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feenbelt 

1km Iktim 


AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 


VodtiTae 31, Number 33 


GREENBELT, MARYLAND 


P.G. Police Operations Eased 
Electronic Improvements 


The Central Communications Center of the Prince Geor¬ 
ges County Police Department, considered by many to be one 
of the most intricate and sophisticated communications opera¬ 
tions on the East Coast, became operational in November, 1967. 
While it is still not completed to final plans specifications, the 
improvement and smoothness of operation over the old system 
is almost phenomenal, according to county officials. 

In a plain, oblong red brick building in Seat Pleasant, a 
handful of men daily perform electronic tricks for the protec¬ 
tion of the citizens in the 486 square miles of Prince Georges 
County. 


Seated at the multi-paneled U- 
shaped control board, they push 
buttons, answer telephones and 
talk softly into mini-microphones. 
In the subdued lighting of the 
room, the translucent light-point¬ 
ed map in front of each man star¬ 
kly shines out. 

Prior to November, dispatchers 
were literally becoming gray¬ 
haired old men overnight in trying 
to get messages through to vehi¬ 
cles on the overcrowded radio 
waves and through the crossed ov¬ 
er maze of telephone lines. 

Faced with the problem of a 
growing department in a burgeon¬ 
ing County and its myriad com¬ 
munications problems, the Police 
Department was able to obtain two 
additional police radio frequencies 
from the Federal Communications 
Commission. 

With the four radio channels 
now assigned them, the Police, 


Meeting for Participants 
In Labor Day Festival 

Every organization taking part 
in the Greenbelt Labor Day Festi¬ 
val should be represented at the 
meeting to be held on Tuesday, 
July 9, at 8 p.m. at the G.H.L 
Hospitality Room. The general 
purpose of this meeting will be to 
coordinate all activities and set up 
schedules for the four-day period 
in which the Festival will be held. 

The gala Parade will be held on 
Monday, September 2, and will 
start at 10 a.m. promptly. Those 
interested in participating in the 
Parade must contact Chief H. John 
Crisman of the Greenbelt Fire De¬ 
partment (P. O. Box 35) before 
August 15. Parade line-up will be¬ 
gin on Ridge Rd. near North End 


School, between Laurel Hill and 

- - a ofcKtfeuon, divi¬ 

ded the County into a Northern Organizations wishing to parti 

and Southern district, using Cen- ci P ate in any other aspect of the 


tral Avenue as the dividing line 
and allocating one channel to each 
district. Another channel was al¬ 
located to the use of the detective 
bureau, the town police and Coun¬ 
ty departments. The fourth chan¬ 
nel is reserved for County-wide 
emergencies. 

24-Hour Operation 

Central Communications oper¬ 
ates naturally on a continuous ba¬ 
sis and is manned by a supervisor 
and six radio dispatchers on each 
of three shifts. Two dispatchers 
are assigned to each of the three 
control panels and are completely 
responsible for the control of the 
vehicles and communications in 
their sector. A large translucent 
map in front of the dispatcher lets 
him know’’ at a glance where each 
car is and which cars are in ser¬ 
vice. When a car is dispatched to 
a particular location or is sent on 
assignment, the dispatcher takes 
an IBM card from the rack beside 
him, time-stamps the time of as¬ 
signment and transfers it to the 
action hie. On completion of his 
assignment the patrol officer re¬ 
ports back and and the dispatcher 
then reverses his actions. 

Library Card 
Use Extended 

Effective on July 1, the possessor 
of a library card issued anywhere 
in the state may borrow books 
and other materials from any pub¬ 
lic library system in Maryland. 

The new service will give library 
borrowers an opportunity to be¬ 
come acquainted with many of the 
specialized collections developed by 
various public libraries in the 
state, such as Edgar Allen Poe 
Room and Collection (for reference 
use only) the H. L. Mencken Room 
and its reference collection, and 
the Maryland Room, with histori¬ 
cal materials for circulation, at 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library in 
Baltimore. 

A brochure on the reciprocal 
borrowing and the enlarged inter- 
library loan program, listing the 
addresses and telephone numbers 
of the public libraries in Mary¬ 
land’s 23 counties and Baltimore 
City, will be available at a T l pub¬ 
lic libraries soon. 


Festival activities must submit 
their intentions in writing to the 
Festival Commitee, P. O. Box 2, 


County Surtax Increases 
From 20 to 45 Percent 

The increase in the present 
County surtax on the State income 
tax from 20 to 45 percent — was 
made necessary by the adoption 
of a 1968-69 Prince Georges budget 
of $176.3 million last week. At the 
same time, the county commission¬ 
ers reduced the real estate proper¬ 
ty tax from $2.90 per $100 assessed 
valuation to $2.88. 

The $176.3 million budget repre¬ 
sented a drop of $1 million from 
that originally proposed. Most of 
the cut came from the Board of 
Education portion, which accounts 
for about 71 percent of the total 
budget. Included in the cuts was 
$400,000 in grants to the Commun¬ 
ity College and the remainder in 
construction monies for schools be¬ 
hind schedule. 

The commissioners also voted to 
increase the recording tax on deeds 
from $1.10 to $1.65 per $500 sale 
price on real estate. 


SWIM TEAM NEWS 

The opening meet of tile Crecn- 
belt Swim Team will be at Rock 
Creek this Saturday, July 6. Swim¬ 
mers and officials should be at 
the Greenbelt pool at 8 a.m. 

Taking first places in last Satur¬ 
day’s practice meet at Cheverly 
were B. McCallon. A. MeCallon, B. 
Klukowski, C. Donnelly and O. 
Penney. Second places went to B. 
Klukowski (2), K. Shock (3), O, 
Penney. (3), E. Donnelly, P. Don¬ 
nelly and R. Smith. 

During the coming weeks Green¬ 
belt will meet: Rock Creek (away) 
on July 6, Bethes^a-Chevy Chase 
“Y” (away) on July 13, Oxon 
Hill (away) on July 20, Burn Brae 
(home) on July 27, Takoma Park 
(home) on August 3, Division Fin¬ 
als (Rock Creek) on August 10, 
Cheverly Relays (Cheverly) Au¬ 
gust 17, All Stars on August 24 
and Novice Meet (Adelphi) on Au¬ 
gust 31. All meets begin at 9 a.m. 
with swimmers expected to be pre¬ 
sent by 8:30. 


Thursday, July 4, 1968 


AGENDA 

REGULAR MEETING OF 
CITY COUNCIL 

Monday, July 8, 1968 

I ORGANIZATION 

1 Call to Order 

2 Roll call 

3 Lord's Prayer 

Pledge of Allegiance to 
the Flag 

4 Minutes of Regular Meet¬ 
ing 6/10/68 

5 Additions to the Agenda 
by Councilmen and Mana¬ 
ger 

EL. COMMUNICATIONS 

6 Bid Opening - Air Com¬ 
pressor 

7 Petitions and Requests 

8 Administrative Reports 

9 Committee Reports - A.P. 
B. Report 77 - GHI Town- 
houses 

III. OLD BUSINESS 

10 Resolution to Accept Por¬ 
tions of Springhill Lane 
and Breezewood Drive in¬ 
to City Road System 
(Permit #126) (2nd read¬ 
ing) 

11 Resolution to Accept Por¬ 
tions of Gentry Drive into 
City Road System (Per¬ 
mit #127) (2nd reading) 

12 Appointments to Boards 

13 Perimeter Road 

14 CommerciaU Zoning - Ja 

ger Tract 

15 Youth Activities Recom¬ 
mendations 

16 Motion to draft ordinance 

permitting the consump¬ 
tion of beer at Greenbelt 
lake park 

(tabled from 6/10/68 meet¬ 
ing) 

17 Approval of Purchase - 
Radar Equipment 

18 Request for gas lights at 
Boxwood Village entrance 

Court Rules in Favor 
Of GHI Corporation 

The initial phase of the Green¬ 
belt Homes, Inc.- James Smith (4- 
H Southway) court case, in which 
Smith’s lawyers filed a counter¬ 
claim seeking the title to Smith’s 
house, was decided by Judge Ro¬ 
bert B, Mathias in favor of GHI. 

According to GHI manager, Roy 
Breashears, in the opinion of the 
judge, “GHI’s mutual ownership 
contract is not a land installment 
contract so that Smith could never 
get the deed.” 

The case involving the injunction 
GHI is seeking against Smith, for 
removal of his automobile from 
his yard, is scheduled for trial 
in the fall. 

WEATHER CENTER 
HOLDSOPEN HOUSE 

On Friday, July 12, from 9 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. there will be an open 
house at the world Weather Cen¬ 
ter in Suitland, Md. The Washing¬ 
ton World Weather Center is the 
largest weather computing com¬ 
plex in the world. 

The tour includes visits to the 
Washington Weather Bureau Fore¬ 
cast Center; the National Meteor¬ 
ological Center, where giant com¬ 
puters forecast for the nation and 
the hemisphere; the National En¬ 
vironmental Satellite Center to see 
weather photographs being receiv¬ 
ed from ESS A spacecraft; and the 
Spaceflight Meteorology Group. 

The World Weather Center is 
located in Federal Office Building 
Number 4, Suitland, near the inter¬ 
section of Suitland Road and Sil¬ 
ver Hill Road. 


Fireworks and Concert Will 

Mark Fourth of July Here 

Greenbelt’s Fourth of July festivities will feature the 
Greenbelt Concert Band at Greenbelt Lake on Thursday night 
at 7:30 p.m. and a fireworks display which will start at dark 
on the south shore. The best view can be had from the north 
shore where the usual large crowd is expected. 

~ The display, costing about $1,500, 


WHAT GOES ON 

Sat., July 6-8 a.m. Swim Team 
gathers at pool for transpor¬ 
tation to meet. 

2 pun. Slow-Pitch Champion¬ 
ship Game, Braden Field. 

8 pun. Choral Group, “Sing- 
Out-Baltimore” Lake-Park. 

Mon., July 8 - 7:30 pun, Green¬ 
belt and Rockville Concert 
Bands, Lake Park. 

8 pjm. City Council Meeting, 
Municipal Building. 

Tues., July 9, 8 pun* Labor Day 
Festival - Committee Meet¬ 
ing, GHI Hospitality Room, 
Hamilton PL 


City Notes 

All members of the Greenbelt 
City Council, the City Manager, 
and his Administrative Assistant 
attended the annual conference of 
the Maryland Municipal League, 
held on June 23-25 at Ocean City. 
Topics discussed were gun control 
legislation, the conducting of city 
council sessions, procedures in se¬ 
curing federal grants for urban 
renewal, new laws concerning po¬ 
lice aid and training requirements, 
audio-visual training devices for 
police departments and labor-un- 
ion relations for municipal work¬ 
ers. The conference sent back to 
committee for further study pro¬ 
posed changes in the State consti¬ 
tution. 

* * * 

On June 27 two planning officers 
from Vietnam, one from Brazil, 

and one from Korea met with City 
Manager James K. Giese for in¬ 
struction in municipal finance. 
Giese found them more interested 

in - ML 

organization and structure, than 
in purely fiscal matters. 

* * * 

Although the final accounting of 
the fiscal year just completed will 
not be available until fall, Giese 
predicts that the city of Greenbelt 
may “probably realize a greater 

budget surplus than previously es¬ 
timated.” This assessment follows 
the receipt last week of estimated 
income tax money from the State’s 
allocation. This amount was $12,000 
over the budget estimate, 

* * * 

The recent heavy rains have 
made extra work for the Public 
Works Dept.: frequent cleaning of 
catch basins of washed down sand 
and leaves that clog them, causing 
flooding of the streets; replace¬ 
ment of dirt for the playing sur¬ 
faces of Braden Field (hauled 
from the rear of the firehouse); 
and improvement of the drainage 
area near the band stand at the 
Lake Park. 

The city crew has also installed 
playground apparatus and park 
benches at various locations, set 
up a chemical toilet at the North 
End playground at the top of 
Ridge Rd., repaired two cinder 
block experimental trash enclos¬ 
ures, sealed joints in the swimming 
pool deck with a special rubber 
mixture, and sprayed for poison 
ivy and poison oak at various lo¬ 
cations throughout the city. 

# * * 

Throughout the summer therp 
will be a park attendant on duty 
at the Lake Park every day of 
the week. He will operate from a 
truck or tractor and will be re¬ 
sponsible for keeping the park 
clean. He will also enforce park 
regulations. 

A new janitor, John W. Lawless, 
has been hired for the Municipal 
Building and the Youth Center. 

* * * 

At the firehouse they completed 
the final subgrading for the new 
parking lot and also repaired an 
under-drain to carry off spring 
water. The contract to pave the 
parking lot was let at a recent 
city council meeting to the A. H. 
Smith Co. for $1,794. The work is 
expected to be performed soon. 

As of last week four summer 
crew members have been added to 
the Public Works Dept. Five more 
young men will be hired later. 


will include the traditional Ameri¬ 
can flag, as well as a Double 
Wheel, Saxon Square, Niagara 
Falls, Airplane and Battleship, 
Travelling Rats, Donkey Finale, 
and others. They will be supplied 
by the Zambelli Fireworks Com¬ 
pany which furnishes the fire¬ 
works at the Washington Monu¬ 
ment. 

Extra policemen will be station¬ 
ed at the lake to direct traffic and 
patrol the crowd. City Manager 
James Giese reminds the public 
that alcoholic beverages are pro¬ 
hibited, as is the use of fireworks 
by spectators. 

A limited number of parking 
spaces will be available on Cres¬ 
cent Road, in Boxwood Village, 
and at the small lakeside parking 
lot. Giese recommends, however, 
that residents walk to the lake 
if they can, to avoid the traditional 
traffic. 

In the event of rain, the fire¬ 
works will be postponed from day 
to day, and will be shown on the 
first day that the weather permits. 

Athletic events scheduled for the 
Fourth included horseshoe and 
ping-pong tournaments. The horse¬ 
shoe men’s singles (16 years and 
older) will start at 10 a.m. at the 
Braden Field pits (registration at 
the Youth Center at 9:30 a.m.). 
The ping pong tournament for 
teens will start at 1 p.m. at the 
Youth Center. 

Saturday Events 

On Saturday, July 6 at 2 p.m. at 
Braden Field, the finals of the 
Men’s Slow Pitch Softball Tourna¬ 
ment will be played. Greenbelt’s 
“Brass Lanterns” will be compe¬ 
ting against the Clancy’s for the 
Championship. A record-breaking 
200 spectators turned out for the 
games last weekend. 

A bright new teenage glee club 
called “Sing-Out-Baltimore” will 
sing folk and contemporary songs 
at the Lake-Park bandstand on Sa¬ 
turday, July 6 at 8 p.m. 


FOURTH OF JULY EVENTS 

10 a.m. Horseshoe Tournament, 
Braden Field Pits (sign up at 
9:30 at the Youth Center). 

1 pjn. Ping Pong Tournament, 
Youth Center. 

7:30 pun. Band Concert, Green¬ 
belt Lake Park. 

Dark Fireworks Display. 


Register to Vote 

To have “every eligible voter a 
registered voter” is the goal of 
VOTER (Volunteers Organized To 
Encourage Registration). 

And to accomplish this goal VO¬ 
TER registration booths have been 
set up at six of Prince Georges 
County’s shopping centers. For the 
convenience of the County’s citi¬ 
zens, the booths are located at 
Iverson Mall, Capital Plaza, Prince 
Georges Plaza, Belair Shopping 
Center, Calverton Shopping Center 
and the Laurel Shopping Center. 
These locations will be in operation 
through August 10, on Thursdays 
and Fridays from 4 until 9 p.m 
and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. ins¬ 
til 6 p.m. 

Registration will also be held at 
the Courthouse in Upper Marl¬ 
boro now through August 12 and 
September 21 through October 7th, 
Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. 
until 9 p.m. The State primary 
election will be held on Tuesday, 
September 10, and the General 
Election will be on Tuesday, No¬ 
vember 5. 

The final registration date before 
the Primary election is Monday, 
August 12. Registration books will 
reopen on September 21, and the 
final registration before the Gener¬ 
al election is October 7. No 
change in party affiliation can be 
made until after November 21. 

Citizens who have registered 
once are eligible for all elections, 
provided they have voted at least 
once in the five-year period pre¬ 
ceding each election. Changes in 
address or name must be reported. 











Page 2 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Thursday, July 4, 1968 


. GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 

an I.N'UEI'EN’DENT newspaper 
Cditor i Mary Smith. 474-6314 
STAFF 

Sandra Barnes, Virginia Beauchamp, Judy Craine, Rita Fisher, Vic Fishei, 
Judy Goldstein, Bess Halperin, Bernice Kastner, Sid Kastner, Martha 
Rauf man, Charles T, McDonald, Virginia Moryadas, Joan Okin, Pauline 
Pritzker A1 Skolnik, Elaine Skolnik, Audrey Stern, David P. Stern 
Dorothy Sucher, Mary Louise Williamson. liiiKinexx Maniigeri Adele Mund. 

Manageri Delores Downs, 474-4653, and Mrs. Rena Friedman, 
474-5218 (Springhill Lake). 

I* ii l>l is lied every Thursday hy Greenhelt Cooperative Publishing Aon., Inc. 
T> ^ a . , . BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

r'res., a. Skolnik: Vice Pres., Virginia Beauchamp; Secy., Sid Kastner; 
nr iTT Treas., David Stern and Sandra Barnes. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS: $5.00 per year. Advertising and news articles 
may be mailed (Box 68, Greenbelt); deposited in our box at the Twin 
A**? S /?nL ce i de h v ^red to the editorial office in the basement of 15 Park- 

|**** 4-4131), open after 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Deadline is 9:30 p.m. 


Volume 31, Number 33 


Thursday, July 4, 1968 


Hello From Judy in Alaska 

If you have yet to visit the 49th state and wonder what it 
looks like, you may get some answers from Judy Holland of 13- 
8 Ridge Road. Judy, a resident of Greenbelt and employee of 
(Joddard for quite a few years has recently moved to College. 
Alaska. In a letter to her friends at Goddard, she described 
some of her experiences as follows: 


I arrived safely without too 
much incident. Seattle was cold 
and rainy and so was Fairbanks 
when I finally got here. People 
keep telling me it never rains in 
Alaska. Sure! Like last summer 
it never rained. The effects of 
the flood are still being felt; for 
instance, telephone lines that got 
wet and then froze. From the er¬ 
ratic behavior of the phones, they 
never unfroze. My particular tel¬ 
ephone has nervous hiccups. It 
gives short little rings and slides 
all over the desk, when I pick 
it up there’s never anyone there. 
Anyway, the weather is warm (too 
warm) and sunny now. I had to 
go out and buy some summer 
clothes. It’s hot here. There’s 
no air-conditioning in the building, 
of course. Right now, there’s a fan 
on the floor, keeping my ankles 
cool, but not the rest of me. The 
cord isn’t long enough for me to 
put it on a table, and I can’t find 
another one. 

The flight from Seattle to Fair¬ 
banks was very interesting. Not 
just for the Gold Rush theme they 
keep playing up. I think all Alas¬ 
kans read too much Robert W. 
Service. The usual safety instruc¬ 
tions in Alaskan Airlines are in, 
you should excuse the expression, 
“verse’. For example, “In your 
seat, please firmly sit and make 
sure your seat belts fit/ I not 
only had to listen to that leaving 
Seattle, but again when we left 
Anchorage. Bleah! 

My office is very colorful. The 
chairs are orange and the file cab¬ 
inets are blue and white. (But 
there aren’t enough of them — 
naturally). The people are very 
friendly and seem to be terribly 
afraid I don’t know what I’m in 
for when winter comes. I’ve been 
receiving all sorts of instructions 
on how to get to work (ski), how 
to keep my car going (just don’t 
turn the motor off — ever), how 
to keep warm (the thickest fur 
parka you can buy) and how to 
pass the cold winter evenings when 
you can’t go out (take a drinkL 

So (’ailed “Highways” 

The area around Fairbanks is 
very beautiful. The very high 
mountains are quite a way off. 
The immediate hills look very 
much like the ones in Virginia. I 
can see Mt. McKinley from my of¬ 
fice window. I’ve taken several 
drives in the surrounding country¬ 
side, on what are rather optimis¬ 
tically called “highways”. Alask¬ 
ans don’t waste their money on 
pavement. The Steese Highway is 
1 mile of gravel and 100 miles of 
dirt. On the way is the town of 
Fox. Again the overly optimistic 
use of a word. Fox consists of a 
general store, a bar, three houses 
and an apartment house that looks 
like a shoe box with windows. Last 
Saturday, on a drive along the Ne- 
nana Road, we had a flat tire, miles 
from nowhere. No jack of course, 
and we had to walk about a mile 
to somebody’s homestead to get 
help. And me in high heels. When 
people speak of the “unspoiled 
Alaskan countryside’, they mean 
houses without indoor plumbing, 
no agriculture at all, moose and 
caribou hogging the roads, and 
some of those roads little more 
than dog tracks. 

Alaskan Wildlife . . . 

The mosquitos here are not only 
numerous, but I understand there’s 
a special branch of taxidermy that 
specializes in stuffing them for 
museums. I have a running war 


with them. When I first arrived, 
somebody presented me with a 
beautifully wrapped package of 
mosquito repellant. I’ve been ad¬ 
vised never to walk anywhere with¬ 
out it 

I’ve also been up to see the Musk 
Oxen. Big deal! They look like 
haystacks with legs. I was taken 
up to the Institute of Arctic Biolo¬ 
gy one day last week. When I 
was asked if I would like to go I 
thought “Oh, goody! Here’s my 
chance to see some real Alaskan 
wildlife”. The first animal I saw 
was a kangaroo! 

I had a little trouble getting used 
to the long hours of daylight. It 
doesn't get dark until around 3 
in the morning. It seems funny to 
look at your watch at midnight 
and see the sun still shining bright¬ 
ly. Around the end of June, we go 
to 24 hours daylight. Oh, joy! 

. . . And About Judy Herself 

Judy, who has worked at Goddard 
Space Flight Center and whose 
furthest venture westward has so 
far been a steamboat trip down the 
Ohio river, will work during the 
next year at the Geophysical Insti¬ 
tute of the University of Alaska 
in College, a suburb of Fairbanks. 
She will be the secretary of Profes¬ 
sor Neil Davis, Assistant Director 
of the Institute, who is active in 
the research of the polar aurora, 
including an attempt (sponsored by 
NASA) to create a small artificial 
aurora by means of rocket-borne 
equipment. 

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Judy is 
a long-time resident of Greenbelt 
and member of the first graduating 
class of St. Hugh’s. She recalls 
the time when St. Hugh’s school 
was not yet ready and classes were 
held in the Greenbelt Theatre, as 
was the Sunday Morning Mass. She 
later graduated from the Notre 
Dame Academy in Washington. 
Many Greenbelters remember her 
from her appearances with the 
Greenbelt Players, including the 
central role of Romaine (the wife) 
in “Witness for the Prosecution,” 


Thomas C. Williams, age 89, died 
last week. A patient at the Green¬ 
belt Convelescent Center since last 
fall, he is survived by his daughter, 
Mrs. John P. Murray, 159 West¬ 
way, grandsons Dennis, Terry and 
Timmy, granddaughter, Mrs. Jo¬ 
ann Hite and two great-grandchil¬ 
dren. 


Successful Evening 

To the Editor: 

The June 7 G.C.S.-sponsored “In¬ 
ner City Projects” Benefit Concert 
at Grace Methodist Church proved 
to be a successful and entertaining 
evening. The proceeds, combined 
with the Christmas tree sale, will 
enable five persons to receive 
scholarships to the Co-op Institute. 

Chairman Ethel Rosenzweig 
wishes to express her thanks to all 
who made it possible: Frank Lewis 
and the NS A Gleemen, “The Para¬ 
phernalia”, “The Dominotes”, An¬ 
thony Madden, Carnie Harper, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Brown, Steve Bu¬ 
chanan. Sylvia Lewis, Ben Kosen- 
zweig, Yyetta Brehm, Margaret 
Scattergood, the Greenbelt Feder¬ 
al Credit Union, and especially to 
all who attended. 

W. Victor Smith 

Director, Member Relaf ons 

Rev. Ravenscroft Appointed 

Pastor of Methodist Church 

William E. Ravenscroft is the 
newly appointed pastor of Mowatt 
Memorial Methodist Church. He 
and his wife Catherine have taken 
up residence in the parsonage at 
2-A Northway Rd., Greenbelt. Wm. 
Ravenscroft graduated from Wes¬ 
tern Maryland College, Westmins¬ 
ter, Md. in 1961 and Boston Univer¬ 
sity School of Theology in 1965. He 
is currently in the last stages of 
nonresident graduate study on a 
Ph.D. degree at Boston University. 
Mr. Ravenscroft has been a full 
member of the Baltimore Annual 
Conference of the United Metho¬ 
dist Church since 1967 and has 
served churches in W.Va., Massa¬ 
chusetts and Vermont prior to 
coming here. 

Golden Age Club 

By Allen D. Morrison 

Recent new members of the Gol¬ 
den Age Club are George Grimes, 
Alice Davis, Edward Kaighn, John 
McWilliams, and Agnes Tezza. 

Visitors from Florida were Mr. 
& Mrs. Leo Mullen and Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Cherry. 

Hundreds of pounds of maga¬ 
zines have been contributed to the 
club by David J. O’Keefe, Bruce 
Bowman, Mary Evanosky, Martha 
Lev, Mrs. Tracy Burke, Walter 
Paris and Mrs. Rubin Berdansky. 
1600 ibs of magazines have re¬ 
cently oeen sold. 

At present 84 members are listed 
as going to Williamsburg. The 
closing date is July 3. Buses will 
leave neat the Post Office at 8:30 
a.m. or July 25. 

OUR 91st YEAR 

This Weeks Key Value 
Pl’stic Place Mats 18c ea 

Special Tufted 
Scatter Rugs 3.99 


20” Breeze 

Box Fan ■ only 15.88 

Ben Franklin 

In the Center 
Open 9-9 Mon.-Sat. 


GHI MEMBERS GHI MEMBERS 

DO YOU HAVE SUGGESTIONS ON GHI REGULATIONS? 

The Board of Directors is studying the Rules and Regulations of 
the Corporation; members who have suggested changes, additions or 
deletions are invited and urged tb submit them IN WRITING to the 
office of the Corporation by August 15. 1968. The Board will hold 
special meetings at which members may make oral presentations at a 
later date to be announced. 

Information on or copies of existing Regulations may be obtained 
by calling the GHI office, 474-5566. 


Joint Worship Services 
Will Start This Sunday 

Joint Summer Sunday worship 
services for the Greenbelt Com¬ 
munity Church and the Mowatt 
Memorial Methodist Church will 
commence this Sunday, July 7, at 
9:30 a.m. with the Sacrament of 
Holy Communion celebrated at the 
Methodist Church, 40 Ridge Rd., 
Greenbelt. The Rev. William E. 
Ravenscroft, newly appointed pas¬ 
tor of the Mowatt congregation, 
will conduct the service. 

Child-care for infants under 
three years of age will be provided 
at the Methodist Church, while 
Church School classes for 3 year 
olds through fourth graders will 
be held at the Community Church. 
The Church School teaching staff 
will include teachers from both 
church schools. 

Children of fifth grade and older 
are invited to attend worship ser¬ 
vices with their parents. 

During the month of July, servi¬ 
ces will be held at the Methodist 
Church at 9:30 a.m. each Sunday, 
and during August at the Com¬ 
munity Church, Preaching at the 
services will be done byMr. Rav¬ 
enscroft and Dr. Dale Stover, pas¬ 
tor of the Greenbelt Community 
Church. 


Spiritual Retreat 

A retreat for widows, divorced 
and separated women will be held 
July 12 to 14 at the Washington 
Retreat House, 4000 Harewood 
Road, N. E., Washington, D. C. It 
will be conducted by the Rev. 
Hugh J. Munro, S. M. M., an ex¬ 
perienced retreat master. The re¬ 
treat opens Friday with Mass at 
6:15 p.m. and concludes on Sun¬ 
day at 4 p.m. 

Please call Mrs. Haslinger at 
474-8171 for further information. 

Thanks 


To the many parents and child¬ 
ren who participated in my retire¬ 
ment party I would like to say that 
it was YOU who made the years of 
my kindergarten teaching reward¬ 
ing and fulfilling. Your tributes 
leave me with a warm and glowing 
feeling. 


uuuiuaii 


§ They say the poor have it 
H hard. 

t 

|jr Well - the hardest thing 
they have is US. 

i 

g 

S Courtesy St. Hugh’s 

ti 

ks St. Vincent de Paul Society 


& 




St. Hughs 
Catholic Church 

Sunday Masses 

8:00, 9:30, 11:00, 12:30 p.m. 

Confessions Saturday 

4-5:30 p.m. 7:30-9:00 p.m. 


High Point Senior Night 

On Senior night members of the 
graduating class of High Point 
Senior High School were presented 
awards with their friends and par¬ 
ents as guests. Following the pre¬ 
sentations, a reception was held in 
the school cafeteria. 

Vaclav Majer was awarded the 
Bausch and Lomb Science Award 
for outstanding competencies in 
Science. Ruth Amberg received 
from Mr. Satterlee the American 
Legion award for scholarship, lead¬ 
ership and honor. 

A Thespian Society Award was 
given to Pattie Seay. Mathematics 
team awards were presented to 
Vaclav Majer and Robert Cassels. 
Pat Seay received the Jerome 
Swartz Memorial Scholarship. 
William Bevan and John W. 
Maffay presented the Greenbelt 
Lions Club Scholarship to Ruth 
Amberg. Vaclav Majer received a 
scholarship from the mathematics 
department, University of Mary¬ 
land. Angie Lushine was given 
a certificate for outstanding ser¬ 
vice to the Senior Class. Phyllis 
Rosenzweig received a Senatorial 
Award. 

The following received Princi¬ 
pal’s Certificates: Vaclav Majer, 
Douglas Brisler, Ruth Amberg, 
Phyllis Rosenzweig, Ann Klukow- 
ski, Elissa Wiedow, Myra Herlich, 
Angie Lushine, and Barbara Geller. 

Ann Klukowski, Elissa Wiedow, 
and Laura Simonson won Music 
Festival Awards. 

Douglas Butler, 18 years old, of 
5-G Gardenway, received a $2,000.00 
Southland Scholarship Award for 
his scholastic achievement as a 
student at High Point High School. 

Greenbelt 
Nursery 
School, Inc. 

A non-profit cooperative 

is now accepting applica¬ 
tions for the 1968-69 
School Year 

• Professional Teaching Staff 

• Morning or afternoon sessions 

• Ages 3 to 5 

PHONE: 474-4904 
474-4906 

State Accredited 

Greenbelt Community 
Church 

(United Church of Christ) 

Hillside & Crescent Roads 
Dr. Dale A. Stover, Pastor 

Month of July - Joint Sunday 
Morning Worship Service to 
be held at the Mowatt 
Methodist Church 9:30 a.m. 

Child Care: (infant through 
3rd birthday) Methodist 
Church. 

Church School Classes: Com¬ 
munity Church 

3 year olds through grade 4 - 
9:30 a.m. 


MOWATT MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH 


THE REV. WM. E. RAVENSCROFT, PASTOR 

Church School ..... 9;jo a.m. 

Worship Service . 11:00 a.m. 

Classes for pre-schoolers and Nursery provided 
40 Rklge Rd. 474-9410 Pastor. 588-0568 


^ 9:45 a.m . Sunday School 6:00 p.m. ..._.-. Training Union > 

§ H:00 a.m. - Morning Worship 7:00 p.m. . Evening Worship ^ 

r Wednesday, 8:00 pan. Prayer Meeting ^ 

f GREENBELT BAPTIST CHURCH j 


) Crescent & Greenhill S. Jasper Morris, Jr., Pastor 474-4040 ^ 



HOLY CROSS LUTHERAN CHURCH* 


22 Ridge Road, Greenbelt, Maryland, GR 4-4477 

Edward H. Birner, Pastor. GR 4-9200 mJ)\ 

WORSHIP SERVICES 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Uffl) fjjfi 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m, W/j/J/jk 

WEEKDAY NURSERY T/‘ '/A 

K ' ^ 

i 









































Thursday, July 4, 1968 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Page 3 


CLASS IFIED 

$1.00 for a 10-word minimum, 5c 
for each additional word. Submit 
ads in writing, accompanied by 
cash payment, either to the News 
Review office at 15 Parkway before 
10 p.m. of the Tuesday preceding 
publication, or to the Twin Pines 
Savings and Loan office 

CALDWELL’S WASHER SERVICE 
All makes expertly repaired Au¬ 
thorized Whirlpool dealer. GR 4- 
5515. 103 Centerway. 

PIANO TUNING AND REPAIR. 
EXPERIENCED, RELIABLE, 474- 
6894. 

FOR SALE: - Hand Lawn Mowers, 
been sharpened and reconditioned 
- $8 ea. Hand lawn mowers shar¬ 
pened - $2.50. Call S. J. Rolph 
after 6 p.m. 474-4136. 


WANTED: - 

Old electric i 

trains, 

any condition. 

Call 

474-4136 

after 

6 p.m. 




APARTMENT 

744-6400. 

FOR 

RENT. 

Call 


GREENBELT CO-OP NURSERY 
SCHOOL has a part-time opening 
on its teaching staff for the af¬ 
ternoon session. Applicants with 
training in early childhood educa¬ 
tion may call 577-5424. 

LAWN CUTTING - GARDENING 
- Reasonable rates, call 345-7327. 

WANTED: - Domestic help for 
cleaning, some ironing - one or two 
days a week. Must have own 
transportation - 345-3592 after 7:30 
p.m. 

FOR SALE: - 2 pairs gold drapes 
84x200 inc. one new and one used 
6 months. Cal 345-7996 after 5 p.m. 

WANTED: - Ride to N.O.L. daily 
starting Aug. 5 - 8 a.m.-4:40 p.m. 
474-4969. 


WANTED: - Ride to and from 
Prince George’s County Health De¬ 
partment, Cheverly or vicinity. 
Weekdays 8 to 5. Call 474-4292. 

State Farm 
Insurance 
Ron 

Borgwardt 

Auto - Life - Homeowners 
10210 Baltimore Blvd. 
College Park, Md. 20740 
(on U. S. 1 at the Beltway) 

474-8400 


LOT - level wooded 70 x 119 oppo¬ 
site access road to lake. One hour 
from Greenbelt. Area fully devel¬ 
oped for family enjoyment. $1,600 
cash and assume balance of note 
at $40 per month. Call 464-8068 af¬ 
ter 7 p.m, 

SALE: - 3-BEDROOM FRAME. 
Remodelled kitchen, roofed patio, 
attic stairs, near school 474-1594. 

YOGA INSTRUCTION: - Small 
classes in postures and practices 
of Hatha Yoga. Telephone 474- 
2777. 


SALE: - Kenmore Automatic Wa¬ 
sher - like new - -100. Call 345- 
1785, 474-6911 after 5. 

PIANO INSTRUCTION - Conser- 
vatory Trained - beginners, ad¬ 
vanced - 345-9129. 



FURNITURE-NEW 

COST PLUS 10% 

BRAND NAMES 

GR 4-7720 GR 4-6258 

SALE: royal blue nylon plush car¬ 
pet (app. 8’xll’) and pad. $40.00. 
474-2890. 

WILL BABYSIT - 5 day week. 18 
yrs. old6 references. 474-3548. 

LOST: Greenbelt area. Cockateil; 
yellow crest, banded. Reward. 474- 
9463, evenings. 

HOUSEKEEPER WANTED: 5 day 
wk., child care, LHW $50 wk. Ref¬ 
erences. 345-9421. 


King’s Referral Service 

Home Repairs 

P.-T.-Men - Sink Enclosures 
- Attic Stairs - Tile - Paint 
Plaster - Appliances Irg & sm. 
AH exp. men - very reasonable 

474-7206 


•TATI UIB 



WIMAMI 

V, , 


Oun, 


Elaine Skolnik — 474-6060 

‘‘Break up the Pisano’s” has now 
become the watchword of the 
Greenbelt Duplicate Bridge Club. 
Ann and Tony won again last Fri¬ 
day night for the fifth time in a 
row. Providing close competition, 
however, just a point behind was 
the team of Sid Barnett and Jack 
Sanders, with Ed and Adelaide 
Kaighn in third place. Next game: 
Friday, July 12. 

Mrs. John Carroll, 28-B Crescent, 
is back home and getting along 
very nicely after undergoing open- 
heart surgery at NIH in Bethesda. 

The John W. Churchills are back 
in Greenbelt after spending a year 
at the University of Wisconsin, 
where Churchill received his doc¬ 
torate. He majored in recreation 
with a minor in urban and regional 
planning. 

Newlyweds Harold and Janet 
Pincus of Greenbelt spent their 
honeymoon at the Nevelle Country 
Club in Ellenville, New York. 

Aviation Support Equipment 
Technician Second Class Kevin J. 
Hildreth, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence R. Hildreth, 11-D South¬ 
way. is serving aboard the attack 
aircraft carrier USS America. His 
ship is operating in the Gulf of 
Tonkin. 

Naomi Baron, 19-M Ridge, re¬ 
ceived a Bachelor of Arts degree 
magna cum laude from Brandeis 
University. She was an English 
major and president of the Lingu¬ 
istics Club. Miss Baron received 
the Irving Shull Prize for excel¬ 
lence in the humanities and was el¬ 
ected to Phi Beta Kappa. She will 
study linguistics at Stanford Un¬ 
iversity in the fall. 

David Leslie Volk, 5-G Ridge, 
graduated from Antioch College. 
He received a B.A. in Biology. 

Norman Granims, Sam Schwim- 
er, Lester Millman, Hal Berman, 


SERTA BEDDING 
AT DISCOUNT PRICES 

KAY DEE 

474-7720 

474-6258 


SALE: - ’66 Barracuda, V8, auto, 
trans., pwr steering, air-cond. 
$1800 - 474-3555. 

WILL BABYSIT - 26 years old, 75c 
hour - no transportation - Brae 
Brooke Apts. 552-2961. 

SALE: - 2-B.R. end, many im¬ 
provements, large yard. 474-1067 
or 439-6484. 


CHILDCARE Mature dependable 
lady - in MY Home. 474-3738. 

FOR SALE - Story & Clark spinet 
piano, exc. cond. best offer. Hide-a¬ 
bed sofa, dehumidifier, 2 single 
beds. 474-6314. 


Harry Weiner and sons, Dave and 
Jerry, Harry Greenbaum and sons, 
Martin and Milton attended the 
14th Annual Jewish Layman’s In¬ 
stitute at Camp Comet in Waynes¬ 
boro, Pa. 

Our deepest sympathy to Mrs 
Teddy Murray, 159 Westway, who 
lost her dad, Thomas C. Williams. 

A Greenbelt family touring the 
Finger Lake region of New York 
state was looking for a supermar¬ 
ket in Ithaca the other day. After 
criss-crossing the town several 
times in a futile search, they gave 
up and headed out of town, deter¬ 
mined to patronize the first coun¬ 
try store they saw. But when they 
rounded that last curve on the edge 
of town, what did they see but a 
big Coop store, complete with its 
twin-pines emblem! Indeed, it 
turned out that this was a distant 
relative of the Greenbelt Co-op — 
except that where ours has grown 
to be a great enterprise, the Itha¬ 
ca Co-op, built in 1949, is still the 
only one in that city. Its manager, 
Robert Brill, is well acquainted 
with Greenbelt — having been here 
in a Co-op conference three years 
ago — and sends his regards to all 
his friends here, especially to Ben 
Rosenzweig, Bruce Bowman and 
Jim Cassels. 

Specialist 4th Class Patrick 
Cummings, son of Evelyn Cum¬ 
mings, 2H Plateau Place, has re¬ 
turned to Vietnam after 30 days 
leave at home . 

Cummings was assigned to the 
101st Airborne Division during his 
first tour. His next assignment will 
be with a Helicopter Company 
near Saigon. 

Congratulations to Alexis Esther 
Pogorelskin, 9-G Ridge, who re¬ 
ceived a Master of Arts degree 
from Harvard University at com¬ 
mencement exercises on June 13. 

Congratulations also to the fol¬ 
lowing graduates of the University 
of Baltimore: Steven R. Dolgoff, 
6000 Breezewood, B.S. in Business 
Management; Robert M. Greene, 
3-K Eastway; Martin A. Heilman, 
6108 Breezewood; and Lewis H. 
Zarfoss, 6164 Springhill Terrace, all 
earning the LLB degree. 

Chairmaine S. Yochim, 408 Ridge, 
librarian at the Prince Georges 
Community College, was appointed 
chairman of a study group of the 
Maryland Association of Junior 
Colleges which will investigate ar¬ 
eas in which Maryland's two-year 
college libraries can' develop co¬ 
operative ventures. 

Miss Lorraine Sharon Barr, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
A. Barr, Jr., 120 Lastner Lane, 
graduated from Strayer Junior 
College in the June 23 Graduation 
Exercises at the Statler Hilton. 
She received a diploma for her 
work in the Legal Secretary field. 
Miss Barr, a 1966 graduate of High 
Point High School, is currently 
employed by Stevens, Davis, Mil¬ 
ler & Mosher. 



Twin Pines 
Is A Cooperative 

(Membership is Open To All) 

Dividends Are Paid Quarterly On 
Multiples of $10 - Current Rate 5% Per Year 

MONEY ORDERS - 15c 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

ELECTROCOPIES 10c - 3/25c 

GREENBELT MAPS - 10c 

CHECKS CASHED FOR MEMBERS ONLY 
LEAVE NEWS REVIEW ADS HERE 
CONSUMER REPORTS AVAILABLE. 

ART EXHIBITS 

Wholesale Life Insurance Available To Members 


☆ GREENBELT * 
☆ THEATRE ☆ 

Phone 474-6100 

Adults $1.00 Children 40c 


Guess Who's Coming 
To Dinner 

Show Times 7:IK) and 9:10 
Sunday 2:30 - 4:40 - 6:50 - 9:00 


SATURDAY CHILD’S SHOW 

Sleeping Beauty 

Show Times 11:00 - 12:35 - 2:10 
Sunday One Show 1:00 


Golden Agers As Always Are 
Welcome - Still $.50 



I Greenbelt 

& 

jg Beauty Salon 


|Fashion Tress Wigs and Wiglet) 


| Ph 474-4881 

t 133 CENTERWAY 

jjj Greenbelt Shopping Center 


GREENBELT CARRY-OUT 


107A Centerway 

LARGE CHEESE PIZZA - Special $1.25 

4th OF JULY SPECIAL 
Fruit Drinks On The House 


Lemonade, Orange, Grape 


CLOSED SUNDAYS FOR SUMMER 


PHONE AHEAD 

FOR FASTER SERVICE 


474-4998 


Don’t 
lose touch 

The Suburban Yellow Pages Is Closing Soon} , 


Now's the time to give your 
Telephone Business Office a ring, 
Mr. Advertiser. They'll be printing 
the suburban Yellow Pages soon. 
And that's where smart shoppers 
go to keep in touch. 

They let their fingers 
do the walking. 

Don't find yourself 
left out of the 
Yellow Pages, 

Call today! 



PLANKING TO SELL? 

PLANNING TO BUY? 

Consult 

Mary Jane Kinzer, Broker 

REAL ESTATE OFFICE 

HAMILTON PLACE - GREENBELT, MD. 

Follow The Red And White Signs To Our Officel 


FINANCING AVAILABLE 


SALES OFFICE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK: 

8:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday thru Friday 
10:00 A.M. to 6.00 P.M. Saturday 
12'00 PJVI. to 6:00 P.M. Sunday | 

For Information or Appointment 
474.4161 474-4331 

For Best Results.. List With Ut 


























































Page 4 GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Thursday, July 4. 1968 


Recreation Review 

Teen Club Chatter 
The Greenbelt Teen dob will 
hold a Splash Party at the Green¬ 
belt Municipal Pool on Friday, 
July 5, from 8:30 to 10:30 pm. 
Records are needed so that all mtsf 
listen to the latest hits. 

COMING: Ocean City trip! 

Only a few places left so get your 
money and permission slips into 
the Recreation Office between 9 
a.m. and 4:30 p.m,, Monday thru 
Friday , July 16 is the big day. 

Notice to Residents Those resi¬ 
dents without season passes to the 
swimming pool now must show 
some identification before entering 
the pool This rule applies to resi¬ 
dents 16 and over. 

Men's Slow Pitch Softball League 
The Men’s Slow-Pitch Softball 
League finally finished the first 
half of play. The “Villa” was the 
winner with a 10 and 0 record. 
The “Brass Lantern” took second 
place with 9 wins and 1 loss. Tied 
for third place was “Moyers Esso” 
and “Mrs, Filberts”. Games are 
played every Monday thru Thurs¬ 
day from 6:45 to 10:00 p.m, on Bra¬ 
den Field. 

Concert at the Lake Park 
On Monday, July 8 at 7:30 p.m., 
the Greenbelt and Rockville Con¬ 
cert Bands will again combine to 
bring an evening of delightful mu¬ 
sic. If you missed the last concert 
be sure to put this date on your 
calendar. We promise an evening 
of pleasurable music. 

Women’s Golf Lessons 
Registration is now being taken 
at the Recreation Department for 
Women’s Golf Lessons to be given 
from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesdays. 
Call the recreation department for 
further information. 

Judo Classes Now Beginning 
The next beginner Judo class 
will begin on Tuesday evening, 
July 23rd at 5:30 p.m. at Center 
School, Call 474-6878. 

4 tli of July Men’s Softball 
Double Elimination - July 6 
Championships 

The winners in the first round 
of play were as follows: “Goddard 
Booster”. “Mrs. Filberts”, “Bob 
Banning” and “The Clancy’s”. In 
the second round, “Goddard Boos¬ 
ters” and “The Clancys” were on 
top. In subsequent play, “Clancys” 
beat Goddard making ‘Clancy” 
the winners bracket finalist. 

In the loser’s bracket, the 
“Brass Lantern”, beat “Congres¬ 
sional Movers”, “Mrs. Filberts” and 
“Moyers Esso” to emerge as the 
losers bracket finalist. 

The Championship game will be 
held on Saturday July 6 at 2 p.m. 
The Brass Lantern must win a 
double-header to take the tourna¬ 
ment. 


Junior Highlights 

by Pal Rexon 
J9©8 Awards Assembly 
Art Ohib —— .... Susan Kanen 


Band 


Chris Jess 


Boys Athletic Award _ Jim Grey 

Steve Wolfe 

Cheerleaders Marylin Miller 

Chess Club -- John Sieniki 

Crisco Award —. Carol Freeman 

Explorers Club ...... Robert Alfaro 

Danial Haviland 

Future Homemakers of America 
Patti Rexon 

Future Scientists of America 

Steve Cliffton 

Future Teachers of America 

Sheila Derry 
Girls Athletic Award Susan LaRue 

Hi-Y --- Tom Love 

Joe Becka 

Publications Awards — Irma Majer 
Barbara Becker 
Sinkov Memorial Award 

Marie Pinches 

News Review Staff 

Ann Gallagher 
Patti Rexon 

Gymkana .. . Sherry Kennedy 

Awards for Outstanding 
Achievement and Leadership 
Student Council ... Connie Urquhart 
Susan LaRue 
Superintendents Award Pat Rexon 
Hal Berman 
Academic Achievement 

Irma Majer 
John Sieniki 

American Legion Runner-Up 

Girl .... Connie Urquhart 

Boy . Barry Miller 

Second Highest Honor Awartis 
Eshbaugh Memorial Award 

Doug Samson 
Knapp Memorial Award 

Susan LaRue 
Highest Honor Awards 
American Legion Award 

Girls ... Pat Rexon 

Boys - — . Hal Berman 

P.T.A. Award 

Presented to students who received 
a 4.00 average 

Seventh Grade: Karen White, 
Kimberly Kirwan, Sarah Grambs, 
Bernadette Brinsko, Nancy Chotin- 
er, Heidi Meyers, Julie Heizer. 

Eighth Grade: Carol Donnelly, 
Santa Dilavore, Ruth Kastner. 

Ninth Grade: Mary Williams,, 
Irma Majer, Terry Schroeder, Pa¬ 
tricia Rexon, Kathy Wathen, Doug¬ 
lass Samson. 


KAY-DEE 


FURNITURE 

BOUGHT 

PHONE 


Spring Hill Villa 

for the finest in Pizzas, 
Submarines, Sandwiches 
Cali 

474-8333, 474-8344 

With this coupon next 
Tuesday Pizzas half-price 

9234 Springhill Lane 
Springhill Lake Shopping Center 
Greenbelt, Maryland 

Hours: Monday thru Thursday - 7:3© a.m. till 10 pjn, 

Friday and Saturday - 7:S0 am. till 2 a.m. 

Sunday - 1:00 pun. till 10 pun. 



HOMES FOR SALE 

CALL 345-2151 ANYTIME 
GREENBELT - THE BEST IN 
TOWN - DREAM DUPLEX - 
ABSOLUTELY PERFECT 
HOME WITH SHOWPLACE 
LAWN. THIS HOME HAS ALL 
EXTRAS, AND WILL BE PUR¬ 
CHASED BY SOMEONE WHO 
APPRECIATES THE FINEST. 
ITS CONVENIENT LOCATION 
NEAR THE CENTER MAKES 
IT AS SOMETHING TRULY 
SPECIAL. 

THREE BEDROOM FRAME - 
PRIME LOCATION WITH 
SPLENDID YARDS, very con¬ 
venient to shopping with many 
extras. Call for details, 

DON’T READ THIS UNLESS 
YOU WANT A FINE THREE 
BEDROOM CENTRALLY AIR- 
CONDITIONED BRICK HOME 
WITH A PROFESSIONALLY 
FINISHED REC ROOM AND 
TWO COMPLETELY TILED 
BATHS - HOW CAN YOU GO 
WRONG WITH A PRICE OF 
$23,900? OF COURSE THERE 
ARE MORE EXTRAS - but 
phone for information about 
these. 

WE HAVE A LARGE BEAU¬ 
TIFUL BI-LEVEL HOME 
WITH CARPORT AND 
SCREENED PORCH. SO 
PLEASANT AND QUIET YOU 
WILL LET THE REST OF 
THE WORLD GO BY, PRICED 
IN THE UPPER THIRTIES 
WHICH IS NOMINAL FOR 
THIS PRESTIGE AREA. 
SECLUDED - YET CONVEN¬ 
IENT IS THE ANSWER FOR 
THIS FINE THREE BED¬ 
ROOM HOME WITH AT¬ 
TACHED GARAGE. BUY ON 
A GOOD ASSUMPTION AND 
SAVE MONEY. PRICED IN 
THE LOW TWENTIES. 

FOUR - OR POSSIBLY FIVE 
BEDROOMS WITH THREE 
BATHS AND CENTRALLY 
AIR - CONDITIONED, HOW 
CAN YOU GO WRONG WITH 
THIS ASSUMPTION? USE 
YOUR EQUITY NOW TO 
GAIN THIS FINE HOME ON 
A LOW INTEREST RATE. 
PRICED IN THE DOW THIR¬ 
TIES. 

ACTION IS THE WORD WE 
WANT FOR THIS OWNER 
WITH THREE BEDROOMS 
AND ROOM FOR ONE MORE, 
2% BATHS, PLEASANT REC 
ROOM. OTHER EXTRAS TOO 
NUMEROUS TO MENTION. 
PRICED IN THE HIGH 
TWENTIES ON ASSUMP¬ 
TION. 

FOR SALE OR RENT - $2,000 
TAKES ALL ON THIS FINE 
TWO BEDROOM ALL BRICK 
RAMBLER WITH FULL 
BASEMENT. WITH MODERN 
KITCHEN AND COMPLETE¬ 
LY FENCED YARD YOU 
HAVE ALL YOU NEED FOR 
CONVENIENT AND LOW 
COST LIVING. 

WANT LAND, LOTS OF 
LAND? WE HAVE TWO 
VERY GOOD PROPERTIES, 
EACH OF THEM WITH THAT 
MUCH-WANTED ACRE OF 
GROUND. 

FARM FOR SALE: TWENTY 
ACRES, ALL FENCED WITH 
DEER ON THE PROPERTY. 
Also 365 feet of shoreline. Duck 
Hunting privileges net $1000.00 
a year. 

KASH Realtor 

(Above Post Office) 

345-2151 


FOR TOP QUALITY 
AT CUT-RATE PRICES 

CHECK OUR PRICES BEFORE YOU BUY ANYWHERE! 

Veterans Liquors 


11620 Baltimore Blvd. (Route 1) 

Free Delivery - 474-8046 


Beltsville, Md. 

474-1000 


Automotive Services 

All Makes of Automobiles Repaired Domestic and VW 

Discovered Gremlins In Your Car 
Over the 4th? 

Have “Big Ed” EXORCISE THEM! 

LEARY'S AUTO SERVICE 

Located at the CO-OP Service Station, 20 Southway 
Greenbelt, Md. Tel. 474-9789 


It's New! It's Fun! 

Why get yourself messy and wet 
with a do-it-yourself wash or ag¬ 
gravated waiting for the kids to 
do the job? Now you can get it 
done professionally and automa¬ 
tically in a jiffy . . , and you don’t 
even have to gef out of your car. 


Nightly 6 to 9 

Monday through Saturday 


Bring the whole family 
. . . great fun for the kids! 


COMPLETE EXTERIOR ?4ut<WtCltiC 

CAR WASH 


STAY-IN-YOUR-CAR 

SPECIAL 




exterior only 

Here's what you get for only $J 


1. Your whitewalls seam-clean¬ 
ed sparkling white. 

2. Hot water with powerful-yet- 
gentle-to-your-car’s-finish de¬ 
tergent soaks away dirt. 

3. Giant brushes clean away 
stubborn smudges automati¬ 
cally 

4. Powerful jet-spray rinses a- 
way suds and dirt for a spar¬ 
kling finish. 

5. Controlled heat air-dries 
your car. 


PLUS 

6. Free spray wax application 
gives your car that extra pro¬ 
fessional shine and retards 
new accumulation of dirt 


You stay in your car during the 
entire cleaning operation . * . a 
brand new experience watching 
the job done from the inside 
out. You can actually feel your 
car come clean. Be sure to bring 
the kids — it’s more fun than 
a roller-coaster ride. 


DISCOUNT CARWASH 


COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE 

IN ONE LOCATION 

SEADROOK DISCOUNT 
GENERAL TIRE AUTO PARTS 

Authorized Inspection Station 
Opposite Seabrook Shopping Center 
9457 Lanham-Severn Rd. 577-2900 

OPEN 7 DAYS - “BUDGET” RENT-A-CAR 


50 * 


OFF ON YOUR 

NEXT CAR WASH 


With This Coupon 
good 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mon. - Sat. 

8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Sunday thru July Tlth