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drembrlt 

I \tm Review 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 


Volume 36, Number 32 


GREENBELT, MARYLAND 


Thursday, June 28, 1973 


Grand and Glorious Fourth 

Our Flag - Show It Proudly! 



WHAT GOES ON 

Thurs., June 28, 7:45 p.ni. Green- 
belt Homes Board Meeting. 
Hamilton PI. 

Friday, June 29, 8 p.m. Twin 
Pines Bylaw Meeting, Council 
Chambers, Municipal Building 

Wed., July 4, 7:30 p.m. Green- 
belt Concert Band - Lake 
Park. Fireworks to follow 


by Joel Kastner 

This year’s Fourth of July evening celebration opens with the 
Greenbelt Concert Band performing at 7:30 p.m. John Del 
Homme will direct a program including works by Bach, Weber, 
Gershwin, patriotic airs, and climaxed with the 1812 Overture to 
provide the lead into the fireworks. Emory Harman will be Master 
of Ceremonies. 

The Zambelli Manufacturing 
Company is again supplying the 
display at a cost of $1800, a $200 
increase from last year. The fire¬ 
works contain 12 ground and 231 
aerial displays. 

Featured on the ground are such 
creations as a transformation star, 

Niagara Falls, a seal with a ball, 
and even a battleship with a cannon. 

The aerial display includes all-new 
chrysanthemum flower shells, mul¬ 
tiple-explosion blasts, flying ser¬ 
pents, and a machine gun. The 
grand finale will be in two parts, 
first a light display and then a 
noise barrage. 

Parking will be in the lake park 
parking lot and along Crescent 
Road. Police will be on hand to 
help with parking and direct traf¬ 
fic. Those living within walking 
distance should do so, since the dis¬ 
play usually attracts large crowds. 

The best wiew is from the lake 
park. Those residents who have 
boat permits may view the display 
from the water, provided they do 
not go too near the launch area. 

The Greenbelt Police Department 
reminds the public that setting off 
fireworks by private citizens is both 
dangerous and illegal. 


Reception for Robert Ellis 

Approximately 100 members and 
friends of Center School PTA gath¬ 
ered to honor Robert Ellis, princi¬ 
pal, at a surprise reception on Sun¬ 
day afternoon, June 24 in the school 
auditorium. Ellis is leaving Cen¬ 
ter after having served as principal 
for seven years. 

John Bogumill, newly elected 
president of Center’s PTA, presen¬ 
ted Ellis with two rosebushes and 
a plant for his garden as a token 
of appreciation for his many ser¬ 
vices to the school. Bogumill prais¬ 
ed Ellis for his continued work for 
and interest in the children of Cen¬ 
ter school. 


Requirements To Vote, Run 
In City Election on Sept. 18 

Election day for the Greenbelt City Council is just three 
months away, on September 18, to be exact. All citizens should 
be aware of the requirements to make them eligible to vote or 
run for office. Do you know, for example, whether you are quali¬ 
fied to vote, or how to nominate the candidate of your choice, or 
when and where to register? 


Booth Benefits Jaycees 

The Greenbelt Jaycees will be 
selling sno-cones at the firework 
display at Greenbelt Lake on July 
4. All proceeds are to be used for 
charitable projects in the Green¬ 
belt area. They also will have an 
information booth for anyone inter¬ 
ested in joining the Greenbelt Jay¬ 
cees. 


Women's Slow Pitch Softball 

Women’s slow pitch softball 
league standings places Greenbelt 
fourth in the Northern Division 
with three wins and four losses. 
The leagues are sponsored by the 
Dept, of Parks and Recreation of 
the Maryland-National Capital Park 
and Planning Commission. 


Holiday Refuse Collection 

Due to the July 4 Holiday the 
following change in the refuse 
collection schedule will take 
place. For this one week only 
the Wednesday paper collection 
will be eliminated. Those resi¬ 
dents who regularly receive col¬ 
lection on Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday are asked to save 
their paper until the following 
week when normal collections 
will be resumed. All other collec¬ 
tions next week will be on the 
regularly scheduled days. 


Here are the regulations for citi¬ 
zen participation in Greenbelt City 
elections. 

Anyone who is eligible to vote in 
Greenbelt City elections is eligible 
to run for one of the five seats on 
the city council. ELECTION DAY 
is September 18, 1973; the term of 
office is 2 years Councilmen get a 
salary of $2,000 a year; the Mayor 
$2,400 (if pending legislation goes 
into effect.) 

Registration 

REGISTRATION DAY for vo¬ 
ters is ANY DAY, from 8:00 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. — just go to the city 
offices and sign up with the city 
clerk. If you work during the day 
and can’t register then, wait until 
special registration days, which 
are announced later in the sum¬ 
mer. The last day to register is 
August 20. 

Once you have registered for 
Greenbelt elections, you need not 
register again as long as you live 
here continuously, provided you 
have voted in at least one of the 
two previous city general elections. 
If you’ve never registered here or if 
you moved out of town and then 
moved back or if you missed vo¬ 
ting in two successive general elec¬ 
tions. it will be necessary to regis¬ 
ter again under the same provisions. 

Eligibility 

To be eligible to vote in Green¬ 
belt council elections you must be 
a citizen of the United States, at 
least 18 years of age, must have 
lived in Greenbelt at least 29 days 
immediately preceding the election. 
Employees of the U.S. government 
residing in Greenbelt. are eligible 
to vote in the city election and run 
for city council posts. 

If you — or your candidate — 
are eligible to vote, here’s what 
must be done to get a place on the 
ballot for City Councilman: 

1- Get at least 50 and not more 
than 60 of the qualified registered 
voters to sign a nomination peti¬ 
tion form - which may be obtained 
from the city clerk; she also has an 
information form that will be help¬ 
ful. There were roughly 3,500 
registered voters as of the last gen¬ 
eral election. 

2- Submit the signed petition to 
the city clerk (together with a $3 


filing fee) no earlier than July 20 
and not later than August 20 at 5 
p.m, OrUy regiklereu j liens' sig¬ 
natures are valid, and a voter may 
sign only ONE nomination petition 
even though he may vote for five 
candidates. Therefore, the city 
clerk will disqualify a voters’ 
signature on the second and all sub¬ 
sequent petitions she receives on 
which it appears. 

This means a voter should think 
twice before signing a nomination 
petition for someone he isn’t really 
eager to back; it would make him 
unable to nominate anyone else. 
This also means that the candidate 
(or the backers of a candidate) 
who file their petitions early in the 
July 20 - August 20 period will 
have more time in which to get 
additional signatures to validate the 
petition. 

Married women signers of peti¬ 
tions should use the form Mary 
Doe, not Mrs. John Doe. The re¬ 
cords show them as Mary Doe and 
if the city clerk doesn’t recognize 
the name in its married form, she 
may not be able to check and 
accept it. 

3-Within 7 days of filing of a 
valid petition, the city clerk noti¬ 
fies the candidate. The latter then 
must indicate acceptance of nom¬ 
ination. (In some cases petitions 
are circulated without the candi¬ 
dates say-so). The ballot car¬ 
ries only persons nominated this 
way. But you can write in names 
when you vote. 

That’s all there is to it. On Sep¬ 
tember 18 there will be an election. 
If five candidates fail to win at 
least 40 percent of the votes cast, 
there will be ~a run-off election 7 
days later. In the run-off election 
the ballot will consist of those un¬ 
successful candidates receiving the 
highest number of votes, up to 
twice as many names as there are 
positions to be filled. 


News Review De^'Min* 

All News Review articles and 
advertisements must be in by 
Monday, July 2, at 8-10 p.m. due 
to the 4th of July Holiday, The 
neper will be distributed on 
Thursday night. 


City Council Sensitive 
Over Cable TV Issue 

by A1 and Elaine Skolnik 

Cable television again popped into the news last week wi 
the disclosure that Mrs. Claire Pilski, wife of Greenbelt Mayor 
Richard Pilski, is a stockholder in a cable television corporation 
that has submitted a proposal to obtain a franchise from the ci y 


of College Park. 

Members of city council (Charles 
Schwan, Gil Weidenfeld, and Eliz¬ 
abeth Maffay) said they first learn¬ 
ed of this development at the Mu¬ 
nicipal League Conference at Oc¬ 
ean City last week and immediately 
issued a statement informing the 
press of Mrs, Pilski’s interest, 

“We have a firm conviction that 
there should be a full disclosure by 
public officials of any interest they 
may have, direct or indirect, in 


Hearing on Gill Suit 

In preparation for a hearing on 
Thursday, June 28, James F. Vance, 
attorney for the ten Greenbelt 
Homes, Inc. members seeking re¬ 
dress against GHI and seven GH1 
board members, has filed a response 
to GHI’s demurrer requesting dis¬ 
missal of the suit on technical 
grounds. 

The petitioners (Eunice Coxon. 
et al.) deny that they have failed 
to state a cause of action aganst 
the respondents in equity or in law. 
They state that their petition for a 
writ of mandamus and declaratory 
judgment requests the court to or¬ 
der the GHI board to take speci¬ 
fic action, e.g. to cease their im¬ 
proper conduct, to account to GHI 
members for certain funds, and not 
to repeat their improper conduct. 
Vance disputed the contention of 
GHI’s attorney, Albert Ginsberg, 
that the general relief sought by 
the petitioners cannot be obtained 
in a mandamus action. 

The answer to the demurrer con¬ 
cluded with a declaration that the 
petition sets out a justiciable con¬ 
troversy and that the relief sought 
is neither moot nor abstract, as 
charged by Ginsberg. Vance con¬ 
tended that the respondents are 
guilty of wrongful conduct. 

“The respondents,’’ Vance said, 
“have insisted to the petitioners 
that their conduct is not improper 
and that under similar circumstan ¬ 
ces in the past, respondents mav 
expect a repetition of said wrongful 
conduct.’’ Hence, the relief sought 
is one for which there is no ade¬ 
quate remedy at law and monetary 
damages are inadequate. 

Vance asked the court for a judg¬ 
ment which would correct the 
wronks of which the petitioners 
complain and prevent their repeti¬ 
tion by the GHI board in the future. 


Environment Award 

The Prince Georges Environment 
Coalition held its Second Annual 
Membership Meeting at the Green¬ 
belt Public Library June 7 to el¬ 
ect officers and to present awards. 

The Coalition presented its first 
“Earth Keeper Awards’’ to twelve 
persons and groups “for rendering 
outstanding service on behalf of 
environmental protection” during 
the past year in Prinee Georges 
County, naming Rhea L. Cohen of 
Greenbelt as “Earth Keeper of the 
Year” “In recognition of her out¬ 
standing efforts as a citizen advo¬ 
cate to save Prince Georges County 
from the ravages of over-develop¬ 
ment . . . and for her diligent and 
effective utilization of legal/admin¬ 
istrative strategies to preserve our 
environment ...” 


Councilman White on TV 

Francis W. White, former may¬ 
or of Greenbelt and now vice-chair¬ 
man of Prince Georges County 
Council will be the guest of WT- 
OP’s Caution Consumer show Sat¬ 
urday at 7:30 p.m. White was ask¬ 
ed to appear and demonstrate how 
unwary citizens are clipped at car¬ 
nivals. White will show the various 
games that gyp the innocent carni¬ 
val patron. White will emphasize 
that most carnivals are honest but 
a few need regulation. 


cable television companies,” said 
Schwan. “We have so informed the 
mayor of our feelings.” 

Last March the Greenbelt city 
council had before it a proposed 
amendment to the charter to clarify 
the city’s right to grant a cable 
television franchise, introduced by 
Weidenfeld. The amendment was 
not acted upon, but council chose 
instead to appoint a citizen com¬ 
mittee- to study and make recom¬ 
mendations on cable television ser¬ 
vice in Greenbelt. Such a commit¬ 
tee has not yet been appointed. 

At that time, Weidenfeld said, 
neither he, Schwan, nor Mrs. Maf¬ 
fay had any knowledge of Mrs. 
Pilski’s interest in a cable televis¬ 
ion company. Council member Rhea 
Cohen could not be reached for 
comment, 

Mrs. Pilski told the News Re¬ 
view that she didn’t understand 
what all the excitement was about. 
She said she is one of the vice- 
presidents of the College Park Ca¬ 
ble 'Vision Corporation which has 
about 23 stockholders. Her invest¬ 
ment is about $1,500, she said. 

“This is a College Park matter,” 
she said, “It is a personal thing and 
has nothing to do with the City of 
Greenbelt. It is not as if we were 
looking for a franchise from the 
city of Greenbelt.” Mrs. Pilski, who 
was contacted in Ocean City, said 
she would be happy to discuss the 
matter further upon her return. 

Background 

City manager James Giese said 
that for many years the question 
of cable TV in suburban commun¬ 
ities and the possibility of franchis¬ 
ing and regulating such systems 
have been discussed. The city so- 
Mcitor has expressed the view that 
the Greenbelt charter as presently 
written grants authority to the city 
to regulate cable TV. But because 
of doubts raised, Giese said he rec¬ 
ommended last March a proposed 
change in the charter that would 
specifically provide the city with 
authority to grant franchises for 
community antenna and cable tele¬ 
vision systems. Giese said he was 
not aware of any interest of any 
city council member in television 
cable companies at that time. 

Giese said that he was not rec¬ 
ommending the granting of a cable 
TV franchise at this time but he 
saw certain advantages for the city 
if it had clear-cut authority. For 
one, the county might be precluded 
from granting franchises within the 
city because of a State constitu¬ 
tional provision which restricts the 
county from acting in certain areas 
whch have been preempted by a 
municipality. Giese said that the 
city would also have the advantage 
of reserving certain cables for pub¬ 
lic use. 

A cable TV franchise is permis¬ 
sion given by a government body 
to a cable operator allowing him 
exclusive rights to sell his service 
to residents in. the area. Cable TV 
is supposed to offer clearer pictures 
than home antennas, particularly 
for color television and can offer as 
many as 80 to 100 channels. Many 
systems feature separate channels 
for weather, stock market reports, 
wire service news, and FM radi'x 
On the average, the monthly fee to 
the homeowner is $5 to $6 for ser¬ 
vice, with installation fees ranging 
from about $10 to $20. 

Giese said that there are no ac¬ 
tive or recent requests for a city 
cable TV franchise. If the efiy 
decides to grant a franchise, Giese 
said he would recommend that 
franchise be based on public bids 
with the names of all participants 
made public. 

If the reaction of council to the 
disclosure of Mrs. Pilski’s interest 
is any indication, even the pronos^l 
for having a citizen’s group study, 
the issue may be dead. 

















Page 2 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Thursday, June 28, 1973 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 

A\ INDEPENDENT AKWSFAl'ER 

Editors Mary Lou Williamson, 474-4900 
Associate Editor: Mary Grauofsky, 474-0U14 
STAFF 

Alexander Karnes, Sandra Barnes, Virginia Beauchamp, Linda Braun, 
Miriam Cornelius, Margaret Gianfagna, Judy Goldstein, Bess Halperin 
Bernice Kastnei*, Joel Ivastner, Sid ivastner, Martha Kaufman, Barbara 
Lane, Dorothy Lauber, Barbara Likowski, Jane Main, Bob McGee, 
Roberta McNamara, Jim O’Sullivan, Pauline Pritzker, A1 Skolnik, Elaine 
Skolnik, Dorothy’Sucher, Otillie Van Allen. 

Business H:maj;en Adele Mund, Circulntioii Managers Carolyn Rhine, 
474-86f»4, Sill, Cirruliitioni Barbara Clawson, 474-4541. 

Piihlislu'fl every Tlmmluy l»y (ireenbelt Cooperative Publishing A««n., Inc. 
flOAUl) OF DIKECTOHS 

I'rrs., A1 Skolnik; Vice Pres., Sid Kastner; Secy., Sandra Barnes; 
Trens.. Mary Granofsky; Barbara Likowski. 

MAIL STBSCRIPTIONS: $(>.50 per year. Advertising and news articles may 
be mailed (Box f>8, Greenbelt): deposited in our box at the Twin Pines 
office: or delivered to the editorial office in the basement of 1 5 Parkway 
(I7f-H:»l). open after 8 p.nrt. Tuesday. Deadline is 10 p.m. on Tuesday. 

Volume 36, Number 32 Thursday, June 28, 1973 


In Reply to Schwan 

To the Editor: 

In reply to Charles Schwan, who 
has an amazing capacity for self 
delusion. In part I am replying so 
that his delusion may not spread 
to many of our citizens, and, in 
part, I am replying because here, 
Mayor Pilski cannot interrupt me. 

First. Charles, the people of 
Greenbelt are not interested in 
your feelings about my tempera 
ment or my passion. I am sure 
they have made up their minds on 
that score long ago. 

Second. Charles, you didn’t even 
answer the points I made in the 
letter. Don’t you agree that the 
county and state have erred in 
granting approval and building 
permits for a project that has no 
sewer? It is true that the develop 
er’s request for a right-of-way ac¬ 
ross NASA property is under study 
and may not be granted for envi¬ 
ronmental reasons. Don’t you also 
agree, Charles, that the State 
Health Department has a very in¬ 
consistent stance on package sew¬ 
age plants, when at the same time 
they approve Greenbriar with min¬ 
imal (your conditions notwithstan¬ 
ding) standards, they are threaten¬ 
ing to close down over a score of 
them that are malfunctioning and 
polluting Maryland rivers and 
streams, as reported in the Stars- 
News last month? And don’t you 
also agree, Charles, that the ov¬ 
erwhelming majority of citizens 
who have spoken on this issue have 
urged city council to oppose the 
plant, and you must be aware that 
the package sewage plant is con¬ 
trary to the adopted community 
goals and Master Plan for Green 
belt. 

There is one thing that I don’t 
expect you to agree on, however, 
and that is my thesis, arrived at af¬ 
ter two long hard years of fight¬ 
ing this intrusion on Greenbelt, that 
the cruelest blow to the efforts of 
citizens to defeat it was the equiv¬ 
ocal Schwan resolution that effec¬ 
tively neutralized the official city 
position and allowed the develop - 
er, the former mayor, and the pre¬ 
sent mayor to state in public and in 
private lobbying efforts that, and 
I quote, “the City of Greenbelt is 
not opposed to this package plant/’ 

Charles, it is not a question of 
whether you are right, or I am 
right, in the final analysis we have 
ali been had. I can assure you that 
the citizens to whom I have spoken, 
and who have supported Council- 
woman Cohen in this fight, are not 
interested in a sewage plant with 
honor; they are unquestionably 
decided that they want no tempor¬ 
ary package treatment plant in 
Greenbelt at all. 

Charles, it is you who has been 
inflexible. No matter what evidence 
was presented you, you absolutely 
refused to oppose the plant, where¬ 
as on the other hand, it is I who 
am flexible. I promise that I will 
do anything to prevent a package 
sewage plant from being located in 
this city that I love. 

Thomas X. White 


Unnerving Experience 

To the Editor: 

This is to thank the good neigh¬ 
bor who turned in my billfold to the 
police station early on Sunday mor¬ 
ning. It was an unnerving exper¬ 
ience to have had my purse snat¬ 
ched the night before. However, 
when the billfold was returned to 
me with all my ID cards intact, as 
well as my shopping plate, I was 
very grateful not to have to go 
through all the trouble of replac¬ 
ing them. 

Ottilie Van Allen 


It Can Happen Here! 

To the*Editor: 

This past Saturday evening, my 
brother-in-law who was visiting 
from New Jersey told me of a mug¬ 
ging that took place there recently 
at 5:30 in the afternoon when a 
friend of his returned from a shop¬ 
ping tour and was robbed and bea¬ 
ten so severely he had to be 
hospitalized. He asked me if we 
had any such problems in Green¬ 
belt. I replied that I didn’t know 
of any such grave difficulties and 
that it was safe, to walk around 
Greenbelt without any concern. 

I no sooner finished making this 
statement (about 9:45 p.m.) when a 
neighbor of mine and her friend, 
who was visiting from Columbia, 
Md., told me that some teen-aged 
boys stole a wallet from them while 
they were walking near the library 
on their way home from the Center, 
They further said that they were 
told that this was the fourth such 
incident that happened. Shortly 
thereafter, I saw a police car come 
by and the office flashed his spot 
light on an inner walkway, but by 
that time it was too late to appre¬ 
hend the juveniles. 

To prevent further such experien¬ 
ces, it may be well for the city to 
assign some officers to plain-clothes 
duty to patrol the streets and walk 
ways on foot or to get a plain¬ 
clothes police woman on detail 
from some other jurisdiction to help 
apprehend the thieves. After they 
are caught, perhaps the use of 
stocks in the Center Mall for such 
courageous culprits who prej' >n 
unsuspecting women shoppers may 
be one way of stopping these cow¬ 
ardly actions. 

Worried Greenbelter 

Twin Pines —**,>* 

To the Editor: 

The Special Membership Meeting 
of Twin Pines tomorrow night 
June 29 - is an opportunity for 
Greenbelt to prove that a savings 
and loan association can operate 
within the confines of state insur¬ 
ance regulations and still continue 
to be a true cooperative in the Roch 
dale tradition. 

The proposed by-laws distributed 
to the members last week do not 
have to be given a rubber-stamp 
verbatim aproval. True, a new set 
of by-laws must be adopted at this 
time if Twin Pines is not to risk 
losing out on obtaining insured 
status by July 1 as the state law 
requires. This does not mean that 
the members have to swallow the 
offered draft without even chewing 
it — typographical errors and all! 

We have about the soundest and 
fastest-growing savings and loan 
institution in the state; which must 
mean that we are doing some 
things right. It means, most cer¬ 
tainly, that Twin Pines understands 
Greenbelt’s special needs — and 
keeps its doors open all day long 
and into the night in order to pro¬ 
vide the fullest service possible. 
And we understand it — its infor¬ 
mality, its individuality. 

Or do we? 

by Miriam Cornelius 


MISHKAN TORAH 

Rabbi Charles Kraus, of Far 
Rockaway, New York, a candidate 
for rabbi of the Mishkan Torah, 
will be with the congregation for 
the weekend of June 29. 

The rabbi will conduct services 
on Friday, June 29 at 8:30 p.m, and 
Saturday, June 30, at 9:30 a.m. The 
congregation and friends of Mish¬ 
kan Torah are invited to meet with 
the rabbi and his wife. 

Rabbi Maurice Weisenberg, spiri¬ 
tual leader of the congregation for 
seven years, has accepted the rab¬ 
binic position at Olev Shalom Con ¬ 
gregation in Kansas City, 


Request a Reply 

To the Editor: 

Several weeks ago in your col 
umn I drew attention to an adver 
tisement that appeared in the News 
Review during the GHI election 
campaign. The ad was reprinted 
and used as a primary piece of 
campaign literature which contri¬ 
buted to the election of three in a 
field of five, extending the power 
of an established majority of the 
Board. 

My letter asked the ad’s authors 
to specify the thrust of a concern 
they professed. It also asked them 
to pin down and spell out back¬ 
ground for inferences they tied to 
the ad as “cause”. 

There has been no reply. 

The News Review may be able 
to ignore the silence. I can’t. 

I believe the members of this 
Corporation deserve no less than 
complete candor in representing 
an election which affects the larg¬ 
est investment most of us wall ever 
make, one which in turn directly 
affects the security and comfort of 
our families and our old age. My 
own statements have always reflec¬ 
ted this belief and I think I should 
ask no less in return. 

I am also convinced that this 
Corporation can rightly afford no 
less. 

Indeed, if it continues the pre¬ 
sent manner of vacillating between 
a “busv work” least administra¬ 
tive effort and a frenzied approach 
to major decisions. I can see but 
one disastrous result for all of us 
We need make no other mistakes. 

My minortv report from the Au¬ 
dit Committee reflected this con 
cern. i 

But as an examnle of the “con 
cern” now exercised over our in¬ 
vestments, let me remind us all 
that loss of a primary department 
head from our staff in mid-tdection 
has not yet produced any great ef¬ 
fort to check the department’s out 
standing assets and liabilities. This 
is the least we can do to insure 
that a new 7 man will not start oqt 
with two strikes against him. 

It is also the least that can be 
done to reassure this member that 
the Board’s concern is alive and in 
the interests of all the members. 
Perhaps I should publicly question 
the right individuals direct. 

Gordon Allen 

Bike Trails Planned 

Fourteen citizens including Green- 
belter Sue Modgelewski, recently 
met with Maryland-National Capi¬ 
tal Park and Planning Commis¬ 
sion planners as the first step in 
developing a comprehensive system 
of hiker biker-equestrian trails in 
Prince Georges County. 

The trails will serve the county’s 
residents for recreation and com¬ 
muter needs. The trail system 
would provide safe access to the 
University of Maryland, communi¬ 
ty colleges, schools, parks, libraries, 
recreation centers, commercial 
areas, Metro stations, employment 
areas and historic sites. 

The committee of citizens agreed 
to direct its work toward recom 
mending countywide safety policies 
for trails which will serve as a 
guide in developing a Trails Plan. 

The commission would have the 
primary responsibility for develop¬ 
ing trails in the parks and would 
assist elsewhere. 

A Zoning Attorney to 
Represent the People 

“To protect the public interest” 
in the sensitive area of zoning, 
John J. Garrity and Councilman 
Francis B. Francois introduced a 
Frince Georges Council Chairman 
bill calling for the appointment of 
a people’s zoning counsel to appear 
on the public’s behalf at all hear¬ 
ings. 

Offered at the June 19 session, the 
bill will come to public hearing on 
July 31 at 10 a.m. at the Upper 
Marlboro Courthouse. The meas¬ 
ure is in response to a recent Court 
of Appeals ruling invalidating zon¬ 
ing sections of the Charter, thus 
making legislation necessary to 
keep a people’s zoning counsel. 

Under the bill’s provisions, the 
counsel must be a member of the 
Maryland bar and experienced in 
zoning law and procedure. Countv 
Executive William W. Guilett has 
the option of appointing more than 
one people's attorney, all subject 
to Council conflrttt&UQfA 


Recreation Review Lecture on Prison Reform 


Singles and Doubles Horseshoe 
Tournament 

Registration at Candy Cane City 
Wednesday, July 4 at 10 am. Win¬ 
ners will receive banquet hams. 
Women’s Softball Game 
Greenbelt Gals challenge County 
women’s team on Braden Field 4 
p.m. 

Youth Center Hours 


A lecture on “Prison Reform ’ 
will be given Sunday night, July 
l/at the Mishkan Torah synagogue 
(Jewish Community Center of 
Prince Georges County) at West¬ 
way and Ridge Rd. The speaker 
will be James Irby, member of the 
board of the National Association 
for Justice, who is presently ser¬ 
ving a 20-year term at the Minimum 
Security Facility in Lorton, Va. Re- 


Open Gym and Lounge from 9 
am - 5 pm for basketball, bumper 
pool, carroms and ping pong. All 
regular classes and Camp Pine Tree 
cancelled. 

Swimming Pool Hours 

Weather permittting, the pool will 
open at 1 pm, July 4. 

Openings are left in the City 
Closed Tennis Tournament. Tourna¬ 
ment registration will be taken at 
the Braden Field Courts Saturday, 
June 30 at 9 am. Trophies will be 
awarded to the winners. 


LARGO SUMMER SESSION 

Registration for Summer Session 
II at Prince George's Community 
College from July 10 through Au¬ 
gust 10 will be held Thursday, July 
5 from 1 to 7 p.m. in the Breezeway 
of Bladen Hall on the Largo Cam 
pus. 

About 75 courses will be offered 
including special non-credit cours¬ 
es in developmental English and 
reading to prepare students for 
college level work in these areas. 
A high school diploma is not neces 
sary for enrollment. 

Tuition rates are $10,50 per credit 
hour for Prince George's County 
residents. Applications and infor¬ 
mation are available from the Ad¬ 
missions and Records Office at 
Prince George’s Community College, 
336 -6990, ext. 201. 


i *• v • l* *:* *!* *;♦ v *1* *1* v v *1* *1* *1* *!♦ v ♦** «£» »y 

X *** 

❖ Stern's ‘ * 

! SHOE REPAIR I 

i * 

❖ Itepair v 

* Handbags & Belts •> 

A 

♦% 

* Beltway Plaza * 

*:« i 

around corner Hanover Shoes 


freshments will be served at 8 p.m. 
and the lecture begins at 8:30; en 
trance is free and the public is in¬ 
vited. 

The National Association for Jus¬ 
tice was formed less than a year 
ago to seek reforms in the prison 
system and better treatment of past 
convicts. The group has been ac ¬ 
tive in settling the Lorton reform 
atory strike and is presently set¬ 
ting up a “crisis center” for media 
ting prison disorders. 


Domchick-Barton 

Mr, and Mrs. Harold Domchik. 
Sr. of 11-A Ridge Road announce 
the marriage of their daughter 
Margaret Elizabeth to Robert Earl 
Barton, son of Mr. & Mrs. Joel 
Barton of 44-N Ridge Road. 

The weddirg took place Saturday, 
June 23 at 1 p.m. in the Greenbelt 
Community Church with the Rev. 
Robert L, Field officiating. 

After a honeymoon in the Pocono 
mountain resort area, the couple will 
reside near Grissom Air Force Base 
where the groom is presently sta 
tioned. 


Holy 

Cross 

Lutheran 

Church 

6905 Greenbelt Rd. 



Worship Services 


8:30 and 11:15 A.M. 


Sunday School 9:50 A.M. 
Weekday Nursery School 
9:00 - 11:80 A.M. 






£ 474-9288 


Sat. til 6$ 

# * 

**♦ *;♦*;« **«♦•* •;* **♦ «j* ••♦*•«**»•** t 


Edward II. Birner, Pastor 
Phone 345-511J 


UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

(Mowatt Memorial) 40 Ridge Road, Greenbelt, Md. Telephone 474-9110 
Rev. Clifton Cunningham, Pastor - Tel. 474-3381 
JULY 1, 1973 HOLY COMMUNION 
Worship Service 11:00 A.M. 

(Nursery through Kindergarten at 11:00) 

Church School (Kindergarten through adults) 9:30 A.M. 


Suburban Washington's Largest Bank 

Suburban Trust Company 

For Prompt, Pleasant Service 

Greenbelt Office 

103 Centerway 270-5000 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 


Twin Pines Savings & Loan Assn. 


5‘/2% 


6% 

Regular Savings 


Savings Certificates 


Greenbelt Shopping Center 474-6900 

SPECIAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING 
FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 8 P.M. 

Council Chambers, Municipal Building 

Closed Sat. June 30th for Dividends 


MON. THRU FRI. 
9 to 8 


SATURDAY 
9 - 2 





























Thursday, June 28, 1973 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Page 3 


Twenty-Five Years Ago 

“PHA Manager Charles Cormack today firmly squelched a 
rumor that negotiations are in progress for the sale of Greenbelt 
to a leading insurance company.” 

Cormack was also queried as to why “Mrs. Fanny Eubanks 
— who has done without window shades for three years” is still 
on a waiting list while “shades are offered to other residents who 
don’t need them (we could name a few) . . , ” 

Letters to the Editor were limited to 150 words, and need¬ 
less-to-say the Cooperator (News Review) felt some heat from this 
editorial policy. 

Fourth of July plans were underway with a $1,000 fireworks 
display, a parade, athletic events and concessions. 

GCS grocery clerks became unionized, and the roof to the 
new supermarket was expected to be completed by the end of 
June. 

Cormack announced the sale by the government to Prince 
Georges County of the Greenbelt schools and land. Sale of the 
Center school posed a problem in that it left Greenbelt without 
a community building, but it was hoped that the town would 
still be able to use the school for civic events for at least five years 
until a municipal building could be constructed. 

The Cooperator decried the clannishness ascribed to the pap¬ 
er. In an editorial entitled “Wanted; Transfusion (Printer’s Ink)”, 
the editorialist wrote, “When you’re still sleepy at three in the 
afternoon because lack of help kept you up till three that morn¬ 
ing putting out a newspaper, and you hear someone in the food 
store say, “You can’t work on the Cooperator unless you’re one 
of the “inner circle”; when an already overworked reporter has 
to take over the work of publicity director for an organization 
in order to get news from the outfit, then hears that “you can’t 
get a story in the Cooperator”; it’s then that you almost — but 
never quite, thank heavens — feel that the whole thing just isn’t 
worth it.” The writer then made a strong plea for reporters and 
workers to join the paper. 

Veteran’s Liquors, on U.S. Route #1 began advertising and 
offered “Free Delivery”. “No order too small”. 

A summer Baby Playground was initiated to run in 8 play¬ 
grounds for children 4-7 years old. The Recreation Dept, an¬ 
nounced its summer crafts program with classes in basketry, sten¬ 
ciling and splatter painting, general crafts, gimp and leather 
work. There was no charge except for materials. 

Renovation of the Center Mall was planned. “FHA has 
signed a contract for concrete work at the Center. This contract 
calls for taking up the cobblestones . . . and paving the area 
with concrete ... A sidewalk will be laid from the barber shop 
to the police station entrance. There will be steps leading down 
to the Radio Repair Shop and there will also be space provided 
for a bicycle parking rack. The main sidewalk will also be wid¬ 
ened.” 

Compiled by Sandra Barnes 


P.6, Go. Schools 
Decentralization 

The Prince Georges County Pub¬ 
lic Schools, largest school system 
in the Washington Metropolitan 
Area, became a decentralized sys¬ 
tem on Monday, June 18, Superin¬ 
tendent Carl W. Hassell has an¬ 
nounced. The system, comprising 
234 schools and some 155,000 stu¬ 
dents, is now divided into Nor¬ 
thern, Central, and Southern Areas, 
with a Director for each area. With 
the opening of the 1973-74 school 
year in September, each area will 
contain approximately 78 schools 
and 52,000 students. 

“The decision to decentralize has 
been under consideration for sever¬ 
al years,” Dr. Hassel said, “and has 
now been taken in order to make 
management more effective by 
breaking the system into smaller 
components and moving manage¬ 
ment and leadership services clos 
er to the local school.” 

Taking office as Area Directors 
are G. James Gholson, Director of 
the Northern Area; Dr. Annabelle 
E. Ferguson, Director of the Cen¬ 
tral Area; and Dr. Allan I. Chot- 
iner, Director of the Southern Area. 

Schools which Greenbelt students 
attend are Northern Area: Park- 
dale, Greenbelt Junior High. 
ter Elementary and North End El¬ 
ementary. Central Area: Mary Be- 
thune, Oakcrest and John Carroll. 

The center for the Northern Ar¬ 
ea will be the old Berwyn Elemen¬ 
tary School at 49th Avenue and 
Greenbelt Road in College Park. 

The Central Area center will be 
the former Highland Park Elemen¬ 
tary School at Hill Road and L 
Street in Landover. 

The Southern center, headquar¬ 
ters for Dr. Chotiner and staff, will 
be the old Oxon Hill Junior High 
School at 7711 Livingston Road in 
Oxon Hill. 

All three Area Directors now 
have temporary offices at Highland 
Park Elementary School. Each has 
a separate phone number — Nor¬ 
thern Area Mr. Gholson): 336-6131; 
Central Area (Dr. Ferguson): 336 
6100: and Southern Area (Dr. Chot¬ 
iner) : 336-6355. 


Scout Troop 746 

The summer Court of Honor for 
Boy Scout Troop 746 was held on 
Friday, June 15, at the Mowatt 
Methodist Church, The following 
scouts were invested as tenderfeet 
—Craig Fitzenreiter, Mike Free¬ 
man, Jim Thurston, Sudi Dwivedi, 
Doug Wimsett, Quentin Wililams 
and Scott Fitzenreiter. Jim Sin den, 
Alex Likowski, Clint Boushell, 
Craig Fitzenreiter, Jon Freeman, 
Gary Hibbs, Neil O’Shea, Tom Han- 
yok, and Warren Halsey were made 
second class scouts while the first 
class scouts installed were Andy 
Webster, Paul Felsher, Alex Li¬ 
kowski, Clint Boushell, and Pete 
Bracken. Erik Winkler received 
his Star rank, and merit badges 
were earned by Tim Moore, Erik 
Winkler, Gary Cousin, and Mark 
Felsher. . 

The troop climaxed the glass drive 
which it had conducted from De¬ 
cember, through May, by announc¬ 
ing the names of the scouts who 
had led in glass collecting. William 
Aleshire, assistant Scoutmaster, 
presented the first place award to 
Tim Moore, with Mark Felsher. 
Pete Bracken, and Paul Felsher 
winning second, third, and fourth 
place medals. 

Other awards presented at the 
Court of Honor included the Presi¬ 
dent's Award earned by the troop 
for its exhibit on glass recycling 
prepared by Tim Moore for the 
Scout Exposition in Gaithersburg. 
In addition. Troop 746, under the 
direction of Committee Chairman, 
Ruth Dee, and Cub Pack 746, un¬ 
der the direction of Cubmaster 
Steve Sinden and Drive Chairman, 
Pete Bracken, received awards for 
their performances in the annual 
sustaining membership drive of the 
Scouts. 

The Court of Honor concluded 
with the Senior Patrol members 
presenting a cake and a uniform 
to assistant Scoutmaster Jim Han¬ 
na for his many years of service 
to the troop. 


The Police Blotter 

A 26-year-old male non-resident 
was arrested for indecent exposure 
around Breezewood Terrace in 
Springhill Lake. The arrest is ex¬ 
pected to close the cases of six such 
incidents in that part of town, 

S. Klein’s reported the theft of 
5 watches worth $198 from an un¬ 
locked display case. 

There was a strong arm robbery 
in front of 40-A Crescent. Two boys 
ran past a woman walking back 
from the Center. When she got to 
her apartment, one of the boys was 
in the doorway and he grabbed her 
purse as she set down her pack¬ 
ages. There was about $3.00 in the 
purse. When found the boy will be 
charged with robbery, which is a 
felony. 

The police now have a descrip¬ 
tion of the juvenile who has been 
snatching pocketbooks along South¬ 
way and Crescent Roads. He is a 
white male, 13-15 years old, medium 
weight When last seen, he wore 
dark trousers and a white and green 
athletic “T” shirt with a numeral 
on it. The youth involved tends to 
follow his victim before he snatches 
her purse. Most of the incidents 
have happened in the early evening 
hours. There is a possibility two 
youths are involved. 

In two different cases of larceny, 
the police, recovered a mini-bike and 
)a mini-go-cart. 

In a housebreaking of an apart¬ 
ment on Westway, an $80 portable 
TV was taken. The thief made his 
entrance through a sliding glass 
door. Chief Lane suggests that 
■people who have sliding doors 
should place a steel bar or even a 
stick the length of the tr^k be¬ 
hind the movable door to prevent 
a thief from entering that way. 

By use of a propane torch an un¬ 
known amount of coins was taken 
from the coin boxes on 2 washing 
machines in the basements of two 
apartment buildings, one on West¬ 
way, and the other on Lakeside 
Drive. 

Recently seven boys around 15 
and 16 years old were caught snif¬ 
fing cleaning fluid in the wooded 
area of the lake park around 2:45 
am. Officers were able to appre¬ 
hend three of them and a lookout 
has been posted for the rest. Police 
remind parents that they may be 
charged under a state law for fail¬ 
ure to maintain the care and super¬ 
vision of minors. This applies to 
any juvenile found out after 10 p.m. 
without reason. 

Police were on the lookout for 
four runaways: A 12 and a 14 year 
old boy, and a 14 and 15 year old 
girl. One boy returned on his own; 
the other was apprehended by the 
police, and the 14 year old girl was 
apprehended by police in Howard 
County and her parents were noti¬ 
fied to come and get her. 

The police auction of bicycles 
netted the city approximately $900. 
Sgt, Van Valkenburgh was the 
auctioneer. 


State Farm 
Insurance 
Ron 

Borgwardt 
474-8400 

Auto - Life - Homeowners 
10212 Baltimore Blvd. 
College Park, Md. 20740 

(on U.S. 1 at the Beltway) 


PORTER’S LIQUORS 

8200 Balto. Blvd. 474-3273 

(next to McDonald’s in College 
Park; 

We have the largest selection of 
Wines from around the world. 
Special prices on case purchases 

Order Early 

Any questions about wines 
welcomed 



Sales * Rentals * Repairs 

Howard’s Typewriter Co. 

56 Ave. & Annapolis Rd. 277-8333 


CITY OF GREENBELT, MARYLAND 

Notice of Charter Amendments 

« 

On June 11, 1973, the City Council of Greenbelt, Maryland adopted 
the following Amendments to the Charter of the City of Greenbelt 
Charter Amendment Resolution 1973-2 and Charter Amendment Res¬ 
olution 1973-3. Titles of the Resolutions, which are a fair summary 
of the amendments, are as follows: 

CHARTER AMENDMENT RESOLUTION 1973-2 

RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF GREENBELT ADOPTED PUR¬ 
SUANT TO THE AUTHORITY OF ARTICLE 11E OF THE CON¬ 
STITUTION OF MARYLAND AND SECTION 13 OF ARTICLE 
23A OF THE ANNOTATED CODE OF MARYLAND (1957 EDI¬ 
TION AS AMENDED), TITLE “CORPORATION-MUNICIPAL”, 
SUBTITLE “HOME RULE”, TO AMEND THE CHARTER OF THE 
CITY OF GREENBELT, SAID CHARTER BEING SECTION 40 
OF ARTICLE 17 OF THE CODE OF PUBLIC LAWS OF MARY¬ 
LAND (1963 EDITION AS AMENDED) AND CONTAINING IN 
WHOLE OR IN PART THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF 
GREENBELT, BY REPEALING AND REENACTING WITH 
AMENDMENTS SUBSECTION (C), TITLE “ADOPTION” OF 
SECTION 40-50, TITLE “COUNCIL ACTION ON BUDGET”, TO 
PROVIDE THAT COUNCIL SHALL ADOPT THE BUDGET ON 
OR BEFORE THE TWENTIETH DAY OF JUNE OF THE FISCAL 
YEAR CURRENTLY ENDING. 

CHARTER AMENDMENT RESOLUTION 1973-3 

RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF GREENBELT ADOPTED PUR¬ 
SUANT TO THE AUTHORITY OF ARTICLE 11E OF THE CON¬ 
STITUTION OF MARYLAND AND SECTION 13 OF ARTICLE 23A 
OF THE ANNOTATED CODE OF MARYLAND (1957 EDITION 
AS AMENDED), TITLE “CORPQRATIQN-MUNICIPAL”, SUB¬ 
TITLE, “HOME RULE”, TO AMEND THE CHARTER OF THE 
CITY OF GREENBELT, SAID CHARTER BEING SECTION 40 
OF ARTICLE 17 OF THE CODE OF LOCAL LAWS OF MARY¬ 
LAND (1963 EDITION) AND CONTAINING IN WHOLE OR IN 
PART THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF GREENBELT, BY RE¬ 
PEALING AND REENACTING WITH AMENDMENTS SECTION 
40-4 (AS AMENDED), TITLE “CREATION; QUALIFICATIONS; 
COMPENSATION”, TO PROVIDE A SALARY OF $2,400 PER 
ANNUM FOR THE MAYOR AND $2,000 PER ANNUM FOR 
EACH OF THE OTHER MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

The above amendments shall become and be considered a part of 
the Charter of the City of Greenbelt, Maryland, according to the 
terms of the amendments, in all respects to be effective and observed 
as such, upon the 31st day of July, 1973, unless on or before the fortieth 
day after passage, which shall be the 21st day of July, 1973, there shall 
be presented to the Council of the City of Greenbelt, Maryland, or 
mailed to it by registered mail, a petition for referendum signed by 
twenty percent or more of the persons qualified to vote in the general 
election of the City of Greenbelt, requesting that both or either of 
the above Charter Amendments be submitted on referendum to the 
voters of the City of Greenbelt. 

Copies of the above Charter Amendments Resolutions are posted 
in the Greenbelt Municipal Building in accordance with the require¬ 
ments of Section 13(d) of Article 23A of the Annotated Code of Mary¬ 
land. and may be obtained from the City Clerk, 25 Crescent Road, 
Greenbelt, Maryland, Telephone 474-8000. 

James K. Giese, City Manager 



Vete 

traits Cut-Rate Liquors 

11620 Baltimore Blvd. (Route 1) 

937-1110 

Beltsville, Md. 

937-3022 

Jacquin's Rum 

$7.99 Vigal. 

Teacher's Scotch 

$12.99 Vigal. 

Ancient Age 

9.29 Vigal. 

Gordon Gin 

$8.49 Vigal. 

Schenley OFC 

11.99 Vigal. 

Old Crow Light 

7.99 Vigal. 

Smirnoff Vodka 

8.99 Vigal. 

B & L Scotch 

8.99 Vigal. 

Gilbey's Vodka 

7.29 Vigal. 

Munich Beer 12 oz.. 3.69 case 

Bacardi Rum 

8.99 Vigal. 

Budweiser 12 oz. 

Pop Tops 4.99 case 


WE HONOR ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS 























Page 4 


GREENBELff NEWS REVIEW 


PRAB Plan Ready For 

by Roberta McNamara 

PRAB is ready after a year and 
a half of study and three public 
hearings to give its recommenda¬ 
tions to council for the improve¬ 
ment of Greenbelt Lake Park and 
Br-aden Field based on a plan sub¬ 
mitted by the architectural firm 
of T. D. Donovan as modified by 
the city staff in September of 1971. 
Only five board members, chair¬ 
man Joe Wilkinson, Hugh Jas- 
court, James Parochetti, Mike Mc¬ 
Mahon, and Rev. Kenneth Buker 
attended the Thursday night meet¬ 
ing which included nominations for 
officers. Also Darald Lofgren, the 
resigning city recreation director, 
was present. 

According to the proposed plan, 
PRAB recommends that the main 
entrance of the lake be improved 
by moving the entrance to opposite 
Lastner Lane. This would improve 
traffic flow and also allow more 
parking facilities to be developed, 

PRAB recommends that the par¬ 
king lot should be separated by an 
ornamental hedge, fencing or wall. 

The lake park would be enlarged 
to include parcels 7 and 8 (vacant 
lots across the road which border 
.Boxwood), Crescent Road should 
be moved to go diagonally through 
parcls 7 and 8 to connect with 
Ridge Rd. and eventually Kenil¬ 
worth Ave. at about the latitude of 
Jvy Lane, The northeastern tri¬ 
angle bordering Boxwood would 
then be for neighborhood recrea¬ 
tion. The specifics should be done 
only after consultation with Box¬ 
wood citizens. On the southwest¬ 
ern triangle four tennis courts 
would be constructed. After a top¬ 
ographical study, that part of 
Crescent road which will be within 
the park would be reclaimed as 
parkland. A pedestrian underpass 
should be constructed from Box¬ 
wood to the lake park. 

The old city staff plan had rec¬ 
ommended a group pavilion where 
the present concession stand is 
now. PRAB disagreed. The feeling 
was that no structures should inter¬ 
fere with the overview of the lake: 
thus the bandstand should be re¬ 
moved and whenever a stage is 
needed the city should borrow the 
mobile stage from MNCPPC. The 
basketball courts should be remov¬ 
ed and placed elsewhere. The pre¬ 
sent concession stand also should 
be moved and screened, perhaj^s 
even built into the bank. It was felt 
that the construction of a small or¬ 
namental shelter to be reserved for 
small family groups could be plac¬ 
ed across the lake near the dam 
and more tables with shelter tops 
could be provided along the lake 
side. 

According to PRAB, the north 
shore peninsula should be left na¬ 
tural; therefore, no ornamental 
structure at the tip of the peninsu¬ 
la. However, a warming pit will be 
constructed for skaters. The stream 
channel to the lake from Braden 
Field should be improved but not 
by weirs (small dams) as the city 
staff plan suggests since studies 
prove weirs ineffective. At the 
Jayceo Center between Braden 
Field and the lake, a play area that 
includes pre-teen equipment should 
be built. 

Braden Field Changes 

Any Braden Field development 
plans except for the construction 
of tennis courts and handball courts 
placed near the present tennis 
courts must be held in abeyance 
until the city acquires land suitable 
for playing fields. The fields are 
used year round, thus, improve¬ 
ment without relocation will cur¬ 
tail organized sports as well as 
free play in that area. PRAB rec¬ 
ommends the removal of the road 
around the pool because it causes 
erosion. The area now designated 
for horseshoes should be moved 
north for pedestrian safety. The 
city staff plan called for a larger 
sunbathing area at the pool, but 
PRAB disagreed. 

Along the bay area, the city 
Staff plan recommends the paving 
of the path; PRAB disagreed. How¬ 
ever, it agreed with the develop¬ 
ment of basketball courts and 
more tennis courts on that side, but 
only after Braden Field is im¬ 
proved. The southeastern shore 
should be developed into a wood¬ 
land garden. 

Over on the west shore, PRAB 
felt the dam should be improved 
but a pier, as proposed, might in- 


Oouncil Action 

crease the hazards and could make 
“accidental’' falling into the water 
attractive. PRAB also felt that a 
model airplane field should not be 
included but that the open area 
west of the dam is to be reserved 
for free play except for tree plant¬ 
ing on the slope. Perhaps a soft- 
ball field could be placed behind 
the public works building. There is 
to be no organic garden and defin¬ 
itely no lighted fountain spewing 
from the lake. In general the lake 
park should be as natural as a man 
made lake can be. 

All pathways around the lake 
should be improved. New path¬ 
ways should be developed from the 
parking lot to various areas in or¬ 
der to reclaim parts that have erod¬ 
ed. The lake service road should 
be just that, not open to unauthor¬ 
ized vehicle traffic. PRAB suggests 
a park patrol on motorcycles to pre¬ 
vent vehicle traffic. The park pa¬ 
trolled in such a manner would 
cut down erosion due to heavy ve¬ 
hicle trails. 

Even if council accepts PRAB’s 
proposal, the plan will be handi¬ 
capped by the lack of funds. Ini¬ 
tially, the city had planned to pay 
for the improvements with funds 
from the 1968 bond issue matched 
by a federal grant from HUD. Be¬ 
cause of federal budget cutbacks, 
the city will have to look for funds 
elsewhere. 

Size of PRAB 

Earlier in the meeting, PRAB in¬ 
dicated it would fight council’s pro¬ 
posal to cut the size of PRAB's 
board from twelve to nine mem¬ 
bers. Wilkinson felt that perhaps 
if council and the board could 
screen prospective board members 
attendance would improve. He also 
said that if the chairman was told 
by council who finally is appointed 
the chairman could welcome the 
new member. Jascourt felt that ap¬ 
plicants for the board had not in 
the past understood that PRAB is 
a working body that makes studies 
before it make recommendations. 

In general, the feeling was that 
in order to represent all segments 
of the city including two represen¬ 
tatives apiece from GHI and Spring- 



151 Centerway MLS 474-5700 

Greenbelt - Boxwood 
OPEN HOUSE - 111 Periwinkle 
oourt - Sunday - 1:30 p.m. 4 
Bedroom 3 bath Central Air 
Conditioned Split Foyer Brick 
and Aluminum siding. This 
home is situated in an area 
overlooking the City. Come up 
and see us. 

Greenbelt 

2 Bedroom brick end town- 
nouse (Duplex) with walk-up 
attic available for immediate 
possession. This home has 
washer, dryer, 3 Air Condi¬ 
tioners, freezer, and remodel¬ 
ed kitchen with many more 
extras included. A must to see. 
2 Bedroom frame home close to 
the Center is being offered at 
reduced price. Seller is leaving 
the area. This home is in beau¬ 
tiful condition. Call to show. 

For October occupancy we 
have a three bedroom frame 
home with large addition. This 
addition may be used as a fam¬ 
ily room or fourth bedroom. 

if you are looking for a very 
reasonable 3 Bedroom frame 
home in very good condition, we 
have one for you for $12,700. 

We sell our listings quickly. 
Come in to see our list of homes 
for sale and make a selection of 
the ones you w^uld like to see. 
COLLEGE PARK - U. of Md. 

A VERY WELL BUILT 3 BED¬ 
ROOM BRICK HOME WITH 
FAMILY ROOM AND FIRE¬ 
PLACE, TWO BATHS, FULL 
BASEMENT. THIS HOME IS 
SITUATED ON A CORNER 
LOT IN A VERY NICE AREA 
OF COLLEGE PARK. PRICED 
$42,575. 

SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS 
May we help you sell your home 
and help you find the home of 
your choice. 

GREENBELT SHOPPING 
CENTER 

NEXT TO MOBIL GAS 
STATION 


Boys-Girfs Gab News 

The Greenbelt Boys-Girls club 
anticipates an active year with the 
help of $800, raised by magazine 
subscriptions and donations during 
its recent fund drive. Several pro¬ 
grams are planned for next fall. 

Pre-sign-up for the fall programs 
will be on Saturday, July 14, afcthe 
Youth, Center from noon until i and 
on Saturday, July 28, at Springhill 
Lake from noon to 4. 

Help is needed for cheerleading 
instructors and aides. A full pro¬ 
gram of cheerleading will not be av¬ 
ailable unless help is forthcoming. 
No experience is necessary. Volun¬ 
teers are urged to call Marilyn Na¬ 
gle, 474-8781, or Mary Ann Baker, 
474-1706._ 

hill Lake (largest sectors of the 
city) and all interest groups — 
golden agers, youth, arts and crafts 
people, sports people, ecologists, a 
twelve person board is a necessity. 



For 


LIFE-HEALTH -CAR 
HOME INSURANCE 

Call 

Marty Madden 


Thursday, June 28, lay 

Library Programs 

Enjoy the summer of ’73 at the 
Greenbelt Branch Library every 
day of the week. 

A ‘U’ Film Workshop will be held 
on Mondays at 2 p.m. in the Meet¬ 
ing Room beginning July 9 through 
August 13 for ages 9-12. 

Tuesdays for boys and girls, 6 to 
12 years old, at 2:00 p.m. in the 
Meeting Room will be programs 
ranging from films to magicians. 

A film program for preschoolers 
(ages 3 to 6 years) and their par¬ 
ents, will be on Wednesdays at 10 
a.m., July 11 through August 15. 

Discuss your favorite book rec¬ 
ord or film on Thursdays at 4 p.m. 
in the Program Room beginning 
July 12 through August 16. (Ages 
10-12 years). 

“You read to me, I’ll read to you,” 
a program to share favorite stories, 
songs and games will be on Fri¬ 
days at 10:30 a.m. in the Program 
Room beginning July 6 through 
August 10. 


University Boutique 

International 

Our local seamstress has designed especially for YOU a beautiful 
halter wrap dress and sews it in colorful jersey prints to fit sizes 3 
to 22. 

In short it costs $15.00 

In Maxi $23.00 


One size Panty Hose 

Nylon Mesh Briefs 
asst, colors 

Plastic Houseware 
Assortment 


37c 

3/99c 

2/1.00 

23c 


Playing Cards 
Diamond Alummum Foil 4/99c 
Disposable Moist Towelettes 78c 
Solid Color Blankets 

polyester/acrylic blend 3.77 

Chair Re-Webbing Kits 57c 

W hoppers Candy 1 lb. 2 oz 
container 


63c 


Central Char ge-BankAmericard 


Ben Franklin 

Greenbelt Shopping Center 
Open 9-9 Mon.-Sat. 


Greenbelt, Maryland 

474-4742 

474-3670 

The man from Nationwide is on your side. 

(Nationwide 

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co. 
Nationwide Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 
Nationwide Life Insurance Co. 
Home Office: Columbus, Ohio 


Tf you prefer to buy your own material you may bring it in and 
we sew it for you. 

Also we still have the soft cotton gauze halter and pants sets which 
were featured in June GLAMOUR Magazine (p. 146) and the cotton 
tunic with the sheer ballooning sleeves shown in McCall’s June issue 
p. 70/71. 

Come and see us at 7404-Vi Baltimore Avenue, upstairs, 
in College Park, open 11 am - 7 pm (277-5521) 


DON’T SAVE 
WHERE YOU CHECK 

Check Where You Save 


Think about it. Banks offer many fine services. Checking accounts. 
Automobile financing. Personal loans. Many people also maintain savings 
accounts at the bank where they check. 

We at first Federal specialize in savings accounts, BUT, with one very im¬ 
portant difference. Our basic passbook savings plan is 5%. The highest pass¬ 
book interest in the area. 

Interest is computed on daily balances, from day following deposit to day 
of withdrawal, and is compounded MONTHLY. There is no penalty for with¬ 
drawing before the end of a so-called interest period, provided that at least 
$10-remains on deposit until the last day of the month. 

Certificate plans are also available which offer up to 6% interest on min¬ 
imum deposits of $5,000 with a two to five year guarantee period. 

WHAT DOES ALL THIS MEAN? 

Simple. It means the money you have worked hard for is working even 
harder for you once it’s deposited in First Federal Savings and Loan. So go 


ahead. Check at a bank. But SAVE at First Federal. 


For more information, fill out the coupon or stop in and see us. 


FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS 

Open ’til 4 daily, Fridays until 6. ^ 


& LOAN ASSOCIATION 
of Annapolis 

7910 Cherrywood Lane 
Greenbelt, Md. 20770 
Gentlement: Please send me my 
free copy of “The Capital Way 
to Save.” 

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS 

and Loan Association of Annapolis 


Beltway Plaza, Greenbelt, Md. 


Name . 

(Main Office 2024 West St., Annapolis, Md.) 


Add r ^ss ... 

Phone: 535-0800 



































Page 5 


Thursday, June 28, 1973 


CREENBELT NEWS REVIEW/ 


DIAL TRUTH 
EVERY DAY 

Recorded music and inspiration by telephone 



THIS AD SPONSORED BY ALLEN PRINTING SERVICE 







Page 6 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Thursday, June 28, 1973 


now come 

this kid has more 
money saved 

than you do? 



Take stock in America. 

Now Bonds pay a bonus at maturity. 


Because over the years his parents 
have invested in U.S. Savings Bonds 
—in his name, for his future—by 
participating in the Payroll Savings 
Plan at work. 

He probably doesn’t even know. 
And right now* he couldn’t care less. 
But when he’s older, that money can 
be used for a lot of things—a car, a col¬ 
lege education, or even a new home. 

The Payroll Savings Plan is an 
easy way to save money for you and 
every member of your family. When 
you join, an amount you designate 
will be automatically laid aside from 


your paycheck and invested in U.S. 
Savings Bonds. It’s a painless way 
to save. 

And now there’s a bonus interest 
rate on all U.S. Savings Bonds—for 
E Bonds, 5^% when held to matu¬ 
rity of 5 years, 10 months (4% the 
first year). That extra payable 
as a bonus at maturity, applies to all 
Bonds issued since June 1, 1970 . . . 
with a comparable improvement for 
all older Bonds. 

Join the Payroll Savings Plan 
where you work and make your son 
the richest kid on the block. 




Bonds arc safe. If lost, stolen, or destroyed, 
we replace them. When needed, they can be 
cashed at your bank. Tax may be deferred 
until redemption. And alwayi remember, 
Bonds are a proud wav to save. 


fC% 


i Th* Government dots not pay for IHis advertisement. 
It b p niM> i < w •iMtblk aervica in cooperation with The 
I Am Treasury isd The Advertising Council. 























Thursday, June 28, 1973 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Page 7 


CLASSIFIED 

$1.50 for a 10-word minimum, 10c 
for each additional word. Submit 
ads in writing, accompanied by 
cash payment, either to the News 
Review office at 15 Parkway before 
10 p.m. of the Tuesday preceding 
publication, or to the Twin Pines 
Savings and Loan office. 

There is no charge for advertising 
items that are found. 

RELIABLE T.V. SERVICE, Color- 
B/W. Call Andy Hanyok 474-6461. 
'‘MARIE’S POODLE GROOMING” 
give your poodle a new look. 474- 
3219. 

CALDWELL’S WASHER SER- 
VICE. All makes expertly repaired. 
Authorized Whirlpool dealer. GR 
4-5515. 103 Centerway. 

SUMMER CAMP <July 5 - August 

39) and fall registration (Sept. 4) 
now being accepted at the Green - 
belt Town and Country School. Con¬ 
tact Mrs. Day for further informa¬ 
tion 474-5252. 

TYPEWRITER REPAIR, ELEC¬ 
TRIC, STANDARD AND PORTA¬ 
BLES. Call 474-6018. 

AIR CONDITIONERS REPAIRED 
& INSTALLED. Call 474-5606. 
BEAUTIFY YOUR FURNITURE: 

- Fabric selection - Free estimate - 
quality work Prompt service. THE 
UPHOLSTERY SHOP 441-2062. 
PIANO LESSONS - Given by com 
poser. Beginners, intermediates, ad¬ 
vanced. 345-9129. 

TROMBONE. TRUMPET and 

VOICE LESSONS. Professional 
musician with degree. 474-5945. 


ANTENNA 

PROBLEMS 

Sales & Service 
Expert antenna man will 
install new/repair anten¬ 
na for 

Attic or Outdoors 
474-4892 


FLOOR SANDING & FINISHING 
(20 YEARS EXPERIENCE). CALL 
AFTER 5:30. 474-5673. 

PIANO TUNING AND REPAIR. 
EXPERIENCED. RELIABLE. 
474-6894. 

LEARN TO DRIVE - CALL TRI^ 

STATE DRIV-SCHOOL 347-7773. 
RES. 301-934-2095. 
KINDERGARTEN, PRE-KINDER- 

GARTEN, NURSERY. Exciting 
progressive, educational program. 
Accredited School, Certified Teach¬ 
ers. Limited openings for fall. Full 
day or half day. Greenbelt Town 
and Country School. Please call 
Mrs. Day for information and bro¬ 
chure. 474-5252. 

PAINTING, - PANELING - CAR- 
PENTRY, WALLPAPER- 
ING, DECKS, DOORS. 474-4791. 
YARD SALE, SATURDAY, thirti- 
eth, nice clothes, miscellaneous, 7-C 
Research Rd. 10- ? 

SALE: MOVING, Gibson refrigera¬ 
tor $25., other household items, best 
offer. 474-5289. 

30” WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC 

Range, wide oven, good condition. 
$50. 474-8821. 

FOR SALE: ANTIQUE mahogany 

china closet, excellent condition, $70. 
New blue and red braid carpet. 
$15. 474-0316. 

TRUNDLE BED, new condition 

$65., rollaway bed, 39”, $20. 474- 

4449. 

FOR SALE: PLAYPEN, walker, 

jolly jumper $25. 434-8168 or 345- 

8456. 

TRUCK WASHING - 20-35 tirs/wk. 
$2.50/hr., over 18 yrs. of age. Call 
345^2015 or 474-5985. 

CAk POOL DRIVER - Vic. of~17th 
& K Sts., N.W. call A1 Bistany 474- 
8556. 


POSITION AVAILABLE 

Police Clerk-Dispatcher 
Full time, rotating shifts, high 
school graduate or equivalent. 
Ability to type. Minimum age - 
18. 

Starting. $2.83 per hour, plus 
fringe benefits. 

APPLY: Police Department 
City of Greenbelt, Md, 
25 Crescent Road 

474-5454 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 
EMPLOYER 

WANTED, EXPERIENCED MAN 
to do lawn work and hedges. 474- 
9419. 


Ocvt 'JtetyM&tt 

by Elaine Skolnik - 474-6060 

In a close battle at last Friday’s 
duplicate bridge session, Tony Pi 
sano and Sid Barnett emerged vic¬ 
torious by % point over Claire Ja¬ 
cobs and Marian Hettenhous. Third 
place went to the team of Joe Nu- 
sinov and Joe Reid. Next game: 
Friday, July 13. 

Congratulations to Esther Kiel, 
47-C Ridge, who was elected secre¬ 
tary of the Washington Chapter of 
the Federal Government Account¬ 
ant’s Association. She is a senior 
accountant for the National Science 
Foundation. 

James O. Ragwar, 9124 Edmon- 
ston Road, received the B.S. degree 
in Chemistry from Florida A&M 
University. 

Joining her sister, Mrs. Ruth 
Wexler of Israel, for a reunion 
with their mother, Mrs. Evelyn 
Wagner, 3~C Crescent, is Mrs. Deb 
orah Rashkin of North Hollywood, 
Cajif. 

Vincent Palacino Jr., 7908 Lake 
crest Dr. received his Ph.D. in Psy 
chology at Michigan State Univer¬ 
sity. 

Leslie Moore of 1 Lake view Cir¬ 
cle, a 1973 graduate of Parkdale 
High School, has been admitted to 
Bucknell University, Lewisburg, 
Pennsylvania. Leslie, a recipient of 
a gubernatorial Award of Merit for 
graduating in the top five percent 
of her class, was also installed re¬ 
cently as Honored Queen of Bethel 
34, International Order of Job’s 
Daughters at Beltsville. 

Air Force Sergeant David C. 
Wigley, son of Mrs. Ruth L. Wig- 
ley, 29 Woodland Way, has arrived 
for duty at Beale AFB, California. 
An administration specialist, he is 
assigned to a unit of the Strategic 
Air Command. 

Shelby Best, secretary of the 
Greenbelt Jaycees, has been selec¬ 
ted to represent the Maryland Jay- 

MNCPPC, P.6. Chapter 
Role Conflict Defined 

Commenting on the recent decis¬ 
ion of the Maryland Court of Ap¬ 
peals upholding a lower court de¬ 
cision that the Prince Georges 
County Charter does not supersede 
or amend the powers of The Mary¬ 
land-National Capital Park and 
Planning Commission, Vice Chair¬ 
man Philip R. Hogue said, “We ap¬ 
plaud the ruling but at the same 
time we want to work in harmony 
with the county government to make 
Prince Georges County the best 
county possible." 

In tile earlier decision, the court 
held “the Maryland-Washington 
Regional District Act is a public 
general law. The county may not 
exercise the powers of planning 
and zoning within the ‘Regional Dis¬ 
trict’ and that provisions of the 
Prince Georges County Charter are 
not applicable to that portion of 
Prince Georges County within the 
‘Regional District’.” 

According to MNCPPC coun¬ 
sel, the Regional Act gives the Dis¬ 
trict Council the power to zone 
nearly all of Prince Georges Coun¬ 
ty. But this does not make the 
Charter invalid. The Charter is val¬ 
id when applied to areas not cov¬ 
ered by the Act. Right now the 
Charter has no geography to con¬ 
trol as it relates to zoning. 

The public general law govern¬ 
ing the Commission has the over¬ 
riding power because it pertains 
to two counties, Prince Georges and 
Montgomery, rather than just one 
as the Charter does. 


LOST, VIC. NORTH END. Key 
chain with gold medallion from 
Prudential Life. Reward, call 474- 
9468 or 474-0389. 

FREE: PART BORDER COLLIE, 
female, owners moving, 474-6028. 
SALE, GREEN SOFA and chair, 

$50; gold 9x12, 9x9, & 9x3 rugs $125; 
2 bookcases $20. 474-1748. 

LOST - READING glasses and 
case near the Co-op. 474-6980. 

YARD HELP WANTED, experien- 
ced trimming hedges, ornamentals, 
lawn, etc., 474-9435. 

REMODELING, REC-ROOMS, Kit- 

chens, also additions. Done by re¬ 
liable carpenter. Call Don 474-0881. 
FOUND - HALF GROWN CAT, on 
Lakeside. Black with white nose, 
chest and paws. 474-4346. 


cees in the “Speak-Up” contest at 
the national convention of the Un¬ 
ited States Jaycees. Shelby had to 
compete with many outstanding 
candidates from Jaycee chapters 
from all across the state of Mary¬ 
land. He now will have to compete 
with candidates from all 50 states 
and will have to give a speech on 
what the Jaycee Creed means to 
him. 

Leo Gorton was awarded the 
Heart Association’s Tom Heilman 
Memorial Award for his outstand 
ing volunteer service in coordin 
ating the Greenbelt Heart Disease 
Screening Project. Gerton served 
as Heart Sunday Chairman for the 
Berwyn District. 

Welcome home to Sid and Ber 
nice Kastner of North way. They 
recently visited England and the 
Netherlands. 

Gene Rodefer of 8421 Greenbelt 
Road, has received a Pacesetter 
Award from Southwestern Life In¬ 
surance Company for outstanding 
service during his first three 
months with the firm. 

Arlene Dortch, 5831 Cherrywood 
Tr, received a BA cum laude; hon¬ 
ors in English, at Hofstra College 
in Hempstead, N. Y. 

Roving Ronald Allan Charles \ 
2-D Garden way, is now home after 
a seven-year trip around the world. 
He visited 75 countries by hitchhik 
ing and back-packing, teaching ju 
do ' in many places. Welcome 
home, Ronald! 

County Rents Controls 

Prince Gdorges County Council 
voted 8-1 recently to adopt an emer¬ 
gency rent control bill, legislating 
a six percent ceiling on rent in¬ 
creases and placing enforcement 
powers in the hands of the county’s 
Landlord-Tenant Commission. 

Council’s action during the June 
19 legislative session prompted 
Chairman John J. Garrity to call 
on County Executive William W. 
Gullett to submit a slate of ap¬ 
pointees who would “give the Com ¬ 
mission instant credibility with 
tenant and landlord organizations 
and with the public at large.” 

The emergency rent control mea¬ 
sure was approved with Council¬ 
man Samuel W. Bogley casting the 
lone dissenting vote. Vice Chair¬ 
man Francis W. White was absent. 
The bill provides for a flat six 
percent ceiling on rent increases 
until Dec. 31, making mandatory 
the rent ceiling with which at least 
90 percent of the county’s land¬ 
lords voluntarily complied in April. 

County Executive Gullett signed 
the bill into law June 21. 

Garrity said the measure reme¬ 
dies two major problems in the 
rent control bill enacted in April 
by the state legislature. 

The state bill requires a tenant 
seeking redress of a violation to 
hire an attorney and file suit, while 
enforcement of the local law will 
be vested in the landlord-tenant 
commission. Tenants will incur no 
costs in filing a complaint with the 
commission. 

The state bill also allows land¬ 
lords to “pass through” to tenants 
increased costs such as taxes and 
utilities over and above the per¬ 
mitted five percent increase. The 
Prince Georges rent control law 
sets a flat ceiling on increases over 
rents charged as of Jan. 11, when 
federal guidelines were lifted, with 
no “pass throughs.” 


TRAFFIC TIPS 

of the most dangerous thing* 
about freeways comes after having 
just left one. Drivers have to re¬ 
adjust their thinking, get back tr 
old speeds, watch each intersection 
end other things they don’t have *' 
do on freeways. 

Fatigue impairs driving ability. 
Recent tests have shown that after 
four hours on the road, drivers 
took 20 percent longer to make 
steering corrections and drifted 
twice as far from the center line. 
The message is obvious. Keep rest¬ 
ed and alert when driving. 

Slow moving drivers on highways 
or expressways built for higher 
speeds are a menace. These roads 
are designed to move traffic quickly 
and safely. “Sunday Drivers” should 
maintain a reasonable speed or use 
a side road. 


KASH REALTOR 
345-2151 


MEMO: WHAT DO YOU DO 
NOW? COME TO HASH REAL¬ 
TOR ABOVE THE POST OF¬ 
FICE IN THE GREENBELT 
SHOPPING CENTER FOR AS¬ 
SISTANCE IN BUYING OR 
SELLING A HOME. WE OF¬ 
FER EXPERT ADVICE ON 
THE LATEST FINANCING 
PROCEDURES. WE ARE UP- 
TO-DATE ON THE LATEST 
M O N E Y DEVELOPMENTS 
THAT CAN INFLUENCE YOUR 
ACTIONS IN THE COMING 
MONTHS AS WELL AS NOW. 
WE HELP YOU BUY HOMES 
OVER ANY PART OF MARY¬ 
LAND AND OF COURSE ARE 
BEST EQUIPPED TO HAND¬ 
LE THE SALE OF YOUR 
HOME BECAUSE WE ARE A 
LOCAL REALTOR. OR CALL 
345-215! ANYTIME DAY OR 
NIGHT FOR SERVICE. 


LET THE “CHAP-STICK” in 
his apartment if he wants to, but 
we are “bugging” you to come 
to Kash Realtor above the post 
office in the Greenbelt shopping 
center to see this 3 BR brick 
rambler with rec. room in the 
basement. This is a real oppor¬ 
tunity to buy a home near the 
Univ. of Md. and get a Wishing 
Well in the back yard (every¬ 
one could use one of these). Pri¬ 
ced at .$32,500. 


T H E “MOVING FINGER” 
POINTS AND HAVING POIN¬ 
TED, MOVES ON. NOT ONE 
TEAR NOR BIT OF REMORSE 
CAN REMOVE “.J’ACCUSE” 
NOR THE DOUBTS CAST. LET 
NOT THE MOVING FINGER 
BE POINTED AT YOU IN 
COMING YEARS BECAUSE 
YOU DID NOT BUY A HOME 
NOW. COME TO KASH REAL¬ 
TOR, THE PROFESSIONALS 
ARE ALWAYS AT YOUR SER¬ 
VICE TO GIVE THE VERY 
BEST IN SERVICE ANYTIME 
DAY OR NIGHT. TRY US! 
CALL 345-2151 NOW. 


Greenbelt Cares 

Greenbelt Cares, the bureau that 
will provide services to youth in 
this area, is located at 133 Center - 
way, room 201 (over the theater). 
The office is open on Monday 
through Friday 8 a.m. 10 p.m.: 
Saturday, 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Sun 
day, 10 a.m, to 4 p.m. 

The services offered will be emer ¬ 
gency crisis intervention, referral 
service to other county and state 
agencies, and information about 
training in behavior modification. 

The counseling service will still 
be held as usual in the Commun¬ 
ity Church, Crescent and Hillside 
Roads, on Wednesday evenings 
from 7 to 9. 

People may register with the cen¬ 
ter if wishing to hire a youth to 
work around their homes. Youth 
may also register with the center 
if they wish to work. The phone 
number is 345-3456. 


NOTICE 

The Greenbelt CARES coun¬ 
seling center in the Community 
Church will be closed next Wed¬ 
nesday July 4. It will reopen the 
following Wednesday for the us¬ 
ual 7 to 9 session. 


The Partridgeberry 
School, Inc. 


of Greenbelt, located in the new 
classroom wing of Mishkan 
Torah, offers children 5-10 an 
innovative academic program 
with child-appeal. The school 
welcomes applications from fam¬ 
ilies of all backgrounds (racial, 
ethnic, economic, religious). Pa¬ 
rent training program for com¬ 
fortable and effective parent 
classroom participation. State 
authorized. Information: 474- 
4609. 


KASH Realtor 
HOMES FOR SALE 

Call 345-2151 Anytime 
MULTIPLE LISTING 
SERVICE 

MEMORANDUM: TO: All apart¬ 
ment dwellers, still putting off 
buying a home? Do not wait any 
longer, here is your opportunity 
to get a 2 BR home with many 
features you have always want 
ed. Dishwasher, washer, dryer, 
2 A/C’s, beautiful covered patio, 
pleasant yard, planters, and 
many flowers. Lots of storage! 
Buy now while mortgage money 
has a low interest rate. Take 
over pmts. of $107.25/mo. after 
dwn. pmt. that includes all util 
ities except elect, and phone. 
Some structural maintenance in - 
eluded. $13,500 


FOR YOUR EYES ONLY if you 
buy this fabulous 3 BR brick 
END HOME BACKED UP TO 
WOODS! With Ige. family room 
opening out onto patio. Modern 
kit. with dishwasher & disposal. 
Washer, dryer and 4 A/C's as 
well as W/W carpeting. This is 
a must to see! Take over pmts. 
of $156/mo. after dwn. pmt. Your 
present Greenbelt home could 
very well be the down pmt, 
MOVE UP IN GREENBELT! 
UPPER TWENTIES! 

HUSH MONEY? Sure, but it 
goes into an escrow account to 
be used as part of the purchase 
price of the house you will buy 
from Kash Realtor. This earn¬ 
est money hushes the advertis¬ 
ing. So, be prepared to bring 
your “hush money” and buy this 
3 BR rambler with rec. room in 
basement Remodeled kit. with 
dishwasher & disposal. W/W car¬ 
peting and 2 A/C’s are included. 
Located near Greenbelt with 
fenced yard and pleasant patio. 
$30,900 

“A BAKER’S DOZEN” can lit 
into this Brand New potential 
5 BR 3 Bath Cent. A/C home 
with carport that will be held 
open this Sunday from 1 until 6 
PJVI, Bring your committee to 
interrogate us on the features 
that go with this quality home. 
Imagine, a 24 foot rec. room, with 
fireplace, beautiful kit. with wav- 
free linoleum, Intercom, beauti¬ 
ful parquet floors throughout 
main floor. Located on wooded 
lot, on a dead-end street. Direc¬ 
tions: Kenilworth Ave. North to 
Powdermill, cross over Rte. One 
and follow Powder mill to Cellar 
Lane. Left on Cedar and right 
on Greenwood to 4519. Priced in 
upper forties. 

COVER-UP all you want to but 
you cannot stop the rise in pric¬ 
es. If you have been looking for 
a 3 BR home that is a real bar¬ 
gain — here it is; with dish¬ 
washer, washer, dryer, A/C and 
fenced yard with woods in back! 
Take over pmts. of $121.75/mo. 
after dwn. pmt. Financing avail¬ 
able. $13,200 

A’INT NO WAY Senator you 
can find a more convenient place 
to live in Greenbelt than this 
3 BR masonry with remodeled 
kit., that has dishwasher, dis¬ 
posal, huge ref./freezer and 
many modern cabinets. Call 
about this right now to find how 
you can take over pmts. of $145/ 
mo. after dwn. pmt. Your pres¬ 
ent home could be the down 
pmt. MOVE UP IN GREEN¬ 
BELT! $26,700 

THE WHITE HOUSE on the 
“hill” is always the dream, but 
we have one that is in a dell 
that will serve the needs of the 
executive that needs a home for 
advertising. It is all here! 
LARGE CUSTOM BUILT HOME 
LOCATED ON PRIVATE 
ESTATE SIZED GROUNDS OF 
APPROX. 6 ACRES. CALL FOR 
DETAILS. $159,000 

“PLASTER OVER” no need to 
do this to this 3 BR brick home 
with attic, unique bunk-beds 
built into one bedroom. Equip¬ 
ped with dishwasher, washer, 
dryer A/C, and W/W carpet¬ 
ing. Take over pmts, of $131.50/ 
mo. after dwn, pmt. Priced to 
move, $24,500 



















































Page 8 GREENBE LT NEWS REVIEW Thursday, JuneJ28, 1973 

Burning at the FDR School Site 
Exceeds Smoke Regulations 

by Elaine Skolnik 

With the clearing of the Board of Education tract for the Franklin 
D. Roosevelt senior High School in its last week, complaints of a major 
order were received for the first time regarding the operation of the air 
curtain destructor (ADD) method. On Tuesday afternoon, June 19, the 
city received a report from council member Rhea Cohen that a passerby 
had just seen black smoke arising from the school board property on the 
Smith-Ewing tract east of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. 


Reportedly the city inspector at 
the time was examining the Green- 
briar operation at the other end of 
the tract. City Public Works Di¬ 
rector Albert Attick was immedi— 
ately dispatched to the scene and 
stopped the operation. Part of the 
wall had caved in, causing part of 
the flare up. Attick said the air, 
instead of blowing across the pit, 
was going wild. The operator had 
also improperly loaded the pit, put¬ 
ting into it unsuitable material that 
resulted in ineffective burning, 
causing a smothered fire which 
registered about number 3 on the 
Ringelmann Chart. The city ordin¬ 
ance prohibits smoke that has a 
density in excess of 1 on the Ring¬ 
elmann Chart. 

Warning Issued 

The county inspector Fred Woo- 
ton had been present at the site in 
the morning and had warned the 
contractor about the operation. He 
said that the general practice, when 
specifications are not being met, is 
to give warnings and advise the 
operator what corrective action to 
take. Since the contractor in this 
instance immediately undertook 
corrective work, no orders to close 
down the operation at that time 
were issued. The city inspector, who 
also was on the scene, followed a 
similar procedure. 

Wooten noted that the school 
board land-clearing contractor was 
inexperienced in the operation of 
the ACD. With the job coming to 
a close, he had apparently also be¬ 
come careless, Wooten said. The in¬ 
spector said that when he returned 
to the scene later in the afternoon, 
he found further infringements and 
cited the company for violations 
of the ACD guidelines. He added 
that “This company will have to do 
back bends and flips for us before 
they will be given another ACD 
burning permit.” 

Greenbriar Burning 

Work had begun on the school 
board tract on May 16 and burning 
had continued intermittently for a 
total of 21 days. As for the ACD 
operation on the Greenbriar site 
which began about 10 burning-days 
later, no citations for violations 
have been issued. Wooten said that 
the soil of the Greenbriar tract 
was more stable and had heavier 
clay than that of the sandy school 
board property, causing fewer prob¬ 
lems with collapsing pit walls. Also, 
according to Wooten, the Greenbri¬ 
ar operator was an experienced hand 
in the operation of ACD. The clear¬ 
ing of the Greenbriar tract is ex¬ 
pected to be finished by the end of 
the month. 

City manager James Giese also 
reported that the ACD operation 
£t Greenbriar has functioned more 
satisfactorilv than the school oper¬ 
ation. Greenbriar, he said, has been 
able to hum their stumps in a rel¬ 
atively smokeless fashion bv build¬ 
ing up the heat of the fire with 
other tree material and then care¬ 
fully laying stumps upon the fire. 
“The great majority of Greenbriar 
trees, Giese said, are being chipped, 
however, and not burned.” 


As of this date, the county has 
reported some ten complaints from 
the two operations and the city two. 
Approximately six complaints came 
on Friday, June 15, from NASA. 
These were not due to the ACD 
operation, but to the spontaneous 
combustion of wood chips on the 
Greenbriar tract. A pile of chips 
caught fire and smouldered through 
the night. The smoke was sucked 
into NASA’s air conditioners and 
circulated within some buildings. 

The city council will dscuss the 
ACD operaton at its next council 
meeting on July 9. 


Environmental Hem 

by Gabe Huck 

ENERGY CRISIS! It's as close 
as the BP station on Southway. 
Last Sunday night at 9:30 there 
wasn’t a station open on Green- 
belt Road. Where has all the gas 
gone? The papers are full of the¬ 
ories as to whether the crisis is 
real or is the creation of the big 
oil companies. Those who hold the 
later viewpoint believe that the 
“crisis” will help drive out inde¬ 
pendent dealers and, more impor¬ 
tant, that the public demand for 
fuel for the big chariots we all 
drive around will force the repeal 
of such weak environmental re¬ 
strictions now in force on the oil 
companies. What better way to get 
that pipeline for Alaskan oil, quick¬ 
ly and with no care for environ¬ 
mental disruption, than 100 million 
vehicles starving for their black 
gold? 

The commercial radio and TV 
stations are telling us to slow down 
and save a gallon a week. Ecolo¬ 
gists have been giving advice like 
that for some time. But watch what 
is happening. The burden of the 
crisis is placed on you and me. 
And it belongs there, but only in 
part. Profits in the oil companies 
have been higher than ever this 
year and the federal government 
has refused to make meaningful 
cuts in the military’s use of fuel. 
Let’s share the “crisis” a little. 

Instead of gratifying the oil com¬ 
panies with an outcry for more gas 
(at any price) we can cut down on 
our consumption. Fix up the bicy¬ 
cles. Get the legs into shape. Use 
Amtrak for the family vacation (in¬ 
expensive, relaxing, exciting — a 
lark the first time you do it, may¬ 
be but after that you’ll come back 
for better reasons). If you don’t 
have small children, check out 
Greyhound’s vacation rates. You pay 
a fixed amount and can travel as 
much as you wish, anywhere you 
wish, during a specified number of 
days. Easily the cheapest way, es¬ 
pecially if you can travel and sleep 
on the bus by night and save hotel 
bills too. 

Make all trips in the car count. 
Wait until several errands can be 
done at once. Why should a two- 
ton assembly of metal and glass be 
put into motion to move just one 
small person. Set a limit on the 
amount you will spend for gas in 
any one day period and stick to it. 


LAUNDROMIT 

★ FULLY ATTENDED 

FULL SERVICE I 

1. WASH & DRY - Do a full week’s laundry in less than 1 hour 

2. HEAVY ITEMS - Shag rugs, blankets, spreads, quilts, sleep¬ 
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up to 45 lbs. in one load for $1.00. 

3. DRY CLEANING - Genuine coin-op dry cleaning - A full 8 
lbs. for $3.00. No need to stay & wait, we will take care 
of it for you. All items returned on hangers and in plastic 
bags. 

BELTWAY PLAZA 

Coin-Op Wash & Dry Clean Center 
6C00 Greenbelt Rd. 

(Next to A&P) 

_ 


Greenbelt Grab-Bag 

by Punchin’ Judy 

“Traffic is moving well on New 
York Avenue at this time and it’s 
clear sailing all the way to the 
Baltimore Washington Parkway.” 
These cheerful words came through 
my radio as I sat helplessly en¬ 
meshed in a monumental traffic 
jam on - you guessed it - New York 
Avenue. 

Not for the first time I wonder¬ 
ed where the good captain in his 
helicopter gathered his informa¬ 
tion. Every night, on my way home 
from work, I listen to the traffic 
information from the helicopters of 
two radio stations. Seldom does it 
happen that they have any agree¬ 
ment with each other, never mind 
the actual traffic situation. 

Traffic Reports 

But, I hear you cry, those heli¬ 
copters passed over your location 
perhaps a half hour ago, and traf¬ 
fic conditions have changed. OK, but 
how do you explain what happened 
the other day. An ambulance pas¬ 
sed me as I was getting on the 
Beltway at New Hampshire Ave. A 
short distance later, it could be seen 
that it was going to the scene of a 
two-car accident. Although both the 
cars and the ambulance were well 
off the road, a traffic jam instant¬ 
ly developed, since all the cars 
passing by naturally had to slow 
down to see what was going on. 
The eye in the sky quickly sent in 
a report. “There is a three-car ac¬ 
cident on the Beltway near New 
Hampshire Avenue,” the captain re¬ 
ported, “but traffic is moving well.” 
Crawling along at 5 mph in a 65 
mph zone, I wondered where he 
saw a third car or whether we were 
looking at the same accident. 

Then I pushed the radio button 
and got the other traffic reporter. 
“There is a heavy build up on the 
Beltway near New Hampshire Av¬ 
enue,” he confirmed. “But there 
is no sign of any accident so it 
appears to be the usual load of 
rush hour traffic.” 

As you might have guessed, 1 
have several theories on why I find 
a clear road when the report is 
bumper-to-bumper and get bogged 
down when there allegedly isn’t 
another car on the highway. On my 
paranoid days, of course, I am 
convinced that this is a conspir¬ 
acy involving the radio stations, 
the police department, and prob¬ 
ably the FBI, CIA, and PTA. 

Practical Jokes 

However, I am not always para¬ 
noid. On some days, I believe this 
is a practical joke played by the 
Joy Boys and other disc jockeys. 
At still other times, I entertain the 
possibility that the traffic fellows 
pre-record a number of reports 
and then go out to play golf, leav¬ 
ing the radio stations to play them 
at random at 15 minute intervals. 

There is P.nother possibility of 
course, and that is that when the 
helicopter leaves the ground, it goes 
into a different space-time contin¬ 
uum. This is a science fiction type 
of idea, but then so are helicop¬ 
ters. Everybody knows they can’t 
possibly fly. I know it, and don’t 
bother me about Leonardo Da Vin¬ 
ci. 

The worst experience I ever had 
was the other day, when the cop¬ 
ter entreated me not to use the 
Parkway but to take some other 
route which he described in detail 
and which I swear I never heard of. 
By brain seething with visions of 
paranoia, practical jokes, and Da 
Vinci, I almost abandoned my car 
in mid-traffic. Just in time I heard 
the rest of the report: “And if at 
all possible, avoid Michigan Blvd.” 
With great relief, I realized that I 
was getting a Chicago station, a 
freak of radio reception caused, no 
doubt, by a disturbance on the sun. 

Hey, maybe that’s it! Sun spots! 
I’ll have lots of time to think about 
that tomorrow when I’m watching 
mv car standing there and over¬ 
heating, while the captain assures 
me that “You’ll have no problem 
all the way to the Baltimore Wash¬ 
ington Pky.” 


GUTTERING 

Seamless Aluminum 

Baked on Enamel Finish 
Cust6m Made & Installed on 
Job Site 

Gaudette - Seamless 
Guttering 
345-3066 


Greenbelt Carry-out 

Saturday Special: Royal Steak Sub . 65c 

Large Sausage Pizza . $1.50 

EVERYDAY SPECIALS 

Super Hot Dog . 35c 

Canned Coca-Cola . 79c a carton 


107 CENTERWAY 474-4998 



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