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DOCUMENT RESUME 



ED 279 963 



CG 019 772 



TITLE 

INSTITUTION 



PUB DATE 
NOTE 

PUB TYPE 



EDRS PRICE 
DESCRIPTORS 



TEAM. 

CBS, Inc., New York, NY.; Government Employees 
Insurance Co., Washington, DC; International 
Association of Auditoritjum Managers, Chicago, IL.; 
National Automobile Dealers Association, McLean, VA.; 
National Basketball Association, New York, NY.; 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), 
Washington, D. C. 
15 Oct 85 
55p. 

Reports - General (140) — Audiovisual Materials 
(100) 

MF01/PC03 Plus Postage. 

*Alcohol Education; Alcoholism; *Community 
Involvement; *Dr inking; Facilities; Programing 
(Broadcast); *Public Service; *Television 
*Drinking Drivers 



IDENTIFIERS 
ABSTRACT 

This document presents materials covering the 
television campaign against drunk driving called "TEAM" (Techniques 
for Effective Alcohol Management). It is noted that TEAM'S purpose is 
to promote effective alcohol management in public facilities and 
other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. TEAM sponsors 
are listed, including the National Basketball Association, the 
International Association of Auditorium Managers, the National 
Automobile Dealers Association, the Government Employees Insurance 
Company, Columbia Broadcasting System, and the National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration. TEAM'S four campaign slogans are 
included in the document with their intended message points and 
approach. These anti-drinking and driving slogans are shown to make 
connections between basketball and the anti-drunk driving message 
(i.e., take away the keys, it's the biggest assist you can make). 
Scripts from the campaign are included. An extensive 30-page section 
of the document is a kit for public facility managers on effective 
alcohol management techniques. Background information, practical 
advice, an in-house procedures checklist, discussion of public 
information programs to reduce drinking and driving, and a relevant 
source materials list are provided. (ABL) 



******** 

* Reproductions supplied by EDRS a^e the best that can be made * 

* from the original document. * 
*****************************^*^^^^**^*^^^^^^^^ .^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



ERLC 



CBS Inc. 
★ 

Government Employees 
Insurance Company 

International Association of 
Auditorium Mar&agers 
★ 

National Automobile Dealers 
Association 



U.S. OEPARTMEH'TOF FOUCATION 

OHice of Educational Research and improvement 

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION 
y CENTER (ERIC) 

P^is document has been rep'-^uced as 
received from the person or crftaniiation 
originating it. 

n Minor changes have been made to improve 
reproduction quality. 

• Points of view or opinions stated in this docu- 
ment do not necessarily represent official 
OERl position or pohcy 



National Basketball Association 
★ 

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
U.S. Department of Transportation 



# 



SLOGANS 



^ MESSAGE CONTENTS 




MESSAGES/SLOGANS 
FOR TEAM CAMPAIGNS 




October 15, 1985 




4 



SLOGAN FOR ALL CAMPAIGNS 



This slogan will appear on the screen along 
with the logo during the last three to five seconds 
of each television spot. 



STOP DRINKING AND DRIVING — IT'S A TEAM EFFORT 



5 



CAMPAIGN #1 
INTRODUCING TEAM 



ERIC 



MESSAGE POINTS 



e NBA/CBS recognize that drinking & driving is a problem 

• NBA and its players are joining the national effort (coalition) to 
fight drinking and driving 

• NBA/C3S^anV to do their part 

• NBA/CBS want to encourage fans/viewers to join with them to do 
their part — we care 

APPROACH 



Use national and/or local team spokesperson to convey feeling of 
cooperation making people (fans., viewers) a part of the solution ~ 
convey appreciation to fans/viewers for their support. 



TAG LINE - CAMPAIGN 1 

HELP US CUT OUR ROAD LOSSES . . . 
STOP DRINKING AND DRIVING — IT'S A TEAM EFFORT 



8 



TAG LINE - CAMPAIGN 1 



HELP US CUT OUR ROAD LOSSES . . . 
STOP DRINKING AND DRIVING — IT'S, A TEAM EFFORT 



9 



MESSAGE POINTS 



Friends (teammates) take care o<" Pn^h ^^ho. i-i,- • , ^ 

sure you-re friends don't drive aaerdr.nking. "^'^ '"^'^'"^ 



Have a friend sleep over 

Take their keys 

Drive them home yourself 

Know your limits 



fhesf tllh"""" - want fans to be aware of 

these techniques, fans should know their limits. 



APPROACH 



Use national and local spokespersons to convey the spirit of friendship 
among players, which carries over to their caring for fans/viewers - 
communicates forms of intervention that assure that fans/viewers can share 
good limes (more games) in the future. 



10 



CAMPAIGN 2 
TAG LINE 



Depending upon the spokesperson(s) used, either slogan i 



s applicabler 



TAKE AWAY THE KEYS. IT'S THE BIGGEST ASSIST YOU CAN MAKE 

PASS THE KEYS. IT'S THE BIGGEST ASSIST YOU CAN MAKE 
GIVE UP THE KEYS - IT-S A TURNOVER WE CAN ALL LIVE WITH 



11 



9 



CAMPAIGN #3 
DESIGNATED DRiyef 



12 



MESSAGE POINTS 

• When planning to go to the game (or to a friend»s house to watch 
the game on TV) designate someone who will not drink. This person 
will serve as the "designated driver", 

« The designated driver is a special person who takes care of his 
f riends. 

• You can have fun when you are the designated driver, 

• No one has to worry about "getting into trouble" on the way home 
from the game, 

• Teammates have positive attitudes (enthusiastic acceptance) toward 
designated driver 

APPROACH 

Use national and local spokesperson to promote the concept of the 
designated driver. This message needs to be communicated in a very positive 
light — and teammates must show acceptance of this concept. 



13 



TAG LINE 
Either slogan can be used — depending upon spokesperson(s) chosen. 

THE DESIGNATED DRIVER - OUR MOST-VALUABLE PLAYER - 
THE DESIGNATED DRIVER — A SIXTH MAN WE OAN'T LIVE WITHOUT 



14 



Additional thoughts . 



HEADLINE: 

PICTURE: 

COPY: 

HEADLINE: 
PICTURE: 



WARNING TO DRINKING DRIVERS 

Moses M alone 

Stay out of my lane 



WOULD YOU WANT ME TO DRIVE DRUNK 
Magic Johnson shooting 



15 




FINAL SCRIPTS 



6 

ERIC 



16 



TEAM SPOTS 
'H'edB Intro" 
October 30, 1985 



VIDEO 



AUDIO 



Open On game in progress, 



CELEBRIS 
PLAYER V/0: 



It happens on the court and 
off. 



One player is boxed In the 
corner — double-teamed. 
CUT TO clock winding down. 
CUT TO player passing to 
open man who makes the 
lay-up. 



You hear a lot of talk about a 
one-man team. But even the 
best players can't win a game 
al 1 by themselves. 



Teammate makes the basket. 
CUT TO players giving each 
other "high fives". CUT TO 
tipsy fan cheering on his 
way cut. 

CLOSEUP of Celebrity 
speaking on camera. 



CUT TO fan as friend Joins 
him. CLOSEUP, fan hands 
keys to friend. Player and 
coach leave court together. 
Two fans walk away together 
toward exit. 

SUPER: STOP DRINKING AND 
DRIVING. IT'S A TEAM 

erf 



CELEBRITY: 



The smart player knows when 
it's time to pass. 
And the team that works best 
together has the best chance of 
winning the game. 

We lose too meny lives when 
individuals take to the road 
after drinking. 

But if we work together^ we can 
cut those road losses. Join us 
in the fight against drinking 
and driving. IT'S A TEAM 
EFFORT. 



17 



TEAM SPOTS 
:10 "Tean- 
Nove«ber 16, 1985 



VIDEO 



AUDIO 



OPEN ON BOXED-IN PLAYER MAKING PASS TO 
OPEN MAN. CUT TO TIPSY FAN AND 
FRIEND. TIPSY FAN PASSES KEYS TO 
FRIEND, 

CLOSEUP ON CELEBRITY PLAYER. 

SUPER: Stop Drinking and Driving. 
It's a Team Effort. 



CELEBRITY 

PLAYER V/0: On the court ... and off 
• . . the smart player 
knows when to pass. We 
lose too"many lives to 
drinking and driving. 
Join us and cut those road 
losses. It's a team 
effort. 



18 



TEAM SPOTS 

:10 "Living Roora" 

Dece«bor 12, 1985 

YerbatlB 



VIDEO 



AUDIO 



OPEN ON GAME IN PROGRESS. 
CU ON CELEBRITY PLAYER. 



MAGIC 

JOHNSON V/0: 



SUPER: Stop Drinking and Driving, 
It's a Team Effort. 



If somebody Is having 
an off-night, take 
charge. We lose too 
many lives when fans 
drink and drive. So, 
have your friend pass 
the keys. It's the 
biggest assist he can 
make. 



J9 



ERIC 



TEAM SPOTS 
"Designated Driver* 
October 30* 198S 



Lone player walking toward 
locker room after the game. 
CUT TO lone fan/ returning 
home* coat over his 
shoulder* walking up walkway 
to his house. 
FLASHBACK: Player makes a 
great shot. , FLASHBACK: Fan 
is calmly driving home a 
group of rowdies. 
FLASHBACK: Basket is made, 
lights flash. 
CLOSEUP: Celebrity Player 
speaking on camera. 



Player reaches locker room 
and is greeted by happy 
coach. Fan opens front door 
and is greeted lovingly by 
his wife and child. 
SUPER: STOP DRINKING AND 
DRIVING. IT'S A TEAM 
EFFORT. 



CELEBRITY PLAYER 



V/O: 



CELEBRITY: 



There's one on every winning 
team. There should be one in 
every group of fans. The one 
guy who can be counted on when 
the team needs a lift. The one 
guy who* If necessary, can step 

and turn things around so 
everybody wins. 



lose too many lives when 
fans take to the road after 
drinking too much. So before 
you go to the game, choose the 
guy who'll drive you home. The 
Designated Driver. When you 
think about it that's your 
most valuable player I 



20 



TEAM SPOTS 

:10 "Flashback'' 

November 16, 1985 



VIDEO 



AUDIO 



OPEN ON LONE PLAYER WALKING TOWARD 
LOCKER ROOM AFTER GAME. CUT TO 
FLASHBACK: HE MAKES GREAT SHOT. CUT 
TO RETURNING FAN WALKING UP HIS WALK. 
CUT TO FLASHBACK: HE'S DRIVING GROUP 
OF ROWDY GUYS HOME. CU ON CELEBRITY 
PLAYER. 



SUPER: Stop Drinking and Driving. 
It's a Team Effort. 



CELEBRITY 

PLAYER V/0: There's a guy on every 

winning team: one you can 
count on to do the job 
when nobody else can. 
Before you go to the game, 
choose the guy who won't 
drink so he can drive you 
home. The Designated 
Driver: that's your most 
valuable player! 



21 



• 



TEAM PRESS RELEASE 



ERIC 



22 



FOR RELEASE TUESDAY Contact: Mr. Mike Impellezzerl, NHTSA 

December 24, 1985 Mr. Lou Priebe» NADA 

Mr. Jay Rosenstein, CBS 

Mr. Jerry Sachs, Capital Centre 

Mr. Gary Smith, GECICO 

Mr. Rick Welts, NEiA 



NEW TEAM LAUNCHED TO EVEN THE SCORE AGAINST DRUM<. DRIVING 

The National Basketball Association is one of the players on a new TEAM to reduce 
drinking and driving throughout our nation. TEAM was formed by Mr. Jerry Sachs, 
President of the Capital Centre and Executive Vice Presidont of the Washington 
Bullets, to promote techniques for Effective iilcohol {lanagenient in public 
facilities and other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. The roster 
Includf^".: 

THE NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION (NBA) 

THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF AUDITORIUM MANAGERS (lAAM) 

THE NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE DEALERS ASSOCIATION (NADA) 

THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES INSURANCE COMPANY (GEICO) 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM, INC. (CBS) 

NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION (NHTSA), 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT) 

Local affiliates of the lAAM are working with NHTSA In six cities to Implement 
policies and procedures that will control the misuse of alcohol In public 
assembly facilities to cre.ite a safer and more enjoyable entertainment 
atmosphere. In addition, all local TEAM members are working to form comnunity- 
based coalitions that will promote activities to reduce drinking and driving. 



23 



President Reagan announced the kick-off of TEAM's national campaign at a 
White House Press Conference on December 16, 1985. As part of this campaign, 
public service announcement starring Magic Johnson of the Los Angeles Lakers 1 
being aired on CBS during prime time and, starting December 25, will be aired 
during NBA games. 

The national coalition plans to provide support to all 23 NBA cities with the 
hopes that other sports leagues and community organizations will Join them to 
form a national "all star" TEAM to fight drinking and driving. 



24 



KIT FOR PUBLIC FACILITY MANAGERS 




25 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 

TEAM 

Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management 
What TEAM? 

In July of 1985, the National Basketball Association (NBA); CBS, Inc.; the International 
Association of Auditorium Managers (lAAM); Government Employees Insurance 
Company (GEICO); National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) and the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), part of the U.S. Department of 
Transportation formed a coalition to reduce drinking and driving throughout our 
nation. This coalition v/as organized to encourage public assembly facility owner.s and 
managers to work within their facilities and with their communities to promote 
Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management (TEA,M). 

WhaXDoes TEAM Wpnt to Acgomplfffi^^ 

The overall goal of ';.Vrs% .oic-jr-Ct is to demonstrate that public assembly facility owners 
and managers can w w-th^^r. their facilities and with their -omrnunities to create 
and implement policies and procedures that will effectively reduce the threat of 
drinking and driving. 

The specific objectives of this effort are to: create a more enjoyable entertainment 
atmosphere; promote effective crowd control; address safety issues that affect people 
when they travel to, attend, and leave sporting events in public assembly facilities; 
and to organize commu"nity coalitions that will promote activities to reduce the 
incidence of drinking and driving. 

In order to achieve these objectives, participating national parties are working to: 

• Promote responsible alcohol service by developing and implementing 
policies and procedures that enhance the safety of patrons, and reduce 
the potential liability to public facilities and servers that can occur 
when people drink and drive upon leaving events at facilities. 

• Foster an enjoyable, entertainment atmosphere at public facilities by 
reducing/eliminating the abuse of alcohol or other drugs by patrons. 




DRA FT 
January 16, 1986 

• Increase awareness of the dangers of drinking and driving and 
motivate the driving public to make their communities safer places to 
live. 

• Protect the well-being of patrons and citizens in the surrounding 
communities by reducing/eliminating instances of drinking and driving 
that may occur when people travel to and leave events at public 
facilities. 

• Provide leadership to stimulate their communities to carry out 
comprehensive efforts to deter and prevent drinking and driving and to 
increase safety belt use. 



Why Should I Join TRAM? 

Through their local affiliates, the NBA, (its member teams and players); CBS, Inc.; 
GEICO; NHTSAj and NADA will assist public assembly facility managers to stimulate 
their communities to join the fight against drinking and driving. At this time, these 
groups are developing national television spots and other public information materials 
that can be adapted for local use. 

In addition, the lAAM and NHTSA will work with public assembly facility managers to 
develop and implement alcohol and drug policies and procedures. In order to provide 
this assistance, lAAM and NHTSA are developing curricula for training management, 
service, and other appropriate staff. Once the training package has been refined, 
they will train instructors, develop ancillary manuals and other resources; and, along 
with other TEAM members, assist public facility managers to develop and evaluate 
community-based alcohol highway safety programs. 

Where Do We Go From Here? 

As previously indicated, the overall goal of the TEAM program is to encourage public 
facility owners and managers to work within their facilities and in their communities 
to promote techniques for the effective management of alcohol in order to reduce the 
tragic consequences of drinking and driving. National TEAM members have prepared 
this kit as an introduction to the TEAM program for potential TEAM members. 



2 

27 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 

This kit contains information on: 

^ the magnitude of the drinking driving problem, 

• how communities can work together to form local TEAMs to fight 
drinking and driving, and 

• background information for public facility managers that highlights the 
liability issues concerning the serving and consumption of alcohol and 
other drugs at facilities. 



FOR MORE INFORMATION, contact . . . 



Mike Impellizzeri 
TEAM Coordinator 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
U.S. Department of Transportation 
(202) 426-9581 



3 

28 



D RA I'T 
January 16, 1986 



DRINKING AND DRIVING FACT SHEET 

Listed below are national statistics describing the nature of the drinking driving 
problem. The first section contains information on drinking and driving incidents, the 
second, describes alcohol consumption and driving, and the third section contains 
drinking and driving statistics specific to teenagers and young adults. We have a long 
way to go in the elimination of drinking and driving. The information below only 
begins to describe the drinking driving problem. It doesn^t address the numbers of 
people who are seriously injured and permanently disabled, or the families who are 
living victims of drunk driving incidents. 

Drinkin ? and Driving Incidents 

1. More than half of all Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related traffic 
crash in their lifetime. 

2. Over the last 10 years, 250,000 Americans lost their lives in alcohol-related 
traffic crasheSr This is 25,000 deaths each year; 500 every week; 71 every day, 
and 1 every 20 minutesc 

3. Approximately 540,000 people are injured each 'y^^r in alcohol-related crashes; 
about 52,000 of them seriously. 

4. Traffic crashes are the greatest single cause of death for Americans between the 
ages of 5 and 34; alcohol is involved in at least half of these fatal crashes. 

5. About 43 percent of all fatal crashes involve a drinking driver or pedestrian; 
between 45 percent and 50 percent of ali fatally injured drivers were considered 
legally intoxicated in most States. 

6. The fatally injured victims of alcohol-involved crashes include the following; 52 
percent of the victims are the alcohol-involved drivers themselves; 11 percent 
are drinking pedestrians; 20 percent are passengers in the drinking driver^s 
vehicle; and the remaining 17 percent are passengers, drivers or pedestrians not 
in the drinking driver's vehicle. 



4 

29 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 



Alcohol C onsumption aaci Driving 

Beer accounts for half of all the alcohol consumed in this country. 

Between 7 p.m. and 3 a.m. on weekends, in some parts of the country, 10 
percent of all drivers are legally impaired or drunk. 

During the period between midnight and 4 a.m. on any night of the week, 
between 75 percent and 90 percent of all fatally injured drivers had been 
drinkiag prior to the crash. 



Drinking and Driv ing ~ Teen agers and Yount^^ Adults 

Although 16-24 year olds comprise only 20 percent of the licensed drivers in this 
country and account for less than 20 percent of the total vehicle miles traveled, 
they are involved in 42 percent of all fatal alcohol-related crashes. 

Drivers between 16 and 24 have twice as many fatal crashes per mile driven as 
older drivers. When alcohol is involved, the fatal crash rate of young drivers is 
three times greater than that of older drivers. 

Approximately 9,000 people between 15 and 24 years old were killed in 
alcohol-related traffic crashes in 1984. Additionally, approximately 200,000 15 to 
24 year olds were injured. 

Almost 60 percent of the fatally-injured teenage drivers (aged 15-19) were 
drinking prior to their crash. Forty-three percent were legally intoxicated, 
according to the laws in most states. 



30 



DRAPT 
January 16, 1986 



DRAM SHOP LAWS AND LIABILITY PROTECTION 
In many states, the passage of Dram Shop Laws which make the server of alcohol 
responsible for damages caused by drinking drivers, has spurred renewed interest by 
public assembly facilities and other servers of alcohol in developing alcohol policies. 
Operators are concerned because there has been a 300 percent increase in the number 
of liability cases over the past two years and a 500 percent increase in liquor liability 
insurance costs during the same time period. Fortunately, there are many ways 
facility management can protect themselves fr. :n exemplary damages under common 
law by having responsible business policies a,:i practices regarding the serving :f 
alcoholic beverages. 

Currently^over twenty states provide fo r dram shop liability action under statutory 
laws. Seventeen additional states now provide dram shop liability under caseTaw. 
these instances, an injured third party can bring common law negligence action 
against a liquor licensee. Facility managers are urged to contact their legal counsel 
to identify dram shop liabilities in their own state. 

While the laws vary among states, typical dram shop law which would apply to public 
assembly facilities that have been licensed to sell alcoholic beverages might include: 

• Licenses will be held liable in a negligence action for the damages caused 
by serving alcoholic beverages to minors or intoxicated persons. 

• Punitive damages may be awarded if it can be proven that the service of 
alcoholic beverages was "reckless" where, for example, there was active 
encouragement of the intoxicated person to continue drinking. 



How Do You Protect Yourself Prom T ,flrf^ Li ability Claimsr 

A facility operator can mjnimjge risks against exemplary liability damages or the loss 
of a liquor license by developing a set of policies regarding the serving of alcoholic 
beverages. By doing this, the establishment is more apt to be viewed favorably by 
the courts if a patron is involved in an alcohol-related crash. In general, these 
policies include: 



6 



31 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 



1. Admission Policies that address the issue of patrons attempting to bring 
alcohol or other drugs into the facility; 

2. Responsible Sales and Vending Policies that address the guidelines to be 
followed by concessionaires when serving alcoholic beverages; 

3. Alternative Transportation Policie s for publicizing alternative transportation 
that is available for patrons who have been drinking and want to avoid 
driving. 

4. Public "mat ion Policies through which facility procedures are publicized 
and patrons ar- made aware of the risks of d^^nking and driving. 

Examples of procedures that can be instituted to support these four major policy 
areas are listed on the following pages. By reviewing the list and deciding whether 
the procedure can be instituted, you will have taken the first ste p in the development 
of policies and procedures for your facility. 

Once the policies and procedures are selected, it is important that ; A) the policy and 
specific procedures be in written form and be approved by facility counsel; B) the 
management and staff be formally trained and skilled in properly implementing 
procedures; C) facility patrons be informed about specific in-house policies through 
the use of sign-ins, public address announcements, and the like; and, d) the 
community is informed about these in-house policies and procedures. 

A number of alcohol management training programs are available to give you and your 
staff some real solutions to the alcohol abuse problem. They will increase your 
employee's knowledge and professionalism in coping with abusers of alcohol and help 
protect you from exemplary damages resulting from any accidents caused by patrons 
leaving your facility. 

For information on programs in your area, contact your State Governor's Highway 
Safety Representative. 



32 



SPECIFIC IN-HOUSE PROCEDURES 
A Checklist 



A ( J«t5?lQn Procedures 



Check all coolers and confiscate alcoholic 
beverages patrons attempt to bring 
Into the facility. 

Check IDs of people carrying alcoholic 
beverages and confiscate false IDs. 

Monitor all patrons entering the premises 
for apparent Intoxication. Inform security 
and concessionaires of any patrons whose 
sobriety 1s In question. 

Do not allow alcoholic beverages to be 
carried from the facility's restaurant to 
the arena or auditorium area. 

Provide management and security staff support 
and back up when a patron is denied admission. 

Increase visibility of parking lot patrols to 
discourage drinking 1n the parking areas before 
and after the event. 

Announce the exiting policies after each event. 

Monitor all patrons for signs of apparent 
intoxication. 

Prohibit patrons from exiting with alcoholic 
beverages which have been sold on the premises. 

Prohibit patrons from loitering or remaining in 
their cars in the parking areas. 

Show that the facility supports local police if 
they should select to set up sobriety check 
points nearby. 



8 



33 



DRAFT 

January 16/ 1986 



Responsible Sale s and Yftn ding Procedures 
Identifying and Serving Legal Drinkers 

1^-^:5 NLq Mavbe 

o Require that patrons show a valid photo ID, 

• Confiscate false IDs. 

• Require IDs from any patron up to 25 years of age, 

• Hand stamp patrons after validating proper IDs, 

• Make periodic ID checks for under-aged drinking 
in the stands. 



Liniting Sales and Quantity of Liquor 

Yes Hq^ Maybe 

• Limit the number of drinks patrons can purchase 

at each transaction. 



• Prohibit the use of beer dispensers. 

• Limit the size of containers of alcoholic 
beverages sold at the facility. 

• Prohibit the sale of alcoholic beverage In 
cans or bottles. 



• Require facility bars to use "measured pourers" 
on liquor bottles so that drinks are more apt 
to be properly mixed. 

• Require that food be made available whenever 
alcoholic beverages are sold. 



9 

34 



DRAFT 

January 16, 1986 



Considering the Nature of the Event 



IS^ to Mavbe 



When appropriate to the nature of the event, 
non-alcoholic cocktails and/or beer should 
be made aval 1 able. 

Based on the nature of the event, discontinue 
alcoholic beverage service at a pre-determined 
time prior to the end of the event. 

Management and security staff should b? put on 
alert when service Is terminated during an event. 

In-stands vending of alcoholic beverages should 
be carefully monitored or eliminated depending 
upon the nature of the event and t he a nxiety 
level of the patrons. 

The facility management should, when appropriate, 
designate non-drinking seating areas. 

When an event Is Intended for young adults, 
special consideration should be given to 
limiting the sale of alcoholic beverages to 
prevent slightly older peers from purchasing 
alcoholic drinks for those underage. 

Exercise special attention and creativity In 
developing and promoting non-alcoholic beverages 
and food (menus, table tent displays, 
signs, etc.). 




10 



.^5 



DRAFT 

January 16, 1985 

Llaltlng Alcohol Sales Prxnootlons 

le^ ^ Mavbe 

• Special policies should be developed for Trade 
Show Exhibitors who vend alcoholic beverages who 
may not be Included under the facility serving 
policy guidelines. For example/ beer 
distributors who provide free samples to 
trade-show patrons.. 



• Prohibit "last calls" and other countdown 

techniques designed to promote the last-minute 
consumption of alcoholic beverages before 
customers begin to drive home. 

o Prohibit any over-reaching promotions which 
would encourage any form of alcohol abuse or 
emphasis on quantity or frequency of consumption, 
e.g., beer commercial on the screen at half time. 



• Prohibit promotions that unduly stimulate the 
sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages, 
e.g., "the winner of the half-time basketball 
shooting contest wIlTwIn a free keg of beer." 

• Prohibit the practice of automatically bringing 
drinks to patrons. 

• Separate the "fun" of an event from the "need 
for Intoxication" In the writing of all messages 
promoting the sale of alcoholic beverages. 

© Require that alcoholic beverage signs be turned 
off or covered when patrons are primarily 
underage or when alcoholic beverages are not 
being sold. 

• Develop standard procedures for cutting off a 
patron from more drinking, e.g. minimize 
confrontation, call security, notify parents if 
the patron is a minor. 



11 

.^6 



DRAFT 

January 16, 1986 



Alternative Transp ortation Pro cQdures 

1^ fto Mavbe 

• Arrange alternate transportation for intoxicated 
patrons, e.g. call a cab. 

• Encourage the formation of alternate forms of 
transportation for groups and Individual patrons 
to avoid driving after drinking. 

• Form and publicize a designated driver program. 

• Form and public e ? Dial-A-R-^de program. 



^ ubHc Inforaa tlopi Procedure s 

Printed Messages 

Yes tto Mayb^ 

• Post signs near concession stands, bars and on 
the trays of vendors selling beverages In the 
stands/ indicating that this facility does not 
serve minor >. 



Post signs near enXf arices and exits iih; -.'ting 
that no alcoholic beverages may be brought In or 
be allowed to be taken from this facility. 

Post signs in washrooms warning of the risks and 
dangers of drinking and driving. 



Print messages on the back of tickets indicating 
that minors are not served alcoholic beverages. 

Print anti-drinking/driving messages on napkins, 
placemats in the facility restaurant, coasters, 
popcorn boxes, table tents, and other paper goods 
used to serve patrons. 



Use unrented in-house billboard space for 
drinking and driving messages* 



12 



37 



DRAFT 

January 16# 1986 

Electronic Message Boards 

les. tla Mavbe 

• Use electronic message boards to warn of the risks 
of drinking and driving and to Inform patrons of 
positive steps they can take to minimize 
those risks. 



Design special effects and other graphic 
techniques to complement the words. 



Videoscreen Messages 

les. tiQ. Maybe 

• Broadcast drunk driving public service 
anfiouncements. 




• Produce your own PSAs using athletes* stars* and 



personalities known to the patrons of a 
particular event. 

• Use silent word messages during noisy half tYmes. 
Several slogans in rotation can be effective. 



Public Address Annour>cef i )^ ntr? 

Yss. tto Mavbe 

• Make announcements before events Indicating 

in-house policies regarding: bringing alcoholic 
beverages to the facility* serving minors* cutting 

off intoxicated patrons* and the like. 



Make announcements during breaks* at half time* and 
intermissions about the risks of drinking and 
driving and some things patrons can do. 
For example* suggest a designated driver and 
other positive messages. 




13 



38 



Make announcements after events Indicating the 
In-house policy regarding exiting the facility 
with alcoholic beverages/ loitering and drinking 
In the parking areas. 

Make announcements at the end of events about the 
facility's alternate forms of transportation such 
as the designate driver program* safe rides 
program* or shuttle bus services. 



Special Project Ideas 



Promote non-alcoholic mixed drinks at concession 
stands. For example* "Non-alcchol 1c 
Drinks for Drivers." 

Ask local businesses to buy in-house billboard 
space and post a drunk driving message. 

Have a billboard contest with local high schools. 
The winner will have his/her billboard posted, 
in the facll Ity . 

Start some alternate forms of Transportation 
programs such as a Safe Rides Program* Designated 
Driver Program* Shuttle Bus Service* and the like. 



39 



ORAl-r 
January 16, I'jgG 



PLANNING CAMPAIGNS AND PUBLIC INFORMATION PROGRAMS 
TO REDUCE DRINKING AND DRIVING 

There are numerous opportunities and media through -.vhich you can reach people with 
drinking/driving messages. In your facility you can post signs, print messages on 
paper goods, enter messages on the electronic message board, and others. In the 
community you can encourage television and radio stations to air anti-drunk driving 
PSAs and write editorials for newspapers. Listed below are suggestions for in-house 
public information activities and others that can be undertaken as part of a 
community-based campaign. 



Developing In-house P ublic Inform ation Actiyitj^s 

Effective Messages and Slogans 

There are many ways that patrons of public facilities can receive drinking and driving 
messages. The procedures listed below contain ideas that have been used in 
public/assembly facilities across the c;ountry. 

Printed Messages 

• Post signs near concession stands, bars and on the trays of vendors selling 
beverages in the stands, indicating that this facility does not serve minors. 

• Post signs near entrances and exits indicating that no alcoholic beverages 
raay be brought in or taken from this facility. 

• Post signs in washrooms warning of the risks and dangers of drinking and 
driving. 

• Print messages on the back of tickets indicating that minors are not served 
alcoholic beverages. 

• Print anti-drinking/driving messages on napkins, placemats in the facility 
restaurant, coasters, popcorn boxes, table tents, and other paper goods used 
to serve patrons. 

• Use unrented in-house billboard space for drinking and driving messages. 



40 



DRA FT 
Jonuary 16, 1986 



Electronic Message Boards 

• Use electronic message boards to warn of the risks of drinking and driving 
and to inform patrons of positive steps they can take to minimize those 
risks. 

• Design special effects and other graphic techniques to complement the 



Yideoscreen Messages 

• Broadcast drunk driving public service announcements, 

• Produce your own PSAs using athletes, stars, and personalities known to 
the patrons of a particular event. 

• Use silent word messages during noisy half times. Several slogans in 
rotation can be effective. 



Public Address Announcements 

« Make announcements before events indicating in-house policies regarding: 
bringing alcoholic beverages to the facility, serving minors, cutting off 
intoxicated patrons, and the like. 

« Make announcements during breaks, at half time, and intermissions about 
the risks of drinking and driving and some things patrons can do. For 
example, suggest a designated driver and other positive messages. 

9 Make announcements after events indicating the in-house policy regarding 
exiting the facility with alcoholic beverages, loitering and drinking in the 
parking areas. 

• Make announcements at the end of events about the facility's alternate 
forms of transportation such as the designated driver program, safe rides 
program, or shuttle bus services. 



Special Project Ideas 

o Promote non-alcoholic mixed drinks at concession stands. For example, 
"Non-alcoholic Drinks for Drivers." 

• Ask local businesses to bay in-house billboard space and post a drunk 
driving message. 



words. 



If) 




DRAFT 
January 16, 198G 



« Have a billboard contest with local high schools. The winner will have 
his/her billboard posted in tho facility. 

e Start some alternate forms of Transportation Drcgrams such as a Safe Rides 
Program, Designated Driver Program, Shuttle Bus Service, and the like. 

Once you have decided on the Public Information Procedures that are to be used, 
decisions must be made regarding the specific themes and slogans. The lists below 
contain themes and slogans that have been developed for general sporting events and 
for specific sports such as basketball. For printed items such as signs, posters or 
catchy taglines for video screen messages these slogans can help increase your 
patrons* awareness to the dangers of driving after drinking. 



General Sporting Events 

The best thing about a road game is getting home safely — Don't drink and 
drive. 

If a friend has had too much to drink, bench him — take away his keys — 
DonH drink and drive. 

Give up the keys, it's a turnover everyone can live with — Don't drink and 
drive. 

Teammates and friends take care of each other. Don't drink and drive. 

Play on the team that knows the score. Don't drink and drive. 

Keep your team together. Don't drink and drive. It's a TEAM effort. 

Help cut our road losses. Don't drink and drive. It's a TEAM effort. 

Drinking is not a road game. Stop drinking and driving. It's a TEAM effort. 

We care about you. Don't Drink and Drive. 

The drinking driver. He»s not on our team. 

Drinking and driving, a game you can't win. 

The designated driver is your most valuable player. 

Who's driving home from the game? Don't drink and drive. 

17 



EKLC 



42 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 



Your life may depend on how much someone else drinks before they drive. 
Drinking and driving, why risk it? 

Football 

The blitz is on against drinking drivers. 

Who will quarterback your ride home? Don't drink and drive. 

Our goal is to make sure you get home safely. Don't drink and drive. 

The safety blitz is on ... against the drinking driver. 

A good defense against a drinking driver is to wear your safety belt home. 
Wear your safety belt — a good defense against a drinking driver. 

Basketball 
Don't foul out — don't drink and drive. 

The designated driver ~ our most valuable player. Don't drink and drive. 

The designated driver ~ a sixth man we can't live without. 

Pass the keys, it's the biggest assist you can make. Don't drink and drive. 

If a friend has had too much to drink — Take away his keys. It's a 
man-to-man defense. 

If a friend has had too much to drink — Take away his keys. It's a legal steal. 

The best thing about a road game is coming home safely. 

Know when to shoot and when to pass the keys. Don't drink and drive. 

Concerts 

Enjoy the memories of the concert by riding with an alcohol-free driver. 

Don't be drunk driven home. 

Friends don't let friends drive drunk. 

A drunk driving crash is a sound you don't want to hear. 

18 

43 



DRAI'T 
January 16, 1986 



• Your life may depend on how much someone else drinks before they drive. 

• Celebrate the concert with care. Don't drink and drive. 

• Wear your safety belt home and don't drink and drive. 

As an additional defense against liability, facility management and staff should 
publicize in-house policies when speaking in the community. Let people know that 
management and staff have been properly trained in the serving of alcoholic 
beverages. It would be beneficial to show that training is a pre-condition to 
employment and that training and refresher training sessions for full- and part-time 
employees are scheduled on a regular basis. 

Athletes can be asked to mention their concern about the drinking driving problem 
and relate how their home facility is on the TEAM to fight drunk driving. This will 
further establish the facility as a leader or model within the community and should 
further serve as a hedge against exemplary liability claims. 

Developing Community-Wide Public Information Activities 

Once the public information procedures have been implemented in your facility, you 
can help to develop public information activities in your community. This will help 
reinforce the messages patrons are receiving in the facility and increase the 
awareness of the general population to this serious problem. 

In developing a message, and the theme and appeal that you are going to use to 
convey it, it is important to think about the effect that you want that message to 
have on your target audience. Do you want to increase their awareness of the 
drinking driving problem; change their attitudes toward the acceptability of drinking 
and driving; increase their knowledge of the consequences of drinking and driving; 
change their drinking driving behavior; or motivate them to intervene to prevent 
others from drinking and driving. Identifying your message and the target audience 
to whom it will be communicated is the first step in developing your campaign to 
reduce drinking and driving. 

19 



44 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 



The next step in the development of your campaign is to identify the mediums 
through which your message will be communicated and to determine the number of 
times (exposure) the target audience will receive the message. Most public 
information campaigns are designed to last approximately 4-6 weeks. Given the 
optimal number of exposures to the message, this is the maximum length of a 
coordinated campaign. 



A coordinated campaign is one that uses several different mediums, e.g., TV (PSAs, 
editorials, talk show appearances) radio, posters, billboards, print ads, to name a few, 
to repeat and reinforce the same message. An additional consideration when 
developing your campaign is the use of influencers or significant others to help you 
get your message across. 

For example, if your target audience is young men, ages 18-24, who are sports fans, 
you might want to have a prominent sports figure speak at local high schools and 
colleges about the perils of drinking and driving. If your target audience is white 
collar males who drink a lot of three martini lunches, a respected CEO of a major 
corporation in the community might be asked to appear on a TV talk show. These 
significant others will increase and enhance the credibility and effectiveness of your 
campaign. 

There is a wealth of different media and activities available as possible carriers of 
drinking and driving messages. When deciding on which medium to use, consider the 
following questions: how many people will be exposed to the message (media coverage 
or readership); to what extent will particular target audiences be reached; to what 
extent will the prestige and credibility of the medium contribute to the effect of the 
message (media authority); and what are the economic consequences of the use of 
certain media (cost/effectiveness considerations). The following describes a variety of 
activities that can be undertaken during different times of the year using different 
mediums. 



20 

45 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 



Television 

Send a letter to each television Station manager to alert them to drunk driving 
issues, detailing your interest and outlining some of your activities. 

Schedule talk show appearances for professionals and citizens knowledgeable 
about drunk driving. 

Work with Public Affairs Directors to develop on-the-air editorials. 
Hold a press conference at the beginning of your campaign. 



Radio 

Ask the phone-in show hosts to schedule several forums to discuss the drunk 
driving issue during your campaign. 

Ask the stations to develop several editorials to be aired throughout the 
campaign. 

Give the stations the dates and locations of each of the high school proms ir 
their listening areas and encourage them to produce messages that would 
encourage alcohol-free driving during prom and graduation season. 



Print Media 

Develop a press kit (feature stories, fact sheets, press releases, decals, editorials, 
camera-ready logo sheets, brochures, law summaries, tragic stories of DWI 
victims, speakers, etc.) that can be tailored to suit special needs. 

Print the tip-of-the-week (or day) on how to spot drunk drivers in the 
newspaper. 

Submit a list of possible feature story angles to the editor of the paper. Also 
contact local free-lance writers who are always in search of a good topic. 

Persuade newspapers to publish a full page ad before each holiday as a public 
service. 



Speeches 

Organize a drunk driving Speaker's Bureau. 

Write sample speech sv^/ipts; use local uniform facts. 

Develop a Speaker's Bureau Brochure and distribute it widely. 

21 



46 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 



Signs, Posters, Message Boards 

Ask shopping malls, convention centers, high schools, police stations, etc, to post 
a drunk driving message on their scoreboards, public marquees, and moving 
message panels. 

Place posters in store-front windows (drug stores, grocery stores), in corporation 
hallways, on employee message boards, near elevators, in bar and restaurant rest 
rooms, and near public telephones. 

Develop and distribute bar signs: "Please don't ask me to serve minors," "We 
want you to have a good time, but we also want you back," "Non-alcoholic 
Drinks for Drivers Available." 



Brochures 

List in one single booklet a comprehensive community resource list. Include 
films, materials, speakers, volunteers, activist groups, countermeasure groups with 
contact names and phone numbers, treatment groups, community leaders who are 
involved in DWI issues, and a directory of national organizations that can 
provide even more resources. 

Develop a recipe booklet for non-alcoholic beverages or distribute one that is 
already developed. 



Other Printed Materials 

Approach billboard companies and ask for donated space for your message during 
their down-time. Ask local businesses to each sponsor one billboard. 

Meet with advertising and public relations agencies. Ask them to adopt this 
issue and encourage clients to sponsor events, subsidize printing and other 
projects, etc. 

Print envelope stuffers and offer them to businesses, organizations, associations 
and government agencies. These messages can be placed in pay envelopes. 

Print litter bags (filled with information). 

Print t-shirt messages. 

Print messages on bar and restaurant placemats, coasters, and napkins. 

Offer camera-ready art to be used on bottle bags in liquor and package stores, 
as well as grocery stores and drug stores. 



22 

47 



D RA FT 
January 16, 1986 



Develop pledge cards - young adults sign cards, co-signed with parent teacher 
club president, etc., using the theme "A Pledge for Life," "A Pact for Life " 
parlnts/^ elective with young adults in opening up communication channel's with 

Print your own letterhead - have a letterhead printed wiu. ndviaorN committee 
members, intermediaries, and others listed. This gives your group credibility. 

Print street banners - for city streets, fairs, special displays, in shopping 
centers, and for use in your arena or stadium. 



Special Projects 

Complete a cost breakdown of what one person (perhaps someone with several 
offenses) costs your community. Show that drunk driving is an economic 
liability. Refer to court expenses, health/hospital costs, insurance, police time 
and expenses, and the like. I'uiii-c umie 

Conduct a city-wide bartenders' contest to create the best non-alcoholic mixed 
drink. Present winning drinks at a conference along with printed recipes. 

Tow a crashed car to high schools and shopping center parking lots (or inside 
the mall) showing what a local victim's car looks like. A small sign could tell 
about the victim. Be certain to clear this with families, attorneys, etc. 

Stage a simulation of an entire drunk driving crash scene in the center of 
town. Make use of make up, police, demonstrate the "Jaws of Life," ambulance 
service, hospitals to give actual blood tests, and the like. Ask for hard news 
coverage. 

Sponsor free taxi courtesy cards for employees who over-imbibe. These would be 
passed out by organization heads at employees' orientation or at a special 
event. This would be signed by the taxi driver and be turned in by the 
employee for reimbursement. 



23 

48 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 



HOW TO DSE AND OBTAIN EXISTING MATERIALS FOR DEVELOPING YOUR 

PUBLIC INFORMATION CAMPAIGN 

Many organizations and communities have developed public information materials on 
drinking and driving that they are eager to share. In some instances, groups are 
willing to provide materials that can be adapted for local use. Others would prefer 
that you do not alter their materials. When requesting information make sure you find 
out the circumstances under which materials are being provided. 

Available materials include; television and radio public service announcements; 
posters; bumper stickers; print ads, films and lists of campaign themes and slogans 
which can be used in developing your own campaigns. Possible uses of these 
materials are suggested below: 

Adapt materials for local use. In cases where the material is appropriate for your 
community, it may be possible to simply secure the printing elements and tag each 
piece with your organization's name. 

Use the existing desigru You may like the message and format of a particular piece, 
but feel that some elements are not appropriate. You may choose to produce a new 
version by simply changing a few words or using your own photographs. Here, 
substantial cost savings can be realized in that the creative and development stages of 
production are eliminated. 

Gain ideas for new materials. Materials offer a wide range of subjects and ideas for 
further development. You may choose to combine or adapt several different pieces or 
develop entirely different approaches from those used previously. 



24 

49 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 



Specific Sources For Obtaining Campaign Materials 



Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc 

P.O. Box 182 

Madison Square Station 

New York, NY 10010 



American Automobile Association 
8111 Gatehouse Road 
Falls Church, VA 22042 



American Automobile Association Foundation for Traffic Safety 

8111 Gatehouse Road 
Falls Church, VA 22402 



American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association 

123 North Pitt Street 
Alexandria, VA 22314 



American Medical Association 
Safety Education Department 
535 North Dearborn Street 
Chicago, IL 60610 



Distilled Spirits CouncU of the United States, Inc 

Education Department 
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Washington, DC 20004 



Mental Health Materials Center 

30 East 29th Street 
New York, NY 10016 



National Association of Governors' Highway Safety Representatives 
444 North Capitol, N.W. 
Suite 524 

Washington, DC 20001 



National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors 
444 North Capitol, N.W. 
Suite 530 

Washington, D.C. 20001 



25 



50 



National Audiovisual Center 

General Services Administration 
Washington, D.C. 20409 
(301)763-1896 (Information Services) 



National Clearinghouse for Alcohol Information 
P.O. Box 2345 
Kensington, MD 20852 



National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information 
P.O. Box 416 

Kensington, MD 20795 



National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information 

Room llA-21 
5600 Fishers Lane 
Rockville, MD 20852 



National Council on Alcoholism 

Publications Department 

733 Third Avenue 

Suited 1410 

New York, NY 10017 



National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 

Department of Transportation 
400 7th Street, S.W. 
Washington, DC 20590 



National Safety Council 
444 North Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60611 

National Technical Information Service 

Springfield, VA 22151 



Traffic Safety Now, Inc. 

c/o Motor Vehicles Manufacturers Association 
1620 I Street, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20006 



51 

20 




January 16, 1986 



D.S. Brewers Association 
Alcohol Programs Division 
1750 K Street, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20006 



U.S. Government Printing Office 

Superintendent of Documents 

Washington, DC 20402 

202-783-3238 (Orders and Information) 




52 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 

STATE-LEVEL PROGRAMS 

For information, contact these agencies: State Alcohol and/or Drug Abuse Authority, 
State Department of Education, State Department of Mental Public Health, State 
Department of Motor Vehicles, state Highway Safety, Department of Transportation, 
and the office of the Governor's Highway Safety Representative. 



53 

28 



DRAFT 
January 16, 1986 

CONTACTING POTENTIAL TEAM MEMBERS 
(Organizing the Community) 

Local affiliates of the TEAM national coalition are all committed to working with 
public facility managers to establish local programs that will promote activities to 
reduce drinking and driving. 

The success of a community-wide drinking and driving program depends on the active 
support and guidance of influential public officials and private citizens who have the 
trust and respect of the community. However, before you begin to contact potential 
TEAM members, find out what has been done, or is being done in your community to 
combat the drinking driving problem. You may end up joining someone else's team. 

Find out whether the mayor has appointed a task force on drinking and driving. 
Contact your local newspaper and speak to a reporter who has covered 
drinking/driving stories. Before you announce the first meeting, make sure you have 
a game plan that will enable you to create a winning team. 

You might consider contacting the Mayor, City Council members. Superintendent of 
Schools, Team Owners and Players, Police Chief, Congressman, Newspaper Publisher, 
Public Health Authority, Head of Local Alcohol Authority, Head of Retail Liquor 
Board, Traffic Court Judge, Local Church Leaders, Ethnic Community Leaders, Jaycees 
President, United Way Director, Television Station owners, and others to join the 
TEAM. 

Seek out people who can be counted on for support throughout the life of the 
project. Make sure you attract individuals with skills and resources directly related 
to your program, in addition to persons who offer status or money. Look for 
committee members with special qualifications, such as policy-making authority in local 
government or in an organization that comes in contact with potential or actual drunk 
drivers. Other valuable qualifications of members include knowledge of and access to 
the media and ability to mobilize volunteer groups. 



54 



DRA FT 
January 16, 1986 



The first meeting will be important. Invite potential committee members by letter. 
Describe the extent of the problem in your community and what is being done about 
it. Reinforce your invitation with available statistics pertaining to the drinking 
driving problem in your community. 

At the first meeting, present potential members with an overview of the program: the 
objectives, a list of related needs in terms of funding and resources, and 
recommendations on how they can assist with the program's design and ^ 
implementation. Obtain their commitment to the program byJdBfl-tifying a specific 
activity or committee on which they can work. '""^-^ — --^'^ 



55