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REPORT 



R E S U M E S 



ED 012 070 



CO 000 227 



PREVENTIVE ACTION IN COLLEGE MCNTAL HEALTH. 

D Y - DAROER, E EN 

FLORIDA UN IV., GAINESVILLE 



PUD DATE SEP 65 



FDRS PRICE MF~S0.09 HC-$0,60 



20P 



DESCRIPTORS - ^EMOTIONAL ADJUSTMENT, ^STRESS VARIABLES, 
♦COLLEGE STUDENTS, ♦MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS, COLLEGE 
COOPERATION, WORKSHOPS, ♦PILOT PROJECTS, NATIONAL INSTITUTE 
OF MENTAL HEALTH PROJECT, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE 

THE UNIVERSITY OP FLORIDA HAS D EEN DEVELOPING PROGRAMS 
TO STUDY AND PREVENT THE EMOTIONAL STRESS EXPERIENCED EY 
STUDENTS WHEN THEY HAKE THE TRANSITION FROM HOME TO COLLEGE. 

A UNIVERSITY MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAM WHICH IS 

PREVENTION-ORIENTED HAS DEEN DEVELOPED . THE PROJECT PROPOSED 
IN THIS PAPER IS AN INTENSIVE STUDY OF THE TRANSITIONAL 
EXPERIENCES, STRESSES, AND RESULTING BEHAVIORS OF FRESHMEN 
AND TRANSFER STUDENTS. THE STUDY WILL LEAD TO THE DEVELOPMENT 
OF ORIENTATION PROGRAMS AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS TO MEET THE 
NEEDS OF ENTERING STUDENTS. INTERVIEWS WITH APPROX I MATELY 300 
STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ARE PLANNED TO 
DETERMINE THE INDEXES OF EMOTIONAL VULNERAD I L I TY . THE INDEXES 
ESTABLISHED l/ILL BE USED FOR THE SELECTION OF MEASURING 
INSTRUMENTS AND CONTINUED CROSS VALIDATION OF EMOTIONAL 
PROBLEMS FOUND. WORKSHOPS FOR COUNSELORS OF HIGH SCHOOLS AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGES WILL FOLLOW TO GIVE THE COUNSELORS AN 
OPPORTUNITY TO INTERVIEW STUDENTS AND DISCOVER WAYS OF 
PREPARING THEM FOR THE TRANSITIONAL EXPERIENCES. A SUMMER 
ORIENTATION PROGRAM FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS ON READINESS FOR 
COLLEGE IS ALSO PLANNED. EVALUATION OF THE STUDY AND THE 
INSTITUTED PROGRAMS THROUGH SUBSEQUENT STUDENT INTERVIEWS AND 
COUNSELOR WORKSHOPS IS THE FINAL PHASE OF THE PROPOSED 
PROJECT. (NS) 



ED012070 



S 

4 I 

U.S. DEPARTMENT Of HEALTH, EDUCATION & WELFARE 
OffICE Of EDUCATION 



THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRODUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM THE 
PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIGINATING IT. POINTS Of VIEW OR OPINIONS 
STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT OffICIAL OffICE Of EDUCATION 
POSITION OR POLICY. 



PREVENTIVE ACTION IN COLLEGE MENTAL HEALTH* 
Ben Barger, Project Director 



Department of Student Health 
University of Florida 
Gainesvi I le 

& 



September 1965 



*A project supported in part by 
National Institute of Mental Health Project Grant MH 2144 






















PREVENTIVE ACTION IN COLLEGE MENTAL HEALTH 



THE PROBLEM 

For many students, the period of transition from the home 
environment to the university environment provides an experience of 
"discontinuity" (Benedict, 1938) which subjects their adaptive resources 
to considerable strain. Srole and his associates in their important 
Midtown Manhattan Study (1962) singled out role discontinuity as one of 
the three major "social phenomena contributing to emotional morbidity." 
Further, they specify that ". . .role transitions occur in especially 
rapid sequence during adolescence and early adulthood, e.g., puberty, 
entering high school, dating, entering college, launching a career, 
and courtship." To this list we might add marriage and beginning a 
family. Erikson ( 1959) » too, has highlighted adolescence as a critical 
period of personality consolidation and synthesis necessary for the 
development of the adult identity. His careful description of the ado- 
lescent identity crisis, particularly as it is found among college stu- 
dents has drawn attention to the need for greater understanding of this 
important period of development. Sanford, too, in the concluding 
chapter of The American College (1962) has emphasized the importance of 
studying the determinants of change in the college student, and desig- 
nates late adolescence as one of the neglected areas of developmental 
psychology. 

The proposed project will focus on this period in the life 
cycle, during which the transition from home to college and resulting 
experiences of discontinuity constitute an important source of emotional 
distress. In addition, preventive programs related to the transitional 
process will be developed and evaluated. These will be designed to 
help students and those who work, with them to better understand the na- 
ture of the transitional crises of this period in order to deal with 
them more effectively. Both Bowsr (i960) and Cap Ian (1964) have empha- 
sized the value of intervention during crisis, when individuals are 
particularly receptive to help. 



BACKGROUND 

Two general developments at the University of Florida make 
it an especially good laboratory for the study of this transition 
period, and for the development and evaluation of the programs of pre- 
vention proposed below. During the past five years, the staff of the 
Mental Health Service, Department of Student Health, University of 
Florida has been developing a University Mental Health Service empha- 
sizing public health concepts. This has been done with support from 
National Institute of Mental Health Project Grant MH 380. This project 
has had four interrelated aspects. 



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1. Programs of consultation and mental health education have been 
offered to key university personnel In the interest of developing 
an Increasingly effective program of early identification and 
Intervention within the exist ng university structure. 

2. A program of demographic a r .d epidemiologic research has been under- 
taken for the purpose or identifying those conditions within the 
university community and those withir the student which contribute 
to disruptive emotional distress. 

3* A program of mental health services has been developed to meet the 
needs of students whose problems represent the full range of emo- 
tional adjustment. This Includes diagnostic and referral services 
for the most acute and most chronic disturbances and brief treat- 
ment for a wide range of the less severe or less chronic problems. 

4. A program of graduate training emphasizing the concepts and methods 
of this project has been offered In order to help prepare mental 
health professionals to serve the growing demands from community 
and university mental health programs. 

A fuller description of this program is to be found in the 
accompanying Conference Proceedings . During the establishment of this 
project, extensive commitment to the concepts of prevention, early 
Identification and intervention have developed In the university com- 
munity and broad participation In programs of early detection and 
intervention have been achieved. 

The second significant development Is the program of summer 
orientation for beginning freshmen which was instituted three years 
ago. This has been so successful (nearly 80% of entering freshmen and 
a majority of their parents took advantage of this program during the 
past summer) that plans are underway to extend It In two directions. 

(a) To include lower division transfer students as well as beginning 
freshmen, and (b) to extend the one-day period of orientation. This 
would enable tho university to obtain additional evaluation of stu- 
dents at that time, thus permitting the identification of students 
needing remedial programs In either the academic or social -emotional 
spheres, In time to Institute such programs during the summer, prior 
to admission. The project outlined below proposes the development 
and evaluation of such an early Identification and intervention 
program. 



AIMS 

The proposed project Is designed to study systematically and 
In some depth, the transitional experiences and adaptive behavior of 



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successive samples of entering students. These studies wi II be under- 
taken with several purposes in mind: (a) to help define the sources 

of vulnerability in students entering the university for which correc- 
tive Intervention can be effectively undertaken; (b) to guide the de- 
velopment of action programs for early intervention which may be ex- 
pected to meet with some measure of success, and (c) to provide 
counselor and guidance personnel in the university and in the Florida 
high schools and junior colleges with realistic frames of reference 
regarding transitional experiences and coping behavior of students 
entering the university. In other words, Ihe data of these studies 
will be fed back into action programs of early identification, early 
intervention, and mental health education. 



SIGNIFICANCE 

The establishment of the proposed project will permit the 
development and evaluation of action programs based on concepts and 
methods of preventive mental health. The project will take advantage 
of the groundwork that has been laid during the five-year development 
of a university mental health program which Is prevention oriented. 

The proposed action programs will be more truly preventive 
than the current university programs, In that intervention will be 
introduced into the period prior to admission, when the student is 
preparing for college. 

The project will involve mental health personnel, university, 
junior college and high school administrative and counseling personnel, 
as well as students and their parents In a collaborative effort to 
understand more fully and more clearly the sources of transitional 
distress associated with leaving home to enter university life and to 
develop ways of dealing with these more effectively. Such a cooperative 
undertaking not only should increase the understanding of transitional 
phenomena by the many people who will be involved in the project, but 
it should also contribute to the body of knowledge in this important 
area. In addition, it should contribute to mutual understanding and 
respect among the personnel of the many institutions Involved and help 
to establish lines of communication that will facilitate consultation, 
referral, early Identification and intervention among those who are 
most concerned with students in transition. 

The project will provide a program model by which other uni- 
versities and colleges may be guided in attacking the transitional 
problems of their students. It may also have application in other 
types of institutional settings by providing some general principles 
regarding the handling of transitional experiences and some guidelines 
for studying them. 



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It will provide opportunities for cental health professionals 
in training as well as graduate students In the social sciences and 
other helping professions to assimilate concepts and to develop skills 
in consultation, mental health education, research and program develop- 
ment. These concepts and skills wi 1 1 be applicable in the educational 
settings, community mental health centers, and other institutional set- 
tings in which they will be employed. These students, with their 
faculty advisors, will augment the research and program capabilities 
of the project through their utilization of project data and participa- 
tion in project research, program development and evaluation in their 
master's and doctoral programs. 



FACILITIES AND RESOURCES AVAILABLE 

The University of Florida has a current student population 
of 15 » 000 students. Of the students entering the university last fall, 
there were approximately 2300 beginning freshmen, 800 lower division 
transfer students, and 1000 upper division transfer students. The last 
group is growing rapidly. 

The active interest and support of the university administra- 
tion and the commitment of this university to early identif icatien and 
early orientation have already been described. 

The Mental Health Service staff is very adequately housed in 
the University Infirmary, occupying ten offices for professional and 
clerical staff and graduate assistants. In addition, a library/con- 
ference room, mimeograph, photocopy, dictating equipment, and other 
facilities of the Student Health Service are at the disposal of the 
project staff. Books and articles which constitute basic readings in 
this area have been assembled. 

A substantial amount of basic data has been collected from 
nearly 20,000 students during the past five years and has been stored 
on IBM data cards and tapes. These data include personality and in- 
terest inventory scores, background and experience information, which 
have been obtained during the orientation period each trimester in 
testing sessions conducted by the project staff. 

The resources of the University Computing Center, the Board 
of University Examiners, and the Office of the Registrar are available 
for project use. These offices provide student data and such facili- 
ties as optic reading test-scoring machines, collators, and reproducers 
with mark-sensing equipment, two 3K 1401 data processors, and a 709 
computer with a substantial library of computer programs. 



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METHOD OF PROCEDURE 

It Is proposed that an intensive study of the transitional 
experiences, stresses, and coping behaviors of two successive random 
samples of entering students be undertaken. Independent evaluations 
wi II be made for freshmen, lower division transfer students (LDT), and 
upper division transfer students (UDT). This will make it possible to 
develop programs of orientation, early intervention, and "anticipatory 
counseling" (Caplan, 1964) that are tailored to the special needs of 
each of these student sub-groups. 

Such programs will be instituted and their relative effective- 
ness will be evaluated. Also, a program of mental health education 
workshops wi 1 1 be undertaken for junior college and high school coun- 
selors utilizing the findings of the intensive studies of students and 
providing opportunities for them to evaluate directly the transitional 
experiences of students from their own institutions. 



SPECIFIC PROPOSAL 

Phase I . The first phase of the project will be devoted to 
the development of structured interview schedules designed to assess 
the transitional experiences and stresses of students who have left 
home to enter the University of Florida. This undertaking will be 
guided by the excellent work of SI Iber and his associates (1961) in 
their intensive study of IS outstanding students during the period In 
which they were selecting and preparing for college. The interviews 
will be intended to yield information from which a classification of 
transitional experiences and stresses may be made. In addition, an 
attempt will be made to develop from the interview material, a set of 
temporal profiles which describe the sequence of experiences and 
coping behaviors which are typical of representative segments of the 
entering student body. 

The basic interview schedule will be varied slightly to make 
It appropriate for the specific circumstances of beginning freshmen, 
lower division transfer students (LOT) and upper division transfer stu- 
dents (UDT). It will consist of three sections. One will deal with 
the period of preparation for college; one will deal with the period 
of adaptation to the university, and the third will provide for 
classification of the areas of vulnerability shown by a student and 
for mating the degree of vulnerability he is judged to have. The Mid- 
town Manhattan schedule provides some useful guidelines for the con- 
struction of the interview. To facilitate the development of the 
schedule, approximately 100 students randomly selected from among 
those entering the university in September 1965, wi 1 1 be interviewed, 
utilizing the evolving interview schedule. 



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When a satisfactory schedule is developed, at least IOC stu- 
dents wi 1 1 be selected randomly from each of the groups entering in 
September 1965 (freshmen, LOT, and UDT). They will be Interviewed for 
the purposes of: (a) determining the types of transitional experiences, 

stresses, and coping behaviors which are characteristic of freshmen, 
LDT’s and UDT’s respectively, and (b) rating the degree of emotional- 
social vulnerability each student is judged to exhibit. These ratings 
j will provide a representative epidemiological survey of emotional 

problems among entering university students. Further, they will serve 
as criterion measures against which a set of indices of emotional 
vulnerability may be developed, using the MMPI and background question- 
naire (Appendix 0) items as predictors. Instruments yielding self- 
perception and evaluation of the university will also be selected for 
administration at this time. Analyses wi 1 1 be made which take into 
account both type and degree of vulnerability. The classification task 
and the analyses necessary for the development of the vulnerability 
indices wi 1 1 be undertaken during the summer trimester of 1966. 

Phase 1 1 . In September 1966 the MMPI and the background 
questionnaire will again be administered to all incoming students during 
the orientation period. During the fall trimester three new samples of 

I at least 100 students each wi 1 1 be randomly selected and interviewed, 

using the interview schedule developed during the previous year. These 
interviews will be undertaken to cross-va I idate and refine the classi- 
fication of transitional stresses that was developed during the first 
phase of the project. They will provide a new epidemiological survey 
of student emotional problems and will establish a new set of criterion 
measures against which to cross -va I idate the indices of emotional 
vulnerability. 

In order to determine the reliability of the vulnerability 
ratings, the same 300 students wi 1 1 be re- interviewed and independently 
rerated during the winter trimester. These interviews will also be 
undertaken to determine additional ways in which these students have 
adapted to the university situation. 

The summer trimester will be devoted to analysing the reli- 
ability of the vulnerability ratings, cross-validating the vulnerability 
indices, and identifying the special transitional problems experienced 
respectively by freshmen and both lower and upper division transfer 
students. This material will be prepared for use in a set of mental 
health workshops to be held with counseling personnel throughout the 
university and from the junior colleges and high schools which send a 
substantial number of students to the university each year. 

Phase III . During the fall trimester of 1967, a program of 
mental health education will be developed which will Involve junior 
college counselors and interested administrators. At least one coun- 
selor from each of the approximately 20 junior colleges from which 20 



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or more students come to the University each year, wi i I be invited to 
participate in two-day workshops, in groups of about iO counselors at 
a time. These workshops will consist of a period of orientation to 
the workshop itself, to a structured interview which wilt have been 
developed for this purpose, and to some of the more relevant findings 
of the preceding year's studies. The counselor from each college will 
then be scheduled to Interview at least 10 students who had transferred 
from that college to the University at the beginning of the current 
school year. 

The focus of these interviews will be on factors and experi- 
ences which the student found had prepared him well or poorly for 
university life. Students who had completed junior college (UDT's) and 
those who had not (LDT's) will both be scheduled for these interviews, 
in order that the counselors may identify problems that are common and 
those that are more specific to one group or the other. 

Following these series of interviews, the counselors will 
reassemble and be joined by representatives of the hental Health Serv- 
ice, the University Counseling Center, the residence counseling staff, 
and the Oean of Student Affairs office. A review session will be con- 
ducted in which the counselors will summarize what they have learned 
from the interviews with their former students. The attention of the 
entire group will be directed toward planning programs for dealing 
with the problems thus identified. This will mean that attention is 
focused on the development of preventive programs at both the junior 
college and the university level. Any particularly abrasive circum- 
stances within the university to which these students draw attention 
will be brought directly to the attention of the Office of Student 
Affairs where the responsibility and the authority for taking correc- 
tive action lies. The junior college counselors, too, may take back 
with them plans for program improvement which will prepare their stu- 
dents better for university life, or at least help them make more 
realistic choices regarding their continuing education. 

These workshops will serve the additional purpose of devel- 
oping mutual understanding and respect, and of establishing better 
lines of communication among the several agencies and institutions in- 
volved. This should facilitate consultation, referral and interagency 
cooperation in early detection and intervention. Thus the goals of 
prevention wi 1 1 be served. 

Involvement of parents in the early identif 5 cat ion and inter- 
vention processes is considered important because of the significant 
place which the family continues to hold in the awareness and feelings 
of the entering student, and the key role which parents can play in 
determining the relative smoothness of the transition from home to un- 
iversity. In terms of early identification, parents may be helped to 
indicate possible sources of vulnerability in the entering student by 









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means of an appropriate questionnaire. In fact, students themselves 
may be helped to evaluate their own readiness for the emotional demands 

of university life through the medium of an appropriately warded ques- 
tionnaire. 



During the winter trimester, therefore, two such questionnaires 
will be developed, guided in large part by the findings of the pre- 
ceding two year's study. 

Pertinent materia) from the indices of emotional vulnerabil- 
ity as well as from the structured interviews will determine much of 
the content of these questionnaires. They will be intended to stimulate 
a frank assessment of such factors as: (a) the degree of interest and 

satisfaction derived from academic work; (b) readiness for independent 
decision-making and self maintenance; (c) readiness for group living, 
especially coping with a roommate; (d) tolerance for sustained aca- 
demic effort; (e) tolerance for widely varying soc'al, cultural, and 
moral values, and (f) adequacy of social skills. 

The quality of the relationship with parents has been found 
so often to be related to the insecurity, despair, frustration or 
antagonism which interfere with students' effectiveness and contribute 
to their emotional distress. Because this is true, an effort will be 
made in a portion of each questionnaire to get students and their par- 
ents to evaluate the quality of the communication, understanding, and 
mutual respect which exists between them. Such an evaluation should 
provide a first step toward initiating corrective action where che need 
exists. Several alternative methods of facilitating such corrective 
action will be undertaken and evaluated. 

During the summer trimester, the students and parents who 
attend the summer orientation program will participate in the following 
early identification and anticipatory counseling programs. Two groups 
per week of approximately 150 students and their parents wi II come to 
the university campus for summer orientation. 

The following four program wl 1 1 be presented in rotation. 

(a) The current orientation program wi H provide a control condition. 

(b) The questionnaires, designed to help students and parents evaluate 
the adequacy of the student's preparation for university life and the 
quality of intra-family communication and understanding, will be admin- 
istered in separate group sessions for parents and students. Following 
completion of the questionnaires, both students and parents will be en- 
couraged tc discuss between them and/or with some other appropriate 
person in their home community any matters of concern which may have 
been brought to their attention, (c) The questionnaire will be admin- 
istered in separate group sessions. Following completion of the 
questionnaires, the major factors covered by the questionnaires will 

be discussed briefly and time will be allotted for questions and 






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discussion, (d) Group discussions will be scheduled to draw the atten- 
tion of students and parents to the common as well as the more serious 
problems faced by students in transition. This will enable parents and 
students to recognize problems of transition about which they may need 
to take corrective action. 

Throughout the 14 weeks of the summer orientation program, 
each series of four orientation groups will receive one of the four 
types of orientation outlined above. These will be presented in an 
order which controls for any temporal factors which may influence 
selectively the composition of the groups. 

Phase IV . During the fall trimester, 1968, 100 students from 
each of the anticipatory counseling and control conditions will be 
interviewed. This will be done to determine the relative effectiveness 
of each form of Intervention. Effectiveness will be defined both in 
terms of the students' stated satisfaction with the results of the 
intervention and the relative number of kinds of intervention or pre- 
paratory actions that were undertaken by the students (or parents). 

During the latter part of the fall trimester and the early 
part of the winter trimester, mental health workshops of the kind held 
for junior college counselors wi 1 1 be conducted for counselors from 
the approximately 40 high schools from which 20 or more students come 
to the University of Florida each year. A similar program outline will 
be followed, for the same purposes. 

During the latter part of the winter trimester and throughout 
the summer trimester 1969 , the aspects of the identification and antic- 
ipatory counseling programs which have been found to be effective will 
be established as continuing aspects of the summer orientation program 
by preparing the material in booklet form, on audio and/or video tape. 

The materials wi 1 1 be tailored to the needs of freshmen and both lower 
division and upper division transfer students. 

Phase V . During the final phase of the project (September 
1969 - August 1970) a conference wi 1 1 be arranged for counseling, 
mental health, and administrative personnel from all Florida univer- 
sities, colleges, and junior colleges to review the methods and find- 
ings of the project. A similar conference wl 1 1 be arranged for rep- 
resentative universities throughout the southeastern region. The 
staff will make themselves available for consultation with colleges 
and universities or individuals who request help in utilizing the 
findings. A full report of the project will be prepared for publication. 



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SUMMARY 

The foregoing proposal represents an attempt to develop an 

action program in university mental health which has the following key 

features: 

1. It Is based on public health or community mental health concepts 
with emphasis on prevention. 

2. It builds a program of preventive action on a foundation of 
focused research and provides continuing evaluation so that cor- 
rective measures and program improvements may be instituted as 
needed . 

3* ^ attempts to differentiate the special needs and problems of 

students with differing preparatory experiences and to tailor 
corrective intervention to these special needs. 

4. It gives recognition to the continuing importance of the family 
in the emotional well-being of the college student during his 
transition from home to university. 

5» it emphasizes the importance of feedback to junior colleges and 

high schools, of information that will help counselors and teachers 

guide their students in preparing themselves better for university 
life. 1 

6. it proposes the introduction of a program of anticipatory counsel- 
ing as part of summer orientation which will further help students 
and their parents evaluate the student's readiness for the emo- 
tional demands of university life and suggest approaches to pre- 
paratory actien. 



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REFERENCES 



Benedict, R. Continuities and discontinuities in cultural conditioning. 
Psychiatry . 1938 , J., 16 1 - 167. 

Bower , E. M. Ear ly i den t i f i ca t i on of emotiona I Iv handicapped chi Idren 
in school . Springfield, III.: Charles C. Thomas, I960. 

Caplan, G. Principles of preventive psychiatry . New York: Basic 

Books, 1964. 

Erikson, E. H. Identity and the life cycle. Psycholoaical Issues. 

>959. !. 1-171. 

Langner , T. S. , and Michael, S. T. Life stress and mental health . 

New York: Free Press, Glencoe, 1963. 

Sanford, N. (Ed.) The Amer I can co I lege . New York: John Wl ley and 

Sons, Inc., 1962. 

Silber, E. , Coelho, G. V., Murphy, E. R. , Hamburg, D. A., Pear I in, 

L. I., and Rosenberg, M. Adaptive behavior in competent 
adolescents: coping with the anticipation of college. 

Archives of General Psychiatry . 1961, £, 354-365. 

Srole, L. , Langner, T. S. , Michael, S. T., Opler, M. K. , and Rennie, 

T. A. C. Menta 1 hea 1 th i n the metropo 1 j s . New York: 

McGraw-HI II, 1962. 



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BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Blaine, G. b. , Jr., and McArthur, C. C. (Eds.) Emotional problems ef 
the student . New York: App I e ton -Century-Crofts , 1961. 

Erlkson, E. H. Problem of ego identity. Jcurna I of American Psycho - 
ana Ivti c Association . 1956, 4, 56-121. 

Farnsworth, D. L. Menta I hea I th i n col lege and uni versi tv . Cambridge: 
Harvard University Press, 1957. 

Getzels, J. W. , and Jackson, P. W. Creativity and intelligence . New 
York: John Wiley and Sons, 1962. 

Hathaway, S. R. , and Monaches i , E. 0. Adolescent personality and 

behavior . Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1963. 

Havighurst, R. J. , et al. G row i nq up I n River City . New York: John 

Wiley and Sons, 1962. 

Jahoda, M. Current concepts of pos i t i ve mental hea I th . New York: 

Basic Books, 1958. 

Joint Commission on Mental Illness and Health, Action for mental 
hea I th . New York: Basic Books, 1961. 

Kleinmuntz, B. MMPI decision rules for the identification of college 
maladjustment. Psychological Monographs . 1963, 21 0*0. 

Lidz, Theodore The fami ly and human adaptation . New York: Inter- 

national Universities Press, Inc., 1963. 

Marks, P. A. , and Seaman, W. Actuaria I descri ption of abnorma I per - 
sona I i tv . Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins Co., 1963. 

Nichols, R. C. , and Holland, J. L. Prediction of the first year col- 
lege performance of high aptitude students. Psycho log i ca I 
Monographs . 1963, 21 (7). 

Sanford, N. Personality development during the college years. Journal 
of Soc I a I I ssues . 1956, J2. (4) . 

Stern, G. G. Congruence and dissonance in the ecology of college 
students. Student Medicine. I960, 8, 304-339. 




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Stern, G. G. Continuity and contrast in the transition from high school 
to college. In N. F, Brown (Ed.) Orientation to College 
learn! nq- -A Reappraisal . Washington, 0. C. : American Council 

on Education - ] 196 1 . 

Wedge, B. M. (Ed.) Psychosocial problems of college men . New Haven: 
Yale University Press, 1958. 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 



I. John J. Wright, Research and Training Associate, NIMH Project 
Grant MH 380. 

II. Date of Birth: February 18, 1926 

III. Place of Birth: Detroit, Michigan 

IV. U. S. Citizenship V. Male 

VI. Educational History: 

B.A. University of Michigan, Psychology, 1950 

M.A. Wayne State University, Clinical Psychology, 1953 

Ph.D. Purdue University, Clinical Psychology, 1956 

Work History: 

1956-1957 Placement Specialist, General Electric Company, 

Cincinnati . 

1957*1958 Chief Counselor, Testing and Counseling Center, 

University of Cincinnati. 

1958-1962 Psychologist to Chief Psychologist, Henderson 

Clinic, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 

1962- Training and Research Associate, Student Health 

Project, MH 380. 



VII. Special Interests: 

Community mental health 

Self perception, envi ronmenta I stress evaluation, self con- 
cept theory. 

VIII. Memberships: 

American Psychological Association 
Diplomate, American Board of Examiners in Professional 
Psychology 
Certified, Florida 
Associate Member, Sigma Xi 



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biographical sketch 






Benjamin Barger, Project 01 rector, NIMH Project Grant MH 380, 
Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Florida. 



II. Date of Birth: October 26, 1920 

III. Place of Birth: Belgian Congo, Africa 



IV. U. S. Citizenship V. Male 

VI. Educational History: 

B.A. George Washington University, Psychology, 19** 7 
Ph.D. Duke University, Clinical Psychology, 1952 



Work History: 

1952 - 1955 

1953 - 1959 

1956-1957 

1955-1959 

1959 - 

1960 - 



Chief Psychologist, Mental Hygiene Clinic, Ohio 
State University, College of Medicine. 

Instructor to Assistant Professor, Department of 
Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Ohio State 
Uni vers I ty. 

Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Ohio State 
Uni vers! ty. 

Director, Psychological Services, Celumbus Psychi- 
atric Institute and Hospital, Ohio State 
University. 

Assistant Director to Director, NIMH Project Grant 
MH 380, Department of Student Health, University 
of Florida. 

Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of 
F lor Ida. 



VII. Special Interests: 

University mental health 
Community mental health 
Personality development and dynamics 

VIII. Memberships: 

American Psychological Association, Div. 12 

AAAS 

AAUP 

Sigma XI 



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biographical sketch 



I. Everette Hall, Jr., Ph.D. , Research Associate, NIMH Project Grant 
MH 380. 

II. Oate of Birth: December 16, 1925 

III. Place of Birth: Miami, Florida 

IV. U. S. Citizenship V. Male 

VI. Educational History: 

B.B.A. University of Miami, Accounting/finance, 1952 
M.R.C. University of Florida, Rehab. Counseling, I960 
Ph.D. University of Florida, Psychology, 1983 

Work History: 

1957*1959 Research Assistant, Family Student Center, Univer- 
sity of Chi cago 

1960-1961 Teaching and Research Assistant, Department of 

Psychology, University of Florida. 

1962- Research Associate, Mental Health Project, Univer- 
sity of Florida. 



VII. Special Interests: 

Family constellation as related to personality 
Community mental health in a university 
Developmental psychology, especially adolescence 

VI II. Memberships: 

American Psychological Association 
Interamerican Society of Psychology 




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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 



I. E. Arthur Larson, M.D. , Chief, Mental Health Service, Department 
of Student Health, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychi- 
atry J. HI Ills Miller Health Center 



II. 


Date of Birth: April 11, 1932 




III. 


Place of Birth: New Richmond, 


Wi scons in 


IV. 


0. S. Citizenship 


V. Male 


VI. 


Educational History: 





B.A. University of Minnesota, 1954 

M.D. Northwestern University, 1958 

internship In 1958— 1959 » Virginia Mason Hospital, Seattle 
Resident in Psychiatry, 1959-1962, Menninger School of Psychiatry 



Work History: 

1962- 1964 Chief, Psychiatric Service, Maxwell AFB Hospital, 

Alabama. 

1963- 1964 Psychiatric Consultant, Alabama Commission on 

Alcohol i sm. 

1963- 1964 Psychiatric Consultant, Alabama Sanity Commission, 

Montgomery, Alabama. 

1964- Chief, Mental Health Service, Department of Student 

Hea I th . 



VII. Special Interests: 

Community Psychiatry 
Student Mental Health 

VIII. Memberships: 

American Psychiatric Association 










biographical sketch 



I. 



II. 

III. 



IV. 



VI. 



C. A. Yozgatl loglu, M.D. , University Psychiatrist 
Date of Birth: March 10, 1926 

Place of Birth: Tire, Turkey 

First paper toward U. S. Citizenship V 

Educational History: 

M.D. Istanbul University, Turkey, 1951 



Work History: 
1953-1955 

1955- 1956 

1956- 1958 

1958- 1959 
1953-1959 

1959- 1961 
1961-1963 
1963- 



Medical Residency, Bergen Pines County Hospital, 
Paramus, N.J. 

Internship, The Cooper Hospital, Camden, N.J. 

Psychiatric Residency, Danville State Hospital, 
Danvl 1 1e, Pa. 

Psychiatric Residency, Delaware State Hospital, 
Farnhurst, Del. 

Postgraduate work, Temple University, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Staff Psychiatrist, Florida State Hospital, 
Chattahoochee, Florida. 

Staff Psychiatrist, Delaware State Hospital, 
Farnhurst, Del. 

University Psychiatrist, Student Health Service, 
University of Florida. 



VII. Special Interests: 

Commun i ty men ta I hea 1 th 



VIII. Memberships: 

American Psychiatric Association 







i 
















BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 



I. Bonnie Raedisch, Psychiatric Nurse 

II. Date of Birth: December 9» 1939 

III. Place of Birth: Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

IV. U. S. Citizenship V. Female 

VI. Educational History: 

B. S. Nursing, Florida State University, 1962 
Incomplete M.A. Education, Guidance and Counseling 

Work History: 

>961 3 months - nurses training at Florida State Hospital 

at Chattahoochee. 

1962-1964 Psychiatric Nurse, J„ Hillis Miller Health Center, 

Gainesville, Florida. 

1964-1965 Florida School for Girls, Ocala, practicum course. 

VII. Special Interests: 

Counse 1 1 ng 

Preventive psychiatry — community level 
Marriage Counseling 



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