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The^ 



Shining light on Mansfield University since 1926 


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Sept. 21, 2018 
Volume 112 
Issue 1 

Inside This Issue 

Police beat, 
world news 

- Page 2 

Spring Break in 
Italy 

- Page 3 

MU Move-In 
Crew 

- Page 4-5 

Word Salad 

- Page 6 

LUMA 

- Page 8 



Photo by Dan Mason 

RA Carra Stevens, 4 th Floor Oak, RA Doug Kloss, 3 rd Floor Oak, and RA Casey Blair, 1 st Floor Oak RA, spent 
several hours at the check-in table welcoming first-year students, answering questions, giving directions and 
providing keys when the students signed-in. 

More than 200 students moved into 
the residence halls on August 23 


by DAN MASON 
Flashlight Adviser 

RAs and volunteers from almost a 
dozen student organizations helped 
more than 200 first year students 
move into their dorms last month. 

Dusty Zeyn, Associate Director 
of Student Living & Community 
Programs, organized the MU 
Move-In Crew. With the help of 
Bonnie Phelps, who also works for 
Residence Life, Zeyn and her Crew 
moved more than 200 students into 
three residence halls. 

“It’s important to welcome new 
students and their parents,” Zeyn 
said. 

With rolling carts, muscle 
and not a little sweat, more than 


50 upperclasswomen and men, 
according to Zeyn, unloaded cars, 
trucks and minivans. Most first year 
students moved into Oak. Others, 
mostly transfer students new to 
Mansfield University, and a few first 
year students moved into Spruce 
and Sycamore. 

“It was fantastic seeing our 
Mansfield family coming to 
together to welcome and help our 
new students start their adventure 
on top of the mountain,” Dean 
of Students Frank Crofchick said. 
“Our Student Living Staff, faculty, 
and student volunteers should be 
very proud of themselves.” 

Alpha Kappa Lambda brothers 
helped with as many as 50 vehicles. 
AKL Brother Tyler Walters saw lots 


of students with plastic storage bins, 
fishing poles, mirrors and clothes. 
“One student brought an entire 
piano. We had to carefully maneuver 
it into the building,” Walters said. 

At one point the elevators 
stopped working, so Walters and his 
partner Nick Williams hauled their 
cart upstairs manually, “to keep 
the line moving.” AKL had their 
hands full moving night stands, 
large televisions and other pieces of 
furniture. 

Kyle Cannon, also of AKL, 
noticed a lot of food and shoes being 
moved into the residence halls. 
“I love participating in Mountie 
Move-in” Cannon said. “Not only 
do we get the chance to interact 
with the new students and help 


ease their transition that day, but 
it also gives organizations, Greek 
Life especially, the chance to show 
what MU’s students are all about. 
We are a family here. We support 
each other and are not shy to lend a 
helping hand.” 

Since the MU Move-In Crew 
was only for first year students, 
upperclasswomen and men had to 
have special permission to move 
in the night before so they could 
help. “We had 50-75 volunteers 
helping,” Zeyn said. Zeyn had a 
workshop Wednesday evening to 
prepare the volunteers. “We needed 
the volunteers to be positive. 
They had to be good resources for 
the incoming students and their 
parents.” 

Volunteers from around campus 
showed up to help. Among them 
were Dr. Tiffany Welch from the 
Social Work Department and 
her husband Jason, who works in 
Purchasing. They lent a hand along 
with several coaches and the MU 
police department. 

Students helping students move 
into the residence halls has a long 
history at Mansfield University. 
Ten or more years ago the Mountie 
Movers moved all students into 
their rooms. When the University 
started their current policy of first 
year students arriving on campus a 
couple days early for orientation and 
other activities, the MU Move-In 
Crew replaced the Mountie Movers. 
“It was about five years ago,” Zeyn 
said. 

Students or organizations who 
want to get involved with the MU 
Move-In Crew next year can write 
to Dusty Zeyn at dzeyn@mansfield. 
edu. 

See pages 4 & 5 for more photos 

MU Move-In Crew 

































Friday, September 21, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 2 


Weekly 

Weather 


Saturday 


b 


Cloudy 


High:61 Low:46 


Sunday 



Party 

Cloudy 


High:66 Low:48 


Monday 



Partly 

Cloudy 


High: 66 Low: 5 5 


Tuesday 

Showers 

/pp 

High:68 Low:63 


Wednesday 


Scattered 
Thunder¬ 
storms 

High:72 Low:56 



Thursday 

AM 

Showers 

High:67 Low:52 



Friday 

Showers 

vW 


High:64 


Low: 


POLICE BEAT 

- Anyone with information on any these events are encouraged to 
contact the Mansfield University Police at 570-439-4900 - 


- 8/27/18 - At 10:45am on 8/06/2018, this station received a case 
from Mansfield Borough Police Department that took place on 
Spaulding (Baseball) Field. The case involves an adult male and a 
juvenile female. This case is under investigation. 

- 8/27/18 - At 8:50pm on 8/26/18, the police station received a 
complaint of an individual smoking on campus and possessing 
marijuana in her dorm room. After contact with individual MUPD 
did seize 27.1 grams of suspected marijuana from the defendant. 

- 8/27/18 - At 7 pm on August 25 to 1:40 pm on the August 26, 
three vehicles in the second row of the T2 lot were observed with 
severe damage. The vehicle descriptions were 1) Red Dodge Neon, 

2) Dark Green Jeep Cherokee, 3) Grayish Ford Fusion. Anyone with 
Information in regard to this incident please notify campus police 
immediately 


- 8/28/18 - At approximately 1:20 pm on 6/06/2018, this station 
received a call for criminal mischief in Spruce room 405. 14 BB marks 
were found around different areas of the room. This case is under 
investigation. 

- 8/28/18 - At 2:30 on 8/14/18, police were called to Oak dorm for 
drug paraphernalia found in a student’s room. Student will be referred to 
Campus Judicial. 

- 9/4/18 - Between 4pm and 11:30am on 9/4/18, unknown person(s) 
damaged the door handle to the Spruce 1st floor long wing hallway access 
door. Anyone with information regarding this incident is encouraged to 
contact Campus Police. 


- Mr Trump welcomed the agreements, which he said were 
“tremendous progress”, and was quick to tweet his applause for the 
Moon-Kim summit. 


- 9/19/18 - Colombia cocaine production acreage at ‘record level 5 

- The UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) said the 
acreage under coca cultivation rose to 171,000 hectares in 2017, a 
17% increase from 2016. 

- Colombia is the world’s largest producer of cocaine, much of 
which ends up in the US - which is the world’s largest consumer. 

- Eighty per cent of the coca has been grown in the same area 
for the past 10 years, while crops produce 33% more coca leaf - the 
main cocaine ingredient - than they did in 2012. 

- A scheme to use drones to spray coca crops with herbicide has, 
however, attracted criticism. 

- Mr Duque’s predecessor, Juan Manuel Santos, suspended 
aerial fumigation using the chemical glyphosate in 2015, following 
warnings by the World Health Organization (WHO) that the 
chemical could be linked to cancer. 

- 9/19/18 - Yemen conflict: A million more children face famine, 
NGO warns 

- Rising food prices and the falling value of the country’s 
currency as a result of a civil war are putting more families at risk of 
food insecurity. 

- Save the Children says a total of 5.2 million children now face 
famine. 

- In early 2015, the rebel Houthi movement seized control of 
much of the west of the country and forced President Abdrabbuh 
Mansour Hadi to flee abroad. 

- At least 6,660 civilians have been killed and 10,563 injured in 
the conflict, according to the UN. 

- Those who are paid face food prices which are 68% more 
expensive than when the war began. 


counterpart, Moon Jae-in. 


World News 


Headlines from across the planet 

Blurbs courtesy of bbc.com 

- 9/19/2018 - Trump on sessions: I don’t have an attorney general 

- In his fiercest attack yet on Jeff Sessions, the US president says 
he is very disappointed 

- He also said he was unhappy with Mr Sessions’ response to 
immigration. The attorney general is yet to respond to Mr Trump’s 
comments. 

- It is unusual for a sitting president to attack their attorney 
general and critics accuse Mr Trump of trying to meddle in the 
legal system. 

- 9/19/18 - Liberia travel ban after ‘$60m vanish’ 

- Liberia’s former central bank governor Milton Weeks says he 
is fully co-operating with the police as they investigate allegations 
that at least one container-load of newly printed banknotes has 
gone missing. 

- Mr Weeks told the BBC’s Jonathan Paye-Layleh in the capital, 
Monrovia, that he was “definitely” not aware of any money missing 
after it was printed abroad, and brought to the country between 
November last year and August this year. 

- Earlier, the Ministry of Information said he was among a list 
of people barred from leaving the country while investigations take 
place into the alleged disappearance of the money reported to be 
worth between $60m (£45.6m) and $100m. 

- 9/19/18 - US ‘ready to restart negotiations’ with North Korea 

- US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says he is ready to restart 
negotiations with Pyongyang, with the aim of denuclearising 
North Korea “by 2021”. 

- Mr Kim agreed to shut one of the country’s main missile 
testing and launch sites. 

- Mr Kim also “agreed on a way to achieve denuclearisation” on 
the Korean peninsula following the summit with his South Korean 
































Mansfield University 


Friday, September 21, 2018 

Paid Internship in 
Harrisburg 

Spring 2019 - Work with a state agency, get paid, and 
gain valuable experience and contacts. Must have 60 or 
more credits and an overall GPA of 3.0 or better at the 
time of application. For more information contact Dr. 
Brian Loher at 570-662-4777, by e-mail at bloher@ 
mansfield.edu, or come to 152 South Hall. Applications 
are due by Wednesday, October 3rd. 

Don’t Miss out on the 
opportunity to Spend 
Spring Break in Italy! 

March 2019 will be our 11th year travelling to Europe! 
This year we will be visiting Venice, Florence and Rome. 
The tour is open to all Mansfield Students. We will have 
the opportunity to see Michelangelo’s most famous 
masterpieces including his statue of David, the Sistine 
Chapel, and St. Peter’s Basilica. Students will walk the 
Roman Forum and visit the Roman Colosseum, where 
gladiators fought to the death. Other highlights include 
a visit to Pisa and its leaning tower, a gondola ride in 
Venice and a visit to the UNESCO- World Heritage 
listed medieval city of Assisi, the birthplace of St. Francis 
of Assisi. There will be some free time to explore these 
famous cities as well. Full-time MU students may have 
the opportunity to receive partial financial support for 
this trip from SGA. Space is limited. Consider joining us 
on this amazing trip. If you are interested, please contact 
Dr. Shawn Holderby for more information at sholderb@ 
mansfield.edu _ 

The Student Activities 
Office 

Is presenting a combined student bus trip to both 
Niagara Falls (USA) and Six Flags Darien Fake 
Theme Park on Sunday, October 14th, 2018... 
Student bus trip tickets will go on sale for the bus 
trip this Thursday, September 20th at the campus 
bookstore (Mountie Den) beginning at 8:00 AM 
on a first come - first served basis. The $17 student 
bus trip ticket price includes round trip Coach 
bus transportation and also includes our students 
theme park admission ticket into Six Flags Darien 
Fake Theme Park. The Coach bus is scheduled to 
leave the MU campus at 6:30 AM from in front 
of Faurel Hall. Please arrive 15 minutes prior to 
all bus departure times for bus passenger load- 
in / check-in. The Coach bus will make one 30 
minute rest / food stop on the way to Niagara Falls 
(USA) and also on the way back from Darien Fake 
heading to our campus. The bus is scheduled to 
arrive at Niagara Falls (USA) at 10:30 AM and is 
scheduled to leave Niagara Falls bound for Darien 
Fake at 2:00 PM. The bus is scheduled 

to arrive at Darien Fake at 3:00 PM and leave 
Darien Fake at 8:30 PM arriving back on our 
campus at 11:30 PM. www.niagarafallsstatepark. 
com www.darienlake.com 

SAYRE campus students can contact the MU 
bookstore (Mountie Den) and a staff member there 
will assist you with your Niagara Falls (USA) / Six 
Flags Darien Fake Theme Park student bus trip 
ticket purchase. Their phone number is 1-800-577- 
6798 or 570-662-4922. This bus trip is funded by 
Student Activity Fees. Additional funding support 
for this student bus trip coming from PSECU. Bus 
trip poster attached. 


Girl Scouts Hold 
Second Annual 

Carrying the Torch: Girl 
Scout Convention on 
Women’s Rights Oct. 
6-7 in Seneca Falls 

Collaboration with Women’s Rights National Historical 
Park, National Women’s Hall of Fame and Friends of the 
Park 

commemorates women’s suffrage in NYS while 
celebrating how girls of today carry the torch of equal 
rights through civic engagement 

Cicero, N.Y. (September 18, 2018) — Girl Scouts 
of NYPENN Pathways (GSNYPENN) is proud to 
announce the second annual Carrying the Torch: Girl 
Scout Convention on Women’s Rights. The event takes 
place the weekend of October 6-7 in Seneca Falls, N.Y., 
the location of the first women’s rights convention in 
1848. 

This special collaboration between GSNYPENN, 
Women’s Rights National Historical Park, the National 
Women’s Hall of Fame and Friends of Women’s Rights 
National Historical Park commemorates the 101st 
anniversary of women’s suffrage in New York State while 


A Native American 
Cultural Celebration 

Corning NY - September 12, 2018 - All are 
welcome to The Annual Native Nations Festival 
on September 22nd and 23rd, 2018 at the Watson 
Homestead in Corning, NY. This event, organized 
by Seven Generations of Stewards, Inc., is an 
interactive Powwow for all ages. There will be 
Native American dancing, drumming, arts and 
crafts, native food and more. Throughout each 
day at the Native Nations Festival, there will be 
demonstrations that will help everyone learn 
more about the Native American Culture. The 
Thunderbird American Indian Dancers and the 
Nahui Ollin Aztec Dancers will grace this years 
main arena. The Old Bridge Singers will provide 
the pounding beats and beautiful songs expected 
at most Native American gatherings. There will be 
great learning and educational opportunities for 
everyone. FREE Admission and Parking Native 
Nations Festival Hours 

Saturday (9/22): 10 am to 6 pm - General 
Admission for everyone. Gates open at 9 am Grand 
Entry at 10 am Closing Ceremony at 6 pm Sunday 
(9/23): 10 am to 4 pm - General Admission for 
everyone. Gates open at 9 am Grand Entry at 10 
am Closing Ceremony at 3 pm Pets: We understand 
that your pets are important to you, however, 
there are NO pets allowed on the grounds during 
the event. Thank you for your understanding. 
Facebook: https://facebook.com/groups/ 

sevengenerationsofstewards/ Demonstrations 
and Exhibitors Details Demonstrations will be 
scheduled each day and will include interactive, 
educational and artisan topics. Several exciting 
demonstrations will be on-going through both 
days. Currently, we have storytelling, a live hawk 
demonstration, drumming, and beadwork. The 


celebrating how girls of today carry the torch of equal 
rights through civic engagement. Participation in this 
event gives girls the opportunity to not only learn about 
past achievements made by women but also empowers 
them to achieve their own goals and dreams. 

The convention is open to all Girl Scouts, girls and the 
public. Cost is $10 per person. Registration is open at 
gsnypenn.org/torch. The schedule is girl-led and allows 
girls to pick and choose which sessions and activities they 
wish to attend. (Some require pre-registration due to 
seating capacity.) 

Admission grants access to Women’s Rights National 
Historical Park, Wesleyan Chapel, Elizabeth Cady Stanton 
House, M’Clintock House, National Women’s Hall of 
Fame, a voter education session and the Convention 
with keynote speakers. Convention speakers will focus on 
women’s entrepreneurship and empowerment, history of 
women’s rights and the suffrage movement, and the Girl 
Scout Movement. They include: 

* Jess Eckstrom, Founder/CEO, Headbands of Hope 
(keynote speaker) 

* Julie Dale, CEO, Girl Scouts of NYPENN Pathways 

* Betty Bayer, Co-President of the National Women’s 
Hall of Fame and Professor of Women’s Studies at Hobart 
and William Smith Colleges 

* Rebecca Weaver, Girl Scout Alum and Park Ranger at 
Women’s Rights National Historical Park 


line-up will be constantly growing. Check the 
website for the complete, up-to-date, schedule. 
Camping & Lodging Options There are many 
camping and lodging options for the Native 
Nations Festival including the following: Hotels 
& B&Bs: Americas Best Value Inn, Budget Inn, 
Comfort Inn and Suites, Econo Lodge, Hampton 
Inn, Radisson Hotel, Ramada Inn, Staybridge 
Suites, Villa Bernese, Rosewood Inn, Hillcrest 
Manor Bed & Breakfast, Halcyon Place Bed & 
Breakfast Campgrounds: Watson Homestead 
Conference & Retreat Center, Ferenbaugh 
Camping and Recreation Area, Watkins Glen/ 
Corning KOA, Cardinal Campground, Camp 
Bell Campground. VENDORS: Please email 
sevengenerationsofstewards@gmail.com or call 
Tom at 607-346-3256 for more information. The 
Vendor application can be found on our website or 
Facebook page. 

The Thunderbird Native American Indian Dancers 
are the oldest resident Native American dance 
company in New York. The troupe was founded 
in 1963 by a group of ten Native American men 
and women, all New Yorkers, who were descended 
from Mohawk, Hopi, Winnebago, and San Bias 
tribes. They founded the troupe to keep alive the 
traditions, songs, and dances they had learned 
from their parents and added to their repertoire 
from other Native Americans living in New York 
and some who were passing through. The Old 
Bridge Singers are a drum/singing group made 
up of mostly family members from the Ohi:yo’ 
reservation otherwise known as the Alleghany 
Indian Reservation in southwestern New York. 
They represent different tribes from within 
the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois Confederacy. 
They were taught by their fathers, uncles, and 
grandfathers not only in their own ways but also 
from what they had learned from many powwows. 
They formed their own group in the early 1980s 
known then as the Treaty of 1794 Singers but 
later became the White Pine Singers. As members 
changed over the years, the name was once again 


_ The Flashlight - 3 

* “The Women Will Gather” with Girl Scout Women 
of Distinction Recipient Alette Miller Smith, Associate 
Professor and Program Director of African American 
Studies at St. John Fisher College 

Admission also includes a commemorative passport, 
patch and bag available for pick-up at on-site registration. 
Attendees who complete the passport can earn the 2020 
Suffrage Centennial Junior Ranger Badge from Women’s 
Rights National Historical Park. Pre-registration is 
required for a Declaration of Sentiments Reenactment 
Reading, a Situational Awareness & Self Protection 
Workshop with June Worden from Syracuse Self Defense 
and a Sunrise Service for Ml Faith Communities led 
by Rev. Leah Ntuala of First Presbyterian Church of 
Seneca Falls due to venue seating. Girls can also earn the 
Centennial of Women’s Suffrage in New York patch by 
attending this event. 

Girls Scouts can earn their official national Global Action 
Award during Carrying the Torch. (Pre-registration is 
required for these sessions.) This year’s Global Action 
Award focuses on the Global Goals for Sustainable 
Development. In September 2015, leaders from around 
the world agreed to work together to accomplish these 
17 goals by 2030. The goals focus on ending extreme 
poverty, fighting inequality and injustice, and tackling 
climate change. To earn their award, girls work together 
to make a difference on these topics which affect girls and 
women all over the world. 

To register to attend and for complete information 
about Carrying the Torch weekend, including overnight 
accommodations and local amenities, visit gsnypenn.org/ 
torch. 


changed to the Old Bridge Singers in early 2000s. 
The songs they sing are mostly composed by their 
own singers, as well as a few that were given to the 
group. They also sing some classics from time to 
time. They have an older style of singing compared 
to many other Native American drum groups. 
They enjoy traveling and sharing their music 
and culture to all. Their name come from the 3 
bridges left behind when, in the 1960s the Army 
Corp of Engineers put a dam on the rivers that run 
through the reservations, flooding 10,000 acres 
and displacing over 100 families resulting in a way 
of life gone forever. 3 bridges are in the flood plain; 
one at each end and one in the middle. The name 
Old Bridge honors the 3 bridges and the fight and 
struggle that their ancestors went through there. It 
is also a means of saying “We are still here and still 
carrying on our ways.” 

The Nahui Ollin Aztec Dancers represent the 
Salinas Family of Mexico City, Mexico. They 
travel to many cultural events and festivals in the 
United States and perform their cultural dances. 
They have a special program designed for Native 
American festivals, Powwows, Cultural Events, 
Universities, and schools. Luis and his wife present 
in full traditional regalia. They perform indigenous 
Aztec dances and educate about their culture and 
traditions. The public can participate in a slow 
and easy Friendship Circle Dance called "Tloke 
Nahauque". Their program is closed with the 
traditional ancient movement of "Xicoatl" or the 
"Ceremonial Aztec Fire Dance". 


4 - The Flashlight 


Mansfield University 


Friday, September 21, 2018 



Lindsay Daly, Kenzie Temple, Abbey Dabback, Madison Wyant, Morgan Bishop, Faith 
Rivenburg, and Maggie Smith 


The MU Move-In Crew 

Photos by Dan Mason 


Jesse Carr, Kyle Cannon, Tyler Walters, Nick Williams 


Above: Rebecca Bly, justine Colegrove, Elizabeth Anderson, Katie Blose, Laureen Burns, 
Ella Walsh, Selena Fitzwater, Kate Davis, and Alexis Anthony 


Right: Stephanie Tunnicliff, Emerald Hamilton, and Sarah Ferguson 

















































Friday, September 21, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 5 



Jordan Cash-Rawliegh, Taryn Ross, Collin Kilpatrick 


Brendan Owens, Angelo Wrobleski, Tyler Tyus, Devin MacGeorge, Pat Wood, TJ Murphy 


Above: Kyler Littlefield and Phil Dickson 


Left: Emily Gaily, Tiffany Werts, Tatyana Valentin, Haley Snyder, Suzanna Searles 
Front row: Shaye Stine, Bethany Weber 























































6 - The Flashlight 


Mansfield University 


Friday, September 21, 2018 


Word Salad 


27. Start. 


(again) 


by Dan Mason 





2 \ 


21 

n 






lid 










Across 

1. Arab ruler 
5. Small spread of flowers 
or water 

10. Proud of oneself 

14. Academy Award 
winning Vice President 

15. Hurl 

16. Medic or chute head 


56. Down source 
60. Urban growth zone 

64. One who ogles 

65. Pageant crown 

66. Italian car company 

67. Play places 

68. Base 8 number system 

69. Period of time 
Down 


17. 

Ne’er-do-wells 

i. 

Breakfast staple 

20. 

Pig nose 

2. 

Sounds like a cow 

21. 

Hotdogs 

3. 

Ferrous 

22. 

Feeds gas to the engine 

4. 

Perform a second time 

25. 

Early LSD guru 

5. 

Newly weaned pig 

26. 

No-no 

6. 

Miles - hour connector 

30. 

Ultimate goal 

7. 

Tried to get elected 

33. 

Broadcasting 

8. 

Confess openly 

34. 

Ooze 

9. 

Asian Bigfoot 

35. 

Life science prefix 

10. 

Magnesium-aluminum 

38. 

Our president, for 


compound 


example 

11. 

Strong passion 

42. 

Wise bird 

12. 

Persuader 

43. 

Pom alternative 

13. 

Like soda with too 

44. 

Poke public fun at 


much C0 2 

45. 

Book lover 

18. 

Outbreak of public 

47. 

“Just do it.” e.g. 


anger (Brit.) 

48. 

Reef material 

19. 

War 

51. 

French for “Are you 

23. 

Wearing a waistcoat 


coming?” 

24. 

Tennis shoe 

53. 

Make it happen 

26. 

Matador’s opponent 


28. 17 th Century king of 
19 Down 

29. Black gold 

31. Discourages 

32. Copy 

35. Bit with a stick 

36. School, for short 

37. First name in von 
Bismarcks 

39. Place to relax 

40. “Secret” spot 

41. “Secret” residue 

45. NASCARs 

46. Twelfth month of the 
Jewish civil year 

48. Gives up power 

49. Chrysanthemum 
relative 

50. Evaluate again 
52. Open to bribery 

54. Oz mutt 

55. Of great scope, like 
“War and Peace” 

57. Mad 

58. Pennsylvania’s 4th 
largest city 

59. Raise, like a child 

61. Small floor covering 

62. Historic period 

63. $20s source 


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The Flashlight 

Fall 2018 

Mansfield University 

of Pennsylvania 
Student Newspaper 


Lucianna Minoia, 

Editor-in-chief 

Rebekah Rocha , 

Copy Editor 

Danielle Smith 

Treasurer 

Benjamin Maas 

Staff Writer/Secretary 

Sam Finch 

StaffWriter 

Daniel Mason , 

Faculty Adviser 


120 Alumni Hall Student 
Center - Box 1 

Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 16933 
Office: 570-662-4986 
flashlit@mansfield. edu 


The Flashlight supports 
our professors and 
programs! 






































































































Friday, September 21, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 7a 




YOU’RE INVITED T y. 

to an Environmental Outreach Forum p u ^ 
on Fishing and Streams ^ V 


Thursday, September 27 | 5:30 PM 

Coach Stop Inn 4755 Rt. 6 in Wellsboro, PA 16901 

The event is hosted by Carrie Heath, candidate for the PA House of Representatives, and will 
offer information on aquatic ecology and wildlife abundant in our region. 

Presentations currently scheduled include: 

• Larry Brannaka, Hydrologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service, will speak on 
stream restorations, including Water Hydraulics and (Instream/ Bank) 

Structure enhancement. 

• Peter Pet okas, PhD, Lycoming College, Research Associate, Clean Water Institute, 
will speak on our local Hellbenders population. 

• Carrie Blakeslee, Ecologist, USGS Northern Appalachian Research Laboratory, 
will speak on the effects of re-establishing the host-affiliate relationship between the 
Eastern Elliptio Mussel and the American Eel. 


A meet and greet will begin at 5:30 PM and presentations start at 6:00 PM. 
A Q&A session will follow. Light refreshments will be available. 



Heath Endorsed by 
Pennsylvania State Education 
Association (PSEA) 

The Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) has endorsed Carrie 
Heath’s candidacy for the 68th District of the PA House. Heath is the first 
woman, first Democrat and first union member to win this endorsement. 

PSEA represents more than 180,000 individuals committed to the 
advancement of public education. As a professional organization and 
union, the organization recommends candidates based upon their views on 
public education, health care and labor. Recommendations are also based 
on candidates’ professional accomplishments, public comments and their 
advocacy and commitment to PSEA members. 

Heath, a seventh generation Tioga County resident, holds a Masters Degree 
from Mansfield University and is employed by the Wellsboro Area School 
District. Her platform includes establishing a Vocational and Technical School 
in the 68th District. 

For more information, email carrieforpa68th@gmail.com or view the 
campaign Facebook page at Heath for PA House. 


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Topcon Solutions Store 
welcomes 2018 Topcon 

Technology Roadshow and 

Constructioneering Academy 
to Pittsburgh area 

NEW ALEXANDRIA, Pa. — September 06, 2018 — Topcon 
Solutions Store - Pennsylvania and West Virginia announces 
the arrival of the 2018 Topcon Technology Roadshow to the 
Pittsburgh area. From September 11 - 12, the expandable 
semi-trailer truck with a seated theater room and product 
showcase stops at 457 Christopher Road, New Alexandria, 
Pennsylvania, along with the Topcon Solutions Store team. 

On Thursday, September 13, the Topcon and Bentley Institute 
personnel will host a special Constructioneering Academy 
— an initiative designed to allow construction industry 
professionals to learn best practices in constructioneering, a 
process of managing and integrating survey, engineering, and 
construction data, to streamline construction workflows and 
improve project delivery. 

The Topcon Technology Roadshow features the latest 
construction, survey, civil engineering, architecture and 
design technologies in a hands-on environment across North 
America. The free program features live demonstrations and 
presentations focused on productivity and profitability. 

Jay Capristo, president and general manager of Topcon 
Solutions Store - Pittsburgh, said, “The event will feature 
the most up-to-date machine control technology as well as 
the latest Topcon total station instruments and mass data 
capture solutions. Attendees are welcome at any time between 
9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Tuesday September 11 and Wednesday 
September 12 and can look forward to an interactive 
experience with a variety of hands-on demonstrations. We 
have a tremendous opportunity to address infrastructure 


Photo courtesy of 
Topcon 

challenges that can be met more quickly and accurately with 
technology that has revolutionized grading, excavation, paving 
and surveying.” 

Ron Oberlander, senior director ofTopcon Professional Services, 
said, “The Topcon Technology Roadshow offers a uniquely 
suited environment to host this special Constructioneering 
Academy. We will have two five-hour sessions to choose from 
— morning or afternoon — where attendees will learn how 
to remove barriers and data compartmentalization between 
surveying, engineering design, and construction, as well as 
optimize digital insights to simplify workflows and improve 
project outcomes.” 

The Constructioneering Academy will include experience in 
the field with geopositioning technology, drones, earthmoving 
machinery, and integrated software demonstrations in the 
classroom. 

To register for the 7 a.m. — 12 p.m. session, click here, or for 
the 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. session, click here. Lunch will be served 
at noon for all attendees. 

For more information, visit topconroadshow.com. 

Istation 

A Dallas-based education technology company with a 20-year history, 
recently announced a partnership with Boulder Learning, Inc., to develop 
its Oral Reading Fluency and Listening Comprehension Program using 
Boulder Learning’s speech recognition technology. The new Istation program 
utilizes Boulder Learning’s FLORA (fluent oral reaching assessment) speech- 
recognition and assessment product to analyze what students say and how 
fluently they speak. The program’s goal is providing teachers with a time-saving 
tool that allows them to focus on teaching instead of student assessments. 

“This will take what we have been doing with Istation’s state-of-the-art 
reading assessments and give teachers and students even more information 
for intervention and subsequent instruction,” said Richard H. Collins, co¬ 
founder, chairman, and CEO of Istation, in a statement. Read more here: 
https://dallasinnovates.com/dallas-ed-tech-company-rolls-out-speech- 
recognition-tech/ 




















































































































Shining the light on your 



since 1926 


♦♦♦ Volume 112, Issue 1 ♦♦♦ Friday, September 21, 2018 


Mansfield university 

Women’s Soccer Mounties 

Lose to Seton Hill 

BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

STAFF WRITER 

Light Up Mansfield Again (LUMA)/Salute The Troops weekend 
celebrations started with the women’s soccer match on Saturday, 
September 15th in the afternoon. The Mansfield Mounties hosted 
the #24 Seton Hill Griffins. The Griffins scored two goals in the first 
and four goals in the second half to end the match with a 6-0 win. 

Italia Biondi scored the first goal for Seton Hill in the third minute. She 
intercepted a clearance attempt. Biondi’s shot floated above Mansfield keeper, 
Stephanie Moir, to the left side of the goal. In the 28th minute, Biondi’s 
header bounced off the crossbar, and landed right at the foot of Madison 
Schwerzler. Schwerzler scored the second goal for the Griffins. Unfortunately, 


Meghan Noone was injured and had to be replaced in the 34th minute. 
Katie Caruso stepped in for her. Chelsea Thomas took a free kick for the 
Mountaineers in the last minute of the first half. Alex Teeter attempted 
a goal, but the Griffins’ goalkeeper, Jessica Neill, prevented the attempt. 

The Griffins scored three goals over a five minute stretch during the second half. 

Amanda Banfield’s shot found its way from ten yards out to the left of the net 
in the 61st minute. Stephanie Moir received the red card in the 63rd minute 
for a play inside the box. Moir had ten saves during this point of the game. 

Freshman goalkeeper Brianna Roys stepped in for her first 
career appearance. Roys c ended the game with six saves. Randi 

Selbekk buried the penalty kick in the 63rd minute. In the 66th 

minute, Biondi scored her second goal of the day, when 

she shot from 12 yards out over the head of Roys. 


With 88 minutes played, Ally Bloom scored the last goal of 
the match with a shot from five yards out off a corner kick. 

The Mounties recorded 7 shots in total versus 49 shots from the 
Griffins. Breanna Murphy, Chelsea Thomas, Alex Teeter and Eleni 
Gebbia were the game leaders for the Mountaineers with one shot 
on goal each and Mansfield created some great movement at times. 

Mounties’ coach, John Shaffer, said, “The girls worked very hard today 
under some difficult circumstances. We were out a couple starters today 
and then Meg got injured. It definitely stretched our depth, and then 
once we got the red card, having to play down a girl against a very good 
team was not easy. I can not complain about the work rate of the team, 
they always give 100%." When asked about the team’s improvements 
since the pre-season, he said, “If you look at the season as a whole, I have 
seen tremendous improvement in areas since the start of pre-season.” 


Sprint Football Mounties Lose 
Home Opener on LUMAto Penn 

BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

STAFF WRITER 

In the second match of the Light Up Mansfield Again (LUMA)/Salute 
The Troops weekend celebrations, the Mansfield Mounties hosted the 
University of Pennsylvania’s Sprint Football team on September 15th, on 
a Saturday evening. The season opener ended with a 54-21 win for Penn. 


Quinn Henry opened the season with a 93-yard return on the opening kick-off 
with just 14 seconds played. Penn needed four minutes and a 61-yard drive to 
take the 7-6 lead. One minute thereafter, the Mounties provided a fast answer 
with a big play from Adam Hutchinson to Saville Pope on an 81 -yard touchdown. 
With eight minutes to play in the first quarter, Penn countered with a 58-yard 
pass from Eddie Jenkins to Aiden Kelly, retaking the lead at 14-12. At the 
end of the first quarter, Penn’s Jenkins passed to Ben Klaus for the 21-12 lead. 

In the second quarter, Adam Hutchinson finished an eight play, 63- 
yard drive with a 22-yard pass to D.J. McLean to reduce the deficit 
to 21-19. The Quakers scored back-to-back touchdowns, but the 
extra point attempt of the latter was blocked by Bryton Barna, 


who finished a 98-yard return to finish the first half with 34-21. 
During halftime, The Spirit and The Pride of Pennsylvania Mansfield 
University Marching band presented performance. The Mounties’ Cheerleaders 
motivated the team and entertained the spectators during the entire match. 


Field Hockey Mounties Fail 
to Capitalize on Chances 
in Loss against Queens 

BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

STAFF WRITER 

The last game of the Light Up Mansfield Again (LUMA)/Salute The 
Troops weekend celebration was the women’s Field Hockey home 
opener of the Mounties against the Queens University of Charlotte 


on September 15th, on Sunday morning. The Mounties lost the 
match with a final score of 3-2, despite a big 43-11 shots advantage. 

In the second minute, Amber Prince played a rebounded ball off the 
goalkeeper’s pads, into the left side of the goal. It was Prince’s second goal 
of the season. Queens’ scored their first goal of the day in the 14th minute. 
Mazvita Mtisi also got a rebound off of the keeper’s pads and shot into the right 
corner of the goal. In the 28th minute, Christie Buyer beat the keeper to the 
right. It was her second goal of the season. The assist came from Dana Evans. 

The Mounties tried everything to score the third goal with an impressive 


amount of 31 shots in the second half. Queen’s keeper, Jet Van Den 
Berg, and her defense line did not allow an additional goal. Mtisi 
scored her second goal of the day in the 47th minute, when she beat the 
goalie one-on-one. Jill Sherman scored the game-winner for Queens 
in the 67th minute. Sherman shot into the left side of the goal. 

Mansfield had an 18-5 advantage on penalty corners, and placed 25 of 43 
shots on goal. Queens placed 9 shots on goal. Meghan Griffin and Dana Evans 
had the most shots on goal for the Mountaineers with an amount of six each. 


Com! 

ing up in 

Mounts 

lineer Sr 

ions 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

23 

- 1:30 p.m. Women’s 
Soccer: Mounties vs. 
Clarion University; 

Home 

24 

23 

- 3 p.m. - Field Hockey: 
Mounties vs Kutztown 
University; Away 
(Kutztown, PA) 

26 

- 4:30 p.m. - Women’s 
Soccer: Mounties vs. 
Millersville University; 

Home 

27 

28 

- 7 p.m. - Sprint Football: 
Mounties vs. Navy; Away 
(Annapolis, MD) 

29 

- 1 1 p.m. - Men’s & 

Women’s Cross Country: 
Mounties vs. Paul Short 

Invite; Away (Bethlehem, PA) 

- 12 p.m. - Women’s Soccer: 
Mounties vs. California 
University of Pennsylvania; 
Away (California PA) 

- 6 p.m. - Field Hockey: 
Mounties vs. Millversville 
University; Home 

30 

1 

2 

3 

- 4 p.m. - Field Hockey: 
Mounties vs. Mercyhurst 
University; Home 

4 

5 

6 

- 1:30 p.m. - Women’s 
Soccer: Mounties vs. 
Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania; Away 
(Indiana, PA) 









































The '^flashlight 

Shining lighten Mansfield University since 1926 


Oct. 12, 2018 
Volume 112 
Issue 2 
Inside This Issue 

Police beat, 
world news 

- Page 2 

In memory of 
Caitlin M. Knoll 

- Page 3 

Seneca Guns 
take the stage 

- Page 4 

PSECU 

Scholarship 

- Page 5 

Solve the puzzle 

- Page 6 

Mountie field 
hockey 

- Page 7 

Colton Evans 
Signed to play 
Baseball 

- Page 8 



musica 

BYCARLHELRICH 

StaffWriter 


“Experience a Theatre-in-the- 
Round Performance - A Musical 
Prism of Sound Uninterrupted by 
Pause or Applause.” This compelling 
announcement was displayed on the 
posters advertising the 23rd annual 
PRISM concert. At 7:30 PM on 
September 29th and 2:30 PM on 
September 30th, students, faculty, 
and members of the community 
gathered in Steadman Theater to 
witness a musical display of talent 
performed by the students of MU. 
There was no applause during the 
entire concert, so one act moved 
smoothly into the next. Many 
performances were placed off of the 
main stage, and closer or right next 
to the audience, surrounding them 
with the different acts. 

The show opened 

dramatically with Mansfield’s 
Symphony Orchestra, who 

performed “Overture to Candide” 
by Leonard Bernstein. The song 
filled the hall with a dramatic, 
melody driven tune while setting 
an impressive tone for the entire 
concert. They were followed by 
a barbershop quartet made up of 
seniors Robert Flora, Cole Ramsey, 
Nathan Shedd, and junior Sean 


Andres. They performed the fun, 
patriotic song “Grand Old Flag” 
by George M. Cohan from behind 
the audience at the top of the 
theater. The quartet was followed 
by a vibraphone and marimba 
duet by junior Mary Smith and 
sophomore Trevor Jackson. The 
two instruments played off of 
each other to perform the flowing 
tune “Come Thou Font of Every 
Blessing” by Matthew Weyer. The 
next performers were a brass quintet 
who performed “JA-DA” by Bob 
Carleton. The trumpets, horn, 
trombone, and tuba complimented 
each other nicely for a very jazzy 
tune. 

The next piece, “Sir 
Patrick for Saxophones” arranged 
by Phillippe Geiss, reintroduced 
PRISM’s theme of surrounding 
the audience. Senior Mike Becker 
began the song by himself, and 
was joined by over a dozen other 
performers’ brass voices animated 
the Irish swing of the piece. 
Returning to the stage was the 
string quartet of 3 th year student 
Chloe Higgins, seniors Devon 
Lawson and Django Klumpp, and 
junior Shannon Pizzirusso. They 
performed “Lark Quartet” by F. 


avj. Haydn, which was calm, but 
included sudden changes in tempo 
to keep the audience vigilant. They 
were followed by a flute quintet 
with “On Seeing Castle Stalker & 
Snow on Ben Nevis” by Catherine 
McMichael. The high-flowing 
melodies of the piece transitioned 
halfway through to a more Irish 
feel, all presented beautifully by the 
five unique instruments. “Menuet 
Op. 14, No. 1” by Ignace Jan 
Paderewski was performed next by 
sophomores Korena Kraynak and 
Hannah James, who played “four 
hand style” on the same piano. The 
perfect coordination of the two 
musicians beautifully presented the 
flowing, complex tune. 

“Irish Tune from County 
Derry” arranged by P. Grainger 
was performed by a woodwind 
quintet who performed once more 
from behind the audience. The 
majestic tune flowed down the 
theater, utilizing all five different 
instruments for a flowing sound. 
The quintet was followed by a 
snare drum trio of senior Khosi 
Jones with Mary Smith and Trevor 
Jackson who played “Trio 4 Three” 
by Adam F. Brennan. The drums 
commanded attention, and there 


were several engaging moments 
where the musicians played off 
of each other literally. They were 
followed by Mansfield’s Concert 
Choir, who stood up out of the 
audience to perform “Only in 
Sleep” by Eriks Esenvalds. The 
captivating piece highlighted 
soloists senior Cassie Zinkan and 
junior Rosemary Wargo as the 
choir’s impressive chorus swelled 
throughout the theater capturing 
the audience with powerful 
crescendos and mournful, reflective 
resonance. They were followed by 
“Cheval ane Chimes” performed 
by the Steadman Theater tech 
ensemble. Variations of new-age 
sounds projected from speakers 
around the audience to create a 
haunting atmosphere in the total 
darkness. 

Mansfield’s Jazz Ensemble 
shattered the quiet atmosphere 
with “Birdland” by Josef Zawinul. 
The energetic rhythm and melodies 
drove the song’s vigorous tune 
had everyone clapping along to a 
section of the piece. Mansfield’s 
Chamber Singers gathered on 
stage afterwards to perform “Sure 
on this Shining Light” by Morten 
Lauridsen. The beautiful mix of 
voices were accompanied by piano 
to build an elegant rising and 
falling melody From above the 
theater, six trumpets heralded the 
next piece, “Festival of Lights” by 
David Malott. The combinative 
brass voices announced and 
projected the dramatic piece over 
the audience. They were followed 
by an acapella quintet with “Hm 
Hm Hm Quintet from The Magic 
Flute.” The fun, slightly comedic 
performance told an entire story 
in German (incomprehensible to 
English speakers), but the vocalists 
expressed the meaning behind the 
story rather fluently 

The wind trio of Mike 
Becker, junior Ben Kearns, and 
freshman Jeff Tobey performed 
“Bulgar” by Mike Curtis. 

Continued on page 7 
PRISM 










Friday, October 12, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 2 


Weekly 

Weather 


Saturday 

AM 

Showers 

High:52 Low:37 


Sunday 



Partly 

Cloudy 


High:56 Low:44 


Monday 


f 


/ /7r 

High:50 


■> PM 
Showers 


Low: 3 5 


Tuesday 



Partly 

Cloudy 


High:50 Low:39 

Wednesday 


Mostly 
Cloudy 

High:52 Low:39 

Thursday 


Partly 

Cloudy 


High:50 Low:38 



Friday 



Partly 

Cloudy 


High:56 Low:38 


POLICE BEAT 

- Anyone with information on any these events are encouraged to 
contact the Mansfield University Police at 570-439-4900 - 

- 9/8/2018 - Unknown person(s) removed a decoration, a large drawing of a space 
ship, from the 4th floor long wing of Spruce dormitory. This incident was report¬ 
ed on September 7, 2018 and occurred between 3:15 p.m. and 3:45 p.m. (Theft) 

- 9/9/2018 - The station received a call for an alcohol violation is Spruce room 273. Mack¬ 
enzie Brewer (18), Wynnree Doan (19), Alexis Felegie (19), Jacob Giammichele (19), Zach 
Hamilton (19), a juvenile female, and a juvenile male were all found to have consumed al¬ 
cohol. Several bottles of alcohol were also removed from the room. These individuals were 
charged underage consumption and judicially referred. This event was reported on Septem¬ 
ber 8, 2018 and occurred between 10:35 p.m. and 12:24 a.m. (Underage Consumption) 

- 9/9/2018 - University Police responded to a call from Oak Hall Room 339 for a possible drug 
law violation. Drug paraphernalia was recovered from the room. Raymond Glemser (20) was 
also referred for a violation of University Rules and Regulations for having a weapon stored 
in his dorm room. This incident was reported on September 9, 2018 at 9:34 p.m. (Drug law) 

- 9/17/2018 - Tahjmir Owens (19) allegedly kicked a female’s bedroom door, breaking 
the door frame, and shoved the resident of the room. Owens was charged with crimi¬ 
nal mischief and harassment, as well as, judicially referred. This incident was reported 
on September 10, 2018 at 10:09 p.m. in Spruce room 460. (Criminal Mischief) 

- 9/17/2018 - A maroon Ford Fusion, parked in the diagonal spaces on Clinton Street, was 
struck with damage to the rear driver's side fender. Anyone with information on the incident is 


asked to call M U Police at 3 /0-662-4900. This incident was reported on September 11,2018 andl 

occurred between 8:30 a.m. and 4:23 p.m. in the Clinton St employee parking area. (Hit and Run) 

- 9/19/2018 - Stephanie Harkins (22) was reported to have made verbal statements to¬ 
ward a female victim and subjected the victim to unwanted physical contact. Har¬ 
kins was referred to the campus community conduct officer for disciplinary ac¬ 
tion. This incident was reported on September 13, 2018 and occurred between 1:15 
a.m. and 1:45 a.m. at the Sycamore east entrance. (Harassment by Communication) 

- 9/19/2018 - University Police Officer stopped John Brunetti (24) for a traffic violation. Furthei 
investigation found that Brunetti was suspected of being under of the influence of an alcoholic 
beverage to the degree that he was no loner capable of safely operating a motor vehicle. He wa? 
taken into custody for suspicion of DUI and consented to a blood alcohol test. Criminal charges 
are pending the results of a blood alcohol concentration test. This incident occurred on Septem¬ 
ber 15, 2018 on Wilson Ave between 2:03 a.m. and 2:30 a.m. (Driving Under the Influence) 

- 9/19/2018 - University Police Officer encountered Zhane Hamilton (20) stumbling in 
the roadway while being assisted by another individual. Hamilton was found to be under 
age while being under the influence of an alcoholic beverage. A summary non-traffic cita¬ 
tion has been filed against Hamilton in relation to this incident. This incident occurred on 
September 16, 2018 on College Pi at South Academy St at 12:04 a.m. (Underage Alcohol) 

- 9/19/2018 - University Police Officer on routine patrol discovered that unknown person(s) 
had unlawfully removed a portion of a wooden traffic barricade that was in place at Campus 
View Dr. at Stadium Dr. A thorough check of the area failed to locate the item, which was the 
property of Mansfield University. A cost estimate to replace the item is not yet available. Any¬ 
one with information on this incident is asked to call the police at 570-662-4900. This incident 
occurred on September 17, 2018 between 12:30 a.m. and 3:22 a.m. (Theft- Movable Property) 

Continued on page 4 

Police Beat 


World News 


Headlines from across the planet 

Blurbs courtesy of bbc.com 

- 10/10/2018 - Hurricane Michael: record-breaking storm mauls US 

- The most powerful hurricane ever to hit northwest Florida made 
landfall on Wednesday afternoon, and is now a category three storm with 
125 mph winds. 

- Michael reportedly killed at least 13 people in Central America, 
but only one reported death so far in the US. 

- More than 370,000 people in Florida have been ordered to evac¬ 
uate, to a quarter of a million homes and businesses have lost power, due to 
destroyed power lines, and states of emergency have been declared in all or 
parts of Florida, Alabama, Georgia and North Carolina. 

- 10/9/2018 - Australia defies climate warning to back coal 

- A climate report produced by the UN's Intergovernmental 
Panel on Climate Change warned that "unprecedented" changes would 
be required to limit the Earth's temperature rise, and that coal-fired power 
generation had to end by 2050 in order to avoid devastating changes to the 
planet. 

- Despite the UN’s recommended regulations to limit global 
warming to 1.5C, the Australian government has continued support for 
coal-fired power. 

- Meanwhile, China has restarted work at hundreds of coal-fired 
power stations, and is reported to possess some 993 gigawatts of coal power 
capacity, although additional approved new plants would increase this by 

25%. 

- 10/10/2018 - Nato and Serbia put bombing behind them 

- In 1999, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) aircraft 
bombed Serbia for 78 days, but Aleksandar Vucic, the country’s president, 
has since called for a change of its negative feelings of NATO. 

- Public opinion in Serbia remains strongly opposed to NATO, 
and Mr. Vucic explains, “emotional issues...are something that we need to 
work on - and that's what we're going to do in the future.” 

- The NATO anthem was publically played in Serbia during a 
large-scale Nato-led exercise, which suggests that reconciliation is likely in 
the near future. 

- 10/10/2018 - Guatemala ex-VP Roxana Baldetti jailed in 'Magic Water' 


scandal 

- A court in Guatemala has sentenced the former vice-president, 
Roxana Baldetti, to 15 years and six months in jail for her role in embez¬ 
zling millions from a state fund set up to decontaminate a lake. 

- The decontamination deal was negotiated by her brother, Ma¬ 
rio, who held no official post, and arranged to use an ineffective solution 
of chemicals of water, salt and chlorine for the clean-up. 

- Ms. Baldetti had previously left office in disgrace in 2015, after 
the biggest anti-corruption protests the country had ever seen. 

- Former Guatemalan president Otto Perez Molina is also impli¬ 
cated in the scheme, which both he and Ms. Baldetti deny the allegations. 

- 10/8/2018 - Libyan forces capture Egyptian jihadist Hisham Ashmawi 

- One of Egypt's most wanted jihadists, accused of being behind 
several deadly attacks, was captured by security forces in Libya during an 
operation in the eastern port city of Darnah. 

- Ashmawi was arrested while wearing an explosive vest but was 
unable to detonate it, reported the Libya National Army (LNA), who said 
they would hand over Ashmawi to Egyptian authorities after investiga¬ 
tions. 

- Egypt, who has close relations with the LNA, has launched air 
strikes over Darnah to target jihadists linked to militant activity inside 
Egypt, and Egyptian officials say Ashmawi was behind the attempted as¬ 
sassination of then Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim in May 2013, and 
the killing of the country's top public prosecutor in a car bomb in 2015. 

- 10/10/2018 - China Uighurs: Xinjiang legalises 'reeducation' camps 

- China's western Xinjiang region has written "vocational train¬ 
ing centres" for Muslim Uighurs into law amid growing international con¬ 
cern over large-scale disappearances in the region. 

- Xinjiang says the centres will tackle extremism through "thought 
transformation,” while rights groups say detainees are made to swear loy¬ 
alty to President Xi Jinping and criticise or renounce their faith. 

- Said extremism is defined so broadly that it even seems to be ap¬ 
plicable to parents who complain if their children want to marry someone 
of a different faith or ethnic group, and former prisoners of the camps have 
reported physical as well as psychological torture. 

- The “vocational skills and educational training centres" contain 
most inmates who have never been charged with a crime, and do not re¬ 
ceive legal representation, while they are poorly fed with reports of wide¬ 
spread torture. 































Friday, October 12, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 3 



In Memory of Caitlin M. Knoll 
1998-2018 


CAITLIN M. KNOLL Age 20 of Horseheads, NY became one of “Heaven's Special Angels” on Wednesday, September 26, 2018 as thel 
result of a motor vehicle accident. Caitlin was born March 5, 1998 in Elmira, NY the daughter of Randy and Brenda Mann Knoll. She was 
a graduate of Horseheads High School Class of 2016 and was graduating Summa Cum Laude from Mansfield University. Caitlin enjoyed 
dancing and it was her dream to help children through her work. She loved woodworking with her father and built a Chess Board for her 
brother and also re-finished furniture. Caitlin also enjoyed knitting, crocheting, and gardening with her mother Brenda. Caitlin was return¬ 
ing home to marry the “Love of Her Life,” Zachary Gustin. She was a uniquely gifted young woman who treasured her family and her 
pursuit to help guide children through her future career. Caitlin is survived by her parents Randy and Brenda Mann Knoll of Horseheads, 
NY; brother: Keegan Knoll of Horseheads, NY; sister: Mackenzie Knoll of Horseheads, NY; her fiance Zachary Gustin U.S.M.C. stationed 
at Henderson Hall in Arlington, VA; her beloved fur baby Sugar and many extended family members and friends including her professors 
and the staff of Mansfield University. There will be no prior calling hours. A Memorial Service for Caitlin will be announced at a future 
date. Those wishing to remember Caitlin may do so through memorials to a charity benefitting children. Arrangements are entrusted to the 
LYNCH FUNERAL HOME 318 WEST BROAD STREET HORSEHEADS, NY. Words of Condolence and Memories may be shared 
at www.lynchsfuneralhome.com. 


Photo courtesy of Family of Caitlin M. Knoll 

Mary E. Daly (Sunday, September 30, 2018) 

Caitlin’s unexpected death is a tragedy. She was a student of mine at 
Mansfield University and was a promising young woman. Her passing is a 
loss to everyone at the college. Please keep us advised of funeral services. 

In Sympathy, 

Dr. Mary Daly 

Leslie Farr (Sunday, September 30, 2018) 

I’m so very sorry for the loss of Caitlin I don’t know if I knew her or not 
I work at Mansor Hall so I might have seen her I just wanted to let her 
family and friends know how very sorry to hear of her passing prayers to 
the family and friends at this time. 

Mary Dyer (Sunday, September 30, 2018) 

I am very sorry for your loss. Caitlyn was a wonderful woman, I was honored 
to be a fellow student. She was always kind to others and I enjoyed taking 
classes with her, as I am also a Social Work major. 

My thoughts and prayers go out to all family and friends. 

Mike McArdle (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

I never physically met her be I'm a online learner. We had Cultural nutrition 
online over the summer together. Pretty sure we did a project together too. 
Sad that someone so young is gone. 


Heather Bennett-Cavanaugh (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

Cait was one of my daughters first friends. They would spend the night to¬ 
gether and dance together for hours. Cait was also a dancer at my studio for 
a little while and I was so happy to work with her. She had a huge heart and 
a will to learn. Watching her compete her solo made me cry because I knew 
how much she had overcome to be on that stage. Cait you will be sorely 
missed. So many of us love you and will miss your smile. 

The Rogan Family (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

We love you all! We are so glad that we got to spend time with Cait over 
the years while watching her grow into such a beautiful young lady...thank 
you for sharing your daughter with us...please let us know what we can do 
to help you. 

Love, 

Tom, Jenn, Tyler & Maddy 

Marlene Gush posted a condolence (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

Randy, Brenda, and family, 

Heaven has gained another beautiful angel. My heart is heavy but please 
know I am right across the street if theres anything you need. My thoughts 
and prayers are with you. Prayers that God will give you peace and comfort 
in the days ahead. 

Your neighbor 
Marlene 

STEVE HURLEY (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

RANDY & BRENDA, SO SORRY TO READ ABOUT THE LOSS OF 
YOUR DAUGHTER, CAITLIN 


Cassie Dickinson (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

Dear Brenda, Randy, Keegan, and MacKenzie. I am saddened and heart¬ 
broken to hear of Caitlin's passing. May you all find peace and comfort in 
your beautiful memories. All of my thoughts and prayers are with you at this 
time. 

Gillian Myers (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

Being able to get to know Caitlin, sit next to her everyday in class, and 
work with her on several projects, papers, and presentations throughout our 
time at Mansfield has been an honor and an inspriration. I cannot think 
of anyone more dedicated to their education, family, and friends. I will 
never run out of good things or fond memories of her beautiful soul and I 
am heartbroken by her passing. My thoughts are with you, her family and 
friends, and I hope you find peace after this tragedy. 

Judy Wald (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

Wishing the family my deepest sympathy and compassion at this most dif¬ 
ficult time. I am so sorry for your loss. 

Jenny (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

I am so very sorry to hear of your loss! I worked with Caitlin at ECFC. She 
was such a sweet young woman, and will no doubt be missed by many. 

Annette Cobb (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

My heart breaks for all of you. Cait was such a sweet girl and I loved see¬ 
ing her grow up to a beautiful young adult! Heaven gained an angel.... 
Godspeed. 


Hailey VanZile (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

I am so sorry for the familys loss. I was a friend of caits and i miss her dearly. 
She was and still is a very respected student and friend. She had a wonderful 
personality and i miss her dearly. Every one here does. May she fly high in 
heaven 

Stephanie Von Bevern (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

The Mountie community will miss you, may you rest easy. 


Emmy Knoll Mucci (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

Randy Brenda Keegan & MacKenzie my prayers are with you. So Sorry for 
a Horrible Accident. If there is anything I can do please contact me. 

Love Aunt Emmy 

Candy kirkwood (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

I’m so very sorry for your loss. My prayers are with you all at this difficult 
time. 


Shelley (Cavaluzzi) Hollenbeck (Wednesday, October 3, 2018) 

Randy, Brenda & family... words cannot even begin to express how sorry I 
am for your devastating loss.... keeping you all in my prayers for strength to 
get through the coming days.thinking of you all. 

Christina A Peterson (Wednesday, October 3, 2018 

My heart and prayers go out to your family during this devastating time. 


Elaine and Alexandra Benton (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

Brenda, Randy, and family, our hearts go out to you. Allie was a part of 
the Let’s Dance family with Caitlin and we have many great memories of 
Caitlin’s beautiful performances. Words cannot express how sorry we are 
for you. 

Jamy Brice Hyde (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

My deepest sympathy to your entire family Caitlin was an incredible young 
lady. This an incredible tragedy. I hold you all in my prayers There are no 
words that can describe the immense loss. Keegan if there is anything you 
need you know how to reach Brice Hyde sending my love 

Tracey Fish-McLaughlin (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

I am SO very sorry for your loss! 

Katrina Church Nichols (Monday, October 1, 2018) 

I will always remember how Caitlin’s smile lit up the room when she 
danced... especially at Irish dance-outs. She might have not been in the 
best mood prior to the dance, but once that music started, she lit up like a 
Christmas tree. The most beautiful smile... you couldn’t help but love watch¬ 
ing her! I cannot imagine the pain of your loss, but I have no doubt Cait is 
resting in the Lord’s arms and will always be with you. My prayers are with 
you all. 

CarlTodzia lit a candle (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

So sorry for your loss our thoughts and prayers are with you and your family 


Jack and Lorrie Roges (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

To Caitlin family, so sorry for your loss. 

Marty & Lisa Hubbard (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

Brenda, Randy, Keegan & Mackenzie: 

We are so so very sorry about Caitlyn. Just remembering her sweet lil smile 
and how she got so excited about seeing the kitty cats as a toddler.... among 
other times. She turned into such a poised, smart, beautiful young woman 
to be so proud of. We hope that the closeness you had with her brings floods 
of warm memories and peace. Please know if we can help in any way during 
this time, we’d love to. 

Marty, Lisa, Marisa & Hailey Hubbard 

Ashley Materne (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

She was the best friend anyone could ever ask for. My heart is with her 
family at this time. With all love my prayers are with you Randy, Brenda, 
Keegan, and Kenzie. 

Love 

Ashley 

Andrew Giometti (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

So sorry to hear about this 

Diane Comfort JoAnne Comfort Lee Andrews (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 
We are so sorry for your loss. 

Brenda L. Knoll (Tuesday, October 2, 2018) 

My heart breaks for you all! 


Tyree (Thursday, October 4, 2018) 

I remember working with you, you were a pleasure! just because your not 
down here with us doesn't mean your not in are hearts! RIP, 

my condolences stay with your family and pray to get you guys better 
through devastating times 

Tiffany Welch (Thursday, October 4, 2018) 

My deepest condolences to each of you. I don't feel like sorry is enough 
as I can't imagine the heartache your family must be experiencing at this 
time. Caitlin was one of my advisees and was in many of my classes here at 
Mansfield University. Her smile and her sweet spirit will be missed by so 
many of us. Please know your entire family is in my thoughts and prayers as 
you move forward through the very difficult days ahead. 

Jan Purk (Friday, October 5, 2018) 

My heart breaks for you. Caitlin was an amazing student. She was focused 
on working with those with disabilities. I often told her she need to be a 
sociology major as she excelled in my classes and her passions showed in her 
work. Our prayers are raised for her and her family. 

Missie Burro us (Saturday, October 6, 2018) 

Oh Caitlin. I have no words. Dear Family of this beautiful girl, I am so so 
so so sorry for your loss. We ALL at ECFC loved Caitlin so much. She was 
always willing to help out and was great at whatever she was doing. Sending 
much love and prayers for comfort your way. May God wrap his loving arms 
around you and keep you especially close at this time. 









Friday, October 12, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 4 


Police Beat 

Continued from page 2 

- 9/23/2018 - University police officer investigating a handicapped-parking 
violation, encountered Gregoire Kercy (20) when he returned to the ve¬ 
hicle in question. During the course of that contact, a sealed can contain¬ 
ing an alcoholic beverage was observed in the center console of the ve¬ 
hicle. Kercy, less than 21 years of age, was found to be the operator of 
the vehicle. He has been referred to the campus community conduct offi¬ 
cer for campus disciplinary action. This incident occurred on September 
22, 2018 at 1:06 a.m. in the Spruce A3 parking lot. (Underage Alcohol) 

- 9/25/2018 - MU Police were dispatched to Sycamore 3rd Floor Hallway 
for a fight in progress. Upon arrival it was found that Nykeria Watson- 
Pope (21) and Millenia Williams (19) had been involved in a physical al¬ 
tercation causing injury to both individuals. It was also found that prior to 
September 24, 2018 Williams had damaged Watson-Pope's personal items. 
Both individuals are being referred to the Judicial Board and charged crimi¬ 
nally. This incident was reported on September 24, 2018 and occurred 
between 3:25 p.m. and 3:28 p.m. (Simple Assault, Criminal Mischief) 

- 10/1/2018 - 6 individuals were reported smoking marijuana behind Spruce 
dormitories. Names ofthe individuals: Ajahnaah Martin, Monae Bishop, Melika 
Boone, Melanie Moore, Mya Johnson, and Destiny Hill. This incident was re¬ 
ported on September 28,2018 and occurred between 10:30 p.m. and 10:37 p.m. 

- 10/4/2018 - University Police received a complaint regarding the theft 
of personal property of a residence hall room. The item the victim re¬ 
ported as having been, stolen was located by police in Kevin Gamber's 

(18) possession, however the circumstances do not support criminal 
charges in this matter. Gamber has been referred to the campus judicial 
officer for appropriate action under the student code of conduct. This in¬ 
cident was reported on September 25, 2018 and occurred between 10:40 
p.m. and 11:40 p.m. in Oak room 229. (Theft- Movable Property) 

- 10/4/2018 - Raymond Glemser (20) was assisting University Police with an¬ 
other matter. When police entered the room, an item of drug paraphernalia as 
well as alcoholic beverages were found in plain view. Glemser is being referred 
to the campus judicial officer for both violations. Criminal charges are pend¬ 
ing for the underage alcohol violation. This incident occurred on September 
26, 2018 at 1:00 a.m. in Oak 339. (Drug Paraphernalia/ Underage Alcohol) 

- 10/4/2018 - A male victim was on the telephone with police regard¬ 
ing another matter. During the course of that call, Jarell Patton report¬ 
edly initiated a verbal altercation with the victim and subsequently struck 
the victim on the arm, head, and neck. Patton has been referred to the 
campus judicial officer for further action. Criminal charges are also pend¬ 
ing in this matter. This incident occurred on September 25, 2018 at 
11:40 p.m. in Oak on the 3rd floor. (Harassment/ Disorderly Conduct) 

- 10/27/2018 - “The station received a case from Mansfield Borough Po¬ 
lice Department that took place on Spaulding (Baseball) Field. The case 
involves an adult male and a juvenile female. This case is under investiga¬ 
tion.” More information has been released: The incident initially took place 
between June 14, 2018 and June 26, 2018 at 12:00 a.m. The adult male’s 
identity was disclosed as Tristan Gerow (21). This incident was reported 
on August 6, 2018 at 10:45 a.m. (Rape-Intercourse w/ victim less than 13) 

- 10/8/2018 - The station received reports of loud noise and drinking in Oak 
room 433. Eight individuals were found occupying the room and consuming 
liquor, malt or brewed beverages, all under the age of 21. Names of the indi¬ 
viduals: Joshua Naylor (18), Deron Tarylor (17), Ali-Anis Rhanime (18), Trev¬ 
or Henneman (18), Zachary Drewno (18), Laura Stempin (18), Christopher 
Durkin (18), and Michael Frankie (18). This incident was reported on October 
6, 2018 and occurred between 9:15 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. (Underage Drinking) 

- 10/9/2018 - The Mansfield University Police Department is inves¬ 
tigating theft of food from a vending machine that is located in the 
game room of the Alumni Hall Student Center. Anyone with informa¬ 
tion regarding this incident is asked to call 570-662-4900. This event 
is believed to have taken place between September 25, 2018 and Oc¬ 
tober 8, 2018 and occurred between 7:20 a.m. and 12:57 a.m. (Theft) 

- 10/9/2018 - Police were called to the second floor of Oak dormitory for 
a loud party involving alcohol violations. Nine individuals were cited for 
underage drinking and referred to residence life. Names of the individu¬ 
als Diamond Thompson (18), Cristin Hickey (19), Shaniya Moore (19), 
Isabella Cook (18), Ishea Willis (19), Julie Louineus (19), Ashley Miller 

(19) , Aaron Coleman (18), and Sharima Rowland (19). This incident 
was reported on October 5, 2018 at 10:51 p.m. (Underage Drinking) 


MU fall sorority recruitment 
week 

BY DANIELLE SMITH 

Treasurer 

Mansfield University’s Fall Sorority Recruitment Week took 
place the week of September 10th to the 14th of 2018. The 
four social sororities that participated were Alpha Sigma Al¬ 
pha, Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Sigma Tau, and Delta Zeta. 

Faith Rivenburg, an undecided sophomore sister of 
Alpha Sigma Alpha, answered some questions about what Re¬ 
cruitment week entails, both as someone being recruited and 
running recruitment. 

When she was asked why she chose Alpha Sigma Al¬ 
pha she said it was because they were really welcoming and it 
felt like a home, due to how funny the girls are. The late nights 
were tolling, but getting to know everyone else in each of the 
sororities was the best part, Rivenburg explained. 

“I always thought about joining a sorority and expe¬ 
riencing it. Then I met Mckenzie Temple and we decided to 
go out to recruitment together. I had come in during the fall, 
so it was really nerve-wracking because it was so formal and 
intense. It sucked being new because I was not yet initiated or 
formally a sister,” Rivenburg said. 

Rivenburg said that the recruitment took place in 
different rooms for each sorority in order to optimize mingling 
with each of them. The different sororities’ rooms had themes 
and activities as well. Her favorite event was bid day because 
of meeting her new sisters. She also said there is nothing she’d 
change about the process. 

Rivenburg’s advice to any girls debating on coming 
out for recruitment in the future is, “Do it, you probably won’t 
regret it. Be open-minded, don’t be dead set on one sorority.” 

Preparing for Recruitment Week as a sister rather 
than being the recruited, consisted of the sisters all making 
and getting their shirts, making the banner and decorations, 
and food for the week. Rivenburg went on to say she preferred 
going through the recruitment because setting it all up is 
stressful. Her favorite part was experiencing it, because it was 
her first time being a part of recruiting, as opposed to being 
recruited. 

Rivenburg currently holds the Ritual Chairman po¬ 
sition in Alpha Sigma Alpha and someday wants to apply for 
the Social Chair and maybe Fundraising positions. 




Senca Guns take the stage 

BYCARLHELRICH 

StaffWriter 

On September 28th, 2018, the alumni band of Mansfield 
University of Pennsylvania Seneca Guns performed a 
band set in The Hut. 

The band was comprised of Jack Stevens on 
vocals and guitar, Jake Wilson playing lead guitar and 
backing vocals, Dylan Willoughby on bass, Ben Dan¬ 
ner on the drums, and Lizzie Stiadle on alto-saxophone. 
All of the band members, besides Stevens, are graduates 
or former students of Mansfield University. Stevens and 
Wilson started a band in high school in Corning, NY. 
They were regular performers at Open Mic night at The 
Hut (every Wednesday at 9:00 PM). Wilson and Danner 
both worked at The Hut, and formed the current group 
with Willoughby and Stiadle when they arrived on the 
MU scene. 

Around 8:30 p.m., Seneca Guns grabbed the 
attention of their audience, which was mostly made up 
of MU students, with a cover of Led Zeppelin’s song, 
“Immigrant Song.” Although, they were fighting various 
technical issues, the band managed to continue the show. 
Stiadle’s saxophone provided a conducive supporting 
track for Stevens’ vocals. 

Kelsey Bathrick, a student attendee who loved 
the band’s finale, “Killing in the Name” by Rage Against 
the Machine, proclaimed of the band, “It was like [Led] 
Zeppelin reincarnate. Like I was at one of their concerts, 
but didn’t have to spend $2,000 to be there.” 

Seneca Guns’ set list included a variety of rock 
music, including several Led Zeppelin covers, as well as 
other covers of rock songs from Guns and Roses, Pink 
Floyd, Cage the Elephant, and the Red Hot Chili Pep¬ 
pers. Spliced throughout the performance were several 
original pieces, such as crowd favorite “Ignore Me,” that 
held their own against covers of classics like, “Comfort¬ 
ably Numb” and “Hotel California.” 

Stevens said after their intermission break, “So 
I’m not feeling so good, and I thought I would take it 
easy tonight, but I decided ‘f*** that’ and I’m gonna blow 
my voice out.” 

At the end of one song, Danner held up his 
snare drum, which he had smashed during a drum solo, 
and called out to Ryan Dalton, the resident Hut direc¬ 
tor, to ask if he had another one somewhere, and it was 
soon replaced. After “Kashmir,” Willoughby grabbed a 
mic and, breathing heavily, said that was the first time 
they had ever performed that song without messing up 
anything, which was received with applause. 

The band clearly cherished getting to play once 
more on their “home stage.” The audience left The Hut 
with less hearing in their ears, but rock music in their 
hearts and smiles on their faces. 

Learn about opportunities to see live bands at 
The Hut with the Mountie Minute emails, sent out every 
Monday and Thursday. 

Seneca Guns are working on their first EP. Like 
them on Facebook at Seneca Guns, follow them on Ins- 
tagram @senecagunsmusic, or add them on Snapchat at 
senecagunsmusic to keep up with the band as they work 
on their first EP. 


Photos courtesy of Mansfield.edu 















Friday, October 12, 2Qlg 


TFp Flashlight - 5 


Mansfield 

Few students earn credit by exam 

BYDANMANSON 

Flashlight Adviser 

Mansfield University allows students to get credit for any class by testing out of it, but its not 
easy to do. 

To earn college credit by exam, students must have prior knowledge or “life experi¬ 
ence” about a subject, according to Ryan Stanley. Stanley works in the Registrar’s office. He’s 
the last person to clear students for graduation. 

Students with such experience have to explain or demonstrate that knowledge to the 
appropriate professor. The professor, once convinced that the student might have already mas¬ 
tered the material in the class, writes and administers a test. If the student passes the test, the 
student earns the credit for the class. Another advantage to the student is that credit by exam 
costs less. Students pay one-third of the tuition cost for the course: for a three credit course, a 
student would pay for the equivalent of one credit, but still earn the full three credits for the 
course upon completion of the examination. 

“We only have one or two students per semester,” Stanley said. 

The only exception is graduates of the police academy. Students who have graduated 
from the Mansfield University Police Academy can earn up to 19 credits through Credit by 
Examination. Students can then use these credits toward completion of an associate’s or bach¬ 
elor’s degree program at Mansfield. 

There is one other way to earn college credits by completing an examination. Man¬ 
sfield University participates in the College Level Examination Program. “CLEP is one way 
to earn credits,” Stanley said. “These examinations are difficult, so students definitely need to 
devote the time to prepare for them if they want to be successful.” 

Governor Wolf’s Cabinet in your community 

On Monday October 22, members of Governor Wolf’s Cabinet will be on campus to talk 
about issues that are important to our region. Cabinet in Your Community: Government That 
Works will be held in Manser Hall’s North Dining Room beginning at 1:30 pm. Please see the 
attached invitation for more information. 

Please preregister by sending an email to cacoleman@pa.gov by October 13. If you 
are planning to invite your class (es), you only need to give your name and the number of stu¬ 
dents attending. 


University _ 

PSECU scholarship 

Harrisburg, PA — PSECU, Pennsylvania’s largest credit union, opened the application period for 
its annual scholarship program as of September 28th, 2018. 

The program awards six scholarships — valued at up to $8,000 each - to graduating high 
school seniors to help reduce the financial burden of pursuing postsecondary education. Since its 
inception in 1997, the PSECU scholarship program has awarded more than half a million dollars 
in scholarships to over 100 students. 

“We’re proud to announce that the application period for this year’s round of PSECU 
scholarships is now open, and we look forward to continuing to help students reach their edu¬ 
cational goals,” said PSECU President Greg Smith. “The application is available for completion 
online at psecu.com/scholarships.” 

Each winner will receive a $2,000-per-year scholarship that is renewable for up to four 
years based on the fulfillment of set academic requirements, including GPA. The total potential 
value of each scholarship is $8,000 per student. 

“We at PSECU understand that paying for higher education can be a challenge,” said 
Sara Weiser, PSECU Financial Education Manager. “That’s why in the credit union people help¬ 
ing people’ spirit, we make the annual PSECU scholarship available for students. It is our hope 
that through this merit-based support, coupled with offerings from our financial education pro¬ 
gram - WalletWorks - and the PSECU blog, students have the resources they need for success.” 
To qualify for PSECU’s 2019 scholarship program, applicants must: 

- Be a current PSECU member (by December 31, 2018). Note that a student who is a joint owner 
on an account is NOT automatically a member. The student must have a custodial account or 
have his or her own separate account. 

- Be a high school senior graduating in spring 2019 

- Plan to attend a two- or four-year college or university 

-Completed applications must be submitted by noon (ET) on Thursday February 28, 2019 to be 
considered. For more information or to apply visit psecu.com/scholarships. 



Photo courtesy of psecu.com 


Campus Events Calendar 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

14 

- All Day - Student Bus 
Trip - Niagara Falls 
(USA) & Six Flags 

Darien Lake Theme Park 

- 2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. 
Choral Collage 

15 

- All Day - Registration 
for Spring Semester 

Begins 

-8:15 p.m.- 11:30 p.m. 
Monday Night Football 
@ The HUT 

16 

- 11 a.m - 1 p.m. - Ani¬ 
mal Care Sanctuary 

- 7;30 p.m. - John Zaffis 
Ghost Hunting Lecture 

- North Manser Dinning 
Hall 

- 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. - Triv¬ 
ia Night @ The HUT 

17 

- 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. - Em¬ 
ployer On-Campus: The 
Arc of Chemung 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. - 
Open Mic Night @ The 
HUT 

18 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Live Music Jam Night @ 
The HUT 

19 

- All Day - MU Home¬ 
coming 2018 

- 9p.m. - 11:55 p.m. Off 
Beat Movie Night @ The 
HUT 

20 

- All Day - MU Home¬ 
coming 2018 

- 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. - 
PRISM Concert 

21 

- All Day - MU Home¬ 
coming 2018 

- 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. 
Saxophone Studio 

Recital 

- 4 p.m. Melissa Anne 
Phelan’s Senior Clarinet 
Recital 

22 

- 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Em¬ 
ployer On-Camp us: PA 
State Police 

-8:15 p.m.- 11:30 p.m. 
Monday Night Football 
@ The HUT 

23 

- 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. - Triv¬ 
ia Night @ The HUT 

24 

- 4:30 p.m. - 7:30 
p.m. - Transfer Student 
Information Nights 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. - 
Open Mic Night @ The 
HUT 

25 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Live Music Jam Night @ 
The HUT 

26 

- All Day - Young Men’s 
Choral Festival 

- - 9p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Off Beat Movie Night @ 
The HUT 

- 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. - 
Octoboefest 

27 

- 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. 

- MU Jazz Ensemble 
Concert 















6 - The Flashlight 


Mansfield University 


Friday, October 12, 2018 


Solve the puzzle! 


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Photos courtesy of wiki media Commons 

Answers on page 7 



The Flashlight 

Fall 2018 ' 

Mansfield University 

of Pennsylvania 
Student Newspaper 


Lucianna Minoia, 

Editor-in- Chief 

Rebekah Rocha, 

Copy Editor 

Danielle Smith, 

Treasurer 

Benjamin Maas, 

Secretary 

Carl Helrich, 

StajfWriter 

Daniel Mason, 

Faculty Adviser 


120 Alumni Hall Student 
Center - Box 1 

Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 16933 
Office: 570-662-4986 
flash lit @mansfield. edu 


The Flashlight supports 
our professors and 
programs! 




























Friday, October 12, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 7 


Field Hockey Mounties lose to No. 5 Millersville 


BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secretary 

The Mansfield Mounties hosted the Millersville Marauders on Saturday, September 30th, 
2018, at Karl Van Norman Field. The first half was a even score, but Millersville was able to 
secure the 2-0 win in the second half of the game. 

The first half ended goalless with an 11-7 shots advantage for Millersville. Both 
teams had four penalty corners during the first 33 minutes. 

In the 53rd minute, Millersville’s Emma Boutcher scored the first goal of the day, when she 
beat the keeper to the right from three yards out. Mansfield responded in a two minute span 
with three penalty corners and five shots, four of them found their way on goal. Erica Tarsi 


Field Hockey Mounties win PSAC opener 

BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secretary 

The Mounties took a 5-0 win in PSAC opener versus Mercyhurst last week on October 3rd, 
2018 Wednesday afternoon at Karl Van Norman Field. 

Mercyhurst received a penalty stroke in the seventh minute, but the Mounties’ goal¬ 
keeper Brittany Ryan saved the shot by Katelyn Smith. In the 19th minute, the Mounties had 
the chance to take the lead, but Dana Evans missed her shot. 

Meghan Griffin scored her second goal of the season in the 33rd minute, when she 
scored from top of the circle. The assist came from Olivia Bell. 

Two minutes later, Larissa Motts dribbled in from top of the circle and shot from 10 
yards out for her fifth goal of the season. The first half ended 2-0 for the Mounties. 


beat the keeper from four yards out to the right for the last goal of the match in the 63rd min¬ 
ute. 

Brittany Ryan made some impressive saves for Mansfield, totaling a season-high with 
19 stops in the match. Meghan Griffin was the game leader for the Mounties with 3 shots on 
goal, Larissa Motts and Dana Evans added two each. 

The Mounties totaled 17 versus 36 shots for Millersville. The Marauders ended up 
with 16 versus 11 penalty corners for the Mounties. 


against Mercyhurst 

In the 38th minute, Dana Evans scored her third goal of the season, when she tipped 
in a pass by Caitlin Beauduy. Evans converted a penalty stroke in the 46th minute and gave the 
Mounties a 4-0 lead. In the 59th minute, Kalla Borden beat the keeper right and scored the last 
goal of the day. It was her first goal of the season. The assist came from Mikaila Chakon. 

The Mounties had a 24 to 20 shots advantage over Mercyhurst. Brittany Ryan had 
eleven and Misty Van Horn had four saves, leading the Mounties to their second shutout of the 
season. 

It was the first time Mansfield has scored five goals in a game since the 2013 season 
and the biggest margin of victory since defeating Mercyhurst 7-2 during the 2012 season. 


PRISM 

PRISM 

Continued from page 1 

The tune seemed to come right out of a traveling scene, 
and the oboe, English horn, and bassoon blended together 
beautifully. Seniors Sean Andres and Cole Ramsey took the 
stage next with a drum set and vibraphone. They played 
“Hold Fast” by Ivan Trevino, with a match of rhythm and 
melody that crafted a complex, enjoyable tune. The lights 
then opened on a guitar quintet which performed “Moderato 
from Four Souvenirs for Five Guitars” by Elaine Fine. The 
attention of the piece flitted from one player to the next for a 
intricate, serene melody. Mansfield’s Concert Wind Ensemble 
claimed the finale as the curtain drew back one last time. The 
massive orchestra performed “Adrenaline City” by Adam 
Gorb, a clearly difficult piece with numerous tune and rhythm 
changes and the dramatic unity of so many instruments. 

As the finale concluded, the audience exploded, 
releasing the applause they had to contain throughout the 
entire concert up until this point. Acknowledgements were 
made for conductors Dr. Jacobsen, Dr. Dettwiler, and Dr. 
Brennan, and organizers Dr. Moulton and Dr. Murphy. The 
first concert of the 2018-19 Mansfield year was a great first 
look into all that Mansfield’s Music Program will have to offer 
this 2018-19 year. 

If you happened to miss out on the first two 
performances, there will be another concert on October 20 at 
7:30 PM in Steadman Theater. 


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The FlashP g ht 


Shining the light on your 


SPORTS 


since 1926 


Mansfield university ♦♦♦ Volume 112, Issue 2 ♦> Friday, October 12, 2018 


Colton Evans signed to play baseball 



Photo courtesy of Dan Lewis Above: Colton Evans 


Mansfield Owner/President, Don Lewis welcomes the first major signing of outfielder, Colton Evans of the 
NCAA Div. I UC Davis Aggies of the Big Western Conference to the Destroyers Family for the upcoming 2019 
Inaugural Season!! 

“I’m incredibly excited about coming to play for the Mansfield Destroyers. Two years ago, I played 
under Coach Hill for the Elmira Pioneers and it was one of the best summers of my life. Myself and Coach Hill 
share the same passion for the game and love getting up every day to head to the ballfield. Going everyday learn¬ 
ing and growing as a baseball player. I would like to say thank you to the Mansfield Destroyers and can’t wait to 

hit the field in Mansfield”; stated Colton Evans. 

Military specialist honored at Softball match 
on LUMA 

BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secretary 

The Mounties’ softball matches versus Penn College/Alfred, which were part of the Light Up Mansfield Again 
(LUMA)/Salute the Troops weekend celebrations, were held on Sunday morning, September 16, 2018. They 
were part of the Non-Championship season, which means they did not count statistically. 


The highlight of these matches was honoring the military with the first pitch thrown by Emily David¬ 
son, who is a specialist in the PA Army National Guard. She is the sister of the Mounties’ catcher Erin Davidson. 
She said, “My major is Safety Management and I am a junior, so I will have to put school on hold for the spring 
and fall of 2019 until I come home, then I plan to return to return to Mansfield University. I go to Texas in January 
and then I will be deploying to Poland in March of 2019”. 

When asked about the deployment, she said, “The Battle Group Poland is a unique, multinational 
coalition of U.S., U.K., Croatia and Romanian soldiers, who serve as a deterrence in support of NATO’s Enhanced 
Forward Presence”. 

Mounties start with the lead, but Shippens- 
burg takes the win 

BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secretary 

The Field Hockey Mounties faced the No. 1 Shippensburg University at Karl Van Norman Field on Saturday, Sep¬ 
tember 22nd, 2018. Despite an 1-0 lead for Mansfield, the Raiders won the match with 6-3. This match between two 
PSAC opponents did not count for the conference standings. 

Larissa Motts scored the first goal of the day in the sixth minute, when she received a pass from Christie 
Buyer and beat the keeper with a shot to the left side of the goal. It was her fourth goal of the season. Buyer is tied for 
third place in the PSAC in goals scored. Shippensburg needed three minutes to reply. 

Kelly Shulenberger tapped in a pass from the right side of the goal. In the 14th minute, Jazmin Petrantonio 
played a rebounded ball into the goal for the 2-1. Petrantonio scored again, when she beat the keeper 25 mintues left. 
The first half ended with a 3-1 lead for the Raiders. 

In the second half, Shippensburg scored their fourth goal of the match after four minutes, when Valen 
Alonso’s shot found its way to the top left corner of the goal. In the 50th minute, Petrantonio’s shot was deflected off the 
defender’s stick for the 5-1. Mansfield’s Buyer played a rebounded ball into the goal in the 53rd minute. It was Buyer's 
third goal of the season. Molly Herigan scored the sixth goal of the match for Shippensburg in the 60th minute, when 
she tapped a pass to the right side of the goal. In the 62nd minute, Amber Prince scored the last goal of the day and 
her third goal of the season, when she received a pass from Larissa Motts and finished it to the left side of the goal. The 
match ended with a 6-3 win for the Raiders. 

Both teams totaled 27 shots in the game. The Raiders put 20 shots on goal to Mansfield’s 15. The Mounties, 
who lead the nation in penalty corners, held a 10-8 advantage in the match. 

The three goals by the Mounties were the second most allowed to an opponent by the Raiders this season. Mansfield 
has scored at least two goals in all six games. 


Coming up in Mountaineer Sports 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

14 

- 1:30 p.m. - Women’s 
Soccer Mounties vs. 
Edinboro University; 
Home 

15 

16 

17 

- 3 p.m. - Field Hockey 
Mounties vs. Indiana 
University of PA; Home 

- 6 p.m. - Womens 

Soccer Mounties vs. 
Gannon University; 

Home 

18 

19-11 a.m. - Men’s & 
Women’s Cross Country 
vs. Bison Open; 
Fewisburg, PA 

20 

- 1 p.m. - Sprint 

Football Mounties 
vs. Franklin Pierce 
University; Home 

- 3 p.m. - Women’s 

Soccer Mounties vs. 

Fock Haven University; 
Away (Fock Haven, PA) 

21 

22 

23 

- 4 p.m. Field 

Hockey Mounties vs. 
Bloomsburg University; 
Away (Bloomsburg, PA) 

24-2 p.m. - Women’s 
Soccer Mounties vs. 

West Chester University; 
Away (West Chester, PA) 

25 

27 

- 1 p.m. - Sprint Football 
Mounties vs. Caldwell 
University; Home 

- 1:30 p.m. - Women’s Soccer 
Mounties vs. Mercyhurst 
University; Home 

- 6 p.m. - Field Hockey 
Mounties vs. West Chester 
University; Home 

28 





















The ^ffashlight 

Shining lighten Mansfield University since 1926 



Photo courtesy of Benjamin Maas 

MU Takes a trip to Niagara Falls & Darien Lake 


Oct. 26, 2018 
Volume 112 
Issue 3 

Inside This Issue 

Police beat, 
world news 

- Page 2 

Issa Girls Thing 

- Page 3 

MU Students 
Showcase their 
Skills 

- Page 4 

Choral collage 
Performed at 
Steadman 

- Page 5 

Spooky Search 

- Page 6 

Homecoming 
sprint football 
game 

- Page 7 

Vote.org 

- Page 8 


BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secratary 

The bus trip to the Niagara 
Falls and Six Flags Darien 
Lake Theme Park took place 
on Sunday, October 14, 2018 
and was organized by Mansfield 
University. 

The trip was sponsored by 
the student activities office and 
funded by student activity fees. 
Additional funding support 
was provided by PS ECU. The 
amount of tickets was limited 
to 46 and the sale started on 
Thursday, September 20 at the 
campus bookstore, the Mountie 
Den. Tickets cost $17 and were 
sold out after three days. 

On October 14, the bus left 
at 6:30 a.m. in front of Laurel 
Hall. It took approximately 
three hours and thirty minutes 
until it stopped at a gas station 
nearby the Niagara Falls. This 
thirty minute break offered an 
opportunity for the students to 
get some food and beverages. 
Afterwards, the bus headed to 
the US American Niagara Falls 
and arrived at approximately 11 
a.m. The students were able to 


explore the area. The main attraction 
was the Niagara Falls. There were 
several opportunities to get close to 
them. For instance, there was the 
Observation Tower and the Maid of 
the Mist boat tour. The Observation 
Tower provides the only panoramic 
view of all Niagara Falls and its rate 
is $1.23 per person. The Tower’s 
elevators gave access to the base 
of the Niagara Falls gorge and the 
boarding site for the boat tour. The 
Maid of the Mist boat tour takes its 
passenger from the American Falls 
to the Canadian Horseshoe Falls. 
The tickets for adults cost $19.23 
for the Maid of the Mist Tour. 

The Cave of the Winds gives an 
opportunity to descend 175 feet 
into the Niagara Gorge and feel the 
Falls very close from the Hurricane 
Deck. It also includes the World 
Changed Here Pavilion, which 
shows the history of the Falls. Its 
tickets cost $12. Another option 
to get to the Canadian Horseshoe 
Falls was to cross the Rainbow 
Bridge. The bridge has the US 
American border on one end, and 
the Canadian border on the other 
end. In addition, to the already 
there was a discovery center, which 


offered information and facts about 
the Falls. 

At 2 a.m., the bus headed to 
Darien Lake Theme Park and 
arrived at approximately 3:30 a.m. 
The PSECU provided the tickets 
for the theme park. The theme park 
offered a lot attractions. 

Tantrum, a rollercoaster opened 
in 2018, offers a 98-foot vertical lift 
at a 90-degree angle, which leads 
to a 97-degree drop. Its high speed 
measures 52 mph. 

Rolling Thunder is a 7-story 
steep loop. The rollercoaster, 
Boomerang, drives forwards and 
backwards. These rollercosters are 
some of the main attractions of the 
theme park. 

The theme park also has record 
setting attractions. Two of them 
are Predator, which has the tallest 
wooden coaster drop in the state 
and Ride of Steel, which is the 
tallest roller coaster in New York 
state, climbs 208 feet and reaches 
speeds in excess of 75 mph. 

Viper, Darian Lake’s signature 
coaster. It has five inversions and a 
70-foot drop. Blast Off is a 185-foot 
tower ride that simulates an actual 
NASA launch. 


The theme park offers a 
seasonal event as well. The event 
is called Fright Fest, which is 
a spooky fest which started on 
Friday, September 28 and will 
end on Sunday, October 28. The 
fest includes haunted houses and 
scare zones. At dusk, zombies 
and ghouls hid, lurked around 
and scared people. Fright Fest 
also includes some frightening 
shows, like laser light and live 
shows. 

The bus departed at 8:30 
p.m. from the theme park. At 
approximately 10 p.m., the bus 
stopped for thirty minutes at 
McDonald’s in Bath, NY. The 
trip ended approximately at 
11:10 p.m. in Mansfield. 

Mohamed Diallo, a student 
who went on the trip, said, “the 
trip was a great experience and 
a welcomed escape from the 
confines of the campus.” It was 
special to him, because he has 
“...been in America for 13 years 
and never got to see the Niagara 
Falls before.” Diallo said that 
“the price was more than fair 

Continue to page 3 











Friday, October 26, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 2 


POLICE BEAT 

- Anyone with information on any these events are encouraged to 
contact the Mansfield University Police at 570-439-4900 - 


- 10/20/18 - Police are investigating 
a dispute at the conclusion of the 
Mansfield University and Franklin 
Pierce sprint football game where 
both the coaching staff and team 
members from both sides engaged 
in pushing, shoving, and throwing 
punches towards each other. The 
dispute took place in the central area 


of the Mansfield University football 
field. This incident took place on 
Saturday, October 20, 2018. The 
incident was reported on the same 
day at 4 p.m. (Disorderly Conduct) 
- 10/21/18 - On or around Octo¬ 
ber 13, 2018, a University Police 
Officer observed a parked vehicle in 
A parking lot (FFickory) with their 


lights left on. In accessing informa¬ 
tion on the vehicle's owner, it was 
discovered that the campus parking 
permit being displayed on that car 
was reported lost or stolen. This inci¬ 
dent is still under investigation. This 
incident occurred on October 13, 
2018 at 12:59 a.m. (Receiving Stolen 
Property) 

- 10/21/2018 - On October 3, 2018 
around 1 a.m. at Straughn Drive and 
Swan Street, a University Police Of¬ 


ficer discovered damage to a stop sign 
and sign post. The damage was con¬ 
sistent with the post and sign having 
been struck by a vehicle of some type. 
The total cost of damages is estimated 
at $109.46. Anyone with information 
regarding this incident is asked to 
call police. This incident is believed 
to have occurred between October 
1, 2018 at 12 p.m. and October 2, 
2018 at 8 a.m. (Accident - Damage 
to Unattended Property) 


World News 

Headlines from across the planet 

Blurbs courtesy of bbc.com 



10/24/2018 - Explosives 

sent to Democrats and CNN 

- Suspected bombs were 
sent to locations in New York, the 
Washington DC area and Florida 
on Wednesday apparently target¬ 
ing individuals including Barack 
Obama, FFillary Clinton, and for¬ 
mer FBI director John Brennan. 

- The explosives are sus¬ 
pected to be pipe bombs, and 
were packaged in manilla enve¬ 
lopes with a misspelled return ad¬ 
dress of former chairwoman of the 
Democratic National Commit¬ 
tee, Debbie Wasserman Schultz. 

No packages were 
detonated, and the FBI has 
made the investigation of the 
packages their top priority 

- Both President Don¬ 
ald Trump and White FFouse 
spokesperson Sarah Sanders con¬ 
demned the attacks, declaring 
they “have no place in America.” 

- 10/24/2018 - Migrant cara¬ 
van of thousands trudge 
north from Central America 

- On October 12, a 
small group of 160 people gath¬ 
ered to leave to country and 
was joined by more than 1,000 
others who heard about the ar¬ 
rangement through Facebook. 

- The caravan has grown im¬ 
mensely since passing through Gua¬ 
temala and Mexico, seeking a better 
life in either Mexico or the U.S. 


- As of October 22, a Unit¬ 
ed Nations spokesman stated there 
were more than 7,000 migrants, all 
of whom have endured sunburn, 
dehydration, a lack of sanitation, 
and many instances of violence. 

- There is a legal obliga¬ 
tion to hear asylum claims from mi¬ 
grants who arrive in the U.S. fleeing 
violence in their home countries. 

- President Donald Trump 
tweeted out “we will now begin cut¬ 
ting off, or substantially reducing, 
the massive foreign aid routinely 
given to [Guatemala, FFonduras and 
El Salvador] ” as a result of the coun¬ 
tries’ failure to halt the procession. 

10/24/2018 - Afghan Tali¬ 

ban founding member released 
from detention in Pakistan 

- The Taliban are a for¬ 
midable fighting movement in 
Afghanistan which is working 
to destabilize its governments. 

- Mullah Abdul Ghani 
Baradar, founding member of the 
Taliban was arrested 8 years ago in 
Pakistani city Karachi, but was re¬ 
leased along with two other mem¬ 
bers after “high-level negotiations.” 

- FFe, the Taliban, and Paki¬ 
stan are preparing to begin a peace 
process for all parties involved. 

- 10/24/2018 - National apology 
delivered to sexual abuse victims 

- FFundreds of people gath¬ 
ered in Canberra, Australia’s capital 


on the 22nd to hear Prime Minister 
Scott Morrison deliver the apology 
to the victims of child sexual abuse. 

- The apology was given in re- 
sponsetoafive-yearinquirywhichheard 
over 8,000 testimonies from children 
in churches, schools, and sports clubs. 

The inquiry involved 
over 4,000 institutions, involv¬ 
ing mostly religious ministers and 
school teachers, nearly all have 
which have signed up for the gov¬ 
ernment’s compensation scheme. 

- The Australian government is also 
offering victims monetary com¬ 
pensation and promises to consider 
recommendations from proposals. 

- 10/24/2018 - Russia 'will respond' to 
any increase of US missiles in Europe 

- Russian President Vladi¬ 
mir Putin has warned that Russia 
will take action against more pres¬ 
sure on the Intermediate-Range 
Nuclear Forces treaty (INF), which 
bans ground-launched and cruise mis¬ 
siles in a large range around Moscow. 

- President Donald Trump has 
threatened to pull out of the INF treaty 
due to suspicions of a Russian missile 
allegedly already breaking the treaty. 

- Jens Stoltenberg, North At¬ 
lantic Treaty Organization (NATO) 
Secretary General, declared that NATO 
stood behind Washington’s criticism 
of Russia’s encroachment on the INF 

10/24/2018 - Pernam¬ 

buco, state of Brazil, divides 
ahead of presidential election 

- On October 27th, Bra¬ 
zil’s presidential election will 
take place between liberal candi¬ 
date Fernando FFaddad and con¬ 
servative rival Jair Bolsonaro. 


Many interviewees’ 
chief concern is Bolsonaro’s lean¬ 
ing towards a “government [that] 
will be one that violates rights 
[with] nobody to appeal to.” 

- Others refute the Worker’s 
Party to which FFaddad represents, 
because of Fuiz Inacio Tula da Sil¬ 
va, former president and “symbol 
for all that went wrong in Brazil.” 

- Bolsonaro, according to a BBC 
survey has 46% of Brazil’s sup¬ 
port, compared to FFaddad’s 
29% and Ciro Gomes’ 13%, 
another running candidate. 

- 10/24/2018 - Khashoggi murder: 
Crown prince vows to punish' culprits' 

- Jamal Khashoggi, a jour¬ 
nalist, died during an October 
2nd visit to the Saudi consulate 
in Istanbul, Turkey who blamed 
the murder on “rogue agents.” 

- Turkish President Recep 
Tayyip Erdogan says the journalist, a 
prominent critic of the government, 
was the victim of a carefully planned 
"political murder" by Saudi intel¬ 
ligence officers and other officials. 

- Mohammed bin Salman, 
Saudi crown prince, met with 
Khashoggi’s son on the 23rd, 
while cameras recorded the event. 

- There are many conflicting 
reports during the ongoing investi¬ 
gation, including denied permission. 

- The crown prince declared 
"the crime was painful to all 
Saudis... but I would nev¬ 
er allow any rift with Turkey” 





















Friday, October 26, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 3 


MU Takes a trip 

Continued from page 1 

the Falls”. When asked if he will be going on future 
bus trips organized by the university, he responded, 
“yes, I will be taking advantage of every single trip 
from now on”. 

Steve Plesac, the Director of Student Activities 
and Programming, said that 46 students and one 
staff member went on the bus trip and the cost to 
charter them with Coach bus, including the driver, 
was $1,499. The PSECU subsidized the cost for 
the Darien Lake Theme Park admission tickets for 
the students with $825. 

When asked why the Student Activities and 
Programming Office chose these destinations, 
Pleasac said, “Niagara Falls is one of the great 
natural wonders of the world. This is a popular 
yearly bus trip destination for our students, and 
the trip sold out after only three days. Also, its very 
popular with our international students. We also 
go to Six Flags Darien Lake Theme Park on the 
same day because its also a popular fun destination 
that’s only one hour away from Niagara Falls giving 
our student’s two signature bus trip destinations on 
the same day.” Fie also said that some of the 46 
students did not show up for the bus trips early 
morning departure. 

Fiowever, the bus trip was a great success, since 
it sold out fast and provided students a good 
opportunity to see two attractive destinations for 
a fair price. 

The next bus trip will head to Washington, D.C. 
and will be on Saturday, November 3. The sale 
started on Wednesday, October 17 at the campus 
bookstore (Mountie Den) for $17. 



Photo courtesy of Benjamin Maas 


Issa Girls Thing on the Rise 

BY AARON COLEMAN 

Flashlight Contributer 

Fiere at Mansfield, there are many different clubs 
but, there isn't a club that truly helps people with 
their issues. A club where everyone genuinely feels 
like family and feel comfortable around each other. 
A little over a year ago, Shyonna Williams (a Crimi¬ 
nal Justice in her junior year) changed that and 
started ISSA Girls Things. 

Williams’ began Issa Girls Thing with the help 
of Paul Solomon (Vice President), Shaniya Moore 
(secretary), Danielle Fiickman (public relation rep¬ 
resentative), and Ashley Miller (treasurer). 

“Issa Girls Thing are the base of female Empow¬ 
erment at Mansfield University based on educating, 
glorifying one another, and bonding skills,” Wil¬ 
liams’ said. When asked why she started Issa Girls 
Thing, she answered, “Cause I wanted a platform 
for girls on campus to have a voice, bond and have 
somewhere to have a home away from home.” 

When asked if there is anything that can be ap¬ 
proved upon, Williams’ answered to “have trips, 
more events, besides the workshops and talks.” 

In one of the meetings on October, students 
played games that improve everyday relationships, 
such as communication. For example, students 
whispered down the lane and whispered a sentence, 
passing the message to the person next to them. It's 
a game that can show how communication can be 
misconstrued when information goes through dif¬ 
ferent people. Students also did role-playing games 
to help with situations like cheating, or how to make 
people feel accepted in groups. 

Issa Girls Thing is also making a positive impact 
in the Mansfield community by partnering with 
Domestic violence awareness centers and DUA 
counseling centers. They have upcoming events like 
best friend trivia, bowling and trips, and other fun 
events. 

Issa Girls Thing also allows men to help with their 
point of view and other problems men might have 
in their lives. Issa Girl Thing is a place where people 
come to learn life lessons and build relationships. 

Issa Girls Thing meets every other Wednesday in 
Spruce MPR. Their social media can be found on 
Instagram, issagirlsthingmu. 


























Friday, October 26, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 4 


MU students Showcase their skills for homecoming weekend 


BYCARLHELRICH 

StaffWriter 

Mansfield got the chance to witness 
many of the music programs perfor¬ 
mances over the past two weeks. Two 
musical recitals were performed on Sat¬ 
urday, October 13, 2018, the Choral 
Collage on October 14, 2018, the final 
PRISM concert on October 20, 2018, 
and two more recitals on October 21, 
2018. 

Megan Gullone’s Senior Saxophone 
Recital was on October 13, 2018. She 
performed eight pieces that showed off 
her skills that shes acquired throughout 
her seven semesters of study. Her wide 
variety of pieces included “Aria” by Eu¬ 
gene Bozza, “Celebration of Flight” by 
Sy Brandon, and “Summertime” by 
George Gershwin. Gulone had other 
student musicians who accompanied 
her on every piece. The recitals closer, 
“Strange Humors” by John Mackey, in¬ 
cluded four other instruments, which 
crafted a masterful and attention-grab¬ 
bing piece. Gullone chose tunes that she 
hoped would create a new appreciation 
for classical music; her spirit and skill 
aroused that point from the audience. 

That same Saturday, Megan George 
and Marissa Fargnoli-Peterson per¬ 
formed for their Junior Voice Recital. 
They traded off performing pieces after 
each other, and sang seven or eight pieces 
each. Fargnoli-Peterson choices included 
“Despair” by Joseph Haydn and two 
musical theater pieces—” Another Hun¬ 
dred People” by Stephen Sondheim and 
“I’m Not Afraid of Anything” by Jason 
Robert Brown. Her love for these pieces 
was on full display, especially during the 
theater songs, where her expressiveness 
carried the songs’ meaning into the au¬ 
dience. George performed pieces includ¬ 
ing “Affetti, non Turbate” by Vincenzo 
Righini, “The Singer” by Michael Head, 
and “All That Matters” by Gary Bar- 
low. Before every song, it was as if she 
pictured the scene where the next song 
was taking place, and that image shone 
through her performance. George said 
she was “extremely excited to perform 
everything [she’s] been working so hard 
on for so long...and get to enjoy telling 
musical stories on stage.” 

On the October 14, 2018, the Man¬ 
sfield’s Choral Program performed a 
collage in Steadman Theater. The con¬ 


cert included performances by many of 
Mansfield’s choral groups— The Grace 
Notes, The Steadmen, Chamber Singers, 
Brass Band Barbershoppers, and the Fes¬ 
tival Chorus and Concert Choir. Over the 
course of fifteen pieces, those attending 
witnessed a variety of skill and choral ar¬ 
rangements, designed to display the talent 
of the Choral Department. The Stead- 
men performed a crowd favorite “Finnan 
Haddie” by Vijay Singh, and acted out 
the humorous, almost ridiculous piece. 
The Concert Choir performed “Want¬ 
ing Memories” by Ysaye M. Barnwell by 
gathering in a circle on stage, which set 
the tone for that performance. At the end 
of their performance, Dr. Peggy Dettwiler 
invited MU choral alumni from the audi¬ 
ence onto stage for a final piece. 

The next Saturday, the final PRISM 
concert was performed with the same 
skills that the previous two performances 
had achieved. Due to it being Homecom¬ 
ing weekend, there was a much larger 
audience and it was a bit more difficult 
to deter applause during pauses, but the 
concert proceeded as planned. Every piece 
was thoroughly enjoyed by the extensive 
audience, and the performers appeared to 
have loved recreating this unique event 
equally. 

The next day, October 21, 2018 a re¬ 
cital for the Saxophone Studio, directed 
by Dr. Joseph Murphy, was performed. 
Most of the composers for all nine pieces 
were present at the performance and of¬ 
fered some insight before each piece was 
played by MU students. Six of the pieces 
had never been performed before, mean¬ 
ing this recital presented six “world pre¬ 
miere” performances. The recital had 
been crammed into Room 163, and the 
musicians and composers all enjoyed a 
hugely positive reception. 

The Saxophone Studio was followed 
by Marissa Anne Phelan’s Senior Clarinet 
Recital later on that same Sunday, Oc¬ 
tober 21, 2018. Phelan performed four 
pieces, each of which offered some new 
challenge she overcame onstage in front 
of her audience. She was joined by ac¬ 
companying performers for “Duex Duos 
Op.46” by Kasper Kummer and “Four 
Short Pieces for Clarinet and Piano” by 
Howard Ferguson. All of the pieces high¬ 
lighted different tones that Phelan has 
mastered over her years practicing for her 
Senior Recital. After her performance, 


she invited the Brothers of Kappa Kappa 
Psi from the audience to the stage, where 
they performed a song while gathered in 
a circle. 

A big congratulations to all of the per¬ 
formers from these past two weeks and 
thank you for sharing your music with 
the MU community. A schedule for up¬ 
coming musical events is available on the 
online Campus Calendar, or on the back 
of any of the programs from the described 
recitals. 



Photos courtesy of Carl Helrich 




































Friday, October 26, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 4 


Student Photographic 
Exhibition 

Mansfield University Junior, and Advanced 
Photography student, Natasha Kamzelski, 
will be holding a Photographic Exhibition 
entitled Empowering Pin-ups. The show will 
take place on Thursday, November 29th, 

2018 from 6-8pm at the restaurant, Yorkolo 
Brewing Co., in Mansfield, PA. 

This exhibit is inspired by Mihaela No- 
roc. She is a photographer that takes photos 
of women around the world and in the way, 
they make themselves appear, for that’s what 
makes them feel confident and beautiful. She 
uses intense high definition (HD) colors. 

Kamzelski’s theme is if the idea of Pin¬ 
up girls were created today, and what type of 
aesthetics exist among each girl’s personality. 

It has a twist on makeup, hairstyles, showing 
the progression in body image with some ex¬ 
pressing body modifications. This exhibition 
will show female empowerment with how 
women have taken control of our bodies and 
who women are. For some women, nudity 
empowers them. While, for other women, 
modesty is what helps them to feel at home 
in their bodies. This show will break the rules 
of old-fashioned society, and show what is 
today’s society. Women are perceived in so 
many different aspects with today’s eyes, and 
everyone deserves to acknowledge it. 

Yorkolo Brewing Co. is located at 19 N 
Main Street, Mansfield, Pa. For more infor¬ 
mation, please visit the Facebook Event Page, 
“Empowering Pin-ups” by Tosh Olivia. Feel 
free to contact Natasha Kamzelski at 267- 
273-8210 or kamzelskino29@mansfield.edu 
or Martha A. Campbell (Professor at Man¬ 
sfield University) at 570-662-4505 or by 
email, mcampbel@mansfield.edu. 


The BSU Held a Barbeque 

BY ROYTEZ G. LONGINO 

Flashlight Contributer 

The Black Student Union (BSU) of Mansfield University held a barbeque 
on Saturday, October 5, 2018 in the evening in Spruce Hall’s multi-pur¬ 
pose room. 

The club is an academic and social support group for students inter¬ 
ested in the promotion of the culture and interest of African-Americans, 
Hispanics, or other students of color. 

There over 30 members that are all loyal to the cause of the BSU. 
Mansfield University has exactly 32 members to be exact in our Black 
Student Union. 

The Mansfield BSU is to provide the cultural enrichment and diversity 
of the African diaspora to people from all cultural backgrounds. 

This was the first barbeque for the BSU. The barbeque was to celebrate 
and encourage the black community. At the barbeque there were many 
types of food to promote the cause, such as, hot links, macaroni, burgers, 
hot dogs. There were also salads, cookies and etc., too. The barbeque had 
the students themselves cook the food. One student in particular helped 
out. Eddie Kadysh, a senior Accounting major, helped grill during the 
barbeque outside of Spruce Hall. 

Students apart of the BSU meet up in Alumni Hall 317. 

The Chair of the BSU is Zhamya Hampton. Hampton said, “the bar¬ 
beque was a success.” She feels very strongly about the black community 
and the problems faced within the community. She has passion for further¬ 
ing African American people. 

The event had music, including rap battles. Rapping is a sign of black 
culture wherever you go. Diamond Thompson said that, “this is a great 
event to expand our knowledge of the black community at Mansfield 
[University].” 

During the barbeque, there was even Double Dutch, too. Double 
Dutch is rooted within the African American community. It is something 
that many have done as children in the street or at the park with their 
childhood friends in their local communities. 


Choral collage Performed at Steadman 


BY DANIELLE SMITH 

Treasurer 

On Sunday, October 14, 2018 the Mansfield 
University Music Department hosted its An¬ 
nual Fall Choral Collage. The groups who 
performed were the Grace Notes, Steadmen, 
Chamber Singers, Festival Chorus and the 
Concert Choir. The groups were directed by 
Dr. Peggy Dettwiler. 

The Grace Notes performed two songs; 
Come, Ye Makers of Song by Ruth Watson 
Henderson, with Korena Kraynak accompa¬ 
nying on the piano and Fall Leaves Fall by 
Houston Bridge. 

The Steadmen performed three songs; 
Play a Simple Melody by Irving Berlin, 
with Hannah James as the accompanist, 
Hard Times Come Again No More by Ste¬ 
phen Foster, arranged by Alice Parker, with 
Thomas McCutcheon accompanying on the 
Baritone piano, and Finnan Haddie by Vijay 
Singh and accompanied by Matthew Merolla 
on the Baritone and Nathan Shedd on the 
recorder. 

Sean Andres, Robert Flora, Cole Ramsey, 
and Nathan Shedd, also known as the Brass 
Band Barbershoppers, performed You’re a 
Grand Old Flag by George M. Cohan. 

Festival Chorus is a choral group that is 
comprised of both university students and 
members of the community. The group per¬ 
formed four songs. Sing a Mighty Song by 
Daniel E. Gawthrop, Et in terra pax from 
Gloria by Antonio Vivaldi, The Road Hoe 
from Southern Harmony, conducted by 
Conner Newkam- Ulrich and Regina Re¬ 
ese as the Soprano soloist and arranged by 
Stephen Paulus, Order My Steps by Glenn 
Burleigh, arranged by Jack Schrader and Sky- 
lar Marcen as the Soprano soloist. 

Concert Choir also performed four 


songs as well, to round out the collage. 
Wanting Memories from Crossings by 
Ysaye M. Barnwell; Sometimes I feel like 
a motherless child, a spiritual arranged 
by Rosephayne Powell; Only in Sleep by 
Eriks Esenvalds with Cassie Zinkan as the 
Soprano soloist, and The Promised Land 
from Southern Harmony by Matilda T. 
Durham. 


Campus Events Calendar 

28 

- 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. 
Helen Isaacson and 
Shannon Pizzirusso’s 

Voice Recital 

29 

- 8:15 p.m. - 11:30 p.m. 
Monday Night Football 
@ The HUT 

30 

- 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. - Triv¬ 
ia Night @ The HUT 

31 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. - 
Open Mic Night @ The 
HUT 

1 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Live Music Jam Night @ 
The HUT 

2 

- All Day 

Last Day to Withdraw 
from a Course 

- 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. 
MU Concert Wind 
Ensemble 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Off Beat Movie Night @ 
The HUT 

3 

- 6:30 a.m. - 11:55 p.m. 
Washington D.C. Stu¬ 
dent Bus Trip 

4 

- 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. 
Shayne Ferguson and 
Caroline Bollinger’s 

Senior Recital 

3 

- 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 
Ball Appetite! @ Oak 
Multipurpose Room 

- 8:15 p.m. - 11:30 p.m. 
Monday Night Football 
@ The HUT 

6 

- 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. - Triv¬ 
ia Night @ The HUT 

7 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. - 
Open Mic Night @ The 
HUT 

8 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Live Music Jam Night @ 
The HUT 

9 

- 11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 
Visit Day 

- 7:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
The Magic Flute Opera 
@ Straughn Auditorium 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Off Beat Movie Night @ 
The HUT 

10 

- All Day 

MU Piano Competition 

- 10:00 p.m. -12:00 p.m. 
Sayre Open House 

- 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. 
MU Brass Band Veterans 
Day Concert 

- 7:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
The Magic Flute Opera 
@ Straughn Auditorium 
















6 - The Flashlight 


Mansfield University 


Friday, October 26, 2018 


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Photos courtesy of pixabay.com 



The Flashlight 

Fall 2018 ' 

Mansfield University 

of Pennsylvania 
Student Newspaper 


Lucianna Minoia, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Rebekah Rocha, 

Copy Editor 

Danielle Smith, 

Treasurer 

Benjamin Maas, 

Secretary 

Carl Helrich, 

StaffWriter 

Daniel Mason, 

Faculty Adviser 


120 Alumni Hall Student 
Center - Box 1 

Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 16933 
Office: 570-662-4986 
flashlit@mansfield. edu 


The Flashlight supports 
our professors and 
programs! 






The FlashP g ht 


Shining the light on your 


SPORTS 


since 1926 


Mansfield university 


Volume 112, Issue 3 


Friday, October 26, 2018 


Mansfield Rolls Past Franklin Pierce 18-2 on Homecoming 


Mansfield shut out Franklin 
Pierce's offense as the Moun¬ 
taineers rolled to an 18-2 Home¬ 
coming victory to win the Josh 
Palmer Pigskin Classic on Satur¬ 
day at Karl Van Norman Field. 

In the first quarter, both sides 
threatened in enemy territory, 
but neither team was able to 
produce points in what would 
prove to be a scoreless quarter. 

In the second quarter, quarter¬ 
back Gary Raupers rushed four 
straight times, scrambling out 
of the pocket and finding pay 
dirt on a 17-yard rushing touch¬ 
down to give Mansfield (2-3, 
0-3 CSFL South) a 6-0 advan¬ 
tage. The score capped a seven 
play, 44-yard drive that began in 
Franklin Pierce territory. It was 


the second rushing touchdown 
in as many games for Raupers. 

Just before halftime, Franklin 
Pierce got on the board when its 
defense forced the Mountaineer 
quarterback out of the back of 
the end zone resulting in a safe¬ 
ty to make it 6-2 at the half. 

Mansfield padded its lead 
with two more touchdowns in 
the second half to climb out 
to an 18-2 advantage. Bran¬ 
don Allen picked off a pass 
in the third quarter and re¬ 
turned it 20 yards for a touch¬ 
down, before Vaughn Hines 
punched in a two-yard touch¬ 
down run in the fourth quarter. 

Franklin Pierce held a 336 
to 263 advantage in total of¬ 
fense, but was plagued with 


11 penalties for 188 yards. 

Starting quarterback Adam 
Hutchison completed nine 
passes for 106 yards with Rau¬ 
pers connecting on five passes 
for 48 yards. Raupers led the 
rushing attack with 10 attempts 
for a net of 56 yards as Hines 
rushed 23 times for 48 yards. 

Quinn Henry was the top 
target for the Mountain¬ 
eers, hauling in four passes 
for 54 yards. Savile Pope had 
three catches for 49 yards. 

Bryton Barna continued to 
lead the Mansfield defense with 
a game-high nine tackles. Chase 
Moser totaled five solo tackles 
including 1.5 sacks and a fum¬ 
ble recovery while Kayin Berger 
also had five solo tackles with 


two sacks and a pass break up. 

Raven quarterback Jared Lubas 
went 18-44 through the air for 
245 yards and an interception. 

It marks the first time 
that Mansfield's defense 
shut out the opposing of¬ 
fense since a 28-0 win against 
Post during the 2016 season. 


Coming up in Mountaineer Sports 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

28 

29 

30 

31 

- 4 p.m. - Field Hockey 

- Mounties vs. Kutztown 
University; Home 

1 

2 

- 6 p.m. - Sprint 

Football - Mounties vs. 
Saint Thomas Aquinas 
College; Away (Sparkill, 
PA) 

3-11 a.m. - Men’s 
and Women’s Cross 
Country vs. PS AC 
Championships; Away 
(Edinboro, PA) 

- 12 p.m. - Field 

Hockey - Mounties vs. 
Millersville University; 
Away (Millersville, PA) 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

- 1 p.m. - Field Hockey: 
Mounties vs. East 
Stroudsburg University; 
Home 

- 4 p.m. - Men’s 

Basketball - Mounties vs. 
Shaw University; Away 
(Raleigh, NC) 
















Friday, October 26,2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight -8 


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Problems voting? Call the Election Protection 
Hotline at (866) OUR-VOTE • (866) 687-8683 







The ^ffashlight 

Shining lighten Mansfield University since 1926 


Nov. 13, 2018 
Volume 112 
Issue 4 

Inside This Issue 

Police beat, 
world news 

- Page 2 

Octobofest! 

- Page 3 

Ghost hunter 
comes to 
Mansfield 

- Page 4 

Students Vote, 
Career Cafe 

- Page 5 

Turkey 

Scramble 

- Page 6 

Haunted 

Laurel 

- Page 7 

Mounties beat 
Caldwell 

- Page 8 





Photo courtesy of Rebekah Rocha 


Mansfield students go to Washington, D.C. 


BY REBKAH ROCHA, 

Copy Editor 

On Saturday, November 3, 2018 
Mansfield University took a trip 
to Washington D.C. 27 tickets 
were sold at the Mountie Den 
for $17 apiece to all university 
students starting on October 
17, 2018. Tickets were left over, 
so the Student Activities Office 
opened the trip up to family and 
friends of university students. 
12 tickets were sold to non¬ 
students. These tickets were sold 
for the price of $43. In total, 39 
tickets were sold for this trip. 

When taking a trip to a 
location, Mansfield needs 
to have an advisor that is 
responsible for the students and 
others in attendance. For this 
trip, Tiffany Welch, assistant 
professor of social work, was the 
advisor. She was there to make 
sure that everyone that was on 
the bus, when it departed from 
Mansfield University, was also 
on the bus when it departed 
from Washington DC. She 
checked everyone in when they 
got on the bus, both times. 
She also was there in case of 


an emergency, so she gave all in 
attendance her cellphone number. 

The trip was presented by 
Student Activities Office (SAO) and 
funded by Student Activities Fees. 
A coach bus was rented that would 
take attendants on the trip. The bus 
made two stops along the way both 
there and back, one at Sheetz so 
that those attending could use the 
bathroom and get food, and one to 
pick up two individuals that also 
were attending the trip. 

Those in attendance were asked 
to arrive to the bus fifteen minutes 
prior to departure, which was at 
6:30 a.m., in front of Laurel Hall 
for check-in and load-in. 

The bus did not arrive at 
Mansfield University till 6:30 a.m. 
Although this happened, the bus 
managed to depart by 6:43 a.m. 
and arrived in Washington D.C. at 
11:40 a.m. 

Upon arrival, attendees were 
dropped off at the National 
Museum of Natural History. They 
were told to explore Washington 
D.C and meet back at 8:00 p.m. 
at the Nation Museum of Natural 
History. 


One well known location 
that many people in attendance 
visited was the Lincoln Memorial. 
Construction of the Lincoln 
Memorial started in 1914. It 
finished and opened to the public 
in 1922. The memorial stands 
100 feet tall with Lincoln, the 
U.S. 16th president, inside sitting 
19 feet tall. A history of former 
President Lincoln is inside the 
memorial. The statue sits looking 
out over Washington D.C. and the 
Reflection Pool, which is 2,028 feet 
long and 167 feet wide. 

Another location that many 
people visited was the White House. 
On this particular day, like many 
others, protestors lined the streets on 
the North side of the White House. 
This protest was for the removal 
of the current President, Donald 
Trump. With this happening, many 
students and family were able to 
watch performers on the street while 
also looking at the White House. 

SOA tends to choose locations 
based on student’s input. They 
listen to what students recomend 
and the feedback they recieve from 
previous trips. 


If a students would like to, they 
are able to contact the office and 
recommend a trip location with a 
budget in mind and reasons as to 
why the trip is beneficial. 

If you missed this trip, don’t 
worry, there will be other trips next 
semester, if you missed this one. 
The tickets are sold for a reasonable 
price with student input taken into 
consideration. 



Photo courtesy of Rebekah Rocha 




























Tuesday, November 13, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 2 


POLICE BEAT 

- Anyone with information on any of these events are encouraged to 
contact the Mansfield University Police at 570-439-4900 - 


- 11/6/8 - Jamira Rogers (19), Kim 
Cooper (18), and Stella Mclean (18) 
engaged in vandalism in Oak Dormi¬ 
tory. They “egged” several doors on the 
second and third floors, and are being 
referred to campus judicial authorities. 
This incident was reported on Nov. 4, 
2018 between 12:04 a.m. to 12:31 a.m. 
(Criminal Mischief) 


-11/8/18 - Ericka Dudley reported that 
her cellphone is missing. The phone is 
described as a black iPhone 7, valued at 
$257.99. The phone was believed to have 
gone missing on or around November 1, 
2018 near Alumni Hall at 12 a.m. This 
was reported on Nov. 8, 2018 at 11:40 
a.m. 

(Lost Property) 


- 11/8/18 - While police were conduct¬ 
ing a walk-through of Spruce third floor, 
the officer noticed an odor of marijuana. 
Upon further investigation officers deter¬ 
mined that the odor was coming from 
room 374. The investigation revealed that 
Tanarah Duncan-Washington (19) was 
smoking marijuana in her room. She was 
given a judicial referral for said violation. 
This incident occurred on Nov. 8, 2018 
from 1:37 p.m. to 1:49 p.m. 

(Drug Law Violation) 


World News 

Headlines from across the planet 

Blurbs courtesy of bbc.com 



- 11/7/2018 - Cameroon students freed 
and returned to parents 

- Cameroon, a country in Central Afri¬ 
ca, suffered a tragedy on November 5th, 
when over 75 children and others were 
abducted from a boarding school in the 
country’s North-West region. 

- Cameroon’s authorities have blamed 
the kidnapping on separatist militia 
who have been very politically active in 
the region. 

- The victims were returned on the 7, 
after two days of being held, and had 
been treated decently and humanely. 

- There have been several other kidnap¬ 
pings in the region by the separatist 
forces, who have been aggressive to¬ 
wards against schools in Cameroon. 

- 11/7/2018 - Pakistani woman acquit¬ 
ted of blasphemy from death row 

- After spending eight years on death 
row in Pakistan, Christian woman, Asia 
Bibi, was acquitted after being accused 
of blasphemy in 2010. 

- She was convicted and arrested for 
insulting the Prophet Muhammad, the 
founder of Islam, during an argument 
with about her and others’ religion. 

- After Bibi was released, she and her 
family faced lots of anger and death 
threats from Islamists and strong sup¬ 
porters of blasphemy laws. 

- The case is very divisive in Pakistan, as 
the two sides each claim a large portion 
of the population. 

- 11/7/2018 - South Korea apologizes 
for rapes by troops in 1980 


- A recent government investigation 
uncovered 17 cases of sexual assault by 
troops sent to Gwangju to shut down an 
anti-government protest 38 years ago. 

- In May 1980, thousands of troops were 
deployed to control tens of thousands of 
protestors outside major governmental 
buildings. 

- The United States helped in the take- 
back of Gwangju by sending about 
20,000 troops from the demilitarized 
zone (DMZ) between North and South 
Korea. 

- The Minister of Defence in South Ko¬ 
rea, Jeong Kyeong-doo, addressed the na¬ 
tion, apologising for the actions taken by 
troops almost four decades ago. 

- Some victims were vocal in declaring 
that an apology is not enough, and that 
further action should be taken. 

- 11/7/2018 - ‘Oldest animal painting’ 
discovered in Borneo 

- A 40,000 year old figurative painting, 
depicting more than abstract objects, has 
been identified in a cave in the island of 
Borneo, located in Indonesia. 

- The painting supposedly depicts a “ban- 
teng,” a type of wild cow that still lives in 
the area today. 

- The caves also contain thousands of 
other prehistoric drawings of animals, ab¬ 
stract signs and symbols. 

- After extensive dating processes of calci¬ 
um carbonate deposits, two ages of draw¬ 
ings were determined: one from 40,000 
years ago, and the second from 21,000 
years ago. 

- The large collection points to a con¬ 


nection with similar examples found in 
France and Spain. 

- 11/7/2018 - Russian director Kirill Sere- 
brennikov goes on trial for fraud 

- Serebrennikov denies the accusations 
of embezzling some $2 million of pub¬ 
lic money from a theatre project, a ballet 
with the dancer Rudolf Nureyev. 

- The production still took place, amid 
public opinions that the play was “consid¬ 
ered too risque for conservative Russia.” 

- He faces up to a decade in prison, as his 
denials focus on his minimal access to fi¬ 
nancial authority involved with the pro¬ 
duction. 

- Serebrennikov has some support, in¬ 
cluding a petition with more than 50,000 
signatures with intentions to “not silence 
an internationally renowned director.” 

- 11/7/2018 - Greece Church agreement 
to take 10,000 priests off payroll 

- In Athens, Greece, a landmark agree¬ 
ment has been reached in that will end 
the status of priests and bishops as civil 
servants, creating a separation of Church 
and state. 

- After years of international bailouts and 
18% of the workforce being employed 
by the government in 2015, Greece is at¬ 
tempting to scale back its public sector. 

- Greek Orthodox Church will remain 
omnipresent in numerous aspects of the 
Greek state, including schools, court¬ 
rooms, and most area of government. 

- Opinions on the agreement are mixed, 
including much dissention from priests 
who no longer have guaranteed salaries. 

- 11/7/2018 - Jurors have been selected in 
the trial of notorious drug lord Joaquin 
“El Chapo” Guzman. 

- Seven women and five men will decide 
if Guzman is guilty of 11 charges related 


to trafficking, money laundering and 
firearms. 

- All 12 will remain anonymous under 
tight security terms and be escorted to 
and from court by US Marshals. 

- His trial in a federal court in Brook¬ 
lyn will begin on November 13th and 
could last up to four months. 

- Guzman’s lawyers have reportedly 
hinted they plan to argue he had a 
smaller role in the cartel than is be¬ 
lieved. 

- 11/7/2018 - Yemen war: Battle for vi¬ 
tal port of Hudaydah intensifies 

- Government forces backed by Saudi- 
led coalition air strikes advance on rebel 
positions in the port town in Yemen, 
located south of Saudi Arabia. 

- More than 150 people are reported to 
have been killed since troops and militia 
stepped up a ground assault on the city’s 
outskirts on November 7th. 

- The UN and charities say the fight¬ 
ing is also endangering medical facilities 
and hundreds of thousands of civilians. 

- The war has caused the deaths of at 
least 6,660 civilians, 10,560 injured in 
the war, and the fighting and a partial 
blockade by the coalition have also left 
22 million people in need of humani¬ 
tarian aid. 

- Two hundred air strikes were reported 
in and around Hudaydah on Novem¬ 
ber 3rd alone, and aid workers say there 
have been intense clashes around the lo¬ 
cal airport. 





















Tuesday, November 13, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 3 


Octoboefest! takes over Mansfield 


BYCARLHELRICH 

StaffWriter 

There were, once again, many 
musical events over the past 
two weeks. On October 26, 
2018, the Young Men’s Choral 
Festival (YMCF) practiced 
and performed, Octoboefest! 
The Jazz Ensemble Concert 
took over Steadman Theater 
on October 27, 2018. 

Senior Helen Isaacson and 
junior Shannon Pizzirusso 
performed a voice recital on 
the October 28,2018. Finally, 
seniors Caroline Bollinger 
and Shayne Ferguson 
participated side-by-side in a 
vocal and french horn recital 
respectively on November 4, 
2018. 

The YMCF brought in 
over 120 students varying 
from seventh through ninth 
grade, all from sixteen schools 
around the region. They spent 


the day practicing different 
skills with MU students and 
directors, preparing four 
different pieces to perform 
in Steadman Theater in front 
of an extensive audience. The 
Young Men’s Choir performed 
three songs to begin the 
concert, two of which were 
accompanied by MU students 
performing with various 
instruments. The Mansfield 
University music groups of 
Phi Mu Alpha, the Grand 
Old Barbershop Quartet, and 
the Steadmen all added pieces 
to round out the concert. 
For the final number, “Praise 
His Holy Name” by Keith 
Hampton, the Steadmen 
combined musical forces with 
the Young Mens Choir for a 
powerful conclusion to the 
day-long event. 

The 22nd Annual 
Octoboefest!, according to Dr. 


Sue Laib, the events director, 
is “a chamber music recital 
featuring the students from the 
Mansfield University Double 
Reed Studio and the MU 
Double Reed Ensemble.” She 
also added, “There was a guest 
double reed ensemble of area 
junior high and high school 
students.” Some Mansfield 
University alumni also made 
an appearance at the event, 
which has a very loyal, annual 
audience. More than 15 pieces 
were performed, including 
many light-hearted pieces like 
Queens “We Will Rock You,” 
and John Williams’ “Imperial 
March.” The entire concert 
went well, and, according 
to Laib, “It challenged oboe 
majors and non-majors alike 
while giving them a fun 
learning experience.” 

Helen Isaacson and 
Shannon Pizzirusso 



Featuring The Young Men's Choir Photo courtesy of Carl Helrich 



Featuring The Steadmen performing “Finnan Photo courtesy of Carl Helrich 

Haddie” by Vijay Singh 


performed a total of 16 pieces 
during their recital on Sunday 
the 28th. Through their 
alternating performances, 
they showcased an extensive 
variety of songs across genres, 
composers, and languages. 
Isaacson’s pieces included 
“Erlkonig” by Franz Schubert, 
“Must the winter come so 
soon?” by Samuel Barber 
from the opera Vanessa, and 
“Selections from Tonadillas” 
by Enrique Granados. 
Alternatively, but similarly, 
Pizzirusso’s setlist included 
“Not All my Torments” by 
Henry Purcell, “An Chloe” 
by Wolfgang Mozart, and 
“La Partenza” by Gioachino 
Rossini. To conclude the 
performance, both vocalists 
sang “Evening Prayer from 
Hansel and Gretel” by 
Engelbert Humperdinck 
together, combining their 


talent to send off the audience 
with something memorable. 

Caroline Bollinger and 
Shayne Ferguson performed 
numerous intricate and 
impressive pieces for their 
senior recitals. Ferguson, who 
began the concert, included 
“La Bestiaire” by Francis 
Poulenc, “Total Eclipse from 
Samson” by George Frideric 
Handel, and “Offrande” 
by Reynaldo Hahn in his 
collection of songs. Bollinger 
performed several lengthy 
pieces, including “Nocturno 
Op. 7” by Franz Strauss, and 
“Sonata for Horn and Piano 
Op. 17” by Ludwig van 
Beethoven. The alternation 
between vocal performances 
and french horn tunes gave 
a unique impression to the 
recital, and drew the past two 
weeks’ musical events to a 
talented conclusion. 



The combined choirs of the Steadmen and Young Men's Choir Photo courtesy of Carl Helrich 

performing “Praise His Holy Name” by Keith Hampton 



Helen Isaacson (left) and Shannon Pizzirusso (right) performing Photo courtesy of Carl Helrich 

“Evening Prayer from Hansel and Gretel” by Engelbert Humperdinck 


















Tuesday, November 13, 2018 


Mansfield University 


TTe Flashlight - 4 


Ghost Hunter John Zaffis comes to Mansfield 


BYCRISTIN HICKEY 

Flashlight Contributor 

Famous ghost hunter, demonologist, 
and star of Syfys Haunted Collector, 
John Zaffis, visited Mansfield Univer¬ 
sity on Tuesday, October 16 to present 
a Ghost Hunting Lecture and a ghost 
hunt that followed. This was the first 
time John Zaffis came to Mansfield, 
but he has traveled to many different 
universities. 

Zaffis, also known as The Godfather 
of Ghost Hunters, came to Mansfield 
University to talk to the students 
about his job as a demonologist and 
the experiences he has encountered. 
He answered questions the students 
had about demons, ghost hunting, his 
life as a ghost hunter, and his family. 

Lea Esnault, a freshman, said, “It 
was really cool, yet kind of scary, to see 
the presentation of ghost hunting and 
of demonology. He showed us a lot of 
videos and explained several situations 
where he had to work against haunt- 
ings and demons.” 

Zaffis is the nephew of Lorraine 
and Ed Warren, the ghost hunters the 


Conjuring movie series is based off of 
and portrays in the movies. Zaffis’ im¬ 
mediate family also has a TV show on 
Syfy called The Haunted Collector, 
where him, his son and daughter hunt 
ghosts together. Zaffis has also been 
featured on TV several times on shows 
such as 20/20, Piers Morgan’s CNN, 
Travel Channel, Discovery Channel, 
Unsolved Mysteries, Fox News, and 
more. 

Zaffis showed several videos to the 
audience and explained his experi¬ 
ences working with the paranormal. 
Zaffis included clips from shows he 
has been featured on, along with clips 
from the haunted museum he has in a 
barn behind his home. 

He explained what it was like to 
have a career as a demonologist and 
explained the hardships that come 
along with ghost hunting. “I have 
encountered demons in a way that is 
hard to explain to anyone else. The 
feeling of the demon presence is some¬ 
thing that is hard to explain to anyone 
who has never experienced it,” Zaffis 
said, “I had been a demonologist for 


40 years and have been around the 
paranormal since I was young. This 
job is not for everyone. I do love my 
job, but demons and the paranormal 
are to be taken serious.” 

The event was sponsored by the 
Student Activities Office here at 
Mansfield. This event was free for all 
students to attend and was paid for 
by the Student Activity Fees in each 
student’s account. The Ghost Hunt¬ 
ing Lecture took place at the North 
Manser Dining Hall at 7:30 p.m., and 
a ghost hunt followed. 33 students at¬ 
tended the event, but the ghost hunt 
was a raffle where 25 people were cho¬ 
sen. 

The ghost hunt took place at the 
North Hall Library on campus, which 
is supposedly one of the haunted 
buildings on campus. Zaffis took 25 
students to the fourth floor of the li¬ 
brary where he used a ghost hunting 
app to try and communicate with any 
ghosts that might come through. To 
this student's surprise, several ghosts 
came through the app. Zaffis encour¬ 
aged the students to ask the ghosts 


questions about them and their re¬ 
lation to Mansfield. Some students 
could easily get a response from the 
ghosts. 

One of the students who was able 
to reach the ghosts easily was sopho¬ 
more, Kate Cron. Kate said of this ex¬ 
perience, “It was crazy that I was able 
to be one of the people who could eas¬ 
ily communicate with the ghosts. Ev¬ 
ery time I asked a question, all of the 
ghosts on the radar went crazy and all 
said something really fast. It was really 
cool that we were able to talk to the 
ghosts with an actual ghost hunter just 
in our school’s library.” 

This event was informational and 
fun for the students, and it helped pre¬ 
pare everyone for Halloween. 


Photo courtesy of Creative Commons 


Mansfield student presenting photographic exhibition 


Mansfield University senior, and 
Advanced Photography student, 
Marissa Stage, will be holding a 
Photographic Exhibition entitled The 
Places We Go. The show will take place 
on Friday, November 16 2018, at 
Cuigini’s Cafe on 16 W Market Street 
Corning, N.Y. 

This exhibit is inspired by Stage’s 
life growing up in Corning. She want¬ 
ed to use her newfound skills with a 
camera to show her life growing up. 
These places are places she spent time 
with friends and family at. There are 
places she went by herself to just sit 
and listen to music as a quiet place. 

These pictures mean something 
to the locals because these places are 
where they have gone, their friends 
have been, or even their children have 
been to them. 


Stage has used her artistic creativ¬ 
ity while capturing these places on the 
camera, that shows how she sees these 
places. 

Cugini’s Cafe is located on 16 W 
Market Street Corning, New York. 
For more information, please visit 
the Facebook Event Page, The Places 
We Go by Marissa Stage. Feel free to 
contact Marissa Stage at 607 438 
0206 orstageml5@mansfield.edu 
or Martha A Campbell (Professor 
at Mansfield University) at 570 662 
4505 or mcampbel@mansfield.edu. 



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Tuesday, November 13, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight - 4 


Mansfield Students voted 


First ever Career Cafe takes place 


BY NATALIE KELLEY 

StaffWriter 

On Tuesday, November 6 was the 
day of midterm elections, and quite 
a few Mansfield students voted, and 
some did not; all with their own 
reasons regarding why they did, 
and why they did not. 

Evan Miller, 19 years old, an In¬ 
formation Systems major, did not 
vote today. According to Miller he 
did not vote because he “doesn’t 
care about politics too much,” and 
he’s too busy with schoolwork. 

Trent Smith, 19 years old, an 
Environmental Science major, vot¬ 
ed today by absentee ballot. Smith 
believes that “every election is im¬ 
portant, so that’s why I vote.” Smith 
believes that the best way to get 
things to change, is to vote. 

Kelsey Murphy, 18 years old, 
an Environmental Science major, 
did vote today. She “thinks it’s im¬ 
portant for this generation to vote 
because we have our own different 
views and wants for our society, and 
if we don’t vote, they won’t be met. 


I personally voted today for the en¬ 
vironmental aspect.” 

David Allen, 18 years old, a Busi¬ 
ness major, also voted today. Allen 
said, “I voted today because I feel 
like it’s my right and my privilege 
to be able to vote for who I want, so 
that my voice can be heard through 
my vote.” 

Mamadou Diallo, 20 years old, 
Political Science major, did not vote 
because his vote “probably would 
not have done much to change the 
outcome since Pennsylvania has 
been a red state since the last elec¬ 
tion.” He felt as though his vote 
would not have made much of a 
difference. 

Many Mansfield students are 
passionate about their views, and 
some made sure that said views were 
heard with their vote. However, 
there are some that are discouraged 
to vote for a variety of reasons, and 
they do not see a point in voting, or 
they just do not have the time. Did 
you vote? 


BY LEE FISHER 

Flashlight Contributor 

On Thursday, October 11, 
the Career Cafe was a new event 
to Mansfield University campus, 
courtesy of Mansfield’s Career Cen¬ 
ter, located on the ground floor of 
Alumni Hall. 

This event was open to any and 
all Mansfield University students 
with the intention of promoting the 
Career Center. This brought stu¬ 
dents’ attention to its existence and 
purpose. Originally the event was 
going to be outside of Alumni and 
South Hall, but the Career Cafe had 
to be moved inside. It was moved 
next to the bookstore on the second 
floor of Alumni Hall, due to rainy 
weather that day. 

About 60 students had attended 
the event between 11:00 am and 
1:00 pm. The Career Center direc¬ 
tor, Nichole Lefelhoc, said the event 
had a “really well” turnout. 

For students, the event had cost 
them nothing out of pocket to show 
up at. There were fall snack classics, 
such as hot chocolate, apple cider, 
doughnuts, and cinnamon buns 
available to students. 

At the Career Cafe, students also 
lined up to receive papers detailing 
what the students could use the Ca¬ 
reer Center for in the future and to 
have their job resumes reviewed. 


Not only that, the Career Center 
had partnered up with Mansfield 
University’s marketing office to also 
provide students with the chance to 
have their head shot photos taken 
by a professional photographer for 
any reason. 

Being the first time this event 
has ever happened here on campus, 
there is not much history to it. In 
an interview with Lefelhoc, prior 
to the event last Thursday, she had 
answered, “Depending on the turn 
out and the feedback we get from 
students, it’s really important to 
me to do things the students want 
to come to, as opposed to just do¬ 
ing something because we’ve always 
done that, and then nobody shows 
up. So, if we get a good turn out 
and good feedback, I would love to 
be able to do it again,” when asked 
about the prospect of this particular 
event happening again. 

After being asked the question 
again a few days later, Lefelhoc said 
that while the Career Cafe would 
not be happening again this school 
year, it may become an annual event 
every fall here on campus. 

While students did not have to 
pay to attend this event, it did cost 
the Career Center $250 to have 
those snacks there, which, accord¬ 
ing to Mansfield senior Nicholas 


Doan, “were not bad, especially in 
comparison to the food at the desert 
bar that have been sitting there for a 
few days”. 

The Career Center’s casual ap¬ 
proach to getting out the word 
about itself appears to have been a 
success, even with just a 60 student 
turnout. It shows the potential of 
being a yearly event for the students 
of Mansfield University to attend in 
October. 


Campus Events Calendar 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

11 

- 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. 
Daniel Rodriguez’s Se¬ 
nior Trumpet Recital 

- 2:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. 
The Magic Flute 

12 

- All Day 

Music Department 
Spend-A-Day 

- 11:00 a.m. - Music 
Department Auditions 
-8:15 p.m.- 11:30 p.m. 
Monday Night Football 
@ The HUT 

13 

- 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. - Triv¬ 
ia Night @ The HUT 

14 

- 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. 
International Students 
Celebration 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. - 
Open Mic Night @ The 
HUT 

15 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Live Music Jam Night @ 
The HUT 

16 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Off Beat Movie Night @ 
The HUT 

17 

18 

19 

- Fall Break Begins! No 
Classes 

- 4:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 
Transfer Student Infor¬ 
mation Nights 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 
















6 - The Flashlight 


Mansfield University 


Tuesday, November 13, 2018 


Turkey Scramble 

Unscramble the words!! 


GSTIVNNAGKHI 

ERYKTU 

UTFSGFIN 

IGLIPRM 

STHVAER 

AIENTV MINAERCA 
BRNRCRYEA ACUES 
CPOINCURAO 
MUNPIKP EPI 
PAPLE IRFTTRE 
YMLFAI 
AFMOLYERW 
BOVEMERN 
AYCMSAYD PDEARA 
BAKER 

CLAKB DAYIFR 

TUAMNU 

DOTSITIRNA 

GITRUEADT 

BAFOLLTO 


Answers on page 4 



The Flashlight 

Fall 2018 ' 

Mansfield University 

of Pennsylvania 
Student Newspaper 


Lucianna Minoia, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Rebekah Rocha, 

Copy Editor 

Danielle Smith, 

Treasurer 

Benjamin Maas, 

Secretary 

Carl Helrich, 

StaffWriter 

Daniel Mason, 

Faculty Adviser 


120 Alumni Hall Student 
Center - Box 1 

Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 16933 
Office: 570-662-4986 
flashlit@mansfield. edu 


The Flashlight supports 
our professors and 
programs! 
























Tuesday, November 13, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight -7 


Mounties 7 goalie Moir sets Mansfield University students 
historic record attend Haunted Laurel 


BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secretary 

The Mounties soccer team 
faced Mercyhurst University 
on Saturday, October 27 at 
Karl Van Norman Field, this 
being the last match of the 
season. Mercyhurst won the 
match with 3-0. 

Eleni Gebbia and Alexis 
Bittel created a good chance 
in the 13th minute, but Mer¬ 
cyhurst’ goalkeeper Vilde 
Wold denied the chance. In 
the 22 minute, Emilie Bock 
headed a free kick to the right 
side of the net to give Mercy¬ 
hurst the 1-0 lead, which was 
the halftime result. 

At the start of the second 
half, the Lakers put Mans¬ 
fields goalkeeper, Stephanie 
Moir, under heavy pressure. 
Maya Bauer scored five min¬ 
utes after the kickoff of the 
second half from 15 yards 
out, and gave Mercyhurst the 
2-0 lead. Emma Scali scored 


BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secretary 

The field hockey Mounties 
hosted Kutztown University 
on Wednesday, October 31 
at Karl Van Norman Field. 
Kutztown won the match 
with 4-0. 

In the 26 minute, Kyra 
Wozniak scored the first goal 
of the match for Kutztown. 
She received a pass from the 
right side of the circle and 
shot the ball into the top 
right corner. She scored again 
in the 33 minute, when she 
beat the keeper right. The first 
half ended with a 2-0 lead for 
Kutztown. 

Molly Bobjak scored a goal 


the last goal of the day in the 
89 minute, when she shot 
from three yards out and beat 
the keeper from the right. 

Mercyhurst held a 33-8 
shot advantage over the 
Mounties. Alexis Bittel was 
the Mounties’ game leader 
with four shots. Eleni Gebbia 
had two shot attempts, with 
Breanna Murphy and Nico- 
lette Desalvator adding one 
goal each. 

Moir ended the match 
with 16 saves, which was 
her second-most this season 
and fourth all-time in the 
Mansfield history books. She 
finished her freshman year 
campaign with 141 saves, 
ranking fourth in the nation 
and breaking the single-sea- 
son saves record at Mansfield. 
The Mounties ended their 
season with a record of 1-15 
(1-15 PSAC). 


in the 47 minute. She received 
a goalie kick and shot from 12 
yards out for the 3-0. Woz¬ 
niak made her 3rd goal of the 
match in the 52 minute. She 
tipped a pass from the right 
side into the left side. 

The game leaders for the 
Mounties were Meghan Grif¬ 
fin and Brittany Ryan. Grif¬ 
fin put two shots on goal and 
Ryan made eleven saves. 

The Mounties are currently 
sixth in the PSAC standings 
with a 4-4 record. They have 
two remaining conference 
matches. The top six teams 
in the conference earn PSAC 
Playoffs berths. 


BY ELYSSA SMITH 

Flashlight Contributor 

On October 30, 2018, at Lau¬ 
rel Manor from 7 to 10 p.m., 
students lined up for a chance 
to go through a haunted 
house, called Haunted Laurel, 
and attended an activity party 
afterwards. 

They also had the option 
to avoid the haunted house 
and just attend the after party. 
This was made possible due to 
the two entrances set up using 
the side doors of Laurel Man¬ 
or, one leading to the haunt¬ 
ed house, which had a line 
stretching out to the street, 
and the other line leading to 
the party. 

Haunted Laurel was a 
haunted house that was set 
up through the building of 
the old dormitory of Laurel 
Manor, informally known as 
Laurel. Many students were 
more anxious to see what the 
inside of Laurel, than what 
the haunted house would be 
like. 

Jameir S. was intrigued by 
the idea of going inside the 
building for the first time, 


all while enjoying the fright 
behind the haunted house. 
“I thought it was a very nice 
experience, I had a lot of fun, 
had a few scares here and 
there, but, I would enjoy do¬ 
ing it again.” Jameir then add¬ 
ed, “It was also very nice get¬ 
ting to explore Laurel for the 
time, even if it was covered in 
Halloween decorations.” 

A total of 75 students 
walked through the haunt¬ 
ed portion of the building 
and 30 students skipped the 
haunted house and went right 
to the snack party. 

Isabella C. was dragged out 
by her friends to attend this 
event, “I didn’t appreciate the 
clowns, but it was a good one¬ 
time experience,” Isabella stat¬ 
ed. “I would not do this ever 
again, even if my friends really 
wanted me to go,” she added. 

The entrance was set up 
to look like a hotel lobby. 
Groups of students were giv¬ 
en a ticket, with a designated 
room number on it. The room 
number made the group feel 
as if they were checking into 
a room. It took roughly 20 


minutes from start to finish 
to walk through the haunted 
house. 

“The haunted house lasted 
longer than what I expected, 
the ticket was a good idea, but 
I didn’t understand the mean¬ 
ing until after I had left the 
Manor,” said Grace K. “It was 
fun and definitely worth it, [I] 
probably would do it again if 
I have the chance.” 

A great deal of time and re¬ 
sources went into making this 
event take place. Almost $300 
worth of food, props, decora¬ 
tions, and costumes was spent 
to create an evening of scares. 

The Resident Assistants 
(RA) around campus put to¬ 
gether the event. While some 
of the RA’s were characters 
in the haunted house, oth¬ 
ers acted as a guide that took 
groups through the haunted 
house. Students on campus 
were also able to volunteer as 
characters. 

This was the first time the 
event has taken place and 
may be repeated if there is the 
funding and the resources for 
it next fall. 



Field hockey Mounties lose 
against Kutztown University 
















The FlashE g ht 


Shining the light on your 


SPORTS 


since 1926 


Mansfield university 


Volume 112, Issue 4 


Tuesday, November 13, 2018 


Football Mounties beat Caldwell University 


BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secretary 

The Mounties faced Caldwell 
University on Saturday, October 27 
at Karl Van Norman Field, earning 
their third straight win with the 
34-26 over Caldwell University. 

Prior to the match, seniors 
Colin Kilpatrick, Steve Sicilia, 
Tristin Cicio, Adam Hutchinson, 
Dante Torrisi, Hunter Brown, Ja¬ 
cob Woods, A.J. McDermott, and 
Ryan Watson were honored as part 
of Mansfield’s Senior Day ceremo¬ 
ny. 

Caldwell scored two touchdowns 
after 8 minutes to take the 13-0 
lead. The Mounties scored their 
first touchdown in the 10 min¬ 
ute, when Gary Raupers II rushed 
11 yards. It was the team-leading 
third rushing score for the quarter¬ 
back and the successful end of a six 
play, 39-yard drive. The first quarter 
ended with a score of 13-6. 

In the third minute of the sec¬ 
ond quarter, the defending CSFL 
Defensive Player of the Week, 
Allen, scooped up a loose ball and 


ran it back 94 yards for the touch¬ 
down to give Mansfield the 14-13 
lead. Allen also scored a defensive 
touchdown last week, when he took 
an interception to the house against 
Franklin Pierce. 

In the 8 minute, Caldwell 
scored a touchdown and re¬ 
gained the lead with 20-14, when 
Carl Watson ran 17 yards for a 
touchdown. 

Mansfield was able to score 
a touchdown in the 13 minute. 
Hutchinson completed a pass to 
Quinn Henry for 18 yards, which 
put the Mounties back on top with 
21 - 20 . 

Caldwell needed nine minutes in 
the third quarter to score a touch¬ 
down and take the 26-21 lead. With 
just 46 seconds left to play in the 
third quarter, the Mounties took the 
final lead of the games. Hutchinson 
found Imir Pope for 6 yards, which 
lead to the score of 26-28. 

In the 10 minute of the final 
quarter, Hutchinson connected with 
Pope again on a 13-yard, giving the 
match the final score of 34-26. 


Hutchinson completed ten 
passes for 135 yards and three 
touchdowns. 

Brayden Gabel was the leading 
receiving for the Mounties, totaling 
68 yards including a 54-yard recep¬ 
tion in the third quarter. 

Vaughn Hines rushed for a 
team-leading 55 yards. Andrew 
Schenk and Bryton Barna topped 
the team in tackles with 11 each. 

Allen was responsible for three 
turnovers, picked off a pair of pass¬ 
es and recovered a fumble for a 
touchdown. He totaled 167 return¬ 
ing yards, returning the fumble 
recovery with 94 yards and 
two interceptions for 73 yards. 

Saville Pope picked off a pair of 
passes and broke up a pass to go 
along with eight tackles. 

Caldwell’s quarterback, Tajae’ 
Irby, threw for 140 yards and 
Watson rushed 30 times for 196 
yards and two touchdowns. 

The three wins on the current 
season are the most for any team 
in sprint football era dating back to 
the inaugural season of 2008. This 


marks the most wins for Mansfield 
football team since 2003,when the 
Mounties went 8-3. 

Head coach John Evans is the 
first head coach to win three match¬ 
es in his first year since Tom 
Elsasser, who won four matches 
during the 1983 season. 


Coming up in Mountaineer Sports 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

11 

- 2 p.m. - Men’s 
Basketball: Mounties 
vs. St. Augustine’s 
University; Away 
(Raleigh, NC) 

12 

13 

14 

15 1 

6 

17 

- All Day - Cross 

Country: Mounties @ 
Atlantic Regionals; Away 
(Slippery Rock, PA) 

18 

19 

20 

- 5:30 p.m. - Women’s 
Basketball: Mounties 
vs. Roberts Wesleyan 
College 

- 7:30 p.m. - Men’s 
Basketball: Mounties vs. 
Roberts Wesleyan; Away 
(Rochester, NY) 

21 : 

22 2 

13 

24 
















The wrlashlight 

Shining light on Mansfield University since 1926 



Photo courtesy of Erica Meyer 


The International Student Celebration in Spruce’s MPR with Jia “Rocky” Congzheng, RA Mary-Kate Gallagher, Lea Esnault, 
Benjamin Maas, RA Taylor Benfer, and RA Connor Lawson spent time preparing traditonal dishes from their home countries. 

International students celebrate cultures 
by sharing food 

BY BENJAMIN MAAS 

Secretary 


Nov. 30, 2018 
Volume 112 
Issue 5 

Inside This Issue 

Police beat, 
world news 

- Page 2 

Die 

Zauberflote 

- Page 3 

Holiday Choral 
Concert 

- Page 4 

Final Exams 
Schedule 

- Page 5 

CJA Students 
Visit Supreme 
Court 

- Page 6 

Christmas 
Chaos Search 

- Page 7 

Mountie 

Madness 

- Page 8 


The Culture Feast was a free event 
organized by the international 
exchange students, the Black 
Student Union, and the Resident 
Assistants (RAs) Mary Kate 
Gallagher, Connor Lawson, 
Taylor Mitchell and Aaron 
Benfer. 

It took place in Spruce’s 
multipurpose room on November 
15 between 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. 
Dr. Brad Lint, the associate 
Professor of English and the US- 
China Exchange Coordinator, 
was in charge of the presentation, 
but he could not attend due to 
the snowstorm that day. 

Some RAs and international 


exchange students got together and 
prepared international food. They 
offered French crepes, Chinese 
curry, German potato dumplings 
filled with ground meat and served 
with bacon gravy, Italian lasagna 
and bruschetta, sauerkraut with 
sausages, and some ice cream 
with iced coffee. Additionally, 
some drinks were provided. 
Approximately, 40 people showed 
up to the event. 

The German potato dumplings, 
filled with ground meat and served 
with bacon gravy, was one of the 
favorite dishes. They are called 
Gefillde, which literally translates 
to “Filled Ones”. They were made 
out of potatoes which were cooked 


for 45 minutes in cooking water, 
peeled, and mixed with flour and 
eggs. The ground meat is fried, put 
into the dumplings, and then put 
into cooking water for 20 minutes 
once again. In the meantime, 
some bacon was fried and then 
cooked with heavy cream, making 
the bacon gravy. In the end, the 
bacon gravy was poured over the 
dumplings. 

The meal comes from Saarland, 
which is one of sixteen states of 
Germany. Saarland is located in 
the Southwest of Germany at the 
French border. The state was a steel 
and coal producing, poor region; 
therefore, cheap and stuffing food 
was needed. Potatoes were the 


perfect ingredient for this food. 
Bacon was one of the cheapest 
types of meat, so it was added to 
this meal. 

Eddie Kadysh, an accounting 
major and senior said, “[I] enjoyed 
the event immensely, especially the 
company and the different foods.” 
Kadysh said he would go again, 
and that he would even make some 
food. 

Max Colegrove, a Liberal Arts 
major and freshman, really enjoyed 
the feast. Lie said, “it was a pleasure 
meeting the international students 
and getting a taste of their culture. 
Hopefully, there will be another 
event like this because I would go 
again.” 












Hie Flashlight -2 


Mansfield University 


Friday, November 30, 2018 


POLICE BEAT 

- Anyone with information on any of these events are encouraged to 
contact the Mansfield University Police at 570-439-4900 - 


- 11/11/18 - University Police 
responded to Spruce Room 136 
for a report of loud yelling and 
banging. The resident of room 
136, John Bonanca stated he 
was having an argument with 
his girlfriend on the phone and 
had gotten upset to the point he 
pushed a chair over, pounded his 
fist on the window sill, and was 


shouting. No damage was done to 
the room or property. Bonanca is 
being Judicially Referred for the in¬ 
cident. Reported on Nov. 11, 2018 
between 3:21 p.m. and 3:25 p.m. 
(Disorderly Conduct) 

- 11/12/18 - Mansfield University 
Police were notified of a possible 
Drug Violation in Oak Room 130. 
Officers responded and were able 


to detect that in fact marijuana had 
been smoked in the room. RA staff 
reported to officers that both occu¬ 
pants, as well as 2 other male indi¬ 
viduals, were seen leaving the room 
at the time of the incident. It was 
also found that the occupants of the 
room had covered the smoke detec¬ 
tor with a plastic bag and hangers. 
Both occupants of the room, Tah- 
jmir Owen and Khalil Roane are 
being judicially referred for the in¬ 
cident. Reported on Nov. 12, 2018 
between 4:40 p.m. and 12:00 a.m. 
(Drug Law) 


- 11/13/18 - Police were dispatched 
to investigate an odor of marijua¬ 
na on the 3rd floor of Oak Resi¬ 
dence Hall. Police arrived, finding 
Raymond Glemser (20) possessing 
marijuana and marijuana para¬ 
phernalia. The culprit was referred 
to campus judicial and charged in 
district court. Reported on Nov. 
9, 2018 at 10:27 p.m. (Drug Law 
Violation) 

- 11/16/18 - Campus police had a 
wallet turned, upon looking for the 
owner information it was discov¬ 
ered that there was 2 driver license 


from different states. 1 of the li¬ 
cense showed Charles Steinmetz 
(20) to be over the age of 21, 
which is false. The driver license 
was seized and the student was 
given a judicial referral for said 
violation. Reported on Nov. 16, 
2018 at 12:00 p.m. (Possession 
of Fake ID) 


World News 

Headlines from across the planet 

Blurbs courtesy of bbc.com 



- 11/28/2018 - Putin Accus¬ 
es Ukraine of Staging a Border 
Clash 

- The Federal Security Service 
of Russia (FSB) opened fire and 
captured three Ukrainian naval 
vessels on November 25th. 

- Putin accused Ukraine’s leader, 
Petro Poroshenko, of unneces¬ 
sary provocation and declared 
that the incident was staged in 
order to boost his popularity 
ratings before Ukraine’s 2019 
election. 

- Poroshenko, in response, has 
warned of increased Russian 
aggression in recent publicized 
interviews. 

- Ukrainian officials have pub¬ 
lished a chart, placing their ships 
outside of Russian territory at 
the time they were apprehended. 

- The region of Crimea, where 
the incident took place, is law¬ 
fully still partially Ukrainian 
control, and several Western 
governments have sided with the 
Ukrainian argument. 

- 11/28/2018 - Bank warns of 
UK Sinking into Recession Fol¬ 
lowing Brexit 

- The Bank of England has 
warned that if there is no tran¬ 
sition period to acclimate the 
British pound to the aftermath 
of Brexit. 

- The Bank’s predictions are 
based off of a worst-case “disor¬ 
derly Brexit” that could possibly 
take place. 

- Although the warnings are se¬ 
rious, the prediction has the EU 
economies being disruptive for 


only five years, and returning to 
mostly normal in 2023. 

- Many distinguished politicians in¬ 
cluding Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg, 
who declares that the Bank’s predic¬ 
tion serves the purpose of a scare 
tactic, and has little significance be¬ 
hind it. 

- 11/28/2018 - Sri Lanka Defense 
Chief Held Over Murders 

- Chief of Defence Staff, Ravindra 
Wijeguneratne, appeared in court 
after warrants for his arrest were is¬ 
sued. 

- He was accused of murdering 11 
young men during the final stages 
of the conflict with Tamil rebels in 
2008-9. 

- Three warrants for his apprehen¬ 
sion have existed since November, 
and there has been lots of outcry for 
a response to several of known “hu¬ 
man right atrocities.” 

- The apprehension of Wijeguner¬ 
atne asks the question of what other 
investigations will arise and follow 
through with arresting culprits of 
other incidents from the same time 
period. 

- 11/28/2018 - Chinese Scientist 
Defends ‘World’s First Gene-Edited 
Babies’ 

- Speaking at a genome summit in 
Hong Kong, scientist He Jiankui 
declared the success of altering the 
genes of twin girls so they could not 
contract HIV. 

- The work has not yet been clari¬ 
fied, and many scientists have con¬ 
demned his announcement. 

- Similar gene-editing work is 
banned in most countries, includ¬ 
ing China. 


- The Southern University of Sci¬ 
ence and Technology in Shenzhen, 
Jiankui’s university, said it was un¬ 
aware of the research project and 
would launch an investigation. 

- The twins, named “Lulu” and 
“Nana,” are planned to be moni¬ 
tored over the next 18 years to keep 
track of progress and effects of the 
experiment. 

- 11/28/2018 - Thousands told to 
flee “catastrophic” bushfire threat in 
Queensland Australia 

- Queensland’s fire danger warning 
has been raised to “catastrophic,” 
which is the highest level for the 
state, for the first time ever. 

- More than 130 bushfires are burn¬ 
ing across Queensland, fueled by 
strong winds, a heatwave and dry 
vegetation, including the worst 
threat from a fast-moving bushfire 
near the town of Gracemere. 

- Several properties are reported to 
have been destroyed since the fires 
began burning across the weekend, 
and dozens of schools have been 
closed. 

- Unlike in Australia’s drier south, 
intense fire conditions are unusual 
in central Queensland in late No¬ 
vember because it is the wet season. 

- Approximately 1,000 miles south, 
Sydney is currently experiencing 
flash-flooding. 

-US Senate advances measure to 
end support for Saudi forces 

- The US Senate has advanced a 
measure to withdraw American sup¬ 
port for a Saudi-led coalition fight¬ 
ing in Yemen. 

- Secretary of State Mike Pompeo 
and Defence Secretary Jim Mattis 
had urged Senators not to back the 
motion, saying it would worsen the 
situation in Yemen. 

- The vote comes in the wake of the 
murder of Saudi journalist Jamal 
Khashoggi, a US resident. 

- The Senate’s vote is seen as a re¬ 


buke to President Trump who has 
described Saudi Arabia as a vital 
ally and resisted calls for sanctions 
against the kingdom’s leadership. 

- The vote in the Senate means fur¬ 
ther debate on US support for Saudi 
Arabia is expected next week. 

- World Chess Championship: 
Magnus Carlsen Retains Title 

- Norwegian Magnus Carlsen has 
retained his World Chess Champi¬ 
onship title, beating US opponent 
Fabiano Caruana in a tie-breaker 
event. 

- Calsen beat Caruana in three 
time-limited games, ending the 
American’s hopes of becoming the 
first US champion since Bobby 
Fischer won in 1972. 

- Carlsen, who has won the cham¬ 
pionship three times before and was 
the favourite to win the game, took 
a two-match lead and needed only a 
draw in the third tie-breaker to seal 
his victory. 

- Caruana resigned in the third set 
as it became increasingly clear the 
Norwegian incumbent would win. 

- US charges Iranian ‘SamSam’ 
hackers 

- The city of Atlanta saw five differ¬ 
ent government departments infect¬ 
ed with the ransomware, known as 
SamSam, which prevented residents 
from paying utility bills. 

- The hacking attack was said to 
have lasted for 34 months, holding 
schools, hospitals, universities in 
several other countries to ransom - 
earning the perpetrators millions of 
dollars in the process. 

- US prosecutors have charged two 
Iranians they believe were behind 
the attack - though justice is per¬ 
haps unlikely. 

- The FBI claimed Faramarz Shahi 
Savandi and Mohammad Mehdi 
Shah Mansouri were responsible for 
deploying the ransomware, which 
was relatively unremarkable. 


- The effectiveness of the hack 
was likely strengthened by poor¬ 
ly maintained, out-of-date com¬ 
puter systems, rather than the 
sophistication or determination 
of the attackers. 





















Friday, November 30, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight -3 


Mansfield students perform Die Zauberflote 



Photo courtesy of Carl Helrich 


The cast of Die Zauberflote along with Dr. Todd Ranney and Dr. Youngsuk Kim posing for a photo in costume. 


BY CARL HELRICH 

StaffWriter 

Mansfield students performed 
the opera Die Zauberflote (The 
Magic Flute) by Mozart during 
the weekend of Friday, November 
9, 2018. The performances 

were the culmination of an 
entire semester of practice and 
rehearsals. 

Senior Kyle Cannon and 
junior Jack Tobey alternated 
playing the lead role, Prince 
Tamino. Junior Jessica 
Neidinger and senior Cassie 


Zinkan alternated performing 
of prince's love interest, Pamina. 
Junior Robbie Flora portrayed 
the comical bird-man, Papageno. 

Die Zauberflote is a fairytale 
story of Prince Tamino going on 
a quest to save the princess from 
imprisonment. On his quest, 
he has to face many trials to 
gain her hand in marriage. The 
opera was originally written in 
German, but for the sake of a 
primarily monolingual audience, 
the dialogue was performed 
in English. The songs spread 


intermittently throughout the 
show were sung in German, 
with invaluable English subtitles 
which were projected above the 
performers. 

Dr. Todd Ranney, the director 
and driving force behind the 
opera, spoke on why he chose 
Die Zauberflote as his 10th 
annual opera at Mansfield. “I 
wanted to have developed a 
program for full length operas,” 
says Ranney, “its a wonderful 
opera-tunity to teach students 
how to work together with a 


full orchestra and prepare for 
a possible operatic career. Die 
Zauberflote is appropriate for the 
voice parts of our students, and 
it provides the full experience of 
a professional opera.” 

Dr. Youngsuk Kim, the opera 
orchestra conductor, and Peter 
Davis, the technical wizard 
behind the production, also 
played pivotal and essential roles 
in the fulfillment of the opera. 
The 11th annual Mansfield opera 
will take place next year, so make 
sure to mark your calendars. 


Senior Dan Rodriguez conducted trumpet recital 


BY CARL HELRICH 

StaffWriter 

Dan Rodriguez conducted 
his senior trumpet recital 
on November 11, 2018. 
He played six pieces, with 
an extensive list of student 
collaborators, who performed 
with him on different songs. 
Rodriguez's setlist included 
“The Carnival of Venice” by 
J.B. Arban, “The Stars and 
Stripes Forever” by John 
Philip Sousa, and “You Make 
Me Feel So Young.” His last 


piece, “Dancing Men” by John 
LaBarbera, featured a large jazz 
ensemble, which powerfully 
ended the recital with an energy- 
driven performance. 

The Student Composers’ 
Society had their concert, 
which is held every semester, 
on the November 26, 2018. 
After deciding on a theme at 
the beginning of the year, each 
member in the organization 
composes an original piece that is 
performed in a combined recital 


by various Mansfield Music 
students. Following the “nature” 
theme, each composer took 
inspiration from types of trees, 
to the changing of the seasons, 
to the varying heights of a tree 
line captured from a canoeing 
trip. The five pieces took on 
a mainly acoustic tone, and 
serenaded away the beginning of 
the conclusion of the semester. 







Hie Flashlight -4 


Mansfield University 


Friday, November 30, 2018 


Holiday Choral Concert announced 


BY DANIELLE SMITH 

Treasurer 

Mansfield University’s Music 
Department will be hosting its 
annual Holiday Choral Concert, 
“Goodwill to All,” on Saturday, 
December 1, 2018 at 7:30 
p.m. and Sunday, December 2, 
2018 at 2:30 p.m. in Steadman 
Theatre. 

The choral groups participating 
will be the Grace Notes (a mostly 
womens choir), the Steadmen 
(an entirely mens group), the 
Chamber Singers and Concert 
Choir, men and women who 
have auditioned, and the Festival 
Chorus (a choir including 
men and women consisting of 
Mansfield students as well as 
members of the community). 
The Grace Notes will be 
performing three pieces: 
“Prepare Thyself, Zion” by J.S. 
Bach, “Ave Maria” by Zolton 
Kodaly and “Tundra” by Ola 
Gjeilo. All will be conducted 
by Conner Newkam-Ulrich. 
Korena Kraynak will accompany 
on piano, with Jenna Alderman 


on oboe and Devon Lawson 
on cello for Prepare Thyself, 
Zion. Cassie Zinkan will have a 
soprano solo in Tundra. 

The Steadmen are performing 
two songs: “Sicut Cervus” by 
Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina 
and “Praise His Holy Name” by 
Keith Hampton. Robert Flora 
will be singing a solo while 
Hannah James will accompany 
on piano. 

The Chamber Singers have 
four pieces: “Convidando 

esta la Noche” by Juan Garcia 
de Zespedes, “O Magnum 
Mysterium” by Tomas Luis de 
Victoria, “A Boy was Born” by 
Benjamin Britten, and “More 
Than Enough” by Michael 
Isaacson. Korena Kraynak will 
be accompanying on piano, 
with Django Klumpp playing 
guitar and Rosemary Wargo 
performing a solo. 

The Festival Chorus also has 
four pieces prepared, “Glory 
to God” from Messiah by G.F. 
Handel, “Blow, Blow, Thou 


Winter Wind” by John Rutter; 
“Silent Night” by Franz Gruber 
arranged by Jeff Batdorf, and 
“Light the Legend” by Michael 
Isaacson. Barbara Winters will 
perform a soprano solo. Virginia 
Rice will also be performing a 
soprano solo. Jenna Alderman 
will play oboe. 

Concert Choir will continue 
the concert with four pieces: “O 
Virtus Sapientiae” by Hildegard 
von Bingen, “Glory to God in the 
Highest” by Randall Thompson, 
“A Spotless Rose” by Herbert 
Howells, and “Every Life Shall 
be a Song by Gwyneth Walker. 
Shannon Pizzirusso, Rosemary 
Wargo, Megan George, Molly 
Cerep, Jessica Nistad, and Kyle 
Cannon all have solos and Linda 
Seipler will play piano. 

The Festival and Concert Choirs 
will perform a combined piece: 
“A Dream Isaiah Saw” by Glenn 
L. Rudolph. Vincent Lawrence 
will play organ, with Linda 
Seipler on piano, Dan Rodriguez 
and Chris Doyle on trumpets, 


Robert Sutton with horn, Dylan 
Woodring on trombone, Brooke 
Peterson on tuba, and Trevor 
Jackson and Brendan McCorckle 
on percussion. 

The concert will also feature 
carol singing with the songs “O 
Come, O Come Emmanuel”, 
“Good King Wenceslas”, “It 
Came Upon a Midnight Clear,” 
“Hark the Herald Angels Sing” 
and “Let There Be Peace on 
Earth.” 

A Mansfield University 
Alumni, Vincent Lawrence, 
will play the Chorale Prelude 
on “Greensleeves” by Richard 
Purvis and the Postlude which 
is the Tuba Tune in D by C.S. 
Lang. 

The concert is directed by Dr. 
Peggy Dettwiler. Students, 
faculty, and community 
members have worked hard in 
making this performance, so 
come out on December 1, 2018 
or December 2, 2018 for a night 
of Christmas celebration with 
music. 


Mansfield Voice Students Successfully 
Compete at Regional Auditions 


BY JOHN MASLAR 

A group of voice students from 
Mansfield attended the Allegh¬ 
eny Mountain Chapter of the 
National Association of Teach¬ 
ing of Singing student auditions 
November 3 at York College. 

Approximately 150 students 
from Pennsylvania competed 
in categories ranging from high 
school to graduate school. Eigh¬ 
teen students from Mansfield 
auditioned in the event. Each of 
the students’ studies voice with 
either Dr. Youngsuk Kim or Dr. 
Alissa Rose. The top three win¬ 
ners in each category were fea¬ 
tured in a final concert at the end 


of the auditions. All students re¬ 
ceived comment sheets from the 
judges, who were voice teachers 
and NATS members. The au¬ 
ditions are a great opportuni¬ 
ty for students to get feedback 
about their singing, hear other 
students from across the region, 
and be exposed to a wide variety 
of repertoire. NATS is the largest 
association of teachers of sing¬ 
ing in the world, with members 
in more than twenty-five coun¬ 
tries, and the student auditions 
are one of the major activities of 
each NATS chapter. 

Winners: Ernest Falgo (First 
Year College Men), Seth Shields 


(First Year College Men), Mi¬ 
chael Deshield (Second Year 
College Men), Jessica Nistad 
(Second Year College Wom¬ 
en), Shannon Pizzirusso (Third 
Year College Women), Cassie 
Zinkan (Fourth/Fifth Year Col¬ 
lege Women), Jake Foil-Charles 
(Fourth/Fifth Year College 
Men). 

Semi-Finalists: Madison Fel- 
pel (First Year College Women), 
Skylar Marcen (First Year College 
Women), Natalie Holsey (First Year 
College Women), Deanna Mogia- 
nesi (Second Year College Women), 
Megan George (Third Year College 
Women) 



Photo courtesy of munews.mansfield.edu 

Students attending regional auditons. 










Friday, November 30, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight -3 


Final Exam Schedule Fall 2018 


If your class meets 

M/W/F 

Your final exam is 

scheduled: 


8:00 or 8:30 a.m. 

Wednesday 

12/12/2018 

8:00a.m. 

9:00 or 9:30 a.m. 

Friday 

12/14/2018 

8:00a.m. 

10:00 or 10:30 a.m. 

Wednesday 

12/12/2018 

10:15a.m. 

11:00 or 11:30 a.m. 

Friday 

12/14/2018 

10:15a.m. 

12:00 or 12:30 p.m. 

Wednesday 

12/12/2018 

1:00p.m. 

1:00 or 1:30 p.m. 

Friday 

12/14/2018 

1:00p,m. 

2:00 or 2:30 p.m. 

Wednesday 

12/12/2018 

3:15p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

Friday 

12/14/2018 

3:15p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

Thursday 

12/13/2018 

3:15p.m. 

6:00 or 6:15 or 6:30 p.m. (MW) 

Wednesday 

12/12/2018 

6:30p.m. 

6:00 or 6:15 or 6:30 p.m. (M) 

Wednesday 

12/12/2018 

6:30p.m. 

4:00 or 4:30 or 5:00 p.m. (MW) 

Friday 

12/14/2018 

5:30p.m. 

6:00 or 6:15 or 6:30 p.m. (W) 

Friday 

12/14/2018 

6:30p.m. 

If your class meets 

Your final exam is 


T/TH 


scheduled: 


8:00 or 8:30 a.m. 

Tuesday 

12/11/2018 

8:30a.m. 

9:30 or 10:00 a.m. 

Thursday 

12/13/2018 

8:30a.m. 

11:00 or 11:30 a m. or 12:00 pm 

Tuesday 

12/11/2018 

10:45a.m. 

12:30 or 1:00 or 1:30 p.m. 

Thursday 

12/13/2018 

10:45a.m. 

2:00 or 2:30 p.m. 

Thursday 

12/13/2018 

1:30p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 

12/11/2018 

3:45p.m. 

5:30 p.m. 

Thursday 

12/13/2018 

5:30 p.m. 

6:00 or 6:15 or 6:30 p.m. (T) 

Tuesday 

12/11/2018 

6:30p.m. 

6:00 or 6:15 or 6:30 p.m. (TH) 

Thursday 

12/13/2018 

6:30p.m. 


Campus Events Calendar 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

2 

- 2:30 p.m. - Annual 
Holiday Concert 

3 

- 11:00 a.m. - Employer 
On-Campus: PA State 
Police 

-8:13 p.m.- 11:30 p.m. 
Monday Night Football 
@ The HUT 

4 

- 7:00 p.m. - Joshua 
Johnson’s Percussion 
Recital 

- 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. - Triv¬ 
ia Night @ The HUT 

5 

- 5:00 p.m. - Three 

Kings Day Meal 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. - 
Open Mic Night @ The 
HUT 

6 

- 6:30 p.m. - Chamber 
Singers Holiday Dinner 
Concert 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Live Music Jam Night @ 
The HUT 

7 

- 5:00 p.m. - Nathan 
Shedd’s Euphonium 
Recital 

- 7:30 p.m. - MU Jazz 
Ensemble & Mansfield- 
ians Concert 

- 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m. 

Off Beat Movie Night @ 
The HUT 

8 

- 11:00 a.m. - String 
Project Recital 

- 2:30 p.m. - Concert 
Wind Ensemble Holiday 
Concert 

9 

- 2:30 p.m. - Mansfield 
University Symphony 
Orchestra Concert 

10 

Last Day of 

Fall Semester Classes! 

11 

All Day - Final Examina¬ 
tion Period 

- 2:00 p.m. - Animal 

Care Sanctuary 

- 4:30 p.m. - Transfer 
Student Information 
Night 

12 

All Day - Final 
Examination Period 

13 

All Day - Final 
Examination Period 

14 

All Day - Final 
Examination Period 

15 

- 11:00 a.m. - 

Fall Commencement! 



















Hie Flashlight -6 


Mansfield University 


Friday, November 30, 2018 


Students have to paid 
parking ticket fines 


Mansfield CJA students 
visit U.S. Supreme Court 


The Mansfield University 
Police Department would like 
to remind any student that has 
unpaid parking tickets that all 
parking fines need to be paid 
prior to leaving campus at the 
end of the semester. 

Failure to do so will result 
in a hold being placed on your 
academic records, restricting 
registration for classes and the 
ability to obtain your transcripts 


or diplomas. Payments can 
be made online at parking. 
mansfield.edu or 24 hours a 
day at the University Police 
Department first floor Doane 
Center. If you are unsure 
whether you have any tickets or 
not, log on to parking.mansfield. 
edu with your ID # and any open 
tickets will show. If you have any 
questions, please call 662-4900. 


Student Veterans 
support group launches 
holiday campaign 



Photo courtesy of munews.mansfield.com 
Mansfield University Student Veterans 
Organization logo. 


BY JOHN MASLAR 

The Mansfield University 
Veteran Support Group 
has launched campaign to 
support our deployed military 
service members this holiday 
season. Through the programs 
operationgratitude.com and 
operationshoebox.com, the 
Veteran Support Group invites 
everyone to participate in this 
endeavor. 

“We would like to remind all 
students, faculty and staff there 
is a very simple way one can 
support our troops. If you’re 


so busy you are wondering 
how you could find the time to 
support our troops, worry no 
more. In a matter of minutes, 
you can support troops online 
at operationgratitude.com or 
operationshoebox.com,” said 
Roger Maisner, Coordinator of 
Military and Veteran Affairs. 

The Veteran Support Group 
is comprised of students, faculty 
and staff and believes the holidays 
is a good time to remind others 
that there are ways to show 
support for our troops. 



CJA Students and Dr. Jeremy Olson 
at U.S. Supreme Court 


BY JOHN MASLAR 
Eight criminal justice ad¬ 
ministration students from 
Mansfield University lis¬ 
tened to oral arguments 
made in two separate cases 
before the United States 
Supreme Court on Tues¬ 
day, November 6, 2018. 

The first case, Bucklew v 
Precythe, was a death pen¬ 
alty case. The Court heard 
arguments about whether 
an inmate with a rare and 
severe medical condition 
must provide an alternate 
means of execution, if the 
medical condition would 


cause unconstitutional pain and 
suffering under the states nor¬ 
mal method of execution. 

After both hearings conclud¬ 
ed, the group met with Officers 
Smith and Marshall from the 
Supreme Court of the US Po¬ 
lice Department (SCUS Police). 
The officers provided informa¬ 
tion on the requirements, duties, 
and responsibilities of the SCUS 
Police, as well as tips on how stu¬ 
dents can prepare for successful 
interviews and careers with the 
department. 

This is the second consecutive 
year Mansfield students attend¬ 
ed hearings at the U.S. Supreme 


Court. SCUS Police Officer 
Smith has been instrumental in 
helping plan both visits. The 
trips were sponsored by Lamb¬ 
da Alpha Epsilon (LAE), the 
professional fraternity in crimi¬ 
nal justice. Attending the 2018 
visit were students Steven Hook, 
Harrison Ledda, Alexis Tedesco, 
Sahara Randall, Zachary Sedun, 
Tamara St. Clair, James Natali, 
and Alex Vonweinstein. CJA 
Department Chair Dr. Jeremy 
Olson and his wife Dr. Rebecca 
Sarver helped coordinate the trip 
and chaperoned the students. 


Letter From the Editors 

We would like to thank all of the Flashlight staff for their hardwork 
and dedication this past semester. We are proud of everything we have 
accomplished as a team. 

We want to give a shout out to Benjamin Mass, our dedicat¬ 
ed Secretary for all his hard work this past semester. You have done 
so much and we greatly appreciate it. We will all miss you when you 
return to Germany for the spring semester. Thank you for being part 
of the Flashlight and we wish you the best in all that you do. 

From your Editor-in-Chief Lucianna Minoia and Copy Editor 
Rebekah Rocha. 











Friday, November 30, 2018 


Mansfield University 


The Flashlight -7 


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The Flashlight 
Fall 2018 ' 

Mansfield University 

of Pennsylvania 
Student Newspaper 


Lucianna Minoia, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Rebekah Rocha, 

Copy Editor 

Danielle Smith, 

Treasurer 

Benjamin Maas, 

Secretary 

Erica Meyer 

Photographer 

Aaron Coleman 

StajfWriter 

Carl Helrich, 

StajfWriter 

Natalie Kelley 

StajfWriter 

Daniel Mason, 

Faculty Adviser 


120 Alumni Hall Student 
Center - Box 1 

Mansfield, Pennsylvania, 16933 
Office: 570-662-4986 
flash lit @mansfield. edu 


The Flashlight supports our 
professors and programs! 








The Flashl? g ht 


Shining the light on your 


SPORTS 


since 1926 


Mansfield university 


Volume 112, Issue 5 


Friday, November 30, 2018 


Mansfield University Basketball team hosts Mountie Madness 



Photo courtesy of gomounties.com 

Men’s Basketball Team lined for a photo. 


Photo courtesy of gomounties.com 

Women’s Basketball team lined up for a photo. 


BY AARON COLEMAN 

StaffWriter 

The Mansfield University 
Basketball team hosted Mountie 
Madness on Monday November 
27, 2018 at 7 p.m. 

To kick off the night, both the 
boys’ and girls’ basketball teams 
were introduced. 

The girls’ team came first. 
The team consisted of Alyssa 
Denofa, Erin Gibbons, Kira 


Merritt, Ellie Thompson, Hanna 
Johnson, Autumn Hultberg, 
McKenzie Hatch, Sydney Reed, 
Noelle Cameron, Mia Leonard, 
Brooke Roys, Lily Soulliard, Paige 
Whitfield, and Madison Mattas. 

The girls team was then followed 
by the boys: Ryan Bernstein, Nysir 
Marshburn, Eli Alvin, Keith Farmer, 
Jay Dincher, Xavier Starks, Mike 
Rell, Reilly Collins, Tyler Moffe, 
Tyler Sweeney, Dan Ransom, 


Garrett Cook, Aaron McFarlan, 
Anthony Mcfall, and Jahmir Green. 

After the introductions, the 
cheerleaders put on a special 
performance to get the crowd 
excited. Following the performance, 
there was a dunk contest. The dunk 
contest began with contestants 
Mcfall, Alvin, and Ransom. The 
winner was Alvin. He stands at 
5’10 and plays guard for the team. 
They then had the boys’ three-point 


contest followed by the girls’ three- 
point contest. The boys’ three-point 
contest was won by Cook and the 
girls three-point contest was won by 
Whitefield. 

To put an end to the evening, 
there was a pick-up game with a 
mixture of the boys and girls. On 
behalf of Mansfield University, we 
wish the best to our boys’ and girls’ 
basketball teams! Keep up the good 
work! 


Coming up in Mountaineer Sports 

Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

2 

- 1 p.m. - Women’s 
Basketball: Mounties 
vs. Gannon University; 
Home 

- 3 p.m. - Men’s 
Basketball: Mounties 
vs. Gannon University; 
Home 

3 

4 

3 

- 6 p.m. - Women’s 
Basketball: Mounties 
vs. LeMoyne College; 
Home 

6 

- 7 p.m. - Men’s 

Basketball: Mounties vs. 
Felician College; Home 

7 

- All Day - Track & 

Field: Mounties @ 
Houghton December 
Classic; Away 
(Houghton, NY) 

8 

- 1 p.m. - Women’s 
Basketball: Mounties 
vs. Clarion University; 
Away (Clarion, PA) 

- 3 p.m. - Men’s 

Basketball: Mounties 
vs. Clarion University; 
Away (Clarion, PA) 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15