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2008 Air Force Strategic Plan 


October 2008 



ll-ti. JUR FORCE 


Norton A. Schwartz Michael B. Donley 

General, USAF Secretary of the Air Force 

Chief of Staff 


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2008 Air Force Strategic Plan 


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Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) 

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Table of Contents 

PURPOSE.3 

VISION.3 

MISSION.3 

PRIORITIES.5 

Priority 1: Reinvigorate the Air Force Nuclear Enterprise.6 

Goal 1.1: Meet Recognized Benchmarks for Nuclear Surety.6 

Goal 1.2: Improve Focus on the Nuclear Mission.6 

Priority 2: Partner with the Joint and Coalition Team to 

Win Today’s Fight.6 

Goal 2.1: Support Combatant Commanders at All Levels, Particularly in 
the Global War on Terror and Ongoing Irregular Warfare 

Operations.7 

Goal 2.2: Bolster ISR Support for Joint Operations.7 

Goal 2.3: Build Global Partnerships.7 

Priority 3: Develop and Care for Airmen and Their Families.7 

Goal 3.1: Ensure Airmen Possess the Appropriate Skills to Conduct Joint 

Operations in Air, Space, and Cyberspace.7 

Goal 3.2: Sustain Deployed and Home Station Quality of Service.8 

Priority 4: Modernize Our Air and Space Inventories, Organizations and 

Training.8 

Goal 4.1: Reduce Medium to Long-Term Joint Warfighting Risk.8 

Goal 4.2: Meet Joint and Air Force Recapitalization Benchmarks.8 

Goal 4.3: Ensure an Accountable, Credible, and Transparent Institution. 8 

Goal 4.4: Achieve Total Force Integration.8 

Goal 4.5: Align Organization and Processes with Air Force Core 

Functions and DoD Core Competencies.9 

Priority 5: Acquisition Excellence.9 

Goal 5.1: Rebuild and Shape the Acquisition Workforce.9 

Goal 5.2: Continue to Improve Acquisition Processes and Skills.9 

Goal 5.3: Enforce Stability in Requirements, CONOPS, Funding.9 

OBJECTIVES.10 

GOVERNANCE.13 

SUMMARY.15 

APPENDIX A: Implementation and Administration Responsibilities.16 

APPENDIX B: External Requirements.20 


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PURPOSE 

Informed by national guidance, the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan identifies 
priorities and goals that will shape Air Force-wide actions over the next three to 
five years. Within the Air Force Strategic Planning System, this strategic plan is 
part of a biennial process of review and revision of Air Force long-range planning 
and, out of necessity, identifies Air Force priorities in a broad way for 
implementation at all echelons across the Air Force. The 2008 Air Force 
Strategic Plan aligns activities and functions across the entire Air Force with the 
guidance of the Secretary of Defense, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and 
the needs of the Combatant Commanders (CCDRs). 

As noted in Figure 1, the 2008 Air 

Force Strategic Plan sustains Figure 1 : Air Force Strategic Plan Overview 

much of the organizational 
framework of the 2006 plan, and 
identifies senior leaders’ vision, 
mission, priorities, and goals for 
the overall enterprise. Once 
specific objectives and measures 
are identified by the Priority 
Champions, FIAF and SAF 
Functionals will be charged with 
carrying out these objectives and 
meeting the goals. The Air Force’s progress toward fulfillment and achievement 
of these priorities and goals will be reported quarterly to the Air Force Process 
Council. 

VISION 

The United States Air Force will be a trusted and reliable joint partner with our 
sister services known for integrity in all of our activities, including supporting the 
joint mission first and foremost. We will provide compelling air, space, and cyber 
capabilities for use by the Combatant Commanders. We will excel as stewards 
of all Air Force resources in service to the American people, while providing 
precise and reliable Global Vigilance, Reach and Power for the Nation. 

MISSION 

The mission of the United States Air Force is to fly, fight and win... in air, space 
and cyberspace. 1 

This mission statement meets departmental requirements as defined in Title 10, 
Subtitle D, Part I, Chapter 807, of the U.S. Code - the Air Force shall be 
organized, trained, and equipped primarily for prompt and sustained offensive 
and defensive air operations. The Air Force is responsible for the preparation of 
the air forces necessary for the effective prosecution of war except as otherwise 

1 SECAF/CSAF Mission Statement and Priorities, Letter to Airmen, 15 Sep 08. 



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assigned and, in accordance with integrated joint mobilization plans, for the 
expansion of the peacetime components of the Air Force to meet the needs of 
war. 2 Actions undertaken to achieve these objectives contribute to the joint 
team’s support of the National Defense Strategy. 

As directed in the 2008 National Defense Strategy, the Department of Defense 
has five objectives: 

• Defend the Homeland 

• Win the Long War 

• Promote Security 

• Deter Conflict 

• Win Our Nation’s Wars 

The specific operational missions assigned to the Air Force are expressed in the 
Department of Defense’s Force Planning Construct. As articulated in the 2006 
Quadrennial Defense Review, the National Military Strategy, and the recently 
published Guidance for the Development of the Force, that Force Planning 
Construct is summarized in Figure 2 and includes: 


Defend the Homeland 

• Detect, deter, and if necessary, defeat 
external threats to the U.S. homeland. 

• Enable homeland security partners. 

• If directed, and in partnership with other 
U.S. Government agencies, surge to 
respond to, manage, and lead consequence 
management of weapons of mass 
destruction (WMD) and other catastrophic 
events. 

Prevail in the War on Terror and 

Conduct Irregular Warfare 

• Deter and defend against external transnational terrorist attacks, enable 
partners through integrated security cooperation and assistance 
programs, and conduct multiple, globally distributed irregular operations of 
varying duration. 

• If directed, surge to conduct a large-scale, long-duration irregular warfare 
campaign, to include unconventional warfare, counterinsurgency, security, 
stability, transition, and reconstruction operations. 

Conduct and Win Conventional Campaigns 

• Deter state-on-state coercion or aggression. 


Figure 2: The Force 

Planning Construct 


Steady State 


Surge 

Actw Partnering 

Homeland 

Consequence 

Management 

with USG Agencies 

Defense 

Global 

Deterrence 

Interdiction 


Active Partnering 
& Tailored Shaping 

Train & Equip 

War on Terror/ 
Irregular Warfare 

Counterinsurgency 

Stability Operations 

Information Operations 


Transnational 

Foreign Internal Defense 


Deterrence 

WMD Elimination 



Conventional 

Ma(or Combat/Strike 

& Tailored Shaping 

Campaiqn(S) Reconstruction Import 

Forward Presence 


Regional 

Deterrence 

Information Operations 




2 US Code, TITLE 10, Subtitle D, PART I, CHAPTER 807, § 8062, (c). 


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• If directed, surge to conduct and win two nearly simultaneous, large-scale 
conventional campaigns (or one conventional campaign if already 
engaged in a large-scale, long-duration irregular warfare campaign) to 
defeat aggression or coercion while selectively reinforcing deterrence 
against opportunistic acts of aggression or coercion. Be prepared to 
transition one of the campaigns (conventional or prolonged irregular) to 
remove a hostile regime, destroy its military capability including eliminating 
its WMD, and set conditions for the transition to or restoration of civil 
society. 

PRIORITIES 

The Air Force must ensure national trust and confidence in our institutional 
capacity to organize, train, and equip forces proficient across the spectrum of 
peacetime and wartime missions. The Air Force will bolster the relationship 
between the President, the Secretary of Defense, and the men and women of the 
Air Force. Our core values - integrity first, service before self, and excellence in 
all we do - are the standards by which every Airman will be held accountable, at 
all times. The Air Force will evaluate our own institution, seek out tactical to 
enterprise-wide improvements, and, where shortfalls exist, act proactively and 
decisively. 


In order to accomplish this 
overarching purpose, the Air 
Force must focus 
department-wide efforts on a 
specific set of priorities. 
These Air Force priorities 
reflect the understanding that 
all Airmen must be trained 
and equipped to provide our 
Joint force with Global 
Vigilance, Global Reach, and 
Global Power through air, 
space, and cyberspace. 


The Air Force priorities are: 

• Reinvigorate the Air Force Nuclear Enterprise 

• Partner with the Joint and Coalition Team to Win Today’s Fight 

• Develop and Care for Airmen and Their Families 

• Modernize Our Air and Space Inventories, Organizations and Training. 

• Acquisition Excellence 3 


Figure 3: Global Vigilance, Global Reach. 
and Global Power 


Global Vigilance is the ability to gain and maintain awareness - to 
keep an unblinking eye on any entity - anywhere in the world; to 
provide warning and to determine intent, opportunity, capability, or 
vulnerability; then to fuse this information with data received from 
other Services or agencies and use and share relevant information 
with the Joint Force Commander. 

Global Reach is the ability to project military capability responsively 
- with unrivaled velocity and precision - to any point on or above the 
earth, and provide mobility to rapidly supply, position, or reposition 
Joint forces. 

Global Power is the ability to hold at risk or strike any target 
anywhere in the world, assert national sovereignty, safeguard Joint 
freedom of action, and achieve swift, decisive, precise effects 
related to Air Force alignment with Joint and National priorities. 


3 SECAF/CSAF Mission Statement and Priorities, Letter to Airmen, 15 Sep 08. 


5 




These priorities provide the framework in which the Air Force directly supports 
the National Defense Strategy. 

Priority 1: Reinvigorate the Air Force Nuclear Enterprise. The Air Force 
must restore the Nation’s trust and confidence regarding the entire nuclear 
enterprise. As a core function, the Air Force must, in conjunction with the other 
services, bear the accountability and responsibility for its share of the nuclear 
enterprise and nuclear deterrence. The Air Force must maintain its ability to 
quickly and proactively address needs at the squadron, group, wing, numbered 
air force, major command, and across the entire enterprise. 

Goal 1.1: Meet Recognized Benchmarks for Nuclear Surety. The Air 

Force will comply with recommendations and findings from 
internal and external commissions, including the DoD 
Investigation Report, the Welch Report, the Blue Ribbon Review, 
the Report on the Air Force Inventory and Assessment of Nuclear 
Weapons and Nuclear-weapons Related Materiel, the 
Comprehensive Assessment of Nuclear Weapons, and the 
recently released Phase 1 Report of the Secretary of Defense 
Task Force on DoD Nuclear Weapons Management. In addition, 
the Air Force will prioritize investments to reduce capability gaps 
in the Nuclear Deterrence Operations Service Core Function 
across Joint Capability Areas. 

Goal 1.2: Improve Focus on the Nuclear Mission. The Air Force will 
improve focus on the nuclear mission by organizing to reduce 
fragmentation of authority; training, evaluating and exercising to 
meet nuclear deterrent mission demands; and ensuring the 
nuclear deterrent mission area is properly resourced in execution 
year, within the Five-Year Defense Plan (FYDP), and beyond the 
FYDP consistent with the Air Force vision for needed future 
capabilities. 

Priority 2: Partner with the Joint and Coalition Team to Win Today’s Fight. 

The Air Force remains committed, first and foremost, to supporting the Joint 
warfighter by providing Global Vigilance, Reach, and Power. Air Force 
components will be prepared to act in both “supporting” and “supported” roles as 
dictated by the objectives of the joint or combined commanders. Intelligence, 
Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) are particularly important to today’s 
Joint operations, and enhancements to these capabilities are a specific goal in 
the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan. The Air Force will continue to improve our 
contributions to Irregular Warfare and the Global War on Terror, dissuade 
competitors from entering military competitions, deter adversaries threatening 
aggression and, if needed, defeat conventional and irregular adversaries. 


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Goal 2.1: Support Combatant Commanders at All Levels, Particularly 
in the Global War on Terror and Ongoing Irregular Warfare 
Operations. The Air Force will strive to meet the requirements of 
Combatant Commander operational plans and Integrated Priority 
Lists, and, where needed, mitigate any shortfalls. The Air Force 
also will work to prioritize investments to reduce capability gaps 
across component functions, emphasizing strike and aerial 
delivery capabilities in Irregular Warfare scenarios. 


Goal 2.2: Bolster ISR Support for Joint Operations. Through changes in 
organization, training, and equipment, the Air Force will enhance 
the contributions of air, space, and cyberspace power to stated 
Combatant Commander requirements to collect, process, and 
distribute knowledge and information. As a core function, the Air 
Force must, in conjunction with the other services, provide global 
integrated ISR, as well as work to prioritize investments to reduce 
capability gaps across component functions, emphasizing ISR 
capabilities in Irregular Warfare scenarios. 

Goal 2.3: Build Global Partnerships. The Air Force will enhance the long¬ 
term capability and capacity of special operations and general 
purpose forces to work by, with, and through host nations to 
bolster security and reduce the scale and scope of ungoverned 
spaces, while expanding governmental legitimacy and the rule of 
law. The Air Force will prioritize investments to reduce capability 
gaps in the Building Partnerships core function, particularly in 
areas related to communications, shaping, and security 
cooperation as outlined in the GDF. 

Priority 3: Develop and Care for Airmen and Their Families. Airmen are the 
Air Force’s most valuable resource, and the Air Force remains committed to 
recruiting and retaining the world’s highest quality force. Spanning six decades of 
Air Force history - particularly over the past seventeen years - our Airmen have 
proven themselves as global first responders in times of crisis. 

Moving forward, the Air Force must recruit, train, educate, sustain, and retain the 
right number and mix of Airmen - including Active Duty, Air National Guard, Air 
Force Reserve, and Civilian personnel. The Air Force will ensure that we are 
preparing Airmen for the challenges of today and tomorrow. 

Goal 3.1: Ensure Airmen Possess the Appropriate Skills to Conduct 

Joint Operations in Air, Space, and Cyberspace. As Air Force 
missions and capabilities evolve, so must Airmen and their skills. 
The Air Force will ensure that the education and skills of our 
Airmen - including both occupational specialties and institutional 


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competencies - are fully aligned with Joint warfighting 
requirements. Among our Airmen, we will foster the international 
perspectives, strategic vision, and operational warfighting skills 
needed to foster effective partnerships around the globe. 

Goal 3.2: Sustain Deployed and Home Station Quality of Service. The 

Air Force will continue to maintain the Quality of Service for 
Airmen and their families and strive to achieve the highest 
possible standard of the Air Force Quality of Service Index. 

Priority 4: Modernize Our Air and Space Inventories, Organizations and 
Training. Fundamental to our Air Force is the ability to exploit air, space, and 
cyberspace. As the Nation adapts to an evolving threat environment across the 
spectrum of operations, the Air Force must maintain a comprehensive set of 
capabilities - organizations, Airmen, and equipment - available to a Joint Force 
Commander in any scenario. 

Goal 4.1: Reduce Medium to Long-Term Joint Warfighting Risk. Using 
the Capabilities Review and Risk Assessment (CRRA), the Air 
Force will identify and prioritize capability shortfalls to achieve 
specific operational requirements of the National Military Strategy. 
The Air Force will reduce the risks to achieving these operational 
requirements. 

Goal 4.2: Meet Joint and Air Force Recapitalization Benchmarks. The 

Guidance for the Development of the Force (GDF), Joint 
Programming Guidance (JPG), and Annual Planning and 
Programming Guidance (APPG) provide specific targets for 
desired Air Force capabilities and capacity. Air Force performance 
in the achievement of the right capability and capacity mix will be 
measured, in part, by its ability to achieve those benchmarks. 

Goal 4.3: Ensure an Accountable, Credible, and Transparent 

Institution. Across all functions - planning, programming, 
budgeting, acquisition, operations, and training - the Air Force will 
ensure a secure and transparent environment that guarantees the 
integrity required of America’s air, space, and cyberspace force. 
Specifically, Air Force Smart Operations for the Twenty-First 
Century will continue to strive for transparency and accountability 
by applying a comprehensive, enterprise-wide, strategic-level 
continuous process improvement approach across the entire Air 
Force. 

Goal 4.4: Achieve Total Force Integration. Total Force Integration is a 
transformational initiative bringing together the human resources 
from all Air Force components - Active Duty, Air National Guard, 


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Air Force Reserve, and Civilian. As the Air Force transforms to 
face increasingly complex 21st century challenges, Total Force 
Integration strives to ensure all components are positioned to 
transition into new and relevant missions. We will continue to 
implement current Total Force Integration initiatives and seek new 
opportunities to capitalize on the capacity and experience resident 
in our Total Force. 

Goal 4.5: Align Organization and Processes with Air Force Core 

Functions and DoD Core Competencies. Within the context 
of Global Vigilance, Global Reach, and Global Power, the Air 
Force will establish a comprehensive set of Service core functions 
to support Department of Defense core competencies. In 
addition, the Air Force will streamline the Air Force Corporate 
Structure and Capability Champion framework to provide better 
organizational alignment between Air Force core functions and 
DoD core competencies. 

Priority 5: Acquisition Excellence. While DoD has shown an ability to rapidly 
develop, acquire and deploy technology to meet urgent warfighter needs, 
Unmanned Aerial Systems, and Remotely Operated Video Enhanced Receivers 
(ROVERs) are the exceptions to a larger trend in the Air Force that 
recapitalization is neither timely nor adequately funded. The Air Force must 
improve its ability to manage complex procurements and ensure that our 
acquisition processes reflect the highest standards of rigor and transparency. 

Goal 5.1: Rebuild and Shape the Acquisition Workforce. We will rebuild 
crucial skills and increase the number of qualified, experienced 
organic acquisition personnel, including uniformed military, 
through coordination with the requirements, budget, acquisition 
and personnel communities. This will include the addition of 
proven engineering and management talent in supervisory roles. 

Goal 5.2: Continue to Improve Acquisition Processes and Skills. The 

Air Force will pursue improvements in the delivery of air, space, 
and cyberspace capabilities by improving enterprise-wide 
understanding and execution of requirements definition, 
budgeting, and weapons acquisition processes. We will pursue 
policies that instill discipline between these processes and retain 
process flexibility. 

Goal 5.3: Enforce Stability in Requirements, CONOPS, Funding. 

Working across functional boundaries, we will improve 
requirements definition, establish funding stability, estimate costs 
realistically, design effective acquisition strategies, conduct sound 
source selections, and aggressively mitigate program risk. 


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OBJECTIVES 

Critical to any effective strategic plan are a set of cascading objectives to guide 
action at the HAF and major command (MAJCOM) levels. Aligned with the 
priorities and goals of the overall Air Force, these objectives should both reflect 
and guide actions across the Air Force and be measured with relevant, outcome- 
based measures. 


The 2008 Air 
Force Strategic 
Plan will use the 
existing objectives 
and measures 
from the 2006 Air 
Force Strategic 
Plan as a baseline. 

Within 30 days of 
publication of the 
2008 Air Force 
Strategic Plan, the 
Priority Champions 
identified in Figure 
4 will review the 
baseline objectives 
to develop a single 
set of objectives 
and measures that 
better meet the 

intent and goals of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan. As the Enterprise Process 
Champion, the Chief Management Officer (CMO) will facilitate horizontal 
integration across all Priorities, and provide a direct link to the functions and 
responsibilities of the Air Force CMO and Department of Defense Chief 
Management Officer. 

An initial assessment of the baseline objectives and measures is provided in 
Figure 5. 


Figure 4: Priority Champions 


Priority 

Priority 

Champions 

Enterprise 

Process 

Champion 

Reinvigorate the Air 
Force Nuclear 
Enterprise 

AF/A3/5 & 
AF/A10 

USecAF (CMO) 

Partner with the Joint 
and Coalition Team to 
Win Today’s Fight 

AF/A3/5 

Develop and Care 
for Airmen and Their 
Families 

AF/A1 

Modernize Our Air 
and Space 
Inventories, 
Organizations and 
Training 

AF/A8 

Acquisition Excellence 

SAF/AQ & 
SAF/US(D) 


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Figure 5: Objectives for Review by Priority Champions 


2008 

Priorities 

2008 

Goals 

Objectives for Review by Priority Champions 

Italics indicates a new objective; Parentheses indicate objectives from 2006 Air Force Strategic Plan 

Priority 1: 
Reinvigorate 
the Air Force 
Nuclear 
Enterprise 

Goal 1.1: Meet Recognized 
Benchmarks for Nuclear 
Surety 

• Comply with recommendations from the DoD Investigation Report, Welch Report, the Blue Ribbon Review, the Report on the 

Air Force Inventory and Assessment of Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear-weapons Related Materiel, the Comprehensive 
Assessment of Nuclear Weapons, and the recently released Schlesinger report. 

• Prioritize investments to reduce capability gaps in the Strategic Deterrence Component Function across Joint Capability Areas 
as outlined in the Guidance for Development of the Force (GDF), specifically in Force Application, Battlespace Awareness, 
Netcentric and Command and Control 

Goal 1.2: Improve Focus on 
the Nuclear Mission 

• Ensure operations, security, maintenance, logistics personnel are properly trained, evaluated, and aggressively exercised in 
order to produce combat ready alert (ICBM) forces, fully prepared generation (Bomber) forces and ready fighter forces in full 
support of NATO and alliance security objectives 

• Optimize alignment of nuclear operations, sustainment and policy 

• Revitalize nuclear deterrent theory instruction across nuclear enterprise 

• Match size, skill and CONOPs of nuclear inspection teams against nuclear deterrent mission demands 

• Ensure future capabilities development includes requirements for follow on nuclear systems 

• Align DOTMLPF with Demands of Nuclear Enterprise 

- Doctrine, Organization, Training, Materiel, Leadership and Education, Personnel, and Facilities (DOTMLPF) will align with 
stringent and specific requirements associated with the stewardship and employment of nuclear weapons 

Priority 2: 
Partner with 
the Joint and 
Coalition 
Team to Win 
Today’s Fight 

Goal 2.1: 

Support the Combatant 
Commanders at All Levels, 
Particularly in the Global 
War on Terror and Ongoing 
Irregular Warfare 
Operations 

• Meet Combatant Commander requirements 

Satisfy CCDR operational plans and Integrated Priority Lists and resolve any shortfalls in FY11 APOM / FY12 POM 

• Establish cyber operations as an Air Force core competency (2006 Obj 1.3) 

• Develop doctrine and Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTP) for information operations and cyber missions and weapons 
systems (2006 Obj 1.4) 

• Align Air Force organizations/training to integrate effectively with Joint, interagency, and coalition partners (2006 Obj 1.8) 

• Maximize participation of Joint, interagency, and coalition partners in Air Force planning, capability development, and training in 
core and emerging missions (2006 Obj 1.9) 

• Achieve interoperability through flexible risk management approaches to technology transfer and information sharing (Obj 3.10) 

• Develop and implement an effective strategic communications program to clearly explain the Air Force’s contributions to U.S. 
and global security (2006 Obj 1.1) 

Goal 2.2: 

Bolster ISR Support for Joint 
Operations 

• Play a lead role in the development, execution, and management of the Joint roadmap for C4ISR and knowledge-enabled 
warfighting capabilities (2006 Obj 1.6) 

• Equip Airmen with operational assets to produce knowledge-based, time-critical, decision quality information (2006 Obj 1.7) 

• Satisfy all stated CCDR requirements 

• Design, develop, and maintain an Air Force ISR strategy and associated plan providing alternatives 
to resource the ISR Strategy 

• Prioritize investments to reduce capability gaps across component functions emphasizing aerial infiltration ISR and strike 
capabilities in Irregular Warfare scenarios 

Goal 2.3: 

Build Global Partnerships 

• Implement appropriate changes in DOTMLPF to increase GWOT/IW capabilities 

SECAF/CSAF approval of Global Partnership Strategy by Dec 08 

Identify specific DOTMLPF changes to support the Global Partnership Strategy 

Incorporate DOTMLPF changes in FY11 APOM and FY12 POM 

• Implement appropriate changes in DOTMLPF to increase Building Partnership capabilities 

CSAF approval of BP concept of operations by Dec 08 

Identify specific DOTMLPF changes to support BP concept of operations 

Incorporate DOTMLPF changes in FY11 APOM and FY12 POM 

• Prioritize investments to reduce BP capability gaps in communications, shaping and security cooperation as noted in the GDF. 


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2008 

Priorities 

2008 

Goals 

Objectives for Review by Priority Champions 

Italics indicates a new objective; Parentheses indicate objectives from 2006 Air Force Strategic Plan 

Priority 3: 
Develop and 
Care for 
Airmen and 
Their Families 

Goal 3.1: 

Ensure Airmen Possess the 
Appropriate Skills to 
Conduct Joint Operations in 
Air, Space, and Cyberspace 

• Strengthen bond between Air Force core values and the warrior ethos (2006 Obj 2.1) 

• Synchronize force development to ensure all Airmen are capable of executing current and emerging air, space, and cyber 
missions (2006 Obj 2.4) 

Goal 3.2: 

Sustain Deployed and 
Flome Station Quality of 
Service 

• Advance proactive force health protection efforts to ensure Airmen are healthy, fit and safe - from accession through separation 
(2006 Obj 2.6) 

• Transform capability to improve Airmen and family Quality of Service (2006 Obj 2.5) 

Priority 4: 
Modernize Our 
Air and Space 
Inventories, 
Organizations 
and Training 

Goal 4.1: 

Reduce Medium to Long- 
Term Joint 
Warfighting Risk 

• Focus and protect R&D investments that advance the state of the art in fighting the global war on terror; recapitalizing and 
modernizing our aging aircraft, satellites, and equipment; and future challenges to continued dominance of air, space, and 
cyberspace (2006 Obj 3.2) 

• Assess risk using common force structure and scenario assumptions in the Capabilities Review and Risk Assessment 

• Successively reduce risk to meeting medium and long-term warfighting requirements 

Goal 4.2: 

Meet Joint and Air Force 
Recapitalization 
Benchmarks 

• Develop and execute a fiscally informed, integrated recapitalization and modernization strategy (2006 Obj 3.1/3.7) 

Meet benchmarks in the Guidance for Development of the Force and Annual Planning and Programming Guidance 

Goal 4.3: 

Ensure an Accountable, 
Credible, and Transparent 
Institution 

• Establish a secure, transparent information sharing environment within the AF and among our external partners (2006 Obj 1.5) 

• Improve ability to conduct Service-wide cost management (2006 Obj 3.5) 

• Develop and institutionalize a comprehensive, AF-wide, strategic-level continuous process improvement approach (2006 Obj 

3.6) 

• Streamline infrastructure assets while optimizing operational capability (2006 Obj 3.8) 

Goal 4.4 

Achieve Total Force 
Integration 

• Increase opportunities to integrate Total Force personnel (2006 Obj 2.3) 

• Refine concepts, strategies, force management policies and practices, to access ARC forces while minimizing reliance on 
involuntary activation (2006 Obj 1.10) 

Goal 4.5: 

Align Organization and 
Processes with Air Force 
Core Functions and DoD 
Core Competencies 

• Within the context of Global Vigilance, Global Reach, and Global Power, the Air Force will establish a comprehensive set of 
Service core functions to support Department of Defense core competencies. 

• Streamline the Air Force Corporate Structure and Capability Champion framework to provide better organizational alignment 
between Air Force core functions and DoD core competencies. 

Priority 5: 
Acquisition 
Excellence 

Goal 5.1: 

Rebuild and Shape the 
Acquisition Workforce 

• Build and retain a high quality acquisition workforce using force management policies to effectively meet the requirements of 
current, changing, and emerging air, space and cyber mission areas (2006 Obj 2.2) 

• Ensure appropriate distribution of uniformed military in the Acquisition workforce 

Goal 5.2: 

Continue to Improve 
Acquisition Processes and 
Skills 

• Strengthen the source selection governance process so that no ACAT1 and II source selections are protested or if protested the 
result is in favor of the Air Force 

• Review and revitalize acquisition and related processes to improve cost/schedule control and performance assurance (2006 

Obj 3.9) 

Goal 5.3: 

Enforce Stability in 
Requirements, CONOPS, 
Funding 

• Produce accurate, reliable, timely, life-cycle financial data throughout the PPBE process (2006 Obj 3.4) 

• Develop and deploy next generation operational concepts that leverage legacy and emerging capabilities (2006 Obj 1.2) 


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GOVERNANCE 

The 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan revises the governance framework used in the 
2006 Air Force Strategic Plan. Specifically, the Air Force Process Council will 
now provide oversight of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan, and the addition of 
the role and responsibility of the Under Secretary of the Air Force as the Chief 
Management Officer will support all DoD and US Government standards. 

As related to the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan, there are five organizations that 
assess and recommend decisions to the Secretary of the Air Force and Chief of 
Staff. These organizations include: 

• AF/A8 

• HAF Priority Champions 

• Chief Management Officer 

• Air Force Council 

• Air Force Process Council 

AF/A8 

AF/A8 is the office of primary responsibility for the Air Force Strategic Plan, will 
continue to lead the Air Force Strategic Planning System outlined in Air Force 
Policy Directive 90-11, and retains responsibility for the development, 
maintenance, reporting, and revisions of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan. 

Within six months of the Air Force Strategic Plan’s publication, AF/A8 will assess 
all MAJCOM, enterprise, organizational, and functional strategic plans. Findings 
will be provided to the Air Force Process Council for final review. 

AF/A8 will continue to lead the Air Force’s overall planning (A8X) and 
programming (A8P) functions in the Air Force Corporate Structure. 

HAF Priority Champions 

A1, A3/5, A8, A10, SAF/AQ, SAF/US(D) and the Air Force CMO collectively 
comprise the FIAF Priority Champions. Within 30 days of the publication of the 
2008 Air Force Strategic Plan, the Priority Champions and the CMO will review 
the objectives in Figure 5 to develop a single set of refined objectives and 
measures for use in evaluating progress toward the 2008 Priorities and Goals. 

This refined set of objectives and measures will be presented to the Air Force 
Process Council, along with identified HAF functional Objective Champions, 
within 30 days of publication. Based on updates from specific Objective 
Champions, the respective Priority Champions will report progress on the 2008 
Air Force Strategic Plan to the Air Force Process Council. 


13 



Chief Management Officer 

The CMO serves as the Enterprise Process Champion. Consistent with the intent 
and requirements of the Chief Management Officer within the Air Force and the 
Department of Defense, the CMO will facilitate integration across the Strategic 
Plan, and bolster the alignment and effectiveness of Air Force-wide processes in 
support of the priorities, goals, and objectives in the 2008 Air Force Strategic 
Plan. 

Air Force Council 

Co-chaired by the Air Force Vice Chief of Staff and the Under Secretary of the Air 
Force, the Air Force Council is the final deliberative body in the Air Force 
Corporate Structure and includes all SAF and HAF two-letter organizations. The 
Air Force Council is the final forum for resource decisions and recommendations 
to the Secretary and the Chief of Staff. 

Air Force Process Council 

Originally established for oversight and reporting of Air Force Smart Operations 
for the Twenty-First Century, the Air Force Process Council will expand its span 
of control to include oversight of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan through review 
of quarterly Priority Champion reports. HAF Priority Champions will provide 
quarterly assessments of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan directly to the Air 
Force Process Council for enterprise management attention. 

The overall governance structure is depicted in Figure 6. Additional information 
on specific implementation and administration responsibilities can be found in 
Appendix A. For further information on the relationship between the Air Force 
Strategic Plan and DoD- and US Government-wide requirements, refer to 
Appendix B. 


Figure 6: Air Force Strategic Plan Governance 



14 











The Air Force Strategic Plan will be revised on a biennial basis or as required by 
changing events. 

SUMMARY 

The 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan provides a focused and deliberate framework 
for aligning current and future Air Force actions with national guidance. By 
linking specific goals to priorities, the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan allows the Air 
Force and Nation to evaluate the performance of the Air Force. A summary of 
the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan is found in Figure 7. 

Figure 7: Summary of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan 

Vision 

The United States Air Force will be a trusted and reliable joint partner with our sister services 
known for integrity in all of our activities, including supporting the joint mission first and foremost. 
We will provide compelling air, space and cyber capabilities for use by the Combatant 
Commanders. We will excel as stewards of all Air Force resources in service to the American 
people, while providing precise and reliable Global Vigilance, Reach and Power for the Nation. 

Mission 

The mission of the United States Air Force is to fly, fight and win... 
in air, space, and cyberspace. 


2008 Priorities 

2008 Goals 

Priority 1: 
Reinvigorate the 

Air Force 

Nuclear Enterprise 

Goal 1.1: Meet Recognized Benchmarks for Nuclear Surety 

Goal 1.2: Improve Focus on the Nuclear Mission 

Priority 2: 

Partner with the Joint 
and Coalition Team to 
Win Today’s Fight 

Goal 2.1: Support the Combatant Commanders at All Levels, 

Particularly in the Global War on Terror and Ongoing 
Irregular Warfare Operations 

Goal 2.2: Bolster ISR Support for Joint Operations 

Goal 2.3: Build Global Partnerships 

Priority 3: 

Develop and Care 
for Airmen and Their 
Families 

Goal 3.1: Ensure Airmen Possess the Appropriate Skills to Conduct 

Joint Operations in Air, Space, and Cyberspace 

Goal 3.2: Sustain Deployed and Home Station Quality of Service 

Priority 4: 

Modernize Our Air and 
Space Inventories, 
Organizations and 
Training 

Goal 4.1: Reduce Medium to Long-Term Joint Warfighting Risk 

Goal 4.2: Meet Joint and Air Force Recapitalization Benchmarks 

Goal 4.3: Ensure an Accountable, Credible, and Transparent Institution 
Goal 4.4: Achieve Total Force Integration 

Goal 4.5: Align Organization and Processes with Air Force Core 
Functions and DoD Core Competencies 

Priority 5: 

Acquisition Excellence 

Goal 5.1: Rebuild and Shape the Acquisition Workforce 

Goal 5.2: Continue to improve Acquisition Processes and Skills 

Goal 5.3: Enforce Stability in Requirements, CONOPS, Funding 


15 












APPENDIX A: Implementation and Administration Responsibilities 

The Air Force Process Council 

Established for oversight and reporting of Air Force Smart Operations for the 
Twenty-First Century, the Air Force Process Council will expand its span of 
control to include oversight of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan through review of 
quarterly Priority Champion reports. HAF and SAF Priority Champions will 
provide quarterly assessments of the Air Force Strategic Plan directly to the Air 
Force Process Council for enterprise management attention. 

The Air Force Council 

The Air Force Council acts as a deliberative body with resource responsibility for 
supporting the overall attainment of the Priorities, Goals, and Objectives in this 
Plan. The Council will meet quarterly with the SECAF and CSAF to review 
progress and to discuss any significant resource implications of the Priorities, 
Goals, or Objectives. The resource reviews will also offer the opportunity to 
recommend changes to continuously align the strategic Priorities and Objectives 
of the Strategic Plan with changing Air Force and DoD demands. Specific 
responsibilities include: 

• Provide resources to establish new capabilities as outlined in the Plan 

• Assess resource implications of quarterly performance reports from 
Priority Champions 

The Air Force Council will strive to adequately balance the costs associated with 
implementing the Objectives against current obligations. It will advocate for future 
funding to pursue implementation as necessary. 

Chief Management Officer 

As it pertains to the Air Force strategic planning process, the CMO and Deputy 
CMO are responsible for effective administration of the Strategic Plan. In 
particular, the CMO, acting as Executive Secretary to the Air Force Process 
Council, will facilitate and schedule all quarterly assessments of the Air Force 
Strategic Plan. 

The CMO also serves as the Enterprise Process Champion and bolsters the 
alignment and effectiveness of Air Force-wide processes in support of the 
priorities, goals, and objectives across the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan. 

HAF Priority Champions 

Priority Champions are members of the HAF and SAF staff and are either 
appointed members of the Secretariat, General Officers, or SES members 
assigned to each of the five Air Force Priorities. Each Priority Champion is 
responsible for directing, coordinating, and reporting actions (generally executed 
at the Objective level) to achieve a particular Priority. Priority Champions review 
frequently the efforts and progress of the Objective Champions associated with 


16 



their Priority, assist with implementation, and recommend changes to Objectives 
when appropriate. Priority Champions provide quarterly progress reports to the 
Air Force Process Council. Priority Champions’ responsibilities include: 

• Within 30 days of the publication of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan, 
reviewing proposed objectives and developing a single set of objectives 
and measures for use in evaluating progress toward the 2008 Goals and 
Priorities. 

• Directing and coordinating activities associated with accomplishing the 
overall Priority, including actions that fall within the responsibility of 
another organization 

• Tracking and ensuring the completion of actions outlined in the 
implementation plans for each Objective that falls within the Priority area 

• Approving and providing feedback on performance metrics developed by 
Objective Champions for each Objective within the Priority area 

• Consolidating findings and conclusions regarding progress on the 
Objectives under their Priority and reporting them quarterly to the Air 
Force Process Council 

• Identifying and articulating resources needed to achieve the Priority 

• Reporting shortfalls to the Air Force Process Council and identifying risk 
areas 

• Recommending changes to the Plan (e.g. closing, adding, or changing an 
Objective) to the Air Force Process Council as appropriate 

Objective Champions 

Objective Champions are senior military or civilian members of the HAF and SAF 
staff who are directly responsible to a Priority Champion for attaining 
performance levels on assigned Objectives. Specific responsibilities include: 

• Developing the implementation plans necessary for the achievement of 
their assigned Objectives 

• Ensuring the overall achievement of assigned Objectives, by managing 
and overseeing initiatives and other actions taken in support of the 
Objectives 

• Identifying resources to accomplish responsibilities for assigned 
Objectives 

• Implementing specific actions to successfully complete the Objective and 
supporting initiatives 

• Developing Objective performance metrics (with the assistance of AF/A1) 

• Reporting progress against the implementation plan and its performance 
metrics (to track achievement of milestones) 

• Attending the quarterly Air Force Process Council meetings to provide 
additional information as needed in support of Priority Champions’ reports 

• Identifying and reporting constraints with recommendations to mitigate risk 


17 



Objective Champions will begin drafting implementation plans for their assigned 
Objectives in accordance with the format guidelines issued by AF/A8 within 30 
days of being notified as an Objective Champion. All Objective implementation 
plans must be completed and approved by the Priority Champions within 90 days 
of 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan publication. 

HQ Air Force Two-Letter Organizations and MAJCOMs 

HQ Air Force Two-Letter Organizations and MAJCOMs will create and/or update 
existing MAJCOM, enterprise, organizational, and functional level strategic plans 
to align with and support the Air Force Strategic Plan at the next scheduled 
interval in their organizational planning cycle, or within six months of Air Force 
Strategic Plan publication, whichever is earlier. In the case of 
organizations/commands that have published strategic plans within the six 
months preceding publication of the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan, they will (at a 
minimum) issue a change that addresses any disconnects between their existing 
plan and the Air Force Strategic Plan. They will work closely with Objective 
Champions to implement specific actions within their areas of responsibility to 
successfully achieve the Objectives. 

The flow-down of strategic Priorities, Goals, and Objectives to initiatives and 
actions at each successive level of organization will allow the Air Force to 
execute its mission and form the basis for the development of performance 
management plans for all Air Force civilian personnel as required by the National 
Security Personnel System. 

AF/A8 

AF/A8 has overall administrative responsibility for the review, updating and 
maintenance of the Air Force Strategic Plan. AF/A8 is responsible for providing 
updated guidance for the overall strategic planning process within the Air Force. 
AF/A8 serves as advisor to the SecAF, CSAF, Air Force Council and the Air 
Force Process Council on strategic planning. AF/A8 advises Priority Champions, 
consolidates feedback and ideas from the Priority and Objective Champions, and 
prepares the members of the Air Force Council and Air Force Process Council on 
planning issues. Within six months of the publication of the Air Force-wide plan, 
AF/A8 will review the alignment of MAJCOM, enterprise, organizational, and 
functional strategic plans with the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan. Every two 
years, AF/A8 will conduct a review and update the overall Air Force Strategic 
Plan. 

AF/A1 

AF/A1 has overall responsibility for the performance measurement and reporting 
elements of the Air Force Strategic Plan. AF/A1 will assist Priority and Objective 
Champions in the development of strategic performance measures. AF/A1 will 
provide analytical expertise and counsel to the Priority and Objective Champions 
in determining the most effective performance measures for assessing the 
accomplishment of strategic Objectives, as outlined in the Air Force Strategic 


18 



Plan. AF/A1 is responsible for ensuring all performance metrics, once 
developed, are updated on a regular basis by the Objective Champions and 
ready for leadership review at the quarterly Performance Management Reviews 
with the Air Force Process Council. AF/A1 is responsible for meeting any 
external reporting requirements on the performance of the Air Force Strategic 
Plan. Lastly, AF/A1 will consolidate any feedback and ideas from the Priority and 
Objective Champions and forward this information to AF/A8. 


19 



APPENDIX B: 


External Requirements 


The President’s Management Agenda 

With five government-wide initiatives, the President’s Management Agenda 
focuses on performance and results for government. The PMA is guided by 
three principles: citizen (not bureaucracy) centered, results oriented, and focused 
on innovation. Mapping how Air Force Priorities and Goals help address each of 
the PMA’s initiatives is shown in Figure 7: 


Figure 7: Alignment with the President’s Management Agenda 


Goals 

Strategic 
Management of 
Human Capital 

Competitive 

Sourcing 

Improved 

Financial 

Performance 

Expanded 

Electronic 

Government 

Budget and 
Performance 
Integration 

1.1 






1.2 

• 





2.1 

• 



• 

• 

2.2 




• 

• 

2.3 






3.1 

• 




• 

3.2 

• 




• 

4.1 




• 

• 

4.2 



• 


• 

4.3 


• 

• 

• 

• 

4.4 

• 





4.5 

• 


• 


• 

5.1 

• 





5.2 

• 

• 

• 

• 


5.3 





• 


Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) 

Under the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, the Department of 
Defense is responsible for submitting a strategic plan to OMB and the Congress 
on a regular basis. Though the Air Force, as a component within the DoD, is not 
required to submit a separate strategic plan, this document is intended to 
conform to the GPRA requirements to the fullest extent possible. Below is a 
description of how the Air Force Strategic Plan meets the basic requirements for 
strategic plans under GPRA. 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the United States Air Force is to fly, fight and win... in air, space 
and cyberspace. 

To fulfill this mission we must be committed to these Priorities: 

• Reinvigorate the Air Force Nuclear Enterprise 


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• Partner with the Joint and Coalition Team to Win Today’s Fight 

• Develop and Care for Airmen and Their Families 

• Modernize Our Air and Space Inventories, Organizations and Training. 4 

• Acquisition Excellence 

Air Force Strategic Goals 

The strategic goals of the Air Force are: 


• Goal 1.1 

• Goal 1.2 

• Goal 2.1 


• Goal 2.2: 

• Goal 2.3: 

• Goal 3.1: 

• Goal 3.2: 

• Goal 4.1: 

• Goal 4.2: 

• Goal 4.3: 

• Goal 4.4: 

• Goal 4.5: 

• Goal 5.1: 

• Goal 5.2: 

• Goal 5.3: 


Meet Recognized Benchmarks for Nuclear Surety 

Improve Focus on the Nuclear Mission 

Support the Combatant Commanders at All Levels, 

Particularly in the Global War on Terror and Ongoing 

Irregular Warfare Operations 

Bolster ISR Support for Joint Operations 

Build Global Partnerships 

Ensure Airmen Possess the Appropriate Skills to Conduct 
Joint Operations in Air, Space, and Cyberspace 
Sustain Deployed and Home Station Quality of Service 
Reduce Medium to Long-Term Joint Warfighting Risk 
Meet Joint and Air Force Recapitalization Benchmarks 
Ensure and Accountable, Credible, and Transparent 
Institution 

Achieve Total Force Integration 

Align Organization and Processes with Air Force Core 

Functions and DoD Core Competencies 

Rebuild and Shape the Acquisition Workforce 

Continue to Improve Acquisition Processes and Skills 

Enforce Stability in Requirements, CONOPS, Funding 


Description of the Relationship Between Annual Program Performance 
Goals and Agency’s Strategic Goal Framework 

The priorities and goals outlined in the 2008 Air Force Strategic Plan will be 
associated with specific objectives and performance measures during the next 
planning cycle of each program. All program performance goals will be linked 
directly to one or more of the priorities and goals contained in this Strategic Plan. 


Identification of Key Factors That Could Affect Achievement of Goals 

The following section identifies some of the key external factors that could 
influence our ability to achieve our goals. At the broadest level, implementation 
of Air Force goals could be influenced by changes in national guidance, the 
global security environment, technological change, and decisions regarding the 
Air Force budget. 


4 SECAF/CSAF Letter to Airmen, 15 Sep 08. 


21 








Goal 1.1: 


Goal 1.2: 


Goal 2.1: 


Goal 2.2: 


Goal 2.3: 


Goal 3.1: 


Goal 3.2: 


Meet Recognized Benchmarks for Nuclear Surety 

While national guidance in terms of current and/or new arms control 
agreements could affect Air Force nuclear weapons inventory, the 
goal of nuclear surety will remain unchanged. The importance of 
this issue cannot be emphasized enough, and the Air Force is fully 
committed to recognizing ail benchmarks for nuclear surety. 

Improve Focus on the Nuclear Mission 

Changes in nuclear-related DOTMLPF can occur through national 
policy decisions regarding the Nation’s nuclear posture. As noted 
previously, multiple sources will directly influence the shape and 
character of this goal. 

Support the Combatant Commanders at All Levels, Particularly 
in the Global War on Terror and Ongoing Irregular Warfare 
Operations 

Air Force support to the Joint Force in ongoing operations is a 
given. The specific capabilities and capacity provided to CCDRs 
can be influenced by changes in operational and contingency 
plans, U.S. foreign policy, and overall security environment. 

Bolster ISR Support for Joint Operations 

External influences upon the implementation of this goal potentially 
include Congressional and or Department decisions regarding roles 
and missions of the United States Armed Services. However, the 
Air Force is approaching this goal with a focus on Joint solutions, 
thereby mitigating unanticipated external influences. Potential 
changes in technology, operational concepts, and adversary 
capabilities could affect the intensity or type of Joint operational 
demand for ISR support. 

Build Global Partnerships 

U.S. foreign policy and the overall security environment may affect 
the implementation of this goal. 

Ensure Airmen Possess the Appropriate Skills to Conduct 
Joint Operations in Air, Space, and Cyberspace 

Changes to national and DoD guidance, as well as CCDR 
requirements, regarding education and training of personnel may 
affect this Air Force goal. 


Sustain Deployed and Home Station Quality of Service 

Legislative and DoD-level guidance regarding personnel 
management and benefits will affect implementation of this goal. 


22 



Goal 4.1: 


Goal 4.2: 


Goal 4.3: 


Goal 4.4: 


Goal 4.5: 


Goal 5.1: 


Current and projected federal budgetary trends will continue to 
have an impact upon this goal. 


Reduce Medium to Long-Term Joint Warfighting Risk 

Changes in the security environment, to include changes in 
adversary capability, capacity, intentions, or force posture, will exert 
influences on this goal. Additionally, changes in U.S. national 
policies regarding foreign affairs, force posture, and CCDR 
warfighting strategies and requirements will affect this goal. 

Meet Joint and Air Force Recapitalization Benchmarks 

National policy changes regarding the degree and type of risk 
acceptable in meeting the demands of the future security 
environment can alter the pace of meeting this goal or the goal 
itself. Also, radical advances in materials technologies could 
impact implementation of this goal as well. Budgetary pressures 
are also likely to influence this goal. 

Ensure an Accountable, Credible, and Transparent Institution 

Changes in national leadership priorities involving a new emphasis 
on promoting overall U.S. government transparency could have an 
effect on implementation of this goal. DoD-level process 
improvements will also affect this goal. 

Achieve Total Force Integration 

Specific legislation affecting the Active, Guard, and Reserve will 
affect aspects of Total Force Integration. 

Align Organization and Processes with Air Force Core 
Functions and DoD Core Competencies 

The congressionally-legislated Quadrennial Roles and Missions 
Review could identify areas influencing function alignment to the 
Department of Defense’s core competencies. National leadership 
priorities could also impact the Air Force’s ability to meet core 
functional alignment. 

Rebuild and Shape the Acquisition Workforce 

Competition from commercial markets and future demographic 
talent pool may challenge the department’s ability to attract and 
retain qualified individuals. A prolonged stay while executing a 
program may adversely impact an officer’s career since broadening 
and developmental opportunities may be missed; the reverse is 
also true whereas when an officer leaves the program the program 
manager continuum may be temporarily disturbed. 


23 



Goal 5.2: 


Goal 5.3: 


Continue to Improve Acquisition Processes and Skills 

There is no current methodology for establishing quantifiable and 
objective programs/portfolio performance goals as well as injecting 
these goals into the performance evaluations of Acquisition 
professionals (Pay for Performance Concept). The current AQ IT 
Infrastructure is not mature enough to produce repeatable 
transparent results when reporting programs/portfolio performance. 

Enforce Stability in Requirements, CONOPS, Funding 

Ensuring stability and possibly best pricing may rely on sustained 
congressional support, for example, multiyear funding for some 
major acquisition programs. Requirements “creep” will need to be 
controlled or risk subjecting major programs to spiraling costs and 
becoming unaffordable. 


24