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DOCUMENT RESUME 



ED 059 704 



JC 720 057 



TITLE 



INSTITUTION 



PUB DATE 
NOTE 



Measurable Institutional Objectives for 1970-71: 
Achievement Report. 

Mount San Jacinto Coll. , Gilman Hot Springs, 

Ca 1 i f . 

Jun 7 1 
34 p. 



EDRS PRICE 
DESCRIPTORS 



IDENTIFIERS 



MF-$0. 65 HC-S3.29 

Administration; ^Educational Administration* 
^Educational objectives; Institutional 
Administration; ^Institutional Role; * Junior 
Colleges; ^Program Evaluation 
California 



ABSTRACT 



In this report measurable Institutional objectives 
recommended by the faculty, students serving on faculty committees, 
and the administrative staff of Mt_ San Jacinto College (California) 
are presented. The objectives are based on discussions with members 
of the Board of Trustees, advisory committees, community groups such 
as the Patrons Association, chamber of commerce, and more than 20 
other groups who had meetings on campus to review the college 
program. The achievements listed for the appropriate objectives were 
prepared by the office and administrative staff and based on 
available auditable records. Objectives and achievements are 
presented for the college activity areas of: general education, 

transfer education, community services, student personnel, special 
remedial education, occupational training, and increasing 
instructional effectiveness. In addition, statistics related to units 
of credit , grade point average, costs associated with units earned 
and taught, and systemic constraints are reported. (Author/AL) 



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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, 
EDUCATION. & WELFARE 
OFFICE OF EDUCATION 
THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRO 
DUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM 
THE PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIG 
inatsng it POINTS Of view or OPIN- 
IONS STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY 
REPRESENT OFFICIAL Cr-'FIC^ O r ^DU 
CATION POSITION OR POLICY 



MEASURABLE INSTITUTIONAL OBJECTIVES FOR 1970-71 
ACHIEVEMENT REPORT 



Mt» San Jacinto College 
Gilman Hot Springs, California 





July, 1971 




UNIVERSITY OF CALIF 
LOS ANGELES 

Iv.AR 2 2 1972 

clearinghouse for 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 
INFORMATION 



Foreword 



These objectives were recommended by faculty* students serving 
on faculty cGimni ttees , and administrative staff. They were based on 
discussions with members of the Board of Trustees, advisory commit- 
tees, community groups such as the Patrons Association, Chambers of 
Commerce, and more than twenty other groups who had meetings on 
campus to review the college program* Last year's efforts at estab- 
lishing ’’Institutional Goals” aided the effort this year. The recom- 
mendation of these objectives was made by the Superintendent ^President 
to the Board of Trustees for their review and adoption at the regular 
meeting on October 13, 1970. They were adopted by Resolution No. 1440. 

The "Achievements > ,f were prepared by the office and administra- 
tive staff and were based on available and auditable records* The 
objectives and achievements were presented for review and acceptance 
by the Board of Trustees at their meeting of July 13, 1971. 



Hilo F« Johnson 
Superintendent and President 
Ht, San Jacinto College 



Table of Contents 



Foreword *••*■*■ 

Genera] Education Objectives and Achievements 1 

Transfer Education. Objectives and Achievements • • , . * 2 

Community Services Objectives and Achievements , 3 

Student Personnel Objectives and Achievements 6 

Special Remedial or Second Chance Objectives and Achievements , 14 



Occupational Training Objectives and Achievements . . - 

Increasing the Effectiveness of Instruction Objectives 

and Achievements 

Units c£ Credit Completed by all Students • 

Grade Point Average for all Units Completed . . 

Current Expense Cost Per Unit of Credit Earned • • • • 

Cost Per Semester Hour Taught (for comparative purposes, 
not an output) ,«••»••*••••• 
Cost per A.D.A, (for comparative purposes, not an output) 
Constraints, Need for Summary Statement to Establish a 

More Complete Accountability System * 

Definitions 



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23 

23 

24 

25 





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MEASURABLE INSTITUTIONAL OBJECTIVES FOR iy/U-iy/1 



ACHIEVEMENT REPORT 
I* General Education Objectives; 

A* Each graduate will have demons t rated his understanding of and 

appreciation for the nature and development of our system of govern- 
ment by having achieved the minimum behavioral objectives in any of 
the following; History 17A and 17B; Political Science I and any 
U#S. History class; or History 51, 

B„ Each graduate will have demonstrated his knowledge of the factors 
affecting good mental and physical health and the moral and social 
values related to membership in the family and a demoractie society 
by having successfully achieved the behavioral objectives of the 
course in Health Education* 

CL Each graduate will have demonstrated his ability to communicate 
thoughts clearly in speaking and writing, and his ability to read 
with understanding by having achieved at least the minimum 
behavioral objectives of at least the course in English Fundamentals 
and one o ther course in English, speech or journalism, 

D* Each graduate will have demonstrated his unders tanding of the bio- 
logical or physical environment by having completed at least the 
minimum behavioral objectives of a course in biology* physics, 
chemistry , physical g eography , geogra phy or physical anthropology# 

E # Each graduate will have demonstrated his understanding of, apprecia- 
tion for, and participation in, creative and cultural heritage and 
activities or economic environment by successfully completing at 
least the minimum behavioral objectives of I a course! in the humani - 
ties or s ocial sciences in addition to those completed to fulfill 
other stated objectives,. 



O 




4 



2 



F* Each graduate will have demonstrated his ability to develop personal 
habits and attitudes to preserve and improve both mental and physi- 
cal health for himself, his family, and his community by having suc- 
cessfully achieved the behavioral objectives of at least four semes- 
ter courses in physical educat ion, if required* 

G* Each graduate will have demonstrated his ability to use the basic 
mathematical and arithmetical skills necessary to everyday life by 
successfully achieving the behavioral objectives of at least one 
course in mathematics , or by passing an examination i n mathoma tics * 

Achievement : 

Each of the 1Q7 graduates met the objectives required for the assoc- 
late degree listed A through G as evidenced in the records kept by 
faculty members and as recorded on the students 1 official transcripts* 

XI* Transfer Education: 

A. Each student who intends to transfer to one of the California State 
Colleges with complete certification will have satisfied the general 
education requirements for such transfer by successfully achieving 
at least the minimum objectives in a program of studies as follows : 
nine semester units of natural science, nine semester units of 
social science, eight semester units of humanities, six semester 
units of basic subjects, and eight additional semester units elected 
from the above areas or in the areas of mathematics, health education 
and/or physical education* 




5 



Achievement : 






All those graduates who indi cated their intention to transfer to 
one of the California State Colleges have had at least one con - 
ferance, and in most cases, several confe rences with a M»S,J,G. 
Jq_unsel_o_r, and have met all^of the minimum objectives of the gen - 
era! education requirement for the school of their choice, except 
in those cases where choi ce of four year institution changed dur- 
ing the last semester i 

B, Each student who intends to transfer to any four year institution 

other than California State Colleges, shall identify the college 

| 

and plan his general education program with his counselor or 
advisor in such a Way that he will meet that institutions general 
education requirements. 

Achievement : 

All those students who indicated their intention to transfer to a 
four year institution othe r than one of the California State Col- 
leges have had conferences with an M,S,J*C# counselor and 100% 
have met their selected institutions* general education requirement, 

III* Community Service: 

The Community Service Program is designed to assist the residents of 
the District in achieving worthwhile utilization of leisure time, in 
broadening of cultural and recreational knowledges and skills, and 
in facilitating the exchange of ideas, the following specific ob- 
jectives will be accomplished: 

A, Building and grounds facilities will be made available to all 



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community groups for use upon request and within the rules and re- 
gulations prescribed by law and policies established by the Board. 

Ac h i e y eme.n t : 

The campus was used 58 times by a variety of groups ranging from a 
play production by San Jacinto High School in S- 1 to a meeting by 
Experience In orporated utilizing the Lit t le Theatre, cafeteria and 
four classrooms . S-l was used 26 times for a play, meetings and a 
speech by Hr, V* Veysey, The Music Room was used by the Kiwanis , 
Soroptimists , San Jacinto Chamber of Commerce , Rotary and for a Miss 
Hemet Contest, A- 5 was used 2 elections, a Rotary Luncheon, 

Riverside County Educational Officers meeting and police testing. 
Additional classrooms and the cafeteria were used in conjunction 
with some of these meetings by College Auto Teachers Association 
and Experience Incorporated . 

B. Organized recreational activities will be provided at least one night 
per week during the school year and four nights per week during 
summer school. 



Achievemen t : 

Recreational activities were provided every Tuesday and Thursday that 
school was in session during both fall and spring semest ers^ Activi* 
ties included group and individual sports such as volleyball, badmin- 
ton , golf, table tennis, body conditioning and square dancing. During 
simmer school, activities were offered in 11 different areas with some 
activity being offered 5 afternoons and nights each week . 

During the school year, attendance at the bi-weekly session numbered 



5 



between 35 and 50 participants, with an average of 40 for the 32 
weeks. In the summer program, 276 individuals were served in groups 
of from 4 to 6 CL 

G, At least four dramatic productions, two musical productions, and two 
other cultural events open to the public will be presented during the 
1970-71 school year. 



Achieveme nt : 

'the drama section produced five plays. Taming of the Shrew, Stop the 
World I Want to Get Off, Medea, U.S.A. and Anastasia for a total of 
20 performances on campus. Off campus, 2 plays were put on almost 
in their entirety for I.S.O.M.A.T.A. in Idyllwlld and 25 appearances 
before civic id church groups in the surrounding area. In addition, 
two drama festivals were sponsored on campus for the high schools in 
the area with almost 100 participants each time# The opera. Hansel 
and Gretel played to a standing room only audience for four nights. 
The music depart ment held a !, Husic of the Big Ban d E a n conc e rt 
entitled >f Remembe ring^ for the retired people of the community, the 
choral group performed before several groups and the orchestra played 
for Hemet High School * s open house. The Concert Series was a show" 
case for a piano duo, and a wide variety of musical talent, includ- 
ing indivi dual performances by opera star Enrico DiGiuseppe and 
Frances Bible# 

D. All requests from civic and service organizations in the College dis- 
trict for speakers from the college staff will be filled. Requests 
for dramatic or musical performances will be filled when they enhance 



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the educational program. 

Achievement: 

Dr. Thangaraj has spoke to almost all the major service clubs in 
the District giving over 35 talks to these organizations. He also 
has presented reading and discussion series to civi c groups. Other 
faculty members have addressed several clubs and fraternal o rganiza- 
tions both within and outside the District* 

IV. Student Personnel 
1 # Guidance 

Provide testing* counseling and advising to students to "know them* 
selves" through an integrated guidance and counseling program includ- 
ing developing realistic goals and planning their lives and their 
educational program so they can accomplish these goals. 

In order to achieve the guidance goal for the year 1970-71, the fol- 
lowing measurable objectives will be accomplished: 

A. Of the new students enrolling, 100% will confer with a counselor 



Achievement ; 

All students new _ to Mt. San Jacinto College had at least one con fer- 
ence with a counselor to plan a program of studies. All stud ents de- 
clared a major on their registration form. 

B. After their initial enrollment, not more than 15% of the total stud- 
ents will make class changes. 



or advisor, declare a major and plan a program of studies. 



Achievement : 








1 

■-£ 



7 



Total number 


of class enrollments 


Number 

4,599 


Percentage 

loot 


Breakdown of 


class drops: No ’Shows 


155 


3% 




Student Initiated 


989 


22% 




Teacher Initiated 
(Excessive Absences) 


645 


14% 




Total class drops 


1,789 


39% 



A different breakdown of the students who dropped classes shows t he 
following: 

Total number of students w ho withdrew from college 136 2-1/2% 

Total number of students who dropped one or more 

classes ‘ 435 9-1/2% 

Total number of students who dropped from full- 
time to part-time 144 3% 

*As a result of failing to meet this objective, the faculty and sta ff 

have started a major effort to reduce the dlrops. See the plans M A 

Method for Achieving Greater Retention of Students and Better 

Student Performance 11 , June 1971 

G, Of the freshmen enrolling in the Fall, 1969, 45% of those in continu- 
ous enrollment at JSJC and stating a transfer objective will have met 
that educational objective by June, 1971, 



Achievement : 

Four hundred sixty-six students stating a transfer objective enrolled 
as first- time (new) students at Mt, San Jacinto College in the Fall » 
1969, A complete longitudinal study of these students has been made . 
The portion relevant fo r this institutional objective shows that 147 
students had continuous enrollment for the four ensuing semesters . 

Of this 147, 74, or 51% of those in continuous enrollment, will re- 
ceive associate degreees in June, 1971, It is also interesting to 




note than an additional 24 (16%) of those in continuous enrollment 



have completed between 53 and 60 units. These 24 students have the 
possibility of finishing the associate degree in the Summer, 1971 
sessions thereby raising the total graduates to 67% of those in 
continuous enrollment . 

D, (1) Ninety percent of those completing the class which includes the 
writing of educational and occupational goals will develop and 
try out such goals. 

Achievement i 

All students who continued in the educational , voc ational, and per * 
sonal assessment classes had help in develo pi ng and trying out goals . 
(2) In a written evaluation questionnaire, this goal setting acCivi^ 
ty will be rated as helpful or very helpful by 70% of those who 
write such goals. 

Achievement : 

On an evaluation questionnaire in regard to how helpful the goal set * 
Citig activity had been the following rating was recorded; Do you feel 
this course has been helpful to you In the following areas; 



Vocational Choice 


Yes 


697. 


Educational Plans 


Yes 


697. 


Personal Understanding 


Yes 


867. 


E, Thirty percent of the June 1970 graduates from the 


high 


schools with' 



In the college district shall be enrolled in Mt , San Jacinto College 
for the Fall, 1970 and/or Spring 1971 semesters. 



9 



Achievement : 

A study of the Springy 1970 high school graduates who enrolled in Mt * 
San Jacinto College for the Fall, 1970 and/or Spring, 1971 semesters 
shows that 34% of these students enrolled for either the fall and/or 
spring semesters. The breakdown of the highschools was as follows: 





San 

Jacinto 


Banning 


Mt. 

View 


Ferris 


Hemet 


Beaumont 


Totals 


Graduates (H.S,) 


75 


112 


15 


130 


310 


107 


749 


Enr ed at MSJC 


23 


48 


(y 


27 


108 


35 


251 


Percentage Enrolled 


30% 


43% 


40% 


21% 


35% 


36% 


34% 



F * (1) To encourage more persons of ethnic minority background to pur- 
sue further education, at least 40 students of such background, 
who would, in all likelihood not attend college, will be recruited. 

Achievemen t: 

Records show that at least 13 new students from ethnic m i nority back- 
grounds entered Mt. San Jacinto in the Fall, 1 970* semester as a 
direct result of recruiting contacts by students* At least Ijf addi - 
tional students from ethnic minority backgrounds entered in the 
Spring, 1971, semester as a direct result of peer recruiting , 

(2) To aid in recruitment of ethnic minority students, 3 filmstrips 
tape multi media packages will be developed;. one each for per* 
sons of Ameriean-Xndian, Mexiean-Amerlcsn, and Negro backgrounds. 



Achievement : 



The three recruitment tapes are in final stages of production. 



(3) To promote better understanding of the unique cultural heritage 
of the American-Xndian, the Mexican- American, and the Negro, 



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3 filmstrip- tape multi media packages will be developed for use 
in various social science programs by all students (to be devel- 
oped as part of one of the guidance projects). 

Achievement r 

The 3 ,f u nders tanding 11 tapes are in final stages of production, 

G, In order to determine factors effecting drop-out and re-entry of 
students , 

(1) Information on factors effecting exit and re-entry will be 
obtained on all students who withdrew from college during the 
Fall semester of 1969 and re-enrolled for the Fall semester of 
1970, by February 1, 1971, 

Achievement : 

The longitudinal study of the Fall, 1969 first- time enroll. ees shows 
tha t of the 162 students dropping out during or at the end of the 
Fall , 1969 semester, 2 0 returned to college in the Fall, 1970, These 
students stated that financial problems and job committments were 
the biggest factors in their missing a semester of college* 

(2) Information on factors affecting drop-out will be obtained on 
75^ of students who withdrew from all classes during the Fall 
semester 1970 by July l f 1971* 

(3) The information will be compared and all factors judged that 
have an effect on a student’s decision to withdraw or re-enter 
college will be tabulated. 

Achievement ; 

A complete study was done on students who withdrew from all classes 



13 



durin g the Fall, 1970 semester. The following are pertinent exerpts 
f rom the study : 

Marital Status 



A. 


Single 


47% 


B* 


Married 


47% 


C, 


Divorced 


2% 


D. 

How 


Separated 

did you get to college? 


3% 


A* 


My own car 


71% 


B* 


Parents car 


8% 


C* 


Rode with others 


8% 


D. 


School bus 


7% 


E. 


Other (including motorcycle) 


5% 


If you were employed while attending college, 
per week required on the job. 


the ni 


A. 


0-8 


10% 


B, 


9-16 


18% 


C, 


17-24 


10% 


D. 


25-32 


10% 


E, 


33-40 


28% 


F. 


Over 40 


21% 


How 


many units of college work have you corr.pl 


etad? 


A. 


1-15 


32% 




16-30 


17% 


C. 


31-45 


4% 


D, 


46-60 


6% 


E. 


Over 60 


17% 


F. 


None 


2% 



What was your reason for attending college? 
applicable) 



(Mark more than one if 



A. 

B. 
C e 

D. 

E, 



To prepare for transfer to another college 
To get a junior college degree 
To complete a vocations), program 
To take a short tern program, or courses 
of special interest 
Other 



33% 

19% 

9% 

12 % 

20 % 



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2 



How many of the following influenced your decision to withdraw 
from college? 



A. Change in marital status 

B, Financial problems 

G, Take full- tine employment 

D. I no longer plan to attend college 

E, I no longer live in the community 
F* Military service 

G. Transportation problems 

H* The college was not meeting my needs 

I* Other 



9% 

19% 



1 O”? 




Have you enrolled in classes at Mt* San Jacinto College for 
spring semester? 



A, Yes 

B, No 



25% 

74 % 



(4) Using the factors determined in the above study, recommendations 
for change in counseling, administrative or instructional proce- 
dures which will minimise factors cited as cause for withdrawal 
and maximize factors cited as cause for re-entry will be made 
with the aim of reducing drops by 5% for the 1972-73 school 
year » 

Achievement : 

In order to help the student formulate more concrete educational 
goals and in order to give the student and his counselor an opportun - 
ity to discuss personal problems, a new counseling registration pro- 
cedure has been developed and implemented *, 

2m Job Placement 

A. The counseling staff will find part-time job opportunities for 



all students who desire to have such work and whose records 



indicate they can profit from such employment 



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Achievement : 

Records^ ahov that approximately 150 part-time off campus jobs were 
made available to students and approximate ly 100 students took jobs. 
It should be pointed out that in some instances job times are not 
compatible with students 1 hours. In addition, approximately 60 
students held on campus jobs during the school year * 

3* Student Activities 

A* The student government association will have completed by Febru- 
ary 1, 1971, a set of behavioral objectives for the student body 
organization, and will have identified the means of accomplish- 
ing these objectives. 

Achievemen t : 

Student government members have developed a set of behavioral objec- 
tives for the student body organization* See document mailed to 
Board on 7/9/71, 

B* In February, 1971, on a written evaluation questionnaire, the 

process of formulating the student body objectives will be judged 
as valuable or very valuable by 70% of those involved in writing 
them. 

Achievement: 

On an evaluation questionnaire 95% of the students involved in form- 
ulating the objectives judged the experience as valuable. The ques- 
tionnaire included the following questions : 



Students who met and worked on the project are to answer the follow- 



Questionnaire 



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ing questions regarding the above- stated process: 

1, Was the project of value to you in learning how to establish 
objectives for the Associated Student Body? 

2, Do you think .at the project in its completed form will be 
valuable to the entire student body when it is completed and 
executed? 

3, Did you feel the process was sufficient to allow students to 
explore what they feel are the goals they wish to accomplish 
for their own organization? Were students allowed to determine 
their own goals? 

4* What suggestions or recommendations do you have for working on 
their objective i in the future? 

V* Special Remedial or Second Chance: 

Students j who did not complete high school and who are over 18 years 
of age, and those students who are so deficient in subject skills and 
knowledge that they will find it difficult to succeed in junior college 
classes, will be provided with special classes, or workshops, or lab- 
oratory experiences which will prepare them for college classes. In 
order to achieve the special remedial or second chance goal for the 
year 1970-71, the following measurable objectives will be accomplished: 
A. All students who indicate a desire to improve their reading skill 
will be enrolled in a regular reading class. Ninety percent of 
the students who persevere throughout the semester will meet the 
minimum objectives of the course and receive a passing grade. 




15 



Achievement : 

Twenty-seven students were enrolled in the special reading classes 
during the Fail, 19 70 , semester. Standardized testing showed that 
78% of this group read at the 10th grade level and below. All stu - 
de nts who persisted in the class met the minimum objective^ of the 
course and received a passing grade, 

B. All students who indicate a desire to improve their arithmetic skills 
will be enrolled in a remedial math program, and at least 45% of 
these will meet the measurable objectives of that course, thereby 
passing the entrance examination for Elementary Algebra* 

Achievement: 



One hundred thirteen students were enrolled in the rem edial math 



classes . 


Forty-seven percent 


(52 students) completed 


requirements 


for entrance into Elementary Albegra, Another 5% of 


the students 


completed 


lesser math goals. 


but will do additional work before en 


trance to 


Elementary Algebra * 


(The total enrollment 


figure is the 



original enrollment* ) 



C. Students who indicate a desire to improve their knowledge of American 
History but who are of low verbal skills will be enrolled in History 
51. Eighty percent of the students who persevere throughout the sem- 
ester will meet the minimum objectives of the course, receive a pass-* 
ing grade, and thus satisfy their government and history requirements 
for graduation. 

Achievement : 

Forty students were enrolled in the History 51 classes for the Fall, 
1970, semester. Ninety-two percent of those persisting in the course 



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received a passing grade, thus satisfying their government and history require- 
ment for graduation. 

D. Students who desire to take a science course that is challenging but within 
the ability of students with low verbal skills may enroll in Georgraphy 51. 
Ninety percent of the students who persevere throughout the semester will 
meet the minimum objectives of the course, receive a passing grade and thus 
satisfy the science requirement for graduation* 

Achievement : 

Sixteen students were enrolled in the Geography 51 class for the Fall, 1970, 
semester. Ninety-four percent of those persisting in the course received a 
passing grade, thus satisfying the science requirement for graduation. 

VI* Occupational training: 

Provide qualified district residents, who request full time or part time 
training leading to available en^loyment, with local vocational and technical 
education, where the number of requests justify the program. Provide district 
residents who request full time training not offered at MSJC, and which leads 
to employment , and who are qualified to take such training, with an opportunity 
to enroll in another community college which offers the desired program. 

Achievement : 

Twenty- two occupational programs offering 103 classes show a total enrollment 
of 972 . 

Provide leadership in the cooperative imp lamentation of the State Vocational Area 
Plan, with other schools and colleges, and government agencies, in order to promote 
the broadest possible occupational training network for students and employers of 
this district. 

Achievement t 

The Dean of Vocational Education and members of the vocational 

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instructional staff have participated in r egional and State meetings 
for the improvement of occupational training but the prime work on 
this objective was done by Board member Omer Barker who was elected 
to the Area XX Planning Committee Vocational Technical Education, 

In order to achieve our occupational training goal for the year 1970-71, 
the following measurable objectives will be accomplished: 

A (1) Of high school students enrolled in Auto Body at the initial 
attendance report period, 75% will satisfactorily complete 
the semester. Achievement: 93% did complete. 

(2) Of high school student": enrolled in Auto Mechanics at the 

initial attendance report period, 75% will satisfactorily com- 
plete the semester. Achievement: 81% did complete. 

(3) Of high school students enrolled in Printing at the initial at^ 

tendance report period, 80% will satisfactorily complete the 
semester# Achievement : 71% did complete# 

B. (1) Of first semester non-H.S. students enrolled in Auto Body at 
the initial attendance report period, 75% will satisfactorily 
complete the semester* Achievement: 80% did complete,* 

(2) Of first semester non-H.S. students enrolled in Engineering 

Technology at the initial attendance report period, 80% will 
satisfactorily complete the semester# Achievement: 85% did 

complete. 

(3) Of first semester non-H.S. students enrolled in Engineering 

Technology at the initial attendance report period, 40% will 
satisfactorily complete the semester. Achievement: 55% did 

complete. 



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18 



(4) 



(5) 



( 6 ) 



G. ( 1 ) 



( 2 ) 



(3) 



(4) 



O 

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Of first semester students enrolled in LVN classes at the ini- 
tial attendance report period , 80% will satisfactorily cem- 
ple te the semester* Achievement; New classes in LVN were not 
started in 1971*72* 

Of first semester non-H.3. students enrolled in Photography, 
at the initial attendance report period, 907* will satisfactorily 
complete the semester. Achievement: 85% did complete 
Of first semester non-H.S. students enrolled in Printing at the 
initial attendance report period, 67% will satisfactorily com- 
plete the semes ter* Achievement : 67% did complete* 

The second semester non-H.S. students enrolled in Auto Body at 
the initial first semester attendance report period, 40% will 
satisfactorily complete the semester, or will have accepted a 
full-time position in the above, or closely related, occupation. 
Achievement; 727* did complete* 

Of second semester non-H.S* students enrolled in Auto Mechanics 
at the initial first semester attendance report period, 50% 
will satisfactorily complete the semester, or will have accepted 
a full-time position in the above, or closely related, occupa- 
tion. Achievement: 90% did complete. 

Of second semester non-H*S. students enrolled in Engineering 
Technology, 50% will satisfactorily complete the semester, or 
will have accepted a full-time position in the above, or close- 
ly related occupation. Achievement: 60% did complete. 

Of second semester students enrolled in LVN classes at the 
initial first semester attendance report period, 66% will 



21 



19 



(5) 



( 6 ) 



D. ( 1 ) 



( 2 ) 



(3) 



( 4 ) 



( 5 ) 



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satisfactorily complete the semester. Achievement: N/A. 

Of second semester non- H. S . students enrolled in Photography, 
90% will satisfactorily complete the semester, or will have 
accepted a full-time position in the above, or closely re-* 
lated, occupation. Achievement: 100% did complete. 

Of second semester non-H.3. students enrolled in Printing at 
the initial first semester attendance report period, 60% will 
satisfactorily complete the semester, or will have accepted 
a full-time position in the above, or closely related, occu- 
pation. Achievement: 78% did complete. 

Of students receiving a certificate or degree in Au o Body, 

50% will accept a position in the specified, or closely re- 
lated occupation. Achievement: 100% accepted positions. 

Of students receiving a certificate or dgree in Auto Mechanics, 
50% will accept a position in the specified, or closely related 
occupation. Achievement: 80% accepted positions. 

Of students receiving a certificate or degree in Engineering 
Technology, 90% will accept a full-time position in the speci- 
fied or closely related, occupation. Achievement: 75% accepted 

positions . 

Of students receiving a certificate or degree in LVN, 90% will 
accept a position in the specified, or closely related, occu- 
pation. Achievement: N/A* 

Of students receiving a certificate or degree in Photography, 

90% will accept a position in the specified, or closely related, 
occupation. Achievement! 1007* accepted positions. 




20 



(6) Of students receiving a certificate or degree in Printing, 90% 

will accept a full-time position in the above, or closely relat- 
ed , occupation, Achievement: N/A. 

E„ Of last year's students placed In a full-time position in the speci- 
fied, or closely related, occupation, 90% will be judged by their 
employer to be successful employees at the end of their first year 
of employment. Achievement : Auto Body - 100%; Auto Mechanics - 

100%; Licensed Vocational Nursing - 90%, Photography - 100%, and 
Printing - 100% 

F. Of full-time vocational students who indicate a desire to work in a 
job related to their major, 100% will be aided by the vocational 
counselor in obtaining such jobs* Achievement: 100%, were assisted. 

G* Within the VEA handicapped definition, 30 such students will be 
recruited, counseled, and trained for occupations judged to be in- 
dividually realistic by the counselor, pertinent instructor, and the 
Vocational Dean. 

Achievement : 

The vocational counselor, personally interviewed individually 70 
handicapped people - 43 enrolled in occupational classes and 32 
completed at least one semester's work. 

H. Within the VEA disadvantaged criteria, 25 such students will be 
recruited, counseled, or enrolled in programs judged to be in- 
dividually realistic by the counselor, pertinent instructors 
and the Vocational Dean. 

Achievement : 

10 6 students who met the above criteria were enrolled in vocational 
programs , 




23 



21 



VII. Increasing the Effectiveness of Instruction: 

Although accomplishing the following goals will not result in 
direct and measurable "product output" they are herein listed as 
a part of the Institutional Goal Statement because it is firmly 
believed that by their accomplishment this year there will be 
an improvement in the educational process which will in future 
years reflect in better accomplishing the institution 1 s measur- 
able performance objectives. 

Grading plans directly related to course objectives will be pre- 
pared, additional courses will have behavioral objectives written 
and on file, new and revised individualized multi media will be 
prepared and utilized, "prescriptive education* 1 and "continuous 
progre s s ion" education will be investigated and further steps 
will be taken to implement both. In order to achieve the goal 
relating to the effectiveness of instruction, the following ob- 
jectives will be accomplished* 

A* The updating of course content will further be achieved by 
preparing measurable objectives for 29 courses and by re- 
vising the measurable objectives already written for 21 
courses • 

Aehieven, mt ; 

Seventy-six grading plans directly related to course objec - 
tives were prepared* 

Measurable objectives were written for 28 additional courses , 
and measurable objectives previously written were revised for 
25 courses* 



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B, Twenty-five filmstrip tape multi media lessons will be pre- 
pared and produced by June 30, 1971* Each will have semi- 
programmed worksheets and post tests when such instruments 
are practical. All will be prepared so they can be copy- 
righted , 

Achievement : 

Eighty-eight multi media lessons were produced in the fiscal 
year and 44 ar e in the process of production as to June 30 , 

1971 * 

C* Filmstrip, tape multi media lessons will be sold by snail order 
and by direct sales at conferences and on campus for a total 
of 750 iiniu.a for the fiscal year. 

Achievement : 

ij929 multi media lessons w ere sold to other institutions 
for a total sales volume of $13,760# 

D. Faculty committees involved directly with students and the 
students academic performance will investigate "prescriptive 
education" and "continuous progression" education and submit 
procedures for consideration by February 1, 1971, to be 
utilised in reducing the drop rate and making the education 
of each student more relevant for him. 

A chievement : 

As a result of failing to meet this objective, the faculty 
and staff have started a major effort to reduce the drops . 

See the plans "A Method for Achieving Greater Retention of 
Students and Better Student Performance", June 1971 (copy appended). 



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23 



The foregoing pages listing the objectives and accoirajlishments of 
Mt. San Jacinto College for the school year 1970-71 describes the extent 
to which certain parts of the educational program achieved the purposes 
and objectives of this college as set forth in the catalog. The most 
significant "output" achievement was the "units of credit completed" and 
grades earned, based on performance objectives and precise grading plans 
for courses. 

The units of credit completed by all of the students for the year 1970-71 
were 18,414, and the grade point average for all units completed was 2,6 
(CH->*. The current expense cost per unit of credit earned is $59.44, 

Cost per semester hour taught is $30.86** and cost per A.D.A, $925,80. 



*There is some risk of producing a self serving statistic when an instructional 
grade point average is used as one measure of institutional output. To 
counteract this risk and for other purposes, teachers at Mt. San Jacinto 
College have developed precise grading plans as a part of the performance 
objectives for courses. Also, as verification of grading criteria certain 
students' grade point averages earned at M.S.J.C. are compared with their 
grade point averages when these students transfer to four year colleges. 

And next year money has been budgeted to provide travel expenses for 
instructors to go to other colleges and universities where performance 
objectives and precise grading plans are used so that M.S.J.C. instructors 
can further verify their objectives and grading criteria, 

**This lower cost is primarily the result of the fact that all physical 
education classes, vocational education classes and all laboratory classes 
have many more hours than units. 



I 




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24 



There is no summary statement available of the constraints which mu lc 



be considered when making judgements on the effective use of financial 



resources for purposes of accountability. Plans are under way to provide 
the summary statement of constraints to the Board in the future so that 
a more complete accountability system may then be established. 



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DEFINITIONS 



Accountability as applied to the educational process is: (1) the ability 

to demonstrate cost effectiveness (efficient us *£ resources) in meeting 
agreed upon philosophy and goals, (2) when using verified objectives, (3) 
when serving a well identified group of students, (4) and when taking 
into consideration constraints relative to this: school, course, group 
of students and community. 

Performance Objectives f^r Course - A series of statements describing 
in measurable terms what skills, knowledges and other outcomes students 
are expected to achieve as a result of this class including intermediate 
points in the course at which students would be awarded units for com- 
pleting objectives to tha». point. 

Verified Objectives - Course objectives which have been approved by 
an advisory committee, a group of teachers of the same subject or by 
a recognized authority. 

Constraints - Those obstacles to the learning activity which are beyond 
the control of immediately responsible educators and which may or may 
not be controllable by anyont in the school district. 

Restraints - Those hindrances to learning which are within the control 
of one or more of the educators who are immediately responsible. Hin- 
drances which may be reduced in the time span of this class (semester). 

Student Effort Factors - Those actions associated with motivation which 
if practiced by the student in a given class lead to his achieving ob- 
jectives commensurate with his potential. 



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26 



Grading Crl terja - A set of criteria for the awarding of letter grades 
eased on student achievements of performance objectives for the course 
and including criteria for establishing grades for intermediate points 
in the course where each unit or fraction of a unit is earned* 

Conferring Process - The act of two or more people analyzing available 
data, considering trends and mutually arriving at an agreed upon plan 
of action or a conclusion. 



Philosophy - Means a composite statement of the relationship between 
the individual and society based upon beliefs, concepts, and attitudes 
from which the goals and objectives of the district are derived. Cali- 
fornia Education Code 7561 

Goa Is - Means a statement of broad direction or intent which is general 
and timeless and Is not concerned with a particular achievement within 
a specified time period. California Education Code 7562, 

Objectives - Means a devised accomplishment that can be verified within, 
a given time and under specifiable conditions which, if attained, ad- 
vances the system toward a corresponding goal, California Education 
Code 7563, 



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Teaeher-s tudent accountability - The ability of the teacher to demon- 
strate that he has taken all reasonable steps to assist students to 
accomplish the course objectives up to each student 1 s fullest potential. 

Corollary - The ability of the student to demonstrate that he has made 
reasonable effort to accomplish all of the course objectives up to his 
fullest potential , 



29 



A Method for Achieving Greater 
Retention of Students and 
Better Student Performance 



This plan envisions the following steps: 

1. At the end of the first Week of the semester, each teacher and his 
administrative representative (coordinator) will confer regarding one 
pre-selected course* They will consider the grade point average of 
registered students furnished by registration office, results of first 
of the semester tests, results of placement tests, student records 
from the previous semester of this course, constraints, and restraints 
in an attempt to predict the factors which may keep some students from 
achieving all of the course objectives. 

The teacher and the administrator will confer on the statement of 
constraints and confirm that they represent constraints and not res- 
traints . 

2, The teacher and the administrator confer on the steps to be taken by 
the teacher to help reduce certain selected restraints. This will 
include the possibility of asking the counseling office to transfer 
some misplaced students to other classes . 

3* Administrative representative and the teacher confer on the steps 
to be taken by the administrator to help reduce other selected 
, restraints, 

4. The administrative representative will, by the third week of the 

semester, prepare a report including course title and catalog number, 
number of students enrolled, along with a listing of agreed upon 
constraints beyond the scope of these two conferees to reduce, and 
restraints upon which each will work . This will be presented to 
the Superintendent during a conferring session during the third week. 




2 



5- At the end of the year the teacher and administrative representative 
will confer on the results of the students' achievements and the ad- 
ministrator will be responsible for making a report on grades earned 
in accordance with the grading plan* and a report on constraints which 
were verified during the year as being beyond the influence of the 
teacher and administrative representative and a report on the restraints 
which each had eliminated * These reports will be presented in writing 
to the Superintendent with a copy to the teacher* 

6, This conferring process will be started on a trial basis with one class 
for each teacher using a different class each semester* In June 1972 
this plan will be reviewed for improvement or for replacement. 

At the first of the year the teacher brings to the conference with the 
administrative representative the following: 

1* A copy of the precise objectives for the course and a copy of the grad- 
ing criteria. Each should be dated * 

2* A list of constraints which describes the main reasons why in the opin- 
ion of the teacher all of last semesters students did not complete all 
of the objectives with the highest possible grade# 

3, A copy of this year 1 s first of the semester tests designed by the 

teacher to determine the readiness of new students to meet the course 
objectives . 

b* Eesults of the first of the semester tests given to the new class, 

5* Other available information about students* i.e** previous grade point 
average for each student. 



What is to be accomplished at the first -of -the-year conference between the 
instructor and the administrative representative: 




Odi 

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*3 



1, Precise objectives for the course and grading criteria are to be dis^ 
cussed and methods agreed to in order to verify these with other teach- 
ersj consultants ^ or by advisory committees, 

2. Discuss the constraints relating to the previous semester f s student 
achievements , 

3* Discuss the first of the semester tests utilized by the teacher to de- 
termine the readiness of new students to meet the objectives of the 
course. 

4, Confer on the constraints relating to this semester ? s students and how 
these may differ from last semester's. 

5« Confer on the restraints which are possible for the teacher to reduce 
and how these relate to the teacher f s professional goals. 

6, Confer on the restraints which are possible for the administrative 
representative to reduce. 

At the end of the year the teacher brings to the conference with the admin- 
istrative 4 representative the following; 

1. A copy of the precise objectives for this coarse and the grading plan 
and suggestions for updating one or both. 

2. The number enrolling and completing this course for the previous 
semester. 

3* A list of the projected constraints reevaluated in respect to what 
actually developed during this current year. 

4. A copy of the final exams and grades earned on the final exam and 
other records of student achievement including final grades, 

5. Evidence of having reduced the restraints which were possible for the 
teacher to influence. 



32 



What is to be accomplished at the end -of -the -year conference between the 
instructor and the administrative representative? 

1* Confer on the comparison of projected constraints with the list of 
constraints which actually developed during the year* 

2. Confer on the teacher's efforts to try and reduce the restraints which 
were within the power of the teacher to influence* 

3« Confer on the administrative representative's efforts to reduce the 

restraints which were within the power of administration to influence* 
4. Confer on what is to be learned from studying the grades earned by 
these students considering the constraints that existed and the res- 
traints which were reduced. Plan what can be done next tim e this 
class is taught to increase the retention rate and to increase student 



performance. 



DEFINITIONS 



Constraints - Those obstacles to the learning activity which are beyond the 
control of immediately responsible educators and which may or may not be 
controllable by anyone in the college district. 

Restraints - Those hindrances to learning which are within the control of 
one or more of the educators who are immediately responsible. Hindrances 
which may be reduced in the time span of this class (semester). 

Precise Objectives for Course - a series of statements describing in 
measurable terms what skills, knowledges and other outcomes students are 
expected to achieve as a result of this class. 

Grading Criteria - A set of standards for the issuance of letter grades 
based on levels of student achievements of the precise objectives for the 
course. 

Conferring Process - The act of rfo people analyzing available data, consid- 
ering trends and mutually arriving at an agreed upon plan or conclusion. 
Philosophy - "Philosophy" means a composite statement of the relationship 
between the individual and society based upon beliefs, concepts, and attitudes 
from which the goals and objectives of the district are derived. Edu, Code 7561. 
Goals - "Goal" means a statement of broad direction or intent which is general 
and timeless and is not concerned with a particular achievement within a 
specified time period. Edu, Code 7562. 

Objectives - "Objective" means a devised accomplishment that can be verified 
within a given time and under specifiable conditions which, if attained, 
advances the system toward a corresponding goal. Edu. Code 7563- 



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34