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the possibilities. At Cal State Fullerton, you will quickly discover 
that this large, dynamic and diverse university — a microcosm of our international community — provides 
an exceptional learning environment on a very personal level. You can take advantage of close mentoring 

relationships with outstanding professors 
who take pride in shaping a successful 
student experience, whether it’s in the 
classroom, collaborating on a research 
project, or planning an internship. Our 
expanded facilities, upgraded classrooms 
and new technology provide access to 
a wealth of resources. You will also discover 
a wide network of support services that 
help ensure student success and offer 
a rich and rewarding college experience. 


Strong partnerships with our surrounding communities, in both public and private sectors, provide real-life 
connections for our students to develop essential skills in teamwork, leadership and citizenship. In fact, 
the majority of our alumni live and work in Southern California. Many have become leaders in business, 
industry, government, politics, education and the arts. Their contributions to the communities they serve — 
internationally, as well as locally — are continuing testimony to our success. 


Your future is full of infinite possibilities. I am proud to say that our entire university community 
is committed to providing the support, encouragement and challenging opportunities to make 
your dreams and goals a reality. 

Milton A. Gordon 


PRESIDENT 




*o> 


is preeminent at California State University, Fullerton. 


We aspire to combine the best qualities of teaching and research universities where actively engaged 


students, faculty and staff work in close collaboration to expand knowledge. Our affordable undergraduate 



and graduate programs provide students the best of current practice, theory and research and integrate 


m 


professional studies with preparation in the arts and sciences. Through experiences in and out of 



the classroom, students develop the habit of intellectual inquiry, prepare for challenging professions, 


strengthen relationships to their communities and contribute productively to society. We are a 


comprehensive, regional university with a global outlook, located in Orange County, a technologically 


rich and culturally vibrant area of metropolitan Los Angeles. Our expertise and diversity serve as 


a distinctive resource and catalyst for partnerships with public and private organizations. We strive 


to be a center of activity essential to the intellectual, cultural and economical development of our region. 


Contents 


President’s Message 

Academic Calendars 

The California State University 

California State University, Fullerton 

University Advisory Board 

Mission and Goals 

Accreditations and Associations 

El Toro Campus 

Students of the University 

The Faculty 

CSUF Foundation 

Alumni Association 

Community Support Groups 

University Administration 

COLLEGES 

College of the Arts <— • 

College of Business and Economics 

College of Communications 

College of Engineering and Computer Science 

College of Human Development and Community Service 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS 

Accounting 

Afro-Ethnic Studies 

American Studies 

Anthropology 

Art 

Asian American Studies 

Asian Studies 

Biological Science 

Business Administration Degrees 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Chicana and Chicano Studies 

Child and Adolescent Studies 

Communications 

Comparative Religion 

Computer Science 

Counseling 

Criminal Justice 

Economics <— « 

Educational Leadership 

Elementary and Bilingual Education 

Engineering Division 

Engineering: Civil and Environmental 

Engineering: Electrical 

Engineering: Mechanical 

English and Comparative Literature 

Environmental Studies 


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Finance 

Geography 

Geological Sciences 

Gerontology 

History 

Human Services 

Information Systems and Decision Sciences... 

Instructional Design and Technology 

International Business Program 

Kinesiology and Health Promotion 

Latin American Studies Program 

Liberal Studies 

Linguistics Program 

Management 

Marketing 

Mathematics 

Military Science Program 

Modem Languages and Literatures 

Music 

Natural Sciences 

Nursing in, 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Radio-TV-Film 

Reading 

Science Education Program 

Secondary Education 

Sociology 

Special Education 

Speech Communication 

Theatre and Dance 

Women’s Studies 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Academic Advisement Center 

Academic Programs 

Academic Senate 

Admissions and Records 

Center for Community Service-Learning .... 
Classroom Technology and Support Center 

Distance Education 

Faculty Affairs and Records 

Faculty Development Center 

Graduate Studies 

Grants and Contracts 

Information Technology 


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CONTENTS 


Institutional Research and Analytical Studies 433 

International Programs 433 

Library 433 

University Extended Education 434 

University Outreach 434 

Freshman Programs 

Fullerton First Year Community 435 

COMPASS Community 435 

Live ‘n’ Learn Community 436 

TREK 436 

Freshman Success 436 

Freshman Programs Student Association 436 

Freshman Programs Advisory Board 436 

Honors Programs 

Admission and Eligibility 437 

Curriculum 438 

Honors Courses 438 

Honors and Recognition 

Admission with Distinction 440 

President’s Scholars 440 

Dean’s Honors List 441 

Departmental Honors Program 441 

Honors at Graduation 441 

Honors Societies 441 

Research Centers 

California Desert Studies Center 443 

Center for Business Studies 443 

Center for California Public Archaeology 443 

Center for Children Who Stutter 444 

Center for Community Collaboration 444 

Center for Demographic Research 444 

Center for Economic Education 444 

Center for Entertainment and Tourism 445 

Center for Entrepreneurship 445 

Center for Ethnographic Cultural Analysis 445 

Center for Excellence in Science and 

Mathematics Education 445 

Center for Governmental Studies 445 

Center for Insurance Studies 445 

Center for International Business 446 

Center for Molecular Structure 446 

Center for Public Policy 446 

Center for Economics of Aging 446 

Center for the Study of Emerging Markets 446 

Center for the Study of Religion in American Life 446 

Center for Successful Aging 447 

Centers for Lifespan Development 447 

Cognitive Development Laboratory 447 

Developmental Research Center 447 

Decision Research Center 447 

Family Business Council 447 

Gianneschi Center for Nonprofit Research 447 

Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies 447 

Institute for Molecular Biology and Nutrition 448 

Institute of Gerontology 448 

Ocean Studies Institute/Southem California Marine Institute 448 

Real Estate and Land Use Institute 448 

Small Business Institute 448 

Social Science Research Center 448 


South Central Coastal Information Center 449 

Sport and Movement Institute 449 

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary 449 

Twin Studies Center 449 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Vice President for Student Affairs 452 

Academic Appeals 452 

Assistant Deans for Student Affairs 452 

Career Planning and Placement Center 453 

Counseling and Psychological Services 453 

Disabled Student Services 453 

Education Enhancement Programs 454 

Financial Aid 454 

Guardian Scholars Program 454 

Honors and Scholars Support Services 455 

Housing and Residence Life 455 

International Education and Exchange 455 

Student Academic Services 456 

Educational Opportunity Program 456 

Intensive Learning Experience 456 

MESA Engineering Program (MEP) 456 

Student Diversity Program 456 

Student Retention Services 456 

Student Support Services 456 

Summer Bridge 456 

Testing Services 456 

Student Affairs Research Center 457 

Student Health and Counseling Center 457 

University Learning Center 457 

Women’s Center/Adult Reentry 457 

Student Life 

Dean of Students Office 458 

Judicial Affairs 458 

Leadership and Multicultural Development 458 

Student Information and Referral Center 459 

New Student Orientation 459 

Titan Week of Welcome 459 

New Student Information Center 459 

Campus Tours 459 

America Reads and Counts 459 

Student Organization Research Center 459 

Volunteer and Service Center 460 

Associated Students, CSUF Inc. 

Associated Students Government 460 

Associated Students, Inc. Productions 460 

Association for Intercultural Awareness 460 

Camp Titan 461 

Interclub Council 461 

Children’s Center 461 

Legal Information and Referral 461 

Titan Student Union 461 

Rec Sports 461 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Coaches 463 

Conference Memberships 463 

Men’s Intercollegiate Athletics 463 

Women’s Intercollegiate Athletics 464 

Athletic Academic Services 465 


CONTENTS 


Resources 

Anthropology Museum 466 

Art Gallery 466 

Center for Internships and Cooperative Education 466 

Center for Oral and Public History 467 

Chicano Resource Center 467 

Daily Titan 467 

Dining and Vending Services 467 

Foreign Language Laboratory 468 

Fullerton Arboretum 468 

Grand Central Art Center 468 

Herbarium 468 

Mathematics Tutoring Center 468 

Opportunity Center for Science and Mathematics Students 468 

Reading Clinic 468 

Speech, Language and Hearing Clinic 469 

Theatre and Dance Department Productions 469 

Titan Communications 469 

Titan Shops 469 

Undergraduate Reading Lab 470 

Writing Center 470 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Academic Advisement Policy 472 

General Education Courses and Electives 472 

Advisement in the Major 472 

College Advisement Offices 472 

Academic Advisement Center 473 

Undeclared Majors 473 

Planing a Major Program 473 

Departmental Academic Advisement 473 

Preprofessional Programs 473 

Health Professions 474 

Teaching Careers 474 

Immigration Requirements for Licensure 474 

Answers to Your Questions 475 

ADMISSIONS 

Undergraduate Students 

Freshmen Requirements 478 

Eligibility Index 478 

High School Honors Courses 478 

Transfer Requirements 479 

Health Screening 480 

Test Scores 480 

TOEFL Requirement 480 

Computer Competency 481 

Placement Test Requirements 481 

Residency Determination 482 

Application Procedures 

How to Apply for Admission 484 

Impacted Programs 485 

Application Filing Periods 486 

Hardship Petitions 486 

Admission Requirements 

First-Time Freshmen 487 

Undergraduate Transfer Students 488 

International Students 488 

American Language Program 489 

Readmission 490 

Transfer Credits 491 


REGISTRATION 

Registration Information 496 

Fee Information 498 

Financial Aid 501 

UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS 

Enrollment Regulations 508 

Class Attendance 509 

Grading System 510 

Administrative Grading Symbols 511 

Student Records 512 

Challenge Exams 513 

Repetition of Courses 513 

Grade Changes 513 

Academic Dishonesty 514 

Transcripts 515 

Stop-Out Policy 516 

Leave of Absence 516 

Withdrawal from the University 516 

Retention, Probation and Disqualification 517 

Student Conduct 517 

Parking 519 

University Police 519 

Nondiscrimination Policy 521 

Sexual Harassment 521 

Privacy Rights 521 

Use of Social Security Number 522 

GRADUATE REGULATIONS 

Application Procedures 524 

All-University Master’s Degree Requirements 527 

Writing Requirement 527 

Graduate Academic Standards 529 

Graduate Enrollment Policies 531 

Leave of Absence 531 

Transfer Credit 532 

Theses and Projects 534 

Graduate Student Checklist 536 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Degree Listing 538 

Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree 539 

General Education Requirements 543 

General Education Certification Policy 544 

California Articulation Number (CAN) 544 

General Education Goals 545 

Teaching Credential Programs 549 

University Extended Education 553 

International Education 555 

International Programs 558 

Course Numbering Code 560 

B.A. Special Major Program 562 

Library Course 562 

University Studies Courses 563 

EMERITI 566 

FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 583 

INDEX 624 

CREDITS 634 

MAP 635 


CONTENTS 


Academic Calendar 


Please note: This calendar is not intended to be construed as an employee work calendar. 

2004 


SUMMER SESSION 2003 


June 2 

Monday Instruction begins. 

July 4 

Friday Independence Day - Campus closed. 

August 1 

Friday Initial period for filing applications for admission 

to the following spring semester begins. 

August 22 

Friday Instruction ends. 


FALL SEMESTER 2003 


August 21 

Thursday Academic year begins. 

August 25 

Monday Instruction begins. 

September 1 

Monday Labor Day - Campus closed. 

September 9 

Tuesday Admission Day - Campus open. 

October 1 

Wednesday Initial period for filing applications for admission 

to the following fall semester begins. 

October 13 

Monday Columbus Day - Campus open. 

November 11 

Tuesday Veterans Day - Campus Open 

November 24-28 

Monday-Friday Fall recess - no classes. 


Campus open 1 1/24-26. 

Campus closed 11/27-28. 

December 12 

Friday Last day of classes. 

December 15 

Monday Examination preparation day. 

December 15-20 

Monday-Saturday Semester examinations. 

December 22 

Monday Winter recess begins. 

December 25-31 

Thursday- Wednesday.... Holiday break - Campus closed. 


January 1-2 

Thursday-Friday New Year’s break - Campus closed. 

January 5 

Monday Winter recess ends. Semester ends; grade reports due. 


INTERSESSION 


January 5 

Monday Intersession begins. 

January 19 

Monday Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - Campus closed. 

January 30 

Friday Intersession ends. 


SPRING SEMESTER 2004 


January 28 

Wednesday Semester begins. 

February 2 

Monday Instruction begins. 

February 12 

Thursday Lincoln’s Birthday - Campus open. 

February 16 

Monday Washington’s Birthday observed - Campus closed. 

March 29-April 2 

Monday-Friday Spring recess - Campus open but no classes. 

April 1 

Thursday Cesar Chavez Day - Campus closed. 

April 5 

Monday Instruction resumes. 

May 21 

Friday Last day of classes. 

May 24-29 


Monday-Saturday Semester examinations 

May 2S-29 zq >30 


Fnday - Saturday Commencement exercises. 

- -S 

May 31 ^ 

Monday Memorial Day - Campus closed. 

June 4 

Friday Semester ends; grade reports due. 


2003-2005 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 


SUMMER SESSION 2004 


2005 


June 1 

Tuesday Instruction begins. 

July 5 

Monday Independence Day observed - Campus closed. 

August 2 

Monday Initial period for filing applications for admission to 

the following spring semester begins. 

August 20 

Friday Instruction ends. 


FALL SEMESTER 2004 


August 19 

Thursday Academic year begins. 

August 23 

Monday Instruction begins. 

September 6 

Monday Labor Day - Campus closed. 

September 9 

Thursday Admission Day - Campus open. 

October 1 

Friday Initial period for filing applications for admission to 

the following fall semester begins. 

October 12 

Tuesday Columbus Day - Campus open. 

November 11 

Thursday Veterans Day - Campus open. 

November 22-26 

Monday-Friday Fall recess - no classes. 


Campus open 1 1/22-24; 
Campus closed 11/25-26. 

December 10 


Friday Last day of classes. 

December 13 

Monday Examination preparation (a.m.) 

December 13-18 

Monday-Saturday Semester examinations. 

December 20 

Monday Winter recess begins. 

December 24-31 

Friday-Friday Holiday break - Campus closed. 


January 3 

Monday Winter recess ends. Semester ends; grade reports due. 

INTERSESSION 2005 


January 3 

Monday Intersession begins. 

January 17 

Monday Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - Campus closed. 

January 28 

Friday Intersession ends. 


SPRING SEMESTER 2005 


January 26 

Wednesday Semester begins. 

January 31 

Monday Instruction begins. 

February 12 

Saturday Lincoln’s Birthday - Campus open. 

February 21 

Monday Washington’s Birthday observed - Campus closed 

March 28-April 1 

Monday-Friday Spring recess - Campus open but no classes. 

April 1 

Friday Cesar Chavez Day - Campus closed. 

April 4 

Monday Instruction resumes. 

May 20 

Friday Last day of classes. 

May 23-28 


Monday-Saturday Semester examinations. 


May 27-28 

Friday-Saturday Commencement exercises and evaluation days. 

May 30 

Monday Memorial Day - Campus closed. 

June 3 

Friday Semester ends; grade reports due. 


2003-2005 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 


08 


The California 
State University 


03 


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019 

012 


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1 California State University, Bakersfield 

2 California State University, Channel Islands 

3 California State University, Chico 

4 California State University, Dominguez Hills 

5 California State University, Fresno 

6 California State University, Fullerton 

7 California State University, Hayward 

8 Humboldt State University 

9 California State University, Long Beach 


X 


10 California State University, Los Angeles 


021 

017 


11 California Maritime Academy 

12 California State University, Monterey Bay 

13 California State University, Northridge 

14 California State Polytechnic University, Pomona 

15 California State University, Sacramento 

16 California State University, San Bernardino 

17 San Diego State University 

18 San Francisco State University 

19 San Jose State University 

20 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo 

21 California State University. San Marcos 

22 Sonoma State University 

23 California State University, Stanislaus 


THE CSU 


The individual California State Colleges were brought together as a system by the Donahoe 
Higher Education Act of 1960. In 1972 the system became the California State University and 
Colleges, and in 1982 the system became the California State University. Today the campuses of 
the CSU include comprehensive and polytechnic universities and, since July 1995, the California 
Maritime Academy, a specialized campus. 

The oldest campus - San Jos6 State University - was founded in 1857 and became the first 
institution of public higher education in California. The newest CSU Channel Islands - opened 
in fall 2002, with freshmen arriving in fall 2003. 

Responsibility for the California State University is vested in the Board of Trustees, whose 
members are appointed by the governor. The trustees appoint the chancellor, who is the chief 
executive officer of the system, and the presidents, who are the chief executive officers of the 
respective campuses. 

The trustees, the chancellor, and the presidents develop systemwide policy, with implemen- 
tation at the campus level taking place through broadly based consultative procedures. The 
Academic Senate of the California State University, made up of elected representatives of the 
faculty from each campus, recommends academic policy to the Board of Trustees through 
the chancellor. 

Academic excellence has been achieved by the California State University through a distin- 
guished faculty whose primary responsibility is superior teaching. While each campus in the 
system has its own unique geographic and curricular character, all campuses, as multipurpose 
institutions, offer undergraduate and graduate instruction for professional and occupational 
goals, as well as broad liberal education. All the campuses require for graduation a basic program 
of “General Education Requirements” regardless of the type of bachelor’s degree or major field 
selected by the student. 

The CSU offers more than 1 ,800 bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in some 240 subject 
areas. Many of these programs are offered so that students can complete all upper-division and 
graduate requirements by part-time, late afternoon, and evening study. In addition, a variety of 
teaching and school service credential programs are available. A limited number of doctoral 
degrees are offered jointly with the University of California and with private institutions in 
California. 

Enrollments in fall 2002 totaled 406,896 students, who were taught by more than 21,225 
faculty. The system awards more than half of the bachelor’s degrees and 30 percent of the master’s 
degrees granted in California. Nearly 2 million persons have been graduated from CSU campuses 
since 1960. 



THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY 

Campuses of The California State 
University 

Trustees and Officers of The California 
State University 

Office of the Chancellor 


9 


CAMPUSES - THE CALIFORNIA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

California State University, Bakersfield 

9001 Stockdale Highway 
Bakersfield, CA 93311-1099 
Dr. Tom£s A. Arciniega, President 
(661)664-2011 

www.csubak.edu • quarter system 

California State University, Channel Islands 

One University Drive 
Camarillo, CA 93012 
Dr. Richard Rush, President 
(805) 437-8400 

www.csuci.edu • semester system 

California State University, Chico 

400 West First Street 
Chico, CA 95929-0150 
Dr. Manuel A. Esteban, President 
(530) 898-4636 

www.csuchico.edu • semester system 

California State University, 

Dominguez Hills 

1000 East Victoria Street 
Carson, CA 90747-0005 
Dr. James E. Lyons, Sr., President 
(310) 243-3300 

www.csudh.edu • semester system 

California State University, Fresno 

5241 Nonh Maple Avenue 
Fresno, CA 93740 
Dr. John D. Welty, President 
(559) 278-4240 

www.csufresno.edu • semester system 

California State University, Fullerton 

800 N. State College Boulevard 
Fullerton, CA 92831-3599 
Dr. Milton A. Gordon, President 
(714) 278-2011 

www.csufullerton.edu • semester system 

California State University, Hayward 

25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard 
Hayward, CA 94542 
Dr. Norma Rees, President 
(510) 885-3000 

www.csuhayward.edu • quarter system 

Humboldt State University 

Areata, CA 95521-8299 

Dr. Rollin C. Richmond, President 

(707) 826-3011 

www.humboldt.edu • semester system 


California State University, Long Beach 

1250 Bellflower Boulevard 
Long Beach, CA 90840-0115 
Dr. Robert C. Maxson, President 
(562) 985-4111 

www. csulb.edu • semester system 

California State University, Los Angeles 

5151 State University Drive 
Los Angeles, CA 90032 
Dr. James M. Rosser, President 
(323) 343-3000 

www.calstatela.edu • quarter system 

California Maritime Academy 

200 Maritime Academy Drive 
Vallejo, CA 94590 
Dr. William B. Eisenhardt, President 
(707) 654-1000 

www.csum.edu • semester system 

California State University, Monterey Bay 

100 Campus Center 
Seaside, CA 93955-8001 
Dr. Peter P Smith, President 
(831) 582-3330 

www.monterey.edu • semester system 

California State University, Northridge 

18111 Nordhoff Street 
Northridge, CA 91330 
Dr. Jolene Koester, President 
(818) 677-1200 

www.csun.edu • semester system 

California State Polytechnic University, 
Pomona 

3801 W. Temple Avenue 
Pomona, CA 91768 
Dr. Bob Suzuki, President* 

(909) 869-7659 

www.csupomona.edu • quarter system 

California State University, Sacramento 

6000 J Street 

Sacramento, CA 95819 

Dr. Donald R. Gerth, President* 

(916) 278-6011 

www.csus.edu • semester system 

California State University, San 
Bernardino 

5500 University Parkway 
San Bernardino, CA 92407-2397 
Dr. Albert K. Kamig, President 
(909) 880-5000 

www.csusb.edu • quarter system 


San Diego State University 

5500 Campanile Drive 
San Diego, CA 92182 
Dr. Stephen L. Weber, President 
(619) 594-5000 

www.sdsu.edu • semester system 

San Francisco State University 

1600 Holloway Avenue 
San Francisco, CA 94132 
Dr. Robert A. Corrigan, President 
(415) 338-1111 

www.sfsu.edu • semester system 

San Jose State University 

One Washington Square 
San Jose, CA 95192-0001 
Dr. Robert L. Caret, President 
(408) 924-1000 

www.sjsu.edu • semester system 

California Polytechnic State University, 
San Luis Obispo 

One Grand Avenue 
San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 
Dr. Warren J. Baker, President 
(805) 756-1111 

www.calpoly.edu • quarter system 

California State University, San Marcos 

333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Road 
San Marcos, CA 92096-000 1 
Dr Alexander Gonzalez, President 
(760) 750-4000 

www.csusm.edu • semester system 

Sonoma State University 

1801 East Cotati Avenue 
Rohnert Park; CA 94928-3609 
Dr. Ruben Arminana, President 
(707) 664-2880 

www.sonoma.edu • semester system 

California State University, Stanislaus 

801 West Monte Vista Avenue 
Turlock, CA 95382-0299 
Dr. Marvalene Hughes, President 
(209) 667-3122 

www.csustan.edu • 4-l-4system 

* Effective July 2003, Dr. Michael Ortiz 
will become president at Cal Poly Pomona; 
effective July 2003, Dr. Alexander Gonzales 
will become president at CSU Sacramento. 


THE CSU 


TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS OF THE 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY 

Ex Officio Trustees 

The Honorable Gray Davis 

Governor of California 

State Capitol, Sacramento CA 95814 

The Honorable Cruz Bustamante 
Lieutenant Governor of California 
State Capitol, Sacramento CA 95814 

The Honorable Herb Wesson 

Speaker of the Assembly 

State Capitol, Sacramento CA 95814 

The Honorable Jack O’Connell 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

721 Capitol Mall, Sacramento CA 95814 

Dr. Charles B. Reed 

Chancellor of the California State University 
401 Golden Shore 
Long Beach 90802-4210 

Officers of the Trustees 

The Honorable Gray Davis 
President 

Debra S. Farar 
Chair 

Richard P West 
Treasurer 

Murray Galinson 
Vice Chair 

Richard P West 
Treasurer 

Christine Helwick 
Secretary 


Appointed Trustees 

Appointments are for a term of eight 
years, except student, alumni, and faculty 
trustees whose terms are for two years. Terms 
expire in the year in parentheses. Names are 
listed in order of appointment to the Board. 
Roberta Achtenberg (2007) 

William Campbell (2003) 

Debra S. Farar (2006) 

Robert Foster (2006) 

Murray L. Galinson (2007) 

Harold Goldwhite (2003) 

William Hauck (2009) 

Ricardo F Icaza (2008) 

M. Alexander Lopez (2004) 

Shailesh J. Mehta (2005) 

Dee Dee Myers (2004) 

Ralph R. Pesquiera (2004) 

Frederick W Pierce IV (2004) 

Erene S. Thomas (2003) 

Kyriakos Tsakopoulos (2009) 

Anthony M. Vitti (2005) 

Martha C. Walda (2003) 

Correspondence with Trustees should be 
sent: 

do Trustees Secretariat 

The California State University 

401 Golden Shore 

Long Beach, California 90802-4210 


OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR 

The California State University 
401 Golden Shore 
Long Beach, California 90802-4210 
(562) 951-4000 

Dr. Charles B. Reed 
Chancellor - CSU System 

Dr. David S. Spence 

Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief 

Academic Officer 

Mr. Richard P West 

Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief 

Financial Officer 

Mr. Louis Caldera 

Vice Chancellor, University Advancement 

Ms. Christine Helwick 
General Counsel 

Dr. Gary Hammerstrom 

Associate Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs 


THE CSU 


California State 
University, Fullerton 



GOVERNANCE 

Governance on the campus at California State University, Fullerton is the responsibility of the 
president and his administrative staff. Working closely with the president are a number of faculty 
and student groups that initiate, review, and/or recommend for approval, various university 
programs, policies and procedures. Although the president is vested with the final authority for 
all university activities, maximum faculty and staff participation in campus decision-making and 
governance has become traditional. Students also are actively involved, with student representa- 
tives included on almost all university, college and departmental committees and policymaking 
bodies. 

UNIVERSITY ADVISORY BOARD 

The California State University, Fullerton University Advisory Board consists of community 
leaders interested in the development and welfare of the university. The board advises the 
president on a number of matters, particularly those affecting university and community 
relations. Members are appointed by the president for terms of four years. 

Rudy Hanley (Chair) Santa Ana 

President & CEO 
OCTFCU 

Peggy Hammer Placentia 

Victor K. Hausmaninger, C.PA. Irvine 

Managing Partner 

Hausmaninger Benoe Lang & Alford 
Certified Public Accountants, Inc. 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, 
FULLERTON 

Governance 

University Advisory Board 
Mission and Goals 
Accreditations and Associations 
Academic Freedom and Responsibility 
History of the University 
Environment of the University 
The Campus and Its Buildings 
CSUF El Toro Campus 
Students of the University 
The Faculty 

Outstanding Professor Award 
CSU Wang Family Excellence Award 

California State University, Fullerton 
Foundation 

Alumni Association of Cal State Fullerton 


Jack B. Lindquist 

Chairman (retired) 

The Lindquist Group, Inc. 

Frederick T. Mason 


Dr. Arnold Miller 
President 

Technology Strategy Group 

Loren C. Pannier 

Frank Quevedo 
Vice President 
Equal Opportunity 
Southern California 

John M. Rau 
President 
David Industries 


Villa Park 

Fullerton 
Fullerton 

Fullerton 

Newport Beach 
Rosemead 

Company 

Orange 


William J. McGarveyJr. 

Director of Community Relations 
Anderson, Lynn & Cottrel, CPAs, Inc. 


Edison 


Community Support Groups 


Ruth Schermitzler 


Brea 


12 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON 


MISSION AND GOALS 

Mission Statement 

Learning is preeminent at California State 
University, Fullerton. We aspire to combine 
the best qualities of teaching and research 
universities where actively engaged students, 
faculty and staff work in close collaboration 
to expand knowledge. 

Our affordable undergraduate and graduate 
programs provide students the best of current 
practice, theory, and research and integrate 
professional studies with preparation in the 
arts and sciences. Through experiences in 
and out of the classroom, students develop 
the habit of intellectual inquiry, prepare for 
challenging professions, strengthen relation- 
ships to their communities and contribute 
productively to society. 

We are a comprehensive, regional univer- 
sity with a global outlook, located in Orange 
County, a technologically rich and culturally 
vibrant area of metropolitan Los Angeles. Our 
expertise and diversity serve as a distinctive 
resource and catalyst for partnerships with 
public and private organizations. We strive 
to be a center of activity essential to the 
intellectual, cultural and economic develop- 
ment of our region. 

Goals: 

■ To ensure the preeminence of learning. 

■ To provide high-quality programs that 
meet the evolving needs of our students, 
community and region. 

■ To enhance scholarly and creative activity. 

■ To make collaboration integral to our 
activities. 

■ To create an environment where all 
students have the opportunity to succeed. 

■ To increase external support for university 
programs and priorities. 

■ To expand connections and partnerships 
with our region. 

■ To strengthen institutional effectiveness, 
collegial governance and our sense of 
community. 

ACCREDITATIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS 

California State University, Fullerton, is 
accredited by the Western Association of 
Schools and Colleges. 


Questions about accreditation may be 

addressed to: 

Western Association of Schools and Colleges 
985 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100 
Alameda, CA 94501 
Phone: (510) 748-9001 
E-mail: WASCSR@WASCSENIOR.ORG 
Internet: www.wascweb.org 

Other accreditation and association recog- 
nition includes: 

Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology 

Accrediting Council on Education in 
Journalism and Mass Communications 

AACSB International - The Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business - 
Accounting Program 

AACSB - The Association to Advance 

Collegiate Schools of Business - Business 
Programs 

American Association of State Colleges and 
Universities 

American Chemical Society 

American Council on Education 

Council on Academic Accreditation of the 
American Speech-Language-Hearing 
Association 

California Commission on Teacher 
Credentialing 

Certified in Education for Public Relations 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied 
Health Education Programs 

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 

Council for Advancement and Support of 
Education 

Council of Graduate Schools 

Hispanic Association of Colleges and 
Universities 

National Association of Schools of Art and 
Design 

National Association of Schools of Dance 

National Association of Schools of Music 

National Association of Schools of Public 
Affairs and Administration 

National Association of Schools of Theatre 

National Association of State Universities and 
Land-Grant Colleges 


National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education 

National League for Nursing Accrediting 
Commission 

National Organization for Human Services 
Education 

Orange County Business Council 

Southern California Consortium on 
International Studies 

Western Association of Graduate Schools 

ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND 
RESPONSIBILITY 

The Academic Senate of California State 
University, Fullerton endorses the 1990 
Statement of Professional Ethics (University 
Policy Statement 230.000). 

HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

In 1957, Cal State Fullerton became the 
12th State College in California to be autho- 
rized by the Legislature. The following year 
a site was designated in northeast Fullerton. 

It was purchased in 1959, when Dr. William 
B. Langsdorf was appointed as founding pres- 
ident, the first staff was selected and plans for 
opening the new college were made. Orange 
County State College started classes for 452 
full- and/or part-time students in September, 
1959, using leased quarters for its administra- 
tive offices on the Fullerton Union High 
School campus and for its classrooms at 
Fullerton’s Sunny Hills High School. In the 
fall of 1960, the college opened classes on its 
own campus, where it occupied 12 temporary 
buildings. The name changed to Orange State 
College in July 1962, to California State 
College at Fullenon in July 1964, to California 
State College, Fullerton in July 1968 and to 
California State University, Fullerton in June 
1972. The first permanent building, the six- 
story Letters and Science Building (now 
known as McCarthy Hall), was occupied 
in 1963. 

Today, there is much dramatic evidence 
of additional, rapid growth. Several new 
buildings have been completed, and enroll- 
ment has climbed to more than 31,540. Since 
1963 the curriculum has expanded to include 
lower-division work and many graduate 
programs, as well as numerous credential and 
certificate programs. 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON 


The Donahoe Higher Education Act of 
1960 established the California State Colleges 
as a system under an independent Board of 
Trustees, redefined the functions of the State 
Colleges, and related them to both the com- 
munity colleges and the University of 
California system. 

In May 1971, Dr. L. Donald Shields, who 
had served as acting president for seven months, 
was appointed the second president of Cal 
State Fullerton. Dr. Miles D. McCarthy became 
acting president in January 1981; Dr. Jewel 
Plummer Cobb took office as the third presi- 
dent in October 1981; and Dr. Milton A. 
Gordon was appointed the fourth president 
in August 1990. 

ENVIRONMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Fullerton, a city of more than 129,300 
inhabitants, is located in north Orange 
County, about 30 miles southeast of central 
Los Angeles. It is part of the Southern 
California population center and within easy 
freeway access of all the diverse natural and 
cultural attractions of this region. 

Orange County, with an area of 798.2 
square miles, is the 47th in size of California’s 
58 counties, but it is the second largest county 
in population (2.9 million). Orange County 
has experienced during the last four decades 
almost unprecedented growth as communities 
continue to occupy the diminishing expanses 
of open land. 

Today, there co-exists an interesting mixture 
of the old and new economic and life styles 
in Orange County. Underneath the soil, 
archeologist and bulldozers uncover traces of 
the hunting and gathering Indian bands who 
flourished at least as early as 4,000 years ago 
in what was a benign and bountiful region. 
More visible traces remain of the Spanish and 
Mexican periods and cultures: Mission San 
Juan Capistrano, which began the agricultural 
tradition in Orange County, and subsequent 
adobes from the great land grants and ranches 
that followed. Additionally, both customs and 
many names persist from this period, and so 
does some ranching. The architectural and 
other evidences of the subsequent pioneer 
period are still quite visible: farmsteads, old 
buildings from the new towns that were 
established in the late 1800s, mining opera- 
tions, and traces of early resort and other 
types of promotional activities. For about 100 
years, farming was the main economic activ- 
ity with products such as grapes, walnuts. 


vegetables and oranges replacing the older 
wheat and cattle ranches. Today, agriculture 
still is very important. Orange County ranks 
high among California’s counties in mineral 
production with its oil, natural gas, sand and 
gravel, and clay mining and processing activities. 

The extensive development of the 42 
miles of beaches in Orange County and the 
development of such attractions as the 
Disneyland Resort, Knott’s Berry Farm, the 
Laguna Festival of Arts and Pageant of the 
Masters, the Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim, 
Edison International Field, the Anaheim 
Convention Center and the Orange County 
Performing Arts Center continue to make 
tourism an increasingly important activity. 

So does the Mediterranean-type climate, 
with rainfall averaging 14 inches per year, 
and generally mild days (either freezing or 
100-degree temperatures are uncommon) 
with frequent morning fog during the summer. 
Both downtown Los Angeles and the Pacific 
Ocean can be reached by car in half an hour, 
and mountain and desert recreation areas are 
as close as an hour’s drive from the campus. 

THE CAMPUS AND ITS BUILDINGS 

Once part of a vast orange grove, Cal State 
Fullerton’s attractively landscaped main 
campus now consists of 228 acres bounded 
on the south by Nutwood Avenue, on the 
west by State College Boulevard, on the north 
by Yorba Linda Boulevard and on the east by 
the Orange Freeway (57). 

The portion of Orange County immediately 
surrounding the campus is predominantly 
suburban; it includes housing tracts, apart- 
ment complexes, shopping centers and 
industrial parks. 

Other educational institutions also are 
part of the immediate environment. The 
Southern California College of Optometry 
opened in the spring of 1973. It is just north 
of Cal State Fullerton. To Cal State’s immedi- 
ate south is Hope International University, a 
liberal arts school with a Bible emphasis, 
where students started classes in the fall of 
1973. Western State University College of Law 
occupied its new campus to the immediate 
west of Cal State in January 1975. 

The Cal State Fullerton campus itself has 
an efficient urban layout of facilities devel- 
oped to serve a predominantly commuting 
public. The university’s modem buildings 
were planned so that no student needs more 
than 10 minutes to go from one class to 


another. The campus is surrounded with 
landscaped parking areas. 

The first permanent building, the Letters 
and Science Building, was occupied in 1963. 
This imposing structure, master planned to 
serve ultimately as a facility for undergradu- 
ate and graduate science instruction and 
research, has been used to house other pro- 
grams until they could warrant new facilities 
of their own. This building is now called 
Miles D. McCarthy Hall. 

Since 1963, growth has been rapid. The 
Performing Arts Center was completed in 

1964, the Physical Education Building in 

1965, the Library Building in 1966, the 
Commons in 1967, the Humanities-Social 
Sciences Building and Visual Arts Center in 
1969, William B. Langsdorf Hall (Administration- 
Business Administration) and the Engineering 
Building in 1971, the Student Health Center 
in 1974, the Education-Classroom Building 
and University Center in 1976, an addition 
to the Visual Arts Center in 1979, the Jewel 
Plummer Cobb Residence Halls and the 
Charles L. and Rachael E. Ruby Gerontology 
Center in 1988, and the Fullerton Marriott 
and the Computer Science Building in 1989. 
The Ruby Gerontology Center was the first 
building on campus financed solely by 
contributed funds; the Fullerton Marriott, 

a full-service hotel, resulted from a joint 
venture involving the Marriott Corp., the 
university and the city of Fullerton. 

An expansion of the Titan Student Union 
(formerly known as the University Center) 
and the Titan Sports Complex, featuring the 
multipurpose 10,000-seat Titan Stadium, 
baseball pavilion, track and tennis courts, 
were completed in 1992. The Titan Student 
Union houses a 1 ,200-seat pavilion, small 
theater, food court, pub, bowling alley and 
conference rooms. The five-story University 
Hall, with classrooms, faculty offices, and 
student and academic support services, was 
occupied in 1993, followed by the two-story 
Science Laboratory Center in 1994. A four- 
story addition to the University Library was 
completed in 1996, and the entire complex 
was dedicated as the Paulina June & George 
Poliak Library in 1998. The 10-story College 
Park building on Nutwood Avenue provides 
additional classrooms and office space for 
university staff and faculty members. 

Cal State Fullerton’s on-campus student- 
resident population more than doubled with 
the completion of a 440-bed student housing 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON 


facility in August 2002. The new facility is 
adjacent to Cobb Residence Halls, an on- 
campus apartment complex for 396 students. 
A major addition to the Physical Education 
Building began construction in summer 2001. 
Construction begins in April 2003 for the 
new 102,000-square-foot Performing Arts 
Center. The new facility will feature venues 
that include a concert hall, studio and black 
box theaters, dance studios and rehearsal 
halls. The entire seating capacity of the new 
facility will be 1,200. Construction also 
begins in June 2003 on a multilevel, 2,500- 
space parking structure on the west side of 
campus. 

In the northeast comer of the campus is 
the Fullerton Arboretum, which was dedi- 
cated in the fall of 1979 in a joint venture 
with the city of Fullerton. The 26-acre botani- 
cal garden is a living museum of rare plants 
from around the world. The ecologically 
arranged botanical collection depicts habitats 
from the desert to the tropics. With its ponds, 
streams and wildlife, it offers a tranquil retreat 
from our fast-growing urban life. The Fullerton 
Arboretum also is home to Heritage House, a 
restored 19th-century dwelling and serves as 
a cultural museum for North Orange County. 

The ample freeway and surface street 
accommodations that approach the main 
entrance to the university’s campus also 
provide comparatively easy access to the great 
and diverse learning resources available in 
Southern California: many other colleges and 
universities; museums, libraries and art gal- 
leries; zoos; and the wide variety of economic, 
governmental, social, and cultural activities 
and experiences that may be found in this 
dynamic and complex region of California 
and the United States. 

Information concerning the instructional, 
laboratory and other physical facilities that 
relate to the academic program may be 
obtained from the Office of Facility Planning 
and Construction. 

CAL STATE FULLERTON - EL TORO 
CAMPUS 

El Toro Campus is a new branch campus 
of California State University, Fullerton. 
Located on a portion of the former El Toro 
Marine Corps Air Station in Irvine, just 22 
miles from Fullerton, the El Toro Campus 
serves as a regional center for meeting the 
higher education needs of central and south 
Orange County. 


The El Toro Campus offers course work at 
the upper-division level (junior/senior), post- 
baccalaureate, and graduate levels. All lower 
division (freshman/sophomore) general edu- 
cation and major course work is taken either 
at the main campus at Fullerton, a commu- 
nity college, or a private higher education 
institution. 

The El Toro Campus occupies a 48,000- 
square-foot two-story structure built around 
a central courtyard area. At present CSUF 
leases eleven acres that include the educa- 
tional facility and about 500 parking spaces 
for faculty and students. It contains an 
administrative center, twenty classrooms, 
faculty offices, an electronic university library, 
computer classrooms, an open computer lab- 
oratory, a student affairs service center, an 
enrollment services center, an admissions, 
registration and cashiering center, a book- 
store and a food service center. 

Students who plan to attend the El Toro 
Campus must be admitted to California State 
University, Fullerton through the regular 
admissions process. Applications for admis- 
sion to the university are available at the 
main campus, the El Toro Campus, and at all 
community colleges and high schools. 
Registration for El Toro Campus classes takes 
place through the regular university 
processes. 

Student Affairs enhances and supports the 
academic mission of the university by imple- 
menting the concepts of student development 
and student services. As a resource for stu- 
dents, administration, faculty, staff and the 
broader community, Student Affairs provides 
a wide variety of university services such as 
advising, counseling, financial aid services 
and programs. 

Advising provides students with the nec- 
essary information to make sound academic 
decisions and educational plans. Advisers 
assist students with information about gradu- 
ation requirements and course selection. 
Prospective students who wish to transfer to 
the university also have the option of meeting 
with a transfer adviser to discuss university 
requirements for admission. In addition, per- 
sonal counseling for students experiencing 
excessive stress and pressure in their lives is 
now available on campus by appointment. 


Financial Aid at El Toro assists students 
in the process of applying for financial aid 
and finding ways to meet educational 
expenses. Financial aid is designed to assist 
students in paying basic educational costs 
for eligible certificate and degree programs. 
There are multiple resources students can 
access to pay for college. Financial Aid offers 
grants, loans and scholarships to eligible stu- 
dents. Students are encouraged to meet with 
the financial aid adviser. 

Students at El Toro have many opportunities 
to get involved in activities and programs. 
Students are invited to participate in any 
number of social, educational, cultural, lead- 
ership, and recreational activities. Students are 
encouraged to get involved in campus organi- 
zations and events to build lasting 
friendships, develop skills, and participate 
in new experiences. 

The University Library at El Toro provides 
information and access to high-quality 
resources to meet the instructional and 
research needs of El Toro students, faculty 
and staff. The physical library provides 24 
computer workstations, two group study 
rooms, photocopier, and course reserves. 
Reference assistance is available in several 
formats: a reference librarian is available for 
consultation; the reference hotline provides 
easy access to the library staff at the main 
campus; through “Ask a Librarian,” students 
may submit reference queries via e-mail; 
online chat reference allows students to 
interact virtually in real time with a librarian. 
Through the library website, students have 
access to the library’s 100-plus databases 
(many full-text), NetLibrary (CSU collection 
of over 4,300 electronic books), discipline- 
specific and special topics research guides, 
and of course the online library catalog. 
Document delivery is provided through two 
avenues - items owned at the main campus 
library can be paged for delivery at El Toro, 
and free interlibrary loan service is available 
through the online ILLiad system for items 
not owned by the library. 

The campus has expanded its information 
technology facilities to include four multi- 
purpose computer classrooms. The multipurpose 
computer classrooms incorporate some of the 
latest technology including video networking, 
which allows instructors to show the latest 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON 


films in a variety of languages. Instructors 
are available to broadcast their presentations 
to individual students, student groups, or to 
all students. Similarly, the instructor can see 
a student’s screen in order to provide individ- 
ual attention or to share it with the entire 
class. The El Toro Campus also has an open 
computer laboratory, video conferencing and 
interactive televised video instruction. 

Overall, students at the El Toro Campus 
have full access to technology linked to the 
Internet and to connectivity with the main 
campus in Fullerton. 

For information, contact the CSUF El 
Toro Campus, 7320 Trabuco Road, Irvine, 
California 92618 or telephone (949) 
936-1600 or (714)/CSU-TORO. Office hours 
are 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday. 

STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Much of the distinctive character and 
learning atmosphere of any campus comes 
from the nature and vitality of its students. 
Diversity, the synthesis of academic study 
with work and family interests, strong 
achievement records, and relative maturity 
are some of the predominant characteristics 
of the student body at Cal State Fullerton. 

The university is primarily a community- 
based institution, with two on-campus 
residence facilities. Nearly 74 percent under- 
graduate and 86 percent of graduate students 
are employed, and yet 62 percent of all stu- 
dents take 12 or more hours of course work 
each semester. The majority of students live 
in Orange County. Of the fall 2002 new 
undergraduate students, 43 percent came 
from California public high schools, 6 percent 
from California private high schools, 44 
percent came from California community 
colleges, 2 percent from other Cal State 
campuses, 1 percent from other California 
colleges and universities, and 4 percent from 
other states or other countries. The fall 2002 
new graduate students came from Cal State 
University campuses (57 percent), other 
California colleges and universities (24 
percent), and other states or other countries 
(20 percent). 


The student body is 1 1 percent first-time 
freshmen, 19 percent other lower division, 

53 percent upper division, and 18 percent 
graduate levels. Sixty-one percent of all stu- 
dents are women. The median age of all 
students is 22; undergraduates have a median 
age of 21, while graduate students have a 
median age of 29. Many students take advan- 
tage of course offerings during the day and 
at night, in order to create a workable 
schedule for their multiple responsibilities. 

Many students already have clearly 
defined interests in a major field of study 
Only 16 percent of all students have not yet 
declared a major, and are in the process of 
exploring different fields of knowledge. 
During 2001-2002, 5,239 undergraduates 
received their baccalaureate degrees, and 
1 ,087 graduates received their master’s 
degrees. 

THE FACULTY 

Central to the effectiveness of any institu- 
tion of higher learning is the quality and 
dedication of its individual faculty members 
to teaching and scholarship. 

In the fall of 2001, there were 755 full- 
time faculty and administrators and 1,132 
part-time faculty members teaching on the 
campus. Almost all the full-time faculty had 
some previous college or university teaching 
experience before coming to Fullenon. Faculty 
members also have a wide variety of scholarly 
experiences and creative activities. Seventy- 
nine percent of the full-time faculty have 
earned their doctoral degrees. 

Criteria for selection to the faculty include 
mastery of knowledge in an academic 
specialty, demonstrated skill and experience 
in teaching, and continuing interest in schol- 
arly study and research. Retention and 
promotion criteria also include service to 
the university and community. 

Information concerning the faculty and 
other personnel may be obtained from the 
Office of Faculty Affairs and Records. 

OUTSTANDING PROFESSOR AWARD 

Each year the university selects a faculty 
member to receive the CSUF Outstanding 
Professor Award. This individual becomes the 
campus nominee for the statewide Outstanding 
Professor Award, an honor conferred annually 
on two system faculty members by the 
Trustees of the California State University. 


Below are the names of all professors who 
have received the CSUF Outstanding 
Professor Award. Those with an asterisk were 
also honored with the statewide award. 


Year 

Name 

Subject 

1963-64 

Donald Stanley Tull 

Marketing 

1964-65 

Miles Duffield McCarthy* Biology 

1965-66 

Giles Tyler Brown 

History 

1966-67 

Gustave Bonding Mathieu French/ 

German 

1967-68 

Norman Townsend- 

Zellner 

Economics 

1968-69 

John Brown Mason 

Political 

Science 

1969-70 

No award given 


1970-71 

Loh Seng Tsai 

Psychology 

1971-72 

Richard C. Gilbert 

Mathematics 

1972-73 

Herbert C. Rutemiller Quantitative 

Methods 

1973-74 

Fred M. Johnson 

Physics 

1974-75 

Willis E. McNelly* 

English 

1975-76 

Donald E. Lagerberg 

Art 

1976-77 

Sidney Klein 

Economics 

1977-78 

Charles G. Bell Political Science 

1978-79 

Bruce H. Weber 

Chemistry 

1979-80 

Michael H. Horn 

Zoology 

1980-81 

Donald A. Sears 

English and 
Linguistics 

1981-82 

Joyce E. Pickersgill 

Economics 

1982-83 

Carl C. Wamser 

Chemistry 

1983-84 

Corinne S. Wood 

Anthropology 

1984-85 

Maria C. Linder 

Chemistry 

1985-86 

Charles C. Lambert 

Zoology 

1986-87 

Glenn M. Nagel 

Chemistry 

1987-88 

Harris S. Shultz* 

Mathematics 

1988-89 

Warren A. Beck 

History 

1989-90 

Roger Nanes 

Physics 

1990-91 

Gerald E Corey 

Human 

Services/ 

Counseling 

1991-92 

Michael H. Bimbaum 

Psychology 

1992-93 

David L. Pagni* 

Mathematics 


1993- 94 Keith O. Boyum Political Science 

1994- 95 Carol P Barnes Elementary and 

Bilingual Education 

1995- 96 Mario Martelli Mathematics 

1996- 97 Frank G. Cummings III Art 

1997- 98 John A. Olmsted Chemistry 

1 998- 99 George A Marcoulides Management 

Science/ 

Information 

Systems 

1999- 00 Jane V Hall Economics 

2000- 01 Hallie Yopp Slowik Elementary, 

Bilingual, and 
Reading Education 

2001- 02 Albert W Flores Philosophy 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY 
WANG FAMILY EXCELLENCE AWARD 

Annually, during a ten-year period begin- 
ning in 1998-99, four faculty members and 
one administrator throughout the California 
State University (CSU) system are selected to 
receive the Wang Family Excellence Award. 
Established by CSU Trustee Stanley T. Wang, 
this award is designed to recognize and “cele- 
brate” CSU faculty and administrators who 
are making multi-faceted contributions to the 
learning community, and whose achieve- 
ments are having a discemable effect on 
students. 

Four colleagues from Cal State Fullerton 
have been honored as recipients of the Wang 
Excellence Award. 

Year Name 
2003 David L. Pagni 

Professor of Mathematics 
Claire Palmerino 

Director, Academic Advising 
Services 

2002 Hallie Yopp Slowik 

Professor of Elementary and 
Bilingual Education 
2001 Jane Hall 

Professor of Economics 

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, 
FULLERTON FOUNDATION 

The California State University, Fullerton 
Foundation was established and incorporated 
as a not-for-profit corporation in October 
1959. The Foundation is an auxiliary organi- 
zation of the university established to provide 
essential student, faculty and staff services 
that cannot be provided from state appropria- 
tions. It supplements university programs 
and activities by assisting the university in 
fulfilling its purposes and in serving the 
people of the State of California, especially 
those in the immediate Fullerton area. 

The Foundation develops and administers 
research and educational grants and con- 
tracts; conducts retail operations including 
bookstore, food service and vending on 
campus; and administers various education- 
ally-related functions and programs, such as 
the Artist Village and the university’s afford- 
able housing program. 

The Foundation’s overall policies are 
administered by a Board of Directors com- 
posed of members of the university faculty, 
administration and students, as well as 
prominent community leaders. 


Board of Directors 

Chair, Robert F Clark, Jr.# 

Vice Chair, Ted Bremner# 

Secretary, Ron Rangel# 

Treasurer, Pearl Cheng (ex officio) 

Executive Director, William M. Dickerson 
(ex officio) 

Judith Anderson (ex officio) 

Gary Del Fium# 

Milton A. Gordon (ex officio) 

Willie Hagan (ex officio) 

Robert Hall# 

Kolf Jayaweera 
David Palmer# 

Robert Palmer (ex offico) 

Linda Patton (ex officio) 

Ephraim Smith (ex officio) 

ASI president plus two additional student 
members 

Academic Senate chair plus three additional 
faculty members 

Administrative Officers 

William M. Dickerson, Executive Director 
Pearl Cheng, Director, Finance & Administration 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF 
CAL STATE FULLERTON 

The Alumni Association of Cal State 
Fullerton provides graduates with opportuni- 
ties for continued affiliation with their alma 
mater and fellow alumni through unique 
networking, educational and social activities. 
Membership also provides graduates with 
a variety of valuable benefits such as access 
to all 23 CSU campus libraries, invitations 
to special members-only events, discounts 
at the Titan Bookstore, discounts on athletic 
and cultural events tickets, group insurance 
programs and more. The most important 
benefit of being a member of the alumni 
association, however, is the opportunity to 
be part of a strong Cal State Fullerton alumni 
network. 

The George G. Golleher Alumni House is 
the focal point of alumni activity on campus 
where alumni engage in a variety of activities- 
everything from pre-game barbecues to 
alumni weddings. 


# Community Member 


The Student Alumni Association is a 
unique student organization that not only 
offers ways to get involved in campus life, 
but links students to CSUF alumni. In addi- 
tion to social events and service projects. 
Student Alumni Association members have 
career development opportunities by net- 
working with alumni. 

For more information on Alumni 
Association programs and services, please 
contact (714) CSU-ALUM or visit our Web 
site at csufalumni.com. 

COMMUNITY SUPPORT GROUPS 

California State University, Fullerton wel- 
comes and encourages the development and 
activities of volunteer organizations commit- 
ted to enriching university life. The expertise 
and efforts of its dedicated volunteers are 
most appreciated for they enhance the uni- 
versity’s academic excellence. In addition to 
their involvement in the programs of their 
own organizations, support group members 
are invited to participate in university events. 

Cal State Fullerton’s volunteer organiza- 
tions form the Coordinating Council of 
Support Groups, which coordinates commu- 
nication between the organizations and the 
university. Further information about support 
groups may be obtained from the Office of 
the Vice President for Academic Affairs, 
McCarthy Hall-133, at (714) 278-2615. 

Art Alliance 

The Art Alliance encourages excellence in 
the arts, particularly through the educational 
curriculum of the university’s An Department. 
Organized in 1967, the alliance assists in 
financing gallery exhibitions, participates in 
the acquisition of campus art works, and 
annually awards scholarships and graduate 
research grants. Art Alliance members host 
special exhibit tours and receptions, trips to 
museums and artists’ studios, and staff the 
main gallery during open hours. 

Association of the Friends and Docents 
of the Anthropology Museum 

Anthropology majors, alumni and inter- 
ested members of the community make up 
association membership. The group takes an 
active role in presenting exhibits, providing 
tours and conducting the activities of the 
museum. 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON 


College Advisory Councils 

Advisory councils are composed of 
community and campus leaders who are 
committed to sharing their expertise and pro- 
viding support to individual colleges within 
the university. Groups include the College of 
Business and Economics Executive Council, 
College of Communications Executive 
Council and the College of Engineering and 
Computer Science Industrial affiliates. 

Continuing Learning Experience 

For more than two decades, Continuing 
Learning Experience has offered an extensive 
range of courses for retiree members who 
look to the university and the Ruby Gerontology 
Center as focal points for their lifelong learn- 
ing. CLE is a nationally recognized, self-supponed 
organization that draws strength from its own 
board of trustees and a sophisticated manage- 
ment structure. 

For an annual membership fee that includes 
parking, CLE members savor the university 
setting and student privileges. Members enjoy 
a rich variety of classes, study groups, discus- 
sion forums and trips of educational interest. 
Some of the outstanding lecture series are 
also open to the community. In addition, 
both PC and Macintosh-based computer 
classes are available in the CLE SeniorNet 
Learning Center. 

The CLE office is housed in the Ruby 
Gerontology Center, a research and confer- 
ence facility built with private funds in large 
part from CLE members. 

Emeriti 

Cal State Fullerton’s retired faculty and 
staff members belong to the Emeriti, which 
is dedicated to keeping its members involved 
and knowledgeable about current campus 
life. While providing opportunities to be 
involved in faculty governance, curricular 
programs and campus activities, the organiza- 
tion also offers renewal of friendships between 
its members and awards two student scholar- 
ships each year. Through affiliation with the 
systemwide CSU emeriti organization, 
California State University Emeritus and 
Retired Faculty Association, emeriti concerns 
are presented to all branches of the govern- 
ment and the Chancellor’s Office. 


Friends of the Fullerton Arboretum 

Friends of the Fullerton Arboretum 
support the 26 -acre botanical garden located 
on the northeast comer of campus. The 
Friends coordinate the work of the many 
volunteers needed to maintain the gardens, 
programs and events. Friends host tours of 
the arboretum and Heritage House museum, 
a tum-of-the-century residence listed in the 
National Register of Historic Places and the 
Inventory of California Historic Sites. 

Through plant sales, gift shop and events, the 
Friends contribute operating monies for the 
arboretum and fund student scholarships. 

Music Associates 

In support of the Music Department, 
Music Associates fund student scholarship; 
an annual awards contest recognizing excel- 
lence in vocal, instrumental and piano 
performance; and purchases of equipment 
and instruments to enhance Cal State 
Fullerton’s music program. Associates attend 
campus performances and co-sponsor one 
of the biggest holiday events on campus, the 
“Carol Candlelight Dinner and Concert” 
featuring the University Singers. The 
Associates also hold an annual spring 
scholarship luncheon. 

Patrons of the Library 

Community members, alumni and faculty 
and staff members interested in maintaining 
the quality of the Poliak Library belong to 
Patrons of the Library. The group sponsors 
exhibits and operates a book sale center in 
conjunction with the Emeriti. Funds raised 
through book sales, dues and donations 
support the augmentation of library holdings 
and facilities. 

President’s Associates 

The generous members of the President’s 
Associates provide financial support to the 
region^ most promising students, the President’s 
Scholars, and a host of other programs and 
projects at Cal State Fullerton. This premier 
support group also provides the president 
with resources for universitywide needs such 


as student scholarships, faculty research 
grants and recognition awards for faculty, 
students and staff. Through their gifts. 
President’s Associates play a significant role 
in preserving and enhancing Cal State 
Fullerton now and for future generations. 

Reading Educators Guild 

Graduates who earn a master of science 
in education with a concentration in reading 
and other interested individuals are eligible 
for membership in the Reading Educators 
Guild. Working in close relationship with the 
Reading Department, the Guild promotes 
literacy research. Throughout the school year, 
the Guild holds various activities, lectures 
and conferences, promoting effective reading 
instruction. 

Titan Athletic Club 

The Titan Athletic Club is the fund-raising 
support group for CSUF Intercollegiate 
Athletics. The purpose of the Titan Athletic 
Club is to raise money for athletic scholar- 
ships and encourage private support from 
alumni, friends and family. Titan Athletic 
Club membership includes individuals and 
businesses that support scholarships, facility 
upgrades and sport-specific booster organiza- 
tions among others. Building this support, 
while at the same time increasing the family 
atmosphere surrounding Titan Athletic’s 
many programs, creates the total package of 
a high-quality athletic experience for all 
involved. 

Tucker Wildlife Society 

The Tucker Wildlife Society is located in 
Modjeska Canyon in the Santa Ana Mountains. 
This sanctuary offers students and faculty an 
opportunity for biological and geological 
field studies and conservation education. 


CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON 


Administration 


EXECUTIVE DIVISION 

Milton A. Gordon, President 

(Vacant) Executive Assistant to the President 
Norma L. Morris, Staff Assistant to the President 
Vennita Jackson, Financial Manager 

u UNIVERSITY AUDITOR 

Alex Tzoumas, Director 

m UNIVERSITY COUNSEL 

Patrick Carroll, University Counsel 

m BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL AFFAIRS 

Sherri Newcomb, Chief Financial Officer 

Mark Lopez, Executive Assistant to the Chief Financial Officer 
(Vacant), Senior Director, Financial Management 

Financial Operations 

E. Sue Boeltl, Senior Director, Financial Operations 
May Wong, Director, Financial Operations 

Mary Ann Torres, Associate Director, Payables 
(Vacant), Associate Director, Payroll 

Marilou Encina, Operations Supervisor, Payroll 
Karen Batten, Technical Supervisor, Payroll 
(Vacant), Director of Contracts and Procurement 

(Vacant), Procurement Operations Manager 
(Vacant), Contracts Operations Manager 

Financial Management 

Elahe Amani, Director, Student Financial Services 

Marsha Lovell, Associate Director, Student Financial Services 
(Vacant), Director of Accounting and Financial Reporting 

(Vacant), Associate Director, Accounting and Financial Reporting 
(Vacant), Bursar/Treasurer 
(Vacant), Tax Compliance and Reporting Officer 
(Vacant), Budget Director 

Terri Sharp, Chief Budget Analyst 

Business Planning & Improvement 

Cheryl Perreira, Senior Director, Business Planning and Improvement 
Don Stelluto, Coordinator, Training and Development 

Business Systems 

Keiko Takahashi, Senior Director, Business Systems 


m INFORMATION/TECHNOLOGY SERVICES 

Michael Parker, Chief Information/Technology Officer 
Dick Bednar, Senior Director, Technology Planning 
Amir Dabirian, Director, Internet Technologies 
Susan Kachner, Director, Administrative Computing 
Susan Lasswell, Director, Information Technology 
Communications 

Chris Manriquez, Director, Desktop Computing 
Mike Marcinkevicz, Director, Network Applications 
Chuck Kensicki, Director, Enterprise Computing 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Ephraim R Smith, Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Davida Hopkins-Parham, Executive Assistant to the Vice 
President 

Margaret A. Atwell, Associate Vice President, Academic Affairs 
Dolores Flope Vura, Assistant Vice President for Institutional 
Research and Analytical Studies 
Edward Sullivan, Director of Analytical Studies 
Lisa Kopecky, Director, Budget for Academic Affairs 
Mary Watkins, Director, Faculty Affairs and Records 
Sandra Sutphen, Acting Director, Faculty Development Center 
Linda Patton, Director, Office of Grants & Contracts 

Lori Jennex, Coordinator of Regulatory Compliance and 
Intermural Programs 

Chris Smithson, Coordinator, Contracts and Grants 
Erika Blossom, Contracts & Grants Coordinator 
Mike Nichols, Contracts Coordinator 
William E Presch, Director, Desert Studies Consortium 

u ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS 

James C. Blackburn, Director, Admissions and Records 
Nancy Dority, Admissions Officer 
Barbara Hooper, University Articulation/Project Officer 
Vacant, Registrar 

Melissa Whatley, Associate Registrar 

m ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Keith O. Boyum, Associate Vice President, Academic Programs 
Gladys Fleckles, Director, Graduate Studies 
Kathleen Costello, Director, Gianneschi Center for Nonprofit 
Research 

Sylvia Alva, Assistant Vice President, Academic Programs 
Claire Palmerino, Director, Academic Advising Services 
David Drath, Coordinator, Health Professions Advising 
June Kearney, Assistant Director of Athletics, Compliance and 
Academic Services 


UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 


Sally Cardenas, Director, Center for Internships and Cooperative 
Education 

Wayne Hobson, Director, University Honors Program 
Bridget Driscoll, Director, Freshman Programs 
Linda Cambron, Associate Director of University Outreach 
Jeannie Kim-Han, Director, Center for Community and 
Service-Learning 

m UNIVERSITY EXTENDED EDUCATION 

Harry L. Norman, Dean, University Extended Education 

Melody Johnston, Associate Dean (Acting), University Extended Education 
Lynne Richmond, Director, American Language Program 
Barbara Talento, President, Continuing Learning Experience 
Gregory Dyment, Director, Fullerton Arboretum 
Pat Puleo, Director, Education Programs 
Tim Green, Director (Acting), Distance Learning 
Rod Guimaraes, Manager, Information Systems 
Carol Ferguson, Client Services Manager 
Margaret Luzzi, Director, Academic Credit Programs 
Khanh Vanpetten, Director, Budget and Finance 
Terry Roberts, Director, Interactive Televised Instruction 
Karen McKinley, Director (Acting), Marketing and Public 
Relations, and Director, Computer Technologies and 
Engineering 

Irene Freer, Administrative Assistant to the Dean 

Carol Creighton, Director, Business Arts and Social Sciences 

Luu Trankiem, Director (Acting), Extension International Programs 

m LIBRARY 

Richard C. Pollard, University Librarian 

Elizabeth Housewright, (Acting) Associate University Librarian 

Carol Bednar, Chair, Technical Services 

Theresa Liedtka, Head, Access Services & Systems 

■ EL TORO CAMPUS 

George Giacumakis, Director, El Toro Campus 

Nadine Dillon, Coordinator, Cashiering and Registration, 

El Toro Campus 

Lynne McVeigh, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, El Tom Campus 
Greg Yorba, Librarian, El Toro Campus 
Chuck Moore, Director, Enrollment Services Center 
Marilyn Conklin, Executive Assistant 

ADMINISTRATION 

Willie J. Hagan, Vice President for Administration 
Naomi Goodwin, Assistant Vice President 
William C. Barrett, Associate Vice President for Administration 
Thomas H. Whitfield, Director, Environmental Health & 
Instructional Safety 

Joe Ferrer, Director, Parking and Transportation 
Welson Badal, Manager, Divisional Information Technology 
John Beisner, Director, University Risk Management 

m FACILITIES MANAGEMENT 

Jay W. Bond, Associate Vice President, Facilities Management 
Kim Apel, Facility Planner 

Michael C. Smith, Director, Design & Construction Services 
Willem H. van der Pol, Director, Physical Plant 


m HUMAN RESOURCES 

R. John Lynn, Executive Director, Human Resources 

Rosamaria Gomez-Amaro, Director, Affirmative Action 
Robin Innes, Director, Employee Training & Development 
Denise Johnson, Director, Human Resource Operations 

m PUBLIC SAFETY 

Judith D. King, Chief of Police/Director, Public Safety 
Willie J. Glen, Lieutenant 

u FOUNDATION 

William M. Dickerson, Executive Director, Foundation 

Shou-Yinn (Pearl) Cheng, Director, Finance and Administration 
Jerry C. Olson, Director, Titan Shops 
Anthony Lynch, Director, Campus Dining 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT 

Judith Anderson, Executive Vice President 
Angela Gee, Executive Assistant 

m GOVERNMENTAL AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS 

Owen Holmes, Director, State and Federal Relations 

Karon Cornell, Director, Community Relations 

m PRESIDENT SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

James Mettler, Director, President's Scholars Program 

m PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Janet McNeill, Associate Vice President for Communications 
and Marketing 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Robert L. Palmer, Vice President for Student Affairs 

Howard Wang, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs 
Silas H. Abrego, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs 
Karen J. Wall, Assistant Vice President, Budget and Human Resources 
(Vacant), Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs 
Kandy S. Mink, Dean of Students 

Harvey McKee, Executive Director, Associated Students, CSUF, Inc. 
Ryan Alcantara, Director, Honors and Scholars Support Services 
Brian Quinn, Director, Intercollegiate Athletics 
Maryalyce Jeremiah, Senior Associate Director, Intercollegiate 
Athletics 

James Case, Director, Career Planning and Placement Center 
Robert Aylmer, Director, Counseling and Psychological Services 
Paul K. Miller, Director, Disabled Student Services 
Deborah McCracken, Director, Financial Aid 
Jenny Mohr, Director, Guardian Scholars Program 
Darlene Stevenson, Director, Housing and Residence Life 
Robert Ericksen, Director, International Education and Exchange 
Jeremiah Moore, Director, Student Academic Services 
(Vacant), Director, Student Affairs Research Center 
Robert Aylmer, Acting Executive Director, Student 
Health and Counseling Center 
Kurt Borsting, Director, Titan Student Union 
Fran Zareh-Smith, Director, University Learning Center 
Barbara McDowell, Director, Women’s Center/Adult Reentry 
David Pagni, Director, GEAR UP - Anaheim 


UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 


Gerald Bryant, Director, Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program 
Patricia Bejarano-Vera, Director, Upward Bound Math Science 
Angela Alvarado, Director, Upward Bound North 
Janet Long, Director, Upward Bound South 

UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT 

Pamela Hillman, Vice President for University Advancement 

(Vacant), Executive Assistant to Vice President for University 
Advancement 

Carrie Stewart, Associate Vice President for Communications, 
Stewardship & Events, and Annual Campaigns 
(Vacant) Director of Advancement Communications 
Ira Unterman, Director of Annual Campaigns 
Stefanie McCombie, Director of Stewardship & Events 
Mary Jacobson, Associate Vice President for Corporate and 
Foundation Relations 

Barbara Barrett, Director of Corporate & Foundation Relations 
Paul Carey, Associate Vice President for Development 

Milly Muzzy, Director of Development, College of the Arts 
(Vacant), Director of Development, Athletics 
Marcia Miller-Harrison, Director of Development, College of 
Business and Economics 

Justin Gehrls, Director of Development, College of Communications 
Lisa Gallaway, Director of Development, College of Engineering 
and Computer Science and College of Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics 

Regina Webster, Senior Director of Development, Gerontology 
and College of Fluman Development and Community Service 
Carlos Leija, Director of Development, Guardian Scholars and 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences 
Stephen Tanenbaum, Director of Development, Principle Gifts 
Patricia Boggs, Executive Director of Alumni Relations 
Thomas Popple well. Executive Director of Advancement Services 

COLLEGE OF THE ARTS 

Jerry Samuelson, Dean 

Joseph Arnold, Associate Dean 

Dean Harris, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs 

ART DEPARTMENT 

Larry Johnson, Chair 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Vance Wolverton, Chair 

THEATRE DEPARTMENT 

Susan Hallman, Chair 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 

Anil K. Puri, Dean 

Thomas Johnson, Associate Dean, Academic Programs 
Katrin Harich, Associate Dean, Administration 
Robert Miyake, Assistant Dean, Academic Advisement 
(Vacant), Assistant Dean, Student Affairs 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Betty Chavis, Chair 

ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Stewart Long, Chair 


FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

John Erickson, Chair 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND DECISION SCIENCES 

Barry Pasternack, Chair 

MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 

Ghasem Manoochehri, Chair 

MARKETING DEPARTMENT 

Irene Lange, Chair 

COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS 

Rick D. Pullen, Dean 

Fred Zandpour, Associate Dean 

Peggy Garcia Bockman, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs 

COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT 

Wendell Crow, Chair 

RADIO-TV-FILM DEPARTMENT 

Ed Fink, Chair 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION DEPARTMENT 

Kurt Kitselman, Chair 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Raman Menon Unnikrishnan, Dean 
David R. Falconer, Associate Dean 
Lisa D. Jones, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs 

COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

Ning Chen, Chair 

m DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 

Jesa H. Kreiner, Division Chair 

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Jeff Kuo, Head 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Mostafa Shiva, Head 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Hossein Moini, Head 

COLLEGE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Roberta E. Rikli, Dean 

Ellen Junn, Associate Dean 

Nancee L. Buck, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs 

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT STUDIES DEPARTMENT 

Patricia Szeszulski, Chair 

COUNSELING DEPARTMENT 

Jeffrey Kottler Chair 


UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 


HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

Mikel Garcia, Chair 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

Robert Voeks, Coordinator 

NURSING DEPARTMENT 

Christine Latham, Chair 

EUROPEAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

Cora Granata, Coordinator 

m SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Mickey L.Y. Hollis, Acting Associate Dean 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES DEPARTMENT 

Jan Eyring, Chair 

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP DEPARTMENT 

Louise Adler, Chair 

GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT 

William Lloyd, Chair 

ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Carmen Dunlap, Chair 

GERONTOLOGY PROGRAM 

Eric Solberg, Coordinator 

SECONDARY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Victoria Costa, Chair 

HISTORY DEPARTMENT 

William W Haddad, Chair 

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Belinda Dunnick Karge, Chair 

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

Sandra Perez-Linggi, Coordinator 

■ DIVISION OF KINESIOLOGY AND HEALTH PROMOTION 

Kathy Koser, Division Chair 

LIBERAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT 

Jim Hofmann, Chair 

MILITARY SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Lt. Col. Christian Taddeo, Coordinator 

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT 

Albert Flores, Chair 

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Thomas Klammer, Dean 

Ray Young, Associate Dean 

Angela Della Volpe, Associate Dean 

Michael Paul Wong, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs 

m POLITICAL SCIENCE AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE DIVISION 

Alan Saltzstein, Chair 

PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

David Perkins, Chair 

AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES DEPARTMENT 

Wacira Gethaiga, Chair 

SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

John W Bedell, Chair 

AMERICAN STUDIES DEPARTMENT 

Jesse Battan, Chair 

WOMEN S STUDIES PROGRAM 

Renae Bredin, Coordinator 

ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

Susan Parman, Chair 

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

Kolf O. Jayaweera, Dean 

David Fromson, Associate Dean 

ASIAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

William W. Haddad, Coordinator 

Rochelle Woods, Assistant Dean, Student Affairs 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

Craig Ihara, Coordinator 

C. Eugene Jones, Chair 

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 

CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIES DEPARTMENT 

Isaac Cardenas, Chair 

Robert Belloli, Chair 

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT 

COMPARATIVE RELIGION DEPARTMENT 

Benjamin Hubbard, Chair 

John Foster, Chair 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 

ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITERATURE AND 

LINGUISTICS DEPARTMENT 

Joseph Sawicki, Chair 

James O. Friel, Chair 

PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 

Roger Nanes, Chair 


SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Richard Lodyga, Acting Coordinator 


UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 





COLLEGE OF TH E/\jtS 


DEAN 

Jerry Samuelson 

ASSOCIATE DEAN 

Joseph Arnold 

ASSISTANT DEAN, STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Craig Haggett 

DEAN'S OFFICE 

Visual Arts 199 
(714) 278-3256 

COLLEGE WEBSITE 

http://www/fullerton.edu/arts/ 


“More than anything else, the 
excellence of our programs can be 
seen in our people - the faculty, 
staff, students and graduates. 
Their presence is perhaps the 
strongest recommendation to 
be made for pursuing the arts 



The learning opportunities within the College of the Arts are based on a commitment 
to artistic and academic excellence. We provide an environment that encourages individual 
achievement for performers, artists and scholars. 

Within the broader university liberal arts environment, the College of the Arts 
offers intensive programs in Art, Music, Theatre and Dance. We are also committed 
to the enhancement of artistic awareness of all students. 

We extend a warm welcome to you, and we promise that with your perseverance, 
we will do everything possible to further your goals and objectives in whatever field 
of the arts you choose. 

Academic advisement is available through the departments. Faculty advisers are 
available to assist students with career decisions and degree requirements. 

Several scholarships are available to students in the College of the Arts. Inquiries 
should be made to the respective department offices. 


at Cal State Fullerton. 


Dean Jerry Samuelson 

College of the Arts 


COLLEGE OF THE ARTS 



PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Art, Bachelor of Arts 
Art History 
General Studio Art 
Teaching 

Art, Bachelor of Fine Arts 
Ceramics 
Crafts 

Creative Photography 
Drawing and Painting 
Entertainment Art/Animation 
Graphic Design 
Illustration 
Printmaking 
Sculpture 
Art, Minor 
Art, Master of Arts 
Design 

Drawing and Painting ( Printmaking) 
Sculpture 

Crafts (including Ceramics, Glass, Wood, 
Jewelry/Metalsmithing) 

Design (including Graphic Design, 
Illustration, Exhibition Design, 
Creative Photography) 

Art History 

Art, Master of Fine Arts 

Drawing, Painting and Printmaking 
Sculpture 

Ceramics (including Glass) 

Crafts (including Jewelry/Metalsmithing 
and Woodworking) 

Design (including Graphic Design, 
Illustration and Exhibition Design) 

Creative Photography 
Art, Museum Studies, Certificate 
Dance, Bachelor of Arts 



Music, Single Subject (Secondary) Credential 
Theatre Arts, Bachelor of Arts 
Liberal Arts 

Production/Performance 

Acting 

Directing 

Entertainment Studies 
Playwriting 

Technical Production/Design 
Teaching 

Theatre, Bachelor of Fine Arts 
Musical Theatre 

Theatre Arts, Master of Fine Arts 
Acting 
Directing 

Design and Technical Production 


Music, Bachelor of Arts 
Liberal Arts 
Music Education 
Music History and Theory 
Music, Bachelor of Music 
Composition 
Classical Guitar 
Instrumental 

Jazz and Commercial Music 

Keyboard 

Voice 

Accompanying 
Music, Minor 
Music, Master of Arts 

Music History and Literature 
Music Education 
Music, Master of Music 
Performance 
Theory-Composition 


COLLEGE OF THE ARTS 



COLLEGE OF 

Business and Economics 


DEAN 

Anil Puri 

ASSOCIATE DEAN, ADMINISTRATION 

Katrin R. Harich 

ASSOCIATE DEAN, 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Thomas W Johnson 

ASSISTANT DEANS 

Robert Miyake, Academic Advisement 
Vacant, Student Affairs 

DEAN’S OFFICE 

Langsdorf Hall 700 
(714) 278-2592 

COLLEGE WEBSITE 

http ://business. fullerton . edu 

“ Welcome to the nationally accredited 
College of Business and Economics- 
home of the second largest 
undergraduate business program 
in the United States. The college 
leads the region in meeting the needs 
of its diverse student body and 
provides the latest skills for business 
success in today’s global economy 

Dean Anil K. Puri 

College of Business 
and Economics 



Programs of study in the College of Business and Economics equip men and 
women with the intellectual and professional tools needed to assume responsible 
positions in business, industry, education, government and social service. The College 
offers a broad exposure to business and economics. Behavioral and quantitative 
sciences are studied in both theoretical and applied contexts. Mathematics is used 
as a key tool in the analysis of complex problems and in the interpretation of data. 
Emphasis is placed on effective oral and written communication. Students are made 
aware of the need for imaginative, innovative solutions to business problems that 
encompass human needs and ethical objectives. 

The College provides the opportunity to develop technical expertise in a chosen 
discipline at a beginning professional level acceptable to prospective employers. 
Nine concentrations are offered within the business administration major, as well 
as an economics major, an international business major and a business education 
credential program. 

The College of Business and Economics offers the only undergraduate and 
graduate programs in Orange County accredited by the Association to Advance 
Collegiate Schools of Business for both Business Administration and Accounting. 
Accreditation assures a rigorous course of study. It also indicates a well-qualified 
faculty, high standards for students, access to computing and an extensive library 
system. 


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 



PROGRAMS OFFERED 


In pursuit of its mission, the CBE: 


■ Interaction with CBE alumni and 


Accountancy, Master of Science 
Business Administration, Bachelor of Arts 
Accounting 
Business Economics 
Entertainment and Tourism Management 
Entrepreneurship 
Finance 

Information Systems 
Management 
Management Science 
Marketing 

Business Administration, Minor 
Business Administration, (M.B.A) 
Accounting 
Business Economics 
E-Commerce 
Entrepreneurship 
Finance 

Information Systems 
International Business 
Management 
Management Science 
Marketing 

Economics, Bachelor of Arts 
Economics, Minor 
Economics, Master of Arts 
Information Systems, Minor 
International Business, Bachelor of Arts 
Chinese 
French 
German 
Japanese 
Portuguese 
Spanish 

Information Systems, Master of Science 
Decision Sciences 

E-Commerce 

Taxation, Master of Science 

MISSION AND GOALS STATEMENT 

The College of Business and Economics 
(CBE) is committed to delivering high-quality, 
accessible, and affordable undergraduate and 
graduate programs to a diverse student pop- 
ulation. The College also contributes to the 
business community by providing research, 
consulting, continuing education, and train- 
ing programs. 


1 . Offers students programs that prepare 
them for careers in business and graduate 
programs that foster professional career 
advancement by developing their: 

■ Critical thinking, analytical and 
problem solving skills 

■ Interpersonal, team work, leadership 
and communication skills 

■ Awareness of ethical issues and 
responsibilities 

■ Functional business knowledge 

■ Multicultural understanding 

■ Technology skills 

■ Awareness of the global economy 

2. Provides its current and future students: 

■ Outreach and recruiting programs 

■ Career planning, internship, and 
placement assistance 

■ Student support services and extra- 
curricular activities 

■ Access to off site and distance-learning 
programs 

3. Attracts, develops, and retains highly 
qualified, diverse faculty by encouraging 
and rewarding: 

■ Teaching excellence and innovative 
instructional development 

■ Active participation in applied and 
basic research 

■ Involvement in professional activities 
and university service 

4. Supports high-quality teaching, learning, 
and research by maintaining: 

■ A program of assessment 

■ An up-to-date technology infrastructure 

■ An attractive and well-equipped 
instructional environment 

■ A program of fundraising from 
individuals and corporate sponsers 

5. Promotes alumni and business involve- 
ment through: 

■ Outreach events 

■ Centers and institutes 


business practitioners 

PREPARATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Algebra and geometry are necessary for 
many required business courses. The equiva- 
lent of three years of high school mathematics, 
including a second course in algebra, is the 
prerequisite for the required Math 135 
Business Calculus. Students without the 
necessary background should enroll in Math 
115 College Algebra. 



Business students are encouraged to 
take courses in sociology, psychology, anthro- 
pology, speech communication, political 
science, history, philosophy, geography and 
foreign languages. Many courses in these 
fields may be used to meet general education 
requirements. For the international business 
degree, intermediate level competency in a 
foreign language, equivalent to Foreign 
Language 204 courses, is prerequisite to the 
required concentration courses. It is strongly 
recommended that students planning to 
major in international business complete a 
minimum of three years of foreign language 
study while in high school. 


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 



BUSINESS ADVISING CENTER 

Langsdorf Hall, Room 731 

Undergraduate Program Advising 

The Business Advising Center serves 
business administration, economics and 
international business majors. Information 
is available on admissions, curriculum and 
graduation requirements, as well as on regis- 
tration and grading procedures, residence 
and similar academic matters. Transfer stu- 
dents should see an adviser immediately 
regarding transfer credit. For information 
on general education, consult the Academic 
Advisement Center. 

Graduate Program Advising 

The graduate adviser (in the Business 
Advising Center) provides academic advising 
for the graduate programs in accountancy, 
business administration, information systems 
and taxation. Information is available on 
admissions, curriculum and graduation 
requirements, as well as on registration 
procedures, residence and similar academic 
matters. For information on admission, 
curriculum and graduation requirements 
for the M.A. in Economics, see the graduate 
program adviser in the Economics Department. 
Students should also consult the faculty 
advisers for the programs in accountancy, 
information systems and taxation. 

TRANSFER CREDIT FOR BUSINESS 
AND ECONOMICS COURSES 

Students should see an adviser as soon 
as possible regarding transfer credit. College- 
level courses successfully completed at another 
college or university may be applied toward 
the requirements of the CBE subject to the 
approval of the appropriate department 
chair. Lower division courses completed at 
an appropriately accredited institution with 
a grade of “C” or better that are equivalent in 
content and level may be considered. Upper- 
division transfer courses will be considered 
if the course is (a) equivalent in content and 
level, (b) completed with a grade of “C” or 
better, and (c) taught in an Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business 
accredited program. Exceptions require 
thorough documentation evidencing the 
above standards. Lists of approved equivalent 
courses from local community colleges are 
available in the Business Advising Center. All 
other courses are subject to approval by the 
department chair concerned. In these cases, 


the student must supply catalog descriptions, 
course outlines and textbook titles. Courses 
taken in the extension division of another 
university, or by correspondence, are gener- 
ally not acceptable. 

INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE 
EDUCATION 

Students may earn academic credit, 
first-hand work experience and financial 
remuneration as well. Opportunities exist in 
accounting and auditing; cost-benefit analysis 
and econometrics; finance and real estate; 
insurance and banking; management and 
industrial relations; marketing, sales and 
advertising; and business data systems. For 
more information, consult the internship 
adviser in your department or in the Center 
for Internships and Cooperative Education. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The Business Administration Honors 
Program offers to highly motivated students 
the opportunity to take enriched coursework 
in the foundation areas of the business 
major. Courses in the honors program are 
smaller in class size, provide challenging 
learning experiences, individual attention 
from selected professors, and closer interac- 
tion with other similarly motivated students. 

Students in honor sections are encour- 
aged to develop and discuss ideas in an active, 
imaginative and original way. Professors 
contribute by making creative use of curricular 
materials and student assignments. Students 
interact personally and intensively with their 
faculty and classmates. In addition, students 
are given the opportunity to be partnered 
with a corporate executive mentor and be 
given special assistance in securing an 
internship during the senior year. 

Business Administration students with 
45 or more units who have a cumulative 
grade point average of at least 3.5 are eligible 
to enter the Honors program. Students must 
maintain a 3.4 or higher grade point average 
in order to remain in the program. Students 
in good standing in the Business Administration 
Honors program shall receive registration 
priority into designated honors sections. 


Recognition for Honor Students 

Students who successfully complete the 
requirements of Business Administration 
Honors program shall have an appropriate 
notation placed on their permanent record 
and shall be awarded a Certificate of Honors 
upon graduation. 

For additional information, please 
contact the Business Advising Center, 
Langsdorf Hall 731, (714) 278-2211. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Chapters of the following national 
honor societies have been established on 
campus with membership open to qualified 
students: Beta Alpha Psi (accounting). Beta 
Gamma Sigma (business), Financial Manage- 
ment Association Honor Society (finance). 
Omega Rho (MS/IS), Phi Kappa Phi (all- 
campus), Pi Sigma Epsilon (marketing). In 
addition there are the following clubs which 
students are encouraged to join: Accounting 
Society, Association Intemaionale des 
Estdiantes en Sciences Economiques et 
Cxommerciales (AIESEC), American 
Marketing Association, Association of 
Information Technology Professionals 
(AITP), Business Inter-Club (BICC), Delta 
Sigma Pi (business fraternity), Economics 
Association, Finance Association, Society for 
the Advancement of Management (SAM), 
Trans-Pacific Leadership Program, Xicano 
Business. 

CBE GENERAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

Stephen J. Barres Leadership Award 
Richard Glassman Scholarship 

National Electronics Distributors Association, 
Southern California Chapter Scholarship 

Executive Council Outstanding Student 
Award 

Theodore H. Smith Outstanding Graduate 
Student Award 

Frank P Stanek Continuing Junior 
Scholarship 

Francisco J. Valle Scholarship 
Samuel Mendoza Memorial Scholarship 
Yokohama Tire Corporation Scholarship 

See also awards listed under each depart- 
ment. For additional information on awards 
and scholarships available to business stu- 
dents, contact the Office of the Dean, 
Langsdorf Hall 700. 


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 


COMPUTER FACILITIES 

The CSUF Information Technology in 
the Library and the CBE Satellite Computer 
Laboratories in McCarthy Hall are available 
for student use. Computer facilities are 
generally available evenings and weekends 
during the school year. 

INFORMATION ON DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 

Information on degrees is located in the 
following department and program listings: 

Accounting: 

Accountancy, M.S. 

Taxation, M.S. 

Business Administration: 

Business Administration, B.A. 

Business Administration, Minor 
Business Administration, M.B.A. 
Economics: 

Economics, B.A. 

Economics, Minor 
Economics, M.A. 

International Business: 

International Business, B.A. 

Information Systems and Decision Sciences: 
Information Systems, M.S. 


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS 


COLLEGE OF 

Communications 


DEAN 

Rick D. Pullen 

ASSOCIATE DEAN 

Fred Zandpour 

ASSISTANT DEAN, STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Peggy Garcia Bockman 

DEAN’S OFFICE 

College Park Building, Suite 450 
(714) 278-3355 

COLLEGE WEBSITE 

http://communications.fullerton.edu 

“The College of Communications 
provides an excellent learning 
environment with nationally 
recognized faculty and modem 
laboratory facilities. Students are 
welcomed into a supportive 
environment that consists of 
computerized writing, editing 
photo and graphics labs ; television 
studios; a speech and hearing clinic; 
a presentation lab, and a newspaper 
and magazine production complex. ” 

Dean Rick D. Pullen 

College of Communications 



The College of Communications is committed to advancing a democratic 
society by preparing students to function in a wide variety of communication 
professions. With a strong tradition in the liberal arts and social sciences, the 
academic programs of the College share a common theoretical base which identifies 
the elements of human communication and the principles governing their use in all 
communicative processes essential to contemporary society, namely, the spoken and 
written word and visual images. Specialized programs in advertising, communication 
theory and process, intercultural, interpersonal, organizational communication, 
communication studies, communicative disorders, journalism, photocommunica- 
tions, public relations, entertainment and tourism, and radio-television-film make 
up the basic curricula of the College. These programs of study lead to traditional 
academic degrees for undergraduates and graduates, to state credentials and licenses, 
to professional certification, and to entry into graduate and professional degree 
programs. 

Academic programs in the College of Communications prepare students to 
function as professionals in the fields of business, education, government, entertain- 
ment, and in media and health related careers. Ancillary educational experiences 
are available through the campus daily newspaper, audio and video production 
recording studios, television facility, forensics program, speech and hearing clinic, 
the Center for Children who Stutter, Tusk magazine and internships in professional 
settings. 

The College is dedicated to the principles of academic excellence and sees its 
fundamental mission as preparing citizens to function as effective communicators 
who practice their disciplines in accordance with the highest ethical codes of 
professional and personal conduct. 


COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS 





PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Advertising, Minor 
Communications, Bachelor of Arts 
Advertising 
Entertainment Studies 
Journalism 

Photocommunications 
Public Relations 

Communications, Master of Arts 
Communicative Disorders, Bachelor 
of Arts 

Communicative Disorders, Master of Arts 
Journalism, Minor 

Speech Communication, Bachelor of Arts 
Speech Communication, Minor 
Speech Communication, Master of Arts 
Radio-TV-Film, Bachelors of Arts 
Radio-TV-Film, Minor 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The College of Communications supports 
a large number of student organizations and 
activities that provide a wide variety of pre- 
professional opportunities for academic 
advancement. They include: the Advertising 
Club; Comm Grads: Communications Week; 
Daily Titan; Debate (forensics); Entertain- 
ment and Tourism; International Association 
of Business Communicators; National Press 
Photographers Association; National Student 
Speech-Language-Hearing Association; Public 
Relations Student Society of America; Society 
of Professional Journalists; Titan Internet 
Radio; Tusk Club; and TV-Film Society. 

ACCREDITATION 

The Department of Communications 
is accredited by the Accrediting Council on 
Education in Journalism and Mass Commu- 
nications. The Communicative Disorders 
program in the Department of Speech 
Communication is accredited by the 
American Speech-Language-Hearing 
Association. 


INTERNSHIPS 

A wide variety of student internships 
are available throughout Southern California. 
In the Department of Communications, 
students are required to complete an intern- 
ship, unless specifically waived from doing 
so, normally as the culminating undergraduate 
experience. The Speech Communication’s 
internship is normally taken sometime 
in the junior or senior year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Some $30,000 in scholarships and 
awards is presented annually to students in 
the College of Communications. Among the 
sponsors of scholarships are the Advertising 
Club of Orange County, the Business/ 
Professional Advertising Association of 
Orange County, the Hearst Foundation, the 
Orange County chapter of the Public Relations 


Society of America, and the Los Angeles 
Times. Awards annually are presented to 
students who excel in academic and pre-pro- 
fessional activities in the three departments. 

FACILITIES 

The College of Communications is 
equipped with modern laboratory facilities 
including a state-of-the-art speech and 
hearing clinic; photography studio; teaching 
labs for writing and graphics with more than 
200 upgraded and networked workstations; 
television and sound studios and control 
rooms; video and audio production, post- 
production, storage and streaming facilities; 
film editing laboratory; a daily newspaper 
newsroom and production area; Internet 
radio; dedicated multi-media network and 
quality video-on-demand and multicasting 
facilities. 



COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS 


COLLEGE OF 

Engineering and 

Computer Science 


DEAN 

Raman Unnikrishnan 

ASSOCIATE DEAN 

David Falconer 

ASSISTANT DEAN, STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Lisa Jones 

DEAN’S OFFICE 

Computer Science 502 
(714) 278-3362 

COLLEGE WEBSITE 

http ://www. fullerton .edu/ecs 

“Our mission is simple. We want 
to educate engineers and computer 
scientists who will graduate with 
state-of-the art knowledge in their 
chosen field and are ready to embark 
on careers in industry and government 
or proceed to acquire advanced degrees 
in their own or related fields. More 



The curricula of the College of Engineering and 
Computer Science are designed to prepare students for 
careers in engineering and computer science, and for 
funher study and specialization in graduate work. The 
faculty of the college is actively involved not only in 
instruction and scholarship but also in the advisement 
of students on topics relating to the planning of career 
and program goals. Cooperative education and internship 
programs are available. 


and more of our graduates are also 
interested in being entrepreneurs, 
thanks to the success of so many 


young people on the west coast who 


have become successful in creating 
wealth via technology. ” 


Dean Raman Menon Unnikrishnan 
College of Engineering 
and Computer Science 


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Computer Science, Bachelor of Science 

Computer Science, Minor 

Computer Science, Master of Science 

Civil Engineering, Bachelor of Science 
Emphasis in Architectural Engineering 

Civil Engineering, Master of Science 

Concentration in Environmental 
Engineering 

Electrical Engineering, Bachelor of 
Science 

Electrical Engineering, Master of Science 
Option in Systems Engineering 

Engineering, Bachelor of Science 

Emphasis in Pharmaceutical 
Engineering 

Option in Engineering Science 

Engineering, Master of Science 
Option in Engineering Science 

Mechanical Engineering, Bachelor of 
Science 

Emphasis in Manufacturing 
Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering, Master of 
Science 

ENGINEERING 

Engineering is the application of scientific 
principles to the solution of practical prob- 
lems. Engineers are professionals who 
employ the empirical art and techniques of 
engineering to the benefit of the society. 
Throughout the ages, human progress has 
been able to flourish due to the brilliant 
minds of engineers. Historical works, such 
as the Egyptian pyramids, the Roman 
aqueducts, and the Greek and Persian 
monuments, are examples of engineering 
ingenuity. In the contemporary world, the 
technological breakthroughs, such as com- 
puters, lasers, and robots, have become 
reality due to the creativity and imagination 
of engineers. 

People-made wonders, such as the Hoover 
Dam, the Golden Gate Bridge, the Empire 
State Building, and the Gateway Arch on the 
Mississippi River, are examples of engineering 
ingenuity. Great inventors like Leonardo da 
Vinci, Galileo, James Watt, and Thomas 
Edison had exceptional engineering minds. 


Engineers need a firm knowledge of the 
sciences and mathematics and must be able 
to analyze complex situations involving 
people, money, machines and information 
in order to create workable and economical 
designs. Engineers often work with others 
in a team to develop systems and products. 
The increasing technological complexity 
of modem society offers both opportunities 
as well as challenges to the engineering 
graduates of the future. 

Engineers are employed in practically 
every field of human endeavor. This includes 
manufacturing, construction, education, 
government, health care, and business. As 
society becomes increasingly more technological, 
an engineering education provides a back- 
ground for careers which will extend well 
into the 21st century. There is a real need for 
more engineering professionals, and so there 
are tremendous opportunities for everyone, 
including women and underrepresented 
minorities, in this field. 

The College of Engineering and Computer 
Science has developed a reputation for excel- 
lence in its undergraduate and graduate 
engineering and computer science programs. 
The college is committed to providing the 
student with a solid preparation in the 
fundamental principles of engineering as an 
applied science, as well as the practical 
experience to use these principles in the 
solution of engineering problems. 

At Cal State Fullerton students who are 
pursuing the bachelor’s degrees in civil, elec- 
trical, or mechanical engineering are affiliated 
with one of the colleges three engineering 
departments. These programs are accredited 
by the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology (ABET). 

Each engineering degree program incor- 
porates the following three curricular areas: 

Mathematics and basic science courses 
such as physics and chemistry; 

Engineering topics courses such as thermo- 
dynamics, materials science, and electrical 
circuits, which provide a bridge between 
basic math/science and engineering practice 
and engineering design courses in which a 
system, component, process or structure is 
devised to meet a specific need; 

General education courses in the arts, 
humanities, and social sciences. 

Each undergraduate program prepares 
students for entry into the engineering pro- 
fession or for further study and specialization 
in graduate study. 


COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Computer Science deals with all phases 
of information including its representation, 
storage, structure, display and the processes 
by which it is transformed and used. 

Computer science professionals create 
new systems such as an inventory control 
system for a large manufacturer, or a naviga- 
tional system for a new space vehicle, or 
a decision support system for the manage- 
ment of a bank. These people use their 
technical skills to convert specific needs 



into specialized programs, procedures, and 
systems that will actually do the job. 

Students who pursue the Bachelor of 
Science in Computer Science degree at Cal 
State Fullerton are prepared for careers in a 
variety of fields in business, government and 
industry. The curriculum, which is accredited 
by the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology, emphasizes fundamental 
concepts exemplified by various types of pro- 
gramming languages, computer architectures, 
operating systems and data structures. 

The computer science program focuses on 
several curricular objectives that are designed 
to provide the student with the foundations 
of the discipline and the opportunity for 
specialization. The department faculty are 


33 


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 


highly versed in the discipline through 
education and work experience. 

The Computer Science Building houses 
five large computer science laboratories with 
an extensive range of computers and related 
equipment for student use. The building 
provides ample space for a full range of state- 
of-the-art systems and equipment. 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT 
ADVISEMENT 

Undergraduate students should call the 
department office of their major to arrange 
for advising and approval of their study 
plans. The College of Engineering and 
Computer Science has a policy of mandatory 
advising. Each undergraduate student must 
see an advisor at least once per year. 

Students interested in programs in the 
college, but without a declared major should 
contact either the Engineering Division Office 
or the Computer Science Department Office 
for advisement. 

GRADUATE STUDENT ADVISEMENT 

Graduate students should consult the 
graduate adviser in their major department 
before registering for the first semester. No 
more than nine units may be completed 
before an approved study plan is filed. 

PROGRAM IN GENERAL EDUCATION 

Because of high unit requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science degrees in Engineering, 
these programs have modified requirements 
for general education. Students should 
consult the department for requirements. 

Majors in the College of Engineering and 
Computer Science should take mathematics 
and other courses in related fields early. 
General education courses normally should 
be scheduled throughout the student’s 
program of study. 


MESA ENGINEERING PROGRAM (MEP) 

The MESA Engineering Program (MEP) 
is an academic support program designed to 
recruit, retain and graduate students. MESA 
serves educationally disadvantaged students, 
to the extent possible by law, and emphasizes 
participation by students from groups with 
low eligibility rates for four-year colleges. 

MESA 

The goal of the Mathematics, Engineering, 
Science Achievement (MESA) program is to 
create opportunities for educationally disad- 
vantaged students, especially those from 
groups with low college acceptance rates, 
to prepare for and enter colleges and univer- 
sities in majors such as engineering, computer 
science and other mathematics-based 
scientific fields. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

There are 14 active student organizations 
in the college. These are student branches of 
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers 
(ASME), Association for Computing Machinery' 
(ACM), Institute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers (IEEE), Society of Mexican- 
American Engineers and Scientists (MAES), 
National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), 
Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), 
California Chi Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, Society 
for the Advancement of Materials and Process 
Engineering (SAMPE), Society of Women 
Engineers (SWE), Society of Hispanic 
Professional Engineers (SHPE), Instruments 
Society of America (ISA), International 
Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering 
(ISPE) and Society of Manufacturing 
Engineers (SME). These 14 societies form 
the colleges Interclub Council. 


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 

























35 




COLLEGE OF 

Human Development and 
Community Service 


DEAN 

Roberta E. Rikli 

ASSOCIATE DEANS 

L.Y. (Mickey) Hollis 
Ellen Junn 

ASSISTANT DEAN, STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Nancee Buck 

DEAN S OFFICE 

Education Classroom Building 324 
(714) 278-3311 

COLLEGE WEBSITE 

http://hdcs.fullerton.edu 


“Our college offers programs that 
focus on areas of broad human 
concern — the education of children 
and youth and the health, 
development, and well-being of 
people of all ages from infancy 
to older adult years. I welcome 
you to the College of Human 
Development and Community 
Service and the opportunity to learn 
the knowledge and skills needed 
to make a lasting contribution to 
the world in which we live.” 

Dean Roberta E. Rikli 
College of Human Development 
and Community Service 



Through its teaching, scholarship, and service mission, the College of Human 
Development and Community Service provides students with an education that 
contributes to their intellectual, personal, and professional development. Emphasis 
is placed on both theory and practice, with special attention to the development of 
critical thinking and humanistic skills needed to function in a widely diverse and 
ever-changing society. Programs in the college lead to traditional academic degrees 
at the baccalaureate and graduate levels, as well as to a variety of specific certificates, 
credentials and licenses. 

The College of Human Development and Community Service is organized into 
the following instructional units: the Division of Child, Family and Community 
Services, which is comprised of the depanments of Child and Adolescent Studies, 
Counseling, Human Services; the School of Education, which includes the depan- 
ments of Educational Leadership, Elementary and Bilingual Education, Reading, 
Secondary Education, Special Education, and the Instructional Design and 
Technology program; Division of Kinesiology and Health Promotion; and the 
Department of Nursing. The Military Science Program is also part of the College. 


36 


COLLEGE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY SERVICE 


PROGRAMS OFFERED 

California Reading Certificate 

Child and Adolescent Development, 
Bachelor of Science 

Child and Adolescent Development, 

Minor 

Counseling, Master of Science 
Education, Master of Science 

Bilingual/Bicultural Education 
(Spanish-English) 

Educational Technology 
Elementary Curriculum and 
Instruction 

Reading 

Educational Administration 
Secondary Education 
Special Education 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other 
Languages (For funher information 
refer to the Department of Modem 
Languages and Literatures section 
of this catalog.) 

Health Promotion, Minor 
Health Science, Bachelor of Science 
Human Services, Bachelor of Science 
Human Services, Minor 

Information Technology and Design, 
Master of Science 

Kinesiology, Bachelor of Science 
Kinesiology, Minor 
Kinesiology, Master of Science 
Military Science, Minor 

Second Lieutenant Commission, 

U.S. Army 

Nursing, Bachelor of Science 
Nursing, Master of Science 
Nursing Administration 
Nurse Anesthetist 
Master of Public Health (pending 
approval) 

Teaching Credentials 

See Teaching Credential Programs 
section of this catalog. 


ACCREDITATIONS 

The College of Human Development and 
Community Service offers high quality programs 
that meet state and national accreditation 
standards. Major accrediting bodies for 
college programs include: 

■ California Commission of Teacher 
Credentialing 

■ Commission on Accreditation of Allied 
Health Education Programs 

■ Commission on Collegiate Nursing 
Education 

■ National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education 

■ National League for Nursing 
Accreditation Commission 

RESEARCH CENTERS AND INSTITUTES 

In addition to its academic degree programs, 
the college also sponsors the following inter- 
disciplinary centers and institutes. For addi- 
tional information, see the Research Centers 
section of the catalogue. 

■ Center for Community Collaboration 
(co-sponsored with University Extended 
Education) 

■ Center for Excellence in Science and 
Mathematic (co-sponsored with College 
of National Science and Mathematics) 

■ Center for Successful Aging 

■ Sports and Movement Institute 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

There are 10 active student organizations 
in the college. Theses are student clubs for 
R.O.T.C. Military Science (Alpha Lambda 
Fraternity), Child & Adolescent Student 
Association (CASSA), Council of Educational 
Leadership Students, Graduate Counseling 
Student Association (GCSA), Human Services 
Student Association (HSSA), Kinesiology and 
Health Promotion Student Association, 
Student California Teachers Association 
(SCTA), Student Council for Exceptional 
Children, Blended Teacher Education 
Program Organization (BTEPO), and Sports 
Health Care Club (SHCC). These 10 student 
organizations form the college’s Interclub 
Council. 


COLLEGE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COURSES 

410 Theory and Methods of Service 
Integration (3) 

Prerequisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 
210 or Human Services 201 or consent of 
instructor. Interdisciplinary study of current 
services systems; changing environment of 
children/family systems; methods of negoitat- 
ing collaboration at the policy level, providing 
integrated services at the client/worker level, 
and planning community-based services; 
outcomes-based funding and evaluation. 
Fieldwork required. 



37 


COLLEGE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY SERVICE 


COLLEGE OF 

Humanities and 
Social Sciences 

DEAN 

Thomas Klammer 

ASSOCIATE DEAN 

Ray Young 

ASSOCIATE DEAN, ACADEMIC PRO- 
GRAMS 

Angela Della Volpe 

ASSISTANT DEAN, STUDENT AFFAIRS 


The College of Humanities and Social Sciences (H&rSS) offers students the breadth of a traditional 
liberal arts education in the humanities and social sciences while preparing them for a wide 
school and for advance professional study in fields such as law, public administration, clinical 
psychology, and business. In fact, the College is home to 25 different departments and programs, 
most offering both bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Our faculty and staff are student-centered 
and enjoy providing friendly, personal guidance and mentoring to our students. That’s why 
the College of H&SS is the right place for so many Cal State Fullerton students. 

Many of our students intend to become teachers, and each of our programs includes a track 
that prepares students for entry into the elementary school teaching credential program. For 
those seeking to become high school teachers, we offer programs leading to secondary 
credentials in English/Language Arts, Foreign Languages, and History/Social Science. 

In the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, students know that “the name of your 
major does not have to be the same as the name of your career.” In fact, for most college students, it 
rarely is. All majors in H&rSS provide students with the broad education and core skills (reading, 
writing, critical thinking, working in teams, public speaking) that will be attractive to employers 
in whatever career or field a graduate may later choose. 

Majors in Humanities and Social Sciences not only prepare students for the profession of 
their choice, but also help them to excel in coursework throughout their time at the University 
If you’re a student working on an assignment that involves complex analysis, critical thinking, 
or persuasive communication, your studies in one of the degree programs in Humanities and 
Social Sciences will provide you with what you need to succeed in your classes — in any field. 

Of course, learning takes place outside of the formal structure of classes, as well. We give 
a high priority to involving students directly in faculty research and professional internships. 

And each of our departments includes one or more student clubs and organizations that promote 
life-long friendships, social activities, and service projects. The H&rSS Interdub Council (ICC) 
provides additional leadership opportunities for students in the College, as well as promoting 
communication among more that 50 clubs and organizations run by and for Humanities and 
Social Sciences students. 


Michael Paul Wong 

DEAN'S OFFICE 

Humanities 211 
(714) 278-3528 

COLLEGE WEBSITE 

http://hss.fullerton.edu 

“ Students new to the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences are 
often surprised at how friendly and 
helpful our faculty are. Classes are 
“ student friendly, ” and students 
discover many opportunities for 
involvement with their teachers in 
research, in service learning, and 
in producing student-faculty research 
journals. Our faculty make a really 
positive difference in students' lives." 

Dean Thomas Klammer 

College of Humanities 
and Social Sciences 



COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 


Listed below are many majors, minors, 
and graduate degrees offered within the 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 
Academic advisement is provided by each 
of the College’s departments and programs, 
as well as in our Student Access Center 
located in Humanities 112. 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Afro-Ethnic Studies (Option in B.A. 

Ethnic Studies) 

Afro-Ethnic Studies, Minor 
American Studies, Bachelor of Arts 
American Studies, Master of Arts 
American Studies, Minor 
Anthropology, Bachelor of Arts 
Anthropology, Master of Arts 
Anthropology, Minor 
Asian American Studies (Option in B.A. 
Ethnic Studies) 

Asian American Studies (Minor) 

Asian Studies, Minor 
Chicano Studies (Option in B.A. Ethnic 
Studies) 

Chicano Studies, Minor 
Christian Studies, Minor 
Comparative Literature, Bachelor of Arts 
Comparative Literature, Master of Arts 
Criminal Justice, Bachelor of Arts 
Criminal Justice, Minor 
English, Bachelor of Arts 
English, Master of Arts 
English, Minor 

Environmental Studies, Master of Science 
Environmental Sciences 
Environmental Policy and Planning 
Environmental Education and 
Communication 
Ethnic Studies, Bachelor of Arts 
French, Bachelor of Arts 
French, Master of Arts 
French, Minor 
Geography, Bachelor of Arts 
Urban Geography 
Environmental Analysis 
Geography, Master of Arts 
Geography, Minor 
German, Bachelor of Arts 
German, Master of Arts 


German, Minor 
Gerontology, Master of Science 
Gerontology, Minor 
Gerontology, Certificate 
History, Bachelor of Arts 
History, Master of Arts 
History, Minor 
International Politics, Minor 
Japanese, Bachelor of Arts 
Japanese, Minor 
Jewish Studies, Minor 
Latin American Studies, Bachelor of Arts 
Latin American Studies, Minor 
Liberal Studies, Bachelor of Arts 
Linguistics, Bachelor of Arts 
Linguistics, Master of Arts 
Applied Linguistics 
Anthropological Linguistics 
Analysis of Special Language 
Structures 

Communication and Semantics 
Disorders of Communication 
Linguistics, Minor 
Philosophy, Bachelor of Arts 

Social, Moral and Legal Philosophy 
for the Professions 

Philosophy, Minor 
Political Science, Bachelor of Arts 
Political Science, Master of Arts 
Political Science, Minor 
Portuguese, Minor 
Psychology, Bachelor of Arts 
Psychology, Master of Arts 
Psychology, Master of Science Clinical 
Psychology, Minor 

Public Administration, Bachelor of Arts 
Public Administration (M.RA.) 

Criminal Justice 
Human Resources 
Public Finance 
Urban Management 
Public Administration, Minor 
Religious Studies, Bachelor of Arts 
Religious Studies, Minor 
Russian and East European Area Studies, 
Bachelor of Arts 


Sociology, Bachelor of Arts 

Deviance and Socio-Legal Studies 

Education 

Family 

Gerontology 

Social Work 

Sociology' of Class, Race and Gender 
Sociology, Master of Arts 
Sociology, Minor 
Spanish, Bachelor of Arts 
Spanish, Master of Arts 
Spanish, Minor 



Teachers of English as a Second Language 
(Certificate) 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other 
Languages-TESOL (Concentration in 
M.S. Education) 

Women’s Studies, Bachelor of Arts 
Women’s Studies, Minor 

HUMANITIES COURSE 

350 British Life and Culture (3) 

Interdisciplinary introduction to British 
culture and civilization. Takes a social, historical 
and cultural approach to contemporary 
British society. Examines traditions and 
institutions to help understand 20th Century 
British life. Related field trips. Team-taught. 
Offered only as part of the CSUF London 
semester. 


39 


COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 


COLLEGE OF 

Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics 


DEAN 

Kolf O. Jayaweera 

ASSOCIATE DEAN 

David Fromson 

ASSISTANT DEAN, STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Rochelle Woods 

DEAN’S OFFICE 

McCarthy Hall 166 
(714) 278-2638 

COLLEGE WEBSITE 

http://nsm.fullerton.edu 



“We provide a complete 

educational experience to all 

students through student- 

centered, inquiry-based instruction 

in the classroom and the laboratory. 

We view research experience for 

students as an essential and 

necessary component in the 

learning of science. ” 

Dean Kolf O. Jayaweera 
College of Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics 


The curricula of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
are designed to prepare students for careers in scientific, 
mathematical, and other technical fields; for further study and 
specialization in advanced graduate work; and for entry into 
professional schools of medicine and other health-related 
disciplines. The faculty of the college is actively involved not 
only in instruction and scholarship but also in the advisement 
of students in the college on topics relating to the planning of 
career and program goals. Cooperative education internship 
programs are available in each of the Colleges Departments. 

The College sponsors a variety of professional and educa- 
tional programs at which students and faculty have an 
opportunity to meet with their counterparts. 


COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 



PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Biological Science, Bachelor of Science 
Biology, Master of Science 
Biochemistry, Bachelor of Science 
Biotechnology, Minor 
Chemistry, Bachelor of Arts 
Chemistry, Bachelor of Science 
Chemistry, Minor 
Chemistry, Master of Science 
Geology, Bachelor of Science 
Geology, Minor 
Geology, Master of Science 
Mathematics, Bachelor of Arts 
Mathematics, Minor 

Mathematics for Teacher Education, 
Minor 

Mathematics, Master of Arts 
Natural Sciences, Minor 
Physics, Bachelor of Science 
Physics, Minor 
Physics, Master of Science 
Science, M.A.T.S. 

Recommended Preparation 

For a career in mathematics or science, 
a sound foundation is essential. High school 
preparation should include: 

At least three, preferably four, years of 
mathematics 

Chemistry and/or physics, preferably both 
Two or three years of foreign language. 

Community college preparation should 
include at the minimum: 

College writing 
Calculus 

College chemistry 
First course in the major. 

Qualifying Examinations 

Enrollment in introductory courses is 
restricted to those who are adequately pre- 
pared, as shown by performance on qualify- 
ing examinations. In addition, the Entry 
Level Mathematics (ELM) examination is 
required of all students unless exempt. 


UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT 
ADVISEMENT 

Undergraduate students should call the 
department office of their major to arrange 
for advising and approval of their study plan. 
University policy requires students to see an 
adviser each of their first two semesters and 
every year thereafter. Most departments 
prefer to advise their majors more frequently. 

Students interested in programs in the 
College, but without a declared major should 
call the OfTice of the Dean for advisement. 

ADVISEMENT FOR HEALTH 
PROFESSIONS 

It is important for any student interested 
in a career in the health professions to seek 
advisement at the Health Professions Office 
prior to registering for the first semester. 

GRADUATE STUDENT ADVISEMENT 

Graduate students should consult the 
graduate adviser in their major department 
before registering for the first semester. No 
more than nine units may be completed 
before an approved study plan is filed. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

General 

Diefenderfer Award: made annually to an 
outstanding woman or minority student. 

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics’ 
Scholarship for Scholastic Achievement 

Jewel Plummer Cobb Scholarship for 
Scholastic Achievement: awarded to an 
outstanding, under-represented science 
major. 

Health Professions 

Miles McCarthy Health Professions Award: 
annual award to the outstanding graduate 
from the program for the health professions. 

Kenneth Goodhue-Mc Williams Award: for 
outstanding contributions to community 
service by a health professions student. 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 

American Chemical Society Award: recognizes 
a graduating senior Chemistry-Biochemistry 
major for exemplary academic achievement. 

American Institute of Chemists Award: made 
to a graduating senior who has demon- 
strated outstanding scholarship and 
undergraduate research. 


The Lyle Wallace Award: for service to the 
Department of Chemistry and 
Biochemistry. 

The Hypercube Scholar Award recognizes a 
graduating senior for accomplishments in 
molecular modeling/computational 
chemistry. 

Other awards made by the Department 
of Chemistry and Biochemistry are the 
Freshman Chemistry Award, and the 
Undergraduate Awards for Achievement in 
Organic Chemistry and in Analytical 
Chemistry. 



Biology 

Rachel Carson Award: a commemoration of 
the ideals of Rachel Carson. 

Friends of the Arboretum, David L. 

Walkington Scholarship: for an outstand- 
ing biology student who has chosen 
Botany for a career. 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald B. Bright Environmental 
Scholarship: for students interested in 
careers in Environmental Biology. 

Geology 

Department of Geological Sciences: for out- 
standing graduating senior students for 
service and scholarship. 

Margaret Skillman Woyski Scholarship: for 
a woman Geology major for outstanding 
academic achievement and teaching. 


41 


COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 


Mathematics 

Department of Mathematics recognizes 
excellent academic achievement by both 
undergraduate and graduate students in a 
number of awards, including the Outstanding 
Teaching Award, the Outstanding Math 
Scholar, The Math Club Scholarship and 
the Lila B. Hromadka Award. 

Physics 

The Dan Black Schoolarship provides 
support to a junior Physics major based on 
need and promise, and is renewable for the 
senior year. 

The Department of Physics honors the 
memory of Edward Lee Cooperman, and a 
scholarship in his name goes to an outstand- 
ing student. The Constance Beech Eiker- 
Raymond V Adams Creativity Award is given 
to a student who developed an outstanding 
set of instructional laboratory experiments. 
The Dr. Robert W. Kedzie Award recognizes 
the most improved Physics major. 

FUNDED RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES 

MARC (Minority Access to Research 
Careers) 

This NIH-supported program develops six 
exceptional scholars and prepares them for 
success in PhD programs. 

MSD (Minority Student Development) 
Program 

This NIH-funded program supports the 
research of 25 undergraduate and graduate 
students who work in labs of 14 faculty. 

REU (Research Experience for 
Undergraduates) Program 

Provides students interested in research, 
who might not otherwise have the opportunity 
because of economic constraints, to carry out 
the research during the summer months. 


M1RT (Minority International Research 
Training) Program 

NIH-sponsored program that provides 
minority students with the opportunity to 
carry out research during the summer at lab- 
oratories in England. 

Bridges-to-the-Doctorate Program 

NIH-funded program facilitates admission 
of our masters-level minority research students 
to PhD programs at UC Riverside, UC San 
Diego, USC and UCI. 

Individual Faculty Research Projects 

RECOMMENDED PROGRAM IN 
GENERAL EDUCATION 

Majors in the College of Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics should take mathematics 
and other courses in related fields early in 
their academic careers. General education 
courses normally should be scheduled 
throughout the study sequence. 

Because of high unit requirements for 
the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, this 
program has modified requirements for 
general education. Students should consult 
the department for particulars. 


COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 















43 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Betty Chavis 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Langsdorf Hall 630 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://business.fullerton.edu/accounting/ 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Business 
Administration 
Concentration in Accounting 
Master of Science in Accountancy 
Master of Science in Taxation 
Master of Business Administration 
Concentration in Accounting 

FACULTY 

Betty Chavis, Don Cram, Mary Fleming, 
Paul Foote, Clyde Hardman, Mahamood 
Hassan, A. Jay Hirsch, Gerald Hoth,Vijay 
Karan, K. J. Kim, Andrew Luzi, Vivek Mande, 
Robert McCabe, Robert Miller, Christopher 
Petruzzi, Shirish Seth, Mohsen Sharifi, 
Ephraim Smith, Randy Swad, Iris Stuart, 

Kim Tarantino. 

ADVISERS 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf 
Hall 731, provides information on admis- 
sions, curriculum and graduation require- 
ments; registration and grading procedures; 
residence and similar academic matters. In 
addition, the Accounting Department Chair 
provides advising on curriculum content and 
career opportunities in Accounting, the CPA 
Examination, and Taxation. 


MISSION STATEMENT 

The Department of Accounting is a separately accredited entity within the College of Business 
and Economics at California State University, Fullerton. 

Our mission is to provide a high-quality accounting education relevant to a diverse group of 
undergraduate and graduate students, to advance accounting education and knowledge through 
research, and to promote valuable associations with business and professional communities. 

DEPARTMENT OBJECTIVES 

Undergraduate Education 

To provide a competency-based education in accounting that qualifies accounting majors 
for entry-level accounting positions in private industry, government, public accounting or 
not-for-profit organizations. The undergraduate education also will provide a foundation for 
advancement through professional certification and success in graduate studies. 

Graduate Education 

To provide advanced professional education that strengthens the skills of graduate students in 
both general and technical competencies and enhances the students ability to enter or continue 
in leadership roles and develop increased professional responsibilities in private industry, gov- 
ernment, public accounting or not-for-profit organizations. 

Educational Support 

To serve the educational needs of the College of Business and Economics as well as other 
colleges and departments of the University by teaching various accounting subjects as may 
be required or requested within the resource constraints of the Department. 

Enhanced Intellectual Capital 

To enhance the intellectual capacity of its faculty by encouraging and supporting fundamental 
and applied research as well as faculty development activities. This includes support of active 
participation and leadership in local, regional and national academic and professional accounting 
organizations. 

Community Outreach 

To support student and alumni activities and encourage outreach activities that address 
accounting needs of the local, regional and global communities. This includes developing strong 
ongoing relationships with local and regional employers and supporters of an enhanced academic 
environment. 

International Learning Opportunities in Accounting 

The Department of Accounting includes an integrated international perspective in all its 
introductory courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. In addition, a graduate 
class in international accounting is offered for all interested students. 

Ethics 

The Department recognizes that numerous ethical decisions must be made in todays business 
environment. Therefore, all accounting classes use cases and problems to help students develop 
an ability to evaluate ethical situations. 


44 


ACCOUNTING 



INTRODUCTION 

Accounting is often referred to as “the language of business.” Very 
generally, the accounting process is concerned with recording, classify- 
ing, reporting and interpreting the economic data of an organization. 
These data are important to users, who may include managers, 
investors and other interested groups. Accounting helps in decision- 
making processes by showing how money has been spent and where 
commitments have been made, by judging performance and by 
showing the implications of following different courses of action. 
Reliable information in a dynamic business environment is necessary 
for sound decisions concerning the allocation of scarce resources. 

Thus accounting plays a very significant part in our social and 
economic systems. 

Programs in accounting are designed for students who are interested 
in careers in public accounting, industry, government, or service 
organizations, and for students who intend to work for advanced 
degrees in accounting in preparation for teaching and research. 

Credential Information 

The Department of Accounting offers courses which may be 
included in the Single Subject Waiver Program in Business. Further 
information on the requirements for teaching credentials is contained 
in the Teacher Credential Programs section of this catalog. 

Awards in Accounting 

Accounting Advisory 
Association Awards: 
GPA Award 

Communications Award 
Community Service Award 
Outstanding Student 
Award 

Beta Alpha Psi Award 
Accounting Society Award 


Other Awards 

AICPA Minority Students Scholarship 
American Society of 

Women Accountants, Orange County Chapter 

Amy Vanasse Memorial Award 

Awards from various CPA review firms 

Construction Financial Management Association Award 

California Society of CPAs 

Cynthia A. Brown Memorial Scholarship 

Financial Executive Award 

Institute of Internal Auditors Award 

Institute of Management Accountants Award 

Tax Executives Institute, Inc. Award 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration Degrees, Accounting Concentration.” 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTANCY 

The Master of Science in Accountancy program provides the 
conceptual understanding and technical competence for a career in 


professional accounting. Employment opportunities include public 
accounting, industrial accounting and government. The program 
encompasses both a theoretical foundation and technical skills. 

Emphasis is placed on the development of a professional attitude and 
the capacity to deal with accounting policy and ethics issues. Graduates 
should be prepared for entry-level positions, and for potential advance- 
ment in the profession. 

The M.S. in Accountancy program is scheduled especially for students 
who are employed full-time. Courses are offered during the late after- 
noon and evening. Most students enroll on a part-time basis, taking 
two courses (6 units) per semester. 

The curriculum is designed for students with an undergraduate 
degree in business administration with a concentration in accounting. 

In addition to six units of required accounting courses, there are 12 
units of accounting electives and nine units outside accounting, and 
a terminal research-project course. Students not holding an under- 
graduate degree in accounting or business may apply; qualified 
candidates will be admitted to postbaccalaureate-unclassified standing 
or conditionally classified standing as explained in the Admissions 
section below. 

Cal State Fullerton has the only accounting program in Orange 
County accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools 
of Business at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This assures 
a rigorous program, a well-qualified faculty, high standards for students, 
and access to an extensive library system and computing facilities. 

The qualifications of the M.S. in Accountancy faculty include advanced 
degrees in accounting, taxation and law; practical experience; and 
professional standing as CPAs, CMAs, and attorneys. 

Most graduate courses in the College of Business and Economics 
require “classified CBE status” and are open only to students with 
classified standing in the M.B.A., M.S. in Accountancy, M.S. in 
Taxation, M.S. in Information Systems, or M.A. in Economics 
programs. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Admission 

Students meeting the following requirements will be admitted to 
postbaccalaureate-unclassified standing. 

1 . Acceptable bachelor’s degree from an institution accredited by a 

regional accrediting association, or equivalent. 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units 

attempted and in good standing at the last college attended. 

Note: Postbaccalaureate-unclassified students may enroll in under- 
graduate courses (100 through 400 level), but generally are ineligible 
for graduate business courses (500 level). Such students may wish to 
take undergraduate courses which are necessary to meet the require- 
ments for classified standing (see below). Upon completing the require- 
ments, the student may file an “Application for Postbaccalaureate/ 
Graduate Change of Academic Objective” requesting admission to the 
M.S. in Accountancy program. Admission to the university as a post- 
baccalaureate-unclassified student does not constitute admission to the 



ACCOUNTING 


M.S. in Accountancy program, does not confer priority, nor does it 
guarantee future admission. Students planning to apply for admission 
to the M.S. in Accountancy program should confer with the graduate 
adviser in the College of Business and Economics. 

Students meeting the following departmental requirements may 
be admitted to the M.S. in Accountancy program with conditional 
classified standing: 

3. Combination of GPA and score on the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT) sufficient to yield a score of at least 1000 
according to one of the following formulas. Due to limited facilities 
and resources in the College of Business and Economics, a higher 
score may be required of all applicants. 

A. If overall undergraduate GPA is at least 2.7 and GMAT is at least 
450, then score = (GPA x 200) + GMAT. 

B. If overall undergraduate GPA is below 2.7 or GMAT is below 
450, then score - (GPA x 200) + GMAT - 50. 

4. A score in the top 50 percent on the verbal, analytical and quantita- 
tive areas of the GMAT. Students who do not reach this level are 
required to complete a department approved course(s). 

5. For international students a TOEFL score of 570. A student scoring 
between 550 and 570 may be admitted conditionally depending 
upon an evaluation of the entire application file. The student may 
be required to complete a department approved course(s). 

Conditionally classified students may take a limited number of 
graduate courses (500 level) subject to the approval of the graduate 
adviser of the College of Business and Economics. Students may take 
whatever courses are necessary to fulfill requirement 6 (below) while 
enrolled as conditionally classified students. In addition, a maximum 
of 9 units (three courses) from the M.S. in Accountancy curriculum 
may be taken while in conditionally classified standing. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements will be 
advanced to classified standing. Such students are eligible to take 
graduate courses for which they qualify 

6. A bachelor’s degree with a major in business administration and a 
concentration in accounting which meets the requirements stated 
in this catalog for such degrees. The degree must include calculus 
and computer information systems equivalent to passing Mathematics 
135, Business Calculus (3 units) and Info Sys/Decision Sciences 
265 Introduction to Computing and Application Software (3) with 
grades of at least C. Courses in the major are to be no more than 
seven years old, and courses in the accounting concentration no 
more than five years old. Courses in the major (including the 
accounting concentration) must have at least a 3.0 (B) GPA; courses 
with grades lower than C must be repeated with at least a C grade. 
Any deficiencies must be made up by taking additional course 
work. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree in a field other than 
Business Administration may meet this requirement by completing 
the courses in calculus and computer information systems (above) 
with grades of at least C, courses in the accounting concentration, 
and also the Foundation Courses within the curriculum of the 
Master of Business Administration (27 units, including Accounting 
510; Business Admin 590; Economics 515; Finance 517; Management 
515, 516, 518; Information Systems/Decision Sciences 513, and 


Marketing 519). Both the accounting concentration courses and the 
MBA Foundation Courses must have at least a 3.0 (B) GPA; 
accounting concentration courses and Foundation Courses with 
grades lower than C must be repeated with at least a C grade. 

7. Approval of study plan. 

M.S. ACCOUNTANCY CURRICULUM 

The curriculum requires 30 semester units of course work beyond 
the baccalaureate degree. At least 24 of the 30 units required for the 
degree must be at the graduate level. A 3.0 GPA (B) is required in 
study plan courses and overall applicable course work. Any study plan 
course with a grade lower than C must be repeated with at least a C 
grade. 

Required Courses (6 units) 

Accounting 502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 

Accounting 505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

OR Accounting 52 1 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) 

Electives in Accounting (12 units) 

Four courses (12 units) to be selected in consultation with and 
approved by the student’s program adviser. At least one course but not 
more than two must be tax-related (denoted by an asterisk in the list 
below) for a maximum of six units in tax-related courses. 

Accounting 503 Seminar in Contemporary Accounting Problems (3) 
Accounting 505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

Accounting 506 Seminar in Professional Accounting Communications (3) 
Accounting 507 Seminar in Accounting Information Systems (3) 
Accounting 508 Seminar in Tax Planning (3)* 

Accounting 518 Seminar in International Accounting (3) 

Accounting 521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) 

Accounting 572 Seminar in Taxation of Corporations and 
Shareholders (3)* 

Accounting 573 Seminar in Taxation of Property Transactions (3)* 

Accounting 574 Seminar in Taxation of International Business 
Operations (3)* 

Accounting 575 Seminar in Estate, Gift, Inheritance Taxes and Estate 
Planning (3)* 

Accounting 576 Seminar in State and Local Taxation (3)* 

Accounting 577 Seminar in Taxation of Employee Compensation (3)* 
Accounting 578 Seminar in Taxation of Partnerships (3)* 

Other Electives (9) 

Three courses (9 units) at the 400- or 500-level in business or 
related areas, to be selected in consultation with, and approved by the 
student’s adviser. Accounting courses may not be used to satisfy this 
requirement. 

Terminal Evaluation 

Accounting 597 Project (3) 

*Tax Course 


ACCOUNTING 


MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration Degrees, Accounting Concentration.” 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TAXATION 

The Master of Science in Taxation program provides the conceptual 
understanding and technical competence for a career in taxation. 
Employment opportunities include the tax departments of CPA and law 
firms, as well as corporations and government tax agencies. For those 
already employed in this field, the M.S. in Taxation program should meet 
the continuing education requirements of professional associations and 
licensing boards. 

The M.S. in Taxation program is scheduled especially for students 
who are employed full- time. Courses are offered during the late after- 
noon and evening. Most students enroll on a part-time basis, taking 
two courses (6 units) per semester 

The curriculum is designed for students with an undergraduate 
degree in business administration or accounting. In addition to six 
required courses in the field of taxation, there are three electives and a 
terminal, research-project course. Students not holding an undergraduate 
degree in accounting or business may apply; qualified candidates will 
be admitted to post-baccalaureate-unclassified standing or conditionally 
classified standing as explained in the Admissions section, below. 

Cal State Fullerton is the only university in Orange County accredited 
by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business at both the 
undergraduate and graduate level. This assures a rigorous program, 
a well-qualified faculty, high standards for students, and access to an 
extensive library system and computing facilities. The qualifications 
of the M.S. in Taxation faculty include advanced degrees in taxation, 
accounting, and law; practical tax experience; and professional standing 
as CPAs and attorneys. 

Most graduate courses in the College of Business and Economics 
require “classified CBE status” and are open only to students with 
classified standing in the M.B.A., M.S. in Accountancy, M.S. in Taxation, 
M.S. in Information Systems, or M.A. in Economics programs. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for 
the fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, 
deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check 
the university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www. fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Admission 

Students meeting the following requirements will be admitted to 
post-baccalaureate-unclassified standing: 

1 . Acceptable bachelors degree from an institution accredited by 

a regional accrediting association, or equivalent. 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units 

attempted and in good standing at the last college attended. 

Note: Postbaccalaureate unclassified students may enroll in under- 
graduate courses (100 through 400 level) but are generally ineligible for 
graduate business courses (500 level). Such students may wish to take 
undergraduate courses which are necessary to meet the requirements for 
classified standing (see below). Upon completing the requirements, the 
student may file an “Application for Postbaccalaureate/Graduate Change 
of Academic Objective” requesting admission to the M.S. in Taxation 
program. Admission to the university as a postbaccalaureate-unclassified 


student does not constitute admission to the M.S. in Taxation program, 
does not confer priority, nor does it guarantee future admission. 
Students planning to apply for admission to the M.S. in Taxation 
program should confer with the graduate adviser in the College of 
Business and Economics. 

Students meeting the following departmental requirements will be 
admitted to the M.S. in Taxation program with conditionally classified 
standing: 

3. Combination of GPA and score on the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT) sufficient to yield a score of at least 1000 
according to one of the following formulas. Due to limited facilities 
and resources in the College of Business and Economics, a higher 
score may be required of all applicants. 

A. If overall undergraduate GPA is at least 2.7 and GMAT is at 
least 450, then score = (GPA x 200) + GMAT. 

B. If overall undergraduate GPA is below 2.7 or GMAT is below 
450, then score = (GPA x 200) + GMAT - 50. 

4. A score in the top 50 percent on the verbal, analytical and quanti- 
tative areas of the GMAT. Students who do not reach this level are 
required to complete a department-approved course(s). 

5. For international students a TOEFL score of 570. A student scoring 
between 550 and 570 may be admitted conditionally depending 
upon an evaluation of the entire application file. The student may 
be required to complete a department-approved course(s). 

Conditionally classified students may take a limited number of 
graduate courses (500 level) subject to the approval of the graduate 
adviser of the College of Business and Economics. Students may take 
whatever courses are necessary to fulfill requirement 6 (below) while 
enrolled as conditionally classified students. In addition, a maximum 
of 9 units (three courses) from the M.S. in Taxation curriculum may 
be taken while in conditionally classified standing. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements will be 
advanced to classified standing. Such students are eligible to take 
graduate courses for which they qualify. 

6. A bachelor’s degree with a major in business administration which 
meets the requirements stated in this catalog for such degrees, and 
Accounting 308, Concepts of Federal Income Tax Accounting (or 
an equivalent course or work experience). The degree must include 
calculus and computer information systems equivalent to passing 
Mathematics 135, Business Calculus (3 units) and Info Sys/Decision 
Sciences 265 Introduction to Computing and Application Software 
(3 units) with grades of at least C. Courses in the major are to be 
no more than seven years old and must have at least a 3.0 (B) 

GPA; courses with grades lower than C must be repeated with at 
least a C grade. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree in a field other 
than Business Administration may meet this requirement by com- 
pleting the courses in calculus and computer information systems 
(above) with grades of at least C, Accounting 308 with a grade of 
at least C, and also the following foundation courses within the cur- 
riculum of the Master of Business Administration (12 units, including 
Accounting 510; Economics 515; Finance 517; Management 515. 
The MBA Foundation Courses must have at least a 3.0 (B) GPA; 
Foundation Courses with grades lower than C must be repeated 
with at least a C grade. 

7. Approval of study plan. 


ACCOUNTING 


M.S. TAXATION CURRICULUM 

The curriculum requires 30 semester units of course work beyond 
the baccalaureate degree. At least 2 1 of the 30 units required for the 
degree must be at the graduate level. A 3.0 GPA (B) is required in study 
plan courses and over-all applicable course work. Any study plan 
course with a grade lower than C must be repeated with at least a 
C grade. 

Required Tax Course 

Accounting 470 Tax Research, Practice and Procedures (3) 

Electives in Taxation and Related Fields 

Five courses (15 units) to be selected in consultation with, and 
approved by, the student’s program adviser. 

Available courses include but are not limited to: 

Accounting 408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Accounting 508 Seminar in Tax Planning (3) 

Accounting 572 Seminar in Taxation of Corporations and 
Shareholders (3) 

Accounting 573 Seminar in Taxation of Property Transactions (3) 

Accounting 574 Seminar in Taxation of International Business 
Operations (3) 

Accounting 575 Seminar in Estate, Gift, Inheritance Taxes and Estate 
Planning (3) 

Accounting 576 Seminar in State and Local Taxation (3) 

Accounting 577 Seminar in Taxation of Employee Compensation (3) 
Accounting 578 Seminar in Taxation of Partnerships (3) 

Other Electives 

Courses are to be selected in consultation with, and approved by, 
the student’s adviser. 

One course (3 units) in either economics or political science and 
two courses (6 units) in either business or non-business fields. 

Note: recommended courses in economics and political science 
include Poli Sci 421, 519, 528. 

Terminal Evaluation 

Accounting 597 Project (3) 

ACCOUNTING COURSES 

Courses are designated as ACCT in the class schedule. 

201 A Financial Accounting (3) 

Accounting concepts and techniques essential to the administration 
of a business enterprise: analyzing and recording financial transactions; 
accounting valuation and allocation practices; preparation, analysis and 
interpretation of financial statements; international accounting issues. 
(Not open to freshmen) 

20 IB Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 A. Introduction to managerial account- 
ing; product costing; budgetary control and responsibility accounting; 
analysis and techniques for aiding management planning and control 
decisions; basic income tax concepts for planning business transactions. 
(Not open to freshmen) 


301 A Intermediate Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 20 IB, and completion of all lower-division 
business administration core courses with grades of at least C in each 
course. Corequisite: Business Admin 301. Accounting theory; prepara- 
tion of income statements, balance sheets and statements of changes in 
financial position; present value and amount concepts; assets, liabilities 
and stockholders equity; price-level accounting; pensions; leases; earn- 
ings per share; financial statement analysis; accounting changes and 
error analysis. 

30 IB Intermediate Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in Accounting 301 A and 
Business Admin 301. Accounting theory; preparation of income 
statements, balance sheets and statements of changes in financial 
position; present value and amount concepts; assets, liabilities and 
stockholders equity; price-level accounting; pensions; leases; earnings 
per share; financial statement analysis; accounting changes and error 
analysis. 

302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 20 IB, and completion of all lower-division 
business administration core courses with grades of at least C in each 
course, or a grade of C or better in 301 A. Co-requisite: Business Admin 
301. Accounting information for management of manufacturing enter- 
prises; cost records; cost behavior and allocation; product costing and 
inventory valuation; flexible budgeting; standard costs; responsibility 
accounting; cost planning and control; and operating decision analysis. 

307 Accounting Information Systems (Formerly 407) (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 20 IB and completion of all lower-division 
business administration core courses with a grade of C or better in 
each course. Co-requisite: Business Admin 301. The organization and 
implementation of computer-bases for the collection, organization, and 
presentation of accounting information with an emphasis on enterprise 
resource planning systems. 

308 Concepts of Federal Income Tax Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 20 IB, and completion of all lower-division 
business administration core courses with grades of at least C in each 
course, or a grade of C or better in 301A. Co-requisite: Business Admin 
301. Provisions, legislative history and implications of the federal 
income tax. 

358 Principles of Taxation (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 A or instructor permission. The federal 
tax system, federal income taxation relating to federal tax system, 
federal income taxation relating to individuals, corporations, partner- 
ships, and fiduciaries. Federal estate and gift taxes. Not open to 
accounting majors. 

401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 30 IB with a grade of C or better, Business 
Admin 301. Business combinations; meaning, usefulness and method- 
ology of consolidated financial statements; investments in non-subsidiary 
affiliates and corporate joint ventures; consolidated financial statements 
for overseas units of U.S. -based multinational companies; translations 
of foreign currencies. 


ACCOUNTING 


402 Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 30 IB and 302 with grades of C or better 
and Business Admin 301. The auditing standards and procedures used 
by financial and operational auditors. Management information and 
computer systems, internal control, audit evidence, professional 
responsibilities and legal liabilities, standards of reporting financial 
information. 

403 Accounting for Governmental & Nonprofit Entities (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 30 IB with grade of C or better and 
business Admin 301. Fund accounting as applied to governmental 
and nonprofit entities; state and federal governments, municipalities, 
hospitals and universities. Budgets, tax levies, revenues and appropria- 
tions, expenditures and encumbrances, various types of funds, and 
accounting statements. 

408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 with a grade of C or better and 
Business Admin 301. Federal income tax as it applies to corporations, 
partnerships, fiduciaries, and federal estate and gift taxes as they apply 
to taxable transfers. 

420 Advanced Cost Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 302. This course covers advanced topics 
in accounting: strategic profitability analysis; cost allocation and 
resources; quality and Just-In Time Inventory; and investment deci- 
sions and management control. 

460 Seminar in Financial Statement Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites. Accounting 30 IB, Business Admin 301, Info Sys/Desc 
Sci 36 IB, or consent of instructor. Analysis of demand and supply 
forces underlying the provision of financial statements; distributional, 
cross-sectional and time series properties of financial statement numbers; 
financial decision-making processes and the uses of financial statement 
information for decision making. 

463 Financial Controls for Entrepreneurs (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 20 IB and Finance 320. Accounting 
system design for new ventures, including budgeting, purchasing, 
collections, payroll taxes, safeguards against error and embezzlement, 
financial reports, cash management, and banking relationships. 
Casework, research and fieldwork with selected local businesses. 

470 Tax Research, Practice and Procedures (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 with a grade of C or better and 
Business Admin 301. The methodology of tax research including case 
studies; the management of a tax practice; administration procedures 
governing tax controversies; rights and obligations of taxpayers and tax 
practitioners. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 30 IB (may be taken concurrently). 
Accounting 302, Business Admin 301, a concentration in accounting, 
consent of the department internship adviser, and at least junior stand- 
ing, 2.5 GPA and one semester in residence at the university. Planned 
and supervised work experience. May be repeated for credit up to a 
total of six units. Credit/No Credit only. 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, senior standing and approval of 
department chair. Open to qualified undergraduate students desiring 
to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 

Not open to students on academic probation. 

502 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 30 IB, classified CBE status. The effects of 
professional, governmental, business, and social forces on the evolution 
of accounting theory. 

503 Seminar in Contemporary Accounting Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.S. in Accounting status. Current issues 
in financial reporting including pronouncements by the Financial 
Accounting Standards Board and the Securities and Exchange 
Commission. Coverage of topics will change as new issues in 
accounting emerge. 

505 Seminar in Auditing (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 402 and classified CBE status. Auditing 
theory and practices; professional ethics; auditing standards; Securities 
and Exchange Commission and stock exchange regulations; auditor’s 
legal liability; statement trends and techniques. 

506 Seminar in Professional Accounting Communications (3) 

Prerequisite: classified M.S. in Accounting status. Compilation and 
composition of accounting reports and client presentations relating to 
accountants’ working papers, client engagement letters, management 
advisory reports and prospectuses. 

507 Seminar in Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 307 or equivalent. Case studies of computer 
based accounting systems used by organizations such as universities, 
banks, industrial corporations and CPA firms. Emphasis on accounting 
information, reports and internal controls. 

508 Seminar in Tax Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified CBE status. Substantive 
provisions of federal law; tax planning from a corporate viewpoint; 
case studies of the effect of federal tax law on business decisions. 

510 Financial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisite: classified CBE status. Accumulation, organization, and 
interpretation of financial and quantitative data relevant to the activities 
of corporate business enterprise. 

511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 20 IB or 510, and classified CBE status. 
Accounting information for management decisions; elements of 
manufacturing, distribution and service costs; cost systems; standard 
costs; cost reports; cost analysis. 


ACCOUNTING 


518 Seminar in International Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 20 IB or 511 and classified CBE status. 
Comparative analysis of accounting principles and practices outside the 
United States; international financial accounting standards; current 
problems of international financial reporting, accounting planning and 
control for international operations; multinational companies. 

521 Seminar in Administrative Accounting (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 302 or 511 and classified CBE status. 
Integrative aspects of accounting, financial, and quantitative data for 
managerial decision-making; long-term, short-term profit planning; 
budgetary control; cost analysis; financial analysis and planning; 
taxation; and transfer pricing. 

572 Seminar in Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified CBE status. Federal 
taxation relating to corporations; organizing, distributions, liquidations 
and reorganizations. 

573 Seminar in Taxation of Property Transactions (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified CBE status, or consent 
of instructor. Federal taxation relating to sales, exchanges and other 
transfers. 

574 Seminar in Taxation of International Business Operations (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified CBE status. Federal 
taxation relating to U.S. citizens and corporations with foreign source 
income and of foreign persons with U.S. source income; planning for 
foreign operations. 


575 Seminar in Estate, Gift, Inheritance Taxes and 
Estate Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified CBE status. Federal 
and California death taxes and the planning of personal estates. 

576 Seminar in State and Local Taxation (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified CBE status. Application 
of interstate income allocations; multi-state tax compact; separate 
apportionment accounting; foreign country sourced income. Also, 
California taxes as applied to businesses and individuals. 

577 Seminar in Taxation of Employee Compensation (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified CBE status. Federal taxation 
relating to employee compensation including pensions and profit 
sharing, stock options, ESOPs, IRAs, Keoghs, maximum tax 5-year 
averaging, death benefits, group term life, etc. 

578 Seminar in Taxation of Partnerships (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 308 and classified CBE status. Federal taxation 
relating to partnerships, estates, trusts and other special entities. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified CBE status. Directed independent inquiry. 

Not open to students on academic probation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified CBE status, approval of Department Chair 
and Associate Dean. May be repeated for credit. Not open to students 
on academic probation. 


ACCOUNTING 



INTRODUCTION 

Afro-Ethnic Studies is a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the black experience 
as it relates to life in America as part of a world community. In addition to degree programs in 
Afro-Ethnic Studies, the department provides course work in Ethnic Studies in general (e.g. 
Intercultural Socialization) and other specific ethnic groups (e.g. American Indian).The B.A. 
in Ethnic Studies (Afro-Ethnic Studies) requires a minimum of 120 units, which includes 
courses for the option, General Education, all University requirements, and free electives. 

The option consists of 30 units: 101 or 107, 190 and a minimum of 24 units in upper-division 
courses. Students majoring in the Afro-Ethnic Studies program acquire a special preparation in 
and sensitivity to life in America as a part of a world community. The program is multi-disciplinary 
in nature in that all aspects of Afro-Ethnic Studies affect and are affected by other programs. 

Graduates from the Afro-Ethnic Studies program go into careers in teaching, community 
development, community leadership, social work, urban research, law, civil service, industrial 
relations and a variety of comparable fields. Many have gone into graduate work in this field and 
some have entered more traditional disciplines where a general knowledge of social sciences and 
humanities is a prerequisite. 

INTERNATIONAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES IN AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 

The major in Afro-Ethnic Studies includes courses that examine non-African issues. Some of 
these courses are Introduction to Ethnic Studies, Intracultural Socialization Patterns, and History 
of Racism. Additionally, students are encouraged to participate in the California State University 
International Program (CSUIP); for example, in the Zimbabwe Program, students study in a 
majority black environment. Most course credits from the Study Abroad Program (CSUIP) are 
accepted for the major and enhance the college experience. 


DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Wacira Gethaiga 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Humanities 314 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://hss.fullerton.edu/afro 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies 
Option in Afro-Ethnic Studies 
Minor in Afro-Ethnic Studies 

FACULTY 

Stan Breckenridge, Wacira Gethaiga, 
Carl Jackson, J. Owens Smith, Julie Stokes 

ADVISER 

All programs: Wacira Gethaiga 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ETHNIC STUDIES (OPTION IN AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES) 

Lower-Division Courses (6 units required) 

Afro 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

OR Afro 107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

Afro 190 Survey of American History with Emphasis on Ethnic Minorities (3) 

Upper-Division Courses (24 units minimum) 

Core Courses (15 units required) 

(To be selected from the following courses) 

Afro 304 The Black Family (3) 

Afro 311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

Afro 317 Black Politics (3) 

Afro 320 Black Political Thought (3) 

Afro 322 Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 

Afro 335 History of Racism (3) 

Afro 346 African Experience (3) 

Afro 381 African Literature (3) 

Afro 424 Afro-American Literature (3) 


51 


AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 




Upper-Division Electives (9 units minimum) 

Afro 301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Afro 310 Black Women in America (3) 

Afro 312 American Indian Women (3) 

Afro 314 Pan-African Dance & Movement (3) 

Afro 32 1 Minority Community Development Planning (3) 

Afro 325 African-American Religions and Spirituality (3) 

Afro 337 American Indian Religions and Philosophy (3) 

Afro 356 Afro-American Music Appreciation (3) 

Afro 385 Schools and Minority Groups (3) 

Afro 430 A Social Psychological Study in Ethnic Minority Behavior (3) 
Afro 463 Seminar in Black Music (3) 

Afro 499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Upper-Division Writing Requirement (3 units) 

English 301 Advanced College Writing (3) 

MINOR IN AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 

Students interested in the Afro-Ethnic Studies minor are required to 
take a minimum of 2 1 units. This includes six units of lower-division 
courses and fifteen units of upper-division courses. 

Lower-Division Courses (6 units) 

Afro 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

OR Afro 107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

Afro 190 Survey of American History with Emphasis on Ethnic 
Minorities (3) 

Upper-Division Courses (15 units) 

Afro 301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

Afro 304 The Black Family (3) 

Afro 310 Black Women in America (3) 

Afro 311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

Afro 312 American Indian Women (3) 

Afro 314 Pan-African Dance and Movement (3) 

Afro 317 Black Politics (3) 

Afro 320 Black Political Thought (3) 

Afro 32 1 Minority Community Development Planning (3) 

Afro 322 Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 

Afro 325 African-American Religion and Spirituality (3) 

Afro 335 History of Racism (3) 

Afro 346 The African Experience (3) 

Afro 381 African Literature (3) 

Afro 385 Schools and Minority Groups (3) 

Afro 424 Afro-American Literature (3) 

Afro 430 A Social Psychological Study in Ethnic Minority Behavior (3) 
Afro 463 Seminar in Black Music (3) 

Afro 499 Independent Study (1-3) 


AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES 

Courses are designated as AFRO in the class schedule. 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 

The perspective through which people of color have come to see them- 
selves in terms of their own heroes, culture and contributions to societies 
in which they live and world society in general. (Same as Asian 
American Studies 101, Chicano Studies 101, Women’s Studies 101) 

107 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 

The aims and objectives of Afro-American studies. The basic terms and 
references that give substance to Afro-American studies. 

108 Linguistics and Minority Dialects (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 108) 

190 Survey of American History with Emphasis 
on Ethnic Minorities (3) 

(Same as History 190 and Chicano Studies 190) 

301 Afro-American Culture (3) 

African cultural characteristics in the New World and contemporary 
events, including art, ideas, dance and literature. 

304 The Black Family (3) (Formerly 309) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or completion of General Education 
category III.C.l. The American social conditions that shaped the black 
family from the African cultural patterns to the family that exists today. 
The roles of poverty, racism and discrimination. 

310 Black Women in America (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 
Issues in the study of black women in America, including social, political, 
economic and intellectual development. Historical and contemporary 
issues as they affect black American women will be investigated. 

(Same as Women’s Studies 310) 

311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 
Patterns of role learning as they vary within subpopulations; changes 
over time in the values, attitudes, and goals of both the general culture 
and of subcultures; stereotypes and realities; understanding and dealing 
with cultural variation as well as cultural “norms.” (Same as Human 
Services 311) 

312 American Indian Women (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. The 
female role in American Indian tribal lifestyles. Labor divisions, leader- 
ship, political and social activities from a number of tribes. Historical 
and contemporary issues, as they affect American Indian women. 

314 Pan- African Dance and Movement (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.B.l. 
or III.B.2. Theory and practice of movement of African and Haitian 
peoples. Movement (dance) as quasi-language in perpetuating the life 
style of African cultures and cultures of African descent. 


AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 


317 Black Politics (3) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 100 or consent of instructor. Blacks’ 
struggle for political equality and relief from political oppression. 

Public policies concerning blacks’ freedoms, liberties and property 
rights. (Same as Political Science 317) 

320 Black Political Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category I1I.B.2. 
A study of the black American intellectual from slavery to contemporary 
times, with special emphasis on black contributions to American political 
and social thought as well as their contributions in America’s social 
development. 

321 Minority Community Development Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Afro-Ethnic Studies 317 or permission of instructor. 
This course is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of political 
and economic development in minority communities. Emphasis is 
placed on conceptualizing problems and planning and designing 
problem-solving models to resolve them. 

322 Psychology of the Afro-American (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category 1II.C.1. 
Black identity and the life styles that have risen from racism. The 
socioeconomic, political, and cultural conditions which have fostered 

the blackness concept 
and the psychological 
devices used by blacks 
to survive. (Same as 
Psych 322) 

325 African-American 
Religions and 
Spirituality (3) 

Prerequisite: com- 
pletion of General 
Education Category 
1II.C.1. African- 

American belief systems and denominations. A study of folk beliefs 
among Blacks, African-American religious groups, and the role of the 
Black Church in politics and social change in the Black community. 
(Same as Comparative Religion 325) 

335 History of Racism (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. An 
investigation into the historical roots and current expressions of racism. 
Course focuses on how racism maniiests itself through individual, 
social, political, economic and religious institutions and proposes 
methods of combating it. 

337 American Indian Religions and Philosophy (3) (Formerly 437) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education category I1I.B.2 
Examination of American Indian religious and philosophic perspectives. 
Survey of religious interpretations and thought in various facets of 
belief ranging from traditional Indian religion to Christianity. 
Contemporary religious activities will be highlightened. Not available 
for graduate degree credit. (Same as Comparative Religion 337) 


346 The African Experience (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 
African history from the origin of the black man and traditional 
African civilization through the African diaspora to the institutional 
realities of Africa today. Not available for credit to students who have 
completed History 355. 

356 Afro-American Music Appreciation (3) (Formerly 460) 

Prerequisite: junior/senior standing. Black music in America; the 
sociological conditions that help produce various forms of black 
music. (Same as Music 356) 

381 African Literature (3) 

(Same as English 381 and Comparative Literature 381) 

385 Schools and Minority Groups (3) 

Prerequisite: junior/senior standing. Focuses on the ways in which 
the constraints of formal schooling affect the behaviors and attitudes 
of ethnic minority group members. Emphasizes the role of the 
community and family in school readiness and the psycho-logical 
consequences of schooling. 

400 Research and Writing in Ethnic Studies (3) 

(Same as Asian American 400 and Chicana/o 400) 

424 Afro-American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.B.2. The 
literary contributions by major black American authors. Contemporary 
black writers and the recurring themes of protest and quest for identity. 
Not available for graduate degree credit. (Same as English 424) 

430 A Social Psychological Study in Ethnic Minority Behavior (3) 

Prerequisites: junior/senior standing. The social psychological 
problems that ethnic minorities face such as stress-related problems 
in mental health. Society’s reactions to these problems among these 
groups. 

450 African History Since 1935 (3) 

(Same as History 450) 

457 West African and the African Diaspora (3) 

(Same as History 457) 

458 Southern Africa in the 20th Century (3) 

(Same as History 458) 

463 Seminar in Black Music (3) 

Prerequisite: junior/senior standing or consent of instructor. In-depth 
appreciation of Black American musical performance practices and 
musical styles such as Spirituals, Ragtime, Blues, Jazz, Gospel, and 
Rhythm & Blues through lecture, discussion, and demonstration. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance of the subject by 
department chair and instructor directing the study. 



AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Jesse Battan 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Education Classroom 622 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http ://hss . fullerton . edu/amst 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in American Studies 
Minor in American Studies 
Master of Arts in American Studies 

FACULTY 

Allan Axelrad, Jesse Battan, Wayne 
Hobson, John Ibson, Karen Lystra, Terri 
Snyder, Michael Steiner, Pamela Steinle, 
Scott Tang, Leila Zenderland 

ADVISERS 

Undergraduate: All full-time faculty 
within the department 

Graduate: Pamela Steinle 


INTRODUCTION 

American studies gives students a thorough understanding of the past and present nature 
of American civilization. Three central features of our approach are: (1) an emphasis on the 
analysis of culture-that shared system of beliefs, behaviors, symbols and material objects through 
which Americans give meaning to their lives; (2) examination of dominant culture patterns as 
well as the diversity of cultures in America; and (3) an interdisciplinary perspective that uses 
both the social sciences and humanities. 

Besides providing a rich liberal arts education, training in the major develops skills in writing 
and analysis and strengthens the ability to recognize connections among complex materials and 
diverse phenomena. American studies graduates enter careers in business, communications, 
government service, law, social services and teaching. The major is also a fine background for 
graduate work in the field or in related fields. 

Teaching Credential 

Because American Studies is interdisciplinary, the major may be effectively combined with 
subject matter studies necessary for either the multiple subject teaching credential (K-8) or 
single subject credential (7-12) in social science. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with 
the Center for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers 
to plan efficient course selections for general education, the major and electives. With careful 
planning, it may be possible to enter the credential program m the senior year of the bachelor’s 
degree. Postgraduate students should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the 
School of Education (714-278-3411) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation. 

Awards in American Studies 

The David Jon Vaca Memorial Scholarship of $500 is awarded every semester to an under- 
graduate major in American studies based on need and academic achievement. The Susan 
Flinkingshelt Memorial Award is given annually in recognition of outstanding services to the 
American studies department and student association. The Earl James Weaver Graduate Student 
Essay Prize of $250 is awarded annually for the best graduate paper in American studies. The 
Margarete Liebe Sekhon Graduate Scholarship in American Studies annually provides an award 
in the fall semester to a new student enrolled in the graduate program at CSUE 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The American Studies degree requires a minimum of 120 units which includes courses for 
the major, General Education, all University requirements, and free electives. The major consists 
of 36 units: 12 units in the core program and 24 units of electives following either Plan A or B. 

Core Program (12 units required of all majors) 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

301 American Character (3) 

350 Seminar in Theory and Method of American Studies (3) 

40 IT Proseminar in American Studies (3) 

Electives (24 upper-division units) 

Elective course work must be approved by the major adviser following either Plan A or B: 

A. Students may take all eight electives in American Studies courses or they may include up to 
four courses from other departments such as Afro-ethnic studies, anthropology, Chicano 


54 


AMERICAN STUDIES 


studies, communications, criminal justice, English, history, geogra- 
phy, political science, psychology or sociology. 

B. Course work pursuing a particular theme or subject, such as: law 
and society, sex roles, the visual arts, ethnicity, urbanization, region- 
alism, the child and the family, or popular culture. 

MINOR IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The minor in American Studies requires 21 units: American Studies 
201, 301 or 345, and 40 IT, plus 12 units of electives. Six units may be 
lower-division and three units may be taken in a related department 
upon approval of an American Studies Department adviser. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The graduate program is grounded in a thorough understanding of 
the concept of culture. It examines the creative tension between unity 
and diversity in the American experience, seeking ultimately to provide 
a full vision of our complex pluralistic culture. The program is interdis- 
ciplinary, requiring graduate students to integrate knowledge from the 
humanities and social sciences. It stresses the process of cultural 
change, requiring students to trace the past sources of contemporary 

issues. It develops 
advanced research, 
writing and analytical 
skills. Particular areas 
of faculty specialization 
within the department 
include: gender and 
sexuality; ethnicity; lit- 
erature, film, art, and 
architecture as cultural 
expression; American 
regions; popular 
culture; and cultural 
radicalism. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 
http:/Avww. fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

A student must meet the all-university requirements for admission. 
(Please consult the appropriate section of this catalog for complete 
information.) In addition, a student must (1) hold a bachelor’s degree 
with a major, or its equivalent, in American studies or in an appropriate 
discipline of the humanities or social sciences; (2) have a grade -point- 
average of at least 3.0 in upper-division major courses; and (3) submit 
two satisfactory letters of recommendation from instructors in upper- 
division major courses. 

Students whose undergraduate program indicates certain limited 
subject, grade, or breadth deficiencies may be considered for admis- 
sion, at the discretion of the graduate adviser, with approval of the 
departments graduate committee. In such cases, a student must make 
up deficiencies, in consultation with the graduate adviser, and must 
complete all required courses with at least a B average before classified 
graduate standing may be considered. 


Graduate Standing: Classified 

Students will be classified upon fulfillment of the above prerequisites 
and after development of an approved study plan. 

Study Plan 

The program requires 30 units of graduate study: 2 1 units in the 
discipline of American studies, six units in other disciplines and three 
units in the development of an appropriate research skill. 

American Studies (21 units) 

A. Required courses 

American Studies 501 Theory and Methods (3) 

American Studies 502T Seminar: Selected Topics (3) 

(May be repeated for credit with different topic) 

B. Electives 

Additional upper-division or graduate level course work in 
American studies (12) 

Choose either Cor D as follows: 

C. American Studies 598 Thesis (3) should be taken in the semester 
immediately preceding graduation from the program. 

D. An additional American studies graduate level elective, i.e., American 
Studies 599, American Studies 502T or American Studies 503, plus 
successful completion of a three-part take home comprehensive 
examination based on the department’s core reading list. 

Other Disciplines (6 units) 

Graduate-level seminars in anthropology, art, communications, 
comparative literature, English, geography, history, political science 
or sociology. Pedogogical and productions skill seminars are excluded. 
Students should select outside discipline seminars in consultation with 
the graduate advisor. 

Elective Skill (3 units) 

A student must demonstrate proficiency in a methodological skill 
appropriate to his or her scholarly interests. In consultation with an 
adviser, the student will select the skill to be developed. Proficiency 
in a foreign language, quantitative methods or linguistics would, for 
example, be appropriate. If prerequisite work is necessary before a 
student can develop proficiency through three units of course work, 
that preliminary work will not be counted toward the 30 units 
required for the M.A. degree. 

For further information, consult graduate program adviser. 

AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

Courses are designated as AMST in the class schedule. 

101 Introduction to American Culture Studies (3) 

The concepts of interdisciplinary culture studies, focusing on analysis 
of cultural change in complex, literate society, American culture, 
including cross-cultural comparisons. Topics include popular culture, 
subcultures, regionalism, myths and symbols, and culture and personality. 

201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

With the concept of culture as a unifying principle, focus is on four 
separate time periods in order to provide the framework for an under- 
standing of American civilization. Several different kinds of documents 
will be used to illustrate the nature and advantages of an interdisciplinary 
approach. 



AMERICAN STUDIES 


300 Introduction to American Popular Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III. C.l. 

A historical exploration of popular culture in America as it both reflects 
and contributes to the search for meaning in everyday life. Themes 
include heroes, myths of success, symbols of power, images of romance, 
consumerism, race and sexual identity. 

301 American Character (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category III.C.l. 
Cultural environ- ment and personality. The extent to which there have 
been and continue to be distinctly American patterns of belief and 
behavior. Similarities, as well as class, ethnic, sex, and regional 
differences among Americans. 

312 Multicultural Identities and Women’s Experience (3) 

Examination of the diversity of women’s experiences, focusing on 
both historical and contemporary analysis of African American, Asian 
American, Latina, and white ethnic women. Course materials include 
autobiography, fiction, visual and popular arts, and feminist cultural 
criticism. (Same as WMST 312) 

318 Hollywood and America: Using Film as a Cultural Document (3) 

An examination of Hollywood as a cultural institution. Concentrating 
on the films of selected periods, the course analyzes Hollywood’s ability 
to create and transmit symbols and myths, and legitimize new values 
and patterns of behavior. 

345 The American Dream (3) 

An interdisciplinary analysis, in settings both historical and contem- 
porary, of the myth and reality surrounding the notion of America as 
a land of unparalleled and unlimited possibilities, especially in the 
achievement of personal material success. 

346 American Culture Through Spectator Sports (3) 

Study of the shifting meaning of organized sports in changing 
American society. Includes analysis of sports rituals, symbols and 
heroes. Focus is on the cultural significance of amateur and profes- 
sional football, baseball, and basketball. 

350 Seminar in Theory & Method of American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or consent of instructor. 
To provide an understanding and appreciation of methodology, theories 
of society, and images of humanity as they affect American studies 
contributions to scholarship. Fulfills the course requirement of the 
university upper-division baccalaureate writing requirement for 
American studies majors. 

377 Prejudice and American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing. Concepts and methods of 
American culture studies as tools for better understanding the origins 
and appeal of intolerance, past and present. Particular focus on racism, 
ethnic and religious bias, sexism, and homophobia. 

40 IT Proseminar in American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: American Studies 201 and 301; or consent of instructor. 
The relationship between theory and application. Analytic readings and 
research. Check the class schedule for topics being considered. May be 
repeated for credit. 


402 Religion and American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: upper division standing. An interdisciplinary analysis 
of the religious dimensions of American core culture from colonial 
settlement to the present. Topics include: Puritanism; rationalization, 
secularization, and feminization; the conversion experience, revivalism, 
and revitalization; fundamentalism and modernism; and civil religion. 

405 Images of Crime & Violence in American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or completion of general education 
section on American history, institutions and values. Cultural analysis 
of meanings ascribed to law and order, authority, violence, and punish- 
ment in the American past and present. Examined in selected symbols, 
images, traditions, and realities. 

407 American Humor (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or completion of general education 
section on American history, institutions, and values. Analyzes the 
cultural significance of various types of American humor in past and 
present settings. How humor reinforces existing culture and also serves 
as an index and agent of cultural change. Humor’s relationship to 
ethnicity, region, social class, and sex. 

413 The Shifting Role & Image of the American Male (3) 

The effect of economic, social, political, and cultural changes on 
American males. Emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. 

416 Southern California Culture: A Study of American 
Regionalism (3) 

Regionalism as a concept and as a fact of American life. Theories 
of regionalism measured against a study of Southern California and 
one other distinct American region. 

419 Love in America (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. 
Examines changes in the emotional lives of American men and women 
from the 17th century to the present. Concentrates on enduring and 
innovative views on the nature of love and the cultural forces that 
shape its legitimate and illegitimate expression. 

420 Childhood and Family in American Culture (3) 

Historical and contemporary culture study of childhood and family 
in America. The idea of childhood, changing concepts of child-rearing, 
growing up in the American past, the impact of modernization, mother 
and home as dominant cultural symbols. 

423 The Search for Community (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing. Examining the historical 
transformation and modem reformulation of community in America, 
the course emphasizes the relationship of the individual to the larger 
social group. Topics include: freedom, need to belong, alienation, and 
search for identity. 

433 Visual Arts in Contemporary America (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or completion of general education 
section on American history, institutions and values. Visual phenomena 
in America as they reveal changes in recent American culture. Areas 
covered include: the “high” arts (painting, sculpture) as contrasted 
with the “low” arts (advertising, television); the artist as innovator, 
alienation, the business world, and American values in art. 


AMERICAN STUDIES 


438 American Minds: Images of Sickness and Health (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing. Historically explores cultural 
changes in American images of the healthy mind. Topics include: 
medical and legal views of insanity, Freud’s impact on American 
thought, literary treatments of madness, and psychological themes 
in American popular culture. 

440 American Folk Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. 
Considers American culture from the perspectives of particular folk 
groups and through the eyes of the “common” person, past and 
present. Topics include: interpretation of artifacts and oral traditions; 
relationships between regional, ethnic, and folk identity; modernization 
and folk consciousness. 

442 Television and American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the general education section of American 
history, institutions, and values. American television as an interactive 
form of cultural expression, both product and producer of cultural 
knowledge. Examines the structure and content of television genres, 
and social-historical context of television’s development and use, 
audience response, habits and environments of viewing. 

444 The Built Environment (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. 
Examines how Americans have shaped and structured space from the 
17th century to the present. Emphasizes the relationship between 
space, place, architecture, and material culture; the interpretation of 
cultural landscapes and architectural styles; the changing meanings 
of the American home. 

449 The American West in Symbol and Myth (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or completion of general education 
section on American history, institutions, and values. The meaning of 
the West to American culture through analysis of cultural documents 
such as explorer and captivity narratives, fiction, art, and film. Topics 
include: perception of wilderness, Indians, frontiersmen, and role of 
the West in creating a sexist national mythology. 

450 Women in American Society (3) 

Socio-cultural history of women and women’s movements in 
American society. Emphasis on 19th and 20th centuries. Examination 
of cultural models of American womanhood-maternal, domestic, 
sexual, social-their development and recent changes. Not available 
for graduate degree credit. 

460 Bohemians and Beats: Cultural Radicalism in America (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or completion of the general 
education section on American history, institutions, and values. 
Examines the ideas, activities, and legacies of the creators of a “counter- 
cultural” tradition in the 19th and 20th centuries. Explores their critique 
of modem civilization as well as their projects for self-transformation, 
social change, and cultural renewal. 


465 The Culture of the American South (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or completion of the general 
education section on American history, institutions, and values. Examines 
distinctive cultural patterns in the American South, past and present. 
Topics include: Southern concepts of work and leisure, race and 
gender roles, political and religious controversies, literature and 
folklore, and the South as portrayed in the media. 

468 Culture in Turmoil: 1960s America (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing. Origins, manifestations, and 
continuing significance of the turbulence in American culture associated 
with the 1960s. Accelerated changes which occurred (or seemed to 
occur) in cultural meanings of authority, achievement, patriotism, 
sexuality, technology, and consciousness. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in American studies to be taken with 
the consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated for 
credit. 

501 Theory and Methods (3) 

The American Studies movement. Its conceptual and methodological 
development. The way this development was affected by and in turn 
reflected larger trends in the culture itself. 

502T Seminar: Selected Topics (3) 

A particular problem or topic as a case study in the use of interdis- 
ciplinary methods in American studies. May be repeated for credit. 

596 American Studies Teaching Tutorial (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 501. Preparation for community 
college or university teaching. Small group discussion, lecture-discussion, 
examinations, teaching strategies. Enrollment requires approval of 
American Studies graduate coordinator. Course may be repeated for 
credit, but may only count once on a graduate study plan. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in American studies and consent 
of graduate coordinator. The writing of a thesis based on original 
research and its analysis and evaluation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in American studies and consent 
of graduate coordinator. May be repeated for credit. 


AMERICAN STUDIES 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Susan Parman 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

McCarthy Hall 426 

ANTHROPOLOGY MUSEUM 

McCarthy Hall 424 

CENTER FOR CALIFORNIA 
PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY 

McCarthy Hall 212 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

McCarthy Hall 420 

BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 
LABORATORY 

McCarthy Hall 428 

CENTER FOR ETHNOGRAPHIC 
CULTURAL ANALYSIS 

McCarthy Hail 422 

SOUTH CENTRAL COASTAL 
INFORMATION CENTER 

McCarthy Hall 477 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://anthro.fullerton.edu 


INTRODUCTION 

Anthropology is the scientific study of humankind from its beginnings, millions of years ago, 
to the present day. Nothing human is alien to anthropology. Of the many sciences that study 
certain aspects of our species, only anthropology attempts to understand the whole panorama, 
in time and space, of the human condition. While other academic disciplines may concentrate 
on one aspect of human experience, anthropology is an integrated study of the whole range of 
human activities, including communication and language, economics, political organization, 
religion, the arts, philosophy, education, medical and nutritional practices, social interaction, 
marriage, child rearing, science, and technology. Anthropology enables the study of people from 
all over the world as they live now, as they lived in the prehistoric and historic past, and as they 
may live in the future. Anthropology also studies people as biological-psychological-cultural- 
social wholes living in relationship with their environment; a major goal is to understand human 
beings from this overall perspective. 

The major in Anthropology is designed to prepare students for advanced degrees in 
Anthropology as well as for positions in the private and public sector. Social service occupations, 
work in urban centers, museum work, health professions, natural resources management, and 
overseas work are some of the areas that offer many opportunities for anthropology graduates. 

International Aspects of Anthropology 

Anthropology is inherently international in scope, drawing on world-wide cross-cultural 
comparisons for understanding culture and what it means to be human, and offers an inter-, 
multi-, and trans-disciplinary perspective to promote an understanding of global networks that 
occur in transnational cultural contexts such as ethnicity, business, religion and education. 
Anthropology studies the global flow of information and channels of communication that cross 
spatial, national-territorial boundaries; and it studies transnational actors who enter into the 
spaces opened up by the intersection of corporate capital, labor mobility and new information, 
communication, and transportation technologies. The department encourages study in different 
cultures and will provide, where appropriate, academic credit for educational experiences abroad. 


PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology 
Minor in Anthropology 
Master of Arts in Anthropology 

FACULTY 

John Bock, Colleen Delaney-Rivera, 
Phyllisa Eisentraut, Laura Greathouse, Sara 
Johnson, Hilarie Kelly, Joseph Nevadomsky, 
Jacob Pandian, Susan Parman, Lori Sheeran, 
Judy Suchey 

ADVISERS 

Undergraduate: All full-time faculty 
Graduate: Jacob Pandian 

Internship Program Adviser: 

Hillarie Kelly 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology requires a minimum of 120 units which includes courses 
for the major. General Education, all University requirements, and free electives. The major 
requires 45 units consisting of core courses, upper-division courses, and elective course work. 

Core Courses (15 units) 


Anthro 101 
Anthro 102 
Anthro 103 
Anthro 480 
Anthro 481 


Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3) 
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 
Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

History of Anthropology (3) 

Contemporary Anthropology (3) 


Upper-Division Requirements (9-30 units) 

Anthro 400 Cultural Analysis: Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3) 
Anthro 401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 

Anthro 402 Museum Studies (3) 

Anthro 403 Archaeological Fieldwork (3) 


58 


ANTHROPOLOGY 


Anthro 404 
Anthro 405 
Anthro 406 
Anthro 407 
Anthro 408 
Anthro 409 
Anthro 412 
Anthro 414 
Anthro 416 
Anthro 417 
Anthro 418 
Anthro 420 
Anthro 423 
Anthro 424 
Anthro 425 


Analytical Methods in Archaeology (3) 

Human Osteology (3) 

Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

Anthropological Video Production (3) 

Ethnogerontology (3) 

Applied Anthropology (3) 

Culture Change (3) 

Economic Anthropology (3) 

Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Life Quests (3) (formerly 317) 

GIS and Archaeology (3) 

Visual Anthropology (3) 

The Ancient Maya (3) (formerly 324A) 

The Aztecs and Their Predecessors (3) (formerly 324B) 
Advanced Topics in Human Osteology (3) 

Anthro 441 Human 
Variation (3) 

Anthro 442 Medical 
Anthropology (3) 

Anthro 460 Public 
Archaeology in 
California (3) 

Anthro 470 Survey 
of Anthropological 
Films (3) 

Anthro 475 Research 
Methods in 
Primatology (3) 



Anthro 476 Archaeological Investigations (3) 

Anthro 490T Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology (3) 

Anthro 491 Internship in Anthropology (3) 

Anthro 497 Ethnographic Investigations (3) 

Anthro 498 Museum Practicum (3) 

Anthro 499 Independent Study (3) 

Electives (0-21 units) 

Anthro 100 Non-Western Cultures and The Western Tradition (3) 
Anthro 300 Language and Culture (3) 

Anthro 301 Primate Behavior (3) 

Anthro 304 Traditional Cultures of the World (3) (formerly 104) 
Anthro 305 Anthropology of Religion (3) 

Anthro 306 Comparative Aesthetics and Symbolism (3) 

Anthro 308 Culture and Aging: Anthropological Gerontology (3) 
Anthro 310 Urban Anthropology (3) 

Anthro 311 Culture and Communication (3) 

Anthro 313 Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3) 
Anthro 315 Culture and Nutrition (3) 


Anthro 320 
Anthro 32 1 
Anthro 325 
Anthro 327 
Anthro 328 
Anthro 329 
Anthro 332 
Anthro 340 
Anthro 344 
Anthro 345 
Anthro 347 
Anthro 350 
Anthro 360 
Anthro 370 


Cultures of Europe (3) 

The American Indian (3) 

Peoples of South America (3) 

Origins of Civilization (3) 

Peoples of Africa (3) 

Peoples of the Caribbean (3) 

Women in Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3) 
Peoples of Asia (3) 

Human Evolution (3) 

Peoples of the Middle East and North Africa (3) 
Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Culture and Education (3) 

Contemporary American Culture (3) 
Anthropology of Non- Western Films (3) 


With the approval of the adviser or department chair, up to nine 
units may be accepted from related disciplines. 

Note: all courses under “Upper-Division Requirements” are 400- 
level courses. They are courses intended for junior, senior and graduate 
students. Courses under “Electives in Anthropology” are 100-level or 
300-level. They may be taken by all students except graduate students. 


Multiple and/or Single Subject Credential Information 

The Anthropology degree may be effectively combined with subject 
matter studies for either the multiple subject credential (K-8) or single 
subject credential (7-12) in Social Science. Undergraduates are encour- 
aged to work with the Center for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) 
as early as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course 
selections for general education, major and electives. With careful plan- 
ning, it may be possible to enter the credential program in the senior 
year of the bachelor’s degree. Postgraduate students should contact the 
Admission to Teacher Education office in the School of Education 
(714-278-341 1) to obtain information on attending an overview 
presentation. 


MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

Twenty-one units must be taken to fulfill requirements for a minor. 

Core Courses (12 units) 

Anthro 101 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3) 

Anthro 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

Anthro 480 History of Anthropology (3) 

Anthro 481 Contemporary Anthropology (3) 

Additional Courses (9 units) 

Nine units of 300- or 400-level courses in anthropology. 


MASTER OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The program offers advanced study of general anthropology, while 
simultaneously encouraging specialization in one (or more) of the 
traditional subdisciplines: archaeology, cultural anthropology, linguistics, 
and biological anthropology. Opportunities for field and laboratory 
research and for other related learning experiences permit students to 
enlarge upon formal classroom training and to work independently 




ANTHROPOLOGY 


with original data. Students may pursue a thesis or project of either a 
traditional or more exploratory character. Efforts are made to assist 
individuals to plan programs that will meet their individual needs and 
interests. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Prerequisites 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for conditionally 
classified graduate standing: a baccalaureate from an accredited institu- 
tion and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester 
units attempted (see section of this catalog on admission of graduates 
for complete statement and procedures). Admission is contingent upon 
evaluation and acceptance by the Graduate Study Committee. In addi- 
tion to the University Application, the applicant must submit a letter 
of intent and at least two letters of recommendation. Students with 
limited subject or grade deficiencies may be considered for admission 
to the program if they agree to complete additional courses selected by 
the Graduate Study Committee, with at least a 3.0 (B) average. Subject 
deficiencies must be met prior to candidacy. Students entering from 
other colleges and universities and/or from fields other than Anthropology 
may discuss appropriate course substitutions with the graduate adviser. 

Classification 

A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified 
graduate standing, as well as the following requirements, may be 
granted classified graduate standing upon the development of an 
approved study plan: 

1 . A bachelors degree with a minimum of 27 units in anthropology, 
including the following courses or their equivalents. 

Lower-Division (9 units) 

Anthro 101, 102 and 103 

Upper-Division (12 units) 

Anthro 480 and 481 

Additional upper-division coursework in Anthropology (6 units) 
Reading courses and special examinations may be substituted for 
the additional upper-division coursework in Anthropology. 

2. A GPA of 3.0 (B) for all work taken in Anthropology. 

3. Classification review administered by the graduate adviser. 

Study Plan 

The 30-unit study plan for the degree must include the following: 
Anthro 501 Seminar: Methodology of Anthropological Research (3) 
Anthro 502 Contemporary Theory in Anthropology (3) 

Anthro 597 Project (6) or Anthro 598 Thesis (6) 

Two additional graduate seminars (Anthro 504) in Anthropology (6 units) 
400-level or graduate work in Anthropology (6 units) 

400-level or graduate work in Anthropology or related fields (6 units) 


Up to six units of Anthropology 599 Independent Graduate Research 
may be used for the last two requirements above. For continuation in 
the program an average of 3.0 (B) for all work in the study plan must 
be maintained. 

Students must remain continuously enrolled, either by enrolling 
in at least one Anthropology course each semester or by enrolling in 
Graduate Studies 700. Students may request a waiver of this require- 
ment for one or two semesters if professional purposes require absence 
from campus. A student who is not continuously enrolled will be 
required to apply for readmission to the program. 

A thesis or a project, including an oral examination, must be com- 
pleted for the degree. Anthropology 501 and 502 must be taken within 
the first 1-1/2 years of graduate work. 

The progress of graduate students will be reviewed prior to classifi- 
cation and again before advancement to candidacy. Students must 
demonstrate competence in a foreign language or quantitative methods. 

For further information, consult the graduate program adviser. See 
also the Department of Anthropology’s student handbook. 

ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES 

Courses are designated as ANTH in the class schedule. 

100 Non- Western Cultures and the Western Tradition (3) 

An examination of the changing views of man, nature and culture 
in Western civilization as related to the impact of non-Westem influ- 
ences, including the use and interpretation of data on non-Westem 
peoples and cultures. 

101 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3) 

Humans as biological organisms from an evolutionary perspective. 
Concepts, methods, findings and issues in the study of the Order 
primates, including the relationships among fossil monkeys, apes 
and humans, and the significance of genetic diversity in modern 
populations. (CAN ANTH 2) 

102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) 

The nature of culture and its significance. Uniformities and variations 
in human cultures. Cultural analyses of major institutional forms such 
as the family, economy, government, religion and art with an emphasis 
on preliterate peoples. Central problems of cultural comparison and 
interpretation. (CAN ANTH 4) 

103 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category I1I.C.1. 
Relationship of archaeology, culture history and culture process, field 
methods and analysis of archaeological data; the uses and abuses of 
archaeology. World culture history from Pleistocene beginnings to the 
threshold of civilization. (CAN ANTH 6) 

110 Ancient Peoples of the American Southwest (3) 

Introductory-level exploration of the lifeways of prehistoric peoples 
of the American Southwest as evidenced through archaeological 
remains and through Native American perspectives. 

300 Language and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 
Language as a factor in culture. Trends in the study of language and 
culture. 


60 


ANTHROPOLOGY 


301 Primate Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or 102 or Psychology 101 or completion 
of General Education Category III.A.2. The anthropological study of 
the behavior of primates including monkeys and apes with data collec- 
tion in the wild and the laboratory; review and discussion of behavioral 
characteristics that are part of the primate heritage of humankind. 

304 Traditional Cultures of the World (3) 

(Formerly Anthropology 104) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.B.2. A 
comparative, worldwide survey of traditional, selected and well-studied 
ways of life using ethnographic writings, novels and films. Examines 
representative bands, tribes, chiefdoms, primitive states and folk societies. 

305 Anthropology of Religion (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.B.2. 
Beliefs and practices in the full human variation of religious phenomena, 
with an emphasis on primitive religions. The forms, functions, struc- 
tures, symbolism, and history and evolution of religious systems. 

306 Comparative Aesthetics and Symbolism (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.B.2. The 
metaphysical and mystical systems underlying the “grammars” of the 
art, myths, and rituals of various nonliterate and literate peoples and 
their development into creative experiences. 

308 Culture and Aging: Anthropological Gerontology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 100 or 101 or 102 or 103. Anthropological 
discourse on diverse cultural conceptions of aging as they relate to 
gender, class, ethnic and religious categories. Cross-cultural comparison 
of culturally patterned time-table of life-cycle and age -grades for under- 
standing the universal and variability in human aging. 

310 Urban Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102. A cross-cultural investigation of similarities 
and differences in urbanism with an emphasis on current theoretical 
and methodological perspectives in the study of urban social and 
cultural forms and processes. 

311 Culture and Communication (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.B.2. How 
culture meaning and manipulation are constituted in both traditional 
and modem cultures through language, mythology, ritual, architecture, 
religion, and other communication systems. 

313 Culture & Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. The relationship 
between the individual and the culture. Child training in non-westem 
cultures. Survey of concepts, studies, and research techniques. 

315 Culture and Nutrition (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or 102 or consent of instructor. Interrelation- 
ships between human nutrition, basic food resources, individual 
development and socio-cultural organization; includes assessment 
of students nutritional status, beliefs, and practices relative to other 
cultures. 


320 Cultures of Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or equivalent. A cultural survey of Europe, 
focusing on the peasant, national, and pan-European traditions of 
Europe. Diverse anthropological approaches are used to examine 
changing boundaries of European identity from prehistory to the 
present “European Union.” 

321 The American Indian (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. North American 
Indians north of Mexico; origin, languages, culture areas, cultural 
history; the impact of European contacts. 

325 Peoples of South America (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. Central and 
South America. Representative cultural areas before and after contacts 
with Western countries. 

327 Origins of Civilizations (3) 

The development of civilization in both the Old and New Worlds 
in primary centers such as Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, 
China, Mesoamerica and Peru, and secondary centers such as the 
Aegean and Europe. 

328 Peoples of Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. A cultural survey 
of Africa. Description of selected cultures and aspects of culture before 
and after contact with non-Africans. 

329 Peoples of the Caribbean (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or equivalent. A survey of the various 
ethnic groups of the Caribbean, focusing on the description and inter- 
pretation of African, European, Asian and Amerindian cultural elements. 

332 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. The influence of 
biological determinants as they are shaped by cultural beliefs, values, 
expectations and socially defined roles for women. The changing role 
of women in industrial society. 

340 Peoples of Asia (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. A survey of Asian 
civilizations and cultural traditions, emphasizing the study of the per- 
sonality configurations in different culture areas, the analysis of the 
structure of Asian civilizations, and an examination of the peasant, 
tribal and ethnic groups of Asia. 

344 Human Evolution (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or completion of General Education 
Category Ill.A.2. Advanced primate evolution; the origin of Homo 
sapiens as evidenced in the fossil record and through biochemical 
and molecular studies. Evolutionary theory and problems in human 
evolution. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

345 Peoples of the Middle East and North Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. Interrelationship 
between culture, economy, political structure and belief system of 
selected cultures in the Middle East and North Africa. 


ANTHROPOLOGY 


347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. The indigenous 
peoples and cultures of the Pacific Islands, including Tahiti, Hawaii and 
Australia. The forces and processes contributing to social change in 
island communities and current problems being faced by them. 

350 Culture and Education (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 

The transmission of values, implicit cultural assumptions, and the 
patterning of education in cross-cultural perspective. American culture 
and development problems. 

360 Contemporary American Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. Application of 
anthropological methods, categories of analysis, and types of interpre- 
tation to American culture. Survey and critique of selected community 
studies and other kinds of relevant research. 

370 Anthropology of Non- Western Films (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 100 or 102 or 304 or consent of instructor. 
Comparative analytical study of commercial and non-commercial films 
and videos made by non-western people. Films and videos considered 
as cultural artifacts that are particularly revealing of the ways people 
conceive of themselves and their cultures. 

400 Cultural Analysis: Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102. An examination of the qualitative 
methods that are used in the analysis of culture; review of recent 
methodologies developed in the framework of semiotic, phenomeno- 
logical, and interpretive anthropology. 

401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthro 102 and six additional units of anthropology 
or consent of instructor. Anthropological field research by students on 
various problems using participant observation techniques. 

402 Museum Science (3) 

Methods, principles and techniques used in natural history, and 
small scientific and historical museums. Subjects covered include scope 
of exhibit and research collections, care and repair of specimens, acqui- 
sitions, storage and preparation of presentations in anthropological, 
historical, biological and paleontological museums. 

403 Archaeological Fieldwork (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthro 102 or 103 and consent of instructor. Excavation 
of a local archaeological site. Archaeological mapping, photography 
and recording. Laboratory methods of cataloging, preservation, 
description and interpretation of archaeological materials. Saturday 
field sessions. May be repeated once for credit as an elective. (1 hour 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

404 Analytical Methods in Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthro 103 and 403. The employment of physical 
data collecting techniques (e.g., photographic, paleo-magnetic) in the 
field and the analysis of artifact collections and data from previous field 
operations in the laboratory. May be repeated once for credit as an 
elective. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 


405 Human Osteology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Techniques in the basic identifi- 
cation of human skeletal remains. Aging, sexing, racing and stature 
reconstruction. For those interested in archaeology, hominid evolution 
and/or forensic science. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

406 Descriptive Linguistics (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 406) 

407 Anthropological Video Production (3) 

Prerequisite: six upper-division units of anthropology or consent of 
instructor. Planning, shooting, and editing videotapes relating to all 
sub-disciplines of anthropology. (1 hour lecture; 6 hours laboratory 
activities, demonstrations, and fieldwork) 

408 Ethnogerontology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Learning the methods of ethnoscience 
and interpretive semiotics for analyzing cultural knowledge and 
domains pertaining to aging. Training in ethnographic cultural analysis 
of aging for the production of ethnographies that focus on the symbols, 
taxonomies, paradigms, and themes of aging. 

409 Applied Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. The uses of 
anthropological skills and sensitivities in approaching contemporary 
human problems. Cultural change, organizational development, 
program planning and evaluation, the consultant’s role, and profes- 
sional ethics. 

412 Culture Change (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. Interrelations 
between cultural, social and psychological processes in the dynamics 
of culture growth and change. Impact of western technology on tribal 
and peasant societies. Anthropological contributions to the planning 
of directed sociocultural change in selected areas. 

414 Economic Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. The ethnology 
and ethnography of economic life, principally in non- Western societies; 
the operation of systems of production and distribution within diverse 
cultural contexts. 

416 Anthropological Linguistics (3) 

Nature and functions of language; language structure and change; 
classification of languages; use of linguistic evidence in anthropology. 
(Same as Linguistics 416) 

417 Life Quests (3) (Formerly Anthropology 317) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Contemporary ways to wisdom and 
humanness in cross-cultural and historical perspectives. New and 
comparative approaches to understanding the life cycle, development 
and fulfillment of individual personalities. 

418 GIS and Archaeology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 103 or equivalent course and junior or senior 
standing. This course is an introduction to the use of Geographic 
Information Systems as they apply to the study of archaeology. The 
course focuses on the spatial analysis of past cultural remains from 
anthropological perspectives. 


ANTHROPOLOGY 


420 Visual Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 100, 101, 102, 103, or equivalent. An exami- 
nation of the development of the field of visual anthropology and an 
analysis of the changing and diverse approaches to the use of visual 
media in representing and interpreting other cultures. 

423 The Ancient Maya (3) (Formerly Anthropology 324A) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102, 103 or consent of instructor. The archae- 
ology and ethnohistory of the Maya area of Southern Mesoamerica. 

The problems of initial settlement of the area and the “rise” and 
dynamics of ancient Maya civilization. 

424 The Aztecs and Their Predecessors (3) 

(Formerly Anthropology 324B) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102, 103 or consent of instructor. Archaeological 
survey of principal Mesoamerica pre-Columbian cultures north and 
west of the Maya area. The Aztecs and their predecessors, religion, 
art, architecture, intellectual achievements and the Olmec heritage. 

425 Advanced Topics in Human Osteology (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthro 405 and consent of instructor. Analytical 
methods stressing morphological examination of human bone in 
a laboratory setting (determination of human, prehistoric; analysis of 
fragmented and commingled remains; basic identification and report 
writing; pathological conditions). For those interested in archaeology, 
hominid evolution and/or forensic science. 

441 Human Variation (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 101. The processes underlying and the theories 
for the existence of the present variation between and within human 
populations. The genetics of human populations and the significance 
of racial classifications. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

442 Medical Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or 102 or Psychology 101. Human health 
and disease and their relationship to cultural practices, beliefs and 
environmental factors; histories of various diseases as factors of cultural 
change; health care delivery systems. 

451 Advanced Human Evolution (3) 

Prerequisites: Anthro 322 or 344 or Biology 274. Thus course uses 
life history theory to examine the evolutionary ecology of human 
behavior. Topics covered include the human life course, resource 
acquisition, parenting, and fertility. Computer labs utilizing eHRAF 
(Same as Biology 451) 

460 Public Archaeology in California (3) 

An archaeological survey of California, emphasizing the examination 
of recent scientific excavations. Analysis of new archaeological methods, 
current research specializations, responsibilities of the modem archae- 
ologist, and review of legislation affecting archaeology. 

470 Survey of Anthropological Films (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 100 or 101 or 102 or 103 or consent of 
instructor. Survey and analysis of the uses of film and video in anthro- 
pological research, teaching, theory, methodology. Films are studied not 
only for their anthropological content, but also as artifacts of western 
culture which reveal significant aspects of that culture. 


475 Research Methods in Primatology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 301 or completion of General Education 
Category III.A.3. This course prepares students to conduct advanced 
behavioral research on non-human primates. It focuses on research 
design, data collection techniques, ethical and other situations unique 
to captive or to field settings, statistics, literature resources, permits, 
and disease transmission. 

476 Archaeological Investigations (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or 103 or consent of instructor. 
Methodology and practice of archaeological fieldwork. May be 
repeated for credit. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

480 History of Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. The principal 
contributions of anthropologists 1850-1950; evolutionary, diffusionist, 
historical, particularist, configurationalist, and culture and personality 
approaches in anthropology. 

481 Contemporary Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or consent of instructor. Anthropologists 
from 1950 to the present; neoevolutionist, sociological, structuralist, 
psychological and symbolic approaches. 

490T Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in anthropology. May be 
repeated for credit. 

491 Internship in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisites: 18 upper-division units in anthropology and/or 
related fields. Career opportunities. On-the-job training under faculty 
supervision in museum, industry or governmental service. May be 
repeated for credit for a total of six units. 

497 Ethnographic Investigations (3) 

Prerequisite: Anthro 102 and Anthropology 401 or equivalent. 
Training in the methodologies of participant observation and interview 
techniques; investigation and description of cultural domains such as 
religion, health, economics, politics, and family and ethnic boundaries. 
May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six units. 

498 Museum Practicum (3) 

Prerequisite: at least 15 units of anthropology and consent of 
instructor. Practical experience in museum operations, using the 
facilities of the Anthropology Museum. Topics covered include exhibit 
preparation, membership and funding operations, catalogue prepara- 
tion and outreach activities. May be repeated for credit for a maximum 
of six units. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 units of anthropology and consent of 
adviser. Individual research project involving either library or field- 
work. Conferences with the adviser as necessary. Results in one or 
more papers. May be repeated for credit. 


ANTHROPOLOGY 


501 Seminar: Methodology of Anthropological Research (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology 
and/or graduate standing or consent of instructor. The contemporary 
methodological spectrum in anthropology and new trends in research 
planning and implementation. 

502 Contemporary Theory in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology 
and/or graduate standing or consent of instructor. The basic assump- 
tions and theoretical positions of leading contemporary anthropologists. 

504T Seminar: Selected Topics in Anthropology (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology 
and/or graduate standing or consent of instructor. The topic chosen 
and a general outline of the seminar is circulated prior to registration. 
May be repeated. 

507 Grammatical Analysis (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 507) 


597 Project (3,6) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The 
completion of a project derived from original field or laboratory 
research, and/or from library study. May be repeated for credit to 
a maximum of 6 units. 

598 Thesis (3,6) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. The 
writing of a thesis based on original field or laboratory research, 
and/or on library study, and its analysis and evaluation. May be 
repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 units. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Individual research involving field- 
work, laboratory, or library study, and conferences with a project 
adviser as necessary, and resulting in one or more papers. May be 
repeated for credit. 


ANTHROPOLOGY 


DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Larry Johnson 



DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Visual Arts 102 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://www.art.fullerton.edu 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Art 
Art History 
General Studio Art 
Teaching 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art 
Ceramics 
Crafts 

Creative Photography 
Drawing and Painting 
Entertainment Art/Animation 
Graphic Design 
Illustration 
Printmaking 
Sculpture 
Minor in Art 
Master of Arts in Art 

Drawing and Painting (including 
Printmaking) 

Sculpture 

Crafts (including Ceramics, Glass, 
Wood, Jewelry/Metalsmithing) 
Design (including Graphic Design, 
Illustration, Exhibition Design, 
Creative Photography) 

Art History 

Master of Fine Arts in Art 

Drawing, Painting, and Printmaking 
Sculpture 

Ceramics (including Glass) 

Crafts (including Jewelry/ 
Metalsmithing, and 
Woodworking) 

Design (including Graphic Design, 
Illustration, and Exhibition Design) 
Creative Photography 
Certificate in Museum Studies 


FACULTY 

Ana-Victoria Aenlle, Bryan Cantley, Ruth Capelle, John Carter, Kyung Sun Cho, Done 
Christjansen, Eileen Cowin, Cliff Cramp, John T. Drew, Joe Forkan, Maurice Gray, 

Charles Grieb, Arnold Holland, Jim Jenkins, Jade Jewett, Larry Johnson, Linda Kroff, 

Donald Lagerberg, Dana Lamb, Sergio Lizarraga, Clinton MacKenzie, Mike McGee, 

Theron Moore, Zena Pearlstone, Joanna Roche, Jerry Samuelson, Vincent Suez 

ADVISERS 

Undergraduate: Contact department office. 

Graduate: Mike McGee 

INTRODUCTION 

The Department of Art is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and 
Design. 

The Department of Art offers programs which include the scholarly fields of art history, 
theory, analysis and criticism; the studio fields of drawing and painting, entertainment art / 
animation, printmaking, sculpture, crafts (including jewelry, wood and metal), ceramics 
(including glass), graphic design, creative photography, illustration, and exhibition design; and 
the single subject teaching field of art education. 

Curricular plans for the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Fine Arts have been 
developed to meet the individual needs and interests of students in art. 

The general objectives of the programs are to provide a comprehensive learning environment 
which contributes conceptually and technically to the development of the art historian, the visual 
artist and the art teacher. Specifically, the programs provide opportunities for students to: (1) 
develop a knowledge and understanding of fundamental visual experience and concepts basic 
to many forms and fields of art; (2) develop a critical appreciation of historical and contempo- 
rary art forms as they relate to individual and social needs and values; (3) creatively express one’s 
personal experience and thought with visual skill and clarity; (4) develop knowledge and skills 
necessary to pursue graduate studies in visual arts, or to teach art and (5) develop the under- 
standing and expertise applicable to professional practice. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ART 

The 120-unit Bachelor of Arts degree offers concentrations in Art History, General Studio Art 
and Teaching. The program objectives are to provide correlative experiences, information and 
theory. 

The Art History concentration emphasizes the area of art history, theory, and appreciation 
and is particularly recommended for those students who wish to pursue graduate studies 
in art history or museum studies. 

The General Studio Art concentration is a varied curriculum that provides a broad education 
in the visual arts. 

The Teaching Concentration prepares students to meet the requirements for admission to the 
Credential Program teaching art, grades K-12. Students are encouraged to work with the depart- 
ment adviser and/or the Center for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in 
their academic careers to plan efficient course selections for general education, major and electives. 

In addition to the requirements listed below for the major, students must meet the other 
university requirements for a bachelor of arts degree. Students in the Teaching Concentration 


65 


ART 



must also meet specific requirements for the desired teaching credential. 
All art majors must take Art 300, Writing in the Visual Arts, and pass 
the university’s Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP) after achiev- 
ing junior standing (60 units). Testing dates for the EWP are available 
from the Testing Center or the Academic Advisement Center. 

To earn a Bachelor of Arts in Art students must achieve grades 
of C or better in all art courses required for the degree. 

ART HISTORY CONCENTRATION 

Preparation for the major (lower-division - 21 units) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Lower-division studio courses (3,3) 

Approved electives in art, American studies, anthropology, history, 
literature, music, philosophy or theatre (3,3,3) 

The major (upper-division - 33 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts (3) 

Art 480T Selected Topics in Art History (3) 

Art 481 Seminar in Art History (3) 

Approved upper-division elective (3) 

Upper-division art history (21) 

GENERAL STUDIO ART CONCENTRATION 

Lower- Division (27 units) 

Art 103 Two-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art 104 Three-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art 107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art Electives (3,3) 

Select at least two courses from two of the following areas: design; 
printmaking; creative photography; sculpture; ceramics; crafts; drawing 
and painting. 

Upper-Division (27 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts (3) 

Art History (3,3) 

Studio Area (12 units) 

Select one course from each of the following: (1) drawing and 
painting; (2) sculpture, creative photography, printmaking; 

(3) crafts and ceramics; (4) design. 

Electives (3,3) 

Choose two courses from at least two different categories of the 
following: drawing and painting; printmaking; creative 
photography; sculpture; crafts (glass); ceramics; graphic design; 
illustration; exhibition design; art education. 


TEACHING CONCENTRATION 

Single Subject Instruction 

(Qualifies for Teaching Art in Grades K-12) 

Preparation for the major (lower-division-30 units) 

Art 103 Two-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art 104 Three-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art 106A Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Art 107A,B Beginning Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art 205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Art 207A Drawing and Painting (3) 

Major requirements (upper-division - 24 units) 

Select Drawing and Painting, Crafts or Creative Photography 
or Computer Design Emphasis. 

Drawing and Painting Emphasis 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts (3) 

Art 307A Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 310A Watercolor (3) 

Art 312 Modem Art (3) 

Art 317A Life Studies, Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 347A Printmaking Etching (3) 

Art 363B Illustration (3) 

Art 441 Media Exploration for Teaching Art (3) 

Crafts Emphasis 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts (3) 

Art 305A Advanced Crafts (3) 

Art 306A,B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) 

Art 312 Modem Art (3) 

Art 315A Jewelry (3) 

Art 363B Illustration (3) 

Art 441 Media Exploration for Teaching Art (3) 

Creative Photography and Computer Design Emphasis 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts (3) 

Art 338A,B Creative Photography (3,3) 

Art 363B Illustration (3) 

Art 441 Media Exploration for Teaching Art (3) 

Art 478 Studio Expanded: Other Genre (3) 

Art History (3) 

Select one course from the following: 

Art 423 Computer Animation (3) 

Art 483E Computer Assisted Graphics (3) 

Art 483F Design for Interactive Art (3) 


ART 


Credential Requirements 

The B.A. in An (Teaching Concentration) may be effectively com- 
bined with subject matter studies necessary for either the multiple 
subject teaching credential (K-8) or single subject credential (7-12) in 
art. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the faculty adviser 
in art and the Center for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early 
as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course selections 
for general education, the concentration and electives. With careful 
planning it may be possible to take certain education courses in the 
senior year of the bachelor’s degree. Postgraduate students should 
contact the Admission to Teaching Education office in the School of 
Education (717-278-3411) for information on attending an overview 
presentation. 

General Program Requirements 

1. Be advised by a faculty adviser in art education. 

2. Fulfill credential requirements listed in the credential program 
section of the catalog (see “Teacher Education” or “Credentials” 
in the index). 

3. Meet the require- 
ments listed under 
the Teaching Con- 
centration. 

4. Apply and be 
admitted to a cre- 
dential program 
prior to enrollment 
in Art Ed 442, pro- 
fessional education 
courses and student 
teaching. Contact 
the Admission to 

Teaching Education office in the School of Education. 

5. Be accepted for teacher education and student teaching based on 
candidate quotas, portfolio review, and evidence of success in 
completed university course work. 

6. Be recommended by the faculty adviser in art education. 

7. Complete Secondary Education prerequisites 310 and 320 or 
equivalents prior to applying to the teacher education program 
for the Single Subject credential. 

8. Pass C-BEST exam prior to admission to the credential program. 

9. Complete Secondary Education prerequisites 330, 340 and 404/407 

before extern semester. 

10. Have a G.P.A. of 2.89 overall, 3.0 in major. 

Single Subject Credential Preparation 

First semester (extern): 15 units 
Second semester (intern): 15 units 

Upon completion of above program the student is eligible for a 
partial or preliminary credential. A clear credential requires nine 
additional units of state-mandated courses within a specified period 
of time. 


Multiple Subject Credential Preparation 

The following three courses are recommended for all students 
intending to teach in the elementary schools in multiple subject class- 
rooms. 

Art 380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Music 333 Music and Child Development (3) 

Theatre 402 Dramatic Activities for Children (3) 

The following additional list of courses would be strongly recom- 
mended for students who wish to expand their knowledge in any 
or all of the arts: 

Art 101, 103, 104, 106A, 107A, 201A,B, 310A,B, 330, 380, 441 
Dance 101, 112, 122, 132, 142, 323A,B, 422 
Music 111, 281B,P,S,W, 283 

Theatre 100, 263A,B, 276A, 277, 370A,B, 402A,B, 403A,B 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN ART 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is a professional program providing 
directed studies in nine studio concentrations within the visual arts. 

The program is designed for students seeking in-depth preparation for 
specialized goals selected from one of the following areas: ceramics, 
crafts, creative photography, drawing and painting, entertainment 
art/animation, graphic design, illustration, printmaking, and sculpture. 

The program develops the understanding and advanced specialized 
skills applicable to professional practice and to meet entrance require- 
ments to graduate school. 

Admission Requirements 

Upon admission to the University as an art major, students are 
placed in the Bachelor of Arts category, whether entering as a freshman 
or transferring from a community college. Upon proof of completion of 
the 12 lower-division studio units listed below with a B or better grade- 
point average, students may contact the Art Department for changing 
their academic objective to the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art. 

Art 103 Two-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art 104 Three-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art 107A Beginning Drawing (3) 

Art 107B Beginning Painting (3) 

Program Requirements 

The 132-unit Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program requires a 
minimum of 81 units in art: The 12 units of studio art “Admission 
Requirements” plus 12 units of Art History and 57 units of studio art. 
The major is divided into 2 1 units of lower-division preparation and 
48 upper-division units. In addition to the minimum 69-unit 
requirement for the B.EA. degree, students must meet the other 
university requirements for a bachelors degree (see the University 
Catalog and Class Schedule). 

To earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art, students must achieve grades 
of C or better in all art courses required for the degree. 

In addition to Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts (*below), students 
must also take and pass the Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP). 



67 


ART 


CERAMICS CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division - 21 units) 

Art 106A,B Beginning Ceramics (3,3) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Lower-division studio electives (3,3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Art 306A,B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) 

Art 326A,B Ceramic Sculpture (3,3) 

Art 424A,B Glass Forming (3,3) 

Art 484A or 484B or Art 484C Special Studies (3,3,3) 
Upper-division art history (3,3) 

Upper-division studio art electives (3, 3, 3, 3) 

CRAFTS CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division - 21 units) 

Art 123 Descriptive Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art 205A,B Beginning Crafts (3,3) 

Lower-division studio electives (3,3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Art 305A,B Advanced Crafts (3,3) 

Select 12 units from: 

Art 306A,B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) 

Art 315A,B Jewelry (3,3) 

Art 330 Creative Papermaking (3) 

Art 364A,B Stained Glass (3,3) 

Art 485A,B,C, or F Special Studies in Crafts (3,3) 

Art 495 Internship in Art (3) 

Upper-division art history (3,3) 

Upper-division studio art electives (3, 3,3, 3) 

CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division -21 units) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art 238 Photo Visual Concepts (3) 

Art 247 Introduction to Linoleum and Woodcut Prints (3) 
Lower-division studio electives (3,3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Art 317A Life Studies, Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 338A,B Creative Photography (3,3) 


Art 348 Artists’ Books (3) 

Art 439 Creative Photo Studio Projects (3,3) 

Art 478 Studio Expanded: Other Genre (3) 

Art 489 Special Studies, Creative Photo (3,3) 
Upper-division art history (3,3) 

Upper-division studio art electives (3, 3, 3, 3) 

DRAWING AND PAINTING CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division - 21 units) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art 207A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Lower-division studio electives (3,3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Art 307A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Art 317A,B Life Studies, Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Art 487A Special Studies, Painting (3) 

Art 487B Life Studies, Drawing and/or Painting (3) 

Choose nine units from the following: 

Art 487A,B and/or C (3,3,3) 

Upper-division art history (3,3) 

Upper-division studio art electives (3, 3, 3, 3) 

ENTERTAINMENT ART/ANIMATION CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division - 21 units) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art & Civilization (3,3) 

Art 217 Life Drawing for Animation (3,3) 

Art 253 Introduction to Traditional Animation (3) 

Select one course from: 

Art 123 Descriptive Drawing (3) 

Art 263 Perspective Drawing (3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Select two courses from: 

Art 317A Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 317B Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 317C Sculpting Life Forms (3) 

Art 318A Drawing & Painting the Head and Hands (3) 
Art 318B Portraiture (3) 

Art 337 Animal and Wildlife Drawing (3) 

Art 353A,B Animation (3,3) 

Art 367 Elements of Sequential Art (3) 

Art 373 Cartooning and Caricature (3) 


68 


ART 


Select two courses from: 

Art 483B Pictorial Background (3) 

Art 487E Special Studies in Entertainment/Art Animation (3) 

Art 487S Special Studies in Sequential Art (3) 

Art History (3,3) 

Art Studio Electives and/or Interdisciplinary courses by approval (3,3) 

GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division - 21 units ) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art 223A,B Lettering and Typography (3,3) 

Lower-division studio electives (3,3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Art 323A,B Graphic Design (3,3) 

Art 338A Creative Photography (3) 

Art 363A,B Illustration (3,3) 

Art 483A Special Studies in Graphic Design (3,3) 

Art 483E Computer Assisted Graphics (3) 

Art 495 Internship (3) 

Upper-division art history (3,3) 

Upper-division studio art electives (3, 3, 3, 3) 

ILLUSTRATION CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division - 21 units) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 123 Descriptive Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art 223A Lettering and Typography (3) 

Lower-division studio electives (3,3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Art 317A,B Life Studies, Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Art 318A Drawing and Painting the Head and Hands (3) 

Art 323A Graphic Design (3) 

Art 363A,B Illustration (3,3) 

Art 483C Special Studies in Illustration (3,3) 

Art 495 Internship in Art (3) 

Upper-division art history (3,3) 

Upper-division studio art electives (3, 3, 3, 3) 

PRINTMAKING CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division - 21 units) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art 207A Drawing and Painting (3) 

Art 247 Introduction to Linoleum and Woodcut Prints (3) 


Lower-division studio electives (3,3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Art 307A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Art 317A,B Life Studies (3,3) 

Art 338A Creative Photography (3) 

Art 347A Printmaking Etching (3) 

Art 347B Printmaking Lithography (3) 

Art 487D Special Studies in Printmaking (3,3) 

Upper-division art history (3,3) 

Upper-division studio art electives (3, 3, 3,3) 

SCULPTURE CONCENTRATION 
Preparation (lower-division - 21 units) 

Art 117 Life Drawing (3) 

Art 201A,B Art and Civilization (3,3) 

Art 216A,B Beginning Sculpture (3,3) 

Lower-division studio electives (3,3) 

Concentration (upper-division - 48 units) 

Art 300 Writing in the Visual Arts* (3) 

Art 316A,B Sculpture (3,3) 

Art 317A,B or C Life Studies, Drawing and Painting and 
Sculpting Life Forms (3,3) 

Art 326A Ceramic Sculpture (3) 

Art 336A,B Casting Techniques and Theories of Cast Sculpture (3,3) 

Art 486A Modeling and Fabrication (3,3) 

Upper-division art history (3,3) 

Upper-division studio art electives (3, 3, 3, 3) 

MINOR IN ART 

Twenty-four units with a grade of C or better are required for a minor 
in art; a minimum of 12 units are to be in upper-division courses in 
residence. A basic course in each of the following areas is required: 

(1) art history, theory, analysis and criticism; (2) design; (3) drawing 
and painting, and (4) crafts. 

Recommended courses to meet the “basic courses” requirement are: 

(1) Art 201A or B; (2) Art 103 or 104; (3) Art 107A or B; (4) Art 106A 
or 205A. Completion of these courses will provide a reasonable foun- 
dation for entry into upper-division courses. Students planning to 
qualify for a standard teaching credential specializing in elementary 

or secondary teaching with art as a minor must obtain approval 
from the Art Department. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART 

This program provides a balance of study and practice for those 
who wish a career in the visual arts, or who want to prepare for further 
graduate work in the field. The program offers the following areas of 
concentration: (1) drawing and painting (including printmaking); 

(2) sculpture; (3) crafts (including ceramics, wood, glass, jewelry/ 
metalsmithing); (4) design (including graphic design, illustration, 
exhibition design, creative photography); and (5) art history. 


69 


ART 


Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information http:/Avww. 
fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Admission Requirements 

1 . Classified standing: 

a. A baccalaureate degree in art with the same concentration as 
the graduate degree objective from an accredited institution, 
or 24 upper-division units in art of which 12 units must be in 
a concentration completed with grades of B or better. Applicants 
are advised that most upper-division courses require lower- 
division prerequisites. A faculty adviser should be consulted 
with regard to recommended courses. 

b. GPA minimum of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted. 

c. Pass comprehensive review: Held semiannually, the comprehensive 
review is an evaluation of the candidate by a committee comprised 
of faculty teaching in the area of concentration. The committee 
reviews the student’s creative work, statement of purpose, 
academic and other relevant qualifications; assigned research 
papers are required of art history applicants in lieu of a portfolio. 
Procedures, dates and appointment times are available through 
the art department graduate office. 

d. Form a graduate committee. 

e. Development of an approved study plan. 

f. Art history program: reading knowledge of a foreign language 
is required before advancement to candidacy. 

2. Conditionally classified standing: The same requirements as a. and 

b. above plus: 

c. 1) Studio program: Participation in comprehensive portfolio 

review with a recommendation by the committee of 
conditional acceptance. 

2) Art History program: Satisfactory review of research 
papers by art history faculty. 

d. Enrollment is allowed in graduate-level courses with the exception 
of Art 500A,B; 511; 512; 597; and 598. 

e. Passing the comprehensive review will be required for 
classified standing. 

Study Plan 

The degree program requires 30 units of graduate study approved 
by the student’s graduate committee of which 15 units must be 500- 
level courses. The 30 units are distributed as follows: 

1 . Core courses in art history, philosophy, analysis and criticism (9 units) 

a. Studio program: 

Art 500A Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Art history program: 

Art 511 Seminar on the Content and Method of Art History (3) 
WITH CLASSIFIED STANDING ONLY) 


b. Studio Program: 

Art 500B Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Art history program: 

Art 512 Seminar on Selected Topics in Art History (3) 
(ADMISSION WITH CLASSIFIED STANDING ONLY) 

c. 400-level course in art history, theory, analysis or criticism on 
the recommendation of the major adviser. 

2. Concentration (12 units) 500-and/or 400-level courses in an area 
of concentration (minimum of six units at 500-Level) 

3. Additional course work in the area of concentration or approved 
electives (3 or 6 units) 

4. Art 597 Project (for studio); or Art 598 Thesis (for art history) 

(3 or 6 units) The M.A. study plan must be completed with no 
grade below C, a B average, and B or better in all courses in the 
area of concentration. Every graduate student is required to 
demonstrate writing ability commensurate with the baccalaureate 
degree. Two graduate seminars are certified to fulfill this university 
requirement. The Department of Art requires the studio candidate 
for the Master of Arts in Art to exhibit the project in one of the 
department’s graduate galleries. The art history candidate is 
required to submit a written thesis based on a specific topic of 
research. 

For further information consult the graduate program adviser and 
read the University Graduate Regulations section of this catalog. 

MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN ART 

The Master of Fine Arts in Art features a rigorous studio program 
for the serious, responsible and talented student. The curriculum and 
faculty challenge students to focus on the goal of becoming profes- 
sional artists. 

The M.E A. program provides in-depth study within a 60-unit 
approved study plan in the following areas of concentration: (1) design 
(including graphic design, illustration, and exhibition design); (2) 
ceramics (including glass); (3) crafts (including jewelry/metalsmithing, 
and woodworking); (4) sculpture; (5) drawing, painting, and printmaking; 
and (6) creative photography. 

Admission Requirements 

1 . Classified standing: 

a. Baccalaureate degree in art with the same concentration as the 
graduate degree objective from an accredited institution, or 24 
upper-division units in art, 18 of which must be in the concen- 
tration completed with grades of B or better. Applicants are 
advised that most upper-division courses require lower-division 
prerequisites. 

b. Minimum grade-point average of 2.5 in the last 60 units 
attempted and have been in good standing at the last college 
attended. 

c. Pass the comprehensive portfolio review: Held semi-annually, 
the comprehensive portfolio review is an evaluation of the 
candidate by a committee comprised of faculty teaching in the 
area of concentration. The committee reviews the student’s 
creative work, statement of purpose, academic and other 


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relevant qualifications. Procedures, dates, and appointment 
times are available through the An Department Graduate Office. 

If the student’s portfolio is not adequate, the applicant could 
still be recommended for conditionally classified standing by 
the faculty comprehensive review committee. However, the 
comprehensive portfolio review must be repeated. 

d. Form a graduate committee. 

e. Develop an approved study plan. 

2. Conditionally Classified standing: 

Conditionally classified students may enroll in graduate courses 
with the exception of Art 500A,B; 511, 512, 597; and 598. The 
comprehensive portfolio review must be repeated and passed to 
be recommended for classification. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information http://www. 
fullerton . edu/graduate/. 

Study Plan 

The M.E A. degree program requires 60 units of graduate study. The 
study plan must be completed with grades of C or better, an overall B 
average or better and grades of B or better in the concentration. Every 
graduate student is required to demonstrate writing ability commensurate 
with the baccalaureate. Two graduate seminars are certified to fulfill 
this university requirement. The 60-unit study plan is distributed as 
follows: 

Areas (60 units total ) 

Theory, Criticism: Art 500A, 500B (6) 

Art History (9) 

Studio Area of Concentration (24) 

Studio Electives in Art (12) 

Capstone Experience: 

Independent Study: Research (3) 

Studio Project (6) 

Master of Fine Arts Project 

The M.F. A. project exhibition constitutes a professional one-person 
art exhibit. It is installed in one of the department’s graduate galleries 
and announced for public view by the student as the final phase of the 
M.F A. program requirements. 

POSTBACCALAUREATE UNCLASSIFIED 

Students who do not have the prerequisites to qualify for the graduate 
program may apply to the university as a postbaccalaureate-unclassified 
student. Typically, students in this category have a bachelor’s degree in 
art but need to meet the prerequisites for a different concentration; or 
did not major in art and must complete courses for the 24 upper-division 
art unit requirement. To qualify for admission, an applicant must hold 
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution, have attained a 
grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 units attempted and 
have been in good standing at the last college attended. Admission 
with postbaccalaureate standing does not constitute admission to the 
art graduate program or graduate degree curricula. 


CERTIFICATE IN MUSEUM STUDIES 

Courses leading to the certificate are designed to educate students 
in museum practices in preparation for entry into the museum profes- 
sion. The curriculum includes instruction in the historical development 
and philosophical basis of collections, exhibitions and their design, and 
curatorship. A museum internship is required. The certificate in 
museum studies may be undertaken as a self-contained program or 
may be taken in conjunction with the Master of Arts in Art degree or 
the Master of Fine Arts in Art degree or, by special permission, with 
other graduate degrees in the university. (For an M.A. or M.E A. in Art 
degree with an exhibition design emphasis see M.A. and M.F A. 
emphases under the design concentration.) 

Prerequisites 

1. B.A. in Art or other major by special permission 

2. Specific course prerequisites: 

a. 12 units in upper-division art history 

b. 6 units in graphic design and exhibition design 

c. 3 units of advanced writing (Communications 435 Editorial 
and Critical Writing; or Communications 362 Public Relations 
Writing; or English 301 Advanced College Writing) 

d. 3 units of beginning accounting 

Study Plan 

The certificate program requires 24 units. The 24 units are distributed 
as follows: 

Art 464 Museum Conservation (3) 

Art 481 Seminar in Art History (3) 

Art 483D Exhibition Design (3) 

Art 495 Internship in Art (3) 

Art 501 Curatorship (3) 

Art 503D Exhibition Design (3,3) 

Course in museum education (3) 

For further information, consult the Department of Art. 

ART COURSES 

Courses are designated as ART in the class schedule. 

101 Introduction to Art (3) 

Historical and contemporary art forms of painting, sculpture, 
architecture and design. Field trips required. Not open to art majors 
for credit except by permission of Art Department. (3 hours lecture) 

103 Two-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art concepts, aesthetic elements and materials of two-dimensional 
design and visual organization. (6 hours activity) (CAN ART 14) 

104 Three-Dimensional Design (3) 

Art concepts, aesthetic elements and materials of three-dimensional 
design and spatial organization. (6 hours activity) (CAN ART 16) 

106A Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Form as related to ceramic materials, tools, processes. Kiln loading 
and firing, hand building, wheel throwing and raku. (9 hours laboratory) 
(CAN ART 6) 


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106B Beginning Ceramics (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 106A. Form as related to ceramics. Glaze batching 
and its application, and the presentation of ceramic technique. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

107A Beginning Drawing (3) 

Traditional and contemporary use of drawing materials integrated 
with visual experiences and art concepts. (6 hours activity) (CAN ART 8) 

107B Beginning Painting (3) 

Traditional and contemporary use of painting materials integrated 
with visual experiences and art concepts. (6 hours activity) 

115 The Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to the Blended Teacher Education program 
(BTEP). Survey of the visual and performing arts for individuals 
preparing to be teachers of children. Includes aesthetic perception, 
creative expression, arts heritage, and aesthetic valuing. 

117 Life Drawing (3) 

Drawing the live model. (3 hours activity) 

123 Descriptive Drawing (3) 

Descriptive drawing, rendering techniques and theories representing 
forms of nature. (6 hours activity) 

201 A Art and Civilization (3) 

The ideas, forms and styles of the visual arts as they developed in 
various cultures from prehistoric time to the present.(3 hours lecture) 
(CAN ART 2; 201A+201B = CAN ART SEQ A) 

20 IB Art and Civilization (3) 

The ideas, forms and styles of the visual arts as they developed in 
various cultures from prehistoric time to the present. (3 hours lecture) 
(CAN ART 4; 201A + 201B = CAN ART SEQ A) 

205A Beginning Crafts (3) 

Traditional and contemporary concepts and processes with emphasis 
on design principles in the development of aesthetic forms based on 
function. (9 hours laboratory) 

205B Beginning Crafts (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 and 205 A. Art 104 may be taken 
concurrently. The development of esthetic forms based on function, 
with emphasis on design principles and the creative use of hand tools 
and power equipment. (9 hours laboratory) 

207A,B Drawing and Painting (Experimental Methods and 
Materials) (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117 or equivalents. Traditional and 
contemporary concepts, methods and materials. (6 hours activity) 

216A,B Beginning Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Art 104. The creative use of wood and metal, power 
equipment and hand tools. (9 hours laboratory) (CAN ART 12) 

217 Life Drawing for Animation (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 117. A continuing course of the human figure. 
Designed to develop animation and student’s skills of drawing from 
observation. Course may be repeated for credit. (6 hours activity) 


223A Lettering and Typography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. The history, design and use of letter forms; 
the rendering and use of hand-lettered forms. (6 hours activity) 

223B Lettering and Typography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 223A. The history, design and use of letter forms; 
techniques for rough and comprehensive layouts and introduction to 
computer graphics. (6 hours activity) 

238 Photo Visual Concepts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103. An introductory photography course for art 
majors. Course content includes the study of photographic vision and 
design, visual conceptualization and examination of the qualities of 
light through the use of instant and automatic cameras. 

247 Introduction to Linoleum and Woodcut Prints (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B. An exploration of woodcut, linocut and 
monoprint as a medium of personal expression. (9 hours laboratory) 

253 Introduction to Traditional Animation (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, Art 104, Art 117, Art 217, or consent 
of instructor. Principles and practices of traditional animation tech- 
niques ranging from the fundamentals of squash and kinetics and 
acting. 

263 Perspective Drawing (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 107A, Art 123, equivalents or consent of instructor. 
Introduction to linear perspective systems used to develop and place 
natural and fabricated forms in space on a two-dimensional surface. 
Integrated with methods and techniques of rendering light, shadow 
and reflection on varied subject matter including the human figure. 

300 Writing in the Visual Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. Principles, practices and objectives 
of writing in the visual arts. Includes descriptive, analytical and 
expressive essays; project and grant proposals; artist’s statements; 
resumes; and professional correspondence. Satisfies the classroom 
portion of the upper-division writing requirements for art majors. 

301 Ancient Art (3) 

The developments in art from the Paleolithic to late antiquity. 

(3 hours lecture) 

302 Medieval Art (3) 

The developments in art from the late antiquity through the Gothic. 
(3 hours lecture) 

305A,B Advanced Crafts (3,3) 

Prerequisites: 205A and 205B. Advanced concepts and processes 
in the development of esthetic forms based on function, emphasizing 
individual growth and personal expression. (9 hours laboratory) 

306A,B Advanced Ceramics (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104 and 106A,B or consent of instructor. 
Forms and the creative use of ceramic concepts and materials; design, 
forming, glazing and firing. (9 hours laboratory) 


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307A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117, 207A,B or equivalents. The concepts, 
materials and activities of drawing and painting, emphasizing individual 
growth, plan and craft. (6 hours activity) 

310A,B Watercolor (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B or equivalents. An exploration of water- 
color media related to varied subject matter and design applications. 
Includes field trip activity. Provides skills and concepts useful for 
school art programs. (6 hours activity) 

311 Foundations of Modern Art (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division The history of painting and sculpture 
from the French Revolution to the end of the 19th century. (3 hours 
lecture) 

312 Modern Art (3) 

Prerequisite: upper-division standing. The history of painting, 
graphic arts and sculpture from late 19th century to World War II. 

(3 hours lecture) 

315A,B Jewelry (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 205A and 305A. Art 305A may be taken concur- 
rently. Design and creation of jewelry. (9 hours laboratory) 

316A,B Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 104 and 216A. Sculptural materials and processes. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

317A,B Drawing and Painting (3,3) 

Prerequisites: three units lower-division life drawing. Drawing and 
painting from the live model. (9 hours laboratory) 

317C Sculpting Life Forms (3) 

Prerequisites: ART 103, 104, 117, 217 and 317A or 318A. A three- 
dimensional investigation of any life form, its characteristics and 
expressive possibilities. 

318A Drawing and Painting the Head and Hands (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B and Art 117. Specialized problems in 
construction and anatomy of the human head and hands, and their 
principal use in drawing, painting and illustration. (9 hours laboratory) 

318B Portraiture (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B. Comprehensive problems in composition, 
concept, content and execution of portraits. (9 hours laboratory) 

320 History of Architecture Before the Modern Era (3) 

A study of selected monuments from Stonehenge through the late 
Baroque. Interrelationship between patronage, style, function, structural 
principles and technological developments. (3 hours lecture) 

323A,B Graphic Design (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 22 3A and 22 3B or consent of instructor. 
Development and projection of ideas in relation to the technical, 
aesthetic and psychological aspects of advertising art. Intermediate 
use of computer graphics. (6 hours activity) 


324 Beginning Glass (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104 or consent of instructor. Hot glass 
laboratory equipment and casting techniques. Designing molds and 
handling hot and cold glass. (9 hours laboratory) 

326A,B Ceramic Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 117 or consent of instructor. Development 
of ceramic technology into individual sculptural forms and techniques. 
(9 hours laboratory) 

330 Creative Papermaking (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103 and 104, or consent of instructor. The use 
of papers and fibers as an art form. (9 hours laboratory) 

336A,B Casting Techniques and Theories of Cast Sculpture (3,3) 
Prerequisite: Art 316A. Theories and techniques of rigid and flexible 
moldmaking incorporated with both cold material and hot metal 
casting processes. Course is recommended for concentrations in 
Entertainment Art/Animation, Ceramics and Crafts; required for 
Sculpture concentration. (9 hours laboratory) 

337 Animal and Wildlife Drawing (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117, 317A. Principles and practices of 
drawing animals, including construction, anatomy, texture, movement 
and expression. Fundamentals, historical information and critiques are 
covered in the classroom; field studies are conducted at various zoos 
and wildlife habitats. (6 hours activity) 

338A Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103 or its equivalent. The photographic media in 
personal expression. Historical attitudes and processes; new materials 
and contemporary aesthetic trends. Field trips required. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

338B Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 338A. The photographic medium as personal 
expression. Historical and contemporary aesthetic issues. Exploration 
of black and white, color and digital media. Field trips required. 

(9 hours laboratory) 

343 A Architecture of Cyberspace (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 104 or equivalent and knowledge of Macintosh 
Operating Systems. Introduction to the logic of digital form. Explores 
the creation and understanding of 3-dimensional and 4-dimensional 
virtual forms. Investigation of data manipulation as a form generator. 
The extension of 3-D design studio in the digital realm. May be 
repeated once for credit. (9 hours activity) 

347A Printmaking Etching (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B, 117, and 247. Concept development, 
exploration and materials involved in printmaking techniques. Includes 
etching and aquatint. (9 hours laboratory) 

347B Printmaking Lithography (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A.B, 117, and 247. Concept development, 
exploration and materials involved in lithography. (9 hours laboratory) 


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348 Artists’ Books (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 103, 107A or 247, or consent of instructor. 

Personal vision and concepts applied to the book form as art; the 
history and aesthetics of artists’ books. (6 hours activity) 

353A Drawing for Animation (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 117 and 217. Corequisite Art 317A. Principles 
and practices of drawing characters, backgrounds and objects for ani- 
mation. Construction, character design, movement and expression are 
taught in relation to current studio practice. May be repeated once for 
credit. (9 hours laboratory) 

353B Animation (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 353A. Advanced principles and practices of 
construction, character design, cleanup, movement and expression. 
Content is taught in relation to current studio practice. May be 
repeated once for credit. (9 hour lab) 

357 Woodcuts and Monotypes (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A,B or equivalents. The exploration of the 
woodcut and monotype as a means of personal expression. Emphasis 
on traditional as well as contemporary materials and trends. Course 
may be repeated once for credit. (9 hours laboratory) 

363A Illustration (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A,B and 117. Story, book, magazine, and 
film illustration. (6 hours activity) 

363B Illustration (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 363A. Computer aided illustration. (6 hours activity) 

364A,B Stained Glass (3,3) 

Leaded and stained glass; individual exploration, growth, planning 
and craftsmanship. (6 hours activity) 

367 Elements of Sequential Art (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 317A. Theory and practice of pictorial narrative 
in film story-board and graphic novel. Includes character and scenic 
design; story sketch, “breakdown” and production design. Considerations: 
plot, scene, exposition, transition and continuity. Individual and team 
projects. Repeatable once for credit. (6 hours activity) 

373 Cartooning and Caricature (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 107A, 107B, 117, or approval by instructor. 
Principles and practices of cartooning and caricature construction, 
anatomy and expression. Study will also include an historical overview 
of the field with an emphasis on professional applications and the 
impact of computer graphics. (6 hours activity) 

377 The Figure: Alternative Representations (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 117 (or equivalent) and 3 units of a lower-division 
studio course or consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary course that 
explores alternative ways to create art that is based on the human 
figure. Students work in class with professional models or pursue 
individual projects. There are no media or style limitations. 
Experimentation is encouraged. Course may be repeated once for credit. 


380 Art and Child Development (3) 

Art concepts, materials and processes as they relate to child 
development. (6 hours activity) 

383 Packaging Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 223B, and 323A or their equivalent, 
working knowledge of the Macintosh computer or consent of instruc- 
tor. Principles and practices of design in relation to packaging graphics. 
Focus on conceptual development. Mechanical skills and historic ele- 
ments of the discipline. Includes two field trips to a printing facility 
and design studio that specializes in packaging. Course may be 
repeated once for credit. 

401 Flistory of Women Artists (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 20 IB. Study of art made by women in the context 
of major art historical developments from the 10th century to the 
present. Analysis of images of women and the evolution of gender 
stereotypes in art. (3 hours lecture) Not available for graduate credit. 

413 History of Contemporary Art (3) 

Prerequisites: 312 and 461 or consent of instructor. A historical 
perspective of contemporary art beginning with major developments 
in Europe and the United States in the 1950’s. Emphasis on new 
materials, new exhibition methods, and in particular the major concep- 
tual issues raised by individual artists and groups. (3 hours lecture) 

423 Computer Animation (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 323A or 363B or equivalent. The exploration 
of advanced computer application in the creation of visual images and 
concepts through three-dimensional modeling and animation. Field 
trips required. (6 hours activity) 

424A,B Glass Forming (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 104, 324 or consent of instructor. The 
chemistry, handling and manipulation of glass and its tools and 
equipment for the ceramic artist. (9 hours laboratory) 

431 Renaissance Art (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 20 IB (an majors) or An 101 (non-an majors). 
Painting, sculpture and architecture from the late 13th to 16th century 
in Italy. (3 hours lecture) 

439 Creative Photo Studio Projects (3) 

Prerequisites: An 338A and B or consent of instructor. This is an 
advanced technical class designed to perfect and refine photographic 
skills. Students will learn to integrate technical skills with creative 
options. Course may be repeated for credit. Maximum nine units for 
credit. 

441 Media Exploration for Teaching Art (3) 

Prerequisites: An 103, 104, 107A,B, 205A or consent of instructor. 
Exploring the an media used in secondary school an programs today. 
Materials for secondary an curnculum. Two and three dimensional 
media in subject matter applications. (6 hours activity) 


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j 


448 Special Studies: Artists’ Books and Art (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 103, 107A, or 347A or 348 or consent of instructor. 

A studio art course for advanced students who want to continue to 
explore the book form as it relates to their personal aesthetic goals. 

(6 hours activity) 

453AB Exhibition Design (3,3) 

Technical and aesthetic experience in problem-solving exhibition 
design concepts, evaluation and design analysis. The production of 
exhibitions in the University Art Gallery, their selection, design, 
installation, lighting and supportive interpretive material. (More 
than 9 hours laboratory) 

460 Pre-Columbian Art (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 201A,B or consent of instructor. An introduction 
to the art and architecture of Meso and South America from the early 
formative stage to the Spanish Conquest. Emphasis on aesthetic 
achievement with varying contexts of pre-Columbian culture. 

(3 hours lecture) 

461 American Art: 20th Century (3) 

Painting and sculpture in America during the 20th century. The role 
of the visual arts in helping to define, reflect and challenge American 
values and institutions. (3 hours lecture) 

462 Latin American Art from 1800 to the 1950s (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 311 or 312. History of painting, sculpture and the 
graphic arts in Latin America. Emphasis on the changing relationship 
to European Modernism and major principles of Latin American 
cultural and political identity as expressed in art. (3 hours lecture) 

Not available for graduate degree credit. 

463 Native North American Art (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 201 A. A survey of the art and architecture of the 
Native Peoples of North America from c. AD 1 to the present. Emphasis 
on the relation between art and culture. 

464 Museum Conservation (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 453A and six units of art history or anthropology. 
The examination of the preservation of objects; the history, role and 
principles of conservation within a museum context. Three combined 
sessions at Conservation Center, LACMA; Huntington Library; J. Paul 
Getty Museum; and Museum of Cultural History, UCLA. (3 hours 
lecture) 

465 Art of Sub-Saharan Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 201 A or permission of instructor. A survey of the 
art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa from c. 300 BC to present. 
Emphasis is on the relation between art and culture. 

466 Museum Education (3) 

Prerequisites: six units 300-400 Art History or equivalent. History 
of museum education, its philosophy and issues. Relationship with 
other museum departments, outreach programs, new technology. 
Events organization, writing interpretive materials, budgets and grants, 
conducting tours. Lectures, field trips and guest speakers. (3 hours lecture) 


470 History and Aesthetics of Photography (3) 

Prerequisites: 201A,B. Photography from ancient optical observations 
through 19th-century invention to 20th-century acceptance as an art 
form. Aesthetic movement and influential innovators. Lectures, slides 
and class discussion. (3 hours lecture) 

472 Native Arts of California and the Southwest (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 201A and 463. A survey of the native arts and 
architecture of California and the Southwest from c. 500 BC to present. 
Emphasis is on the relation between art and culture. 

475 Professional Practices in the Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: Art major with junior or above standing. Practices 
unique to the visual arts, including an overview of changing concepts 
in the art market, traditional roles in cultural context, portfolio devel- 
opment, strategies for protecting ideas and avoiding abuses, and 
long- term professional development. (3 hours lecture) 

478 Studio Expanded: Other Genre (3) 

Prerequisite: any 400-level studio art course or permission of 
instructor. Exploration of various methods of expanding traditional 
studio approaches through the investigation of installation, perfor- 
mance and video art. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 
units, but no more than three units in a single semester. (6 hours activity) 

479 Video: Aesthetics and Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: six units of upper-division studio courses. This course 
is designed to advance the student’s understanding of video as a 
medium of visual expression. Students will examine all aspects of fine 
art video: history, aesthetics, camera work, non-linear editing and post- 
production techniques. Course may be repeated for credit for a 
maximum of 12 units. 

480T Selected Topics in Art History (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 201 A or B and consent of instructor. Detailed 
study of the work of individual artists, patronage in particular places, 
specific pictorial, sculptural and architectural programs or art history 
periods. Topics will be listed in the class schedule. Repeatable if topic 
is different. (3 hours lecture) 

481 Seminar in Art History (3) 

Prerequisites: six units upper-division art history or equivalent. 
Study and evaluation in one area of art history and appreciation. May 
be repeated up to a maximum of 6 units. 

483A Special Studies in Graphic Design (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper-division units in area emphasis 
or equivalent. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than 3 units in a 
single semester without permission of instructors. Advanced use of 
computer graphics. (6 hours activity) 


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483B Pictorial Background (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 363A plus 3 upper-division units in area of 
emphasis or equivalent. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than 
3 units in any one area in a single semester without permission of 
instructors. Team collaboration and individual development through 
the exploration of story concepts, research, design and media for 
rendering and painting background environments. Exposure to historical 
precedents, color theory, perspective, theatrical composition, painting 
and drawing media, and stylization for dramatic impact. 

483C Special Studies in Illustration (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper-division units in area emphasis 
or equivalent. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than 3 units in any 
one area in a single semester without permission of instructors. 

(6 hours activity) 

483D Special Studies in Exhibition Design (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper-division units in area emphasis 
or equivalent. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than 3 units in any 
one area in a single semester without permission of instructors. 

(More than 9 hours laboratory) 

483E Computer Assisted Graphics (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 323A or Art 363A and consent of instructor. 
Theory and practice of design using the computer. Students will 
explore the numerous applications of the computer through lecture 
demonstration, studio/laboratory experience, guest speakers and field 
trips. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than three units in a single 
semester without permission of instructors. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

483F Design for Interactive Art (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 483E. Exploration of the creation of interactive art 
and design projects. A concentration in the advanced visual organiza- 
tion systems of art and design and how to apply those techniques to an 
interactive computer environment. Course may be repeated once for 
credit. (9 hours laboratory) 

483G Entertainment Graphics (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 323A, 323B, and 483E. An advanced course in 
entertainment graphics focusing on structure, procedure and standards 
of the entertainment design field. Students will work on projects from 
a major entertainment design group, developing concepts and designs 
for comparison with professional solutions. Course may be repeated for 
credit. Maximum six units. 

4831 Motion Graphics Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 483E (including completion of all 483E 
prerequisites) and instructor’s consent; knowledge of film production/ 
editing helpful. Translation of traditional graphic design into time and 
motion-based design. Exposure to historical precedents, film nomen- 
clature, storyboarding, software/hardware for the creation of film titles, 
station/program identification (logo/logotypes), promotion graphics. 
Course may be repeated once for credit. 


484 Special Studies in Ceramics (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper-division units in ceramics. 
Maximum of 12 units in each area, but no more than three units in any 
one area in a single semester. (9 hours laboratory) 

484A Ceramics (3) 

484B Glass Forming (3) 

484C Glass Casting (3) 

485 Special Studies in Crafts (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper-division units in designated 
area or consent of instructor. Maximum of 12 units in each area, but 
no more than three units in any one area in a single semester. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

485A Jewelry (3) 

485B General Crafts (3) 

485C Metalsmithing (3) 

485F Papermaking (3) 

486 Special Studies in Sculpture (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 316A,B and consent of instructor. Maximum of 
12 units but no more than three units in a single semester. (9 hours 
laboratory) 

486A Modeling and Fabrication. (3) 

486B Casting (3) 

487 Special Studies in Drawing and Painting and Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper-division units in drawing 
and painting, or consent of instructor. Maximum of 12 units in each 
area, but no more than three units in any one area in a single semester 
without permission of instructors. 

487A Special Studies in Painting (3) 

487B Life Studies: Drawing and/or Painting (3) 

487C Special Studies in Drawing (3) 

487D Special Studies in Printmaking (3) 

487E Special Studies in Entertainment Art/Animation (3) 

Prerequisites: Twelve units of upper-division courses in the enter- 
tainment art/animation concentration. Planning, development and 
evaluation of individual projects. Maximum of 12 units, but no more 
than 3 units in any one area in a single semester without permission 
of instructors. (3 hours activity) 

487S Special Studies in Sequential Art (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 367. Individual investigation and development of 
a specialized portfolio in one or more of the following: character 
design; story sketch and/or production design; storyboard; or, graphic 
novel. Maximum of 12 units, but no more than 3 units in any one area 
in a single semester without permission of instructors. (6 hours activity) 

489 Special Studies in Creative Photography (3) 

Prerequisites: a minimum of six upper-division units in photography 
courses or equivalent. Photography as personal expression. Maximum 
of 12 units but no more than three units in a single semester. (9 hours 
laboratory) 


76 


ART 


495 Internship in Art (3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing as a declared BFA in Art major. Work 
in a specific art field in business or industry. 

499 Independent Research (1-3) 

Open to advanced students in art with consent of department chair 
and written consent of instructor. May be repeated twice more for credit. 

500A Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: Classified Standing. Directed research in the area of 
major emphasis. Oral and written material on historical backgrounds 
and developments in art as they relate to individual intent as an artist 
and in support of the master’s project (with 500B meets graduate level 
writing requirement). 

500B Graduate Seminar in Major Field (3) 

Prerequisite: Classified standing and 500A recommended. Problems 
and issues in art. Intellectual clarification and verbal articulation of 
individual intent as an artist. Oral and written material in support of 
the master’s project (with 500A meets graduate level writing requirement). 

501 Curatorship (3) 

Prerequisites: B.A. in art, anthropology' or other major by special 
permission, and An 466 and 481. The curator collects, cares for and 
studies objects. 

503 Graduate Problems in Design Course Series 

Prerequisite: Classified Standing or consent of instructor. Planning, 
development and evaluation of individual projects listed below. Maximum 
of 12 units in each area, but no more than three units in any one area 
in a single semester without permission of instructors. 

503A Graphic Design (3) 

(6 hours activity) 

503C Illustration (3) 

(6 hours activity) 

503D Exhibition Design (3) 

(More than 9 hours laboratory) 

504 Graduate Problems in Ceramics Course Series 

Prerequisite: Classified Standing or consent of instructor. Planning, 
development and evaluation of individual projects in ceramics, glass 
forming and glass casting. Maximum of 12 units in each area but no 
more than three units in a single semester without permission of 
instructors. (9 hours laboratory) 

504A Ceramics (3) 

(9 hours laboratory) 

504B Glass Forming (3) 

(9 hours laboratory) 

504C Glass Casting (3) 

(9 hours laboratory) 


505 Graduate Problems in Crafts 

Prerequisite: Classified Standing or consent of instructor. Planning, 
development and evaluation of individual projects listed below. 
Maximum of 12 units in each area but no more than three units in a 
single semester. (9 hours laboratory). 

505A Jewelry (3) 

(9 hours laboratory) 

505B General Crafts (3) 

(9 hours laboratory) 

506A,B Graduate Problems in Sculpture (3,3) 

Prerequisite: Classified Standing or consent of instructor. Planning, 
development and evaluation of individual projects in sculpture. 
Maximum of 12 units in each area but no more than three units in 
a single semester. (9 hours laboratory). 

507 Graduate Problems in Drawing, Painting and Printmaking (3) 

Prerequisite: 12 units of upper-division drawing and painting. 
Planning, development and evaluation of individual projects listed 
below. Maximum of 12 units in each area but no more than three units 
in a single semester without permission of instructors. 

507A Painting (3) 

(6 hours activity) 

507B Life Drawing (3) 

(9 hours laboratory) 

507C Drawing (3) 

(6 hours activity) 

507D Printmaking (3) 

(9 hours laboratory) 

508A,B Graduate Problems in Creative Photography (3,3) 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Planning, development and 
evaluation of individual projects in photography. Maximum of 12 units 
in each area, but no more than three units in a single semester. (9 hours 
laboratory). 

511 Seminar on the Content and Method of Art History (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 481 or consent of instructor. Methods of research, 
analysis and theories of art historical scholarship. May be repeated up 
to a maximum of 6 units. 

512 Seminar on Selected Topics in Art History (3) 

Prerequisites: appropriate upper-division Art course approved by 
instructor and Art 511. Analysis and evaluation of specific works and 
their historical significance including cultural, social and economic 
circumstances. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 units 

548 Graduate Problems in Artists’ Books (3) 

Prerequisite: Art 448 or consent of instructor. Investigation and 
application of principles of the book form to visual art and design, 
illustration, photography and printmaking media. Development of 
original works of art, which demonstrate competency in design, con- 
struction, and fabrication of graduate quality visual books. (Six hours 
of activity) Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 units. 


77 


ART 


577 The Figure: Advanced Alternatives (3) 

Prerequisites: Art 377 or graduate status and consent of instructor. 
Advanced exploration of the human figure and figurative arts, includ- 
ing representational and conceptual art forms. Students pursue individual 
projects and/or work in class with professional models. All media and 
styles are welcomed. Experimentation is encouraged. Course may be 
repeated once for credit. 

578 Graduate Studio Expanded: Other Genre (3) 

Prerequisite: Any 400-level studio art course or consent of instructor. 
This graduate studio course examines all aspects of new genre work, 
including conceptual, historic and theoretical approaches. Studio 
disciplines that will be investigated are installation, performance art, 
video and public art. 

579 Graduate Problems: Aesthetics and Advanced 
Techniques of Video (3) 

A graduate course designed to advance the student’s production of 
video as a medium of visual expression. Students will examine all 
aspects of fine art video; history and aesthetics, camerawork, non-linear 
and assemble editing, post production techniques video installations and 
the role of video as a medium of contemporary' fine art production. 

597 Project (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: Art 500A,B, written consent of instructor and recom- 
mendation of the student’s graduate committee. Art 500B may be taken 
concurrently with Art 597 on approval of instructor. Development and 
presentation of a creative project in the concentration beyond regularly 
offered coursework. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisites: Art 511, 512, written consent of instructor and 
recommendation of the student’s graduate committee. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students in art with consent of department chair 
and written consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 


ART EDUCATION COURSES 

Art Education courses are designated as ARTE in the class schedule. 

442 Teaching Art in Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Objectives, methods 
and practices for teaching art in secondary schools. Required before 
student teaching of majors in art for the Single Subject Teaching 
Credential. 

449E Externship in Secondary Teaching (3) 

See description and prerequisites under Division of Teacher 
Education. Offered every fall semester. 

4491 Internship in Secondary Teaching (10) 

See description and prerequisites under Division of Teacher 
Education. Concurrent enrollment in Art Education 449S required. 
Offered every spring semester. 

449S Seminar in Secondary Teaching (3) 

Taken concurrently with Art Ed 4491. Seminar in teaching a single 
subject in secondary schools. Videotape analysis of teaching based on 
Teaching Performance Assessments. Taken Credit/No Credit. A “B” or 
better is required to receive a grade of credit. 


ART 




TV 






iHIHL • .wm* ■ 

Asian American Studies 



College of HumanltieMPPSoeial Sciences 


PROGRAM COORDINATOR 

Craig K. Ihara 

PROGRAM OFFICE 

Humanities 314 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://hss.fullerton.edu/asian-american/ 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Minor in Asian American Studies 
Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies 
Option in Asian American Studies 

INSTRUCTIONAL FACULTY 

Jeffrey Brody (Communications), Mary 
Kay Crouch (English), Thomas Fujita Rony 
(Asian American Studies), William Gudykunst 
(Speech Communications), Art Hansen 
(History), Mikyong Kim-Goh (Human 
Services), Eliza Noh (Asian American 
Studies), Michael Perez (Sociology), Yichin 
Shen (English and Comparative Literature), 
Scott Tang (American Studies), Son Kim Vo 
(Intercultural Development Center). 

ADVISER 

Thomas Fujita Rony 
Humanities 324B 


PROGRAM COUNCIL 

The program council consists of faculty and non- faculty from on and off-campus groups 
who provide direction and support for the Asian American Studies Program: Gloria Bogdan 
(Anthropology, Orange Coast College), Jeffrey Brody (Communications), Juana Chen (Asian 
American Studies), Mary Kay Crouch (English), Thomas Fujita Rony (Asian American Studies), 
Angela Gee (Management), William Gudykunst (Speech Communications), Art Hansen 
(History), Craig K. Ihara (Philosophy), Richard Jong (Asian American Studies), Ellen Junn 
(Child Development), Daniel Kee (Psychology), Mikyong Kim-Goh (Human Services), Lisa Mori 
(Psychology), Michael Perez (Sociology), Sherri Sawicki (English), Yichen Shen (English), Scott 
Tang (American Studies), Jie Tian (Library), Son Kim Vo (Intercultural Development Center). 

INTRODUCTION 

The minor and the option in Asian American Studies are designed for students who have an 
interest in learning about the experiences, expression and social conditions of Americans of Asian 
ancestry, including those whose origins trace back to central, south and southeast, as well as east 
Asia and the Pacific Islands. 

Cross-disciplinary in nature, Asian American Studies draws on a wide variety of courses 
offered throughout the university which relate to Asian American history, an, literature, politics, 
socio-economics, psychology and relations to other ethnic and sociopolitical groups. In addition, 
the Asian American Studies Program currently offers twenty-one (21) of its own courses. 

The goals of both the option and the minor are to encourage more students to do work in the 
area and to prepare students in selected career paths where sensitivity to and knowledge of Asian 
American issues, history and artistic expression are important. These include careers in counsel- 
ing, human services, nursing, public administration, law and the health professions; teaching 
careers in history, English, political science, psychology, sociology, as well as elementary school 
education. 

Two features of the Asian American programs are of special note. First, there is a conscious 
effort to inform and sensitize students to other ethnic groups and to their interrelationships and 
commonalities. Second, there is a definitive emphasis on contributing to Asian American com- 
munities and, thereby, the larger society. The requirement in experiential and community-based 
learning is one example of our effort to combine learning with service. 

The option in Asian American Studies may be effectively combined with subject matter 
studies necessary for either the multiple subject teaching credential (K-8) or single subject 
credential (7-12) in Social Studies. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the Center 
for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan 
efficient course selections for general education, the major and electives. With careful planning, 
it may be possible to enter the credential program in the senior year of the bachelor’s degree. 
Postgraduate students should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office (714-278-3411) 
to obtain information on attending an overview presentation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ETHNIC STUDIES 
OPTION IN ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The B.A. in Ethnic Studies (Asian-American Studies) requires a minimum of 120 units, 
which includes courses for the option, General Education, all University requirements, and free 
electives. 


79 


ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES 


The Option in Asian American Studies requires 36 units of course 
work in Asian American Studies. If a student chooses the B.A. in 
Ethnic Studies (Asian American Studies) as a second major, up to 9 
units can double-count in general education. 

Other Asian American Studies requirements can be double-counted 
in a student’s primary major. 

Core Courses (12 Units) 


Asian American 101 
Asian American 201 
Asian American 300 
Asian American 400 


Introduction to Ethnic Studies 
History of Asian Pacific Americans 
Introduction to Asian Pacific American Studies 
Research and Writing in Ethnic Studies 


Topical Requirements (12 units) 

In consultation with an adviser, students may focus their studies on 
Asian American Ethnic Groups; topics in Asian American Studies such 
as literature, art, communication, families, psychology, or law, etc.; or 
Non-Asian Ethnic Groups and Inter-ethnic relations in the U.S. 
Students must take two courses from the courses listed below: 

Specific Asian American Ethnic Groups (6 units) 

Asian American 220 Vietnamese Communities in the U.S. (3) 

Asian American 360 Mixed Heritage Asian Americans (3) 

Asian American 362 The Filipino/American Experience (3) 

Asian American 364 The South Asian American Experience (3) 

Asian American 366 The Korean American Experience (3) 

Asian American 370 The Chinese American Experience (3) 

History/Asian American 411 World War II Japanese American 
Evacuation (3) 

The remaining six units must be selected from the two categories 
listed below. 

1. Topics in Asian American Studies 

Asian American 308 Asian American Women (3) 

Asian American 320 Asian American Creative Expression (3) 

Asian American 327 Asian American Literature (3) 

Asian American 340 Asian American Communication (3) 

Asian American 342 Asian Pacific American Families (3) 

Asian American 344 Asian Pacific American Identities (3) 

Asian American 346 Asian American Psychology (3) 

Human Services 318 Human Services for Immigrants and Refugees (3) 

Communication 438T Specialized Reporting (Reporting in Minority 
Affairs) (3) 

English 323T Cultural Pluralism in American Literature (when topic 
covers Asian American author) (3) 


2. Non-Asian Ethnic Groups and Inter-ethnic Relations in the U.S. 
Afro Ethnic 310 Black Women in America (3) 

Afro Ethnic 311 Intracultural Socialization (3) 

Afro Ethnic 320 Black Political Thought (3) 

Afro Ethnic 322 Psychology of Afro-American (3) 

Afro Ethnic 335 History of Racism (3) 


American Studies 301 The American Character (3) 

American Studies 377 Prejudice and American Culture (3) 

Chicana/o 220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

Chicana/o 303 Cultural Differences in Mexico and the Southwest (3) 
Chicana/o 337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

Chicana/o 340 Mexican/Chicano Intellectual Thought (3) 

Chicana/o 345 History of the Chicano (3) 

History 190 Survey of American History with Emphasis on 
Ethnic Minorities (3) 

Sociology 357 Minority Group Relations (3) 

Women’s Studies 302 Intro to Intercultural Women’s Studies (3) 


Asian Language or Asian Cultures and Social Institutions (6 units) 

Asian Languages 

Chinese 100 Introduction to Chinese Conversation (3 units) 

Chinese 101 Fundamental Chinese A (5 units) 

Chinese 102 Fundamental Chinese B (5 units) 

Japanese 101 Fundamental Japanese A (5 units) 

Japanese 102 Fundamental Japanese B (5 units) 

Any 200 or higher level course in Chinese or Japanese 
Vietnamese 201 Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers (3) 

Vietnamese 202 Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers (3) 

Asian Cultures and Institutions 

Topics include, but are not limited to the following courses: 
Anthropology 347 Peoples of Asia (3) 

Comparative Literature 42 3T Topics in Asian Literature (3) 

English /Asian Amer 327 Asian American Literature (3) 

Geography 340 Asia (3) 

History 464B History of Contemporary Southeast Asia (3) 

History 465A,B History of India (3) 

Philosophy 350 Asian Philosophy (3) 

Philosophy 352 Philosophy of Asian Martial Arts (3) 

Political Science 434 China and Japan: Friends or Foes? (3) 
Comparative Religion 270T Introduction to Asian Religions (3) 
Comparative Religion 353 Buddhism in India (3) 

Comparative Religion 354T Topics in Buddhism (3) 

Speech Comm 492T Proseminar in Speech Communication (when 
topic covers intercultural communication) (3) 

Community Research Requirement (6 units) 

Students may choose from one or two of the following courses. The 
courses may be repeated for credit. 

1. Asian American 499 Independent Study. This course involves com- 
pleting a senior project requiring community research. Students are 
required to display knowledge, understanding, and application of 
research, methods and culturally-relevant skills to solve real world 
problems in an Asian Pacific American community setting. 


ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES 


2. Oral history fieldwork. This course provides students with experi- 
ence in an Asian Pacific American community agency or organization. 
Please consult the department for information on the course 
number, title, and scheduled offerings. 

3. Asian American 495 Internship in Asian American Studies. This 
course combines work in a community organization with regular 
class meetings and written assignments. This can include the analysis 
of community based organizations along ethnic, class, and/or 
gender lines; or interns of Asian American literature or art; or in 
terms of power politics, historical developments, or in minority 
group psychology. Please consult the department for information 
on the course number, title, and scheduled offerings. 

MINOR IN ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES 

The minor consists of 21-23 required units distributed among 
categories listed below with at least six upper-division units. 

Core Courses (6 units) 

Asian American 201 History of Asian Pacific Americans (3) 

Asian American 300 Introduction to Asian Pacific American Studies (3) 

Comparative Cultures Breadth Requirement (3 units) 

A course on a different minority group in America should be 
selected from an approved listing in consultation with the program 
coordinator or a faculty adviser. Courses include, but are not limited to 

the following: Afro 304, 
310,311,317, 320, 
322, 335; American 
Studies 301, 377; 
Chicano 220, 303, 
305, 331, 332, 337, 
340, 450; Comparative 
Religion 305; History 
190; Sociology 133, 
357; Womens Studies 
302. 

Topical Requirements (6 units) 

Select two three-unit courses in Asian Pacific American Studies, 
chosen in consultation with a faculty adviser. Topics include, but are 
not limited to the following courses: Asian American 220, 308, 320, 
327, 340, 342, 344, 346, 360 362, 364, 366, 370; History 411; 
Human Services 318; English 323T; Communications 438T 

Asian Language or Asian Cultures and Social Institutions 
Requirement (3-5 units) 

One course in an Asian language (3-5 units), or one three-unit 
course on Asian cultures or Asian social institutions, chosen in consul- 
tation with the undergraduate adviser. 

Approved courses include, but are not limited to the following: 

Asian Languages 

Chinese 100 Introduction to Chinese Conversation (3) 

Chinese 101 Fundamental Chinese A (5 units) 


Chinese 102 Fundamental Chinese B (5 units) 

Japanese 101 Fundamental Japanese A (5 units) 

Japanese 102 Fundamental Japanese B (5 units) 

Vietnamese 201 Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers (3) 

Vietnamese 202 Vietnamese for Vietnamese Speakers (3) 

Any 200 or higher level course in Chinese or Japanese 

Asian Cultures and Social Institutions 

Anthro 347; Comp Lit 423T; Comparative Religion 280, 353, 354T; 
Geography 340; History 464B, 465A; Philosophy 350, 352, 353, 354T; 
Poli Sci 433, 434; Speech Comm 492C 

Community Research Requirement (3 units) 

Students choose one of the following: 

Asian American 499 Independent Study. This course involves 
completing a senior project requiring community research. Students 
are required to display knowledge, understanding, and application 
of research, methods, and culturally-relevant skills to solve real world 
problems in an Asian Pacific American community setting. 

Oral history fieldwork. This course provides students with a service 
learning experience in an Asian Pacific American community agency or 
organization. Please check the department for information on the 
course number, title, and scheduled offerings. 

ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES 

Courses are designated as ASAM in the class schedule. 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 101) 

201 History of Asian Americans (3) 

(Same as History 201) 

220 Vietnamese Communities in the U.S. (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category 1I1.C.1. 

A historical and cultural overview of Vietnamese communities in the 
U.S., especially Orange county. It covers the vital role of voluntary 
agencies, mutual assistance associations, and religious centers. 
Vietnamese business, entertainment, family, education and hobbies 
will also be examined. 

300 Introduction to Asian Pacific American Studies (3) 

(Formerly 105) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.I. 
Interdisciplinary exploration of the experiences of several Asian 
American groups. Addresses questions of cultural assimilation and 
cultural persistence, family and gender roles, and literary and popular 
culture representations. 

308 Asian American Women (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. An interdisciplinary exami- 
nation of Asian and Pacific Islander American women’s experience. 

It compares and contrasts the experience of women from various parts 
of Asia and explores the social, cultural and political issues they face 
both in the U.S. and abroad. (Same as Women’s Studies 308) 



ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES 


320 Asian American Creative Expression (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Categories III. B.l 
and 2. This course explores Asian American life as portrayed through 
novels, short stories, plays, poetry, film, music, painting, dance, and 
other expressive forms. It examines both historical and contemporary 
works by a variety of Asian and Pacific Americans. 

327 Asian American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.B.2. 

This course introduces early literary expressions of the Asian American 
experience. Readings include poetry, short stories, novels, and autobi- 
ographies. Students will gain a fundamental understanding of Asian 
American literary history and become increasingly aware of the 
cultural diversity in America. (Same as English 327) 

340 Asian American Communication (3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and completion of General 
Education Category III.C.l. An introduction to Asian American com- 
munication. The influences of Asian American cultural heritage, ethnic 
identity, generation, and language fluency on communication are 
examined. Similarities and differences in communication among the 
various Asian American ethnic groups are presented. (Same as Speech 
Comm 340) 

342 Asian Pacific American Families (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 
Asian Pacific American families have ranged from the seemingly solitary 
“bachelor” to the extended “clan.” We will explore these, and many 
other ways of being a “family,” as it has been a basic part of Asian 
Pacific American history and culture. 

344 Asian Pacific American Identities (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 
Interdisciplinary explorations of the ways in which those of Pacific 
Islander, Southeast, South and East Asian descent have met the 
challenge of being American at the personal level. Covers social 
construction of racial/ethnic identities, cultural conflict, self- 
determination and personal growth. 

346 Asian American Psychology (3) 

This course involves in-depth analysis of major issues in the Asian 
American community from a psychosocial perspective, including ethnic 
identity development, generational conflicts, the “model minority” myth, 
interracial relationships, attitudes toward mental health services and 
alternative healing/therapeutic approaches. (Same as Psychology 346) 

360 Mixed Heritage Asian Americans (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category III.C.l. 
Overview of the mixed heritage Asian American population in the 
USA. The course will survey the historical avenues that led to the 
United States and to inter-ethnic alliances. The many challenges this 
multi-ethnic population faces will be examined. 


362 Filipina/o American Experience (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 

An introduction to Filipina/American Studies, covering point of origin, 
immigration, legal barriers, economic struggles, civil rights and other 
current issues. 

364 The South Asian American Experience (3) 

Interdisciplinary course that explores the experience of South Asian 
Americans originally from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh or Sri Lanka. 

It focuses on questions regarding influence of American culture on 
South Asian American identity, intergenerational concerns and cultural 
continuity among others. 

366 The Korean American Experience (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category III.C.l. 
Examination of historical events and contemporary issues such as 
Korean American immigration, Korean identity, inter-ethnic relations, 
gender issues, and Korean American Entrepreneurship within the 
context of social, political, and economic conditions of Korea and 
the United States. 

370 The Chinese American Experience (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category III.C.l. 
An introduction to the experiences of Chinese in the United States. 

It will examine historical events and contemporary issues, including 
Chinese immigration, exclusion, Chinese American identity, racial 
violence, and gender. 

400 Research and Writing in Ethnic Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Afro-American 101 or Asian American 101 or Chicano 
101 and Afro American 107 or Asian American 300. An introduction 
to research and writing in ethnic studies. Issues of research in ethnic 
studies (e.g. quantitative v. qualitative analysis, reliability/validity) and 
specific methods of research (e.g. archives, interviews, oral history) will 
be examined. Extensive writing is required. A grade of “C” or better is 
required to satisfy the upper-division writing requirement. (Same as 
Afro-Ethnic 400 and Chicano 400). 

411 World War II Japanese American Evacuation (3) 

Not available for graduate degree credit. (Same as History 411) 

495 Internship in Asian American Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: six upper-division units in Asian American Studies. 
One hundred (120) hours practical experience in some organization 
serving the Asian Pacific American community Regular meetings with 
faculty advisor. May be repeated once for credit. 

496 Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

Consult “Student-to-Student Tutorials” in this catalog for a more 
complete course description. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research and/or service learning projects in Asian 
American Studies to be taken with consent of instructor and program 
coordinator. May be repeated for credit. 


ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES 



INTRODUCTION 

Asia, more than any other region in the world, has become the focus of extensive international 
business, political relationships, and cultural exchange. Millions of people of Asian descent have 
become an integral part of American society. Indeed, California, more than any other place in the 
United States, is the residence of immigrants from throughout Asia. In order to keep pace with 
current developments in this extremely important part of the world, students are encouraged 
to take advantage of the opportunity to minor in Asian Studies. 

The faculty for the Asian Studies Minor is drawn from several departments. What they have 
in common is that they teach and do research on Asia. The interdisciplinary nature of the Minor 
allows students the unique opportunity to learn about Asia from broad and differing perspectives. 


MINOR IN ASIAN STUDIES 

The minor consists of 21 units: 6 units chosen from the listed core courses and 15 units of 
electives chosen in consultation with an adviser as outlined below. 


PROGRAM COORDINAOR 

William W Haddad (History) 

PROGRAM OFFICE 

Humanities 815F 

PROGRAM OFFERED 

Minor in Asian Studies 

PROGRAM COUNCIL 

Ian Bailey (Kinesiology and Health 
Promotion), K. Chu (Economics), Craig Ihara 
(Philosophy), Irene Lange (Marketing), Keiji 
Matsumoto (Foreign Languages), Vera 
Simone (Political Science), Preston Stedman 
(Music), Barbara Weightman (Geography), 
Rich Wiseman (Speech Communication) and 
Heping Zhao (English). 


Core Courses (6 units) 

Anthro 340 Peoples of Asia (3) 

OR Anthro 347 Peoples of the Pacific (3) 

Geography 340 Asia (3) 

Electives (15 units) 

One course each from three of the four following categories, plus 6 units of advisor-approved 
electives: 

Language, Culture, Geography, and Human Behavior 
Anthro 340 Peoples of Asia (3)* 

Anthro 347 Peoples of the Pacific (3)* 

Any Japanese Language Course 
Any Chinese Language Course 
Any Vietnamese Language Course 
Geography 330 California Landscapes (3) 

Geography 340 Asia (3) 

Kinesiology 151 Aikido (1) 

Kinesiology 152 Karate (1) 

Speech Comm 320 Intercultural Communication (3) 

*One of these is applicable as an elective if not chosen as a core course. 

History and Politics 

History 360 Modem Asia: Nationalism and Revolutionary Change (3) 

History 461 Modem Vietnam (3) 

History 462A History of China (3) 

History 462B History of China (3) 

History 462C China Since 1949 (3) 


83 


ASIAN STUDIES 


History 463A History of Japan (3) 

History 463B History of Japan (3) 

History 464A History of Southeast Asia 1850-1945 (3) 

History 464B History of Contemporary Southeast Asia (3) 

History 465A History of India (3) 

History 465B History of India (3) 

History 490T Senior Research Seminar (3) (Where course topic 
focuses on area of Asia). 

Poli Sci 434 Comparative Politics of China and Japan (3) 

Poli Sci 45 IT Problems in International Politics (3) 

Poli Sci 457 Politics of International Economics (3) 

Poli Sci 476 International Law (3) 

Arts and Humanities 

(including Art, Literature, Philosophy and Comparative Religion) 
Comp Lit 257 Writing Haiku (1) 

Comp Lit 380 Introduction to Asian Literature (3) 

Comp Lit 42 3T Topics in Asian Literature (3) 

Music 352 Symphonic Music in Western & Eastern Cultures (3) 
Philosophy 350 Asian Philosophy (3) 

Philosophy 352 Philosophy of Asian Martial Arts (3) 

Comparative Religion 270T Introduction to the Asian Religions (3) 


International Business and Economics 
Economics 332 Economies of the Pacific Rim (3) 

Economics 333 Economic Development: Analysis & Case Studies (3) 
Economics 335 The International Economy (3) 

Economics 411 International Trade (3) 

Finance 370 International Business Finance (3) 

Marketing 445 Multinational Marketing Strategies (3) 



84 


ASIAN STUDIES 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

C. Eugene Jones 

DIRECTOR, GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Kathryn Dickson, Michael Horn, Steven 
Murray 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

McCarthy Hall 282 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://biology.fullerton.edu 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Biological Science 
with Emphases (pending approval) in: 

Biodiversity, Ecology and 
Conservation Biology 

Cell & Developmental Biology 
Marine Biology 

Molecular Biology & Biotechnology 
Minor in Biotechnology 
Master of Science in Biology 

Subject Matter Preparation Program for 
Single Subject Teaching in Science 

FACULTY 

Oscar Aurelio, Sandra Banack, MerriLynn 
Casern, Amybeth Cohen, Kathryn Dickson, 
David Drath, Doug Eemisse, David Fromson, 
William Hoese, Michael Horn, C. Eugene 
Jones, Judy Kandel, Robert Koch, Rodrigo 
Lois, Steven Murray, Joyce Ono, Nancy 
Pelaez, William Presch, Felipe-Andres 
Ramirez-Weber, Darren Sandquist, Jochen 
Schenk, Roger Seapy, James Smith, Paul 
Stapp, Barry Thomas, Marcelo Tolmasky, 

Joel Weintraub, Fred Whipple. 


INTRODUCTION 

Biology is the study of life, its basis and processes. The discipline is dynamic and expanding 
rapidly. It covers multiple scales, from the study of molecular origins as the basis for understand- 
ing how cells are constructed and how they function, including their metabolism, growth, 
development and reproduction, to the study of organisms as the basis for understanding how 
populations of organisms interact among themselves and with their environment, including the 
distribution and abundance of organisms, energy flow among organisms and the cycling of 
inorganic and organic resources. 

The department has designed a curriculum that builds on a core of biology and supporting 
courses for students who: (1) seek careers in industry and state or federal agencies, (2) wish to 
prepare for secondary school teaching, or (3) desire to enter graduate and professional schools. 
The curriculum beyond the basic core experience will be developed through individual advising. 
Students will be assigned a faculty adviser when they enter the University or they may choose a 
faculty member to serve as their adviser. Each semester, students are required to meet with their 
designated adviser in order to develop an appropriate program of study. After discussion with 
their adviser, students will elect upper-division courses in one of four emphases that will satisfy 
their individual interests and professional goals. These emphases are pending approval, refer 
to the department’s website for when they will be offered. 

Special Programs 

In addition to the usual course offerings, the Department of Biological Science participates 
in the Institute for Molecular Biology and Nutrition and three consortial programs with other 
California State University campuses. These are CSUPERB (California State University Program 
for Education and Research in Biotechnology), the Ocean Studies Institute (through the Southern 
California Marine Institute) and the California Desert Studies consortium at Soda Springs; the 
latter two are described in this catalog under “Institutes/Study Centers.” 

Pre-professional Information 

The Health Professions Office provides advising services to students wishing to enter the 
health professions. The services include counseling students to plan their academic programs, 
providing students with the opportunity to volunteer for work opportunities in the area of their 
interest, and providing assistance in the preparation of applications, including interviewing tech- 
niques. 

Credential Information 

The bachelor’s degree in biology may be effectively combined with requirements for the 
Subject Matter Preparation Program for the Single Subject Teaching Credential. Undergraduate 
students are encouraged to work with the departmental credential adviser and/or the Centers 
for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan 
efficient course selections for general education, the major, and electives. Postgraduate students 
should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the School of Education 
(714-278-3411) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation and orientation 
and then contacting the department credential adviser. 

Recommended Program in General Education 

Because of high unit requirements for the B.S. in Biological Science, students are urged 
to consult with their adviser to design their general education program. 


85 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


Upper-division Baccalaureate Writing Requirement 

To meet the upper-division baccalaureate writing requirement, 
students must (1) pass the English Writing Proficiency exam and pass 
with a C or better, 6 units from Biology 411, 414, 445, 470, or (2) 
English 301 or Chemistry 340. 

Internships 

Biology 495 Biological Internship provides students with the oppor- 
tunity to participate in a practical work experience that integrates their 
interests with classroom studies. 

SCHOLARSHIPS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald B. Bright Environmental Scholarship 

To preserve the memory of Dr. Donald B. Bright, one or more schol- 
arships per year are awarded to deserving undergraduate students of 
biology. 

Judith A. Presch Desert Studies Scholarship 

To preserve the memory of Judith A. Presch, two scholarships per 
year are awarded (one undergraduate and one graduate student) for work 
in the Mojave Desert by the Desert Studies Consortium. 

Jerome Wilson Scholarship 

To preserve the memory of Dr. Jerome Wilson, two scholarships per 
year are awarded to deserving undergraduate or graduate students of 
biology. 

Coppel Graduate Science Award 

For biolog)' graduate students for their unrestricted use. Established 
by Lynn and Claude Coppel. 

Rachel Carson Scholarship in Conservation Biology 

To preserve the memory of Rachel Carson, a scholarship was created 
to encourage biology majors to pursue a career in Conservation Biology. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

A total of 120 units, including general education, 43 units in biology 
courses (20 units in the core and 23 units of upper-division electives 
constituting one of the emphases (described below), and 30 units of 
supporting courses in physical sciences and mathematics are required 
for completion of the B.S. in Biological Science. In addition, as a gradu- 
ation requirement, students pursing the B.S. in Biological Science will 
be required to complete an exit exam on biology in the spring semester 
of their senior year. 

The supporting courses must include one year of general college 
chemistry including qualitative analysis with laboratory; one year of 
organic chemistry with laboratory; one semester of college calculus or 
introduction to experimental design and statistics for biologists; and 
one year of college physics with laboratory. Those students seeking 
careers in the health professions should speak to a health professions 
counselor about specific course recommendations. Students who wish 
to earn a doctoral degree should consider, in addition, a modem foreign 
language or advanced courses in computational sciences. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in Biological Science, students 
must have a 2.0 overall average in all required supporting courses. 

No credit toward the major will be allowed for biology courses in 
which a grade of D or F is obtained. Courses taken under the Credit/ 

No Credit grade option may not be applied towards the major. 


Students with junior or senior standing will be permitted to enroll 
in Biology 480 Advanced Topics in Undergraduate Biology, Biology 495 
Biological Internship, and Biology 499L Independent Laboratory 
Study; however, only a combined total 6 units of Biology 499L or 3 
units from Biology 480 or 495 may be applied to the biology upper- 
division elective requirement. All full-time upper-division students 
are expected to attend the departmental seminars. 

Core Requirements for the Major (20 units): 

The core program in Biology provides an introduction to basic 
principles of biology and to the investigative nature of science. The 
curriculum uses Themes and Perspectives to connect and integrate 
major concepts, principles and basic facts. Three Themes run 
throughout the core curriculum: 

Evolution: Inherited changes in organisms accumulate over time. 

Unity and Diversity: Organisms possess common characteristics while 
exhibiting a wide range of variability. 

Dynamics of Biological Systems: Living systems continually respond 
to their external and internal environments by making changes neces- 
sary to sustain life. 

Each theme will be presented from two Perspectives: 

Human Impact: The human and the biological world and 

Scientific Process: The testing of new ideas, questions or hypotheses 
through observation and experimentation. 

Students should complete the following four core courses with a 
passing grade (C or better) before they take most upper division 
biology courses. 

Biol 171 Evolution and Biodiversity (5) 

Biol 172 Cellular Basis of Life (5) 

Biol 273 Genetics and Molecular Biology (5) 

Biol 274 Principles of Physiology and Ecology (5) 

Upper-division courses (23 units): 

The upper-division program is designed to provide students with 
depth in a chosen emphasis. Four emphases are pending approval by 
the University and up-to-date information is available on the depart- 
ment’s website. Each student selects a program leading to an emphasis 
in one of four areas with approval from his or her departmental 
adviser. The transcript will specify that the student has completed 
a B.S. in Biological Science with an emphasis in one of the following: 

Biodiversity, Ecology, and Conservation Biology 
Cell and Developmental Biology 
Marine Biology 

Molecular Biology and Biotechnology 

Supporting Course Requirements for the Major (29-30 units) 

Chem 120A,B General Chemistry (10) 

Chem 301A,B Organic Chemistry (6) 

Chem 302A,B Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

Physics 21 1, 21 1L Elementary Physics and Laboratory (4) 

Physics 212, 212L Elementary Physics and Laboratory (4) 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


Math 130A Short Course in Calculus (4), 

ORMathl50A Calculus (4), 

OR Math 337 Intro to Experimental Design and Statistics in the 
Laboratory Sciences (3) 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE/PRE-MBA PROGRAM 

A student may combine a B.S. in Biological Science with a minor in 
Business Administration to qualify to enroll in an MBA degree at CSUE 
The student who completes this Biology/pre-MBA program, and meets 
all other entrance requirements, will be poised to apply to the MBA 
degree program and will then need to take only the second year (33 
units) of coursework to complete the MBA. See your department 
adviser for details. 


Required Core Courses (28 units) 

Biol 273 Genetics and Molecular Biology (5) 

Biol 309 Intermediate Molecular Biology (3) 

ORChem421 Biological Chemistry (3) 

Chem 301A,B Organic Chemistry (6) 

Chem 302A,B Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

Biol 412 Principles of Gene Manipulation (3) 

Biol/Chem 472A,B Advances in Biotechnology Laboratory (6) 
Chem/Biol 477 Advances in Biotechnology (3) 

Supporting Courses (3-4 units) 

Students must complete one of the following courses: 

Biol 309 Intermediate Molecular Biology (3) 

Biol 413 Advances in Molecular Genetics (3) 


Biol 424 Immunology (4) 

Chem 42 1 Biological Chemistry (3) 

Chem 423A General Chemistry (1st semester) (3) 

Chem 42 3B General Chemistry (2nd semester) (3) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY 

The program is based on the assumption that modem science 
necessitates broad preparation through the master’s level of training. 

The M.S. in Biology is a thesis-based degree for which the student 
completes original, independent research summarized in a Master’s 
thesis. The program offers sufficient breadth and depth to strengthen 
the student’s academic understanding and improve competence for 
(a) advanced graduate work toward a doctoral degree in biological 
sciences, (b) teaching at the elementary, secondary and community 
college levels, (c) participating in research programs, (d) participating 
in various field service and conservation positions within local, state 
and national governments, (e) entering the field of public-health 
service, or (0 technological work in the health sciences. 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission, 
which include a baccalaureate from an accredited institution, and 
a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units 
attempted (see section of this catalog on Graduate Admissions for 
complete statement and procedures). Students must make two applica- 
tions, one to the university and another to the department. In addition 
to the university requirements for admission, acceptance into this 
program is contingent upon the following: (1) a B.A. or B.S. in 
Biological Science or related area at an accredited institution with a 
grade-point average of 3.0 in biology courses and a GPA of 2.5 in the 
related courses in mathematics, chemistry and physics, (2) acceptance 
by a thesis adviser, and (3) satisfactory scores on one of the following: 
(a) Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test and the Advanced Test 
in Biology, (b) Medical College Admission Test, or (c) Dental Admission 
Test, (4) completion of departmental application, and (5) submission 
of two letters of recommendation. 

Students with limited subject or grade deficiencies may be consid- 
ered for conditional acceptance to the program. Conditionally classified 
graduate standing may be removed upon completion of nine units of 
adviser and graduate committee approved postgraduate studies in 
biology, mathematics, chemistry or physics, with grades of B or better. 
These conditions are set at the time of admission. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for 
the fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, 
deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. 

Check the university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Classified Standing 

Students should achieve classified graduate standing as soon as they 
are eligible, since no more than nine units of graduate work taken 
before classification can be included on the study plan (see below) for 
the degree. A student who meets the admission requirements may 
apply for classified standing, which requires the development of a 
study plan approved by the thesis adviser, thesis committee, director 



MINOR IN BIOTECHNOLOGY 

The biotechnology minor is appropriate for students majoring in 
biological science or biochemistry and interested in gaining employ- 
ment in nearly any area of the 
growing medical and agricultural 
biotechnology industries, working 
in academic research laboratories, 
or pursuing postgraduate degrees 
in basic molecular biology or 
biochemistry. 

The biotechnology minor 
requires a minimum of 31 accept- 
able units of chemistry and 
biology. These courses must 
be completed with a minimal 
overall grade-point average of 
2.0 and include 12 units unique 
to the minor that are not used 
to meet requirements for the 
biological science or chemistry 
major. 


87 




BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


of the departmental graduate program and dean of graduate studies. 
Students admitted with conditional acceptance must meet conditions 
(see above) before being considered for classified standing. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

Advancement to candidacy is attained by requesting a graduation 
check and receiving subsequent approval of the graduate program 
adviser on the Grad Check Review Form, mailed by the Graduate 
Studies Office. 

Study Plan 

Students must meet the Graduate Level Writing Requirement, 
which can be found in this catalog under “Graduate Regulations.” 
Students will meet this requirement by taking Biology 500A,B 
Professional Aspects of Biology. 

A study plan includes a minimum of 30 units of adviser-approved 
graduate work; at least one-half of the total units must be at the 500- 
level. All study plans must include Biology 599 Independent Graduate 
Research, Biology 500A,B Professional Aspects of Biology, and Biology 
598 Thesis, and at least one graduate seminar. Six units must be 
outside the principal area. 

A thesis acceptable to the adviser and committee, covering a 
research problem, as well as a final oral examination on the thesis 
research, are required to complete the degree program. 

Supervising the work of graduate students requires the personal 
attention of advisers. To insure that advisers are available for new 
graduate students, a graduate student is expected to complete the 
requirements for graduation within three years after classification. 

For more detailed information or advisement, students should 
contact the Biological Science Department, or the Graduate Program 
Director of the Biological Science Department. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE COURSES 

Courses are designated as BIOL in the class schedule. 

Unless otherwise designated, prerequisites may be waived by the 
instructor of the course if the instructor is satisfied that the student 
is qualified to undertake the course. 

101 Elements of Biology (3) 

Underlying principles governing life forms, processes and interactions. 
Elements of biology and reasoning skills for understanding scientific 
issues on personal, societal, and global levels. For the non-science 
major. No credit toward biological science major. (3 hours lecture) 

10 1H Elements of Biology (Honors) (3) 

Corequisite: Biology 101LH (Honors). Students must meet honors 
qualifications. Living organisms and characteristics of the natural 
environment. Emphasis on the scientific reasoning leading to our 
current understanding of living systems. For the non-science major. 

(3 hours lecture) 

101 L Elements of Biology Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Biology 101. Laboratory experiments 
demonstrating the principles presented in the lecture course. Scientific 
inquiry, cell structure and function, physiology, genetics, biodiversity, 
evolution and ecology. For the non-science major. (3 hours laboratory 
or fieldwork; weekend field trips may be required). 


101LH Elements of Biology Laboratory (Honors) (1) 

Corequisite: Biology 10 1H (Honors). Students must meet honors 
qualifications. Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which 
provide insight into scientific reasoning and the basis of our current 
understanding of living systems. For the non-science major. (3 hours 
laboratory or fieldwork; field trips may be required) 

102 Biology for Future Elementary Teachers (3) 

Designed especially for the prospective elementary teacher, this 
activity-based course will examine biological concepts in real-world 
contexts such as the medical examination, genes and evolution, and 
the environment. Lecture and laboratory form a single unified learning 
experience. No credit toward biological science major. (6 hours 
activity) 

171 Evolution and Biodiversity (5) 

Introduction to scientific processes and methods of biology. 
Explorations of unifying principles of evolution processes leading 
to biodiversity, and principles of conservation biology. (Primarily 
for majors in the Colleges of Natural Science/Mathematics and 
Engineering/Computer Science; 3 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory/ 
fieldwork) Weekend field trips may be required. 

172 Cellular Basis of Life (5) 

Prerequisite: Biology 171 or consent of instructor. Exploration 
of the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells 
including: evolutionary relationships; cell membranes; compartmenta- 
tion; signaling and metabolic pathways; cellular reproduction; cell 
differentiation, multicellularity and development. (For majors in 
Colleges of Natural Science/Mathematics and Engineering/Computer 
Science; 3 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

210 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3) 

Introductory anatomy and physiological concepts for Kinesiology 
and Health Science majors. Gross and micro-level human anatomy as 
well as the structure and function of selected systems. Preparation for 
Kinesiology 260, 300, 348, 371, and the major in Health Science. 

No credit toward biological science major. (Same as Kinesiology 210) 

(3 hours lecture) 

273 Genetics and Molecular Biology (5) 

Prerequisite: Biology 172 or consent of instructor. Corequisite: 
Completion or enrollment in Chemistry 120A. Explorations of the 
underlying principles of inheritance, structure and functions of nucleic 
acids, regulation of gene expression, the mechanisms by which popula- 
tions evolve, and the impact of biotechnology on society. (3 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

274 Principles of Physiology and Ecology (5) 

Prerequisites: Biology 273 and Chemistry 120A or consent of 

instructor; MATH 130, 150A, or 337 suggested. Principles of organ- 
isms’ interactions with their environments; physiological and evolutionary 
mechanisms of change in response to environmental factors; population 
and community ecology; energy and material flow through ecosystems. 
(3 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory/fieldwork) Weekend field trips 
may be required. 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


299L Directed Laboratory Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Biology 171 and 172 and consent of instructor. 
Research in biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. 
Intended for students (especially lower-division) who may not have 
completed sufficient course work to allow them to work independently, 
but who are eager for laboratory research experience. May be repeated 
for university credit, but units do not count toward major. (3 hours 
laboratory per unit) 

300 Environmental Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. Biological consequences 
of human intervention in ecosystems: Endangered and threatened 
species, pollution impact on organisms, pest control, population 
dynamics, genetic engineering of agricultural species, management 
of natural areas and urban ecosystem dynamics. No credit toward 
biological science major. (3 hours lecture) 

302 General Microbiology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core and 
Chemistry 120B. Introduction to structure and function of bacteria 
and viruses including beneficial and detrimental activities and interac- 
tions with other organisms. Laboratory provides investigations with 
microscopy, culture, physiology and genetics of microbes. (2 hours 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

303 Intermediate Cell Biology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. 

Corequisite: Chemistry 301 A. Evidence-based examination of cells in 
action, roles of information, matter and energy flow as driving forces 
for compartmentation, protein sorting, metabolic and signaling path- 
ways, motility and adhesion; examples taken from developmental, 
neural and cancer processes. (3 hours lecture) 

305 Human Heredity and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. Principles of human heredity 
and embryology relating to human development. Mendelian genetics, 
single gene effects, genetics, prenatal diagnosis, and human embryology. 
No credit toward biological science major. (3 hours lecture) 

306 Biology of Aging (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. Biological changes in cells, 
tissues, organs and the whole body associated with aging. Theories of 
aging will be discussed with primary emphasis on mammals. No credit 
toward biological science major. (3 hours lecture) 

309 Intermediate Molecular Biology (3^ 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 301 A. Molecular and genetic basis of cellular 
functions. The role of gene expression and protein function in metabo- 
lism, physiology, growth, development. Introduction to recombinant 
DNA and its uses, and to critical analysis of primary literature. 

(3 hours lecture) 

310 Human Physiology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. Human physiological 
systems and their relationship to human function for non-biology 
majors and students in physical education and health sciences. 

No credit for biological science major. (3 hours lecture) 


311 Nutrition and Disease (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111 or Biology 101. Relationship between 
nutrients and disease, with an emphasis on cancer, atherosclerosis and 
infectious illness. Dietary factors that modify and/or contribute to the 
disease process from the viewpoints of physiology, biochemistry and 
immunology. Not applicable to the major or minor. (3 hours lecture) 
(Same as Chemistry 311) 

314 Evolutionary Ecology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. The integra- 
tion of evolutionary and ecological principles. Includes the nature and 
causes of variation, population genetics, life histories, adaptation, 
evolution of behavior, ecology of interspecific interactions, paleoecology 
and life through time, and the interplay between ecology and 
phylogeny. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory/field work) 

317 Field Marine Biology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Field 
biology and natural history of local marine plants and animals. 
Identification of common species and factors determining their 
distributions and abundance in marine habitats. Effects of human 
activities on marine organisms. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours lab or 
fieldwork; weekend field trips may be required) 

319 Marine Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. Survey of marine plants 
and animals in their habitats. No credit toward biological science 
major. (3 hours lecture) 

330 Ecology of American Indians (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. Interrelationships of native 
peoples of the Americas with the local flora and fauna and the natural 
environment. Roles of American Indians in predator-prey interactions, 
ecological hierarchy, nutrient cycling, successional change and resource 
management. No credit toward biological science major. (3 hours 
lecture) 

340 Field Botany (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. The native 
flora of southern California. Identification, natural history and factors 
that determine the distribution of species. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory or fieldwork; weekend field trips are required) 

344 Survey of the Land Plants (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. A survey 
of the anatomical and morphological characteristics of the land plants 
as they relate to the evolutionary development and ecological strategies 
of these plants. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

352 Plants and Life (3) 

Prerequisite: one semester of college biology. Humans’ dependence 
upon and economic interest in plants throughout the world. The 
domestication of plants and the origin of agriculture. (3 hours lecture) 

360 Biology of Human Sexuality (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. The biology of the human 
reproductive system, sexual differentiation, anatomy and physiology, 
sexual behaviors, procreation, contraception and sexually transmitted 
disease. No credit toward biological science major. (3 hours lecture) 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


361 Human Anatomy (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. A systems 
approach to the structure and function of the human body. For biology 
majors and related health sciences. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory). 

362 Mammalian Physiology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core and 
Chemistry 120B. The fundamental mechanisms of mammalian and 
human physiology. Integration of cellular and organ system functions 
with emphasis on regulatory processes. For biology majors and related 
health sciences. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory). 

401 Biogeography (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Evolutionary 
patterns and mechanisms of the distribution of plants and animals 
in the major habitats of the world. Current concepts and theories. 

(3 hours lecture) 

402 Computer Lab in Molecular Systematics (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. To gain 
practical and theoretical experience with software-based methods in 
molecular systematics, with emphasis on Internet resources for molecular 
biologists, acquisition of gene protein sequences, multiple sequence 
alignment, PCR primer design, phylogenetic analysis, and controversies 
in the field. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

404 Evolution (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. The 
history of evolutionary thought; origin of universe, earth and life; 
geological and paleontological history of the earth; evidence derived 
from comparative anatomy, embryology, genetics, zoogeography; 
mechanisms of evolution. (3 hours lecture) 

405 Developmental Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 303 or 309 or consent of instructor. Molecular 
and cellular processes in embryonic development encompassing 
mechanisms of fertilization, cell and tissue interactions, morphogenesis, 
organogenesis, and the regulation of gene expression. (3 hours lecture) 

411 Medical Genetics (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core plus one 
of the following: Biology 302, 309, Chemistry 421 or 423A. Advances 
in genetics, genomics, proteomics, and systems biology. Implications 
for the pharmaceutical industry, the clinic, and for genetic counseling. 
Uses of biological arrays in diagnosing and treating diseases. (3 hours 
lecture) 

412 Principles of Gene Manipulation (3) 

Prerequisites: Biology 309 and Chemistry 30 IB. Current approaches 
to and applications of recombinant DNA technology. Principles behind 
construction of recombinant molecules including vectors and enzymes, 
introduction into organisms, selection, expression of cloned genes, and 
impact of research on society. (3 hours lecture) 


413 Advances in Molecular Genetics (3) 

Prerequisites: Biology 309 and Chemistry 301A,B. The function of 
genetic material and informational macromolecules. Extensive analysis 
of recent scientific articles in molecular genetics illustrating mutagene- 
sis, protein synthesis, protein structure and function, biogenesis of 
RNA molecules, regulation of gene expression and their relationship 
to important biological processes. (3 hours lecture) 

414 Microbial Genetics (3) 

Prerequisite: one of the following: Biology' 302, 309, Chemistry 
421, or 423A. A perspective of genetics of microbial systems including 
background information, experimental methods, data interpretation, 
genetic analysis and applications to biotechnology. (3 hours lecture) 

417 Advances in Cell Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 303. Current topics in the cell biology of cell 
motility, cell multiplication and regulation, membranes and permeability, 
cell signaling, cell-to-cell contact and extracellular matrix, and cell 
differentiation using current journal articles. (3 hours lecture) 

418L Advances in Cell Biology Lab (2) 

Prerequisite: Biology 303. Use of current techniques like fluores- 
cence microscopy, immunolabeling, ion-sensitive dye ratiometry, image 
processing, and 2-D and 3-D reconstruction to study problems in cell 
biology, cellular developmental biology, and cellular neurobiology. 

(6 hours of laboratory) 

419 Marine Ecology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 314. Ecology of planktonic, nektonic and 
benthic organisms; their communities and environments. (3 hours 
lecture) 

419L Marine Ecology Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Biology 419. Field and laboratory studies of plank- 
tonic, nektonic and benthic communities. (3 hours laboratory or field 
work; weekend field trips may be required) 

424 Immunology (4) 

Prerequisites: Biology 302, and 303 or 309. The molecular, cellular 
and organismic nature of the immune process. Inflammation, phagocy- 
tosis, antigens, immunoglobulins and cell-mediated immune phenomena. 
Modern immunology techniques. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory- 
discussion) 

426 Virology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 303 or 309. Viral structure and replication and 
host-virus interactions in the viral replication process, with emphasis 
on animal and bacterial virus systems. (3 hours lecture) 

428 Biology of Cancer (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 303 or 309 or 314. Biology 424 is recommended. 
The cancer problem as a dilemma of biology. Clinical and epidemiological 
aspects. Current research. (3 hours lecture) 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


433 Microbial Problems in Foods (2) 

Prerequisite: Biology 302 or equivalent. Food spoilage, food intoxi- 
cation and food-borne diseases caused by microbes in food processing. 
The microbes involved, sources of contamination, and methods used 
in detection and prevention of problems. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours 
laboratory or fieldwork; weekend field trips may be required) 

436 Advanced Applied Statistics (4) (Formerly 406) 

Prerequisites: Math 337 or 338; junior or senior standing. Linear 
models, including mixed models, applied to experimental and field 
data from current research projects. Poisson and logistic regression. 
Emphasis on model fitting and checking; use of permutation tests as 
needed. Presentation of results suitable for publication. (3 hours lecture, 

3 hours laboratory) (Same as Math 436) 

438 Public Health Microbiology (4) 

Prerequisite: Biology 302. The control and epidemiology of infectious 
diseases of public health importance, water and sewage microbiology. 
Control of current problems. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory) 

441 Plant Taxonomy (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Classification 
and evolution of vascular plants; emphasis on the flowering plants. 

(2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork; weekend field 
trips may be required) 

442 Pollination Biology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Pollination 
in the plant kingdom. Floral cues, pollination syndromes, pollinator 
behavior, chemical and physical characteristics of pollination, energetics, 
gene flow, phenology, and ecological aspects of pollination. (2 hours 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory or fieldwork) 

443 Plant Ecology (4) 

Prerequisite: Biology 314. Community and population ecology of 
terrestrial plants. Environmental factors and plant distribution with 
emphasis on California vegetation. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
or fieldwork; weekend field trips may be required) 

444 Plant Physiological Ecology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core and Biology 

445 recommended. Fundamental mechanisms of plant physiological 
responses to the environment with primary emphasis on whole plants 
and ecosystems. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory; weekend field 
trips may be required) 

445 Plant Cell Physiology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core plus one 
of the following: Biology 302, 309, 314, Chemistry 421, or 423A. 
Cellular and molecular mechanisms of behavior, growth, transport 
processes, and environmental responses in vascular plants. Plant 
cell development, nutrition, respiration, photosynthesis, hormones, 
photoperiodism, and stress biology. (3 hours lecture) 

446 Marine Phycology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Biological 
aspects of marine algae; comparative development, morphology, 
taxonomy, physiology, and ecology. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory or fieldwork; weekend field trips may be required) 


448 Plant Molecular Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 302 or 303 or 309 or Chemistry 421 or 423A. 
Genetic mechanisms in vascular plants controlling metabolism, growth, 
development, and responses to biotic/abiotic environmental stresses. 
Emphasis on molecular regulation of gene expression and transduction 
of internal and external signals. (3 hours lecture) 

450 Conservation Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 314 or consent of instructor. Current topics 
involving theory, concepts and techniques in the conservation of 
biological diversity. (3 hours lecture) 

451 Advanced Human Evolution (3) 

(Same as Anthropology 451) 

461 Marine Invertebrate Biology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Evolution, 
classification, phylogeny, morphological and physiological adaptations 
of marine invertebrate animals. Dissection, identification and observation 
of extant animals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork; 
weekend field trips may be required) 

462 General Parasitology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Survey 
of various animal parasites with an emphasis on the morphology, 
physiology, and genetics of human protozoans and helminthes. Other 
topics will include vectors and common parasites of domestic animals. 
(2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab per week). 

466 Behavioral Ecology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Current 
problems in the evolution of animal behavior; the origin and mainte- 
nance of social systems and behavioral interactions of animals. 

(3 hours lecture) 

467 Entomology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Anatomy, 
physiology, evolution and biology of insects and other terrestrial 
arthropods. Dissection, collection, identification and observation of 
living arthropods. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork; 
weekend field trips may be required) 

468 Comparative Animal Physiology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core and 
Chemistry 120B. Comparative study of physiological and biochemical 
processes among representative animals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory, weekend field trips may be required) 

470 Cellular Neurobiology (3) 

Prerequisites: Biology 303 or 309, and 362. Processes of cell com- 
munication, particularly in nervous systems. Molecular biology of 
neurons, model sensory and motor systems, and cellular basis for 
behavior. (3 hours lecture and activity) 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


472A Advances in Biotechnology Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core or Chemistry 
477. Corequisite: Biology 412. First semester explores biotechnology 
techniques for DNA cloning and analysis: restriction enzyme action, 
DNA sequencing, sequence analysis by computer, plasmid cloning, 
genomic library production and screening, DNA probe hybridization. 

(1 hour of lecture/discussion, 6 hours of laboratory) (Same as 
Chemistry 472 A) 

472B Advances in Biotechnology (3) 

Prerequisite: Biology/Chemistry 472 A. Second semester exploring 
biotechnology techniques for gene product analysis: DNA sequencing, 
site-directed mutagenesis, predicting amino acid changes, protein over- 
production, enzyme function assays, protein identification/preparation 
by gel techniques, immunoblotting. (1 hour discussion, 6 hours 
laboratory) (Same as Chemistry 427B) 

473 Introduction to Bioinformatics (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 30 IB, 302 and Biology 309, Biology 314 
or Chemistry 421; or consent of instructor. Provides a research-based, 
problem-solving experience using the tools and algorithms of molecular 
and computational biology to analyze genetic and protein sequences 
retrieved from appropriate databases. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours 
of computer laboratory) (Same as Chemistry 473) 

474 Natural History of the Vertebrates (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Natural 
history of the vertebrates. Observation, identification, behavior, ecology 
and distribution of the vertebrates. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
or fieldwork; weekend field trips may be required) 

475 Ichthyology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. The sys- 
tematics, evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and behavior of 
fishes. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork; weekend field 
trips may be required) 

476 Herpetology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. The biology, 
structure, physiology, ecology, distribution, identification, collection, 
evolution and behavior of amphibians and reptiles. (2 hours lecture, 

6 hours laboratory or fieldwork; weekend field trips may be required) 

477 Advances in Biotechnology (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Corequisite: 
Biology 412 or Chemistry 421 or 423B. Current topics in biotechnology 
centering on techniques for molecular cloning and DNA sequencing 
of genes. Medical breakthroughs for diagnosis of mutations and gene 
therapy. Role of biotechnology in agriculture, energy and environment. 
Bioethical issues. (3 hours lecture) (Same as Chemistry 477) 

478 Mammalogy (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. The sys- 
tematics, evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and behavior of 
mammals. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory or fieldwork, plus two 
weekend field trips) 


479 Ornithology (4) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core. Anatomy, 
physiology, evolution, behavior, and ecology of birds. Laboratory and 
fieldwork in identification, anatomy, observational techniques and 
community composition. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours lab or fieldwork 
per week; one or more weekend field trips) 

480 Advanced Topics in Undergraduate Biology (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper-division students majoring in biological science and 
consent of instructor. Current topics, updating of concepts, recent advances 
and unification of the principles of biology. May be repeated for credit. 

480E SCERP Proseminar (1) 

Prerequisites: selection as a Southern California Ecosystem Research 
Program (SCERP) Fellow. Increase the experience and skills of SCERP 
Fellows in working on problems in environmental biology. Discussion 
of publications, development and presentation of SCERP research. 

May be repeated for credit. Not available for graduate degree credit. 

480M MARC Proseminar (1) 

Prerequisite: selection as MARC Fellow. Intended to increase the 
contact of MARC Fellows with minority scientists of national repute. 
Five speakers will present seminars. Fellows will read and discuss 
relevant primary literature, attend the seminars, and meet with 
speakers before and after the seminars. May be repeated for credit. 
(Same as Chemistry 480M) 

495 Biological Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: successful completion of 90 units, including all core 
requirements, and consent of instructor. Biological, ecological, and 
health-related fields. Ninety (90) hours of practical experience in 
student’s chosen field of interest with public or private agencies or 
businesses. May not be repeated for credit. (1 hour lecture/discussion, 
laboratory work experience) 

496 Biology Tutorials (1-3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Biology lower-division core and 
consent of instructor. Supervised experience in biological science 
teaching through tutoring or assisting in a laboratory or field class. 

No credit toward biological science major. 

498 Senior Thesis (2) 

Prerequisite: 6 units of Biology 499L (two units may be taken 
concurrently). Thesis committee must approve research plan at least 
two semesters prior to enrollment in this course. Requires preparation, 
presentation and defense of a formal thesis. 

499L Independent Laboratory Study (1-3) 

Junior or senior standing with consent of instructor with whom 
the student wishes to pursue independent laboratory study in biology. 
May be repeated for credit. 

500 A Professional Aspects of Biology (1) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and concurrent enrollment in 
Biology 500B. Discussions concerning research protocol, scientific 
methodology and communication techniques. Ethics and social 
responsibilities of professional biologists. (1 hour discussion) 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 


500B Professional Aspects of Biology (1) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and concurrent enrollment in 
Biology 500A. Individualized project work and experiences in scientific 
writing. Required of all students upon admission to the graduate 
program. (3 hours project work) 

500C Professional Aspects of Biology: Teaching Effectiveness (2) 

Prerequisites/corequisites: graduate standing; must have received 
a Graduate Teaching Associate appointment. This course is designed 
to assist graduate students in becoming effective classroom teachers 
and understanding the scholarship of teaching in higher education. 
Graduate Teaching Associates will learn pedagogy and a variety of 
teaching alternatives while concurrently teaching in a laboratory/ 
discussion setting. 

505T Seminar in Molecular, Cellular, Immunological and 
Physiological Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Selected advanced topics. May 
be repeated for credit. 

517T Seminar in Ecological and Organismic Biology (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Selected advanced topics. May 
be repeated for credit. 

520T Seminar in Microbiology (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Selected advanced topics. May 
be repeated for credit. 

580 Advanced Topics in Graduate Biology (1-3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing in biology and consent of instructor. 
Current research topics, experimental design and problem solving in 
biological systems. May be repeated for credit. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Open to graduate students with consent of instructor with whom 
the student is conducting graduate thesis research. May be repeated 
for a maximum of 6 units of credit. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students with consent of instructor with whom 
the student wishes to pursue independent study in biology. May be 
repeated for credit. 



ASSOCIATE DEAN 
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Thomas Johnson 

ASSISTANT DEAN 
ACADEMIC ADVISING 

Robert Miyake 

ADVISING CENTER 

Langsdorf Hall 731 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://business.fullerton.edu 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration 
Concentrations in: 

Accounting 
Business Economics 
Entertainment and Tourism 
Management 
Entrepreneurship 
Finance 

Information Systems 
Management 
Management Science 
Marketing 

Minor in Business Administration 
Minor in Information Systems 
Master of Business Administration 
Concentrations in: 

Accounting 
Business Economics 
E-Commerce 
Entrepreneurship 
Finance 

Information Systems 
International Business 
Management 
Management Science 
Marketing 


INTRODUCTION 

This major prepares students for entry level positions in business and administration in both 
the private and public sectors. Career opportunities range from accounting, cost analysis, 
marketing research and statistical forecasting to real estate, personnel, sales and information 
systems. This curriculum also provides a foundation for advanced study. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Admission to the Business Administration Major 

Admission to the Business Administration major involves two steps. Students who apply to 
the major are initially classified as Pre -business. After completing the lower-division core require- 
ments with grades of at least C, students may apply to the Business Administration major. Pre- 
business students may take lower-division business courses, but most upper-division courses 
are not open to Pre-business students. 

All of the following requirements must be met for the degree. Students must earn a grade 
of at least C in each core course listed below. For assistance in interpreting these requirements 
contact the Business Advising Center. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration requires a minimum of 124 units which 
includes courses for the major. General Education, all University requirements, and free electives. 

Required Lower-Division Core Courses 

Accounting 201 A Financial Accounting (3) 

Accounting 20 IB Managerial Accounting (3) 

Business Admin 201 Business Writing (3) 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 

Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Management 246 Business and Its Legal Environment (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 265 Introduction to Computing and Application Software (3) 

Math 135 Business Calculus (3) 

OR Math 130 Short Course in Calculus (4) 

OR Math 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 

Required Upper-Division Core Courses 

Business Admin 301 Advanced Business Communication (3) 

Econ 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

OR Econ 315 Intermediate Business Microeconomics (3) 

OR Econ 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Finance 320 Business Finance (3) 

Management 339 Principles of Management & Operations (3) 

Management 340 Organizational Behavior (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A Quantitative Business Analysis: Probability and Statistics (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 36 IB Quantitative Business Analysis: Statistics and Management Science (3) 
Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing (3) 


94 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


Required Capstone Core Course 

After completing all lower and upper-division core courses, take: 
Management 449 Seminar in Strategic Management (3) 

Required Concentration Courses 

A minimum of 18 units of course work is required in one concen- 
tration. See listing of concentration requirements below. 

Collateral Requirement 

Three-unit introductory social science course other than Economics, 
chosen from General Education section III.C.l. 

Other Requirements, Grades and Residence 

Global Business Requirement. Complete one course, of at least 3 units, in 
the area of Global Business. The course must be selected from the list 
of Approved Global Business Courses, which is available from the 

Business Advising 
Center. 

Other subjects. 
Complete at least 50 
percent of the 
coursework for the 
degree in subjects 
other than business 
administration or 
economics. Complete 
all university 
requirements for the 
bachelor’s degree. 

Grade-Point 
Average (GPA). 
Maintain at least a 
2.0 grade point 
average in all college 
level units 
attempted, in all 
units attempted at 
CSUF, in all units 
attempted in the 

major, and in all units attempted in the concentration. Earn at least a C 
grade in each core course and in each of the following concentrations: 
accounting, information systems and management science. Students in 
the marketing concentration are required to complete Marketing 353, 
Marketing 370 and Marketing 379 with at least C. 

Grade option. Take all required core courses and all required concen- 
tration courses in the College of Business and Economics for a letter 
grade (A,B,C,D,F). The Credit/No Credit grading option may not be 
used for these courses, and a grade of CR (credit) will not satisfy the 
requirements for the degree. Exception: Courses in calculus may be 
taken under the Credit/No Credit grading option; however, if it is also 
taken to meet general education requirements then it must be taken 
for a letter grade. 

Residence. At least one-half of the units in the concentration (except 
accounting, which requires 15) and a minimum of 30 units must be 
taken in residence in the College of Business and Economics; at least 
15 of the last 24 units before graduation must be taken in residence in 
the College of Business and Economics. 



Concentrations for the B.A. in Business Administration 

Business administration majors must complete the requirements 
of one concentration in addition to the degree requirements shown 
above. 

ACCOUNTING CONCENTRATION (21 UNITS) 

All students with an accounting concentration are required to take 
the courses shown below. 

Accounting 301A,B Intermediate Accounting (3,3) 

Accounting 302 Cost Accounting (3) 

Accounting 307 Accounting Information Systems (3) 

Accounting 308 Concepts of Federal Income Tax Accounting (3) 

And two courses from the following (6 units): 

Accounting 401 Advanced Accounting (3) 

Accounting 402 Auditing (3) 

Accounting 403 Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit 
Entities (3) 

Accounting 408 Problems in Taxation (3) 

Accounting 420 Advanced Cost Accounting (3) 

Accounting 460 Seminar in Financial Statement Analysis (3) 
Accounting 470 Tax Research, Practice and Procedures (3) 

BUSINESS ECONOMICS CONCENTRATION (18 UNITS) 

All students with an economics concentration are required to take 
Econ 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) or Econ 315 
Intermediate Business Microeconomics (3) as part of their business 
administration core requirements. In addition, the concentration 
requires Econ 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) and 
Econ 410 Industrial Organization (3) and 12 units of upper-division 
economics electives, 3 units of which must be at the 400-level. 

Students interested in economics also may wish to consider the 
Bachelor of Arts in Economics. 

ENTERTAINMENT & TOURISM MANAGEMENT 
CONCENTRATION (21 UNITS) 

Required courses (6 units) 

Business Admin 346 Introduction to Entertainment and Tourism 
Studies (3) 

Business Admin 449 Capstone in Entertainment and Tourism 
Studies (3) 

Interdisciplinary Electives (9 units from the following) 

RTVF 100 Introduction to Radio, TV, and Film (3) 

Course in Entertainment and Public Relations (3) 

RTVF 480 Management in Radio, TV, and Film (3) 

Theatre 350 Stage Management (3) 

Theatre 351 Theatre Management (3) 

Business Electives (6 units) 

Management 435 Service Operations and Operations (3) 

OR Management 446 Entertainment Business Law (3) 

Marketing 425 Retail Marketing Strategies (3) 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


OR Marketing 465 Managing Services Marketing (3) 
Internship (Recommended) 

Business Admin 495 Internship (1-3) 


ENTREPRENEURSHIP CONCENTRATION (18 UNITS) 

Management 461 Entrepreneurial Management (3) 
Marketing 462 Marketing for Entrepreneurs (3) 
Accounting 463 Financial Controls for Entrepreneurs (3) 
Management 464 Entrepreneurial Leadership (3) 
Management 465A New Venture Creation and Funding (3) 
Management 465B New Venture Launch (3) 


FINANCE CONCENTRATION (18 UNITS) 

Required Courses (6 units) 

Finance 332 Theory of Corporate Finance (3) 
Finance 340 Introduction to Investments (3) 

OR Finance 342 Capital and Money Markets (3) 


Electives (12 units) 

Students must complete 12 units of elective courses in finance. 
Students are encouraged to choose as many courses as possible from 
one of the following. Students are expected to consult with faculty 
advisers when selecting courses. 


Corporate/Intemational Financial Management Track 
Finance 331 Working Capital Management and Computer 
Applications (3) 

Finance 335 Financial Analysis for Investors and Lenders (3) 
Finance 342 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Finance 370 International Business Finance (3) 

Finance 371 Export-Import Financing (3) 

Finance 373 Asia-Pacific Financial <Sr Security Markets (3) 
Finance 432 Financial Forecasting and Budgeting (3) 

Finance 433 Problems in Business Finance (3) 

Financial Institutions Track 

Finance 335 Financial Analysis for Investors and Lenders (3) 
Finance 340 Introduction to Investments (3) 

Finance 342 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Finance 351 Introduction to Real Estate (3) 

Finance 352 Real Estate Finance (3) 

Finance 370 International Business Finance (3) 

Finance 425 Commercial Bank and Financial Institution 
Management (3) 

Finance 444 Options and Futures (3 


Insurance & Financial Service Track 

Finance 335 Financial Analysis for Investors and Lenders (3) 
Finance 360 Principles or Insurance (3) 

Finance 410 Theory and Practice of Personal Financial Planning (3) 


Finance 411 Retirement and Estate Planning (3) 

Finance 461 Business Property and Liability Risk Management (3) 
Finance 462 Life and Health Insurance (3) 


Investments/Financial Planning Track 

Finance 335 Financial Analysis for Investors and Lenders (3) 
Finance 340 Introduction to Investments (3) 

Finance 355 Real Estate Investment Analysis (3) 

Finance 360 Principles or Insurance (3) 

Finance 410 Theory & Practice of Personal Financial Planning (3) 
Finance 411 Retirement and Estate Planning (3) 

Finance 442 Advanced Investment Analysis (3) 

Finance 444 Options and Futures (3) 

Note: To be eligible to sit for the Certified Financial Planner 
Examination, students must take all of the following: Finance 340, 
355, 360, 410, 411, and Accounting 358. 


Real Estate Professions Track 

Finance 351 Introduction to Real Estate (3) 

Finance 352 Real Estate Finance (3) 

Finance 353 Real Estate Valuation (3) 

Finance 355 Real Estate Investment Analysis (3) 

Finance 454 Real Estate Market Analysis (3) 

Finance 456 Property Development and Management (3) 


Note: To be eligible to sit for the Real Estate Broker License Examination, 
students must have completed eight college-level courses, in addition 
to meeting the experience/educational requirements. Five of the 
courses are required, including: Real Estate Practice (not offered at 
CSUF); Legal Aspects of Real Estate (not offered at CSUF); Real Estate 
Finance (Finance 352); Real Estate Appraisal (Finance 353); and Real 
Estate Economics (Finance 454). In lieu of Real Estate Economics, the 
student may complete Economics 201, 202 or 361 or Accounting 
201 A or 20 IB. In addition to the five required courses, the student is 
required to complete three courses from a long list of electives includ- 
ing the following courses offered at CSUF: Real Estate Principles 
(Finance 351); Advanced Real Estate Finance (Finance 355); Advanced 
Real Estate Appraisal (Finance 551); and Business Law (Management 
246). For detailled informaiton, please visit the California Department 
of Real Estate website. 


INFORMATION SYSTEMS CONCENTRATION (21 UNITS) 

All students with an Information Systems concentration are 
required to take: 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 309 Intro to Operating Systems and 
Programming (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 310 Systems Analysis and Design (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 370 COBOL Programming for Information 
Systems (3) 

OR Info Sys/Decision Sci 371 C++ for Business Applications (3) 

OR Info Sys/Decision Sci 411 Micro-computer Business 
Application Design (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 408 Database Management Systems (3) 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


Info Sys/Decision Sci 409 Business Telecommunications for 
Information System Design (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 454 Seminar in Information Systems 
Development (3) 

Information Systems Elective (3) 

MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION (18 UNITS) 

Students in the management concentration must choose one of the 
following emphases: 

General Management (18 units) 

Management 343 Human Resource Management (3) 

OR Management 443 Team Leadership Skills (3) 

Management 425 Productivity and Quality Management (3) 
Management 440 Emerging Issues in Management (3) 

and nine units of elective course work to be chosen in consultation 
with a departmental adviser. 

Human Resources Management (18 units) 

Management 343 Human Resource Management (3) 

Management 432 Staffing, Management (3) 

Management 434 Compensation (3) 

Management 441 Labor-Management Relations (3) 

and 6 units of elective coursework to be chosen in consultation with 
a departmental advisor. 

International Management (18 units) 

Management 346 International Law for Business (3) 

Management 350 International Management (3) 

Management 425 Productivity & Quality Management (3) 

and 6 units of elective coursework to be chosen in consultation with 

a departmental advisor. 

Operations Management (18 units) 

Management 343 Human Resource Management (3) 

OR Management 443 Team Leadership Skills (3) 

Management 421 Operations Systems Design (3) 

Management 422 Production and Inventory Control (3) 

Management 425 Productivity and Quality Management (3) 

and six units of elective course work to be chosen in consultation with 

a departmental adviser. 

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE CONCENTRATION (18 UNITS) 

Required Courses (9 units) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 309 Introduction to Operating Systems and 
Programs (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 310 Systems Analysis and Design (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 440 Integrative Decision Tools for Business 
Operations (3) 


One Course in Statistical Concepts (3 units) 

Electives in Statistics (Students must take at least one course from 
this category) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 422 Surveys and Sampling Design and 
Applications (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 461 Statistical Theory for Management 
Science (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 467 Statistical Quality Control (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 472 Design of Experiments (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 473 Applied Statistical Forecasting (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 474 Data Mining (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 475 Multivariate Analysis (3) 

6 Units from: 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 408 Database Management Systems (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 411 Microcomputer Business Application 
Design (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 415 Decision Support and Expert Systems (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 465 Linear Programming in Management 
Science (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 490 Queuing and Stochastic Models in 
Management Science (3) 

Economics 440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

Finance 360 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Finance 444 Options and Futures (3) 

Management 422 Production and Inventory Control (3) 
Management 430 Integrated Logistics Management (3) 

Management 444 Project Management (3) 

An additional course in Statistical Concepts (3) 


MARKETING CONCENTRATION (18 UNITS) 

Required Courses (9 units) 

Marketing 353 Marketing Information Technology (3) 
Marketing 370 Buyer Behavior (3) 

Marketing 379 Marketing Research Methods (3) 


Electives (6 units) 

Choose two from the following: 

Marketing 401 Professional Selling (3) 

Marketing 405 Integrating Marketing Communications (3) 
Marketing 415 Managing the Sales Force (3) 

Marketing 425 Retail Marketing Strategy (3) 

Marketing 445 International Marketing (3) 

Marketing 455 Strategic Internet Marketing (3) 

Marketing 462 Marketing for Entrepreneurs (3) 

Marketing 465 Managing Services Marketing (3) 

Marketing 475 Export Marketing Strategies (3) 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


Marketing Concentration Capstone Course (3 units) 

Marketing 489 Developing Marketing Strategies (3) 

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The minor provides a basic understanding of the role of business in 
society and the methods used by business. This curriculum also pro- 
vides a basis for advanced study A working knowledge of algebra is 
necessary for several of the required courses. 

Business administration minors shall not enroll in any required 
upper-division course (in the minor) until they have completed all of 
the required lower-division courses (in the minor) with a grade of at 
least C in each course. Students must earn a grade of at least C in each 
course required for the minor. 

Required Lower-Division Courses 

Accounting 201A,B Financial and Managerial Accounting (3,3) 
Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 

Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Management 246 Business and Its Legal Environment (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 265 Introduction to Computing and Application 
Software(3) 

Required Upper-Division Courses 

Special Notice: Enrollment in these courses requires the completion 
of all lower-division minor requirements with a grade of C or better in 
each course. 

Finance 320 Business Finance (3) 

Management 339 Principles of Management & Operations (3) 

OR Management 340 Organizational Behavior (3) 

Marketing 351 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Economics Majors minoring in Business Administration: Economics 
Majors can complete a minor in business administration by taking 
Accounting 20 IB, Management 246, Finance 320, Management 339 or 
340 and Marketing 351. All other required courses for the minor are 
required for the major in Economics. 


MINOR IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS* 

This minor surveys modem computer methods and the develop- 
ment of information-systems. Emphasis is placed on systems which aid 
management decision-making. Students must earn a grade of at least C 
in each course listed below. 


Accounting 201 A Financial Accounting (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 265 Introduction to Computing and Application 
Software (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 309 Introduction to Operating Systems and 
Programming (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 310 Systems Analysis & Design (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 408 Database Management Systems (3) 


* Students with a major in business administration may not minor 
in information systems. Interested students may elect to complete a 
second concentration in information systems. 


One of the following: 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 370 COBOL Programming for Information 

Systems (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 371 C++ for Business Applications (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 372 Java Programming for Business Applications (3) 
Info Sys/Decision Sci 411 Microcomputer Business Application 

Design (3) 

CREDENTIAL INFORMATION 

The bachelor’s degree in Business Administration may be effectively 
combined with subject matter studies necessary for the Single Subject 
Teaching Credential in Business. Undergraduates are encouraged to 
work with the department adviser and/or the Center for Careers in 
Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers 
to plan efficient course selections for general education, the major and 
electives. Postgraduate students should contact the Admission to 
Teacher Education Office in the School of Education (714-278-3411) 
to obtain information on attending an overview presentation and 
orientation and then contact the department credential adviser. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

The M.B.A. degree program is accredited by the Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). This assures a rigorous, 
in-depth program, covering the full spectrum of business administra- 
tion. Accreditation also indicates a well-qualified faculty, high standards 
for students, access to computing and an extensive library system. 

Programs of Study 

The College of Business and Economics offers two plans for the 
M.B.A. degree. 

The M.B.A. Generalist Plan is designed for students with little or 
no course work in business administration. The curriculum surveys the 
entire field of business administration, preparing students for general 
management responsibilities. 

The M.B.A. Specialist Plan is designed for students with a recent 
undergraduate degree in business administration or for those who wish 
to include a specialized area of concentration in their curriculum. The 
areas of concentration are accounting, business economics, e-com- 
merce, entrepreneurship, finance, information systems, international 
business, management, management science and marketing. 

The M.B.A. program is scheduled especially for students who are 
employed full time. Courses are offered during the late afternoon and 
evening. Most students enroll on a part-time basis, taking two courses 
(6 units) per semester. 

Most graduate courses in the College of Business and Economics 
require “classified CBE status” and are open only to students with 
classified standing in the M.B.A., M.S. in Accountancy, M.S. in 
Information Systems, M.S. in Taxation or M.A. in Economics programs. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based on enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


Admission 

Students meeting the following requirements will be admitted to 
conditionally classified standing: 

1 . Acceptable bachelor’s degree from an appropriately accredited 
institution, or equivalent. 

2. Minimum grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester 
units attempted and in good standing at last college attended. 

3. Satisfactory score on the Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT). Students must score in the top 50 percent on the verbal, 
quantitative and analytical writing areas. 

4. For international students, a score of 570 on the paper exam or 230 
on the compter based TOEFEL is required. A student scoring 
between 550 and 570 may be admitted conditionally depending 
upon an evaluation of the entire application file. The student may 
be required to complete a department approved course(s). 

5. Recommendation from the MBA Admissions Committee based 
upon a review of the above requirements, the student’s “Statement 
of Purpose”, and prior work experience. Admission is competitive. 

Students meeting the following additional requirements will be 
advanced to classified standing: 

1. Proficiency in calculus and computer applications equivalent to 
passing Mathematics 135 Business Calculus (3 units), and 
Information Systems/Decision Sciences 265 Introduction to 
Computing and Application Software (3 units), with grades of 
at least a “C n . 

2. Approval of study plan. 

M.B.A. GENERALIST PLAN (51 UNITS) 

Foundation Courses (27 units) 

Accounting 510 Financial Accounting (3) 

Business Admin 590 Strategic Management (3) 

Economics 515 The Price System and Resource Allocation (3) 

Finance 517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 513 Statistical Analysis (3) 

Management 515 Management of Information in the Corporate 
Environment (3) 

Management 516 Organizational Theory and Management of 
Operations (3) 

Management 518 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Marketing 519 Marketing Management (3) 

Up to nine units of foundation courses may be waived on the basis 
of equivalent undergraduate coursework providing the proposed 
courses are no more than seven years old and have at least a C grade 
with an overall of 3.0 GPA (B). Courses waived beyond nine units must 
be replaced by an advanced course in the same discipline. 

Advanced Courses (21 units) 

All advanced courses must be at the graduate level. 

Accounting 511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Economics 521 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (3) 

Finance 523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3) 


Info Sys/Decision Sci 514 Decision Models for Business and 
Economics (3) 

Management 524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and 
Administration (3) 

Marketing 525 Seminar in Marketing Problems (3) 

500-level elective chosen from any of the six CBE departments 

Capstone Course (3 units) 

Business Admin 591 Comprehensive Business Management (3) 

Pass the individual written project in Business Admin 591 and 
complete the course with a grade of B or better. 

M.B.A./SPECIALIST PLAN (33-60 UNITS) 

The M.B.A./Specialist curriculum includes a concentration in a 
specialized area. Students with a bachelor’s degree in business adminis- 
tration may be able to complete the program with the minimum of 33 
units. Students with little or no recent course work in business admin- 
istration may require 60 units. Any deficiencies in calculus or com- 
puter applications must be removed within one year. Any study plan 
course with a grade lower than C must be repeated with at least a C 
grade, regardless of the overall GPA of the student. A 3.0 GPA (B) is 
required in study plan courses and over all applicable course work. 

Foundation Courses (30 units) 

Accounting 510 Financial Accounting (3) 

Business Admin 590 Strategic Management (3) 

Economics 515 The Price System & Resource Allocation (3) 

Finance 517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 513 Statistical Analysis (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 514 Decision Models for Business and 
Economics (3) 

Management 515 Management of Information in the Corporate 
Environment (3) 

Management 516 Organizational Theory and Management 
of Operations (3) 

Management 518 Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Marketing 519 Marketing Management (3) 

Foundation courses may be waived on the basis of equivalent 
undergraduate course work, providing that the equivalent courses are 
no more than seven years old and have grades of at least C with a GPA 
of at least B. 

A list of equivalent undergraduate courses is available from the 
graduate adviser. In many cases, students with a recent bachelor’s 
degree in business administration from an accredited university will 
be able to waive all foundation courses. 

Advanced Courses (18 units) 

Accounting 511 Seminar in Managerial Accounting (3) 

Note: Students who have satisfactorily completed a course in cost 
accounting must substitute Accounting 52 1 Seminar in Administrative 
Accounting (3) for Accounting 511. 

Economics 521 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (3) 

Note: Economics 521 is not open to students with credit in interme- 
diate macroeconomics. 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


Finance 523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3) 

Management 524 Seminar in Organizational Behavior and 
Administration (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 526 Forecasting, Decision Analysis and 
Experimental Design (3) 

OR Info Sys/Decision Sci 550 Business Data Communications (3) 
OR Info Sys/Decision Sci 560 Advanced Deterministic Models (3) 
OR Info Sys/Decision Sci 561 Advanced Probabilistic Models (3) 
Marketing 525 Seminar in Marketing Problems (3) 

All courses in this group must be taken at the graduate level. The 
Info Sys/Decision Sci seminar will be waived for students who have 
successfully completed both Info Sys/Decision Sci 513 and 514 (but 
not for students who have taken Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A and 
36 IB). Students with a concentration in International Business are 
required to take only five of the following courses: 

Concentration Courses (12 units except International Business) 

Students may choose a concentration in Accounting, Business 
Economics, E-Commerce, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Information 
Systems, Management, Marketing or Management Science. Students 
may also elect to take a combination of courses from each of these 
areas with no concentration. 

At least 6 units of the concentration courses must be taken at the 
500-level. Concentration courses are to be approved by the department 
chair concerned, or designee within the department, and the Associate 
Dean, College of Business Administration and Economics. If no con- 
centration is desired, the combination must be approved by the 
Associate Dean. 

Note: The accounting concentration electives must cover the follow- 
ing areas: Financial Accounting and Theory, Accounting Information 
Systems, Auditing, and Taxation. At least nine of these units must be 
at the graduate level. 

International Business Concentration (15 units) 

Five of the following courses (15 units) are required, including at 
least 9 units at the graduate (500) level. (Note: students with an inter- 
national business concentration take only five of the courses listed 
above under Advanced Courses.) 

Accounting 518 Seminar in International Accounting (3) 

Economics 531 International Economics (3) 

Finance 570 Seminar in International Financial Management (3) 
Management 547 Comparative Management (3) 

Marketing 445 International Marketing (3) 

Elective (3 units) 

Recommended electives must be approved by the international 
business adviser. Electives include courses in business and economics 
as well as selected courses in history, political sciences, communica- 
tions, geography and Chicana and Chicano Studies. 


Capstone Course (3 units) 

Business Admin 591 Comprehensive Business Management (3) 

Pass the individual project in Business Admin 591 and complete the 
course with a grade of B or better. 

In exceptional cases, a thesis (Business Administration 598, Thesis) 
may also serve as an option. See the graduate adviser for details. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

Courses are designated as “BUAD” in the class schedule. 

201 Business Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent (with a grade of C or better). 
Covers core communication practices: routing business correspondence, 
positive, informative, negative, persuasive messages. Introduction to 
research and job application process. 

301 Advanced Business Communication (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101, Business Admin 201, and Info 
Sys/Decision Sci 265 (or equivalent) with a C or better. An advanced 
course in business communication focusing on case analysis, analytical 
reports, ethics, and business presentations. 

346 Introduction to Entertainment and Tourism Studies (3) 

(Same as Communications 346) 

449 Capstone in Entertainment and Tourism Studies (3) 

(Same as Communications 449) 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing, major in Business Administration, 
consent of the instructor, 2.5 GPA and semester in residence at the 
university. Planned and supervised work experience. May be repeated 
to a total of six units of credit. Credit/No Credit grading only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to qualified students 
desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for 
credit. Not open to students on academic probation. 

501 Managerial Communication (3) 

This course investigates the entire process of case studies and 
formal reports. Students analyze management communication 
problems, apply writing strategies, and deliver executive presentations. 
Credit/No Credit grading only. 

590 Strategic Management (3) 

Prerequisites: classified CBE status and completion of all other 
Foundation courses. Focuses on importance of monitoring changes in 
environment(s) facing business and incorporating social, economic, 
and technological change into corporate decision-making process. 
Emphasizes use of analysis tools from other M.B.A. classes with focus 
on data sources and methods for effective environmental scanning; 
emphasis on business ethics and social responsibility, international 
competitiveness, and changes in legal environment. 


100 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


591 Comprehensive Business Management (3) 

Prerequisites: classified CBE status, within six units of completion of 
study plan and in final semester of program. Studies complex business 
problems and solutions. Builds skills in integrating knowledge from 
functional areas and applying them in an original and organized form 
to a range of business problems arising from changing technology, 
competitive market conditions, social changes, government actions. 
Includes article analysis, case analysis, a research project, individual 
and group reports and oral and written presentations. The individual 
project will fulfill the terminal degree requirement. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: classified CBE status and consent of the Associate 
Dean. Individual research under supervision. See “Theses and Projects” 
in this catalog for university requirements. 


101 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



istry/Biochemistry 


College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 


DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Robert C. Belloli 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

McCarthy Hall 580 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry 
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry 
Minor in Chemistry 
Minor in Biotechnology 

Emphasis in Biotechnology 

Emphasis in Environmental 
Chemistry 

Master of Science in Chemistry 

Emphasis in Geochemistry 

SUBJECT MATTER 
PREPARATION PROGRAM 

Single Subject Teaching Credential in 
Science 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://chemsrvr2.fullerton.edu/ 

FACULTY 

Robert C. Belloli, Peter deLijser, Richard 
Deming, Barbara Gonzalez, Christina Goode, 
A. Scott Hewitt, Gene Hiegel, Katherine 
Kantardjieff, Maria Linder, Christopher Meyer, 
John Olmsted, Harold Rogers, Chandra 
Srinivasan, Fu-Ming Tao, Joseph Thomas, 
Bruce Weber, Patrick Wegner, W Van Willis 

ADVISERS 

Undergraduate: Katherine Kantardjieff 
Graduate: Fu-Ming Tao 


INTRODUCTION 

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is on the approved list of the American 
Chemical Society. The curriculum is planned to provide thorough instruction in the basic princi- 
ples and concepts of chemistry and biochemistry for students who will (1) advance to graduate 
work in chemistry or biochemistry; (2) teach in the science programs of secondary schools; 

(3) seek employment in industry or government; (4) advance to medical, dental, or pharmacy 
training or (5) pursue a degree or minor in support of a career in other areas such as physics, 
biology, geology, business or computer science. 

The department offers three bachelor’s degrees, the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and the 
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Chemistry and the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biochemistry. 

To qualify for any of these degrees, a student must earn C grades in all courses required for 
the major including prerequisites in related sciences or mathematics. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry, the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and the Bachelor 
of Science in Biochemistry require a minimum of 120 units. These total units include courses 
for the major, General Education, all University requirements, and free electives. 

Internships 

Internship in chemistry (Chemistry 490) provides practical work experience which integrates 
with the students classroom studies. 

Recommended Program in General Education 

Because of high unit requirements for chemistry degree programs, a student majoring in 
chemistry is strongly urged to consult with a chemistry faculty adviser prior to designing his/her 
general education program. There is a six-unit exemption in general education for B.S. 

Chemistry degree majors for which the undergraduate Chemistry adviser must be consulted. 

Upper-Division Baccalaureate Writing Requirement 

Chemistry and biochemistry majors meet the coursework portion of the University’s 
upper-division writing requirement by passing Chemistry 340. 

TEACHING CREDENTIALS 

The B.A. in Chemistry degree may be effectively combined with subject matter studies neces- 
sary for the single subject teaching credential in science. Undergraduates are encouraged to work 
with the department adviser and/or the Center for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early 
as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course selections for general education, the 
major and electives. Postbaccalaureate students need to contact the Admission to Teacher 
Education office in the School of Education (714-278-3411) to obtain information on attending 
an overview presentation and orientation prior to meeting with the department adviser. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

The B.S. degree in Biochemistry is recommended for students planning to go directly into 
professional biochemistry and for students planning to attend graduate school in biochemistry or 
molecular biology. It is also excellent preparation for medical, dental and pharmacy school. 
Students who complete this program and include Chemistry 325 and Chemistry 411 (3 units) 
qualify for certification by the American Chemical Society. The major in biochemistry requires 
the following course work: 


102 


CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 


Basic Requirements (46 units) 

Courses Normally Taken During the First Two Years (Courses are 
prerequisite to additional required courses.): 

General Chemistry (Chemistry 120A,B) (10) 

Organic Chemistry (Chemistry 301A,B) (6) 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 302) (2) 

Elementary Physics (Physics 211, 212) (6) 

Elementary Physics Lab (Physics 211L, 212L) (2) 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus (Math 150A,B) (8) 

Biology 172, 273 (10) or appropriate transfer classes. 

Note: Chemistry 305, 306A and B may be substituted for 30 IB and 
302. 

Additional Required Courses (30 or 32 units) 

Theory of Quantitative Chemistry (Chemistry 315) (3) 

Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 316) (1) 

Writing for the Chemical Sciences (Chemistry 340) (3) 

Introduction to Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 361A,B) (6) 

Careers in Chemistry and Biochemistry (Chemistry 390) (1) 

General Biochemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 422) (2) 

General Biochemistry (Chemistry 423A,B) (6) 

Advances in 
Biotechnology 
(Chemistry 477) (3) 

Senior Research 

(Chemistry 495) (3) 

Introductory Chemical 
Computation 
(Chemistry 210) (2) 

OR Intermediate 
Calculus (Math 
250A) (4) 

Note: Chemistry 371A,B may be substituted for Chemistry 361A,B 

Upper-division electives are encouraged. See department handbook 
or advisor for approved list of courses. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry is recommended for 
students planning to go directly into professional chemistry and for those 
who wish to do graduate work in chemistry. Students who complete 
this program and include an advanced course in instrumental analysis 
(such as 3 units of Chemistry 411) and advanced inorganic chemistry 
(425) qualify for certification by the American Chemical Society. The 
B.S. in Chemistry requires 55 units of Chemistry courses, 25 units of 
support courses, and 9 units of adviser-approved career-breadth courses. 

Basic Requirements (40 units) 

Courses Normally Taken During the First Two Years (These courses 
are prerequisite to the additional required chemistry courses): 

General Chemistry (Chemistry 120A,B) (10) 

Organic Chemistry (Chemistry 301 A, 305, 306A,B) (10) 


Quantitative Chemistry (Chemistry 315) (3) 

Fundamental Physics (Physics 225, 226, 227 (1 unit), 255L, 226L) (9) 
Analytic Geometry and Calculus (Math 150A.B) (8) 

Note: For students planning to pursue a graduate degree, both 
Physics 227 (3 units) and 227L (1 unit) are highly recommended. 

Additional Required Chemistry Courses (20 units) 

Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 316) (1) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chemistry 325) (3) 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 355) (3) 

Writing for the Chemical Sciences (Chemistry 340) (3) 

Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 371A,B) (6) 

Careers in Chemistry and Biochemistry (Chemistry 390) ( 1) 

Senior Research (Chemistry 495) (3) 

Upper-division elective (3 units) 

The following upper-division chemistry courses do not apply 
toward the upper-division elective requirement: Chemistry 480A, 490, 
495, 496 and 499. 

Other Requirements (19 units) 

Calculus and Linear Algebra (Math 250A,B) (8) 

Introductory Chemical Computation (Chemistry 210) (2) 

Career Breadth (9) 

Career Breadth Requirements (9 units) 

The career breadth requirement is satisfied by taking nine units 
of upper-division course work directly related to the students career 
plans and approved in advance by the undergraduate adviser. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 

The Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry is offered for students who are 
planning careers which require a sound background in fundamental 
chemistry, but not at the depth of the B.S. degree. The B.A. is particu- 
larly suited for those who plan to go into areas such as secondary 
education, technical sales, food processing, chemical patent law and 
forensic sciences. The B.A. in Chemistry requires 36 units of 
Chemistry courses, 16 units of support courses, and 6 units of 
adviser-approved career-breadth courses. 

Basic Requirements (37 units) 

Courses Normally Taken During the First Two Years (These courses 
are prerequisite to the additional required chemistry courses): 

General Chemistry (Chemistry 120A,B) (10) 

Organic Chemistry (Chemistry 301A,B, 302) (8) 

Quantitative Chemistry (Chemistry 315) (3) 

Elementary Physics (Physics 211, 212, 21 1L, 212L) (8) 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus (Math 1 50A,B) (8) 

Additional Required Chemistry Courses (18 units) 

Introductory Chemical Computation (Chemistry 210) (2) 

Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 316) (1) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chemistry 325) (3) 

Writing for the Chemical Sciences (Chemistry 340) (3) 



103 


CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 


Introduction to Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 361A,B) (6) 

Career Options in Chemistry (Chemistry 390) (1) 

Senior Research (Chemistry 495) (2) 

Other Requirements (6 units) 

Adviser-approved career breadth electives (6) 

Chemistry/Pre MBA Program 

A student may combine a B.A. in chemistry with a minor in 
Business Administration to qualify to enroll in and complete an MBA 
degree at CSUF in one additional year (33 units), provided all entrance 
requirements for the MBA program have been met. See your department 
adviser for details. 

MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

A minor in Chemistry requires a minimum of 24 acceptable units 
of chemistry, including general chemistry (Chemistry 120A,B) plus 
14 units of upper-division chemistry courses. These courses must 
be completed with an overall grade-point average of 2.0. A list of 
approved upper-division chemistry classes is available from the 
department office. 

The chemistry minor is appropriate for students majoring in 
Biological Science, Geological Science, or Physics. It is also appropriate 
for students who have an interest in Art Restoration, Environmental 
Science, Forensic Science, Industrial Administration, Medical Technology, 
Patent or Environmental Law, or Science Writing. Students with an 
interest in these or other areas should consult the chemistry depart- 
ment about courses for the minor which are most appropriate for 
the interests. 

MINOR IN BIOTECHNOLOGY 

See description of this minor under the Department of Biological 
Science. 

EMPHASIS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY 

This emphasis is appropriate for students majoring in biochemistry 
and interested in gaining employment in nearly any area of the medical 
and agricultural biotechnology industries, working in academic research 
laboratories, or pursuing postgraduate degrees in molecular biology 
or biochemistry. 

Required Courses (12 units) 

Advances in Biotechnology Lab (Chem 472A,B) (6) 

Advances in Biotechnology (Chem 477) (3) 

Principles of Gene Manipulation (Biol 412) (3) 

Note: Six of the twelve required units may also be applied to meet 
elective requirements for the B.S. Biochemistry degree. 

EMPHASIS IN ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 

This emphasis provides a concentration in chemistry with respect to 
the environment. The course work addresses issues of concern such as 
EPA analysis protocols and other analytical methods, the interactions 
of chemicals with the air, water, and soil environments, how chemicals 
interact with living systems, chemical hazards, safe handling and dis- 
posal of chemicals, and an introduction to the regulatory framework. 
Interested students should consult their academic adviser for specific 
course requirements. The emphasis provides training for individuals 


interested in becoming environmental scientists and for those inter- 
ested in graduate programs in this area. 

Requirements (18-19 units) 

Three of the following (9 units): 

Chemistry of Hazardous Materials (Chem 435) (3) 

Atmospheric Chemistry (Chem 436) (3) 

Environmental Water Chemistry (Chem 437) (3) 

Environmental Biochemistry (Chem 438) (3) 

Three of the following (3 units): 

Optical Spectroscopy (Chem 411 A) (1) 

Separations (Chem 41 1C) (1) 

Radiochemistry (Chem 41 IE) (1) 

Mass Spectrometry (Chem 41 1G) (1) 

Statistics Applied to the Natural Sciences (Math 338) (4 units) 

This course can be substituted for Chemistry 210 in meeting requirements 
for the major. 

Senior Research (Chem 495) (2-3 units). 

Topic must be environmentally related. 

The Environmental Chemistry Emphasis may be integrated with 
the B.S. Chemistry with no additional required units by using the 
above courses to meet career breadth and elective requirements. 

The environmental chemistry courses also can be used to satisfy 
requirements for the minor in chemistry. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY MAJORS SEEKING 
A TEACHING CREDENTIAL 

To qualify for the Subject Matter Preparation Program for the Single 
Subject Teaching Credential in Science with a concentration in 
Chemistry, students should elect the B.A. with the following changes: 

1. Students substitute Science Education 412 for Chemistry 495. 

2. Students must take Biology 171. 

3. Students must also take Geological Science 101, 101L and 420. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

The degree is designed to qualify students for more advanced work 
in chemistry, to provide preparation that will lead to responsible 
positions in industrial or government research and development 
laboratories, and to provide preparation for the effective teaching 
of chemistry in high schools and community colleges. 

The program provides fundamental courses at a level and depth 
commensurate with those taken during the first year of a doctoral 
program and provides an introduction to research and research 
methods. 

Admission 

Students must meet the university requirements for admittance to 
the university. This normally requires a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited institution and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the 
last 60 semester units attempted. (See the section of this catalog on 
Graduate Admissions for a complete statement and procedures.) In 
addition to university requirements, in order to achieve conditionally 
classified standing in the chemistry program, a student must meet the 
following requirements: 


104 


CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 


j 


1 . An undergraduate degree in chemistry or a selection of science courses 
deemed as adequate preparation for further study in chemistry by 
the Department Graduate Committee; and 

2. At least a 2.5 GPA in upper division chemistry courses. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for all 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information 
http ://www. fullerton . edu/graduate . 

Placement Examinations 

Each student is required to take and pass placement examinations or 
take and pass with a grade of B or better the appropriate courses. Graduate 
students in one of the chemistry options must demonstrate competency 
by passing four placement examinations in the following five areas of 
chemistry: analytical, inorganic, organic, physical, and/or biochemistry. 
Graduate students in the biochemistry option must demonstrate compe- 
tency in the following areas of chemistry: analytical, biochemistry, and 
organic as well as either biology or physical chemistry. 

A student may take each placement examination three times within 
the first 13 months of enrolling in the graduate program. A student who 
does not pass the placement examinations within the 1 3 months must 
demonstrate competency by passing with a grade of B or better the 
appropriate courses within two years after first enrolling. 

The appropriate courses for analytical, inorganic, and organic chemistry 
are Chem 315, 325, and 301B, respectively. For biochemistry, Chem 
42 1 is the appropriate course except for a biochemistry option student 
who must take Chem 423A and B. For physical chemistry, Chem 36 1A 
or B is an appropriate course except for a physical chemistry option 
student who must take Chem 371 A or B. 

Classified Standing 

In order to proceed from conditionally classified to classified standing, 
a student must meet the following requirements: 

1 . Demonstration of competency in any three of the areas, as described 
above. 

2. Approved selection of a research director. 

3. An approved study plan. 

4. The university graduate-level writing requirement. 

Study Plan 

Two alternatives are available for the study plan. The student can 
complete either a laboratory thesis (preferred) or a library thesis. 

The degree program consists of 30 units of graduate committee - 
approved course work completed with a minimum grade-point average 
of 3.0 in all course work exclusive of Chemistry 505A,B and 599. Each 
student prepares a study plan in consultation with the graduate program 
adviser. The study plan must be approved by the student’s research 
director, the department, and the Office of Graduate Studies. All chem- 
istry courses on the study plan must be 400 level or above. 

Study plans may contain no more than 2 units of Chemistry 505A,B, 
and no more than 6 units of Chemistry 599 (3 units for students elect- 
ing the library thesis alternative). 


1. Basic requirements 

Courses required of all students: 

Chemistry 505A,B Seminar (2) 

Chemistry 599 Independent Graduate Research (3-6) 

Chemistry 598 Thesis (2-4) 

2. Core and Elective Requirements 

A minimum of 18 units of adviser-approved coursework are 
required, at least nine units of which must be the 500-level. Nine of 
these units must be core courses in the students area of specialization, 
as follows: 

Analytical: Chemistry 511, 512, and 552 
Biochemistry: 540, 542, and 546 
Inorganic: Chemistry 425, 431, and 552 
Organic: Chemistry 431, 535, and 539 
Physical: Chemistry 512, 551, and 552 

A specialization on geochemistry is also available. Consult the 
chemistry graduate adviser for more information. For further details 
or advisement concerning the M.S. program, contact the graduate 
adviser. 

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY COURSES 

Courses are designated as CHEM in the class schedule. 

100 Survey of Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: one year of high school algebra. The fundamental 
principles of chemistry; atomic and molecular structure and the 
application of these principles to contemporary problems. For the 
nonscience major. (3 hours lecture) 

100L Survey of Chemistry Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: concurrent or prior enrollment in Chemistry 100 or 
Chemistry 115. Experiments chosen to develop laboratory techniques; 
chemical principles and their application to environmental and 
societal problems. (3 hours laboratory) 

102 Physical Science for Future Elementary Teachers (3) 

(Same as Physics 102) 

105 Survey of the Molecules of Life (3) 

An introduction to the biochemical processes of life, including 
metabolism, development, and disease. Recent scientific advances are 
discussed with emphasis placed on AIDS, cancer, diabetes, and 
cloning. Scientific methods and ethical issues in scientific research 
are also examined. For the non-science major. (3 hours lecture) 

111 Nutrition and Health (3) 

The basics of nutrition; diet, food additives, vitamins, hormones, 
drugs, disease and related biochemical topics. Current controversies, 
popular practices, fads and fallacies. For the non-science major. 

(3 hours lecture) 

115 Introductory General Chemistry (4) 

Basic chemistry principles. For students with limited background 
in chemistry who plan to take additional chemistry or other science 
courses. Does not fulfill chemistry requirements for majors or minors. 


105 


CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 


120A General Chemistry (5) 

Prerequisites: passage of the chemistry placement examination and 
exemption from or passage of the ELM examination or completion of 
Chemistry 115 with a grade of C or better. For majors and minors in 
the physical and biological sciences The principles of chemistry: 
stoichiometry, acids, bases, redox reactions, gas laws, solid and liquid 
states, changes of state, modem atomic concepts, periodicity and 
chemical bonding. Laboratory: elementary physical chemistry and 
volumetric quantitative analysis. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, 

3 hours activity) (CAN CHEM 2) (CAN CHEM SEQ A = Chemistry 
120A and B) 

120B General Chemistry (5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 120A or equivalent. For majors and minors 
in the physical and biological sciences, chemical thermodynamics, 
chemical equilibrium (gaseous, aqueous, acid-base, solubility and 
complexion), elementary electrochemistry and chemical kinetics. 
Laboratory: quantitative analysis and elementary physical chemistry; 
some qualitative analysis. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory). 

(CAN CHEM 4) (CAN CHEM SEQ A = Chemistry 120A and B) 

120W General Chemistry Workshop (1) 

Corequisite: Chemistry 120A. Designated to develop and refresh 
problem-solving, mathematical and analytical skills needed for success 
in Chemistry 120A. Activity-based, small-group cooperative learning 
used extensively. Limited to students enrolled in Chemistry 120A. 

125 General Chemistry for Engineers (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 120A. The topics are the same as Chemistry 
120B but without laboratory. Not open to students with credit in 
Chemistry 120B. (3 hours lecture) 

196 Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

Supervised experience in chemistry teaching through tutoring or 
assisting in lower-division laboratory or field classes. Consult “Student- 
to-Student Tutorials” in this catalog for prerequisites and a more 
complete course description. 

210 Introductory Chemical Computation (2) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 120A,B and a major in chemistry or bio- 
chemistry. Introduction to the use of spreadsheets and C language 
programming for chemical problem solving and data management. 
Chemical algorithms; data analysis and interpretation; graph selection 
and preparation; data base creation and management; file transfers 
between programs and operating systems. (2 hours activity/lecture) 

295 Directed Study (1) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research in chemistry under the 
supervision of a chemistry department faculty member. Credit/no 
credit only. May be repeated for credit. Does not count towards major. 
(3 hours laboratory per unit) 

301 A Organic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 120A,B. Properties and reactions of 
aliphatic and aromatic compounds, theories of structure, and reaction 
mechanisms. For the nonchemistry major or for a B.A. in Chemistry 
or B.S. in Biochemistry major. (3 hours lecture) 


30 IB Organic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 120A,B and 301 A. Properties and reactions 
of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, theories of structure, and reaction 
mechanisms.For the nonchemistry major or for a B.A. in Chemistry 
or B.S. in Biochemistry major. (3 hours lecture) 

302 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 A. Corequisite: Chemistry 30 IB. 
Techniques for the synthesis, characterization and isolation of typical 
aliphatic and aromatic compounds. (6 hours laboratory). 

302 A Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1) 

Chemistry 302A must be taken concurrently with Chemistry 301 A. 
Techniques for the synthesis, isolation and characterization of typical 
aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Students wishing to fulfill all of 
their organic chemistry laboratory requirements in a single semester 
should enroll in Chemistry 302. 

302 B Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1) 

Chemistry 302B must be taken concurrently with Chemistry 30 IB. 
Techniques for the synthesis, isolation and characterization of typical 
aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Students wishing to fulfill all of 
their organic chemistry laboratory requirements in a single semester 
should enroll in Chemistry 302. 

303A,B,C Biotechnology: Science, Business, and Society (1-3) 
Prerequisites: completion of General Education Categories I, II, and 
III.A.l and 2. Chemistry 303A is a prerequisite for Chemistry 303B 
and 303C. Major applications of modem biotechnology will be explored 
in a lecture/discussion/presentation format that includes guest speakers 
from industry. (3 hours lecture/discussion for 5 weeks) 

303 A Biotechnology: Business and Society (1) 

303B Biotechnology: Medical Biotechnology (1) 

303C Biotechnology: Agricultural and Environmental 
Biotechnology (1) 

305 Organic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 A. Corequisite: Chemistry 306B. 
Continuation of Chemistry 301 A for the B.S. in Chemistry major. 

306A Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 120 A,B. Corequisite: Chemistry 301A. 
Techniques for synthesis, isolation and characterization of typical 
aliphatic and aromatic compounds, with applications of instrumental 
and spectroscopic methods for the B.S. in Chemistry major. 

306B Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 301A, 306A. Corequisite: 305. 
Continuation of Chemistry 306A for the B.S. in Chemistry major. 

311 Nutrition and Disease (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111 or Biology 101. Relationship between 
nutrients and disease, with an emphasis on cancer, atherosclerosis and 
infectious illness. Dietary factors that modify and/or contribute to the 
disease process from the viewpoints of physiology, biochemistry and 
immunology. Not applicable to the major or minor. (3 hours lecture) 
(Same as Biology 311) 


106 


CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 


313A,B,C Environmental Pollution and Its Solutions: Air 
Pollution, Water Pollution, Land Pollution (1-3) 

Prerequisites: completion of General Education Categories I, II, and 
III. A. Human pollution of the Earth’s atmosphere, 313A, aqueous envi- 
ronment, 313B, and terrestrial environment, 313C, and means to 
ameliorate this pollution. Historical examples, current cases, and 
future prospects. (3 hours lecture/discussion for 5 weeks) 

313A Environmental Pollution and Its Solutions: Air Pollution (1) 

313B Environmental Pollution and Its Solutions: Water Pollution (1) 

313C Environmental Pollution and Its Solutions: Land Pollution (1) 

315 Theory of Quantitative Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 120B. Physics 211, 212 or Physics 225. 
Physics 226 strongly recommended. Modem analytical chemistry; 
aqueous and non-aqueous equilibrium calculations, electrochemistry, 
spectrometry, and contemporary separation methods with emphasis 
on chromatography. (3 hours lecture) 

315W Quantitative Chemistry Workshop (1) 

Corequisite: Chemistry 315. Designed to enhance knowledge and 
skills needed for success in Chemistry 315. Emphasis on review of 
general chemistry, problem-solving skills, study and exam skills, and 
their application to quantitative chemistry. Credit/No Credit only. 

316 Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 315. Corequisite: Chemistry 210. Modem 
analytical chemistry laboratory: polyprotic acids, liquid chromatogra- 
phy, electrochemistry, absorption spectroscopy (ultraviolet/visible, 
infrared, atomic). (3 hours laboratory) 

325 Inorganic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30 IB or 305. The chemistry of the main 
group elements and an introduction to transition metal chemistry. 

(3 hours lecture) 

340 Writing for the Chemical Sciences (3) 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing, English 101 and two semesters 
of chemistry beyond general chemistry. Design and preparation of 
scientific manuscripts and presentations. Emphasizes practice in 
writing, American Chemical Society writing guidelines, peer-review 
and critical analysis of scientific literature. 

355 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 316. Corequisite: Chemistry 36 IB or 37 IB. 
Experiments in chemical synthesis, instrumental analysis and physical 
chemistry. Laboratory training and written presentation of theory, data 
and results are emphasized. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory). 

361 A, B Introduction to Physical Chemistry (3, 3) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 150A,B and Physics 211, 212 or 225, 
226, Chemistry 301A.B or 305. Corequisite: Chemistry 315. Thermo- 
dynamics and kinetics; properties of gases and solutions; molecular 
structure and energies and application to spectroscopic techniques; 
liquids, phase equilibria, thermodynamics of multicomponent systems 
with application to the life sciences. (3 hours lecture) 


371A,B Physical Chemistry (3,3) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 250A, Physics 225, 226 and Chemistry 
301 A. Corequisite: Mathematics 250B and Chemistry 315. Thermo- 
dynamics, solutions, chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, 
transport phenomena, introduction to atomic and molecular structure, 
rotation and vibration spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and kinetics. 
(3 hours lecture) 

390 Careers in Chemistry and Biochemistry (1) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 120B. Career options in chemistry. 
Credit/no credit only. (1 hour lecture) 

395 Undergraduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of one upper-division course in chemistry, 
one semester of experience working in a research laboratory, and 
consent of instructor. Independent research in chemistry or biochem- 
istry under the guidance of a department faculty member. May be 
repeated for credit. Does not count towards major. (3 hours per 
week per unit). (4 units maximum) 

411A-G Instrumental Analysis (1) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 315 and 316. Corequisite for 41 1A: 
Chemistry 36 IB or 37 IB or consent of instructor. Students wishing 
an ACS certified degree must take three units. (1 hour lecture, 

3 hours laboratory for 5 weeks) 

A. Optical Spectroscopy (UV/visible, infrared, atomic absorption, 
flame emission) 

B. Magnetic Resonance (nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin 
resonance) 

C. Separations (high performance liquid chromatography, gas 
chromatography) 

E. Radiochemistry 

G. Mass spectrometry (conventional magnetic sector, quadruple, 
Fourier transform, tandem, and time-of-flight; hyphenated 
techniques including gas chromatography (GC-MS), liquid 
chromatography (LC-MS). 

421 Biological Chemistry (3) (Formerly 322) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 A. Survey of biochemistry designed for 
biology majors. This course will cover major areas of biochemistry, 
including intermediary metabolism and compounds of biochemical 
interest. The focus of this one-semester course will be on the applica- 
tion of biochemistry and the biochemical foundation of health science. 
(3 hours lecture) 

422 General Biochemistry Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 302A or 306A and 316. Corequisite: 
Chemistry 421 or 42 3 A. The chemistry and metabolism of carbo- 
hydrates, nucleic acids, lipids and proteins; techniques of enzyme 
chemistry and isolation; research methods. (6 hours laboratory) 

423A General Biochemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30 IB or 305. Corequisite: Chemistry 315. 
Survey of biochemistry designed for Biochemistry majors; structural 
chemistry and function of biomolecules, bioenergetics and intermediary 
metabolism. (3 hours lecture) 


107 


CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 


423B General Biochemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 423A5. Corequisite: Chemistry 315. Survey 
of biochemistry designed for Biochemistry majors; structural chemistry 
and function of biomolecules, central metabolism; replication and 
expression of the genetic material. (3 hours lecture) 

425 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 325 and 361A,B or 371A,B. The bonding, 
structure and reactivity of transition and lanthanide elements. Molecular 
orbital and ligand field theory, classical metal complexes and organo- 
metallic chemistry of the transition elements. (3 hours lecture) 

431 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 30 IB or 305 and 361A,B or 371A,B or 
consent of instructor. Theoretical and physical aspects of organic 
chemistry. The modem concepts of structure, and reaction mechanisms. 

(3 hours lecture) 

435 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30 IB. An in-depth examination of hazardous 
chemicals; organic and inorganic air- and moisture-sensitive compounds, 
reactive metals; chemical reactivity patterns; chemical compatibilities; 
storage and handling; methods of disposal and waste containment; 
Federal and local regulations; case histories. (3 hours lecture) 

436 Atmospheric Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 315 or consent of instructor. Chemistry 
and photochemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere, both natural 
and polluted. Includes fundamental reaction kinetics and mechanisms, 
monitoring techniques, smog chamber, field and modeling studies. 

(3 hours lecture) 

437 Environmental Water Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 315. Chemical characteristics of fresh and 
oceanic water; major water pollutant classes, origins, environmental 
chemical transformations, effects, abatement, and fates; chemical 
methods for determining water quality, large scale processes for water 
treatment. (3 hours lecture) 

438 Environmental Biochemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30 IB. Effects of current agricultural, industrial 
and mechanical practices on the composition, metabolism and health 
of soil, plants, animals and man, from a biochemical perspective; 
mechanism of action and degradation of common agricultural chemicals 
and industrial pollutants. (3 hours lecture) 

445 Nutritional Biochemistry (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 423A or Chemistry 421. Nutrition, metabolism 
and excretion of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, major minerals 
and trace elements from a biochemical perspective. Relevant variations 
in dietary practices related to life stages and specific illnesses. (3 hours 
lecture) 

472A Advances in Biotechnology Lab (3) 

(Same as Biology 472A) 

472B Advances in Biotechnology Laboratory (3) 

(Same as Biology 472B) 


473 Introduction to Bioinformatics (3) 

(Same as Biology 473) 

477 Advances in Biotechnology (3) 

(Same as biology 477) 

480 A Topics in Contemporary Chemistry (1) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in chemistry. Research 
seminar dealing with topics of current interest in chemistry such as 
photochemistry, biochemistry, analytical chemistry and organometallic 
chemistry. Credit/no credit only. Not applicable toward masters degree. 
May be repeated for credit. 

480T Topics in Contemporary Chemistry (2-3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in chemistry. Special lecture 
topics of current interest in chemistry. May be repeated for credit. 

(1 hour lecture per unit) 

480M MARC Proseminar (1) 

(Same as Biology 480M) 

490 Internship in Chemistry and Biochemistry (1-2) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing in chemistry and consent 
of instructor. Internship in chemistry. Work on projects in industrial, 
governmental or medical laboratories. May count as career breadth 
requirement units for chemistry majors. May be repeated once. Does 
not count toward M.S. degree. 

495 Senior Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: three one-year courses in chemistry, Chemistry 390, 
and consent of instructor. Corequisite: Chemistry 340. The methods of 
chemical research through a research project under the supervision of 
one of the Department faculty. May be repeated for credit. Only 6 units 
may apply toward B.A. or B.S. degree (3 hours per week per unit) 

496 Student-to-Student Tutorials (1-3) 

Supervised experience in chemistry teaching through tutoring or 
assisting in laboratory or field classes. Consult “Student-to-Student 
Tutorials” in this catalog for prerequisites and a more complete course 
description. 

498 Senior Thesis (2) 

(Same as Biology 498) 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and completion of two 
one -year courses in chemistry. Special topics in chemistry selected 
in consultation with the instructor and approval of department chair. 
May be repeated for credit. Only six units may apply toward B.A. 
or B.S. degree. 

505A Seminar (Participation) (1) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of department. 
Student attendance at presentations by invited scientists on topics 
of current interest in chemistry. May not be repeated for credit. 

(1 hour seminar) 


108 


CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 


505B Seminar (Presentation) (1) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 505A, graduate standing and consent of 
the department. Student presentation of recent contributions to the 
chemical literature. May not be repeated for credit. (1 hour seminar) 

511 Theory of Separations (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 355 and 361 A,B or 371A,B. The theory, 
application and limitations of physical and chemical separation 
techniques; chromatography. (3 hours lecture) 

512 Advanced Instrumentation (Formerly 580T) (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 315. Spectroscopic instrumentation compo- 
nents and systems. Includes laser spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, 
chemical sensor, process control, surface science, and microscopy 
methods; vacuum technology, optics, electro-optics, and electronics 
components; design and repair of instrumentation. (3 hours) 

535 Organic Synthesis (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 361A,B or 371A,B and 301B or 305. 
Methods of synthetic organic chemistry and their application to 
construction of organic molecules. (3 hours lecture) 

539 Chemistry of Natural Products (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 301B or 305. The biosynthesis of the 
alkaloids, terpenes, steroids and other natural products of plant 
and animal origin. (3 hours lecture) 

543 Physical Biochemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 361A,B or 371A,B, 322 or 423A,B or 
consent of instructor. Methods for measuring physical properties 
of proteins and nucleic acids. Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic 
aspects. (3 hours lecture) 

546 Metabolism and Catalysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 421 or 423A,B or consent of instructor. 
Regulation of bio-synthetic and degradative reactions in living systems. 
The control of enzyme activity and concentration. Mechanisms of 
hormone action. (3 hours lecture) 


551 Quantum Chemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 371A,B. Postulates and theories of 
approximation methods in quantum chemistry, the electronic structure 
of atoms and molecules, chemical bonds, group theory and applications. 
(3 hours lecture) 

552 Kinetics and Spectroscopy (Formerly 580T) (3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 361B or 37 IB. Kinetics and spectroscopy 
of chemical and biochemical systems in the gas phase, in the liquid 
phase, and on surfaces. 

580T Topics in Advanced Chemistry (1-6) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in chemistry. Current research 
topics in chemistry in the area of analytical, organic, inorganic, physi- 
cal 

chemistry and biochemistry. May be repeated for credit. (1 hours 
seminar period) 

597 Project 1-6 

Prerequisites: an officially appointed project committee and consent 
of the department chair. Guidance in the preparation for a project for 
the master’s degree. 

598 Thesis (1-6) 

Prerequisite: an officially appointed thesis committee. Guidance 
in the preparation of a thesis for the master’s degree. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-6) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in chemistry. May be repeated 
for credit. 


109 


CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 



INTRODUCTION 

Chicana and Chicano Studies is an interdisciplinary field, drawing from and contributing 
to the humanities, social sciences and the arts. The department offers a unique opportunity for 
students to gain an understanding and awareness of the vital presence and increasing signifi- 
cance of the Chicano population in the United States. Studies of the Chicana/o experience 
include history, culture, art, literature, music and contemporary issues, such as education, family 
identity, immigration and citizenship, ethnicity and gender. Particular emphasis is also given to 
other Latino cultures in the United States. Community service learning and research is an 
important aspect of the curriculum. 

Because of its interdisciplinary scope, Chicana/o Studies offers a broad liberal arts education 
with theoretical perspectives and critical thinking skills to prepare students for rewarding careers 
in the public and private sector. Chicana/o Studies graduates enter careers in business, commu- 
nications, counseling, government science, law, social services and teaching. The major also 
provides a strong foundation for graduate studies. 

The Chicano Studies option consists of 36 units, of which a minimum of 24 units must 
be upper-division. Students must consult with their advisers for an approved study plan. 

In addition, a minor consisting of 24 units is offered in Chicano Studies. 

INTERNATIONAL EMPHASIS 

The Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies offers courses relevant to Mexico and Latin 
America that incorporate humanities and social sciences perspectives. Issues of culture and 
ethnicity are integrated in all of the coursework. This ensures that students understand their own 
culture in relationship to other cultures and therefore develop a global perspective. Chicana/o 
DEPARTMENT CHAIR Studies majors are encouraged to explore international educational opportunities, either through 

Isaac Cardenas the CSU international programs, or through any one of the numerous other international programs 

offered by academic institutions throughout the United States. The Department of Chicana/o and 
DEPARTMENT OFFICE Chicano Studies will cooperate fully in providing academic credit in Chicano Studies for such 

Humanities 314 experiences where appropriate. 


DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http ://hss . fullerton . edu/Chicano 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies 
Option in Chicano Studies 
Minor in Chicano Studies 

FACULTY 

Isaac Cardenas, Robert Castro, Dagoberto 
Fuentes, Nancy Porras-Hein, Naomi 
Quinonez 

ADVISERS 

Consult the department chair. 


TEACHING CREDENTIAL 

Because Chicana/o Studies is interdisciplinary, the major provides a particularly fine back- 
ground for elementary school teaching (K-8) and for secondary school teaching (7-12) in the 
social sciences. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the Center for Careers in Teaching 
(714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course selections 
for general education, the major and electives. With careful planning, it may be possible to enter 
the credential program in the senior year of the bachelor’s degree. Postgraduate students should 
contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the School of Education (714-278-3411) 
to obtain information on attending an overview presentation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ETHNIC STUDIES 
OPTION IN CHICANO STUDIES 

The Bachelor’s of Arts in Ethnic Studies (Chicana/o Studies) requires a minimum of 120 units 
which includes courses for the option, General Education, all University requirements, and free 
electives. 

A total of 36 units from the following courses are required for the option. 


110 


CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIES 


Lower-Division (6 units minimum) 

Chicana/o 106 Intro to Chicano Studies (3) 
Chicana/o 220 Mexican Heritage (3) 


Upper-Division (24 units minimum) 

Required Courses (9 units) 

Selected from the following courses: 

Chicana/o 330 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 
Chicana/o 331 The Chicano Child (3) 

Chicana/o 340 Mexican/Chicano Intellectual Thought (3) 
Chicana/o 345 History of the Chicano (3) 

Chicana/o 353 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 


Upper-Division Writing Requirement (3 units) 

Chicana/o 400 Research and Writing in Ethic Studies (3) 


OR English 301 Advanced College Writing (3) 



Electives (12 units 

minimum) 

Chicana/o 101 
Introduction to 
Ethnic Studies (3) 

Chicana/o 102 
Communication 
Skills (3) 

Chicana/o 190 Survey 
of American History 
with Emphasis on 
Ethnic Minorities (3) 

Chicana/o 302 Ancient 
Mexican Culture (3) 

Chicana/o 303 Cultural 
Differences in Mexico 
and the Southwest (3) 

Chicana/o 304 Music of 
Mexico (3) (same as 
Music 304) 

Chicana/o 305 The 
Chicano Family (3) 


Chicana/o 306 
Chicana/o 313 
Chicana/o 315 
Chicana/o 316 
Chicana/o 330 
Chicana/o 331 
Chicana/o 332 
Chicana/o 336 
Chicana/o 337 
Chicana/o 340 
Chicana/o 345 


Barrio Studies (3) 

La Chicana (3) 

Chicano/Latino Theater (3) 

The Chicano Music Experience (3) 

Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) 

The Chicano Child (3) 

The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 
Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 
Mexican/Chicano Intellectual Thought (3) 
History of the Chicano (3) 


Chicana/o 353 
Chicana/o 360 
Chicana/o 433 
Chicana/o 450 
Chicana/o 460 
Chicana/o 480 
Chicana/o 499 


Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

Chicanos and the Law (3) 

Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) 

The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 
The Chicano and Politics (3) 

The Immigrant and the Chicano (3) 
Independent Study (1-3) 


MINOR IN CHICANO STUDIES 

The minor in Chicano Studies consists of 24 units in the following 
areas: 


Required lower-division courses (6 units) 

Chicana/o 106 Intro to Chicano Studies (3) 
Chicana/o 220 Mexican Heritage (3) 


Required upper-division courses (9 units) 

(to be selected from the following) 

Chicana/o 330 The Evolution of Mexican Litertaure (3) 
Chicana/o 331 The Chicano Child (3) 

Chicana/o 340 Mexican/Chicano Intellectual Thought (3) 
Chicana/o 345 History of the Chicano (3) 

Chicana/o 353 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 


Approved Electives 

Nine units of approved course work in lower- and upper-division 
classes that are selected by the adviser. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies offers courses for 
advanced study in the following graduate degree programs: 

Master of Science in Education: Bilingual/Bicultural Concentration 
Master of Arts in Spanish: Bilingual Concentration 

CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIES COURSES 

Courses are designated as CHIC in the class schedule. 

101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 101) 

102 Communication Skills (3) 

The basic communication skills including oral and written expression. 
A unit on the mechanics of writing and reporting on a term paper. 

106 Introduction to Chicano Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of General Education category III.C.l. The 
role of the Chicano in the United States. The Chicanos cultural values, 
social organization, urbanization patterns, and the problems in the area 
of education, politics and legislation. 

108 Linguistics and Minority Dialects (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 108) 


111 


CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIES 


190 Survey of American History with Emphasis on Ethnic 
Minorities (3) 

(Same as History 190 and Afro-Ethnic Studies 190. This course 
fulfills Title V, Statutory Requirements.) 

220 Mexican Heritage (3) 

The basic characteristics of the Mexican, especially the Chicano 
society and culture. From 1519 to the present. Emphasis on the arts, 
literature and history of Mexico and the Chicano in the United States. 

302 Ancient Mexican Culture (3) 

An historical and cultural survey of the principal pre-Columbian 
cultures of Mexico and their significance for Mexican society. 

303 Cultural Differences in Mexico & the Southwest (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.C.l. 

The cultural conflicts in Mexico as seen by the contemporary thinkers 
of Mexico and the United States. Urban and rural problems. 

304 Music of Mexico (3) 

(Same as Music 304) 

305 The Chicano Family (3) 

The Chicano family development as an American social institution. 
Historical and cross-cultural perspectives. The socio-, and psycho- 
dynamics of the Chicano family. 

306 Barrio Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicana/o Studies 220 or consent of instructor. The 
major characteristics of the barrio. Supervised fieldwork in the barrio 
is required. Analysis of the barrio or agency will be made after field- 
work is completed. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours fieldwork) 

313 La Chicana (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.C.l. 

The cultural influences that the family, religion, economic status and 
community play upon the lifestyles, the values and the roles held by 
Chicanas. (Same as Women’s Studies 313) 

315 Chicano/Latino Theater (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.B.l. 
or III.B.2. Analysis of contemporary Chicano/Latino theater in relation 
to its historical evolution. Emphasis on plays, playwrights and theater 
groups expressing the Chicano/Latino experience. Extensive play 
reading. (Same as Theater 315) 

316 The Chicano Music Experience (3) 

Mexican folk and popular music and its relationship to the culture 
which produced it. The pre-Cortesian period to the present in Mexico 
and in the Southwestern United States. 

330 The Evolution of Mexican Literature (3) (Formerly 430) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category III.B.2. 
Survey and analysis of the Nahautl, Mexican and Chicano literature 
from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Not applicable for 
graduate degree credit. 


331 The Chicano Child (3) (Formerly 431) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.C.l. 

The Chicano child from preschool through grade six. Motor, physical, 
social, intellectual and emotional growth and development and their 
effect on school adjustment and achievement. Observation of preschool 
and grade school children. 

332 The Chicano Adolescent (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education category III.C.l 
The Chicano adolescent’s social, intellectual and emotional growth and 
development. The bicultural pressures from the barrio, family structure, 
school and achievement values. 

333 Mexican Literature Since 1940 (3) (Formerly 433) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.B.2. 

The literature of Mexico since 1940: Carlos Fuentes, Luis Spota, 

Rodolfo Usigli, Xavier Villarrutia, Juan Jose Arreola, Octavio Paz, 
Roberto Blanco Moheno and Luis G. Basurto. Not applicable for 
graduate degree credit. 

336 Main Trends in Spanish-American Literature (3) 

The main currents of Spanish-American literature emphasizing 
contemporary works. The relation between the artistic expression and 
the ideological values of the period. 

337 Contemporary Chicano Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: Chicana/o Studies 106, or 220, or consent of instructor. 
The modem Chicano writers in the United States: Allurista, Corky 
Gonzales, Octavio Romano, El Teatro Campesino and the major 
Chicano magazines and newspapers. 

340 Mexican/Chicano Intellectual Thought (3) (Formerly 440) 

Prerequisite: Completion of General Education category III.B.2. The 
emergence of the Chicano movement dealing with political, economic 
and sociological facets. The writing of Nahautl, Spanish, Spanish- 
American, Chicano, and contemporary writers. Not applicable for 
graduate degree credit. 

345 History of the Chicano (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education category III.C.l. 
History of the Chicano from the pre-Columbian period to the present. 
The Chicanos’ changing role in the United States, their cultural identity 
crisis and their achievements. 

353 Mexico Since 1906 (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.C.l. The 
Mexican Revolution of 1910 stressing the political, economic and social 
aspects as well as its contributions in the fields of art, literature and 
social reforms. 

360 Chicanos and the Law (3) 

The relationship between Chicanos and the legal and judicial 
system, including the administration of justice, Chicano-police 
relations, and Chicanos and the prison system. Guest speakers will 
be a regular feature. 


112 


CHICANA AND CHICANO STUDIES 


400 Research and Writing in Ethnic Studies (3) 

(Same as Asian American 400) 

450 The Chicano and Contemporary Issues (3) 

The socioeconomic and political problems confronting the Chicano 
including proposed solutions. The effect that social institutions have 
had on the Chicano community. 

460 The Chicano and Politics (3) 

Theory of urban politics and evaluation of issues that affect the 
Chicanos and American society. Evaluations and surveys will be made 
on political organizations in Hispanic-surnamed communities. (Same 
as Political Science 460) 

480 The Immigrant and the Chicano (3) 

Mexican immigration to the United States and its social, economic 
and political impacts on the Chicano and non-Chicano communities 
and other immigrant groups. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and approval by the department chair 
and instructor(s) in charge of directing the study. An opportunity to 
do independent study under the guidance of the faculty on a subject 
of special interest to the student. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor and classified status. Individual 
research for Chicana and Chicano Studies components in Master of 
Arts in Bilingual Studies (Spanish), Master of Science in Bilingual 
Education (Education) and related programs. Maximum of 3 hours 
credit. 






and Adolescent 

Studies 



College of Human Development and Community Service 



DIVISION OF CHILD, FAMILY, AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 

DEPARTMENT OF CHILD AND 
ADOLESCENT STUDIES 

DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Patricia A.Szeszulski 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Education Classroom 105 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://hdcs.fullerton.edu/CAS/ 

studentstudent.htm/ 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Child and 
Adolescent Development 

Minor in Child and Adolescent 
Development 

FACULTY 

Sylvia Alva, Jacqueline Coffman, Leslie 
Grier, Enid Gruber, Diana Wright Guerin, 
Ellen Junn, Leigh Hobson, Kari Knutson 
Miller, Sharon Seidman Milbum, Pamella 
Oliver, Mark Runco, Susan Shipstead, 
Patricia A. Szeszulski, Sharon Willmer, Shelli 
Wynants, Shu-Chen Yen 


INTRODUCTION 

The Department of Child Adolescent Studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study 
of development from conception through adolescence that emphasizes interrelationships between 
the developing person, family, and community. The curriculum examines empirically derived 
biological-physical, socio-emotional, and cognitive developmental milestones, as well as individual 
differences and common variations in development. This applied program addresses develop- 
mentally appropriate educational, socialization, and parenting practices within the context of key 
theoretical paradigms. Course topics focus on observation skills, knowledge of research methodology 
and assessment, and the interaction of contextual and individual factors as they shape develop- 
ment, including the influences of biology, gender, families, peers, institutional practices, societal 
change, social class, communities, culture, and public policies. 

The Child and Adolescent Development major is designed to provide students with the 
knowledge and skills to interact effectively with children, adolescents, and families in a variety 
of educational and service settings. Effective work with and/or on behalf of children, adolescents, 
and families in diverse environments is informed by research, relevant professional and ethical 
standards, and legal mandates. Because such setting? change dramatically with time, the curriculum 
provides students with a variety of tools to acquire, communicate, and disseminate information 
so that they may develop a lifelong pursuit of developmental inquiry. Course work emphasizes 
critical thinking, proficiency with field relevant technology resources, communication skills, 
and the intellectual framework and methods necessary for in-depth interdisciplinary study. 

The Bachelor of Science in Child and Adolescent Development provides broad undergraduate 
preparation for careers in child and adolescent-related professions, including elementary education, 
special education, early care and education, child/adolescent guidance, and a variety of youth- 
related social service careers as well as graduate study in disciplines such as child development, 
counseling, developmental psychology, and social work. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

Academic advisement is provided at both the Fullerton and El Toro campuses through regularly 
scheduled Overview of the Major sessions and individual student advising appointments. 

During their first semester as a major, students are required to attend an Overview of the Major 
session and are expected to consult with a department adviser to develop an academic plan. 
Consult the department website or contact the department office for a schedule of Overview 
of the Major sessions and to arrange an individual advisement appointment. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT 

The Bachelor of Science in Child and Adolescent Development requires the successful com- 
pletion of a minimum of 51 units in the major consisting of required core classes, advisement 
track courses, fieldwork, and interdisciplinary courses from other departments. A grade of C 
or better is required in all courses applied to the major. 

Required Core Classes (18 units) 

Prerequisites are strictly enforced in the four-semester core sequence. 

Child/Adolescent Studies 300 Elements of Effective Professional Communication (3) 
Child/Adolescent Studies 301 Inquiry and Methodology in Development (3) 

Child/Adolescent Studies 310 Assessing and Observing Development (3) 


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j 



Child/Adolescent Studies 325A Conception through Adolescence (3) 
Child/Adolescent Studies 32 5B Age 9 through Adolescence (3) 
Child/Adolescent Studies 490T Senior Seminar (3) 


Advisement Track (15 units) 

Each student, in consultation with a department adviser, selects 
a 15-unit advisement track in an area of specialization. Standard 
advisement tracks include elementary education, special education, 
early care and education, adolescent/youth services, preparation for 
master’s/doctoral degrees or other specialized training, and general 
studies in child and adolescent development. 


Fieldwork (6 units) 

Students take the core practicum course (3 units) and one advise- 
ment track-specific practicum course (3). Students must complete a 
minimum of 60 hours of supervised fieldwork while enrolled in each 
of the two required fieldwork courses. 



Core Practicum 
Course (3 units) 

Child/Adolescent 
Studies 394 
Practicum Seminar 
(2) and 

Child/Adolescent 
Studies 394L 
Practicum in Child 
Development (1) 

One of the following 
advisement track- 
specific practicums 
(3 units) 


Child/Adolescent Studies 464 Seminar (2) and 
Child/Adolescent Studies 464L Practicum in Early Care and Education (1) 
OR Child/Adolescent Studies 484 Seminar (2) and 
Child/Adolescent Studies 484L Practicum in Adolescent/Youth Services (1) 
OR Child/Adolescent Studies 494 Seminar (2) and 
Child/Adolescent Studies 494L Practicum in Child, Family, and 
Community Involvement (1) 

OR Ed Elm 315A Lecture (2) and 
Ed Elm 315B Introduction to Elementary Teaching Lab (1) 

Interdisciplinary Study 

Biology 

Biology 305 Human Heredity and Development (3) 

Cultural Diversity Class - Take one of the following: 

Afro/Afro Ethnics 310 Black Women in America (3) 

Afro/Afro Ethnics 311 Intracultural Socialization Patterns (3) 

American Studies 301 The American Character (3) 

American Studies 450 Women in American Society (3) 

Anthro 450 Culture and Education (3) 

Asian Amer 300 Introduction to Asian American Studies (3) 


Asian Amer 308 Asian American Women (3) 

Asian Amer 340 Asian American Communication (3) 

Asian Amer 342 Asian American Families (3) 

Chicano 305 The Chicano Family (3) 

Chicano 331 The Chicano Child (3) 

Sociology 357 Minority Group Relations (3) 

Speech Comm 320 Intercultural Communication (3) 

Women’s Studies 302 Introduction to Intercultural Women’s Studies (3) 

Sociology - Take one of the following: 

Sociology 451 Sociology of the Family (3) 

Sociology 453 Child in American Society (3) 

Special Education - Take one of the following: 

Special Ed 371 Exceptional Individual (3) 

Special Ed 400 Early Childhood Special Education (3) 

MINOR IN CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT 

For a minor in Child and Adolescent Development, 21 units are 
required. A minimum of 12 units of coursework for the minor must 
be distinct from coursework that is applied to the major. No more 
than six units of lower-division coursework may be applied to the 
minor. 

Core Courses (9 units) 

Child/Adolescent Studies 301 Inquiry and Methodology in 
Development (3) 

OR approved alternate 

Child/Adolescent Studies 32 5 A Conception to Age 8 (3) 
Child/Adolescent Studies 325B Age 9 through Adolescence (3) 

Practicum (3 units) 

Take one of the following: 

Child/Adolescent Studies 394 Practicum Seminar (2) and 
Child/Adolescent Studies 394L Practicum in Child Development (1) 
OR Child/Adolescent Studies 464 Seminar (2) and 
Child/Adolescent Studies 464L Practicum in Early Care/Education (1) 
OR Child/Adolescent Studies 484 Seminar (2) and 

Child/Adolescent Studies 484L Practicum in Adolescent/Youth 
Services (1) 

OR Child/Adolescent Studies 494 Seminar (2) and 

Child/Adolescent Studies 494L Practicum in Child, Family, and 
Community Involvement (1) 

OR Ed Elm 315A Lecture (2) and 

Ed Elm 315B Introduction to Elementary School Teaching: 

Fieldwork (1) 

Electives (9 units) 

Nine units selected in consultation with department adviser. 


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CHILD AND ADOLESCENT STUDIES 


MULTIPLE SUBJECTS TEACHING CREDENTIAL PREPARATION 

A Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential is required to teach in 
California public elementary schools. Completion of either the Multiple 
Subject Matter Preparation Program (MSMPP) or the California Subject 
Examination for Teacher (CSET): Multiple Subjects is an entrance 
requirement for Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential programs. 
Further information is available from the Center for Careers in Teaching. 

BLENDED TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

First-time freshman interested in teaching in a California public 
elementary school may apply to the Blended Teacher Education Program 
(BTEP). Child and Adolescent Development majors in the BTEP 
combine their bachelor’s degree in CHAD with credential program 
classes to earn a baccalaureate degree and Level I credential in four 
calendar years. Further information is available from the Center 
for careers in Teaching. 

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT STUDIES COURSES 

Courses are designated as CAS in the Class Schedule. 

210 Orientation to the Field of Child Development (3) 

Introduction to the field of child development. Survey of programs 
and services for children, adolescents, and young adults, and exploration 
of professional opportunities, organizations, and publications. 

300 Elements of Effective Professional Communication (3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore status. Styles of written communication 
common to child development programs and services. Reporting on 
theories and research to multiple audiences (e.g. other professionals, 
parents, community groups, etc.) in written and oral formats. Meets 
upper-division baccalaureate writing course requirement for Child 
and Adolescent Development majors. 

301 Inquiry and Methodology in Development (3) 

Prerequisite: sophomore status. Framework and methods necessary 
for interdisciplinary study of child development. Conducting library 
research, reading and writing scientific reports, using descriptive and 
inferential statistics, developing computer literacy, and exploring devel- 
opmental methodology and theory. (2 hours lecture, 2.5 hours laboratory) 

310 Assessing and Observing Development (3) 

Prerequisites: Child/Adolescent Development 300, 301. Purposes 
and methods associated with assessing and observing child and adolescent 
development. Topics include selection of appropriate methods, survey 
of standardized measures, ethics, and interpretation and implications 
of data. 

312 Human Growth and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or consent of instructor. Biological/ 
physical, socio-emotional, cognitive development across the lifespan. 

325A Conception through Age 8 (3) 

Prerequisites: Child/Adolescent Studies 300, 301. Research, theories 
and their application to biological/physical, socio-emotional, and cognitive 
development from conception through age 8. 


325B Age 9 through Adolescence (3) 

Prerequisites: Child/Adolescent Studies 300, 301, 325A. Research, 
theories and their application to biological/physical, socio-emotional, 
and cognitive development from age 9 through adolescence. 

330 Adolescence and Early Adulthood (3) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or consent of instructor. Examination 
of human development during and following adolescence. Community 
resources and services for adolescents and their families. Consequences 
of adolescent experiences for later development. 

350 Chid Development in Elementary School Settings (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category II1.C.1. 
Positive developmental outcomes associated with programs/materials 
used in elementary school contexts are examined. Developmental 
theory and research findings are linked to these practice alternatives. 

394 Practicum Seminar in Child and Adolescent Development (2) 

Prerequisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 300, 301, 325A or approved 
survey of development course. Co-requisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 
394L. Classroom analysis of field experience focusing on linkages 
between theory and practice and skills and techniques of child 
development professionals. 

394L Practicum in Child and Adolescent Development (1) 

Co-requisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 394. Supervised field experience 
in agencies, institutions and organizations serving children and families. 
Minimum of four hours per week for a total of 60 hours required for 
the semester. Credit/No Credit grade option only. 

464 Practicum Seminar in Early Care/Education (2) 

Prerequisites: Child/Adolescent Studies 300, 301, 325A, 394, 394L. 
Co-requisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 464L. Classroom analysis of 
field experience focusing on linkages between theory and practice and 
skills and techniques of early childhood development professionals. 

464L Practicum in Early Care/Education (1) 

Co-requisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 464. Supervised field experience 
in agencies, institutions, and organizations serving young children and 
families. Minimum of four hours per week for a total of 60 hours 
required for the semester. Credit/No Credit grade option only. 

484 Practicum Seminar in Adolescent and Youth Services (2) 

Prerequisites: Child/Adolescent Studies 300, 301, 325A, 394, 394L. 
Co-requisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 484L. Classroom analysis of 
field experience focusing on linkages between theory and practice 
and skills and techniques of adolescent development/youth services 
professionals. 

484L Practicum in Adolescent and Youth Services (1) 

Co-requisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 484. Supervised field experience 
in agencies, institutions, and organizations serving adolescents and 
families. Minimum of four hours per week for a total of 60 hours 
required for the semester. Credit/No Credit grade option only. 


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CHILD AND ADOLESCENT STUDIES 


490T Senior Seminar in Child and Adolescent Development (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, Child/Adolescent Studies 300, 301, 
310, 325A, 325B. Systematic study of theory, methods, and findings 
concerning a specific developmental topic. Variable topics include 
Children and Adolescents at Risk, Cognition and Motivation, Controversial 
Issues in Development, Culture and Ethnicity in Development, Life 
Span Creativity, Life Span Perspective, Families and Development, 
Gender and Development, Gifted Intelligence, Working for Change, 
Legislative Advocacy, Moral Development, Self Concept, and Tempera- 
ment and Development. May be repeated for credit under different topic. 

494 Seminar in Child, Family, and Community Involvement (2) 

Prerequisites: Child/Adolescent Studies 300, 301, 325A, 394, 394L. 
Co-requisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 494L. Classroom analysis of 
field experience focusing on linkages between theory and practice and 
skills and techniques of professionals working with parents and fami- 
lies in school and community settings. 

494L Practicum in Child, Family, and Community Involvement (1) 

Co-requisite: Child/Adolescent Studies 494. Supervised field experience 
in agencies, institutions, and organizations serving parents and families. 
Minimum of four hours per week for a total of 60 hours required for 
the semester. Credit/No Credit grade option only. 


496 Student-to-Student Tutorial (1-3) 

Prerequisites: a 3.0 or higher grade-point average and simultaneous 
enrollment in the course being tutored or previous enrollment in a 
similar course or its equivalent. Consult “University Curricula” section 
of this catalog for more complete course description. May be repeated 
for a maximum of 6 total units of credit. Only 3 units may be taken 
in a single semester. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Individual research project, either library or field, under the direction 
of a Child and Adolescent Studies faculty member. May be repeated for 
a maximum of six total units of credit. Only three units may be taken in 
a single semester. 


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CHILD AND ADOLESCENT STUDIES 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Wendell C. Crow 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

College Park 400 

DAILY TITAN NEWSROOM 

College Park 670 

DAILY TITAN BUSINESS MANAGER 

College Park 660 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://communications.fullerton.edu 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Communications 
Concentrations: 

Advertising 
Entertainment Studies 
Journalism 

Photocommunications 
Public Relations 
Minors 

Advertising 

Journalism 

Master of Arts in Communications 

FACULTY 

Jeff Brody, Pamela Caldwell, Thomas 
Clanin, Wendell Crow, David DeVries, Olan 
Farnall, Tony Fellow, Dennis Gaschen, 
Carolyn Johnson, Kuen-Hee Ju-Pak, Cynthia 
King, Paul Lester, Gail Love, Joseph Massey, 
Coral Ohl, Rick Pullen, Tony Rimmer, Shay 
Sayre, Nancy Snow, Audi Stein, Edgar Trotter, 
Hazel Warlaumont, Diane Witmer, Fred 
Zandpour 


INTRODUCTION 

Effective ethical communications are essential for the well being of a democratic society. Thus, 
there is a need for persons trained in the theory and practice of informing, instructing, and per- 
suading through communications media. The educational goals of the programs leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts in Communications are to: 

• Ensure that all majors are exposed to a broad liberal education; 

• Provide majors with a clear understanding and a global perspective of the role of communi- 
cations media in society; and 

• Prepare majors desiring communications-related careers in the mass media, business, 
government and education by educating them in depth in one of the specialized concentrataions 
within the department. 

ADVISERS 

Undergraduate: All faculty serve as undergraduate advisers. Students may find their assigned 
concentration adviser in the Communications Department Office, College Park 400. 

Graduate: Shay Sayre, College Park 400 or College Park 650-29. Additional advising services 
are available in the College of Communications Advising Center, CP-425. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

A communications major is required to take 12 units of core requirements in addition to 
24 units in a chosen concentration. The department offers five concentrations: advertising, 
entertainment, journalism (print and broadcast), photocommunications, and public relations. 

The major totals 36 units. All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C or 
better. 

Collateral requirements: Twelve units of upper-division course work in other departments 
approved by the students concentration adviser are also required. Collateral courses are listed 
on advising materials available in College Park 400. 

Every major must take a minimum of 80 units outside Communications, out of the 120 units 
required for graduation. Of this 80 units, 65 must be in the traditional liberal arts, humanities 
and sciences. Students should consult their concentration adviser and the College of Communi- 
cations Advisement Center early in their course work to be sure they meet these requirements. 

Grade-Point Average Requirements 

Three grade-point averages, each 2.0 or higher, are required for graduation: 

A. An average based on all units attempted, including those attempted at other institutions. 

B. An average based on all units attempted at CSUE 

C. An average based on all units attempted in the major. 

Communications Core 

The communications core provides background and perspective appropriate to all the 
departmental concentrations and an understanding of the role of communicators and their 
contributions to the development of high standards of professionalism. 

Nine units of required course work: 

Communications 233 Mass Communications in Modem Society (3) 

Communications 407 Communications Law (3) 

Communications 425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 


118 


COMMUNICATIONS 


Plus three units selected from: 

Communications 300 Visual Communication (3) 
Communications 333 Mass Media Effects (3) 

Communications 410 Principles of Communications Research (3) 
Communications 422 Communications Technologies (3) 
Communications 426 Global Media Systems (3) 

Communications 480 Persuasive Communications (3) 


ENTERTAINMENT STUDIES CONCENTRATION 

Courses in this concentration introduce students to theory, trends 
and practices emerging in entertainment and tourism. The concentration 
is designed to prepare students for career opportunities in entertain- 
ment communication and management in a growing range of sectors 
including business, industries, agencies, and nonprofit organizations. 

Communications 101 Writing for Mass Media (3) 

Communications 346 Introduction to Entertainment Studies (3) 


Minor or Collateral Requirement 

All Communications majors must complete EITHER a minor 
(double major also counts) OR 12 collateral units (4 classes) of upper- 
division (UD) coursework outside of Communications. For minors or 
double major requirements, consult the “Academic Programs” section 
of this catalog. For collaterals, consult a concentration checklist for a 
list of approved courses. The following classes are approved for ALL 
concentrations: Afro 335, American Studies 300, American Studies 

301, Comparative 
Religions 400, 
Philosophy 312, 
Political Science 300, 
Political Science 448, 
Psychology 351, 
Radio-TV-Film 300, 
Radio-TV-Film 350, 
Radio-TV-Film 480, 
Sociology 345, Speech 
Communication 320, 
Speech Communi- 
cation 325, Speech 
Communication 333. 

Communications Concentrations 

Every communications major must select and complete 24 units of 
course work in a major concentration. 

ADVERTISING CONCENTRATION 

The objective of the advertising concentration is to prepare students 
for entry-level positions in one or more of the four basic advertising 
activities: creative (copy, layout design), media planning and buying, 
research, and management. Students are provided with knowledge and 
skills needed for work with an advertiser, advertising agency, the print 
and broadcast media, or support service industry. 

Communications 350 Principles of Advertising (3) 

Communications 351 Writing for the Advertising Industry (3) 
Communications 352 Advertising Media (3) 

Communications 353 Advertising Creative Strategy and Execution I (3) 
Communications 451A,B or C Advertising Campaigns (3) 
Communications 495 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Plus three units from: Communications 317, 358, 361, 380, 410, 415T 
or 446. 

Plus three units from: Communications 450, 452, 453, 454, 455 or 456. 


Communications 446 Entertainment and Society (3) 

Communications 449 Capstone in Entertainment and Tourism 
Studies (3) 

Communications 495 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Plus one of the following: Communications 301, 334, 338, 351, or 362 

Plus six units from: Communications 317, 350, 352, 361, 380, 410*, 
422*, 426* or 447. 

* Course may count either as a core elective or as a concentration 
elective, but not as both. 

JOURNALISM CONCENTRATION 

The principal objective of the journalism concentration is to provide 
the skills and practice necessary for careers in the print media. 
Specifically, the concentration objectives are: (1) to provide experience 
in writing various types of news stories, and to develop skills in report- 
ing and news gathering techniques; (2) to develop critical acumen 
necessary to check news stories for accuracy and correctness; (3) to 
develop skills in graphics or photography that complement the jour- 
nalistic writing skills; (4) to provide actual on-the-job experience by 
working on the campus newspaper and through an internship, and 
(5) to add breadth and depth to the professional’s specialized skills 
through collateral courses. 

The concentration includes three emphases: print, broadcast 
journalism and visual journalism. 

Journalism Concentration Core: 

Communications 101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 

Communications 203 Introduction to Visual Journalism Production (3) 
Communications 338 News Media Production (3) 

Communications 495 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Print Journalism Emphasis 

Communications 201 Reporting for the Mass Media (3) 
Communications 332 Editing and Design (3) 

Plus six units from: Communications 334, 335, 380, 434, 435, 436, 
437, or 438T. 

Broadcast Journalism Emphasis 

Communications 202 Writing Broadcast News (3) 

Communications 372 TV News Production (3) 

Plus six units from: Communications 335, 371, 380, 435, 436, 438T. 



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COMMUNICATIONS 



Visual Journalism Emphasis 
Communications 319 Photojournalism 
Communications 409 Advanced Photojournalism 
Plus six units from: Communications 332, 380, 436, 438T. 

PHOTOCOMMUNICATIONS CONCENTRATION 

The photocommunications concentration provides a comprehensive 
study of the aesthetics, theories, and practices of contemporary 
photography for professional careers in magazine and newspaper 
photojournalism, and advertising/commercial photography. 

Communications 101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 

Communications 217 Introduction to Photography (3) 
Communications 319 Photojournalism (3) 

Communications 32 1 Advanced Color Photography (3) 
Communications 495 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Plus six units selected from: 

Communications 326, 338, 340, 358, 380, or 409. 

Plus one of the following: 

Communications 301, 334 or 362. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS CONCENTRATION 

This concentration provides preparation in both theory and practice 
of two-way communication and management counsel for prospective 
professional public relations careers in business, industry, agency, 
government, and nonprofit sectors of society. 

Communications 101 Writing for Mass Media (3) 

Communications 361 Principles of Public Relations (3) 
Communications 362 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Communications 464 Public Relations Management (3) 
Communications 495 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Plus one writing course from: 

Communications 301, 334, or 338. 

Plus six units selected from: 

Communications 317, 346, 350, 358, 363, 380, 410, 446, 467, 468 
or 497. 


INTERNSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

The Department of Communications has always recognized the beneficial 
attributes of an internship. Students intern at sites in Orange and Los 
Angeles Counties, as well as at national and international sites. Examples 
of internship sites include newspapers, magazines, television and radio 
stations, public relations and advertising agencies, health-related institutions, 
nonprofit organizations, film production companies, publishers, education 
offices, high-tech industries and cities and businesses with communica- 
tions needs. 

Students can view course syllabus on the website at 
https://commsec.fullerton.edu/intemship for a full understanding of the 
internship program. Applications are approved by the Communications 
Faculty Internship Coordinator (located at College Park 460-24) through 
the online site before a student registers with Titan. Deadlines for appli- 
cations are March 15 (summer); May 15 (fall); October 15 (spring). 
Internship coursework must be completed within the term it is taken. 
Incompletes are discouraged. Students are encouraged to seek advice 
from the Communications Faculty Internship Coordinator (located at 
College Park 460-24) early in their academic career to gain the highest 
level of professional growth from their internship experience. 

Students must meet the following prerequisites: 

■ Communications major 

■ Senior standing 2.25 GPA overall and in major 

■ Specific prerequisites for each area of concentration - which are NOT 
TO BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY WITH THE INTERNSHIP They 
include: 

Advertising 

Required: Communications 350, 351, 352, and 353. 

Recommended: Communications 358. 

Entertainment Studies 

Required: Communications 346, 446. 

Journalism 

Required: Communications 203 and 338. 

Recommended: Communications 334 and 335. 

Photocommunications 

Required: Communications 217, 319, and 321. 

Recommended: Communications 326. 


WRITING REQUIREMENTS 

All communications majors must satisfy both departmental and uni- 
versity writing requirements. For the department Writing Requirement, 
each concentration requires one or more writing courses. Consult an 
adviser or concentration checklist. 

University Writing Requirement: The course work portion of the uni- 
versity’s upper-division baccalaureate writing requirement for communi- 
cations majors may be met by satisfactory completion of any one of 
Communications 301, 334, 335, 338, 351, 362, 371, and 435. Students 
must earn a C or better in the course which is used to fulfill 
the university’s upper-division writing requirement. 


Public Relations 

Required: Communications 361 and 362. 

Recommended: Communications 358, 363, and 464. 

Students with the equivalent of one year or full-time employment 
in the area of their concentration may petition out of the Internship by 
taking a different 400 level class approved by their faculty adviser. 
International students must obtain approval of the International 
Education and Exchange Office. 

Students who do not meet the 2.25 GPA may be asked to petition 
out of the Communications 495 class and take a different 400 level 
class approved by their faculty adviser. 

Applications and information can be obtained at the Department 
of Communications Internship Office in College Park 460-24. 


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COMMUNICATIONS 


MINOR IN ADVERTISING 

The minor in Advertising requires 21 units as follows: 

Lower-Division (3 units) 

Communications 233 Mass Communications in Modem Society (3) 

Advertising courses (12 units) 

Communications 350A,B or C Principles of Advertising (3) 
Communications 352A,B or C Advertising Media (3) 

Communications 353A,B or C Creative Strategy and Execution (3) 
Communications 451A,B or C National Advertising Campaigns (3) 

Electives (6 units) 

Two adviser-approved courses from Communications 380, 407, 

415T, 425, 450, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456 or 480. 

MINOR IN JOURNALISM 

The Minor in Journalism requires 21 units. Required Journalism 
courses for a Minor in Journalism, unlike the Minor in Advertising, 
must be taken in sequence. Each course builds upon the other. The 
three required journalism courses provide a core of information for 
beginning journalism students. Students can then specialize in print, 
broadcast or visual journalism. A stint on the Daily Titan, Communications 
338 News Media Production, takes the place of an internship. However, 
students who will plan to purse a career in professional print journal- 
ism are encouraged - but not required - to obtain an internship before 
applying for a job. 

Communications Core Requirements (6 units) 

Communications 233 Mass Media in Modern Society (3) 

Plus three units selected from: Communications 310, 407, or 425 (3) 

Journalism Concentration Requirements (9 units) 

Communications 101 Writing for the Mass Media (3) 

Communications 203 Introduction to Visual Journalism Production (3) 
Communications 338 News Media Production (3) 

Electives (6 units) 

Choose six units from one of the following specializations: 

Print Journalism Track 

Communications 201 Reporting for the Mass Media (3) 

Plus three units selected from: Communications 332, 334, 335, 380, 

434, 435, 436, 437, or 438T. 

Broadcast Journalism Track 

Communications 202 Writing Broadcast News (3) 

Plus three units selected from: Communications 335, 371, 372, 380, 

435, 436, or 438T. 

Visual Journalism Track 
Communications 319 Photojournalism (3) 

Plus three units selected from: Communications 300, 332, 380, or 409. 


MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIONS 

The degree is designed to provide advanced study in communications 
theory and research by integrating courses from all of the department’s 
areas of study: advertising, journalism, public relations and entertainment. 

The program prepares the graduate to apply advanced communica- 
tions concepts, research and development skills, and relevant theories 
of communications media for a wide variety of purposes. These studies 
serve those whose careers involve the use of mediated messages to inform, 
instruct, and persuade as well as those seeking doctoral degrees. Course- 
work is highly applicable to a wide range of careers in business, industry, 
government, education, mass media, and entertainment. 

Students completing the Master of Arts in Communications are 
eligible for journalism and communications teaching positions in 
community colleges. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

Normally, an applicant must meet grade-point average requirements 
of 3.0 in the undergraduate major and 2.75 in the last 60 semester 
units of undergraduate course work, meet the university requirements, 
and satisfactorily complete the Graduate Record Examination General 
Test prior to admission. Students must also submit three letters of 
recommendation and an essay (approximately 1000 words) outlining 
reasons for pursuing the masters degree. Consult the department 
graduate program adviser or the department Web site for details 
regarding additional admission requirements. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for 
the fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, 
deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. 

Check the university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/ 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student admitted in conditionally classified standing may be granted 
classified standing upon the development of an approved study plan 
and satisfactory completion of prerequisite course work. Satisfactory 
coursework or its equivalent in the following may be taken concur- 
rently with degree requirements if not completed prior to classification: 

(a) communications writing (Communications 201, 301, 351, 362) 

(b) an introductory course in communications (Communications 233, 
332, 350, 361) 

(c) Communications 410 Principles of Communication Research 

Study Plan 

The student is required to complete 30 units of approved studies 
with a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 including 21 units in 500- 
level communications courses. Six of the 2 1 units of 500-level courses 
may be a thesis, three units may be a project. The remaining units may 
be comprised of 400-level courses appropriate to the student’s area of 
interest. 

The candidate must develop a program of study in consultation 
with the graduate adviser of the Department of Communications. The 
candidate must plan the thesis or project topic with a committee. The 
committee includes at least two faculty members from the Department 
of Communications. 


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COMMUNICATIONS 


Study plan requirements include the following: 

Core Courses (9 units) 

Communications 500 Theory and Literature of Communications (3) 

Communications 507 Communications Research Design and 
Analysis (3) 

Communications 508 Humanistic Research in Communications (3) 

OR Communications 509 Social Science Research in 
Communications (3) 

400-500 Level Courses (21 units) 

In consultation with the graduate adviser, students design a program 
of study that is tailored to their educational and career goals and integrates 
courses in advertising, journalism, pubic relations, and entertainment. 
Maximum 9 units of 400-level courses allowed. 

Project/Thesis/Exam (0-6 units) 

Communications 597 Project (3) 

OR Communications 598 Thesis (6) 

OR Comprehensive Exam 

For further information and advisement, please consult the graduate 
program adviser or the department website. 

COMMUNICATIONS COURSES 

Courses are designated as COMM in the class schedule. 

101 Writing for Mass Media (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; 
typing ability. Principles and practices of writing for major types of 
mass communications media. Content, organization, conciseness and 
clarity (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory). 

201 Reporting for Mass Media (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 101. Development of expertise in 
the use of news reporting techniques combined with development of 
ability to compose complex journalistic writing forms for possible 
publication. Students will be introduced to computer-assisted reporting. 
They will also write stories for the Daily Titan. 

202 Writing Broadcast News (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; 
Communications 101 or equivalent; typing ability. Intensive journalistic 
writing and reporting for radio and television. Emphasis on writing 
assignments for both audio and video tape media. Lecture/discussion 
of issues and responsibilities facing broadcast journalists. 

203 Introduction to Visual Journalism Production (3) 

Photojournalism assignments (news, sports and features) will be 
completed with still and video cameras for print and World Wide Web 
presentations. Camera operation, shooting techniques, photo software, 
cut-line writing, video and audio production and editing, and Web 
homepage production. 

217 Introduction to Photography (3) 

Cameras, accessories, materials, exposure, image processing, printing, 
finishing, composition, filters, flash, studio techniques, and special 
subject treatments and applications. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 


233 Mass Communication in Modern Society (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category II1.C.1. 
Newspapers, magazines, films, radio and television; their significance as 
social instruments and economic entities in modem society. (CAN JOUR 4) 

300 Visual Communication (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Categories III.B.l or 
III.B.2. A social and cultural analysis of the meaning, production and 
consumption of visual information in a modem media society. Still, moving, 
television, graphic design, cartoon, and computer images will be analyzed 
in terms of technical, commercial, and cultural considerations. 

301 Writing for Broadcasting and Film (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; 
typing ability. Theory and principles of writing in the broadcast and 
film media. 

310 Mass Media Ethics for Communications Professionnals (3) 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. The study of moral and professional 
conduct within various communications contexts. Examines cases 
involved with advertising, broadcast journalism, film, photojournalism, 
print journalism, public relations, television and the World Wide Web. 

317 Multimedia Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of General Education Category III.B.l 
or III.B.2. A convergence in film/digital photography, communication 
design, streaming media, and web-page production for creative visual 
problem solving. Students apply new media techniques to real world 
problems through service learning or client-based projects. 

319 Photojournalism (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 203 or 217. Photography for publication 
in print media. News, advertising, feature, sports, lifestyle, photo essay 
and documentary applications. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

321 Advanced Color Photography (3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and Communications 319 or consent 
of instructor. Positive and negative color film processing, sensitometry, 
and color printing. Creative and effective use of color in publications 
photography. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

326 Communications Photography (3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and Communications 321, or consent 
of instructor. Photographs and photographic communications produced 
with the large format camera for the mass media, business, education, 
government, industry and science. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

332 Editing and Design (3) 

Communications 201 or consent of instructor. Principles and 
practice of newspaper editing: copy improvement, headline writing, 
news photos and cutlines, wire services, typography, copy schedules 
and control, page design and layout, law and ethics. (2 hours lecture, 

3 hours laboratory) 

333 Mass Media Effects (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 

The course is intended to help students discover the role mass media 
communications play in all human activity with heavy emphasis on 
the effects of mass media on the political, social, and economic fabric 
of America. 


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COMMUNICATIONS 


334 Feature Article Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; 
and Communications 101 or equivalent. Nonfiction writing for news- 
papers and magazines; sources, methods and markets. 

335 Public Affairs Reporting (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; 
Communications 101 and either 20 lor 202, or consent of instructor; 
and junior standing. Communications 407 recommended. Reporting 
public interest news such as courts, education, finance, government, 
police and urban problems. 

338 News Media Production (3) 

Communications 201, 202 or consent of instructor. Members of the 
class constitute the editorial staff of the university newspaper and 
receive training in print, on-line and magazine -style journalism. Meets 
four hours per week for critiques in news reporting, writing, editing 
and makeup, followed by production. May be repeated for a maximum 
of six units of credit. (More than 9 hours laboratory) 

340 Photography in Advertising and Public Relations (3) 

Prerequisites: junior standing and Communications 326 or consent 
of instructor. Advertising and public relations photography. Materials 
and techniques for producing photographs with visual impact suitable 
for photo reproduction. Students will prepare a portfolio of photo- 
graphs. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours activity) 

346 Introduction to Entertainment and Tourism Studies (3) 

Introduces students to the entertainment industry. Applies entertain- 
ment and persuasion theory. Offers learning about career opportunities in 
entertainment-related fields. Explores the tasks, skill sets, demands and 
rewards associated with different entertainment professions. (Same as 
Theatre 346 and Business Administration 346) 

350 Principles of Advertising (3) 

This course explores the functions, strategies, ethics, technology, 
and media relevant to the advertising industry, as well as concepts in 
international, intercultural and integrated marketing communication. 

351 Writing for the Advertising Industry (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101. This course develops written communica- 
tions and critical thinking skills essential for success in all advertising 
related careers. Students leam to compose persuasive letters, reports, 
proposals and news releases. Emphasis is placed on grammar and 
language skills. Students must achieve a C or better to continue taking 
advertising courses. 

352 Advertising Media (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 350 and junior standing. Planning, 
execution and control of advertising media programs. Basic data and 
characteristics of the media. Buying and selling process, techniques, 
and methods in media planning process. Audience measurement and 
media analysis. 

353 Advertising Creative Strategy and Execution I (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101, Communications 350, and junior standing. 
Writing of copy and layout of advertisements, based on study of sales 
appeals, attention factors and illustrations. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
activity) 


358 Graphics Communications (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. Printing processes, publication formats, 
copy preparation, copy-fitting techniques, layout principles, paper 
selection and distribution methods. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity) 

361 Principles of Public Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The social, behavioral, psychological, 
ethical, economic and political foundations of public relations, and the 
theories of public relations as a communications discipline. 

362 Public Relations Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or better; 
Communications 101 or consent of instructor; typing ability; junior 
standing. Communications analysis, writing for business, industry and 
nonprofit organizations. Creating effective forms of public relations 
communication. 

363 Desktop Publishing (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of any one of Communications upper- 
division writing courses. Editing functions and techniques involved 
in creative development of publications for business, industry and 
nonprofit organizations and institutions. Magazines, newspapers, 
newsletters and brochures. 

371 Radio News Production (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 202 and 203. Writing, producing, 
planning, taping, editing and evaluating radio news. 

372 TV News Production (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 202 and 203. Writing, production 
and evaluation of television news. Discussion of TV reporting techniques 
and problems. Students cover events and produce TV news in lab. 

380 Web Design and Production (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. Underlying design concepts and 
production techniques for creating World Wide Web multimedia 
presentations for educational lessons, commercial applications, and 
online publications. 

407 Communications Law (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 233 and junior standing. The 
Anglo-American concept of freedom of speech and press; statutes and 
administrative regulations affecting freedom of information and pub- 
lishing, advertising, and telecommunication. Libel and slander, rights 
in news and advertising, contempt, copyright, and invasion of privacy. 

409 Advanced Photojournalism (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 319. Advanced press photography. 
Extensive use of cameras for photographic reporting; evaluation and 
preparation of pictures for publication. Field/laboratory experience 
in black and white and color. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

410 Principles of Communication Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 233 and junior standing. Research 
methods used to assess the effects of print, broadcast, and film commu- 
nications on audience attitudes, opinions, knowledge, and behavior. 
Research design and data analysis in communications research. 


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COMMUNICATIONS 


41 5T Current Issues in Advertising (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 233, 350, or 361; permission of 
instructor. This course presents a variety of current advertising topics 
in all fields of communications. Professional problems, global issues, 
critical analysis and special skills are presented to supplement the 
curriculum, and to enhance the understanding of, and appreciation 
for, advertising concepts. Not available for graduate degree credit. 

422 Communications Technologies (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 233. Issues surrounding communi- 
cations technologies. Covered are recent developments in technology, 
impact of government, industry and economic factors, historical 
overview, and implications for social change. Exposure to technological 
developments. Applications to all areas of mass communications. 

425 History and Philosophy of American Mass Communication (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 233 and junior standing. American 
mass communication; newspapers and periodicals through radio and 
television; ideological, political, social and economic aspects. Not avail- 
able for graduate degree credit. 

426 Global Media Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 233 and junior standing. Major mass 
communication systems, both democratic and totalitarian, and the 
means by which news and propaganda are conveyed internationally. 

434 Magazine Industry and Production (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 338 or consent of instructor. Students 
produce Tusk, the magazine of Cal State Fullerton. They learn the 
dynamics of magazine production and the magazine industry. 

435 Opinion Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: English 101 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or 
better, upper-division writing course and junior standing. Techniques of 
editorial writing and opinion writing, including personal essays, for 
print, broadcast and the Internet. The role of punditry in television 
news and on TV and radio talks shows, and how this might affect 
public perceptions of the media. 

436 Reporting on the Entertainment Industry (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 201, 202, or consent of instructor. 
Development of expertise in reporting and writing on the entertainment 
industry. An understanding of the economics, business models, legal 
aspects, and culture of the industry. 

437 Advanced Magazine Writing (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 201 and 338. Designed to give students 
practical experience in reporting and writing long, in-depth feature articles 
for professional magazines. Will cover the peculiarities of researching 
writing for specialized audiences, and the business of free-lancing. Includes 
techniques for improving clarity, cohesion, emphasis and concision. 

438T Specialized Reporting (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 201, 202 or consent of instructor. 

This varied topic course is designed to teach advanced reporting and 
writing skills in specialized areas. It will combine an awareness of 
techniques and resources with an abundance of writing models and 
field experiences. 


446 Entertainment and Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 233, 316, or Business Administration 
346 or Theatre 346. In-depth exploration of the role of entertainment 
in modem society. Examines audience uses, motivations and individual 
preferences for entertainment. Reviews theories and research regarding 
the form and function of entertainment and entertainment media. 

447 Tourism and Travel (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 346, 350, or 361 or Management 
339 or Marketing 351 or Theatre 200. This course examines the con- 
cepts, tools, and techniques necessary for understanding the tourism 
and travel industry and its promotional communications. Students 
explore the trends and issues of tourism and travel and the unique 
problems and opportunities of this field. 

449 Capstone in Entertainment and Tourism Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 346 or equivalent. Prepares students 
for careers in the entertainment industry by combining theory with 
applied principles and analytical skills in examining and developing 
case studies. Students plan and execute their own campaigns and 
projects. (Same as Theatre 449 and Business Administration 449) 

450 Advertising and Brand Communication Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 352 and 353. Theory and tech- 
niques for planning, directing and evaluating advertising and brand 
communication programs with emphasis on media-message strategies. 
Managerial approach with case studies to the solution of brand 
communications problems. 

451 A Advertising Campaigns — AAF Competition (3) 

(Formerly 451) 

Prerequisites: Communications 352, 353, and consent of instructor. 
Advertising campaigns, including applied research, writing and utiliza- 
tion of print and electronic mass media. Design of complete campaigns 
from idea to prediction readiness. 

45 IB Advertising Campaigns — Local Focus (3) (Formerly 451) 

Prerequisites: Communications 350, 352, 353. Advertising cam- 
paigns, including applied research, writing and utilization of print and 
electronic mass media. Design of complete campaigns from idea to predic- 
tion readiness. 

451 C Advertising Campaigns — TitanCom Agency (3) 

(Formerly 451) 

Prerequisites for Advertising majors - Communications 350, 352, 
353; for Public Relations majors - Communications 361, 362. 
Advertising campaigns, including applied research, writing and utilization 
of print and electronic mass media. Design of complete campaigns 
from idea to prediction readiness. 

452 Advanced Media Strategy and Tactics (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 352 or consent of instructor. This 
course is designed to offer students further education in advertising 
media. It integrates theories from related disciplines, such as communi- 
cations, marketing, and psychology, to illustrate better ways to use 
media as a competitive tool in business. 


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COMMUNICATIONS 


453 Advertising Creative Strategy and Execution II (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 353. Advanced advertising projects 
involving application and execution of creative advertising strategies for 
mass media, including theory and practice of writing copy, and prepar- 
ing comprehensive layouts and completed scripts. Group discussions, 
labs, and individual conferences. 

454 Advertising Media Sales (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 350 and 353; or Communications 332 
and either 217 or 358; or Marketing 351 and any 300-level graphics, 
layout or design course. Prepares students for careers in advertising 
media sales, including radio, television, newspaper, magazine, new 
media and the internet. Personal sales techniques and media sales 
strategies are presented for each medium. 

455 Internet Advertising & Promotional Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 350, 352 and 353 or consent of 
instructor. This course examines Internet advertising and marketing 
issues and ideas. Students learn to evaluate, develop, and execute 
Internet-based advertising and promotional campaigns. 

456 Advertising Account Planning (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 353 anad 410. Students learn to 
apply principles of research, consumer behavior and creative concept 
development to advertising and brand communication campaigns. 

Field study and case application facilitate the process of the planner’s 
consumer advocacy function. 

464 Public Relations Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 361, 362 and junior standing. 
Analysis of systems and strategies for planning public relations cam- 
paigns and solving/preventing problems. Individual, team case studies, 
in corporate development of proposals; actual use of tools in addition 
to role playing presentations to management. 

467 Public Relations Agency Seminar (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 101, 361 and junior standing. 
Seminar focuses on psychology and functions of client counseling, 
proposal writing, new business development, agency management, 
servicing clients, evaluation of methods, reporting results, and legal 
and ethical concerns. 

468 Corporate and Nonprofit Public Relations (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 101 and 361. This seminar focuses 
on the public relations strategies and tactics used in today’s increasingly 
sophisticated and maturing corporate and nonprofit marketplaces. This 
advanced course, which relies heavily on professional guest speakers 
and in-class simulations/exercises, encompasses a host of specific 
topics, such as fund raising, corporate and social responsibility, media 
relations, and technology and ethical issues. 

477 Research Methods in Primatology (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 346, 350 and 361; Management 
339, Marketing 351, or Theatre 200. This course examines the con- 
cepts, tools, and techniques necessary for understanding the tourism 
and travel industry and its promotional communications. Students 
explore the trends and issues of tourism and travel and the unique 
problems and opportunities of this field. 


480 Persuasive Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 233 and junior standing. Persuasive 
communications applied to mass communication. The communicator, 
audience, message content and structure, and social context in influ- 
encing attitudes, beliefs and opinions. 

495 Mass Media Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing, communications major, 2.25 GPA overall 
and in major, and specific prerequisites for each concentration. Visit the 
website at: httpS ://commsec . fulletton . edu/intemshi p for further details. 
Supervised internship according to concentration. Selected from a wide 
variety of communications media, industries, agencies, and nonprofit 
organizations. Applications must be made through the department 
coordinator one semester prior to entering the program. See the depart- 
ment section titled “Internship Requirements” in this catalog or the 
internship website. (Cedit/No Credit Only) 

496 Student-to-Student Tutorial (1-3) 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor and previous superior perfor- 
mance in a similar or equivalent course. Under faculty supervision, 
student provides tutorial assistance in a communications course. May 
involve small group demonstrations and discussions, individual tutoring 
and evaluation of student performance as appropriate. May be repeated 
to a maximum of four units either separately or in combination with 
Communications 499. 

497 Public Communications Practices (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 346, 350, 361 or consent of instructor. 
Public communications theory and practice. Ethics, responsibilities and 
role of public communications in contemporary society. Principles 
applied to event planning, including Communications Week (spring 
only) or other activities. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department chair. Individually supervised 
mass media projects and research on campus and in the community. 
May involve newspaper and magazine publishers, radio and television 
stations and public relations agencies. May be repeated up to a 
maximum of four units either separately or in combination with 
Communications 496. 

500 Theory and Literature of Communications (3) 

Prerequisite: conditional classified status. Theories and research 
on communication processes and effects; source, media, message, 
audience and content variables. Types, sources and uses of 
communication literature. Graduate seminar. 

507 Communications Research Design and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Communications 500. This course 
develops a working knowledge of data collection and analysis techniques 
in both quantitative and qualitative research methods. The material and 
presentation are developed for practical application to all professional 
fields of communication. 


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COMMUNICATIONS 


508 Humanistic Research in Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 410, 507 (may be taken concurrently) 
and classified status. Humanistic methods of study in communications: 
historical research and critical analysis applied to problems, issues and 
creative works in communication. Graduate seminar. 

509 Social Science Research in Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 410, 507 (maybe taken concurrently) 
and classified status. Social-scientific research design and analysis and 
the study of communication processes and effects. Graduate seminar. 

515T Professional Problems in Specialized Fields (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. Selected topics and issues in 
the field of mass communications. Subjects vary each semester. May 
be repeated with a different topic. 

517 Ethical Problems of the Mass Media (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. This course will study criticisms 
of specific functions of the mass media and public relations. The course 
will consist of three sections: the history of criticism; problem areas of 
the media; and practitioner response to criticism. 

518 Public Relations Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. This graduate seminar explores 
cutting edge communication and organizational theories and vital 
emerging issues influencing the field of public relations. Special focus 
will be on contemporary public relations models and practitioner roles. 

519 Communications and Governance in America (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500 or consent of instructor. The 
course will study relationships between systems of communications, 
particularly new communication technologies, and governmental 
institutions and processes within the American setting. It will explore 
how technological change relates to patterns of decision-making, 
management, and the content and flow of information among public 
officials. 

520A,B,C Communications Practicum (3,3,3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 500 and six units of study-plan 
courses in area of specialization; Communications 518 is an additional 
prerequisite for C. Under supervision of a faculty member, students 
plan, design, conduct and evaluate a team project in their field of 
specialization: A - News-Editorial, B - TV/Film, C - Public Relations. 

525 Advanced Communications Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. The course is designed to 
provide the student with an up-to-date assessment of general manage- 
ment and communications management techniques, and to help equip 
the student for management positions in advertising, journalism, 
public relations and broadcasting. 

527 Politics and Mass Media (3) (Formerly 515T) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. Study of the nature of the 
relationship between the mass media and politics. Particular attention 
to the role and impact of the mass media in political election cam- 
paigns and policy making. 


530 Communications Technologies (3) (Formerly 515T) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. Seminar in emerging communi- 
cations technologies which are transforming professional practices, 
associated with various communications industries. Course deals with 
recent technological developments, corporate and government policies 
affecting their use and social consequences of current and projected 
applications. 

534 American Media History (3) (Formerly 51 5T) 

Prerequisite: Communications 508 or consent of instructor. This 
seminar will focus on the history of the American Mass Media from 
McCarthy to the present. It is a period, which marked the birth of 
television and the maturation of investigative journalism in shaping 
American attitudes about government and society. 

536 International Communications (3) (Formerly 515T) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. Comparative examination of 
communications policies and practices in different national settings. 

The course provides future practitioners with an understanding of 
cross-national variations in communication policies and how they 
shape communication industries and practices. 

541 Film Criticism (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. This graduate foundation 
course in screenwriting examines methods of evaluating and critiquing 
motion picture screenplays and films for a variety of Hollywood genres. 

550 Advertising in Modern Society (3) 

Prerequisite: Communications 500. Assessing the impact of adver- 
tising on society, the culture and economy. Philosophical rather than 
technical examinations of critical issues and problems such as 
economic and social effects of advertising, effects of value and life 
styles, ethics and regulation. 

595 Graduate Mass Media Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: Communications 500 and Communications 508 or 
509, and consent of graduate adviser. Supervised practical work expe- 
rience with media outlets, advertising and promotion agencies, public 
relations firms, film companies, etc. Involves cooperative efforts of both 
the departmental faculty and employers. Exposure to current and inno- 
vative techniques in research, management and creative activities while 
offering practical experience. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate coordinator. Completion of 
creative project in a sequence beyond regularly offered course work. 

598 Thesis (3 or 6) 

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate coordinator. Completion of a 
thesis in a sequence beyond regularly offered course work 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of graduate coordinator. Individually super- 
vised mass media projects or research for graduate students. May be 
repeated. 


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COMMUNICATIONS 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Benjamin Hubbard 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Education Classroom 622 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://hss.fullerton.edu/comparative 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies 
Minor in Religious Studies 
Minor in Christian Studies 
Minor in Jewish Studies 

FACULTY 

Benjamin Hubbard, Paul Levesque, James 
Santucci, Jeanette Reedy Solano, Bradley Starr 

adviser 

All programs: James Santucci 


INTRODUCTION 

Comparative Religion examines the spiritual quest of humankind, especially as it has manifested 
itself in the worlds living religions. These include Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Judaism, 
Christianity, Islam, and other less familiar traditions. No other academic field looks at the 
origins, sacred writings, rituals, beliefs and world views of the various religions for their own 
sake rather than as an aspect of another field of study. 

Within a public university, religion must be approached with academic objectivity and 
without favoritism for any one tradition. Yet, religion must also be studied with sensitivity and 
empathy for the millions of believers whose lives are shaped by their faith. Comparative Religion 
is also an interdisciplinary field which draws on the work of social scientists, historians, philoso- 
phers, and literary scholars in attempting to understand the religious quest. Hence, studying 
religious traditions develops habits of mind that are very important for life in our multicultural 
society Furthermore, a familiarity with the worlds religions is necessary for an understanding of 
church-state issues in America and of geo-political conflicts in South Asia, the Middle East, and 
elsewhere. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies is designed for those who (1) want a humanities 
undergraduate background focusing on religion as a preparation for further study in such fields 
as education, law, social work, counseling and government service; (2) wish to pursue graduate 
studies in religion with the aim of teaching and/or doing research in the subject; (3) are consid- 
ering a career in various religious ministries or in religious education. 

Because the major consists of 36 units of course work (less than some other fields), it may 
be possible to add a second major in, for example, Communications, History, Human Services 
or Philosophy. Such double majors may strengthen a student’s job preparation or background 
for graduate studies. 

Minors in religion are offered in three areas depending on a students particular interest: 
Religious Studies (comparative emphasis), Christian Studies (an emphasis on Christianity in 
its many forms), and Jewish Studies (an emphasis on the Judaic tradition). 

Awards in Comparative Religion 

Two graduating seniors are recognized each year with the James O’Shea/Joseph Kalir Award 
for Outstanding Scholarship and the James Parkes/Morton Fierman Award for Student 
Achievement (for service to the department and university and/or for interfaith work within and 
outside the university). The Donald Gard Award is given annually to a non-graduating Religious 
Studies major for academic achievement. In addition, the Althea and Robert McLaren Award 
recognizes the student (majoring or minoring in religious studies) judged to have written the 
outstanding essay in a Comparative Religion class in a particular year. 

International Learning Opportunities in Comparative Religion 

The Religious Studies major within the Department of Comparative Religion requires the 
study of the world’s religions, thereby necessitating an examination of religion in other cultural 
and national settings. This is particularly true of courses dealing with Asian religions such as 
Hinduism and Buddhism, and a predominantly Middle Eastern faith — Islam. Moreover, the 
Department encourages students to study abroad, for example at the Hebrew University of 
Jerusalem, many of whose courses will transfer into the Religious Studies major at Fullerton. 

See the department chair or undergraduate adviser if interested. 


127 


COMPARATIVE RELIGION 


Graduate Study 

The department works cooperatively with the Department of 
Religion in the Claremont Graduate School. Please contact the chair 
or undergraduate adviser about specific cooperative arrangements. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

The Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies requires a minimum of 
120 units which includes courses for the major, General Education, all 
University requirements, and free electives. The religious studies major 
consists of 36 units. Courses in other schools and departments may be 
acceptable for the major upon consultation with the departmental 
adviser. Each course counted toward the major must be completed 
with a grade of C or higher. 

Lower-Division Requirements (9 units) 

Introduction to the Study of Religion (3 units) 

Comparative Religion 105 Religion and the Quest for Meaning (3) 
Comparative Religion 110 Religions of the World (3) 

Introduction to Western Religious Traditions (3 units) 

Comparative Religion 200 Introduction to Christianity (3) 
Comparative Religion 201 Origins of the New Testament (3) 
Comparative Religion 210 Introduction to Judaism (3) 

Comparative Religion 250 The Religion of Islam (3) 

Introduction to Non-Western Religious Traditions (3 units) 

Comparative Religion 270T Introduction to the Asian Religions (3) 
Comparative Religion 280 Introduction to Buddhism (3) 

Upper-Division Requirements (27 units) 

Core Requirements (6 units) 

Comparative Religion 300 Methods of Studying Religion (3) 
Comparative Religion 485T Major Religious Thinkers and Concepts (3)* 

The Development of Western Religious Thought (6 units) 

Comparative Religion 345A History and Development of Early 
Christian Thought (3) 

Comparative Religion 345B History and Development of Modem 
Christian Thought (3) 

Comparative Religion 346A History and Development of Jewish 
Thought: Biblical Origins to Maimonides (3) 

Comparative Religion 346B History and Development of Jewish 
Thought: 1204 to the Present (3) 

Comparative Religion 349A History and Development of Islamic 
Thought: The Beginning to 1258 (3) 

Comparative Religion 349B History and Development of Islamic 
Thought: 1259 to Modem Times (3) 

Comparative Religion 350T Major Christian Traditions (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 405 History of the Jews (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 406 The Holocaust (3) 

*May be taken only after completion of 15 units in Comparative 
Religion, including Comparative Religion 105 or 110 and 300, and junior 
standing. 


History/Comparative Religion 417B Roman Empire (3) 

History 420 The Byzantine Empire (3) 

History/Comparative Religion 421 A History of the Christian Church 
to 1025 (3) 

History/Comparative Religion 42 IB History of the Christian Church 
from 1025 to the Present (3) 

History/Comparative Religion 42 5B The Reformation (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 466A Islamic Civilization: Arab Era (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 466B Islamic Civilization: Imperial Age (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 483 American Religious History (3) 

The Development of Non-Western Religious Thought (6 units) 

Comparative Religion 337 American Indian Religions and 
Philosophy (3) 

Comparative Religion 347A Hindu Tradition to 400 B.C.E. (3) 
Comparative Religion 347B Hindu Tradition from 400 B.C.E. (3) 
Philosophy 350 Asian Philosophy (3) 

Comparative Religion 354T Topics in Buddhism (3) 

Comparative Religion 370 New Religious Movements in the U.S.A. (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 465A History of India (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 465B History of India (3) 


The Experience of Religion (6 units) 

Comparative Religion 305 Contemporary Practices of the World’s 
Religions (3) 

Comp Lit/Comparative Religion 312 The Bible as Literature (3) 
Comparative Religion 335 Judaism, Christianity, and Islam Compared (3) 
Comparative Religion 343 Religion and Current Ethical Issues (3) 
Philosophy/Comparative Religion 348 Philosophy of Religion (3) 
Comparative Religion 358 Comparative Mysticism (3) 

Comparative Religion 376 Dimensions of Religious Experience (3) 
Comparative Religion 380 The Religious Roots of Nonviolence (3) 

Comparative Religion 400 Religion, the Media, and Contemporary 
Culture (3) 

Sociology/Comparative Religion 458 Sociology of Religious Behavior (3) 

Comparative Religion 481 Religion and Politics in the American 
Experience (3) 

Textual Studies (3) 

Comparative Religion 330T Hebrew Scriptural Studies (3) 

Comparative Religion 33 IT New Testament Studies (3) 

Comparative Religion 40 IT Studies in Religious Texts (3) 

Writing Requirement 

The course requirement of the university upper-division baccalaureate 
writing course is met through Comparative Religion 485T. It is highly 
recommended that students majoring in Religious Studies pursue the 
study of classical languages such as Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, and 
Sanskrit when such languages are offered. 


128 


COMPARATIVE RELIGION 


minor in religious studies 

Students minoring in Religious Studies are required to take 21 units 
in Comparative Religion, distributed as follows: 

Lower-Division Requirements (9 units) 

Introduction to the Study of Religion (3 units) 

Comparative Religion 105 Religion and the Quest for Meaning (3) 
Comparative Religion 110 Religions of the World (3) 

Introduction to Western Religious Traditions (3 units) 

Comparative Religion 200 Introduction to Christianity (3) 

Comparative Religion 201 Origins of the New Testament (3) 
Comparative Religion 210 Introduction to Judaism (3) 

Comparative Religion 250 The Religion of Islam (3) 

Introduction to Non-western Religious Traditions (3 units) 

Comparative Religion 270T Introduction to the Asian Religions (3) 
Comparative Religion 280 Introduction to Buddhism (3) 

Upper-Division 
(12 units) 

Core Requirements (3 units) 

Comparative Religion 
300 Methods of 
Studying Religion (3) 

Elective Courses (9 units) 
Any nine units of 
upper-division courses 
in Comparative Religion. 
It is highly recom- 
mended that students 
minoring in Religious Studies pursue the study of classical languages 
such as Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, and Sanskrit when such courses 
are offered. 

MINOR IN CHRISTIAN STUDIES 

Students minoring in Christian Studies are required to take 2 1 units, 

distributed as follows: 

Required Courses (12 units) 

Comparative Religion 200 Introduction to Christianity (3) 
Comparative Religion 300 Methods of Studying Religion (3) 
Comparative Religion 345A History and Development of Early 
Christian Thought (3) 

Comparative Religion 345B History and Development of Modern 
Christian Thought (3) 

Elective Courses (9 units) 

At least six units must be taken in courses cross-listed with other 
departments. 

Comparative Religion 201 Origins of the New Testament (3) 

Comp Lit/Comparative Religion 312 The Bible as Literature (3) 

Afro 325 African-American Religion (3) 

Comparative Religion 33 IT New Testament Studies (3) 


Comparative Religion 335 Judaism, Christianity, and Islam Compared (3) 
Comparative Religion 343 Religion and Current Ethical Issues (3) 
Comparative Religion 350T Major Christian Traditions (3) 

Comparative Religion 358 Comparative Mysticism (3) 

Comparative Religion 376 Dimensions of Religious Experience (3) 
Comparative Religion 380 The Religious Roots of Nonviolence (3) 
Comparative Religion 400 Religion, the Media, and Contemporary 
Culture (3) 

Comparative Religion 40 IT Studies in Religious Texts (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 417B Roman Empire (3) 

History 420 The Byzantine Empire (3) 

History/Comparative Religion 421 A History of the Christian Church 
to 1025 (3) 

History/Comparative Religion 42 IB History of the Christian Church 
from 1025 to the Present (3) 

History/Comparative Religion 425B The Reformation (3) 
Sociology/Comparative Religion 458 Sociology of Religious Behavior (3) 
Comparative Religion 481 Religion and Politics in the American 
Experience (3) 

History/Comparative Religion 483 American Religious History (3) 
Comparative Religion 485T Major Religious Thinkers and Concepts (3)* 
Comparative Religion 499 Independent Study (3)* 

It is highly recommended that students minoring in Christian 
Studies pursue the study of classical languages such as Greek, Hebrew, 
and Latin when such courses are offered. 

*When content pertains to the Christian tradition. 

MINOR IN JEWISH STUDIES 

Students minoring in Jewish Studies are required to take 21 units, 
distributed as follows: 

Required Courses (12 units) 

Comparative Religion 210 Introduction to Judaism (3) 

Comparative Religion 346A History and Development of Jewish 
Thought: Biblical Origins to Maimonides (3) 

Comparative Religion 346B History and Development of Jewish 
Thought: 1204 to the Present (3) 

Elective Courses (9 units) 

At least six units must be taken in courses cross-listed with other 
departments. 

Comp Lit/Comparative Religion 312 The Bible as Literature (3) 
Comparative Religion 330T Hebrew Scriptural Studies (3) 

Comparative Religion 335 Judaism, Christianity, and Islam Compared (3) 
Comparative Religion 343 Religion and Current Ethical Issues (3) 
Comparative Religion 358 Comparative Mysticism (3) 

Comparative Religion 376 Dimensions of Religious Experience (3) 
Comparative Religion 380 The Religious Roots of Nonviolence (3) 
Comparative Religion 400 Religion, the Media, and Contemporary 
Culture (3) 



129 


COMPARATIVE RELIGION 


Comparative Religion 40 IT Studies in Religious Texts* (3) 
History/Comparative Religion 405 History of the Jews (3) 
History/Comparative Relition 406 The Holocaust (3) 
Sociology/Comparative Religion 458 Sociology of Religious Behavior (3) 
History 467 The Middle East in the 19th Century (3) 

History 468 The Middle East in the 20th Century (3) 

Comparative Religion 481 Religion and Politics in the American 
Experience (3) 

Comparative Religion 485T Major Religious Thinkers and Concepts (3)* 
Comparative Religion 499 Independent Study (1-3)* 

* When content pertains to the Jewish tradition. 

COMPARATIVE RELIGION COURSES 

Courses are designated as CPRL in the class schedule. 

105 Religion and the Quest for Meaning (3) 

Inquiry into the nature of religious experience as the human pursuit 
of meaning and transcendence, exploring its central themes, phenomena, 
and questions; its principal types of figures and communities; and its 
major categories of sacred rituals, objects, seasons, and places. 

110 Religions of the World (3) 

An introduction to at least five religious world views from an historical 
and comparative perspective, with descriptive analysis of their belief 
system, moral code, and symbolic rituals: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, 
Hinduism, and Buddhism. (Same as Philosophy 110) 

200 Introduction to Christianity (3) 

The Christian scriptures and their background in the light of 
modem exegesis; the Synoptic Gospels, written creeds and liturgical 
formulae associated with the Orthodox, Roman and Protestant 
communions. 

201 Origins of the New Testament (3) 

The sources and content of the New Testament writings which 
reflect the life and beliefs of the Christians in the first century of the 
Common Era, including literary and historical criticism. 

210 Introduction to Judaism (3) 

The Jewish tradition — its scriptures, laws, customs, holidays and 
world view in their historical setting. 

246A Basic Hatha Yoga (2) 

(Same as Kinesiology 246A) 

250 The Religion of Islam (3) 

The religion of Islam, its background and main teachings: the rise 
of Islam; the caliphate; Islamic theology, teachings, mysticism and 
philosophy. 

270T Introduction to the Asian Religions (3) 

The main teachings of a major South Asian, Far Eastern, or 
“Oriental” religion per semester. Such religions as Jainism, Hinduism, 
Taoism, Shintoism, and Zoroastrianism will be discussed. May be 
repeated for credit with different subject matter. 


280 Introduction to Buddhism (3) 

Introduction to the origins and development of Buddhism. Included 
in the course will be a discussion of the major teachings found in all 
traditions of Buddhism, the three major traditions of Buddhism, and 
the position of Buddhism in the U.S. 

300 Methods of Studying Religion (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 110 or consent of instructor. 

The academic study of religion to include the definition, functions and 
varieties of religion; the methods used to study it; and key figures who 
have shaped the development of this discipline. 

301 Sanskrit (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 301) 

305 Contemporary Practices of the World’s Religions (3) 

Prerequisite: any one of the following: Anthro 100, History 110A, 
Comparative Religion 105, or Comparative Religion 110. A comparative 
study of how the beliefs, practices and moral codes of the worlds 
major religions influence the way nations and individuals behave 
in the spheres of daily life, culture, ethics, business and politics. 

312 The Bible as Literature (3) 

(Same as Comp Lit 312) 

325 African-American Religions and Spirituality (3) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 325) 

330T Hebrew Scriptural Studies (3) 

Specific areas of Hebrew Scriptures such as major and minor 
prophets, Psalms, values of wisdom writers, books of the Old 
Testament. May be repeated for credit with different subject content. 

331T New Testament Studies (3) 

Specific areas of the New Testament such as the Synoptic Gospels, 
the Pauline Corpus, the Johannine Corpus, etc. May be repeated for 
credit with different subject matter. 

335 Judaism, Christianity and Islam Compared (3) 

A comparative study of the three great monotheistic traditions, 
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; their beliefs, practices, and structures. 

337 American Indian Religions and Philosophy (3) (Formerly 437) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies 337) 

345A History and Development of Early Christian Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education category III.B.l 
and III.B.2. A historical study of the diversity of Christian beliefs, 
movements, and key figures from New Testament times to the late 
Middle Ages, including such topics as important creeds and councils, 
spiritual movements, and central figures such as Augustine and 
Aquinas. 

345B History and Development of Modern Christian Thought (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of the General Education category III.B.l 
and III.B.2. A historical study of the diversity of Christian beliefs, 
movements, and key figures from the late Middle Ages to the present, 
including such topics as the context and thinkers of the Reformation 
era, post-Reformation controversies, and recent debates and trends. 


130 


COMPARATIVE RELIGION 


346A History and Development of Jewish Thought: Biblical 
Origins to Maimonides (3) 

Jewish thought from biblical times to the death of Moses 
Maimonides (1204); Hebrew scriptures, Roman era, Talmud, and 
Spanish Jewry. 

346B History and Development of Jewish Thought: 1204 
to the Present (3) 

Jewish thought from the death of Maimonides to the present; 
expulsions and persecutions, mysticism, emancipation, modem 
anti-Semitism, and Zionism. 

347A Hindu Tradition to 400 B.C.E. (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or 270T or consent of 
instructor. Hindu thought in its earliest period. Subjects will include 
an overview of Vedic literature, especially its religious content and the 
major rituals of the early Veda; philosophical developments in the 
Upanisads or later Veda; and related sacred writings. 

347B Hindu Tradition from 400 B.C.E. (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105 or 110 or completion 
of General Education Category 1II.B.2. Hindu thought after the Vedic 
period. Subjects will include the beginnings of Hindu philosophies, 
classical Hindu practice, devotionalism, modern or neo-Hindu groups 
appearing in the nineteenth century, and the contributions of thinkers 
such as Ramakrishna and Gandhi. 

348 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

(Same as Philosophy 348) 

349A History and Development of Islamic Thought: 

The Beginning to 1258 (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or 250 or equivalent. 
Islamic theology, law, culture, and spirituality up to the close of the 
classical period in 1258. Interpretation of the Qur’an, formation of 
Hadith literature, development of Islamic law, divisions within Islam, 
rise of mysticism, contributions to science and art. 

349B History and Development of Islamic Thought: 

1259 to Modern Times (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or 250 or equivalent. 
Islamic thought from the close of the classical period to the present, 
with emphasis on twentieth century developments. Emergence of 
modem Middle East, reform movements, Islamic response to nationalism 
and modernity, recent Islamic resurgence. 

350T Major Christian Traditions (3) 

Catholicism, Protestantism, Eastern Christianity, or Post- 
Reformation Communities; historical development and self-under- 
standing, liturgy, creeds, moral norms, canon laws and outstanding 
figures. May be repeated for credit with different content. 

354T Topics in Buddhism (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or 280. A historical 
survey of Buddhist doctrines, schools, and practices in a particular 
region or regions which are: South Asia, Tibet, China, Japan, Korea, 
and Southeast Asia. May be repeated for credit with different content. 
(Same as Philosophy 354T) 


358 Comparative Mysticism (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105, 1 10 or equivalent. A compar- 
ative survey of mysticism as a recurring phenomenon within major 
religious traditions. Included are selected writings and representative 
male and female figures, analyzed from philosophical and psychological 
viewpoints. Definitions, terms, metaphors, techniques, and stages of 
the mystical experience. 

370 New Religious Movements in the U.S.A. (3) 

Beliefs, history, ritual and organizational make-up of non-traditional 
modem religions in America, such as Scientology, the Unification 
Church, Hare Krishna (ISKCON) and Rajneeshism as presented by 
guest speakers. Discussion of “cult,” “sect” and the occult will comprise 
portion of course. 

380 The Religious Roots of Nonviolence (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or consent of instructor. 

An investigation of the foundations of nonviolence as taught within the 
major religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and 
Buddhism. 

400 Religion, the Media, and Contemporary Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or Communications 233 or 
History 180 or Comparative Religion 105, 1 10 or consent of instructor. 
Religion reporting in the secular media; the religious press in America; 
the influence of the media, both secular and religious, on the shaping 
of society’s values; ethical dilemmas faced by reporters. 

40 IT Studies in Religious Texts (3) 

Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or consent of instructor. 
The study and interpretation of a selected portion of the scriptures of 
a particular religion, for example, the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, 
the New Testament, the Qur’an, the Veda, the Pali Canon. 

405 History of the Jews (3) 

(Same as History 405) 

406 The Holocaust (3) 

(Same as History 406) 

41 7B Roman Empire (3) 

(Same as History 417B) 

42 1A History of the Christian Church to 1025 (3) 

(Same as History 421 A) 

421 B History of the Christian Church From 1025 to the Present (3) 

(Same as History 42 IB) 

425B The Reformation (3) 

(Same as History 42 5B) 

458 Sociology of Religious Behavior (3) 

(Same as Sociology 458) 

465A History of India (3) 

(Same as History 46 5 A) 

465B History of India (3) 

(Same as History 465B) 


131 


COMPARATIVE RELIGION 


466B Islamic Civilization: Imperial Age (3) 

(Same as History 466B) 

481 Religion and Politics in the American Experience (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.C.l. 

An examination of the relationship of politics and religion, especially 
in the U.S. The colonial and constitutional experience, Supreme Court 
decisions on religious issues, the principal theorists of moral discourse 
in the public forum, contemporary issues of concern. (Same as Poli 
Sci 481) Not available for graduate degree credit. 

483 American Religious History (3) 

(Same as History 483) 

485T Major Religious Thinkers and Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: fifteen units in Comparative Religion, including 
Comparative Religion 105 or 110 and 300, and junior standing or 
approval of undergraduate adviser. Religious thinkers and concepts 
dealing with Western, Eastern and non-traditional religious ideas from 
ancient to modem times. Fulfills university upper-division baccalaure- 
ate writing requirement. May be repeated with different content. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Supervised research projects in Comparative Religion to be taken 
with consent of instructor and the department chair. May be repeated 
for credit. 


132 


COMPARATIVE RELIGION 



INTRODUCTION 

The undergraduate program in computer science prepares students for careers in applications 
programming, systems programming, and software engineering, as well as entrance into graduate 
and professional schools. The curriculum emphasizes fundamental concepts exemplified by 
various types of programming languages, computer architectures, operating systems, and data 
structures. 

The bachelor’s program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) 
of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). 

The Computer Science program is designed to provide the student with the foundations 
of the discipline as well as the opportunity for specialization. Six objectives are addressed: 

(1) development of the ability to work effectively as an individual or as a team member to 
produce correct, efficient, well-organized and documented programs in a reasonable time; 

(2) development of the ability to recognize problems that are amenable to computer solutions, 
and knowledge of the tools necessary for solving such problems; (3) development of the ability 
to assess the implications of work performed; (4) development of an understanding of basic 
computer architecture and operations; (5) preparation to pursue in-depth training in one or 
more application areas, or further education in computer science, and (6) development of the 
ability to write and speak effectively. 


DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Ning Chen 

VICE CHAIR 

James Choi 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Computer Science 522 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://www.fullerton.edu/ecs 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 
Master of Science in Computer Science 
Minor in Computer Science 

FACULTY 

Susamma Barua, Ning Chen, James Choi, 
Hwang Chung, Bin Cong, Jozef Goetz, Allen 
Holliday, Floyd Holliday, Dorota Huizinga, 
Chang-Hyun Jo, Donna Kastner, Barbara 
Laguna, Deme trios Michalopoulos, Mariko 
Molodowitch, Nick Mousouris, Tae Ryu, 
Xiong Wang, Les Williams and Chao-Hui 
(Sara) Wu. 


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Each Computer Science major is required to complete a minimum of 130 units including 
general education. The degree program assumes that the student has already obtained a working 
knowledge of at least one high-level programming language such as C++ and a working knowledge 
of personal computing fundamentals and applications, including word processing, spreadsheets, 
database systems, e-mail systems, and presentation graphics. Students without this knowledge 
may be required to take up to seven additional units of course work beyond those normally 
required by the major. 

Courses taken toward the major or toward the requirements in related fields must be taken 
on a traditional (letter grade) basis, unless the course is offered only on a non-traditional 
(credit/no credit) basis, or if the course is passed by a challenge examination. Students must 
maintain at least a 2.0 grade point average, in all college-level units attempted, in all units 
attempted at CSUF, and in all units attempted in the major. A maximum of 6 units of a grade 
of D can be counted towards the major, provided the courses are Technical Electives or 
Requirements in Related Fields, excluding the Mathematics requirement. All other courses 
in the major must be passed with a C or better. 

Computer Science Placement Examination 

Before entry into the first course required by the major (Computer Science 131), the student 
is required to take a placement examination or complete the required prerequisite courses 
offered by the department. 

Computer Science Core (49 units) 

Students must take and pass a Computer Science Department Programming Exam before 
taking upper-division Computer Science courses. The exam will be included in Computer 
Sci 301 Programming Lab Practicum (2 units). 


133 


COMPUTER SCIENCE 


Lower-Division 
Computer Sci 
Computer Sci 
Computer Sci 
Computer Sci 
Computer Sci 


Core (13 units) 

131 Data Structures Concepts (3) 

231 File System Concepts (3) 

240 Computer System Architecture I (3) 

241 Low-level Language Systems (3) 
253U Workshop in UNIX (1) 


Upper-Division Core (24 units) 

Computer Sci 301 Programming Lab Practicum (2) 
Computer Sci 315 Social and Ethical Issues in Computing 
Computer Sci 32 1 High-Level Language Concepts (3) 
Computer Sci 331 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis 
Computer Sci 351 Operating Systems Concepts (3) 
Computer Sci 375 Problem Solving Strategies (3) 
Computer Sci 423 Language Processor Techniques (3) 
Computer Sci 440 Computer System Architecture II (3) 
Computer Sci 461 Software Engineering Techniques (3) 


( 1 ) 

(3) 


Technical Electives (12 units) 

Each Computer Science major must take 12 units of technical elec- 
tives which must be approved in advance by a departmental adviser. 
These electives must be selected from upper-division courses offered 
by the department or upper-division courses in numerical analysis. 

The electives shall constitute a coherent body of study consistent with 
the students professional and educational objectives. No more than 
three (3) units of course work may be selected from Computer 
Science courses numbered 491 through 499. 


Requirements in Related Fields (39 units) 


Mathematics Requirement (18 units) 

Mathematics 1 50A,B Calculus (4,4) 

Mathematics 270A,B Mathematical Structures (3,3) 
Mathematics 338 Statistics Applied to Natural Sciences (4) 


Science Requirements (12 units) 

Physical Science (8 units) 

One of the following combinations: 

Physics 225 Fundamental Physics: Mechanics (3) 

Physics 225L Fundamental Physics: Laboratory (1) 

Physics 226 Fundamental Physics: Electricity and Magnetism (3) 
Physics 226L Fundamental Physics: Laboratory (1) 

OR Chemistry 120A General Chemistry (5) 

Chemistry 125 General Chemistry for Engineers (3) 

OR Geological Sci 101 Physical Geology (3) 

Geological Sci 101L Physical Geology Laboratory (1) 

Geological Sci 201 Earth History (4) 

Biological Science (4 units) 

Biology 101 Elements of Biology (3) 

Biology 10 1L Elements of Biology Laboratory (1) 


Undesignated Units (9 units) 

These are to be taken in related fields and/or career support fields, 
with prior adviser approval. 

Upper-Division Writing Requirement (3 units) 

Computer Science 311, which meets the university requirements for 
an upper-division writing course, must be completed before the senior 
year. This course must be passed with a “C” or better. 

General Education (39 units) 

Computer Science students must complete the university’s 51 -unit 
general education requirements. Twelve of these 51 units will be 
completed in the majors “Requirements in Related Fields.” For the 
remaining 39 units see the “General Education” section of this catalog. 

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

A Computer Science minor shall consist of 20 units of adviser- 
approved courses including Computer Science 121, 131, 253U, and 
313. It shall include at least six units of upper-division courses (which 
may include 313) taken in residence. At least 12 units must be distinct 
and different from the units used to complete the requirements for 
the major; at least six of these 12 units must be upper-division. All 
prerequisites must be observed. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a grade- 
point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted 
is required. Any deficiencies must be made up and will require six or 
more units of adviser-approved course work with at least a 3.0 average 
in addition to those required for the degree. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check out 
the university graduate studies website for current information at 
http://www. fullerton.edu/graduate . 

Classified Graduate Standing 

Achievement of this status requires the following: 

1. Approval of a formal study plan (see description below) by the 
Computer Science Graduate Committee and the Associate Vice 
President, Academic Programs (or designee). 

2. Satisfactory completion of no more than nine units on the study 
plan. 

3. Satisfactory completion of the following courses or equivalents 
including prerequisites: Computer Science 231, 240, 241, 321, 
331, 351, 375, 423, 431, and Mathematics 270A,B. 

4. Competency in written communication in English must be demon- 
strated by a passing score on the California State University 
Examination in Writing Proficiency. The requirement must be 
satisfied before the student can be classified and before 500-level 
courses may be attempted. The student who fails to pass the EWP 
test may complete Computer Science 311 (Technical Writing for 
Computer Science) with a grade of B or better as an alternative to 
the EWP requirement. 


134 


COMPUTER SCIENCE 


Talented professional computer scientists have traditionally come 
from a diversity of undergraduate preparations. The listed courses have 
been carefully selected to provide an adequate basis for graduate work 
while not unfairly precluding admission of persons without a bachelor’s 
degree in computer science. It should be noted, however, that each of 
these courses has prerequisites and the student without preparation 
in a closely related degree may have considerable work to complete 
beyond the courses listed here. Reference should be made to the 
catalog descriptions for prerequisites of each course deficiency. 

If you have not taken many of the undergraduate prerequisites, 
you can follow an accelerated path of preparation for your graduate 
courses. The following prerequisite courses are the “fast track” and 
do not grant units toward the degree. 

Comp Sci 901 Programming Concepts and Fundamental Data 
Structures 

Comp Sci 902 Computer Architectures and Low-Level Languages 
Comp Sci 903 File Structures and Database Systems 
Comp Sci 904 Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures 


Comp Sci 905 Programming Languages and Compilers 
Comp Sci 906 Operating Systems 



advanced placement examinations. Consult a 
ate adviser for further information. 


These courses and 
their prerequisites consti- 
tute program prerequi- 
sites. Students are not 
allowed to enroll in 
courses for which they 
have prerequisite defi- 
ciencies. Students with 
knowledge equivalent to 
any or all of these pre- 
requisite courses are 
encouraged to satisfy 
such prerequisites by 
Computer Science gradu- 


Study Plan 

Prior to admission to classified graduate standing in Computer 
Science, the student with the aid of a Com-puter Science graduate 
adviser shall prepare and submit for approval by the Computer Science 
Department graduate committee a formal study plan consisting of a 
minimum of 30 units of 400 level and graduate course work. 

This shall include Computer Science 440, 461, 589, 597 or 598; 
one of 541, 542, 543, 544, 545 or 546; and 15 units of electives 
(9 units must be at the 500-level). At least 15 units shall represent 
courses offered by the Department of Computer Science. Courses 
offered by other disciplines, not listed here, and related to the student’s 
objectives in Computer Science may be approved by petition to the 
Department of Computer Science. 

All course work in the study plan must be completed with a GPA of 
at least 3.0. 

Graduate Student Advisement 

The graduate program adviser provides overall supervision of the 
graduate program. The individual student chooses an adviser from the 
full-time faculty of the Computer Science Department on the basis of 
the student’s particular interests and objectives. 


COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES 

Courses are designated as CPSC in the class schedule. 

Prerequisites for Computer Science courses may be waived only by 
department petition. 

103 Introduction to Personal Computer Applications (3) 

Introduction to use and application of personal computers: word 
processing, spreadsheets, database systems, e-mail systems and World 
Wide Web. Evaluation of personal computers and software. (2 hours 
lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

121 Programming Concepts (4) 

Prerequisite: three years high school mathematics including 
trigonometry. Introduction to programming of digital computers; 
subroutines, functions, and structure of algorithms; elementary 
input/output; arrays; strings, and data types; documentation. 

(3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

131 Data Structures Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 121 or sufficient score on the 
Computer Science Placement Exam, high school computer applications, 
and three years high school mathematics including trigonometry. Data 
structures: linked lists, stacks, queues, arrays, sequential text files, text 
formatting. 

135 C++ Application Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 103 or equivalent. A survey course 
in programming using the C++ language. Designed for persons seeking 
basic programming skills. Topics include language organization, data 
types, control structures, functions, I.O. techniques, classes, and operators. 
Credit earned not applicable toward B.S. degree in Computer Science. 
(2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

203 Advanced Personal Computing (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 103. Computer networks. Work- 
group computing: electronic mail, scheduling, work-flow automation, 
central repositories. Desktop publishing. Vertical and horizontal soft- 
ware suites. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

223A Ada Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 241. Ada control statements, types, 
subprograms, array and record types, packages, exceptions, access 
variables, dynamic objects, files, generics, compilation units, tasking, 
and low-level programming. Laboratory programming assignments. 

(2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

223C COBOL Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 231. COBOL identification, environ- 
ment, data and procedure divisions; moving data; printing information; 
arithmetic verbs; control statements; arrays and tables; sequential, 
relative, and indexed files; subprograms; report writer module. 
Laboratory programming assignments. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
laboratory) 

223H Visual BASIC Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 231. Elements of Visual BASIC, 
forms and controls, properties, mouse events, multiple-document 
interface, processing files, accessing databases, dynamic data exchange, 
object linking and embedding. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 


135 


COMPUTER SCIENCE 


22 3J Java Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 223V or Computer Science 131 and 
proficiency in C++ language. Characteristics of Java: portable, robust, 
secure, object-oriented, high performance; using the Java environment; 
server administration; types, expressions, and control flow; classes, 
interfaces, and packages; threads; exceptions; class libraries; Java for 
the Internet; tools, the Java Virtual machine. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
lab per week) 

223S Smalltalk Programming (1) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 121 or other high-level programming 
course. Smalltalk programming language including syntax, classes, 
objects, methods, polymorphism, inheritance, programming tools, 
class library. Laboratory programming assignments. (2 hours laboratory) 

223U C Programming (1) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 121 or General Engineering 205. 
Structure of C programs, functions, statements, macros, data types and 
expressions. Header files and control facilities for separate compilation. 
Standard system library functions for I/O, math, dynamic memory, 
process control, and interfacing with the operating system and environ- 
ment. Laboratory programming assignments. (2 hours laboratory) 

223V C++ Programming (3) 

Prerequisite: programming concepts course using a language other 
than C++. C++ types, arithmetic, operators, control structures, assign- 
ment operators, functions, scope, recursion, logical operators, arrays, 
pointers, characters, strings, structures, unions, enumerations, classes, 
operator overloading, inheritance, virtual functions, polymorphism, 
stream input/output, templates, exception handling, file processing. 
Laboratory programming assignments. Credit earned not aplicable toward 
a bachelor’s degree in computer science, except with adviser approval. 

231 File System Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 131 and proficiency in the C++ 
language. Characteristics and utilization of bulk storage devices. B-trees, 
sequential and random access methods. Introduction to relational data 
model. 

240 Computer System Architecture I (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 131 and either Mathematics 270A 
or Mathematics 280. Digital logic and architecture of a computer system, 
machine level representation of data, memory system organization, and 
techniques for interrupt handling. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

241 Low-level Language Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 131. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 240. The structure of low-level computer languages. Machine, 
assembly, and macro language programming. Principles of assembler 
operation. Laboratory programming assignments. (2 hours lecture, 

2 hours laboratory) (Same as Electrical Engineering 241) 

243 Low-Level Language Workshops (2) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 241. Workshops in the use of 
specific low-level programming. Offered Credit/No Credit only. 

253 Operating System Workshops (1) 

Workshops in the use of specific operating systems. See list follow- 
ing. Offered Credit/No Credit only. Prerequisites vary. (2 hours activity) 


253U Workshop in UNIX 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 121 or General Engineering 205. 

253V Workshop in VMS 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 121 or General Engineering 205. 

301 Programming Lab Practicum (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 231, 240, 241 and 253U. Intensive 
programming covering concepts learned in lower-division courses. 
Includes procedural and object oriented design, documentation, arrays, 
classes, file input/output, recursion, pointers, dynamic variables, data 
and file structures. 

303 Multimedia Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 103, 121 and completion of the 
General Education critical thinking requirements. Components and 
issues associated with multimedia technology, applications of multimedia 
and its evolution. Laboratory activities will include developing a multi- 
media application using a PC-based authoring tool. (2 hours lecture, 

2 hours laboratory) 

311 Technical Writing for Computer Science (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101. Co-requisite: Computer Science 301. 
Practice in developing documentation skills as used in the computer 
field. Topics include proposals, feasibility studies, user guides and 
manuals, business communication and technical presentation. Case 
studies in professional ethics. Both written and oral reports are 
required. 

313 The Computer Impact (3) 

Prerequisites: upper-division standing and one course from GE 
section III.A.l. Effect of computer use on individuals and organiza- 
tions. Side effects of innovative technology and the resulting changes to 
organizations, social institutions, and human perceptions of events. 
Emphasis on personal responsibility, legal ramifications, and educa- 
tional implications. Hands-on use of e-mail and the World Wide Web. 

315 Social and Ethical Issues in Computing (1) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 311. The course will cover relevant 
issues that responsible professionals will face in a complex technological 
society. Issues covered are professional ethics, computer control, piracy, 
encryption, benefits and downside of computers, privacy and computer 
crimes. Both written and oral reports required. 

321 High-Level Language Concepts (3) 

Co-requisite: Computer Science 301. Language definition concepts. 
Data types and structures. Control structures and data flow. Run-time 
considerations. Interpretive languages. Introduction to lexical analysis 
and parsing. 

322L Introduction to Computer Aided Design (3) 

(Same as Mechanical Engineering 322L) 

331 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 301; Mathematics 150B and 270B. 
Co-requisite: Mathematics 338. Advanced data structures: recursion, 
stack, trees, hashing, queues, sorting and searching, disjointed sets and 
graph algorithms. Emphasis on algorithm efficiency analysis. 
Quantitative experiments and written laboratory reports are required. 


136 


COMPUTER SCIENCE 


341 Client Server Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 231. A study of the client/server 
environment including platforms, operating systems, networks, middle- 
ware, distributed processing, data communication, optimization, client/ 
server model, and trends. Programming exercises in a language suitable 
for the client/server environment. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 

351 Operating Systems Concepts (3) 

Co-requisite: Computer Science 301. Resource management, 
memory organization, input/output, control process synchronization 
and other concepts as related to the objectives of multi-user operating 
systems. 

361 Software Design Concepts (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 223A and 241. Concepts and 
methodologies of the object-oriented paradigm. Object-oriented analysis 
and object-oriented design. Implementation of moderate size object- 
oriented systems. Topics in embedded systems. (2 hours lecture, 

2 hours laboratory) 

375 Problem Solving Strategies (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 321, 331 and Mathematics 338. 
Complexity classes, including undecidable and NP-complete problems. 
Problem solving strategies applied to parallel and distributed processing, 
numerical computation, and artificial intelligence. Greedy methods, 
divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, approximation, and search 
methods. 

423 Language Processor Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 321 and 331. Concepts behind the 
design and implementation of programming language processors such 
as compilers and interpreters. The design of a small compiler from a 
software engineering perspective. 

431 Database Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 231 and 331. Database models: 
hierarchical, network, relational, functional, E-R and object-based. 
Distributed DBMS and concurrency control. Query optimization. 

433 Data Security and Encryption Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 311, 351 and Mathematics 270B. 
System security and encryption. Current issues in security, encryption 
and privacy of computer based systems. 

437 Web Database Development (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 431 and either Computer Science 
223J or 223H. Various techniques for developing Web -based database 
applications using software engineering methodology. Introduce 
concept and architecture of Web servers, Web database design tech- 
niques, client/server side programming, and Web applications tools 
and techniques. 

440 Computer System Architecture 11 (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 240 and 241. Computer performance, 
price/performance, instruction set design and examples. Processor 
design, pipelining, memory hierarchy design, and input/output 
subsystems. 


451 Advanced Operating Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 351. The course covers internal 
structures of a modem operating system. The specific topics include 
processes, process communication, file systems, networking, and the 
I/O system. There will be several programming assignments which 
will utilize calls and other low level interfaces. 

457 Computer Communications (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 351. An introduction to digital 
data communications. Terminology, networks and their components, 
common-carrier services, telecommunication facilities, terminals, error 
control, multiplexing and concentration techniques. 

459 Micro-Computer Software Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 351. The design and implementation 
of software. Analysis of a micro-computer operating system and work 
on a team to implement a significant programming assignment. 

461 Software Engineering Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 311, 321, 331 and passing score 
on the Examination in Writing Proficiency. Analysis, design and imple- 
mentation of large scale software using classical and object oriented 
technologies. Students will work in team projects. Oral presentation 
and written project documentation are required. 

465 Principles of Computer Graphics (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 331. Examination and analysis 
of computer graphics; software structures, display processor organization, 
graphical input/output devices, display files. Algorithmic techniques 
for clipping, windowing, character generation and viewpoint transfor- 
mation. 

481 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 375. Use of computers to simulate 
human intelligence. Topics include production systems, pattern recog- 
nition, problem solving, searching gjime trees, knowledge representation, 
and logical reasoning. Programming in AI environments. 

483 Pattern Recognition Techniques (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 331. Classification techniques, 
discriminant functions, training algorithms, potential function theory, 
supervised and unsupervised learning, feature selection, clustering 
techniques, multidimensional rotations and rank ordering relations. 

491 Variable Topics in Computer Science (1-3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and consent of instructor. 
Lectures and/or workshop covering various current Computer Science 
topics. Course may be repeated for up to 3 units. Course topics may 
be taken only once. 

495 Internship in Computer Science (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science or related major and consent 
of instructor. Practical experience relevant to computer science in 
government or private agencies. Written and oral reports are required. 


137 


COMPUTER SCIENCE 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: approval by the computer science chair. Special topic 
in Computer Science, selected in consultation with and completed 
under the supervision of instructor. 

531 Design of Database Management Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 431. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Implementation techniques for query analysis, data allo- 
cation, concurrency control, data structures, and distributed databases. 
New database models and recent developments in database technology. 
Student projects directed to specific design problems. 

541 Specification of Software Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 461. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Models and languages for software system specification, 
documents, standards, and traceability. Documentation of specification 
process. 

542 Software Verification and Validation (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 461. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Theory and practice needed to ensure that a high quality 
software product is developed. Topics covered include a quality 
assessment, proof of correctness, testing, and limitations of current 
verification and validation methods. 

543 Software Generation and Maintenance (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 461. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Software creation, reuse, enhancement, adaptation and 
correction. Alternatives to coding, language concepts, role of standards, 
style, management, tools, performance analysis, regression analysis, 
and productivity issues. 

544 Principles and Application of Software Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 461. Co-requisite: Computer Science 
589. Exploration and application of different methods and languages 
for expressing software design. Evaluation of designs. 

545 Software Systems Design (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 351 and 461. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Development of software systems at the highest level. 
Systems view of software development, trade-offs between software 
and hardware. User interfaces, requirements analysis, techniques for 
development from requirements, system integration, and transition 
into use. Includes case studies and project. 

546 Software Project Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 461. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Process considerations in software systems development. 
Materials and tools in software project planning. Mechanisms for 
monitoring and controlling software projects. 

551 Operating Systems Design (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 351. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Design and evaluation techniques for controlling automatic 
resource allocation, providing efficient programming environments and 
appropriate user access to the system, and sharing the problem solving 
facilities. 


558 Advanced Computer Networking (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 457. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. System-oriented view of computer network design, 
protocol implementation, networking, high-speed networking, 
network management, computer network performance issues. 

566 Advanced Computer Graphics (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 465. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Three dimensional: reflection models, shading techniques, 
rendering process, parametic representation, ray tracing, radiosity, 
texture, anti-aliasing, animation, color science. 

583 Expert Systems Design Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 481. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Knowledge representation and search strategies for 
expert systems; logic programming; expert system tools. Project. 

585 Artificial Neural Networks (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 481. Co-requisite: Computer 
Science 589. Principles of neural networks; neural networks paradigms, 
software implementations, applications, comparison with statistical 
methods, use of fuzzy logic; project. 

589 Seminar in Computer Science (3) 

Prerequisites: one 400-level course in Computer Science and 
passing score on the Examination in Writing Proficiency. Research 
methods in computer science. Student presentations covering current 
topics, research advances, updating of concepts and verifications of 
principles of computer science. (Examples: large-scale parallelism, 
Internet security, design for user interfaces, computers in instruction). 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: classified graduate standing, approval of the computer 
science graduate adviser and Computer Science 589. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: classified graduate standing, approval of the computer 
science graduate adviser and Computer Science 589. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: classified graduate standing, approval of the computer 
science department chair and Computer Science 589. Special topic in 
computer science, selected in consultation with and completed under 
supervision of a full-time faculty member. 

901 Programming Concepts and Fundamental Data Structures (3) 

Prerequisite: Three years high school math including trigonometry. 
Using C++, Abstract Data Type (ADT) including linked lists, stacks, 
queues, tables; Object Oriented Programming (OOP) including classes, 
operator overloading, inheritance, virtual functions, polymorphism, 
stream input/output, templates; basic file structures and file processing. 
Not applicable for graduate degree credit. 


138 


COMPUTER SCIENCE 


902 Computer Architectures and Low-Level Languages (3) 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 270A. Digital logic and computer system 
architecture, machine level representation of data, memory system 
organization, Input/Output (I/O) Subsystem, and techniques for inter- 
rupt handling; Low-level computer language programming; Machine, 
assembly, and macro languages including principles of assembler 
operations. Not applicable for graduate degree credit. 

903 File Structure and Database Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 901 and 902. Fundamental concepts 
of file structures. Characteristics and utilization of bulk storage devices. 
Various indexing techniques (e.g., B-tree, Hashing, etc.) and search 
methods using C++. Fundamental concepts of database management 
systems. Database design and application development. SQL program- 
ming. Not applicable for graduate degree credit. 

904 Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science 903, Mathematics 150B, 270B 
and 338. Concepts of theoretical computer science at a more advanced 
level. Topics covered are efficiency, data structures, and algorithms. 

In particular, Strassen’s algorithm for matrix multiplication, various 
sorting algorithms, NP-completeness, and other topics important to 
algorithmic efficiency are discussed. A strong mathematical background 
is recommended. Not applicable for graduate degree credit. 

905 Programming Languages and Compliers (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 904. Language definitions, bind- 
ings, type checking, scopes, data types, control structures, subpro- 
grams. Design and implementation of programming language 
processors such as compliers and interpreters. Not applicable for 
graduate degree credit. 

906 Operating Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science 903. Intensive Training course 
covering concepts learned in Computer Science 253U and 351. 
Includes the principles of process management, memory management, 
file management, and I/O device management. Also includes Unix 
basic user commands, editors, Shell scripts, and programming 
environment. Not applicable for graduate degree credit. 



DIVISION OF CHILD, FAMILY, AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 

DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Jeffrey Kottler 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Education Classroom 105 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http ://hdcs . fullerton . edu/Counsel/ 
counseling.htm 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Master of Science in Counseling 
Marriage and Family Therapy 
MFT Licensure Preparation 

FACULTY 

Leah Brew, Joseph M. Cervantes, Sapna 
Batra Chopra, Matt Englar-Carlson, Jeffrey 
Kottler, Michael C. Parker, Mary Reed, 
Maryam Sayyedi, and David S. Shepard 

ADVISERS 

Counseling, Master of Science: 

Jeffrey Kottler 

Admissions: David S. Shepard 
Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) 
Licensure: Marty Reed 
Community Agency Counseling: 

Mary Reed 

Social Services Administration: 

Leah Brew 

Graduate Counseling Students 
Association: Sapna Batra Chopra 


INTRODUCTION 

The Department of Counseling offers a program leading to the Masters of Science in 
Counseling, with a concentration in Marriage and Family Therapy The program is designed 
to prepare students to meet California State Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) licensure 
requirements as a Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT). 

Our emphasis is on the training of clinicians who can serve the needs of individuals and 
families in their communities. We train students to brief and long-term counseling while 
maintaining professional identities as a counselors and marriage and family therapists. 

The program strongly emphasizes a multicultural perspective. We prepare counselors who 
will be sensitive to the diverse heritages, lifestyles, and special needs of individuals and families. 
Both our student body and our faculty encompass a wide range of backgrounds and values. 

Our theoretical orientation is grounded in humanistic and integrative principles. This means 
that we are respectful of different counseling philosophies, flexible in our approaches depending 
on client and student needs, and united in our belief that relationships remain at the core of all 
helping encounters. We also believe that counselors can best help people by understanding the 
relationship of emotional distress to family dynamics and to the social and cultural contexts that 
shape our lives. 

The curriculum (or study plan) comprises 48 units, delivered in four phases. Phase I is intro- 
ductory. Phases II and III form the body of core training in counseling. Phase IV comprises 
advanced courses and the final project, an original research study. 

Conditionally Classified Standing 

Phase I 12 units: Counseling 500, 502, 511, 518 

Classified Standing 

Phase II 12 units: Counseling 520, 522, 523, 526 
Phase III 12 units: Counseling 521, 527, 528, 530 
Phase IV 12 units: Counseling 560, 562, 584, 597 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COUNSELING 

Admission Requirements 

The Department welcomes applicants from diverse academic, social, and cultural backgrounds. 
International and minority students are especially encouraged to apply. Preparation for the 
counseling profession is rigorous and multifaceted, necessitating the students development in 
intrapersonal, interpersonal, and academic realms. Admission is therefore based upon indicators 
of the applicant’s potential for becoming an effective counseling practitioner, including but not 
limited to grade point average (GPA), letters of reference, personal statement and departmental 
interview. Admission is not based on any single factor considered, but on a composite assessment 
of all factors. The following are required for consideration for admission to the program: 

1. An acceptable bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) from a regionally accredited institution or its 
equivalent. 

2. A minimum GPA of 3.0 for the last 60 sequential semester units completed. 

3. A minimum GPA of 3.2 in four prerequisite behavioral science courses (or their equivalents): 
counseling theory, statistics or research methods, abnormal psychology, and human develop- 
ment. At least two of the four prerequisites must be completed at the time of entrance; any 
remaining prerequisite(s) must be completed during the first semester of enrollment. 


140 


COUNSELING 


4. A detailed personal statement (1,500-3,000 words). This statement 
should inform the faculty about the following: 

a) applicant’s personal and educational background, strengths 
and weaknesses; 

b) applicant’s understanding of, motivation and suitability for 
entering into the counseling profession; and, 

c) applicant’s long-term professional goals. This statement is very 
important. 

5. An interview with department faculty. 

6. Three letters of recommendation. These letters should address the 
author’s assessment of your suitability for pursuing graduate studies 
and entering the counseling profession. At least one letter must be 
academic (i.e., written by a professor or an instructor). The 
Department understands that for some applicants, contacting 
former instructors is not feasible; in these situations, professional 
references, written by supervisors or managers who are familiar 
with your work, are also appropriate. 


For application forms, phone University Outreach, at 714-278-2480. 
You can also complete the CSU graduate application on-line at 
https://www.csumentor.edu/AdmissionsApp. The application code is 
#08261. 

2. Send three letters of recommendation, the personal statement, and 
one copy of all transcripts to: 

Department of Counseling 
California State University, Fullerton 
PO. Box 6868 
Fullerton, CA 92834-6868 

No separate department application form is required. 

All required materials must be received by the University Office of 
Admissions and Records and by the Department of Counseling office 
by the deadline date. Late applications will not be reviewed. 

For more information about admissions, please contact our Prospective 
Student Adviser, at 714-278-3042, or e-mail us at applycounseling® 

fullerton.edu. 


All successful applicants are initially admitted as conditionally 
classified graduate students. They are invited to attend an orientation 
session before classes begin, and are encouraged to join the Graduate 
Counseling Students Association (GCSA). 

The department recommends that students take at least six units 
per semester. Students working full-time are strongly advised against 
taking more than six units per semester because of the demanding 
nature of the program; however, students should be aware of time 
limits for completion of the degree and of the possibility that they may 
be unable to enroll in a specific course because of the class size limits 
or other factors. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Advisement 

Each student is assigned to an adviser upon admission to the 
department. Advisers provide academic assistance, help students 
develop official study plans, recommend them for classified standing 
and advancement to candidacy, and monitor their progress throughout 
the duration of enrollment. 

Students should consult their adviser on a regular basis. It is 
especially important to initiate contact with an adviser as soon as 
possible during the first semester of enrollment to verify enrollment 
in any remaining prerequisite courses and to discuss pre-classification 
requirements. 

Classification and Advancement to Candidacy 

Admission to the department as a conditionally classified student 
does not guarantee advancement to classified standing. 

Each student undergoes two comprehensive evaluations; one during 
Phase II and the other during Phase III. Advancement to classified 
standing and to candidacy requires a 3.0 GPA and the faculty’s on-going 
assessment of the student’s aptitude and suitability for the counseling 
profession, progress in skill development, interpersonal and cultural 
sensitivity, and ethical and professional conduct. (See the “Graduate 
Regulations” section of this catalog for details concerning advancement 
to classified standing or candidacy.) 

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY (MR) LICENSURE 

To practice as a Marriage and Family Therapist in California, 
a license issued by the State Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) is 
required. Our 48-unit program with the MFCC concentration is 
designed to prepare students to meet licensure requirements (Business 
and Professions Code, Section 4980.37). Students should note that 
licensure requirements extend beyond those of the M.S. degree and 
include an internship and passing official written and oral examinations. 
It is the student’s responsibility to keep informed about licensure 
requirements as they are subject to change from time to time. An 
authoritative source of information is Laws and Regulations Relating to 
the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy and Licensed Educational 
Psychology issued by the BBS. For further information, write to the 
Board of Behavorial Sciences, Department of Consumer Affairs, 400 R 
Street, Suite 3150, Sacramento, CA 95814-6240; Tel. (916) 445-4933. 



Admission Procedures 

Admissions to the 
Department of Counsel- 
ing is a two-step process. 

1. Send CSU graduate 
application and one 
set of official tran- 
scripts from all 
colleges/universities 
to: 

Admissions and 
Records 

California State 
University, 
Fullerton 
PO. Box 6900 
Fullerton, CA 
92834-6900 


COUNSELING 


Upon graduation, students have 90 days to register with the BBS 
as an intern. It is advisable to write early to the BBS for a registration 
packet (e.g., at the beginning of the last semester). 

COUNSELING COURSES 

Courses are designated as COUN in the class schedule. 

252 Career Exploration and Life Planning (3) 

Exploration of personal career potentials, employment trends, 
decision making, goal setting and job search methods. 

380 Theories and Techniques of Counseling (3) 

(Same as Human Services 380) 

449 Seminar on Child Abuse (1) 

Prerequisite: Human Services 201 or Child/Adolescent Studies 301 
or consent of the instructor. Presents characteristics of child abuse and 
a review of current laws, appropriate procedures for intervention, and 
methods of community networking and referral. 

475T Counseling Special Populations (3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and completion of introduc- 
tory social science General Education class (lll.C). Counseling 
assessment and treatment of specific client groups. Various topics will 
be covered depending on the specialized training and expertise of 
instructor. May be repeated with different topic for additional credit. 

500 The Counseling Profession (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. The study of counseling as a mental 
health profession, including its history, current functions and future 
directions. Examination of the counselor as a professional, including 
educational goals, personal values, and cultural understandings. 
Opportunity to observe master counselors at work. 

502 Career and Lifestyle Development (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Counseling 
500. Survey of career and lifestyle development throughout the lifespan. 
Major theories and strategies in career counseling. Integration of 
knowledge of career development with the practice of counseling. 

511 Prc-Practicum (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Counseling 
500. Basic counseling skills, including establishing a therapeutic relation- 
ship, facilitating client self-exploration and understanding how one’s 
values influence the counseling process. Crisis intervention also will 
be addressed. Extensive role play practice. 

518 Human Development and Functioning (3) 

Prerequisites: Child/Adolescent Studies 312 and completion of or 
concurrent enrollment in Counseling 500. Integrated study of human 
development from infancy to old age and its effect upon individuals, 
couples, and family relationships. Emphasis on relevance to counseling. 
Role of human sexuality in lifespan development will be addressed. 

520 Modes of Individual Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: Counseling 511. Advanced study of major theoretical 
frameworks in counseling, including models of personality, definitions 
of individual dysfunction and approaches to treatment. Practice in case 
conceptualization and application of theories to counseling. 


521 Science of Human Inquiry II (3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in 
Counseling 530, 527 and 528. Applied research methods and program 
evaluation. Comparative review and synthesis of inquiry approaches. 
Completion of literature review for anticipated Counseling 597 project. 
Instructional fee required. 

522 Techniques of Brief Treatment and Assessment (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 511 and 518. Advanced study of the 
latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health 
Disorders (DSM) with emphasis on detection and assessment of alcohol 
and substance, spousal or partner, elder, and child abuse, 
and human sexual dysfunction. Review of brief treatment models. 

523 Counseling and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Counseling 500. Theory, research, and techniques 
related to counseling people from diverse cultural backgrounds. 
Emphasis on role plays and skills applications. 

526 Professional, Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Counseling 
522 and 523. Ethical and legal standards as related to 
critical professional issues, including child abuse, spousal or partner 
abuse, elder abuse, and substance abuse. The relationship and integra- 
tion of values for the counselors role in practice, training, supervision, 
test usage, and consultation. 

527 Systems of Family Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Counseling 
511. Survey of family systems models, including Adler, Satir, Bowen, 
Haley, Minuchin, and others. 

528 Groups: Process and Practice (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 500 and 511. Basic issues and concepts 
related to group process. Demonstration of group leadership skills with 
an emphasis on self-reflection. 

529 Practicum: Supervised Counseling of 
Children or Adolescents (3) 

Prerequisites: classified standing, Counseling 523, and consent of 
fieldwork coordinator. Supervised clinical practice with children or 
adolescents in approved community agencies. A minimum of 105 
contact hours of counseling required for course completion. 

530 Practicum (3) 

Prerequisites: classified standing; completion of Counseling 520 and 
526; consent of fieldwork coordinator and completion of or 
concurrent enrollment in Counseling 502, 527 and 528. Supervised 
clinical practice with adults, families and children in approved commu- 
nity agencies. A minimum of 105 contact hours of counseling required 
for course completion. 

560 Psychological Testing For Counselors (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 502, 522 or consent of instructor and 
completion of or concurrent enrollment in Counseling 530. Theories 
and applications of psychological testing and other means of appraisal, 
as they’ relate to the practice of community-based counseling and 
marriage and family therapy. 


142 


COUNSELING 


562 Counseling Couples (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Counseling 527 or consent of instructor 
and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Counseling 529 and 
530. The treatment of couples, including overview of current theories, 
assessment, goal-setting, interventions, ethical issues, and diversity 
issues. Assessment and treatment of spouse abuse. Study of sexual 
dysfunctions and sex therapy. 

575T Professional Issues in Counseling (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Exploration of contemporary 
contextual issues facing the practicing counseling professional. The 
topics offered depend on the specialized training and experience of 
instructor. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Current 
topics include clinical supervision, program evaluation, career 
development, and consultation. 

584 Advanced Practicum (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 529 or 530 and consent of Fieldwork 
Coordinator. Advanced supervised clinical practice wit adults, families, 
and children in approved community agencies. A minimum of 105 
contact hours of counseling required for course completion. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 52 1 and consent of faculty adviser. 
Capstone program experience; taken final semester. Student conducts 
original research relevant to the counseling field. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Counseling 529 or 530; consent of graduate program 
adviser. Independent research culminating in a thesis. Recommended 
for pre-doctoral students. May be repeated for credit. 

599 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or graduate program adviser. 
Research and development in counseling pursued independently with 
periodic conference with instructor. May be repeated for credit. 



INTRODUCTION 

Criminal Justice is the study of the causes, consequences and control of crime. Like other 
new and developing fields, criminal justice is difficult to define as it draws from a number of 
different disciplines, including psychology, public administration, philosophy, political science, 
sociology and law. 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice is designed to acquaint 
preservice and inservice students with the principles and practices of criminal justice in America. 
Although the department’s curriculum allows for the development of depth in one of the 
subject’s substantive subsystems (i.e., law enforcement, courts or corrections), the overriding 
objective is to familiarize students with activities in all the above areas. 

The department is both academic and professional in that it is an interdisciplinary attempt 
to relate intellectual issues and practitioner perspectives to the challenge of crime in a free 
society. In this regard, the department provides preparation for employment with a related 
agency and/or further study (e.g., law school). 

ADVISEMENT 

Students are urged to attend a “New Major Advisement Session” prior to their first semester 
at the university as a Criminal Justice major. This is particularly important for community 
college transfers. Failure to do so may delay graduation. The depanment’s “New Major 
Advisement Sessions” are regularly and frequently scheduled. See the bulletin board or call 
the division office for details. 


AWARDS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Graduating seniors are eligible for the Academics Award, the Activities Award, the Overall 
DIVISION OF POLITICAL SCIENCE Achievement Award and the William Hobbs Scholarship for outstanding law-related coursework. 

AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE The Dan B > Tnes Scholarship is given annually to an undergraduate who plans a career in law 

enforcement. 


DIVISION CHAIR 

Alan Saltzstein 

DIVISION OFFICE 

University Hall 511 

DIVISION WEBSITE 

http://hss. fullerton.edu/polisci 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

The Criminal Justice degree requires a minimum of 120 units, which includes courses for the 
major, General Education, all University requirements, and free electives. For the major, every 
student must complete the core courses (21 units) and a minimum of 12 units from the elective 
curriculum. In addition, each student is required to complete 9 units in a correlated curriculum. 

For additional information regarding the Criminal Justice program and its courses, check 
with the Division office in University Hall 511. 


PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice 
Minor in Criminal Justice 

FACULTY 

Rhonda Allen, W Garrett Capune, George 
M. Dery, III, James Farris, James Lasley, Jarret 
Lovell, Kevin Meehan, Jill Rosenbaum 


Core Curriculum (21 units) 

Crim Just 300 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) 

Crim Just 310A Criminal Law: Substantive (3) 

Crim Just 315 The Enforcement Function (3) 

Crim Just 320 Introduction to Public Management and Policy (3) 
Crim Just 330 Crime and Delinquency (3) 

Crim Just 340 Criminal Justice Research Methodology (3) 

Crim Just 345 Corrections (3) 


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CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


NOTE: Criminal justice majors must achieve a grade of C or better 
in 6 of the last 7 core courses in order to earn their Bachelors Degree. 

Elective Curriculum (12 units) 

Crim Just 310B Criminal Law: Procedural (3) 

Crim Just 350 Principles and Concepts of Investigation and Reporting (3) 
Crim Just 385 Minorities and the Criminal Justice System (3) 

Crim Just 405 Criminal Justice Policy (3) 

Crim Just 422 Human Resources Management (3) 

Crim Just 425 Juvenile Justice Administration (3) 

Crim Just 430 Women and Crime (3) 

Crim Just 450 Organized Crime and Intelligence Analysis (3) 

Crim Just 455 Gangs and the Criminal Justice System (3) 

Crim Just 462 Crime Analysis (3) 

Crim Just 465 Law, Punishment, and Justice (3) 

Crim Just 470 Sex, Crime and Culture (3) 

Crim Just 472 The Judicial Process 

Crim Just 475T Topics in Administration of Justice: A Seminar (3) 
Crim Just 480 Courtroom Evidence (3) 



Crim Just 485 Search, 
Seizure and 
Interrogation I (3) 

Crim Just 486 Search, 
Seizure and 
Interrogation II (3) 

Crim Just 495 
Internships (3) 

Crim Just 499 

Independent Study 
(1-3) 


Correlated Curriculum (9 units) 

Courses in the related fields shall be selected by the student in 
consultation with an adviser. The purpose of this requirement is to 
allow for an awareness of the disciplines contributing to the creation 
of “criminal justice” as a separate subject. Upper-division courses in 
such fields as philosophy, political science, psychology and public 
administration are included. For a list of courses that can count in 
this regard, check with the Division office. 

Writing Requirement (3 units) 

One of the following courses: 

Crim Just 350 Principles and Concepts of Investigation and Reporting (3) 
English 301 Advanced College Writing (3) 

English 365 Legal Writing (3) 

For further information on these alternatives, please see a Criminal 
Justice adviser. 


MINOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

The Minor in Criminal Justice consists of a total of 18 units including 
three required and three elective courses to be chosen from the 
Criminal Justice curriculum. The required courses are: 

Crim Just 300 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) 

Crim Just 310A Criminal Law: Substantive (3) 

Crim Just 330 Crime and Delinquency (3) 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE COURSES 

Courses are designated as CRJU in the class schedule. 

300 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) 

A study of the underlying ideological issues confronting America’s 
system of criminal justice, with an emphasis on key concepts in 
conflict (law and order, rehabilitation vs. retribution, etc.) 

310A Criminal Law: Substantive (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300. The general doctrines of criminal liability 
in the United States and the classification of crimes as against persons, 
property and the public welfare. The concept of governmental sanction 
of the conduct of the individual. 

31 0B Criminal Law: Procedural (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300. Legal problems associated with the 
investigation of crime, the acquisition of evidence, the commencement 
of a criminal proceeding, the prosecution and defense of charges, 
sentencing and appeal. The development of existing procedures and 
examination of current efforts for reform. 

315 The Enforcement Function (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. The historical 
and philosophical development of the enforcement function at federal, 
state and local levels; community controls, political pressures and legal 
limitations pertaining to law enforcement agencies at each level of 
government; police policies and problems vis-a-vis the administration 
of justice as a system. 

320 Introduction to Public Management and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Political Science 100 and completion of General 
Education Category III. C. 1 . Introduction to the Social Sciences. 
Introduction to the field of public administration. The course emphasizes 
current trends and problems of public sector agencies in such areas 
as organization behavior, public budgeting, personnel, planning, and 
policy making. Examples and cases from the criminal justice field are 
emphasized. (Same as Poli Sci 320) 

322 Leadership for Public Service (3) 

(Same as Poli Sci 322) 

330 Crime and Delinquency (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300. This course provides an overview and 
analysis of the evolving and conflicting purposes and practices associated 
with the topics of criminology, crime and delinquency with an emphasis 
on contemporary strategies for the prevention, remediation and control 
of crime and delinquency. 


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CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


340 Criminal Justice Research Methodology (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300. Elementary statistics including descriptives, 
measurements and tests; data collection methods for effort evaluation and 
program prediction; systems analysis techniques. 

345 Corrections (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. This course 
provides an overview and analysis of the evolving and conflicting 
purposes and practices associated with the adult corrections systems, 
with an emphasis upon contemporary strategies for treating/punishing 
offenders both while incarcerated, as well as while in the community. 

350 Principles and Concepts of Investigation and Reporting (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. Principles of 
investigative activity practiced by police, courts and correctional sub- 
systems. Reporting procedures and requirements. Meets classroom 
portion of upper-division writing requirement for Criminal Justice 
majors, or as an elective in the concentration curriculum. 

385 Minorities and the Criminal Justice System (3) (Formerly 440) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category II. and 
Category III. C.1; Crim Just 300 recommended. An introduction to 
the issues surrounding the charges of overt and indirect institutionalized 
racism in the criminal justice system. An overview of patterns of criminal 
behavior among minority groups in the U.S. will be discussed. 

405 Justice Policy (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 and 330. Not open to students who 
have studied Criminal Justice policy as Crim Just 475T. The evolving 
purposes and practices associated with the development of criminal 
justice policies, principally in the United States. Particular topics, such 
as sentencing legislation, illustrate the development, adoption, and 
impact of public policy on criminal justice systems. 

422 Human Resources Management (3) 

(Same as Poli Sci 422) 

425 Juvenile Justice Administration (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. Definitions of 
“delinquency" and the related responses of the interested institutions 
(police, courts and correction); the juvenile court (past and present), 
and prevention and correction programs (practicing and proposed). 

430 Women and Crime (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or Philosophy 302. An examination 
of women as criminals and victims, gender differences in criminal 
behavior and the role of women as professionals in the criminal 
justice system. 

450 Organized Crime and Intelligence Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300. History and development of organized 
crime. Current criminological strategies of control of organizational 
crime. Systems theories and other analytical techniques of police 
intelligence. 


455 Gangs and the Criminal Justice System (3) 

Prerequisites: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. Causal factors 
of, and legal solutions to, gang related crime in the United States are 
examined. Relevance of sociological, psychological, economic, and 
educational deviance theories to justice intervention strategies is 
emphasized. 

462 Crime Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Crim Just 300 and 340. This course will examine the 
crime analysis function within the law enforcement organization, 
demonstrate how to develop, implement and operate a crime analysis 
unit, and discuss the nexus between crime analysis, field and investigative 
operations, and administrative bureaus. 

465 Law, Punishment and Justice (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300. Theoretical scholarship in criminal 
justice is increasingly concerned with law in relation to delivery of 
justice and practices of punishment. Students will examine the rule 
of law, question whether justice is different from law, and review 
the role punishment plays. 

470 Sex, Crime and Culture (3) 

Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 300 or consent of instructor. Analysis 
of rationale for law’s concern with sexual conduct, developed via 
discussion of selected offenses and offenders. Lectures and guest 
speakers also present opposing perspectives regarding the role of law 
enforcement, courts and correction. Research and reform will be 
reviewed. Field trips to be arranged. 

472 The Judicial Process (3) 

Prerequisites: Crim Just 300 or Poli Sci 375 or consent of instructor. 
The nature, functions and roles of courts. Roles of major participants in 
the American legal system, including judges, attorneys and citizens. 

The administration of justice as a system. (Same as Poli Sci 472) 

475T Topics in Administration of Justice: A Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. Current social, 
legal and practical problems confronting police, courts and corrections. 
A “variable topic” class with specific subjects to be announced each 
semester. 

480 Courtroom Evidence (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. The rules of 
evidence in the context of a criminal trial in a California court. The 
rules, their application and their rationale. Lecture, discussion and 
simulated courtroom situations. 

485 Search, Seizure and Interrogation I (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. Analysis of the 
laws that apply in common street search-and-seizure and interrogation 
situations in California; how they have evolved, and what developments 
are anticipated. 


146 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


486 Search, Seizure and Interrogation II (3) 

Prerequisite: Crim Just 300 or consent of instructor. An analysis 
of the laws that apply in some search-and-seizure and interrogation 
situations, such as those involving the border patrol and College 
officials. 

492 Pre-law Internship (3) 

(Same as Poli Sci 492) 

495 Internships (3) 

Prerequisites: Crim Just 300 or senior standing and consent of 
instructor. The criminal justice professions; eight to 20 hours per week 
as a supervised intern in a public agency or related organization. In 
addition to the job experience, interns meet in a weekly three-hour 
seminar. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: at least 12 units of criminal justice and consent of 
adviser. Student selects an individual research project, either library or 
field. Conferences with adviser as necessary, culminating in one or 
more papers. May be repeated for credit. 


147 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Stewart Long 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Langsdorf Hall 702 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://business.fullerton.edu/economics 

DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR 
ECONOMIC EDUCATION 

Chiara Grafton -Lavoie 

CENTER FOR ECONOMIC EDUCATION 

Langsdorf Hall 530 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Business 
Administration 

Concentration in Business Economics 
Bachelor of Arts in Economics 
Minor in Economics 
Master of Arts in Economics 
Master of Business Administration 

Concentration in Business Economics 


INTRODUCTION 

As a scholarly discipline, economics is over two centuries old, dating back to the French 
physiocrats and Adam Smith in the 18th century. The nature of economic analysis has been 
described by John Maynard Keynes as “. . . a method rather than a doctrine, an apparatus of the 
mind, a technique of thinking which helps its possessors to draw correct conclusions.” 

Economic methods are used to study a basic question which faces all societies: how should 
limited resources be used to produce goods and how should that production be distributed? Not 
all wants can be satisfied because resources and knowledge are limited. Therefore, societies are 
faced with choices. These choices are made in different ways: by custom, by command and 
centralized control, or by a system of markets and prices as in our mixed economy. Economists 
examine alternative solutions to the basic economic problem by analyzing costs and benefits of 
changing existing patterns of resource use. 

Economists work in many specialties including money and banking, financial economics, 
international trade and finance, labor, public finance, industrial organization, regulation, envi- 
ronment and natural resources, economic development, transitional economies, e-commerce, 
business cycles, planning and forecasting. Social issues and problems such as poverty, crime, 
discrimination, minimum wage, anti-trust, immigration, aging, energy, pollution, health and 
education are typical subjects of faculty research. The Department of Economics offers up to 
date courses that prepare students for the issues raised by the new global economy, the modem 
telecommunications and computer revolution, and the economics of e-commerce. 

The faculty of the Economics Department participate in programs leading to both undergrad- 
uate and graduate degrees. One undergraduate program leads to a bachelor of arts degree with 
a major in economics. Another undergraduate program leads to a bachelor of arts degree with 
a major in business administration and a concentration in business economics and requires a 
larger number of business courses. Both programs prepare the student for a variety of career 
opportunities in business and government as well as advanced studies in economics, business, 
public administration and law. Graduate study is offered in economics, leading to a master of 
arts degree. Alternatively, students may follow the Master of Business Administration curriculum, 
with a concentration in business economics. 

Advisers 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 731, provides information on admission, 
curriculum and graduation requirements; registration and grading procedures; residence and 
similar academic matters. In addition, all economics majors should see a faculty adviser in the 
Department of Economics for information on career opportunities and advanced study. 
Undergraduates should consult the department office for the name of their faculty adviser. 
Graduate students should consult the graduate adviser, Dipankar Purkayastha. 


FACULTY 

Radha Bhattacharya, Victor Brajer, Edward 
Castronova, Kwang-wen Chu, James Dietz, 
Vincent Dropsy, Adrian Fleissig, Andrew Gill, 
Jane Hall, Walter Hettich, Sei-Wan Kim, 
Stewart Long, Robert Michaels, Howard 
Naish, Dipankar Purkayastha, Morteza 
Rahmatian, Lakshmi Raut, Suddhasatwa Roy, 
Eric Solberg, Denise Stanely, David Wong 


Credential Information 

For students interested in a teaching credential, the Department of Economics offers courses 
which may be included in Subject Matter Preparation Programs and Supplementary Authorization 
Programs for elementary and secondary teaching. 

Further information on the requirements for teaching credentials is found in the Teaching 
Credential Programs section of this catalog and is also available from the Department Office for 
Elementary and Bilingual Education and the Department Office for Secondary Education. 
Students interested in exploring careers in teaching at the elementary or secondary school levels 
should contact the Office of Admission to Teacher Education, Education Classroom 207. 


148 


ECONOMICS 


Awards in Economics 

Formuzis, Pickersgill, and Hunt Student Paper Award 
Outstanding Senior in Economics 
Outstanding Graduate Student in Economics 
Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award 
Murray Wolfson Memorial Scholarship 
Norman Townshend-Zellner Award 
Levem Graves Award 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

Admission to the Economics major involves two steps. Students 
who apply to the major are initially classified as Pre-economics. After 
completing the lower-division core requirements with grades of at least 
C, students may apply to the Economics major. Pre-economics students 
may take lower-division business and economics courses, but most 
upper-division courses are not open to Pre-economics students. 

The Bachelor of 
Arts in Economics 
requires a minimum of 
120 units which 
includes courses for 
the major, General 
Education, all 
university require- 
ments, and free elec- 
tives. All of the 
following require- 
ments must be met for 
the degree. Students 
must earn a grade of at 
least C in each course 
listed below. However, 
a C average will be 
acceptable in the 
upper-division eco- 
nomics electives. For 
assistance in interpreting these requirements contact the Business 
Advising Center, Langsdorf Hall 731. Students should also contact 
their faculty adviser in the Economics Department prior to or during 
their first semester. 

Required Lower-Division Courses 

Accounting 201 Financial Accounting (3) 

Bus Administration 201 Business Writing (3) 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 

Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Economics 440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

OR Math 150B Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 

OR Accounting 20 IB Managerial Accounting (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 265 Introduction to Computing and Application 
Software (3) 

Math 135 Business Calculus (3) 

OR Math 130A Shon Course in Calculus (4) 

OR Math 150A Analytic Geometry and Calculus (4) 


Required Upper-Division Courses 

Business Administration 301 Advanced Business Communication (3) 
Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Economics 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Economics 340 Economic Research Methods (3) 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A Quantitative Business Analysis: 

Probability & Statistics (3) 

and 15 units of upper-division economics electives (6 units of which 
must be 400-level) 

No more than 3 units of independent study may be used to meet 
the 400-level electives requirement. 

Other Requirements, Grades and Residence 

Other Subjects. Complete at least 50 percent of the coursework for 
the degree outside the College of Business and Economics. The depart- 
ment recommends that these courses be from the social sciences and 
mathematics. Students planning to do graduate work in economics are 
advised to take Math 150A,B; Economics 440 and Economics 441. 
Complete all university requirements for the bachelor’s degree. 

Grade-Point Average (GPA). Attain at least a 2.0 GPA (C average) in 
all university courses and in the upper-division economics electives. 
Earn at least a C grade in each course required for the major (other 
than the upper-division economics electives). 

Grade Option. Take all required courses in economics, accounting 
and management science/information systems for a letter grade 
(A,B,C,D,F). The credit/no credit grading option may not be used for 
these courses, and a grade of CR (credit) will not satisfy the require- 
ments for the degree. Exception: courses in calculus may be taken 
under the credit/no credit grading option; however, if it is also taken 
to meet general education requirements, then it must be taken for 
a letter grade. 

Residence. At least 15 units of courses must be taken in residence 
at the College of Business and Economics at Cal State Fullerton. 

Also, students must fulfill University residence requirements. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Business Economics Concentration.” 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

The economics minor covers the basics in the discipline of economics 
and gives students the opportunity to explore personal interests through 
electives. Note that a course in calculus (Math 135 or equivalent) is 
prerequisite to Economics 310 and 320. Students must earn a grade 
of at least C in each course listed below. 

Required Lower-Division Courses 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 

Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Required Upper-Division Courses 

Business Administration 301 Advanced Business Communications (3) 
Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomics Analysis (3) 

OR Economics 315 Intermediate Business Microeconomics (3) 
Economics 320 Intermediate Macroeconomics Analysis (3) 
and 9 units of upper-division economics electives 



149 


ECONOMICS 


Note: Students with a major in business administration and a 
concentration other than economics, who wish to minor in economics, 
must take Economics 201, 202, and 310 as part of their major. For 
such students, these requirements in the minor will be waived and the 
minor will consist of Economics 320 and nine units of upper-division 
economics electives. Students with a major in business administration 
and a concentration in business economics may not also minor in 
economics. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, MBA Specialist Plan." 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

This program provides preparation for professional careers in private 
industry and government and provides a foundation for further gradu- 
ate work at the doctoral level. Full-time and part-time students can be 
accommodated. Most of the courses are scheduled in the evening. 

The curriculum is designed for students with an undergraduate 
degree in business administration or economics, and consists of 10-11 
courses (30-33 units). Provided that all prerequisites have been satisfied, 
the program may be completed in one year (full-time) or two and one- 
half years (part-time). 

The required courses progress from economic theory through 
economic model building and estimation to the seminar in which the 
student prepares a thesis applying economic theory and econometric 
methods to a specific area of investigation. The curriculum also 
includes four to six courses (12-18 units) of electives. 

Most graduate courses in the College of Business and Economics 
require classified “CBE status” and are open only to students with clas- 
sified standing in the M.A. in Economics, M.B.A., M.S. in Accountancy, 
M.S. in Management Science, or M.S. in Taxation programs. 

Admission 

Students meeting the following requirements will be admitted to 
post-baccalaureate-unclassified standing: 

1. Acceptable bachelors degree from appropriately accredited institution, 
or equivalent. 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units 
attempted, and in good standing at last college attended. Postbac- 
calaureate-unclassified students may enroll in undergraduate courses 
(100 through 400 level) but are generally ineligible for graduate 
economics courses (500 level). Such students may wish to take 
undergraduate courses which are necessary to meet the require- 
ments for classified standing (see below). Upon completing the 
requirements, the student may file an Application for Change of 
Academic Objective requesting admission to the M.A. in Economics 
program. Admission to the university as a postbaccalaureate - 
unclassified student does not constitute admission to the program, 
does not confer priority, nor does it guarantee future admission. 
Students planning to apply for admission to the program should 
confer with the graduate adviser in the Department of Economics. 
Students meeting the following departmental requirements will be 
admitted with conditionally classified standing: 

3. An average score of 500 each on the Graduate Record Examination 
(G.R.E.) verbal and quantitative sections. 


4. Three letters of recommendation and a statement of purpose sent 
directly to the Graduate Adviser in Economics. 

5. For international students a TOEFL score of 570. A student scoring 
between 550 and 570 may be admitted conditionally depending 
upon an evaluation of the entire application file. The student may 
be required to complete a department approved course(s). 
Conditionally classified students may take a limited number of 
courses at the graduate level, subject to the approval of the graduate 
adviser of the Department of Economics. Students are expected 

to advance promptly to classified standing. Students meeting the 
following additional requirements will be advanced to classified 
standing. Such students are eligible to take graduate courses for 
which they are qualified. 

6. Completion of the following courses at Cal State Fullerton (or 
equivalent courses at other institutions) with a grade-point average 
of at least 3.0 (B average). The course in calculus must have a grade 
of at least C. 

Economics 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 

Economics 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Economics 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

OR Economics 315 Intermediate Business Microeconomics (3) 
Economics 320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

One 400-level economics course 

Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A Quantitative Business Analysis: 
Probability and Statistics (3) 

Mathematics 135 Business Calculus (3) 

7. Approval of study plan. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate. 


M.A. CURRICULUM 

Students are urged to meet as soon as possible with the graduate 
adviser in the Department of Economics to file a study plan and 
advance to classified standing. 

Any study plan course in which a D grade is received must be 
repeated with at least a C grade, regardless of the overall grade-point 
average of the student. 

Required Courses (15 units) 


Economics 441 
Economics 504 
Economics 502 
Economics 503 
Economics 595 


Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 
Econometric Analysis (3) 

Advanced Microeconomic Analysis (3) 
Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 
Current Research in Economics (3) 


OR approved 500-level substitute 


150 


ECONOMICS 


Area & Elective Courses (12-18 units) 

Area courses require nine units chosen from the students field of 
interest. Coursework may focus on the following areas: 

1. Environmental and natural resource economics (six units from 
Economics 416, 461, 462 and six units approved 500-level electives); 

2. International economics and finance (Economics 411, 433, and six 
units approved 500-level electives); 

3. Applied economic analysis involving coursework related to industrial 
organization and labor (six units from Economics 410, 412, 413, 
and six units approved 500-level electives); 

4. The public sector (six units from Economics 416, 417, 420, 421, 
and six units approved 500-level electives); 

5. Banking and finance (six units from Economics 420, 421, and six 
units approved 500-level electives); and 

6. Economics of human capital, health and aging (Economics 412, 
Gerontology 506 and six units approved 500-level electives. 

Among area and elective courses, 12 units must be taken with at least six 
units at the 500- level and at least six units must be in economics. 

Terminal Evaluation (0-3 units) 

Economics 598 Thesis Research (3) 

OR Comprehensive Exam 

ECONOMICS COURSES 

Courses are designated as ECON in the class schedule. 

100 The Economic Environment (3) 

The application of economics to the problems of unemployment 
and inflation, the distribution of income, competition and monopoly, 
the role of government in the economy, and other policy issues. Not 
open to prebusiness, business administration majors or minors, 
economics majors or minors, or international business majors. 

201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 

Principles of individual consumer and producer decision-making in 
various market structures; the price system; market performance and 
government policy. 

202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 201. Principles of macroeconomic analysis 
and policy; unemployment and inflation; financial institutions; interna- 
tional trade; economic growth; comparative systems. 

310 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 202 and Mathematics 135. Corequisites: 
Business Admin 301 and Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A or equivalent. 
Rational decision-making behavior of consumers and firms and price 
and output determination in markets. Primarily for economics majors, 
but open to all students who qualify. 

315 Intermediate Business Microeconomics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 202 and Mathematics 135. Corequisites: 
Business Admin 301 and Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A or equivalent. 
Analysis of business decisions in alternative market structures with 
special emphasis on problem solving in a business context using 
economic concepts and methods. Not open to economics majors. 
Students may not receive credit for both Economics 310 and 315. 


320 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 202 and Math 135. Corequisites: Business 
Admin 301, Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A or equivalent. The determinants 
of the level of national income, employment and prices, and monetary 
and fiscal policies. 

330 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. Alternative economic systems; 
their theoretical foundations, actual economic institutions, and achieve- 
ments and failures. Contrast between socialist and capitalist systems. 

331 Economies in Transition (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. The transformation from centrally- 
planned to market-oriented economies in Russia and Eastern Europe. 
Focuses on the economic, social and political costs and benefits 
involved in the restructuring of economic systems. 

332 Economies of the Pacific Rim (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. Dimensions of industrialization, 
agriculture, investment, human resources, and trade in economies of 
the Far East (including Japan and China), India, and related nations 
of the Pacific Rim. 

333 Economic Development: Analysis and Case Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. The processes of economic 
growth with references to developing areas. Capital formation, resource 
allocation, relation to the world economy, economic planning and 
institutional factors, with case studies. 

334 Economics of Latin America and the Caribbean (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. Corequisite: Business Admin 
301. Examines regional economic problems within an international 
context: dependence, industrialization and the international corporation; 
agriculture; regional cooperation; inflation; trade and debt problems. 
Major economic thinkers will be discussed. 

335 The International Economy (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. The theory, practice and insti- 
tutions of the international economy. International trade and investment, 
balance of payments, foreign exchange rates, multi-national enterprise, 
international economic policy. Current trade issues: European Community, 
trade with developing countries, Eastern Europe, and the states of the 
former Soviet Union; General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 
and other major trade agreements. 

340 Economic Research Methods (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 202, Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A or equiv- 
alent. This course will introduce the student to the basics of applied 
economic research. Students will learn how to access existing economic 
knowledge, locate and compile economic data, and analyze economic 
problems using theory and quantitative methods. 

350 American Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. The development of American 
economic institutions; economic problems, economic growth and 
economic welfare. 


151 


ECONOMICS 


351 European Economic History (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. The evolution of European 
Economic institutions and their relation to the development of industry, 
commerce, transportation and finance in the principal European 
countries. 

361 Urban Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. Theory and analysis of the 
urban economy, urban economic problems and policy. 

362 Environmental Economics (3) 

Prerequisite: Economics 100 or 201. Economic analysis of environ- 
mental problems and related issues: externalities, property rights, social 
costs and benefits, user cost,, rent and decision making under uncertainty. 

410 Industrial Organization (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 310 or equivalent. 
Business organization, conduct and performance; the rationale and 
impact of public policy on business and business activities, including 
the regulated industries, sick industries and antitrust policy. 

411 International Trade (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 310 or 315 or 
equivalent. The theory of international gains from free trade, effects 
of tariff and non-tariff barriers, and conduct of commercial policy. The 
balance of payments, the theories of exchange rate determination, and 
other international economic issues. 

412 Labor Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 310 or equivalent. 
Labor supply and demand, labor force participation, employment, 
unemployment, human capital, wage differentials, disadvantaged labor 
market groups, discrimination and wage-related income transfers. 

413 Law and Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301; Economics 310 or 315. An 
economic analysis of the common law-property, contract, and ton- 
focusing on the use of microeconomic theory to study the economic 
efficiency characteristics and effects of these laws. An emphasis will 
be placed on the analysis of specific legal cases. 

416 Benefit Cost and Microeconomic Policy Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 310 or equivalent. 
Application of microeconomic models and welfare economics to public 
policy. Concepts of economic efficiency, economic surplus and equity. 
Measurement of policy effects, including benefit-cost analysis, with 
applications to selected policy areas such as education and environ- 
mental programs. 

417 Public Finance (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 310 or equivalent. 
Government finance at the federal, state and local levels; the impact 
of taxation and spending on resource allocation, income distribution, 
stabilization and growth. 

420 Money and Banking (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 320 or equivalent. 
The money supply process and the impact of monetary policy on 
economic activity. 


421 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 320 or equivalent. 
The techniques of monetary and fiscal policy and their relative roles 
in promoting economic stability and growth. 

431 International Macroeconomics and Growth (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301 and Economics 320. Macro- 
economic analysis of the open economy: the impact of stabilization 
policies in a global economy, the role of the balance of payments, the 
international monetary system and growth in less developed countries. 

433 The Less Developed Countries and the World Economy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310, 315, or 515 and Economics 320 or 
52 1 . In-depth analytical study of development and underdevelopment 
in the poorer countries in the context of a changing international 
economic order. Both the neo-classical and the political economy 
approaches will be discussed. Includes case studies from Asia, Africa, 
and Latin America. 

440 Introduction to Econometrics (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 202, Info Sys/Decision 
Sci 361 A or equivalent. Economic measurement: specification and 
estimation of econometric models; statistical methods in economic 
research. 

441 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301, Economics 202 and Math 135 
or equivalent. Economic theory from microeconomics and macroeco- 
nomics. Content varies; constrained optimization problems and 
rational decision-making. 

450 History of Economic Thought (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301 and Economics 310 or 320. 
Major schools of thought and of leading individual economists as 
they influenced economic thought and policy. 

461 Ecological Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301 and Economics 310 or 315 
or equivalent. The application of economic concepts and methods 
to understanding the ways in which human economic behavior 
contributes to environmental and ecosystem degradation; the use 
of economic approaches to evaluate and manage these impacts; the 
design of sustainable economic policies. 

462 Natural Resource Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Business Admin 301 and Economics 310 or 315 or 
equivalent. Concepts and principles in the application of economics to 
issues in natural resource economics. Issues will include uncertainty 
and risk in investment, depletion over time, cartelization, the role of 
technological innovation and government intervention related to fuels, 
water, land, etc. 


152 


ECONOMICS 


495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Economics major with Business Admin 301, Info 
Sys/Decision Sci 361 A, Economics 310 or 320 or the equivalents; 
or international business major with Economics 202 and 335, Info 
Sys/Decision Sci 361 A or the equivalents; and consent of the depart- 
ment internship adviser, at least junior standing, 2.5 GPA and one 
semester in residence at the university. Planned and supervised work 
experience. May be repeated for a total of six units credit. Credit/No 
Credit grading only. 

496 Student-to-Student Tutorial (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Economics major or concentration, Business Admin 
301, Economics 310 and 320, senior standing, 3.0 GPA and consent 
of department chair. Student learns through teaching (tutoring) other 
students enrolled in principles and intermediate economics courses. 
Consult “Student-to-Student Tutorials” in this catalog for more informa- 
tion. May not be used to satisfy the elective requirements for the major 
or concentration in business economics. Credit/No Credit grading only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Economics major or concentration, Business Admin 
301, Economics 310 and 320 or the equivalents, senior standing, and 
consent of department chair. Directed independent inquiry. May be 
repeated for credit. Not open to students on academic probation. 

502 Advanced Microeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 or equivalent and classified graduate 
status in Economics. An advanced treatment of rational decision- 
making behavior of consumers and firms, the price system, and 
resource allocation in partial and general equilibrium settings. Topics 
include preference theory, welfare economics, gains from trade, 
monopoly power, external costs and benefits, public goods, factor 
markets, intertemporal decisions, risk and uncertainty. 

503 Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 320 or equivalent and classified graduate 
status in Economics. The determination of employment, fluctuations 
of real and money income, and the forces underlying economic growth. 

504 Econometric Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 440 or equivalent and classified graduate 
status in Economics. Contemporary methods used in econometric 
research with a focus or methods used in regression analysis, cross- 
section and panel data methods, and advanced topics of non-linear 
models, simulations and limited dependent variables. 

505 Economic Models and Forecasting (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 440 and classified graduate status in eco- 
nomics. Statistical methods of econometric estimation and forecasting. 
Practical solutions to problems in model specification, estimation by 
regression, time series analysis and forecasting. 

506 Economics of Aging (3) 

(Same as Gerontology 506) 


515 The Price System and Resource Allocation (3) 

Prerequisites: Classified CBE status and Math 135 or the equivalent. 
Microeconomic analysis and policy under mixed capitalism. The eco- 
nomic environment and institutions, markets, consumer choice, 
production and resource allocation. Monopoly power and government 
intervention. (Not open to M.A. Economic candidates.) 

516 Economics and Benefit-Cost Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 201 and classified graduate status in 
Economics, or Environmental Studies or Public Administration. 
Economics and benefit-cost analysis of public projects. Consumer 
demand and the estimation of benefits; the nature of cost in a market 
economy; price controls, unemployment and inflation; and criteria 
for choice, for multi-year projects. For elective credit in the M.S. 
Environmental Studies or Master of Public Administration. 

521 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 or 515 or equivalent and classified 
CBE status. National income determination and macroeconomic 
models. Inflation and unemployment. Monetary and fiscal policies. 
International trade and foreign exchange (Not open to M.A. Economics 
candidates or students with credit for Economics 320.) 

531 International Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 or 315 or 515 or equivalent and 
classified CBE status, and Economics 320 or 52 1 . An introductory 
analysis of theories and current issues in international trade, finance, 
macroeconomics and growth, with an emphasis on business applica- 
tions. (Not open to M.A. Economics candidates or students with 
credit for Economics 431.) 

590 Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 310 and 320 or equivalent; classified 
graduate status in Economics. Contemporary research in areas such 
as: resource economics; history of economic thought; international 
monetary systems; forecasting; economics of planning; human 
resource economics. May be repeated for credit. 

595 Current Research in Economics (3) 

Prerequisites: classified graduate status in Economics or Economics 
440 and permission of the instructor. Students attend the departmental 
research seminar where faculty and outside speakers present papers 
dealing with recent and ongoing research. Students read material 
relevant to presentations and write analytical reports covering five 
seminar meetings. 

598 Thesis Research (3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 502, 503 and classified graduate status 
in Economics. Corequisite: Economics 505. Selection and approval 
of topic; outline; methodology; literature survey; data collection and 
analysis; presentation of results. Award of the grade is contingent upon 
the completion and acceptance of the thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Economics 440, 502 and 503; classified graduate 
status; and consent of instructor and Department Chair (or designee). 
Directed advanced independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. 
Not open to students on academic probation. 


153 


ECONOMICS 



ducational Leadership 


College of Human Development and Community Service 


MISSION 

Our mission is to prepare school leaders who demonstrate strategic, instructional, organizational, 
political and community leadership; and to provide the community a source of scholarship and 
assistance in interpretation and application of scholarship. 


GOALS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The goals of the department are to prepare educational leaders who demonstrate a wide array 
of knowledge, skills, attributes, and commitment. 


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATE DEAN (ACTING) 

L.Y. (Mickey) Hollis 


Strategic Leadership 

Leadership requires the ability to develop with others vision and purpose, utilize information, 
frame problems, exercise leadership processes to achieve common goals, and act ethically for 
educational communities.' 

A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by 
facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning 
that is shared and supported by the school community. 2 

A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by 
modeling a personal code of ethics and developing professional leadership capacity. 2 


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL 
LEADERSHIP 

DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Dr. Louise Adler 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Education Classroom Building 531 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://hdcs.fullerton.edu/edleadership 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Master of Science in Education 

Concentration in Educational 
Administration 

Preliminary Administrative Credential 
Professional Administrative Credential 

School Business Management Certificate 
(University Extension) 

Doctorate of Education (Approval pending) 
Educational Leadership and Policy 

FACULTY 

Louise Adler, Joyce Lee, Ron Oliver, 

Linda Orozco, Ken Stichter 


Instructional Leadership 

Leadership requires the ability to design appropriate curricula and instructional programs, to 
develop learner-centered school cultures, to assess outcomes, to provide student personnel services, 
and to plan with faculty professional development activities aimed at improving instruction. 1 

A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by 
advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to 
student learning and staff professional growth. 2 

Organizational Leadership 

Leadership requires the ability to understand, initiate and/or improve the organization, 
implement operational plans, manage financial resources, and apply effective management 
processes and procedures. 1 

A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students 
by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and 
effective learning environment. 2 

Political Leadership 

Leadership requires the ability to act in accordance with legal provisions and statutory 
requirements, to apply regulatory standards, to develop and apply appropriate policies, to under- 
stand and act professionally regarding the ethical implications of policy initiatives and political 
actions, to regulate public policy initiatives to student welfare, to understand. 1 

A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by 
understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and 
cultural context. 2 

Community Leadership 

Leaders must collaborate with parents and community members; work with community 
agencies, foundations, and the private sector; respond to community interests and needs in 
performing administrative responsibilities; develop effective staff communications and public 
relations programs; and act as mediators for the various groups and individuals who are part of 
the school community. 


154 


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 


A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the 
success of all students by collaborating with families and community 
members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and 
mobilizing community resources. 1 2 

PHILOSOPHY OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Administration of schools for the 21st Century demands that 
education leaders demonstrate: 

■ Commitment to high standards; 

■ Strong ethical values; 

■ Credible instructional leadership; 

■ Understanding of social and political trends and the changing role 
of education in our society; 

■ Problem solving ability and the skills necessary to promote and adapt 
to change and use collaboration to build a shared vision for schools; 

■ Capacity to collaborate effectively with a wide range of non-school 
agencies and community organizations which can help schools 
achieve their mission; 

■ Commitment to life 
long learning 
which empowers 
students, staff, and 
themselves. We 
believe that: every 
child must achieve 
academic success 
in school; 

■ Every school must 
educate for an 
American democ- 
racy that values the norms and practices of diverse groups and at 
the same time celebrates shared community values; 

■ School leaders must be reflective practitioners; 

■ Knowledge is evolving and socially constructed and that learning 
is produced through an interaction of different perspectives that 
enable students to connect their education to their experiences. 

Policies of the Department 

Candidates for our programs will be selected on the basis of leader- 
ship potential and commitment to the improvement of education, and 
will engage in a rigorous course of study. 

The department is committed to a continual effort to plan and revise 
programs in collaboration with university colleagues, our students, and 
the leaders of the schools in the communities we serve. 

Students who wish to apply for credential programs must complete 
a separate applicant portfolio. Contact the School of Education Admission 
Office, 278-4028, for a copy of the requirements and information. 

Students applying for the Preliminary Administrative Credential 
Program are required to have three years teaching experience when 
entering the program. Waiver requests for 1-2 years of experience are 
considered for those starting a second career or under unusual circumstances. 


1 NCATE-Approved Curriculum Guidelines for Advance Program in 
Educational Leadership 1995. 

2 California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders 2001. 


The courses offered by the department are arranged in a specific 
order, which must be followed by all students. Cohorts of students 
are formed and move through the courses as a group. 

The department expects every student to maintain an email address 
and have access to the World Wide Web while they are enrolled in our 
programs. The university has computing facilities that can be used by 
students to email or access the web. 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES CREDENTIAL 

The Administrative Services Credential programs of the Department 
of Educational Leadership are approved by the California Commission 
on Teacher Credentialing. Because regulations governing these programs 
change, students should contact the department office for current 
information and requirements. 

Preliminary Credential 

The Preliminary Administrative Services Certificate/Credential is the 
“Tier I” administrative credential in California, requiring a total of 
26-31 units of work (which may be incorporated into the master’s 
degree program). Upon receipt of the Preliminary credential, one is 
eligible for employment as an administrator in California public 
schools. A Masters Degree is required for California State University 
to recommend a candidate for this credential. 

Professional Credential 

The Professional Administrative Services Credential is the “Tier II” 
administrative credential, requiring a total of 26 semester hours. Please 
note that holding a job as administrator and the Preliminary Credential 
are prerequisites to entry to the program for the Professional Credential. 

For Further Information, please contact the Department olfice (EC-531), 
phone 278-7673. 

SCHOOL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE 

This certificate is offered through Cal State Fullerton’s University 
Extended Education program. It provides a 25-unit specialization for 
people who work in or want to move into the field of school business 
management. Classes reflect general skills and specific functions of 
school business management, capped by a practicum designed to 
demonstrated what has been gained in classroom study. The instructors 
are practitioners with successful experience as school business managers. 

For further information on the program including program objectives, 
eligibility, and registration, please visit the University Extended Education 
website at http://www.csufextension.org or contact Pat Puleo at 
714-278-4645, ppuleo@fullerton.edu. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
(EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION) 

The principal objective of the curriculum is to prepare carefully 
selected individuals for leadership positions in public schools. The 
program is designed to help these individuals gain the technical 
knowledge and scholarship requisite to high achievement in these 
positions. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for fall 
semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, deadlines 
may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the university 
graduate studies website for current information at http://www.fullerton. 
edu/graduate/. 



155 


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 


Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

University requirements include: a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited institution and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the 
last 60 semester units attempted (see “Graduate Regulations” section 
of this catalog for complete statement and procedures). In addition, 
an applicant should have a successful teaching experience in an ele- 
mentary or secondary school. (If such experience is not available, 
other experience in related fields is an alternative if approved by a 
graduate adviser before starting the program). A candidate portfolio 
is also required. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the admission requirements and has a minimum 
2.5 GPA in previous academic work may be granted classified graduate 
standing upon the development and approval of a study plan. 

Study Plan 

The study plan must include 30 units of course work. Course 
requirements include field experience and a project. 

No more than nine units of postgraduate work taken prior to classi- 
fied standing may be applied to a students master’s degree program. 

The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will 
include: 


Core Course Work (8 units) 

Ed Admin 503 Organizational Leadership (3) 

Ed Admin 505 Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment (3) 
Ed Admin 510 Research Design (3) 

Concentration Course Work (20 units) 

Ed Admin 561 Policy, Governance, Community Relations (3) 
Ed Admin 563 Human Resource Administration (2) 

Ed Admin 564 School Law and Regulatory Process (3) 

Ed Admin 565 School Finance (3) 

Ed Admin 566 Leadership in Public Schools (3) 

Ed Admin 567 Fieldwork (1,1,1) 

Ed Admin 593 Meeting the Needs of Diverse Populations (2) 


Project (2 units) 

Ed Admin 597 Project (1,1) 

For advisement and further information, consult the graduate 
program adviser. 


Cohort Order of Classes 

Once students are admitted to the Tier I/Preliminary Administrative 
Credential Program, they are required to take all of the courses in a 
prescribed order shown below. 


FALL START 
Fall 593 
Fall 505 
Fall 567 
Spring 510* 
Spring 503 
Summer 564 
Summer 561 
Summer 597* 


SPRING START 
Spring 593 
Spring 593 
Spring 567 
Summer 561 
Summer 564 
Summer 597* 
Fall 510* 

Fall 503 


Fall 563 

Spring 563 

Fall 565 

Spring 565 

Fall 567 

Spring 567 

Spring 566 

Summer 566 

Spring 567 

Summer 567 

Spring 597* 

Summer 597’ 


* may not be required of credential only students. 

Prior approval is required from the cohort leader and department 
chair to change the order or timing of courses. 

DOCTORATE OF EDUCATION (ED.D.) 

Educational Leadership and Policy 

As of catalog press-time, approval for this new doctorate program 
is still pending. The program will be jointly offered with the University 
of California, Irvine. For current information, please contact the 
Educational Leadership Department Chair, Dr. Louise Adler, 
ladler@fullenon.edu (714.278.7673). 

General Components of the Degree 

■ The program is designed for professionals who are or will become 
educational leaders. 

■ The program will include current and/or revised requirements for 
the California Professional Administrative Services Credential (Tier II). 

■ The degree can be completed in three years. 

■ Research training will focus on data-driven decision-making and 
the utility of research methods for education leaders who must act 
to improve student learning. 

■ A masters degree in education or related field is required for 
admission. 

■ University of California admission standards including the GRE 
will be used. 

■ Courses will be scheduled during evenings, summers, and via 
distance modes. 

■ Classes will be taught by both University of California, Irvine and 
Cal State Fullerton faculty. 

■ Students will be charged the University of California rates for units. 

EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION COURSES 

Courses are designated as EDAD in the class schedule. 

Students who desire only isolated courses from the program are 
normally denied admission to such courses. 

501 Collaborative Professional Portfolio Assessment of 

Competence for School Leaders (6) (Formerly 501A,B) 

Prerequisite: one year of experience as a school administrator. 
Comprehensive course for Professional Administrative Services (Tier II) 
credential candidates. Candidates will demonstrate mastery of fieldwork 
performance standards by preparing a professional portfolio of work- 
embedded artifacts, evidences and documentation. A collaborative assessment 
process (student, university faculty, mentor, colleagues in the course) 
will establish the candidates competency in each of the California 
Standards for Educational Leaders adopted by the California Commission 
on Teacher Credentialing. Successful completion of the course provides 
for university-approval and recommendation to the CCTC for the full 
and clear Professional Administrative Services Credential (Tier II). 


156 


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 


503 Organizational Leadership (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to Preliminary Credential and/or masters 
program. The focus of this class is on using organizational theory and 
leadership studies to understand schools and how to bring about 
change in schools. The course includes study of the organization, 
structure, and cultural context of schools and the study of techniques 
used to guide, motivate, delegate, build consensus, and lead others in 
the achievement of goals. 

505 Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment (3) 

Study of alternative designs for school curriculum, delivery and 
evaluation of instructional programs, current trends in supervision and 
assessment of student progress. Exploration of the works of major edu- 
cational theorists and reviews of research. Study of the dynamics of 
curriculum change. 

510 Research Design (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to Preliminary Credential and/or master’s 
program and a grade of U C” or better in Ed Admin 505. Introduces 
students to the major forms of both quantitative and qualitative 
research used in education. Students will learn how to select an 
appropriate research method and the characteristics of sound research. 
Stress will be placed on making reasoned judgments as consumers 
of research as well as selecting appropriate information collection 
strategies as school leaders. 

537T Advanced Issues in School Leadership (1) 

Prerequisite: Ed Admin 501 A. This is a variable topic course for 
students in the professional Administrative Credential Program which 
deals with advanced issues emerging in the field of educational leader- 
ship. Course may be repeated for credit. 

546 Leadership Through Communication (3) 

Learn to identify key internal and external constituent groups, and 
optimal means of communication with them. Develop leadership skills 
in facilitating these groups’ contributions to organizational success. 

561 Policy, Governance, Community Relations (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed Admin 503. In this course students study the 
factors which determine public policy with regard to education, the 
roles of the various levels of government in controlling public education, 
how to identify various interest group, and how to communicate 
effectively about school programs. 

563 Human Resource Administration (2) 

Prerequisite: Ed Admin 503. This course focuses on the importance 
and dimensions of human resource administration and the need to 
attract, retain, develop, and motivate school personnel in ways that 
enhance learning and professional development and that lead to positive 
and productive school settings. Includes study of collective bargaining 
and employee evaluation in public schools. 


564 School Law and Regulatory Process (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed Admin 503. This course reviews the federal, state 
and local educational laws, regulations and other policies that govern 
schools and the requirements that administrators act in accordance 
with these laws and regulations in ways that are ethically and legally 
defensible. 

565 School Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed Admin 503. Course reviews effective management 
of fiscal resources and business services. The course covers the sources 
of income to public schools: federal, state, local, and private (including 
grants and foundations). It also reviews sound budgetary and business 
procedures for schools. 

566 Leadership in Public Schools (3) 

The course focuses on the leadership roles of principals, co-admin- 
istrators, and supervisors in public schools. Content includes leadership, 
reflective practice, human relations, the administrator’s role in group 
process, site based decision-making, school climate change agent roles, 
and planning models. Violence and school safety issues such as gangs 
will be studied. 

567 Fieldwork (1) (Formerly 567 A,B,C) 

Prerequisite: admission to credential and/or master’s program. 
Directed fieldwork in administrative areas in school. 

593 Meeting the Needs of Diverse Populations (2) 

Prerequisite: Ed Admin 503. The course examines effective adminis- 
trative practices and leadership in working with teachers and students 
of differing gender or ethnicity or with disabilities so as to promote 
equal learning opportunities. The course includes study of diverse 
cultural patterns among families and appropriate mechanisms for 
involving all families in school programs. 

597 Project (1-2) 

Prerequisites: Ed Admin 510. Individual research on a graduate 
project, with conferences with a faculty adviser, culminating in a project. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Independent inquiry for qualified 
students. 


157 


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATE DEAN (ACTING) 

L.Y. (Mickey) Hollis 

DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY 
AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 

DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Carmen Zuniga Dunlap 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Education Classroom Building 190 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

hdcs.fullenon.edu/ElEd/lmro.html 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Master of Science in Education 
Concentrations: 

Bilingual/Bicultural (Spanish-English) 
Educational Technology 
Elementary Curriculum and 
Instruction 
Reading 

Basic Teacher Credential Programs 

Professional Teacher Preparation 
Program for the Multiple Subject 
Credential 

Professional Teacher Preparation 
Program for the Multiple Subject 

Credential with Bilingual Cross 
Cultural and Academic 
Development (BCLAD) 
Emphasis. 

FACULTY 

Carol Barnes, Donna Bennett, Abbie Brown, 
Kim Case, Amy Cox-Peterson, Teresa Crawford, 
Mildred Donoghue, Carmen Zuniga Dunlap, 
Barb Finnell, Susana Flores, Ana Garza-Dargatz, 
Earl Gotts, Tim Green, Andrea Guilluame, 
Laurie Hansen, Karen Ivers, Gale Kahn, Patricia 
Keig, Lisa Kirtman, Carol Lionello, Christine 
Mayfield, Kathy Murphy, Kim Norman, Terri 
Patchen, Nawang Phuntsog, Kristine Quinn, 
Chris Renne, Beth Schipper, Brenda Spencer, 
Christine Valenciana, Evelyn Weisman, Ruth 
Yopp-Edwards, Hallie Yopp Slowik 


Awards in Education 

Outstanding Graduate Student 
Emma H. Holmes Mathematics Award 
Bernard Kravitz Multicultural Project Award 
Outstanding Curriculum Project 
Edwin Carr Fellowship 

Application Deadlines 

University applications to credential programs or master’s program need to be postmarked 
no later than March 1st for the fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, 
deadlines maybe changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the university graduate 
studies website for current information at http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

THE PROFESSIONAL TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM FOR THE 
MULTIPLE SUBJECT (ELEMENTARY) CREDENTIAL PROGRAM 

The Professional Teacher Preparation Program for the Multiple Subject (Elementary) 
Credential prepares individuals to teach in self-contained classrooms at the elementary or middle 
school level where multiple subjects are taught. Candidates may select either a two or three- 
semester credential program sequence, or a three-semester sequence that can include teaching 
on an internship credential. The Department also offers two Bilingual Crosscultural and 
Academic Development (BCLAD) Emphasis options - the Asian BCLAD and the Spanish BCLAD. 
Applicants to the credential program must either hold a bachelor’s degree or have completed 
the major, including a minimum of 80% of the Multiple Subject Matter Preparation Program 
(MSMPP) or have passed the California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET). 

Freshman may opt to simultaneously pursue an undergraduate major and a teaching credential 
through the Blended Teacher Education Program, which leads to a Multiple Subject Credential 
or to a basic Education Specialist Credential. The section on Credentials in this catalog contains 
more information on the Blended Teacher Education Program. 

California law requires an academic major; there is no major in education. Students who opt 
for the Blended Teacher Education Program select a Liberal Studies or Child and Adolescent 
Studies major. Students who opt for the fifth-year Multiple Subject Credential Program devote 
their first three or four years of work to completing requirements for the baccalaureate degree 
with an academic major, and possibly requirements for the Multiple Subject Matter Preparation 
Program (discussed later). Majors in the social sciences, humanities, or natural sciences provide 
excellent background for careers in elementary school teaching. Individuals interested in 
working as bilingual teachers may consider a major in a non-English language. Students are 
encouraged to attend a program overview during the junior and senior year. Overview schedules 
may be obtained through the Office of Admissions to Teacher Education. Applications for 
admission to BTEP are processed through the Center for Careers in Teaching in Humanities 113 
or by phone at (714) 278-7130. 

Two-Semester Program Sequence 

The Multiple Subject Credential Program two-semester sequence is as follows: 

First Semester 

Ed El 430A Foundations in Elementary School Teaching (3) 


158 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


Ed El 430B Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School 
Teaching (Math, Science, Social Studies) (2) 

Ed El 430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (2) 

Ed El 433 Language Arts and Reading Instruction in the Public 
Schools (3) 

Ed El 434 Methods and Inquiry for Teaching English Learners (2) 

Ed El 439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (5) 

Ed El 439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching (Visual and 
Performing Arts) (1) 

Second Semester 

Ed El 429 Integrated Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary 
School (3) 

Ed El 430B Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School 
Teaching (Math, Science, Social Studies) (4) 

Ed El 439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (9) 

Ed El 439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching Current Issues, 
Mainstreaming Health and Physical Education (4) 

Three-Semester Credential Program Sequence 

A three-semester program is also available. This sequence is designed 
for individuals who wish to take classes during evenings and Saturdays, 

with limited though 
required daytime 
involvement in ele- 
mentary schools. 
Student teaching 
requires a full daytime 
commitment. 

First Semester 

Ed El 430A 

Foundations in 
Elementary School 
Teaching (3) 

Ed El 430B Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School 
Teaching (Math, Science, Social Studies) (2) 

Ed El 430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (1) 

Ed El 433 Language Arts and Reading Instruction in the Public 
Schools (3) 

Ed El 439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (for interns) (5) 
Ed El 446 Methods and Inquiry for BCLAD Candidates (BCLAD only) (3) 

Second Semester 

Ed El 429 Integrated Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary 
School (3) 

Ed El 434 Methods and Inquiry for Teaching English Learners (2) 

Ed El 439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching (Current Issues 
and Visual and Performing Arts) (2) 

Ed El 439A Student Teaching in Elementary School (4-9) 

Ed El 430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (1) 


Third Semester 

Ed El 430B Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School 
Teaching (Math, Science, Social Studies) (4) 

Ed El 439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (5-9) 

Ed El 439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching (Mainstreaming, 
Health and Physical Education) (2) 

Three-Semester Internship Program 

The three-semester Intern Credential Programs for Multiple Subject 
and Multiple Subject BCLAD credentials are three-semester programs 
to which candidates may apply while completing the first semester of 
the regular credential preparation program. Admission is contingent 
on approved full-time employment with a participating district, 
superior standing in first-semester coursework and student teaching, 
and recommendations from University and district personnel. The 
remaining two semesters involve paid teaching internship positions and 
University coursework. Additionally, some opportunities may arise for 
candidates in the three-semester non-internship program to pursue 
internship status. Questions may be directed to the Intern Coordinator. 
Information about these programs is available in the Office of 
Admission to Teacher Education. 

Both the two-and three-semester credential programs require 
substantial time commitments. The three-semester credential program 
requires evening course work and may require Saturday course work. 

Admission Procedures and Criteria 

Admission to the University does not include admission to the 
Multiple Subject Credential Program. Students must apply for admis- 
sion to the Multiple Subject Credential Program the semester prior to 
anticipated enrollment in the program. Filing deadlines are February 
28 (to begin the program the following fall) and September 30 
(to begin the program the following spring). 

Applicants for admission into the Multiple Subject Credential 
Program are evaluated according to many criteria. These include 
scholarship, breadth of understanding, professional aptitude, physical 
and mental fitness, fundamental skills, and character. Evidence related 
to these criteria is submitted at time of application and include the 
following: 

1. Overall grade point average of greater than 2.67, or a grade point 
average of 2.75 for the last 60 units. 

2. Prior to student teaching: completion of at least 80% of an 
approved subject matter program (Multiple Subject Matter 
Preparation Program) or passage of the PRAXIS Multiple Subject 
Assessment for Teachers (MSAT) or California Subject Examination 
for Teachers (CSET). Information regarding the Multiple Subject 
Matter Preparation Program is available from the Center for Careers 
in Teaching (714-278-7130) located in Humanities 113. 

3. Completion of the California Basic Education Skills Test (CBEST) 
and passage of the written portion of this test. 

4. Satisfactory completion of prerequisite courses: 

a. Child/Adolescent Studies 312 Human Growth and 
Development (3) 

OR 



159 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


b. Child/Adolescent Studies 325A Conception Through age 8 (3), 
AND 

Child/Adolescent Studies 32 5B Age 9 Through Adolescence (3) 
OR 

c. Psych 361 Developmental Psychology (3). 

d. Ed El 31 5A (2) and Ed El 315B (1) Introduction to Elementary 
Classroom Teaching” Lecture and Fieldwork 

e. Ed El 425 (3) Cultural Pluralism in Elementary Schools 

5. Recommendations from academic faculty, school personnel, and/or 
other appropriate persons. 

6. Autobiography. 

7. Interview with an Education Faculty member 

Program faculty and staff also conduct informal assessments of 
applicants’ suitability for teaching throughout prerequisite courses 
and the application process. Further evidence is provided subse- 
quent to application when opportunity is provided for verification 
of tuberculosis screening and certificate of clearance which verifies 
the absence of a criminal record. 

Details concerning admission procedures and criteria are available 
in the Office of Admission to Teacher Education. 

Admissions to Teacher Education 

Admission to the subsequent semesters of the program is based on 
continuous and satisfactory progress in the prior semester(s). CBEST 
must be passed prior to student teaching or intern teaching. 

Bilingual Cross-cultural Language And Academic Development 
(BCLAD) Emphasis 

A Multiple Subject Credential with a bilingual-bicultural (Spanish- 
English) emphasis or with an Asian language emphasis is available. 
Information about these programs is available in the Office of 
Admissions to Teacher Education. 

Application for Teaching Credentials 

Upon completion of a multiple subject credential program the 
credential candidate must submit an application to the Commission on 
Teacher Credentialing through the CSUF credential analyst and verify 
passage of the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA). 

The credential analyst is located in the Credential Preparation Center in 
College Park 740. Additional information on the credential application 
process is available in the Credential Preparation Center. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
(BILINGUAL/BICULTURAL EDUCATION CONCENTRATION) 

The program is designed to develop qualified bilingual/bicultural 
instructors (Spanish-English) who can work as classroom or resource 
teachers and staff developers. It will help individuals teach others how 
to provide experiences in the cultural heritage of the target population 
and develop specific teaching techniques and methods in teaching 
reading and English as a second language. The program will also help 
individuals to interpret and implement research related to 
bilingual/bicultural children. Individuals will become skilled in their 
abilities to diagnose learning needs for such students and to develop 
and implement sound educational strategies. 


Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

University requirements include: a baccalaureate from an accredited 
institution and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 
semester units attempted (see “Graduate Regulations” section for 
complete statement and procedures). 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the admission requirements and the following 
requirements may be granted classified graduate standing: 

1. The development of an approved study plan 

2. A basic teaching credential or equivalent experience 

3. An approved major (minimum of 24 units upper division or graduate) 

4. A 2.5 grade-point average on previous academic and related work 

5. Language competence (English and Spanish) as determined by 
satisfactory interviews or course work 

6. Completion of Spanish 466 

Credit will be given for previous postbaccalaureate studies when 
possible. Otherwise well-qualified students may be admitted with 
limited subject or grade deficiencies, but these deficiencies must be 
removed. Grade-point average deficiencies may be removed by a 
demonstration of competency in the graduate program. 

Study Plan 

The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will 
include the following: 

Core Course Work (9 units) 

Ed El 500 Bilingual Multicultural Curriculum (3) 

Ed El 51 1 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Ed El 541 Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Bilingual- 
Bicultural Education (3) 

Required Teacher Education Course (3 units ) 

Ed El 542 Current Issues and Problems in Bilingual-Bicultural 
Education (3) 

Course Work Outside Bilingual-Bicultural Education (12 units) 

Chicano 450 The Chicano and Temporary Issues (3) 

Chicano 480 The Immigrant and the Chicano (3) 

One of the following: 

For Lang 509 Advanced Principles of TESOL: Listening/Speaking 
Focus (3) 

For Lang 510 Advanced Principles of TESOL: Reading/ 

Writing Focus (3) 

One of the following: 

For Lang Ed 527 Second Language Acquisition (3) 

For Lang Ed 595 Curriculum and Program Design for TESOL (3) 

Elective (3 units) 

Elective units are chosen in consultation with and approved by the 
graduate adviser. 


160 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


Culminating Experience (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Ed El 594 Research Seminar (3) 

OR Ed El 597 Project (3) 

OR Ed El 598 Thesis (3) 

For further information consult the graduate program adviser. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
(EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION) 

The Concentration in Educational Technology within the Master 
of Science in Education is designed to (1) help classroom teachers 
upgrade their skills and knowledge about new educational technologies 
and their role in the classroom and (2) prepare teachers for technology 
leadership roles in public and private schools. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

University and department admissions requirements include: 

1 . Baccalaureate from an accredited institution 

2. Grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units 
attempted 

3. A basic teaching credential or equivalent experience 

4. An approved major (minimum of 24 units upper-division or graduate) 

5. 2.5 grade-point average on previous academic and related work. 
Credit will be given for previous post -baccalaureate studies when 
possible. 

Otherwise well-qualified students may be admitted with limited 
subject or grade deficiencies, but these deficiencies must be removed. 
Grade-point average deficiencies may be removed by a demonstration 
of competency in the graduate program. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

Classified standing will be granted when all admissions deficiencies 
or prerequisites have been met and a study plan developed. 

Study Plan 

Core Classes (9 units) 

Ed El 511 Survey of Educational Research (3) [meets writing 
requirement] 

Ed El 529 Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 

Ed El 536 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Concentration Courses (18 units) 

Ed El 419 Advanced Technologies (3) 

Ed El 515 Problem Solving Including Logo (3) 

Ed El 518A Issues in Instructional Design of Classroom Software (3) 

Ed El 518B Multimedia Development and Instruction in the 
Classroom (3) 

Ed El 522 Web Design and Instruction (3) 

Ed El 590 Practicum: Elementary School Teachers and Computers (3) 


Culminating Experience (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Ed El 594 Research Seminar Including Project (3) 

OR Ed El 597 Project (3) 

OR Ed El 598 Thesis (3) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
(ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION CONCENTRATION) 

The program is designed to help career classroom teachers upgrade 
their skills, become informed about new ideas in elementary teaching, 
and prepare for curriculum and instructional leadership in one or more 
of the following areas: elementary classroom teaching, computer educa- 
tion, meeting the needs of diverse learners, early childhood education, 
and staff development in public and private schools. Students may 
follow the study plan outlined below for the concentration in 
Elementary Curriculum and Instruction or they may elect to specialize 
in one of five emphasis areas: Computer Education, Diversity, Early 
Childhood Education, Professional Inquiry and Practice, and Staff 
Development. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

University requirements include a baccalaureate from an accredited 
institution and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 
semester units attempted (see “Graduate Regulations” for complete 
statement and procedures). 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

A student who meets the admission requirements and the following 
requirements may be granted classified graduate standing upon the 
development of an approved study plan: a basic teaching credential 
or equivalent experience, and an approved major (minimum of 24 
units upper-division or graduate), a 2.5 grade-point average on previous 
academic and related work. Credit will be given for previous post- 
baccalaureate studies when possible. Otherwise well-qualified students 
may be admitted with limited subject or grade deficiencies, but these 
deficiencies must be removed. Grade-point average deficiencies may 
be removed by a demonstration of competency in the graduate 
program. 

Study Plan 

The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will 
include the following: 

Core Course Work (9 units) 

Ed El 51 1 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Ed El 529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 
Ed El 536 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Course Work in Concentration (12 units) 

Six units from following instruction-focused courses: 

Ed El 492A,B Gender Issues in Math and Science (2,1) 

Ed El 515 Problem Solving Strategies Including Logo (3) 

Ed El 521 The Study of Teaching (3) 

Ed El 527 Graduate Seminar in Developmental Psychology: The 
Human from Conception Through Eight Years (3) 


161 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


Ed El 528 Readin^Language Arts in the Early Childhood Curriculum (3) 
Ed El 538 Graduate Studies: Early Childhood Education (3) 

Ed El 539 Clinical Supervision: Analyzing Effective Teaching (3) 

Ed El 541 Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Bilingual- 
Bicultural Education (3) 

Ed El 542 Current Issues and Problems in Bilingual-Bicultural 
Education (3) 

Ed El 548 Social Studies, Science, and Math in Early Childhood 
Education (3) 

Ed El 551 Assessment Across the Curriculum (3) 

Ed El 552 Family, Community, and Professional Partnership (3) 

Ed El 553 Models of Teaching (3) 

Six units from the following curriculum-focused courses: 

Ed El 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second 
Languages (3) 

Ed El 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Integrated 
Language Arts (3) 

Ed El 532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 
Ed El 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Ed El 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Ed El 535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading in the 
Language Arts Program (3) 

Ed El 537 Graduate Studies: Current Issues and Problems (3) 

Ed El 571 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science 
Education Practicum (3) 

Electives (6 units) 

Electives are chosen in consultation with and approved by the 
graduate adviser. 

Culminating Experience (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Ed El 594 Research Seminar (3) 

OR Ed El 597 Graduate Project (3) 

OR Ed El 598 Thesis (3) 

For further information, consult the graduate program adviser. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION CONCENTRATION 
(EMPHASIS IN COMPUTER EDUCATION) 

This emphasis has been designed to provide elementary school 
teachers with a broad understanding of the applications of computers 
in the elementary school classroom. Competencies will enable participants 
to become computer curriculum specialists who will guide the integra- 
tion of computers into the elementary school curriculum, their uses in 
instruction, and their applications in instructionally related activities. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified/Classified 

The requirements for admission to conditionally classified and 
classified standing are the same as those for the M.S. in Education 
concentration in Elementary Curriculum and Instruction. 


Study Plan 

The study plan consists of 30 units of adviser-approved course work: 

Core Course Work (9 units) 

Ed El 51 1 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Ed El 529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 
Ed El 536 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Course Work in Computer Education Emphasis (12 units) 

Ed El 419 Advanced Technology in Education (3) 

Ed El 5 1 5 Problem Solving Strategies Including Logo (3) 

Ed El 522 Web Design and Instruction (3) 

Ed El 590 Practicum: Elementary School Teachers and Computers (3) 

Curriculum-Focused Course Work (6 units) 

Ed El 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second 
Languages (3) 

Ed El 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Integrated 
Language Arts (3) 

Ed El 532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 
Ed El 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Ed El 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 

Social Studies (3) 

Ed El 535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading in the 
Language Arts Program (3) 

Ed El 537 Graduate Studies: Current Issues and Problems (3) 

Ed El 571 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science 
Education Practicum (3) 

Culminating Experience (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Ed El 594 Research Seminar (3) 

OR Ed El 597 Project (3) 

OR Ed El 598 Thesis (3) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION CONCENTRATION 
(EMPHASIS IN DIVERSITY) 

The Diversity emphasis is designed to help career classroom teachers 
become informed about appropriate curriculum and instruction for the 
diverse student population in the public schools in the state of 
California. It will help individuals to provide educational experiences 
and develop curriculum appropriate to linguistically and culturally 
diverse populations. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified/Classified 

The requirements for admission to conditionally classified and clas- 
sified standing are the same as those for the M.S. in Education concen- 
tration in Elementary Curriculum and Instruction. 


162 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


Study Plan 

Core Course Work (9 units) 

Ed El 500 Bilingual Multicultural Curriculum (3) 

Ed El 5 1 1 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Ed El 529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 

Diversity Emphasis Course Work (9 units) 

Ed El 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second 
Languages (3) 

Ed El 541 Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Bilingual- 
Bicultural Education (3) 

Ed El 542 Current Issues and Problems in Bilingual-Bicultural 
Education (3) 

Curriculum-Focused Course Work (15 units) 

Two of the following: 

Ed El 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Integrated 
Language Arts (3) 

Ed El 532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 

Mathematics (3) 

Ed El 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Ed El 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 

Social Sciences (3) 

Ed El 535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading in the 
Language Arts Program (3) 

Ed El 571 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science 
Education Practicum (3) 

Elective (3 units) 

Elective units are chosen in consultation with and approved by the 
graduate adviser. 

Culminating Experience (3 units) 

Ed El 594 Research Seminar (3) 

OR Ed El 597 Project (3) 

OR Ed El 598 Thesis (3) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION CONCENTRATION 
(EMPHASIS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION) 

This emphasis is designed to meet the greater community and 
professional need for quality education during the critical early years 
of school. The educational demand for sound planning and instruction 
in preschool, kindergarten, and the primary grades has increased the 
need for effective specialists in Early Childhood Education. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified/Classified 

The requirements for admission to conditionally classified or 
classified standing are the same as for the M.S. in Education 
concentration in Elementary Curriculum and Instruction. 


Study Plan 

The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will 
include the following: 

Core Course Work (9 units) 

Ed El 511 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Ed El 529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 
Ed El 536 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Course Work in Early Childhood Emphasis (9 units) 

Ed El 528 ReadingTanguage Arts in the Early Childhood Curriculum (3) 
Ed El 538 Graduate Studies: Early Childhood Education (3) 

Ed El 548 Social Sciences, Science, and Math in Early Childhood 
Education (3) 

Curriculum-Focused Course Work (6 units) 

Two of the following: 

Ed El 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second 
Languages (3) 

Ed El 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Integrated 
Language Arts (3) 

Ed El 532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 
Ed El 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Ed El 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Ed El 535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading in the 
Language Arts Program (3) 

Ed El 537 Graduate Studies: Current Issues and Problems (3) 

Ed El 571 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science 
Education Practicum (3) 

Elective (3 units) 

Elective units are chosen in consultation with and approved by the 
graduate adviser. 

Culminating Experience (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Ed El 594 Research Seminar (3) 

OR Ed El 597 Project (3) 

OR Ed El 598 Thesis (3) 

For further information, consult the graduate program adviser. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION CONCENTRATION 

(EMPHASIS IN PROFESSIONAL INQUIRY AND PRACTICE) 

The Professional Inquiry and Practice emphasis is designed to help 
career classroom teachers become informed about appropriate curriculum 
and instruction for students in the public schools of California. They 
will develop reflective and analytical thinking and initiate cycles of 
goal setting, professional practice, and reflection. The base of skills 
and knowledge will support their growing involvement in school 
reform including systematic reforms. Courses in this emphasis provide 
a foundation for teachers who wish to prepare for certification by the 
National Board for Professional Standards. 


163 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


Admission to Gradate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified/Classified 

The requirements for admission to conditionally classified or classi- 
fied standing are the same as for the M.S. in Education concentration 
in Elementary Curriculum and Instruction. 

Study Plan 

Core Courses (9 units) 

Ed El 51 1 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Ed El 529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 
One of the following: 

Ed El 536 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Ed El 500 Bilingual Multicultural Curriculum (3) 

Emphasis Courses (9 units) 

Ed El 521 The Study of Teaching (3) 

Ed El 551 Assessment Across the Curriculum (3) 

Ed El 552 Family, Community, and Professional Partnerships (3) 
Curriculum Course (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Ed El 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second 
Language (3) 

Ed El 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Integrated 
Language Arts (3) 

Ed El 532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: 

Mathematics (3) 

Ed El 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Ed El 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Ed El 535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading in the 
Language Arts Program (3) 

Electives (6 adviser-approved units) 

Culminating Experience (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Ed El 594 Research Project (3) 

OR Ed El 597 Graduate Project (3) 

OR Ed El 598 Thesis (3) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION CONCENTRATION 
(EMPHASIS IN STAFF DEVELOPMENT) 

This program is designed to enable educators to assume leadership 
roles in staff development in school districts. The sequence of courses 
is also designed to help teacher leaders and master teachers to under- 
stand contemporary trends and research findings in elementary 
curriculum and instruction. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally 
Classified/Classified 

The requirements for admission to conditionally classified or classi- 
fied standing are the same as for the M.S. in Education concentration 
in Elementary Curriculum and Instruction. 


Study Plan 

The adviser-approved 30 units (minimum) on the study plan will 
include the following: 

Core Course Work (9 units) 

Ed El 51 1 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Ed El 529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 
Ed El 536 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Course Work in Staff Development Emphasis (9 units) 

Ed El 52 1 The Study of Teaching (3) 

Ed El 539 Clinical Supervision: Analyzing Effective Teaching (3) 

Ed El 553 Models of Teaching (3) 

Curriculum-Focused Course Work (6 units) 

Two of the following: 

Ed El 530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second 
Languages (3) 

Ed El 531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Integrated 
Language Arts (3) 

Ed El 532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 
Ed El 533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Ed El 534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Ed El 535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading in the 
Language Arts Program (3) 

Ed El 537 Graduate Studies: Current Issues and Problems (3) 

Ed El 571 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science 
Education Practicum (3) 

Elective (3 units) 

Elective units are chosen in consultation with and approved by 
the graduate adviser. 

Culminating Experience (3 units) 

One of the following: 

Ed El 594 Research Seminar (3) 

OR Ed El 597 Project (3) 

OR Ed El 598 Thesis (3) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Reading 

Please refer to Reading Department section of this catalog. 

COMPUTING CERTIFICATE FOR ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL TEACHERS 

The purpose of this certificate program is to provide participants 
with a broad understanding of the applications of microcomputers in 
the elementary school classroom and the instructionally related tasks in 
the public schools. The certificate program is designed to provide the 
needed competencies for participants to become curriculum specialists 
who will guide the integration of computers into the elementary school 
curriculum, their uses in instruction, and their applications in instruc- 
tionally related activities at the elementary school. This certificate 
requires 12 units. 


164 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


Required Courses (12 units) 

Ed El 419 Advance Technologies in Education (3) 

Ed El 515 Problem Solving Strategies Including Logo (3) 

Ed El 522 Web Design and Instruction (3) 

Ed El 590 Practicum: Elementary School Teachers and Computers (3) 

For further information, consult the Elementary Education graduate 
program adviser. 

ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION COURSES 

Courses are designated EDEL in the class schedule. 

1 10 Explorations in Education (2-3) 

(Same as Ed Sec 110) 

315A Introduction to Elementary Classroom Teaching: 

Lecture (2) 

An exploratory course required for students considering careers 
in elementary school teaching. Includes on campus seminars and 
overview of admission requirements for the Multiple Subject Credential 
Program. Must be taken concurrently with 31 5B. Must be taken 
Credit/ No Credit. A “B” or better is required to receive a grade of 
credit. 

31 5B Introduction to Elementary Classroom Teaching: 

Fieldwork (1) 

An exploratory field assignment consisting of 45 hours as a volunteer 
aide in a public, K-6, elementary classroom where all subject areas 
are taught. Requires a journal and evaluation by the classroom teacher. 
Must be taken concurrently with 315A. Must be taken Credit/No 
Credit. A “B" or better is required to receive a grade of credit. 

419 Advanced Technologies in Education (3) (Formerly 519) 

Prerequisite: Teaching Credential. Theoretical basis and strategies 
for improving teaching of elementary students through use of multimedia 
technologies. Emphasis on HyperStudio, telecommunications and 
other digital media. Meets Level II (Induction) technology requirement. 

425 Cultural Pluralism in Elementary Schools (3) 

Culture and cultural pluralism in elementary schools. Topics: 
Examination of one’s own beliefs and values, classroom practices and 
materials that promote equity, strategies for learning about students, 
history/traditions of cultural groups, and assessment of multicultural 
education programs. Fieldwork required. 

429 Integrated Curriculum and Instruction in the 
Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to second semester of Multiple Subject 
Credential Program. Additional study of elementary curriculum with 
emphasis on language arts, integrated instruction across the curricu- 
lum, and assessment of learning outcomes. Must be taken Credit/ 

No Credit. A “B” or better is required to receive a grade of credit. 


430A Foundations in Elementary School Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject Credential Program. 

A focus on the curriculum of the elementary school, instructional 
planning, principles of effective teaching, generic instructional strate- 
gies, classroom management, and legal issues in education. To be 
taken concurrently with Ed Elm 430B, C and 433. Must be taken 
Credit/No Credit. A “B” or better is required to receive a grade of 
credit. 

430B Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary School Teaching 
(Math, Science, Social Studies) (1-6) 

Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject Credential Program. 

An emphasis on instructional materials, learning styles, inquiry, 
concept learning, problem solving, direct instruction applied to the 
teaching of math, science, and social studies. Must be taken Credit/ 

No Credit. A U B” or better is required to receive a grade of credit. 

430C Supervised Fieldwork in Elementary Teacher Education (1-2) 

Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject Credential Program. 
Co-requisites: other credential courses such as Ed El 429, 430A,B, 
and 433. Students will serve as teacher participants in an assigned 
elementary school classroom. Must be taken Credit/No Credit. 

A “B” or better is required to receive a grade of credit. 

431 Curriculum and Instruction for Diverse Populations in 
Elementary Schools 1(1) 

Prerequisite: earned Multiple Subject Credential. Effective integration 
of curriculum and instruction relating to linguistic and cultural 
diversity in elementary school students. CLAD certificate requirement. 

432 Curriculum and Instruction for Diverse Populations in 
Elementary Schools II (2) 

Prerequisites: Ed El 431 and earned Multiple Subject Credential. 
Effective integration of curriculum and instruction relating to linguistic 
and cultural diversity in elementary school students. CLAD certificate 
requirement. 

433 Language Arts and Reading Instruction in the 
Public Schools (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject Credential Program. 

An overview of principles of reading instruction, elements of the 
language arts program including literature-based reading, content 
area reading, the role of phonics, emergent literacy, and diagnosis 
of reading problems. Must be taken Credit/No Credit. A “B” or better 
is required to receive a grade of credit. 

434 Methods and Inquiry for Teaching English Learners (2) 

Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject Credential Program. 
Theoretical foundations, legal issues, and school programs for the 
education of English learners. Assessment, materials, methods and 
strategies for English language development and learning across the 
curriculum for elementary school English learners. Must betaken 
Credit/No Credit. A “B” or better is required to receive a grade of 
Credit. 


165 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


439A Student Teaching in the Elementary School (5-14) 

Pre- or co-requisites: Ed El 430A,B,C, 433 and admission to student 
teaching. Co-requisite: Ed Elm 439B. Participation in a regular 
elementary school teaching program for the full school day. Must be 
taken Credit/ No Credit. A M B” or better is required to receive a grade 
of credit. 

439B Seminar in Elementary Student Teaching (4) 

Prerequisites: Ed El 430A.B.C, 433 and admission to student teaching. 
Co-requisite: Ed Elm 439A. Seminar in problems and procedures of 
elementary school teaching. Must be taken Credit/No Credit. A “B” 
or better is required to receive a grade of credit. 

439C Intern Teaching in the Elementary School (3) 

Prerequisites: Ed El 430A,B,C, 433, and completion of the first two 
semesters of intern teaching program. Admission only with consent 
of instructor. Participation in a regular elementary school teaching 
program for the full school day, as an intern teacher. Must be taken 
credit/no credit. A “B" or better is required to receive a grade of credit. 

446 Methods and Inquiry for BCLAD Candidates (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to Multiple Subject Program with BCLAD 
Emphasis. This course prepares Multiple Subject candidates for 
teaching Spanish-speaking elementary students. Emphasis includes 
reading instruction methods, materials and assessment, equity issues, 
and elements and considerations of culture that promote effective 
instruction for Spanish-speaking elementary students. 

448 Methods and Inquiry for Vietnamese BCLAD Candidates (3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Multiple Subject Credential Program 
with BCLAD emphasis (Vietnamese). Course focuses on equity issues, 
curriculum and instruction for Vietnamese speaking elementary students. 

492 A Gender Issues in Math and Science Teaching and Learning (2) 

Prerequisites: Ed El 315A,B and senior or graduate standing. 
Explores educational and cultural barriers and avenues to the success 
of girls in science and mathematics, development of curricula and 
instructional methods to address these issues. 

492B Gender Issues in Math and Science Education: Practicum (1) 

Prerequisite: Ed El 315A,B. Co-requisite: Ed El 492A. Educational 
and cultural barriers/avenues to girls’ success in science and mathematics; 
implementation of curricula and instructional methods. 20 hours teaching 
required. If taken Credit/No Credit, a “B” or better is required for credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing, consent of instructor prior 
to registration. Individual investigation under supervision of a faculty 
member. Only students of demonstrated capability and maturity will 
be approved. May be repeated for credit. 

500 Bilingual Multicultural Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
the multicultural school curriculum including forces operating on the 
curriculum and the participants involved in curriculum building. 
Modification of the curriculum to reflect multicultural contexts. 


511 Survey of Educational Research (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Descriptive 
statistics and statistical inferences in educational research. Representative 
research papers. Principles of research design. Prepare papers using 
research findings. 

515 Problem Solving Strategies Including Logo (3) 

Prerequisites: Ed El 419 and teaching credential. Strategies for 
using logo graphics, words and lists, and other microcomputer problem- 
solving applications with elementary school children. Design and use 
of micro-worlds to facilitate children’s development of problem - 
solving skills. 

518A Issues in Instructional Design of School Software (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed Elm 419. This course focuses on issues related 
to the instructional design of courseware designed specifically for 
classroom students. Topics include learning principles, learner 
characteristics, instructional strategies, screen design, response 
analysis, feedback, and interactivity. 

518B Multimedia Development and Instruction in the Classroom (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed Elm 518A. This course focuses the application 
and instruction of computer-based instructional design principles 
in the development for classroom software and multimedia projects. 

Topics include planning and assessment, design principles, and 
development of tools. 

521 The Study of Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed El 511 and teaching credential or permission of 
instructor. A systematic study of the teaching process. Examination 
of the research methodology used to analyze teaching, the current 
knowledge of the association between teaching processes and student 
learning, and the implications of the research for the classroom. 

522 Web Design and Instruction (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed Elm 419. Design, development, ad implementation 
of Web pages and sites for instructional purposes. Emphasis placed in 
the issues surrounding using the World Wide Web for instruction. 

527 Graduate Seminar in Developmental Psychology: The Human 
from Conception Through Eight Years (3) 

Prerequisites: teaching credential or consent of instructor. The physical, 
social, cognitive-intellectual, and emotional development of individuals 
from conception to middle childhood. Current problems, theories and 
research. 

528 Reading/Language Arts in the Early Childhood Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
significant research, curriculum developments and materials, and current 
instructional strategies for promoting emergent literacy in children. 

529 Graduate Studies: Learning Theory for Classroom Use (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Major 
theoretical positions in planning and interpreting classroom practices. 
Educational research findings, implications for curriculum develop- 
ment and teaching practices. 


166 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


530 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Second 
Languages (3) 

Prerequisites: Ed El 431 and 432 and teaching credential, or 
consent of instructor. Seminar: significant research, curriculum devel- 
opments and materials, and criteria for planning and improving second 
language programs including those for English as a second language. 

531 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Integrated 
Language Arts (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
significant research, trends and problems in teaching the fundamental 
skills of communication; curriculum development and materials, and 
criteria for planning and improving integrated language arts programs. 

532 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Mathematics (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
significant research, curricular developments and materials, criteria for 
planning and improving mathematics programs and instruction. 

533 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
research in elementary school science. The development of materials. 

534 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Social Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
research developments and materials, criteria for planning and improv- 
ing social studies programs, and current techniques of teaching. 

535 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Reading in the 
Language Arts Program (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
research developments and materials, criteria for planning and 
improving reading instruction in the integrated language arts programs, 
current instructional strategies, and the role of childrens literature. 

536 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
the school curriculum including the forces operating on the curriculum 
and the participants involved in curriculum building. The process of 
curriculum building. 

537 Graduate Studies: Current Issues and Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Problems 
and issues in elementary education, their causes and possible solutions. 

538 Graduate Studies: Early Childhood Education (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Seminar: 
application of significant research in the education of young children. 
Current instructional strategies and criteria for planning and improving 
programs in early childhood education. 

539 Clinical Supervision: Analyzing Effective Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. A systematic, 
research-based approach. Identifies basic components needed by teachers, 
staff developers, and administrators to improve their instructional 
skills. Includes principles of learning applied to supervision and 
applied practice in analyzing the instructional process. 


541 Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Bilingual- 
Bicultural Education (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Application 
of psychological and sociological theory related to teaching English 
learners; application of these disciplines for the development of 
emotionally and socially supportive learning environments. 

542 Current Issues and Problems in Bilingual-Bicultural 
Education (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Problems 
and issues in the development and implementation of bilingual- 
bicultural education. 

548 Social Studies, Science, and Math in Early Childhood 
Education (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or equivalent experience. This 
seminar investigates current curriculum standards and instructional 
options in social studies, science, and mathematics in early childhood 
education. Focus on content, process skills and literature connections. 

551 Assessment Across the Curriculum (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. 

Improving student performance through assessment, self-assessment, 
and student goals setting; establishing congruence between purposes, 
audiences, and instruments used. Goals of the course include: design 
and selection of instruments including performance assessment, 
portfolio, observation, and personal communication forms for 
standards based assessment. 

552 Family, Community and Professional Partnership (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Overview 
of community collaboration with service providers, business leaders, 
policy makers, and parents. Addresses diversity across families and 
importance of family interface with agencies and community. Stresses 
importance of partnerships with professional agencies concerned with 
education, youth, and children. 

553 Models of Teaching (3) 

Prerequisite: teaching credential or consent of instructor. Explores 
varied strategies of instruction, culminating in the identification and 
study of sixteen unique models. Examines relationships among theo- 
ries of learning and instruction. Investigates various instructional 
alternatives. 

571 Graduate Studies in Elementary Education: Science 
Education Practicum (3) 

Prerequisite: Ed El 533 or consent of instructor. Strategies for 
effectively teaching and assessing science content knowledge, science 
process skills, and scientific attitudes in the elementary school; 
includes field assignments in elementary schools (1 unit - 4 hours 
per week); seminars (2 units - 2 hours per week). Principles of 
effective staff development in elementary science education. 


167 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 


590 Practicum: Elementary School Teachers and Computers (3) 
(Formerly 517) 

Prerequisite: completion of all technology-related courses in the 
degree program or consent of instructor. Strategies for effectively using 
computers with elementary school children to improve learning; course 
includes field work assignments in elementary schools, and on-campus 
seminars. 

594 Research Seminar (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The preparation, evaluation, 
development, and presentation of curriculum research proposals 
culminating in a graduate project. Individuals and groups will 
participate in critiquing proposals, curriculum projects, and research 
results. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research on an 
empirical project, with conferences with the instructor, culminating 
in a project. 

598 Thesis (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research with 
conferences with the instructor, culminating in a thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: a teaching credential, one year of teaching experience, 
and consent of instructor. Independent inquiry. 


ELEMENTARY AND BILINGUAL EDUCATION 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 

The Division of Engineering consists of the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. Programs offered by the Division lead to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in the above disciplines; the three Bachelor 
of Science degree programs are nationally accredited by ABET, the Engineering Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Also offered are programs 
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Engineering with an 
Emphasis in Pharmaceutical Engineering or Option in Engineering Science, for which the 
student, working with an adviser, designs an appropriate interdisciplinary program. 

CSUF is located in an industrial and highly technological region of Southern California. 
Drawing upon its professional expertise in many areas of engineering, the Division of Engineering 
serves as a distinctive resource and catalyst for partnership with public and private organizations 
in our region. Our nationally accredited undergraduate engineering programs offer a broad edu- 
cation in basic sciences, mathematics, and fundamental principles and practice of engineering. 
These are coupled with studies in social sciences, arts, humanities, and behavioral sciences due 
to their importance for an engineer’s professional career. 


DIVISION MISSION AND OBJECTIVES 


DIVISION CHAIR 

Jesa Kreiner 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
Emphasis in Architectural Engineering 
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering 
Option in Engineering Science 

Emphasis in Pharmaceutical 
Engineering 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering 

Emphasis in Manufacturing 
Engineering 

Master of Science in Civil Engineering 

Concentration in Environmental 
Engineering 

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 
Option in Systems Engineering 
Master of Science in Engineering 

Option in Engineering Science 
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 


Division Mission Statement 

Consistent with the university’s mission, learning is the first priority in the Division of 
Engineering. 

To implement its mission, the engineering programs at CSUF provide the best qualities of 
teaching, scholarship and professional practice. The Division’s programs are committed to facilitate 
the education of both engineering undergraduate and graduate students for their entrance in, 
and significant contribution to the engineering profession. Our students are actively engaged and 
work in collaboration with faculty and staff to acquire and expand knowledge. The objectives for 
our mission are further elaborated under “Division Educational Objectives.” 

Division Educational Objectives 

The goals of the Division are as follows: 

1. To provide the best of current practice, theory, research and intellectual study in the humanities 
to prepare students for challenging careers in engineering, strengthen relationships to their 
communities and contribute ethically and productively to society; 

2. To educate students who, actively engage with faculty and staff, work in collaboration to 
acquire and expand knowledge; 

3. To provide service to the profession, the state of California, the country and to the world- 
wide development of engineering. 

A critical focus of the education, research, and service programs within the Division of 
Engineering is to afford undergraduates of varying backgrounds and abilities every opportunity 
for achieving success in the engineering professions. 

To achieve these goals, the faculty and students of the Division of Engineering, with input 
from other constituents, have established the following program educational objectives: 

1. To prepare students for successful careers and lifelong learning; 

2. To make students thoroughly proficient in methods of analysis, including the mathematical 
and computational skills appropriate for engineers to use when solving problems; and 


169 


ENGINEERING DIVISION 


3. To develop the skills pertinent to the design process, including the 
students’ ability to formulate problems, to think creatively, to com- 
municate effectively, to synthesize information, and to work 
collaboratively; 

4. To teach students to use current experimental and data analysis 
techniques for engineering application; and 

5. To instill in our students an understanding of their professional 
and ethical responsibilities. 

Actual program education objectives for various disciplines such 
as Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering and 
Mechanical Engineering are decided by the respective departments 
to match their program outcomes. 

2 + 2 Articulated Programs with Community Colleges 

The Division of Engineering has developed 2+2 years articulation 
agreements with community colleges to provide students seamless transfer 
to the CSUF engineering program of their choice. This allows the full-time 
students, taking the courses specified by the engineering department 
each semester, to graduate in two years following transfer to CSUF. 

INTRODUCTION 

The undergraduate engineering programs have a broad base of 
science, mathematics, social sciences, humanities and engineering 
topics (which include engineering science and engineering design 
courses). Students are thus prepared to enter directly into engineering 
practice or to continue further education at the graduate level. The 
Bachelor of Science degrees in Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering 
are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). 

High School Preparation 

The entering high school student should have a preparation which 
includes two years of algebra, geometry, trigonometry', and one year of 
physics or chemistry. Students deficient in mathematics or chemistry 
must take special preparatory courses, i.e., Mathematics 125 and 
Chemistry' 115, which will not carry credit for the major. (See 
Mathematics Section for Entry’ Level Mathematics test and Math-Science 
Qualifying Examination requirements.) 

Transfer Students 

A transfer student shall complete a minimum of 30 units in residence 
of which at least 1 5 units shall be taken in upper-division engineering 
courses. Work taken at another college or university on which a grade 
of “D” was earned may not be substituted for upper-division courses. 

BACHELOR S DEGREES IN ENGINEERING 

The undergraduate program requirements in engineering are com- 
prised of four major segments. The first three segments are common 
to all four engineering programs, i.e., Civil Engineering, Electrical 
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and the Engineering Science 
Option as well as the Architectural Engineering Emphasis within the Civil 
Engineering degree and the Manufacturing Engineering Emphasis 
within the Mechanical Engineering degree. 

The first segment consists of foundation courses in mathematics 
and the physical sciences (33 units for Electrical Engineering, 32 units 
for Civil Engineering, and 30 units for Mechanical Engineering, 35 for 
Pharmaceutical Engineering). The second segment consists of 24 units 
of engineering core courses. The third segment contains 33 units of 


general education courses in the arts, humanities, social sciences, 
biological sciences and other related areas. 

The fourth segment contains a sequence of courses in one of the 
four programs which includes a combination of required courses and 
adviser-approved technical elective courses. The number of units in 
this segment is not the same for each of the four engineering programs 
but varies from 45 to 50 units. Students must meet with their academic 
adviser to prepare an approved study plan of technical elective courses 
prior to taking such courses. Undergraduate students are required to 
meet with their academic adviser every semester during the first year 
and at least once a year thereafter. Students are strongly encouraged 
to see their academic advisers frequently. 

All courses taken in fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor’s 
degrees in Engineering must be taken for a letter grade, i.e., under grade 
Option 1 . All mathematics and physical science courses required for 
the degree must be completed with at least a “C” grade to count as 
prerequisite courses or as credit towards the degree. Graduate courses 
are not open to undergraduate students without approval of the 
department head. 

Mathematics and Science Courses 

Mathematics 150A Calculus (4) 

Mathematics 150B Calculus (4) 

Mathematics 250A Multivariate Calculus (4) 

Mathematics 250B Introduction to Linear Algebra and Differential 
Equations (4) 

Chemistry 120A General Chemistry (5) 

Physics 225, 225L Fundamental Physics: Mechanics and Lab (4) 
Physics 226, 226L Fundamental Physics: Electricity and Magnetism 
and Lab (4) 

Physics 227, 227L Fundamental Physics: Waves, Optics, and Modem 
Physics and Lab (4) (required in Electrical, and Engineering 
Science) 

OR either Chemistry 125 (3) or Geological Sciences 376 (3) 
(required in Civil Engineering) 

OR Physics 227 (1) (Required in Mechanical Engineering) 

OR Biology 101 (3) and Chemistry 301 A (3) (Pharmaceutical 
Engineering) 

Engineering Core Courses 

All undergraduate engineering students are required to complete 
the following 24 units of engineering core courses regardless of the 
particular program selected by the student. 

EGME 102 Graphical Communications (3) 

EGCE201 Statics (3) 

EGEE 203 Electric Circuits (3) 

EGGN 205 Digital Computation (3) 

EGCE 302 Dynamics (3) 

EGME 304 Thermodynamics (3) 

EGME 306A Unified Laboratory (1) 

EGGN 308 Engineering Analysis (3) 

EGGN 314 Engineering Economy (2) 


170 


ENGINEERING DIVISION 




General Education Courses 


I. Core competencies (9 units) 

A. Oral Communication (3 units) HONR 101B, SPCOM 100 or 
SPCOM 102 

B. Written Communication (3 units) (ENGL 101) 

C. Critical Thinking (3 units) 

HONR 101A, PHIL 105, 106, PSYCH 110, READ 290 or 
SPCOM 235 


II. Historical and Cultural Foundations (9 units) 

A. Development of Civilization (3 units HIST 110A or HIST 1 10B 

B. American History, Institutions and Values 

1. American History (3 units) AFRO 190, AMST 201, CHIC 190, 
HIST 180, 190 or HONR 201A 

2. Government (3 units) POLSC 100 



the selection of courses in sections I.C, II.B.2, 


Note: In order to 
meet the ABET accred- 
itation requirement for 
depth in either 
Humanities or Social 
Sciences, at least two 
courses must be 
selected from the same 
department (one 
preferably a prerequi- 
site to the other) from 

IIl.B.l, 1II.B.2, III.B.3. or 


1II.C.2 


education courses and 45 units of adviser-approved elective courses 
for a total of 135 units. The adviser-approved electives must include 
a component of engineering design courses and engineering laboratory 
courses. 

Master of Science in Engineering 
Option in Engineering Science 

The degree consists of 30 units of adviser-approved 400- and 500- 
level courses. At least half the units required for the degree must be 
graduate (500-level) courses. A segment of the 30 units must include 
a math-oriented course as well as EGGN 403 Computer Methods 
in Numerical Analysis (3). 

PHARMACEUTICAL ENGINEERING EMPHASIS 

Pharmaceutical Engineering is a new and an emerging field that 
incorporates multiple areas of science and engineering as well as 
innovative technological advances in pharmaceutical manufacturing. 
Students in this program will be introduced to the broad fundamentals 
of pharmaceutical engineering and manufacturing. They will learn 
about the manufacturing technologies for different drug dosage forms, 
industrial fermentation, sterilization and aseptic technology, validation 
and quality control, good manufacturing practice, and FDA regulations. 
Students choosing this program will leam about the emerging tech- 
nologies in pharmaceutical manufacturing in order to meet the 
growing demand of the industry for pharmaceutical engineers. 

Math and Science Courses (35 units) 

Engineering Core Courses (24 units) 


INTERNSHIPS IN ENGINEERING 

Internships for Engineering provide practical work experiences which 
integrate with and supplement the student’s academic studies. Internship 
jobs are coordinated through the Center for Internships and Cooperative 
Education. In order to participate in this program, a student must register 
for EGGN 495 Professional Practice (1) foreach semester of internship 
participation. 

ENGINEERING SCIENCE OPTION 

The Engineering Science Option program is an interdisciplinary program 
designed for those students who are interested in a broad education in 
the basic concepts and principles of engineering, rather than an in-depth 
study in one particular engineering discipline such as civil, electrical or 
mechanical engineering. The Option provides a flexible interdisciplinary 
program in engineering with ample opportunity to develop a study 
plan which meets specific career goals. Courses can be selected from 
engineering, computer science, the physical sciences, mathematics and 
business to meet a special and specific engineering science objective. 

Students who wish to be considered for an undergraduate or graduate 
engineering science program should meet with the Chair of the 
Division of Engineering. The Division Chair may serve as the academic 
adviser to the student or one or more advisers from the engineering, 
computer science, physical sciences, mathematics or the business 
faculties may be selected if appropriate. 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering 
Option in Engineering Science 

The degree consists of 33 units of mathematics and physical science 
courses, 24 units of engineering core courses, 33 units of general 


Required Courses (37 units) 

EGEE 203L Electric Circuits Lab (1) 

EGEE 245 Computer Logic and Architecture (3) 

EGEE 303 Electronics (3) 

EGEE 303L Electronics Lab (1) 

EGEE 409 Introduction to Linear Systems (3) 

EGME 306B Fluids and Thermal Lab (1) 

EGME 333 Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics (3) 

EGME407 Heat Transfer (3) 

EGME 426 Design of Thermal and Fluid Systems (3) 

EGPH 201 Introduction to Pharmaceutical Engineering (3) 

EGPH 320 Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Drug Delivery Systems (3) 
EGPH 420 Pharmaceutical Utilities, Safety and Environment (3) 
EGPH 484 Pharmaceutical Engineering Lab (2) 

EGGN 495 Professional Practice (1 unit each semester) 

EGPH 497 Design Project (3) 

Elective Courses (6 units) 

Students choose six units from the following list of courses. Additional 
elective courses may be available. Please contact the Division of 
Engineering. 

EGPH 401 Project Management for Pharmaceutical and General 
Engineering (3) 

EGME 452 Fluid Machinery (3) 

EGME 457L Intelligent Systems Lab (2) 


171 




ENGINEERING DIVISION 


GENERAL ENGINEERING COURSES 

Courses are designated as EGGN in the class schedule. 

General engineering courses are courses whose academic content is 
not specific for any of the engineering disciplines. The courses are not 
administered by any one particular department. General engineering 
courses are taught by faculty from all three of the engineering depart- 
ments. 

Although there is no degree program in general engineering, new 
students who do not select a specific engineering degree will be classi- 
fied as a general engineering major. The Chair of the Division of 
Engineering serves as the academic adviser to all general engineering 
students. General engineering students should make every effort to 
declare a major in one of the four engineering programs after one or 
two semesters of course work. 

205 Digital Computation (3) 

Prerequisite: college algebra or three years of high school mathematics 
including a second course in algebra. Computers and their numerical 
applications. Elementary FORTRAN programming language, digital 
computation methods in statistics and solving algebraic equations. 

308 Engineering Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Physics 226, Math 250B or equivalent. Fundamentals 
and engineering applications of Fourier series, Fourier transforms, 
Laplace transforms, complex analysis, vector analysis; engineering 
applications. 

314 Engineering Economy (2) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in engineering. Development, 
evaluation and presentation of alternatives for engineering systems and 
projects using principles of engineering economy and cost benefit 
analysis. 

350 Living and Working in Space (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. Flistory of space flight. Space travel 
in literature and films. Space pioneers. The Moon Race. Space tourism 
and space hotels. Colonization of Moon and Mars. Space art. Economic, 
social, psychological, technological and global issues in space habitats. 

403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250B and EGGN 205 or equivalent. The use 
of numerical methods and digital computers in the solution of 
algebraic, transcendental, simultaneous, ordinary and partial 
differential equations. 

495 Professional Practice (1) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in engineering. Professional 
engineering work in industry or government. Written report required. 
May be repeated for credit. Applicable towards bachelor’s degree 
programs. Not for credit in the graduate program. 


PHARMACEUTICAL ENGINEERING COURSES 

These courses are designated as EGPFI in the class schedule. 

201 Introduction to Pharmaceutical Engineering (3) (Formerly 
EG-GN 201) 

Prerequisites: Biology 101, Chemistry 120A, Math 250A. Survey of 
major areas of pharmaceutical engineering. Overview of pharmaceutical 
engineering technologies in drug manufacturing and delivery systems, 
high purity water systems, sterilization, medical devices, process engi- 
neering and packaging and industrial fermentation. Process validation, 
FDA requirements and good manufacturing practices. 

320 Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Drug Delivery Systems (3) 
(Formerly EG-GN 320) 

Prerequisites: Biology 101, Chemistry 120A, and EG-PH 201. 
Dosage form design. Peroral solids, injections and transdermal drug 
deigns. Products of biotechnology. New drug delivery systems. 
Implantable vascular access devices. Closed-loop insulin delivery 
systems. Computerized drug delivery systems in cardiology and oncol- 
ogy. Validation of dosage process and equipment. GMP guidelines. 

401 Project Management for Pharmaceutical and General 
Engineering (3) (Formerly EG-GN 401) 

Prerequisite: EG-GN 314 Pharmaceutical and general engineering 
applications of project management. Engineering projects life cycle. 
Product and facility development process. Needs identification and 
proposal preparation. Planning and scheduling. Resource Considerations. 
Project implementation. Teamwork in a multi-cultural environment. 
International engineering codes and government regulations. Software 
applications. Case studies and term project. 

420 Pharmaceutical Utilities, Safety and Environment (3) 
(Formerly EG-GN 420) 

Prerequisites; EG-ME 333, EG-PF1 201 and Chemistry 301 A. 
Reaction kinetics and reactor design. Industrial fermentation and 
bioreactor systems. Sterilization techniques. Cleaning and passivation. 
Design of HVAC systems. Clean room design. WFI systems; filtration, 
reverse osmosis and distillation. Pharmaceutical facilities, piping, 
maintenance, process safety, environmental impact and protection. 

484 Pharmaceutical Engineering Lab (2) (Formerly EG-GN 484) 

Prerequisites: EG-PH 320 and Chemistry 301 A. Exploring current 
techniques in pharmaceutical manufacturing and monitoring. 
Including water purification methods and WFI systems, steam steril- 
ization, calibration of pharmaceutical devices, validation of 
pharmaceutical devices and procedures. 

497 Design Project (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser and instructor. Directed independent 
design project. 


172 


ENGINEERING DIVISION 



DEPARTMENT HEAD 

George Lin (Acting) 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Engineering 100 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http ://www. fullerton.edu/ecs 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Emphasis in Architectural 
Engineering 

Master of Science in Civil Engineering 

Concentration in Environmental 
Engineering 

FACULTY 

Pinaki Chakrabarti, Jeff Kuo, George Lin, 
Mallela Prasada Rao, Chandrasekhar Putcha, 
Dindial Ramsamooj, Mufid Samara, 
Mahadeva Venkatesan 

advisers 

Undergraduate adviser: 

Pinaki R. Chakrabarti 

Graduate adviser: 

Jeff Kuo 


INTRODUCTION 

The civil engineering program at CSUF includes the fields of engineering mechanics and 
structural, geotechnical, hydraulic, environmental, construction, transportation, and architectural 
engineering. Modem civil engineering practices rely heavily upon computer-aided analysis and 
design. Students at CSUF use both microcomputers and the mainframe computer. 

“Structural” engineers are designers of buildings, bridges, dams, power plants, offshore 
structures and many other kinds of systems. These engineers determine, usually by computer 
analysis, the forces that a structure must resist, the appropriate materials, and the possible 
structural types. Structural engineers usually work with a team that includes architects, mechanical 
and electrical engineers, contractors, and the owner of the project. 

“Engineering Mechanics” courses offered in this department provide strong support for 
research, consulting and teaching in many fields of civil engineering. 

“Geotechnical” engineers analyze the properties of soils and rocks that affect the behavior of 
structures. They evaluate the potential settlements of buildings, the stability of slopes and fills, 
and the effects of earthquakes. They take part in the design and construction of foundations, 
including those of offshore platforms, tunnels and dams. 

“Hydraulic” engineers deal with all aspects of the physical control of water. They work to 
prevent floods, develop irrigation projects, design hydroelectric power systems, manage water 
resources, and predict water runoff. 

“Architectural” engineering is a combination of the art of architecture and the science of 
engineering. The architect conceives of structures as an art form, and relies upon the structural 
engineer to translate his concepts of beauty into structural reality. The architectural engineer has 
the training to interact with both architects and engineers or to work on his own in designing 
structures that combine both strength and beauty. 

“Construction engineering and management” is a wide ranging specialization that uses both 
technical and management skills to plan and build public and private projects and commercial 
developments. 

“Environmental” engineers apply science and engineering principles to minimize the adverse 
effects of human activity on the environment. They typically deal with water and waste water 
treatment, air pollution control, solid and hazardous waste management, and groundwater/soil 
remediation. They also help draft regulations and enforce many federal and state laws to control 
damage to the environment. 

“Transportation” engineers are concerned with the planning, design, and control of projects 
related to transportation of people and goods. They also help draft regulations and enforce many 
federal and state laws related to transportation. 

The undergraduate engineering program is designed to impart knowledge of mathematics 
and natural sciences to students so that they learn to use the forces of nature and materials eco- 
nomically while maintaining engineering ethics and high professional standards. 

One of the major objectives of this program is to provide design experience to the 
students gradually from the very beginning years until they graduate, through a variety of 
courses. During this time, they also learn about safety, reliability, ethics and socially sensitive 
problems. 

The graduate engineering program is designed for specialization in the areas of structures, 
engineering mechanics, geotechnology, hydraulics, construction management, and environmental 
engineering. 


173 


ENGINEERING - CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Mathematics and Science Foundation Courses (32 units) 

See information under “Division of Engineering” section. 

Engineering Core Courses (24 units) 

See information under “Division of Engineering” section. 

Upper-Division Writing Requirement 

In addition to the Examination in Writing Proficiency which is to be 
taken as soon as 60 units are completed, six units from the following 
courses are required and must be passed with a grade of C or better. 
The laboratory- reports are graded on English composition as well as 
content. 

EGME 306A Unified Laboratory (1) 

EGCE 324L Soil Mechanics Laboratory (1) 

EGCE 32 5L Structural Analysis Laboratory (1) 

EGCE 377 Civil Engineering Materials Lab (1) 

EGCE 428L Engineering Hydraulics Lab (1) 

EGCE 43 1L Advanced Structural Lab (1) 

EGCE 463L Precast and Prestressed Concrete Design Lab (1) 

EGCE 465 Planning and Control of Engineering Construction Projects (3) 
EGCE 468 Engineering Construction (3) 

EGCE 490 Civil Engineering Professional Practice (1) 

Required Courses in Civil Engineering (38 units) 

EGEE 203L Electric Circuits Laboratory (1) 

OR EGCE 206 Computer-Aided Architectural and Civil 
Engineering Drafting (1) 

EGCE 214 Engineering Surveying (2) 

EGCE 214L Engineering Surveying Laboratory (1) 

EGCE 301 Mechanics of Materials (3) 

EGCE 324 Soil Mechanics (3) 

EGCE 324L Soil Mechanics Laboratory (1) 

EGCE 325 Structural Analysis (3) 

EGCE 325L Structural Analysis Laboratory' (1) 

EGCE 330 Computer Applications in Civil Engineering (3) 

EGCE 377 Civil Engineering Materials Lab (1) 

EGCE 408 Reinforced Concrete Design (3) 

EGCE 418 Foundation Design (3) 

EGCE 428 Engineering Hydraulics (3) 

EGCE 428L Engineering Hydraulics Lab (1) 

EGCE 430 Structural Steel Design (3) 

EGCE 43 1L Advanced Structural Laboratory (1) 

OR EGCE 463L Precast & Prestressed Concrete Design Lab (1) 
EGCE 494 Design of Civil Engineering Structures (3)* 

EGCE 494L Civil Engineering Structural Laboratory (1)* 

EGCE 495 Civil Engineering Professional Practice (1) 

*EGCE 494 and 494L must be taken together. 


Technical Electives in Civil Engineering (8 units minimum) 

Before enrolling in any elective course, approval of the adviser must 
be obtained. Technical electives must include EGCE 441 or 465 or 466 
or 468. 

EGCE 41 1 Structural Dynamics (3) 

EGCE 43 1L Advanced Structural Laboratory (1) 

OR EGCE 463L Precast and Prestressed Concrete Design Lab (1) 


EGCE 432 Computer-Aided Design in Structural Engineering (3) 
EGCE 435 Design of Hydraulic Structures (3) 

EGCE 436 Engineering Hydrology (3) 

EGCE 44 1 Environmental Engineering (3) 

EGCE 463 Precast and Prestressed Concrete Design (3) 

EGCE 465 Planning and Control of Engineering Construction 
Projects (3) 

EGCE 466 Public Transit Systems Planning and Operations (3) 
EGCE 468 Engineering Construction (3) 

EGCE 493 Structural Systems for Buildings (3) 

EGCE 497 Senior Projects (1-3) 

EGCE 499 Independent Study (1-3) 


ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING EMPHASIS 


Mathematics and Science Courses (32 units) 


Engineering Core Courses (24 units) 

Required Civil Engineering Core (30 units) 

EGEE 203L Electric Circuits Laboratory (1) 

OR EGCE 206 Computer-Aided Architectural and Civil 
Engineering Drafting (1) 

EGCE 214 Engineering Surveying (2) 

EGCE 214L Engineering Surveying Laboratory (1) 

EGCE 301 Mechanics of Materials (3) 

EGCE 324 Soil Mechanics (3) 

EGCE 324L Soil Mechanics Laboratory (1) 

EGCE 325 Structural Analysis (3) 

EGCE 325L Structural Analysis Laboratory (1) 

EGCE 377 Gvil Engineering Materials Laboratory (1) 
EGCE 408 Reinforced Concrete Design (3) 

EGCE 418 Foundation Design (3) 

EGCE 430 Structural Steel Design (3) 

EGCE 494 Design of Civil Engineering Structures (3)* 
EGCE 494L Civil Engineering Structural Laboratory (1)* 
EGCE 495 Civil Engineering Professional Practice (1) 


*EGCE 494 and 494L must be taken together. 

Core Courses for the Emphasis in Architectural Engineering (13 units) 

EGCE 43 1L Advanced Structural Laboratory (1) 

OR EGCE 463L Precast and Prestressed Concrete Design Lab (1) 
EGCE 432 Computer-Aided Design in Structural Engineering (3) 


174 


ENGINEERING - CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 


EGCE 441 Environmental Engineering (3) 

EGCE 493 Structural Systems for Buildings (3) 

OR EGCE 463 Precast and Prestressed Concrete Design (3) 

EGCE 496 Architectural Design (3) 

Technical Electives for the Emphasis in Architectural 
Engineering (3 units) 

EGCE 465 Planning and Control of Engineering Construction 
Projects (3) 

EGCE 466 Public Transit Systems Planning and Operations (3) 

EGCE 468 Engineering Construction (3) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

The Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering is intended to 
meet the needs of students who wish to prepare for careers in areas 
such as construction and project management, design and analysis of 

complex systems 
(including structures 
such as tall building? 
and bridges), environ- 
mental engineering, 
consulting, and 
research. This program 
also provides excellent 
preparation for doc- 
toral studies. 

The program pro- 
vides advanced study 
within the area of civil 
engineering and allows 
students to elect 
coursework, with 
adviser approval, in 
the areas of structural 
engineering, hydraulics/ 

hydrology, geotechnical engineering, engineering mechanics, engineer- 
ing management or environmental engineering. 

Graduates from the M S. program have obtained employment in 
various fields including manufacturing, construction, business, education, 
and government. 

Admission Requirements 

To qualify for admission to conditionally classified standing, applicants 
must meet the following university and departmental requirements: 

1. Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution. 

2. Bachelors degree in Civil Engineering from an institution accred- 
ited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
(ABET). 

3. Minimum grade-point-average of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units. 

4. Good standing at the last institution attended. 

Students meeting the above requirements will be admitted to the 

graduate program in Civil Engineering and will be advanced to classified 
standing immediately after filing an adviser-approved study plan in the 
Civil and Environmental Engineering Department office. 


Students not meeting the above requirements may be admitted at 
the discretion of the department head and will be required to take an 
additional six or more units of adviser-approved prerequisite course- 
work. The student must demonstrate potential for graduate study by 
earning a GPA of 3.0 or higher in these prerequisite courses. 

Any student entering the Master of Science degree program without 
a B.S. in Civil Engineering will also be required to complete deficiency 
courses prior to beginning coursework for the masters degree. 

Graduate and postbaccalaureate students who do not possess 
a bachelor’s degree from a postsecondary institution where English is 
the principal language of instruction must receive a minimum score 
of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

The Civil and Environmental Engineering Department does not 
require the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 

http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate. 

Classified Standing 

Students meeting the following additional requirements will be 
advanced to classified standing and are eligible to take graduate 
courses for which they are qualified. 

1. Completion of all deficiency work specified by the graduate 
adviser with a grade of B or better. 

2. Development of an approved study plan. Before completing nine 
units at CSUF toward the M.S. degree, the student must meet with 
an adviser for preparation of a study plan which must be approved 
by the department head and Office of Graduate Studies. 

3. Fulfillment of the university writing requirement prior to completing 
nine units at CSUF toward the M.S. degree. Students must demon- 
strate writing ability commensurate with the baccalaureate degree 
by successfully completing one of the following: 

A. An upper-division writing requirement at any CSU campus. 

B. An upper-division writing course from another university 
which is equivalent to a course satisfying the CSUF Upper- 
Division Writing Requirement. Equivalency must be certified 
by the department head. 

C. Cal State Fullerton Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP). 

D. A CSUF upper-division or graduate-level course that is certified 
as meeting the writing requirement and is approved by the 
department head. The grade received must be a C or better. 

Study Plan 

The study plan consists of a minimum of 30 units of adviser-approved 
upper-division or graduate -level coursework which must be completed 
with an overall grade-point average of at least 3.0. At least half the units 
required for the degree must be in approved graduate (500-level) courses. 

Required Courses (6 units) 

EGGN 403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) and an 
additional adviser-approved math-oriented course (3) OR six units 
adviser-approved electives (for those focusing on environmental and 
construction areas). 



ENGINEERING - CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 


Concentration Courses (15 units) 

A student is required to select a minimum of 1 5 units in Civil 
Engineering. These units may be 400-level (subject to approval by the 
department head) and 500-level courses and are selected according to 
the student’s areas of interest. Coursework may focus on the following 
areas: Engineering Mechanics, Geo-technical Engineering, Hydraulics/ 
Hydrology, Structural Engineering, and Construction Engineering and 
Management. Students interested in Environmental Engineering should 
refer to the text following this section. 

Other Courses (9 units) 

Elective units should be taken in Civil Engineering or a related 
engineering field and are subject to adviser approval. 

Exam/Thesis/Project Option 

Subject to approval by the department head, students may select 
one of the following three options for final review by a department 
committee: 

1. Oral comprehensive examination OR 

2. EGCE 598 Thesis OR 

3. EGCE 597 Project 

Students enrolling in less than six units of Independent Study/Thesis/ 
Project will be required to take an oral comprehensive exam. Students 
enrolling in six units of thesis or project may defend their thesis or 
project instead of taking an oral comprehensive exam. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

Advancement to candidacy and completion of requirements for the 
degree include: 

1 . Filing a graduation check prior to the beginning of the final semester 
(deadlines are listed in the class schedule). 

2. Completion of study plan coursework with a minimum overall GPA 
of 3.0. 

3. Successful completion of a comprehensive examination or oral 
defense of a thesis or project. 

4. Recommendation by the Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Department faculty and Office of Graduate Studies. 

CONCENTRATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

Required Concentration Courses (15 units) 

EGCE 481 Solid Waste Technology & Management (3) 

EGCE 482 Liquid Waste Technology & Management (3) 

Adviser-approved Environmental Engineering courses which may 
include Thesis, Project or Independent Study (9) 

Electives (15 units) 

Adviser-approved electives must include a minimum of six units in 
non-Environmental Engineering courses. 

Students enrolling in less than six units of Independent 
Study/Thesis/Project will be required to take an oral comprehensive 
exam. Students enrolling in six units of thesis or project may defend 
their thesis or project instead of taking an oral comprehensive exam. 


CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING COURSES 

Courses are designated as EGCE in the class schedule 

201 Statics (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 150B and Physics 225. Vectorial treatment of 
statics of particles and rigid bodies. Freebody diagrams. Applications 
to problems of equilibrium (two and three dimensions) of structural 
and mechanical force systems. Trusses, frames and machines. Friction 
problems. Centroids and moments of inertia. (CAN ENGR 8) 

206 Computer-Aided Architectural and Civil 
Engineering Drafting (1) 

Prerequsite: EGME 102. Architectural and civil engineering drawing 
with the aid of computer-aided drafting techniques; grading plans, 
engineering drawings (including standard structural, electrical and 
hydraulic details) of buildings, bridges, dams and civil engineering 
structures. Bill of Materials. (3 hours laboratory) 

214 Engineering Surveying (2) 

Co-requisite: EGCE 214L. Basis of plane surveying. Distance 
measure- ment using tapes and EDM. Levelling. Measurement of angles 
and directions. Traverse and topographic survey and computations. 
Applications in highway curves, construction surveys and land surveys. 
Principles of stadia. 

214L Engineering Surveying Laboratory (1) 

Co-requisite: EGCE 214. Field practice of measurement of distance, 
difference of elevation, and horizontal and vertical angles using tapes, 
EDM, automatic levels, theodolites and total stations. (3 hours laboratory) 

301 Mechanics of Materials (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250A and EGCE 201. Stress and deformation 
analysis for axial load, torsion, flexure, and combined forces. Analysis 
of simple statically indeterminate structures. Deflection and stress 
analysis of beams. Stability of columns. Strain energy and ultimate 
resistance. Interactive relationships between analysis and design. 

302 Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisites: Math 250A and EGCE 201. Kinematics and kinetics 
of particles and rigid bodies, kinetics of rigid bodies in three dimen- 
sion, Newtons laws, work and energy, impulse and momentum. 
Solution of problems using vector approach. 

305 Failure of Building and Structure due to Earthquakes 
and After Effects (3) 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed one course from 
General Education category III.A.l Math, or III.A.2 Natural Science. 
Geological aspects of earthquakes as they apply to building safety, 
introduction to earthquake-related problems and building damages 
cause by historic earthquakes. Discussion on destruction aspects of 
earthquakes, preparedness for large earthquakes and ho to protect 
structural and non-structural parts of buildings. (Same as GEOL 305) 

324 Soil Mechanics (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 301. Soil properties and soil action as related 
to problems encountered in engineering structures; consolidation, 
shear strength, stability and lateral earth pressures. 


176 


ENGINEERING - CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 


324L Soil Mechanics Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: English 101 and EGCE 324. Behavior and properties 
of soils. Application to foundation design, liquefaction and seepage. 

325 Structural Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 301. Analysis of forces and displacements in 
statically determinate and indeterminate elastic structures by force 
and displacement methods. Approximate methods of analysis. 

Matrix formulation of structural analysis and computer applications. 
Introduction to structural design. 

325L Structural Analysis Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: English 101 and EGCE 325. Principles of model 
analysis and similitude. Influence lines for reactive and internal forces; 
generalized displacements of statically indeterminate structures. 
Nonprismatic members. (3 hours laboratory) 

330 Computer Applications in Civil Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 205, EGCE 324 and 325. Application of 
computer programming to the solution of analytical and design 
problems in various branches of Civil Engineering. 

377 Civil Engineering Materials Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 324 and 325. Behavior and properties of most 
common materials, e g. steel, concrete, wood, masonry and asphalt. 

Mix design of asphalt and concrete. Determination of strain and stress 
using strain gages. Specimen testing according to ASTM. Material 
properties determination. Safety, reliability, and design considerations. 

(3 hours laboratory) 

408 Reinforced Concrete Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 325.Co-requisite: EGCE 377 or equivalent. 
Design for bending, shear, axial force, torsion and combined loading. 
Beam, columns, slab and foundation design for ultimate strength and 
serviceability requirements. Prestressed concrete design. Safety, reliability 
and cost considerations. Design project conforming to latest ACI code. 
Professional computer program. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 

411 Structural Dynamics (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 325 and EGGN 308 or equivalent. Free and 
forced vibrations of discrete and continuous systems. Matrix formulation 
and normal coordinates analysis. Response of structures to impulse 
and earthquake loads. Application to structural design problems and 
comparison with code prescribed forces. 

418 Foundation Design (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 324 and 408. Design of footings and retaining 
walls. Mat and piled foundations for structures. Design project to standards 
of professional practice using latest codes and standards. Consideration 
for safety, reliability and cost. 

428 Engineering Hydraulics (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 302. Incompressible fluid flow in closed conduits 
and open channels. Hydrostatics, energy, and hydraulic grade lines. 
Momentum, friction formulas, pipelines, uniform flow, and water 
surface profiles. Design of pipes and open channels. Computer 
solutions. 


428L Engineering Hydraulics Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: English 101 and EGCE 428. Introduction to experimental 
hydraulics in open channel and pipe flows including measurements 
of discharge, depth, velocity, force and friction coefficients. Hydraulic 
model laws and report writing. (3 hours laboratory) 

430 Structural Steel Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 325. Co-requisite: EGCE 377 or equivalent. 
Design for bending, torsion, shear, axial forces, combined loadings. 
Design of built-up girders, composite construction. Design of shear 
and moment connections. Design project using professional practice 
standards. LRFD method. Safety, reliability and cost considerations. 
Professional computer program. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab) 

43 1L Advanced Structural Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 325L and either EGCE 408 or EGCE 430. 
Fundamentals of earthquake engineering and soil structure interaction; 
design of lateral bracing for model buildings. (3 hours laboratory) 

432 Computer-Aided Design in Structural Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 205, EGCE 325 and 408. Application of 
computer-aided design techniques with automated graphics to the 
design of civil engineering structures. Design project to the standards 
of professional practice. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

435 Design of Hydraulic Structures (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 428. Applications of hydraulic principles to 
design of various structures including spillways, energy dissipators, 
outlet works, storm drains, culverts and water distribution systems. 
Use of computers in design process. 

436 Engineering Hydrology (3) 

Co-requisite: EGCE 428. Hydrologic cycle with applications to 
hydrologic design of engineering structures. Rainfall, stream flow, 
ground water, surface runoff, hydrographs, flood routing, frequency 
distributions and design hydrographs. 

441 Environmental Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: Biology 101 or Chem 120A and EGGN 308. 

Planning and control of the environment; wastewater treatment and 
disposal; solid waste management; air pollution; radiation protection; 
housing and residential environment. 

463 Precast and Prestressed Concrete Design (3) 

Prerequisite: ECCE 408. Prestressed concrete design and analysis 
for conventional and lateral loading. Design of reinforced and pre- 
stressed structural and architectural elements. Safety and economy. 
Connection design for earthquake and wind loadings. Design projects 
using professional practice standards including latest codes. 

463L Precast and Prestressed Concrete Design Lab (1) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 408 and EGCE 463 or equivalent. Behavior 
of prestressed and reinforced concrete beams subjected to the different 
types of loadings Observation of elastic and ultimate strength behavior, 
deflection crack propagation and collapse. Observation of prestressing 
operation and camber. (3 hours laboratory) 


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ENGINEERING - CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 


465 Planning and Control of Engineering Construction Projects (3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Overview of construction project 
management; construction scheduling fundamentals: bar charts, CPM, 
PERT; schedule control: manual vs. computer systems, reports, schedule 
maintenance; cost control: code of accounts, control base, budgets, 
forecasting, reports, computer systems; applications in construction 
projects. 

466 Public Transit Systems Planning and Operations (3) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Civil Engineering. Urban passenger 
transportation modes, paratransit, special modes, vehicles characteristics 
and motion, highway transit mode, rail transit mode new concepts, 
transit system performance (capacity, productivity, efficiency and 
utilization, organization and financing). 

468 Engineering Construction (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 408 or equivalent. Co-requisite: EGCE 418. 
Engineering construction planning equipment and methods. 
Construction management. Critical path method. Construction of 
buildings, bridges, highways, foundations and dams. Consideration 
for safety and reliability. 

481 Solid Waste Technology and Management (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 441 or equivalent. Process dynamics and kinetics; 
thermal, physical, chemical and biological treatment operations; immo- 
bilization process; residual management and treatment process train 
selection. 

482 Liquid Waste Technology and Management (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 441 or equivalent. Process dynamics; reactions 
and kinetics; reactor engineering and process design; pretreatment 
operations and physical, chemical and biological treatment operations; 
residual management and treatment process train selection. 

490 Civil Engineering Professional Practice (1) (Formerly 495) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Discussion of civil engineering as a 
profession and the civil engineer as a professional. Career opportunities 
in private sectors and government. Office and field practice. Professional 
growth and development. Project management. Business management 
and opportunities. Ethics and aesthetics. Case studies. 

493 Structural Systems for Buildings (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 408 or 430. Co-requisite: EGCE 418. Building 
structural concepts and systems and their behavior under loads. 
Foundation systems. Roof, floor, wall systems. Construction safety and 
cost considerations. Design project to standards of professional practice. 
Use of latest building codes and standards and computer application. 

(2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory) 

494 Design of Civil Engineering Structures (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 408 and 430. Co-requisites: EGCE 418 and 
494L. Timber, reinforced masonry; reinforced concrete and steel design. 
Use of Uniform Building Code and standards. Design of buildings and 
bridges. Design projects to standards of professional practice. Reliability, 
safety and cost consideration. Computer application. (2 hours lecture; 

3 hours laboratory) 


494L Civil Engineering Structural Laboratory (1) 

Co-requisite: EGCE 494. Design of bridges according to AASHTO 
code. Design project to the standards of professional practice. (3 hours 
laboratory) 

496 Architectural Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 408 or 430 or senior standing or consent of 
instructor and department head. History of architectural design. 

Systems based design process: aesthetic, functional, environmental, 
and behavioral aspects. Urban planning and design. Case studies. 
Architectural design project to the standards of professional practice. 

497 Senior Projects (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Senior standing in engineering and formal approval 
by adviser and department head. Independent design projects. Formal 
report to be submitted after completion of project work. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Senior standing in engineering and formal approval 
by adviser and department head. Special topics in civil engineering. 
Formal report to be submitted after completion of independent study. 

501 Analytical Methods for the Design of Civil Engineering 
Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or equivalent. Application of linear 
and dynamic programming principles to the design of pipelines, irrigation 
systems, water-resources and traffic-flow control problems. Probabilistic 
network analysis. First order and advanced first order second moment 
reliability methods. Probabilistic design. 

509 Theory of Plates and Shells (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 438 or equivalent. Theory of thin plates subjected 
to transverse loads. Analysis of plates of circular, rectangular and other 
shapes. Theory of thin shells. Shells of revolution. Shells of translation. 

510 The Finite Element Method (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 517 and 533 or equivalent. Formulation of 
finite elements for analysis of plane stress and strain problems, axisym- 
metric bodies, plates and shells. Conforming and non-conforming 
shape functions. Computer applications to complex structural systems 
under static and dynamic loads. 

515 Geo-Environmental Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 436 or equivalent. Geo-environmental properties 
and soil action related to problems encountered in waste management 
engineering; physico-chemical soil properties, shear strength as applied 
to landfill design and lateral earth pressures on braced excavation; 
contaminant migration and partitioning in unsaturated soils. 

517 Theory of Elasticity (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 438 or equivalent. Analysis of stress and strain. 
Equations of elasticity. Extension, torsion and flexure of beams. Two- 
dimensional elastostatic problems. Variational methods and energy 
theorems. Elementary three-dimensional elastostatic problems. 
Introduction to thermoelasticity and wave propagation. 


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ENGINEERING - CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 


532 Earthquake Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 411 and 533 or equivalent. Earthquake motions; 
response spectra; computational methods and computer applications 
for response of structural systems. Energy absorption capacity of 
materials and structural components. Soil structure interaction. 

Seismic design and evaluation of current building codes. 

533 Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 325 and EGGN 403. Matrix formulation of 
structural analysis using the direct stiffness approach. Comparison 
of flexibility and stiffness approaches. Computer aided analysis of 
complex structural systems under static and dynamic loads. Stability 
analysis. Introduction to the finite element method. 

534 Construction Methods and Equipment for Buildings (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 408 and 430. Methods and equipment for 
construction of high-rise buildings, space structures, folded plates, 
shells, and suspension systems. Modularization. Quality control and 
construction failures. 

537 Groundwater and Seepage (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 436 or equivalent. Equations governing flow 
of liquid in porous media. Seepage through dams and under structures, 
flow in confined and unconfined aquifers, steady and unsteady flow, 
well fields, flow nets, computer solutions, sea water intrusion, 
recharge, groundwater pollution. 

538 Construction Methods and Equipment for Heavy 
Construction Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 408 and 418. Methods and equipment for 
construction of foundations, highways, airfields, bridges, ports, 
harbors, dams, nuclear power plants and industrial facilities. Quality 
control and construction failures. 

539 Preconstruction Design Evaluation (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 534 or equivalent. Cost benefit, preconstruction 
scheduling, and constructibility modifications in design, specifications 
and construction methods. Value Engineering. 

540 New Technology & Innovations in Construction Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 534 or 538 or equivalent. Automation and 
robotics in construction. New materials, construction equipment and 
methods for construction of dams, highways, and buildings. Latest 
computer applications in construction. 

546 Coastal Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 418 and 436 or equivalent. To introduce theories 
and applications in coastal engineering, coastal hydrodynamics, coastal 
development, planning of ports, and conceptual engineering design, 
tide, wave, wind, currents, littoral drift, beach erosion and sedimentation, 
coastal geomorphology. Port planning, location, design factors and 
engineering features. Preparation of construction, dredging, anchoring 
and dewatering. Effect of coastal engineering on environment. 


549 Theory of Elastic Stability (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 509 and 517 or equivalent. Critical buckling 
loads of columns, beam-columns, frames, plates, and shells. Lateral 
stability of beams. Torsional buckling of open wall sections. 

550 Major Commercial Project Development and Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Any 400-level Management course approved by the 
department head. Process of major commercial project development; 
macroeconomics aspects; project initiation and implementation, 
construction management systems, schedule, cost and quality control, 
control of long-lead equipment and materials, construction disputes 
and claims, case studies. 

556 Construction Cost Control, Scheduling and Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 465 or 468 or equivalent. Systems approach for 
estimating, scheduling, cost comparison, risk analysis and cost control. 
Project feasibility studies and alternative approaches. Project control, 
baseline establishment, cost and claim management. 

557 Total Cost Management of Capital Projects (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 465 or equivalent. Management and cost 
control of large capital projects. Capital cost estimation, value prediction 
and control, cost and schedule control and management of mega 
projects. 

559 Environmental and Public Transportation Regulations (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 441 or equivalent. Environmental regulations, 
clean air act, intermodal surface transportation efficiency act of 1991, 
Federal Transit Administration project planning guidelines, planning 
for public transit and environmental requirement, development of 
required environ-mental documents; procedure for major investment 
studies; future of public transportation. Project. 

563 Advanced Prestressed and Reinforced Concrete Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 408 or 463. Prestressed concrete theory. 
Continuous prestressed concrete members, flat plate systems, virendeel 
systems, application of unbonded postensioning-Theory and design. 
Yield line theory, limit analysis and cracking of concrete. Design of 
prestressed dome roof, barrel shell and hyperbolic paraboloid shell. 
Design project to standards of professional practice. Computer 
application. (2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab). 

566 Design of Tall Buildings (4) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 408 or 430; EGCE 533 or equivalent. 
Characteristics, design criteria and safety provisions of tall buildings. 
Selection, optimization and analysis of framing systems. Design 
standards, constructability, wind and seismic considerations. Design 
project to the standards of professional practice. Computer applica- 
tion. 

575 Expert Systems in Construction Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: any 400-level Management course approved by the 
department head. Expert systems and artificial intelligence techniques 
in construction engineering, expert systems for: safety evaluation of 
structures during construction, site selection, construction decision 
making, and construction schedule analysis; project monitoring; 
claims and disputes. 


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ENGINEERING - CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 


597 Project (1-6) 

Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and formal approval 
of Civil Engineering Graduate Committee, graduate adviser and depart- 
ment head. 

598 Thesis (1-6) 

Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and formal approval of Civil 
Engineering Graduate Committee, graduate adviser, and department 
head. (Maximum of 3 units per semester) 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and formal approval of Civil 
Engineering Graduate Committee, graduate adviser, and department 
head. 




180 


ENGINEERING - CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 



DEPARTMENT HEAD 

Mostafa Shiva 


INTRODUCTION 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering is accredited by the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The electrical engineering program provides the 
students with the knowledge of basic and advanced topics in the areas of design and analysis 
of VLSI and electronic circuits, design and analysis of computer architecture, microprocessors, 
communication systems, signal processing, and control systems. This program develops an 
ability to apply design and analysis knowledge to the practice of electrical engineering in an 
effective and professional manner. This knowledge can be applied to various engineering 
practices in aerospace, computer, electrical, electronics and other applied fields. 


DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Engineering 100A 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http ://www. fullerton . edu/ecs 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical 
Engineering 

Master of Science in Electrical 
Engineering 

Option in Systems Engineering 

FACULTY 

Maqsood Ahmed Chaudhry, David Cheng, 
John Clymer, George Cohn, Shahin 
Ghazanshahi, Mohinder Grewal, Karim 
Hamidian, Hassan Hamidi-Hashemi, Young 
Kwon, Chennareddy Reddy, Mostafa Shiva, 
Fleur Tehrani, Jesus Tuazon, Raman 
Unnikrishnan 

ADVISERS 

Undergraduate program adviser: 

Jesus Tuazon 

Graduate program coordinator: 

Mostafa Shiva 

Graduate admissions: 

Jesus Tuazon 

All department full-time faculty serve as 
advisers; see electrical engineering bulletin 
board for names, office hours and room 
numbers. 


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

See “Division of Engineering” section of this catalog for requirements in mathematics and 
science foundation courses (33 units), engineering core courses (24 units) and general education 
course work. 

In addition, EGEE 203 and 303 must be completed. 

Upper-Division Writing Requirement 

In addition to the Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP), all of the following courses are 
required to fulfill the upper-division English writing requirement: 

EGEE 303L Electronics Laboratory (1) 

EGME 306A Unified Laboratory (1) 

EGEE 310L Electronic Circuits Laboratory (2) 

EGEE 485 Electrical Engineering Design Projects Laboratory (3) 

OR EGEE 407L Digital Computer Design Lab (3) 

Written work for these courses must meet professional standards. All these courses must be 
passed with at least a “C” grade. 

Required Courses in Electrical Engineering (34 units) 

Enrollment in these courses is limited to students who meet the prerequisites. 

EGEE 203L Electric Circuits Lab (1) 

EGEE 245 Computer Logic & Architecture (3) 

EGEE 245L Computer Logic and Architecture Lab (2) 

EGEE 303 Electronics (3) 

EGEE 303L Electronics Lab (1) 

EGEE 309 Network Analysis (3) 

EGEE 310 Electronic Circuits (3) 

EGEE 310L Electronic Circuits Lab (2) 

EGEE 311 Field Theory and Transmission Lines (3) 

EGEE 313 Introduction to Electromechanics (3) 

EGEE 323 Engineering Probability and Statistics (3) 


181 


ENGINEERING - ELECTRICAL 


EGEE 407L Digital Computer Design Lab (3) 

OR EGEE 485 Electrical Engineering Design Projects Lab (3) 

EGEE 409 Introduction to Linear Systems (3) 

EGEE 490 Seminar in Electrical Engineering (I) 

Note: EGEE 203, 303, 303L, and 310L must be passed with at least 
a C grade. 

Technical Electives in Electrical Engineering (11 units) 

Before enrolling in any elective course, approval of the adviser must 
be obtained. At least 3-5 units of design content must be included. 
Senior project, EGEE 497 (1-3), and Independent Study, EGEE 499 
(1-3), are elective courses; the student must complete a study application 
form and submit it for approval to the supervising faculty member and 
the department head prior to the semester in which the course work 
is to begin. 

VLSI and Electronic Circuits 

EGEE 404 Intro to Microprocessors and Microcomputers (3) 

EGEE 404L Microprocessor Laboratory (1) 

EGEE 410 Electro-Optical Systems (3) 

EGEE 442 Electronic Circuits (3) 

EGEE 445 Digital Electronics (3) 

EGEE 448 Digital Systems Design and VHDL (3) 

EGEE 455 Solid State Electronics (3) 

EGEE 465 Introduction to VLSI Design (3) 


Communication Systems and Signal Processing 

EGEE 404 Introduction to Microprocessors and Microcomputers (3) 
EGEE 410 Electro-Optical Systems (3) 

EGEE 420 Introduction to Digital Filtering (3) 

EGEE 442 Electronic Circuits (3) 

EGEE 443 Electronic Communication Systems (3) 

EGEE 448 Digital Systems Design and VHDL (3) 

EGEE 480 Engineering Optics (3) 

EGEE 483 Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) (3) 
EGEE 483L Global Positioning Systems Lab (2) 

Control Systems 

EGEE 313L Power Laboratory (1) 

EGEE 404 Introduction to Microprocessors and Microcomputers (3) 
EGEE 416 Feedback Control Systems (3) 

EGEE 420 Introduction to Digital Filtering (3) 

EGEE 424 Computer Simulation of Continuous Systems (3) 

EGEE 425 Introduction to Systems Engineering (3) 

EGEE 483 Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) (3) 


Computer Engineering 

EG-GN 403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) 

EGEE 404 Introduction to Microprocessors and Microcomputers (3) 
EGEE 404L Microprocessor Lab (1) 

EGEE 407 Digital Computer Architecture & Design l (3) 


EGEE 407L Digital Computer Design Lab (3) 

EGEE 412 Digital Computer Architecture and Design II (3) 
EGEE 425 Introduction to Systems Engineering (3) 

EGEE 445 Digital Electronics (3) 

EGEE 448 Digital Systems Design with VHDL (3) 

EGEE 455 Solid State Electronics (3) 

EGEE 465 Introduction to VLSI Design (3) 


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

To qualify for admission in conditionally classified standing, applicants 
must meet the following university and departmental requirements: 

1. Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution. 

2. Bachelor’s degree in an engineering program which is accredited by 
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). 

3. Good standing at the last institution attended. 

4. Minimum GPA of 2.75 in the last 60 semester units and 3.0 in the 
last 15 units of electrical engineering courses attempted. 

Students with grade deficiencies, degrees from non-ABET accredited 
universities, or undergraduate majors other than Electrical Engineering 
may be considered for conditional admission. However, any deficiencies 
must be made up prior to advancing to classified standing and prior 
to beginning course work for the master’s degree. Requirements for 
fulfilling deficiencies include a minimum of six units of adviser-approved 
course work. Deficiencies must be completed with minimum 2.5 GPA 
and with at least 2.75 GPA in the last nine deficiency units. 

Each applicant file will be reviewed by the department graduate 
admissions adviser. Upon admission, the applicant is required to make 
an appointment with the graduate program coordinator. The program 
coordinator will assign a faculty adviser based on the student’s areas of 
interest and career objectives. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 
http://www.fullenon.edu/graduate. 

Classified Standing 

A student who meets the above requirements for admission to 
conditionally classified standing may be granted classified standing 
contingent upon: 

1 . Completion of all required deficiency course work. 

2. Fulfillment of the university writing requirement. Students with 
degrees from American universities must show proof of meeting 
an upper-division writing requirement, pass the EWP, or complete 
English 301 or 360. Students who have degrees from foreign 
universities must pass the Examination in Writing Proficiency 
(EWP) or complete English 301 or 360 with a grade of “C” or 

better. 

3. Development and approval of a study plan prior to completing 
nine units toward the 30-unit degree requirement. 


182 


ENGINEERING - ELECTRICAL 


Students must meet with a faculty adviser to set up a study plan. 
Classification is not granted until the study plan is approved by the 
faculty adviser, the department head, and the Office of Graduate 
Studies. Any subsequent changes to the study plan must have prior 
written approval by the faculty adviser and department head. 

Study Plan 

The study plan consists of a minimum of 30 units adviser-approved 
upper-division and graduate-level course work which must be completed 
with an overall grade-point average of at least 3.0. At least half the units 

Required Courses (6 units) 

EGGN 403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) 
Additional adviser-approved math-oriented course (3) 


Other Courses (9 units) 

Elective units should be taken in Electrical Engineering or a related 
engineering field and are subject to adviser approval. 

Exam/Thesis/Project Option 

Subject to approval by the faculty adviser, students may select one 
of the following options for final review by the department graduate 
committee: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of a final oral comprehensive examination 
on coursework OR 

2. Satisfactory completion of a formal project EGEE 597 (3 units) 
and a final oral comprehensive examination on coursework 

OR 

3. Satisfactory completion and oral defense of a thesis EGEE 598 
(6 units). 

A typed draft of the thesis or project report must be submitted to the 
student’s thesis or project committee no later than four weeks prior to 
the last day of the semester in which the oral defense of the thesis 
or project report is scheduled. 


The thesis or project committee consists of a minimum of three 
members of the Electrical Engineering faculty The thesis should cover 
original research and be prepared according to the university guide- 
lines. Committee questions will be directed toward defense of the 
project report and include questions related to course work. 

Guidelines for the preparation of theses and formal reports are 
available in the Electrical Engineering Department office and the 
university Graduate Studies office. 

Students requesting Graduate Project (EGEE 597), Thesis (EGEE 
598) or Independent Study (EGEE 599) must complete a study 
application form and submit it for approval to the supervising faculty 
member and department head prior to the semester in which the 
course work is to begin. 

Advancement to Candidacy 

Advancement to candidacy requires that the student file a graduation 
check prior to the beginning of the final semester (see class schedule 
for deadlines). Completion of requirements for the degree include 
a minimum GPA of 3.0 on all study plan course work, successful 
completion of a comprehensive examination or oral defense of a thesis 
or project, and recommendation by the Electrical Engineering faculty 
and Office of Graduate Studies. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
OPTION IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 

Students seeking this option must meet the same requirements as 
the program in Electrical Engineering. In addition students selecting 
the systems engineering option will be required to include the following 
five courses in their study plans: 

EGEE 580 Analysis of Random Signals (3) 

EGEE 581 Theory of Linear Systems (3) 

EGEE 582 Linear Estimation Theory (3) 

EGEE 585 Optimization Techniques in Systems Engineering (3) 

EGEE 587 Operational Analysis Techniques in Systems Engineering (3) 

The remainder of the systems engineering study plan will include 
other engineering courses with an emphasis in a particular field such 
as information systems, control theory, computer systems, civil or 
mechanical engineering applications. Students possessing a Bachelor 
of Science in Engineering may elect to include up to nine units from 
approved subjects offered by the College of Business Administration 
and Economics as a part of their study plan. 

ENGINEERING COURSES 

Courses are designated as EGEE in the class schedule. 

203 Electric Circuits (3) 

Prerequisites: Physics 226; Math 250A; Prerequisite or co-requisite: 
EGGN 205. Units; Ohm’s and Kirchhoffs laws; mesh and nodal analysis, 
superposition; Thevenin and Norton theorems; RL and RC transients; 
phasors and steady state sinusoidal analysis; response as a function 
of frequency; current, voltage, and power relationships; polyphase 
circuits. (203=CAN ENGR 12; 203+203L=CAN ENGR 6) 



Concentration Courses 
(15 units) 

A student is re- 
quired to select a 
minimum of 15 units 
in Electrical Engineering. 
These units may be 
400- and 500-level 
courses and are selected 
according to the 
student’s area of inter- 
est. Course work may 
focus on the following 
areas: Communications 
Systems/Signal Pro- 
cessing, Computer 
Engineering, Control 
Systems, Microelec- 
tronics and Circuit Theory, Electromag-netic Field Theory and Optics 
and Systems Engineering. Graduate Project, EGEE 597 (1-3), and 
Thesis, EGEE 598 (6), are considered concentration courses. 


183 


ENGINEERING - ELECTRICAL 


203L Electric Circuits Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: EGEE 203. Simple resistive RL and RC 
circuits, electrical measurement techniques, verification of basic circuit 
laws through hard-wired breadboarding and CAD circuit simulation. 

(3 hours laboratory) (203+203L=CAN ENGR 6) 

241 Low-Level Language Systems (3) 

(Same as Computer Science 241) 

245 Computer Logic and Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: EGGN 205 or equivalent. Logic design and organization 
of the major components of a computer, analysis and synthesis of 
combinational and sequential logics, analysis of the arithmetic, memory 
control and I/O units, concepts in computer control. 

245L Computer Logic and Architecture Lab (2) 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: EGEE 245. Digital logic circuits; 
decoders, counters, serial and parallel adders, control circuits 
(1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

303 Electronics (3) 

Prerequisites: Physics 227 and EGEE 203. Co-requisite: EGEE 
203L. Characteristics and elementary applications of semiconductor 
diodes, field-effect transistors and bipolar-junction transistors, and 
operational amplifiers; mid-frequency small-signal analysis and design 
of transistors. 

303L Electronics Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 203L, 323 and English 101. Co-requisite: 

EGEE 303. Study of semiconductor diodes, transistors and elementary 
electronic circuits through hard-wired breadboarding, CAD electronic 
simulation and analysis. (3 hours laboratory) 

309 Network Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 203 and EGGN 308. Prerequisite or co-requisite: 
EGEE 203L. Performance of RLC circuits; complex frequency and the 
s-plane; frequency response and resonance; network topology; two-port 
network characterization; classical filter theory. 

310 Electronic Circuits (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 303 and 309. Continuation of 303, analysis 
and design of multistage and feedback amplifiers; frequency character- 
istics of amplifiers, frequency characteristics and stability of feedback 
amplifiers, differential amplifiers, design of IC circuit biasing, operational 
amplifiers and their applications. 

310L Electronic Circuits Lab (2) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 303L. Prerequisite or co-requisite: EGEE 310. 
Single, multistage and feedback amplifiers; linear and digital integrated 
circuits, ADC and DAC design project. (3 hours laboratory, 1 hour 
lecture) 

311 Field Theory and Transmission Lines (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 203, Physics 226 and Math 250B. Electrostatics 
and magnetostatics; boundary value problems; magnetic materials and 
the magnetic circuit; magnetic induction; Maxwell’s equations and the 
formulation of circuit concepts; transmission lines. 


313 Introduction to Electromechanics (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 309 and 311. Electromagnetic fields and circuits; 
transformers, saturation effects. Simple electro-mechanical systems. 
Circuit models, terminal characteristics and applications of DC and 
AC machines. 

313L Power Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 303L. Prerequisite or co-requisite: EGEE 313. 
Experiments in electromagnetic fields and circuits, transformers, and 
electromechanical systems such as AC and DC machines (3 hours 
laboratory) 

323 Engineering Probability and Statistics (3) 

Prerequisite: Math 250A. Set theory: axiomatic foundation of proba- 
bility; random variables; probability distribution and density functions; 
joint, conditional, and marginal distributions; expected values; distrib- 
ution of functions of random variables; central limit theorem; estimation. 

404 Introduction to Microprocessors and Microcomputers (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 245L. Hardware and software concepts in 
microprocessors, processor family chips, system architecture, CPU, 
input/output devices, interrupts and DMA, memory (ROM, RAM), 
electrical and timing characteristics, assembly language programming. 

404 L Microprocessor Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 245L. Prerequisite or co-requisite: EGEE 404. 
I/O interfacing with a microprocessor system; familiarization with the 
operating system, assembler, debugger and emulator; design of key- 
board, LCO display, RS 232, D/A converter, A/D converter and floppy 
disk interfaces. (3 hours laboratory) 

406 Design Applications with Microcontroller and FPGA (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 245 and 245L. Digital system application 
design using microcontrollers, FPGAs and CPLDs including program- 
ming hardware interfacing, A/D conversion, CLB, logic arrays, 
interconnections, testing and simulations 

407 Digital Computer Architecture and Design I (3) (Formerly 307) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 24 5L. Organization and design of major compo- 
nents of a digital computer including arithmetic, memory, input, 
output and control units. Integration of units into a system and 
simulation by a computer design language. 

407L Digital Computer Design Laboratory (3) (Formerly 307L) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 245, 303L, and 407. Design and implementation 
of a small digital computer; adders, arithmetic unit, control unit, memory 
control unit, memory unit and program unit. May be taken in lieu of 
EGEE 485. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory). 

409 Introduction to Linear Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 309. Development of time and frequency domain 
models for physical systems. The linearization process and representation 
with block diagrams and signal flow graphs; discrete-time systems and 
digital signals including use of Z-transforms; stability theory of continuous 
and discrete time systems. 


184 


ENGINEERING - ELECTRICAL 


410 Electro-Optical Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 311. Introduction to electro-optics; optical radiation 
characteristics and sources; geometrical and physical optics; lasers and 
electro-optical modulation; quantum and thermal optical radiation 
detectors; detector performance analysis; electro-optical systems 
modeling and analysis; application examples. 

412 Digital Computer Architecture and Design II (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 307. Modem architectures of computer systems, 
their CPU structure, memory hierarchies and I/O processors; conven- 
tional and microprogrammed control; high-speed and pipelined ALU; 
cache, virtual and interleaved memories, DMA, interrupts and priority. 

416 Feedback Control Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 409. Feedback control system characteristics; 
stability in the frequency domain; analysis and design of continuous- 
time systems using root-locus, Bode and Nyquist plots and Nichols 
chart. 

420 Introduction to Digital Filtering (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 409. Discrete-time signals and systems; solution 
of difference equations; Fourier transform for a sequence, Z-transform; 
discrete Fourier transform; FIR and HR realizations; design of digital 
filters. 

424 Computer Simulation of Continuous Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 205 and 308. Use of the digital computer for 
simulation of physical systems modeled by ordinary differential equations; 
problem formulation, in-depth analysis of two integration methods, 
and the use of a general purpose system simulation program such 
as CSSL. 

425 Introduction to Systems Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 245, EGEE 323 or Computer Science 240 and 
Math 338 for Computer Science majors. Introduction to systems engi- 
neering analysis and the systems approach; introduction to modeling, 
optimization, design and control; systems requirements analysis; 
analytical and computational solution methods; information process- 
ing; integrated systems. 

430 Fuzzy Logic and Control (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 409. Fuzzy logic and systems; comparison of 
classical sets, relations, and operators with fuzzy sets, relations and 
operators; fuzzy arithmetic and transformations, classical predicate 
logic and reasoning versus fuzzy logic and approximate reasoning. 
Applications to rule-based systems and control systems. 

442 Electronic Circuits (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 310. Power amplifiers and tuned amplifiers; 

RF amplifiers; modulation and detection circuits; oscillators; and 
operational amplifier applications. 

443 Electronic Communication Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 310 and 323 or equivalent. Principles of 
amplitude, angular and pulse modulation, representative communication 
systems, the effects of noise on system performance. 


445 Digital Electronics (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 245 and 303. RC circuits, attenuators, com- 
pensation and scope probe. Logic circuits: DTL, TTL, STTL, LSTTL 
and ECL. Fanout, noise-immunity, switching speed, power consumption, 
input-output characteristics. Design and analysis of MOS logic circuits; 
PMOS, NMOS and CMOS gates, flip-flops, shift registers and memory 
circuits. 

448 Digital Systems Design and VHDL (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 245 and 303. Basic concepts and characteristics 
of digital systems, traditional logic design, LSI/VLSI logic design, 
combinational and sequential logic, and their applications; timing and 
control, race conditions and noise, microcomputers, computer-aided 
programming, development systems, microcomputer system hardware 
design, input/output devices. 

455 Solid State Electronics (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 303 and 311. Quantum mechanical principles, 
atomic structure, crystal structure, crystal defect and diffusion, lattice 
vibration and phonons, energy band theory, charge transport phenomena, 
free electron theory of metal, intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors, 
p-n junction theory, transistor theory. 

460 Introduction to Cellular Mobile Communications Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 443. Introduction to wireless mobile telecom- 
munications, description and analysis of cellular radio systems, 
co-channel interference reduction, channel capacity and digital 
cellular systems. 

465 Introduction to VLSI Design (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 245 and 303. Computer-aided design of VLSI 
circuits. MOS device structure, design rules, layout examples, CMOS 
standard cells. Speed power trade off, scaling, device and circuit 
simulation. VLSI design software tools. Routing method system 
design, Design Project. Chip fabrication through MOSIS service, 
testing. 

480 Engineering Optics (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 311 or Physics 227. Engineering aspects of the 
optics of planar interfaces; geometrical optics of devices; interference 
of beams at parallel interfaces; linear system transforms; diffraction, 
polarization, coherence; practical optical elements; laboratory demon- 
strations and significant coverage of engineering applications. 

483 Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 232, 308, 409. Description of Global 
Positioning Systems (GPS) and Differential Global Positioning Systems 
(DGPS), GPS navigation, errors. Satellite signals and co-ordinate 
transform math. Modeling for position and velocity. Application 
to navigation. 

483L Global Positioning System Lab (2) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 483. Use and description of Novatel, Magelon, 
Ahstek, Collins and Tribel receivers. Computation of GPS and GEO 
stationary satellite positions from ephemeris data available on almanac. 
Errors such as selective availability, ionospheric, tropospheric, satellite 
ad receiver will be calculated and compensated in the data. (1 hour 
lecture, 3 hours laboratory ) 


185 


ENGINEERING - ELECTRICAL 


485 Electrical Engineering Design Projects Laboratory (3) 
(Formerly 385) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 310L. Learn the practical aspects of design and 
project construction. Select an instructor approved design project in 
electrical engineering. Use CAD program for schematic capture and 
simulation. Construct the final hardware according to the design 
specification. Complete a performance evaluation and demonstrate 
the final product. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory). 

490 Seminar in Electrical Engineering (1) (Formerly 370) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineering. The engineering 
profession, professonal ethics, and related topics. 

497 Senior Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of adviser and instructor. Directed independent 
design project. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: approval of study plan by adviser. Specialized topics 
in engineering selected in consultation with and completed under the 
supervision of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

503 Information Theory and Coding (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 323. Information measures, probabilistic studies 
of the transmission and encoding of information, Shannons fundamental 
theorems, coding for noisy channels. 

504A Linear Network Synthesis (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 310. Synthesis of passive element driving-point 
and transfer-functions with emphasis on RC networks. Basic operational 
amplifier RC circuits and their performance limitations, introduction 
to second-order RC active filters. Parameter sensitivity analysis. 

507 Detection Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 580. Formulation of decision rules for the detection 
of signals in a noisy environment, optimum receivers. Estimation of 
parameters of detected signals. Estimation theory. 

510 Optics & Electromagnetics in Communications (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 480. Plane-wave propagation and reflection from 
multiple layers; two- and three-dimensional boundary value problems; 
waveguides and resonant cavities; radiation from apertures and antennas; 
electromagnetic properties of materials, gases, and plasmas; significant 
coverage of engineering applications. 

518 Digital Signal Processing 1 (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 420. Discrete Fourier transform; fast Fourier 
transform; Chirp Z-transform; discrete time random signals; floating- 
point arithmetic; quantization; finite word length effect in digital filters; 
spectral analysis and power spectrum estimation. 

519A Hypercube Multiprocessing and Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 412. The system architecture and application 
of hypercubes; the node processor, floating point accelerator, communi- 
cation circuits, synchronization, routing and message-passing algorithms, 
process decomposition and load balancing, a hands-on parallel program- 
ming experience on Hypercube Parallel Processing System. 


519B Multiprocessing and Computer Networks (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 519A. Advanced topics in computer architecture 
design to increase computing through-put and efficiency through multi- 
processing, distributed processing, array and pipeline processors, and 
computer networks. 

522 Spread Spectrum Communications (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 443 and 580. Introduction to Spread Spectrum 
(SS) Systems. Performance analysis of coherent digital signaling schemes. 
Synchronization. Direct sequence, frequency hopping, time hopping, 
and Hybrid Spread Spectrum Modulations. Binary shift register sequences. 
Code tracking loops. Performance of SS systems in a jamming environ- 
ment, with forward error correction. 

523A VLSI Technology and Integrated Circuits (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 465 or equivalent. Solid-state physics of silicon 
crystal, oxide and interface physics. Wafer fabrication technologies: 
oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, epilaxy, thin film process, 
photolithography, layout design principles for integrated circuits. 
Bipolar technology and design rules. 

523B Very Large-Scale Integrated Circuits (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 465 or equivalent and EGEE 445. Design and 
analysis of VLSI circuits. MOS device physics. Short channel effect, 
LDD device. PMOS, NMOS, and CMOS circuits. Fabrication process 
and design rules. Latch-up problem. CMOS static and dynamic circuit. 
CAD design. 

526 Digital Control Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 416. Analysis, design and implementation of 
digital control systems; Z-transform methods; frequency domain and 
state-space approach for discrete-time systems. 

527 Fault Diagnosis and Fault-Tolerant Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 307. Fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant design 
of digital systems; fault diagnosis test for combinational and sequential 
circuits, reliability calculations, multiple hardware redundancy, error 
detection and correcting codes, software redundancy and fault-tolerant 
computing. 

529 Principles of Neural Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 310 and 409. Principles of neural systems and 
their hardware implementation. Basic properties, discrete and continuous 
bidirectional associative memories. Temporal associative memories. 
Neural nets classifiers, perceptrons, supervised and unsupervised 
learning. Forward and backward propagation. Electrical models of 
neural networks using op-amp., analog VLSI. 

531 Phase-Locked and Frequency Feedback Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 580 or consent of instructor. Theory of noise 
and linear systems, FM feedback principles. Theory and design of 
phase-locked loops and their applications in communication and 
control. 

537 Satellite Communications (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 443. Satellite systems, link analysis, propagation 
effects, SNR/CNR calculations, modulation schemes, TDMA, FDMA, 
CDMA techniques. 


186 


ENGINEERING - ELECTRICAL 


557 Microprogramming and Emulation (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 407. An introduction to microprogramming 
concepts and applications to the control unit of a computer, digital 
control systems, interpretations, translation and emulations. (Same 
as Computer Science 557) 

558A Microprocessors and System Applications 1 (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 404 and 404L. Microprocessors and micro- 
computers, their related software systems, system design with 
microprocessors, applications in peripheral controllers, communication 
devices and multiprocessing systems. 

558B Microprocessors and Systems Applications II (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 558A. Advanced microprocessor architecture 
and their applications to microcomputer networking; RISC VS CISC 
architectures, communication protocol, distributed-operating system, 
and local area networks. 

559 Introduction to Robotics (3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 416 or consent of instructor. The science of 
robotics from an electrical engineering standpoint, including modeling, 
task planning, control, sensing and robot intelligence. 

580 Analysis of Random Signals (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 323 and 409 or equivalent. Random processes 
pertinent to communications, controls and other physical applications, 
Markov sequences and processes, the orthogonality principle. 

581 Theory of Linear Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 416 and EGGN 403. State space analysis, linear 
spaces, stability of systems; numerical methods of linear systems analysis 
and design. 


582 Linear Estimation Theory (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 580 and 581. Mathematical models of continu- 
ous- time and discrete-time stochastic processes; the Kalman filter, 
smoothing and suboptimal filtering computational studies. 

585 Optimization Techniques in Systems Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: EGGN 403 or Math 340 for Computer Science 
majors. Calculus of variations, optimization of functions of several 
variables, Lagrange multipliers, gradient techniques, linear program- 
ming, and 

the simplex method, nonlinear and dynamic programming. 

587 Operational Analysis Techniques in Systems Engineering 
(3) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 323 or Math 338 for Computer Science 
majors. Operational research models; applications of probability 
theory to 

reliability, quality control, waiting line theory, Markov chains; Monte 
Carlo methods. 

597 Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Classified graduate students only. 

598 Thesis (1-6) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Classified graduate students only. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: consent of adviser. May be repeated for credit. 


187 


ENGINEERING - ELECTRICAL 



DEPARTMENT HEAD 

Hossein Moini 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Engineering 100 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering 

Manufacturing Engineering 
Emphasis 

Master of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http ://www. fullerton . edu/ecs 

FACULTY 

Andy Bazar, Jesa Kreiner, Sundaram 
Krishnamurthy, Timothy Lancey, Hossein 
Moini, Peter Othmer, James Rizza, Hasan 
Sehitoglu 

ADVISER 

Undergraduate/Graduate Program 
Adviser: Hossein Moini 


INTRODUCTION 

The mechanical engineering program at CSUF provides a foundation for professional engineering 
careers in private industry and government. Mechanical engineers are employed in a wide range 
of industries such as manufacturing, transportation, energy, food, and biomedical application. 

In general, mechanical engineers are involved with the design, research, development, manufacture, 
testing, distribution, support, maintenance, and recycling of devices and products. Automobiles, 
airplanes, home appliances (refrigerators, washing machines, dryers, vacuum cleaners, etc.), robots, 
printers, and computer hard disk drives are some of the various products that have been 
customarily designed and developed by mechanical engineers. Mechanical engineers possess 
a firm understanding of science, mathematics and engineering needed to carry out these complex 
tasks which are so important to a modem technological society. 

The graduate curriculum is designed to provide a specialized education for career advancement 
or further work towards a doctoral degree program. 


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

See “Division of Engineering’ 1 for requirements in mathematics and science foundation 
courses (30 units), engineering core courses (24 units) and general education coursework. 

Upper-Division Writing Requirement 

In addition to a passing score on the Examination in Writing Proficiency (EWP), the follow- 
ing courses are required by all mechanical engineering majors: EGME 306A, 306B, 376A and 
376B. Written work for these courses must meet professional standards and requires completion 
with a grade of “C” or better. 

Required Courses in Mechanical Engineering (39 units) 

EGEE 303 Electronics (3) 

EGEE 303L Electronics Laboratory (1) 

EGME 306B Fluids and Thermal Laboratory (1) 

EGME 322L Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (3) 

EGME 331 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (3) 

EGME 333 Fluid Mechanics & Aerodynamics (3) 

EGME 335 Introduction to Mechanical Design (3) 

EGME 376A Dynamic Systems and Controls Lab (2) 

EGME 376B Energy and Power Lab (2) 

EGME 407 Heat Transfer (3) 

EGME 414 Design Project I (3) 

EGME 419 Design Project II (2) 

EGME 42 1 Mechanical Design (3) 

EGME 426 Design of Thermal and Fluid Systems (3) 

EGME 431 Mechanical Vibrations (3) 

EGME 490 Seminar in Engineering (1) 


188 


ENGINEERING - MECHANICAL 


Technical Electives in Mechanical Engineering (11 units) 

Before enrolling in any elective course, approval of the adviser must 
be obtained. 


Power and Energy 

EGGN 403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) 

EGME 417 Computational Heat Transfer (3) 

EGME 424 Data Acquisition and Instrumentation Using LabVIEW (3) 
EGME 447 Piping Selection and Piping Network Design (3) 

EGME 451 Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems (3) 
EGME 452 Fluid Machinery (3) 

EGME 454 Optimization of Engineering Design (3) 



Design and Materials for Manufacturing 

EGME 30 1L Advanced Auto CAD for Design Documentation (2) 
EGGN 403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) 

EGME 410 Introduction to the Finite Element Method and 
Applications (3) 

EGME 41 1 Mechanical Control Systems (3) 

EGME 438 Analytical Methods in Engineering (3) 

EGME 454 Optimization of Engineering Design (3) 

EGME 456 Introduction to Mechatronics for Engineers (3) 

EGME 459 Plastics and Other Non-Metallics (3) 

EGME 460 Failure 
of Engineering 
Materials (3) 

EGME 461 Fabrication 
Methods (3) 

EGME 462 
Composite 
Materials (3) 

EGME 463 
Introduction 
to Robotics (3) 


EGME 475 Acoustics and Noise Control (3) 

EGME 480 Human Factors in Engineering (3) 

EGME 483 Computer-Aided Manufacturing (3) 

EGME 486 Introduction to Electronics Packaging (3) 
EGME 487 Thermal Control of Electronic Packaging (3) 


Thermal and Fluids Engineering 

EGME 410 Introduction to the Finite Element Method and 
Applications (3) 

EGME 417 Computational Heat Transfer (3) 

EGME 424 Data Acquisition and Instrumentation Using LabVIEW (3) 


EGME 447 Piping Selection and Piping Network Design (3) 
EGME 451 Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems (3) 
EGME 452 Fluid Machinery (3) 

EGME 454 Optimization of Engineering Design (3) 

EGME 486 Introduction to Electronics Packaging (3) 

EGME 487 Thermal Control of Electronic Packaging (3) 


Robotics, Controls, and Automated Manufacturing 

EGGN 403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) 

EGME 410 Introduction to the Finite Element Method and 
Applications (3) 

EGME 411 Mechanical Control Systems (3) 

EGME 424 Data Acquisition and Instrumentation Using LabVIEW (3) 
EGME 454 Optimization of Engineering Design (3) 

EGME 456 Introduction to Mechatronics for Engineers (3) 

EGME 457L Intelligent Systems Lab (2) 

EGME 461 Fabrication Methods (3) 

EGME 463 Introduction to Robotics (3) 

EGME 483 Computer-Aided Manufacturing (3) 

EGME 486 Introduction to Electronics Packaging (3) 


MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING EMPHASIS 

See “Division of Engineering” section of this catalog for requirements 
in mathematics and science foundation courses (30 units), engineering 
core courses (24 units) and general education course work. 

Required Courses (43 units) 

EGEE 303 Electronic Instrumentation (3) 

EGEE 303L Electronic Instrumentation Lab (1) 

EGME 306B Fluids and Thermal Laboratory (1) 

EGME 322L Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (3) 

EGME 331 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (3) 

EGME 333 Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics (3) 

EGME 335 Introduction to Mechanical Design (3) 

EGME 376A Dynamic Systems and Controls Lab (2) 

EGME 407 Heat Transfer (3) 

EGME 414 Design Project I (3) 

EGME 419 Design Project II (2) 

EGME 42 1 Mechanical Design (3) 

EGME 426 Design of Thermal and Fluid Systems (3) 

EGME 461 Fabrication Methods (3) 

EGME 463 Introduction to Robotics (3) 

EGME 483 Computer-Aided Manufacturing (3) 

EGME 490 Seminar in Engineering (1) 


ENGINEERING - MECHANICAL 


Technical Electives (9 units) 

Approval of the adviser must be obtained before enrolling in any 
elective course. 

EGME 410 Introduction to the Finite Element Method and 
Applications (3) 

EGME 411 Mechanical Control Systems (3) 

EGME 454 Optimization of Engineering Design (3) 

EGME 459 Plastics and Other Non-Metallics (3) 

EGME 460 Failure of Engineering Materials (3) 

EGME 462 Composite Materials (3) 

EGME 480 Human Factors in Engineering (3) 

EGCE 408 Reinforced Concrete Design (3) 

EGEE 323 Engineering Probability and Statistics (3) 

EGEE 404 Introduction to Microprocessors and Microcomputers (3) 
EGEE 404L Microprocessor Lab (1) 

EGEE 445 Digital Electronics (3) 

EGEE 465 Introduction to VLSI Design (3) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

To qualify for admission to a conditionally classified standing, 
applicants must meet the following university and departmental 
requirements: 

1. Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution, e.g.. 
Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). 

2. Bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from an institution 
accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET). 

3. Minimum GPA of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units. 

4. Good standing at the last institution attended. 

Students not meeting the above requirements may be admitted at 
the discretion of the department head and will be required to take an 
additional six or more units of adviser-approved prerequisite course- 
work. The student must demonstrate potential for graduate study 
by earning a grade point average of 3.0 or higher in these courses. 

Any student entering the Master of Science degree program without 
a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering will also be required to complete one 
or more courses in the areas where the student is deemed to be deficient, 
prior to beginning course work for the Master’s degree. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate. 

Classified Standing 

Students meeting the following additional requirements will be 
advanced to classified standing and are eligible to take graduate 
courses for which they are qualified. 

1 . Completion of all deficiency work specified by the graduate adviser 
with a grade of B or better. 


2. Development of an approved study plan. Before completing nine 
units at CSUF toward the M.S. degree, the student must meet with 
an adviser for preparation of a study plan which must be approved 
by the department head and Office of Graduate Studies. 

3. Fulfillment of the university writing requirement prior to completing 
nine units at CSUF toward the M.S. degree. Students must demon- 
strate writing ability commensurate with the baccalaureate degree. 
Please refer to the “Graduate Regulations” section of this catalog 
for further information on how this requirement can be met. 

Study Plan 

The study plan consists of a minimum of 30 units of adviser-approved 
upper-division or graduate -level course work which must be completed 
with an overall grade-point average of at least 3.0. At least half the 
units required for the degree must be in approved graduate (500-level) 
courses. 

Required Courses (6 units) 

EGGN 403 Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3) 

Additional adviser-approved math-oriented course (3) 

Concentration Courses (15 units) 

A student is required to select a minimum of 15 units in mechanical 
engineering. 

These units may be 400-level and 500-level courses and are selected 
according to the student’s area of interest. Course work is designed 
to meet the student’s professional career goals and may focus on the 
following areas: Power and Energy, Design and Materials for 
Manufacturing, Thermal and Fluids Engineering, Robotics, Controls, 
and Automated Manufacturing. 

Other Courses (9 units) 

Elective units should be taken in mechanical engineering or a related 
engineering field and are subject to adviser approval. 

Exam/Thesis/Project Option (3-6 units) 

Subject to approval by the adviser, students may select one of the % 
following three options for final review by a department committee: 

1. Oral comprehensive examination 

2. EGME 597 Project (3-6 units) 

3. EGME 598 Thesis (3-6 units) 

Students enrolling in less than six units of Thesis/Project will be 
required to take an oral comprehensive exam. Students enrolling in 
six units of thesis or project may defend their thesis or project instead 
of taking an oral comprehensive exam. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSES 

Courses are designated as EGME in the class schedule. 

102 Graphical Communications (3) 

Graphics as a fundamental means of communication in design. 
Development of spatial visualization. Freehand sketching and use 
of instruments, orthographic projection, pictorials. Dimensioning, 
tolerances, descriptive geometry, CAD principles and applications, 
AutoCAD, design procedure, cost analysis and freshman design 
project. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory) (CAN ENGR 2) 


190 


ENGINEERING - MECHANICAL 


214 Basic Machine Shop Practice and Safety (2) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 125 or equivalents. Introduction to 
machine shop practices and drill press, grinding wheel, lathe, vertical 
mill and band saw. Thorough safety procedures instruction on each 
machine. Student demonstrates safe practices on each machine. 
Introduction to measurement and tolerancing. Discussion and 
laboratory practice. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory.) Does not 
count toward fulfilling degree requirements. Credit/No Credit only. 

286 Technology-Based Graphical Communication (3) 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 130 or Mathematics 150A. Introduction 
to the techniques used in three-dimensional graphics, design and 
visualization to conceptualize, apply, analyze, synthesize, evaluate and 
communicate information concepts using available technology. No 
credit for Engineering/Computer Science majors. (2 hours lecture, 

2 hours laboratory) 

304 Thermodynamics (3) 

Prerequisites: Chem 120A, Math 150B and Physics 225; Co-requisite: 
EGGN 205 or consent of instructor. Energy and its transformation; 
heat and work; conservation of mass and energy, system properties, 
irreversibility and availability. Ideal gases, heat engines and refrigeration 
(both ideal and actual), equipment selection and sizing. 

306A Unified Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: Physics 225 and EGME 102. Co-requisite: EGGN 
205. Observations and measurements as an introduction to the experi- 
mental method. Static and dynamic measurements on engineering 
systems (beams, columns, pendulums, gyroscopes) using mechanical 
and electrical transducers. Principles of probability and statistics and 
their applications to experimental measurements. Report writing. 

(3 hours laboratory) 

306B Fluids and Thermal Laboratory (1) 

Prerequisites: EGME 306A and 333. Co-requisite: EGME 407. 
Continuation of EGME 306A. Flow measurement techniques using 
orifice plates, venturimeters. Pitot probes and nozzles. Temperature 
and pressure measurement. Experimental studies of fluid friction and 
heat exchanger performance. Use of microcomputers in data acquisition, 
reduction and analysis. Technical report writing. (3 hours laboratory) 

322L Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 331, EGCE 302, or consent of instructor. 
Introduction to modeling, assembly, design documentation and analysis 
using typical commercial CAD/CAE software such as Mechanical 
Desktop, Pro/ENGINEER and ANSYS. Use of online resources in the 
collaborative design process. Design file transfer protocols. Design 
project using a technology based team environment. CAD/CAE system 
selection criteria. (1 hour discussion, 6 hours laboratory). (Same as 
Computer Science 322L) 

331 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (3) 

Prerequisites: Chem 120A, Math 250A, EGCE 201; Co-requisite: 
EGME 306A. Engineering properties of materials. Toughness and 
fatigue. Creep phenomena. Corrosion. Energy concepts. Beams and 
columns. Torsion. Combined stresses. Pressure vessels. Failure theories. 
Design of machine elements. 


333 Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: EGCE 201. Co-requisites: EGGN 205 and EGME 304. 
Principles of fluid mechanics and their applications; fluid properties; 
fluid statics; one-dimensional incompressible flow; concepts of multi- 
dimensional flows including conservation principles; similitude and 
dimensional analysis; internal and external viscous flow; elements of 
compressible flow; design considerations in fluid mechanics. 

335 Introduction to Mechanical Design (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 205, EGCE 302 and EGME 102. Kinematics 
and dynamics of mechanisms; design and analysis of linkages, gears, 
and cams through the use of analytical, graphical and computer-aided 
techniques. 

376A Dynamic Systems and Controls Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 308, EGCE 302, and EGME 306A. Co-requisite: 
EGEE 303. Dynamic systems, vibration, acoustics and other mechanical 
components; computer simulation of dynamic systems; robotics, 
computer controlled machining and automatic data acquisition. 

(6 hours laboratory) 

376B Energy and Power Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisites: EGME 304 and 306B. Mass transfer, heat transfer, 
and thermodynamic phenomena and their interaction with mechanical 
systems. Team projects, engineering reports. (6 hours laboratory) 

407 Heat Transfer (3) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 250B and EGME 333. Principles of heat 
transfer and their applications: introduction to conductive, convective 
and radiation heat transfer; one-dimensional heat conduction; concepts 
of multi-dimensional conduction; convective heat transfer in conduits 
and external surfaces; heat exchangers and thermal system design. 

410 Introduction to the Finite Element Method and Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: approved study plan. Basic concepts of integral and 
matrix formulation of boundary value problems. One dimensional 
finite element formulation of heat transfer, truss beam and vibration 
problems. Applications of commercial finite element programs. 
Selection criteria for code, element and hardware. CAD system 
interfaces. 

411 Mechanical Control Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 205 and 308, and EGCE 302. Mechanical 
control system design and analysis. Pneumatic, hydraulic, electro- 
mechanical actuators and devices. Stability criteria, root locus plots, 
transfer functions, introduction to feedback control and micro- 
processor applications. 

414 Design Project I (3) 

Prerequisites: EGME 322L and 421. Co-requisite: EGME 426. 
Design methodology, CAD/CAE philosophy, optimization, product 
liability, probability/statistical principles, ASME codes, safety, human 
factors, material selection, legal aspects of design, professional ethics. 
Design project to be completed in EGME 419, feasibility study, 
preliminary design, assembly drawings, interim project report. Oral 
presentation. (1 hour lecture and 6 hours laboratory) 


191 


ENGINEERING - MECHANICAL 


417 Computational Heat Transfer (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 205 and 308, and EGME 407. Computer 
visualization of 2-D/3-D temperature fields. Steady and unsteady 
conduction heat transfer. Incompressible free and forced convective 
boundary layer flows. Multiple surface radiation analysis. Boiling and 
condensation. Emphasis on design aspects of computational heat 
transfer and use of CFD codes. 

418 Space and Rocket Engineering (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 201, EGME 304, 331, and 333. Principles of 
rocket propulsion systems. Single and mutli-stage rockets. Theory 
and application of orbital mechanics. Space flight maneuvers. Boosting 
a satellite into orbit. Spacecraft guidance and control. Trajectories to 
Moon and Mars. 

419 Design Project II (2) 

Prerequisite: EGME 414. Completion of the design project initiated 
in EGME 414. Construction of prototype, model or components. 
Testing of the proposed design, and preparation of a final design 
report. Teamwork and communications skills are emphasized. Oral 
presentation is required. (6 hours laboratory) 

421 Mechanical Design (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 301 or EGME 331, and 335. Design and application 
of machine components such as brakes, clutches, gears, springs, fasteners, 
lubrication of machine elements, bearings, gaskets, seals, w O” rings, 
methods for study of impact, dynamic loading and fatigue; comprehensive 
treatment of failure, safety and reliability. 

422 Mechanical Design Using Pro/ENGINEER (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 322L or equivalent. Modeling, assembly and 
design documentation using Pro/ENGINEER. Design of mechanical 
components and assemblies using Advanced Pro/ENGINEER features 
such as blends, drafts, user defined features, relations, family tables and 
assembly management. Collaborative design project, utilizing online 
resources. May be repeated for one credit. 

424 Data Acquisition and Instrumentation Using LabVIEW (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 306A or equivalent. Graphical programming; 
design and development of virtual instruments using LabVIEW pro- 
gramming environment; building applications for data acquisition, 
measurement, testing, and control of engineering systems; collaborative 
term project. (2 hours discussion, 3 hours laboratory) 

426 Design of Thermal and Fluid Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 407. Integration of fundamental principles of 
thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and related subjects in 
the design of thermal and fluid systems. The design process is applied 
to pumps, fans, turbines, boilers, and heat exchangers using economics 
and optimization with case studies. 

431 Mechanical Vibrations (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 205 and 308, and EGCE 302. Modeling and 
analysis of single and multiple degrees of freedom systems. Response 
to forcing functions. Vibrations of machine elements. Design of vibration 
isolation systems. Balancing of rotating machinery. Random excitation 
and response of mechanical structures. 


438 Analytical Methods in Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: EGGN 308. Ordinary and partial differential equations 
with constant and vanable coefficients; orthogonal functions; conformal 
mapping; potential theory; engineering applications. 

447 Piping Selection and Piping Network Design (3) 

Prerequisites: EGME 333 and EGCE 301 or EGME 331. Pressure 
losses in piping networks; selection of piping based upon fluid, tem- 
perature, pressure and economic considerations; piping connections, 
fittings and components; stress analysis; review of national piping 
codes. 

451 Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems (3) 

Prerequisites: EGME 304 and 407. The fundamentals of controlling 
heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. Theory and analysis 
of fundamental thermodynamics relating to these systems. Laboratory 
demonstrations of actual systems. 

452 Fluid Machinery (3) 

Prerequisites: EGME 304 and 333. Thermal and hydraulic design 
and analysis of pumps, fans, turbines and compressors. Component 
selection, system design and performance evaluations. 

454 Optimization of Engineering Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGGN 308. Application of analytical and computer 
optimization techniques to engineering design problems. Presentation 
of design as an optimization task. One dimensional minimization. 
Unconstrained and constrained nonlinear programming. 

Approximation concepts. Duality. Computer applications to design 
problems using a general purpose optimization program. 

456 Introduction to Mechatronics for Engineers (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 308, EGEE 303L, and EGME 306A. Introduction 
to mechatronics. Design issues. Sensors, actuators, programmable 
controllers. Hardware components for control systems. System perfor- 
mance. Data acquisition and control. Mechatronic control in automated 
manufacturing. Advanced applications and case studies. Design project. 

457L Intelligent Systems Laboratory (2) 

Prerequisite: EGEE 303L. Design and assembly of microprocessor- 
based mechanisms. Lab experiments encompass machine/high level 
programming, and interfacing of microcontrollers with sensors and 
actuators. Design project. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory) 

459 Plastics and Other Non-Metallics (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 331. Simplified chemistry of plastics. Applications. 
Manufacturing processes. Methods for preventing deterioration of non- 
metallic materials. Composites. Ceramics. Refractories. Wood. 
Destructive and nondestructive testing of nonmetallic materials. 

460 Failure of Engineering Materials (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 331. Imperfections in solids; fracture initiation 
and crack propagation; dislocations; yield point phenomenon; fatigue; 
creep; ultrasonic effects; radiation damage; stress corrosion; hydrogen 
embrittlement; composite materials. 


192 


ENGINEERING - MECHANICAL 


461 Fabrication Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 331. Manufacturing processes. Metal joining 
processes. Casting, forging, powder metallurgy, machining and machining 
tools, finishing, coating, plating, non-metallic materials inspection and 
gaging, and tolerances. 

462 Composite Materials (3) 

Prerequisites: EGCE 301 or EGME 331. Application, mechanical 
properties and fabrication studies of fiber reinforced composite materials, 
stress analysis of laminated anisotropic composite structures. Studies 
of special problems unique to composites. 

463 Introduction to Robotics (3) 

Prerequisites: EGME 335. Co-requisite: EGME 376A. Kinematic, 
dynamic, control and programming fundamentals associated with 
industrial robots and programmable manipulators. Trajectory planning, 
application of robotics in manufacturing and integration of robots into 
flexible manufacturing systems. 

475 Acoustics and Noise Control (3) 

Prerequisite: Physics 227. Basic phenomena on the propagation, 
absorption and generation of acoustic waves, specification and measure- 
ment of noise, effects of noise on speech and behavior, legal aspects 
of industrial and building noise, principles and application of noise 
control. 

480 Human Factors in Engineering (3) 

Prerequisite: Approved study plan. Principles of design for making 
products and systems faster, easier, and more effective to use. Design 
project using these principles that consider human capabilities and 
limitation of senses and responses to sensory stimuli. Physiological, 
psychological and work factors are evaluated for design of equipment, 
work methods, environments and standards. 

483 Computer-Aided Manufacturing (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 376A or equivalent. Introduction to computer- 
aided manufacturing processes. CNC machines, robot and PLC program- 
ming. Design for CIM. Fixed and flexible manufacturing systems. 
Process planning and scheduling. Simulation software for manufacturing 
systems. Laboratory experiments. (1 hour discussion, 4 hours laboratory) 

486 Introduction to Electronics Packaging (3) 

Prerequisites: EGEE 303 and EGME 306A. Electronic components 
and devices. The chip carrier, packaging and production of printed 
circuit boards. First, second and third level packaging. Introduction 
to thermal analysis and vibration of electronic equipment. 

487 Thermal Control of Electronic Packaging (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 308, EGME 304 and 486 or equivalent. Fluid 
mechanics and heat transfer as related to the thermal control of electronic 
packages of varying sizes. Analysis of individual components, complete, 
boards, and complete systems is considered. Both liquid and gas 
cooling mediums are covered. 

490 Seminar in Engineering (1) (Formerly 370) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering. The engineering 
profession, professional ethics, and related topics. May be repeated 
once for credit with the approval of the department. 


497 Senior Project (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, adviser and department head. 
Directed independent design project. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Approval of study plan by adviser and department 
head. Specialized topics in engineering, selected in consultation with 
and completed under the supervision of the instructor. May be 
repeated for credit. 

508 Advanced Inviscid Fluid Flow (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 205 and 308, and EGME 333. Study of two- 
and three-dimensional potential flow theory. Sources, sinks, vortices, 
Rankine bodies, free jets, channel flow, air foils. Introduction to com- 
putational fluid dynamics. Complex potential and various transformation 
techniques are used. 

511 Advanced Mechanical Vibrations (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 431. Vibrations in rotating and reciprocating 
machines; noise and vibration in fluid machinery; continuous systems; 
random vibrations; transient and nonlinear vibration, computer 
applications. 

512 Advanced Mechanical Design and Management (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 421 or equivalent. Advanced modem mechanisms. 
Analysis and synthesis of mechanisms. Advanced topics in computer- 
aided design of mechanical, thermal and fluid systems. Methodology 
of modern design. Optimization in design. 

516 Advanced Radiation Heat Transfer (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 407. Radiation heat transfer including the 
study of the geometric factor, black and real systems, and energy 
transfer in absorbing, scattering and emitting media, and radiation 
combined with other modes of energy transfer. 

520 Advanced Viscous Fluid Flow (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 333. The fundamental equations of viscous 
fluid flow. Viscous drag estimation. Drag reduction methods. 
Introduction to instability and transition. 

524 Advanced Thermodynamics (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 304. Equilibrium and stability criteria, third 
law of thermodynamics, multiple component systems, ionization, 
equilibrium reaction, lower core “ideal” gases, thermodynamic cycles. 

526 Advanced Convective Heat Transfer (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 407. Convective heat transfer; heat transfer in 
external and internal flow fields for both laminar and turbulent fluid 
flow, applications. 

530 Advanced Strength of Materials (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 421. Energy methods. Castiglianos theorem. 
Curved beams, beams on elastic supports, thickwall cylinders, shrink 
fits, localized stress, column instability, failure theories, bearings. 


193 


ENGINEERING - MECHANICAL 


536 Advanced Conduction Heat Transfer (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 407. Conduction heat transfer; Bessel and 
Legendre functions, Fourier series solutions, heat sources and sinks, 
multidimensional problems, transient systems and numerical methods 
(finite difference and finite element methods). 

538 Advanced Engineering Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 403 and EGME 438. Partial differential 
equations in engineering, numerical techniques, integral equations, 
engineering applications. 

540 Computer Applications In Engineering Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGGN 403. Computers and microprocessors in 
engineering design. Design methodology, modeling and simulation. 
Geometric modeling. Design optimization. Expert systems in engineering 
design. Generalized programs and simulation languages are emphasized. 

541 Finite Element Method for Mechanical Engineers (3) 

Prerequisites: EGGN 403 and EGME 410. Matrix formulation of 
basic equations in steady state and transient heat conduction. Elements 
and interpolation functions. Non-linear problem formulation. Finite 
element computer programs in heat transfer, fluid dynamics and design. 


554 Applied Optimal Mechanical Design (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 454 or equivalent. Formulation of design 
optimization problems in mechanical engineering. Review of mathemat- 
ical programming methods. Practical aspects of optimization. Design of 
complex mechanical systems. Individual projects will be assigned to 
apply optimization techniques to an engineering system 
or component. 

576 Advanced Dynamics & Control of Mechanical Systems (3) 

Prerequisite: EGME 411. Advanced study of the dynamics and 
control of mechanical systems including: state space modeling, 
Lyapunov stability, modem design techniques and case studies. 

597 Project (1-6) 

Prerequisite: Consent of Graduate Program Adviser. 

598 Thesis (1-6) 

Prerequisite. Consent of Graduate Program Adviser. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: Classified graduate status. Open to graduate students 
only by consent of Mechanical Engineering Graduate Program Adviser. 
May be repeated for credit only upon approval by the Graduate 
Program Adviser. 


194 


ENGINEERING - MECHANICAL 





, Comparative 

1 -r ^ i • • 



wjm& , ^ •— — • ■•" -• 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 


DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

Joseph Sawicki 

VICE CHAIR 

Joanne Gass 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

University Hall 323 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://hss.fullerton.edu/english/index.htm 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Comparative 
Literature 

Master of Arts in Comparative Literature 

Bachelor of Arts in English 

Minor in English 

Master of Arts in English 

Minor in Linguistics 

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics 

Master of Arts in Linguistics 

FACULTY 

Marlin Blaine, Cornel Bonca, Ellen 
Coldwell, Mary Kay Crouch, Angela Della 
Volpe, Sheryl Fontaine, Joanne Gass, Jane 
Hipolito, Susan Jacobsen, Joanne Jasin, Helen 
Jaskoski, Alan Kaye, Thomas Klammer, 
Deborah Lawrence, Mohsen Mirshafiei, Helen 
Mugambi, Franz Muller-Gotama, Keith 
Neilson, Irena Praitis, Sally Romotsky, Chris 
Ruiz- Velasco, Joseph Sawicki, Amy-Scott- 
Douglass, Yichin Shen, Kay Stanton, Atara 
Stein, John White, Heping Zhao 


INTRODUCTION 

The discipline of English includes the study of British and American literature, the various 
kinds of writing, and the history, structure and dialects of the English language. 

The major in English is a flexible program emphasizing skill(s) in writing, familiarity with 
and appreciation of the literatures of England and America, and knowledge of the nature and 
development of the English language. 

Comparative literature is the study of world literature without specific regard for national 
or linguistic boundaries. It is comparative in that it deals with the relationships among different 
literatures. The comparatist studies not only the international literary masterpieces and historical 
periods of world literature, but also examines critical theories from a cross-cultural perspective. 
The major in comparative literature promotes the understanding of world literatures and cultures 
in various historical periods, including the present, for students with a special concern for the 
relationships among the languages and literatures of various civilizations. Comparative literature 
courses are conducted in English, and required reading is available in English. 

The study of literature and language helps students to achieve a mature understanding of 
themselves and the world and to learn to read critically and analytically, write clearly and 
persuasively, and reason soundly. For these reasons such study is ideal preparation for profes- 
sional training in fields such as law, medicine, and religion, or for responsible positions in 
business and industry. The major in English may be combined with preparation for elementary 
and secondary school teaching. In addition, the majors in English, Comparative Literature and 
Linguistics provide a foundation for students who intend to work for advanced degrees in prepa- 
ration 

for college teaching. 

Advisers 

English/Comparative Literature, Undergraduate: 

All full-time faculty members serve as advisers. 

English/Comparative Literature, Graduate: 

Susan Jacobsen 

Teaching Credential: 

John White 

Linguistics, Undergraduate: 

Franz Muller-Gotama 

Linguistics, Graduate: 

Alan Kaye 

An annual conference with a faculty adviser is required. New students must confer with 
an adviser in each of the first two semesters. 

Credential Information 

The bachelor’s degree in English may be effectively combined with subject matter studies 
necessary for either the multiple subject teaching credential (K-8) or single subject credential 
(7-12) in English. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the Center for Careers in 
Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course 
selections for general education, the major and electives. With careful planning, it may be 
possible to enter the credential program in the senior year of the bachelors degree. Postgraduate 
students should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the School of Education 
(714-278-3411) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation. 


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ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Literature requires a minimum 
of 120 units which includes courses for the major, General Education, 
all University requirements, and free electives. For the major, students 
must complete a total of 42 units of upper-division courses. In selecting 
courses, students are urged to consult a faculty adviser. 

Required courses (English 300 and 18 units in comparative literature, 
including Comparative Literature 324, 325, and either English/ 
Comparative Literature 450 or Comparative Literature 451) 

British and American Literature (6 upper-division units listed under 
English) 

Breadth Requirement (6 adviser-approved units in other fields such 
as anthropology, history, art history, music history or philosophy) 
Electives (9 upper-division units in comparative literature, or litera- 
ture courses in English or an adviser-approved foreign language) 

Reading Competence in a Foreign Language 

This requirement can be met by examination or by successful 
completion of an adviser- approved 400-level course offered by the 
Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, provided it is not 
taught in translation. Information on the examination is available in the 
Department of English, Comparative Literature, and Linguistics office. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The masters degree program in comparative literature promotes the 
understanding of other literatures, peoples, and cultures in various 
historical periods, including the present, provides background for 
more advanced degrees, prepares teachers of world literature in the 
high schools and community colleges, and provides a liberal arts 
background for library studies. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check 
the university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

University requirements include a bachelor’s degree from an accredited 
institution and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units 
attempted. 

A writing sample will also be required of all applicants. The writing 
sample should demonstrate advanced skill in literary analysis and 
expository writing. A paper written for a course and analyzing one 
or more elements in one or more literary works is preferred; the sub- 
mitted copy should include the instructor’s name and institution, 
and the grade received. Applicants who do not have course papers 
available should contact the department graduate adviser for advice. 
The writing sample should be approximately five to ten pages long, 
and it need not include secondary research. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

Classified standing requires: 

1. An undergraduate major in comparative literature, English or 
foreign language with a GPA of 3.0 or better in the upper-division 
major courses and a GPA of 2.5 in all other college and/or univer- 
sity work. If the students degree is in another field, a total of 24 


units of upper-division work in comparative literature, English or 
foreign language with a GPA of 3.0 will be required. 

If the student lacks the prerequisite number of courses, they must 
be taken before beginning work in the master’s degree program, 
with at least a 3.0 in such makeup course work. If the student’s 
GPA in these probationary courses is 3.0 or better, classified stand- 
ing may be granted. Courses taken to remove qualitative and 
quantitative deficiencies may not be applied to the M.A. program. 

2. Satisfactory completion of a written examination in an adviser- 
approved foreign language, or satisfactory completion of an upper- 
division course taught in an adviser-approved foreign language. 

3. Development of an approved study plan. 

Study Plan 

A minimum of 30 units of course work must be completed with 
a minimum GPA of 3.0 to be distributed as follows: 

500-Level Courses (18 units) 

This requirement is met by 15 units at the 500-level in comparative 
literature or courses cross-listed in English (one adviser-approved 500- 
level course in English may help satisfy this requirement) and one 
3-unit course at the 500-level in a related area. 

Upper-Division Courses (12 units) 

Adviser-approved courses in comparative literature (6 unite) 
Adviser-approved courses in a related area (6 units) 

(At least 3 units of related course work must be in foreign literature, 
read in the original language.) 

Comprehensive Exam 

At the conclusion of all course work, the student will take a com- 
prehensive examination for the master’s degree. Each section of the 
four-pan comprehensive examination must be passed before the 
degree will be awarded. Any section(s) failed may be repeated once 
only. Notice of intention to take the examination must be on file with 
the graduate secretary within six weeks of the first class of the semester. 

Project Option 

The candidate may elect to write a project. For information, consult 
the graduate adviser. 

For further information, consult the Department of English, 
Comparative Literature, and Linguistics. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

The Bachelor of Arts in English requires a minimum of 120 units 
which includes courses for the major, General Education, all University 
requirements, and free electives. The English major consists of 42 
units. At least 30 units must be upper-division courses. In selecting 
courses, students are urged to consult a faculty member of the 
Department of English, Comparative Literature and Linguistics. English 
101 , 

a graduation requirement for all students, is not part of the English 
major but is a prerequisite to further work in English. 

Required Courses (9 units) 

English 300 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

English 301 Advanced College Writing (3) 

English 316 Shakespeare (3) 


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ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 



Survey Courses (at least 6 units) 

English 211 British Literature to 1760 (3) 

English 212 British Literature from 1760 (3) 

English 221 American Literature to Whitman (3) 

English 222 American Literature from Twain to the Modems (3) 

Comp Lit 324 World Literature to 1650 (3) 

Comp Lit 325 American Ballad and Folksong (3) 

Period, Genre and Criticism Courses 

(at least 9 units, including at least 3 units from courses prior to 1800, 
i.e., 423, 450, 451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456) 

English 423 Early American Literature (3) 

English 450 Medieval Literature (3) 

English 451 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3) 

English 452 

Elizabethan Poetry 
and Prose (3) 

English 453 17th- 
Century Poetry and 
Prose (3) 

English 454 The 
Drama of the 
Restoration and the 
18th Century (3) 

English 455 

Restoration and 18th 
Century Poetry and 
Prose (3) 

English 456 The 
Development of the 
English Novel 
Through Jane 
Austen (3) 


English 457 The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) 
English 458 Victorian Literature (3) 

English 459 The Development of the 19th Century English Novel (3) 
English 462 Modem British and American Novels (3) 

English 463 Contemporary Novels in English (3) 

English 464 Modem British and American Drama (3) 

English 465 Contemporary Drama in English (3) 

English 466 Modem British and American Poetry (3) 

English 467 Contemporary Poetry in English (3) 

English 491 Traditions of English Literary Criticism (3) 

English 492 Modem Critical Theory (3) 

Major Author Courses (at least 3 units) 

English 315 Chaucer (3) 

English 317 Milton (3) 


Language Courses (at least 3 units) 

English 303 Structure of Modem English (3) 

English 305 The English Language in America (3) 

Electives (at least 12 units) 

Chosen from English, Comparative Literature and Linguistics 
courses numbered 201 and above. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Students must complete a total of 2 1 units, including 1 5 units as 
described below and 6 units of electives. No more than six units of 
lower-division course work can be applied to the minor. In selecting 
courses, students seeking a minor in English should consult a faculty 
member of the Department of English, Comparative Literature, and 
Linguistics. 

Required Courses (9 units) 

English 300 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

English 301 Advanced College Writing (3) 

English 316 Shakespeare (3) 

Survey Courses (at least 6 units) 

English 211 British Literature to 1760 (3) 

English 212 British Literature from 1760 (3) 

English 221 American Literature to Whitman (3) 

English 222 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 

Comp Lit 324 World Literature to 1650 (3) 

Comp Lit 325 World Literature from 1650 (3) 

Electives (at least 6 units) 

Chosen from additional English, Comparative Literature and 
Linguistics courses, with the exception of English 101 and 200. 

Students may take the approved upper-division writing course(s) 
in their majors instead of English 301. They must, however, complete 
21 units in English, Comparative Literature and Linguistics. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

The master’s degree program in English offers students the opportunity 
to achieve a multifaceted understanding of literature and language. The 
degree is useful to those already teaching in high schools or interested 
in community college teaching, to those seeking careers in writing and 
publishing, and to those intending to take further graduate work. 

Admission to Graduate Standing 

Applicants are encouraged to make an appointment with the 
department graduate adviser. The adviser will review transcripts, advise 
applicants regarding prerequisites, and determine if any courses apply 
to the degree program. 

Admission requirements for conditionally classified standing are 
outlined below. 

Admission to the master’s degree program is a prerequisite to enroll- 
ment in all graduate courses. 

1. University requirements include a bachelor’s degree from an 
accredited institution and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the last 60 
semester units attempted. 


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ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 


2. The Department requires a bachelor’s degree in English or 
Comparative Literature from an accredited institution with at least 
a 3.0 grade-point average in the upper-division major courses, 
provided that a minimum of 24 units of upper-division course 
work is included. 

If the applicant holds a bachelor’s degree in another major, 24 units 
of upper-division course work in English must be completed with 
at least a 3.0 grade-point average before beginning work in the 
master’s degree program. In the event that the applicant’s GPA in 
prerequisite English courses is less than 3.0, six to nine units of 
probationary, adviser-approved course work may be assigned. If the 
GPA in these probationary courses is 3.0 or better, the student may 
be classified. 

Some courses taken to make up qualitative deficiencies may be 
credited toward the M.A., if completed with a grade of B or better, 
and if applicable to the student’s particular study plan. Courses 
taken to remove quantitative deficiencies may not be applied to the 
M.A. program. 

3. A writing sample will also be required of all applicants. The writing 
sample should demonstrate advanced skill in literary analysis and 
expository writing. A paper written for an upper-division literature 
course and analyzing one or more elements in one or more literary 
works is preferred; the submitted copy should include the instruc- 
tors name and institution, the instructor’s comments, and the grade 
received. The writing sample should be approximately five to ten 
pages long, and it need not include secondary research. Applicants 
who do not have course papers available should contact the depart- 
ment graduate adviser for advice. 

4. Applicants must submit three letter(s) of recommendation from 
individuals best qualified to judge their potential for graduate study 
in English. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

Students must satisfy a foreign language requirement with one of the 
following options: 

(1) two years of one foreign language at the college or university 
level, (2) one 400-level course in a foreign language or in literature 
taught in a foreign language, (3) Linguistics 406 Descriptive Linguistics 
or Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics OR (4) another 400-level linguistics 
course approved by the graduate adviser. This requirement may be 
satisfied prior to or after admission to the M.A. program. 

Study Plan 

The graduate program in English comprises 30 units of course 
credit. All courses must be approved by the graduate adviser. 

A study plan must be developed and approved for admission to 
classified graduate standing within the student’s first nine units of 
graduate coursework. Courses taken by a student admitted to the 
program with conditionally classified status do not necessarily apply 
toward the degree. No more than nine units of postgraduate course 


work may be applied to the master’s degree program. See the graduate 
adviser for further information. 

The study plan allows three units of adviser-approved course work 
outside the department and/or three units of graduate independent 
study. No more than six units are allowed at the 400-level. In addition, 
at least one proseminar or seminar must be in Comparative Literature 
or cross-listed in Comparative Literature. A project and comprehensive 
exam are required of all students. Students are encouraged to take 
English 500 in their first semester. 

Core courses (6 units) 

English 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies in Literature (3) 

Analysis of Discourse (3 units from English 491, 492, 579T) 

Proseminars (12 units) 

Students are encouraged to satisfy the proseminar requirements 
prior to taking seminars. 

Seminars (9 units) 

Students choose from adviser-approved seminar courses (English or 
Comparative Literature 509, 57 IT, 572T, 573T, 574T, 575T, or 59 IT). 

Project (3 units) 

In addition to the written exam described below, students are 
required to complete a project in the project writing course (for the 
course number, title and description, please consult the English depart- 
ment office). Students who plan to do a creative writing project may 
take a maximum of six units of creative writing workshops, one of 
which must be at the 500-level. 

Project proposals are due before the end of the eighth week of the 
semester preceding enrollment in the project writing course and are 
reviewed by the department Graduate Studies Committee. Please 
consult the graduate adviser or department office for further details. 

Written Exam 

In order to complete degree requirements, students must pass a 
two-part written exam involving analysis and synthesis. Failed parts 
of the exam may be retaken only once. The deadline to file a notice of 
intention to take the examination is the end of the third week of the 
semester in which the student plans to take the exam. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

MINOR IN LINGUISTICS 

MASTER OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS 

For information on these programs and a listing of linguistics 
courses, please consult the “Linguistics” section of this catalog. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE COURSES 

Courses are designated as CPLT in the class schedule. 

110 Literature of the Western World from Ancient through 
Medieval Times (3) 

(Same as English 110) 

1 1 1 Literature of the Western World from the Renaissance 
through the 19th Century (3) 

(Same as English 111) 

257 Writing Haiku (1) 

(Same as English 257) 


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ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 


312 The Bible as Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.B.2. 
Literary qualities of biblical literature and the influence of major 
themes upon Western literary traditions. (Same as Comparative 
Religion 312) 

315 Classical Mythology in World Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category 1I1.B.2. 
Greek and Roman myths which have been of continuing significance 
in Western world literature. 

324 World Literature to 1650 (3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and completion of any 
literature course from General Education category III.B.2. Asian and 
Western literature from the beginning to 1650. 

325 World Literature from 1650 (3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and completion of any 
literature course from General Education category III.B.2. Asian and 
Western literature from 1650 to the present. 

347 The Fairy Tale (3) 

(Same as English 347) 

355T Images of Women in Literature (3) 

(Same as English 355T) 

373 Nineteenth Century Russian Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and completion of any 
literature course from General Education category III.B.2. Major 
writers such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and 
their relationship to Western literature. 

374 Twentieth Century Russian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of any literature course from General 
Education category III.B.2. Soviet peoples’ literature from 1918 to the 
present. Basic trends in literary criticism. Major writers such as Gorky, 
Blok, Mayakovsky, Zamyatin, Zoshchenko, Akhmatova and Pasternak. 

380 Introduction to Asian Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of any literature course from General 
Education category III.B.2. Selected translations of Arabic, Persian, 
Indian, Chinese and Japanese literature. 

381 African Literature (3) 

(Same as English 381 and Afro-Ethnic Studies 381) 

382T Topics in Asian Literature (3) (Formerly 423T) 

Prerequisite: completion of any literature course from General 
Education category III.B.2. Specific topics will vary from semester to 
semester. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 

450 Medieval Literature (3) 

(Same as English 450) 

^51 Literature of the Renaissance (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American, or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. The Renaissance as 
a literary movement, from Erasmus to Montaigne and Cervantes. 


499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. 

525T Proseminar in Literature, Rhetoric, or Writing (3) 

(Same as English 52 5T) 

57 IT Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

(Same as English 57 IT) 

572T Graduate Seminar: Literary Genres (3) 

(Same as English 572T) 

574T Graduate Seminar: Special Problems in Literature (3) 

(Same as English 574T) 

575T Graduate Seminar: Topics in Teaching (3) 

(Same as English 575T) 

579T Graduate Seminar: Problems in Criticism (3) 

(Same as English 579T) 

597 Project (3) 

(Same as English 597) 

599 Independent Study (1-3) 

ENGLISH COURSES 

Courses are designated as ENGL in catalog. 

For world literature in English translation, see courses under 
Comparative Literature (CPLT) 

099 Developmental Writing (3) 

An intensive course in basic writing skills. Designed to prepare 
students for English 101. Required of, and open only to, students who 
score below minimum standard on the English Placement Test (EPT). 
Degree credit is not awarded for this course. Instructional fee. (Same 
as Foreign Language Education 099) 

101 Beginning College Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: English 099, a satisfactory score on the English 
Placement Test, or exemption from the EPT. An introductory course 
in the fundamentals of expository prose. Emphasizes grammatical and 
basic rhetorical concepts and practices necessary for successful college 
writing. Instructional fee. (CAN ENGL 2) 

105 Introduction to Creative Writing (3) 

Exploratory creative writing with the opportunity to write in 
various genres. No credit toward the major. 

110 Literature of the Western World from Ancient through 
Medieval Times (3) 

Representative writers and works from the ancient through the 
medieval world. (Same as Comp Lit 110) 

111 Literature of the Western World from the Renaissance 
through the 19th Century (3) 

Representative writers and works from the Renaissance through the 
19th century. (Same as Comp Lit 111) 


199 


ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 


199 Intensive Writing Review (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Restricted to students who have 
failed the EWP at least twice. Intensive review of the fundamentals of 
writing expository prose. Meets examination portion of baccalaureate 
writing requirement. Carries no credit toward graduation. 

200 Introduction to Literature (3) 

An introduction to the study of fiction, drama and poetry. 
Concentration on the critical understanding of literary types rather 
than on their historical development. Carries no credit toward the 
major. 

204 Intermediate Creative Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: Completion of General Education Category III.B.2. 

A course providing experience in creative writing beyond the intro- 
ductory level. Emphasis on poetry, the short story, and/or the 
one-act play. 

211 British Literature to 1760 (3) (Formerly 311) 

Major periods and movements, major authors, and major forms 
through 1760. 

212 British Literature from 1760 (3) (Formerly 312) 

Major periods and movements, major authors and major forms 
from 1760 through modem times. 

221 American Literature to Whitman (3) (Formerly 321) 

Major writers such as Hawthorn, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoureau, 
Whitman, and Dickinson. 

222 American Literature from Twain to the Moderns (3) 

(Formerly 322) 

Major writers such as Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, 
O’Neill, Frost, and Elliot. 

257 Writing Haiku (1) 

After a brief study of the development of haiku in Japan, students 
will write and revise haiku in English and share them with the class. 
With consent of instructor, may be repeated for no more than three 
units of credit. (Same as Comp Lit 257) 

300 Analysis of Literary Forms (3) 

The main literary forms-prose fiction, poetry and drama-are studied 
and analyzed. English majors should schedule this basic course as early 
as possible. 

301 Advanced College Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101. An advanced course in writing expository 
prose. Emphasizes precision in rhetoric and development of individual 
style by concentration on matters of diction, audience, emphasis and 
persuasion. Required of English majors seeking a secondary' credential. 
Instructional fee. 

303 The Structure of Modern English (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing. The grammar of contemporary 
English. Modem English usage. Required of English majors seeking 
a secondary credential. Must be taken before student teaching. 


305 The English Language in America (3) 

American English, its origins, its regional and social dialects, and 
its role in American history and in such institutions as schools, 
corporations, government, and the media. (Same as Linguistics 305) 

315 Chaucer (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. The Canterbury Tales and 
Chaucer’s language. The vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar and 
syntax of the East Midland dialect of Middle English. 

316 Shakespeare (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. A study of the major plays. 

317 Milton (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. The poetry and prose in the 
light of Milton’s intellectual development. 

323T Cultural Pluralism in American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. The role of varied cultural 
groups in the USA as exemplified in American literature. Topics may 
include Jewish writers, images of immigrants, Asian- American writers, 
American Indian literatures, and others. 

324 Introduction to Afro-American Literature (3) (Formerly 424) 

(Same as Afro-Ethnic 324) 

325 American Ballad and Folksong (3) 

Anglo-American balladry and folksong; their historical development, 
ethnic background and poetical values. 

326 The American Frontier in Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: any courses in American literature, American studies 
or American history. Thematic study of American literature as it reflects 
the changing frontier experience and establishes national myths and 
symbols. 

327 Asian American Literature (3) 

(Same as Asian American Studies 327) 

328 Literature of the American Indians (3) (Formerly 420) 

Prerequisite: completion of any literature courses from General 
Education category III.B 2. The prose and poetry of the North 
American Indian tribes. 

341 Children’s Literature (3) (Formerly English 433) 

Prerequisite: completion of any literature course in General Education 
category III.B.2. World literature written primarily for children, including 
material from the oral tradition, realistic fiction, fantasy, and poetry. 

Not applicable for graduate degree credit. 

347 The Fairy Tale (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101. The development of the fairy tale in 
English. Includes early continental influences and covers such authors 
as the Brothers Grimm, H.C. Anderson, C. Rosetti, MacDonald, Barns, 
and Sendak. (Same as Comp Lit 347) 

355T Images of Women in Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Images of women in genres 
such as autobiography, poetry; drama, novel. Individual sections may 
treat conventional literary periods or specific cultures. May be repeated 
with different content for additional credit. (Same as Comp Lit 355T) 


200 


ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 


360 Scientific and Technical Writing (3) 

Open to science and non-science students. Scientific and profes- 
sional writing and editing, with attention to outlines and abstracts, 
description, process explanation, instructions, and fundamentals of 
reports, feasibility studies, proposals, internal memos, and letters. 

365 Legal Writing (3) 

Advanced compositions stressing logic, reasoning, and legal analysis. 

370 Horror Fiction (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. Horror/occult fiction (or 
“dark fantasy”) from Mary Shelley to the present, including such 
writers as E. A. Poe, J. S. LeFanu, Bram Stoker, H. P Lovecraft, Fritz 
Leiber, and Stephen King. 

371 Fantasy Fiction (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. Fantasy in literature from 
Ariosto to Brautigan. 

372 Detective Fiction (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. Detective fiction from Edgar 
Allan Poe to the present, including writers such as Sayers, Christie, 
Chandler, Hammett, and Ross MacDonald. 

373 Science Fiction (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. Science fiction as a literary 
genre, including future-scene fiction, the utopian novel, the superman/ 
woman novel and short stories. 

374 The Gothic Novel (3) 

Prerequisite: English 101. The development of the Gothic Novel in 
England from 1750-1850, including such authors as Walpole, Smith, 
Radcliffe, Lewis, Mary Shelley, Austen, Maturin, and Emily Bronte. 

381 African Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of any literature course from General 
Education category I1I.B.2 African literature written in the English 
language; the fiction, poetry and drama of the new nations. (Same as 
Comparative Literature 381 and Afro-Ethnic Studies 381) 

402 Theories of Response to Written Composition (2) 

Prerequisite: English 301 and 303 or equivalents. Corequisite: 
English 402S. The course does not lend itself to a multi-level dif- 
ferentation in student performance that serves as the basis for the 
letter grade option. Offered credit/no credit only. 

402S Tutor Supervision (1) 

Prerequisites: English 301 and English 303. Corequisite: English 
402. Supervision of Writing Center tutors. Offered credit/no credit 
only. 

404T Advanced Creative Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: English 204 or its equivalent. Instruction and practice 
in a workshop setting for the student with some experience in creative 
writing; emphasis on writing for professional markets. Consult the 
class schedule to determine section’s emphasis. May be repeated for 
credit. 


416 Studies in Shakespeare (3) 

Prerequisite: English 316 or consent of instructor. Problems of 
dramatic structure and artistic meanings. 

423 Early American Literature (3) 

Prerequisite: English 321. Literature of colonial and revolutionary 
America, including the Puritans, 18th century deism and rationalism, 
and the literary antecedents of American democratic thought. 

429 American Landscape in Literature (3) 

The American landscape in literature. Literary perception of our 
environment, with special attention to what perceptions of the land- 
scape reveal about human nature. 

434 Literature for Junior and Senior High School (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. The evaluation, selection, 
and interpretation of fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry reflecting 
the broad range of interest of young people from 12 to 17 years of age. 

442 Changing Words: History, Semantics, and Translation (3) 

(Same as Linguistics 442) 

450 Medieval Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Readings in modern 
English translation from the medieval literature of England and the 
continent from St. Augustine to Sir Thomas Malory. (Same as 
Comparative Literature 450) 

451 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. The dramatic tradition 
in plays by such dramatists as Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Beaumont 
and Fletcher. 

452 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. The non-dramatic 
literature of the English Renaissance. 

453 17th-Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Non-dramatic literature 
of the period from 1603 to 1660 excluding Milton. 

454 The Drama of the Restoration & the 18th Century (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Representative plays 
of the Restoration and the 18th century. The development of such 
dramatic movements as the heroic play. Restoration comedy, and 
sentimental drama. 

455 Restoration and 18th Century Poetry and Prose (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Major writers such as 
Butler, Rochester, Dryden, Pepys, Swift, Addison and Steele, Pope, 
Boswell, Johnson, and selected minor writers. 


201 


ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 


456 The Development of the English Novel through 
Jane Austen (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. The English novel from 
its beginnings to the 19th century including such novelists as Defoe, 
Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, and Austen. 

457 The Romantic Movement in English Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Major writers such as 
Burns, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

458 Victorian Literature (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Major writers such as 
Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Ruskin, and Pater. 

459 The Development of the 19th Century English Novel (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Major novelists such 
as the Brontes, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. 

462 Modern British and American Novels (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Modem British and 
American novels from 1900 to 1950. 

463 Contemporary Novels in English (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. The novel in English 
since World War II. 

464 Modern British and American Drama (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. British and American 
drama from 1900 to 1950. 

465 Contemporary Drama in English (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Drama in English from 
1950 to the present. 

466 Modern British and American Poetry (3) 

Prerequisite: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. British and American 
poetry from 1900 to 1950. 

467 Contemporary Poetry In English (3) 

Prerequisites: survey of English, American or world literature; an 
upper-division literature course; or equivalent. Poetry in English from 
1950 to the present. 

491 Traditions of English Literary Criticism (3) 

Prerequisite: English 300 or equivalent. The major English critics, 
from the Renaissance to the beginning of the 20th century, in relation- 
ship to the classical theories of criticism. 


492 Modern Critical Theory (3) 

Prerequisite: English 300 or equivalent. The major movements in 
20th-century British and American criticism. 

498 English Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior status and consent of faculty supervisor. 
Experience in the practical application of studies in literature and 
language to work outside the university. Hours to be specified; enroll- 
ment limited; C/NC; no credit toward major. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. Open to advanced students 
in English with consent of department chair. May be repeated for 
credit. 

500 Introduction to Graduate Studies in Literature (3) 

Research techniques, analytical approaches and theories of literature. 
A course providing basic orientation in graduate literary studies. 

509 Creative Writing Workshop (3) 

An intensive graduate-level workshop in creative writing. Students 
will produce their own work, write critiques of others’ works, and 
discuss opportunities for publication. Recommended for students with 
an interest in creative writing. Workshops may focus on the writing 
of poetry or fiction or of a mix of fiction and drama, depending on 
expertise of instructor. May be repeated for credit with different topic. 

510 Rhetorical Criticism and Disclosure Analysis (3) 

This course will cover theories of disclosure and rhetorical analysis 
ranging from an overview of historically foundational/classical readings 
and approaches to contemporary' rhetorical theories and their applica- 
tions to textual criticism. 

525T Proseminar in Literature, Rhetoric, or Writing (3) 

Comprehensive readings course focusing on a key area in literature, 
rhetoric or writing. Examines major primary' works and where they 
exist, major critical texts representing the area. Students are strongly 
advised to take proseminars before enrolling in seminars. May be 
repeated for credit with a different topic. (Same as Comp Lit 525T) 

57 IT Graduate Seminar: Major Writers (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of 
instructor; major figures such as Shakespeare, Dante, Shakespeare, 
Cervantes, Goethe, Bronte, Twain, Joyce, Woolf, and Morrison. May 
be repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as 
Comp Lit 57 IT) 

572T Graduate Seminar: Literary' Genres (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of 
instructor, major literary types such as the epic, the novel, the short 
story; lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, and historical drama. May be 
repeated with different content for additional credit. (Same as Comp 
Ut 572T) 

573T Graduate Seminar: Cultural Periods (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of 
instructor, the literature of a cultural period from Anglo-Saxon to 
modem times. May be repeated with different content for additional 
credit. 


202 


ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 


574T Graduate Seminar: Special Problems in Literature (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research and publication of the 
instructor, special problems such as influences on literature, including 
philosophical, religious, scientific, geographic, and other ecological 
viewpoints. May be repeated with different content for additional 
credit. (Same as Comp Lit 574T) 

575T Graduate Seminar: Topics in Teaching (3) 

Specific topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated 
with different content for additional credit. (Same as Comp Lit 575T) 

579T Graduate Seminar: Problems in Criticism (3) 

Historical development and schools of criticism. Individual offerings 
within this course number may deal with only one aspect of critical 
problems. May be repeated with different content for additional credit. 
(Same as Comparative Literature 579T) 

590 Writing Theory and Practice for Teaching Associates (3) 

Prerequisite: English 402 and admission to the English Department 
Teaching Associate Program. Theory and practice of the composing 
process for the beginning college teacher of expository writing. 

Required of all English Department Teaching Associates during their 
first semester of teaching. 

590S Teaching Associate Supervision (1) 

Prerequisite: English 590. Supervised teaching of developmental 
writing and freshman composition. No credit toward the M.A. in 
English. This course may be repeated for credit. 

59 IT Seminar: Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (3) 

As appropriate to the specialized research of instructor, special 
topics on rhetoric and composition, including historical and theoretical 
approaches. May be repeated with different content for additional 
credit. 

595 M.A. Project Writing (3) 

This course will guide students through the process of writing an 
M.A. project in literature, rhetoric and composition, or creative writing. 
To enroll in the course, students must receive prior departmental 
approval of their M.A. project proposal. 


597 Project (3) 

Prerequisite: classified graduate standing. A research paper, a critical 
study, a portfolio of creative writing, or the results of fieldwork or 
experiment. Supervising professor and English department graduate 
studies committee must approve the proposal in advance of registration. 
(Same as Comparative Literature 597) 

599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Research projects in areas of specialization beyond regularly offered 
course work. Oral and written reports. May be repeated with different 
content for additional credit. 

ENGLISH EDUCATION COURSES 

Courses are designated as ENED in catalog. 

442 Teaching English in the Secondary School (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to teacher education. Principles, methods 
and materials of teaching English in the secondary school. 

449E Externship in Secondary Teaching (3) 

Student teaching in the secondary school during the first semester 
of the teacher preparation program. The candidate plans and teaches 
assigned lessons during the last third of the semester. 

4491 Internship in Secondary Teaching (10) 

Student teaching in the secondary school during the second semester 
of the teacher preparation program. The candidate has the same 
instructional hours of responsibility as the master teacher. 

449S Seminar in Secondary Teaching (3) 

Taken concurrently with Ed Sec 4491. Seminar in teaching a single 
subject in secondary schools. Videotape analysis of teaching based on 
Teaching Performance Assessments. Taken Credit/No Credit. A “B” 
or better is required to receive a grade of credit. 


203 


ENGLISH, COMPARATIVE LITEARATURE AND LINGUISTICS 



PROGRAM COORDINATOR 

Robert Voeks 

ASSISTANT COORDINATOR 

Tracy Briggs 

PROGRAM OFFICE 

Humanities 407 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://hss.fullerton.edu/envstud/index.html 

PROGRAM OFFERED 

Master of Science in Environmental 
Studies 

PROGRAM COUNCIL AND ADVISERS 

Michael Steiner (American Studies), 
Gordon Bakken (History), Dennis Berg 
(Sociology), Vincent Buck (Political Science), 
John Foster (Geological Science), Andrea 
Guillaume (Elementary Education), Morteza 
Rahmatian (Economics), Prem Saint (Geological 
Sciences), Coleen Delaney-Rivera (Anthropology), 
Jonathan S. Taylor (Geography) C. Eugene 
Jones (Biological Science), Harold Rogers 
(Chemistry) Chad Briggs (Political Science), 
Theodore Hromadka (Mathematics), Jeff Kuo 
(Civil Engineering). 


INTRODUCTION 

The masters program in Environmental Studies is a broadly-based interdisciplinary program that 
focuses on human interaction with the environment. The program is geared for students entering 
the rapidly expanding environmental field, especially in science, planning and regulation, and edu- 
cation. Because the scale and scope of environmental issues vary from local and practical to interna- 
tional and theoretical, the program seeks to integrate knowledge and approaches from a range of 
related disciplines in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Topics include environmental 
policy, management, pollution, law, philosophy, economics, planning, regulation, and education. 
Given the range of their academic backgrounds, students are encouraged to craft a study plan that 
meets their own particular career or avocational goals. Students demonstrate their expertise in one 
of the environmental concentrations by preparing a thesis or project. 

Students select a course of study consistent with one of the following three concentrations: 

Environmental Sciences 

This area deals with the application of physical and biological science principles to environ- 
mental issues. Topical concerns include environmental ecology, water and air resources, and 
environmental geology. Students in this emphasis typically have a strong background in biology, 
chemistry, earth science, engineering, geography, geology or mathematics. 

Environmental Policy and Planning 

This area deals with the concepts and methods of the social and behavioral sciences as applied to 
environmental policy and planning. Topical concerns include urban and regional planning, envi- 
ronmental aspects of administration, design, ethics, perception, law and economics. Students in 
this area come from many backgrounds, including the natural, social or behavioral sciences, 
or the humanities. 

Environmental Education and Communication 

This emphasis seeks to develop a body of knowledge that is consistent with the needs of the 
classroom teacher, the outdoor naturalist or the communication specialist. Students in this 
emphasis area should have a background in natural science, education or communications. 

International Learning Opportunities in Environmental Studies 

Because many environmental problems are trans-boundary in nature, our curriculum 
necessarily addresses issues that are international in scope. From topical courses, such as 
Environmental Ethics and Global Environmental Issues, to region-specific courses, such as 
Endangered Primates and Tropical Rainforests, students tackle an array of internationally 
significant environmental problems. This experience is enhanced further through interaction 
with the significant number of international students enrolled in the program. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the fall semester and October 
1st for the spring semester. However, deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment 
projections. Check the university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

University requirements include a baccalaureate from an accredited institution and a grade- 
point average of 3.0 in the last 60 units of course work attempted. In addition, two letters of 
recommendation are required, at least one of which must come from a college or university. 


204 


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 


An undergraduate course in ecology and one in statistics are 
prerequisites for admission. Students without these prerequisites will 
be admitted provisionally but must take these courses during their first 
year in the program. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

After completion of no more than nine semester units of adviser- 
approved course work and the development of an approved study 
plan, the student should apply for classified standing. 

STUDY PLAN 

The M.S. in Environmental Studies requires the completion of 36 
units of adviser-approved course work with a GPA of 3.0 or better and 
a thesis or project. The students thesis committee should be comprised 
of three members, representing at least two different fields, with one 
being a member of the Environmental Studies Council. A student’s 
project is supervised by a single faculty member. 

Environmental Studies Core (9 units) 

ENST 500 Environmental Issues and Approaches (3) 

ENST 510 Environmental Evaluation and Protection (3) 

ENST 520 Environmental Research and Analysis (3) 

Environmental 
Studies Electives 
(9-15 units) 

Choose from: 

ENST 595T Selected 
Topics in 
Environmental 
Problems (3) 

ENST 596 Internship 
in Environmental 
Studies (3) 

ENST 599 
Independent 
Graduate 
Research (3) 

Cross-Disciplinary Electives Work (9-15 units) 

Courses outside Environmental Studies are chosen with prior approval 
of the faculty adviser and consistent with the student’s area of concen- 
tration. 

No more than 12 units can be taken from the undergraduate major 
department. A three- unit planning course must be included. 

Thesis 598 or Project 597 (3 units) 

All Environmental Studies students are required to register in ENST 
597 Project or ENST 598 Thesis exit research option. Students may only 
register for this course once. If they do not complete their project or 
thesis within this semester, they will be assigned a grade of RP for the 
course until a letter grade can be assigned. Since students are required to 
maintain continuous enrollment, they must register in GS 700 either 
through University Extension or CSUE Students may only enroll in GS 
700 through University Extension for one semester if they are working 
on a project and for two semesters if they are working on a thesis. 

The deadline for project completion is the last day of the final exam 
period each semester. The deadline for thesis completion is set by the 


university (usually three weeks before the end of exam week). By the 
thesis/project deadline, a notification of completion form must be sub- 
mitted with the faculty supervisor’s signature and (if applicable) with 
change of grade card(s) from the faculty supervisor. In addition, all 
students must submit a completed copy of the project or, for a thesis, 
a receipt from the thesis-binding department of the bookstore indicating 
that a bound and title -embossed copy of the thesis has been ordered 
for the Environmental Studies program office. 

For further information, consult the graduate program adviser. 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES COURSES 

500 Environmental Issues and Approaches (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental Studies or consent 
of instructor. Discussions of interdisciplinary approaches to environ- 
mental problems and research methods. Students prepare seminars and 
papers on research design for potential thesis topics. Meets graduate 
writing requirement. 

510 Environmental Evaluation and Protection (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental Studies or consent 
of instructor. Environmental parameters (water, air, solid wastes, noise, 
radiation, etc.). Techniques in monitoring and measurement; effect on 
human health; environmental quality standards and controls. 
Demonstrations and field trips. 

520 Environmental Research and Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental Studies or consent 
of instructor. Research methods and statistics used in the field of envi- 
ronmental studies. Research tools used in such areas as environmental 
field studies, environmental experiments, social environmental impacts, 
environmental attitudes and behavior and environmental trend analy- 
sis. Use of secondary data sources and computer required. 

595T Selected Topics in Environmental Problems (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental Studies or consent 
of instructor. Various environmental topics, contemporary or historic, 
that focus on problems (e.g., law, endangered habitats, planning, global 
environmental issues, etc.) Topic chosen and outline will be circulated 
prior to registration. May be repeated four times (with different topics) 
for credit. 

596 Internship in Environmental Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental Studies or consent 
of instructor. Field experience with a governmental or private agency. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: classified status in Environmental Studies program 
and consent of instructor and program coordinator. Planning, prepara- 
tion and completion of an acceptable, interdisciplinary project. Credit 
on submission of project. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: classified status in Environmental Studies program 
and consent of instructor and program coordinator. Planning, prepara- 
tion and completion of an acceptable, interdisciplinary thesis. Credit 
on submission of thesis. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental Studies and consent 
of instructor and program coordinator. May be repeated for credit for 
a maximum of three units.. 



205 


ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

John Erickson 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

College Park 1060-2 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http:^usiness.fullerton.edu/finance 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration 
Concentration in Finance 
Master of Business Administration 


INTRODUCTION 

In choosing their coursework, students are advised (but not required) to choose one of the 
five areas (advisory tracks) of study within the finance concentration. The corporate/intemational 
financial management track is designed to provide entry-level skills for students interested in the 
financial management of a non-financial firm. The international component of this track is 
designed for students who are interested in international corporate financial management. The 
financial institutions track may lead to employment in banks or savings and loan associations. 
The investment/financial planning track is designed for students interested in positions with 
brokerage firms or financial planning firms. The insurance and financial services track is 
designed for students interested in positions with life insurance firms. The real estate track is 
designed for students interested in careers in commercial brokerage, property management, 
property development and real estate finance. Students may also combine courses from 
different advisory tracks to meet a specialized educational objective. 


Concentration in Finance 

FACULTY 

Su Chan, Carolyn Chang, Donald Crane, 
John Erickson, Joseph Greco, Tsong-Yue Lai, 
Yuming Li, Weili Lu, Yun Park, Catherine 
Richert, Zekiye Selvili, Mark Stohs, Charles 
Tu, Donald Valachi, Blaine Walgren, Ko Wang 

ADVISERS 

The Business Advising Center, Langsdorf 
Hall 731, provides information on admis- 
sions, curriculum and graduation require- 
ments, registration and grading procedures, 
residence and similar academic matters. In 
addition, advising on curriculum content and 
career opportunities may be obtained from 
the chair of the Finance Department or from: 

Financial Management 
Yun Park, Mark Stohs 

Personal Financial Planning 
Donald Crane 


Awards in Finance 

Finance Outstanding Service Award 
Finance Outstanding Student Award 
Financial Executives Award 

Peter M. Mlynaryk Outstanding Real Estate Student Award 

John Nichols Investment Trust Award 

9 ERZ/STARZ Target of Management Scholarships 

Edward D’Cunha 

Mercury Insurance Group 

Pacific Life 

Golden Eagle 

AAA 

Rims 

ISO 

Chen-da Su Insurance Award 
Prudential 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, Finance Concentration.” 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

See “Business Administration, MBA Specialist Plan” 


Real Estate 

Ko Wang, Donald Valachi 

Securities and Investments 
Tony Lai, Yuming Li 

Insurance and Financial Services 
Weili Lu 

International Finance 
Joseph Greco 


FINANCE COURSES 

Courses are designated as FIN in the class schedule. 

310 Personal Financial Management (3) 

Financial problems of the household in allocating resources and planning expenditures. 
Housing, insurance, installment buying, medical care, savings and investments. Also examines 
the special financial planning problems faced by minorities and women. (May not be used to 
fulfill the concentration requirement in finance.) 


206 


FINANCE 


320 Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Accounting 201 A. Corequisites: Info Systems/Dec Sci 
361 A and Business Admin 301. Financing business enterprises; financial 
planning and control; analysis of alternative sources and uses of combi- 
nations of short-, intermediate- and long-term debt and equity. Cost of 
capital and capital investment decisions; capital budgeting analysis and 
valuation; working capital and capital structure management; corporate 
financial decisions in an international environment. 

331 Working Capital Management and Computer Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Analysis of working capital management 
and policy. Use of available software programs and financial models in 
the management of cash and short-term securities; the management 
of accounts receivable and inventories; financial forecasting; and 
short-term financing. 

332 Theory of Corporate Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Risk and return analysis. An introduction 
to the capital asset and arbitrage pricing models. Analysis of capital 
budgeting, real options, use of capital structure, dividend policy, 
leasing, mergers and divestitures. 

335 Financial 
Analysis for Investors 
and Lenders (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 
320. Interpretation of 
financial statements 
from the perspective 
of both the financial 
analyst and the creditor. 
Emphasis on the 
economic meaning of 
financial statement data 
for the purpose of 
valuing the firm’s 
securities. 

340 Introduction to Investments (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Institutional characteristics of securities 
markets, security valuation and trading methods, fundamental and 
technical analysis, selection and management of securities, role of the 
capital asset pricing model in investing, options and futures markets, 
portfolio analysis and mutual funds. 

342 Capital and Money Markets (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Capital and money markets in the 
American and international economies; markets for new corporate 
and government issues; secondary markets; use of derivative securities 
for hedging; factors influencing yields and security prices. 

351 Introduction to Real Estate (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Real estate principles, practices and 
investment decisions. Equity investment, finance, legal aspects, practices, 
principles, property development, real estate administration in the 
public sector, real estate market analysis, and valuation. 


352 Real Estate Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Financial institutions and real estate 
credit. Sources and uses of capital (funds) in financing real estate 
transactions. Money and capital markets and their effect on credit 
availability. Emphasis on secondary mortgage markets, securitization 
and derivative securities. 

353 Real Estate Valuation (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. A comprehensive coverage of the basic 
concepts and principles of real estate valuation. Emphasis is placed on 
the use of the three approaches to valuation for the appraisal of both 
residential and income-producing properties. The role of valuation in 
real estate investment. Government regulation of appraisers. 

355 Real Estate Investment Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Alternative analytical techniques in eval- 
uating real estate investments. Tax aspects, measurement of investment 
returns, application of computer models to investment decisions. 
Lecture, discussion and case analysis of major investment types - raw 
land, apartment houses, commercial and industrial uses. 

360 Principles of Insurance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Analysis of the risk management 
process, introduction to property and liability insurance, employee 
benefits and financial planning. Overview of the insurance industry 
and insurance problems. 

370 International Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Financing problems of the multinational 
business. The international financial environment, taxation of foreign 
income, the cost of capital in international capital and money markets, 
problems of risk in foreign investments, and financial techniques for 
the operation of the multinational firm. 

371 Export-Import Financing (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Institutional arrangements, methods and 
techniques used to finance international trade. Government and finan- 
cial institution services. Risk-return aspects of international sales, 
insurance needs, the use of letters of credit, international factoring, 
accounts receivable insurance and other financing techniques. Review 
of required export-import documentation. 

373 Asia-Pacific Financial and Security Markets (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Overview of financial markets in Japan, 
Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Southeast Asia. 
Historical perspectives, regulations, more recent liberalization and 
internationalization and institutional technical aspects of the stock, 
bond, and other financial markets. 

410 Theory & Practice of Personal Financial Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Developing, implementing and monitor- 
ing comprehensive personal financial plans. Includes risk manage- 
ment, investments, taxation, retirement and estate planning, as well 
as professional practices. 



207 


FINANCE 


411 Retirement and Estate Planning (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Development of retirement objectives, 
needs and financial condition. Forecasting retirement income from 
employer based retirement plans, IRAs, insurance policies, social security, 
and investment programs. Medicare, medical, group life and health 
benefits after retirement. Property titling, wills and transfers in 
contemplation of death. 

425 Commercial Bank and Financial Institution Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. The solution of financial institution 
problems. Major financial intermediaries and the decision-making 
problems they face. Regulation and its effect on management operations. 
Group problems and case studies. 

432 Financial Forecasting and Budgeting (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 320. Forecasting in financial management; 
profit planning and control process; goals, technical procedures, and 
effects of budgeting; mechanics of forecasting and budgeting, follow 
up and control. 

433 Problems in Business Finance (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 332. Case studies. Group problems and case 
studies relating to estimation of funds requirements, long-term financial 
planning, evaluation of cash flows, financing acquisitions and mergers, 
capital budgeting and cost of capital. Team-building, leadership and 
computer-assisted presentation skills. Not applicable for graduate 
degree cedit. 

442 Advanced Investment Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 340 and Info Sys/Decision Sci 361 A. 
Securities markets and company analysis, security valuation models, 
the CAPM and the APT, option pricing, and portfolio models. Practical 
application of investment theory and recent literature will be empha- 
sized. Students may not receive credit for both Finance 442 and 541. 

444 Options and Futures (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 340. Put and call options, option pricing 
theory and models. Financial futures pricing, hedging strategies and 
models. Institutional characteristics of futures trading. Options and 
futures on stock indices. Options on futures, theoretical relationship 
between options and futures. 

454 Real Estate Market Analysis (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Factors and influences of urban growth 
and development. Economic factors and real estate supply and 
demand. Location theory and urban growth patterns. Public policy 
as a factor in real estate development. Analysis of real estate markets. 

456 Property Development and Management (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 351. Decision making in the property 
development process - from raw land to marketing and management 
of the completed product. Policy formulation and implementation, 
project feasibility analysis, financial analysis, computer assisted analysis; 
case studies. 


461 Business Property and Liability Risk Managememt (3) 

Prerequisite: Finance 360. Course covers the duties and functions of 
a corporate risk manager, the major commercial property liability lines 
including business income, general liability, commercial auto workers 
compensation, business owner insurance, and operation of property 
liability insurers. 

462 Life and Health Insurance (3) 

Prerequisite. Finance 360. Course covers the analysis of various 
types of life annuity and health insurance contracts, major employee 
benefit plans adopted by corporations and the organization and 
management of life and health insurance companies. 

495 Internship (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 332, a concentration in finance, consent of 
department internship adviser, junior standing, 2.5 GPA and one 
semester in residence at the university. Also open to international 
business majors. Planned and supervised work experience. May be 
repeated for credit up to a total of six units. Credit/No Credit only. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 320 and consent of the instructor and depart- 
ment chair. Open to undergraduate students desiring to pursue 
directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for credit. Not open 
to students on academic probation. 

517 Managerial Finance (3) 

Prerequisites: Accounting 510 and classified CBE status. The 
methodology of financial management. The primary tools for financial 
analysis, long-term investment decisions, evaluation and working 
capital management. International applications. 

523 Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or equivalent and classified CBE status. 
The analysis of the financial decision-making process through case 
studies and seminar presentations. Current financial theory and 
models. International applications. 

533 Seminar in Financial Administration (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 523 and classified CBE status. Optimal 
financing and asset administration; advanced techniques of capital 
budgeting; application of analytical methods to the administration 
of the finance function of the business firm. 

540 Seminar in Financial Markets (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or equivalent and classified CBE status. 
Structure and operation of major financial institutions; portfolio com- 
position, price-cost problems, and market behavior; analysis of financial 
intermediation and interrelation of financial institutions and markets. 

541 Seminar in Investment Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or equivalent and classified CBE status. 
Problems of investment and portfolio management; concepts of risk 
evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of interest rate movements; 
investment valuation and timing; regulation and administrative prob- 
lems of the industry. Students may not receive credit for both Finance 
442 and 541. 


208 


FINANCE 


543 Entrepreneurial Finance (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517, Accounting 510 and Accounting 511. 
This course deals with financing a new/small firm including fore- 
casting the firm’s investment needs, raising short-term funding and 
banking relationships, managing working capital, making fixed assert 
investment and managing risk. 

551 Seminar in Real Estate Investment (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or equivalent and classified CBE status. 
Problems of real estate investment; concepts of evaluation and invest- 
ment criteria; analysis of real property values; real estate development 
and financing. Case studies. 

570 Seminar in International Financial Management (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or equivalent and classified CBE status. 
The financial problems of the multinational firm. International financ- 
ing instruments, capital investment decisions, and constraints on the 
profitability of multinational businesses. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or equivalent and classified CBE status, 
consent of instructor and approval by Department Chair. Directed 
independent inquiry. Not open to students on academic probation. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisites: Finance 517 or equivalent and classified CBE status, 
consent of instructor and approval by Department Chair and Associate 
Dean. May be repeated for credit. Not open to students on academic 
probation. 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

William Lloyd 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Humanities 420A 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://geography. fullerton.edu/ 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in Geography 
Minor in Geography 
Master of Arts in Geography 

FACULTY 

John Carroll, Mark Drayse, Wayne 
Engstrom, Deborah Feder, Gary Hannes, 
William Lloyd, Jon Taylor, Robert Voeks, 
Barbara Weightman, Robert Young 

ADVISERS 

Undergraduate: Wayne Engstrom 
Graduate: Barbara Weightman 


INTRODUCTION 

Geography is the study of the earth as the home of humanity. Geography provides a broad 
understanding of the processes that unite people, places and environments. Geographers explore 
the diverse regions of the contemporary world in pursuit of global understanding. They tie 
together the study of human spatial organizations and cultural landscapes with an in-depth 
investigation of the earths landforms, climates and vegetation. Their methods range from field- 
work in foreign areas to advanced information technologies like computerized geographic 
information systems. Geography graduates find rewarding careers in environmental analysis and 
planning, business, government agencies and education. 

International Learning Opportunities in Geography 

The Department of Geography is strongly committed to providing students with an interna- 
tional perspective. Geography 100 Global Geography offers a broad overview of the major 
countries and regions of the earth. Upper-division courses in Latin America (Geography 333), 
Europe (Geography 336), Asia (Geography 340) and Africa (Geography 344) offer an opportunity 
for in-depth study of specific regions. Finally, many other courses (Geography 120 - Global 
Environmental Problems and Geography 360 Geography of the Worlds Economics, for 
example), include a strong international emphasis. In recent years, members of the geography 
faculty have conducted fieldwork in Asia, South America and Europe. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

Credential Information 

The bachelor’s degree in geography may be effectively combined with subject matter studies 
necessary for either the multiple subject teaching credential (K-8) or single subject credential 
(7-12) in social studies. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the Center for Careers in 
Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course 
selections for general education, the major and electives. With careful planning, it may be 
possible to enter the credential program in the senior year of the bachelor’s degree. Postgraduate 
students should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the School of Education 
(714-278-3411) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Geography requires a minimum of 120 units which includes courses 
for the major, General Education, all University requirements, and free electives. 

The major consists of at least 39 units of geography, of which at least 2 1 units must be in 
upper-division courses. Students may satisfy some requirements with equivalent course work 
taken at other institutions. Each course counted toward the major must be completed with 
a grade of C or higher. Students are encouraged to take additional geography courses beyond 
the minimum required for the major. 

Career Emphasis 

Geography graduates often find employment in such areas as environmental planning and 
related technical fields. For this reason, an optional upper-division emphasis in environmental 
analysis is available within the major. 

Major in Geography 

The major consists of a total of 39 units of course work. 


210 


GEOGRAPHY 


Lower- Division Core (15 units) 


Geography 100 Global Geography 

Geography 110 Physical Geography 

Geography 160 Human Geography 

Geography 281 Map Making with GIS 

Three additional units from courses numbered 280 to 289. 


Environmental Geography (3 units) 

Geography 329 Cities and Nature 

OR Geography 350 Nature and Society 

Human Geography (3 units) 

Geography 357 Spatial Behavior 

OR Geography 360 Geography of the World’s Economies 
OR Geography 370 Cities and Suburbs 

Physical Geography (3 units) 

Geography 312 Geomorphology 

OR Geography 323 Weather and Climate 
OR Geography 325 Natural Vegetation 

Regional Geography (3 units) 

Three units from courses numbered 330 to 349. 


Geography 478 Urban Planning Principles 
Geography 488 Land Use Analysis 

Units earned from the capstone course can be used to satisfy the 
Advanced Geography or Geography Elective requirements of the 
Geography Major. 


EMPHASIS IN ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS 

The emphasis consists of a total of 39 units of course work. 

Lower-Division Core (15 units) 

Geography 100 Global Geography 

Geography 110 Physical Geography 

Geography 160 Human Geography 

Geography 281 Map Making with GIS 

Three additional units from courses numbered 280 to 289. 

Environmental Geography (3 units) 

Geography 350 Nature and Society 


Human Geography (3 units) 

Geography 357 Spatial Behavior 

OR Geography 360 Geography of the World’s Economies 
OR Geography 370 Cities and Suburbs 



Advanced Geography 
(6 units) 

Six units from 
courses numbered 400 
to 489. 

Geography Elective 
(3 units) 

Three units lower or 
upper-division geogra- 
phy not used to satisfy 
any other requirement. 

Upper-Division Writing 
Requirement (3 units) 



English 301 Advanced 
College Writing 

OR English 360 
Scientific and 
Technical Writing 


Capstone Requirement 

Prior to graduation, each student must demonstrate a critical under- 
standing of the major processes that shape the earth’s landscapes, 
regions and places, and that influence human interaction with the 
eanh’s cultural and physical environments. This requirement will be 
met through satisfactory completion of one of the following capstone 
courses: 


Geography 422 
Geography 425 
Geography 426 
Geography 475 


Regional Climatology’ 

Tropical Rainforests 
The Coastal Environment 
Interpretation of Urban Landscapes 


Physical Geography (6 units) 

Geography 329 Cities and Nature 

OR Geography 312 Geomorphology 
OR Geography 323 Weather and Climate 
OR Geography 325 Natural Vegetation 
Regional Geography (3 units) 

Three units from geography courses numbered 330 to 347. 
Advanced Geography (6 units) 

Six units from Geography 422, Geography 425, Geography 426, 
Geography 482, or Geography 488. 


Upper-Division Writing Requirement (3 units) 

English 301 Advanced College Writing 

OR English 360 Scientific and Technical Writing 


Capstone Requirement 

Prior to graduation, each student must demonstrate a critical under- 
standing of the major processes that shape the earth’s landscapes, 
regions and place, and that influence human interaction with the 
earth’s cultural and physical environments. This requirement will be 
met through satisfactory completion of one of the following capstone 
courses: 

Geography 422 Regional Climatology 

Geography 425 Tropical Rainforests 


Geography 426 The Coastal Environment 
Geography 488 Land Use Analysis 

Units earned from the capstone course can be used to satisfy the 
Advanced Geography requirement of the Emphasis in Environmental 
Analysis. 


211 


GEOGRAPHY 


MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

The minor in geography serves students seeking a geographic 
perspective to complement their major. Interested students should take 
at least 21 units of geography, including Geography 100 and three 
units from the following (110, 120, 160, 170 or 281) and a minimum 
of 12 units of upper-division work. All courses counted toward the 
minor must be completed with a grade of C or higher. Faculty advisers 
are available to help students structure their minor in geography. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

This program provides advanced study in human and physical 
geography with an emphasis on theory and research. Graduates are 
prepared in the application of interpretive and analytical concepts and 
techniques to a broad spectrum of geographic situations. Such study 
directly serves those whose careers involve urban, regional, and envi- 
ronmental planning and geographic education. Geographic perspectives 
and methods are highly applicable to a wide range of careers in business, 
industry and government. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/ 

Admission and Conditional Classification 

The department requires a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in the 
last 60 semester units attempted and a 3.0 grade-point average in all 
geography courses. 

Students who have no, or a limited, background in geography will 
be expected to make up the deficit by taking appropriate course work 
in consultation with the depanmental graduate adviser. 

All students are required to demonstrate competency in each of 
geography^ four main subfields: human, physical, regional and techni- 

i 

cal. Competency is normally demonstrated by completion of at least 18 
units at the upper-division or graduate level with a 3.0 grade-point 
average. 

Graduate Standing: Classified 

After completion of all prerequisites and removal of deficiencies, 
the student must develop an approved study plan in consultation with 
a personal faculty adviser and the graduate program adviser in order 
to be classified. 

All students must complete six units of upper-division technical 
courses. Three units are prerequisite to classified standing. If the 
remaining three units were not taken as undergraduate work, they 
may be included in the study plan. 

Study Plan 

The study plan consists of 30 units of course work distributed as 
follows: 

Required Courses 

Geography 500 Seminar in Geographic Research (3) 

Geography 520 Seminar in Physical Geography (3) 

Geography 550 Seminar in Human Geography (3) 


Geography 500-level course (3) 

Geography 599 Independent Graduate Research (3) 

Electives ( 12-15 units) 

Senior-level or graduate course work in geography (15 units unless 
approved for thesis; may include additional Geography 500-level 
courses; up to six units from related fields). 

Thesis or Comprehensive Exam (0-3 units) 

Geography 598 Thesis (3) (department approval required) 

Students must follow one of two plans: Plan A requiring a compre- 
hensive examination or Plan B requiring a thesis. 

Plan A requires the development of a specific field of interest and 
a written, three-part comprehensive exam testing knowledge in human 
geography, physical geography, and the student’s specified area of 
interest. The examination may be repeated only once. Plan B requires 
the development of a specific field of interest, a written thesis, and 
a subsequent oral defense. 

All students will follow Plan A unless approval for the thesis option 
is granted. In order to follow Plan B, the thesis option, students must 
have the written consent of their thesis supervisor and all members of 
a thesis committee. Permission to write a thesis may be granted only to 
students who have (1) achieved a 3.25 grade-point average after 15 
units of upper-division and graduate course work and (2) demonstrated 
proficiency in research and writing skills. 

For further details or advisement, communicate with the 
Department of Geography graduate program adviser. 

GEOGRAPHY COURSES 

Courses are designated as GEOG in the class schedule. 

100 Global Geography (3) 

Introduction to world’s geographical regions. Cultural patterns and 
their evolution in diverse physical environments. 

110 Physical Geography (3) 

Introduction to the major components of the physical environment 
including landforms, climate, natural vegetation and soils. (CAN 
GEOG 2) 

120 Global Environmental Problems (3) 

A geographical analysis of the Earths principal environmental 
problems. Subjects include population growth, agriculture and pesticides, 
climate change, forestry and fishing, energy, endangered species, and 
appropriate development. 

160 Human Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. An 
Introduction to Human Geography. Understanding the regional distrib- 
ution of language, religion, population, migration and settlement 
patterns, political organization, technology, methods of livelihood 
over the earth. (CAN GEOG 4) 

170 Southern California Metropolis (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.C.l. 
Geographic variations across Southern California; patterns of urban 
and suburban growth; interaction between the region’s developed and 
natural environments; comparisons between metropolitan Los Angeles 
and other great world cities. 


212 


GEOGRAPHY 


280A Interpretation of Maps & Aerial Photographs (1) 

Prerequisite: minimum of one other core course in geography 
(i.e., 1 10 or 160) or consent of instructor. The uses of maps and aerial 
photographs in geographic research. Types of data which can be 
obtained from these sources. Rudimentary measurement techniques. 

280C Introduction to Quantitative Methods (1) 

Prerequisite: minimum of one other core course in geography 
(i.e., 1 10 or 160) or consent of instructor. Descriptive statistics in 
geography. Graphs, functions and equations, logarithms and expo- 
nents, and an overview of the linear regression model. 

280G Analysis of Weather Maps (1) 

Prerequisite: minimum of one other core course in geography 
(i.e., 1 10 or 160) or consent of instructor. The use and analysis of 
weather maps. 

281 Map Making with Geographic Information Systems (3) 

The principles and practice of effective map making using computerized 
geographic information systems technology. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours 
laboratory) 

312 Geomorphology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 110, Geology 101, or consent of instructor. 
Landforms and the processes responsible for their evolution. 

323 Weather and Climate (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 110 or consent of instructor. Atmospheric 
elements and controls, fronts, severe weather, and climatic classification 
systems. 

325 Natural Vegetation (3) 

Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. The geography of the globe’s 
natural vegetation associations. Examines the role of plate tectonics, 
climate, soils, fire and humans as agents of landscape-level vegetation 
change. 

329 Cities and Nature (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 1 10 or consent of instructor. Overview 
of the impact of urbanization on land forms, climate, vegetation, and 
animals. Planning implications and case studies. 

330 California Landscapes (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. The landscapes of 
California, their environmental characteristics, development patterns 
and current problems. 

332 United States and Canada (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.l. 

The United States and Canada. The interrelated physical and cultural 
features that give geographic personality to the regions. 

333 Latin America (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III.C.l. 
Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Explores 
the region’s physical and cultural landscapes. Emphasis on nature- 
society problems. 


336 Europe (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. The basic physical and 
human lineaments of Europe. The elements that distinguish and give 
character to its major regional divisions. 

340 Asia (3) 

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and completion of the 
General Education category III.C.l. The physical, human and regional 
geography of Asia from Pakistan and India through Southeast Asia and 
the Malay Archipelago to China, Japan and Korea. 

344 Africa (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. The physical, human and 
regional geography of Africa. Saharan borderlands, East Africa and 
Southern Africa. 

350 Nature and Society (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of General Education Category III.C.l 
and junior or senior standing. An exploration of the interface between 
human systems and natural systems. The course covers a variety of 
factors affecting human interaction with the earth, including environ- 
mental ethics, public policy and technology. 

352 The National Parks (3) 

The park system and its evolution as related to conservation, 
preservation, and recreational land use. Cultural heritage and physical 
environment. 

357 Spatial Behavior (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. A geographic approach to 
perception an behavior in local and global spatial settings. 

360 Geography of the World’s Economies (3) 

Geographic perspectives on the global production of goods and 
services and their distribution to consumers. An exploration of key 
geographic issues in uneven development, international trade, invest- 
ment patterns, and the spatial integration of local and regional economies. 

370 Cities and Suburbs (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. American metropolitan 
systems and city-region linkages. Theories and spatial models of social 
and economic patterns within cities and suburbs; planning implications 
of these locational patterns. 

422 Regional Climatology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 323 or consent of instructor. Major climatic 
regions of the world; the physical factors that produce climatic patterns. 

425 Tropical Rainforests (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 110 and Geography 325 or equivalent. 
Discussion/ seminar examining the geography, ecology, and human use 
of tropical rainforests. Focus on the causes and consequences of defor- 
estation, sustainable development, and preservation. 

426 The Coastal Environment (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 110 and one upper-division physical geog- 
raphy course. An overview of coastal geomorphology, climatology, and 
plant geography with an emphasis on Southern California. Human 
interaction, modification, and management of those systems. 


213 


GEOGRAPHY 


452 Ecotourism (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. Evolution and distribu- 
tion of nature-based tourism. The role of ecotourism in regional 
development and environmental conservation. Focus on sociocultural 
impacts in less developed countries. 

475 Interpretation of Urban Landscapes (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 357 or 370 and consent of instructor. 

A geographic view of the city as a landscape composite of structure, 
space, place and experience. Emphasis is on the European and North 
American city. 

478 Urban Planning Principles (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 370, Poli Sci 320, or consent of instructor. 
Seminar/discussion on the conceptual themes and legal foundations of 
American urban planning. Policy areas associated with urbanization 
and suburbanization processes: land use, economic development, 
redevelopment, housing systems, neighborhood dynamics and growth 
management. (Same as Poli Sci 478) 

481 Geographic Information Systems: Introduction (3) 

Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. Methods and applications 
of computer-assisted mapping and geographic information systems. 
Instructional fee. (2 hours discussion, 3 hours lab) 

482 Environmental Impact Assessment (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 350, 431, 478, or equivalent. Techniques 
relevant to environmental impact assessment in accord with CEQA 
(state) and NEPA (federal) regulations. Systematic evaluation of major 
environmental impact topics. Individual and small team activities. 

484 Urban Planning Methods (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 478 or Poli Sci 478. Seminar and Practicum 
on methods in urban planning. Analytical techniques and basic data 
sources. Population forecasting, housing surveys, economic develop- 
ment, fiscal impacts and area revitalization. Individual and team 
projects. (Same as Political Science 484) 

485 Geographic Information Systems: Principles 
and Applications (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 481 or equivalent. Integrated computer- 
assisted methods for handling spatial data, including database design, 
data conversion and updating, information retrieval, analysis, modeling 
and mapping. Instructional fee. 

486 Environmental Remote Sensing (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 481 or consent of instructor. This course 
covers the fundamentals of remote sensing science and digital image 
processing. Focus on remote sensing principles and the processing 
and interpretation of remotely sensed data using image processing 
techniques and software. 


488 Land Use Analysis (3) 

Prerequisites: junior, senior, or graduate standing and consent of 
instructor. Urban and rural land use and settlement; geographic field 
problems. Application of geographic techniques and tools to local field 
studies. 

495 Internship in Applied Geography (1-3) 

Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of instructor. Students 
work specified number of hours in appropriate public or private orga- 
nizations under the supervision of their staff and as coordinated by 
departmental faculty. Interns meet with instructor by arrangement. 

May be repeated for a maximum of three units of credit. 

499 Independent Study (1-3) 

Prerequisite: senior standing. Consent of instructor under whom 
study will be taken required before enrolling. May be repeated for 
a maximum of six units of credit. 

500 Seminar in Geographic Research (3) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor. A required 
seminar to be taken prior to the development of a thesis. 

520 Seminar in Physical Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Research in 
physical geography: methods and contemporary themes. Case studies 
in climatology, geomorphology, and plant geography. 

530T Seminar: Selected Topics in Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Various 
topics selected from any of the subfields of geography. The topic 
chosen and a general outline of the seminar are circulated prior 
to registration. May be repeated for credit. 

550 Seminar in Human Geography (3) 

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Survey of 
methodology and case studies including: experiential environments; 
rural landscapes; urban, social, and economic structure; Geography 
and public policy; and Third World development. 

575 Landscape Interpretation (3) 

Prerequisite: Geography 357, 475, or equivalent. A humanistic 
approach to the nature and meaning of landscape. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: Geography 500 and consent of adviser. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: completion of Geography 500, advancement to 
candidacy and consent of instructor. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Open to graduate students by consent of instructor. May be 
repeated for credit. 


214 


GEOGRAPHY 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

John H. Foster 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

McCarthy Hall 254 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Science in Geology 
Minor in Geology 
Master of Science in Geology 
Emphasis in Geochemistry 

(under Master of Science in Chemistry) 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://geology. fullerton.edu 

FACULTY 

Phillip Armstrong, David Bowman, Gerald 
Brem, Gaylen R. Carlson, Diane Clemens- 
Knott, Matthew Kirby, Jeff Knott, Richard L. 
Laton, John Foster, Brady Rhodes, Prem Saint 


INTRODUCTION 

Geological sciences is the study of Earth through time, including its physical nature, chemical 
composition and dynamics, as well as its origin and evolution. In addition to the quest for 
understanding the way Earth works and its relation to the solar system, geological scientists are 
involved in the search for energy, mineral and water resources, the evaluation and remediation 
of environmental hazards, and the prevention and/or prediction of natural disasters such as 
earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, coastal erosion, and floods. About 60% of all 
geological scientists are employed by private industry, primarily by engineering, environmental, 
petroleum and mining companies. Others are employed by government agencies, educational 
institutions and research centers. 

The department has seven major areas of study within the general fields of geological sciences: 
geology, geochemistry (the integration of geology and chemistry), geophysics (the integration 
of geology and physics), hydrogeology (the integration of geology with fresh water systems), 
engineering geology (the integration of geology and engineering), Quaternary geology (multidis- 
ciplinary study of earth’s recent past), and environmental geology (multidisciplinary study of 
Earths surface). All are designed to develop an appreciation and understanding of Earth 
as well as to prepare students for (1) graduate studies in the geological sciences, (2) employment 
in industry or government, and (3) teaching. 

Evening Program 

The department offers an evening and weekend program of courses that satisfies requirements 
for the major with the exception of the field camps. Consult the department for details. 

Internships 

The department offers an internship program through Geological Sciences 495. This allows 
the student to obtain on-the-job experience in the geological sciences. Three units maximum are 
permitted toward the degree. 


ADVISERS 

Geology students must be advised before 
or immediately upon entering the major in 
order to design an efficient course progression 
that will meet their objectives. While 
enrolled, students must meet with an adviser 
each semester prior to registration for the fol- 
lowing semester. The adviser will assist in 
scheduling of courses, selection of courses, 
and solving problems should any arise. To be 
advised, students should contact the depart- 
ment office for available advisers. Special 
advisers are available for: Geochemistry 
Emphasis, M.S. in Chemistry (Gene Hiegel, 
Department of Chemistry; Gerald Brem, 
Department of Geological Sciences); Earth 
Science Education (Gaylen Carlson, 
Department of Geological Sciences). 


Recommended Program in General Education 

The department maintains a list of preferred general education courses. A copy can be 
obtained by contacting the department office. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY 

Of the 132 units required for graduation, a minimum of 48 are in geological sciences, 34 to 
37 in related fields, and 39 in general education courses (other than related fields). The remain- 
ing 8 to 1 1 undesignated units are selected to meet particular needs of each student. To qualify 
for the B.S. degree, students must have a C or better in all geological sciences courses applied 
towards the 48 unit requirement; in addition, students must have a C average in required courses 
in related fields. A proficiency in a modem foreign language, or a computer language, is 
recommended for students who plan to continue in graduate school. Proficiency in English 
composition is required. 

Minimum Course Requirements for the Major 

Geol Sciences 101, 10 1L Physical Geology (3,1) 

Geol Sciences 201 Earth History (4) 

Geol Sciences 303A Mineralogy and Introduction to Petrology (4) 

Geol Sciences 303B Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4) 


215 


GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 


Geol Sciences 32 1 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4) 
Geol Sciences 360 Structural Geology (4) 

Geol Sciences 380 Geologic Field Techniques (4) 

Geol Sciences 401 Writing in the Geosciences (3) 

Geol Sciences 436 Introduction to Applied Geophysics (3) 
OR Geol Sciences 406 Geochemistry (3) 

Geol Sciences 481 A Geology Field Camp l (4) 

Geol Sciences 498 Senior Thesis (1-2) 


Adviser-approved Upper-Division Geological Sciences Electives 
(8-9 units) 

No more than 3 units from any combination of Geol Sciences 493, 
495, 496L and 499L can be counted toward meeting this 8-9 unit 
requirement. 

(Note: Geol Sciences 310T, 376 and 420 are not accepted as credit 
toward meeting requirements for the major.) 

Minimum Requirements in Related Fields 
(Nine courses required, 34-37 units) 

Biological Science 101 Elements of Biology (3) 

OR 131 Principles of Biology (3) 

OR a life science course from another institution that is acceptable 
to CSUF and that demonstrates treatment of whole-organism- 
biology and concepts of evolution and ecology. 

Chemistry 120A and 120B General Chemistry (5,5) 

Computer Sci 103 Introduction to Personal Computer Applications (3) 
OR Computer Sci 121 Programming Concepts (4) 

OR Engineering 205 Digital Computation (3) 

OR Geography 481 Automated Cartography (3) 

Mathematics 150A and 150B Analytical Geometry and Calculus (4,4). 
Physics 225, 225L Fundamental Physics - Mechanics (3,1) 
and either 

226, 226L Fundamental Physics - Electricity & Magnetism (3,1) 

OR 227, 227L Fundamental Physics - Waves, Optics & Modem 
Physics (3,1). 

Alternatively, 211, 211L, 212, 212L Elementary Physics (3, 1,3,1), 
with consent of adviser. 

One additional semester course selected with approval of adviser 
from courses such as the following: 

Biology: 316, 401, 406, 419, 461 

Chemistry: 301A, 315, 325, 361A 

Computer Science: 203, 241 

Engineering: 102, 202, 301, 324, 436, 441 

Geography: 312, 481, 485 

Mathematics: 250A, 250B, 338 

Physics: 226, 226L, 227, 227L, 310, 320, 330 

Science- or Engineering-based transferable extension certificate courses 
from other universities. 


Undesignated Units (8-11 units required) 

These are to be taken in geological sciences, related fields and/or 
career-supporting fields, with adviser approval. 

General Education (39 units required, other than related fields) 

See University catalog and consult your adviser for proper course 
selection. 

MINOR IN GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

A minimum of 20 units in geological sciences courses, of which 
at least 12 must be upper-division and at least 6 of these 12 must be 
taken in residence, is required for a minor. The courses shall be 
selected by the student in consultation with an adviser. Prospective 
teachers should include courses in physical geology, earth history, 
meteorology, oceanography, mineralogy and petrology. Geological 
Sciences 140, 310 and 376 are not acceptable as part of the 20 units. 

CREDENTIAL PROGRAM 

The bachelor’s degree in Geology may be effectively combined 
with subject matter studies necessary for the single subject teaching 
credential in science. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with 
the department adviser and/or the Center for Careers in Teaching 
(714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan 
efficient course selections for general education, the major and elec- 
tives. Postbaccalaureate students need to contact the Admission to 
Teacher Education office in the School of Education (714-278-341 1) 
to obtain information on attending an overview presentation and 
orientation and then contact the department credential adviser. 

EMPHASIS IN GEOCHEMISTRY 

Offered jointly by the Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry 
and Geological Sciences. Contact the graduate program adviser in the 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry for further information. 

GEOLGICAL SCIENCES COURSES 

For all courses, prerequisites may be waived if the instructor is 
satisfied that the student is qualified to take the course. 

All lower-division (100-200 level) courses are offered each semester. 
The department offers Geological Sciences 303A, 32 1 , and 380 each 
fall, and Geological Sciences 303B, 360, 335, and 401 each spring 
Geological Sciences 481 A is offered each summer, and the remaining 
courses are offered on a three- to four-semester rotation. A schedule 
of projected class offerings is available from the department. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY 

The program is based on the assumption that every geologist must 
have a thorough knowledge of fundamental geologic principles and 
that this knowledge must be rooted in field- and laboratory-based 
experiences. No matter how graduating students may choose to apply 
this knowledge, the sound geologic basis provided by the master of 
science degree will enable them to meet new intellectual challenges 
in their future professional or academic careers. The program is suffi- 
ciently flexible to meet a student's interest in the application of geology 
to the solution of environmental, hydrogeologic or engineering geologic 
problems facing our society. 


216 


GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 


The program is designed to prepare students for (a) employment 
in all fields of geology, (b) teaching at the elementary, secondary and 
community college levels, and/or (c) doctoral study in the geosciences 
or related fields. 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission, 
which include a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution, 
and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 (4.0) in the last 60 semester 
units attempted (see catalog section on Graduate Admissions for com- 
plete statement and procedures). In addition, acceptance into this 
program in a classified standing is contingent upon the following: 

(1) a bachelors degree in geology at Cal State Fullerton or another 
accredited institution with a grade-point average of 3.0 in geology 
courses (which must include a minimum of 8 semester units of field 
geology) and a 2.5 grade-point-average in related science and mathe- 
matics courses; or, in the case of a bachelor’s degree in a related area, 
a selection of science courses deemed as adequate preparation for 
further study in geology by the Department Graduate Committee; 

(2) satisfactory performance on the Graduate Record Examination 
Aptitude Test; (3) two letters of recommendation; (4) completion 
of the departmental application; and (5) availability of faculty and 
resources in the student’s stated area of interest. 

Students with limited subject or grade deficiencies may be consid- 
ered for conditional acceptance into the program if they meet all other 
departmental and university requirements. Conditionally classified 

graduate standing may 
be removed upon 
completion of nine 
units of adviser- and 
graduate- committee- 
approved postgraduate 
studies in geology, 
mathematics, chemistry 
or physics, with grades 
of B or better. 

Students with a 
degree in a related 
field and/or substantial 
subject deficiencies are encouraged to apply. Such applicants may be 
accepted to the university as unclassified post-baccalaureate students 
if they meet the university requirements. An unclassified student may 
later qualify for admission to conditionally classified standing by com- 
pleting all courses recommended by the Department Graduate 
Committee, and by maintaining a 3.0 grade-point-average in geology 
and a 2.5 grade-point-average in related science and mathematics 
courses. 

Application Deadlines 

Financial aid (teaching and research assistantships) are ordinarily 
awarded only to fall semester applicants. Students who wish to be con- 
sidered for financial aid must have their application received by 
February 15 for admission to the following fall semester. 

All other applications need to be postmarked no later than March 
1st for the fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. 


However, deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment projec- 
tions. Check the university graduate studies website for current infor- 
mation at http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate/. 

Classified Standing 

Students should achieve classified graduate standing as soon as they 
are eligible, since no more than nine units of graduate work taken 
before classification can be included on the study plan for the degree 
(see below). Students may apply for classified standing when they (1) 
have met all university and departmental admission requirements, and 
(2) have filed a study plan approved by the adviser, the Department 
Graduate Committee, and the Associate Vice President of Academic 
Programs. 

Students must meet the Graduate Level Writing Requirement as 
described in this catalog under “Graduate Regulations”. Students will 
meet this requirement by taking Geology 501A,B Research Methods 
in Geology. 

Advancement Advanced to Candidacy 

Advancement to candidacy is attained by applying for graduation 
and receiving a recommendation by the Department Graduate 
Committee. 

Study Plan 

A study plan must contain a minimum of 31 units and be approved 
by the Graduate Advisor. At least 2 1 units must be at the graduate 
level; a maximum of 9 units may be 400 level. A minimum grade-point 
average for courses satisfying the study plan is 3.0. The study plan 
must consist of the following: 

Required Courses (13 units) 

Geol 500 Advanced Concepts in Geology (4) 

Geol 501 A,B Research Methods in Geology (1,1) 

Geol 590 Graduate Seminar (1) 

Geol 598 Thesis (3) 

Geol 599L Independent Graduate Research (3) 

An oral defense of the thesis is required. 

Breadth Courses (3-6 units) 

400- or 500-level course offered by departments outside of 
Geological Sciences. Courses may be taken from departments 
or programs such as, but not restricted to, Biology, Chemistry and 
Biochemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Geography, Civil Engineering 
or Environmental Studies. Course selection will be dependent 
on student’s academic objectives and must be approved by the 
Graduate/ Thesis Adviser. 

Focus Courses in Applied Geology (12-15 units) 

Adviser-approved 400- or 500-level courses offered by the depart- 
ment. Course selection will be dependent on students academic 
objectives. 



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COURSES IN GEOLOGY 

101 Physical Geology (3) 

Prerequisite: high school chemistry or physics, or equivalent. The 
physical nature of the planet Earth, the genesis of rocks and minerals, 
erosion processes and their effects. (101 & 101L=CAN GEOL 2) 

10 1H Physical Geology (Honors) (3) 

Prerequisite: high school chemistry or physics, or equivalent. The 
physical nature of planet Earth, the genesis of rocks and minerals, 
erosion processes and their effects, (weekend field trips) 

101 L Physical Geology Laboratory (1) 

Corequisite: Geological Sciences 101. Laboratory on minerals, 
rocks, earthquakes, and map and aerial photographic interpretation. 

(3 hours laboratory or field trip) (101 & 101L=CAN GEOL 2) 

101LH Physical Geology Laboratory (Honors) (1) 

Corequisite: Geological Sciences 101 or 101H. Laboratory on 
minerals, rocks, earthquakes, and map and aerial photographic inter- 
pretation. (3 hours laboratory and weekend field trips) 

102 Earth and Astronomical Science for Future Elementary 
Teachers (3) 

Designated especially for the prospective elementary school teacher, 
this activity-based course will examine fundamental Earth/astronomical 
science concepts and the potential impacts of natural hazards on 
ecosystems on planet Earth. 

105 Field Experiences in California Geology (1) 

Prerequisite: Geology 101. Students will participate in three field 
trips that will examine the rich geology of California. Students will 
read and discuss topical papers and make presentations on selected 
topics. Weekend field trips are required. 

140 Earth’s Atmosphere (3) 

The composition, structure and circulation of the atmosphere; the 
origins of storms and other weather disturbances. 

201 Earth History (4) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101, 10 1L. Evolution of Earth 
as interpreted from rocks, fossils and geologic structures. Plate tecton- 
ics provides a unifying theme for consideration of mountain building, 
evolution of life and ancient environments. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory, field trips) (CAN GEOL 4) 

303A Mineralogy and Introduction to Petrology (4) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101, 101L, Chemistry 120A; 
Prerequisite or co-requisite: Geological Sciences 201. Crystallography; 
origin, occurrence, composition and identification of minerals with 
emphasis on minerals in rocks. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory, 
field trips) 

303B Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 120B; Geological Sciences 303A, 380; 
Computer Science 103. Description, classification, occurrence and 
origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours 
laboratory, field trips) 


305 Earthquake Impact on Structures (3) 

(Same as EGCE 305) 

310T Topics in California-Related Geology (1-3) 

Directed investigations of one aspect of earth science. Alternating 
topics are: geology of national parks, California geology, ocean off 
California, California earthquakes, geological hazards of California, 
and California gems and minerals. May be repeated for credit with 
a different topic. (3 hours lecture for 5, 10, or 15 weeks; optional 
field trips) 

321 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 201, 303B, 380; Computer 
Science 103. Textural, mineralogic properties of sediments used in 
discrimination of depositional conditions, environments, classification 
of sedimentary rocks, study of stratigraphic patterns. (2 hours lecture, 

6 hours laboratory, field trips) 

322 Principles of Paleontology (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 201; Biology 101 or 261 or 
equivalent. The groups of organisms that have left an important fossil 
record. Taxonomy, morphology and systematics, biostratigraphy, pale- 
oecology, and evolutionary trends. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, 
field trips) 

333 General Oceanography (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101, 10 1L and upper-division 
standing. The chemical, physical and geological nature of the oceans. 

(2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips) 

335 General Hydrology (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101; Mathematics 150A. Nature, 
occurrence, movement of surface and groundwater. Rainfall/runoff 
relation, floods, aquifer evaluation, and water quality investigation. 

(2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips) 

340 General Meteorology (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101; Mathematics 150A; Physics 
225, 225L or 211, 21 1L. Atmospheric processes, composition and 
structure. Radiation, thermodynamics of moist air, precipitation 
mechanisms, atmospheric dynamics. Map analysis and use of 
thermodynamic diagrams. 

355 Earth's Interior (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101; Mathematics 150A; Physics 
225, 225L or 211, 21 1L; Chemistry 120A or equivalent. Geophysical, 
geochemical properties of mantle and core. Data collection techniques. 
Impact of internal processes on crustal/surface phenomena. 

360 Structural Geology (4) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 380; Mathematics 125; Computer 
Science 103. Faults, folds, mechanics of rock deformation, and elemen- 
tary tectonics; solution of problems by geometric, trigonometric and 
stereographic analysis. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips) 


218 


GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 


375 Engineering Geology (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 380; Mathematics 150A; Physics 
225, 225L or 21 1, 21 1L. Engineering properties of rocks and soils; 
exploration techniques; analysis of geological science principles applic- 
able to engineering problems; report preparation and professional 
responsibility. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips) 

376 Applied Geology (3) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 130, 135 or 150A; Geological Sciences 
101 and one semester university-level physics recommended. Geology 
applied to engineering works. Earth materials, processes; site evaluation 
techniques; geologic hazard analysis; case histories. (2 hours lecture, 

3 hours laboratory, field trips) 

380 Geologic Field Techniques (4) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 201; English 101; trigonometry; 
Computer Science 103 or equivalent recommended. Brunton compass 
use, measurement of stratigraphic sections, principles of topographic 
maps and aerial photographs and use in geologic mapping, geologic 
map preparation, columnar sections, cross sections and technical 
reports. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours field, weekends) 

401 Writing in the Geosciences (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 201 and 380; must be taken 
before Geological Sciences 481 A. Preparation of publication-quality 
geoscience reports. Emphasis on writing clearly and concisely for 
a technical audience. Exercises include literature research using 
electronic databases, critical evaluation of published literature, 
original analysis of field data. Written and oral assignments. 

(6 hours activity; field trips) 

404 Optical Mineralogy and Petrography (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 303B. Principles of optical 
mineralogy. Use of petrographic microscope to analyze minerals and 
textures of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. (1 hour 
lecture, 6 hours laboratory/field trip) 

406 Geochemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 303B and 321, Chemistry 120B, 
Mathematics 150B. Basic chemical and thermodynamic principles 
applied to the origin and alteration of igneous, sedimentary and 
metamorphic rocks and economic mineral deposits. 

420 Earth Science for Science Teachers (4) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101 and 10 1L plus upper-division 
standing or science teaching credential. Major concepts of the earth 
sciences with primary emphasis on physical and planetary geology and 
secondary emphasis on meteorology and oceanography. (3 hours of 
lecture, 3 hours of laboratory, field trips) 

423 Advanced Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 303A and 32 1 . Case histories 
from literature illustrate concepts, methods, and results in sedimentology/ 
stratigraphy analysis. Field and lab work center around student 
research on actual problems; research to culminate in paper with 
professional format. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips) 


436 Hydrogeology (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 335, 360, 456, or equivalent. 
Occurrence, movement and utilization of groundwater resources; 
geological, geophysical and hydrological methods for groundwater 
exploration and development. Well hydraulics and ground-water 
contamination. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips) 

437 Water Quality Investigations and Control (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 335; Chemistry 120B. Methods 
in sampling strategy. Evaluation of chemical data for quantitative 
interpretation of water quality status and trends in surface and ground 
water. Techniques for graphic representation, water contamination 
source identification and control. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, 
field trips) 

455 Earthquake Seismology (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101; Physics 225, 225L or 211, 

21 1L, Mathematics 150A. Seismic waves, their recording and measure- 
ment. Estimation of earthquake source strength, location and mechanism. 
Introduction to seismic risk and strong motion studies. (3 hours 
lecture, field trips) 

456 Introduction to Applied Geophysics (3) 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 150B; Physics 225, 225L or 211, 21 1L; 
Physics 226, 226L or 212, 21 2L recommended. Seismic refraction, 
gravity, magnetic and electrical techniques and fundamentals as applied 
to determination of subsurface structure, groundwater and location of 
mineral resources. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips) 

460 Regional Tectonics (3) 

Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 303B, 360; Geological Sciences 
321 as prerequisite or corequisite. Discussion of recent literature 
on plate tectonics, tectonics of the world’s major orogenic belts, and 
tectonics of California. (3 hours lecture, Spring-recess field trip) 

470 Environmental Geology & Planning (4) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101, 101L or Geological Sciences 
420; 401. Geologic processes, hazards, mineral and energy resources 
and their interaction with planning and environmental regulations. 

(3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field trips) 

475 Quaternary Tectonics (3) 

Prerequisites: Geology 360 and 380. Study of the processes and 
products of relatively young Quaternary tectonics. Evaluation of 
surface tectonic features, their ages, deformation styles, and structural 
regimes. Assessment of past and contemporary deformation rates. 

(6 hours activity, field trips) 

481 A Geology Field Camp I (4) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 303B, 321, 360, 380, and 401. 
Geologic field mapping, operating from a field camp under primitive 
conditions in an area of varying geologic complexity. Field report, map 
and cross-sections completed during semester following field work. 
Instructional fee required. (45 hours a week for four weeks during 
June and July, 1 hour lecture during the semester) 


219 


GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 


481 B Geology Field Camp II (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 481 A or equivalent experience 
and consent of instructor. Advanced geologic mapping techniques in 
a variety of geologic settings, operating from a field camp under 
primitive conditions. Field reports, maps and cross-sections required 
one week after completion of field work. Instructional fee required. 

(45 hours a week for three weeks during summer) 

48 1C Flydrology Field Camp (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 335 and 481 A. Geologic mapping 
and hydrologic mapping and techniques applied to integrated hydro- 
geologic model for selected areas. Field report(s), map(s), cross-sections 
required. Instructional fee required. (45 hours per week for three 
weeks during summer) 

493 Directed Studies (1-3) 

Prerequisites: upper-division standing and consent of instructor. 
Directed studies in specialized areas of the geological sciences, such 
as petroleum geology, sedimentology, optical and instrumentation 
techniques. Library research and written reports required. May be 
repeated once with a different topic. 

495 Geological Sciences Internship (3) 

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in geological sciences. 
Geological sciences work experience, salaried or volunteer, with 
industry, government or private agencies. Student intern will be super- 
vised by faculty adviser and employer. (1 hour of seminar per week 
plus a total of 120-150 hours of work experience) 

496L Geological Sciences Tutorial (2) 

Prerequisite: 20 units in geological sciences. Supervised experience 
in geological sciences teaching through tutoring or assisting in 
laboratory or field classes. 

498 Senior Thesis (1-2) 

Prerequisite: senior standing in geological sciences. Developed 
as an extension of an advanced course, conducted independently 
by the student under faculty supervision, culminating in a paper 
of professional quality. Two units maximum credit permitted. 

499L Independent Study (1-3) 

Independent study of a topic selected in consultation with and 
completed under the supervision of the instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. 

500 Advanced Concepts in Geology (4) 

Current advances in geological concepts with emphasis on 
Southern California geology. Concepts include: plate tectonics; 
igneous processes; sedimentary record; surficial processes; water 
resources. (2 hours lecture; 3 hours lab; 2 hours activity, field trips) 

501 Research Methods in Geology (1) 

Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 500. Introduction to research 
planning: choosing a thesis topic; bibliographic search; research design 
(laboratory and field); research proposal preparation. (2 hours activity) 


506T Topics in Geochemistry (3) 

Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 303B, Chemistry 120B, Computer 
Science 103, or consent of instructor. Special topics in geochemistry 
with emphasis on current investigations, specifically including isotope, 
organic, and contaminant geochemistry. May be repeated for credit 
with a different topic. 

510T Advanced Topics in Geology (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics in advanced 
geology; recent developments and applications. May be repeated for 
credit with different topic including advanced structural mapping, 
sedimentary basin analysis, igneous petrogenesis, seismotectonics 
of Los Angeles basin. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field trips) 

535T Advanced Topics in Hydrogeology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 436. Modem techniques in 
hydrogeology. Topics include: groundwater modeling; contaminant 
hydrogeology; groundwater exploration and development; well 
hydraulics. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. 

(2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field trips) 

575T Advanced Topics in Engineering Geology (3) 

Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 375. Modem techniques and 
new advances in engineering geology. Topics include: neotectonics 
of southern California; soil stratigraphy; and landslide analysis. 

May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (2 hours lecture, 

3 hours lab; field trips) 

590 Geoscience Seminar (1) 

Prerequisite: Geological Science 500 , 50 1A. Discussion of journal 
publications that represent current research. Variable seminar themes 
such as: tectonics, stratigraphy, geophysics, geochemistry, engineering 
geology, hydrogeology, volcanism. May be repeated one time only with 
a different theme. 

593 Directed Graduate Studies in the Geosciences (1-3) 

Post baccalaureate standing and consent of instructor. Directed 
studies of specialized geoscience topics not covered by existing courses 
and tailored to individual student interest. Literature research, 
recitations and written reports required. May be repeated for a total 
of 3 units. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisite: approval of adviser and completion of M.S. thesis 
proposal that is approved by the Department Graduate Committee. 
Design, analysis, and presentation of a research problem culminating 
in a thesis for the master’s degree. May be repeated once. 

599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3) 

Prerequisite: approval of adviser and Department Graduate 
Committee. Independent research on an approved topic. May be 
repeated for up to 3 units maximum. 


220 


GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



PROGRAM COORDINATOR 

Eric Solberg 

PROGRAM OFFICE 

Ruby Gerontology Center 8 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http ://hss . fullerton . edu/gerontology/ 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Minor in Gerontology 
Master of Science in Gerontology 
Emphases in Gerontology 
Professional Certificate in Gerontology 

PROGRAM COUNCIL 

Pauline Abbott (Director, Institute of 
Gerontology) 

Tony Bell (Sociology) 

Dennis Berg (Sociology) 

Yosuke Chikamoto (Health Science) 

John Doyle (Human Services) 

Rosalie Gilford (Sociology) 

Barbara Haddad (Nursing) 

Margaret Hamilton (Extended Education) 
Sara Johnson, (Anthropology) 

Jessie Jones (Kinesiology and Health 
Promotion) 

Mary Joyce (Marketing) 

Thomas Klammer (College Dean) 

Robert Koch (Biology) 

Bill Larson (Student Representative) 

Shari McMahan (Kinesiology and Health 
Promotion) 

Karen Perell (Kinesiology and Health 
Promotion) 

Maty Read (Counseling) 

Carl Renold (Human Services) 

Roberta Rikli (College Dean) 

Wendy Elliott Scheinberg (Oral History) 
Susan Shoho (Institute of Gerontology) 
William Smith (Psychology) 

Eric Solberg (Coordinator, Gerontology 
Programs) 

Barbara Talento (Continuing Learning 
Experience [CLE] President) 

Joseph Weber (Sociology) 

Duana Welch (Psychology) 


INTRODUCTION 

Gerontology, the study of aging, is a multidisciplinary field that examines the biological, 
psychological, social, and health/fitness aspects of the aging process. The unprecedented growth 
of the older population has created a growing demand for professionals in a variety of fields who 
understand issues related to the aging process. 

Programs in Gerontology provide students with knowledge and critical understanding of the 
processes of adult development and aging. They prepare students for a variety of career opportu- 
nities in business, government, industry, public and private agencies, health and human services, 
research and education, and entrepreneurial endeavors. Many career options involve working 
with healthy and independent older adults, while other positions involve working with older 
adults who have health problems and other age-related limitations. 

ADVISEMENT 

Academic and career advisement is provided by the Coordinator of Gerontology Programs 
and members of the Gerontology Program Council. 

Information on job and volunteer opportunities, as well as professional events in gerontology 
are posted near the Gerontology Program office. Ruby Gerontology Center, Room 8. Students are 
urged to take advantage of programs available through the Career Development and Counseling 
Center, Langsdorf Hall 208. 

RUBY GERONTOLOGY CENTER 

The Charles L. and Rachael E. Ruby Gerontology Center serves as a forum for intellectual 
activity and creative scholarship in the area of gerontology. The center houses the activities of 
the Continuing Learning Experience, the Institute of Gerontology, and gerontology academic 
programs, as well as being a resource center on aging for the Orange County region. 

The center’s goals include: promoting educational programs concerning adult development 
and aging, developing productive intergenerational activities in education and research, fostering 
cross-disciplinary research on topics related to aging and later life, providing opportunities for 
lifelong learning, and expanding opportunities for professional growth and development for 
those interested in gerontology. 

Students are encouraged to become involved in research, conferences, and community service 
activities of the Center. 

GERONTOLOGY AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Emeriti Memorial Scholarship in Gerontology has been established to honor a full-time 
continuing junior, senior, or graduate student with a minor or an emphasis in gerontology. 
Criteria include scholastic achievement and professional purpose. 

The Gerontology Program Council Award may be given to a junior/senior student with 
a minor in Gerontology or to a graduate student who has been accepted into the M.S. in 
Gerontology degree program. The criteria include active membership in the Student Association 
for Gerontology Education (SAGE) or Sigma Phi Omega gerontology honor society, and 
financial need. 

The Beverly and Arnold Miller University Scholarship in Gerontology is open to continuing 
junior/senior students with a declared minor, emphasis, or concentration in aging or gerontology 
and to graduate students accepted into the M.S. in Gerontology degree program. 


221 


GERONTOLOGY 


STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Students interested in gerontology are encouraged to join the Student 
Association for Gerontology Education (SAGE) and the Gamma Kappa 
Chapter of Sigma Phi Omega, a national honor society. Opportunities 
are available to become involved in research, conferences, and commu- 
nity service activities. Students are also encouraged to become active in 
professional gerontology organizations such as the California Council on 
Gerontology and Geriatrics (CCGG). Applications are available at the 
Gerontology Program office, Ruby Gerontology Center, Room 8. 

MINOR IN GERONTOLOGY 

The Gerontology minor consists of 21 units in the following areas: 

Lower- Division Requirements (3 units) 

Sociology 133 Introduction to Gerontology (3)* 

Upper-Division Requirements (9 units from the following) 

Sociology 333 Sociology of Aging (3) 

Psychology 362 Psychology of Aging (3)* 

Biology 306 Biology of Aging (3)* 

Kinesiology 454 Physical Activity and the Aging Process (3) 

Required Internship (3 units) 

One three unit internship at the 300/ 400 level in a related field. An 
internship is a supervised experience working within the community. 
Internships are coordinated through the student’s major department. 

Upper-Division Electives (6 units, adviser approved) 

Anthropology’ 308 Culture and Aging: Anthropological Gerontology (3) 
Anthropology 408 Ethnogerontology (3) 

Anthropology’ 417 Life Quests (3) 

Biology 306 Biology of Aging (3) 

Biology 311 Nutrition and Disease (3)* 

Child Development 312 Human Growth and Development (3)* 
Counseling 475T Counseling Special Populations (3) 

Finance 41 1 Retirement and Estate Planning (3) 

Health Sci 342 Stress Management (3)* 

Health Sci 401 Epidemiology (3) 

Health Sci 440 Determinants of Health Behavior (3) 

Health Sci 450 Applied Health Promotion Throughout the Lifespan (3) 
Human Services 310 Case Management (3) 

Human Services 380 Theories and Techniques of Counseling (3)* 
Human Services 385 Program Design and Proposal Writing (3) 

Human Services 400 Ethical and Professional Issues in Human 
Services (3) 

Human Services 410 Crisis Intervention (3) 

Human Services 420 Human Services Management (3) 

Human Services 480 Case Analysis and Intervention Techniques (3) 
Kinesiology 353 Physical Activity and Lifelong Well-Being (3)* 
Kinesiology 364 Motor Development (3) 

Kinesiology 371 Human Motor Learning and Control (3) 


Kinesiology 400 Program Design in Kinesiology and Health 

Promotion (3) 

Kinesiology 454 Physical Activity and the Aging Process (3) 

Kinesiology 455 Functional Performance Assess and Programming 

for Older Adults (3) 

Management 435 Service Organizations and Operations (3) 

Marketing 35 1 Principles of Marketing (3) 

Nursing 301 Promotion of Optimal Health (3)* 

Nursing 303 Women’s Health and Healing (3)* 

Nursing 357 Health Promotion: Adult-Aged Nursing (3) 

Philosophy 314 Medical Ethics (3)* 

Philosophy 448 Death, Dying and Meaning (3) 

Psychology 302 Learning and Memory (3) 

Psychology 303 Sensation and Perception (3) 

Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology (3) 

Psychology 362 Psychology of Aging (3) 

Psychology 364 Intelligence: A Life-span Perspective (3) 

Psychology 415 Cognitive Processes (3) 

Psychology 474 Medical Psychology (3) 

Psychology 475 Psychopharmacology (3) 

Sociology 333 Sociology of Aging (3) 

Sociology 361 Population and the Environment (3)* 

Sociology 371 Sociology of City Life (3)* 

Sociology 433 Aging and Social Services (3) 

Sociology 351 Sociology of Families (3)* 

Sociology 354 Sociology of Sex Roles (3)* 

Sociology 360 Death and Dying (3)* 

Speech Comm 320 Intercultural Communication (3)* 

Speech Comm 345 Communication and Aging (3)* 

Women’s Studies 410 Women, Health and Aging (3) 

Additional elective courses are available in selected departments 
across campus. Such additional electives are chosen in consultation 
with the major department adviser and with the approval of the 
Coordinator of Gerontology Programs. Up to nine units of coursework 
may be applied to both the major and Gerontology minor. 

MAJORS THAT COMPLIMENT THE MINOR IN GERONTOLOGY 

The Gerontology minor is available and appropriate to strengthen 
and otherwise complement the course work of students in many 
majors. Notation of the minor appears on the transcript and the 
diploma. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN GERONTOLOGY 

The Master of Science program combines training in both scientific 
and applied areas of gerontology. Because various departments across 
the University participate in the program, the student is able to design 
a course of study that will meet his or her individual needs. In addition 


1 Meets General Education requirement. 


222 


GERONTOLOGY 


to course work in research and theory, the program provides prepara- 
tion for work in a variety of settings. It can also be tailored to meet the 
needs of the student who wants to prepare for doctoral programs. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information at 
http ://www. fullerton.edu/graduate . 

Admissions to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified 

An applicant who meets the following requirements may be consid- 
ered for conditionally classified graduate standing. 

■ Baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade 
point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 units attempted. 

■ The baccalaureate must be in gerontology or a related field in con- 
junction with an undergraduate minor, certificate, or emphasis in 
gerontology or the equivalent. In the absence of the above, the 
student should have the following 12 units of upper-division 
course work in gerontology or their equivalent: 

Biology 306 Biology 
of Aging (3 units) 

Kinesiology 454 
Physical Activity 
and the Aging 
Process (3 units) 

Psychology 362 
Psychology of 
Aging (3 units) 

Sociology 333 

Sociology of Aging 
(3 units) 

■ Completion of Psychology 201 or Sociology 303, or an equivalent 
statistics course. 

■ A grade-point average of at least 3.0 in gerontology-related course 
work. 

■ Three satisfactory letters of recommendation. 

■ Professional objectives as presented in a student letter of intent. 

■ Completion of a Gerontology Programs application form, obtain- 
able from the Gerontology Programs Office. 

The following additional criteria may be taken into consideration: 
research experience, previous paid or volunteer experience in working 
with elderly people. 

It may be possible for applicants who have minimal deficiencies in 
prerequisite requirements, as detailed above, but who are otherwise 
highly qualified, to be admitted in conditionally classified graduate 
standing, with provisions made for removal of deficiencies prior to the 
granting of classified standing. For further information, consult with 
the Gerontology Program Coordinator. 


Admissions to Graduate Standing: Classified 

Each student, in consultation with the program coordinator, will 
develop a program of study. This program will be outlined in an official 
university study plan form. Students who have met the requirements 
for conditionally classified standing will be granted classified standing 
upon submission of an adviser-approved study plan to the Graduate 
Studies office. 

Study Plan 

The Master of Science in Gerontology requires 30 units of approved 
graduate work with a minimum of 21 units at the 500-level. 

Core Courses (12 units) 

Gerontology 500 Processes of Adult Development and Aging (3) 
Gerontology 501 Research Methods in Gerontology (3) 

Gerontology 503 Aging and Public Policy (3) 

Gerontology 595 Gerontology Internship (3) 

Gerontology Electives (6-9 units) 

Gerontology 504T Selected Topics in Gerontology (3) 

Gerontology 526 Administration and System Management in Programs 
for Older Adults (3) 

Gerontology 506 Economics of Aging (3) 

Gerontology 507 Professional Issues in Gerontology (3) 

Gerontology 599 Independent Study in Gerontology (1-3) 

Multidisciplinary Electives (6-9 units) 

Selected from two or more departments with the program 
coordinators approval: 

Electives are: 

Anthro 408 Ethnogerontology (3) 

Counseling 475T Counseling Special Populations [Older Adultsl (3) 
Finance 411 Retirement and Estate Planning (3) 

Kinesiology 454 Physical Activity and the Aging Process (3) 

Kinesiology 455 Fitness Evaluation and Programming for 
Older Adults (3) 

Philosophy 448 Death, Aging, and Meaning (3) 

Psychology 543 Advanced Life Span Development (3) 

Sociology 433 Aging and Social Services (3) 

Sociology 50 IT Seminar: Topics in Societal Structure and Process (3) 
[Topic: Life Span Developmental Sociologyl 

Women’s Studies 410 Women, Health, and Aging (3) 

Thesis or Project or Comprehensive Exam (0-3 units) 

Gerontology 597 Project (3) 

OR Gerontology 598 Thesis (3) 

OR Comprehensive Exam (0 units) 

If a project or thesis is not done, an additional 3 units of 
Gerontology 500-level elective courses and a comprehensive 
examination must be taken. 



223 


GERONTOLOGY 


PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE IN GERONTOLOGY 

Admission to this program requires a bachelor’s degree with a 
minimum grade-point average of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units. The 
program requires 18 units total: 15 units of required courses and three 
units of electives. For further information on specific course content on 
this certificate and others related to Gerontology, please contact 
Extended Education, (714) 278-2611. 

OTHER GERONOTOLOGY PROGRAMS 

Sociology, B.A., M.A. 

An Emphasis in Gerontology is offered within the Bachelor of Arts 
and the Master of Arts in Sociology. Degree requirements are outlined 
in the Sociology Department section of this catalog. 

Kinesiology, B.S., M.S. 

Students pursuing the B.S. or M.S. in Kinesiology may choose a 
focus area in Gerontology. Requirements are available through the 
Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion. 

Human Services, B.S. 

Students pursuing a B.S. in Human Services may choose a gerontology 
track. Requirements are available through the Department of Human 
Services. 

GERONTOLOGY COURSES 

Courses are designated as GERO in class schedule. 

410 Women, Health and Aging (3) 

(Same as Womens Studies 410) 

500 Process of Adult Development and Aging (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. in Gerontology degree program or 
consent of instructor. Overview of theory and research on biological, 
psychological, and social changes that accompany adult development 
and aging. May include a service learning component. 

501 Research Methods in Gerontology (3) 

Prerequisite: admission to M.S. in Gerontology or consent of 
instructor. Overview of research processes and problems in gerontology; 
more detailed study of applied research, including program evaluation, 
in the field of gerontology. 

503 Aging and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisites: Gerontology 500, Sociology 333, Political Science 309 
or 315, or classified graduate student status. Origin, development, and 
overview of public policies affecting older persons, families, and service 
providers. Political administrative, advocacy, and private sector involve- 
ments in employment, retirement, income security, health care, social 
services, and housing of older persons. May include a service learning 
component. (Same as Political Science 503 and Sociology 503) 

504T Selected Topics in Gerontology (3) 

Prerequisites: classified status in the M.S. in Gerontology Program 
and consent of instructor. A detailed examination of a selected area of 
gerontology. Emphasis will be both on the relevant literature and on 
the preparation, presentation (oral and written), and discussion of 
research papers. May be repeated once for credit with different topic. 


506 Economics of Aging (3) 

Prerequisites: admission into the Gerontology M.S. Program or 
classified SBAE status and Gerontology 501 or Economics 340 or 
consent of instructor. Economic consequences of population aging 
and the economic status of the aged. Income adequacy in old age: 
dependency, work income, retirement income planning, social security 
income, employer-sponsored pensions, financing health care. 

Economic security today and tomorrow. International comparisons. 
(Same as Economics 506) 

507 Professional Issues in Gerontology (3) 

Prerequisite: classified graduate student status. An introduction to 
the concepts, attitudes, knowledge, skills and ethical issues upon 
which professional practice in gerontology is based. 

526 Administration and Systems Management (3) 

Prerequisites: admission to the M.S. in Gerontology program and 
Gerontology 501 (pre/co-requisite), or a course in basic statistics and 
Political Science 309 or 320. Management oriented analysis of organi- 
zational behavior. Treatments of decision making, leadership, commu- 
nication, group dynamics and ethical aspects of organization. Includes 
application of theories of administration and systems management to 
public and volunteer programs and services (Same as Political Science 
526). 

595 Gerontology Internship (3) 

Prerequisites: classified status in the M.S. in Gerontology degree 
program and consent of instructor and program coordinator. 

Supervised experience in organizations that serve older adults and 
their families. May be repeated once for credit. 

597 Project (3) 

Prerequisites: classified status in the M.S. in Gerontology Program 
and consent of instructor and program coordinator. Under the direction 
of a faculty member, a topic that integrates learning in the program 
with an applied area of student interests will be selected, and a major 
project on the topic will be developed and submitted. 

598 Thesis (3) 

Prerequisites: classified status in the M.S. in Gerontology' degree 
program and consent of instructor and program coordinator. Individual 
research under supervision, reported in a thesis and defended success- 
fully in an oral examination conducted by a faculty thesis committee. 

599 Independent Study in Gerontology (1-3) 

Prerequisites: completion of the M.S. in Gerontology core courses 
or consent of instructor and program coordinator. Individualized study 
with an instructor whose recognized interests are in the area of the 
planned study. Conferences with the instructor as necessary, and the 
work will culminate in one or more papers. May be repeated once 
for credit. 


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GERONTOLOGY 



DEPARTMENT CHAIR 

William W Haddad 

DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Humanities 815F 

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE 

http://hss.fullerton.edu/history/ 

PROGRAMS OFFERED 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
Minor in History 
Master of Arts in History 

FACULTY 

Gordon Bakken, Leland Bellot, Gayle 
Brunelle, Jochen Burgtorf, Jack Crabbs, 

Touraj Daryaee, Kristine Dennehy, Jack 
Elenbaas, Nancy Fitch, Natalie Fousekis, 
George Giacumakis, Cora Granata, William 
W Haddad, Arthur Hansen, Harry Jeffrey, 
Samuel Kupper, Mougo Nyaggah, Ronald 
Rietveld, Seymour Scheinberg, Gary Shumway, 
Laichen Sun, David Van Deventer, Nelson 
Woodard, James Woodward, Philippe Zacair, 
Cecile Zinberg 

ADVISERS 

General Advisement: 

Check with departmental office. 
Undergraduate Coordinator: 

Gayle Brunelle 
Graduate Adviser: 

Jack Elenbaas 
Credential Advises: 

Nelson Woodard 


INTRODUCTION 

Historians engage in systematic study of the human past in order to discover meaning for 
people in the present. The student of history may draw upon the subject matter and methods 
of many academic disciplines. Thus, social history employs the methods of the social sciences, 
including quantitative analysis, in examining social movements and issues in the past; psycho- 
history utilizes the approaches of psychology in the study of the behavior of historically signifi- 
cant individuals and groups; and the development of the various areas of human intellectual and 
cultural activity, for instance the arts and sciences, are studied to inform us of how and why 
people have thought as they did. 

Lower-division survey courses are designed to convey the broad sweep of past human events 
and introduce the student to the study of causation and historical source materials. Aspects of the 
philosophy and methodology of history and the mechanics of writing historical essays are 
addressed in History 300A and 300B. The study, in greater depth, of specialized historical topics 
comprises the bulk of the upper-division offerings of the department. History majors are required 
to take History 490T, a senior seminar on a special topic in which they are expected to write an 
original historical essay based chiefly upon the analysis of historical materials that date from the 
time of the events studied 

The history major is useful for students who: (1) seek a broad liberal arts education with the 
option to choose more specialized study by geographical region, epoch and focus of inquiry 
(cultural, social, etc.); (2) plan a career in government service, including positions in United 
States Government agencies and international organizations overseas; (3) in business where 
writing, research and people skills are important; (4) pursue a career in private, nonprofit organi- 
zations that may involve research and service organizations, i.e. archives, museums and libraries; 
(5) desire to study law; (6) intend to prepare for primary or secondary school teaching, or 
(7) intend to work for advanced degrees in history in preparation for college teaching. The 
department is committed to the university’s missions and goals- where learning is preeminent. 

Credential Information 

The bachelor’s degree in history may be effectively combined with subject matter studies 
necessary for either the multiple subject teaching credential (K-8) or single subject credential 
(7-12) in history. Teaching credentials require specific study plans and students are urged to seek 
advice from an adviser early in their course of study Majors planning to teach at the secondary 
level should have a study plan approved by the Undergraduate Coordinator or designee by the 
first semester of their junior year in residence. Undergraduates are also encouraged to contact the 
Center for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers. 
Postgraduate students should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the School 
of Education (714-278-3411) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation. 

Center for Oral and Public History 

The Center for Oral and Public History, under the sponsorship of the Department of History, 
is one of the most comprehensive university-based oral history programs in the nation. In addi- 
tion to offering course work in interviewing techniques, technical processing methodology, and 
community fieldwork, the program administers an assortment of ethnic, political, and other 
regional projects. 


225 


HISTORY 



Pre-Professional Information 

Students intending careers in government service or business should 
seek counsel from an adviser. Those planning to pursue graduate study 
in history should consult a faculty member of their choice. Those who 
expect to attend law school should plan their course of study with 
Professors Bakken, Bellot, or Kupper. 

Prizes and Scholarships 

Students should inquire at the department office for information 
regarding departmental prizes and scholarships. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The B.A. in History requires a minimum of 120 units that includes 
courses for the major. General Education, all University requirements, 
and free electives. History majors are expected to earn at least a W C” in 
History 300A, 300B and 490T. 

The major requires a total of 43 units distributed as follows: 

Introductory Survey Courses (12 units) 

World Civilization 
(6 units) 

1. History 110A World Civilizations to the 16th Century (3) 

AND History 110B World Civilizations Since the 16th Century (3) 

US. History (6 units) 

2. History 170A United States to 1877 (3) AND History 170B United 
States Since 1877 (3) 

OR History 180 Survey of American History (3) 

OR History 190 Survey of American History with Emphasis on 
Ethnic Minorities 

Intermediate Requirements (24 units) 

History 300A Historical Thinking (3) 

History 300B Historical Writing (3) 

At least 6 units in each of the following fields: 

1. United States History 

2. European and Ancient Mediterranean History 

3. Latin American, Asian, African, or Middle Eastern History 

Advanced Requirements (9 units) 

Two upper-division history electives (6) 

History 490T Senior Research Seminar (3) 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

The minor in history, undertaken in consultation with a history 
adviser, should include a concentration in a general field. 

1 . Lower-division course work - 6 or 9 units (including general 
education) 

2. Upper-division course work - 15 or 18 units (including History 
300A) 

A total of 24 units is required for the minor in history. 

To complete 24 units, the student has the option of taking the last 
three units either in the introductory requirements or the upper- 
division course work. 


MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

The Master of Ans degree in history is designed to provide a course 
of study for those whose interests are in teaching, business, government 
service and the professions as well as for personal enrichment. It offers 
all the basic requirements for those who intend to pursue a doctoral 
degree upon the completion of their study at California State 
University, Fullerton. 

Application Deadlines 

Applications need to be postmarked no later than March 1st for the 
fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester. However, dead- 
lines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the 
university graduate studies website for current information 
http://www. fullenon.edu/graduate/. 

Prerequisites 

Applicants to the Master’s program must first fulfill all requirements 
for admission to graduate standing in the University. A student must 
have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with a 
grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units and 
a 3.0 grade-point average in upper-division history courses. After 
fulfilling the university requirements, the applicant’s records are sent to 
the History Department’s graduate coordinator for evaluation. Students 
with deficiencies will be considered for admission only after they have 
completed courses approved by the coordinator. 

Study Plan 

Each student determines his or her study plan with the graduate 
coordinator and an adviser in the area of specialization before com- 
mencing course work. Two plans are offered: Plan I, in which one 
specific field of interest is developed, requiring a written thesis or 
project (with an oral examination taken before the final draft); Plan II, 
in which the student must pass written comprehensive examinations 
in two of the following fields: (1) American; (2) European; or (3) Latin 
American, Asian, African, or Middle Eastern areas. 

Thirty units of work are required for the master’s degree. All students 
must complete the following courses: 

History 501 Theory' and History (3) 

History 52 IT Directed Readings Seminar-European History (3) 

OR History 57 IT Directed Readings Seminar-American 
History (3) 

History 522 Seminar in European History' (3) 

OR History 572 Seminar in American History (3) 

In addition, nine more units of 500-level course work must be 
taken, making a total of 18. The remaining 12 units may be taken in 
400-level or graduate courses related to the study plan, at least one of 
which must be taken in history*. 

Before advancement to candidacy, a cultural understanding or research 
skill requirement must be met. This may be fulfilled in a variety of 
ways: (1) an examination on reading ability in a foreign language, (2) 
completion of 12 units of comparative studies in other departments 
appropriate to the student’s program, (3) an examination or courses 
taken in statistics, or (4) courses and certification by the director of the 
Center for Oral and Public History. 


226 


HISTORY 


EMPHASIS IN PUBLIC HISTORY 

Students seeking admission to the Master of Arts in history with 
an emphasis in public history must meet the same admission require- 
ments as those entering the regular history program. The degree 
requirements include 30 units of course work and completion of 
cultural understanding or skill requirement prior to candidacy 

Required History Courses (9 units) 

History 501 Theory and History (3) 

History 506 Seminar in Public History (3) 

History 57 IT Directed Readings Seminar-American History (3) 


Electives (15 units) 

Electives must include six units in adviser-approved content 
courses, three of which must be in history, and six units from the 
following applied courses: 

History 456 Introduction to Public History (3) 

History 492 Community History (3) 

History 493 Oral History (3) 

History 494 History and Editing (3) 



Culminating 
Experience (6 units) 

History 596 Graduate 
Internship in History 
(3) 

History 597 History 
Project (3 or 6) 

For further informa- 
tion call the Department 
of History 


HISTORY COURSES 

Courses are designated as HIST in the class schedule. 

1 10A World Civilizations to the 16th Century (3) 

The development of Western and non-Westem civilizations from 
their origins to the 16th century. 

110B World Civilizations Since the 16th Century (3) 

The development of Western and non-Westem civilizations from 
the 16th century to the present. (CAN HIST 16; CAN HIST SEQ C = 
History llOAand 110B) 

170A United States to 1877 (3) 

The political, social, economic and cultural development of the 
United States to 1877. Old World background, rise of the new nation, 
sectional problems, the Civil War and Reconstruction. (CAN HIST 8) 


170B United States Since 1877 (3) 

U.S. History from the late 19th century to the present. Economic 
transformation, political reform movements, social, cultural, and intel- 
lectual changes, and the role of the United States in world affairs. 

(CAN HIST 10; CAN HIST SEQ B = History 170A and 170B) 

180 Survey of American History (3) 

American history from prehistoric times (before 1492) to the 
present according to chronological time periods. Basic themes which 
pervade the entire sweep of the nations history. Satisfies state require- 
ment in U.S. History. Not available for credit to students who have 
completed History 190. 

190 Survey of American History with Emphasis on Ethnic 
Minorities (3) 

A survey of American history from prehistoric times (before 1492) 
to the present with special emphasis on the role of race and ethnicity. 
(Same as Afro-Ethnic Studies/ Chicano Studies 190). Credit will not 
be given for both History 180 and 190. 

201 The History of Asian Pacific Americans (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of General Education category III. C.l. 

This class examines the origins and evolution of Asian American com- 
munities and cultures, with an emphasis upon the southern California 
region, through selected books, oral histories, films, outside speakers, 
and excursions. (Same as Asian American Studies 201) 

230 The Ascent of Man (3) 

Science and technology in the development of human culture, 
especially the development of science in western culture since the 17th 
century. Scientific concepts, their emergence and the social impact of 
science. 

300A Historical Thinking (3) 

The nature of history, history of historical thought, and history’s 
relationship to the humanities and social sciences. Seminar required 
of all history majors. History majors must earn at least a “C” in this 
course. 

300B Historical Writing (3) 

Prerequisite: History 300A. Research, writing and library usage 
(including computer- assisted bibliographic searches) as related to 
history. Meets the classroom portion of the upper-division writing 
requirement for history majors. Seminar required of all history majors. 
History majors must earn at least a “C” in this course. 

302A Historical Dimension of Liberal Studies (3) 

Prerequisites: prior or concurrent completion of Liberal Studies 300 
and completion of General Education Category 1 1. A. The origins and 
development of modes of thought and forms of expression in the 
three core areas of liberal studies, i.e., the natural sciences, the social 
sciences, and the arts and humanities.(Same as Liberal Studies 302A) 

302B Historical Dimension of Liberal Studies (3) 

Prerequisite: completion of History 302 A with a grade of C or 
better. The origins and development of modes of thought and forms of 
expression in the three core areas of liberal studies, i.e., the natural 
sciences, the social sciences, and the arts and humanities.(Same as 
Liberal Studies 302B) 


227 


HISTORY 



311 World War II (3) 

A history of World War II: Films, documentaries, lectures and 
discussion. 

320 Modern European History (1789 - Present) (3) 

Prerequisites: History 110B or completion of General Education 
category I1I.C.1. Explores major political, social, economic, and 
cultural developments in Modem Europe. Topics include: French 
Revolution, industrial revolution, liberalism, socialism, nationalism, 
imperialism, urbanization, modernity, the World Wars, Russian 
Revolution, inter-war period, and post- 1