Skip to main content

Full text of "DTIC AD0757197: Model Induction Test Facility Capability for Testing Turbofan Engines"

See other formats



AEDC-TR-73-10 





MODEL INDUCTION TEST FACILITY 
CAPABILITY FOR TESTING 
TURBOFAN ENGINES 


James W. Hale 
ARO, Inc. 


March 1973 


Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 


ENGINE TEST FACILITY 

ARNOLD ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT CENTER 
AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND 
ARNOLD AIR FORCE STATION , TENNESSEE 




















MODEL INDUCTION TEST FACILITY 
CAPABILITY FOR TESTING 
TURBOFAN ENGINES 


James W. Hale 
ARO, Inc. 


Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 




AEDC-TR-73-10 


FOREWORD 


The work reported herein was done by Arnold Engineering Develop¬ 
ment Center (AEDC), Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), Arnold Air 
Force Station, Tennessee, under Program Element 65802F. The re¬ 
search was conducted by ARO, Inc. (a subsidiary of Sverdrup & Parcel 
and Associates,' Inc.), contract operator of AEDC. The work was ac¬ 
complished from July 6, 1971 to June 30, 1972 under ARO Project No. 
BE2256, and the manuscript was submitted for publication on November 
30, 1972. 

This technical report has been reviewed and is approved. 

ROBERT O. DIETZ 
Director of Technology 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


ABSTRACT 


The objective of this model study was to determine the potential for 
testing very large thrust, high-bypass-ratio, turbofan engines at condi¬ 
tions simulating flight Mach numbers of 0. 4 to 0. 6, sea level, by use 
of a jet pumped air supply system. The simulation of low altitude, sub¬ 
sonic operation of a large, high-bypass-ratio, turbofan engine in ground 
test facilities requires extremely large airflows. This airflow, even at 
relatively low pressure, cannot be provided by existing test facilities for 
engines having thrust levels of 60, 000 to 100, 000 lbf. The jet pumped 
air supply is therefore a very attractive potential facility. The purpose 
of this study is to determine the maximum jet pump mass ratio at which 
the pressure rise corresponding to sea-level flight at M = 0. 4 to 0. 6 
can be obtained and the resulting motive airflow rate and state conditions 
required to test engines in the thrust class of 60, 000 to 100, 000 lbf. 


iii 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


CONTENTS 

Page 

ABSTRACT.‘ . . . iii 

NOMENCLATURE.vi 

I. INTRODUCTION.1 

II. APPARATUS.1 

III. TEST PROCEDURE.3 

IV. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION.3 

V. CONCLUSIONS.5 

REFERENCES.5 

APPENDIXES 

I. ILLUSTRATIONS 

Figure 

1. Model Air-Driven Annular Ejector.9 

2. Model Induction Test Facility for Turbofan Engines .... 10 

3. Photograph of Model Induction Test Facility for 

Turbofan Engines.11 

4. Variation of Ratio of Ejector Inlet to Ejector Driving 
Pressure (P e i/Pte^ with Ejector Exit Total 

Pressure ( p t 16 » avg).12 

5. Variation of Secondary-to-Primary Mass Flow Ratio 
(m"/m , ) with Ejector Exit Total Pressure (P^g, avg) ... 13 

6. Variation of Simulated Turbofan Engine Inlet Mach 
Number with Turbofan Engine Inlet Total 

Pressure (P^g, av g).14 

7. Simulated Turbofan Engine Inlet Total Pressure Profile . .15 


v 















AEDC-TR-73-10 


Page 


II. TABLES 

I. Maximum Deviation of Measuring Instruments .... 16 

II. Ejector Tabulated Test Data ..17 

III. Ejector Tabulated Calculated Performance Data ... 21 

III. EJECTOR DESIGN CONSTANT AREA MIXING.23 


NOMENCLATURE 


A Area, in.^ 

Cp Specific heat at constant pressure, Btu/lbm-°R 

D Diameter 

F Force, lbf 

I. D. Inside diameter 

J Mechanical equivalent of heat, ft-lbf/Btu 

M Mach number 

m Mass flow rate, lbm/sec 

P Static pressure, psia 

P t Total pressure, psia 

R Specific gas constant, ft-lbf/lbm-°R 

T Static temperature, °R 

T t Total temperature, °R 

7 Ratio of specific heats at constant pressure 

rj Subsonic diffuser efficiency 

SUBSCRIPTS 


2, 3, 4, 5, 
and 16 


Station location 





AEDC-TR-73-10 


a 

d 

e 

ex 

i 

nex 

P 

t 

s 


Annular 
Diffuser 
Ej ector 
Exit 
Inlet 

Nozzle exit 
Plenum 
Total 
Static 


SUPERSCRIPTS 


1 Primary fluid 

" Secondary fluid 

* Nozzle throat 


Vll 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


SECTION I 
INTRODUCTION 


Environmental simulation testing of aerospace propulsion devices 
and systems requires that the simulation capabilities of ground test 
facilities cover a range of test conditions comparable to those to which 
vehicles will be subjected during flight. Advancements in aerospace 
technologies have placed more stringent requirements on performance 
capabilities of ground environmental simulation facilities. High alti¬ 
tude simulation requirements have increased to the point where existing 
conventional mechanical exhaust gas pumping systems are not capable 
of providing the test conditions required in the development and testing 
of large full-scale propulsion systems. 

Problems associated with ground test facilities to enable simulation 
of flight conditions for aerospace propulsion systems have led to the ap¬ 
plication of ejectors-diffusers to pump exhaust gases from test cells to 
the atmosphere. The simplicity of construction and installation of 
ejectors-diffusers plus their performance capabilities provides an eco¬ 
nomical and feasible means for pumping large quantities of gases at the 
low pressures required to simulate flight conditions. 

The airflow rate for large-bypass-ratio, subsonic turbofan engines 
operating at altitudes below 15, 000 to 20, 000 ft places very stringent 
requirements on ground test facilities designed primarily for testing 
turbojet and small-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. A facility which uses 
the compressor-generated air supply to drive a jet pump which induces 
air from the atmosphere, compresses it to the required level of pressure, 
and delivers it to the turbofan inlet plenum might be used to meet the low 
altitude test requirement of these engines. The feasibility of this ap¬ 
proach has been verified theoretically. 


SECTION II 
APPARATUS 


2.1 TEST ARTICLE 

A model annular ejector was designed to use a standard 8-in. pipe 
as the mixing section. The ejector as-built parameters and dimensions 
are shown in Fig. 1 (Appendix I). A subsonic diffuser with a half-angle 


1 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


of approximately 3. 65 deg connected the standard 8-in. pipe to a stand¬ 
ard 16-in. pipe. The ejector nozzle throat area was A* = 1. 94 in.2. 

The ejector secondary airflow inlet pipe was an 8-in. schedule 80 pipe 
(see Fig. 1). 

The ejector was equipped with an inlet plenum section made from 
a standard 16-in. pipe inside of which a 6-in.-diam baffle was installed 
(Fig. 2). A secondary air plenum and airflow measuring nozzle with a 
throat diameter of 1. 50 in. were attached to the inlet plenum. A num¬ 
ber 8 mesh 0. 016-in.-diam wire screen was selected for installation 
between the subsonic diffuser exit and the exhaust plenum section. The 
screen has approximately 75 percent open area. This size screen was 
available and is the size normally used in the Engine Test Facility (ETF)/ 
AEDC, for flow straightening in ducts equal to or less than 6 ft in diam¬ 
eter. The exhaust plenum section was made from a standard 16-in. pipe. 
Provision was made near the downstream end of the plenum for installa¬ 
tion of a 9-probe total pressure rake. A typical high thrust', high-bypass- 
ratio, simulated turbofan engine made from a standard 6-in. pipe con¬ 
nected the exhaust plenum to the exhaust ducting in the R-2C-1 test area 
of the Engine Test Facility, AEDC. The high pressure air supply was 
connected to the secondary air plenum and the annular ejector nozzle 
plenum. This installation is presented in Figs.* 2 and 3. 

Air from the von Karman Gas Dynamics Facility (VKF), AEDC, 
4000-psi storage tank provided the primary air or driving medium for 
the annular ejector and the secondary air. 

2.2 INSTRUMENTATION 

The parameters of primary interest were the ejector driving fluid 
total pressure and temperature, ejector inlet pressure, simulated en¬ 
gine inlet total and static pressure, and simulated engine exhaust pres¬ 
sure. The location of these parameters are shown in Fig. 2. The type 
of measuring instruments and the maximum deviation within the meas¬ 
ured range of each of the manually recorded parameters is presented 
in Table I (Appendix II). 

The rake total pressure parameters were measured on a 120-in. 
manometer board filled with tetrabromoethane (TBE) and recorded by 
a 70-mm camera. The TBE had a specific gravity of approximately 
2. 94 at 70°F. The accuracy of the manometer board is believed to be 
excellent because of the following factors which were used in gathering 
data: 


2 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


1. The tubes containing TBE were referenced to 
atmosphere, and the data taken from the barom¬ 
eter were used in reducing the manometer data. 

2. A vacuum check was taken before testing and at 
an interval during testing to ensure that the pres¬ 
sure lines and manometer board contained no 
leaks. 


SECTION III 
TEST PROCEDURE 


The preoperational procedures for the test components were com¬ 
pleted and the ETF exhaust ducting was opened to atmospheric pressure. 
Then the ejector driving pressure was set and maintained constant at 50, 
65, and 70 psia while the secondary air plenum pressure was varied 
over a range of values for each of the set ejector driving pressure levels. 
Steady-state data were recorded for each set condition. Pressures and 
temperatures indicated by gages were recorded manually, and the ma¬ 
nometer board was photographed. 


SECTION IV 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 


The model tests of the jet pump air supply facility were conducted 
with ejector driving pressures of 50, 65, and 70 psia. At each of these 
ejector driving pressures, several secondary airflow rate values were 
set for steady-state data points while the simulated engine exhaust pres¬ 
sure was maintained at atmospheric conditions. The results of the test 
are presented in Figs. 4, 5, and 6. A listing of the tabulated data taken 
during the test is presented in Table II. The ratios of ejector inlet pres¬ 
sure to ejector driving pressure (Pei^te^' secondary-to-primary mass 
flow (m"/m'), and engine inlet static to total pressure avg) 

are shown as varying with engine inlet total pressure (P t ^g, The 

engine inlet total pressure (P^g, av ^ * s t * le average of 8 probes (not 

including the center probe) of the 9-probe rake. The probes were lo¬ 
cated on centroids of equal areas in the 16-in. duct shown in Fig. 1. 


3 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


The 9-probe-rake total pressure profile for the ejector driving pres¬ 
sures of 50, 65, and 70 psia at the maximum secondary airflow is 
shown in Fig. 7 and Table II. 

In order to use these curves to predict engine performance, atmos¬ 
pheric pressure of 14. 7 psia (secondary inlet total pressure) is divided 
by the ejector driving pressure and the result indicated on each of the 
ejector driving curves (50, 65, and 70 psia) in Fig. 4. The correspond¬ 
ing values of secondary-to-primary mass flow ratios, rfi ,, /rh', versus 
ejector exit total pressure, P^g, av 2* determined from Fig. 4 are 

presented in Fig. 5. These results are also shown in the following 
table: 


P te , psia 

P ei , psia 

p ei/ p te 

Pt 16* aVg * pSla 
(from Fig. 4) 

xh"/m' 

(from Fig. 5) 

50 

14. 7 

0. 294 

16. 55 

1. 65 

65 

14. 7 

0. 226 

17. 275 

1. 40 

70 

14. 7 

0. 210 

17.375 

1. 175 


The largest secondary-to-primary mass flow rate, m"/m 1 , was 
obtained with the smaller of the three ejector driving pressures. A 
mass ratio, m"/rii', of 1. 65 resulted from the Pt e of 50 psia (see above 
table). Since m" + m' = and m"/m* = 1. 65, then m-p = 2. 65 m' or 
m 1 = m'p/2. 65. The sea-level airflow requirements for the correspond¬ 
ing flight Mach number for different thrust level typical turbofan engines 
is shown in the following table: 


Engine 
Thrust, lbf 

Bypass Ratio 

Sea-Level 

Airflow Requirement 
at Flight Mach No. 

40, 000 

8:1 

1800 at M 0 = 0. 40 

45, 000 

5:1 

1800 at M 0 = 0. 40 

60, 000 

8:1 

2700 at Mq = 0. 40 

67, 000 

5:1 

2700 at M q = 0. 40 

89, 000 

8:1 

4000 at M q = 0. 45 

100, 000 

5:1 

4000 at M 0 = 0. 45 


4 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


The sea-level airflow requirement for a 100, 000-lbf-thrust 5:1 or 
89, 000-lbf-thrust 8:1 bypass ratio turbofan engine operating at a flight 
Mach number of 0. 45 is 4000 lbm/sec. For a total mass flow riiT = 

4000 lbm/sec, the required primary mass flow would be m' = m-p/2.65 = 
4000/2. 65 = 1509 lbm/sec. The engine inlet total pressure for the 
flight Mach number of 0. 45 would be 16. 89 psia. Figure 6 shows the 
engine inlet plenum Mach number variation with inlet total pressure. 

Theoretical performance calculations for the model induction test 
facility were made by using the equations for constant area mixing 
ejector design as shown in Appendix III and Ref. 1 for comparison with 
experimental performance. The calculations were made for jet pump 
secondary flow inlet Mach numbers (Mg) of 0. 10, 0. 15, 0. 20, 0. 30, 
and 0. 40 at ejector driving pressures (P te ) ^0, 50, and 70 psia as 
shown in Table III. These theoretical data for P^ e of 50 and 70 psia 
are shown in Fig. 5 as the points marked "predicted by theory". The 
theoretical engine inlet total pressure or ejector exit total pressure 
(listed as P e ,. in Table III) was based on an assumed value of subsonic 

diffuser efficiency of 60 percent (rj = 0. 60). A more accurate efficiency 
for the subsonic diffuser may have resulted in a closer prediction of the 
experimental performance. 


SECTION V 
CONCLUSIONS 


An ejector sized for 1509 lbm/sec of driving air at 50 psia could 
induce 2500 lbm/sec of atmospheric air, thus delivering 4000 lbm/sec 
of air at 16. 55 psia which corresponds to the airflow requirement of a 
100,000 lbf 5:1 or a 89,000 lbf 8:1 bypass ratio turbofan engine operat¬ 
ing at M Q = 0.45, sea-level flight condition. 


REFERENCES 


1. Lewis, G. W. G. and Drabble, J. S. "Ejector Experiments." 

National Gas Turbine Establishment, Pystock, Hants (Great 
Britain), Report No. R. 151, 1954. 


5 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


APPENDIXES 

I. ILLUSTRATIONS 

II. TABLES 

III. EJECTOR DESIGN 
CONSTANT AREA 
MIXING 


7 



Not Drawn to Scale 


Fig. 1 Model Air-Driven Annular Ejector 




> 

m 

O 

o 

H 

X 

4j 

co 

o 



Fig. 2 Model Induction Test Facility for Turbofan Engines 


Plant Exhaust 
Ducting — 




















p ei^ p te 



Fig. 4 Variation of Ratio of Ejector Inlet to Ejector Driving Pressure (P.j/P te ) with Ejector Exit 
Total Pressure (P t16 , avg) 


AEDC-TR-73-10 




Pt l 6 Avg ' psla 


Fig. 5 Variation of Secondary-to-Primary Mass Flow Ratio (m"/m') with Ejector Exit Total 
Pressure (P,,„. avg) 










Engine Inlet Plenum Mach Number 



15 16 17 18 

P tl6< avg, psia 

Fig. 6 Variation of Simulated Turbofan Engine Inlet Mach Number with Turbofan Engine Inlet 
Total Pressure (P, 16 , avg) 


AEDC-TR-73-10 









Rake Probe Total Pressure, 



Fig. 7 Simulated Turbofan Engine Inlet Total Pressure Profile 












TABLE I 

MAXIMUM DEVIATION OF MEASURING INSTRUMENTS 


Parameter 

Range Measured 

Type of Instrument 

Instrument Full Range 

Maximum Deviation 

P ei 

11. 00 to 

16. 25 psia 

Bourdon Tube 
Type Gage 

0 to 30 psia 

±0. 02 psia 

P dex 

15. 00 to 

18. 00 psia 



0 to 50 psia 

±0. 06 psia 

P ex 

14. 20 to 

14.41 psia 



0 to 30 psia 

±0. 01 psia 

P aex 

14.00 to 

17. 00 psia 

t 


0 to 30 psia 

±0. 01 psia 

P si6 

15. 15 to 

17. 70 psia 



0 to 30 psia 

±0. 022 psia 

P P 

16. 00 to 

14. 00 psia 



0 to 500 psia 

±0. 50 psia 

p te 

36.00 to 

75. 00 psia 



0 to 500 psia 

±0. 75 psia 

Barometer 

28 to 31 in. HgA 



28 to 31 in. HgA 

-0. 009 in. HgA 

T P 

40 to 60°F 

Copper- Constuntun 
Thermocouple 

-100 to H400°F 

±5.0°F 

T te 

40 to 62°F 

Copper- Constantan 
Thermocouple 

-100 to +400°F 

±5. 0°F 














TABLE II 

EJECTOR TABULATED TEST DATA 


BB 

-P. , psia 

T 16 


Probe 1 

Probe 2 

Probe 3 

Probe 4 

Probe 5 

Probe 6 

Probe 7 

Probe 8 

Probe 9 

i 

17.756 

17.765 

17.765 

17.777 

17.793 

17.784 

17.771 

17.762 

17.743 

2 

17.506 

17.519 

17.519 

17.528 

17.541 

17.534 

17.525 

17.513 

17.506 

3 

16.797 

16.821 

16.821 

16.850 

16.843 

16.837 

16.831 

16.821 

16.809 

4 

16.090 

16.090 

16.096 

16.102 

16.112 

16.112 

16.105 

16.102 

16.090 

5 

15.561 

15.561 

15.561 

15.573 

15.573 

15.573 

15.561 

15.561 

15.551 

6 

16.613 

16.613 

16.613 

16.625 

16.641 

16.635 

16.625 

16.619 

16.600 

7 

17.080 

17.086 

17.086 

17.095 

17.114 

17.114 

17.100 

17.092 

17.074 

8 

15.965 

15.978 

15.978 

15.978 

15.984 

15.978 

15.978 

15.965 

15.956 



P avg., 

V 

16 

psia 

\ 6 

Center 

p -/P. 
ex te 

P s /P t 
s 16 16 

Avg. 

1 

17.765 

17.793 

0.3250 

.0.9851 

2 

17.519 

17.541 

0.3190 

0.9846 

3 

16.823 

16.843 

0.3020 

0.9659 

4 

16.098 

16.112 

0.2918 

0.9908 

5 

15.563 

15.573 

0.2689 

0.9915 

6 

16.618 

16.641 

0.2135 

0.9875 

7 

17.091 

17.114 

0.2231 

0.9871 

8 

15.973 

15.984 

0.2189 

0.9892 


AEDC-TR-73-10 

























TABLE II (Continued) 


Run Pt. 
No. 

P p ,psia 

P te , p sia 

P ei .PSia 

P aex' psl ° 

P dex' psia 

P ,psia 

S 16 

P ,psia 
ex’ 

T ,°F 
P 

T te’° F 

1 

140 

50 

16.25 

17.00 

17.50 

17.50 

14.20 

50 

40 

2 

130 

50 

15.95 

16.75 

17.25 

17.25 

14.30 

55 

50 

3 

103 

50.5 

15.25 

16.15 

16.60 

16.25 

14.25 

58 

52 

4 

80 

49 

14.30 

15.60 

15.95 

15.95 

14.20 

58 

52 

5 

52.5 

50.5 

13.58 

15.18 

15.40 

15.43 

14.21 

58 

55 

6 

74 

65 

13.88 

16.00 

15.60 

16.41 

14.21 

55 

62 

7 

92 

65 

14.50 

16.90 

15.10 

16.87 

14.22 

55 

55 

8 

55 

61 

13.35 

15.50 

15.80 

15.80 

14.24 

60 

55 



A", 

lbm/sec 

m' 

lbm/sec 

m"/m' 

lbm/sec 

m t ’ 

lbm/sec 

V OR 

T te-° B 



P + Avg. 
t 16 

(8probes) 

1 

5.825 

2.308 

2.524 

8.133 

510 

500 

22.583 

22.361 

17.765 

2 

5.383 

2.285 

2.356 

7.668 

515 

510 

22.694 

22.583 

17.519 

3 

4.253 

2.304 

1.846 

6.557 

518 

512 

22.760 

22.627 

16.823 

4 

3.303 

2.235 

1.478 

5.538 

518 

512 

22.760 

22.627 

16.098 

5 

2.168 

2.297 

0.944 

4.465 

518 

515 

22.760 

22.694 

15.563 

6 

3.064 

2.937 

1.043 

6.001 

515 

522 

22.694 

22.847 

16.618 

7 

3.809 

2.956 

1.289 

6.765 

515 

515 

22.694 

22.694 

17.091 

8 

2.266 

2.775 

0.817 

5.041 

520 

515 

22.804 

22.694 

15.973 


AE0C-TR-73-10 




























TABLE II (Continued) 


Run Pt. 

P + »psia 

__ 

No. 

Probe 1 

Probe 2 

Probe 3 

Probe 4 

Probe 5 

Probe 6 

Probe 7 

Probe 8 

Probe 9 

1 

17.482 

17.493 

17.493 

17.505 

17.521 

17.521 

17.505 

17.493 

17.482 

2 

16.121 

16.132 

16.132 

16.132 

16.144 

16.138 

16.132 

16.121 

16.110 

3 

15.829 

15.829 

15.829 

15.829 

15.840 

15.829 

15.829 

15.817 

15.812 

4 

15.553 

15.559 

15.559 

15.559 

15.559 

15.559 

15.553 

15.547 

15.542 

5 

15.249 

15.255 

15.255 

15.255 

15.261 

15.255 

15.299 

15.249 

15.238 

6 

16.279 

16.284 

16.279 

16.290 

16.301 

16.301 

16.290 

16.289 

16.273 

7 

17.122 

17.128 

17.128 

17.139 

17.156 

17.150 

17.145 

17.133 

17.117 

8 

17.735 

17.746 

17.746 

17.746 

17.769 

17.769 

17.758 

17.746 

17.724 

9 

16.121 

16.127 

16.127 

16.132 

16.132 

16.132 

16.127 

16.121 

16.110 

10 

16.144 

16.144 

16.144 

16.144 

16.155 

16.155 

16.144 

16.138 

16.127 



P. avg., 
*16 
psia 

P h6 

Center 

P ./P + 
ei te 

P s /P t 

16 16 

Avg. 

1 

17.497 

17.521 

0.2142 

0.9830 

2 

16.127 

16.144 

0.1859 

0.9906 

3 

15.825 

15.840 

0.1736 

1.1185 

4 

15.554 

15.559 

0.1716 

0.9933 

5 

15.251 

15.261 

0.1699 

0.9950 

6 

16.286 

16.301 

0.2866 

0.9910 

7 

17.133 

17.156 

0.2024 

0.9879 

8 

17.746 

17.769 

0.1966 

0.9974 

9 

16.125 

16.132 

0.2070 

0.9891 

10 

16.143 

16.155 

0.1839 

0.9880 


AE DC-TR-73-10 



























TABLE II 


m Pt. 
No. 

P p » psia 

p te’ psla 

P ei ,ps ia 

p aex ,psu«| 

1 

94 

68.5 

14.675 

16.75 

2 

44 

70 

12.975 

15.725 

3 

27 

71 

12.325 

15.450 

4 

i 16 

70.5 

12.1 

15.25 

5 

— 

69 

11.725 

15.05 

6 

82 

50.5 

14.475 

15.825 

7 

80.1 

70.05 

14.175 

16.50 

8 

95 

74.9 

14.725 

17.00 

9 

53 

64.5 

13.35 

15.675 

10 

40 

70.0 

12.875 

15.70 



• 

m ll 

m , 

lbm/sec 

m' 

lbm/sec 

m"/*' 

lbm/sec 

lbm/sec 

1 

3.919 

3.162 

1.239 

7.081 

2 

1.834 

3.231 

0.568 

5.065 

3 

1.123 

3.277 

0.343 

4.400 

4 

0.666 

3.238 

0.206 

3.904 

5 


3.169 

0 

3.169 

6 

3.412 

2.331 

1.464 

5.743 

7 

3.333 

3.218 

1.036 

6.551 

8 

3.961 

3.440 

1.151 

7.401 

9 

2.205 

2.962 

0.744 

5.167 

10 

1.664 

3.215 

0.518 

4.879 



AEDC-TR-73-10 




TABLE III 

EJECTOR TABULATED CALCULATED PERFORMANCE DATA 


Ejector desisn 


DATE 8/14/72 



r’ 

T 

V 

T t " 

R* 

R" 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53,3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

' 1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53,3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53.3400 

53.3400 

1 

<00 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53,3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53.3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53.3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53.3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53,3400 

53,3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53.3400 

53.3400 

1 

< 00 . 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53.3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53,3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53,3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53.3400 

53.3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53,3400 

53,3400 

1 

400 

1.400 

510.0000 

510.0000 

53.3400 

53.3400 


• • • CONSTANT AREA NIXING NO 1 • • . 


TINE 1036.29 


V 

V 


b' 

1 ff 

“3 

N 

b"/b’ 

30.0000 

14.7000 

2.850 

1.371 

.100 

.600 

2.085 

30.0000 

14.7000 

4.255 

1.371 

.150 

.600 

3.104 

30.0000 

14.7000 

5.614 

1.371 

.200 

.600 

4.095 

30.0000 

14.7000 

8.173 

1.371 

.300 

*600 

3.961 

30.0000 

14.7000 

10.457 

1.371 

.400 

.600 

7.627 

50.0000 

14.7000 

2.843 

2.'285 

.100 

.600 

1.244 

50.0000 

14.7000 

4.23b 

2.285 

.150 

.600 

1.851 

50.0000 

14.7000 

5.580 

2.285 

.200 

.600 

2.442 

50.0000 

14.7000 

8.121 

2.285 

.300 

.600 

3.554 

50.0000 

14,7000 

10.383 

2.285 

.400 

.600 

4.544 

70.0000 

14,7000 

2.822 

3.200 

.100 

.600 

0.882 

70.0000 

14.7000 

6.201 

3.200 

*l5p 

.600 

1.313 

70.0000 

14,7000 

5.541 

3.200 

.200 

.600 

1.732 

70.0000 

14,7000 

8.0*2 

3.200 

.300 

.600 

2.519 

70.0000 

14.7Q00 

10.305 

3.200 

.400 

.600 

3.220 


AEDC-TR-73-10 






AEDC-TR-73-10 


APPENDIX III 
EJECTOR DESIGN 
CONSTANT AREA MIXING 


5 



2. COMPUTER INPUTS: 


Program No. 1 

Program No. 2 

7 ' 

7 ' 

V' 

7 " 

T t 


T t 

t" 

A t 

1 

R 

R' 

If 

R 

M 

R 

*>{ 

p t 

ft 

ii 

p t 

• M 

m 

m" 

Ad/A* 

rh' 

11 

m 3 

11 

m 3 

r\ 

r} 


23 



AE DC-TR-73-10 


3. Equations used in computer programs No. 1 and 2: 



pj/p 3 - <Pt/p 3 ) (p;/pi' 




7 1 + 1 



Ag = (A 3 '/A*) A* 
a 3 = (a 3 /a 3 ) a 3 

P 3 = Pj/(P{/P 3 ) 


24 



AEDC-TR-73-10 


F4 = P 3 |>3 {l + 7 ' (Mg') 2 } + Ag" {l + 
= in' + m" 


m 4 


Ra = 


m' R' + m" R" 
rh 4 

7 1 


C = — 

J 7 ' - 1 

7* 


" R" *" 


'P J 7 "- 1 
™4 C P 4 


hj C n< = m' C' + m" c" 


_ m' Cp T; + rh" Cp Tj* 
1 1 4 ~- 


m 4 C 


P4 


71 = r 1 - 

'4 1 TT- 

L J HP4 J 


-1 


Let 


R 4 Tj 

G = (m 4 /F 4 ) 2 ■ and K = 1 - 2 T4 G 


7 4 g 




K - \l K - 2G ' 
_ 1 - 7 4 K 


1/2 


74 

( p t / p) 4 = [l + M 4 2 ] 74 " 1 

__F4_ 

?4 (A d /A v ) A* (1 + 7 4 M 2 ) 

P s 5 /P 4 = 1 + n [<P t /P> 4 - 9 

P s 5 = < P s 5 / P 4) P 4 
A d /A* = (A 3 + .pL 


7" (Mg") 2 }] 


25 



Security Classification 


DOCUMENT CONTROL DATA • R & D 

fSeeurity rtaaaitieation of tftla, body of abatraet and indexing Annotation muci be entered whan (be overall raport fa elaaaifiad) 


I ORIGINATING ACTIVITY fCorporata Author) 2e, REPDRT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 

Arnold Engineering Development Center UNCLASSIFIED _ 

Arnold Air Force Station, Tennessee 37389 »<>■ =»»up 

N/A 


3 REPOR T TITLE 

MODEL INDUCTION TEST FACILITY CAPABILITY FOR TESTING TURBOFAN ENGINES 


« desc RIP ti vE noteS (Typa ot report and Inetualvm datma) 

Final Report - July 6 1971 to June 30, 1972 


S autMORIS) (Fltat name, mlddla initial, lief name; 

James W. Hale, ARO, Inc, 


S REPORT DATE 

March 1973 


•a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NO 


b. PROJEC T NO 


7a. TOTAL NO OF PAGES 17b. NO OF REFS 


9a. ORIGINATOR'S REPORT NUMBER!!I 


AEDC-TR-73-10 


Program Element 65802F 


9b. OTHER REPORT NOIS) (Any othat numbara that may ba aaatgnad 
thia raport) 

ARO-ETF-TR-72-189 


1C DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT 


Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 


II SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 


12. SPONSORING MILI TAR Y ACTIVITY 


Available in DDC 


13 ABSTRACT 


The objective of this model study was to determine the potential 
for testing very large thrust, high-bypass-ratio, turbofan engines at 
conditions simulating flight Mach numbers of 0.4 to 0,6, sea level, by 
use of a jet pumped air supply system. The simulation of low altitude,- 
subsonic operation of a large, high-bypass-ratio, turbofan engine in 
ground test facilities requires extremely large airflows. This airflow, 
even at relatively low pressure, cannot be provided by existing test 
facilities for engines having thrust levels of 60,000 to 100,000 lbf. 

The jet pumped air supply is therefore a very attractive potential 
facility. The purpose of this study is to determine the maximum jet 
pump mass ratio at which the pressure rise corresponding to sea-level 
flight at M - 0.4 to 0.6 can be obtained and the resulting motive air¬ 
flow rate and state conditions required to test engines in the thrust 
class of 60,000 to 100,000 lbf. 


,1473 


Security Classification 

















UNCLASSIFIED 

Security Classification