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€XPR€SS VOURS€LF 


f>G-0CC8 


GRANITE CITY HIGH SCHOOL 
3101 MADISON AVENUE 
GRANITE CITY, ILLINOIS 62040 




Board Office 

206-207 



Superintendent of Schools 208 

Introduction 

1 

Administrative Staff 

209 

Table of Contents 

2-3 

Principal 

210-211 

Remember 

4-5 

Assistant Principals 

212-213 

Student/Faculty 


Teachers 

214-227 

Basketball 

6-7 

Secretaries 

228-229 

Gateway Arch 

8-9 

Cafeteria Workers 

230-231 

Hard Rock Cafe 

10-11 

Monitors 

232-233 

Lip Sync 

12-13 

Custodians 

234-235 

Cars /Trucks /Plates 

14-15 

Aides 

236-237 



High World 

240-241 



Photography Club 

242-243 



Student Council 

244-245 



Scholar Bowl 

246 



Chess Club 

247 

May Carousel 1990 

16-21 

F.S.A. 

248-249 

Homecoming 

22-35 

Quill & Scroll 

250-251 



Foreign Language Club 

252-253 



N.H.S. 

254-255 



Audio-Visual Club 

256-257 



V.I.C.A. 

258-259 



Science Club 

260-261 

Seniors 

36-113 

Red Peppers 

262-263 

Best of the 


Empathy 

264-265 

Best/ Worst 

114-117 

Young Authors Club 

266-267 

Senior Summary 

118-125 

S.A.D.D. 

268 

Juniors 

126-155 

ALPHA 

269 

Sophomores 

156-185 

Speech & Theatre 

270-271 

Freshmen 

186-205 

Varsity Club 

272-275 



Foreign Policy Club 

276-277 


2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 






Reoyv^ 














Flags 

280-281 






Rifles 

282-283 






Pom-Pons 

284-285 






Music 

286-289 

Softball 

352-353 




Band 

290-295 

Track 

354-355 




Cheerleaders 

296-303 

Baseball 

356-359 




Winter Play 

304-305 

Boys Tennis 

360-361 






Girls Soccer 

362-365 






Prom 

366-369 






Recognition 







Assembly 

370-371 






Spring Play 

372-373 






Graduation 

374-377 




Football 

308-313 






Girls Tennis 

314-315 






Girls Basketball 

316-319 






Volleyball 

320-323 






Golf 

324-325 






Cross Country 

326-327 






Soccer 

328-337 






Boys Basketball 

338-343 






Wrestling 

344-347 






Scores 

348-349 

Yearbook Staff 

380-387 






Index 

388-399 






Closing 

400 








TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 


PRICES 


I 


Warrior yearbook • $24.00 
Cassette ■ $8.96 
CD . $14.97 

Taco Bell soft taco • $.59 
St. Louis Post Dispatch • $.25 
Nameoki Twin Cinema • $1.50 
Phone Calls • $.05 
G.C. Press-Record - $.30 
High World • $.25 
Canned soft drink • $.50 
Unleaded gasoline • $1.24 
School lunch • $1.25 
Seventeen magazine • $1.75 
Post card stamps • $.19 
Stamps • $.29 


WINNERS 


Homecoming queen • Leah Schuman 
Homecoming king • Bryan McKeckan 
GCHS soccer team • Illinois state champions 
Super Bowl Winner • New York Giants 
Songs of the year • “U Can’t Touch This” by 
M.C. Hammer and “Hold On” by Wilson 
Phillips 

World Series Winner • Cinnicinati Reds 
Lip Sync • Scrambled Eggs 
Mr. Sexy Legs ■ Mike Nordstrom 
Ms. Sexy Legs • Amy Isom 


BIG 


Polk-a-dots 
Dancing 
Straight hair 
Leggins 
Blazers 

Imitation purses 
Black 

Sophisticated clothing 

Recycling 

Bajas 

Short Hair (guys) 

Boots 

PRETTY WOMAN 

GHOST 

70’s style 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 
Shaved hair designs 
Darkening your hair 


DECEASED 


Mary Martin • Broadway’s Peter Pan 
Sarah Vaughn ■ singer 
Leonard Bernstein • conductor 
Barbara Stanwick • actress 
Jill Ireland • actress. Charles Bronson’s wife 
Sammy Davis, Jr. • singer 
Aaron Copeland • composer 
Jim Henson • creator of the muppets 
Stevie Ray Vaughn • guitarist 
Pearl Bailey • singer 
Irene Dunn ■ actress 
Robert Cummings • actor 
Armand Hammer • industrialist 
Steve Clark • member of Def Leopard 
Strfano Casraghi • Princess Caroline’s 
husband 

George Allen • football coach 
Eve Arden • “Our Miss Brooks” 

John Mclntire ■ actor 
Clifton Edom • founder of the school of 
photojournalism at the University of 
Missouri-Columbia 
Dean Jogger • actor 
Danny Thomas • actor, comedian, and 
benefactor of St. Jude Children’s Research 
Hospital. 

Nancy Kulp ■ actress who played Mr. 
Drysdale’s secretary, Jane Hathaway, on 
The Beverly Hillbillies. 


4 REMEMBER 


BIG NEWS IN 1990-91 


Berlin Wall came down to unite Germany 
McDonald's banned the foam clambox 
First McDonald's opened in Moscow 
Mick Jogger and Jerry Hall married November 
21 after being together for 12 years 
MTV banned Madonna's video "Justify My 
Love" 

Margaret Thatcher resigns as Prime Minister of 
Great Britian on Thanksgiving 
Flintstone's 30th anniversary-first prime time 
cartoon show 

Groucho Marx would have been 100 years 
old 

Spanky (little rascals) is 62 years old 
Snoopy is 40 years old 
Pillsbury dough boy is 25 years old 
Milli Vanilli won a Grammy for best new artist 
but later lost award for lip syncing the 
album 

X-rating changed to NC-17 no children under 
17 permitted 

Bugs Bunny is 50 years old 
September 27 oil went up to $40.00 per 
barrel and gas went up to $1.31 per gallon 
Six Flags Over Mid- America is 15 years old 
Peter Pan released on video 
Fantasia is 50 years old 
Arch closed due to lack of national funds 
October 1-9 

Tunnel completed November 30 connecting 
England and France across the English 
Channel 


Ivan Browning predicted an earthquake 
December 3 and it never happened 
Cigarette smoking was banned in most 
public buildings 

Blue Moon first discovered in 1528 happens 
ever 32 months, which is the second full 
moon of the month 
New McDonald's built In Granite City 
15th anniversary of the Rocky Horror Picture 
Show 

The rap group 2 Live Crew was banned 
because of their explicit lyrics 
Whitey Herzog resigns from baseball Cardinals 
January 7 Pete Rose left the Marion, II. prison 
after serving a 5-month sentence and 
enters a halfway house in Cincinnati, Chio 
NFL former athletes and coaches lost 
hundreds of pounds on Ultra Slim Fast 
Walgreens bought Glazer drugstores 
The movie "White Palace" was filmed in St. 
Louis 

January 7 the A- 12 fighter program was 
cancelled making it the largest military 
cancellation in history. Approximately 4000 
McDonnell-Douglas workers lost their jobs 
America declared war with Iraq on 
Wednesday, January 16, at 6 p.m. 

Carl E. Cfficer, mayor of East St. Louis, was 
on the Phil Donahue Show on November 12 
Domino's Pizza celebrated 30 years of 30- 
minute delivery 

David Painter became principal of Granite 
City High School 



REMEMBER 5 


\ 

STUDENT-FACULTY BASKETBALL GAME - 



1. Greg Garland, Tom 
Wyrostek, Debbie Larsen, 
Allen Lobdell, Christine Byer, 
Dariene Harrigan, Larry 
Curry, Laura Chapeil, Shan- 
non McClintock, Roy Logan, 
Linda Green, Carla Ziff, and 
Greg Patton. 2. Mr. Miller 
fires up his team with a pep 
talk. 3. Jason Scrum chal- 
lenges Greg Garland as he 
tries to get by. 4. Allen 
Lobdell shows off his basket- 
ball knowledge. 



6 BASKETBALL GAME 




JANUARY 14, 1991 




, 


. 

'^5 



HA HA, WE BEAT YOU! 

On the night of January 14th, 1991, another win was recorded into the history of GCHS. 
Athletes of the varsity club challenged the faculty to a basketball game. D.F. Miller, sponsor 
of the club, was the students' coach and Tom Wyrostek coached the teachers. 

The competition was intense and at the end of the first half the score was close. The half time 
show was entertaining as the cheerleaders performed to pep up the crowd and inspire the 
players. The score remained close throughout the game, but, the students won beating the 
teachers by a score of 48-44. 

Approximately $200.00 was raised from ticket sales, personal and corporate donations. 
Proceeds were used to purchase athletic equipment. 

Although the teachers lost, they were good sports and everyone had a good time. Allen 
Lobdell contributed it to the fact that, 'The initial velocity vector that I gave to the sphere was 
either at the wrong angle or started at the wrong special coordinates, probably do to the fact 
that my weight force isn't what it used to be." 

Debbie Larsen "... found out how out of shape I've gotten in 20 years. I was tired during the 
warm-up before the game even started! Next year I hope they play volleyball-that's my 
game." Linda Green says "Next year the women's faculty will insist that the men's faculty team 
practice more. They looked a little rusty to us," 

Jason Scrum commented, "It was a lot of fun to go out and show up the faculty and prove 
that we can always win." Brad O'Neill thought "It was great being able to be a cheerleader 
and lead cheers for our students instead of playing and being cheered for." Dan Brazee said, 
"It was a lot of fun to show up the faculty in basketball. I should have dunked it." 

by Carrie Owen 


BASKETBALL GAME 7 





THE GATEWAY ARCH 



8 THE GATEWAY ARCH 




25 YEARS 



THE 

ARCH 

It's 630 feet tall and 630 feet wide. Ifs the 
gateway to the west. It's the symbol of St. Louis. 
It's 25 years old. It's the Gateway Arch. 

Twenty-five years after its completion, the 
Gateway Arch seems as though it has been in 
our lives forever. The final 142nd piece was put 
into place on October 28, 1965 and the new 
symbol for the city of St. Louis was completed. 

Not everything during its construction came 
easy-even to the final day. It was a Thursday, 
October 28, 1965 and the sun was shinning on 
the almost completed Arch. Since heat expands 
steel, the temperature became a problem. The 
sun's warmth was stretching the south leg, warp- 
ing it out of alignment with the north leg. 

The fire department was called and they dis- 
patched high-pressure pumpers to splash cool- 
ing water along the length of the south leg. Hours 
later, the final triangular section was inserted 
and the St. Louis monument finally took the 
shape of a completed arch. 

It took tons of steel, concrete, and thousands 
of man hours to finalize this most-impressive 
project. The dollar cost of the arch itself was 
approximately $12,000,000. The landscaping, 
museum, parking lot and other improvements 
put the total above $35 million. 

The Arch weighs 4,1 19 tons in steel and 12,127 
tons in concrete. The number of steps in the 
stainA/ays in each leg is 1,076. Tonnage of stain- 
less steel in the Arch's exterior is 886. 

On a good clear day, a visitor to the top of the 
arch can expect to see 30 miles in either the east 
or west directions. The number of five-passenger 
capsules that carry visitors atop the Arch is 16; 
and as of October 1990 when the Arch cele- 
brated its 25th birthday, the number of visitors to 
reach the top totalled 20,500.00. 

In only 25 years, the Gateway Arch has truly 
come to symbolize St. Louis to the rest of the 
United States and the world. In only 25 years, its 
silver anniversary, the Gateway Arch has re- 
flected back honor and profit to the city and its 
people. In only 25 years, this monument which 
was once a dream has become one of the 
proudest achievements in modern history. 

And the people of St. Louis and the surround- 
ing cities are proud to say, "it belongs to us." 


THE GATEWAY ARCH 9 



s. 



I LOVE ALL ■ SERVE ALL 

One of the most popular tee-shirts and sweatshirts worn, by Granite City students have Hard 
Rock Cate written on the front. There isn't a day that does by — warm or cold — when you 
don't see one of these shirts proudly worn by the students. 

There are Hard Rock Cafe's all over the world. Some are better than others — some are 
louder than others. The original Hard Rock Cate was created June 14, 1971, in London by Isaac 
Tigrett of Jackson, Tennessee. He, along with his partners, felt that European people should be 
able to sample the best of American cooking — the best down-home, good meals, at 
reasonable prices. 

Now there are Cafes in London, New York, Stockholm, Dallas, Tokyo, and Criando. The Sister 
Company has restaurants in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Houston, Boston, Washington D.C., 
Reykjavic, Honolulu, San Diego, Sydney, and Las Vegas. 

These restaurants represent what People Magazine called "The Smithsonian of Rock 'n Roll." 
They have one of the largest collections of authentic rock musical memorabilia that rotates 
; ’ among the restaurants in the different cities. 

Cne of the newest cafes is the one located in Criando, Florida. It is in the shape of a large 
. guitar and the largest cafe built so far. If you decide to eat on the spacious seating area 
\ outside, you could eat and look at the Bates house from the movie "Psycho" located on the 
Viniversal Studio grounds. 

Along with good food served in a gracious way, the Hard Rock Cafe strives to offer a simple 
rrwl- message with each meal. This message is read and known by all who patronize the restaurant. 
Their Motto: Love All — Serve All. 


10 HARD ROCK CAFE 





HARD ROCK CAFE 



1. Kendra Boyer/New York City, 2. Liz Harris/Chicago. 3, Angela Grady/ 
Chicago, 4. The front entrance of Washington D.C. 5. Hard Rock Cafe/ 
London. 6, Above the Hard Rock Cafe entrance in Chicago, the neon sign 
states: NO GUNS DRUGS OR NUCLEAR WEAPONS ALLOWED ON THE PREMISES, 
7. Hard Rock Cafe in Orlando, Florida, is shaped like a large guitar. 8. Angie 
Withers/ Chicago, Angela Judd/Orlando, Larry Stader/Chicago, and Jo Ann 
Gray/Cancun. 9. Brad O'Neill/Chicago, Stacy Johnson/London, Judy Berg- 
brader/Dallas, and Julie Fernandez/ Los Angeles. 10. Cancun. 


HARD ROCK CAFE 11 








METALLICA - ELVIS - JERRY LEE - MADONNA - VANILLA ICE 

The lip sync raised $1500. for Christmas baskets. This evening of live entertain- 
ment was sponsored by the GCHS student council and was held on December 
5, 1990. 

Many students took advantage of the opportunity to perform on stage in front 
of 600 -h students, parents, faculty, and friends. The music ranged from heavy 
metal to Bob Dylan folk to Elvis Presley. There were 19 acts performing and 
contributing to the festivities of the evening. 

Prizes were given for first, second, and third place. Scrambled Eggs took the 
honor of being chosen as Number 1. Participants in the group were Mike 
Delgado, Scott Anderton, Gary Horley, Don Goss, and Mike Allen. Second place 
went to Morgan Mance, Chris Cuvar, and Brandie Myers who performed a 
Madonna song and routine. Third place was Jerry Lee Lewis' song, "Great Balls 
of Fire" performed by Chuck Noud. 

It was a fun-filled evening enjoyed by the students on stage and the people 
in the audience. Besides having a great time performing, the money raised was 
used for a great cause. See you next year. 


UP SYNC 


12 LIP SYNC 







DEC. 5, 1990 




5 


6 




1 . Mark Anderson sings with Brent Clutts. 

2. Don Gross kneels to the floor and Mike 
Delgado and Mike Allen, play their in- 
struments. 3. Brian Osborne sings. 4. Erik 
Lewis, Mike Nordstrom, Tim White, Da- 
mon Yates, and Mike Vaughn are the 
New Kids On The Block. 5. John Hensley, 
Douglas Tubbs, and Eric Winkinson rap. 6. 
Elvis is back and well . . he's Brian Bell- 
man. 7. Skip Birdsong and Brad O'Neill 
havn't lost that lovin' feeling. 8. Queen 
Leah Schuman waves and Carrie Owen 
and Emily Stitch pull her wagon. 9. Chuck 
Noud is Jerry Lee Lewis. 


LIP SYNC 13 





PLATES 




2 

1, John Frazier, 2. Beth Bolandis, 3. Julie 
Fernandez. 4. Melissa Tapp, 5. Eric Hill. 6. Rob 
Saggio 7. Mike Rongey. 



14 PLATES 







CARS-TRUCKS 



UNIQUE AND PERSONAL 


GOLF 98, AMY 1 222, I'M GROS 2, BADD Z 2, 2 RICHS. and SO SHEK I are just a few 
of the personalized car plates students have chosen for themselves. Do to 
finances, most students cannot select the car of their choice. So, they do the next 
best thing and get a license piate that refiected their personalities. 

Other plates in the parking lot are SOCR 14, NIKKI T 6, ALI 31, STAO 73, PTRPN 
6, JNSCAR 2, KATRNA 3, NEMO 12, and MIKE 481. Some are easy to figure out and 
some need a little more thought. PTRPN is really Peter Pan, GLKPER is goalkeeper, 
and, of course, SOCR is soccer. TINA belongs to Tina McCallie, RG CAM is realiy 
Robin Grogen, and RiCHEY's owner is Travis Richey. 

Some of the reasons students own these plates include, "it's me," "I thought it 
wouid be a neat thing to do." "No other person will have it," "I like my name and 
my car," "It's so unique," and "it says something about me." 

These plates are fun to have and read. They are a popular addition to many 
of the students cars. They are an extension of the owner's personality. 


CARS-TRUCKS 15 



€XPR€SS VOURS€LF - 




16 HOMECOMING & MAY CAROUSEL 





1 The girls of May Carousel court: Kelly Kessler, Stephanie 
Cook, Laura Zeisset, Gina Zenzi, Janet Ridlen, DeAnna Kopsky, 
and Jennifer Cavaness. 2. Homecoming court boys: Nathan 
McClain, Larry Strader, Pat Rich, Ryan Reeves, Erik Lewis, Skip 
Birdsong, Rob Terrell, Chris Milton, Tim White, Bryan McKechan, 
Dave Edwards, and Dan Terrell. 3. Homecoming king and 
queen: Bryan McKechan and Leah Schuman. 4. Nathan 
McClain and Amy Isom. 5. Tony Sternberg and Melissa Tapp. 








HOMECOMING AND MAY CAROUSEL 17 



MAY CAROUSEL 



KELLY 

KESSLER 


STEPHANIE 

COOK 


LAURA 

ZEISSET 

GINA 

LENZI 

H. CHAD 
LANE 


KEVIN 

KASPROVICH 


JOSEPH 

YURKO 

THOMAS 

SCHMEDAKE 


JANET 

RIDLEN 


DEANNA 

KOPSKY 


JENNIFER 

CAVANESS 


BRET 

WARE 


MATT 

COOK 


JOHN 

VANBUSKIRK 


18 MAY CAROUSEL 



1990 




4 



5 

1. The 1990 May Carousel Court. 2. The 1990 
graduating senior girls at May Carousel. 3. 
May Carousel Queen DeAnna Kopsky. 4. 
Homecoming Queen, Tammi Wickham, 
crowns DeAnna Kopsky. 5. Senior girls do 
the traditional May Pole Dance. 


MAY CAROUSEL 19 



MAY CAROUSEL 




2 


1. Julie Bailey, Denise Ray, Jennifer Hagnauer, and Christy 
Grooms take one last look at themselves, 2. The 1990 senior 
girls perform the May Pole Dance. 3. Cari Crawford, Amy 
Niepert, and Amy Russell practice smiling before their perfor- 
mance. 4. Andrea Davis and Michelle Bridges get in line to 
walk In. 5. Cheryl Holtkamp, Clara Cornelison, and Sheri 
Orahood decide who is going first. 6. King Darryn Yates and 
May Carousel Queen DeAnna Kopsky celebrate after the 
ceremony. 7. The cheerleaders sit and wait for their turn to 
perform. 





20 MAY CAROUSEL 




1990 



WE ARE SO BEAUTIFUL 


May 11, 1990, was a very special night for the senior girls of the class of 1990 and the 1990 
May Carousel Queen DeAnna Kopsky. 

Each girl, dressed beautifully in her formal, walked down the aisle as their name was 
announced. Family and friends admired the lovely girls and took pictures as they walked by. 
This was the beginning of a very special evening for the graduating senior girls. 

The Master of Ceremonies, Homecoming King Darryn Yates, welcomed all who were 
present and seated the girls. Tammi Wickham, the retiring queen, was seated in her throne, 
which was soon going to be taken over by the new queen. The court consisted of Jennifer 
Cavaness, Stepahnie Cook, Kelly Kessler, Gina Lenzi, Janet Ridlen, and Laura Zeisset. The 
1990 May Carousel Queen DeAnna Kopsky was escorted to her throne by Matthrew Cook. 

The entertainment of the evening began with the Flag Squad's performance to “We've 
Got a Lot of Technique", "Chorus Line" by the PomPon Squad, and the Rifle Squad with 
“Opposites Attract". The cheerleaders performed to “Listen For the Lighf', and Darla 
Mayhall concluded with a baton routine. Each performance will be long remembered by 
the senior girls. 

After the farewell performances by the auxiliaries and cheerleaders, the traditional senior 
dance was performed to the song “Could I Have This Dance?" by the chosen senior couples. 
Senior girls then performed the May Pole Dance, which symbolizes the birth of spring. The 
prom theme, “Wonderful Tonight", was sung by Chris Richeson. This special evening was 
concluded with the candlelight ceremony, and the singing of “I'll See You Again". 

This is the final ceremony that these girls will be together as part of the Granite City Senior 
High School. It will always be a very special memory for the 1990 senior girls. 

by Melissa Tapp 


MAY CAROUSEL 21 





1 . Matt Smithers and Sara Bone dress for 70's day during home- 
coming week. 2. Julie Fernandez the 70's look. 3. Four of the best 
looking nerds at GCHS, Bryan Ogle, Rob Terrell, Tracy Polach, and 
Gretchen Mink. 4. Beautiful toga girls Leah Schuman, Angela 
Judd, Melissa Tapp, Kendra Boyer, and Angela Withers are sur- 
rounded by nerds, Mark Cotter and John Billick. 5. Groom Mary 
Kay Mitchell and her bride Brent Golden. 6. Sharon Flowers shows 
off the nerdy side of herself. 7. Sam Fowler, Robert Haack, David 
Mills, Matt Loftus show off their school spirit on dress reversal day. 
8. Scott Wolfe, Lance Renyolds, Barry Sykes, Gary Tipton, Brent 
Golden, and Chip Ashford support school color day. 



SPIRIT WEEK 23 



HOMECOMING 



1. Warrior football 
fans. 2. Misty Timko 
and David Ed- 
wards. 3. Amy 
Canady, Judy 
Bergbrader, and 
Kelly Green help 
each other with 
their Homecoming 
mums. 4. Leah 
Schuman and 
Bryan McKechan. 



24 HOMECOMING GAME 



GAME 


A FESTIVE FRIDAY NIGHT 

Friday night of Homecoming week was the evening for the traditionai footbaii game. The 
theme of the week “Blast the Billikens" echoed. 

jhe evening began with a pre-game show of ail the cheerleaders. It was also senior night for 
the senior football players and cheerleaders. Both they and their parents were recognized. Then 
the game began. Everyone was excited and spirits were high. Before the half-time show began, 
the senior band members, auxiliaries, and their parents were also acknowledged 
The half-time show was a great success. The homecoming king and queen circled the football 
field in a horse-drawn carriage along with the rest of the court in convertibles. 

Even though the Warrior football team wa? defeated by the Billikens, everyone had fun that 
evening and all week. 

by Carrie Owen 


HOMECOMING GAME 25 



HOMECOMING 


QUEEN 

LEAH RENEE 
SCHUMAN 


KING 

JOHN BRYAN 
MCKECHAN 




Dan Terrell 
Kristi Holsinger 
Dave Edwards 
Misty Timko 
Ryan Reeves 
Lori Arthur 
Rob Terrell 
Cari Crawford 


26 HOMECOMING COURT 









Skip Birdsong 
Amy Russell 
Tim White 
Jill Broshow 
Pat Rich 
Angela Biason 
Erik Lewis 
Shawn Weeks 


Emily Stitch 
Chris Milton 
Leah Schuman 
Bryan McKechan 
Shawn Oliver 
Larry Strader 
Carrie Owen 
Nathan McClain 


HOMECOMING COURT 27 





HOMECOMING 




1. Cari Crawford and Rob Terrell circle the 
football field. 2. Kristi Holsinger gets ready to 
make her entrance. 3. Ryan Reeves, Chris 
Milton, Skip Birdsong, and Bryan McKechan 
are good friends. 4. Shawn Weeks and Erik 
Lewis ride in the parade. 5. Carrie Owen and 
Nathan McClain parade around the football 
field. 



28 HOMECOMING WEEK 


WEEK 




HOMECOMING TIME 


There is a very special honor given to senior boys and girls on 
Wednesday and Thursday of Homecoming week. The corona- 
tion ceremony recognizing these seniors was held on October 
11 and 12, 1990, in our high school auditorium. It all began about 
nine o'clock following the Homecoming play "Cheaper by the 
Dozen". This honor is to be a part of the 1990 Homecoming 
Court. 

Twelve senior couples were chosen by secret ballot by the 
1991 senior class. Preparation for the two evenings occurred 
about a month in advance. Dresses were fitted to each girl, and 
suits with matching ties were bought so each couple would look 
their best. 

From the twelve couples, there is a chosen Homecoming king 
and queen. They are chosen by the entire student body. This 
year the honors went to Leah Schuman and Bryan McKechan. 
May Carousel Queen DeAnna Kopsky crowned Leah the new 
1990 Homecoming queen. 

by Melissa Tapp 


HOMECOMING WEEK 29 







1. Shown A&teeks waits 
I Homecoming coronation 
■ 2 .Homecoming pages, N 
i loTd -^^ Rene Biggs. 3. 

' zee shows his.:^ohootert|| 
KMifton 


iiUUi 

iiiUUi 


^Q^^OMING 








HOMECOMING PLAY — 


CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN 

MR. GILBRETH 

DON GOSS 

MRS. GILBRETH 

APRIL POIVICK 

ERNESTINE 

... REGINA HANKINS 

FRANK 

DUSTIN WILKINSON 

JACKIE 

RENEE BIGGS 

DAN 

GREG WECKMAN 

BILL 

JASON CASS 

FRED 

JACOB ERIKSON 

ANNE 

.... JENNIFER BRAND 

ULLIAN 

NIKKI PETRILLO 

MARTHA 

.... AUCIA SKIRBALL 

MRS. FinGERALD 

LYNETTE MELTON 

DR. BURTON 

NICK MCLAREN 

JOE SCALES 

scon TRIPP 

MISS BRILL 

WINONA MEFFORD 

LARRY 

PATRICK JESSEE 



Homecoming Play 1. Jason 
Cass, Jennifer Brand, and Pat 
Jessee. 2. Jennifer Brand, Don 
Goss, and April Polivick. 3. 
Row 1: Doggy Brand, Alicia 
Skirball, and Dustin Wilkinson. 
Row 2: Renee Biggs, Nicole 
Petrillo, Gina Hankins, Jason 
Cass, and Jacob Erikson. Row 
3: Greg Weckman. Row 4: 
Scott Tripp, Nona Mefford, 
Nick McClaren, Patrick 
Jessee, Lynette Melton, Don 
Goss, April Polivick, and 
Jennifer Brand. 4. Renee 
Biggs, Nicole Petrillo, Greg 
Weckman, Gina Hankins, 
Jennifer Brand, Alicia Skirball, 
Dustin Wilkinson, Jason Cass, 
Jacob Erikson and Nona 
Mefford. 



32 HOMECC^TING PLAY 




OCTOBER 10-11 




GOOD JOB ■ WELL DONE 

"Cheaper by the Dozen" was the 1990 Homecoming play. It was presented on October 10 
and 11. 

Each person who participated in the play spent many hours working after school. Lines were 
read over and over until perfection was achieved. 

The stagecraft students, under the direction of Beverley Scroggins, created the appropriate 
background and other props to make the play colorful and unique. They spent many demand- 
ing hours during class and after school preparing for this play. 

Assisting Mrs. Scroggins were Morgan Mance, Sarah Patton, and Erin Rotter. Props were 
handled by Shelle Goodman and Jennifer Scheerer. Lights were done by Kevin Gross. Sound was 
done by Nathan Branding. The spotlight was handled by Brad La Rose, and set Instructions were 
done by Amy Wood, Cleta Hadley, Erin Rotter, Joe Rodriguez, Lynette Melton, Greg Weckman, 
Renee Biggs, Regina Hankins, Jacob Erickson, Melissa Keen, Dustin Wilkinson, Myk Delgado, 
Heather Sanders, Kara Andres, Nicholas McLaren, Matt Potts, Sarah Patton, Jason Cass, Nona 
Mefford, Melissa Mclivoy, Sharon Stacey, Alicia Skirball, April Polivick. 

by Angela Judd 


HOMECOMING PLAY 33 



HOMECOMING 



1. Shawn Oliver and 
Misty Timko display 
the sexy legs posters. 

2. Amy Russell and 
Skip Birdsong ride in 
the parade. 3. Jason 
Yarber, Jeremy 
Wyatt, Daryn Strong, 
Chad Dooley, Brian 
Welborne, Tanya 
Elliot and Beth 
Scaturro at the 
Homecoming foot- 
ball game. 4. Derek 
Ashoff and Daniel 
Lemp sell a program 
to Shane McKeal. 



34 HOMECOMING WEEK 





WEEK 




HOMECOMING WEEK 


From toga day to the semi-formal dance. Homecoming 
week October 9-13, 1990, was a great success and a whole 
lot of fun. This year's theme was "Blast the Billikens". Monday 
was Columbus Day, so the week officially began on Tues- 
day. The first day was 70's dress up day and the parade 
leading to the bonfire. But because of the rainy weather, 
the parade was postponed to Friday afternoon, and the 
bonfire was cancelled. Wednesday was toga/nerd day and 
Thursday was opposite day. The play "Cheaper by the 
Dozen" and the coronation was also held those evenings. 
Leah Schuman and Bryan McKechan were crowned king 
and queen. Friday was school color day with the entire 
school body dressing in red and black. The pep rally and 
parade lifted school spirits for the upcoming football game. 
The winners of the sexy legs contest, Amy Isom and Mike 
Nordstrom, were announced. The semi-formal dance on 
Saturday evening concluded the Homecoming events. The 
entire week expressed much enthusiastic festivities for all 
who participated. 

by Melissa Tapp 


HOMECOMING WEEK 35 





€XPR€SS VOURS6LF 


36 CLASSES 


2 

1 . Chris Stroder and Chuck Noud are among the many lip-sync participants that celebrate the 
success of the program, 2. Cafeteria people-Michelle Alexander, Chris Cupples, Tony 
Malherek, Wendy Lerch, Dave Lowe, Mark Anderson, and Michael Allen. 3. Eric Davis studies 
his assignment in 20th Century Writers, 





SEMOR HONORS ENGLISH 



MRS. COOK'S ROUND TABLE 


Mrs. Helen Cook's "favorite hour of the day" is her 3rd hour 
Senior Honors English class. This course is offered to seniors as 
an alternative to senior composition. 

The Senior Honors English class consists of reading iiterature 
in depth, writing essays, and class discussion. In some cases, 
the students gather their chairs in a circle and openly ex- 
press the piece of literature and what it signifies to them. 

Mrs. Cook enjoys the class "because it's a student-partici- 
pation course and students participate, not teacher only." 
Brian Henry likes the "round-table symposium rather than 
listening to a teacher lecture all hour. This interaction makes 
the class more enjoyable." Amber Rogers likes "having a 
class that I can express myself in and I also enjoy the chal- 
lenge." 

Mrs. Cook continued to say that former students have 
come back and said they have read the same material in 
college and were glad they took the course in high school. 

By Carrie Owen 



38 SENIOR HONORS ENGLISH 



3 



1 Melissa Tapp reads, Mrs. Cook ex- 
plains, Mike Fisher sits, and Angie Withers 
and Julie Fernandez look at Mike Fisher. 
2. Tim White and Kristi Reed enjoy sharing 
the same book. 3. Sarah Stone, Matt Lof- 
tus, Dustin Horn, Craig Leavell, and Allen 
Ledbetter look at their books. 4. Sarah 
Kulier shows her enthusiasm for the book. 
5. Kristi Holsinger gets into her book. 


SENIOR HONORS ENGLISH 39 




IT WAS DUE YESTERDAY 

Vocational graphic arts is a class synonym to creativity and imagination. Printing, develop- 
ment, and darkroom skills are an excessive part of the classwork. Through this knowledge, the 
students, with the assistance of their teacher, Mr. Paul Mihalich, do most of the printing for the 
school district. 

The course is a change from the basic English, science, and social studies class. This class is a 
vocational class which is taught two hours at a time. There is an early bird class and others 
during the day. This course prepares the students for a technical career in printing. Some of the 
gentlemen share their thoughts: 

"It's fun to be in this class and theres always something new to do.” . . . Darrell Dockery 

"Each day is a new learning experience.” . . . Stan Kromray 

"Teaches me responsibility and teaches me how to get along with each other.” . . . Don 
Clark 

"One of the most productive classes there is in school.” . . . Eric Ponder 

By Kristin Jenness 


40 VOCATIONAL GRAPHIC ARTS 






6 

1 Mr. Phil Mihalich — the boss man. 2. Stanley Kromray 
gets ready to put away some envelopes. 3. Mr. Mihalich 
helps Sean Briggs at the press. 4. Derek Ashoff and 
Danny Lemp read their instructions carefully before be- 
ginning a project. 5. Eric Ponder puts on his black apron 
and gets ready to work. 6. John Lantrip displays a big 
negative. Jim Haeffner shows a metal plate, and Garrin 
Gann holds up a finished product — hall passes. 


VOCATIONAL GRAPHIC ARTS 41 




SENIORS 



1. Kevin Gros looks exhausted after the lip sync competition. 


CLASS OF 1991 


42 SENIORS 











Angela Alexander 
Michelle Alexander 
Shannon Allen 


Rodney Almos 
Lori Arthur 
Heather Asbeck 


Dwayne Ashburn 
Derek Ashoff 
Jennifer Aubuchon 


Paul Bagby 
Michael Bailey 
Ernest Baker 






SENIORS 43 


Tammy Ballew 
Meshia Barton 
Gary Bazzell 


Jeffrey Bearley 
Ginger Beasley 
Diane Becker 




1 


1. Melissa Tapp dances with Christopher Stroder. 2. 
Kathleen MacKay gets ready to dance with Chris 
Kraus. 3. Andy Jenkins, Angela Biason, Chris 
Martinez, and Amy Russell dance as they listen to 
Mrs. Papa give instructions. 4. Mrs. Papa helps one 
of her class members. 



3 


44 SENIORS 








Michael Becker 
Brian Bellman 
Dawn Benson 


Heather Benson 
Rhonda Benson 
Judith Bergbrader 




DANCING THE HOUR AWAY 


Seniors have various activities during their senior year which 
they cherish. One of these is the senior dance program offered to 
them through the P.E. department. It always ends up to be a 
fun-time for everyone involved. 

The first day is usually the worst. It's the time when everyone 
selects a 'partner.' Many times friends end up with friends, but 
occasionally the seniors dance with partners they do not even 
know. It gives them a good opportunity to become acquainted 
with both new dances and new students. 

Some of the dances they learn are the fox trot, waltz, and the 
cha cha. Every Friday, the students get the pleasure of square 
dancing. 

Even though there were some 'jitters' the first day of class, the 
rest of the days were full of fun and excitement. It was a class the 
seniors will never regret or forget. 


by Melissa Tapp 


SENIORS 45 



Angela Biason 
John Billick 
Jonathan Birdsong 


Michelle Bishop 
Brett Blanton 
Stephen Blind 



A VERY HOT SPOT 


It was the hot spot between classes, before class, and after 
school. It was the place where seniors gathered during those 
seven frantic minutes between their next class. 

Lockers often created problems that seniors did not need. 
There were times fingers got caught in the locker, heods got 
bumped, and occasionally the combination would not work 
properly. Trying to expiain these situations to impatient teachers 
as they got to ciass iate was not always easy. 

Lockers were sometimes cluttered too. There could be as 
many as three or four seniors using the same locker. This caused 
a big book jam up. If parents thought those teenagers cluttered 
their rooms at home, they should have seen their high school 
lockers. 

"At times it was trying because of confusion and mixing up of 
books, but those were the best times in my senior year," said 
Jenny Canady. 

Lockers often sported decorations and strange odors. Some- 
times lunches were forgotten and the only way they got found 
was by the strange smell coming out of the wall. Pictures of 
friends, heart throbs, and rock singers were often found adorn- 
ing the walls of these little homes away from home. 

"When you're having a hard day, seeing pleasant faces and 
colors in your locker helps motivate you 
through the day," said Shawn Oliver. 


Many times a mirror was found in the locker too. This was to 
make sure everything was always in place . . . hair, make-up, 
lipstick, etc. Note pads, erasable boards for messages, and 
bulletin boards were also found there for the important mes- 
sages. 

"I feel that a mirror is very convenient because some days 
when you're having a bad day, you can look in a mirror and try 
to make yourself smile and see a reflection of a happy face," 
said Becky Rice. 

And, of course, no locker could be complete without cologne, 
comb, brush, and/or hairspray for quick touchups and primping. 

"Ifs a good thing to have hairspray in your locker. After P.E., it 
helps to improve your looks for impressing people," states Beth 
Scaturro. 

Finally, sometime during the semester there was locker clean- 
out. This was the time to throw away all the trash, the excess, the 
not needed junk. No senior really had time to clean out the 
locker during the school year. There were more important items 
to attend to. But now the day was here. Time was taken out of 
homeroom and everyone was out in the halls cleaning, finding, 
and throwing. Only then could a senior bring himself to go 
through all the mess and maybe even throw some of it away . . . 
maybe. 


46 SENIORS 



Hertha Blumer 
Amey Bohnenstiehl 
Beth Bolandis 


David Boley 
Christine Bonds 
Sarah Bone 




1 



2 



3 


1. Brad O'Neill and Mike 
Nordstrom squeeze. 2. Emiiy 
Stitch and Skip Birdsong step 
into the iockers. 3. Carrie Owen 
and Stacie Kenneriy throw 
away the trash they found by 
the lockers. 


SENIORS 47 


Julie Boneau 
Michelle Booher 
Jeffrey Boushard 


Jennifer Boushard 
Carrie Boyer 
Dena Boyer 




1. Brandi Greco and Tim White at the student council Christmas 
dance under the mistletoe. 2. Amy Niepert and Erik Lewis are 
always together. 



48 SENIORS 





Julia Boyer 
Jennifer Brand 
Dianna Brandt 


Jason Brankov 
Daniel Brazee 
Vicki Breeden 


I LOVE YOU 


They're everywhere. Wherever you 
look, anywhere you go, you see them. 
Those eye-catching couples who don't 
seem to have a care in the world (except 
for each other, of course.) 

During our high school years, we learn 
a great deal (some of us more than 
others). Besides the books, and the term 
papers, and the hours of homework, we 
learn about people and relationships. 
We learn about friendship and we learn 
about love. We learn the joys of having a 
special companion — someone with 
whom to share our secrets and dreams, 
someone who won't laugh at us if we 
seem idealistic, someone who will stick 
by us and love us for who we are, not who 
they want us to be. 


SENIORS 49 


But, unfortunately, with love there 
comes heartaches. There's the heart- 
ache of 'breaking up', and/or seeing 
your 'someone' talking to someone else. 
This can be tough. And, it usually hap- 
pens to all of us while in high school. But, 
if we wait long enough, another special 
someone will come along and replace 
the first special someone, (not take the 
place of — just replace) 

In conclusion, we leave you with a few 
wise words. If you see those couples lean- 
ing against the wall in the hall or gath- 
ered around some lockers, ignoring ev- 
eryone else except each other, leave 
them alone. They won't look at you or 
answer you, because they only have 
eyes for each other. 




Stephen Breese 
Gerald Brim 
Steven Bringer 


John Bringer 
Jill Broshow 
Jason Brown 




1. Kelly Green and Chris Harrison are always able to beat the 'blahs'. 


50 SENIORS 



Sally Brown 
Karla Broyles 
Shawn Buckingham 


Douglas Buehrer 
Christopher 
Bunselmeyer 
Sheri Bushong 


DO YOU HAVE THE BLAHS? 


Daily routines can become 'routine.' What can 
we do about this? is there a way to turn routine 
situations into different experiences? Sure there is. 

Students try to 'beat the biahs' all the time. Even 
though most of their ciasses are exciting and full 
of wonder challenges, sometimes fidgeting oc- 
curs. So, to conquer the doldrums, they begin 
doing strange and peculiar things. They aiways 
iook for new ways to possibiy overcome boredom. 

We have a few suggestions and some seniors 
added to our coliection of ideas. Try something 
different in the morning before you come to 
schooi. How about brushing each tooth in a differ- 
ent way and using a variety of toothpastes. That'il 
start you out in a different stroke. Then count the 
steps it takes to get to your car or bus from your 
front door. Compiiment the bus driver and talk to 
some of the students on your bus. Wake everybody 
up . . get things moving. 


When you sit in ciass, count the number of dots 
on the tile above your head, think about the 
cafeteria and aii the fun you are going to have 
with your friends eating your lunches, say 'hi' to 
someone you don't know and see if they answer, 
sing in the haliway walking to class, be nice to your 
teachers and volunteer in ciass, and see what's 
stuck to the bottom of your desk. That shouid do it 
for a whiie. 

Then when schooi is aimost over, reaily iisten to 
the 3:05 announcements, skip to your car or bus, 
shake hands with someone you don't know, and 
smile at the afternoon bus driver. 

Some students, however don't get the biahs. 
Nothing bores them and they find everything 
fuifilling and exciting. That's wonderful. But some 
students get a little blah at times. These 'blahs' are 
not hard to beat if you have a iittle imagination 
and use it. 


SENIORS 51 



1 


1. Dan Terrell, Angela Biason, Jay Robertson, and Tim White are the varsity ciub officers. 

52 SENIORS 



Sascha Carter 
Mark Chapman 
Lee Cheung 


Brian Cholevik 
Jessica Chomko 
Michael Clark 


GRADE 1 TO GRADE 12 


It all began with kindergarten. Those first years 
of school seemed to last forever. We were the 
younger ones, looking up to all those 'big high 
school kids.' Look at us now. We're those kids. 

Those early years crept by — second grade, 
eighth grade — now here we are seniors at last 
ready to make history during our last year here at 
GCHS. 

If we could do it all over again, would we? And 
would we make any changes? Here are some 
comments by fellow classmates. 

Jason Leonard says, "I would stay on the heat 
schedule all year long." Mark Cotter thinks "a 
walkway should be built between the main build- 
ing and Coolidge." Jason Hart says we should go 
back to "the open campus." 

Other comments include, "get tougher on the 
drug crackdowns," "plant some trees," "bigger 
parking lot," "bring the smoking area back 


again," "no smoking at all in school," and "the 
cafeteria is better than I thought." 

Graduation was once a dream, unattainable 
and unbelievable, but never forgotten. Now in our 
last year of school, graduation is almost here. 

It's difficult to believe that this is our last year. 
Our last year to share lockers, meet with our 
friends before school, share time with our favorite 
teachers, and go to school on Saturday morning. 
More important, it is the last year to make the 
grades and the lasting friendships that will give us 
that boost into a secure and successful future. 

Hold on to the memories, from the first day of 
school to the last moment in high school. Hold on 
— the diploma Is now almost ours. 


by Melissa Tapp 


SENIORS 53 


Andrea Cline 
Mason Connolly 
Kyle Cooper 


Mark Cotter 
Dana Cottrell 
Lisa Cowley 



REASON - ALIBI - EXCUSE 


In everyone's life, there comes a time when you have to use 
an excuse to get yourself out of a sticky situation. Whether it's 
getting out of that "little lie you told' or something you forgot 
to do, everyone has used an alibi. 

Sometimes when you are out having a good time and you 
miss your curfew by an hour or so, you can come up with some 
pretty good ones. And sometimes your parents believe you. 

Another situation where you often use an excuse for is when 
you forgot to do something you were definitely supposed to 
do. Examples of these situations might be (1] cleaning your 
room, (2) washing clothes, (3) wash the dishes, or (4) take out 
the trash. 

John Bringer simply says, "I forgot." Sarah Patton says that 
her room is 'her room' and "nobody goes up there anyway." 
Stan Gregory thinks that his room "will only get dirty again 
anyway," and Kristi Holsinger simply stated, "earthquake." 

No matter how perfect you think you are, you'll always find 
yourself in a situation where a good alibi is necessary. An 
excuse, aiibi, or good reason might get you out of trouble, but 
it may also get you in even more trouble. 

by Melissa Tapp 



54 SENIORS 




Jack Cox 
Leigh Ann Cox 
Adria Crane 


Cari Crawford 
Ryan Crisler 
Thomas Cromer 


SENIORS 55 


1. Emily Stitch will find any excuse to scratch her back. 2. Nathan McClain and Dave Edwards need no 
excuse to act the way they do. 





Sandy Cummings 
Darren Cuppett 
Christopher Cupples 


Eric Czerniejewski 
Gerald Daugherty 
Anthony Davis 



I CALL HER MOM 


When watching a football game on TV and the camera 
zooms onto one player's face, what is always the re- 
sponse? "Hi, Mom!" Your mom is the one person who 
always sticks by you when times are bad, and especially 
when times are good. No matter what, she will be by your 
side. 

Who is the one person who looks like you or some 
mistake as your sister? It is your mother. She has been with 
you from the beginning to help mold you into an inde- 
pendent adult and to prepare you for all the unpredict- 
able situations that may occur in the rest of your life. She 
was there when you said "MA MA" for the first time, and 
when you went on your first date. She will also be there on 
your graduation day and eventually on your wedding 
day. 

This woman you refer to as your mom will be there for 
you, and you for her. Some girls may try to model their lives 
after their mothers. You will never find the same bonding 
between any two other people as you will between a 
mother and her daughter. She is your mother, but she is 
also your best friend. 

by Melissa Tapp 







56 SENIORS 




Kristina Davis 
Ricardo Davis 
Chariotte Dawson 




Kevin Deason 
Miguel Delgado 
Cynthia Dennis 






Gregory Dickerman 
Michael Dickerson 
Tina Dickerson 


Sandy Ditch 
Sherri Dobier 
Richard Dooiey 






1 


1. Dawn Benson and friend huddle in the 
snow. 2. Kyle Cooper gets ready to throw 
some snow in the trash and Tom Mattern 
watches. 3. Tracy Polach and Gretchen 
Mink. 4. Judy Bergbrader holds a snow- 
ball, and Becky Rice, Robin Grogan, 
Shawn Oliver try to keep warm. 



58 SENIORS 




Betty Downs 
Denise Drago 
Allison Dumoulin 



David Edwards 
Tracey Edwards 
Lara Egbert 




OUR WINTER WONDERLAND 


Looking out your window you see the snowflakes failing decorating 
the trees and streets making a beautiful scene. For some of us this is a 
"Winter Wonderland" to go sliding, build a snowman, or have a 
snowball fight at home. 

For others, it causes problems getting from piace to place. If you 
drive, you risk the chance of your car not starting, getting stuck in the 
snow, or even sliding on the ice. These dangerous situations leave 
many people stuck at home with nothing to do. Sometimes, if the 
conditions are serious enough, students will awake to hear school has 
been canceled for the day. They can take this opportunity to sleep a 
little longer and then do some school homework. 

Different people have different feelings about the snow. “I like the 
snow because I iike to go sledding," comments Julie Fernandez. On the 
other hand, some don't like the dangerous situations that the snow 
causes. "I don't like the snow because my car got stuck in the school 
parking lot," comments Jennifer Harris. 

If If v\/ere possibie for snow to fall only in certain parts of town or only 
on certain individual's cars, all of us in the yearbook staff agree that 
snow should only fall on William Ohiendorf and Stanley Wojcik. They're 
tough enough to handle any situation . . just ask them. 


by Kendra Boyer 


SENIORS 59 




Tanya Elliott 
Kathryn Engelke 
Donald Eudy 


Brandy Evans 
Heather Ferguson 
Julie Fernandez 







ALL WORK AND PLAY 


It's 5:30 A.M. The alarm goes off. The bus does not get here 
until 6:50, so I can catch a few more winks. Wrong. I just 
realized I have to be at school early today because the 
team is having an early practice. Doesn't the coach ever 
sleep? 

Being an athlete is not all fun and games. Participation in 
extracurricular activities requires discipline, training, and 
practice time. With all the pressure and the juggling of time, 
is it all worth it? Most of the athletes at GCHS say 'yes.' 

John Billick says "if you train hard, your abilities in your sport 
will increase. You will look back and thank yourself for the 
hard work you did to get prepared as you did." 

The tiring physical rituals sometimes seem monotonous, 
but it's beneficial and the final act of competition makes it 
all worth it. 

"All the hard work and practices paid off because Hollie 
and I qualified for state tennis," says Addie Lenzi. 

Playing the game is the goal of all practices, hard work, 
and time spent away from your friends. Winning the games 
is even better. 

by Melissa Tapp 



60 SENIORS 



Jennifer Finazzo 
Charles Fisher 
Mikel Fisher 


Sharon Flowers 
Tonya Focht 
Elaine Franklin 



2 

1. Denise Ray congratulates her boyfriend, Brian Buske, at the soccer assembly. 2. Senior archery. 


SENIORS 61 


John Frazier 
Nicole Futrell 
Garrin Gann 


Katrina Garcia 
Christopher Garriott 
Keith Gaudreault 




1. Daniel Marcum, Scott Wilson, Thomas Waller, and Brett Blanton take a short break from class, 2. Jason 
Leonard works on the computer in Mr. Mihalich s graphic arts class. 


62 SENIORS 





Ronald Gibson 
Alicia Gillham 
Stephanie Gilliam 


Cherie Gillison 
John Gilmore 
Tonia Graham 




DO YOU REMEMBER? 


Do you remember the night before your first day of high 
school? You probably laid awake in bed for hours wondering 
if you were really ready for the big day ahead of you. You had 
spent the whole summer shopping to just the "right outfit", got 
a new haircut, and bought all new school supplies, Freshman 
orientation was attended where the first encounter of the 
principal took place. Mr. Painter explained the basic rules of 
the high school and answered any questions. Then you were 
on your own to face the hollowed halls to find all the class- 
rooms. That seemed easy until about 2000 additional students 
were jammed into the halls with you. 

That seem so long ago, and the time has really flown by. The 
small chore of finding your third hour class seems rather minor 
to the now bigger chore of choosing a college to attend. 

You have made some of the best friends a person could 
ever ask for. You have went out on weekends with them, 
shared your deepest and darkest secrets, and walked 
through the halls with them. There will always be a special 
place for these special friends in each person's heart. 

Each senior has made it through ali the good times and bad 
in high school. All the great memories definitely outweigh the 
pop quizzes and finals. As it has been said many times, high 
school is absolutely the fastest four years of a student's life. 

by Emily Stitch and Melissa Tapp 


SENIORS 63 




1 . Skip Birdsong and Tracy Polach use their time wisely in study hall. 2. Rich Dooley and Scott Anderton meet 
by their lockers. 

64 SENIORS 


Rebecca Grayson 
Jason Greco 
Kelly Ann Green 


Billy Greer 
Amy Gregory 
Stanley Gregory 







Leisa Griffin 
Brian Grimes 
Jeanine Groboski 


Robin Grogan 
Kevin Gros 
Robert Guithues 





STUDY TIME 

One of the most misused hours in the day is the study 
haii. It's the time you have to yourself. This is the time 
you are able to catch up on all your work, do your 
homework, or finish your assignments. But do you? 

In this hour, many tasks should be accomplished. 
Unfortunately, many students don't take advantage of 
this time. They write notes, doodle, chew on their pencil 
and erasers, think about their date for the evening, etc, 
etc. 

Matt Loftus says, "i find excuses to get out of my study 
hall every day. I surprise myself sometimes with all the 
clever ideas i come up with." “Each day is a new 
adventure to find ways to waste as much time in there 
as possible," adds Chris Steiner. 

By using this time wisely, many students can avoid 
hours of homework and not have to carry all those 
heavy books home. The time at home could be used 
for more significant and important things. 

With ail this free time, you can now watch television 
at your ieisure, rent a movie, have some 'quality time' 
with your sister or brother, talk to your parents, and 
even do some chores around the house. 
by Melissa Tapp 


SENIORS 65 


Guadalupe Gutierrez 
Robert Haack 
James Haeffner 


Cynthia Hahn 
Sharon Haley 
Crystal Hall 




1 . After the lip sync contest, first-place winners. Scrambled Eggs. 2. Mike Nordstrom and Erik Lewis have their 
photo taken, They were part of New Kids On The Block, 


66 SENIORS 





Yu Jin Han 
Jana Harley 
Jennifer Harper 


Laura Harper 
Jennifer Harris 
Christopher Harrison 



SENIORS 


Seniors. What are you? What do you represent 
to your classmates and others throughout the 
school? Are you worth remembering? Are you 
anyone? You certainly are. 

When you and others look back on your senior 
year, you'll find out that you were Superior. You'll 
also remember all the Entertaining things you did, 
because you found them Noteworthy. Your Intelli- 
gent conversations were Outstanding and Re- 
nowned. All in all, seniors, you were Sensational. 

S S S S S Superior 
E E E E E Entertaining 
N N N N N Noteworthy 
1 1 1 1 1 Intelligent 
O O O O O Outstanding 
R R R R R Renowned 
S S S S S Sensational 


SENIORS 67 


Jason Hart 
Christopher Hartman 
Melissa Hasse 


Lora Heath 
Jeffrey Held 
Andrew Hellrich 



IN THE HALLS . . OFF THE WALLS 


"Watch it." "Could you please move." "Get out of my way." "Well, 
excuuuuuse me." 

It's not at all unusual to hear these familiar phrases as one tries to push 
and shove his way through the halls between classes. In these seven- 
minute jam-packed, hallways, one struggles to find a passageway leading 
to the classroom barely visible in the distance. 

You move a little further down the hall and you hear, "Get moving." 
"Give me a break and stop crawling." Or how about "Let's go. Let's go. 
Let's go." Do you know how far it is from the English section of the building 
to the drafting classes? Or how about from the science lab to the high 
school section of Coolidge? 

There's no time to stop and chat. Barely time to stop by your locker. And 
this is only if your locker just happens to be on the way to class. If you have 
to direct yourself to another direction to get locker books and then expect 
to get to class on time, forget it. Especially if you stop to talk or go to the 
restroom. 

And what happens if you drop something. It's history. Don't plan to stoop 
over to pick up the pen you dropped unless you want your fingers to get / 
squashed by the three dozen students behind you trying to get to their 
next class too. 

The trick is to get out of your room as soon as you are excused by your 
teacher. Even though you would like to run out of ciass when you hear the 
bell, you know it's wise to wait for your teacher's lovely voice say to you. 
"You may leave now " 

Knowing you have to wait, and you do, ifs as though the beil is saying 
to you, "On your mark, get set, goooo." 



68 SENIORS 



Brian Henry 
Christopher Hiii 
Eric Hiii 


Jennifer Hillman 
Donna Holland 
James Holmes 




3 


1. Brian Paterson gets ready to face the crowded 
halls. 2. Gerald Owens gives Darryl Dockery the tro- 
phy his graphic arts class made especially for him. 3. 
Rob Nolan, Rich Meyer, John Frazier, and Rob Saggio 
leave the hallways and go to room 166 before school 
to socialize and watch all the girls walk by. It also 
gives the girls a chance to see Rob, Rich, John, and 
Rob. 


SENIORS 69 


Kristi Holsinger 
Dustin Horn 
Jason Howards 


Leighann Humphrey 
Darren Irby 
Amy Isom 








1. Jerry Weller relaxing. 2. 
Angela Biason gets a lit- 
tle rest. 3. Carl Crawford 
and Amy Niepert are 
completely exhausted. 4. 
Melissa Hasse and Shawn 
Weeks try to stay awake. 




70 SENIORS 




Lauri Ivey 
Stacy Jackson 
Lori Jacobs 


Robert Jaycox 
Melanie Johnson 
Rhonda Jolly 



SLEEPY TIME PEOPLE 


Red eyes, dragging feet, and sweatpants are very commonly 
seen around school on Mondays. Students move through the 
halls in only one speed-SLOW. Monday is the day when students 
try to get themselves back when falling apart over the weekend. 
It's a day of recoopertaion. 

If any student is asked when the most horrible time of the week 
for a teacher to plan a test or a pop quiz, the answer would 
have to be Monday. Over the weekend, students put a tempo- 
rary halt on their thinking module. With the weekend flying so 
fast, it's hard for the brain to get back in gear. That is what 
Mondays are for. 

It is also quite common for students to be caught cat napping 
in their study halls. There seems to be neverending contagious 
yawn lingering throughout the hall. Students seem to wander 
from class to class in a zombie like daze. 

But, as always there is an exception to every rule. There are 
those students who are very much awake from the excitement 
from the past weekend. They are spreading the word about all 
the great times they had, and even the new plan of ideas for the 
approaching weekend. Even though the majority of Mondays 
have been spent dozing off somewhere, they will always be one 
of those memorable days remembered by all. 


SENIORS 71 



Angela Jones 
Sheri Jones 
Earl Jones 


Ann Joyce 
Angela Judd 
Brandy Kalips 



AROUND THE WORLD 


One of the main problems of the world that contributes to 
many others is that people do not understand the ways of life 
of other people. This has led to misunderstanding, hatred, and 
war amongst people of the world. One of the things our school 
and the Rotarians are doing to help solve this problem is to 
encourage people to go spend a year in a foreign country. 
Three of such people have spent the school year 1990/91 with 
us. They are VIodimir Milosevic, Christine Roitzsch, and Luise 
Christensen. 

VIodimir is from Yugoslavia, Christine is from Germany and 
Luise is from Denmark. Three Granite City families have been 
kind enough to provide room and board for these students, to 
enable them to experience our school system, our way of life, 
and discover that we basically have the same feelings and 
hopes of all people. 

Hopefully these people will someday be in positions of 
power and their experience with us, and we hope that their 
experience with us has been a good one and we wish them 
well as they return to their homeland. 

by Leah Schuman 



72 SENIORS 




Donald Kamadulski 
Raffi Karibian 
Patricia Keck 


Melissa Keen 
Mark Keenan 
Deanna Kelley 


SENIORS 73 


1. Luis Christensen 2. Vlodimir Milosevic 3. 
Christine Roitzsch 


Stacie Kennerly 
Brian Kershaw 
Candi Kessler 



Amy Killian 
Thomas Kinder 
Brandi Kirkbride 








1 . Mickey's birthday party at Walt Disney Worid. 2. Dale Rice keeps the rain off his head while visiting Vatican 
City in Rome. 3. Tina Scaturro, Christie Hayden, and April Pollvick on spring break in Fiorida. 


74 SENIORS 





Ami Kissel 
Daveanna Knight 
Christopher Kraus 


Carrie Kromray 
Stanley Kromray 
Walter Krupco 



I BREAK FOR SPRING 


After the Christmas holidays everyone looks forv\/ard to the 
next big vacation time . . . spring break. It is usually in the middle 
of the semester and most of the time at the end of March or in 
April. 

This is the time when most students relax and take a break 
from the everyday school life. Some students take vacations on 
the beach, go skiing, or just stay home and relax. 

Some went where the weather was warm. These students 
came home with a good tan and a relaxed attitude. 

Brad O'Neil says, “I went to Mexico to spend my spring break." 
Some student council members went to Walt Disney World and 
celebrated Mickey Mouse's birthday with him. 

Others just stayed home and had just as good of time 
watching television, going to the movies, shopping, and just 
sitting around doing nothing. 

Chris Stroder says that "spring break is a party no matter 
where your at." 

Whatever you did for your spring break vacation, you eventu- 
ally had to come back to school and begin the routine once 
again. However, now you can sit back and begin counting the 
days until your next vacation . . . summer vacation. 

by Melissa Tapp 


SENIORS 75 


Sara Kulier 
Aaron Lakatos 
James Lalor 


Thomas Laior 
Johnny Lando 
Amos Lanear 



1. Lynn Yehling, Angie Jones, and Jeanie Groboski at the lip sync contest. 2. Jeff Bearley in his graphic arts class 



76 SENIORS 




John Lantrip 
James Lay 
Craig Leavell 


Michele Lebeau 
Allen Ledbetter 
Timothy Lee 



SENIORS SEEK HIGHER DEGREES 


Many of the 1991 graduates plan to attend college. Some 
will relocate within the state and others wiii choose schools 
in different states. Probably one of the most popular out-of- 
state schools is the University of Missouri/Columbia. Its excel- 
lent academic program coupled with the possibilities for 
social activity was appealing to many of the GCHS seniors. 

Local colleges and junior colleges, such as Washington 
University, St. Louis University, Belleville Area College, South- 
ern Illinois University/Edwardsville and Carbondale, 
Meramac, Florissant Valley, Lindenwood, and University of 
Missouri/Rolla and St. Louis were also popular choices 
among the senior also. 

Some seniors, however, decided to go to 'trade' schools 
such as Sanford-Brown Business College. Ranken, I.T.T., St. 
Louis Tech., and Lincoln Tech. These schools offered some- 
thing to a select number of seniors that was not available 
in a traditional college curriculum. 

Regardless what specific plans each senior made, all 
were somewhat apprehensive about the future and the 
challenges it would bring. They were nervous about it since 
they never really knew what was going to happen. 

They did know, however, they would miss their friends and 
many of their close acquaintances. They also knew that 
college was a chance to meet new friends. 


SENIORS 77 


Rhonda Legate 
Jaimie Leggett 
Daniel Lemp 


Adrienne Lenzi 
Jason Leonard 
Robert Levart 




1. Dan Terrell just 'loves' Mr. Rehg's class and the fish. 2. Bryan Ogle keeps his classroom clean because 
he just loves it so much. 


78 SENIORS 



Bryan Lewis 
F. Erik Lewis 
Edward Linhart 


Barbara Linton 
Matthew Loftus 
Melanie Lynn 



LOVING IT UP 


Each student at G.C.H.S. looks forward to at least one of their classes 
every day; and there are many different reasons that this certain class 
makes their day worthwhile. Weather it's the intriguing curriculum, the 
interesting teacher, or the gorgeous person who sits next to you, there 
is something that makes one class more enjoyable than all of the rest. 

For the first three years of high school, students are required to take 
a variety of mandatory courses in subjects such as math, science, 
English, and history. But now, as a senior, they are finally able to choose 
some electives that appeal to their own personal interests. Because of 
this, seniors seem to enjoy their schedules more than anyone else. 

Many seniors, like Dan Terrell and Pam Mansfield, choose to take 
follow-up courses such as Biology III. and IV. and college algebra to 
continue their education in their favorite classes. Dan says, "I am 
furthering my biology education because I believe everyone should 
learn more about themselves and other things that they deal with in 
every day life." However, the most popular choices made by seniors on 
registration day seem to be less mind-boggeling classes such as study 
hall and office worker. Carrie Owen, a frequent hall roamer, said, “I took 
office because I like to walk around all hour and not do anything like in 
a real class." 

But whatever classes they take, most will agree that they're senior 
year is the most exciting and productive of their high school years. 

by Emily Stitch 


SENIORS 79 


Kathleen MacKay 
Scott Mackenzie 
Christopher Madden 


Lisa Modrusic 
Anthony Maiherek 
Pamela Mansfield 





A FAMOUS ADDITION 


There is an addition to the Granite City High School campus. The 
project was started in 1989 and is estimated to take another year to 
be completed. 

The new addition is the Hall of Fame building. This building is divided 
by a walkway and has a concession stand, ticket booth, an utility room, 
two sets of restrooms, and a large display area. The entire building is 
approximately 5600 square feet. 

The building trades class layed and poured the foundation walls and 
floor for the building. Work, such as wiring, was done by the vocational 
department and the heating and air was provided by the heating and 
air conditioning class. The blue prints were drawn up by Brad Peterson, 
a former GCHS student, with the help of Mr. Jerry Ethridge. 

Ed Linhart says that, 'T really appreciate what I learned because I 
might want to further it in a career." Jeff Mathews said "This prepares 
me for the future and gives me the knowledge to build my own home." 
Dwayne Ashburn feels privileged because "I am one of the few to help 
build this building. Mike Shrum says, "It gives me a good background 
for construction in the future." The class concluded saying that if it 
wasn't for Mr. Roger Waldrup there wouldn't be a Hall of Fame. 

by Carrie Owen 


80 SENIORS 





Christopher Martinez 
Jason Mathenia 
Jeffrey Mathews 






Thomas Mattern 
Tina McCallie 
Nathan McClain 



3 




1. Bryan Lewis gets a little messy playing in the 
concrete. 2. Mr. Rodger Waldrup. 3. Mike 
Shrum, Gene Krepko, Jeff Mathews, and Ed 
Linhart stir concrete to pour for the floors. 4. 
Scott Wolfe and Joe Dineff work hard smooth- 
ing out the concrete. 5. Tom Barker watches 
while Jim Miller, Scott Wolfe, and Joe Dineff lay 
the floor foundation. 


SENIORS 81 




Mary McClelland 
William McCormick 
Dani McDowell 


David McFarland 
Shane McKeal 
James McKechan 



IN A COLLEGE DAZE 


Everyone looks forward to receiving letters or birthday cards in the mail. It is a daiiy habit for some 
to grab the mail from the mailbox on the way inside the front door from schooi. But for most seniors, 
that maii ioad seems to be getting heavier. Information from universities from UCLA to Florida State 
start appearing nearly every day. 

There are different ways these colleges learn your name and address. Different colieges visit the 
school cafeteria certain days during lunch hours. It is a great chance for them to iearn about you 
and let the college know you may be interested. By taking the ACT test, you release your score to 
three different coiieges. If the college feels they may benefit your needs, they begin to send 
brochures and letters. 

There are a number of catalogs containing postcards of different schools. These cards have a 
number of boxes to mark for the specific information needed, it could be financial aid or 
scholarships, and your desired major. School counselors are also a great resource. They can help 
find information on schools you may be interested in. 

The best way to sort all this college mail is to keep a separate pile of colleges that really interest 
you. The rest just pile up in case you change your mind and want to review the sent information. 
Before long, that pile will continue to grow and grow. 

Through all the stressful decisions and hours of searching through the brochures, the ideal 
college will be chosen. If it's a trade school, a junior college, or a state university, be sure to chose 
the college that will most benefit you in your lifelong career. 

by Melissa Tapp 


82 SENIORS 



John Bryan 
McKechan 
Nicholas McLaren 
Danny McNeely 


Lynette Melton 
Lia Mendoza 
Kimberly Merz 



1 

1. Scott Portell, Rob Terrell, Bobby Thomas, and David Steward think about college. 


SENIORS 83 



Richard Meyer 
Dawn Meyers 
Francis Meyers 




Jennifer Miiler 
Juiie Miiler 
Kevin Miller 






SHAPING UP 

How fit are you? Have you ever just stopped for a while 
and looked at yourself in a full-length mirror? Did you like 
what you saw, or did you go 'yuck?' 

Most surveys and experts agree that eating right, drinking 
plenty of water, and exercise are three good ways to a 
healthy and better looking you. And usually a moderate 
mixture of these three will almost always give you a slimmer 
and healthier body. 

Some seniors are always dieting. They think that is the only 
way to stay slim and trim. But diets can be harmful if done 
in excess. Chris Martinez says, "I want to be skinny like 
Tommy Lee, so I try to diet all the time." 

What if dieting and eating right just doesn't do it for you. 
What are you going to do about all that excess baggage 
you are carrying around? How about weights? Sometimes 
weight lifting can be a great way to a better and stronger 
looking body, because they help you lose the fat and gain 
the muscle. "I lift to become strong so it is easier for me to 
compete at other athlete's level," adds Mike Nordstrom. 

The ways to stay in shape are many and plenty. Have a 
glass of water instead of a Pepsi, eat a salad instead of a 
hamburger and fries, and walk short distances instead of 
getting in the car and driving a few blocks. So boost your self 
confidence, improve your appearance, and feel great 
about yourself. 



84 SENIORS 




David Mills 
Brett Milton 
Christopher Milton 


Vladimir Milosevic 
Gretchen Mink 
Mary Miskell 



SENIORS 85 



Laura Mock 
Brigitta Modglin 
Michelle Monroe 


Michael Montgomery 
Christina Moore 
Karen Moore 



THE ART OF CRAMMING 


For most students, putting off studying for a test could be considered a way of life. They wait and 
wait until there is absolutely no more time left. The test is tomorrow morning at 8 A.M. What's a 
student to do? Only one thing left — cram. 

When those tests and final exams sneak up on you without warning, it's time to get together with 
all those other 'cram' buddies and study the night away. Final exams sometimes have a tendency 
of sneaking up on a student. 

There are many ways of doing this cramming. Some students put it off until Sunday evening and 
about 8 P.M. realize time is running out. So they stay up all night and try to memorize, read, and 
utilize their brain power. 

Some students cram all weekend long and get totally stressed out. As a result, they may also get 
totally stressed out on the test as well and do poorly. Gradual studying is easier and more relaxing. 

Others lock themselves in their room with a six-pack of Pepsi or Coke and read their notes over 
and over. They also call their friends and see if the notes 'match.' IF the notes are similar, no 
problem. If not, call someone else. 

This serious studying is really tough. Trying to review an entire semester of work into a few hours 
is not an easy task. Maybe the studying should have began a few weeks ago instead of just today. 
But then, look at all that free time used for studying. But then, look at that bad grade that may 
appear on the grade card. 

Which is more important? It's a matter of priorities. Do you blame all this cramming on 'lack of 
time' during the semester? Or should you blame it on being plain 'lazy?' Figure it out, because in 
a few short months, you'll begin college and it all starts over again. 

by Melissa Tapp 


86 SENIORS 






Doretta Morrison 
Tommy Moss 
Timothy Mudd 


Ryan Mueller 
Richard Mullen 
Raymond Nash 







3 


1 . Tim White, Beth McCieliand, and Dean Sheikh 
chow down at Mr. Tucker's English tea. 2. Aiien 
Ledbetter goes up for seconds while Mrs. Tucker 
and David Milis watch him make a sow of him- 
seif. 3. Amy Canady toasts the camera while 
Kristi Reed watches and laughs. 


SENIORS 87 


Bradley Nelson 
Jason Nemeth 
Bryan Nichols 


Derek Nickeson 
Amy Niepert 
Robert Nolan 









1 . Jeff Stephens, Chris Sturdivant, and Torey Pryor taik in the 
cafeteria. 2. Shawn Buckingham and Chris Stroder are 
great friends. 3. Meiissa Tapp and Travis Richey smiie at the 
footbali game. 



88 SENIORS 





Michael Nordstrom 
Melissa Norton 
Brad O’Neill 


Bryan Ogle 
Dianne Oliver 
Shawn Oliver 



MY GOOD FRIEND 


What is a friend? It's a person with whom you share good times, bad 
times, and secrets. Your high school days can be your happiest and 
most memorable, but none of this would be possible without your close 
friends. 

Friends can be your neighbors, your fellow classmates, your lunch 
buddies, or your sister and brother. Friends can help you get through the 
rough times and be joyous with you during the good celebrations. They 
can help you with your homework, your social life, and talk with you 
when you need just a little more help than anyone else can give to you. 
Chris Stoder says, "Sometimes my friends can be jerks, but I could not live 
without them. High school would not be the same without them." 

You can spend time with your friends in various ways. One way might 
be at the mall. It's fun to shop and it's even more fun to share it with your 
friend, especially when you cannot decide what to buy. 

Other ways to have a good time with your friends might be sitting 
around home watching television or the latest video. Sometimes it's fun 
to cruise Madison Avenue or some of the more popular side streets of 
Granite City. “Usually, I prefer to just kick back and watch a movie at my 
house than to go out," adds Kelly Green. 

No matter what you do with your friends, it usually ends up to be more 
enjoyable because they are with you. So how about telling that special 
friend or friends how much you appreciate them and ail the things they 
do for you. It sure would make them feel good, and it would be a nice 
gesture on your part too. 

by Melissa Tapp 


SENIORS 89 



Carrie Ann Owen 
Juana Pacheco 
Brian Palmisano 


Amie Parker 
Daniel Partney 
Shawn Patrick 



DADDY’S LIHLE GIRL 


Seven pounds six ounces and dad's life is never the same. Cribs, never 
ending diapers, birthdays, Christmas, and pictures were no longer just 
mom and dad it was a family. Dad's workout room turned into pink walls 
with flowers and ribbons. What dad will ever forget the first crawl, the first 
step, and a small cut on the finger? 

After being home and growing for five years, the first day of school 
was more dramatic for dad than for his little girl. Who was going to 
watch her? Who would make sure she had friends? Who would make 
sure she would eat all of her sack lunch, particularly the carrots? Who 
would tell her where to go and what to do? 

Maybe she Is too young to go to school just yet. Maybe she is too 
young to receive the hurts and sorrows of the real world that daddy had 
protected her from. 

Would she cry? Would she run back into her dad's arms and ask to go 
home to make dream castles in the sand box that her daddy had built 
her so many years ago. Did she cry? Did she run? No, she walked into 
the room, shook hands with the little old lady in black shoes and horned 
rimmed glasses, walked to the table and immediately made friends 
with two other "Daddy's Girls". She took a big step and had grown more 
mentally than emotionally than daddy ever dreamed. 

In fact, she was proud and happy with her new freedom as the doors 
of the world opened to her. Who was really the sad one? Dad. She was 
no longer just his little girl. Now, it seems to be just a blink of an eye, she 
graduates from high school and the bonds of the front and back door 
are broken forever. She has a good education and the keys to the car, 
daddy won't see her as often now. But he'li never forget her. 

by Leah Schuman 



90 SENIORS 




Sarah E. Patton 
Daniel Pearman 
Tracy Polach 


April Polivick 
Eric Ponder 
Scott Portell 




3 

1. Kristi Holsinger and her dad, Kent. 2. Patrick 
Schuman and his queen, Leah. 3. Cari and her par- 
ents, Don and Cheryl Crawford. 


SENIORS 91 




Brian Price 
Dixie Lee Price 
Christopher Proffitt 


Todd Pryor 
Torey Pryor 
Crystai Ragan 




1. Leatherman cannot 
wait for Friday evening. 2. 
Mr. Tom Lubak's class 
does 'the wave' when 
they thought of Friday- 
night plans. 3. Brett 
Blanton and Thomas 
Waller leave class 





92 SENIORS 







Marisa Ramirez 
Kathleen Ramsey 
Michelle Randall 


Keith Ray 
Justin Rayl 
Anastasia Rea 




T. G. I. F. AT G. C. H. S. 


Most students are of the average type, studying during 
the week and going out for a good time on weekend. They 
drag themselves out of bed at six or seven in the morning 
during the week to go to school and begin their fact-filled 
day. They listen in class for five days a week and by the 3:05 
announcements on Friday, they are ready for some real 
serious fun. 

What do the students of GCHS feel like doing after a long 
hard week of homework, tests, lectures, and cafeteria food? 
They like to relax, take it easy, go to a movie, cruise Madison 
Avenue, rent a video or two, go shopping, and/or meet new 
friends. These are some of the more popular stress relievers. 

Some of the seniors share their thoughts of what a good 
Friday evening is to them. Jason Leonard goes to work on 
Friday and tries to 'stay out of trouble.' 

James Scott says that he 'just goes out. Sometimes I party 
and sometimes I don't.' he adds. 

No matter what seniors do or where they go on the 
weekends, they always manage to have fun and revive 
themselves for the next five days of school. Monday is usually 
a day of droopy-eyed seniors sitting in class or relaxed, 
ready-to-work twelfth graders. Which one are you? 


SENIORS 93 


Kristi Reed 
TiaTussa Rees 
Ryan Reeves 



Christy Reynoids 
Beci^ Rice 
Patrick Rich 







1. Ryan Crisler sits on the cab of his Chevy S-15. 2. Kevin Gros and "IM GROS 2" Cavalier. 


94 SENIORS 


Erica Richards 
Rachaei Richardson 
Travis Richey 





Raymond Robertson 
Monica Rodgers 
Joey Rodriguez 



MY DREAM CAR 


When seniors were asked about their dream car, 
there was a large variety of responses. They ranged 
anywhere from an Alto Romero to a Z28. Different colors 
were mentioned, each with a different, but unique, 
striping here or there. Some have some advanced 
power stereo systems or a turbo control engine. 

Bobby Thomas says, “My dream car would be a black 
with red pin stripe 1991 GT 5.0 mustang convertible." “A 
black Mitsubishi Talon with a white knob on the gear 
shift is definitely the best", thinks Jay Robertson. 

The rising price of oil caused gasoline prices to soar 
from $.98 in August to about $1.33 in December. This 
dampered many spirits when it came to cruising the 
streets in good old Granite City and other neighboring 
cities. 

But back to reality. It is fairly impossible for most high 
school students to own their very own car, and espe- 
cially their own $40,000 Mercedes Benz. Those who do 
have their own car, even a 1969 Bel-Air, rarely com- 
plain. It sure beats the old two wheel Schwinn in the 
garage. 

by Melissa Tapp 


SENIORS 95 


Amber Rogers 
Michael Rongey 
Lisa Rudy 


Amy Russell 
Robert Saggio 
Matthew Scarsdale 




1 


1 . Michelle Randall reflects the past. 2. 
Brad O'Neill shows us his famous Q-tip 
pose. 3. Derek Ashburn is so happy in 
the morning. 



96 SENIORS 





Beth Scaturro 
Paulette 
Schellingberg 
Deanna Schenke 


Scott Schmid 
Kimberly Schnefke 
Gregory Schreiber 



KCAB GNIKNIHT 


It seems impossible for our fours years at GCHS to be 
coming to an end. It just seems like yesterday “we were top 
dogs" in the 6th and 8th grade. Most of us can remember 
our grade school years and now we are going to graduate 
as the class of 1990/91. 

They say that these four years are the best four years of 
our lives. Who can ever forget the fears of getting lost in the 
halls on the first day of our freshman years? Placing more 
importance on getting to class than going to the restroom. 
Some may have even missed lunch because we could not 
find the cafeteria. 

We will never forget the friendships formed in these four 
years. The hours spent on the phone talking to one another 
about our earth shaking problems and love concerns. 

Who will ever forget bundling up for a Warrior football and 
soccer game? The thrill of winning, the sadness of defeat. 
Whether it be basketball, baseball, hockey, track, or golf, 
sports have been our main menu. 

As far as school work goes, they say that in Granite you 
receive one of the best educations in the state. It all goes 
back to reading, writing, and arithmetic, and the Golden 
Rule. The 1991 Senior class has learned these rules. Gradua- 
tion night will be a time of happiness and a time of sorrow 
when we part. But, through it all it has been much fun and 
a truly memorable experience. 


SENIORS 97 



Lorie Schroeder 
Traci Schueren 
Diana Schuman 


Leah Renee Schuman 
James Scott 
Meianie Scott 




1 . Row 1 : Stacie Taylor, Heather Gitchoff, Ann Obucina, Erin 
Davis. Row 2. Robbie Nolan, David Ezell, Derek Zirkelbach, 
Doug Turner, Brent Golden. Row 3. Co-ordinator Ginny 
Henson, Ginger Henson, Beth Scatturro, Angela Parker, 


Stephanie Cathy, Staci Johnson, Kristen Yobby. Row 4. Mike 
Naeve, Rick Whyeis, Jack Chandler, Mike Jaros, Chris Goclan, 
Greg Obucina, Coach Gary Henson. Row 5. Larry Wright, Kevin 
Sitton, Chad St. Peters. 2. Doug Turner and Larry Wright. 


98 SENIORS 



Jason Scrum 
Jeffrey Seiz 
Dean Sheikh 


Michael Shrum 
Richard Shubert 
Andrew Simpson 


-^■*1 



CHILL OUT, DUPE 

Telling a senior to avoid slang Is like telling a dog to avoid a 
bone. Slang terms colored everyone's life in the year of 1990-91 . 
Many English teachers were still putting red marks on words like 
'gonna/ 'cuz,' and 'awesome,' telling seniors to avoid using 
slang. 

Parents heard their daughters and sons talking on the tele- 
phone with friends and became totally convinced that proper 
English was once part of their childrens' vocabulary. Both teach- 
ers and parents thought that warnings about using slang were 
going in one ear and out the other. 

But seniors understood each other perfectly and communica- 
tion continued in spite of those nervous and caring adults. Here 
are some of the popular slang terms for this year. 

Awesome - Later, Dude - Yo - No Doubt - Check Ya Later - Hey, 
Dude - What Cha Doing? - Scary - Have a Cow - What Is It - Do 
What? - Hey, Baby - Chill Out - No way, Man - Killer Dude - 
Radical - Let's Cruise - Cool - Know What I Mean? - I About 
Freaked - Like - Oh, I'm Sure - Get Real 

You didn't have any difficulty understanding the meanings of 
the above terms, did you? Of course not. You're seniors and you 
know what's going on in your world today. 

Just remember — there's life after high school. And when your 
children ask you to 'chill out', will It mean the same as it did in 
1991? Probably not. 


SENIORS 99 


Jason Simpson 
Sherry Simpson 
Leroy Sloan 


Linette Smith 
Tracy Smith 
Patricia Soto 






LEFT — RIGHT — LEFT — RIGHT 


Could any of the following items cause problems for someone: Soup ladles, pens, pencils, school 
desks, or spiral notebooks? If so, they possibly may fall in the small percentage of students who 
make up the left-handed population. 

How can these be problems? For starters, who has noticed the smudged effect left by pens and 
pencils on the left hands or the indentations from a spiral ring notebook? or how about ladles that 
have the spout on the wrong side for left-handers. And the majority of school desks have the arm 
extensions on the right side. 

Pencil sharpeners are make for the majority. Even stereo equipment is difficulty to manage for 
left-handed people because usually the knobs and turntable arm are on the right. 

Mr. Bunting says that, "Albert Einstein, Harry Truman, Robert E. Lee, and Donald Trump are all 
left-handed. So am I." Mr. Cook added and says "ditto, and all good republicans." Even the 
president of the United States, George Bush, holds his pens in his left hand. 

There are even some inconveniences for sports fans. Baseball mitts and golf clubs are designed 
for the right-handed person unless you order a special set. 

But despite the difficulties, lefties have overcome. Travis Richey states that "we're really not 
backwards." 

Sometimes it was tough. But, most of the time this group of minority students were able to get 
through their day just like anyone else. They wrote their assignments, unlocked their locks, and even 
got a drink out of the right-handed drinking fountains. So when you see some of these left-handed 
students, remember, lefties have rights too. 

by Melissa Tapp 


100 SENIORS 



Rachel Sponsler 
Gary Spray 
Michelle Springer 


Angela Squires 
Amy Stallings 
Justin Stallings 




2 


1. Travis Richey finds no 
probiem writing with his left 
hand. He's done it all his 
life. 2. Dean Sheikh, Dave 
Mills, and Tim White don't 
mind being left-handed ei- 
ther. 


SENIORS 101 



Erica Stanton 
William Starr 
Susan Stegall 


Christopher Steiner 
Jeffrey Stephens 
Jenny Stephens 



EXPRESS 
YOURSELF . . 
YOU’VE GOT 
TO BE 
YOU 

AND ONLY 
YOU 



Susan Stegall and Miguel Delgado 


102 UNIQUE 




Kristen Stephens 
David Steward 
Robin Steward 



Emily Stitch 
Sarah Stone 
Charles Stout 



Leah Schuman and Bryan McKechan 


LEADER 

OF 

THE 

PACK 


REPRESENTATIVE 103 


Larry Strader 
Christopher Stroder 
Derek Strong 


Connie Stuhll 
Christopher 
Sturdivant 
Young Suh 



YOU 

ARE 

so 

BEAUTIFUL 

TO 

ME 



Cari Crawford and Rob Terrell 


104 BEAUTIES 




> 



Krista Sullivan 
Jerry Sumpter 
Harold Swearengin 


Steven Taft 
Jane Talley 
Judy Tanner 



Chris Sturdivant and Hoiiie Tayior 


/ 

LOVE 

HOW 

YOU 

LOVE 

ME 


SWEETHEARTS 105 



Melissa Darice Tapp 
Nicole Tate 
Allison Taylor 


Hollie Taylor 
Jennifer Taylor 
Melissa Taylor 






HAIR . . 
HAIR . . 
LONG 
BEAUTIFUL 
HAIR 



Ryan Crisler and Emily Stitch 


106 HAIR 



Daniel Terrell 
Robert Terrell 
Robert Thomas 



Amy Thompson 
Debra Thompson 
Misty Timko 



Angela Withers and Brad O’Neill 


EVERY 

GIRL 

IS 

CRAZY 

ABOUT 

A 

SHARP 

DRESSED 

MAN 


FASHION 107 


Lorraine Tindall 
Gary Tipton 
Charlene Tucker 


Douglas Turner 
Jennifer Valbert 
Michael Vance 



PRETTY WOMAN, 
WALKING 
DOWN 
THE 
STREET 



Dave Boley and Carrie Owen 


108 PHYSIQUE 



I 


Darin Varble 
Kristine Vaughn 
Krystai Wakeford 


Baria Waiker 
Tara Waiker 
Tonya Ware 



Kristi Hoisinger and Bryan McKechan 


WALK 

WITH 

PERSONALITY . . 
TALK 
WITH 

PERSONALITY 


PERSONALITY 109 


Patricia Webb 
Michaei Weber 
Sonnet Weeks 


Brian Welborne 
Timothy White 
Allison Whitmer 





DID YOU EVER 
KNOW THAT 
YOU’RE MY 
HERO . . 
EVERYTHING 
I WISH 
/ COULD BE 



Addie Lenzi and Skip Birdsong 


110 ATHLETE 






Stephanie Wienhoff 
Eric Wiikinson 
Carla Williams 


Stacie Williams 
David Wilson 
Scott Wilson 



Susan Stegall and Tim White 


VM 

ON 

TOP 

OF 

THE 

WORLD 


INTELLECTUAL 111 


Jennifer Winfield 
Julie Wingerter 
Donald Winnie 


Angela Withers 
Charles Wofford 
Scott Wolfe 



DON’T 

IT 

MAKE 

YOUR 

BROWN 

EYES 

BLUE 



Ryan Reeves and Angela Biason 


112 EYES 




Angela Worthen 
Larry Wright 
Mary Lynn Yehling 


Bridgette York 
Shawn Young 



Bryan McKechan and Shawn Weeks 


YOU’RE 

NEVER 

FULLY 

DRESSED 

WITHOUT 

A 

SMILE 


SMILE 113 


BEST OF THE BEST 

BEST OF THE WORST 

LEGS 


Amy Isom 

Dan Terrell 

CAR/TRUCK 

Julia Boyer 

Dan Terrell 

MANNERS 


Carrie Owen 

Bryan McKechan 

GOSSIP 

Melissa Hasse 

Ryan Crisler 

DANCER 


Marisa Ramirez 

Eric Wilkinson 

CLUMSY 

Carrie Kromray 

Kyle Cooper 

HANDS 


Shawn Weeks 

Brad O’Neill 




CAR/TRUCK 


Connie Stull 

Dean Sheikh 

WHINER 

Sheri Jones 

John Frazier 

TUSH 


Amy Niepert 

Dan Terrell 

HEARTBREAKER 

Jill Broshow 

Bill McCormick 

SPIRIT 


Leah Schuman 

Eric Czerniejewski 

MOOCH 

Denise Drago 

Bobby Thomas 

SINGER 


Misty Timko 

Bryan Ogle 

MOST GULLIBLE 

Shawn Weeks 

Jay Robertson 

BAND PERSON 


Sarah Stone 

Craig Leavell 




ACTRESS/ACTOR 

Jenniter Brand 

Nick McLaren 

FLIRT 

Misty Timko 

Bobby Thomas 

BLUSHER 


Jeanie Groboski 

Brad O’Neill 

BROWN NOSER 

Jill Broshow 

Rob Terrell 

CLASSY 


Amy Russell 

Brad O’Neill 

DRIVER 

April Polivick 

Jim McKechan 

ARTIST 


Young Mi Suh 

Nathan McClain 

HALL ROAMER 

Leah Schuman 

Jason Scrum 

DIMPLES 


Angela Biason 

Erik Lewis 




STRUT 


Emily Stitch 

Ryan Mueller 

SLEEPER 

Stephanie Wienhotf 

Jason Brown 

LIFE OF THE PARTY 

Tracy Polach 

Chris Martinez 

ALWAYS LATE 

Melissa Hasse 

Larry Wright 


114 BEST/WORST 







1. Eric Wilkinson shows off his dancing ability. 2. 
Leah Schuman, Shawn Weeks, Amy Isom, Tracy 
Polach, Marisa Ramirez, Erik Lewis, Chris Martinez, 
and Mike Nordstrom. 3. reclining: Dean Shiekh. 
row 2: Young Mi Suh, Nathan McClain, Danny 
Terrell, Brad O'Neill, row 3: Angela Biason, Amy 
Russell, Amy Niepert, Emily Stitch, Carrie Owen, 
Bryan McKechan. 4. row 1. Sarah Stone, Jennifer 
Brand, Connie Stull, Misty Timko. row 2. Craig 
Leavell, Ryan Mueller, Jeanie Groboski, Bryan 
Ogle. 5. row: Danny Terrell, Kyle Cooper, Melissa 
Hasse, Denise Drego, row 2. Billy McCormick, Jill 
Broshow, Jim McKechan, Larry Wright, Ryan 
Crisler, Carrie Kromray. 6. John Frazier. 7. row 1. 
Sheri Jones, Julia Boyer, April Polivick. row 2. Misty 
Timko, Stephanie Wienhoff, Shawn Weeks, Rob 
Terrell. 8. Leah Schuman and Jason Scrum. 


BEST OF THE WORST 117 






SENIOR 

SUMMARY 


A 

AHLERS, MICHAEL C. 

ALEXANDER, ANGELA: COLLEGE PREP., Tri. M, 
Concert Band, Band Letter, May Carousel, 
Marching Band 

ALEXANDER, MICHELLE R.: VOCATIONAL, Girls 
Glee Club, Contando, Red Peppers, May 
Carousel, Girls Soccer Manager, Wrestling 
Manager, Wrestlerette. 

ALLEN, RUSSELL V. 

ALLEN, SHANNON S. 

ALMOS, RODNEY D.: COLLEGE PREP., Soccer, 
Empathy, Science Club, Varsity Club. 

ARTHUR, LORI A. 

ASBECK, HEATHER L. 

ASHBURN, DWAYNE J. 

ASHOFF, DEREK A. 

AUBUCHON, JENNIFER 

B 

BAGBY, PAUL C.; COLLEGE PREP., Basketball. 
BAILEY, MICHAEL: VOCATIONAL AUTO. MECH. & 
DRAFTING 

BAKER, ERNEST L. 

BAKER, JOHN E. 

BALLEW, TAMMY J.: COSMOTOLOGY, Girls Glee 
Club, Contando, Red Peppers, May Carousel, 
SADD 

BARRON, LINDA M. 

BARTON, MESHIA M. 

BAUER, MICHAEL W. 

BAUMAN, JEFFREY J. 

BAZZELL, GARY L. VOCATIONAL DRAFTING, 

Young Authors, Wrestling, VICA, Empathy 

BEASLEY, GINGER 

BECKER, DIANE S.: COLLEGE PREP,, Red Peppers 

BELLMAN, BRIAN E.: GENERAL 
BENSON, DAWN L. 

BENSON, HEATHER A. 

BERGBRADER, JUDITH A.: COLLEGE PREP,, 

Science Club. 

BIASON, ANGELA: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council, Science Club, Pom-Pons, Homecoming 
Court, Red Peppers, Varsity Club, May Carousel, 
Soccer 

BILLICK, JOHNATHN S. 

BIRDSONG, JONATHAN L.: COLLEGE PREP , 
National Honor Society, Baseball, Varsity Club, 
Basketball, Soccer, Homecoming Court. 

BISHOP, MICHELLE L: BUSINESS ED., COLLEGE 
PREP., Future Secretaries Association 
BLANTON, BRETT A. 

BLIND, STEPHEN C. 

BLUMER, HERTHA G. 

BOHNENSTIEHL, AMEY L. 

BOKER, ADAM W. 

BOLANDIS, BETH A.: COLLEGE PREP., Varsity Club, 
Track, May Carousel 

BOLEY, DAVID J. COLLEGE PREP., Baseball, 
Wrestling 

BONDS, CHRISTINE D. 


BONE, SARAH A.: COLLEGE PREP,, Flags, May 
Carousel, Marching Band. 

BONEAU, JULIE A. 

BOOHER, MICHELLE R.: GENERAL. 

BOONE, DUANE F. 

BOUSHARD, JEFFREY S. 

BOUSHARD, JENNIFER M. 

BOYER, CARRIE: COLLEGE PREP., Science Club, 
Red Peppers, Varsity Club, Cheerleading, May 
Carousel, Soccer, 

BOYER, DENA M. 

BOYER, JULIA COLLEGE PREP,, High World, 
Photography Club, Red Peppers, Varsity Club, 
Cheerleading 

BRAND, JENNIFER L. COLLEGE PREP,, Thespians, 
Science Club, Cross Country, Individual Events, 
Winter Play, Spring Musical, Homecoming Play, 
Varsity Club, Track, Foreign Policy, May Carousel, 
Speech and Theatre, National Forensic League 
BRANDT, DIANNA L. COLLEGE PREP., National 


BRANKOV, JASON L. 

BRAZEE, DANIEL W. 

BREEDEN, VICKI L.: COLLEGE PREP,, Science Club, 
Volleyball, Soccer, May Carousel. 

BREESE, STEPHEN W. 

BRIGGS, ADAM D. 

BRIM, GERALD L. 

BRINGER, STEVEN C. 

BRINGER JR., JOHN A. COLLEGE PREP., Cross 
Country, Track. 

BROOKS, TODD E. 

BROSHOW, JILL M.: COLLEGE PREP., Homecoming 
Court, Cheerleading, May Carousel. 

BROWN, JASON E. 

BROYLES, KARLA M. 

BUCKINGHAM, SHAWN E. 

BUEHRER, DOUGLAS J. 

BUNSELMEYER, CHRIS L. 

BURRIS, EDWARD E. 

BUSHONG, SHERI L. 

BUSKE, BRIAN P.: VOCATIONAL ELECTRONICS, 


Honor Society, Science Club, Volleyball, Alpha, 

Varsity Club, Basketball, Track. Baseball, Basketball, Soccer. 



118 SENIOR SUMMARY 


! 



2 


c 

CAMPBELL, GRACE K. 

CAMPBELL, JEFFREY S. 

CANADA, JENNIFER L.: COLLEGE PREP.. Girls Glee 
Club, Red Peppers, Cheerleading, May Carousel 
CANADY, AMY C. 

CANTLON, CHRISTINE M. 

CARLSON, JOHN G.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honors Society, High World, Science Club, Audio- 
Visual Club, Debate, Wrestling, ALPHA, Foreign 
Policy 

CARTER, SASCHA N.: GENERAL, Science Club, 

Sirls Glee Club, Contando, Swing Choir, Spring 
Musical, Homecoming Play, TrI-M, Adv. Mixed 
Chorus, Empathy. 

CHAPMAN, MARK L.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Science Club, Cross Country, 
Chess Club, Varsity Club, Track, Foreign Policy. 

CHASTAIN, CHARLES 
CHEUNG, LEE J. 

CHOLEVIK, BRIAN; COLLEGE PREP., Science Club, 
Track, Soccer. 

CHOMKO, JESSICA L.: COSMOTOLOGY, High 
World, Pom-Pons, Red Peppers, Cheerleading. 
i CLARK, MICHAEL S.; COLLEGE PREP , National 
Honors Society, Science Club, Foreign Policy. 
CLINE, ANDREA L.: COLLEGE PREP., Red Peppers, 
Varsity Club, Basketball. Soccer, Foreign Policy, 
May Carousel. 

COFFMAN, KRISTENE A. 

COLE, DONNA M. 

CONNOLLY, MASON P.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Chess Club, Foreign Policy. 

COOPER, KYLE W. 

COTTER, MARK J.: COLLEGE PREP., Wrestling, 
Varsity Club, Football. Track. 

COTTRELL, DANA J. 

COWLEY, LISA R.: BUSINESS, Girls Glee Club, 
Contando 

COX, LEIGH A. 

CRANE, ADRIA L.: COLLEGE PREP,, Science Club, 
Chess Club. RItles, May Carousel 
CRAWFORD, CARI A.: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council. Science Club, Pom-Pons, Red Peppers, 
Cheerleading, May Carousel, Homecoming Court. 
CRISLER, RYAN J.: COLLEGE PREP. 

CROMER, THOMAS J.: COLLEGE PREP.. Baseball, 
Debate, Football, Basketball 
CUMMINGS. SANDY A. 


CUPPETT, DARREN D.: COLLEGE PREP 
CUPPLES, CHRISTOPHER 
CZERNIEJEWSKI, ERIC S. 


D 

DAVIS, ANTHONY S. 

DAVIS, KRISTINA: COLLEGE PREP,, Jazz Band, 
Concert Band, Marching Band. 

DAVIS, RICARDO M.: COLLEGE PREP., High World. 
Debate 

DELGADO, MIGUEL: COLLEGE PREP , Science 
Club, Individual Events, Winter Play, Spring 
Musical, Football, Track, Empathy, Speech And 
Theatre. 

DENNIS, CYNTHIA L.: VOCATIONAL CHILD CARE, 
Warrior Yearbook, May Carousel. 

DICKERMAN, GREGORY M. 

DICKERSON, MICHAEL S. 

DICKERSON, TINA J.: BUSINESS. Future Secretaries 
Association, Rifles, May Carousel, Marching Band. 

DITCH, SANDRA 
DIXON, JOSE C. 

DOBLER, SHERRI L.: COSMOTOLOGY, Girls Glee 
Club, Cheerleading, May Carousel, Speech And 
Theatre. 

DOOLEY, RICHARD E. 

DOWNS, BETTY S.: COLLEGE PREP 

DRAGO, DENISE M.: COLLEGE PREP AND BUSINESS, 

Thespians. Warrior Yearbook, High World, 

Individual Events, Spring Musical, Homecoming 
Play, Red Peppers, Empathy, May Carousel, 
Speech And Theatre. 

DUMOULIN, ALLISON A.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Tri-M, Jazz Band, Concert Band, 
Empathy, Marching Band. 


E 

EDWARDS, DAVID S. 

EDWARDS, TRACEY: COLLEGE PREP, BUSINESS, 
AND CO-OP, May Carousel. 

EGBERT, LARA K. 

ELLIOTT, TANYA R.: BUSINESS, May Carousel. 



4 

I'l 


3 


ENGELKE, KATHRYN M.: GENERAL. May Carousel. 
EUDY JR., DONALD L.: VOCATIONAL DRAFTING, 
Football, VICA 

EVANS, BRANDY R.: COLLEGE PREP.. CO-OP, 
Soccer, Red Peppers, May Carousel. 

EWING, MICHAEL J. 


F 

FERGUSON, HEATHER A. 

FERNANDEZ, JULIE: COLLEGE PREP , Warrior 



SENIOR SUMMARY 119 



Yearbook, Science, Photography Club, Red 
Peppers, May Carousel, Quill & Scroll. 

FISHER, CHARLES W. 

FISHER, MIKEL J.: COLLEGE PREP., Science Club. 
FLOWERS, SHARON K.: COLLEGE PREP., Girls Glee 
Club, Contando, Red Peppers, Cheerleading, 

May Carousel 

FOCHT, TONYA L. 

FOURCAULT, STEPHEN M. 

FRAZIER JR., JOHN E.: COLLEGE PREP 
FUTRELL, NICOLE A. 


G 

GANN, GARRIN B. 

GARCIA, KATRINA M. 

GARRIOTT, CHRISTOPHER 
GAUDREAULT, KEITH J. 

GIBSON, RONALD E. 

GILLHAM, ALICIA R. 

GILLIAM, STEPHANIE B.: COLLEGE PREP,. Red 
Peppers, Cheerleading, May Carousel. 

GILMORE, JOHN D.: COLLEGE PREP., Tennis. 

GRAHAM, TONIA E. 

GRAYSON, REBECCA J.: BUSINESS. Future 
Secretaries Association, Red Peppers, Rifles, May 
Carousel. 

GREEN, KELLY A. COLLEGE PREP., National Honors 
Society, Photography Club, Foreign Language 
Club, Red Peppers, Foreign Policy, Flags, 

Empathy, May Carousel, Marching Band 

GREER, BILLY J. 

GREGORY, AMY S.: BUSINESS, Thespians, Softball, 
Future Secretaries Association, Foreign Policy, 
Speech And Theatre. 

GREGORY, STANELY A.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Foreign Policy, Soccer. 

GRIFFIN, LEISA R.: VOCATIONAL CHILD CARE. 
GRIMES, BRIAN T.: COLLEGE PREP., Cross Country, 
Individual Events, Track, Speech And Theatre, 
GROBOSKI, JEANINE M.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Volleyball, Varsity Club, May Carousel, 
Socc0r 

GROGAN, ROBIN D.: BUSINESS, Girls Glee Club, 
Contando, Wrestlerette, Cheerleading, Track, 
May Carousel 


GROS, KEVIN: COLLEGE PREP,, Thespians Cross 
Country, Individual Events, Audio-Visual Club, 
Winter Play, Homecoming Play, Varsity Club, 
Track, Speech and Theatre, Soccer. 

GRUBBS, TIMOTHY W.: COLLEGE PREP 
GUITHUES, ROBERT 
GUTIERREZ, GUADALUPE L. 


H 

HAACK, ROBERT R.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Science Club, Chess Club, Debate, 
Basketball, Foreign Policy, Scholar Bowl, Speech 
and Theatre 

HAEFFNER, JAMES R. 

HAGEN, JAMIE D. 



8 


HAGER, DAVID A. 

HAHN, CYNTHIA D. 

HALEY, SHARON M.: COLLEGE PREP., High World, 
Science Club, Foreign Language Club, SADD. 

HALL, CRYSTAL L. 

HALL, TAMMY L. 

HAN, YU JIN 

HARLEY, JANA R.: BUSINESS, Girls Glee Club, May 
Carousel 

HARPER, AMY M.: COLLEGE PREP., National Honor 
Society, Foreign Policy, May Carousel, Speech 
and Theatre 

HARPER, JENNIFER L.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Varsity Club, Basketball, Soccer. 

HARRIS, JENNIFER M.: COLLEGE PREP., Volleyball, 
Varsity Club, May Carousel 

HARRIS, TAMMY L. 

HARRISON, CHRISTOPHER 



120 SENIOR SUMMARY 





HARSH, MARK D. 

HART, JASON E.: GENEI7AL 
HARTMAN, CHRISTOPHER M. 

HARTWICK, TIMOTHY D. 

HASSE, MELISSA L.: BUSINESS AND SOCIAL 
STUDIES, Pom-Pons, Red Peppers, May Carousel 
HAYES, DENISE M, 

HEATH, LORA C. 

HELLRICH, ANDREW 

HENRY, BRIAN J.: COLLEGE PREP., National Honor 
Society, Young Authors Club, High World, 

Baseball, Quill & Scroll, Foreign Language Club, 
Foreign Policy, Scholar Bowl. 

HEUER, PATRICK 
HILL, CHRISTOPHER P. 

HILL, ERIC I.: COLLEGE PREP., Baseball, Football 
VIC A 

HILLMAN, JENNIFER L. 

HOLLAND, DONNA K.: COLLEGE PREP., Flags, May 
Carousel, Marching Band. 

HOLMES JR., JAMES H.: 

HOLSINGER, KRISTI L.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Tennis, Photo Club, Foreign Lang 
Club, ALPHA, Varsity Club, Foreign Policy, 
Homecoming Court, May Carousel. 

HOLTSFORD, TERESA A.: CO-OP 
HORN, DUSTIN J. 

HOWARDS, JASON A, 

HUBERT, MICHELLE E. 

HUMPHREY, LEIGHANN S. 

HURRY, DAVID L. 

HUTCHINS, LAURA N. 


I 

IRBY, DARREN K. 

ISOM, AMY R.: COLLEGE PREP., Science Club, 
Tennis, Photography Club, Red Peppers, Varsity 
Club, Cheerleading, Foreign Policy, Flags, May 
Carousel 

IVEY, LAURI L. 


J 

JACKSON, STACY: COLLEGE PREP., Baseball, High 
World, Football 

JACOBS, LORI J. 

JAYCOX, ROBERT B. 

JOHNSON, BRYAN P. 

JOHNSON, MELANIE K.: COLLEGE PREP AND 
BUSINESS, Wrestlerettes, Red Peppers, Empathy, 
May Carousel 

JOLLY, RHONDA J. 

JOLLY JR., DENNIS R. 

JONES, ANGELA D.: COLLEGE PREP , National 
Honor Society. Science Club, Varsity Club, 
Basketball, May Carousel, Soccer. 

JONES, SHERI L. 

JONES JR., EARL M. 

JOYCE, ANN M.: COLLEGE PREP.. Concert Band, 
Marching Band 

JUDD, ANGELA S.: COLLEGE PREP.. Young 
Authors, Warrior Yearbook, High World, Science 
Club. Audio-Visual Club, Wrestlerettes, Foreign 
Language Club, Red Peppers, Track, Rifles. 
Empathy. May Carousel, SADD. 


K 

KALIPS, BRANDY M. 

KAMADULSKI, DONALD E. 

KARIBIAN, RAFFI S.: COLLEGE PREP., Tennis, 
Audio-Visual Club, Basketball, Soccer. 

KAVANAUGH, KEVIN B. 

KECK, PATRICIA A. 

KEEN, MELISSA A.: COLLEGE PREP.. National Honor 
Society, Thespians. Science Club, Individual 


Events, speech & Theatre, May Carousel. 

KEENAN, MARK E. 

KELLEY, DEANNA L. 

KENNERLY, STACIE L.: COLLEGE PREP., High World, 
Science Club, Red Peppers, Varsity Club, 
Cheerleading, Empathy, May Carousel 

KERSHAW, BRIAN 

KESSLER, CANDI A.: BUSINESS. Pom-Pons, Red 
Peppers, May Carousel. 

KILLIAN, AMY E.: COLLEGE PREP.. Red Peppers. 
May Carousel 

KINDER, THOMAS W. 

KIRKBRIDE, BRANDI S. 

KISSEL, AMI K.: VOCATIONAL CHILD CARE, Girls 
Glee Club, Contando, May Carousel. 
Wrestlerettes 

KNIGHT, CHAD L. 

KNIGHT, DAVEANNA F.: BUSINESS, COLLEGE PREP., 
CO-OP, Girls Glee Club, Red Peppers, May 
Carousel. 

KRAUS, CHRISTOPHER L. 

KRISMANICH, ELLEN M. 

KROMRAY, CARRIE B.: COLLEGE PREP.. Red 
Peppers, Flags 

KROMRAY, STANLEY A.: VOCATIONAL GRAPHIC 


KRUPCO, WALTER G.: VOCATIONAL BUILDING 
TRADES 

KULIER, SARA C.: COLLEGE PREP., National Honor 
Society, Young Authors, High World Science Club, 
Debate, Quill and Scroll, Foreign Language Club, 
Foreign Policy, Empathy, Scholar Bowl. Speech 
and Theatre 


L 

LAKATOS, AARON A.: COLLEGE PREP., Golf, 
Football 

LALOR, JAMES M.: GENERAL. Cross Country, 
Homecoming Play, Jazz Band. Concert Band, 
Track, Empathy, Marching Band 
LALOR, THOMAS A.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Tri-M, Jazz Band, Concert Band, Marching 
Band 

LANDO, DAVID C. 

LANDO II, GEORGE H. 

LANEAR, AMOS: VOCATIONAL MACHINE SHOP. 
Tri-M, Jazz Band, Concert Band, Marching Band 

LANTRIP, JOHN C. 

LAY III, JAMES L. 



SENIOR SUMMARY 121 





LEA VEIL, CRAIG D.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Science Club, Tri-M, Jazz BonO, 
Concert Bond, ALPHA, Foreign Policy, Marching 
Bond 

LEBEAU, MICHELE: COLLEGE PREP., Contondo, 
Wrestlerettes, Red Peppers, Cheerleading, Rifles, 
Marching Bond. 

LEDBETTER, ALLEN R.: COLLEGE PREP., Golf. 

LEGGETT, JAIMIE L. 

LEMP, DANIEL P.: VOCATIONAL GRAPHIC ARTS, 
VIC A. 

LENZI, ADRIENNE K.: COLLEGE PREP., Tennis. 
Varsity Club, Basketball, May Carousel, Soccer. 
LEONARD, JASON M.: VOCATIONAL GRAPHIC 
ARTS. VIC A, 

LERCH, WENDY M. 

LEVART, ROBERT L. 

LEVY, CHARLES 
LEWIS, BRYAN J. 

LEWIS, FRANCIS E.: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council, Baseball, Varsity Club, Football. 

LEWIS, JEFFREY A, 

LEWIS, KEVIN M. 

LINHART, EDWARD G. 

LINTON, BARBARA K. 

LOFTUS, MATTHEW COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Science Club, Audio-Visual, ALPHA, 
Varsity Club. Basketball, Soccer. 

LOWE, JAMES D. 

LOWE, TRACY D. 

LYNN, MELANIE D. 



MACKAY, KATHLEEN C.: COLLEGE PREP., High 
World, Chess Club, Foreign Policy, Rifles, May 
Carousel, Marching Band. 

MACKENZIE, SCOTT R. 

MADDEN, CHRISTOPHER T.: COLLEGE PREP., 
Young Authors, Swing Choir, Spring Musical, Tri-M, 
Advanced Mixed Chorus. 

MALHEREK, ANTHONY J. 

MANSFIELD, PAMELA K.: COLLEGE PREP., Chess 
Club, Foreign Policy, Flags, May Carousel, 
Marching Band 
MARCUM, DARRELL E. 

MARSALA, CHRISTIE L. 

MARTINEZ, CHRISTOPHER: SOCIAL STUDIES 
MATHENIA, JASON H.: COLLEGE PREP., Varsity 




Club, Track, Soccer. 

MATHEWS, JEFFREY E.: VOCATIONAL BUILDING 
TRADES. VICA 

MATTERN, THOMAS M. 

MCCALLIE, TINA K. 

MCCLAIN, NATHAN A.: ART. COLLEGE PREP., 
National Honor Society, Student Council, Science 
Club, Golf, Tennis, Photography Club. 
MCCLELLAND, MARY E.: COLLEGE PREP., Red 
Peppers, May Carousel, Speech & Theatre, SADD. 
MCCORMICK, WILLIAM T.: COLLEGE PREP,, 
Science Club, Golf, Tennis, Audio-Visual Club, 
Varsity Club. 

MCDOWELL, DANI M.: COLLEGE PREP., Thespians, 
Science Club, Contando, Swing Choir, Foreign 
Language, Homecoming Play, Adv. Mixed Chorus, 
Empathy. Speech & Theatre. May Carousel, and 
Homecoming Page 
MCFARLAND, DAVID R. 

MCGARITY, DENISE G. 

MCKEAL, SHANE: VOCATIONAL DRAFTING. VICA, 
Jets 

MCKECHAN, JAMES B. 

MCKECHAN, JOHN B.: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council, Baseball, Homecoming King, Soccer. 
MCLAREN, NICHOLAS: COLLEGE PREP., Thespians, 
Individual Events, National Forensics League, 
Winter Play, Spring Musical, Homecoming Play, 

P.A. Announcer, Foreign Policy, Speech & 

Theatre. 


MCNEELY, DANNY L. VOCATIONAL DRAFTING. 
VICA. 

MEHELIC, JULIA M. 

MELTON, LYNETTE R.: COLLEGE PREP., Thespians. 
Volleyball, Individual Events, Winter Play, Spring 
Musical, Homecoming Play. Red Peppers, 
Basketball, May Carousel, Speech & Theatre. 
MENDOZA, LIA M.: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council, Debate, Red Peppers, Cheerleading, 
Varsity Club, May Carousel, Soccer. 

MERZ, KIMBERLY D. 

MEYER, RICHARD S. 

MEYERS, DAWN M. 

MILLER, JENNIFER 

MILLER, JULIE N.: COLLEGE PREP., High World, 
Science Club. Empathy. 

MILLER, KEVIN B. 

MILLER, LISA M. 

MILLS, DAVID P.: COLLEGE PREP., Science Club, 
Chess Club, Debate, Basketball, Jets. 

MILTON, BRETT E. 

MILTON, CHRISTOPHER D.: COLLEGE PREP., 
Baseball, Homecoming Court, Basketball. 

MINK, GRETCHEN M.: COLLEGE PREP., High World. 
Varsity Club, Soccer, May Carousel, Speech & 
Theatre. 

MISKELL, MARY M. 

MOCK, LAURA A.: BUSINESS MAJOR. Future 
Secretaries Association, May Carousel. 

MODGLIN, BRIGITTA K.: COLLEGE PREP., National 


122 SENIOR SUMMARY 



Honor, Young Authors, Science Club, Foreign 
Language Club, Tri-M, Jazz Band, Concert Band, 
Band Letterman's Club, Empathy, Marching Band. 

MODRUSIC, USA M. 

MONROE, MICHELLE R. 

MONTGOMERY, MICHAEL D.: COLLEGE PREP., 
Football, 

MOORE, CHRISTINA R. 

MOORE, KAREN S.: COLLEGE PREP,, Warrior 
Yearbook 

MORALES, GEORGIA J. 

MORRISSEY, JOHN 
MOSLANDER, AMY E. 

MOSS, TOMMY G. 

MOULTON, CHRISTIAN A. 

MUDD, TIMOTHY D. 

MUELLER, RYAN M.: BUSINESS, Golf, Basketball. 

MULL, DANETTEA A. 

MULLEN, RICHARD F. 


N 

NASH JR., RAYMOND F.: VOCATIONAL AUTO 
MECHANICS, V.I.C.A, 

NELSON, BRADLEY S.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Chess Club, Football. 

NEMETH, JASON P.: COLLEGE PREP., High World, 
Science Club, Baseball, Quill & Scroll, Varsity Club, 
Soccer 

NICHOLS, BRYAN K. 

NICKESON, DEREK M, 

NIEPERT, AMY L.: COLLEGE PREP., Science Club, 
Pom Pons, May Carousel, Red Peppers. 

NOLAN, ROBERT L. 

NORDSTROM, MICHAEL D.: COLLEGE PREP , 
Baseball, VICA, Basketball, Football, Varsity Club. 

NORTON, MELISSA 


o 

O’NEILL BRAD M.: COLLEGE PREP., Science Club, 
Tennis, Varsity Club, Track, Soccer. 

O'SHIA, RONALD M. 

OGLE, BRYAN L.: COLLEGE PREP., Swing Choir, 
Spring Musical, Alpha, Basketball, Adv. Mixed 
Chorus. 

OLIVER, DIANNE T.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Tri-M, Jazz Band, Concert Band. 
Foreign Policy, May Carousel, Marching Band. 
OLIVER, SHAWN M.: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council, Volleyball, Homecoming Court, Red 
Peppers, Varsity Club, Cheerleading, Basketball, 
May Carousel, Soccer. 

OWEN, CARRIE A.: COLLEGE PREP., Warrior 
Yearbook, Science Club, Chess Club, 
Photography Club, Homecoming Court, Red 
Peppers, Varsity Club, Cheerleading, Foreign 
Policy Club, May Carousel, Quill & Scroll. 


P 

PALMISANO, BRIAN K. 

PARKER, AMIE R.: COLLEGE PREP., Tri-M, Concert 
Band, Band Letter, Marching Band. 

PARRISH, RACHEAL A. 

PARTNEY, DANIEL J. 

PATRICK, SHAWN J. 

PATTON, SARAH E.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, High World, Science Club, Baseball 
Stat, Tennis Stat, Foreign Language Club, Soccer 
Stat, Alpha, Red Peppers, Foreign Policy, Flags, 
Empathy, May Carousel. 

PEARMAN, DANIEL P. 

POLACH, TRACY M.: COLLEGE PREP., Red 
Peppers, Cheerleading, May Carousel. 

POLIVICK, APRIL L.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 


Club, Contando, Photography Club, Winter Play, 
Swing Choir, Spring Musical, Homecoming Play, 
Tri-M, Red Peppers, Cheerleading, Ad. Mixed 
Chorus, May Carousel, Speech & Theatre. 

PONDER, ERIC M. 

PORTELL, SCOTT T.: COLLEGE PREP,, Baseball, 
Golf, Tennis, and Varsity Club. 

PRICE, ARTHUR L. 

PRICE, BRIAN K.: COLLEGE PREP., Science Club, 
Foreign Language Club, Speech & Theatre. 
PRICE, DIXIE L.: COLLEGE PREP., National Honor 
Society, Basketball. 

PROFFITT, CHRISTOPHER 

PRYOR, TODD D.: COLLEGE PREP,, Science Club. 
Tennis, Varsity Club. Football. 

PRYOR, TOREY D.: COLLEGE PREP., Soccer, 
Science Club, Audio-Visual Club, Football. 


R 

RAMIREZ, MARISA A. 

RAMSEY, KATHLEEN R. 

RANDALL, MICHELLE L.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Young Authors, Science Club, 
Office Worker, Foreign Language Club, Math 
Tutor, Red Peppers, Foreign Policy, May Carousel, 
Scholar Bowl. 

RAY, KEITH A. 

RAYL, JUSTIN M. 

REA, ANASTASIA 

REED, KRISTI: COLLEGE PREP., National Honor 


Society, Science Club, Tri-M, Jazz Band. Concert 
Band. Flags, Marching Band. 

REED, TIMOTHY K. 

REES, TIATUSSA M. 

REEVES, RYAN W. 

RICE, BECKY J. 

RICH, PATRICK J.: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council, Homecoming Court, Varsity Club, 

Soccer, Track. 

RICHARDS, ERICA L. 

RICHARDSON, RACHAEL: COLLEGE PREP., High 
World, Future Secretaries Association, Red 
Peppers, Wrestlerettes, Cheerleading, Captain, 
May Carousel, Soccer. 

RICHEY, TRAVIS W.: VOCATIONAL, Football, 
VICA. 

RICHWINE, TRACY L. 

RIGSBY, KELLIE J. 

ROBERTSON, RAYMOND J. 

RODRIGUEZ, JOSEPH 

ROGERS, AMBER: COLLEGE PREP., National Honor 
Society, Young Authors, High World, Quill & Scroll, 
Foreign Language Club, Foreign Policy. 

RUDY, LISA A. 

RUSSELL, AMY C.: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council, Science Club, Pom-pons, Red Peppers, 
Homecoming Court, May Carousel. 


s 

SAGGIO, ROBERT: VOCATIONAL. 



SENIOR SUMMARY 123 




14 


SCARSDALE, MATTHEW R. 

SCATURRO, BETH A.: COLLEGE PREP., Soccer. 
SCHELLINGBERG, PAULETTE D. 

SCHMID, SCOTT A.: COLLEGE PREP.. Football, 
Wrestling 

SCHNEFKE, KIMBERLY D. 

SCHROEDER, LORIE M.: COLLEGE PREP., Girls Glee 
Club, Contando, Softball. Future Secretaries 
Association, Red Peppers, May Carousel. 

SCHUEREN, TRACI M. 

SCHUMAN, DIANA L. 

SCHUMAN, LEAH R.: COLLEGE PREP.. National 
Honor Society, Warrior Yearbook, Student Council 
Pres.. Science Club, Photography Club, 
Hamecoming Queen, Red Peppers, Varsity Club, 
Cheerleading, Track, Fcreign Pciicy, Empathy, 

May Carousel, Quill & Scroll. 

SCOTT, JAMES C. 

SCOTT, MELANIE A. 

SCRUM, JASON M. 

SEIZ, JEFFREY: COLLEGE PREP., Cross Country, 

T rack 

SHEIKH, DEAN R. 

SHEPARD, RANDALL W. 

SHRUM, MICHAEL D. 

SHUBERT JR„ RICHARD E.: CO-OP 

SIMPSON, ANDREW D.: VOCATIONAL. Football, 

VICA. 

SIMPSON, JASON A. 

SIMPSON, SHERRY A. 

SLOAN, LEROY M. 

SMITH, LINETTE S. 

SNEED, DAVID D. 

SORENSON, DONNA L. 

SOTO, PATRICIA L.: COLLEGE PREP., High World, 
Science Club, Foreign Language Club, Foreign 
Policy, Empathy 

SPONSLER, RACHEL L. 

SPRAY JR„ GARY L. 

SPRINGER, MICHELLE F. 

SQUIRES, ANGELA M. 

STALLINGS, AMY E.: COLLEGE PREP,, Science 
Club, Chess Club, Foreign Language Club, Red 
Peppers. Foreign Policy, May Carousel. 

STALLINGS, JUSTIN P.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Cross Country, Varsity Club, Track, 
Foreign PoNcy 
STANTON, ERICA L. 

STARD WILLIAM L 

STEGALL, SUSAN A.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Science Club, Chess Club, Foreign 
Language Club, Scholar Bowl. 

STEINER, CHRISTOPHER: COLLEGE PREP., High 
World, Science Club, Winter Play. 

STEPHENS, JEFFREY D. 

STEPHENS, JENNIFER L. 


STEPHENS, KRISTEN L.: COLLEGE PREP.. Debate. 
Swing Choir, Foreign Language Club, Adv. Mixed 
Chorus, Cheerleading, May Carousel. 

STEWARD, DAVID: COLLEGE PREP., Science Club. 
Foreign Language Club. 

STEWARD, ROBIN G. 

STITCH, EMILY: COLLEGE PREP., Warrior Yearbook, 
Science Club, Volleyball, Chess Club, 

Photography Club, Baseball Stat , Red Peppers, 
Varsity Club, Cheerleading, Foreign Policy, 
Homecoming Court, May Carousel, 

STONE, SARAH E. COLLEGE PREP., National Honor 
Society, Science Club, Foreign Language Club, 
Tri-M, Concert Band. Band Letterman's Club, 
Foreign Policy, Marching Band. 

STOUT, CHARLES D. 

STRADER JR„ LARRY G.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Cross Country, Varsity Club, Track, Soccer. 
Homecoming Court 

STRODER, CHRISTOPHER L.: COLLEGE PREP., 

Young Authors, High World. Golf, ALPHA, Quill & 
Scroll, Scholar Bowl 

STRONG, DEREK W. 

STULL, CONNIE J.: COLLEGE PREP,, Girls Glee 
Club, Contando, Swing Choir, Spring Musical, Adv. 
Mixed Chorus. 

STURDIVANT, CHRISTOPHER: COLLEGE PREP , 
Baseball, Golf, Varsity Club, Soccer. 

SUH, YOUNG Ml: ART, Science Club. 

SULLIVAN, KRISTA L.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Tri-M, Jazz Concert, Band 


Letterman's Club, Marching Band. 

SUMPTER, JERRY L. 

SWARINGAM, SHEILA L. 
SWEARENGIN, HAROLD W. 


T 

TALLEY, JAN E.: CHILD CARE, Red Peppers, May 
Carousel 

TANNER, JUDY M. 

TAPP, MELISSA: COLLEGE PREP., National Honor 
Society, Warrior Yearbook, Science Club. Softball, 
Volleyball, Photography Club, Quill & Scroll, 

Varsity Club, May Carousel. 

TARTT, JASON N.; BUSINESS. 

TATE, NICOLE J. 

TAYLOR, ALLISON L.: BUSINESS. Red Peppers, May 
Carousel, Co-op 

TAYLOR, HOLLIE B.: COLLEGE PREP., Tennis, 
Soccer, Red Peppers, Varsity Club, Basketball. 
TAYLOR, MELISSA A.: SCIENCE. Science Club. 
Individual Events, 

TAYLOR, TAMMY D. 

TERRELL, DANIEL C.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Varsity Club, Soccer, Flomecoming Court. 
TERRELL, ROBERT L.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Student Council, Baseball, 
Homecoming Court, Basketball, Foreign Policy, 



124 SENIOR SUMMARY 






16 


Soccer 

THOMAS, ROBERT W.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Baseball. Varsity Club, Football, Basketball 

THOMPSON, AMY L. 

THOMPSON, DEBRA S. 

TIMKO, MISTY L.: BUSINESS, Girls Glee Club, 
Contando, Future Secretaries Association, Swing 
Choir, Spring Musical, Homecoming Play, 
Homecoming Court, Red Peppers, Varsity Club, 
Cheerleading, Adv. Mixed Chorus. May Carousel 
TINDALL, LORRAINE M. 

TIPTON, GARY W. 

TUCKER, CHARLENE M. 

TURNER, DOUGLAS E. 


u 

URIOSTE, NICOLE R. 


V 

VALBERT, JENNIFER A.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society, Young Authors, Science Club, 
Foreign Language Club, ALPHA, Foreign Policy, 
Scholar Bowl. 

VANCE, MICHAEL R. 

VARBLE, DARIN L. 

VAUGHN, BRIAN L. 

VAUGHN, KRISTINE D. 


w 

WAGGONER, SHERI J. 

WAKEFORD, KRYSTAL J.: COLLEGE PREP., Foreign 
Language Club, Rifles, Marching Band. 

WALKER, BARLA S.: COLLEGE PREP., Red Peppers. 
Cheerleading 

WALKER, TARA L.: COLLEGE PREP., Girls Glee 
Club, Contando, Tri-M, Adv. Mixed Chorus, May 
Carousel 

WALLER, AMY E. 

WALLER, THOMAS L. 

WARE, TONYA K. 



WATERMAN, LEWIS H. 

WEBB, PATRICIA M.: COLLEGE PREP., Concert 
Band, Band Letter, Red Peppers, May Carousel, 
Marching Band, SADD, Band Letterman's Club. 
WEEKS, SONNET S.: COLLEGE PREP., Student 
Council, Pom-Pon. Red Peppers, Varsity Club. 
Homecoming Court, May Carousel. 

WELBORN, BRIAN L. 

WHITE, LARRY W. 

WHITE, TIMOTHY N.: COLLEGE PREP., National 
Honor Society. Science Club, Cross Country, 
Homecoming Court, Varsity Club, Track. 

WHITMER, ALLISON D.: COLLEGE PREP., BUSINESS, 
Girls Glee Club, Contando, Swing Choir, Spring 
Musical, Tri-M. Red Peppers, Adv. Mixed Chorus, 
Empathy. 

WHITSELL, IAN J. 

WIENHOFF, STEPHANIE M. 

WILKINSON, ERIC C.: COLLEGE PREP., Young 
Authors. 

WILLIAMS, CARLA S.: COLLEGE PREP.. High World. 
May Carousel, Co-op. 

WILLIAMS, STACIE: COLLEGE PREP,. Foreign Policy, 
Rifles. Marching Band. 

WILSON, DAVID A.: COLLEGE PREP., Young 
Authors, High World. Golf, Quill & Scroll, Foreign 
Policy, Schoiar Bowl 

WILSON, scon A.: COLLEGE PREP., Wrestling. 
WINFIELD, JENNIFER L.: COLLEGE PREP., Science 
Club, Cross Country, Red Peppers, Varsity Club. 
Cheerleading, Track, May Carousel. 

WINGERTER, JULIE A. 

WINNIE, DONALD L.: VOCATIONAL AUTO 
MECHANICS 

WITHERS, ANGELA M.: COLLEGE PREP., Warrior 
Yearbook, Student Council, Science Club, 
Photography Club, Red Peppers, May Carousel, 
Quill & Scroll. 

WOFFORD JR., CHARLES T. 

WOLFE, SCOTT A. 

WOODS, JODY A. 

WORTHEN, ANGELA C. 

WRIGHT, LARRY D.: COLLEGE PREP.. Hockey. 
Soccer 


Y 

YEHLING. MARY L. 



li ilm 

18 


YORK, BRIDGETTE: BUSINESS, Future Secretaries 
Association, Rifles, May Carousel, Marching Band. 

YOUNG, SCOTT A. 

YOUNG, SHAWN R.: AUTO MECHANICS. 


1 Michelle Booher. 2. Leah 
Schuman. 3. Angela Withers. 4. 
Todd and Torey Pryor. 5. Sarah 
Patton. 6. Jennifer Harris. 7. Emi- 
ly Stitch. 8. Gretchen Mink. 9. 
Tanya Elliot. 10. Amy Isom. 11. 
Jennifer Winfield. 12. Larry 
Strader. 13. Melissa Hasse. 14. 
Derrick Shipman, 15. Allison 
Taylor. 16. Ryan Crisler. 17. 
Dave Edwards. 18. Lia Mendo- 
za. 


SENIOR SUMMARY 125 




20th CENTURY WRITERS 



BOOKS, PLAYS, & STORIES 

In 20th Century Writers, students read modern plays, short stores, and poetry. Some of the novels 
they might read are Richard Morvi^'-Wafership Down and John Mersey's Hiroshima. George 
Bernard Shav\/'s-5/; Joan and Arthur Laurent's A/ome of the Brave are some of the plays. The Giass 
Menagerie arvJii Know Why the Cage Bird Sings are their favorite short stories. 

The teachers who teach this course are Helen Cook, Donna McCormick, James Randall and 
Mary Dame. 

Mrs, Dame said, "I like teaching this course because the students seem to enjoy it more and they 
make better grades, I guess the reason why they enjoy it more is because the course is about 
modern authors. The stories aren't so out of date that they can't understand them," 

Kendra Boyer said, "I like the class because Mrs, McCormick expands my horizons," "Sharon 
Flowers and I look forward to going to this class everyday because it is so much fun and so 
interesting," stated Shannon Hahn. 

by Liz Harris 


126 20th CENTURY WRITERS 




3 

1. Susan Wachter reads Bernard Shaw's Saint Joan in Mrs. Dames 20th Century Writers class. 2. Class 
members participate by reading aloud. 3. Mrs. Mary Dame reads to her class. 


20th CENTURY WRITERS 127 




ALGEBRA 3 



1 


WORKING WITH FIGURES 


Linear inequalities, quadratic equations, quadratic in- 
equalities, fractional equations, and radical equations 
are just some of the problems the algebra 3 students 
have to face during the semester. 

Students are required to take one year of algebra and 
one year of geometry before taking this very exciting 
course. It's all in the math series provided for the students 
of Granite City High School. 

"Polynomials, factoring, and radical are some of the 
topics that must be mastered in the first two semesters of 
the math series. Then students are ready to handle the 
algebra 3 course." says Be^ Hicks. She enjoys teaching 
this class and always enjoys the wonderful group of 
students who participate in the program. 

At the end of the semester, all students have to take the 
final exam. This test is required in order to receive a 
passing grade. Good grades are also required. 

by Kristin Jen ness 



128 ALGEBRA 3 




1. Mrs. Betty Hicks talks to 
Kimberly Holloway. 2. Bill 
Brown is hard at work. 3. Travis 
Terrell shows off his algebra 
book. 4. Bill VanBuskirk takes a 
test. 5. Students work on their 
last test of the semester. 


ALGEBRA 3 129 






JUNIORS 



1. Shell© Goodman holds up a Mickey Mouse clock set to 7. A.M. Remember the heat schedule? 


CLASS OF 1992 


130 JUNIORS 



Shannon Adair 

Michelle Adele 

Benjamen Ahivers 

Christopher 

Aleman 

Catherine 

Alexander 


Christopher 

Alfaro 

Russell Allen 
Shawn Almos 
Bart Alsop 
Deidre Angel ly 


Maria Argueiles 
Daniel Askins 
Christy Atchley 
Alyssa Aud 
Grant Badger 


Barbara Bailey 
Jennifer Baker 
Thomas Barker 
Michael Barnes 
Michael Barnett 


Bernard Barth 
Cary Bartling 
Jennifer Basuel 
Darla Bauer 
Dawn Bazzell 


Jonathan Beasley 
Amanda Bettis 
Jason Birks 
William Black 
Nicole 
Bloodworth 


Brett Bloomquist 
Ammey Bode 
Kenneth Boone 
Joseph Boushard 
Jennifer Bowman 


JUNIORS 131 



Kendra Boyer 
Russell Boyer 
Lloyd Brake 
Jessica Branch 
Nathan 
Branding 


Sara Brawley 
Joseph Brewer 
Bradley Briggs 
Sean Briggs 
Tina Briley 


Timothey Brim 
Patricia 
Brinkhoff 
Jennifer Britt 
Paul Brittin 
Carrie Brown 


Eric Brown 
Jason Brown 
Russell Buchek 
Ronald Buecker 
Dana Bugnitz 


BEST BUDDIES FOREVER AND EVER 


This person has been there for you when the going gets tough and toid you the tough get going. 
They've shared their secrets and also shared yours with them. You've known them either a lifetime 
or only a couple years. This person is your best friend and you'il never forget them. 

Remember ail those great times you had with your best buddy? Going to soccer and football 
games or just driving around are just a few. 

Most of the people who you become friends with share common interests. You like the same 
movies, music, and like to do the same things on the weekends. 

When you start college and meet new people, you may meet new friends. Even though new 
friends have replaced your old friends, nothing can 'take the place' of the old friends with which 
you spent your most memorable days. 

by Liz Harris 


132 JUNIORS 




Tamara Bunker 
Tonya Burton 
Terri Buster 
Tara Bulter 
JoAnn Buxton 


Robert Byrne 

Scott By rum 

Shawn 

Calenine 

Catherine 

Campbell 

Kim Carkuff 

Vicki Carter 

Jason Cass 

Stephanie 

Cathey 

Matthew 

Cauble 

Shaana Cavins 

Wendy 

Chamberlin 

Michael 

Chapman 

Amy Cheat 

Luise 

Christensen 
Donyal Clark 




2 



3 


1. Brandie Greco's best friend 
is her book. 2. Graphic Art 
buddies - Darrell Dockery, 
Gerald Owens, and Sean 
Briggs. 3. The Curry's . . Larry 
Jr. and Larry Sr. 


JUNIORS 133 




Brent Clutts 
Lea Ann 
Coakley 
Tina Combs 
Douglas 
Conrad 
Jacquelin Cook 


David 
Costellow 
William Cotter 
Carlos Cox 
Christina Cox 
John Coziar 


Timmothy 
Cozine 
Matthew Crider 
Cory Cupp 
Lawrence Curry 
Timmothy 
Dagon 

Georginna 
Danials 
James 
Daugherty 
Bruce David 
Dave Davis 
Robert Davison 




134 JUNIORS 




Ronald Dawson 
Ericka Dayton 
Donna Delaney 
Jessica 
Derossett 
Jamie Deruntz 


Brandi Diak 
Brad Dickey 
William 
Dimitroff 
Joseph Dineff 
Chubeto Dixon 


Darrell Dockery 
Lisa Dohogne 
Floyd Dooley 
Christopher 
Drennen 
Michael Dressel 


Robert Duboise 
Amy Duffield 
Gary Dugan 
Ronald 
Dunnavant 
Larry Earney 


HA, HA, HO, HO, HEE, HEE 

High School is said to be your best four years. It is a time to make the grade and also a time to 
gain many friendships. Friends have fun together, talk and very commonly play practical jokes on 
one another. 

Do you remember your freshman year? Were you asked to buy an elevator pass and actually 
look for the elevator. Situations like this occur very often and even daily at our high school. 

After being sick I came back to school and opened my locker, it was empty. All of my books and 
posters were gone. At first I though someone stole them, soon I found out that Cheryl Forbes, 
Athena Harris and Tina Scaturro had taken my books and spread them throughout the school. Ever 
since that day I've still been missing a few books. If anyone knows where I can find them please 
return them to Willy. Willy Dimitroff 

One morning Eric Mendenhall taped up our locker lock. He was so proud of himself until he 
realized that the joke was on him. The lock Eric had taped with sports tape was his own. Vicky 
Justice 

The harder the fall, the harder the spectators laugh. Jokes are fun as long as the unsuspecting 
victims aren't hurt. 

by Liz Harris 


JUNIORS 135 


Catrina Earon 
Jennifer 
Edwards 
Lisa Eikins 
Meiissa Eiiiott 
Jason Eliis 


Wiiiiam Eiiis 
Cori Eimore 
Cara Embick 
Taily Evans 
David Ezeil 


Christy Farris 
Penny Farris 
Adam Fasick 
Robert 
Ferguson 
Bridgette 
Fiowers 


Cheryi Forbes 
Andrew 
Forehand 
Samuei Fowier 
Robert Gaddy 
Steve Gaiinski 




1 


1 . Scott Mudd sits in the office waiting 
for someone to talk to. 2. Chad St. 
Peters and Michael Garcia do what 
they do best — smile. 





136 JUNIORS 



Ernie Gameng 
Michael Garcia 
David Garriott 
Amy Glass 
Julie Giese 


Jenny Gobble 

Christopher 

Golden 

Michael Gooch 
Sheile 
Goodman 
Sara Gravlin 


Brandie Greco 
Brian Green 
Nicole Green 
Heather 
Gregery 
Robyn Grieve 


Melissa Griffin 
Jennifer Guzy 
Robert 
Habermehl 
Cleta Hadley 
Shannon Hahn 


OH, YOU NASTY BOYS 


The yearbook staff sent out a survey to junior students. There were a variety of topics and 
questions. When the surveys were returned, the variety of answers out did the variety of questions. 
Here are some of the resuits. 

HAS ANYONE EVER TAKEN YOUR I.D. AWAY FROM YOU? “yes, because they worship my picture" 
. . . Doug Tubbs “Yes, to blow it up into a poster" . . . Floyd Dooley. 

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE TO GET INTO CERTAIN GROUPS? “I am the group" . . . Jason Ellis “I shaved 
half of my head to be in an afro-skin group" . . . Brad Briggs. 

Because of the poor response, other answers were not available. Maybe that's why there's a 
song entitled, “Nasty Boys" by Janet Jackson. 


by Kristin Jenness & Liz Harris 


JUNIORS 137 



I CAN’T DRIVE 55 


Remember when you first got your license and couldn't wait to go out on the open road? 
Hearing your parents mumble something about using safe driving skills and always wear your 
seatbelt, while you thought how good you would look behind the wheel of a new car. Can you also 
remember the time when you saw flashing red and blue lights? 

Many students can remember the experience Jason Ellis said, “When I got pulled over, I was 
driving much too fast in a 25 mph zone." Brian Smith said, "I wanted to go out driving one night, 
so one of my friends gave me the keys to his parent's car. I got pulled over for driving 40 mph in 
a 15 mph speed zone." 

Traci Horstmeyer said, “I was out at low-water dam and I hit three railroad ties and knocked them 
out. I had $1500 worth of damage and my car only cost $1000. Kendra Boyer can remember when 
Char Wheeler hit Jack-In-The-Box and put a dent in the building while going through the 'drive 
thru.' 

by Liz Harris 


138 JUNIORS 


Amy Haii 
Brian Hamiiton 
Mary Hamiiton 
Ju Hi Han 
Erica Handy 


Carrie Hankins 
Ryan Hankins 
Amy Hardesty 
Jeffery Hariey 
Denise Harper 


Mark Harper 
Athena Harris 
Eiizabeth Harris 
Jeffery Harris 
Stacy Harrison 


Christopher 
Hass 
Michaei 
Hatfieid 
Brian Hawkins 
Maria Hawkins 
Christie Hayden 




Heather Hayes 
Stephen 
Heavilon 
Rod Heil 
Scott Henson 
Timothy Henson 


Virginia Henson 
Sheiena Henss 
Jeffery 
Heubschman 
Jerry 

Heubschman 
Amy Hicks 


Danny Hicks 
Christopher 
Hiidreth 
Christina Hill 
Denise Hinds 
Tina Hinkle 


Jennifer Hitt 
Gary Hoerle 
Stacey Hoffman 
Christopher 
Hoffstot 
Mary Hogue 




3 


1. After a night 
out on the town, 
Brandi D i a k 
shows off her 
automobile. 2. 
Derrick Shipman 
parks himseif 
next to a NO 
PARKING sign. 3. 
A familiar school 
sign. 


JUNIORS 139 




Angela Hollis 
James Hooker 
Thomas 
Hoskins 
William 
Houston 
Stephanie 
Huckelberry 


Angela Hucks 
James Huie 
Nikki Hull 
Traci Hunt 
Amy Isenburg 


Angela Jacobs 
Andrew Jenkins 
Kristin Jenness 
Biiiy Johnson 
Biiiy Johnson 


Jeremy 
Johnson 
Kevin Johnson 
Wiliiam 
Johnson 
Beveriy Jones 
Donaid Jones 




140 JUNIORS 






Melissa Jones 
Vicki Justice 
Kimberly Karius 
Shauna Keck 
Terry Kent 


Rebecca 
Kershaw 
Curtis Kessler 
Karen Kidd 
Bryan Kielty 
Nicole Kincer 


Ryan King 

Derrick 

Kingsley 

Ann Kirkpatrick 

Kelli Knight 

Thomas 

Knowland 

Timothy 
Knowland 
Melissa Konuch 
Sharon Kozjak 
Christopher 
Krause 

Bryan Kromray 


UP ALL NIGHT — SLEEP ALL DAY 


C^ll them hoot owls if you will. While you are rubbing your eyes at night, they're running the cash registers late at 
night or early into the morning. If not at the registers, they are cleaning up the place. They are In a minority group 
They are the students who have jobs after school that run well into the night. 

I go to work a 7 pm each night and I often work until 3 or 4 in the morning. These late hours really affect mv 
grades-Henry Polach. ' 

With so many 24-hour convenience stores now open in the area, employees are needed round the clock. Many 
students take advantage of this employment opportunity, but lose sleep and sometimes good grades because the 
numerous hours spent at work. 

I don't think students should work late hours because it affects my school work. I spend more time at work than 
concentrating on my grades-Scott Mudd. I don't think working late affects my school work, my grades are alwavs 
bad-Amy Mance. ^ 

Working late hours requires the ability to stay awake and stay cheerful even if your body and mind would rather be 
sleeping. Most nighttime customers that come in the place are grouchy or tired. They're there because they forget 
to get something earlier in the day or they're hungry and required some nurishment NOW. Some of the places 
students keep late working hours are McDonald's, Dairy Queen, Jan's Auto Mechanic, and Baskin-Robbins. 

In summary, most of the students who work these late hours did agree on one thing. They said that everyone should 
work at night at least once in their life. There's no way to explain it . . it has to be experienced. 

by Kristin Jenness 


JUNIORS 141 


Robert Krupco 
Martha Kutz 
Lori Laboray 
Tara Laboray 
Brad La rose 


Mark Lavelle 
Cristi Ledbetter 
Donald Legens 
William Lenzi 
Carrie Leone 


John Lerch 
Barbara Lewis 
Lisa Lewis 
Randel Lewis 
Rose Lewis 


Christopher 
Lieneke 
Lori Lignoul 
Brandy Lofink 
Erin Love 
Donald Lowe 



YOUR REAL IDENTITY 


Year after year students dread lining up for their I.D. pictures to be taken. I.D.'s are taken to 
identify ail 2500 students at Granite City High School each year. 

I.D.'s are used in many ways. They are an important part of a student's academic and social life, 
in order for students to check out a library book, they must use their I.D. Each I.D. has the students's 
picture and number. It is also used for school functions. To attend a sporting event (in or out of 
town], your i.D. wili reduce the price of you admission. If caught smoking, fighting, cursing or kissing, 
your i.D. wiil be confiscated and sent to one of the principais. This insures the guiity student will be 
punished according to the rules. 

I.D.'s are required to be carried by the student at all times. To make sure students carry their card, 
surprise I.D. checks are made in homeroom. If a student doesn't have his or her i.D. the day of the 
check, their name is sent to the office. Aren't you giad you have yours? 


by Kristin Jenness & Liz Harris 


; 


i 


142 JUNIORS 



John Lowe 

Rosa Lucas 

Meilssa Lynch 

Edward 

Mackay 

Melissa 

Maddox 

Lynda Mahoney 

Amy Mance 

Morgan Mance 

Christopher 

Manners 

Shannon 

Marcum 


Tanya Marlette 
Peggy Marsala 
Kristen Martin 
Shawn Martin 
Sharon Mattern 


Michael May 

Derek Mays 

Darla Mayhall 

Theresa 

McClery 

Rebecca 

McElroy 




2 


1. Brian Hamilton gets ready 
to have his school I.D. photo 
taken. 2. Beverly Golden 
writes down the names of the 
students getting their I.D.'s 
taken. 


JUNIOR 143 


Garrick 
McFarland 
Mark McGlawn 
Melissa Mclivoy 
Shawnery 
McIntosh 
Mark 
McKechan 

Billie Joe 
McKee 
Christopher 
McMillan 
Scott McMillan 
David McQuay 
Winona Mefford 

Eric 

Mendenhall 
Jayme Mercer 
Valerie 
Mersinger 
Julie Merz 
Adam 
Meyenburg 

Jason Meyer 
Patricia Meyer 
Teena 
Mikolaszuk 
Dana Miller 
Jim Miller 



FASHIONS AND FADS 

Fads always come and go. Some stayed for as long as an entire school year and some were 'out' a few weeks after 
they were so 'In'. 

One fad that seems to be here to stay was pants rolled up at the end. This fashion fad was not only for girls. Guys 
adopted this fad just as much as the females did. 

"Everyone should roll their jeans because if you don't you'll look like an idiot, like some goof-ball from the 60's-70's 
and this is the 90's." Shannon Hahn. "Rolled jeans are ok but more and more people are not rolling theirs!" Gretchen 
Schuler. 

Another fad that invaded the halls of GCHS was the jeans shorts. This style looked like it might last for a while also. 
The two most common types of jeans shorts were the baggy t/pe and the kind that were cuffed just above the knee. 

"I think jean shorts are super cool because you can wear them with anything," Chanda Wallace. "Homemade jeans 
shorts are the best," Liz Harris. 

Another popular fashion statement was the leggins underneath the skirt. This continued all year no matter if the 
weather was warm or cool. 

"Leggings look good on girls that are under 130 lbs, with a cute shape," Brian Srnith. "That's why they call them 
stretch pants." Jerry Heubschman. "In some cases they shouldn't make them that big," Chris Hoffstot. 

The clothing that the students chose made a fashion statement for them and made the school year a little more 
fun. They wore clothing that was comfortable, fashionable, and bearable for them to survive any t/pe of Granite Cit/ 
weather. And they also felt that they looked good. 

by Kristin Jenness 


144 JUNIORS 



John Miller 
Kelly Miller 
Catherine 
Milton 

Pamela Miskell 

Heather 

Miskelley 


James Mitchell 
Eric Mitchem 
Jason Mizell 
Kimberly 
Modrusic 
Laurie Monroe 


Jamie Moore 
Shaun Moran 
Kimberly 
Morgan 
Lori Morgan 
Michael Morlan 


Dennis Morris 

Jeanette Morris 

Bradley 

Moulding 

Christina 

Mouser 

Michael Mowell 




3 


1. Chris Peeler and Darla 
Mayhall's idea of fashion. 2. 
Gretchen Schuler shows off 
comfortable clothing. 3. Mr. 
Ronald Dillard and Kristen 
Novacich. 


JUNIORS 145 


Anthony Mull 
Mathew Murray 
Brandi Myers 
Donald Naeve 
Edwin 
Nageimilier 


Delania Neeiey 
Joshua 
Neidhardt 
David Nelson 
Mark 
Nenninger 
Dale Newberry 

Amy Nolan 
Stephanie 
North 
Douglas Norton 
Sarah Nothstine 
Kristen 
Novacich 

Mechelle 
Novosel 
Eric O’Brien 
Gregory 
Obucina 
Karen Odom 
Kelly Ollis 



STUDY TIME — TEST TOMORROW 


I'm sure you heard someone in your class say, “Test, what test?" Most teachers tell you in advance 
when you will have a test so you can study. Then the night before you stay up to 1 :00 a.m. studying 
because most people wait until the last minute. 

There are different ways to study. For example, talking on the phone, listen to the radio and some 
just make cheat sheets, then go to sleep. There are some students that actually study and pass 
the test, too. How do you study for that important test? 

Ben Ahivers said," i read my notes over and over again and read the chapter three times." 
Robert Deboise said he “doesn't study." “Usually with the radio and T.V. on," stated Maria Hawkins. 
Chanda Wallace talks on the phone when she studies. Brad Briggs said, “ I sleep with a book on 
my head." 

by Liz Harris 


146 JUNIORS 



Brian Orsborn 
Gerald Owens 
April Pabst 
Cherri Pallardy 
Gerlean Parker 


Timothy Parker 
Daniel Pascoe 
Lori Pascoe 
Michael 
Pascoe 
Sean Paterson 


Christopher 
Patterson 
Tracy Patten 
Sally Pavlow 
Christopher 
Peeler 

Nikki Petrillo 


James Petroski 
Bobbie Jo 
Pei per 

Amber Pierce 
Melissa Pingel 
Julie Pinkley 



1. Nindi Prokopich, Mike Tarasovich, and Jason Tartt study their Engiish assignment. 


JUNIORS 147 





Henry Polach 
Heather Pond 
John Pope 
Matthew Potts 
Craig Powell 


Gary Preswood 
Robert Proffitt 
Nindy 
Prokopich 
Mia Puhse 
Stacy Pyles 


Kelly Ralston 
Monty Rapp 
Michelle 
Raynor 
Kathleen 
Reeder 
Kerri Rebstock 


Ryan Repp 
Christina Reyes 
Lance Reynolds 
Katherine 
Ribbing 
Robert Ribbing 


ALIGATORS AND POLO PLAYERS 

Preppies. Who are these people? Where do they come from? You can usually pick them out of 
a crowd by a few tell-tale signs, Some of these include button-down collars, Izod shirts, Ralph 
Lauren clothing, no socks, designer jeans, and maybe little round glasses. The glasses are worn 
even if they are not needed. It adds the preppie touch to the rest of their attire. Here are some 
comments. 

"Too expensive," Jason Ellis. “It looks and feels cooler," Matt Stearns, "Round glasses are classy. 
They show that some people have taste," John Hensly If the person decides to wear the Izod shirt, 
then the belt should also have the alligator on it. If the little man playing polo is on the shirt, then 
the rest of the outfit should also match. You never see a preppie with an alligator and a polo player 
on their clothing on the same day. 

“I don't go for green alligators," Shawn Gooch. "I think they're really fading out of style. I wore 
Izod shirts when I was in third grade," Tara Swalley. "Ralph Lauren Is too cheap for me," Bill Ellis. 
"Polo smells great," Marla Hawkins. “Guys wear Polo too strong," Tara Swalley. 

Another requirement to be a preppie is that you have to read Esquire, Vogue, and possibly 
Gentlemen's Quarterly. 

See you at the magazine rack. 

by Kristin Jenness 


148 JUNIORS 




Michael 
Ribbley 
Heather Rice 
Jeannette 
Richardson 
John Rickert 
Michael 
Ridenour 

Stephen 
Ridings 
Jamie Riggs 
Tracy Riggs 
Kimberly 
Rippee 
Ailie Ritchie 

Krystall 
Robinson 
Joel Roderick 
Michael Rody 
Rachael Roe 
Christine 
Rogenski 


David Rosales 
Rebecca Ross 
Erin Rotter 
Jason 
Roulanaitis 
Jennifer Ruder 




3 


1. Damon Yates 
and his fther 
Ronald Yates. 2. 
Doug Tubbs and 
Christy Smith wear 
comfortable cloth- 
ing to school. 3. 
Three preppies - 
Grant Badger, 
Andy Jenkins, and 
Terri Buster. 


JUNIORS 149 



Christine 
SanSoucie 
Christina 
Scaturro 
Jason Scaturro 
Micheile 
Schaus 
Stephen Schaus 

Joseph 
Schmedake 
Cheryl Schmidt 
Gretchen 
Schuler 
Jennifer Scott 
Randall Scott 

Brian Seiz 
Ronald Selph 
Angela Serrano 
Laura Shane 
Bryan Shaw 


Derrick 
Shipman 
Whitney 
Shoemaker 
Scott Simon 
Melissa 
Simpson 
Kevin Sitton 



WILD, WILD THING 


Are you a party animal? Do you live for the weekends? Most students are already talking about 
what they will do next Friday and Saturday night on Monday. When Friday comes around all you 
can hear is, "Do you know anyone who is having a party?" and “What are you doing tonight?" 

Ben Ahivers likes to go "dancing" on weekends. Becky Walker said, "I like to spend time with my 
boyfriend." Maria Hawkins just likes to “have fun being with her friends." "I like to steal my friends 
girlfriends." said Brad Briggs. Mike Rody likes to go skateboarding and play his guitar. Chanda 
Wallace stated, "I like going to all the local parties." 

Rain, sunshine, or snow, the students of Granite City High School always find something to do on 
the weekends. 

by Liz Harris 


150 JUNIORS 



Brian Smith 
Jeffery Smith 
Kara Smith 
Kerrie Smith 
Kimberly Smith 


Neale Smith 
Timothy Smith 
Matthew 
Smithers 
Brandi Sneison 
Yoianda Soto 


Doric Soweii 
Jennifer 
Sprankie 
Daniei Spratt 
Chad St Peters 
Erik Stagner 


Tamela 
Stamper 
Amy Starko 
Leslie Staviey 
Matthew 
Stearns 
Meiissa Steizer 



JUNIORS 151 



Rebecca 
Stephens 
Michelle 
Stieglitz 
Jason Stroud 
Guy Stucker 
Stacy 
Sturdivant 


Tisha Summers 
Tara Swalley 
Barry Sykes 
Karen Sykes 
Timothy Tague 


Michael 
Tarasovich 
Christine Taylor 
Gregory Taylor 
James Taylor 
Stacy Taylor 


Mark Tesreau 
Daniel Thomas 
Jeremy 
Thornton 
Brian Tieman 
Penny Tingley 




1 


1 . Tina Scaturro keeps cool read- 
ing a cool book. 2. Whitney Shoe- 
maker and Kristen Novacich work 
in the office and keep cool by the 
air conditioner. 



152 JUNIORS 



STUDENTS LEARN TO KEEP COOL 


School began on a worm note and it seemed that cool weather would never be here. Students 
walked from class to class dressed in their shorts and summer shoes. Sometimes they could feel 
a breeze of warm air circulate through their classrooms from the open windows: but most of the 
time, the air was hot and still. 

The heat schedule went into effect for several weeks in the beginning of September. Most of the 
students found the schedule to their satisfaction. Rod Heil states, "I would rather go to school on 
the heat schedule than the regular schedule all year long. We would still be putting in our five hours 
of school and getting out early." 

Day by day, the weather got cooler and cooler. By the beginning of October, the temperatures 
were in the low 70's and school rooms were once more enjoyable. 

by Liz Harris 


JUNIORS 153 


Chad 

Toeniskoetter 
Casey Trigg 
Scott Tripp 
Tricia Trotts 
Douglas Tubbs 

Nikole Tucker 

Kimberly 

Upshaw 

William 

VanBuskirk 

Christopher 

Vance 

Michael 

VanGilder 

Jamie Vaughn 

Michael 

Vaughn 

Steven Vaughn 

Monte Vickery 

Robert 

Viessman 


Harold Vincint 
Tammy Vinton 
Christine Vivod 
Harry Vivod 
Pamela Voss 


Chris Vofoupal 
Susan Wachter 
Jodi Wagner 
Rebecca 
Walker 
Lachanda 
Wallace 


Sara Walters 
Thuy Waterman 
Hilary Watkins 
Steven Watkins 
Jeremy Weaver 


Nathan Weaver 
Rebecca Weber 
Michael 
Weinkein 
Christopher 
Wense 
Sarah Werths 

Vanessa 
Westbrook 
Deana Whaley 
Charlene 
Wheeler 
Jennifer 
Wheeler 
Richard White 



THE END IS NEAR 


Most people say that the junior year in high school is the toughest. Taking the ACT test and other 
college entrance tests can be a real strain on the brain. Then others say it's the best of your four years 
. . only one more to go and two behind you already. 

When the junior year rolls around, many thoughts come with it. The thoughts of graduation, the 
prom, the recognition assembly, etc. are just a few. Sitting in the audience at graduation makes 
them think what it is going to be like in 1992 when its their turn. Ifs an exciting time. 

Students have certain expectations of their senior year. Some think it should be a year of fun and 
games while others say it's a time to really study and do their best in school. No matter what your 
thoughts are, you'll enjoy it as much as you did this year . . your junior year. 

by Liz Harris 


154 JUNIORS 




Susan White 
Shelly Wilbur 
Alan Willaredt 
Elizabeth 
Williams 
Scott Williams 


Tiffany Winters 
Audrey 
Wisnasky 
Amanda Witter 
Melissa Woehrl 
Nichole Wolfe 


Sonya Womack 

Lisa Woolen 

Laura Worley 

Rebecca 

Worley 

Jennifer 

Wortham 


Susan Wylde 
Brenda Yates 
Damon Yates 
Leslie Yates 
Matthew Yates 


Terrence Yobby 
Denny Young 
Randall Young 
Terry Zoppe 




1. Matt Stearns and Mike 
Vaughn are thrilled to 
make it through another 
year at GCHS. 2. Greg 
Obucina waits to go to 
class. 




JUNIORS 155 


CHEMISTRY 



BIM ■ BAM ■ BOOM ■ SPLAT ■ ZAP 

Sitting on the couch, watching a mad scientist mix colorful bubbling chemicals 
together looks exciting. A little dab here, a drop there, and BOOM! A new formula 
is discovered. 

Everyone knows though, that it only happens that way on television. In 
chemistry, there is so much hard work to be done. Before anything can be 
attempted in the lab. Most importantly, everyone must know what to do in case 
of an accident. 

To avoid accidents, aprons and goggles must be worn at all times while In the 
lab. The instructor will always know the results of any experiment; and only the 
necessary chemicals will be out. This eliminates many chances for accidents. 

"One of the hardest tasks I face each year is convincing students that 
chemistry takes study everyday. Too many students think that a few hours of 
'cramming' the night before the test will get the job done. They eventually realize 
that it won't." says Mr. Rotter. 

Although the wgrk can be tough and quite challenging, the fun comes in the 
labs. That can make the whole thing worth while. 

by Julie Fernandez 


156 CHEMISTRY 





4 


I. Travis Terrell and Leslie 
Laycock show Mr. Rotter 
how to turn on the water. 2. 

J. B. Anderson, Michelle 
Knox, and Jason Warchal 
study for their test. 3. Mike 
Speer helps Brad Breese 
and Sunil Kumar under- 
stand the assignment for 
today. 


CHEMISTRY 157 



ORAL COMMUMCATIONS 



1 


SPEAK UP 


Oral ComiTiunications is a class that prepares and 
teaches students how to speak in front of an audience. 
Most people fear this class at the beginning. A couple of 
weeks into the semester, students realize that the class 
is not as bad as they thought. 

The first speech is an introduction about yourself. Then 
you have to give a demonstration. The next time 
around you have to tell everyone one of your most 
private and most embarrassing moments. 

The biggest project in the class is the radio show. In this 
project, the students select a group, design a billboard, 
and write their own radio show. After the script is writ- 
ten, it is presented to the rest of the class. While the 
presentation is going on, it is also being taped. That 
gives the performers a chance to view themselves. 

This class, which is a required sophomore class, helps 
students communicate with other people. It is also a 
class which lets people express their individuality and 
creativity. 

By Angie Withers 



158 ORAL COMMUNICATIONS 




1. Mr. Mueller collects 
papers from his oral 
communications class. 

2. Jason Hall speaks in 
front of the class. 3. Kari 
Bennett and Chelly 
Puentes show off their 
speech books. 4. The 
class does their home- 
work in oral communi- 
cations. 


ORAL COMMUNICATIONS 159 






SOPHOMORES 


1. John Hensley and Jennifer Sprankle sit and rest after John's performance in the lip-sync contest. 


CLASS OF 1993 


160 SOPHOMORES 



Stacie Ahlers 
Chad Alexander 
Matthew Alexander 
William Alexander 
Eric Alfaro 
Christina Allen 


Michael Allen 
Bonda Anderson 
J.B. Anderson 
Brian Anderton 
Janet Anderton 
Kara Andrews 


Kimberly Annable 
Shawn Armour 
Sean Asbeck 
Gerald Ashford 
Paul Austin 
David Badgett 


Laura Baggette 
Emilee Bailey 
Shea Bain 
Brent Baker 
Michelle Baker 
Michael Ballard 


Wendy Bamford 
Jeffrey Barnhart 
Kimberly Barrios 
Brett Barron 
Tamara Batson 
Mindy Bayer 


Karl Bennett 
Bradley Bierschwal 
Renee Biggs 
Todd Biggs 
Buddy Bishop 
Shannon Bixler 


Misty Black 
Jason Blair 
Wendy Blanton 
Jason Blomme 
John Blomme 
Joseph Blumer 


SOPHOMORES 161 



Amy Bobb 
Leigh Ann Bonvicino 
Jeffrey Boyer 
Melanie Boyer 
Vicky Brandt 
Carios Bras 


Brad Breese 
Michael Brimberry 
Amy Britton 
Mark Brokaw 
Holly Brown 
Jennifer Brown 


Justin Brown 
William Brown 
Wendy Budnicki 
Jacklyn Bukovac 
Melissa Burlison 
Bobbie Burns 


Katrina Butler 
Amy Callis 
Laura Calvin 
Kellie Cann 
Heather Carlson 
John Carmody 




1. Erika Wheatley, Beth 
Rapoff, Sako Mouradian, 
and Suzanne Stuart talk 
about their weekend 
plans. 2. Angela Willaredt 
and Angela Parker dis- 
cuss the roses one of 
them received. 



162 SOPHOMORES 



Steven Cartwright 
John Castillo 
Michael Causey 
Brian Cave 
Steve Chapman 
Chris Charter 


James Childers 
Margaret Christiansen 
Daniel Clark 
William Clark 
Dana Clements 
Sheila Clements 


Ryan Clifford 
James Clutts 
Timothy Connolly 
Karl Cook 
Fonda Cooley 
Mary Beth Cooper 


Nathan Coppedge 
Herbert Cornwall 
Michael Corrado 
Randall Cory 
James Cox 
Betty Coyle 


IT HAPPENS TO EVERYONE 


Everyone has to grow up, 
whether he wants to or not. 
Some teenagers can't wait 
to be fourteen, then six- 
teen, then eighteen, and 
then the magical number 
of 21. 

In junior high, girls began 
to fuss more over their hair 
and makeup, and the guys 
started to notice. As they 
reached high school, dat- 
ing had become a real 
part of those growing-up 
years. But that wasn't easy. 
How do you go about ask- 
ing that special girl out on 
a date — especially if this is 
your first time? 

A shy guy may quietly ask 


a girl, “do you want to go to 
a movie? out for pizza? to the 
mall? Or, as the times are 
now, a girl may go up to a 
boy and ask him out for a 
date. 

Except for school activities, 
most dates took place on the 
weekend. Popular places to 
go were the movies, 
McDonald's, one of the many 
malls, or out for a pizza. 

Coming to high school was 
fun. But, along with all the fun 
came the heartaches. That 
special person who went out 
with you this weekend may 
not want to next weekend. 
What do you do then? Try 
again with someone else. 


It's all part of growing up. 
This is what some sopho- 
mores do on weekends. 

"The mall!" -Laura James 
"Pantera's or someone's 
house." -Stefanie Jacobs 
"Party" -Shawn Howland 
"Nothing, really." -John 
Hopkins 

"Sit around and do noth- 
ing." -Keith Ishum 
"Hang out with my friends." 
-Eric Throne 

"Go to St. Louis." -Renee 
Ross 

"Go places with my 
friends." -Jason Richardson 

by Julie Fernandez 


SOPHOMORES 163 


Chris Crain 
Stacy Crayne 
Christina Cuvar 
Tonya Daie 
Thomas Daiton 
Meiinda Danieis 


Wiiiiam Danieis 
Erin Davis 
Michaei Davis 
Rachaei Davis 
Amanda Dawson 
Jessica Dayton 


Brian Dean 
Daniei Debert 
Derek Dejarnett 
Donna Deiay 
Wendy Denson 
Amy Diak 


Christina Dickerman 
Christina Dickerman 
Joeiie Dickie 
Jason Diiiard 
Brent Dippie 
Carrie Dockery 




1. Mr. Dillard's class gets ready to take a test. 


164 SOPHOMORES 



Michael Dockery 
Lisa Dooley 
Heather Dothage 
Tracy Drakeford 
Dana Dresch 
Dina Dressel 


Jonathan Duft 
Elizabeth Duncan 
Tammy Dutko 
Amy Eckmann 
Jami Egbert 
Kathleen Ehiman 


Stacy Eller 
Chris Ellis 
James Embrey 
Chris Enzwiler 
Melissa Everts 
William Farmer 


Matthew Fea 
Jason Ferguson 
Lisa Fernandez 
David Fielding 
Colleen Fields 
Denessa Fisk 


WAITING FOR SWEET SIXTEEN 


All your life you've waited for 
that special day when your par- 
ents give you the keys to the 
car. Of course, you have to lis- 
ten to the “with a car comes 
certain responsibilities" speech, 
but it's worth it. With a cheerful 
“have a good time" and a not 
so cheerful “don't be home too 
late", your parents hand you 
the keys. 

On the other hand, some 
teens just can't wait for the cer- 
emonial passing of the keys, 
and decide to sneak the car 
out when mom an dad are 
gone. This sometimes leads to 
an incident that ends by you ex 


plaining how the front fender was 
smashed while the car had re- 
mained in the garage. 

For those who do wait, there is 
always a problem of finding a 
ride. Every sophomore has their 
own way to get around and a few 
explain how: 

“Friends or a cousin get me 

around." -Danny Smith 

“My parents and my friends." 

-Kim Townsend 

“Leather-sole express gets me 
around." -Jason Mayes 
“Bi-State bus takes me where I 
want to go." -Charies Spratf 
“We bum rides" -Kim Holloway 


and Anne Obicina 
“We usually get rides for people 
who are going the same place 
we are (after a lot of hunting 
around!)" -Andrea Valincia and 
Jodi Melzer 

“Beg for rides with other people 
and be REALLY sweet to them 
for a while." -Renee Ross 
“We get rides from Brian Nichois 
everyday since he's got nothing 
better to do." -Steve Kuh and 
Chris Enzwiler 

“I bum rides from my brother 
and from people I don't know." 

-Eric Alfero 

by Angie Withers 


SOPHOMORES 165 


Marty Fisk 
Elvis Flowers 
Angie Floyd 
Matthew Foret 
Jodi Forister 
Andrea Free 


Dawn Freeman 
Michelle French 
Billy Fuller 
Laura Gaddy 
Gina Galati 
Jena Gann 


Kathy Garber 
Jeffrey Gibson 
Shelley Gilliam 
Heather Gitchoff 
Stephen Glasgow 
Joshua Glover 


Chris Goclan 
Julie Goclan 
Brent Golden 
Donna Goodrich 
Angela Grady 
Nicole Graves 



ARE YOU A DEDICATED STUDENT? 


Many things take devo- 
tion and patience. Other 
things take determination 
and discipline. It all de- 
pends on what it is and 
your attitude toward it. 

In all activities and in the 
classroom, some sort of 
dedication is present. It is 
one of the most important 
elements needed for one's 
progress of achievement. 

Anybody can devote 
themselves to something 
they believe in or even 
something they don't. One 
might say school is an obli 


gation and sometimes a bur- 
den, but there is a reward for 
those who do not forget that 
school is a privilege and the 
most significant educator in 
your life. 

Those who are dedicated 
and work up to their full po- 
tential in school will always 
do best . . for they are giving 
it their all. 

"I study until my eyeballs pop 
out!" - Tammy Dutko 
"I always try to do my best." 
-Sunil Kumar 

"I study with some K-SHE on 


the radio." -Renee Ross 
"I study off and on, when- 
ever I have time." -Tony 
Flowers 

"I love school." -Melinda 
Daniels 

"I go to school to get a 
good education. I like 
school a little bit." - Eugene 
Cornwall 

By Angie Withers 


166 SOPHOMORES 



Jo Ann Gray 
Robert Greco 
Jacquelyn Green 
Jimmy Greene 
Chris Greer 
Paula Gregory 


John Gresham 
Amanda Gudac 
Jami Gustafson 
Donald Haddix 
Michael Hahn 
Chris Hall 


Jason Hall 
Phillip Hamilton 
Jaye Hammes 
Byron Hammond 
Mark Hannigan 
Lisa Hard 


Stephanie Hardesty 
Julie Hargrove 
Robyn Harper 
Sunny Harper 
Robyn Hartline 
Allison Hatcher 



1 . Billy Daniels, Billy Fuller, Lisa Hard, David Partney, Lynn Novich, and Matt Stearns enjoy a night out at the Homecoming football 
game. 


SOPHOMORES 167 



Bonnie Hawley 
Jason Hayes 
Jennifer Heater 
Celia Heck 
Robert Heffner 
Toni Hendricks 


Monte Hendrickson 
John Hensley 
Tamara Hergert 
Jessica Herman 
William Herman 
Anne Hewlett 


Ben Hicks 
Charles Hicks 
James Hicks 
Aaron High 
Regan Hildebrand 
Ian Hildreth 




TENNIS - 

BOOTS - FLATS - BOATS 


Remember your first pair of 
Nike tennis shoes? Those awfui 
tacky brown, pink, or purple 
shoes. Or even worse, did you 
piay in your mom's clogs? All of 
these wonderful shoe fads that 
pass by. What will your children 
say when they see your silver 
and gold shoes, or your tennis 
shoes with the bright neon 
stripes? What will you say when 
your child wants an ugly pair of 
$200 shoes that they must have. 
Wili you do the same to your 
children as they did to you? It 
can be fun to imagine what the 
future wiil possibly hold for you In 
fads! Here are some weirdest, 
ugliest, or funniest shoes stories. 

“My bright green tennis shoes." 
-Beth Rapoff 

“My ugly light biue Nikes with a 
bright blue stripe." 


-Suzanne Start 

“Checker board tennis shoes that 
Quinn Dalton wears." -Mandy 
Townsend 

“When I was little I would only 
wear my favorite pair of ugiy yel- 
low shoes that didn't match any- 
thing." -Pauia Gregory 
“A pair of trax." -Chip Ashford 
“My brown leather shoes with In- 
dian feathers all over them." -Amy 
Niehaus 

“My dollar pink jellies with hoies in 
them." -Jodi Meizer. 

“NIKE-i like the bottom of them." 
-Brian Anderton 

“i iike high-tops. They make me 
run fast. -Christopher Brake 
“Reebok pumps are comfortable. 
I have to wear them. I have a bad 
ankle." -George Roethemeyer 
“NIKE-I like them." -Ray Hoffman 
“I wear any kind I buy . . just what- 
ever I iike." -Jeff Wolfe 


“K-Swiss is what I wear." -Doug- 
las Tubbs 

"I wear Reebok pumps, be- 
cause they're neat." -Darrell 
Dockery 

“I wear Gorglo Brutinl." -Floyd 
Dooley 

“Adidas, because I like them." 
-James Scott 

“I like cowboy boots." -Kenny 
Spears AKA Eddie Haskail 
“I wear any kind of shoes as iong 
as they are comfortable." 
-Nicole Kincer 

“I like high-tops." -Michelle 
Booher 

By Julie Fernandez 


168 SOPHOMORES 



Kimberiy Hildreth 
Crystal Hill 
Scott Hill 
Chad Hitchcock 
Shannon Hoelter 
Christina Hoffman 


David Hoffman 
Raymond Hoffman 
Angela Hogue 
Ghrista Holder 
Kimberly Holloway 
Traci Horstmeyer 


Matthew Howell 
Jamie Howland 
Shawn Howland 
Lauri Hull 
Heather Ishum 
Keith Ishum 




SOPHOMORES 169 


Jason Me 
Chris Jaco 
Stephanie Jacobs 
Laura James 
Debra Jankowski 
Michaei Jaros 


Patrick Jessee 
Dorthy Jeter 
Chris Johnson 
Paige Johnson 
Staci Johnson 
Terri Johnson 


Dennis Johnson 
Brian Jones 
Eric Jones 
Keiiey Jones 
Nichoi Jones 
Jeremiah Justice 



LET’S GET PHYSICAL AND FIT 


As we enter our sopho- 
more year, we begin to 
take more notice of our ap- 
pearance. We begin to 
worry about those extra 
pounds and extra flab. 
Soon we'll get our drivers 
license and we are going 
to have to look our best in 
that new car we plan to 
buy. It's time to begin a 
physical fitness program. 

How do we do this? We 
can exercise, diet, run, stop 
eating as much, or just stop 
snacking. Some of these 
techniques require time 
and some require effort. 

Jogging can be fun. You 
can buy yourself a pretty 
outfit and find a friend to 
run around with. Dieting is a 
little tougher. It takes deter- 


mination to begin and con- 
tinue with a program. Snack- 
ing is the worst. It Is so tempt- 
ing to sit in front of the televi- 
sion and eat and eat and 
eat. The grocery stores have 
entire aisles full of snacks that 
are good sounding and 
good tasting. 

But if you plan to get into 
those smaller-sized clothing, 
you better shape up our eat- 
ing habits. That's the only 
way you can shape up your- 
self as well. 

"I snack, exercise, and jog." - 
Tony Flowers 

“I walk everywhere." - Renee 
Ross 

"I play soccer." - Donna Mink 
"I eat whenever I can or 
when there's nothing else to 


do." - Chris Glasgow 
"I exercise whenever I feel 
like it." - Brent Dipple 
"Play basketball." -Charles 
Hick 

"Workout." -David Murry 
"Dance, ride a bike, and 
swim." -Patricia Schultz 
"Workout in the gym every- 
day." -Scott Weller 
"Weightlift." -Pat McKinney 
"Baseball and football." - 
Clinton North 

"I run and swim." -Christie 
Allen 

"run, exercise, drink water, 
and eat good food." 
-Andrea Simpson 

by Julie Fernandez and 
Angela Withers 


170 SOPHOMORES 



Krista Kalips 
Jason Kass 
James Kasys 
Steven Keel in 
Tonya Keelin 
Lena Keeling 


Jennifer Kelley 
Adelaide Kelly 
David Kiee 
Michelle Knox 
Laura Kostecki 
Angie Kovach 


Amy Krakowiecki 
Kimberly Kramer 
Jason Krause 
Kristie Kudelka 
Terry Kuehnel 
Stephanie Kult 



1 . Donald Dunnavant buys a good, hardy, nutritious, healthy lunch in the schooi cafeteria. He always enjoys 
a good meal. 


SOPHOMORES 171 


Sunil Kimar 
Melissa Kusmierczak 
Gladys Lamb 
Rosalie Lane 
Michelle Langsdorf 
James Lay 


Leslie Laycock 
Jason Lee 
Michelle Lee 
Misty Legate 
Angela Lewis 
Michael Upchik 


Ann Logan 
Cristy Long 
Matthew Lour 
Guy Love 
Aimee Lowe 
Steven Lubak 




1. Room 166 is occupied most of the day by students trying to occupy their time for one hour. Some study, 
some sleep, and some just sit there. 


172 SOPHOMORES 



Jeffrey Luff man 
April Madison 
Christine Malady 
Christina Malherek 
Jeffrey Malone 
Tanya Mann 


Tonya Mann 
Daniel Marcum 
Kelle Marcum 
Christy Marletfe 
Matthew Marsala 
April Marsh 


Amy Martin 
Chad Martin 
Christine Martin 
Paul Martin 
Holly Mason 
Rosalie Matlock 


STUDY - SLEEP - SIT 


Bill sits with his head 
down with a puddle of 
drool on his desk as he 
snores. Annie and Mike 
pass notes back and forth 
and flirt with each other. 

Frank and Joe slide a tri- 
angle piece of paper 
across a desk and claim 
they are playing football. 
Karen sits with her attention 
focused on her trig book. 

Vince catches up on the 
latest gossip on his favorite 
rock star in his heavy metal 
dude magazine. Biff 
pounds his head with frus- 
tration, knowing he has to 
learn his algebra to stay 
eligible for the team. 

Mr. Smith sits at his desk 
keeping order in the study 


hall. A few of the sophomores 
tell us what they do in their 
study hall: 

"Write notes.” -Jenni Milton 
"I sleep." -JoAnn Gray 
"Work, most of the time." - 
Tammy Hergert 
"If I've got homework, I do it 
in study hall." -Paige Johnson 
"If I'm not writing notes. I'm 
studying. If I'm not studying. 
I'm watching guys walk by." 
-Shanna Means 
"Write notes." -Robyn 
Hartline 

"I read the sports section of 
the newspaper." -Jeff 
Luffman 

"I write notes — that's about 
it." -Jim Green 

"I read magazines." -Chris 
Jaco 


Jaco 

"I sleep." -Mike Dockery 
"I sit and draw." -Jason 
Krause 

"Write notes, sleep, sit 
there." -Erika Wheatley 
"Write notes, sleep, and 
check the clock" -Tammy 
Dutko 

"I listen to the freshman talk 
to me about Hulk Hogan." 
-Erin Davis 

"Pass notes, whisper, and 
sleep." -Renee Ross 
"I sleep and dream about 
the language lab" -Jon 
Duft 

by Angie Withers 


SOPHOMORES 173 


Todd Moulding 
Jason Moxfield 
Billy McCollister 
Shone McCollister 
Angela McCormick 
Chris McCullough 


Jennifer McDonald 
Paul McEntyre 
Shane McFarland 
John McGinness 
Robert McGuire 
Carrie McKinney 


Patrick McKinney 
Jennifer McQuay 
Wiliiam Meadows 
Shanna Means 
Sarah Mehelic 
Tammy Meinhardt 



PUMP UP THE VOLUME 


When it comes to music, there 
are as many different tastes as 
there are musical styles. Some 
like to turn up the volume and 
listen to their favorite heavy 
metal bands on Monday night 
metal or Headbangers Ball. 

On the other side of the spec- 
trum, some like to relax by listen- 
ing to the classical music like 
Bach. Many people like to listen 
to dance or top-forty music, too. 

Some stray away from the 
mainstream music and listen to 
the country music of Hank 
Williams Jr. or Randy Travis. Oth- 
ers enjoy the heavy beat and 
lyrics of Rap. 

As are different tastes, there 
are as many different radio sta- 
tions of preference. K-SHE and 
KSD play a variety, from heavy 
metal to music 


of the late sixties. Q-106.5 plays 
everything from pop to top forty to 
some rap. Catering to most of the 
rap favorites is 107.7. And all those 
country fans can tune Into WIL or 
KIX. Here a few opinions of what 
some like the best. 

"Slaughter, Winger.” Emilee Bailey 
"Vanilla Ice, Bel Biv Devoe." Shane 
McCalllster 

"Randy Travis is the best." Melissa 
Kusmierczak 

"I'm in love with Randy Travis." 
-JoAnn Gray 

"I like 106.5, because they play 
the best music." -Brett Barron 
"K-SHE doesn't play rap. I like 
that." -Jason Millsap 
"Good music and it's neat . . 
106.5." -Michelle Knox 
"MAJIC 108 plays good music." 
-Jennifer McOuay 


"I listen to K-SHE, because it 
'rock-n-rolls.' " -Donald 
Dunnavant 

"I listen to 106.5, because I like 
the music they play." -Chris 
Taylor 

"I listen to 106.5 because it is a 
good station." -Becky Walker 
"K-SHE is the best." -James Scott 
"I like 96.7 KSD because it plays 
classic rock." -David Lando 
"Frank O. Pinion is the best on 
KIX 104. There's no other person 
like Frank and not other station 
like KIX." -Butch Walker 
"I do the Q." -Christine Taylor 

by Julie Fernandez 


174 SOPHOMORES 



Jodi Melzer 
Michael Mendoza 
Angela Miles 
James Miller 
John Miller 
Tonya Miller 


Jason Millsap 
Jennifer Milton 
Walter Milton 
Eric Miner 
Gabriel Mitchell 
Mary Mitchell 


Tanya Mitchell 
James Monroe 
Jared Monson 
Robert Morgan 
Sheila Mullen 
David Murray 





3 


1 . Erika Wheatley and Melinda Stephens 
listen to their favorite tapes in the bus. 2. 
Julie Goclan, Mary Beth Cooper, 
Michelle Knox, Nicki Graves, and Ann 
Logan smile after eating a nice lunch in 
the cafe. 3. Angie Ryan and Krista Kalips 
take a break. 


SOPHOMORES 175 


Heather Nail 
Kimberly Nance 
Jason Naney 
David Nappier 
Misti Noah 
Jenniter Norris 


Lyn Novich 
Leslie Nunes 
Keith Nussbaum 
Anne Obucina 
Shawn Odom 
Robert Odom 

Christina Orosco 
Elizabeth Owca 
Timothy Ozanich 
Sunday Pace 
Clint Page 
Tonya Palmer 



HOLD THAT CHALKBOARD 


Aren't you lucky? You get 
to hold the chalkboard 
with the numbers on them. 
These photos are always so 
flattering and lovely. You 
didn't think anyone would 
ever see them. Isn't that 
what the photographer 
told you? Too bad. How 
about if we share them 
with the entire school. You 
don't mind, do you? 

You're just one of approx- 
imately 2400 students at 
Granite City High School. 
You are the chosen ones 
keeping the numbering 
system in order. What a 
fancy way to say, "Too bad 
for you. It's your turn to hold 
the board." 

It could happen to any 


one. You could be one of the 
students purchasing a 
packet of photos or you may 
be someone that just wants a 
'yearbook only' photo. It 
doesn't matter. The chalk- 
board eventually finds it way 
to the appropriate person. 

All the photos turn out 
good. It's just a matter of 
one's personal opinion just 
how 'good' they reaily are. 
Here are some comments re- 
garding personal school 
photos. 

' \ 

"It was one of my better pic- 
tures . . better than last 
year." -Amanda Westbrook 
"They were OK. Could have 
been better." -Tony Yurko 
"I've had better pictures 


taken of me." -Kara 
Andrews 

"They are one of the better 
ones I've had taken." 
-Dana Dresch 
"I like them, but they 
weren't my best . . but, my 
cousin's friends fought over 
them." -Jennifer Scheerer 
"My friends thought they 
were good." -Lene Keeling 
"They were the average 
school pictures that I al- 
ways hate. But, everyone 
else thinks they are won- 
derful." -Heather Sanders 

by Julie Fernandez 


176 SOPHOMORES 



Angela Parker 
Crystal Parker 
Michael Parker 
David Partney 
Christine Parton 
Laura Patton 


Marc Patton 
Charlene Pearman 
Daniel Peterson 
Nicole Podnar 
Jamie Pomeroy 
Michael Pool 


Janice Poole 
Terry Prather 
Michael Pritchard 
Amy Rainer 
Stephen Rains 
Sherry Ralston 



1. Holding the chalkboard is so exciting. These students were the chosen ones to keep the numbering 
system in order. Beginning with the top row, they are: Shiela Clements, Celia Heck, Jennifer Kelley, Sunil 
Kumar, Clint Page, Duane Shemwell, Suzanne Stuart, and Kim Wachter. 


SOPHOMORES 177 



David Ramey 
Beth Rapoff 
Bryan Reed 
Korey Reed 
Sheila Reiter 
Jeremy Reuter 


Shawn Revelle 
William Ribbing 
Christina Rice 
Andrew Richards 
Jason Richardson 
Stacey Rieger 


Joseph Rieser 
Paul Roan 
Bridget Roeder 
George Roethemeyer 
Katherine Ross 
Renee Ross 




1. Anne Obucina and Lyn Novich discuss what their next excuse will be. 


178 SOPHOMORES 



Norman Ross 
Jennifer Rudy 
Jason Rumpf 
Dennis Rushing 
Brandy Ryder 
Jennifer Ryder 


Caroiyn Ryferski 
Michaei Sacckefti 
Meiissa Sammons 
Heafher Sanders 
Rebecca Sansoucie 
Cynfhia Scafurro 


Eiizabefh Schaefer 
Jason Schannof 
Jennifer Scheerer 
Pafrick Sheffer 
Kafhryn Schmedake 
Shurie Schmidf 


HOW FAR WILL YOU STRETCH THE TRUTH? 


Is it magic or does the 
mailman just walk faster on 
those dreaded days when 
low and failing notices 
come out? Some people 
get home as soon as possi- 
ble so they can get their 
notice out of the mail box. 
Others go as slow as possi- 
ble, because they know 
waiting for them at home is 
mom or dad ready to give 
the third degree and more. 

Suddenly strange lies 
come to mind about why 
you're doing so poorly in 
the class. You begin to rat- 
tle off just about anything 
that will come to mind. 
You're just about in tears or 
you think you've gotten 
them and they are going to 
buy it. Wrong? They just roll 


their eyes and snicker at you. 
You're at a loss. Those grades 
must come up, or your social 
life is over. What do you do to 
get out of all that trouble? 

"The teacher goes too fast, I 
can't see the board, I can't 
hear her, and she hates me." 
-Jackie Bubovac 
“I don't get along with the 
teacher!" -Donna Mink 
'Til do better next time." - 
Dan Smith 

"I didn't like the teacher." 
-David Badgett 
"Everyone else is failing too." 
-Jamie Pomeroy 
"I don't like that subject." - 
Amy Niehaus 

"Mom, not everyone loves 
History." -Michelle French 
"I stopped to save a baby 


from a burning building 
and didn't get my work fin- 
ished." -Tim Bryan 
"I didn't understand — I'm 
confused." -Gabe Mitchell 
"The teacher must have 
made a mistake." -Steve 
Keelin 

"I'll bring up my grade." 
-Cindy Scafurro 
"Mom, they must have 
made a mistake." 
-Stephanie Kult 

by Angie Withers 


SOPHOMORES 179 


Tammy Schmidt 
Michelle Schoneman 
Daniel Schrader 
Patricia Schult2 
Cathrine Schut2enhoffer 
Rebecca Schwab 


Kathleen Scott 
Michelle Severs 
Jason Sharp 
Shawn Sheikh 
Charles Shemwell 
Leigh Shemwell 


Dustine Shipman 
Jason Sikes 
Jennifer Simon 
Andrea Simpson 
Christ! Simpson 
Melissa Singleton 



BIG TEST TOMORROW 


You look up at the 
clock, only five more min- 
utes left till the bell rings, 
then you hear those two 
mighly words — test to- 
morrow. You fumble 
through your notes while 
groaning of no. Then you 
think about the three 
other test you have to- 
morrow. You have prom- 
ised your mom you'd 
clean your room tonight 
and you and your best 
friend had plans to go to 
the mall all week. What 
do you do! 

Well, the next day rolls 
around and you've 
looked at your notes five 
minutes before your 
class. There's no way you 


can pass the test. You have a 
few options: 1. take the de- 
serving grade, 2. tear off the 
bottom of a piece of paper 
and write the answers down 
better known as 'the cheat 
sheet', 3. move closer to the 
brain that sits next to you. A 
few sophomores explain how 
they make the grade. 

"I study my notes that I have 
taken in class." -Shiela Clem- 
ents 

"Don't show up for school the 
day of the big test. Then you 
can have all this extra time to 
study." -Michelle Lee 
"I'm there in class and I do 
my homework." -Krista Kalips 
"Pay attention in class and 
hope for the best when tests 
come." -Jodi Meizer 


"Go over the notes you 
wrote down." -Crystal 
Parker 

"Take notes, read, and do 
the best I can." -Chris Crain 
"I study. It's easy. I get the 
book, open the book, and 
read," -James Lay 
"I don't. It's luck" -Jon 
Blomme 

"Good notes and pay at- 
tention in class. Then the 
night of the big test you go 
home, go to your room, 
shut of the TV and radio, 
and study." -Scott Hill 
"I take notes in class, do my 
homework, and study all 
my notes before the test." 
-Melanie Boyer 

by Julie Fernandez 


180 SOPHOMORES 



Bradley Skalsky 
Alissa Slater 
Christy Smith 
Daniel Smith 
William Smith 
James Smothers 


Claudia Snyder 
Michael Speer 
Anastacia Spiroff 
Charles Spratt 
Amy Springs 
Faith Stanek 


Dawn Star 
Jason Starko 
Paul Stepanek 
Melina Stephens 
Tim Stephens 
David Steward 



1. Angela McCormick, Anne Obucina, and Krista Kalips forget about any tests they will have next week. 


SOPHOMORES 181 



Matthew Stinson 
James Stodnick 
Stephanie Stordahi 
John Stroder 
Suzanne Stuart 
Young Sim Suh 


David Tayior 
Travis Terreii 
Jason Thebeau 
Mark Thornsberry 
Eric Thrane 
James Townsend 


Kimberiy Townsend 
Mandy Townsend 
Teresa Townsend 
Hobart Tripp 
Lorrie Trower 
Jennifer Turck 







rSi*ri!»| 



3 


1. Cathy Schutzenhofer, 
Sheila Clements, Dana 
Clements, and Stephanie 
Jacobs chat before their 
next class. 2. JoAnn Gray 
and Stephanie Kult stop to. 
have their photo taken be- 
fore going to their fifth-hour 
class. 3. Lunch time. 4. Jeff 
Boyer and Michelle French. 



182 SOPHOMORES 




Bradley Turner 
Andrea Valencia 
Michael Vanesler 
Nina Vanvoorst 
Cristal Villareal 
Robert Vincent 


Kimberly Wachter 
Julie Wahl 
Kristina Waich 
Rachelle Walker 
Abraham Walts 
Jason Warchol 


Dawn Ware 
Chris Warren 
Scott Weller 
Bryan Welser 
Jason West 
Amanda Westbrook 


THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME 


It's friday night and it's 7:00 
p.m., your fiends are getting 
ready for possibiy the biggest 
party of the year. Talk of this 
party has been building up for 
over three weeks. Everyone will 
be there, even the guy/girl you 
have been admiring for the 
past month. But here you are 
forced to stay in your room be- 
cause of that unexpected de- 
tention slip for your tardies your 
parents received in the mail. 

You've tried everything to get 
out of the situation. You promise 
you'll never be tardy to class 
again and you'li clean the en- 
tire house tomorrow, including 
your room which hasn't been 
touched since your 7th grade 
year. Since bribery didn't work 
with your parents, you ask if you 
can be grounded next week- 
end instead of this one. You've 
had plans with your friends for 
the past two weeks. 


By this time, your parents are 
sick of your pathetic begging and 
they scream, ”N O." Off you go to 
your bedroom with stomping feet 
and slamming doors. 

While you're in your room 
grounded, your friends are out 
having the time of their iives. Does 
this sound iike a familiar situation? 
There is no way to escape this 
horrible punishment. Some of the 
experienced sophomores advise 
others what to do when you are 
grounded. 

"Sneak out, bug mom to let me 
off." -Joe Rieser 

"Being grounded doesn't work for 

me." -Tony Flowers 

"I go to my room and turn on the 

radio." -Lesiie Laycock 

"I'm lucky, I don't get grounded." 

-Renee Ross 

"I don't get grounded. My parents 
do other things to me." -Matt Foret 
"Staying out too late gets me 
grounded." -Steve Chapman 


"Being iate to come home." - 
Jamie Howiand 

"When I was in eighth grade, i 
took my mom's car and 
wrecked into a tree, i was 
grounded until the car got 
fixed." -Melanie Boyer 
"I've never been grounded." - 
Stacie Spiroff 

"I got grounded for five days for 
the use of smokeless tobacco in 
school." -Jeff Luffman 
"I've gotten grounded for my 
bad grades." -Kris Kudelka 
"I'm grounded every weekend 
of my life, especially when Jodi 
and i stayed out until 4 A.M." 
-Andrea Valencia 
"I usually don't get grounded, 
but I did when I stayed out until 
4 A.M. with Andi." -Jodi Melzer 

by Angie Withers 


SOPHOMORES 183 



Erika Wheatley 
Angela White 
Teresa White 
Richard Whiteside 
Amy Whitford 
Jamie Whitford 


David Wiesehan 
Robert Wiggins 
Dustin Wilkinson 
Angela Willaredt 
Mark Willaredt 
Daniele Williams 


Mary Williams 
Sean Williamson 
Ellen Willis 
Richard Wilson 
Robert Wilson 
Kathy Winnie 



SHAKE, RAHLE, AND ROLL 


This is the fist time the 
school has tried so hard to 
prepare students for an 
earthquake. The prediction 
for the New Madrid fault is 
on the third of December 
at 4:56 a.m. or within a ra- 
dius of 48 hours of the third. 
Many people are trying to 
prepare for it. 

The media, the news, 
and the television almost 
have nothing eise to talk 
about. The 900 numbers 
are trying to cash in on the 
earthquake too. For just 
$3.00 for the first minute 
and $.95 for each addi- 
tional minute, they will tell 
you what to do in case of 
an earthquake. 

With all the talk and ex 


citement of an earthquake, 
everyone has to get a little 
nervous. Do you know what 
to really do? And if you get 
stranded, how will you keep 
yourself alive? And when in a 
building that has a couple of 
floors, where should you try to 
go-to the bottom or stay 
where you are? Here are a 
few opinions. 

"I don't beiieve that any- 
one can predict an earth- 
quake, but if it happens it 
happens." -Faith Stanek. 

"I realiy hope it doesn't hap- 
pen while I'm at school." 
Laurie Hull. 

"I think too many people are 
making to big of a deal 
about it." -Jason Richardson. 
“I think that guy is full of 


hot air, and if it does hap- 
pen, there is nothing that 
can be done about it any- 
way." -Melanie Boyer. 

“I didn't believe it would 
happen. There Is not 
enough seismic activity."- 
Chris Charter 

"No quake . . earthquakes 
are unpredictable." 
-Aracelis Fuentes. 

"I didn't think there would 
be an earthquake, be- 
cause it wasn't time for 
one." -Steve Courtright. 

"I thought we would have 
an earthquake, because 
that guy said so." -Renee 
Biggs. 

by Angie Withers 


184 SOPHOMORES 



Robert Wittkamp 
Damon Wolf 
Derek Wolfe 
Jeffrey Wolfe 
Amy Wood 
Crystal Woods 


Stacie Woodward 
Shawn Worthen 
Christina Wright 
Shane Wright 
Tara Wyatt 
Kirsten Yobby 


Anthony Yurko 
Jeremy Zaruba 


I 


r 




2 

1 . Ann Logan and Stephanie Jacobs have no 
earthquake fears, but Bart Simpson looks a 
littie worried. 2. Jodi Meizer and Andy Valencia 
ciutch each other for morai support. 


SOPHOMORES 185 




BIOLOGY 

BIOLOGY 

BIOLOGY 

BIOLOGY 


Biology is on unpredictable and interesting class taken by students 
their freshman year at G.C.H.S. Freshman seem to find Biology excit- 
ing because it is very different from any of the science classes they 
took in junior high. 

During the semester, students will learn how to correctly use a 
microscope through the use of various labs and also learn how to 
classify organisms into their correct Kingdom, Phylum, Class, etc. 
Although it may cause some discontent among freshman, the stu- 
dents dissect a frog. They learn by seeing and doing. 

When Mr. Tom Pinnell, a dedicated biology teacher, was asked 
why he likes to teach Biology I. he replied, "The subject of biology 
commends much interest on my life; guiding students to begin to 
understand and to come to appreciate the natural world is very 
rewarding." 

by Carrie Owen and Emily Stitch 


186 BIOLOGY 





1 Debbie Flowere, Chelly Fuen- 
tee, Kellie Gregory, and Shannon 
Green set up for an experiment. 2. 
Christy Birdsong and Tom Breeden 
go over their labs while Micah Roe 
looks for an amoeba under the 
microscope. 3. Jill Haddix shows off 
her favorite book. 4. Mr. Tom Pin- 
nell helps Holly Gaddy and Ireene 
Gameng with their homework. 


BIOLOGY 187 










1. Students wait patiently to learn more Spanish. 2. 
Teaching Spanish is so much fun for Mrs, Williams. 3. 
Scott Lybarger shows off his Spanish book. 4. Some 
students read while they wait for class to begin. 



188 SPANISH 




"iHola! ;Como Estas?" or as many of us have heard before, "Chicle 
en la canasta!”, (Put your gum in the trash), says Mrs. Janet Williams as 
she enters her fourth hour Spanish class. 

A first year Spanish class is normally filled with freshman, waiting 
patiently or even a little obnoxiously, to learn some new words of this 
exciting new language. Donald Harris said, "I like Spanish so much 
because the language is interesting and my teacher, Mrs. Williams, 
makes it so interesting.” Jamey Bridges likes it because, "Mrs. Williams is 
a great teacher.” He added later, "I also like the language.” 

It takes studying and a little bit of work to understand what's going on 
in this subject. Conjugating verbs and transforming English into Spanish is 
a little bit tricky, especially if a decent sentence is to appear. Then 
there are the questions! ;Donde?, ^Como?, ;Que?, ^Cual?, which one 
goes where and when does it go there? To those that don't under- 
stand, there's still another year to figure all of these things out and it 
gets better. 

To some this language comes easily and they have no trouble under- 
standing what's going on. Ireene Gameng is one of those people. She 
says, "I like the Spanish language because it's one of the easiest 
languages to learn.” 

Mrs. Janet Williams concludes, "Spanish class is an opportunity to 
learn about different cultures, and see how we, as Americans, are so 
fortunate to live here in the United States.” 

by Carrie Owen and Emily Stitch 


SPANISH 

SPANISH 

SPANISH 

SPANISH 


SPANISH 189 




190 FRESHMAN 


FRESHMAN 


2 

1. Jamie Caveness is getting prepared for biology class, 2. Terry Shots and Becky Pryor pose for a 
picture. 


CLASS OF 1994 











1 









Charles Adams 
Jennifer Aitken 
Chris Anderson 
Daniel Anderton 
Gene Anderton 
Francisco Aponte 


Gerry Armbruster 
Benjamin Asbeck 
Ryan Ashby 
Nona Ashing 
Jamie Baker 
Chris Barnes 


Ronald Barnes 
Heather Barnhart 
Timothy Barrel! 
Cathy Barrios 
Timothy Barton 
Anthony Bazzeli 


Marvin Bazzeli 
Angela Beariey 
Jamie Beaver 
Cher’ell Beckwith 
Aaron Beimer 
Christina Birdsong 


Michaei Bishop 
Catherine Bivens 
Brooke Bjorkman 
Jason Black 
Daryn Blair 
Matthew Blakenship 


Christopher Blatz 
John Blaylock 
Casey Bloomquist 
Joshua Blomm Blumer 
Matthew Bolandis 
Michael Boston 


Nathan Bowser 
David Brand 
Tom Breeden 
Rochelie Brewer 
Emiiy Bridges 
Jamey Bridges 


Kimberly Briley 
Tyler Brockman 
Billy Bronaugh 
Jamie Brooks 
Jason Brooks 
Robert Brooksher 


FRESHMAN 191 




THE SOAP ADDICTION 


Who killed ? What happened to — ? 

Did you know that . . . . ? What is really going on 
with ? 

If you watch soap operas, you should be 
familiar with these questions. They are the com- 
mon questions asked on the afternoon soaps. 

Soaps have become an obsession for some 
students. They discuss the soaps with other stu- 
dents, try to solve everyone's problems, and 
match the couples together. It's all in a days 
watching. 

Angie Bearlay says she likes soaps because 
''they're romantic, they're exciting and they 
keep you in suspense." . 

Many people wonder why anyone would 
spend hours and hours watching people get 
murdered, kidnapped, bombed, or get finan- 


cially destroyed. It's entertaining and fun to 
figure out what was going to happen before it 
actually happens is one of the main reasons 
students view the soaps. Another is that they 
think some of the guys are "cute" and would not 
miss watching them for anything. 

Amy Gebhardt thinks Bo Brady on Days of Our 
Lives, Jack Devero on Days of Our Lives, and 
Cruis on Santa Barbara are the cutest guys on 
T.V. 

Some students actually fall in love with the 
characters on the T.V. soaps. So if you see 
someone running down the hall, to their bus, or 
their ride home and they have a desperate look 
on their face, get out of their way. They're 
probably under the influence of the soaps. 

by Carrie Owen and Emily Stitch 


192 FRESHMAN 


Angela Brown 
Stephanie Broyles 
Kristopher Brumley 
Terry Buchanan 
Jamie Buckingham 
Kari Buckingham 

Monica Buckingham 
Becky Buecker 
John Bukovac 
Julianna Burris 
Morgan Burris 
Heather Burroughs 

Brant Bushue 
Lisa Buske 
John Buxton 
Christina Cahill 
Andrew Cann 
Melissa Carmack 


Tonya Carpenter 
Jamie Cavaness 
Nicole Chapman 
James Chastain 
James Chastain 
Jerry Chastain 

James Chism 
Nathan Cholevik 
Geraid Cicio 
David Clark 
Shane Clark 
William Coker 





Michelle Colbert 
Lourdes Colon 
Kevin Colp 
Christopher Coonrod 
Brad C^per 
Donald Cooper 


Melinda Cooper 
Nicole Coulter 
William Cowley 
Stephen Cozart 
Tracy Crain 
Lesli Crowell 


Bill Citizen 

Amanda Cunningham 
Keri Cunningham 
Eric Cuppett 
Angela Davis 
Lula Davis 


Michael Davis 
Susan Davis 
Lisa Davison 
Cassandra Dawes 
Phillip Dean 
Delaney Dennis 


Corey Dickerson 
Julie Dickerson 
Kayla Dineff 
Ritchie Dioneda 
Jason Dittrich 
Robert Divine 




1. Stan Martinez takes 
advantage of some free 
time during the first few 
days of school in his P.E. 
class and watches televi- 
sion. 2. Two freshman girls 
wait for the television to 
be turned on. 


FRESHMAN 193 




Heather Dix 
Ami Dobrynski 
Joseph Doggett 
William Donnell 
Chad Dooley 
Michael Drennan 


Issac Duckett 
Jayme Duckworth 
Shelley Duffield 
David Dutko 
Debra Dutko 
Denise Dutko 


Renee Eaglin 
Michelle Economy 
Teresa Egbert 
Lorry Eller 
Deborah Engelke 
Jennifer Engike 


Emily Epperson 
Christine Erickson 
Jacob Erickson 
David Eithington 
Craig Eudy 
Amyee Evans 


Lynsy Evans 
Renee Fackler 
Angela Favier 
Marcia Fenner 
Christopher Finn 
Sean Firebaugh 




1. Freshmen enjoying the good caf- 
eteria food and each other's com- 
pany. 2. Jeff Bauman and Geraid 
Slattery laugh at something their P.E. 
teacher said to them. 


2 



194 FRESHMAN 



Raymond Fisher 
Ronald Fisher 
Deborah Flowers 
Danielle Ford 
Cheryl Forehand 
Jennifer Frankin 


Jeffery Frisse 
John Fuhrman 
Holly Gaddy 
Ryan Gaddy 
Jonathan Galbreath 
Amy Gallagher 


Tammy Gallas 
Ireene Gameng 
Cassie Gardner 
Amy Gebhardt 
Jeremie Geggus 
Frank Genovese 


Jeremy Gibbs 
Fred Giffin 
Michael Gilbert 
Ronald Glasdow 
Amy Godwin 
Amy Gooch 


Jennifer Gosnell 
Melanie Gosnell 
Robin Graham 
Wanetta Graham 
Patric Gramc 
Herbert Grammer 


EIGHTH GRADE TO NINTH GRADE 


One of the biggest steps in the life ot a 
teenager is the moving from junior high 
school to high school. Most ot the eighth 
graders agree that they can't wait to get 
to the senior high. 

There were so many differences be- 
tween eighth grade at the junior school 
and ninth grade at the senior school. 
There seemed to be more freedom, or at 
least It seemed that way because we 
were one year older. And that one year 


made us so much more grown up. 

Nathan Hill says, "the nicest thing 
about being here is that I am no longer 
at Coolidge." 

As grown up as we are now, we'll be 
even more grown up and older next year 
as sophomores. Then only two more years 
and it's time tor graduation. See how fast 
the time went. 

by Carrie Owen & Emily Stitch 


FRESHMAN 195 


Danny Gray 
Kelly Green 
Shannon Green 
Theresa Greene 
Jonathan Greer 
Kellie Gregory 


Michael Grubbs 
Jill Haddix 
Billy Hagen 
Jamie Hamilton 
Paul Hand 
Regina Hankins 


Nicole Hardester 
James Harlen 
Richard Harms 
David Harris 
Donald Harris 
Lori Harris 


Craig Harrison 
Jeremy Hartman 
Farrah Hawkes 
Larry Hayden 
Hope Heck 
Paula Heffner 


Tammy Henderson 
Thomas Henry 
Christopher Hensley 
Steven Hicks 
Jeff Hill 
Nathan Hill 



THE TYPICAL FRESHMAN SITUATION 


Remember what it was like to be a freshman? 
Many students try to believe that they never 
belonged to that dark era of life. Tradition has 
always had it, quite unfairly, that the freshman 
was the bottom of the high school totem pole, 
and the favorite victims of mischevious upper- 
classpersons. 

These older class members claimed that 
freshmen often lacked good looks, manners, 
and grace. They seemed to always be combing 
their hair, looking in mirrors, and always drop- 
ping their books in the hallways. 

Strange incidents of freshmen casualties also 
happened quite frequently in the middle of 
crowded areas. Explanations as to what hap- 
pened, or of whom assaulted the poor student 


often went unanswered. 

But not all older students make trouble from 
these little people. Brooke Bjorkman said 
"Nathan McClain has really helped me during 
my first year at the high school." 

Many seniors, juniors, and sophomores help 
the youngsters through the halls, with their 
schedules, and their locker combinations. They 
act as their older peers and often overlook the 
strange happenings or questions. They often 
snicker to themselves when they have over- 
heard some remarks they thought quite funny 
and something a typical freshman would ask. 
They overlook it and just say, "They're freshmen." 

by Carrie Owen & Emily Stitch 


196 FRESHMAN 



Jerin Holder 
Joseph Hollis 
Melissa Holloway 
Brenda Holmes 
Fred Holt 
Shawn Holt 


Judith Hoover 
Donald Hopkins 
Timothy Hopkins 
Clarissa Horn 
Stephan Horvath 
Kenneth Hozian 


Kristopher Huckelberry 
Allison Hudgins 
Christopher Hunter 
John Hyden 
Jose Jacinto 
Renee Jackson 


Aaron Jackstadt 
Brian James 
Donald James 
Adam Jenness 
Lynde Jerrell 
Amy Johnson 

Jenette Johnson 
Bradley Jolly 
Charles Jolly 
Davis Jones 
Jennifer Jones 
Joseph Judd 




2 


1 . Jill Talley and Jennifer Frankiin 
enjoy the evening and the 
Homecoming football game. It's 
alv/ays a good time and a good 
way to meet new friends. 2. 
Ryan Reeves, Pat Rich, and 
Brian Buske teach Dustin 
Richards a little lesson. 


FRESHMAN 197 




David Justice 
Meiody Justice 
Sheiley Justice 
Karla Kamadulski 
David Kasprovich 
John Keene 


Amanda Kelley 
Jodie Kern 
Kami Kessel 
Cynthia King 
Todd Kinison 
John Kirchner 


Leighann Klug 
Brian Koberna 
Brian Kohler 
Steven Kondrich 
Chrissy Kozlowski 
Jeffery Kraus 


Stephanie Kraus 
Cassandra Krinski 
Lori Krug 
Frederick Kudelka 
John Kudelka 
Robert Kuehnel 


Brian Kulasza 
Christopher Kult 
Sean Lakatos 
Lorna Lance 
Michelle Landon 
Carey Lassen 


1. Jeff Stephens shoves 
Jason Smith in the locker 
while his friends laugh. 2. 
Ireene Gameng is em- 
barrassed to read her 
Spanish in front of other 
people. 


198 FRESHMAN 




Jason Leach 
Nicholas Leara 
Susan Ledbetter 
Bryan Lee 
Asa Legate 
Ian Leith 


Kim Lemler 
John Lewis 
Sean Lewis 
Jennifer Lidikay 
Matthew Lienemann 
Stacey Little 


Charles Loftus 
Gary Long 
Terry Long 
Christina Lour 
David Love 
Mathew Lucash 


Scott Lybarger 
Joe Maher 
Sevag Manoufar 
Amy Martin 
Dana Martin 
Danielle Martin 


Anthony Martinez 
James Martinez 
Stan Martinez 
Richard Mathenia 
Patrick May 
Joe Mayes 


LIFE GOES ON AND ON AND ON 


Have you ever had food stuck in your 
teeth when you were talking to that 
'special someone?' Have you tripped 
over your own feet or spilled some 
soda in the cafeteria? Didn't you just 
want to disappear? Everyone has had 
one of the embarrassing moments 
throughout their high school days. 

David Justice said, "I feel down the 
steps.", and Brian Nemeth has an " . . . 
older brother calling him 'freshman.'" 

Being embarrassed is not all that 
bad. When you think about it every- 
body gets that way once in a while. If 


you can laugh about it it helps. But some- 
times that's difficult to do. 

Matt Lienemann said, "I got my books 
knocked out of my hands and I just 
laughed about it because I didn't want to 
look dumb." 

Getting embarrassed is not the end of 
the world. The next time you get red in the 
face, don't worry. All you have to remem- 
ber is that it happens to every one — even 
you. 

by Carrie Owen and Emily Stitch 


FRESHMAN 199 


Rebecca McArther 
May McCallister 
Joshua McClelland 
Joseph McCoy 
Anthony McGllberry 
Melissa McIntosh 


Robert McIntosh 
Tina McIntosh 
David McKee 
Jeanine McMillan 
Jeffrey McMIlllan 
Dana Mead 


Kristi Melton 
Tammy Mendenhall 
Jamie Michaels 
Tabitha Milam 
Ernest Miller 
James Miller 


Stacy Milton 
Chad Miner 
Regina MIskell 
Holly Morgan 
Larren Mosby 
Angela Mouser 


JIM Moutrla 
Kelly Mullen 
Melissa Munoz 
Donald Murphy 
James Myers 
Olivia Neeley 




1 


1. Nick Simpson and Shane Ciark display 
their locker rules and all their books and 
notes. 2. Sean Firebaugh glances up while 
reading the Granite City High School rule 
book. 



200 FRESHMAN 



Brian Nemeth 
Crystal Nicol 
Bobby Niesporek 
Beth Noe 
Clinton North 
Stephen Norton 


Erika Nothstine 
Charles Noud 
Lee Ann Novich 
Angela O’Dell 
Donald Oehlecker 
Jason Oliver 


Kimberly Olson 
Nathan Owen 
Renee Ozee 
Brandy Pace 
Nicole Parker 
Robbie Parker 


Thomas Parmley 
Stephanie Parrish 
Christine Patterson 
Christina Pavlow 
Christopher Petras 


David Petrillo 
Zachary Phillips 
Jesse Pigg 
Jason Pilger 
Jerome Planitz 
John Polivich 


READ AND FOLLOW ALL THE RULES 


High school rules are tolerable for all students, 
Everyone should read them and follow them. 
That's the rules. 

The rules at the high school are not the same 
as in junior high. That's why it is important to 
know what you can and cannot do here at the 
big school. It's a good idea to get the ruie book, 
read it, know it, and foilow the ruies. That'll keep 
you informed and probabiy out of school trou- 
ble. 

Some of the freshmen comments regarding 
ruies were, "I don't mind them," "Why do i have 
to foilow them?" "Every place has its ruies," "It 
sure is different here. It's not like in junior high 
schooi," and "Why so many rules." 

It's important that you are familiar with the 
smoking rules, the tardy policy, and the ab- 


sence poiicy. It's also a good idea to tell your 
parents the name of your guidance counseior. 

Your guidance counseior is the person your 
parent cail when you are at home sick in bed. 
If you are sick in bed, you're probably too tired 
to wake up and disciose the name of your 
counseior to your parents ... so give them a 
break and teli them before you get sick. 

Believe it or not, ruies are made for a reason. 
Basicaliy, they are made and enforced to keep 
order and maintain discipiine at the high 
school. There is a iogicai explanation for any 
high school rule . . just read it a couple of times 
and you'll begin to understand it. 

by Emily Stitch 


FRESHMAN 201 


Robert Porter 
Brian Powell 
Travis Price 
Rebecca Pryor 
Dicha Puckette 
Gilbert Pulley 


Elizabeth Purkaple 
Stacy Rath 
Jamie Ray 
Nicole Raynor 
Misty Reagan 
Rebecca Reese 


Dennis Revelle 
Dustin Richards 
Sherry Richardson 
Norman Richter 
Jeffrey Ridenour 
Jimmy Rieser 


Tammy Rippee 
Charles Rippy 
Ryan Robertson 
Kimberly Robinson 
Matthew Ruder 
Allen Rutledge 


Jason Rutter 
Rachel Saebens 
Michelle Sanders 
Erica Sbabo 
Patricia Scarbrough 
Laura Schannot 


Teri Schatz 
Scott Schaus 
Jason Schmidt 
Sara Schmedaman 
Robin Schubert 
Mark Schuette 



JUST A LIHLE ADVICE FOR YOU 


Entering high school can be a frightening 
experience. No one knows this better than a 
ninth grader. These wide-eyed students come 
to school not knowing what to wear, what to 
say, or how to act. This is where the upperclass- 
man comes in to assist. Here is some good 
advice to help break the ice and get things 
going for these young students. 

Tim White says, ” ... Do anything you want. 
Your actions shouldn't be dictated by some- 


body just because they are a few years older.' 

Todd Pryor continues to say, "... Don't be 
afraid to open your mouth and say what you 
feel. But, if you do, don't be surprised if you get 
yelled at." 

Dan Terrell concludes and says," . . . Stay with 
it and don't forget the grades either." 

by Carrie Owen & Emily Stitch 


202 FRESHMAN 




Jennifer Schwager 
April Self 
Larry Severs 
Rebecca Shaver 
Ryan Shelton 
Matthew Shickles 


Jamie Shipp 
Shawn Shrum 
George Siler 
Erik Simpson 
Nicholas Simpson 
Alicia Skirball 


Gerald Slattery 
Carl Smick 
Jason Smith 
Lon Smith 
Shannon Smith 
William Snyder 


Melanie Solomon 
Gerald Sorenson 
Nicky Sponsler 
Paula Sronce 
Jaclyn Stallings 
Jennifer Stepanek 


Jason Stern 
Jennifer Stimac 
Jeremy Stovall 
Brandy Strader 
Daryn Strong 
Billy Swaringam 


Cindy Talley 
Jill Talley 

Christopher Tanksley 
Jeremy Taylor 
Jessica Thomas 
William Thomas 



1. Seniors give some advice to the freshman boys in their P.E. classes. They tell them what to expect during 
their next four years. 


FRESHMAN 203 


Richard Thomas 
Michael Thompson 
Jennifer TrtanJ 
Shon Tullock 
Sarah Turck 
Melanie Valencia 


Eric Vallo 
Jamie Vance 
Melissa Varner 
Amanda Vaughn 
JoAnn Venable 
Ray Villier 


Heather Votoupal 
Jolene Votoupal 
Craig Wagner 
Kenneth Wakeford 
Charles Walker 
Corey Wall 


Robert Wallace 
Stacie Wallace 
Tina Wallace 
Corey Wallis 
JoAnna Webb 
Robert Webb 


Amy Webster 
Channa Weckman 
Greg Weckman 
Jennifer Wells 
Damon Wesbrook 
Usa West 


Christie Wheatley 
Jodie Wheeler 
Angela White 
Jason White 
Sheila White 
Trula White 




204 FRESHMAN 





Christopher Whitehead 
Keri Whitehead 
MaryJo Whitford 
Sarah Whitseii 
Michaei Wieigus 
Juiie Wienhoff 


George Wiikerson 
Dawn Wiison 
Mark Winfieid 
David Wise 
Cari Witt 
Jeffery Witter 


Jennifer Wojtowicz 
Brandy Woif 
Tanya Woif 
Shannon Woife 
Michaei Wood 
Chad Wozniak 


Amy Wright 
Juiie Wright 
Jeremy Wyatt 
Jason Yarber 
Adriane Yates 
Christopher Yokiey 


Kimberiy York 
Meiissa Young 
Stephanie Younger 
Vicky Zeigier 
Nicoie Zeienka 
Joseph Zeiierman 


Stacy Zingrich 
Shane Zorbist 


PLEASE OBEY THE FOLLOWING RULES 


In order to survive as a freshman at Granite 
City High School, there are some major rules to 
follow. Of course, you must obey all the school 
rules. But, be prepared for some rules made up 
by the upperclassmen. 

1. Don't panic the first day of school. 2. If you 
cannot find your way to your first class, just keep 
walking — you'll eventually find it. 3. Stay out of 
the way of the upperclassman. Don't think you 
know more than a senior. 4. Be prepared for 
teasing. 5. Don't get angry at name calling or 


practical jokes. 6. Remember that whatever a 
senior wants, they usually get. 7. Don't cut in 
front of someone oider than you in the cafeteria. 
8. Try not to get too close to lockers — you may 
end up in one. 9. Smile. 10. Be nice to seniors, 
juniors, and even sophomores. 11. Don't get 
discouraged . . . remember that all upperclass- 
man were once freshmen. They survived . . so 
will you. 

by Carrie Owen & Emily Stitch 


FRESHMAN 205 


€XPR€SS VOURS€LF 


GRANITE CITY 
BOARD OF 
EDUCATION 



Roy Koberna 
President 



Front row: Roy Koberna, Jeff Parker, and Mack Johnson Back row. Dr. Mark Eavenson, L. 
Monroe Worthen, Debbie Holt-Wilkerson, and Pete Novacich 


206 BOARD OF EDUCATION, FACULTY, & STAFF 


IN 



Debbie Holt-Wilkerson 
Vice-President 



Mack Johnson 
Treasurer 



Pete Novacich 
Board Member 



Dr. Mark Eavenson 
Secretary 



L . Monroe Worthen 
Board Member 



Jeff Parker 
Board Member 





BOARD OF EDUCATION, FACULTY, & STAFF 207 



GILBERT 

V. 

WALMSLEY 



Our Superintendent of Schools is Mr. Gilbert V. 
Walmsley. Mr. Walmsley has been associated 
with the Granite City school system since 1963 
when he left teaching in St. Louis to come here 
as an instructor in the industrial arts and drivers 
education programs. 

Besides being an instructor in industrial arts and 
driver education, he was a former guidance 
counselor and assistant principal at the high 
school. In 1970, he became principal of Prather 
Junior High School. In 1972, he was named princi- 
pal of Granite City High School/North, serving in 
that position for ten years. 


In 1983 when the high schools were combined, 
he became principal of Granite City High School. 
He served as principal of the combined higlf 
schools until being appointed Superintendent o. 
Schools-District #9 in 1986. 

Mr. Walmsley graduated from East Alton- 
Wood River High School. He holds a Bachelor's 
Degree in Industrial Arts and Safety Education 
from Southern Illinois University/Carbondale, a 
Master's Degree in School Administration anc.' 
Guidance, and an Educational Specialist Degree 
in School Administration from Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity/Edwardsville. 


208 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 




STEVE BALEN 

Director of Special Education 
District Region I 



RICHARD BRINKHOFF 

Administrative Assistant 
Elementary Instruction 



RONALD LANDMAN 

Director of Buildings 
and Grounds 



, GARY PFROENDER 

Director of Chapter I 


BOARD OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

STAFF 




DICK ERVAY 

Director of Food Sen/ices 


TOM HOUOWAY 

Director of Industrial Arts 
Vocatiorxal and Career 
Education 


MONTE KESSLER 

Director of Data Processing 





BOYD McCOMMIS 

Supervisor of Custodians 


W. STUART MILLS 

Supen/isor of Special Education 
District Region I 


NORMAN OWCA 

Director of Finance 





MICHAEL SIKORA 

Administrative Assistant 
Secondary Instruction 


PATRICK SCHUMAN 

Personnel Director 


KAREN SZEDLAR 

Supervisor of Insurance 


ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 209 






AT THE HELM 


The last textbook was returned. The last attendance sheet was picked up. The last final grade 
was determined. The last diploma was issued. 

Finally, a lull came in the frantic last-week and last-day activities. Finally, the GCFIS principal had 
several free moments to relax and reflect over the year which had just ended. 

What had been unique about 1990-91? Flad it been a year which could be distinguished from 
those which immediately preceded and which would immediately follow? 

To begin with, this was David Painter's first year at the helm. Mr. Painter had served as assistant 
principal at this school and at CGFIS/North, but he had never been the man in charge. 

This year, then, had been unique for Mr. Painter. As he sat and reflected on his first year at the 
helm, he realized that many of his goais for the past year had been met. 

Improved communication in the high school had been one of Mr. Painter's goals. Fie instituted 
meetings, wrote personai memos and encouraged parent-teacher interaction to heip establish 
better communication. In addition, there was a positive change in students' behavior and attitude. 
Change in discipiinary procedure and new student spirit activities heiped to make students have 
better reactions to their schooi. 

Finaiiy, Mr. Painter said that he would remember this year as a year of cooperation. 'The 
cooperation of the students and staff with the administration helped make this a very successful 
year." 



1. Emily Stitch, David Painter, Julie Fernandez, and Carrie 0\A/en wear their Santa hat during 
Christmas activity week. 2. Principal David Painter. 3. Mr. Painter sits at his desk and enjoys 
one of the quiet moments in his busy daily schedule. 


210 PRINCIPAL 




DAVID PAMTER 
PRINCPAL 

PRINCIPAL 211 







JERRY MCKECHAN 


212 ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS 




WALT WHITAKER 


THREE BRAVE MEN 


Being an assistant principal is one of the toughest jobs at the high school. Besides all the time spent 
at school, they also willingly attend dances, concerts, and sporting events. These three good and brave 
men are Allen Kennerly, Walt Whitaker, and Jerry McKechan. 

Mr. Kennerly's job puts him in charge of student records, progress reports, and eligibility forms. He also 
deals with the stujdents who drop out of school and the newly enrolled ones. 

He says that "being in charge of all student records is both rewarding and challenging. I enjoy the 
responsibility of keeping track of all the little details that make up a student's permanent record." 

Mr. Whitaker is mainly in charge of discipline. He is responsible for students whose last names begin 
with the letters M thru Z. He says “It's pretty hectic in our office sometimes, but overall the student body 
is well behaved and does an outstanding job in supporting sports and extra curricular activities. We 
have a great school." 

Mr. McKechan joined us this year from Grigsby Junior High School where he taught health and P.E. 
He is also in charge of disciplining students. The letters A thru L are his responsibliity. He says everyday 
is a challenge-different and exciting. Everyone should try this once. 

Without these three gentlemen, our school would not run as smoothly as it does. The teachers and 
other administrators are always aware of this and grateful for their assistance and cooperation. 


ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS 213 




FACULTY 



1 . Karen Moore, Jim Hoeffner, Lorry Wright, and Jim McKechon sit next to their favorite teacher — 
Mr. Horry Cook. 


1990 - 1991 


214 FACULTY 




Sonya Adkerson 
Laura Aerne 
JoAnn Aleman 
David Ames 


Dale Ashmore 
Eugene Baker 
Richard Bertacchi 
Antonio Betancourt 


Donna Brown 
Melvin Bunting 
Christine Byer 
August Catanzaro 


Laura Chappell 
Russell Chappell 
Sheila Christianson 
Dennis Church 


Barbara Coleman 
Harry Cook 
Helen Cook 
Milton Cox 


FACULTY 215 


Frank DallaRiva 
Mary Dame 
Ronald Dillard 
Larry Duckworth 


Bette Dumont 
Arthur Eardley 
Jerry Ethridge 
Sheryl Evans 


Evelyn Fedora 
Laura Froemling 
Robert Gagliano 
Gale Garbe 




216 FACULTY 




Michael Garland 
Harold Gebhardt 
Austin Gonnez 
Linda Green 


Linda Haddox 
Steve Hamilton 
James Harsh 
Betty Hicks 


Joann Higgins 
Linda Hill 
David Hopp 
Cynthia Hormell 


irs NOT JUST A JOB 


Early each morning of the school year, approximately 130 teachers pull into the parking lots, step 
from their cars, and enter the hallowed halls of Granite City High School. 

What brings these teachers out at such an early hour? What brings them back day after day? Could 
it be students who are eager for learning? Often. Could it be those students who challenge teachers 
every minute they are in class? Frequently. Could it be exorbitant salaries. No. But show up these 
professionals do. They come because they know they can make a difference. It doesn't have to be a 
big difference — just a difference. 

The day often starts with a mug of coffee strong enough to float a horseshoe. The early birds know 
their job is to get that coffee pot going. That tantalizing aroma floats down the hallway, drawing others 
with cups in hand. And so begins another challenging day at GCHS. 

Picking up their mail and greeting friends and colleagues, those professionals make their way to the 
special turf to do what they do best. The joys and rewards are many, and in quiet moments of 
frustration, they reassure themselves with some familiar sayings, 'Teachers touch the future." "I'm here 
for a reason," and "the good days always seem to outnumber the bad." 

To find out more about these unique individuals, check the following pages. 


FACULTY 217 


Glen Hubbartt 
Sondro Jesse 
Jamie Johnson-Dunn 
Michael Johnson 


Teresa Johnson 
Mary Karoly 
Gary Kasprovich 
Paul Kimbrell 



GOOD-BYE OLD FRIENDS 


After years of education and after years of helping people achieve their educational goals, dreams, and hopes a fev/ 
of our teachers are retiring this year. The students and faculty would like to wish them well in their retirement and hope that 
it will be full of joy and happiness. Everyone knows that here have been many ups and downs in their careers when dealing 
with the unpredictable behavior of students as they are trying to achieve adulthood. 

Below is a brief biography of each retiree: 

Frank DallaRiva, business teacher, attended Livingston, Illinois High School and went on to continue his education at Illinois 
State University. He began teaching business at Granite City High School in 1958, now in 1991 is ready for a change in his 
life. After retiring, he plans to fish, travel, and hike. Mr. DallaRiva would like to leave some last words of advice to high school 
students, “Students need to apply themselves and take advantage of their opportunities - which they have many." 

Dale Rice, math teacher, attended Granite City High School and then went on to continue his education at SlUE. He 
began teaching at GCHS in 1965 and now he would like to move on and teach in different parts of the world. 

Milton Cox, business teacher, attended Wheeler High School in Mississippi. He later went on to pursue his education in 
Nashville, Tennessee at Vanderbilt. He began teaching at GCHS in 1956 and no would like to travel and do volunteer work. 
Mr. Cox says, “At the beginning of my teaching career students, in general, seemed to have needed less incentives and 
“prodding" in lesson preparation and learning. In comparison, todays students need more incentives and encouragement. 
Several factors may cause this need, such as more outside interferences, excessive T.V., drugs, less parental involvement, 
and less pressure from teachers for achievement standards. I believe most of our students are capable of adjusting to these 
factors and making a success of themselves in life." 

Al Turner, vocational teacher, attended Granite City High School. He then went on to continue his education at St. Louis 
University. He began working at the board office in 1970 as assistant business manager. In 1974 he changed jobs and 
started teaching at Alton Junior High School. A year later he moved back to Granite City and began teaching at Granite 
City North High School. In 1984, when our high schools merged, Mr. Turner continued teaching in Graite City and now in 
1991 he would like to retire and enjoy the rest of his life. 

Evelyn Fedora, counselor, attended Madison High School. After graduation she furthered her education at SlUC. Mrs. 
Fedora, although relatively new to our high school, is ready to retire and find out what else life has to offer. She has 
contributed much to our school and has had a wonderful influence on our students. When asked to comment our her job, 
she replied; “I value the opportunity to work with high school students. I hope our students feel that they are important to 
us." 

The students at GCHS say, “Thank you for holding on and dedicating your lives to ours." Many will immulate you and take 
the torch of education to other young people. 


218 FACULTY 



David King 
Earl Koller 
Sondra Kopsky 
Stanley Kowalev\/ich 


Edward Lenzi 
Gus Lignoul 
Allen Lobdell 
Thomas Lubak 



FACULTY 219 



Leonard Lyborger 
Margaret Lyons 
David McClain 
Shannon McClintock 


Donna McCormick 
Dennis Meyer 
Paul Mihalich 
D.F. Miller 


Don Miller 
John Modica 
Richard Moore 
F. Gordon Mueller 





NO SMOKING 


Everyone knows that "smoking ain't allowed in 
school." and there should be no "smoking in the boys' 
room" either. That was made perfectly clear by a 
unique group of faculty and staff members as they lip 
synced their way into the hearts of everyone who 
attended the 1990 lip sync competition. ^ 

Their version was sung by Motley Crue, but the 
original goes back a few years to when the members 
of Motley Crue were still in diapers. In either case, the 
message is still the same — no smoking in school. If 
you don't believe that, just ask Mr. Jerry McKechan. 



220 FACULTY 



FACULTY 221 


Shirley Stroud. 2. Linda Green, Beverly Golden, Betty Hicks, and Sandra Jessee, 3. Deborah 
Larsen, Connie Paterson, Mary Dame, Mary Trimmer, and Ginny Henson. 



Gail Mueller 
Jean Nelson 
William Ohiendorf 
Terryl Papa 


Elaine Parish 
Jack Parker 
Gregory Patton 
Diane Peach 



SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE 


“Today's lecture will cover the ..." 

"Your homework assignment for tomorrow is in the red book 
on page " 

“The next exciting test will be over " 

Each day in the classrooms throughout Granite Cit/ High 
School a variety of topics was discussed, projects and lessons 
assigned, and activities conducted. Glasses were offered to 
meet the needs and Interests of all students. 

College-bound students enrolled in academic classes such as 
chemistry, algebra, foreign language, or biology. 

Career-oriented students had an opportunity to learn job skills 
they could use immediately. Office skills were taught In business 
classes and some students took advantage of the co-op pro- 
gram and began working during their last two years in high 
school. 

Vocational opportunities came from classes such as welding, 
graphic arts, drafting, machine shop, metals, electricity, auto- 
motive, and building trades. Some of these classes offer 'hands- 
on' experience, such as automotive. Also in the building trades 
class, students help build the new Hall of Fame that will grace 
the Granite City High School campus. 

Specialized and practical skills such as art, foods, career, 
fashion merchandising, music, and speech were also made 
available for interested students. 

Thus, everyday at GCHS, students were preparing for their lives 
after graduation. And the teachers were there to instruct, assist, 
and advise the future business women and men of our commu- 
nity. 



222 FACULTY 



Ronald Pennell 
Mary Perdue-Tapp 
Thomas Pinnell 
Harold Price 


Dan Rahn 
James Randall 
Thelma Randall 
Robert Rehg 




3 

1 . Paul Mihalich paints a football for Mr. Lignoul. 

2. Mr. Kimbrell works with his welding students. 

3. Donna Brown goes to help Julie Meyers 


2 


FACULTY 223 




Marvin Rensing 
Dale Rice 
Ann Rich 
Catherine Riebold 


Dorothye Reynolds 
Ralph Rotter 
Albert Rowden 
Wilma Schulze 


Beverley Scroggins 
Mary Jo Seibold 
Donald Shaffner 
Phillip Shatto 



ON AGAIN — OFF AGAIN 


Every year bn January 1 or December 31, people throughout the world resolve to do or not to do. 
They plan to give up bad habits, clean up their act, and pay more attention to their personal faults. 

Teachers are among these noble people. Many will resolve to stop smoking, lose weight, be nicer 
to everyone, or make more money. The ones who keep these resolutions are disciplined and motivated 
enough to succeed. The teachers who don't always have another year to try again. 

Ralph Rotter — “I didn't make any, because I always break them anyway." Larry Talbert — "to try 
harder." Sheila Christianson — "Just to make it through 1 991 -honestly. Elaine Parish — "lots of fun in '91 ." 
Sheryl Evans — "I'm going to get my eyes checked." Thomas Lubak — "lose weight and grade my 
papers on time." David Hopp — "reduce my stress level at school so my blood pressure can drop and 
approach a normal level." Betty Hicks — "I was going to seriously diet. However, I heard on the radio 
it is too stressful to start a new year that way." Frank DallaRiva — "more fun and less work." Cynthia 
Hormell — "to lose ten pounds — the same ten pounds I've lost numerous times and to become a 
better teacher and motivate students more." Allen Lobdell — "to be a better teacher and coach and 
stop eating three meals a day. 


224 FACULTY 




Robert Stegemeier 
Betty Stone 
Sandro Strannigan 
Shirley Stroud 


Larry Talbert 
Norbert Tate 
Donna Theis 
Deane Thomas 


Mary Trimmer 
Peggy Tucker 
Alvin Turner 
Bruce Ullman 





3 


1. David Hopp stands on the heater to dry 
off his shoes and possibly reduce his stress 
level. 2. Nicole Zelenka says to Mr. Allen 
LobdelL "Give me a break." 3. Mr. Thomas 
Lubak shows Tim White how to work a math 
problem. 


FACULTY 225 




John VanBuskirk 
Robert Waldrup 
Phyllis Weiss 
Darlene Wenner 


Bryan Wilkinson 
Janet Williams 
Stanley Wojcik 
Evelyn Wright 


Thomas Wyrostek 
Andrew Yurko 
Richard Zeisset 
Carla Ziff 




1. Soccer coaches David Ames, Gene Baker, and Mel Bunting. 2. Mr. Bunting does \A/hat he likes best — 
talking and teaching. 3. Mel and Bobby Thomas say "if you can do this, you can do anything." 4. At his desk, 
behind a stack of books, Mel shows his famous smile. 5. Mel. 


226 FACULTY 



NOBODY DOES IT BEHER 

The month of September began another work year for the Warrior yearbook staff. It was the 
month that they would once again select their ‘spotlight teacher’ featured at the end of the faculty 
section. They thought about this for a few days and decided that this was the year for Mr. Mel 
Bunting. 

Most of the seniors on the staff had Mr. Bunting for their economics teacher and were sincerely 
overwhelmed by his knowledge of the subject. Skip Birdsong said that “Mr. Bunting made 
economics one of the funniest classes I had during school.” “His class was the first class I had a 
great time in and didn’t get in trouble for it.” added Byran McKechan. 

Mr. Bunting has been a teacher at Granite City High School for 22 years. He enjoys his job and 
this admiration for teaching and high school students is reflected in his daily lectures. Emily Stitch 
says, “Mr. Bunting is not just an excellent teacher, he’s also a great person. He treats his students 
with respect and makes you feel like your opinions and comments count. I’m very glad I got the 
chance to have him as one of my teachers.” 

He has also been assistant soccer coach here for 18 years. His fellow coaches. Gene Baker and 
David Ames, are both work buddies and close friends. It would be impossible to have such a 
successful soccer season year after year without complete cooperation and respect among the 
coaches. 

“The three of us. Coach Baker, Mr. Bunting and myself, have been friends for a long time and look 
out for each other. The close friendships we have, I think has a lot to do with the success the soccer 
program has experienced. We are friends both on and off the soccer field and seem to know how 
each of us fell about many situations’ says good friend and teacher David Ames. 

With his wife, Cathy, and two children, Chris end Lauren, Mr. B shares his lovely home in 
Rosewood Heights. His oldest daughter, Lisa, lives in Atlanta, Georgia. Very soon she will make him 
the proud grandfather of his first grandchild. 

Mel Bunting puts enthusiasm into each and every lecture he gives. He doesn’t just teach out of 
a text book, but he relates economics to student’s every day life. Probably the most noticed quality 
in Mr. Bunting is the fact that he really cares about his students and will go out of his way to assist 
them in any way he can, whether it be an assignment or even a college recommendation letter. 
The Warrior yearbook staff thinks that Mel Bunting is the best thing to come along since apple 
butter . . . and we all know that’s good! 

by Carrie, Emily, Leah, and Melissa 


YEARBOOK SPOTLIGHT TEACHER 227 





THE LADIES OF GCHS 


When speaking of dedication, thoughtful- 
ness, and understanding, it is natural to think 
of the secretaries of Granite City High 
School. They are hard-working ladies that 
deal with students, teachers, and adminis- 
trators. 

They arrive before anyone gets to school 
and are usually the last ones to leave the 
building. They face hours of endless paper 
work, excuses, and phone calls, and they 
always manage to keep smiling. 

The high school secretaries include Geor- 
ganne Georgeff, Gladys Zukas, Nancy Ro- 


sales, Donna Swanson, Kristen Hamilton, 
Jane Moore, and Kathleen Webb. Pat Uzun- 
off and Berta Milianis are board office sec- 
retaries at the high school. 

The endless hours of paperwork done by 
these ladies sometimes goes unrecognized. 
Many do not stop to realize that this high 
school would not run as smoothly as it does 
without them. They do their work, go home, 
and come back the next day ready to 
begin all over again. 

by Kristin Jenness 


228 SECRETARIES 







1 Executive secretary, Georganne Georgeff. 2. 
Gladys Zukas. 3. Donna Swanson, 4. Kristen Hamil- 
ton. 5. Jane Moore. 6. Kathleen Webb. 7. Pat Uzun- 
off. 8. Nancy Rosales and Santa Randy Anderson. 9. 
Berta Milianis 


SECRETARIES 229 




1 Debbie Brimm, Joan 
Slecka, Marie Gray, Earleen 
Hayes, Nancy Wilson, Miriam 
Ozonich, Jackie Bulla, Judy 
Dutko, ROW 2. Lorraine Nie- 
pert, Joann Romaine, Cher- 
ly Birdsong, Elaine Vomor- 
nia, Debbie Kennedy, 
Sandy Richey, Joan Stark, 
Debbie LeMaster, Pat Hart- 
man, Phyliss Popmarkoff. 2. 
Nancy Wilson fills out a food 
order. 3. Debbie Kennedy 4. 
Elaine Vomornia pours a 
cool drink of water. 5. 
Cleaning up after a hard 
days work. 6. Earleen Hayes 
and Miriam Ozonich. 



230 CAFETERIA 




WHAT’S COOKMG? 

Everyday when you come to school one might think, what will we get for lunch 
today? A usual day for the dedicated cafeteria staff is getting up at 5:30 A.M. in order 
to be at the high school by 7:00 A.M. That's what the cafeteria staff does five days a 
week. 

They work diligently to get everything put together on time and in the right way. Their 
jobs do not end for the day untii they get everything ready for the next day to begin. So 
when they get to work at 7:00 everything is ready to go. 

The lady that has this responsibility is Nancy Wilson. Mrs. Wilson has been at the high 
schooi for eight years and in charge for five years. 

Mrs. Nancy Wiison stated, "\ enjoy the job very much and the women are great to 
work with. The staff works great with the kids." She adds, "Since the campus has been 
ciosed, we have provided a variety of foods for the students to choose from." 

Students often take this staff for granted. They do not realize that Granite City High 
Schooi would not be the same if it was not for the hard work, dedication, hours, and 
care of ali the staff who heip keep this school running smoothly and the people well fed. 

by Liz Harris 


CAFETERIA 231 





1. Connie Paterson. 2. Don Gray. 3. Beverly Golden. 
4. Charlie Jakal. 5. Terry Kent. 6. Ginny Henson. 7. Bob 
Morgan, Mike Montgomery, and Eric Hill \A/atch Mike 
Rongey grab hold of Beverly Golden. 8. Kathy House 
talks to Julie Fernandez while Connie Paterson gets 


ready to talk on her radio. 9. Ginny Henson gets Todd 
Brooks while Dave Boley watches. 10. The monitors of 
Granite City High School; Don Gray, Charlie Jakal, 
Beverly Golden, Ginny Henson, Terry Kent, Kathy 
House, and Connie Paterson. 


232 MONITORS 




YO, YOU OVER THERE 


Monitors ore a familiar sight now around the 
campus. Six monitors have returned from last 
year, and before. They are Don Gray, Kathy 
House, Charlie Jakul, Connie Paterson, Beverly 
Golden, and Terry Kent. 

Terry is a part-time monitor along with Ginny 
Henson who is new this year. 

The full time monitors arrive every morning at 
7:15 a.m. and are at school until 3:30 p.m. They 
patrol the entire school inside and out during the 
school day. Connie Paterson says that “It's bet- 
ter this year. The students respect us more, 
which makes our job easier." “What I enjoy most 
about this work are the students. Nothing makes 
me happier than to see them happy. And defi- 
nitely when the weather is really nice outside." 
says Kathy House. 

The part-time monitors are here from 10 a.m. 
until 1:30 p.m. They monitor the cafeteria and 


surrounding areas during the lunch hours. When 
asked what she thinks of her job, Mrs. Henson 
replied enthusiastically, “I love my job!" 

The monitors help to keep order and discipline 
around the campus. With only seven monitors to 
watch over so many students, their job isn't an 
easy one. Some days they must stand in freezing 
weather to see that no one is on the move to 
sneak off campus. Even under conditions like 
these, they always have a cheerful hello and 
bright smiles for everyone. 

With the success of the closed campus, it 
looks like the monitors are here to stay, and most 
students like that idea. 

by Julie Fernandez 


MONITORS 233 





SPOT CLEAN 


Very few students at GCHS ever stop to 
consider how important the custodians 
really are. They work 7 days a week 12 
months a year to help make our high school 
days run smoothly. 

Custodians usually go unappreciated. 
Many students do not know or realize the 
time, effort, and hours these hard working 
people put in. 

During the year there are custodians as- 
signed to the day and evening shift. During 
the day, when school is in session, the cus- 
todians can be seen throughout the build- 
ing keeping the campus clean and orderly. 
In the evening, other custodians come and 
have their designated classrooms and 
area to clean. Both of these shifts are very 
time consuming and strenuous, but the 
summertime is one of the worst parts of 
their job. This is the time when they have to 
clean all the rooms, make repairs, replace 
lights and missing tiles, and tend to all the 
other things that need to be completed to 
do their job well. 

By Leah Schuman 



234 CUSTODIANS 





7 


1. Betty Bladdick 2. Sam Parks 3. Gary Aaron 4. Lead Man, C. J. Jones 
5. Row 1. Walt Volkmar, C.J, Jones, Don Murphy Row 2. Jim Moske, 
John Kipp, Tom Slecka, Sam Stoynoft, Kenny Mitchell, Bill Robbins, Mike 
Beasley 6. Bill Robbins 7. Jeff Withers 


CUSTODIANS 235 






1. Barbara Schmedake. 2. JoAnn Yurko, 3. Nelda 
Sanders. 4. Kevin McBee. 5. Ronda Anderson, 6. Bob 
Burkett. 7. JoAnn Yurko works on the computer in 
room 145. 8. Kevin McBee watches o demonstration 


along with the class members and therapist, Debbie 
Mergler. 9. Neldo Sanders in one of the classrooms 
she visits doily. 


236 AIDES 




SPECIAL PEOPLE - SPECIAL HELP 


The teacher aides are caring and special people. They spend their days taking care and 
teaching the disable people in our school. 

Time, patience, and optimism are qualities our teacher aides possess. Their job is very demand- 
ing, but none of them mind. Mrs. Yurko says, "I love having fun with all the kids." 

Kevin McBee says that he likes his job because the "kids are special people." He also says that 
his job's environment is the best he has ever worked in. Barbara Schmedake says, "I like my job 
because I enjoy the kids and it's fun to work at the high school." 

Nelda Sanders likes her job "because I get to be around great kids. I also work with some really 
nice people. I think working at the high school is a lot of fun. There is always something going on." 

Rondo Anderson concludes and says, "The teachers are so interesting. So are the students." 

By Angie Withers & Carrie Owen 


AIDES 237 


PilAJP 




€XPft€SS VOURS€LF 



♦ 


238 CLUBS 



IN 



3 


1 John Billick works on High World material. 2. Ronald Pennell talks 
to the play members. 3. Lori Lignoul cools off after a Student 
Council meeting. 




CLUBS 239 






1. High World Staff: Row 1: David Wilson. Justin Rayl. Patricia Soto. Cori Elmore. 
Amber Rogers. Angela Judd. Julia Boyer. Row 2: Mike Chapman. Chris Steiner. 
Shawn Buckingham. Chris Stroder. Brian Henry. John Billick. and Mr. Antonio 
Betancourt. 2. High World Editors: Row 1: Shawn Buckingham. Cori Elmore. 
Angela Judd. Chris Stroder. John Billick. Row 2: David Wilson. Patricia Soto. Julia 
Boyer. Mike Chapman. Stacy Jackson, and Justin Rayl. 3. Mike Chapman. 
Stacy Jackson, and Shawn Buckingham layout a sheet to be printed for the 
High World Newspaper. 4. David Wilson and Patty Soto write out bills for 
advertisement. 5. Angela Judd and John Billick take one last look before press 
time. 6. Chris Steiner and Justin Rayl type in a story. 7. Chief editors Amber 
Rogers and Brian Henry stand with High World sponsor Mr. Antonio Betancourt. 



3 


240 HIGH WORLD 



HIGH WORLD 

Did you ever wonder who put together the High World newspaper or how you could become a 
port of the staff? Step into room 132 to get the answers. 

Mr. Antonio Betancourt is the sponsor of the High World newspaper. He is an enthusiastic 
gentleman ready to help assist you with your needs and problems. As sponsor of the school 
paper, it is his job to listen to complaints proposed by the students. He, then, has to decide 
whether these student problems are significant enough for publications in the editorial section of 
the newspaper. 

Mr. Betancourt does a superior job helping and teaching his students the do's and do net's 
pertaining to the paper. This year's staff consists of 16 members. These staff members publish nine 
newspapers each year. The cost is 25-cents with one exception. The senior edition sells for 50- 
cents. 

The High World has been printed for 64 years. Mr. Betancourt has been in charge for the last five 
years. 

To become a member of the High World staff, one must obtain a permit from Mr. Betancourt. 
Students taking the beginning journalism class published a Cub Edition newspaper getting the real 
insight on newspaper publishing. This class also takes the place of one junior English course if of 
course taken in your junior year. 

The High World has many sections such as current news, sports, editorials, and features. All 
stories are written by the students for the purpose of publication. 

by Angela Judd 


HIGH WORLD 241 





— PHOTO CLUB— 

The photography club organizes the sales of 
all holiday carnations. They are sold on Hallow- 
een, Christmas, Valentine's Day, and St. Pa- 
trick's Day. The money earned was used to 
buy new equipment, film, and for the spring 
trip. 

Club members learn about camera proce- 
dures and the correct or best way to take 
pictures. Many events throughout the year are 
attended by club members to take pictures. 
Many of the pictures were donated to the 
yearbook staff. Members considered it quite 
an achievement to see their photos published. 

Officers for the club were Kristi Holsinger, 
president; Amy Isom, vice president; Angie 
Withers, secretary; and Melissa Tapp, treasur- 
er. D.P. Spudich sponsored the club. Together 
they did a wonderful job of capturing every 
perfect moment with their cameras. 

By Julie Fernandez 



242 PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 





1. Melissa Tapp, Amy Isom, Kristi 
Holsinger, and Angie Withers. 2. 
Amy Isenburg, Melissa Sam- 
mons, and Melissa Lynch. 3. Julie 
Fernandez, Angie Judd, Emily 
Stitch, and Carrie Owen. 4. Julie 
Fernandez, Kristi Holsinger, and 
Melissa Tapp sell a carnation to 
Jason Leonard. 


PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 243 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

What group of people have the most fun? What group is elected by their peers to direct the activities of 
the school? What group forges friendships for a lifetime? They serve without pay but learn the principles of 
leadership and how to get people to work together toward a common goal. They are the elected student 
council of Granite City High School. 

They organize the semi-formal dance and other dances, the homecoming parade, Christmas and 
Thanksgiving baskets, shopping sprees and shoes for the needy, and student of the month. Their main goal 
is to get students, parents, and the administration involved and dedicated to the idea of Warrior pride. 

Through their volunteer efforts, the members learn valuable lessons of what the real world is like. They 
meet the people that run the school system and the business world. They work with teachers, administrators, 
and business people. They get involved in school and business projects. They learn by doing and not by just 

watching. , 

The person who is behind all of this is their sponsor-Mr. Steve Hamilton. Mr. Hamilton has been the sponsor 
for the last 1 2 years. He enjoys his work and his participation in the student council projects. "It's always such 
a pleasure to meet such great people who care so much for other students, people, and the community. 
The council representatives put in literally hundreds of hours. It makes you so proud," replies Mr. Hamilton. 
The 1990-91 president Is Leah Schuman and serving as vice-presidents are Darla Mayhall and Andy 

Jenkins. , . .. l. ^ 

Andy says, "The vice-president's position has been an honor to fill as well as a pleasure. I have had fun 

this past year in student council." ^ 

Darla Mayhall adds, "I feel that being chosen to serve as vice-president of student council this past year 
has been a honorable position and a memorable one," 

Leah Schuman concludes by saying, "Being student council president was a very strenuous but very 
rewarding experience. But without the help of the vice-presidents; Darla Mayhall and Andy Jenkins, our 
student council advisor, Steve Hamilton and the entire student council the success of all of our activities 
would not have been possible." 


by Leah Schuman 


244 STUDENT COUNCIL 







1. Mr. Hamilton works hard on student council activities. 2. Bryan 
McKechan waits for someone to dance with at the Christmas 
dance sponsored by the student council. 3. Student Council. Row 
1; Dana Bugnitz, Tina Scaturro, Jenny Baker, Darla Mayhall. Row 2: 
Lori Lignoul, Angie Jacobs, Christie Hayden, Brandie Greco. Row 3: 
Andy Jenkins, Billy Vanbuskirk. 4. Row 1: Adrian Yates, Brooke 
Bjorkman, Mindy Stephens, Amy Johnson. Row 2. Bill Clark, Billy 
Herman, Travis Terrell, Ben Hicks. Row 3. Jon Duft, Chad Wozniak, 
Jon Galbreath, Jayme Bridges. 5. Amy Russell-secretary, Leah 
Schuman-president, Angela Biason-treasurer, Andy Jenkins-vice- 
president, Darla Mayhall-vice-president. 6. Row 1: Dave Edwards, 
Nathan McClain, Steve Hamilton, Rob Terrell, Erik Lewis, Bryan 
McKechan. Row 2: Shawn Oliver, Leah Schuman, Shawn Weeks, 
Angela Biason, Cari Crawford, Amy Russell. 


STUDENT COUNCIL 245 




1 


SCHOLAR BOWL 
- CHESS CLUB - 


The SCHOLAR BOWL is a group of students 
chosen to represent our high schooi. These 
students work very hard each year to become 
a member of this group. 

There are two squads — a varsity and junior 
varsity. Each squad competes against other 
schools. The participants race against the 
clock and try to out score the other team. 

The Illinois High School Association has made 
the GCHS scholar bowl an official team. The 
team is sponsored by Mr. Daie Ashmore. 

it has been several years since GCHS has 
had a CHESS CLUB. This year the club is spon- 
sored by Mr. Allen Lobdell. The members meet 
twice a month in Mr. Lobdell's room. Each 
share a common interest in the game of chess 
and meeting bi-monthiy gives members a 
chance to improve their skills through competi- 
tion. 

The officers are Mike Fisher, president: 
Donaid Kimiduiski, vice president; Pam Mans- 
fieid, secretary; Mason Connoliy, treasurer; and 
Mark Chapman, Sgt. at Arms. 

President Fisher says that he is very glad the 
chess club was formed and adds "It's a dream 
come true. I hope it continues after I'm gone." 

by Kristin Jenness & Emily Stitch 




246 SCHOLAR BOWL 








4 


SCHOLAR BOWL 1. Ms. Christine 
Byer, Sara Kulier, Shawn Patrick, 
Michelle Randall, Susan Stegall, 
Robert Haack, Valdimir Milosevic, 
Mr. Dale Ashmore. 2. Jennifer 
Ruder, Scott McMillian, Mike 
Pascoe, Steve Schaus, Chris 
McMillian, Roy Smith, Danny 
Pascoe. 3. Steve Lubak, Bryan 
Welser, Regan Hildbrand, Kathy 
Schmenake, Staci Ahlers, Becky 
Schwab. CHESS CLUB 3. Henry 
Baker, Chad Stockton, Mike Fisher, 
Emily Stitch, Carrie Owen, Mark 
Harper, Don Kamildulski, Rob 
Haack, Joe Rodriguez, Mark 
Chapman, Mason Connolly, Mr. 
Lobdell, Kathy MacKay, Pam 
Mansfield, Adria Crane, Dave 
Mills. 4. Mr. Allen Lobdell 


CHESS CLUB 247 







F.S.A. 

Future Secretaries Association, better known as F.S.A., is an organization made up of 27 active 
members interested in a career as a secretary. There is more to F.S.A. than just being a secretary 
as described by Historian Tina Dickerson, "F.S.A. is more than most giris think; it offers not oniy fun 
and friendship, but valuable insight for a future in all careers, not only the secretarial field." 
Members come together every third Tuesday of each month at 7:00 P.M. in Room 126. 

Sponsoring this program is Professional Secretaries International. The G. C. Chapter is sponsored 
by the Lindbergh, Missouri Chapter of P.S.I. Linda Haddix is a sponsor and Georganne Georgeff is 
a co-sponsor for this organization. 

Students interested in F.S.A. must have taken two semesters of business courses and have a 3.0 
average. This year F.S.A. will be going to a convention in Orlando, Florida, where a representative 
from P.S.I. will be present. 

Officers for the year 1990-91 include President Amy Gregory; Vice President Becky Grayson; 
Treasurer Micheile Bishop; Historian Tina Dickerson; and Board members Grace Campbeii and 
Melissa Norton. 

by Kendra Boyer 


248 F.S.A. 





1. ROW 1. Amy Gregory, Becky Grayson, 
Misty Timko, Michelle Bishop. ROW 2. 
Melissa Norton, Tina Dickerson, Grace 
Campbell. 2. Georganne Georgeff, 
Melissa Norton, Amy Gregory. 3. Melissa 
Norton, Amy Gregory, Becky Grayson, 
Misty Timko, Michelle Bishop, Tina 
Dickerson, Grace Campbell. ROW 2. Vicki 
Carter, Brandy Kalips, Laura Mock, Tara 
Swalley, Shannon Marcum, Rachael 
Richardson, Rebecca McElroy. ROW 3. 
Georganne Georgeff, Rose Lewis, Jenny 
Stevens, Bridget York, Angela Squires, 
Jamie Mercer, Karen Odom, Gerlean 
Parker, Shelley Goodman, Dana Bugnitz, 
Linda Haddix. 4. Linda Haddix, Georganne 
Georgeff. 


F.S.A. 249 





QUILL & 

As the old saying goes, "great things 
come in small packages”. This cliche defi- 
nitely describes the Quill &. Scroll club. The 
1990-91 membership consists of only eight 
members and their sponsor, Mr. Antonio Be- 
tancourt. 

Quill &. Scroll is an honorary writing club 
which members must contain a certain cri- 
teria. These members are asked to join be- 
cause of their writing accomplishments. 
Each member must maintain an accumula- 
tive grade point average of at least 3.75, 
be an active member of either the WAR- 
RiOR yearbook staff or the HIGH WORLD 
newspaper staff, and a recommendation 
from the advisor. David Wilson adds, "Quill 
& Scroll is a really great experience and the 


SCROLL 

trips we take are unforgettable." 

The officers of this year's club are presi- 
dent Amber Rogers, vice-president Brian 
Henry, and secretary /treasurer Melissa 
Tapp. Each year they seli Heart-o-grams to 
raise money for a club outing. This year they 
attended a play at The Repertory Theater, 
"A Day in Hollywood, A Night in the 
Ukraine". Mr. Betancourt conciudes, "I was 
president of Quill 8c Scroll in my high school 
and editor-in-chief of the school newspa- 
per. I really like to do it at GCHS as well. 
These students are enthusiastic and I like to 
take educational, but fun trips. I enjoy 
spending time with and advising them." 

by Melissa Tapp 


250 QUILL & SCROLL 






5 


1 Melissa Tapp, secreatry/treasurer, 2. Justin Rayl. 
3. Cori Elmore and Amber Rogers, president, work 
on a layout for the High World. 4. Cori Elmore, Sara 
Kulier, David Wilson, and Chris Stroder. 5, Brian Henry, 
vice president, and Amber Rogers. 


QUILL & SCROLL 251 




1. Top Row 1: Paul Austin, Brian Price,Sheila Reiter. Row 
2: Dale Newberry, Sarah Stone, Patti Meyer,Sarah 
Werths, and Marti Kutz. Row 3: Amber Rogers, Patty 
Soto, Luise Christensen, and Heather Dothage. Row 4: 
Dani McDoweil, Christiane [DiDi) Roitzch, Stacie Ahlers, 
and Kathy Schmedake. Row 5: Donna Deiay and Carrie 
Heck. 2. Row 1: Susan Stegall, Bryan Welser,Cathy 
Milton, and Dustin Horn. Row 2: Angeia Judd. Row 3: 
Derrick Kingsley, Margaret Christiansen, Michell 
Randali, Jennifer Vaibert, and Don Kamadulski. Row 4: 
Dan Pascoe, Mike Pascoe, Shawn Patrick, and Carolyn 
Ryterski. Row 5: Kristen Stephens and Heather Gitchoff. 
3. Angeia Judd, Cathy Milton, and Jason Stickles pose 
for the camera. 4.0fficers Amber Rogers, Patty Soto, 
sponsor: Mr. Dennis Church, President Susan Stegali, 
and Shawn Patrick. 




252 FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB 



— FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB — 

The Foreign Language Club is very unique. People with an interest in foreign languages join this 
club. Having an interest in a foreign language and wanting to learn more about a country and 
its heritages are primary reasons why students at GCHS became involved in the Foreign Language 
Club. 

This year the club sold Christmas decorations and went to see cultural foreign plays. 

The Foreign Language Club includes members from both Spanish and German classes. Mr. 
Dennis Church is the club sponsor. Hard work, fund raising, and after school meetings all proved 
worthwhile at the end of the school year. It was a year of learning and sharing. 

Susan Stegall served as president. Shawn Patrick as vice president, Patricia Soto as secretary, 
and Amber Rogers as treasurer. 

Members enjoy being part of the Foreign Language Club because it lets them explore the other 
parts of the world. Mr. Church also makes the club very valuable with his support. He helps the 
members better understand the ways of other countries. 

by Angela Judd 


FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB 253 




1 Row 1: Allison Dumoulin, Dianna Brandt, Tim White, 
Matt Loftus, Angie Jones Row 2: Mike Clark, Michelle 
Randall, Amber Rogers, Jennifer Valbert, Sarah Kulier, 
Shawn Patrick Row 3: Leah Schuman, Nathan McClain, 
Mark Chapman, Justin Stallings, Brian Henry, Mary Per- 
due-Tapp 2. Mark Chapman, Susan Stegall, Kristi Hol- 
singer, Tim White 3. Kelly, Tim, and Michelle add some 
excitement to the Christmas dance 4. Row 1. Susan 
Stegall, Amy Bohnenstiehl, Melissa Tapp, Kelly Green, 
Rob Haack Row 2. Craig Leavell, Sarah Patton, Rob 
Terrell, Skip Birdsong, John Carlson Row 3. Andrew Yurko, 
Kristi Reed, Missy Keen, Sarah Stone, Krista Sullivan, Brig- 
gita Modglin 5. Mary Perdue-Tapp and Andrew Yurko at 
the Christmas dance. 



254 N.H.S. 





N.H.S. 


The National Honor Society is o group of very ambitious and 
intelligent students. It is on organization based on scholarship, 
leadership, service, and character. 

Students selected for National Honor Society must hove o 4.25 
grade point overage and show willingness to render service to 
the school, community, and also be involved in school activities. 
Students should demonstrate leadership in classroom work, orga- 
nization work, and in promoting school activities. Members dem- 
onstrate high standards for honesty, reliability, and concern for 
others. 

During the year National Honor Society engages in many phil- 
anthropic and community activities. The club is involved in func- 
tions ranging from United Way solicitations to coordinating par- 
ties for the handicapped. Tim White, president, replied "Partici- 
pation in the club gives one a sense of satisfaction and commu- 
nity leadership.” 

The National Honor Society is sponsored by Mary Perdue-Tapp 
and Andrew Yurko. 

By Leah Schuman 


N.H.S. 255 




2 


1. Shane Zobrist, John Kirchner, Tim Morton, Judy 
Hoover, and Ginger Henson. 2. John Carison sits 
in Mr. Lubak's room waiting’for his duties to begin 
as an A-V worker. 3. Senior A-V members Kevin 
Milier, Angeia Judd, John Carlson, and Raffi 
Karabian. 3. A-V workers Jeremy Waters, Ryan 
Hankins, Jim Hooker, and Eddie Nagelmiller. 4. 
Sponsor Teresa Johnson. 



256 AUDIO-VISUAL CLUB 




AUDIO-VISUAL CLUB 


The audio-visual workers are needed everyday to help the teachers with any equipment they 
, need from the A-V room. They move the televisions, VCR's, and projectors from room to room. 

^ Along with moving this equipment, they also must have a working knowledge of how to do repair 
) work on the systems. If the equipment breaks or works improperly, Mrs. Teresa Johnson, sponsor, 
' or one of the members get It back into working order. 

Cleaning the equipment is also part of their job. All the equipment must be cleaned properly 
, so that it works properly, and they must help to schedule the use of the equipment or run errands. 
The A-V workers are automatically part of the audio-visual club. The group participates in many 
fund raising activities. Once a year, the club members go to a Cardinal baseball game. 

Senior Raffi Karabian enjoys being part of the club and says "The Audio-Visual club is exciting 
i . and helps me in many ways." 

' 1 by Julie Fernandez 

I j " 


AUDIO-VISUAL CLUB 257 






1. Jason Meyer, Todd Mitchell, Danny Hicks, Brad 
Briggs, Shawn Almos, Chris Golden, Mike Ribley. 2. 
Officers: Derek Ashoff, Mike Nordstrom, Travis 
Richey, Jason Leonard. 3. Andy Simpson, Brian 


Paterson, Gerald Daugherty, Tony Malherek, Kevin 
Miller. 4. Dan Lemp, Garrin Gann, Chris Cupples, Stan 
Kromray, Randy Shepard, Keith Gaudreault, David 
Jackson, John Lantrip. 


258 VICA 





VICA 


The Vocational-Industrial Club of America, sponsored by Gus Lignoul, has 65 members. Each 
year there is an election of officers by the club. They include President Mike Nordstrom, Vice- 
President Travis Richey, Secretary Derek Ashoff, and Treasurer Jason Leonard. 

The motto of the VICA club is "Preparing for Leadership in the World of Work". That is just what 
these members try to achieve. VICA members consist of a wide range of trades that each have 
learned. From cosmetology, to electronics, to auto mechanics, these members work to become 
happy, mature, and productive citizens. 

"VICA gives you the chance to compete with other students in the area of your specialized 
vocational skill," comments Derek Ashoff. "It's fun trying to control 65 of the wildest and craziest 
guys!", adds Mike Nordstrum. 

VICA is open to any high school student enrolled in a vocational trade, industrial, technical, or 
health occupations course. They meet each day in room 050 for a 5-2 study hall. 

Mr. Gus Lignoul concludes, "You don't have to be an athlete to be recognized in VICA. You just 
have to be a craftsman who can show a skill. That is when the recognition that you deserve is 
received." 

by Melissa Tapp 


VICA 259 




1 



SCIENCE CLUB 


The science club is an organization where 
students who share a similar interest in sci- 
ence can get together on a social basis. 
Each member must pay annual dues of one 
dollar. This money, along with funds from 
sausage, cheese, candy, and apple salei 
goes into a general fund and helps to fi- 
nance club activities. The activities planned 
for the 1990-1991 school year include a 
hayride, apple picking, winter hike, and a 
spring campout. 

The club is sponsored by Mr. Harold Geb- 


hardt. Mr. Gebhardt comments, "The pur- 
pose of the science club is to stimulate in- 
terest in the field of science through extra- 
curricular activities and secondly to pro- 
mote leadership and scholarship." 

With the help of Mr. Harsh, Mr. Pinnell, Mr. 
Rehg, Mr. Rensing, and Mr. Rotter, the sci- 
ence club has become a tremendous suc- 
cess. 

by Emily Stitch 


260 SCIENCE CLUB 






6 

1. Row 1: Nikki Tate, Dan Terrell, Matt Loftus, Tim 
White, John Carlson, Stan Gregory, Billy McCormick, 
Mike Fisher. Row 2: Kristi Reed, Mason Conolly, Mark 
Chapman, Chris Steiner, Patty Soto, Angie Judd, Me- 
lissa Taylor. Row 3: Sarah Kulier, Brigitta Modglin, Mi- 
chelle Randall, Shawn Patrick, Mike Clark, Jennifer 
Valbert, Craig Leavell, Dustin Horn. Row 4: Adria 
Crane, Amy Isom, Jennifer Harper, Emily Stitch, April 
Polovick, Young Mi Suh, Angie Jones, Jeannie Gro- 
boski. Row 5: Kathy MacKay, Carrie Boyer, Stacie 
Kennerly, Vladimir Milodevic, Sarah Stone, Susan Ste- 
gall, David Mills, Rob Haack. 

2. Row 1; Wendy Chamberlin, Missy Conege, Melissa 
Mcliovy, Amy Kirkpatrick, Leslie Stavely, Shelly Wilbur, 
Kathleen Reeder, Carrie Brown, Jennifer Wortham, 
Steven Schaus, Jennifer Ruder. Row 2: Josh Houston, 
Yolanda Soto, Christine Reves, Maria Hawkins, Dean- 
na Whaley, Dana Bugnitz, Gretchen Schuler, Jennifer 
Wheeler, Amy Isenburg, Sheri Mattern, Erin Rotter, 
Jennifer Hitt, Jennifer Bauswell. Row 3: Derrik Kingisey, 
Mike Pascow, Dan Pascow, Scott McMillian, Nona 
Mefford, Kelly Miller, Bobby Ribbing, Joe Schmedake, 
Kelly Miner, Jo Ann Buxton, Becky Stephens, Sarah 
Worths, Marti Kutz, Brandie Greco. 

3. Row Vicki Brandt, Dawn Freeman, Donna Delay, 
Hope Heck, Niky Coulter, Jodi Kern, Renee Eglin, Amy 


8 

Gebhardt, Nikki Rainer, Sarah Turk, Terry Schatz. Row 
2: Carla Kamidalski, Jill Haddix, Ryan Robertson, Kelly 
Mullen, Debbie Engleke, Jenny Schwaeger, Tammy 
Mendenhall, Angela Favier, Lensey Evans, David Pe- 
trillo. Row 3: Adam Jenness, Charlie Loftus, Jon Gal- 
breth, Chris Johnson, Stacy Ahlers, Kathy Schme- 
deke, Jo Buxton, Carrie Heck, Becky McArthur, Matt 
Bolandis. Row 4: Asa Legate, Jeff McCleland, Greg 
Weckmen, Paul Austin, Matt Masala, Bryan Wessler, 
Steve Lubak, Sunil Kumar, Pat Jesse, Missy Sammons. 
Row 5; Amanda Gudak, Caroline Ryferski, Beth Ra- 
poff, Stephanie Kult, Lesley Laylock, Jack Carmody, 
Dan Debert, Jason Warscholl, Steve Chapman, Re- 
gan Hildabrand. Row 6: Young Su, Billy Ribbing, Travis 
Terrell, Heather Dobbage, Margaret Christianson, 
Jeanie Lamb, Angela Grady, Wendy Blanton, Sarah 
Mehallic, Crystal Nicol. Row 7: Angela Parker, Marc 
Patton, Emilee Bailey, Angela McCormick, Kim 
Holloway, Sheila Mullen, Paula Gregory, Jodi Forester, 
Nicloe Zelenka, Christine Pavlow. Row 8: Tara Wyatt, 
Jenny Turk, Amy Rainer, Mary-Beth Cooper, Nicole 
Graves, JoAnn Gray, Stacie Johnson, Becky Schwab, 
Amy Krakowiecki, Chris Hunter. 4. Mike Fisher and 
Susan Stegall hike on one of the science club outings. 

5. Robert Rehg waves good-bye to everyone. 6. 
Tom Pinnell 7. Ralph Rotter 8. The official sponsor, 
Gerald Gebhardt. SCIENCE CLUB 261 






1. Row 1: Daveanna Knight, Racheal Richardson, Andrea Cline, Julia Boyer, Anny Isom, Missie Simpson. 
Row 2: Melissa Jones, Wendy Chamberlain, Emily Stitch, Carrie Owen, Nikki Tate, Shawn Oliver, Misty 
Timko. Row 3: Kelly Jones, Ellin Willis, Leah Schuman, Christie Hayden, April Polivik. 2. Row 1: Jamie Baker 
and Shannon Marcum. Row 2: Amy Killian, Kara Andrews, Amanda Witter, Amanda Kelly. 3. Row 1: Erica 
Sbabo, Claudia Snyder, Shelia Mullen. Row 2: Melissa Hasse, Amy Niepert, Denise Drago, Carrie Boyer, 
Stacie Kennerly. Row 3: Jill Talley, Angie Withers, Sharon Flowers, Missy Young. 4. Row 1: Susan Wachter, 
Pam Miskell, Hillary Watkins, Laurie Monroe, Julie Merz, Brandi Greco, Dana Bugnitz. Row 2: Sara Brawley, 
Tara Swalley, Jenny Baker, Christine Reyes, Gretchen Schuler, Shelly Wilbur, Deana Whaley. Row 3: Jenny 
Basuel, Melissa Mclivoy, Julie Simon, Kathleen Reader. 5. Row 1: Missie Simpson, secretary: Chrissy Vivod, 
vice president. Row 2: Daveanna Knight, treasurer: Racheal Richardson, president. 


262 RED PEPPERS 







4 



RED PEPPERS 


The spirit club, also known as red peppers, plays an 
important part in the lives of our students and our schooi 
spirit. This unique group of girls decorate the halls, cheer 
for the players, and are responsible for the 'secret pals.' 

The gentlemen athletes appreciate the work and effort 
put into the secret pal campaign. They always try to guess 
who their 'pai' is before being told. The girls also appreci- 
ate the good work the boys do in their individual sports. 

The lady responsible for all the work and good times is 
Mrs. Janet Williams. Mrs. Williams has been with the red 
pepper program for 4 years. She enjoys working with the 
giris and it definiteiy shows in the effort she displays 
throughout the school year. 

The president this year is Racheai Richardson. Chrissy 
Vivod is vice president. Missy Simpson is the secretary, and 
Daveanna Knight is treasurer. 

by Angie Withers 


RED PEPPERS 263 







1 ' 41 . 

H 



H 

•1 




Tr ^ 1 







1. Row 1: Kathy Schmedake, Becky Schwab, Jennifer 
Norris, Stacy Rieger, Jodi Forister. Row 2: Melissa Sin- 
gieton, Steve Courtright, Regan Hiidebrand, Aman- 
da Gudac. Row 3; Brian Dean, Jeannie Lamb, Laura 
Andrews, Christopher Johnson, Rick Whiteside. 2. 
Row Derrick Kingsiey, Chris Kraus, Melissa Mclivoy, 
Morgan Mance, Tonya Burton, Holly Eugea. Row 2: 
Kerri Rebstock, Shannon Marcum, Jeanette Moris, Ni- 


cole Kincer, Audi Wisnasky. Row 3: Tammy Bunker 
Angela Hollis, Amanda Witter, Sara Walters, Chud 
Hill, John Redstone. 3. Row 1: Patricia Soto, Allisoi 
Whitmer, Dani McDowell. Row 2; Sascha Carter, Mik( 
Johnson, Karla Broyles, Kathleen Ramsey. 4. Row 1 
Greg Weckman, Kim York. Row 2; Lorna Lance, Betl 
Purkaple, Chuck Noud. Row 3: Heather Votoupa 
Jack Haug. 


264 EMPATHY 





EMPATHY 

Being a teenager isn't easy and the road to becoming an adult can be twisted and uncertain. 
Many of us run into problems that sometimes we feel we cannot face alone. But with the help of a 
friend, the problems seem smaller. Friends are people who are there for you in a time of need and 
troubles, but also in the good times. 

Empathy is a special organization of 'friends' coming together to share their problems and help 
each other deal with uncertainties. The group of friends in empathy help each other become 
better listeners and helpers to each other. They help each other understand their own feelings as 
well as the feelings of others. 

To meet the requirements of this special group, you must keep your grades up, attend school 
on a regular basis, and stay out of trouble. You also must promise to be drug and alcohol free, 
respect the privacy of others, and be a caring person and listener. 

The two gentlemen who sponsor empathy are Jack Haug and Michael Johnson. Both men are 
guidance counselors at GCHS and know how to deal with the feeling, emotions, and troubles of 
high school teenagers. 

"If I had to choose one word to sum up what empathy means, the word would be 'caring' — 
caring about others and caring about yourself," says Mr. Johnson. 

^ Other adult helpers in the organization are Ronald Pennell, Sonya Adkerson, Pam Baker, Kathy 
house, Jamie Johnson, and Berta Milianis. 

"I am involved with empathy because I want to make a difference in the lives of young people. 
By caring and sharing, we can help each other," says Mrs. Adkerson. 

This year empathy went to Pinckneyvilie, Illinois, for a three day retreat at Camp Salbteska. This 
is a special time for empathy members and is described by Mr. Haug as a "time of sharing." 

Karla Broyles sums up the retreat experience by saying, "If you go on the retreat, you get to 
know people on a personal basis. You also get to show your feelings about peer pressure. It's a lot 
of fun." by Kendra Boyer 


EMPATHY 265 


1 



1. Row 1: Mary McCallister, Rachael Sabeans, Judith Hoover, 
Tammy Rippee. Row 2: Paul Austin, Christopher Johnson, Melinda 
Daniels, Katrina Butler, Jason Shannot, Regan Hildebarand, 2. Mrs. 
Jo Ann Aleman and Amanda Gudac work together, 3. Michelle 
Randall, Chuck Hill, Sara Kulier, and Amber Rogers are proud club 
officers. 4. Row 1: Shannon Marcum, Donna Sorenson, Jennifer 
Guzy, Juanita Morals, Vincent Schildman. Rw 2: Jennifer Ruder, 
Steven Schaas, Sharon Kojsaik, Michelle Randall, Amber Rogers, 
Chuck Hill, Jennifer Valbert, Chris' Madden, and Sara Kuiier. 5. 
Michael Moreland is the 1990-91 Young Authors Club president. 






266 YOUNG AUTHORS 







- YOUNG AUTHORS - 

The Young Authors Club is a very unique club. It is 
sponsored by Mrs. Joann Aleman. 

Every year, the Young Authors publish “The Student 
Voice,” a compilation of original writings submitted by 
students of Granite City High School. Included in the 
"Voice.” are poems, essays, short stories, plays, and 
some illustrations. The club also participates in some 
activities, but their primary purpose is the publication of 
the “Voice.” 

Mrs. Joann Aleman is going strong in her third year of 
sponsoring the Young Authors Club. She puts a large 
amount of time and effort into producing bright young 
teenagers into bright young authors. 

She says, “The Voice” does not only publish items 
written by members of the club, but also anyone wish- 
ing to submit something to the club may also be pub- 
lished.” 

The Young Authors Club is a wonderfully talented 
group of bright people. 

by Angela Judd 


YOUNG AUTHORS 267 



SADD & ALPHA 


S.A.D.D. also known as students against drunk driving, is a club that participates in activities 
designed to promote awareness of problems caused by drinking and driving. Club members also 
work on activities aimed at promoting safe rides, Robert Gagliano is the active sponsor of S.A.D.D. 
He has been the sponsor for three years. "Just like any other sponsor, I am there to guide the club. 
But S.A.D.D. itself is basically run by the students," states Mr. Gagliano. 

The officers are president Holly Eugea, vice-president Tonya Burton, and secretary/treasurer 
Stephanie Huckleburry. 

ALPHA is a nominated group of upperclass students who are to be viewed by freshmen as 
credible role models. These selected students vow to live a substance free lifestyle. They are able 
to communicate well with others to portray a positive attitude. 

This program is organized to teach a nine lesson unit of drug prevention concepts which will 
touch the attitudes and beiiefs of the freshman health students. Statistics show a lower increase 
of drug usage than schools who do not sponsor this program. Mr. Jack Haug and Mr. Michael 
Johnson both play an important role in sponsoring and supporting what this club tries to teach all 
students. 

This program is to iilustrate that it is still "cool" to be a non-user of drugs and it is also quite 
acceptable by a large part of the high school population. 

by Angie Withers & Meiissa Tapp 


268 S.A.D.D. 








5 


1. S.A.D.D.: Row 1: Amy Martin, Paula 
Heffner, Teresa Egbert, Kim Barrios, Shan- 
non Marcum, Eric Brown. Row 2: Henry 
Baker, Melissa Mclivoy, Kathleen Ramsey, 
Stephanie Huckelberry, Bob Gaddy, 
Stacey Rieger. Row 3: Kathy Barrios, Shelley 
Duffield, Susan Ledbetter, Katherine 
Schnefke, Tonya Burton, Tammy 
Mendenhall, Holly Eugea, Melody Justice, 
Hope Heck. 2. ALPHA: Craig Leavell, John 
Carlson, Sarah Patton, Gretchen Schuler, 
Kerri Rebstock, Mr. Michael Johnson. 3. 
Dan Brazee, Bryan Ogle, Jenny Baker, 
Dianna Brandt. 4. Melissa Lynch, Amy 
Isenburg, Kristi Holsinger, Mr. Jack Haug, 
Jennifer Valbert. 5. Mr. Leonard Lybarger 
and Amy Isenburg smile together during 
an ALPHA meeting. 6. Dianna Brandt an- 
swers a question from Nicole Coulter and 
Melissa Carmack. 


ALPHA 269 

I 





1. I.E.: Tom Kinder, Nick McLaren, Jason Cass, Don 
Goss. ROW 2: Cheryl Schmidt, Missy Keen, Jenny 
Brand, Nona Mefford. 2. DEBATE: Rob Proffitt, JoAnn 
Webb, Vicky Justice, Scott McMiliian, Tonya Dale, 
Stacie Spiroff, Dan Pascoe. ROW 2: Bob Gaddy, 
Chris Hill, Paul Austin, Ricardo Davis, Stephanie 
Weinhoff, Tom Cromer ROW 3: Jennifer Wortham, 


Erin Rotter, Kristen Stephens, Heather Mefford, Lia 
Mendoza. 3. I.E.: Jason Mizell, Ericka Dayton, Renee 
Biggs, Nikki Petrillo, Sara Brawley. ROW 2: Brandi 
Meyer, Morgan Mance, Cara Andrews, Miguel 
Delgado, Gary Hoerle, Jena Gann, Heather Sanders. 
ROW 3: Kenny Boone, Kevin Gros, Dennis Morris, Pot 
Jessee. 


270 SPEECH & THEATRE 




3 


SPEECH & THEATRE 

If you've always wanted to be an actress or actor, join the Speech and Theatre 
club. This is one of the most productive and active groups at Granite City High 
School. This club consists of students from debate, individual events, and stagecraft. 

As the school year began, the theatre group was busy rehearsing for the 
Homecoming play, "Cheaper By The Dozen." As usual, it was an outstanding 
performance by the students and the teachers who assisted and trained them. 

The I.E. team is another group of very gifted actors. They are a major part of the 
plays that go on at CCHS. Mrs. Beverley Scroggins is in charge of these talented 
students. 

None of these productions could be possible if it were not for the stagecraft 
student. They put the realistic look to the performance. 

The debate team is sponsored by Ronald Pennell. They participate in tournaments 
and spend many hours of research to ensure perfection. This will also ensure they will 
bring home the blue-ribbon. 

These teams are very beneficial and being part of them gives the students a 
chance to be recognized for all their hard work and effort. 

by Liz Harris 


SPEECH & THEATRE 271 



C/f, 





an j 


7 




1 


VARSITY CLUB 


As soon os a varsity letter is earned, the 
athlete has the option to join the Varsity 
Club. To remain in this club, one varsity sport 
must be participated in yearly and a mini- 
mum of a 3.0 grade point average must be 
maintained. 

"The primary goal for the Varsity Club is 
to bring athletes together and involve them 
in activities to reduce inter-disciplinary rival- 
ry and conflict," says Mr. D. F. Miller, one of 
the club sponsors. Mr. Miller has been a 
sponsor for five years. 

The club serves as a social and service 
organization that works together with Stu- 
dent Council on many activities and fund 
raisers. The money raised is used for chari- 
ties, social activities, and purchasing athle- 
tic equipment. 


The club also sponsors the student/f acui- 
ty donkey-basketball game. Amy Isom and 
Julia Boyer said, "We can't wait to get a 
chance to ride the donkeys." 

At the beginning of the year, officers are 
elected. The 1990-91 officers are Dan Ter- 
rell, president; Angela Biason, vice presi- 
dent; Jay Robertson, treasurer; sergeant- 
at-arms, Tim White, and Larry Strader, sec- 
retary. 

Rodney Almos likes being in varsity club 
because, "... the different types of activi- 
ties to participate in." All Dan Terrell had to 
say was, "We all get together and have 
very much fun!" , 

By Carrie Owen I 


272 VARSITY CLUB 




3 


1 Row 1: Tammy Dutko, Ann Logan, Julie 
Goclan, Staci Johnson, Brent Dippel, Brian 
Dean. Row 2: Michelle Stewart, Stephanie 
Kult, Vicky Brandt, Dave Partney, Billy Her- 
man, Beth Rapoff. 2. Row t; Kathleen Reader, 
Jennifer Wortham, Carrie Brown, Karen Sykes, 
Tiffany Winters, Melissa Mclivoy, Mia Puhse, 
Terri Buster, Gretchen Schuler, Larry Curry. 
Row 2; Jenny Basuel, Eric Mendenhall, Chris 
Hofstot, Mark Achenbach, Jennifer Wheeler, 
Christie Hayden, Sally Pavlow, Maria Hawkins, 
Matt Stearns, Mike Vaughn. Row 3: Amy Isen- 
burg, Brian Seize, Kelly Miller, Chris Peeler, Eric 
Davis, Chris Votoupal, Jeff Smith, Leslie Sta- 
vely. Ginger Henson, Billy Vanbuskirk, Damon 
Yates. 3. Mike Nordstrom stretches out be- 
fore the varsity football game. 


VARSITY CLUB 273 







274 VARSITY CLUB 








4 


Row 1: Mark Cotter, Don Pattney, Dan Brazee, Jason Scrum, 
Jason Mathenia, Brad O'Neill, Dan Terrell, Julia Boyer, Leah 
Schuman, Emily Stitch, Melissa Tapp, Andrea Cline. Row 2: John 
Billick, Billy McCormick, Matt Loftus, Chris Sturdivant, Holly Tay- 
lor, Amy Isom, Stacie Kennerly, Carrie Royer, Addie Lenzi, Lia 
Mendoza, Angela Jones, Jeanie Groboski. Row 3: Bobby 
Thomas, Jay Robertson, Skip Birdsong, Pat Rich, Jeff Stephens, 
Jimmy McKechan, Misty Timko, Shawn Oliver, Nikki Tate, Beth 
Bolandis, Kristi Holsinger, Shawn Weeks, Angela Biason, Carrie 
Owen. Row 4: Justin Stallings, Rodney Almos, Mark Chapman, 
Larry Strader, Scott Portell, Ryan Reeves, Erik Lewis, Tim White, 
Kevin Gros, Todd Pryor, Jennifer Winfield, Jennifer Harper, Tia 
Rees. 2. Varsity Club members enthusiastically board the bus 
for State. 3. Karen Sykes earned her varsity letter playing 
volleyball. 4. Club sponsors D. F. Miller and Bob Stegemeier. 5. 
Addie Lenzi and Holly Taylor take time for a picture. 


VARSITY CLUB 275 





FOREIGN POLICY 

If you are a junior or senior who is interested in 
current events and the world today. Foreign Policy is 
the club tor you. Students involved with this club really 
enjoy it. Sarah Patton says, “The Foreign Policy club is 
really great. I've been in the club for two years and 
it's really fun." 

Mr. Phil Shatto is the sponsor of this club. He has 
been sponsoring this organization for twenty years. 
He described himself as being "in between" liberal 
and conservative. Also, he is the Social Studies De- 
partment head for G.C.H.S. 

This year. Foreign Policy took a spring trip to San 
Diego, California for four days. Mr. Shatto stated that, 
"Travel is a great way to learn about the country; 
much more interesting than to read it in a textbook." 
On the trips they take, they go sightseeing to histori- 
cal places. To raise money to take this trip they sold 
oranges and grapefruit. Another activity of the club 
included writing letters to our troops in Saudi Arabia. 

by Kendra Boyer 



276 FOREIGN POLICY CLUB 








1. Marty Kotz. Mike Clark, Jennifer Valbert, 
Scott McMillian, Rob Ribbing, Mike Pascoe, 
Derek Kingsley, Dan Pascoe. 2. Sarah 
Patton reads her paper. 3. ROW 1. Leah 
Schuman, Emily Stitch, Amy Isom, Julia 
Boyer. ROW 2. Jennifer Ruder, Andrea 
Cline, Carrie Owen, David Mills, Mark 
Chapman, Stephen Schaus. ROW 3. 
Robert Haack, Mason Connolly, 4. ROW 1. 
Patty Soto, Sarah Stone, Sarah Werths, Kristi 
Holsinger. ROW 2. Michelle Randall, Stacie 
Williams, Amber Rodgers, Amy Gregory. 5. 
Mr. Phillip Shatto, Justin Stallings, Sarah 
Patton, Stan Gregory. 

FOREIGN POLICY CLUB 277 



€XPR€SS VOURS€LF 



278 SPIRIT 


IN 



1. Varsity soccer cheerleaders at the state soccer assembly. 

2. Amy Johnson and Shelly Justice are dedicated poms. 3. 
Mark Cotter, John Billick, and Andy Simpson talk about varsity 
club. 4. Bill LenzI, Jason Brown, and Stephanie Parrish at the 
homecoming football game. 




SPIRIT 279 





TWIRL THAT FLAG 


The Granite City Flag Squad consisted of 
many ambitious girls. The squad performed be- 
fore and during games at half-time. The cap- 
tains for the 1990-91 flag squad were Lisa Fer- 
nandez, Sara Bone, and Sharon Kozjak. 

These girls practice very hard to make the 
best of their talents and to perform with their top 
skill. They practice during and after school. Thbir 
summer is taken up by parades, camps, and 
competitions. All is well worth it. 

The talents of these bright young women are 
put to the test during football games, parades, 
basketball games, competitions, and May Car- 
ousel. The hours involved in flag /auxiliary routines 
are very important. They must take advantage 
of practice in order to make the best perfor- 


mances possible. After devoting their time and 
talents to Granite City High School, the girls be- 
come very close throughout the year. 

Last year's May Carousel performance was 
very good. The performance was well choreo- 
graphed by the captain of the 1989-90 squad, 
Kelly Green. 

Each year the squad holds tryouts for the next 
year's squad. A girl wanting to tryout must be 
ready to devote an enormous amount of time 
and effort to the squad. Dennis Meyer and Nor- 
bert Tate are the gentlemen who sponsor the 
flag squad. 

by Angela Judd 


280 FLAGS 




FLAG SQUAD 1. Row 1: Lisa Fernandez, Sarah Bone, 
and Sharon Kozjak. Row 2; Christy Atchley, Kristi Reed, 
Donna Flolland, Pam Mansfield, Audrey Wisnaski, and 
Tracy Riggs. Row 3: Kristi Flolder, Tamara Batson, Jenny 
Naeve, and Elizabeth Schaefer. Row 4: Beth Owca, 
Melissa Kusmierczak, Michelle French, Kari Bennett, 
Kelly Jones, and Stephanie Kraus. 2. The Granite City 
Fligh School flag squad have very high spirits at the 
1990 homecoming football game. Row 1: Jenny 
Naeve, and Beth Owca. Row 2: Sarah Bone, Audi 
Wisnaski, Michelle French, Christy Atchiley, and Steph- 
anie Kraus. Row 3: Tammy Batson, Tracy Riggs, Kristi 
Reed, and Donna Flolland. 3. Flag members enjoy their 
evenings at flag camp. 


3 


FLAGS 281 



RIFLE SQUAD 1. Row 1: Captains Adria Crane and 
Becky SanSoucie. Row 2: Mary Williams, Becky Gray- 
son, Stacie Williams, and Krystal Wakeford. Row 3: 
Sherrie Richeson, Beth Noe, Amy Hardesty, and Kathy 


MacKay. 2. Mr. Tate shows off his rifle while Mr. Meyer 
just smiles. 3. Amy Hardesty practices her routine 
before the rifle squad begins their performance at 
the Homecoming football game. 


282 RIFLES 




ALWAYS READY TO PERFORM 


Rifle members put many hours into perfecting 
their performance. They show their talents at 
sporting events. May Carousel, the Veiled 
Prophet Parade, and competitions. 

Rifle tryouts are held at the close of each 
school year. Girls wanting to try out for the 
squad to through a two-week learning period 
where the captains teach the new students 
commands and routines. 

Each year before rifle tryouts are held, a spe- 
cial tryout is held to select new captains. The 
girls trying out for captain must have been in the 
rifles squad the previous year and must do three 
routines. The first must be an original. The other is 


a song chosen by Mr. Meyer or Mr. Tate, and the 
last routine is constructed by the previous senior 
captain. After all this is finished, she must go 
through an interview with judges consisting of 
Mr. Meyer, Mr. Tate, and previous senior cap- 
tains. 

The captains of the 1990-91 rifle squad were 
Adria Crane and Rebecca SanSoucie. They 
have worked many hours to make up different 
routines. This year's captains have ensured great 
performances throughout the year and the stu- 
dents of GCHS are proud of them. 

by Angela Judd 


RIFLES 283 





1 . Shannon Hahn, Denise Harper, Lori Lignoul, 
Sally Pavlow, and Tara Butler show off their 
T-shirts, 2. Pom captains Angie Jacobs, Amy 
Niepert, and Cari Crawford. 3. All of the 
senior Poms get together before a perfor- 
mance. 4, Amy Russell, Shawn Weeks, An- 
gela Biason, Amy Niepert, Cari Crawford, 
Candi Kessler, and Mellisa Hasse show off 
their six foot sub. 5. The Poms get together 
before the Homecoming parade. 6. POM 
SQUAD: Row 1 Angela Biason, Amy Niepert, 
Cari Crawford, Angela Jacobs, and Shawn 
Weeks. Row 2 Amy Russell, Mellissa Hasse, 
Tara Butler, Sally Pavlow, Tina Scatturro, 
Darla Mayhall, Christie Hayden, and Candi 
Kessler. Row 3 Lori Lignoul, Shannon Hahn, 
Brandie Greco, Denise Harper, Susan 
Wachter, Kristen Novacich, and Vicki Jus- 
tice. Row 4 Amy Johnson, Erika Wheatley, 
Mindy Stephens, Ann Hewlett, Jodi Melzer, 
Stephanie Jacobs, Ann Logan, and Shelley 
Justice. 



284 POM PONS 



6 



BEHIND THE PRETTY SMILES 


The ^ 990 - 9 ^ Pom-Pon squad is made up of 28 girls. There is more to these girls than 
meets the eye. Behind their pretty smiles are ambitious, hard working, talented dancers. 
Much of their spare time is taken up practicing and performing. The poms spend many 
of their nights practicing after school to be the best they can be. These girls will agree 
that all the hard work pays off in the end and is well worth it. Brandie Greco says, "We 
always work really hard, but we have a great time." 

Their hard work was awarded. This past summer at Eastern Illinois University they were 
awarded with Outstanding Home Routine. They also received the Spirit Baton and the 
Grand Champion trophy. 

The captain of the squad is senior Cari Crawford. To help her are co-captains, senior 
Amy Niepert and junior Angela Jacobs. 

Cari would like to wish the whole squad, "Good luck in the years to come, and enjoy 
them, they'll go by too fast. Just don't ever give up!" 

by Kendra Boyer & Julie Fernandez 


POM PONS 285 



LISTEN TO US SING 


Where is all that music coming from? How 
many different songs do these students 
know? They sound really good. 

The students who participate in the music 
program meet in room 126 under the super- 
vision of Gail Mueller. Mrs. Mueller has been 
in charge since 1973 (1983 at GCHS/South 
oniy). 

These students don't just sing in room 126. 
They take tours to different schools and 
give two concerts each year. They are De- 
cember 4 and April 30. 

Swing Choir perform popular staged 
songs with costumes and sets. They per- 
form for nursing home patients, church 
groups, and civic organizations. They at- 
tend the State Music concert and perform 
at the annual State Musicals. This group re- 


presents GCHS throughout the state. 

Advanced Mixed is the advanced chorus 
with both femaie and maie voices. They 
perform classicai and popular music for 
concerts in the community. 

Giris Giee is a haif-hour chorus of female 
voices who perform at the Spring and 
Christmas concerts. 

By the end of the year, after all the prac- 
tices and performances are over, the 
members of the music groups remember 
the opportunities that were offered to 
them. They are able to perform as a group, 
but still be able to express their individual 
efforts. 

by Melissa Tapp 


286 MUSIC 




SWING CHOIR 1 Row 1: Nicole Kincer, Carrie Heck, 
Lynda Mahoney, Cory Cupp, Amy Hicks. Row 2: Sherri 
Mattern, Sascha Carter, Amanda Bettis, Connie Stull, 
Kathleen Reeder, Allison Whitmer. Row 3: Scott Tripp, 
Jeremy Lewis, Ben Asbeck, Nick Leara, John Buston, 
Jeremy Hartman. Row 4: JuHi Han, Jennifer Norris, 
Misty Timko, Rebecca Schwab, John Miller, Christo- 


pher Madden. Row 5: Mrs. Mueller, Chad Martin, Me- 
lissa Woehrl, John Pope, Bryan Ogle, Kimberly Sealey, 
Jeremy Zaruba, Christopher Krause, April Polovick, 
and Charles Hill. VOCAL MUSIC OFFICERS 2. Seated: 
Connie Stull, treasurer; Carrie Heck, historian; Sascha 
Carter, president. Standing: Lynda Mahoney, vice 
president; and Sharon Mattern, secretary. 


MUSIC 287 



288 MUSIC 






I 1. CONTANDO: Row 1: Shanna Sue Gibson, Misty 
f Block, Cristol Villareal, Ammey Bode, Jeanette John- 
son, Tammy Rippee. Row 2: Rachael Saebens, Chris- 
tina Wright, Tanya Mann, Tonya Mann, Laura Schan- 
not. Heather Votoupal. Row 3: Lori Arthur, Amy 
Krawowiecki, Jessica Herman, Kathy Barrios, Melissa 
f Young, Amanda Kelley, Patricia Perry. 2. ADVANCED 
MIXED CHORUS: Row t: Jennifer Norris, Melissa 
^ Woehrl, Allison Whitmer, Connie Stull, Nicole Kincer, 
; Jessee Pigg, Jeffrey Boyer, Cory Cupp, Gerald Brim. 

Row 2: Jeanette Morris, JuHi Han, Angela Worthen, 
' Lynda Mahoney, Sharon Mattern, Sascha Carter, 
Rhonda Jolly, Jeremy Hartman, Scott Tripp, Jeremy 
Zaruba. Row 3: Rebecca Schwab, Amy Hall, Amy 
Starko, Leslie Yates, Melissa Stelzer, Tara Walker, 
L_Carrie Heck, Gregory Dickerman, John Buxton, John 
f Miller. Nick Leary, Jon Halverson, Kathleen Reader, 
f April Polovick, Misty Timko. Row 4: Janice Poole, Jen- 
nifer Guzy, Paul Martin, John Hopkins, Vincent Schild- 


man, Charles Hill, Kimberly Sealey, Amy Hicks, Terry 
Kent, Bryan Ogle, Chad Martin, Lonnie Bettis, Christo- 
pher Krause, Amanda Bettis, Christopher Madden, 
Daniel Burris, John Pope. 3. GIRLS GLEE CLUB: Row 1: 
Irene Gaming, Georgia Morales, Amanda Kelley, 
Danielle Ford, Amy Gallagher, Lori Krug, Michelle Hu- 
bert, Michelle Stieglitz, Misty LeGate, Elizabeth Dun- 
can, Stacey Harrison. Row 2: Mary McCallister, An- 
drea Simpson, Laura Calvin, Tanya Mann, Tonya 
Mann, Kimberly Kramer, Rebecca Reese, Sharon 
Flowers, Jennifer Canada, Robin Grogan, Brenda 
Yates, Catherine Campbell, Christine Parton, Kimber- 
ly Rippee, Lisa Dooley. Row 3: Melissa Pingel, Regina 
Hankins, Michelle Moreland, Heather Votoupal, Chris- 
tina Wright, Stephanie Jacobs, Michelle Alexander, 
Wendy Lerch, Julie Giese, Penny Farris, Dawn Avants, 
Cari Smick, Kathy Barrios, Paula Sronce, Stephanie 
North, Jodie Kern. 


t 

I 

I 


f 

t- 

T 


I 


MUSIC 289 






I’VE GOT THE MUSIC IN ME 


If you enjoy music and play a musical instrument you should become a member of the GCHS 
band. The band is a very talented organization and very important to the students at GCHS. 
When fans hear the school song being performed by the band everyone gets into the spirit of the 
event. That boosts the morale of our athletes to play a great game. 

The director is Mr. Dennis Meyer. This is his fifth year at Granite City High School. He is a very busy 
person, besides directing the band he also directs the Flag, Rifle, and Pom Pon squads. The 
assistant band director is Mr. Norbert Tate. He helps direct the Jazz, Concert, and Pep bands. He is 
the Percussion Instructor tor the Marching Band. This is Mr. Tate's second year here at GCHS. 

Every summer the band goes to camp for two weeks to sharpen their music skills for the football 
season. They also take part in a number of contests such as the V.P. Parade, Murphyboro Parade 
and they have performed at Busch Stadium a number of times. Not to mention all the local 
parades they have participated in. 

Mr. Meyer states that, "This has been the most successful year ever." "It's a very educational 
and musical experience." said Kim Morgan. Chuck Noud said "I think people of high school age 
should at least try to experience this before stereotyping us." "It's a fun challenge for us all.", 
comments Mark Harper. 

If you have musical talent, lots of school spirit, and love to have fun; then you have what it takes 
to be a Granite City High School band member. B L‘ H 


290 BAND 




I. MARCHING BAND, 2. Mr. Dennis Meyer and Mr. Norbert Tate 3. 
Row 1 Ali Dumoulin, Amie Parker, Patty Webb, Ann Joyce, Bri- 
gitta Modglin, Sarah Stone, Lisa Lewis, Ann Kirkpatrick, Rosa Lu- 
cas, Pam Voss, Tricia Brinkhoff 2. JoAnn Buxton, Brian Weiser, 
Jennifer Heil, Heather Nail, Donna Delay, Dianne Oliver, Stacie 
Ahlers, Angela Cappendge, LeighAnn Klug, Jennifer Lidikay, Me- 
lissa Holloway, Jeanine McMillan, Cassandra Krinski, Kim Annable. 
3. Christy Cahill, Cassy Dawes, Robyn Schubert, David Rosales, 
Nathan Branding, Matt Cauble, Jennifer Wheeler, Bill Lenzi, Kim 
Morgan, Kathy Scmedake, Ben Asbeck, Eric Vallo, Chuck Noud, 
Brenda Holmes, Jim Holmes, Robert McGuire, Stephanie Parrish, 
Keri Cunningham, Amy Cheat. 4. Dale Newberry, Mark Harper, 
Derek DeJanett, Jim Martinez, Rich Harms, Chris Blatz, Ames LaN- 
ear, Chris McMillan, Jason Brown, Regan Hildebrand, Craig Lea- 
veil, Rachael Parrish, Seval Manoufar, Scott Schaus, Mike Davis. 5. 
Kim Schnefke, Krista Sullivan, Dan Pearman, Willy Dimitroff, Patti 
Meyer, Jeremy Reuter, Justin Brown, Aaron Belmer, Dan Cooper, 
Tammy Mendenhall, Kathy Schnefke, Amanda Cunningham, Rod 
Jaycox, Andy Lalor, Mike Corrado, Mark Tieman, Dennis Meyer, 
director, and Norbert Tate-assistant director. 


BAND 291 




BAND LETTERMAN CLUB: 

• 1 . Row 1 : Heather Nail, Kim Schnefke, Kim Morgan, Amy Choat, Jennifer 
Wheeler, Dianne Oliver, Michelle Schaus, Ann Kirkpatrick, Kim Annable 2. 
Amie Parker, Patti Meyer, Angela Alexander, Ann Jayce, Patty Webb, Ali 
Dumoulin, Racheal Parrish, Sarah Stone, Krista Sullivan, Brigitta Modglin, 
Kathy Schnefke 3. Stacie Ahlers, Dale Newberry, Brian Welser, Derek 
DeJarnett, Amos LaNear, Robert McGuire, Mark Harper, Nathan Brand- 
ing, Chris McMillan, Bill Lenzi 4. Dan Pearman, Jeremy Reuter, Matt Cau- 
ble, Andy Lalor, Mike Corado, Jim Holmes, Craig Leavell, Willy Dimitroff, 
Mike Davis, Regan Hildebrand 5. David Rosales, Justin Brown, JoAnn 
Buxton, Jennifer Heil, Patricia Brinkhoff, Donna Delay 2. Mr. Dennis Meyer 
3. JAZZ BAND: JoAnn Buxton, Scott Schaus, Mike Davis, Craig Leavell, 
Racheal Parrish, Regan Hildebrand, Ali Dumoulin 2. Krista Sullivan, Mike 
Corrado, Jim Martinez, Dale Newberry, Rich Harris, Aaron Belmer, Jeremy 
Reuter 3. Andy Lalor, Brigitta Moglin, Amy Choat, Kim Morgan, Bill Lenzi, 
David Rosales, Kim Schnefke, Dan Pearman, Director Norbert Tate 4. 
Tammy Mendenhall, Amanda Cummingham, Dan Pearman, Jeremy Reu- 
ter, Don Cooper 



292 BAND 





BAND 293 





294 BAND 







1. Amy Hicks, Kathy Haddock, Ali Dumoulin, Tri- 
cia Brinkhoff, Sharon Mattern, Dianne Oliver, 
Patti Meyer, Craig Lea veil, Chris McMiilan 2. 
Krista Sullivan, Sarah Stone, Allison Whitmer, 
Kristi Reed, Brigitta Modglin, Nikki Kincer, Amy 
Cheat, Jennifer Wheeler 3. Lisa Lewis, Rob Jay- 
cox, Andy Lalor, Chris Madden, Kim Schnefke, 
Amanda Dettis, Sasha Carter, Nathen Brand- 
ing, Chris Kraus, Dale Newberry 2. Angie Alex- 
ander, Michelle Schaus, and Brigitta Modglin 
practicing hard 3. Tricia Brinkhoff, Sharon Mat- 
tern, Patti Meyer 2. Jennifer Wheeler, Chris 
Kraus, Craig Leavell, Chris McMillian 4. Mr. Nor- 
bert Tate 


BAND 295 




JUMP-POUND- YELL-CHEER 


Pounding the mat, jumping up and down, yelling to the crowd are just some of the duties of the 
GCHS cheerleader. Their job isn't all fun. There are hours and hours of hard work and dedication 
that go along with the excitement. 

Why become a cheerleader? The reasons vary as much as the girls do. Leah Schuman's reason 
for leading the fans in cheers is to motivate the players and keep the spirit in troubled times. 

There are cheering squads for football, soccer, wrestling, and basketball. The girls who cheer for 
these oports also enjoy watching them. Kristen Jenness ”... really enjoyed cheerleading through 
the season and made a lot of great friends. I'll always remember the great times our squad had 
together." 

To improve the quality and variety of the cheers, the girls attend camps at Southeast Missouri 
State and practice long and hard hours through the summer. Emily Stitch said, "Camp was a 
great experience. We learned a lot, made new friends, and learned to work together as a 
squad. It helped us throughout the entire season." 

The highlight of any season is when and if the team goes to state competition. This year the 
soccer Warriors won state. Deana Whaley thought, "Cheering State was fun and exciting, 
especially when we became the state champions." 

The support these girls give to the teams in invaluable. They give their 'all' no matter what the 
team does or how far they go in competition. But they know that's what they are supposed to 
do. They definitely have their work cut out for them and they enjoy every minute of it. 

by Leah Schuman 


296 VARSITY FOOTBALL CHEERLEADERS 




1. Varsity football cheerleaders. Row 1: Misty Timko, 

Nikki Wolfe, Emily Stitch. Row 2; Shawn Oliver, 

Gretchen Schuler, Julia Boyer, Dana Bugnitz, Carrie 
Owen. Row 3; Carrie Hankins, Amy Isom, Leah Schu- 
man, Jenny Baker. 2. Row 1: Sheila Mullen, Dawn 
Smith. Row 2: Lynn Novich, Lisa Hard, Jackie Bukovac. 

Row 3: Kim Holloway, Missy Baker, Claudia Snyder, 

Julie Goclan j v FOOTBALL CHEERLEADERS 297 




1 


298 VARSITY SOCCER CHEERLEADERS 




VARSITY SOCCER: Row 1: Jenny Basual, Christine Reyes. 
Row 2: Laurie Monroe, Shelly Wilber, Deono Whaley. Row 
3; Stacie Kennedy, Carrie Boyer, Nikki Tate. 2. J.V. SOC- 
CER: Row 1: Hillary Watkins, Pam Miskell, Christy Vivod. Row 
2: Crystal Villareal, Jennifer Simon, Chrissy Cuvar. Row 3: 
Jenny Rudy, Laura Patton. 3. Varsity soccer cheerleaders 
at the state tournament. 


J. V. SOCCER CHEERLEADERS 299 



CHEERFUL LITTLE SMILES 


Both positive and negative feelings and attitudes accompanied being a cheerleader. 
There were always the good times, but there are also some tough situations cheer- 
leaders must face. 

Nobody, but another cheerleader, knows the time and effort that goes into this 
activity. There are endless hours of practice and more practice. Most evenings they 
don't get home until 4:40 or 5 P.M. Tired from continuously repeating their routines, they 
begin their homework before bedtime only to begin again the next day. 

There are, however, good sides. Participation in the sport for which they cheered was 
always rewarding. Watching their favorite team win was exciting for both themselves 

and the fans. ^ , . 

by Liz Hams 


300 FRESHMEN CHEERLEADERS 






FRESHMEN: Row I: 
Jennifer Trtanj, Leann 
Novich, Jamie Ray, 
Brooke Bjorkman, 
Alicia Skirball. Row 2: 
Jayme Duckworth, 
Debbie Engelke, Jen- 
ny Schuager, Amy 
Gebhardt, Kelly Mul- 
len, Lynsy Evans. Row 
3; Michelle Dickerson, 
Jill Haddix, Dana Mar- 
tin, Adrian Yates, Me- 
lissa Carmack, Daniel 
Martin. 2. J.V. WRES- 
TLING: Row 1: Kim 
Wachter, Crystal Vil- 
lareal. Row 2: Jodi 
Forister, Alissa Slater, 
Jackie Bukovac, 
Missy Baker, Michele 
Lewis. VARSITY WRES- 
TLING: Row Jenni- 
fer Winfield, Billy Jo 
McKee, Rachel Rich- 
ardson. Row 2: Hilary 
Watkins, Pam Miskell, 
Row 3: Barla Walker, 
Kristin Jenness, Brandi 
Snelson. 


WRESTLING CHEERLEADERS 301 










1. Varsity Basketball. Row Shelly Wilber, Jenny Ba- 
sual, Deana Whaley. Row 2: Carrie Boyer, Stacie 
Kennerly, Misty Timko. Row 3: Laurie Monroe, Gretch- 
en Schuler, Jenny Baker. 2. J.V. Basketball. Row 1: 
Chrissy Cuvar. Row 2: Jennifer Rudy, Laura Patton. 


Row 3; Shelia Mullen, Jennifer Simon, Nikki Petrillo. 3. 
Senior cheerleaders. Row 1: Nikki Tate, Carrie Boyer, 
Stacie Kennerly. Row 2: Julia Boyer, Shawn Oliver, 
Misty Timko. Row 3: Leah Schuman, Amy Isom, Emily 
Stitch, Carrie Owen. 


FOOTBALL AND SOCCER SENIORS 303 




The cast of The Diary of Anne 
Frank; (seated) Don Goss, April Po- 
livick, and Jennifer Brand, (back 
row) Mike Delgado, Alicia Skirball, 
Nick McLaren, Nona Mefford, Erin 
Rotter, Dustin Wilkinson, and Tom 
Kinder. 2. Cast members put on 
their makeup. 3. Mr. F. Gordon 
Mueller helps Nona Mefford with 
her wardrobe. 4. Mr. Mueller and 
Mrs. Beverley Scroggins get every- 
thing ready for the play. 5. Jennifer 
Brand talks to Erin Rotter as Dustin 
Wilkinson walks into the dressing 
room. 6. Nona Mefford and Alicia 
Skirball. 7. Nick McLaren discusses 
a serious situation with Erin Rotter. 
8. Dustin Wilkinson and Mouschi. 



304 WINTER PLAY 





THE PLAY 


"The Diary of Anne Frank" was put on by the speech 
department of Granite City High School. The setting of 
the play took place in Amsterdam during the years of 
World War II and immediately thereafter. 

The cast for the play was very hard working and 
dedicated. The rehearsals were long and very hard, 
but definitely worth it. The play went off with great 
success. All were very pleased with the performances. 
"We put in a lot of hard work or the stage, but the final 
result was great. It was wonderful to work with Nick 
and Jenny, they are so talented," said Erin Rotter. 

The play was performed on Thursday and Friday, 
February 7th and 8th, and couldn't have been at a 
better time. The play was a complete hit and every- 
one enjoyed it. Mr. Painter encouraged everyone that 
did not go Thursday to go Friday because it was such 
a hit. 

by Julie Fernandez 


WINTER PLAY 305 


€XPR€SS VOURS€LF 




306 SPORTS 






5 


1. Larry Strader, Pat Rich, and Jeff Stephens tell everyone that 
the Granite City soccer Warriors are Number 1. 2. Jeff Stephens 
kicks the soccer ball. 3. Nikki Petrillo gives it her best swing. 4. 
Mike Vaughn and Damon Yates say that the football team is 
Number 1. 5. Good tennis players-Kristi Holsinger, Hollie Taylor, 
Coach Allen Lobdell, and Addie Lenzi. 









SPORTS 307 



1. Bobby Thomas checks his throw. 2. 
Erik Lewis cools off. 3. ROW 1. Todd 
Pryor, Mike Weinkein, Brad Nelson, 
John Billick, Damon Yates, Bobby 
Thomas, Mark Cotter, Larry Curry, 
Manager Brian Dean. ROW 2. Chris 
Peeler, Larry Earney, Eric Mendenhall, 
Jeff Heubschman, Chris Hoffstot, Gary 
Tipton, Billy Vanbuskirk, Mike Vaughn, 
Erik Lewis, Mike Nordstrom, Dan 
Partney. ROW 3. Dave Cotter, Jeff 
Luffman, Mike Montgomery, Larry 
White, Ed Linhart, Mike Bonvicino, Ja- 
son Roulanaitis, Mark Brokaw, Bob Wil- 
son, Matt Lour, Billy Herman, ROW 4. 
Coach Robert Stegemeier, Coach 
Don Harris, Barry Sykes, Donald Lowe, 
Mike Mowell, Michael Gooch, John 
Rickert, Scott Wolfe, Robert Morgen, 
Bryan Kromray, Coach Tom Wyrostek, 
Coach Larry Curry. 



308 FOOTBALL 


FOOTBALL 



3 


A FOOTBALL EXPLOSION 


From the first long, hot practice in August to the lost, brisk practice in October, the main object 
of any football team and it's coaches is to win. That's exactly what this varsity team intended to 
do. 

Under the new coaching of Tom Wyrostek our Warrior team exploded. Even though they didn't 
win every game, the improvement from the '89 season was remarkable. The boys kept their spirits 
up and their hopes high at the approaching of every game. It takes hard work to have a winning 
season, not to mention all of the sweat and dirt involved. 

One of the greatest or perhaps, the most memorable moments the players had this season 
was, "Winning the first game for Coach Wyrostek and kicking the winning field goal with 12 
seconds left in the game against Alton." says Mike Nordstrom. 

For Bobby Thomas it was, "the game against Belleville West. We hadn't beat them in a long 
time." When Mike Vaughn was asked, he replied, "being the underdog against Cahokia and 
coming out victorious." 

To Coach Wyrostek, "This year's football team was, at times, as exciting a football team as you 
would like to be around." 

As this year's season drew to a close, the younger players looked to the future. Maybe the 
playoff dream will come true. 

Todd Pryor concluded with, "Cur goal as seniors was to go out winners, and we did. If next 
year's team does as good. I'll feel we had a part in it." 

by Carrie Owen 


FOOTBALL 309 


FOOTBALL 



AN ALL-AMERICAN COACH 


As a coach it is his responsibilities to improve the team, encourage them to do better, and 
keep their spirits up so they are able to concentrate on winning their next game. This is exactiy 
what Coach Tom Wyrostek did for the varsity team. 

After six seasons of footbali under the coaching of Ronaid Yates, Tom Wyrostek took over. 
Coach Wyrostek graduated from East St. Louis High School and continued his education at the 
University of Missouri. Then he came to Granite City to teach and coach. 

He is now enjoying his first year back as head footbali coach and assistant athietic director. 
When asked about this years season and team, he repiied, "It was an enjoyable year. They were 
super kids, who worked hard and wanted to win." He is also proud to say, "They were never a 
disappointment." 

He looked optimistically at next year and said, "They are going to be as good as they want 
to be. They have enough talent to compete with every team on the schedule." 

What does it take to make a successfui team? Hard work and concentration are needed. 
That's exactly what Coach Tom Wyrostek does for this school. 

by Carrie Owen 


310 FOOTBALL 




FOOTBALL 311 


1. Coach Tom Wyrostek 
gives a pep talk. 2. ROW 1. 
Brett Barron, Matt Lour, Tim 
Ozanich, John Bloome, Tim 
Connolly, Steve Keelin, Les 
Nunes, Bob Morgen, Damon 
Wolf. ROW 2. Coach Al 
Lewis, Coach Gus Lignal, Ja- 
son Dillard, Mike Speer, Da- 
vid Klee, John TInnon, Matt 
Howell, Korey Reed, Mike 
Lipchick, Brien Cave. ROW 3. 
Zach Boyer, Wally Milton, 
Chris Warren, Pat Jessee, 
Andy Richards, Billy Herman, 
Erie Miner, Bobby Wilson, 
Mark Brokaw. 3. Mark Cotter 
gets ready to play. 4. Mike 
Vaughn stretches in prepa- 
ration. 5. Mike Nordstrom 
kicks a field goal. 





1. The Warrior football team in action. 2. Damon Yates 
smiles for the camera along with his dad, Ron Yates, 
and his grandpa, Richard Yates. 3. Bobby Thomas 
watches the football that Mike Nordstrom kicked. 4. 
row 1: John Polivick, Chad Dooly, Chris Kult, Jeremy 
Wyatt, Don Harris, Patrick May, Allen Rutledge, Jacob 
Zimmerman, row 2: Nathan Owen, Charles Loftus, 
John Buxton, Ryan Shelton, Steve Patterson, Jason 
Smith, Chad Miner, Corey Wall, Jeff McMillan, row 3: 
Coach Hylla, Coach Gunderson, Jeff Koberna, Jamie 
Michaels, Sean Firebaugh, Brain Nemeth, Mike 
Drennen, Adam Janness, Ron Fisher, Mike Grubbs, 
Larry Severs, row 4: Ray Vallier, Daryn Strong, Robert 
Wallace, Matt Zimmerman, Mike Bishop, Jason Yarber, 
Shawn Scrum, Jeff Ridenour. 



312 FOOTBALL 




FOOTBALL 


4 


ALMOST AT THE TOP 


This year's sophomore football team was one of the toughest teams that has ever come 
through GCHS. Their record was 8-1. The defense was a major factor of their success. Being a 
blue-collar team — not having the speed and size of other teams — they had to play extra hard 
especially when going up against teams like East St. Louis and Belleville East. 

The offense came through in clutch situations when they needed to play extra tough to keep 
the ball from the opposing team. There were no superstars, but the team played well together. 
Sometimes those two factors are more important than speed and power. 

Sophomores work hard at this level always with the hope of being called to play varsity. They 
receive little recognition but with their ambition, hopes, and dreams, they strive to play varsity. 

To all the young boys who tried out and didn't make it, keep your chin up and keep on fighting. 
Late bloomers often grow in the summer of their sophomore year and become the new starters 
their junior year. 

Best of luck in carrying on the Warrior tradition next year. Never forget the phrase in our school 
song "but win or lose we'll keep on fighting just the same." 

by Leah Schuman 


FOOTBALL 313 








1 


1. Nikki Petriilo displays her best 
effort to return the serve. 2. Kristi 
Holsinger swings into action. 3. 
Row 1: Kellie Gregory, JoAnna 
Webb, Jodi Forister, Nikki Petriilo, 
Hollie Taylor, Amy Isenburg, 
Heather Barnhart. Row 2: Coach 
Allen Lobdell, Kristi Holsinger, 
Addle Lenzi, Melissa Sammons, 
Tara Wyatt, Nicole Zelenka, 
Jennifer Hitt. 



314 GIRLS TENNIS 



TENNIS 



SWINGING INTO ACTION 


The 1990 girls tennis team was a group of energetic and optimistic athletes. Together, with 
coach Allen Lobdell, the team set goals for a successful season. The long hard hours of 
practice and determination paid off, as they compiled a record of 7 wins and 7 losses. Kristi 
Holsinger, a senior member of the girls Warrior tennis team, said, 'Tennis has been one of the 
major highlights in high school. The friendships will stay with me always." 

The experience of the other senior members, such as Hollle Taylor and Addie Lenzi, helped 
the girls strive for their seasonal goal. This experience was a dominant factor when the girls 
beat East St. Louis 7-0. 

With the team consisting of 10 underclassmen, success came through hard work and 
determination. With this experience, these girls will see success next year. 

The girls developed a friendship. They helped one another at practices and were dedicated 
to be the best. Special honors went to Kristi Holsinger for "most valuable" player and Nikki 
Petrillo for "most improved" player. Addie Lenzi and Hollie Taylor qualified for state. They also 
achieved third place In the sectionals. Addie Lenzi comments "It was a great achievement 
for me to go to state my senior year. It was also a memorable experience." 

The 13 member tennis team had a surprising season. With 10 returning players in 1991, they 
expect to do equally well as they did this season or better. 

by Angie Withers 


GIRLS TENNIS 315 




A SLAMMING GOOD TIME 

This year's girls varsity basketball team was made of a combination of experience 
ana new talent. With the loss of many key seniors from last year, the team had to work 
especially hard to prove themselves in These girls can be found in the gym every 
day after school and on weekends practicing hard and learning new skills to help them 
perfect their game. 

The team was coached by Mr. Allen Lobdell and led by senior co-captains Andrea 
Cline and Addie Lenzi. Andrea said, "Being a captain my senior year was a great honor. 
We won more games than anyone gave us credit for, partly because we played as a 
team." This year's team played with effort and determination and finished their season 
with a very impressive record. Coach Lobdell concludes, "This team was a blend of 
experience and youth. They learned the meaning of team play and therefore we 
should be even stronger next season." by Emily Stitch 


316 VARSITY GIRLS BASKETBALL 


GIRLS BASKETBALL 





VARSITY GIRLS BASKETBALL 317 


1. ROW 1: Coach Boyer, Dixie Price, Karen 
Sykes, Jamie Cavaness, Dana Dresch, Coach 
Lobdell. Row 2: Jennifer Wheeler, Andrea 


Cline, Addie Lenzi, Jennifer Wortham, Steph- 
anie Kult. 2. Karen Sykes goes up for the shot. 


GIRLS BASKETBALL 



SHOOT FOR TWO 

In the eyes of every junior varsity basketball 
player, there are hopes and dreams of playing 
varsity. 

Jennifer Wortham and Wendy Chamberlain are 
two very skillful and ambitious players who are 
looking forward to the challenges of playing varsi- 
ty next year. Their goals are to practice hard, 
improve their "loose” weave, and to have as 
much fun next year as they did this year. 

Jennifer Wortham, team captain, says "I enjoy 
the challenge of playing basketball, making 
friends with the team members, and I will never 
forget all the memories I have from the long, hard, 
and exciting practices and the games we had 
through the year.” 

The team improved their record this year with 9 
wins and 8 losses. Next year they are hoping to 
improve even more, work well with their new 
team and strive to beat Collinsville. 

by Leah Schuman 





2 


318 GIRLS BASKETBALL 




J.V. GIRLS BASKETBALL 319 


^ it 


1 Row 1; Coach Boyer, Wendy Chamberlin, Amy Rainer, Dixie Price, Dana Dresch, Jennifer 
Wortham, Carolyn Ryterski, Coach Lobdell. Row 2; Melissa Sammons, Melinda Daniels, Kami Kessel, 
Jennifer Wheeler, Luise Christenson. 2. Coach Allen Lobdell smiles. 3. Stephanie Kult passes the 
ball. 4. Adadie Lenzi tries to escape her opponent. 




1 


1 . Jennifer Harris passes the ball. 2. Varsity Warriors 
discuss the game during a time out. 3. VARSITY: 
Row 1; Terri Buster, Staci Johnson, Jennifer Harris, 
Melissa Tapp, Amey Bohnenstiehl, Mia Puhse. Row 
2: Coach Natalie Buster, Amy Krakowiecki, Carrie 
Brown, Karen Sykes, Stephanie Kult, Jennifer 
Wortham. 



320 VOLLEYBALL 


VOUEYBALL 



SIMPLY SMASHING PERFORMANCE 

Before every game, the Warrior varsity volleyball team has a set of rituals to complete before 
they can start a game. The final pep talk is led by Coach Natalie Buster in the locker room. The 
varsity team begins their warmup with some muscle stretches and a tew jogs around the court. 
The captains are called together with the officials, as the remainder of the team begins passing 
to warm the skills. 

Both the Warrior team and their opponents are called to their benches to discuss the starting 
six and the plans tor a victory for the approaching game. The referee blows the whistle for both 
teams to line up on the court preparing for the first serve. This is where all the hard work and 

practice begins to pay off. , . . 

The varsity team ended their season with a 4 win 17 loss record. "Although it wasn t a winning 
season, we did make improvements. I have enjoyed my senior year for Coach Buster. I will miss 
her and the rest of my teammates,” comments Jennifer Harris. 

Senior night was held against Althoff. It was a very special and memorable evening. 

by Melissa Tapp 


VOLLEYBALL 321 





VOLLEYBALL 



FRESHMAN: Row 1: Becky Shaver, Lisa Buske, Angela Favier, Kami 
Kessel, Jessica Thomas. Row 2: Coach Wilma Schulze, Misty Reagan, 
Jennifer Engelke, Jamie Cavaness, Lori Ann Harris, Emily Epperson. 2. 
Amey Bohnenstiehl sets the ball for a kill. 3. JV: Row 1: Staci Johnson, 
Jo Ann Gray, Beth Rapoff, Charlene Pearman. Row 2: Coach Natalie 
Buster, Terri Buster, Amy Rainer, Dana Dresch, Michelle Knox, Amy 
Krakowiecki. 



322 VOLLEYBALL 



ALL THE YOUNG GIRLS 


In addition to coaching the varsity volleyball team. Coach Natalie Buster is also in charge of the junior 
varsity team. Coach Wilma Schulze assists Coach Buster with both the JV and varsity teams, but also has 
a separate responsibility of her own. She coaches the freshman volleyball team. 

With a combination of eight sophomores and one junior, the JV team worked together to play to the 
best of their ability. Jo Ann Gray says, "We went through all types of games. We struggled through hard 
games as well as the winning ones. We worked as a team no matter what.” Some players were also 
chosen to move up to compete at the varsity level. "Both JV and varsity improved from last year. The 
varsity tournament in Collinsville was a lot of fun and a great learning experience for me,” adds Staci 
Johnson. 

At the freshman level, this team learned the basic skills of the bump, set, spike to make their season a 
success. With much hard work, they achieved the basic strategy for a winning team. The freshman 
team ended their season with a record of 3 wins and 14 losses. Lori Ann Harris concludes, ' Being my first 
year playing real competitive volleyball, I have learned quite a bit about the game. I am looking 
forward to the upcoming season to really put it all together.” 

Volleyball is a competitive game which is full of grace, strategy, and skill. It is fun to watch and really 
fun to play. These athletes have done their best to have the most fun possible and still be a competitive 
volleyball team. 

by Melissa Tapp 


VOLLEYBALL 323 





1. VARSITY Row 1: Russ Chappell, 
Chris Sturdivant, Joe Brewer, 
Dwayne Chaney. Row 2: Billy 
McCormick, Gabe Mitcheii, Dean 
Sheikh, Steve Rains, Ryan Muelier, 
Allen Ledbetter. 2. The necessary 
equipment. 3. Allen Ledbetter 
takes a shot. 3. JV Row 1: Tom 
Hoskins, Paui Austin, Jason Cass, 
Shane McCaliister, Josh 
McCeiiand, Jon Duft, Jason 
Schaus, Joei Roderick. Row 2: Russ 
Chappell, Ed MacKay, Matt 
Blankenship, Matt Bolandis, P.J. 
Hamilton, Bart Alsoph, Matt Ruder, 
Dan Peterson, Steve Lubak, Brad 
Breese, Dwayne Chaney. 



2 



324 GOLF 






TRY FOR A BIRDIE 


The Warrior golf team, led by Mr. Russell Chappell and Dwayne Chaney, had a respectable 
season. The team consisted of 5 seniors and underciassmen. The varsity team finished their 
season with 16-9 record. Junior Varsity finished with a 4-6 record. Various teams the Granite City 
Warriors played against were Roxana, Edwardsvilie, Red Bud, and Alton. The Warriors also 
defeated the rivals, Collinsville, with a 199-205 final score. 

The team displayed their taient every time they hit the course. They finished third in their 
scrambie. The goiters aiso set an impressive team regional score of 317. In the IHSA sectional, 
Ryan Mueller qualified as an individuai and the whole team qualified as a team. In the 
conference, the Warrior team tied for second piace. 

The leaders of the team were senior captains, Billy McCormick, Allen Ledbetter, and Dean 
Sheikh. Billy McCormick says “Our team this year was surprising. If there was any year for us to 
do anything, this was the year. With five returning seniors and some new faces on the team, we 
were abie to advance to the sectionais. If it wasn't for the new guys we wouldn't have been able 
to do what we achieved this year." 

Speciai honors went to Joe Brewer for “most effective". The “most improved" award was to 
Ryan Mueiler and Steve Rains. There wili be 20 remaining pius new freshmen to make the 1991 
season another successfui year for the Granite City Warrior golfers. 

by Angie Withers 


GOLF 325 



1 


1 Chris Garriott improves his stride to 
move ahead. 2. Justin Rayl catches his 
second wind. 3. Row 1; David Taylor, 
Aaron Jackstadt, Jennifer Winfield, Carla 
Broyles, Ernie Miller, David Petrillo, and Bri- 
an Grimes. Row 2: Mark Chapman, Kelly 
Miller, Brian Siez, Justin Stallings, Dan Pas- 
coe, Jason Bloome, Mike Pascoe, Justin 
Rayl, Jeff Siez, Shawn Calentine. Row 3; 
Coach Tom Haeffner, Brian Reed, Chris 
Garriott, Derrick Kingsley, John Bringer, 
Dan Brazee, Rick Evans, Lance Reynolds, 
Tim Barton, Coach David McClain. 



326 CROSS COUNTRY 



CROSS COUNTRY 



READY - SET - GO 

For some people the thought of running three or four miles is too much work. For 
cross country members, it is just a warm up. 

Cross country is not one of the big spectator sports at Granite City Fligh School. 
But the athletes and participants know it takes a very special and definitely athletic 
person to be able to take the heat, sweating, and strain. 

This sport, unlike most, is very individual. While running the race, one of the 
thoughts running through the athlete's mind is the color of the uniform in front of him. 
All they think of is how they could move a little closer to that person and eventually 
pass him. 

The athlete has to be in excellent condition to endure some the of long, exhaust- 
ing runs. Consequently, the practices consist of running and more running. 

Before any of the running begins, there are many preparation stretches to do. 
These are always done at practices and meets. Without a good warm-up, injuries 
may occur, such as shin splints, pulled muscles, and cramps. 

This year, our team has done very well. They have qualified from the regional 
meet to the sectional. "We work very hard to get where we are." says Justin 
Stallings. 

Coaches David McClain and Tom Haeffner have done a very good job of 
keeping their runners in excellent shape and spirit. Fernandez 


CROSS COUNTRY 327 





A TRADITION OF SUCCESS 


The 1990 varsity soccer season started off at 12:01 on the morning of August 13 with the 
traditional midnight practice. Despite the rainy dreary weather, over 400 loyal fans came out 
to the practice to help the Warriors kick off their season. This year's team proved to be as 
talented and dedicated as ever. 

On October 1 -6 the Tournament of Champions was held on our home field. Here GCHS would 
face the toughest teams in the St. Louis area such as Vianney and St. Louis University High. 

The Warriors knew they had to puil together in order to win; and they did just that when they 
defeated top ranked DeSmet to receive first piace in their own tournament. Coach Gene Baker 
said, “Night in and night out, we've piayed the best that this area has to offer and i think we've 
responded to that chalienge." 

This elite group of athietes will retire 1 7 seniors this year. They are: Rodney Aimos, Brian Buske, 
Brian Cholevik, Matt Loftus, Jason Mathenia, Jim McKechan, Jason Nemeth, Brad O'Niel, Ryan 
Reeves, Jay Robertson, Jason Scrum, Dan Terrell, and Lariy Wright. 

Led by their team captains, who are also seniors. Skip Birdsong, Pat Rich, Jeff Stephens, and 
Larry Strader, the soccer Warriors finished their season with an impressive record of 24-3-2. 

Skip Birdsong conciudes, “It has been a privilege to be a captain of a team that has 
accomplished so mdny great things." 

by Emily Stitch 


328 SOCCER 


SOCCER 







SOCCER 329 


2 3 

1. Row 1: Brian Cholevik, Brad O'Neil, Tim 
Henson. Row 2: Jeff Stephens, Jim McKechan, 
Dan Terrell, Eric Davis, Chris Votoupal, Matt 
Sterns, Andy Jenkins. Row 3: Jason Nemeth, 
Jason Maxfield, Josh Neidhardt, Dave Partney, 
Rodney Almos, J.B. Anderson, Kurt Kessler, Ja- 
son Mathenia, Jamie Bridges. Row 4: Ryan 
Reeves, Larry Strader, Brian Buske, Jay 
Robertson, Skip Birdsong, Brent Dippel, Larry 
Wright, Pat Rich, Matt Loftus. 2. Brent Dippei in 
action. 3. Dan Terreil shoots the bail in hopes of 
a goal. 4. Pat Rich takes control in the 
Collinsville game. 




SOCCER 



MOVING RIGHT ALONG 


It takes a great amount of endurance for a soccer player to handle all of the practice and 
hard work needed to put together a winning team. Since it takes all of the players to make 
the team a winning success, each player must work hard in order to develop new skills. They 
must learn to communicate with each other and work together to back each other up. 

The junior varsity soccer team is composed mostly of juniors and sophomores; however, a 
few freshman are selected to move up to the J.V. level. With ambition and perseverance, 
these young men strive to excel and hope to, one day, carry on Granite City's tradition of 
excellence in soccer. 

This year was another great year for the junior varsity soccer team. They played hard and 
ended their season with 13 wins, two losses, and one tie. 

The moral support and helpful advise the players received from Coach Mel Bunting helped 
to achieve such an impressive record. Coach Bunting concludes, "I am very proud of the 
team's hard work and I look forward to seeing how they play at the varsity level." 

by Emily Stitch 


330 SOCCER 







4 


1. Row 1: Tom Dalton, Russell Buchek, Chad 
Toeniskoetter, Jason Richardson. Row: Jason Starko, 
Matt Crider, Mike Tarasovich, Mark McKechan, Rod Heil, 
Brian Koiher, Tony Yurko. Row 3; Matt Stearns, Marc 
Patton, Billy Clark, Josh Huston, J.B, Anderson, Shawn 
Sheik, Andy Jenkins, Mark Thornsberry, Jim Petroski. Row 
4: Bill Ribbing, Ryan Repp, Bob Vincent, Ben Hicks, Kurt 
Kessler, Jason Naney, Chris Hildreth, Josh Neidhardt, Eric 
Jones. 2. Skip Birdsong takes control of the ball. 3. Jason 
Maxfield vigorously chases the ball. 4. Jay Robertson tries 
to eat the soccer ball. 


SOCCER 331 




SOCCER 



1 

1. Jason Scrum heads the ball away from a Chaminade Row 3; Tommy Breeden, Steve Kondrich, Sean Lakatos, Brian 
player. 2. Row 1: Ron Glascaw, Dave Kasprovich, Don Mur- Kolher, Eric Simpson, Mark Schuette, Ryan Robertson, Row 4: 
phy. Row 2: Nathan Cholevick, Mark Winfield, Chad Wozniak, Jim Martinez, Jason Leach, Corey Wallace, Jeff Witter, Rob 
John Galbreath, Dave Dutko, Casey Bloomquist, Nathan Hill. Brooksher, Jason Black, Bobby Webb, Craig Harrison. 


332 SOCCER 




SOCCER 



HOPE FOR THE FUTURE 


Soccer is a game that requires strategy, control, and skill. The freshman soccer team 
possesses all of these traits. The team did exceptionally well this year due to the fact that they 
put in many long hours of practice both after school and on weekends preparing for their 
season. The boys found that high school practices were much more strenuous than at the 
junior high level, This hard work obviously paid off when the freshman team finished their first 
high school season with a record of 9-4-1. They had three shutouts and scored a total of 39 
goals. 

The dedicated man that made such a successful season possible was the freshman coach, 
Mr. David Ames. Coach Ames is greatly respected by each and every member of the team. 
Mark Winfield says, “Coach Ames taught the team well and I feel we related well with each 
other." Brian Kohler adds, "It was a lot of fun playing for Coach Ames, He's a great coach, I 
always had a fun time at practices, except for when we had to run killers," 

Coach Ames concludes, “This year's freshman team proved that they were a good team 
based on their record and level of competition they faced. They can look forward to having 
great seasons in the future and that's good for the entire soccer program." 

by Emily Stitch 


SOCCER 333 



1. Jeff Stephens, Skip 
Birdsong and the War- 
rior crowd celebrate 
after the victory 
against St. Charles. 2. 
Jay Robertson and 
Brent Dippel wait anx- 
iously for the ball to be 
thrown into play. 3. 
Proud senior soccer 
players show off their 
first-place trophy. 



334 STATE SOCCER 




STATE SOCCER 



NUMBER ONE AGAIN 


Bad weather, tough practices, injuries, and a disappointing home opener to Civic Memorial 
were just a few obstacles the varsity soccer team had to face at the beginning of the season. 
These motivated young athletes hurdled those obstacles with flying colors and began striving 
for the top in hopes of another state championship title 

Success did not come easy for the Warriors. They played some very tough teams throughout 
the season. But, with dedication, the Warriors pulled through clinching the conference and the 
Regional, Sectional, and Super-sectional titles. Once again. Granite City earned a trip to the 
state tournament. 

On Thursday November 1 , the soccer Warriors set off to St. Charles ready to defend their title 
as State Champions. Fanatic Warrior fans followed the next day bringing with them their 
school spirit, lots of energy, and high hopes of another victory. 

The Warriors' first opponent in the tournament was Naperville North. A single goal scored by 
Skip Birdsong was enough to edge by Naperville for our first win. The next game, played 
Saturday afternoon, kept the fans on the edge of their seats. Everyone kept their fingers 
crossed as the scoreless game between Granite City and St. Charles went into a penalty-kick 
shootout. With a blocked shot by goalkeeper Tim Henson, and perfect penalty shots by Skip 
Birdsong, Brent Dippel, Jim McKechan, Ryan Reeves, and Jeff Stephens, the Warriors defeated 
St. Charles and advanced to the championship game. 

The Warriors found themselves in a do or die situation as they took the field against Evanston. 
Hundreds of excited Warrior fans filled the bleachers anxious to see another victory. All of the 
concentration and perseverance paid off when Granite City beat the previously undefeated 
Evanston 3-1 and brought home the state championship title for the second year in a row 
giving us a total of ten state championships. 

When asked about this great accomplishment. Coach Mel Bunting replied, 'This one ranks 
right up there with the best because the Chicago teams did not think we could win this year. 
Surprise! Surprise!" 

by Emily Stitch 


STATE SOCCER 335 



SOCCER 




A GATHERING OF THE BEST 

The scene looked familiar at the G.C.H.S. parking lot on November 4 when the 
soccer Warriors' bus returned home from St. Charles. Cheers were heard, pictures 
were taken, and the school song was played as the State Champion Soccer 
Team emerged from the bus, bringing with them the first place trophy and, once 
again, proving that they are the best of the best. I 

On Monday, November 5, an assembly was held in honor of the athletes in the 
school gym. The whole school watched as the coaches and athletes entered the 
gym proudly wearing their championship medals. Each player reflected back on 
their season, remembering special highlights and their most memorable mo- 
ments. 

Coach Bunting congratulated the players and then turned the assembly over ! 
to the team. Skip Birdsong took over the job of master of ceremony and 
introduced each team member one by one. Each player. In turn, thanked the 
coaches for their time, dedication, and guidance. 

The 1990 varsity soccer team contributed to Cranite City's reputation of soccer 
excellence. Everyone is very proud of this teams accomplishments. Congratula- 
tions guys! 

by Emily Stitch 







1. Captains, Pat 
Rich, Skip Bird- 
song, Larry 
Strader, and Jeff 
Stephens return 
home in style. 2. 
Soccer players 
show off their first 
place trophy 
and game ball. 
3. Ryan Reeves, 
Skip Birdsong, 
and Jeff Step- 
hens admire 
their trophy with 
Coach Baker. 4. 
Coach Bunting is 
ready to cele- 
brate. 5. Tim 
Henson smiles 
proudly as he 
carries the tro- 
phy off the bus. 


SOCC€R 337 



1. Jeff Smith goes for the lay-up. 2. Brian Smith 
struggles to make the shot. 3. Bobby Thomas 
reaches high to block the throw. 4. Row 1: Craig 
Powell, Randy Scott, Jay Robertson, Drake Mar- 


shall, Jeff Stephens, Raffi Karibian, Danny Askins, 
Les Nunes. Row 2: Melissa Mclivoy, John Coziar, 
Bobby Thomas, Jeff Smith, Brian Smith, Jason Ellis, 
Rob Terrell, Skip Birdsong, Jessica Derossett. 


338 VARSITY BOYS BASKETBALL 


BOYS BASKETBALL 



THE BIG BOYS 


Let's go! Let's fight! A cheer that is the base fouridation of the boys varsity basketball 
team. 

This group of boys are described to be "high caiiiber individuals". As a team, together 
they set high goals working and competing hard to meet them. The i990-91 team began 
its season In the end of November, performing well. Jay Robertson said, "This year's team 
was expected to do a lot this year in the way of winning . . . we had a midseason slump, 
but we came out in fine fashion." 

Skip Birdsong, Raffi Karibian, Jay Robertson, Jeff Stephens, Rob Terrell, and Bob Thomas 
are the six returning seniors that gave leadership and direction to the team. Captain Skip 
Birdsong commented, "It was a pleasure to be chosen as a captain of this team. We had a 
lot of fun, good luck to the underclassmen." Rob Terrell, captain also, added, "In four 
years, basketball and the people in it provided me with many experiences that will help me 
in the future." Bobby Thomas learned, "Basketball has taught me one thing. Not to be 
guarded by someone better than me." Coach Ohiendorf concluded commenting about 
next years team, "We'll have size and a strong nucleus to start the season out with." 

by Carrie Owen 


VARSITY BOYS BASKETBALL 339 






1. Jeff Stephens dribbles the ball down the court. 2. Jeff Smith 
concentrates on the game and his opponent. 3. Skip Birdsong 
says, "It's mine and you can't have it" as he hoids on to the 
basketbail during an important game at the GCHS gymnasium. 
4. J.V. BASKETBALL: Row 1: Randy Scott, Les Mines, and Dan 
Askins. Row 2: Melissa Mcliroy (manager), Craig Powell, Jason 
Ellis, John Cozar, and Jessica Derosset (manager). 



3 


340 J.V. BASKETBALL 



BASKETBALL 



VANBUSKIRK'S BOYS SHOOT FOR TWO 

The junior varsity basketball team is made up of ten piayers, which includes freshman, 
sophomores, and juniors. These piayers work hard in hopes that they may be able to play varsity. 
Their coach, Mr. VanBuskirk, helps them to perfect their skills of dribbling, passing, and shooting 

To become the best, these boys work together as a team and listen to the advice of Mr. 
VanBuskirk. 'This group of young men were hard working and very enjoyable to be around. I wish 
them the best of luck in the future." said Mr. VanBuskirk. Steve Rains also stated "Best wishes for 
the future." 

All the players will agree it has been an enjoyable year "Playing this year was really enjoyable 
for not only myself but for the rest of the team." said Craig Powell. "I really enjoyed playing for 
Coach VanBuskirk, added Brent Dipple. "Playing was a great experience," concluded Marc 
Patton. 

by Kendra Boyer 


J.V. BASKETBALL 341 




BASKETBALL 



1. SOPHOMORE TEAM: Row 
1: Dan Peterson, Jack 
Carmody, Marc Patton. Ja- 
son Rumpf, John Duff, Mi- 
chael Pritchard. Row 2: 
Coach Harris, Anthony 
Yurko, Chris Warren, Jannes 
Clutts, Stephen Rains, P.J. 
Hamilton, Chris McCul- 
lough. 2. A tense moment 
during one of our basket- 
ball games. 



2 


342 SOPHOMORE BASKETBALL 




3 

3. Row 1 : Bobby Webb, Don 
Harris, Michael Godair, Ja- 
son Smith, Gerald Cicio, 
Chris Kult. Row 2: Robert 
Wallace, Josh Zimmerman, 
Jacob Zimmerman, Chad 
Miner, Corey Wallis, Jason 
Black. 4. Involved baskeball 
fans. 


4 


FRESHMEN BASKETBALL 343 





A GREAT GROUP OF GUYS 


The 1990-91 Warrior wrestling team consisted ot 2 seniors and 24 underclassmen. The juniors were 
a "cut above" this year. They helped gain many victories. Mark Cotter and Scott Wilson are the 
graduating wrestlers this season. 

Individuals and team performances sparkled as did the success of the wrestling season. The 
wrestlers had an outstanding record for tournaments this season. The team won first place at the 
St. Charles tournament. The grapplers also received three seconds at the Springfield tournament, 
I.H.S.A. Regional tournament and I.H.S.A. Dual Team Regional tournament. At the close of the 
season the team ended with an 18 and 3 record. 

Sectional qualifiers include Pat Scheffer 103, Ryan King 112, Dan Hicks 125, Chris Hoffstot 135, 
Jerry Heubschman 140, and Al Willaredt 275. State qualifiers are Pat Scheffer 103, Ryan King 112, 
Chris Hoffstot 135, and Jerry Heubschman 140. 

by Kristin Jenness and Angie Judd 


344 WRESTLING 




WRESTLING 



2 

1. Chris Hass strives for the win. 2. Scott Wilson, Chris 
Hass, Mark McKechan, Jerry Heubschman, Chris 
Hoftstot, Jeff Heubschman, Pat Schaefer, Jason 
Moerlien, Ryan King. Row 2: Coach Mike Garland, Dan 
Hicks, Russ Buchek, Andy Richards, Al Willaredt, Mark 
Cotter, Scott Simon, Coach Smith, Coach Mike Garland. 
3. Mark McKechan struggles to turn his opponent. 


WRESTUNG 345 




WRESTLING 



1 . Chris Hoffstot holds on to his opponent. 

2. Coach Michael Garland shakes Chris 
hand for a good match. 3. J.V. Wrestling: 
Row 1: Mike Thompson. Michael Grubbs. 
Ritchie Dioneda. Ernie Milier. Gerald 
Slattery. Matt Bolandis. Row 2: Coach 
Greg Garland. Jeff Witter. Mike Gilbert. 
Robert Viessman. Matt Lienemann. Pat 
Jesse. Coach Smith. 4. Coaches Greg 
Garland, Smith, and Michael Garland 



2 


346 J.V. WRESTLING 



3 



COACH GREG'S BOYS 


The junior varsity wrestling team worked very hard through- 
out the season on and off the mat. Practices were very hard 
and time consuming, but ail was worthwhile when the team 
or individual won at the meets. 

Wrestling on the Warrior team took much dedication. Being 
on the junior varsity team prepared the athiete for next year. 
Many JV wrestling participants continue and become varsity 
piayers. It becomes a most exciting part of their life and their 
junior or senior year. 

There were fifteen individuais on the JV squad this year. Their 
coach was Greg Garland. Mr. Garland has been an outstand- 
ing coach and has heiped GCHS wrestlers reach their top 
form. 

Seniors Scott Wilson and Mark Cotter ended their high 
schooi career by wishing the underclassman the best of luck 
in wrestiing next year. 

by Angela Judd 


J.V. WRESTLING 347 



TEAM 


BASKETBALL 


WON: 1 1 LOST: 1 1 




SOCCER 

Won: 24 Lost: 3 Tie: 2 


Regional Champions 
Sectional Champions 
State Champions 


CROSS COUNTRY 


FOUR FIRST PLACE 
ONE SECOND PLACE 
THREE THIRD PLACE 


VOLLEYBALL 


GOLF 

• 


WON: 16 

WON: 4 
LOST: 1 8 


LOST: 9 


348 TEAM RECORDS 



FOOTBALL 

Won: 5 Lost; 4 


GIRLS TENNIS 

Won: 7 Lost: 7 


WRESTLING 

Won: 18 Lost: 3 

Four State Qualifiers 


BASKETBALL 

Won: 14 
Lost: 11 


RECORDS 


TEAM RECORDS 349 




€XPR€SS VOURSCLF- 



1. Matt Forys, Mike Mueller, Larry Hahne, Chad Roseman, Joseph Marks, and Steve Hull get 
ready for the ceremony to begin, 2. Mindy Stephens, Jennifer Simon, Anne Hewlett, Coach 
Jerry McKechan. 3. Seniors at the graduation practice. 4. President of the Board of Education, 
Roy Koberna, speaks at the recognition assembly. 


350 SPRING 1990 






GIRLS 




2 


1. Junior Varsity Softbali: Row 1: Darla Mayhall, Amy Choat, Nikki 
Petrillo, Amy Isenburg, Nicole Wolfe, Carrie Dockery, row 2: 
Coach Mike Edwards, Christie Hayden, Terri Buster, Karen Sykes, 
Dana Dresch, Wendy Chamberlin, Coach John Hutchings. 2. 
Michelle Bequette follows through with her swing. 3. Mia Puhse 
pitches a strike. 4. VARSITY SOFBALL: Row 1 : Dawn Basil, Amey 
Etohnenstiehl, Katie Modrusic, Michelle Bridges, Stacey Mertz, 
Tiffany Winters, Mia Puhse. Row 2: Coach Mike Edwards, Kim 
Pawlak, Carrie Bohnenstiehl, Jennifer Cavaness, Michelle 
Bequette, Julie Bailey, Melissa Mclivoy, Coach John Hutchings. 




352 SOFTBALL 






SOFTBALL 



SWINGING THROUGH THE SEASON 


Softball is a sport which requires a team effort. The 1990 softball team is made up of a 
group of girls who put their time and effort into this sport. Julie Baiiey, Micheile Bequette 
Came Bohnenstiehl, Jennifer Cavaness, Lori Dillier, Stacey Mertz, and Kim Pawiak are the 

helped make this years season a good one. Julie Bailey said. 
Softball IS a really fun sport. It is not only a game, but a good way to make friends and to 
travei to different places." 

, varsity team is made up of ten girls willing to work. Nicki Wolfe and Terri Buster 

lead the team in scoring with nine runs each, while Christie Hayden lead the team in 
doubies and one triple. Dawn Basil also had two triples. They worked hard, finishing the 
season 3-6. ^ 

good start even though there were quite a few rained out games 
Lon Dillier said, 'The 1990 softbali team ended up in the middle of the Southwest Conference 
with a record of 4-4." Even though the girls didn't win every game, they did piace third in 
the Southwest Conference. They piayed weli and improved from last year, finishing the 
season with a record of 7-4. 

by Andrea Davis and 

Carrie Owen 


SOFTBALL 353 



VARSITY 



BOYS TRACK: 1. Row IJustin Stallings, Kelly 
Miller, Jeremy Weaver, Chris Votopal, Dave 
Fielding, Andy Jenkins, Jason Biomme, 
Justin Rayl. Row 2. Robert Taylor, Nathan 
Coppedge, Mark Thornsberry, Brian Seiz, 
Eric Davis, Tim Noud, Terry Noud, Tom 
Hoskins, Brian Grimes, Wiiliam Dematroff, 
Jeff Seiz, Kevin Gros. Row 3. Coach Dave 
McCiain, Coach Greg Gariand, Edward 
MacKay, Mathew Joyce, Bob Morgan, 
Mark Chapman, Tim White, Larry Strader, 
David Davis, Chris Warren, Eric Miner, Ron 
Selph, Mark Cotter, Sean Caientine, Lance 
Reynolds, Coach Dale Rice, Coach Ron 
Seiph. Row 4. John Bringer, Jason Frazier, 
Andreas Knaack, David Cotter, Alan 
Williams, Brian Cholevik, Larry Curry, Dan 
Brazee, Frank Vivod, Joe Thomas, Jason 
Roulantis, Rick Evans, Brian Reed, Damon 
Yates, Kyie Cooper. 2. Joe Thomas. GiRLS 
TRACK: 3. Row 1. Cherie Gillison, Melissa 
Sammons, Ruth Matheni, Vicky Brandt, 
Jennifer Basuel, Sherry Simpson, Jennifer 
Winfield. Row 2. Coach Dave McClain, 
Coach Dale Rice, Saily Pavlow, Kathleen 
Reeder, Beth Bolandis, Carrie Brown, Maria 
Hawkins, Lynn Yehling, Kevin Gros. 



354 BOYS TRACK 




TRACK 



ALWAYS MAKING TRACKS 


As the fun flared, loud shouts from the fans and coaches roared and the adrenaline of the boys track team 
rose as they raced toward the finish line. With high goals in mind, the team set out to have an excellent season. 

"With ten hard work-outs we have had this year, we have became a much more competitive tfock 
comments Dan Brazee. The long hours after school and the strenuous work-outs were not the only thing that 
it took to become a successful athlete. The boys also had to watch their diets very carefully. .... 

Track consisted of many different events. The boys could choose from events such as hurdles, high jumj^ 
sprints long distances, shot put, and discus. The men who coached these boys were James Harsh, David 

McClain, Melvin Bunting, Michael Garland, and Dale Rice. nifforont 

These coaches proved to be very important members of the team. They showed the athletes different 

techniques in improving their skills and strengthening their muscles. 

"The coaches made the team work harder this year but it paid off in the end, said Larry Strader. The 
coaches give the athletes the moral support needed to do well in their event. 

For the girls, determination, hard work, practices, and good tennies were important factors needed for track. 
Whether it be iong distance, short distance, shot put, discus or high jump, the practices help them prepare 
for the challenge that was ahead. The sport was a team sport, but also allowed the girls to individually excel. 

"Dedication, from the girls helped make it a more interesting sport. It really is no fun if you are there just to 
run " said Carrie Brown. Beth Bolandis states, "The challenge from this sport helps build your confidence and 
lets you set higher goals for yourself." Discus thrower, Vicky Brandt says, "It takes of hard work and long hours 

'^The DeoDle?hat helped prepare the girls for competition were coaches David McClairi, Melvin Buntirig, 
Michael Garland, James Harsh and Dale Rice. They were important to the girls and helped them prepare for 

^*^ThSgh this year's team was small, it did not stop the girls from trying to achieve the goal they had made 

^°CoachRiS^ concludes by saying, "With all the school activities, the turnout was small. But for the girls who 
stayed with the sport, it proved to be much credit and glory." 


By Amy Canady and Karen Moore 


GIRLS TRACK 355 



VARSITY 




2 


1. Joe Wallace displays his baseball talents, 2. Coaches 
and stats: Row 1: Susan Becherer and Christy Moweli. 
Row 2: Christy Milis, Robert Stegemeier, Gus Lignol, and 
Shawn Weeks. 3. Richard Schardan. 4. Row 1: Stacey 
Jackson, Tony Sternberg, Chris Sturdivant, Jim 
McKechan, Jeff Stephens, Chris Hili. Row 2: Rich 
Schardan, Ryan Reeves, Chad Lignoi, Chris Mance, Mike 
Nordstrom, Dan Partney, Mike Mueiier, Coach Bob 
Stegemier, Coach Gus Lignoi. Row 3: Brian Harshany, 
Todd Brooks, Jay Robertson, Thomas Seneczyn, Dave 
Boiey, Chris Milton, Joe Wallace, Erik Lewis, Tom Mattern. 


r 



3 


356 BASEBALL 



BASEBALL 



THREE UP. THREE DOWN 

At the end of a slow starting season with 9 seniors and 14 juniors, the varsity Warriors 
finished with a record of 16 - 8. The coaches of this successful team were Robert Stegemier 
and Gus Lignoul. These exciting games were all played at the varsity diamond. 

Baseball is a sport which exhibits players individual talents, The 1990 baseball team 
proved that a group of individuals can form one highly skilled team. Drills and hard practices 
enabled them to be quite competitive both defensively and offensively. This team practiced 
after school nearly every evening and sometimes even before school. 

The starting position at the mound was sometimes a mystery since the team had so many 
qualified players. David Boley, Chris Hill, and Mike Nordstrom displayed their pitching arms 
sufficiently; while Brian Harshany and Rich Schardan played to their full potential at any 
position needed. 

Every player contributed to the baseball team the entire season. They worked together 
boosting spirits, easing tenses, and encouraging each other. This was what was needed to 
make the Warrior baseball team so successful. 

by Melissa Tapp 


BASEBALL 357 





BASEBALL 



THREE STRIKES 


It takes a team of nine athletic team players who mastered the skill of working together 
to make a team successful. With the season record of the freshman and sophomore 
baseball teams, it is obvious that these boys have done just that. The freshman team ended 
their year with 15 wins and one loss. The coach who was in charge of putting this all together 
was Coach Jerry McKechan. 

The sophomore baseball team was coached by Coach Don Harris. This team had 1 1 wins 
and 5 losses. They also competed in a sophomore tournament hosted at the Warrior varsity 
diamond. They proudly placed second in this tournament. 

Randy Scott says, "The best game this season was against Bellevilie West. We were tied 
11-11, and I sacrificed moving runners to both second and third base. This allowed Chris 
Hildreth to get the winning RBI." 

These two baseball teams have put much effort and practice into their season. The result 
of all this hard work has definitely paid off with their winning record. 

by Melissa Tapp 


358 BASEBALL 





BASEBALL 


2 

1, Freshman Baseball: Row 1; 
Matt Stenson, Mike Pricherd, 
Marc Patton, Rob Odem, John 
Duft, Les Nunnes, Terry Prather. 
Row 2: Coach Jerry 
McKechan, Jason Maxfield, 
Bobby Wilson, Matt Lour, Brett 
Barron, Bobby Vincent, Mike 
Spear, John tennen. Row 3: 
Brent Golden, Chris Hoffman, 
Brent Dippel, P.J. Hamilton, 
Steve Rains, Bill Herman, Joe 
Reecer, Chad Martin, Ben 
Hicks. 2. Sophomore Baseball: 
Row 1: Cheryl Forbes, Josh 
Houston, David Nelson, Mike 
Mowell, Athena Harris. Row 2: 
Billy VanBuskirk, James Miller, 
Bill Ellis, Sam Fowler, Josh 
Neidhardt, Adam Fasick, 
Randy Scott. Row 3: Coach 
Don Harris, Chris Hildreth, Alan 
Willaredt, John Coziar, Larry 
Earney, Kevin Sitton, Brian 
Tieman, Brandie Greco. 3. Jim 
McKechan at his best. 








BASEBALL 359 



BOYS 



1. BOYS TENNIS: Row 1: 
Sunil Kumar, Bret 
Sutphin, Tom Hoskins, 
Scott Harrison, Scott 
Portell, Travis Terreli, 
Matt Forys, Nathan 
McClain. Row 2: Coach 
Alien Lobdell, John 
Gillmore, Joe Lombar- 
di, Biii McCormick, Dan 
Debert, Andy Wolfe, 
Chad Lane, Joe Yurko, 
Raffi Karibian. 2. Chad 
Lane returns a serve. 3. 
Scott Portell in action. 
4. Andy Wolfe stretches 
to reach for the ball. 




360 BOYS TENNIS 



GAME WITH A POINT 


Serve and volley, cross court ground strokes, and down the alley were different drills Coach Allen 
Lobdell demanded from his players during a strenuous practice session. The vigorous practice 
became a critical key to the Improvement of the team and preparing the boys for strong 
competition. 

The skill and determination to become competitive were similar goals shared by both varsity and 
junior varsity teams. Coach Alien Lobdell says, "This squad was a blend of young freshmen talent and 
upperclassmen experience. Their 6-5 record doesn't truly represent their skill level." 

There were seven graduating seniors: Matt Forys, Scott Harrison, Chad Lane, Joe Lombardi, Brett 
Sutphin, Joe Yurko, and Andy Wolfe. By the time tennis players reach their senior year, they are 
dominating. 

Teamwork combined with individual effort, long hours of practice, and dedication brought the 
team to a record of 6-5. Both varsity and junior varsity had the experience and talent to show their 
skill through the season. Their strenuous efforts paid off with satisfying results. 

Senior Andy Wolfe says, “Like Domino's pizza — we deliver." Joe Lombardi says, "I love to play tennis 
because it involves Individual concentration and strength which just proves If you win, you did it all 
on your own." 

by Jennifer Schwartz 


BOYS TENNIS 361 


GIRLS 




GIRLS J.V. SOCCER: 1. Row 1: Laurie Monroe, 
Jennifer Wortham, Jena Gann. Row 2: Leslie 
Laycock, Andrea Free, Kirsten Yobby, Shawn 
Odom, Jinitfer Harris, Ann Obecino, Amy 
Springs, Jo Ann Gray, Beth Scatturo. Row 3: 
Coach H. Nighohossian, Stacie Taylor, Julie 
Mertz, Jennifer Wheeier, Lena Keeling, 
Stephanie Cathey, Sheri' Jones, Staci John- 
son, and Sarah Mehelic. 2. Angela Biason 
tries to recover the bail. 3. Tammy Dutko 
fights for the bali. 4. Beth Epperson is in 
control. 5. Jennifer Harper gets into the soc- 
cer action. 



3 


362 GIRLS SOCCER 



SOCCER 



STRIVING FOR SUCCESS 


The 1990 junior varsity soccer team kicked off their season with a win against O'Fallon, 
which was the beginning of a successful season. Together the team worked to achieve an 
exciting season. The team was coached by Haig Nighohossian. Jo Ann Gray says, Overall 
Coach Nighohossian is a great coach as well as a friend." . ^ 

Practice made perfect for the team as they ended their season with 10 wins, 1 loss, and 
1 tie. They tied the game against Collinsville. With practice, hard work, and dedication, the 
girls felt confident about next year's season. Staci Johnson comments, 'The practices were 
hard, but when we won, the thrill of victory was alive. I hope we have another great season 
next year." 

The junior varsity girls always seemed to keep their spirits up during a game. The Lady 
Warriors showed good sportsmanship and were always willing to assist an opposing player 
when she was down. Leslie Laycock says, "It takes good sportsmanship to make a successful 
season." 

Watching the girls play soccer was always pleasure. The girls are a hard-working tearn 
and strive for only the best. After each game was over, the girls listened to the applause and 
knew that they worked hard for a victory and they earned it with pride. 

by Mary Gray 


i 


GIRLS SOCCER 363 


GIRLS 



1. GIRLS VARSITY SOC- 
CER: Row 1: Ginger 
Henson, Shelly 
Reynolds, Beth Rapoff, 
Leslie Stavely, 
Stephanie Kult, Cindy 
Scatturo, Tia Rees. Row 
2: April Druhe, Angie 
Jones, Andrea Cline, 
Suzanne Stuart, 
Amanda Witter, Beth 
Epperson, Tammy 
Dutko, Julie Gocian, 
Ann Logan, Hollie 
Taylor. Row 3: Coach 
Gene Baker, Addle 
Lenzi, Carrie Ross, Lia 
Mendoza, Jeannie 
Groboski, Jennifer 
Harper, Jennifer Moniz, 
Angela Biason, 
Michelle Knox, Angela 
Parker, Shawn Oliver, 
and Julie Dempsey. 2. 
Ann Logan kicks the 
ball. 3. Amanda Witter 
has control of the situa- 
tion. 4. Julie Dempsey 
gives 100% 



364 GIRLS SOCCER 












ACHIEVING THEIR GOALS 


The 1990 Warrior girls varsity soccer team, led by Coach Gene Baker, achieved another 
winning season. Junior captain Angela Biason says, "All-in-all, we had a successful season. 
We worked hard and gave a 100% effort at all times. We had good team unity and everyone 
worked well together as a single unit." The team ended the season with a 10 win 3 lost 
record that included a streak of seven consecutive victories. The team defeated many 
competitive teams. The girls soccer team notched a 3-2 victory against their rival, the 
Collinsville Kahoks. 

Each player did her best to contribute to the Warrior's successful season. Julie Dempsey, 
the Most Valuable Player, provided the team with great offense by scoring many of the 
goals. Addle Lenzi was the recipient of the junior award. The sophomore award went to 
Amanda Witter and Tammy Dutko received the freshman award. The most improved player 
award went to senior Jennifer Moniz. The varsity team's hard work, determination, and 
practice resulted in successful season. 


by Angie Withers 


GIRLS SOCCER 365 


PROM 



2 


1. John Utz, Teresa Isom, Ron 
Sammons, Lynette Wheeler, 
Stephanie Cauble, Gina Lenzi, 
Kelly Green, and Jeff Graff show 
off their formals. 2. Fancy Faces 
enjoying the prom. 3. Ruth and 
Pete Novacich with their daugh- 
ter Kristen at the prom. 4. Melissa 
Smith and Larry Flahne taking a 
rest. 5. Fleather Nobus and Kory 
Burton say, “Cheese". 6. Friends 
pose for a picture, while waiting 
to go into the prom. 7. Vicki 
Gauen, Jeff Wiedhardt, Rhonda 
Orwig, Rob Terrell, and Chris 
Burns sit down for a minute, after 
a long evening. 



366 PROM 


APRIL 21, 1990 



THE DANCE OF THE DECADE 


The 1990 senior prom was a long awaited evening. This event took place at the Pipefitters 
Hall on April 21, 1990. The girls had their dresses made months in advance. Guys also had 
tuxedos rented and reservations made months in advance. 

As tradition had it, many prom attenders visited the park first to have pictures taken and 
visit with friends. 

Limousines started arriving at Pipefitters Hall around 5:30 and prom was concluded at 
10:30. 

For many seniors, this was their first prom. Some sophomores and juniors attended the 
prom. Tim Noud says, "The prom was absolutely incredible! Waiting until my senior year was 
the best part of it. A good time is almost guaranteed." Jerry Richardson adds, "Going to 
prom my junior and senior year was fun because everything I didn't do my junior year, I could 
do my senior year." 

There will be many proms to come, but the one of 1990 will be remembered in the minds 
of seniors as nothing but fun. 


by Denise Ray 


PROM 367 


PROM 




2 


1 . Joyce and Michael Sikora enjoy the evening. 2. Judy and 
Walter Whitaker. 3. Barbara and Allen Kennerly remember 
what it was like in high school 4. Debbie Holt-Wilkerson and 
her husband Ronald. 5. Dr.- Mark Eavenson and his wife 
Laura. 6. Janet and Kenneth Spalding. 7. David Painter and 
Roy Koberna sit with their wives Patricia and Diane. 



368 PROM 






APRIL 21, 1990 




A FESTIVE EVENING 


The seniors who attended the 1990 prom were not the only ones who had a good time. 
Contrary to many students' belief, adults enjoy an occasional 'evening out.' The prom was 
such a glorious night out for everyone who attended. 

Seniors found the evening enjoyable and had a variety of reasons for this fun-filled night. 
Angela Judd said that "the decorations were beautiful." Other seniors liked the disc jockey, 
the delicious food, having the opportunity to have their photographs taken with their 
sweetheart, and getting the opportunity to wear beautiful clothing. 

Administrators also enjoyed the entire evening. Mr. Whitaker says that "it's nice to see the 
students dressed up and having a good time," and Mr. Kennerly adds that he likes the 
chance for the student "to see me as a friend and person instead of as an admiriistrator." 
An evening like this always is a special one for everyone. Mr. Painter believes that "anytime 
you are with your boyfriend or girlfriend at an event of this nature is a memorable occasion." 

All of the administrators seem to agree that the prom has come a long way. The prom 
used to be held in the high school gym and tickets cost less than $20. Memories, fancy 
clothes, and all of the fun has remained the same though. Prom of today is just as special 
as the proms they attended. 


by Julie Fernandez 


PROM 369 



RECOGNITION 



1 



2 


1 . The 1989 student body president, Bret Ware, introduces the 
1990 president, Leah Schuman, to everyone attending the 
recognition assembly. 2. Bret Ware addresses the seniors. 3. 
Superintendent Gilbert Walmsiey congratulates the graduat- 
ing 1990 class. 4. Principal Kenneth Spalding awards Tom 
Schmedake, the 1990 valedictorian, with a plaque. 5. Janet 
Ridlen receives her plaque for being the salutatorian of her 
class. 6. Joseph Thomas and Bret Ware raise the flag as the 
seniors say their last good-byes. 7. Seniors smile knowing that 
their high school days are almost over. 



370 RECOGNITION ASSEMBLY 



ASSEMBLY 




LAST DAY TO BE RECOGNIZED 


On May 23, 1990, all the graduating seniors gathered in the memoriai gymnasiunn for the 
traditional recognition assembly. Mr. Spalding opened the ceremony and greeted the 
seniors, attending board members, Mr. Walmsiey, and the civic ieaders. 

All the dedications and hard work these seniors did throughout their four years were finally 
Qoing to b© rocognizocl. Honors wor© b©stow©d ond scholorships QWord©d. Mr. Houg 
advis©d th© juniors that without applying for scholarships now, th©r© would b© no chanc© 

of receiving them later. . . x ^ 

This was aiso the day the valedictorian and salutatorian were announced. The top 
scholastic senior honor went to Thomas Schmedake who had a 5.612 average. Janet Ridlen 
was announced as number 2 in her class with a 5.584 grade-point av^a^. + ^ 

Bret Ware spoke to the seniors and swore in Leah Schuman as the 1990/91 student body 
president. Leah took the student councii oath and wished the graduates good luck in all 

After the ceremony, the seniors went outside to the front of the building and hung the 
traditional class flag. As the flag went up, the GCHS band played the schoc^ song. Seniors 
anticipated graduation with the end of this ceremony and joyously applauded. 

Mr Spalding called a brief meeting after the flag-hanging ceremony to give instructions 
to the seniors regarding graduation. The 1990 class knew that it was inow only a few short 
days before they officially become the 1990 graduating class of GCHS. 


by Leah Schuman and Melissa Tapp 


RECOGNITION ASSEMBLY 371 




SPRING MUSICAL 


CAST OF CHARACTERS 


Ministrel Ron Sammons 

Pantomime Prince Dustin Wilkinson 
Pantomime Queen Lisa Niemeyer 
Pantomime Princess Jennifer Norris 
Princess No. 1 2 Renee Biggs 
Wizard Nick McLaren 

Lady Larken Jennifer Brand 


Queen Aggravain 
Prince Dauntless 
King Sextimus the 
Snent 
Jester 
Sir Studley 
Sir Luce 
Lady Rowena 
Lady Merrill 
Lady Lucille 
Lady Beatrice 
Lady Helena 
Lady Mabelle 
Sir Harry 

Princess Winnifred 
Emily 


Kelly Kessler 
Jason Gass 

Don Goss 
Scott Tripp 
Patrick Jessee 
Bobby Fithen 
Nicole Schneider 
Carrie Heck 
April Polivick 
Nona Mefford 
Lisa Niemeyer 
Cheryl Schmidt 
Ralph Walden 
Cari McCallister 
Morgan Mance 


KNIGHTS AND LADIES 


Lady Anne 
Lady Elaine 
Lady Elinor 
Lady Catherine 
Lady Alicia 
Lady Elizabeth 
Lady Guinivere 
Lady Ingrid 
Lady Marie 
Lady Rosalind 
Lady Jeannette 
Sir Lionel 
Sir Gawayne 
Sir Geoffrey 
Sir Stephen 
Sir Guillaume 
The Nightingale of 
Samarkand 
Sir Dunstan 


Lisa Dagon 
Jennifer Guzy 
Cory Cupp 
Jennifer Norris 
Karla Broyles 
Georgia Morales 
Jessica Dayton 
Amy Krakowiecki 
Missy Sammons 
Becky Schwab 
Jennifer Hitt 
Tom Kinder 
John Miller 
Chris Glasgow 
Michael Morlan 
Shannon Forshee 

Nona Mefford 
Dustin Wilkinson 


1. Scott Tripp and Ronald Sammons show off their costumes. 2. Carrie 
McCallister, Ron Sammons, Jennifer Brand, and Ralph Walden thank Mrs. 
Scroggins for all her help. 3. Carrie McCallister proves her strength. 4. Row 
1 : Mike Morlan, Shannon Forshee, Dustin Wilkinson, Morgan Mance, Don 
Goss, Scott Tripp, Kelly Kessler, Nick McLaren, John Miller, Chris Glasgow, 
Tom Kinder. Row 2: Jessica Dayton, Lisa Dagon, Karla Broyles, Missy 
SamrTKsns, Amy Krakowiecki, Becky Scott, Becky Schwab, Jennifer Hitt, 
Georgia Morales, Jennifer Guzy, Nona Mefford, Cheryl Schmidt, Cory 
Cupp, Jennifer Norris. 5. Row 1: Patrick Jessee, Bobby Fithen, Carrie 
McCallister, Ron SamrrvDns. Row 2: Nicole Schneider, Carrie Heck, April 
Polivick, Lisa Niemeyer, Jason Cass, Renee Biggs, Jennifer Brand, Ralph 
Walden. 





372 SPRING MUSICAL 




APRIL 26-27, 1990 




ONCE UPON A MAnRESS 

The Vocal Music and Speech & Theatre Departments of Granite City High School 
presented "Once Upon A Mattress" on April 26 and 27th. This play was based on the fairy 

tale "The Princess and the Pea." ^ 

This piay was directed by Beverley Scroggins and musical direction by Gail E. Mueller; 

accompanied by Dan Vizer. ..... ^ xl. 

Georgia Morales stated, "There are no words to describe the feeling you get when the 
curtain goes up and there you are on stage." Lisa Dagon also replied that, "The peopie that 

you work with are reaily great." ....... x xx . xw 

Mrs. Beveriey Scroggins conciuded, "I was really pleased with the stage crafts work on this 

spring musical." 


by Marti Morgan 


SPRING MUSICAL 373 


GRADUATION 




2 ' 


1. Tom Schemdake, the 1990 vale- 
dictorian, offers words of advice. 2. 
Roy Koberna wishes the seniors the 
best of luck. 3. Superintendent Gil- 
bert Walmsiey speaks to the audi- 
ence. 4. Cherie Karius, Mary Gray, 
and Nancy Gray. 5. Tim Noud, Jeff 
Rosenburg, Chad Feltmeyer, Mike 
Mueller, and Vernon Speidel cele- 
brate. 6. Seniors. 



374 GRADUATION 





JUNE 1, 1990 



TIME TO SAY GOOD-BYE 


Graduation can be described as the iast day of the beginning of a student's iife. As a freshman, 
just entering high schooi, one shyly wanders through the jammed hallways searching for the right 
classroom, This worried freshman would never consider being late to his next math class. This student 
can be called the well prepared student. As a sophomore, the student soon becomes more 
confident. He begins to find the shortcuts to class and talks to friends along the way. The sophomore 
can be called the efficient student. 

As a junior, the student is now an upperclassman. This student wanders the hall, but not looking 
for the next class, the shortcuts are used. A pen and paper usually has to be borrowed from another 
student. The junior can be called the experimenting student. 

Finally, the student has spent the fastest four years of his life in the halls of a high school he will never 
forget. Good times and friends definitely outweighed all the term papers, pop quizzes, and final 
exams. This student is finally a senior, and has become aware of all his future beholds and tries to 
make the most to prepare for it in high school. A senior can be called the maturing adult. 

Graduation was the final step for this student to approach before his life really begins to soar in 
the direction he wants. This big day was held June 1, 1990, at the Warrior football stadium for the 
freshman who entered high school in 1986. Seniors, wearing their caps and gowns, marched down 
to their seats as "Pomp and Circumstance" began to play. 

All rose in honor of the American flag as Keri Lewis sang "The Star Spangled Banner". An Invocation 
to begin the ceremony was lead by Reverend David Fielding. Mr. Kenneth Spalding greeted all in 
attendance with an opening speech. Final words of inspiration were given to the graduates by 
Superintendent Gilbert Walmsiey, and the floor was handed over to Board of Education president, 
Roy Koberna. 

The moment of final accomplishment and anticipation of these graduating seniors had finally 
arrived. The distribution of the diplomas were next on the agenda. The administrative staff and the 
board members readied themselves to begin handing the diplomas to each graduate. The smiles 
on the faces of these seniors grasping their diplomas and shaking each person's hand is one all the 
graduating participates will remember for days to come. 

Mr. Spalding concluded the graduation with a short congratulations and his final good-bye. This 
is just one more class of individuals that made its way through the Granite City High School to move 
on to the best future that they can make. 


by Melissa Tapp 


GRADUATION 375 




GRADUATION 




1. Matt Caldwell, Steve Spiroff, Chris Burns, Matt 
Schnefke, Tony Sternberg, Bill Yarbrough, and 
Jeremy Hoitgrave. 2. Principal Kenneth Spalding. 3. 
The salutorian, Janet Ridien, addresses the seniors. 
4. Board members, Roy Koberna, Pete Novacich, 
Debbie Hoit-Wilkerson, Dr. Mark Eavenson, and 
Mack Johnson. 5. Senior guys. 6. Walt Whitaker puts 
the markers in place. 



376 GRADUATION 






GRADUATION 377 


JUNE 1, 1990 





€XPR€SS VOURS€LF 


378 YEARBOOK AND INDEX 




IN 




4 


1 Junior students gather in the cafeteria. 2. Jennifer Trtanj and 
James McMillin work in their science class. 3. Miss Wilma Schulze's 
sophomore P.E. class. 4. Angela Withers, Emily Stitch, Carrie 
Owen, Leah Schuman, Melissa Tapp, Kristin Jenness, and Angela 
Judd get their photo taken at the semi-formal dance. 





in 

I/I 




YEARBOOK AND INDEX 379 





YEARBOOK 



"Working with this ail-female staff has been 
like going to a toga party and being the 
only one to dress the part. Good luck - 
Good lives." . . . Norman Mangoff - Holly- 
wood/Andrews Studio 



"We just do not realize the most significant mo- 
ments of our iives while they are happening. You 
think there wiil be other days. You do not realize this 
might be the oniy day - express yourself." . . . D.P. 
Spudich 


The yearbook has been completed. The ten yearbook staff members struggled through 
deadlines, interviews, and photo sessions to reach the last page of this 398-page Warrior edition. 

Oniy Melissa Tapp was a returnee from iast year's staff. To Carrie Owen, Emily Stitch, Leah 
Schuman, Angeia Judd, Juiie Fernandez, Angeia Withers, Kristin Jenness, Liz Harris, and Kendra 
Boyer, yearbook was a totally new experience. It was more work, time, and effort than they could 
have imagined. 

The large task of putting together this large of a book sometimes became overwhelming too, 
for such a smaii staff. A staff, however, was not oniy dedicated to putting out a first-class edition, 
but aiso was invoived in participating in numerous other school activities and organizations. They 
put in endless hours with nothing to show for the work until the end of the school year when the 
book finally became published. 

Newspaper people had had the gratification of seeing their work pubiished periodically. 
Yearbook staffers had to wait until the end of the year, making it difficuit to maintain the 
momentum necessary to complete the job. They did, however, keep going and going. 

They iearned leadership, computer skilis, management, photography, graphics, and initiative. 
Through this, they learned dedication. They created new concepts and turned their dreams into 
reaiistic ideas. 

This yearbook is, indeed, the project of a staff involved, active, and dedicated to the 
publication of one of the finest possibie Warrior editions. 


380 YEARBOOK 


JUNIORS 



"I really enjoyed being part of the staff. This year 
was an experience I will never forget. Putting the 
1991 yearbook together was hard work and a lot of 
fun." . . . KRISTIN JENNESS 


"Being on the yearbook staff was an experi- 
ence I'll always remember. Working to meet 
all the deadlines was well worth the wait." 
... LIZ HARRIS 



'Tve enjoyed working with everyone to 
make the 1991 yearbook a success. It 
has taken long hours of hard work to 
make sure deadlines were met, but I'm 
sure everyone would agree it was worth 
it. We have had many memorable expe- 
riences together this year. I will never 
forget my junior year and the yearbook 
staff." . . . KENDRA BOYER 


YEARBOOK 381 




YEARBOOK 



“Being on the yearbook staff 
my senior year was a great 
experience. The memories and 
the friendships I have gained 
will last forever. I'm glad I had 
the opportunity and I 
encourage any underclass 
person to be on it if they have 
the chance." . . . .ANGELA 
WITHERS 



“Our goal was to put the 
memories of this year together, so 
that we could later look back 
and remember the best years of 
our lives. The staff worked well 
together. It was an experience 
that I learned a great deal from 
and will never forget." . . . LEAH 
SCHUMAN 


382 YEARBOOK 


SENIORS 



"I enjoyed working with 
everyone on the yearbook 
staff. It was a great experi- 
ence. Many people don't 
realize all the work that has 
to be done and all of the 
hours spent after school. 
Even though it got pretty 
rough at times. I really en- 
joyed it, and would do it all 
over again. I hope next 
year everyone has just as 
much fun as we did and 
they make all their dead- 
lines." . . . JULIE FERNANDEZ 


"Being on the yearbook staff gave 
me a chance to write about clubs 
and sports. I was happy to be a part 
of the yearbook family. It took a 
while to get the yearbook 
completed, but when all the 
yearbook staff pulled together and 
shared the responsibility, our mission 
was successful.” . . . ANGELA JUDD 



YEARBOOK 383 



YEARBOOK 



"When I signed up to be 
on the yearbook staff, I did 
not quite realize just how 
much work I was in for. Year- 
book is not just roaming the 
halls for two hours a day, like 
some people would like to 
believe. It's hours and hours 
of writing, editing, and in- 
dexing, both during and af- 
ter school. But, I feel that all 
of the hardwork put in by 
this dedicated staff has 
paid off. The memories I 
have made during year- 
book will remain with me 
forever. I wish the seniors on 
the staff the best of luck In 
their college years and to 
the juniors, good luck on 
next year's book." . . . EMILY 
STITCH 


"When I joined 
yearbook, I never 
realized how much 
work it would be. It 
was a new 
experience and 
fun to do. The staff 
was great and we 
all got along well" 

. . . CARRIE OWEN 



384 YEARBOOK 



SENIORS 



"I have honestly learned a great deal being part of the Warrior yearbook staff for the past two years. Many 
memories have enhanced my junior year, and especially my senior year. Some great friendships have formed 
and a closeness that I will never forget. This 398 yearbook has taken many long hours, much hard work, and 
quite a bit of pizza to complete. But through it all, it was well worth it. Thanks to everyone who made it all 
possible. Good luck to Leah, Carrie, Emily, Julie, and Angie in everything they may pursue. To the juniors, whom 
I wish all the great times that I experienced; and with the help of DPS, it was all made possible." . . . MELISSA 
TAPP. 


Jostens Publishing Company of Topeka, Kansas 
printed 1500 copies of the 1991 WARRIOR year- 
book. A staff of ten girls compiled the information 
and photography to complete this 398-page 
edition. 

All portrait work was done by Holiywood- 


Andrews Studio of Granite City, Illinois. A majority 
of the sports photography was through the Gran- 
ite City Press-Record. Informal photography was 
by Norman Mangoff of Hollywood-Andrews Stu- 
dio, Cheryl Cravyford, D.P. Spudich, and the 1991 
yearbook staff. 


YEARBOOK 385 



THANK YOU 


I, Melissa Tapp, would like to express my appreciation to everyone who contributed to the publication 
ot this 400 page Warrior yearbook. It has been a new experience tor all ot this year's start. 

Special thanks to D.P. Spudich, without all her time and ertort this book would not have been 
published. I also want to thank the entire yearbook start: Leah Schuman, Emily Stitch, Carrie Owen, Julie 
Fernandez, Angela Withers, Angela Judd, Kendra Boyer, Kristin Jenness, and Liz Harris. 

We thank everyone who Intiuenced us In gathering Intormatlon in putting this yearbook together. All 
our parents and famIlies-JGS and C & D for allowing us to keep DPS after school for long hours-Mr. 
Mihallch for all his artwork and printing, and his appreciation for the art on my sweatpants -Mr. Spencer 
for the use of his room, his skills, his knowledge, and his good sense of tIming-Mr. Ethridge tor letting us 
borrow his keys Mr. Bertacchl tor leaving our great hallway and changing Julie’s attitude for English-Just 
Jett for keeping our room In TIP TOP shape-MIss Schulze and Mr. Catanzaro for upholding the hallpass 
rule-Mrs. Zukas lor helping us with the trait sheets, senior summary, and other collectible yearbook 
papers-Mrs. Georgert for her superior executive powers-Mr. David Painter lor his patience, his kind 
word, his proofreading knowledge, and his cheerful smIle-Nancy Wilson lor the use of the cafeteria-all 
the graphic arts boys-Nick Mangort tor keeping Norman moving In the right dIrectlon-Norman’s big 
camera, his special lenses, and his Inspiring Christmas card-Ed Sugden, yearbook representative, for 
visiting us and for the Topeka tour-LIz Harris for the yearbook theme-Mr. Olendorf for his wise words 
about static guard-Mr. Dillard tor always being kInd-Mr. Bunting for being our spotlight teacher and for 
widening our tastes to the sweetness of appie butter-our Cancun trip during spring break-Mr. Cook to 
being our benevoient instructor in history-Dan Terrell for having a great toosh-Mr. Kessier for the 
printouts and aii his computer knowiedge-Dave Whaiey and the Granite City Press Record for aii the 
photos-fast food from McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Domino’s, Imo’s, and Subway- Mr. Kennedy tor his encour- 
aging words to keep us in our terribiy cluttered room-Mr. PInnell for disposing of all the false hall passes- 
Julie Brown for her hit song at the lip sync-Cheryl Crawford for all her ertort In taking such good photos- 
Cari Crawford for delivering them to the yb start-Apple lIGs for all the pounding It withheld and storage 
of all our facts-Mr. Eardly for the Number 2 Apple lIGs-The Franklin Spelling ace-January 8-Jason for 
sharing my locker and being a great voci friend-Mr. Lignoui for keeping us on our toes with his big mouth- 
Waigreen’s for deveioping some of the fiim-Angie W. for her whining and her cute smile-Angie J. for her 
haii passes and hairspray-Leah for all her opinions and being our queen, our president, our representa- 
tive, but stiii our friends-Liz for aii her great ideas-Kendra for her giggies and dirty Jokes-Kristin for aii her 
stories and hot gossip-Juiie for her indexing and sarcastic remarks-Carrie for being pititui and having 
such a superb physique-Emiiy tor her gorgeous hair- Warrior soccer for winning state-November 1-Mary 
for ail her slaps in the face and help on the book-Skip tor being our herd-February 2-homeroom 201 for 
allowing me to be queen and Mrs. McCormick tor being a great friend-Mr. Harsh for offering to give me 
an ‘A’ for a date with the Itching potato and allowing Emily to iron his fashionable wardrobe-Ms. Williams 
for letting us borrow the markers-Mr. Rehg for Just being Mr. Rehg-Mr. Hopp tor warming his feet-Mrs. 
Hormeil for being so energetIc-AV tor the use of the TV and VCR-BrIan Buske for farming DPS’s land and 
dating Denise-Ed Sugden for finally giving Denise the guatamala worry doll book cover-Mr. Patton for 
giving us all the sport scores-Mr. McKechan tor being our friendly vice-principal and always wearing a 
pleasant grin-gum-penclls-missing Ink pens-copy sheets-carbon-tape-camera-fllm-dlet pepsI and sllc^ 
radlo-disks-quotes-November 30 and January 17-flle cablnets-envelopes-hairspray-mirrors-brushes and 
picks- VICA for letting the YB girls be honorary members-Lincoln and all his dust-Dan and Tim for all their 
thought provoking, but disgusting quotes-Jo Ann for all the Indexing-Mr. VanBuskIrk for all the delicious 
brownies- Julie for the truck for the homecoming float-ConnIe Paterson tor helping DPS in the room when 
photos were needed-Pat and Berta tor always willing to help In data processing-Mr. Wojcik for passing 
Liz in American HIstory-the new blue chairs-Topeka, Kansas Josten tour-our shopping In Kansas City-all 
the great memories we have made . . . Thanks to everyone once again who helped us accomplish our 
goal. It has been a truly wonderful experience that each of us will remember. Always remember to 
express yourself. That you must be you and only you ... Melissa, Julie, Angle, Leah, Carrie, Angela, 
Emily, KIrstIn, Kendra, Liz 


YEARBOOK 387 


INDEX 


A 

Adair, Shannon 131 
Adams, Charles 131, 191 
Ahlers, Stacie 131, 161, 247, 252, 
261, 292 

Aitken, Jennifer 131, 191 
Alexander, Angela 43, 131, 295, 
292 

Alexander, Chad 161 
Alexander, Matthew 161 
Alexander Michelle 36, 43, 151, 
289 

Alexander, William 131, 161 
Alfaro, Eric 161 
Allen, Christina 161 
Allen, Michael 12, 13, 36, 131, 161 
Allen, Shannon 43 
Almos, Rodney 43, 274, 329 
Almos, Shawn 131, 258 
Alsop, Bart 329 
Anderson, Bonda 161 
Anderson, Christoph 191 
Anderson, J. Bernhar 157, 161, 
329, 331 

Anderson, Mark 12, 13, 36 
Anderton, Brian 161 
Anderton, Daniel 191 
Anderton, Gene 191 
Anderton, Janet 161 
Anderton, Scott 12, 13, 64 
Andrews, Kara 33, 131, 161, 262, 
264, 270 

Annable, Kimberly 161, 292 
Aponte, Francisco 191 
Arguelles, Maria 131 
Armbruster, Gerry 191 
Armour, Shawn 161 
Arthur, Lori 26, 43, 289 
Asbeck, Benjamin 191, 287 
Asbeck, Heather 43 
Asbeck, Sean 161 
Ashburn, Dwayne 43, 97 
Ashby, Ryan 191 
Ashford, Gerald 161 
Ashing, Nona 191 
Ashoft, Derek 34, 41, 43, 131, 258 
Askins Jr., Daniel 131, 338, 340 
Atchley, Christy 281 
Aubuchon, Jennifer 43 
Aud, Alyssa 131 
Austin, Paul 161, 252, 261, 266, 
270, 324 

Avants, Dawn 289 

B 

Badger, Grant 131, 149 
Badgett, David 161 
Bagby, Paul 43 

388 INDEX 


Baggette, Laura 161 
Bailey, Barbara 131 
Bailey, Emilee 161, 261 
Bailey, Michael 43 
Bain, Shea 161 
Baker, Brent 161 
Baker, Ernest 43 
Baker, Jamie 191, 262 
Baker, Jennifer 131, 245, 262, 269, 
297, 303, 388 
Baker, Michelle 161, 297 
Baker, William 247 
Ballard, Michael 161 
Ballew, Tammy 44 
Bamford, Wendy 161 
Barker, Thomas 81, 131 
Barnes, Christoph 131, 191 
Barnes, Ronald 131, 191 
Barnhart, Heather 191, 314 
Barnhart, Jeffrey 161 
Barrel!, Timothy 191 
Barrios, Kathy 191, 268, 289 
Barrios, Kimberly 161, 268 
Barron, Brett 161, 311, 359 
Barth, Bernard 131 
Bartling, Cary 131 
Barton, Meshia 44 
Barton, Timothy 131, 191, 326 
Basuel, Jennifer 261, 262, 273, 303, 
354 

Batson, Tamara 131, 161, 281 

Bauman, Jeffrey 182, 194 

Bayer, Mindy 161 

Bazzell, Anthony 131, 191 

Bazzell, Dawn 352 

Bazzell, Gary 44 

Bazzell, Marvin 191 

Bearley, Angela 191 

Bearley, Jeffrey 76, 44 

Beasley, Ginger 44 

Beasley, Jonathan 131 

Beaver, Jaime 191 

Becker, Diane 44 

Becker, Michael 44 

Beckwith, Cher’ell 191 

Bellman, Brian 12, 13, 44 

Belmer, Aaron 191, 292 

Bennett, Karl 159, 161, 281 

Benson, Dawn 44, 58 

Benson, Rhonda 44 

Bergbrader, Judith 11, 24, 44, 58 

Bettis, Amanda 131, 287, 289, 295 

Bettis, Lonnie 289 

Biason, Angela 27, 31, 46, 52, 57, 
70, 114, 117, 245, 274, 284, 285, 
364, 397 

Bierschwal, Bradley 161 
Biggs, Renee 31, 32, 33, 161, 270, 
372 

Biggs, Todd 161 

Billick, Johnathan 23, 46, 239, 240, 
274, 279, 309 


Birdsong, Christina 187, 191 
Birdsong, Jonathan 12, 13, 17, 27, 
28, 34, 46, 47, 64, 131, 254, 274, 
329, 331, 334, 337, 338, 340 
Bishop, Michael 312 
Bishop, Michelle 46, 191, 249 
Bivens, Catherine 191 
Bixler, Shannon 161 
Bjorkman, Brooke 191, 245 
Black, Jason 191, 332 
Black, Misty 131, 161, 289 
Blair, Daryn 191 
Blair, Jason 161 
Blankenship, Matthew 191, 324 
Blanton, Brett 46, 62, 92 
Blanton, Wendy 161, 261 
Blatz, Christoph 191 
Blaylock, John 191 
Blind, Stephen 46 
Blomme, Jason 161, 326, 354 
Blomme, Jonathan 131, 161, 311 
Bloomquist, Brett 131 
Bloomquist, Casey 191, 332 
Blumer, Hertha 47, 191 
Blumer, Joseph 161 
Bobb, Amy 162 
Bode, Ammey 131, 289 
Bohnenstiehl, Amey 47, 254, 320, 
322, 352, 398 
Bolandis, Beth 14, 47, 354 
Bolandis, Matthew 191, 261, 324, 
346 

Boley, David 47, 232, 356 
Bonds, Christine 47 
Bone, Sarah 28, 47, 281 
Boneau, Julie 48 
Bonvicino, Leigh 162 
Bonvicino, Michael 309 
Booher, Michelle 48, 127 
Boone, Kenneth 131, 271 
Boston, Michael 191 
Boushard, Jeffrey 48 
Boushard, Jennifer 48 
Boushard, Joseph 131 
Bowman, Jennifer 131 
Bowser, Nathan 191 
Boyer, Carrie 48, 261, 262, 274, 303 
Boyer, Dena 48, 182 
Boyer, Jeffrey 162, 182, 289 
Boyer, Julia 49, 114, 117, 240, 262, 
274, 277, 297, 303, 398 
Boyer, Kendra 3, 10, 132, 134 
Boyer, Melanie 132, 162 
Boyer, Zachary 311 
Brake, Lloyd, 132 
Branch, Jessica 132 
Brand, David 191 

Brand, Jennifer 32, 49, 114, 117, 
270, 304, 372 

Branding, Nathan 33, 132, 292, 295 
Brandt, Dianna 49, 254, 269 
Brandt, Vicky 162, 261, 272, 354 


Brankov, Jason 49 
Bras, Carlos 162 
Brawley, Sara 132, 262, 270 
Brazee, Daniel 31, 49, 269, 274, 326, 
354, 398 

Breeden, Byron 187, 191, 332 
Breeden, Vicki 49 
Breese, Bradley 151, 162, 324 
Breese, Stephen 50 
Brewer, Joseph 132, 151, 324 
Brewer, Rochelle 191 
Bridges, Emily 191 
Bridges, Larry 191, 245, 329 
Briggs, Sean 41, 132, 133, 

Briggs Jr., Bradley 132, 149, 258 
Briley, Kimberly 191 
Briley, Tina 132 
Brim, Gerald 50, 289 
Brim, Timothy 132 
Brimberry, Michael 162 
Bringer, Steven 50 
Bringer Jr., John 50, 326, 354 
Brinkhoff, Patricia 132, 292, 295 
Britt, Jennifer 132 
Brittin Jr., Paui 132 
Britton, Amy 162 
Brockman, Tyler 191 
Brokaw, Mark 162, 309, 311 
Bronaugh, Billy 191 
Brooks, Jamie 191 
Brooks, Jason 191 
Brooks, Todd 232, 356 
Brooksher, Robert 191, 332 
Broshow, Jili 27, 50, 57, 114, 117 
Brown, Angela 192 
Brown, Carrie 132, 261, 273, 320, 
354 

Brown, Eric 132, 268 
Brown, Holly 162 
Brown Jason E., 50, 132, 279 
Brown Jason M., 114, 132 
Brown, Jennifer 162 
Brown, Justin 162, 292 
Brown, Sally 51 
Brown, William 129, 162 
Broyies, Karia 51, 265, 326, 372 
Broyies, Stephanie 192 
Brumiey, Kristophe 192 
Buchanan, Terry 192 
Buchek, Russeii 132, 331, 345 
Buckingham, Jamie 192 
Buckingham, Kari 192 
Buckingham, Monica 192 
Buckingham, Shawn 51, 88, 240 
Budnicki, Wendy 162 
Buecker, Becky 192 
Buecker, Ronaid 132 
Buehrer, Dougias 51 
Bugnitz, Dana 132, 245, 249, 261, 
297 

Bukovac, Jackiyn 162, 297 
Bukovac, John 192 
Bunker, Tamara 133, 264 
Bunseimeyer, Chris 51 
Burlison, Melissa 162 
Burns, Bobbie 162 
Burris, Daniei 289 
Burris, Juiianna 192 


Burris, Morgan 192 
Burroughs, Heather 192 
Burton, Tonya 133, 264, 268 
Bushong, Sheri 51 
Buske, Brian 52, 61, 185, 197, 329 
Buske, Lisa 192, 322 
Buster, Terri 133, 149, 273, 320, 322, 
352 

Butler, Katrina 162, 266 
Butler, Tara 133, 285 
Buxton, Joann 133, 261, 292 
Buxton, John 192, 261, 287, 289, 
312 

Byrne, Robert 133 
By rum, Scott 133 

C 

Cahill, Christina 192 
Calentine, Shawn 133, 326, 354 
Callis, Amy 162 
Calvin, Laura 162, 289 
Campbeil, Catherine 133, 289 





1 


Campbeii, Grace 52, 249 
Campbeli, Jeffrey 52 
Canada, Jennifer 52, 289 
Canady, Amy 24, 52, 87 
Cann, Andrew 192 
Cann, Kellie 162 
Carkuff, Kim 133 
Carison, Heather 162 
Carison, John 52, 254, 256, 261, 268 
Carmack, Meiissa 192, 269 
Carmody, John 162, 261 
Carpenter, Tonya 192 
Carter, Sascha 53, 265, 287, 289, 
295 

Carter, Vicki 133, 249 
Cass, Jason 32, 33, 133, 324, 372 
Castiiio, John 163 
Cathey, Stephanie 98, 133, 362 
Caubie, Matthew 133, 292 
Causey, Michael 163 
Cavaness, Jamie 190, 192, 317, 322 
Cave, Brian 163, 311 
Cavins, Shaana 133 
Chamberiain, Wendy 133, 261, 262, 
319, 352 

Chandier, Jack 98 
Chaney, Dwayne 324 
Chapman, Mark 53, 247, 254, 261, 
277, 324, 326, 354 
Chapman, Michael 133, 240, 274 


Chapman, Steve 163, 261 
Charter, Christoph 163 
Chastain, James 192 
Chastain, Jerry 192 
Cheung, Lee 53 
Chiiders, James 163 
Chism Jr., James 192 
Choat, Amy 133, 292, 295, 352 
Choievik, Brian 53, 329, 354 
Cholevik, Nathan 192, 332 
Chomki, Jessica 53 
Christensen, Luise 73, 133, 252, 319 
Christiansen, Margaret 163, 252, 
261 

Cicio, Gerald 192 
Clark, Daniel 163 
Clark, David 192, 331 
Ciark, Donyal 133 
Ciark, Michaei 53, 254, 261, 277 
Ciark, Shane 192, 200 
Ciark, Wiliiam 163, 245 
Clements, Dana 163, 182 
Clements, Sheila 163, 177, 182 
Clifford, Ryan 163 
Ciine, Andrea 54, 262, 274, 277, 
317, 364 

Clutts, Brent 12, 13, 134 
Clutts, James 163 
Coakiey, Lea 134 
Coker, Wiiliam 193 
Colbert, Michelle 193 
Colp, Kevin 193 
Combs, Tina 134 
Conege, Missy 261 
Connoiiy, Mason 54, 247, 261, 277 
Connolly, Timothy 134, 163, 311 
Cook, Jacqueiin 134 
Cook, Kari 163 
Cooley, Fonda 163 
Coonrod, Christoph 193 
Cooper, Brad 193 
Cooper, Donaid 193, 292 
Cooper, Kyie 54, 58, 114, 117, 354 
Cooper, Mary 163, 175, 261 
Cooper, Meiinda 193 
Copedge, Nathaniei 163, 354 
Cornwaii, Herbert 163 
Corrado Jr., Michaei 163, 292 
Cory, Randai 134, 163 
Costeiio, David 354 
Cotter, Mark 23, 54, 274, 279, 309, 
311, 345, 354 
Cotter, Wiliiam 134, 309 
Cottreii, Dana 54 
Couiter, Nicoie 193, 269, 261 
Courtright, Steven 264 
Cowiey, Lisa 54 
Cowiey, Wiliiam 193 
Cox, Carloes 134 
Cox, Christina 134 
Cox, Jack 55 
Cox, James 163 
Cox, Leigh 55 
Coyie, Betty 163 
Cozart, Stephen 193 
Coziar, John 134, 338, 340, 359 

INDEX 389 



Cozine, Timothy 134 

Diak, Brandi 135, 139 

Elkins, Lisa 136 

Crain, Christoph 164 

Dickerman Christina M., 164 

Eller, Lorry 194 

Crain, Tracy 193 

Dickerman Christina M., 164 

Eller, Stacy 165 

Crane, Adria 55, 247, 261, 282 

Dickerman Gregory 58, 289 

Elliott, Melissa 136 

Crawford, Cari 20, 26, 28, 31, 55, 

Dickerson, Corey 193 

Elliott, Tanya 34, 60, 127 

70, 91, 104, 245, 397 

Dickerson, Juiie 193 

Ellis, Christoph 165 

Crayne, Stacy 164 

Dickerson, Michaei 58 

Ellis, Jason 136, 338, 340 

Crider, Matthew 134, 331 

Dickerson, Tina 58, 249 

Ellis, William 136, 359 

Crisier, Ryan 55, 94, 114, 117, 127 

Dickie, Joeiie 164 

Elmore, Cori 136, 240, 251 

Cromer, Thomas 55, 270 

Diliard, Jason 164, 311 

Embick, Cara 136 

Croweii, Lesii 193 

Dimitroff III, William 135, 292 

Embrey, James 165 

Cruzen, Biii 193 

Dineff, Joseph 135, 181 

Engleke, Deborah 194, 261 

Cummings, Sandy 56 

Dineft, Kayla 193 

Engelke, Jennifer 194, 322 

Cunningham, Amanda 193, 292 

Dioneda, Ritchie 193, 346 

Engelke, Kathryn 60, 85 

Cunningham, Keri 193 

Dippel, Brent 164, 272, 329, 334, 

Enzwiler, Christoph 165 

Cupp, Cory 134, 287, 289, 372 

359 

Epperson, Emily 194, 322, 364 

Cuppett, Darren 56 

Ditch, Sandra 58 

Erickson, Christine 194 

Cuppett, Eric 193 

Dittrich, Jason 193 

Erickson, Jacob 32, 33, 194 

Cuppies, Christoph 36, 56, 133, 

Dix, Heather 194 

Eudy, Craig 194 

134, 258 

Dixon, Chubeto 135 

Eudy Jr., Donald 60 

Curry, Lawrence 273, 309, 354 

Dobler, Sherri 58 

Eugea, Holly 264, 268 

Cuvar, Christina 12, 164, 169, 303, 

Dobrynski, Ami 194 

Evans, Amyee 194 

391 

Dockery, Carrie 133, 135, 164, 352 

Evans, Brandy 60 

Czerniejewski, Eric 56, 114, 134 

D 

Daie, Tonya 164, 270 
Daiton, Thomas 134, 164, 331 

Dockery, Darrell 68 
Dockery Jr., Michael 165 
Doggett, Joseph 135, 194 
Donnell, William 194 
Dooley Chad 34, 135, 194, 312 
Dooley, Lisa 165, 289 

Evans, Lynsy 194, 261 
Evans II, Tally 136, 326 
Everts, Melissa 165 
Ezell, David 98, 136 

Danieis, Meiinda 164, 266, 319 

Dooley, Richard 58, 64 

F 

Danieis, Wiiiiam 164, 166 

Dothage, Heather 165, 252, 261 

Fackler, Renee 194 

Daugherty, Geraid 56, 258 

Downs, Betty 59 

Farmer, William 165 

Daugherty, James 134 

Drago, Denise 59, 114, 117, 262 

Farris, Christy 136 

David, Bruce 134 

Drakeford, Tracy 165 

Farris, Penny 136, 289 

Davis, Angeia 193 

Drennan, Michael 135, 194, 312 

Fasick, Adam 136, 359 

Davis, Anthony 56 

Dresch, Dana 165, 317, 319, 322, 

Favier, Angela 194, 261, 322 

Davis, David 134, 354 

352 

Fea, Matthew 165 

Davis, Eric 37, 273, 329, 354 

Dressel, Dina 165 

Fenner, Marcia 194 

Davis, Erin 98, 164 

Dressel, Michael 135 

Ferguson, Heather 60 

Davis, Kristina 57 

Duboise, Robert 135 

Ferguson, Jason 165 

Davis, Luia 193 

Duckett, Issac 194 

Ferguson, Robert 136 

Davis Michaei B., 164, 292 

Duckworth, Jayme 194 

Fernandez, Julie 11, 14, 23, 39, 60, 

Davis Michaei P., 193 

Duffield, Amy 135 

233, 243, 386 

Davis, Rachaei 164 

Duffield, Shelley 194, 268 

Fernandez, Lisa 165, 281 

Davis, Ricardo 57 270 

Duft, Jonathan 165, 245, 324, 359 

Fielding, David 165, 354 

Davis, Susan 193 

Dugan, Gary 135 

Fields, Colleen 165 

Davison, Lisa 134, 193 

Dumoulin, Allison 59, 254, 292, 295 

Finazzo, Jennifer 61 

Dawes, Cassandra 193 

Duncan, Elizabeth 165, 289 

Finn, Christoph 194 

Dawson, Dmanda 164 

Dunnavant, Donald 171 

Firebaugh, Sean 194, 188, 200, 312 

Dawson, Chariotte 57, 135 

Dunnavant, Ronald 135 

Fisher, Charles 61 

Dayton, Ericka 135, 270 

Dutko, David 194, 332 

Fisher, Mikel 39, 61, 247, 261 

Dayton, Jessica 164, 372 

Dutko, Debra 194 

Fisher, Raymond 195 

Dean, Brian 164, 264, 270, 309 

Dutko, Tammy 165, 272, 362, 364 

Fisher Jr., Ronald 195, 312 

Dean, Phiiiip 193 
Deason, Kevin 57 
Debert, Daniei 164, 261, 360 

E 

Fisk, Denessa 165 
Fisk, Margaret 166 
Flowers, Bridgette 136 

Dejarnett, Derek 164, 292 

Eaglin, Renee 194 

Flowers, Deborah 187, 195 

Deianey, Donna 135 

Earney, Lawrence 135, 309, 359 

Flowers, Elvis 166 

Deiay, Donna 164, 252, 261, 292 

Earon, Catrina 136 

Flowers, Sharon 23, 61, 262, 289 

Deigado, Miguei 12, 13, 33, 57, 102, 

Eckmann, Amy 165 

Floyd, Angie 166 

270, 304 

Economy, Michelle 194 

Focht, Tonya 61 

Dennis, Cynthia 57 

Edwards, David 17, 23, 26, 55, 59, 

Forbes, Cheryl 136, 359 

Dennis, Deianey 193 

127, 245 

Ford, Danielle 195, 289 

Denson, Wendy 135, 164 

Edwards, Jennifer 136 

Foret, Matthew 166 

Derossett, Jessica 135, 340, 338 

Edwards, Tracey 59 

Forister, Jodi 166, 169, 261, 264, 

Diak, Amy 164 

Egbert, Jami 59, 165 
Egbert, Teresa 194, 269 

314 

Fowler, Samuel 23, 136, 359 

390 INDEX 

Eglin, Renee 261 

Franklin, Elaine 61 


Franklin, Jennifer 185, 195, 197 
Frazier, Jason 68, 354 
Frazier Jr., John 14, 62, 117 
Free, Andrea 166, 362 
Freeman, Dawn 166, 261 
French, Michelle 166, 182, 281 
Frisse, Jeffrey 195 
Fuentes, Aracelis 159 
Fuhrman, John 195 
Fuller, Billy 166 
Futrell, Nicole 62 

G 

Gaddy, Holly 187, 195 
Gaddy, Laura 166 
Gaddy, Robert 136, 268, 270 
Gaddy, Ryan 195 
Galati, Gina 166 

Galbreath, Jonathan 195, 245, 261, 
332 

Galinski, Steve 136 
Gallas, Tammy 195 
Gameng, Ernie 137 
Gameng, Ireene 186, 187, 199, 289 
Gann, Garrin 41, 62, 258 
Gann, Jena 166, 270, 362 
Garber, Katherine 166 
Garcia, Katrina 62 


Garcia, Michael 137 
Gardner, Cassle 195 
Garriott, Christoph 62, 326 
Garriott, David 137 
Gaudreault, Keith 62, 258 
Gebhardt, Amy 195, 261 
Geggus, Jeremie 195 
Genovese, Frank 195 
Gibbs, Jeremy 195 
Gibson, Jeffrey 166 
Gibson, Ronaid 63 
Gibson, Shannasue 289 
Giese, Juiie 137, 289 
Giffin, Fred 195 
Gilbert, Michael 195, 346 
Gillham, Alicia 63 
Giiliam, Shelley 166 
Gilliam Stephanie 63 


Gillison, Cherie 63, 354 
Gilmore, John 63, 360 
Glasgow, Ronald 195, 332 
Glasgow, Stephen 166, 372 
Glover, Joshua 166 
Gobble, Jenny 137 
Goclan, Christoph 98, 166 
Goclan, Julie 166, 175, 272, 297, 
364, 388 

Godwin, Amy 195 
Golden, Brent 23, 98, 166, 359, 391 
Golden, Christoph 137, 258 
Gooch, Amy 195 
Gooch, Michael 137, 309 
Goodman, Shelle 33, 130, 137, 249, 
391 

Goodrich, Donna 166 
Gosnell, Jennifer 195 
Gosnell, Melanie 195 
Goss, Donald 12, 13, 32, 270, 304, 
372 

Grady, Angela 10, 166, 261 
Graham, Robin 195 
Graham, Tonia 63 
Graham, Wanetta 195 
Grammer, Herbert 195 
Graves, Nicole 137, 166, 175, 261 
Gray, Danny 196 

Gray, Jo Ann 11, 167, 182, 261, 322, 


362 

Grayson, Rebecca 64, 133, 137, 
249, 282 

Greco, Brandie 48, 245, 261, 262, 
285, 359 
Greco, Jason 64 
Greco, Robert 137, 167 
Green, Jacquelyn 167 
Green, Kelly 3, 50, 64, 196 
Green, Kelly 24, 254, 366 
Green, Shannon 187, 196 
Greene, Jimmy 167 
Greene, Nicole 137 
Greene, Theresa 196 
Greer, Billy 64 
Greer, Chris 167 
Greer, Jonathan 196 
Gregory, Heather 137 


Gregory, Amy 64, 249, 277 
Gregory, Kellie 187, 196, 314 
Gregory, Paula 167, 261 
Gregory, Stanley 64, 261, 277 
Gresham, John 167 
Grieve, Robyn 137 
Griffin, Leisa 65 
Griffin, Melissa 137 
Grimes, Brian 65, 326, 354 
Groboski, Jeanine 65, 76, 114, 117, 
261, 274, 364 
Grogan, Robin 58, 65, 289 
Gros, Kevin 33, 42, 65, 271, 274, 354 
Grubbs, Michael 196, 312, 346 
Gudac, Amanda 167, 261, 264, 266 
Guithues, Robert 65 
Gustafson, Jam! 167 
Gutierrez, Guadalupe 66, 137, 149 
Guzy, Jennifer 267, 289, 372 

H 

Haack, Robert 23, 66, 247, 254, 261, 
277 

Habermehl, Robert 137 
Haddix, Donald 167 
Haddix, Jill 187, 196, 261 
Hadley, Cleta 33, 137 
Haeffner, James 41, 66, 214 
Hagen, Billie 196 
Hahn, Cynthia 66 
Hahn, Michael 137, 167 
Hahn, Shannon 284, 285 
Haley, Sharon 66 
Hall, Amy 138, 289 
Hall, Crystal 66 
Hall, Jason 159, 167 
Halverson, Jonathan 138, 289 
Hamilton, Brian 143 
Hamilton, Jamie 138, 196 
Hamilton, Mary 391 
Hamilton, Phillip 167, 324 
Hammes, Jaye 167 
Hammond, Byron 167 
Han, Ju Hi 138, 287, 289 
Han, Yu Jin 67 
Hand, Paul 138, 196 
Handy, Erica 396 
Hankins, Carrie 138, 297 
Hankins, Regina 32, 33, 196, 289 
Hankins, Ryan 138, 256 
Hannigan, Mark 167 
Hard, Lisa 166, 167, 297 
Hardester, Nicole 196 
Hardesty, Amy 138, 282 
Hardesty, Stphanie 167 
Hargrove, Julie 167 
Harlan, James 196 
Harley, Jana 67 
Harely, Jeffery 138 
Harms, Richard 196 
Harper, Denise 138, 284, 285 
Harper, Jennifer 67, 261, 274, 362, 
364 

Harper, Mark 138, 247, 292 
Harper, Robyn 167 

INDEX 391 



Harper, Sunny 167 
Harris, Athena 138, 359 
Harris, David 196 
Harris, Donaid 196, 312 
Harris, Eiizabeth 10, 138, 386 
Harris, Jeffry 138 
Harris, Jennifer 67, 127, 320, 362 
Harris, Lori 196, 322 
Harrison, Christoph 50, 67 
Harrison, Craig 196, 332 
Harrison, Stacey 138, 289 
Hart, Jason 68 
Hartline, Robyn 167 
Hartman, Christoph 68, 196 
Hartman, Jeremy 287, 289 
Hass, Christoph 138, 345 
Hasse, Melissa 68, 70, 114, 117, 
127, 262, 284, 397 
Hatcher, Allison 167 
Hatfield, Michael 138 
Hawkes, Farrah 196 
Hawkins, Brian 134, 138 
Hawkins, Maria 138, 261, 273, 354 
Hawley, Bonnie 168 
Hayden, Christie 74, 138, 245, 262, 
273, 285, 352 
Hayden Jr., Larry 196 
Hayes, Heather 139 
Hayes, Jason 168 
Heater, Jennifer 168, 391 
Heath, Lora 68 

Heck, Celia 168, 177, 261, 287, 289 
Heck, Hope 196, 261 
Heffner, Paula 196, 268 
Hefner, Robert 168 
Heil, Jennifer 292 
Heil, Rod 139, 331 
Held, Jeffrey 68 
Hellrich, Andrew 68 
Hendricks, Toni 168 
Hendrickson, Monte 168 
Herny, Brian 69, 240, 251, 254 
Henry, Thomas 196 
Hensley, Christoph 196 
Hensley, John 12, 13, 160, 168 
Henson, Scott 139 
Henson, Timothy 139, 329, 337 
Henson, Virginia 98, 139, 256, 273, 
364 

Henss, Shelena 139 
Hergert, Tamara 168 
Herman, Jessica 168, 289 
Herman, William 168, 245, 272, 309, 
311, 359 

Heubschman, Jeffery 139, 309, 345 
Heubschman, Jerry 139, 309, 345 
Hewlett, Anne 168, 285, 350 
Hicks, Amy 139, 287, 289, 295 
Hicks, Benjamin 168, 245, 33 1j 359 
Hicks, Charles 168 
Hicks, Danny 139, 258, 345 
Hicks, James 168 
Hicks, Steven 196 
High, Aaron 168 

Hildebrand, Regan 168, 247, 261, 
264, 266, 292 

392 INDEX 


Hildreth, Christoph 139, 331, 359 
Hildreth, Ian 168 
Hildreth, Kimberly 169 
Hill, Charles 264, 266, 267, 287, 289 
Hill, Christina 139, 169 
Hill, Christoph 69, 270, 356 
Hill, Eric 14, 69, 323 
Hill, Jeffrey 196 
Hill, Nathan 196, 332 
Hill, Scott 169 
Hillman, Jennifer 69 
Hinds, Denise 139 
Hinkle, Tina 139 
Hitchcock, Chad 169 
Hitt, Jennifer 139, 261, 372 
Hoelter, Shannon 169 
Hoerle Jr., Gary 139, 270 
Hoffman, Christina 169 
Hoffman, David 169 
Hoffman, Raymond 169 
Hoffman, Stacey 139 
Hoffstot, Christoph 139, 273, 309, 
345, 346 

Hogue, Angela 169 



3 


Hogue, Mary 139 
Holder, Christa 169, 281 
Holder, Jerin 197 
Holland, Donna 69, 281 
Hollis, Angela 140, 264 
Hollis, Joseph 197 
Holloway, Kimberly 129, 169, 261, 
297 

Holloway, Melissa 197 
Holmes, Brenda 197 
Holmes Jr., James 69, 292 
Holsinger, Kristi 26, 28, 39, 70, 91, 
243, 254, 269, 274, 277, 307, 314 
Holt, Fred 197, 204 
Holt, Shawn 197 
Hooker, James 140, 256 
Hoover, Judith 197, 256, 266 
Hopkins, Donald 197 
Hopkins, John 289 
Hopkins, Timothy 197 
Horn, Clarissa 197 
Horn, Dustin 39, 70, 252, 261 
Horstmeyer, Traci 169 
Horvath, Stephan 197 
Hoskins, Thomas 140, 324, 354, 360 
Houston, William 140, 261, 331, 359 
Howards, Jason 70 
Howell, Matthew 169, 311 
Howland, Jamie 169 


Howland, Shawn 169 
Hozian, Kenneth 197 
Hubert, Michelle 289 
Huckelberry, Kristophe 197 
Huckelberry, Stephanie 140, 268 
Hucks, Angela 140, 391 
Hudgins, Allison 197 
Huie, James 140 
Hull, Lauri 140, 169 
Humphrey, Leighann 70 
Hunt, Traci 140 
Hunter, Christoph 197, 261 
Hyden, John 197 

I 

Irby, Darren 70, 140 
Isenburg, Amy 243, 261, 269, 273, 
314, 352 

Ishum, Heather 169 
Ishum, Keith 169 

Isom, Amy 17, 70, 114, 117, 127, 
243, 261, 262, 274, 277, 297, 303 
Ivey, Lauri 71 
Ivie, Jason 170 

J 

Jacinto, Jose 197 
Jackson, Stacy 71, 240, 356 
Jackson Jr., David 258 
Jackstadt, Aaron 197, 326 
Jaco, Christoph 140, 170 
Jacobs, Angela 245, 284, 285 
Jacobs, Lori 71 

Jacobs, Stefanie 170, 182, 185, 285, 
289 

James, Donald 197 
James, Laura 170 
Jaros, Michael 98, 170 
Jaycox, Robert 71, 295 
Jenkins, Andrew 140 149, 245, 329, 
331, 354 

Jenness, Adam 140, 197, 261, 312 
Jenness, Kristin 379 
Jarrell, Lynde 197 
Jessee, Patrick 32, 170, 261, 271, 
311, 346, 372 

Johnson, Amy 197, 245, 279, 285 
Johnson, Christoph 170, 261, 264, 
266 

Johnson, Jeanette 140, 197, 289 
Johnson, Kevin 140 
Johnson, Melanie 71 
Johnson, Paige 170 
Johnson, Staci 11, 98, 170, 261, 272, 
320, 322, 362 
Johnson, Terri 140, 170 
Johnson II, Billy 140 
Johnson Jr., Dennis 170 
Jolly, Bradley 197 
Jolly, Charles 197 
Jolly, Rhonda 71, 289 
Jones, Angela 72, 76, 140, 254, 261, 
274, 364 

Jones, David 140 
Jones, Eric 170, 331 
Jones, Jennifer 197 


Jones, Kelley 141, 170, 262, 281 
Jones, Melissa 262 
Jones, Sheri 72, 114, 117, 362 
Jones Jr., Earl 72 
Joyce, Ann 72, 292 
Judd, Angela 11, 23, 72, 240, 243, 
252, 256, 261, 379 
Judd, Joseph 197 
Justice, David 198 
Justice, Jeremiah 170 
Justice, Melody 198 
Justice, Shelley 141, 198, 279, 285 
Justice, Vicki 270, 285 

K 

Kalips, Brandy 72, 249 
Kalips, Krista 171, 175, 181 
Kamadulski, Donald 73, 247, 252 
Kamadulski, Karla 198, 261 
Karibian, Ratti 73, 141, 256, 338, 
360 

Kasprovich, David 198, 332 
Kass, Jason 171 
Kays, James 171 
Keck, Patricia 73, 141 
Keelin, Steven 171, 311 
Keeling, Lena 171, 362 
Keen, Melissa 33, 73, 254, 270 
Keenan, Mark 73 
Keene, John 198 
Kelley, Amanda 198, 262, 289 
Kelley, Deanna 73 
Kelley, Jenniter 171, 177, 391 
Kelly, Adelaide 171 
Kennedy, Stacie 31, 47 , 74, 141, 
261, 262, 274, 303 
Kent, Terry 289 
Kern, Jodie 198, 261, 289 
Kershaw, Brian 74, 141 
Kessel, Kami 198, 319, 322 
Kessler, Candi 74, 141, 284, 285, 
331, 397 

Kessler, Curtis 329 
Kidd, Karen 141 
Kielty, Bryan 141 
Killian, Amy 74, 262 
Kincer, Nicole 141, 264, 287, 289, 
295 

Kinder, Thomas 74, 270, 304, 372 
King, Cynthia 141, 198 
King, Ryan 141, 345 
Kingsley, Derrick 252, 261, 264, 
277, 326 

Kirchner, John 198, 256 
Kirkbride, Brandi 74, 141 
Kirkpatrick, Ann 261, 292 
Kissel, Ami 75 
Kiee, David 171, 311 
Kiug, Leighann 198 
Knight, Daveanna 75, 141, 262 
Knowland, Thomas 141 
Knowland, Timothy 141, 391 
Knox, MIcheile 157, 171, 175, 322, 
364 

Koberna, Brian 198, 312 
Kohler, Brian 198, 332 
Kondrich, Steven 198, 332 
Konuch, Melissa 141 


Kostecki, Laura 171 
Kotz, Marty 277 
Kovach, Angie 141, 171, 391 
Kozjak, Sharon 267, 281 
Kozlowski, Chrissy 198 
Krakowiecki, Amy 171, 261, 289, 
320, 322, 372 

Kramer, Kimberly 141, 171, 289 
Kraus, Christoph 289 
Kraus Jetfrey A., 198 
Kraus Jetfrey T., 198 
Kraus, Stephanie 198, 281 
Krause, Christoph 75, 264, 287, 295 
Krause, Jason 171 
Krepko, Gene 81 
Krinski, Cassandra 198 
Kromray, Bryan 141, 309 
Kromray, Carrie 75, 114, 117 
Kromray, Stanley 31, 41, 75, 258 
Krug, Lori 198, 289 
Krupco, Robert 142 
Krupco, Walter 75 
Kudelka, Frederick 198 
Kudelka, John 198 



4 


Kudelka, Kristie 171 
Kuehnel, Robert 198 
Kuehnel, Terry 171 
Kulasza, Brian 198 
Kulier, Sara 39, 76, 247, 251, 254, 
261, 266, 267 
Kuit, Christoph 198, 312 
Kuit, Stephanie 171, 261, 272, 317, 
319, 320, 364 

Kumar, Sunil 157, 172, 177, 261, 360 
Kusmierczak, Melissa 172, 281 
Kutz, Martha 142, 252, 261 

L 

Laboray, Lori 142 
Laboray, Tara 142 
Lakatos, Aaron 76 
Lakatos, Sean 198, 332 
Lalor, James 76 
Lalor, Thomas 76, 292, 295 
Lamb, Gladys 172, 261, 264 
Lance, Lorna 198, 265 
Landon, Michelle 198 
Lane, Rosalie 172 
Lanear, Amos 76, 292 
Landsdorf, Michelle 172 
Lantrip, John 41, 77, 258 
Larose, Brad 33, 142 


Lassen, Carey 198 
Lavelle, Mark 142 
Lay, James 77, 172 
Laycock, Leslie 157, 172, 261, 362 
Leach, Jason 199, 332 
Leara, Nicholas 199, 287, 289 
Leavell, Craig 39, 77, 114, 117, 254, 
261, 269, 292, 295 
Lebeau, Michele 77 
Ledbetter, Allen 39, 77, 87, 268, 324 
Ledbetter, Cristi 142 
Ledbetter, Susan 199 
Lee, Bryan 199 
Lee, Jason 172 
Lee, Michelle 172 
Lee, Timothy 77 
Legate, Asa 199, 261 
Legate, Misty 172, 289 
Legate, Rhonda 78 
Legens, Donald 142, 391 
Leggett, Jaimie 78 
Leith, Ian 199 
Lemler, Kimberly 199 
Lemp, Daniel 34, 41, 78, 258 
Lenzi, Adrienne 78, 274, 275, 307, 
314, 317, 319, 364, 394 
Lenzi, William 142, 279, 292 
Leonard, Jason, 62, 78, 93, 258 
Leone, Carrie 142 
Lerch, John 142 
Lerch, Wendy 36, 289 
Levart, Robert 78 
Lewis, Angela 172 
Lewis, Barbara 142 
Lewis, Bryan 79, 81 
Lewis, Francis 12, 13, 17, 27, 28, 48, 
66, 79, 114, 117, 245, 274, 308, 
356 

Lewis, Jeremy 287 
Lewis, John 199 
Lewis, Lisa 142, 295 
Lewis, Rose 142, 249 
Lewis, Sean 199 
Lidikay, Jennifer 199 
Lienemann, Matthew 199, 346 
Lignoul, Lori 142, 239, 245, 284, 285 
Linhart, Edward 79, 81, 309 
Linton, Barbara 79 
Lipchik, Michael 172, 311 
Little, Stacy 199 
Lofink, Brandi 142 
Loftus, Charles 199, 261, 312 
Loftus, Matthew 23, 39, 79, 254, 
261, 274, 329, 392 
Logan, Ann 172, 175, 185, 272, 285, 
364 

Long, Cristy 172 

Long, Gary 199 

Long, Terry 199 

Loor, Christina 199 

Lour, MaHhew 172, 309, 311, 359 

Love, David 199 

Love, Erin 142 

Love, Guy 172 

Lowe, Aimee 172 

Lowe, James 36, 309 

INDEX 393 




Lowe, John 143 
Lowe Jr., Donald 142 
Lubak, Steven 172, 247, 261, 324 
Lucas, Rosa 143 
Lucash, Mathew 199 
Luffman, Jeffrey 173, 309 
Lybarger, Scott 188, 199 
Lynch, Melissa 143, 243, 269 
Lynn, Melanie 79 



Mackay, Kathleen 80, 247, 261, 282 
Mackay Jr., Edward 143, 324, 354 
Mackenzie, Scott 80 
Madden, Christoph 80, 267, 287, 
289, 295 

Madison, April 173, 391 
Maher, Joseph 199 
Mahoney, Lynda 143, 287, 289 
Malady, Christine 173 
Maiherek, Anthony 36, 80, 258 
Maiherek, Christina 173 
Maione, Jeffrey 173 
Mance, Amy 143 

Mance, Morgan 12, 33, 143, 264, 
270, 372 

Mann, Tanya 173, 289 
Mann, Tonya 173, 289 
Manners, Christoph 143 
Manoufar, Sevag 199 
Mansfield, Pamela 80, 247, 281 
Marcum Daniel 62, 173 
Marcum, Kelle 173 
Marcum, Shannon 143, 249, 262, 
264, 267, 268, 391 
Marlette, Christy 173 
Marlette, Tanya 143 
Marsaia, Matthew 173, 261 
Marsaia, Peggy 143 
Marsh, April 173 
Marshall, Drake 338 
Martin Amy E., 173 
Martin Amy L., 199, 268 
Martin, Chad 173, 287, 289, 359 
Martin, Christine 143, 173 
Martin, Dana 199 
Martin, Danielle 199 
Martin, Paui 173, 289 
Martin, Shawn 143 
Martinez, Anthony 199 
Martinez, Christoph 81, 114, 117 
Martinez, James 199, 292, 332 
Martinez, Stan 181, 199, 193 
Mason, Hoiiy 173 
Mathenia, Jason 81, 274, 329 
Mathenia, Richard 199 
Mathews, Jeffrey 81 
Matiock, Rosaiie 173 
Mattern, Sharon 143, 261, 287, 289, 
295 

Mattern, Thomas 58, 81, 356 
Maulding, Todd 174 
Maxfieid, Jason 174, 329, 331, 359 
May, Michaei 143 
May, Patrick 199, 312 

394 INDEX 


Mayes, Derek 143 
Mayes, Joe 199 

Mayhail, Daria 143, 145, 245, 285, 
352 

McArther, Rebecca 200, 261 
McCallie, Tina 81 
McCallister, Billy 174 
McCalllster, Mary 200, 266, 289 
McCallister, Shane 174, 324 
McClain, Nathan 17, 27, 28, 55, 81, 
114, 117, 245, 254, 360 
McClelland, Joshua 200, 261, 324 
McClelland, Mary 82, 87 
McClery, Theresa 143 
McCormick, Angela 174, 181, 261 
McCormick, William 82, 114, 117, 
261, 274, 324, 360 
McCoy, Joseph 200 
McCuilough, Christoph 174 
McDonaid, Jennifer 174 
McDoweil, Dani 82, 252, 265 
McElroy, Rebecca 143, 249 
McEntyre, Paul 174 
McFarland, David 82 
McFarland, Garrick 144 
McGilberry, Anthony 200 
McGinness Jr., John 174 
McGlawn, Mark 144 
McGuire, Robert 174, 292 
Mclivoy, Meiissa 33, 144, 261, 262, 
264, 268, 273, 338, 340, 352 
McIntosh, Melissa 200 
McIntosh, Robert 200 
McIntosh, Shawnery 144 
McIntosh, Tina 200 
McKeal, Shane 34, 82 



5 


McKechan, James 17, 24, 26, 27, 
28, 82, 114, 117, 214, 274, 329, 
359 

McKechan, John 82, 103, 114, 117, 
245, 356 

McKechan, Mark 144, 345 
McKee, Billie 144 
McKee, David 200 
McKinney, Carrie 174, 391 
McKinney, Patrick 174 
McLaren, Nicholas 32, 33, 83, 114, 
270, 304, 372 

McMillan, Christoph 144, 292, 295 
McMillan, James 379 
McMillan, Jeanine 200, 388 
McMillan, Scott 144, 247, 261, 270, 


277 

McMillian, Jeffrey 200, 312 
McNeely, Danny 83 
McQuay, David 144 
McQuay, Jennifer 174 
Mead, Dana 200 
Meadows, William 174 
Means, Shanna 174 
Mefford, Heather 270 
Mefford, Winona 31, 32, 33, 144, 
261, 270, 304, 372 
Mehelic, Sarah 174, 261, 362 
Meinhardt, Tammy 174 
Melton, Kristi 200 
Melton, Lynette 32, 33, 83 
Melzer, Jodi 175, 185, 285 
Mendenhall, Eric 144, 273, 309 
Mendenhall, Tammy 200, 261, 268, 
292 

Mendoza, Lla 83, 127, 151, 270, 274, 
369 

Mendoza, Michael 175 

Mercer, Jayme 144, 249 

Merz, Julie 144, 262, 362, 391 

Merz, Kimberly 83 

Meyenburg, Adam 144 

Meyer, Jason 144, 258 

Meyer, Patricia 144, 252, 292, 295 

Meyer, Richard 68, 84 

Meyers, Dawn 84 

Meyers Jr., Francis 84 

Michaels, Jamie 200, 312 

Mikolaszuk, Teena 144 

Milam, Tabitha 200 

Miller, Dana 144 

Miller, Ernest 200, 326, 346 

Miller, James 81, 144, 175, 287, 289 

Miller, James 144, 175, 200, 359 

Miller, Jennifer 84 

Miller, John 145, 372 

Miller John A., 145, 175 

Miller, Julie 84 

Miller, Kelly 145, 261, 273, 326, 354 
Miller, Kevin 84, 256, 258 
Miller, Tonya 175 

Mills, David 23, 85, 87, 101, 247, 
261, 277 

Millsap, Jason 175 

Milosevic, Vladimir 73, 85, 247, 261 

Milton, Brett 85 

Milton, Catherine 33, 145, 252 
Milton, Christph 17, 27, 28, 31, 85, 
356 

Milton, Jennifer 175 
Milton, Stacy 200 
Milton, Walter 175, 311 
Miner, Chad 200, 312 
Miner, Eric 175, 311, 354 
Miner, Kelly 261 
Mink, Gretchen 23, 58, 85, 127 
Miskell, Mary 85 
Miskell, Pamela 145, 262 
Miskell, Regina 200 
Miskelley, Heather 145 
Mitchell, Gabriel 175, 324 
Mitchell, James 145 
Mitchell, Mary 23, 175 
Mitchell, Tanya 175 



Mitchem, Eric 145 
Mizell, Jason 145, 270 
Mock, Laura 86, 249 
Modglin, Brigitta 86, 254, 261, 292, 
295 

Modrusic, Kimberly 145 

Modrusic, Lisa 80 

Moerlien, Jason 345 

Monroe, James 175 

Monroe, Laurie 145, 262, 303, 362 

Monroe, Michelle 86 

Monson, Jared 175 

Montgomery, Michael 86, 232, 309 

Moore, Christina 86 

Moore, Karen 86, 214 

Morales, Georgia 267, 289, 372 

Moran, Shaun 145 

Moreland, Michelle 289 

Morgan, Kimberly 145, 292 

Morgan, Lori 145 

Morgan Jr., Robert 175, 232, 309, 
311, 354 

Morlan, Michael 145 
Morris, Dennis 145, 271 
Morris, Jeanette 145, 264, 289 
Morrison, Dorretta 87 
Morton Jr., Timothy 256 
Mosby, Larren 200 
Moss, Tommy 87 
Mouradian, Sarkis 162 
Mouser, Angela 200 
Mouser, Christina 145 
Moutria, Jill 200 

Mowell, Michael 134, 145, 309, 359 
Mudd, Scott 
Mudd, Timothy 87 
Mueller, Ryan 87, 114, 117, 146, 
324, 356 

Mullen, Kelly 200, 261 
Mullen, Richard 87 
Mullen, Sheila 175, 261, 262, 297, 
303 

Munoz, Melissa 200 
Murphy, Donald 200, 332 
Murray, David 146, 175 
Murray, Matthew 146 
Myers, Brandi 270 
Myers, James 146, 200 

N 

Naeve, Donald 98 
Naeve, Jennifer 281 
Nagelmiller, Edwin 146, 256 
Nail, Heather 176, 292 
Nance, Kimberly 176 
Naney, Jason 176, 331 
Happier, David 176 
Nash Jr., Raymond 87, 146 
Neeley, Olivia 146, 200 
Neidhardt, Joshua 329, 331, 359 
Nelson, Bradley 146, 188, 309 
Nelson, David 359 
Nemeth, Brian 201, 312 
Nemeth, Jason 88, 146, 329 
Newberry, Dale 146, 252, 292, 295 
Nichols, Bryan 88 
Nickeson, Derek 88 


Nicol, Crystal 201, 261 
Niepert, Amy 20, 48, 70, 88, 114, 
117, 262, 284, 285, 397 
Niesporek, Bobby 201 
Noah, Misti 176 
Noe, Beth 146, 200, 282 
Nolan, Robert 68, 88, 98 
Nordstrom, Michael 12, 13, 47, 66, 
89, 117, 258, 273, 309, 311, 312, 
356 

Norris, Jennifer 176, 264, 281, 289, 
372 

North, Clinton 146, 201 
North, Stephanie 146, 289 
Norton, Melissa 89, 249 
Norton, Stephen 201 
Nothstine, Erika 146, 201 



Noud, Charles 12, 36, 145, 146, 152, 
201, 265, 285, 366 
Novich, Lee 201 

Novich, Lyn 146, 166, 176, 178, 297 
Nunes, Leslie 176, 311, 338, 359 
Nussbaum, Keith 176 


O 

O’Dell, Angela 201 
O’Neill, Brad 11, 12, 13, 47, 89, 97, 
114, 117, 274, 329, 392 
Obucina, Anne 98, 146, 155, 176, 
178, 181, 362 

Obucina, Gregory 98, 134, 146 
Odom, Karen 249 
Odom, Shawn 176, 362 
Odum, Robert 176, 359 
Oehlecker Jr., Donald 23, 201 
Ogle, Bryan 78, 89, 114, 117, 269, 
287, 289 

Oliver, Dianne 89, 292, 295 
Oliver, Jason 27, 34, 201 
Oliver, Shawn 58, 89, 245, 262, 274, 
297, 303, 364 
Ollis, Kelly 146, 391 
Olson, Kimberly 201 
Orasco, Christina 147, 176 
Orsborn, Brian 12, 13 
Owca, Elizabeth 27, 28, 176, 281 
Owen, Carrie 12, 13, 47, 57, 90, 111, 
114, 243, 247, 262, 274, 277, 297, 
303, 379, 398 

Owen, Nathan 133, 147, 200, 312 
Owens, Gerald 68 
Ozanich, Timothy 176, 311 
Ozee, Renee 147, 201 


P 

Pacheco, Juana 90 
Page, Clint 147, 176, 177 
Palmer Tonya 176 
Palmisano, Brian 90 
Parker, Amie 90, 292 
Parker, Angela 98, 162, 177, 261, 
364 

Parker, Crystal 147, 177 
Parker, Gerlean 249 
Parker, Michael 177 
Parker, Nicole 201 
Parker, Robbie 147, 201 
Parmley, Thomas 201 
Parrish, Rachael 292 
Parrish, Stephanie 201, 279 
Partney, Daniel 85, 90, 274, 309, 
356 

Partney, David 166, 177, 272, 329 
Parton, Christine 147, 177, 289 
Pascoe, Daniel 147, 247, 252, 261, 
270, 277, 326 

Pascoe, Michael 147, 247, 252, 261, 
277, 326 

Paterson, Brian 68, 147, 258 
Patrick, Shawn 90, 247, 254, 261, 
262 

Patterson, Christine 147, 201 
Patterson, Stephen 201, 312 
Patton, Laura 177, 303, 391 
Patton, Marc 177, 261, 359 
Patton, Sarah 33, 91, 127, 147, 254, 
269, 277, 392 
Pavlow, Christina 201, 261 
Pavlow, Sally 147, 273, 284, 285, 
354 

Pearman, Charlene 177, 322 
Pearman, Daniel 91, 147, 177, 292 
Peeler, Christoph 145, 273, 309 
Perry, Patricia 289 
Petersen, Daniel 324 
Petras, Christoph 201 
Petrillo, David 32, 147, 201, 261, 
326 

Petrillo, Nikki 270, 303. 307, 314, 
331, 352 

Phillips, Zachary 147, 201 
Pierce, Amber 147 
Pigg, Jesse 201, 289 
Pilger, Jason 147, 201 
Pingel, Melissa 289, 391 
Pinkley, Julie 147 
Planitz, Jerome 201 
Podnar, Nicole 148, 177 
Polach, Tracy 23, 58, 64, 91, 114 
Polivick, April 32, 33, 74, 91, 114, 
117, 261, 262, 287, 289, 304, 372 
Polivick, John 201, 312 
Pomeroy, Jamie 148, 177 
Ponder, Eric 41, 91 
Pool, Michael 177 
Poole, Janice 148, 177, 289 
Pope, John 287, 289 
Portell, Scott 83, 91, 274, 360 
Porter Jr., Robert 148, 202 

INDEX 395 


Powell, Brian 148, 202 

Powell, Craig 338, 340 

Prather, Terry 148, 177, 359 

Price, Brian 92, 252 

Price, Dixie 92, 317, 319 

Price, Travis 201 

Pritchard, Michaei 177, 359 

Proffitt, Christoph 92 

Proffitt, Robert 148, 270 

Prokopich, Nindy 146, 148 

Pryor, Rebecca 190, 202 

Pryor, Todd 92, 127, 274, 308, 392 

Pryor, Torey, 88, 92, 127, 392 

Puckett, Dicha 148, 202 

Puhse, Mia 273, 320, 352 

Pulley, Gilbert 202 

Purkaple, Elizabeth 202, 265 

Pyies, Stacy 148 


R 

Rainer, Amy 177, 261, 319, 322 
Rains, Stephen 148, 177, 324, 359 
Ralston, Sherry 177 
Ramey, David 178 
Ramirez, Marisa 93, 114, 117 
Ramsey, Kathieen 93, 265, 268 
Randaii, Michelle 93, 97, 247, 252, 
254, 261, 266, 277 
Rapoff, Beth 148, 162, 178, 261, 
272, 322, 364 
Rath, Stacy 202 
Ray, Jamie 202 
Ray, Keith 93 

Rayi, Justin 93, 148, 240, 251, 326, 
354 

Raynor, Nicole 202 
Rea, Anastosia 93, 148 
Reader, Kathleen 261, 287, 289, 
354 

Readan, Misty 148, 202, 322 
Rebstock, Kerri 264, 269 
Redstone, John 264 
Reed, Bryan 178, 326, 354 
Reed, Korey 178, 311 
Reed, Kristi 39, 87, 94, 254, 261, 
281, 295 

Rees, Tiatussa 94, 274, 364 
Reese, Rebecca 202, 289 
Reeves, Ryan 17, 26, 28, 94, 185, 
197, 274, 329, 337, 356, 392 
Reiter, Sheiia 148, 178, 252 
Repp, Ryan 331 
Reuter, Jeremy 178, 292 
Reveile, Shawn 148, 178 
Reyes, Christine 261, 262 
Reynoids, Christy 94, 148 
Reynolds, Lance 23, 148, 326, 354 
Ribbing, Katherine 148 
Ribbing, Robert 148, 277 
Ribbing, Wiiiiam 149, 178, 261, 331 
Ribley, Michael 258 
Rice, Becky 58, 94 
Rice, Christina 149, 178 
Rich, Patrick 17, 27, 31, 94, 185, 
197, 274, 307, 329, 337 

396 INDEX 


Richards, Andrew 178, 311, 345 
Richards, Dustin 185, 197, 202 
Richards, Erica 95 
Richardson, Jason 149, 178 
Richardson, Rachael 95, 249, 262, 
263 

Richardson, Sherry 202, 282 
Richey, Travis 88, 95, 101, 258 
Richter Jr., Norman 202 
Rickert, John 149, 309 
Ridenour, Jeffrey 149, 202, 312 
Ridings, Stephen 149 
Rieger, Stacey 178, 264, 268 
Rieser, Jimmy 202 
Rieser, Joseph 178 



7 


Riggs, Jamie 149 
Riggs, Tracy 149, 281 
Rippee, Kimberly 149, 289 
Rippee, Tammy 202, 266, 289 
Rippy, Charles 149, 202 
Roan, Paul 178 

Robertson, Raymond 52, 95, 114, 
274, 329, 331, 334, 338, 356 
Robertson, Ryan 202, 261, 332 
Robinson, Kimberly 149, 202 
Roderick, Joei 149, 324 



8 


Rodgers, Monica 95 
Rodriguez, Joseph 33, 95, 149, 247 
Roe, Micah 149, 187 
Roeder, Bridget 178 
Roethemeyer, George 178 
Rogers, Amber 97, 149, 240, 251, 
252, 254, 266, 277 
Roitzsch, Christine 73, 252 
Rongey, Michael 14, 97, 149, 232 
Rosales, David 292 
Ross, Katherine 149, 178 
Ross, Renee 178 
Rost, Norman 179 
Rotter, Erin 33, 149, 261, 270, 304 
Roulanaitis, Jason 149, 309, 354 
Ruder, Jennifer 149, 247, 261, 267, 


277 

Ruder, Matthew 202, 324 
Rudy, Jennifer 179, 303 
Rudy, Lisa 97 
Rumpf, Jason 179 
Rushing, Dennis 179 
Russell, Amy 20, 27, 34, 57, 97, 114, 
117, 245, 284, 285, 397 
Rutledge, Kenneth 202, 312 
Rutter, Jason 202 
Ryan, Angela 175 
Ryder, Brandy 179 
Ryder, Jennifer 179 
Ryterski, Carolyn 179, 252, 261, 319 

S 

SacckettI, Michael 179 
Saebens, Rachel 202, 266, 289 
Saggio, Robert 14, 68, 97 
Sammons, Melissa 179, 243, 261, 
314, 319, 354, 372 
Sanders, Heather 33, 179, 270 
Sanders, Michelle 202 
Sansoucie, Christine 150 
Sansoucie, Rebecca 179, 282 
Sbabo, Erica 202, 262 
Scarbrough, Patricia 202 
Scarsdale, Matthew 97 
Scaturro, Beth 34, 97, 98, 150, 152, 
Scaturro, Christina 74, 245, 285 
Scaturro, Cynthia 150, 179, 364 
Schaefer, Eiizabeth 179 281, 362 
Schannot, Jason 179, 266 
Schannot, Laura 202, 289 
Schatz, Teri 202, 261 
Schaus, Jason 324 
Schaus, Michelie 150, 292, 295 
Schaus, Scott 150, 202, 292 
Schaus, Stephen 247, 261, 267, 277 
Scheerer, Jennifer 33, 179, 391 
Scheffer, Patrick 179, 345 
Schellingberg, Paulette 97 
Schildman, Vincent 150, 267, 289 
Schmedake, Joseph 261 
Schmedake, Kathryn 179, 247, 252, 
264 

Schmid, Scott 97, 150 
Schmidt, Cheryi 270, 372 
Schmidt, Jason 202 
Schmidt, Shurie 179 
Schmidt, Tammy 180 
Schnefke, Katherine 292 
Schnefke, Kimberiy 97, 292, 295 
Schoneman, Michelle 180 
Schrader, Daniel 180 
Schreiber, Gregory 97 
Schroeder, Lorie 97, 98 
Schubert, Robin 202 
Schueren, Traci 98 
Schuette, Mark 150, 202, 332 
Schuler, Gretchen 261, 262, 269, 
273, 297, 303 
Schultz, Patricia 180 
Schuman, Diana 98 
Schuman, Leah 12, 13, 17, 23, 24, 
26, 27, 91, 98, 103, 117, 114, 127, 
245, 254, 262, 274, 277, 297, 303, 


370 

Schutzenhofer, Cathrine 180, 182 
Schwab, Rebecca 180, 247, 261, 
264, 287, 289, 372 
Schwager, Jennifer 203, 261 
Scott, James 85, 93, 98 
Scott, Kathleen 180 
Scott, Melanie 98, 150 
Scott, Randall 338, 359 
Scronce, Paula 289 
Scrum, Jason 6, 98, 99, 114, 117, 
274, 332 

Sealey, Kimberly 150, 287, 289 
Seiz, Brian 273, 326, 354 
Seitz, Jeffrey 99, 150, 326, 354 
Selph, Ronald 150, 354 
Severs, Larry 203, 312 
Severs, Michelle 31, 180 
Shane, Laura 150 
Sharp, Jason 180 
Shaver, Rebecca 150, 203, 322 
Sheikh, Dean 87, 99, 101, 114, 117, 
324 

Sheikh, Shawn 180, 331 
Shelton, Ryan 203, 312 
Shemwell, Charles 177, 180 
Shemwell, Leigh 180 
Shepard, Randall 258 
Shickles, Matthew 150, 203 
Shipman, Derrick 127, 139 
Shipman, Dustin 180 
Shipp, Jamie 203 
Shoemaker, Whitney 150, 152 
Shrum, Michael 81, 99 
Shrum, Shawn 203 
Shubert Jr., Richard 99 
Sikes, Jason 180 
Siler, George 203 

Simon, Jennifer 150, 180, 262, 303, 
350 

Simon, Scott 345 
Simpson, Andrea 180, 289 
Simpson, Andrew 99, 258, 279 
Simpson, Christ! 180 
Simpson, Erik 203, 332 
Simpson, Jason 101 
Simpson, Melissa 150, 262, 263 
Simpson, Nicholas 200, 203 
Simpson, Sherry 101, 354 
Singleton, Melissa 150, 180 
Sitton, Kevin 98, 359 
Skalsky, Bradley 181 
Skirball, Alicia 32, 203, 304 
Slater, Alissa 181 

Slattery, Gerald 182, 194, 203, 204, 
346 

Sloan, Leroy 101 

Smick, Cari 151, 203, 289 

Smith, Brian 338 

Smith, Christy 181 

Smith, Daniel 181 

Smith, Dawn 297, 391 

Smith, Jason 151, 186, 199, 203, 312 

Smith, Jeffrey 273, 338, 340 

Smith, Kara 151 

Smith, Kerrie 151 

Smith, Kimberly 151 

Smith, Linette 101 


Smith, Lon 151, 203 
Smith, Roy 247 
Smith, Shannon 203 
Smith, Timothy 151 
Smith, William 151, 181 
Smithers, Matthew 23 
Smothers, James 181 
Snelson, Brandi 151 
Snyder, Claudia 181, 262, 297 
Snyder, William 203 
Solomon, Melanie 203 
Sorenson, Donna 267 
Sorenson, Gerald 203 
Soto, Patricia 101, 151, 240, 252, 
261, 265, 277 
Soto, Yolanda 151, 261 
Speer, Michael 157, 181, 311, 359 
Spiroff, Anastacia 181, 270, 391 
Sponsler, Nicky 203 
Sponsler, Rachel 101, 151 
Sprankle, Jennifer 160, 391 
Spratt, Chares 151, 181 
Spray Jr., Gary 101 



9 


Springer, Michelle 101 
Springs, Amy 181, 362 
Squires, Angela 101, 249 
Sronce, Paula 203 
St. Peters, Chad 98, 137, 151 
Stagner, Erik 140, 151 
Stallings, Amy 101 
Stallings, Jaclyn 203 
Stallings, Justin 101, 151, 254, 274, 
277, 326, 354 
Stanek, Faith 181 
Stanton, Erica 102 
Star, Dawn 151, 181 
Starko, Amy 289 
Starko, Jason 181 
Starr, William 102 
Stavely, Leslie 151, 261, 273, 364 
Stearns, Matthew 151, 155, 166, 
273, 329 

Stegall, Susan 102, 247, 252, 254, 
261 


Steiner, Christoph 102, 151, 240, 
261 

Stelzer, Melissa 289 
Stepanek, Jennifer 203 
Stepanek, Paul 181 
Stephens, Jeffrey 88, 102, 186, 199, 
274, 307, 329, 334, 337, 338, 340, 
356, 392 

Stephens, Jennifer 102, 249 
Stephens, Kristen 103, 252, 270 
Stephens, Melinda 152, 175, 181, 
245, 285, 350 
Stephens, Rebecca 261 
Stephens, Tim 181 
Stern Jason 203 
Steward, David 181 
Steward David C., 83, 103, 181 
Steward, Robin 103 
Stickles, Jason 152, 252 
Stieglitz, Michelle 289 
Stimac, Jennifer 203 
Stinson, Matthew 182 
Stitch, Emily 12, 13, 27, 47, 55, 57, 
103, 114, 117, 127, 243, 247, 261, 
262, 274, 277, 297, 303, 379, 398 
Stockton, Chad 247 
Stodnick, James 182 
Stone, Sarah 39, 103, 114, 117, 252, 
254, 261, 277, 292, 295 
Stordahi, Stephanie 182 
Stout, Charles 103 
Stovall, Jeremy 203 
Strader, Brandy 203 
Strader Jr., Larry 11, 17, 27, 104, 
127, 274, 307, 329, 337, 354, 392 
Stroder, Christoph 36, 88, 104, 240, 
251 

Stroder, John 182 
Strong, Daryn 34, 203, 312 
Strong, Derek 104, 152 
Stuart, Suzanne 152, 162, 177, 182, 
272 

Stull, Connie 104, 114, 117, 287, 289 
Sturdivant, Christoph 88, 104, 152, 
274, 324, 356 

Suh, Young Mi 104, 114, 117, 261 
Suh, Young Sim 182, 261 
Sullivan, Krista 105, 254, 292, 295 
Sumpter, Jerry 105 
Swalley, Tara 152, 262 
Swearengin, Harold 105 
Sykes, Barry 23, 152, 309 
Sykes, Karen 152, 273, 274, 317, 
320, 352 


T 

Taft, Steven 105 
Tague, Timothy 152 
Talley, Cindy 203 
Talley, Jan 105 
Talley, Jill 203, 262 
Tanksley, Christoph 203 
Tanner, Judy 17, 23, 105 
Tapp, Melissa 14, 39, 88, 106, 243, 
251, 254, 274, 320, 379 

INDEX 397 



Tarasovich, Michael 146, 152 
Tartt, Jason 146 

Tate, Nicole 106, 261, 262, 274, 303 
Taylor, Allison 106, 127, 152 
Taylor, David 152, 182, 326 
Taylor, Hollie 105 106, 152, 274, 
275, 307, 314, 364 
Tarylor, Jennifer 106 
Taylor, Jeramy 203 
Taylor, Melissa 106, 152, 261 
Taylor, Staci 98, 362 
Terrell, Daniel 17, 26, 52, 78, 107, 
114, 117, 261, 274, 329 
Terrell, Robert 17, 23, 28, 83, 104, 
107, 117, 114, 245, 254, 338, 354, 
366 

Terrell, Travis 129, 157, 182, 245, 
261, 360 

Tesreau, Mark 152 
Thebeau, Jason 182 
Thomas, Daniel 152 
Thomas, Jessica 203, 322 
Thomas, Robert 83, 107, 114, 226, 
274, 308, 312, 392 
Thomas, William 203, 312 
Thomas Jr., Richard 204 
Thompson, Amy 107 
Thompson, Debra 107 
Thompson, Michael 204, 346 
Thornsberry, Mark 152, 182, 331, 
354 

Thrane, Eric 182 
Tieman, Brian 152, 359 
Timko, Misty 24, 26, 34, 107, 114, 
117, 249, 262, 274, 287, 289, 297, 
303 

Tindall, Lorraine 108, 152 

Tinnon, John 23, 311 

Tipton, Gary 108, 309 

Toeniskoetter, Chad 153 

Townsend, James 182 

Townsend, Kimberly 182 

Townsend, Mandy 182 

Trigg, Casey 153, 391 

Tripp, Hobart 182 

Tripp, Scott 32, 153, 287, 289, 372 

Trotts, Tricia 153 

Trower, Lorrie 182 

Trtanj, Jennifer 153, 204, 379 

Tubbs, Douglas 12, 13 

Tucker, Charlene 108 

Tullock, Shon 204 

Turck, Jennifer 182, 261 

Turck, Sarah 204 

Turner, Bradley 183 

Turner, Douglas 98, 108, 153 

V 

Valbert, Jennifer 108, 252, 254, 261, 
267, 269, 277 

Valencia, Andrea 183, 185 
Valencia, Malanie 204 
Vallo, Eric 153, 204 
Vanbuskirk, William 129, 153, 245, 
273, 309, 359 

398 INDEX 


Vance, Jamie 204 
Vance, Michael 108 
Vanesler, Michael 153, 183 
Varble, Darin 109 
Varner, Melissia 204 
Vaughn, Amanda 204 
Vaughn, Jamie 153 
Vaughn, Kristine 109 
Vaughn, Michael 12, 13, 153, 155, 
273, 307, 311 
Vaughn, Steven 153 
Venable, Joann 204 
Vickery, Monte 153 
Viessman, Robert 153, 346 
Villareal, Cristal 183, 289 
Villier, Ray 204 
Vincent, Harold 153 
Vincent, Robert 183, 331, 359 
Vivod, Christine 153, 262, 263 
Vivod, Harry 153 
Voss, Pamela 153 
Votoupal, Chris 154, 273, 329, 354 
Votoupal, Heather 204, 265, 289 
Votoupal, Jolene 204 


W 

Wachter, Kimberly 177, 183, 391 
Wachter, Susan 126, 154, 262, 285 
Waggoner, Sheri 204 
Wagner, Jodi 154 
Wakeford, Krystal 109, 282 
Wakeford Jr., Kenneth 204 
Walker, Barla 109 
Walker, Charles 204 
Walker, Rebecca 154 
Walker, Tara 109, 289 
Wallce, Lachanda 154 
Wallace, Robert 204 
Wallace, Stacie 204 
Wallace, Tina 204 
Waller, Thomas 62, 92 
Wallis, Corey 204, 312, 332 
Walters, Sara 154, 264 
Walts, Abraham 183 
Warchol, Jason 157, 183, 261 
Ware, Dawn 183 
Ware, Tonya 109 
Warren Christoph 183, 311, 354 
Waterman, Thuy 154 
Waters, Jeremy 256 
Watkins, Hilary 154, 262 
Watkins, Steven 154 
Weaver, Jeremy 154, 354 
Weaver, Nathan 154 
Webb, Joanna 204, 270, 314 
Webb, Patricia 110, 292 
Webb, Robert 204, 332 
Weber, Michael 110 
Webster, Amy 204 
Weckman, Channa 204 
Weckman, Greg 32, 33, 204, 261, 
265 

Weeks, Sonnet 27, 28, 31, 70, 110, 
114, 117, 245, 285, 356 
Weinkein, Michael 110, 154, 309 
Welborn, Brian 34 
Weller, Jerry 70 


Weller, Scott 183 
Wells, Jennifer 204 
Welser, Bryan 154, 183, 247, 252, 
261, 292 

Werths, Sarah 154, 261, 277 
Wesbrook, Damon 204 
West, Lisa 204 
Westbrook, Amanda 183 
Westbrook, Vanessa 154 
Whaley, Deana 154, 261, 262, 303 
Wheatley, Christie 204 
Wheatley, Erika 140, 154, 162, 175, 
184, 285 

Wheeler, Jennifer 154, 261, 273, 
292, 295, 317, 319, 362 
Wheeler, Jodie 204 
White Angela E., 184 
White Angela M., 204 
White, Jason 204 
White, Larry 309 
White, Richard 154 
White, Sheila 204 
White, Susan 155 
White, Teresa 184 
White, Timothy 12, 13, 17, 27, 39, 
48, 52, 87, 101, 110, 225, 254, 



10 


261, 274, 354, 392 
White, Trula 204 
Whitehead, Christoph 205 
Whitehead, Keri 205 
Whiteside, Richard 184, 264 
Whitford, Amy 184 
Whitford, Jamie 184 
Whitford, MaryJo 205 
Whitmer, Allison 110, 265, 287, 289, 
295 

Whitsell, Sarah 205 
Whyeis, Rick 98 
Wielgus Jr., Michael 205 
Wienhoff, Julia 205 
Wienhoff, Stephanie 111, 114, 117 
270 

Wiesehan Jr., David 184 
Wiggins, Robert 155, 184 
Wilbur, Shelly 261, 262, 303 
Wilkerson, George 205 
Wilkinson, Dustin 32, 33, 184, 304, 
372 

Wilkinson, Eric 12, 13, 111, 114, 117, 


155 

Willaredt, Alan 345, 359 
Willaredt, Angela 162, 184 
Willaredt, Mark 184 
Williams, Carla 111 
Williams, Danlele 155, 184 
Williams, Mary 155, 184, 282 
Williams, Stacie 111, 277, 282 
Williamson, Sean 184 
Wilis, Ellen 184, 262 
Wilson, David 111, 240, 245 
Wilson, Dawn 205 
Wilson, Richard 184 
Wilson, Robert 184, 309, 311, 359 
Wilson, Scott 62, 111, 345 
Winfield, Jennifer 112, 127, 274, 
326, 354 

Winfield, Mark 205, 332 
Wingerter, Julie 112 
Winnie, Donald 112 
Winnie, Kathy 155, 184 
Winters, Tiffany 273, 352 
Wise, David 205 
Wisnasky, Audrey 155, 264, 281 
Withers, Angela 11, 23, 39, 112, 
127, 155, 243, 262, 379, 386 
Witter, Amanda 262, 264, 364 
Witter, Jeffery 205, 332, 346 
Wittkamp, Robert 155, 185 
Woehrl, Melissa 287, 289 
Wofford Jr., Charles 112 
Wojtowicz, Jennifer 205 
Wolf, Brandy 205 
Wolf, Damon 185, 311 
Wolf, Tanya 205 
Wolfe, Derek 185 
Wolfe, Jeffrey 155, 185 
Wolfe, Nicole 297, 352 
Wolfe, Scott 23, 81, 112, 309 
Wolfe, Shannon 205 
Womack, Sonya 155 
Wood, Amy 33, 185 
Wood Jr., Michael 205 
Woods, Crystal 185 
Woodward, Stacie 155, 185 
Worley, Laura 155 
Worley, Rebecca 155 


Wortham, Jennifer 155, 261, 270, 
317, 319, 320, 362, 391 
Worthen, Angela 113, 289 
Wothen, Shawn 185 
Wozniak, Chad 205, 245, 332 
Wright, Amy 205 
Wright, Christina 185, 289 
Wright, Julie 205 

Wright, Larry 98, 113, 114, 117, 214, 
329, 398 

Wyatt, Jeremy 34, 205, 312 
Wyatt, Tara 185, 261, 314 


Y 

Yarber, Jason 34, 205 
Yates, Adriane 205, 245 
Yates, Brenda 155, 289 
Yates, Damon 12, 13, 155, 273, 307, 
309, 354 

Yates, Leslie 155, 289 
Yates, Matthew 155 
Yehling, Mary 76, 113, 354, 388 
Yobby, Kirsten 98, 185, 362 
Yobby, Terrence 155 
Yokley, Christoph 205 
York, Bridgette 113 
York, Kimberly 205, 265 
Youchoff, Charles 113 
Young, Denny 155 
Young, Melissa 205, 262, 289 
Young Jr., Randall 155 
Younger, Stephanie 205 
Yurko, Anthony 185 

Z 

Zaruba, Jeremy 185, 287, 289 
Ziegler, Vicky 205 
Zelenka, Nicole 205, 225, 261, 314 
Zellerman, Joseph 205 
Zimmerman, Jacob 312 
Zimmerman, Josh 312 
Zingrich, Stacy 205 
Zobrist, Shane 205, 256 


1. Jeanine McMillan, Jenny Ba> 
ker, Lynn Yehling, and Julie Go- 
clan participated in the IHSA 
Sectional Swimming/Diving 
Championship. Jenny took first 
place in the diving competition 
in the sectional meets. 2. Row 1: 
Jennifer Sprankle, Jennifer 
Wortham, Kim Wachter, Dawn 
Smith, Christina Cuvar, Shannon 
Marcum, Shelle Goodman, April 
Madison, Jennifer Kelley Row 2: 
Tim Knowland, Jennifer Heater, 
Jennifer Scheerer, Don Legens, 
Stacie Spiroff, Julie Merz, Angie 
Kovac, Carrie McKinney Row 3: 
Craig Tanksley, Brent Golden, 
Mary Hamilton, Angela Hucks, 
Laura Patton, Melissa Pingel, Ca- 
sey Trigg, Kelly Ollis. 3. Torey 
Pryor measures Sarah Patton for 
a cap. 4. The cheerleaders at the 
student/faculty basketball 
game were Todd Pryor, Jeff Ste- 
phens, Larry Strader, Brad 
O’Neil, Bob Thomas, Matt Loftus, 
Ryan Reeves, and Tim White. 5. 
Addle Lenzi gets a little rest dur- 
ing Mr. Lubak’s lunch/study. 6. 
Detective Nedwin Tapp and Lt. 
Dennis Chenault are the officers 
on duty during the Christmas 
dance held in our cafeteria. 7. 
The basketball cheerleaders. 8. 
Kevin Greene from the Los An- 
geles Rams signs an autograph 
for Ericka Handy. 9. Pom mer- 
maids Melissa Hasse, Amy Nie- 
pert, Candi Kessler, Angela Bia- 
son, Cari Crawford, and Amy 
Russell. 10. Brittany Franko. 11. 


INDEX 399 




3 


1. Larry Wright, Amey Bohnenstiehl, Julia 
Boyer, and Dan Brazee say, "Yeh, school is 
out!" 2. Mr. Jim Harsh's chemistry class say, 
"See you next year." 3. Emily (Elrod] Stitch 
and Carrie (Einstein] Owen say, "See you." 



2 


400 GOOD-BYE