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Helping Texans Turn Information into Knowledge: Agency 
Strategic Plan, Fiscal Years 2003-2007. 

Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Austin. 
2002 - 00-00 
120p . 

Texas State Library and Archives Commission, P.O. Box 12927, 
Austin, TX 78711-2927. Tel: 512-463-5460; Fax: 512-463-5436. 
For full text: 

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^Library Planning; Mission Statements; ^Organizational 
Objectives; State Agencies; State Government; State 
Libraries; ^Strategic Planning 
Texas; *Texas State Library 



ABSTRACT 

This document presents the Texas State Library and Archives 
Commission Agency Strategic Plan for fiscal years 2003-2007. Contents include 
an overview outlining the vision, mission, philosophy and goals of .the Texas 
State Government and the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and 
eight chapters: Overview of Our Agency Scope and Functions; Organizational of 
Our Agency; Fiscal Aspects; Service Population Demographics and Economic 
Variables; Technological Developments; Impact of Federal Statutes and 
Regulations; Other Legal Issues; and Self-Evaluation and Opportunities for 
Improvement. Appendixes include: the Agency’s planning process and timetable; 
Agency organization chart; five-year projections for outcomes; measure 
definitions; workforce plan; survey of organizational excellence results; and 
information resources policies and practices . (AEF) 




Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made 
from the original document. 



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Texas State Library and 
Archives Commission 




Helping Texans 

Turn Information Into Knowledge 



PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE AND 
DISSEMINATE THIS MATERIAL HAS 
BEEN GRANTED BY 



E. Seidenberg 



TO THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 
INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC) 

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Agency Strategic Plan 
Fiscal Years 2003-2007 
June 2002 



dfpartment of education 

^Educational Research and Improvement 
IONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION 
CENTER (ERIC) 

iocument has been reproduced as 
red from the person or organization 
ating it. 

- changes have been made to 
>ve reproduction quality. 



oints of view or opinions stated in this 
ocument do not necessarily represent 
fficial OERI position or policy. 



2 




o 

ERIC 



Helping Texans Turn 
Information Into Knowledge 



Texas State Library and Archives Commission 
Agency Strategic Plan 
Fiscal Years 2003-200 7 



Carolyn Palmer, Chairman 


1995-2001 


San Antonio 


Sandy Melton 


1995-2001 


Dallas 


Sandra J. Pickett 


1995-2003 


Liberty 


Kenneth Carr 


1997-2003 


El Paso 


Chris A. Brisack 


2000-2005 


Edinburg 


Elizabeth Sanders 


2000-2005 


Arlington 








Pe|if/ Q. Rudd, Director and Librarian 











CarolyfT Palmer, Chairman 



June 17, 2002 



3 



TEXAS STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES COMMISSION 
CATALOGING IN PUBLICATON DATA 

Texas State Library and Archives Commission. 

Helping Texans turn information into knowledge : agency 
strategic plan, fiscal years 2003-2007. - Austin, TX : 

Texas State Library and Archives Commission, [2002] 
p. : ill. ; 28 cm. 

“June 2002.” 

Cover title. 

1. Texas State Library and Archives Commission. 

2. State libraries - Texas - Planning. I. Title. 

II. Title: Agency strategic plan fiscal years 2003-2007. 



Comments or complaints regarding programs and services of the 
Texas State Library and Archives Commission may be addressed to: 

Director and Librarian 
PO Box 12927 
Austin, TX 78711-2927 
512-463-5460; fax 512-463-5436 

Copies of this publication are available in alternate format upon request. 

Published by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission 

June 2002 

www.tsl.state.tx.us 




and Archives 
Commission 



ERIC 



Helping Texans Turn Information Into Knowledge 



Table of Contents 



Overview 



Texas State Government 

Vision, Mission, and Philosophy i 

Priority Goals and Benchmarks iii 

Texas State Library and Archives Commission 

Vision, Mission, and Philosophy v 

Agency Goals, Objectives, Strategies, and Measures vii 



External/Internal Assessment 



Chapter One Overview of Our Agency Scope and Functions 1 

A. Our Enabling Statutes and Administrative Rules 

B. Agency History and Significant Events 

C. Affected Populations 

D. Our Main Functions 

E. Public Perception 



Chapter Two Organization of Our Agency 7 

A. Size and Composition of Our Workforce 

B. Our Organizational Structure and Process 

C. Our Location and the Impact of Geography on our Operations 

D. Location of Our Service Populations 

E. Our Human Resources Strengths and Weaknesses 

F. Our Capital Asset Strengths and Weaknesses 

G. Our Use of Historically Underutilized Businesses 

H. Key Events, Areas of Change, and Their Impact 



Chapter Three Fiscal Aspects 15 

A. Size of Our Budget (trends in expenditures) 

B. Method of Finance 

C. Per Capita and Other States’ Comparisons 

D. Budgetary Limitations (appropriation riders) 

E. Degree to Which Our Budget Meets Current and Future Needs and 
Expectations 

F. Agency Benchmarks 

Chapter Four Service Population Demographics and Economic Variables 19 



Chapter Five Technological Developments 23 

A. Impact of Technology on Current Operations 

B. Degree of Agency Automation and Telecommunications 

C. Impact of Anticipated Technological Advances 

D. Direction of Agency Automation and Telecommunications 

Chapter Six Impact of Federal Statutes and Regulations 37 

A. Historical Involvement of Federal Government 

B. Description of Current Federal Activities 

C. Anticipated Impact of Future Federal Actions 



Chapter Seven Other Legal Issues 41 

A. Impact of Anticipated Statutory Changes 

B. Impact of Current and Outstanding Court Cases 

C. Impact of Local Government Requirements 



Chapter Eight Self-Evaluation and Opportunities for Improvement 43 

A. Meeting Legal Requirements and Serving Critical Populations 

B. Agency Characteristics Requiring Improvement 

C. Key obstacles 

D. Opportunities 

E. Relationship with Local, State, and Federal Entities 

F. Available Key Technological, Capital, Human, and Community 
Resources 

G. Employee Perception 



Appendices 



Appendix A Agency's Planning Process and Timetable A-l 

Appendix B Agency Organization Chart B-l 

Appendix C Five-Year Projections for Outcomes C-l 

Appendix D Measure Definitions D-l 

Appendix E Workforce Plan E-l 

I. Overview E-l 

II. Current Workforce Profile (Supply Analysis) E-2 

III. Future Workforce Profile (Demand Analysis) E-7 

IV. Gap Analysis E- 1 0 

V. Strategy Development E-ll 

VI. Conclusion E-l 2 

Appendix F Survey of Organizational Excellence Results F-l 

Appendix G Information Resources Strategic Plan G- 1 

I. Goals, Objectives, and Strategies G-l 

II. Databases and Applications G-3 

III. Information Resources Policies and Practices G-10 



Texas State Government 
Vision, Mission, and Philosophy 



From Planning for Progress: The Statewide Strategic Planning Elements for Texas State Government 
Governor Rick Perry 
March, 2002 



Vision 

Working together, I know we can accomplish our mission and achieve these priority goals for our 
fellow Texans: 

To assure open access to an educational system that not only guarantees the basic core 
knowledge necessary for citizenship, but also emphasizes excellence in all academic and 
intellectual undertakings; 

To provide for all of Texas' transportation needs of the new century; 

To meet the basic health care needs of all Texans; 

To provide economic opportunities for individual Texans and provide an attractive 
economic climate with which to attract and grow businesses; and 

To provide for the safety and security of all within our border. 



Mission 

Texas State Government will be limited, efficient, and completely accountable. It will foster 
opportunity, economic prosperity, and family. The stewards of the public trust will be men and 
women who administer state government in a fair, just, and responsible manner. To honor the 
public trust, state officials will seek new and innovative ways to meet state government priorities 
within its financial means. 



Overview 



The Philosophy of Texas State Government 



The task before all state public servants is to govern in a manner worthy of this great state. We are 
a great enterprise, and as an enterprise we will promote the following core principles. 

> First and foremost, Texas matters most. This is the overarching, guiding principle by 
which we will make decisions. Our state, and its future, is more important than party, 
politics, or individual recognition. 

> Government should be limited in size and mission, but it must be highly effective in 
performing the tasks it undertakes. 

> Decisions affecting individual Texans are best made by those individuals, their families, 
and the local governments closest to their communities. 

> Competition is the greatest incentive for achievement and excellence. It inspires ingenuity 
and requires individuals to set their sights high. An just as competition inspires excellence, 
a sense of personal responsibility drives individual citizens to do more for their future, and 
the future of those they love. 

> Public administration must be open and honest, pursuing the high road rather than the 
expedient course. We must be accountable to taxpayers for our actions. 

> Finally, state government should be humble, recognizing that all its power and authority is 
granted to it by the people of Texas, and those who make decisions wielding the power of 
the state should exercise their authority cautiously and fairly. 

Aim high... we are not here to achieve inconsequential things ! 




Overview 
- ii - 



Texas State Government 
Priority goals and benchmarks 



From Planning for Progress: The Statewide Strategic Planning Elements for Texas State Government 
Governor Rick Perry 
March, 2002 



Education (public schools): 

To ensure that all students in the public education system are at grade level in reading and math by 
the end of the third grade, continue reading and developing math skills at appropriate grade level 
through graduation, demonstrate exemplary performance in foundation subjects, and acquire the 
knowledge and skills needed to be responsible and independent Texans. 

Benchmarks 

Percent of students from third grade forward who are able to read at or above grade level. 

Percent of students who achieve continued mastery of the foundation subjects of reading, 
English language arts, math, social studies, and science. 

Education (higher education): 

To provide an affordable, accessible, and quality system of higher education that prepares 
individuals for a changing economy and workforce and that furthers the development and 
application of knowledge through instruction, research and public service. 



Benchmarks 

Percent of Texans with a bachelor’s degree or higher. 

Number of Texans who obtain a vocational/technical certificate or associate degree. 

Health and human services: 

To reduce dependence on public assistance through an efficient and effective system that promotes 
the health, responsibility, and self-sufficiency of individuals and families. 



Benchmarks 

Percent of people completing vocational rehabilitation services employed. 




Overview 
- iii - 



9 



Public safety and criminal justice: 



To protect Texans from crime by quick and fair enforcement of laws, maintain statewide 
emergency and disaster preparedness and response, police public highways, and to confine, 
supervise and rehabilitate offenders. 

Benchmarks 

Percent of Texas communities covered by current emergency and disaster 
prevention/recovery plans. 

Juvenile violent crime arrest rate per 100,000 population. 

Adult violent crime arrest rate per 1 00,000 population. 

Economic development: 

To foster economic opportunity, job creation, capital investment, and infrastructure development 
by promoting a favorable business climate, addressing transportation and housing needs, and 
developing a productive workforce. 

Benchmarks 

Median household income. 

Number of new small businesses created. 

General government: 

To support effective, efficient, and accountable state government operations and to provide 
citizens with greater access to government services while reducing service delivery costs. 



Benchmarks 

Total state spending per capita. 

State and local taxes per capita. 

Number of state services accessible by Internet. 

Savings realized by making reports/documents/processes available on the Internet. 




Overview 
- iv - 



10 



Texas State Library and Archives Commission 
Vision, Mission, and Philosophy 



Vision 

The people of Texas will have access to and effectively use information, archival resources, and 
library materials to improve their lives, the lives of their families, and their communities. All people 
will benefit from expanded opportunities and resources to explore diverse pathways to knowledge 
and wisdom. 



Mission 

The mission of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission is to safeguard significant 
resources, provide information services that inspire and support research, education and reading, 
and enhance the capacity for achievement of current and future generations. To accomplish this, 
we 

• preserve the record of government for public scrutiny, 

• secure and make accessible historically significant records and other valuable resources, 

• meet the reading needs of Texans with disabilities, 

• build and sustain statewide partnerships to improve library programs and services, and 

• enhance the capacity for achievement of individuals and institutions with whom we work. 



Philosophy 

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission and staff believe all Texans have the right to 
barrier-free access to library and information services that meet personal and professional needs 
and interests, provided by well-trained, customer-oriented staff. 

We pledge to adhere to the highest standards of honesty, integrity, and accountability. 

We strive to attain and hold the highest levels of public trust. 




Overview 
- v - 



11 



Texas State Library and Archives Commission 
Agency Goals, Objectives, Strategies, and Measures 



A. Goal: To improve the availability and delivery of library and information services for all 
Texans . [Government Code 441 .00 1 -.01 6, et. seq., 441.121-139; 44 1 . 1 01 1 06, 44 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 6; 441 .201 -.210; 
Human Resources Code 9 1.081 -.084] 



A. 1 Objective: Enable Texas libraries to avoid $ 1 .42 billion of costs between 2003 

and 2007 by sharing library resources. 

Outcome Measures: 1 . Percent of population living outside of the service areas of 

public libraries. 

2. Dollar value of cost avoidance achieved by library resource 
sharing. 



A. 1 . 1 Strategy: Share library resources among libraries statewide through Library of Texas, 

interlibrary loan, TexShare, and other projects. 



Output Measures: 



1 . Number of books and other materials made available/circulated 
by library resource sharing. 

2. Number of persons provided project-sponsored services by 
library resource sharing. 

3. Number of librarians and others trained or assisted to use shared 
resources. 



Efficiency Measures: 1 . Number of days of average turnaround time for interlibrary 

loans. 

2. Cost per book and other library material provided by shared 
resources. 




Overview 
- vii - 




A. 1 .2 Strategy: Provide services and grants to aid in the development of local libraries, 

including Loan Star Libraries grants, continuing education and consulting 
services, the Texas Reading Club, funding regional cooperative programs, and 
other grants. 



Output Measures: 


1 . Number of books and other library materials provided to local 
libraries. 

2. Number of persons provided local library project-sponsored 
services. 

3 . Number of librarians trained or assisted. 


Efficiency Measure: 


Cost per person provided local library project-sponsored 
services. 


A.2 Objective: 


Increase library use by Texans with disabilities to 8 percent of the 
eligible population by 2007. 


Outcome Measure: 


Percent of eligible population registered for Talking Book Program 
services. 



A.2.1 Strategy: Provide direct library service by mail to Texas citizens with disabilities from a 
centralized collection of large-print, Braille, and recorded books. 

Output Measures: 1 . Number of persons served. 

2. Number of institutions served. 

3. Number of volumes circulated. 

Efficiency Measures: 1 . Cost per person/institution served. 

2. Cost per volume circulated. 

Explanatory Measure: Number of Texans eligible for Talking Book Program service. 



Overview 



B. Goal: To improve the availability and delivery of information services to state govern- 
ment and to persons seeking current and historical information from state 
government. [Government Code 441.001, et. seq.; and Subtitle C, Title 6, Local Government Code] 



B.l Objective: Improve information services to state and local government offices, 

historical and family history researchers, and the public by achieving 
an annual satisfaction rating of 95 percent from customers seeking 
information and reference services. 

Outcome Measure: Percent of customers satisfied with State Library reference and 

information services. 



B. 1 . 1 Strategy: Provide legislators, staff, and the general public with ready access to needed 
government information from publications, documents, records, and other 
library resources. 



Output Measure: 
Efficiency Measure: 
Explanatory Measure: 



Number of assists with information resources. 

Cost per assist with information resources. 

Number of Web-based information resources used. 



C. Goal: To provide for the cost effective management of all state and local government 

records. [Subchapter L, Chapter 44 1 , Government Code; and Subtitle C, Title 6, Local Government Code] 



C.l Objective: Achieve a 95 percent annual records retention compliance rate for 

state agencies, and a 79 percent annual records retention compliance 
rate for local government offices by 2007. 



Outcome Measures: 1 . Percent of state agencies administering programs based on 

approved records schedules. 



2. Percent of local government offices administering programs 
based on approved records schedules. 

3. Dollar value of cost-avoidance achieved for state records 
storage/maintenance. 




Overview 
- ix - 

14 



C. 1 . 1 Strategy: Provide records management training, consulting, and storage services to state 
agencies and local government officials. 



Output Measures: 



1. Number of cubic feet stored/maintained. 

2. Number of state and local government employees assisted or 
trained. 

3. Total revenue from imaging services. 

4. Total revenue from storage services. 



Effic iency Measures : 1 . 

2. 



Imaging services production revenue per FTE. 
Cost per cubic foot stored/maintained. 



D. Goal: To implement a program to insure the meaningful and substantive inclusion of 

historically underutilized businesses in all areas of procurement. [Government Code 
2161.001 - . 231 ] 



D.l Objective: Include historically underutilized businesses (HUBs) in at least 

20 percent of all agency dollars spent for special trades services; 

5 percent of all agency dollars spent for other services; and 
30 percent of all agency dollars spent for commodities by FY2007. 

Outcome Measure: Percent of total dollars spent with HUB vendors. 

D. 1 . 1 Strategy: Develop and implement a plan to increase HUB vendor participation in all 

procurement areas. 



Output Measures: 



1 . Dollar value of HUB contracts awarded. 

2. Number of HUB vendors contacted for bid proposals 



Overview 



Chapter One 



Overview of Our Agency Scope and Functions 

A. Our Enabling Statutes and Administrative Rules 
Texas legislation and statutes 

Overall: Government Code, Chapter 441, Subchapter A; Administrative Code, Title 13, Chapter 2 

Library systems: Government Code, Chapter 441, Subchapter I; Administrative Code, 

Title 13, Chapter 1 

School library standards: Education Code, Section 33.021; Administrative Code, 

Title 13, Chapter 4 

TexShare library consortium: Government Code 441, Subchapter M; Administrative Code, 

Title 13, Chapter 8 

State publications: Government Code, Chapter 441, Subchapter G; Administrative Code, 

Title 13, Chapter 3 

Central service to visually disabled: Human Resources Code, Chapter 91, Subchapter E; 
Administrative Code, Title 13, Chapter 9 

Print access aids: Government Code, Chapter 441, Subchapter H; Administrative Code, 

Title 13, Chapter 9 

State records: Government Code, Chapter 441, Subchapter L; Administrative Code, Title 13, 
Chapter 6 

Local government records: Local Government Code, Title 6, Subtitle C; Government Code, 
Chapter 441, Subchapter J; Administrative Code, Title 13, Chapter 7 

Texas Historical Records Advisory Board: Government Code, Chapter 441, Subchapter N 
United States legislation and statutes 

Service to blind and other physically disabled persons: 2 U.S.C.A. § 135b 
Federal funding for library services and technology: 20 U.S.C.A. §9101-9176 
Federal documents: 19 U.S.C.A. §44 

B. Agency History and Significant Events 

1895 - U.S. and Texas governments agreed to exchange government documents 

1909 - Texas Library and Historical Commission created; later renamed Texas State Library 
and Archives Commission (TSLAC) in 1979 

1919 - Legislation enacted regarding county public libraries 




Chapter One 
- 1 - 

16 



1931 - National Library Service established for adults who are blind, and TSLAC began providing 
Talking Book services 

1947 - State records management function established 

1952 - Children who are blind became eligible for Talking Book service 

1956 - Federal Library Services Act created and funded to establish and improve local public 
library service 

1962 - Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building opened; Federal Depository 

Library Act established regional depository system 

1963 - State legislation enacted to authorize TSLAC to collect, organize, and distribute Texas 

documents and to establish the depository library system for state publications 

1966 - Persons with physical disabilities other than blindness became eligible for the Talking 
Book service 

1969 - Legislative Reference Library separated from the agency; Library Systems Act enacted to 
provide for a regional cooperative program to improve Texas public libraries 

1971 - Local government records function enacted 

1972 - State Records Center opened 

1974 - Persons with organic dysfunction resulting in learning disabilities became eligible for 
Talking Book service 

1977 - Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center in Liberty opened 

1988 - State Records Center expansion completed, and Talking Book Program circulation 

facility opened adjacent to the State Records Center 

1989 - Local Government Records Act enacted 

1994 - North Texas Regional Library System became the first of the ten regional public library 

systems to establish as a private not-for-profit organization awarded a Library Systems 
Act grant 

1995 - Legislature assigns responsibility for the development of standards for school library 

programs to TSLAC; Legislation added electronic publications and Internet to agency 
responsibilities 

1996 - Federal Library Services and Construction Act replaced by the Library Services and 

Technology Act; Texas Book Festival inaugurated to raise funds for public libraries and to 
encourage reading in Texas 

1997 - Legislature created library tax districts as a mechanism to establish and fund public 

libraries; Legislature enacted new state records preservation and management law; 
Legislature transferred responsibility for the TexShare academic library resource sharing 
consortium to TSLAC 

1999 - Legislature added public libraries to the TexShare library resource sharing consortium 

2001 - Legislature funded the Loan Star Libraries Program of direct aid to Texas public libraries; 
Libraries of clinical medicine added to the TexShare library resource sharing consortium 




Chapter One 
- 2 - 



17 



C. Affected Populations 



The Texas State Library and Archives Commission, as an agency in service to the life of the mind, 
provides collections and information services to the people of Texas, the nation, and the world. 
Through the Internet, telephone, interlibrary loan, and on-site assistance, we serve the information 
needs of all that seek our help. We also serve as guardians of the public’s right to know by 
overseeing the management and retention of the records of Texas governments. 

Key Service Populations 
Our services directly benefit: 

• Patrons who use the current and historical materials in the State Archives, genealogy, and 
reference/documents collections, which together house the most complete library of state 
and federal publications in Texas, as well as extensive unique archival records and 
manuscripts 

• Texas public libraries and their patrons 

• Patrons with visual, physical, and learning disabilities, including the organizations serving 
them, who use the services of our Talking Book Program 

• Students, faculty, and staff of institutions of higher education; patrons and staff of public 
libraries and libraries of clinical medicine who participate in the TexShare library resource 
sharing consortium 

• Government agencies that use our State Records Center and its records storage and 
document imaging services 

• Records managers, librarians, and others who participate in our library and records 
management training and use our consulting services 

• Persons who attend workshops, conferences, and professional meetings featuring 
presentations by our staff 

• Member libraries in the Texas State Publications Depository network that receive the state 
publications that we collect from state agencies and distribute 

• Government agency staff who use our reference and interlibrary loan services 

• Readers of our publications, including library and records management professionals and 
the general public 

• Visitors to the Lorenzo de Zavala Building and its exhibits, as well as visitors to our Sam 
Houston Regional Library and Research Center in Liberty, Texas 

• Researchers who use public and academic library statistics collected and compiled by TSLAC 

• Staff of Texas libraries who use the materials in our Library Science Collection to further 
their professional development 

• Library professionals who use our job-listing service 




Chapter One 
- 3 - 



18 



Our services indirectly benefit: 

• Students and teachers in schools where libraries are improved through our standards for 
school library programs 

• Children and families who participate in our annual Texas Reading Club 

• Persons receiving materials distributed through our statewide interlibrary loan network 

• Citizens serving on library system advisory councils whose activities are administered 
through TSLAC and the Library Systems Act 

• All Texans, whose right to access government is defended and preserved by the activities 
of our information services and government records management and preservation 
programs 

Our rule-making authority affects: 

• State agencies and state-supported or state-sponsored institutions subject to the 
requirements of the Texas State Publications Depository Law 

• Public libraries subject to commission rules, including those for administering the Library 
Systems Act and for accrediting county libraries and certifying their librarians 

• Institutions of higher education, public libraries, and libraries of clinical medicine 
participating in the TexShare library resource sharing consortium 

• School districts and school librarians who improve school library programs through 
TSLAC’s school library standards 

• State and local government agencies subject to Texas government records management 
laws and our administrative rules adopted under authority of those laws 



D. Our Main Functions 

In The Functions and Roles of State Library Agencies published in 2000 by the American Library 
Association, library consultants Ethel Himmel and Bill Wilson describe nine roles that state 
library agencies can play. These roles grew out of Himmel and Wilson’s in-depth analysis of data 
collected from the 50 state library agencies on collections, services, and functions. The roles are 
intended as tools to help state library agencies categorize and effectively articulate the vast array 
of activities in which they engage and which they support. Further, Himmel and Wilson intended 
that the roles provide a framework for a state library agency in which to make choices and set 
priorities. 

A subcommittee of our Strategic Planning Task Force revised the nine roles, reshaping them to 
more accurately reflect the functions of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission, and 
added a tenth role, that of “Preserver.” These roles formed the basis for the strategic planning 
effort in which we engaged. 




Chapter One 
- 4 - 



19 



OUR ROLES IN STATE GOVERNMENT 



Advocate - We actively promote the important place of libraries and archives in our society. We 
champion the need for effective government records management. We encourage state and federal 
legislation that would improve these vital services. 

Advisor - Through our expert staff, we provide guidance to libraries, government agencies, and 
the public on a broad range of topics including children’s and youth library services, library 
technology, grant writing, the management of government records, and the needs of special 
populations. 

Provider - We provide direct services to libraries, government agencies, and the public through 
online databases, reference services, interlibrary loan, grants, and by providing reading aids to 
those in our client population with special needs. We also provide records storage and document 
imaging services to government agencies. 

Preserver - We acquire, arrange, maintain, and protect the historically valuable records of state 
government for public use and assist local governments in preserving their documentary heritage 
through training in records management. 

Data Collector/Evaluator - We collect statistical information from libraries, government 
agencies, and others we serve; and then compile, analyze, and report back the data on a regular or 
requested basis to the legislature, our client populations, and others we serve. We also collect data 
and use it to evaluate the effectiveness of our programs and services. 

Enforcer - We monitor and enforce federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements 
related to the management of library services, archives, and records. 

Leader - We promote library, archival, and records management services by encouraging libraries 
and government agencies to implement programs and methods that improve their accountability, 
efficiency, and effectiveness. 

Facilitator - We encourage cooperation and linkages between and among different types of 
libraries, among governments at all levels, and between other members of our public and 
ourselves. These interconnections, through electronic networks, advisory committees, supportive 
organizations, and personal relationships, are invaluable to our mission. 

Educator - We provide continuing education opportunities to members of the records 
management, library, and archival communities in order for them to carry out their respective 
duties and roles more effectively. We train customers directly in the efficient and effective use of 
print and electronic information resources. 

Innovator - We continually seek new methods to demonstrate, inspire, and sponsor fresh ideas 
and innovative leadership in our constituent communities. 



Staff provided input during a series of thirteen focus group interviews conducted between 
February 21 and March 7, 2002. In these sessions, staff participants were asked to identify the 




0 



Chapter One 
- 5 - 



roles that TSLAC does the best job of fulfilling now. In addition, participants were asked to 
identify roles that were most important for TSLAC to fulfill in the future. Participants engaged in 
thorough and lively discussion of each role and the implications for setting priorities among the 
roles. 

The roles that focus group participants identified as roles that the agency fulfills best now are 
Provider, Preserver, Advisor, and Educator. Roles that were identified for future growth or 
emphasis are Innovator, Educator, Advocate, Data Collector/Evaluator, and Leader. Focus group 
participants felt that the agency needed to maintain support for the Provider, Preserver, Advisor, 
and Educator roles while directing greater resources and energy to increasing our ability to fulfill 
other important roles in the future. 



E. Public Perception 

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission is a complex agency with a wide variety of 
services. Knowledge of our agency is determined by the nature of the services accessed. Public 
librarians, for example, are aware of our consulting services and continuing education program, 
while academic librarians are more aware of resource sharing services. 

Studies have historically shown that the general public has a high regard for libraries and believes 
that communities are enhanced by the presence of libraries. We believe that the public's good will 
toward libraries positively influences the public’s view of the Texas State Library and Archives 
Commission and our services. 

We serve our customers in a supportive role in the delivery of many of our services, and this often 
impedes the public’s direct knowledge of us and our programs and services. For example, our State 
and Local Records Management Division also provides consulting services and continuing 
education opportunities for state and local government records management officers to help them 
manage their records more efficiently and effectively. Our services to these government employees 
translate into efficiencies that save time and tax dollars. However, the general public — who is the 
ultimate beneficiary — is rarely aware that these services exist, much less the impact that these 
services have on them. 

It is very important that the public perception of the commission is both clear and positive; 
therefore, we have concentrated our efforts on clarifying and promoting our identity as a single 
agency with common goals. Operating under the motto of "Making information work for all 
Texans," the various programs of the commission work together to make the statement a reality. 
Additionally, we have implemented a new logo, uniform standards for agency publications, an 
agency-wide information packet, and hosting of agency-sponsored booths at major constituent 
conferences (such as the Texas Library Association and the Texas Municipal League). These 
efforts further provide a consistent, single message that emphasizes the entire spectrum of our 
duties and services to our customers. Our Web site, organized from the customer's perspective by 
topic rather than by organizational structure, is another example of our efforts to project an 
integrated image. 




Chapter One 
- 6 - 



21 



Chapter Two 



Organization of Our Agency 



A. Size and Composition of Our Workforce 

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission is authorized 210.5 full-time equivalent 
positions, and employs one exempt, 191 full-time classified, and 33 part-time classified staff. Our 
workforce is diverse: 21 percent are Hispanic, 7 percent are African-American, 55 percent are 
women. More complete information on the agency’s workforce may be found in Appendix E in 
the Workforce Plan. 



B. Our Organizational Structure and Process 

A six-member commission leads our agency. The governor appoints commissioners to six-year 
terms. We have seven program divisions: Archives and Information Services, Information 
Resources Technologies, Library Development, Library Resource Sharing, State and Local 
Records Management, Talking Book Program, and Administrative Services. The director and 
librarian is responsible for agency-wide policy development and dissemination. However, staff 
input is valued and used to inform decision making and policy formulation and evaluation. An 
Administrative Team, composed of the Assistant State Librarian, the seven division directors, and 
the Communications Officer, meet weekly to discuss issues, share information, and work together 
to advise the director and librarian. 

We value our employees as individuals and rely on their collective skills and talents to meet our 
goals. While style varies from manager to manager, the overall structure supports a two-way 
communication flow, and focuses efforts on creative work solutions that benefit our customers as 
well as staff. 



C. Our Location and the Impact of Geography on our Operations 

Our agency headquarters in the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building located in 
the Capitol Complex at 1201 Brazos in Austin. The State Records Center and Talking Book annex 
are at 4400 Shoal Creek Boulevard in Austin. The Sam Houston Regional Library and Research 
Center is located in Liberty. 

Being housed in separate locations presents numerous challenges for operations and program 
managers. Effective communication between facilities is a high priority and employees in each 
facility use a variety of methods to communicate including email and the agency’s Intranet, 
Angelina. 

Because staff in the Talking Book Program and the Library Development Division must work 
closely with federal cohorts in the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, respectively, to implement 




Chapter Two 
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22 



programs, staff must travel annually to Washington, D.C. to attend training sessions and meetings 
related to their areas of administration. 



D. Location of Our Service Populations 

Our service populations are far-flung, requiring careful planning and resource allocation in order 
to meet needs spread over a wide geographic area. We strive to partner as often as possible with 
regional structures such as the regional public library systems and the Texas Library Association 
districts in order to deliver continuing education and training. Continuing education activities are 
replicated regionally so as to meet local needs more directly. Records management workshops for 
local governments are provided on a regional basis. We also support a network of regional 
document depositories and libraries that are part of a regional state publications network in order 
to meet the demands of a geographically diverse state. 

Currently we are deploying eleven videoconferencing sites in the state in order to deliver 
continuing education more efficiently and effectively. Videoconferencing capabilities will enable 
us to meet the challenge of geographic diversity to facilitate distance learning, communication, 
group discussion, and more. In addition, we are implementing web-based continuing education 
programs in order to deliver education to librarians and library staff at their desktops. 

As prescribed by the Legislature, we place special emphasis on the Texas-Louisiana and Texas- 
Mexico border regions. Of the ten library systems in the state that we fund, five serve counties 
located in those targeted border regions. In FY2001, we awarded $5,179,737 in grants to those 
five systems. We also awarded $352,433 in discretionary grants to six individual libraries serving 
those border-region counties. In FY2002, libraries in those regions received discretionary grants 
totaling $477,670. Discretionary grants include Establishment Grants to support new public 
libraries, Special Project Grants to reach underserved or disadvantaged populations, Cooperation 
Grants to promote cooperation among different types of libraries, and Technology Assistance 
Negotiated Grants to help libraries better use and maintain their existing technology. 

In FY2001, we awarded interlibrary loan grants of over $1,070,000 to libraries in the border regions 
to facilitate resource sharing. We also awarded TexTreasures grants totaling $80,000 to libraries in 
border region counties to support digitizing special collections to achieve broader public access. 

During the first five months of FY2002, we delivered 17 percent of our Talking Book services 
within the Texas-Mexico border counties. As of January 2002, we registered 3,425 individuals and 
institutions for services in the Texas-Mexico border counties, and 1,005 individuals and institutions 
within the Texas-Louisiana border counties. These registrants represent 18 percent and 5 percent, 
respectively, of all patrons registered in our Talking Book Program. 

In FY2001, we licensed two Spanish language databases for use statewide to address the needs of 
our Spanish-speaking customers in this region and across the state. In addition, we encouraged 
many public libraries to take advantage of an offer from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 
FY2001 to install Spanish language computers. These resources have greatly enhanced the ability 
of libraries to serve individuals whose first language is Spanish. 

The commission also provides a variety of training and education opportunities to our customers 
throughout the state. In FY2001, our State and Local Records Management and Library Develop- 
ment divisions conducted 253 workshops for 7,596 participants around the state; ninety-three of 




Chapter Two 
- 8 - 



23 



the workshops (37% of total workshops) were delivered in the targeted border regions to 2,539 
attendees (33% of total participants). During the first five months of FY2001, we have offered 318 
workshops for 5,881 attendees; seventy-five of these workshops (24% of the total) were conducted 
for 852 participants (14% of total) in the two border regions. 



E. Our Human Resources Strengths and Weaknesses 

Our employees are educated and highly motivated. Ninety-eight of our positions are categorized as 
“professional.” Of these, 48 require an advanced degree, 42 require a bachelors degree, and many 
of the remainder require college courses. 

Our training program is principally work-related with a focus on increasing competence and 
performance. As funds are available, we also focus on building capacity in staff to handle new 
challenges such as additional responsibilities, technological or legal requirements, and prospective 
duties. 

Training and staff development needs are generally determined at the division level. Because staff 
training needs vary and financial resources are limited, priorities must be set for training purposes. 
Division directors collaborate in order to maximize training resources and opportunities. The 
Human Resources Office conducts periodic training for supervisors in agency policies and federal 
and state laws pertaining to the workplace. 

Work time and cost reimbursement are provided for staff in all divisions to attend professional 
conferences and meetings. This type of staff development activity greatly benefits both customers 
and staff. In order to fulfill our role as Educator, staff responsible for providing consulting and 
training to our customers must attend professional conferences as an important way for them to 
keep abreast of trends and issues, best practices, and innovative technologies and service delivery 
approaches. Networking with colleagues in other state library agencies around the country is 
crucial to maintaining our role as Leader. 

Staff, whose specialized training is underwritten, is required to share new skills and information 
with peers and customers upon completion of training. Staff is encouraged to write articles for 
agency newsletters, to speak at conferences, and to conduct follow-up training sessions in-house. 

We continue to experience a significant problem in replacing employees in key positions with new 
staff with similar training and experience. At the root of this problem is the fact that our salaries are 
not competitive with the private sector. This is compounded by the decrease in the number of 
people obtaining college degrees in the specialized fields required for our professional positions. It 
is also time-consuming to fill vacancies. The average number of days to fill all vacant positions 
during FY2001 was 62 days, while professional positions averaged 78 days to fill. 

We experienced a turnover rate of over 30 percent for FY2001, compared to a turnover rate of 17.6 
percent for all classified state employees in the same period. In the State Auditor’s Report No. 02- 
701 , An Annual Report on Full-Time Classified State Employee Turnover for Fiscal Year 2001, 
state employees in the occupational category Library and Records had a turnover rate of 18.4 
percent. Within this category, two Job Class Series, Library Assistants and Archivists, had 
extremely high turnover rates — 30.8 percent and 19.1 percent respectively. Almost 25 percent of 
our turnover occurred within these two class series. The Clerks series, under the Administrative 
Support Category, at 20.5 percent turnover was also extremely high when compared on a statewide 




Chapter Two 
- 9 - 



24 



basis. Over 28 percent of our turnover during FY2001 is attributed to this single class series. These 
three classification series account for almost 60 percent of the agency’s turnover. This analysis 
suggests that the wage scale for these categories may still be low when compared to wage rates paid 
by other employers of these groups. 

The 76th Legislature (1999) authorized a change in the classification schedule for library assistants, 
librarians, and archivists, and the establishment of new manager and director series. This resulted in 
significant salary increases for a large percentage of our staff in FY2000. Nevertheless, the entry- 
level salary of $25,932 for professional library staff remains lower than the $30,000 figure 
recommended by the Texas Library Association. Given the level of education and experience 
required for many of our positions, low salaries will continue to impede progress in recruiting and 
retaining a diverse workforce in management and professional positions. 



F. Our Capital Asset Strengths and Weaknesses 

The State Archives collection documents the history of Texas, and constitutes an irreplaceable 
asset for the State. It is a unique collection of official, historically significant government records, 
as well as private papers, maps, photographs, and other priceless Texas treasures that comprise the 
essential evidence of the history of Texas. We are charged with maintaining the official Archives 
for the State of Texas. 

We also manage a collection of more than 1 .5 million federal government and 23 1,000 state 
government publications, which include more than 3,000 federal government CD-ROMs. We have 
collected and maintained these documents since 1895, when the U.S. and Texas governments 
agreed to exchange government documents. These collections are one of the our most important 
assets and irreplaceable information resources. Our book collections comprise almost 1 16,000 
volumes. Books and microforms purchased by the State Library have a value of over $3 million. 

We own and operate a facility at 4400 Shoal Creek Boulevard, known as the State Records Center, 
which jointly houses the State and Local Records Management Division and the circulation 
department of our Talking Book Program. The State Records Center has a capacity to store 
390,000 cubic feet of state agency hard-copy records, and an additional three vaults for the storage 
of electronic and microfilm records. The State Records Center also houses a micrographics and 
imaging laboratory and service bureau with equipment valued at $800,000. The condition of aging 
infrastructure systems at the Shoal Creek location is being assessed. Many of these systems, such 
as air handling compressors, will need major repair or replacement within the next five years. 

The State and Local Records Management Division produces, stores, and maintains about 35,000 
microfilm reels containing census records, tax records, and Texas newspapers, with an estimated 
replacement cost of almost $1 million. The Talking Book Program maintains a collection of 
cassette, disc, large print, and Braille books and magazines. In addition, TBP is a machine-lending 
agency for the National Library Service, which provides playback equipment and adaptive 
technology devices for patrons with visual, physical, or learning disabilities. Together, the Talking 
Book collection is valued at $14 million. 

The Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center in Liberty is the official regional 
historical resource depository for ten counties in Southeast Texas. It was constructed during 1976- 
77 on 1 10 acres of land given to the agency by former Governor Price Daniel, Sr. and his wife 




Chapter Two 
- 10 - 



25 



Jean. In its museum, the Center features exhibits on a variety of Southeast Texas topics. The 
complex also includes the following structures that are available to the public for tours: 

• The Gillard- Duncan House, built in 1848, showcases furnishings of five generations, 
including an early Texas schoolroom. 

• The Norman House, circa 1883, depicts the periods of three families that owned the home. 

• The 1898 St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church was recently restored and serves as a visitor 
orientation center and meeting room. 

• The Price Daniel House is patterned after the original 1856 plans for the Texas Governor’s 
Mansion and displays mementos of the public life of Governor and Mrs. Price Daniel. 

An extensive renovation project at the Center was completed during FY 2001. Renovations and 
repairs included painting the exterior and interior of the building, refitting portions of the main 
building to meet ADA standards, grading drainage ditches, and replacing the driveway and 
parking lot. 

In addition to the collection of physical materials, the commission acquires and delivers electronic 
information resources (databases, documents, and publications) from other state agencies to the 
public. While there has been an explosion of information in all formats, we are well positioned to 
collect, organize, and deliver digital information to the public for use in understanding and 
interacting with government. We have initiated a program to provide for the preservation and 
access of historic state government publications in electronic format. Through cash grants, we 
encourage and support the digitization of unique and rare collections of Texas libraries. We also 
deliver — by means of the Internet — information from both our own collections as well as from a 
variety of other sources. We continue to provide a variety of other informational and educational 
sources in electronic form. Providing reliable electronic information services through the Internet 
requires continual capital investments in computer and telecommunications equipment. 



G. Our Use of Historically Underutilized Businesses 

The commission purchases goods and services from historically underutilized businesses (HUBs) 
whenever possible. We have historically exceeded the statewide average performance; however, 
our ability to increase our performance is restricted by two major challenges. 

Contractors must have special expertise in the library field to meet many of our programmatic 
needs. While we frequently enter into professional service contracts with women and minorities, 
these vendors are reluctant to complete the paperwork required to become state-certified as HUBs, 
despite staff encouragement. Our staff continues to provide assistance to vendors who choose to 
seek certification. 

The area of "other services" procurements presents a second challenge. A large portion of our 
procurements are proprietary in nature, such as serial and journal subscriptions, library books and 
materials, and library equipment and supplies which are excluded from some Building and 
Procurement Commission purchasing guidelines. This category also includes sole source 
procurements of electronic subscriptions, database access, and computer software and hardware 
maintenance. During FY 2001, these sole source procurements represented almost 90 percent of 
the total agency expenditures. If we exclude these proprietary procurements, almost 25 percent of 



O 

ERIC 



26 



Chapter Two 
- 11 - 



total expenditures were with HUBs. Despite these challenges, we will continue to seek out HUB 
vendors for all purchases that are not proprietary. 

To further increase procurements from HUBs, our purchasers participate in Economic Opportunity 
Forums sponsored by the Building and Procurement Commission in the central Texas area. The 
forums provide an opportunity for HUB vendors to become more familiar with our procurement 
needs. 



H. Key Events, Areas of Change, and Their Impact 
Key management staff 

The commission has experienced major turnover in upper management over the past four years. 
Three of seven division directors will be eligible for retirement within the next four years, as will 
1 8 other staff in key professional positions. The challenge for our agency is to employ methods of 
knowledge transfer that will preserve much of the wealth of experience that employees of long- 
standing possess. This may include mentoring, job shadowing, cross training, and other methods 
of ensuring that we do not suffer from “brain drain” when retirements occur. 

TexShare 

The 77th Legislature in 2001 authorized libraries of clinical medicine to join TexShare, the 
statewide resource sharing program. TexShare quadrupled in size when the 76 th Legislature 
added public libraries to the program in 1999. Accommodating future growth, while maintaining 
high standards of service, is a major challenge for our Library Resource Sharing Division, which 
administers TexShare. A Task Force on TexShare Expansion, comprised of nine librarians 
representing a cross section of Texas libraries, was appointed to research and make 
recommendations regarding this challenge. Their report, issued in February 2002, presented (a) an 
overview of nonprofit candidates for TexShare membership and (b) specific information on state 
government agency libraries and nonprofit hospital libraries, including the funding implications of 
admitting these groups to TexShare membership. 

In October 2000, we launched the Library of Texas initiative funded by the Telecommunications 
Infrastructure Fund (TIF) Board. Two TIF grants have enabled us to build an infrastructure to 
deliver information when, where, and how Texans need it. The four components of the Library of 
Texas are online databases, current and retrospective electronic state government information, a 
statewide resource discovery tool, and extensive training for library staff. Building an effective 
infrastructure for statewide information delivery is challenging in a state that is characterized by a 
large population, vast expanses of rural areas, diverse demographics, and a high poverty level. We 
have found that statewide licensing of databases on behalf of all academic and public libraries is 
much more efficient than each library negotiating separate licenses for these same resources. 




Chapter Two 
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27 



T ECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS 



The Universal Service Fund (commonly called E-Rate) under the Federal Communications 
Commission requires that we approve technology plans for public libraries that apply for the E- 
Rate federal technology and telecommunications discounts. The approval process requires staff 
time and resources for training local librarians, providing technical assistance, and reviewing 
plans. Other new technology programs, such as the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund and 
grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, also require extensive participation by our 
staff for client groups to reap the benefits of these programs. The agency also maintains 
membership in the Education Technology Coordinating Council to maximize the benefits of state 
tax funds spent on technology. 




Chapter Two 
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28 



Chapter Three 



Fiscal Aspects 

A. Size of Our Budget (trends in expenditures) 
Expenditures/Budget FY 2001 /FY 2003 





FY2001 


FY2002 


FY2003 


FY2001 


STRATEGY 


Expenditures 


Budget 


Budget (Est.) 


PERCENT 


Statewide sharing of resources 


$3,827,835 


$6,664,864 


$4,927,714 


14% 


Texas Library System 


8,318,694 


8,361,764 


8,334,391 


23% 


Development of local libraries 


1,641,494 


6,718,142 


6,011,168 


17% 


TexShare 


9,617,407 


9,635,773 


9,483,253 


26% 


Talking book services 


1,562,108 


1,753,106 


1,646,819 


5% 


Ready access to information 


1,736,580 


1,473,801 


1,498,979 


4% 


State and local records 


2,039,144 


2,523,075 


2,423,894 


7% 


Indirect (Admin & IRT) 


1,794,813 


2,018,499 


1,876,576 


5% 


TOTALS 


$30,538,075 


$39,149,024 


$36,202,794 


100% 


METHOD OF FINANCE 










General Revenue 


$12,653,227 


$13,329,032 


$13,101,413 


36% 


Federal Funds 


8,647,435 


9,783,819 


8,984,923 


25% 


Telecom. Infrastructure Fund 


0 


2,900,000 


2,900,000 


8% 


Appropriated Receipts 


278,828 


304,148 


184,148 


1% 


Interagency Contracts 


8,846,809 


12,721,395 


10,921,680 


30% 


Earned Federal Funds 


111,776 


110,630 


110,630 


0% 


TOTALS 


$30,538,075 


$39,149,024 


$36,202,794 


100% 



B. Method of Finance 

Federal funds remain an important component of our revenue at 25 percent. The majority of these 
funds are granted to regional library systems to improve local public library services. Another 
large part of our budget comes from Interagency Contracts, which reflects the fees generated by 
the State and Local Records Management division and the funds from the Telecommunications 




Chapter Three 
- 15 - 



29 



Infrastructure Fund (TIF). The TIF Board awarded TSLAC $7,368,887 in FY2001 and 
$13,281,962 to expend in FY2002-2003 to implement the Library of Texas Project. 



C. Per Capita and Other States' Comparisons 

The state contributes a relatively small share to the funding of public libraries. In FY2000, Texas 
contributed $0.20 per capita for state aid to public libraries, while the national average for state 
contributions was $2.26 per capita. Texas ranked 42nd among 44 states reporting. Local funding 
for public libraries in Texas was about 95 percent of the total funding, while state and federal 
funds made up the remaining 5 percent of the government funding for public libraries. In FY1998, 
Texas ranked 47 of 5 1 states and the District of Columbia reporting total per capita income from 
all sources. 

Based on FY1999 funding and 1999 state population estimates, the Talking Book Program for 
Texans with disabilities ranks 10th in per capita spending out of the ten most populous states with 
similar programs. The national average was $0.22 per capita, with South Dakota spending the 
most at $0.66. Texas ranks at the bottom, tied with Hawaii, with per capita spending at $0.07. In 
the five-state area of Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, Oklahoma spends 
$0.30 per capita, Arkansas spends $0.26, and Louisiana spends $0.09. New Mexico did not report 
budget figures to the national office. 



D. Budgetary Limitations (appropriation riders) 

Our imaging and records storage activities are funded entirely through revenues generated by 
providing services to state agencies and local governments. The commission successfully operates 
these activities as business enterprises but access to a cash flow contingency account is necessary 
should unanticipated major expenditures be required early in a fiscal year. Since the 1996-1997 
biennium, the commission has had authority to carry-forward unexpended revenue balances from 
the first to the second year of a biennium. We believe that such authority is not necessary provided 
that we are permitted to borrow funds if needed and that there is no reduction in the current level 
of general revenue funding for our State and Local Records Management Division. 

Current Rider #6 (S.B. 1, 77th Legislature, 2001), should be re-authorized to read: 

Cash Flow Contingency. Contingent upon reimbursements from state agencies and 
other governmental and private entities for imaging and records storage, the agency 
may temporarily utilize general revenue funds, not to exceed $500,000. These funds 
shall be utilized only for the purpose of temporary cash flow needs. The transfer and 
reimbursement of funds shall be under procedures established by the Comptroller of 
Public Accounts to ensure all borrowed funds are reimbursed to the Treasury on or 
before August 31, 2005. 




Chapter Three 
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30 



E. Degree to Which Our Budget Meets Current and Future Needs and 
Expectations 



Current budget levels and staffing authorizations cannot sustain our services for a growing 
customer base. Through attrition, the percentage of Talking Book patrons we serve is expected to 
decline because funding and staffing levels are not keeping pace with the growth in potential 
customers. While the 77 th Legislature appropriated $20,000 for the first year of the current 
biennium to fund a statewide public awareness campaign for the Talking Book Program, we are 
concerned that current operating funding and staffing levels will limit our ability to provide high 
quality service to increasing numbers of patrons resulting from the success of the public awareness 
campaign. 

More funding and staffing are needed to accession, appraise, and store state and local government 
records. Our current budget does not enable us to meet customer-expressed needs for new and 
expanded services. 

We continue to face challenges in adequately compensating staff and providing special 
compensation incentives for high achievement. According to the most recent Survey of 
Organizational Excellence, staff continue to rate the construct of Fair Pay as the lowest of the 
twenty constructs measured in the survey. This low score reflects staff perceptions that our 
agency does not compare favorably to other organizations in the area of compensation. Since 
perceptions of fair pay influence staff feelings of satisfaction or discontent, agency leadership will 
continue to work toward addressing these issues. 

As we continue to identify newer technologies to preserve documents and information and make 
them available to the public, our budget available for support of these technologies is increasingly 
inadequate. It is critical to achieve and maintain a high level of customer service, and failure to use 
these technologies proactively and effectively can jeopardize the fulfillment of our mission. Our 
ability to support the new technologies depends on our internal information resources and 
telecommunications capabilities, as well as our physical facility. This infrastructure must be 
maintained and enhanced to keep pace with the emergence of Web and imaging technologies that 
enhance document storage and preservation and information access. The wiring in the Lorenzo de 
Zavala Archives and Library Building must be upgraded, and the computer center requires a 
reliable emergency cooling system. 

Training for technical staff is essential to prepare the agency for technical migrations and the 
integration of new technologies with existing services. Equipment upgrades are also essential to 
prevent disruptions in service. The delivery of Web-based information services places a strain on 
existing funding and requires staff with a higher technical skill level than was previously needed. 
We continue to allocate scarce resources to the process of building capacity in information 
technology staff and program administrators so that they can make effective use of new 
technologies. 



F. Agency Benchmarks 

The outcome measure for Objective A.l, "percent of population living within the service areas of 
public libraries whose services (circulation per capita) meet or exceed the average of the ten 




Chapter Three 
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31 



largest states," is essentially a comparative metric. Unfortunately, Texas does not compare 
favorably to this peer group as only about 14.5 percent or our population is served by public 
libraries that meet or exceed this target. 

The outcome measure for Objective A.2, "percent of eligible population registered for Talking 
Book Program services," reflects the lack of state funding for library services and fewer potential 
persons served, when compared to other states. A 2000 report of the number of individuals served 
by the National Library Service program of the Library of Congress provided information on the 
percent of eligible population served for the ten largest states. 



Percent of Eligible Population Served (FY99) 



Florida 


15% 


Ohio 


12% 


Michigan 


16% 


Pennsylvania 


14% 


New York 


14% 


California 


9% 


Georgia 


14% 


New Jersey 


9% 


Illinois 


9% 


Texas 


8% 



Outcome measure B.l is "improve information services to state and local government offices, 
historical and family history researchers, and the public by answering correctly 90 percent of all 
reference questions received." No reliable source of benchmark information from a peer group is 
available for this measure. 




Chapter Three 
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32 



Chapter Four 



Service Population Demographics and 
Economic Variables 



Four key variables influence the Texas State Library and Archives Commission's efforts to 
effectively serve Texans: the state’s high poverty rate, rapid population growth, increasing 
numbers of Hispanic and older Texans, and the vast expanses of rural Texas. Texas has the eighth- 
highest poverty rate in the nation, and this high poverty rate, coupled with low per capita income, 
translates into sparse local support for archives, libraries, and records management services. In per 
capita income, Texas ranks 23rd nationally and is 47th in terms of per capita support for public 
libraries. Rapid population growth and low levels of local support intensify the pressure for 
archivists, librarians, and records managers to do more with less. 

Between 1990 and 1999, Texas was the second fastest- growing state in the nation, with a 14 
percent total population increase. The state’s population is expected to continue this rapid growth, 
with a total projected population of 24.3 million by the year 2010. An estimated 2.8 million 
Texans will be over the age of 64 in 2010, and the Hispanic population in Texas will have grown 
to 8.5 million by 2010. At the same time that Texas must serve a rapidly growing population, it 
must continue to attend to the needs of a large rural constituency. Of all Texas counties, 77.2% 
(196) are designated as rural. 

Our user groups can be broadly categorized as the general public, libraries and librarians, state 
agencies and local governments, and individuals with visual, physical, and learning disabilities. 
Every Texan, regardless of status, falls into one of these groups. Informational needs across these 
user groups vary widely, and our programs cover a broad spectrum of resources and services in 
order to serve these varied needs effectively. 

Four units within our Archives and Information Services Division — State Archives, Genealogy, 
Reference/Documents, and the Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center in Liberty — 
provide access to historical sources, government documents, and research assistance available 
nowhere else. 

In FY2001, our Talking Book Program (TBP) served 20,573 patrons or 7.94 percent of the 
estimated eligible population in Texas. According to FY2001 figures, an estimated 291,123 
Texans have visual, physical, or learning disabilities which prevent them from reading standard 
print, and these Texans are eligible for TBP services. This number of eligible Texans will continue 
to increase, especially as the population ages. Currently TBP offers reading materials in Braille, 
recorded cassette, vinyl disk, large print, and over 4,000 digitized Braille books, magazines, and 
musical scores on the Web. Despite advances in services available electronically, a continuing 
challenge for service delivery is that many patrons with disabilities do not have the means to 
purchase the necessary hardware and software to access these materials in their homes. We 
anticipate an increased demand for services from the Talking Book Program due to the aging of 
our state’s population and additional demand for Spanish-language materials for Talking Book 
Program patrons. 




Chapter Four 
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33 



Programs and activities provided by our Library Development Division currently assist 535 public 
libraries, which serve over 92.72 percent of the state's population. About 1.4 million Texans (7.28 
percent of the population) have no public library service available. 

The statewide Texas Reading Club, co-sponsored by TSLAC and local public and school libraries, 
serves over 490,000 children in Texas each year. The Reading Club provides public libraries with 
promotional materials and a program manual to establish summer reading programs for children. 
School libraries use the materials during the school year. Staff also assists over 2,000 librarians 
through various commission programs, including consulting services, in-person workshops, and 
the division's professional collection. Considering the state's vast distances and rural 
demographics, we are exploring innovative delivery strategies such as videoconferencing and 
Web-based training. 

Rural demographics, increasing state population, and sparse local support also make Texas ideally 
suited for collaborative solutions. One such collaboration is the TexShare program, coordinated by 
our Library Resource Sharing Division. TexShare serves academic libraries, public libraries, and 
libraries of clinical medicine. TexShare services include a courier that provides two-day delivery 
of books statewide, electronic databases, and a statewide reciprocal borrowing program. 

TexShare was transferred to us from the Higher Education Coordinating Board on September 1, 
1997. At that time, the program included 52 publicly funded institutions of higher education. 
Legislation passed by the 75th, 76th, and 77th Legislatures opened TexShare membership to 
private academic institutions, community colleges, public libraries, and libraries of clinical 
medicine. By 2001 the number of participating TexShare institutions had increased to over 600. 

As resource sharing programs continue to be effective ways to stretch library budgets, we 
anticipate that additional customer groups will be added to the TexShare consortium in the future. 

An important component of TexShare is access to electronic databases, which puts vast storehouses 
of knowledge on the patron's computer desktop, even in the most remote areas of Texas. This 
service erases distance barriers and levels the playing field, so all Texans have access to the same 
resources. Consolidating buying power at the state level enables us to offer Texans more databases 
for less money. The database component of TexShare has been further enhanced by grants from the 
Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund for the implementation of the Library of Texas Project. In 
FY2001 TIF funding for the Library of Texas enabled us to offer $150 million worth of online 
database subscriptions at one-tenth of that cost. For every dollar spent, Texas received a $1 5 return 
on investment. 

The Library of Texas Project will feature the ability to search across Texas library online catalogs, 
online databases, and selected Internet sites via a single search interface, and will allow Texans in 
remote areas and in rapidly growing but underserved counties to find and use information 
resources from their computer desktops. The integrated search interface will allow immediate and 
user-friendly access to these resources. Through the Library of Texas Project, the smallest, most 
remote library will have access to the same resources as the largest research library in the state. 

The State Records Center is also an example of a collaborative solution. Use of this low cost, high- 
density storage facility enables state agencies to achieve almost $55 million in cost avoidance. 
Approximately 9,400 state and local government offices currently use the services of our State and 
Local Records Management division. The steadily growing perception among governments that 
information is an asset and a resource that requires careful management has created a constant 
demand for this division's records management consulting and training services. State agencies and 




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public universities also rely on us to help them determine which of their records have permanent, 
archival value. The increased use of new information technologies among government offices 
creates a greater demand for advanced and intensive consultations and training sessions. 

State government and the Texans they serve also benefit from the services of our State 
Publications Clearinghouse and Texas Records and Information Locator Service (TRAIL). 
Together these services insure that state government publications and the valuable information 
they contain are available throughout the state, through a network of depository libraries and an 
online system for one-stop access to state publications in electronic form. A new Electronic 
Depository Program, a component of the Library of Texas Project, will build on these efforts to 
insure that electronic state publications are preserved for use by future generations. 

Historically, our user groups have relied on our various programs to access information and 
perform work-related tasks. Those seeking information are increasingly turning to the Web for 
answers. As a result, our customer base has grown exponentially. Increased awareness of services 
and heightened expectations for rapid response times also has resulted in increased demands from 
our patron groups. We have made major progress in providing information and services to our 
patrons through a variety of new avenues. At the same time, however, many Texans do not have 
the resources to take advantage of the new technology, so these Texans will continue to rely on our 
staff to help them with their informational needs. Part of our concern for the future is how we can 
best insure that these Texans are not left behind. 




Chapter Four 
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35 



Chapter Five 



Technological Developments 

A. Impact of Technology on Current Operations 

Technology continues to change the world in which we live in very dramatic ways. This 
transformation poses major challenges to the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and 
the services we provide our customers. 

Automated and networked applications continue to be essential elements in the delivery of 
services to our customers. The Internet has opened paths to information worldwide, and we are 
systematically taking steps to optimize our use of new technologies to serve our customers better. 

Access to information 

We take advantage of the Internet and Web-based services to provide information to more 
customers. We provide an increasing number of our documents on our Web site 
(www.tsl.state.tx.us) . including the Texas Public Library Statistics and the Texas Library Jobline. 
The number of electronic documents received by the Federal Documents Depository continues to 
increase, and the federal government is making an increasing number of documents available only 
in electronic format. Texas documents are also increasingly available online. In response to a 
mandate from the 74th (1995) Legislature to index and make available all electronic state 
government publications, we launched the Texas Records and Information Locator, or TRAIL, 
which provides one-stop access to electronic state publications (www.tsl.state.tx.us/trail ). 

As the complexity of the Internet continues to grow, and more information is becoming available 
electronically, we continue to organize and index resources for easier reference. TRAIL indexes 
and provides searching of more than 8,000 Texas state electronic publications, allowing state 
agency staff to find information produced by other agencies. TRAIL also helps the general public 
find information about state government. This effort has been expanded to include a special search 
feature that allows Texans to quickly locate state grant monies to fund their business, educational, 
artistic, and other useful endeavors. 

Talking Book Program patrons can access and download over 4,000 titles from Web-Braille, an 
Internet, web-based service provided by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped (NLS). This service, introduced in 1999, makes available in an electronic format 
many Braille books and all Braille magazines produced by NLS. Newest additions to Web-Braille 
include titles from the NLS music collections in Braille. 

In 1997, the 75th Legislature transferred the TexShare resource sharing consortium from the 
Higher Education Coordinating Board to the commission. TexShare ’s Web site 
(www.texshare.edu) includes participation guidelines, grant applications available for 
downloading, along with lists of TexShare program participants. 

With TIF funding for the Library of Texas Project, TexShare’s database service has expanded to 
provide 60 databases to academic libraries, public libraries, libraries of clinical medicine, and state 
agencies. The database service offers full-text articles from over 6,000 journals, 60,000 primary 




Chapter Five 
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36 



source documents, and over 18,000 e-book titles. TexShare databases are available even in the 
most remote, rural locations across Texas. Students, consumers, and researchers rely on these 
services for current, accurate information on health, technology, business, and a host of other 
topics. 

We continue our efforts to provide increasing amounts of information in electronic format on our 
Web site. By the end of FY 2002 we will have more than 200,000 digital images of original 
archival documents available online to researchers. Online exhibits such as “Texas Treasures,” 
“Governors of Texas,” and “The McArdle Notebooks” showcase some of the most significant 
documents from our collections of Texas history and provide historical background and 
interpretive information. We will develop at least one new exhibit each year, as well as add to the 
existing online searchable databases of the collections of archival state records thereby enabling 
thousands of teachers, school children, and others to easily find the information they need. 

Our staff will continue to use technology to locate additional information resources outside our 
collections, which in turn allows us to answer an increasing number of reference questions by 
referring clients directly to those readily available electronic resources. 

We also organize information by making an electronic catalog of all of our collections available 
via the web (http://star.tsl.state.tx.us/uhtbin/webcat) and via our website. This web-based catalog 
allows the public to know what resources are available from us, and in many cases allows access 
to those resources that are available electronically. 

Our staff continues to make improvements to the search capabilities of our most in-demand online 
archival and reference materials. Our outreach to libraries and state and local governments also 
increases because of improved online registration methods for statewide training events. Other 
changes include improved website design and navigational elements that focus on our customers 
and on the services we provide. 

Recognizing the value of providing information and services via the Internet, we allocated more 
resources to our web development efforts. Our webmaster and members of a cross-divisional team 
collaborated to design and build an improved agency website, launched in 2000, which continues 
to evolve to optimize our use of this technology to deliver services to our customers. 

Our increased web presence has raised new security, maintenance, and training issues agency- 
wide. The rapid pace of technological change requires frequent software upgrades including 
software patches for security upgrades and to maintain functionality. Our Information Resources 
Technologies staff continues to address new issues in security, as new software and services create 
new possibilities for abuse of the systems. A network architecture upgrade project is underway to 
replace obsolete network equipment, provide adequate firewall protection, and help position the 
commission to take better advantage of computer technology and telecommunications in 
delivering our services. 

We also continue to address and comply with all legislative initiatives for organizing, securing, 
and enhancing state agency Web sites and for improving customer services. 

Efficiency of our operation 

We use technological advances to streamline and automate many of our services, saving both time 
and money for the agency and our patrons. 




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37 



We continue to make enormous amounts of library and historical resources available via our 
website, including online catalogs, databases, indexes, full-text, answers to frequently asked 
questions, and digital images of original archival materials. There has been a corresponding 
expansion in the amount of similar information resources being made available on other state and 
federal Web sites. Consequently, growing numbers of researchers are able to obtain desired 
information from our website and other Web sites without ever having to consult with a member of 
our staff. Even when contacted directly by researchers, it is now frequently more efficient, effective 
and timely for our staff to provide those customers, particularly those seeking assistance via e-mail, 
with the locations of web sites/pages that contain online textual, graphical, or data base resources 
that provide the exact information being requested. Staff time conserved in this way can be devoted 
to compiling and mounting additional online information resources on our website. 

The move toward a networked environment has significantly increased the range of services and 
resources that we are able to provide our customers. We, like so many other libraries, have 
become a twenty-four hour a day access point to information services where users obtain services 
and resources on their terms and when they want such services. In this way, we are using Internet 
technology to empower our users and accomplish more of our goals. 

The automation of services has also created easier reporting procedures for both patrons and staff. 
In fiscal year 2001, public and academic librarians were able, for the first time, to complete and 
submit their annual reports via the Web. This makes the process easier for the librarians and 
decreases mathematical errors. Librarians are also able to download grant applications and 
guidelines. 

Reporting capabilities between the Talking Book Program and its parent organization, the 
National Library Service (NLS) at the Library of Congress continue to shift from paper to 
electronic means, saving time and improving accuracy. Recently, NLS began beta-testing a new 
web-based reporting system, with our program selected as one of the testing partners. 

Approximately 65 percent of the records in storage at the State Records Center are now managed 
in an automated system, and clients are able to enter information about their records from their 
own computers and submit the information by way of the Internet. The success of this in-house 
developed system, called Auto-Rec, has been invaluable in the quality and timeliness of services 
to our customers over the last decade. However, we are currently investigating systems that will 
provide a more user-friendly interface between our records storage center and our customers and 
will give us greater capacity to meet increasing demands for enhanced services. 

We utilize technology to efficiently automate and manage many of our functions, streamlining 
agency procedures. Staff throughout the Talking Book Program (TBP) division rely on ACCESS, 
an automated bibliographic, inventory, and circulation system, to track the status and location of 
materials, as well as access patron account information. Reader consultants in TBP's reader 
services unit assist patrons by using a variety of Internet resources, including Web-BLND, the 
Library of Congress's web-based catalog of books available in Braille and audio formats. 

Our Accounting Office uses automation technology to accomplish its daily tasks. Files such as 
voucher and deposit numbering logs, charts of accounts, and electronic copies of reports and their 
documentation are shared across the network. Our accounting staff has access to purchasing files, 
enabling the electronic creation of purchase vouchers from purchase orders which eliminates 
duplicate data entry. 




Chapter Five 
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38 



Our accounting staff enters all budgetary, expenditure, encumbrance, and revenue transactions 
online directly into the Uniform Statewide Accounting System (USAS) maintained by the 
Comptroller’s Office. As such, we are considered an “internal” agency of the system for reporting 
and monitoring purposes. USAS is our system of record. Each morning, the previous day’s 
transactions and the daily reports from USAS are copied from the Comptroller’s system and 
imported into the Ad Hoc Reporting System (AHRS) database, our internal accounting database. 
The AHRS database is used by our division directors and accounting staff to extract financial 
information at the transaction detail level. Our link to the Comptroller’s office is vital. Our 
technical staff works with the technical staff at the Comptroller’s office to insure a secure channel 
for this information exchange. 

Three times a week, revenue deposits are hand-delivered to the Treasury. Simultaneously, entries 
are made into USAS for the electronic distribution of that revenue to the appropriate strategies. 

Our federal grant payments are dependent upon wire transfers from the federal distribution center 
in Washington, D.C. to the state Treasury, which then notifies our accounting staff, via e-mail, of 
the arrival of federal grant funds. 

Our accounting staff uses Internet access to meet legislative reporting requirements by completing 
online reports for the Legislative Budget Board and the Comptroller’s Office. Access to the text of 
state and federal legislation impacting the agency is available via the Internet. Many state agencies, 
especially the Comptroller’s office, distribute information on policy changes and procedures 
electronically on their Web sites rather than sending hard copies to all agencies. Generally, staff 
receives an e-mail notification of new procedures, publications, or agency reporting requirements. 
The Comptroller has also made web training available to meet the requirements of using USAS. 
The Comptroller’s office will be expanding this web training to cover more subjects in the future to 
help with staff reductions and to make the training available to agency staff in remote areas. 

New services 

Technological advances within the commission create new opportunities for services that benefit 
Texans, state and local governments, and Texas libraries and librarians. The access to services 
through the Internet on our website, as well as e-mail access to our divisions, is a tremendous 
benefit to our customers. We expect to continue to upgrade and improve our website to make it 
easier to use and navigate. 

We enhanced the Texas Records and Information Locator service (TRAIL) so that it will: 

• Identify public information resources in state government 

• Describe the information available in those resources 

• Provide a direct link to that information 

• Be available from a Z39.50 (information retrieval standard) server 

• Quickly search for state grant opportunities 

As more of our customers use electronic mail and the Internet, the number of requests for 
information and consulting services grows. Web-based registration for workshops has been a 
welcome service. In addition to online registration, customers automatically receive a 
confirmation notice and are able to see the list of registrants for each event. 




Chapter Five 
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39 



As Internet and electronic services become more prevalent in the library community, the need for 
adequate technology training also grows. Our Continuing Education and Consulting (CE/C) 
Department staff aids in training Texas librarians in the use of various online and database 
resources. This department now includes three staff members well-versed in various aspects of 
technology. One and one-half consultants help librarians in the areas of telecommunications, 
integrated library systems, and web-based services. The third consultant specifically deals with 
various distance learning opportunities and technologies. 

The CE/C Department already provides statewide access to library-related satellite 
videoconferences, in addition to a small selection of self-directed online training sessions of 
benefit to library staff. The CE/C Department is venturing into new territory in 2002 by offering 
interactive online courses on the implementation and management of network security in libraries. 

The Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board is providing initial funding for Texas libraries 
to implement distance learning capabilities. Our staff is implementing a network-based video- 
conferencing system across the ten library regions. This system will allow us to develop a full 
range of web-based courses to offer to library staff, along with the opportunity to receive this 
needed training on essential topics wherever and whenever it is most beneficial to them. With the 
availability of this service within the agency, divisions can have face-to-face meetings with 
clients, provide continuing education to targeted audiences, provide consulting on a one-on-one 
basis, and provide monthly updates to their clients. The training and consulting staff of our State 
and Local Records Management Division, in particular, is planning a major expansion of its 
training services through the introduction of distance learning opportunities to our state agency 
and local government customers. 

The 76th Legislature authorized public libraries to join TexShare, and we met the challenge, 
successfully integrating the TexShare academic library databases and Texas State Electronic 
Library public library database offerings. Now all public and academic library patrons have access 
to the same information-rich selection of databases. The service is available to authorized library 
users 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The 77th Legislature has added libraries of clinical 
medicine to the TexShare consortium, and we will meet that challenge by also making these 
information resources available to the health professionals that use those libraries. 

Using the integrated library system that supports the web-based catalog, we have begun exporting 
MARC records of new items on the Texas State Document Depository shipping list. These records 
are sent to Texas State Document Depository libraries around the state. The records are then 
loaded into their catalogs, thus increasing public access to Texas state documents. 

In addition to improving web-based information and services to our external clients, we are also 
improving our internal web-based information and communications for our employees by 
establishing a networked intranet environment. Employees are able to post, maintain, and access 
policy and procedural information with just a few clicks of a mouse. 

The Library of Texas project, initiated with seed money from a Telecommunications Infrastructure 
Fund grant in FY01, will include: 

• expanded online database service 

• an Electronic Depository Program that will capture and preserve state government 
information that has bee produced in electronic format so that future generations can enjoy 
the same continuing access to electronic publications as they have with print publications., 




Chapter Five 
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40 



• a statewide information discovery tool to allow Texans in remote areas and in rapidly 
growing but underserved counties to find and use information resources from their 
desktops. The integrated interface will allow immediate and user-friendly access to these 
resources 

• extensive training, employing distance learning technologies, to help librarians and their 
customers gain full benefit from these rich information resources. 

Our partnerships 

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission utilizes partnerships and collaborations with 
other entities to strengthen our technology-based services and assist other state agencies. 

The development and growth of commission services, such as TRAIL, continue to increase our 
liaison and collaboration with other state agencies. TRAIL organizes the wealth of electronic 
information produced by state agencies and academic institutions and enables users to find 
information about state government efficiently. The new grant-searching feature of TRAIL was a 
collaborative effort with the Governor’s Office’s State Grants Team. 

The new Library of Texas initiative is a partnership program that was initiated through a grant 
from the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board. Collaboration with the University of 
North Texas is bringing to realization two components of that project, the Electronic Depository 
Program, and the virtual library resource discovery tool. 

We are also participating as a founding member in the Texas Archival Resources Online (TARO) 
Project. Funded by the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund at a cost of over $200,000, the 
1 8-month Phase I converted approximately 42,000 pages of archival finding aids from 
participating archival repositories into a format meant especially for the Internet. The project has 
established an online repository of archival resources for use by every Texan who has access to the 
Internet. The initial content of the repository will be a database consisting of collection 
descriptions, or "finding aids," that the member archives and libraries create to assist users in 
locating information in their holdings. In cooperation with the Library of Congress, the archival 
community has developed a standard method of creating online finding aids and this standard is 
being adopted by libraries, archives, and museums around the world are adopting this standard. 
Initially, this database will reside on a server at the University of Texas at Austin campus. Over 
10,000 of the 42,000 pages of finding aids will be from the Texas State Archives. Other 
participants in the TARO project included: Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, Center for 
American History, Benson Latin American Collection, Alexander Architectural Archives, and the 
Tarlton Law Library of the University of Texas; Texas A&M University; Rice University; 
University of Houston; and, Texas Tech University. 

As one of its six member agencies, the commission also works with the Records Management 
Interagency Coordinating Council to study the technological aspects of records management. The 
council will be conducting a survey of state agencies in late FY2002 to determine what the most 
pressing issues are in the field of electronic record-keeping. The findings of the survey will help 
chart a course for the council in the future. The council will examine the feasibility of centralizing 
e-mail management in a statewide depository and will study the issue of state agency Web sites as 
records and how best they should be maintained and managed. 




Chapter Five 
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41 



Presently we extend our web-based catalog to a limited number of state agencies for them to add 
their collections. These agencies include the State Law Library, the Texas Natural Resources 
Conservation Commission, Comptroller of Public Accounts (Technical Library), Texas Workers’ 
Compensation Commission, and the Legislative Reference Library. These agencies also use other 
modules of our library automation system, such as circulation control, serials control, and 
cataloging. However, due to limited staff resources, and the diversity of the agencies’ needs and 
collections, it is impractical to extend the service beyond the current group of agencies. 

Partnerships allow us to accomplish more of our technology-based goals and strengthen the 
effectiveness of state government. 



B. Degree of Agency Automation and Telecommunications 

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission supports mission-critical client-server 
applications and Web-based services, 25 servers, 200 desktop computers across two physical 
locations, a TCP/IP-based Ethernet local area network (LAN), and full service connectivity to the 
LAN, TEX-AN, and Internet. The Lorenzo de Zavala Building is connected to CAPnet via a fiber 
optic line which provides 10 megabits-per-second access. The State Records Center and Talking 
Book facilities at 4400 Shoal Creek Boulevard are each connected to the Lorenzo de Zavala 
Building by T-l lines. 

We maintain database applications to: 

• support the operations and service of the Talking Book Program; 

• support the management of the flow of records to and from state agencies; 

• provide detailed financial information required to manage the agency's financial resources; 
and 

• track the use of collections in the Archives and Information Services Division. 

We also use the unified state systems provided by the Comptroller, including: 

• Uniform State Personnel System for the management of personnel and payroll; 

• Uniform State Accounting System for accounting and management of funds; and 

• Uniform State Resources/Property Management for inventory control. 

Consortium services include the Integrated Library System and the cataloging and Interlibrary 
Loan service. 

We share our web-based catalog and the other modules of the integrated library system in a 
consortium arrangement with six other state agency libraries. Because of this arrangement, these 
state agency libraries are able to use the system for cataloging, retrieving, circulating and reporting 
on their collections at a very minimal cost. We use Unicom library system software purchased 
from and supported by SIRSI, Inc. to provide these services. 

Cataloging and Interlibrary Loan services are purchased from Online Computer Library Center 
(OCLC) and provide cataloging and other related library services for the agency and state agency 
partners. 




Chapter Five 
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42 



LAN and Internet services include: 

• our website that makes available collections of information from a growing number of 
libraries, state agencies, and commercial sources, as well as extensive indexes to the 
holdings in our various collections and value-added data compiled by staff; 

• the Texas Records and Information Locator service (TRAIL), a commercial application to 
gather and index the electronic documents of all state agencies that are made available via 
electronic networks; 

• electronic mail and network services; and 

• desktop backup services for online backups of all systems on the network. 

Currently, our Talking Book Program's automation staff are migrating the division's automated 
bibliographic and circulation system to a new server. This should increase database capacity and 
speed of operations. TBP staff have made great improvements in streamlining automated 
operations, particularly in the circulation unit. Staff in the reader services unit are working to 
improve telephone service to patrons, especially increasing the number of calls that reader 
consultants handle and reducing the number of calls turned away. 



C. Impact of Anticipated Technological Advances 

Over the next five to ten years, all of the current services of the Texas State Library and Archives 
Commission will increasingly be performed and delivered electronically. These changes will 
affect not only how the agency does business, but will also affect the agency’s client groups, their 
environments, and how they do business. For many organizations, information is a tool, and the 
shift from paper to electronic information is merely an improvement in their access to the tool. For 
libraries and archives, whose business is acquiring, organizing, storing, and providing information, 
the shift from paper to electronic information is both significant and crucial. 

Access to information 

Technological advances will continue to create new opportunities and challenges for the 
commission in providing information to Texas citizens, state and local government, and Texas 
libraries and librarians. 

Commercial, state and federal government publishing, and government record-keeping at all 
levels, will continue to move to online, network-accessible formats. State agencies have found it 
challenging to retain archival copies of state government documents that have been issued in 
electronic format. Pricing and licensing agreements with commercial publishers will remain 
unstable and difficult to negotiate for a number of years, until authors, publishers, etc., have 
established procedures and standards for online market behavior. 

We continue to lack the resources both in terms of technology and sufficiently trained staff to 
permit us to accept from agencies electronic record keeping systems that contain archival state 
records. Consequently, to insure that agencies properly maintain such records, the Electronic 
Records Standards and Procedures as set forth in our Administrative Rules (13 TAC 6.91 - 6.99) 
were amended in 2000. The option to substitute paper copies for electronic state records, explicitly 




Chapter Five 
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43 



stated in the previous version of the rules, was removed. Electronic state records that have archival 
value must now be maintained by the creating agency, except as otherwise determined by the state 
archivist. They must be maintained through hardware and software upgrades as authentic evidence 
of the state’s business in an accessible and searchable form. 

As the public becomes more familiar with online resource discovery, there will be demand for 
broader access to library catalogs and a user-friendly way to cross search these catalogs. As public 
awareness of the rich resources available grows, so will demand for quick retrieval of these 
resources. We must be prepared to provide the technology to answer these demands. 

Commercial, networked information providers are challenging the public libraries' information 
provider roles. Information needed for children's schoolwork, along with medical, legal, financial, 
and home maintenance information for adults, traditionally provided by public libraries, is already 
being provided by Internet businesses. Public libraries continue to develop their electronic roles. 
These roles include electronic publishing of community resources, providing support for distance 
learning, subsidized access to online information resources, continuing education, providing a 
place for people to do videoconferencing, and computer and web-based training. Assuring 
information access to Texans who currently don’t have access to these resources at home or work 
continues to be a basic responsibility of public libraries. 



Efficiency of our operation 

Improvements in Web-based technologies offer limitless opportunities to increase cost avoidance 
while streamlining agency procedures and maintaining a high level of customer service. As more 
services are moved to automated systems, and the business environment continues to shift to Web- 
based systems, the agency’s human resources must also adapt to maintain effectiveness. 

The need for direct intervention by reference staff to answer research inquiries is decreasing as a 
result of increased availability of network based information resources and services. Some of those 
staff will need to be trained in procedures to digitize original archival and library materials and to 
develop the databases and other online indexes designed to assist researchers in locating and 
accessing the digital images. Additional scanners and computers will be needed as well. 

Over 90 percent of the public libraries in Texas have Internet connections, but increased bandwidth 
and sophistication of those connections is needed. As more people use the Internet to access 
services, the need for electronic services, training, and support increases, thus straining the agency's 
technical and human resources. Widespread connectivity will allow new methods of communicat- 
ing among libraries and create opportunities for increased resource sharing, such as more effective 
interlibrary lending of paper materials, substitution of electronic for paper materials, shared 
subscriptions to online resources, and improved tools for statewide resource discovery. 

New services 

Technology offers us new and improved opportunities for service to our customers. 

Connectivity of client groups continues to increase, and transactions with client groups are 
expected to increasingly shift from paper mail, telephone, and personal contacts to electronic 
transactions. Electronic discussion groups, online training, computer-based training, and, 
eventually, videoconferencing, will replace some meetings and workshops. 




Chapter Five 
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Within this biennium, Continuing Education and Consulting staff and our records management 
training staff expect to use the Web to provide additional information and learning experiences 
that would enhance current in-person workshops. Stand alone Web-based continuing education 
opportunities will also be created. Currently, we expect to purchase a web-based courseware 
software package that will allow for the creation of both real-time online courses and self-directed 
online courses. We will have the added capability to record the real-time sessions and convert 
them into streaming media that will be made available via our website. 

Our Talking Book Program plans to create an online public catalog of its book collections. This 
catalog will be available on the Internet so that patrons may select books and view account 
information via home computers. 

In the next few years, the National Library Service (NLS) for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped will be making the conversion to digital recordings. Our Talking Book Program 
currently participates in NLS's Quality Assurance Program by submitting recordings from the 
Texas volunteer recording studio. As NLS moves into the digital age, our Talking Book Program 
will be participating in the conversion project by replacing equipment, training staff, and 
upgrading studio operations. 

Our partnerships 

We will continue to embrace partnerships as tools to enhance our services to the citizens of Texas. 
Technological advances have enabled more productive collaborations between entities due to 
improved communications systems and software developments. 

Network technology has opened up possibilities of shared services for client groups who where 
once served by separate agencies such as the Texas State Library and Archives Commission, 
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and Texas Education Agency. These collaborations 
are expected to continue to flourish. 

Partnerships will continue to play an important role in the conversion of documents to an 
electronic or Internet format. We anticipate continued involvement with initiatives like the Texas 
Archival Resources Online Project (TARO). 

The University of North Texas Library has formed a partnership with the Office of the Secretary 
of State to preserve and make permanently available back issues of the Texas Register. We 
support this partnership as an exemplary model of interagency collaboration. 

The work of the Library of Texas project will continue to build upon our current partnerships with 
the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board and the University of North Texas in building 
a statewide mechanism for information access. 

The Talking Book Program (TBP) is developing working relationships with other organizations 
and entities that serve a common patron base. These include governmental agencies, non-profit 
groups, and private organizations. TBP also is investigating ways in which its services could be 
offered through Texas public libraries. 




Chapter Five 
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45 



D. Direction of Agency Automation and Telecommunications 



The information resources strategy for the next five years will address the following: 

• Adopt and maintain a Windows-based desktop as an agency standard; 

• Increase user direct access to services via Web-based applications; 

• Increase telecommunication bandwidth to support user direct access; 

• Adopt and maintain the open-source Linux operating system as an agency standard; 

• Continue implementation of security technologies and standards; 

• Implement videoconferencing capabilities; and 

• Adopt planning and training standards and technologies to maximize staff productivity. 

• Continue implementation of in-house support systems to increase staff efficiency. 

Adopt and maintain a windows-based desktop as an agency standard 

We successfully migrated to a Windows environment from Macintosh computers. The five-year 
migration was completed in 2001 . We are upgrading desktops to Windows 2000 during the current 
biennium. Standardization has decreased the workload on the staff who support the desktop 
systems, allowing staff resources to be more efficiently used to support the overall network. 



Increase user direct access to services via web-based applications 

The State and Local Records Management application currently allows state agency users to enter 
information related to the storage of their records over Internet-based e-mail. Migrating applications 
such as this to web-based systems will provide more and better services to users without increasing 
staff resources. External customers access the agency's networked services via the Internet; there- 
fore, our emphasis on web functionality as an effective delivery method will continue to be a 
primary strategy. 

Our Talking Book Program plans to make direct access to its in-house ACCESS system possible 
through the Internet so that patrons can select books and review account information on their own. 



Increase telecommunication bandwidth to support user direct access 

The growth of commercial activities on the Internet results in users demanding more functionality 
through online services, creating a need for faster networked servers and increased network band- 
width. We currently receive telecommunications services (voice, data, and Internet) from the 
Department of Information Resources (DIR), Southwestern Bell, and Time-Wamer Cable. Due to 
the implementation of TRAIL, the publication of more of our collections on the Internet, and the 
increased number of Internet users, the need for bandwidth to TEX- AN and the Internet has 
increased. The current installation of fiber optic access to these services will be modified from half- 
duplex to full-duplex, effectively doubling the available bandwidth. If necessary, the bandwidth can 
be expanded to 100 megabits, depending on the vendor's capacity to support this expansion. 




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Adopt and maintain the open-source linux operating system as an agency standard 



We are moving away from vendor-specific UNIX and SCO and have adopted the open-source 
Linux operating system as an agency standard. The Linux operating system is more cost efficient 
and provides more hardware independence than UNIX and SCO. This move is reducing the 
hardware variations which the technical staff must support. 

Continue implementation of security technologies and standards 

Our divisions continue to expand their use of the Internet to provide access to a growing number of 
applications and materials to external customers. External access to applications and services and 
increased electronic government transactions pose potential security threats to the integrity of the 
agency's information resources. Although most of our information is public information, effective 
methods of preventing unauthorized access or modification of agency information are required. We 
have implemented firewall technology and will continue to implement appropriate and effective 
security standards as provided by the Texas Department of Information Resources and implement 
effective technologies to ensure the safety of the agency's information resources. 



Implement videoconferencing capabilities 

As connectivity of client groups increases, more transactions with client groups will shift from 
paper mail, telephone, and personal contacts to electronic transactions. Electronic discussion 
groups, online training, computer-based training, and, eventually, videoconferencing will replace 
some meetings and workshops. Videoconferencing will become a key method of delivering client 
group training for some of the agency's programs. During this biennium we are partnering with the 
Telecommunication Infrastructure Fund Board and the Texas libraries to implement a video- 
conferencing system across the library regions. This system will have significant positive impact on 
the availability of training for librarians across the state. 

Adopt standards and technologies to maximize staff productivity 

In recent years we have continuously increased the number of automated processes, applications, 
and services, as well as the number of desktop computers and network devices we use to manage 
these services. Our client groups are increasing in number, as well as their level of technical and 
Internet sophistication; therefore, expectations for expansion of Web-based services are high and 
continue to increase. The authorized FTEs in the Information Resources Technologies Division, 
however, has increased by only two positions. By implementing standards the IRT staff is able to 
plan, implement, and support new technologies, and maximize the efficiency of staff resources. 

Networked technology has become a necessity for doing business. The reliability of this service is 
critical. To help ensure that network resources are consistently available, IRT staff are replacing 
obsolete equipment according to a planned schedule, implementing security standards, and 
ensuring that adequate capacity exists to effectively manage the shift to Web-based services. 




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Continue implementation of in-house support systems to increase staff efficiency 

While many of the accounting procedures are automated, we need to implement an integrated 
procurement process, from identifying a need through disposing of property. We will participate in 
the statewide E-Procurement system when that system is fully operational. In the meantime, we 
will implement an interim automated system that integrates purchase requisitions, purchase orders, 
purchase vouchers, and accounting data. This networked system will improve efficiency, speed the 
payment process, and eliminate data entry errors. 

We will research options for moving from an antiquated manual inventory system to a more 
efficient bar code system. We have property located in three separate facilities, and the manual 
system is time consuming and cumbersome. Many state agencies have implemented this type of 
system and have realized savings in terms of staff time and reduction in lost and/or stolen items. 

Develop web-based access to records information for state agencies 

Our State Records Center currently stores over 325,000 hard copy records and over 350,000 
microfilm reels or microfiche for state agencies. Records in storage are tracked through Auto-Rec, 
a database application developed in-house. While the application has served us well, it lacks the 
functionality to permit state agencies to directly access information concerning their records stored 
at the center. The State Council for Competitive Government recommended and our state agency 
customers are requesting that we acquire and implement such access capability. Staff of our State 
and Local Records Management Division and our IRT Division will study and assess 
commercially available software systems with a view to migrating data from Auto-Rec to a 
database application accessible by our customers through the Internet. Since much of the time of 
staff of our State Records Center is currently spent in providing information to state agencies about 
their stored records, an accessible database system would free up staff time for the expansion of 
our services in other directions. 




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Chapter Six 



Impact of Federal Statutes and Regulations 



A. Historical Involvement of Federal Government 

In 1931 Texas became one of the first states to affiliate with the newly formed National Library 
Service (NLS) for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, a division of the Library of Congress in 
Washington, D.C. Today, using recorded cassette and Braille books, catalogs, special playback 
equipment, and a Braille database supplied by NLS, the Texas State Library and Archives 
Commission's Talking Book Program serves almost 21,000 Texans who would not be able to 
enjoy books without this vital service. 

From 1956 through 1998, the commission received federal funds under the Library Services Act 
and its successor, the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA), to assist local public library 
development. Federal funds were used to advance a statewide interlibrary loan system, fund the 
Texas Library System, provide grants for public library construction and renovation, promote 
library services to the disadvantaged, promote interlibrary cooperation and resource sharing, and 
support other projects to improve library service statewide. In 1996, the Library Services and 
Construction Act was replaced by Public Law 104-208, the Library Services and Technology Act 
(LSTA). LSTA consolidated all federal support for libraries into one piece of legislation and 
moved library funding out of the U.S. Department of Education to a newly organized Institute of 
Museum and Library Services (IMLS). While several projects funded under LSCA continued with 
LSTA funds, the new Act placed greater emphasis on programs that support technology in 
libraries, promote cooperative efforts among all types of libraries, and that support library services 
to people of diverse geographic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Programs funded with 
LSTA began in FY 1998. 

In 1964, TSLAC was designated as a regional depository for federal documents, in accordance 
with 44 United States Code 1912. This agency is one of only two regional depositories in the state, 
and serves the 70 Texas libraries that are selective depositories. Selective depositories are libraries 
which receive only a portion of documents distributed by the Depository Library Program of the 
U.S. Government Printing Office and retain the documents for a limited period of time. Regional 
depositories receive all publications distributed through the Depository Library Program and retain 
them permanently. 

The Schools and Libraries Universal Service Program (commonly called E-Rate) was established 
as part of the federal Telecommunications Act of 1996 with the express purpose of providing 
affordable access to telecommunications services for all eligible schools and libraries, particularly 
those in rural and inner-city areas. This federal program provides discounts of 20-90 percent on 
telecommunications services, Internet access, and internal connections. Since 1997, Texas public 
libraries have been required to submit a technology plan to TSLAC for approval in order to be 
eligible to receive the federal discount. Agency staff provide assistance to public libraries in 
developing, revising, and certifying the technology plans, and insuring that libraries are aware of 
the available discounts. In FY1999, 124 public libraries received $1.5 million in discounted 
services. In FY2000, 143 public libraries received $1.9 million. In FY2001, 171 libraries received 
$5,613,996.61. 




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B. Description of Current Federal Activities 



Under LSTA, federal funds can comprise only 66 percent of program costs, and require a 34 
percent matching investment. Administrative costs are limited to four percent of federal funds 
received; the remaining 96 percent must be used for direct projects or grants. In FY2000 and 2001, 
agency staff participated in training to learn outcome-based evaluation methods and will begin 
applying those methods to selected grant projects during FY2002. 

All projects funded by LSTA are described in our LSTA five-year plan, 1998-2002, and have been 
approved by IMLS. A five-year evaluation of LSTA funded projects in Texas is due to the 
Institute of Museum and Library Services by April 30, 2002. In addition, we are working with 
stakeholders statewide to craft a new five-year LSTA plan covering FY2003-2007. 

As one of 53 regional depositories for federal government publications in the nation, the Texas 
State Library and Archives Commission permanently maintains and provides free access to more 
than 1.4 million items produced by the federal government. These items are distributed by the U.S. 
Government Printing Office under authority of the Depository Library Act. As a regional 
depository, we must meet minimum standards for maintaining these documents. Periodic on-site 
visits are made to review TSLAC's collection and services. 

Technology is changing the role of government depository libraries. Regulations and amendments 
to the Paperwork Reduction Act, Printing Act, Depository Library Act, and the Government 
Printing Office Electronic Information Access Enhancement Act of 1993 (Public Law 103-40) 
have extended the definition of government publications beyond paper formats. The federal 
government is now providing an increasing amount of information in electronic formats, and often 
publishes exclusively in electronic form. 

In December 1 996, the Government Printing Office (GPO) issued their Study to Identify Measures 
Necessary for a Successful Transition to a More Electronic Federal Depository Library Program 
as required by legislation. In this document, GPO outlined several principles fundamental to a 
depository library system, regardless of format. These principles include: 

• The government has an obligation to guarantee the authenticity and integrity of its 
information. 

• The government has an obligation to preserve its information. 

The study set a number of goals to insure that electronic government resources receive treatment 
similar to other formats. The study also called for an increased investment in federal depository 
libraries to guarantee continuing public access to electronic resources. 

The migration to electronic resources has skyrocketed in Texas government. Almost all state 
agencies have Web sites, and many publications are issued on the Internet instead of in print. 

Some agencies are dropping print publication altogether in favor of online distribution to reduce 
publication costs and increase access to the information. 

The agency's Texas Records and Information Locator service (TRAIL — www.tsl.state.tx.us/trail) 
provides public access to the electronic publications issued by Texas state agencies. The 
Electronic Depository Program (EDP) currently in development as part of the Library of Texas 
Project will expand TRAIL to insure that public access is both complete and enduring. EDP will 




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harvest the content of Texas State agency Web sites, extract and index descriptive information 
about that content, and securely store the original electronic files. This digital preservation will 
afford Texans permanent and comprehensive access to state government resources. 

On January 25, 2002, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released a Notice of 
Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) and Order, FCC 02-8. This NPRM initiates a review of certain 
rules governing the universal service support mechanism for schools and libraries. The goals of 
the NPRM are as follows: 

• To consider changes that would fine-tune FCC rules to improve program operation; 

• To ensure that the benefits of this universal service support mechanism for schools and 
libraries are distributed in a manner that is fair and equitable; and 

• To improve FCC oversight of this program to insure that the goals of section 254 are met 
without waste, fraud, or abuse. 

Comments on the NPRM were due on or before April 5, 2002 with reply comments due on or 
before May 6, 2002. We are following this rulemaking process and will take appropriate action in 
response to any changes enacted. 

The federal Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) was signed into law in December 2000. 
Under CIPA, no public library could use Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) funds or 
receive federal Universal Service (E-Rate) discounts unless it certified that it was enforcing a 
policy of Internet safety that includes the use of filtering or blocking technology. The American 
Library Association, joined by the American Civil Liberties Union, challenged the CIPA 
legislation, and on May 3 1 , 2002, a three-judge panel ruled in favor of the American Library 
Association. 

The judges, sitting in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania ruled Sections 1712(a)(2) and 1721(b) 
of the Children’s Internet Protection Act to be facially invalid under the First Amendment and 
permanently enjoined the government from enforcing those provisions. The Court’s action 
prohibits the Federal Communications Commission, which administers the E-Rate Program, and 
the Institute of Museum and Library Services, which administers the Library Services and 
Technology Act, from withholding funds from public libraries that have chosen not to install 
filtering software on computers. Thus, public libraries are not required to install filters on their 
computers in order to receive funds from either of these agencies. 



C. Anticipated Impact of Future Federal Actions 

LSTA expires on September 30, 2002, and is being considered for re-authorization by Congress. If 
LSTA is not re-authorized, this would mean Texas libraries would lose approximately $10 million 
of federal funding each year. 

The Government Printing Office continues to move toward a more electronic federal depository 
library program; the number of paper products will continue to diminish. Increasingly libraries 
will be required to purchase robust telecommunications and Internet access services, and provide 
more computer hardware and software to meet public demand for access to networked government 
information. 




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Depository libraries continue to serve as centers for access to federal government information. The 
federal Depository Library Program provides access to both print and electronic publications not 
widely available. 

The Government Printing Office (GPO) has recently begun developing a system for providing 
permanent public access to electronic versions of federal government information. Participants 
involved in the development include government agencies, the National Archives, and the 
depository library community. 

GPO will continue to distribute electronic items through the depository program. The Library and 
Archives Commission currently owns more than 2,000 such items. Besides storage requirements to 
provide the service, the agency must also provide adequate computer workstations for the public to 
use while accessing the information. The minimum requirements for public workstations issued by 
GPO continue to reflect the cutting edge of technology and will require the agency to upgrade 
hardware and software periodically to meet the requirements. 




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Chapter Seven 



Other Legal Issues 

A. Impact of Anticipated Statutory Changes 

The Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA) is a draft state law for contracts 
relating to software and other forms of computer information. It has the potential to profoundly 
transform the way in which software is licensed and to limit the copyright protections consumers 
now enjoy when purchasing software. The law was passed in July 1999 by the National 
Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws and referred to the states for possible 
enactment by state legislatures. The legislation was considered by the 77 th Texas Legislature in the 
form of SB 709 and the companion HB1785. Due to a significant amount of opposition, those bills 
were never passed out of their respective committees. Passage of UCITA by a majority of states 
would alter the relationship between software vendors and consumers. UCITA is intended to 
govern all contracts for the development, sale, licensing, maintenance, and support of computer 
software, including contracts for information in digital form, such as electronic books. For the 
Texas State Library and Archives Commission and other Texas libraries, UCITA would mean 
higher costs and greater restrictions on information purchased in digital form. We anticipate that 
similar legislation will be introduced for consideration by the 78 th Texas Legislature. If the 
legislature invites the agency to submit a Fiscal Note on proposed legislation in the next session, 
staff will identify the anticipated cost increases. 



B. Impact of Current and Outstanding Court Cases 

The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) was signed into law in December 2000. Under 
CIPA, no public library may use Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) funds or receive 
Universal Service (E-Rate) discounts unless it certifies that it is enforcing a policy of Internet 
safety that includes the use of filtering or blocking technology. This Internet Safety Policy must 
protect against access, through computers with Internet access, to visual depictions that are 
obscene, child pornography, or (in the case of use by minors) harmful to minors. The library must 
also certify that it is enforcing the operation of such filtering or blocking technology during any 
use of such computers by minors. For E-Rate, the law was effective July 1, 2001, and for all future 
years. For LSTA funds, FY2003 funds are the first to be affected. Libraries using LSTA or E-Rate 
funds only on Telecommunications Services are excluded from the requirements of CIPA. 

The American Library Association and the American Civil Liberties Union have challenged the 
CIPA legislation. That court hearing is scheduled for March 25, 2002. 



C. Impact of Local Government Requirements 

Local governments continue to be more aggressive in their attempts to recover indirect costs from 
state and federal grants, resulting in higher administrative costs in grant programs. This also 
reduces available funds for improving local library services. Additionally, an increasing number of 




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cities and counties are questioning the value of applying for grants due to the perceived increase in 
staff time to apply for, implement, and report on grants. 

The 76 th Legislature (1999) amended the law related to the formation of library sales tax districts. 
This law authorized local entities to approve local taxes to establish library service. Nine tax 
districts have been established in Texas: Westbank (Austin-West Lake Hills), Salado, Wells 
Branch (Austin), Benbrook, Dripping Springs, Wimberley, Canyon Lake, Forest Hills, and 
Bulverde. More communities are exploring the library tax district as an option, and continue to 
request assistance from TSLAC staff to understand the law and the establishment process it 
enables. 




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Chapter Eight 



Self-Evaluation and 
Opportunities for Improvement 

A. Meeting Legal Requirements and Serving Critical Populations 
Library Resource Sharing 

In 1997 the 75th Texas Legislature moved the administration of the TexShare academic library 
resource sharing consortium from the Higher Education Coordinating Board to the Texas State 
Library and Archives Commission. The Legislature later expanded TexShare to include public 
libraries (1999) and libraries of clinical medicine (2001). Recognizing a need to deliver quality 
information content to Texas citizens, the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund (TIF) Board 
awarded a grant to the commission for the implementation of the Library of Texas Project, allowing 
us to expand resource sharing services. This expansion increased the savings that resource sharing 
generates for Texas libraries from $10 million dollars in FY1999 to over $150 million in FY2001. 
We need additional staff to realize the full potential of these resource sharing initiatives for the 
libraries of Texas. We will also need funding from the Legislature to continue these services after 
the TIF grant expires in FY2003. 

School Library Standards 

Under Education Code, §33.021, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission, in 
consultation with the State Board of Education, developed and adopted standards for school 
library services in 1997. The goal of School Library Programs: Standards and Guidelines for 
Texas is to maximize a school’s effectiveness in teaching students the skills needed to become 
dedicated lifelong learners. 

In response to changes affecting the state’s school libraries and based on a recent study of Texas 
school libraries and their impact on student achievement, these standards are currently being 
revised. Texas School Libraries: Standards, Resources, Services, and Students' Performance, 
published in 2001, measured the effect of school library activities, resources, and services on 
students’ TAAS scores and made recommendations for revising the standards. (The full report 
may be found at www.tsl.state.tx.us/ld/pubs/schlibsurvev/index.html .) We presented the findings 
to librarians throughout Texas and to the National Commission on Libraries and Information 
Sciences at a national hearing on school libraries held in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

In cooperation with the Texas Education Agency, TSLAC’s director appointed members to eight 
committees to revise the school library standards. Committees are accomplishing their work 
through teleconferences, e-mail, in-person meetings, and an electronic listserv and a web site. The 
committees are due to submit the revised standards to the Texas State Library and Archives 
Commission and the Texas State Board of Education in November 2002. 

In December 2002, Congress re-authorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The 
legislation includes authorization of $250 million for school library resources. This is the first 




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federal funding earmarked for school libraries since 1965. Studies on the effect of school libraries 
on student achievement, including our Texas School Libraries: Standards, Resources, Services, 
and Students' Performance, were used to support the need for federal funding for school libraries. 
Improvements in school libraries have also been a focus of President George W. Bush. The Texas 
Education Agency will receive these funds for distribution to Texas school libraries. The resources 
purchased will enable administrators to bring school libraries into greater compliance with School 
Library Programs: Standards and Guidelines for Texas. 



Talking Book Program 

Texans who qualify for service from our Talking Book Program because of visual, physical, or 
reading disabilities comprise a critical underserved population. At current levels of staffing and 
funding, our Talking Book Program can only serve about eight percent of the estimated eligible 
population. Increased funding for travel and outreach is necessary to promote the service 
throughout the state. Currently, only one staff member is available to do this promotional work and 
is asked to serve the entire state. In order to improve response times and expand the scope of the 
service, we also need more staff to assist patrons with reading requests and to duplicate recorded 
materials on demand. 

Loan Star Libraries Program 

Local communities are unable to provide the resources needed to meet the increasing library needs 
of their citizens. Local communities already provide almost 95% of library funding in Texas. As 
populations grow and needs for technology access and training increase, library budgets remain 
static. Particularly in rural and impoverished areas, public libraries are in a funding crisis. 

The Loan Star Libraries Program of direct state aid to public libraries was included in TSLAC’s 
FY2002-2003 budget. The appropriation of $2.9 million has been awarded to 517 eligible public 
libraries. Loan Star Libraries Program funds will be used to improve and expand library services. 

One quarter of the funds appropriated is divided equally among the eligible public libraries. The 
remaining three-quarters of the funds are distributed as a match on each local dollar spent for the 
operation and maintenance of the public library, with incentives to encourage libraries to offer 
statewide access. 

Friends of Libraries and Archives of Texas 

In 2001 we created a non-profit organization, the Friends of Libraries & Archives of Texas, to 
support our statewide library and archival services that benefit all Texans. The Friends advocate 
and promote our services and fundraise to expand those services. The group also fosters the 
development and growth of local groups in support of local libraries and archives in Texas. 

The Friends made their first important donation to the Texas State Library and Archives 
Commission in December 2001. The $4,500 donation will accomplish two initiatives: the 
preservation microfilming of a popular group of records in the Texas State Archives, the Convict 
Record Ledgers 1848-1954, and the installation of a computer kiosk in the lobby of our main 
facility, the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building. 




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While we consider the group still a fledging in terms of capital and membership, the future of the 
Friends is promising, and we anticipate a growth in its level of support over the next several years. 



B. Agency Characteristics Requiring Improvement 
Need for human resources development 

The increase in the Library Assistant and Librarian job classification in 1999 has helped us stay 
more competitive in this market, but the entry-level salary for professional librarians is still less 
than that recommended by the Texas Library Association ($25,932 vs. $30,000). 

Need for effective collaboration with constituent groups 

The State Library and Archives Commission communicates effectively with its client groups. We 
continue, however, to seek even greater interaction with citizen groups, professional associations, 
and our clients and advisory committees that help form ties and alliances for support of our 
initiatives. 

One of the roles that TSLAC fulfills is that of Facilitator. As such, we actively encourage 
cooperation and linkages between and among different types of libraries, among governments at 
all levels, and between other members of our public and ourselves. These interconnections, 
through electronic networks, advisory committees, supportive organizations, and personal 
relationships, are invaluable to our mission. We are pursuing additional opportunities for 
collaboration with public and private organizations in an effort to better serve our clients. 
Examples include partnerships with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Summerlee 
Foundation, the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board, the Tocker Foundation, and 
Libraries for the Future. 

Our Talking Book Program is working to resurrect natural alliances with allied state agencies, 
such as the Texas Commission for the Blind, and groups and organizations in order to promote 
this service more broadly to potential clients. TBP staff are seeking opportunities to work with 
non-profit groups, such as the Library Users of America and the National Federation of the Blind, 
to explore means to enhance our services. 



C. Key obstacles 
Space 

Archives and Information Services 

The most critical challenge to the successful realization of many of the public records goals and 
objectives of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission is the inadequacy of our 




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headquarters at the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building at 1201 Brazos Street 
in Austin. In particular, the growth, value, and use of the historically valuable archival collections 
of Texas are severely compromised by the lack of stack space in the existing building. 

Due to a lack of secure storage space in our headquarters, approximately 12,000 cubic feet of 
archival records are stored at our State Records Center — and the figure increases monthly. The 
State Records Center was not designed to be and is not an acceptable repository for the 
preservation of permanent records. Given the current rate of accessioning records of known or 
potential archival value, the allocation of space for archival records will begin hindering the ability 
of the State Records Center to carry out its primary objective, providing low-cost storage of the 
semi-active, non-permanent records of all state agencies. Because we are required by law to 
recover the costs of our records storage services, our Archives and Information Services Division 
must pay our State and Local Records Management Division for storage space. These charges 
currently amount to almost $35,500 per year, a figure that will continue to grow, putting further 
strain on an already inadequate budget for our Archives and Information Services Division. 

Work areas for staff to arrange, describe, and carry out minimal preservation treatment efforts are 
cramped and inadequate. Our long-standing goal to use volunteers to assist with some of those 
efforts continues to go unfulfilled because of lack of workspace. In addition, almost no secure 
storage space remains at our Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center in Liberty. The 
short-term problem is a lack of shelving, which is an expensive commodity. 

Problems with preserving documentary heritage are not confined to Texas. But legislatures 
throughout the nation, confronted with the same challenge, have authorized funding for new or 
expanded facilities and much needed staff. We believe that sooner, rather than later, Texas must 
do the same or risk causing irreparable damage to our efforts to preserve its history. 

Talking Book Program 

Our Talking Book Program is also hampered by a shortage of space. On a practical level, there are 
problems having the program scattered over three floors in our headquarters at the de Zavala 
building, as well as having half of the program's staff located at the State Records Center on Shoal 
Creek. Operations in the Lorenzo de Zavala building are crowded, especially in the volunteer 
recording studio, the cassette duplication workroom, and the Disability and Information Referral 
Center. Staff employed at the program’s Shoal Creek location, as well as active community 
volunteers, compete for work space and restroom facilities. Inadequate accommodations mean a 
loss of scheduling flexibility for both staff and volunteers and inhibit the growth of the volunteer 
program, especially as the efforts of our volunteers are critical to meeting our goals. The fact that 
staff are located in two separate facilities poses challenges for communication, staff sharing and 
training, and mutual problem solving. 

Staffing 

The volume of demand for services exceeds the ability of our staff to deliver them, despite 
ongoing improvements in productivity. 




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Archives and Information Services 

The historic understaffing of our Archives and Information Services Division undermines our 
ability to carry out activities related to our core role of Preserver. With limited staff, we must 
assign priorities to meet pressing demands. Records are prepared for research as resources permit. 
Part of the preparation process includes identifying records determined to have no long-term value 
so that they can be deaccessioned and destroyed. The backlog is growing faster than our staff can 
address. We no longer perform preservation treatments on fragile historical documents. Delaying 
description and forgoing preservation, two central functions of an archive, are unfortunate, but 
necessary choices given the current level of funding. 

From 1996 until the end of FY 2000, three archivists were assigned to thoroughly analyze and 
appraise existing records housed at state agencies. The project’s intention was to forestall the 
transfer to the State Archives of state records without long-term value, thereby decreasing 
dependence on our State Records Center for storage. For the most part, however, state agencies 
were unable to provide the archivists with accurate information about their records. Our appraisal 
archivists are now concentrating on records transferred to the State Archives. Record series are 
analyzed for their long-term value as resources permit. Appraisal on a series-by-series basis is far 
from ideal. Each record series stands alone without complete knowledge of its relationships to 
other record series from the same agency or from other agencies performing somewhat similar 
functions. It is likely that the State Archives is retaining more records than is truly necessary. If we 
are not allocated additional staff soon, we may be forced to require that state agencies retain such 
records themselves, and bear the costs of their ongoing maintenance, preservation, and access. In 
addition to imposing a serious financial burden on state agencies, such a situation could easily 
result in information of enduring value being lost due to accidental or deliberate destruction. 

The documentation of electronic records of archival value is almost nonexistent. Agencies 
continue to create complex relational databases, geographic information systems, and other 
increasingly sophisticated electronic records. To insure the preservation of electronic records of 
long-term value, records retention requirements must be addressed in the planning and design 
stages of new information systems. Agencies need assistance in determining what has archival 
value and should be transferred to the State Archives for permanent retention, and what should be 
retained permanently in the agency, in accordance with requirements for their storage and access 
as determined by the commission. Our Archives and Information Services Division does not have 
enough trained professional archivists to identify and appraise those systems. Further, we do not 
possess the necessary hardware and software to permit the transfer of and access to the content of 
those information systems. 

Library Development 

Inadequate staffing levels also limit the ability of our Library Development Division to deliver 
services at a level that meets the needs and expectations of our customers. The use of distance 
learning technology has not reduced the level of staffing needed; if anything, it has had the 
opposite effect. For example, when we provide access to videoconferences purchased from third 
party vendors at multiple sites around the state, the participants in distant sites require additional 
support, not only in the form of coordination and instructional materials, but also with subsequent 
information, advice and guidance. We currently support 12-20 videoconference sites, but as 
technology becomes available in more locations, our clients expect us to offer the programs at 
those locations as well. Our Library Development Division staff is also coordinating more training 




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opportunities for our Library Resource Sharing Division in support of programs for public and 
academic libraries and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grants. These grants will bring an 
estimated $12 million to Texas public libraries, but require our support. We simply lack the staff 
to provide these services at a level that meets customer expectations. 

Library Resource Sharing 

Our Library Resource Sharing program implements technical innovations to improve access to 
information by its constituent libraries. Much of this innovation comes at a high cost in terms of 
personnel, of computer resources, and of dollars. Consulting with librarians to provide statewide 
access to the shared database subscriptions takes hours of staff time. When the Library of Texas is 
in place, which will permit statewide cross-catalog resource discovery, these needs will increase 
exponentially. Our staffing level needs to grow as participation in these resource sharing programs 
grows. 

State and Local Records Management 

While interest in records management has grown steadily over the last decade in Texas 
governments and the records management needs of those governments have continued to grow 
more complex as a result of the use of electronic records, the number of records managers on our 
staff remains static at six. These staff members are expected to provide assistance and training to 
approximately 254 counties (some 9,000 local governments) and nearly 200 state agencies. 

Local governments, in particular, are in need of both basic and advanced records management 
assistance. Due to constant turnover of elected officials and declining tax revenues in small and 
medium local governments, local officials are rarely able to come to Austin to attend training 
classes. We will attempt to increase the number of regional training classes we conduct and to 
develop and offer more distance learning opportunities through the use of videoconferencing and 
web based learning. There will remain, however, a strong and steady demand for on-site 
assistance. While the lifting of the in-state travel cap in FY2002 provides us with opportunity for 
increased assistance, the number of staff we can employ limits our ability to take full advantage of 
the opportunity. When staff travels to local jurisdictions, they do so at the expense of services they 
can offer to state agencies. We are simply unable to meet all the demands and needs for our 
services, and those that are met are often not as timely as they should be. 

Talking Book Program 

The Talking Book Program also has difficulty meeting client needs because of inadequate staffing 
levels. We experienced a staggering 72 percent increase in circulation between FY1991 and 
FY1999. Staffing for the program, however, remained static throughout that period. The increase 
in circulation is due to automation enhancements, the extensive use of volunteers, and the 
streamlining of work procedures, all of which enable staff to accomplish work more efficiently. 

In FY2001, the Talking Book Program served approximately 8 percent of the population eligible 
for service, and 44 percent of the calls from patrons attempting to reach our reader consultants 
received a busy signal. The inadequate number of staff available to interact with patrons, duplicate 
copies of high-demand cassette materials, and coordinate circulation of books and magazines 
limits service growth. Our patrons may go unserved or discontinue use of the program because 
they are unable to communicate with our staff. Technology has streamlined workflow, but the 
human element is critical in the services we provide to our Talking Book Program patrons. Those 




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GO 



we serve through the program often feel isolated from their communities because of lack of sight 
or other disabilities, and require and deserve a human voice to assist them. 



Reliance on automated information resources 

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission has become increasingly reliant on computing 
and telecommunications technologies; some service delivery cannot function adequately without 
them. The investment in information technology and networks has improved internal communica- 
tion and enhanced productivity. Increasingly staff who have field assignments rely on the 
availability of a “virtual office” to support their efforts so that they are never out of touch with 
resources that can help them offer better service to our customers. 

Dependence on TSLAC as a gateway to electronic information requires computer systems to be us 
and reliable 24 hours a day/7 days a week. Increased resources are needed to support continuing 
education of our staff and to upgrade current hardware and software technology. 

The Library of Texas Project, once in place, will require access to broadband technologies and to 
hardware on which to run programs and store information. 



Planning and budgeting 

We continue to seek the most effective way to allocate existing resources. In some cases, formula- 
funded grant programs have created stakeholder groups that influence continued funding through 
their advocacy. While sensitivity to constituent needs is valuable, it can produce stagnation or a 
failure to address new needs when new revenue is not available. Because of their tendency to 
evolve into entitlement programs, formula programs tend to be incompatible with effective program 
evaluation. 

Dramatic changes have taken place in the basic federal structure for supporting library services. The 
40-year-old Library Services and Construction Act expired in 1996 and was replaced by new 
legislation, the Library Services and Technology Act. The new Act shifts the emphasis to using 
technology to provide networked and collaborative services, and to develop services for 
underserved populations — especially children living in poverty. These priorities are appropriate, 
and we must dramatically adapt our traditional programs for assisting most public libraries to align 
more effectively with these new priorities. The expansion of the federal program from exclusively 
public libraries to all libraries reinforces the recent direction of state programs. As a result, we have 
become increasingly active with the academic and school library communities. In short, the 
commission is in a transitional period that will require careful planning as we expand our client 
base and restructure our programs accordingly. 

One way we have already expanded our client base is through the TexShare library resource sharing 
consortium which brings together public libraries, academic libraries, and libraries of clinical 
medicine. The success of this program has prompted other types of libraries to request participation 
in the program, but current legislation and funding has limited our ability to expand participation in 
the program. We must find creative ways to forge partnerships with governmental libraries, school 
libraries, and other nonprofit libraries to realize the benefits of cost management and efficiency that 
are achieved when libraries work together and share resources. 




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61 



D. Opportunities 



Although faced with many obstacles, we will avail ourselves of numerous opportunities to provide 
an expanded array of services to our diverse client groups, enhance and improve the effectiveness 
of our operations, and play a more active role in state government in general. 

Enhance statewide sharing of library resources 

In 1997, the Legislature shifted responsibility for the TexShare library consortium to the 
commission, which prompted us to establish a new division to coordinate and manage statewide 
library resource sharing activities. The Legislature added new types if libraries to the consortium 
in 1999 and 2001. We now operate networked resource sharing initiatives for three distinct 
constituencies: public libraries, academic libraries, and libraries of clinical medicine. The Texas 
Education Agency operates similar programs for school libraries. As the sole state agency 
concerned predominantly with library issues, resources, and services, we are involved in joint 
planning efforts to better coordinate and develop these separate programs and to ensure the most 
effective use of limited state resources. 

We are developing a system to allow Texans, no matter where they live, to locate the information 
materials they need. The Library of Texas will allow all residents of the state, in one online 
session, to identify and locate holdings in libraries and other information repositories statewide. 
We speed delivery of materials to all Texans through effective use of high-tech and traditional 
infrastructures. A statewide interlibrary loan system utilizes online catalogs and communications 
systems already in place to encourage library-to-library lending. Our TexShare courier provides 
faster delivery of these interlibrary loan services statewide, and yields cost savings for academic 
and public libraries across Texas. Our TexShare card program encourages direct lending of library 
materials to users that need them while setting up parameters that protect the participating libraries 
from burdensome loss of materials. The combined efforts of the Library of Texas Project with our 
interlibrary loan system will dramatically expand the number of persons served by libraries and 
the number of informational materials provided to Texans, while decreasing the cost per book and 
other library materials provided. 

Ensure libraries have the telecommunications infrastructure they need 

Libraries of all types find it increasingly difficult to provide the range of information products and 
services that their clients need, without reliable and affordable access to broadband telecommu- 
nications services. The commission has worked closely with the Telecommunications Infra- 
structure Fund (TIF) Board to advance programs of support for the development of information 
infrastructure for libraries. To date, the TIF Board has provided $14 million for 592 public library 
locations, both for initial funding of technical infrastructure and for enhancing existing infra- 
structure. Approximately 90-95 percent of the public libraries in Texas had Internet access by 
2001. By the end of the current grant cycle, every public library that desires Internet access will 
have had an opportunity for TIF funding. 

Similarly, grant programs for community college connectivity provide more robust Internet access 
and technical infrastructure for every academic institution in the state. Commission staff played an 
active role in working with the TIF Board to develop these programs. 




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The Federal Telecommunications Act of 1996 established a federal Universal Service Fund (USF), 
an important program of support for discounted telecommunications rates for schools and 
libraries. Commission staff provided information and assistance to libraries seeking to benefit 
from this new program by providing workshops and information on the complex application 
process. We also accepted responsibility for approving the technology plans that are required for 
every applicant under the USF program. Further development of this program will require 
consistent staff involvement to assist libraries in maximizing the benefits of these discounts. 

Provide information through the Internet 

Since 1994, the commission has provided an effective public gateway to electronic information, 
including federal and state government information and commercial information databases. The 
TexShare online database service is a good example of the effectiveness of these services. Since 
FY1994, we have provided one-stop access to commercial full-text databases that enable public 
and state agency librarians to better serve their clients. Expanded through the TexShare and 
Library of Texas initiatives to include academic libraries and libraries of clinical medicine, this 
service now provides over 6,000 full text journals, over 60,000 primary source documents, and 
over 18,000 e-book titles. The availability of these storehouses of knowledge in even the smallest, 
most remote communities enables rural Texans to use resources that were formerly available only 
in large, research libraries. 

The Texas Records and Information Locator (TRAIL) is another example of our effective delivery 
of electronic library services. Launched in response to a legislative mandate to index and enhance 
access to state agency publications, TRAIL is a comprehensive source for state government infor- 
mation, regardless of format. TRAIL indexes and provides searching of more than 8,000 Texas 
state electronic resources, from more than 200 state agencies and 30 state colleges and universities. 
This effort has been expanded to include a special search feature that allows users to quickly locate 
state grant monies to fund their business, educational, artistic, and other useful endeavors. 

Realizing that everyone deserves access to both current and historic governmental information, the 
TRAIL service is being enhanced by the addition of an Electronic Depository Program (EDP). The 
EDP will capture and preserve state government information that has been produced in electronic 
format so that future generations can enjoy the same continuing access to electronic publications 
as they have with print publications. 

Through TexShare and the Library of Texas Project, we have an opportunity to expand and 
integrate electronic services, including TRAIL and over sixty electronic information databases. By 
collaborating with other libraries and electronic information providers across the state, we can help 
build a comprehensive electronic library all Texans can use effectively — anytime and anywhere. 

Our Talking Book Program offers two important services via the Internet to its patrons — the 
National Library Services’ public access catalog of available books and magazines and Web- 
Braille, a collection of over 4,000 Braille books, magazines, and musical scores. 

Use of technology to improve access and preservation 

Continuing advancements in information technologies, particularly in the area of digital imagery, 
offer libraries and archives new preservation and access opportunities. The ability to transmit 




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digital images of unique and valuable archival resources over communications networks to users 
— on-site as well as at distant locations — without any wear or possible damage to the original 
items contributes significantly to their long-term preservation and availability. 

Realizing the potential benefits of this technology, and in keeping with our long-standing efforts to 
make increasing numbers of our information resources directly accessible via the Internet, we 
reallocated existing resources in FY2000 to allow the creation of a new Digital Imaging Specialist 
position. As a result, by the end of FY 2002 we expect to have more than 200,000 digital images 
of original archival materials available on our web site. 

One impact of our efforts to provide Internet access to digital images of our archival holdings, as 
well as links from our web site to other known Internet sources for both historical and genealogical 
information has been a steady decline in the number of researchers requesting direct assistance from 
our reference staff. We expect that decline to continue, but time previously spent by commission 
staff in responding to direct inquiries from researchers will be devoted instead to constantly 
improving our web pages, to converting more archival and library materials to digital form, and to 
preparing online digital exhibits that will interpret and improve access to the unique information 
resources in our collections. Thus, we will be able to continue empowering the people of Texas to 
locate government information at anytime without having to contact us or travel to our facilities. 

Increase earned revenues, grants, and gifts 

A grant from the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund (TIF) Board has provided seed money 
to enable us to build the Library of Texas project. This innovative project allows us, in partnership 
with the 600 academic and public libraries across Texas, to better meet the information needs of 
Texas. The Library of Texas project builds on previous TIF infrastructure grants by providing 
content, the key element in a world-class telecommunications system. By transcending geographic 
and economic barriers, it also reinforces our other resource sharing services, such as TexShare and 
interlibrary loan. The information services provided through the Library of Texas will include 
online databases, current and retrospective electronic state government information, a statewide 
information discovery tool, and extensive training to help librarians and their customers gain full 
benefit from these rich information resources. 

We will continue to take advantage of opportunities to advocate for foundation funding for the 
historical projects of the State Archives and its network of regional historical resource depositories. 
The major obstacle to this opportunity is staff time to develop proposals for foundation grants. 

We will intensify our ongoing efforts to attract gifts for special projects to enhance services 
provided by the Talking Book Program (TBP). Additional staff in its public awareness department 
would facilitate this effort. While TBP has benefited from the receipt of several substantial bequests 
during the past biennium, we believe that an organized giving program would be invaluable in 
raising awareness of the program and its services. Funds will be used to improve outreach efforts 
and services to patrons, and to address some unmet needs at the TBP Circulation facility. Because 
we cannot depend on regular contributions of this kind, however, and because of various 
restrictions in using this funding, we are somewhat limited in the ways these funds can be used to 
support direct service to patrons. 

The Friends of the Talking Book Program Volunteer Recording Studio, Inc. is a support group 
formed in 1 996. They have had success in raising funds for purchases that assist in the production 




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of audio books, including reel-to-reel master tapes, book weights, headphones, and other 
production tools. 

In 1999, the Legislature provided for the issuance of a New Millennium/Texas Reads license plate. 
The proceeds from the sale of these specialty plates are to be used to fund grants for reading 
programs in public libraries. The project has the potential to raise additional revenues for us to 
grant to libraries; however, it also requires a substantial amount of planning and promotion work 
on the part of commission staff. We are working to coordinate the effort with other organizations, 
such as the Texas Library Association. In January 2002 there were 258 license plates on operating 
vehicles in the state, and $1 1,350 is in the fund for public libraries. 

In 2001 the Friends of Libraries & Archives of Texas was established as a private non-profit 
organization to support our statewide library and archival services that benefit all Texans. The 
Friends made their first important donation to the Texas State Library and Archives Commission 
in December 2001 . The $4,500 donation will accomplish two objectives: the preservation 
microfilming of a popular group of records in the Texas State Archives, the Convict Record 
Ledgers 1848-1954, and the installation of a computer kiosk in the lobby of our main facility, the 
Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building. While the group is still a fledging in 
terms of capital and membership, the future of the Friends is promising, and we anticipate growth 
in its level of support over the next several years. 

Explore alternatives for serving unserved populations 

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission awarded three grants in FY1999, four grants in 
FY2000, and six grants in FY2001 to establish library service in unserved areas of the state. The 
Establishment Grant Program, along with legislation that permits the creation of library tax 
districts, has helped to increase the availability of library service. 

The 1 .4 million persons without library service present us with an opportunity to partner with local 
libraries to extend services to this population. The opportunity does carry the challenge of 
overcoming geographical, administrative, and political obstacles, including the frequent lack of a 
local entity with which to work. Alternative methods of service delivery, such as electronic 
information networks, electronic document delivery, and resource sharing, are services that can be 
extended to the unserved, especially in isolated rural areas. 

Formation of state information policy 

We will continue to take a leadership role in working with other state agencies, both directly and 
through the Records Management Interagency Coordinating Council and other bodies, to establish 
sound state information policies and programs. Policies must be adopted that will ensure the 
development and implementation of record-keeping systems that use information technology to 
manage the state’s electronic records as effectively as its paper records have been managed. 
Effective policies will ensure electronic records are preserved as long as they are needed. We will 
play a key role in this arena because of our specialized staff skills in organizing information, our 
advocacy for equitable public access to government information, and our relationship with govern- 
ment records management programs, state agency libraries, university libraries, and public libraries. 




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65 



Improve cost-effectiveness and efficiency in government record-keeping 



At a time when expanded demand for government services is challenged by limited resources, we 
will continue to assist in the development of records management programs in Texas government 
offices that provide cost savings of millions of tax dollars. Cost avoidance for government record- 
keeping can be dramatically improved through the use of retention schedules to dispose of obsolete 
government records, the low-cost storage of inactive records, the organization of active records for 
easy retrieval, and the appropriate use of record-keeping technologies. Dependable, time-sensitive 
accessibility to records is critical for sustaining services to Texans and improving accountability of 
government operations. 

Explore funding options for a records management and preservation grant program 

In 2000 and 2001, the Texas Historical Records Advisory Board, one of our advisory bodies, 
conducted six focus groups around the state to get input from local government records custodians 
and those who use local government records. These group sessions were designed to gather input 
related to the most pressing needs in preserving and improving access to the historically valuable 
records of the local governments of Texas. At every session board members heard the same 
message - especially from custodians and users in smaller counties and cities - that there is clearly 
a need for funding to provide grants to assist counties, cities, and other local governments in 
managing and preserving their records. 

Commission staff have studied options for funding a records management and preservation grant 
program for local governments. A funding source, apart from the general revenue stream, would 
allow us to provide records management and preservation grants to local governments, expand our 
archival and records management resources and services to those governments, and provide us the 
means to assist them in times of disaster. In recent years, we have been unable to answer pleas for 
onsite assistance or financial aid from governments that have experienced natural disasters, such 
as Del Rio and Houston, because of lack of staff and funds. 

Implementing e-government initiatives 

Working with our Electronic Recording Advisory Committee, we will continue to assist Texas 
county clerks in implementing programs that will allow for the electronic filing and acceptance of 
real property documents as official records of their offices. Commission staff will also work with 
staff of the Department of Information Resources to develop administrative rules for the full 
deployment in Texas of the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act, a model law enacted by the 
Legislature in 2001, to encourage both e-commerce and e-govemment. 



E. Relationship with Local, State, and Federal Entities 

The commission has a statutory advisory structure to support our work with local governments 
and state agencies. 




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The Local Government Records Committee consists of ten local government and two state 
agency officials to advise and approve rules affecting local government records and review all 
other policy matters concerning local government records. 

The Electronic Recording Advisory Committee develops and recommends rules to the 
commission that permit county clerks to receive and record documents, especially in county real 
property records, by electronic means. The nineteen-member committee is comprised of a mixture 
of state officials, county clerks and judges, and representatives from the title industry. 

The Records Management Interagency Coordinating Council is composed of the elected or 
appointed heads of seven state agencies or their designees. The council reviews the activities of 
each member agency that affect the state’s management of records, studies other records 
management issues, and reports its findings and any recommended legislation to the governor and 
legislature every two years. The council is not technically an advisory committee to the 
commission; however, we carry out many of the council's recommendations through our existing 
rulemaking authority. A member of our staff also serves as clerk to the council, and we maintain 
the official records of all council activities. 

The Library Systems Act Advisory Board has a membership of five librarians to advise on 
operation of the Library Systems Act and the new Loan Star Libraries Program of direct aid to 
public libraries. The Library Services and Technology Act Grant Review Panel has ten 
members representing different types of libraries and their customers, and advises on library 
development policy issues and the use of federal funds to improve library services. Commission 
staff also meets with representatives of library systems several times a year to coordinate the 
delivery of services to local public libraries. 

The TexShare Advisory Board consists of eleven individuals, two each representing state- 
supported colleges and universities, community and junior colleges, and private universities and 
colleges; two members of the general public; two public library representatives; and one member 
at large. This board advises us on all aspects of the operation of the TexShare library resource 
sharing consortium. 

The Texas Historical Records Advisory Board (THRAB) works to ensure the comprehensive 
and efficient preservation of the state’s unique documentary heritage, including state records, local 
government records, and historical manuscripts. The governor appoints two citizen members. The 
state archivist serves as THRAB coordinator. Six remaining members — with demonstrated 
experience in the administration of government records, historical records, or archives — are 
appointed by the director and librarian of the commission. 

Our Talking Book Program is a member of a nationwide network of libraries providing library 
service to persons with disabilities. The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped is a division of the Library of Congress and provides thousands of books, playback 
equipment, and adaptive technology that would otherwise be unavailable to Texas readers with 
disabilities. The U.S. Postal Service provides postage so that TBP is able to deliver these materials 
to our patrons free of charge. 

Our Talking Book Program is also seeking alliances with groups that serve the same client base. 
These groups include other state agencies such as the Texas Commission for the Blind, non-profit 
groups such as Library Users of America, and businesses such as Recording for the Blind and 
Dyslexic of Texas. We also are also attempting to form closer working relationships with the 




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public library systems of the state. Even minimal contact with other groups such as these helps our 
Talking Book Program improve the service it delivers to our patrons. 

We continue to work closely with other state agencies to promote numerous initiatives and 
activities. For example, our staff provides expertise and information to assist the staff of the 
Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund Board as it develops programs relevant to libraries. We 
also maintain a high level of cooperative interaction with the staff of the Department of 
Information Resources in developing standards and guidelines, in addressing information 
technology issues, and in co-sponsoring an annual e-records conference. 

Commission staff also works with a range of non-governmental entities. We take a leading role in 
endeavors such as the Texas Book Festival. We provide consulting services for funding entities, 
such as the Tocker Foundation, the Seawell-Elam Foundation, and the Bill and Melinda Gates 
Foundation, to assist them in developing guidelines for grant programs, scoring grant proposals, 
and supporting libraries in carrying out their grant-funded projects. 



F. Available Key Technological, Capital, Human, and Community 
Resources 

• Our educated and motivated staff — our greatest strength and without whom we could not 
fulfill our mission. 

• Our library and archival collections, without which we would be unable to achieve our 
mission. These include the State Archives and our Sam Houston Regional Library and 
Research Center, the U.S. and Texas Documents collections, the Library Science Collection, 
and the Talking Book Program collection. 

• Our micrographics and digital imaging services and the records storage services of our State 
Records Center. 

• Our volunteers, whose efforts are critical to meeting the program goals of the Talking Book 
Program and the Archives and Information Services Division. In 2001, volunteers donated 
41,308 hours of work in these divisions, the equivalent of approximately 20 FTEs. 

• Our cooperative and collaborative working relationship with numerous state, local and federal 
officials and staff. Among these are records management officers in state agencies; local 
government records management officers; the librarians of state agencies libraries; the 
directors and staffs of the public, academic and school libraries in the state; and network 
division staff at the National Library Service. 

• Our access, through encouragement of resource sharing among all types of libraries, to the rich 
collections of the public, academic, and school libraries of Texas. 

• Our robust local area network connected with broadband access to the Internet. 

• Our access to the OCLC Library Network, through the AMIGOS Bibliographic Council, 
which provides a massive database of bibliographic records. 

• Our relationship with the Texas Library Association and its members who assist us in 
developing programs of service that meet the needs and expectations the residents of Texas. 




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68 



G. Employee Perception 



To assess our employees' opinions, the Texas State Library and Archives Commission participates 
in the Survey of Organizational Excellence, conducted every two years by the University of Texas 
at Austin School of Social Work. 

In response to the 1999 survey, management appointed an Organizational Excellence Task Force 
(OETF) to examine our strengths and weaknesses in greater detail. Comprised of staff members 
from each of our divisions, the OETF's mission was to distribute information about, collect 
feedback on, and develop recommendations for improvement in our performance. Our 
management team worked closely with the OETF to address employee concerns, and the 2001 
survey results indicate those efforts were successful. 

We developed and implemented an internal communications plan in response to concerns 
expressed by the OETF. We have publicized efforts in response to other issues through our 
internal newsletter. As a result, 51 percent of respondents in 2001 either agreed or strongly agreed 
that the information from the survey was used to improve performance. 

Highest increases in ratings in 2001 occurred in questions relating to employee value and 
supervisor effectiveness. Sixty-seven percent agreed that they were provided the opportunity to do 
their best work, and 64 percent agreed that the pace of work enables employees to do a good job. 

In terms of performance being evaluated fairly, 74 percent of staff agreed or strongly agreed. 

In analyzing the overall 2001 data, it is significant to point out that staff rated us higher than 
benchmarks in all dimensions except Accommodations. This is consistent with the 14-point drop 
in ratings for the Physical Environment construct, and the drop in ratings on primary items for 
employee safety and a well-maintained workplace. 

The data also reflects a positive staff view on all constructs except Fair Pay, which reflected a 48 
percent drop from the previous survey. This finding is of concern to us, since other data shows that 
almost 30 percent of our staff received a promotion or were re-classified to a higher position 
during the previous two years, and almost 60 percent of our staff received a merit increase. 

Further analysis shows that over 36 percent of respondents make less than $25,000 per year, but 
only 10 percent of the respondents were part-time employees. Demographic information from the 
survey indicates that 60 percent are primary wage earners, and 61 percent are the only wage 
earners in their households. In addition, almost 75 percent of the respondents support two or more 
persons. 




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Appendix A 



Agency's Planning Process and Timetable 



September, 2001: 

October 25-26, 2001 
January 22, 2002: 
January 24- April 29: 

March 8: 

March 15: 

March 25: 

March 26 - April 30: 
April 1: 

April 15 & May 2: 

May 6: 

May 14: 

June 17: 



Initial discussion of Strategic Planning were held among the 
division directors and management; preliminary plans were made 
for preparation of the plan and the inclusion of staff in the process. 

Strategic planning workshop was held with about 35 staff to discuss 
the agency’s goals, mission, and programs. 

Preliminary discussion of the Strategic Plan was held at a meeting 
of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. 

Using the staff who attended the strategic planning workshop, a 
series of meetings were held to develop and review plans, and to 
draft revised goal and mission statements. The director held a series 
of ten focus groups with all work units to discuss the staff view of 
the agency’s programs. 

Instructions for Preparing and Submitting Agency Strategic Plans 
were issued by the Legislative Budget Board and Governor’s Office 
of Budget and Planning. 

Initial draft of the Strategic Plan was sent to members of the Texas 
State Library and Archives Commission. 

Initial draft of the Strategic Plan was discussed at a meeting of the 
Texas State Library and Archives Commission. 

Completed and revised plan as necessary. 

Submitted requests to approve changes in budget structure, and 
definitions of outcome, output, efficiency, and explanatory 
measures to the Legislative Budget Board and Governor’s Office of 
Budget and Planning. 

Met with analysts from the Legislative Budget Board and the 
Governor’s Office of Budget and Planning to discuss suggestions 
for improvement to the measures definitions. 

Submitted final draft of Strategic Plan to Library and Archives 
Commission for approval. 

Texas State Library and Archives Commission reviewed and 
approved the Strategic Plan. 

Submitted Strategic Plan to Legislative Budget Board, Governor’s 
Office of Budget and Planning, and others. 




Appendix A 
- A-1 - 



70 



Appendix B 



Agency Organization Chart 

Number of FTE employees in FY02: 210.5 






Appendix B 
- B-1 - 



71 



Appendix C 



Five-Year Projections for Outcomes 



OUTCOME MEASURES 

Objective A. 1 

Percent of the population living outside of the 
service areas of public libraries. 

Dollar value of cost avoidance achieved by 
library resource sharing (millions). 

Objective A.2 

Percent of eligible population registered for 
Talking Book Program service. 

Objective B.l 

Percent of customers satisfied with State 
Library reference and information services. 

Objective C. 1 

Percent of state agencies administering 
programs based on approved records 
schedules. 

Percent of local government offices 
administering programs based on approved 
records schedules. 

Dollar value of cost-avoidance achieved for 
state records storage/maintenance (millions). 

Objective D. 1 

Percent of total dollars spent with HUB 
vendors. 



(Assumes Continuation of FY03 Funding Level) 



2003 


2004 


2005 


2006 


2007 


6.8% 


6.8% 


6.7% 


6.7% 


6.6% 


$464.0 


$381.0 


$276.7 


$155.0 


$143.7 


8.0% 


7.8% 


7.7% 


7.7% 


7.7% 


95% 


95% 


95% 


95% 


95% 


93% 


93% 


94% 


94% 


95% 


71% 


73% 


75% 


77% 


79% 


$64.0 


$66.0 


$68.2 


$70.3 


$72.3 


8% 


8% 


8% 


8% 


8% 



Appendix C 



Measure Definitions 



OBJECTIVE A.1 OUTCOME MEASURES 





Percent of Population without Public Library Service * 


Short Definition 


Gauges the percent of Texans who do not have a public library. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure is intended to show the percentage of Texans who live outside the 
service areas of public libraries and, by comparison, the percentage of Texans 
who are served by a public library. It measures the number of Texans who do not 
have access to a publicly supported library. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


The State Library assigns the amount of population served by each public library 
in accordance with administrative rules; generally, population is assigned on the 
basis of the governmental units that fund a particular library. This is done 
annually and is completed no sooner than late July. The data are available only 
annually. 


Method of Calculation 


The percent of population living outside of the service areas of public libraries is 
computed by subtracting the population served from the total population and 
dividing by the total population. Data elements are smoothed by computing a five- 
year linear trend to reduce the impact of new Census reports that are published on 
a somewhat erratic schedule. 


Data Limitations 


The population is generally assigned based on governmental units that fund a 
particular library. This does not take into account libraries that are willing to serve 
people outside their governmental funding units who may not have access to any 
other public library. When governmental units funding the public library do not 
match census data units (city, county), population is extrapolated from available 
data to assign service population. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Lower than Target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High/ Yes 

Dollar value of cost-avoidance achieved by library resource sharing 


Short Definition 


This is the amount of cost-avoidance realized by Texas libraries because of 
TexShare and the other resource sharing programs and services provided. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure shows the cost savings realized through library resource sharing 
services. It demonstrates the economies of scale and expanded services made 
possible by statewide resource sharing programs. 



•Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 



Source / 

Collection of Data 


Costs for individual libraries to provide access to databases are estimated from 
vendor’s price schedules. Costs to purchase materials received through inter- 
library loan and the TexShare Card program are calculated using the published 
average costs for books and commercial document delivery services. Costs to 
provide access to state agency publications are estimated by calculating the cost of 
postage to mail the materials individually. Costs to provide library-to-library 
delivery of materials are estimated by calculating the cost of postage to mail 
materials individually. Library resource sharing program costs include all 
allocable direct costs and are obtained from internal budget summaries. 


Method of Calculation 


The agency compiles a listing of database products purchased on statewide 
contract, estimating the cost each library would pay for these products if libraries 
purchased them on their own. Interlibrary loan data are derived from reports 
submitted by interlibrary loan centers and a commercial vendor. The State 
Publications Depository Program tracks the number of publications distributed to 
depository libraries. Participating libraries annually report the number of items 
circulated as part of the TexShare Card program. The number of materials 
delivered among libraries is reported by the commercial courier. 

Reported measure is determined by: (1) estimating the cost for participating 
libraries and state agencies to provide electronic access to databases, acquire state 
agency publications, mail library materials, and purchase materials received 
through interlibrary loan and the TexShare Card; and (2) subtracting actual 
expenditures of TexShare and other sharing programs. Calculated annually. 


Data Limitations 


Listed prices for databases reflect price quotations from vendors. Consistent cost 
comparisons are difficult to verify since the database marketplace changes 
rapidly; vendors frequently negotiate statewide discounts, and regularly offer 
price breaks on “package deals.” Postage costs could vary due to the weight of the 
packages or the number of items included in a single package. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High /No 



STRATEGY A.1 .1 OUTPUT MEASURES 





Number of books and other materials made available/circulated by 
library resource sharing services. 


Short Definition 


This is the number of items made available by TexShare and other library 
resource sharing services. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure shows the wide range of informational materials made available 
through TexShare and other library resource sharing services. It demonstrates how 
resource sharing services extend the range of materials available in libraries 
across Texas. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Includes interlibrary loans supplied, books, articles, audiovisuals, microforms, 
state publications, electronic publications and other materials supplied as well as 



* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 





the number of items circulated via the TexShare Card. The count of electronic 
documents represents the number of times project-funded resources (files, menus, 
graphics, or services) are used. Includes database searching results and database 
gateway services, but does not include typical Web-page browsing. 


Method of Calculation 


Reported quarterly, based on computer logs or on-site counts by participating 
libraries, contracting vendors, and the State Library. Some reports will include 
materials received from orders placed in the previous fiscal year. Based on non- 
unique counts each time materials are provided. 


Data Limitations 


Since database and interlibrary loan statistics are submitted by third parties, they 
are sometimes incomplete, or are sent too late for inclusion in quarterly reports. 
Database vendors do not uniformly define and report the number of electronic 
publications accessed. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 

Number of persons provided project-sponsored services by library 
resource sharing * 


Short Definition 


This is the number of people who receive TexShare and other library resource 
sharing services. 


Purpose / Importance 


The measure demonstrates the wide range of Texans who benefit from TexShare 
and other library resource sharing services. It illustrates the impact of these 
cooperative programs. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Measures instances of use of materials, services and activities. Includes interli- 
brary loans requested, number of reciprocal borrowers cards issued, and the 
number of search sessions on project-funded resources. A “session" is defined by 
the cumulative hits to the site by a single individual, as defined by a unique IP 
(Internet Protocol) address. A particular IP address is considered new/unique if 
the server has no record of activity for 30 minutes. Additionally, a "session" may 
be counted as beginning when a user logs into a particular service - such as a 
database - and ending when that person logs off that service. Includes database 
search sessions and database gateway services, but does not include typical Web- 
page browsing. 

Database statistics are reported by the database vendors; interlibrary loan and 
other transactions are submitted by participating libraries and a commercial 
vendor; and reciprocal borrowing transactions are reported by participating 
libraries. 


Method of Calculation 


Reported quarterly, based on computer logs or on-site counts by grant projects, 
contract vendors and the State Library. Some reports will include performance for 
projects funded in the previous fiscal year; reports from grant recipients may be 
based on sampling or other estimating techniques. Based on non-unique counts 
each time services are provided. 


Data Limitations 


Statistics from third parties are inconsistent and sometimes arrive too late to be 
reported. The number of “search sessions” may sometimes have to be estimated 



“Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 





based on a count of actual searches performed. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High / Yes 



Number of librarians and others trained or assisted to use shared 
resources 



Short Definition 


This is the number of librarians and other customers receiving consulting or 
training services in TexShare and other library resource sharing programs from 
the State Library. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure shows the number of clients who receive training and technical 
assistance from project staff. Training and consulting are critical to successful use 
of TexShare and other library resource sharing services. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Count of people (1) attending instructional workshops (based on sign-in sheets) or 
(2) receiving consulting technical assistance. Reported quarterly. Consulting 
includes assistance given by computer network, mail, telephone, and in person. 


Method of Calculation 


Based on non-unique counts by staff or contractors each time assistance or 
training is provided to librarians, library staffs, state agencies staff, state or local 
officials, or other customers. Calculated quarterly. 


Data Limitations 


Some reports may be based on sampling or other estimating techniques. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Low /No 



STRATEGY A.1 .1 EFFICIENCY MEASURES 



Number of days of average turnaround time for interiibrary loans 



Short Definition 


This is the average number of days it takes for a library to receive items requested 
through interiibrary loan. 


Purpose / Importance 


Interiibrary loan is a central component of library resource sharing. One measure 
of success is the average number of days it takes for a library to receive a 
requested item. It illustrates the success of efforts to implement ongoing process 
improvements. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


This data is based on statistical samples of filled requests, as submitted from 
resource centers, local libraries, and the computer network operator. 


Method of Calculation 


This figure reflects a weighted average of: (1) the average number of days it takes 
a library to receive requested materials when the material is available from the 
nearest resource center library; and (2) the average number of days it takes a 
library to receive requested materials when the material is not available from the 
nearest resource center. These requests are referred to and filled by another 



‘Indicates Key Measure Appendix D 



ERIC 



76 





lending library. 

Data is based on statistical samples of filled requests, as submitted from resource 
centers, local libraries and the computer network vendor. Calculated annually. 


Data Limitations 


Reports are based on sampling and other estimating techniques. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Lower than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 



Cost per book and other library material provided by shared 
resources 



Short Definition 


This is the unit cost of materials delivered via TexShare and other library resource 
sharing services. 


Purpose / Importance 


Resource sharing services dramatically expand the range of materials provided to 
libraries and the public. This measure shows the efficiency of TexShare and other 
library resource sharing services. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Costs are derived from budget summaries. Costs include all direct and allocable 
indirect costs in the strategy. Calculated annually. 


Method of Calculation 


This measure calculates a unit cost for all materials supplied. The cost of appro- 
priate projects in this strategy is divided by the number of materials, loaned or 
supplied by those projects. The cost of projects is based on the final budgeted 
grant or project amounts at the end of each reporting period, or on actual amounts, 
when available. Calculated annually. 


Data Limitations 


The reported results are not always within the complete control of the agency. For 
example, if the complete number of search sessions or interlibrary loans supplied 
is not reported on time, the reported cost per use will be higher than actual. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Lower than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Low / No 




* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 
- D-5 - 



77 



STRATEGY A.1 .2 OUTPUT MEASURES 





Number of books and other library materials provided to local libraries 


Short Definition 


Measures the number of items added to library collections or provided to libraries 
through programs funded by the Texas Library System and a variety of projects 
that support local libraries. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure provides a count of materials purchased for or provided to libraries 
as a result of projects designed to aid or assist local libraries directly. Examples of 
projects in this strategy include the Texas Library System, Loan Star Libraries 
grants, special focus grants, continuing education and consulting provided by the 
State Library, and Texas Reading Club. This is a count of books, subscriptions, 
audiovisuals, microforms, electronic documents and other materials loaned or 
supplied to a Texas library (includes materials purchased by all projects, materials 
in circuit or deposit collections, articles and documents, instructional manuals, 
Library Science Collection circulations, subscriptions, and other publications). It 
shows the amount of materials provided to local libraries that might otherwise not 
have been purchased or provided for Texans. Based on non-unique counts each 
time materials are provided. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Count of books, subscriptions, audiovisuals, e-documents and other materials 
purchased, leased, loaned, or supplied to a library (includes items purchased by all 
projects, in circuit/deposit collections, interlibrary loans, articles and documents, 
etc.). Counts of e-documents represent number of times project-funded resources 
(files, menus, graphics, or services) are used. Focuses on materials libraries would 
usually include in a collection, not administrative or publicity items. Traditional 
items purchased (books, a/v, etc.) are counted as the local library receives them. 
Counts of e-documents are collected through data collection software or by 
sampling or estimating. Reported at least quarterly, based on computer logs or on- 
site counts and tally sheets compiled by grantees, the agency, or contract vendors. 
Some reports may be based on sampling or other estimating techniques. Some 
reports will include materials received from orders placed in the previous fiscal 
year. 


Method of Calculation 


Numbers are compiled from various projects and tallied. 


Data Limitations 


Item counts may include materials from orders placed in a previous fiscal year. 
Database and e-resources statistics may be based on estimates and sampling. 
Statistics provided by commercial vendors sometimes vary in completeness. Data 
may be based on sampling or estimates. Data collected from grant projects may be 
received too late for inclusion is a particular report. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 



* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 





Number of librarians trained or assisted in local libraries 


Short Definition 


Calculates the number of librarians who receive training or assistance through the 
Texas Library System or directly from the State Library. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure counts people (1) attending or accessingjnstructional workshops or 
(2) receiving consulting assistance provided by the Texas Library System or the 
State Library. It provides a measure of the amount of service the strategy is 
providing to local librarians. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Reported monthly or quarterly, based on on-site counts by the library systems or 
the State Library; technical assistance includes assistance given by mail, e-mail, 
fax, telephone, and in person. Based on non-unique counts each time assistance or 
training is provided to librarians, library staffs, local officials, or others; some 
reports may be based on sampling or other estimating techniques. Sign-in sheets 
or on-site counts are used to count people attending instructional workshops. Staff 
record the number of people to whom they provide technical assistance by 
telephone, in-person, email, or mail. 


Method of Calculation 


Data are compiled and tallied. 


Data Limitations 


Data may be based on sampling or estimates. Some workshop attendees do not 
register and may not be counted. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 

Number of persons provided local library project-sponsored services 


Short Definition 


Calculates the number of Texans who receive direct services through the Texas 
Library System and a variety of other programs that support libraries. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure counts the number of instances persons receive services as a result 
of projects in this strategy. These projects are available directly to the local 
library; examples include the Texas Library System, Loan Star Libraries grants, 
special focus grants, continuing education and consulting services provided by the 
State Library, and the Texas Reading Club. It measures citizen use of materials, 
services, and activities provided by these projects. Includes persons receiving 
materials circulated by grant projects, persons viewing grant-supplied audiovisual 
materials, persons using circuit or deposit collections, persons attending literacy 
instruction, number of reference questions, direct loans to non-residents, Texas 
Reading Club logs distributed, and direct use of other funded services. Also 
includes the number of instances someone logs onto a project- funded electronic 
information resource; does not include users who directly access a file or directory 
down the menu tree. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Reported at least quarterly, based on computer logs, tally sheets, or on-site counts 
by grant projects and State Library. Some reports may be based on sampling or 
other estimating techniques; will include performance for some projects funded in 
previous fiscal year. The usage of library materials is estimated by multiplying the 
reporting entity's average collection turnover rate for the most recent year by the 
number of materials it received from the project. Based on non-unique counts 
each time service is provided. 



* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 



Method of Calculation 


Numbers for each project are compiled and tallied. 


Data Limitations 


Data may be based on sampling or estimates. Available software may not com- 
pletely capture electronic usage. Collection turnover rates are calculated from data 
reported by the local libraries. Some libraries do not use Texas Reading Club logs 
even though they participate in the program. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High / No 



STRATEGY A.1.2 EFFICIENCY MEASURES 

Cost per person provided local library project-sponsored services 



Short Definition 


Calculates the cost efficiencies of services provided through funded projects. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure calculates the cost effectiveness of providing local library project 
services. It demonstrates fiscal responsibility and the ability to provide effective 
service efficiently. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


The cost of projects is based on the final budgeted grant or project amounts at the 
end of each reporting period. The cost of appropriate projects is divided by the 
number of persons provided local library project-sponsored services. 


Method of Calculation 


Final budget figures are divided by the number of persons served. 


Data Limitations 


Unexpended grant funds may be returned after the report is filed due to unfilled 
orders, refunds, or other accounting anomalies. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Lower than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Low / No 



OBJECTIVE A. 2 OUTCOME MEASURES 

Percent of eligible population registered for Talking Book Program services * 



Short Definition 


This is the percentage of persons in Texas who are registered for service with the 
Talking Book Program (TBP), expressed as a ratio of all Texans estimated as be- 
ing eligible for TBP services by virtue of a visual, physical or learning disability. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure is intended to show the scope of service within the state and to indi- 
cate the program's level of success in serving as many eligible Texans as possible. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


A count of all individual patrons who have registered for service and had a status 
of "active" at any time during the fiscal year is tallied by the database system. 


Method of Calculation 


The count of individual patrons who have been active is divided by the "Number 




* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 
- 0-8 - 



30 





of Texans Eligible for Talking Book Program Service” to produce a percentage. 


Data Limitations 


The number of Texans estimated as eligible for service is calculated using a 
formula provided by the Library of Congress' National Library Service, but this 
formula has not been updated since 1979; the currency and accuracy of the census 
population information for Texas varies over time. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High / Yes 



STRATEGY A.2.1 OUTPUT MEASURES 



Number of persons served * 



Short Definition 


This is the total number of persons registered and actually receiving service from 
the program during the reporting period. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure is intended to document the number of individual Texans served. It 
tracks program service activity and growth patterns. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Tallied by computer, based on date of last service as documented by the database 
system. 


Method of Calculation 


The count of persons is not duplicative, is cumulative, and is updated monthly to 
include new patrons becoming active and receiving service as well as established 
patrons receiving service for the first time during the reporting period. 


Data Limitations 


Patrons registered with the program occasionally receive a book or magazine from 
an entity affiliated with TBP without TBP's knowledge; if the item loaned to the 
patron is not circulated from our collection it is not tracked by the database system 
and if it is the only item loaned to the patron within the reporting period, the 
patron is not counted as having received service. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High / Yes 



Number of institutions served 



Short Definition 


This is the total number of institutions registered and actually receiving service 
from the program during the reporting period. 


Purpose / Importance 


A significant portion of Texans who meet eligibility requirements receive services 
from the Talking Book Program through another organization, such as a retire- 
ment home, learning resource center, library, disabled students center, or class- 
room in a public or private school or college. This count represents these groups 
of patrons served at the institutional level. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Tallied by computer based on date of last service in the database. 




* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 
- D-9 - 



Method of Calculation 


The count of institutions is not duplicative, is cumulative, and is updated monthly 
to include new institutions becoming active and receiving service as well as estab- 
lished institutions receiving service for the first time during the reporting period. 


Data Limitations 


Institutions registered with TBP occasionally receive a book or magazine from an 
entity affiliated with TBP without TBP's knowledge; if the item loaned to the 
institution is not circulated from our collection it is not tracked in the database and 
if it is the only item loaned to the institution within the reporting period, the 
institution is not counted as having received service. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Low / No 



Number of volumes circulated 



Short Definition 


Total number of books and magazines sent to registered and active patrons. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure complements the strategy’s other output measures by depicting the 
extent of service provided to active patrons. 


Source / 


The count of volumes circulated is tallied by computer based on daily circulation 


Collection of Data 


as tracked by the database system. 


Method of Calculation 


Reports from the database are produced daily and summarized monthly through- 
out the reporting period. 


Data Limitations 


Of the items specifically requested by patrons, or selected for the patrons, some 
are unavailable; this lack of availability limits circulation. Also, it is possible, 
however unlikely, for items to be mailed without first being checked out and 
counted by the computer. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High /No 



STRATEGY A.2.1 EFFICIENCY MEASURES 



Cost per person/institution served 



Short Definition 


This is the unit cost to provide service to each individual patron and institution 
served during the reporting period. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure evaluates cost efficiency of the program; changes in cost per person 
can reveal an increase or decrease in overall efficiency. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Computer tracks expenditures and persons/institutions served and unit cost is 
calculated manually. 


Method of Calculation 


The total direct costs from appropriated funds are divided by the number of 
individual and institutional patrons served. 


Data Limitations 


The limitations associated with the ’’Number of Persons Served" and "Number of 




* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 
- D-10 - 



32 





Institutions Served" are relevant for this measure since its calculation includes the 
counts for those two output measures. Total expenditures may change slightly 
after the time this calculation is performed at the close of the fiscal year, but the 
changes would be negligible. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Lower than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Low / No 



Cost per volume circulated 



Short Definition 


This is the unit cost to circulate each volume, including books and magazines, to 
patrons throughout the reporting period. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure evaluates the cost efficiency of the program; changes in cost per 
volume circulated can reveal an increase or decrease in overall efficiency. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Computer tracks expenditures and volumes circulated; unit cost is calculated 
manually. 


Method of Calculation 


The total direct costs from appropriate funds are divided by the number of 
volumes circulated. 


Data Limitations 


The limitations associated with the "Number of Volumes Circulated" measure are 
relevant for this measure since its calculation includes the count for that output 
measure. Total expenditures may change slightly after the time this calculation is 
performed at the close of the fiscal year, but the changes would be negligible. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Lower than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 



STRATEGY A.2.1 EXPLANATORY MEASURES 

Number of Texans eligible for Talking Book Program service 



Short Definition 


This is the number of Texans estimated to be eligible for Talking Book Program 
service, derived from a formula endorsed by the Library of Congress’ National 
Library Service. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure provides an estimate of potential need for service in Texas. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Calculated manually based on population estimates provided by the Comptroller. 


Method of Calculation 


The total Texas population as estimated by the Comptroller is multiplied by .014. 


Data Limitations 


The formula provided by the Library of Congress’ National Library Service has 
not been updated since 1979. The currency and accuracy of the population infor- 
mation varies over time. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 




* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 
- D-1 1 - 



83 



New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Not applicable 


Priority / Key Measure 


Low / No 



OBJECTIVE B.1 OUTCOME MEASURES 





Percent of customers satisfied with State Library reference and 
information services 


Short Definition 


Quarterly surveys will be used to measure the level of customer satisfaction. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measurement provides an assessment of the level of customer satisfaction in 
regard to the overall availability and delivery of information services and serves 
as an indication of the extent to which improvements are needed. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


The agency will survey all persons who contact any of the four reference units of 
the Archives and Information Services (ARIS) Division for reference or research 
services on two sample days quarterly. Survey days will vary during the third and 
ninth week of each quarter. All individuals surveyed will be given an opportunity 
to provide additional comments including complaints or suggestions for 
improvement. No personal information will be requested as part of the survey. 
That day, customers having contact with staff via on-site visits, telephone, or 
written requests will be asked if they are satisfied with the services they received 
from the specific unit; the survey will be administered when the response to the 
customer's request is provided. 


Method of Calculation 


To compute a percentage of satisfied customers, the number of persons who 
respond "yes" will be divided by the total number responding for that day. 


Data Limitations 


Customers may indicate dissatisfaction with the services received when informed 
that a requested resource is either unavailable or simply does not exist. 
Respondents may mark more than one score (these will be considered non- 
respondents). 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High /No 



STRATEGY B.1 .1 OUTPUT MEASURE 





Number of assists with information resources 


Short Definition 


The number of times staff assist customers to find information; the staff will 
provide customers with information resources or informational responses. 


Purpose / Importance 


The measure provides an indication of the degree of success achieved in 
continually improving services to customers and a measure of staff effectiveness 



"Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 





in maintaining familiarity with internal and external resources. Customer 
assistance involves the knowledge, use, recommendation, interpretation of, or 
instruction in the use of one or more information resources by a staff member; 
directing a person to a source outside the agency known to possess the desired 
information; or, verifying that the information requested is not available. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Staff count all onsite information resources used by customers, or by staff 
assisting customers, as those materials are returned to their original locations. 

Staff also count those contacts where the provision of information does not 
involve the use of onsite resources. The assistance to customers includes 
responses to reference questions received by mail, phone, fax, e-mail, or in 
person. Onsite information resources include individually numbered containers of 
archival documents and items assigned and retrieved by means of a unique/locator 
number. External resources include libraries, institutions, organizations, or 
individuals, as well as databases, library catalogs, and other electronic 
information. Customer visits to the agency Web site are not included. Daily 
counts are tallied on a monthly basis. 


Method of Calculation 


The monthly total of customers assisted without the use of onsite information 
resources is combined with the monthly total of information resources used onsite 
to assist customers. 


Data Limitations 


Information resources might be returned to their original locations by non-staff 
members, which would result in an undercount of usage. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High /No 



STRATEGY B.1.1 EFFICIENCY MEASURE 





Cost per assist with information resources 


Short Definition 


A unit cost figure is derived by dividing the total of all appropriate direct costs by 
the total number of assists with information resources. 


Purpose / Importance 


This unit cost figure is an important tool for measuring the overall efficiency of 
providing ready access to information. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Staff maintain individual documentation of number of assists with information 
resources; this is calculated and reported monthly. Applicable direct costs are 
determined annually using data derived from the state accounting system. 


Method of Calculation 


The cost to assist with information resources is calculated by subtracting the costs 
of purchasing published materials, appraising, accessioning and processing 
archival or other documents for current and future use from the sum of all direct 
costs and dividing by the total number of assists with information resources by 
staff who provide service from all four collections. 


Data Limitations 


Two of the collections use full counts while two others employ a combination of 
full counts and statistical sampling in gathering data. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 



* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 



New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Lower than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Low /No 



STRATEGY B.1.1 EXPLANATORY MEASURE 



Number of Web-based information resources used 



Short Definition 


The number of times Web-based information resources provided by the Archives 
and Information Services (ARIS) Division are accessed by customers. Web-based 
document views (defined as the number of static Web pages accessed and does 
not include pages, forms, or search queries) will be considered as Web-based 
information resources. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure provides an indication of the degree of success of the agency's 
efforts to improve access to information by continually making new access tools 
and information resources available via the Internet, including full-text 
information, links to other Web pages, and digital reproductions of original 
archival materials. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Web document views are tallied automatically in a monthly report generated by 
the Web log analyzer used by the agency. 


Method of Calculation 


The total number of Web documents used is calculated by the Web log analysis 
software. 


Data Limitations 


A failure or "glitch" of the software used to analyze Web use may result in an 
inaccurate count. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


Yes 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Low/No 




* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 
- D-14 - 



86 



OBJECTIVE C.1 OUTCOME MEASURES 





Percent of state agencies administering programs based on approved 
records schedules 


Short Definition 


This is the percentage of state agencies that have submitted records retention 
schedules and have had the schedules approved, as required by Government Code, 
§441.185. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure tracks the level of compliance with state records management laws 
and reflects the agency's efforts to procure compliance. Compliance with records 
management laws improves public access to government information, provides 
for government accountability, and fosters cost-effective government record- 
keeping practices. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Approved records retention schedules are maintained in paper and evidence of 
approval is entered into a database. The number of state agencies is determined at 
the beginning of each fiscal year. State agencies that are administratively sup- 
ported by and receive their funding through the appropriated budget of another 
state agency are considered part of the supporting agency. State universities and 
colleges that are part of a university or state college system are considered part of 
the system. The Texas County and District Retirement System and the Texas 
Municipal Retirement System are state agencies by the Government Code, 
§441.185. 


Method of Calculation 


Divide the total number of state agencies with approved records retention 
schedules by the total number of state agencies. Calculated monthly. 


Data Limitations 


In every session of the Legislature, agencies are created, abolished, or combined 
with other agencies; thus, the total number of state agencies fluctuates unpredicta- 
bly from biennium to biennium. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High /No 

Percent of local government offices administering programs based on 
approved records schedules 


Short Definition 


This is the percentage of local governments that have, in accordance with the 
Local Government Code, §201.041: (1) submitted a records control schedule and 
have had the schedule approved; (2) adopted the records retention schedules 
issued by the State Library and Archives Commission; or (3) declared that all 
records will be maintained permanently. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure tracks the level of compliance with the Local Government Records 
Act of 1989 and reflects the agency's efforts to procure compliance. Compliance 
with the act improves public access to government information, provides for 
government accountability, and fosters cost-effective government recordkeeping 
practices. 



•Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 



Source / 

Collection of Data 


Documents demonstrating compliance are maintained in paper and evidence of 
compliance is entered into a database. The agency determines at the beginning of 
each fiscal year the total number of local governments subject to the Local 
Government Records Act with sources provided by other state agencies and 
government associations. Legally established, but otherwise inactive, water 
districts are not included in the total number of local governments. 


Method of Calculation 


Divide the total number of local governments in compliance by the total number 
of local governments. Calculated monthly. 


Data Limitations 


New local governments are created each year and some are abolished; thus, the 
total number of local governments fluctuates unpredictably from year to year. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 

Dollar value of cost-avoidance achieved for state records storage/maintenance 


Short Definition 


This is an estimate of the total costs avoided by Austin-area state agencies from 
using the State Records Center. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure is an indicator of dollars saved by removing non-current records of 
Austin-area state agencies from high-cost office space and placing them in the 
low-cost State Records Center. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


The estimated cost to store a cubic foot of records in Austin-area office space is 
determined at the beginning of each fiscal year from data provided by the General 
Services Commission (lease office space and filing equipment costs) and the 
Appropriations Act (file clerk salaries). The number of cubic feet stored in the 
State Records Center is taken from Output Measure C.1.1 (Number of cubic feet 
stored/maintained). Records Center costs include all direct and allocable indirect 
costs in the strategy and are derived from internal budget summaries and 
databases. 


Method of Calculation 


The cost to store a cubic foot of records in office space is multiplied by the 
number of cubic feet of records in storage at the State Records Center. Records 
Center storage and maintenance costs are subtracted from the office environment 
storage and maintenance costs to determine the total net cost-avoidance to the 
state. Calculated monthly. 


Data Limitations 


The cost per cubic foot to store and maintain records in an office environment 
varies from agency to agency, depending on the cost of their building and the 
level of staffing employed. An overall estimated average is used; no effort is made 
to weight the average based on the number of cubic feet each agency stores in the 
Records Center. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 



Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 



STRATEGY C.1.1 OUTPUT MEASURES 





Number of cubic feet stored/maintained * 


Short Definition 


This is the total number of cubic feet of paper documents (hard copy records) that 
are stored by state agencies in the State Records Center. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure indicates the extent to which the State Records Center is used by 
state agencies to store hard copies of their records; this in turn, indicates the level 
of customer satisfaction with the services and the competitiveness of the fee struc- 
ture for the services. Use of the State Records Center results in cost-avoidance as 
shown by Outcome Measure C.1.1 (Dollar value of cost-avoidance achieved for 
state records storage/maintenance). 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Hard copy records indexes (records accessioned prior to 1995) and an inventory 
database (records accessioned in 1995 and after) are updated continuously 
throughout the month as records move into and out of storage. Final total 
calculated monthly. 


Method of Calculation 


The total cubic feet shown in the hard copy records indexes is added to the total 
cubic feet shown in the inventory database to compute a total at the end of each 
month. 


Data Limitations 


The number of cubic feet may vary unexpectedly as customer agencies may in- 
crease or decrease the volume of their records stored in the Center on short notice. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


High / Yes 

Number of state and local government employees assisted or trained 


Short Definition 


This is the number of state agency and local government employees receiving 
consulting or training services in records and information management from the 
agency. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure indicates the level of interest by state and local government officials 
in records management and in complying with the state and local government 
records management statutes. This measure also reflects this agency's efforts to 
provide training and consulting services to stimulate the continued growth of 
records management in Texas government. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Staff complete electronic consulting and training logs maintained in a database on 
a daily basis. Calculated monthly. 


Method of Calculation 


The total number of persons receiving consulting are added to the total number of 
those receiving training services in a given month. 


Data Limitations 


As governments develop more sophisticated programs, the need for routine train- 
ing or technical assistance declines. This decreased need is usually offset by the 
needs of other governments that wish to improve their less advanced programs, 
but the ratio and the resulting target is not easily predictable. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 



Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 



New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 

Total Revenue from Storage Services 


Short Definition 


This is the total amount of fees billed to customers for the records storage services 
provided by the agency. 


Purpose / Importance 


Since this agency’s records storage services are on a full cost-recovery basis, the 
constant tracking and monitoring of revenues and expenses is important to ensure 
fees are in line with costs. Fees are set to recover all direct and allocable indirect 
costs in the strategy. Storage services include the physical transfer of paper, 
microfilm, and electronic record media from state agencies to the secure, 
environmentally controlled State Records Center; indexing, coding, and shelving 
of containers; retrieval, delivery and pick-up of records upon request; updating 
inventory indexes in compliance with changing records retention requirements; 
and ensuring the proper, final disposition of records, once retention requirement 
have been met. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Databases are used to document the volume of stored records in all formats and 
fees billed for storage services. The volume of stored records is updated daily and 
fees billed are calculated monthly. 


Method of Calculation 


Total fees billed for records storage services as determined by end of month 
figures. 


Data Limitations 


Total revenue will vary depending on the volume of records stored by state 
agencies during a given fiscal year. There is nothing in state law that requires 
agencies to use this agency’s records storage services. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 

Total Revenue from Imaging Services 


Short Definition 


This is the total amount of fees billed to customers for the imaging services 
provided by the agency. 


Purpose / Importance 


Since the agency’s imaging services are on a full cost-recovery basis, the constant 
tracking and monitoring of revenues and expenses is important to ensure fees are 
in line with costs. Fees are set to recover all direct and allocable indirect costs in 
the strategy. Microfilm imaging includes source document microfilming, dark- 
room operations for film processing and duplicating, quality control editing, and 
chemical testing of microfilm. Digital imaging includes scanning of original 
documents and conversion of computer output to laser disc. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


Databases are used to track work performed and fees billed for imaging services. 
Work performed is updated daily and fees billed are calculated monthly. 



* Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 



Method of Calculation 


Total fees billed for imaging services as determined by end of month figures. 


Data Limitations 


Total revenue will vary depending on volume of imaging work during a given 
fiscal year. Legislative requirements regarding the use of a contract workforce 
may not allow us to achieve the maximum revenue possible. There is nothing in 
state law that requires agencies to image records or to use this agency for imaging 
services if they do image records. 


Calculation Type 


Cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 



STRATEGY C.1 .1 EFFICIENCY MEASURES 





Cost per cubic foot stored/maintained 


Short Definition 


This is the cost to the State Library and Archives Commission to store a cubic 
foot of hard copy records in the State Records Center. 


Purpose / Importance 


This is an important measure in that it not only indicates the cost competitiveness 
of the records storage services, but it indicates the degree to which operating costs 
are controlled. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


The total number of cubic feet stored in the State Records Center is the Output 
Measure C.1.1 (Number of cubic feet stored/maintained). Records center costs are 
derived from monthly budget summaries and databases. Costs include all direct 
and allocable indirect costs in the strategy. Calculated monthly. 


Method of Calculation 


The total number of cubic feet of records stored in the State Records Center at the 
end of each month is divided by the costs of operating the Center during the 
month. 


Data Limitations 


The reported results of this measure are not always within the complete control of 
the agency. For example, if the volume of records stored/maintained exceeds 
target due to more agencies storing greater volumes of records, this will reduce 
the cost per cubic foot but will likely reduce the timeliness and quality of services 
due to the inability to staff the operation at a level proportionate to the demand for 
services. Ideally, the cost per cubic foot should remain at or near target, indicating 
expenses are in line with service levels. A sharp spike up in the targeted unit cost 
indicates operating costs are inappropriately high for the volume of work. A sharp 
spike down may indicate the volume of work is exceeding the program's ability to 
maintain acceptable service levels. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Lower than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 



Indicates Key Measure 



Appendix D 





Imaging services production revenue per FTE 


Short Definition 


This is a calculation of the total annual production revenue per FTE in the 
agency's imaging services operations. 


Purpose / Importance 


This measure is important because when the revenue per FTE declines, it 
indicates problems such as lower worker productivity, incorrect bidding of jobs, 
or an outdated fee structure. 


Source / 

Collection of Data 


FTE data is maintained in a database and updated monthly. Revenue data are 
maintained in accounting and billing databases and are updated and calculated 
monthly. 


Method of Calculation 


Total receipts earned and billed for imaging services during the month divided by 
the total number of FTEs used in imaging services, both permanent and contract 
labor. 


Data Limitations 


Although imaging projects are bid carefully, problems occasionally arise that 
require the allocation to a project of more permanent FTEs than originally planned 
without a corresponding increase in revenue. 


Calculation Type 


Non-cumulative 


New Measure 


No 


Desired Performance 


Higher than target 


Priority / Key Measure 


Medium / No 



* Indicates Key Measure 


Appendix D 
- D-20 - 

92 



Appendix E 



Workforce Plan 



I. Overview 

The Texas State Library and Archives Commission and staff believe all Texans have the right to 
barrier-free access to library and information services that meet personal and professional needs 
and interests, provided by well-trained, customer-oriented staff. 

The mission of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission is to safeguard significant 
resources, provide information services that inspire and support research, education and reading, 
and enhance the capacity for achievement of current and future generations. To accomplish this, 
we: 

• Preserve the record of government for public scrutiny 

• Secure and make accessible historically significant records and other valuable resources 

• Meet the reading needs of Texans with disabilities 

• Build and sustain statewide partnerships to improve library programs and services, and 

• Enhance the capacity for achievement of individuals and institutions with whom we 
work. 

To accomplish our mission, we work to achieve three programmatic goals and four objectives. 
These are outlined below. 

Goal 1: To improve the availability of library and information services 

Objective 1.1: Increase the percent of population with services exceeding the average 

Objective 1.2: Increase library use by Texans with disabilities 

Goal 2: To improve information services by answering reference questions 

Objective 2.1: Improve information to public and others by answering reference questions 

Goal 3: To achieve cost-effective management of state and local records 
Objective 3.1: Achieve record retention rate for state-local government 

We serve a variety of roles in state government to accomplish these goals. These roles range 
from Advisor to Innovator, and form the basis for our strategic planning efforts. 

Our core business functions include the following: 

• Provide grant funding, technical assistance and continuing education support for 
establishing, expanding, and improving public library services statewide 

• Provide technical assistance to state and local records managers 

• Provide recorded books and magazines for Texans who are blind or physically 
handicapped 

• Provide safe, economical storage of print and electronic records for state agencies 

• Preserve historically-significant state records and documents 

• Provide access to state and federal government documents 




Appendix E 
-E-1 - 



93 



• Provide access to specialized genealogical materials 

• Support interlibrary cooperation and resource sharing programs among all types of 
libraries 

We do not anticipate any major changes to our mission, strategies or goals over the next five 
years in our state-mandated programs. The primary changes we anticipate will be in the way we 
deliver our programs and services. We are increasingly using technology to provide information 
and other services in electronic formats in response to customer demands. This shift will require 
us to continually re-examine our existing workforce and ensure our future workforce has the 
skills necessary to make this shift successful. 

Our federal programs are subject to change based on actions at the federal level; however, these 
changes are generally publicized well in advance of expected implementation. We will be able 
to readjust our workforce to meet future changes in these programs with minimal disruption to 
current service delivery. 

We currently operate seven program divisions: Archives and Information Services, Information 
Resource Technologies, Library Development, Library Resource Sharing, State and Local 
Records Management, the Talking Book Program, and Administrative Services. We do not 
anticipate a need to reorganize this structure in the next five years. 

Our agency has three independent “libraries” operating within the agency, all of which serve 
separate and distinct customers. In addition, we preserve the state’s records, store and image 
other agencies’ records, and provide consulting and training services to our constituent groups. 
Therefore, the organizational structure of the agency is departmental, and the staff structure is 
hierarchical within those departments. We recently implemented self-managed teams in some of 
our departments, and there will be greater emphasis on teamwork and streamlining of staffing 
functions throughout the agency. However, the basic organizational structure should change very 
little. 

As an agency, we will continue to focus on improving service delivery to our customers and 
patrons while maintaining our current staffing levels. This includes meeting emerging customer 
demands for services in digitized and Spanish-language formats. 



II. Current Workforce Profile (Supply Analysis) 

Demographics 

The following table details the ethnic and gender breakdown of our workforce as of February 28, 
2002, by job category as defined by the Texas Commission on Human Rights. The agency is 
authorized 210.5 FTEs, and we have 192 full-time and 37 part-time staff when we are at full 
employment. 



O 

ERIC 



Appendix E 
* E-2 - 



94 



Job Category 


Category 

Total 


Asian 


African 

American 


Hispanic 

American 


White 


Subtotals 


Number of Employees 




Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Officials/Administrators 


9 


0 


0 


0 


0 


1 


0 


3 


5 


4 


5 


Administrative Support 


56 


0 


0 


3 


5 


12 


1 


24 


11 


39 


17 


Technicians 


9 


1 


0 


1 


0 


0 


0 


6 


1 


8 


1 


Service/Maintenance 


2 


1 


0 


0 


0 


0 


0 


1 


0 


2 


0 


Professionals 


85 


0 


0 


0 


1 


4 


12 


26 


42 


30 


55 


Para-Professionals 


40 


0 


1 


1 


3 


6 


3 


9 


17 


16 


24 


Skilled/Craft 


18 


0 


0 


0 


4 


1 


2 


5 


6 


6 


12 


Total 


219 


2 


1 


5 


13 


24 


18 


74 


82 


105 


114 


Percent of Workforce 


3 \ 


18 1 


42 


156 1 


219 


1.37% 


8.22% 


19.18% 


71 . 23 % 


48% | 52% 



Our agency continues to face challenges in recruiting qualified minorities. We received a total of 
724 applications for the 117 job vacancy notices posted during FY 2001. We filled 35 vacancies 
with qualified internal applicants, and 42.8 percent of these promotions were filled with internal 
minority candidates. The overall number of applications received from minority candidates is up 
from 171 in FY 2000; however, the percentage of qualified candidates (applicants meeting stated 
minimum requirements) decreased during FY 2001 . 

In FY 2001, qualified minority candidates comprised less than 14 percent of the total applicant 
pool. Thirty-one percent (228) of the total applications submitted were from minority candidates, 
and less than half of those applicants (101) met minimum job qualifications listed on the job 
vacancy announcement. This indicates that our recruiting efforts have shown success in reaching 
minority job applicants; however, less than half of the available candidates meet the job 
requirements for our specific positions. 

The threat of “brain drain” presents an additional threat to our agency in the near future. We 
have 34 staff members eligible to retire within the next five years, with 21 eligible during the 
current biennium. Many of these staff members hold key management and program specialist 
positions. 

The following chart shows the seriousness of this problem at our agency. Almost 60 percent of 
our current staff have less than five years of state service, either at our agency or another state 
agency institution. In addition, almost 20 percent have more than 15 years of total state agency 
service. Closing the anticipated gap in institutional knowledge is an area where we will focus 
our efforts in the next two to five years. 




Appendix E 
- E-3 - 



95 




> than 2 to 5 5 to 10 10 to 15 15 to 20 20 to 25 25 to 30 30 to 35 

2 



□ FY 2000 
■ FY 2001 

□ FY 2002 



Similarly, the next chart reflects our aging workforce. Over 62 percent of our workforce are over 
the age of 40, and many of these have more than 20 years of service. We anticipate "brain drain" 
to be a continuing issue for us over the next several years. 




Our management philosophy is to promote from within whenever there is a qualified internal 
candidate for a vacancy. This philosophy has been very effective, as evidenced by the many key 
managers and program specialists who have chosen to advance their career within the agency. 

As a result, a large number of staff have acquired institutional knowledge that will be difficult to 
replace. 

Turnover and Attrition 

A high staff turnover rate in FY 2001 (30.99%) prompted us to examine our policies and take 
additional steps to ensure maximum employee retention and reduce the number of voluntary 
turnovers. We believe these efforts have been successful, and the smaller turnover we have 
experienced in the past six months indicates we are moving in the right direction. From Sep. 
2001, to Feb. 2002, a total of 17 employees left the agency. If this trend continues, our annual 
turnover rate will be 40 percent lower than FY 2001 . 




Appendix E 
• E-4 - 




96 



We recognize, however, that the declining economy has also been a factor in our reduced 
turnover rate. The massive layoffs by private companies in the Austin area during the past year 
mean fewer jobs available in the private sector. As a result, fewer agency employees are actively 
seeking other employment at this time. It is, therefore, important that we continue efforts to 
retain qualified staff so we do not experience a high turnover when economic conditions 
improve. 

Voluntary staff resignations present challenges for programs at our agency. Attrition on the 
professional side has slowed in recent months, and this trend is expected to continue, except for 
those who will reach retirement eligibility. However, many of our positions are clerical or para- 
professional in nature and are not intended to be career jobs. These positions tend to have a 
higher turnover rate as staff seek increased salaries and better possibilities for advancement from 
employment elsewhere. Many of the job requirements in these positions are repetitious and 
unchallenging with little opportunity for staff to utilize their creativity. In addition, the physical 
work environments in our storage and circulation facilities do not foster a desire to remain in 
those positions for an extended period. Attrition rates for these positions will continue to be 
moderate to high. 



Critical Workforce Skills 

In order to fulfill our mission, we must have individuals with advanced information research, 
organization and retrieval skills. In particular, our workforce needs the ability to integrate 
emerging technologies into the information management process. 

We have a number of positions that require highly specialized skills, such as professional 
librarians, archivists, and government information analysts, in addition to IT professionals. 
Ninety-eight of our positions are categorized as professional. Of these, 48 require an advanced 
degree, and 42 require a bachelors degree. 

Our current workforce needs additional computer literacy and proficiency skills training to 
ensure we remain in-step with rapidly advancing technology. We are delivering more of our 
services electronically, and all staff will need to have minimal computer skills. In addition, 
many staff will need to attain proficiency in various applications and bring more of the work 
processes to their own desktop computers. 

Our movement towards digitization of documents and information requires more staff to become 
proficient in this emerging technology. Some of the technical skills currently required 
(microfilming, tape duplication, etc.) will no longer be necessary when we transition to the new 
technology. Customer demand for these new services will determine how quickly this transition 
is made. 

Challenges Recruiting Mission-Critical Skills 

State agency salaries continue to lag behind the regional marketplace, particularly for positions 
located in the Austin area. This limits our ability to successfully recruit the most qualified 



0 

ERIC 



Appendix E 
- E-5 - 



97 



candidates for some of our critical professional and management positions. In addition, evolving 
job responsibilities demand a proportionately larger return in skill level, education, and ability. 

We have significantly raised the salary levels within our agency since FY 2000, as reflected in 
the chart below. Many of our jobs have become increasingly complex, and we have adjusted job 
responsibilities and position classifications accordingly. However, we have a large number of 
staff who have been in their positions for many years, and an additional challenge we face is 
increasing these salaries comparable to what we are able to offer new hires. Our large number of 
part-time positions in the clerical series is also a challenge to raising overall salaries in our 
agency. 




Staff have acquired some of our mission-critical skills over time, such as institutional knowledge 
of our particular collections. Agency "experts" expedite the flow of information and maintain the 
high levels of customer service we strive to provide. As individuals retire, replacements with the 
same skills and knowledge are harder to secure for the salaries we can pay. 

The legislative cap on the number of authorized full-time equivalent positions, combined with 
the increasing number of customers we serve and the growing number of programs we 
administer, have resulted in a constantly expanding workload for a static number of employees. 
This is particularly apparent in the Schedule A positions, where the salaries are lower and the 
tasks are more repetitive in nature. The challenge will be to keep these jobs interesting and help 
identify better career ladders for all positions in our agency. 




Appendix E 
- E-6 - 



As we reduce turnover among the professional positions, we create a lack of advancement 
among the entry-level positions. This paradox presents an additional challenge in implementing 
mentoring systems and career ladders throughout our organizational structure. Additionally, 
most of our higher-level positions require advance degrees, and this also limits the career 
advancement possibilities for staff in entry-level positions. 

Our agency continues to be affected by the Boom/Bust economy of the Austin metropolitan area. 
When economic times are good, we experience extremely high attrition as qualified staff move 
to better paying positions. Alternately, the bust cycles bring with them more skilled workers who 
are attracted to the stability that State employment offers. This is particularly true for the 
Information Technology positions. We must continue to make employment at our agency more 
appealing, especially during boom cycles. 



III. Future Workforce Profile (Demand Analysis) 

In order to fulfill our strategic plan and meet the informational needs of our customers, we must 
perform the following critical functions: 

• prepare archives entrusted to our agency for effective and efficient use and access 

• increase efforts for preserving library and archival materials 

• provide advice and assistance to agency personnel on management of records 

• acquire, reproduce, and distribute large amounts of material and information to deliver 
program services 

• perform the duties required by our legislative mandates and maximize use of the Internet 
for distributing information 

• maintain our existing and future equipment to ensure efficient service delivery 

While we do not anticipate any new programs, many of the current programs will add or expand 
services and service delivery mechanisms. This will include hosting additional digital image 
files on the Web, replacing outdated database systems, and implementing new methods for 
delivering training and consulting services. The expansion of our state publications program to 
include current and archival electronic documents is evidence of the change in service delivery. 

Within the next two years, we will need to develop the skills and abilities to provide for the 
acquisition, management and preservation of electronic records. Skilled archivists and/or 
information technology professionals will be needed to implement standards and policies for 
electronic records transferred to our agency to ensure they are maintained permanently. 

The new Library of Texas program has recently added several facets to the services we deliver 
and significantly changed the means by which we deliver these services. During FY 2002, we 
will install 1 1 videoconferencing centers around the state. In addition, we are adding the 
capability for Web-based learning systems that will allow customers to access training on an as- 
needed basis. We are upgrading the TRAIL system and implementing the Electronic Depository 
Program within the Library of Texas effort. This will require us to provide more advanced 
technical and programmatic support to our staff and local partner entities. 




Appendix E 
-E-7- 



99 



Future Workforce Skills 



Workforce skills over the next several years will become even more highly specialized. Many 
actual workloads will transition from being primarily processed-based to more analyses-based. 
For many customers, we plan to move to a system requiring less paperwork and more on-demand 
consulting assistance. This will require professional staff to have additional skills in auditing, 
communication, consulting, report writing and systems analysis, in addition to experience and 
knowledge of program requirements. Over the next five years, we will incorporate web-based 
and distance learning classes to our repertoire, adding technological skills to the existing training 
skills required for these positions, particularly as we implement the transition from paper to 
electronic records. 

The database application currently used at the State Records center will need to be replaced in 
the next three years. The two staff from the Applications Development team who coded and 
maintain the current application for the Records Center will be eligible for retirement within the 
next two years. If the new system is not implemented before the retirements, the institutional 
knowledge will be difficult to replace. It is critical that we adequately plan for and acquire the 
highly specialized skills needed for its successful replacement/transition. 

Customer demand for information delivered in digital formats is increasing and requires more 
staff at all levels within our agency to have some technical proficiency in order to fulfill these 
requests. In addition, staff must know and understand cutting-edge information management 
systems to effectively train and consult with our customers. Because we see this as a national 
and international work flow trend, we will require a workforce well-versed in emerging 
technology and practices, who are able to network effectively with customers, partner 
organizations, vendors, and stakeholders. Staff in professional and management positions will 
need to apply and understand both basic and advanced technology, and the issues associated with 
it in the development of new services. In addition, they must possess the ability to understand, 
interpret, and create policies, procedures, rules, regulations, etc. so that they are able to write, 
edit, summarize and succinctly report information from diverse sources. 

We anticipate an increase in the importance of the Public Information Act, particularly within 
our agency as the custodian of state government records. Our future workforce will need to be 
well-versed on the provisions of the Public Information Act in order to provide the best customer 
service while meeting the legal requirements of this law. 

Staff in many areas will need to be skilled in electronic records applications and outputs, and 
have a background and/or training in the design of automated systems. Staff will also need skills 
in cataloging electronic documents, as well as skills in the new OCLC interface. 

Technological advancements will also increase the complexity of records created by government. 
These advancements require new equipment and computer platforms that must be deployed and 
supported. We will assume a wider range of technical responsibilities for projects, including 
systems analysis and project planning, cost estimation and resource acquisition, installation, 
support, life cycle maintenance, and technology refreshment. 




Appendix E 
- E-8 - 



100 



Economic and social conditions in Texas reinforce the need to maintain the cost-efficient 
statewide resource-sharing programs. The Hispanic/Spanish-speaking population in Texas is 
growing rapidly, and we must have adequate bilingual staff to meet customer needs. Demands 
for services, particularly in the Talking Book Program, will increase as the populations of both 
aged and disabled persons continues to increase. 



Training Needs 

In many instances, program budgets do not allow for adequate professional training and/or 
development, which often requires out-of-state travel. Even with use of distance learning 
technologies and the budget to accommodate that need, our current workloads and staffing levels 
do not allow staff time to take advantage of training opportunities. We need to secure the 
resources to break out of a frustrating cycle: Because staff do not have adequate training 
available, too much time is spent performing tasks using tedious, out-dated methods. The drain 
on staff time prevents them from learning new skills that would save them time in the long run. 

Current archivists do not have sufficient skills to appraise, manage, and provide access to 
electronic archival records. In addition, current library staff do not have the skills to catalog 
electronic format materials. The best approach would be to train the current staff, already 
experienced with archival records, to use these new technologies. 

As previously indicated, continuous, planned technology training will be critical within all 
program areas. 



Staffing 

We are already understaffed across the agency; we expect that situation will persist. We 
anticipate an increase in the demand for our current services and that technology will require us 
to provide additional services. More staff is needed to meet current challenges; the shortage will 
be more acute in the future. 

As the need for more advanced technical skills increases, we anticipate we will need additional 
technical staff to support both the agency staff and equipment. Within the next five years, we 
anticipate the need for one additional desktop support position, and one additional systems 
analyst in the Information Resource Technologies (IRT) division, as well as a reshuffling of 
existing technical positions. We are working to develop an adequate IRT staff that can 
efficiently support the growing needs of the agency. 

Trends indicate an ever-increasing population eligible for the Talking Book Program. Within the 
next five years, we anticipate the need to increase staff in shipping, reproducing, and acquiring 
materials, in addition to an additional customer service referral position. Should the federal 
authorizing agency for this program move toward digital technology more rapidly than 
anticipated it would require additional staff in the reproduction section, but a reduction of staff in 
the shipping section. 




Appendix E 
-E-9- 



101 



State agencies demand more records center services than we can accomplish with current 
resources. The level of services that can be provided to state agencies for paper records storage is 
limited by the staffing restrictions enacted by the legislature. Even though records center 
services are funded on a cost-recovery basis and could theoretically respond to agency needs by 
paying for additional staff through records center services fees, we cannot exceed the mandatory 
FTE limit imposed by the legislature. 



IV. Gap Analysis 

Skills 

In some cases, our current staff have the anticipated skills. In many instances, our workforce is 
capable of acquiring the needed skills with minimal training or other resources. However, a 
large number of staff in the agency do not possess even basic computer skills, and many more 
lack sufficient skills to be efficient in their positions. We will need to provide more computer 
training, particularly in regard to the creation and manipulation of increasingly sophisticated 
databases. These skills should be available at the desktop level, and not dependent on IT staff. 

A large number (98 of 210.5) of our positions are professional, meaning they require expertise or 
education in a specific area. The professionals are required to continue acquiring education and 
experience relative to their fields. This ensures instant credibility as the professionals work with 
high ranking agency staff and state and local elected officials. 

The future skill requirements identified previously relate to management and dissemination of 
information, documents, records, and other agency services in electronic formats. Digital 
imaging, enhanced databases, and sound recording are the most notable emerging technologies 
that we need to embrace. 

As we move toward digital information sharing, current skills for duplication and distribution of 
information in cassette tape, microfilm, and microfiche formats will no longer be required or will 
be required at a much diminished level. Similarly, the skills required for repairing and 
maintaining the equipment for these processes will be phased out or eliminated. 

Increasingly, we will need employees with bilingual skills, particularly English/Spanish, to meet 
the needs of a growing Spanish-speaking population in Texas. 



Recruitment 

Almost 15% of our staff become eligible to retire in the next five years, so we may experience 
long-term vacancies and a shortage of qualified replacement staff for management and other key 
program positions. This could be exacerbated by the expanding skill set required for 
replacements. Salaries for many of the professional positions are significantly lower than the 
regional and national averages. In addition, fewer people are obtaining college degrees in the 
specialized fields required for many of our professional positions, according to national research 




Appendix E 
-E-10- 



102 



by the American Library Association. This trend is expected to continue. We anticipate a 
shortage of employees and/or extended vacancies as we recruit qualified replacements. 

The tight labor market in the Austin area over the past few years has made it difficult to fill our 
professional positions in a timely manner. As a result, we have had to hire staff without the 
desired experience. Because of the complexity of the programs we administer, it can take up to a 
year for new employees to become fully productive in their positions. We actively seek 
professionals with experience in their particular field of expertise, since prior experience will 
accelerate the learning process. Unfortunately, the competition is high for employees with 
relevant experience, and we are not always able to offer a competitive salary. 

In addition, many other governmental entities are creating positions similar to those at our 
agency. Records Management Officer, Librarian, and Archivist positions have historically been 
few at other state agencies and local governments. This change has created an additional level of 
competition for recruiting for these professional positions. 

Staffing Levels 

The current workforce is inadequate to meet the workload in many of our program areas. Over 
the next several years, we expect an increase in the number and types of customers served, the 
use of the automated services we provide, and the use of consulting services that help our 
customers and partners keep current with technology. Additional staff will be needed to support 
the deployment and maintenance of technology and Internet-based services. 

The volume of paper records is expected to continue to increase during the next 1 0 to 15 years, 
despite efforts to go to a “paperless” society. If this trend continues, we will need additional 
staff to properly arrange, describe, and provide mandated access to archival records. 



V. Strategy Development 
Maintaining Mission-Critical Skills 

To be successful, staff need to learn new technologies and managerial and mathematical skills. 
We must take steps to remain aware of current trends, and develop the skills to speak as experts 
to constituents and peers. Many of our current staff have the skills necessary to learn new 
methods, so time, funding, and training are key here. 

We need to train the current workforce so they can perform the analytical, auditing and technical 
requirements of the existing programs and any advancements in service delivery. To maintain a 
workforce capable of supporting these direct-service programs, we must provide professional 
development and continuing education to internal staff. Training will also be necessary in the 
cataloging of electronic documents and in the use of the new OCLC cataloging interface for 
current or future staff without those skills. 




Appendix E 
- E-11 - 



103 



The Human Resources staff will work with agency managers and supervisors to revise job 
descriptions and task statements to reflect changing skill and technology requirements. Our goal 
will be to hire new staff who already possess appropriate skills and abilities so they can 
immediately be successful in the position. Unfortunately, this will create salary compression 
issues in many areas, so we will need to look for ways to address the consequences of this 
solution. 

We implemented a new performance evaluation system for many of the positions. The new 
process requires supervisors and managers to work with each particular employee to identify 
training required to ensure the employee is successful in accomplishing the job responsibilities of 
his/her particular position. This then becomes the training plan, establishing written goals for the 
next evaluation period. The training goals are updated as the section’s needs and employee’s 
abilities evolve. The use of this new tool will ensure our success in training current staff who 
have the ability to acquire needed skills for the future. 

We will also coordinate training for professional staff in distance-learning techniques and 
curriculum development, as well as Web-based curriculum development, to ensure that newly 
implemented technology systems are utilized to the fullest extent possible. 

We will continue efforts to implement mentoring and peer-training programs to minimize any 
potential skill shortages. In addition, we can establish systems to allow senior staff members to 
work with junior staff on teams that will facilitate on-the-job training in some of the soft skills 
necessary for the professional positions. 

Recruitment/Retention 

Supervisors and managers will coordinate with staff to ensure ongoing professional education 
and development is available for all positions, especially those of a technical and/or professional 
nature. Job classifications are reviewed and modified when necessary, which provides a 
mechanism to upgrade positions when additional duties are assumed. 

To help motivate and retain staff, agency managers will continue efforts to recognize and reward 
individual performance according to agency policies and to provide opportunities for 
professional growth. Current tools available include merit raises, one-time merit bonuses, and 
administrative leave. Our agency also provides peer-recognition tools including the Employee of 
the Quarter Award, and the Lorenzo Award. 



Work Processes 

In many areas of our agency, current work processes will need to change as a result of 
technological advancements, industry changes, and economic, social, and political conditions. 
We will need to look for more ways to streamline and automate processes, particularly for 
administrative tasks and legislative requirements. Programs may need to work together to 
accomplish tasks common to several divisions. We may also need to explore the use of 
temporary workers, consultants, and outsourcing for specialized jobs or tasks to prevent burnout 
of the existing workforce. 




Appendix E 
- E-12 - 



104 



Divisions may need to form cross-divisional teams to avoid duplication of effort. However, even 
with the implementation of efficiency practices, current staffing levels will not accommodate 
new programs or services without dropping some of our present services. While we anticipate 
that all programs will change and grow, we have not seen a decline in demand for any of our 
current services, with the exception of microfilming. 

Our current structure, task-oriented with specific job descriptions for each position, will need to 
become more fluid. We must have staff who can handle a variety of skills and be willing to 
work at whatever tasks are required each day. The agency has implemented self-managed teams 
in several areas. This method allows the team members to utilize each person’s strengths and 
minimize weaknesses, and to rearrange work processes and assignments to provide the most 
effective and efficient service delivery. In addition, expanded responsibilities often allow each 
team member opportunities to use and develop skills other than those required for routine 
completion of job duties. We will look for additional program areas that could benefit from this 
less traditional organizational structure. 

We must focus efforts on proper planning for information resources acquisition and 
implementation as the need for technology increases in all program areas. We will need to 
ensure we have adequate technical support for our wide-area network, Web-based services, 
client-server services, and the new videoconference systems being deployed throughout the state. 
In addition, we must ensure proper project management for all information resources projects to 
eliminate interruptions to service. 

Succession Planning 

The agency has not yet implemented the practice of succession planning. In the next year, the 
Human Resources staff will work with division directors to identify key positions throughout the 
agency for which succession planning is critical. Then, the division directors will work as a 
group to identify potential staff with the skills and abilities to assume a particular key position 
with a minimal amount of training. This will allow managers and supervisors to develop staff 
with the potential to provide adequate backup of critical skills throughout the agency. This is 
especially important as we evaluate the positions of staff who will be eligible to retire in the next 
five years. Agency leadership will need to ensure adequate resources are available to develop 
these human resources. 

Mentoring programs will be established to provide a mechanism for transferring institutional 
knowledge and program-specific skills from retiring staff to advancing staff in an effort to avoid 
the “brain drain” syndrome. 

Leadership Development 

The Human Resources staff will work closely with agency managers to identify individuals with 
potential for leadership positions using a variety of standard evaluation methods and tools. 
Replacement and succession charts will be developed within each division that will provide an 




Appendix E 
- E-1 3 - 



105 



opportunity for both managers and staff to examine the depth of talent, skills, and abilities of the 
current workforce. 

Increased use of self-managed teams will also help us provide leadership development 
opportunities. Each team member, regardless of classification or job duties, will be allowed the 
opportunity to lead the team or subgroups in specific efforts. In this environment, all team 
members are encouraged to develop leadership skills through practical experience. Most staff 
welcomes the opportunity to expand their responsibilities and demonstrate their abilities and this 
has proven to be an effective tool in some programs. 



VI. Conclusion 

We believe we have one of the most qualified and professional workforces in state government. 
We recognize that as our programs and services evolve so will the skill requirements for our 
workforce. We will implement strategies to ensure our current and future workforce have access 
to the resources to acquire the skills necessary to remain successful in accomplishing our 
mission. 



Appendix E 
- E-14 - 



106 



Appendix F 



Survey of Organizational Excellence Results 



Survey of Organization Excellence - FY2002 

Comparison of Constructs 



No. 


Construct Name 


TSL 

Score 


Rank 


Agency 

size 

(FTE3) 


Rank 


Mid-sized 

agencies 


Rank 


Mission 

1/10 


Rank 


All 

agencies 


Rank 


TSL 
in '00 


Rank 


TSL 
in '98 


Rank 


13 


Quality 


391 


1 


391 


1 


389 


1 


387 


1 


388 


1 


377 


2 


369 


3 


7 


Benefits 


380 


2 


355 


5 


379 


3 


380 


3 


381 


3 


369 


4 


368 


4 


12 


Strategic 

Orientation 


378 


3 


310 


15 


385 


2 


384 


2 


388 


2 


407 


1 


399 


1 


16 


External 

Communications 


365 


4 


316 


13 


370 


5 


369 


5 


372 


5 


374 


3 


371 


2 


19 


Burnout 


363 


5 


320 


10 


363 


8 


364 


8 


369 


6 


338 


7 


328 


10 


2 


Fairness 


361 


6 


291 


19 


355 


10 


352 


11 


356 


12 


294 


18 


285 


18 


15 


Availability of 
Information 


353 


7 


308 


16 


365 


6 


365 


7 


366 


7 


319 


15 


313 


13 


20 


Empowerment 


350 


8 


297 


18 


352 


12 


355 


10 


360 


10 


305 


17 


301 


17 


4 


Diversity 


350 


9 


337 


7 


352 


11 


351 


12 


356 


13 


329 


12 


325 


11 


17 


Job Satisfaction 


349 


10 


360 


4 


365 


7 


366 


6 


364 


8 


322 


14 


312 


15 


6 


Physical 

Environment 


348 


11 


305 


17 


373 


4 


374 


4 


374 


4 


362 


5 


345 


6 


18 


Time and Stress 


347 


12 


341 


6 


362 


9 


363 


9 


361 


9 


330 


11 


328 


9 


10 


Goal Oriented 


346 


13 


319 


11 


351 


13 


345 


14 


357 


11 


347 


6 


351 


5 


11 


Holographic 

(Consistency) 


345 


14 


333 


8 


344 


15 


344 


15 


351 


15 


323 


13 


320 


12 


9 


Change Oriented 


338 


15 


331 


9 


336 


16 


333 


17 


343 


16 


313 


16 


307 


16 


1 


Supervisor 

Effectiveness 


332 


16 


288 


20 


334 


17 


334 


16 


341 


17 


290 


19 


283 


19 


3 


Team 

Effectiveness 


331 


17 


312 


14 


331 


18 


330 


18 


336 


18 


333 


8 


339 


7 


8 


Employment 

Development 


325 


18 


366 


2 


350 


14 


349 


13 


354 


14 


331 


9 


312 


14 


14 


Internal 

Communications 


321 


19 


361 


3 


317 


19 


320 


19 


323 


19 


331 


10 


328 


8 


5 


Fair Pay 


230 


20 


318 


12 


267 


20 


254 


20 


266 


20 


278 


20 


277 


20 


Average 
Construct Score 


345 




328 




352 




351 




355 




334 




328 





After receiving the results of the FY 2002 Survey of Organizational Excellence, the management 
of the agency conducted a series of focus groups to discuss the staffs perception of the agency 
and our programs. This information was used to prepare the Strategic Plan. 

Appendix F 




107 



APPENDIX G 



Information Resources Strategic Plan 

I. Goals, Objectives, and Strategies 



Item 


Description 


IR Goal 


The Texas State Library and Archives Commission will deliver improved 
access to library services and efficient management of state and local 
records through the efficient use of information resources technologies. 

The agency IR goal supports the stated goals of the agency to (1) improve the 
availability of library and information services; (2) improve information 
services by answering reference questions; and (3) provide cost-effective 
management of state and local records. 

The agency's goals, including the IR goals, support the statewide IR goals. 

The state goal to leverage information resources to deliver services to citizens 
irrespective of government boundaries is addressed through the library’s 
efforts to identify and implement strategies that facilitate the public’s access 
to information, especially through our web-based services. 

Another state goal is to enhance the performance of agencies’ mandates and 
missions through appropriate use of information resources. The Library and 
Archives Commission addresses this goal through these same strategies, as 
well as through the agency's coordination with other organizations on IR 
projects and its internal efforts at improving its information resources and 
skills sets. 

The state goal to ensure the privacy, security, integrity and relevance of the 
information entrusted to government by the people of Texas is addressed 
through the agency’s efforts to establish an efficient program for electronic 
imaging of historical documents, management of state and local records, and 
its internal efforts to ensure the security of its information resources. 

Through careful short-term and long-term planning, the agency will apply 
information technologies to address the needs of its customers and manage its 
resources efficiently. 




Appendix G 
- G-1 - 




IR Objective 
01 


The Library and Archives Commission will implement technologies and 
standards to ensure the availability of its information resources and materials 
to the public. 


IR Strategy 
01.01 


This agency will adopt and use standards to ensure the development of 
consistent and efficient user interfaces for accessing the information services 
and materials made available by the agency. 


IR Strategy 
01.02 


The Library and Archives Commission will plan for, acquire, install, and 
maintain equipment to provide adequate access to the information services 
and materials made available by the agency. 


IR Strategy 
01.03 


The agency will develop and submit comprehensive and coordinated plans 
and reports as required by the state leadership to promote effective targeting 
of resources to meet customer needs. 


IR Strategy 
01.04 


The agency will complete the enhance the application used by the Talking 
Book Program to access to usage information to its patrons via the Web. 


IR Objective 
02 


The Library and Archives Commission will implement technologies and 
standards to ensure efficient management of state and local records. 


IR Strategy 
02.01 


The agency will replace the application used by the State and Local Records 
Management Division with a more comprehensive system. 


IR Strategy 
02.02 


The agency will improve the infrastructure used by the State and Local 
Records Management Division to improve operating efficiency of the 
automated system. 


IR Objective 
03 


The Library and Archives Commission will implement technologies and 
standards to ensure the security of its information resources. 


IR Strategy 
03.01 


The agency will plan for, acquire, install, and maintain appropriate equipment 
upgrades to ensure adequate security of information resources. 


IR Strategy 
03.02 


The agency will develop, distribute, and promote security awareness 
standards and materials to ensure technical staff and user awareness and 
compliance with security policies. 


IR Objective 
04 


The Library and Archives Commission will implement technologies and 
standards to ensure that the skills of its technical staff are adequate to support 
the mission of the agency. 


IR Strategy 
04.01 


The agency will review individual staff needs in relation to agency needs and 
develop and implement individual training plans for technical staff in support 
of the agency’s information resources priorities to ensure adequate technical 
support. 



Appendix G 



II. Databases and Applications 



Application Name 


Archives Tracking System 


Application Type 


Other, Client Server Usage tracking 


Application Size 


440,000 KB 


Projected Growth 


500,000 KB 


Application Description 


Assist Archives staff serve users and identify major interest areas by 
tracking the history of patron using the State Archives collections. 
Archives and Information Services staff are the primary users. 


Database System 


Microsoft Access 97 


Development Language 


Microsoft Access 97 


Sharing 


Not shared outside agency 


Future 


Application will be scheduled for conversion to Access 2000 when 
the agency implements Windows 2000 



Application Name 


Talking Book Application "ACCESS" 


Application Type 


Other, Client Server Circulation system 


Application Size 


18 GB 


Projected Growth 


25 GB 


Application Description 


Assist Talking Book Program staff manage the multimedia collection 
of books and magazines for delivery to authorized patrons with visual 
and/or physical disabilities. The application allows the selection of 
specific items or the automated selection of a class or type of material 
from the collection for distribution to the patrons. Database also 
tracks history of patrons use of collection to reduce duplicate 
distribution from the collection. Talking Book Program staff are the 
primary users. 


Database System 


Unify 2000 DBMS 


Development Language 


Unify/ACCELL 


Sharing 


Not shared out side agency 


Future 


Database software to be upgraded in FY2002-2003. 




Appendix G 
-G-3- 



Application Name 


Records Storage Management "AUTO-REC" 


Application Type 


Document Management 


Application Size 


3.540,000 KB 


Projected Growth 


3,840,000 KB 


Application Description 


Assists staff with the management of the storage of records and 
collects the information to bill the agencies for stored materials. 
Application accepts establishment of record series information, 
request for storage, identifies and tracks the flow of records stored by 
state agencies. State and Local Records staff are the primary users. 


Database System 


Unify 2000 DBMS 


Development Language 


Unify/ACCELL 


Sharing 


Application is not shared out side agency. However, over 48 agencies 
use email to submit various requests for system actions. 


Future 


Database software to be upgraded in FY2002-2003. 



Application Name 


Uniform State Personnel System "USPS" 


Application Type 


Human Resources 


Application Description 


Comptroller provided application. The application functions as the 
personnel and payroll application for TSLAC employees. Human 
Resources staff are primary users. 


Database System 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Development Language 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Sharing 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Future 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 



Appendix G 



Application Name 


Uniform State Accounting System "USAS’' 


Application Type 


Client Server Financial System 


Application Description 


Comptroller provided application. The application functions as the 
accounting and fund management for TSLAC employees. Daily 
transaction information is down loaded to an MS Access database file 
for use by Accounting and division fund management staff. 
Accounting and division fund management staff are primary users. 


Database System 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Development Language 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Sharing 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Future 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 



Application Name 


Uniform State Resource Management System "USRMS" 


Application Type 


Other, Client Server Inventory Management system 


Application Description 


Comptroller provided application. The application functions as the 
inventory and resource management for TSLAC employees. 
Purchasing and division equipment management staff are primary 
users. 


Database System 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Development Language 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Sharing 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 


Future 


Uniform state system, managed by Comptroller 



Appendix G 
- G-5 - 



i 



o 



Application Name 


On-line Cataloging and Interlibrary Loan Services "OCLC" - SIRSI 


Application Type 


Web-enabled 


Application Size 


27 GB 


Projected Growth 


27 GB 


Application Description 


A not for profit library automation product from OCLC provides 
agency and partners with cataloging capabilities and automated 
update to the agency on-line catalog. Primary users are key partner 
staff. 


Database System 


Database management system in use for this application 


Development Language 


Programming language(s) used in the application 


Sharing 


Application server operates at OCLC in Dublin, Ohio. TSLAC is a 
member of AMIGOS, the sole source provider of OCLC services in 
the southwestern United States. OCLC has over 26,000 participating 
libraries world wide. 


Future 


OCLC is testing improved access ranging from Internet to dedicated 
line access methods 



Application Name 


Public Library Statistics 


Application Type 


Web-enabled 


Application Size 


1,500 KB 


Projected Growth 


3,000 KB 


Application Description 


Documents historical data for public libraries in Texas. Collects this 
information for preparation of a report to the Department of 
Education (DOE). The Library Development staff and librarians are 
primary users. 


Database System 


MySQL 


Development Language 


PHP 


Sharing 


The data is made available over the Internet 


Future 


Database is modified annually to collect data required by DOE. 



Appendix G 



Application Name 


Academic Library Statistics 


Application Type 


Web-enabled 


Application Size 


1,500 KB 


Projected Growth 


3,000 KB 


Application Description 


Documents historical data for academic libraries in Texas. Collects 
this information for preparation of a report to the Department of 
Education (DOE). The Library Development staff and librarians are 
primary users. 


Database System 


MySQL 


Development Language 


PHP 


Sharing 


The data is made available over the Internet 


Future 


Database is modified annually to collect data required by DOE. 



Application Name 


AdHoc Reporting System, AHRS 


Application Type 


Client Server Financial System 


Application Size 


135,000 KB 


Projected Growth 


155,000 KB 


Application Description 


Daily transaction data downloaded from USAS to Access db. Data is 
then available as report or spreadsheet to manage agency funds. 
Primary users are Accounting and agency managers. 


Database System 


Microsoft Access 


Development Language 


Microsoft Access 


Sharing 


Not shared outside agency 


Future 


Scheduled for conversion to Access 2000 when the agency 
implements Windows 2000 



o 



Appendix G 
-G-7- 



Application Name 


Republic Claims 


Application Type 


Web-enabled 


Application Size 


10,302 KB 


Projected Growth 


10,302 KB 


Application Description 


Provides public access to the Texas Republic Claims data 


Database System 


MySQL 


Development Language 


PHP 


Sharing 


The data is made available over the Internet 


Future 


To be replaced by application developed by Blue Angel 
Technologies. 



Application Name 


Texas Maps 


Application Type 


Web-enabled 


Application Size 


12,000 KB 


Projected Growth 


12,200 KB 


Application Description 


Provides public access to the Texas Maps Collection data 


Database System 


MySQL 


Development Language 


PHP 


Sharing 


The data is made available over the Internet 


Future 


Application static. No future plans. 



o 



Appendix G 
- G-8 - 



Application Name 


Confederate Pensions 


Application Type 


Web-enabled 


Application Size 


3,500 KB 


Projected Growth 


3,700 KB 


Application Description 


Provides public access to the Confederate Pensions data 


Database System 


MySQL 


Development Language 


PHP 


Sharing 


The data is made available over the Internet. 


Future 


To be replaced by application developed by Blue Angel 
Technologies. 



Application Name 


Service Records 


Application Type 


Web-enabled 


Application Description 


Provides public access to the Texas Adjutant General Service 
Records 1836-1935 data 


Database System 


MySQL 


Development Language 


PHP 


Sharing 


The data is made available over the Internet 


Future 


To be replaced by application developed by Blue Angel 
Technologies. 




116 



Appendix G 
- G-9 - 



III. Information Resources Policies and Practices 



Category 


Brief Summary/Overview 


IR Priorities 


The Texas State Library and Archives Commission relies on its 
management team to develop IR strategies. Agency division 
directors, including the director of the Information Resources 
Technologies (IRT) Division, present proposed IR strategies and 
related projects to the director and librarian. With this input from 
the division directors, the director and librarian or the assistant state 
librarian identifies the priorities for funding, purchasing, and 
development. 

The management team, including the director and librarian, 
assistant state librarian, and the division directors, is kept informed 
of the progress in addressing specific IR priorities. These priorities 
are reviewed during the regular management team meetings and 
revised as needed. 


IR Planning 
Methodology 


The director of IRT, as the agency’s IRM, and the other division 
directors, participate in the development of the agency’s strategic 
plan. The directors also provide input to the director and librarian 
and the assistant state librarian on the agency’s IR strategic 
direction, which is consistent with agency goals and objectives. 

The IRM prepares a draft of the IR plan for review by management 
and finalizes the plan to reflect the additional guidance by 
management. 

Biennial Operating Plans and amendments require the coordinated 
efforts of the IRM, IRT staff, and the division directors involved in 
the various IR projects of the agency. 

All IR-related acquisitions require review and approval from the 
IRT division. System replacements and upgrades are also 
coordinated efforts between the user divisions and the IRT division. 


Quality-Assurance 

Practices 


The Library and Archives Commission is modifying its internal 
quality assurance program to reflect the guidelines recently made 
available by DIR. The Commission is using the risk assessment 
instrument available through DIR for the initial risk assessment of 
its major projects. A Project Development Plan is also developed 
for major projects. 

The Spiral Model for systems development used by the agency 
provides a structure for the identification and management of risks 
based on project alternatives and constraints. The model also 
provides a structure for project planning including the various 
components of the project master plan. 



Appendix G 





IRT works with the other agency divisions and the assistant state 
librarian to formulate informal, but appropriate, cost/benefit 
analyses for projects. Costs and benefits are routinely described by 
the agency divisions as they develop plans for proposed projects 
which include a technology component. 

The IRM participates in weekly management team meetings with 
other division directors, the assistant state librarian, and the director 
and librarian, where ongoing and upcoming projects and budgets 
are discussed. Agency leadership is kept aware of project status. 
Project effectiveness is measured informally against projections 
established at project initiation. Reports are submitted to all 
participant and customer groups after project implementation. 

The agency is augmenting its procedures with more formal policies 
by adopting a comprehensive security program and DIR standards 
throughout its IT environment. 


Personal Computer 
Replacement Schedule 


The library is committed to maintaining a practical technology 
refresh rate to ensure that its staff has adequate computing 
resources to accomplish its job tasks efficiently and effectively. 
Desktop computer purchasing is based on need analyses by the 
agency divisions and approved and coordinated by the Information 
Resources Technologies Division (IRT). Based upon these 
analyses and its IR goal to deliver improved access to library 
services and efficient management of state and local records 
through the efficient use of information resources technologies, the 
library expects to replace approximately twenty percent (20%) of its 
desktops computers each year. 

In accordance with Art IX, Subsection 10.09, using standard 
industry assumptions for replacement costs and a five-year life 
cycle for agency personal computers, the agency is consistent with 
DIR guidelines (PC life Cycle and Lease vs. Purchase) in its 
determination that it is more practical and cost effective to 
purchases personal computers than to lease. 


Procurement 


The agency uses standard industry assumptions for replacement 
costs and a five-year life cycle for its personal computers. This is 
consistent with the DIR guideline Lease vs. Purchase which states 
that for this life cycle duration it is more cost effective to purchase 
personal computers than to lease. The agency will continue to 
review its options annually to select the most cost-effective 
approach to technology refreshment. 


Disaster Recovery/ 
Business Continuity 
Planning 


The agency management team sets priorities for disaster recovery 
planning. Consideration is given to the priority functions of the 
agency, including the applications and online databases accessed by 
Texas libraries and citizens. Standard Operating Procedures are in 



Appendix G 





place for system backups to tape which are stored off site as well as 
on site for recovery purposes. A backup procedure is developed for 
each system as part of its implementation. Authorizations for tape 
retrieval from off site are periodically reviewed and updated as 
necessary. Documentation for recovery is server specific and also 
kept on site and off site. 

The agency is reviewing and updating its disaster recovery plan and 
business continuity plan. As part of this revision process, the 
agency will continue to examine the opportunities available for 
recovery alternatives through the Austin or West Texas Disaster 
Recovery Operations centers. 


Data Center Operations 


The Texas State Library and Archives Commission maintains its 
Data Center Operations using internal staff. This staff is 
responsible for the planning and designing, acquisition and 
implementation, and operation of information resources critical to 
the successful completion of the agency’s mission. The staff 
supports information resources across two in-town facilities via 
dedicated telecommunications lines. 

Agency management receives recommendations from the 
Information Resources Technologies Division on the planning and 
operation of the Data Center. 

The agency will periodically review its options for this support, 
including the opportunities presented by the Disaster Recovery 
Center. 


Standards 


The agency follows the guidelines and standards provided by the 
Department of Information Resources in its use of Information 
Resources Technologies. The agency adopted information security 
policies based on the templates provided by the Security Office of 
DIR. We are also using the risk assessment instrument provided by 
DIR for our major projects, as well as their template for Project 
Development Plans for these projects. We are reviewing the DIR 
Quality Assurance guidelines for adoption. We adhere to the DIR 
guidelines for PC Life Cycle and reviews of Lease vs. Purchase of 
technology. The agency IRM complies with DIR continuing 
professional education requirements. We also comply with all 
reporting requirements for submission of the IR Biennial Operation 
Plan as well as Incident reporting as outlined by DIR. 




119 



Appendix G 
- G-12 - 



Texas State Library and 
Archives Commission 



Comments or complaints 
regarding the programs and 
services of the Texas State 
Library and Archives 
Commission may be 
addressed to: 

TSLAC Director & Librarian 
PO Box 12927 
Austin, TX 78711-2927 
Phone (512)463-5460 




Texas 

State Library 



and Archives 
Commission 



For more information about 
the programs of the 
Texas State Library and 
Archives Commission, 
please visit our Web site at: 

www.tsl.state.tx.us 




Agency Strategic Plan 
Fiscal Years 2003-2007 
June 2002 



120 





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