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California State 
University, Fullerton 



1985-87 

CATALOG 


1985-1987 University Catalog 

Available from: Titan Bookstore, Fullerton, CA 92634. 
Price: $4.80 plus sales tax. 

Add $1.50 for postage and handling if ordered by mail. 

University Address 

When corresponding with the university, write to the spe- 
cific office, school or department— 

California State University, Fullerton 

Fullerton, CA 92634 

Telephone information (714) 773-2011 

Changes in Rules and Policies 

Although every effort has been made to assure the accu- 
racy of the information in this catalog, students and others 
who use this catalog should note that laws, rules and 
policies change from time to time and that these changes 
may alter the information contained In this publication. 
Changes may come in the form of statutes enacted by the 
Legislature or rules and policies adopted by the Board of 
Trustees of The California State University, by the chan- 
cellor or designee of The California State University, or by 
the president or designee of the Institution. Further, It is 
not possible in a publication of this size to include all of the 
rules, policies and other information which pertain to the 
student, the Institution, and The California State Univer- 
sity. More current or complete information may be ob- 
tained from the appropriate department, school or 
administrative office. 

Nothing in this catalog shall be construed, operate as or 
have the effect of an abridgment or a limitation of any 
rights, powers or privileges of the Board of Trustees of 
The California State University, the chancellor of The Cali- 
fornia State University or the president of the campus. The 
Board of Trustees, the chancellor and the president are 
authorized by law to adopt, amend or repeal rules and 
policies which apply to students. This catalog does not 
constitute a contract or the terms and conditions of a 
contract between the student and the Institution or The 
California State University. The relationship of the student 
to the institution is one governed by statute, rules and 
policy adopted by the Legislature, the Board of Trustees, 
the chancellor, the president and their duly authorized 
designees. 


Effective date: August 26, 1985 


California State 
University, Fullerton 

Accreditations and 
Associations 

Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. 
Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass 
Communications 

American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business 
American Chemical Society 
American Speech and Hearing Association 
Council of Graduate Schools in the United States 
National Association of Schools of Art and Design 
National Association of Schools of Music 
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Ad- 
ministration 

National Association of Schools of Theatre 
National Athletic Trainers Association 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 
National League of Nursing 

National University Continuing Education Association 
Southern California Consortium on International Studies 
Teacher Preparation and Licensing 
Western Association of Graduate Schools 
Western Association of Schools and Colleges 


1 


Nondiscrimination Policy 

Sex 

The California State University does not discriminate on 
the basis of sex in the educational programs or activities 
it conducts. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 
as amended, and the administrative regulations adopted 
thereunder prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex in 
education programs and activities operated by California 
State University, Fullerton. Such programs and activities 
include admission of students and employment. Inquiries 
concerning the application of Title IX to programs and 
activities of California State University, Fullerton may be 
referred to Rosamaria G6mez-Amaro, the campus officer 
assigned the administrative responsibility of reviewing 
such matters or to the Regional Director of the Office of 
Civil Rights, Region 9, 1275 Market Street, 14th Floor, San 
Francisco, CA 94103. 

Handicap 

The California State University does not discriminate on 
the basis of handicap and is in compliance with Section 
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the 
regulations adopted thereunder. 

More specifically. The California State University does not 
discriminate in admission or access to, or treatment or 
employment in, its programs and activities. Rosamaria 
G6mez-Amaro, Director of Affirmative Action, has been 
designated to coordinate the efforts of California State 
University, Fullerton to comply with the act and its imple- 
menting regulations. Inquiries concerning compliance 
may be addressed to this person at California State Uni- 
versity, Fullerton, Langsdorf Hall 802C, Fullerton, CA 
92634, (714) 773-3951. 

Race, Color or National Origin 

The California State University complies with the require- 
ments of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the 
regulations adopted thereunder. No person shall, on the 
grounds of race, color or national origin, be excluded from 
participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise 
subjected to discrimination under any program of The Cal- 
ifornia State University. 


Credits 

The California State University, Fullerton, Catalog is pre- 
pared under the supervision of the Associate Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Programs and Dean of Graduate 
Studies, Dennis Berg. 

Catalog Design Andrea Jones 

Cover Photographs John Blod 

Interior Photographs Charles Blatten 

John Blod 

Selected photographs appear through the courtesy of: 
Dally Titan 

Office of Alumni Affairs 
CSUF Media Center 

Associate Editors Gladys Fleckles 

Pam Migliore 

Proofreading Toni Raff a 

Kristine Waday 

Curriculum Editing School Deans 

Department Chairs 
Program Coordinators 

Planning and Printing Jerry Keating 

Office of State Printing 

Clerical Support Frances Brooks 


2 



President’s Message 


We welcome your interest in our university, which was 
born in the orange groves of Fullerton more than 25 years 
ago. In 1959-60, we had no campus and gratefully held 
classes In the nearby Sunny Hills High School. Soon after 
that in 1963, we proudly held forth In our new landmark 
building called Letters and Science. It now has a new 
name, Miles D. McCarthy Hall. It was to be used in 1963 
for all our classes, and at that time it seemed very large. 
Yet now, in the 1980s, we are 23,000 students strong with 
more than 12 major buildings or building clusters, all 
strategically located for easy access. 

Our, your university is dedicated to serve the citizens of 
Orange County and the region. Our distinguished faculty 
of scholars, selected from graduates of the top universi- 
ties of the nation, is dedicated first and foremost to excel- 
lence in teaching, followed by dedication to research, 
creativity, professional activities and service to the com- 
munity. 

We are proud that In this short time we offer 44 under- 
graduate majors and 41 graduate degrees. The spirit of 
our campus is warm and friendly, yet seriously involved in 
giving each student the finest academic experience possi- 


ble. 


We care about our students as citizens, as scholars and 
as human beings preparing to serve society. May we join 
with you soon to share the Cal State Fullerton experience 
as a wonderful time in your life. 



Jewel Plummer Cobb 
President 

California State University, Fullerton 


3 


Table of Contents 


President’s Message 3 

Academic Calendars 10 

The California State University 13 

California State University, Fullerton 17 

University Advisory Board 20 

Community Minority Affairs Advisory Council .... 20 

University Administration 21 

CSUF Foundation 24 

CSUF Alumni 24 

Community Support Groups 25 

ACADEMIC SERVICES 

Academic Affairs 28 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 28 

Academic Programs 29 

Admissions and Records 29 

Computer Center 29 

Extended Education 30 

Graduate Affairs 30 

Faculty Affairs and Records 30 

Faculty Research 30 

Instructional Media Center 30 

Library 31 

Student Academic Affairs 32 

Student Academic Affairs and Special 

Programs 32 

Academic Advisement Center 32 

Athletic Academic Services 33 

Center for Internships and Cooperative 

Education 33 

Educational Opportunity Program 33 

Learning Assistance Resource Center 33 

Office of Relations with Schools and 

Colleges 33 

Student Academic Services 34 

Student Affirmative Action 34 

University Outreach Services 34 

Writing Assistance Center 35 

Honors Programs .......... 36 

Dean’s Flonor List 36 

General Education Flonors 36 

Honors at Entrance 36 


Honors at Graduation 36 

Honor Societies 37 

President’s Opportunity Scholars 37 

President’s Scholars Program 37 

Institutes and Centers 38 

California Desert Studies Consortium 38 

Center for Economic Education 38 

Center for Governmental Studies 38 

Center for International Business , 39 

Child and Infant Studies Centers 39 

Field Services and Professional 

Development Center 39 

Institute for Early Childhood Education 39 

Institute for Geophysics 39 

Institute for Molecular Biology 39 

Institute for Research in Reading and 

Related Disciplines 40 

Laboratory for Phonetic Research 40 

Southern California Ocean 

Studies Consortium 40 

Sport and Movement Institute 40 

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary 40 

STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 

Student Services 42 

Vice President for Student Services 42 

Academic Appeals 42 

Adult Reentry Center 43 

Career Development Center 43 

Financial Aid Office 44 

Handicapped Student Services 44 

Health and Counseling Services 44 

Housing and Transportation 45 

International Education and Exchange 45 

School Based Student Services 45 

Testing and Research 46 

Veterans’ Services 46 

Women’s Center 46 

Student Activities ........... 47 

University Activities Center 48 

Associated Students 49 

Child Care Center 50 

University Center 50 

University Recreation Program 51 


4 


Intercollegiate Athletics 52 

Conference Affiliations and Memberships 52 

Men’s Intercollegiate Athletics 53 

Women’s Intercollegiate Athletics 54 

Resources 55 

Anthropology Museum 55 

Art Gallery 55 

Cabaret Repertory Threatre 55 

Daily Titan 56 

Energy Consortium 56 

Fullerton Arboretum 56 

Herbarium 56 

Microcomputer Resource Center 56 

Oral History Program 56 

Orange County Now 57 

Reading Clinic 57 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 57 

Theatre Department Productions 57 

Titan Shops 57 

Undergraduate Reading Lab 58 

University Channel 58 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

School Advisement Offices 61 

Academic Advisement Center 61 

Departmental Academic Advisement 62 

Preprofessional Programs 62 

Health Professions 63 

Answers to Your Questions 64 

ADMISSIONS POLICIES 

Application Procedures 66 

Admission Requirements 70 

First-Time Freshmen 70 

Undergraduate Transfer Students 72 

International Students 73 

Summer Session 73 

English Placement Test (EPT) 74 

Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) Test 74 

Transfer Credits 75 

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

Registration Information 80 

Schedule of Fees 82 

Financial Aid 85 


UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS 


Enrollment Regulations 90 

Grading Policies 91 

Grading System 91 

Administrative Grading Symbols 92 

Student Records 94 

Continuous Residency Regulations 97 

Stop-Out Policy 97 

Leave of Absence 98 

Complete Withdrawal from the University 98 

Retention, Probation and Disqualification 98 

Student Rights 100 

GRADUATE REGULATIONS 

Graduate Application Procedures 104 

Graduate Admissions 106 

Requirements for the Master’s Degree 107 

Graduate Enrollment Policies 110 

Graduate Academic Standards 112 

Theses and Projects 113 

Steps in the Master’s Degree 116 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Degree Programs 118 

Graduation Requirements for the 

Bachelor’s Degree 119 

General Education 122 

Teaching Credential Programs 129 

Extended Education 142 

International Programs 143 

Special Major Program 144 

Course Numbering Code 145 

Cross-Disciplinary University Programs 147 

Library Courses 147 

CURRICULA 

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS 151 

Art 153 

Music 165 

Theatre 178 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 189 

Accounting 192 

Business Administration Degrees 198 

Economics 206 

Finance 212 

International Business Program 216 


5 


Management 219 

Management Information Systems 223 

Management Science 224 

Marketing 230 

SCHOOL OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICE 233 

Child Development Program 235 

Counseling 238 

Educational Administration 242 

Health Education, Physical Education 

and Recreation 245 

Human Services Program 256 

Military Science Program 259 

Nursing 261 

Reading 265 

Special Education 269 

Teacher Education Foundations Program 274 

Elementary and Bilingual Education 275 

Secondary Teacher Education Program 281 

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL 
SCIENCES 285 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 287 

American Studies 291 

Anthropology 295 

Chicano Studies 301 

Communications 304 

Criminal Justice 311 

English/Comparative Literature 314 

Environmental Studies 322 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 324 

Geography 341 

Gerontology 346 

History 347 

Latin American Studies Program 354 

Liberal Studies Program 357 

Linguistics 359 

Philosophy 364 


Political Science 369 

Psychology 377 

Religious Studies 385 

Russian and East European Area 

Studies Program 390 

Social Sciences Program 391 

Sociology 393 

Speech Communication 399 

Women’s Studies 407 

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE 

AND ENGINEERING 409 

Biological Science 411 

Chemistry 420 

Computer Science 428 

Engineering 434 

Civil Engineering and Engineering 

Mechanics 437 

Electrical Engineering 441 

Mechanical Engineering 447 

Master of Science in Engineering 452 

Geological Sciences 455 

Mathematics 460 

Physics 468 

Science Education Program 472 

Special Programs 475 

Astronomy 475 

Earth Science 475 

Geochemistry 475 

Marine Sciences 475 

Medical Biology 476 

Meteorology 476 

Oceanography 476 

Physical Science 476 

FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 477 

INDEX 507 

CAMPUS MAP Back Cover 


6 


Academic Advisement 

Academic Advisement Center 

Academic Affairs 

Academic Appeals 

Academic Calendars 

Academic Programs 

Academic Services 

Accounting 

Administrative Grading Symbols ... 

Admission Requirements 

Admissions Policies 

Admissions and Records 

Adult Reentry Center 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 

American Studies 

Answers to Your Questions 

Anthropology 

Anthropology Museum 

Application Procedures 




Art. 


Art Gallery 

Associated Students 

Astronomy 

Athletic Academic Services 

Biological Science 

Business Administration Degrees 

CSUF Alumni 

CSUF Foundation 

Cabaret Repertory Theatre 

California Desert Studies Consortium 

Career Development Center 

Center for Economic Education 

Center for Governmental Studies 

Center for International Business 

Center for Internship and 

Cooperative Education 

Chemistry 

Chicano Studies 

Child Care Center 

Child Development Program 

Child and Infant Studies Centers 


61 

61 

28 

42 

10 

117 

27 

192 

92 

70 

65 

29 

43 

287 

291 

64 

295 

55 

66 

153 

55 

49 

475 

33 

411 

198 

24 

24 

55 

38 

43 

38 

38 

39 

33 

420 

301 

50 

235 

39 


Subject Contents 


Civil Engineering and Engineering 

Mechanics 437 

Communications 304 

Communicative Disorders 400 

Community Minority Affairs Advisory 

Council 20 

Community Support Groups 25 

Comparative Literature 314 

Computer Center 29 

Computer Science 428 

Conference Affiliations and Memberships 52 

Continuous Residency Regulations 97 

Counseling 238 

Course Numbering Code 145 

Criminal Justice 31 1 

Cross-Disciplinary University Programs 147 

Curricula 149 

Daily Titan 56 

Dean’s Honor List 36 

Degree Programs 118 

Departmental Academic Advisement 62 

Earth Science 475 

Economics 206 

Educational Administration 242 

Educational Opportunity Program 33 

Electrical Engineering 441 

Elementary and Bilingual Education 275 

Energy Consortium 56 

Engineering 434 

English Placement Test (EPT) 74 

English/Comparative Literature 314 

Enrollment Regulations 90 

Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) Test 74 

Environmental Studies 322 

Ethnic Studies 287 

Extended Education 142 

Faculty Affairs and Records 30 

Faculty and Administration 477 

Faculty Research 30 

Field Services and Professional 

Development Center 39 

Finance 212 

Financial Aid Office 44 


7 


Financial Aid 85 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 324 

Fullerton Arboretum 56 

General Education 122 

General Education Honors 36 

Geography 341 

Geological Sciences 455 

German 324 

Gerontology 346 

Grading Policies 91 

Grading System 91 

Graduate Academic Standards 112 

Graduate Admissions 106 

Graduate Affairs 30 

Graduate Application Procedures 104 

Graduate Enrollment Policies 110 

Graduate Regulations 103 

Graduation Requirements for the 

Bachelor’s Degree 119 

Handicapped Student Services 44 

Health Education, Physical Education 

and Recreation 245 

Health Professions 63 

Health and Counseling Services 44 

Herbarium 56 

History 347 

Honors Programs 36 

Honors Societies 37 

Honors at Entrance 36 

Honors at Graduation 36 

Housing and Transportation 45 

Human Services Program 256 

Index 507 

Institute Research in Reading 

and Related Disciplines 40 

Institute for Early Childhood Education 39 

Institute for Geophysics 39 

Institute for Molecular Biology 39 

Institutes and Centers 38 

Instructional Media Center 30 

Intercollegiate Athletics 52 

International Business Program 216 

International Education and Exchange 45 

International Programs 143 

International Students 73 

Laboratory for Phonetic Research 40 

Latin American Studies Program 354 

Learning Assistance Resource Center 33 


Leave of Absence 98 

Liberal Studies Program 357 

Library 31 

Library Courses 147 

Linguistics 359 

Management 219 

Management Information Systems 223 

Management Science 224 

Marine Sciences 475 

Marketing 230 

Mathematics 460 

Mechanical Engineering 447 

Medical Biology 476 

Men’s Intercollegiate Athletics 53 

Meteorology 476 

Microcomputer Resource Center 56 

Military Science Program 259 

Multiple Subject Credential and Waiver 

Program 130 

Music 165 

Nursing 261 

Oceanography 476 

Office of Relations with Schools 

and Colleges 33 

Oral History Program 56 

Orange County Now 57 

Philosophy 364 

Physical Education 245 

Physical Science 476 

Physics 468 

Political Science 369 

Preprofessional Programs 62 

President’s Message 3 

President’s Opportunity Scholars Program 37 

President’s Scholars Program 37 

Psychology 377 

Public Administration 369 

Reading 265 

Reading Clinic 57 

Registration Information 80 

Registration Procedures 79 

Religious Studies 385 

Requirements for the Master’s Degree 107 

Retention, Probation and Disqualification 98 

Russian and East European Area 

Studies Program 390 

Schedule of Fees 82 

School Advisement Offices 61 


8 


School Based Student Services 45 

School of Business Administration and 

Economics 189 

School of Human Development and 

Community Service 233 

School of Humanities and Social Sciences 285 

School of Mathematics, Science and 

Engineering 409 

School of the Arts 151 

Science Education Program 472 

Secondary Teacher Education Program 281 

Single Subject Credentials and 

Waiver Programs 132 

Social Sciences Program 391 

Sociology 393 

Southern California Ocean Studies 

Consortium 40 

Spanish 324 

Special Education 269 

Special Major Programs 144 

Special Programs 475 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 57 

Speech Communication 399 

Sport and Movement Institute 40 

Steps in the Master’s Degree 116 

Stop-Out Policy 97 

Student Academic Affairs and Special 

Programs 32 

Student Academic Services 34 

Student Activities 47 

Student Affirmative Action 34 

Student Conduct 98 


Student Records 94 

Student Rights 100 

Student Services 42 

Summer Session 73 

Taxation 194 

Teacher Credential Programs 129 

Teacher Education Foundations Program 274 

Testing and Research 46 

Theatre 178 

Theatre Department Productions 57 

Theses and Projects 113 

Titan Shops 57 

Transfer Credits 75 

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary 40 

Undergraduate Reading Lab 58 

University Activities Center 48 

University Administration 21 

University Advisory Board 20 

University Center 50 

University Channel 58 

University Outreach Program 34 

University Recreation Services 51 

University Regulations 89 

Veterans’ Services 46 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 28 

Vice President for Student Services 42 

Withdrawal from the University 98 

Women’s Center 46 

Women’s Intercollegiate Athletics 54 

Women’s Studies Program 407 

Writing Assistance Center 35 • 


9 


1985-86 Academic Calendar 


SUMMER SESSION 1985 


June 3, 

Monday Instruction begins, registration and 

classes 

July 4, 

Thursday Independence Day holiday — cam- 

pus closed 

August 1, 

Thursday Initial period for filing applications 

for admission to the spring 1986 se- 
mester begins 

August 23, 

Friday Instruction ends 

FALL SEMESTER 1985 

August 26, 

Monday Academic year begins. Advisement, 

orientation, and registration begin. 
See class schedule for details 

September 2, 

Monday Labor Day — campus closed 

September 3, 

Tuesday Instruction begins 

September 9, 

Monday Admission Day — campus open 

September 16, 

Monday Rosh Hashanah — campus open 

September 25. 

Wednesday Yom Kippur — campus open 

October 14, 

Monday Columbus Day— campus open 

November 1, 

Friday Initial period for filing applications 

for admission to the fall semester 
1986 begins 

November 11, 

Monday Veterans’ Day— campus open 


November 28-29, 

Thursday-Friday ..Thanksgiving Recess — campus 


closed 

December 13, 

Friday Last day of classes 

December 16, 

Monday Examination preparation day 

December 17-20, 

Tuesday-Friday ....Semester examinations 
December 21, 

Saturday Winter recess begins 


January 2-3, 

Thursday-Friday ..Winter recess ends; grade reports 


due 

January 3, 

Friday Semester ends 

INTERSESSION 1986 

January 2. 

Thursday Intersession begins 

January 20, 

Monday Martin Luther King Day — campus 

closed 

January 31, 

Friday Intersession ends 

SPRING SEMESTER 1986 

January 23, 

Thursday Semester begins. Departmental and 

faculty meetings through Friday, 
January 24 

January 27, 

Monday Advisement, orientation and regis- 

tration begins. See class schedule 
for details 

February 3, 

Monday Instruction begins 

February 12, 

Wednesday Lincoln’s Birthday Holiday — campus 

open 

February 17, 

Monday Washington’s Birthday Holiday- 

campus closed 

March 24, 

Monday Spring recess begins 

March 31, 

Monday Instruction resumes 

May 23. 

Friday Last day of classes 

May 26. 

Monday Memorial Day and examination 

preparation day — campus closed 
(Library open) 

May 27-30, 


Tuesday-Friday ....Semester examinations 
May 31-June 1, 

Saturday-Sunday .. Commencement exercises 
June 2-5, 

Monday-Thursday Evaluation days; grade reports due 
June 5, 

Thursday Semester ends 


10 


1986-87 Academic Calendar 


SUMMER SESSION 1986 


June 4, 

Wednesday Instruction begins, registration and 

classes 

July 4, 

Friday Independence Day Holiday— cam- 

pus closed 

August 1, 

Friday Initial period for filing applications 

for admission to the spring semester 
1987 begins 

August 22, 

Friday Instruction ends 

FALL SEMESTER 1986 

August 25, 

Monday Academic year begins. Advisement, 

orientation, and registration begin. 
See class schedule for details 

September 1, 

Monday Labor Day — campus closed 

September 2, 

Tuesday Instruction begins 

September 9, 

Tuesday Admission Day — campus open 

October 4, 

Saturday Rosh Hashanah— campus open 

October 13, 

Monday Yom Kippur — campus open 

October 13, 

Monday Columbus Day — campus open 

November 1, 

Saturday Initial period for filing applications 

for admission to the fall semester 
1987 begins 

November 11, 

Tuesday Veterans’ Day — campus open 


November 27-28, 

Thursday-Friday ..Thanksgiving Recess — campus 


closed 

December 12, 

Friday Last day of classes 

December 15, 

Monday Examination preparation day 

December 16-19, 

Tuesday-Friday ....Semester examinations 
December 20, 

Saturday Winter recess begins 


January 5-6, 

Monday-Tuesday Winter recess ends; grade reports 


due 

January 6, 

Tuesday Semester ends 

INTERSESSION 1987 

January 5, 

Monday Intersession begins 

January 19, 

Monday Martin Luther King Day — campus 

closed 

January 30, 

Friday Intersession ends 

SPRING SEMESTER 1987 

January 22, 

Thursday Semester begins. Departmental and 

faculty meetings through Friday, 
January 23 

January 26, 

Monday Advisement, orientation and regis- 

tration begins. See class schedule 
for details 

February 2, 

Monday Instruction begins 

February 12, 

Thursday Lincoln’s Birthday— campus open 

February 23, 

Monday Washington’s Birthday— campus 

closed 

April 13, 

Monday Spring recess begins 

April 20, 

Monday Instruction resumes 

May 22, 

Friday Last day of classes 

May 25, 

Monday Memorial Day and examination 

preparation day — campus closed 
(Library open) 

May 26-29, 


Tuesday-Friday ....Semester examinations 
May 30-31 , 

Saturday-Sunday .. Commencement exercises 
June 1-4, 

Monday-Thursday Evaluation Days; grade reports due 
June 4, 

Thursday Semester ends 


11 



12 




The California State University 


The individual California State Colleges were brought to- 
gether as a system by the Donahoe Higher Education Act 
of 1960. In 1972 the system became The California State 
University and Colleges and in 1982 the system became 
The California State University. Today, 18 of the 19 cam- 
puses have the title “university.” 

The oldest campus — San Jose State University — was 
founded as a Normal School In 1857 and became the first 
institution of public higher education in California. The 
newest campus — California State College, Bakersfield — 
began Instruction in 1970. 

Responsibility for The California State University is vested 
in the Board of Trustees, whose members are appointed 
by the governor. The trustees appoint the chancellor, who 
is the chief executive officer of the system, and the presi- 
dents, who are the chief executive officers on the respec- 
tive campuses. 

The trustees, the chancellor and the presidents develop 
systemwide policy, with actual implementation at the cam- 
pus level taking place through broadly based consultative 
procedures. The Academic Senate of The California State 
University, made up of elected representatives of the fac- 
ulty from each campus, recommends academic policy to 
the Board of Trustees through the chancellor. 

Academic excellence has been achieved by The Califor- 
nia State University through a distinguished faculty, whose 
primary responsibility is superior teaching. While each 
campus in the system has its own unique geographic and 
curricular character, all campuses, as multipurpose institu- 
tions, offer undergraduate and graduate Instruction for 
professional and occupational goals as well as broad lib- 
eral education. All of the campuses require for graduation 
a basic program of “General Education-Breadth Require- 
ments” regardless of the type of bachelor’s degree or 
major field selected by the student. 

The California State University offers more than 1,500 
bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in some 200 
subject areas. Nearly 500 of these programs are offered 
so that students can complete all upper-division and 
graduate requirements by part-time late afternoon and 
evening study, in addition, a variety of teaching and school 
service credential programs are available. A limited num- 
ber of doctoral degrees are offered jointly with the Univer- 
sity of California and with private Institutions In California. 

The Consortium of The California State University draws 
on the resources of the 19 campuses to offer regional and 
statewide off-campus degree, certificate and credential 
programs to individuals who find it difficult or impossible 


to attend classes on a campus. In addition to Consortium 
programs, individual campuses also offer external degree 
programs. 

System enrollments total approximately 314,000 students, 
who are taught by a faculty of 18,500. In 1983-84 the sys- 
tem awarded over 50 percent of the bachelor’s degrees 
and 30 percent of the master’s degrees granted In Califor- 
nia. More than 900,000 persons have been graduated from 
the 19 campuses since 1960. 

Consortium of The California 
State University 

The Consortium of The CSU — “The 1,000-Mile Campus” 
—is a separate, fully accredited, degree-granting entity of 
the CSU. It draws on the combined resources of the 19 
campuses to offer external statewide and regional degree, 
certificate, and teaching credential programs. 

The Consortium was established In 1973 to meet the 
needs of adults who find it difficult or impossible to partici- 
pate In regular on-campus programs. Instruction is thus 
provided students in convenient places at convenient 
times. Currently, programs are offered in more than 20 
geographic areas throughout California. 

Full- and part-time CSU faculty, as well as qualified ex- 
perienced practitioners, go where the students are, or 
provide opportunities for individualized home study. Pro- 
grams can be tailored to meet the specific needs of em- 
ployees in business, industry, education or government. 

Consortium programs are upper-division or graduate level. 
All courses offer residence credit leading to bachelor’s or 
master’s degrees. Credit and course work are transfera- 
ble statewide. Programs are financed by student fees. 

Academic policy for The Consortium is established by the 
statewide Academic Senate of the CSU. Degrees or cer- 
tificates are awarded by The Consortium In the name of 
the Board of Trustees of the CSU. The Consortium is 
accredited by the Western Association of Schools and 
Colleges. 

For more information contact: The Consortium of The Cal- 
ifornia State University, 400 Golden Shore, Long Beach, 
CA 90802; (213) 590-5696. 

The statewide Admissions and Records Office may be 
reached by dialing the following numbers: Los Angeles 
and Long Beach areas (213) 590-5696; all other areas in 
California toll free (800) 352-5717. 


The CSU 


THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY 


California State College, Bakersfield 

California State Polytechnic University, 

Pomona 

California State University, Northridge 
California State University, Los Angeles 
California State University, Dominguez Hills 
California State University, Long Beach 
Office of the Chancellor, Long Beach 
Caiifornia State University, Fullerton 
California State University, San Bernardino 
San Diego State University 


Humboldt State University 
California State University, Chico 
Sonoma State University 
California State University, Sacramento 
San Francisco State University 
California State University, Hayward 
San Jose State University 
California State University, Stanislaus 
California State University, Fresno 
California Poiytechnic State University, 
San Luis Dbispo 




The CSU 



Campuses of The California State University 


California State College, Bakersfield 
9001 Stockdale Highway 
Bakersfield, CA 93309-1099 
Dr. Thomas A. Arciniega, President 
(805) 833-2011 

California State University, Chico 
1st and Normal Streets 
Chico, CA 95929 
Dr. Robin S. Wilson, President 
(916) 895-6116 

California State University, Dominguez Hills 
Carson, CA 90747 
Dr. Richard Butwell, President 
(213) 516-3300 

California State University, Fresno 
Shaw and Cedar Avenues 
Fresno, CA 93740 
Dr. Harold H. Haak, President 
(209) 294-4240 

California State University, Fullerton 
Fullerton, CA 92634 
Dr. Jewel Plummer Cobb, President 
(714) 773-2011 

California State University, Hayward 
Hayward, CA 94542 
Dr. Ellis E. McCune, President 
(415) 881-3000 

Humboldt State University 
Areata, CA 95521 

Dr. Alistair W. McCrone, President 
(707) 826-3011 

California State University, Long Beach 
1250 Bellflower Boulevard 
Long Beach, CA 90840 
Dr. Stephen Horn, President 
(213) 498-4111 

California State University, Los Angeles 
5151 State University Drive 
Los Angeles, CA 90032 
Dr. James M. Rosser, President 
(213) 224-0111 

California State University, Northridge 
18111 Nordhoff Street 
Northridge, CA 91330 
Dr. James W. Cleary, President 
(213) 885-1200 

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona 
3801 West Temple Avenue 
Pomona, CA 91768-4011 
Dr. Hugh O. LaBounty, President 
(714) 598-4592 


California State University, Sacramento 
6000 J Street 
Sacramento, CA 95819 
Dr. Donald R. Gerth, President 
(916) 454-6011 

California State College, San Bernardino 
5500 State College Parkway 
San Bernardino, CA 92407 
Dr. Anthony H. Evans, President 
(714) 887-7201 

San Diego State University 
5300 Campanile Drive 
San Diego, CA 92182 
Dr. Thomas B. Day, President 
(619) 265-5000 

Imperial Valley Campus 
720 Heber Avenue 
Calexico, CA 92231 
(619) 357-3721 

San Francisco State University 
1600 Holloway Avenue 
San Francisco, CA 94132 
Dr. Chla-Wei Woo, President 
(415) 469-2141 

San Jose State University 
One Washington Square 
San Jose, CA 95192-0005 
Dr. Gail Fullerton, President 
(408) 277-2000 

California Polytechnic State University, 
San Luis Obispo 
San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 
Dr. Warren J. Baker, President 
(805) 546-0111 

Sonoma State University 
1801 East Cotati Avenue 
Rohnert Park, CA 94928 
Dr. David W. Benson, President 
(707) 664-2156 

California State University, Stanislaus 
801 West Monte Vista Avenue 
Turlock, CA 95380 
Dr. A. Walter Olson, President 
(209) 667-3122 

The California State University 
400 Golden Shore 
Long Beach, CA 90802-4275 
Dr. W. Ann Reynolds, Chancellor 
(213) 590-5506 


The eSU 


Trustees and Officers of The California State University 


Ex Officio Trustees 

The Honorable George Deukmejian 

Governor of California 

State Capitol, Sacramento. CA 95814 

The Honorable Leo T. McCarthy 
Lieutenant Governor of California 
State Capitol. Sacramento. CA 95814 

The Honorable Willie L. Brown, Jr. 

Speaker of the Assembly 

State Capitol, Sacramento, CA 95814 

The Honorable Louis “Bill” Honig 
State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction 

721 Capitol Mall, Sacramento. CA 95814 

Dr. W. Ann Reynolds 
Chancellor of the California State 
University 
400 Golden Shore, 

Long Beach, CA 90802-4275 


Appointed Trustees 

Appointments are for a term of eight 
years, except for a student Trustee, 
alumni Trustee, and faculty Trustee 
whose terms are for two years. Terms 
expire in the year in parentheses. Names 
are listed in order of appointment to the 
Board. 

Dr. Claudia H. Hampton (1986) 

4157 Sutro Avenue 
Los Angeles, CA 90008 

Mr. Willie J. Stennis (1991) 

Golden Bird, Inc. 

3947 Landmark 
Culver City, CA 90230 

Ms. Wallace Albertson (1986) 

1618 Sunset Plaza Drive 
Los Angeles, CA 90069 

Mr. Donald C. Livingston (1987) 

Carter Hawley Hale Stores, Inc. 

550 S. Flower Street, 11th Floor 
Los Angeles, CA 90071 

Ms. Celia I. Ballesteros (1987) 

530 B Street. Suite 2001 
San Diego, CA 92101 


Ms. Lynne Wasserman (1988) 

Levine & Leonard 
415 N. Camden Drive 
Beverly Hills, CA 90210 

Mr. George M. Marcus (1989) 

Marcus & Millichap. Inc. 

2626 Hanover Street 
Palo Alto. CA 94304 

Mr. Dixon R. Harwin (1J90) 

Alwin Management Co., Inc. 

9300 Wilshire Boulevard 
Beverly Hills. CA 90212 

Mr. Thomas J. Bernard (1989) 

Investors Bancor 
P.O. Box 8210 
Orange, CA 92668 

Mr. Roland E. Arnall (1990) 

Long Beach Savings and Loan 

11878 La Grange 

Los Angeles, CA 90025 

Mr. Daniel J. Bronfman (1984) 

2545 Beverly Avenue, Apt. C 
Santa Monica, CA 90405 

Mr. Roy T. Brophy (1991) 

Gannon/ Brophy Organization 
3040 Explorer Drive, Suite 11 
Sacramento, CA 95827 

Dr. Robert D. Kully (1985) 

California State University, Los Angeles 
5151 State University Drive 
Los Angeles, CA 90032 

Dr. Dale B. Ride (1992) 

Santa Monica Community College 
District 

190 Pico Boulevard 
Santa Monica. CA 90405 

Mr. Tom C. Stickel (1992) 

T.C.S. Financial, Inc. 

3878 Old Town Avenue. Suite 202 
San Diego, CA 92110 

Mr. Lee A. Grissom (1986) 

Greater San Diego Chamber of 
Commerce 

110 West C Street, Suite 1600 
San Diego, CA 92101 

Ms. Marian Bagdasarian (1988) 

6382 E. North Avenue 
Fresno, CA 93725 


Officers of the Trustees 

Governor George Deukmejian 
President 

Ms. Wallace Albertson 
Chair 

Mr. Willie J. Stennis 
Vice Chair 

Chancellor W. Ann Reynolds 
Secretary-T reasurer 


Office of the Chancellor 

The California State University 
400 Golden Shore 
Long Beach, CA 90802-4275, 
(213) 590-5506 

Dr. W. Ann Reynolds 
Chancellor 

Dr. William E. Vandament 
Provost and 

Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs 

Dr. Herbert L. Carter 
Vice Chancellor, 

Administration 

Mr. D. Dale Hanner 
Vice Chancellor 
Business Affairs 

Dr. Caesar J. Naples 
Vice Chancellor, Faculty 
and Staff Relations 

Mr. Mayer Chapman 
Vice Chancellor and 
General Counsel 


The CSU 


California State 
University, Fullerton 


Governance 


Governance on the campus at California State University, 
Fullerton is the responsibility of the president and her 
administrative staff. Working closely with the president are 
a number of faculty and student groups which initiate, 
review, and/or recommend for approval, various univer- 
sity programs, policies, and procedures. Although the 
president is vested with the final authority for all university 
activities, maximum faculty and staff participation In cam- 
pus decision-making and governance has become tradi- 
tional. Students also are actively involved, with student 
representatives being included on almost all university, 
school, and departmental committees and policy-making 
bodies. 


Advisory Board 


The California State University, Fullerton Advisory Board 
consists of community leaders interested in the develop- 
ment and welfare of the university. The board advises the 
president on a number of matters, particularly those af- 
fecting university and community relations. Members are 
appointed by the president for terms of four years. 


Philosophy and Objectives 


Institutions of higher learning disseminate and advance 
knowledge. The philosophy which guides an Institution 
can limit or promote the successful achievement of these 
objectives. Therefore, from its inception. Cal State Fuller- 
ton has consciously endeavored, through its educational 
program, to enhance the fullest possible development of 
those It sen/es. For both professors and students this 
entails a commitment to high standards of scholarship, to 
a comprehensive rather than a narrow approach in major 
areas of study, and to a concern with research and other 
creative activity. 

The university is committed to provide students with the 
intellectual skills necessary for their continued personal 
and professional development, as well as an awareness 
of human achievement. The general education forms one 
segment of a student’s program of study. The other two 
major segments are courses taken In the major field of 
concentration, and courses taken as electives. Specifi- 
cally, the general education program has as its objectives 


CSUF 



the development in each student of: 

• The skills of reading, writing, computing and thinking. 

• An understanding of the development of Western civ- 
ilization. 

• An awareness of the content, approaches, and meth- 
ods of the various disciplines and of the interrelation- 
ships of those disciplines. 

• An understanding of cultural diversity within our own 
society and of the cultures of other societies. 

• An appreciation of aesthetics through practice or criti- 
cism of the arts. 

To achieve these objectives the faculty of California State 
University, Fullerton has established a general education 
program described under “Graduation Requirements for 
the Bachelor’s Degree.” 

Retrospect and Prospect 

In 1957 Cal State Fullerton became the 12th State College 
in California to be authorized by the Legislature. The fol- 
lowing year a site was designated in northeast Fullerton. 
It was purchased In 1959, when Dr. William B. Langsdorf 
was appointed as founding president, when the first staff 
was selected and when plans for opening the new college 
were made. Orange County State College started classes 
for 452 full-and/or part-time students In September, 1959, 
using leased quarters for its administrative offices on the 
Fullerton Union High School campus and for its class- 
rooms at Fullerton’s Sunny Hills High School. In the fall of 
1960, the college opened classes on its own campus, 
where it occupied 12 temporary buildings. The name 
changed to Orange State College in July, 1962, to Califor- 
nia State College at Fullerton In July, 1964, to California 
State College, Fullerton in July, 1968 and to California 
State University, Fullerton in June, 1972. The first perma- 
nent building, the six-story Letters and Science Building, 
was occupied In 1963. 

Today, there are many dramatic evidences of additional, 
rapid growth. Sixteen buildings or building clusters have 
been completed, and enrollment has climbed to approxi- 
mately 23,000. Since 1963 the curriculum has expanded to 
include lower division work and many graduate programs. 

The Donahoe Higher Education Act of 1960 established 
the California State Colleges as a system under an Inde- 
pendent Board of Trustees, redefined the functions of the 
State Colleges, and related them to both the community 
colleges and the University of California system. Cal State 
Fullerton was the first of the State Colleges to submit and 
secure approval for a five-year master curricular plan and 
one of the first three to secure approval of a master build- 
ing plan. It also was able to think in terms of its ultimate 
enrollment objectives from the beginning. 

On May 26, 1971, Dr. L. Donald Shields, who had served 
as acting president for seven months, was appointed the 


second president of Cal State Fullerton. Dr. Miles D. Mc- 
Carthy became acting president In January, 1981, and Dr. 
Jewel Plummer Cobb took office October 1, 1981. 

Environment of the University 

Fullerton, a city of more than 100,000 Inhabitants, is locat- 
ed in northern Orange County, about 30 miles southeast 
of central Los Angeles. It is in the center of the new 
Southern California population center and within easy 
freeway access of all the diverse natural and cultural at- 
tractions of this region. 

Orange County, with an area of 782 square miles, is the 
48th In size of California’s 58 counties, but it is second 
largest county In population (1.9 million), and In total per- 
sonal income. Orange County has experienced during the 
last three decades almost unprecedented growth as com- 
munities continue to occupy the diminishing expanses of 
open land. 

Today, there co-exists an interesting mixture of the old 
and new economic and life styles in Orange County. Un- 
derneath the soil, archeologists and bulldozers uncover 
traces of the hunting and gathering Indian bands which 
flourished at least as early as 4,000 years ago in what was 
a benign and bountiful region. More visible traces remain 
of the Spanish and Mexican periods and cultures: Mission 
San Juan Capistrano, which began the agricultural tradi- 
tion in Orange County, and subsequent adobes from the 
great land grants and ranches that followed. Additionally, 
both customs and many names persist from this period, 
and so does some ranching. The architectural and other 
evidences of the subsequent pioneer period are still quite 
visible: farmsteads, old buildings from the new towns that 
then were established In the late 1800’s, mining opera- 
tions, and traces of early resort and other types of promo- 
tional activities. For about 100 years, farming was the main 
economic activity with products such as grapes, walnuts, 
vegetables, and oranges, replacing the older wheat and 
cattle ranches. Today, agriculture still Is very important. 
Orange County ranks high among California’s counties in 
mineral production with Its oil, natural gas, sand and grav- 
el, and clay mining and processing activities. 

The extensive development of the 42 miles of beaches In 
Orange County and the development of such attractions 
as Disneyland, Knott’s Berry Farm, the Laguna Festival of 
Arts and Pageant of the Masters, and the Anaheim Sta- 
dium and Convention Center continue to make tourism an 
Increasingly Important activity. So does the Mediterra- 
nean-type climate, with rainfall averaging 14 Inches per 
year, and generally mild days (with either freezing or 100- 
degree temperatures uncommon) with frequent morning 
fogs during the summer. Both downtown Los Angeles and 
the Pacific Ocean can be reached by car In half an hour, 
and mountain and desert recreation areas are as close as 
an hour’s drive from the campus. 


CSUF 


The Campus and Its Buildings 

Once part of a vast orange grove, Cal State Fullerton’s 
attractively landscaped campus now consists of 225 acres 
bounded on the south by Nutwood Avenue, on the west 
by State College Boulevard, on the north by Yorba Linda 
Boulevard and on the east by the Orange Freeway. 

The portion of Orange County immediately surrounding 
the campus is predominantly suburban; it Includes hous- 
ing tracts, apartment complexes, shopping centers, 
space-age industrial firms and still-remaining orange 
groves and undeveloped hills and fields. 

Other educational institutions also are part of the Immedi- 
ate environment. The new campus of the Southern Cali- 
fornia College of Optometry, with Its four modernistic 
buildings, opened in the spring of 1973. It is just north of 
Cal State Fullerton. To Cal State’s Immediate south is 
Pacific Christian College, a liberal arts school with a Bible 
emphasis, where students started classes in the fall of 
1973. The Western State University College of Law, Cali- 
fornia’s largest law school, occupied its new campus to 
the immediate west of Cal State in January, 1975. 

The Cal State Fullerton campus itself has a high density 
urban layout of buildings and facilities developed to serve 
a predominantly commuting public. The university’s mod- 
ern buildings were planned so that no student should 
need more than 10 minutes to go from one class to an- 
other. The campus is surrounded with landscaped parking 
facilities. 

The first permanent building, the Letters and Science 
Building, was occupied in 1963. This Imposing structure, 
master planned to serve ultimately as a facility for under- 
graduate and graduate science instruction and research, 
has been used to house other programs until they could 
warrant new facilities of their own. This building is now 
called Miles D. McCarthy Hall. 

Since 1963, growth has been rapid. The Performing Arts 
Center was completed In 1964, the Physical Education 
Building in 1965, the Library Building In 1966, the Commons 
in 1967, the Humanities-Soclal Sciences Building and 
Visual Arts Center in 1969, William B. Langsdorf Hall (Ad- 
ministration-Business Administration) and the Engineer- 
ing Building in 1971, the Student Health Center In 1974, the 
Education-Classroom Building and University Center in 
1976, and an addition to the Visual Arts Center in 1979. 
Langsdorf Hall and the Engineering Building reflect a com- 
mitment to programs with high community involvement. In 
addition to the many undergraduate students who study 
and learn In these buildings, many professional engineers 
and local businessmen also use these very advanced 
facilities to continue their education. 

In the northeast corner of the campus is the Fullerton 
Arboretum, which was dedicated in the fall of 1979. It 
includes a 15-acre contoured botanical garden, a three- 


acre organic garden and a two-acre experimental plot. 
The ecologically arranged flora depicts habitat from the 
desert to the tropics. The Fullerton Arboretum also in- 
cludes Heritage House, a 19th-century restored dwelling. 
Heritage House serves as a cultural museum for North 
Orange County as well as an Arboretum office. 

The ample freeway and surface street accommodations 
that approach the main entrance to the university’s mod- 
ern campus also provide comparatively easy access to 
the great and diverse learning resources available in 
Southern California: many other colleges and universities; 
museums, libraries, art galleries; zoos; and the wide vari- 
ety of economic, governmental, social, and cultural activi- 
ties and experiments that may be found in this dynamic 
and complex region of California and the United States. 

Information concerning the instructional, laboratory and 
other physical plant facilities which relate to the academic 
program may be obtained from the Office of Facility Plan- 
ning and Operations. 

Students of the University 

Much of the distinctive character and learning atmos- 
phere of any campus comes from the nature and vitality 
of its students. Diversity, the synthesis of academic with 
work and family interests, strong achievement records, 
and relative maturity are some of the predominant charac- 
teristics of the student body at Cal State Fullerton. 

The university is a commuter institution, with no university- 
affiliated housing. Thirty-four percent of the students work 
35 hours or more a week, and yet nearly 54 percent take 
12 or more units of course work each semester. Seventy- 
four percent come from a radius of 15 miles from the 
campus, but many have lived elsewhere before coming to 
Orange County. 

Twenty-four percent are lower division students, 57 per- 
cent are university juniors and seniors, and another 20 
percent are doing postbaccalaureate or graduate work. 
Over seven-eighths of the upper division students are 
transfers from other institutions, principally community 
colleges. The median age is 23; more than 50 percent are 
women. Most participate In both the day and evening pro- 
grams during the regular semesters and 16 percent are 
Involved only in the late afternoon or evening program. 

Many already have clearly defined disciplinary, profes- 
sional and artistic Interests. Sixteen percent have not de- 
clared an academic major and are in the process of 
exploring different fields of knowledge. For the past three 
or four years most of the undergraduates have searched 
for meaningful vocations and corresponding employment 
opportunities upon completion of degree programs. Most 
are trying to understand themselves and their world so 
that they can become more effective human beings and 
citizens. 


CSUF 


The Faculty 

Central to the effectiveness of any institution of higher 
learning is the quality and dedication of its individual fac- 
ulty members to teaching and scholarship. 

In the fall 1984 there were 821 full-time faculty and ad- 
ministrators and 658 part-time faculty members teaching 
on the campus. Almost all the full-time faculty had some 
previous college or university teaching experience before 
coming to Fullerton. Faculty members also have a wide 
variety of experiences and creative activities. A very high 
percent of the full-time faculty have earned their doctoral 
degrees, and these have come from more than 100 major 
colleges and universities. 

Criteria for selection to the faculty Include mastery of 
knowledge in an academic specialty, demonstrated skill 
and experience in teaching, and continuing Interest In 
scholarly study and research. Retention and promotion 
criteria Include service to the university and community. 

Information concerning the faculty and other personnel 
may be obtained from the Office of Faculty Affairs and 
Records. 

University Advisory Board 


H. William Bridgford, Chair 

Chairman of the Board, 

Bridgford Foods Corp Anaheim 

Evelyn E. Bauman, Vice Chair Fullerton 

Robert F. Beaver 

President, Wlllard-Brent Co., Inc Los Angeles 

W. Benton Boone, M.D., Ophthalmologist Inglewood 

Frederick T. Mason 

Attorney at Law Santa Ana 

William J. McGarvey, Jr. 

Chairman of the Board, 

McGarvey-Clark Realty, Inc Fullerton 

Ruth Schermitzler Brea 

Richard J. Stegemeier 

Senior Vice President, 

Union Oil of California Los Angeles 

James D. Woods 

President and Chairman of the Board, 

Baker Oil Tools Orange 


Community Minority Affairs 
Advisory Council 

Joshua White, Chair 

Developer/ Insurance Planner Anaheim 

Anthony Espinoza, Vice Chair 

Account Executive, 

Bache, Halsey, Stuart, Shields, Inc Whittier 

Jo Caines 

Director of Community Relations, 

KOCE-TV Huntington Beach 

James D. Carrington 

Pastor, Friendship Baptist Church Fullerton 

Amin David, Jr. 

President, Regal Products Anaheim 

Vy Trac Do 

Bilingual Educator El Toro 

Jerry Folsom 

Project Director, Orange County Indian Center 
Employment and Training Program. ...Garden Grove 
Manuel B. Frias 

Director of Personnel Services, 

El Camino College Torrance 

Marne Glass 

Attorney at Law Cypress 

Russell Kennedy 

Director, Orange County 

Human Relations Commission Santa Ana 

Won Kim 

President, Korean Association of 

Orange County Garden Grove 

Marla Mendoza 

EEO Officer, Orange County 

Manpower Commission Santa Ana 

Joe Montes 

Health Services Consultant Santa Ana 

Robert Nava 

Orange County 

Human Relations Commission Santa Ana 

James O. Perez 

Judge, Orange County Superior Court Santa Ana 

Chieu Minh Pham 

Computer Programmer Orange 

W. J. Bill Thom 

President, Anaheim Office Furniture & 

Supply, Inc Anaheim 

Christine Vasquez 

Librarian, Santiago Library System Orange 

Mary White 

Educator/Consultant Anaheim 

Joe Wilson 

Research Coordinator, Capistrano Unified 

School District San Juan Capistrano 


CSUF 


University Administration 

President 

Staff Assistant 

Executive Assistant 

Director of Affirmative Action 

Administrative Assistant 

Director of Athletics 

Associate Athletic Director 

Athletics Business Manager 

Athletic Academic Coordinator 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Staff Assistant 

Associate Vice President, Academic Affairs 

Position Control Coordinator 

Associate Vice President, Academic Programs/Dean of Graduate Studies.. 

Director of Graduate Affairs 

Associate Vice President, Extended Education 

University Facilities Coordinator 

Director of Administrative Services 

University Community Programs Director 

Associate Vice President, Student Academic Affairs and Special Programs 

Dean, School of the Arts 

Dean, School of Business Administration and Economics 

Dean, School of Human Development and Community Service 

Dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Dean, School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering 

University Librarian 

Assistant to the University Librarian 

Associate University Librarian 

Chair, Collection Management 

Chair, Processing Services 

Chair, Public Services 

Dean of Admissions and Records 

Assistant to the Dean 

Director of Admissions 

Director of Relations with Schools and Colleges 

Registrar 

Director of Academic Advisement 

Assistant to the Director 

Director, Educational Opportunity Program 

Assistant Director, EOP 

Assistant Director, EOP 

Director, Faculty Affairs and Records 

Administrative Assistant 

Labor Relations Specialist 

Director, Faculty Research 

Coordinator, Contracts and Grants 

Director, Information Services and Computer Center 

Manager, Administrative Programming 

User Services 

Instructional Coordinator 

Manager, Operational Support 

Director of Learning Resources Services 

Coordinator, Learning Assistance Resource Center 

Media Consultant 

Director, Center for Internships and Cooperative Education 

Associate Director 

Coordinator of Health Professions 

Director of Student Affirmative Action 


Jewel Plummer Cobb 

Norma Morris 

Donna C. Rhodes 

. Rosamarla Gomez-Amaro 

F. Caroline Cosgrove 

Leanne L. Grotke (Acting) 


Edward O. Carroll 

Alison Cone 

Jack W. Coleman 

Marlys K. Rietman 

Michael H. Clapp 

Mary Wise Aguilar 

Dennis F. Berg 

Gladys Fleckles 

Patrick A. Wegner (acting) 

Martin E. Carbone 

James T. Mavlty 

Betty Robertson 

Brenda L. Wash 

Jerry Samuelson 

Thomas L. Brown 

Peter A. Faclone 

Don A. Schweitzer 

A. James Diefenderfer 

Alan E. Schorr 

E. Sue Boeltl 

Carolyn Kacena 

Donald W. Keran 


Patricia L. Bril 

Mildred Scott (acting) 
Francis M. Casey 


William P. Gowler 

Carole Jones 

Judith V. Ramirez 
Frances Vose 


Stephanie M. Ortiz 

Jeremiah W. Moore 

Gordon M. Bakken 

Kay Adams-Hernandez 

Cecil A. Rhodes 

Marlene D. Rios 

Elizabeth Gewin 

Gene H. DIppel 

Bobbe Weber 

Dick Bednar 

Michelle Perlman 

Charles Sowers 

Ernest B. Gourdine 

Ina Katz 

William Shultz 


Brenda SImmons-Parker (acting) 

Miles D. McCarthy 

Brenda Wash (acting) 


CSUF 



Associate Director 

Radiation Safety Officer 

Vice President for Administration 

Staff Assistant 

Director of Organizational Development 

Associate Vice President, Facility Planning and Operations 

Administrative Program Specialist 

Campus Planner 

Assistant Campus Planner 

Environmental Health and Safety Officer 

Director of Public Safety 

Director of Physical Plant 

Personnel Management Director 

Office Manager 

Personnel Management Specialist 

Business Manager 

Administrative Program Specialist 

Administrative Assistant 

Accounting Officer 

Budget Officer 

Administrative Program Specialist 

Procurement and Support Services Officer 

Foundation Executive Director 

Titan Bookstore Executive Director 

Food Services Director 

Vice President for Student Services 

Administrative Assistant 

Associate Vice President for Student Services 

Assistant Vice President for Student Services 

Administrator for Associated Students 

Coordinator, Academic Appeals 

Director, Career Development Center 

Director, Financial Aid 

Director, Handicapped Student Services 

Director, Housing and Transportation 

Director, International Education and Exchange 

Director, Student Health and Counseling Service 

Director, Testing and Research 

Director, University Activities Center 

Director, Women’s Center 

Vice President for University Relations and Development 

Associate Vice President for University Relations and Development 

Director of Alumni Affairs 

Director of Development Office Information Systems 

Director of Public Affairs 

Director of Public Information 

Schools, Divisions and Departments 

(Administrators serving as Chairs unless otherwise noted) 

School of the Arts 

Art Department 

Music Department 

Theatre Department 

School of Business Administration and Economics 

Accounting Department 

Economics Department 

Finance Department 



Valerie Bordeaux 
John Elliott 

Sal D. Rinella 

. Marianne Kreter 

GInny Scheel 

. James B. Sharp 
.Joanie Donovan 

Glenn Lemon 

Philo Rohrbough 


William Huffman 

Walter NowackI 

.. David J. Losco (acting) 

Marilyn White 

Emily E. Gilbert 

Thomas A. Williams 

Ronald G. Lamb 

Joseph J. Dusbabek 

Robert E. McPeek 

Robert G. Fecarotta 

Charles R. Umlaut 

David D. Baird 

E. Karl Lorentzen 

E. Karl Lorentzen 

Lee Reavis 

T. Roger Nudd 

Eddie Cline 

Charles W. Buck 

William J. Reeves 

William G. Pollock 

Roy Williams 

Roberta F. Browning 

Joseph B. Terry (Acting) 

Paul K. Miller 

Roy Williams 

Robert Ericksen 

Harley Estrin 

John Glllis 

Loydene Pritchard 

Diane Reeves 

Anthony Macias 

Marion Sneed 

Sue Shepard 

Tim Hughes 

Jerry J. Keating 

Judy M. Mandel 


Jerry Samuelson, Dean 

Frank E. Cummings, III, Associate Dean 

George James 

David O. Thorsen 

Joseph A. Arnold, Jr. 

Thomas L. Brown, Dean 

Ken Goldin, Associate Dean 

Trini U. Melcher 

Eric J. Solberg 

Marco Tonietti 


Management Department Thomas W. Johnson 

Management Information Systems Mabel Kung, Coordinator 

Management Science Department David Stoller 

Marketing Department Irene Lange 

School of Human Development and Community Service Peter A. Facione, Dean 

Michael Parker, Associate Dean; Jeremiah Moore, Assistant Dean 

Administrative Assistant Laela E. Handy 

Elementary and Bilingual Education Department Shirly Hill 

Counseling Department Patricia Hannigan 

Educational Administration Department K. Jack Preble 

Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation Department Eula M. Stovall 

Nursing Department Vera Robinson 

Reading Department Norma Inablnette 

Special Education Department Stephen Aloia 

Child Development Program Leo Schmidt, Coordinator 

Human Services Program Gerald Corey, Coordinator 

Military Science Program Alan R. Bradolino, Coordinator 

University Recreation Program Ronald G. Andris, Director 

School of Humanities and Social Sciences Don A. Schweitzer, Dean 

Chris Cozby, Associate Dean 

Administrative Assistant Elaine Hutchison 

Afro-Ethnic Studies Department Carl E. Jackson 

American Studies Department Allan Axelrad 

Anthropology Department Jacob Pandian 

Chicano Studies Department Isaac Cardenas 

Communications Department Edgar P. Trotter, III 

Criminal Justice Department Garrett W. Capune 

English and Comparative Literature Department Thomas P. Klammer 

Foreign Languages and Literatures Department Jacqueline Kiralthe 

Geography Department Robert Young 

History Department James F. Woodward 

Linguistics Department z^ian S. Kaye 

Philosophy Department Gloria D. Rock 

Political Science Department Alan Saltzstein 

Psychology Department Patricia Worden 

Religious Studies Department Donald H. Gard 

Sociology Department Rae R. Newton 

Speech Communication Department Joyce M. Flocken 

Environmental Studies Program Imre Sutton, Coordinator 

Gerontology Program Rosalie Gilford, Coordinator 

Latin American Studies Program James Dietz, Coordinator 

Liberal Studies Program Ronald Clapper, Coordinator 

Russian and East European Area Studies Program Robert Feldman, Coordinator 

M. A. in Social Sciences Program Sheldon L Maram, Coordinator 

Women’s Studies Program Sandra Sutphen, Coordinator 


School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering 


Biological Science Department 

Chemistry Department 

Civil Engineering Department 

Computer Science Department 

Electrical Engineering Department ... 

Geological Sciences Department 

Mathematics Department 

Mechanical Engineering Department 

Physics Department 

Science Education Program 


A. James DIefenderfer, Dean 

Margaret Woyski, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 
John Olmsted, Associate Dean, Administrative Affairs 
Floyd Thomas, Associate Dean, Engineering (acting) 

Steven N. Murray 

Robert Belloli 

Mahadeva Venkatesan 

Morteza Anvarl 

Mohinder Grewal 

John A. Ryan 

James O. Friel 

James Rizza 

Dorothy Woolum 

Gaylen R. Carlson, Director 


CSUF 



California State University, 
Fullerton Foundation 

The California State University, Fullerton Foundation was 
established and incorporated as a not-for-profit corpora- 
tion in October 1959. The Foundation is an auxiliary organi- 
zation of the university. The Foundation was established 
to provide essential student, faculty and staff services 
which cannot be provided from state appropriations; to 
supplement the program and activities of the university In 
appropriate ways; and to assist otherwise the university in 
fulfilling its purposes and in serving the people of the State 
of California — especially those of the area in which the 
university is located. 

Some of the activities In which the Foundation assists the 
university are developing and administering research and 
educational grants and contracts; conducting bookstore, 
food service and vending operations on campus; ac- 
cumulating and managing endowment and student scho- 
larship funds; administering various educationally related 
functions and special programs and the Tucker Wildlife 
Sanctuary. 

The Foundation’s overall policies are administered by a 
Board of Directors composed of members of the univer- 
sity faculty, administration and students as well as com- 
munity leaders. 

Board of Directors 

Jewel Plummer Cobb, President * 

Sal D. Rinella, Vice President * 

Hilton DalessI, Secretary # 

David L. Palmer, Treasurer # 

Rudolph Baldoni # 

John Beisner t 
Keith O. Boyum ** 

Clare Carlson # 

Edward Carpenter # 

Jack W. Coleman * 

Jerry L. Conrey t 
Peggy Cotton # 

A. James Diefenderfer * 

Richard Houston ** 

Maria C. Linder ** 

Robert Ostengaard # 

T. Roger Nudd * 

Walter J. Pray # 

Mark H. Shapiro ** 

Tracey Stotz t 

Marlene D. Rios, Ex-Officio * 

Anthony A. Macias, Ex-Officio * 

E. Karl Lorentzen, Ex-Officio 

Administrative Officer 

E. Karl Lorentzen, Executive Director 



These five students were first to graduate from Cal State 
Fullerton (then known as Orange County State College). 
They are (left to right): Ryland C. Gibbs, Margaret E. 
Opsahl, Faye Z. Corwin, Shirley L Saydman and Joseph 
E. Stephens. 

CSUF Alumni 

Five students were first to graduate from Cal State Fuller- 
ton, becoming the Class of 1960. Since then, over 60,000 
graduates have passed through the university. 

CSUF alumni have a vested Interest In their university. 
They have been part of its past, belong to Its present and 
are working for Its future. Representing those alumni and 
many affiliates, the Conference of CSUF Alumni consists 
of the: 

Executive Council (11 -member governing body) 
School of the Arts Alumni Council 
School of Business Administration and Economics 
Alumni Council 

School of Human Development and Community 
Service Alumni Council 


* Administrator * * Faculty f Student # Community member 


CSUF 


School of Humanities and Social Sciences Alumni 
Council 

School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering 
Alumni Council 

Chartered departmental, special interest and regional 
clubs and other alumni groups and affiliates 

Inaugurated in November, 1983, the organization serves to 
advance the university’s interests through alumni talents, 
services, energies and financial assistance to nurture and 
enhance the academic setting in such a way that students 
will benefit directly. The group promotes alumni involve- 
ment on campus and honors outstanding student, faculty, 
staff, community and alumni achievement. 

Anyone graduating from CSUF with a bachelor’s degree, 
master’s degree or a credential Is a regular member of the 
organization. Regular members enjoy tangible benefits 
such as the quarterly publication {Titan News), library 
privileges, insurance program, various events and dis- 
counts. There are also associate, affiliate, honorary and 
community membership categories. 

Call the Alumni Affairs Office for further information. 


Community Support Groups 

California State University, Fullerton has established 
close relationships with the community during its 25 years 
as the state university of Orange County. There are 11 
community support groups with approximately 7,000 mem- 
bers who are involved in the life of the university and who 
support the university In ways that are unique to their 
particular organization. Each group determines for Itself 
membership criteria, annual membership fees, and Its pri- 
mary goal for university assistance. Further information 
about community support groups may be obtained from 
the Office of University Relations and Development locat- 
ed in Langsdorf Hall 801 at (714) 773-2108. 

Art Alliance 

The Art Alliance provides support programs for the Art 
Department and Gallery through scholarships for art stu- 
dents; endowment funds; financial support for Main Art 
Gallery exhibitions and catalogs; and the administration of 
a docent program. 



Inaugurated in November 1963, the Conference of CSUF Alumni commemorated its beginning with this group shot of 
celebrants: alumni, students, faculty, staff, administrators and special friends. 


CSUF 


Continuing Learning Experience 

CLE, an acronym for Continuing Learning Experience, is 
an organization of retired and semi-retired men and 
women who wish to pursue continuous learning in a high- 
level educational environment. The programs are de- 
signed to serve special interest groups and/or respond to 
special academic needs in the community. The members 
of CLE are currently involved in raising funds for a Geron- 
tology Center on campus. 

Friends of the State University 

The Friends of the State University is a group of people 
from neighboring communities who reach out helping 
hands to assist Cal State Fullerton. Its members include 
community leaders, community organizations and busi- 
nesses, university faculty members and interested in- 
dividuals. The Friends serves as a channel of 
communications from the community to the leaders of the 
university and from the university back to the community. 
Members provide through their membership contributions 
financial support for a variety of activities for which other 
funds are unavailable such as scholarships, faculty re- 
search and special equipment. The Friends also honors 
outstanding professors and students who distinguish 
themselves through service to the community. 

Friends of the Arboretum 

Besides contributing annually to the Fullerton Arboretum 
operating budget, the Friends augments and assists the 
Arboretum program through a wide variety of volunteer 
functions. The purpose of the Arboretum is threefold: to 
create a quiet, esthetic retreat In the midst of a rapidly 
growing urban area; to provide the university and sur- 
rounding communities with a resource for environmental 
and historical education; and to encourage research and 
experimentation in horticulture, plant ecology, and the 
conservation of natural resources. 

Music Associates 

The Music Associates supports the programs, faculty and 
students of the Music Department through memberships 
and fund-raising events. 

Parents’ Association 

The Parents’ Association is designed to respond to the 
needs and Interests of the parents of California State Uni- 
versity, Fullerton students. The organization sponsors a 


broad spectrum of activities and educational programs as 
well as contributing financially to unmet university needs. 

Patrons of the Library 

The Patrons of the Library is an organization of community 
leaders, concerned citizens, former students, faculty and 
staff who generate financial support to sustain the margin 
of excellence of the university Library. It is a group that is 
unique among the 19 campuses of the California State 
University in the quality of its support of library holdings 
and facilities. 

President’s Associates 

The President’s Associates Is an organization of dedicat- 
ed community leaders who are committed to the support 
of quality higher education. Membership contributions en- 
able the university to initiate and sustain quality cultural 
and educational programs of both breadth and depth de- 
signed to benefit students and members of the communi- 
ties served by the university. 

Reading Educators’ Guild 

The Reading Educators’ Guild is composed of those who 
have graduated from California State University, Fullerton 
with a Master of Science in Education, Reading. The Guild 
sponsors credit courses and non-credit workshops, has a 
close working relationship with the Institute for Reading, 
and promotes research dealing with all aspects of read- 
ing. 

Titan Athletic Foundation 

The Titan Athletic Foundation is a nonprofit organization 
that exists solely to aid the athletic program at California 
State University, Fullerton. The Foundation is composed 
of individuals who have a genuine interest in athletics, the 
university, and the community and support athletics by 
providing funds for scholarships that Insure an effective 
recruiting program. 

Tucker Wildlife Society 

Donated by the San Fernando Audubon Society, the 
Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary is located In Modjeska Canyon. 
The grounds are open to the general public and serve as 
an outdoor education facility to ail students In the county. 
Volunteers contribute to the support of the programs and 
operation of this facility. 


CSUF 


Academic Services 



27 



Academic Affairs 



California State University, Fullerton provides a diversity 
of educational opportunities to satisfy the broad range of 
backgrounds and interests of its students. The academic 
programs available include 44 bachelor’s degrees, 41 
master’s degrees, 41 minors, 5 certificates and 15 teach- 
ing credential programs. Approximately 3,000 courses 
have been developed to provide learning from introduc- 
tory to highly specialized, in-depth and advanced work in 
a wide variety and growing number of fields of study. 

Certain traditions have developed with the academic pro- 
grams at Fullerton. One is that of relative balance in 
strength of the programs In the physical sciences, the 
social sciences, the humanities and the fine arts. Another 
is that of academic excellence in the various specializa- 
tions offered by the university and the comparative free- 
dom given to departments and professional schools to 
develop programs for their majors. Through the general 
education program of the university, students are pre- 
pared in basic subjects and gain experience in a variefy of 
carefully selected disciplines. 

Vice President for Academic 
Affairs 

McCarthy Hall 134 
(714) 773-2614 

The Vice President for Academic Affairs is responsible for 
the leadership and coordination of all campus academic 
matters. The Vice President is the chief academic officer 
for the campus and Is directly Involved In the areas of 
curriculum, faculty personnel processes and budget and 
resource allocation as they pertain to instruction and aca- 
demic support. 

The academic Vice President works closely with the Presi- 
dent, the academic associate vice presidents, deans, and 
program directors regarding all instructionally related 
planning and operational matters. Related responsibilities 
include: (1) instructional resource administration relating 
to staffing, operating expenses and equipment; (2) assur- 
ing that all faculty and staff personnel actions reinforce 
and complement the qualitative objectives of the univer- 
sity while meeting its strong commitment to the principles 
and spirit of affirmative action; (3) academic support serv- 
ices such as the library, admissions and records. Extend- 
ed Education, Information Services and Computer Center, 
and student EOP and Affirmative Action programs. As 
chief academic officer, the Vice President reviews and 
recommends to the President on all faculty and tenure 


Academic Affaire 




considerations as well as other academic personnel ac- 
tions as required by university policy. 

Information concerning the academic programs of Cal 
State Fullerton may be obtained from the Office of the 
Vice President for Academic Affairs. This information may 
include: 

1. The current degree programs and other educational 
and training programs; 

2. The instructional, laboratory, and other physical plant 
facilities which relate to the academic program; 

3. The faculty and other instructional personnel; 

4. Data regarding student retention at Cal State Fullerton 
and, if available, the number and percentage of stu- 
dents completing the program in which the student is 
enrolled or has expressed interest; and 

5. The names of associations, agencies or governmental 
bodies which accredit, approve, or license the Institu- 
tion and its programs, and the procedures under which 
any current or prospective student may obtain or review 
upon request a copy of the documents describing the 
institution’s accreditation, approval or licensing. 

Academic Programs 

McCarthy Hall 129 
(714) 773-3602 

The Office of Academic Programs coordinates the deve- 
lopment of educational programs; provides an all-univer- 
sity perspective on educational activities at the campus; 
and stimulates academic Innovations. 

The Associate Vice President, Academic Programs is re- 
sponsible for administering university policies and regula- 
tions dealing with undergraduate and graduate curricula; 
preparation and publication of the university catalog; and 
serves as liaison officer to the Western Association of 
Schools and Colleges (WASC) and other accrediting 
agencies. 

Particular responsibilities include leadership with the Cur- 
riculum Committee, General Education Committee, 
Graduate Education Committee, International Education 
Committee and other groups and Individuals concerned 
with changing and improving the educational programs of 
this institution. Responsibilities relating to the Chancel- 
lor’s Office include regular review and updating of the 
Academic Master Plan; coordination of program perform- 
ance review; and staff reports for the Chancellor’s Office 
relating to academic planning. 


Admissions and Records 

Langsdorf Hall 102 
(714) 773-2350 

The Office of Admissions and Records is responsible for 
the administration of the admission, registration, records, 
and relations with schools and colleges programs and 
services for undergraduate and graduate students in the 
regular sessions of California State University, Fullerton. 
These programs and services provide preadmission guid- 
ance to prospective students and current information 
about the university’s curricula and requirements to 
school and college counselors; admit and readmit stu- 
dents within enrollment categories and priorities; evaluate 
the applicability of undergraduate transfer credit toward 
all-university requirements of the curriculum; provide liai- 
son in the identification and resolution of articulation prob- 
lems of transfer students; register student programs of 
study, including enrollment into classes; maintain aca- 
demic records; administer academic probation and dis- 
qualification policies; provide enrollment certifications on 
student request, including transcripts of academic re- 
cords, to the Veterans Administration and for other pur- 
poses; certify the completion of degree and credential 
requirements; receive petitions for exceptions to academ- 
ic regulations; and provide information about these pro- 
grams and services. 

Computer Center 

McCarthy Hall 38 
(714) 773-3921 

The Computer Center is located in the basement of the 
McCarthy Hall, offering consulting services to students 
and faculty as well as performing administrative data proc- 
essing. As a component of the CSU Distributed Computer 
Network, the university offers a wide range of computing 
resources. The campus host computer is a CDC Cyber 
170/730 with dual processors, 262,000 words of memory 
and 2.0 billion characters of on-line disk storage. It pro- 
vides timesharing services to over 100 users. Also avail- 
able are two additional timesharing computers; a PDF 
11/44 which supports UNIX and a PDP 11/70 which pro- 
vides RSTS. Users have access to many computer lan- 
guages and a variety of statistical and other applications 
programs. Through the facilities of the network, users are 
able to share access with other campuses to a large 
capacity Cyber 170/760-730 complex located at the Divi- 
sion of Information Systems In Los Angeles. 

Students have access to all these computing resources 
from 250 terminals connected to the campus data com- 
munications network. Terminal labs located at several 
sites on the campus allow students convenient access. 


Academic Affairs 


Extended Education 

Building T 14 
(714) 773-2611 

The Office of Extended Education is responsible for all 
university program and course offerings not supported by 
state appropriations. These include summer and interses- 
sion, extension courses, adjunct enrollment, travel study 
programs, contract courses and certificate programs. In 
contrast to resident programs which require matriculation 
and a degree objective, most Extended Education pro- 
grams allow any adult and selected high school student to 
participate. The primary objective of Extended Education 
is to augment the regular university offerings and to pro- 
vide further educational opportunities for all who wish to 
gain new knowledge and skills or to enhance those al- 
ready acquired. Courses are taught by regular university 
faculty, visiting faculty and practicing professionals. All are 
specialists in their fields. Additional Information concern- 
ing the Extended Education programs may be found in the 
Academic Programs section of this catalog. 

Graduate Affairs 

McCarthy Hall 129 
(714) 773-2618 

The staff of the Office of Graduate Affairs assists students 
in answering questions about admission, academic poli- 
cies and procedures, graduate programs, financial assist- 
ance, student services, and other matters of concern to 
applicants or graduate students. The office Is also respon- 
sible for performing an evaluation of student programs at 
Classification and completion of requirements for author- 
izing award of degree. 

The Associate Vice President for Academic Programs/ 
Dean of Graduate Studies is the appropriate university 
authority for coordinating and administering all matters 
related to graduate degree curricula. This position is guid- 
ed by the policy recommendations of the Graduate Edu- 
cation Committee. 

Faculty Affairs and Records 

McCarthy Hall 142 
(714) 773-2125 

The Office of Faculty Affairs and Records is the official 
repository for documents and correspondence concern- 
ing full-time teaching and administrative faculty. It has 
responsibility for retaining documentation pertaining to 
employment, reappointment, tenure, promotion, leaves of 
absence, grievances, disciplinary actions and separa- 
tions. The Director of Faculty Affairs and Records also 
serves as the employee relations designee in all matters 
pertaining to Interpretation and Implementation of the 
memoranda of understanding in the collective bargaining 
process. 


Faculty Research 

McCarthy Hall 112 
(714) 773-2106 

The Office of Faculty Research has the following func- 
tions: (1) Responsibility for pre-proposal consultation and 
forum for external grant proposal design and implementa- 
tion; technical assistance (typing and editing) and prepa- 
ration of draft and final copies of grants and contracts 
research proposals, their budgets and compliance forms 
for governmental procedures; initiation, design and writing 
of research and programmatic proposals (when appropri- 
ate) in response to “RFP’s” (requests for proposals) 
and/or President’s mandate; (2) Dissemination of avail- 
able research resources and sources of funding through 
direct mailings to faculty/staff, and via monthly newslet- 
ter, “Research News and Opportunities”; primary univer- 
sity source of grant resources library and Federal/private 
funding announcements and agency foundation profiles; 
(3) Transmittal and coordination of internal CSUF ap- 
proval procedures for grants and contracts, and oversight 
responsibility for pre-proposal compliance with university 
grant/contract requirements and procedures. Including 
signoff signatures; oversight responsibility for archiving all 
records of university grants and contracts; (4) Administra- 
tion and dissemination of information on Internal research 
resources at CSUF, Including President’s Summer Sti- 
pend, Faculty Research Grants, Professional Encourage- 
ment Fund and Hughes’ Faculty Research Grants; 
coordination of University Services Program contracts an- 
nouncements and submissions to CSU Chancellor’s Of- 
fice; (5) Secretariat for University Research Committee, 
Institutional Review Board and Animal Protection Commit- 
tee, in compliance with external and internal regulations 
and obligations; responsibility for implementing work- 
shops, conferences and seminars for CSUF faculty for 
professional development related to research and grant 
activities. 

Instructional Media Center 

Library 80 
(714) 773-2621 

The Instructional Media Center, located in the lower level 
of the Library building, includes audiovisual and instruc- 
tional television services. 

Services to the faculty and students include use of audio- 
visual equipment and materials, and rental of films. Serv- 
ices for faculty Include production of transparencies, 
charts, graphs, diagrams, audiotapes and cassettes, tele- 
lectures and all types of still and motion picture photogra- 
phy. Instructional television services include distribution of 
off-the-air or videotaped programs from master control to 
classrooms, videotaping facilities and playback both in the 
studio or classroom and off the campus. 


Academic Affairs 


The center is responsible for the coordination and deve- 
lopment of instructional applications of media and the 
improvement of programs and materials designed for in- 
structional use. Liaison and service relations are main- 
tained with other media learning-oriented units on the 
campus. Personnel of the center assist the faculty In their 
analysis of media needs and the procurement or produc- 
tion of materials pertinent to instructional development. 

Instructional Media Center staff are also responsible for 
the operation of the cable television system which pro- 
vides educational access programming to the cities of 
Fullerton and Anaheim. Programming from the Communi- 
cations Department and the Theatre Department, along 
with Instructional programming from the Instructional 
Media Center, is provided. 

The Library 

Library 114 
(714) 773-2714 

Chief among the learning resources on the campus is the 
University Library. The six-story building located in the 
heart of the campus houses a collection of well over half 
a million books and bound periodicals, as well as one 
million other items including maps, microforms, docu- 
ments (local, regional, state and federal) and non-print 
materials such as kits, phonorecords, audiotapes and film- 
strips selected through the joint efforts of faculty and li- 
brarians to support the graduate and undergraduate 
programs of the university. In addition to the general col- 
lections, supplemental collections designed to support 
the curriculum and instructionally-related research have 
been created and developed. As examples, the School 
Curriculum and Textbook Library houses a collection of 
children’s books, curriculum guides, state approved text- 
books, teaching kits, pictures and prints. The Phonorecord 
and Tape Library includes a representative selection of 
classical and semi-classical music, full-length plays, dra- 
matic readings, and speeches in phonorecord or audi- 
otape formats and provides facilities for listening to these 
sound recordings Individually and In small groups. 

As part of the curriculum, the Library offers courses in 
bibliographic research; tours and lectures on specialized 
materials are given at the request of the faculty; and Intro- 
ductory tours of the services and materials are offered at 
the beginning of each semester. In addition to formal in- 
struction In bibliographic research, the library faculty pro- 
vide subject-specialized research and reference services. 


Materials for required and recommended course-related 
reading are made available through the Reserve Book 
Room for limited loan periods. For the user’s conven- 
ience, several photocopiers and microform reader/print- 
ers are available. Other specialized facilities include the 
music listening rooms, group study rooms, and a mi- 
croform reading room. 

Access to published materials is enhanced through the 
Computerized Information Retrieval Service (CIRS) on- 
line reference In conjunction with the Reference Section 
of the Library. Over 200 different databases are accessible 
for curricular and research needs. Details on the fees for 
this service are provided in a guide available at the Infor- 
mation Desk and at the Reference Desk. 

The student identification card Issued by the university 
must be validated each semester at the library circulation 
counter to permit Its use as a library card for checking out 
books. The loss or theft of the student ID, as well as any 
changes of address, must be reported immediately to the 
library circulation counter. Library users are responsible 
for the return of all materials charged out on their ID card; 
early reporting of a lost ID will reduce the risk of misuse 
of your card. If there is a need to be absent from the 
immediate area for more than two weeks, all library 
materials should be returned. Guides to ail library circula- 
tion services and fees are available at the information 
desk. 

In addition to the many resources available on campus, 
mutual use agreements make accessible to students and 
faculty the library collections of the other 18 libraries of 
The California State University system, of The University 
of California campuses nearby (Irvine and Riverside) , and 
of neighboring institutions such as Fullerton College. In- 
terlibrary borrowing arrangements with major university 
and research libraries throughout the country expand fur- 
ther the research potential for the CSUF community. 

Throughout the academic years 1985-86 and 1986-87, the 
Library will be undergoing extensive expansion and reno- 
vation. General information will be available at the infor- 
mation desk on the first floor. Information desk personnel 
will provide directional assistance as well as a variety of 
descriptive materials and guides to the building and the 
collections. 


Academic Affairs 



student Academic Affairs 


Student Academic Affairs and 
Special Programs 

McCarthy Hall 134 
(714) 773-3988 

The Office of Associate Vice President, Student Academic 
Affairs and Special Programs is responsible for the leader- 
ship and coordination of academic services to under- 
graduate students. This office works with the faculty and 
with the Associate Vice President, Academic Programs, 
the school deans and others to assure the academic qual- 
ity and standards of the undergraduate program, provide 
a diversity of educational opportunities for students, and 
to oversee the administrative rules and practices by which 
the undergraduate program Is conducted. 

The Associate Vice President for Student Academic Af- 
fairs and Special Programs has administrative responsibil- 
ity for the Office of Academic Advisement, Learning 
Resource Services, the Health Professions Program, the 
Student Affirmative Action Program, the Educational Op- 
portunity Program, the Office of Relations with Schools 
and Colleges, and Admissions and Records. 

The Associate Vice President works with appropriate ad- 
ministrators and on committees dealing with the im- 
plementation of University policies and procedures on 
advising, retention, outreach, learning assistance and 
special curricula in an effort to enrich the educational op- 
portunities for undergraduate students. 

Academic Advisement Center 

Humanities 112 
(714) 773-3605 

The Academic Advisement Center provides information 
and guidance in the choice of an undergraduate major, a 
school of Interest, or selection of elective and general 
education courses. It is the administrative center for un- 
dergraduate students who have not declared a major or 
school of interest. Refer to the Academic Advisement sec- 
tion for additional information. 



Student Academic Affairs 


Athletic Academic Services 

Physical Education 130B 
(714) 773-3057 

As an integral part of the CSUF student advising system, 
the Athletic Academic Coordinator’s office provides ad- 
visement for student-athletes; provides referrals to cam- 
pus academic support units; and conducts programs 
which are designed to assist student-athletes in meeting 
their academic goals. 

Center for Internships and 
Cooperative Education 

Langsdorf Hall 210 
(714) 773-2171 

The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education 
was established to formally integrate a student's academ- 
ic experience and practical work experience with coope- 
rating employers. The Center is the focal point and 
coordinating office for the initiation, development and ex- 
pansion of cooperative education. The internships and 
Cooperative Education Program offers students an oppor- 
tunity to expand their knowledge and skills in a “real work” 
situation which better prepares them to select a career 
and successfully enter the job market. Through academic 
study and practical experience, students enhance their 
academic knowledge, personal development and profes- 
sional preparation. 

An internship or co-op experience is offered as a credit 
course by the academic department and is under the guid- 
ance of a faculty coordinator. Some internships are sala- 
ried and consequently assist students to finance their 
educational expenses. 

Educational Opportunity 
Programs 

Library 18 
(714) 773-2484 

The Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) is primarily 
a “Special Admissions” program available to legal 
residents of the State of California. EOP is designed to 
provide Information regarding admission, financial assist- 
ance, and supportive services to prospective undergradu- 
ate students who have potential to perform satisfactorily 
at the university level, but who might be prevented from 
doing so because of economic, educational and environ- 
mental disadvantages. 

EOP gives each of the students individual attention. It 
uses knowledge of the students’ distinctive patterns of 
social behavior, learning styles, motivations, and aspira- 
tions to assist them in realizing their full potentials. 


The services offered by the Educational Opportunity Pro- 
gram include: advisement, tutoring, and retention serv- 
ices. These services ensure a progressive rate of student 
achievement. 

Advisement Sen/ices 

The EOP advisement component, located in the Student 
Academic Services Center, is one key to the effectiveness 
of the EOP. Peer mentors, working under the direction of 
professional staff, serve as important liaisons between 
each EOP student and the university as a whole. Assist- 
ance and guidance are provided to help the student re- 
solve academic, social, financial and personal problems. 
The EOP component of the Academic Services Center 
also serves as a referral point to direct students to the 
appropriate support services, e.g. Financial Aid, Learning 
Assistance Center, and Health Center. 

Learning Assistance Resource 
Center (LARC) 

Library 38 
(714) 773-3488 

The Learning Assistance Resource Center (LARC), 
located on the lower level of the Library, offers a wide 
range of services for students who want to Improve their 
academic skills. LARC services include: 

1. Strategies for Learning classes to help students learn 
appropriate study skills while taking general education 
courses (e.g., history, political science, biological 
science and chemistry) . 

2. General classes to help students improve their aca- 
demic capabilities in the areas of study skills, language 
arts and writing. Special sections of these classes for 
ESL students are available. 

3. Test preparation classes to help students prepare for 
the Entry Level Mathematics Examination, the Exami- 
nation in Writing Proficiency, the California Basic Edu- 
cational Skills Test and the Graduate Record Exam. 

4. The Learning Laboratory which contains self-help pro- 
grams that students can use independently to learn 
new skills or to review old skills. 

Office of Relations with 
Schools and Colleges 

Langsdorf Hall 102 
(714) 773-2361 

The Office of Relations with Schools and Colleges serves 
as an articulation link between the university and the com- 
munity colleges, high schools, other CSU campuses, the 
University of California, and independent universities and 
colleges. It is the responsibility of the office to disseminate 
information regarding admission, curriculum offerings and 


2—79417 


Student Academic Affaire 


applications to prospective students. Applications, cata- 
logs and course schedules are provided through the office 
to area high schools and community colleges. Course 
articulations are developed with area community colleges, 
and follow-up Information on students enrolled at the uni- 
versity is sent to schools and colleges from which Califor- 
nia State University, Fullerton students have come. 
Campus tours are available to prospective students 
through this office. 

Student Academic Services 

Humanities 113 
(714) 773-2288 

An important component of the Educational Equity Pro- 
grams (Student Affirmative Action and the Educational 
Opportunity Program) is Student Academic Services. 
These support services are designed to facilitate student 
adjustment, academic achievement and persistence at 
CSUF. Through Individual advisement and guidance, 
workshops, social activities and a mentor program, stu- 
dents are encouraged toward their educational goals. The 
center also provides referrals to other appropriate serv- 
ices and is an important liaison between each individual 
student and various university offices. 

The university mentor program is an integral part of Stu- 
dent Academic Services. Because meaningful Interac- 
tions with university personnel enhance students’ 
academic and other campus experiences, the mentor pro- 
gram involves faculty, staff and administrators as academ- 
ic mentors to provide Information, assistance and support 
to ethnic minority and other students. Mentors serve as 
role models and provide encouragement to the students 
with whom they work. 

Student Affirmative Action 

Library (lower level) 22 
(714) 773-2086 

CORE (Comprehensive Outreach, Retention and Educa- 
tional Enhancement) Student Affirmative Action (SAA) Is 
part of The California State University’s systemwide Stu- 
dent Affirmative Action plan which was mandated by the 
California Legislature in 1974 under Assembly Concurrent 
Resolution No. 151. The Intent of this resolution was to 
address the underrepresentation of ethnic minority, 
women and economically disadvantaged students en- 
rolled In California postsecondary institutions. 

At Fullerton, the SAA program focuses on ethnic minority 
students from underrepresented groups who are 
academically qualified to meet the system’s regular ad- 
mission requirements. The program’s major activities fall 
Into three components: outreach, retention, and educa- 
tional enhancement. 


Outreach Services 

In cooperation with the university’s outreach services of- 
fice (see University Outreach Services), the outreach 
component coordinates services and activities to Increase 
the enrollment of regularly admissible ethnic minority stu- 
dents from underreoresented groups to Cal State Fuller- 
ton. 

High School and community college students seeking ad- 
mission to the university are provided Information on Ful- 
lerton admissions’ procedures, academic programs and 
student support services. Students are also provided indi- 
vidual advisement and assistance with application proc- 
esses and information on financial aid and scholarships. 
Parents of prospective students are also Invited to partici- 
pate in outreach activities Including a parent support 
group and Information workshops which familiarize them 
with various segments of the university and promote their 
Involvement in the college experience of their offsprings. 

The SAA Early Outreach Program works with ethnic mi- 
nority students from local junior high schools to assist in 
preparing them to enroll successfully and excel academi- 
cally in college. 

Retention Services 

Students enrolled at Cal State Fullerton can participate In 
SAA retention services and programs (see Student Aca- 
demic Services) which assist them to make a successful 
transition to the university, maintain a good academic 
standing, explore career alternatives and graduate with a 
chosen degree. These include academic support serv- 
ices, personal and career development activities and so- 
cial and cultural experiences. 

Educational Enhancement 

Recognizing that students are more likely to succeed in an 
environment where they are treated with sensitivity and 
understanding, the SAA educational enhancement com- 
ponent works with faculty, staff and administrators to cre- 
ate a sensitive and supportive environment for minority 
and underrepresented students. 

University Outreach Services 

Library (lower level) 22 
(714) 773-2086 

The University Outreach Services Office develops and 
coordinates a comprehensive program of outreach serv- 
ices and activities which assist to make the university 
more visible, attractive and accessible to all potential stu- 
dents. An overall goal of the office Is to Increase the 
enrollment of students at Cal State Fullerton with a special 
emphasis on students from underrepresented ethnic mi- 
nority groups. 


Student Academic Affairs 


To accomplish this goal, outreach staff make presenta- 
tions to high school and community college students, par- 
ents and counselors regarding Fullerton admissions 
procedures (including admission to the Educational Op- 
portunity Program (EOP) and Student Affirmative Action 
(SAA), academic programs and student support serv- 
ices). Students are also provided Individual advisement 
and assistance with application processes and financial 
aid procedures. 

Special activities including campus tours, financial aid 
workshops for parents and conferences for high school 
and community college counselors are also sponsored by 
the office. 

In keeping with the university’s commitment to increase 
the representation of ethnic minority and underrepresent- 
ed students at Fullerton, special efforts are made to Incor- 
porate the unique needs of these students In the 
development and Implementation of all outreach efforts. 


Writing Assistance Center 

Humanities 511 
(714) 773-3650 

The Writing Assistance Center provides tutorial assist- 
ance primarily for students who are enrolled in English 
099, 101, 106, 201 and 301 classes; however, tutors will 
assist students who seek help in writing papers for other 
English classes, especially students who need to improve 
their knowledge of writing and grammar in order to com- 
plete their university requirements. The tutors provide in- 
dividualized Instruction adjusted to the learning pace and 
the achievement level of the student. They attempt to help 
the student meet both the demands of academic writing 
and the standards of good, clear, concise prose. 

The staff is trained to work with students who are prepar- 
ing papers for a course or who need help In interpreting 
the instructor’s comments on a completed paper. They do 
not proofread nor do they edit papers; rather they offer 
constructive suggestions designed to help the student 
master the techniques of proofreading and editing. The 
tutor’s goal is to Increase the student’s competency, not 
to Improve any given paper. If a student needs intensive 
work on grammar, the tutor will provide one-to-one tutor- 
ing and will Introduce the student to a variety of study 
materials, including written exercises, computer pro- 
grams, and sound/slide instructional programs. 



Student Academic Affairs 




Honors Programs 


Dean’s Honor List 

Academic achievement is recognized with the publication 
each semester of a list of undergraduate students whose 
grade-point averages for the previous term were 3.5 or 
better. Students are notified in writing when they have 
earned this distinction. Eligibility is based on a minimum of 
12 units of graded course work. 

General Education Honors 

The General Education Honors Program offers students 
many of the benefits of education at a small college in the 
midst of the rich resources of a large university. Courses 
In the General Education Honors Program provide chal- 
lenging learning experiences in smaller classes, individu- 
alized attention from professors, and closer interaction 
with other students. 

The program also gives students the opportunity to earn 
recognition for distinguished academic performance in 
general education courses. Students who successfully 
complete the requirements for honors in general educa- 
tion will have a notation placed on their transcripts, and 
will be awarded a certificate of honors upon graduation. 

In order to graduate with honors in general education, a 
student must: complete the university’s general education 
requirements; complete 30 units of general education hon- 
ors courses; maintain a grade-point average of 3.25 in all 
general education honors classes. 

Honors at Entrance 

Honors at entrance are awarded to both freshman and 
transfer students who have demonstrated outstanding 
achievement in past academic work. For first-time fresh- 
men with no previous college units earned, a grade point 
of 3.5 on a four-point scale must be earned in the course 
work considered for admission to the university. Students 
who have completed fewer than 56 transferable semester 
units of credit must meet the grade-point average criteria 
for first-time freshmen and must also have earned a 3.5 
grade-point average on all college work attempted. Stu- 
dents who have completed 56 or more transferable se- 
mester units are eligible if a grade-point average of 3.5 is 
earned in ail college work completed. 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors at graduation for baccalaureate recipients are 



Honors Programs 



based on overall performance and have been defined by 
the Faculty Council In three classifications: 

With honors GPA 3.50-3.74 

With high honors GPA 3.75-3.89 

With highest honors GPA 3.90-4.00 

Honor Societies 

Chapters of seven honor societies have been chartered at 
California State University, Fullerton to accord recognition 
to students who demonstrate superior scholarship and 
leadership in special academic fields. 

Beta Alpha Ps/— Encourages and gives recognition to 
scholastic and professional excellence in the field of 
accounting. 

Golden Key National Honor Soc/e^— Promotes and 
recognizes scholastic excellence among juniors and 
seniors at CSUF. 

Mu Phi Epsilon — Promotes high standards in education 
and performance in the professional world of music. 

Phi Alpha r/iefa— Serves as a vehicle of recognition for 
outstanding students in the field of history who are 
honored at an annual function. 

Phi Delta Gamma — Promotes the highest professional 
ideals among women of the graduate schools. 

Phi Kappa Phi — Provides an honor society dedicated to 
the unity and democracy of education and open to honor 
students from all departments of American universities 
and colleges. 

PsI C/i/— Advances and maintains scholarship in the 
science of psychology. 

President’s Opportunity 
Scholars Program 

California State University, Fullerton established the 
President’s Opportunity Scholars Program as a means of 
recognizing the academic and extracurricular excellence 
of a select group of students. Its special focus is outstand- 
ing students from the current year of high school gradu- 
ates who are also members of minority groups which are 
underrepresented in higher education — primarily black 
and Hispanic students. Scholars receive per year for 
four years while maintaining eligibility in the program. 

To be eligible for consideration, an applicant must: 

• Be a legal resident of California. 

• Have a grade-point average of at least 3.2 in all aca- 


demic subjects for the 10th, 11th and first half of the 
12th grades. 

• Earn a Scholastic Aptitude Test total score of 900 or 
higher, or an American College Test composite score 
of 20 or higher. 

• Graduate from high school in the class year preced- 
ing the fall semester for which applying. 

• Document significant contributions to school and 
community activities during the high school years. 

• Verify outstanding individual achievement. 

• File for admission to Cal State Fullerton before apply- 
ing for a President’s Opportunity Scholars award. 

• Submit a completed President’s Opportunity Schol- 
ars application form and arrange for the Secondary 
School Report and Description and Evaluation of Stu- 
dent forms to be submitted by the high school princi- 
pal or a counselor and by a faculty member. 

President’s Scholars Program 

California State University, Fullerton established the 
President’s Scholars Program as a means of recognizing 
the academic and extracurricular excellence of a select 
group of students. Funded by the President’s Associates, 
the program began in 1979 with the first 10 President’s 
Scholars. Each year 10 additional President’s Scholars 
are selected with the potential eligibility of all chosen in- 
dividuals extending for a total of four years. President’s 
Scholars receive $500 a year. 

To be eligible for consideration, an applicant must: 

• Be a legal resident of California. 

• Present a grade-point average of at least 3.5 in all 
academic subjects for the 10th, 11th and first half of 
the 12th grades. 

• Earn a Scholastic Aptitude Test total score of 1050 or 
higher, or an American College Test composite score 
of 24 or higher. 

• Graduate from high school. 

• Verify outstanding individual achievement. 

• Document significant contributions to school and 
community activities during the high school years. 

• File for admission to Cal State Fullerton before apply- 
ing for a President’s Scholars award. 

• Submit a completed President’s Scholars application 
form and arrange for the Secondary School Report 
and Description and Evaluation of Student forms to 
be submitted by the high school principal or a coun- 
selor and by a faculty member. 

Application forms for both Scholars’ Programs are avail- 
able by telephoning (714) 773 2361 or by writing the Office 
of Relations with Schools and Colleges, President’s 
Scholars Program, California State University, Fullerton, 
Fullerton, CA 92634. 


Honors Programs 



Institutes and Centers 


California Desert Studies 
Consortium 

McCarthy Hall 236B 
(714) 773-2428 

The California Desert Studies Consortium consists of sev- 
en California State University campuses including Do- 
minguez Hills, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, 
Northridge, Pomona, and San Bernardino. The primary 
objectives of this consortium are to promote and provide 
physical and academic support for undergraduate educa- 
tional programs In a variety of disciplines and to better 
understand and manage the physical and biological as- 
pects of desert environments. The newly developed CSU 
Desert Studies Center provides living and laboratory 
space for over 100 undergraduates at Soda Springs in the 
Mojave Desert, a location central to all high desert study 
areas. 

Center for Economic Education 

Langsdorf Hall 315 
(714) 773-2246 

The Center for Economic Education is one of many such 
centers at colleges and universities In the United States 
working with the National Joint Council on Economics 
Education and the Economic Literacy Council of California 
to expand economic understanding. Center programs in- 
clude services to schools and colleges, individual educa- 
tors, and the community; research and professional 
training; and operation of an economic education Informa- 
tion center. The center is located in the School of Busi- 
ness Administration and Economics. 

Center for Governmental 
Studies 

Education Classroom 424 
(714) 773-3521 

The Center for Governmental Studies supports research, 
training and publication which assist governmental, pro- 
fessional and civic groups. It is housed in the Political 
Science Department and draws upon departmental, com- 
munity and alumni expertise. The Institute publishes 
monographs and books, sponsors training programs, and 
supports theoretical and applied research which are of 
interest to public policy makers. Institute funds also assist 
in supporting the teaching mission of the Department. 



Institutes and Centers 



Center for International 
Business 

Langsdorf Hall 626 
(714) 773-2223 

The need for an international dimension to business edu- 
cation is underscored by the importance of international 
business operations to domestic firms and the develop- 
ment of multinational firms and agencies. Equally impor- 
tant is a growing awareness of the diversity among the 
world’s cultures and economies, and an understanding of 
an unavoidable interdependence between nations. The 
International Business Center has undertaken to meet 
these challenges in the international area by developing 
international business programs with the School of Busi- 
ness Administration and Economics. 

Child and Infant Study Centers 

Humanities 519 
(714) 773-3589 

The Child and Infant Study Centers In the Department of 
Psychology support the research and Instructional activi- 
ties of faculty and students in developmental psychology. 
Unique opportunities are provided to students In both re- 
search training and applied developmental psychology. 
Programmatic research conducted at the centers include: 
(1) longitudinal assessment of the relationships between 
home environment, mental development and school 
readiness; (2) experimental analysis of perceptual and 
cognitive abilities; (3) life-span changes In memory and 
information processing; (4) learning disabilities in children 
and adults; (5) memory strategy Instruction across the 
life-span; (6) development of cerebral hemisphere spe- 
cialization; and (7) parent-child computer learning activi- 
ties. 

Field Services and 
Professional 
Development Center 

Education Classroom 321 
(714) 773-2166 

The Field Services and Professional Development Center 
operates through partnership of the Office of Extended 
Education and the School of Human Development and 
Community Service. Its major function is to sponsor and 
facilitate outreach activities in the form of credit and non- 
credit extended education courses as well as workshops 
and inservice programs for schools and professional orga- 
nizations. 

Working In partnership with schools. Institutions, and com- 
munity agencies, the Center can provide consultation to 


help solve existing problems and assist in developing edu- 
cational programs which meet organizational needs. Serv- 
ices offered by the Center include (1) creating new 
educational programs to meet current needs, (2) provid- 
ing qualified consultants on a variety of educational, pro- 
fessional and human services issues, (3) assisting school 
districts in developing programs and services that meet 
legislative requirements, (4) providing credit and non- 
credit courses, meetings and workshops at convenient 
locations, (5) co-sponsoring conferences with Institutions 
and agencies, and (6) assisting with applications for state 
and federal grants related to educational and human serv- 
ice programs. 

Institute for Early Childhood 
Education 

Education Classroom 379 
(714) 773-3411 

The Institute for Early Childhood Education (1) fosters 
and encourages communication of ideas and information 
among its membership for mutual professional develop- 
ment; (2) encourages its members to engage in research 
and writing related to the problems of early childhood 
education; (3) encourages students and teachers to 
adopt an approach of inquiry to solve their professional 
concerns relating to the education of young children; and 
(4) seeks ways of Improving the individual teaching per- 
formance of its membership through communication with 
others at ail levels of instruction. 

Institute of Geophysics 

McCarthy Hall 263 
(714) 773-3882 

The Institute of Geophysics is an interdisciplinary organi- 
zation currently comprised of faculty members from the 
Departments of Geological Sciences and Physics. It was 
established to foster the communication of ideas and in- 
formation; encourage interdisciplinary research; and im- 
prove instruction in geophysics. Membership is open to all 
faculty members who are interested in all aspects of geo- 
physics. 

Institute for Molecular Biology 

McCarthy Hall 580 
(714) 773-3624 

The purposes of the Institute are: (1 ) to foster and encour- 
age communication of ideas and information among its 
membership for mutual professional Improvement; (2) to 
encourage students to adopt affiliation with the member- 
ship and to adopt an interdisciplinary understanding of 
their particular areas of emphasis; (3) to foster an active 
research program on the part of the membership on prob- 


Instltutes and Centers 


lems best approached by the integration of chemistry, 
physics and biology; and (4) to seek ways of improving 
the individual teaching performance of Its membership 
through Interdisciplinary communication at all levels of 
Instruction. 

The institute sponsors a series of special seminars devot- 
ed to topics in the molecular biological sciences, featuring 
speakers from its own personnel and from other cam- 
puses. 

Institute for Research in 
Reading and Related 
Disciplines 

Education Classroom 544 
(714) 773-3015 

The Institute for Research In Reading and Related Disci- 
plines was formed to (1) foster and encourage communi- 
cation of ideas and Information about reading research 
among Its members, the profession and the community: 
(2) foster reading research and creative activities on the 
part of the membership; (3) seek ways of Improving the 
professional skills of Its membership through Interdiscipli- 
nary communication; and (4) encourage students in re- 
search and creative activities under the guidance of its 
members. 

The institute determines a yearly research goal and se- 
lects its panel of advisers to aid in the development of 
those goals by contributing resources or professional ex- 
pertise. The institute holds regular business meetings and 
faculty development sessions and publishes the FORUM, 
a newsletter circulated to teachers and administrators 
within Orange County. 

Laboratory of Phonetic 
Research 

Education Classroom 630D 
(714) 773-2526 
(714) 773-2441 

The Laboratory of Phonetic Research is a research and 
training facility in the Department of Linguistics. It is 
equipped with electromechanical facilities for the acousti- 
cal, psychoacoustical, and physiological study of human 
speech. Its objectives are twofold; 

Instruction. To provide teaching, training and experi- 
ence to assist the language handicapped. 

Research. To provide advanced students and faculty 
with facilities for research on language function and dys- 
function. 


Southern California Ocean 
Studies Consortium 

McCarthy Hall 282 
(714) 773-3614 

The Southern California Ocean Studies Consortium, 
which consists of six State University campuses (Do- 
minguez Hills, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, 
Northridge, Pomona), participates in training managers 
and scientists and in educating the general public by coor- 
dinating and facilitating marine educatic' r^sl and research 
activities, it provides facilities for introducing students to 
the marine environment or for Intensive participation by 
students pursuing professional programs. The major facil- 
ity is the R. V. Nautilus (50-foot vessel) which is used by 
classes and research programs in biology, geology and 
ocean engineering. In addition the Consortium serves as 
an educational and research liaison between regions, 
states and nations. 

Sport and Movement Institute 

Physical Education 134 
(714) 773-3316 

The purpose of the Sport and Movement Institute is to 
promote an atmosphere congenial to research, creative 
activity, and services concerned with human movement 
and its related phenomena. Specifically, the organization 
endeavors to: (1) provide services of evaluation, consul- 
tation and advisement; (2) foster and encourage the gen- 
eration and communication of Ideas and Information; (3) 
interpret and facilitate the practical application of research 
findings; (4) provide opportunities for individuals and 
community groups to participate in activities of the Insti- 
tute such as clinics, workshops, seminars, etc.; (5) pro- 
mote and support research and other scholarly activities 
on the part of the membership. 

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary 

McCarthy Hall 533F 
(714) 649-2760 
(714) 773-3451 

The Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary operates as a nonprofit 
California State University, Fullerton Foundation agency. 
Located on Modjeska Canyon Road in the Santa Ana 
Mountains, the sanctuary provides for a program of con- 
tinuing educational service to the community; a research 
center for biological field studies; a facility for teacher 
education In nature Interpretation and conservation edu- 
cation; and a center for training students planning to enter 
into the public service field of nature interpretation. 


Institutes and Centers 


student Services 
and Activities 



41 


student Services 



Vice President for Student 
Services 

While classroom activity is devoted to the academic deve- 
lopment of the learner, Student Services offers programs 
which simultaneously provide students with services and 
opportunities for personal growth. Some Student Services 
programs such as housing and financial aid emphasize 
their service and educationally supportive roles; others, 
like counseling, accentuate their developmental aspects. 
The opportunities offered by the university’s Student Serv- 
ices program vary from the traditional social activities to 
lectures and concerts funded through the Associated Stu- 
dents. Developmental activities include the exploration of 
personal and vocational life styles and holistic health. 

Student Services are comprised of Academic Appeals, 
the Adult Reentry Center, the Career Development Cen- 
ter, Financial Aid, Handicapped Student Services, Health 
and Counseling Service, Housing Office, International Ed- 
ucation and Exchange Program, Testing and Research, 
University Activities Center, University Center (Student 
Union), Veterans’ Services and Women’s Center. 

Vice President’s Office 

Langsdorf Hall 810 
(714) 773-3221 

The efforts of all of the Student Services are coordinated 
and supervised by the vice president for student services. 
The vice president is responsible for the quality of student 
life on the campus and works with faculty, administration 
and students to improve the campus environment. The 
vice president is assisted by an associate vice president 
(programs and operations) and an assistant vice presi- 
dent (budget and personnel). This office is also charged 
with administering the university’s academic appeals pro- 
cedure and the student disciplinary codes. 

Academic Appeals 

McCarthy Hall 78 
(714) 773-3836 

Students who have grade disputes are encouraged to 
make every effort to resolve the issue informally by meet- 
ing with the instructor and department chair. Students who 
feel they have been unsuccessful at resolving the issue 
informally, should contact the coordinator of academic 
appeals, who will work to resolve the dispute informally 


Student Services 




and provide information and clarification about university 
policies. Students are encouraged to contact the coordi- 
nator if they have questions about the academic appeals 
process. 

Adult Reentry Center 

McCarthy Hall 33 
(714) 773-3889 

The Adult Reentry Center (ARC) serves adults who, after 
a break In their education, are considering beginning or 
continuing their college education. The center provides 
support and guidance for currently enrolled reentry stu- 
dents and others whose needs differ from those of the 
traditional university student. 

ARC offers a variety of programs which include peer coun- 
seling, workshops, support groups and referrals to staff 
and faculty. The center’s counselors and programs can 
help students and perspective students to clarify their 
goals and determine if a university education is the appro- 
priate method for attaining those goals. The center also 
provides information and assistance with university ap- 
plication and registration procedures as well as personal, 
academic and career counseling. Special programs, 
groups, workshops, and films and discussions which 
focus on the special needs of reentry students are pre- 
sented each semester. 

Career Development Center 

Langsdorf Hall 208 
(714) 773-3121 

The Career Development Center helps students within the 
context of their total educational development to define 
career goals and objectives and assists them In achieving 
these goals. In addition to its own resources, the center 
works closely with academic departments, the Academic 
Advisement Center, the Center for Cooperative Education 
and Internships, the Testing Center and other campus 
services to ensure that every student has an opportunity 
for career exploration and planning. The university be- 
lieves that both students and employers are best served 
when graduates are placed In professions well suited to 
the student’s interests, talents and education. All regis- 
tered students are welcome to use the services of the 
center without cost. 

The university will furnish, upon request, Information con- 
cerning the subsequent employment of graduates from 
programs or courses of study which have the purpose of 
preparing students for a particular career field. This Infor- 
mation includes data concerning average starting salary 
and the percentage of previously enrolled students who 
obtained employment. The information provided may in- 
clude data collected from either graduates of the campus 
or graduates of all campuses In The California State Uni- 


versity. Copies of the published information may be re- 
quested from the director of the center. 

Career Development Services 

The Career Development Center assists students to ex- 
plore and plan their career options. Professional counsel- 
ors help students evaluate personal values, skills and 
vocational interests through group and individual counsel- 
ing and testing. The center’s System of Interactive Guid- 
ance and Information (SIGI) uses computer technology 
to provide students with a clear and easily understood 
approach to the career decision-making process. .A grow- 
ing career library provides materials on career opportuni- 
ties, labor market Information, job search techniques and 
related topics. Information about careers in education, 
business. Industry and government is also available. The 
career library also features an Alumni Career Bank com- 
posed of hundreds of CSUF alumni who have volunteered 
to share their work experiences with students. 

Programs on career exploration are conducted through- 
out the year. Career information sessions introduce stu- 
dents to professionals working In a variety of fields. Career 
seminars offer assistance In goal setting and career deci- 
sion making, job search techniques. Interviewing skills, 
r6sum6 writing and graduate school application proce- 
dures. 

A course titled “Career Exploration and Life Planning” 
(Counseling 252) Is taught each semester by the center’s 
counselors. This three-unit course is offered through the 
School of Human Development and Community Service. 

Part-Time Placement 

The center provides assistance for part-time or seasonal 
employment while attending the university. New students 
may contact the center regarding part-time employment 
after August 1 for the fall semester, or after January 1 for 
the spring semester. Listings for clerical workers, drivers, 
custodians, teacher aides, drafting, waiters, clerks, youth 
and recreation leaders, gardeners, and other jobs are re- 
ceived daily and posted in the center. 

Business, Industry and Government 
Placement 

Career placement counselors assist students and alumni 
who are seeking full-time employment in defining occupa- 
tional preference, pursuing job leads and writing r6sum6s. 
Each semester, the center coordinates an on-campus re- 
cruitment program in which employers Interview students 
who are approaching graduation. 

Educational Placement 

Students in teacher education, pupil personnel services, 
or administration curricula of the university who are In the 
final semester of a credential, student teaching or directed 
fieldwork program are eligible for educational placement 


Student Services 


services. Counselors help students establish a profes- 
sional employment file, supply information about openings 
and assist in making referrals to school districts and edu- 
cational institutions. 

Minority Relations 

Minority Relations is responsible for broadening the 
awareness of the entire community to the career develop- 
ment services available to all minorities and for encourag- 
ing minority students to register with the center for career 
counseling and placement services. Counselors offer in- 
formation regarding opportunities available to minority 
students for graduate study. This resource Includes finan- 
cial aid information, application filing, recruitment ses- 
sions and personal contacts with those involved with 
graduate programs on other campuses. 

Minority Relations counselors work cooperatively with 
other staff specialists to help minority students utilize the 
various services of the center. 

Financial Aid 

McCarthy Hall 63 
(714) 773-3125 

The purpose of the Financial Aid Office is to provide finan- 
cial assistance to eligible students. The office administers 
the following student financial assistance programs; 

California Loans to Assist Student (CLAS) 

National Direct Student Loan 
Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) 

Pell Grant 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 
Bureau of Indian Affairs Grant 
State University Grant Program 
Educational Opportunity Program Grant 
College Work-Study Program Grant 
Cal Grant A (State Scholarship) 

Cal Grant B (College Opportunity Grant) 

Graduate Fellowship 
Private Scholarship 
Emergency Loan Fund 

For further information concerning financial aid programs 
available at the university see the Registration Procedures 
section of this catalog or call the Financial Aid Office. 

Handicapped Student Services 

Library 113 
(714) 773-3117 

Handicapped Student Services provides assistance and 
offers special services to ail handicapped/disabled stu- 
dents. The purpose of this program is to make all of the 
university’s educational, cultural, social and physical facili- 
ties available to students with orthopedic and/or percep- 
tual handicaps/disabilities. The program serves as a 


centralized source of Information and provides students 
with individual attention. The office is staffed by profes- 
sionals and support staff who are experienced with the 
particular needs of the handicapped/disabled. 

The office works in close cooperation with other university 
departments in order to provide a full range of services 
that will eliminate or significantly reduce barriers resulting 
from the mobility and perceptual problems encountered 
by most handicapped/disabled students. These services 
include a resource center and lounge, application assist- 
ance, priority registration, orientation, counseling, career 
and academic advisement, housing, transportation, hand- 
icapped parking, job placement, and referral services for 
Interpreters, attendants, readers and notetakers. 

The program also coordinates and provides diagnostic 
assessment, counseling, advisement, advocacy and sup- 
portive services for students with learning disabilities. 

The office needs and encourages involvement and input 
from the students It serves in order to maintain a respon- 
sive and quality program. 

Information regarding special facilities and services avail- 
able to handicapped students may be obtained from the 
office. 

Health and Counseling Service 

Student Health Center 
(714) 773-2800 

The Student Health and Counseling Service is equipped 
to care for a wide range of medical problems. 

The Health and Counseling Service is staffed by doctors, 
nurses, laboratory and X-ray technologists, pharmacists 
and a physical therapist. Most of the doctors are primary 
care physicians. The staff also includes gynecologists, an 
orthopedist, a dermatologist, an allergist and a podiatrist. 
The center has a pharmacy (not for outside prescrip- 
tions), a laboratory, an X-ray service, physical therapy, 
and birth control and nutritional counseling. Students who 
encounter emotional or personal problems can come to 
the Counseling and Mental Health Department where psy- 
chological counselors and psychiatrists are available for 
consultation and treatment when needed. 

All medical records are confidential; no Information will be 
released without the patient’s written permission except In 
the rare case of a court subpoena. 

The cost of care provided by the Health and Counseling 
Service, except for a few specific fees, has been paid 
through student fees and by the State of California. Every 
registered student is eligible for care. The Health and 
Counseling Service cannot, however, meet all medical 
needs. Students are urged to obtain health insurance if 
they do not already have adequate private insurance. A 
good. Inexpensive policy Is offered through the Associat- 
ed Students, Inc. 


Student Services 


Housing and Transportation 

McCarthy Hall 78 
(714) 773-2168 

California State University, Fullerton does not have on- 
campus housing facilities. The primary function of the 
housing and transportation office Is to assist students in 
their search for off-campus housing. The office provides 
information on privately owned and operated off-campus 
residence halls as well as constantly updated listings of 
vacancies in local apartment complexes. Bulletin boards 
are available in the office for the posting of cards by stu- 
dents seeking roommates or accommodations. Other bul- 
letin boards highlight rooms for rent in private homes and 
room offerings in exchange for light duties. Additional 
housing information available to students includes a mod- 
el rental agreement, information on tenant rights and re- 
sponsibilities, landlord/tenant mediation, and community 
housing agency referrals. 

The office also coordinates the university’s carpool pro- 
gram. Complete information and applications for the car- 
pool program are available in the Office of Housing and 
Transportation. The buses of the Orange County Transit 
District (OCTD) provide an alternative to the automobile. 
Complete OCTD route and schedule information are avail- 
able in the office. 

International Education and 
Exchange 

McCarthy Hall 79 
(714) 773-2787 

California State University, Fullerton is a community of 
people from many nations and cultures. The Office of 
International Education and Exchange is dedicated to pro- 
moting the exchange of knowledge and experience within 
the multicultural campus community and with the world at 
large. The office provides information and assistance for 
all International students attending CSUF and for U.S. 
students planning to study abroad. 

International Students 

Several hundred students from nearly 50 countries study 
at CSUF as International students, and the staff of the 
Office of International Education and Exchange endeav- 
ors to provide them with a home away from home. The 
office provides visa eligibility documents, pre-arrival infor- 
mation, and orientation to newly admitted students. The 
door is always open for students to meet with an adviser 
to discuss academic concerns, cultural adjustment, immi- 
gration matters or just to chat. 

Campus activities such as international dinners and dis- 
cussions occur throughout the year. The office coordi- 
nates programs in the Fullerton community, such as the 
Friendship Families hospitality program. 


study Abroad 

A year or semester overseas can provide an Invaluable 
educational experience. Cultural awareness, language 
skills and an in-depth knowledge of one’s field from an 
international perspective are but a few of the many bene- 
fits of studying abroad. A well planned program offers 
career advantages with the increasingly multinational and 
multicultural organizations and communities of southern 
California. 

The California State University International Programs is 
an academic year program with 25 centers In 15 countries. 
International Programs participants remain enrolled at 
CSUF earn residential credit, and pay only home campus 
fees. All personal expenses are the student’s responsibili- 
ty. 

The International Programs campus representative is 
available to meet with Interested students in the Interna- 
tional Education office. 

Immigrant and Refugee Students 

Students who have recently Immigrated to the United 
States are served with various kinds of specialized assist- 
ance including orientation programs, student handbooks, 
and personal advising. University courses as well as infor- 
mal conversation programs are available for students who 
wish to improve their English language skills. International 
Education and Exchange advisors work closely with stu- 
dent organizations to develop new programs to meet stu- 
dents’ changing needs. 

The goal of immigrant and refugee student programs Is to 
aid new American students as they develop a support 
network in order to achieve personal and academic suc- 
cess. 

School Based Student 
Services 

The concept of school based student sen/ices was devel- 
oped in an effort to broaden services to students within 
each academic school. A student services specialist is 
located in the office of the dean of each of the schools 
within the university. The student services specialists are 
available to assist students with personal and academic 
problems. They are also responsible for developing stu- 
dent and alumni groups, referring students to specific 
campus resources, assisting with special programs, and 
coordinating each school’s orientation program with the 
university’s New Student Orientation program. 

Information on school based student services Is available 
in the office of the dean of each academic school. 


Student Services 


Testing and Research 

Langsdorf Hall 206 
(714) 773-3638 

The Testing Center provides a variety of testing and re- 
search services to the university. 

The center supports the counseling services available 
through the Career Development Center and the Student 
Health and Counseling Service by administering a variety 
of psychological tests designed to help students gain a 
better understanding of themselves and of their goals and 
interests. These tests are administered on an individual 
basis in response to counselor referrals. 

The center conducts ongoing research and evaluation of 
university testing programs and consults with members of 
the university community regarding the design and con- 
duct of testing-related studies and survey research. The 
center also designs and conducts surveys of student 
needs, attitudes, and other characteristics. 

National group testing programs related to undergraduate 
and graduate school admissions and teacher certification 
are also coordinated by the center. Information on the 
following tests is available in the center: 

American College Test (ACT) 

Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) 

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) 

Law School Admission Test (LSAT) 

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) 

National Teacher Examination (NTE) 

California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) 

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
Miller Analogies Test (MAT) 

The center also administers other group tests related to 
CSUF degree requirements. Information on these tests is 
available in the center: 

English Placement Test (EPT) 

Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) 

English Equivalency Examination (EEE) 

Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP) 


Veterans’ Services 

McCarthy Hall 78 
(714) 773-2168 

The Office of Veterans’ Services provides assistance to 
veterans who want to attend the university, as well as to 
those who are currently enrolled. The office operates un- 
der an Institutional award from the U.S. Department of 
Education and is responsible for outreach, recruitment, 
special programs, and counseling. Veterans’ Services 
also provides assistance with registration, tutoring, benefit 
advisement, housing and employment. 

Women’s Center 

McCarthy Hall 33 
(714) 773-3928 

The Women’s Center provides support, information and 
resources to help women explore the many options avail- 
able to them. The center has existed for over a decade as 
a reminder of the challenge to create a future in which all 
people, regardless of their race, gender, religion, sexual 
preference or disability can contribute their best efforts. 
The staff of the Women’s Center strives to bury the preju- 
dice of the past and meet the challenge of the future by 
reeducating its constituents and by providing a comforta- 
ble and safe place to examine beliefs, behaviors and alter- 
natives. 

The center offers a variety of programs which examine 
current issues in the women’s movement, violence 
against women, and effective communication skills. 
These group sessions also deal with health and related 
issues, building self-esteem, assertion training, divorce 
and other topics of concern. 

The Women’s Center is closely Involved with the minor in 
women’s studies. The center houses a women’s studies 
library of over 800 books and files with excellent research 
materials. A listing of film and tape titles rounds out the 
collection. The center also gathers and maintains Informa- 
tion on local women’s events, news and networks. 

Although the Women’s Center is designed to serve the 
specific needs of women, it is open to all interested stu- 
dents. 


Student Services 


student Activities 



Opportunities to teach and to learn are not limited to the 
classroom at California State University, Fullerton. Stu- 
dents taking full advantage of the many educational op- 
portunities find themselves attending lectures, concerts 
and seminars offered as part of a well-developed co-cur- 
riculum on campus. Students not only attend events, but 
they participate in the planning and implementation of a 
full slate of activities held throughout the year. Through 
their participation, students experiment with new interests 
and broaden their experience with existing interests. Many 
clubs and organizations exist in the academic disciplines 
which encourage close contact between students and 
faculty. 

Leadership Opportunities 

Workshops and training programs are available to teach 
and encourage students who may want to learn or refine 
leadership skills. Practical application of these skills is 
available through the approximately 200 campus clubs 
and organizations. Academic and professional organiza- 
tions are either closely affiliated with academic areas at 
Cal State Fullerton or have national professional recogni- 
tion. These groups offer students a chance to Identify with 
faculty and community members who have similar career 
interests. 

Councils and task forces are formed by representatives of 
other officially recognized organizations. These groups 
often have a specific purpose or are formed to solve a 
particular problem. 

Cultural organizations seek to present ethnic, minority and 
cultural programs for the Cal State Fullerton campus. 
Many opportunities are created for the development of 
leadership and programming skills in this area because of 
the diversity of the cultures represented on campus. 

Groups representing specific academic departments on 
campus provide opportunities for students to meet and 
Interact with classmates and faculty outside the class- 
room atmosphere. 

Greek letter fraternities and sororities with national affilia- 
tion also exist at Cal State Fullerton. With a choice from 
twelve fraternities and eight sororities. Cal State Fullerton 
students can usually find a group with which they want to 
affiliate. Rush information is available at the University 
Activities Center. 

Many religious organizations have been formed at Cal 
State Fullerton with representation from a wide variety of 
religious persuasions. Groups which are predominatly po- 


Student Activities 




litical in nature and those whose goal is service to others 
also enjoy student support. 

Club sports, recreation and leisure groups in a variety of 
recreational programs are very active on campus. Some 
are competitive as teams and others offer students a 
chance to develop individual skills which can be used as 
lifetime leisure activities. 

University Activities Center 

University Center 2-43 
(714) 773-3211 

From New Student Orientation through commencement 
the University Activities Center serves as a resource for 
students seeking to develop their management, leader- 
ship and organizational skills. New Student Orientation is 
coordinated by the center and held each semester during 
the week prior to the beginning of classes. Since orienta- 
tion is staffed by students, this program is an excellent 
way for new students to take advantage of training re- 
sources and beome involved with the university. 

Opportunities for involvement In the center’s programs 
are open to all students according to their interests, abili- 
ties and time. Staff members at the Activities Center ad- 
vise many student organizations and are available as 
resources in the formation of new groups and strengthen- 
ing existing groups. Workshops on team building, organi- 
zational behavior, leadership styles, group dynamics and 
programming aids are available by contacting the office. 

AS Productions 

University Center M-17 
(714) 773-3501 

Entertainment possibilities are endless with AS Produc- 
tion at CSUF. ASP consists of six committees composed 
of student volunteers whose common interest is to keep 
the campus alive with quality entertainment and educa- 
tional presentations. 

Any student can apply to be a program director or assist- 
ant director. Candidates for these posts are appointed by 
the ASI president and are approved by the board of direc- 
tors. Their responsibilities Include planning and imple- 
menting programs, managing budgets, and training 
committee members. 

Committee members are student volunteers who attend 
regular meetings, help In program selection and work at 
the actual events. Joining a committee is a great way to 
have fun while learning leadership, communication and 
organization skills, as well as making a lot of new friends. 

Students can join an AS Productions committee anytime 
during the year by contacting the ASP office. 

AS Productions coordinates the film series, lecture series 
and concert series committees. The film series presents 


a variety of contemporary, classic and foreign movies to 
students at a cost lower than that charged by most com- 
mercial theaters. The speaker series provides the campus 
with prominent speakers who create a forum for issues 
and topics that are of importance to the campus and to the 
community. Noontime and major concerts provide a 
showcase of original music ranging from classical to rock. 
Major concerts are usually held indoors while all noontime 
concerts are performed at the Soundstage. 

Pub entertainment features bands from local nightclubs in 
the afternoon as well as evening concerts In the University 
Center Pub. 

Special Events offers unique and memorable events such 
as fairs, theatre groups and other special entertainment. 

University Center programming is the events arm of the 
University Center Board, the governing body of the Uni- 
versity Center. This committee brings special events to 
the University Center In order to promote the use of the 
building’s facilities. 

Camp Titan 

Camp Titan is a service opportunity for students who en- 
joy the special feeling that comes from sharing their time 
with children. 

CSUF students devote one week of their time each June 
to be friends and counselors to 80 to 100 children attend- 
ing Camp Titan, which is accredited by the American 
Camp Association. 

The children range in age from 7 to 12 years and are 
selected on a referral basis from community service agen- 
cies. Because all of the children are underprivileged, they 
attend camp at no cost to their families. 

Students enjoy a special time of helping these children 
develop positive attitudes about themselves. The week is 
as much fun for the counselors as It is for the children. 

Students who are interested in a week of hiking, fishing, 
sitting around a campfire, swimming and spending time 
with children, can obtain further Information about Camp 
Titan from the University Activities Center. 

Departmental Association Council 

The Departmental Association Council (DAC) Is the orga- 
nization that represents the academic associations at 
CSUF. DAC is composed of student delegates who repre- 
sent all of the academic student organizations within each 
department. By being a member of his or her own depart- 
mental student organization the student is a part of the 
DAC. 

The DAC provides funding for programs originated by 
member organizations. Student departmental organiza- 
tions can use DAC funds to provide speakers, films and 
presentations that enhance the classroom experience. 


Student Activities 


Individual stuo nts can receive funds for use in conduct- 
ing research. All CSUF students are eligible to apply for 
such funds. 

The DAC provides a forum for discussion of student ideas 
and concerns. All students are welcome to attend council 
meetings. 

For more information on how to get involved In the DAC, 
contact the University Activities Center. 

Multicultural Council 

The Multicultural Council Is composed of the student cul- 
tural clubs and organizations at CSUF. It provides funds 
to student groups that represent ethnic programs and for 
educational programs that have cultural bases. For more 
information about the Multicultural Council contact the 
University Activities Center. 

student Publications 

CSUFax is a biweekly newsletter that contains current 
news about campus events. It is a calendar of the pro- 
grams and activities of CSUF clubs and organizations. 
Items for publication may be given to the Fax editor in the 
University Center. CSUFax is available in distribution 
boxes throughout campus. 

Associated Students 

University Center 2-7 
(714) 773-3295 

The Associated Students, Inc. Is a campus involvement 
connection at California State University, Fullerton. ASI 
offers a variety of learning experiences through Its govern- 
ment, programs and services. Many campus special 
events are the product of student efforts to bring students 
new educational opportunities, to teach them about the 
campus, and to provide them a friendly, social atmos- 
phere at CSUF. 

ASI is a non-profit corporation supported by the activity 
fee students pay through registration each semester. By 
paying this fee, students are automatically a member of 
the Associated Students, Inc. The purpose of the corpora- 
tion is to provide academic and co-curricular programs 
and services for students. When students are Involved in 
ASI they are a part of an energetic, productive group, 
learning valuable organization and communication skills 
that can augment their personal and professional growth. 

ASI Government 

The ASI government controls the actions of the corpora- 
tion; it is a powerful, active organization that has use for 
students’ talents and skills. To apply for a position or find 
out more about student government, visit the ASI govern- 
ment office in the University Center. 


ASI President and Vice President 

The ASI president and vice president are chosen through 
student elections each spring and manage the corpora- 
tion and its employees and volunteers. These officers rep- 
resent students’ needs and Interests to CSUF’s faculty 
and administration and to the surrounding community. 
They also participate In several committees. Along with 
the executive staff, the president and vice president sub- 
mit recommendations to the ASI Board of Directors on the 
corporation’s annual budget of more than $1.8 million. 

ASI Executive Staff 

The executive staff works with the president and vice 
president to direct the programs and operation of the cor- 
poration. All executive staff members are appointed by the 
ASI president. Students may apply for these positions In 
the ASI government office. 

The ASI controller is the chief financial officer who coordi- 
nates the budget process. The chlef-of-staff recruits stu- 
dents for presidential appointments and implements 
special projects. The director of legislative affairs is the 
CSUF representative to the California State Student As- 
sociation. This statewide organization Influences deci- 
sions about education, fee schedules and related topics. 
The public relations director is responsible for marketing 
the corporation and communicating with the campus com- 
munity. Student volunteers are assigned specific duties 
according to the needs of the corporation. 

ASI Board of Directors 

The ASI Board of Directors Is composed of three directors 
from each school who are elected to serve one-year 
terms. The ASI president, vice president, controller and 
administrator, one faculty council representative and one 
appointee of the university president also sit on the board. 
Directors also sit on various board subcommittees and 
other university committees. 

These directors represent the student body and work with 
the executive staff to Implement programs that fulfill stu- 
dents’ academic and co-curricular needs. They deal with 
issues regarding the business and affairs of the corpora- 
tion, including approving budgets and appointments, au- 
thorizing business contracts, and issuing policy 
statements for administrative purposes. 

The weekly meetings of the ASI board are held In the 
Legislative Chambers In the University Center. All stu- 
dents are welcome to attend. Board seats are open to all 
students. Election applications are available at the mid- 
point of each semester in the ASI government office in 
University Center. 

ASI Judicial Commission 

The ASI judicial commission decides cases for the As- 
sociated Students, Inc. The five justices, who serve stag- 
gered two-year terms, make decisions according to the 
ASI bylaws. Any student can bring a case to the ASI judi- 
cial commission. 


Student Activities 


Child Care Center 

Buildings 200 and 400 
(714) 773-2961 

The Child Care Center is sponsored and funded by As- 
sociated Students, Inc. For a nominal fee, children aged 
3 months through 5 years whose parents are CSUF stu- 
dents, staff or faculty can benefit from the services of the 
center. Trained preschool teachers offer a comprehen- 
sive curriculum which covers learning skills In several 
areas of education. 

Legal Information and Referral 

(714) 870-5757 

The Associated Students contracts with the College Legal 
Clinic, a Fullerton-based corporation, to provide Informa- 
tion on legal procedures and initial consultation on all 
types of legal matters. If desired, students are referred to 
Orange County attorneys for reduced fee services. A 24- 
hour hot line is maintained by the College Legal Clinic. 

University Center 

The University Center is located on the northwest corner 
of campus and provides areas for recreation, relaxation 
and study. Each semester a portion of student fees helps 
support the services available there. 

University Center Governing Board 

The University Center Governing Board establishes oper- 
ating policies for the University Center. Board members 
include students, faculty, an alumni representative, ad- 
ministrative representatives and an appointee of the uni- 
versity president. Additionally, the board also evaluates 
the programs and services of the University Center as well 
as space allocation and budgetary matters. 

Board members are Involved in several committees. 
Among them are the Food Services Committee, Policy 
Committee, Interior Design Committee and the Future Di- 
rections Committee. Any student may apply for a board 
position. 

Main Information Desk 

The main information counter of the University Center has 
the answer to most questions. It’s the place to purchase 
OCTD bus passes and ticket books; tickets for some cam- 
pus events; receive vending machine refunds; retrieve lost 
belongings from “lost and found”; and obtain general 
campus information. In addition, student clubs or organi- 
zations can place announcements of coming events on 
the building’s three video screens by filling out the appro- 
priate request form. The nearby ride share board contains 
the names and phone numbers of people seeking carpool 
companions for long-distance trips. 


The reservation office located behind the information 
desk provides meeting/event facilities and related serv- 
ices in the UC for student groups, faculty/staff groups, 
and for the surrounding community. While specific room 
rental rates vary, some facilities are frequently available at 
no charge to CSUF chartered student organizations. 

Center Gallery 

The Center Gallery offers displays of student, graduate 
and faculty artwork. Exhibits usually feature the work of a 
single artist and are shown for three weeks. All exhibits 
are chosen by a student art gallery coordinator. 

Leisure Adventure Center 

The Leisure Adventure Center offers low-cost workshops 
and outings to students, staff and the community. The 
center has presented a variety of workshops In everything 
from stained glass to photography. Outings have taken 
participants to the Los Angeles garment district, Solvang, 
whale watching and the Huntington Library. 

Photo enthusiasts may use the Leisure Adventure Center 
photography lab. Students and community members can 
pay on a dally fee basis or purchase a semester member- 
ship which includes unlimited use of chemicals, equip- 
ment and a locker. Art supplies are also available for 
students who are working on personal or class projects. 

Within the Leisure Adventure Center is the Frame Shop, 
where students can purchase fine art posters, laser de- 
sign artwork, frames and mattes. The shop offers low-cost 
custom framing and matting by a professional framer. 

The Leisure Adventure Center is located on the lower 
level of the UC. 

Music Listening Room 

The Music Listening Room has a living room atmosphere, 
with soft chairs, bean bag chairs, bright lights for reading, 
and a counter full of magazines. The Music Listening 
Room has a wide selection of the latest releases of rock, 
jazz, classical and country-western music. There also are 
headsets to listen to one of the many albums that are on 
cassette tapes. 

Pub and Snack Bar 

The Pub’s congenial atmosphere offers a place to relax 
where you can enjoy soft drinks, beer and wine, sand- 
wiches, pizza, baked potatoes and other foods. Major 
sporting events are shown on the Pub’s big-screen televi- 
sion, and music Is played continuously. The Pub is located 
on the University Center’s lower level. The Snack Bar is 
located on the main level of the University Center and 
specializes in a variety of fast foods. 

Soundstage 

The CSUF Soundstage was built by the Associated Stu- 
dents, Inc. In conjunction with the University Center. The 


Student Activities 


Soundstage, located at the south end of the University 
Center, is used for noontime concerts, theatre produc- 
tions and other live entertainment. 

student Typing Center 

Aside from the study lounges, the Student Typing Center 
is the most popular room in the University Center during 
finals week. By paying a minimum fee at the UC informa- 
tion counter, students may rent an IBM Selectric typewrit- 
er to do their papers. 

UC Recreation Area 

It’s mostly fun ‘n’ games on the lower level of the UC. The 
recreation area offers a place for diversions that Include 
a lounge with a large screen television, a billiard room, 
table tennis, video and pinball games, a counter for rent- 
ing lockers, small table games and the Titan Bowl. The 
CSUF community Is invited to participate in the various 
bowling leagues and tournaments sponsored each se- 
mester. 

UC Theatre 

The University Center Theatre Is available to clubs and 
organizations for meetings, conference lectures and other 
presentations. It can be reserved through the reservation 
office at the information counter. 

The theatre is also the home of the Center Theatre 
Company. This student group produces and stages 
two to three plays each year for the university and the 
community. 

University Recreation Program 

Believing that recreation and leisure pursuits are an inte- 
gral part of one’s total educational experience and 
achievement, the Office of University Recreation strives to 
provide all students an opportunity to use their leisure time 
wisely in order to attain the highest degree of physical 



reward and mental relaxation. 

The benefits of the recreation program are numerous, and 
It has been proven time and again, that those who main- 
tain good health and physical fitness, perform better In all 
aspects of life. These programs are free to all students. 

Informal Leisure Recreation 

An intensive program of unstructured recreational activi- 
ties are available to all CSUF students. By presenting a 
validated, photo ID card, students can participate in the 
supervised use of numerous facilities including the rac- 
quetball and tennis courts, swimming complex, gymna- 
sium and welghtroom. These facilities are open seven 
days a week. 

Intramural Sports 

The Intramural Sports program Is designed for the student 
who does not have the skill or time to devote to intercolle- 
giant athletics. This low competitive program offers 59 
separately structured sporting events. Activities such as 
flag football, ultimate frisbee, inner tube water polo, 
horseshoes, bowling and volleyball are scheduled at vari- 
ous times and days to accommodate individual schedules. 

Club Sports 

The Club Sports program is for individuals or organiza- 
tions with similar athletic or recreational Interests who 
wish to compete against other clubs and colleges. Present 
clubs include rugby, aikido, karate, kung-fu, archery, ice 
hockey, bowling, skiing, soccer, volleyball, team handball, 
wrestling and fencing. 

student Family Memberships 

Current CSUF students who are married may purchase a 



recreation membership for their spouse and children (21 
years and younger, living at home). Unmarried students 
living at home may purchase a recreation membership for 
their parents and siblings (21 years and younger, living at 
home.) 


Student Activities 







Intercollegiate Athletics 


Physical Education 160 
(714) 773-2677 

Director of Athletics: (Acting) Leanne Grotke 
Associate Director; Ed Carroll 
Academic Adviser: Alison Cone 

Coaches 

Baseball 
Augie Garrido 
Basketball 

George McQuarn (Men) 

Chris Gobrecht (Women) 

Cross Country 
Jeff Potter 
Fencing 

Heizaburo Okawa 
Football 

Eugene Murphy 
Golf 

Jim Howe (Men) 

Carol Howe (Women) 

Gymnastics 
Dick Wolfe (Men) 

Lynn Rogers (Women) 

Soccer 
Al Mistri 
Softball 
Judi Garman 
Tennis 

Buff Bogard (Men) 

Bill Etchegaray (Women) 

Volleyball 
Fran Cummings 
Wrestling 
Dan Lewis 
Water Polo 
Kevin Hopp 

Conference Affiliations and Memberships 

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)— Men 
and Women 

Pacific Coast Athletic Association (PCAA)— Men and 
Women 



Intercollegiate Athletics 




The rise of academic prestige at California State Univer- 
sity, Fullerton has grown alongside the development of 
one of the nation’s premier athletic departments. The in- 
ter-collegiate athletic department provides student-ath- 
letes the opportunity to compete against the country’s 
finest competition as well as providing a top-notch educa- 
tion. In an effort to ensure academic development, the 
university provides counseling systems designed specifi- 
cally for student-athletes. Those services include aca- 
demic advisement, guidance counseling and daily study 
halls. 

CSUF has also made a commitment to provide facilities 
that enable fans and athletes alike to enjoy first-rate com- 
petition. The long-awaited Youth Sports Complex will give 
Fullerton fans a much-needed home football stadium. The 
complex will provide a 10,000-seat football stadium plus 
upgraded baseball facilities that will seat over 2,000. Al- 
ready completed are two lit softball diamonds and a light- 
ed soccer field that enable fans to enjoy the university’s 
many night events. Titan Gymnasium already enjoys tre- 
mendous popularity among the local community with over 
4,000 fans attending home basketball (men and wo- 
men’s), gymnastics (men and women’s) and women’s 
volleyball. An outdoor swimming complex, racquetball 
courts, weighttraining facilities, a high-level gymnastics 
practice facility plus facilities for wrestling and fencing 
make the Fullerton athletic complex a step above. 

Men’s Intercollegiate Athletics 

Baseball 

No other NCAA Division I baseball program has enjoyed 
the degree of success that the Titans have had over the 
past decade. During that time. Titan Coach Augle Garrido 
has won 10 conference championships, four regional 
championships and two national championships. Major 
League stars Tim Wallach (Montreal Expos), Jeff Robin- 
son (San Francisco Giants) and 1984 Olympian Bob Caf- 
frey have tutored under Garrido while ct Fullerton. Year in 
and year out the Titans compete against the nation’s fin- 
est programs and always come out winners. 

Basketball 

The development of Fullerton basketball has been one of 
college sports’ finest Cinderella stories. Always in conten- 
tion for the PCAA Championship, George McQuarn’s pro- 
gram has proven that outstanding coaching can produce 
winners. 1984 Olympic Team point guard Leon Wood Is 
one of many fine athletes who has helped develop the 
Titans into a team that will continue to grow. The univer- 
sity’s commitment to basketball ensures that success In 
the years to come. 

Cross Country 

Men’s cross country will be taking positive strides In the 
future thanks to the addition of Head Coach Jeff Potter. 


The program competes In the very competitive PCAA con- 
ference which is perennially in the spotlight for national 
attention. The campus and outlying community offer a 
beautiful setting which enable the sport to set new stand- 
ards among local and national universities. 

Football 

If one were going to single out a particular NCAA team 
that has made the greatest turnaround, the CSUF football 
team might fall into that bracket. In Gene Murphy’s five 
years, he has taken a perennially hard luck team and 
turned it into a nationally ranked power. The year 1983 saw 
the Titans gain their first PCAA championship and a trip to 
the California Bowl. With the coming of a new on-campus 
football stadium. Titan football gains the additional expo- 
sure that will make them a national power for many years 
to come. 

Golf 

One of the campus’ many developmental programs. Titan 
golf will definitely make an Impact on the local and na- 
tional scene. Head Coach Jim Howe is building the foun- 
dation of the program with the many outstanding golfers 
that live in the Orange County area. With the bevy of local 
talent. Titan golf will be a success story to watch in the 
future. 

Soccer 

Soccer is another of Fullerton’s many sports where strong 
coaching has turned the program into a West Coast pow- 
er. Al Mistri developed one of Southern California’s finest 
soccer programs at Damien High School in Claremont 
before taking over at Fullerton. Through hard work and 
support from a summer soccer camp. Coach Mistri has 
turned Titan soccer into one of the NCAA’s most competi- 
tive squads. Soccer, like all Titans men’s sports, com- 
petes in the PCAA along with Fresno State, Nevada-Las 
Vegas, UC Santa Barbara— all nationally ranked teams. 

Fencing 

One of the West Coast’s few Division I fencing programs 
give prospective athletes a chance to train under former 
Olympian Helzaburo Okawa. The team has enjoyed a 
great deal of success over the past few years competing 
against local universities in all areas of the sport including 
sabre and foil. 

Tennis 

Newly named Head Coach Buff Bogard will offer the 
necessary expertise that can make Titan tennis a force to 
be reckoned with In the years to come. The surplus of 
outstanding local and regional talent make the climb that 
much easier and will enable Titan fans to look forward to 
some fine competition. 

Water Polo 

Playing in the nation’s most difficult conference (PCAA) 


Intercollegiate Athletics 


has yet to prevent water polo coach Kevin Hopp from 
offering an athlete an opportunity to play with a highly 
ranked program. The Titans play and practice In a beauti- 
ful on-campus pool against competition that is always in 
contention for the NCAA championship. With a commit- 
ment to water polo from the NCAA, Fullerton’s program is 
sure to enjoy continued success. 

Wrestling 

Another sport that few West Coast schools support Is 
prospering In Orange County as CSUF proves that hard 
work and strong coaching can bring success. 1984 Olym- 
pic team candidate Dan Lewis offers prospective athletes 
an atmosphere that is unparalled among California univer- 
sities. Top-notch competition and an All-American envi- 
ronment are two reasons why Fullerton wrestling is so 
successful. 

Gymnastics 

Fullerton gymnastics have always been one of the 
NCAA’s great success stories. Head Coach Dick Wolfe 
has won two NCAA championships and countless confer- 
ence titles In making the Titan team one of the nation’s 
premier units. Countless All-Americans have competed 
under Coach Wolfe including Nissen Award candidate and 
Assistant Coach Ron Howard. Innovative gymnastics 
have always been the course of the program as several 
internationally recognized tricks were devised under 
Coach Wolfe Including the now famous Thomas Flair per- 
formed by U.S. Olympian Kurt Thomas. 

Women’s Intercollegiate 
Athletics 

Basketball 

The rise of popularity of women’s basketball has its foun- 
dations tied to the success of Fullerton women’s basket- 
ball teams. Under former Coach Billie Moore, the Titans 
won one of the very first national championships given out 
in the sport while present Head Coach Chris Gobrecht 
vies for national prestige with a tremendous team. Two of 
women’s basketball’s greatest names have risen from 
Fullerton including 1976 Olympian Nancy Dunkle and 
Nancy Ratliff. 

Gymnastics 

The consistent efforts of Lynn Rogers’ women’s gymnas- 
tics squad have made them a top-three national power for 
10 consecutive years. No other school in the nation has 
produced more All-Americans or finished In the top three 
for more years than the Titans. American Award winner 
Julie Goewey and Assistant Coach Breck Greenwood 
give potential scholar-athletes an opportunity to compete 
and win year round. The 1984 Titans are shooting for an- 


other national title with Tami Elliott, the only collegian on 
the U.S. National Team. 

Softball 

The sport of softball continues to set new standards of 
excellence on the local and national level. Always a con- 
tender for the NCAA title. Coach JudI Carman’s teaching 
has brought the university countless All-Americans includ- 
ing former Broderick Award winner Kathy Van Wyk who 
assists Coach Carman. A newly finished on-campus facil- 
ity now enables an even greater audience to enjoy one of 
the nation’s most successful teams face off against other 
national powers like UCLA, Fresno State, Texas A&M and 
many others. The Titans compete In the PCAA against 
such national powers as Fresno State, UOP, Santa Bar- 
bara, UCLA, Arizona, Arizona State, Long Beach and sev- 
eral others. 

Golf 

The Titan golf program takes advantage of a family’s 
coaching abilities with the addition of Carol Howe as the 
head coach. The sister of men’s coach Jim Howe will work 
alongside her brother In the development of the women’s 
golf program. The team will take advantage of the many 
top-ranked courses In the Orange County area and the 
surplus of local talent. All of these factors should add up 
to future success. 

Cross Country 

Head Coach Jeff Potter will combine his efforts In both 
men’s and women’s cross country in an effort to make 
Titan cross country the best that It can be. An outstanding 
setting plus the addition of some outstanding athletes 
make that success a very strong likelihood in the years to 
come. 

Tennis 

One of the university’s many programs on the rise. Head 
Coach Bill Etchagaray will take advantage of the beautiful 
climate of Orange County to attract the nation’s top ath- 
letes to Fullerton. The redevelopment of the tennis facili- 
ties in the future make Titan tennis a program that is 
bound to be very competitive In the PCAA. 

Volleyball 

Despite playing In one of collegiate volleyball’s most com- 
petitive conferences. Titan volleyball has proven to be a 
program on the rise. The obvious attraction of playing 
against NCAA Championship contenders UCLA, USC, 
San Diego State, Stanford and strong conference oppo- 
nents plus the expert teaching skills of Head Coach Fran 
Cummings have developed Titan volleyball as a program 
on the rise. The acquisition of future athletes, plus the 
development of budding stars will create an environment 
that will be hard to beat in the upcoming years. 


Intercollegiate Athletics 


Resources 



Anthropology Museum 

The Museum of Anthropology is an educational and re- 
search resource for the University and the community. It 
houses, sponsors, and conducts a variety of activities as 
part of the CSUF Anthropology program. Exhibits of the 
Museum of Anthropology have included artifacts from Cal- 
ifornia, the Middle East, Mesoamerica, the Southwest and 
Oceania. The well-equipped archaeology laboratory, fau- 
nal collection and research library provide facilities for 
research. Internships and classes in museum techniques 
are offered for students interested In museology. The mu- 
seum publishes a series of Occasional Papers, adminis- 
ters an annual scholarship for archaeology students, 
houses the business office of the Society for California 
Archaeology, conducts studies on cultural resource man- 
agement and is the clearing house for Orange County 
archaeology. The extensive collections are curated by a 
certified museologist. 

Art Gallery 

Since 1963 the Art Gallery at California State University, 
Fullerton has brought to the campus carefully developed 
art exhibitions that instruct, inspire and challenge the stu- 
dent to the visual arts. Exhibitions of national interest and 
of museum caliber are presented to the entire student 
body, faculty and to the community. These act not only as 
an educational tool but also create Interaction between 
various departmental disciplines and between the campus 
and the community. In 1970 the Art Gallery was housed in 
Its current permanent location within the Visual Arts Cen- 
ter. In the following years, the gallery has earned national 
visibility for its program in Museum Studies and Exhibition 
Design in which museum preprofessionals may obtain 
both conceptual and practical experience. 

Cabaret Repertory Theatre 

During the summer months. Cabaret Repertory Theatre, 
the university’s adjunct professional company, produces 
four to six productions at the multimilllon-dollar Brea Civic 
Cultural Center. These productions feature graduates of 
the Department of Theatre and selected outstanding 
graduate students. Cabaret Repertory Theatre has been 
In operation since 1975, and its productions have brought 
great distinction to the university. CSUF students receive 
discounted ticket rates for these productions. 


Resources 




Daily Titan 

Cal State Fullerton’s Daily Titan is one of the largest col- 
lege newspapers in California. In recent years, it has 
become one of the most critically successful, as well. 

The Titan earned a tie for third place among all college 
dailies in the state in 1984 competition sponsored by the 
California Intercollegiate Press Association. 

The Titan is published every Tuesday through Friday 
throughout the academic year. It is produced, written and 
edited entirely by Cal State Fullerton students. All its pho- 
tographic content is the work of CSUF students. 

The Daily Titan has a daily readership of more than 
19,000. It is distributed at more than 40 locations on 
campus, as well as In newsracks near the university. 

Work on the Daily Titan provides Intensive experience in 
newswriting, copy editing, page layout and the myriad 
other functions necessary to produce a modern dally 
newspaper. 

Energy Consortium 

The Statewide Energy Consortium was founded In 1975 to 
help Californians understand and cope with emerging en- 
ergy situations. The ways In which this has been done 
include: 1 ) providing teacher training in energy education 
for hundreds of teachers throughout the state, 2) devel- 
oping a very successful program by which faculty from all 
19 state university campuses provide technical assistance 
in energy to both the public and private sectors, and 3) 
conducting major state and national conferences on vari- 
ous energy themes. 

Fullerton Arboretum 

The Fullerton Arboretum is a 26-acre botanical carden — a 
living museum of plants— located at the northeast corner 
of the campus. It contains local historical artifacts in the 
Heritage House museum and horticultural collections that 
attract visitors from the University and the surrounding 
communities. The Arboretum is an island of serenity In an 
Increasingly urban/metropolltan environment. 

The Arboretum offers countless opportunities to study lo- 
cal history and culture. Heritage House is the restored 
residence and medical office of Dr. George C. Clark, an 
Orange County pioneer physician. The Clark home was 
built in 1894 and exemplifies the Eastlake Victorian style 
of architecture. The house is listed in the National Regis- 
ter of Historic Places and the Inventory of California His- 
toric Sites. It is also an Orange County Historic Site. It is 
open to the public on Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m., at which 
time trained docents discuss the period furnishings and 
memorabilia. Several student projects and studies have 
used this facility. 


The Arboretum grounds contain a recirculating waterfall, 
pond and stream system that is a focal point for migratory 
waterfowl and human visitors. Many plants are grown In 
groups according to their moisture requirements. Others 
form special collections such as conifers, palms and rare 
fruits. Special plant displays assist visitors in their selec- 
tion of plant materials for urban landscaping. 

The CSUF Associated Students (AS) helped to Initiate 
the Fullerton Arboretum by contributing $10,000 in 1971. 
Since then, the AS have contributed support monies each 
year to hire students to help in the maintenance and oper- 
ation of the Arboretum. 

The Friends of the Fullerton Arboretum, the community 
support group, also supplies operating monies, manages 
the gift and garden shop, propagates plants for plant sales 
and provides countless hours of volunteer effort In behalf 
of the Arboretum. 

The Fullerton Arboretum is open 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., seven 
days a week. The Arboretum is closed on major holidays 
and the week between Christmas and New Years. 

Herbarium 

The Faye A. MacFadden Herbarium is named after Faye 
A. MacFadden, who sold her extensive collection of plants 
to the university just prior to her death in 1964. The collec- 
tion now includes over 25,000 vascular plants, about 12,- 
000 bryophytes and nearly 800 lichen specimens. The 
plants are used as a research and teaching tool. The 
bryophyte collection is reported to be the largest In the 
Southwest. 

Microcomputer Resource 
Center 

The School of Human Development and Community Serv- 
ice has a Microcomputer Resource Center to sen/e its 
students, faculty and staff. This center has 15 microcom- 
puters and 2 printers with telecommunication capabilities. 
The various departments and programs within the school 
hold many classes in the center to teach numerous ap- 
plications and uses of computers. The classes also use 
specific programs to teach and practice concepts related 
to the content of the subjects. In addition, classes use the 
center to observe specific demonstrations related to their 
disciplines. The center has also been used for faculty and 
staff In-service programs. During the summer children 
from the community attend classes on computing. 

Oral History Program 

The Oral History Program offers students a source of 
Information, courses and work experience. The program 
has conducted over 2,000 interviews on the history of 


Resources 


Orange County and other areas of the western United 
States. Either transcrptions or tapes are available for any 
student to use as they would use any library materials, at 
the Oral History Archive. 

Most of these interviews were done by students in the 
several classes offered at the Oral History Program. The 
program also maintains a student staff through intern- 
ships, work study or grant-supported positions. These 
staff receive experience in word-processing, editing, book 
production and organizational administration. They are 
credited with authorship or assistance on publications, 
and several alumni of the program now hold important 
professional positions. 

Orange County Now 

Orange County Now is a 30-mlnute weekly radio public 
affairs program produced by students in the Radio-TV- 
Film sequence of the Department of Communications and 
broadcast on Saturdays and Sundays by KIKF, Garden 
Grove, and KRLA, Los Angeles. The program is in the 
news magazine format and students in the broadcast 
news class, as well as volunteers, record Inten/iews with 
newsmakers In Orange County and then edit, write and 
produce segments that are integrated into the weekly pro- 
gram by a volunteer staff of writers, producer and on-air 
talent. Orange County Now has won first place in the 
California Intercollegiate Press Association In the News 
Magazine category and segments of the program have 
won Cl PA awards in news and sports categories. 

Reading Clinic 

The Reading Clinic serves three major purposes. First, It 
provides a controlled, supervised setting for the training of 
reading specialists and classroom teachers who wish to 
improve their skills in working with learning disabled and 
reading disabled students. 

Secondly, the clinic serves as a community service provid- 
ing very low cost, high quality Instruction in reading that is 
not available elsewhere in Orange County. The clinic 
works closely with the Southern California College of Op- 
tometry in order to provide broader services. 

The third purpose of the clinic is to provide parent educa- 
tion to community members whose children have reading 
disabilities. The clinic provides parent inservice sessions, 
a hot line for phone information, and a monthly newsletter 
of information, tips and examples of student work. The 
clinic is proud of its 16 year service to the university and 
community. 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic (SHC) is an Integral part 
of the curricular programs of the university leading to a 


B.A. and M.A. Degree in Communicative Disorders. Since 
1961 the Department of Speech Communication has pro- 
vided speech, language and heading services to the com- 
munity in conjunction with Its training program for 
professional speech pathologists. The original clinic held 
the distinction of being the first institution in California to 
receive registration under Interim Standards for both 
speech pathology and audiology by the Professional Serv- 
ices Board of the American Board of Examiners In Speech 
Pathology and Audiology (ABESPA), which is the ac- 
creditation board of the American Speech-Language- 
Hearing Association (ASHA). The graduate program in 
Communicative Disorders holds the distinction of being 
one of only two academic programs In California to main- 
tain continuous accreditation by the Educational Training 
Board of ABESPA since September 1969. 

The clinic Is composed of a Speech Pathology Unit, an 
Audiology Unit and a Communicative Disorders Research 
Laboratory with special emphasis given to voice disord- 
ers. The clinic offers the services of a resident profes- 
sional Speech Pathologist who holds the Certificate of 
Clinical Competence (CCC-SP) , faculty supervisors who 
are clinically certified and, in addition, hold doctoral de- 
grees in the field, and student clinicians who have met 
strictly prescribed standards for admission to clinical prac- 
tlcum. Referrals to the clinic come from a variety of 
sources including: physicians, teachers, rehabilitative cen- 
ters, private speech pathologists and audiologists, and 
self-referrals. Services available at the clinic Include: diag- 
nostic evaluations, therapeutic intervention, audiometric 
testing, rehabilitative audiology including hearing aid 
evaluations, screening tests for students seeking state 
credentials, and family counseling relative to problems 
associated with communicative disorders. 

Theatre Department 
Productions 

CSUF students receive reduced ticket rates to all Theatre 
Department productions. Each year, six plays and two 
dance concerts are produced on main stage along with 
theatre for children, touring plays, master’s thesis produc- 
tions, playwright workshops and original one-acts. CSUF 
plays have been selected eight times during the last nine 
years to be produced at the American College Theatre 
Festivals, selected out of over 50 production entries. In 
1983, Its production of The Bulldog and the Bear was 
selected from over 500 production entries to be produced 
at the National American College Theatre Festival at the 
John F. Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. 

Titan Shops 

Titan Shops Is a subsidiary of the California State Univer- 
sity, Fullerton Foundation and Is the organization that is 


Resources 


responsible for the administration of the Titan Bookstore, 
Food Services and the vending for the university. Titan 
Shops policy is set by the CSUF Foundation Board of 
Directors. Titan Shops is administered by the Titan Shops 
manager. 

Titan Bookstore 

The Titan Bookstore is located on the ground floor of the 
Commons Building directly east of the University Center 
and west of the Library. Its primary function is to service 
the textbook and school supply requirements of the stu- 
dents of the university. In addition to these Items, howev- 
er, the Titan Bookstore carries an extensive stock of office 
supplies, greeting cards and clothing items, a trade book 
department which encompasses 15,000 reference and 
general interest books, a photocopy center and a gift de- 
partment with an ever changing selection of Items. Finally, 
the Titan Bookstore is engaged in the sale of personal 
computers at significant price reductions to encourage the 
use of computers and development of computer literacy 
at the university. 

Food Service 

Titan Shops is responsible for the operation of Food Serv- 
ices on the University campus. Primary Food Service 
facilities are on the second floor of the Commons (the 
main cafeteria) , on the University Center ground floor (the 
UC Snack Bar) and at the southeast corner of the campus 
(McTitan’s and Salad Daze). In addition to these primary 
facilities there is a Pub serving food, beer and wine on the 
basement level of the University Center. Catering for the 
university is the responsibility of Food Services. 

Vending 

Vending machines are located at several areas on the 
campus to service the needs of the university. Product 
selection is monitored by the University Food Service 
Committee. 


Undergraduate Reading Lab 

The Undergraduate Reading Lab/ Professional Library is 
an essential element in the Reading Program for both 
graduate and undergraduate students. It serves as a re- 
source for materials and equipment by which undergradu- 
ate students can improve their reading skills and complete 
additional class assignments. The lab also functions as a 
liaison between faculty and students, as a diagnostic lab 
for required or additional assessment of student skills, and 
as a professional resource for graduate students and fac- 
ulty. 

The lab has also offered services to special students from 
the Handicapped Center, Women’s Center and the Coun- 
seling Center. In addition, the development of a profes- 
sional library and the recent donation of material from the 
Reading Educators Guild aids graduate students in their 
research and course work. Finally, a goal of this lab is to 
develop a base of software materials for both classroom 
and individual student use. 

University Channel 

As part of two local cable television agreements with the 
cities of Fullerton and Anaheim, the university received 
from the Group W and Storer Cable Companies complete 
color television production equipment to use In the televi- 
sion curriculum and to provide programming for dedicated 
channels on each of those cable systems. In January 
1981, regular production of programs about Cal State Ful- 
lerton and Orange County In general was begun. Students 
In a senior level communications course. Cable Produc- 
tion Workshop, conceive, write and produce a wide variety 
of videotaped interview and discussion programs as well 
as special live coverage of election returns and Communi- 
cations Week events cabiecast, over University Channel 
33. In addition, student crews In other classes cablecast 
sports events and write, produce and direct documentar- 
ies for the channel. 


Resources 



Academic 

Advisement 


Academic Advisement 


Academic Advisement Policy 

The CSUF Academic Policy (UPS 300.002) states that: 

— the responsibility for ensuring advisement rests 
with each school dean; 

—every matriculated student shall enroll in one of the 
five schools; and 

—all students shall confer with an academic adviser 
on a regular basis. 

Choosing General Education 
Courses and Electives 

In keeping with the liberal arts tradition, the university 
requires its graduates to have sampled a variety of disci- 
plines as part of their general education. The broad cate- 
gories of general education courses are presented in the 
catalog section on “Graduation Requirements for the 
Bachelor’s Degree.” 

All students are strongly encouraged to consult with fac- 
ulty members or the Academic Advisement Center about 
choice of general education and elective courses. 

Advisement in the Major 

Students who have declared a major should consult their 
departmental adviser on a regular basis for academic ad- 
vice. 

Advisement for Students Who 
Have Not Selected a Major 

Students who have not declared a major should consult 
one of the school advisement offices listed below or the 
Academic Advisement Center to discuss their academic 
goals. 



Academic Advisement 


School Advisement Offices 

Students who have declared a school of interest or who 
wish to explore the majors offered by a specific school 
should contact the appropriate school advisement office: 


School of the Arts 


School of Business 
Administration 
and Economics 

School of Human 
Development 
and Community 
Service 

School of Humanities 
and Social Sciences 


School of Mathematics, 
Science and 
Engineering 


Academic Advisement 
Center 

Visual Arts 191B 
(714) 773-3550 

Business Advising Center 
Langsdorf Hall 706 
(714) 773-2211 

Office of the 
Assistant Dean 
Education Classroom 325 
(714) 773-2165 

Office of Student 
Academic Affairs 
McCarthy Hall 103 
(714) 773-2024 

Office of Academic Affairs 
McCarthy Hall 166 
(714) 773-2638 


Academic Advisement Center 

Humanities 112 
(714) 773-3606 

The Academic Advisement Center provides guidance in- 
formation in the choice of an undergraduate major and 
selection of elective and general education courses. It is 
the administrative center for undeclared undergraduate 
majors. All problems encountered by the undeclared ma- 
jor, which normally require the assistance of a department 
chair, are handled by the director of the Academic Advise- 
ment Center. 

For choosing general education courses and help In 
choosing an undergraduate major, students should seek 
the advice of the director or of an adviser In the Academic 
Advisement Center. 

No appointment is necessary to engage the assistance of 
an adviser about various aspects of the academic life at 
the university. For more specific information about the 
office, the student should consult the class schedule. 


Undeclared Majors 

Lower division students who are uncertain about their pri- 
mary educational or vocational goals may enroll as unde- 
clared majors. However, they must select a school which 
reflects their general interests and consult the office of the 


school dean for academic advisement. During their fresh- 
man and sophomore years, such students should explore 
their interests and potential by enrolling in a set of courses 
recommended by a school adviser. 

Choosing an 
Undergraduate Major 

Every student should choose a major by the beginning of 
the junior year so that he or she may complete major 
requirements in an orderly way. Most major requirements 
allow students the freedom to take a number of courses 
in fields other than in the majors. 

To help students, the university has available a number of 
useful resources: the academic information sessions con- 
ducted In May and November; the Information about ma- 
jors available from the Academic Advisement Center; a 
variety of counseling and testing services provided by the 
Career Development Center; and the department and 
school offices for information and advice on particular 
fields, departmental brochures and manuals describing 
their programs of study and later work opportunities. 
There are student organizations with disciplinary and pro- 
fessional interests and the Career Development Center 
has Information on vocations and work opportunities 
which may help in the selection of a major. 

The task of selecting a major (and often a minor or other 
complementary specialization) becomes one of crystalliz- 
ing ideas on the basis of experiences in specific courses, 
discussions with other students, faculty, the staff of the 
Academic Advisement Center, etc. The option of taking a 
limited number of courses on a Credit/ No Credit basis 
often will be helpful in exploring new interests. 

Students must plan freshman or sophomore programs 
which will permit their entering or taking advanced 
courses in fields they may want to be their majors. They 
should check such major requirements as mathematics, 
chemistry and foreign language which must be taken 
before the junior year or perhaps even begun during the 
freshman year. Students anticipating graduate or profes- 
sional study should exercise special care in planning un- 
dergraduate programs, and they should seek faculty 
counseling in the fields concerned. Advance examination 
of the possibilities of graduate or professional study will be 
helpful to students who have clear educational and voca- 
tional objectives. 

Those whose goals and objectives have not yet crystal- 
lized will have opportunities to take courses in various 
fields and make up their minds during their lower division 
work. They should, however, take full advantage of the 
opportunities that exist on and outside the campus to 
learn more about available fields of study and occupation- 
al fields. 


Academic Advisement 


Planning a Major Program 

When students have selected a major field, they should 
study all the requirements which are specified in this cata- 
log under their chosen degree program. Then they should 
make a tentative semester by semester plan for complet- 
ing the requirements, with regard for prerequisites. They 
should discuss this plan with their major advisers. 

In addition to courses in the major department, related 
courses in other fields and supporting courses in basic 
skills may be required. These should be included in the 
tentative semester by semester plan. 

Some departments require placement tests prior to ad- 
mission to classes. The time and place for such tests are 
given in the class schedule. Students should purchase a 
copy of the class schedule at the Titan Bookstore well 
before registration for classes begins. 

Change of Major, Degree or 
Credential Objective 

To change major, degree, or credential objective, obtain 
the required form In the Office of Admissions and Records 
or the Academic Advisement Center. Such a change Is not 
official until the form has been signed and filed In the 
Registrar’s Office. 

Departmental Academic 
Advisement 

Each department follows the advisement system which it 
finds the most appropriate for Its majors. 

It Is the responsibility of the student to obtain the assist- 
ance of a faculty adviser. 

The adviser is a resource person who can provide infor- 
mation and suggestions and who can assist the student 
to find the most desirable ways to meet the requirements 
for graduation and for the major or credential. The final 
choice of courses and the responsibility for the program 
lies with the student. Undergraduate students who have 
not yet decided upon a major (undeclared majors) or who 
are not seeking a degree will be advised in the Academic 
Advisement Center. 

Academic program advisers are able to offer better advice 
If students provide lists of courses they have taken and 
their own copies of transcripts from colleges previously 
attended (If students are new to Cal State Fullerton). 

Undergraduate advisement coordinators are appointed by 
each department (for the School of Business Administra- 
tion and Economics see below) in order to facilitate com- 
munication between students and faculty. They coordi- 


nate advisement In each department and act as resource 
persons for the students and the faculty of the department 
In all matters of advisement. 

The School of Business Administration and Economics 
provides advisement in the advisement center of the 
school. 

Graduate students will be assigned a major adviser in their 
fields of specialization, except in education where all will 
have a professional adviser from the School of Human 
Development and Community Service. Those students 
seeking a credential for teaching in secondary schools will 
be assigned both a professional and a major adviser. 

Preprofessional 

Programs 

The academic programs of the university provide appro- 
priate preparation for graduate work In a variety of fields. 
Students who have made tentative decisions about insti- 
tutions in which they may wish to pursue graduate work 
should consult the catalogs of those graduate schools as 
they plan their undergraduate programs. Students plan- 
ning to undertake graduate work should supplement their 
undergraduate programs by anticipating requirements at 
major graduate schools. 

The university offers a number of professional programs 
through the master’s degree. These Include programs in 
the fine arts, business administration, communications, 
education, engineering, health education and physical ed- 
ucation and recreation, public administration, and speech 
pathology-audiology. Students interested in preparing for 
professional careers In these areas, either here or in other 
educational institutions, are encouraged to seek assist- 
ance and guidance from our faculty members in these 
fields. 

Prelegal Preparation 

It is recommended that prospective law students prepare 
themselves in such fields as English, American history, 
economics, political science (particularly the history and 
development of English and American political institu- 
tions) and such undergraduate courses as judicial proc- 
ess, administrative law, constitutional law and 
international law, philosophy (particularly ethics and log- 
ic), business administration, anthropology, psychology 
and sociology. 

A distribution of course sequences among the social 
sciences, the natural sciences and the humanities Is desir- 
able. Students with Interest In becoming lawyers should 
contact the Prelaw Society. Some faculty members In the 
School of Business Administration and Economics and 
Departments of American Studies, History and Political 
Science, also can provide advice and assistance. 


Academic Advisement 


Pretheological 

Students who might be interested in pursuing careers in 
counseling, social work, the teaching of religion, and the 
ministry and associated fields should take some courses 
In religion, psychology, anthropology, sociology, philoso- 
phy, education, communications, history, English, speech 
communication and a foreign language. Students desiring 
assistance and counseling regarding advanced work or 
professional careers may seek help from the faculty in the 
Department of Religious Studies. 

Social Welfare 

Students who plan to seek employment in social work or 
social welfare should prepare themselves in the fields of 
human services, psychology (particularly child and 
adolescent psychology), sociology, anthropology, politi- 
cal science, economics and research methods in soda) 
science. 

Students who intend to enter a professional school follow- 
ing undergraduate training should learn about the specific 
prerequisites for admission to the graduate school of their 
choice. Ordinarily a major in one of the social sciences, 
and some additional work in at least several other social 
sciences, is recommended. Students with interests In pur- 
suing careers in the fields of social welfare should contact 
the Department of Sociology for advice and assistance. 

Health Professions 

Langsdorf Hall 203 
(714) 773-3980 

Ail health professicris programs are seeking the best 
qualified applicants with a good command of communica- 


tion skills, rigorous basic science preparation and as 
broad a general education base as possible. 

The Health Professions Committee assists students to 
prepare the best academic programs consistent with their 
former educational experience, interests and professional 
objectives. 


Student Responsibility 

All new students, both first-time freshmen and transfer 
students. Interested in preparing to enter one of the fol- 
lowing health professions, or related health professions, 
should register with the secretary of the committee, in the 
Health Professions Office. These health professions are 
medicine, osteopathic medicine, podlatric medicine, 
veterinary medicine, chiropractic, clinical pharmacy, clini- 
cal pharmacology, dentistry, optometry. 

The related health professions include anatomist, dental 
hygienist, histologist, medical technologist, nutritionist, oc- 
cupational therapist, orthotlst-prosthetist, pharmacologist, 
physical therapist, pharmacist, physiologist, public health. 


Health Professions Committee 

The committee assists the student to (a) gain some 
“preceptorship” experience with a practicing professional 
in the area appropriate to the field of interest; (b) select 
a list of professional schools to which there is a likelihood 
of admission; (c) prepare professional school applica- 
tions; (d) prepare for an admissions interview. 

The committee prepares recommendation letters for ap- 
proved applicants. 



Academic Advisement 




Answers To Your Questions 


TOPIC 

Academic Appeals 
Add or Drop of Class 
Address Change 
Admissions/Applications 
Advisement: 

Undeclared Major 
Declared Majors 
Athletics Tickets/ Passport 

Counseling; 

Personal 

Vocational 

Degree Application/Diploma Orders 
Degree Evaluation, Undergraduate 
Disqualification / Reinstatement 
Emergency Messages 
Enrollment Verification: 

Duplicate ID Card or Fee Receipt 
Letter Request 
Extension Class Information 
Evaluations/General Education 
Financial Aid 
Foreign Student: 

Advisement 
Permits to Register 
Graduate Affairs 
Graduation Requirements 
Handicapped Student Sen/ices 
Health Insurance 
Housing and Transportation 
Internships and Cooperative Ed. 
Name Change 
Organizations & Clubs 
Parking: 

Fees 

Information 
Handicapped 
Readmission 
Records (Student) 

Registration Fees 

Residency 

Scholarships 

Student Affirmative Action 
Summer Sessions, Information 
Test Information 
Transcripts 
Tutoring 

Veterans’ Certification Assistance 
Women’s Center 


WHERE TO GO 

Academic Appeals Office 
See Class Schedule 
Admissions & Records Counter 
Admissions & Records Counter 

Academic Advisement Center 
Major Department 
University Center 
Physical Education Department 

Counseling Service-Health Center 
Career Development Center 
Graduation Unit 
Graduation Unit 
Admissions Counselor 
V.P. for Student Services 

Cashier 

Admissions & Records Counter 
Extended Education Office 
Evaluations Unit 
Financial Aid Office 

Major Department 
International Education Office 
Graduate Affairs Office 
Graduation Unit 
Library 

University Center 
Housing Office 
Internship Office 
Admissions & Records Counter 
University Center 

Cashier 

Department of Public Safety 
Library 

Admissions & Records Counter 

Records Office 

Cashier 

Evaluations Unit 
Financial Aid 

Student Affirm. Action Office 
Extended Education Office 
Testing Center 

Admissions & Records Counter 
Learning Resource Services 
Veterans Affairs Office 
Women’s Center 


LOCATION 

TELEPHONE 

McCarthy Hall-78 

773-3836 

773-2300 

Langsdorf Hall-Lobby 

773-2300 

Langsdorf Hall-Lobby 

773-2300 

Humanities-112 

773-3606 

Lobby 

773-2468 

Physical Education-122 

773-2783 

Health Center 

773-2800 

Langsdorf Hall-208 

773-3121 

Langsdorf Hall-1 10A 

773-2300 

Langsdorf Hall-1 10A 

773-2300 

Langsdorf Hall-107 

773-2370 

Langsdorf Hall-810 

773-3221 

Langsdorf Hall-108 

773-3918 

Langsdorf Hall-Lobby 

773-2300 

Temporary- 14 

773-2611 

Langsdorf Hall-110 

773-2300 

McCarthy Hall-63 

773-3125 

McCarthy Hall-79 

773-2787 

McCarthy Hall-129 

773-2618 

Langsdorf Hall-1 10A 

773-2300 

Library-113 

773-3117 

U.C.-Lobby 

773-2468 

McCarthy Hall-78 

773-2168 

Langsdorf Hall-210 

773-2171 

Langsdorf Hall-Lobby 

773-2300 

University Center 2-43 

773-3211 

Langsdorf Hall-108 

773-3918 

Temporary- 1200 

773-2515 

Library-113 

773-3117 

Langsdorf Hall-Lobby 

773-2300 

Langsdorf Hall-110 

773-2300 

Langsdorf Hall-108 

773-3918 

Langsdorf Hall-110 

773-2300 

McCarthy Hall-63 

773-3125 

Library-22 

773-2086 

Temporary-14 

773-2611 

Langsdorf Hall-206 

773-3838 

Langsdorf Hall- Lobby 

773-2300 

Library-4 

773-3483 

Langsdorf Hall-1 IOC 

773-2300 

McCarthy Hall-33 

773-3928 


Academic Advisement 


Admissions Policies 



3—79417 


65 


Application Procedures 


Applications may be obtained from the admissions office 
at any of the campuses of The California State University 
or at any California high school or community college. 
Requirements for admission to California State University, 
Fullerton are in accordance with Title 5, Chapter 1, Sub- 
chapter 3, of the California Administrative Code. A student 
unsure of these requirements should consult a high 
school or community college counselor or the admissions 
office at California State University, Fullerton. 

The CSU advises prospective students that they must 
supply complete and accurate information on the applica- 
tion for admission, residence questions and financial aid 
forms. Further, applicants must submit authentic and offi- 
cial transcripts of all previous academic work attempted. 
Failure to file complete, accurate and authentic applica- 
tion documents may result in denial of admission, cancel- 
lation of academic credit, suspension or expulsion 
(Section 41301, Article 1.1, Title 5, California Administra^ 
tive Code ) . 

Undergraduate Application 
Procedures 

Prospective students, applying for part-time or full-time 
programs of study, in day or evening classes, must file a 
complete application as described In the admissions 
booklet. The $35 nonrefundable application fee should be 
in the form of a check or money order payable to The 
California State University. The application fee may not be 
transferred or used to apply to another term. Applicants 
need file only at their campus of first choice. An alternative 
choice campus and major may be Indicated on the ap- 
plication. Applicants should list as an alternative campus 
only that campus of The California State University that 
they would be able to attend. Generally, an alternative 
major will be considered at the first choice campus before 
the application is redirected to an alternative choice cam- 
pus. Applicants will be automatically considered at the 
alternative choice campus only if the first choice campus 
is unable to accommodate them. 

Postbaccalaureate and 
Graduate Application 
Procedures 

See information In the “Graduate Regulations” section of 
this catalog. 


Admissions Poiicies 


How to Apply 

1. Submit a completed application for admission within 
the announced filing period accompanied by the re- 
quired application fee to; 

Office of Admissions and Records 
California State University, Fullerton 
Fullerton, California 92634 

2. Request required transcripts of record of all previous 
scholastic work from each school or college attended 
when asked to do so by the admissions office. The 
transcripts required at Fullerton are: 

—for undergraduate applicants with fewer than 56 
transferable semester units — 

(a) the high school transcript, and 

(b) a transcript from each college or university at- 
tended. 

— for undergraduates with 56 or more transferable se- 
mester units— 

(a) a transcript from each college or university at- 
tended. 

—for graduates — 

(a) applicants for unclassified postbaccalaureate 
standing with no degree or credential objective 
must submit a transcript from the college or uni- 
versity where the baccalaureate was earned. 
Further, one transcript from other Institutions at- 
tended is required as necessary so that the uni- 
versity has a complete record of the last 60 
semester units attempted prior to enrollment at 
Fullerton. 

(b) applicants for a master’s degree or teaching 
credential, or both, must submit two copies of 
the transcript from each college or university 
attended. 

Note; In addition, all students should have a personal set 
of college transcripts for advising purposes. All transcripts 
must be received directly from the issuing institutions and 
become official records of the university; such transcripts 
therefore cannot be returned or reissued. Foreign lan- 
guage transcripts must be accompanied by certified Eng- 
lish translations. 

3. All undergraduate students who have completed fewer 
than 56 semester or 84 quarter units of transferable 
work are required to submit scores from either one of 
two national testing programs before eligibility for ad- 
mission to the university can be determined. This re- 
quirement does not affect undergraduate students who 
have previously attended Fullerton and who have sub- 
mitted ACT or SAT scores at the time of their first 
admission. 

Registration forms and test dates for either test may be 
obtained from school or college counselors, from the 
address below, or from campus testing offices. For ei- 
ther test, submit the registration form and fee at least 
one month prior to the test date. 


ACT Address 

American College Testing Program, Inc. 
Registration Unit, P.O. Box 168 
Iowa City, Iowa 52240 
SAT Address 

College Entrance Examination Board 
P.O. Box 592 

Princeton, New Jersey 08541 

Applicants to classified graduate curricula must submit the 
scores of any qualifying examinations required in their 
prospective programs of study. 

Impacted Programs 

The CSU designates programs to be impacted when more 
applications are received in the first month of the filing 
period than the spaces available. Some programs are 
impacted at every campus where they are offered; others 
are impacted at some campuses but not all. You must 
meet supplementary admissions criteria if applying to an 
impacted program. 

The CSU will announce before the opening of the fall filing 
period which programs are Impacted and the supplemen- 
tary criteria campuses will use. That announcement will be 
published in the CSU School and College Review, dis- 
tributed to high school and college counselors. We will 
also give Information about the supplementary criteria to 
program applicants. 

You must file your application for admission to an impact- 
ed program during the first month of the filing period. 
Further, if you wish to be considered In Impacted pro- 
grams at two or more campuses, you must file an applica- 
tion to each. Nonresident applicants are rarely admitted to 
impacted programs. 

Supplementary Admission Criteria: Each campus 
with impacted programs uses supplementary admission 
criteria in screening applicants. Supplementary criteria 
may include ranking on the freshman eligibility index, the 
overall transfer grade point average, and a combination of 
campus-developed criteria, if you are required to submit 
scores on either the SAT or ACT, you should take the 
tests no later than December if applying for fall admission. 
The supplementary admission criteria used by the individ- 
ual campuses to screen applicants appear periodically in 
the CSU School and College Review and are sent by the 
campuses to all applicants seeking admission to an im- 
pacted program. 

Unlike unaccommodated applicants to locally impacted 
programs, who may be redirected to another campus in 
the same major, unaccommodated applicants to system- 
wide Impacted programs may not be redirected in the 
same major, but may choose an alternative major either 
at the first choice campus or another campus. 

At the time of the preparation of this catalog, the under- 
graduate majors In business administration (all concen- 
trations), and in computer science and electrical/ 


Admissions Poiicies 


electronic engineering at Fullerton were declared impact- 
ed as defined in this section. 

Application Filing Periods 

Terms Filing Period Begins Filing Period Duration 
Fall Previous November Until application 

Spring Previous August categories are filled 

Applicants who file by June 1 for fall terms, or by Novem- 
ber 1 for spring terms, may participate in early registration 
(by mail) for classes. 

Space Reservations 

Applicants who can be accommodated will receive letters 
acknowledging their application. The letters are not state- 
ments of admission but are commitments by Cal State 
Fullerton to admit the applicants who establish their eligi- 
bility for admission. The acknowledgment letters direct 
applicants to arrange to have appropriate records for- 
warded promptly to the admissions office. Applicants 
should not request that any records be forwarded until 
they have received a space reservation notice. Space 
reservation notices are mailed by the university to those 
who apply In November for fall terms in December, and to 
those who apply In August for spring terms in September. 
Applicants filing after Initial filing periods will normally re- 
ceive their acknowledgments within two weeks of the re- 
ceipt of their applications. 

Space reservations may not be transferred to other terms 
or campuses. 

Hardship Petitions 

Fullerton has established procedures to consider qualified 
applicants who would be faced with an extreme hardship 
if not admitted. Prospective hardship petitioners should 
write to the dean of admissions and records regarding 
specific policies governing hardship admission. 

Records Retention 

The university retains the admissions materials for those 
who apply but who for whatever reason do not enroll for 
two years. For those who do enroll the university will retain 
the materials in student folders. Including transcripts of 
the record of work completed elsewhere, for five years 
beyond the date of last attendance. 

Records of academic performance at California State Uni- 
versity, Fullerton, Including individual student records, fac- 
ulty grade lists, and graduation lists are kept permanently. 

Determination of Residence for 
Nonresident Tuition Purposes 

The campus admissions office determines the residence 
status of all new and returning students for nonresident 
tuition purposes. Responses to Items 29-45 on the Ap- 


plication for Admission and. If necessary, other evidence 
furnished by the student are used in making this determi- 
nation. A student who falls to submit adequate information 
for establishing a right to classification as a California 
resident will be classified as a nonresident. 

The following statement of the rules regarding residency 
determination for nonresident tuition purposes is not a 
complete discussion of the law, but a summary of the 
principal rules and their exceptions. The law governing 
residence determination for tuition purposes by The Cali- 
fornia State University Is found In Education Code Sec- 
tions 68000-68090, 68121, 68123, 68124, 89705-89707.5, 
and 90408 and in Title 5 of the California Administrative 
Code, Sections 41900-41912. A copy of the statutes and 
regulations Is available for inspection at the campus ad- 
missions office. 

Legal residence may be established by an adult who is 
physically present in the state and who, at the same time. 
Intends to make California his or her permanent home. 
Steps must be taken at least one year prior to the resi- 
dence determination date to show an intent to make Cali- 
fornia the permanent home with concurrent 
relinquishment of the prior legal residence. The steps 
necessary to show California residency intent will vary 
from case to case. Included among the steps may be 
registering to vote and voting In elections in California; 
filing resident California state income tax forms on total 
income; ownership of residential property or continuous 
occupancy or renting of an apartment on a lease basis 
where one’s permanent belongings are kept; maintaining 
active resident memberships in California professional or 
social organizations; maintaining California vehicle plates 
and operator’s license; maintaining active savings and 
checking accounts In California banks; maintaining per- 
manent military address and home of record In California 
if one is In the military service. 

The student who is within the state for educational pur- 
poses only does not gain the status of resident regardless 
of the length of the student’s stay in California. 

In general, the unmarried minor (a person under 18 years 
of age) derives legal residence from the parent with whom 
the minor maintains or last maintained his or her place of 
abode. The residence of a minor cannot be changed by 
the minor or the minor’s guardian, so long as the minor’s 
parents are living. 

A married person may establish his or her residence Inde- 
pendent of his or her spouse. 

An alien may establish his or her residence, unless pre- 
cluded by the Immigration and Nationality Act from estab- 
lishing domicile in the United States. An unmarried minor 
alien derives his or her residence from the parent with 
whom the minor maintains or last maintained his or her 
place of abode. 

Nonresident students seeking reclassification are re- 


Admissions Policies 


quired by law to complete a supplemental questionnaire 
concerning financial independence. 

The general rule is that a student must have been a Cali- 
fornia resident for at least one year immediately preceding 
the residence determination date in order to qualify as a 
“resident student” for tuition purposes. A residence deter- 
mination date is set for each academic term. 

At the Fullerton campus, the residence determination date 
for the fall terms Is September 20, and for the spring terms 
is January 25. 

Questions regarding residence determination dates 
should be directed to the campus admissions office which 
can give you the residence determination date for the term 
for which you are registering. 

There are exceptions from nonresident tuition, including: 

1. Persons below the age of 19 whose parents were resi- 
dents of California but who left the state while the stu- 
dent, who remained, was still a minor. When the minor 
reaches age 18, the exception continues for one year 
to enable the student to qualify as a resident student. 

2. Persons who have been present in California with the 
intent of acquiring residence for more than a year 
before the residence determination date, and entirely 
self-supporting for that period of time. 

3. Persons below the age of 19 who have lived with and 
been under the continuous direct care and control of an 
adult, not a parent, for the two years immediately pre- 
ceding the residence determination date. Such adult 
must have been a California resident for the most re- 
cent year. 

4. Dependent children and spouses of persons In active 
military service stationed in California on the residence 
determination date. This exception applies only for the 
minimum time required for the student to obtain Califor- 
nia residence and maintain that residence for a year. 
The exception, once attained, is not affected by retire- 
ment or transfer of the military person outside the state. 

5. Military personnel in active service stationed In Califor- 
nia on the residence determination date for purposes 
other than education at state-supported institutions of 
higher education. This exception applies only for the 
minimum time r'^ouired for the student to obtain Califor- 


nia residence and maintain that residence for a year. 

6. Certain credentialed, full-time employees of California 
school districts. 

7. Full-time State University employees and their children 
and spouses. This exception applies only for the mini- 
mum time required for the student to obtain California 
residence and maintain that residence for one year. 

8. Certain exchange students. 

9. Children of deceased public law enforcement or fire 
suppression employees, who were California residents, 
and who were killed In the course of law enforcement 
or fire suppression duties. 

Any student, following a final campus decision on his or 
her residence classification, only may make written appeal 
to: 

The California State University 
Office of General Counsel 
400 Golden Shore 
Long Beach, California 90802-4275 

within 120 calendar days of notification of the final deci- 
sion on campus of the classification. The Office of Gen- 
eral Counsel may make a decision on the issue, or it may 
send the matter back to the campus for further review. 
Students classified incorrectly as residents or incorrectly 
granted an exception from nonresident tuition are subject 
to reclassification as nonresidents and payment of non- 
resident tuition in arrears. If incorrect classification results 
from false or concealed facts, the student is subject to 
discipline pursuant to Section 41301 of Title 5 of the Cali- 
fornia Administrative Code. Resident students who 
become nonresidents, and nonresident students qualify- 
ing for exceptions whose basis for so qualifying changes, 
must Immediately notify the admissions office. Applica- 
tions for a change In classification with respect to a previ- 
ous term are not accepted. 

The student is cautioned that this summation of rules 
regarding residency determination is by no means a com- 
plete explanation of their meaning. The student should 
also note that changes may have been made in the rate 
of nonresident tuition. In the statutes, and in the regula- 
tions between the time this catalog is published and the 
relevant residence determination date. 


Admissions Poiicies 


Admission Requirements 


Admission Requirements for 
First-Time Freshmen 

High School Graduates 

You will qualify for regular admission as a first-time fresh- 
man if you 

1. are a high school graduate 

2. have a qualifiable eligibility index (see below), and 

3. have completed with grades of C or better at least four 
years of college preparatory English and at least two 
years of college preparatory mathematics. 

Eligibility Index 

The eligibility index is the combination of your high school 
grade point average and your score on either the Ameri- 
can College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(SAT). For this purpose we compute your grade point 
average on your final three years of high school studies, 
excluding physical education and military science. 

You can calculate the index by multiplying your grade 
point average by 800 and adding your total score on the 
SAT. Or, if you took the ACT, multiply your grade point 
average by 200 and add ten times the composite score 
from the ACT. If you are a California high school graduate 
(or a legal resident of California for tuition purposes) , you 
need a minimum index of 2994 using the SAT or 722 using 
the ACT; the table below shows the combinations of test 
scores and averages required. If you neither graduated 
from a California high school nor are a legal resident of 
California for tuition purposes, you need a minimum index 
of 3402 (SAT) or 826 (ACT). 

Applicants with grade-point averages above 3.10 (3.60 for 
nonresidents) are exempt from the test requirement. 

Eligibility Index Alternative— As an alternative to 
calculating an eligibility index, California residents (or 
graduates of California high schools) may use the 
following table to determine their eligibility. 


Admissions Policies 


Eligibility Index Table for 
California High School Graduates 



ACT 

SAT 


ACT 

SAT 


ACT 

SAT 


ACT 

SAT 

GPA Score Score GPA 

Above 3.10 qualifies with any score 

Score 

Score 

GPA 

Score 

Score 

GPA 

Score 

Score 

3.10 

11 

520 

2.82 

16 

740 

2.54 

22 

970 

2.26 

27 

1190 

3.09 

11 

530 

2.81 

16 

750 

2.53 

22 

970 

2.25 

28 

1200 

3.08 

11 

530 

2.80 

17 

760 

2.52 

22 

980 

2.24 

28 

1210 

3.07 

11 

540 

2.79 

17 

770 

2.51 

22 

990 

2.23 

28 

1210 

3.06 

11 

550 

2.78 

17 

770 

2.50 

23 

1000 

2.22 

28 

1220 

3.05 

12 

560 

2.77 

17 

780 

2.49 

23 

1010 

2.21 

28 

1230 

3.04 

12 

570 

2.76 

17 

790 

2.48 

23 

1010 

2.20 

29 

1240 

3.03 

12 

570 

2.75 

18 

800 

2.47 

23 

1020 

2.19 

29 

1250 

3.02 

12 

580 

2.74 

18 

810 

2.46 

23 

1030 

2.18 

29 

1250 

3.01 

12 

590 

2.73 

18 

810 

2.45 

24 

1040 

2.17 

29 

1260 

3.00 

13 

600 

2.72 

18 

820 

2.44 

24 

1050 

2.16 

29 

1270 

2.99 

13 

610 

2.71 

18 

830 

2.43 

24 

1050 

2.15 

30 

1280 

2.98 

13 

610 

2.70 

19 

840 

2.42 

24 

1060 

2.14 

30 

1290 

2.97 

13 

620 

2.69 

19 

850 

2.41 

24 

1070 

2.13 

30 

1290 

2.96 

13 

630 

2.68 

19 

850 

2.40 

25 

1080 

2.12 

30 

1300 

2.95 

14 

640 

2.67 

19 

860 

2.39 

25 

1090 

2.11 

30 

1310 

2.94 

14 

650 

2.66 

19 

870 

2.38 

25 

1090 

2.10 

31 

1320 

2.93 

14 

650 

2.65 

20 

880 

2.37 

25 

1100 

2.09 

31 

1330 

2.92 

14 

660 

2.64 

20 

890 

2.36 

25 

1110 

2.08 

31 

1330 

2.91 

14 

670 

2.63 

20 

890 

2.35 

26 

1120 

2.07 

31 

1340 

2.90 

15 

680 

2.62 

20 

900 

2.34 

26 

1130 

2.06 

31 

1350 

2.89 

15 

690 

2.61 

20 

910 

2.33 

26 

1130 

2.05 

32 

1360 

2.88 

15 

690 

2.60 

21 

920 

2.32 

26 

1340 

2.04 

32 

1370 

2.87 

15 

700 

2.59 

21 

930 

2.31 

26 

1150 

2.03 

32 

1370 

2.86 

15 

710 

2.58 

21 

930 

2.30 

27 

1160 

2.02 

32 

1380 

2.85 

16 

720 

2.57 

21 

940 

2.29 

27 

1170 

2.01 

32 

1390 

2.84 

16 

730 

2.56 

21 

950 

2.28 

27 

1170 

2.00 

33 

1400 

2.83 

16 

730 

2.55 

22 

960 

2.27 

27 

1180 

Below 2.00 does not 
for regular admission 

qualify 


High School Honors Courses 

Grades in up to eight semester courses, taken in the last 
two years of high school, that are designated honors in 
approved subjects receive additional points in grade point 
average calculations. Each unit of A in approved courses 
will receive a total of 5 points; B, 4 points; C, 3 points; D 
1 point; and none for F grades. 

Early Admission Program 

California State University, Fullerton will recognize out- 
standing academic achievement (3.40 GPA or higher) of 
high school students by issuing an early admissions com- 
mitment. This commitment is conditional upon the earning 


of the high school diploma or its equivalent. Details about 
the Early Admission Program may be obtained from the 
Office of Admissions and Records. 

Graduates of Secondary Schools in 
Foreign Countries 

Applicants who are graduates of foreign secondary 
schools must have preparation equivalent to that required 
of eligible California high school graduates. The university 
will carefully review the previous record of all such appli- 
cants and only those with promise of academic success 
equivalent to that of eligible California high school gradu- 
ates will be admitted. 


Admissions Poiicies 


Non-High School Graduates 

Applicants over 18 years of age, but who have not gradu- 
ated from high school, will be considered for admission as 
first-time freshmen only when preparation in all other ways 
is such that the university believes promise of academic 
success is equivalent to that of eligible California high 
school graduates. 

High School Students 

Students still enrolled in high school will be considered for 
enrollment in certain special programs If recommended by 
the principal and the appropriate campus department 
chair and If preparation Is equivalent to that required of 
eligible California high school graduates. Such admission 
Is only for a given program and does not constitute the 
right to continued enrollment. 

College Preparatory English and 
Mathematics Requirements 

Preparing for Undergraduate Study: Most academic 
advisers agree that preparation for university study 
includes preparation in subjects beyond four years of 
English and two years of mathematics. Bachelor’s degree 
curricula build upon previous study in the natural sciences, 
social sciences, visual and performing arts, foreign 
languages and the humanities. Students planning to major 
in mathematics, the sciences (Including computer 
science), engineering, premedicine, other science-related 
fields, business, or economics should complete four years 
of college preparatory mathematics. Students in the social 
sciences and preprofessional fields of study should 
include at least three years of mathematics in the 
preparatory studies. Further, all students should include 
English and mathematics in the final year of high school. 

Subject Requirement: The California State University 
requires that all undergraduate applicants for admission 
complete with a C or better four years of college 
preparatory study in English and two years of college 
preparatory mathematics, or their equivalent. California 
secondary school courses that meet the subject 
requirement are listed in “Courses to Meet Requirements 
for Admission to the University of California,” published 
for, and available at each high school. 

English: Regular English courses in the 9th and 10th 
grades that integrate reading and writing will be 
considered college preparatory. English courses in the 
11th and 12th grades will be considered college 
preparatory if (1) they include writing instruction and 
evaluation, and require substantial amounts of writing of 
extensive, structured papers, expressive and analytical, 
demanding a high level of thinking skills; and (2) they are 
integrated with challenging, in-depth reading of significant 
literature. 

Courses in speech, drama or journalism will be considered 


college preparatory If they meet the criteria for 11th and 
12th grade courses. Two consecutive semesters of ad- 
vanced English as a Second Language may be substitut- 
ed for two semesters of college preparatory English. 
Remedial reading and writing courses at any level will not 
be accepted nor will courses in beginning or intermediate 
English as a Second Language. 

Mathematics: College preparatory courses In 
mathematics include algebra, geometry, trigonometry, 
calculus and mathematical analysis. Most students will 
have taken at least algebra and geometry or two years of 
algebra. Business or technical mathematics, arithmetic or 
prealgebra are not considered college preparatory. 

TOEFL Requirement 

All undergraduate applicants, regardless of citizenship, 
must demonstrate competence in English. Those who 
have not attended for at least three years schools at the 
secondary level or above where English is the principal 
language of instruction must earn a minimum score of 500 
on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
Individual campuses may require a higher score. 

Admission Requirements for 
Undergraduate Transfer 
Students 

You will qualify for admission as a transfer student if you 
have a grade point average of 2.0 (C) or better in all 
transferable units attempted, are In good standing at the 
last college or university attended, and meet one of the 
following standards: 

1 . You graduated from high school before spring 1984 and 
either 

(a) were eligible as a freshman, or 

(b) have completed at least 56 transferable semester 
(84 quarter) units. (Nonresidents must have a 2.4 
grade-point average or better.) 

2. You graduated from high school In spring 1984 or later 
and either 

(a) were eligible as a freshman, or 

(b) were eligible as a freshman except for the college 
preparatory subjects in English and mathematics 
and have satisfied the subject deficiencies, or 

(c) have completed at least 56 transferable semester 
(84 quarter) units and have satisfied any deficien- 
cies in college preparatory English and mathemat- 
ics. (Nonresidents must have a 2.4 grade-point 
average or better.) 

For these requirements, transferable courses are those 
designated for that purpose by the college or university 
offering the courses. (Transfer applicants must meet 
standard 2 beginning fall 1986, Irrespective of when they 
graduate from high school.) 


Admissions Poiicies 


Admission Requirements for 
Postbaccalaureate and 
Graduate Students 

See admissions information in the “Graduate Regula- 
tions” section of this catalog. 

Admission Requirements for 
International Students 

The university is pleased to accept applications from inter- 
national students. Freshman applicants applying directly 
from overseas should have outstanding academic qualifi- 
cations and meet TOEFL score requirements. Under- 
graduate transfers, who have completed a two-year 
program in an accredited institution of higher education, 
with a good academic record and satisfactory TOEFL 
scores, shall receive priority for admission. Postbac- 
calaureate applicants who have completed a bachelor’s 
degree or its equivalent, with a strong academic record, 
and satisfactory TOEFL scores from an accredited institu- 
tion may be considered for admission as graduate stu- 
dents. 

International students applying from overseas are normal- 
ly considered for admission to the fall semester only. 
Those transferring from U.S. Institutions may apply to the 
fall or spring semesters. 

The university has established deadlines to Insure the 
timely processing of all applications and to enable admit- 
ted applicants to make arrangements to reach the U.S. 
and the campus prior to orientation and registration. 
Newly admitted students are required to take an English 
Placement Examination prior to enrollment in classes. 

Application Deadlines 
Fall Semester Spring Semester 

January 1 October 1 

Document Deadlines 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

April 1 November 1 

All international student applicants must declare a major 
field of study when the application is filed. Campus pro- 
grams of study which receive more applications than 
spaces are available, have been declared Impacted, and 
are not open to nonresidents, foreign or domestic. 

All applicants whose native language is other than English 
are required to present scores for the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before they can be admit- 
ted to the university. Undergraduate applicants must 
achieve a score of 500; graduate applicants a score of 550. 


Adequate performance on the TOEFL is mandatory for 
admission. 

Applicants should obtain the TOEFL Bulletin of Informa- 
tion and registration forms well in advance. Copies of this 
bulletin and registration forms are often available at 
American embassies and consulates, offices of the United 
States Information Service, United States educational 
commissions and foundations abroad, bi-national centers, 
and several private organizations. Those who cannot ob- 
tain locally a TOEFL Bulletin of Information should write 
to: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Box 899, 
Princeton, New Jersey, USA, 08541 . 

International student applicants must include a statement 
of financial support accompanied by a bank statement 
from their sponsor. Students sponsored by an internation- 
al organization or home government agency must include 
a letter of scholarship support specifying this university 
and the students proposed degree and program of study. 
For an International student studying in 1984-85, an es- 
timated cost of nonresident tuition and fees is $3,750.00, 
with living expenses at $8,250.00, totalling $12,000 (subject 
to change). Financial support documents must reflect 
availability of this amount. 

Transcripts of all educational documents in languages 
other than English must be accompanied by translation 
Into English certified by independent agencies. All aca- 
demic records must be received directly from the issuing 
institutions and become official records of the university. 

International student applicants who are admitted by the 
university will be issued form 1-20 which is used to obtain 
an F-1 student visa from a U.S. Embassy or Consulate 
overseas. Students transferring from a U.S. institution will 
use form 1-20 to apply for transfer authorization through 
the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Arrival, orien- 
tation and registration information from the Office of Inter- 
national Education and Exchange will accompany the 
admission materials mailed to new students. 

Admission Requirements for 
Summer Session Students 

Although the quality of the program and most of the 
course offerings are the same as In the regular session, 
the university does not require an advance application or 
transcripts from students registering for credit courses in 
the summer session. Students normally must be high 
school graduates, however, and are expected to have 
satisfied the prerequisites for the courses In which they 
register. In addition, students are expected to file a re- 
quest to register In the summer session. Admission to 
summer session does not grant admission to the regular 
session. 


Admissions Poiicies 


Readmission of Former 
Students 

A student previously enrolled in the university, planning to 
return after an absence of more than one semester, must 
file a new application for admission. A student absent for 
one semester, and who enrolls elsewhere In the interim, 
must also file an application for readmission. Unless a 
leave of absence was granted, catalog requirements at 
the time of readmission will apply. Please see the “Stop- 
Out Policy” section in the regulations subchapter of this 
catalog for further information on applications for readmis- 
sion. 

Former Students in Good Standing 

A student who left the university in good standing will be 
readmitted provided any academic work attempted else- 
where since the last attendance does not change his or 
her scholastic status. Transcripts of the record of any 
work attempted In the interim are required. 

Former Students Who Were on Probation 

A student on probation at the close of the last enrollment 
will be readmitted on probation provided he or she is oth- 
envise eligible. The student must furnish transcripts of any 
college work taken during the absence. 

Former Students Who Were Disqualified 

The readmission of a previously disqualified student is by 
special action only. Ordinarily the university will consider 
an application for reinstatement only after the student has 
remained absent for a minimum of one year following 
disqualification and has fulfilled all recommended condi- 
tions. In every instance, readmission is based on evi- 
dence, including transcripts of study completed elsewhere 
after disqualification, that in the judgment of the university 
warrants such action. If readmitted, the student is placed 
on scholastic probation. 

Cancellation of Admission 

A student admitted to the university for a given semester 
but who does not register in the specified semester will 
have the admission canceled. The student must file a new 
application form when again seeking admission and must 
follow the complete application procedure and meet the 
current admission requirements. 

• Please note that, beginning in academic year 1986-07. all undergraduates (including 
those who enroll with 56 or more transferable semester units and who are subject 
to the 1966-67 or later campus catalog) will be required to complete the English 
Placement Test requirement. Even though the English Placement Test is r>ot 
required this year for those with 56 or more units, all undergraduates are en- 
couraged to take the test to heighten their awareness arxl command of college 
level English skills. 


Placement Test 
Requirements 

English Placement Test (EPT) 

The CSU English Placement Test must be completed by 
all freshmen or sophomores (those who enroll with fewer 
than 56 * transferable semester units) with the exception 
of those who present proof of one of the following: 

• a score of 3, 4, or 5 on either the Language and Compo- 
sition or the Composition and Literature examination of 
the College Board Advanced Placement Program 

• a satisfactory score on the CSU English Equivalency 
Examination 

• a score of 510 or above on the Verbal section of the 
College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT-Verbal) 

• a score of 600 or above on the College Board Achieve- 
ment Test In English Composition with essay 

• completion of an acceptable college course In English 
composition of four quarter or three semester units with 
a grade of C or better. 

The results of this test do not affect admissions eligibility. 
For those who are required to take the examination, it is 
a prerequisite to English 99, English 101 and Communica- 
tions 103. The results will be used, however, to provide 
information to the university and to students to aid in the 
selection of courses In writing skills and to prepare for the 
graduation requirement in writing. The Office of Admis- 
sions and Records will mail announcements about the 
test to eligible freshmen and sophomores. 

Entry Level Mathematics 
(ELM) Test 

All undergraduate students admitted for fall 1983 and 
thereafter and who are subject to the 1983-84 or later 
campus catalog must take and pass the ELM before en- 
rolling in a course which satisfies the General Education 
Breadth Requirement in Quantitative Reasoning. Exemp- 
tions from the test are given only to those students who 
can present proof of one of the following: 

• a score of 3 or above on the College Board Advanced 
Placement Mathematics examination (AB or BC) 

• a score of 530 or above on the Mathematics section of 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT-Math) 

• a score of 23 or above on the ACT Mathematics Test 

• a score of 520 or above on the College Board Math 
Achievement Test, Level 1 

• a score of 540 or above on the College Board Math 
Achievement Test, Level 2 

• completion of a college course that satisfies the Gen- 
eral Education Breadth Requirement in Quantitative 
Reasoning at California State University, Fullerton. The 
course must be at the level of intermediate algebra or 
above with a grade of C or better. 


Admissions Policies 


f w 


Transfer Credits 



: 


Evaluation of Transfer Credits 

The Office of Admissions and Records will evaluate previ- 
ous college work in relation to the requirements of Fuller- 
ton. All degree candidates will be issued a credit summary 
during the first semester of attendance which serves as a 
basis for determining remaining requirements for the stu- 
dent’s specific objectives. The admissions office will con- 
vert quarter units of credit transferred to the university to 
semester units by multiplying quarter-unit totals by two- 
thirds. 

Once issued to a student, the evaluation remains valid as 
long as the student enrolls at the date specified, pursues 
the objective specified, and remains in continuous attend- 
ance. The student will not be held to additional graduation 
requirements unless such requirements become manda- 
tory as a result of changes in the California Administrative 
Code or the California Education Code. If the student does 
not remain in continuous attendance and has not applied 
for and been granted a formal leave of absence, the 
evaluation issued upon readmission will specify the re- 
maining requirements for the student’s objectives. 

In view of the foregoing regulations, the student should 
notify the Office of Admissions and Records immediately 
of a change in the objective specified in the evaluation. 
While the evaluation for a student remains valid, the stu- 
dent is held responsible for complying with all changes in 
regulations and procedures which may appear in subse- 
quent catalogs. 

Acceptance of Credit 

Credit for work completed at accredited institutions, other 
than course work identified by such institutions as reme- 
dial or in other ways as being nontransferable, will be 
accepted toward the satisfaction of baccalaureate degree 
and credential requirements at the university within limita- 
tions of residence requirements and community college 
transfer maximums. 

Transfer of Credit From a 
Community College 

Upper division credit is not allowed for courses taken in a 
community college. Credential credit is not allowed for 
courses in professional education taken in a community 
college. This does not invalidate credit for preprofessional 
courses taken at a community college, such as introduc- 


Admlssions Policies 



tion to education, art or design, arithmetic, or music for 
classroom teachers. After a student has completed 70 
units of college credit at a cor munity college, no further 
community college units ma^ oe accepted for unit credit. 

Credit by Advanced Placement 

Students who have successfully completed courses in the 
advanced placement program of the College Entrance 
Examination Board (defined as receiving a score of 3, 4 
or 5) shall be granted credit for each advanced placement 
course toward graduation, advanced placement in the uni- 
versity’s sequence of courses and credit for curriculum 
requirements. 

Cal State Fullerton grants credit toward its undergraduate 
degrees for successful completion of examinations of the 
Advanced Placement Program of the College Board. Stu- 
dents who present scores of three or better will be granted 
six semester units of college credit. 


Advanced Placement 

Equivalent 

Semester 

Course 

Course: CSUF 

Units 

American History 

History 170A,B 

6 

Art History 

Art 201 B 

3-6* 

Studio Art 

Art 103 or 104 

Art 107A or 107B 


Biology 

Bio Sci 101 

4** 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 

120A,B 

6 *** 

English 

English 101 

3 


English 110, 

111, or 112 

3 

European History 

History 110A,B 

6 

French 

French 101, 102 

10 

German 

German 101, 102 

10 

Latin 4 

Latin 101 

3 

Latin 5 

Latin 101, 102 

6 

Math A & B 

Math 150A 

4 

Math B & C 

Math 150A,B 

8 

Physics 

Physics 211A,B 

6 

Spanish 

Spanish 101, 102 

10 


Consult the Department of Art for applicability of advanced placement examination 
credit. 

•* Consult the Deparment of Biological Sciences for applicability of advanced place- 
ment examination credit. 

•••To complete the requirement for Chemistry 120A. B. the student must successfully 
complete four units of Chemistry 120A and 120B laboratory at Cal State Fullerton. 


Credit for Extension and 
Correspondence Courses 

The maximum amount of credit through correspondence 
and extension courses which may be allowed toward the 
bachelor’s degree is 24 units, if otherwise applicable. 

Credit for Noncollegiate 
Instruction 

Cal State Fullerton grants undergraduate degree credit for 
successful completion of non-collegiate instruction, either 
military or civilian, appropriate to the baccalaureate, that 
has been recommended by the Commission on Educa- 
tional Credit and Credentials of the American Council on 
Education. The number of units allowed are those recom- 
mended in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational 
Experience in the Armed Services and the National Guide 
to Educational Credit for Training Programs. Students who 
have at least one year of active military service may be 
granted six or 12 units of undergraduate credit. 

College Level Examination 
Program 

The university shall accept three semester units of credit 
for each of the following College Level Examination Pro- 
gram (CLEP) examinations, subject to achievement of 
the scores indicated, provided the examination was not 
taken previously within one calendar year and that degree 
credit has not been granted for previous course work at 
the equivalent or at a more advanced level than for the 
examination in question. 


Examination Passing score 

Mathematics General Exam 
(1975 edition) 50* 

College Algebra-Trigonometry 49 

Introductory Calculus 

and Analytic Geometry 48 

Statistics 49 

General Chemistry 48 


On both parts of examination. 

Fullerton may grant additional credit and advanced stand- 
ing based upon CLEP examination results using as mini- 
mum standards: 

General Examinations 

1. That the student achieve a score at or above the 50th 
percentile, college sophomore norms. 

2. That no unit credit be granted for any test in the general 
examinations, but that up to six units of general educa- 
tion requirements be waived for each test completed 
with the appropriate score. 


Admissions Poiicies 


Subject Examinations 

1. That the student subrr it a score at or above the 50th 
percentile of those i the norm group who earned a 
mark of C or better. 

2. That equivalency to Fullerton courses be determined 
by the appropriate academic department in conjunction 
with the Office of Admissions and Records. 

3. That university credit shall have not been previously 
earned in the courses in question. 

In no case will credit so awarded count toward residence 

credit. 

English Equivalency 
Examination 

Students passing the California State University English 

Equivalency Examination shall be awarded six semester 


units of credit provided credit has not been granted previ- 
ously at the equivalent or at more advanced levels. Fur- 
ther, those who pass this optional examination are exempt 
from the requirement to take the English Placement Test. 

Science/Mathematics 
Equivalency Examinations 

Students may receive credit by examination in general 
mathematics, calculus-analytic geometry, statistics, 
chemistry, biology, and calculus by passing California 
State University-approved examinations. Each test offers 
those who pass three semester units of credit, provided 
credit has not previously been granted at the equivalent 
or at more advanced levels. 



Admissions Poiicies 




Registration 

Procedures 



79 


Registration Information 


Orientation 

Various opportunities are provided for new students to 
obtain Information relating to academic programs, student 
services and activities, and other aspects of university life. 
Information about specific programs Is published sepa- 
rately. 


Registration 

Class Schedule: A complete listing of courses offered will 
be found In the class schedule published prior to the start 
of each semester. This publication, which may be pur- 
chased In the Titan Bookstore, also states detailed Infor- 
mation pertaining to the semester Including class 
enrollment and fee payment procedures. 

It is Important that students familiarize themselves not 
only with the academic policies stated in this catalog but 
also with the requirements and procedures In the class 
schedule as both are used in the selection of classes for 
the semester. 

Registration: Registration is made up of two steps — 
class enrollment and fee payment, and may be accom- 
plished through early registration by mail, walk-through 
registration in the week preceding the first day of Instruc- 
tion, or through late registration during the first three 
weeks of instruction. Most students should find early reg- 
istration by mail advantageous. 

At registration, every student is required to file a study 
program with the Office of Admissions and Records. The 
filing of a program by the student and Its acceptance by 
the university obligates the student to perform the desig- 
nated work to the best of his or her ability. It is emphasized 
that registration does not become official until all fees 
have been paid. 

Computerized Records System 

The student records system, including the registration 
process, uses the computer. It is a fact of life in a large 
institution such as Fullerton that use of the computer is 
essential. Thus, there are requirements for data cards, 
code numbers, student file numbers and for meeting pre- 
cise criteria for recording data, which introduce imperson- 
al elements in the student records system. Despite these 
conditions, every effort is made to provide courteous, effi- 
cient and personalized service to students and the entire 
university community. To assist in providing this service, 
students are urged to be careful and accurate in preparing 



Registration Procedures 


forms, especially the official program and change of pro- 
gram forms. Accurate preparation of information will as- 
sure each student of error-free records. 

Controlled Entry Classes 

In general, all courses listed in the semester class sched- 
ule shall be available to all matriculated students except 
for appropriate academic restrictions as stated in the 
schedule and the catalog. These restrictions. Including 
special qualifications and other academic limitations, on 
class entry shall be published in the class schedule as 
appropriate footnotes to the designated class or class 
section and shall be consistent with the catalog. 

Late Registration 

The last day to register late each semester will be an- 
nounced In the class schedule. Late registrants will find 
themselves handicapped in arranging their programs and 
must pay a $25 late registration fee in addition to regular 
fees. 

Changes in Program After 
Registration 

Each student is responsible for the program of courses 
listed at registration. Changes may be made thereafter 
only by filing a change of program form in the Office of 
Admissions and Records following procedures an- 
nounced in the class schedule. 

Students may add classes to their programs of study dur- 
ing the first three weeKs of instruction. They may drop 
classes through th-^ first two weeks. After the 11th day of 
instruction the university expects students to complete all 
courses in which they are enrolled. If after the 11th day 
students must withdraw, they are subject to the withdraw- 
al policy contained in the “University Regulations” section 
of this catalog. In all instances, dropped classes must be 
reported to the Office of Admissions and Records; stu- 
dents not attending class are not dropped automatically. 

Concurrent Enrollment 

A student enrolled at the university may enroll concurrent- 
ly for additional courses at another Institution only with 
advance written approval from the student’s academic 
adviser on official forms obtained from the Office of Ad- 
missions and Records. Permission will not be granted 
when the study load in the proposed combined program 


of study exceeds the units authorized at this university. 

Enrollment at Other CSU 
Campuses 

Fullerton students may enroll at other campuses of The 
California State University either while concurrently en- 
rolled at Fullerton or as visitors. There are certain eligibility 
requirements and enrollment conditions that must be met, 
including completion of at least one semester at Fullerton 
and being in good academic standing. Information and 
application forms may be obtained from the Office of Ad- 
missions and Records. 

Visitor Enrollment 

Students enrolled at other campuses of The California 
State University may enroll at Fullerton while concurrently 
enrolled at their home campus or as visitors. Information 
about eligibility requirements, enrollment conditions and 
application forms are available from the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records at the home campus. 

Auditors 

A properly qualified student may enroll in classes as an 
auditor. The student must meet the regular university ad- 
mission requirements and must pay the same fees as 
other students. See the description of Audit \n the “Univer- 
sity Regulations” section of this catalog under “Adminis- 
trative Symbols.” 

Handicapped Students 

Students physically handicapped who require assistance 
should consult the Handicapped Student Services Center 
prior to the announced semester registration period so 
that special arrangements for them can be made. 

Veterans 

California State University, FuP'''1on Is approved by the 
Bureau of School Approvals, Staie Department of Educa- 
tion, to offer programs to veterans seeking benefits under 
state and federal legislation. All students seeking veter- 
ans’ benefits must have a degree or credential objective. 

Applications for benefits should be filed well In advance of 
the semester In which the veteran plans to use these 
benefits to have the authorization at the time of registra- 
tion. 


Registration Procedures 



Schedule of Fees, 
1985-86 


Tuition is not charged to legal residents of California. The 
1985-86 and 1986-87 schedule of fees will be published in 
the class schedules for those years. The following are the 
fees and nonresident tuition assessed at the time of pre- 
paring this catalog. 

Application fee (nonrefundable) 

Payable by check or money order at time 


application is made $35 

All Students (Per Semester Fees) 

State University fee 

0 to 6.0 units $166.50 

6.1 or more units 286.50 

Facilities fee 3 

Associated Students fee 16 

University Union fee 18 

Instructlonally related activity fee 5 

Nonresident and Foreign Visa Students 

Nonresident tuition fee (in addition to fees charged all 
students) 

Per unit $126 

Summer Session 

Course fee per unit see current bulletin 

Associated Students fee $3 

University Union fee 5 

Extension Fees 

Per unit see current bulletin 

Other Fees or Charges 

Campus service card $3 

Late registration fee (in addition 

to other fees listed above) 25 

Check returned from bank for any cause 10 

Transcript fee 4 

Graduation and diploma fee 15 

Failure to meet administratively required 

appointment or time limit 2 

Miscellaneous course fee A few courses 


require fees for registration 

Consult current class schedule for further information. 

Auditors pay the same fees as others. 

Fees are subject to change by the Trustees of The Califor- 
nia State University without advance notice. 



Registration Procedures 



Alan Pattee Scholarships 

Children of deceased public law enforcement or fire sup- 
pression employees, who were California residents and 
who were killed in the course of law enforcement or fire 
suppression duties, are not charged fees or tuition of any 
kind at any California State University campus, according 
to the Alan Pattee Scholarship Act, Education Code Sec- 
tion 68121. Students qualifying for these benefits are 
known as Alan Pattee scholars. For further Information 
contact the Admissions/Registrar’s Office, which deter- 
mines eligibility. 

Waiver of Fees 

Section 32320 of the California Education Code provides 
for the waiver of certain fees other than nonresident tui- 
tion, for certain veterans’ dependents. Those who meet 
one or more of the following criteria should present to the 
university registrar a certificate of eligibility obtained from 
the Division of Educational Assistance, California Depart- 
ment of Veterans Affairs, on or before the date of registra- 
tion. 

A. Children of veterans who have service-connected 
disabilities and whose annual income not including 
governmental compensation for such service-con- 
nected disability does not exceed $5,000. 

B. Children of veterans killed in action or because of a 
service-connected disability, where the annual income 
of such children, including the value of any support 
received from parents and the annual Income of sur- 
viving parents, does not exceed $5,000. No limitations 
on age or length of residency. 

Refund of Fees 

Details concerning the fees which may be refunded, and 
the circumstances under which fees may be refunded, 
and the appropriate procedure to be followed In seeking 
refunds may be obtained by consulting Section 41803 
(parking fees), 41913 (nonresident tuition), and 41802 (all 
other fees) of Title 5, California Administrative Code. In all 
cases it is important to act quickly in applying for a refund. 

Information concerning the policy and appropriate proce- 
dure to be followed in seeking a refund may be obtained 
from the Office of the Registrar. 

Parking Fees 

Semester pass (nonreserved spaces): 

Regular and limited students (4-wheeled vehicle) $33.75 
Regular and limited students (2-wheeled vehicle) 8.45 


Coin operated gate per exit 50 

Summer session (4-wheeled vehicle) 15.00 

Summer session (2-wheeled vehicle) 3.75 


Typical Student Expenses 

Typical school year budgets for California residents living 
at home or making other housing arrangements will vary 
widely. It is estimated that. Including a $3,300 yearly allow- 
ance for room and board, and $400 for books and sup- 
plies, the total cost will approximate $5,300 for an 
unmarried person. Nonresident students must also allow 
for nonresident tuition. 

Student Services Fee 

The student services fee provides financing for the follow- 
ing student services not covered by state funding. 

1 . Social and Cultural Development Activities. Provides 
for the coordination of various student activities, stu- 
dent organizations, student government and cultural 
programs. 

2. Counseling. Includes the cost of counselors’ salaries 
and clerical support, plus operating expenses and 
equipment. 

3. Testing. Covers the cost of test officers, psychome- 
trists, clerical support, operating expenses and equip- 
ment. 

4. Placement. Provides career information to students 
and faculty for academic program planning and em- 
ployment information to graduates and students. 

5. Financial Aids Administration. Includes the cost of 
the counseling and business services provided in con- 
nection with the financial aid programs. 

6. Health Services. Provides health services to students 
and cpvers the cost of salaries of medical officers and 
nurses and related clerical and technical personnel, as 
well as operating expenses and equipment. 

7. Housing. Supports personnel who provide housing In- 
formation and monitor housing services available to 
students. 

8. Student Services Administration. Covers 50 percent 
of the cost of the office of the vice president for student 
services, which has responsibility for the overall admin- 
istration of student services. 

Associated Students Fee 

The law governing The California State University pro- 
vides that a student body fee may be established by stu- 
dent referendum with the approval of two-thirds of those 
students voting. The Associated Students fee was estab- 
lished at California State University, Fullerton by student 
referendum in December 1959. The same fee can be abol- 
ished by a similar two-thirds approval of students voting 
on a referendum called for by a petition signed by 10 
percent of the regularly enrolled students {Education 
Code, Section 89300). The level of the fee is set by the 
chancellor who may approve a fee increase only following 
a referendum approved by a majority of the students. The 


Registration Procedures 


Associated Students fee supports a variety of cultural and 
recreational programs, child care centers and special stu- 
dent support programs. 

Average Annual Costs and 
Sources of Funds Per 
Full-Time Equivalent Student 

The 19 campuses and the Chancellor’s Office of The Cali- 
fornia State University are financed primarily through fund- 
ing provided by the taxpayers of California. The total State 
appropriation to the CSU for 1984-^5, Including capital 
outlay and employee compensation Increases, is $1,177,- 
687,000. The total cost of education for CSU, however, Is 
$1,390,712,240 which provides support for a projected 
242,740 full-time equivalent (FTE) * students. 

The total cost of education in the CSU is defined as the 
expenditures for current operations, including payments 
made to the students in the form of financial aid, and all 
fully reimbursed programs contained in State appropria- 


tions, but excluding capital outlay appropriations. The av- 
erage cost of education is determined by dividing the total 
cost by the total FTEs. The average cost is further dif- 
ferentiated Into three categories: State support (the State 
appropriation, excluding capital outlay). Student Fee sup- 
port, and support from other sources (including federal 
funds). 

Thus, excluding costs which relate to capital outlay (I.e., 
building amortization), the average cost of education per 
FTE student Is $5,729. Of this amount, the average student 
fee support per FTE Is $876. The calculation for this latter 
amount includes the amount paid by nonresident stu- 
dents. 

Averages do not fit all students alike or even any specific 
student. To arrive at an average figure that is meaningful, 
the costs outlined above exclude “user fees” for ’Iving 
expenses, housing and parking as well as costs for exten- 
sion and summer session work. Computations are based 
on full-time equivalent students, not Individuals, and costs 
are prorated by system totals, not by campus. The aver- 
age costs for a full-time equivalent student in the system 
are shown in the following chart: 


Source of Funds and Average Costs for 1984/85 CSU Budget 
(Projected Enrollment: 242,740 FTE) 




Average 
Cost Per 



Amount 

Student (FTE) 

Percentage 

Total Cost of Education 

$1,390,712,240** 

$5,729 

100.0 

— State appropriation 

1,152,423,000*** 

4,748 

82.9 

— Student Fee support 

212,727,489 

876**** 

15.3 

— Support from other sources 

25,561,751 

105 

1.8 


• For budgetary purposes, full-time equivalent (FTE) translates total head count into total academic student load equivalent to 15 units per term. Some students enroll for more 
than 15 units; some students enroll for fewer than 15 units. 

•• The total cost of education does not include the amount related to the capital investment of the CSU. The estimated replacement cost of all the system’s permanent facilities 
and equipment on the 19 campuses is currently valued at $4.6 billion, excluding the cost of land. 

*** This figure does not include the capital outlay appropriation of $25,264,000. 

•*** The average costs paid by a student include the State University Fee, Student Services Fee, Application Fee, Catalog Fee and nonresident tuition. Individual students may pay 
less than $876 dependir^g on whether they are part-time, full-time, resident or nonresident students. 


Registration Procedures 


Financial Aid 



V. 

V 


Eligibility Requirements 

The following eligibility requirements apply to all financial 
aid programs except emergency loans and scholarships. 

In order to be eligible for financial assistance, applicants 
must demonstrate financial need. Financial need Is the 
difference between the reasonable and approved costs 
Incurred by a student at CSUF and all of the resources 
available to the student, including contributions from par- 
ents, student (and spouse, if applicable), and any other 
aid the student may be eligible to receive. 

In addition to demonstrating financial need, all applicants 
must: 

1. be a national of the United States or be in the United 
States for other than a temporary purpose and intend 
to become a permanent resident thereof, or be a per- 
manent resident of the Trust Territory of the Pacific 
islands (holders of student visas are not eligible for 
aid); 

2. be accepted for enrollment as at least a half-time stu- 
dent, or in the case of a student already attending the 
university, be enrolled and in good standing as at least 
a half-time student; 

3. maintain satisfactory academic progress in the course 
of study according to the standards and practices of 
the university; 

4. not be in default on any loan made from a student loan 
fund and not owe a refund on grants previously re- 
ceived; 

5. submit a completed Student Aid Application for Califor- 
nia (SAAC) or an Application for Federal Student Aid 
if the student wants only a Pell Grant, and all documen- 
tation requested by the Financial Aid Office; and 

6. be registered for the Draft with the Selective Service or 
certify that he/she is not required to register. 

Application Periods 

The deadlines listed below are approximate and are sub- 
ject to annual changes. Consult with the Financial Aid 
Office for current dates. 

Emergency Loans: Emergency loans are available from 
the first day of classes until 30 days before the end of the 
semester. (See director of financial aid for exceptions.) 

Scholarships: Applications for scholarships are accepted 
from mid-April through mid-May. Consult with the Finan- 
cial Aid Office for exact dates. 


Registration Procedures 


Bureau of Indian Affairs Grants: Consult with the BIA for 
exact dates. The application deadline is usually In mid- 
June. 

GSL and CLAS Loans: Apply after June 1 for the fall 
semester and academic year, and after November 1 for 
the spring semester. 

Cal Grants and Graduate Fellowships: First-time appli- 
cants must mail the SAAC Supplement form by February 
11 for the following academic year. 

Pell Grant only (no other aid desired): Apply by May 1 of 
the academic year for which aid is desired. 

All Other A/cf—Priority is given to SAAC applications 
mailed between January 1 and March 1 for the next aca- 
demic year. 

Rights and Responsibilities of 
Students Receiving Aid 

Rights: All students are entitled to and are guaranteed fair 
and equitable treatment in the awarding of financial aid. In 
addition, there shall be no discrimination of any kind. Ap- 
peals procedures exist for anyone who feels that a viola- 
tion has occurred; consult with the director of financial aid 
for details. 

All students have the right to receive full and open infor- 
mation about various financial aid programs and the sta- 
tus of their eligibility. In addition, they have the right to 
know the selection and review processes used in award- 
ing financial aid. 

All students have the right to know the costs of attending 
the institution, the refund policies in case of withdrawal 
from the university, the academic programs offered by the 
university, the faculty and physical facilities of the Institu- 
tion, and data regarding student retention at the university. 

Responsibilities: All financial aid recipients agree to carry 
and complete a specific number of units each semester, 
report graduation or withdrawal from the university and to 
notify the Financial Aid Office of any changes in their 
financial or marital status, or unit load. 

Recipients of financial aid must use the funds only to meet 
education costs. Any other use of the funds Is prohibited 
by law. 

Students who are receiving financial aid must maintain 
satisfactory academic progress. See the section below for 
details. 

Satisfactory Academic 
Progress Standards 

In order to provide factors which are measurable against 


a norm, the following standards apply for satisfactory aca- 
demic progress. 

1. Grade Point Average — No special GPA requirement 
exists for financial aid recipients. Instead, the university’s 
established policy regarding Academic Retention, Proba- 
tion and Disqualification will apply. This policy comes from 
Section 413C)0 of Title V and the Chancellor’s Executive 
Order #393. Students who are academically disqualified 
are not eligible to receive financial aid. 

2. Minimum Unit Completion — Undergraduate recipients 
of federal financial aid who are funded as full-time stu- 
dents must enroll in and successfully complete at least 12 
units per semester. Graduate recipients of federal finan- 
cial aid who are funded as full-time students must enroll 
in and successfully complete a minimum of 9 units per 
semester. 

Students wishing to register for less than full-time status 
must have the prior approval of the Financial Aid Office. 

Course grades A, B, C, D and CR are counted as success- 
ful completion of units in relation to financial aid eligibility. 
Grades of I, F, U, W, WF, AU, SP and RD do not signify 
successful completion of units for financial aid eligibility. 
Under university policy, however, the grades of I, SP and 
RD may be replaced with letter grades which will yield unit 
credit. Students must provide official notification of grade 
changes to the Financial Aid Office. 

3. Financial Aid Probation — Students who fail to complete 
the number of units for which they are funded will be 
placed on financial aid probation. These students will be 
counseled regarding the unit deficiency, and will be asked 
to sign an agreement specifying the number of units which 
must be made up and the time period In which to do so. 
(Note: All EOP students must consult with an EOP coun- 
selor.) Students who fail to meet the terms of the proba- 
tion agreement will be ineligible for further financial aid. 

4. Reinstatement of Eligibility— Students who are found 
ineligible for aid through the procedure described in sec- 
tion 3, above, may reestablish their eligibility by complet- 
ing the deficit units while not on aid. These students must 
submit documentary evidence showing the completion of 
the units. 

5. Maximum Time Eligibility for Financial Aid— \t is univer- 
sity policy to provide financial aid for no more than six 
academic years for bachelor’s degree candidates, and no 
more than three academic years for master’s degree can- 
didates. Candidates registered less than full-time will be 
allowed proportionate time to complete the degree. 

Students’ progress toward the completion of the require- 
ments for a degree will be examined, as a minimum, at the 
end of each academic year. In addition, full-time under- 
graduates are expected to complete each year at least 
one-sixth of the units required for the degree being 
sought; full-time graduate students are expected to com- 


Registratlon Procedures 


plete one-third of the units required for their programs. tory academic progress. 


It should be noted that compliance with the unit comple- 
tion requirements explained in section 2, above, will satisfy 
the yearly progress criteria. 

6. Maximum Unit Eligibility— A bachelor of arts degree at 
this university normally requires a minimum of 124 semes- 
ter units, while a bachelor of science degree requires from 
124 to 138 semester units. A bachelor of music degree 
requires 132 semester units. The university, therefore, will 
not provide financial aid for those who have earned 150 or 
more semester units and still have not completed the 
requirements for a bachelor’s degree. 

A master’s degree from this university requires a minimum 
of 30 approved semester units. It is, therefore, the policy 
of the university not to provide financial aid to graduate 
students who have earned 40 or more units and still have 
not completed the requirements for a master’s degree. 

7. Repetition of Classes — It is the academic policy of the 
university that students may repeat certain classes and 
reccivp credit for them. When such units are earned 
‘nrough the normal academic process, the units are 
counted in relation to financial aid eligibility and satisfac- 


6. General Stipulations — Students whose academic re- 
cords exhibit a pattern of unsatisfactory progress extend- 
ing beyond the standards set forth above may be placed 
on financial aid probation and be subject to a reduction In 
aid or be disqualified from further participation in the finan- 
cial aid program. 

Financial aid funds will not be provided for more than one 
degree program beyond the initial bachelor’s degree. 

9. Appeals — Students who are disqualified for financial 
aid due to a determination of unsatisfactory progress, or 
who have exhausted their eligibility, may appeal the dis- 
qualification by submitting a Satisfactory Progress Petition 
to the Financial Aid Office. The facts will be reviewed and 
the student will be Informed of the decision. If the decision 
Is not in the student’s favor, he or she may request a 
further review by the Financial Aid Appeals Committee. 
The committee, on the basis of the information contained 
on the petition, plus any other pertinent Information, will 
determine either to reinstate eligibility or to let the dis- 
qualification stand. 



Registration Procedures 




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S:‘i M ^ - . ', 

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:-,i 


University 

Regulations 

Each student is responsible for meeting the requirements 
printed in the university catalog and all published regula- 
tions of the university. 

The university establishes certain academic policies and 
requirements which must be met before a degree is grant- 
ed. These include major and unit requirements and 
prerequisites. While advisers, directors, deans and faculty 
will provide a student with Information and advice, respon- 
sibility for meeting these requirements rests with the stu- 
dent. Since failure to satisfy these requirements may 
result in the degree being withheld. It Is important for each 
student to become thoroughly acquainted with all regula- 
tions. The catalog and the semester class schedule, avail- 
able in the Titan Bookstore, are the best sources of 
information on current policy and regulations. 

The student also has the responsibility for securing the 
consent of the Instructor before enrolling In a course with 
prerequisites that the student has not completed. 

To ensure receipt of timely information and accurate 
grade reports from the university, each student must keep 
the Office of Admissions and Records Informed of 
changes in personal data, including changes in name, 
address and program of study. Each student is mailed a 
student data verification each semester during the third 
week of classes to ensure the accuracy of official enroll- 
ment for that term; corrections must be reported to the 
registrar by the 20th day of classes, using the Change of 
Program form. Corrections should be reported on the form 
and returned to the Office of Admissions and Records. 



89 


Enrollment Regulations 


Unit of Credit 

Each semester unit represents three hours of university 
work per week for one semester. Courses are of three 
types: 

(1 ) Lecture— one hour in class plus two hours of study. 

(2) Activity — two hours of class plus one hour of study. 

(3) Laboratory — three hours in class. 

Some courses may combine two or more of these types. 
Ail required courses carry unit credit. 

Classification in the University 

Undergraduate students who have completed 0-29 se- 
mester units of work are classified as freshmen, 30-59 
semester units as sophomores, 60-89 semester units as 
juniors, and 90 or more as seniors. 

Maximum Number of Units 

Undergraduate students’ requests to enroll for more than 
19 units must be approved by the student’s adviser and 
the department chair of the major. If such requests are 
denied, appeals may be made to the appropriate school 
dean. (Undeclared majors must receive the approval of 
the director of academic advisement.) The minimum full- 
time program is 12 units. 

A student whose academic record justifies a study list in 
excess of the normal may request to be allowed to enroll 
for extra units. Request forms may be obtained from the 
Office of Admissions and Records. In general, only stu- 
dents with superior academic records are allowed to en- 
roll for more than the maximum. In addition, the need to 
enroll for the extra study must be established. Factors 
such as time spent In employment or commuting, the na- 
ture of the academic program, extracurricular activities 
and the student’s health should be considered in planning 
a study program. Students who are employed or have 
outside responsibilities are advised to reduce their pro- 
gram of study. 

The minimum and maximum units of a full-time program 
of study for graduate students are defined in the “Gradu- 
ate Regulations’’ section of this catalog. 


Graduate Level Courses 

Graduate level (500) courses are organized primarily for 
graduate students. Undergraduate students may be per- 
mitted to enroll In a graduate level course if: 

a. they have reached senior status (completed a mini- 
mum of 90 semester units) 

b. have the academic preparation and prerequisites re- 
quired for entry into the course 

c. gain the consent of the Instructor. 

Students wishing to use 500-level coursework taken dur- 
ing their undergraduate degree toward a master’s degree 
should read the section on Postgraduate Credit. 

Class Attendance 

While class attendance is not recorded officially by the 
university, regular attendance in class is often essential to 
success in a course. The policy on class attendance is 
within the discretion of the individual faculty member and 
shall be announced by the faculty member at the first 
class meeting of the semester. 

Initial Class Meeting 

It is especially Important that students attend the first 
meeting of a class. Students absent from the first meeting 
and who fall to notify the instructor or departmental office 
no later than 24 hours after the class meeting may be 
denied admission to the class. Instructors may deny ad- 
mission to absentees to admit persons on waiting lists. 

Instructor-Initiated Drops 

A student who registers for a class and whose name ap- 
pears on the first-day-of-class list should attend all class 
meetings in the first week. If the student Is absent without 
notifying the instructor or departmental office within 24 
hours after any meeting missed during that week, the 
student may then be dropped administratively from the 
class by the instructor. An instructor may also administra- 
tively drop a student who does not meet prerequisites for 
the course. These administrative withdrawals shall be 
without penalty and must be filed by the Instructor with the 
registrar no later than the 11th day of Instruction. 


University Reguiations 


Grading Policies 


fl 



Grading System 

Every student of the university will have all course work 
evaluated and reported by the faculty using letter grades 
or administrative symbols. 

The university uses a combination of traditional and non- 
traditional grading options as follows: 

Traditional 

Option 1. Letter grades, defined as: 

A — outstanding performance 
B — above average performance 
C — average performance 
D — below average performance, though passing 
F — failure 

Nontraditional 

Option 2. OR (Credit) for satisfactory (equivalent to C or 
better In undergraduate courses; B or better In graduate 
courses.) and NC (No Credit) for less than satisfactory 
work. 

When, because of circumstances, a student does not 
complete a particular course, or withdraws, certain ad- 
ministrative symbols may be assigned by the faculty. 
Grades and symbols are listed in the chart below together 
with grade-point values. The chart also Illustrates the aca- 
demic bookkeeping involved for all grades and symbols 
used. 

Selection of Grading Option 

Selection of a grading option, with certain exceptions, is 
the responsibili^; of the student. Graduate students must 
use option 1 for courses that are on study plans leading 
to master’s degrees. Undergraduates must use option 1 
for major, minor and general education requirements. 

Exceptions are those courses designated by the faculty to 
be graded solely on an option 2 basis. 

These courses will be so designated in the class schedule 
(and shall not be changed by the faculty after publication 
of the class schedule) for each semester and may be 
included In major, core or special program requirements. 

Students shall inform the registrar up to the end of the 
third week of classes regarding the selection of grading 
options in designated courses. If a student does not do so, 
option 1 will be used. 

The faculty shall grade all students using the traditional A, 
B, C, D or F grades except in Credit/No Credit courses. 


University Regulations 


and the registrar shall make the necessary changes from 
A, B, C, D or F, converting A, B, C to Credit, and D and F 
to No Credit in undergraduate courses and A, B to Credit, 
and C, D and F to No Credit in graduate courses. In those 
courses offered only on a Credit/No Credit basis, the in* 
structor shall assign grades of CR or NC or appropriate 
administrative symbols. 

Nontraditional Grade Option 

A nontraditional grading option is available to undergradu- 
ate students nonobjective graduate students and to clas- 
sified graduate students for courses not included In the 
approved study plan. Any student attempting a course 
using the nontraditional grading option must meet the 
prerequisites for that course. Each student shall be per- 
mitted to select courses in subjects outside of the major, 
minor and general education requirements for enrollment 
on a Credit/No Credit basis (grading option 2). The 
phrase “major requirements” shall be taken to include 
core plus concentration (or option) requirements In de- 
partments using such terms, and professional course re- 
quirements in teacher education curricula. A student In 
any one term may take one course under option 2. In 
addition, he or she may enroll in a required course offered 
only under option 2; however, a maximum of 36 units of 
Credit/No Credit courses, including those transferred 
from other institutions, may be counted toward the bacca- 
laureate. 

Under option 2 the term “Credit” signifies that the stu- 
dent’s academic performance was such that he or she 
was awarded full credit in undergraduate courses with a 
quality level of achievement equivalent to a C grade or 
better. In all graduate level courses Credit signifies aca- 
demic performance equivalent to B or A grades. No Credit 
signifies that the student attempted the course but that 
the performance did not warrant credit toward the objec- 
tive. 

Ordinarily, a student shall be limited to one nonmajor 
course per term using this option, exclusive of courses 
offered only on a Credit/ No Credit basis. 

When an undergraduate student changes his or her major 
field of study to one where he or she has completed 
courses with CR grades, such lower division courses shall 
be included in major requirements. Upper division courses 
may be included at the option of the department upon 
petition by the student. 


Grade or 
Symbol 

Units 

Units 

Grade 

Point 

Full 

Option 1 

Attempted Earned 

Value 

Credit 

A 

Yes 

Yes 

4 

Yes 

B 


Yes 

3 

Yes 

c 

Yes 

Yes 

2 

Yes 

D 

Yes 

Yes 

1 

No 

F 

Yes 

No 

0 

No 


Option 2 

CR 

* 

Yes 

None 

Yes 

NC 

Administrative Symbols 

* 

No 

None 

No 

I (Incomplete 
authoriz^) 

t 

No 



U (Unauthorized 
incomplete) 

Yes 

No 

0 

No 

W (Withdrawal) 

No 

No 

None 

No 

WF (Withdrawal) 

Yes 

No 

0 

No 

AU (Audit) 

SP (Satisfactory 

No 

No 

None 

No 

progress) 

No 

No 

None 

No 

RD (Report delayed) 

No 

No 

None 

No 

TOTALS 

Used 

Counted 

Used 



In 

in 

Toward 



GPA 

Objective 

GPA 



* Cre'jit/No Credit course units are not included in grade-point computations, 
t If not completed within one semester the I will be changed to an F (or NC) . 

ADVISORY CAUTION: Undergraduate students 
who plan to pursue graduate or professional studies 
later are advised to be selective in opting for 
courses on a credit/ no credit basis. As a general 
rule (advisory only) , course work that is preparatory 
or prerequisite to advanced specialized study 
should be completed and evaluated on a letter 
grade basis and not Credit/ No Credit. 

Administrative Symbols 

Incomplete Authorized (!) 

The symbol I signifies that a portion of required course 
work has not been completed and evaluated in the pre- 
scribed time period owing to unforeseen but fully justified 
reasons and that there is still a possibility of earning credit. 
It is the responsibility of the student to bring pertinent 
Information to the Instructor and to reach agreement on 
the means by which the remaining course requirements 
will be satisfied. A final grade is assigned when the work 
agreed upon has been completed and evaluated. 

An Incomplete must be made up during the semester 
immediately following the end of the term In which it was 
assigned. This limitation prevails whether or not the stu- 
dent maintains continuous enrollment. Failure to complete 
the assigned work will result in an Incomplete being 
changed to an F or an NC. 

A grade of Incomplete may be given only when. In the 
opinion of the instructor, a student cannot complete a 
course during the semester of enrollment for reasons 
beyond the student’s control. Such reasons are assumed 
to include: illness of the student or of members of the 
student’s immediate family, extraordinary financial prob- 
lems, loss of outside position and other exigencies. In 


University Regulations 



assigning a grade of I, the instructor shall file with the 
department for future reference and student access a 
Statement of Requirements for Completion of Course 
Work. The requirements shall not Include retaking the 
course. The instructor will also designate a time limit (up 
to one semester) for completing requirements. Upon re- 
quest, a copy of the document will be furnished to the 
student. The student should review this statement at the 
earliest opportunity. 

The statement of requirements will include an Indication 
of the quality of the student’s work to date. This not only 
provides an interim evaluation for the student but assists 
the department chair in assigning a final grade In those 
instances where the instructor is no longer available. 

When the specific requirements are completed, the in- 
structor will report a change of grade. The responsibility 
for changing the Incomplete crade rests with the instruc- 
tor. 

Withdrawal (W, WF) 

Students may withdraw from class during the first 1 1 days 
of instruction without record of enrollment. After the first 
11 days of classes, students should complete all courses 
In which they are enrolled. 

The university authorizes withdrawal after the 11th day of 
instruction and prior to the last three weeks of Instruction 
only with the approval of the instructor and the depart- 
ment chair or school dean. All requests for permission to 
withdraw and all approvals shall be made in writing on the 
Change of Program form and special drop petition and 
shall be filed at the Office of Admissions and Records by 
students or their proxies. 

The student withdrawing from class after the 20th day of 
instruction shall receive a grading symbol of W or WF. The 
symbol W signifies that the student dropped the course 
after the 20th day of instruction and that the quality of 
performance at the time of withdrawal was C or better (B 
or better in graduate courses) . The symbol WF signifies 
that the student dropped the course after the 20th day of 
instruction and that the quality of performance at the time 
of withdrawal was below these standards. W’s are not 
counted In grade-point average calculations; WF’s are 
counted In the same way as F grades. When signing the 
Change of Program form, the Instructor shall indicate to 
the student whether W or WF will be given. 

Students may not withdraw during the final three weeks of 
instruction except In cases, appropriately documented, 
such as accident or serious illness, where the assignment 
of an Incomplete is not practicable. Ordinarily, withdrawals 
of this nature will involve withdrawal from all classes ex- 
cept that Credit or Incomplete Authorized (I) may be as- 
signed for courses In which students have completed 
sufficient work to permit an evaluation to be made. Re- 
quests for permission to withdraw from all classes under 
these circumstances, with authorizations as described 


above, shall be made on the Change of Program form and 
special drop petition and shall be filed by the students (or 
their proxies) with the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Unauthorized Incomplete (U) 

The symbol U indicates that an enrolled student did not 
withdraw from the course but failed to complete course 
requirements. It is used when, in the opinion of the instruc- 
tor, completed assignments or course activities or both 
were insufficient to make normal evaluation of academic 
performance possible. For purposes of grade-point aver- 
age computations this symbol Is equivalent to an F. 

A student may petition for a retroactive withdrawal pro- 
vided the student can document both the serious and 
compelling reason or circumstances that required the 
withdrawal and the date of such withdrawal. Such a peti- 
tion must be filed within 30 days after the first class day 
of the following semester. 

Petitions for retroactive withdrawal may be submitted for 
withdrawal in individual courses. 


ADVISORY NOTE: Students who unofficially with- 
draw and who are receiving financial aid or benefits 
which are dependent on completion of specified 
course units are advised that they may have such 
benefits suspended and may be subject to repay- 
ment of allowances received after date of unofficial 
withdrawal. 


Audit (AU) 

The symbol AU Is used by the registrar In those instances 
where a student has enrolled In a course either for infor- 
mation or other purposes not related to the student’s for- 
mal academic objective. Enrollment as an auditor is 
subject to the permission of the instructor, provided that 
enrollment in any course as an auditor shall be permitted 
only after students otherwise eligible to enroll In the 
course on a credit basis have had an opportunity to do so. 
Auditors are subject to the same fees as credit students 
and regular class attendance Is expected. Once enrolled 
as an auditor, a student may not change to credit status 
unless such a change is requested prior to the last day to 
add classes. A student who is enrolled for credit may not 
change to audit after the third week of instruction. An 
auditor is not permitted to take examinations in the 
course; therefore, there is no basis for evaluation nor a 
formal grade report. 

Satisfactory Progress (SP) 

The SP symbol is used in connection with thesis, project 
or similar courses that extend beyond one academic term. 
It indicates that work is in progress, and has been evaluat- 
ed and found to be satisfactory to date, but that assign- 
ment of a final grade must await completion of additional 
course work. Cumulative enrollment in units attempted 
may not exceed the total number applicable to the stu- 


University Regulations 



dent’s educational objective. Work is to be completed 
within a stipulated period which may not exceed one year 
except for graduate degree theses or projects for which 
the time may be longer, but may not exceed the overall 
limit for completion of all master’s degree requirements. 
Any extension of time must receive prior authorization by 
the dean of the school (or the dean’s designee) in which 
the course is offered. 

Report Delayed (RD) 

The RD symbol is used where a delay in the reporting of 
a final grade is due to circumstances beyond the control 
of the student. The symbol is assigned by the registrar and 
will be replaced as soon as possible. An RD shall not be 
included in calculation of a grade-point average. 

Student Records 

Grade Reports to Students 

A report of the final grades assigned in classes is sent to 
each student at the end of each semester. Many students 
also leave self-addressed post cards for instructors of 
specific courses to send them earlier reports. 

Class Grade-Point Averages 

Beginning with the fall semester 1978, information is in- 
cluded on student grade reports and permanent academic 
records that is intended to depict the level of achievement 
of students in relation to other students in a particular 
class. The Information is displayed in parentheses before 
each course grade. The first set of figures Indicates the 
number of students officially completing the course and 
the second set is the class grade-point average. In making 
the computations, marks of W, I, CR, NC, and SP are 
excluded. This same information is displayed for summer 
session classes, but not for extension or Intersession 
classes sponsored by the Office of Extended Education. 

Examinations 

Final examinations, if required by the instructor, will be 
given at times scheduled by the university. Once estab- 
lished, the final examination schedule may not be 
changed unless approved by the dean of the school. No 
makeup final examination will be given except for reason 
of illness or other verified emergencies. 

Credit by Examination 

Students may be granted credit toward the baccalaureate 
and to meet curriculum requirements in certain designated 
courses by the satisfactory completion of challenge ex- 
aminations in the courses. The examinations are to be 
comprehensive and administered by the sponsoring de- 
partments. Well in advance of the semester In which a 
challenge examination is to be administered, the student, 
using the appropriate university form, will secure written 
approval of his or her major adviser and the chair of the 


department in which the course is offered. In general, prior 
work or academic experience will be required. 

Courses to be offered as challenge examinations will be 
determined by the academic departments. Matriculated 
students may either enroll in these courses during regis- 
tration or add them during the first three weeks of the 
semester. The examination must be administered not later 
than the end of the third week of instruction. 

Upon successful completion of the examination, the In- 
structor will report the grade of CR. Students who fall the 
challenge examination may elect to continue the course 
for credit or may officially withdraw from the course 
through the normal class withdrawal procedure. The chal- 
lenge examination for any course may be administered 
only once. 

A maximum of 30 credits can be earned by challenge 
examination, including those earned by advanced place- 
ment. Credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the 
minimum residence requirements. 

Grade-Point Averages 

The numerical grade-point values in the grading system 
chart are Intended to give an exact determination of a 
student’s scholastic standing. To compute the grade-point 
average for course work at Fullerton, the grade-point val- 
ue of each grade, with the exception noted in the “Repeti- 
tion of Courses’* section, is multiplied first by the unit value 
of each course to obtain a total of all grade points earned. 
The total Is then divided by the total units attempted in all 
courses in which grades of A. B, C, D, F, U and WF were 
received. The resulting figure is the grade-point average. 

Repetition of Courses 

Undergraduate students may repeat courses at California 
State University, Fullerton for which D or failing grades 
were earned either at Cal State Fullerton or at other insti- 
tutions; in repeating such courses, the traditional grading 
system shall be used. In computing the grade-point aver- 
age of a student who repeats courses In which he or she 
received D or failing grades, only the most recently earned 
grades and grade points shall be used for the first 16 units 
repeated. Nevertheless, the original grade on the aca- 
demic record shall not be changed or eradicated. 

In exercising this option, an undergraduate student must 
repeat the course at Cal State Fullerton and may request 
application of this policy when a course has been repeat- 
ed. This should be accomplished using the appropriate 
petition form, immediately following the term In which the 
course has been completed, so that the student’s grade- 
point average can be revised. In the absence of student 
petitions, courses successfully repeated are routinely 
credited by the Office of Admissions and Records during 
degree requirement reviews at the time of graduation. 

In the case of any repetition beyond the 16-unit limit or In 


University Reguiations 


courses for which a C or better grade was awarded, both 
grades are considered in computing grade-point aver- 
ages. Successful repetition of a course originally passed 
carries no additional unit credit toward a degree or creden- 
tial except for certain courses such as independent study, 
practicum, or other courses specified in this catalog as 
“may be repeated for credit.” 

Students transferring from other colleges where courses 
were taken and repeated may be eligible for consideration 
under this policy. In general, the policy of the college 
where the course was repeated shall be followed; howev- 
er, units for the courses taken and repeated at the transfer 
institution are included in the 16-unit limitation. 

Grade Changes 

The university recognizes the long-standing prerogatives 
of faculty to set standards of performance and to apply 
them to Individual students. The university will seek to 
correct injustices to students but at the same time be- 
lieves that the Instructor’s judgment at the time the original 
grade is assigned is better than a later reconsideration of 
an individual case. Equity to all students is of fundamental 
concern. The following policies apply to changes of 
grades except for changes of Incomplete Authorized and 
Unauthorized Incomplete synibols. 

1. In general, all course grades are final when filed by the 
instructor in the end-of-term course grade report. Each 
student is notified by mall of the grades earned during 
the term, and these grades become a part of the official 
record. 

2. A change of grade may occur only in cases of clerical 
error, administrative error, or where the instructor 
reevaluates the original course assignments of a stu- 
dent and discovers an error in the original evaluation. 
A clerical error Is an error made by the instructor or an 
assistant in calculating or recording the grade. A 
change of grade shall not occur as a consequence of 
the acceptance of additional work or reexamination 
beyond the specified course requirements. 

3. A request for a change of grade shall be initiated by the 
student affected and shall be directed to the Instructor 
within 60 calendar days of the first day of classes of the 
regular semester following the award of the original 
grade. If the Instructor determines that there Is a valid 
basis for the change, a Change of Grade form shall be 
used to notify the Office of Admissions and Records. 
These forms are available in department offices. If the 
instructor determines that there Is not a valid basis for 
the change, and denies the student’s request, the in- 
structor’s decision is final. The student may file a peti- 
tion with the Academic Appeals Board on the basis of 
capricious or prejudicial treatment by the instructor. 

4. The Change of Grade form completed and signed by 
the instructor, noting the basis for the change, shall not 
be accepted by the registrar unless approved separate- 
ly by the department chair and school dean. 


5. If a request for change of grade is initiated after 60 
calendar days Into the following semester, it will be 
approved only in extraordinary circumstances. An ex- 
planation of such circumstances must accompany the 
request and must be approved separately by the in- 
structor, department chair, and the dean before accept- 
ance by the registrar. 

Academic Dishonesty 

Academic dishonesty (usually cheating or plagiarism) al- 
most always involves an attempt by a student to show 
possession of a level of knowledge or skill which he or she 
does not possess. 

Cheating is defined as the act of obtaining or attempting 
to obtain credit for work by the use of any dishonest, 
deceptive or fraudulent means. Examples of cheating in- 
clude, but are not limited to: using notes or aids or the help 
of other students on tests and examinations In ways other 
than those expressly permitted by the instructor, plagia- 
rism as defined below and tampering with the grading 
procedures. 

Plagiarism is defined as the act of taking the specific sub- 
stance of another and offering it as one’s own without 
giving credit to the source. When sources are used, ac- 
knowledgment of the original author or source must be 
made following standard scholarly practice. 

The initial responsibility for detecting and dealing with aca- 
demic dishonesty lies with the instructor concerned. An 
instructor who believes that an act of academic dishones- 
ty has occurred Is obligated to discuss the matter with the 
student Involved. The instructor should possess reason- 
able evidence, such as documents or personal observa- 
tion. However, if circumstances prevent consultation with 
the student, the instructor may take whatever action, sub- 
ject to student appeal, the instructor deems appropriate. 

An instructor who is convinced by the evidence that a 
student is guilty of academic dishonesty shall: 

1. Assign an appropriate academic penalty. This may 
range from an oral reprimand to an F in the course. To 
the extent that the faculty member considers the aca- 
demic dishonesty to manifest the student’s lack of 
scholarship and to reflect on the student’s academic 
performance and academic integrity In a course, the 
student’s grade should be adversely affected. Suggest- 
ed guidelines for appropriate actions are an oral repri- 
mand In cases where there is reasonable doubt that the 
student knew that his or her action constituted aca- 
demic dishonesty; an F on the particular paper, project 
or examination where the act of dishonesty was un- 
premeditated, or where there were significant mitigat- 
ing circumstances, or an F In the course where the 
dishonesty was premeditated or planned. 

2. Report to the student Involved, to the department chair, 
and to the vice president for student services the al- 
leged incident of academic dishonesty, including rele- 


Universlty Regulations 


vant documentation, and make recommendations for 
action that he or she deems appropriate. 

The vice president for student services shall maintain an 
academic dishonesty file of all cases of academic dis- 
honesty with the appropriate documentation. Students 
shall be informed when their names are Inserted Into the 
file and provided with copies of any appeals or disciplinary 
procedures In which they may become involved. The vice 
president for student services or his or her designees may 
initiate disciplinary proceedings under Title 5, California 
Administrative Code, Section 41301, and Chancellor’s Ex- 
ecutive Order 148; when two or more incidents involving 
the same student occur, he or she shall do so. Opportuni- 
ties for appeal regarding sanctions resulting from discipli- 
nary proceedings are provided by Executive Order 148. 

A student may appeal any action taken on a charge of 
academic dishonesty under the University Policy State- 
ment 300.030, “Academic Appeals.” If the Academic Ap- 
peals Board decides that a student is Innocent of 
academic dishonesty, then no entry shall be made in the 
academic dishonesty file. 

If the Academic Appeals Board decides either that a stu- 
dent is innocent of academic dishonesty, or that a faculty 
member has acted arbitrarily or capriciously towards a 
student, it shall Instruct the faculty member to meet with 
his or her department chair and, If appropriate, the dean 
of the school for the purpose of reassessing the student’s 
performance. If the faculty member refuses to do so, the 
matter shall be referred to an ad hoc committee, to be 
established by the department, which shall have ultimate 
authority to act in the case. 

Academic Renewal 

Under certain circumstances, the university may disregard 
up to two semesters or three quarters of previous under- 
graduate course work taken at any college or university 
from all considerations associated with requirements for 
the baccalaureate. These circumstances are: 

1. that the student has requested the action formally and 
has presented evidence that work completed in the 
terms under consideration Is substandard and not rep- 
resentative of present scholastic ability and level of 
performance; and 

2. that the level of performance represented by the terms 
under consideration was due to extenuating circum- 


stances; and 

3. that there Is every evidence that the student would find 
It necessary to complete additional terms to qualify for 
the baccalaureate if the request were not approved. 

Final determination that one or more terms shall be disre- 
garded in the determination of eligibility for graduation 
shall be based upon a careful review of evidence by the 
Review Committee for Academic Renewal and shall be 
made only when: 

1 . five years have elapsed since the most recent work to 
be disregarded was completed; and 

2. the student has completed at Fullerton, since the most 
recent work to be disregarded was completed, 15 se- 
mester units with at least a 3.0 grade-point average, or 
30 semester units with at least a 2.5 GPA, or 45 semes- 
ter units with at least a 2.0 GPA. Work completed at 
another Institution cannot be used to satisfy this re- 
quirement. 

When such action is taken, the student’s permanent aca- 
demic record shall be annotated so that It is readily evi- 
dent to all users of the record that no work taken during 
the disregarded terms, even If satisfactory, may apply to- 
ward bacalaureate requirements. All work must remain 
legible on the record ensuring a true and complete aca- 
demic history. 

This policy is not Intended to merely allow students a 
means by which they may improve their overall grade- 
point averages. 

Transcripts 

Official transcripts of courses taken at the university are 
issued only with the written permission of the student 
concerned. Partial transcripts are not issued. A fee of $4 
for each transcript must be received before the transcript 
can be released. 

Normally, transcripts are available within three working 
days, except at the end of the semester when the student 
should allow about 10 days after the last day of the semes- 
ter. 

Transcripts from other institutions, which have been pre- 
sented for admission or evaluation, become a part of the 
student’s permanent academic file and are not returned or 
copied for distribution. Students desiring transcripts cov- 
ering work attempted elsewhere should request them 
from the institutions concerned. 


University Reguiations 


Continuous Residency 

Regulations 



Good Standing 

Good standing indicates that a student is eligible to con- 
tinue and is free from financial obligation to the university. 
A student under academic disqualification, disciplinary 
suspension or disciplinary expulsion is not eligible to re- 
ceive a statement of good standing on transcripts issued 
by the university or on other documents. 

Choice of Requirements 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular 
sessions and continuing in the same curriculum at any 
campus of the California community colleges or in any 
combination of California community colleges and cam- 
puses of The California State University may, for purposes 
of meeting graduation requirements, elect to meet the 
graduation requirements of such campuses from which he 
or she will graduate in effect either at the time of entering 
the curriculum or at the time of graduation therefrom, ex- 
cept that substitutions for discontinued courses may be 
authorized or required by the proper university authorities. 

Stop-Out Policy 

With certain exceptions, undergraduate students and 
postbaccalaureate unclassified students may be absent 
for one semester and maintain their continuing student 
status. This includes election of curriculum requirements 
for graduation and eligibility to register for the next semes- 
ter. The exceptions are as follows: 

Disqualified Students — Students who are disqualified at 
the end of a semester and have not been reinstated will 
not receive registration materials; they must apply for 
readmission, and if admitted, may be subject to new 
curriculum requirements. 

Foreign-Visa Students — Students with foreign visas are 
required to maintain continuous enrollment. The stop- 
out policy is not applicable. 

Students absent for more than one semester, as well as 
those who attend another institution while absent for any 
period, must apply for readmission should they wish to 
return to Fullerton. 


4—79417 


University Regulations 


Leave of Absence 

An undergraduate student may petition for a leave of ab- 
sence and, if approved, may upon return continue under 
the curriculum requirements that applied to the enrollment 
prior to the absence. A leave of absence may be granted 
for a maximum of one year. Illness is the only routinely 
approved reason for a leave of absence. Students should 
realize that an approved leave of absence does not re- 
serve a place for them in the university; they must reapply. 
The leave of absence policy for conditionally classified 
and classified graduate students is defined in the "Gradu- 
ate Regulations" section of this catalog. 

Withdrawal from the University 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the university 
during a semester must complete a Change of Program 
form and drop petition. See the section on refund of fees 
for possible refunds. No student may withdraw after the 
date shown on the university calendar as the last day of 
instruction. Complete withdrawal from the university is ac- 
complished by following the procedures for dropping 
classes. 

Retention, Probation 
and Disqualification 

For purposes of determining a student’s ability to remain 
in the university both quality of performance and progress 
towards the educational objective will be considered. 

Academic Probation 

An undergraduate student shall be placed on academic 
probation if in any semester the cumulative grade-point 
average or the grade-point average at Fullerton falls be- 
low 2.0 (grade of C on a four-point scale). The student 
shall be advised of probation status promptly and, except 
in unusual instances, before the start of the next consecu- 
tive enrollment period. 

An undergraduate student shall be removed from aca- 
demic probation and restored to clear standing upon 
achieving a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 in all 
academic work attempted, in ail such work attempted at 
Fullerton, and Is making satisfactory progress towards his 
or her educational objective. 

A postbaccalaureate student (credential, unclassified or 
undeclared status [but not second baccalaureate degree 
students]) shall be subject to academic probation if after 
completing 12 or more units his or her postbaccalaureate 
cumulative grade-point average for units attempted at Cal- 
ifornia State University, Fullerton falls below a 2.50 aver- 


age. The GPA will determine whether a student is subject 
to probation only after the student has completed 12 se- 
mester units. 

A graduate student enrolled in a graduate degree program 
in either conditionally classified or classified standing shall 
be subject to academic probation if he or she fails to 
maintain a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 
(grade of B on a four-point scale) In all units attempted. 

Academic Disqualification 

An undergraduate student on academic probation shall be 
subject to academic disqualification if: 

1. as a lower-division student (fewer than 60 semester 
units of college work completed) he or she falls 15 or 
more grade points below a 2.0 average on all college 
units attempted or in all units attempted at this institu- 
tion; or 

2. as a junior (60 to 89/2 semester units of college work 
completed) he or she falls nine or more grade points 
below a 2.0 average on all college units attempted or 
in all units attempted at this institution; or 

3. as a senior (90 or more semester units of college work 
completed) he or she falls six or more grade points 
below a 2.0 average on all college units attempted or 
in all units attempted at this institution. 

A graduate student enrolled in a graduate degree program 
shall be subject to disqualification if while on probation 
sufficient grade points are not achieved to remove proba- 
tionary status. Disqualification may be either from further 
registration in a particular program or from further enroll- 
ment in the university, as determined by appropriate cam- 
pus authority. 

A postbaccalaureate student who is on probation shall be 
subject to disqualification if he or she fails to earn at least 
a 2.50 grade-point average each term after the completion 
of 12 units at California State University, Fullerton in post- 
baccalaureate status. Disqualification may be either from 
further registration as a postbaccalaureate, credential or 
certificate program student or from enrollment at Califor- 
nia State University, Fullerton, as determined by the vice 
president for academic affairs or designee. 

Student Conduct 

The university properly assumes that all students are in 
attendance to secure a sound education and that they will 
conduct themselves as mature citizens of the campus 
community. Compliance with all regulations of the univer- 
sity is therefore expected. If, however, on any occasion a 
student or an organization is alleged to have compro- 
mised accepted university standards, appropriate judici- 
ary procedures shall be initiated through the established 


University Regulations 


university process. Every effort will be made to encourage 
and support the development of self-discipline and control 
by students and student organizations. The vice president 
for student services, aided by members of the faculty, is 
responsible to the president of the university for the 
behavior of students in their relationships to the university. 
The president in turn is responsible to the chancellor and 
the trustees of The California State University and Col- 
leges, who themselves are governed by specific laws of 
the State of California. 

Students have the right to appeal certain disciplinary ac- 
tions taken by appropriate university authorities. Regula- 
tions governing original hearings and appeal rights and 
procedures have been carefully detailed to provide max- 
imum protection to both the Individual charged and the 
university community. 

If the Issue cannot be resolved informally, students should 
consult with the coordinator of academic appeals. 

Inappropriate conduct by students or by applicants for 
admission is subject to discipline as provided in Sections 
41301 through 41304 of Title 5, California Administrative 
Code. These sections follow. 

Article 1. 1, Title 5, California 
Administrative Code. 

41301. Expulsion, Suspension and Probation of Stu- 
dents. Following procedures consonant with due proc- 
ess established pursuant to Section 41304, any student of 
a campus may be expelled, suspended, placed on proba- 
tion or given a lesser sanction for one or more of the 
following causes which must be campus-related: 

(a) Cheating or plagiarism in connection with an aca- 
demic program at a campus. 

(b) Forgery, alteration or misuse of campus documents, 
records, or identification of knowingly furnishing false 
information to a campus. 

(c) Misrepresentation of oneself or of an organization to 
be an agent of a campus. 

(d) Obstruction or disruption, on or off campus property, 
of the campus educational process, administrative 
process, or other campus function. 

(e) Physical abuse on or off campus property of the per- 
son or property of any member of the campus com- 
munity or of members of his or her family or the threat 
of such physical abuse. 

(f) Theft of, or non-accidental damage to, campus prop- 
erty, or property in the possession of, or owned by, a 
member of the campus community. 

(g) Unauthorized entry Into, unauthorized use of, or 
misuse of campus property. 

(h) On campus property, the sale or knowing possession 
of dangerous drugs, restricted dangerous drugs, or 
narcotics as those terms are used In California stat- 
utes, except when lawfully prescribed pursuant to 
medical or dental care, or when lawfully permitted for 


the purpose of research. Instruction or analysis. 

(i) Knowing possession or use of explosives, dangerous 
chemicals or deadly weapons on campus property or 
at a campus function without prior authorization of the 
campus president. 

(j) Engaging in lewd, indecent, or obscene behavior on 
campus property or at a campus function. 

(k) Abusive behavior directed toward, or hazing of, a 
member of the campus community. 

(l) Violation of any order of a campus president, notice of 
which had been given prior to such violation and dur- 
ing the academic term in which the violation occurs, 
either by publication in the campus newspaper, or by 
posting on an official bulletin board designated for this 
purpose, and which order is not Inconsistent with any 
of the other provisions of this Section. 

(m) Soliciting or assisting another to do any act which 
would subject a student to expulsion, suspension or 
probation pursuant to this Section. 

(n) For purposes of this Article, the following terms are 
defined: 

(1) The term “member of the campus community” 
Is defined as meaning California State University 
trustees, academic, non-academic and adminis- 
trative personnel, students, and other persons 
while such other persons are on campus proper- 
ty or at a campus function. 

(2) The term “campus property” Includes: 

(A) Real or personal property in the possession 
of, or under the control of, the Board of 
Trustees of The California State University, 
and 

(B) All campus feeding, retail, or residence 
facilities whether operated by a campus or 
by a campus auxiliary organization. 

(3) The term “deadly weapons” Includes any instru- 
ment or weapon of the kind commonly known as 
a blackjack, sling shot, billy, sandclub, sandbag, 
metal knuckles, any dirk, dagger, switchblade 
knife, pistol, revolver, or any other fi. aarm, any 
knife having a blade longer than five inches, any 
razor with an unguarded blade, and any metal 
pipe or bar used or intended to be used as a club. 

(4) The term “behavior” Includes conduct and ex- 
pression. 

(5) The term “hazing” means any method of Initia- 
tion Into a student organization or any pastime or 
amusement engaged in with regard to such an 
organization which causes, or is likely to cause, 
bodily danger, or physical or emotional harm, to 
any member of the campus community; but the 
term “hazing” does not Include customary ath- 
letic events or other similar contests or competi- 
tions. 

(o) This Section Is not adopted pursuant to Education 
Code Section 89031. 

(p) Notwithstanding any amendment or repeal pursuant 


University Regulations 


to the resolution by which any provision of this Article 
is amended, all acts and omissions occurring prior to 
that effective date shall be subject to the provisions 
of this Article as in effect immediately prior to such 
effective date. 

41302. Disposition of Fees: Campus Emergency; In- 
terim Suspension. The President of the campus may 
place on probation, suspend, or expel a student for one 
or more of the causes enumerated in Section 41301. No 
fees or tuition paid by or for such student for the semester, 
quarter, or summer session In which he or she is suspend- 
ed or expelled shall be refunded. If the student is readmit- 
ted before the close of the semester, quarter, or summer 
session in which he or she is suspended, no additional 
tuition or fees shall be required of the student on account 
of the suspension. 

During periods of campus emergency, as determined by 
the President of the individual campus, the President may, 
after consultation with the Chancellor, place into immedi- 
ate effect any emergency regulations, procedures, and 
other measures deemed necessary or appropriate to 
meet the emergency, safeguard persons and property, 
and maintain educational activities. 

41303. Conduct by Applicants for Admission. Not- 
withstanding any provision In this Chapter 1 to the con- 
trary, admission or readmission may be qualified or denied 
to any person who, while not enrolled as a student, com- 
mits acts which, were he enrolled as a student, would be 
the basis for disciplinary proceedings pursuant to Sec- 
tions 41301 or 41302. Admission or readmission may be 
qualified or denied to any person who, while a student, 
commits acts which are subject to disciplinary action pur- 
suant to Section 41301 or Section 41302. Qualified admis- 
sion or denial of admission in such cases shall be 
determined under procedures adopted pursuant to Sec- 
tion 41304. 

The President may immediately impose an interim sus- 
pension in ail cases in which there is reasonable cause to 
believe that such an immediate suspension is required in 
order to protect lives or property and to insure the mainte- 
nance of order. A student so placed on interim suspension 
shall be given prompt notice of charges and the opportu- 
nity for a hearing within 10 days of the imposition of interim 
suspension. During the period of interim suspension, the 
student shall not, without prior written permission of the 
President or designated representative, enter any campus 
of the California State University other than to attend the 
hearing. Violation of any condition of interim suspension 
shall be grounds for expulsion. 

41304. Student Disciplinary Procedures for The Cali- 
fornia State University. The Chancellor shall prescribe, 
and may from time to time revise, a code of student disci- 


plinary procedures for The California State University. 
Subject to other applicable law, this code shall provide for 
determinations of fact and sanctions to be applied for 
conduct which is a ground for discipline under Sections 
41301 or 41302, and for qualified admission or denial of 
admission under Section 41303; the authority of the cam- 
pus president In such matters; conduct-related determina- 
tions on financial aid eligibility and termination; alternative 
kinds of proceedings, including proceedings conducted by 
a hearing officer; time limitations; notice; conduct of hear- 
ings, Including provisions governing evidence, a record, 
and review; and such other related matters as may be 
appropriate. The chancellor shall report to the board his 
actions taken under this section. 

Debts Owed to the University 

Should a student or former student fail to pay a debt owed 
to the university, the university may “withhold permission 
to register, to use facilities for which a fee is authorized to 
be charged, to receive services, materials, food or mer- 
chandise or any combination of the above from any per- 
son owing a debt” until the debt Is paid (see Title 5, 
California Administrative Code, Sections 42380 and 
42381 ) . For example, the institution may withhold such a 
service as furnishing copies of a student’s transcript. If a 
student believes that he or she does not owe all or part 
of an unpaid obligation, the student should consult the 
business office. The business office, or another office to 
which the student may be referred, will review the perti- 
nent Information, including information the student may 
wish to present, and will advise the student of its conclu- 
sions with respect to the debt. 

Student Rights 

Right of Petition 

Students may petition for review of certain university aca- 
demic regulations when unusual circumstances exist. It 
should be noted, however, that academic regulations 
when they are contained in Title 5, California Administra- 
tive Code, are not subject to petition. 

Petition forms are available in the Office of Admissions 
and Records and must first be reviewed and signed by 
appropriate officers before being reviewed by the univer- 
sity petitions committee. This committee will take action 
on the petition and the student will be notified of the deci- 
sion. Results of the action will be placed in the student’s 
folder In the Office of Admissions and Records. 

The petitions committee members shall consist of the 
associate dean of each school, or designee, a profes- 
sional staff member appointed by the dean of admissions 
and records, and the assistant registrar, who will serve as 
the secretary. 


University Regulations 


Right of Noncompliance 

Certain university activities either within or outside of the 
classroom may involve varying degrees of risk to the par- 
ticipants. It is university policy that the instructor directing 
such activities fully divulge to all potential participants the 
specific nature of such risks and obtain from them their 
expressed or implied consent prior to undertaking activi- 
ties. 

The student who at any time comes to believe that the 
risks, whether physical or psychological, are excessive 
has the responsibility to withdraw from participation at the 
time and to inquire of the instructor if there are alternative 
means of fulfilling the requirements without penalty. If 
there is none, the student may petition for withdrawal from 
the course without penalty or appeal for an appropriate 
modification of the activity. The appeal may be made ei- 
ther to the chair of the department concerned, or to the 
chair of the Committee on Activities Involving Human Sub- 
jects, or both. 

Right of Academic Appeal 

The right of due process, appeal and peer judgment is 
established by the Student Bill of Rights and Responsibili- 
ties for students who feel they have been treated capri- 
ciously or with prejudice by faculty or administrators. 
Students should make every effort to resolve the issue 
informally by consulting the individual concerned, and if 
necessary the department chair and dean of the school. 

Students who still believe the problem has not been re- 
solved should consult with the coordinator of academic 
appeals. Upon the student’s request, the coordinator will 
convene the Academic Appeals Board to hear the stu- 
dent’s complaint. Students must initiate the appeals proc- 
ess within one month after they could reasonably be 
expected to be aware of the action in question. 

Copies of the governing documents are available in the 
Academic Appeals Office. 

Privacy Rights of Students 

The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 
1974 (20 U.S.C. 1232g) and regulations adopted thereun- 
der (45 C.F.R. 99), set out requirements designed to pro- 
tect the privacy of parents and students concerning 
education records maintained by the institution. Specifi- 
cally, the statute and regulations govern access to re- 
cords maintained by the university, and the release of 
such records. In brief, the law provides that the university 
must provide students access to official records directly 
related to them and an opportunity for a hearing to chal- 
lenge such records on the grounds that they are inaccu- 
rate, misleading or otherwise inappropriate; the right to a 
hearing under the law does not include any right to chal- 


lenge the appropriateness of a grade as determined by 
the professor. The law generally requires that written con- 
sent of the student be received before releasing personal- 
ly identifiable data about the student from records to other 
than a specified list of exceptions. The institution has 
adopted a set of policies and procedures concerning im- 
plementation of the Act and the regulations on the cam- 
pus. Copies of these policies and procedures may be 
obtained from the vice president for student services. 
Among the types of Information included In the campus 
statement of policies and procedures Is: (1) the types of 
student records and the information contained therein; 
(2) the official responsible for the maintenance of each 
type of record; (3) the location of access lists which indi- 
cate persons requesting or receiving information from the 
record; (4) policies for reviewing and expunging records; 
(5) the access rights of students; (6) the procedures for 
challenging the content of student records; (7) the cost 
which will be charged for reproducing copies of records, 
and (8) the right of the student to file a complaint with the 
Department of Education. An office and review board 
have been established by the Department to investigate 
and adjudicate violations and complaints. The office 
designated for this purpose is: The Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), U.S. Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare, 330 C Street, Room 
4511, Washington, D.C. 20202. 

The campus is authorized under the act to release directo- 
ry Information concerning students. Directory information 
may include the student’s name, address, telephone list- 
ing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participa- 
tion in officially recognized activities and sports, weight 
and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attend- 
ance, degrees and awards received, and the most recent 
previous educational agency or institution attended by the 
student. Directory information is subject to release by the 
university at any time unless it has received prior written 
objection from the student specifying Information that the 
student requests not be released. Written objections 
should be sent to the vice president for student services. 
Further details are published each semester in the class 
schedule. 

The campus is authorized to provide access to student 
records to campus officials and employees who have le- 
gitimate educational interests in such access. These per- 
sons are those who have responsibilities in connection 
with the university’s academic, administrative or service 
functions and who have reason for using student records 
connected with university or other related academic re- 
sponsibilities. 

Use of Social Security Number 

Applicants are requested, but not required, to include their 
social security number in designated places on applica- 
tions for admission pursuant to the authority contained in 


University Regulations 


Title 5, California Administrative Code, Section 41201. The 
social security number is used on many campuses as a 
means of Identifying records pertaining to the student as 
well as Identifying the student for purposes of financial aid 
eligibility and disbursement and the repayment of financial 


aid and other debts payable to the institution. At Fullerton, 
student records are identified by a university-assigned stu- 
dent file number, not the social security number, though 
the latter is used in financial aids administration and in 
student payroll records. 


University Regulations 


Graduate 

Regulations 



The regulations contained herein are in addition to other 
policies and procedures applying to both undergraduates 
and graduates which may be found in the preceding sec- 
tion of this catalog and the class schedule. Also, individual 
schools, divisions and departments may have established 
particular rules governing programs offered. 

Since all policies and procedures are subject to change, 
by appropriate authority, students should consult class 
schedules and other official announcements for possible 
revision of policies and procedures stated herein. 


103 





Graduate Applications 


All applicants for any type of postbaccalaureate or gradu- 
ate standing (e.g., master’s degree applicants, those 
seeking credentials, and those interested in taking 
courses for personal or professional growth) must file a 
complete application within the appropriate filing period. 
Second baccalaureate degree candidates should apply as 
undergraduate degree applicants. A complete application 
for postbaccalaureate or graduate standing includes all of 
the forms and fees described in the application booklet, 
including the supplementary graduate admissions ap- 
plication. Applicants who completed undergraduate de- 
gree requirements and graduated the preceding term are 
also required to complete and submit an application and 
the nonrefundable application fee. In the event that an 
applicant wishes to be assured of initial consideration by 
more than one campus, it is necessary to submit a sepa- 
rate application (including fee) to each. 

Applications may be obtained from the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records or the Graduate Studies Office of any 
California State University campus. Instructions for com- 
pleting the application forms are included In the material 
supplied. Since some programs require the completion of 
an additional form as part of the application process, stu- 
dents should inquire concerning this possibility at the of- 
fice of the academic unit offering the particular program. 

For further information on application procedures (im- 
pacted programs, filing period dates, space resen/ations) , 
consult the “Admissions Policies” section of this catalog. 

Transcripts 

When an applicant for graduate standing, with a master’s 
degree objective, or a master’s degree and credential ob- 
jective, receives notice of a space reservation, as above, 
requests should be submitted to all of the institutions of 
higher learning in which previously registered, requesting 
that two o/f/c/a/ transcripts from each institution be sent to 
the university Admissions and Records office. 

One copy of each transcript will be forwarded to the aca- 
demic unit offering the degree program specified by the 
student as the objective and the other will be retained for 
use by both the Admissions and Records Office and the 
Graduate Affairs Office. 

Students who receive their baccalaureate degree at Cal 
State Fullerton and continuing graduate students who 
change their declared objective subsequent to admission 
must obtain whatever additional transcripts are needed to 
provide two complete sets, but do not need to request Cal 



Graduate Regulations 



state Fullerton transcripts. 

Applicants for a credential program only must submit two 
copies of transcripts of all college or university attend- 
ance. 

Postbaccalaureate applicants with no degree or creden- 
tial objective must submit a transcript from the college or 
university where the baccalaureate was earned. Further, 
one transcript from other Institutions attended Is required 
as necessary so that Cal State Fullerton has a complete 
record of the last 60 semester units attempted prior to 
enrollment at Fullerton. 

All transcripts must be received directly from the issuing 
institutions and become official records of the university; 
such transcripts therefore cannot be returned or reissued. 
Transcripts which Include course work from other than the 
issuing institution are not sufficient evidence of course 
work taken elsewhere. Foreign language transcripts must 
be accompanied by certified English translations. 

Tests 

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or another 
test, may be required for conditionally classified admis- 
sion, or subsequently for the granting of classified stand- 
ing. Test requirements vary from department to 
department. Students should refer to master’s degree re- 
quirements outlined by each department in the “Curric- 
ula” section of this catalog. Applications and Information 
on test dates for nationally administered tests (e.g. GRE, 
GMAT) are available in the testing center or Graduate 
Affairs Office. 

TOEFL Requirement 

All graduate and postbaccalaureate applicants, regard- 
less of citizenship, whose preparatory education was prin- 
cipally in a language other than English must demonstrate 
competence in English. Those who do not possess a 


bachelor’s degree from a postsecondary institution where 
English is the principal language of Instruction must re- 
ceive a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

International Students 

See procedures outlined In the international student por- 
tion of the “Admissions Policies” section of this catalog. 

Second Master’s Degree or 
Concentration 

Applicants desiring to work for a second master’s degree 
must request permission before applying for admission. 
Students who have completed a master’s degree at Cal 
State Fullerton In one concentration and wish to enroll In 
another concentration must also request permission al- 
though a second degree will not be awarded. 

A letter should be sent to the Dean of Graduate Studies 
giving supportive reasons and indicating the university 
awarding the first master’s degree, the major, and the year 
of award. Units used for the first degree or concentration 
may not be applied to the second. Approval for admission 
to graduate standing in the second degree program will be 
given only after the first degree has been awarded. 

Nonaccredited Schools 

An applicant who Is a graduate of a nonaccredited school 
must apply for admission as an undergraduate to com- 
plete requirements for a bachelor’s degree from this insti- 
tution. However, once admitted, a student in this category 
who gives evidence of unusual promise and superior 
background may petition for graduate standing as condi- 
tionally classified. If the petition is granted, the student 
may then proceed In the graduate program. For further 
information, contact the Graduate Affairs Office. 


Graduate Regulations 


Graduate Admissions 


Following completion of application procedures and 
subsequent review of the student’s eligibility by the Admis- 
sions Office and appropriate academic unit, the student 
will be notified by the Admissions Office concerning ad- 
mission. Only a written notice from the Admissions Office 
is valid proof of admission. Academic advisement prior to 
admission is tentative and cannot be construed as grant- 
ing official admission to a program or establishing require- 
ments for the degree. 

Students may apply for a degree objective, a credential or 
certificate objective, or no program objective. Four admis- 
sion categories are defined in terms of these academic 
objectives. 

Postbaccalaureate Standing: 
Unclassified 

To qualify for admission with no degree objective, stu- 
dents must (1) hold an acceptable bachelor’s degree 
from a regionally accredited institution or have equivalent 
preparation as determined by the appropriate campus au- 
thority; (2) have a grade point average of at least 2.5 (A 
= 4.0) in the last 60 semester (90 quarter) units; and (3) 
have been in good standing at the last college attended. 
In unusual circumstances, exceptions may be made to 
these criteria. 

Admission with postbaccalaureate-unclassified standing 
does not constitute admission to graduate degree or cre- 
dential programs. If a student wishes to change academic 
objective after admission, an application for change of 
objective must be filed in the Admissions Office. 

Postbaccalaureate Standing: 
Classified 

To qualify for admission with a credential or certificate 
objective, students must (1) meet the requirements for 
postbaccalaureate-unclassified standing and (2) satisfy 
any additional professional, personal, scholastic, and 
other standards, including qualifying examinations. Refer 
to specific credential requirements under the departmen- 
tal section of this catalog. 


Graduate Standing: 
Conditionally Classified 

To qualify for admission with a graduate degree objective, 
students must (1) meet the admission requirements for 
postbaccalaureate-unclassified standing and (2) meet 
any additional requirements of the particular program in- 
cluding a favorable recommendation from the academic 
unit. 

An applicant who has deficiencies in prerequisite prepara- 
tion may be considered for admission in conditionally clas- 
sified standing with the approval and recommendation of 
the appropriate campus authority. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student admitted in conditionally classified standing 
may subsequently be granted classified standing In an 
authorized graduate degree curriculum If professional, 
personal, scholastic, or other standards Including qualify- 
ing examinations are met. Evaluation of the student’s 
prerequisites and assignment of courses required to 
remove deficiencies is made by the academic unit. For 
specific information on prerequisites to classified stand- 
ing, consult departmental program requirements. 

Classified standing is normally granted when all prerequi- 
sites have been satisfactorily completed, the official study 
plan formulated, and the recommendation made by the 
appropriate graduate adviser and committee to the Dean 
of Graduate Studies who gives final approval. An eligible 
student may be granted classified standing prior to the 
first registration or during the first semester of registration. 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken at this 
Institution prior to classified standing will be applied to a 
master’s degree study plan. Any acceptable transfer work 
is excluded from the nine units permitted. 

It is the student’s responsibility to initiate the request for 
classified standing In the appropriate academic unit by 
making an appointment with the graduate adviser. The 
student will be sent a copy of the approved study plan by 
the Graduate Affairs Office. Copies will be filed In the 
academic unit, university records, and the Graduate Af- 
fairs Office. A student is not officially classified until an 
approved study plan is on file in the Graduate Affairs Of- 
fice. 


Graduate Regulations 



Requirements for the 
Master’s Degree 


To be granted the master’s degree, a student must have 
been classified, advanced to candidacy, and completed a 
satisfactory pattern of study in an approved field. Require- 
ments which apply to all programs follow. For specific 
requirements of particular programs, see the program de- 
scriptions in the departmental section of this catalog. 

Each student’s program for a master’s degree (including 
eligibility, classified standing, candidacy, and award of the 
degree) must be approved by the graduate program ad- 
viser, the graduate committee, and the Dean of Graduate 
Studies. 



University Writing Requirement 

Students working toward a master’s degree are required 
to demonstrate writing ability commensurate with the bac- 
calaureate degree. This requirement should be met within 
the first nine units of graduate work by successfully com- 
pleting one of the following: 

1 . An upper-division writing requirement at any CSU cam- 
pus. 

2. An upper-division course at another university equiva- 
lent to a course which meets the Cal State Fullerton 
requirement. Such equivalence must be certified by the 
department or program responsible for the student’s 
academic work. 

3. Cal State Fullerton Examination in Writing Proficiency. 

4. An upper-division or graduate-level course that is certi- 
fied as meeting the writing requirement and is approved 
by the department or program responsible for the stu- 
dent’s academic work. The grade received must be a 
C or better. 

Departments and programs may, at their discretion and 
with approval of the Graduate Education Committee, es- 
tablish additional writing requirements for their graduate 
students. For further information, students should consult 
their program adviser or the Graduate Affairs Office. 

Study Plan 

General requirements for the master’s degree study plan 
include: 

1 . A minimum of 30 approved semester units, or more, as 
determined by the particular program. 

2. A minimum of 21 semester units In residence (transfer 


Graduate Regulations 



and Cal State Fullerton extension or intersession 
course work are not considered to be in residence) . 

3. All transfer work equivalent to Fullerton graduate work 
and acceptable by the institution where taken for 
credit toward a comparable degree. A unit of course 
work taken at a college or university on the quarter 
system will be considered as equivalent to two-thirds 
of a unit when such course work is considered accept- 
able as transfer work. 

4. Upper-division and graduate-level courses only (note 
limitation on 300-level courses In course numbering 
code description). 

5. Not less than one-half of the total units in graduate 
(500-level) courses. 

6. Not more than six semester units for a thesis, If a 
thesis is required. 

7. A maximum of six units of independent study (excep- 
tions subject to approval by the appropriate school 
dean). 

8. No courses taken to satisfy prerequisite requirements 
included in the minimum of 30 units. 

9. None of the following: correspondence courses, cred- 
it by examination, or similar. 

10. No courses with nontraditional grades (e.g., CR, S, 

P). 

11. A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 (B) In all 
courses attempted to satisfy requirements for the de- 
gree. 

12. All courses completed within five years of the date of 
award of the degree or satisfactorily validated. 

13. All courses taken after the baccalaureate (or post- 
baccalaureate credit granted) and not credited to- 
ward another degree. 

14. A final evaluation, which may be a thesis, a project, a 
comprehensive examination, or any combination of 
these. 

The approved study plan is valid as long as the student 
maintains continuous enrollment in regular semesters at 
the university; othenvise it is necessary to reapply and 
meet any changed or additional requirements approved in 
the interim. 

Election of Curriculum 

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular 
semesters and continuing In the same curriculum may 
elect to meet the degree requirements in effect either at 
the time of entering the curriculum or at the time of com- 
pletion of degree requirements, except that substitution 
for discontinued courses may be approved by the gradu- 
ate program adviser. 

Advisers and Committees 

University policy provides that each student’s program for 
the master’s degree shall be under the guidance of an 


adviser and committee. In some areas a graduate pro- 
gram adviser has been designated to give overall supen/i- 
sion for the graduate program. In others, the graduate 
program adviser also serves as the individual student’s 
adviser. The student’s adviser is usually a member of the 
committee. The committee is responsible for all major 
recommendations to the Dean of Graduate Studies re- 
garding the student’s achievement of classified standing, 
advancement to candidacy, and completion of the mas- 
ter’s degree. 

It is the responsibility of the student to arrange appoint- 
ments for advisement and other information in the office 
of the academic unit offering the degree program. As a 
minimum, the student should obtain advisement (1 ) either 
prior to or during the first semester of attendance, (2) 
when requesting classified standing, and (3) when apply- 
ing for a graduation check prior to the final semester. 

It is advisable for the student to maintain a personal file 
of transcripts and other evidences of grades and achieve- 
ments, and to carry these whenever seeking advisement. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

A student who has been granted classified standing is 
normally advanced to candidacy after a request is filed for 
graduation by the student and an affirmative recommen- 
dation made by the graduate program adviser. A minimum 
grade-point average of 3.0 (B) for all study plan course 
work is required; other scholastic, professional and per- 
sonal standards, the passing of examinations, and other 
qualifications, may be prescribed. Only those students 
who continue to demonstrate a satisfactory level of scho- 
lastic competence and fitness, as determined by the ap- 
propriate authorities, shall be eligible to continue In 
graduate programs. 

Completion of Requirements 
and Award of Degree 

The degree is awarded upon the satisfactory completion 
of all general state and university requirements, the spe- 
cific requirements for the particular program, the recom- 
mendation of the appropriate graduate adviser and 
committee (advancement to candidacy), and the ap- 
proval of the faculty and the Dean of Graduate Studies. It 
is highly recommended that all work for the degree, ex- 
cept final course examinations, be submitted by the last 
day of classes. In order to assure granting of the degree 
by the end of the semester or session. 

If a thesis is required. It must be deposited in the Titan 
Bookstore In accordance with the Instruction shown under 
“Theses and Projects,” no later than the last day of final 
examinations for the semester or session in which the 
degree is to be awarded. 


Graduate Regulations 


It is the student’s responsibility to file an application for a 
graduation check and pay the graduation and diploma fee 
prior to the beginning of the final semester. Forms are 
available at the Admissions and Records information 
counter, the Graduate Affairs Office, and the Records Of- 
fice graduation unit. 

This application initiates review of degree requirements 
and formal approval by the faculty as well as serving as 
a diploma order. The last date to file the application is 
listed in the academic calendar of the class schedule for 
each regular semester. Candidates for August graduation 
must file their requests prior to registration for the spring 
semester. 

Students who fail to complete as planned must update the 
application for a graduation check and do so by the appro- 
priate deadline. An additional fee may be required. 

Since Cal State Fullerton is on the semester basis, 
master’s degree programs are ordinarily completed in 
January and June. A student who wishes to complete 
requirements during the summer must obtain written ap- 
proval prior to summer term on a form available in the 
Graduate Affairs Office. The approved form must be re- 
turned to Graduate Affairs during the spring semester. 

The effective date of graduation will be the last day of the 
specific term in which requirements are completed. 

Commencement ceremonies are held only at the end of 
the spring semester. Students completing requirements at 
the end of the fall and spring semesters and during the 
following summer may participate in those ceremonies. 
Information concerning commencement activities is sent 
to students by the Registrar during the final semester. If 
preferred, diplomas may include major and, for certain 
degrees, a concentration. Arrangements for cap, gown 
and hood rental are made in the Titan Bookstore. 


Time Limit for Completion 

All course work on the master’s degree study plan should 
normally be completed within five years. The five-year 
time limit is defined as a total of 10 semesters for enroll- 
ment In and completion of ail course work and other re- 
quirements for award of the degree. 

The time may be further extended if warranted by individ- 
ual circumstances and if the outdated work is validated by 

(1) a comprehensive examination in the relevant course, 

(2) an additional course, or (3) such other demonstration 
of competence as may be prescribed. Requests for updat- 
ing should be made to appropriate graduate studies com- 
mittees through the graduate program adviser. Students 
may obtain a form for this purpose, “Petition for Validating 
Outdated Coursework,” In the university Graduate Affairs 
Office. 

When an examination is administered or the alternative 
completed, a report of successful completion is made to 
the Dean of Graduate Studies. The grade received on the 
original course will be used on the master’s degree study 
plan, rather than the CR grade used for challenge exami- 
nations. if an additional course is prescribed, the units and 
grades for both courses will be applied to the study plan. 

Changes in Study Plan 

If a classified graduate student wishes to make a change 
in the approved study plan, a request should be made to 
the appropriate graduate program adviser. Requests must 
be made prior to registration for any course work to be 
substituted or added. No course may be removed from the 
study plan after a student has taken It. Forms which may 
be used to file a request are available in the Graduate 
Affairs Office. 

Changes in study plan may also be warranted by outdated 
coursework or grade-point average (see “Time Limit for 
Completion” and “Grade-point Average Standards”). 


Graduate Regulations 



Graduate Enrollment Policies 


Consult previous sections of this catalog and the class 
schedule for other information and regulations relating to 
registration and enrollment. 

Residence Requirement 

A student is considered to be in residence when regis- 
tered during regular semesters at this university. Of the 
minimum of 30 semester units of approved course work 
required for the master’s degree, not less than 21 shall be 
completed In residence at this Institution. Approved units 
earned in summer sessions may be substituted for regular 
semester unit requirements on a unit for unit basis. Exten- 
sion credit and credit by examination may not be used to 
fulfill the minimum residence requirements and are not 
acceptable as part of the transfer work permitted. 

Continuous Enrollment 

A graduate student with a graduate degree objective 
should maintain continuous enrollment during regular 
semesters (summer sessions and extension excluded) 
until award of the degree. This policy is designed to elimi- 
nate the need for readmission to the university, provide 
opportunity for continuous use of facilities, including the 
Library, and assure the development of an Integrated pro- 
gram, adequately supervised, and effectively terminated 
within the time limitations allowed by regulations. 

Unless granted an approved leave of absence, a graduate 
student who fails to register each semester has discon- 
tinued enrollment in the graduate degree program. If the 
student wishes to resume studies. It will be necessary to 
reapply for admission to the university and to the degree 
program and meet any changed or additional require- 
ments approved in the interim. 

Students who may have completed all course work, but 
who may not have satisfactorily completed a comprehen- 
sive examination or other requirement, are expected to 
maintain continuous enrollment until award of the degree. 

A graduate student who finds it impossible to attend dur- 
ing a certain semester and is not eligible for a leave of 
absence, must register in Graduate Studies 700. Registra- 
tion in this course is approved by the appropriate academ- 
ic unit and is restricted to conditionally classified or 
classified graduate students. It carries no unit credit and 
does not require class attendance. A similar course. Cre- 
dential Studies 701 , Is available for students with a creden- 
tial objective in postbaccalaureate-classifled standing. 
Registration in one of these courses In each semester 
when no other course work is taken will be necessary until 
award of the degree. 



Graduate Regulations 




Leave of Absence 

A leave of absence permits a student to continue under 
the curriculum requirements which applied prior to the 
absence and may be granted for a maximum of one year. 
Conditionally classified and classified students in good 
standing who have completed at least six units of resi- 
dence course work toward the degree may qualify for a 
leave of absence. A “Request for Leave of Absence” 
form is available at the Admissions and Records informa- 
tion counter or in the Graduate Affairs Office. 

Any one of the following circumstances may be grounds 
for requesting a leave of absence: 

1. Illness or disability (permanent or temporary) or similar 
personal exigencies including pregnancy which make It 
impossible or inadvisable for a student to register for 
classes. 

2. Activities which enhance a student’s professional ca- 
reer objectives. 

3. Active duty in the armed forces of the United States. 

4. Other reasons at the discretion of the Dean of Gradu- 
ate Studies. 

After review by the Graduate Affairs Office, the academic 
unit (where applicable), and the Registrar’s Office, a re- 
sponse is mailed to the student. 

A first-time leave of absence of one semester only will 
normally be granted upon request for students who qualify 
and will not require an application for readmission to the 
university. Registration materials for the semester follow- 
ing the leave will be sent to the student. 

Students requesting a subsequent leave or a leave longer 
than one semester are required to provide appropriate 
documentation (e.g., doctor’s recommendation, verifica- 
tion of employment). Such requests must also be en- 
dorsed by the program adviser. A leave granted for more 
than one semester does not reserve a place for the stu- 
dent at this university. An application for admission must 
be filed in order to be readmitted and permitted to enroll 
when the leave terminates. 

Study Load 

Graduate students must carry a study load of 12 units of 
course work a semester or nine units of which six are in 
500-level courses for full-time enrollment certification by 
the university. A normal full-time load In summer session 
Is one and one-third units per week of Instruction. The 
maximum study load for students working toward a 
master’s degree is 12 units per semester; in exceptional 
cases, however, a student may take more with the ap- 
proval of the graduate program adviser. 

Enrollment in Extended 
Education Programs 

In addition to Its regular academic programs, the university 
offers a number of courses through its extended educa- 


tion program. These include the summer session, the ex- 
tension program and adjunct enrollment (a program 
permitting those who are not formally enrolled to take 
regular university courses) . 

The applicability of credit earned through courses taken in 
any of the programs sponsored by the Office of Extended 
Education is subject to approval by the graduate program 
adviser and Dean of Graduate Studies. 

Summer Sessions: Appropriate courses taken during the 
summer session may be applied to a graduate degree 
program, providing the courses are approved in advance. 

Extension: No more than nine units of credit earned In the 
university extension program (including intersession pro- 
gram) may be applied to a graduate degree. Consultation 
with a graduate adviser before taking an extension course 
Is strongly recommended. 

It should be noted that enrollment In summer session or 
extension courses does not constitute admission to the 
university or enrollment as a continuing student In the 
university. Any student desiring a master’s degree must 
be admitted to a regular semester (fall or spring). 

Enrollment in 500-Level 
Courses by Seniors 

Undergraduate students may enroll In graduate level 
courses (500 level) if: 

a. they have reached senior status (completed a mini- 
mum of 90 semester units) 

b. have the academic preparation and prerequisites re- 
quired for entry Into the course 

c. gain the consent of the instructor. 

Students wishing to use 500-level coursework taken dur- 
ing their undergraduate degree toward a master’s degree 
should read the following section on Postgraduate Credit. 

Postgraduate Credit 

A graduate student may petition for a maximum of nine 
units of postgraduate credit for course work (either 400 or 
500 level) taken during the undergraduate degree If: 

a. the course work was not used to meet any of the uni- 
versity’s requirements for the baccalaureate degree 
(Including major, minor or concentration) 

b. the course work was taken during the final two semes- 
ters prior to the student’s graduation 

c. approved by the registrar of the appropriate university. 
Petition forms are available at the Admissions and Re- 
cords information counter. If approved, appropriate nota- 
tions will be entered on the student’s permanent record. 

The use of postgraduate course work on a student’s 
graduate study plan is governed by the general regula- 
tions for all graduate degrees and is subject to the ap- 
proval of the program adviser, the appropriate graduate 
committee and the Dean of Graduate Studies. 


Graduate Regulations 



Graduate Academic Standards 


Graduate study deals with more complex ideas and de- 
mands more sophisticated techniques, searching analy- 
sis, and creative thinking than undergraduate study. The 
research required is extensive in both primary and sec- 
ondary sources and the quality of writing expected is high. 
The student is advised to consider these factors when 
deciding upon the amount of coursework to be undertak- 
en during any one semester. 

Grade- Point Average 
Standards 

Prerequisites: The grade-point average required for 
prerequisites prior to classified standing varies according 
to the particular program. See requirements in departmen- 
tal section of this catalog. 

Study Plan: Grade-point averages are calculated by divid- 
ing grade points earned by units attempted. No student 
may be granted classified standing with less than a B 
average for courses already completed on the study plan. 
The 30 or more semester units of approved study plan 
course work, including transfer work, required for the de- 
gree must be completed with a 3.0 (B) minimum grade- 
point average. If a student approaches the completion of 
the degree requirements with less than a 3.0 average, a 
request may be made for a change In the study plan to add 
no more than six units of course work in order to achieve 
at least a 3.0 (see “Changes in Study Plan”) . If the grade- 
point average at any time falls below such a level that It 
cannot be raised to a 3.0 within the prescribed limits of 
course work, this has the effect of withdrawing the student 
from the master’s degree program. 

If permission is given to repeat a course, and the course 
Is successfully repeated, both grades are considered in 
computing grade-point averages. However, successful 
repetition of a course originally passed carries no addition- 
al unit credit toward a degree. 

University: A graduate degree student Is expected to earn 
a 3.0 average in all postbaccalaureate course work taken 
at this university. Exception to this rule may be granted 
only If courses for which grades are not to be computed 
in the GPA have never been part of the student’s study 
plan for the degree, and if it is evident that they are inappli- 
cable and inappropriate to the degree program. 


Academic Probation and 
Disqualification 

A graduate student enrolled in a graduate degree program 
in either conditionally classified or classified graduate 
standing Is subject to academic probation If a cumulative 
grade-point average of at least 3.0 (grade of B on a four- 
point scale) Is not maintained. 

If sufficient grade points to remove probationary status 
are not earned while on probation, the student is subject 
to disqualification. Disqualification will prevent further reg- 
istration in a particular program or further enrollment In the 
university, as determined by appropriate campus author- 
ity. 

A graduate student may also be placed on probation or 
may be disqualified for unsatisfactory scholastic progress 
regardless of cumulative grade-point average. Such ac- 
tions may be due to repeated withdrawal, failure to 
progress toward an educational objective, and non-com- 
pliance with an academic requirement. 

A postbaccalaureate student (credential, unclassified, or 
undeclared status) shall be subject to academic probation 
If after completing 12 or more units, the cumulative grade- 
point average falls below a 2.5 average. A postbaccalaure- 
ate student on probation shall be subject to disqualifica- 
tion if at least a 2.50 grade-point average is not earned 
each term after the completion of 12 units in postbac- 
calaureate status. Disqualification may be either from fur- 
ther registration as a postbaccalaureate credential, or 
certificate program or from further enrollment in the uni- 
versity as determined by the appropriate campus author- 
ity. 

Declassification 

Graduate students In classified graduate standing shall be 
declassified upon the recommendation of the appropriate 
academic unit, with a change to postbaccalaureate stand- 
ing, unclassified, when one or more of the following condi- 
tions exist: 

1. The student’s request for declassification has been 
recommended for approval by the graduate committee. 

2. The student fails to maintain the grade-point average 
required in the master’s degree program. 

3. The student has failed to demonstrate a satisfactory 
level of scholastic competence and fitness. 

4. The student fails to complete the degree within the 
prescribed time limit. 

A recommendation for declassification is sent to the 
Graduate Affairs Office by the graduate program adviser 
for the particular degree. 


Graduate Regulations 


Theses and Projects 


Definition 

A thesis is defined as the written product of a systematic 
study of a significant problem. It identifies the problem, 
states the major assumptions, explains the significance of 
the undertaking, sets forth the sources for and methods 
of gathering information, analyzes the data, and offers a 
conclusion or recommendation. The finished product evi- 
dences originalilty, critical and Independent thinking, ap- 
propriate organization and format, and thorough 
documentation. Normally, an oral defense of the thesis is 
required. 

A project is a significant undertaking appropriate to the 
fine and applied arts or to professional fields. It also evi- 
dences originality and independent thinking, appropriate 
form and organization, and a rationale. It is described and 
summarized in a written abstract that includes the pro- 
ject’s significance, objectives, methodology and a conclu- 
sion or recommendation. An oral defense of the project 
may be required. 



Annual Thesis Award 

An award of $250 along with an engraved plaque will be 
given each year to the student whose thesis represents 
the highest standard of scholarly accomplishment as de- 
termined by a panel of judges chosen from emeriti profes- 
sors. interested students should contact their program 
adviser for further information on eligibility and deadlines. 

General Regulations 

Of the minimum of 30 semester units of approved course 
work required for the master’s degree, no more than six 
are allowed for a thesis. 

When a thesis Is required, the Library is to be provided 
with the approved original copy, or a fully acceptable du- 
plicated copy, in the approved binding, and an acceptable 
microfilm of it. An abstract accompanies the thesis and 
will normally be published In the University Microfilms In- 
ternational journal. Masters Abstracts. Copies are thereby 
made available for order by interested scholars. 

When a project is required, it will be filed with the academ- 
ic unit offering the degree program. Some record of the 
project, or the project itself, is presen/ed in the academic 
unit and, when appropriate. In the Library. When the ap- 
propriate authority recommends, a project or its written 
record may be treated as a thesis. 


Graduate Regulations 



Although a minimum of three faculty members supervise 
and approve the thesis, it is possible for a qualified person 
who is not a regular university faculty member to serve as 
a visting examiner and join in the approval of the written 
record. This person serves as the fourth member of the 
committee. 

Title to theses (and projects when treated as theses, as 
above) passes to the university upon their acceptance by 
the evaluating faculty. 

Variations from procedures and regulations should be re- 
ferred to the Office of Graduate Affairs for approval. 

Format Guidelines and Style 
Manuals 

All-university format guidelines are included In a thesis 
manual which has been developed to assist the student 
in preparation of a thesis or a project which is to be treated 
as a thesis. Copies are available in the Office of Graduate 
Affairs. It is the student’s responsibility to make certain 
that the requirements are met The student is strongly 
advised to become familiar with the instructions in the 
manual. Theses from the library or departmental offices 
should not be used as examples of correct format. 

The academic unit, through the student’s adviser and/or 
committee, is responsible for the academic content and 
English usage in the thesis and for the student’s correct 
use of forms of documentation and bibliography. In addi- 
tion to the university format guidelines, each academic 
unit may select a supplementary style manual to be fol- 
lowed in matters of documentation and bibliography. Stu- 
dents should consult their academic program adviser or 
thesis committee chair concerning the style manual used. 

If the supplementary style manual presents regulations 
which conflict with the all-university format guidelines pub- 
lished in this manual, the university regulations take 
precedence. 

Some graduate programs require style manuals or guides 
designed for journal articles. Although these are helpful 
for abbreviations, tables, figures and footnoting, as well as 
other purposes, students should be aware of the differ- 
ence between a thesis and an article and make appropri- 
ate adaptations, approved by the graduate program 
adviser. 

if the academic unit does not recommend a specific style 
manual, the student should refer to A Manual for Writers 
of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (Fourth Edi- 
tion) by Kate L. Turabian. 

Thesis Typists 

The student makes all necessary arrangements for the 
typing of the thesis. A list of thesis typists is available in 


the Office of Graduate Affairs. The university Career 
Development Center also maintains a listing of students 
and others who have Indicated their availability for typing 
assignments. An experienced typist is strongly advised, 
although the university does not endorse or recommend 
individual typists. 

Deadlines 

Adequate time should be allowed for typing, reading and 
approval by the adviser, the committee members, and the 
university thesis reader. 

It is recommended that the academic area sponsoring the 
degree program require that the final version of the thesis 
be submitted for approval at least six weeks prior to the 
last day of classes of the appropriate semester. The dead- 
line for submission to the university thesis reader is two 
weeks prior to the last day of classes. For summer com- 
pletion, the student should check with the academic unit 
and the Office of Graduate Affairs for appropriate dead- 
lines. The Office of Graduate Affairs must receive notifica- 
tion from the Titan Bookstore by the last day of final 
examinations for the appropriate semester or session that 
the thesis has been deposited there and the fees paid. 
Ample time should be allowed for any special arrange- 
ments, such as duplication of the thesis by the Titan Book- 
store or elsewhere, prior to the deadline. 

Final Procedures 

1 . Approval Signatures: When the final draft is completed, 
the student obtains signatures on the approval page of 
all of the members of the committee. If there Is a disa- 
greement within the committee concerning the accept- 
ability of the thesis, the approving signatures of a 
majority of the committee will be sufficient. Nonavaila- 
bility of one member of the committee is not an ade- 
quate reason for acceptance of signatures by less than 
the full committee. No changes or additions will be 
allowed after the final signatures have been obtained. 
The student should arrange for at least three original 
title pages to be signed by the committee members. 

2. University Thesis Reader: The thesis is ready for review 
by the university thesis reader after the faculty have 
signed off and the thesis has been typed In its final 
form. One unbound copy of the thesis Including the 
original approval page is taken to the Office of Gradu- 
ate Affairs for review by the thesis reader for conformity 
to all-university format guidelines. The student, gradu- 
ate program adviser, and thesis committee chair will be 
notified of any revisions or corrections which need to 
be made. Final approval on format is given by the Office 
of Graduate Affairs on the “Thesis Approval Form.” 

3. Binding and Microfilming: The student takes the ap- 
proved copy of the thesis, two signed title and approval 


Graduate Regulations 


pages, and the signed Thesis Approval Form to the 
Titan Bookstore and pays the appropriate fees. The 
bookstore arranges for the binding of the thesis by a 
local bindery and Oiher services by University Mi- 
crofilms International. Once submitted and receipted, 
the thesis may not be withdrawn by the student from 
the Titan Bookstore. The Titan Bookstore sends the 
approved original or duplicated copy (including the 
original signed approval page) to University Microfilms 
International for filming and publication of the abstract, 
and upon its return sends It to the bindery. 

An agreement is normally completed for UMI to pub- 
lish the abstract in Masters Abstracts, prepare a nega- 
tive microfilm, and sell microfilm or xerographic copies 
to Interested scholars. The university will accept alter 
native methods of microfilming, duplication of printe^i 
copies and binding, subject to the specifications on fii^ 


in the Graduate Affairs Office. Arrangements for copy- 
righting are also possible. If desired, through UMI. 

4. Notification for Award of the Degree: The grade for the 
thesis is reported In the usual manner to the office of 
the registrar by the appropriate faculty. The Titan Book- 
store notifies the Office of Graduate Affairs that the 
approved thesis has been deposited, the fees paid, and 
the agreement for microfilming and publication of the 
abstract completed by the student. 

5. Depositing of Thesis in Library: When the thesis Is re- 
turned by the bindery, the bound copy Is deposited for 
circulation in the library. One set of the slides or sepa- 
rately mounted illustrative material is housed with the 
bound copy. The second set is placed in the university 
archives with the microfilm copy. 



Graduate Regulations 




Steps in the Master’s Degree 

There may be additional steps for individual students In showing approval by the Dean of Graduate Studies, 

particular programs; for these, consult the program de- ^ If not received within a reasonable length of time, 

scriptlon and the academic unit (school, division, depart- call the academic unit sponsoring the degree or 

ment or program) offering the degree program. Graduate Affairs. 


^ Action initiated by student (as indicated below) 

1. Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classi- 
fied 

^ Apply for admission 

^ Declare objective (s). using precise codes on 
the application form 

Receive space reservation from Admissions Of- 
fice 

^ Request two sets of official transcripts of all previ- 
ous college-level course work attempted to be sent 
to Admissions Office 

^ Take tests, if required by program, and order test 
scores sent to Cal State Fullerton, designating ap- 
propriate academic unit on the test registration form 
^ Consult appropriate academic unit for advisement 
^ Provide appropriate academic unit with any other 
supporting statements or materials, as required 

Recommendation for admission made by academic 
unit to Admissions Office 

Receive notification of admission from Admissions Of- 
fice 

2. Graduate Standing: Classified 

^ Complete any course prerequisites and/or remove 
deficiencies 

^ Apply for classified standing In the academic 
area offering the particular program prior to 
completion of nine units of study plan course 
work 

^ Consult appropriate academic unit for advisement, 
including development of official study plan 
^ Provide appropriate academic unit with any other 
supporting statements or materials, as shown in 
program descriptions in this catalog 
^ Take tests If required by program, and order test 
scores sent to Cal State Fullerton, designating ap- 
propriate academic unit on the test registration form 

Recommendation made by academic unit to the Dean 
of Graduate Studies 

Receive notification of granting of classified standing 
from Graduate Affairs when the study plan is sent. 


3. Completion of Requirements 

^ Apply for a graduation check and advancement 
to candidacy prior to the beginning of the final 
semester and no later than the deadline Initiat- 
ing university review and formal approval by 
faculty. The form is available at the Admissions 
and Records information desk, the Graduation Unit 
and the Graduate Affairs Office. A graduation and 
diploma fee must be paid when filing request with 
the university cashier. 

^ Consult appropriate academic unit for advisement 

^ Complete written and/or oral examination, if re- 
quired 

^ Complete thesis or project. If applicable 
^ Obtain approval of committee 
^ Obtain approval of university thesis reader (the- 
sis only) 

^ Deposit approved copy of thesis and make arrange- 
ments for binding, microfilming and publication of 
the abstract In the Titan Bookstore by the applica- 
ble deadline 

Final, approved study plan, with recommendation, 
sent by appropriate academic unit to Dean of 
Graduate Studies 

Preliminary approval, pending adequate grades, 
and completion of any other requirements, granted 
by Dean of Graduate Studies. 

^ Complete all general and specific requirements, 
other than final course examinations, by the last day 
of classes, in order to assure granting of the degree 
by the end of the semester 

Final verification of completion of requirements 
sent by the Graduate Affairs Office to the registrar 

Receive notification of award of degree from regis- 
trar approximately six weeks after the end of the 
semester 

4. Commencement 

^ Make appropriate arrangements for cap, gown and 
hood rental In Titan Bookstore 

Commencement information sent by the Regis- 
trar’s Office 


Graduate Regulations 


Academic Programs 




Degree Programs 


California State University, Fullerton offers the following 
baccalaureate degree programs which are described on 
the pages listed; 


BA American Studies 291 

BA Anthropology 295 

BA Art 153 

B.FA Art 153 

B.A. Biological Science 411 

BA Business Administration 198 

B.A. Chemistry 420 

B.S. Chemistry 420 

B.S. Child Development 235 

B.A. Communications 304 

B.A. Communicative Disorders 399 

B.A. Comparative Literature 314 

B.S. Computer Science 428 

B.A. Criminal Justice 311 

B.A. Economics 206 

B.S. Engineering 434 

B.A. English 314 

B.A. Ethnic Studies (with concentrations 

In Afro-American studies and Chicano studies) 287 

B.A. French 324 

B.A. Geography 341 

B.S. Geology 455 

B.A. German 324 

B.A. History 347 

B.S. Human Services 256 

B.A. International Business with a 

concentration in French, German or Spanish 216 

B.A. Latin American Studies 354 

B.A. Liberal Studies 357 

B.A. Linguistics 359 

B.A. Mathematics 460 

B.A. Music 165 

B.M. Music 165 

B.S. Nursing 261 

B.A. Philosophy 364 

B.S. Physical Education 245 

B.A. Physics 468 

B.A. Political Science (including concentration 

in public administration) 369 

B.A. Psychology 377 

B.A. Religious Studies 385 

B.A. Russian and East European 

Area Studies 390 

B.A. Sociology 393 

B.A. Spanish 324 

B.A. Special Major 144 

B.A. Speech Communication 399 


B.A. Theatre Arts 178 

The following master’s degree programs are offered: 

M.S. Accountancy 192 

M.A. American Studies 291 

M.A. Anthropology 295 

M.A. Art 153 

M.F.A. Art 153 

M.A. Biology 411 

M.B.A. Business Administration 198 

M.S. Chemistry 420 

M.A. Communications 304 

M.A. Communicative Disorders 399 

M.A. Comparative Literature 314 

M.S. Computer Science 428 

M.S. Counseling 238 

M.A. Economics 206 


M.S. Education (with concentrations in bilingual/ 
bicultural education [Spanish-English], elementary 


curriculum and instruction, higher education, 
reading, educational administration, special 
education and teaching English to speakers 

of other languages) 233 

M.S. Engineering 452 

M.A. English 314 

M.S. Environmental Studies 322 

M.A. French 324 

M.A. Geography 341 

M.A. German 324 

M.A. History 347 

M.A. Linguistics 359 

M.S. Management Science 224 

M.A. Mathematics 460 

M.A. Music 165 

M.M. Music 165 

M.S. Physical Education 245 

M.A. Political Science 369 

M.A. Psychology 377 

M.S. Psychology (Clinical/Community) 377 

M.P.A. Public Administration 369 

M.A.T. Science 472 

M.A. Social Sciences 391 

M.A. Sociology 393 

M.A. Spanish (Including emphasis in 

bilingual studies) 324 

M.A. Special Major 144 

M.A. Speech Communication 399 

M.S. Taxation 192 

M.A. Theatre Arts 178 

M.F.A. Theatre Arts (with concentrations in Acting, 
Directing, and Technical Theatre and Design 178 


Degree Programs 



Graduation Requirements 
for the Bachelor’s Degree 



Unit Requirements 

A. Total Units 

A minimum of 124 semester units is required for gradua- 
tion with a bachelor of arts degree. A bachelor of science 
degree requires between 124 and 132 semester units, de- 
pending on the major. The bachelor of science In engi- 
neering degree requires a minimum of 135 semester units. 
The bachelor of music and bachelor of fine arts degrees 
require a minimum of 132 semester units. 

B. Upper-Division Requirement 

The completion of a minimum of 40 semester units of 
upper-division credit is required. Upper-division courses 
are those numbered In the 300 and 400 level series. 

C. Residence Units Requirement 

The completion of a minimum of 30 semester units in 
residence (I.e., CSUF course work) is required. Of this 30 
unit requirement at least 24 semester units must be 
earned in upper-division courses and 12 semester units 
must be in the major. While extension credit or credit by 
examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum resi- 
dence requirement, summer session and intersession 
courses offered as part of the special sessions program 
may be counted toward the residence requirement. 

Distribution of Requirements 

A. General Education 

A minimum of 51 semester units are needed to complete 
CSUF’s general education requirements. See the general 
education section of this catalog. 

B. Major 

The unit requirements in a major varies substantially from 
major to major. Some majors require as little as 36 semes- 
ter units while others require as much as 105 units. Refer 
to the Department listings for the specific requirements of 
any particular major. 


Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 


C. Upper-Division Baccalaureate Writing 
Requirement 

The university requires that every person completing 
bachelor’s degrees under 1980-81 and later catalog re- 
quirements, demonstrate writing ability acceptable for 
graduation. The upper-division writing requirement has 
two parts; students must satisfy each: 

Upper-division course requirement: Each major re- 
quires that students pass a specially designated upper- 
division course or courses of at least three semester 
units. Examination requirement: The university faculty 
requires that each student pass the University Examina- 
tion in Writing Proficiency (EWP), which has been de- 
signed to measure writing ability. 

Courses. The University Board on Writing Proficiency 
must certify the course or courses that each major depart- 
ment designates to fulfill the requirement. Departments 
and programs may specify either a single course of at 
least three units which involves intensive Instruction in 
writing, or two or more courses (a total of at least six 
units) in which students are required to write one or more 
lengthy papers, or several shorter ones, which involve the 
organization and expression of complex ideas. In these 
courses students will be given careful and timely evalua- 
tions of their writing and suggestions for improvement. An 
assessment of writing competence will be Included in de- 
termining the final course grade. 

Students must pass these courses with a grade of C or 
better. A list of courses designated for each major will 
appear in the class schedule each semester. 

Examination. After completing 60 units toward the bac- 
calaureate, students must take the University Examination 
In Writing Proficiency (EWP). The EWP consists of two 
parts, a machine-scored test of Standard Written English, 
and a 90-mlnute essay which is evaluated by faculty read- 
ers. Students who fall the examination may retake It until 
they pass it. A limited number of students who have failed 
the EWP two or more times may enroll in English 199, 
Intensive Writing Review. Credit In English 199 will be 
equivalent to passing the examination. This course will not 
count toward graduation requirements, nor will it satisfy 
the upper division writing course requirement described 
above. Information about registration for the EWP and 
testing dates Is published in the class schedule each se- 
mester. 

Petitions. In certain cases, students may petition the 
University Board on Writing Proficiency for exemption 
from or modification of the requirement. 

1. Transfer students and candidates for a second bacca- 
laureate may be certified as meeting the requirement 
after they have submitted to the Board acceptable evi- 
dence of having completed the equivalent to CSUF’s 
upper division requirement. 


2. Students may petition the Board for substitution of an 
alternative to the EWP when exceptional circum- 
stances, such as a clinically identified learning disabili- 
ty, make the examination Inappropriate. Such 
petititlons must include documentation of the special 
circumstances and propose specific alternative means 
of demonstrating writing proficiency. 

D. Minors 

A minor is not required for the baccalaureate, however, 
students may elect to complete one or more minors from 
those available and have that noted on their records. A 
minor consists of an academic program specified by the 
academic departments In the catalog. No courses re- 
quired In the major may be counted toward the minor and 
also toward requirements for the major. General educa- 
tion courses, however, may be used to meet minor re- 
quirements. 

E. Electives 

After fulfilling the requirements in general education, and 
a specific major (and possibly a minor), each student Is 
free to choose the rest of the courses needed to complete 
the semester units required for graduation. Different ma- 
jors vary considerably In both the number of units they 
require in their own and related fields. They also vary 
considerably in the amount of latitude or choice they per- 
mit in selecting courses to satisfy the major requirement. 
The general education requirement encourages freedom 
of choice within the natural sciences, social sciences, arts 
and humanities, and basic subjects. Students at the uni- 
versity use their electives to broaden their general educa- 
tion, deepen some aspect of their specialities, pursue 
work in related fields, and satisfy curiosities and en- 
thusiasms for particular subjects or areas of interest. 

Advisement on general education and electives is pro- 
vided by the Academic Advisement Center. 

F. Multiple Majors and Second 
Baccalaureate Degrees 

Within the units required for the baccalaureate it is possi- 
ble for a student to complete the requirements for more 
than one major within a degree program when the addi- 
tional major is within the degree of the first major. At least 
24 units. Including 12 at the upper-division level, In each 
bachelor of arts major, or 36 units, including 18 at the 
upper-division level, in each bachelor of science major, 
must be applied exclusively to the respective major and 
may not be used to meet requirements in other majors or 
In general education. The student shall declare the addi- 
tional major with the appropriate department not later than 
the beginning of the student’s final year of study. The 
completion of additional majors will be noted at the time 
of graduation by appropriate entries on the academic 
record and in the commencement program. 


Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor^s Degree 


It is also possible for a student to complete a major in one 
degree program and an additional major from a different 
program, provided the minimum units described in the 
preceding paragraph are applied exclusively to the re- 
spective major and are not used in other majors or in 
general education. In this Instance, the student has the 
option of which degree he or she will receive with the 
major appropriate to that degree. The completion of the 
additional major will be noted on the student’s academic 
record. The university does not award two degrees to the 
individual who completes multiple majors in a four-year 
degree program. 

Second baccalaureate 

(a) First degree completed elsewhere, second at Ful- 
lerton 

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree from Fuller- 
ton after having received a baccalaureate from an- 
other institution may qualify for graduation with the 
approval and recommendation of the faculty upon 
completion of the following: 

(1) general education requirements 

(2) all requirements In the major field of study 

(3) residence and scholarship requirements 

(b) Two baccalaureates from Fullerton 

With the approval and recommendation of the fac- 
ulty, a student may qualify for a second baccalaure- 
ate under the following circumstances: 

(1 ) The second field of study is offered in a differ- 
ent degree (e.g., bachelor of arts to bachelor 
of science) 

(2) At least 30 units, including 24 upper-division 
units and 12 in the major, are earned in resi- 
dence after the conferral of the first degree 

(3) all requirements of the major are fulfilled 

Units Included In second baccalaureate programs may not 
apply to graduate degrees or credential programs. 

Scholarship 

(a) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on 
all units attempted, including those accepted by transfer 
from another Institution. 

(b) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better is required on 
all units in the major. 


(c) A grade-point average of 2.0 or better Is required on 
all units attempted at Fullerton. 

Graduation Requirement Check 

A candidate for graduation must file an application for a 
graduation requirements check during registration week 
for the semester prior to the semester in which the student 
expects to graduate. The graduation and diploma fee is 
required when the application is filed. Application forms 
are available at the admissions and records information 
desk and in the registration center. 

Candidates for the baccalaureate should refer to the se- 
mester class schedule for application filing dates. A senior 
should have completed at least 100 units (Including the 
current work In progress) and a substantial portion of the 
major requirements before requesting a graduation check. 
If the candidate does not complete the requirements in 
the semester indicated, a change of graduation date must 
be filed in the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Faculty Approval and 
Recommendation 

Under provisions of the Faculty Council, the Office of Ad- 
missions and Records publishes a list of degree candi- 
dates twice a year: In the fall and in the spring (for both 
spring and summer graduates) . After review and approval 
by the faculty, and upon verification of the completion of 
requirements, diplomas are Issued with the last day of the 
respective term as the official date of graduation. 

Annual commencement exercises are held at the end of 
the spring semester for those who completed degree re- 
quirements mid-year and for those completing degree re- 
quirements In the spring semester or summer session. 
The president of the university, with the authority of the 
Board of Trustees, confers all degrees, subject to the 
completion of remaining requirements. 

Note: Students completing bachelor degree requirements 
who wish to continue their studies at the university for 
postbaccalaureate or graduate degree objectives must 
apply for admission declaring their new objective. 


Graduation Requirements for the Bacheior^s Degree 


General Education 


General Education Objectives 

The general education-breadth requirements are de- 
signed so that, taken with the major-depth program and 
electives presented by each baccalaureate candidate, 
they will assure that graduates have made noteworthy 
progress toward becoming truly educated persons. Par- 
ticularly, the purpose of these requirements is to provide 
means whereby graduates: 

A. will have achieved the ability to think clearly and logi- 
cally, to find and critically examine information, to com- 
municate orally and in writing, and to perform 
quantitative functions; 

B. will have acquired appreciable knowledge about their 
own bodies and minds, about how human society has 
developed and how It now functions, about the physi- 
cal world In which they live, about the other forms of 
life with which they share that world, and about the 
cultural endeavors and legacies of their civilization; 

C. will have come to an understanding and appreciation 
of the principles, methodologies, value systems, and 
thought processes employed in human inquiries. 


General Education 
Requirements 

Ail students beginning studies fall 1985 or later shall com- 
plete the general education requirements listed below. 
These must Include at least nine units of upper-division 
course work taken after the student has achieved junior 
standing. At least nine units of general education must be 
earned In residence at California State University, Fuller- 
ton. 

To be eligible for a baccalaureate from CSUF, a student 
must complete a minimum of 51 semester units of general 
education courses selected in accordance with the pat- 
tern designated below. At the discretion of the department 
in which a student has a major (or minor) , up to nine units 
taught by that department which count for general educa- 
tion may also be counted toward the student’s major (or 
minor) . No more than nine units from any single depart- 
ment, however, may be used In meeting the requirements 
of general education. 

At least three units of cultural diversity must be taken from 
C.3 or D.3 and up to nine units of cultural diversity may be 
used to satisfy requirements in categories C and D. 



General Education 



Among the following list of requirements a few courses 
appear in more than one category. These courses may 
only be used to fulfill the requirements of one, and not 
both, of the categories within which they appear. 

A. Communication Skills (9 units minimum) 

The package of courses taken to meet this requirement 
must include instruction in each of A.1, A.2, and A.3. 

A.1 Written Communication (3 units) 

Courses in this area are designed to impart skills in orga< 
nizing, analyzing and expressing thoughts and concepts in 
standard written English. (Courses in this area have as a 
prerequisite appropriate scoring on the English Placement 
Test, or an equivalent). 

Communications 103 Applied Writing (3) 

English 101 Beginning College Writing (3) 

A.2 Oral Communication (3 units) 

Courses in this area are designed to impart skills in the 
use of human symbolic Interaction, focusing on effective 
oral communication. 

Chicano Studies 102 Communication Skills (3) 

Speech Comm 100 Introduction to Human 
Communication (3) 

Speech Comm 102 Public Speaking (3) 

Theatre 110 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 

A.3 Critical Thinking (3 units) 

Courses in this area are designed to develop skills in 
critical thinking, including the abilities to distinguish fact 
from judgment and belief from knowledge, to reason In- 
ductively and deductively, and to understand the formal 
and informal fallacies of language and thought. 

Philosophy 200 Argument and Reasoning (3) 
Philosophy 210 Logic (3) 

Psychology 110 Reasoning and Problem Solving (3) 
Speech Comm 235 Essentials of Argumentation and 
Debate (3) 

A.4 Reading Communication (0-3 units) 

Reading 201 Academic Reading: Analyses and 
Strategies (3) 

A. 5 Upper-Division Writing Requirement (0-3 
units) 

Courses in this area have received the approval of 
the Upper-Division Writing Board as meeting the course 
work portion of the university upper-division writing re- 
quirement. (Approved courses are listed In the Class 
Schedule.) 

B. Science and Mathematical Concepts (12 units 
minimum) 

At least three units must be taken from each of the follow- 
ing: B.1, B.2, and B.3. 

A laboratory course must be taken in either B.1, B.2 or B.4. 


B.1 Fundamentals of Physical Science (3-4 units) 

Courses in this area provide the content and methodology 
that form the bases for studies in the physical sciences. 

Chemistry 100 Survey of Chemistry (3) 

Chemistry 100L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory (1) 
Chemistry 115 Introductory Chemistry (4) 

Chemistry 120A General Chemistry (5) 

Geological Sci 101 Physical Geology (3) 

Geological Sci 101L Physical Geology Lab (1) 

Physics 123 Perspectives of Man’s Physical Universe 

( 3 ) 

Physics 123L Perspectives of Man’s Physical Universe 
Lab (1) 

Physics 211 A Elementary Physics (3) 

Physics 21 1AL Elementary Physics Laboratory (1) 
Physics 225A Fundamental Physics: Mechanics (3) 
Physics 225AL Fundamental Physics: Mechanics 
Laboratory (1) 

B.2 Fundamentals of Biological Science (3-4 
units) 

Courses in this area provide the content and methodology 
that form the bases for studies in the biological sciences. 

Biological Sci 101 Elements of Biology (3) 

Biological Sci 101L Elements of Biology Lab (1) 
Biological Sci 141 Principles of Botany (2) 

Biological Sci 141L Principles of Botany Lab (2) 
Biological Sci 161 Principles of Zoology (2) 

Biological Sci 161L Principles of Zoology Lab (2) 

B.3 Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative 
Reasoning (3-4 units) 

Courses in this area are designed to provide a basis for 
understanding mathematical concepts and methodolo- 
gies and their applications. (Courses in this area have as 
a prerequisite appropriate scoring on the Entry Level 
Mathematics examination, or an equivalent. The exact 
wording of this restriction is yet to be stipulated.) 

Math 100 Precalculus Mathematics (4) 

Math 110 Mathematics for Liberal Arts Students (3) 
Math 120 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3) 
Math 130 A Short Course in Calculus (4) 

Math 135 Business Calculus (3) 

Math 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 
Phil/Math 368 First Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 

B.4 Implications and Explorations (0-4 units) 

Courses in this area are topical and thematic, specialized 
inquiries into contributions of the sciences and mathemat- 
ics. These courses have a substantial scientific or mathe- 
matical content. In addition, they are either introductory to 
the major subdisciplines in the natural sciences or math- 
ematics or relate science or mathematics to significant 
social problems or other related disciplines. 

Anthropology 101 Introduction to Biological 
Anthropology (3) 


General Education 


Biological Sci 102 
Biological Sci 306 
Biological Sci 313 
Biological Sci 314 
Biological Sci 319 
Biological Sci 31 9L 
Biological Sci 323 
Diseases (1) 
Biological Sci 352 
Biological Sci 353 
Biological Sci 360 


Issues In Environmental Biology 
Biology of Aging (3) 

Human Genetics (3) 

Human Issues in Genetics (1) 
Marine Biology (3) 

Marine Biology Laboratory (1) 
Biology of Sexually Transmitted 


(3) 


Plants and Life (3) 

Principles of Horticulture (2) 
Biology of Human Sexuality (1) 
Chemistry 111 Nutrition and Drugs (3) 

Geological Sci 120 Introduction to Earth Science (3) 
Earth Science Laboratory (1) 
Earth’s Atmosphere (3) 

Earth History (4) 

Topics In California-Related 


Geological Sci 120L 
Geological Sci 140 
Geological Sci 201 
Geological Sci 310 
Geology (1-3) 
Geological Sci 333 
Geological Sci 335 
Geological Sci 340 
Geological Sci 376 
Geography 110 
Geography 120 


Oceanography (3) 
General Hydrology (3) 
General Meteorology (3) 
Applied Geology (3) 
Physical Geography (3) 
Environment and Change (3) 


History 231 The Ascent of Man (3) 

History 430B History of Science: Copernicus to the 
Present (3) 

Phil 303 Introduction to the Philosophy of Science (3) 
Phil 384 Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (3) 

Phil 386 Philosophy of Biology (3) 

Physical Scl/Physics 100 Man and His Physical 
Environment (4) 

Physics 105 Fads and Fallacies In the Name of 
( 1 ) 

Nuclear Energy and Its Impact on Society 


Science 
Physics 107 
(1) 

Physics 200 
Physics 384 
Sociology 303 


Introduction to Astronomy (4) 
Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (3) 
Statistics for the Social Sciences (3) 


C. Arts and Humanities (9 units) 

At least one course from C.1 and one course from C.4 
must be taken. One more course must be taken from C.1, 
C.2, C.3 or C.4. 


C.1 Performing and Visual Arts (3-6 units) 

Courses in this area are designed to motivate students to 
cultivate and refine their affective, cognitive and physical 
faculties through studying great works of the human 
Imagination. 

Art 101 Introduction to Art (3) 

Art 201 A Art and Civilization (3) 

Art 201 B Art and Civilization (3) 

Music 100 introduction to Music (3) 

Music 101 Music Theory for Non-Music Majors (3) 
Theatre 100 Introduction to the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 101 Introduction to Dance (3) 


Theatre 175 History of Western Theatre (3) 

C.2 Participatory Experiences In the Arts and 
Humanities (0-3 units) 

Courses in this area foster the appreciation of the content 
of areas C.1, C.3 and C.4 through participation. 

Art 100 Exploratory Course in Art (3) 

Art 103 Two-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art 104 Three-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art 106A Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Art 107A Beginning Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 107B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Library 300 Elements of Bibliographic Investigation 
(3) 

Music 183 Voice Class for Non-Majors (1) 

Music 184A Plano Class for Non-Majors (1) 

Music 184B Piano Class for Non-Majors (1) 

Music 361 A Major Performance Ensemble — Symphony 
Orchestra (1) 

Music 361 B Major Performance Ensemble — University 
Choir (1) 

Music 361 C Major Performance Ensemble — University 
Concert Band (1) 

Music 361 E Major Performance Ensemble — University 
Singers (1) 

Music 361 F Major Performance Ensemble — University 
Wind Ensemble (1) 

Music 361 W Major Performance Ensemble — Women’s 
Choir (1) 

Music 362A Jazz Band (1) 

Theatre 112 Beginning Classical Ballet (2) 

Theatre 122A Beginning Modern Dance (2) 

Theatre 126 Dance Improvisation (2) 

Theatre 132 Beginning Jazz Dance (2) 

Theatre 163 Beginning Acting (3) 

Theatre 206A Mime and Pantomime (3) 

Theatre 277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Theatre 310 Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3) 
Theatre 410 A Oral Interpretation of Prose Literature 
(3) 

Theatre 41 OB Oral Interpretation of Poetry (3) 

Theatre 410C Oral Interpretation of Drama (3) 

Theatre 411 Oral Interpretation of Children’s Literature 
(3) 

C.3 Cultural Diversity In the Arts and Humanities 
((V-3 Units) 

Courses In this area are designed to enhance understand- 
ing of cultural differences within or between Western and/ 
or non-Western societies. 

Anthropology 104 Traditional Cultures of the World 
(3) 

Anthropology 305 Anthropology of Religion (3) 
Anthropology 306 Comparative Aesthetics and 
Symbolism (3) 

Afro 314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 


General Education 


Afro 460 Afro-American Music Appreciation (3) 
Chicano 302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

Chicano 316 The Chicano Music Experience (3) 
Chicano 440 Mexican Intellectual Thought (3) 

French 315 Origins of Modern France (3) 

German 315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) 
History 465A History of India (3) 

Music 102 History of Jazz (3) 

Music 203 Ethnic Music (3) 

Music 204 Music of Mexico (3) 

Philosophy/Religious Studies 110 Comparative Study 
of the World’s Great Religions (3) 

Philosophy 350 Oriental Philosophy (3) 

Portuguese 320 Introduction to Luso-Brazlllan Culture 
and Civilization (3) 

Religious Studies 250 The Religion of Islam (3) 
Religious Studies 270 Introduction to the Oriental 
Religions (3) 

Spanish 315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) 
Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish-American 
Civilization (3) 


C.4 Literary and Language Arts and Humanities (3 
units) 

Courses in this area Introduce students to reflective in- 
quiry Into the values and subjective responses of civiliza- 
tion in its language, philosophy and literature. 


Afro 410 Afro-American Literature (3) 

Anthropology 100 Non-Western Cultures and the 
Western Tradition (3) 

Chicano 336 Main Trends in Spanish-American 
Literature (3) 

Chicano 337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 
Chicano 430 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 
Chicano 433 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 
English/Comp Lit 110 Literature of the Western World 
from Ancient Through Medieval Times (3) 
English/Comp Lit 111 Literature of the Western World 
from the Renaissance Ti trough the 19th Century 
(3) 

Comp Lit 324 World Literature to 1650 (3) 

Comp Lite 325 World Literature from 1650 (3) 

English 200 Introduction to Literature (3) 

English 311 Masters of British Literature to 1760 (3) 
English 312 Masters of British Literature from 1760 
(3) 

English 321 American Literature to Whitman (3) 
English 322 American Literature from Twain to the 
Moderns (3) 

English/Afro/Comp Lit 352 African Literature (3) 


French 101 
French 102 
French 203 
French 204 
French 230 


Fundamental French A (5) 
Fundamental French B (5) 
Intermediate French A (3) 

Intermediate French B (3) 

Intermediate Diction and Phonetics (2) 


French 240 Intermediate Conversation and 
Composition (2) 

French 375 Introduction to Literature (3) 

German 100A-K Personalized Instruction in 
Fundamental German (1) 

German 101 Fundamental German A (5) 

German 102 Fundamental German B (5) 

German 203 Intermediate German A (3) 

German 204 Intermediate German B (3) 

German 213 Intermediate Reading (2) 

German 214 Intermediate Reading (2) 

German 375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Greek 101 Fundamental Greek A (3) 

Greek 102 Fundamental Greek B (3) 

Greek 299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Italian 101 Fundamental Italian A (4) 

Italian 102 Fundamental Italian B (4) 

Italian 299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Japanese 101 Fundamental Japanese A (5) 

Japanese 102 Fundamental Japanese B (5) 

Latin 101 Fundamental Latin A (4) 

Latin 102 Fundamental Latin B (4) 

Latin 299 Directed Study (1-3) 

Portuguese 101 Fundamental Portuguese A (4) 
Portuguese 102 Fundamental Portuguese B (4) 
Spanish 101 Fundamental Spanish A (5) 

Spanish 102 Fundamental Spanish B (5) 

Spanish 103 Intensive Review of Fundamental 
Spanish (5) 

Spanish 201 Spanish for Hispanics (3) 

Spanish 203 Intermediate Spanish A (3) 

Spanish 204 Intermediate Spanish B (3) 

Spanish 213 Intermediate Conversation (2) 

Spanish 214 Intermediate Composition (2) 

Spanish 375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 
Linguistics 106 Language and Linguistics (3) 
Linguistics 301 /Religious Studies 301 Sanskrit (3) 
Linguistics 354 Linguistics and Literature (3) 
Philosophy 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3) 
Philosophy/Religious Studies 110 Comparative Study 
of the World’s Great Religions (3) 

Philosophy 115A The Western Tradition: Philosophy 
(3) 

Philosophy 115B The Western Tradition: Philosophy 
(3) 

History of Philosophy: Greek 
(3) 

History of Philosophy: Rationalism and 
(3) 

Ethics (3) 

Medical Ethics (3) 

Existentialism (3) 

Introduction to Christianity (3) 
Introduction to Judaism: From 


Philosophy 290 
Philosophy 
Philosophy 300 
Empiricism 
Philosophy 310 
Philosophy 314 
Philosophy 323 
Religious Studies 200 
Religious Studies 210 

the Beginning to the Middle Ages (3) 

Religious Studies 211 Introduction to Judaism: From 
the Middle Ages to the Present (3) 


General Education 


Religious Studies 345A History and Development of 
Christian Thought: The Beginning to 1274 (3) 
Religious Studies 345B History and Development of 
Christian Thought: 1275 to Present (3) 

Religious Studies 346A History and Development of 
Jewish Thought: The Beginning to Moses 
Maimonides (3) 

Religious Studies 346B History and Development of 
Jewish Thought: Ben Gerson to the Present (3) 
Religious Studies 350 Major Christian Traditions (3) 

D. Social Sciences (6 units minimum) 

At least one course from D.1 must be included. 


D.1 Fundamentals of Social Science (3-6 units) 

Courses in this area provide an Introduction to the con- 
ceptual and methodological aspects of the approach of 
the social sciences to human social, political and econom- 
ic institutions and behavior in their contemporary and his- 
torical settings. 

American Studies 101 Introduction to Culture Studies: 
American Studies as Interdisciplinary Social 
Sciences (3) 

Anthropology 102 Introduction to Cultural 
Anthropology (3) 

Economics 100 * The Economic Environment (3) 
Economics 201 * Principles of Microeconomics (3) 
Economics 210 * Principles of Economics (5) 
Geography 100 World Geography (3) 

Poll Sci 200 Introduction to the Study of Politics (3) 
Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology (3) 

Sociology 101 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

D.2 Implications and Explorations (0-3 units) 

Courses in this area are topical and thematic, specialized 
inquiries into the contributions of the social sciences to 
the understanding of human behavior, both within and 
across traditional disciplines. 


American Studies 300 Introduction to American 
Popular Culture (3) 

American Studies 345 The American Dream (3) 
Anthropology 300 Language and Culture (3) 
Anthropology 302 Culture and Personality: 

Psychological Anthropology (3) 

Anthropology 450 Culture and Education (3) 

Child 312 Human Growth and Development (3) 
Communications 233 Mass Communication In Modern 
Society (3) 

Criminal Justice 300 Introduction to Criminal Justice 


(3) 

Economics 201 
Economics 202 
Economics 330 
Economics 331 
Economics 332 
Economics 333 


Principles of Microeconomics (3) 
Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 
Comparative Economic Systems (3) 
The Soviet Economy (3) 

Economic Problems of Asia (3) 
Economic Development: Analysis and 


Case Studies (3) 

Economics 334 Economic Problems of Latin America 
and the Caribbean (3) 

Economics 350 American Economic History (3) 
Economics 361 Urban Economics (3) 

Economics 362 Environmental and Resource 
Economics (3) 

Geography 160 Culture and Environment (3) 
Geography 170 The City (3) 

Geography 350 Conservation and Ecology in America 
(3) 

History 370 American Sex Reformers (3) 

History/ Amer Studies 386A American Social History 
1750-1860 (3) 

History/ Amer Studies 386B American Social History 
1865-1930 (3) 

Hu Ser/Counseling 380 Theories and Techniques of 
Counseling (3) 

Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics 
Physical Ed 381 Cultural Perspectives in Human 
Movement (3) 

Philosophy 341 Assumptions of Psychotherapy (3) 
Philosophy/Social Science 385 Philosophy o^ Social 
Sciences (3) 

Poll Sci 310 American Political Behavior (3) 

Poll Sci 315 American Political Process (3) 

Poll Sci 320 Politics, Policy and Administration (3) 

Poll Sci 330 Comparative Political Analysis (3) 

Poll Sci 340 Political Philosophy (3) 

Poll Sci 350 World Politics (3) 

Poll Sci 352 American Foreign Policy (3) 

Poll Sci 375 Public Law (3) 

Psychology 301 The Psychology of Human Sexual 
Behavior (3) 

Psychology 311 Educational Psychology (3) 
Psychology of Personality (3) 
Abnormal Psychology (3) 
Environmental Psychology (3) 

Social Psychology (3) 

Developmental Psychology (3) 
Psychology of Aging (3) 

Introduction to Gerontology (3) 
Population Problems (3) 

Urban Sociology (3) 

Women in Contemporary Society (3) 
Sociology of Sex Roles (3) 

Sociology of the Family (3) 

Medical Sociology (3) 

Mental Illness (3) 

Law and Society (3) 


Psychology 331 
Psychology 341 
Psychology 350 
Psychology 351 
Psychology 361 
Psychology 362 
Sociology 133 
Sociology 361 
Sociology 371 
Sociology 407 
Sociology 450 
Sociology 451 
Sociology 455 
Sociology 456 
Sociology 465 

D.3 Cultural Diversity In the Social Sciences (0-3 
units) 

Courses In this area are designed to enhance understand- 
ing of cultural differences within or between Western and/ 
or non-Western societies. 


* Students n^ay take only one of these courses for credit in category D.1. 


* Students may take only one of these courses for credit in category D.2. 


General Education 


Afro 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

Afro 107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 
Afro 220 The Indian in American History (3) 

Afro 240A Afro-American History to 1865 (3) 

Afro 240B Afro-American History from 1865 to Present 

( 3 ) 

Afro 301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Afro 309 The Black Family (3) 

Afro/Hu Ser 311 Intercultural Socialization Patterns 

( 3 ) 

Afro 312 American Indian Women (3) 

Afro 331 Tribalism and Reservation Life (3) 

Afro 346 The African Experience (3) 

Afro 422 Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 
American Studies 301 The American Character (3) 
American Studies 41 1 The White Ethnic in America 


( 3 ) 

American Studies 450 
( 3 ) 

Anthropology 321 
Anthropology 325 
Anthropology 328 
Anthropology 340 
Anthropology 345 
North Africa 


Women in American Society 


The American Indian (3) 
Peoples of South America (3) 
Peoples of Africa (3) 

Peoples of Asia (3) 

Peoples of the Middle East and 

( 3 ) 


Anthropology 347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Chicano 106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 
Chicano 220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Chicano 305 Chicano Family (3) 

Chicano 403 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the 
Southwest (3) 

Chicano 406 La Chicana (3) 

Chicano 431 The Chicano Child (3) 

Chicano 432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

Chicano 445 History of the Chicano (3) 

Chicano 450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues 


(3) 

Chicano 453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

Chicano 460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 
Geography 332 United States and Canada (3) 
Geography 333 Latin America (3) 

Geography 344 Africa (3) 

History 350 History of Latin American Civilization (3) 
History 360 Modern Asia: Nationalism and 
Revolutionary Change (3) 

History 452 20th Century Brazil (3) 

Linguistics 108/ Afro 108 Linguistics and Minority 
Dialects (3) 

Philosophy 302 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3) 
Sociology 431 Minority Group Relations (3) 

Speech Comm 320 Intercultural Communication (3) 


E. Lifelong Understanding and Development (3 
Units) 

Courses in this section facilitate understanding of the hu- 
man being as an integrated physiological, social and psy- 
chological organism. 

American Studies 450 Women in American Society 

( 3 ) 

Anthropology 417 Life Quests (3) 

Anthropology 432 Women in Cross-Cultural 
Perspective (3) 

Biological Science 306 Biology of Aging (3) 

Biological Science 314 Human Issues In Genetics (1) 
Biological Science 360 Biology of Human Sexuality 
( 1 ) 

Chemistry III Nutrition and Drugs (3) 

Chicano Studies 305 Chicano Family (3) 

Child 312 Human Growth and Development (3) 
Geography 357 Social Geography: Perception and 
Behavior (3) 

Health Education 101 Personal Health (3) 

Human Services 300 Character and Conflict (3) 
Nursing/Health Ed 301 Promotion of Optimal Health 
( 3 ) 

Physical Ed 350 Physical Activity and Lifelong 
Well-Being (3) 

Philosophy 324 Existential Group (3) 

Psychology 301 The Psychology of Human Sexual 
Behavior (3) 

Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology (3) 
Psychology 362 Psychology of Aging (3) 

Sociology 341 Social Interaction (3) 

Sociology 450 Sociology of Sex Roles (3) 

Sociology 451 Sociology of the Family (3) 

F. History, Institutions and Values (12 units) 

Comprehensive examinations are available from the Polit- 
ical Science, History and American Studies departments, 
successful completion of which fulfill the requirements In 
F.1 and/or in F. 2 in lieu of class attendance. 

F.1 The American Political System (3 units) 

Political Science 100 American Government (3) 
Political Science 300 Contemporary Issues in 
California Government and Politics (3) * 

F. 2 American History and Culture (3 units) 

American Studies 201 Introduction to American 
Studies (3) 

History 170A United States to 1877 (3) (Take 170A 
and B) 

History 170B United States Since 1877 (3) (Take 
170 A and B) 

History 180 Sun/ey of American History (3) 
History/Afro/Chicano 190 Survey of American History 
(emphasis on ethnic minorities) (3) 

• Transfers from outside the State of California who have already completed a basic 
course in American government may substitute Political Science 300 for Political 
Science 100. These units cannot be used to satisfy any other general education 
requirements. 


General Education 


F.3 History of Western Civilization (6 units) 

Courses in this area give a holistic view of the develop- 
ment of Western society — Its values, traditions and Institu- 
tions. 

History 110A Western Civilization to the 16th Century 

(3) 

History 11 OB Western Civilization since the 16th 
Century (3) 


Certification Policy 

Under provisions of Executive Orders 338 and 342, ac- 
credited colleges and universities may certify the comple- 
tion of part of the 48-51 units required in general 
education. Within the policy of the Board of Trustees, Cal 
State Fullerton will accept such certification of general 
education up to a maximum of 39 semester units, but may 
accept no more In general education than the number of 
units required in each area and no more than 30 units in 
areas in which the student has not been certified. 



Genera! Education 



Teaching Credential 

Programs 



California State University, Fullerton offers a full range of 
State-approved credential programs leading to careers in 
education. From its earliest days to the present, this has 
been one of the chief missions of the university. Pursuing 
a teaching credential in California is a complicated matter 
because of the number of specific requirements that must 
be met. Credential requirements are established by the 
Legislature and enforced by the Commission on Teacher 
Credentialing (CTC) . This commission also reviews and 
approves ail credential preparation programs, such as 
those at the university. An academic major in education is 
not permitted in California, thus students seeking teaching 
credentials must do so in conjunction with, or after the 
completion of, a baccalaureate degree program in an aca- 
demic area outside of education. CSUF offers programs 
leading to basic teaching credentials, specialist creden- 
tials and services credentials. The specialist and services 
credentials, described briefly below, are more advanced 
programs designed to be taken in conjunction with gradu- 
ate study. 

In this section of the catalog information is presented 
regarding; 

A. Basic Credential Programs 

B. The Multiple Subject Credential and Waiver Program 

C. The Single Subject Credentials and Waiver Pro- 
grams 

D. Supplementary Authorizations for the Basic Teach- 
ing Credentials 

E. Specialist and Services Credentials 

A. Basic Credential Programs 

In California there are two types of basic teaching creden- 
tial, the Multiple Subjects Credential and the Single Sub- 
ject Credential. The Multiple Subjects Credential 
authorizes a person to teach in a classroom where many 
different subjects are taught by a single individual, such as 
In elementary schools. The Single Subject Credential au- 
thorizes sen/ice as a teacher in a classroom where only 
one subject is taught, such as classrooms in departmen- 
talized high schools and some junior highs. Thus the per- 
son interested in elementary school teaching should 
pursue the program designed for the Multiple Subjects 
Credential, and the person interested in teaching a specif- 
ic subject at the junior high or high school level should 
pursue the program for the Single Subject Credential. 


5-79417 


Teaching Credential Programs 




In California a person can earn first a preliminary and then 
a c/ear basic teaching credential. The requirements for the 
clear credential are built on those for the preliminary cre- 
dential. The preliminary credential Is the level that author- 
izes beginning teaching. 

Minimum Requirements for a Preiiminary Muitipie or 
Singie Subject Credentiai 

Although It is possible to complete the minimum require- 
ments for a preliminary basic teaching credential in four 
years, it generally takes a good student with accurate 
academic advising about four and a half years full time to 
complete all the requirements for a preliminary basic 
teaching credential and a baccalaureate degree. The 
minimum requirements for a preliminary basic credential 
include: 

1. A baccalaureate degree in a field other than profes- 
sional education from a regionally accredited college or 
university. 

2. An approved program of professional preparation, In- 
cluding supervised student teaching. This two semes- 
ter program is taken during the fourth and/or fifth year 
of study. Cal State Fullerton offers State approved pro- 
fessional preparation programs through the School of 
Human Development and Community Service. Further 
information about these programs, including admission 
and prerequisite requirements, is provided in this cata- 
log under the Division of Teacher Education. 

3. Passage of the California Basic Education Skills Test 
(CBEST) , a test of reading, writing, critical thinking and 
mathematics skills. CSUF is one of the State-approved 
testing centers for this examination as well as for other 
examinations used in the teacher credentialing proc- 
ess. 

4. Demonstration of subject matter knowledge appropri- 
ate to the specific credential being authorized. This can 
be achieved either by passing a State-approved sub- 
ject matter examination or by completing a State-ap- 
proved examination Waiver Program. Cal State 
Fullerton offers Waiver Programs for the Multiple Sub- 
jects subject matter examination and for 14 Single Sub- 
ject examination areas. These programs are described 
in more detail below. 

5. Satisfactory completion of at least two semester units 
of work on the provisions and principles of the U.S. 
Constitution or passage of an examination on this area. 

6. Demonstration of a knowledge of the various methods 
of teaching reading. 

To help ensure that all credential requirements are met 
with a minimum of difficulty, it is essential that people seek 
sound academic advising as soon as possible. The Office 
of Admissions to Teacher Education, located in Education 
Classroom 207, provides Information on waiver program 
advising and specific credential requirements, details on 


procedures for admission to the professional program In 
teacher preparation, information on preprofessional 
prerequisites, and advice on a number of other important 
matters of concern to students Interested in the possibility 
of becoming a teacher. Students are encouraged to seek 
the information offered by this Office at their earliest con- 
venience. 

B. The Multiple Subject 
Credential and Waiver Program 

In California Professional Teacher Preparation is a two- 
semester program taken during the fourth and/or fifth 
year of college; there is no major in education. Since stu- 
dents will be devoting their first three years of work to 
completing general education, major and waiver program 
requirements, it is essential that students consider their 
selection of an academic major carefully. Most persons 
interested in earning a Multiple Subjects Credential at 
CSUF select child development, liberal studies or human 
services as an academic major. Persons interested in 
working as bilingual teachers by earning a Multiple Sub- 
jects Credential with a Bilingual Emphasis, might consider 
majoring in a foreign language. Majors in the social 
sciences, humanities or natural sciences can also be ex- 
cellent backgrounds for careers in elementary school 
teaching. According to California law, any major (other 
than education) can be selected. 

Transfer students and students interested in qualifying for 
a CSUF waiver program should seek a transcript evalua- 
tion from the Credential Preparation Center, Education 
Classroom 207. 

A person seeking a Multiple Subjects Credential will also 
be required to demonstrate a broad general knowledge of 
the arts, humanities, social sciences, mathematics, lan- 
guage arts, and natural sciences. There are two ways to 
demonstrate that knowledge; one is by passing a State- 
approved examination, the other is by completing the 
CSUF State-approved Multiple Subjects Waiver Program. 

Multiple Subjects Waiver 

1. English (18 units) 

Composition: (6 units) 

English 101 Beginning College Writing (3)* 

Any course approved by the University Writing Board as 
meeting the upper-division writing requirement (3)** 

Grammar: Any of the following (3 units) 

English 303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 
English 305 The English Language of America (3) 
English 490 History of the English Language (3) 
Linguistics 106 Language and Linguistics (3) 


Teaching Credential Programs 


Literature: Any of the following (3 units) * 


English 110 Literature of the Western World from 
Ancient Through Medieval (3) * 

English 1 1 1 Literature of the Western World 
Renaissance Through 19th Century (3) 

English 200 Introduction to Literature (3) * 

English 311 Masters of British Literature to 1760 (3)* 
English 312 Masters of British Lit from 1760 (3)* 
English 321 American Literature to Whitman (3) * 
English 322 American Literature from Twain to 
Moderns (3)* 

Speech: Any one of the following: (3 units) * 


Speech Comm 100 Introduction to Human 
Communications (3)* 

Speech Comm 102 Public Speaking (3)* 

Theatre 110 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3)* 
Theatre 411 Oral Interpretation of Children’s Literature 
(3)* 

Critical Thinking (3 units) * 


Completion of Section A3 “Critical Thinking” of the cam- 
pus general education program (3) * 

2. Mathematics an ' Science (24 units) 

Math 303A, B Fundamental Concepts of Elementary 
Mathematics (6) 


Completion of 12 units of course work selected from Sec- 
tion B “Science and Mathematical Concepts” of the cam- 
pus general education program. 

Two of the following: 

Science Ed 310 Physical Science Concepts (3) 
Science Ed 453 Life Science Concepts (3) 

Any 3 units from general education and/or upper-division 
courses in biology, chemistry, geological sciences, and/or 
physics (other than the units used above) 

3. Social Science (24 units) 

Government (3 units) 

Completion of section FI “Contemporary Issues in Cali- 
fornia Government and Politics” of the campus general 
education program (3) * 

American/U.S. History (3 units) 

Completion of Section F2 “American History and Culture” 
of the campus general education program (3) * 

Western Civilization (3 units) * 

History 11 OB History of Western Civilization (3) 

Social Sciences (15 units) 

Completion of 3 units of course work from Section D1 
“Fundamentals of Social Sciences” or Section D2 “Im- 
plications and Explorations in the Social Sciences” of the 
campus general education program. 

Child 390 Middle Childhood (3) t 


Two of the following: 

Sociology 450 Sociology of Sex Roles (3) 

Sociology 451 Sociology of the Family (3) 

Sociology 453 Child In American Society (3) 

Amer Studies 420 Childhood and Family in American 
Culture (3) 

Child 312 Human Growth and Development (3)* 

Child 385 Infancy and Early Childhood (3) 

Child 386 Adolescence (3) 

Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology (3)* 
Psychology 311 Educational Psychology (3) 

Geography 330 California Landscape (3) 

Anthropology 450 Culture and Education (3) 

One of the following courses approved for Section D3 
“Cultural Diversity In the Social Sciences” of the CSUF 
general education program. 

Hu Ser/Afro 311 Intracultural Social Patterns (3)* 
Chicano 305 Chicano Family (3) * 

Chicano 431 The Chicano Child (3)* 

Chicano 432 The Chicano Adolescent (3) * 

Sociology 431 Minority Group Relations (3) * 

Amer Studies 301 The American Character (3)* 
Geography 332 United States and Canada (3)* 

Afro 309 The Black Family (3) * 

Afro 483 Black Child and the Educational System (3) 
Afro 485 Pan Africanism and Contemp Issues (3) 

4. Humanities/Fine Arts (18 units) 

Nine units selected from the following: (9 units) 

Art 380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3) 

History 11 OA History of Western Civilization (3) 

Theat 402A Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 

Theat 403A Theatre for Children (3) 

Theat 471 Creative Dance for Children (3) 

Physical Ed 372 Movement and the Child (3) 

English 433 Children’s Literature (3) 

English 434 Adolescent Literature (3) 

Completion of Section C “Arts and Humanities” of the 
campus general education program (9 units) * 

The above waiver program has been designed for maxi- 
mal compatibility with the campus general education pro- 
gram. Nevertheless, good academic advising and careful 
course selection each semester are essential if a person 
is to complete major requirements, waiver requirements 
and general education requirements with the least amount 
of difficulty. # 


* Course work that can also be used to satisfy CSUF undergraduate general education 

baccalaureate requirements. 

* * Course work that can also be used to satisfy the CSUF upper-division writing require- 

ment. 

t Course work that is a required prerequisite to admission to the Professional Education 
Basic Credential Program. 

* Nine units of upper-division course work satisfying gerteral education requirements 

must be taken no earlier than the first semester of the junior year. 


Teaching Credential Programs 


C. Single Subject Credentials 
and Waiver Programs 

Although a person seeking a Single Subject Credential 
may complete any academic major, most people decide 
to complete the degree major closest to the subject field 
in which they wish to be authorized to teach. CSUF offers 
a Single Subject Credential program in each of the follow- 
ing 14 State-authorized subject fields: 

Art 

Business Education 

English (English, Speech, Theater) 

French 

German 

Government (Political Science) 

History 

Life Science (Biology) 

Mathematics 

Music 

Physical Education 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry, Geology and Physics) 
Social Sciences (Anthropology, American Studies, 
Economics, Geography, Chicano Studies, History, 
Afro-Ethnic Studies, Psychology and Sociology) 
Spanish 

To demonstrate subject matter competence a person 
must either pass the appropriate State-approved exami- 
nation, or complete a State-approved waiver program. 
These waiver programs generally coincide sufficiently 
with the degree major to make it possible to complete 
major requirements and waiver requirements using many 
of the same courses. But degree programs and waiver 
programs serve different purposes; taking one Is not a 
guarantee that you will have satisfied the requirements of 
the other. Good advising and careful planning are crucial. 
Transfer students seeking a CSUF waiver should seek a 
transcript evaluation from the Credential Preparation Cen- 
ter, Education Classroom 207. The CSUF waiver programs 
for each of the Single Subject fields listed above are pre- 
sented below: 

SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: ART 

Core Requirements in Subjects Commoniy Taught 
(36 units) 

Art 103 Two-dimensional Design (3) 

Art 104 Three-dimensional Design (3) 

Art 106A Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Art 107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (6) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201 A,B Art and Civilization (6) 


Art 205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Art 207A Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 31 OA Watercolor (3) 

Art 412 Art of the 20th Century (3) 

Breadth and Perspective Requirements (15 units) 

Students select one of the following areas of emphasis 

Drawing, Painting and General Art 
Art 207B Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 247 Beginning Printmaking (3) 

Art 307A,B Advanced Drawing and Painting (6) 

Art 317 Life Studies: Draw, Paint and Sculpting (3) 

Crafts and Ceramics 

Art 205B Beginning Crafts: Wood (3) 

Art 305A Advanced Crafts (3) 

Art 306A,B Advanced Ceramics (6) 

Art 485A Special Studies In Crafts: Jewelry (3) 

SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Core Requirements in Subjects Commonly Taught 
(30-33 units) 

(All students must meet the following core requirements. 
In addition, each student must meet the requirements of 
one of the four specializations which are: accounting, mar- 
keting, economics, and office administration.) 

Demonstration of Typewriting Proficiency 

(Proficiency Exam: (1) five-minute timed writing; mini- 
mum score 50 words gross per minute with five error max- 
imum, and (2) demonstration of problem-solving ability: 
Setting up a business letter, tabulation problem and 
rough-draft material from unarranged copy and In maila- 
ble/usable form.) 

Demonstration of Office Machines Proficiency 

(Proficiency Exam: (1) Demonstration of ability to pro- 
duce a complex business letter, containing tabulation, on 
a microcomputer or wordprocessor. In mailable form, and 
(2) ability to add columns of figures on a 10-key calculat- 
ing machine using the touch system. 

Each of the following: (15 units) 

Econ 100 The Economic Environment (3)** 
or Econ 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)** 
Econ 200 The Principles of Economics (3)** 
or Econ 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)** 
Accounting 201 A,B Elementary Accounting (6) 
Management 246 Business Law (3) 

One of the following: (3 units) 

Manag Sci 263 Intro to Information Systems (1) and 
Manag Sci 264 Intro to Computer Programming (2) or 
Manag Sci 265 Introduction to Information Systems 
and Computer Programming (3) or 
Computer Sci 112 Introduction to Computer 
Programming (3) 


Teaching Credential Programs 


Each of the following: (9 units) 

Business Admin 301 Business Writing (3) 

Finance 310 Personal Financial Management (3) 
Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

One area of specialization: (3-6 units) 

Accounting Specialization* 

Accounting 301 A, B Intermediate Accounting (6) 

Marketing Specialization* 

Marketing 352 Principles of Retailing (3) 

Marketing 370 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Economics Specialization* 

Econ 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 
Econ 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Office Administration Specialization* 

Demonstration of Shorthand Proficiency 

(Proficiency Exam: Ability to take dictation at a minimum 
of 80 words per minute for three minutes and transcribe 
the material into mailable/usable form.) 


Management 339 Managing Business Operations and 
Organizations (3) 

Breadth and Perspective Requirements (15 units) 

Students must take 15 units selected from the following 
courses. Courses must be divided among at least four 
categories (e.g., accounting, computer science, manage- 
ment science, and management.) 


Accounting 301 A,B Intermediate Accounting (6)*** 


Accounting 302 
Accounting 308 
Accounting 401 
Economics 310 

(3)*** 

Economics 320 


Cost Accounting (3) 

Federal Income Tax (3) 

Advanced Accounting (3) 
Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis 

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis 


(3)*** 

Management 224 Intro to Systems Concepts (3) 
Finance 320 Business Finance (3) 

Management 340 Organizational Behavior (3) 
Marketing 352 Principles of Retailing (3)*** 
Philosophy 312 Moral Issues in Business (3) 
Mathematics 135 Business Calculus (3) 

Comp Sci 260 Structured Programming in Fortran (3) 
Comp Sci 261 Programming In Pascal (3) 

Manag Sci 270 File Concepts and Cobol Programming 

(3) 

Management 339 Managing Business Operations and 
Organizations (3)** 

Manag Sci 361 Probabil ty and Statistical Methods in 
Business and Economics (3) 


* The concentrations for the business administration major in accounting, ecorK)mics 

and marketing require a total of 18-20 units of in-depth course work in those areas. 

** EcorxKnics 210 Principies of Ecorx>mics (5) may be substituted for Econ 201 
and 202. 

* * * These courses may not fulfill a portion of the breadth and perspective requirements 

if they are used to meet part of t^ core (specialization) requirements. 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: ENGLISH (ENGLISH, THE- 
ATER, SPEECH) 


Core Requirements in Subjects Commoniy Taught 
(36 units) 

English 101 Beginning College Writing (3) 

English 301 Advanced College Writing (3) 

English 303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 

One of the following: 

Communications 101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 
Communications 201 Reporting for Mass Media (3) 
Theatre 477B Seminar in Critical Techniques (3) 


One of the following: 

Linguistics 106 Language and Linguistics (3) 
English 305 The English Language in America (3) 
English 490 History of the English Language (3) 


Each of the following: 

English 300 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

English 311 Masters of British Literature to 1760 (3) 
English 312 Masters of British Lit from 1760 (3) 
English 321 American Literature to Whitman (3) 
English 322 American Literature from Twain to the 
Moderns (3) 

English 334 Shakespeare (3) 


One of the following: 


Theater 410A Oral Interpretation of Prose (3) 

Theater 410B Oral Interpretation of Poetry (3) 

Theater 41 OC Oral Interpretation of Drama (3) 

Breadth and Perspective Requirements (15 units) 

Students may select one of the following areas of empha- 
sis: 


Theatre 


Theatre 200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 263 Acting (3) 

Theatre 276A Stagecraft (3) 

Theatre 370A Directing (3) 

Theatre 402B Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 

English Literature: Five courses from the following: 


English 391 
English 423 
English 433 
English 434 
English 445 
English 462 
English 463 
(3) 

English 464 
English 465 
English 
(3) 

English 467 


Traditions of English Literary (3) 

Early American Literature (3) 

Children’s Literature (3) 

Adolescent Literature (3) 

The American Tradition In Poetry (3) 
Modern British and American Novels (3) 
Contemp British and American Novels 

Modern British and American Drama (3) 
Contemp British and American Drama (3) 
466 Modern British and American Poetry 

Contemp British and American Poetry (3) 


Teaching Credential Programs 


Public Speaking: Five courses from the following: 


Speech Comm 102 
Speech Comm 138 
Speech Comm 200 
Speech Comm 324 
Speech Comm 332 
Speech Comm 334 


Public Speaking (3) 

Forensics (3) 

Human Communication (3) 

Small Group Communication (3) 
Processes of Social Influence (3) 
Persuasive Speaking (3) 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: FRENCH 


Upper-Division Requirements in Subjects 
Commonly Taught (30 units) 


French 300 French Conversation (3) 

French 315 Origins of Modern France (3) 

French 317 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 
French 318 Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) 
French 325 Contemporary French Civilization (3) 
French 375 Introduction to Literature (3) 

French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3) 
French 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure 
and Style (3) 


Six units selected from the following: 


French 307 
French 415 
French 425 
French 475A 
French 475B 
French 475C 
French 475D 
French 485 


French Film (3) 

French Classicism (3) 

French Romanticism (3) 

Exploration of the Self (3) 

In Search of the Real (3) 

The Individual and Society (3) 

Beyond Despair (3) 

Senior Seminar in French Literature (3) 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: GERMAN 

30-Unit Upper-Division Requirement in Subjects 
Commonly Taught 

German 300 German Conversation (3) 

German 315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) 
German 317 Adv Conversation and Composition (3) 
German 325 Current Trends In Culture of 
German-Speaking Peoples (3) 

German 375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 
German 399 German Phonetics (3) 

German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3) 
German 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure 
and Style (3) 


Six units selected from the following: 

German 430 German Literature and Culture to the 
Baroque (3) 

German 440 18th-Century German Literature and 
Culture (3) 

German 450 19th-Century German Literature and 
Culture (3) 

German 460 20th-Century German Literature and 
Culture (3) 

German 485 Senior Seminar in German Literature (3) 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: GOVERNMENT 


Core Requirements in Subjects Commonly Taught 
(30 units) 

Poll Sci 100 American Government (3) 

Poll Sci 300 Contemporary Issues in California 
Government and Politics (3) 

Poll Sci 310 American Political Behavior (3) 

Poll Sci 315 American Political Process (3) 

Poll Sci 375, 375W Public Law (3) 

Poll Sci 350 World Politics (3) 

One of the following: 


Poll Sci 414 The Legislative Process (3) 

Poll Sci 470 Judicial Process (3) 

Poll Sci 473 Introduction to Constitutional Law (3) 

One of the following: 

Chicano 220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Economics 332 Economic Problems of Asia (3) 
Anthropology 328 Peoples of Africa (3) 

Anthropology 340 Peoples of Asia (3) 

Anthropology 345 Peoples of the Middle East and 
North America (3) 

Anthropology 347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Poll Sci 340 Political Philosophy (3) 

One of the following: 

Poll Sci 440 Political Ideologies and Attitudes (3) 

Poll Sci 442 Prob of Democratic Political Thought (3) 
Poll Sci 443 Theory and Philosophy of Marxism (3) 
Economics 330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 


Breadth and Perspective Requirements (15 units) 

U.S. Government: Two courses from among the following: 


Poll Sci 347 Political Theory and Political Practice (3) 
Poll Sci 352 American Foreign Policy (3) 

Poll Sci 410 Political Parties (3) 

Poll Sci 413 Pressure Groups and Public Opinion (3) 
Poll Sci 415 Power and Participation In American (3) 
Poll Sci 416 The American Presidency (3) 

Poll Sci 309 Introduction to Metropolitan Politics (3) 
Poll Sci 311 Research Proseminar in American 
Political Behavior (3) 

Chicano 460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 

Afro 335 History of Racism (3) 


Law: One course from among the following: 

Crim Jus 31 OA Criminal Law (3) 

Management 245 Personal Law (3) 

Management 246 Business Law (3) 

Chicano 360 Chicano and the Law (3) 

Poll Sci 376 Research Processes in Public Law (3) 
Poll Sci 474 Seminar In Constitutional Law: Civil 
Rights and Civil Liberties (3) 


Comparative Systems/ International Politics: One course 
from among the following: 

Poll Sci 330 Comparative Political Analysis (3) 


Teaching Credential Programs 


Poli Scl 335 Comparative Political Change (3) 

Poll Sci 351 Research Proseminar in International 
Politics (3) 

Poll Sci 430 Government and Politics of a Selected 
National-State (3) 

Poli Sci 431 Government and Politics of a Selected 
Area (3) 

Poli Sci 446 Corruption, Ethics and Public Policy (3) 
Poli Sci 452 Foreign Policy for a Selected Country or 
Group of Countries (3) 

Poli Sci 455 Comparative Analysis of Foreign Policies 

( 3 ) 

Public Administration: One course from the following: 


Poli 

Poli 

Poli 

Poll 

Poli 

Poli 

Poli 

Poll 

Poli 

Poll 


Scl 320 or 320W Politics, Policy and 
Administration 

Sci 321 Research Prosemlnar In Politics, Policy 
and Administration (3) 

Sci 421 Public Finance Administration (3) 

Scl 422 Public Personnel Administration (3) 

Scl 424 Urban Planning and Development (3) 

Sci 425 Comparative Public Administration (3) 

Scl 426 Collective Bargaining in Public Sector (3) 
Sci 423 Regional Planning and Development (3) 
Sci 427 Current Issues in Urban and Metropolitan 
Policy (3) 

Scl 429 Public Personnel Training (3) 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: HISTORY 


Core Requirements In Subjects Commonly Taught 
(30-33 units) 

History 110A Western Civilization to 16th Century (3) 
History 11 OB Western Civilization Since the 16th 
Century (3) 

History 383 History of California (3) 

History 426 Rise of Modern Europe (3) 

History 429 Europe since 1914 (3) 

North America and U.S.: take one from the following: 

History 180 Survey of American History (3) 

History 170A,B United States History (6) 

Amer Studies 201 Intro to American Studies (3) 


Latin America: take one from the following: 

History 350 History of Latin American Civilization (3) 
History 453A,B History of Mexico (6) 

Asia: take one of the following — 


History 360 Modern Asia (3) 

History 462A,B History of China (6) 

History 463A,B History of Japan (6) 

History 464A,B History of Southeast Asia (6) 
History 465A,B History of India (6) 


Africa and the Middle East: take one pair— 


History 466A,B History of Islamic Civilizations (6) 


History 467A,B History of the Middle East (6) 

History 458 Southern Africa in the 20th Century (3) 
and Afro 346 The African Experience (3) 

Breadth and Depth Requirements (15 units) 

Historical Methodology: (at least 3 units) 

History 300A Historical Thinking (3) 

Amer Studies 350 Seminar In Theory and Method of 
American Studies (3) 

History 490 Senior Research Seminar (3) 

Amer Studies 401 Proseminar in American Studies 

( 3 ) 

U.S. and North American History: (at least 6 units) 

History/ Amer Studies 386A American Social History 
1750-1860 (3) 

History/ Amer Studies 386B American Social History 
1860-1930 (3) 

Amer Studies 301 The American Character (3) 

Amer Studies 345 The American Dream (3) 

Amer Studies 416 So. California Culture: A Study of 
American Regionalism (3) 

Amer Studies 395 American West In Symbol and Myth 

( 3 ) 

History 380 Canada, 1534-1967 
Chicano 453 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

History 470 American Colonial Civilization (3) 

History 471 United States from Colony to Nation (3) 
History 472 Jeffersonian Themes in American Society, 
1800-1861 (3) 

History 473 Democracy on Trial 1845-1877 (3) 

History 474 The United States 1876-1914 (3) 

History 475 America Comes of Age, 1914-1945 (3) 
History 476 United States Since 1945 (3) 

History 479 The Urbanization of American Life (3) 
History 485A U.S. Foreign Relations to 1900 (3) 
History 485B U.S. Foreign Relations from 1900 (3) 
History 486 United States Cultural History (3) 

History 487 Hist of American Parties and Politics (3) 
History 350 History of Latin American Civilization 
(3) — If not used to satisfy 1.41 
History 453A Mexico to 1910 (3) 

History 453B Mexico Since 1910 (3) 

American Studies 450 Women in U.S. History (3) 

Western Civilization and Modern Europe: (at least 6 units) 

History 341 Tudor-Stuart England 3) 

History 342 Modern England and Great Britain (3) 
History 401 European Intellectual History from 1500 to 
the Present (3) 

History 41 5A Classical Greece (3) 

History 41 5B Hellenistic Civilization (3) 

History 41 7A Roman Republic (3) 

History 41 7B Roman Empire (3) 

History 425A The Renaissance (3) 

History 425B The Reformation (3) 

History 432 Modern Germany from 18th Century (3) 


Teaching Credential Programs 


History 434A Russia to 1890 (3) 

History 434B The Russian Revolutions and the Soviet 
Regime (3) 

History 437 East Europe (3) 


Math 401 Algebra and Probability for the Secondary 
Teacher (3) 

Math 402 Logic and Geometry for the Secondary 
Teacher (3) 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: LIFE SCIENCE 


Core Requirements in Subjects Commoniy Taught 
(31 units) 

Biological Sci 141 Principles of Botany (2) 

Biological Sci 141 L Principles of Botany Lab (2) 
Biological Sci 161 Principles of Zoology (2) 
Biological Sci 161L Principles of Zoology Lab (2) 
Biological Sci 302 General Microbiology (2) 
Biological Sci 302L General Microbiology Lab (2) 
Biological Sci 312 Genetics (3) 

Biological Sci 315 Cell and Molecular Biology (3) 
Biological Sci 316 Principles of Ecology (3) 

One of the following: 

Biological Sci 31 5L Cell and Molecular Biol Lab (2) 
Biological Sci 31 6L Principles of Ecology Lab (2) 

One of the following: 


Biological Sci 362 
Biological Sci 410 
Biological Sci 468 
Biological Sci 444 


Human Physiology (4) 

General Cell Physiology (4) 
Comparative Animal Physiology (4) 
Plant Physiology (4) 


One of the following: 


Biological Sci 419 Marine Ecology (3) and 
Biological Sci 41 9L Marine Ecology Lab (1) 
Biological Sci 446 Phycology (4) 

Biological Sci 461 Invertebrate Zoology (4) 
Biological Sci 475 Ichthyology (4) 

Breadth and Perspective Requirements (27-30 
units) 

Chemistry 120A,B General Chemistry (10) 

One of the following: 

Chemistry 301 A, B Organic Chemistry and 
Chemistry 302 Organic Chemistry Lab (8) , or 
Chemistry 303 Survey of Organic Chemistry (5) 

One of the following: 

Math 130A A Short course In Calculus (4) 

Math 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 
Physics 211 A, B ar7d 21 2A,B Elementary Physics (8) 


One of the following: 

Math 435 Mathematical Statistics (3) 

Math 438 Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3) 

One of the following: 

Computer Sci 112 Introduction to Computer 
Programming (3) 

Engineering 205 Digital Computation (3) 

Closely Related Subjects Requirement (15) 

Mathematics 302 Modern Algebra (3) 

Mathematics 307 Applied Linear Algebra (3) 

One of the following: 

Computer Sci 210 Introduction to Machine Language 
and Logic (3) 

Computer Sci 212 Introduction to Computational 
Languages (3) 

Two of the following courses: 

Math 350A Advanced Calculus (3) 

Math 370 Mathematical Model Building (3) 

Philosophy 368 First Course in Symbolic Logic (3) 
Philosophy 369 Second Course In Symbolic Logic (3) 

SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: MUSIC 

Core Requirements in Subjects Commonly Taught 
(30 units) 

Music 111A,B Diatonic Harmony (6) 

Music 211 Chromatic Harmony (3) 

Music 251 Sun/ey of Musical Literature (3) 

Music 281B,P,S,W Orchestral Instruments (1) 

Music 319 Form and Analysis (3) 

Music 351 A History and Literature of Music (Greek 
through Renaissance) (3) 

Music 351 B History and Literature of Music (Baroque 
and Classics) (3) 

Music 351 C History and Literature of Music (Romatic 
to Present) (3) 

Music 391 A Choral Conducting (2) 

Breadth and Perspective Requirements (15+ units) 

One of the following: (2 units) 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: MATHEMATICS 

Minimum 30 Unit Requirement (34 units) 

Math 150A, B Analytic Geometry and Calculus (8) 
Math 250A,B Intermediate Calculus (8) 

Math 335 Mathematical Probability (3) 

Math 380 History of Mathematics (3) 


Music 320A 20th Century Techniques (2) 
Music 320B 20th Century Techniques (2) 

One of the following: (4 units) 

Music 323A Orchestration (2) 

and Music 324 Scoring for the Band (2) 


Teaching Credential Programs 


Music 453A or 453B Choral Literature and 
Interpretation (2) 
and one of: 

Music 457A Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 
or Music 457B Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 
or Music 468A Vocal Pedagogy (2) 

Music 381 Survey of Recreational Instruments (1) 
and Music 435 Music in the Modern Classroom (3) 


One of the following: (2 or 3 units) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3) 
Music 354 Survey of Public School Choral Music 
Materials (2) 

Music 444 Survey of Marching Band Materials (2) 


Take at least five of the following: (5 units) 
Music 361 A Symphony Orchestra (1) 
Music 361 B University Choir (1) 

Music 361C University Concert Band (1) 
Music 361 D Opera Theatre (1) 

Music 361 E University Singers (1) 

Music 361 F University Wind Ensemble (1) 
Music 361 H Symphonic Band (1) 

Music 361 M Men’s Choir (1) 

Music 361 W Women’s Choir (1) 


One of the following: (2 units) 

Music 391 B Choral Conducting (2) 

Music 392A Instrumental Conducting (2) 

Performance Requirement: 

Perform at level sufficient to be admitted to Music 371 on 
principle instrument (0-4) 


Piano Proficiency Requirement: 

Completion of Music 282B or satisfactory passage of 
piano proficiency examination (0-4) 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: PHYSICAL EDUCATION* 


Core Requirements in, or directiy reiated to, 
Subjects Commoniy Taught (30 units) 


Physical Ed 300 
Physical Ed 349 
Physical Ed 352 
Physical Ed 364 
Physical Ed 371 


Principles of Movement (3) 
Measurement and Evaluation (3) 
Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Motor Development (3) 

Prin of Human Motor Learning (3) 


Analysis of Sports: (4 units) 


Physical Ed 302 
Physical Ed 303 
Physical Ed 304 
Physical Ed 305 
Physical Ed 306 
Physical Ed 308 
Physical Ed 309 
Physical Ed 312 
Physical Ed 314 
Physical Ed 316 


Track Events (2) 

Field Events (2) 

Swimming (2) 

Golf (2) 

Gymnastics (2) 

Soccer (2) 

Badminton/Racquetball (2) 
Tennis (2) 

Wrestling (2) 

Volleyball (2) 


Physical Ed 317 Basketball (2) 
Physical Ed 319 Softball (2) 


Techniques of Coaching: (2 units) 


Physical Ed 328 
Physical Ed 330 
Physical Ed 332 
Physical Ed 334 
Physical Ed 335 
Physical Ed 337 
Physical Ed 338 


Gymnastics (2) 
Softball (2) 
Tennis (2) 
Baseball (2) 
Football (2) 
Basketball (2) 
Volleyball (2) 


Activities (9 units: at least one course in each of the five 
commonly taught areas; at least six of the nine units at the 
intermediate, advanced or intercollegiate level) 

Dance 

Theatre 101 Introduction to Dance (3) 

Theatre 112 Beginning Ballet (2) 

Theatre 212 Intermediate Ballet (2) 

Theatre 312 Advanced Classical Ballet (3) 

Theatre 122A Beginning Modern Dance (2) 

Theatre 222 Intermediate Modern Dance (3) 

Theatre 323A Dance Composition (3) 

Theatre 132 Beginning Jazz Dance (2) 

Theatre 232 Intermediate Jazz Dance (3) 

Theatre 332 Advanced Jazz Dance (3) 

Theatre 142 Beginning Tap Dance (2) 

Theatre 242 Intermediate Tap Dance (2) 


Basic Movement 

Physical Ed 100 Physical Conditioning (1) 

Physical Ed 101 Athletic Conditioning (1) 

Physical Ed 102A Beginning Jogging (1) 

Physical Ed 102B Intermediate/ Advanced Jogging (1) 
Physical Ed 104 Horseback Riding (1) 

Physical Ed 105 Cycling (1) 

Physical Ed 106 Skiing (1) 

Physical Ed 107 Ice Skating (1) 

Physical Ed 108 Roller Skating (1) 

Physical Ed 125 Rock Climbing (1) 

Physical Ed 144 Exercise Weight Control (1) 

Physical Ed 146 Body Building (1) 

Physical Ed 151 A Beginning Aikido (1) 

Physical Ed 151B Intermediate Aikido (1) 

Physical Ed 152A Beginning Karate (1) 

Physical Ed 152B Intermediate Karate (1) 

Physical Ed 154 Self-Defense (1) 

Physical Ed 246A Basic Hatha Yoga (2) 

Physical Ed 246B Intermediate Hatha Yoga (2) 


Sports and Games 


Physical Ed 117A 
Physical Ed 117B 
Physical Ed 117C 
Physical Ed 118A 
Physical Ed 118B 
Physical Ed 118C 
Physical Ed 119A 


Beginning Bowling (1) 
Intermediate Bowling (1) 
Advanced Bowling (1) 
Beginning Archery (1) 
Intermediate Archery (1) 
Advanced Archery (1) 
Beginning Golf (1) 


Teaching Credential Programs 


Physical Ed 11 9B Intermediate Golf (1) 

Physical Ed 119C Advanced Golf (1) 

Physical Ed 130A Beginning Badminton (1) 
Physical Ed 130B Intermedite Badminton (1) 
Physical Ed 131 A Beginning Tennis (1) 

Physical Ed 131 B Advanced/Beginning Tennis (1) 
Physical Ed 131C Intermediate Tennis (1) 

Physical Ed 1310 Advanced Tennis (1) 

Physical Ed 132A Beginning Racquetball (1) 
Physical Ed 132B Intermediate Racquetball (1) 
Physical Ed 132C Advanced Racquetball (1) 
Physical Ed 133 Handball (1) 

Physical Ed 142 Children’s Games (1) 

Physical Ed 147 Olympic Power Lifting (1) 
Physical Ed 150A Beginning Wrestling (1) 

Physical Ed 1 SOB Intermediate Wrestling (1) 
Physical Ed 155A Beginning Fencing (1) 

Physical Ed 155B Intermediate Fencing (1) 
Physical Ed 160 Baseball (1) 

Physical Ed 161 A Beginning Slow Pitch (1) 
Physical Ed 161 B Intermediate Slow Pitch (1) 
Physical Ed 162 Fast Pitch Softball (1) 

Physical Ed 164A Beginning Volleyball (1) 

Physical Ed 164B Intermediate Volleyball (1) 
Physical Ed 164C Advanced Volleyball (1) 

Physical Ed 165A Beginning Soccer (1) 

Physicai Ed 165B Intermediate Soccer (1) 

Physical Ed 166 Team Handball (1) 

Physical Ed 167A Beginning Basketball (1) 
Physical Ed 167B Intermediate Basketball (1) 
Physical Ed 167C Advanced Basketball (1) 
Physical Ed 171 Intercollegiate Golf (2) 

Physical Ed 172 Intercollegiate Cross Counrty (2) 
Physical Ed 174 Intercollegiate Track-Field (2) 
Physical Ed 175 Intercollegiate Tennis (2) 

Physical Ed 176 Intercollegiate Wrestling (2) 
Physical Ed 177 Intercollegiate Fencing (2) 
Physical Ed 178 Intercollegiate Basketball (2) 
Physical Ed 179 Intercollegiate Baseball (2) 
Physical Ed 160 Intercollegiate Soccer (2) 

Physical Ed 184 Intercollegiate Football (2) 
Physical Ed 185 Intercollegiate Volleybail (2) 
Physical Ed 186 Intercollegiate Softball (2) 

Aquatics 

Physical Ed 110A Beginning Swimming (1) 
Physical Ed 11 OB Intermediate Swimming (1) 
Physical Ed HOC Advanced Swimming (1) 
Physical Ed 111 Life Saving (1) 

Physical Ed 112 Water Polo (1) 

Physical Ed 114 Skin Diving (1) 

Physical Ed 116 Springboard Diving (1) 

Physical Ed 122A Beginning Sailing (1) 

Physical Ed 122B Intermediate Sailing (1) 

Physical Ed 173 Intercollegiate Water Polo (2) 
Physical Ed 210 Water Safety Instructor (2) 
Physical Ed 214 Basic Scuba (2) 


Physical Ed 343 Intermediate Scuba (2) 


Gymnastics 

Physical Ed 120A Beginning Gymnastics (1) 
Physical Ed 120B Intermediate Gymnastics (1) 
Physical Ed 120C Advanced Gymnastics (1) 
Physical Ed 170 Intercollegiate Gymnastics (2) 
Physical Ed 306 Gymnastics (2) 

Depth and Perspective Requirements (15 units) 
One of the following courses: 

Physical Ed 380 History of Physical Education (3) 
Physical Ed 382 Philosophical Perspectives (3) 


One of the following courses: 

Physicai Ed 381 Human Movement in Cultural 
Perspective (3) 

Physical Ed 384 Sociology of Sport (3) 

Three of the following courses: 


Physical Ed 340 Contemporary Movement 
Environments (3) 

Physical Ed 363 Developmental Adaptations of the 


Atypical (3) 
Physical Ed 365 
Injuries (3) 
Physical Ed 372 
Physical Ed 373 
Activity (3) 
Physical Ed 383 
Movement 


Prevention and Care of Athletic 

Movement and the Child (3) 
Movement Concepts in Physical 

Psychological Aspects of Human 
(3) 


SINGLE SUBJECT WAVIER: PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Core Requirements In Subjects Commonly Taught 
(38-41 units) 

Chemistry 120 A.B General Chemistry (10) 

One of the following: (5-8 units) 

Chemistry 301A,B Organic Chemistry (6) 

and Chemistry 302 Organic Chemistry Lab (2), or 

Chemistry 303 Survey of Organic Chemistry (5) 

Each of the following: 

Physics 225A Fundamental Physics: Mechanical (3) 
Physics 225B Fundamental Physics: Electricity and 
Magnetism (3) 

Physics 225C Fundamental Physics: Modern Physics 
(3) 

Physics 226A,B,C Fundamental Physics Lab (1) 
Geological Sci 101 Physical Geology (3) 

Geological Sci 101 L Physical Geology Laboratory (1) 
Geological Sci 201 Earth History (3) 

Physics 350 General Astronomy (4) 

Breadth and Perspective Requirements (19 unite) 

Math 150 A,B Analytic Geometry and Calculus (8) 


naehlng CndMtIal Programs 


One of the following: 

Geological Sci 340 General Meteorology (3) 
Chemistry 361 A Intro to Physical Chemistry (3) 
Chemistry 371 A Physical Chemistry (3) 

Physics 325 Fundamental Physics: Classical 
thermodynamics (3) 

Two of the following: 

Biological Sci 101 (and 101 L) Elements of Biology 
and Lab (4) 

Biological Sci 141 (and 141L) Principles of Botany 
and Lab (4) 

Biological Sci 161 (and 161 L) Principles of Zoology 
and Lab (4) 

SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Core Requirements in Subjects Commoniy Taught 
(30-33 units) 

One of the following courses: (3-6 units) 

History 180 Survey of American History (3) 

Amer Studies 201 Intro to American Studies (3) 
History 170A,B United States History (6) 

Each of the following: (21 units) 

History 383 History of California (3) 

Poll Sci 100 American Government (3) 

Economics 100 The Economic Environment (3) 
History 110A Western Civilization to 16th Century (3) 
History 11 OB Western Civilization Since the 16th 
Century (3) 

Anthropology 100 Non-Western cultures and the 
Western Tradition (3) 

Geography 100 World Geography (3) 

One of the following: (3 units) 

Hu Ser/Afro 311 Intracultural Social Patterns (3) 
Chicano 445 History of the Chicano (3) 

One of the following: (3 units) 

Amer Studies 301 The American Character (3) 

Amer Studies 450 Women In American Society (3) 

Breadth and Perspective Requirements (15 units) 

One of the following courses: 

Geography 330 California Landscape (3) 

Geography 332 United States and Canada (3) 

Three units of Sociology 

Three units of Psychology 

Six units from any combination of the following: 
Afro-Ethnic Studies 
American Studies 
Anthropology 
Chicano Studies 
Economics 


Geography 

History 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

SINGLE SUBJECT WAIVER: SPANISH 

30— Unit Upper-Division Requirement in Subjects 
Commonly Taught 

Spanish: (9 units) 

Spanish 300 Spanish Conversation (3) 

Spanish 315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) 
Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish American 
Civilization (3) 

Take one of the following: (3 units) 

Spanish 317 Advanced Conversation and Composition 
(3) (for non-native speaker) 

Spanish 318 Advanced Spanish Syntax and 
Composition (3) (for non-native speaker) 

Spanish 375 Introduction to Literary Forms (3) 

Take one of the following: (3 units) 

Spanish 415 Contemporary Spanish Culture (3) 
Spanish 416 Contemp Spanish American Culture (3) 

Six units selected from the following: (6 units) 

Spanish 430 Spanish Lit to Neoclassicism (3) 

Spanish 441 Spanish American Literature (3) 

Spanish 461 Spanish Lit Since Neoclassicism (3) 
Spanish 475 Senior Seminar: Topics in Spanish: 
Peninsula Literature (3) 

Spanish 485 Senior Seminar: Topics In Spanish: 
American Literature (3) 

Spanish 466 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

Either of the following: (3 units) 

Spanish 467 Dialectology (3) or , 

Spanish 468 Contrastive Analysis (3) 

D. Supplementary 
Authorizations for the Basic 
Teaching Credentials 

It is possible to expand the subject matter authorization a 
teaching credential initially carries to other subject fields. 
The State recognizes several subject areas that can be 
added to a Multiple Subjects Credential; thereby qualifying 
person to teach in departmentalized junior high class- 
rooms (grades 6-9). CSUF offers 14 Supplementary Au- 
thorizations for the Multiple Subject Credential in: 

Art 

French 

Health Science 


Teaching Credential Programs 


Music 

Spanish 

Business 

General Science 

Life Science 

Physical Education 

Social Science 

English 

German 

Mathematics 

Physical Science 

Supplementary Authorizations for the Single Subject Cre- 
dential permit a person who holds a credential in one 
broad subject field to be also authorized to teach in an- 
other more specific subject area, one that might be quite 
different from the field of broader authorization. CSUF 
offers 37 supplementary authorizations for the single Sub- 
ject Credential in: 

Accounting/Computer Literacy 
Animal Science (Zoology) 

Anthropology 

Biology 

Ceramics 

Chemistry 

Comparative Political Systems/International Relations 
Composition/Critical Thinking 
Computer Concepts and Applications 
Crafts (Arts) 

Dance 

Drama 

Drug Use and Abuse 
Earth Science (Geology) 

Economics 

Economic and Consumer Education 

Electronics 

Family Health 

Geography 

Graphic Arts 

Instrumental Music 

Jewelry 

Journalism 

Literature 

Marketing and Distribution 

Painting and Drawing 

Personal Health 

Photography 

Physics 

Plant Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Speech 

U.S. Government/CIvIcs 
U.S. History/California History 
Vocal Music 
World History 

Also, to permit the holder of a single subjects credential 


to teach certain subjects in grades 9 and below, CSUF 
offers eight supplementary authorizations in: 

General Science 
Introductory English 
Introductory French 
Introductory German 
Introductory Health Sciences 
Introductory Mathematics 
Introductory Social Science 
Introductory Spanish 

Contact the Credential Preparation Center, Education 
Classroom 207, for details concerning course require- 
ments for specific supplementary authorizations. 

E. Specialist and Services 
Credentials 

CSUF offers several State approved programs leading to 
more specialized credentials. Most of these programs 
build on the teaching experience that holders of a basic 
credential have achieved. Often these specialist or serv- 
ices credentials are oriented toward postbaccalaureate 
course work and coincide with Masters degree programs. 
Further Information about specific requirements for each 
can be obtained under the appropriate departmental list- 
ing in this catalogue. 

CSUF offers the following Specialist Credential 
programs: 

1. Gifted, to teach in classrooms designed for the special 
needs of gifted and talented students. See Department 
of Special Education, School of Human Development 
and Community Service. 

2. Learning Handicapped, to teach the learning hand- 
icapped including the behaviorally disordered and edu- 
cationally retarded. See Department of Special 
Education, School of Human Development and Com- 
munity Service. 

3. Physically Handicapped, to teach the physically hand- 
icapped Including the orthopedically handicapped. See 
Department of Special Education, School of Human 
Development and Community Service. 

4. Reading Specialist, to teach reading to students of 
diversified grade and ability levels and to assist all 
teachers In being better reading teachers. See Depart- 
ment of Reading, School of Human Development and 
Community Service. 

5. Resource Specialist (Certificate of Competency), to 
serve as a resource specialist in programs serving spe- 
cial education students, their parents and their regular 
teachers. See Department of Special Education, 
School of Human Development and Community Serv- 
ice. 


Teaching Credential Programs 


6. Severely Handicapped, to teach the severely-multiply- 
handicapped, severely emotionally disturbed and autis- 
tic. See Department of Special Education, School of 
Human Development and Community Service. 

In addition CSUF is currently seeking approval for a newly 
authorized credential. Language Development Specialist, 
to teach limited or non-English proficient students. See 
Department of Foreign Language and Literature, School 
of Humanities and Social Science. 

CSUF offers the following Services Credential 
programs: 

1. Administrative Internship, a field based Internship pro- 
gram leading to a preliminary level administrative serv- 
ices credential. See Department of Educational 
Administration, School of Human Development and 
Community Service. 

2. Administrative Services (Preliminary Level), the first 
step of the new two-step administrative services cre- 
dential structure, authorizing service as a school site 
administrator, principal or other administrative officer of 
a school district. See Department of Educational Ad- 
ministration, School of Human Development and Com- 
munity Service. 


3. Administrative Services (Professional Level), the sec- 
ond step of the new two-step administrative services 
credential structure. See Department of Educational 
Administration, School of Human Development and 
Community Service. 

4. Clinical Rehabilitation (Language, Speech and Hear- 
ing), to provide services to students with exceptional 
needs and/or neurophysical disorders in language, 
speech, and hearing. See Department of Speech Com- 
munication, School of Humanities and Social Sciences. 

5. Clinical Rehabilitation (Special Class Authorization), to 
provide services to students with severe disorders of 
language. See Department of Speech Communication, 
School of Humanities and Social Sciences. 

6. Pupil Personnel Services, to provide counseling and 
testing services to students. See Department of Coun- 
seling, School of Human Development and Community 
Services. 

7. School Psychology, to provide counseling and school 
psychologist services to students. See Department of 
Counseling, School of Human Development and Com- 
munity Service. 



Teaching Credential Programs 



Extended Education 


Building T 14 
(714) 773-2611 

Extension Programs 

The Extension program is designed for those who are 
unable to take university work in residence but who wish 
to pursue university-level study for various purposes, such 
as resuming an interrupted or incomplete education, aug- 
menting professional or vocational abilities, or enhancing 
personal growth and fulfillment. 

Extension offerings include regularly established univer- 
sity courses as well as non-credit seminars and confer- 
ences, special weekend programs and travel study 
programs. Workshops and courses designed to meet the 
needs of particular groups and agencies may be initiated 
at various times during the year. Any adult may enroll in 
an extension course provided the prerequisites of the 
course are met. An individual does not have to be enrolled 
in the university in order to take extension courses. 

The maximum amount of extension credit which will be 
accepted toward a baccalaureate degree is 24 semester 
units. Nine semester units of extension credit may be ap- 
plied toward a master’s degree with appropriate approval. 
Extension credit may not be used to fulfill the minimum 
residence requirement for graduation. 

Extension courses are offered during fall, spring, summer 
session and intersession. 

Adjunct Enrollment 

Many of the regular university courses offered to enrolled 
students are also open on a space-available basis to ex- 
tension students through Adjunct Enrollment. Matriculat- 
ed students may not enroll through this program. Contact 
the Office of Extended Education for further information. 

Summer Session 

The summer session program is designed for regularly 
enrolled students, either at California State University, Ful- 
lerton or another university, who wish to accelerate 
progress toward a degree or credential; prospective stu- 
dents who wish to begin course work while admission to 
the university is in process; and members of the communi- 
ty who wish to enroll In a course or courses for profes- 
sional advancement or personal enrichment. Summer 


session offerings consist of regular university courses and 
apply toward residence and graduation requirements. Stu- 
dents must satisfy all prerequisites for the course or 
courses in which they Intend to register. The summer ses- 
sion curriculum consists of lower-division through gradu- 
ate-level courses. 

The summer session bulletin is available in March and 
may be obtained by writing or calling the Office of Extend- 
ed Education. The bulletin contains course descriptions, 
special offerings, registration form and Instructions. Reg- 
istration may be completed by mall at specified times. 
Summer enrollment does not constitute admission to the 
university. 

Intersession 

Intersession is open to everyone— continuing and pro- 
spective students, community residents and visitors. 
Scheduled during January, the one-, two- and three-unit 
courses are primarily designed to meet the needs of stu- 
dents who wish to accelerate their academic progress. 

The intersession offers extension courses as well as 
courses which earn resident credit and range from both 
lower- and upper-division credit courses to graduate-level 
offerings. 

Certificate Programs 

Certificate programs are designed for those who want 
formal recognition for completing a structured and rigor- 
ous course of study in a specific field, but who may not be 
interested In pursuing a university degree program. Certifi- 
cates are awarded when participants complete the course 
requirements. The Office of Extended Education offers 
certificate programs in the following areas: 

Production and Inventory Management 

Gerontology 

Industrial Engineer Productivity Management 

Community Programs 

The Office of Extended Education sponsors various com- 
munity educational outreach programs including the Con- 
tinuing Learning Experience (CLE) program for retired 
and semi-retired persons. For a list of current activities 
contact the CLE office. 


Extended Education 


International Programs 


The California State University (CSU) International Pro- 
grams offers students the opportunity to continue their 
studies overseas for a full academic year while they re- 
main enrolled at their home CSU campus. The Internation- 
al Programs’ primary purposes are to enable selected 
students to gain a firsthand understanding of other areas 
of the world and to advance their knowledge and skills 
within specific academic disciplines in pursuit of estab- 
lished degree objectives. 

A wide variety of academic majors may be accommodated 
by the 25 foreign universities cooperating with the Interna- 
tional Programs In 15 countries around the globe. The 
affiliated institutions are: the University of Sdo Paulo 
(Brazil); the universities of the Province of Quebec 
(Canada); the University of Copenhagen (through Den- 
mark’s International Student Committee’s Study Divi- 
sion); the University of Provence (France); the 
Universities of Hamburg, Heidelberg, and Tubingen (Ger- 
many); the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); the 
University of Florence (Italy); Waseda University (Ja- 
pan); the Ibero-Americana University (Mexico); Massey 
University and Lincoln University College (New Zealand); 
the Catholic University of Lima (Peru); National Chengchi 
University (Republic of China/Taiwan) ; the Universities of 
Granada and Madrid (Spain); the University of Uppsala 
(Sweden); and Bradford University (the United King- 
dom). Information on academic course offerings available 
at these locations is in the International Programs Bulletin 
which may be obtained from the International Programs 
representative on campus. 

Eligibility for application is limited to those students who 
will have upper-division or graduate standing at a CSU 
campus by departure, who possess a cumulative grade- 
point average of 2.75 for all college level work completed 
at the time of application (some programs require a 3.0 
cumulative grade-point average), and who will have com- 
pleted required language study where applicable. Selec- 
tion is competitive and is based on home campus 
recommendations and the applicant’s academic record. 
Final selection is made by the Office of International Pro- 
grams in consultation with a statewide faculty selection 
committee. 

The International Programs supports all tuition and ad- 
ministrative costs overseas for each of its participants to 
the same extent that such funds would be expended to 
support similar costs in California. Students assume re- 
sponsibility for all personal costs, such as transportation. 


room and board, and living expenses, as well as for home 
campus fees. Because they remain enrolled at their home 
CSU campus while studying overseas. International Pro- 
grams students earn full resident credit for all academic 
work completed while abroad and remain eligible to re- 
ceive any form of financial aid (other than work-study) for 
which they can individually qualify. 

Information and application materials may be obtained 
from the Office of International Education and Exchange 
or by writing to The California State University, Internation- 
al Programs, 400 Golden Shore, Suite 300, Long Beach, 
California 90802. Applications for the 198S-87 academic 
year overseas must be submitted by February 1, 1986. 


International Study Courses 

Cal State Fullerton students under The California State 
University International Study Programs register concur- 
rently at Cal State Fullerton and at the host institution 
abroad, with credits assigned to the student which are 
equivalent to courses offered at Cal State Fullerton. Un- 
dergraduate students who discover appropriate study op- 
portunities at the host Institution but no equivalent course 
at Cal State Fullerton may use Independent Study 499 and 
International Study 292 or 492. Graduate students may use 
Independent Graduate Research 599 and International 
Study 592. 

292 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): 1-6 
lower-division units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University In- 
ternational Programs. Study undertaken In a university 
abroad under the auspices of The California State Univer- 
sity. 

492 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): 1-3 
upper-division units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University In- 
ternational Programs. Study undertaken in a university 
abroad under the auspices of The California State Univer- 
sity. 

592 Projects in Study Abroad (Subject): 1-3 graduate 
units) 

Open to students enrolled in California State University In- 
ternational Programs. Study undertaken In a university 
abroad under the auspices of The California State Univer- 
sity. 


I 


International Programs 


Special Major Program 


From the total curriculum of the university, students may 
wish to plan a specially designed program of study that 
does not duplicate significantly any existing major or con- 
centration. The special major provides opportunities for 
selected students to pursue individualized programs of 
study leading to a degree when legitimate academic and 
professional goals can be satisfied by a judicious selec- 
tion of courses from two or more fields, and when these 
aims cannot be satisfied by the authorized standard de- 
gree majors or double majors that are available on the 
campus (e.g., liberal studies, social sciences). This major, 
designed for exceptional cases of individual students only, 
provides an opportunity to develop concentration or spe- 
cializations outside the framework of existing majors. {It 
is not intended as a means of bypassing normal gradua- 
tion requirements or as a means by which students may 
graduate who fail to complete the degree major in which 
they are enrolled.) 

B.A. Special Major 

Students desiring to work for a bachelor’s degree with a 
special major should consult with the Office of Academic 
Advisement. 

1. Entrance to the special major program Is normally at 
the beginning of the junior year (60 units remaining for 
graduation). 

2. The minimum requirement for the major is 48 units. A 
minimum of 36 upper-division units must be included in 
the major. 

3. Although students may include on their study plans 
course work In progress and a maximum of 12 units of 
course work completed prior to the time of filing, ap- 
proval of these courses in not automatic. 

4. No more than six units of 499 (Independent Study) 
and/or internship course work may be Included in the 
major. 

5. Neither lower- nor upper-division courses applied to 
general education breadth requirements will be appli- 
cable toward the major. 

6. At least three units of appropriate course work In me- 
thodology shall be included in the student’s study plan. 
Where appropriate this requirement may be waived by 
the University Curriculum Committee. 

7. All courses in the major must be taken under Grade 
Option 1. A GPA of 3.0 In the major is required for 
graduation. 


8. Prior to taking any substitute course work a petition for 
change of the study plan must be approved by the 
student’s adviser and the University Curriculum Com- 
mittee. 

9. A senior thesis shall be written by the student in this 
program during the semester preceding graduation. 
This thesis should show scholarly evidence of the merit 
in the student’s choice of an interdisciplinary program. 
This paper shall be written under the direction of the 
student’s special major adviser and approved by the 
faculty designated by the departments represented on 
the student’s study plan. 

M.A. Special Major 

A graduate student desiring to work for a master’s degree 

with a special major should consult with the Office of 

Graduate Affairs and fill out an Initial request form avail- 
able at that office. 

1. Entrance to the special major program requires a 
grade-point average (GPA) of 3.0 In the undergraduate 
major and a GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 units of course 
work. 

2. The minimum requirement of units In the special major 
program is 30 units of which at least half must be gradu- 
ate courses (500 level). 

3. Although students may include on their proposed study 
plan course work In progress or completed prior to the 
time of filing, approval of these courses is not auto- 
matic. No more than nine units of course work taken 
prior to classified standing can be approved on the 
program. 

4. The program may contain no more than six units of 
Independent Study, Project or Thesis. 

5. All courses on the study plan must be taken under 
Grade Option 1. A GPA of 3.0 Is required on all work on 
the study plan. 

6. Prior to taking any substitute course work, a petition for 
change of the study plan must be approved by the 
student’s graduate adviser and graduate committee. 

7. A Thesis or Project shall be required for the completion 
of the program. The completed Thesis will be filed with 
the Library; whereas the Project shall be filed with the 
Office of Graduate Affairs. 


Special Major Program 


Curricula Information 


Course Descriptions 

Course descriptions briefly describe the content or subject 
matter to be covered and provide additional Information 
on units of credit, the level of instruction (see general 
course numbering code), prerequisites and the type of 
course (lecture, laboratory, activity, seminar and individu- 
ally supervised work) . 

Course Numbering Code 

The first number in each course designation is Intended to 
indicate the level of complexity of the course. In addition, 
the first number also is a rough index of the student’s year 
of study at the university. The following are guidelines for 
course numbering. 

001-099 Developmental or remedial level course work is 
pre-college In nature. It may not be counted to- 
ward a degree objective. 

100-199 First year or freshman level course work Is intro- 
ductory in nature. Such courses may provide the 
fundamental or essential elements or qualities 
Important to a specific discipline. Emphasis in 
many first year courses may be on the develop- 
ment of preliminary skills. These courses are 
usually designed without prerequisites and may 
be characterized as emphasizing breadth rather 
than depth of instruction. 

200-299 Second year or sophomore level course work 
may include preliminary history or survey-type 
courses or Intermediate skill development. Al- 
though there is no clear distinction made 
between lower division courses listed at the 100 
or 200 level, there is an Inherent assumption that 
students In the second year of study have ac- 
quired preliminary skills appropriate to university 
level work. 

300-399 Third year or junior level course work is likely to 
emphasize specialization for majors in their disci- 
plines. Work at this level Is expected to be more 
challenging than lower division work. Usually, 
specific prerequisites are used to indicate the 
necessary competencies required for study at 
this level. The “core” courses of many disci- 
plines are offered at this level and provide the 
prerequisites necessary to senior level study. 
Many disciplines use 300 level courses to focus 
on areas of speciality or emphasis within the dls- 


Currlcula Information 


ciplines. These courses do not give graduate 
credit unless included on an approved graduate 
study plan for a specific graduate student. 

400-499 Fourth year or senior level course work is intend- 
ed to provide depth of understanding or special 
focus appropriate to majors and generally re- 
quires prerequisite work. The student is expect- 
ed to be able to theorize and/or practice at a 
professional level of competence. Students en- 
rolled in 400 level course work are assumed to 
have advanced skills in writing proficiency. 
Courses at the 400 level are sufficiently sophisti- 
cated for inclusion on graduate study plans. 

500-599 Fifth year university study is for graduate stu- 
dents who are enrolled in advanced degree pro- 
grams. The courses of study are advanced and 
specialized in nature and require substantial un- 
dergraduate preparation. Independent initiative 
is expected in the theoretical, practical, critical, 
and analytical exploration of specialized topics. 
An essential feature of graduate study is the 
facilitation of independent decision-making, in- 
vention of theoretical constructs, application of 
research processes, and the development of 
original creations. 

900-999 Courses are specifically designed for profes- 
sional groups seeking vocational improvement 
or career advancement. Credit for these courses 
does not apply to undergraduate or graduate de- 
grees or credentials at the university. 

The uppercase letters A, B, C and D (letter designations) 
when attached to the course numbers designate a pro- 
gression or sequence for taking such courses. An honors 
course shall use the letter H. A laboratory course which 
accompanies another course should use the letter L. 

A controlled entry course is one which has enrollment 
requirements in addition to any prerequisite courses. Addi- 
tional requirements include prior approval of the Instruc- 
tor, special academic advisement, a qualifying exam, a 
placement test, an audition, a teaching credential, or simi- 
lar special qualifications. 

Special Course Numbers 

For uniformity, certain types of courses have been listed 
by all departments and schools with the same numbers: 
499 and 599 are used for undergraduate and graduate 
“independent study”; 196 or 496 for “student-to-student 
tutorials”; 597 for a graduate “project”; and 598 for a 
graduate “thesis.” 


Explanation of Course 
Notations 

Certain notations are uniformly used In the course de- 
scriptions in this catalog. 

1 . The figure in parentheses following the course title Indi- 
cates the number of semester units for the course. 
Courses offered for varying units are Indicated as (1-3) 
or (3-6). 

2. A course listing such as Afro-Ethnic Studies 108 (3) 
(Same as Linguistics 108) indicates that a student tak- 
ing the course may choose to count it In either of those 
two disciplines. 

3. A notation such as (Formerly 433) following the course 
title and the number of units indicates the same course 
previously was numbered 433. 

Student-to-Student Tutorials 

The “student-to-student tutorial” provides a formal way to 
encourage students to learn through teaching. It also pro- 
vides tutoring to all students who need and want tutorial 
assistance. 

In those departments which choose to offer such courses, 
the courses are numbered 196 or 496 and carry one to 
three units of credit. The prerequisites Include a grade- 
point average of at least 3.0 and/or consent of the instruc- 
tor plus simultaneous enrollment in the course or previous 
enrollment in a similar course or its equivalent. The tutor 
and his/her tutee or tutees will work in mutually advanta- 
geous ways by allowing all involved to delve more careful- 
ly and thoroughly Into the materials presented In this 
specific course. One to three students may be tutored by 
the tutor unless the instructor decides that special circum- 
stances warrant Increasing the usual maximum of three 
tutees. Three hours of work per week are expected for 
each semester unit of credit, and this work may include, 
apart from contact hours with tutees, such other activities 
as: tutorial preparations; consulting with instructors; re- 
porting, analysis and evaluation of the tutorial experi- 
ences; and participation In an all-university orientation and 
evaluation program for tutors. A maximum of three units 
may be taken each semester. No more than three units of 
any combination of tutorial courses (196 or 496) may 
count toward an undergraduate degree program. The 
course must be taken as an elective and not counted 
toward general education, major or minor requirements. 
The course can be taken on a credit/ no credit basis by the 
tutor. Requests for tutors must be Initiated by tutees and 
can be initiated up until the official university census date. 
Tutors electing to respond to such requests will receive 
credits at the end of the semester and can register In the 
course until the official university census date. Both tutors 
and tutees must submit written reports, analyses and 
evaluations of their shared tutorial experience to the in- 
structor, and both must participate in an all-university 
orientation program as well as In any conference or cri- 
tique that the instructor of the course may require. 


Curricula Information 


Further Information can be obtained from the department 
in which the student is interested in a "student-to-student 
tutorial.” 

Independent Study 

Under the independent study program, the student may 
pursue topics or problems of special interest beyond the 
scope of a regular course under the supervision of a fac- 
ulty adviser. The work is of a research or creative nature, 
and normally culminates in a paper, project, comprehen- 
sive examination, or performance. Before registering, the 
student must get his topic approved by the instructor who 
will be supervising independent study and by the depart- 
ment chair. 

A student may take no more than six units of independent 
study at the undergraduate level (299 and 499 numbered 
courses) in a given semester. No more than nine units of 
independent study may be applied toward completion of 
the baccalaureate degree. A graduate student may apply 
no more than six units of independent study (499 or 599 
numbered courses) toward completion of a master’s de- 
gree, unless written approval is obtained from the appro- 
priate school dean. 

Cross-Disciplinary University 
Programs 

A joint degree program is an endeavor involving two or 
more existing academic departments which need not be 
within the same school. Such programs are administered 
by program councils composed of representatives elected 
by participating departments. The joint degree programs 
are housed in administration units as follows: 

School of Human Development and Community 
Service 

Child Development, B.S. 

Human Services, B.S. 


School of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Environmental Studies, M.S. 

Latin American Studies, B.A. 

Liberal Studies, B.A. 

Russian and East European Area Studies, B.A. 

Social Sciences, M.A. 

The degree descriptions are located within the appropri- 
ate school section of this catalog. 

Bilingual/Cross-Cultural Studies 

Students may pursue a course of study with a bilingual/ 
cross-cultural emphasis. 

Complete course listings and details are available from 
the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, 
the Department of Chicano Studies, Division of Teacher 
Education and Educational Opportunity Program advisers. 


Library Courses 

201 Introduction to Library Resources (1) 

A practical introduction to library materials and methods 
enabling undergraduate students to locate information for 
course-related, as well as independent study and research. 

300 Elements of Bibliographic Investigation (3) 

A sun^ey of important information sources in various subject 
fields and the application of research methods which will 
enable students to become effective library users. Particular 
attention is given to the assembling of material for term 
papers and reports, including the preparation of bibliogra- 
phies. 

302 Library Research Methods for Specific Majors (1) 

Library research methodology and introduction to library re- 
sources in special subject areas such as business, educa- 
tion and science. 


Curricula Information 



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149 





School of the Arts 


Dean: Jerry Samuelson 
Associate Dean: Frank Cummings, III 

The learning opportunities within the School of the Arts 
are based on a commitment to artistic and academic ex- 
cellence. We provide an environment which encourages 
individual achievement for performers, artists and schol- 
ars. 

The School of the Arts offers intensive programs in art, 
music and theatre, within the broader liberal arts educa- 
tion of the university. We are committed to the cultivation 
of aesthetic awareness for all students. 

We extend a warm welcome to students and we promise 
that with your perseverance, we will do everything possi- 
ble to further your goals and objectives in whatever field 
of art you choose. 

The School of the Arts maintains an academic advisement 
center in Visual Arts 191-C. Advisers are available in the 
center throughout the semester to assist students with 
career decisions and degree requirements including gen- 
eral education. 

Several scholarships are available to students in the 
School of the Arts. Inquiries should be made to the re- 
spective department offices. 



151 


Programs Offered 

Art, Bachelor of Arts 

Art History 

Studio 

Teaching 

Art, Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Drawing and Painting 

Printmaking 

Sculpture 

Crafts 

Ceramics 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Environmental Design 
Creative Photography 

Minor In Art 

Art, Master of Art 

Drawing and Painting (including Printmaking) 
Sculpture 

Crafts (including Ceramics, Glass, Fibers, Wood, 
Jewelry/Metalsmithing) . 

Design (including Environmental Design, Graphic 
Design, Illustration, Exhibition Design, Creative 
Photography) . 

Art History 


Music, Bachelor of Music 
Composition 
Instrumental 
Keyboard 
Voice 

Accompanying 
Minor in Music 

Music, Master of Arts 

Music History and Literature 
Music Education 

Music, Master of Music 

Performance 

Theory-Composition 

Theatre Arts, Bachelor of Arts 

History and Theory 
Professional Area of Concentration 
Playwriting 
Oral Interpretation 
Acting 
Television 
Directing 

Technical Production/Design 
Dance 

Musical Theatre 
Teaching 


Art, Master of Fine Arts 

Drawing, Painting and Printmaking 

Sculpture 

Ceramics 

Crafts 

Design 

Creative Photography 

Certificate in Museum Studies 

Music, Bachelor of Arts 

Liberal Arts 

Music Education 

Music History and Theory 


Theatre Arts, Master of Arts 

Acting and Directing 

Dramatic Literature and Criticism 

Oral Interpretation 

Playwriting 

Television 

Technical Theatre 

Theatre for Children 

Theatre History 

Theatre Arts, Master of Fine Arts 

Technical Theatre and Design 

Acting 

Directing 



School of the Arts 



Department of Art 


Department Chair: George James 
Department Office: Visuai Arts 102 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts in Art 

Art History 

Studio 

Teaching 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art 

Drawing and Painting 

Printmaking 

Sculpture 

Crafts 

Ceramics 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Environmental Design 
Creative Photography 

Minor in Art 

Master of Arts in Art 

Drawing and Painting 

Sculpture 

Crafts 

Design 

Art History 

Master of Fine Arts in Art 

Drawing and Painting 

Printmaking 

Sculpture 

Ceramics 

Crafts 

Design 

Creative Photography 

Certificate in Museum Studies 

Faculty 

Robert Caddes, Ruth Capelle, John Carter, Alvin Ching, 
Eileen Cowin, Frank Cummings III, Darryl Curran, 

Robert Ewing, Dextra Frankel, Maurice Gray, 

Raymond Hein, Thomas Holste, Dorian Hunter, 

George James, Jimmie Jenkins, Lawrence Johnson, 

G. Ray Kerclu, Donald Lagerberg, Clinton MacKenzIe, 
Theodore Phillips, Robert Partin, Albert Porter, 

Leo Robinson, Jerry Rothman, Jerry Samuelson, 

V. Joachim Smith, Jon Stokesbary, Vincent Suez 


153 


INTRODUCTION 

The Department of Art offers programs which Include the 
scholarly fields of art history, theory, analysis and criti- 
cism; the studio fields of drawing and painting, printmak- 
ing, sculpture, crafts (including fibers, jewelry, wood and 
metal), ceramics (including glass), graphic design, illus- 
tration, environmental design, exhibition design, and crea- 
tive photography; and the single subject teaching field of 
art education. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART 

The curricular plans have been developed to meet the 
individual needs and interests of students working for the 
bachelor of arts with a major In art. 

The general objectives of the B.A. degree program are to 
provide a comprehensive learning environment which 
contributes technically and conceptually to the develop- 
ment of the art scholar, the creative artist and the art 
teacher. More specifically, the B.A. degree program pro- 
vides opportunities for students to: (1) develop a knowl- 
edge and understanding of fundamental visual experience 
and concepts basic to many forms and fields of art; (2) 
develop a critical appreciation of historical and contempo- 
rary art forms as they relate to individual and social needs 
and values; (3) express creatively one’s personal experi- 
ence and thought with skill and clarity In visual terms; and 
(4) to develop those understandings and skills necessary 
to pursue graduate studies in visual arts, or to teach art in 
the schools. 

Plan I provides for an emphasis in the area of art history, 
theory, and appreciation and is particularly recommended 
for those students who wish to pursue graduate studies in 
art history or museology. 

Plan II is a liberal curricula that provides a broad education 
in the visual arts to students seeking an individualized, 
flexible course of study with open-ended goals. 

Plan III is for students who wish to meet the requirements 
for single subject instruction (Ryan Act ) for teaching art 
In grades K-12. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, 
students must meet the other university requirements for 
a bachelor of arts degree. Students following Plan III must 
also meet specific requirements for the desired teaching 
credential. 

All art majors must take Art 300, Writing in the Visual Arts, 
and pass the university’s Examination in Writing Proficien- 
cy (EWP) after achieving junior standing (60 units). Test- 
ing dates for the EWP are available from the Testing 
Center or the Academic Advisement Center. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in art, 
students must have a 2.0 or better grade-point average in 
all courses required for the degree. No credit toward the 
major will be allowed for specific major courses in which 
a grade of D is obtained. 


Plan I: Art History 

Preparation for the major (lower division— 21 
units) 

Art 201 A,B Art and Civilization 6 

Lower division studio courses 6 

Approved electives in art, American studies, 
anthropology, foreign languages, history, 
literature, music, philosophy or theatre 9 

The major (upper division-^ units) 

Upper-division art history selected from the 
following: 21 


301 Ancient Art 

302 Medieval Art 
321 The Art of Asia 

411 Foundations of Modern Art 

412 Art of the 20th Century 

431 Renaissance Art 

432 Baroque and Rococo Art 
460B Pre-Columbian Art 

461 American Art: Colonial-1900 
461 B American Art: 20th Century 


481 Seminar in Art History 3 

300 Writing in Art 3 

Approved upper-division electives 6 

Total 54 

Plan II: Studio 

Preparation for the major (lower division— 27 
units) 

103 Two Dimensional Design 3 

104 Three Dimensional Design 3 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 6 

117 Life Drawing 3 

201 A,B Art and Civilization 6 

Lower-division art electives 6 

The major (upper division— 27 units) 

Upper-division art history and appreciation.... 6 

Upper-division studio area emphasis 12 

Upper-division art electives 6 

300 Writing in Art * 3 

Total 54 

Plan III: Teaching 

Single Subject Instruction — Ryan Act 
(Qualifies for Teaching Art in Grades K-12) 


Preparation for the major (lower division — 27 


units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

106A Beginning Ceramics 3 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 6 

117 Life Drawing 3 


• Emphases may include; drawing and painting, printmaking, sculpture, crafts, ceram- 
ics, graphic design, illustration, environmental design, creative photography, exhi- 
bition design. 


154 


201 A, B Art and Civilization 6 

205A Beginning Crafts 3 

The major (upper division) 

(Select one of the following areas) 

Drawing and Painting (24 units) 

300 Writing in Art 3 

307A,B Drawing and Painting 6 

31 OA Watercolor 3 

31 7A Life Studies, Drawing and Painting .... 3 

347 A Printmaking-Etching 3 

412 Art of the 20th Century 3 

441 A Media Exploration for 

Teaching Art 3 

Crafts (24 units) 

300 Writing in Art 3 

305A Advanced Crafts 3 

306A,B Advanced Ceramics 6 

307A or 31 OA Drawing and Painting 

or Watercolor 3 

485B Special Studies, Crafts 3 

412 Art of the 20th Century 3 

441 A Media Exploration for 

Teaching Art 3 

Professional Preparation (23-26 units) 

Art Ed 442 Teaching Art in 

the Secondary School 3 

Education course work 8-1 1 

Student teaching 

(one semester full time) 12 


Program Requirements: 

1. Be advised by a faculty adviser in art education as- 
signed by the art department chair. 

2. Fulfill credential requirements listed in the catalog with- 
in the School of Human Development and Community 
Service for the Ryan Act curriculum. 

3. Meet the requirements listed under Plan III. 

4. Complete the major requirements prior to enrolling in 
the teacher education program. 

5. Be admitted to teacher education through the School 
of Human Development and Community Service prior 
to enrollment In Art Ed 442 and student teaching. 

6. Be accepted for teacher education and student teach- 
ing based on candidate quotas, portfolio review, and 
evidence of success in completed university course 
work. 

7. Be recommended by the faculty adviser in art educa- 
tion. 

Credential Information 

Upon completion of the above program and the bachelor 

of arts degree, the student Is eligible for a partial creden- 
tial, which meets state requirements for teaching art In 


grades K-12. Within the specified period of time from the 
beginning of a teaching assignment, 30 units of course 
work must be completed at an accredited college or uni- 
versity to qualify for a clear credential. Credentials are 
issued from the institution where this requirement has 
been completed. 

Multiple Subject Instruction — Ryan Act 

The following three courses are recommended for all stu- 
dents intending to teach in the elementary schools in mul- 
tiple subject classrooms. 

Art 380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Theatre 402 Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN ART 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is a professional pro- 
gram providing directed studies in nine studio concentra- 
tions within the visual arts. The program is designed for 
students seeking in-depth preparation for specialized 
goals selected from the following areas: drawing and 
painting: printmaking; sculpture; crafts; ceramics; graphic 
design; illustration; environmental design; or creative pho- 
tography. 

Admission Requirements 

All entering students must apply to the B.A. (Bachelor of 
Arts) In Art program for their first semester of residence. 
After completing a minimum of 13 lower-division prepara- 
tion units with a 3.0 minimum grade-point average, stu- 
dents may contact the Art Department to change their 
objective to the B.F.A. in Art program. 

Students who transfer from community colleges or other 
universities must also apply to the B.A. in Art program. 
They may change their objective to the B.F.A. in Art pro- 
gram during the first semester after an evaluation and 
approval of studio courses taken at the other institutions 
has been completed. 

All students must achieve a 3.0 grade-point average in 
studio courses. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts Requirements 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program requires a mini- 
mum of 70 units in art, with 28 lower-division units of prepa- 
ration and 42 upper-division units, including 24 units in an 
area of concentration, nine units of art history, three units 
of writing In art, and six units of art electives. In addition 
to the minimum 70 unit requirement for the B.F.A. degree, 
students must meet the other university requirements for 
a bachelor’s degree (see the university Catalog and Class 
Schedule). 

To qualify for a baccalaureate with a major in art, students 
must have a 2.0 or better grade-point average in all 
courses required for the degree. No credit toward the 
major will be allowed for art courses in which a grade of 
D is obtained. 


155 


Drawing and Painting 

Preparation (lower division-2d units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 

117 Life Drawing 

201 A, B Art and Civilization 

207A,B Drawing and Painting 

Concentration (upper division-^2 units) 

307A,B Drawing and Painting 

317A,B Life Studies, Drawing and Painting.. 

487B Special Studies, Life Drawing 

487A Special Studies, Painting 

300 Writing in Art* 

Upper division art history 

Upper-division art electives 

Printmaking 

Preparation (lower division-2d units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 

107A, B Beginning Drawing and Painting .... 

117 Life Drawing 

201 A, B Art and Civilization 

207A Drawing and Painting 

247 Beginning Printmaking 

Concentration (upper divisiorh42 units) 

307A Drawing and Painting 

31 7A, B Life Studies, Drawing and Painting 

338A Creative Photography 

347A, B Printmaking-Etching, Lithography .. 

487D Special Studies, Printmaking 

300 Writing in Art* 

Upper-division art history 

Upper-division art electives 

Sculpture 

Preparation (lower division — 26 units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 

107A, B Beginning Drawing and Painting .... 

117 Life Drawing 

201 A, B Art and Civilization 

21 6A, B Beginning Sculpture 

Concentration (upper division-^2 units) 

31 6A, B Sculpture 

31 7A, B Life Studies, Drawing and Painting 

326A Ceramic Sculpture 

336A Techniques and 

Theories, Cast Sculpture 

486A Special Studies, Sculpture 

300 Writing In Art* 

Upper-division art history 

Upper-division art electives 


Crafts 

Preparation (lower division-2d units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 

117 Life Drawing 

123 Descriptive Drawing 

201 A,B Art and Civilization 

205A,B Beginning Crafts 

Concentration (upper division--42 units) 

305A,B Advanced Crafts 

Select 9 units from: 

306 A, B Advanced Ceramics 
315A,B Jewelry 
325A,B Metalsmithing 
330 Fibers and Papers 
355A,B Fibers, Fabric Printing and 
Dyeing 

364A,B Stained Glass 
365A,B Weaving 

485B Special Studies, Crafts 

498 Internship In Art 

300 Writing in Art* 

Upper-division art history 

Upper-division in art electives 

Ceramics 

Preparation (lower divisiorh‘26 units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 

106A,B Beginning Ceramics 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 

117 Life Drawing 

201 A,B Art and Civilization 

Concentration (upper divisiorh-42 units) 

306A,B Advanced Ceramics 

317A,B Life Studies, Drawing and Painting.. 
326A,B Ceramic Sculpture 

or 426A,B Glass Forming 

484A or 484B Special Studies 

300 Writing in Art* 

Upper-division art history 

Upper-division art electives 

Graphic Design 

Preparation (lower division-28 units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 

117 Life Drawing 

201 A,B Art and Civilization 

223A,B Lettering, Typography 

and Rendering 

Concentration (upper division-^2 units) 

323A,B Graphic Design 

338A Creative Photography 

363A,B Illustration 

483A Special Studies, Graphic Design 


Units 

3 

3 

6 

4 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3 

9 

3 

9 

6 

3 

3 

6 

4 

6 

3 

3 

3 

6 

3 

6 

6 

3 

9 

6 

3 

3 

6 

4 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3 

3 

6 

3 

9 

6 


156 


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498 Internship 3 

300 Writing in Art* 3 

Upper-division art history 9 

Upper-division art electives 6 

Illustration 

Preparation (lower division-2d units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 6 

117 Life Drawing 4 

123A Descriptive Drawing 3 

201 A, B Art and Civilization 6 

223A Lettering, Typography and 

Rendering 3 

Concentration (upper division— 42 units) 

317A,B Life Studies, Drawing and Painting.. 6 

323A Graphic Design 3 

363A,B Illustration 6 

483C Special Studies, Design and 

Composition 6 

498 Internship 3 

300 Writing in Art* 3 

Upper-division art history 9 

Upper-division art electives 6 

Environmental Design 

Preparation (lower division-28 units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 6 

117 Life Drawing 1 

123B Descriptive Drawing 3 

201 A,B Art and Civilization 6 

213A,B Beginning Environmental Design .... 6 

Concentration (upper division-42 units) 

313A,B Environmental Design 6 

333A,B Environmental Design 6 

453A Exhibition Design 3 

483B Special Studies, Environmental 

Design 6 

498 Internship in Art 3 

300 Writing in Art* 3 

Upper-division art history 9 

Upper-division art electives 6 

Creative Photography 

Preparation (lower divisiorh-26 units) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

104 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting 6 

117 Life Drawing 4 

123A Descriptive Drawing 3 

201 A,B Art and Civilization 6 

247 Beginning Printmaking 3 

Concentration (upper division-42 units) 

31 7A Life Studies, Drawing and Painting .... 3 


338 A, B Creative Photography 6 

339A Photo Illustration 3 

438A,B Creative Color Photography 6 

489 Special Studies, 

Creative Photography 6 

300 Writing in Art* 3 

Upper-division art history 9 

Upper-division art electives 6 


* Students must also take and pass the Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP). 

The following additional list of courses would be strongly 
recommended for any student who wishes to expand his/ 
her knowledge in any or all of the arts: 

Art 100, 101, 103, 104, 106A, 107A, 201 A,B, 310A,B, 330, 380, 
441A,B 

Music 111A,B, 184A,B 251, 281P,B,S,W, 283, 381 

Theatre 100, 101, 112, 122, 132, 142, 206A,B, 263, 276A, 277, 
323A,B, 370A,B, 402A,B, 403A,B, 422 

MINOR IN ART 

A minimum of 24 units Is required for a minor in art of which 
a minimum of 10 units must be in upper division courses. 
Included in the program must be a basic course In each 
of the following areas: (1 ) art history, theory, analysis and 
criticism; (2) design; (3) drawing and painting; and (4) 
crafts. Those students planning to qualify for a standard 
teaching credential with specialization in elementary or 
secondary teaching and art for a minor must obtain ap- 
proval from the Art Department for the courses selected 
to meet the upper division requirements for a minor in art. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART 

The program of studies leading to this degree provides a 
balance of study and practice for those who wish a strong- 
er educational and experiential basis for a professional 
career in the visual arts, or who wish advanced study in 
preparation for further graduate work in the field. This 
graduate program is for students who are seriously com- 
mitted, responsible, and experienced and have concen- 
trated within a specific area of art. The program offers the 
following areas of concentration: (1) drawing and painting 
(including printmaking); (2) sculpture; (3) crafts (includ- 
ing ceramics, glass, fibers, jewelry/metalsmithing); (4) 
design (including environmental design, graphic design. 
Illustration, wood, exhibition design, or creative photogra- 
phy); and (5) art history. 

Admission Requirements 

1. Conditionally classified standing requires: 

A. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institu- 
tion. 

B. GPA minimum of 2.5 In the last 60 semester units 
attempted. 

C. Special requirements: 

(1) Studio program: satisfactory review of prelimi- 
nary portfolio by a faculty member In the area 


157 


of studio concentration. 

(2) Art history program: satisfactory preliminary in- 
terview by a faculty member in art history. 

2. Classified standing requires; 

A. An approved undergraduate major in art or 24 units 
of approved upper division art including at least 12 
units in the area of concentration completed with 
grades of B or better. 

B. Portfolio review — before any units may apply to the 
approved study program for the degree, the student 
must arrange an area faculty committee evaluation 
of the student’s background, including a statement 
of purpose by the student and review of creative 
work; or, for art history applicants, submission of 
assigned research papers. Portfolio review dates 
are in April for the following fall semester, and in 
November for the following spring semester of each 
year. Arrangements may be made through the Art 
Department office to meet these deadlines prior to 
admission. 

C. Art history program: reading knowledge of either 
French or German required before advancement to 
candidacy. 

D. Development of an approved study plan. 

Study Plan 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study 
approved by the student’s graduate committee of which 
15 must be 500-level courses. The 30 units are distributed 
as follows: 

Units 

1 . Core courses in art history, philosophy, 

analysis and criticism 9 

A. Studio program: 

Art 500A, Graduate Seminar In Major 
Field (3 units) 

Art history program: 

Art 511, Seminar on the the Content and 
Method of Art History (3 units) 

(ADMISSION WITH CLASSIFIED 
STANDING ONLY) 

B. Studio Program: 

Art 500B Graduate Seminar in Major 
Field (3 units) 

Art history program: 

Art 512, ^mlnar on Selected Topics in 
Art History (3 units) (ADMISSION 
WITH CLASSIFIED STANDING 
ONLY) 

C. Art 481 Seminar in Art History (3 units), 
or substitute of a 400-level course in art 
history, theory, analysis or criticism on 
the recommendation of the major 
adviser. 

2. 500-and/or 400-level courses In the area of 
concentration selected from one of the 


following (minimum of six units at 500 level) 12 

A. Drawing and painting (including 
printmaking) 

B. Sculpture 

C. Crafts (including ceramics, glass, fibers, 
wood, jewelry/ metalsmithing) 

D. Design (including environmental design, 
graphic design, illustration, exhibition 


design, or creative photography) 

E. Art history 

3. Additional course work In the area of 

concentration or approved electives 3 to 6 

4. Art 597, Project (for studio) ; or Art 598, 

Thesis (for art history) 3 or 6 

Total 30 


The M.A. study plan must be completed with a B average, 
and all courses in the area of concentration be completed 
with grades of B or better. Every graduate student is re- 
quired to demonstrate writing ability commensurate with 
the baccalaureate degree. Please refer to the section on 
Graduate Regulations for further clarification. The Depart- 
ment of Art requires the studio candidate for the Master 
of Arts in Art to exhibit the project in one of the depart- 
ment’s graduate galleries prior to graduation. The art his- 
tory candidate is required to submit a written thesis based 
on a specific topic of research. 

For further information consult the graduate program ad- 
viser. 

MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN ART 

The Master of Fine Arts Is a rigorous studio program for 
students with advanced proficiency and focus who are 
committed to becoming professional artists. The M.F.A. 
program provides in-depth study within a 60-unit approved 
study plan In the following areas of concentration: (1) 
design (including graphic design, illustration, environmen- 
tal design, and exhibition design); (2) ceramics (including 
glass); (3) crafts (Including fibers, jewelry/metalsmithing, 
and woodworking/furniture); (4) sculpture; (5) drawing, 
painting, and printmaking; and (6) creative photography. 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant may apply to the university In one of three 
categories; 

1. Postbaccalaureate Unclassified (no degree objective 
or major declared). This is for students who hold a 
bachelor’s degree and wish to take additional course 
work to fulfill prerequisites or prepare for the compre- 
hensive review. To qualify for admission an applicant 
must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
institution, have attained a GPA of at least 2.5 In the last 
60 units attempted and have been in good standing at 
the last college attended. Admission with postbac- 
calaureate unclassified standing does not constitute 
admission to the art graduate program or graduate de- 
gree curricula. 


158 


2. Conditionally Classified (objective declared in art) . An 
applicant who is admitted with conditionally classified 
standing may enroll in graduate courses. Admission 
requirements are the same as for postbaccalaureate 
unclassified standing. In addition, the department re- 
quires all applicants to undertake the comprehensive 
portfolio review and be recommended for conditionally 
classified standing by the faculty portfolio review com- 
mittee. 

3. Classified (approved study plan for the M.F.A. degree) . 
Admission requirements are the same as for postbac- 
calaureate unclassified, with the addition of the follow- 
ing requirements: 

a. An approved undergraduate major In art or 24 units 
of approved upper-division art including a minimum 
of 18 units of upper-division study In the area of 
concentration completed with a grade-point aver- 
age of 3.0 or better. 

b. Comprehensive Portfolio Review. Before any units 
may apply to the approved study plan for the de- 
gree, students must receive a satisfactory faculty 
committee evaluation of their creative work, their 
ability to verbalize about their work and their aca- 
demic background. The comprehensive portfolio re- 
view is held semi-annually, in the fail and spring. 
Exact dates are announced each semester. A de- 
tailed description of the portfolio review may be ob- 
tained from the art department graduate secretary. 

c. Development, with the student’s graduate commit- 
tee, of an approved study plan. 

Study Plan 

The M.F.A. degree program requires 60 units of graduate 
study approved by the student’s graduate committee and 
the dean of graduate studies. The study plan must be 
completed with a grade-point average of 3.0 or better. The 
courses in the concentration must be completed with a 
grade of “B” or better. The 60 unit study plan is distributed 
as follows: 


Areas Units 

Theory, criticism: Art 500A, 500B 6 

History 9 

Area of concentration 24 

Electives In art 12 

Independent study: research 3 

Project 6 

Total 60 


Master of Fine Arts Project 

The M.F.A. project exhibition constitutes a professional 
one-person art exhibit which is installed in one of the 
department’s graduate galleries and announced for public 
view by the student as the final phase of the M.F.A. pro- 
gram requirements. 

The Department of Art is nationally accredited at the high- 


est level of quality and professionalism (Division I) by the 
National Association of Schools of Art and Design. For 
further details on the comprehensive portfolio review, 
communicate with the graduate coordinator or graduate 
secretary in the art department. Visual Arts 102 (714/773- 
3471). 

CERTIFICATE IN MUSEUM STUDIES 

Courses leading to the certificate are designed to educate 
students In museum practices in preparation for entry into 
the museum profession. The curriculum Includes instruc- 
tion in the historical development and philosophical basis 
of collections, exhibitions and their design, and curator- 
ship. A museum internship is required. The certificate in 
museum studies may be undertaken as a self-contained 
program or may be taken in conjunction with the Master 
of Arts in Art degree or the Master of Fine Arts In Art 
degree or, by special permission, with other graduate de- 
grees in the university. (For an M.A. or M.F.A. In Art de- 
gree with an exhibition design emphasis see M.A. and 
M.F.A. emphases under the design concentration.) 

Prerequisites 

1. B.A. In Art or other major by special permission 

2. Specific course prerequisites: 

A. 12 units in upper-division art history 

B. 6 units in graphic design and exhibition design 

C. 3 units of advanced writing (Communications 435, 
Editorial and Critical Writing; or Communications 
362, Public Relations Writing; or English 301, Ad- 
vanced College Writing 

D. 3 units of beginning accounting 

Study Plan 

The certificate program requires 24 units. The 24 units are 
distributed as follows: 

Units 


1. Art 463 Museum Studies 3 

2. Art 481 Seminar In Art History 3 

3. Art 464 Museum Conservation 3 

4. Art 483D Exhibition Design 3 

5. Art 498 Internship in Art 3 

6. Art 501 Curatorship 3 

7. Art 503D Exhibition Design 6 

Total 24 


For further information, consult the Department of Art. 


Art Courses 

100 Exploratory Course In Art (3) 

Use of a variety of art materials, processes and concepts. 
Field trips required. Not open to art majors for credit except 
by permission of Art Department. (6 hours activity) 

101 Introduction to Art (3) 

Historical and contemporary art forms of painting, sculpture, 


159 


architecture and design. Field trips required. Not open to art 
majors for credit except by permission of Art Department. 

103 Two-dimensional Design (3) 

Materials, concepts and elements of two-dimensional visual 
organization. (6 hours activity) 

104 Three-dimensional Design (3) 

Materials, concepts and elements of three-dimensional vis- 
ual organization. (6 hours activity) 

106A Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Form as related to ceramic materials, tools, processes. Kiln 
loading and firing, hand building, wheel throwing and raku. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

106B Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 106A. Form as related to ceramics. Glaze 
batching and its application, and the presentation of ceramic 
technique. (9 hours laboratory) 

107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

The traditional and contemporary use of drawing and paint- 
ing materials integrated with visual experiences and con- 
cepts. 107A emphasizes drawing; 107B emphasizes 
painting. (6 hours activity) 

117 Life Drawing (1) 

The live model. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 units. 
(3 hours activity for each unit) 

123A,B Descriptive Drawing (3,3) 

Traditional and contemporary drawing techniques and theo- 
ries. 123A, representation of nature forms; 123B, manmade 
and mechanical forms including linear perspective. (6 hours 
activity) 

201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

The ideas, forms and styles of the visual arts as they devel- 
oped in various cultures from prehistoric time to the present. 

205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Traditional and contemporary concepts and processes with 
emphasis on design principles in the development of es- 
thetic forms based on function. (9 hours laboratory) 

205B Beginning Crafts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 and 205A. Art 104 may be taken 
concurrently. The development of esthetic forms based on 
function, with emphasis on design principles and the crea- 
tive use of hand tools and power equipment. (9 hours labo- 
ratory) 

207A,B Drawing and Painting (Experimental Methods and 
Materials) (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 117, 107A,B or equivalents. Traditional and 
contemporary methods and materials. (6 hours activity) 

213A Beginning Environmental Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104. Design methodology and 
communication skills in the environmental design field. (6 
hours activity) 

213B Interior Space Planning and Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 21 3A or consent of instructor. 
The planning and organization of residential and commer- 


cial Interior space. (6 hours activity) 

216A,B Beginning Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 104, sculpture: The creative use of wood 
and metal, power equipment and hand tools. (9 hours labo- 
ratory) 

223A,B Lettering, Typography and Rendering (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. The history, design and use of letter 
forms; techniques for rough and comprehensive layouts; the 
use of hand-lettered forms and handset type. (6 hours activ- 
ity) 

226 Beginning Glass Forming (3) 

Hot glass laboratory equipment and techniques. Handling 
hot glass. (9 hours laboratory) 

247 Beginning Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 107A,B. Printmaking forms; litho, etching, 
woodcut and serigraphy. (9 hours laboratory) 

300 Writing in the Visual Arts (3) 

Principles, practices and objectives of writing in the visual 
arts. Includes descriptive, analytical and expressive essays; 
project and grant proposals; artist’s statements; resumes; 
and professional correspondence. Satisfies the classroom 
portion of the upper-division writing requirement for art ma- 
jors. 

301 Ancient Art (3) 

The developments In art from the Paleolithic to late antiq- 
uity. 

302 Medieval Art (3) 

The developments In art from the late antiquity through the 
Gothic. 

303 Architectural and Interior Rendering (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 123B or consent of Instructor. Rendering of 
architectural, interior and landscape environments, utilizing 
mechanical perspective and contemporary design drawing 
delineation techniques. Mixed media. (6 hour activity) 

305A,B Advanced Crafts (3,3) 

Prerequisites: 205A and 205B. Advanced concepts and proc- 
esses In the development of esthetic forms based on func- 
tion, emphasizing individual growth and personal 
expression. (9 hours laboratory) 

306A,B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103, 104 and 106A,B. Forms and the crea- 
tive use of ceramic concepts and materials; design, forming, 
glazing and firing. (9 hours laboratory) 

307 A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117, 207A,B or equivalents. The 
concepts, materials and activities of drawing and painting, 
emphasizing individual growth, plan and craft. (6 hours ac- 
tivity) 

310A,B Watercolor (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 107A,B or equivalents. An exploration of 
watercolor media related to varied subject matter and de- 
sign applications. Includes field trip activity. Provides skills 
and concepts useful for school art programs. (6 hours activ- 
ity) 


160 


313A Environmental Design: Unit Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites; Art 103, 104 and 213. Environmental design 
projects and the study of unit concepts. (6 hours activity) 

313B Environmental Design: Systems Concepts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 31 3A. Environmental design projects and 
systems concepts. (6 hours activity) 

315A,B Jewelry (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken 
concurrently. Design and creation of jewelry. (9 hours labo- 
ratory) 

316A,B Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 104 and 21 6A. Sculptural materials and 
processes. (9 hours laboratory) 

317 Life Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: three units lower division life drawing. Draw- 
ing, painting and sculputure from the live model. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

317A Drawing and Painting 
317B Drawing and Painting 
317C Sculpting 

318 Drawing and Painting: the Human Head and Hands 
( 3 ) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B and 3 units of lower division life 
drawing. Construction, anatomy and pictorial use of the hu- 
man head and hands. (9 hours laboratory) 

320 History of Architecture Before the Modern Era (3) 

A study of selected monuments from Stonehenge through 
the late Baroque. Interrelationship between patronage, 
style, function, structural principles and technological deve- 
lopments. 

323A,B Graphic Design (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 223A. Development and projec- 
tion of ideas in relation to the technical, esthetic and psycho- 
logical aspects of advertising art. (6 hours activity) 

325A,B Metalsmithing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken 
concurrently. Metalsmithing concepts, processes and 
materials; utilitarian forms, raising, silversoldering, forging, 
casting, engraving, chasing and repousse. (9 hours labora- 
tory) 

326A,B Ceramic Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 117 or consent of instructor. 
Development of ceramic technology into individual sculptur- 
al forms and techniques. (9 hours laboratory) 

330 Fibers and Papers (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104, or consent of instructor. The 
use of fibers and papers as an art form. (9 hours laboratory) 

333A Environmental Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 31 3B. Materials and structural concepts as 
design determinants. (6 hours activity) 

333B Environmental Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 333A. Change and growth as design deter- 
minants; experimental design concepts and methods. (6 
hours activity) 


336 A,B Casting Techniques and Theories of Cast 
Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 31 6A. Waxing, molding and metal casting 
techniques. Aluminum and bronze and the lost wax process. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

338A Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103 or its equivalent. The photographic 
media in personal expression. Historical attitudes and proc- 
esses; new materials and contemporary esthetic trends. 
Field trips required. (9 hours laboratory) 

338B Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A. The photographic medium In person- 
al expression. Historical and new processes. Field trips re- 
quired. (9 hours laboratory) 

339A Photo-Illustration (3) (Formerly 339) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 338. The use of specialized photo- 
graphic techniques such as lighting, camera position, color 
and motion for solutions to illustration problems of narration, 
visual description, juxtaposition and imagery. (9 hours labo- 
ratory) 

339B Photo Illustration (3) 

Prerequisites: 338A and 339A, or consent of Instructor. Con- 
cepts and attitudes in the field of photo illustration. Illustra- 
tion problems using narrative, visual description, 
juxtaposition and imagery. 

347A Printmaking*— Etching (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117, and 247. Concept develop- 
ment, exploration and materials involved in printmaking 
techniques. Includes etching, aquatint. (9 hours laboratory) 

347B Printmaking— Lithography (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117, and 247. Concept develop- 
ment, exploration and materials involved in lithography. (9 
hours laboratory) 

348 Artists’ Books (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A or 247, or consent of instructor. 
Personal vision and concepts applied to the book form as 
art; the history and aesthetics of artists’ books. 

353 Environmental Design Practice (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 213, 313 and 333, or consent of Instructor. 
Environmental design practice, including research tech- 
niques. project administration, specification writing, estimat- 
ing, forms and documents, evaluation techniques and 
ethics. Areas of emphasis: interior design, architecture, 
landscape architecture. 

355A,B Fibers: Fabric Printing and Dyeing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A or B or consent of instructor. 
Design concepts and printing and dyeing processes as ap- 
plied to fabrics. (9 hours laboratory) 

363A,B lilustration (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A,B and 117. Story, book, maga- 
zine, and film illustration. (6 hours activity) 

364A,B Stained Glass (3,3) 

Leaded and stained glass; individual exploration, growth, 
planning and craftsmanship. (6 hours activity) 


6—79417 


161 


365A,B Fibers: Weaving (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104 or 205A,B or consent of in- 
structor. The use of the loom and weaving processes to 
design and create fiber and fabric art forms. (9 hours labora- 
tory) 

373 Methods in Exhibit Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 123B. Exhibition Design: spatial 
concepts, modular systems, traffic patterns and object vis- 
ual criteria. Drawings, working and finished models, and 
material specifications. 

375 Professional Practices in the Arts (3) 

Practices unique to the visual arts, including an ovenriew of 
changing concepts in the art market, traditional roles in cul- 
tural context, portfolio development, strategies for protect- 
ing ideas and avoiding abuses, and long term professional 
development. 

380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Art concepts, materials and processes as they relate to child 
development. (6 hours activity) 

411 Foundations of Modern Art (3) 

Painting and sculpture of the realism, impressionism, post- 
impressionism periods. 

412 Art of the 20th Century— 1900 to Present (3) 

Fundamentals of modern painting, graphics and architec- 
ture. 

420 History of Modern Architecture (3) 

Development of modem architecture. The interrelationship 
among architecture, technology and society, from the indus- 
trial and political revolutions of the 18th century to the 
present. Exploration of national differences and various ap- 
proaches to city planning. 

423A,B Film Animation (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107A,B and 117. Esthetic and 
technical considerations of animation in the production of 
film. (6 hours activity) 

426A,B Glass Forming (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 206A,B, 306A, and consent of instructor. 
The chemistry, handling and manipulation of glass and its 
tools and equipment for the ceramic artist. (9 hours labora- 
tory) 

431 Renaissance Art (3) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture of the Renaissance 
period. Lectures, discussion and field trips. 

432 Baroque and Rococo Art (3) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture of the Baroque and 
Rococo period. Lectures, discussion and field trips. 

438A,B Creative Color Photography (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 338A,B. Concepts and techniques In crea- 
tive color photography. Historical attitudes and contempo- 
rary trends. Personal involvement with the medium. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

441A,B Media Exploration for Teaching Art (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 107A,B, 205A or consent of in- 
structor. Exploring the art media used in secondary school 


art programs today. Materials for secondary art curriculum. 
Two and three dimensional media in subject matter applica- 
tions. (6 hours activity) 

443 Studio Graphics (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 223A,B and 323A,B. Admission by inter- 
view and portfolio review. Studio production of graphics for 
the School of the Arts, including printed mailers, posters, 
booklets, catalogs, advertisements. Students experience 
designer/client relationships and translate concepts into 
production. (9 hours activity) 

453A,B Exhibition Design (3,3) 

Technical and esthetic experience in problem-solving exhi- 
bition design concepts, evaluation and design analysis. The 
production of exhibitions In the University Art Gallery, their 
selection, design, installation, lighting and supportive inter- 
pretive material. (More than 9 hours laboratory) 

460B Pre-Coiumbian Art (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 201 A, B or consent of Instructor. An intro- 
duction to the art and architecture of Meso and South Ameri- 
ca from the early formative stage to the Spanish Conquest. 
Emphasis on esthetic achievement with varying contexts of 
Pre-Columbian culture. 

461A American Art Colonial Period to 1900 (3) 

The historical development of painting and sculpture In 
America from the Colonial Period until 1900. The role of the 
visual arts in helping to define, reflect and challenge Ameri- 
can values and institutions. 

461 B American Art 20th Century (3) 

Painting and sculpture in America during the 20th century. 
The role of the visual arts in helping to define, reflect and 
challenge American values and institutions. 

463 Museum Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 453A, six units of art history or anthropolo- 
gy, and consent of instructor. Museums, their structure, 
function and operation. Museum governance, ethics, grant 
proposal preparation, conservation and educational pro- 
gramming. 

464 Museum Conservation (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 463. The examination of the presentation of 
objects; the history, role and principles of conservation with- 
in a museum context. Three combined sessions at Conser- 
vation Center, LACMA; Huntington Library; J. Paul Getty 
Museum; and Museum of Cultural History, UCLA. 

470 History and Esthetics of Photography (3) 

Prerequisites: 201 A,B. Photography from ancient optical ob- 
sentations through 19th-century invention to 20th-century 
acceptance as an art form. Esthetic movement and Influen- 
tial innovators. Lectures, slides and class discussion. 

481 Seminar in Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Study and evaluation In 
one area of art history and appreciation. May be repeated 
up to a maximum of 6 units. 

483 Special Studies in Design (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Maximum of 12 units, but 


162 


no more than 3 units in any one area in a single semester. 
483A Graphic Design (6 hours activity) 

483B Environmentai Design (6 hours activity) 

483C Design and Composition (6 hours activity) 

463D Exhibition Design (More than 9 hours 
laboratory) 

484A Special Studies in Ceramics (3) 

Prerequisite; a minimum of six upper-division units in ceram- 
ics. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than three units in any 
one area in a single semester. (9 hours laboratory) 

4346 Special Studies in Glass (3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of six upper-division units in glass. 
Maximum of 12 units, but no more than three units in any one 
area in a single semester. (9 hours laboratory) 

485 Special Studies in Crafts (3) 

Prerequisite: a minimum of six upper-division units In desig- 
nated area or consent of Instructor. Maximum of 12 units, but 
no more than three units In any one area In a single semes- 
ter. (9 hours laboratory) 

4a5A Jewelry 

4856 General Crafts 

485C Metalsmithing 

485D Fibers— Weaving 

485E Fibers— Fabric Printing and Dyeing 

485F Fibers and Fabrics 

486 Special Studies in Sculpture (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 316A,B and consent of instructor. Max- 
imum of 12 units but no more than three units in a single 
semester. (9 hours laboratory) 

486A Modeling and Fabrication 
4866 Casting 

487 Special Studies in Drawing and Painting and 
Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper-division units in draw- 
ing and painting, and consent of instructor. Maximum of 12 
units, but no more than three units in any one area in a single 
semester. 

487A Painting (6 hours activity) 

4876 Life Drawing (9 hours laboratory) 

487C Drawing (6 hours activity) 

487D Printmaking (9 hours laboratory) 

489 Special Studies in Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A,B. Photography as personal expres- 
sion. Maximum of 12 units but no more than three units in 
a single semester. (9 hours laboratory) 

490 Professional Seminar (3) 

Quest speakers from professions in the visual arts. A lec- 
ture/discussion seminar relevant to current issues and con- 
cepts in making and experiencing art. Topics will differ each 
semester. For the senior and graduate art major. May be 
repeated up to a maximum of 6 units. 

498 Internship in Art (3) 

Work in a specific art field in business or industry. Must have 
senior standing. 


499 Independent Research (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in art with consent of depart- 
ment chair and written consent of instructor. May be repeat- 
ed for credit. 

500A Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: classified standing. Problems and issues in art. 
Intellectual clarification and verbal articulation of individual 
intent as an artist. Oral and written material In support of the 
master’s project. 

5006 Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 500A. Directed research in the area of ma- 
jor emphasis. Oral and written material on historical back- 
grounds and developments in art as they relate to individual 
intent as an artist (stated in Art 500A) and in support of the 
master’s project. 

501 Curatorship (3) 

Prerequisites: B.A. in art, anthropology or other major by 
special permission, and Art 481 and 463. The curator col- 
lects, cares for and studies objects. 

503 Graduate Problems in Design (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Planning, development 
and evaluation of individual projects listed below. Maximum 
of 12 units in each area, but no more than three units in any 
one area in a single semester. 

503A Graphic Design (6 hours activity) 

5036 Environmental Design (6 hours activity) 

503C Design and Composition (6 hours activity) 

503D Exhibition Design (More than 9 hours 
laboratory) 

504 Graduate Problems in Ceramics (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Planning, develoment 
and evaluation of individual projects in ceramics. Maximum 
of 12 units but no more than three units in a single semester. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

505 Graduate Problems in Crafts (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Planning, development 
and evaluation of individual projects listed below. Maximum 
of 12 units but no more than three units in a single semester. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

SOSA Jewelry 
SOSB General Crafts 

SOSD Fibers— Weaving, Fibers and Fabrics 

506 Graduate Problems in Sculpture (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Planning, development 
and evaluation of individual projects in sculpture. Maximum 
of 12 units but no more than three units in a single semester. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

507 Graduate Problems in Drawing, Painting and 
Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisite: 12 units of upper-division drawing and painting. 
Planning, development and evaluation of individual projects 
listed below. Maximum of 12 units but no more than three 
units in a single semester. 

507A Painting (6 hours activity) 

5076 Life Drawing (9 hours laboratory) 


163 


507C Drawing (6 hours activity) 

507D Printmaking (9 hours laboratory) 

511 Seminar on the Content & Method of Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 481 . Methods of research, bibliography, and 
theories and philosophies of art historical scholarship. May 
be repeated up to a maximum of 6 units. 

512 Seminar on Selected Topics in Art History (3) 
Prerequisite: appropriate upper-division Art course ap- 
proved by instructor and Art 511 or consent of instructor. 
Analysis and evaluation of specific historical significance 
including cultural, social and economic circumstances. May 
be repeated up to a maximum of 6 units. 

597 Project (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: Art 500A,B, written consent of instructor and 
recommendation of the student’s graduate committee. Art 
500B may be taken concurrently with Art 597 on approval of 
instructor. Development and presentation of a creative 
project in the concentration beyond regularly offered 
coursework. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: Art 511, 512, written consent of instructor and 
recommendation of the student’s graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in art with consent of department 
chair and written consent of instructor. May be repeated for 
credit. 


Art Education Courses 

442 Teaching Art in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, 
methods and practices for teaching art In secondary 
schools. Required before student teaching of majors in art 
for the single subject teaching credential. 

449E Externship in Secondary Teaching (3) (Formerly 
449A) 

For candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act creden- 
tial. See description and prerequisites under Division of 
Teacher Education. Offered every fall semester. 

4491 Internship in Secondary Teaching (10) (Formerly 
449A) 

For candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act creden- 
tial. See description and prerequisites under Division of 
Teacher Education. Concurrent enrollment in Art Education 
449S required. Offered every spring semester. 

449S Seminar in Secondary Teaching (2) (Formerly 
449B) 

Seminar for student teachers in art. The practical aspects of 
art Instruction In secondary schools. Concurrent enrollment 
in Art Education 4491 required. Offered every spring semes- 
ter. 


164 


Department of Music 


Department Chair: David Thorsen 
Vice Chair: Carole Harrison 
Department Office: Performing Arts 262 


Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts in Music 

Liberal Arts 

Music Education 

Music History and Theory 

Bachelor of Music 

Composition 

Instrumental 

Keyboard 

Voice 

Accompanying 

Minor in Music 

Master of Arts in Music 

Music History and Literature 
Music Education 

Master of Music 

Performance 

Theory-Composition 

Single Subject (Secondary) Credential 
Faculty 

Charles, Baker, Martha Baker, David Berfield, Andrew 
Charlton, M’lou Dietzer, Rita Fuszek, Kathleen 
Gjerdingen, Su Harmon, Carole Harrison, Nors 
Josephson, Burton Karson, Leo Kreter, Michael 
Kurkjian, Dimitrle Leivici, Gary Maas, Todd Miller, 

Benton Minor, Gordon Paine, Jane Paul, Lloyd 
Rodgers, James Romeo, Preston Stedman, Robert 
Stewart, David Thorsen, Laurance Timm, Rodger 
Vaughan, Edmund Williams, Mary Mark Zeyen 

INTRODUCTION 

Music is one of the most rewarding of all human endeav- 
ors, and the faculty and students in the Department of 
Music share a deep love for their art and a common desire 
to achieve excellence in it. The department offers a wide 
spectrum of degree programs and options with an overall 
emphasis In the area of performance. The curriculum pro- 
vides basic preparation for careers In music or further 
graduate study, and is designed to provide a balanced 
education in the many facets of musical experience. Art- 
ist-teachers offer Instruction in all areas of performance, 
while practicing composers and theorists teach courses in 



theory, and active musicologists provide instruction in his- 
tory and literature. It is the goal of the department to 
develop each student’s musical and intellectual potential 
to the highest level of Individual capability. The Depart- 
ment of Music is fully accredited by the National Associa- 
tion of Schools of Music, in addition to the overall 
university accreditation by the Western Association of 
Schools and Colleges. 

Credential Information 

The Department of Music offers course work leading to a 
CSUF Waiver Program in Music for the Ryan Single Sub- 
ject Teaching Credential. For details, contact the Admis- 
sion to Teacher Education Office and the coordinator of 
music education. 

The Department of Music offers supplementary authoriza- 
tions for the Ryan Single Subject Teaching Credential in 
Instrumental Music and in Vocal Music. A supplementary 
authorization in music is offered for the Ryan Multiple 
Subject Teaching Credential. For details contact the Of- 
fice of Admission to Teacher Education. 

Advisement 

All music majors are required to obtain advisement each 
semester. Area coordinators serve as the advisers, and 
students are assigned according to area of concentration. 

Requirements of the Music Department 

1. All entering music majors must register In the Bache- 
lor of Arts degree program for at least the first semes- 
ter of residence. Students may change the degree 
objective to the Bachelor of Music upon completion of 
at least one semester of course work at the university, 
successful completion of an audition for the program, 
and recommendation of the coordinator in the appro- 
priate area of concentration. Enrollment in the Bache- 
lor of Music program is limited. 

2. Upon entering the university as a new music major or 
upon officially changing to a major in music, each 
student will present an audition in the appropriate prin- 
cipal performance area (Instrument or voice) and a 
placement audition for class piano. 

3. All students must pass proficiency examinations in 
traditional harmony (sight-singing, dictation, keyboard 
and paperwork) and piano before being approved for 
graduation. Transfer students will fulfill the theory re- 
quirement by passing the entrance examination in 
theory; first-time students and transfers with insuffi- 
cient preparation at entrance will normally take the 
examination in Music 211. The piano-proficiency re- 
quirement may be met by completion of Music 282B 
with a passing grade. Students whose principal per- 
formance area is piano satisfy the piano proficiency 
requirement upon reaching 300 level in performance. 

4. Each music major must declare a single principal per- 
formance area, which must be approved by the coor- 


dinator of that area upon completion of the entrance 
audition. In order to be approved for graduation, each 
student must achieve at least the 300 level of profi- 
ciency in the principal performance area. B.A. Liberal 
Arts-option students who elect project option 2 (Mu- 
sic 497: Project) need reach only the 200 level. 

5. Each music major is required to present one or more 
recitals or a project appropriate to the degree program 
before being approved for graduation. The project op- 
tion is available only in the Liberal Arts and Music 
History and Theory options of the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. Recitals at the 300 level of performance are 
designated Music 398; recitals at the 400 level of per- 
formance are designated Music 498. See the sections 
below on the Liberal Arts and Music History and Theo- 
ry options for recital/project information applicable to 
those degrees. 

6. Undergraduate music majors are required to partici- 
pate in a major performance ensemble (Music 361) 
and complete it with a passing grade each semester 
of residence as follows: 

a. Students who declare wind or percussion as the 
principal performance area must register for band 
(or orchestra, if designated by the instrumental 
area coordinator) ; students who declare a string 
instrument as principal performance area must 
register for orchestra; students who declare voice 
as the principal performance area must register for 
chorus. (Bachelor of Music students In voice who 
have reached the 400 level may elect to substitute 
361 D, Opera Theatre.) A student whose principal 
performance area is keyboard or classical guitar 
must register for one of the above major perform- 
ance ensembles, according to the student’s qualifi- 
cations and subject to audition. 

b. A music major admitted into the Bachelor of Music 
program whose senior recital Instrument is key- 
board or classical guitar and who has participated 
in a major performance ensemble for at least five 
semesters (a minimum of two semesters at Cal 
State Fullerton) is thereafter exempt from the ma- 
jor performance ensemble requirement. 

c. The educational purpose of the requirement that all 
music majors participate in an appropriate major 
performance ensemble during each semester of 
residence is to permit each student to experience 
the highest level of ensemble music-making com- 
mensurate with the student’s skill. To this end, the 
band/orchestra and choir programs at Cal State 
Fullerton are of the traditional graded structure. 
University Singers (361 E), Wind Ensemble (361 F) 
and Symphony Orchestra (361 A) are for the most 
advanced students; University Choir (361 B), Con- 
cert Band (361 C) and Women’s Choir (361 W) are 
for students of less skill or experience. Placement 
in bands, orchestra and choirs will be based on 


166 Music 


student ability as determined by the directors of 
those ensembles. Music majors will be assigned to 
the ensemble for which they are best qualified. A 
student does not have the option of satisfying the 
requirements for participation in a major perform- 
ance ensemble by enrolling in an ensemble intend- 
ed for those of less ability or experience. 

7. Applied-music study in the principal performance area 

is required as stipulated under the requirements for 

each degree program. The following conditions apply: 

a. If a student pursuing the Bachelor of Arts degree 
(Music History and Theory) or the Bachelor of Mu- 
sic degree (Composition) reaches the 300 level in 
the principal performance area before the required 
units in applied music are completed, Music De- 
partment electives may be substituted for the re- 
maining applied music units. 

b. In addition to the four units of applied music re- 
quired In the principal performance area, Bachelor 
of Music students in the Composition option must 
complete six units of applied composition (includ- 
ing the 498 recital) after taking Music 422A. The 498 
recital will consist of a presentation of the student’s 
own compositions. 

c. Students pursuing the Bachelor of Music degree in 
any option except composition must achieve the 
300 level in performance before giving the 398 re- 
cital and 400 level In performance before giving the 
498 recital. Specific information on jury-level criteria 
Is available from the Music Department office. 

d. In order to receive state-funded lessons In applied 
music, an undergraduate student (with the excep- 
tion of a student who is within six units of complet- 
ing all degree requirements) must be currently 
enrolled for a minimum of six units of music classes 
(including applied music), at least two units of 
which must be in an academic area of music (any 
course other than performing ensembles and ap- 
plied music) . In addition, the student must earn a 
passing grade in all music courses, must be mak- 
ing satisfactory progress toward a degree, and 
must be currently enrolled In the appropriate major 
performance ensemble, as stipulated in section 6 
above. If the student fails to complete with a pass- 
ing grade either the required six units of music 
classes or the major performance ensemble, state- 
funded lessons will be withheld in the subsequent 
semester. Students are eligible for a maximum of 
three semesters of state-funded lessons at a given 
level of performance. 

e. Students in the B.A. program are eligible for a max- 
imum of eight units of state-funded applied music 
(398 and 497 included). B.M. students are eligible 
for a maximum of 14 units (398 and 498 included.) 
Regardless of whether or not the student has 
reached the above maxima, eligibility for state- 
funded lessons ceases upon completion of the fi- 


nal recital or project appropriate to the degree 
plan. Students who have completed the final recital 
or project and still have further units of applied 
music required under their degree plan will thereaf- 
ter substitute electives in music. 

8. Senior transfer students entering Cal State Fullerton 
with a major in music, or graduate students in music 
entering to satisfy the legal waiver for teaching cre- 
dentials, are expected to complete a minimum of one 
semester of upper-division course work in music with 
a GPA of at least 3.0 before they may be approved for 
admittance to teacher education. Required courses 
and competencies must be satisfied before the faculty 
committee will consider endorsing the student’s ac- 
ceptance into the credential program. 

9. A music major must maintain a 2.5 GPA in music 
course work at the university in order to be approved 
for graduation. 

10. All requests for exceptions to departmental or curricu- 
lar requirements must be directed by petition to the 
department chair. 

MUSIC DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Department of Music offers a variety of courses that 
lead to baccalaureate and graduate degrees in teaching 
and the professions. The baccalaureate degree may be 
earned in either of two degree programs (Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Music) . Within these programs, a student 
will pursue an emphasis in liberal arts, music history and 
theory, music education, performance, composition or ac- 
companying. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

The Bachelor of Arts In Music shall consist of no fewer 
than 50 units of music, of which at least 29 shall be upper 
divison (300 level and above). All Bachelor of Arts stu- 
dents must complete the basic requirements listed Im- 
mediately below and must select and complete the 
requirements listed in one of three options: Liberal Arts, 
Music History and Theory or Music Education. 

Core Requirements 

Units 


Music theory (Music 111A,B: 211; 319A; 320A 

or B) 14 

Music history and literature (Music 251; 

351A,B,C) 12 

Principal performance area (Applied Music) .... 4 

Major performance ensemble (Music 

361A,B,C,E,F,W) 4 

Total 34 


Liberal Arts Option 

This option allows a student to take an academic major in 
music without being involved in a program of professional 
preparation. The degree emphasis is historically the old- 
est such study plan in music in higher education and 
represents a liberal-arts response to the highly profes- 


Muslc 


sional program of the Bachelor of Music degree. 

Units 


Core requirements for BA degree 34 

Additional upper-division units in music 

Music theory (Music 316 or 318, 323A or 422A) 4 

Conducting (Music 391A or 392A) 3 

Senior project (Music 398 or 497) 1 

Music literature (Music 453A or 460) 2 

Electives (minimum of 6 upper division; no 
more than 2 units of Music 171-471) 7 

Total 50 


Senior Project 

Two options are available to the student, each with a 
different focus and prerequisite: 

Option 1 (Music 398: Recital) : Prerequisite is achievement 
of 300 level In the area of principal performance one se- 
mester before the semester in which the student plans to 
present the recital. The student will present a brief recital 
in a regular recital time or in the appropriate workshop (at 
faculty discretion). 

Option 2 (Music 497: Project) : Prerequisite is achievement 
of 200 level two semesters before the semester In which 
the student plans to present the project. The student will 
prepare a special project In the senior year which will 
culminate in a lecture, lecture-recital or other form of pub- 
lic presentation. To the greatest extent possible, this 
project should be an independent investigation into an 
area of special interest and should involve minimal faculty 
guidance. The public presentation will be evaluated by a 
faculty committee, as is the case with senior recitals, and 
must be approved by that committee prior to graduation. 

In the case of both options, the recital or project will be 
included when calculating the student’s quota of state- 
funded private lessons. 

Music History and Theory Option 

This option is designed as a balanced program in music 
history and theory and provides suitable preparation for 
advanced degrees in theory, literature or musicology. It 
also provides basic preparation for advanced study In 
other fields, such as musical acoustics, music therapy, 
ethnomusicology, library science in music, and music in 
Industry and recreation. 

Students seeking the option in Music History and Theory 
must submit a paper to the music history or theory coordi- 
nator not later than the beginning of their junior year. 
Acceptance Into the degree program Is contingent on the 
submission of a satisfactory paper. 

Allied requirements for the Music History and Theory Op- 
tion: 

1 . Twenty units in a secondary academic area (not music, 
but related to the student’s project or useful to prepare 
the student for future graduate work in music). The 


choice of a secondary academic area must be ap- 
proved in writing by the coordinator of music history 
and theory. Suggested areas: art, English, theatre, his- 
tory, physics (acoustics), anthropology, languages or 
computer science. 

2. Foreign language proficiency, preferably German, to be 
satisfied by one of the following: 

a. Four years of study at the secondary school level, 

b. Passing an examination given by the Department of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures, or 

c. Completing with a passing grade the second semes- 
ter of the beginning university sequence of a foreign 
language. 

Units 


Core requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 34 

Music theory (Music 316, 319B or C) 4 

Conducting or composition (Music 391 A or 

392A or 422A) 2 

Project-proposal preparation (Music 499) 1 

Music history or theory project (Music 497) 1 

Electives In music (conducting, history and/or 
theory) 8 

Total 50 


Music Education Option 

P/9/70 Pedagogy Emphasis: 

The emphasis in piano pedagogy is designed to provide 
in-depth preparation for individual and group piano in- 
struction and will not lead to teaching In the California 
public schools. 

Units 


Core requirements for Bachelor of Arts 34 

Keyboard Ensemble (363K) 1 

Applied Plano (371) 1 

Conducting (391 or 392) 2 

Recital (398) 1 

Piano Literature and Interpretation (454A, B) .. 4 

Piano Pedagogy (467A,B,C) * 6 

Electives (372, 373, 385, 386 recommended by 
advisement) 1 

Total 50 


Instrumental, Vocal-Choral, General Music Emphases: 

The emphases in Instrumental, vocal-choral and general 
music are designed to provide in-depth preparation for 
teaching in the California public schools under the provi- 
sions of the Teacher Preparation and Licensing Law of 
1970 (Ryan Act). 


Instrumental Emphasis: 

Core requirements for the Bachelor of Arts 34 

Orchestral instruments (Music 281B,P,S and W) 4 

Music theory (Music 323A and 320A, 320B, 

323B or 324) 4 

Conducting (Music 392A,B) 4 

Recital (Music 398) 1 



Music 


Electives 3 

Total 50 

Vocal-Choral Emphasis: 

Core requirement for the Bachelor of Arts 34 

Diction for Singers (Music 390) 1 

Orchestral Instruments (Music 281B,P,S,W) .... 4 

Conducting (Music 391A,B) 4 

Literature and interpretation (Music 453A or B 

and 457A or B or 468A) 4 

Recital (Music 398) 1 

Electives 2 

Total 50 

General Music Emphasis: 

Core requirements for Bachelor of Arts 34 

Music and Child Development (Music 333) 3 

Conducting (Music 391A,B) 4 

Orchestral Instruments (Music 281 B,P,S,W) .... 4 

Music In the Modern Classroom (Music 435) .. 3 

Recital (Music 398) 1 

Electives In music 1 

Total 50 


Credential Information 

Students desiring a California teaching credential in music 
must complete the following courses prior to enrolling in 
the professional education program as required by the 
Division of Teacher Education. 

Units 


Instrumental Emphasis: 

Music Education 342, 3991, 391 A, Music 444, 

and Music 281C,T,X 11 

Choral-Vocal Emphasis: 

Music Education 342, Music 354, Music 

Education 399V, Music 392A, 361 D 9 

General Music Emphasis: 

Music 381, Music Education 342, 399V, 441, 436 11 


Students who wish to earn a teaching credential in addi- 
tion to a Bachelor of Arts with a music education option 
must complete the following: 

Units 


Music Education 442 (3) Music Education 
449E (3) and professional education 
courses Teacher Education 440F and 440S .. 12 

Music Education 4491 (Student teaching) and 
Music Education 449S 12 

Total 24 


Prior to admission to teacher education, the student must 
reach 300 level in the principal performance area and pass 
functional examinations in keyboard and voice. The func- 
tional examination requirements may also be met by com- 

* Co-enrollment in Observation and Practice Teaching (Music 465 and 466) strongly 
advised. 


pleting Music 282B (piano) and Music 283 (voice) with 
minimum grade of B. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

This degree program is designed to provide training for 
the highly gifted students who show promise and capabili- 
ty of becoming professional performers and composers. 

The degree consists of 132 semester units. A minimum of 
70 semester units in music are required, at least 32 of 
which must be upper division. 

Core Requirements for the Bachelor of Music 

Units 


Music theory (Music 111A,B; 211) 9 

Music history and literature (Music 251; 

351A,B,C) 12 

Principal performance area (Music 171) 2 

Major performance ensemble (Music 361) 4 

Recital (Music 498) 1 

Total 28 

Composition Specialization 

Core requirements for the Bachelor of Music .. 28 

Music theory (Music 316; 318; 319A; 319B or 

31 9C; 320A,B; 323A; 422A) 17 

Conducting (Music 391 A or 392A) 2 

Principal performance area (Applied Music) .... 4 

Applied composition 5 

Electives In music ]A 

Total 70 

Instrumental Specialization 

Core requirements for the Bachelor of Music .. 28 

Music theory (Music 316, 319A, 320A or B, 

323A, 422A) 11 

Principal performance area (Applied Music) .... 10 

Recital (Music 398) 1 

Conducting (Music 392A,B) 4 

Chamber music (Music 362 and 365) 6 

Electives in music 10 

Total 70 

Keyboard Specialization 

Core requirements for the Bachelor of Music .. 28 

Music theory (Music 316, 320A or B, 319A, 422A) 9 

Music literature (Music 454A,B) 4 

Conducting (Music 391A or 392A) 2 

Recital (Music 398) 1 

Principal performance area (Applied Music) .... 10 

Chamber music (Music 362 or 363) 3 

Accompanying (Music 386) 1 

Pedagogy (Music 467A,B,C) 6 

Harpsichord or Organ class (Music 372 or 373) 1 

Electives In music 5 

Total 70 

Voice Specialization 

Core requirements for the Bachelor of Music .. 28 


Music 


Music theory (Music 316, 320A or B, 319A, 422A) 9 

Music literature (Music 456; 457A,B) 7 

Recital (Music 398) 1 

Principal performance area (Applied Music) .... 10 

Opera Theatre (Music 361 D) 2 

Diction (Music 390A,B,C) 3 

Conducting (Music 391 A) 2 

Pedagogy (Music 468A,B) 4 

Electives In music 4 

Total 70 


Allied requirement for voice specialization: 

Proficiency In two foreign languages (French, German, 
Italian), each to be satisfied by one of the following: 

a. Four years study of foreign language at the secondary 
school level, or 

b. Passing an examination given by the Department of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures, or 

c. Completing the second semester of the beginning uni- 
versity sequence of a foreign language. 


Accompanying Specialization 

Core requirements for the Bachelor of Music .. 28 

Music theory (Music 316, 318, 31 9A, 320A or 

B, 422A) 11 

Music literature (Music 455, 457A) 5 

Principal performance area (Applied Music) .... 9 

Chamber music (Music 363) 2 

Harpsichord class (Music 372) 1 

Organ class (Music 373) 1 

Sight reading (Music 385) 2 

Accompanying (Music 386) 2 

Conducting (Music 391 A) 2 

Diction (Music 390A,B,C) 3 

Recitals (Music 398, 498) 2 

Electives in music 2 

Total 70 


MINOR IN MUSIC 

The minor in music may be used by persons whose majors 
are in other fields. A maximum of 14 lower-division units 
may be included in work counted toward the music minor. 
The minor requires a minimum preparation of 20 units. 

Composite of Lower Division and Upper Division 

Units 


Theory of music (selected from Music 101; 

1 11 A, B; 211; or any 300- or 400-level theory 
classes for which the student is qualified) .... 6 

Music history and literature (Music 100; 251; 

350 or 351A,B,C; or courses at the 400- or 
500-level for which the student is qualified) .. 5-6 

Applied techniques (selected from Music 183, 

184A,B; 281B,P,S,W; 283 or any course In 
ensemble, conducting, piano, voice or 
orchestral instruments at the 300- or 
400-level for which the student is qualified .... 8-9 

Total ^ 


MASTER OF MUSIC AND 
MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

Two graduate degrees in music are offered In the Depart- 
ment of Music: the Master of Music and the Master of Arts. 
Each degree seeks to serve a special group of graduate 
students. For those who intend to pursue advanced de- 
grees beyond the master’s level, the Master of Music 
normally leads to the D.M.A. degree, and the Master of 
Arts to the Ph.D. or the Ed.D. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionaily 
Ciassified 

All applicants admitted into the music program enter Ini- 
tially in conditionally classified graduate standing. Univer- 
sity requirements Include: a baccalaureate from an 
accredited institution; a grade-point average of at least 2.5 
in the last 60 semester units attempted; and good standing 
at the last college attended. In addition, each applicant 
must present a satisfactory entrance audition and submit 
an acceptable written essay in the area of specialization. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A graduate student may apply for classified graduate 
standing only upon attainment of the following prerequi- 
sites: (a) completion of all requirements for conditionally 
classified standing as described above; (b) a major in 
music (or the equivalent of a major; i.e., 29 upper-division 
units in music) with a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 
In the major; and (c) satisfactory completion of Music 500, 
Introduction to Graduate Study In Music. One objective of 
Music 500 Is the selection of a Departmental Advisory 
Committee which aids In the preparation of a study plan 
listing all courses required for completion of the degree. 
This study plan must receive the approval of the student’s 
advisory committee, the Music Department graduate pro- 
gram adviser and the dean of graduate studies. Opportu- 
nity is given the student to remove deficiencies by taking 
certain prescribed courses, but such courses cannot be 
applied to the master’s degree program. 

Special Graduation Requirements 

Written comprehensive examinations in music history and 
music theory are required of ail students following 
achievement of classified graduate standing. In addition, 
for Option 1 In music history and literature only, for the 
Master of Arts, the student must demonstrate reading 
ability In at least one foreign language, preferably German 
or French. 

MASTER OF MUSIC 

The Master of Music provides an avenue of graduate 
study for the highly creative composer or for the superior 
performer in a program tailored to each student’s demon- 
strated talent and to each student’s professional develop- 
ment. Applicants must have completed either a Bachelor 
of Music degree in performance or composition or show 
evidence of equivalent rigorous training. For the entrance 


Music 


audition, applicants in performance must demonstrate 
proficiency equivalent to the 400 level, that level expected 
of a performance major In the Bachelor of Music program 
at the time of the senior recital, while composition appli- 
cants must submit a portfolio of scores for examination by 
the composition faculty. For admission to the programs In 
choral or instrumental conducting, applicants must show 
evidence of substantial conducting course work at the 
undergraduate level plus practical experience. Further, to 
audition for entrance into the program, each choral appli- 
cant must demonstrate conducting proficiency with a 
mixed chorus and each instrumental applicant must dem- 
onstrate conducting proficiency with a band or orchestra. 
Under exceptional circumstances, a tape may be sub- 
stituted for the live audition. 

Study Plan 

The Master of Music degree program requires a minimum 
of 30 units of graduate study in music, at least half of which 
must be in 500-level courses. Music 500, Introduction to 
Graduate Study in Music, must be taken within the first 
nine units. At least one recital is required, in addition to a 
corollary written project. Under certain circumstances, 
and with departmental approval, a thesis may be substitut- 
ed for the recital and written project. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

The Master of Arts provides advanced studies in breadth 
as well as in an area of specialization, either music educa- 
tion or music history and literature. The degree is for 
teachers and supervisors of music and for college teach- 
ing careers in music history or music education. For the 
entrance audition in history and literature, applicants must 
submit an example of a previously-written research paper 
on a musical subject, while applicants to the program in 
music education must submit a 30-minute tape demon- 
strating their teaching technique in a classroom situation. 

Study Plan 

The Master of Arts degree program requires a minimum 
of 30 units of graduate study, no more than nine of which 
may be outside the field of music and at least half of which 
must be In 500-level courses in the major. 

Two options are offered in this degree program. Option I 
in history and literature requires reading ability in a foreign 
language, preferably German or French, prior to advance- 
ment to candidacy, a thesis and at least six units of study 
in a non-music field which is supportive of the major. Op- 
tion II In music education requires either a thesis or a 
project, depending upon the nature of the student’s gradu- 
ate research. Ten semester units are common to both 
options (Music 500, 3 units; Music 361-363, 2 units; Music 
371-571, 2 units; and Music 551-556, 3 units). Music 500, 
Introduction to Graduate Study In Music, must be Included 
within the first nine units taken as a graduate student 
under both options. 

For further details or advisement, consult the Department 
of Music. 


Music Courses 

100 Introduction to Music (3) 

Musical enjoyment and understanding through a general 
survey of musical literature representative of styles and per- 
formance media. Music will be related to other arts through 
lectures, recordings and concerts. For non-music majors. 

101 Music Theory for Non-Music Majors (3) 

Basic theory and practical applications to improve music 
performance and listening skills. Includes sightsinging and 
relationship to keyboard and simple melodic instruments. 
For non-music majors. 

102 History of Jazz (3) 

Historical study of jazz music In America; chronological 
development and stylistic evolution with consideration of 
peripheral trends. Emphasis on listening. For non-music ma- 
jors. 

103 History of Rock (3) 

Rock music around the world; its origins and the develop- 
ment of national styles. Emphasis on listening. For non- 
music majors. 

111A,B Diatonic Harmony (3,3) 

Diatonic harmony and musicianship, includes scales and 
intervals, triads and their inversions, harmonizations, non- 
harmonic tones, modulation and dominant seventh chords. 
Includes sightsinging, dictation and keyboard harmoniza- 
tions. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

171, 271, 371, 471 Individual Instruction (1-2) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual study with ap- 
proved instructor. Emphasis on technique and repertoire. 
Music majors must register for a mimlnum of one unit per 
semester. Performance majors approved by jury recommen- 
dation should register for two units per semester. Jury ex- 
amination required. May be repeated for credit. 

182 Piano Class for Music Majors (2) 

Keyboard skills for students whose major performance in- 
strument is not piano. (3 hours activity) 

183 Voice Class for Non-Majors (1) 

Beginning and elementary techniques in singing for the non- 
music major. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

184A Piano Class for Non-Majors (1) 

Beginning and elementary piano techniques for the non- 
music major. (2 hours activity) 

184B Piano Class for Non-Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: Music 184A or consent of instructor. Continua- 
tion of 184A. 

196 Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

Prerequisites: a 3.0 or higher grade-point average and/or 
consent of instructor and simultaneous enrollment in the 
course or previous enrollment In a similar course or Its 
equivalent. Consult “University Curricula” In this catalog for 
more complete course description. 


Music 


203 Ethnic Music (3) 

Survey of music from Asia, Africa, Australia, Oceania, and 
indigenous Indian music from North and South America. 
Emphasis on musical styles and forms, and religious and 
ritualistic functions of music in various cultural frameworks. 

204 Music of Mexico (3) 

Survey of the art, folk and traditional music of Mexico from 
pre-Cortesian aboriginal music to 20th-century style, includ- 
ing neo-Hispanic, folk (corrico, decimas, etc.), mestizo, 
mariachi, nationalistic, dance, jazz and modernistic art mu- 
sic. Interrelationship between traditional (folk) and serious 
(art) music. 

211 Chromatic Harmony (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 11 IB. Continuation of Music 111A,B; the 
chromatic practice of the 19th century. Secondary domi- 
nants; ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords; sequence, and 
chromatically altered chords. Includes sightsinging, melodic 
and harmonic dictation, and keyboard practice. Required of 
all music majors. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

251 Survey of Musical Literature (3) 

Literature of music in Western civilization. Open to minors 
and qualified students by consent of instructor. Students 
should be able to read music as a part of the analysis of 
form, design and style. Required of majors. (3 hours lecture) 

265A Jazz Improvisation I (1) ^ 

Prerequisite: Music 111A,B, ability on a standard jazz Instru- 
ment or consent of Instructor. Application of scales and their 
relationship to chords. Includes modes, jazz rhythmic phras- 
ing, blues progressions, and cycle of dominant seventh 
chords. Basic jazz keyboard drills and ear training involved. 

265B Jazz Improvisation II (1) 

Prerequisites: Music 265A and 211, or consent of instructor. 
Continuation of modal patterns and jazz rhythms for improvi- 
sation. Explores melodic construction In improvisation. Em- 
phasis on playing ll-V-l progressions in major and minor 
keys. Includes jazz keyboard drills and ear training. 

281B,C,P,SJ,W,X Orchestral Instruments (1,1, 1,1, 1,1,1) 
Techniques and materials for teaching orchestral instru- 
ments. Required for music education emphasis. Instrumen- 
tal majors required to fulfill competency requirements for 
instruments listed in each course description except that of 
their major performance instrument. May be repeated for 
credit. (3 hours activity) 

281 B Brass instruments (1) 

Trumpet and French Horn. 

281C Brass Instruments (1) 

Trombone, Baritone and Tuba. 

281P Percussion Instruments (1) 

Snare drum and mallet-played instruments with related work 
on other standard percussion Instruments. 

281S String Instruments (1) 

Violin and Viola. 

281T String Instruments (1) 

Cello and String Bass. 


281 W Woodwind instruments (1) 

Flute, Clarinet and Saxophone. 

281X Woodwind Instruments (1) 

Oboe and Bassoon. 

282A,B Piano Class for Music Majors (2,2) 

Keyboard skills for students whose major performance field 
is not piano. A— Prerequisite: Music 182 or placement by 
instructor. B— Prerequisite: Music 282A or placement by In- 
structor. Meets minimum piano proficiency requirements for 
degree. (3 hours activity) 

283 Voice Class for Instrumentalists (1) 

Prerequisite: placement by coordinator. Recommended for 
credential candidates. Not required for voice majors. (2 
hours activity) 

312 Commercial Harmony (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 21 1 . Harmonic practices In commercial 
music; stage band and jazz writing techniques. 

314 Special Projects in Commercial Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 312 or consent of instructor. Scoring for 
commercial bands including the stage band. May be repeat- 
ed for credit. (1 hour lecture, one hour activity) 

316 16th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 21 1 or consent of instructor. Sixteenth- 
century counterpoint in two, three and four parts, covering 
motet, canon, double counterpoint. 

318 18th-Century Counterpoint (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 316 or consent of instructor. Eighteenth- 
century counterpoint In two, three and four parts, covering 
invention, canon, double and triple counterpoint and fugue. 

319A,B,C Form and Analysis (3,2,2) 

Prerequisite: Music 21 1 or consent of instructor. A— Analysis 
of structural elements of music such as motive phrase and 
period: binary, tenary, rondo, sonato allegro and larger musi- 
cal forms In representative musical works. Required of all 
music majors. B— Continuation of A; larger musical works. 
C— Continuation of A and B; literature of the 20th century. 

320A,B 20th-Century Techniques (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Music 211. Compositional practices of the 20th 
century; emphasis on written examples in the various styles, 
includes sightsinging, keyboard practice and dictation. A— 
Compositional techniques from 1890 to 1945. B— Composi- 
tional techniques since 1945, to include the synthesis of 
sound. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 

323A,B Orchestration (2,2) 

Prerequisite: Music 391 A, 320 or consent of instructor. Writ- 
ing and analysis of orchestral music. 

324 Scoring for the Band (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 323A or consent of instructor. Devices, 
techniques and skills required to produce complete tran- 
scriptions for the contemporary public school wind band. 

333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 101 or equivalent or successful comple- 
tion of proficiency test. The relationship of music to child 
growth and development for the child from 5 to 12. Survey 
of age-appropriate music materials. 


Music 


350 Music in Our Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 100 or consent of instructor. Music in its 
relationship to general culture. A sociological approach; mu- 
sical criticism and journalism, concert life, audience psy- 
chology and the political/religious/business aspects of the 
American musical scene. 

351 A History and Literature of Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 211 and 251 or consent of instructor. A 
study of the history and literature of music from early Greek 
beginnings through the Renaissance area. 

351 B History and Literature of Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 351 A. A study of the history and literature 
of music of the Baroque and Classic eras. Fulfills the course 
requirement of the university upper division baccalaureate 
writing requirement for music majors. 

351C History and Literature of Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 351 B. A study of the history and literature 
of music from the Romantic era to the present. 

352 Symphonic Music in Western and Eastern Cultures 
(3) (Formerly 452) 

Prerequisite: Music 100 or 101 or consent of instructor. Sur- 
vey of symphonic music in Western and Eastern cultures 
from Baroque through Modern periods. 

354 Survey of Public School Choral Music Materials (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 391 A. Examination and analysis of cho- 
ral repertoire suitable for junior and senior high choruses. 

361 A-W Major Performance Ensemble (1) 

Study and performance of standard and contemporary mu- 
sic literature. Public concerts on campus and in the com- 
munity each semester; participation is required. A concert 
tour may be included by some groups. (More than 3 hours 
major production) May be repeated for credit. 

361 A Symphony Orchestra (1) 

Prerequisite: audition or consent of instructor. 

361 B University Choir (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

361C University Concert Band (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

361 D Opera Theatre (1) 

Roles and representative excerpts from standard and 
contemporary operas and the musical, dramatic and 
language techniques of the musical theatre. Performance of 
operatic excerpts and complete operas. Also open to 
non-vocal majors. 

361 E University Singers (1) 

Prerequisite: advanced voice students or those accepted by 
audition. 

361 F University Wind Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: advanced wind and percussion students 
accepted by audition. 

361W Women’s Choir (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Performance of choral 
literature. 


362A Jazz Band (1) 

Open by audition or consent of Instructor. Public perfor- 
mances on campus and In the community. May be repeated 
for credit. 

362B Varsity Band (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The Varsity Band pro- 
vides music for Titan football and basketball games, and 
other related activities. May be repeated for credit. 

362C Chamber Singers (1) 

Prerequisite: audition. Study and performance of choral liter- 
ature of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Public per- 
formance required. May be repeated for credit. (2 hours 
activity) 

362D Percussion Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and performance 
of music written for the Percussion Ensemble. May be re- 
peated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

362E Brass Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and performance 
of music written for large brass choir/ensemble. May be 
repeated for credit. (2 hours activity) 

362M Horn Ensemble (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and performance 
of music written for French Horn Ensemble with emphasis 
on the solution of various problems relating to multiple horn 
literature. 

362P Choral Laboratory (1) 

Open by audition or with consent of instructor. Performance 
of choral literature for small vocal ensembles using student 
conductors. May be repeated for credit. 

362R Chamber Orchestra (1) (Formerly 362H) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study and performance 
of representative chamber orchestra literature. Open to uni- 
versity students and qualified adults in the community. May 
be repeated for credit. 

362X Beginning Opera Techniques (1) 

Prerequisite: recommendation of voice faculty. Arias for the 
beginning opera student, and fundamentals of stage move- 
ment. May be repeated for credit. 

362Z Advanced Opera Techniques (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Aria preparation, role 
study and character analysis. Musical style of contrasting 
arias; orchestral techniques; language and transliterations 
of libretti. May be repeated for credit. 

363B-X Chamber Music Ensembles (1) 

Open to all qualified wind, string or keyboard students. En- 
sembles will study, read and perform representative cham- 
ber literature of all periods. May be repeated for credit. (2 
hours activity) 

363B Brass 363S Strings 

363G Guitar 363W Woodwind 

363K Keyboard 363X Saxophone 

363R Renaissance 


Music 


365C Composition Workshop (1) 

Weekly workshop presentation by student composers, fac- 
ulty and guests. May be repeated for credit. 

365i instrumental Workshop (1) 

Application of instrumental technique to performance prac- 
tices through lecture, demonstrations, master classes and 
ancillary recitals. Recommended for instrumental major 
each semester. May be repeated for credit. 

365K Keyboard Workshop (1) 

Weekly workshop performances by students, faculty and 
guests. Recommended for keyboard major each semester. 
May be repeated for credit. 

365V Vocal Workshop (1) 

Application of vocal technique to performance practices 
through lecture— demonstration, master classes and ancil- 
lary recitals. Recommended for vocal major each semester. 
May be repeated for credit. 

372 Harpsichord Class for Music Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in piano or organ or consent of 
instructor. The harpsichord as an instrument, the application 
of baroque stylistic characteristics, and training in the rudi- 
ments of continuo playing in ensemble with voices and In- 
struments. (2 hours activity) 

373 Organ Class for Music Majors (1) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in piano or consent of Instructor. 
The organ as an instrument, the playing techniques, and 
repertoire. The differences between piano and organ tech- 
niques. (2 hours activity) 

361 Survey of Recreational Instruments (1) 

Recreational instrument practices and a survey of materials. 
Emphasis on recorder and guitar. (2 hours activity) 

365 Functional Skills for Keyboard Majors (2) 

Development of the ability to sight-read, harmonize, trans- 
pose and improvise. (4 hours activity) 

366 Piano Accompanying (1) 

Prerequisite: by audition only. Piano accompaniments for 
instrumentalists, vocalists and ensembles. Participation in 
rehearsals, recitals and concerts required. May be repeated 
for credit. (2 hours activity) 

390A,B>C Diction for Singers (1,1,1) 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of Instructor. 
Proper singing diction; may not be considered a substitute 
for formal language study. Examples from standard vocal 
literature explained through the use of the International Pho- 
netic Alphabet. A— Italian. B— German. C— French. 

391A,B Chorai Conducting (2,2) 

Prerequisite: one semester of voice class or consent of in- 
structor. A— Principles, techniques and methods of con- 
ducting choral groups. Required of all music education 
majors. (4 hours activity) B-^ntlnuatlon of 391 A Including 
laboratory work with class and vocal ensembles, using 
standard choral repertoire. (4 hours activity) 


392A,B instrumental Conducting (2,2) 

Prerequisite: two courses from 281B,P,S,W or consent of 
instructor. A— Principles, techniques and methods of con- 
ducting orchestral and band groups. Required of all music 
education majors. (4 hours activity) B— Continuation of 
392A, including laboratory experience in conducting instru- 
mental groups, using standard instrumental literature. (4 
hours activity) 

393 Music Instrument Care and Repair (2) 

The care and repair of band and orchestra instruments. 
Experience In the preventative maintenance of music instru- 
ments, and basic repairs which require a minimal amount of 
equipment, skill and time. 

396 Internship: Professional Experience (1-3) 

Fieldwork in music under supervision of resident faculty and 
professionals In the field. Requires minimum six hours field- 
work per week for each unit credit. May be repeated for 
credit to a maximum of six units. Open to all music students 
by consent of instructor. 

396 Recital (1) 

Prerequisites: 300-jury level in the principal performance 
area and consent of Instructor. Corequisite: Enrollment in 
Music 365C,I,K or V. Preparation and presentation of repre- 
sentative works In the principal performance area. In the 
semester of recital presentation. Music 398 will substitute for 
one unit of 371. 

400 Concert Music (1) 

Weekly performances by university students, faculty and 
performing organizations, with lectures and discussions 
relative to the performing arts. Attendance required at addi- 
tional concerts during the semester. Open to all students. 
May be repeated for credit. 

411 Theory Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of all lower division theory re- 
quirements, and at least senior standing or equivalent. A 
survey of the theoretical basis of music from 1500 to the 
present through analysis, readings and discussion. 

422A,B Composition (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Music 316, 31 9A and 320A or B or consent of 
instructor. A— Ear-training analysis of smaller forms, simple 
composition of two- and three-part song form styles. B— 
Analysis and writing of more complex musical forms. 

424 Practicum: Electronic Music Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: Music 320B, 471 level In applied music compo- 
sition and consent of instructor. Individual and group instruc- 
tion in electronic music composition. May be repeated for 
credit. (3 hours laboratory) 

433 Music in Early Childhood (3) 

Prerequisite: ability to read and perform simple songs and 
games for young children. Songs, games, creative activities 
and materials suitable for young children In nursery school 
and early childhood education (approximately 3-6 years). 
Teaching-learning strategies. Field work is conducted in a 
neighboring public school. 


Music 


435 Music in the Modern Ciassroom (3) (Formerly Music 
Education 435) 

Prerequisite: Music 333 or consent of instructor. A survey of 
20th-century materials and techniques of recordings for 
creative movement to music, and of choral materials and 
techniques appropriate for the elementary school choir. 

444 Survey of Marching Bands (2) (Formerly Music 
Education 444) 

Prerequisite; consent of Instructor. Techniques, materials, 
administration for marching band. Charting for field shows 
and parade activities. 

450 History of Musical Style (3) 

Prerequisites: Music 351A,B,C, or equivalent, or consent of 
instructor. An intensive investigation of the principal musical 
styles in Western music from Ancient Greece to the present, 
with an analytical/philosophical examination of reasons for 
stylistic changes. 

453A,B Choral Literature and Interpretation (2,2) 

A— Prerequisites: Music 391 A or equivalent and 351 A,B. 
Choral literature from Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque 
eras analyzed in historical perspective. Appropriate per- 
formance practices. B— Prerequisites: Music 391 A or 
equivalent and 351 C. Continuation of A with examples from 
the Classic, Romantic and Contemporary eras. 

454A,B Piano Literature and Interpretation (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Music 351 A,B and junior level piano standing, 
or consent of instructor. Performance of representative 
styles and schools of piano literature; solo and ensemble 
repertoire. A— Contrapuntal forms, sonatas and variations. 
B— Character pieces, fantasies, suites and etudes. 

455 Instrumental Chamber Literature and Interpretation 
( 3 ) 

Open to all music majors, or to non-majors by consent of 
instructor. The class will be grouped into ensembles for 
demonstration purposes. The stylistic differences required 
in performing works of all periods. 

456 Opera Literature and Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 351A,B,C or consent of instructor. All 
periods and nationalities, including stylistic and historical 
connotations. 

457A Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 31 9A, 390B or consent of Instructor. 
Study and performance of German Lleder with representa- 
tive examples of periods and styles. 

457B Song Literature and Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 390C or consent of instructor. Study and 
performance of French art songs with representative exam- 
ples of periods and styles. 

456 Church Music; History, Literature and Methods (2) 

Prerequisites: Music 351 A,B or consent of instructor. A sur- 
vey of the role of music in the worship traditions of the 
Christian Church; methods for implementation and mainte- 
nance of a successful church music program. 

459 Guitar Literature, Interpretation and Pedagogy (3) 

Prerequisite: 3(X)-jury level In guitar or consent of instructor. 


The literature available to guitarists. Works for lute, vihuela 
and baroque guitar and the compositions and transcriptions 
for the modern guitar. Materials and methods essential for 
the guitar Instructor. 

460 Interpretation of Early Music (3) 

Prerequisite: 300-jury level in principal performance area. 
The stylistic interpretations of vocal and instrumental litera- 
ture from the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. For the senior 
or graduate student majoring in performance. 

465 Observation in Applied Piano (1) 

Prerequisite: piano major, sophomore standing. Observation 
of specialists in private music teaching, teaching tech- 
niques, materials, development of student and preparation 
for beginners, adult beginners, intermediate and early ad- 
vanced students under the specialist in these areas. Re- 
quires written reports of activity in these areas. 
Coenrollment in Music 467A or 467C required. 

466 Pedagogy Internship (1) 

Prerequisites: Music 465 and 467A. Coenrollment In Music 
467B required. Supervised internship in private piano teach- 
ing. 

467A,B,C Plano Pedagogy (2,2,2) 

Prerequisite: junior piano standing or consent of instructor. 
Fundamentals of piano pedagogy for individual and group 
instruction. A— Materials and methods for beginning and 
elementary students. Coenrollment in Music 465 recom- 
mended. B— Materials and methods of intermediate and 
early advanced students. Physiology and psychology for 
studio teachers. Coenrollment In Music 466 recommended. 
C— -Prerequisite: 467A or consent of instructor. Observation 
and practice teaching while learning organizational proce- 
dures, teaching techniques and course literature for class 
piano. 

468A,B Vocal Pedagogy (2,2) 

Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor. A— 
Fundamentals of vocal pedagogy for studio and public 
school teaching; physiology and acoustics as they apply to 
singing. B— Application of the fundamentals discussed In A. 
Seminar discussions and actual studio teaching. The diag- 
nosis and cure of specific vocal problems. 

465 Score Reading (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 282B ancf 391 A,B, or 392A,B. Techniques 
for preparing scores (choral and instrumental) at the key- 
board. Intended primarily for conductors and composers. 

496 Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

Prerequisites: a 3.0 or more grade-point average and/or 
consent of Instructor and simultaneous enrollment in the 
course or previous enrollment in a similar course or its 
equivalent. Consult “Student-to-Student Tutorials” in this 
catalog for more complete course description. 

497 Senior Project (1) 

Independent investigation of an area of special interest in 
music culminating in a public performance, lecture, lecture- 
recital or other suitable demonstration. 


Music 


498 Recital (1) 

Prerequisites: 400-jury level in the principal performance 
area (400-jury level In composition for composition majors) 
and consent of instructor. Corequisite: Coenrollment in Mu- 
sic 365C,I,K or V. Preparation and presentation of represent- 
ative works in the principal performance area. In the 
semester of recital presentation, Music 498 will substitute for 
one unit of Music 471. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

A special topic in music selected in consultation with and 
supervised by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study in Music (3) 

Required of all graduate music majors. Basic bibliography, 
literature, and research techniques and materials useful in 
graduate music study. 

524 Seminar in Music Theory (2) 

Theoretical subjects (form/style analysis, history of music 
theory, etc.) to be chosen by instructor. May be repeated for 
credit. 

551 Seminar in Music of the Medieval Period (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. The music forms, struc- 
tures and styles from 500 to 1450. Analysis of representative 
works and the contributions of individual composers and 
theoretical writers. 

552 Seminar in Music of the Renaissance (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The forms, styles, and 
development characteristics of music between 1450 and 
1600. Analysis of works by representative composers and 
theoretical writers. 

553 Seminar in Music of the Baroque Period (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 351 A,B or consent of Instructor. Musical 
forms, styles, and performance practices of the baroque 
period. Analysis of representative works. 

554 Seminar in Music of the Classic Period (3) 
Prerequisite: Music 351 A,B or consent of instructor. The his- 
tory and literature of music from approximately 1750 to 1825. 
Analysis of representative works. 

555 Seminar in Music of the Romantic Period (3) 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The structure and deve- 
lopment of music in the 19th century. Analysis of representa- 
tive works. 

556 Seminar in 20th-Century Music (3) 

Prerequisite: Music 351 A,B,C or consent of instructor. Deve- 
lopments In the music of western Europe and the western 
hemisphere since 1890. Contemporary music and its struc- 
ture. 

557 Seminar in Musicology (3) 

Prerequisites: at least two courses from Music 551-556 and 
consent of instructor. Detailed investigation and systematic 
analysis of specific developments in musicology. 

558 Collegium Musicum (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Advanced studies in the 
performance of rare and old music, which may include nota- 
tion, transcription, arranging, research, and performance. 
May be repeated for credit. 


559 Composer Studies (2) 

The life, times and musical style of a selected composer. A 
seminar for graduate students in music; lectures, discussion 
sessions and analytical projects. Open to seniors In music 
by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with 
different content. 

567 Seminar in Piano Pedagogy (3) 

Graduate level study of the advanced learning theories, mu- 
sical Issues, and pedagogical methods Involved In teaching 
piano through lectures, discussions and student presenta- 
tions. Practice teaching required. 

568 Advanced Studies in Group/Ciass Piano 
Pedagogy (3) 

Prerequisite: 467C or consent of instructor. Graduate level 
study of the advanced learning theories, musical Issues, and 
pedagogical methods Involved in teaching group/class 
piano through lectures, discussions and student presenta- 
tions. 

569 Seminar in Piano Concerti (3) 

Advanced study of piano concerti with performance and 
analysis by class members and lectures by the Instructor. 
Requirements can be met by performance and/or analysis. 

570 Seminar in Piano Literature (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 500 or consent of instructor. Advanced 
study of piano literature, with performances and analyses by 
class members and lectures by the instructor. Requirements 
can be met by performance and/or analysis. May be repeat- 
ed for credit. 

571 Individual Instruction (1-2) 

Prerequisite: jury recommendation. Individual instruction 
with approved instructor. Emphasis on performance tech- 
niques and repertoire. Required of all graduate students 
whose terminal project Is the graduate recital. May be re- 
peated for credit. 

591 Seminar in Advanced Choral Conducting and 
Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 391 B, conducting experience or consent 
of instructor. Choral conducting techniques. Lab work with 
student groups and concert conducting. May be repeated 
for credit when offered with different course content. 

592 Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Conducting and 
Interpretation (2) 

Prerequisites: Music 392B, keyboard facility for score read- 
ing and consent of Instructor. Conducting techniques. Inter- 
pretive problems of each period covered In lectures. May be 
repeated for credit. 

597 Project (3) 

Systematic study and report of a significant undertaking In 
the area of musical composition, musical performance, or 
other related creative activity. A written critical evaluation of 
the work or activity will be required. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Individual investigations of specific problems in the area of 
concentration by candidates for the M.A. degree. 


Music 


599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in music and consent of 
instructor. Research and study projects in areas of speciali- 
zation beyond regularly offered coursework. Oral and writ- 
ten reports required. 


Music Education Courses 

299 Clinical Practice in Instrumental/Chorai Techniques 
(1) 

Clinical practice and field applications of instrumental/cho- 
ral techniques classes, as in public and private schools. 
Coenrollment in Music 391 B or 392B recommended. (3 
hours weekly to be arranged in nearby school) 

342 Practicum in Schooi Materiais and Techniques (3) 

Corequisite: Music Education 3991 or 399V. For the music 
education major. Experience in the use of musical materials, 
conducting, organization and management. Observation 
and application of rehearsal and classroom techniques. 

3991 Clinicai Practice in Instrumental Conducting (1) 

Prerequisite: Music 299. Clinical practice and field applica- 
tions of concepts, materials and procedures as applied to 
field situations, as in public and private schools. Co-enroll- 
ment in Music Education 342. 

399V Clinical Practice in Choral Conducting (1) 

Prerequisite: Music 299. Clinical practice and field applica- 
tions of concepts, materiais and procedures as applied to 
field situations, as in public and private schools. Co-enroll- 
ment in Music Education 342. 

436 Orff Techniques for Children (3) 

Methods and techniques influenced by Carl Orff in teaching 
music for children. Rhythmic speech, song and movement. 
(2 hours lecture, 1 hour activity) 

441 Teaching General Music in Secondary Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education, senior stand- 
ing or consent of Instructor. Objectives, methods and 
materials for teaching general music or allied art-humanities 
classes in secondary schools, including their relationship to 
specialized instrumental and choral programs. Practical 
problems and field work are included. 

442 Principles and Methods of Teaching Music in the 
Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. History, princi- 
ples of public education, grades K-12, with emphasis on 
music. Philosophy, methods, materials and procedures for 
organizing and teaching music in elementary and secondary 
schools. Must take concurrently with Ed-TE 440F and 440S. 

449E Externship in Secondary Teaching (3) (Formerly 
449A) 

Must be taken concurrently with Music Education 442. For 
candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act credential. 
See description and prerequisite under Division of Teacher 
Education. 


4491 Internship in Secondary Teaching (10) (Formerly 
449A) 

For candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act creden- 
tial. See description and prerequisite under Division of 
Teacher Education. 

449S Seminar in Secondary Teaching (2) (Formerly 
449B) 

Must be taken concurrently with Music Education 4491. For 
candidates who have declared for the Ryan Act credential. 
See description and prerequisites under Division of Teacher 
Education. 

501 Contemporary Music Education (3) 

Recent innovations and overview of the history, philosophy 
and methodology of the art of teaching music. Trends and 
applications of educational theory in relation to the teaching 
of music. Required for M.A. in Music Education. 

530 Practicum of Research in Music Education (2) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing In music and completion of 
Music 500. Research techniques and procedures In music 
education. Research paper required. 

531 Foundations of Music Education (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 500. Philosophical and historical bases 
which have Influenced music education. Philosophic frames 
of leading educators. Contemporary trends. Prerequisite for 
ail graduate music education courses. 

532 Seminar in Music Education (2) 

The trends and application of educational theory in relation 
to the teaching of music in the public schools. 

536 Advanced Orff and Kodaiy Techniques (2) 

Prerequisite: Music 436 or consent of instructor. Separate 
study of both the Orff and Kodaiy approaches to teaching 
music. Open to music education majors with teaching expe- 
rience. 

541 Advanced General Music Methods (2) 

Open to music education majors with teaching experience. 
Teaching-learning strategies, curriculum appropriate for 
general music in grades K-8. 

542 Advanced Choral Techniques and Materials (2) 

Open to music education majors with teaching experience. 
Study of techniques and materials needed for successful 
junior high and secondary choral music programs. 

543 Advanced Instrumental Techniques and Materials (2) 

Open to music education majors with teaching experience. 
Study of techniques and materials needed for successful 
junior high and secondary instrumental music programs. 

545 Leadership in Music Education (2) 

Open to music education majors with teaching experience. 
Philosophy, principles and practices of leadership In music 
in the public elementary and secondary schools. Modern 
principles of leadership, types of services, organization, 
management and evaluation of programs of instruction. Re- 
quired for all graduate students specializing in supervisory- 
leadership roles in music education. 


Music 


Department of Theatre 


Department Chair: Joseph Arnold 
Department Office: Performing Arts 157 
Production Office: Performing Arts 126 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts In Theatre Arts 

History and Theory 

Professional Area of Concentration 

Teaching 

Master of Arts In Theatre Arts 

Acting and Directing 

Dramatic Literature and Criticism 

Oral Interpretation 

Playwriting 

Television 

Technical Theatre 

Theatre for Children 

Theatre History 

Master of Fine Arts In Theatre Arts 

Technical Theatre and Design 

Acting 

Directing 

Secondary Teaching Credential 
Faculty 

Barbara Arms, Joseph Arnold, Bob Christianson, Joel 
Fink, Don Finn, John Fisher, Susan Hallman, Donald 
Henry. Dean Hess, Lawrence Jasper, Robin Johnson, 
Jody Johnston, Gretchen Kanne, Alvin Keller, Gladys 
Kares, Araminta Little, Alex MacKenzIe, William Meyer, 
Sallle Mitchell, S. Todd Muffatti, Jerry Pickering, Jose 
Quintero (Distinguished Visiting Professor), Deborah 
Slate, Ron Wood, James Young, Allen Zeltzer 

INTRODUCTION 

The Department of Theatre undergraduate and graduate 
programs include the fields of playwriting, oral interpreta- 
tion, acting, directing, technical production and design, 
theatre history and theory, television, dance, theatre for 
children, musical theatre, and theatre education. Specifi- 
cally, the course work and theatrical production activities 
are arranged to provide opportunities for students (1) to 
develop an appreciation for theatre arts; (2) to become 
aware, as audience or participants, of the shaping force of 
theatre arts in society; (3) to Improve the knowledge and 
skills necessary for work in the theatrical arts as a profes- 
sion; (4) to pursue graduate studies; and (5) to prepare 
for teaching theatre. 


Theatre 


Public performance is at the center of the department’s 
programs. Therefore, continuing stage, dance and televi- 
sion production activities are essential for all students at 
California State University, Fullerton, including the under- 
graduate and graduate theoretical student as well as the 
undergraduate pre-professional and graduate conserva- 
tory student. In addition to the on-campus theatrical pro- 
duction activity, the Department of Theatre offers 
additional experience for actors, directors, dancers, cho- 
reographers, designers, technicians, playwrights, theatre 
managers, and theoreticians in its adjunct professional 
theatre companies: Cabaret Repertory Theatre and 
Dance Repertory Theatre. Both are made up of carefully 
selected California State University, Fullerton graduates 
and advanced theatre students, chosen on the basis of 
demonstrated excellence in their work at the university. 
Cabaret Repertory Theatre performs in the summer 
months off campus, and Dance Repertory Theatre per- 
forms at various times throughout the year on tours. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

Plan I is for those who wish to study theatre as a cultural 
contribution or who wish to pursue graduate degrees in 
theatre with emphasis In theatre history and theory. It Is 
strongly recommended that students electing this plan 
support the major with approved electives from art, music, 
foreign languages, literature, philosophy or speech. 

Plan II is designed to develop competency for pursuing 
the theatrical arts as a profession, or for pursuing gradu- 
ate degrees in theatre with an emphasis in an area of 
concentration other than history of the theatre. Areas of 
concentration are; playwriting; acting; directing; oral inter- 
pretation; television; technical theatre; dance; and musical 
theatre. 

Plan III meets the requirements of the teaching credential 
with specialization in secondary teaching. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, 
students must meet the other university requirements for 
a bachelor of arts degree. Students following Plan III must 
meet any specific requirements for the desired teaching 
credential. See description of secondary school teaching 
credential program under Division of Teacher Education. 
In addition. Plan III students should see the department’s 
secondary education adviser regarding course sequence 
required for the single subject waiver. Those students who 
plan to work on the M.A. degree as well as the credential 
should see the chair of the Department of Theatre. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree with a major in 
theatre, students must have a C or better in all theatre 
courses required for the degree. In addition to course 
requirements, all theatre majors will enroll for two units of 
Theatre 478B each semester of residency up to a max- 
imum of eight semesters. Students who wish to transfer, 
for credit in the major, courses equivalent to Theatre 200, 


276A,B, 277, 284 and 285 must pass a transfer equivalency 
examination in the specific courses. These examinations 
are administered at the beginning of each semester. Con- 
tact the Theatre Department office for the times at which 
the examinations will be administered. 

Theatre 200, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for all up- 
per-division theatre courses with the exception of Theatre 
478A,B. Transfer students may take Theatre 200 concur- 
rently with their first semeter of upper-division courses. 
Prior to entering their junior year, or upon transferring to 
Cal State Fullerton, all students electing Plan II concentra- 
tion in acting or dance will be evaluated and advised as 
to potential for advancement In the emphasis. Students in 
acting or dance who are admitted to the following inter- 
mediate and advanced level technique classes are re- 
quired to audition and be available for casting in ail 
Department of Theatre major productions appropriate to 
their emphasis: Theatre 212, 222, 312, 422 and 463A,B. 

Plan I: Theatre History and Theory Emphasis 

Lower Division: (15 units required) 

Theatre 110 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 
Theatre 200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 263 Acting (3) 

Theatre 276A Beginning Stagecraft (3) 

Theatre 277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Upper Division: (42 units required) 

Theatre 310 Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3) 
Theatre 364 Seminar in Playwriting (3) 

Theatre 370A Fundamentals of Directing (3) 

Theatre 377 Stage Costuming (3) 

Theatre 386 Beginning Lighting (3) 

Theatre 388 Historical Styles for Scene Design (3) 
Theatre 475A,B,C,D,E World Theatre (15) 

Theatre 477A,B Seminar in Critical Techniques (6) 
Electives (3) 

Plan II: Professional Emphasis In an Area of 
Concentration 

Playwriting — 

Lower Division: (18 units required) 

Theatre 110 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 
Theatre 200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 263 Acting (3) 

Theatre 276A Beginning Stagecraft (3) 

Theatre 277 Costume Fundamentals (3) or 
Theatre 288 Design for the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 284 Introduction to Television Production (3) 

Upper Division: (39 units required) 

Theatre 364 Seminar in Playwriting (3,3) 

Theatre 365 Television/Film Writing (3) 

Theatre 370A,B Fundamentals of Directing (6) 

Theatre 386 Beginning Lighting (3) 

Theatre 470A Advanced Directing (3) 


Theatre 


Theatre 475A,B,C,D World Theatre (12) 

Theatre 477A,B Seminar in Critical Techniques (6) 


Oral Interpretation — 

Lower Division: (20 units required) 


Theatre 110 
Theatre 200 
Theatre 241 
Theatre 251 
Theatre 263 
Theatre 276A 
Theatre 277 
Theatre 285 


Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 
Art of the Theatre (3) 

Voice Production (2) 

Body Movement for the Actor (3) 
Acting (3) 

Beginning Stagecraft (3) 

Costume Fundamentals (3) or 
Theatrical Makeup (3) 


Upper Division: (35 units required) 

Theatre 310 Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3) 
Theatre 341 Advanced Voice Production for the 
Performer (2) 

Theatre 370A Fundamentals of Directing (3) 

Theatre 410A,B,C Oral Interpretation of Prose, Poetry 
and Drama (9) 

Theatre 411 Oral Interpretation of Children’s Lit (3) 
Theatre 414 Readers Theatre (3) 

Theatre 475A,B,C,D World Theatre (12) 


Acting — 

Lower Division: (23 units required) 


Theatre 110 
Theatre 200 
Theatre 241 
Theatre 251 
Theatre 263 
Theatre 276A 
Theatre 277 
Theatre 285 


Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 
Art of the Theatre (3) 

Voice Production for the Performer (2) 
Body Movement for the Actor (3) 
Acting (3) 

Beginning Stagecraft (3) 

Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Theatrical Makeup (3) 


Upper Division: (35 units required) 

Theatre 310 Oral Interpretation of Shakespeare (3) 
Theatre 341 Advanced Voice Production for the 
Performer (2) 

Theatre 363A,B Intermediate Acting (6) 

Theatre 370A Fundamentals of Directing (3) 
Theatre 463A,B Advanced Acting (6) 

Theatre 475A.B.C,D World Theatre (12) 

Theatre 482 Acting for Film and Television (3) 

Directing — 

Lower Division: (24 units required) 


Theatre 350 Organization for Production (2) 

Theatre 370A,B Fundamentals of Directing (6) 

Theatre 384 Television Production and Direction (3) 
Theatre 386 Beginning Lighting (3) 

Theatre 450 Theatre Management (3) 

Theatre 470A,B Advanced Directing (6) 

Theatre 475A.B.C,D World Theatre (12) 

All theatre majors with an emphasis in directing must as- 
sistant stage manage a mainstage production either prior 
to or concurrently with Theatre 470A, Advanced Directing, 
and must stage manage a mainstage production prior to 
graduation. 

Television — 

Lower Division: (21 units required) 

Theatre 110 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 
Theatre 184 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 
Theatre 200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 263 Acting (3) 

Theatre 276A,B Beginning Stagecraft (6) 

Theatre 284 Introduction to Television Production (3) 


Upper Division: (36 units required) 


Theatre 365 Television/Film Writing (3) 

Theatre 370A Fundamentals of Directing (3) 

Theatre 384 Television Production and Direction (3) 
Theatre 386 Beginning Lighting (3) 

Theatre 475A,B,C,D or E World Theatre (6) 

Theatre 484 Television Dramatic Techniques (3) 
Theatre 490 Television/Film Aesthetics and Criticism 


(3) 

Theatre 494 Cable TV Production Workshop 
and 9 units electives selected from: 

Theatre 277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 
Theatre 285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 

Theatre 288 Design for the Theatre (3) 
Theatre 387 Audio Techniques (3) 

Theatre 486 Advanced Lighting (3) 


(3) 


Technical Production/Design — 

Lower Division: (21 units required) 


Theatre 200 Art of the Theatre (3) 
Theatre 263 Acting (3) 

Theatre 276A,B Beginning Stagecraft (6) 
Theatre 277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 
Theatre 285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 
Theatre 288 Design for the Theatre (3) 


Theatre 200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 263 Acting (3) 

Theatre 276A,B Beginning Stagecraft (6) 
Theatre 277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 
Theatre 284 Introduction to TV Production (3) 
Theatre 285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 

Theatre 288 Design for the Theatre (3) 

Upper Division: (35 units required) 


Upper Division: (38 units required) 


Theatre 350 
Theatre 370A 
Theatre 377 
Theatre 379 
Theatre 386 
Theatre 388 


Organization for Production (2) 
Fundamentals of Directing (3) 
Stage Costuming (3) 

Rendering for the Theatre (3) 
Beginning Lighting (3) 

Historical Styles for Scene Design 


(3) 


Theatre 


Theatre 
Theatre 
Theatre 
and 3 
Theatre 
Theatre 
Theatre 
Theatre 
Theatre 
Theatre 


475A, 

486 

488 

units 

284 

385 

387 

486 

487 

488 


B.C.D World Theatre (12) 

Advanced Lighting (3) 

Advanced Design and Technology (3) 
selected from: 

Introduction to Television Production (3) 
Advanced Theatrical Makeup (3) 

Audio Techniques (3) 

Advanced Lighting (3) 

Advanced Audio Techniques (3) 
Advanced Design and Technology (3) 


Dance — 


Music 361 D Opera Theatre (1) 

Music 365V Vocal Workshop (l-hl) 

Plan III: Teaching Emphasis (Single Subject) 

Lower Division: (18 units required) 

Theatre 200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 263 Acting (3) 

Theatre 276A Beginning Stagecraft (3) 

Theatre 277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Theatre 285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 

Theatre 288 Design for the Theatre (3) 


Lower Division: (25 units required) 


Upper Division: (29 units required) 


Theatre 

Theatre 

Theatre 

Theatre 

Theatre 

Theatre 

Theatre 

Theatre 

Theatre 


112 Beginning Classical Ballet (2) 
122A,B Beginning Modern Dance (4) 
126 Dance Improvisation (2) 

212 Intermediate Classical Ballet (2) 
222 Intermediate Modern Dance (3) 
226 Rhythmic Analysis (3) 

263 Acting (3) 

277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 


Theatre 350 Organization for Production (2) 
Theatre 370A,B Fundamentals of Directing (6) 
Theatre 386 Beginning Lighting (3) 

Theatre 402B Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 
Theatre 470A Advanced Directing (3) 

Theatre 475A,D,E World Theatre (9) 
and 3 units selected from: 

Theatre 410A,B or C Oral Interpretation of Prose 
Literature, Poetry, Drama (3) 


Upper Division: (34 units required) 

Theatre 312 Advanced Classical Ballet (3) 

Theatre 323A,B Dance Composition (6) 

Theatre 324 Forces and Figures in Dance (3) 
Theatre 372 Dance Kinesiology (3) 

Theatre 386 Beginning Lighting (3) 

Theatre 387 Audio Techniques (3) 

Theatre 422 Advanced Modern Dance (3) 

Theatre 423 Advanced Dance Composition (3) 
Theatre 424 Fundamentals of Dance Instruction (3) 
Theatre 493 Dance Repertory (3) 

Theatre 497 Production and Performance Projects in 
Theatre (1) 


Musical Theatre — 

Lower Division: (20 units required) 


Theatre 200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre 212 Intermediate Classical Ballet (2) 
Theatre 232 Intermediate Jazz Dance (2) 
Theatre 241 Voice Production (2) 

Theatre 263 Acting (3) 

Theatre 285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 

Music 111 A Diatonic Harmony (3) 

Music 183 * Voice Class (1) 

Music 184A * Plano Class (1) 

* or equivalent 


Upper Division: (36 units required) 

Theatre 332 Advanced Jazz Dance (3) 

Theatre 336A,B Dance for Musical Theatre (6) 
Theatre 363A,B Intermediate Acting (6) 
Theatre 436A,B Musical Theatre Workshop (6) 
Theatre 475 World Theatre (A,B,C, or D) (9) 
Theatre 475E World Theatre (3) 


Theatre Education majors are required to complete the 
Waiver Program in English. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 

The Master of Arts In Theatre Arts provides a program of 
coordinated graduate studies built on undergraduate 
preparation; incentive for intellectual growth reflected in 
teaching and professional recognition; and a sound basis 
for continued graduate study In theatre. The student Is 
expected to demonstrate a high degree of intellectual and 
creative competence and to demonstrate mastery of one 
of the areas of emphasis in theatre: (1 ) acting and direct- 
ing, (2) dance, (3) dramatic literature and criticism, (4) 
oral Interpretation, (5) playwriting, (6) television, (7) 
theatre for children, (8) theatre history, (9) technical 
theatre. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified 

University requirements include a baccalaureate from an 
accredited institution and a grade-point average of at least 
2.5 in the last 60 semeter units attempted (see section of 
this catalog on admission of graduates for complete state- 
ment and procedures) . 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the admission requirements and the 
following requirements may be granted classified gradu- 
ate standing upon the development of an approved study 
plan: an appropriate undergraduate major in theatre, with 
a grade-point average of 3.0 in ail upper-division work in 
the major, or at least 24 units of appropriate upper-division 
work In theatre, with a G PA of 3.0; Theatre 477 A, Senior 
Seminar in Critical Techniques, or in the case of transfer 
students. Its equivalent; satisfactory completion of the 


Theatre 


Graduate Writing Requirement; and, an oral interview. 
Upon recommendation of the student’s graduate commit- 
tee, additional prerequisites, including auditions for the 
M.A. concentration in dance, may be required prior to 
classification and the approval of the area of emphasis. 

Study Plan 

The study plan will include at least 30 units of adviser- 
approved graduate studies, 15 units of which must be 
500-ievel courses. Each program will have 24 units in 
theatre, including a core of nine units (Theatre 500, Intro- 
duction to Graduate Study — which must be taken In the 
first semester of graduate study; Theatre 501, Advanced 
Theatre Theory; Theatre 597, Project, or Theatre 598, The- 
sis) and six units of adviser-approved supporting courses 
in related fields, either in other departments or within the 
Theatre Department. Before the degree is granted, each 
student will pass oral and written examinations. Students 
will be permitted to take the written examination twice. 

For further Information, consult the Department of 
Theatre. 

MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN THEATRE ARTS 
(TECHNICAL THEATRE/DESIGN, ACTING AND 
DIRECTING) 

This degree is for students who wish professionally orient- 
ed education and training in design/technical theatre, act- 
ing, and directing. It is the objective of the department to 
educate and train highly skilled, motivated individuals for 
careers in professional theatre (Including television and 
film) or for careers as artist-teachers in college or univer- 
sity theatre. Only those who demonstrate an exceptional 
talent, a high degree of motivation, and a deep commit- 
ment to their education and training will be admitted into 
the program. The highest academic and creative stand- 
ards will be demanded throughout the program. A positive 
attitude and a rigid sense of theatre discipline are essen- 
tial for success In the program. 

The degree requires 60 units of approved course work. 
Average length of time to complete the program is two 
years. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Ciassified 

Prerequisites for admission to the program and granting of 
classified standing are: 

1. B.A., B.F.A. or M.A. from an accredited college or uni- 
versity with a major in theatre; or a degree in a related 
field and extensive work in technical theatre, acting, or 
directing. 

2. Completion of an oral interview and satisfactory review 
of the student’s portfolio or audition. 

3. Acceptance by the faculty. 

4. Minimum GPA of 3.0 in all upper-division undergraduate 
work in theatre. A minimum GPA of 2.75 for the last half 
of the undergraduate program is also required. 

5. Completion of any additional prerequisites which may 
be required by the student’s Individual committee prior 


to classification. 

6. Selection of a graduate adviser and committee. Total 
committee membership should be three or four faculty 
members, including the adviser. 

7. Submission of a formal M.F.A. study program approved 
by the Individual committee, the department graduate 
adviser and the dean of graduate studies. 

8. Must meet the Graduate Writing Requirement. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionaiiy 
Ciassified 

Students who do not meet certain prerequisites may be 
considered for admission in conditionally classified gradu- 
ate standing. Consult the graduate program adviser. 

M.F.A. Project 

The M.F.A. program shall be culminated by two creative 
projects which, by their nature, are of sufficient challenge 
and complexity to be accepted as worthy completion of 
the two-year period of study. These projects, which shall 
be comparable to a professional undertaking, are deter- 
mined by the individual committee and shall be design, 
acting or directing assignments for major productions. 
Each project shall be reviewed by the Individual commit- 
tee within two weeks after completion. If accepted, the 
student shall submit a project book on one of these as- 
signments within a specified time. Before the degree is 
granted, each student will pass an oral examination over 
the project book. 

Study Plan — Technical Theatre/Design 

Students should concentrate their activities in two of the 
following four technical theatre areas during their two year 
course of study: scene design, costume design-makeup. 


lighting-sound, and technical production. 

Course Requirements * Units 

Take all of the following: 9 

Theatre 477A Senior Seminar In Critical Tech (3) 
Theatre 500 Introduction to Graduate Study (3) 
Theatre 575 Seminar in Theatre History (3) 

Take nine units in the following: 9 


Theatre 566 Graduate Seminar: Stagecraft (3) 
Theatre 577 Graduate Seminar: Costuming (3) 
Threatre 578 Graduate Seminar: Scene Design (3) 
Theatre 586 Graduate Seminar: Lighting (3) 


Take the following each semester: 24 

Theatre 588 Design and Tech Theatre (6) 

Choose 12 adviser-approved units from 
technical courses In theatre, art or 

engineering 12 

Complete a creative project in two of the four 
technical areas: Theatre 597 Project (3) .... 3 

Total 60 


Theatre 


study Plan — Acting 

Course Requirements * 

Take all of the following: 39 

Theatre 443 Audition and Rehearsal 
Processes (3) 

Theatre 477A Seminar in Critical 
Techniques (3) 

Theatre 500 Intro to Graduate Studies (3) 

Theatre 563 Acting Studio (24) 

Theatre 575 Seminar in Theatre History (3) 

Theatre 583 Graduate Seminar: Acting (3) 

Take one of the following: 3 

Theatre 436A Musical Theatre Workshop (3) 
Theatre 436B Musical Theatre Workshop (3) 
Theatre 482 Acting for Film and Television (3) 
Theatre 483 Advanced Acting Workshop (3) 


Take dance elective (3) 3 

Take 9 units adviser-approved electives 9 

Complete two creative projects: 

Theatre 597 Project (6) 6 

Total 60 

Study Plan — Directing 

Course Requirements * Units 

Take all of the following: 48 


Theatre 436A Musical Theatre Workshop (3) 
Theatre 470A Advanced Directing (3) 

Theatre 470B Advanced Directing (3) 

Theatre 477A Seminar in Critical Tech (3) 
Theatre 484 Television Dramatic Tech (3) 
Theatre 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies (3) 
Theatre 563 Acting Studio (6) 

Theatre 570 Styles of Directing (12) 

Theatre 575 Seminar: Theatre History (3) 

Theatre 597 Graduate Project (6) 

Theatre 599 Independent Research (3) 


Take 12 units adviser-approved electives 12 

Total 60 


Based on a student’s previous undergraduate or professional experience, substitu- 
tions or revisions in the study plan might be appropriate. 


Theatre Courses 

100 Introduction to the Theatre (3) 

For the general student leading to an appreciation and un- 
derstanding of the theatre as an entertainment medium and 
as an art form. Recommended for non-majors. 

101 Introduction to Dance (3) 

Historical and contemporary dance forms. Experiences in 
various dance forms such as ballet, modern, jazz, folk, Afro, 
mime. Recommended for non-majors. 


110 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3) 

The analysis and performance of literature by the interpret- 
er. 

112 Beginning Classical Ballet (2) 

The fundamental structure and technique or classical ballet. 
May be repeated once for credit. (4 hours activity) 

122A,B Beginning Modern Dance (2,2) 

Prerequisites: A is prerequisite to B. A—Exploration and 
manipulation of the Instrument and materials of dance; 
development of aesthetic judgment. (4 hours activity) B— 
Expansion of A via more complex technique and composi- 
tion studies; development of performance quality. May be 
repeated once for credit. (4 hours activity) 

126 Dance Improvisation (2) 

Theory and practice of improvisation in movement. Practical 
use of improvisation in expressing imagery, developing 
choreographic concepts, and enhancing performance. (4 
hours activity) 

132 Beginning Jazz Dance (2) 

Modern jazz dance techniques and basic jazz choreogra- 
phy. (4 hours activity) 

142 Beginning Tap Dance (2) 

Structure and technique of tap dance and tap choreography. 
(4 hours activity) 

163 Beginning Acting (3) 

The form and content of acting: Improvisation, action, moti- 
vation, and behavior. Recommended for non-majors. (6 
hours activity) 

175 History of Western Theatre (3) 

A survey of theatre and Western civilization from the classi- 
cal Greeks to the moderns. Recommended for non-majors. 

180 Great Moments in Radio and TV (3) 

Presentation and analysis of radio and television programs 
from 1926 to the present, including guest artists from the 
radio and television industry. 

184 Introduction to Radio and Television (3) 

The broadcasting industry and its impact and influence on 
our society. Broadcasting practices, audiences, production 
and programming. 

200 Art of the Theatre (3) 

Theatre as an art form, Involving the interrelated processes 
of playwriting, directing, acting, design and theatre manage- 
ment. Study of current plays, films and television with em- 
phasis on dramatic analysis and cultural significance. 
Required of all theatre majors. 

206, AB Mime and Pantomime (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 206A is prerequisite for 206B. Individ- 
ual development of creative skill In mime and pantomime. (6 
hours activity) 

212 Intermediate Classical Ballet (2) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 112 and audition. Intermediate level 
technique of classical ballet. May be repeated once for cred- 
it. (4 hours activity) 


Theatre 


222 Intermediate Modern Dance (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 122 and audition. Intermediate mod- 
ern dance and movement vocabulary in terms of composi- 
tion and communication. May be repeated for credit. (6 
hours activity) 

226 Rhythmic Analysis (3) 

Musical form and structure; musically notating dance 
rhythms and percussion accompaniment. 

232 Intermediate Jazz Dance (2) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 132 and consent of instructor. Inter- 
mediate level skills in jazz technique and choreography. (4 
hours activity) 

241 Voice Production for the Performer (2) 

Use of voice in the theatre. Correction of speech faults and 
regional accents. Study of basic interpretive material. (4 
hours activity) 

242 Intermediate Tap Dance (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 142 or consent of instructor. Intermedi- 
ate skills in tap technique and choreography. (4 hours activ- 
ity) 

251 Body Movement for the Actor (3) 

The body as an expressive instrument; acquiring of strength, 
flexibility, relaxation, control. The relationship of the body to 
the creative project. May be repeated for credit. (6 hours 
activity) 

263 Acting (3) 

Improvisations, exercises, and techniques of acting for the 
stage. Motivation and behavior in characterization. (6 hours 
activity) 

276A,B Beginning Stagecraft (3,3) 

Prerequisite: 276A is prerequisite to B. A— Planning and con- 
struction of stage and television scenery. Use of tools and 
stage equipment. B— Drafting and reading of technical 
drawings. Work in the scene shop for department produc- 
tions is required for A and B. (6 hours activity) 

277 Costume Fundamentals (3) 

Costuming theatrical and television productions. Construc- 
tion techniques, organization and duties of the costume 
crew. (6 hours activity) 

284 Introduction to Television Production (3) 

The fundamentals of production for television. (6 hours ac- 
tivity) 

285 Theatrical Makeup (3) 

Makeup for stage and television. Individual skill in character 
analysis, application In pigment, plastic, hair, makeup, and 
selection and use of makeup equipment. (6 hours activity) 

288 Design for the Theatre (3) 

Scene design, including script analysis, formation of visual 
concepts, floor plan development and model building for 
stage and television. (6 hours activity) 

310 Orai interpretation of Shakespeare (3) 

Development of techniques for oral interpretation of Sha- 
kespeare with special emphasis on the problems of verse. 


312 Advanced Classical Ballet (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 212 and audition. Stylization and per- 
formance of classical ballet. May be repeated once for cred- 
it. (6 hours activity) 

322 Partnering Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: intermediate level in dance technique and 
consent of the instructor. The application of professional 
theories and principles of interrelationships In modern 
dance and ballet, Including concepts of balance, counter- 
weight and lifting. May be repeated once for credit. (6 hours 
activity) 

323A,B Dance Composition (3,3) 

A— Prerequisites: Theatre 122, 126, or equivalents. Study of 
basic elements and forms of dance composition. B— Pre- 
requisite: Theatre 323A or consent of Instructor. Problem 
solving studies in space, time, and energy, using choreo- 
graphic devices In solo and group situations. Final project 
required. (6 hours activity) 

324 Forces and Figures in Dance (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A history of dance from 
primitive times to the present. 

332 Advanced Jazz Dance (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 232 and consent of instructor. Ad- 
vanced jazz techniques and choreography through grade 
three of professional jazz dance. The relation of jazz to other 
forms of dance. (6 hours activity) 

336A,B Dance for Musical Theatre (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 112, 132, and audition, or consent of 
instructor. 336A is prerequisite to 336B. Dance utilized in 
musical theatre. A— Ensemble and individual approaches to 
the style. B— Choreography for musical theatre. (6 hours 
activity) 

341 Advanced Voice Production for the Performer (2) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 241. Intensive individual voice and 
speech training for the actor and oral interpreter. Projects 
involving theatrical material will focus on specific problems. 
May be repeated for credit. (4 hours activity) 

343 Dialects for Actors (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 241 or consent of instructor. Dialects 
and accents for theatrical performance. Source materials, 
analysis, and application to scripted material. (6 hours activ- 
ity) 

350 Organization for Production (2) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 370A. Backstage management, Includ- 
ing interrelationships of production personnel for stage and 
television. 

363A,B Intermediate Acting and Characterization (3,3) 
Prerequisites: Theatre 241 , 251 , 263 and audition. Characteri- 
zation; roles, special problems, and application of acting 
techniques through exercises and two-character scenes 
from the contemporary theatre. (6 hours activity) 

364 Seminar in Playwriting (3) 

Prerequisites: evidence of interest in creative writing and 
consent of instructor. Study of superior models, develop- 


Theatre 


merit of style, and group criticism and evaluation of inde- 
pendent work, as it relates to playwriting. May be repeated 
for credit. 

365 Television/Film Writing (3) 

The writing of scripts and other forms of continuity for televi- 
sion/film. May be repeated for credit. 

370A,B Fundamentals of Directing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 263, or consent of instructor. 370A is 
prerequisite to B. Prerehearsal problems and procedures, 
structural analysis of plays, composition, picturization, pan- 
tomimic dramatization, movement and rh^hm on stage and 
in television. Practice in directing scenes. (6 hours activity) 

372 Dance Kinesiology (3) 

Structural aspects of the human body and factors that affect 
movement in dance. 

377 Stage Costuming (3) 

Fashions and textiles of major historical periods, methods of 
research; interpretation and communication of historical 
dress for theatrical statement. 

379 Rendering for the Theatre (3) 

Scenic and costume sketching and rendering for communi- 
cation between production director and designers. Full scale 
costume and scenic painting required. Theoretical and actu- 
al production idea presentation and execution. (6 hours ac- 
tivity) 

381 Radio and Television Announcing (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 110. Control room operation, including 
practice in microphone and camera techniques. (6 hours 
activity) 

384 Television Production and Direction (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 284. Theory and practice in the pro- 
duction of television programs and announcements: the 
planning, organizing, directing, rehearsing, performing, re- 
cording and editing of television programs and announce- 
ments. (6 hours activity) 

385 Advanced Theatre Makeup (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 285. Problems in makeup including 
special techniques and materials: prosthetics, hairpieces, 
and masks for stage and television productions. (6 hours 
activity) 

386 Beginning Lighting (3) 

Theories of lighting for stage and television productions. (6 
hours activity) 

387 Audio Techniques (3) 

Practice necessary to Integrate live and recorded sound Into 
performing arts productions. Recording, reproduction and 
studio techniques. (6 hours activity) 

388 Historical Styles for Scene Design (3) 

Visual survey through lecture and slides of architecture. In- 
terior design and furniture from ancient to modern times. 
Provides necessary basis for advanced design course. 

400 Theatre Internship (3) 

Consent of appropriate faculty supervisor. Supervised work 
experience in all areas of theatre to expand the dimensions 


of the classroom by integrating the formal academic training 
with direct application. Periodic seminar meetings to discuss 
work. 

402A,B Dramatic Activities for Children (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Creative dramatics as a 
tool for building and developing creative and socialized 
processes in children. A— Sense memory, movement/ 
mime, dialogue, characterization, dramatization. B-Teach- 
ing techniques including concentration. Imagination, dra- 
matization, and improvisation for older children. (6 hours 
activity) 

403A,B Theatre for Children (3,3) 

Prerequisite: 403A prerequisite for 403B or consent of In- 
structor. Theatrical production for an audience of children. 
A—Philosophy, theory and practice; B— Application of pro- 
duction principles. (6 hours activity) 

410A Oral Interpretation of Prose Literature (3) 

Criticism and performance In the oral interpretation of prose 
literature. 

410B Oral Interpretation of Poetry (3) 

Criticism and performance In the oral interpretation of po- 
etry. 

410C Oral Interpretation of Drama (3) 

Criticism and performance in the oral Interpretation of 
drama. 

411 Oral Interpretation of Children’s Literature (3) 

Oral presentation of children’s literature In classroom, recre- 
ation and home situations including individual and group 
performance of fiction, non-fiction, fantasy and poetry. 

412 Classical Pointe (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 312 and consent of Instructor. Tech- 
niques for performance of classical pointe. May be repeated 
once for credit. (6 hours activity) 

414 Readers Theatre (3) 

The interpretation of literature in the medium of readers 
theatre. May be repeated for credit. 

422 Advanced Modern Dance (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 222 and audition. Advanced level 
skills in modern dance. Emphasis on individual techniques. 
May be repeated for credit. (6 hours activity) 

423 Advanced Dance Composition (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 323A,B or equivalent. Elements and 
forms in dance composition. The choreographing of dances 
of concert quality. (6 hours activity) 

424 Fundamentals of Dance Instruction (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 112, 222, 226, 323A, 372, and consent 
of instructor. Philosophies, techniques and methods for de- 
veloping progressions in dance instruction. 

436A,B Musical Theatre Workshop (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 363A, 336A,B, and audition. Theatre 
436A prerequisite to B. Roles and excerpts from musical 
theatre: the musical, dramatic, language and dance tech- 
niques. Scenes and musical numbers in workshop. A— 
Large group and solo work. B— Small group and audition 
material preparation. (6 hours activity) 


Theatre 


443 Audition and Rehearsal Processes (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 363A,B. Auditioning and rehearsal 
processes for professional work in theatre, television and 
film. Includes techniques for selecting material and perform- 
ance preparation. (6 hours activity) 

450 Theatre Management (3) 

Organizational principles of front-of-house and box office 
operation. Participation in School of the Arts public presen- 
tations. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours activity) 

463A,B Advanced Acting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 310, Theatre 363A,B and audition. 
Historical theories and techniques of styles of acting. A— 
Greek through renaissance periods. ^The neoclassic 
periods to contemporary styles. (6 hours activity) 

470A,B Advanced Directing (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 288, 350, and 370A,B, or consent of 
instructor. Readings in theory, analysis of scripts and prac- 
tice in directing plays for their oral and visual value as 
theatre. A— Each student directs a one-act play. B— Each 
student directs two one-act plays or equivalent. (6 hours 
activity) 

471 Creative Dance for Children (3) 

Methods and materials for teaching creative dance/ move- 
ment to children. Interrelated arts techniques (movement, 
music, drama, visual art) for teaching in the classroom and 
the dance class. (6 hours activity) 

475A,B,C,D,E World Theatre (3,3,3,3,3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing. The historical and dra- 
matic evolution of world theatre. A— Ancient Greece and 
Rome, Middle Ages; Italian renaissance; B— England from 
1553-1790; 16th- and 17th-century Spain and France; C— 
18th- and 19th-century Europe and Russia; 19th-century 
England; D— 18th- and 19th-century America; the Orient; the 
modern world; E— Historical background and contemporary 
view of the musical theatre. 

477A,B Senior Seminar In Critical Techniques (3,3) 

Theatre 477A or consent of Instructor prerequisite to B. A— 
Major critical theories in theatre. B— Application of critical 
theories to local dramatic productions. Theatre 477B fulfills 
the course requirement of the university upper-division bac- 
calaureate writing requirement for theatre arts majors. 

478A,B Production and Performance (2,2) 

A— Acting in stage or television performances. B— Techni- 
cal crew work on stage or television performances. One 
section of 478B per semester required of all theatre majors 
as well as non-majors cast in theatre department produc- 
tions. (More than 6 hours activity) 

462 Acting for Film and Television (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 363A,B. The adaptation of stage 
techniques for the camera; audition, rehearsal, and final 
performance, utilizing videotape and studio equipment. (6 
hours activity) 


463 Advanced Acting Workshop (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 463A,B and audition. Extensive scene 
study, based on particular needs and problem areas of the 
advanced acting student. Rotating study with three instruc- 
tors in acting, culminating in joint monthly workshop ses- 
sions and final semester workshop presentation. (6 hours 
activity) 

464 Television Dramatic Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 384 and consent of instructor. Tech- 
niques of production for the director, actor and designer In 
televised drama. (6 hours activity) 

466 Advanced Lighting (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 386 or consent of Instructor. Design 
and technology of lighting for the stage and television. (6 
hours activity) 

467 Advanced Audio Techniques (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 387 or consent of instructor. Advanced 
problems in the design and technology of live and recorded 
sound used in the performing arts. (6 hours activity) 

466 Advanced Design and Technology (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 276A,B, 277, 288 and consent of In- 
structor. Advanced design, coordination of scenery and/or 
costume design projects for various types of theatres and 
television. 

490 Televislon/Fllm Aesthetics and Criticism (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 384 or consent of Instructor. The na- 
ture of film and television; aesthetic and theoretical and 
critical bases for film and television evaluation and under- 
standing. 

493 Dance Repertory and Performance (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 212 and 322. Learning and rehearsing 
choreography of established and/or new dance works with 
performance intent. May be repeated for credit. (6 hours 
activity) 

494 Cable Television Production Workshop (3) 

Prerequisites: six units of television production and consent 
of instructor. Practical experience in the creation of full- 
length television dramatic productions for cable broadcast- 
ing. May be repeated for credit. (6 hours activity) 

497 Production and Performance Projects In Theatre 
(1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and consent of in- 
structor; application form with appropriate signatures must 
be on file in department office prior to registration. Projects 
which culminate In production or performance. May be re- 
peated for credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and consent of In- 
structor; application form with appropriate signatures must 
be on file in department office prior to registration. Under- 
graduate research projects. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Study In Theatre (3) 

Methodological problems in graduate research. Location of 
source materials, including library and original data; interpre- 


Theatre 


tation of research and practice in scholarly writing. Must be 
taken the first semester after admission to graduate study. 

501 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Theatre Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 500. Directed research; the relation- 
ship between historical backgrounds and developments in 
the theatre and the student’s area of concentration. 

503 Graduate Seminar: Theatre for Children (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 403A or consent of instructor. Philoso- 
phies, theories, techniques and trends of the art of theatre 
for children. Problems related to the use of materials in 
educational, community and professional children’s 
theatres. 

510 Graduate Seminar: Oral Interpretation (3) 

Historical and philosophical development of oral Interpreta- 
tion and its relationship to contemporary theory and prac- 
tice. 

523 Graduate Projects in Choreography (3) 

Prerequisite: Theatre 423 or consent of instructor. Experi- 
ments In choreography using Improvisation and Innovative 
composition techniques. Environmental and sensorial ex- 
periences and studies in creativity and perception. 

550 Production Planning in Theatre Arts (3) 

Production problems in theatre arts. Planning the production 
within the limitations of budgets and physical facilities. 

563 Acting Studio (6) 

Prerequisite: audition. Re-creation and Interpretation of 
roles utilizing period and contemporary dramatic literature, 
interrelating voice, movement, characterization and period 
style acting. Enrollment limited to M.F.A. students. 

566 Graduate Seminar: Stagecraft (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced theories in the 
preparation and installation of scenery for theatrical produc- 
tion; engineering drawings, exploration of materials, and re- 
search into new methods of theatre technology. May be 
repeated for credit up to six units. 

570 Styles of Directing (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 470A,B and 475A,B,C,D, or consent of 
instructor. Research in theories of directing styles and prac- 
tice in directing period plays. Each student will direct scenes 
for workshop performance in Greek tragedy and comedy, 
Roman comedy, Elizabethan and Jacobean tragedy and 
comedy. Restoration and 18th-century comedy, French neo- 
classical comedy, melodrama, or drama of language/idea. 
May be repeated for credit. 

573 Seminar in Dramatic Literature (3) 

Directed research and criticism in the examination of contri- 
butions of major dramatists or dramatic genres. Emphasis 
on dramatic analysis. Topic will vary from semester to se- 
mester. May be repeated for credit. 

575 Seminar in Theatre History (3) 

Directed research and criticism In the examination of a sig- 
nificant historical period or movement In theatre history. 
Topic will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated 
for credit. 


577 Graduate Seminar. Costuming (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Costume production 
problems and their solutions. Examination of specific de- 
signers, past and present. Research In practical methods of 
interpreting the designer’s sketch. May be repeated for 
credit up to six units. 

578 Graduate Seminar: Scene Design (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Scenic design projects 
involving in-depth production style and scheme develop- 
ment. May be repeated for credit up to six units. 

580 Seminar in Piay Directing in Secondary Schools (3) 
Prerequisites: Theatre 370A,B, 470A,B or consent of Instruc- 
tor. An exploration of the problems unique to staging dra- 
matic productions on the secondary level. Includes such 
topics as time restrictions, appropriate scripts, disciplinary 
problems, faculty and administrative support. 

583 Graduate Seminar. Acting (3) 

Prerequisites: Theatre 463A,B. Investigation and delineation 
of current acting methods as techniques for solving prob- 
lems presented by popular dramatic literature. Development 
of a personal acting philosophy and methodology. May be 
repeated once for credit. 

586 Graduate Seminar: Lighting Design (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Advanced theoretical 
lighting design projects. Production problems and their solu- 
tions. Examination of specific designers, past and present. 
May be repeated for credit up to six units. 

588 Graduate Projects in Design and Technical Theatre 
( 6 ) 

Theoretical projects and designs for productions prior to 
final projects. Faculty and student critiques. Tailored to indi- 
vidual student needs. Enrollment limited to M.F.A. students. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor, student’s graduate 
committee and department executive committee. Develop- 
ment and presentation of a creative project beyond regularly 
offered coursework. May be repeated for credit up to six 
units. Student must complete course application form by the 
end of the seventh week of the semester preceding that in 
which the work is to be done. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: consent of student’s graduate committee; ap- 
plication form with appropriate signatures must be on file in 
department office prior to registration. Development and 
presentation of a thesis in the student’s area of concentra- 
tion. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of student’s graduate committee and 
instructor; application form with appropriate signatures must 
be on file in department office prior to registration. Research 
in theatre. May be repeated for credit. 


Theatre 


Theatre Education Courses 

442 Teaching Theatre in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, 
methods and materials for teaching in the secondary school. 


449E Externship in Secondary Teaching (3) (Formerly 
449A) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

4491 Internship in Secondary Teaching (10) (Formerly 
449A) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 

449S Seminar in Secondary Teaching (2) (Formerly 
449B) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 


Theatre 


School of Business 
Administration and 

Economics 


Dean: Thomas L. Brown 
Associate Dean: Ken Goldin 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts In Business Administration 

Concentrations in: 

Accounting 
Business Economics 
Finance 
Management 

Management Information Systems 
Management Science 
Marketing 

Bachelor of Arts In Economics 

Bachelor of Arts In International Business 

Concentrations in: 

French 

German 

Spanish 

Other Languages 

Minor In Business Administration 
Minor in Economics 

Minor in Management Information Systems 
Master of Science in Accountancy 

Master of Business Administration 

Concentrations in: 

Accounting 
Business Economics 
Finance 

International Business 
Management 
Management Science 
Marketing 

Master of Arts in Economics 

Master of Science in Management Science 

Master of Science in Taxation 


189 


INTRODUCTION 

Programs of study in the School of Business Administra- 
tion and Economics equip men and women with the intel- 
lectual and professional tools needed to assume 
responsible positions in business, industry, education, 
government, and social service. The school offers a broad 
exposure to business administration and economics. Be- 
havioral and quantitative sciences are studied In both the- 
oretical and applied contexts. Mathematics is used as a 
key tool in the analysis of complex problems and in the 
interpretation of data. Emphasis is placed on effective 
communication, both oral and written. Students are made 
aware of the need for imaginative, innovative solutions to 
business problems that encompass human needs and 
ethical objectives. 

The school also offers the opportunity to develop techni- 
cal expertise in a chosen discipline at a beginning profes- 
sional level acceptable to prospective employers. Seven 
concentrations are offered within the business administra- 
tion major as well as an economics major, an International 
business major and a business education credential pro- 
gram. 

The School of Business Administration and Economics 
offers the only programs in Orange County accredited by 
the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Busi- 
ness. Accreditation assures a rigorous course of study 
covering the full spectrum of business administration. It 
also indicates a well-qualified faculty, high standards for 
students, and access to an extensive library system. 

Preparation for Undergraduate Degree Programs 

Algebra and geometry are necessary for many required 
business courses. The equivalent of three years of high 
school mathematics, including a second course in alge- 
bra, is the prerequisite for the required Math 135, Business 
Calculus. Students without the necessary background 
should enroll in Math 100, Precalculus Mathematics. 

Proficiency In written English is necessary to pass the Cal 
State Fullerton Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP) 
and the required course Business Administration 301, 
Business Writing. Students without adequate writing skills 
should enroll In Communications 103, Applied Writing; 
English 101, Beginning College Writing; English 106, Writ- 
ing for ESL Students; Foreign Language Education 
105A,B, English as a Second Language; or Business Ad- 
ministration 301, Business Writing. 

Business students are encouraged to take courses in 
sociology, psychology, anthropology, speech communica- 
tion, political science, history, philosophy, geography and 
foreign languages. Many courses in these fields may be 
used to meet the general education requirement. For the 
international business degree, intermediate level compe- 
tency in a foreign language, equivalent to Foreign Lan- 
guage 204 courses, is prerequisite to the required 
concentration courses. It is strongly recommended that 


students planning to major in international business com- 
plete a minimum of three years of foreign language study 
while in high school. 

Transfer Credit for Business and Economics 
Courses 

Students should see an adviser immediately regarding 
transfer credit. Lower-division courses taken at four-year 
institutions and all courses taken at two-year colleges may 
be used to satisfy only lower-division (i.e., 100 and 200 
level) requirements at the university. Upper-division 
courses taken at four-year institutions may be used to 
satisfy upper division (i.e., 300 and 400 level) require- 
ments at the university. Lists of approved courses are 
available in the Business Advising Center; other courses 
are subject to approval by the department chair con- 
cerned. In all cases, courses must be transferred from an 
appropriately accredited institution. In most cases, 
courses taken in the extension division of a university, or 
by correspondence, are not acceptable. If the institution 
is located outside the Southern California area, the stu- 
dent should supply catalog descriptions, course outlines 
and textbook titles. 

Supplemental Admissions Requirements 

Due to a large demand and limited resources, the under- 
graduate business administration major is impacted, and 
it is not possible to accept all applicants. Applications are 
accepted only during November (for the following fall se- 
mester) and during August (for the following spring se- 
mester). For a copy of the supplemental admission 
criteria, consult the Business Advising Center. 

Business Advising Center 
Langsdorf Hall, Room 706 

Undergraduate Program Advising 

The Business Advising Center serves business adminis- 
tration, economics and international business majors. In- 
formation is available on admissions, curriculum and 
graduation requirements, as well as on registration and 
grading procedures, residence and similar academic mat- 
ters. Transfer students should see an adviser immediately 
regarding transfer credit For information on general edu- 
cation, consult the Academic Advisement Center In the 
Humanities Building. 

Graduate Program Advising 

The graduate adviser (in the Business Advising Center) 
provides academic advising for the graduate programs in 
accountancy, business administration, economics, man- 
agement science and taxation, information is available on 
admissions, curriculum and graduation requirements, as 
well as on registration and grading procedures, residence 
and similar academic matters. Students also should con- 
sult the faculty coordinators for the programs in account- 
ancy, economics, management science and taxation. 


School of Business Administration and Economics 


Internships and Cooperative Education 

Students may earn academic credit, first-hand work expe- 
rience and financial remuneration as well. Opportunities 
exist in accounting and auditing; cost-benefit analysis and 
econometrics; finance and real estate; insurance and 
banking; management and industrial relations; marketing, 
sales and advertising; and business data systems. For 
more information, consult the Internship adviser in your 
department or in the Center for Internships and Coopera- 
tive Education. 

Student Organizations 

Chapters of the following national honor societies have 
been established on campus with membership open to 
qualified students: Beta Alpha Psi (accounting), Beta 
Gamma Sigma (business), Financial Management As- 
sociation Honor Society (finance), Omicron Delta Epsilon 
(economics). Phi Kappa Phi (all-campus). Pi Sigma Epsi- 
lon (marketing) . In addition there are the following depart- 
mentally affiliated clubs which students are encouraged to 
join: Accounting Society, AIESEC, Circle K (manage- 
ment) , Data Processing Management Association, Eco- 
nomics Association, Finance Association, International 
Business Students Association, Marketing Club, Person- 
nel and Industrial Relations Association, Personnel Man- 
agement Association of Aztian, Rho Epsilon (real 
estate-finance). Securities and Investment Association, 
Society for the Advancement of Management and The 
Institute of Management Science. 

Prizes in Business Administration and Economics 

Stephen J. Barres Leadership Award 

Theodore H. Smith Outstanding Graduate Student Award 

Advisory Council Award: Outstanding Student 

Advisory Council Award: Outstanding Faculty 

R. C. Baker Foundation Awards 

Friends of the School of Business Administration and Eco- 
nomics Award 

See also awards listed under each department. 


Computer Facilities 

The CSUF Computer Center in McCarthy Hall and the 
SBAE Satellite Computer Laboratory in Langsdorf Hall are 
available for student use. Facilities Include terminals 
(which access the campus’ main computers), micro com- 
puters, and printers. Computer facilities are generally 
available evenings and weekends during the school year. 

Information on the Degree Requirements 

Accountancy, Master of Science 
See “Department of Accounting" 

Business Administration, Bachelor of Arts 

Business Administration, Master of 

Business Administration, Minor 
See “Business Administration Degrees" 

Economics, Bachelor of Arts 

Economics, Master of Arts 

Economics, Minor 
See “Department of Economics" 

International Business, Bachelor of Arts 
See “International Business Program" 

Management Information Systems, Minor 
See “Management Information Systems" 

Management Science, Master of Science 
See “Department of Management Science" 

Taxation, Master of Science 
See “Department of Accounting" 



School of Business Administration and Economics 




Department of 
Accounting 

Department Chair: TrInI Melcher 
Department Office: Langsdorf Hail 630 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration 

Concentration in Accounting 

Master of Science in Accountancy 

Master of Business Administration 

Concentration in Accounting 

Master of Science in Taxation 
Faculty 

Dale Bandy, Gene Bennett, Jack Coleman, Eugene 
Corman, Orapin Duangploy, Mary Fleming, 

John Goode, Clyde Hardman, A. Jay HIrsch, Jodha 
Khalsa, Norbert Maler, Trini Melchner, Robert Miller, 
Nona Mooers, Shirish Seth, Randy Swad, Anita Tyra, 
Robert Vanasse, Dorsey Wiseman 

Advisers 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706, pro- 
vides Information on admissions, curriculum and gradua- 
tion requirements; registration and grading procedures; 
residence and similar academic matters. In addition, the 
Accounting Department provides advising on curriculum 
content and career opportunities: 

Accounting Trini Melcher 

CPA Examination Shirish Seth 

Taxation Dale Bandy 

INTRODUCTION 

Accounting is often referred to as “the language of busi- 
ness.” Very generally, the accounting process is con- 
cerned with recording, classifying, reporting and 
interpreting the economic data of an organization. These 
data are Important to users, who may include managers. 
Investors and other Interested groups. Accounting helps 
In decision-making processes by showing how money has 
been spent and where commitments have been made, by 
judging performance and by showing the implications of 
following different courses of action. Reliable information 
In a dynamic business environment is necessary for sound 
decisions concerning the allocation of scarce resources. 
Thus accounting plays a very significant part In our social 
and economic systems. 


Accounting 


Programs in accounting are designed for students who 
are interested in careers in public accounting, industry, 
government, or social accounting, and for students who 
intend to work for advanced degrees in accounting in 
preparation for teaching and research. 

Credential Information 

The Department of Accounting offers courses which may 
be Included in the Single Subject Waiver Program In Busi- 
ness. Further information on the requirements for teach- 
ing credentials is contained in the Teacher Credential 
Programs section of this catalog. 

Prizes in Accounting 

Outstanding Senior Award 
Amy Vanasse Memorial Award 
Alexander Grant & Co. 

Arthur Andersen & Co. 

Arthur Young & Company 
Becker CPA Review 
Coopers & Lybrand 
CSUF CPA Review 
Dauberman CPA Review 
Deloitte Haskins & Sells 
Ernst & Whinney 
Kenneth Leventhal & Co. 

Main Hurdman 

McGladrey Hendrickson & Pullen 

National Association of Accountants, O.C. Chapter 

Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. 

Price Waterhouse 

Society of Accountants — O.C. Chapter 
Touche Ross & Co. 
use CPA REview 
Vilmure, Peeler & Boucher 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration Degrees, Accounting Con- 
centration.” 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTANCY 

The Master of Science in Accountancy program provides 
the conceptual understanding and technical competence 
for a career In professional accounting. Employment op- 
portunities include public accounting, industrial account- 
ing and government. The program encompasses both a 
theoretical foundation and technical skills. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of a professional attitude and 
the capacity to deal with issues of accounting policy and 
ethics. Graduates should be prepared for entry-level posi- 
tions, and for potential advancement in the profession. 

The M.S. in Accountancy program is sc/7ec/u/ed especially 
for students who are employed full time. Courses are of- 
fered during the late afternoon and evening. Most stu- 
dents enroll on a part-time basis, taking two courses (6 
units) per semester. 


The curriculum is designed for students with an under- 
graduate degree in business administration with a con- 
centration in accounting. The 10 courses (30 units) may 
be completed in one year (full time) or 2>2 years (part 
time). In addition to seven accounting courses, there are 
two electives and a terminal, research-project course. 

Cal State Fullerton is the only university In Orange County 
accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business. This assures a rigorous program, a 
well qualified faculty, high standards for students, and 
access to an extensive library system. The qualifications 
of the M.S. in Accountancy faculty include advanced de- 
grees In taxation, accounting, and law; practical tax expe- 
rience; and professional standing as CPA’s and attorneys. 

Most graduate courses in the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics require ^classified SBAE status” 
and are open only to students with classified standing In 
the M.B.A., M.S. in Accountancy, M.S. in Taxation, M.S. In 
Management Science, or M.A. In Economics programs. 

Admission 

Students meeting the following requirements will be ad- 
mitted to postbaccalaureate unclassified standing. 

1. Acceptable bachelor’s degree from an institution ac- 
credited by a regional accrediting association, or 
equivalent. 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semes- 
ter units attempted and In good standing at last college 
attended. 

Note: Postbaccalaureate unclassified students may enroll 
In undergraduate courses (100 through 400 level) but gen- 
erally are ineligible for graduate business courses (500 
level). Such students may wish to take undergraduate 
courses which are necessary to meet the requirements for 
classified standing (see below). Upon completing the re- 
quirements, the student may file an “Application for 
Change of Academic Objective — Graduate” requesting 
admission to the M.S. in Accountancy program. Admission 
to the university as a postbaccalaureate unclassified stu- 
dent does nof constitute admission to the M.S. In Account- 
ancy program, does not confer priority, nor does it 
guarantee future admission. Students planning to apply 
for admission to the M.S. In Accountancy program should 
confer with the graduate adviser in the School of Business 
Administration and Economics. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
may be admitted to the M.S. In Accountancy program with 
conditionally classified standing: 

3. Combination of GPA and score on the Graduate Man- 
agement Admission Test (GMAT) sufficient to yield a 
score of at least 950 according to one of the following 
formulas. Due to limited facilities and resources in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics, a 


7—79417 


Accounting 


higher score may be required of all applicants. 

A. If overall undergraduate GPA is at least 2.5 and 
GMAT is at least 450, then score = (GPA x 200) 

-hGMAT. 

B. If overall undergraduate GPA is below 2.5 or GMAT 
is below 450, then score = (GPA x 200) + GMAT 

- 50. 

C. If GPA is based on the last 60 semester units of 
course work* then score = (GPA x 200) -h GMAT 
- 100 . 

Note: To be admitted as conditionally classified students, 
applicants must be within three courses (or 10 units) of 
meeting the requirements for classified standing (see be- 
low). Such courses must be completed within the first 12 
months of study. Students who do not do so will not be 
allowed to continue in the program. Conditionally classi- 
fied students may take a limited number of graduate 
courses (500 level) subject to the approval of the gradu- 
ate adviser of the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree in a field 
other than business administration (or whose deficiency 
is greater than three courses) should apply for the Master 
of Business Administration program. Upon completion of 
the M.B.A. foundation courses and Business Administra- 
tion 595 (or 596), an application for a change of objective 
may be filed for transfer to the M.S. in Accountancy pro- 
gram. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be advanced to classified standing. Such students are 
eligible to take graduate courses for which they qualify. 

4. A bachelor’s degree with a major in business adminis- 
tration and a concentration in accounting which meets 
the requirements stated in this catalog for such de- 
grees. The degree must include calculus and computer 
programming equivalent to passing Mathematics 135, 
Business Calculus (3 units) , and Management Science 
264, Introduction to Computer Programming (2 units), 
with a minimum C grade. Courses In the major are to 
be no more than seven years old, and courses in the 
accounting concentration no more than five years old. 
Courses in the major (Including the accounting con- 
centration) must have at least a 3.0 (B) GPA. Courses 
with grades lower than C must be repeated. 

5. Approval of study plan. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum requires 30 semester units of course work 
beyond the baccalaureate degree. A GPA of 3.0 (B) is 
required. Any study plan course in which a D is received 

*AII work within any given quarter or seniester must be included even though that will 
result in nfK>re than 60 semester units. The units to be included in the last 60 
semester units may come only from the following: (1) work taken in postbac- 
calaureate status during the last seven years toward fulfilling M.S. in Accountancy 
course work requirements; (2) units taken under a prescribed remedial program 
agreed to by the associate dean, School of Business Administration and Econom- 
ics; (3) units earned prior to the bachelor’s degree. 


must be repeated and must receive at least a C grade 
regardless of the overall GPA of the student. 

Required Courses 

Accounting 502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 
Accounting 503 Seminar in Contemporary Accounting 
Problems (3) 

Accounting 505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

Accounting 506 Seminar in Professional Accounting 
Communications (3) 

Accounting 507 Seminar In Acctg. Info. Systems (3) 
Accounting 521 Seminar in Admin. Accounting (3) 
Accounting 572 Seminar In Taxation of Corporations 
and Shareholders (3) 

Eiectives in Accounting or Reiated Business Fieids 

Two courses (6 units) at the 400 or 500 level, to be select- 
ed in consultation with, and approved by, the program 
coordinator. 

Terminal Evaluation 

Accounting 597 Project (3) 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration Degrees, Accounting Con- 
centration.” 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TAXATION 

The Master of Science In Taxation program provides the 
conceptual understanding and technical competence for 
a career in taxation. Employment opportunities include the 
tax departments of CPA and law firms, as well as corpora- 
tions and government tax agencies. For those already 
employed In this field, the M.S. in Taxation program should 
meet the continuing education requirements of profes- 
sional associations and licensing boards. 

The M.S. in Taxation program is scheduled especially for 
students who are employed full time. Courses are offered 
during the late afternoon and evening. Most students en- 
roll on a part-time basis, taking two courses (6 units) per 
semester. 

The curriculum is designed for students with an under- 
graduate degree in business administration. The 10 
courses (30 units) may be completed In one year (full 
time) or 2 X 2 years (part time). In addition to six courses 
In the field of taxation, there are three electives and a 
terminal, research-project course. 

Cal State Fullerton is the only university in Orange County 
accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business. This assures a rigorous program, a 
well qualified faculty, high standards for students, and 
access to an extensive library system. The qualifications 
of the M.S. in Taxation faculty include advanced degrees 
In taxation, accounting, and law; practical tax experience; 
and professional standing as CPA’s and attorneys. 

Most graduate courses in the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics require “classified SBAE status” 


Accounting 


and are open only to students with classified standing in 
the M.S. in Accountancy, M.S. in Taxation, M.S. in 

Management Science, or M.A. in Economics programs. 

Admission 

Students meeting the following requirements will be ad- 
mitted to postbaccalaureate unclassified standing: 

1. Acceptable bachelor’s degree from an institution ac- 
credited by a regional accrediting association, or 
equivalent. 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semes- 
ter units attempted and in good standing at last college 
attended. 

Note: Postbaccalaureate unclassified students may enroll 
in undergraduate courses (100 thru 400 level) but are 
generally ineligible for graduate business courses (500 
level). Such students may wish to take undergraduate 
courses which are necessary to meet the requirements for 
classified standing (see below). Upon completing the re- 
quirements, the student may file an “Application for 
Change of Academic Objective — Graduate” requesting 
admission to the M.S. in Taxation program. Admission to 
the university as a postbaccaiaureate unclassified student 
does not constitute admission to the M.S. in Taxation 
program, does not confer priority, nor does it guarantee 
future admission. Students planning to apply for admis- 
sion to the M.S. in Taxation program should confer with 
the graduate adviser in the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be admitted to the M.S. in Taxation program with con- 
ditionally classified standing: 

3. Combination of GPA and score on the Graduate Man- 
agement Admission Test (GMAT) sufficient to yield a 
score of at least 950 according to one of the following 
formulas. Due to limited facilities and resources in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics, a 
higher score may be required of all applicants. 

A. If overall undergraduate GPA is at least 2.5 and 
GMAT is at least 450, then score = (GPA x 200) 
-h GMAT. 

B. If overall undergraduate GPA is below 2.5 or GMAT 
is below 450, then score = (GPA x 200) -i- GMAT 

- 50. 

C. If GPA is based on the last 60 semester units of 
course work* then score = (GPA x 200) -h GMAT 

- 100 . 

Note: To be admitted as conditionally classified students, 
applicants must be within three courses (or 10 units) of 

*AN work within any given quarter or temeater must be deluded even though that will 
result in more than 60 semester urvts. The units to be included in the last 60 
semester units may come only from the following: (1) work taken in postbac- 
caiaureate status during the last seven years toward fulfilling M.S. in Taxation 
course work requirements; (2) units taken under a prescribed remedial program 
agreed to by the Associate Oeim. School of Business Admirkstration arxl Ecorxxn- 
ice; (3) units earned prior to the bachelor's degree. 


meeting the requirements for classified standing (see be- 
low). Such courses must be completed within the first 12 
months of study. Students who do not do so will not be 
allowed to continue in the program. Conditionally classi- 
fied students may take a limited number of graduate 
courses (500 level) subject to the approval of the gradu- 
ate adviser of the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree in a field 
other than business administration (or whose deficiency 
is greater than three courses) should apply for the Master 
of Business Administration program. Upon completion of 
the M.B.A. foundation courses and Business Administra- 
tion 595 (or 596), an application for a change of objective 
may be filed for transfer to the M.S. in Taxation program. 

(Note: The requirement of Business Administration 595 
or 596 does not apply to students admitted to the program 
in fall 1983 or earlier.) 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be advanced to classified standing. Such students are 
eligible to take graduate courses for which they qualify. 

4. A bachelor’s degree with a major in business adminis- 
tration which meets the requirements stated in this 
catalog for such degrees, and Accounting 308, Con- 
cepts of Federal Income Tax Accounting (or an equiva- 
lent course or work experience). The degree must 
include calculus and computer programming equiva- 
lent to passing Mathematics 135, Business Calculus (3 
units), and Management Science 264, Introduction to 
Computer Programming (2 units), with grades of at 
least C. Courses in the major are to be no more than 
seven years old and must have a least a 3.0 (B) GPA. 
Courses with grades lower than C must be repeated. 

5. Approval of study plan. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum requires 30 semester units of course work 
beyond the baccalaureate degree. At least 21 of the 30 
units required for the degree must be at the graduate level. 
A GPA of 3.0 (B) is required. Any study plan course In 
which a D is received must be repeated and must receive 
at least a C grade regardless of the overall GPA of the 
student. 

Required Tax Course 

Accounting 470 Tax Research, Practice and 
Procedures (3) 

Electives In Taxation and Related Fields 

Five courses (15 units) to be selected in consultation with, 
and approved by, the student’s adviser. 

Available courses include but are not limited to: 

Accounting 408 Problems In Taxation (3) 

Accounting 508 Seminar In Tax Planning (3) 
Accounting 572 Seminar In Taxation of Corporations 
and Shareholders (3) 

Accounting 573 Seminar In Taxation of Property 


Accounting 


Transactions (3) 

Accounting 574 Seminar in Taxation of international 
Business Operations (3) 

Accounting 575 Seminar in Estate, Gift and 
Inheritance Taxes and Estate Planning (3) 
Accounting 576 Seminar in State & Local Taxation 
(3) 

Accounting 577 Seminar in Taxation of Employee 
Compensation (3) 

Accounting 578 Sem in Taxation of Partnerships (3) 

Other Electives 

Courses are to be selected in consultation with, and ap- 
proved by, the student’s adviser. 

One course (3 units) in either economics or political 
science and two courses (6 units) in either business or 
non-business fields. 

Note: recommended courses in economics and political 
science include Econ 517, Poll Sci 421, 519, 528. 

Terminal Evaluation 

Accounting 597 Project (3) 


Accounting Courses 

201A,B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 A must be taken before 2016. 
Accounting concepts and techniques essential to the ad- 
ministration of a business enterprise; measuring and com- 
municating economic information; analyzing and recording 
financial transactions; preparation, analysis and interpreta- 
tion of financial statements; introduction to managerial ac- 
counting; product costing; analysis and techniques for 
aiding management decisions; management control; in- 
teraction with finance, management science. Interpersonal 
relations, motivation, and data-Information systems. (Not 
open to freshmen) 

301A,B Intermediate Accounting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 2016; 301 A must be taken before 
3016. Accounting theory; preparation of income statements, 
balance sheets and statements of changes in financial posi- 
tion; present value and amount concepts; assets, liabilities 
and stockholders equity; price-level accounting; pensions; 
leases; earnings per share; financial statement analysis; ac- 
counting changes and error analysis. 

302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 2016. Accounting Information for 
management of manufacturing enterprises; cost records; 
cost behavior and allocation; product costing and inventory 
valuation; flexible budgeting; standard costs; responsibility 
accounting; cost planning and control; and operating deci- 
sion analysis. 

308 Concepts of Federal Income Tax Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 2016. Provisions, legislative history 


and implications of the federal income tax. The individual 
taxpayer. 

401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 3016. 6usiness combinations; 
meaning, usefulness and methodology of consolidated fi- 
nancial statements; investments in non-subsidiary affiliates 
and corporate joint ventures; consolidated financial state- 
ments for overseas units of U.S.-based multinational com- 
panies; translations of foreign currencies. 

402 Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 6 and 302. The auditing stand- 
ards and procedures used by financial and operational audi- 
tors. Management information and computer systems, 
internal control, audit evidence, professional responsibilities 
and legal liabilities, standards of reporting financial informa- 
tion. 

403 Accounting for Governmental & Nonprofit 
Entities (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 2016 or 511. Fund accounting as 
applied to governmental and nonprofit entities; state and 
federal governments, municipalities, hospitals and universi- 
ties. 6udgets, tax levies, revenues and appropriations, ex- 
penditures and encumbrances, various types of funds, and 
accounting statements. 

407 Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 A and 302 and Management 
Science 265 or equivalent. Alternative accounting systems 
used for the collection, organization and presentation of 
Information. Theory and practice of information processing, 
organizational, behavioral and mechanical. 

408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308. Federal income tax as it ap- 
plies to corporations, partnerships, fiduciaries, international 
operations, securities and fringe benefits including retire- 
ment plans, federal estate and gift taxes as they apply to 
taxable transfers. 

470 Tax Research, Practice and Procedures (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 308. The methodology of tax re- 
search including case studies; the management of a tax 
practice; administration procedures governing tax contro- 
versies; rights and obligations of taxpayers and tax practi- 
tioners. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 3016 (may be taken concurrent- 
ly), Accounting 302, a major In accounting, consent of the 
department internship adviser, and at least junior standing, 
2.5 GPA and one semester In residence at the university. 
Planned and supervised work experience. May be repeated 
for credit up to a total of six units. Credit/ No Credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval of department 
chair. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring to 
pursue directed independent Inquiry. May be repeated for 
credit. Not open to students on academic probation. 


Accounting 


502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 301 B, classified SBAE status and 
consent of instructor. The effects of professional, govern- 
mental, business, and social forces on the evolution of ac- 
counting theory. 

503 Seminar in Contemporary Accounting Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.S. in Accounting status or consent 
of instructor. Current issues in financial reporting including 
pronouncements by the Financial Accounting Standards 
Board and the Securities and Exchange Commission. Cov- 
erage of topics will change as new issues in accounting. 

505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 402 and classified SBAE status. 
Auditing theory and practices; professional ethics; auditing 
standards; Securities and Exchange Commission and stock 
exchange regulations; auditor’s legal liability; statement 
trends and techniques. 

506 Seminar in Professional Accounting Communications 
( 3 ) 

Prerequisite: classified M.S. in Accounting status or consent 
of instructor. Compilation and composition of accounting 
reports and client presentations relating to accountants’ 
working papers, client engagement letters, management ad- 
visory reports and prospecti. 

507 Seminar in Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 407 or equivalent with consent of 
instructor. Case studies of computer based accounting sys- 
tems used by organizations such as universities, banks, in- 
dustrial corporations and CPA firms. Emphasis on 
accounting information, reports and internal controls. 

508 Seminar in Tax Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified SBAE status, or 
consent of instructor. Substantive provisions of federal lax; 
tax planning from a corporate viewpoint; case studies of the 
effect of federal tax law on business decisions. 

510 Financial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: classified SBAE status. Accumulation, organi- 
zation, and interpretation of financial and quantitative data 
relevant to the activities of corporate business enterprise. 

511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisities: Accounting 201 B or 510, consent of Instructor 
and classified SBAE status. Accounting information for man- 
agement decisions; elements of manufacturing, distribution 
and service costs; cost systems; standard costs; cost re- 
ports; cost analysis. 

518 Seminar in International Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B or 511 and classified SBAE 
status. Comparative analysis of accounting principles and 
practices outside the United States; international financial 
accounting standards; current problems of International fi- 
nancial reporting, accounting planning and control for inter- 
national operations; multinational companies. 


521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 302 or 511; classified SBAE status 
and consent of instructor. Integrative aspects of accounting, 
financial, and quantitative data for managerial decision-mak- 
ing; long-term, short-term profit planning; budgetary control; 
cost analysis; financial analysis and planning; taxation; and 
transfer pricing. 

572 Seminar in Taxation of Corporations and 
Shareholders (3) 

Prerequisities: Accounting 308 and classified SBAE status, 
or consent of instructor. Federal taxation relating to corpora- 
tions; organizing distributions, liquidations and reorganiza- 
tions. 

573 Seminar In Taxation of Property Transactions (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified SBAE status, or 
consent of instructor. Federal taxation relating to sales, ex- 
changes and other transfers. 

574 Seminar in Taxation of International Business 
Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified SBAE status, or 
consent of instructor. Federal taxation relating to U.S. citi- 
zens and corporations with foreign source income and of 
foreign persons with U.S. source income; planning for for- 
eign operations. 

575 Seminar in Estate, Gift, Inheritance Taxes and Estate 
Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified SBAE status, or 
consent of Instructor. Federal and California death taxes 
and the planning of personal estates. 

576 Seminar in State and Local Taxation (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified SBAE status, or 
consent of instructor. Application of interstate income allo- 
cations; multi-state tax compact; separate v. apportionment 
accounting; foreign country sourced Income. Also, California 
taxes as applied to businesses and individuals. 

577 Seminar In Taxation of Employee Compensation (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified SBAE status, or 
consent of instuctor. Federal taxation relating to employee 
compensation including pensions and profit sharing, stock 
options, ESOP’s, IRA’s, Keogh’s, maximum tax 10-year ave- 
raging, death benefits, group term life, etc. 

578 Seminar In Taxation of Partnerships (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified SBAE status, or 
consent of instructor. Federal taxation relating to partner- 
ships, estates, trusts and other special entities. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified SBAE status. Directed independent 
Inquiry. Not open to students on academic probation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status, consent of Instructor 
and approval by department chair. May be repeated for 
credit. Not open to students on academic probation. 


Accounting 


Business Administration 
Degrees 


INTRODUCTION 

This major prepares students for entry level positions in 
business and administration in both the private and public 
sectors. Career opportunities range from accounting, cost 
analysis, marketing research and statistical forecasting to 
real estate, personnel, sales and information systems. 
This curriculum also provides a foundation for advanced 
study. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

All of the following requirements must be met for the de- 
gree. For assistance in interpreting these requirements 
contact the Business Advising Center. 

Required Lower-DIvIslon Core Courses 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 

Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5), may 
be substituted for Economics 201 and Economics ^2. 

Math 135 Business Calculus (3) 
or Math 130 A Short Course in Calculus (4) 
or Math 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 
Accounting 201 A,B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 
Management 246 Business Law (3) 

Manag Sci 266 Introduction to Information Systems 
and Computer Programming (3) 

Note: Manag Sci 264, Computer Programming (2), and 
Manag Sci 263, Introduction to Information Systems (1), 
may be substituted for Manag Sci 265. 

English Proficiency Requirement 

Cal State Fullerton Examination in Writing Proficiency 
(EWP) 

Business Administration 301 Business Writing (3) 

Note: Business Administration 301 Business Writing 
should be taken before registering for any 400-level SBAE 
courses. 

Required Upper-Division Core Courses 

Business administration majors shall not enroll in any re- 
quired upper-division core course until they have com- 
pleted all of the required lower-division core courses with 
a grade of at least C in each course. Students desiring to 
enroll in required upper-division core courses while con- 
currently completing the last of their required lower-divi- 


Buslness Administration 


Sion core courses may select only Business Administra- 
tion 301, Business Writing, Economics 310, Intermediate 
Microeconomic Analysis (or 320, Intermediate Macroeco- 
nomic Analysis) , and/or Management Science 361, Prob- 
ability and Statistical Methods in Business and 
Economics. 

Econ 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 
or Econ 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Note: Management concentration requires Econ 310. 

Finance 320 Business Finance (3) 

Management 339 Managing Business Operations and 
Organizations (3) 

Management 340 Organizational Behavior (3) 
Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Manag Sci 361 Probability and Statistical Methods in 
Business and Economics (4) 

Manag Sci 362 Management Science Methods in 
Business and Economics (3) 
or Manag Sci 363 Management Science (3) 

Required Concentration Courses 

A minimum of 18 units of course work is required in one 
concentration. See listing of concentration requirements 
below. 

Required Capstone Core Course 

After completing ail lower and upper-division core 
courses, take: 

Management 449 Seminar in Business Policies (3) 

Other Requirement, Grades and Residence 

Other subjects. Complete at least 50 units of courses in 
subjects other than business administration or econom- 
ics. Complete all university requirements for the ba- 
chelor’s degree. 

Grade-Point Average (GPA). Attain at least 2.0 GPA (C 
average) in all university courses, in all required business 
administration core courses, and in all required business 
administration concentration courses. 

Grade option. Take all required core courses and all re- 
quired concentration courses in the School of Business 
Administration and Economics for a letter grade 
(A,B,C,D,F) . The Credit/No Credit grading option may not 
be used for these courses, and a grade of CR (credit) will 
not satisfy the requirements for the degree. Exception: 
Courses in calculus may be taken under the Credit/No 
Credit grading option, although courses taken to meet 
general education requirements must be taken for a letter 
grade. 

Residence. At least nine units of courses in the area of 
concentration and at least 15 of the last 24 units of 
courses must be taken in residence at the School of Busi- 
ness Administration and Economics. Students also must 
fulfill university residence requirements. 


Concentrations in B.A. in Business Administration 

Business administration majors must complete the re- 
quirements of one concentration in addition to the degree 
requirements shown above. 

Accounting Concentration (21 units) 

All students with an accounting concentration are required 
to take: 

Accounting 301 A,B Intermediate Accounting (3,3) 
Accounting 302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Accounting 308 Concepts of Federal Income Tax 
Accounting (3) 

Accounting 402 Auditing (3) 

Accounting 407 Accounting Information Systems (3) 

and one of the following courses: 

Accounting 401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Accounting 403 Accounting for Governmental and 
Nonprofit Entities (3) 

Accounting 408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Accounting 470 Tax Research, Practice and 
Procedures (3) 

Business Economics Concentration (18 units) 

Ail students with an economics concentration are required 
to take: 

Econ 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 

as part of their business administration core requirements. 
In addition, the concentration requires: 

Econ 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Econ 410 Government and Business (3) 

and 12 units of upper-division economics electives, 3 units 
of which must be 400-level. 

Students interested in economics also should consider 
the Bachelor of Arts in Economics. 

Finance Concentration (18 units) 

All students with a finance concentration are required to 
take: 

Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3) 
or Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

and 15 units of upper-division finance electives (other 
than Finance 310). 

Students may choose all of their courses from one of the 
following emphases, or may sample several emphases. 

Financial Management Emphasis ( 1 8 units including both 
Finance 331 and Finance 332) 

Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3) 

Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

Finance 370 International Business Finance (3) 
Finance 425 Commercial Bank and Financial 
Institution Management (3) 


Business Administration 


Finance 432 Financial Forecasting and Budgeting (3) 
Finance 433 Problems In Business Finance (3) 
Finance 440 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Real Estate Emphasis (18 units including either Finance 
331 or Finance 332) 


Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3) 
or Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 
Finance 351 Real Estate & Urban Land Analysis (3) 
Finance 451 Real Estate/ Land Use Law — Case 
Studies (3) * 

Finance 452 Real Estate Finance (3) * 

Finance 453 Real Estate Valuation (3) * 

Finance 454 Real Estate and Urban Development 


(3) * 

Finance 455 Real Estate Investment Analysis (3) * 
Finance 456 Property Development and Real Estate 
Policy Analysis (3) * 

Finance 459 Real Estate Research (3) 


Courses marked (*) partially satisfy the California State 
Real Estate Brokers License Examination requirements. 
Contact the Finance Department for further details. 

Securities-Investments Emphasis (18 units Including ei- 
ther Finance 331 or Finance 332) 


Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3) 
or Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

Finance 340 Security Investments (3) 

Finance 440 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Finance 442 Security Analysis and Portfolio 
Management (3) 

Finance 443 Portfolio Analysis (3) 
and 3 units upper-division finance electives (other than 
Finance 310) 

Insurance Emphasis ( 1 8 units Including either Finance 331 
or Finance 332) 

Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3) 
or Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

Finance 360 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Finance 461 Business Risk Management (3) 

Finance 462 Life and Health Insurance 
and 6 units upper-division finance electives (other than 
Finance 310) 

Personal Financial Planning Emphasis ( 1 8 units including 
either Finance 331 or Finance 332) 

Finance 331 Financial Analysis (3) 
or Finance 332 Financial Administration (3) 

Finance 340 Security Investments (3) 

Finance 360 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Finance 410 Theory and Practice of Personal 
Financial Planning (3) 

Finance 440 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Finance 450 Real Estate Investment Strategy (3) 
or Finance 455 Real Estate Investment Analysis (3) 


Management Concentration (18 units) 

All students with a management concentration are re- 
quired to take: 

Econ 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) 

as part of their business administration core requirements. 
In addition, students must choose one of the following 
emphases. 

Contract Management Emphasis (18 units) 

Management 341 Service Operations Manage (3) 
or Management 342 Production Operations (3) 
Management 343 Personnel Management (3) 
Management 346 Contract Management (3) 
Management 347 Business Law (3) 
or Management 348 Business Law 
and 6 units of elective course work to be determined in 
consultation with a departmental adviser. 

Entrepreneurial Management Emphasis (18 units) 

Management 341 Service Operations Management 
(3) 

or Management 342 Production Operations (3) 
Management 343 Personnel Management (3) 
Management 349 Law for the Small Business (3) 
or Management 444 Project Management (3) 
Management 448 Seminar in Small Business 
Consulting (3) 

and 6 units of elective course work to be determined in 
consultation with a departmental adviser. 

General Management Emphasis (18 units) 

Management 341 Service Operations Management 
(3) 

or Management 342 Production Operations (3) 
Management 343 Personnel Management (3) 
Management 347 Business Law (3) 
or Management 440 Emerging Issues In 
Management (3) 

Management 447 Management Decision Games (3) 
and 6 units of elective course work to be determined in 
consultation with a departmental adviser. 

Operations Management Emphasis (18 units) 

Management 341 Service Operations Management 
(3) 

or Management 342 Production Operations (3) 
Management 343 Personnel Management (3) 
Management 444 Project Management (3) 
Management 445 Advanced Production Operations 
(3) 

and 6 units of elective course work to be determined in 
consultation with a departmental adviser. 

Human Resources Management Emphasis (18 units) 

Management 341 Service Operations Management 
(3) 


Business Administration 


or Management 342 Production Operations (3) 
Management 343 Personnel Management (3) 
Management 433 Advanced Topics in Human 
Resource Management (3) 

Management 441 Labor-Management Relations (3) 
and 6 units of elective course work to be determined in 
consultation with a departmental adviser. 


Science (4) 

Manag Sci 441 Probabilistic Models in Management 
Science (4) 

Manag Sci 461 Statistical Theory for Management 
Science (4) 

and 6 units of upper-division management science 
electives. 


Organizational Behavior Emphasis (18 units) 


The available electives include: 


Management 341 Service Operations Management 

(3) 

or Management 342 Production Operations (3) 
Management 343 Personnel Management (3) 
Management 439 Organizational Change and 
Development (3) 

Management 443 Individual, Interpersonal and Group 
Dynamics for Management (3) 
and 6 units of elective course work to be determined in 
consultation with a departmental adviser. 

Management Information Systems Concentration 

(22 units) 

All students with a management information systems con- 
centration are required to take: 


Management 344 Intro to Systems Concepts (3) 
Manag Sci 270 File Concepts and COBOL 
Programming (4) 

Manag Sci 300 Elements of Information Systems 
Design and Data Communication (3) 

Accounting 302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Manag Sci 408 Data Base Management Systems (3) 
Management 454 MIS Analysis and Design (3) 
and 3 units of upper-division electives to be selected 
from the following courses: 


Comp Sci 302 Information Structures (3) 

Comp Sci 423 Systems Programming (3) 

Comp Sci 459 Mini-Computer Software Systems (3) 
Management 444 Project Management (3) 
Management 494 Seminar In Management Information 
Systems (3) 

Manag Sci 302 Software Systems for Decision 
Support (3) 

Manag Sci 310 Advanced COBOL Programming (3) 
Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Data Processing: Small Computers 


Manag Sci 409 
Manag Sci 41 1 
(3) 

Manag Sci 416 
Manag Sci 418 
(3) 

Manag Sci 448 
Economics 


Computer Performance Evaluation (3) 
Privacy, Security and Data Processing 

Computer Simulation In Business and 

(3) 


Management Science Concentration (18 units) 

All students with a management science concentration 
are required to take: 

Manag Sci 440 Deterministic Models in Management 


Information Systems Courses 


Manag Sci 300 
Design and 
Manag Sci 302 
Support (3) 
Manag Sci 310 
Manag Sci 404 
Manag Sci 408 
Manag Sci 409 
Manag Sci 41 1 
(3) 

Manag Sci 416 
Manag Sci 418 
(3) 


Elements of Information System 
Data Communication (3) 

Software Systems for Decision 

Advanced COBOL Programming (3) 
Analysis of Information Systems (3) 
Data Base Management Systems (3) 
Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Data Processing: Small Computers 

Computer Performance Evaluation (3) 
Privacy, Security and Data Processing 


Operations Research Courses 

Manag Sci 448 Computer Simulation in Business and 
Economics (3) 

Manag Sci 480 Inventory and Production Analysis in 
Business and Economics (3) 

Statistics Courses 


Manag Sci 420 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 
Manag Sci 422 Surveys and Sampling Design and 
Applications (3) 

Manag Sci 430 Nonparametric Statistics (3) 

Manag Sci 467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

Marketing Concentration (18 units) 

All students with a marketing concentration must choose 
one of the following emphases: 

Advertising Management Emphasis (18 units) 


Marketing 354 
Marketing 370 
Marketing 379 
Marketing 454 
Marketing 459 


Principles of Advertising (3) 
Consumer Behavior (3) 
Marketing Research Methods 
Advertising Management (3) 
Marketing Problems (3) 


(3) 


and 3 units of upper-division marketing electives 


Marketing Management Emphasis (18 units required) 


A 3-unit behavioral course (Marketing 354, 356 or 370. See 
note.) 

Marketing 359 Industrial Marketing (3) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 
or Marketing 457 Quantitative Marketing Analysis 
(3) 

Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 


Business Administration 


and 6 units of upper-division marketing electives 
Marketing Research Emphasis (18 units) 


Marketing 370 
Marketing 379 
Marketing 479 
Marketing 459 
and 6 units of 


Consumer Behavior (3) 

Marketing Research Methods (3) 
Research Problems in Marketing (3) 
Marketing Problems (3) 
upper-division marketing electives 


Industrial Marketing Emphasis (18 units) 


Marketing 356 Professional Selling (3) 

Marketing 359 Industrial Marketing (3) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 
Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
Marketing 469 Industrial Marketing Strategy (3) 
and one of the following courses: 


Marketing 358 
Marketing 455 
Marketing 457 
Marketing 458 
Marketing 460 


Physical Distribution (3) 
Management of the Sales Force (3) 
Quantitative Marketing Analysis (3) 
International Marketing Policies (3) 
Marketing for Nonprofit Org (3) 


Retailing Emphasis (18 units) 


Marketing 352 
Marketing 370 
Marketing 379 
Marketing 456 
Marketing 459 


Principles of Retailing (3) 
Consumer Behavior (3) 
Marketing Research Methods 
Retailing Management (3) 
Marketing Problems (3) 


( 3 ) 


and 3-unit upper-division marketing elective 


Sales Management Emphasis (18 units) 


Marketing 356 Professional Selling (3) 

Marketing 370 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Marketing 455 Management of the Sales Force (3) 

Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
and 3-unlt upper-division marketing elective 


International Marketing Emphasis (18 units) 


A 3-unit behavioral course (Marketing 354, 356 or 370. See 
note.) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 
Marketing 458 International Marketing Policies (3) 
Marketing 459 Marketing Problems (3) 
and 6 units of upper-division marketing electives 

Note: BEHAVIORAL COURSES IN MARKETING 
Marketing 354 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Marketing 356 Professional Selling (3) 

Marketing 370 Consumer Behavior (3) 

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The minor provides a basic understanding of the role of 
business in society and the methods used by business. 
This curriculum also provides a basis for advanced study. 
A working knowledge of algebra is necessary for several 
of the required courses. 


Required Lower-DIvIsion Courses 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 
Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5), may 
be substituted for Economics 201 and Economics 202. 

Accounting 201 A,B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 
Management 246 Business Law (3) 

Sociology 289 Computer Methods In Social Science 
( 3 ) 

Note: Management Science 265, Introduction to Informa- 
tion Systems and Computer Programming (3 units), may 
be substituted for Sociology 289. This substitution is 
recommended for students planning to take additional 
electives, many of which require Management Science 
265 as a prerequisite. 

Required Upper-Division Courses 

Management 339 Managing Business Operations and 
Organizations (3) 

or Management 340 Organizational Behavior (3) 
Finance 320 Business Finance (3) 

Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Note: Students with a major in economics, who wish to 
minor in business administration, must take Economics 
201 and 202 (or 210), Accounting 201 A and B, and Man- 
agement Science 265 as part of their major. For such 
students, the corresponding courses In the minor will be 
waived (note that Management Science 265 substitutes 
for Sociology 289) and the minor will consist of Manage- 
ment 246, Management 339 or 340, Finance 320 and Mar- 
keting 351 . 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

This Is the only M.B.A. degree program In Orange County 
accredited hy the American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business. This assures a rigorous. In-depth 
program, covering the full spectrum of business adminis- 
tration. Accreditation also indicates a well-qualified fac- 
ulty, high standards for students, and access to an 
extensive library system. 

Programs of Study 

The School of Business Administration and Economics 
offers two plans for the M.B.A. degree. 

The M.B.A. Generalist Plan is designed for students with 
little or no course work in business administration. The 
curriculum surveys the entire field of business administra- 
tion, preparing students for general management respon- 
sibilities. The plan is structured, keeping students together 
for most of their classes, and must be completed within 
three years. Courses may not be waived, although limited 
substitution of more advanced courses is allowed. This 
format requires a substantial and sustained commitment 
from students over the three-year period. Students who 
do not complete the curriculum within three years may 


Business Administration 


change to the M.B.A. Specialist Plan. 

The M.B.A. Specialist Plan is designed for students with 
recent course work (or an undergraduate degree) in busi- 
ness administration; for those who wish to include a spe- 
cialized area of concentration in their curriculum; and/or 
for those unable to follow the structure of the M.B.A. Gen- 
eralist Plan. Some courses may be waived on the basis of 
equivalent undergraduate course work. The program is 
not structured, and five years are allowed for completion. 
The areas of concentration are accounting, business eco- 
nomics, finance, international business, management, 
management science and marketing. 

The M.B.A. program is scheduled especially for students 
who are employed full time. Courses are offered during 
the late afternoon and evening. Most students enroll on a 
part-time basis, taking two courses (6-7 units) per semes- 
ter. 

Most graduate courses in the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics require “classified SBAE status” 
and are open only to students with classified standing in 
the M.B.A., M.S. in Accountancy, M.S. in Management 
Science, M.S. in Taxation or M.A. in Economics programs. 

Admission 

Students meeting the following requirements will be ad- 
mitted to postbaccalaureate — unclassified standing: 

1. Acceptable bachelor’s degree from an appropriately 
accredited institution, or equivalent. 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semes- 
ter units attempted and in good standing at last college 
attended. 

Note: Postbaccalaureate — unclassified students may en- 
roll in undergraduate courses (100 thru 400 level) but are 
generally ineligible for graduate business courses (500 
level). Such students may wish to take undergraduate 
courses which are necessary to meet the requirements for 
classified standing (see below). Upon completing the re- 
quirements, the student may file an “Application for 
Change of Academic Objective — Graduate” requesting 
admission to the M.B.A. program. Admission to the univer- 
sity as a postbaccalaureate— unclassified student does 
not constitute admission to the M.B.A. program, does not 
confer priority, nor does it guarantee future admission. 
Students planning to apply for admission to the M.B.A. 
program should confer with the graduate adviser in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be admitted to the M.B.A. program with conditionally 
classified standing: 

3. Combination of GPA and score on the Graduate Man- 
agement Admission Test (GMAT) sufficient to yield a 
score of at least 950 according to one of the following 
formulas. Due to limited facilities and resources in the 
School of Business Administration and Economics, a 


higher score may be required of all applicants. 

A. If overall undergraduate GPA is at least 2.5 and 
GMAT is at least 450, then score = (GPA X 200) -h 
GMAT. 

B. If overall undergraduate GPA is below 2.5 or GMAT 
is below 450, then score = (GPA X 200) -h GMAT 

- 50. 

C. If GPA is based on the last 60 semester units of 
course work* then score = (GPA X 200) -h GMAT 

- 100 . 

Note: Conditionally classified students may take a limited 
number of graduate courses (500 level), subject to the 
approval of the graduate adviser of the School of Busi- 
ness Administration and Economics. Students are expect- 
ed to advance promptly to classified standing. In 
particular, any deficiencies in calculus or computer pro- 
gramming must be removed during the first 12 months of 
study. Students who do not do so will not be allowed to 
continue In the program. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be advanced to classified standing. Such students are 
eligible to take graduate courses for which they are quali- 
fied. 

4. Proficiency In calculus and computer programming 
equivalent to passing Mathematics 135, Business Cal- 
culus (3 units), and Management Science 264, intro- 
duction to Computer Programming (2 units), with 
grades of at least C. Students with work experience in 
these fields may demonstrate proficiency by passing a 
challenge examination and should consult the chair of 
the Management Science Department for details. 

5. Approval of study plan. 

Curriculum — M.B.A./Generali8t Plan 

The M.B.A./Generalist curriculum includes 15 courses (47 
units). Two specified courses must be taken each spring 
and fall semester for six semesters. The remaining three 
courses may be taken at the student’s convenience, dur- 
ing summer school and/or regular semesters, and must 
be completed within the three years allowed. 

Any deficiencies in calculus or computer programming 
must be removed before starting the program. No courses 
may be waived, although limited substitutions of more 
advanced courses in the same field will be allowed. Any 
study plan course in which a D grade is received must be 
repeated, and must receive at least a C grade, regardless 
of the overall GPA of the student. 

* All work within any given quarter or semester must be included even though that will 
result in more than 60 semester units. The units to be irxHuded in the last 60 
semester unite may come only from the following: (1) Work taken in 
postbaccalaureate status during the last seven years towards fulfilling M.B.A. 
coursework requirements; (2) unite taken under a prescribed remedial program 
agreed to by the Associate Dean. Academic Programs, School of Business 
Administration and Economics; (3) unite earned prior to the bachelor's degree. 


Business Administration 


Foundation Courses 

Accounting 510 Financial Accounting (3) 

Economics 515 The Price System and Resource 
Allocation (4) 

Finance 517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Management 516 Organizational Theory and 
Management of Operations (3) 

Management 518 Legal Environment of Business (3) 
Manag Sci 513 Statistical Analysis and Forecasting 
Techniques (4) 

Manag Sci 514 Business Modeling and Solution 
Techniques (4) 

Marketing 519 Marketing Management (3) 

Advanced Courses 

Accounting 511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 
Econ 521 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (3) 
or Econ 522 Comparative Economics Seminar (3) 
Finance 523 Seminar in Corporate Financial 
Management (3) 

Management 524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior 
and Administration (3) 

Marketing 525 Seminar In Marketing Problems (3) 
Terminal Courses 

Business Admin 595 Seminar in Business 
Administration (3) 

Business Admin 596 Management Game (3) 

Terminal Evaluation 
Comprehensive Examination 

Students who are unable to complete the M.B.A./Gener- 
alist Plan within three years may change to the M.B.A./ 
Specialist Plan. This change will result in deleting Busi- 
ness Administration 595 (3 units) from the study plan and 
adding an area of concentration (12 units), a net increase 
of 9 units. 

Curriculum — M.B.A./Speciall8t Plan 

The M.B.A./Speclallst curriculum Includes a concentra- 
tion in a specialized area and requires from 33 to 56 units 
of graduate course work. Students with a bachelor’s de- 
gree in business administration may be able to complete 
the program with the minimum of 33 units, whereas those 
with little or no recent course work in business administra- 
tion may require the full 56 units. Any deficiencies In calcu- 
lus or computer programming must be removed within one 
year. Any study plan course in which a D grade is received 
must be repeated, and must receive at least a C grade, 
regardless of the overall GPA of the student. 

Foundation Courses 

Foundation courses may be waived on the basis of 
equivalent undergraduate course work, providing that the 
equivalent courses are no more than seven years old, 
have grades of at least C, and a GPA of at least B. 

Accounting 510 Financial Accounting (3) 


Economics 515 The Price System and Resource 
Allocation (4) 

Finance 517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Management 516 Organizational Theory and 
Management of Operations (3) 

Management 518 Legal Environment of Business (2) 
Manag Sci 513 Statistical Analysis and Forecasting 
Techniques (4) 

Manag Sci 514 Business Modeling and Solution 
Techniques (4) 

Marketing 519 Marketing Management (3) 

A list of equivalent undergraduate courses is available 
from the graduate adviser. In most cases, students with a 
recent bachelor’s degree in business administration from 
an accredited university will be able to waive all foundation 
courses. 

Advanced Courses 

All seminars in this group must be taken at the graduate 
level. The management science seminar will be waived for 
students who have taken both Manag Sci 513 and 514 (but 
not for students who have taken Manag Sci 361 and/or 
362). Students with a concentration in International busi- 
ness are required to take only five of the following 
courses: 

Accounting 511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Note: Students who have satisfactorially completed a 
course in cost accounting must substitute Accounting 521 
Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3). 

Econ 522 Comparative Economics Seminar (3) 
or Econ 521 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (3) 

Note: Economics 521 is not open to students with 
credit in intermediate macroeconomics. 

Finance 523 Seminar In Corporate Financial 
Management (3) 

Management 524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior 
and Administration (3) 

Marketing 525 Seminar in Marketing Problems (3) 
Manag Sci 526 Forecasting, Decision Analysis, and 
Experimental Design (3) 

or Manag Sci 550 Special Topics on Information 
Systems Design and Data Communication (3) 
or Manag Sci 560 Adv Deterministic Models (3) 
or Manag Sci 561 Adv Probabilistic Models (3) 

Concentration Courses (except international business) 

12 units of courses In one area of concentration: 

Accounting Management 

Business Economics Management Science 

Finance Marketing 

At least 6 units of the concentration courses must be 
taken at the 500-level. Concentration courses are to be 
approved by the department chair concerned, or designee 


Business Administration 


within the department, and the Associate Dean, Academic 
Programs, School of Business Administration and Eco- 
nomics. 

Note: Students choosing the accounting concentration 
may have to take Accounting 301 A,B, Intermediate Ac- 
counting, and/or Accounting 308, Concepts of Federal 
Income Tax Accounting, as prerequisites to their concen- 
tration courses. 

Concentration Courses — International Business 

All of the following courses are required. (Note that stu- 
dents with an international business concentration take 
only five of the six courses listed above under Advanced 
Courses.) 

Accounting 518 Sem in International Accounting (3) 
Finance 570 Seminar in International Financial 
Management (3) 

Management 548 Seminar in International 
Management (3) 

Marketing 558 Seminar in International Marketing (3) 
and 3 units of electives to be approved by the 
international business adviser. 

Terminal Requirements 

Business Administration 596 Management Game (3) 
Comprehensive Examination 

Note: In exceptional cases, a thesis (Business Adminis- 
tration 598, Thesis) may be substituted for the compre- 
hensive examination. See the graduate adviser for details. 


Business Administration 
Courses 

For information about Business Administration 301, con- 
sult the business writing coordinator in the Department of 
Marketing. For information about Business Administration 
595 and 596, consult the graduate adviser in the Business 
Advising Center. 

301 Business Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101 or Communications 103 or equiva- 
lent (with a grade of C or better) and a satisfactory score 
on the course pretest. Principles of effective writing in busi- 
ness. Extensive practices in various forms of business writ- 
ing. Case studies. Satisfies the classroom portion of the 
upper-division writing requirement for business and eco- 
nomics majors. 

595 Seminar In Business Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified M.B.A. status, within nine units of 
completing study plan. Business administration capstone 
course integrating functional areas to formulate business 
policy. Micro and macro current issues are explored in detail 
illustrating the complexities and broad responsibilities of 
business management. 

596 Management Game (3) 

Prerequisite: classified SBAE status and within six units of 
completion of the graduate study plan. Policy decisions us- 
ing the principles and practices of the several disciplines of 
business administration. Teams plan and execute strategies 
and analyze the impacts of their decisions under uncertain- 
ty. Not open to students on academic probation. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status and consent of associ- 
ate dean. Individual research under supervision. See 
‘Theses and Projects" In this catalog for university require- 
ments. 


Business Administration 


Department of 
Economics 


Department Chain Eric Solberg 
Director, Center for Economic Education: 

John Lafky 

Department Office: Langsdorf Hall 530 

Center for Economic Education — Langsdorf Hall 

315B 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration 

Concentration in Business Economics 

Bachelor of Arts in Economics 
Minor in Economics 

Master of Business Administration 

Concentration in Business Economics 

Master of Arts in Economics 

Faculty 

Robert Ayanian, Kwang-wen Chu, James Dietz, 

Peter Formuzis, Andrew Gill, Ken Goldin, 

Levern Graves, Jane Hall, Walter Hettich, Lionel Kalish, 
Sidney Klein, John Lafky, Maryanna Lanier, Stewart 
Long, Farhad Mahloudji, Robert Michaels, 

Brian Moehring, Gary Pickersgill, Joyce Pickersgill, 

Jack Pontney (Emeritus), Anil Purl, T. Roney, 

Guy Schick, Raymond Sfeir, Eric Solberg, David Wong 

ADVISERS 

The Business Advising Center provides Information on 
admission, curriculum and graduation requirements; regis- 
tration and grading procedures; residence and similar aca- 
demic matters. In addition, all economics majors should 
see a faculty adviser in the Department of Economics for 
information on career opportunities and advanced study. 
Undergraduates should consult the department office for 
the name of their faculty adviser. Graduate students 
should consult the graduate coordinator. Anil Puri. 

INTRODUCTION 

As a scholarly discipline, economics is over two centuries 
old, dating back to the French physiocrats and Adam 
Smith In the 18th century. The nature of economic analysis 
has been described by John Maynard Keynes as . a 
method rather than a doctrine, an apparatus of the mind, 
a technique of thinking which helps its possessors to draw 
correct conclusions.*’ 



Economics 


Economic methods are used to study a basic question 
which faces all societies; how should limited resources be 
used to produce goods and how should that production be 
distributed? Not all wants can be satisfied because re- 
sources and knowledge are limited. Therefore, societies 
are faced with choices. These choices are made in differ- 
ent ways: by custom; by command and centralized con- 
trol; or by a system of markets and prices as in our mixed 
economy. Economists examine alternative solutions to 
the basic economic problem by analyzing costs and bene- 
fits of changing existing patterns of resource use. 

Economists work in many specialities including money 
and banking, international trade and finance, labor, public 
finance, industrial policy, business cycles and forecasting. 
Social issues and problems such as poverty, crime, dis- 
crimination, immigration, aging, energy, pollution and edu- 
cation are typical subjects of faculty research. 

The faculty of the Economics Department participates in 
programs leading to both undergraduate and graduate 
degrees. One undergraduate program leads to a bachelor 
of arts degree with a major in economics, which focuses 
on economics as a social science. Another undergraduate 
program leads to a bachelor of arts degree with a major 
in business administration and a concentration in busi- 
ness economics and requires a larger number of business 
courses. Both programs prepare the student for a variety 
of career opportunities in business and government as 
well as advanced studies in economics, business, public 
administration and law. Graduate study is offered in eco- 
nomics, leading to a master of arts degree. Alternatively, 
students may follow the Master of Business Administra- 
tion curriculum, with a concentration in business econom- 
ics. 

Credential Information 

For students interested in a teaching credential, the De- 
partment of Economics offers courses which may be in- 
cluded In the Multiple Subjects Waiver Program; the 
Single Subject Waiver Program in Business; and in the 
Supplementary Authorization Programs in Economics and 
In Economics and Consumer Education. 

Further information on the requirements for teaching cre- 
dentials is available from the Division of Teacher Educa- 
tion. Students interested in exploring careers in teaching 
at the elementary or secondary school levels should con- 
tact the Office of Admission to Teacher Education, Educa- 
tion Classroom 207. 

Prizes in Economics 

Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award 
Outstanding Senior In Economics 
Outstanding Graduate Student in Economics 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

All of the following requirements must be met for the de- 
gree. For assistance in interpreting these requirements 


contact the Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706. 
Students should also contact their faculty adviser in the 
Economics Department prior to or during their first semes- 
ter. 

Required Lower-Division Courses 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 
Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5), may 
be substituted for Economics 201 and 202. 

Accounting 201 A,B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 

Math 135 Business Calculus (3) 
or Math 130 A Short Course In Calculus (4) 
or Math 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 

Note: Accounting 201 A, Elementary Accounting (3), and 
Math 150A,B, Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4,4), may 
be substituted for Accounting 201 A,B and Math 135. 

Manag Scl 265 Introduction to Information Systems 
and Computer Programming (3) 

Note: Management Science 264, Computer Programming 
(2), and Management Science 263, Introduction to Infor- 
mation Systems (1), may be substituted for Management 
Science 265. 

English Proficiency Requirement 

Cal State Fullerton Examination In Writing Proficiency 
(EWP). 

Bus Administration 301 , Business Writing (3) 

Note: Bus Admin 301 , Business Writing, should be taken 
before registering for any 400-level SBAE courses. 

Required Upper-Division Courses 

Economics 310 Informed Microeconomic Theory (3) 
Economics 320 Informed Macroeconomic Theory (3) 
Manag Sci 361 Probability and Statistical Methods in 
Business and Economics (4) 
and 18 units of upper-division economics electives, 6 
units of which must be 400 level. 

Other Requirements, Grades and Residence 

Other Subjects. Complete at least 50 units of courses 
outside the School of Business Administration and Eco- 
nomics. The department recommends that these courses 
be from the social sciences and mathematics. Students 
planning to do graduate work in economics are advised to 
take Math 150A,B; Economics 440 and Economics 441. 
Complete all university requirements for the bachelor’s 
degree. 

Grade-Point Average (GPA). Attain at least a 2.0 GPA (C 
average) in all university courses; in all required courses 
in economics, accounting and management science and 
in all courses in economics. 

Grade Option. Take all required courses in economics. 


Economics 


accounting and management science for a letter grade 
(A.B.C.D.F). The credit/no credit grading option may not 
be used for these courses, and a grade of CR (credit) will 
not satisfy the requirements for the degree. Exception: 
courses in calculus may be taken under the credit/no 
credit grading option, although courses taken to meet 
general education requirements must be taken for a letter 
grade. 

Residence. At least 15 units of courses must be taken in 
residence at the School of Business Administration and 
Economics at Cal State Fullerton. Also fulfill university 
residence requirements. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Business Economics Con- 
centration.” 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

The economics minor covers the basics in the discipline 
of economics and gives students the opportunity to ex- 
plore personal interests through electives. Note that a 
course in calculus (Math 135 or equivalent) is prerequisite 
to Economics 310 and 320. 

Required Lower-DIvIslon Courses 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 
Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5), may 
be substituted for Economics 201 and Economics 202. 

Required Upper-Division Courses 

Economics 310 Informed Microeconomic Theory (3) 
Economics 320 Informed Macroeconomic Theory (3) 
and 9 units of upper division economics electives 

* Note: Students with a major in business administration 
and a concentration other than economics, who wish to 
minor in economics, must take Economics 201 and 202 (or 
210) and 310 as part of their major. For such students, 
these requirements in the minor will be waived and the 
minor will consist of Economics 320 and nine units of 
upper-division economics electives. Students with a major 
in business administration and a concentration in busi- 
ness economics may not also minor in economics. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Business Economics Con- 
centration.” 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

This program provides preparation for professional ca- 
reers in private Industry and government and provides a 
foundation for further graduate work at the doctoral level. 
Full-time and part-time students can be accommodated. 
Most of the courses are scheduled in the evening. 

The curriculum is designed for students with an under- 
graduate degree in business administration or economics. 


and consists of 10 courses (30 units). Provided that all 
prerequisites have been satisfied, the program may be 
completed in one year (full time) or 2/2 years (part time). 

The required courses progress from economic theory 
through economic model building and forecasting to the 
seminar in which the student prepares a thesis applying 
economic theory and econometric methods to a specific 
area of investigation. The curriculum also includes five 
courses (15 units) of electives. 

Most graduate courses In the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics require “classified SBAE status” 
and are open only to students with classified standing in 
the M.A. In Economics, M.B.A., M.S. In Management 
Science, or M.S. in Taxation programs. 

Admission 

Students meeting the following requirements will be ad- 
mitted to postbaccalaureate — unclassified standing: 

1. Acceptable bachelor’s degree from appropriately ac- 
credited institution, or equivalent. 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 In the last 60 semes- 
ter units attempted, and in good standing at last college 
attended. 

Note: Postbaccalaureate — unclassified students may en- 
roll In undergraduate courses (100 thru 400 level) but are 
generally Ineligible for graduate economics courses (500 
level). Such students may wish to take undergraduate 
courses which are necessary to meet the requirements for 
classified standing (see below). Upon completing the re- 
quirements, the student may file an Application for 
Change of Academic Objective — Graduate requesting ad- 
mission to the M.A. in Economics program. Admission to 
the university as a postbaccalaureate — unclassified stu- 
dent does not constitute admission to the program, does 
not confer priority, nor does it guarantee future admission. 
Students planning to apply for admission to the program 
should confer with the graduate adviser In the Department 
of Economics. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be admitted with conditionally classified standing: 

3. Overall undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5. 

4. An average score of 500 on the Graduate Record Ex- 
amination (G.R.E.). 

Note: Conditionally classified students may take a limited 
number of courses at the graduate level, subject to the 
approval of the graduate adviser of the Department of 
Economics. Students are expected to advance promptly 
to classified standing. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be advanced to classified standing. Such students are 
eligible to take graduate courses for which they are quali- 
fied. 


Economics 


Completion of the following courses at Cal State Fuller- 
ton (or equivalent courses at other institutions) with a 
grade-point average of at least 3.0 (B average). The 
course in calculus must have a grade of at least C. 
Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 
Principles of Macroeconomics 
Intermediate Microeconomic 


( 3 ) 


Intermediate Macroeconomic 


Economics 202 
Economics 310 
Analysis (3) 

Economics 320 
Analysis (3) 

Economics 420 Money and Banking (3) 
or three units of upper-division electives 
Manag Scl 361 Statistical Methods in Business and 
Economics (3) 

Mathematics 135 Business Calculus (3) 

6. Approval of study plan. 


Curriculum 

Note: Students are urged to meet as soon as possible with 
the graduate adviser In the Department of Economics to 
file a study plan and advance to classified standing. 

Any study plan course in which a D grade is received must 
be repeated, and must receive at least a C grade, regard- 
less of the overall grade-point average of the student. 

Required Courses 


Economics 440 
Economics 502 
Economics 503 
Economics 505 


Introduction to Econometrics (3) 
Adv Microeconomic Analysis (3) 
Adv Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 
Econ Models and Forecasting (3) 


Elective Courses 


15 units of elective courses in economics at the 400 or 500 
level. (Note: With the approval of the graduate adviser of 
the Department of Economics, some of these courses 
may be in fields outside of, but related to, economics.) At 
least six units of elective courses must be at the 500 level, 
and at least six units must be in economics. Economics 
596 is specifically designed to serve as an elective in this 
program. The topic of the course rotates every semester 
and It may be repeated for credit. 

Terminal Evaluation: Thesis 

Economics 598 Thesis Research (3) 


Economics Courses 

100 The Economic Environment (3) 

The application of economics to the problems of unemploy- 
ment and inflation, the distribution of income, competition 
and monopoly, the role of government In the economy, and 
other policy issues. Not open to prebusiness, business ad- 
ministration majors or minors, economics majors or minors, 
or international business majors. 


201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 

Principles of individual consumer and producer decision- 
making in various market structures; the price system; mar- 
ket performance and government policy. 

202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 201. Principles of macroeconomic 
analysis and policy; unemployment and inflation; financial 
institutions; international trade; economic growth; compara- 
tive systems. 

210 Principles of Economics (5) 

Prerequisite: Open only to junior transfers. (Duplicates 201 
and 202.) Economic analysis and policy. The central prob- 
lem of scarcity, economic Institutions of the United States, 
resource allocation and income distribution, economic sta- 
bility and growth, the role of public policy, and international 
applications. 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 202 (or 210) and Math 135. Ration- 
al decision-making behavior of consumers and firms and 
price and output determination in markets. 

320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 202 (or 210) and Math 135. The 
determinants of the level of national Income, employment 
and prices, and monetary and fiscal policies. 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. Alternative eco- 
nomic systems; their theoretical foundations, actual eco- 
nomic institutions, and achievements and failures. Contrast 
between socialist and capitalist systems. 

331 The Soviet Economy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210; The structure and 
performance of the Soviet economy; the problems of al- 
locating scarce resources and sustaining economic growth 
in a planned economy. 

332 Economic Problems of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. The natural re- 
sources, population, agricultural, industrial, transportation, 
communications, monetary, banking, etc. problems of Asia, 
(i.e., China, Japan, and the Asian subcontinent). The rela- 
tion of non-economic problems to the economy. 

333 Economic Development: Analysis and Case Studies 
( 3 ) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. The processes of 
economic growth with references to developing areas. Capi- 
tal formation, resource allocation, relation to the world econ- 
omy, economic planning and Institutional factors, with case 
studies. 

334 Economics of Latin American and the Caribbean (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. Examines re- 
gional economic problems within an international context: 
dependence. Industrialization and the International corpora- 
tion; agriculture; regional cooperation; inflation; trade and 
debt problems. Major economic thinkers will be discussed. 


Economics 


335 The International Economy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. The theory, prac- 
tice and institutions of the international economy. Interna- 
tional trade and investment; European economic 
community; balance of payments; foreign exchange rates; 
multinational enterprise; trade with developing countries; 
East-West trade; international economic policy. 

340 The Economics of Regulation (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. The laws pertain- 
ing to regulation and the implications for each regulated 
industry. Industry studies; the effects of regulation on price, 
output, innovations, etc. 

350 American Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. The development 
of American economic institutions; economic problems, 
economic growth and economic welfare. 

351 European Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. The evolution of 
European economic institutions and their relation to the 
development of industry, commerce, transportation and fi- 
nance in the principal European countries. 

361 Urban Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. Theory and anal- 
ysis of the urban economy, urban economic problems and 
policy. 

362 Environmental and Resource Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210, or consent of 
instructor. Economic analysis of environmental problems 
and related issues in resource development: externalities, 
property rights, social costs and benefits, user cost, rent and 
decisionmaking under uncertainty. 

363 The Economics of Energy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201 or 210. Economic theory 
applied to energy problems, the impact of energy develop- 
ment on economic structure, and the role of government in 
allocating energy resources and influencing their use. 

410 Government and Business (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310 and Business Administration 
301 or the equivalents. Business organization, conduct and 
performance; the rationale and impact of public policy on 
business and business activities, including the regulated in- 
dustries, sick industries and antitrust policy. 

411 International Trade (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310 and Business Administration 
301 or the equivalents. The theory of international trade and 
the means and significance of balance of payments adjust- 
ments; past and present developments in international, 
commercial and monetary policy. 

412 Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310 and Business Administration 
301 or the equivalents. Labor supply and demand, labor 
force participation, employment, unemployment, human 
capital, wage differentials, disadvantaged labor market 
groups, discrimination and wage-related income transfers. 


416 Benefit-Cost Analysis (3) (Formerly 364) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310 or consent of instructor. Busi- 
ness Administration 301 or the equivalent. Evaluation of 
benefit-cost studies prepared for government programs; 
educational and water resources. Methods of estimating 
environmental, cultural, life-saving, and macroeconomic 
benefits and costs; handling future benefits and costs. 

417 Public Finance (3) (Formerly 365) 

Prerequisite: Economics 310 or consent of the Instructor, 
Business Administration 301 or the equivalent. Government 
finance at the federal, state and local levels; the impact of 
taxation and spending on resource allocation, income distri- 
bution, stabilization and growth. 

420 Money and Banking (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320 and Business Administration 
301 or the equivalents. The money supply process and the 
Impact of monetary policy on economic activity. 

421 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 320 and Business Administration 
301 or the equivalents. The techniques of monetary and 
fiscal policy; of their relative roles in promoting economic 
stability and growth. 

440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 202 (or 210) Manag Sci 361 and 
Business Administration 301, or the equivalents. The theory 
and application of econometrics, economic measurement; 
the specification and estimation of econometric models; sta- 
tistical methods In economic research. 

441 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 202 (or 210) and Math 135 or 
equivalent. Economic theory, from microeconomics and 
macroeconomics. Content varies; constrained optimization 
problems and rational decision-making. 

446 Managerial Economics (3) 

(Same as Management 446.) 

450 History of Economic Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 or 320 and Business Adminis- 
tration 301. Major schools of thought and of leading individ- 
ual economists as they influenced economic thought and 
policy. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: economics major with Business Administra- 
tion 301, Manag Sci 361, Economics 310 (or 320) (or the 
equivalents) or international business major with Business 
Administration 301, Economics 202 and 335, Manag Sci 361 
(or the equivalents); and consent of the department intern- 
ship adviser, at least junior standing, 2.5 GPA and one se- 
mester in residence at the university. Planned and 
supervised work experience. May be repeated to a total of 
six units credit. Credit/ No Credit grading only. 

496 Student-to-Student Tutorial (1-3) 

Prerequisites: economics major or concentration. Econom- 
ics 310 and 320, Business Administration 301, senior stand- 
ing, 3.0 GPA and consent of department chair. Student 
learns through teaching (tutoring) other students enrolled in 


Economics 


principles and intermediate economics courses. Consult 
“Student-to-Student Tutorials” in this catalog for more infor- 
mation. May not be used to satisfy the elective requirements 
for the major or concentration in economics. Credit/No 
Credit grading only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: economics major or concentration, Econom- 
ics 310 and 320, Business Administration 301 (or the equiva- 
lents), senior or graduate standing, and consent of 
Instructor and department chair. Directed Independent In- 
quiry. May be repeated for credit. Not open to students on 
academic probation. 

502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites; Economics 310 and classified SBAE status or 
consent of instructor. The determination of prices and out- 
puts in a market system. Demand, cost, production, theories 
and programming models of the firm, probabilistic and in- 
vestment models of the firm, game theoretic and behavioral 
models of the firm. 

503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 320 and classified SBAE status or 
consent of Instructor. The determination of employment, 
fluctuations of real and money Income, and the forces un- 
derlying economic growth. 

505 Economic Models and Forecasting (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 440 or consent of instructor, and 
classified SBAE status. Statistical methods of econometric 
estimation and forecasting. Practical problems of economic 
forecasting: model specification, multivariate regression, 
forecasting for firms, and the national economy. 

515 The Price System and Resource Allocation (4) 
Prerequisites; classified SBAE status and Math 135 or the 
equivalent. Microeconomic analysis and policy under mixed 
capitalism. The economic environment and Institutions, mar- 
kets, consumer choice, production and resource allocation. 
Monopoly power and government intervention. (Not open to 
M.A. Economics candidates.) 

516 Economics and Benefit-Cost Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites; Economics 201 (or 210) and classified gradu- 
ate status in environmental studies or public administration. 
Economics and benefit-cost analysis of public projects. 
Consumer demand and the estimation of benefits; the na- 
ture of cost in a market economy; price controls, unemploy- 
ment and inflation; and criteria for choice, for multi-year 
projects. For elective credit in the M.S. Environmental Stud- 
ies or M.P.A. 


517 Economics of Public Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 515 (or 516) and classified gradu- 
ate status in environmental studies, public administration or 
taxation. Economics and federal, state and local govern- 
mental spending, taxation and borrowing. Major taxes, their 
effects on market prices, income distribution, employment 
and inflation and evaluation of reform proposals. (For elec- 
tive credit in the M.S. Environmental Studies, M.P.A. or M.S. 
Taxation.) 

521 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 or 515 and classified SBAE 
status. National Income determination and macroeconomic 
models. Inflation and unemployment. Monetary and fiscal 
policies, international trade and foreign exchange (Not 
open to M.A. Economics candidates or students with credit 
for Economics 320.) 

522 Comparative Economics Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 515 or 310 and classified SBAE 
status. Analytical and prescriptive approaches to economic 
problems of scarcity, development, fiscal and monetary pol- 
icy, planning and poverty. (Not open to M.A. Economics 
candidates.) 

596 Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 and 320; classified SBAE sta- 
tus or consent of instructor. Contemporary research and 
materials such as; resource economics; history of economic 
thought; international monetary systems; economic fore- 
casting; economics of planning; macroeconomics; human 
resource economics. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (3) 

Open to qualified graduate students. Directed independent 
inquiry. Not open to students on academic probation. 

598 Thesis Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 502, 503 and classified SBAE sta- 
tus. Corequisite: Economics 505. Thesis research in eco- 
nomics: selection and approval of topic; outline; 
methodology; literature survey; data collection and analysis; 
presentation of results. Award of the grade is contingent 
upon the completion and acceptance of the thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 440, 502 and 503; classified gradu- 
ate status; and consent of instructor and department chair 
(or designee) . Directed advanced independent inquiry. May 
be repeated for credit. Not open to students on academic 
probation. 


Economics 


Department of Finance 


Department Chair. Marco Tonietti 
Department Office: Langsdorf Hall 556 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts In Business Administration 

Concentration in Finance 

Master of Business Administration 

Concentration in Finance 

Faculty 

Hamdi Bilici, Albert Bueso, Donald Crane, 

John Erickson, Albert J. Fredman, Peter Mlynaryk, 
Dennis O’Connor, Paul Sarmas, Radha Sharma, 

P. James Stickels, Ted Tewles, 

Marco Tonietti, B. E. Tsagris 

Advisers 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706, pro- 
vides information on admissions, curriculum and gradua- 
tion requirements, registration and grading procedures, 
residence and similar academic matters. In addition, ad- 
vising on curriculum content and career opportunities may 
be obtained from the chair of the Finance Department or 
from: 

Financial Management 
Insurance 
Personal Financial 
Planning 
Real Estate 

Securities and investments 

INTRODUCTION 

Finance is the study of the methods by which a firm pro- 
vides itself with cash to run its daily operations and its 
long-range expansion. 

In choosing their course work students may elect one of 
five areas of emphasis within the finance concentration of 
the major in business administration; financial manage- 
ment; securities-investments; real estate; personal finan- 
cial planning; and insurance. A financial management 
emphasis can lead to positions as financial analyst for 
industrial firms, banks or public utilities. A securities- 
Investment emphasis may lead to stock brokerage firm 
opportunities. 

Financial analysts can work in real estate for developers, 
appraisers or brokers. Professional financial planning for 
individuals may be a career choice with an emphasis in 


Marco Tonietti 
Marco Tonietti 

Donald Crane 
B. E. Tsagris 
Albert Fredman 


Finance 


personal financial planning. Working with pensions or with 
life or health insurance is an option for students who 
choose an insurance emphasis. 

Credential Information 

For students interested in a teaching credential, the De- 
partment of Finance offers courses which may be includ- 
ed In the Single Subject Waiver Program In Business and 
in the Supplementary Authorization Program in Econom- 
ics and Consumer Education. 

Further information on the requirements for teaching cre- 
dentials is available from the Division of Teacher Educa- 
tion. Students interested in exploring careers in teaching 
at the elementary or secondary school levels should con- 
tact the Office of Admission to Teacher Education. 

Prizes in Finance 
The Wall Street Journal Award 
Edward D’Cunha Finance Award 
Financial Management Association Award 
Outstanding Finance Student Award 
Outstanding Service Award 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Finance Concentration.” 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Finance Concentration.” 


Finance Courses 

310 Personal Financial Management (3) 

Financial problems of the household In allocating resources 
and planning expenditures. Housing, insurance, installment 
buying, medical care, savings and investments. (May not be 
used to fulfill the concentration requirement In finance.) 

320 Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 B. Financing business enter- 
prises; financial planning and control; analysis of alternative 
sources and uses of combinations of short-, Intermediate- 
and long-term debt and equity. Cost of capital. Study of 
capital investment decisions; capital budget analysis and 
valuation; working capital and capital structure manage- 
ment; relative Impact on the international environment of 
financial decisions. 

331 Financial Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Fund statement analysis; cash 
budgeting and pro forma financial statements; traditional 
versus modern financial statement analysis; break-even 
analysis; cash, marketable securities, inventory and ac- 
counts receivable management models; short-term borrow- 
ing. 

332 Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Financial leverage; debt, com- 


mon and preferred stock financing; cost of capital and capi- 
tal structure; leasing; dividend policy; mergers; failure and 
reorganizations; capital budgeting. 

340 Security Investments (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 320 and Management Science 265, 
or consent of instructor. The analysis, selection and man- 
agement of securities; characteristics of securities, valua- 
tion, trading methods, role of mutual funds and other 
institutions; computerized statement analysis and portfolio 
selection methods. 

351 Real Estate and Urban Land Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320 or consent of instructor. Real es- 
tate principles, practices and investment decisions. Equity 
investment, finance, legal aspects, practices, principles, 
property development, real estate administration in the pub- 
lic sector, real estate market analysis, valuation. 

360 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior status. Life, casualty and liabili- 
ty insurance. Individual and group insurance programs; 
methods of establishing risks and rates. 

370 International Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320 or consent of Instructor. Financing 
problems of international business. The international finan- 
cial environment, taxation of foreign income, international 
capital and money markets, problems of risk in foreign in- 
vestments, and financial techniques for the operation of a 
multinational firm. 

410 Theory & Practice of Personal Financial Planning (2) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Developing, implementing and 
monitoring comprehensive personal financial plans. In- 
cludes risk management, investments, taxation, retirement 
and estate planning, as well as professional practices. 

425 Commercial Bank and Financial Institution 
Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. The solution of financial institu- 
tion problems. Major financial intermediaries and the deci- 
sion-making problems they face. Regulation and its effect 
on management operations. Group problems and case 
studies. 

430 Computer-Aided Financial Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 331 or 332. Set-up and analysis of 
financial models using readily available software programs 
on campus computers. Introduces financial databases. Em- 
ploys financial modeling programs to test decision models 
dealing with financial valuation and planning. 

432 Financial Forecasting and Budgeting (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Forecasting in financial manage- 
ment; construction and interpretation of economic forecasts 
for the economy, industry and the firm; construction and 
interpretation of financial plans; evaluation of capital acqui- 
sition decisions under certainty and uncertainty conditions. 

433 Problems in Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 331 or 332. Case studies. Group prob- 
lems of estimating funds requirements, long-term financial 


Finance 


planning, controlling and evaluating cash flows, and financ- 
ing acquisitions and mergers, capital budgeting, and cost of 
capital. Group problems and case studies. 

440 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 320. Capital and money markets in the 
American economy; markets for new corporate and govern- 
ment issues; secondary markets; interrelation of financial 
institutions; factors influencing yields and security prices. 

442 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 340 or consent of instructor. Computer 
applications for statement analysis, valuation models, and 
portfolio selection and management models. Standard and 
Poor’s “compustat tapes.” A simulated portfolio manage- 
ment game at the end of the course. 

443 Portfolio Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 340 and Manag Sci 361 . Markowitz and 
Sharpe models; basic statistical, mathematical and eco- 
nomic concepts in portfolio theory; efficient capital markets; 
applications of portfolio theory to assets other than securi- 
ties; portfolio revisions; survey of developments in the field; 
computer applications. 

444 Securities Options (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 340 or consent of instructor. Put and 
call options. Option writing, option buying, spreads, strad- 
dles, option pricing models, conversions, tax implications 
and recent literature. Students manage a paper portfolio 
including options. 

450 Real Estate Investment Strategy (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 351 or consent of instructor. Back- 
ground discussion of investment risks, reasons for investing 
in real estate from the viewpoint of the individual investor. 
Preparation of personal real estate Investment portfolio and 
analytical methods for real estate investment evaluation. 

451 Real Estate/Land Use Law— Case Studies (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 351. Real estate law. Cases provide 
illustrations of specific legal situations; financial institutions, 
property rights, zoning, land use law and environmental im- 
pact requirements. 

452 Real Estate Finance (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 351. Financial institutions and real es- 
tate credit. Sources and uses of capital (funds) in financing 
real estate transactions. Money and capital markets and 
their effect on credit availability. Instruments in real estate 
finance. Investment methods and decisions. Group prob- 
lems and case studies. 

453 Real Estate Valuation (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Real property value, historical 
evolution of valuation principles, approaches in urban and 
real property appraisals, alternative methods and tech- 
niques for property valuation. 

454 Real Estate and Urban Development (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 351. Factors and influences of urban 
growth and development. Economic factors and real estate 
supply and demand. Location theory and urban growth pat- 


terns. Public policy as a factor In real estate development. 
Analysis of real estate markets. 

455 Real Estate Investment Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Alternative analytical techniques 
in evaluating real estate investments. Tax aspects, meas- 
urement of investment returns, application of computer 
models to investment decisions. Lecture, discussion and 
case analysis of major Investment types— raw land, apart- 
ment houses, commercial and industrial uses. 

456 Property Development and Real Estate Policy 
Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 351. Decision making process in the 
property development process— from raw land to retail mar- 
keting of completed product. Policy formulation and Im- 
plementation, project feasibility analysis, financial analysis, 
computer assisted analysis; case studies. 

459 Real Estate Research: Selected Topics (3) 

Prerequisites; Finance 351 and 452 or 453. Group problems, 
laboratory work as determined by computer terminal availa- 
bility. 

461 Business Risk Management (3) 

Prerequisite; Finance 360 or consent of instructor. Tech- 
niques and structures of risk management; risk planning, 
control and financing in the business enterprise. 

462 Life and Health Insurance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 360 or consent of instructor. Life and 
health insurance coverages, both individual and group poli- 
cies; the operation of insurance companies. Business and 
estate planning, pension plans, and government benefits. 

495 Internship (1-^) 

Prerequisites; Finance 331 or 332, a major in finance, con- 
sent of department internship adviser, junior standing, 2.5 
GPA and one semester in residence at the university. Also 
open to international business majors. Planned and superv- 
ised work experience. May be repeated for credit up to a 
total of six units. Credit/ No Credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites; senior standing and approval by department 
chair. Open to undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 
Not open to students on academic probation. 

517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Prerequisites; Accounting 510 and classified SBAE status. 
The methodology of financial management. The primary 
tools for financial analysis, long-term investment decisions, 
valuation and working capital management. International 
applications. 

523 Seminar In Corporate Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisites; Finance 517 and classified SBAE status. The 
analysis of the financial decision-making process through 
case studies and seminar presentations. Current financial 
theory and models. International applications. 

533 Seminar in Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 523 and classified SBAE status. Opti- 


Flnance 


mal financing and asset administration; advanced tech- 
niques of capital budgeting; application of analytical meth- 
ods to the administration of the finance function of the 
business firm. 

540 Seminar in Financiai Markets (3) 

Prerequisites; Finance 517 or equivalent and classified 
SBAE status. Structure and operation of major financial in- 
stitutions; portfolio composition, price-cost problems, and 
market behavior; analysis of financial intermediation and 
interrelation of financiai institutions and markets. 

541 Seminar in investment Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or equivalent and classified 
SBAE status. Problems of Investment and portfolio manage- 
ment; concepts of risk evaluation and investment criteria; 
analysis of interest rate movements; investment valuation 
and timing; regulation and administrative problems of the 
industry. 


551 Seminar in Reai Estate investment (3) 

Prerequisites; Finance 517 or equivalent and classified 
SBAE status. Problems of real estate Investment; concepts 
of evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of real proper- 
ty values; real estate development and financing. Case stud- 
ies. 

570 Seminar in internationai Financiai Management (3) 
Prerequisites; Finance 517 or consent of instructor and clas- 
sified SBAE status. The financial problems of the multina- 
tional firm. International financing instruments, capital 
investment decisions, and constraints on the profitability of 
multinational businesses. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite; classified SBAE status. Directed independent 
Inquiry. Not open to students on academic probation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites; classified SBAE status, consent of instructor 
and approval by department chair. May be repeated for 
credit. Not open to students on academic probation. 


Finance 



International Business 
Program 

Program Coordinator: Irene Lange 
Program Office: Langsdorf Hall 626 

Program Offered 

Bachelor of Arts in International Business 

Program Council 

Farouk Abdelwahed (Management) 

Linda Andersen-Fiala (French) 

Orapin Duangploy (Accounting) 

Irene Lange (Marketing) 

Maryanna Lanier (Economics) 

Doris Merrifield (German) 

Marcial Prado (Spanish) 

Advisers 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706, pro- 
vides information on admissions, curriculum and gradua- 
tion requirements, registration and grading procedures, 
residence and similar academic matters. Additional advis- 
ing on curriculum content and career opportunities is 
available from the International Business Program: 

International Business: Irene Lange 
French: Linda Andersen-Fiala 
German: Doris Merrifield 
Spanish: Marcial Prado 
Other languages: Jacqueline Kiraithe 

INTRODUCTION 

The international business curriculum covers the funda- 
mentals of business administration, with an emphasis on 
international business. Foreign language courses are re- 
quired and stress the use of the language in international 
business. The program also includes an internship with an 
international business. This curriculum prepares students 
for entry level positions in international business. Oppor- 
tunities exist in contracts, distribution and sales and may 
lead to general management positions. Since Southern 
California is a major international business center, there 
are career opportunities with internationally oriented firms 
in this area. Other career opportunities may involve inter- 
national travel or overseas assignments. 

Language concentrations are offered in French, German 
and Spanish. Other concentrations may be developed in 
the future. The program is offered jointly by the School of 


International Business 


Business Administration and Economics and the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Prize In International Business 

The Dennis RIppIn-Internatlonal Marketing Association 
Scholarship 

Preparation For The Major 

Students who expect to complete this program in the usu- 
al four-year period should realize that the total require- 
ments, including general education courses and 
prerequisites, can exceed 124 semester units. Intermedi- 
ate level competency in a foreign language, equivalent to 
Foreign Language 204, is prerequisite to the required con- 
centration courses. It is therefore strongly recommended 
that students complete a minimum of three years of for- 
eign language study while in high school. Similarly, alge- 
bra and geometry are necessary for many required 
business courses. The equivalent of three years of high 
school mathematics, including a second course in alge- 
bra, is the prerequisite for the required Mathematics 135, 
Business Calculus. Students without the necessary back- 
ground will need to enroll in Mathematics 100, Precalculus 
Mathematics. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS 

All of the following requirements must be met for the de- 
gree. For assistance in interpreting these requirements, 
contact the Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706. 

Required Lower-DIvIslon Core Courses 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 
Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Note: Economics 210, Principles of Economics (5), may 
be substituted for Economics 201 and 202. 

Math 135 Business Calculus (3) 
or Math 130 A Short Course in Calculus (4) 
or Math 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 
Accounting 201 A,B Elementary Accounting (3,3) 
Management 246 Business Law (3) 

Manag Sci 265 Introduction to Information Systems 
and Computer Programming (3) 

Note: Intermediate competency In French, German or 
Spanish is prerequisite to the required concentration 
courses and, if necessary, students should take Foreign 
Language 101, 102, 203 and/or 204. Students may enroll 
at any point in this sequence of courses for which their 
previous study and/or experience have prepared them. 
Normally, two or three years of high school language 
study are counted as the equivalent of 10 units of college 
language study. Students should consult an adviser in the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures before 
enrolling In their first foreign language course. 

English Proficiency Requirement 

Cal State Fullerton Examination in Writing Proficiency 


(EWP) 

Business Administration 301 Business Writing (3) 

Note: Business Administration 301 should be taken before 
registering for any 400-level SBAE courses. 

Required Upper-Division Core Courses 

Note: International business majors shall not enroll In any 
required upper-division core course until they have com- 
pleted all of the required lower-division core courses with 
a grade of at least “C” in each course. Students desiring 
to enroll in required upper-division core courses while con- 
currently completing the last of their required lower- 
division core courses may select only Business Adminis- 
tration 301, Economics 335 and/or Manag Sci 361. 

Economics 335 International Economy (3) 

Finance 320 Business Finance (3) 

Finance 370 International Business Finance (3) 
Management 339 Managing Business Operations and 
Organizations (3) 

Management 340 Organizational Behavior (3) 

Manag Sci 361 Probability and Statistical Methods In 
Business and Economics (4) 

Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Marketing 458 International Marketing Policies (3) 

And a minimum of three units chosen from among the 
following electives. It is recommended that students take 
up to 12 units of electives, if possible. 


Anthropology 303 Economic Anthropology (3) 
Anthropology 308 Culture Change (3) 

Comp Lit 453 The Novel in France and Germany (3) 
Geography 333 Latin America (3) 

Geography 336 Europe (3) 

Geography 344 Africa (3) 

Geography 360 Economic Geography (3) 

History 350 History of Latin American Civilization (3) 
History 429 Europe Since 1914 (3) 

History 432 Modern Germany from 18th Century (3) 
History 453 Modern Mexico (3) 

Philosophy 312 Business and Professional Ethics (3) 
Poll Sci 430 Government and Politics of a Selected 
Nation-State (3) * 

Poll Sci 431 Government and Politics of a Selected 
Area (3) * 


Poll Sci 457 Politics of International Economics (3) 
Speech Comm 320 Intercultural Communication (3) 


Required Concentration (choose one of the following) 
Concentration in French: 


French 310 
French 311 
French 315 
French 325 


French in the Business World (3) 
French for International Business (3) 
Origins of Modern France (3) 
Contemporary French Civilization (3) 


* When topic is appropriate. 


International Business 


Concentration in German: 


German 310 German in the Business World (3) 
German 311 German for International Business (3) 
German 315 Introduction to German Civilization (3) 
German 325 Current Trends in Culture of German 
Speaking People (3) 


Concentration in Spanish: 

Spanish 310 Spanish in the Business World (3) 
Spanish 311 Spanish for International Business (3) 
Spanish 315 Introduction to Spanish Civilization (3) 
Spanish 316 Introduction to Spanish- American 
Civilization (3) 


Note: Students may substitute one of the following for 
Spanish 315 or 316: 


Spanish 415 Contemporary Spanish Culture (3) 
Spanish 416 Contemp Spanish-American Culture (3) 


Concentrations in Other Languages 


Upon review and recommendation of the International 
Business Program Council, students who have earned 
academic credit for courses equivalent to those In the 
language concentrations, but in languages other than 
French, German and Spanish, may be awarded a degree 
with a concentration in the relevant language. In cases 
where the student has completed some, but not all of the 
equivalents, the Program Council may recommend appro- 
priate course work. 


Required Internships 

Foreign Languages 495 Internship (3) 


and one of the following: 


Economics 495 Internship (3) 

Finance 495 Internship (3) 

Management 495 Internship (3) 

Management Science 495 Internship (3) 

Marketing 495 Internship (3) 

Note: All students are required to spend a minimum of four 
months in full-time employment with a faculty-approved 
firm having international dealings and in which daily use of 
a foreign language is normal procedure. (Highly qualified 
students, i.e., those having a 3.2 GPA in their upper-divi- 
sion core and concentration courses, will be aid^ in find- 
ing six-month positions abroad) . Simultaneous enrollment 
in the two required internships is therefore expected, and 
students normally will not take any other course work 
during this period. 

Other Requirements 

Grade Point Average (GPA): Attain at least a 2.0 GPA (C 
average) in ail university courses, in all core courses, and 
in all concentration courses required for this degree. 

Grade Options: Take ail required core and concentration 
courses for a letter grade (A,B,C,D,F). The credit/ no 
credit grading option may not be used for these courses, 
and a grade of CR (credit) will not satisfy the require- 
ments of the degree. Exceptions: Calculus (Math 130, 135 
or 150A) and Internship may be taken under the credit/no 
credit option, although courses taken to meet general ed- 
ucation requirements must be taken for a letter grade. 

Residence: At least 12 units of upper-division core 
courses, 6 units of upper-division concentration courses 
and 6 units of internships must be taken in residence at 
CSUF. 


International Business 


Department of 
Management 


Department Chain Thomas Johnson 
Department Office: Langsdorf Haii 640 

Programs Offered 

Bacheior of Arts in Business Administration 

Concentration in Management 

Master of Business Administration 

Concentration in Management 

Faculty 

Farouk Abdelwahed, Michael Ames, Thomas Apke, 

Mei Liang Bickner, Robert Chapman, James Conant, 
Richard Gilman, Gamini Gunawardane, Leo Guolo, 
Ghasem Haj-Manoochehri, Dorothy Heide, 

Granville Hough, Richard Houston, Thomas Johnson, 
Geoffrey King, Brian Kleiner, Elliot Kushell, 

Thomas Maher, Thomas Mayes, Richard McCarty, 
Leland McCloud, Kent McKee, Tai Oh, Edgar Wiley, 
Edward Zilbert 

Advisers 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706, pro- 
vides information on admissions, curriculum and gradua- 
tion requirements; registration and grading procedures; 
residence and similar academic matters, in addition, the 
Management Department provides advising on career op- 
portunities and on the emphases within the Management 
Concentration: 

Contract Manag. 

Entrepreneurial Manag. 

General Manag. 

Human Resource Manag. 

Law. 

Operations Manag. 

Organizational Behavior 
and Organizational 
Development 

INTRODUCTION 

Managers are necessary In a wide variety of different 
types of organizations — business and nonbusiness, large 
and small, foreign and domestic. Managers in all of these 
organizations draw on "management” as a knowledge 
base to develop the essential skills (technical, human. 


Geoffrey King/ 
Thomas Maher 
Michael Ames 
Farouk Abdelwahed 
Mei Bickner 
Thomas Apke 
Michael Ames 


Elliot Kushell 


Management 


conceptual) that allow them to implement sucessfully the 
management functions (planning, organizing, leading and 
controlling) while fulfilling various roles (interacting with 
others, processing information, making decisions). The 
desired end result is high productivity for Individuals, 
groups, and the organization as a whole. 

Management courses are designed to teach the funda- 
mental principles underlying organizations, to emphasize 
education which will improve students’ thought proc- 
esses, to provide familiarity with the analytical tools of 
management, and to develop In the student an ability to 
use the techniques involved in analyzing and evaluating 
managerial problems and making sound decisions. 

Students may pursue a wide variety of academic and 
career Interests through six different emphases. These 
emphases Include: (1) contract management, (2) entre- 
preneurial management, (3) general management, (4) 
human resource management, (5) production and opera- 
tions management, and (6) organizational behavior. 

Credential Information 

For students Interested in a teaching credential, the Man- 
agement Department offers courses which may be Includ- 
ed In the Single Subject Waiver Program In Business and 
in the Supplementary Authorization Program in Econom- 
ics and Consumer Education. 

Further information on the requirements for teaching cre- 
dentials is available from the Division of Teacher Educa- 
tion. Students interested in exploring careers in teaching 
at the elementary or secondary school levels should con- 
tact the Office of Admission to Teacher Education. 

Prizes In Management 

The H. Peter GuertIn/APICS Orange County Chapter 
Scholarship 

The Orange County Industrial Relations Research As- 
sociation (OCIRRA) 

The Beach Cities Chapter of the National Contract Man- 
agement Association Scholarship 
The Allan F. Long Scholarship 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Management Concentra- 
tion.” 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Management Concentra- 
tion”. 


Management Courses 

245 Introduction to Legal Principles (3) 

The role of law as It affects the citizen in our society. Case 
studies relating to the legal principles that govern students. 


family members, motor vehicles, consumers, Insureds, real 
estate transactions, investments, employees and estate 
planning. 

246 Business Law (3) 

Philosophy, institutions and role of law in business and soci- 
ety. Functions of courts and attorneys, case studies In areas 
of contracts and on the law relating to sale of goods. 

339 Managing Business Operations and 
Organizations (3) 

Prerequisites; all lower division business core courses or 
instructor’s consent. Administrative processes in utility- 
creating business operations: decision-making; planning; 
controlling; organizing; staffing; supporting business Infor- 
mation systems; measuring and improving effectiveness; 
production processes, production operations and institu- 
tions In American and worldwide business. Uses the Produc- 
tion Lab. Includes taking the Cal State Fullerton Examination 
in Writing Proficiency (fee charged). 

340 Organizational Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: general education in social sciences. Social 
and cultural environments of business. Business ethics. 
Communication, leadership, motivation, perception, person- 
ality development, group dynamics and group growth. Hu- 
man behavior and organizational design and management 
practice In American and world wide business. Uses the 
Behavioral Lab. 

341 Service Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339 and Manag Sci 361. Sys- 
tems and quantitative procedures for services such as food 
service, entertainment, health care and government agen- 
cies. Processes for developing and testing new services. 
Uses Production Lab. Students may not receive credit for 
both Management 341 and 342. 

342 Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339 and Manag Sci 361 . Produc- 
tion systems which combine materials, labor, and capital 
resources to produce goods. Systems, models and methods 
for management of production operations. Product and 
process development. Utilization of computer decision mod- 
els. Uses the Production Lab. Students may not receive 
credit for both Management 341 and 342. 

343 Personnel Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 339 or consent of instructor. The 
personnel function, its activities, and its opportunities. Man- 
agement’s responsibilities for selection, development and 
effective utilization of personnel. Open to non-business ma- 
jors. 

344 Introduction to Systems Concepts (3) 

(Formerly 244) 

Prerequisite: Manag Sci 265. The role of Information sys- 
tems in organizations, general systems theory, information 
concepts, and the function of information In management 
decision making. Includes a project which requires the ap- 
plication of word processing and spreadsheet programs. 


Management 


346 Contract Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 246. Advertised and negotiated 
procurement and the role of contract manager. Fiscal and 
regulatory limitations. The nature of changes, disputes and 
termination. Contract terms and conditions and administra- 
tion. 

347 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 246 or equivalent. Philosophy, in- 
stitutions and role of law in business relationships. Business 
ethics. Case studies in areas of agency, partnerships, corpo- 
rations, bankruptcy, unfair competition and trade regulation. 

348 Business Law (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 246 or equivalent. The philoso- 
phy, institutions and role of law in commercial and personal 
transactions: case studies in personal property, bailments, 
commercial paper, secured transactions, real property, 
mortgages, trusts, community property, wills, estate admin- 
istration and insurance. 

349 Law for Small Business (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 246. The philosophy, institutions, 
and role of law and their practical applications in the areas 
of interest to the small businessperson. Product liability, 
consumer rights, workman’s compensation and other top- 
ics. 

400 Regulatory Law of Business (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 246, Economics 310. Philoso- 
phy, institutions and role of law as it regulates business. 
Courts, administrative agencies, case studies relating to 
securities, antitrust, consumer protection, employment, en- 
vironment and managerial social responsibility. 

431 Women in Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 340. (For men and women.) In- 
creasing participation in the management of organizations. 
Employment and earnings, affirmative action, understanding 
male-female and female-female work relationships, dual ca- 
reers, and learning how to increase one’s effectiveness in 
organizations. 

433 Advanced Topics in Human Resource Management 
( 3 ) 

Prerequisite: Management 343. Contemporary concepts and 
procedures in compensation and staffing. Current topics 
and controversial issues in human resource management 
are also covered. 

439 Organizational Change and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 340 or equivalent; senior or 
graduate status. Utilizing behavioral science knowledge to 
improve organizational effectiveness. Diagnosing organiza- 
tional problems; designing planned change; individual-, 
group- and organizational-level interventions; overcoming 
resistance to change and issues in the consultant-client 
relationship. 

440 Emerging Issues in Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339 and 340 or consent of in- 
structor. For upper-division and graduate students. Busi- 
ness and management in America. The interrelationships of 
technological, economic, political and social forces with the 


business enterprises and their ethical obligations to owners, 
employees, consumers and society at large. Open to non- 
business majors. 

441 Labor-Management Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Management 339. Impact of labor-manage- 
ment relations upon labor, management, and the public. 
Proper grievance procedure, collective bargaining and set- 
tlement of disputes. Uses the Behavioral Lab. 

442 Grievance Handling and Arbitration (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 441, or consent of instructor, 
and Management 340. In-depth study of the grievance 
procedures and the arbitration process and procedure In the 
private sector. Topics include discipline, contract interpreta- 
tion, arbitrable issues, management right issues, such as 
subcontracting and employee rights. Uses cases and simu- 
lations. 

443 Individual, Interpersonal and Group Dynamics for 
Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339, 340 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Case studies and current literature on human problems 
of work situations. Developing self-knowledge; manager 
motivation; communicator strengths; improving Interaction 
skills; and improving interaction processes in groups. Uses 
the Behavioral Lab. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

444 Project Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management and management science core 
and other 300 level management courses In student’s con- 
centration. Technology for managing business and other 
enterprises as cybernetic systems. The design and control 
of systems appropriate for product, project and program 
levels of analysis. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) Uses 
Production Lab. 

445 Advanced Production Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 341 or 342 and management 
science core. Planning and control methodologies for pro- 
duction operations. Quantitative approaches which inte- 
grate cost, schedule and technical performance criteria. 
Collection, evaluation and use of real-time information. Indi- 
vidual and group projects. Uses the Production Lab. 

446 Managerial Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: management science core. Economics 310 
and Management 339. Management tools applied. Econom- 
ics and statistics in decision-making process; use of cases 
and group problems; cost, demand, supply, price, product 
and competition. 

447 Management Decision Games (3) 

Prerequisites: business administration core less Manage- 
ment 449, or consent of instructor. A simulation of an 
oligopolistic industry. Statistics and other analytical tools to 
make managerial decisions In management. (2 hours lec- 
ture; 2 hours activity) 

448 Seminar in Small Business Consulting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 201 B, Management 339, Market- 
ing 351 and senior standing. A seminar. Planning and work- 
ing in a consulting relationship with small local businesses. 


Management 


Lectures, research and field work. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours 
fieldwork) 

449 Seminar in Business Poiicies (3) 

Prerequisites: ail other School of Business Administration 
and Economics core courses and departmental approval. 
Integrative cases from top management viewpoint. Adminis- 
trative processes, ethical-legal-economic implications of 
business decisions, international applications; organization 
theory and policy formulation. Individual and team efforts. 
Uses the Behavioral Lab. 

453 Power and Politics in Business Organizations (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339, 340 and senior standing. 
Power and influence models as alternatives to quantitative 
decision-making methods. Used in the organizational/politi- 
cal setting of business to improve understanding of behavior 
and managerial effectiveness. 

454 MIS Analysis and Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Management 339, 340; Manag Sci 362, 408; 
Accounting 302. Strategies for developing I/S applications. 
Life cycle phases; feasibility studies; project management; 
system requirements; system optimization; structured sys- 
tem design; conversion and maintenance. Seminar, case 
studies and laboratory supported projects. 

494 Seminar in Management Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: 300-ievel business core courses. Accounting 
302, Management 344, 444 (or 454), and Manag Sci 300. 
Senior seminar and applications in the design, implementa- 
tion and use of management decision/information systems. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: six units of upper division management 
courses, including Management 339, major in management 
or international business, consent of department internship 
adviser and at least junior standing, 2.5 GPA and one se- 
mester in residence at the university. Planned and superv- 
ised work experience. May be repeated for credit up to a 
total of six units. Credit/ No Credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: management concentration, senior standing, 
and approval by faculty sponsor and department chair of 
proposed statement of work. Open to qualified students 
desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be re- 
peated for credit. Not open to students on academic proba- 
tion. 

516 Organizational Theory and Management of 
Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status, Manag Sci 514 (may 
be taken concurrently). Accounting 510, Economics 515. 
Modem organization theory and application in utility-creat- 
ing operations. Interpersonal behavior, planning, control, or- 


ganizing, directing, communication, production and informa- 
tion systems, and measures of effectiveness, international 
applications. Business ethics and relationships to society 
and politics. Graduate discussion and research reports. 

518 Legal Environment of Business (2) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status. Philosophy, institu- 
tions and role of law in business. Legal implications inherent 
in business decisions. Business ethics. Case studies in 
areas of agency, partnerships, corporations, product liability, 
employment and trade regulations. 

524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and 
Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status. Management 516 and 
518 or equivalent. Human behavior in organizations, studies 
in organizational theories, and administrative action. 

542 Seminar in Labor-Management Relations (3) 
Prerequisites: classified SBAE status. Management 516 and 
518. A seminar that focuses on various aspects of the labor- 
management relationship, issues in collective bargaining, 
the laws governing the relationship, contract administration, 
grievance handling, dispute settlement and arbitration. 
Negotiation simulation and case analyses. 

543 Seminar in Personnel Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status. Management 516 and 
518, or equivalent. Cases, problems and significant person- 
nel administration literature in personnel administration and 
human relations. 

547 Comparative Management (3) 

Management practices and processes in five geographical 
areas; market-structures and management characteristics 
different from those in the United States. Constraints which 
vary between countries because of cultural, legal, economic 
and/or political differences. 

548 Seminar in International Management (3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status. Management 516 and 
518, or equivalent. Problems in managerial qualifications and 
training, political structure within and without the operations, 
foreign receptivity to United States business, organizing and 
controlling the international firm. Management in selected 
countries. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified SBAE status. Directed independent 
project. Student will select and have approved a project 
proposal, conduct the project and prepare a formal analysis 
and report. Not open to students on academic probation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status, consent of instructor 
and consent of department chair. May be repeated for cred- 
it. Not open to students on academic probation. 


Management 


Management Information Systems 


Coordinator. Mabel Kung 
Coordinator’s Office: Langsdorf Hall 535 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration 

Concentration in Management Information Systems 

Minor in Management Information Systems 
Committee 

Eugene Corman (Accounting) 

Richard Gilman (Management) 

Dorothy Heide (Management) 

Mabel Kung (Management Science) 

Ram Singhania (Management Science) 

Robert Vanasse (Accounting) 

Advisers 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706, pro- 
vides information on admissions, curriculum and gradua- 
tion requirements; registration and grading procedures; 
residence and similar academic matters. In addition, ad- 
vising about curriculum content and career opportunities 
is available from the coordinator and the committee mem- 
bers listed above. 

INTRODUCTION 

Management information systems are computer based 
information systems. These systems aid management in 
making decisions and assist in implementing and controll- 
ing management policies. Management information sys- 
tems are used in business, industry and government 
operations. Applications include airline reservations, 
banking transactions, crime prevention networks, election 
returns, real estate assessment, tax records, newspaper 
databases, sports statistics and computer assisted learn- 
ing. 

Management information systems incorporate the use of 
data processing equipment, such as computers and their 
peripherals. Computer software is used to create, main- 
tain and retrieve information. Techniques include mathe- 
matical modeling and statistics, integrated with modern 
computer technology. These methods are applied to sys- 
tems management, programming design, analysis of infor- 
mation flow, decision support, database organization, 
small business problems, data communication networking 
and distributed processing. 


Prizes in Management Information Systems 

Outstanding Management Information Systems Under- 
graduate Award 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

See "Business Administration, Management Information 
Systems Concentration." 

MINOR IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS * 

This minor surveys modern computer methods and the 
development of information systems. Emphasis is placed 
on systems which aid management decision making. 
Some of the courses required have prerequisites. In par- 
ticular, BASIC or FORTRAN programming is a prerequi- 
site to Manag Sci 270. 

A total of 21 units is required. 

Required courses (6 units): 

Accounting 201 A Elementary Accounting (3) 

Note: Accounting 201 A will be waived for students with 
a major In economics. 

Management 344 Intro to Systems Concepts (3) 
and 6 units from: 

Manag Sci 270 File Concepts and COBOL 
Programming (4) 

Manag Sci 300 Elements of Information System 
Design and Data Communication (3) 

Manag Sci 404 Analysis of Information Systems (3) 


and 6 units from: 

Accounting 302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Accounting 407 Accounting Information Systems (3) 
Computer Science 423 Systems Programming (3) 
Management 444 Project Management (3) 

Manag Sci 310 Advanced COBOL Programming (3) 
Data Base Management Systems (3) 
Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Data Process with Small Computers 


Manag Sci 408 
Manag Sci 409 
Manag Sci 411 
(3) 

Manag Sci 416 
Manag Sci 418 
(3) 

Manag Sci 448 
Economics 


Computer Performance Eval (3) 
Privacy, Security and Data Process 

Digital Simulation in Business and 

(3) 


and, in addition, 3 units from the lists above. 


* Students with a major in business administration may not mirnx in management 
information systems. Such students should consult the curriculum for concentra- 
tion in management information systems. 


Management Information System 


Department of 
Management Science 


Department Chair: David Stoiler 
Department Office: Langsdorf Haii 540 

Programs Offered 

Bacheior of Arts in Business Administration 

Concentration in Management Science 

Master of Business Administration 

Concentration in Management Science 

Master of Science in Management Science 
Faculty 

Lutchminia Bilici, Shu-Jen Chen, Wen Chow, 

Roger Dear, Ben Edmondson, Nicholas Farnum, 

George Hayhurst, William Heitzman, Bhushan Kapoor, 
Mabel Kung, Ram Lai, William Lau, John Lawrence, 
Dole Minh, Barry Pasternack, Herbert Rutemiller, 
Bhupinde Saggu, Sohan Sihota, Ram Singhania, 
LaVerne Stanton, David Stroller, Ronald Suich, 

Vishist Vaid-Raizada 

Advisers 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706, pro- 
vides information on admissions, curriculum and gradua- 
tion requirements; registration and grading procedures; 
residence and similar academic matters. In addition, the 
Management Science Department provides advising 
about curriculum content and career opportunities: 

Graduate Program: John Lawrence, David Stoller 

Statistics: Sohan Sihota, LaVerne Stanton, Ronald Suich 

Information Systems: Shu-Jen Chen, Mabel Kung, Ram 
Lai, William Lau, Ram Singhania 

Operations Research: Roger Dear, John Lawrence, David 
Stoller 

INTRODUCTION 

Management Science is the application of the scientific 
method to decision-making in business and government. 
In practice, nearly all management science problems in- 
volve solutions using computers. Three of the major disci- 
plines in management science are operations research, 
statistics and informations systems. Operations research 
uses mathematical and simulation models to provide deci- 
sion makers with quantitative information pertaining to 



Management Science 


complex business situations. Statistics assists decision 
makers by using techiques designed to draw inferences 
from experimental and sampling data. Information sys- 
tems focus on the application of modern computer tech- 
nology to provide accurate and relevant data to aid 
decision-making. 

Situations that require operations research techniques 
arise in all areas of business: accounting, finance, produc- 
tion, marketing, and research and development. Among 
the problems addressed by operations research tech- 
niques are the determination of inventory strategies, the 
allocation of scarce resources and the design of service 
systems. Others include bidding in competitive environ- 
ments, selection of equipment replacement strategies 
and scheduling the completion of large projects. 

The statistician is often involved in activities such as sales 
forecasting, quality control and financial analysis. Statis- 
tics is also concerned with model building and the design 
of experiments dealing with product testing, surveys and 
sampling. 

Information systems is concerned with the management 
of large databases and the efficient reporting of timely 
information to decision makers. It relates to both the data 
processing hardware and the computer software. The 
hardware includes the computer and its peripheral equip- 
ment. The software is used to create, maintain and re- 
trieve information. Information systems methods integrate 
mathematical modeling and statistics with modern infor- 
mation and computer technology. These methods are ap- 
plied to systems management, analysis of Information 
flow, and programming design. 

Credential Information 

For students interested in a teaching credential, the De- 
partment of Management Science offers courses which 
may be Included in the Single Waiver Program in Busi- 
ness. 

Further information on the requirements for teaching cre- 
dentials is available from the Division of Teacher Educa- 
tion. Students Interested in exploring careers in teaching 
at the elementary or secondary school levels should con- 
tact the Office of Admission to Teacher Education, Educa- 
tion Classroom 207. 

Prizes In Management Science 

Outstanding Management Science Undergraduate Award 
Outstanding Management Science Graduate Student 
Award 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Management Science 
Concentration.” 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Management Science 


Concentration.” 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 

The Master of Science in Management Science program 
provides the conceptual understanding and technical 
competence for a career in management science. Empha- 
sis Is placed on the use of scientific method to allocate 
resources so as to maximize profit or minimize cost. Spe- 
cializations include operations research, management in- 
formation systems and statistics. These techniques are 
widely used in both private business and public enterprise. 
Employment opportunities include positions such as man- 
agement analyst, data processing manager, statistician 
and forecaster. 

The M.S. in Management Science program Is scheduled 
especially for students who are employed full time. 
Courses are offered during the late afternoon and 
evening. 

The curriculum emphasizes mathematical approaches 
and should appeal to students with undergraduate de- 
grees in business administration, computer science, 
mathematics, engineering or science. For students with 
an undergraduate degree in business administration, the 
10-course (30-unit) curriculum may be completed in one 
year (full time) or 2/2 years (part time). In addition to a 
three-course survey of management science methods, 
the curriculum includes management science applica- 
tions, electives, a computer-based management game 
and a terminal research project. Students with a ba- 
chelor’s degree in a field other than business administra- 
tion must first complete the eight M.B.A. Foundation 
Courses (26 units) or equivalent undergraduate courses. 

Cal State Fullerton is the only university in Orange County 
accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business. This assures a rigorous program, a 
well-qualified faculty, high standards for students, and ac- 
cess to an extensive library system. The qualifications of 
the M.S. in Management Science faculty Include ad- 
vanced degrees In operations research, statistics and ap- 
plied mathematics; extensive computer experience; and 
practical experience in business, industry and govern- 
ment. Cal State Fullerton is the only campus within The 
California State University offering an M.S. in Manage- 
ment Science. 

Most graduate courses in the School of Business Adminis- 
tration and Economics require “classified SBAE status” 
and are open only to students with classified standing in 
the M.S. in Management Science, M.S. in Taxation M.A. 
in Economics, M.B.A. or M.S. In Accountancy programs. 

Students meeting the following requirements will be ad- 
mitted to postbaccalaureate unclassified standing: 

1. Acceptable bachelor’s degree from an Institution ac- 
credited by a regional accrediting association, or 
equivalent. 


8—79417 


Management Science 


2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semes- 
ter units attempted and in good standing at last college 
attended. 

Note: Postbaccalaureate unclassified students may enroll 
in undergraduate courses (100 through 400 level) but are 
generally ineligible for graduate business courses (500 
level). Such students may wish to take undergraduate 
courses which are necessary to meet the requirements for 
classified standing (see below). Upon completing the re- 
quirements, the student may file an ^‘Application for 
Change of Academic Objective — Graduate” requesting 
admission to the M.S. In Management Science program. 
Admission to the university as a postbaccalaureate un- 
classified student does not constitute admission to the 
M.S. In Management Science program, does not confer 
priority, nor does it guarantee future admission. Students 
planning to apply for admission to the M.S. in Manage- 
ment Science program should confer with the graduate 
adviser in the School of Business Administration and Eco- 
nomics. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be admitted to the M.S. in Management Science pro- 
gram with conditionally classified standing: 

3. Combination of grade-point average and score on the 
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) suffi- 
cient to yield a score of at least 950 according to one 
of the following formulas. Due to limited facilities and 
resources in the School of Business Administration and 
Economics, a higher score may be required of all appli- 
cants. 

A. If overall undergraduate GPA Is at least 2.5 and 
GMAT is at least 450, then score = (GPA x 200) 
+ GMAT. 

B. If overall undergraduate GPA Is below 2.5 or GMAT 
is below 450, then score = (GPA x 200) -h GMAT 

- 50. 

C. If GPA is based on the last 60 semester units of 
course work,* then score = (GPA x 200) + GMAT 

- 100 . 

Note: Conditionally classified students may take a limited 
number of graduate courses (500 level) subject to the 
approval of the graduate adviser of the School of Busi- 
ness Administration and Economics. Students may take 
whatever courses are necessary to fulfill requirement 4 
(below) while enrolled as conditionally classified stu- 
dents. In addition, a maximum of 9 units (three courses) 
from the M.S. In Management Science curriculum may be 
taken while in conditionally classified standing. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements 
will be advanced to classified standing. Such students are 
eligible to take graduate courses for which they are quali- 
fied. 

* All work within any given quarter or semester nuist be included even though that will 
result in more than 60 semester units. The units to be included in the last 60 
semester units may come only from the following: (1) work taken in 
postbaccalaureate status during the last seven years toward fulfilling M.S. in 
Management Science course work requirements; (2) units taken under a 
prescribed remedial program agreed to by the Associate Dean, School of Business 
Administration and Economics; (3) units earned prior to the bachelor's degree. 


4. A bachelor’s degree with a major in business adminis- 
tration which meets the requirements stated in this 
catalog for such degrees. The degree must include 
calculus and computer programming equivalent to 
passing Mathematics 135, Business Calculus (3 units), 
and Management Science 264, Introduction to Com- 
puter Programming (2 units), with grades of at least C. 
Courses in the major are to be no more than seven 
years old, and must have at least a 3.0 (B) grade-point 
average. Courses with grades lower than C must be 
repeated. Applicants with a bachelor's degree in a field 
other than Business Administration may meet this re- 
quirement by passing the courses in calculus and com- 
puter programming (above) with grades of at least C, 
and also the Foundation Courses within the curriculum 
of the Master of Business Administration (26 units, in- 
cluding Accounting 510; Economics 515; Finance 517; 
Management 516, 518; Management Science 513, 514 
and Marketing 519). 

5. Approval of study plan. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum requires 30 semester units of course work 
beyond the baccalaureate degree. At least 21 of the 30 
units required for the degree must be at the graduate level. 
A grade-point average of 3.0 (B) is required. Any study 
plan course in which a D is received must be repeated and 
must receive at least a C grade regardless of the overall 
GPA of the student. 

Required Courses (15 units) 

Manag Sci 526 Forecasting, Decision Analysis and 
Experimental Design (3) 

Manag Sci 550 Special Topics on Information 
Systems Design and Data Communication (3) 
Manag Sci 560 Advanced Deterministic Models (3) 
Manag Sci 561 Advanced Probabilistic Models (3) 
Business Admin 596 Management Game (3) 

Manag Sci 597 Project (3) 

Management Science Applications and Electives (15 

units required) 

Courses to be selected in consultation with, and approved 
by, the student’s adviser from the following: 

Applications in Business and Economics (3 units) 

Accounting 511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Note: Students with credit for cost accounting may substi- 
tute Accounting 521, Seminar In Administrative Account- 
ing (3) 

Economics 502 Adv Microeconomic Analysis (3) 
Finance 523 Seminar in Corporate Financial 
Management (3) 

Management 599 Ind Graduate Research (1-3) 
Marketing 525 Seminar in Marketing Problems (3) 

Electives (12 units) 

Courses may be chosen from one or more of the following 
fields: 


226 .^.^ 


Operations Research: 

A general approach to decision-making based on scien- 
tific method. 


Manag Sci 480 Inventory and Production Analysis in 
Business and Economics (3) 

Manag Sci 576 Business Modeling and Simulation (3) 
Manag Sci 580 Linear Programming (3) 

Manag Sci 585 Queueing and Stochastic Processes in 
Business and Economics (3) 

Information Systems: 

Computer methods for collecting, analyzing and reporting 
data to aid in management decision making. 


Manag Sci 404 
Manag Sci 408 
Manag Sci 409 
Manag Sci 41 1 
(3) 

Manag Sci 418 
(3) 

Manag Sci 555 


Analysis of Information Systems (3) 
Data Base Management Systems (3) 
Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Data Process with Small Computers 

Privacy, Security and Data Process 

Data Structures and Data Base 


Management (3) 


Statistics: 


Collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data. 


Manag Sci 420 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 
Manag Sci 422 Surveys and Sample Design and 
Applications (3) 

Manag Sci 430 Nonparametric Statistics (3) 
Manag Sci 461 Statistical Theory for Management 
Science (4) 

Manag Sci 467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 
Manag Sci 572 Design of Experiments (3) 

Manag Sci 575 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

Variable Topic: 


Manag Sci 590 Seminar in Management Science (3) 


Terminal Evaluation 
Comprehensive Exam 


Management Science Courses 

263 Introduction to Information Systems (1) 

Concepts on data and information; modern digital computer 
and its peripheral equipment; software and problem-solving 
concepts; various computer information systems; examples 
of business applications. Students may not receive credit for 
both Management Science 263 and 265. 

264 Introduction to Computer Programming (2) 

Computer programming in the BASIC language, including 
file processing and other applications to business data proc- 
essing. 


265 Introduction to Information Systems and Computer 
Programming (3) 

Introduction to information systems; computer organization 
and problem-solving concepts; computer programming In 
the BASIC language, including file processing; applications 
to business data processing. 

270 File Concepts and COBOL Programming (4) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 264 or 265 or Computer 
Science 112 or equivalent. Structured COBOL; multiple-level 
table handling, subscripting and indexing; file organization 
documentation; report generation; sequential file updating. 
(Same as Computer Science 270) 

300 Elements of Information System Design and Data 
Communication (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 270. Search, sort; tape 
and disk; record format layouts, storage capacity, I/O tim- 
ings; structures; COBOL illustrations; data communications 
fundamentals; computer networks. 

302 Software Systems for Decision Support (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 265 and Finance 320 
and Accounting 302. Roles and uses of computer supported 
decision modeling and analysis packages in the context of 
modern management. Formulation and implementation of 
models. Case studies and computer projects. 

310 Advanced COBOL Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 270 or consent of the 
instructor. Advanced COBOL features: Indexed and direct 
file processing, report writer, sort feature, declarative and 
linkage sections, segmentation. Overlay structure, survey of 
job control language, libraries. Direct access. Hardware de- 
vices. 

361 Probability and Statistical Methods in Business and 
Economics (4) 

Prerequisites: Math 135 and Management Science 265 or 
equivalents. Probability concepts; expectations; descriptive 
statistics; discrete and continuous random variables; sam- 
pling; estimation; hypothesis testing; simple and multiple 
regression; time series; forecasting; nonparametric statis- 
tics. 

362 Management Science Methods in Business and 
Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361 (may be taken con- 
currently) . Mathematical methods and their application to 
business and economic problems, e.g., production control, 
scheduling, inventory control, PERT, decision and network 
analyses, simulation and queueing. Elementary mathemati- 
cal optimization and production models. 

363 Management Science (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 or both Math 335 
and Computer Science 112. The basic concepts of manage- 
ment science and its relationship to economics and decision 
theory. Optimization in continuous models, linear program- 
ming, queueing and inventory models, network analysis and 
dynamic programming, and production scheduling and con- 
trol. 


Management Science 


404 Analysis of Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 300 or equivalent. Soft- 
ware feasibility studies; information processing systems; 
data processing project organization; cost effectiveness 
and system optimization, hardware/software selection; 
structured systems design; case studies and computer 
projects. 

408 Data Base Management Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 300 and Management 
344. (Prerequisite for computer science majors is Computer 
Science 330.) Integrated data base systems; logical organi- 
zation; data description language (DDL); data manipulation 
language (DML); data independence; relational data bases; 
selected data base management systems (DBMS). (Same 
as Computer Science 408) 

409 Distributed Data Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 300. Hardware and soft- 
ware developments in transmission technology; distributed 
data bases; network architectures; ISO layered models; in- 
terface problems; distributed network design and cost anal- 
ysis; network topology and protocols, tradeoffs among 
distributed and centralized processing systems. Interface 
problems and case studies. 

411 Data Processing with Small Computers (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 300. Small computer 
technology in data processing; selecting and designing busi- 
ness oriented small computer systems; implementing, main- 
taining, supporting and evaluating these systems. 

416 Computer Performance Evaluation (3) 

(Same as Computer Science 416) 

418 Privacy, Security and Data Processing (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 300. Security and pri- 
vacy problems associated with the use of computer sys- 
tems; ways to minimize risks and losses. 

420 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361. Statistical methods 
applied to problems in business and industry; practical multi- 
ple regression models with computer solutions; basic tech- 
niques in time-series analysis of trend, cyclical and seasonal 
components; correlation of time-series and forecasting with 
the computer. 

422 Surveys and Sampling Design and Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361. Principles for de- 
signing business and economic surveys. Applications in ac- 
counting, marketing research, economic statistics and the 
social sciences. Sampling; simple random, stratified and 
multistage design; construction of sampling frames; detect- 
ing and controlling non-sampling errors. 

430 Nonparametric Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361. Nonparametric sta- 
tistical methods and problems In business and economics. 
Sign tests, rank correlation, contingency tables, order statis- 
tics, runs. 


440 Deterministic Models in Management Science (4) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 362. Deterministic math- 
ematical modeling and solution techniques. Including Inter- 
mediate linear programming, network models. Integer 
programming, dynamic programming. 

441 Probabilistics Models in Management Science (4) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 362. Probabilistic mathe- 
matical modeling and solution techniques for business. In- 
cluding quality control and forecasting models, Markov 
processes, intermediate queueing theory, probabilistic in- 
ventory models. 

448 Computer Simulation in Business and Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 264 and 361 (or equiva- 
lents) and Management Science 362 (or 363). Computer 
generation of discrete and continuous random variables, 
their use In computer simulation. Applications include qu- 
eueing, communications, computer systems, economics, 
gaming. Inventory, scheduling and other management 
science topics. 

461 Statistical Theory for Management Science (4) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361 . Review of mathe- 
matical topics needed for statistical theory. Distribution, the- 
ory, moment generating functions, central limit theorem. 
Estimation theory, maximum likelihood, least squares esti- 
mation. Hypothesis testing, Neyman-Pearson Lemma. 
Likelihood ratio tests. Use of statistical software packages. 

467 Statistical Quality control (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 361. Control charts for 
variables, percent defective and defects. Tolerances, proc- 
ess capacity; special control charts, acceptance sampling 
and batch processing problems. Bayesian aspects of proc- 
ess control. 

480 Inventory and Production Analysis in Business and 
Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 and either 362 or 
363. Inventory and production models (deterministic and 
probabilistic). Optimal policy forms and efficient computa- 
tional methods. The specification and control of standards 
In equipment, jobs, products and processes. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 and 362, (or 363) 
and major in management science, or Management Science 
300 and major In management information systems or a 
major In international business, consent of department in- 
ternship adviser, and at least junior standing, 2.5 GPA and 
one semester in residence at the university. Planned and 
supervised work experience. May be repeated for credit up 
to a total of six units. CredIt/No Credit grading only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 361 and either 362 or 
363, senior standing, and approval by the department chair. 
Open to qualified students desiring to pursue directed inde- 
pendent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. Not open to 
students on academic probation. 


pOQ 

Management Science 


513 Statistical Analysis and Forecasting Techniques (4) 

Prerequisites: Math 135, Management Science 264 (or 
equivalents) and classified SBAE status. Basic probability 
and descriptive statistics; sampling techniques; estimation 
and hypothesis testing; simple and multiple regression, cor- 
relation analysis; forecasting; time series; computer pack- 
ages and other optional topics. 

514 Business Modeling and Solution Techniques (4) 
(Formerly 512) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 513 and classified 
SBAE status. Linear programming; inventory; PERT/CPM; 
queueing; simulation, computer application and other op- 
tional topics. 

526 Forecasting, Decision Analysis, and Experimental 
Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 514 and classified 
SBAE status. Time Series Analysis. Trend, cyclical and sea- 
sonal components. Statistical decision theory. Fundamental 
principles of experimental design; interaction. Software 
packages. 

550 Special Topics on Information Systems Design and 
Data Communication (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 514 and classified 
SBAE standing. Information storage requirements; disk tim- 
ing considerations; file organization and processing charac- 
teristics; data structures; modern data communication 
systems; computer networks. 

555 Data Structures and Data Base Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 550 and classified 
SBAE standing. File structures. Multiple-key retrieval file or- 
ganizations; Data Description Language (DDL) and Data 
Manipulation Language (DML); Data independence; hierar- 
chial, network and relational data bases. Students may not 
receive credit for both Management Science 408 and 555. 

560 Advanced Deterministic Models (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 514 and classified 
SBAE standing. Advanced linear programming, dynamic 
programming, integer programming, non-linear program- 
ming, business applications. Software packages and com- 
puter utilization. 

561 Advanced Probabilistic Models (3) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 514 and classified 
SBAE standing. Stochastic processes, Markov processes, 
advanced queueing and inventory models. Reliability. Soft- 
ware packages and computer utilization. 


572 Design of Experiments (3) (Formerly 468) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 513. Experimental de- 
sign. Analysis of variance, factorial experiments, nested de- 
signs, confounding and factorial replications. 

575 Multivariate Analysis (3) (Formerly 475) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 513 and 461. The least 
squares principle; estimation and hypothesis testing in linear 
regression; multiple and curvilinear regression models; dis- 
criminant analysis; principle components analysis; applica- 
tion of multivariate analysis in business and industry. 

576 Business Modeling and Simulation (3) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 513 or equivalent. Theo- 
ry and application of modeling and simulation methodology. 
Probabilistic concepts in simulation; arrival pattern and serv- 
ice times; simulation languages and programming tech- 
niques; analysis of output; business applications. 

580 Linear Programming (3) (Formerly 465) 

Prerequisite: Management Science 514. Theory and applica- 
tions of linear programming and extensions. Problem formu- 
lation and solution, simplex method, duality, sensitivity 
analyses, network, transportation and assignment models, 
and efficient computing techniques for specially structured 
problems. 

585 Queueing and Stochastic Processes in Business and 
Economics (3) (Formerly 490) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 513 and 514. Single and 
multichannel queueing systems of Markovian and general 
arrival and departure streams; birth-death processes, cost 
models and optimization of queues; Markov analyses; intro- 
duction to renewal theory; reliability. 

590 Seminar in Management Science (3) (Formerly 570) 

Prerequisites: Management Science 526 and 560 and classi- 
fied SBAE status. Selected advanced topics and/or case 
studies In operations research, statistics, and/or manage- 
ment Information systems, varying from semester to semes- 
ter. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified SBAE status. Directed Independent 
inquiry. Not open to students on academic probation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status and consent of depart- 
ment chair. May be repeated for credit. Not open to students 
on academic probation. 


229 

Management Science 



Department of Marketing 


Department Chair: Irene Lange 
Business Writing Coordinator. John Brugaletta 
Department Office: Langsdorf Hall 626 
Business Writing Program: Langsdorf Hall 701 A 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration 

Concentration in Marketing 

Master of Business Administration 

Concentration in Marketing 

Faculty 

Robert Barath, William Bell, Grady Bruce, 

Valerie Folkes, Scott Greene, Paul Hugstad, 

Robert Jones, Irene Lange, Ronald Long, 

Robert Olsen, James Taylor, Robert Zimmer 

Advisers 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 706, pro- 
vides information on admissions, curriculum and gradua- 
tion requirements, registration and grading procedures, 
residence and similar academic matters. In addition, the 
Marketing Department provides advising on curriculum 
content and career opportunities: 

Advertising 
Business Writing 
Industrial Marketing 
International Marketing 
Marketing Management 
Marketing Research 
Overall Career Advisement 

Retailing 

Sales Management 

INTRODUCTION 

Marketing is a basic business function, covering a wide 
range of activities. It includes studying markets, planning 
products, pricing them, promoting them, selling them, and 
then delivering these products to customers. People In 
wholesaling, retailing, advertising agencies, research 
firms and transportation companies are all working in the 
marketing area. Any firm which is reviewing Its product 
policies needs marketers to Identify the market, choose 
the products, find where they can be sold and decide on 
a price for them. 

Seven program emphases are available to students which 
help to prepare for entry into the job market. They are 


James Taylor 
John Brugaletta 
Paul Hugstad 
Irene Lange 
Robert Olsen 
Robert Barath 
Scott Greene 
Grady Bruce 
William Bell 
Robert Zimmer 


Marketing 


designed to afford the opportunity to gain both quantita- 
tive and qualitative skills. At the same time, each empha- 
sis retains sufficient flexibility to permit particular needs 
and interests to be pursued through elective course work. 
The emphases are advertising management, marketing 
management, marketing research, industrial marketing, 
retailing, sales management and international marketing. 

Credential Information 

For students interested in a teaching credential, the De- 
partment of Marketing offers courses which may be in- 
cluded in the Single Subject Waiver Program in Business. 

Further information on the requirements for teaching cre- 
dentials is available from the division of Teacher Educa- 
tion. Students interested in exploring careers in teaching 
at the elementary or secondary school levels should con- 
tact the Office of Admission to Teacher Education. 

Prizes In Marketing 

The Michael T. Ashton Memorial Scholarship for Out- 
standing Leadership. 

The Gordon S. Fyfe Memorial Award for Outstanding Aca- 
demic Achievement. 

Outstanding Marketing Student Award. 

Sales and Marketing Executives, Inc. Orange County 
Award. 

American Marketing Association. Southern California 
Chapter Award. 

International Marketing Association Award. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

See ‘‘Business Administration, Marketing Concentration.” 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

See ‘‘Business Administration, Marketing Concentration.” 


Marketing Courses 

351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 202 or 210. How management mar- 
kets output of the enterprise and obtains revenue. Product 
management, pricing, promotion, distribution channels. Mar- 
keting’s role In socio-economic system from viewpoints of 
consumer, management, social responsibility and govern- 
ment In American and worldwide business. 

352 Principles of Retailing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Structure, scope, and evolution 
of retail institutions; retail merchandise management and 
pricing; dimensions of retail competition: Identifying mar- 
kets, defining the retail mix and positioning the mix compo- 
nents to convey meaning. 

354 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The management of the adver- 
tising function; the role of advertising In marketing strategy. 


budgetary considerations, allocation among media, meas- 
urement of effectiveness, administration and control, and its 
economic and social implications. Uses the Behavioral Lab. 

356 Professional Selling (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Salesmanship as an interper- 
sonal influence process. Selling using principles of human 
behavior. Selling skills and techniques. Uses the Behavioral 
Lab. 

358 Physical Distribution (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and Manag Sci 265. The physi- 
cal distribution system and its elements— packaging, trans- 
portation, warehousing and inventory management. 
Physical distribution practices and problems leading to im- 
proved system design and effectiveness. 

359 Industrial Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Marketing of business goods 
and services to other businesses, government agencies, 
and social institutions by the manufacturer. Market analysis, 
sales forecasting, product strategy, effective use of sales 
force and industrial advertising media. 

370 Consumer Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Consumer buying patterns, 
motivation and search behavior. The consumer decision- 
making process. Interdisciplinary concepts from economics, 
sociology, psychology, cultural anthropology and mass 
communications. Case analyses and research projects. 
379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and Manag Sci 361 and a pass- 
ing score on the Statistics Proficiency Examination (admin- 
istered by the Marketing Department). Marketing research 
process: problem formulation, identifying data sources, se- 
lecting data collection and analysis techniques, preparing 
research reports. Selecting marketing problems for re- 
search. Lecture-discussion, cases. 

452 Advanced Salesmanship (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and 356. Negotiation style sell- 
ing techniques; videotape, audio-tape, structured and un- 
structured role plays. Sales writing skills. Field case studies. 

454 Advertising Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 354. The interrelationships of prod- 
uct planning, advertising management, sales management, 
financial management and corporate strategy in a competi- 
tive environment. 

455 Management of the Sales Force (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. The sales manager in organiza- 
tion; recruiting and selecting salesmen; sales training; for- 
mulating compensation and expense plans; supervising and 
stimulating sales activities; morale; sales planning; evaluat- 
ing salesmen; and distribution cost analysis. Uses the Be- 
havioral Lab. 

456 Retailing Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 352. Merchandise management, 
planning and control; market structures, entrepreneurial 
function and competitive strategies (price and non-price 


Marketing 


competition); the dynamic consumer goods segment and 
correlates of store patronage: socioeconomic implications, 
psychographics, changing life styles and product risk; at- 
mospherics fashion perspectives; and trends in the retail 
sector— a macroeconomic view. 

457 Quantitative Marketing Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351, Manag Sci 361 or consent of 
instructor. Marketing-management functions; scheduling, 
evaluating, control. The analysis of marketing processes 
and systems and the development of appropriate action 
recommendations. 

458 International Marketing Policies (3) 

Prerequisites: at least one upper-division course in econom- 
ics, finance, management and marketing and senior stand- 
ing. Domestic marketing systems. Marketing problems 
across national boundaries and within various national mar- 
kets. Business policies, including ethical implications, for 
international business firms. Integrative cases. Individual 
and team efforts. 

459 Marketing Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, two advanced marketing 
courses and Marketing 379. Marketing problems of firm and 
society. Integrative interactions between marketing activi- 
ties and the interfaces of marketing with finance and produc- 
tion. Case method and current readings. 

460 Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351. Application of marketing tech- 
niques to the nonprofit sector. Use of marketing planning 
and research to develop effective marketing programs for 
organizations in health care, education, the arts, public serv- 
ices and related fields. 

469 Industrial Marketing Strategy (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 351 and 359 and Manag Sci 361. 
Specialized marketing techniques for industrial companies; 
marketing forecasting; industrial buying models; designing 
distribution networks; industrial pricing and industrial promo- 
tional programs. 

479 Research Problems In Marketing (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 379. Marketing research practicum. 
Matching research methodologies to problems of market 
analysis, product planning, advertising, sales forecasting 
and other marketing activities. Alternative data collection 
and analysis techniques. Seminars, research projects. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: six units of upper division marketing courses. 


including Marketing 351, major in marketing or international 
business, consent of department internship adviser, and at 
least junior standing, 2.5 GPA and one semester in resi- 
dence at the university. Planned and supervised work expe- 
rience. May be repeated for credit up to a total of six units. 
Credit/ No Credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: marketing concentration, senior standing and 
approval by the department chair. Open to undergraduate 
students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. 
May be repeated for credit. Not open to students on aca- 
demic probation. 

519 Marketing Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 510, Economics 515, Manag Sci 
513, 514, Management 516, 518 (may be taken concurrently) 
and classified SBAE status. Concepts, principles and tech- 
niques used in the administration of the marketing variables. 
The role of marketing within the context of society and the 
business firm, social responsibility of business and interna- 
tional marketing. 

525 Seminar In Marketing Problems (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 519 and classified SBAE status. 
Major marketing problems facing industry: definition of and 
organization for marketing task; demand analysis; decisions 
concerning product, price, promotion and trade channels. 
Use of case method and readings. 

554 Seminar in Promotion (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 525 and classified SBAE status. 
The promotion mix as employed by businesses to optimize 
profitable operations. Determination of promotional goals, 
planning, budgeting, controlling promotional programs and 
measuring promotional effectiveness. 

558 Seminar in International Marketing (3) 

Prerequisites: Marketing 519 or equivalent and classified 
SBAE status. Comparative international marketing systems; 
managerial techniques and strategies in multinational and 
domestic firms engaged in export; and the impact of politi- 
cal, legal, social, economic and cultural forces upon the 
decision-making process. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified SBAE status. Directed independent 
inquiry. Not open to students on academic probation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified SBAE status, consent of instructor 
and approval by department chair. May be repeated for 
credit. Not open to students on academic probation. 


Marketing 


School of Human 
Development and 
Community Service 


Dean: Peter Facione 
Associate Dean: Michael Parker 
Assistant Dean: Jeremiah Moore 

Programs Offered 

Child Development 

Bachelor of Science 
Minor 

Counseling 
Master of Science 

Education 

Master of Science 

Concentrations in: 

Bilingual/Bicultural Education (Spanish-English) 
Elementary Curriculum and Instruction 
Reading 

Educational Administration 
Special Education 
Higher Education 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 
(For further information refer to the Department of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures section of this 
catalog.) 

Teaching Credentials (See Teaching Credential Pro- 
grams Section of this Catalog) 

Health Promotion 

Minor 

Human Services 

Bachelor of Science 

Military Science 
Minor 

Nursing 

Bachelor of Science 

Physical Education 

Bachelor of Science 
Minor 


233 


The School of Human Development and Community Serv- 
ice provides students with a sound academic education 
and technical preparation for professional fields whose 
common purpose is to serve individual and community 
needs. The school offers programs which combine theo- 
retical understandings with practical skills. The faculty em- 
phasize both the scholarly and professional perspectives. 
Programs in the school lead to traditional academic de- 
grees at the baccalaureate and graduate levels as well as 
to a variety of specific certificates, credentials and li- 
censes. 

The School of Human Development and Community Serv- 
ice is organized into the following instructional units: the 


Child Development Program; the Department of Counsel- 
ing; the Department of Educational Administration; the 
Department of Health Education, Physical Education and 
Recreation; the Human Services Program; the Military 
Science Program; the Department of Nursing; the Depart- 
ment of Reading; the Department of Special Education; 
and the Division of Teacher Education, which includes 
programs in Elementary and Secondary Education. 

In addition to these instructional units, the school also 
includes the University Recreation Program (Ronald An- 
dris, Director, and Michael Uraine, Associate Director; and 
the Field Services and Professional Development Center 
(Ashley Bishop, Director). 



School of Human Development and Community Service 



Child Development 

Program 


Coordinator: Leo Schmidt 
Program Office: Education Classroom 127 A 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development 
Minor in Child Development 

Faculty 

Full-time faculty from various departments on campus 
teach courses required for the Child Development 
Program. Contact the program office for information 
regarding participating faculty for each semester. 

Advisers 

Leo Schmidt, Academic and Career Advisement 

Nancy Zuniga, Major and Multiple Subjects Waiver 
Advisement 

INTRODUCTION 

The Bachelor of Science in Child Development is a joint 
degree program in which faculty in the departments of 
Anthropology, Biology, English, Ethnic Studies, Nursing, 
Psychology and Sociology and the Division of Teacher 
Education cooperate and combine their expertise. 

This degree is designed for students interested in child/ 
youth related professions. The objective of the program is 
to expand the degree candidate’s understanding of hu- 
man growth and development and ability to work effec- 
tively with young people. The degree gives emphasis to 
both the nature and nurture of development from concep- 
tion through adolescence. This program treats child deve- 
lopment from a broad perspective and utilizes courses 
from several disciplines. 

Through appropriate selection of elective courses by the 
student and adviser, a program is designed to enhance 
the student’s background and interests. Students are 
strongly encouraged to enroll in upper-division courses in 
public speaking and are required to demonstrate upper- 
division writing competence. 

Students completing the Bachelor of Science in Child 
Development may find it a basis for employment in a vari- 
ety of child and youth related professions. These profes- 
sions include work in early childhood and elementary 
education, special education, counseling, nursery 


Child Development 


schools, day care centers, child guidance clinics and a 
variety of youth-related social service agencies. The de- 
gree prepares candidates to interact with culturally di- 
verse children and families. Also It serves as an 
appropriate preparation for graduate study. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

The major in child development requires the successful 
completion of a minimum of 50 upper-division units which 
satisfy the pattern indicated below. Each course counted 
for the major must be completed with a grade of C or 
higher. 

Many upper-division courses require prerequisites. It is the 
student’s responsibility to become familiar with all appro- 
priate campus regulations and degree requirements. 

BASIC COURSE (Prerequisite for all child development 
majors, 3 units required): 

Child Development 312 Human Growth and 
Development (3) 

Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology (3) 

CHILD COURSES (6 units required): 

Child Development 385 Infancy and Early Child (3) 
Child Development 390 Middle Childhood (3) 

Child Development 386 Adolescence (3) 

CORE COURSES (20 units required): 

Biological Science 314 Ethics and Genetics (1) 
Biological Science 360 Biol of Human Sexuality (1) 
Child Development 391 Practicum in Child 
Development (3) 

or Education-TE 310 The Teaching Experience: 
Participation (3) 

or Sociology 400 Sociology Internships (3) 
or Psychology 495 Internship in Psychology (3) 
Child Development 496 Senior Seminar in Child 
Development (3) 

Special Education 371 Exceptional Individual (3) 
Psychology 463 Experimental Child Psychology (3) 
Sociology 453 Child In American Society (3) 

English 301 Adv College Writing (meets course work 
portion of upper-divison writing requirement) (3) 

STUDIES IN DIVERSITY (6 units required): 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 309 Black Family (3) 

Anthropology 302 Culture and Personality: 

Psychological Anthropology (3) 

Chicano Studies 431 Chicane Child (3) 

Criminal Justice 300 Intro to Criminal Justice (3) 
Sociology 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

Sociology 451 Sociology of the Family (3) 

Special Education 421 Working with Parents of 
Children with Exceptional Needs (3) 

Human Services 311 Intracultural Socialization 
Patterns (3) 


STUDIES IN SPECIAL TOPICS (9 units required): 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 422 Psychology of the 
Afro-American (3) 

American Studies 301 The American Character (3) 
Anthropology 450 Culture and Education (3) 

Art 380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Biological Science 313 Human Genetics (3) 

Chicano Studies 305 The Chicano Family (3) 

Criminal Justice 425 Juvenile Justice Admin (3) 
Educatlon-TE 406 Educational Sociology (3) 
Educatlon-TE 437 Early Childhood Education (3) 
English 433 Children’s Literature (3) 

Mathematics 303A Fundamental Concepts of 
Elementary Mathematics (3) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Nursing 307 HIth Promotion: Parent-Child Nursing (3) 
Psychology 311 Educational Psychology (3) 
Psychology 364 Intelligence: A Life-span Perspect (3) 
Psychology 470 Behavior Modification (3) 
Psychology 476 Developmental Psychopathology and 
Assessment (3) 

Physical Education 364 Motor Development (3) 
Physical Education 372 Movement and the Child (3) 
Science Eduation 310 Elementary Experimental 
Science (3) 

Sociology 341 Social Interaction (3) 

Speech Communication 403 Speech/ Language 
Development (3) 

Theatre 402A Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 
Theatre 471 Creative Dance for Children (3) 

ELECTIVES: 

Required 6 units of electives selected with approval of 
adviser. Units must be upper division, unless prior ap- 
proval of program coordinator is obtained. Electives must 
be for a letter grade unless course is offered only on a 
credit/no credit basis. 

Note: No more than 6 units of practicum/internship shall 
be applied to the child development major. In addition the 
student shall not be granted credit In the major for more 
than six units In any one practicum/internship. Each three 
units of practicum/internship must average at least eight 
hours per week In the field setting. All practicum/lntern- 
ships must have the prior approval of the child develop- 
ment coordinator or designee. 

MULTIPLE SUBJECT CREDENTIAL WAIVER 

A carefully selected sequence of courses in the child 
development major and general education has been ap- 
proved by the State of California as a waiver for the Na- 
tional Teacher Exam (NTE) General Knowledge of the 
Core Battery Examination. 

Either completion of the waiver or passing scores on the 
NTE General Knowledge of the Core Battery Examination 
is a partial requirement for the Multiple Subjects (Elemen- 
tary) Teaching Credential. Contact the Child Develop- 


236 Child Development 


ment Program office for further information. 

THE MINOR IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

For a minor in Child Development 21 units are required: 

One of the following courses (3 units required): 

Child Development 312 Human Growth and 
Development (3) 

Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology (3) 

Two of the following courses (6 units required): 

Child Development 385 Infancy & Early Childhood (3) 
Child Development 390 Middle Childhood (3) 

Child Development 386 Adolescence (3) 

One of the following courses (3 units required): 

Child Development 391 Practicum in Child 
Development (3) 

Education-TE 310 The Teaching Experience: 
Participation (3) 

Sociology 400 Sociology Internships (3) 

Psychology 495 Internship in Psychology (3) 

Three of the following courses (9 units required): 

Psychology 463 Experimental Child Psychology (3) 
Sociology 453 Child In American Society (3) 

Special Education 371 Exceptional Individual (3) 
Special Education 421 Working with Parents of 
Children with Exceptional Needs (3) 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 309 Black Family (3) 

Chicano Studies 431 Chicano Child (3) 

Sociology 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3) 

Sociology 451 Sociology of the Family (3) 

Art 380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Chicano Studies 305 Chicano Family (3) 

Biological Science 313 Human Genetics (3) 

Education TE-437 Early Childhood Education (3) 
English 433 Children’s Literature (3) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Physical Education 364 Motor Development (3) 
Physical Education 372 Movement and the Child (3) 
Speech Communication 403 Speech/ Language 
Development (3) 

Theatre 402A Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 


Theatre 471 Creative Dance for Children (3) 

Criminal Justice 425 Juvenile Justice Admin (3) 
Psychology 476 Developmental Psychopathology and 
Assessment (3) 


Child Development Courses 

312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Human growth and develop- 
ment, childhood, adolescence and middle and old age. Men- 
tal, social, emotional and physical development. This course 
is a prerequisite for all Child Development majors. 

385 Infancy and Early Childhood (3) 

Prerequisite: Child Development 312 or Psychology 361 . The 
physical growth and social and personality development of 
the human through the sixth year of life. 

386 Adolescence (3) 

Prerequisite: Child Development 312 or Psychology 361 or 
teaching credential candidate. The physical, social and cul- 
tural development of human adolescents and youth. Con- 
temporary factors producing change. 

390 Middle Childhood (3) 

Prerequisite: Child Development 312 or Psychology 361 or 
teaching credential candidate. Physical growth, personality 
development and social participation during middle child- 
hood. Patterns of cognitive growth and emotional adjust- 
ment. 

391 Practicum in Child Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Child Development 312 or Psychology 361. Su- 
pervised experience with children or adolescents in com- 
munity settings. Seminar and field placement. Nine units 
maximum for the major. Six units maximum credit In any one 
practicum. At least eight hours/week in the field required for 
each three units. 

496 Senior Seminar in Child Development (3) 

Prerequisites: Child Development 312 or Psychology 361 
and two of the following: Child Development 385, Child 
Development 386 or Child Development 390. Topics In child 
development selected by the faculty and students par- 
ticipating in course. Theory, methodology and findings. 


Child Development 


Department of 
Counseling 


Department Chain Patricia Hannigan 
Department Office: Education Classroom 105 

Programs Offered 

Master of Science in Counseling 

Pupil Personnel Services Credential 
School Psychologist Credential 
Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Licensure 
Preparation 

Educational Psychologist Licensure Preparation 
Faculty 

Keith Golay, Craig Goishi, Patricia Hannigan, 

Lisa Hoshmand, Jeffrey Mio, Michael Parker 

Advisers 

Counseling, Master of Science: Patricia Hannigan 

Pupil Personnel Services Credential: Lisa Hoshmand 

School Psychology Credential: Keith Golay 

Marriage, Family and Child Counseling Licensure: Patricia 
Hannigan 

INTRODUCTION 

The Counseling Department offers professional prepara- 
tion for those persons who wish to work in the helping 
professions in public and private educational institutions, 
mental health and community service agencies, correc- 
tional settings and health care agencies. The Masters of 
Science degree program is a generic academic program 
of 30 units consisting of a set of specific competencies in 
treatment, diagnosis, pathology, research program de- 
velopment and consultation, it forms the basis of academ- 
ic preparation for the Pupil Personnel Services Credential 
(School Counseling Credential), School Psychology Cre- 
dential, Marriage, Family, and Child Counseling License 
and Educational Psychologist License. The basic gradu- 
ate degree in counseling also has applicability for persons 
who want to enhance their skills in fields such as teaching, 
nursing, administration, business and management, 
coaching, speech pathology, medicine, law, law enforce- 
ment and correction. The basic graduate program may be 
used in preparation for study toward a doctorate in a vari- 
ety of helping profession areas. 

The Counseling Department does offer courses at the 



Counseling 


upper-division, undergraduate level for those persons 
seeking a career working with people. 

CREDENTIAL INFORMATION 

The Counseling Department has credential programs In 
Pupil Personnel Services (school counseling) and School 
Psychology approved by the Commission for Teacher 
Credentlaling (CTC). 

LICENSURE INFORMATION 

The program offers academic preparation for California 
Marriage, Family and Child licensure. Students seeking 
this licensure should contact the Board of Behavioral 
Science Examiners (BBSE) for the requirements and 
consult their department adviser concerning the curricular 
content areas that meet BBSE requirements. 

Students desiring licensure as an Educational Psycholo- 
gist should apply to the State Board of Behavioral Science 
Examiners after completion of three years as a full time 
school psychologist. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELING 

Admission Requirements 

1. Baccalaureate from an accredited Institution; 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in last 60 semester 
units; 

3. Grade-point average of at least 3.0 in a minimum of 30 
units of behavioral science courses (e.g., psychology, 
sociology, anthropology, communications, philoso- 
phy): 

4. Three satisfactory letters of recommendation; 

5. Paid and/or volunteer job experience. 

Applicants apply through the Admissions Office, although 
prospective applicants are encouraged to meet with a 
faculty adviser to get information prior to applying. 

The Academic Review Board screens and selects appli- 
cants for admission each semester. 

Classification 

Students are initially admitted at a Conditionally Classified 
status. Prior to the completion of the first nine units with 
grades of B or better, a student is required to apply for 
Classified standing. To achieve this a student must (a) 
acquire satisfactory scores on the General Test of the 
Graduate Record Examination, and (b) meet with the 
assigned faculty adviser and develop and submit a gradu- 
ate study plan. Students must also satisfactorily meet the 
Graduate Writing Requirements. See adviser for details. 

Department Regulations 

1. All required and elective courses must be taken in a 
particular sequence. Check each course description for 
prerequisites. 

2. Admission to the post-masters credential and licensure 
preparation programs is separate from admission for 


the basic master’s degree program and is contingent 
upon performance In the basic Master of Science pro- 
gram. 

3. Progression in and completion of the basic degree, 
credential, and/or licensure programs is based not only 
on successful completion of course work. It is also 
contingent upon the student’s effectiveness, profes- 
sional and ethical behavior with respect to working in 
an applied counseling setting. This is judged objectively 
and clinically by the Academic Review Board. 

Study Plan 

Students should consult the current Counseling Students 
Handbook available In the Titan Bookstore or on reserve 
in the Library for Information pertinent to the Counseling 
Programs. 


Core Courses: Units 

Treatment: (Counseling 511, 512, 513, 514) 12 

Research: (Counseling 521 ) 3 

Pathology: (Counseling 531, 532) 6 

Electives: Select 2 approved electives 6 

Culmination: (Counseling 595, or 597, or 598) .. 3 

Total 30 


No grade below a B Is permitted for any of the 30 units on 
the study plan. Students not seeking to practice counsel- 
ing may elect to substitute Counseling 597 Project or 598 
Thesis In place of 595 Competency Certification with ad- 
viser consent. Later certification requires completion of 
Counseling 595. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES CREDENTIAL 

(Employment as a counselor by a school district requires 
a credential Issued by the State Commission for Teacher 
Credentlaling [CTC].) The Counseling Department is au- 
thorized by law (Ryan Act) to offer this credential. 
Prerequisites for admission to the counseling credential 
objective are: 

1. Possession of the M.S. In Counseling or Its equivalent; 

2. B-level ratings in all competencies listed for the M.S. 
degree and the Pupil Personnel Services credential; 

3. Passage of the California Basic Education Skills Test 
(CBEST) if not previously taken. 

In addition to the M.S. in Counseling degree core courses, 
the student must take Counseling 522, 526, 533 and two 
semesters of fieldwork and practicum experience (Coun- 
seling 581 and 582) . Prior to admission to fieldwork, all 
candidates shall have been determined to be free of a 
criminal record which would preclude the credential. Stu- 
dents are required to be reassessed on any competencies 
not assessed within the last twelve months prior to recom- 
mendation of the PPS credential. Because the state re- 
quirements may be revised, students are advised to 
consult with a faculty adviser for current information and 
requirements. 


239 

Counseling 


SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY CREDENTIAL 

Students may apply for the School Psychology Program 
(School Psychology credential objective) during the last 
semester of the Pupil Personnel Services Program. Pres- 
ently the Department requires a PPS credential earned at 
this institution. The student may apply for the School Psy- 
chologist Specialist credential objective upon assessment 
of the M.S. degree competencies. In addition to comple- 
tion of the specialist competencies, the student must com- 
plete an internship consisting of full-time placement for a 
school year. Any student transferring from another institu- 
tion must pass most of the generic (M.S.) competencies 
at an A— level prior to admission to School Psychology 
course work. All generic competencies must be at the A— 
level before the end of their first semester and formal 
admission. All students within the CSUF Counseling gen- 
eric and PPS program must demonstrate competence at 
A— level as well. 

Employment as a school psychologist requires that the 
student have the Pupil Personnel Credential and an addi- 
tional 26 units of course work including Counseling 515, 
516, 523, 524, 525, 535, 536 and Internship Counseling 583. 
Students are required to be reassessed on any competen- 
cies not assessed within the last 12 months prior to recom- 
mendation for the School Psychologist Credential. 

Note: Since requirements for the above credentials and 
licenses may involve qualifications beyond academic 
preparation, such as further internship experience, official 
state tests, proof of lack of a criminal record, etc., the 
student is advised to consult a faculty adviser to assure 
compliance. Moreover, the requirements are subject to 
change without notice. 


Counseling Courses 

252 Career Exploration and Life Planning (3) 

Exploration of personal career potentials, employment 
trends, decision-making, goal-setting and job search meth- 
ods. 

316 Group Process and Membership (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A didactic and experien- 
tial overview of stages of group development, impact of 
members on group Identify, group member and leader is- 
sues. Sun/ey of various counseling groups. May be repeated 
for credit. Credit/ no credit only. (Same as Human Services 
316) 

317 Special Group Experiences (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Survey of theory and 
practice of special group approaches. A didactic and experi- 
ential view of group models in the helping professions. May 
be repeated for credit. Credit/no credit only. (Same as Hu- 
man Services 317) 

380 Theories and Techniques of Counseling (3) 


(Same as Human Services 380) 

452 Exploration in Self Concepts: Temperament and 
Character (3) 

Temperament and its relationship to career, marriage and 
parenting. 

480 Case Analysis and Intervention Techniques (3) 

(Same as Human Services 480) 

490 Standard Counseling Models (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing and consent of in- 
structor. Analysis of the standard counseling models includ- 
ing their procedures, outcomes, rationale and ostensible 
utility in treating abnormal or deviant behavior. 

511 Counseling Casework (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to M.S. in Counseling program and 
consent of instructor. Introduction to intervention methods. 

512 Counseling Procedures (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 511 and consent of instructor. 
More advanced intervention methods. May be repeated for 
credit. 

513 Counseling Procedures Assessment Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 511, 512, 531, 521 (or concurrent) 
and consent of instructor. Standard treatment models. 

514 Group Leadership (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 513 (or concurrent) and consent 
of Instructor. Group treatment usable with unrelated groups 
in educational, enforcement, correctional and health care 
agencies. May be repeated for credit. 

515 Paradox Counseling Procedures (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 513, 514 and Instructor consent. 
The double bind methods of Milton Erickson and the para- 
doxical uses of standard treatment methods. 

516 Conjoint Counseling Procedures (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 514 and consent of instructor. Ap- 
plications of the Interdiction Model of Milton Erickson and 
Jay Haley and others to related groups. May be repeated for 
credit. 

521 Research in Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. in Counseling program or 
consent of instructor. Methods of controlled Inquiry in coun- 
seling. 

522 Detection Procedure: Formal Experiments (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 521 and consent of instructor. The 
phenomenology of test. Inventory and interview methods 
and their reporting. Must be taken concurrently or prior to 
fieldwork or internship. May be repeated for credit. 

523 Detection Procedure: Abiiity Tests (4) 

Prerequisites: admission to the School Psychology program 
and consent of instructor. Instruction and coaching in the 
assessment of intelligence and achievement tests used to 
devise appropriate individual education plans. Emphasis in 
the Blnet, Weschler Scales, WRAT. 

524 Detection Procedure: Projective Tests (4) 

Prerequisites: admission to the School Psychology program 


Counseling 


and consent of the Instructor. Instruction and coaching in 
the assessment of projective sensory-motor and perceptual 
motor behavior used to devise appropriate individual educa- 
tion plans. Emphasis on drawing and sentence completion 
tests to determine disordered processes and/or dysfunc- 
tional self image. 

525 Personality Study: Advanced Issues (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 523, 524, and consent of instruc- 
tor. Application of metric and projective detection theory to 
the understanding of mentation and personality and their 
application in school settings. 

526 Professional Issues in Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: Counseling 595. A sun/ey of current legal, eth- 
ical, and pragmatic issues faced by counseling practitioners 
and administrators of counseling services. 

531 Pathology: Comparative Etiology (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. In Counseling program or 
consent of instructor. The spectrum of abnormal behaviors 
and experiences of clients of varying age, sex, culture and 
ethnicity. May be repeated for credit. 

532 Child and Family Dysfunction (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 521, 531 and consent of instructor. 
The management of guidance programs in child mal- 
development, family and school dysfunctions, including 
child welfare laws. May be repeated for credit. 

533 Career and Occupational Guidance (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 532 and consent of instructor. 
Consultation with individuals and organizations to prevent 
mismatch of individuals and their opportunities, and mis- 
match of organization means and goals. Special focus upon 
institutional iatrogenics. Career guidance background 
recommended. May be repeated for credit. 

534 Sexual Dysfunction (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 532 and consent of instructor. 
Phenomenology, nosology, demography, etiology, prognos- 
tics, treatment strategies and bibliography of sexual disturb- 
ance. May be repeated for credit. 

535 Pathology: Disorders of Thought and Language (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 532 and consent of instructor. 
Phenomenology, etiology, demography and bibliography of 
“catatonic,” “hebephrenic,” “epileptic,” “paranoid,” 
“obsessive,” “compulsive,” “phobic” and “aphasic” cli- 
ents. May be repeated for credit. 

536 Pathology: Affective & Psychosomatic Disorders (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 532 and consent of instructor. 


Phenomenology, etiology, demography and bibliography of 
“addicts,” “defilers,” “deprivers,” “derelicts,” “hypochon- 
driacs,” “neurasthenics,” “anxieties” and “melancholics.” 
May be repeated for credit. 

581 Fieldwork (3) 

Prerequisites: approval by Academic Review Board and ad- 
mission to counseling credential program. Supervised prac- 
tice in helping troubled clients in a public school setting. A 
weekly casework consultation seminar. Required for coun- 
seling credential. May be repeated for credit. 

582 Advanced Fieldwork (3) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of Counseling 581 and 
approval by the Academic Review Board. Supervised prac- 
tice in helping troubled clients in educational and related 
settings. Weekly casework consultation seminar. Required 
for counseling credential. May be repeated for credit. 

583 Internship In School Psychology (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 515, 523, admission to school psy- 
chology credential program and approval by Academic Re- 
view Board. Supervised practice in helping troubled clients 
In a public school setting. Weekly casework consultation 
seminar. Required for school psychology credential. May be 
repeated for credit. 

584 Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 516 and approval by Academic 
Review Board. Supervised practice in helping troubled cli- 
ents in educational, enforcement, correctional and/or 
health care agencies. Weekly casework consultation semi- 
nar. May be repeated for credit. 

595 Competency Certification Seminar (1-3) 

Prerequisite: approval by Academic Review Board. Candi- 
dates present written, live, videotape or audiotape samples 
to the Board of Professional Supervisors, to acquire exit skill 
ratings on the competencies required. May be repeated for 
credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Student invents and de- 
vises a tool, instrument or technique and reports. May be 
repeated for credit. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Writing of a thesis. May 
be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research and develop- 
ment in counseling pursued independently with periodic 
conference with instructor. May be repeated for credit. 


Counseling 


Department of 

Educational 

Administration 


Department Chair: Kenneth Preble 
Department Office: Education Classroom 558 

Programs Offered 

Master of Science In Education 

Concentration in Educational Administration 
Internship in Educational Administration 

Administrative Services Credential Programs 

Preliminary and Professional 

Faculty 

Walter Beckman, William Callison, Tracy Gaffey, 
Kenneth Preble, Stanley Rothstein 

INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 

The Department of Educational Administration has a pro- 
gram for Interns in Educational Administration which is 
approved by the California Commission for Teacher 
Preparation and Licensing. Because state regulations 
governing this program were under review at the time Df 
this publication, students should contact the department 
office for current Information and requirements. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES CREDENTIAL 

The Administrative Services Credential program of the 
Department of Educational Administration is approved by 
the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing. 
Because state regulations governing this program were 
under review at the time of this publication, students 
should contact the department office for current informa- 
tion and requirements. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
(EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION) 

The principal objective of the curriculum is to prepare 
carefully selected individuals for certain leadership posi- 
tions in educational administration. The program is de- 
signed to help these individuals gain the technical 
knowledge and scholarship requisite to high achievement 
in these positions. This professional program is based on 
and combined with sound preparation in the liberal arts 
and sciences. The curriculum proposes an interdiscipli- 
nary approach to the preparation of the professional spe- 


Educatlonal Administration 



cialist in public education. Thus, those who qualify for the 
degree should have completed course work in such fields 
as philosophy, public administration, psychology, political 
science, biology, English, sociology, economics, an- 
thropology or history. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified. 

University requirements include: a baccalaureate degree 
from an accredited institution and a grade-point average 
of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see 
section of this catalog on admission of graduates for com- 
plete statement and procedures) . In addition, an applicant 
should have a successful teaching experience in an ele- 
mentary or secondary school, or community college. If 
such experience is not available, other experience in relat- 
ed fields is a recommended alternative, which must be 
approved by a graduate adviser before starting the pro- 
gram. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the admission requirements and has 
a minimum 2.5 GPA in previous academic and related 
work may be granted classified graduate standing upon 
the development of an approved study plan. 

Study Plan 

The study plan must Include 30 units of committee-ap- 
proved course work, of which 25 must be at the 500 level. 
A minimum of 22 units must be in educational administra- 
tion; five units may be assigned on an interdisciplinary 
basis from courses related to the needs of individual stu- 
dents. Course requirements include field experience and 
a project. 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken prior 
to classified standing may be applied to a student’s 
master’s degree program. 

Students concentrating in educational administration will 
take Educational Administration 503, Foundations for Ad- 
ministrative Leadership, as soon as they identify their in- 
terest in this degree. To continue in the program beyond 
this course, the student must be granted a “letter of ad- 
mission to the program” and possess an official program 
evaluation. Students who desire only isolated courses 
from the program are normally denied admission to such 
courses. The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on 
the study plan will include: 

Units 

Core course work 9 

Educational Administration 503 
Foundations for Administrative Leadership 
(3) 

Educational Administration 505 Supervision 
of Curriculum (3) 

Ed-RP 510 Research Design and Analysis 
(3) 

Courses for the concentration in school 


administration 21 

All of the following (no grade below C): 

Educational Administration 561 
Governance, Systems, School and 
Community (3) 

Educational Administration 563 School 
Personnel Administration (2) 

Educational Administration 564 Seminar in 
School Law (2) 

Educational Administration 565 Seminar In 
School Finance, Business Administration 
and Buildings (2) 

Educational Administration 588 
Organization Theory and Management 
(3) 

Educational Administration 567A,B 
Fieldwork and Project (2,2) 

One of the following: 

Educational Administration 566 Elementary 
Administration and Supervision (3) 

Educational Administration 586 Secondary 
Administration and Supervision (3) 

Adviser approved electives (2) 

Total 30 

For advisement and further Information, consult the 
graduate program adviser. 


Educational Administration 
Courses 

503 Foundations for Administrative Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Cultures and values to 
which schools must contribute. Community sociology, tax 
systems and public administration; the literature of leader- 
ship. Screening for admission to program. Required of all 
students during their first registration in school administra- 
tion. 

505 The Supervision of Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed Adm 566 or 586. Development of a quality 
program of Instruction in elementary and secondary 
schools; appraisal of programs of instruction; advanced 
principles of curricular review and modification. Evaluation 
of subject matter competence in supervisory specialization. 

560 Contemporary Problems in School Administration 
(3) 

Contemporary problems in school organization and adminis- 
tration including collective bargaining, finance, staff and 
school integration, declining enrollment, pupil achievement 
and affirmative action. 

561 Governance, Systems, School and Community (3) 

Structure, functions, trends, fiscal responsibilities and issues 
in the government of education at federal, state, county and 


9d'^ 

Educational Administration 


local school district levels. School organization and adminis- 
tration. Community involvement; school-community partici- 
pation and communication. 

563 School Personnel Administration (2) 

Prerequisite: Ed Adm 503 or concurrent enrollment. School 
personnel management, collective negotiations and role 
definition. 

564 Seminar In School Law (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. School law as a reflec- 
tion of public policy. California Education Code and the Cali- 
fornia Administrative Code, Title 5, and county counsel 
opinions: administration, instruction and financial manage- 
ment of public schools; legal basis for public education in 
California. 

565 Seminar In School Finance, Business Administration 
and Buildings (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. School finance, business 
administration and buildings and the effective educational 
program. Financial principles. School revenues and expend- 
itures, budgetary procedures and processes, cost analysis, 
business management and salary policies. 

566 Elementary Administration and Supervision (3) 
Prerequisites: Ed Adm 561 and 563. Leadership roles of ele- 
mentary school principal and supen/isor. Pupil personnel 
and instructional program in elementary school; working re- 
lations and morale among staff, community and pupils; par- 
ent education; relations with central district staff; 
management and recordkeeping functions; teacher evalua- 
tion. 


567 A, B Fieldwork and Project (2,2) 

Prerequisites: Ed Adm 566 or 586 and 510. Fieldwork and 
project or thesis, as required for Master’s degree. Directed 
fieldwork in administrative areas in school systems. Superv- 
ised Master’s Project or Thesis required in problem or area 
approved by the instructor. (May be repeated for credit.) 

586 Secondary Administration and Supervision (3) 

Prerequisites: Ed Adm 561 and 563. Leadership roles of the 
secondary school principal and supervisor, pupil personnel 
and Instructional program in secondary schools; develop- 
ment and administration of vocational education; morale 
among staff, community and pupils; relations with central 
district staff; management functions; teacher evaluation. 

588 Organization Theory and Management (3) 

Public school management; planninc and practice in task 
analysis; planning and practice in setting of goals and objec- 
tives; implementation of plans related to goals; manage- 
ment tools; social, political and economic forces affecting 
education; decision making. 

593 Administering the Least Restrictive Environment (3) 
Prerequisite: Edu Adm 503. The role of the administrator In 
providing educational programs for exceptional pupils in en- 
vironments that maximize contact with non-exceptional 
pupils. Emphasis will be placed on the implementation of the 
legislative mandates of Public Law 94-142, the Education for 
All Handicapped Children Act, and Assembly Bill 1250. 
(Same as Special Education 593) 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Independent Inquiry for 
qualified students. 


244 

I 1 Educational Administration 


Department of 
Health Education, 
Physical Education 
and Recreation 


Department Chair: Eula Stovall 
Department Office: Physical Education 134 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Science In Physical Education 
Minor in Health Promotion 
Minor In Physical Education 

Master of Science In Physical Education 

Athletic Training Certification Program 

Corrective Therapy Affiliation Program 

Single Subject Waiver Program in Physical Education for 
the Ryan Single Subject Credential 

Adapted Physical Education Emphasis Credential 
Faculty 

Gene Adams, C. Ian Bailey, Jean Barrett, William 
Beam, Anne Marie Bird, M. William Fulton, Eric 
Hanauer, Alexander Omalev, Bonnie Parkhouse, Paul 
Pastor, Kenneth Ravizza, Roberta Rikli, Diane Ross, 
Virginia Scheel, Eula Stovall, Carol Weinmann, Ronald 
Witchey, Michael Yessis 

The Department of Health Education, Physical Education 
and Recreation provides an academic program in the 
study of human movement designed to prepare graduates 
for a variety of career options. 

Advisement 

Undergraduate and graduate students are required to 
seek academic advisement prior to their first registration 
at CSUF and continuously throughout completion of their 
degree programs. Students are assigned a full-time fac- 
ulty member for academic advisement and graduation 
checks. Students may come to, or telephone, the depart- 
ment office for further Information. 

Transfer students should see an adviser Immediately re- 
garding transfer credit. For information on general educa- 


HEPER 


tion, consult the Academic Advisement Center. 

INTRODUCTION 

The primary mission of the department is to advance and 
disseminate knowledges created through the study of hu- 
man movement, of leisure needs and interests, and of 
total health which Includes physical, mental, social and 
emotional dimensions. The secondary mission focuses 
on: (1) development of knowledges and skills essential 
for entry Into a variety of occupations, (2) development of 
opportunities for participation in internships or coopera- 
tive education work experiences related to academic 
study, and (3) development of attitudes and behaviors 
appropriate for promotion and maintenance of personal 
and environmental health. 

The study of human movement encompasses the mech- 
anisms which influence and are significant to participation. 
These include philosophical, historical, sociological, psy- 
chological and biological factors. Environmental determi- 
nants, Including the social context and movement 
structures in which activity occurs, are considered. 

Career Tracks 

The Department of Health Education, Physical Education 
and Recreation has identified 10 tracks which can help 
prepare students for careers in the field or for graduate 
study. These tracks are advisory only, but can be valuable 
In meeting academic and career objectives. Advisers’ of- 
fice hours for obtaining information on the various tracks 
are available In the department office. Students are en- 
couraged to contact the adviser in the area of choice. 
Career opportunities are available in; 

Athletic Training 
Coaching 

Elementary and Secondary Teaching Certification 
Health 

Human Factors 
Humanities — Arts 

Physical Education for the Handicapped 
Recreation 

Sport and Exercise Management 
Sports Careers 
Sports Medicine 

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT 

In order to satisfy the upper-division writing requirement of 
the university, physical education majors must pass (1) 
Physical Education 301, Writing Styles for Human Move- 
ment Studies, with a grade of C or better; and (2) The Cal 
State Fullerton Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP). 
Note: Physical Education 301 cannot be counted as a part 
of the physical education major, but may count toward 
general elective units in the 124 unit graduation require- 
ment. 

Please see additional information provided in this catalog 
on the writing requirement. 


GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The General Education Committee has approved the fol- 
lowing health education/physical education courses for 
general education credit; 

Health Ed 101 Personal Health (3) 

Health Ed 301 Promotion of Optimal Health (3) 
(cross-listed with Nursing 301) 

Physical Ed 350 Physical Activity and Lifelong 
Well-Being (3) 

Physical Ed 381 Human Movement In Cultural 
Perspective (3) 

Note: Physical Education 350 and 381 may not be used by 
physical education majors to fulfill general education re- 
quirements. 

PERFORMANCE PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS 
FOR MAJOR AND MINOR STUDENTS 

Performance courses should be taken to meet the prereq- 
uisite requirements for any analysis series course. Profi- 
ciency screening tests are administered in the analysis 
classes at the beginning of the semester. 

STUDENT AWARDS 

Awards are presented each year to the outstanding under- 
graduate and the outstanding graduate students in the 
department. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Health Education, Physical Education 
and Recreation offers the Bachelor of Science In Physical 
Education for students preparing to teach, to pursue 
graduate work in physical education and for careers in 
business, Industry and government service. The degree 
consists of 124 units with a maximum of 12 lower division 
units and a minimum of 33 upper division units in physical 
education. Each course counted toward the major must 
be completed with a grade of C or higher. All courses 
counted toward the major must be taken on an option 1 
(letter grade) basis. 

Transfer students must request 2 copies of transcripts of 
records of all previous scholastic work from each univer- 
sity or college attended. These transcripts must be sent 
by the issuing institution directly to the Office of Admis- 
sions. 

All transfer students must have transcripts evaluated by a 
department undergraduate adviser prior to registration. 

MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Lower-Division (Maximum of 12 units) 

Required Courses: 

Physical Education 260 Movement Anatomy (3) 
(General human anatomy courses do not meet 
this requirement. However, such courses are highly 
recommended.) 


MERER 


A minimum of six courses, one from each of the following 
areas: 

Fitness: Physical Education 100, Physical Conditioning; 
102, Jogging; 144, Exercise Weight Control; 146, Body 
Building; 147, Olympic Power Lifting. 

Aquatics: Physical Education 110, Swimming; 111, Life 
Saving; 112, Water Polo; 114, Skin Diving; 21 4A, Basic 
Scuba; 214B, Intermediate Scuba. 

Combatives: Physical Education 150, Wrestling; 151, Aiki- 
do; 152, Karate; 154, Self-Defense; 155, Fencing. 

Individual Sports: Physical Education 104, Horseback Rid- 
ing; 105, Cycling; 106, Skiing; 107, Ice Figure Skating; 108, 
Roller Skating; 117, Bowling; 118, Archery; 119, Golf; 120, 
Gymnastics; 122, Sailing; 125, Rock Climbing; 246A, Basic 
Hatha Yoga. 

Court/Racquet Sports: Physical Education 130, Badmin- 
ton; 131, Tennis; 132, Racquetball; 133, Handball. 

Team Sports: Physical Education 160, Baseball; 161, Soft- 
ball; 164, Volleyball; 165, Soccer; 166, Team Handball; 167, 
Basketball. 

(Intercollegiate sports course may be applied in the ap- 
propriate area.) 

A maximum of 12 lower-dvision units may be counted 
toward completion of the major. However, students may 
elect to take upper-division work in lieu of further lower- 
division work excluding requirements stated above. All 
work taken at other institutions as lower-division work 
must be counted as such at Cal State Fullerton. 

Upper Division (Minimum of 33 units) 

Required courses (18 units): 

Physical Ed 300 Principles of Movement (3) 

Physical Ed 352 Physiology of Exercise (352L 
optional) (3) 

Physical Ed 371 Theory and Principles of Human 
Motor Learning (371 L optional) (3) or 
Physical Ed 383 Psychological Aspects of Human 
Movement (3) 

Physical Ed 380 History of Physical Education and 
Sport (3) or 

Physical Ed 382 Philosophical Perspectives of Human 
Movement (3) 

Physical Ed 381 Human Movement in Cultural 
Perspective (3) or 
Physical Ed 384 Sport Sociology (3) 
and three units selected from courses 371, 380, 381, 

382, 383, 384 which have not been used to meet 
the above requirements. 

Electives (Minimum 15 units): 

Upper-division physical education courses to complete 
the required 45 units for the major. To be selected under 
advisement. 


MiNOR iN HEALTH PROMOTiON 

The department offers a minor In health promotion con- 
sisting of 21 units, with a minimum of 12 upper-division 
units selected in consultation with the minor adviser. The 
minor in health promotion Is offered within a conceptual 
framework of holism, and may be of Interest to students 
preparing for careers In teaching and health care or help- 
ing professions, as well as to students with a personal 
interest in health enhancement. Course work must be tak- 
en on an option 1 (letter grade) basis and completed with 
a C grade or higher to be counted toward the minor. 

Required Courses (12 units): 

Chemistry 111 Nutrition and Drugs (3) or 
Chemistry 480B Topics In Contemporary Chem (2-3) 
or Approved nutrition course (2-3) 

Health Ed 101 Personal Health (3) or 
Health Ed 321 Drugs and Society (3) 

Health Ed 318 Principles of Holistic Health and 
Wellness (3) or 

Health Educ 301 Promotion of Optimal Health (3) 
Health Educ 355 Health Education for Teachers 


Electives (9 units): 

Students may elect to take (up to a maximum of 3 units) 
performance courses which emphasize the application of 
basic health promotion principles in the student’s own life: 
Physical Education 100, 102, 103-169, 246A, 246B; Theatre 
122, 126A, 126B, 132, 142, 162, 222, 232. 

Students shall choose additional elective units, with ap- 
proval of the minor adviser, from approved courses of 
specific relevance to health promotion (list available in 
department office. Physical Education 134). 

MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A physical education minor consists of 24 units of ap- 
proved course work In physical education with a minimum 
of 18 upper division units. Course work must be completed 
with a grade of C or higher. All courses counted toward the 
minor must be taken on an option 1 (letter grade) basis. 

Required Courses: 

Physical Ed 260 Movement Anatomy (3) 

Physical Ed 300 Principles of Movement (3) 

Physical Ed 352 Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Physical Ed 371 Theory and Principles of Human 
Motor Learning (3) or 

Physical Ed 383 Psychological Aspects of Human 
Movement (3) 

Physical Ed 381 Human Movement in Cultural 
Perspective (3) or 

Physical Ed 384 Sport Sociology (3) 

Physical Ed 380 History of Physical Education and 
Sport (3) or 

Physical Ed 382 Philosophical Perspectives of Human 
Movement (3) 


NEPER 


Electives: 

A maximum of 3 units lower-division Physical Ed electives 
(100- and 200-level courses) 

A minimum of 3 units upper division Physical Ed electives 
(300- and 400-level courses) 

ATHLETIC TRAINING CERTIFICATION 

Athletic Training Certification accredited by the National 
Athletic Trainers’ Association must be earned in conjunc- 
tion with a major in physical education. Upon successful 
completion of the specific requirements listed below, the 
student must apply through the department to the Na- 
tional Athletic Trainers’ Association for the certification 
examination. 


1. A bachelor’s degree with a major in physical education 
with a GPA of at least 2.5 overall; 3.0 in the major; and 
2.5 in biological science. 

2. CPR card (yearly) and current first aid card. 

3. The following specific course work (or equivalent): 
Bio Scl 361 Human Anatomy (4) 

Bio Sci 362 Human Physiology (4) 

Chemistry 100 Introduction to Chemistry (3) 
Chemistry 111 Nutrition and Drugs (3) 
or Physics 211 A Elementary Physics (3) 

Health Ed 101 Personal Health (3) 

Prevention and First Aid (2) 
Movement Anatomy (3) 

Principles of Movement (3) 
Principles of Conditioning (3) 
Physiology of Exercise (3) 
Prevention and Care of Athletic 


Health Ed 102 
Physical Ed 260 
Physical Ed 300 
Physical Ed 351 
Physical Ed 352 
Physical Ed 365 
Injuries (3) 

Physical Ed 371 
Learning (3) 

Physical Ed 383 
Movement (3) 

Physical Ed 451 Sports Medicine (3) 

Physical Ed 496 Clinical Training Internship (6) 
(1,000 clock hours) 

Recommended courses: 


Principles of Human Motor 
Psychological Aspects of Human 


Emergency Medical Training 
Health Ed 321 Drugs and Society (3) 

CORRECTIVE THERAPY AFFILIATION 

Corrective therapy is the application of the principles, 
tools, techniques and psychology of medically oriented 
physical education to assist the physician in the accom- 
plishment of prescribed objectives. The course of study 
includes undergraduate and graduate programs in physi- 
cal education. Certification requires the following subject 
areas (for specific courses contact the department office. 
Physical Education 134): 

APPLIED SCIENCES: anatomy, kinesiology, physiology, 
physiology of exercise, neurology, and pathology. 

CORRECTIVE THERAPY AND ADAPTED PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION: organization and administration, and 


kinesiotherapy. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION: analysis of hu- 
man movement, health education and problems, princi- 
ples of health and physical education, physical and mental 
habilitation, tests and measurements, and skills and ap- 
plied techniques. 

PSYCHOLOGY: general psychology, abnormal psycholo- 
gy, physiological; psychology, developmental psychology, 
mental health, psychotherapy, social psychology. 

An overall GPA of 3.0 and a GPA of 3.0 in all courses taken 
in the above subject areas are required. All required 
courses must be completed prior to application for admit- 
tance to the internship at the Veterans Administration 
Hospital, Long Beach (1,000 hours are required In the 
one-year internship). Upon successful completion, the 
student must apply to the Corrective Therapy Association 
for examination to obtain certification. Certified Corrective 
Professionals operate only with the Veterans Hospitals 
throughout the United States. 

TEACHING CREDENTIAL— REQUIREMENTS FOR 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS 

The Physical Education Department offers a Waiver Pro- 
gram in order to obtain a (K-12) Ryan Single Subject 
Credential. 

The university program for meeting the basic require- 
ments for the teaching credential with a specialization in 
physical education (K-12) can be found elsewhere in this 
catalog (see School of Human Development and Com- 
munity Service, Division of Teacher Education). Addition- 
al requirements of the Department of Health Education, 
Physical Education and Recreation are as follows: 

1. Advisement 

The department offers guidance to students consider- 
ing a teaching credential through the Physical Educa- 
tion Teacher Education Advisement Office. Students 
are asked to consult with the adviser as early as the 
sophomore year in order to plan and acquire experi- 
ences prior to entry Into the Teacher Education Pro- 
gram. This will help students to evaluate qualifications 
and to plan appropriate course work. 

A screening committee evaluates candidates’ qualifica- 
tions based on grade-point average, required course 
work and experiences with children or adolescents. Ap- 
plications to the Teacher Education Program may be 
made when all required courses are In progress, or 
completed, and the candidate is within six units of com- 
pleting the physical education major. The bachelor of 
science degree is not a prerequisite for admission to 
the Teacher Education Program. 

2. Required Course Work 

In addition to, or as part of, the requirements for a major 
in physical education all candidates for the credential 
must complete the following with a minimum of a C 
grade: 


NEPER 


Physical Ed 300 Principles of Movement 
Physical Ed 340 Contemporary Movement 
Environments 

Physical Ed 349 Measurement and Evaluation in 
Physical Education 

Physical Ed 371 Theory and Principles of Human 
Motor Learning 

Minimum of two analysis classes and one technique 
of coaching class. 

3. Completion of the Approved Waiver Program 

All candidates for the credential must adequately dem- 
onstrate competency in subject matter scope and con- 
tent of physical education. See a listing of the approved 
waiver under Division of Teacher Education. 


496 (off-campus teacher aides), and Physical Educa- 
tion 396 (on-campus teacher aides). 

6. Admission to Teacher Education 

In addition to the requirements set forth elsewhere in 
this catalog, the Department of Physical Education re- 
quires candidates to submit to an extensive review of 
qualifications for teaching. This review includes addi- 
tional written documentation, and a personal evalua- 
tion by a select faculty committee. 

Acceptance into the program allows the candidate to 
enroll In a two semester sequence: 

First semester: Education-Teacher Education 440F, 
440S, 440R (optional). Physical Education 442, 449E. 
Second semester: Physical Education 449 I, 449S. 


Copy of the waiver can be obtained from the teacher 
education adviser in physical education. 

4. Instructional Subject Matter of Physical 
Education 

Students seeking a credential with a specialization in 
physical education from this institution must be able to 
demonstrate competency In Instructional subject mat- 
ter which is a part of the regular physical education 
program of the public schools. The Department of 
Health Education, Physical Education and Recreation 
specifically requires the following: 

a. Ability to perform and analyze basic movement skills 
common to a large number of Instructional physical 
activities. 

b. Adequate background and preparation to demon- 
strate breadth of understanding of the scope and 
content of physical education. 

c. Strong background and preparation In a minimum of 
six designated areas of physical education to dem- 
onstrate “in-depth” understanding and ability to ap- 
ply understandings to the teaching learning 
situation. At present the areas identified by the 
Teacher Education Advisory Council of the Physical 
Education Department include: (1) team sports, (2) 
individual sports, (3) dual sports, (4) dance, (5) 
aquatics, (6) recreational (must be instructional in 
nature), (7) athletic training, (8) adaptives. 

Note: Students are urged to consult with the teacher 
education adviser of the department before submitting 
documents required for establishing subject matter 
competency. 


SPECIAL ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
EMPHASIS CREDENTIAL 

Cal State Fullerton has been granted approval to offer an 
Adapted Physical Education Emphasis Credential as an 
addition to a Single Subject Physical Education Creden- 
tial. 


There are two options available. Option I Is 18 units of 
required course work and experience within the field of 
physical education. This option is offered to students with 
a Physical Education Teaching Credential but no prior 
experience or course work In the adapted field. Option II 
is an individualized program designed by the teacher edu- 
cation adviser and the candidate. This option is available 
for teachers holding a Physical Education Credential and 
who have already been working In the adapted field. The 
amount of prior experience, the types of students worked 
with, evaluations by supervisors, prior course work, work- 
shops and in-service training help to determine the Individ- 
ual program of each candidate. 


Specific requirements for the emphasis credential include 
completion of: 


Physical Ed 260 
Physical Ed 363 
Physical Ed 364 
Physical Ed 383 
Movement 
Physical Ed 473 
Physical Ed 474 


Movement Anatomy 
Developmental Adapations of Atypical 
Motor Development 
Psychological Aspects of Human 

Motor Impairment in Children 
Kinesiotherapy 


One approved 3 unit upper-division Physical Education 
course. 


5. Experiences 

Students are expected to have been involved in several 
leadership experiences prior to formal application. 
These experiences could be in coaching, recreation, 
camping, youth leagues, and aiding in public school 
physical education classes. These experiences can be 
self-designed or designed through Physical Education 


The Adapted Physical Education Emphasis Credential 
may be obtained only in conjunction with (or in addition 
to) a Single Subject Physical Education Credential. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The program provides advanced study within the broad 
discipline of physical education and allows students to 
elect course work, with adviser approval. In physiology of 
exercise, motor learning, biomechanics, philosophy of hu- 


249 


man movement, psychology of human movement, sport 
sociology, physical education and athletic administration, 
sport and exercise management, elementary physical ed> 
ucation, movement programs for children or adapted 
physical education. 

The Master of Science degree in physical education is 
intended to meet the needs of students who wish to (1) 
prepare for admission to doctoral programs; (2) enhance 
competencies in teaching or athletic administration; and 
(3) to prepare for a variety of other physical education or 
sports-related careers. 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for 
admission, which include a baccalaureate from an accred- 
ited institution, and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 
In the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this 
catalog on admission of graduates for complete state- 
ment and procedures). In addition to the university re- 
quirements for admission, acceptance Into this program is 
contingent upon the following: (1) an undergraduate ma- 
jor in physical education with a grade-point average of 3.0 
In upper-division physical education course work exclud- 
ing health, recreation and fieldwork courses; and (2) sub- 
mission of two letters of recommendation to the graduate 
studies coordinator. 

Students with undergraduate degrees In areas other than 
physical education may be considered for conditional ac- 
ceptance to the program. These students must complete 
24 units of course work as specified by the graduate stud- 
ies committee with a minimum grade-point average of 3.0. 
Course work taken prior to completion of this requirement 
may not be counted toward the M.S. degree. 

Students with grade-point deficiencies may be considered 
for conditional acceptance to the program. These stu- 
dents must complete additional undergraduate course 
work as specified by the graduate studies committee. 
Course work completed to raise grade-point average may 
not be counted toward the M.S. degree. 

Classified Standing 

Classified standing requires the development of a study 
plan (see below) approved by the program adviser, 
graduate studies committee and dean of graduate studies. 
No more than nine units of graduate work taken before 
classification may be included on the study plan. Any 
changes to the study plan after classified standing is 
granted must be approved in advance, in writing, by the 
program adviser and the graduate studies committee. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

Advancement to candidacy Is attained by requesting a 
graduation check in the semester prior to graduation (see 
class schedule for deadlines) and receiving subsequent 
approval of the graduate studies adviser on the comple- 
tion review form (Form B) , mailed by the Office of Gradu- 
ate Affairs. Students not completing requirements by the 


graduation date specified on the original graduation check 
must contact the Office of Graduate Affairs. 

Graduate Advisement 

Students should consult with the graduate studies coordi- 
nator for general information regarding the program. Upon 
acceptance to the program, students are assigned a pro- 
gram adviser who assists in developing the study plan. 
Thesis/project advisers are selected in consultation with 
the student, program adviser and potential thesis/project 
chair. Advisement during the summer is provided by the 
department chair. Students may not register for, or com- 
plete, thesis/project studies during the summer without 
written consent of the thesis/project committee. 

Study Plan 

A study plan includes a minimum of 30 units of approved 
graduate work; at least 18 of the total units must be 500- 
level physical education course work. All study plans must 
include the following physical education courses: 508; 510; 
597 or 598; and two advanced study courses, in addition 
to the advanced study course (if any) listed for the focus 
of study. Additional course work may be selected from: 
(1 ) 400- and 500-level courses in physical education; and/ 
or (2) graduate or approved upper-division courses from 
other departments within the university. An open hearing 
on the thesis/project, prior to undertaking the study, and 
a final oral examination on the study are required. Stu- 
dents subject to academic probation, or those on academ- 
ic probation, may not register for Physical Education 499, 
550, 597, 598 or 599. 

Required: 

Physical Ed 508 Statistical Methods in Physical 
Education (3) 

Physical Ed 510 Research in Physical Education (3) 
Physical Ed 598 Thesis (4) or 597 Project (2) 

Advanced study courses: (See course descriptions for 
prerequisite requirements.) 

Physical Ed 516 Advanced Study of the Philosophical 
Perspective of Human Movement (3) 

Physical Ed 551 Advanced Study in Physiology of 
Exercise (3) 

Physical Ed 552 Advanced Study in Biomechanics (3) 
Physical Ed 554 Advanced Study in Human Motor 
Behavior (3) 

Physical Ed 580 Advanced Study In Psychological 
Aspects of Human Movement (3) 

Physical Ed 582 Adv Study in Sport Sociology (3) 

Elective Courses: 

Approved 400/500-level physical education courses. 

Approved upper division and graduate courses from other 
departments. 

Graduate Level Writing Requirement 

The graduate level writing requirement is met by taking 


MERER 


Physical Education 510, Research in Physical Education, 
and passing the course with a C grade, or better. 


Health Education Courses 

101 Personal Health (3) 

Basic concepts relating to health and well being from a 
holistic perspective. Mental, emotional, physical and socio- 
environmental dimensions of health; sexuality and relation- 
ships; nutrition and physical fitness; use and abuse of drugs; 
health care sen/ices and current health problems. 

102 Prevention and First Aid (2) 

The hazards in environment. The care and prevention of 
accidents. Standard first aid certification by the American 
Red Cross granted upon successful completion of require- 
ments. 

301 Promotion of Optimal Health (3) 

(Same as Nursing 301) 

318 Principles of Holistic Health and Wellness (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of instruc- 
tor. Orientation to holistic concepts of health and wellness. 
Interplay of mind and body in health and illness. Students 
explore basic dimensions of wellness and develop a person- 
alized wellness profile. 

321 Drugs and Society (3) 

Habit-forming substances such as alcohol, tobacco, narcot- 
ics, hallucinogens, and related drugs, other stimulants and 
depressants. Social historical, and legal aspects of the drug 
problem are considered. 

342 Stress Management (3) 

The nature of stress and the physiological and psychologi- 
cal effects of prolonged stress responses. Includes short 
and long term somatic and behavioral techniques (exercise, 
relaxation, meditation, nutrition, time management and goal 
setting) for management of stress. 

350 Nutrition: Vital Link to Better Health (3) 

(Same as Nursing 350) 

355 Health Education for Teachers (3) 

School health, drug education, family living, community 
health, teaching philosophy, safety education and strategy. 
For California teaching credential. 


Physical Education Courses 

Only one section of the following performance courses 
may be taken in the same semester (e.g., Physical Educa- 
tion 131A,B,C,D are the same activity) : Physical Education 
100, 102 through 167, 214A, 214B, 246A and 246B. 

100 Physical Conditioning (1) 

Designed to Improve the Individual’s overall fitness through 
an understanding and application of the basic principles and 


techniques of physical conditioning. Emphasizes muscular 
strength/endurance, cardiorespiratory endurance and flexi- 
bility components through various forms of exercise meth- 
ods. May be repeated for credit. 

101 Athletic Conditioning (specific sport) (1) 

A conditioning program designed to improve strength, flexi- 
bility, agility and cardiovascular conditioning for a specific 
sport. Credit/ no credit only. May be repeated for a maximum 
of four units of credit. 

102 Jogging (1) 

The basic concepts of aerobic principles of conditioning. 
Elementary anatomical, physiological, biomechanical, and 
psychological factors associated with jogging are presented 
in order to serve as the basis for practical guidelines in 
developing or modifying the jogging workout. May be repeat- 
ed for credit. 

104-167 Performance Courses (1) 

104 Horseback Riding; 105 Cycling; 108 Roller Skating; 110 
Swimming; 111 Life Saving; 112 Water Polo; 114 Skin Diving; 
117 Bowling; 118 Archery; 119 Golf; 120 Gymnastics; 122 
Sailing; 125 Rock Climbing; 130 Badminton; 131 Tennis; 132 
Racquetball; 133 Handball; 142 Children’s Games; 144 Exer- 
cise Weight Control; 146 Body Building; 147 Olympic and 
Power Lifting; 150 Wrestling; 151 Aikido; 152 Karate; 154 
Self-Defense; 155 Fencing; 160 Baseball; 161 Slow Pitch 
Softball; 162 Fast Pitch Softball; 164 Volleyball; 165 Soccer; 
166 Team Handball; 167 Basketball. Performance courses 
are primarily Instructional. Beginning, intermediate and ad- 
vanced sections are offered for most performance courses. 
Students who already possess some proficiency in an activ- 
ity should consider the course chosen from the standpoint 
of the level of skill development which may be encountered, 
standards of proficiency expected and their own ability level. 
Initial assessment and determination will be made by the 
course instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

176-189 Intercollegiate Sports (2) 

Prerequisite: consent of coach. An Intercollegiate activity In 
individual or team sports in an educational setting under the 
direction of a coach. Physical Education 170 Gymnastics; 
171 Golf; 172 Cross Country; 173 Water Polo; 174 Track- 
Field; 175 Tennis; 176 Wrestling; 177 Fencing; 178 Basket- 
ball; 179 Baseball; 180 Soccer; 184 Football; 185 Volleyball; 
186 Softball. May be repeated for credit. 

190 Team Management (2) 

Prerequisites: consent of coach and department chair. Field 
experience in the management of an intercollegiate sport. 
May be repeated for maximum of eight units of credit. (Cred- 
it/No Credit only) 

210 Water Safety Instructor (2) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 111 or equivalent and con- 
sent of Instructor. Prepares the student to teach swimming 
and life saving and to supen/ise aquatic programs. Success- 
ful completion will qualify the student for certification as an 
ARC Water Safety Instructor. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activ- 
ity) 


HEPER 


214A Basic Scuba (2) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 114, or ability to swim 400 
yards, tread water one minute and swim 25 yards underwa- 
ter. Skin and scuba diving, theory of diving, safety proce- 
dures and ocean environment. Open Water Basic Scuba 
Certification earned with successful completion. (1 hour lec- 
ture, 2 hours pool activity/ocean dives) 

214B Intermediate Scuba (2) (Formerly 343) 

Prerequisite: Open Water Scuba Certification. Application of 
scuba diving, including photography, navigation, salvage, 
game hunting, night diving and others. Advanced Scuba 
Certification for successful completion. (1 hour lecture, 2 
hours pool activity/ocean dives) 

246A Basic Hatha Yoga (2) 

Basic Yoga postures, breathing and relaxation techniques, 
and beginning meditation techniques from theoretical and 
experiential perspectives. Awareness, concentration and 
breathing patterns that accompany the movements of Ha- 
tha Yoga. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) (Same as Reli- 
gious Studies 246A) 

246B intermediate Hatha Yoga (2) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 246A. An intermediate 
study of the theoretical and experiential aspects of Hatha 
Yoga. Intermediate postures, relaxation, breathing, stretch- 
ing, and concentration techniques are examined. The philo- 
sophical and psychological components of Hatha Yoga are 
discussed. An integrated approach to the body and move- 
ment is investigated. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours activity) 
(Same as Religious Studies 246B) 

260 Movement Anatomy (3) 

The musculo-skeletal system and its function in human 
movement. Movement in sports skills and the muscles In- 
volved. 

300 Principles of Movement (3) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 260. General movement 
patterns as applied to sport and human movement. 

301 Writing Styles in Human Movement Studies (3) 

Identifies the various perspectives through which human 
movement can be studied. Writing styles appropriate for 
each dimension are emphasized. Meets upper division bac- 
calaureate writing course requirements for physical educa- 
tion majors; however, the course is not applicable toward 
the major. 

302-319 Analysis of Sports (2) 

Prerequisites: prior experience In the specific sport (s) to be 
studied; must demonstrate proficiency. Analysis of specific 
sport (s), including game play and skill performance. Under- 
standing the nature of the activity. 302 Track Events; 304 
Swimming; 305 Golf; 306 Gymnastics; 308 Soccer; 309 Bad- 
minton/Racquetball; 312 Tennis; 316 Volleyball; 317 Basket- 
ball; 319 Softball. 

320-338 Techniques of Coaching: Selected Sports (2) 

To prepare the student to coach specific individual and team 
sports. Coaching techniques, conditioning of athletes, 
budget preparation, purchase and care of equipment, sche- 


duling and design and care of facilities. 327 Wrestling; 328 
Gymnastics; 330 Softball; 332 Tennis; 334 Baseball; 335 
Football; 337 Basketball; 338 Volleyball. A maximum of 6 
units may be applied toward completion of the units required 
for the major. 

340 Contemporary Movement Environments (3) 

The acquisition of physical skills In diverse environments; 
similarities and differences among age groups. Useful for 
those considering teaching careers. Required visits to 
schools and other sites. 

341 Analysis of Basic Motor Skills (2) 

Identification and analysis of motor skills and patterns basic 
to all physical activities. Critical evaluation of games and 
activities as to their effectiveness in promoting basic motor 
skills in children is emphasized. Recommended for those 
pursuing careers with children. 

345 Underwater Photography (2) 

Prerequisite: Open Water Scuba Certification. Photography 
in the underwater environment. Equipment, underwater 
camera techniques, flash, and macrophotography. (1 hour 
lecture, 2 hours pool activity/ocean dives) 

349 Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education 
( 3 ) 

Tests and measurements used in the evaluation of human 
movement. Statistical analysis, domains of learning, and the 
construction, selection and administration of tests. 

350 Physical Activity and Lifelong Well-Being (3) 

An integration of physiological, psychological and sociologi- 
cal understandings of the human being In relationship to 
physical activity as a lifelong pursuit. Topics include physical 
fitness, nutrition, stress reduction, socialization, and individ- 
ual differences in human behavior. 

351 Principles of Conditioning (3) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 260 required; 300 and 352 
recommended. Conditioning for those who plan to coach or 
supervise fitness programs. Circuit training, nutrition, moti- 
vation, weight control and kinesiology factors. 

352 Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Recommended: Biological Science 362. Physiological proc- 
esses in physical activities and the effect of training upon 
performance. 

352L Physiology of Exercise Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: prior completion or concurrent enrollment in 
Physical Education 352. Laboratory techniques In physiology 
of exercise. (3 hours laboratory) 

363 Developmental Adaptations of Atypical (3) 

Prerequisites: Physical Education 300, 352, 364, or consent 
of instructor. The disabled whose unique needs In motor 
development determine their least restrictive environment in 
physical activity. Programs of games, sports and exercise in 
diversified settings; legally mandated regulations. 

364 Motor Development (3) 

Prerequisites: Physical Education 260 and 352, or consent of 
instructor. Life span motor development: age, sex, ethnic, 


MERER 


cultural and perceptual components; their implications and 
the main course of action needed in developmental strate- 
gies for optimal motor behavior development. 

365 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing, Health Education 102 
or equivalent, or consent of Instructor. For trainers, coaches, 
physical education instructors, health educators, YMCA and 
playground personnel, and athletes in the prevention and 
care of athletic injuries. Practical applications and theory. (2 
hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

366 Advanced Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 
(3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing. Physical Education 
365, or consent of instructor. Prevention and care of athletic 
injuries, administrative responsibilities, advanced treatment 
modalities, preconditioning, and rehabilitation. (2 hours lec- 
ture, 2 hours activity) 

371 Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning (3) 

Information processing as an explanation of motor learning 
and motor memory. 

371 L Theory and Principles of Human Motor Learning 
Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: prior completion or concurrent enrollment in 
Physical Education 371. Laboratory techniques in motor 
learning studies. (3 hours laboratory) 

372 Movement and the Child (3) 

Characteristics of the child; physical growth and develop- 
ment; basic mechanical principles underlying efficient move- 
ment; and programs for physical needs of children In the 
elementary school. 

373 Movement Concepts (3) 

Elements of movement: space, force, time, and flow. Obser- 
vation, participation, analysis, and synthesis of movement 
experiences. 

380 History of Physical Education and Sport (3) 

Historical development of thought and practice In athletics, 
sport, and physical education from ancient Greeks to the 
modern period with special emphasis upon the historical 
role of sport In American life. 

381 Human Movement in Cultural Perspective (3) 

Human movement In the cultural milieu. Historical and con- 
temporary interpretations of the role of play, games, sports, 
dance and recreation In human life. 

382 Philosophical Perspectives of Human Movement (3) 

The meaning and significance of participation in human 
movement. Human movement relative to personal identity, 
meditation, aesthetics, values, ethics, and the nature of 
competition. 

383 Psychological Aspects of Human Movement (3) 

The role of personality and cognitive factors In human move- 
ment settings. Selected topics may include: arousal, attribu- 
tion theory, achievement motivation, anxiety, interventions, 
attentional styles, aggression, social facilitation, social rein- 
forcement, and imagery. 


384 Sport Sociology (3) 

Sport In society. Sport and social institutions and social 
processes. Understanding sport as a social phenomenon. 

390 Principles of Sport and Exercise Management (3) 

A broad overview of the sport/exercise management enter- 
prise, Including school, facility, professional, commercial. In- 
dustrial, corporate management and specialists in 
marketing, print/electronic media. Job descriptions, profes- 
sional preparation and placement opportunities are detailed. 
Portfolio development. 

396 Physical Education Tutorial (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor and tutorial adviser. Su- 
pervised experience in performance or laboratory situations 
through tutoring or assisting in instruction. May be repeated 
for six units of credit. A maximum of three units may be 
applied toward the major. 

407 Sport Consumer Packaging (3) 

Prerequisite: Marketing 351 or Physical Education 390 or 
Communications 361 or consent of instructor. Technical ap- 
plication of promotions, public relations, marketing, contract 
negotiations, box office and event operations as each ap- 
plies to packaging sport entertainment. Case methods and 
applied team project. 

442 Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary 
School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, 
methods and materials of teaching physical education K to 
12. Required before student teaching. Part of the 12-unit 
education block and may not be taken separately. (Credit/ 
No Credit only) 

449E Externship in Secondary Teaching (3) 

(Formerly 449A) 

To be taken concurrently with Physical Education 442. See 
description under Division of Teacher Education. (Credit/ 
No Credit only) 

4491 Internship in Secondary Teaching (10) 

(Formerly 449A) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 
(CredIt/No Credit only) 

449S Seminar in Secondary Teaching (2) 

(Formerly 449B) 

See description under Division of Teacher Education. 
(CredIt/No Credit only) 

451 Sports Medicine (3) 

Prerequisites: upper division standing. Physical Education 
352 or its equivalent or consent of instructor. Factors (envi- 
ronmental, ergogenic, etc.) which alter the typical physio- 
logical response to exercise and training. 

452 Physical Performance Testing and Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 352 and 352L required; 
Physical Education 351 and 451 recommended. Testing and 
counseling techniques used to assess and develop physical 
performance. 


HEPER 


461 Biomechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 300 or consent of instruc- 
tor. The application of biomechanics to the analysis of hu- 
man movement. 

471 Motor Control (3) 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 371. The application of be- 
havioral and neurological evidence to the control of human 
movement. Mechanisms subserving movement based on 
the central and peripheral nervous systems are studied in 
relation to the control of discrete and sequential move- 
ments. 

473 Motor Impairment (3) 

Prerequisites: Physical Education 363, 364 or consent of 
Instructor. Identification of abnormal mo'tor behavior of the 
neurologically handicapped. Assessment factors, develop- 
ment of educational and/or therapeutic models of remedia- 
tion and action strategies. Disorders of neuromotor, 
convulsive, impulsive and minimal dysfunction syndrome. 

474 Kinesiotherapy (3) 

Prerequisites: Physical Education 260, 300, 363, or consent 
of instructor. Kinesiological bases of therapeutic exercise. 
The application of kinesiological principles in the selection 
and design of therapeutic exercise activities and programs 
for various physical disabilities. 

475 Behavioral Dimensions of Motor Performance (3) 

Prerequisites: Physical Education 371, 383. An integrated 
approach to the understanding of psychological processes 
and behavioral variables which affect the acquisition and 
performance of motor skills. 

496 Practicum (1-3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and consent of fac- 
ulty sponsor, field supervisors, departmental coordinator, 
and department chair. Planning, preparing, coaching, teach- 
ing in public school, college, or community physical educa- 
tion or recreation programs. May be repeated for a 
maximum of six units of credit. Credits not applicable toward 
major, or fifth year work. (CredIt/No Credit only) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: completion of a minimum of 15 upper division 
physical education units. Topics based on a study plan pre- 
pared in cooperation with a faculty supervisor. Culminates in 
a paper, project, comprehensive examination or perform- 
ance. Maximum of three units in any one semester; may be 
repeated once. 

508 Statistical Methods in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status and Physical Education 349 or 
equivalent. Statistical theory, data collection procedures, 
techniques for analysis and interpretation of data. 

510 Research in Physical Education (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and Physical Education 508. 
The fundamental tools of research. Types of research, proc- 
ess of scientific inquiry and critical analysis of research. 
Topic selection and development of a research proposal. 

514 Affective Instruments in Human Movement (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status; Physical Education 349, 383 


or 475, or consent of instructor. The evaluation of assess- 
ment instruments for affective analysis of values, attitudes 
and behavior in human movement settings. Development of 
assessment tools from synthesized information. 

516 Advanced Study of the Philosophical Perspective of 
Human Movement (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and Physical Education 382 
or consent of instructor. Methods of the philosophical proc- 
ess and human movement. 

536 Contemporary Problems and Issues In Sport 
Management (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status and Physical Education 390 or 
consent of instructor. Historical trends, current issues, and 
related problems of the sport and exercise industry. Job 
related decision-making. 

550 Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: classified status and consent of graduate ad- 
viser. On-the-job training experiences supervised by a fully 
trained practitioner. Requirements Include 10 hours per 
week of on-the-job training and one hour weekly conference 
with instructor. Not open to students on, or subject to, aca- 
demic probation. 

551 Advanced Study in Physiology of Exercise (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate status and Physical Education 352 or 
equivalent. Theories of exercise and physiological function. 

552 Advanced Study in Biomechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: Graduate status and Physical Education 461 or 
equivalent. Technique analysis of the major skills in sports. 
In-depth analysis of specific sports using high speed 
cinematography, instrumentation, computers, electromyog- 
raphy and electrogoniometry. 

554 Advanced Study in Human Motor Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status. Physical Education 371 or 
consent of instructor. Current issues In motor behavior. 

555 Scientific Bases of Training (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and Physical Education 351, 
352, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Training: the 
physiological bases for developing the primary fitness com- 
ponents. 

556 Environment and Exercise Physiology (3) 

Prerequisites: Physical Education 352, 352L, 351, graduate 
status, and instructor’s consent. The interrelationship 
between the physical environment and the human while 
exercising under different states of fitness and acclimatiza- 
tion. 

580 Advanced Study in Psychological Aspects of Human 
Movement (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and Physical Education 383, 
or consent of Instructor. Current Issues and research in psy- 
chology and human movement. 

582 Advanced Study in Sport Sociology (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status and Physical Education 384, 
or consent of instructor. The theories and methods of soci- 
ology and the study of the sport phenomenon. 


254 


597 Project (1-2) 

Prerequisites: classified status, Physical Education 508, 510 
and consent of project committee. Directed Independent 
inquiry. Not open to students on, or subject to, academic 
probation. 

598 Thesis (2-4) 

Prerequisites: classified status. Physical Education 508, 510 
and consent of thesis committee. Directed independent re- 
search. Student will select and have approved a research 
proposal, conduct the research, and prepare a formal analy- 
sis and report. May be repeated. Not open to students on, 
or subject to, academic probation. 


599 Independent Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate status. Physical Education 508, 510, 
and consent of the faculty adviser and department chair. 
May be repeated for maximum of 6 units of credit. Student 
research in a specific area of human movement studies. Not 
open to students on, or subject to, academic probation. 


Recreation Course 

384 Leisure in America: A Sociai History (3) 

(Same as History 384) 


HEPER 



Human Services Program 


Program Coordinator: Gerald Corey 
Program Office: Education Classroom 529 

Programs Offered 

Bachelor of Science in Human Services 
Multiple Subject Credential Waiver Program 

Faculty 

Soraya Coley, Gerald Corey, Judith Ramirez, J. Michael 
Russell, Jerome Wright 

INTRODUCTION 

The Bachelor of Science in Human Services is a carefully 
articulated program providing both the academic and ex- 
periential background for the student seeking a career 
working with people in the varied and expanding field of 
human services. An application-oriented major, it is based 
on a synthesis of knowledge from several social sciences, 
together with methodologies of intervention at the individ- 
ual, group and community levels. Human services gradu- 
ates are educated to respond in an informed way to 
Identifiable human service needs In a variety of settings. 
The program’s humanistic orientation and its synthesis of 
knowledge from many background disciplines, as well as 
its focus on the development of specific methods and 
practical skills to apply this knowledge, give it a unique 
perspective. 

The Human Services Program is structured around four 
interrelated components: theoretical foundations/inter- 
vention strategies; client population/cultural diversity; 
research/evaluation; and skills development/field experi- 
ence. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN SERVICES 

The requirements for the major consist of 54 units. The 
required core curriculum consists of 36 units (in the above 
four areas), plus 18-units of adviser approved courses 
related to one’s anticipated professional specialization. 

Majors must achieve a grade of C or better in all courses 
included in the core curriculum and in the advisement 
track. It is the student’s responsibility to consult an adviser 
on the human services faculty at least once during each 
of her/his first two semesters on campus to develop a 
study plan Identifying courses for the advisement track. 

Community College Transfer Students: Community col- 
lege transfer students may apply a maximum of 12 units 
of course work in human services and related fields to- 
wards the total of 54 units. Transfer of any units must be 
approved by the student’s adviser and the Program Coor- 
dinator. 



Human Services 


Courses required for the major total 54 units. The suggest- 
ed sequence is as follows: 

A. Required Core Curriculum (36 units) 


Sophomore Yean Units 

Human Services 201 Introduction to the 

Human Services 3 

Psychology 203 Elementary Statistics 
or Sociology 303 Statistics of the Social 
Sciences 3 


Note: Human Services 300, Character and Conflict, is re- 
quired in the paraprofessional counseling advisement 
track and should be taken early in the program. 


Junior Yean First Semester 

Human Services/Counseling 380 Theories 

and Techniques of Counseling 3 

Afro-EthnIc/Human Services 311 Intracultural 

Socialization Patterns 3 

Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology 
or Child 31 2 Human Growth and Development 3 

Psychology 341 Abnormal Psychology 
or Sociology 466 Deviant Behavior 3 

Junior Yean Second Semester 

Human Services 396 Practicum Seminar 2 

and 

Human Services 396L Practicum * 1 

Sociology 305 Techniques of Social Welfare .... 3 

Advisement Track Course (s) 

Senior Yean First Semester 

Human Sen/ices 385 Program Design and 

Proposal Writing 3 

Human Services 495 Fieldwork Seminar 2 

and 

Human Services 495L Fieldwork * 1 

Advisement Track Course (s) 

Senior Year: Second Semester 
Human Services 470 Evaluation of Human 

Services Program 3 

Human Services 496 Intership * 3 

Advisement Track Course (s) 


B. Required Advisement Track (18 units) 

In addition to the 36-unit core, the human services degree 
program requires each student to select, in consultation 
with an adviser, an 18-unit advisement track in the area of 
her/his anticipated professional specialization. Examples 
of advisement tracks Include: administration, gerontology, 
multiple subject (elementary) teacher education, para- 
professional counseling (individual and group), social 
rehabilitation, social work, or an individual program 

* The practicum fieldwork/intemship courses (Human Services 396 and 396L, 495 and 
495L. and 496) must be taken in sequer>ce. Only one fieldwork course work may 
be taken in a given semester. 


worked out with an adviser. Students are expected to 
consult with an adviser during their first semester in the 
Human Services Program to develop a study plan. 

Note: Human Services 300, Character and Conflict, may 
be used as an elective in advisement tracks; consult an 
adviser for further Information. 

MULTIPLE SUBJECT CREDENTIAL WAIVER 

A carefully selected sequence of courses taken in con- 
junction with the human services major has been ap- 
proved by the State of California as a waiver for the 
General Knowledge Core Battery portion of the National 
Teachers’ Examination. One requirement for a Multiple 
Subjects (Elementary) Teaching Credential is completion 
of a waiver program or passing scores on the (NTE) 
General Knowledge Core Battery. Contact the Credential 
Preparation Center for further information. 


Human Services Courses 

201 Introduction to the Human Services (3) 

The origin and scope of human sen/ices including theoreti- 
cal frameworks, the functions and activities of human serv- 
ices organizations, and the roles and related skills of human 
sen^ices workers. 

300 Character and Conflict (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor at first class meeting. An 
experiential, theme-oriented class exploring life choices in 
the struggle for personal autonomy. Themes include: body 
image, sex roles, love, sexuality, intimacy, marriage, alterna- 
tive life-styles, loneliness, death, meaning and values. 
Grade option 2. 

311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 311) 

316 Group Process and Membership (1-3) 

(Same as Counseling 316) 

317 Special Group Experiences (1-3) 

(Same as Counseling 317) 

380 Theories and Techniques of Counseling (3) 

Survey of contemporary theories and techniques of coun- 
seling. The counseling process, comparison of various theo- 
retical approaches. Introduction to professional and ethical 
issues in the helping profession of counseling. (Same as 
Counseling 380) 

385 Program Design and Proposal Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 201; 396 and 396L, or con- 
sent of instructor. Techniques of program design, budgeting 
and staffing of human service programs; proposal writing 
and fund development methods; survey of needs assess- 
ment procedures. 

396 Practicum Seminar (2) 

Prerequisite: Human Services 201. Corequisite: Human 
Services 396L. Functions and structure of human services 


9—79417 


Human Services 


agencies; interrelationships with community services; the 
role of the human services worker; ethical, legal and profes- 
sional issues. 

396L Practicum (1) 

Prerequisite: Human Services 201. Corequisite: Human 
Services 396. Field placement In one or more human service 
agencies for a minimum of six hours per week. Grade option 
2 . 

400 Ethical Professional Issues In Human Services (3) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 380; 396 and 396L; or Philos- 
ophy 310, or consent of instructor. A survey of ethical, legal 
and professional issues facing the human services worker. 
Designed to teach a process of ethical decision-making and 
to increase awareness of the complexities in practice. 
(Same as Philosophy 400) 

470 Evaluation of Human Services Program (3) 

Prerequisites: Human Sen/ices 385 and an elementary so- 
cial science statistics course. Making program objectives 
measurable; determining appropriate methodology and 
techniques to evaluate effectiveness, efficiency and proc- 
ess variables; practical problems of program evaluation. 

480 Case Analysis and Intervention Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 380, 396 and 396L; Psycholo- 
gy 341. Techniques of counseling; appropriateness in the 
utilization of theoretical modalities; case writing; various 
counseling intervention methods suitable for a culturally di- 
verse population. Role-playing and videotape observations 


of actual counseling encounters. (Same as Counseling 480) 

490 Practicum in Group Leadership (3) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 300, 3^ and consent of in- 
structor. Supervised experience as a group leader. Ap- 
proaches and techniques of group leadership. May be 
repeated once for credit. 

495 Fieldwork Seminar (2) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 396 and 396L. Corequisite: 
Human Services 495L. Classroom analysis of agency experi- 
ence focusing on skills and techniques of human service 
workers and organizational analysis. 

495L Fieldwork (1) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 396 and 396L. Corequisite: 
Human Senrices 495. Supervised fieldwork in one or more 
human senrice agencies for a minimum of six hours per 
week. Grade option 2. 

496 Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: Human Services 495 and 495L and at least 
two courses in approved specialization. Super- 
vised internship in a community service agency in area of 
specialization. A minimum of eight hours of super- 
vised fieldwork per week. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: approval of coordinator, consent of instructor, 
upper-division status. Individual research project, either li- 
brary or field, under the direction of a faculty member. May 
be repeated for credit. Only three units per semester. 


258 

Human Services 



Military Science Program 

(Army ROTC) 

Coordinator: Major Alan R. Brandolini 
Assistant Coordinator. Captain Theodore Goldsmith 
Operations Sergeant: Sergeant First Class 
Thomas Williams III 
Administrative Sergeant: Staff Sergeant 

Robin D. Cook 

Department Office: Education Classroom 207A 

Program Offered 
Minor in Military Science 
INTRODUCTION 

Military Science is the study of the causative factors and 
the tactical principles of warfare. ROTC provides an add- 
ed dimension to the university by offering the student ap- 
plied leadership and management education and 
experience found in few other college courses. Full-time 
enrolled students in all academic disciplines are eligible to 
enroll as cadets in accordance with university and Army 
policy. Three-year and two-year merit scholarships are 
available and awarded on a competitive basis. Military 
Science courses are accredited and open to the academic 
community. Upon successful completion of all require- 
ments cadets are commissioned as second lieutenants 
and serye either in a full-time active duty capacity or part- 
time in The Army Reserve or National Guard, this depend- 
ing on the desires of the student and the needs of the 
Army. 

Four-Year Program 

This program is comprised of a “Basic Course” and an 
“Advanced Course.” The “Basic Course” is normally tak- 
en during the freshman and sophomore years and is com- 
prised of courses from many disciplines while the 
“Advanced Course” is normally taken during the junior 
and senior years and concentrates on military subjects. 
“Basic Course” participation is done on a voluntary basis 
without obligation, however, upon entry into the “Ad- 
vanced Course,” cadets are required to execute a con- 
tract with the Department of The Army agreeing to 
complete the ROTC program and accept a commission as 
a second lieutenant and serve on either a full-time or 
part-time basis. For non-scholarship cadets, there is no 
active-duty obligation beyond training, however, they will 
have a six-year active resen/e obligation. “Advanced 
Course” cadets will receive up to $1,000 a year along with 
free uniforms and books for all military science courses. 


Military Science 


Two-Year Program 

This program is calculated to offer participation to those 
students who have at least four semesters of work re- 
maining on campus as either an undergraduate, graduate 
or combination of, who for whatever reason didn’t initiate 
participation earlier. These students must attend either 
the ROTC Basic Camp or an on-campus “Compression” 
program to gain eligibility for “Advanced Course” enroll- 
ment. Upon successful completion of either training pro- 
gram, the student is then eligible for contracting as an 
“Advanced Course” cadet under the same benefits, re- 
quirements and guidelines as the four-year students. Hon- 
orably discharged veterans are eligible for enrollment in 
the “Advanced Course” without any additional training 
upon gaining sophomore academic standing. 

MINOR IN MILITARY SCIENCE 

The Military Science Minor is comprised of a combination 
of courses from many disciplines totalling 24 units. Stu- 
dents interested in this program should seek additional 
Information from the Military Science office. 

General Requirements 

All enrolled students (cadets) will take one course each 
semester from the list of courses following, as well as 
participating in leadership laboratories conducted on Sat- 
urday. The frequency of one’s Involvement In leadership 
laboratories increases as the cadet advances, beginning 
with 2-3 Saturdays per semester as freshmen to 3-4 
weekends for seniors. Additionally “Advanced Course” 
cadets will attend a six-week advanced summer camp 
prior to commissioning. Nursing students will participate in 
the same academic program; however, they will attend an 
alternate advanced summer camp specifically for nursing 
students. 

All four-year cadets will take the following in their fresh- 
man year: 

Geography 281 Map Reading and Orienteering (2) 
Psychology 210 Psychology of Military Leadership (3) 

Ail four-year cadets will take two of the following in their 
sophomore year: 

Poll Scl 352 American Foreign Policy (3) 

History 395 History of World War I (3) 

Sociology 470 Sociology of Occupations (3) 

History 407 War and Civilization (3) 


History 410 History of World War II (3) 

Poll Sci 456 National Security Establishment (3) 
Sociology 473 Formal Organizations (3) 

All cadets will take the following in their junior year: 

Military Science 101 Military Instruction Techniques 
and Leadership Principles (2) 

Military Science 102 Planning and Organizing Military 
Operations (2) 

All cadets will take the following In their senior year: 

Criminal Justice 325 Military Judicial System (3) 
Military Science 301 Ethics for the Military 
Professional (3) 

Military Science 201 A Leadership Laboratory (1) 
Military Science 201 B Leadership Laboratory (1) 


Military Science Courses 

101 Military Instruction Techniques and Leadership 
Principles (2) 

Techniques of military instruction enhanced by practical ex- 
ercises and leadership principles are examined through the 
use of case studies, both enriched by leadership laborato- 
ries. 

102 Theory and Dynamics of Military Organizations (2) 

Prerequisite: Military Science 101 or consent of the Instruc- 
tor. Theory In planning and organizing the deployment of 
small military units. 

201A Leadership Laboratory (1) 

Application to military organization and management. Deve- 
lopment of objectives, plans and proper execution of military 
skills training exercises. 

201 B Leadership Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: Military Science 201 A. Application of the con- 
cepts of military organization, staffing and training manage- 
ment. Advanced training in the proper execution of military 
training exercises. Study enhanced by a one-week encamp- 
ment at Fort Ord. 

301 Ethics for the Military Professional (3) 

Ethical dimensions of professional decision making, leader- 
ship, crisis-management, the responsibilities of officers and 
officials, and comparisons between military and civilian 
roles. 


Military Science 


Department of Nursing 


Department Chair: Vera Robinson 
Department Office: Education Ciassroom 125A 

Program Offered 

Bacheior of Science in Nursing 

Faculty 

Arlene Gray, Linda McKeever, Sandra Schwartz, 

Barbara Talento, Susan Mattson, Noreen O’Brien, 

Vera Robinson, Kathleen Winston 

INTRODUCTION 

The major in nursing is designed to provide registered 
nurses with knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for 
the performance of the professional nursing role and char- 
acteristic of the generally educated person. The program 
prepares a nursing generalist who can apply the humanis- 
tic approach within a framework of scientific and profes- 
sional accountability and who can function independently 
in a variety of health settings. The program provides stu- 
dents with the necessary foundation for graduate educa- 
tion and specialization and promotes and fosters 
commitment to lifelong learning for personal and profes- 
sional growth. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

The Department of Nursing offers to the registered nurse 
with an associate degree in nursing (or its equivalent) an 
upper-division program leading to a bachelor of science 
degree with a major in nursing. Graduates are eligible for 
certification as public health nurses in the State of Califor- 
nia. 

The program is accredited by the National League for 
Nursing. 

Admission Requirements 

1 . Meet requirements for admission to the university as a 
transfer student. 

2. Completion of an associate degree in nursing or its 
equivalent. 

3. Current licensure as a registered nurse in California. 

4. Completion of one college level course in each of the 
following; anatomy-physiology (with laboratory) , 
chemistry (with laboratory) , microbiology, psychology, 
and sociology or anthropology. A minimum grade of C 
must be attained in each course. 

5. Completion of one year of satisfactory work experience 
as a registered nurse is recommended. 


Nursing 


Admission Procedures 

Students are accepted into the nursing program twice 

each year in the fail and spring semesters. 

1 . Submit a university application and an official transcript 
of ail previous college work to the Office of Admissions 
and Records. 

2. Submit a nursing application form to the Department of 
Nursing office with a transcript copy of all previous 
college work and two letters of reference from previous 
employers or Instructors. 

3. Group counseling sessions are available each semes- 
ter for prospective students. 

4. Entry tests will be required prior to and during the first 
clinical nursing course. Results will be used for coun- 
seling purposes. Exit tests will also be required. A fee 
is charged. 

Departmental Regulations 

1 . All required nursing and support courses must be taken 
in a particular sequence. Check each nursing course 
for prerequisites and corequisites. Students may enroll 
In only one clinical course (Nursing 305L, 355L, 402L 
and 452L) per semester. 

2. Students must apply for the clinical nursing courses 
each semester prior to enrollment in the class. (No- 
vember 1 deadline for spring semester and April 1 for 
fall semester.) Enrollment in the seminar and clinical 
sections is limited to 10-15 students. 

3. Students must maintain a cumulative 2.0 grade-point 
average on all units attempted and attain a minimum 
grade of C in all nursing and support courses. 

4. The student who earns less than a grade of C in nursing 
or support courses must repeat that course prior to 
being admitted into the next nursing course in se- 
quence. A nursing course may be repeated only one 
time and requires departmental consent. 

5. Students must have malpractice insurance and access 
to transportation in order to be admitted into clinical 
courses. 

6. Students are required to make an appointment with 
advisers at least once each semester. 

7. Professional standards are expected to be maintained. 
A student who demonstrates unprofessional behavior 
or behavior which indicates unsafe practice may be 
denied progression or may be dismissed from the pro- 
gram. Refer to department for complete progression 
and retention policy as stated in the Student Hand- 
book. 

8. Any student with a lapse of five years between clinical 
nursing courses, must take a placement test and 
remediation, if necessary, before admission to the 
subsequent clinical nursing courses. 

Scholarships, Awards, Financial Aid 

1. Financial aid and community scholarships are avail- 
able. 

2. Outstanding senior student and W. J. Traber Human- 


ism Award are given to graduating seniors. 

Requirements for the Degree 

1. The total number of units required for the Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing is 128. This consists of a specific 
combination of prerequisites, general education, nurs- 
ing and elective courses. 

2. The following courses are required for the nursing ma- 
jor: Nursing 306, 305L, 307, 320, 365, 355L, 357, 400, 
400L, 402, 402L, 450, 450L, 452, and 452L (36 units); 
Chemistry 300 and 300L (4 units); Biological Science 
425 (3 units); and upper-division statistics course (3 
units). Total: 46 units. 

3. All students must complete the university upper-divi- 
sion baccalaureate writing requirement, which includes 
the Examination in Writing Proficiency. Nursing 305 is 
approved as the upper-division writing course. 

Baccalaureate Plan of Study 

Students may attend full time or part time. Courses must 

be taken In semester sequence. 


Junior Year: First Semester Units 

Nursing 306/ L Professional Nursing I 

(Laboratory /Clinical) * 3, 2 

Nursing 307 Health Promotion: Parent-Child 

Nursing 3 

Chem 300/ L Organic and Biochemistry 

(Lab) 3,2 

General Education/Electives 3 

Junior Year: Second Semester 

Nursing 320 Process of Teaching in Nursing.. 2 

Nursing 355/L Professional Nursing 11 

(Laboratory/Clinical) * 3, 2 

Nursing 357 Health Promotion: Adult-Aged 

Nursing 3 

Biological Scl 425 Pathobiology 3 

General Education/electives 3 

Senior Year: First Semester 

Nursing 400/ L Professional Dimensions of 

Nursing 3 

Nursing 402/L Community Health Nursing 

(Clinical)* 2,4 

Statistics (upper division) 3 

General Education/electives 3 

Senior Year: Second Semester 

Nursing 450/L Nursing Research 3 

Nursing 452/L Leadership/ Management in 

Professional Nursing (Clinical) * 2, 4 

General education/electives 6 


* Clinicai courses require malpractice insurance and access to transportation. 


262 Nursing 


Nursing Courses 

Note: All nursing courses require (1) admission to the 
university as a nursing major, (2) current California R.N. 
licensure, (3) an associate degree (junior standing) and 
(4) consent of instructor. 

301 Promotion of Optimal Health (3) 

Advanced health concepts and practices. Common health 
problems, causative factors and methods for prevention. 
Preventive and promotive health concepts and practices 
explored, integrating physiological, psychosocial, spiritual, 
cultural, and environ- 

mental factors which inhibit or facilitate optimal health. For 
non-nursing majors. (Same as Health 301) 

305 Professional Nursing I (3) 

Prerequisites: see note above. Corequisite: Nursing 305L. 
Focuses on professional nursing role, nursing process, ho- 
listic man, selected bio-psycho-social and nursing theories. 
Concepts and theories of adaptation and communication, 
with skills in therapeutic and written communication empha- 
sized. Meets upper-division writing requirement. 

305L Professional Nursing I: Laboratory/Clinical (2) 

Prerequisites: see note above. Corequisite: Nursing 305. Ap- 
plication of nursing process utilizing adaptation framework 
and concepts presented In Nursing 305 with clients in com- 
munity settings and simulations on campus. Emphasis on 
psycho-social assessment of clients and problem-solving. 
Examination of student’s personal values as aid to profes- 
sional nursing role socialization. (Lab/Clinical 6 hours) 

307 Health Promotion: Parent-Child Nursing (3) 

Theories and issues important in parent-child nursing. Spe- 
cific nursing interventions useful In preventing maladapta- 
tlon relative to developmental change. Topics explored: 
genetic counseling, maternal-child bonding, sexuality, adap- 
tation patterns from birth through young adulthood, cultural 
determinants. 

320 The Process of Teaching in Nursing (2) 

Corequisite: prior to or concurrent with Nursing 355. Nursing 
knowledge and skills in clinical teaching situations with in- 
dividuals, families and groups. Content Includes theories 
and principles of learning, teaching strategies and me- 
thodologies, teaching resources and evaluation of instruc- 
tion. 

350 Nutrition: Vitai Link to Better Heaith (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 111 or comparable course. Con- 
cepts of nutrition as they relate to nutritional needs, prac- 
tices and problems throughout the life cycle. Emphasis on 
nutritional counseling and education of individuals/groups 
toward health promotion and disease prevention. 

355 Professional Nursing II (3) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 305, 305L, 307; Chemistry 300 and 
300L. Corequisite: Nursing 320, 355L, 357, Biological Science 
425. Focuses on physical assessment, identification of 
stressors and health education. Techniques in health his- 
tory-taking and physical examination. Specific common 


stressors are analyzed that influence adaptation and opti- 
mal health. 

355L Professional Nursing II: Laboratory/Clinical (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 305, 305L, 307; Chemistry 300 and 
300L. Corequisite: Nursing 320, 355; Biological Science 425, 
Nursing 357. On-campus supervised practice of physical as- 
sessment and supervised nursing practice with clients in 
ambulatory and in-patient care settings. Students perform 
total health assessment, utilize decision-making, teaching 
and evaluation skills. (Lab/Clinical 6 hours) 

357 Health Promotion: Adult-Aged Nursing (3) 

Prerequisite: Nursing 307. Developmental theories of adult- 
hood and the aging process. Selected topics (body image, 
sexuality, family, retirement, anger, depression, death and 
dying) examined with emphasis on adaptation to develop- 
mental and situational stressors and nursing interventions. 

360 Promoting Health of the Elderly (3) 

Characteristics of aging and concerns of the elderly: multi- 
dimensional assessment and selected therapeutic interven- 
tions useful In promoting health of the elderly. Evaluations 
of health practices and determination of appropriate refer- 
rals. 

400 Professional Dimensions of Nursing (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 355L, 357; Chemistry 300 and 300L; 
Biological Science 425 and 425L. Corequisite: Nursing 400L. 
Analysis of social trends and issues affecting nursing and 
heaith care. Bioethics, health care legislation and roles of 
professional organizations are examined. Nursing leader- 
ship tasks are explored in relation to group process, values 
clarification and ethical decision-making. 

400L Professional Dimensions of Nursing: Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 355, 355L, 357; Chemistry 300 and 
300L; Biological Science 425 and 425L. Corequisite: Nursing 
400. Understanding of group process theory by assuming 
leader, member and participant observer roles. Actual and 
potential stressors are explored and communication pat- 
terns analyzed. Includes observation of group process in 
health planning committees, professional organizations and 
community health advocacy groups. 

402 Community Health Nursing (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 355L, 357. Corequisite: Nursing 402L. 
Theories of community health and nursing synthesized to 
help students facilitate the adaptation process of clients, 
families and communities to attain and maintain optimal 
health. Emphasis on family health care, assessment of com- 
munity health needs, advocacy, collaborative role. 

402L Community Health Nursing: Clinical (4) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 355L, 357. Corequisite: Nursing 402. 
Application of community health nursing concepts to family 
health care in the community milieu. Students collaborate 
with families and others and use community resources to 
promote optimal family health and Improve health status. 
(Clinical 12 hours) 

450 Nursing Research (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 400, 400L, 402, 402L. Corequisite: 


Nursing 263 


Nursing 450L. Historical, philosophical, and ethical aspects 
of nursing research. Relationship between nursing research 
and professional accountability. Principles and methods of 
research process with emphasis on evaluating research for 
use in leadership and professional role. 

450L Nursing Research: Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 400, 400L, 402, 402L. Corequisite: 
Nursing 450. Evaluation of specific nursing studies to deter- 
mine significance and applicability to nursing practice. Stu- 
dents have opportunities to apply selected research 
concepts as they develop a research proposal. 

452 Leadership/Management In Professional Nursing (2) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 400, 400L, 402, 402L. Corequisite: 
Nursing 452L. Nursing 450 and 450L must be taken prior to 
or concurrently. Theories of leadership/management; con- 


cepts of power, motivation, decision-making, change and 
management skills related to health care system and pro- 
fessional nursing role. Barriers and issues relative to 
change, conflict resolution and change strategies. 

452L Leadership/Management In Professional Nursing: 
Clinical (4) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 400, 400L. 402, 402L. Corequisite: 
Nursing 452. Nursing 450 and 450L must be taken prior to or 
concurrently. Application of leadership/management theo- 
ries and skills in student-selected and faculty approved clini- 
cal settings. Students synthesize professional nursing role 
through individualized learning contract. (Clinical 12 hours). 

499 Independent Study In Nursing (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing in nursing and/or consent of 
instructor. Individually supervised studies and/or projects. 


Nursing 


Department of Reading 


Department Chair: Norma Inabinette 
Department Office Education Ciassroom 544 


Faculty 

Thomas Bean, Ashley Bishop, Norma Inabinette, 

Ruth May, JoAnn Carter-Wells 

Programs Offered 

Master of Science in Education 

Concentration in Reading 

Reading Specialist Credential 

UNDERGRADUATE READiNG SKILL DEVELOPMENT 
SKILLS COURSES 

Lower division courses In reading (Reading 101^ 103 mini- 
courses, 201 and 202) and an upper-division course 
(Reading 320) are designed to assist students in develop- 
ing the critical and creative reading skills required for effi- 
cient university learning. 

READING SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL 

The Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing 
has granted approval to the Reading Department to offer 
a reading specialist credential program. 

An examination of the course requirements will show 
overlapping between the reading specialist credential and 
the Master of Science in Education, concentration In 
Reading degree. By careful planning with a graduate ad- 
viser In reading, the student can virtually complete the 
requirements for both at the same time. 

Program pre-entry requirements for the Reading Special- 
ist Credential are as follows: 

1. Methods of teaching reading. Prior to entering this ap- 
proved program the students will present evidence 
(transcripts) demonstrating satisfactory completion of 
one of the following: 

A. Ryan Act reading methods courses, such as Ed-TE 
433 or Ed-TE 440R, or 

B. Teaching of reading examination adopted by the 
Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing 
(National Teacher Examination No. 20) or 

C. Reading 480, The Teaching of Reading (4 units) or 
the departmental exam offered In lieu of the course 
or 

D. Entering students who received teacher training 
from out-of-state Institutions since September 1973, 
may submit a transcript and catalog course descrip- 
tion and petition to have an undergraduate course 


Reading 


accepted in lieu of the above. 

2. Teaching experience. Prior to entering this approved 
program, both in-state and out-of-state students will 
present evidence in the form of letters of verification 
from the district office demonstrating satisfactory com- 
pletion of one of the following; 

A. Two or more years of successful experience teach- 
ing reading for at least one instructional period per 
day in public and/or private elementary and/or sec- 
ondary schools, this experience to include at least 
a two grade spread, or 

B. Two or more years of successful classroom teach- 
ing experience, this experience to include at least a 
two-grade spread, or 

C. Two hundred fifty or more days of successful and 
extensive substitute teaching experience, this expe- 
rience to include at least a two-grade spread, or 

D. Successful student teaching experience, at least 
part of which involved the teaching of reading, as 
well as at least 45 hours of successful experience as 
either a teaching aide in reading or a reading tutor, 
this experience to include at least a two-grade 
spread. Students whose teaching experience cov- 
ers less than a two-grade span may complete this 
requirement by tutoring students in Reading 581 at 
a grade level at least two years different from previ- 
ous experience. 

Assessment of experienced reading specialist. Prior 
to entering this program, the applicant who has served as 
a school or district reading specialist will have his/her 
experience assessed and a program will be planned 
aroung the needs revealed by this assessment. 


Program Description Units 

Reading 507 Current Trends in Secondary 

and College Reading Programs 3 

Reading 508 Teaching Reading in Today’s 

Elementary School 3 

Reading 516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties 3 

Reading 517 Educational Testing and 

Reading Instruction 3 

Reading 581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties 4 

Reading 5821 Analysis of Reading 
Practices; Assessment of Reading 

Specialist Competencies 1 

Reading 585 Professional Development in 

Reading 3 

Reading 584 Linguistics and Reading 4 

Electives and/or support courses 7 


Total 31 


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (READING) 

The program is designed to help qualified individuals gain 
the technical knowledge and scholarship requisite to be- 
coming reading specialists. This professional program is 


based on and combined with sound preparation in the 
liberal arts and sciences. The curriculum proposes an in- 
terdisciplinary approach to the prepartion of the profes- 
sional specialist in reading. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified 

University requirements include: a baccalaureate from an 
accredited institution and a grade-point average of at least 
2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section 
of this catalog on admission of graduates for complete 
statement and procedures) . In addition, an applicant must 
have an approved major, complete an application to the 
reading program and confer with the graduate program 
adviser to discuss the prerequisites for attaining classified 
standing. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the admission requirements and the 
following requirements may be granted classified gradu- 
ate standing upon the development of an approved study 
plan: successful teaching experience or other approved 
experience; a grade-point average of 2.5 or better in aca- 
demic and related work; sufficient background in reading; 
a satisfactory interview; and four references from school 
administrators, school supervisors or professors. 


Study Plan 

The final adviser-approved program of course work for the 
degree must include: 

Units 

Core course work 9 

Ed-RP 510 Research Design and Analysis 
(3) 


Ed-TE 536 Curriculum Theory and 
Development (3) 

Reading 516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties 

(3) 

Courses for the concentration in reading 

Reading 507 Current Trends in Secondary 
and College Reading Programs (3) 
Reading 508 Teaching Reading in Today’s 
Elementary School (3) 

Reading 517 Educational Testing and 
Reading Instruction (3) 

Reading 581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties 

(4) 

Reading 584 Linguistics and Reading (4) 

Elective 

One of the following (or related field): 
Reading 582 Analysis of Reading Practices 
(3) 

Reading 583 
Reading 
Reading 585 
Reading 


Instructional Development in 
(3) 

Professional Development in 
(3) 

Culminating Experience 

Reading 595 Advanced Studies (includes 


17 


3 


1 


Reading 


comprehensive examination) (^) or 
Reading 597 Project (1) or Reading 598 
Thesis (1) 

Total 30 

For advisement and further information, consult the pro- 
gram graduate adviser. 


Reading Courses 

101 Reading Development (1) 

Designed to improve reading efficiency through a combina- 
tion of critical reading and pacing activities. Adaptations are 
made within the course to provide for individual needs. May 
be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units. 

103 Critical Reading (1) (Formerly 103G) 

Emphasis on interpretive, analytical and evaluative abilities 
required for academic reading. Includes drawing inferences, 
seeing relationships, detecting fact/opinion, author’s bias, 
and making critical judgements. 

201 Academic Reading: Analyses and Strategies (3) 

Analysis of reading and learning processes, reading inter- 
pretation and critical thinking strategies as applied to all 
types of academic reading, emphasis on integration and 
synthesis of academic information. 

202 Vocabulary Cognition and Reading Comprehension 
( 3 ) 

Study and analysis of general and academic vocabularies 
and their influence on reading comprehension and com- 
munication. Emphasis on language knowledge and the 
development of contextual analysis and word association 
processes in reading communication. 

320 Power Reading: Rate and Critical Interpretation (3) 
Reading power developed through flexible rate and applica- 
tion of critical thought to written discourse. Emphasis on 
systematic processes for logically analyzing and criticizing 
ideas as represented in selected readings. 

480 The Teaching of Reading (4) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Curriculum and methods 
in the teaching of reading in the elementary and secondary 
schools. 

500 Critical Reading and Writing in Professional 
Education (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. To meet writing require- 
ment for the M.S. in Education. Emphasizes competence In 
professional communication through a series of progres- 
sively difficult reading and writing assignments related to 
educational issues. 

507 Current Trends in Secondary and College Reading 
Programs (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or graduate adviser. Cur- 
rent trends in the teaching of secondary and college reading 


improvement with emphasis on materials, organization and 
methods of instruction. 

508 Teaching Reading in Today’s Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser or instructor. Cur- 
rent trends in the teaching of elementary reading, the teach- 
er as a decision-maker and the reading process for all 
learners. 

516 Etiology of Reading Difficulties (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor or graduate adviser. Stud- 
ies of the physical, social, psychological, educational and 
instructional factors underlying reading disabilities in chil- 
dren, adolescents, and young adults. Course includes an 
indepth case study of a problem reader. 

517 Educational Testing and Reading Instruction (3) 
Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser or instructor. Sur- 
vey of individual and group achievement batteries, reading 
skills measures, intelligence tests, and special ability instru- 
ments— their selection, utilization and evaluation for class- 
rooms and clinics includes extensive comparative testing of 
a child. 

581 Analysis of Reading Difficulties (4) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser in reading or in- 
structor. Analysis and diagnosis of reading difficulties. Tech- 
niques and methods of prevention and treatment. Individual 
remediation of student. Primary through secondary. 

582 Analysis of Reading Practices: Contemporary Issues 
(1) 

Current issues in reading instruction, such as the exception- 
al child in reading, textbook evaluation procedures and com- 
parative reading. Can be repeated for credit with different 
content. 

5821 Analysis of Reading Practices: Assessment of 
Reading Specialist Competencies (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or graduate adviser. As- 
sessment of competencies of students entering the Read- 
ing program in preparation for the Reading Specialist 
Credential. 

583 Instructional Development in Reading (3) 

Consent of instructor or graduate adviser. Seminar and field- 
work in the development of diagnostic prescriptive proce- 
dures for working with developmental and corrective 
students in other than a one-to-one clinic setting. 

584 Linguistics and Reading (4) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate adviser or instructor. A 
study of linguistics and its influence on reading materials 
and instruction. An analysis of trends in linguistics as they 
relate to the teaching of reading. 

585 Professional Development in Reading (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor or graduate adviser. 
Fieldwork In evaluation and development of reading pro- 
grams. Training in inservice education and communication 
with teachers, parents, consultants, and administrators. In- 
cludes writing for publication and grant purposes. 


Reading 


595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Prerequisite; consent of instructor or graduate adviser. 
Graduate seminars in such areas as behavior, teaching 
strategies, educational technology, program development, 
communication theory and interpersonal relations. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or graduate adviser. Indi- 
vidual research on an empirical project, with conferences 
with the Instructor, culminating in a project. 


598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or graduate adviser. Indi- 
vidual research with conferences with the Instructor, cul- 
minating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or graduate adviser. Inde- 
pendent inquiry for qualified graduate students. 




268 Reading 


Department of Special 

Education 


Department Chair: Stephen Aloia 
Department Office: Education Ciassroom 351 

Programs Offered 

Master of Science in Education 

Concentration in Special Education 

Advanced Specialist Credentials; 

1. Learning Handicapped 

2. Physically Handicapped 

3. Severely Handicapped 

4. Gifted 

Resource Specialist Certificate of Competency 
Faculty 

Stephen Aloia, Robert Lemmon, Calvin Nelson, 

Leo Schmidt, Shirl Stark 

iNTRODUCTION 

The mission of the Department of Special Education is to 
develop and implement a curriculum which prepares per- 
sons who work with individuals with exceptional needs. 
This curriculum is designed to give credential and mas- 
ter’s degree candidates a broad background in the physio- 
logical, environmental and social aspects of 
exceptionality. It also provides them with the opportunity 
to develop skills for managing environmental situations to 
bring about change and assist exceptional persons to be 
responsible for their own choices and development. 

GENERAL INFORMATION REGARDING 
CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS 

The curriculum in specialist preparation meets the require- 
ments of Teacher Preparation and Licensing Act of 1970. 
The curricula are subject to change pending approval by 
the Commission for Teacher Preparation and Licensing. 
Students are advised to contact the special education 
office for appropriate publications in the event curricular 
modifications are Introduced by commission action. 

Note: Students who have not previously done so must 
pass the California Basic Education Skills Test before they 
can be recommended for a Special Education Specialist 
Credential. This requirement should be attended to as 
early in the program as possible. 


Special Education 


Specialist Credentials 

Programs leading to four specialist credentials are avail- 
able. They are: 

1. Specialist credential to teach the physically hand- 
icapped (including the orthopedically handicapped). 

2. Specialist credential to teach the learning handicapped 
(including the learning disabled, behavior disordered 
and educationally retarded). 

3. Specialist credential to teach the severely hand- 
icapped (including the trainable mentally retarded, 
severely-multiply-handicapped, seriously emotionally 
disturbed and the autistic). 

4. Specialist credential to teach the gifted. 

All specialist training programs require a generic compo- 
nent and advanced specialist component, for the creden- 
tial. Completion of the generic component is prerequisite 
to admission to advanced specialist component training. 

Persons wishing to earn an advanced Special Education 
Specialist Credential must make formal application to the 
university indicating the specific specialist credential ob- 
jective. in addition, applicants must meet the following 
requirements: 

1 . completion of a bachelor’s degree; 

2. presentation of a grade-point average of at least 2.75 
in the last 60 units earned; and 

3. possession of a preliminary multiple subject or single 
subject credential or another valid California standard 
teaching credential. 

Advisement is available to any student seeking an ad- 
vanced specialist credential in the Department of Special 
Education. New students will be assigned an adviser by 
the Graduate Records Office during the first month of the 
term in which they enter the Department of Special Edu- 
cation. Students should meet with their adviser during the 
first semester of enrollment In the Department of Special 
Education to file a credential study plan. 

GENERIC SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL 

All candidates for an advanced Special Education Spe- 
cialist Credential must satisfactorily complete the follow- 
ing generic specialist credential courses: 

1. Special Ed 370 Personal Quest (3) 

2. Special Ed 479 Observation of Exceptional Child 

( 3 ) 

ADVANCED SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL 

The specific program for each advanced specialist cre- 
dential requires the same course sequence; however, dif- 
ferent activity sections are designed to meet the specific 
needs of each credential. 

Units 


Special Ed 463 Exceptionality: 

Cognitive-Affective Characteristics 3 

Special Ed 464 Exceptionality: 

Physical-Sensory Characteristics 3 


Special Ed 465A,B,C or D Curriculum and 


Methods in Exceptionality 3 

Special Ed 573A,B,C or D Advanced 

Practices in Exceptionality 3 

Special Ed 574 Exceptionality: 

Noneducational Implications 3 

Special Ed 575 Exceptionality: Theory, 

Philosophy and Research 3 

Total (including 12 prerequisite units) 18 


RESOURCE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE OF 
COMPETENCY 

The curriculum for the Resource Specialist Certificate of 
Competency is designed to prepare candidates having 
approved entry-level skills and professional preparation to 
assume the role as resource specialists in programs serv- 
ing special education students, their parents and their 
regular teachers. The certificate program meets the 
competencies set forth by the California Commission for 
Teacher Preparation and Licensing as well as additional 
standards deemed appropriate by the faculty of the De- 
partment of Special Education, other university personnel 
and community advisory board members. Students desir- 
ing this certificate without enrolling for a degree or creden- 
tial should apply for admission to the university as 
undeclared postbaccalaureate majors. 

Prerequisites 

1. A 2.75 GPA. 

2. If not already accomplished, passage of the California 
Basic Education Skills Test. 

3. Appropriate advanced specialist credential in Special 
Education. 

4. Verification of three or more years of successful experi- 
ence with students in regular and special education 
classes. 


Requirements Units 

Special Ed 421 Working With Parents of 

Children with Exceptional Needs 3 

Special Ed 496 Practicum in Special Education 3 

Special Ed 528 Resource Specialist Seminar: 

Curriculum, Assessment, and Management 3 

Special Ed 529 Resource Specialist Seminar: 

Consulting and Staff Development 3 

Total units 12 


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (SPECIAL 
EDUCATION) 

The program is designed to: (1) help individuals interpret 
and implement research related to exceptional children, 
conduct appropriate research in the classroom and/or 
clinical setting, become skilled in their abilities to diagnose 
with educational instruments and observation techniques, 
interpret the results of diagnostic procedures, prescribe 
and implement educational strategies; (2) provide teach- 
ers with competencies to enable them to fulfill the roles of 
supervising teachers and demonstration teachers in spe- 
cial classes; (3) prepare individuals for positions of 


Special Education 


leadership in the field of special education; and (4) pre> 
pare individuals to pursue graduate work toward the doc- 
toral degree. 

Study Plan 

The adviser approved 30 units on the study plan will In- 
clude the following: 

Units 

Core course work 9 

Ed-RP 510 Research Design and Analysis 

( 3 ) 

Special Education 575 Exceptionality: 

Theory, Philosophy and Research (3) 

Special Education 528 Resource Specialist 
Seminar: Curriculum, Assessment and 
Management (3) 

Concentration 6 

Special Ed 463 Exceptionality: 

Cognitive-Affective Characteristics (3) or 
Special Ed 464 Exceptionality: 

Physical-Sensory Characteristics (3) 

Special Ed 574 Exceptionality: 

Non-Educational implications (3) 

Electives 12-15 

If Special Ed 371 has not been taken as a prerequisite, 

Special Ed 463 and 464 will be required with the additional 
course counted as three of the units of electives. 

Culminating experience 0-3 

Comprehensive Examination or 

Special Ed 597 Project (1-3) or 

Special Ed 598 Thesis (1-3) 

Total 30 

For advisement and further information, consult the de- 

partment graduate adviser. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified 

Requirements include a baccalaureate from an accredited 
Institution and a grade-point average of at least 2.75 in the 
last 60 semester units attempted (see section on admis- 
sion of graduates for complete statement and procedures 
regarding admission). 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the admission requirements and the 
following requirements, may be granted classified gradu- 
ate standing upon the development of an approved study 
plan: (1) a grade-point average of 2.75 or better in all 
previous academic and related work; (2) an approved 
major; (3) completion of Special Ed 371, Exceptional Indi- 
vidual, or alternative work on study plan as shown below 
under “electives”; (4) satisfactory interview and autobi- 
ography. 


Special Education Courses 

370 The Personal Quest (3) 

The factors contributing to personality. Individual needs, 
how they are met by the individual, other individuals, society 
and society’s institutions. Life styles and how they meet the 
needs of individuals. 

371 Exceptional Individual (3) 

Children who deviate from the average in the elementary 
and the secondary schools; physically handicapped, men- 
tally retarded, gifted, socially maladjusted, and emotionally 
disturbed. Special educational services, curriculum, proce- 
dures, and materials. 

411 Mainstreaming (3) 

A course designed to assist regular and special class teach- 
ers, school administrators and parents to implement the 
“Least Restrictive Environment” placement requirement of 
Public Law 94-142. Emphasis will be placed upon techniques 
to modify regular classrooms In order to accommodate 
handicapped children. 

421 Working With Parents of Children With Exceptional 
Needs (3) 

Patterns and problems of child rearing in families with ex- 
ceptional children. Role of teachers and other professionals 
in developing cooperative programs involving parents and/ 
or other family members. Community resources. Designing 
change programs. 

463 Exceptionality: Cognitive-Affective Characteristics 
( 3 ) 

Individuals who deviate from the norm In cognitive and emo- 
tional functioning; the educable mentally retarded, gifted, 
slow learner, behavlorally disordered and emotionally dis- 
turbed. 

464 Exceptionality: Physical-Sensory Characteristics (3) 

Individuals who deviate from the norm In physical-sensory 
functioning; the visually handicapped, multiply handicapped, 
physically handicapped, and trainable mentally retarded. 

465A Exceptionality: Curriculum and Methods for the 
Learning Handicapped (3) 

Corequisite: Special Education 464. Curriculum develop- 
ment, methods and materials for teaching the learning hand- 
icapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum. 

465B Exceptionality: Curriculum and Methods for the 
Severely Handicapped (3) 

Corequisite: Special Education 464. Curriculum develop- 
ment, methods and materials for teaching the severely 
handicapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum. 

465C Exceptionality: Curriculum and Methods for the 
Physically Handicapped (3) 

Corequisite: Special Education 464. Curriculum develop- 
ment, methods and materials for teaching the physically 
handicapped. Lectures, demonstrations and practicum. 


Special Education 


465D Exceptionality: Curriculum and Methods for the 
Gifted (4) 

Corequisite: Special Education 463. Curriculum develop- 
ment, methods and materials for teaching the gifted. Lec- 
tures, demonstrations and practicum. 

478 Innovations in Special Education (1-3) 

Recent, dynamic and innovative methodologies and con- 
cepts as they relate to special education. May be taken for 
a maximum of six units. 

479 Observation of Exceptional Children (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Participation in a class 
for exceptional children for greater part of every school day. 
Includes a two-hour seminar each week In problems and 
procedures for teaching exeptional children. 

496 Senior Educational Practicum (1-3) 

Conduct at an advanced level an educational practicum with 
educationally handicapped children. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and consent of 
instructor. Individual studies under the direction of faculty 
member. Experimental, library, or creative projects. 

511 Strategies for Integrating the Handicapped (2) 

Corequisite: Educational Administration 593. Designed to 
assist the administrator to understand the nature of hand- 
icaps and their implications for program Integration and 
modification as well as attitude modifications and resource 
allocation. 

513 Exceptionality: Application of Contemporary 
Humanistic and Holistic Research (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. A 
graduate seminar to explore humanistic theories and holistic 
process as a significant contemporary approach to curricu- 
lar formulation for the education of the exceptional individ- 
ual. 

520 Atypical Children, Fundamentals of Measurement (3) 

Principles of measurement and the evaluation of atypical 
children. Areas covered: teacher design tests; normed tests 
and exceptional children; and using test for Instructional 
planning. 

522 Behavior Problems in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Special Education 371 or consent of Instructor. 
Identification and management of social and affective dis- 
turbances related to school performance. Early detection, 
behavioral modification techniques, parent counseling, in- 
teragency cooperation. 

528 Resource Specialist Seminar. Curriculum, 

Assessment and Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Special Education 463 and 464. Designed to 
prepare teachers to perform the coordination tasks of re- 
source specialists. Focus is on curriculum, legal require- 
ments of resource specialists programs, coordination 
functions and skills, and direct service to teachers and stu- 
dents. 


529 Resource Specialist Seminar. Consulting and 
Inservice Skills (3) 

Prerequisites: Special Education 463 and 464. To prepare 
teachers to perform consultation and staff development 
tasks required of resource specialists. Focus: collaborative 
consultation with other teachers, content and format for 
InservIce activities, skills needed when working with deci- 
sion-making groups. 

530 Graduate Seminar in Giftedness and Creativity (3) 

Prerequisite: Special Education 463 or consent of Instructor. 
An examination of varieties of higher cognitive functioning 
and those characteristics or performances described as cre- 
ativity. Focus on ways to enhance skills In analysis, synthe- 
sis, evaluation, creative problem solving and divergent 
productions. 

531 Exceptionality: Seminar in Developmental Disabilities 

( 3 ) 

Prerequisite: Special Education 463 or 464 or consent of 
instructor. Analysis of selected problems In the field of deve- 
lopmental disabilities with major emphasis upon independ- 
ent investigation into contemporary theoretical and 
research contributions. 

573A Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the 
Learning Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Special Education 463 and 465A. The applica- 
tion of educational practices with the learning handicapped. 
Seminar and fieldwork at selected sites in the community. 
Minimum of 10 hours per week of fieldwork. 

573B Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Severely 
Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Special Education 464 and 465B. The applica- 
tion of educational practices working with the severely hand- 
icapped. Seminar and fieldwork at selected sites in the 
community. Minimum of 10 hours per week of fieldwork. 

573C Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the 
Physically Handicapped (4) 

Prerequisites: Special Education 464 and 465C. The applica- 
tion of educational practices with the physically hand- 
icapped. Seminar and fieldwork at selected sites in the 
community. Minimum of 10 hours per week of fieldwork. 

573D Exceptionality: Advanced Practices for the Gifted 

( 4 ) 

Prerequisites: Special Education 463 and 465D. The applica- 
tion of educational practices with the gifted. Seminar and 
fieldwork at selected sites in the community. Minimum of 10 
hours per week of fieldwork. 

574 Exceptionality: Noneducationai Implications (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to graduate status. Economic and 
social Implications of exceptionality. The adjustment of the 
exceptional individual to society. Society’s accommodation 
to the individual. 

575 Exceptionality: Theory, Philosophy and Research (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to graduate status and consent of 
instructor. Theories, philosophies and evaluation strategies: 
exceptional individuals, critical evaluation of research on 
exceptionality and the consideration of Investigatory models 
for studying exceptionality. 


Special Education 


593 Administering the Least Restrictive Environment (3) 

(Same as Educational Administration 593) 

595 Advanced Studies (1-3) 

Graduate seminars to develop professional competencies 
in behavior, teaching strategies, educational technology, 
program development, communication theory and Interper- 
sonal relations. May be repeated for credit. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Individual research on an 


empirical project, with conferences with the instructor, cul- 
minating in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite; consent of instructor. Individual research with 
conferences with the instructor, culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of Instructor. Independent Inquiry. For 
qualified graduate students. 


Special Education 


Teacher Education Foundations 
Program 


Program Office: Education Ciassroom 379 

Program Offered 

Master of Science in Education 

Concentration in Higher Education 

This program is designed to help qualified instructors in 
postsecondary education advance their knowledge and 
skills related to the development, implementation and 
evaluation of postsecondary Instructional programs. It