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AD-A167 341 



OCEAN EN6MEERMG 
AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECT OFFICE 

CHESAPEAKE DIVISION 

NAVAL FACUHES BMNEERM6 COMMAND 
WASHMGTON, DO. 20374 

H 12. 02S 


REHARD BECKWITH, Pf. 


EH6KEERK6 ANALYSIS 


PROJECT MANAGER 


FPO-1-83 (33) 
APPROVED BY: 


TRANSDUCER CALIBRATION 
PLATFORM (TCP) MOORING 

NAVAL UNDERWATER SYSTEMS CENTER, 
SENECA LAKE DETACHMENT 
DRESDEN, NEW YORK 










fl-DJ- J ( Q 3 Y/ 


Unclassified _ 

SE CURITY CLASS IFICRT10N OF THIS PAGE 


REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 


la. REPORT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 
Unclassified 

lb. RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS 

2a. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 

3. DISTRIBUTION AVAILABILITY OF REP. 
Approved for public release; 
distribution is unlimited 

2b. DECLASSIFICATION/DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 

4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 
FPO-1-83(33) 

5. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT # 

6a. NAME OF PERFORM. ORG. 6b. OFFICE SYM 
Ocean Engineering 
& Construction 

Project Office 

CHESNAVFACENGCOM 

7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION 

6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and Zip Code) 
BLDG. 212, Washington Navy Yard 

Washington. D.C. 20374-2121 

7b. ADDRESS (City, State, and Zip ) 

8a. NAME OF FUNDING ORG. 8b. OFFICE SYM 

9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT INDENT # 


8c. ADDRESS (City. State & Zip) 10. SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS 


PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT 
ELEMENT # # # ACCESS # 


11. TITIE (Including Security Classification) 

Completion Report for Transducer Calibration Platform (TCP) Mooring Naval 
Underwater Systems Center. Seneca Lake Detachment Dresden, New York. _ 

12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) 


13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REP. (YYMMDD) 15. PAGES 

_ FROM _TO_83_ 47 

16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 


17. _ COSAT I CODES _ 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if nec.) 

FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Platforms. Mooring systems, Dresden, N.Y. 

_ Naval Underwater Systems Center Seneca Lake 

_ Detachment 


19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary & identify by block number) 

The Ocean Engineering & Construction Project Office of the Chesapeake 
Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (CKESDIV) accepted tasking from 
the Naval Underwater Systems Center (NUSC), Newport, Rhode Island, to design 
and monitor the installation of a 4-point mooring for the Transducer (Con't) 

20. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 

SAME AS RPT. _ 

22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL 22b. TELEPHONE 22c. OFFICE SYMBOL 

Jacqueline B. Riley _ 202-433-3881 _ 

DD FORM 1473, 84MAR SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE 












BLOCK 19 (Con't) 

Calibration Platform at the Naval Underwater Systems Center Seneca Lake 
Detachment, Dresden, New York. CHESDIV also monitored the recovery of the 
existing temporary mooring and prepared a bill of materials of the recovered 
components. 

The recovery and installation operations were performed under a firm fixed 
price contract awarded by Northern Division, Naval Facilities Engineering 
Command (NORTHDIV) to Dissen and John Corporation, of East Webster, New York. 
Operations commenced 20 June 1983 and were completed on S August 1983. 

This report describes the procedures used to recover three existing moorings 
and to install and prooT test a 4-point mooring in 535 feet of water. 




1 


ABSTRACT 


The Ocean Engineering end Construction Project Office of the Chesapeake 
Division, Nava'. Facilities Engineering Comm; >d (CHESDIV) accepted tasking from 
the Naval Underwater System Center (NUSC), Newport, Rhode Island, to design and 
monitor the Installation of a 4-point mooring for the Traneducer Calibration 
Platform at the Naval Underwater Systems Center, Seneca Lake Detachers, Dresden, 
New York. CHESDIV also monitored the recovery of the existing temporary mooring 
and prepared a bill of materials of the recovered components. 


The recovery and Installation operations ware performed under a firm fixed 
price contract awsrded by Northern Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Coammnd 
(NORTHDIV), to Dlsean and Juhn Corporation, of East Webster, New York. Opera¬ 
tions commenced 20 June 1983 and were colleted on 5 August 1983. 


'This 
logs and to 

K.i' ■ i‘ ‘ ■ r > 


report describee the procedures used to recover three existing moor- 


Install and proof test a 4-polnt mooring In 535 feet of water. 

' ■■ ■ f.-o /-. <c./" [V/. - / rr>- • 



l 








TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Section/Paragraph Pag* 

Aba tract.... ..1 

Table of Content*.11 

List of Illustrations . ....Ill 

1.0 INTRODUCTION.1 

1.1 Background.... • 1 

1.2 Design and Operational Procedures . 1 

1.3 Equipment and Materials . 4 

1.4 Mobilisation...6 

2.0 RECOVERY...6 

2.1 Procedure...6 

2.2 Bill of Materials Recovered.11 

3.0 INSTALLATION.11 

4.0 TESTING.16 

4.1 Test Procedure.16 

4.2 Test Results...23 

4.3 Calibration Verification . 28 

3.0 TRANSFORM FLOAT CONWCTION.28 

6.0 00NICCTION OF TEMPORARY MOORING PATTERN LINES.31 

7.0 E NV IRONIC NT AL DATA.33 

8.0 PROJECT PERSONNEL...33 

9.0 LESSONS LEARNED...34 

APFFNDIX A - Bill of Materials Recovered.A-l 

APPENDIX B - "A*-built' Drawing and Discrepancy List.B-l 


11 


5 


Acceston For 


NTIS CRA4I 
OTIC TAB 
Unannounced 
Justification 


□ 

□ 


By_ 

Diet Ibution/ 


AveiiabtiHy Codes 

Dist 

Avan and/or 


/?-/ 





























LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 


Figure 

Nu*er Description Pegs 

1 Map of Area .. 2 

2 Chart of Seneca Lake .... . 3 

3 40-Foot x 130-Foot Crane Barge .... . 3 

4 Crane Barge, 43-Foot Steel Tug, 

and 18-Foot Runabout . 3 

3 Naval Underwater Systeae Center Seneca Lake . 7 

6 Temporary Storage Area for Buoys, Sinkers 

and Anchors. 7 

7 Temporary Northeast and Northwest Buoys Kith 

Transformer Float • .. 8 

8 Recovering Northwest Mooring ....... . 8 

9 Carpenters Stopper Used to Lift end Stop-off 

Riser ..10 

10 Anchor With Flukes Fixed Open to 30 Degrees . 13 

11 Lowering Anchor Over the Side of Crane Barge.14 

12 Anchor in Direction of Pull and Ready for Lowering . . 14 

13 Lowering Chain With Pelican Book; Note Sinker 

Shackle Used as Stopper.13 

14 Anchor Crown Buoy.IS 

13 8ack-to-Back 2 1/2-inch Safety Shackle end 

Sinker Sheckle Connection.17 

16 Lowering Chain end Sinker; Note Layout of 

Chain end Wire.17 

17 Carpenters Stopper Attached to 1 3/4-inch Riser Hire • 18 

18 Carpenters Stoppers; Top for Lifting, Botton 

Uaed Over the Side eg e Stopper.18 

19 Hire Rope Clips end Bow Pin Shackles Uaed for 

Connection of Temporary Lines.19 

20 Open Swage Wire Rope Fitting.20 

21 Uelded Pin on Open Swage Hire Rope Fitting.20 

22 Open Swage Connecting the End of the Chain to 

the 1 3/4-inch Hire Cable Riser.21 

23 North Mooring Buoy for Leg No. 1 . . . ..22 

24 South Mooring Buoy for Leg No. 3 ... ..22 

23 Sketch of Barge as Set Up for Pull Teat.24 

26 Dillon Dynaaoaater Used for Pull Teat of Anchors ... 23 

27 H-Been Welded to Deck end Stlffandad 

to Act ee Deed Eyea ..23 

28 Connecting Purchase for Deck Pull of Anchors.26 

2* Purchesa Connected to Pulling Hire From Buoy . 26 

30 Buoy Response a: Specified Load of 30,000 lbe .... 27 

31 As-Built Detail Sketch of Mooring Buoy Leg No. 2 . . . 29 

32 Connecting Beet 1 1/4-inch Baldt Di-Lok Chain 

Bridle to the Transforasr Float.30 

33 Connecting Heat 1 1/4-inch Baldt Dl-Lok Chain 

Bridle to the Transformer Float.30 

34 Final Pattern of Trensforaer Float . 32 

33 Tranaforaer Float and Heat Mooring Buoy.32 


ill 
































COMPLETION REPORT 


FOE 

TRANSDUCER CALIBRATION PLATFORM (TCP) MOORING 

NAVAL UNDERWATER SYSTEMS CENTER, SENECA LARS EETACHtCNT 
DRESDEN, NEW YORK 


1.0 INTRODUCTION 

1.1 Background . The Ocaan Engineering and Conatrueeion Projnct Office (VPO-1) 
of CBESDIV accepted tanking from NUSC Navport, Rhoda Inland, to daalgn a A-point 
■coring for tha Tranaducar Calibration Platfors (TCP) oparatad bp NUSC In Sanaca 
Laku naar Dresden, Naw Tork. Tanking aiao laclriad aonltorlng tha racovary of the 
exlatlng teaporerp TCP aoorlng and tha inatallatlon of tha new aoorlng. A nap of 
the area and a chart of Seneca Lake are shown In Flguraa 1 end 2. A flra fixed 
price contract for tha recovery end Inatallatlon wan awarded bp NOITHDIV to 
Dlaaen and Juhn Coporation, Eaat Webeter, Naw York. Recovery operetloaa began on 
20 June 1983, and Inatallatlon waa completed on 3 Auguat 1983. 

Thla report deacrlbaa tha procedurea uaed to recover end lnatell a aoorlng 
in 333 feet of wtet. Raconanndatlona end “lessons learned*, baaed on experi¬ 
ence gained during tha field oparetloua, ere preaented. A bill of atterlele 
Hating all recovered aoorlng component* la Included ea Appendix A. The "••-built* 
drawing of the new 4-polnt Boring la Included In Appendix B. 

1.2 Dealgo end Operational Procedurea . Daalgn of tha TCP 4-polnt aoorlng waa 
coapleted bp FP0-1. The Contractor, with CBESDIV approval, developed recovery, 
inatallatlon, end prjof test procedurea. The "••-built" drawing - NAVFAC Drawing 
No. 3026161, "NUSC Lake Seneca, NY, Tranaducar Callbrstlon Plat fora (TCP) 4-Polnt 


1 









fut 




























Mooring; Sit*, Plan, and Details", Revision 8 of 19 August 1983 - 1* Included In 
Appandlx 8 and will b* rafaranced throughout this raport. 

1.3 Equlpssnt and Matarlala . 

1.3.1 Covarnaent Purnlahad Equlpaent and Matarlala . Equlpaant suppliad by NUSC: 

(a) Two carpantar's atoppara. (Kota: During th* storing Installation 
a wadga froa ona of tha atoppara was lost overboard.) 

(b) Thra* return blocks. 

(c) Ona center arkar buoy, Installed. 

(d) Pour 2 1/2-lnch bow safety shackles. 

Matarlala Suppliad by CSESDIV: Tha governaant provided astarlal for an 
anglnaarlng change order which addad scoring bridles for attachaant of tha TCP 
transforaer float to tha 4-polnt storing (sas paragraph S.O). 

1.3.2 Material and Equlpaant Furnished by Contractor . The Contractor suppliad 
all storing aatarlal and coaponants (buoys, chain, fittings, wire rope, anchors, 
atc>)» except as noted above. 

Tha following equlpssnt was provided by th* Contractor for storing re¬ 
covery, Installation, and tasting: 

(a) A 40-foot by 130-foot steal barge. Tha barge had two anchor winches, 
each fitted with thra* Independent wire rope drusi (saa Figures 3 and 4). 

(b) A 50-ton hydraulic »hll* crane with talesr.cplc boos. T h* boon was 
rigged with a thra*-part wire block. 

(c) A 45-foot steal tug, used to anauvar th* crana barg*. 

(d) An 18-foot runabout, for personnel transportation. 


4 







s 



FIGURE 4 

CRANE BARGE. 45 FOOT STEEL TUG. AND 
IB FOOT RUNABOUT 


s 








(e) A Dillon dynamometer, used to measure the applied load during pull 


testing. 


1.4 Mo bill ration . The Initial mobilization was at Dlssen and Juhn's terminal 

at Weedsport, New York. Here, the four 9 1/2-shot lengths of chain, used In the 
mooring riser legs, were connected and arranged on the deck of the crane barge. 
Each connection between shots was painted with a unique marking used to Identify 
the amount of chain in the water or on deck at any tins during the Installation. 
All other mooring components were also loaded at this time. The barge was moved 
through the Cayuga-Seneca lake Canal to Seneca lake and then down the lake to 
NUSC, a total distance of approximately 50 miles. At NUSC, the anchors, sinkers, 
and buoys were off-loaded in order to make available additional deck space for 
the recovered mooring components. The off-loaded components were stored on the 
lake bed In shallow water, since no dock space was available at NUSC (see Figures 
5 and 6). 

2.0 RECOVERY 

2.1 . Procedure . The existing temporary mooring consisted of three buoys, 

located In the northwest, northeast, and southeast quadrants of the TCP barge 
location. The three existing buoys, similar to those shown In Figures 7 and 8, 
ware recovered, complete with all components. In addition, the fittings used to 
secure the TCP power transformer float between the northwest and northeast buoys 
ware recovered. The transformer float, lAtlch was connected to a submerged live 
electrical cable from shore, was in the work area making it necessary to contin¬ 
ually minauver around the float to avoid a collision. 


6 




FIGURE 5 


NAVAL UNDERWATER SYSTEM CENTER 
SENECA LAKE 



FIGURE 6 

TEMPORARY STORAGE AREA FOR BUOYS, 
SINKERS, AND ANCHORS 


7 










e 








The northeast mooring was recovered first, after releasing the transformer 
float connection. The recovery was completed without incident, and the barge was 
moved to shore to off-load the recovered components. 

Next, the transformer float was disconnected from the northwest mooring. 
(Note: The float remained moored by its 5-inch electrical power cable until It 
was attached to the new 4-point mooring, as described In paragraph 5.0.) When the 
float was released from the northwest buoy, it veered over the government's 
preinstalled center marker buoy, cutting the buoy's light mooring line. The 
marker buoy drifted off station, but was replaced by the government 2 days 
later. In the meantime, the Contractor used the transformer float as a naviga¬ 
tional reference. When the center marker buoy was replaced, it was positioned 
approximately 60 feet too far to the west. However, its position was acceptable 
since NUSC preferred to have the barge position tolerance to the west because of 
the electrical cable connected to the transformer float. The buoy wae referenced 
throughout the installation for bearings end distances. 

During the recovery of the northwest mooring, the variation of the crane 
loada and the notion of the crene itself indicated thet a bundle, or ball, of 
chain had been picked up from the bottom. The bundle suddenly untangled. The 
resulting repld change in tension caused the crane to rock from side to side. 

This wee the only potentially serious nlehep on the project. It resulted in no 
damage or Injury. 

After disconnecting the buoy of the southeast mooring, the crane wae 
connected to the 1 1/4-lnch wire rope riser in an attempt to recover the remain¬ 
der of the components, as had baen accomplished for the other two m>orlngs (see 
Figure 9). However, with the crane holding at approximately 40 tons of tension 
for 30 mlnu ; , nothing moved. After shifting water ballast in the barge to 





FIGURE 9 


CARPENTERS STOPPERS USED TO 
LIFT AND STOP-OFF WIRES 


10 









\ 


provide acre life, tension was again taken on the riser. Aftar waiting another 
30 otnutas for a possible suction break, thera was still no change in the atti¬ 
tude of the crane barge. The Contractor was than Instructed to cut the rlsar, in 
the interest of safety for both the barge crew and the transformer float, which 
was downwind of and in close proxisdty to the barge. This action was reported to 
the ROICC and to personnel at NUSC. The forenan rigger at NBSC ststad that "the 
scoring had been down over 20 years", and that there was no chain in the riser - 
only wlra rope secured to concrete mushroom anchors. 

2.2 Bill of Materials Recovered . The bill of materials presented in Appendix 
A lists all ntarlel recovered from tha threa scorings and the transformer 
float attachments. 

3.0 INSTALLATION 

Following collation of all recovary operations, tha crane barge was 
canterad over the repositioned center airker buoy on a north-south haadlng, 
with hedge anchors set out froa aach quarter. Bearings wera than taken on prom¬ 
inent features eshora which coincided with the da«.t*vt bearing of aach aoorlng 
lag. A preaeesured end Mrked polypropylene line was used to datarslna distances 
froa the erena barge, end the tug moved In turn to aach of the four preasteb- 
llshed anchor locations. Marker buoys - consisting of seeled elualnua bear kegs, 
painted red, and attached to a sasll anchor by one-half Inch nylon lino - were 
positioned for reference during the placement of the anchors. 

Tha general procaduras described below were followed during the installa¬ 
tion of each aoorlng leg. During lowering, the anchors were elung by a bridle 
In e horleontal position. A steel bar had previously been welded across the 
palms of the flukes to keep the flukes open et an angle of 30 degree# to the 


11 



slunk (see Figure 10). The snchors were lowered by the bridle st the port side, 
forward, with 5/8-inch diameter wire rope from the port side der.k winch. The 
riser chain, which was connected to the anchor shank with an anchor shackle, was 
lowered eiaultaneously by the crane, located amidships along the port side (see 
Figures 11 and 12). The horizontal distance between the chain and bridle lowering 
locations alleviated any tendency of the anchor to twist while being lowered 
through the 53S-foot water colum (cee Figure 13). 

When the anchor reached the bottom, the lowering wire was cut from the 
winch and secured to a 4-foot diameter spherical buoy. This buoy served ae 
sn anchor crown marker, and also provided a means of recovering the anchor 
la the event the Inboard end of the riser was lost for any reason during the 
remainder of the Installation (eas Figure 14). 

After the anchor wee on the bottom, the reaalnder of the chain was payed 
out while the crane barga was pulled toward the csntsr of the mooring site by 
the two forward kedge anchors. Probleoa were encountered with the kadge anchors 
coming hooa, primarily bacause the 1,900 of wire on the winch drums did not 
allow for a long enough scope la over S00 feet of water. In addition, at 3,000 
pounds, the kedge anchors were too light for the Job. This problem was over- 
coaa, but required sore than twice the normal nuBer of kedge anchor sets during 
the installation of the northwest and northeast moorings. During the Installa¬ 
tion of the southeast end southwest Borings, this problea did not recur beceuss 
ths reciprocal oeorlag - northwest end northeast, respectively - was used to 
pull ahead, instead of kedge anchors. In these cases, only one kadge ms set 
upwind to keep the barge online end the mooring leg taut end on the eorrsct 
bearing. 


12 






FIGURE 10 


ANCHOR WITH FLUKES FIXED OPEN 
TO SO DEGREES 






FIGURE 12 


ANCHOR IN DIRECTION OF FULL AND 
READY FOR LOWERING 

14 





FIGURE 13 

LOWERING CHAIN WITH PELICAN 
HOOK. NOTE SINKER SHACKLE 
USED AS STOPPER 





The sinker wee connected on the lest helf-shot of cheln in each mooring 
leg, one link In from the lest full shot (see Figures IS end 16). The connection 
vis asda with a 2 1/2-inch safety shackle back-to-back with a sinker shackle as 
shown in Detell A of the ’as-built" drawing. The nut on the safety shackle was 
welded In place, and the locking pin on the slnkar sheckle was peenad over. 

The sinker was lowered to tha bottom, than raised 10 feet while e strain was 
taken on tha kadga anchors or pulling lines to ensure that the chain was taut. 
Tha sinker was lowered again after all slack wea taken out of tha chain. 

Next, the 1 3/4-inch riser wire, which had previously been connected to 
the end of the chain, was lowered by tha crane over the eida of the barge (see 
Flguras 17 and 10). Wire ropa clips and bow shackles were than secured to the 
riser wire, aa shown in Figure 19 and Detail F of the ’as-built’ drawing. These 
fittings wera later used to sacura the temporary mooring pattam lines, as dis¬ 
cussed in paregaph 6.0. Flrelly, the buoy was connected to tha riser wire by an 
open awaga fitting, shown in Flguras 20, 21, 6 22 and Details B, C end C of tha 
"es-built' drawing. 

Tha buoys wera left with the mooring lines secured to the chafing rail, 
as shown in Figures 23 end 26. 

6.0 TESTINC 

6.1 Test Procedures . The contract specifications called for a test consisting 
of e slaiaun of 30,000 pounds horlaontel pull sppllod to diagonally opposed 
mooring legs for at least 13 Routes, with a msxlwa anchor drsg of 30 foot 
being ecceptabla. If an anchor dragged mare than 30 feet, it was to be reset 
and tested until a drag of less than 30 feet was attained. The test procedures 


16 




FIGURE IE 

LOWERING CHAIN AND LINKER, 
NOTE LAYOUT OF CHAIN AND WIRE 


17 

















FIGURE 19 


WIRE ROPE CUPS AND 
BOW PIN SHACKLES USEO FOR 
CONNECTION OF 
TEMPORARY LINES 


19 










FIGURE 21 

WELDED PIN ON OPEN SWAGE 
WIRE ROPE FITTING 


20 




FIGURE 22 


OPEN SWAGE CONNECTING THE 
END OF THE CHAIN TO THE 
1-3/4 INCH WIRE CABLE RISER 


21 








FIGURE 23 

NORTH MOORING BUOY FOR 
LEG NO. 1 



FIGURE 24 


SOUTH MOORING BUOY FOR 
LEG NO. 3 


22 








adopted In the field essentially followed the pre-established procedures, 
with some additional steps Included. 

Prior to testing, the crane barge was positioned In the center of the 
mooring pattern. Mooring lines from diagonally opposed buoys were then secured 
in turn on the barge deck, with the southern leg connected to the dynamometer 
and the northern leg attached to the four-fold purchase, as shown In Figures 
25 through 30. 

Before applying the full test load of 30,000 pounds, a tension of 6,000 
pounds was applied to the buoys to determine the barge and buoy positions under 
load. While the mooring lines were in tension, fixes were taken on references 
ashore. During this phase of the testing. It was determined that the northeast 
buoy's mooring line was 85 feet short of the on-deck connection. This discrepancy 
was corrected as described In paragraph 4.2 below. 

After determining the buoy locations, the Contractor applied the final 
acceptance proof test load of 30,000 pounds for 15 minutes. This was done for 
each set of diagonally opposed mooring legs. 

4.2 Test Results. 

The first pull test was conducted on 28 July 1983, on the northwest 
and southeast buoys. A steady pull of 30,000 pounds wes sustained from 1830 
to 1845. Testing of the northsast and southwest buoys was conducted on 2 August 
1983, with 30,000 pounds of tension applied from 1524 to 1539. 

The CHESDIV Project Manager witnessed and approved the tests. After the 
tests, bearings were taken on the anchor crown marker buoys, and the CHESDIV 
Project Manager determined that there had been no significant drag of the anchors. 


23 





ANCHOR 


'l 



SKETCH OF BARGE 
AS SET UP FOR PULL TEST 


I 


24 






FIGURE 26 

DILLON DYNAMOMETER USED FOR 
PULL TEST OF ANCHORS 



»\ • 


FIGURE 27 

H-BEAM WELDED TO DECK AND 
STIFFENED TO ACT AS DEAD-EYE 


25 







FIGURE 28 



WRlC' f> 


CONNECTING UP PURCHASE FOR 
DECK PULL OF ANCHORS 


FIGURE 29 


PURCHASE CONNECTED TO PULLING 
WIRE FROM BUOY 


2 








However, due Co Che norCheeeC scoring being en estimated 85 feec shore, Che 
contractor ns Instructed Co add one shoe (90 feec) of 1 1/4-inch Beldc Di-Lok 
chain between Che Cowing place and Che open ange fleeing on Che buoy and of Che 
1,100-fooe length of riser wire (see Figure 31 and Detail G of the "aa-built" 
drawing)* 

4.3 Calibration Verification . A Dillon end Coapany, Inc. dynaaenter. Serial 
Nuaber AN 54735, was uaed to aeasura proof test loads. The dynaeoaeter was last 
calibrated on 15 February 1983, and scheduled for raeallbratlon on 15 February 
1984. 

5.0 TRANSFORMER FLOAT CONWCTION 

After the Installation of the additional length of the chain to the 
northeast aoorlng, the crane barge was aoved to the canter of the scoring 
pattern. A winch wire from the barge was run through return blocks teaporarlly 
eat up o?. each buoy, and a tension of epproalaately'6 kips was applied to 
aoor the barge In the position which the TCF will occupy when aoored. At thla 
point tha trensforner float waa located forward and slightly to the waat of 
the crane barge. 

To aecuro the trenaforaer float between tha northwest end northeast 
buoys, tha CBESDIV Project Manager tructed the contractor to fit e bridle to 
the pedayes at the corners of each 'nd of tha float (see Figures 32 end 33). The 
bridle, consisting of 1 1/4-lnch Di >k chain with associated fittings, was con¬ 
nected to each buoy's aoorlng line at ihown In Detail R of the “es-built" drawing. 


I 




FIGURE 31 


“AS BUILT DETAIL SKETCH 
OF MOORING BUOY LEG NO. 2 











FIGURE 32 


CONNECTING EAST 1 1/4 INCH BALDT 
DI-LOK CHAIN BRIDLE ON THE 
TRANSFORMER FLOAT 



FIGURE 33 


CONNECTING WEST 1 1/4 INCH BALDT 
DI-LOK CHAIN BRIDLE ON THE 
TRANSFORMER FLOAT 






Th« notarial for thla change order was auppUad Co Cha Contractor by CHESDIV and 
lncludad: 

(a) Ona ahot (90 faat) of 1 l/4-lnch Baldt Dl-Lok chain* 

(b) four 1 i/4-inch joining link*. 

(c) Two 2 l/2-lnch bow aafaty shackles. 

(d) Four 1 3/8-lnch acraw pin shackles. 

(a) Two 12 1/2-lnch by 2 3/8-lnch dlawatar ground rings. 

Tha coaponents for tha brldla wara taken froa tha aatarlal recovered froa tha 

taaporary noo rings. Tha final lnatallad poaltlon of tha tranaforaar float la 
ah own In tha Plan Vlaw on cha "aa-bullt* drawing and In Plguraa 34 and 35. 

6.0 comecTioH or tenpokaxt noouns pattem liws 

Mian tha tranaforaar float waa In place, and with a tanalon of 6 kips 
atlll balng applied to all four snoring buoys, divers wars aaployad to connact 
tha taaporary scoring pattarn llnas* Tha taaporary pattarn Unaa, which wara 
aacurad to tha four anorlng Unaa 20 faat balow cha buoya, ara uaad to kaap 
tha 4-polnt anorlng In a ractangla of 420 by 300 faat to slapUfy coring of 
tha TCP. Tha connactlons of tha te^orary 1 1/2-lnch dlaaatar nylon Una to 

tha previously aacurad cUps and bow ahacklaa was lnspactad In placa and found 

to ba In coapUanca with apadflcatlona (aaa Datall P of ’ss-bullf drawing). 

Aftar tha taaporary pattarn Unaa wara aacurad, tha crana barge slowly 
aaaad out tha entire pattarn until all Unaa wore slack. Tha to^orary anorlng 
pattern's final configuration waa as designed and la Indicated In the Plan Vlaw 
on tha "as-built" drawing. Tha noorlng Unas and tha 10-foot lengths of chafing 
chain wara left tlad with atoppers to tha top of each bu~y. Tha southeast buoy's 
anorlng Una la 26-feet short, aa reflect ad la cha *ee-bullt* drawing and cha 


31 







FIGURE 34 

FINAL PATTERN OF 
TRANSFORMER FLOAT 



FIGURE 35 

TRANSFORMER FLOAT AND 
WEST MOORING BUOY 


32 







discrepancy llac In Appendix B. Howvsr, alnce Chle scoring lag we placed at e 
depth 35 feat laes than the design depth, the shorter scoring line we acceptable. 
A final heading of 328.S*T, versus the designed 3301, we obtained and la shown 
on the "ee-built" drawing. 

7.0 ENVIROWCKTAL DATA 

The Contractor had 4 down days due to wether. High wind* wre the 
priaery problea, end appeared to result froa the funnel affect caused by the 
high terrain on either side of the long, narrow lake. To eoae extent the llaltlng 
wind conditlone varied depending on the phase of the project being worked on. 

In general, wlnde over 20 HPH, ee reported by the aerlne wether station, wre 
considered too strong to work In affectlwly. For exaapla, when laying out 
chain in quartering winds and sees, it we not possible to keep on line end 
reset kedge anchors with one saell tug. 


8.0 PROJECT PERSONNEL. 



mug 

AGERCT 

TITLE 

Dr. Richard Beckwith 

CHESDIV 

Project Hanager 

H.. Wllllaa Seellg 

CHESDIV 

Design Engineer 

Hr. Allan Rubier 

CHESDIV 

Aaelstant Engineer 

Hr. Tla Laaoy 

NORTKDIV 

ROXCC (Row, K.Y.) 

Hr. Paul Hcfhearson 

NORTHDIV 

Inspector (Row, N.Y.) 

Hr. Art Tralsbahk 

HUSC 

Aaeletent Hanager (Dresden, N.Y.) 

Hr. Gilbert Dlssan 

Dtsssn 4 Juhn 

Prlw Contractor 

Hr. Hartln Juhn 

Corporation 


Hr. Peter UllUaaa 

VSE Corporation 

Technical Honltor for ROICC/ 


ocsorr 


33 





9.0 LESSONS LEARNED 


9.1 The Contractor, Dissen and Juhn Corporation, was found to be very respon¬ 
sive and cooperative during ell phases of the operation. Change orders, field 
modifications, and other revisions were executed In a timely and professional 
manner. The Contractor demonstrated e high degree of accuracy In the Installa¬ 
tion of this deepwater mooring. The crane barge cew worked extremely well as a 
team. Dissen end Juhn Is highly recommended as a contractor for future mooring 
projects or other marine work In the Eastern United States. 

9.2 The successful completion of this project demonstrates that high-quality 
marine construction work can be performed by a relatively Inexperienced contrac¬ 
tor, given a sound yet flexible design, thorough but adaptable operational 
planning, end a full-time quality control and monitoring effort. These attributes 
contributed to the success of the project, despite the feet that the Contractor 
had not previously worked on a mooring recovery or Installation. 

9.3 Accurate navigation and precise locational data are of utmost Importance 
on a deepwater mooring Installation. Tha lack of prominent landmarks on which 
to take fixes should be anticipated In lass developad rsglons or In areas for 
which detailed nautical charts ara not evellebla. Temporary range monuments 
should be set up on shore prior to tha Installation of center or anchor marker 
buoys. 


Tha positioning of buoys end vessels may be facilitated by the use of some 
simple, readily available equlp«nt. The CHESDIV Project Manager has recommended 


3A 



that the government representative have the following Items as part of a standard 
package on future Installations of this type: 

(a) Chart of the area. 

(b) Navigational tools: three-leg station pointer, dividers, compasses, 
and an aziimith circle fitted to a boat's cospass or a hand-held bearing conpass. 

(c) Binoculars. 

(d) Sounding chain or lead line. 

(e) Distance line wound on a hand-held reel. 

A Mini-Ranger would have been a valuable asset when setting marker buoys 
and anchors, and when verifying positions. A hand-held range finder would also 
be helpful when confirming distances between anchor and center marker buoys. 

9.4 In order to reduce the hazard to personnel presented by slippery buoy 
topside decking. It Is recommended that buoy decks be covered with lightweight 
fiberglass or steel gratings, coated with nonskid paint, or constructed of 
diamond-pattern nonskid plate. 




APPENDIX A 


BILL OF MATERIALS RECOVERED 



BILL OF MATERIALS RECOVERED 


FROM NORTHEAST MOORING 


QUANTITY 

EE SCRIPT ION 

CONDITION 

1 

Buoy: 30 feet x 3 feet, 

In need of 


cylindrical 

maintenance 


Buoy Jewelry: TOP: none 


1 

BOTTOM: 3-inch pear link 

GOOD 

1 

2-inch bold shackle 

Wire Rope: 

GOOD 

1 

Length - 660 feet 

Diameter - 1 3/8 Inches 

Fitted with thitable eye on both ends, 
amde up with Crosby wire clips. 

GOOD 

2 

Length - 150 feet 

Diameter - 1 3/8 Inches 

Fitted as above. 

GOOD 

1 

Length - 100 feet 

Diameter - 1 3/8 Inches 

Spliced tillable eye on each end. 

POOR 


Shackles: 

• 

*2 

Bow Safety, 2 1/2-inch 

GOOD 

1 

"D" shackle, 2-inch 

GOOD 

2 

"D" shackle, 1 3/4-inch 

Detachable Links: 

GOOD 

6 

Connecting Link, Baldt, 1 1/4-lnch 

GOOD 

1 

Connecting Link, Baldt, 1 1/8-lneh 

GOOD 

1 

Connecting Link, Baldt, 1 3/8-inch 

GOOD 

2 

Connecting Link, Baldt, 1 3/4-lnch 

Chain: 

GOOD 

4 1/2 ihoti 

1 1/8-inch Baldt Di-Lok 

A-2 

GOOD - New 
condition, 
no measure- 
able wear. 




BILL OF MATERIALS RECOVERED 


FROM NORTHEAST MOORING - Continued 


QUANTITY 

DESCRIPTION 

CONDITION 

7 shots 

1 1/4-inch Baldt Di-Lok 

GOOD - New 
condition, 
no measure- 
able wear 

45 feet 

1 1/2-inch Baldt Di-Lok 

GOOD 

25 feet 

1 1/2-inch Baldt Di-Lok 

GOOD 


Anchor: 


1 

Danforth type, 3140 lbs.. 

Serial No. 41179-JL, 1944, 

U.S. Navy 

GOOD - New 
condition 

2 

Flashing Lanterns 

WORKING 


*The two bov safety shackles were later used In the transformer float bridle. 


A-3 




BILL OF MATERIALS RECOVERED 
FROM NORTHWEST MOORING 


QUANTITY DESCRIPTION CONDITION 


1 

Buoys 30 feet x 5 feet, 
cylindrical 

In need of 
maintenance 

I 

1 

Buoy Jewelry: TOP: none 

BOTTOM: 3-inch pear link 

2 1/2-inch safety bow 
shackle 

GOOD 

GOOD 


Wire Rope: 


2 

Length - 250 feet 

Diameter - l 3/8 inches 

Fitted with thinble eye on one end, 
made up with Crosby wire clips. 

The other end was cut. 

POOR 

2 

Length - 150 feet 

Diameter - 1 3/8 inches 

Fitted with spliced thinfcle eye 
each end. 

POOR 


Shackles: 


*2 

Bow Safety, 2 1/2-inch ' 

GOOD 

1 

"D" Shackle, 1 1/2-inch 

GOOD 


Detachable Linka: 


*2 

Anchor joining linka, Baldt, 

1 1/4-inch x 1 9/16 inch 

GOOD 

*8 

Connecting Linka, Baldt, 1 1/4-inch 

GOOD 

2 

Connecting Linka, Baldt, 1 3/8-inch 

GOOD 


Chain: 


8 shots 

1 1/4-inch Baldt Di-Lok 

GOOD 

2 shots 

1 3/8-inch Baldt Di-Lok 

GOOD 

4 1/2 ahota 

1 i/8-inch Baldt Di-Lot 

GOOD - New 


condition, 
no Ktiur** 
•bit wear. 


A-4 



BILL OF MATERIALS RECOVERED 


FROM NORTHWEST MOORING - Continued 


QUANTITY 


IE SCRIPT ION 


*7 shots 1 1/4-inch Baldt Di-Lok 


45 feet 1 1/2-lnch Baldt Dl-Lok 

25 feet 1 1/2-lnch Baldt Di-Lok 

Anchor; 

1 Danforth type, 3000 lbs., 

Serial No. 6858, Breda 1953, 
U.S. Navy 

1 Flashing Lantern From Buoy 


CONDITION 

GOOD - New 
condition, 
no measure- 
able wear 

GOOD 

GOOD 


GOOD 


WORKING 


*Two bow safety shackles, two anchor Joining links, four 1 1/4-inch connecting 
links, and one shot of 1 1/4-lnch Di-Lok chein were later used in the trans¬ 
former float bridle. 


A-5 





BILL OF MATERIALS RECOVERED 


QUANTITY 

1 


1 


3 

*5 

1 

I 

I 


*2 


I 

I 


3 

10 


FROM TRANSFORMER FLOAT 
AND SOUTHEAST BUOY 


DESCRIPTION 

Buoy: 30 feet x 5 feet, 
cylindrical 

Buoy Jewelry: TOP: none 

BOTTOM: Fixed Ring 
12-ineh I.D. x 1 1/2-1nch 

Shackles and Joining Llnka : 

”D" Shackles, 2-inch 

-D” Shackles, 1 1/2-inch 

Bow Shackle, 2 3/4-inch 

Bow Shackle, 2 1/8-1nch 

Connecting Link, Baldt, 1 1/2-inch 

Rlhga: 

12 1/2-1 nch I.D. x 2 3/8-inch 
Swivel* : 

2-1nch 
l 1/2-1 nch 
Chain : 

Short Lengths (under 10 feet), 

Various Sires 

Various Lengths of 1 1/8-lnch Wire 
Rope with Spelter Sockets 


CONDITION 

In need of 
nelntenance 


POOR 

GOOD 

GOOD 

GOOD 

GOOD 

GOOD 

POOR 

POOR 

GOOD 

POOR 


*The two ground rings and four of the 1 1/2-inch "D“ shac’-.les were later used 
In the transforaer float bridle. 


A-6 


APPENDIX B 

"AS-BUILT" DRAWING AND DISCREPANCY LIST 


B-I 











































































DISCREPANCY LIST 


See "Aa-Bullt ’ 


Require want 

1. Place Noa. 10 and 11 - 
■wage fitting* ahall ba 
galvanised according Co 
ASTM atandarda A123 and 
A1S3 (par paragraph 2.5, 
paga 02199-2 of Spec. 

No. OA-82-0378 to Con¬ 
tract No. N62472-82-C- 
0378) 


2. Place No. 16 - 6x37 
I VAC alra rope, 1 3/4- 
lnch, 180-foot lengtha. 

3. Place no. 27, alnker 
ahackla, to fit hairpin 
of Place No. 8, concrete 
alnker. 


4. Pin of Place No. 10, 
open awaga, to fit 
place No. 2, anchor 
Joining link, aa ahown 
In Detail D. 


Drawing for Detalla and Deaerlptlon 


Dlacrepancy 

Place No. 10 - open a wage 
wire rope fittinga, 1 3/4— 
ineh: all ware epoxy coated 
vice galyaalted. 

Place No. 11 - open awage 
wire rope fittinga, 1 1/4— 
Inch: not galvanlaed or 
coated. 


One too ring Una on aouth- 
aaat noorlng la only 134 
feet long vice 180 feet. 

Sinker ahackla waa not 
large enough to fit over 
the hairpin. 


Pin waa ellghtly too 
large to fit the link. 


1-3 


of Placaa. 


Corrective Action 

Place No. 10 - 
Aceept-ea-la; well 
coated with epoxy. 

Place No. 11 - Hire 
bruahed and painted 
with SIhACAXA 62-603 
epoxy realn, batch 
nuaber 30006. Co ^li¬ 
enee with MILSPEC 
checked by 10ICC. 

Aceept-ea-la. 


Baldt, Inc. auppUed 
(at no coat) four 2 
3/4-ineh safety ahacklea 
which were connected 
back-to-back with the 
alnker ahackla aa ahown 
In Detail A. 

R0ICC laaued a change 
order to have the pine 
turned down one-elx- 
teenth of an Inch.