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REPORT RESUMES 

ED 016 77 ^ VT 001 299 

OUTLINE FOR OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE IN COMMERCIAL 
AND INSTITUTIONAL FOOD PREPARATION^ 

ALABAMA STATE DEPT. OF EDUC., MONTGOMERY 

PUB DATE 66 J 

EDRS PRICE MF-S0.25 HC-S2.00 48P. i 





DESCRIPTORS- ^OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICSi GRADE lit GRADE 12t 
♦FOOD SERVICE WORKERSt NUTRITIONt ♦CURRICULUM GUIDESt FOOD 
SERVICEt ♦FOODS INSTRUCTION* 

THE EXPERIMENTAL OUTLINE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN PLANNING 
A TWO-SEMESTER COURSE TO PREPARE IITH AND 12TH GRADE STUDENTS 
FOR ENTRY LEVEL COMMERCIAL FOOD PREPARATION JOBS SUCH AS FOOD 
SERVICE WORKERS, COOK HELPERS, CATERER HELPERS, SALAD MAKERS, 
BAKER HELPERS, SHORT ORDER COOKS, AND TRAY LINE WORKERS. IT 
WAS DEVELOPED BY VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS TEACHERS AND STATE 
SUPERVISORS. STUDENTS LEARN THE TECHNIQUES OF QUANTITY FOOD 
PREPARATION AND SAFE OPERATION OF QUANTITY FOOD EQUIPMENT. 
SUBJECT MATTER AREAS COVER (1) ORIENTATION TO THE WORLD OF 
WORK AND FOOD SERVICE CAREERS, (2) PERSONAL QUALITIES 
NECESSARY FOR SUCCESS, (3) NUTRITION, (4) SAFETY AND FOOD 
SERVICE WORKERS, (5) HYGIENE AND SANITATION, (6) CARE AND 
OPERATION OF EQUIPMENT, (7) MANAGEMENT OF TIME AND ENERGY, 

C6) QUANTITY FOOD PREPARATION, AND (9) FOOD COST AND PORTION 
CONTROL. EACH SUBJECT AREA INCLUDES OBJECTIVES AND AN OUTLINE 
OF COURSE CONTENT. REFERENCE BOOKS, BULLETINS, AND MAGAZINES 
ARE LISTED. (FP) 









V-1 

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ED016774 






Out I i ne 
for 



U S. OEPARTMEHT OF HEALTH. EDUCATION & WSIFARE 
OFFICE OF EDUCATION 

•THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRODUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM THE 
PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIGINATING IT. POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS 
STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT OFFICIAL OFFICE OF EDUCATION 
POSITION OR POLICY. 



OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

i n 

COMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL 

FOOD PREPARATION 









OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 



IN 




COMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FOOD PREPARATION 




I 

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Home Economics Education 
Vocational Division 
State Department of Education 
Montgomery, Alabama 

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ERIC 









M E"M 0 R A K D U M 



TO: 



The ERIC Clearinghouse on Vocational and Technical Education 
The Ohio State University 
980 Kiniiear Road 
Columbus 9 Ohio 43212 



FROM: (Person) Futh Stovall (Agency E state Deoai^ent of Education 

(Address) State Dept, of Educatlonj Montgomery* Alabama 
December 19 » 19^7 



DATE: 



BE: 



/* . V Outline for Occi^ational Same Economics Course 

(Author, Title, Publisher, Date )_jtn Ooinmerclal ana Thatitutionitr Tihofi 



imfi-Econotaics Education Vocktlon^ Dlvi elon Stute Dgpt. of* 
JBdUCatlQn, — Mantgomerv. Alabmpa ^ 



Breparatlon 



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(2) Means Used to Develop Material: - ^ 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



Course Profile of Commercial and Institutional Food Preparation. . . vi 
COl^CEPT: ORIENTATION TO FOOD SERVICE WORK AS A CAREER 1 

A. History and Present Trends in Commercial and 

Institutional Food Service 1 

B. Types of Food Service Establishments 1 

C. General Operations or Functions Performed In a Food 

Service Unit 2 

D. Types of Jobs Performed In the Area of Preparation, 

Depending On Amount of Experience and Education of Personnel. 3 

E. The Role of Training In Assigning Duties and Responsibilities 

of Food Service Workers 5 

F. Employment Policies Concerning Food Service Personnel. ... 5 

6. Laws Governing Food Service Employees 6 

H. Ethical Practices for Food Service Workers 6 

CONCEPT: PERSONAL QUALIFICATIONS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO SUCCESS. . . 7 

A. Qualifications of Food Service Workers Which Help Them 

Perform In Keeping with the Expectations of the Job 7 

B. Human Relations That Contribute To Success 8 

CONCEPT: NUTRITION 9 

A. Nutrition As It Relates to the Health and Employability of 

Food Service Personnel 9 

B. The Relationship of Nutrition to Food Preparation 10 

C. Menu Planning • • * 

CONCEPT: SAFETY FOR FOOD SERVICE WORKERS 13 

A. Making Food Service Areas Safe 13 

B. Cost of Accidents 13 



iiiiiiilHiiii 



tk 



1 













c. Training Food Service Workers in Safe Working Practices. . 

D. Protection Against Fires in the Kitchen 

E. Protection of Food From Foreign Substances 

F» First Aid Procedures 



CONCEPT: HYGIENE, SANITATION AND HOUSEKEEPING 

A. Advancements in Sanitation and Hygiene 

^ Personal Hygiene to Sanitation In 
Food Preparation 

Cm Sanitary Food Handling Procedures 

D. Food Poisoning and Infections 

E. Food Spoilage 

F. Rodent and Insect Control 

G. Sanitary Dishwashing Procedures 

H. Legal Safeguards in Food Sanitation 

I. Housekeeping Procedures 



CONCEPT: CARE AND OPERATION OF KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 

A. Commercial and Institutional Kitchens 

B. Food Service Planning for Commercial and Institutional 

Kritcnens 

C. Planning Work Stations for Food Preparation Areas 

D. Food Service Equipment. 



COHCEPT: ENERCT AND PROPERTIES REUTING TO 






B. Relationship of "Organization” to a Business 

C. Factors in Energy Management 



D. 



Simplification in Commercial Food 
Establishments 



iBSS. 

14 

14 

15 

15 

16 
16 

16 

17 

17 

17 

18 
18 
18 

19 

20 
20 

20 

20 

21 

22 

22 

22 

22 

23 



ill 



24 



CONCEPT: QUANTITY FOOD PREPARATION 

A. Interpreting and Following Recipes for Quantity Food 

Preparation . . 

B. Choice of Small Equipment to be Used In a Particular 

Recipe or Method of Preparation ... 

C. Herbs, Spices and Seasonings In Quantity Cooking 

D. Preparation of Soups 

E. Preparation of Basic Sauces and Gravies 

F. Preparation of Cereals and Cereal Products 

G. Preparation of Beverages 

H. Preparation of Eggs 

I. Preparation of Special Dishes 

••••••• •• 

J. Preparation of Fruits 

K. Preparation of Vegetables 

L. Preparation of Salads and Salad Dressings 

M. Preparation of Meats, Fish and Poultry. . 

N. Preparation of Batters and Doughs 

O. Preparation of Puddings and Other Desserts 

P. Preparation of Party Foods 

CONCEPT: FOOD COST AND PORTION CONTROL 

^Usfactira^”‘^°” Business Profit and Customer 

B. Standard Heights and Measures Used in Quantity Food 

Preparation 

C. Food Substitutions and Proportions 

D. Methods to use In Computing Portion Costs of Food 



24 

24 

24 

25 

25 

26 
26 
26 
27 
27 

27 

28 
28 

30 

31 

31 

32 

32 

32 

32 

32 



CONCEPT: 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN 
TRAINING AND EXPERIENCES 



FOOD SERVICE THAT REQUIRE FURTHER 



A. Semi-professional Careers - Available After Completing 
Technical School or Junior College Training 



33 

33 



Iv 



a 



33 






B. Professional Careers - Available After Obtaining 
College Degree 



CONCEPT; GETTING AND HOLDING A JOB IN FOOD SERVICE 34 

A. Factors to Consider When Selecting a Job 34 

B. Matching Personal Characteristics to Job Qualifications . . 34 

C. Places to Obtain Employment Leads when Seeking a Job. ... 35 

D. Points to Consider When Being Interviewed For a Job 35 

E. Writing a Letter of Application 35 

F. Reasons People Get the Jobs They Seek 35 

G. Personal Factors That Influence the Holding of a Job ... . 36 

H. Making Progress or Getting Ahead on the Job 36 

CONCEPT: TRADE AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IN FOOD SERVICE. . . 37 

A. Role of Trade and Professional Organizations to the Food 

Service Field 37 

B. Trade and Professional Organizations Related to Food 

Service 07 



Some Suggested References for the Occupational Home Economics Course 
in Commercial and Institutional Food Preparation 38 









pppipis 



COURSE PROFILE 
OF 

COMMERCIAL AMD INSTITUTIONAL FOOD PREPARATION 

(Two semester course to be offered 
In grades eleven or twelve) 



ENTRY LEVEL JOBS FOR WHICH THIS COURSE PROVIDES TRAINING 



JOB 

TITLE 


JOB 

RESPONSIBILITIES 


PLACES OF 
EMPLOYMENT 


Food Service 


Assists with preparation 


Hospitals 


Worker or Cook 


of food; weighs and measures 




Helper, D. 0. T. 


Ingredients, cleans cooking 


Nursing Homes 


No. 317.887 


utensils 


Catering Services 


Caterer Helper, 


Prepares and serves food 




D. 0. T. No. 


and refreshments under 


Hotels 


319.884 


supervision of caterer. 






Arranges tables and 
decorations 


Restaurants 

School and College 
Food Services 


Salad Maker, 


Prepares salads, salad 




D. 0. T. Mo. 


dressings, appetizers. 


Child Care Centers 


317.884 


sandwich fillings, cold 






plates and some desserts. 


Office, Business 
and Industrial 
Cafeterias 


Baker Helper, 


Assists baker by 


• 


D. 0. T. No. 


measuring Ingredients 


Hospitals 


313.884 


mixing, kneading and 






shaping dough for 
breads, rolls, mufflngs 


Nursing Homes 




or biscuits 


Catering Services 


Short Order 


Prepares and cooks to 


Hotels 


Cook, D. 0. T. 


order various foods 




No. 314.381 


requiring only a short 


Restaurants 




time to prepare. May 






carve meats and fill 


Office, Business 




orders from steam table. 


and Industrial 
Cafeterias 


Tray Line 


Prepares, assembles and 




Worker D. 0. T. 


delivers food tays to 




No. 355.878 


hospital patients 
and return trays to 
kitchen. Sets up food 






In cafeteria serving 
line. 





Vi 












OPPORTUNITIES FOB. ADVANCEMENT 

Through experiences and/or additional training, persons may advance to 
jobs involving supervisory or managerial responsibilities. Post high 
school programs offered at the State Vocational Trade and Technical 
Schools and Junior Colleges may be taken to prepare individuals for 
semi*- professional jobs as food service supervisors, dining room super- 
visors, tray line supervisors or school lunch managers. At the 
professional level (4 years of college and 1 year internship) a person 
may become a dietitian. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 



The purpose of this course is to prepare students for employment at the 
entry level in jobs which require knowledge and skills in commercial 
and institutional food preparation. Through this course opportunities 
will be provided for students to learn techniques of quantity food 
preparation and safe operation of quantity food equipment. The course 
content includes the following concepts: 

. OHiznXatijovi to iood AeAv^cce wo/tfe as a coAce/t 

. ? 2 JUomt quaZiilcatlonA that cont/Ubute. to 4ucce64 

. NwtfUtlon 

. Sai^y ioa iood AeAu^ce mfikzfu 

. Hygtane and sanitation 

. CoAC and opwoution of kitchen eqtUiomcnt 

. Management of time, ene/igy and pHope^itles JieJtattng to 
food senotce 

. Quantity food pJtejoaaation 
. food cost and position cont/toZ 

. CaJLcen. oppoAtunities tn food seavtce that fieqwUie fu/ithea 
tnaintng and expe/Uence 

. Getting and holding the night job in food service 
. Tnade and phofetsionat organizations in food service 



o 



v±i 






enrollment of students 

This \Me _^ear course is designed high school pupils who have an 
occupational interest in Commercial and Institutional F6od Preparation. 

It provides both instruction in the fundamentals of quantity food prepa- 
ration and varied work experiences to develop skill in food preparation. 
This course is open to eleventh or twelfth grade students. The prepara- 
tory course in the field of Food Service is recommended as a prerequisite. 
However, this course may be offered without a student having any pre- 
requisite courses when the specific occupational objective of quantity 
food preparation has been decided by the student to be enrolled. 

COITRSE SCHEDULE CREDIT 

This course may be scheduled for single or double class periods and may 
carry one unit credit for a single period course or one and one-half 
units of credit for double periods. 

PLANNING THE COURSE 

The outline for the course has been developed with built-in flexibility 
to enable the teacher to plan the course in keeping with the training 

and work experiences that are able to be planned for the students 
enrolled. 

REFERENCES FOR THIS COURSE 

A list of suggested references for this course may be found on the last 
page of this course outline. 

SPACE AND EQUIPMENT 

Experiences in the use and care of quantity food equipment is necessary 
to develop skill and ability in commercial and institutional food 
preparation. Space provided for these experiences might be a commercial 
food laboratory in the home economics department, the school cafeteria, 
or other community facilities where approved training may be provided 
for the students. 



viii 










mm 



COMMERCIAL AND I N S T I T D T I 0 R A L POOD 

PREPARATION 



CONCEPT; ORIENTATION TO FOOD SERVICE WORK AS A CAREER 



OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Understand the history of current trends in the food service 
Industry. 

II. Develop e better understanding of types of food service 
establishments, and the many opportunities for enq^loyment 
of trained food service personnel In the preparation of 
food. 

Ill* Understand the general operations common to food establishments. 

IV. Become Informed on employment policies, laws, and ethical 
practices for food service workers. 



OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. HISTORY AND PRESENT TRENDS IN COM^IERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL 
FOOD SERVICE 

6. TYPES OF FOOD SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS 

1. Hospitals 

. Employee’s Cafeteria 

• Patients meals In private, seml*-prlvate and ward 
accomodations 

. Vending machines 

. Snack Bars 

. Restaurants for the public 

2. Nursing Homes 

. MAals for Patients 

• Employee's Cafeteria or Dining Room * 



- 2 — 





3. 



Hotels 

• Formal dining room (European, American or Modified 
American plan) 

• Coffee Shop 

• Room service for meals 



4. Restaurants 

5. School and College Food Services 

• Cafeterias 

• Snack Bars 

• Vending Machines 

• Dining Rooms (Faculty, Catered Banquets, etc.) 

• Faculty Clubs 

6. Child Care Centers 

• Meals for children 

• Mid-^morning and Mid-afternoon snacks 



7. Office, Business and Industrial Cafeterias (Company operated) 

8. Caterers 

• Air Line Food Service Caterers 

• Food Vending Machine Caterers 
. Tearoom Caterers 

• Caterers for Special Occasions 



C. GENEBAL OPERATIONS OR FUNCTIONS PERFORMED IN A FOOD SERVICE UNIT 

1. Administration 

2. Purchasing 

3. Receiving 

4. Storage 



Menu Planning 



o 



5 . 



-3- 

6. Preparation 

7. Service 

8. Sales and Merchandising of the food 

9. Sanitation 
10* Safety 

11 Care of equipment 

12. Record keeping 

13. Cost control 

D. TYPES OF JOBS PERFORMED IN THE AREA OF PREPARATION, DEPENDING ON 
AMOUNT OF EXPERIENCE AND EDUCATION OF PERSONNEL 

1« Professional Occupations 

• Dietitian 

2. Technical Occupations 

• Food Service Supervisor 

• Dining Room Supervisor 

• Tray Line Supervisor 

• School Lunch Manager or Supervisor 

3. Skilled Occupations 

• Head Cook 

• Baker 

• Caterer 

- Family Dinner Service Specialist 

4. Semi-Skilled Occupations 

• Cook Helper 

• Short Order Cook 

• Baker Helper 

• Salad Maker 

• Caterer's Assistant 

• Tray Line Worker 



o 








li.jpii F,^ ij fi. mm ii.i^ii 






-4« 



HOME ECONOMICS TRAINING FOR SOME OF THE 
OCCUPATIONS IN FOOD MANAGEMENT, SUPERVISION AND PREPARATION 
AT THE HIGH SCHOOL, TECHNICAL SCHOOL, JUNIOR COLLEGE, AND COLLEGE LEVELS 




COLLEGE LEVEL (PROFESSIONAL OCCUPATIONS) 

>777771 JUNIOR COLLEGE LEVEL (TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS) 

' TECHNICAL SCHOOL LEVEL (TECHNICAL OR SKILLED OCCUPATIONS) 

t HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL (SEMI-SKILLED OR SKILLED OCCUPATIONS AT THE ENTRY 

LEVEL) 



*DICTIONART OF OCCUPATIONAL TITLES. 1965. Volume I, Definitions of Titles, 
U. S. Department of Labor. 



I eric 










-5- 



E. THE ROLE OF TRAINING IN ASSIGNING DOTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF 
FOOD SERVICE WORKERS 

1* Level of Training 

• Less than High School 

• High School 

. Technical School 
. Junior College 
. Senior College 

2. Types of jobs for which this course will provide training 

• S emt -skilled occupations or skilled occupations at the 
entry level (See Job Titles, Page 4) 

3. Opportunities for Food Service training beyond high school 
at Alabama Schools 

4. Opportunities for employment in local community or surrounding 
area 

. Current supply of qualified, trained personnel for work in 
food preparation (Local, State, National) 

F. EMPLOYMENT POLICIES 

1. Hours of work 
. Shifts 

. Split Shifts 

2. Salary 

a. Meaning of term "take home pay” 

b. Common deductions from paycheck 
. Social Security 

. State Income Taxes 
. Federal Income Taxes 
. Health Insurance Premiums 
• State Unemployment Insurance 



o 



6 - 















c. Schedule for payment of salary 

• Weekly 

• Semi-monthly 

• Monthly 

3. Fringe benefits 

• Uniforms furnished 

• Insurance 

• Sick leave 

• Vacation time 

• Overtime pay 

. Retirement benefits 

• Social Security 
. Meals furnished 

4. Age requirements 

5. Health requirements 

6. Dress requirements - hairnets, uniforms, etc. 

7. Probationary period of employment 

• Purpose 

• Length of time usually Involved 
LAWS GOVERNING FOOD SERVICE EMPLOYEES 

1. Health certificate - chest x-ray, blood test, physical 
examination 

2. Workmen's compensation 

ETHICAL PRACTICES FOR FOOD SERVICE WORKERS 

1. Observance of rules and regulations 

2. Respect for rank 

3. Channels of authority 

4. Personal conduct of food service employees 
• Relationship with management, co-workers and the public 



5 



7 






CONCEPT; PERSONAL QUALIFICATIONS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO SUCCESS 

OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Understand the personal qualities and qualifications that 
contribute to success of Food Service Personnel 

II. Develop an appreciation of humrn relationships that contribute 
to success of Food Service Personnel 



OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. QUALIFICATIONS OF FOOD SERVICE WORKERS WHICH HELP THEM 
PERFORM IN KEEPING WITH THE EXPECTATIONS OF THE JOB 



Personal qualities 


• Dependable 


• Courteous 


• Conscientious 


• Judgement 


• Able to get along with 
others 

. Willing to follow 


. Willing to work 
• Interest in Job 


Instructions 


. Pleasing personality 


• Willing to assume 
responsibility 


• Even disposition 

• Command of English -* 


. Interest in working 
with foods 

• Cooperative 


written and spoken 

• Neat in dress 

• Personal hygiene 


• Intelligent 


• Care of halr» nails, 
skin 


• Honest 


. Sanitary habits (to 
avoid spreading germs) 


Physical factors 


• Sound emotionally and physically 

• Personal cleanliness 

• Physical stamina 




1 ^ 







8 - 



3. Educational factors 

• Knowledge and skills required 

• Ability to progress on the job 

B. HUMAN RELATIONS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO SUCCESS 

1* Working as a member of the food. service group 

• Respect for the property of others 

• Maintaining friendly relations with co-workers 

• Showing consideration, thoughtfulness, kindness and 
loyallty 

2. Employer-employee relations 

• Putting the food establishments* Interest ahead of 
one's private Interests during business hours 

• Learning, understanding and respecting the problems, 
pressures and responsibilities of one's boss 

• Following Instructions and carrying out employer's 
expectations 

• Respect for employer's time 

• Loyalty 

• Using of correct titles 

• Upholding the reputation of the business 













CONCEPT: NUTRITION 



:ng:^i<m£riS3:tic>^.g^'ry2{5Kjaqa«5>asgsyJ3aa<iS3g^^ 



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-9- 



OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Broaden their concept of nutrition. 

II. Understand the relationship of nutrition to the etqployability 
and efficiency of the food service worker. 

III. Understand the effect of food preparation and storage on the 
nutritional value of food. 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. NUTRITION AS IT RELATES TO THE HEALTH AND EMPLOYABILITY OF 
FOOD SERVICE PERSONNEL 

1. Role of nutrition to health, physical fitness and 
occupational competency 

. Role of health in helping a person get and hold a Job 

. Contributions that health plays in relationships with 
co-workers 

. Role of food and diet to health 
. Function of food 

2. Role of calories in the diet 

. Energy requirements of individuals 
. Methods of calculating caloric requirements 
. Physical activity 
. Age 
. Sex 

. Body structure 
. Weight and size 

3. Dally food needs 

. Use of the Basic Four Food Guide to meet dally food 
requirements 




'^a^asmaasOBis: 



10 












THE RELATIONSHIP OF NUTRITION TO FOOD PREPARATION 



1. Nutritive value of food in relation to food preparation 
and storage 

a. Carbohydrates 

• Composition and sources 

. Classification 

. Effect of deficiency or encess 
. Effect of cooking 



. Digestibility 



b. Fats 

• Nature and composition 
. Sources 

. Digestibility 
. Effect of cooking 

c. Proteins 

. Composition 

. Complete proteins 
. Incomplete proteins 

. Sources 

. Function 

• Effects of deficinency or excess < 

. Effect of cooking on digestibility 

. Acceptability 

d. Minerals 

. Sources 
. Functions 

. Dietary requirements 

ii 

• Effect of a shortage of various minerals 






- 11 - 

e. Vitamins 

. Conq>osltlon 
. Functions 
. Food Sources 
. Enriched flour 
. Enriched margarine 
e Revitalized food 
. Irradiated milk 
. Demineralized foods 
. Vitamins in the diet 
. Effect of deficiency 
. Effect of cooking 
. Effect of freezing 

. Loss of vitamins In cooking and preparation 
and prevention of this loss 

2. Scientific principles Involved In food preparation 

a. Changes which take place In food 
. Cooking 

• Freezing 
. Curing 
. Dehydrating 

b. Composition of foods 
. Elements 

. Compounds 

c* Principles of cookery (Omit If Included In first level of 
preceding course) 

. Starch cookery 

. Milk and cheese cookery 

. Egg cookery 




I 



- 12 - 

• Vegetable cookery 
. Heat cookery 

. Bread-making 
. Cake-making 
. Dessert making 
« Sugar cookery 

d. Food spoilage 
. Causes 

. Prevention 

e. Food preservation 

• Chemical and physical changes 

C. HENU PLANNING 

1. Planning balanced meals and modified diets 

2. Reconunended dally allo*v7ances 

3. Emotional significance of food 

4. Factors Influencing menu-making policies 

5. Factors Influencing food preferences of those to be 
served 

6. Order of menu planning 

7. Menu terminology 

8. Planning menus In advance 

9. Planning cycle menus 

10. Use of standardized recipes 



-13- 

CONCEPT: SAFETY FOR FOOD SERVICE WORKERS 

OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Develop an understanding of ways to make food service 
establishments safe from occupational hazards and how 
to prevent accidents. 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. MAKING FOOD SERVICE AREAS SAFE 

1. Physical structure 

• Floors 

. Lighting 
. Doors 

. Convenient layout of kitchens 

2. Stairways 

• Having constrastlng color on steps and risers of stairway 
. Handrails 

3. Elevator shafts 

4. Equipment 

• Safety Guards on Food Processing machines 

. Use of color, texture and other means to designate 
moving and non-moving parts 

. Sound signals 

B. COST OF ACCIDENTS 

1. Wage cost to Injured employee and/or uninsured medical 
costs 

2. Cost of repair or replacement of equipment If damaged 
In accident 

3. Extra cost of overtime wages paid to other employees 
to do work 




4. 



Cost of supervisor's time In connection with accident 



5. 



-14- 



Wage cost due to decreased output of worker after 
returning to work 

6. Cost of learning period for another worker to do work 
while injured employee is off work 

7. Administrative cost for investigating accidents 

TRAINING FOOD SERVICE WORKERS IN SAFE WORiaNG PRACTICES 

1. Procedures to follow to prevent STRAINS 

. Technique to follow in lifting items using legs rather 
than straining back and abdominal muscles 

. Use of dollies and utility carts 

2. Procedures to follow to prevent CUTS 

. Safe use of knives in food preparation 

. Use of wooden guide to feed food into kitchen equipment 
such as meat choppers* grinders and slicers 

. Care in discarding broken glass and china 

3. Procedures to follow to prevent BUPJIS 

• Use of pot-holders and gloves 

. Knowledge and skill in using kitchen equipment to avoid 
flying grease 

4. Procedures to follow to prevent FALLS 

• Removal of any substance spilled on the floor immediately 
by either wiping it up or mopping 

. Use of hand rails on stairways 

. Well-lighted work stations, storage areas and stairways 



PROTECTION AGAINST FIRES IN THE KITCHEN 

1. Periodic fire drills 

2. Fire extinguishers in convenient places near cooking 
area 

3. Filters in ventilation system in cooking area 

4. Electrical wiring properly Installed 
Observance of safety practices in preventing fires 



5 . 



-15- 



E. PROTECTION OF FOOD FROM FOREIGN SUBSTANCES 

1. Inspection of food before It Is sensed 

2. Checking dishes and utensils for cleanliness before use 

3. Inspection of sieves, brushes and whlskbrooms for loose 
wires, bristles, etc. 

4. Protection of overhead pipes and ceilings to prevent 
chips of rust or paint from falling Into food 

5. Hair protection 

F. FIRST AID PROCEDURES 






-16- 



CONCEPT; 

OBJECTIVES 



er|c 



HYGIENE, SANITATION AND HOUSEKEEPING 



To help pupils to: 

I. Understand new advancements methods and products and layouts 
that contribute to better sanitation and hygiene standards. 

II. Develop an Interest in sanitary way to handle food and 
equipment. 

III. Understand how food can be contaminated causing food poisoning. 

IV. Become aware of causes of food spoilage. 

V. Gain knowledge of how rodents and Insects can be controlled 
in food establishments. 

VI. Develop knowledge and skill in procedures for washing dishes, 
utensils and equipment. 

VII. Develop an appreciation for the legal safeguard that protects 
food that Is served to the public In commercial institutional 
or industrial food establishments. 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

1 ’ 

A. ADVANCEMENTS IN SANITATION AND HYGIENE 

1. New methods 

2. New products 

3. Planning for sanitary kitchen operations 

B. ROLE OF HEALTH AND PERSONAL HYGIENE TO SANITATION IN FOOD 
PREPARATION 

1. Basic principles of hygiene and their application to 
health 

. Parasitic infections 
. Diseases 

. Carriers of diseases 

. Characteristics of bacteria and how it may enter food 



-17- 



2. Health Habits to Cultivate 

• Rest . Posture 

. Exercise . Recreation 

3. Personal Grooming 

. Care of hair and use of hair nets or caps 
. Skin 

. Hands and Nalls 

• Hand washing procedures 

• Care of hands and nails 

• Bathing and use of deodorants 
. Clothing 

• Personal clothing 
. Care of uniforms 

C. SANITARY FOOD HANDLING PROCEDURES 

D. FOOD POISONING AND INFECTIONS 

1. Microorganisms that cause food poisoning 

• Botulism 

• Staphlococcus 

2. Food infections 
. Salmonella 
. Streptoccus 

• Trichinosis 

FOOD SPOILAGE 

1. Enzymes 

2. Bacteria, yeasts, molds 

3. Causes of food spoilage 

• Improper storage methods 
. Improper storage temperature and humidity 



E. 



o 

ERIC 



18 - 



F. RODENT AND INSECT CONTROL 

1. Mice and Rats 

. Diseases spread 

. Ways to detect presence of rodents 
. Control and elimination of rodents 

• Storage of food to protect them from rat infestation 
and spoilage 

2. Insects 

• Insects that spread disease and spoil food 

. Ways to detect presence of Insects 

. Control and elimination of Insects common to food 
establishments 

6. SANITARY DISHWASHING PROCEDURES 

1. Use of detergents 

2 , Principles of hand and machine dishwashing 

3, Sanitary construction of cooking utensils and equipment 

4. Sanitary handling and storage of dishes, glassware, 
silver and cooking utensils 

H. LEGAL SAFEGUARDS IN FOOD SANITATION 

1. Laws governing inspection of food 
. U. S. Food and Drug Act 

2. Public Health Services 

• Agencies or ordiances that protect food sanitation 
. Federal Agencies and their services 
. State Agencies and their services 



. Local Ordiances 









-19- 



H0USEKEEPIN6 PROCEDURES 

1. Disposal of garbage and refuse material 

2. Care of kitchen equipment 

Cleaning and maintenance of floors, walls and work 
areas 



3 . 



-20 



CONCEPT: CARE AND OPERATION OF KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 

OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Understand the factors affecting the layout of conmerlcal 
and Institutional kitchens. 

II. Develop an understanding of the various food preparation 

areas In commercial and Institutional kitchens and how work 
should flow In the preparation of food. 

III. Gain knowledge and skill In the use, care of food service 
equipment. 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. COMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL KITCHENS 

1. Size and arrangement of kitchens 

2. Layouts planned for efficiency and economy of operation 

3. Equipment used In food production 

B. FOOD SERVICE PLANNING FOR COMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL KITCHENS 

1. Planning In advance the scope of the operation 

2. Utilizing competent counsel 

3. Determining optimum location 

4. Allowing ample space for present and future needs 

5. Planning layouts for efficient production and distribution 
of food 

6. Selecting well-engineered and durable equipment 

7. Designing kitchens for easy cleaning and sanitation 

8. Types of fuel (electricity or gas) used by equipment 

C. PLANNING WORK STATIONS FOR FOOD PREPARATION AREAS 

1. Range and/or grill area 

2. Vegetable area 

3. Salad preparation area 




- 21 - 



4. Baking area 

5. Beverage preparation area 

6. Storage area 

D. FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT 

1. Items of equipment considered to be minimum for food 
preparation 

2. Relationship between cost and quality, and cost and size 
. Initial cost and operation cost of equipment 

3. Relationship between maximum care, and the efficiency 
and productivity of food service equipment 

4. . Multiple uses of equipment 

5. Cleaning, care and operation, of mechanical commercial 
kitchen equipment 

. Ranges (Electric, Gas) 

. Broilers 

• Hot tops 

• Steam jacketed kettles and steamers 

• Steam tables 

. Deep fat fryers 
. Convention ovens 

• Peelers 
. Mixers 

• Dishwashers 

6. Selection, use, cleaning and care of small kitchen equipment, 
used In quantity preparation 



ERIC 



CONCEPT; MANAGEMENT OF TIME, ENERGY AND PROPERTIES RELATED TO FOOD 
SERVICE 

OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Develop an understanding of how the use of rational 
decision making affects the operation of a business. 

II. Gain an understanding of the relationship the organl-- 
zatlon of work has to the success of a business. 

III. Understand the factors Involved In energy management. 

IV. Develop an understanding of and the ability to apply 
the principles of work simplification In quantity 
food preparation. 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. INFLUENCE OF RATIONAL DECISION-MAKING BY EMPLOYEES 

ON THE OPERATION OF A BUSINESS 

\ 

1. tfeanlng of rational declslon-maklng 

2. Processes of rational declslon-maklng 

3. Relationship of the process of rational 
declslon-maklng to quality decisions 

4. Influence of rational decisions by employees on job 
success and to the operation of a business 

B. RELATIONSHIP OF "ORGANIZATION” TO A BUSINESS 

1. Influence of planning on achievement In work 

2. Influence of systematizing on achievement In work 

3. Influence of controlling on achievement In work 

4. Relationship of attitudes to achievement In work 

5. Relationship of team work to achievement In work 

C. FACTORS IN ENERGY MANAGEMENT 

1. Fatigue and Its effect on achievement 

2. Rest periods In relation to fatigue and achievement 

3. Energy, use and waste as applied to work 



- 23 - 



D. PRINCIPLES OF WORK SIMPLIFICATION IN COMMERCIAL FOOD 
ESTABLISHMENTS 

1. Using correct body positions and body dynamics 

2. Using a planned sequence and route of work 

3. Location of work centers and storage 

4. Using equipment appropriate for the task 

5. Using work sequence that is economical in energy, 
time and effort 

6. Using "quick", easy-to-prepare or prepared products 



o 






- 24 - 



CONCEPT! QUANTITY FOOD PREPARATION 

OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Understand principles of quantity food preparation 

II. Develop the ability to read and interpret quantity 
recipes. 

III. Develop skill in weighing and measuring ingredients 
for quantity food preparation. 

IV. Develop skill in the preparation of food in large 
quantities. 

V. Recognize standard products. 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. INTERPRETING AND FOLLOWING RECIPES FOR QUANTITY FOOD 
PREPARATION 

1. The meaning of terms 

2. Methods of weighing and measuring ingredients 

3. Food equivalents and substitutions 

4. Relative proportions of ingredients 

5. Increasing and decreasing recipes 

B. CHOICE OF SMALL EQUIPMENT TO BE USED IN A PARTICULAR 
RECIPE OR METHOD OF PREPARATION 

1. Size of pans 

2. Types of utensils 

3. Cutlery 

C. HERBS, SPICES, AND SEASONINGS IN QUANTITY COOKING 

1. Origin and use of herbs and spices 

2. Use of herbs, spices, and seasonings 



25 



D. PREPARATION OF SOUPS 

1. Milk-base Soups 

. Bisque 
. Cream Soup 
. Chowder 

2. Stock-base Soups 

. Bouillon 
. Broth 
. Consomme* 

. Gumbo 

3. Garnishes for Soup 

4. Accompaniments for Soup 

E. PREPARATION OF BASIC SAUCES AND GRAVIES 

1. Meat and Vegetable Sauces 

. Tomato Sauce 
. Hollandalse Sauce 
. Cream Sauce 
. Tartar Sauce 
. ^stard Sauce 
. Barbecue Sauce 
. Raisin Sauce 

2. Gravies 

. Pan Gravy 
. Cream Gravy 
. Glblet Gravy 



. Puree 
. Stew 













1 1 . 1 . i 




- 26 - 



F. PREPARATION OF CEREALS AND CEREAL PRODUCTS 



1. Cooked Cereals 



. Cream of Wheat 



. Grits 



. Rolled Oats 



2. Cereal Products 



. Noodles 



. Macaroni 



. Rice 



. Spaghetti 



6. PREPARATION OF BEVERAGES 



1. Coffee 



. Hot 
. Iced 

2. Tea 



. Hot 



. Iced 



. Spiced 

3. Cocoa and chocolate drinks 



4. Punch 



H. PREPARATION OF EGGS 



1. Fried 

2. Poached 



3. Soft or hard cooked 



4. Scrambled 



5. Omelet 




i 




- 27 



6. Deviled 

7. Creamed 

8. Baked 

I. PREPAKATION OF SPECIAL DISHES 

1. Meat, Poultry and Fish Dishes 

. Creamed 
. Scalloped 
. Croquettes 
• Meat Rolls 
. Casseroles 
. Hash 

. Spaghetti and Meat 

2. Cheese Dishes 

. Macaroni and Cheese 

t 

. Fondue 
. Souffle* 

3. Foreign Cookery 

J. PREPARATION OF FRUITS 

1. Fresh 

2. Dried 

3. Frozen 

K. PREPARATION OF VEGETABLES 

1. Dried vegetables 

2. Fresh or frozen vegetables 

. Methods used In preparation 

Bolling 
Steaming 
Baking 
Pan Frying 
Deep-fat frying 



o 



- 28 



L. PREPARATION OF SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS 

1. Selection of salad ingredients 

2. Types of salads 

. Fruit salads 
. Vegetable salads 
. Gelatin salads 
. Meat and fish salads 
. Relishes 

3. Preparation of salad ingredients 

. Fresh fruits 
. Canned fruits 

. Meat, fish, chicken, eggs, cheese, , nuts 
. Raw vegetables 
. Cooked vegetables 

4. Types of salad dressings 

. Mayonnaise 
. Cooked salad dressing 
. French dressing 
. Fruit salad dressing 

5. Arranging salads on the plate 

6. Use of salads In the menu 

7. Accompaniments for salads 

M. PREPARATION OF MEATS, FISH AND POULTRY 
1. Forms of meat 
. Fresh 
. Cured 
. Canned 
• 



Frozen 



29 - 



2. Methods used In preparing meats, fish and poultry 

• Moist heat methods 

- Braising 
-> Bolling 

- Stewing 

. Dry heat methods 

- Broiling 
* Roasting 

• Cooking meat with fat 

- Pan frying 

- Deep-fat frying 

3. Function of meat In the diet 

4. Grading of meats 

5. Composition of meat 

6. Types of shellfish and methods of cooking fish 

• Lobster 

s 

. Oysters 

• Shrimp 
. Crab 

• Others 

7. Types of poultry and methods of cooking 

. Chickens 

• Turkeys 
. Ducks 

• Rock Cornish game hens 

• Squabs 



Others 



- 30 - 



8. Preparation of bread dressing or stuffing 

9. Techniques of carving meats and poultry 
N. PREPARATION OF BATTERS AND DOUGHS 

1. Preparing doughs for breads 

. Quick breads 

- Biscuits 

- Muffins 

- Popovers 

- Waffles 

- Doughnuts 

- Corn bread 

. Yeast breads 

- Dinner rolls 

- Sweet breads 

- Bread 

2. Procedure to follow In preparing doughs for breads 

3. Preparation of basic dessert doughs 

. Cakes 

- Sponge 

- Angel 

- Chlflon 

- Conventional 

- Pound 

. Cookies 

- Drop 

- Rolled 

- Refrigerator 
* Molded 

- Pressed 

- Bar 

. Pastries 

- One and two crust pies 
-> Tarts 

- Turnovers 

- French pastries (cream pu.ffs» eclairs) 

- Puff pastry 




- 31 - 

4. Use of mixes when preparing batters and doughs In 
quantity 

5. Techniques used in preparing batters and doughs 

6. Evaluating standard products 

7. Preparation of types of fillings and toppings 

8. Preparation of types of Icings 

9. Techniques In decorating cakes 

O. PREPARATION OF PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 

1. Puddings 

2. Gelatin desserts 

3. Nhlps 

4. Cobblers 

5. Ice Box desserts 

6. Meringue shells 

7. Sauces for desserts 

P. PREPARATION OF PARTY FOODS 

1. Tea sandwiches 

2. Party cakes and cookies 

3. Beverages 

4. Nuts and candles 

5. Ice creams t sherbets or ices 

6. Planning menus for special occasions 
. Dinner menus 
. Buffets 

. Teas and coffees 

Arrangement of table for serving food at special 
occasions 



7 . 



- 32 



CONCEPT: FOOD COST AND PORTION CONTROL 

OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Develop an understanding of the cost of various portions 
of foods In relation to business profit and customer 
satisfaction. 

11. Gain knowledge of how to compute the costs of servings 
of food. 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. RELATION OF PORTION CONTROL TO BUSINESS PROFIT AND 
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 

B. STANDARD WEIGHTS AND MEASURES USED IN QUANTITY FOOD 
PREPARATION 

1. Weights, measures and abbreviations 

2. Weights and measures according to common can size 

3. Dipper and ladel equlllvants wsed In quantity food 
service 

C. FOOD SUBSTITUTIONS AND PROPORTIONS 

1. Approximate equlllvant substitutions 

2. Relative proportions of Ingredients 

3. Proportions of dry Ingredient solids 

. Milk 
• Eggs 

D. METHODS TO USE IN COMPUTING PORTION COSTS OF FOOD 

1. Standardized portions 

2. Method of pricing food portion costs 



33 - 












*i»ft«!»n?tw5fc^sy ;«.•* k'ts-'-iS w»«i8H*«a?et30 <■•«» * » MXTW-^ rjitKni^ii 



CONCEPT; 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN FOOD SERVICE THAT REQUIRE FURTHER 
TRAINING AND EXPERIENCES 



OBJECTIVES; 



To help pupils to; 



I. Gain an understanding of career opportunities In commercial 
and Institutional food service at the post-secondary 
and college levels. 



OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. SEMI-PROFESSIONAL CAREERS-AVAILABLE AFTER COMPLETING 
TECHNICAL SCHOOL OR JUNIOR COLLEGE TRAINING 

1. Food Service Supervisor 

. Duties and responsibilities 

. Knowledge, skills and abilities required of the 
Food Service Supervisors 

• Personal qualities, education and health require' 
ments 

. Salary range 
. Fringe benefits 
. Job opportunities 

• Training available In the locality for Food 
Service Supervisors 

B. PROFESSIONAL CAREERS - AVAILABLE AFTER OBTAINING A 
COLLEGE DEGREE 

Dietitian 

. Duties and responsibilities 

. Knowledge, skills and abilities required of 
Dietitians 

• Personal qualities, education and health 
requirements 

. Salary range 

. Fringe benefits 

. Job opportunities 

. Training available In locality for Dietitians 




- 34 - 



CONCEPT: GETTING AND HOLDING A JOB IN FOOD SERVICE 

OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Gain an understanding of the considerations that are 
made when selecting a job* 

II* Become informed on ^ere to obtain leads on employment 
opportunities* 

III* Understand how to make a personal interview* 

IV* Be able to write a letter of application and fill out 
a personal data sheet* 

V* Understand factors that influence the obtaining and/or 
holding of Jobs* 

VI* Understand how to progress on a job* 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 
A* FACTORS TO CONSIDER WHEN SELECTING A JOB 
1* Opportunities for advancement 

2* Abilities, skills, interests and training required 
of the job in relation to one's own qualifications* 

3* General working conditions 

4* Employment trends affecting this type of job 

B* MATCHING PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS TO JOB QUALIFICATIONS 

1* Education and training 

2* Interests 

3* Aptitudes 

4* Work experience 

5* Personal traits 

6* Physical capacity 

7* Vocational goals 



- 35 



C. PLACES TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT LEADS NHEN SEEKING A JOB 

1. State Employment Agencies 

2. Private Employment Companies 

3. School Placement Office or Food Service Teacher 

4. Relatives, friends, neighbors 

5. "Want Ads" In newspapers and trade journals 

6. Classified telephone directory 

D. POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN BEING INTERVIEWED FOR A JOB 

1. Stating qualifications for the job and shoxd.ng 
Interest In obtaining It 

2. Dlcusslng only matters pertaining to the job 

3. Being businesslike and brief 

4. Letting employers take the lead In asking questions 

5. Having a definite understanding as to what Is to be 
required of the person hired for the job 

6. Using correct English 

7. Having an Immaculate, clean and neat appearance 

E. WRITING A LETTER OF APPLICATION 

1. Typing or writing the letter In Ink 

2. Using standard sized white paper 

3. Writing the letter to a specific Individual 

4. Using correct grammer and spelling 

5. Stating Information briefly and In a businesslike 
manner 

6. Making the letter Interesting to read 

7. Enclosing a description of training and experience on 
a Personal Data Sheet 

F. REASONS PEOPLE GET THE JOBS THEY SEEK 

1. Personal appearance 

2. Sufficient training for work 



36 



3« fo§iHv§ attitude toward work 
4« Caliiy foiaad wmoar wlttiout nervouanesa 

5. friaiidXy waimar 

6. On tliin lor interviav 

7« Ifnpreaiion glvan of wanting to work 

6. Fmiom lACfCmS HiT XmUlWGB the holding of a job 

1. Oarafttl and aoonrato with work 

2« Willing to follow mlea and policiaa 
3t Job glwan fall attantlon 

4« froaent and on tiae exoafit for juatifiable cauae 

5. Bnergetle 

6 . GsmaeiMitioiia 

7 . Anhitieaa 

8. Loyal 

9. Basfonsihle 

10* Able to adapt to tha altuation 

H. HIKING FBOGRESS OR GETTING ANIAB ON THE JOB 

1« Acquiring confidence in the ability to perform the 
job skillfully 

2. Development of personal qualities that contribute to 
auccesa on a 



. Dependability 
. Efficiency 

• Initiative 

• Honesty 



. Congeniality 



Neat appearance 
Accuracy 



3. Investigating the posaibilities of obtaining more 
training to acquire greater skill in food preparation 

• Technical schools 



• Jlmior Colleges 

4 Mght classes at ciiemiian ccntifs 



37 



CONCEPTS TRADE AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IN FOOD SERVICE 

OBJECTIVES: To help pupils to: 

I. Understand the role of trade and professional organi- 
sations to the Food Service Field. 

II. Develop an awareness of the trade and professional 
organisations In Food Service. 

OUTLINE OF CONTENT 

A. ROLE OF TRADE AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS TO THE FOOD 
SERVICE FIELD 

1. Promotion of the field 

2. Definition of standards 

3. Maintenance of standards 

4. In-service education of personnel 

5. Liaison sale with other groups 

B. TRADE AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS RELATED TO FOOD SERVICE 

1. American Home Economics Association 

2. American Dietetic Association 

3. Hospital, Institution and Educational Food Service 
Society 

4. American Hospital Association 

5. National Restaurant Association 

6. American Hotel and Motel Association 

7. American School Food Service Association 

8. American Nursing Home Association 



SOME SUGGESTED REFERENCES 
FOR THE 

OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 

IN 

flOMMERCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FOOD PREPARATION 



Books 

CronsO} Msrlon* The School Lunch * Peorlft} Illinois; Chas* A» Bennett 
Conqiany, Inc., 1962. 

Fowler, Sina Faye; West, Bessie Brooks; Shugart, Grace Severance. Jgood 
For Fifty . New York, New York; John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1965 ($8.95) 

^Kotschevar, Lendal. Quantity Food Production . Berkley, California, 
McCutchan Publishing Corp., 1964. ($11.00) 

*Kotschevar, Lendal. Quantity Food Purchasing . New York, New York; John 
Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1965. ($14.00) 

Lundberg and Kotschevar. Understanding Cooking (Progrananed) Amherst, 
Massachusetts; The University Store, University of Massachusetts, 1966 
($6.15) 

McWilliams, Margaret, Food Fundamentals. New York, New York; John 
Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1966. 

Stokes, John W. F ood Service In Industry and Institutions. Dubuque, 
Iowa: Wm. C. Brcrwn Co., Inc., 1960. ($8.00) 

The United States Department of Agriculture. Food; The Yearbook of 
Agriculture 1959. Washington, D. C.: The Superintendent of Documents, 
1959. ($2.25) 

*I^est, Wood, Harger. Food Service In Institutions . New York, New York: 
John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1966. ($7.75) 



**Teai?hev x'efecence or supplementary reference for students 



39 - 



Bulletins 



American Home Economics Association. Handbook of Food Preparation . 
Washington,' D. C.: American Home Economics Association, 1963. ($1.00) 

The United States Department of Agriculture. Food Purchasing Guide For 
Group Feeding . Washington, D. C.: The Superintendent of Documents, 1965. 
($.40) 

The United States Department of Agriculture. Recipes For Quantity Service 
Washington, D. C.: The Superintendnet of Documents, 1958. ($2.50) 

U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Supervised Food Service 
Worker. Washington, D. C.: The Superintendent of Documents, 1964. ($.20) 



Magazines 



Commercial Kitchen and Dining Room. U. S. Industrial Publications, Inc. 

750 3rd Ave., New York, N. T. (Quarterly) $4.00 per year* 

Food Service Magazine, Electrical Information Publications, Inc., 2132 Fordem 
Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin (Monthly) $5.00 per year 

Institutions Magazine, Medalist Publications, Inc., 1801 Prairie Ave., 
Chicago, Illinois (Monthly) $10.00 per year 

School and College Food Management. Food Management Publications, Inc., 
Ojlbway Building, Duluth, Minnesota (Sfonthly) $5.00 per year 



(Most Food Service magazines will send complimentary copies to Instructors 
who are training for the Food Service industry) 



o