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CLOTHING ALMANAC NO. 8 



(NORTHWEST AFRICA 


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October 1950 







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Department of the Army 

OFFICE OF THE QUARTERMASTER GENERAL 
Military Planning Division 
Research and Development Branch 


Environmental Protection Section 


Clothing. Almanac No. 8 

NORTHV/EST AFRICA 


Washington, D. C. 


October 1950 


"This document contains information affecting the National Defense 
of the United States within the meaning of the Espionage Act, 


50 U. S. C., 31 and 32, as amended. Its 

revelation of its contents in any manner 


person is 



transmission or the 
to an unauthorized 




INTRODUCTION 


1. PURPOSE. Clothing Almanacs show monthly requirements for items of 
military clothing to be used in a particular region by troops operating 
under combat conditions. They are intended to aid logistic planners; from 
them it is possible to determine monthly clothing needs^ probable amounts 
of use and wear of the itemsand requirements for item replacement. 

a. Distribution . The Almanacs are distributed for guidance to 
theater. Army, and other commanders responsible for authorizing the issue 
of discretionary items, and for information to commanders of posts, camps, 
stations, and divisions or equivalent orgardzations. 

2. DESCRIPTION . Clothing Almanacs supplement T/a 21, which specifies 
total yearly clothing allc^mnces for each of seven world-mde zones Each 
T/A 21 Clothing Allowance Zone is based on the average temperatxrres of the 
coldest and warmest months^ as shown in Table lo 


TABLE 1; CLOTHING ALLOWANCE ZONES OF T/A 21 


Zone 

I Tropical . o o « c 
II Serai.tropical o o o 
III Warm Temperate ^ o 
IV Mild Temperate ^ o 
V Cool Temperate « « 
VI Cold Temperate o o 
VII Arctic . c « » . . 


Average Temperature (‘^F) of 
Coldest Month Warmest Month 


Above 68 
50 to 68 
32 to 50 
32 to 50 
Below 32 
14 to 32 
Below 14 


o Above~*S^ 
o Above 68 
c. Above 68 
o 50 to 68 
o Above 68 
o 50 to 68 
o Below 68 


For each zone^ T/A 21 lists the items that are required or m andatory . It 
also lists for each zone the items that are discretionary . (Discretionary 
items are not required by all personnel within the 'respective zones^ but 
they are essential to the operating efficiency of certain personnel whose 
duty assignments may involve greater exposure to environmental conditions.) 
Within the framework of T/A 21, Clothing Almanacs show monthly clothing 
requirements in specific regions, indicating essential items in these 
regions. 


a. Basis . Clothing Almanacs are based on a detailed study of local 
environmental conditions. Each Almanac specifies the clothing most likely 
to be needed by troops for adequate protection against these conditions 
during round-the-clock operations. Of primary concern in preparing an 
Almanac is the amount and kind of clothing a soldier needs while he is in 
the field engaged in relatively light activity. Troops engaged in strenu¬ 
ous activity need less clothing; troops completely at rest require more to 
remain comfortable. Clothing Almanacs show the items that will give troops 





adequate protection for at least 90 percent of the time, and in an average 
year any particular item can be expected to be used at least 30 percent of 
the time during the months specified. 

b» Regions . Clothing Almanacs are issued for particular regions 
(e.g*, Alaska, Japan, Northeast Africa, etc.) which include parts of two 
or more T/A 21 Clothing Allowance Zones. Each Clothing Almanac Region is 
further subdivided into a number of Clothing Requirement Areas, according 
to differences in monthly clothing requirements. Although all Clothing 
Requirement Areas within any one of the T/A 21 Clothing Allowance Zones 
have the same basic annual clothing allowances, they differ in monthly 
clothing needs. 

(1) Clothing Requirement Areas are of tv;o tjrpes, non-mountainous 
and mountainous o The latter are given a special designation to indicate 
that field conditions and, consequently, clothing requirements may change 
rapidly within a relatively short horizontal distance. The mountainous 
areas are divided into elevation intervals, each of vfhich has different 
clothing needs. Thus, in effect, each interval represents a Clothing 
Requirement Area and clothing needs of troops operating within mountains 
can be determined for any elevation. 

(2) Each Clothing Requirement Area is assigned an identifying 
symbol. Non-mountainous areas are designated by Roman numerals of the 
Clothing Zones in which they occur, together with an identifying letter 
(e.g., VI-A) . Mountainous areas are designated by the Roman numerals of 
the Clothing Allowance Zones of their lowest elevations, together with an 
identifying number (e.g., VI-2)* Although Clothing Requirement Areas in 
different Clothing Almanacs may have identical designations, they do not 
necessarily have the same environmental conditions or monthly clothing 
requirements. For example, monthly clothing requirements in Alaska VII-C 
are not the same as those in Greenland VII-G, 

c. Map c A map of the Region showing its Clothing Reqxiirement Areas 
is included in the back of the Almanac. Distinctive boundaries separate 
Clothing Allowance Zones; single line boundaries separate the individual 
Clothing Requirement Areas, Each area is numbered according to the system 
outlined above. 

T&hles . For each Clothing Requirement Area or mountain elevation 
interval there is a table in the Clothing Almanac. Months are shown along 
the top, and the clothing items are listed on the left side of the page. 
Need for an item is shovm by a solid bar dravm opposite the item and in the 
proper month-column. The absence of such a bar means that the item is not 
needed in that month. For each mountain interval, elevations in feet above 
sea level are given at the top of the page. 


ii 


eo Items Listed ^ All items listed in the clothing tables are auth¬ 
orized in T/A 21^ Mobilization^ 26 January 1950 c, for the respective zones <> 
In the tables 5 these items have been grouped and arranged alphabetically 
under the headings of Body Clothing, Footgear, Handgear, Headgear, and 
Sleeping Equipment. For many items, model numbers, shade numbers, etc., 
have been eliminated to conserve space. 

(1) Both discretionary and mandatory items are included in the 
tables. Discretionary items are indicated by an asterisk ('"0 » 

(2) Clothing Almanacs do not specify the requirements for 
specialized equipment. Issue of Specialized Individual Equipment for low 
mountain and alpine areas, as listed in T/a 21, Part III, Section II, may 
be authorized by the commanding general, theater of operations, or by the 
Department of the Army for individuals undergoing special training in 
continental United States. Boots, ski-mountain are considered specialized 
in that they are to be worn primarily by trained ski troops or specially 
equipped mountain troops. When worn with the proper sockgear, these boots 
are satisfactory for use with skis at temperatures as low as -22®F; they 
are not suitable for use with snowshoes. For climbing steep rocky slopes, 
they may be preferred at moderate to high temperatures over the Boot, ser ¬ 
vice, combat, russet , and at lower temperatures over Shoepacs ; the latter, 
however, are generally preferred for climbing wet or snow covered slopes. 

(3) Certain items which are mandatory throughout the world, 
such as Drawers, cotton and Belt, waist are not included in the tables. 

(A) Also excluded are items in the nature of equipment rather 
than clothing: insignia, toilet articles, knives, snowshoes, tents, steel 
helmets, etc. 

(5) Under the heading ”Anti-Insect” need is indicated for: 
Gloves, mosquito ; Headnet, mosquito ; Bar, insect, field ; and Repellent , 
insect. 


iii 



’'iv' • ■'i 


' j’ A 


'>s- ■ ' -• '■■ ■,. • 








Fig* 1* Typical sand dune topography, interrupted by low hills with 
e:xposed bedrock, in the Sahara (27® 30' N, 7® E, Area II-C). Clothing 
here must provide protection against blowing sand and intense sunshine 










’’-Vi,*; ^vi'^’.■ ’ ' ; 




_ 








_ _ _ '' . , ... 

■; ,.■. T' 


> • ' 


T- '■«—r. ^ 




Fig 2. Salt marshes, such as this one south of Constantine, Algeria (Area 
II-D), are found also in Areas II-B, II-G, and II-E. They indicate need 
for Boots, knee wader for wear over Boots, service, combat . This photo- 
graph (courtesy National -Geographic Society^ shows conditions in^spring; 
in summer a dry crust forms, but men and vehicles break through into mud. 













CLOTHING ALMANAC FOR NORTHWEST AFRICA 


1, GK1\TF.BAT. . The Clothing Alina-nac for Northwest Africa lists the month- 
by-month clothing needs for troops operating in Tunislaj Algeria, French 
Morocco, Spanish Morocco, Tangier Zone, Ifni, Spanish Western Sahara, 
French West Africa, Gambia, Portuguese Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Gold 
Coast, Togo, Nigeria, Cameroons and the Madeira, Canary, Fernando Poo and 
Cape Verde Islands (see attached map)» This Almanac Region is slightly 
larger than the United States, Although all of it is »hot", it contains 
such a vri..de range of environmental conditions that a single clothing 
assembly would not provide adequate protection for all. troops throughout 
the year for the entire region^ 

Desert occ-upie-s nearly tv/o-thirds of this region. The remaining 
third includes seasonally dry thc.rn bush and grass land, belt of tropical 
rain forest along the southern coast, and mountain ranges in the northern, 
eastern, and southern parts. The islands to the "west, though mountainous, 
have less severe ranges of climatic conditions than inland places of the 
same elevations, 

2, CLOTHING REQUIREMENT AREAS AMD TABLES . The Northwest Africa Clothing 
Almanac Region is included entirely within Zones I and II of the seven 
world-wide Clothing Allowance Zones described in T/a 21 (see page i), 

Zone I is south of 1.5° N latitude in this Almanac Region; Zone II is north 
of this latitude. Owing to differences in geographic and clijriatic condi¬ 
tions within this region, it has been divided into 15 areas, each with 
essentially homogeneous clothing requirements. These Clothing Requirement 
Areas are shown on the attached map and the clothing needs of each area 
are indicated in the respective Clothl.n,g Requirement Table, 

Environmenta.1 conditions vd.thin one area may vary, from p.lace to 
place and fx'om year to year, so that two or more items sometimes have been 
indicated on the Clothing Requirement Tables as required for the same 
general purpose; for example. Boo ts, service, comba t and Boots, combat , 
tropical . In additi.on, items may be intended for use in different 
military occupations. The fo.l],owi,ng paragraphs are intended to provide 
information to aid in judicious select.ion of such items from the Clothing 
Requireme nt Tables, 

The Clothing Requirement Tables for the seven mountain areas in 
Northwest Africa indicate approximate variations of requirements according 
to elevation intervals. Additional specialized items may be required in 
some of these intervals. Sudden changes in short distances, the great^ 
altitudinal variation of temperature, wind speed, and amount of precipi¬ 
tation, and the steepness and ruggedness of slopes, must be considered 
when recommending clothing for these areas. The Zone I or II conditions 
of the lower levels of Northwest African mountains change to those of 





Zones III or IV in the upper levels., Clothing found to be satisfactory on 
the leeward side of a peak at a high elevation may not be adequate on the 
windward side of the same peak at the same elevation„ Improperly clothed 
troops may become casualties because of sudden changes of temperature in 
these areas, 

3, SURFACE CONDITIONS . 

a. Desert , The Sahara Desert (Clothing Requirement Areas II-B, 

II-C and II-F), extending west to east across the entire region and from 
the Atlas Mountains in the north to approximately 17® N in the south, 
occupies more than one-half of this Almanac Region, From May to September 
the heat and aridity characteristic of the Sahara reach as far north as 
the Mediterranean Coast and from September to March as far south as Accra 
on the Gulf of Guinea Coast, 

A vast territory of diversified landforms, the Sahara is less than 
one-half sand dune topographyj most of it is pebble-covered and rocky with 
great stretches of thin sand deposits not in dunes (Fig. 1). Glasses, sun 
are required as protection against sun glare reflected from the ground. 
Furthermore, these surfaces become so hot during the day that protection 
is required for all parts of the body coming in contact with them. The 
most suitable footgear for use in the desert is Boots, service, combat . 

In addition, Glove-shells, leather are recommended for anticontact pur¬ 
poses, and for handling objects, especially metal ones, which have been 
lying in the sun. 

Wells, springs, salt marshes, and irrigation ditches occur in most 
parts of the desert, and throughout the semidesert parts of the region 
(Fig. 2), Because of the high alkalinity and salinity of the water, the 
land surrounding these features is usually crusted with alkaline and salt 
crystals. For troops operating in or around salt marshes, or in Irrigated 
sections of the cases. Boots, knee wader are suggested for wear over 
Boots, service, combat . The rotting effect of the high alkalinity and 
salinity on clothing and equipment necessitates frequent replacement in 
desert areas. 

In general, clothing for the desert should be lightweight and ligtit 
in color, and should cover as much of the body as possible from the 
burning effect of the sun. An additional outer layer has been included 
in the Clothing Tables because of the extreme variability of conditions. 

b. Steppe . Bordering the desert on the south is a wide semiarid 
grass land with large clumps of thorn trees and stretches of stabilized 
sand dimes (Fig, 3). This type of land, elsewhere called "steppe", in 
Africa is called the Sudan (Areas I-B and II-A) , The northern margins of 
this seasonally wet and dry grass land, varying in elevation from 500 to 
3,000 feet, approximate the southern limit of moving sand dunes. Within 
the Sudan the dunes are grass-covered and are, therefore, fixed. 


2 



Figo 3° In the Sudan 
(Area I-'B);, scattered 
trees and tall grass 
provide some shade and 
cover for troops. After the 
Slammer rains end;> much 
of the grass dries and 
is burned off by the 
natives 0 (l.FoAoNo 
photo by Go Labitte) 



During the wet season grasses in the Sudan grow several feet in 
height, but dry out soon after the rains end and are frequently burned 
off by the natives o Most of the grasses are prickly or burr-bearing and 
together with the thorn trees cause accelerated wear and tear on body 
clothing and footgearo Extensive military operations would destroy the 
anchored grass cover on the fixed sand hills and cause ground conditions 
similar to those in the desert, o Overgrazing has already caused such 
conditions near wells and villages<> Troops stationed in or near these 
places of blowing sand and grit require the same items of clothing and 
equipment normally used in the desert c. 

Although the northern periphery of the Sudan is characterized by 
low bushes, scattered trees are common in the higher elevations and 
along the watercourses o Forests increase in extent in the southern part« 
In some sections, trees are too scattered and too ravaged by fire and 
animals to furnish appreciable shade or cover for troopse 

On the northern side of the Sahara the high plateau (Area II-D) 
between the Middle Atlas and the Saharan Atlas is a grass land with 
large salt marshes, called ”shotts”, scattered throughout its lengtho 
Large wheat fields are located on the higher sections and bushes line 
the canyons at the upper edge of the plateau o 

The Mediterranean coastal area (II-E) is deeply dissected by short, 
swift streams o The narrow beaches are backed by the foothills of the 
Atlas; in many places the cliffs rise directly from the sea® This 
coastal area is only slightly less arid than the high plateau® There are 
groves of trees along the higher slopes in this area, but the lower 
slopes are seasonally dry and the scattered orchards require irrigation® 

Co Tropical rain forests ® Area I-A contains the only large stands 
of tropical rain forest in this Almanac Region® It extends eastward from 


3 





Fig. 4. In the tropical rain forest, such as this view in Liberia (Area 
I-A), body clothing should be loose-fitting and lightweight, and footgear 
should be vapor-permeable and easily dried* (Photo by U* S* Economic 
Mission to Liberia) 


Sierra Leone to the Gold Coast, and from southern Nigeria into the 
Cameroons (Fig. 4)* Smaller stands of tropical rain forest line some of 
the rivers flowing southward into the Gulf of Guinea and westward into the 
Atlantic Ocean as far north as Portuguese Guineao 

Openings appear in the forest where natives have cleared away trees 
to make room for their cultivated crops or to market the timber* For the 
most part, however, the forest is a continuous belt of tall, slender trees 
with dense canopies. Since it is always hot and moist in the tropical 
rain forests, the trees do not have a regular season for shedding their 


4 





leaves, as in temperate lands. Beneath the canopies, therefore, the 
forest is always shaded, the ground wet, and huge vines or lianas of 
various thicknesses hang and twine in a network of cables and ropes* 

In places, especially near rivers and coastal lagoons, the land is 
swampy. Progress through such forests is possible only with a machete 
and a strong arm. 

Troops operating in these forests require easily dried footgear and 
vraterproof covering for sleeping equipment. Because the forests tend to 
restrict the movement of air, and because of the high temperatures, fre¬ 
quent rain, and high relative humidities, the climate of these forests is 
enervating and disagreeable. Body clothing, therefore, should be loose- 
fitting and lightY/eight o 

Mountains . The mountains in and around the desert (the Ahaggar, 
Area II-l; the Air, Area II-3; and the southern slopes of the Saharan 
Atlas, Area II-2) are steep, rocky, sparsely covered Ydth vegetation, and 
deeply cut by flash floods from infrequent but torrential thunderstorms. 
Low thorn bushes, burr-bearing grasses, and stunted olive and acacia trees 
grow only in the more favorable locations. Many of the peaks are inactive 
volcanic cones flanked by lava flews and deep deposits of cinders and 
pumice dust. At least four of the peaks in the Ahaggar Mountains exceed 
9,000 feet in elevation. 

The northern slopes of the Atlas Mountains (Area II-2) are well 
wooded up to 10,000 feet in elevation and contain many alpine meadows 
Yvhich are snow covered during the winter months. The highest peak in 
this area (Tizi-n-Tamjurt) is 13^665 feet in elevation, and there are six 
peaks above 10,000 feet in elevation; all are in the Moroccan portion of 
the Atlas range. In Algeria and Tunisia the elevations are much lov/er, 
the highest peaks being belovj- 8,000 feet (Fig. 5) • 

Clothing Requirement Area II-4 includes the Islas Canarias (Canary 
Islands), Ilhas Salvages (Salvage Islands), and Madeira. For the most 
part, these volcanic islands are climatically similar. Tenerife, on 
Madeira, the highest peak in these islands, rises to 12,162 feet in 
elevation and is snow-capped from 6 to 8 months per year. In January all 
of the peaks are snow-covered above the 5^000 foot elevation. Generally, 
the eastern sides of the islands are more arid than the western sides. 

The Mediterranean climate of the islands permits the gro-vvth of olive and 
citrus trees and several types of palms- Cacti and prickly grasses are 
common on the lov/er mountain slopes. 

Dense rain forests are characteristic of the slopes of the Cameroons 
Mountains (Area I-l) and the Fouta Djalien (Area 1-2) and Bauchi (Area 1-3) 
plateaus. The peak of Mount Cameroons reaches 13^354 feet in elevation. 
Although it is not snov/-covered, its upper levels have cold-v/et climatic 
conditions throughout the year, requiring the use of v^oolen clothing. 


5 



Fig. 5. In the Atlas Motintains of Northern Algeria (Area II-2), conditions 
change vdth elevation from hot desert at the southern foot to cold on the 
upper slopes of the peaks, which are 7)000 to 8,000 feet in elevation. In 
this late spring photograph (courtesy National Geographic Society) the snow 
has almost disappeared from the peaks. 


Because of similar clothing requirements, the semiarid Arquipelago de Cabo 
Verde (Cape Verde Islands) is included with the Bauchi Plateau in Area 1—3. 


6 



4« CLIMATE o 


a-> Temperature o High temperatures are common throughout the year 
in nearly all parts of the Northwest Africa Region^ except the mountains« 
The highest temperatures are experienced in the desert, where daytime 
temperatures may be expected to reach 100®F from March through Octobera 
Readings as high as 133®F have been recorded» Along the Spani.sh Western 
Sahara coast (Area II-F) temperatures are modified by the sea breeze, and 
in the High Plateau (Area II-D) by elevatl.on. Although temperatures 
frequently rise above 100°F along the north coast of Algeria and Morocco 
(Area II-E) from May to October, the highest ever recorded in most of 
this area is 118®Fo" Near Casablanca, however, the temperature reached 
128°F during a hot southerly windo These maximum temperatures are very 
similar to those of the deserts of Southern California, and the monthly 
averages along the north coast of Africa are similar to those of Florida, 
which, however, receives more raino 

In the desert during summer, the heat of the air is increased by 
radiation from the sand and rock surfaces of the ground, which may have 
temperatures as high as 180®F„ In summer the ground continues to radiate 
a diseomfor-ting heat for several hours after sunset, especially i,n low- 
lying placeso On plateaus and at higher ei.evations, faster ground-^ 
radiation and chilly nights may be expectedo During summer nights in the 
desert and in the highlands, troops require blankets as protection against 
stones and uneven ground, the reradiation from the ground, and the rela¬ 
tively chill air just prior to sunriseo Head cover is required for troops 
as protection against intense solar radiationo Tent fli.es or awnings help 
to prevent sunstroke and heatstroke; the only areas with abundant natural, 
shade are in the tropical rain forests (Area I-A)o 

In the southern part of this A.lmana.c Region, the highest temperatures 
(93° to 95°F) are lower than those in the dese.rto Furthermore, the aver¬ 
age range of temperature from night to afternoon is less than ,10 F® on the 
coasts and in the tropical rain forests, compared to over 2,5F° in the 
desert.o For example, south of Freetown, Sierra Leone, the average range 
of temperature from night to day is greater than the range between mean 
monthly averages of the coldest and warmest months. Month-by-month tem¬ 
peratures are relatively uniform. Jacket and Trousers, lightweight 
special are suitable in this area throughout the year. 

Except for the mountain areas, the average temperatures of the 
coldest months for the entire region are above 50°F, Although tempera¬ 
tures as low as -11°F have been recorded in the Atlas Mountains 
(Area II-l), the extreme low readings in other mountain areas in 
Northwest Africa are less severe. The extreme mi.nim\m in non- 
mountainous areas is 26°F; and in the desert, water in wells or pools 
may freeze nearly everywhere at night from November through February, 


7 


Winter daytime temperatures in inland sections (Areas II-B and II-C) 
frequently exceed 80®F* Clothing for these areas must be lightweight 
for high daytime temperatures, and must be supplemented with an addi¬ 
tional jacket or sweater after sunset, 

b. Precipitation , The amount and distribution of rainfall varies 
considerably from south to north in this regiono Year-round rainfall 
may be expected in the tropical rain forest (Area I-A). Smsmer rains and 
dry winters are the rule in the Sudan (Areas I-B and II-A) . Infrequent 
and scattered rains may occur in the desert (Areas II-B, II-C, and II-F)* 
Winter rains and dry summers are characteristic in the north (Areas II-D 
and II-E). Therefore, the Poncho, lightweight, od is required in nearly 
all of this region at some time during the year. 

The highest annual average precipitation, generally between l60^and 
175 inches, is recorded along the Gulf of Guinea coasts. Some localities 
receive over twice as much 3 for example, Debunja, on the coast near the 
Nigeria-Cameroons border, receives 390 inches. On the other hand, Accra, 
Gold Coast (Area I-B), with an annual average of only 28 inches, is 
clearly an exception. Generally, around the Gulf of Guinea there is a 
double maximum of rainfall; December and January are the driest months, 
with only slight intermittent rains. 

Toward the north, the dry season is longer, the rainy^season has a 
single maximum in summer, and the amount of precipitation is less. In 
the central Sudan, at Zinder (Area I-B), and on the Atlantic coast, at 
Stc Louis (Area II-A), the rainy season lasts from May to September with 
an annual average of approximately 19 inches. In general, the rains of 
the Sudan come in separate storms, and are localized. One sector may 
have several rains in succession v^hile an adjacent sector may experience 
drought c 

In the desert (Areas II-B and II-C) the average annual precipitation 
is in places less than one inch, although five inches or more have fallen 
in a few hours during a thunderstormc Flash floods may occur in any of 
the dry stream beds because of rapid run-off from intense storms, perhaps 
some distance away. In many cases the heat of the desert air causes 
complete evaporation of precipitation before it reaches the ground. In 
the plateau (Area II-D) and mountains (Areas II-l, II-2, and 11-3)^ the 
average annual precipitation varies from 8 to 20 inches. 

North of the desert the amount of precipitation and the length of 
the rainy season increase (Area II-E) . Here the rainy season begins in 
October and lasts until March, with November, December, and January the 
rainiest months. This precipitation is largely in the form of drizzle. 

In the summer an average of less than one inch of rain falls per month 
in most of the area. 


8 


Although abundant snow falls every winter in the upper slopes of 
the Atlas Mountains (Area II-2), it is light on the lower slopes of 
these ranges, and rarely appears at all in the desert.. Snow falls 
intermittently on the North African coast, but it usually melts as it 
falls, or soon after it reaches the ground. Above the 5j000 foot eleva¬ 
tion, snow may be expected any time from October to March, 

c. Winds , Winds and their effects vary considerably in the 
different sections of this Almanac Region, The oppressive heat and 
humidity of the tropical rain forests are greatly mollified by the har- 
mattan, an easterly or northeasterly wind from the desert. It is most 
prevalent in the Sudan during the dry season (September to May), but it 
is known even on the Guinea Coast, Dryness is the most prominent feature. 
The leaves on the trees turn yellow and fall, and wood splits. To humans, 
the feeling of dryness is intensified by the presence of dust and smoke 
in the air, but even this is a relief from the steamy heat of the forests. 
The dustiness is greatest just prior to the rainy season. 

Winds in the Sahara are cold in winter, especially at night, requir¬ 
ing additional outer clothing, such as Jacket, field, M-1943 or Sweater, 
high neck ; in summer they are hot blasts. In all seasons these winds are 
dry and laden with dust and grit. Glasses, sun provide partial protec¬ 
tion against these wind-carried irritants. Great gusts of hot air and 
dense, whirling sand storms usually precede rain in the desert. Calms 
are often experienced in the Sahara, resulting in stagnation of hot air. 

Hot winds from the desert, called siroccos, are the usual cause of 
excessively high temperatures along the coasts of North Africa, In 
their wide sweep over the Sahara, the siroccos pick up large quantities 
of dust, viiich with their abnormal heat distinguish them from other 
southerly winds. The sirocco is particularly devastating if long con¬ 
tinued in summer, because of its intense evaporating power. Enormous 
quantities of water are reqtiired to support human life adequately during 
its continuance. 

In mountain areas normally the winds are cold. The Jacket, wool , 
field, od and the Jacket, field, M-1943 are required to protect troops 
against wind chill in the high elevations of Northwest Africa mountains. 

5, CLOTHING SUMMARY . Clothing requirements for Northwest Africa, 
itemized in detail in the Clothing Requirement Tables, can be summarized 
in three groups (Table 2): clothing required for warm and hot weather, 
cool weather, and cold weather. Not all items of each group are required 
in a specific area, but selections from the groups will provide suitable 
protection under average conditions of the applicable season. The 
Clothing Requirement Tables at the end of this Almanac show the detailed 
requirements for individual items, 


TABLE 2; CLOTHING FOR NORTHVJEST AFRICA 


Warm and Hot Weather 


Jacket & Trousers, lightweight special 
Shirt & Trousers, cotton, khaki 
Shirt, knit, od 

Boots, combat, tropical; w/l pr« socks, wool, cushion sole; 

1 pro insoles, ventilating 

Boots, service, combat, russet; w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole 

Cap, herringbone twill 

Blanket, lightweight 

Blanket, wool, od 

Poncho, lightweight, od 

Anti-insect items 


Cool Weather 


Undershirt & Drawers, winter 
Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket & overcoat 
Shirt, flannel, od, & Trousers, field, wool, od 
Trousers, field, cotton, od 

Boots, service, combat, russet; w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole 

Cap, herringbone tvri,ll 

Blanket, wool, od 

Poncho, lightweight, od 

Anti-insect items 


Cold Weather 


Undershirt & Drawers, winter 

Shirt, flannel, od, & Trousers, field, wool, od 
Jacket, wool, od 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket & overcoat 
Jacket & Trousers, herringbone twill 

Boots, service, combat, russet; w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole 

Shoepacs, 12 in,; w/2 pr. socks, wool, ski; 1 pr. insoles, felt 

Glove-shells, leather; w/2 pr, inserts, wool 

Cap, field, cotton, od, w/visor 

Muffler, wool, od 

Bag, sleeping, mountain 

Case, water repellent, bag, sleeping 

Poncho, lightweight 


10 


Warm and hot weather cloth ings as listed in Table 2^ is generally 
suitable for wear in siamiiier in all parts of the region,, and throughout^the 
year in areas where mean monthly temperatures ar-e above 68°Fs such as in 
the central and southern Sahara (Areas II -A and II-B) j, the Sudan (II-A), 
and along the Gulf of Guinea (I-A) ^ 

Cool weather clothing ^ ordinarily suitable for wear when the mean 
monthly temperatures are between 50° and 68°Fs may be used in winter in 
the northern Sahara (II-C) and along the Atlantic and Mediterranean 
coasts. It is suitable in part or all of the year in^the Intermediate 
levels of the mountain areasj including the offshore i.slands. 

At the higher elevations of most mainland and insular mountain areas, 
when the mean monthly temperatures are betvireen 14“ and 50 °F, cold weather 

clothing is worn. In the Fouta Djallon Plateau (Area I.2), this ensemble 

is never required. 

6. INSECTS. Nearly all of Northwest Africa presents requirements for 
some, if not all., of the anti-i.nseot items. The extreme northern coast 
in winter an,d the high sections of the mountains ai'-e the only exceptions. 
Mosquitoes, vectors of malaria, yellcw fever^ filariasi.s, and dengue, are 
common throughout the southern half of this region as well as in northern 
coastal marshes, upland salt flats, desert pools, and ii'=’rigation ditches. 

The common house fly in North?/est Africa carries the germs of 
typhoid, cholera, dysentery., scarlet fever, tuberculosis, etc.| it is 
found throughout the region, except in the most arid sections of the 
desertq and is especially rife around native huts and trails. The sand 
fly, a ■u'eetor of sand fly fever, may be found any where in the desert. 
Many sections of the southern half of this region are infested with 
tsetse fly, similar in appearance to the common house flyj it is usually 
found along rivers and in stands of low bush, and is a bearer of sleeping 
sickness. 

Poisonous spiders, centipedes, and scorpions may be fotmd throughout 
the desert periphery. Fleas, ticks, ants, lice, mites, and bedbugs are 
common in both the extreme northern and southern parts of this region. 
Clothing stored in foot lockers or barracks bags may be damaged by white 
ants, locusts, moths, cockroaches, silverfish, and crickets, all of which 
are especially common in the southern half of the region. 

7 . SUPPLEMENTARY ARMY PUBLICATIONS . Information concerning the con- 
sti*uction, function, manner of wear, and approved methods of care of each 
item of clothing may be found in one or more .of the following Army publi¬ 
cations : 

a. FM 70-10s Mountain Operations (September 1947). Chapter 1, 
General Considerations; Chapter 4, Conditioning and Acclimatization; 
Chapter 6, Weather; and Chapter 7, Winter Characteristics, discuss the 
relationship between the soldier and the mountain environment. 


11 




b. FM 31”25: Desert Operations (March 1942), Section I discusses 
the general aspects and problems of desert environment- Section II gives 
general consideration of the food, clothing, and individual equipment 
needs» 

c- FM 72-20; Jungle Warfare (October 1944)- Of special value are 
Chapter 1, General Characteristics of the Junglej Chapter 2, Health and 
Hygiene and Sanitation; Chapter 3» Jungle Service; Chapter 4} Jungle 
Operations; Appendix I, Native Plants; and Appendix II, Use of Jungle 
Machete. 

d, FM 21-15: Individual Clothing and Equipment (April 1945). 
Emphasis is placed on the care of clothing and equipment and methods of 
assembling and packing. 

e. TM 10-228; Fitting of Shoes and Socks (February 1946), The 
importance of proper shoe fitting methods, foot measuring equipment and 
procedure, sock fitting and also correlation, and data for boots and 
shoes including approved sock combinations, are the more important 
sections of this manual. 

8. OTHER CLOTHING ALMANACS . Clothing Almanacs for adjoining regions 
are; 


Northeast Africa (No. 3> March 1950) 

Central Africa 
Western Europe 
Southeast Europe 

% CLOTHING REQUIREMENT TABLES . The 29 tables of Field Clothing 
Requirements for the 15 Areas of Northwest Africa are arranged according 
to Clothing Allowance Zones, those for Zone I being followed by those 
for Zone II. Within each zone, the tables for non-mountainous areas 
come first; in alphabetical order, the mountain area tables follow in 
numerical order, with the tables for the lowest elevation of each area 
coming first, then for upper levels in ascending order. 

Areas to which each table applies are shown on the folding map in 
the back. For the best use of the tables, especially as regards 
selection from them of clothing items best suited to the individual 
location and year, the preceding text should be consulted. 


12 



FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA I-A 


Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 


BODY CLOTHING 

:^c Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket a overcoat, 
Jacket a Trouser 8, lightweight special 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

^ Raincoat . 


Shirt a Trouser 8, cotton , kha kI 
Sh i rt, kni t, od. 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, comoot, tropicol; w/l pr. socks, wool, 
cushion sole; !pr. insoles, ventiloting. . . . 
Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/lpr. socks,woo I, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 


HEADGEAR 

Cop, herringbone twill 


^ Hel met. sun 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Blanket, lightweight. 

Blanket, wool, od. 


OTHER ITEMS 


Anti-insect (See Introduction) 


mmmm Item usuolly required in th,is month 

)|< Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 

specioll.y because "d i screti onary" in this zone. 
















FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHWEST AFRICA I-B 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/tvood, jacket a overcoat. 
Jocket a Trousers, lightweight special 

poncho, lightwelght, od. 

Raincoat . , . 

Shirt a Trouseri, cotton, kha ki. 

Shi rt, knit, od. 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combat, tropical; w/l pr. socks, wool, 
cuj«hion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating. . . . 

)|< Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 

None 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, herrl ngbone twill. 

3^ Hel met, sun. 

SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Blanket, lightweight. 

Bl anket, wool, od. 

OTHER ITEMS 

Anti-insect (See Introduction) . . . 


Jan 

Feb 

Mor 

Apr 

— 

May 

Jun 

J u 1 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 


















































































































































mmJ 
























Item usually required in this month 

Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionary" in this zone. 


5 / 25/50 


14 



















15 














FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 
NORTHWEST AFRICA I-l (7000-l0000ft.) 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, v#/hood, jacker ft overcoot. 

Jacket, wool, od... 

Jacket a Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoat, wool, od. 

3tc Parka 8 Trousers, field, overwhite. 

* Porka a Trousers, wet weather. 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

Roincoat. 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khoki. 

Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od . . . 

:(c Shirt, knit, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od . .. 

Undershirt 8 Drawers, winter. 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combot, tropicot ; w/ipr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating. 

5|c Boots, knee woder. 

Boots, service, combot, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 

£love ~ shells, leother, w/2pr. inserts, wool 
♦ Mittens, overwhite. 


HEADGEAR 

Cop, field, cotton, od, w/visor 

Cap, herringbone twill. 

Helmet, sun . . , . ,. 

^ Muffler wool, od. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 


5k Bag, sleeping, mountoin. 

5k Bog, sleeping, wool. 

5k Blanket, wool, od. 

* Cose, woter repellent, bog, sleeping 


OTHER ITEMS 

5k Apti-insect ( See Introduction), 


Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 



































_ 

_ 





































■LJlJ 








_ 

_ 






































_ 



































_ 

_ 
































































































_ 














































_ 

_ 

_ 
























_ 


























Item usuolly required in this month 

Item usdolly required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially because ^'discretionary" in this zone 


5 / 25/50 


16 





























NORTHWEST AFRIC 


/i 


BODY CLOTHING 

JoeKet, fIeId, w/hood, jacket & overcoat. 

docket, wool, od. 

Jacket a Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoat, wool, od. 

Jfc Porko a Trousers, field,overwhite. 

Parka a Trousers, wet weather. 

Poncho,lightweight,od. 

^ Roincoat. 

+ Shirt a Trousers,cotton, khaki . 

Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trousers,field, cotton,od .. 

Undershirt a Drowers, wi nter. 

FOOTGEAR 

Boots, knee wader. 

Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, 

service; w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole. , 

♦ Shoepacs, I2in., w/2pr. socks, wool, ski; 

Ipr. insoles, felt. 

HAN DGEAR 

Glove- shells, leather, w/2pr. inserts, wool. . . 
:te Mittens, overwhite. 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, field, cotton, od, w/visor. 

Cap, herringbone twill. 

♦ Muffler, wool, od. 

SLEEPING EQUIPM ENT 

^ Bag, sleeping, mountain. 

♦ Bag, sleeping, wool.. 

Hf. Blanket, wool, od. 

^ Case, woter repellent, bag, slee pi ng. 

OTHER ITEMS 

Ha Anti - insect ( See Introduction ). 


* 


Item usuolly required in this month 
Item usually required in indicated months, 
specially becouse "discretionary'* in this 


u 








































FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA 1-2 (4000-5500ft.) 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jocket ft overcoot. 
Jacket 6 Trouser 8, I ightweight special 

Pof)Cho, lightweight, od. 

3^ Raincoat. 

Shirt a Trouse r 8, cotton , k ha ki. 

Shirt, knit, od. 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combat, tropicol; w/l pr. socks, wool, 
cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating, . . , 

3(c Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes,service; 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 

None 

HEADGEAR 

Cop, herringbone twill 
5|c Helmet, sun. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Blanket, lightweight. 

Bl a n ket, wool, od. 


OTHER ITEMS 

Anti-insect (See Introduction) 


11 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Ju 1 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 










































































































































































Item usually required in this month 

Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionary" in this zone. 


5 / 25/50 


18 
















specially because "discretionary 
























FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHWEST AFRICA 1-3 (below 3000fi) 


* 


* 




* 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket a overcoat. 

Jacket a Trouser 8, lightweight special. 

Poncho, li ghtwelght, od. 

Rai ncoot. 

Shirt a Trouser 8, cotton, k ha ki. 

Shirt, knit, od. 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combat, tropical; w/I pr. socks, wool, 
cushion sole; I pr. in soles, ventilating. . . . 
Boots, service, combot, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 

None 


HEADGEAR 

Cop, herring bon e twill 
Helmet, sun. 


SLEEP! NG EQUIPMENT 

Blanket, lightweight. 

Blanket, wool, od. 


OTHER ITEMS 

Anti-insect (See Introduction) 


Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

J u 1 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 
































Zi 


















































































































J 
























Item usually required in this month 

:i|c Item usually required in indicoted months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionary" in this zone. 


5 / 25/50 


20 
















FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA 1-3 (3000-6000ft.) 


Jan Feb Mar Apr May Junljul Aug SeplOct Nov Dec 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket & overcoat, 
Jacket 8i Trouse r s, t ig ht weight special 
Poncho, lightweight, od. 


^ Raincoat 


Shirt a Trouser 8, cotton, kha ki 


Shirt, kni t, od 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combat, tropical; w/l pr. socks, wool, 
cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating. . . . 

:i(c Boots, service, combot, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 


HEADGEAR 

Cap, herring bon e tw 
Helmet, sun. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 


Bl anket, light weight 
Blanket, wool, od . . 


OTHER ITEMS 

Anti-insect I See Introduction) 


mmmm Item usuolly required in this month 

:!k Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 

specially because "discretionary" in this zone. 


























FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA 1*3 (above 9000 ft.) 


Uan Feb Mar Apr May JuniJul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 



BODY CLOTHING 


Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket 8 overcoot . . . 

docket, wool, od. 

Jacket a Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoat, wool, od. 

^ Parka 8 Trousers, field, overwhite. 

* Parka 8 Trousers, wet weather. 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

^ Raincoat. 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khaki. 

Shirt, flannel, od, 8 Trousers, field, wool, od 

^ Shirt, knit, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od. 

JUndershirt 8 Drawers, winter. 


FOOTGEAR 

:tc Boots, combot, tropical ; w/1 pr. socki, wool, 

cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating. 

Boots, knee woder. 

Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, tervice; 
w/!pr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 

Glove - shells, leather, w/2pr. inserts, wool 
Mittens, overwhite. 


HEADGEAR 

Cop, field, cotton, od, w/visor 

^ Cap, herringbone twill. 

Helmet, sun. 

Muffler wool, od. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

3K Bag, sleeping, mountain., 

^ Bag, sleeping , wool. 

Blanket, wool, od.. 

* Cose, water repellent, bag, sleeping 


OTHER ITEMS 

Apti-insect ( See Introduction) 


Item usually required in this month 

Item usdally required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially becouse '*discretionory" in this zone 


23 




























FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHWEST AFRICA H-A 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket ft overcoat. . . . 

jf: Jacket, wool, od. 

Jacket a Trousers, li ghtweight special. . . 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

Hi: Raincoat. 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khaki. 

Shirt, flannel, od, 8 Trousers, field, wool, od 

Hic Shi rt, knit, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

H/i Trouse r s, f i e id, cot to n , od. 

5|c Undershirt a Dra wer s, wi n t e r. 


Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combot, tropical; w/l pr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating. 

Boots,knee wader. 

Boots, service, com bat, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 


HEADGEAR 

Cop, herringbone twill 
Helmet, sun. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 


5|c Blanket, lightweight 
Blonket, wool, od . . 


OTHER ITEM 

Anti-insect (See Introduction) 


I tern usuolly required in this month 
:|c Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionary" in this zone. 






















FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA 3I-B 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jackel, w/hood, jacket a overcoat . 

)tc Jacket, wool, od . 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

Moy 

Ju n 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

























Jacket a Trousers, lightweight special. 

Poncho, 1 ightweight, od. 


i_ 























Rai ncoat. 













Shirt 8 Trousers, cotton, khoki. 













Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od . . . 
^ Shirt, knit, od. 

























Sweater, high neck. 













3k Trousers field, cotton od .. 













3k Undershirt a Drawer s, wi nte r . 

FOOTGEAR 

3k Boots, combot, tropicol; w/l pr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole; 1 pr. insoles, ventilating . 

























3k Boots, knee wader . 













Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole . . . . 













HANDGEAR 

None 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, herringbone twill . 













3k Hel met, sun . 













SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

:jc Blonket, lightweight . 













Blanket, wool, od . 













OTHER ITEM 

Anti-insect ( See Introduction) 



























Item usuolly required in this month 5/25/50 

3(c Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionary" in this zone. 


25 





























FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA D-D 


* 


* 

* 

* 

* 

* 


* 

* 


* 


* 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket a overcoat. 

Jacket, wool, od. . 

Jacket a Trousers, lightweight special. 

Poncho, I ightweight, od.. 

Raincoat. 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khaki. 

Shi rt, flonnel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od . . 

Shi rt, kn It, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od. 

Undershirt a Drawers, winter. 

FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combat, tropical; w/l pr. socks, wool, 
cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating .... 

Boots, knee wader. 

Boots, service, com bat, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HAND6EAR 

None 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, herring bone twill 
Helmet, sun. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Blanket, li ghtweight. 

Blanket, wool, od.. 


OTHER ITEM 

Anti-insect (See Introduction) 


IBB 

Feb 

Mar 

laa 

IH 


10 

IB 

!0 

IE9 

m 

B 









r 

r 

r 









■ 

■ 

ig 

|B 









■ 

■ 

■ 

IB 


















































































































IB 

■ 

■ 

■ 

B 

Bi 


Bl 

■ 

■ 

1 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 





































1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


wmm Item usually required in this month 

Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
speciolly because "discretionory" in this zone. 


5/25/50 


27 























FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHWEST AFRICA H-E 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jan jpeb 

Mor 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

J u 1 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 













Jacket, field, w/hobd, jacket a overcoot. 







































poncho, lightweight, od. 


























Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od . . . 

























3ft KnlT| 00* 


























Trousers, field, cotton, od. 













FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combat, tropical; w/l pr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole; 1 pr. insoles, ventiloting. 























_ 


Boots, service, com bat, russet, OR Shoes, service; 













w/| pr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 

HANDGEAR 

None 

HEADGEAR 


























SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 


























OTHER ITEM 



























6/25/50 

Item usuolly required in this month 

Item usually required in indicoted months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionary” in this zone. 


28 





















FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA n-F 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket ft overcoot. . . . 

Jacket, wool, od. 

Jocket a Trousers, lightweight special. . . 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

Roincoat. 

Shirt a Trouser s, cotton, k hoki. 

Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od 

Shi r t, kn it, od. 

Sweeter, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od. 

Undershirt a Drawers, winter. 


FOOTGEAR 

^ Boots, combat, tropical; w/l pr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole;Ipr. insoles, ventilating. 

Boo t s, k n e e wader.. 

Boots, service, combot, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 

None 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, herring bone twill. 

5^ Helmet, sun. 

SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Blanket, lightweight. 

Blanket, wool, od . . . .. 

OTHER ITEM 

Anti-insect (See Introduction) 


Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

Moy 

Ju n 

J U 1 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 













































































. 





































































































































































Item usually required in this month 

Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
speciolly because "discretionary" in this zone. 


5 / 25/50 


29 






















30 










FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHWEST AFRICA H-l (6000 - 8000 ft.) 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, v*/hood, jacket S overcoot. 

Jacket, wool, od. 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

























Jacket & Trousers herringbone twill . 













Overcoot, wool, od. 








HIM 





Porko a Trousers, field, overwhite. 













* Porko a Trousers, wet weother. 













Poncho, lightweight, od. 













Raincoat... 













Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khaki. 













Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od . . . 
Shirt, knit, od. 

irminr 
























Sweater, high neck. 













Trousers, field, cotton, od . .. 













JJndershirt a Drawers, winter. 













FOOTGEAR 

* aoots, combot, tropical; w/lpr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole; 1 pr. insoles, ventilating. 

Boots, knee wader. 

























Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/lpr. socks wool cushion sol#i. .. 













HANDGEAR 

Glove - shells, leother, w/2pr. inserts, wool. . . , 

# Mittens, overwhite. 

























HEADGEAR 

Cap, field, cotton, od, w/visor.. . 

Cop, herringbone twill. 

























3|c Helmet, sun .. 













♦ Muffler, wool, od. 













BLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

♦ Bog, sleeping, mountoin. 













# Bag, sleeping, wool. 

_1 

_ 


_ 









# Blanket, wool, od. 












Lil^ 

Hf. Cose, woter repellent, bog, sleeping. 













OTHER ITEMS 

♦ Apti'insect ( See Introduction ). 



























mmm Item usuolly required in this month 

item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionary" in this zone 


31 































FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHWEST AFRICA II -1 (above 8000 ft.) 


* 

* 

* 


* 




* 

* 


* 

* 

5tC 


* 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket a overcoat. 

docket, wool, .. 

Jacket a Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoat, wool, .. 

Porko a Trousers, field,overwhite. 

Porko a Trousers, wet weather. 

Poncho,lightweight,od. 

Roi .. 

Shirt a Trousers,cotton, khaki . 

Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od. . . 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trouser s, fieId, cotton, od.. 

Undershirt a Drowers, winter. 

FOOTGEAR 

Boots, kneewader. 

Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, 

service; w/lpr. socks,wool, cushion sole. . . . 

Shoepacs, I2in., w/2pr. socks, wool, ski; 

I pr. insoles, felt. 

HAN DGEAR 

Glove “ shells, leather, w/2pr. inserts, wool. 

Mittens, overwhite. 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, field, cotton, od, w/visor. 

Cap, herringbone twill. 

Muffler, wool, od. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Bag,sleeping,mountain. 

Bog,sleeping,wool. . . . . . . . • • 

Blanket, wool, od. 

Case, water repellent, bag, sleeping. 

OTHER ITEMS 

Anti-insect ( See Introduction). . 



HQ 


Apr 

Moy 


BI 




g 

g 

■ 

■ 




□ 


■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 




■Bl 

BBI 

B9I 

Hil 

i9 

Hi 

Bl 

■1 

Hi 







_1 

in 





■■■■ 


n 




HI 

B 

HI 





991 

■! 

19 

■1 


■11 

B 

H 

Hil 


_ 


IHI 

■1 

■ 

■ 

■1 

■ 

Hi 

B! 

B! 









Bi 

IH 

Bi 

BI 




91 

9 


HI 

9 


1 





^11 

■ 

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■1 

91 

9 

IH 

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■nil 

mm 

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Hi 

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I^BI 

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HI 

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b: 

zd 


mi 

Bi 



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■I 

■11 

IM 

■■ 

m 

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BI 

B 

BBI 

^B 

IH 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


■H 

Hi 







IH 

IH 

IH 














—N 







IB 

B 

B 

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■i 

IHI 

■ 


HI 

Hi 

HI 

IB 

IB 

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5/25/50 


* 


Item usuoliy required in this month 

Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially because “discretionary" in this zone 


32 






























FIELD CLOT HI NG REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHERN AFRICA II-2 (3500-6500 ft.) 


* 


* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

* 


* 

* 




* 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket a overcoat. , . 

Jacket, wool, od. 

Jacket a Trou $e r s, I i g ht w ei g ht special. , . 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

Raincoat.. . 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khaki. 

Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od 

Shi rt, knit, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od. 

Undershirt a D ra w e r s, w i n t e r. 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combot, tropical; w/l pr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating. 

Boots,knee wader. 

Boots, service, com bat, russet, OR Shoes, ser vice; 
w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole.. 


HANDGEAR 

None 

HEADGEAR 

Cop, herr i ng bone twill. 

Hel met, su n. 

SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Blonket, li ghtweight. 

Blanket, wool, od. 


OTHER ITEM 

Anti-insect (See Introduction) 


iebs 

m 

QU 


Qj 




IQ 

IQ 

IQ 

B 

























































■ 












B 




















































■■ 






“j 





■i 

1 






1 





1 




■ 





■ 







■ 

■ 


1 


1 













































































mh Item usuolly required in this month 

^ Item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 

specially becouse "discretionary" in this zone. 


5 / 25/50 


33 



















FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHWEST AFRICA H-2 (6500 - 9500 ft.) 


* 




* 


* 


* 

3K 

♦ 


* 

* 

3|C 

* 


♦ 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jocket 8 overcoot . . . 

Jacket, wool, od. 

Jocket a Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoat, wool, od. 

Porko a Trousers, field, overwhite. 

Porko a Trousers, wet weather. 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

Roincoot. 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khaki. 

Shirt, flannel, od, 8 Trousers, field, wool, od 

Shirt, knit, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od. 

JUndershirt 8 Drawers, winter. 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combot, tropicol; w/1 pr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole; I pr. Insoles, ventilating. 

Boots, knee wader. 

Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, service 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 

HANDGEAR 

iSlove - shells, leather, w/2pr. inserts, wool. . . . 
Mittens, overwhite. 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, field, cotton, od, w/visor. 

Cop, herringbone twill. 

Helmet, sun.. . . . ’. 

Muffler, wool, od. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Bag, sleeping, mountain. 

Bag, sleeping , wool. 

Blanket, wool, od. 

Cose, water repellent, bog, sleeping 

OTHER ITEMS 

Aptl“insect ( See Introduction). . . . 


Itetn usuolly required in this month 



5/25/50 


Item usQally required In indicoted months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionory" in this zone 


34 



































FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA IE -2 (above 9500 ft.) 


Jon Feb Mori Apr MoyJ uni Jul Aug SeplOct Nov Dec 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jocket, field, w/hood, jacket ft overcoot. . . . 

Jacket, wool,od. 

Jacket 8 Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoat, wool, od. 

Pork oairousers, field, overwhite. 

Parko 8 Trousers, wet weother. 

Poncho,lightweight,od. 

^ Raincoat. 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khoki. 

Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od 

Sweoter, high neck. 

Trouse rs, fiel d, cotton, od. 

Undershirt a Drowers, winter. 

FOOTGEAR 

Boots, knee wader. 

Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, 
service; w/lpr. socks,wool, cushion sole. 
Shoe pa cs, 12 in., w/2pr. socks, wool, ski; 

1 pr. insoles, felt. 

HANDGEAR 

Glove - shelIs, leather, w/2pr. inserts, wool. . 
:|( Mittens, overwhite. 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, field, cotton, od, w/visor. 

Cap, her r i ngbone twill. 

:fc Muffler, wool, od. 

SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

3f( Bag, steeping, mountain. 

4c Bog, sleeping, wool.. 

4c Blanket, wool, od. 

4c Cose, water repellent, bog, tieeping. 

OTHER ITEMS 

4c Anti “insect ( See Introduction). 


Item usually required in this month 

item usually required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially becouse “discretionary" in this zone 


5/25/50 


35 



























FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA n - 3 ( 3500 - 5000 ^t.) 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jon 

Feb 

Mor 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Ju 1 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 













Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket 6 overcoat. 




















mmrn 






Jacket 8 Trousers, lightweight special. 













Poncho, 1 ightweight, od. 




















iM 






Shirt, flonnel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od ... 
















IZ 





mmm 




jft Sweater, high neck. 
























mmm 

Trousers, field, cotton, od. 













jfc Undershirt a Orowers, winter. 

FOOTGEAR 

* Bools, combot, Iropicol; w/l pr. socks, wool, 

cushion sole; 1 pr. insoles, ventilating. 

























Boots, service, combot, russet, OR Shoes, service; 













w/l pr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 

HANDGEAR 

None 

HEADGEAR 













Cop, herr 1 ng bone twill. 













SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 




















_J 


mmm 


tmmm 


Blonket, wool, od. 

OTHER ITEM 













Anti — insect (See Introduction). 














5/23/50 

Item usually required in this month 

Item usually required in indicoted months, but must be procured 
specially because "discretionary" in this zone. 


36 





















FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 

NORTHWEST AFRICA II-3 (above 5000 ft.) 


BODY CLOTHING 


Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket 8 overcoat. 

Jacket, wool, od..*. 

Jacket 8 Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoot, wool, od.. . . 

Parka 8 Trousers, field, overwhite. 

Parka 8 Trousers, wet weather. 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

Raincoot.. . .. 

Shirt 8 Trousers, cotton, khoki. . 

Shirt, flannel, od, 8 Trousers, field, wool, od . . . 

Shirt, knit, od... 

Sweeter, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od . .. 

JJndershirt 8 Drawers, winter. 


FOOTGEAR 


:|c £oots, combot, tropico); w/|pr. tockt, wool, 

cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating. 

Boots, knee wader.. 

Boots, sfervice, combat, russet, OR Shoes, eervice; 
w/ipr. socks, wool, cushion sole. ......... 


HANDGEAR 


£tove - shells, leather, w/2pr. inserts, wool 
Mittens, overwhite.. . ■ . 


HEADGEAR 


Cop, field, cotton, od, w/visor 

Cap. herringbone twill. 

Helmet, sun. . . . .. 

Muffler wool, od. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 


Bog, sleeping, mountain,.. . 

Bag, sleeping , wool. 

Blanket, wool, od.. ; 

Case, water repellent, bog, sleeping 


OTHER ITEMS 

Apti-insect ( See Introduction ). 


Jan 

.o 

• 

u. 

Mor 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 





































■MW 
















































































_ 

_ 

_: 

_ 




























_ 


_ 

_ 

_ 





















— 













































































_ 

_ 


iimu 










_ 





































_ 
























_ 


























mmm Item usuoMy required in this month 

Item usdally required in indicoted months, but must be procured 
specioliy because “diecretionary** in this zone 


5/25/50 


3 





























38 





















FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 



NORTHWEST AFRICA n-4 (2500 • 5000 ft.) 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket a overcoat. 

Jacket, wool, od. 

Jacket a Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoat, wool, od. 

Parka a Trousers, field, overwhite. 

Porko a Trousers, wet weother. 

Poncho, lightweight, od. 

Raincoat..... 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khokl. 

Shirt, flannel, od, 8 Trousers, fleld, wool, od . . . 

Shirt, knit, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od . .. 

Undershirt a Drawers, winter. 


FOOTGEAR 

Boots, combat, tropical; w/lpr tockt, wool, 

cushion sole; i pr. insoles, ventilating. 

Boots, knee woder. 

Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, service; 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole. .......... 

HANDGEAR 

Blove-shells, leather, w/2pr. inserts, wool. . . . 
Mittens, overwhite. .. ■ 

HEADGEAR 

Cap, field, cotton, od, w/visor. 

Cop, herringbone twill. 

Helmet, sun . 

Muffler, wool, od. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 

Bog, sleeping, mountoin.. , 

Bog, sleeping, wool. 

Blanket, wool, od.. • 

Case, water repellent, bag, sleeping 

OTHER ITEMS 

Apti-insect ( See Introduction). . . . 


Item usuolly required in this month 



5/29/90 


Item usQally required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially becouse “discretionary" in this zone 


39 




























FIELD CLOTHING REQUIREMENTS 


NORTHWEST AFRICA 11-4 (6000 - 9000 ft.) 


BODY CLOTHING 


Jackftt, field, w/hood, jacket a overcoot . . . 

Jacket, wool, od. 

Jocket a Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoot, wool, od. 

3k; Parka a Trousers, field, overwhite. 

3k: Porka a Trousers, wet weather. 

Poncho, lightweight, od.. 

3tc Raincoat. 

Shirt a Trousers, cotton, khaki. 

Shirt, flonnel, od, 8 Trousers, field, wool, od 

3tc Shirt, knit, od. 

Sweater, high neck. 

Trousers, field, cotton, od . .. 

JJndershirt a Drawers, winter. 


FOOTGEAR 

3k: Boots, combat, fropicol ; w/l pr, socks, wool, 

cushion sole; I pr. insoles, ventilating. 

3k: Boots, knee woder.. . . . . 

Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoos, service; 
w/lpr. socks, wool, cushion sole. 


HANDGEAR 

JSlove “ shells, leother, w/2pr. inserts, wool 
3tJ Mittens, overwhite. 


HEADGEAR 

Cop, field, cotton, od, w/visor 

Cop, herringbone twill. 

3|c Helmet, sun. 

3ic Muffler wool, od. 


SLEEPING EQUIPMENT 


3jc Bag, sleeping, mountoin. 

3 tc Bog, sleeping, wool. 

3|t Blanket, wool, od.. . ; 

* Case, woter repellent, bog, sleeping 


OTHER ITEMS 

3fc Apti-'insect ( See Introduction), 


Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 














.. 











"""" 


MM 



pMM 








1 


UULJ^ 










































_ 

_ 

_ 

"""" 



























— 






_ 


_ 
















— 












— 






_ 

_ 

_ 

XU u 








































































































































-T 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

. 





















_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


























mm Item ueuolly required in this month 

Item usOally required in indicated months, but must be procured 
specially because **discretionary" in this zone 


5/29/50 


40 





























FIELD CLOTHING REQUI 


NORTHWEST AFRICA ] 


* 

* 

* 

* 


* 




* 

* 


* 

* 

* 


BODY CLOTHING 

Jacket, field, w/hood, jacket 8 overcoat. 

docket, wool, od. 

Jacket a Trousers, herringbone twill. 

Overcoat, wool, od. 

Parka 8 Trousers, fiel d, overwhite. 

Parka 8 Trousers, wet weather . 

Poncho,lightweight,od. 

Roincoot. 

Shirt a Trousers,cotton, khaki . 

Shirt, flannel, od, a Trousers, field, wool, od. . . . 

Sweoter, high neck. 

Trouse r s, fi eI d, cotton, od. 

Undershirt 8 Drawers, winter. 

FOOTGEAR 

Boots, knee woder. 

Boots, service, combat, russet, OR Shoes, 

service^w/lpr. socks,wool, cushion sole. . . . 
Shoepacs, I2in., w/2pr. socks, wool, ski; 

Ipr. insoles, felt. 

HANDGEAR 

Glove - shells, leather, w/2pr. inserts, wool. 

Mittens, overwhite. 


HEADGEAR 

Cap, field, cotton, od, w/visor. 

Cop, herringbone twill. 

Muff I er, wool, od. 

SLEEPING EQUIPM ENT 

Bag,sleeping,mountain. 

Bag, sleeping, wool . . .. 

BI a n k e t, w ool, od. 

Cose, water repellent, bag,sleeping 



OTHER ITEMS 

Anti-insect ( See Introduction) 


Item usually required In this month 
Item usually required in indicated months, out n 
specially because "discretionary" in this zone 




































12 * 14 - 


tl ; I lA L Gi E R_[A 


i K. 

1 i 

i ' 

k.^ ■ 

J- ^ * 

'■v, 1 i 

■'-1, 

'-B I'-x _ 

i i 

1 : 

-U-. ^ i 

V., 

; ’n 

1 

1 1 ; 

] I 1 

E R E N C H, 

WEST 



NORTHWEST AFRICA 

CLOTHING ALMANAC NO. 8 

CLOTHING REQUIREMENT AREAS 


Roman numerals refer to T/A-21 
Clothing AHawance Zones. 


Letters refer to nonmountain areas 

BOUNDARIES 

Clothinq Allowat'ce Zones 
Clothing Requirement Areas 
-... International