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flrcenbdl 

I kins Ikn i cm 


Public Hearing Monday on Bond 
Issue for GHI Rebab Program 

by Mary Lou Williamson 

The City of Greenbelt and Greenbelt Homes, Inc., are in 
the final stretch in their plans to float a $17.5 million revenue 
bond issue to finance a major portion of GHFs member approved 
general rehabilitation. On Monday, September 22, at 8 p.m. 
the City will hold a public hearing before formally adopting 
the ordinance permitting the issuance of the low-interest, tax- 
exempt bonds. According to the current schedule, the bonds 
should be ready to market by the end of Ocober. 

Nanna and Schwan both noted 
that a statement of understanding 
should be provided to the city by 
GHI acknowledging GHI’s respon¬ 
sibility for all costs related to the 
issuance of the bonds. 

New Street Lights 
Being Installed 

Upon order of the City, PEPCO 
is replacing street lights through¬ 
out much of the northern portion 
and GHI areas. Seventy watt high 
pressure sodium vapor lights are 
being installed instead of 189 
watt or larger incandescent lights. 
The new lights will provide twice 
as much light as the incandescents 
but utilize only 37% of the energy. 

Because the lights are so much 
brighter and because of the 
City’s interest in conserving en¬ 
ergy, a survey was made of ex¬ 
isting lights to determine if any 
were spaced closer than the rec¬ 
ommended spacing. As a result, 
lights on some poles were elimi¬ 
nated on a trial basis in several 
locations and particularly in the 
Lakewood Subdivision. 

The new lights are lensed and 
direct their light up and down the 
street. In some locations, because 
of trees or curves in the street, 
residents may find that a missing 
light is needed in spite of the 
brighter lights installed. Resi¬ 
dents who desire to have a re¬ 
moved light restored should no¬ 
tify the City Offices at 474-8000. 
Before calling, it is suggested 
that the matter first be discussed 
with the neighbors to see if there 
is agreement on the matter. 

Spellman to Host Academy 
Careers Showcase on Hill 

An Academy/Career Showcase 
that will feature presentations on 
uniformed service academies and 
their admissions procedures will 
be held for Prince Georges County 
high school students and their 
parents Saturday, October 4, on 
Capitol Hill. 

Mary 1 and Congresswoman 
Gladys Noon Spellman will be host 
to the two-hour conference that 
will be held in the Cannon House 
Office Building. 

Representatives from the Air 
Force, Naval, Coast Guard, Mer¬ 
chant Marine and U.S. Military 
academies will be present. Also 
various ROTC scholarship pro¬ 
grams and financial assistance 
programs for college, vocational 
and technical school students will 
be explained. 

“This event is an absolute must 
fer any high school student inter¬ 
ested in applying to a service 
academy,” the third-term Con¬ 
gresswoman said. 

The Showcase will be held in the 
Caucus Room of the Cannon 
Building, at Now Jersey and C 
Streets, SE, from 10 a.m. to noon. 
Those wanting additional informa¬ 
tion can call Congresswoman 
Spellman’s office at 225-4131. 

WHAT GOES ON 

Thurs., Sept 18, S pjm. GHI 
Special Board Meeting, Ham¬ 
ilton PI. 

>Ion^ Sept 22, 8 p.m. Public 
Hearing on Bond Issue For 
GHI Rehab. Program, Muni¬ 
cipal Building. 


AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 


Volume 43, Number 45 P.O. Box 68, Greenbelt , Maryland2077Q Thursday, September 18, 1980 

GHI Board Finds New Siding Unsatisfactory; 
Members Object to$500-a-day “Union Buster” 


by Sid Kastner 

In a long and arduous regu¬ 
lar meeting Thursday evening 
which lasted past midnight, 
attended by an overflowing 
audience, the GHI board and 
management listened to sev¬ 
eral member complaints about 
the rehabilitation program. 
Questions were raised about 
the quality of some of the ma¬ 
terials being installed and 
about the thoroughness of the 
work being done. These prob¬ 
lems were overshadowed, how¬ 
ever, by reverberations from 
the recent discharge of four 
staff employees. The board 
found its actions criticized as 
“union-busting” by several 
members and also by the Audit 
committee in a formal report. 

Members Mat Amberg and Al¬ 
bert Herling attacked a board de¬ 
cision recently arrived at, appar¬ 
ently in executive session, to hire 
a “labor - management” consult¬ 
ant who they termed actually a 
“union-buster,” Amberg called this 
a continuation of recent GHI 
practice, saying that he has 
learned that the previous board 
spent $5,000 to hire such a firm 
and objected that “we have no 
right to intimidate our employees 
in their lawful right to decide on 
a bargaining unit of their own 
choosing,” 

He and Herling called on the 
board to make recent executive 
session decisions bearing on the 
matter public, with member 
Charles Schwan questioning the 
propriety of “failing to permit 
members to take part in policy¬ 
making.” They suggested in par¬ 
ticular that the released employees 
may have been selected out for 
pro-union views. 

Rebuttals were offered by mem¬ 
ber Ben Hogensen, who argued 
that “GHI’s employees have good 
pay and short hours” and by di¬ 
rector Ed James, who stated that 
“There’s no correlation between 
what employees get fired and 
their views on unions.” Director 
Bobbi McCarthy, emphasizing 
that she was speaking only for 
herself, commented that “after 
much thought, I’m opposed to 
(union-busting), but (with respect 
to) executive sessions, I think 
there are many issues where the 
board has to meet by itself to dis¬ 
cuss implications.” 

Chairman Donald Volk respond¬ 
ed to the members’ criticism with 
a statement that the executive 
session material on union-man¬ 
agement matters would be made 
available. In response also to di¬ 
rect questions posed, general 
manager Kenneth Kopstein an¬ 
swered that the consultant in 
question had been retained for 
$500 per day of service. He also 
verified, for the benefit of director 
Wayne Williams, that “unfair la¬ 
bor practices” have been charged 
against GHI by the four released 
employees through the federal 
National Labor Relations Board. 


Kopstein noted with respect to 
the latter employees that two of 
them have been offered better- 
paid jobs with rehab contractors 
than they had with GHI. 

Independently, the Audit com¬ 
mittee, in a report read by Frank 
Gervasi, expressed “concern” 
about board and management 
handling of employee termina¬ 
tions, in light of the recent pick¬ 
eting of GHI and Teamster's Un¬ 
ion proposals to organize the co¬ 
operative’s employees. It recom¬ 
mended that the board rescind 
its decision to hire a “union-bust¬ 
er” and instead get a good “ne¬ 
gotiator/’ reasoning that the 
needs of a cooperative differ 
from those of a manufac¬ 
turing firm. The committee also 
raised other questions about the 
present personnel situation, refer¬ 
ring to “an excessive number of 
foremen in the Maintenance de¬ 
partment” and “too many highly 
salaried consultants.” Chairman 
Volk agreed to discuss their re¬ 
port at a later meeting. 

Shingles vs Aluminum 

The first installation of new 
composition shingles on two rows 
of homes in 73 Court Ridge has 
brought objections by the resi¬ 
dents, in the form of a petition 
read by one of them. She also 
displayed a sample of the shingle 
—apparently brittle—on which the 
surface coating of paint had been 
rubbed off in the course of ordi¬ 
nary cleaning, she said. The peti¬ 
tion requested that the shingling 
be stopped. Chairman Volk noted 
that this step had already jfeen 
taken, whereupon the question 
was raised of what to do with the 
already-stripped homes; after 
some discussion a motion by Mc¬ 
Carthy was passed to install vinyl 
siding. A further decision was 
made to send a delegation to the 
Maryland Historical Trust, the or¬ 
ganization which has imposed the 
shingle option on GHI, to try to 
convince them of the necessity 
for vinyl siding instead, 

A bit of an internal controversy 
then arose on whether eight-inch 
wide or four-inch, wide (vinyl) 
siding should be chosen — a ques¬ 
tion raised by Kopstein. Volk, in 
the minority, spoke for the four- 
inch width as being “more to 
scale” for GHI homes. But most 
people present, along with project 
head Davis, wanted the eight- 
inch size. (Davis argued for the 
larger size apparently for speed 
of installation among other 
things, saying, “I’d like to get 
back on schedule.”) A formal mo¬ 
tion adopting the larger size was 
made by McCarthy and passed. 

Residents in other courts spoke 
up for vinyl siding too, one noting 
that her row had also been 
stripped down to the tarpaper be¬ 
cause of termites; she said em¬ 
phatically that (a) “The rehabili¬ 
tation work is good” even though 
her electric supply cable had been 
inadvertently cut, but that (b) 
“I’ll have no shingles!” Some 
members differed with project di¬ 
rector Davis on whether a thor¬ 
ough job was being done of in¬ 


specting for structural damage or 
termite damage at the time the 
homes were being stripped, and 
before new covering was installed. 
Chief engineer Ove Kongsted es¬ 
sentially agreed with Davis that 
it was not necessary to remove 
all tarpaper for this purpose, but 
at the same time said he had noted 
steam-damaged wood that had 
been shingled over. 

Other Renovation Issues 

Further related questions came 
up. Amberg asked whether the 
board had yet decided who would 
pay for replacement of new heat¬ 
ing units if they failed after a 
warranty period, to which Volk 
replied in the negative. Another 
member questioned whether these 
heating units had been sufficiently 
tested, in view of the shingle 
problem; Volk and project direc¬ 
tor Davis were affirmative on 
this. To another query on whether 
new windows would necessarily 
fit, director John Lewis replied 
that he didn’t anticipate any prob¬ 
lem with them. 

Urea formaldehyde insulation,! 
recently authorized by the board 
to be installed during the rehab, 
project, came under attack from 
member Amberg who presented a 
thick sheaf of documents in sup¬ 
port of his contention that such 
material was potentially poison¬ 
ous and had been banned, for ex¬ 
ample, in the state of Massachu¬ 
setts. After Amberg’s lengthy 
statement director Ed James 
questioned the validity of the 
laboratory tests he had quoted, 
which in turn triggered an ex¬ 
change of views on the technical 
aspects. From the floor Schwan 
urged a ban against the material 
on the grounds that “GHI would 
be liable for any resulting dam¬ 
ages and would be in a legally 
vulnerable . . . position”. Director 
Williams held the same view, but 
director Lewis argued that he had 
the material installed in his home 
and had found no problem with 
it, while director Steve Curtis 
defended it as having been initia- 
ly improperly installed elsewhere, 
calling it “the only feasible ma¬ 
terial”. 

Member Herling brought up a 
problem he had encountered in 
signing a letter committing him 
to individual conversion to elec¬ 
tric heat, and finding that each 
of us has to select our own con¬ 
tractor”, He noted that he had 
signed only under the impression 
that it was necessary to enable 
another neighbor to be eligible 
for state funds, and objected to 
what he called “a serious lack 
of communication” in the fram¬ 
ing of the letter. Volk and Kop¬ 
stein took his complaint under 
advisement. 

As a final item, Curtis brought 
to the attention of the board the 
fact that poor conditions (Term- • 
ites, running water) have been 
found under some of the brick 
homes also in the course of pre¬ 
liminary work, and suggested 
these problems be corrected pos¬ 
sibly in Phase 2 of the rehabili¬ 
tation project. 


At the September 9 meeting, 
council authorized the employment 
of bond counsel, Ballard, Spahr, 
Andrews & Ingersoll (Philadel¬ 
phia) and the bond underwriters, 
Blyth Eastman Paine Webber 
(New York) and Baker, Watts & 
Co, (Baltimore). GHI officials had 
made the selections on a nego¬ 
tiated basis after interviewing 
several law firms and underwrit¬ 
ing consortiums during the past 
month. Council approved their se¬ 
lections. The expenses of the law 
firm will be paid for from the 
proceeds of the bonds; the under¬ 
writers receive their fee when 
they resell the bonds to their cli¬ 
ents at a slight profit over the 
discounted rate which GHI re¬ 
ceives. 

Rick Ballard, who heads his 
firm’s Washington office and spe¬ 
cializes in tax-exempt securities, 
and a partner were present to 
answer any questions from coun¬ 
cil. 

The only question came from 
Councilman Charles Schwan. He 
and assistant city manager Den¬ 
nis Piendak shared a concern, 
he said, stemming from GHI’s 
present labor problem, which 
would have to be acknowledged in 
the formal description of GHI. 
Was there any chance, he wanted 
to know, that the rating agency, 
seeing that acknowledgment, 
might give the bonds a lower rat¬ 
ing and therefore a higher inter¬ 
est rate? Could the interest rate 
on future city general obligation 
(GO) bonds be adversely affected 
as a result? “My guess is, it 
wouldn’t,” Schwan speculated. 

“Since the security for the 
bonds is GHI’s monthly charges, 
labor problems will have only a 
slight effect, if any,” Ballard ten¬ 
tatively advised. He suggested 
that the proper expert would be 
the bond underwriter. Schwan 
asked the city manager to inves¬ 
tigate and report back to council. 

“We have never been rated be¬ 
cause of the insignificant amounts 
involved in past City of Greenbelt 
general obligation bonds,” re¬ 
marked City Solicitor Emmett 
Nanna. “This $17.5 million issue 
will put us on the rating chart.” 
Nanna was concerned that the 
city receive the best rating pos¬ 
sible. He was also concerned by 
the time constraints (GHI is in a 
hurry to get rehab moving) and 
the potential effect of legislation 
now in Congress which could 
eliminate the tax-exempt status 
of municipal revenue bonds. 
“These are questions that should 
be gone into at the public hear 
ing,” said Nana. 


Recreation Review 

Recreation Fall Class Openings 
Late registration for the Fall 
Recreation classes will be taken, 
on a space available basis only, 
at the Youth Center Business Of¬ 
fice on Friday, Sept. 19, from 9 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Program offer¬ 
ings for all ages and interests, 
ranging from creative arts to fit¬ 
ness activities, are scheduled. 
Weekday classes will get under¬ 
way during the week of Septem¬ 
ber 22. Saturday classes will be¬ 
gin September 17. For a complete 
listing call 474-6878. 






Page 2 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Thursday, September 18, 1980 


Orembdt Ikms Hruirm 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 
ALFRED M. SKOLNIK, PRESIDENT, 1959-1977 
Editor: Mary Lou Williamson, 441-2662 
News Editor: Elaine Skolnik, 474-6060 
Copy Editors: Barbara Likowski, 474-8483 

Vil STAF F Seiluchamp 

R*rk A mbe i g W Sa " dra Barnes * Suzanne Batra, Edith Beauchamp, Sheri 

ChoDer D Cofinn^ r'nnf n | n H B °M C 'c 1 . B l ? ush ? u - Margaret Butler, Lee Chambers, Carl 
’ £?r e Comulada, Mavis Flecher, Joan Freeman, Jenny Geiger, Judy Goldstein 

Kas ner Ma fha"' H""*' P f™ y H £ o1 ’ JaneT James - Bernice K astner, S.d 

I r> I , t? J au l man ; 1 Katherine Keene, Oorothy Lauber, Loretta Levesque Larry 

Rulh Poie l ^Vh ay MC rP aw . le X' P ® 99y Me,le y- Rober t Mongelli, James O’Sullivan 
Siinw! Bchlro ™’ Pearl Siegel, James Simon, Joanne Tucker, Jean Turkiewicz 

Ottilie Van Allen, June Webb, Mar-lin Weiner. ' 

hmTHkl ri1U a ? e . r: Be ‘ t y AQflson; Circulation Manager: Earl Kepler, 345-2670; Spring* 
tographer • ^J^Henson Barbara ^ iawson - 474-4541. News Review; 474-4131. Staff Pho* 

Published every Thursday by Greenbelt Cooperative Publishing Association, Inc. 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Pres., Elaine Skolnik; Vice Pres., Sid Kastner; Sec., Barbara Likowski; Treas., Leta Mach 
Virginia Beauchamp. 

!c£ ,L <5 U ^ SCRI £ T u? N § : $15 £ er year Advertising and news articles may be mailed 
(Box 68, Greenbelt); deposited in our box at the Twin Pines Office before 4 30 Dm 
Tuesday; or delivered to the editorial office in the basement of 15 Parkway ( 474 - 4131 ) 
The office is open Monday after 8 pm for display advertising; deadline is 10 om News 
articles and classified ads are accepted after 8 pm on Tuesday; deadline is 10 pm. 

Volume 43, Number 45 _Thursday, September 18, 1980 


Absolute Disgrace 

To the Editor: 

What the GHI management and 
the Board of Directors are doing 
in the field of our labor relations 
with our maintenance staff is an 
absolute disgrace. What they are 
doing in connection with the ex¬ 
penditure of our scarce dollars in 
support of that labor policy shows 
a complete lack of prudence in 
the handling of our finances and 
a violation of decent conduct. 
And to top it all off, the fact that 
an unfair labor charge has been 
lodged against GHI with the Na¬ 
tional Labor Relations Board may 
well place an increased burden 
on GHI members in connection 
with the bonds we hope the City 
of Greenbelt will sell to help in 
our rehabilitation effort. Permit 
me to explain. 

A majority of the workers in 
cur Maintenance Unit signed 
cards saying that they wished to 
be represented by a union. This 
they are entitled to do under the 
laws of our United States Govern¬ 
ment. The union informed man 
agement that it was filing a peti¬ 
tion with the National Labor Re¬ 
lations Board (NLB> for an elec 
tion. 

Four days later, management 
summarily fired four workers. I 
understand that one of them was 
on vacation at the time. But man¬ 
agement couldn’t wait. They had 
to go immediately. I understand 
they were open union supporters. 
Management’s haste, it seems, 
was based on at least three ob¬ 
jectives: 1— get rid of the poten¬ 
tial union leadership; 2 — throw 
the fear of loss of job into the 
hearts of the other union support¬ 
ers—(an effectivr weapon in times 
of high unemployment); 3 — re¬ 
duce the size of the pro union 
group in the unit so that they 
would no longer constitute a ma¬ 
jority. 

To further its anti union stance, 
especially in the face of what ap 
pears to be unlawful action for 
unlawful purposes, a special at¬ 
torney is hired. Some of us call 
these so-called “labor-consultant” 
attorneys by the name of “union 
busters." This experienced anti¬ 
union attorney, or union-buster, is 
hired at a cost of $500 a day. Ex¬ 
penses must be above the daily 
fee of $50 0a day. He’s not local — 
he is based in Atlanta Ga. 

Our GHI is a cooperative. A co¬ 
operative is a shining example of 
participatory democracy. But 
giving our own employees an op¬ 
portunity, in a secret election 
conducted by an agency of the 
U.S. Government, to freely choose* 
whether or not they will be rep¬ 
resented by a union of their own 
choosing, is to be denied them if 
management and the Board have 
their way. 

The conduct of our Board in 
entering a contract with a union 
buster without consulting the 
membership is disgraceful. To 
hide their action this was done in 
executive session. 

What with an unfair labor prac¬ 
tice charge lodged against GHI. 


this $500 a day cost could run up 
to eventually thousands of dollars. 
Hearings are held, briefs are pre¬ 
sented and appeals to the top 
NLRB and possibly to the whole 
range of federal courts may be 
involved. As much as $100,000 or 
more could easily be spent in at¬ 
tempting to justify a primitive act 
in labor relations. Such conduct 
shows lack of prudence and, in 
my opinion, casts doubt on the 
Board’s sense of fudiciary respon¬ 
sibility in the handling of the 
members’ assets. 

Another disastrous impact of 
the Board and management’s ac¬ 
tion is the forseeable increase in 
the interest charges we will all 
have to pay in connection with 
the bond issue we hope the City 
of Greenbelt will float to assist us 
in our rehabilitation program. 
Those knowledgeable with the 
bond market see a possible in¬ 
crease of at least 1/8 percent in 
the interest we will have to pay 
for the bonds. Now, one-eighth of 
a percent may not sound like a 
lot, but over a period of 20 or 
more years it really mounts up 
into a significant additional cost. 

This is to where our manage¬ 
ment and Board of Directors have 
brought us. 

The membership must demand 
that the policy be reversed and 
soon. A decent respect for the 
rights of our employeeSj a decent 
concern for the membership's de¬ 
votion to democratic principles, a 
respect for the dignity and moral 
worth of our employees are all 
involved. We can gain much, in¬ 
cluding our self-respect if GHI 
ceases its reprehensible conduct. 

Finally, the membership would 
do well to read the magnificent 
and sane report on this issue 
which the Audit Committee unan¬ 
imously presented to the Board at 
its meeting on September 11. 

Albert K. Herling 


Om 'KetyAfou 

Congratulations to Frances and 
A1 Herling on their 37th wedding 
anniversary - September 18. 

Willis Gault, 35-A Ridge Rd., 
has been listed in Who’s Who in 
the World. Gault is a creator of 
bowed instruments and a com¬ 
poser for the viola d'amore. Or¬ 
ganizer and director of Chamber 
Music Workshop, Washington 
from 1946-66, he also performs on 
the viola d’amore. 

Local Chapter of D.P.M.A. 

A local chapter of the Data 
Processing Management Associa¬ 
tion is being founded. The In¬ 
augural Dinner will take place on 
Oct. 2 at the Fireside Beef House, 
Greenbelt Road, starting at 6 p.m. 
Roger Fenwick, International Ex¬ 
ecutive Vice President, will pre¬ 
sent the chapter's charter. For in¬ 
formation and reservations call 
Leonie Penney, 474-6315, eevnings 
and weekends. 

Wants Street 
Light Restored 

To the Editor: 

When a street light (old style) 
on Orange Court (Lakewood) was 
removed last week by PEPCO, 
one of my neighbors was told by 
the company workers that the city 
was “trying to save money.” By 
the way, two old style lights were 
removed but only ONE new style 
light was installed. 

The city did not inform the 
people on the street what was 
coming down. 

There is not enough light on 
the street. Why should citizens be 
told the city is trying to save 
money? At the expense of our 
safety? No way. 

It is my contention that the 
city does have money and that 
the light should be restored. 

Irene Hensel 

Needless Risk 

To the Editor: 

GHI is counting on the city’s 
issuance of revenue bonds to fi¬ 
nance most of the costs of reha 
bilitation. At the same time, GHI 
is charged with an unfair labor 
practice stemming from the re¬ 
cent discharge of four employees. 
If the labor dispute is not resolved 
when the rehabilitation bonds are 
issued, its existence could cause 
their interest rate to be higher 
than it would be otherwise. 

It appears that pressure from 
members is needed to persuade 
the Board not to continue its 
folly. Members who believe that 
continuing the dispute represents 
a needless risk should be in touch 
with the Board. 

Charles S. Brown 



In recognition of the City of Greenbelt's co-sponsorship of 
the Ride-a-Bike-for-the Retarded, Mayor Gil Weidenfeld (left) 
receives plaque at the August 11 city council meeting. The 
four young men on the right, Tom Saltzman, Joel Galium, Mike 
Deredyn and T. J. Larch, each of whom rode 100 miles, 
received special plaques for their substantial contributions to 
the community's fund raising effort which netted over $4,000, 
Missing from the picture was 100 miler Jon Piper who also re¬ 
ceived the award for collecting the most money and Jerry Mor¬ 
ris who accepted a plaque for the JayCees joggers race. 


Home Needed for Cat 

To the Editor: 

Would some kind animal lover 
give a home to a nice cat that 
would make a wonderful pet? 

We live in apartments and can¬ 
not have pets. 

This little animal lives outside 
now but needs a warm home now 
that cold weather is coming. 
Would some Greenbelter please 
help her? 

The number to call is 474-8691. 

Concerned Neighbors. 


BAHA'I MEETING 

The monthly public meeting of 
the Baha’is of Greenbelt will be 
held on Friday, Sept. 19, at 8 p.m. 
at 120 Rosewood. All are welcome. 

This month’s guest speaker is 
Albert Cheung, native of Hong 
Kong but now a resident of 
Washington, D.C. Cheung works 
for the Development Research 
Center at the World Bank and is 
a PhD Candidate in Applied 
Mathematics at Johns Hopkins 
University. 


Church-State Discussion 

An open forum on the topic of 
the relationship between Church 
and State will be conducted at 
Holy Cross Lutheran Church on 
four consecutive Thursdays, Sep¬ 
tember 25 to October 16, Each 
session will begin at noon and 
adjourn at 1 p.m. 

The forum will be led by Leo¬ 
pold Bernhard, Director of the 
Public Affairs Sector Ministry at 
the Lutheran Church of the Ref¬ 
ormation in Washington, D.C. No 
registration fee will be required; 
however, a free-will offering will 
be received at each session. 

Participants are invited to bring 
a lunch. Coffee and tea will be 
provided. The public is invit ed. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH 
Episcopal 

Baltimore Bivd. at Powder Mill 
Rd., BeltsviUe 

8:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist 
10:30 a.m. Morning Prayer 
10:30 a.m. Sunday School 
Rev. John G. Bals, Rector 
422-8057 


For more information, call 474- 
4090 or 474-6779. 

Mowatfr Memorial 

United Methodist Church 
40 Ridge Rd. 474-9410 

Church School 9:30 - 10.30 a.m. 
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. 
Rev, Ira C. Keperling, Pastor 
474-1924 


“God grant that the light of 
unity may envelop the whole 
earth” 

— Baha’i Writings 



public meeting- 
September 19 
8:00 p.m. 

120 Rosewood, Greenbelt 
MR. ALBERT CHEUNG 
speaker 

474^090 * 474-6779 


Greenbelt Community Church 


(United Church of Christ) 


Hillside and Crescent Roads 

i Phone 474-6171 mornings 


Christian Education (all ages) 

1 

10 AM. 

gl | lg§ |fg 

Worship Service 11 A.M. 

Eii t isi u Ffi i iffy 

Nursery provided at 

ILSfiP Mil -1 IBS 

2B Hillside 

KjBSlVi ! Fin- rfriffl 

Rev. Sherry Taylor and 

Harry Taylor co-pastors 


GOD'S WORD HAS A MODERN MESSAGE FOR 
MODERN MAN. 

DISCOVER THIS IN YOUR LIFE 

GREENBELT BAPTIST CHURCH 

474-4212 Crescent & Greenhill Roads 

Bible Study for all ages (Sun.) 9:45 am 

Worship Services 1.1:00 am & 7:00 pm 

Mid-week Prayer service (Wed.) 8:00pm 

For bus transportation, call Church office 
8:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m. weekdays. 



Holy Cross Lutheran Church 


6905 Greenbelt Road 

Worship Services: 8:30 and 11:15 a.m. 

Sunday School: 9:50 a.m. 

Weekday Nursery' School: 9-11:30 a.m. 

Edward H. Rimer, Pastor Phone 345-5111 
















































Thursday, September 18, 1980 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Page 3 


Witty Comedy Delights 

by Mar-Lyn Weiner 

If laughter is the measure of a 
good comedy, then “The Owl and 
The Pussycat" rates high on the 
scale. It is the story of a would-be 
writer and an aspiring actress, 
sometime lady of the night, who 
find themselves unwillingly shar¬ 
ing an apartment. 

This play of two performers is 
saved from the monotony that its 
numbers might induce by a witty 
script that pits two opposite per¬ 
sonalities in mutual attraction. 

Felix Sherman is a self-right¬ 
eous, reserved intellectual whose 
serious attempts at prose read like 
a joke book. Doris Wheelgus (a 
surname for which she has sub¬ 
stituted various aliases) is a 
highly emotional hooker who 
shrieks at the use of long words of 
which she has no understanding. 

These two are thrown together 
when Doris is ejected from her 
own apartment because of a com¬ 
plaint made by Felix. Angry and 
penniless, she shows up at Fe¬ 
lix’s place, determined to stay. 
Felix is at first plagued by* Doris’s 
presence and later by his attrac¬ 
tion to her. 

Craig Mooring in the role of 
Felix precisely portrays the char¬ 
acter of a man torn between rea¬ 
son and reality. In his supplica¬ 
tions to the ceiling, hoping to find 
help from something more than 
stage lights, he injects pain into 
the comedy, which results in noth¬ 
ing short of laughter. His witty 
retorts are delivered with caustic 
sarcasm. When told by Doris that 
he looks sick and asked if she 
should call the doctor, he replies, 
“That would be the first time the 
disease ever called the doctor." 

Judy Marshall as Doris adeptly 
displays her versatility in a part 
that calls for a rainbow of emo¬ 
tions in a matter of moments. 
She crosses the stage with just 
enough sway in her hips and coo 
in her voice to make her seduc¬ 
tive and sensitive nature a be¬ 
lievable attraction to a man like 
Felix. 

The happy mixture of a witty 
script and accomplished acting 
make “The Owl and The Pussy¬ 
cat" an entertaining evening of 
comedy. The play, which is direc¬ 
ted by Janet Schreiber Cripe, is 
at the Utopia Theater through 
Sept. 28. 


City Announces Tree 
Planting Program 

The City will participate with 
residents and property owners in 
the planting of up to fifty trees 
alongside streets this year. Under 
this program, the homeowner 
purchases the tree through the 
City and the City plants the tree. 
All trees must be planted in the 
public right-of-way. 

Trees must be spaced approxi¬ 
mately 30 feet apart for flowering 
trees and 50 feet apart for shade 
trees. The following distances 
must also be kept; 35 feet from 
the radius of the curb at the 
street intersection; 15 feet from 
light posts; 10 feet from driveway 
entrance and fire hydrants; 5 feet 
from water meters, gas boxes, 
storm drain inlets and sewer man¬ 
holes; and 3% feet from back of 


At the Library 

Wednesday, September 24 

Crafts ’n 1 Stories. Ages 4-5. 10:30 
a.m. Registration is required. 
Limit of 25. 

Thursday, September 25 
Adult Book Discussion. 10:15 
a.m. Walker Percy’s The Last 
Gentleman. 


curb. 

Cost of trees will depend on type 
and size. All trees are balled and 
burlapped and guaranteed for one 
year if the purchaser takes proper 
care of the tree. 

A list of trees and prices ap¬ 
pears in ad (this page) or may be 
obtained at the City Manager’s 
Office, 25 Crescent Rd., Greenbelt. 
All planting locations must be ap¬ 
proved by the City. Payment must 
accompany order. 


Greenbelt Cultural Arts Center 


The Greenbelt Players 

present 

THE OWL 










THE PUSSYCAT 

a sophisticated comedy 

8:15 P.M. 

Sept. 19, 20, 21 Sept. 26, 27, 28 

General Donation $3.50 


UTOPIA THEATER 


129 Centerway, Greenbelt 


Tel.: 474-7763 


GREENBELT FEDERAL 


CREDIT UNION 


121 Centerway (P.O. Box 157) 
Greenbelt, Md. 20770 
Phone: 474-5900 


Mon. thru Thurs.: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 



Friday: 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 


Why not open a 
Special Share Draft Account 
this week? A Share Draft can do 
anything a check can do, and 
more. The unused balance earns 
dividends. 


APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP 


Name ..—.... 

Address ...—...... 

City . State .. Zip Code .. 

If this is a joint account please add name of joint 
owner. 


Deposit Home 

Enclosed $ Phone 


Date of Birth .. 

Social Security No. . 

Business Telephone No. 

Employer ..... 

Address .... 

Position .. 

GCI Membership No. , 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

The City Council has scheduled a 

PUBLIC HEARING 

for 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1980 
at 8:00 P.M. 


To consider and receive citizen’s comments on A Proposed Ordin¬ 
ance to Authorize the Issuance by the City of 


$17,500,000 REVENUE BONDS FOR 
FINANCING G.H.I. REHABILITATION PROJECTS 

If issued, the bond proceeds would be paid to a bond trustee who 
would render payment to Greenbelt Homes, Inc. for expenditures 
incurred in conjunction with the membership authorized rehabili¬ 
tation program. Repayment of the bonds would be made over a 
period of not more than 40 years from revenues of G.H.I. pledged 
to be used for this purpose. Additionally, the bonds would be 
secured by a first mortgage upon the property of G.H.I. Only the 
revenues of G.H.I. are pledged to the repayment of the bonds and 
the bonds will not constitute an indebtedness of the city or a 
charge against the general credits or taxing powers of the City. 

It is expected that bond counsel will render an opinion that the 
interest paid to bondholders will be exempt from U.S. and Mary¬ 
land income taxes, thereby resulting in a lower interest rate 
than if the bonds were determined to be taxable. 

The title of the ordinance which is the subject of the public hear¬ 
ing is: 

“AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE AND EMPOWER 
THE CITY OF GREENBELT TO ISSUE ITS REVENUE 
BONDS IN AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED SEVEN¬ 
TEEN MILLION FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND ($17,500,- 
000); SUCH BONDS TO BE ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSE 
OF PROVIDING A PORTION OF THE FINANCING FOR 
THE REHABILITATION OF EXISTING RESIDENTIAL 
STRUCTURES OWNED BY GREENBELT HOMES, INC. 
AND GREENBELT DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 
AND OF PROVIDING REFINANCING OF THE OUT¬ 
STANDING INDEBTEDNESS OF SAID CORPORATIONS 
SECURED BY LIENS ON SAID STRUCTURES; TO 
AUTHORIZE THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF THE 
BONDS BY NEGOTIATED SALE TO UNDERWRITERS 
AND UPON SUCH INTEREST RATES, AMOUNT, DATE, 
MATURITIES, PAYMENT, PREPAYMENT AND/OR RE¬ 
DEMPTION PROVISIONS AS MAY BE DULY AP¬ 
PROVED BY A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL; 

TO PROVIDE FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE PRINCI¬ 
PAL OF ANY SUCH BONDS AND THE INTEREST 
THEREON SOLELY FROM PAYMENTS FROM THE 
REVENUES OF GREENBELT HOMES INC. AND 
GREENBELT DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION IN AC¬ 
CORDANCE WITH DOCUMENTS TO BE NEGOTIATED 
PRIOR TO THE ISSUANCE OF THE BONDS, THE 
FORM OF WHICH DOCUMENTS SHALL BE DULY 
APPROVED BY A RESOLUTION ADOPTED PRIOR TO 
THEIR EXECUTION AND DELIVERY; AND TO AUTH¬ 
ORIZE THE APPOINTMENT BY RESOLUTION OF A 
TRUSTEE AND PAYING AGENT FOR THE BONDS 
AND OF BOND COUNSEL AND OTHER PROFESSION¬ 
ALS AS MAY BE NECESSARY TO ASSIST IN THE 
STRUCTURING OR CARRYING OUT OF THE FINANC¬ 
ING" 

The meeting will be held in the Council Room, Municipal Build¬ 
ing, 25 Crescent Road. All interested citizens are invited to attend. 


Dorothy Lauber, Acting 
City Clerk 


STREETSIDE 

Tree Planting 
Program 

of the 

Department of 
Public Works, 

City of Greenbelt 

Trees listed below are available for purchase by residents 
and property owners wishing to participate in the program, 
(see article on page 3 for details) 

Shade Trees - normal standards or columnar if available 




Quercus Borealis, Northern Red Oak, $48 

6 to 8 ft., \Vz to 1% in., B&B (balled & burlaped) 

Quercus Phellos, Willow Oak, $48 

6 to 8 ft., 1V 2 to 1% in., B&B 


Quercus Coccinea, Scarlet Oak, $48 

6 to 8 ft, 1% to 1 3 / 4 in., B&B 
Acer Rubrum, Red Maple, $48 

6 to 8 ft., 1V 2 to 1% in., B&B 
Acer Succharum, Sugar Maple, $48 

6 to 8 ft, 1% to 1% in., B&B 
Tilia Cordata, Littleleaf Linden, $30 
5 to 6 ft, B&B 


Small Flowering Trees 

Pyrus Calleryana Bradford, Bradford Pear, $36 

6 to 8 ft., % to 1 in., B&B 
Malus, Flowering Crab, $24 

6 to 8 ft., % to 1 in., B&B 
Prunus Yedcensis, Yoshino Cherry, $24 

6 to 8 ft., 3/ 4 to 1 in., B&B 















































MASTERS' RUN 

Greenbelters will have a rare 
opportunity to participate in a 
National Running championship 
on Sunday, September 28 at 8 a.m. 
at Hains Point and East Potomac 
Park in Washington. The Cham¬ 
pionship race (20 km. or 12.4 
miles) is open to all master run¬ 
ners (40 years and older) and is 
divided into 5-year age groups. 
A special non-championship sec¬ 
tion for 30-39 year olds will also 
be run. Entry forms can be ob¬ 
tained from Larry Noel at 474- 
9362 or the Youth Center. Run¬ 
ners may also sign up the day of 
the race 6:30-7:30 a.m. at the race 
site. Runners must be Athletics 
Congress of AAU members, but 
may join at sign up. 


Mishkan Torah News 

Yom Kippur services at the 
Mishkan Torah will start prompt¬ 
ly at 6:45 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 
19. Saturday services run from 
8:30 a.m. to 7:45 p.m. Rabbi Ken¬ 
neth Berger will deliver the ser¬ 
mon at 11 a.m. with Yiskor 
scheduled for 11:30 a.m. The Jun¬ 
ior Congregation meets at 10:30 
a.m. 

Sukkot services will be held on 
Wednesday, September 24 at 8 
p.m. and on Thursday, September 
25 at 9:30 a.m. 


SOCCER VICTORY 

Greenbelt boys and girls born in 
1971 scored a double victory in 
their first weekend of interleague 
and county competition. On Sat¬ 
urday, September 13, they defeat¬ 
ed the interleague Lanham team 
on their own turf by 2 to 0. Then 
on Sunday, September 14, they 
downed College Park 6-1 at 
North way Field, (known as the 
dump). Participating players were: 
Chris Adams, Jim Barron (3 
goals), Kathy Barwick, Joel Ca- 
halan (4 goals), Georgie Cline- 
dinst (1 goal), Mike Cooney, Steve 
Cox, Doug Fischer, Pat Heaney, 
Joey Katsouros, Tommy Liston, 
Sean Luddy, Jimmy Myron, John 
David Powell, Sean Seegle, Chuck 
Simpson, Erica Simpson, Timmy 
Spear and Raj Suri. 


Historical Society Presents 
Greenbelt Blueprint Talk 

Mary Boccaccio, University of 
Maryland librarian, will address 
the Greenbelt Historical Society 
on Tuesday, October 7 at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Greenbelt Library. 

Her subject will be the Green¬ 
belt blueprint microfilming. The 
public is invited. 


Swim Team Notes 

by Mike Jones 

Craig Dies took top honors for 
Greenbelt at the Princemont 
League All-Star meet with gold 
medals in freestyle, breast stroke, 
and the individual medley. James 
Fellows also took high honors 
with a gold medal in breast 
stroke, a silver medal in back- 
stroke and a fifth place ribbon in 
freestyle. Greenbelt’s other repre¬ 
sentative in the meet for winners 
from divisional meets and others 
who qualified by time were Mark, 
Ken, and Lynda Blue, Aimee 
Fellows, Brian Dies, Jay Gordon, 
and Shawn Luddy. 

Novice Meet 

Henry Fields took top honors 
at the novice meet on Labor Day 
weekend with three blue ribbons. 
Other first place awards went to 
Tom Jones, who took two firsts 
and a second; Robin Garafolo, 
who earned two firsts and a 
third; and Theresa Crissman and 
Greg Reisher who won two races 
each. Elaine Robbins took a first 
and a sixth place ribbon, Joy 
McCusker took a first and two 
thirds, Niki Buemi took a first, a 
second and a fifth, and Matthew 
Stauffer took a first and fourth 
place ribbon. 

Ribbons for other places were 
awarded to Loretta Lowe, Leah 
Choper, Margaret McCusker, 
Billy Barwick, Jamie Everhart, 
Jay Vacarro, Brian Jones, Kathy 
Barwick, Karen Fuchs, Amanda 
and Jenny Dillon, Peter and 
Tammi Myers, and Sandi Jones. 

All swim team members and 
families are requested to attend 
the Greenbelt Swim Team ban¬ 
quet Friday, Sept. 26 at 6:30 p.m. 
at Grenoble Hall. 



admit ONE 


Now Available! 

Full Length Feature Movies 
on Video Tapes 

SUPERMAN 

‘TO* 

THE JERK 
MASH 

and Many More - on VHS 

Barry Moien Photo 

3018 Hamilton Street, 
West Hyattsville, Md. 

Just Call 559-4433 


ADMIT ONE 



The American Dream is alive and well. 

And flourishing in Greenbelt. 

Whenever you grasp the opportunity By encouraging thrift and by making 

to improve vour way of life, you’re living home ownership possible, we’re helping 
the American Dream. At First Federal families in Greenbelt and in 21 other 
Savings and Loan Association of Annap- communities throughout Maryland en- 
olis, we’re working hard to help make rich the quality of their lives. It’s our way 
your dreams come true. of keeping the American Dream alive. 

First fMcnlSote|>aadLMBAu»cktiM of Annapolis 

Annapolis: Main Office; 2024 W est Street, 266-6100 
Greenbelt: Beltway Plaza Shopping Center, 474-6004 


Soccer Schedule 

The soccer schedule for Sept. 21 
is as follows: Boys (age 9) vs. Ox- 
on Hill at 2 p.m. at Northway 
Ext.; Boys (age 10) vs. Adelphi at 
3:15 p.m. at North way Ext.; Boys 
(age 11) vs. Cheverly at 3:45 p.m. 
at Cheverley Rec.; Boys (age 12) 
vs, Adelphi at 5:45 p.m. at North¬ 
way Ext.; Girls (12 and under) 
vs. Lewisdale at 4:30 p.m. at 
Northway Ext.; and Girls (16 and 
under) vs. Lewisdale at 2 p.m. at 
Braden Field. 


'reeport 
’ 80/’81 


;3 or 4 night 
(Vacations 

[Departing B.W.I. every 
.Friday and Monday 


BON BORGWAKDT 

102:2 Baltimore Blvd, 
College Park, Md. 20740 
(on US. 1 at the Beltway) 
474-8400 


. “See me for car, home, 
life, health and business 


lull IARM 

insurance’.’ 

<& 




INSUtANCf 
.-^ 

State Farm insurance CoMpamer 
Home Offices: Btoominjton, Uiinoir 

— 


;ph. 301 441-8900 

(Vacation Planning 
[Price includes, AIR, HOTEL, EXTRAS 


Bahamas 

From only 

| $ 189. 00 S 


per person 
double occupancy 



Corporate Travel Associates, Inc. 

6301 IVY LANE • SUITE 708 
GREENBELT, MARYLAND 20770 


GRAND OPENING 


* 

G 

R 

E 

E 

N 

B 

E 

L 

T 

O 

N 

L 

Y 

* 

FRI. 

Sept. 19 

I0"9p.m. 

* 

SAT. 

Sept.20 

IO - 9p.m. 

* 

SUN. 

Sept. 21 

I” 6p.m. 



Complete $ 
Spa 
Facility 



For 

Women 


PER MONTH* 

»(PLUS REGISTRATION FEE) 

® DYNACAM HEALTH EQUIPMENT 
® PRIVATE DRESSING BOOTHS & LOCKERS 
a WHIRLPOOL a SAUNA a PRIVATE SHOWERS 
a NUTRITIONAL GUIDANCE a AEROBIC DANCING 
a HOURLY EXERCISE CLASSES IS SUN BOOTHS 


a PERSONAL 
INSTRUCTION 


aNURSERY 
AVAILABLE 


CALL FOR 
APPOINTMENT 

GREENBELT 

474-5544 


Beltway Plaza 
Greenbelt Rd. 



CALL FOR 
APPOINTMENT 

ROCKVILLE 

770-6930 

CLINTON 

868-8870 

FAIRFAX 

591-4810 



* 

G 

R 

E 

E 

N 

B 

E 

L 

T 

O 

N 

L 

Y 

* 

FRI. 

Sept. 19 

I0 _ 9p.m 

* 

SAT 

Sept.20 

IO-9p.m 

* 

SUN. 

Sept. 21 

|-6p.m. 
























































GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Page 5 


Spellman Schedules 
Call-in on Monday 

Maryland Congresswoman 
Gladys Noon Spellman will hold 
a telephone call-in night at her 
Capitol Hill office Monday, Sept. 
22, to answer questions personally 
and hear comments from her 5th 
District constituents. 

The two-hour session will begin 
at 6:30 p.m. Mrs. Spellman’s regu¬ 
lar office line, 225-4131, will be 
open, as well as her special TTY 
line, 225-2730, for use by deaf and 
hearing impaired constituents. 

“We’ll take as many calls as we 
can on a first-come, first-served 
basis,” Mrs. Spellman said. 


Greenbelt CARES 

Greenbelt CARES would like to 
remind all the young people about 
its free Movie/D iscussion 
Groups. The groups meet every 
other Monday evening at 7:30 
p.m. in the CARES Office located 
in the Municipal Building. 

Contemporary movies covering a 
wide range of issues are shown, 
followed by a short discussion. 
The next meeting will be on Mon¬ 
day, Sept. 22, at 7:30 p.m. Please 
come and bring a friend! For 
more information, call Wendy or 
Jim at 345-6660. 

Greenbelt CARES Youth Serv¬ 
ices Bureau is offering persons a 
chance to get high school diplo¬ 
mas. Starting October 7, CARES 
will be providing free classes to 
prepare for the General Educa¬ 
tion Development — GED exam. 
Instruction will be given in the 
five test areas — Math, Social 
Studies, Science, Literature and 
Grammar as well as test taking 
skills. The only requirements for 
enrollment are that one is offi¬ 
cially withdrawn from school and 
16 years old or older. Classes will 
be given Tuesdays and Thurs¬ 
days from 10 a.m. to 12 noon at 
the Greenbelt CARES offices. To 
reserve a seat, as class size is 
limited, or for more information, 
please call Johnnie at Greenbelt 
CARES at 345-6660. 

PGCC Offers Variety 
Of Classes in Greenbelt 

PGCC Office of Community Serv¬ 
ices offers classes in Greenbelt for 
a small fee. Classes include: Aero¬ 
bic Dancing, Mondays / Wednes¬ 
days, 10-11 a.m., Sept. 22 - Oct. 
29, Youth Center; Authentic Jap¬ 
anese Cooking, Thursdays, 10 a.m, 
-12 noon, Sept. 25-Oct. 30, Youth 
Center; Belly Dancing, Mondays, 
7-8:30 p:m., Sept. 22-Dec. 8, 

Greenbriar Condominiums; Be¬ 
ginning Watercolor, Wednesdays, 
7-10 p.m., Sept, 24-Oct, 29, Green- 
briar; Cake Decorating, Tuesdays, 
1-3 p.m. Sept. 23-Oct. 28, SHL 
Community Centre; Herbology, 
Tuesdays, 10:30 a,m.-12:30 p.m., 
Nov. 4-Dec. 16, Greenbelt Library. 

For registration and fee infor¬ 
mation, call 322-0875. 



jk* ui jluo ui aavc 

Don W. Taulelle 


9200 Edmonston Rd. 
Greenbelt, Md. 20770 

474-5007 

Like a good neighbor. 
State Farm is there. 
State Farm Insurance Co # s. 
Home Offices: Bloomington, Ill. 


COFFEE HOUSE LECTURE 

A free program of coffee hour 
lectures will again be presented at 
the Greenbelt Library under the 
auspices of the library and Prince 
Georges Community College. 

Lectures will be held Tuesday 
mornings from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m. A pre-registration form must 
be submitted. On September 23 
the subject will be “Fall Flower 
Arranging: Fresh, Dried and 

Silk.” Bring flowers and container 
for individual instruction. 

e Brigadoon 9 at National 

Lerner and Loewe's “Brigadoon” 
will be featured in its pre-Broad¬ 
way Washington engagement at 
the National Theatre through Oc¬ 
tober 5. Directed by Vivian Mata- 
lon and spotlighting choreography 
by Agnes de Mille, the musical is 
produced by Wolf Trap. 

Tickets are available at the 
National Theatre Box Office, 
through Ticketron, or by calling 
Charge-a-Ticket at 737-2222. 


Rehabilitation Brief 

Service Door Closing 
Those members having their 
service doors enclosed must be 
sure that some kind of container 
is placed to hold trash cans. 
Dumpsters at some of the courts 
are to be used only for removal of 
rehabilitation debris. Members are 
not to use these dumpsters for 
trash. 

Additions and Air Conditioner 

Sleeves 

Members who plan to put in air 
conditioner sleeeves must contract 
out for this work. GHI will sup¬ 
ply names of contractors. Home 
additions, which will be done if 
the member desires as part of the 
rehab program, will require a sep¬ 
arate contract. Call GHI for in¬ 
formation. 

Crawl Space Storage 
Members using crawl space en- 
trancees for storage are asked to 
remove their possessions as the 
locks will be changed. No mem¬ 
bers will be allowed to have keys. 
For questions or problems with 
rehabilitation, call Pat Estel at 
474-2300. 


School Night for Scouting 

City and area residents still 
have the opportunity to register 
their boys in scouting on Septem¬ 
ber 25 starting at 7 p.m. at Cen¬ 
ter, North End, St. Hugh’s and 
Springhjll Lake Schools. All boys 
between the ages of 8 and 10 are 
eligible to join the Cub Scout pro¬ 
gram and all boys between 11 and 
16 are eligible to join the Boy 
Scout program. Volunteers are also 
needed to help with the packs and 
troops. 


Seminar on Allergies 

A seminar on “Living with Al¬ 
lergies” will be offered on Wednes¬ 
day, Oct. 1 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
at Roosevelt High School. This is 
part of the Adult Continuing Ed¬ 
ucation Program of the P. G. 
County Board of Education. 

Registration should be made by 
mail before September 30 to: Ad¬ 
ult Education — Special Offerings, 
Lincoln Resource Center, 5201 
Baltimore Lane, Lanham, MD, 
20801. Enclose $1 registration fee. 


BODY RHYTHMS 

Presents a Program of Aerobic Dance Exercise, 
by Debbie Feinberg 
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 

Greenbelt: 

BEGINNING WEEK OF SEPT. 22 
Mon., Wed., 7:30 - 8:30 P.M. 

Tues., Thur., 9:30 - 10:30 A.M. 
baby sitting available 

Capital Plaza: 

BEGINNING WEEK OF SEPT. 15 
Mon., Wed., 10:00 - 11:00 AM. 

7:30 - 8:30 P.M. 

Tues., Thurs., 6:15 - 7:15 P.M. 

7:30 - 8:30 P.M. 

Call 341-1199 or 953-1540 

for further info, or to register for fall classes 
Recapture that feeling of well being// 

DtyjtLiL 

mm 

©Y§M 

MITT 

Sponsored by 

Greenbelt Sons of American 
Legion Squad 136 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 
2 P.M. UNTIL 6 P.M. 

Roast Beef, Oysters (fried, steamed, raw, and stew) 
Sauerkraut & Franks, Baked Beans, Potato Salad, 
Cole Slaw, Relish Trays and all the Beer or Soda 
you can consume on the premises 

DOOR PRIZES DONATION: $9.00 per person 

in advance 
$10.00 at the door 

AT THE 

Greenbelt American Legion Post Home 

For ticket Information, call “Sparky” Sparks 474-9731 


Greenbelt Pizza-Sub Shop 

FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY (Sept. 19 and 20) WITH THIS AD 

75c off any large or extra-large pizza 

MONDAY (Sept. 22) 

Jumbo Meatball Sub . $1.75 

MONDAY THRU WEDNESDAY (Sept. 22 - 24) 

Cold half-quart bottle - your choice 
7up, Coca-Cola, Tab, Dr. Pepper, diet 7up, 

diet Dr. Pepper, Mello Yello . 30c/bottle 

107 Centerway 474-4998 


^OMES INC 



THE COOPERATIVE- 


LIVE IN GREENBELT 
. . . PURCHASE A 
CO-OP BRICK OR 
FRAME TOWNHOUSE 
AND ENJOY HOME- 
OWNERSHIP, A YARD 
h OF YOUR OWN AND 
* THE ENJOYMENT OF 
S RECREATION FACIL- 
q ITIES OFFERED 
O WITHIN THE COM¬ 
MUNITY. 


3 br. brick, with lg. corner lot, fenced yds.; newly redeco¬ 
rated throughout .......- $55,000 

3 br. brick, cor. loc., beautifully landscaped yds. house in 
immaculate cond., new appl., near shopping fac. $50,000 

3 br. brick, on cor. loc., nicely landscaped yds., modern 
kitchen & bath . very good loc., $52,500 

2 br, masonry, cor. loc., lg. yds., appl. included; good pkg., 

$42,550. 

2 br. masonry, beautiful cond.; new kitchen with ra/refg/ 
dishwasher/washer & dryer; ac/wall-to-wall carpeting, 

$42,000 

2 br. fr., with lg. two-story addition; nicely decorated; ap¬ 
pliances; good pkg. ...... . $29,500 

2 br. fr., cor. loc., completely fenced yds., appl., . $28,000 

^ ■ 

2 br. fr,, nice kitchen & bath; cor loc with yd extending to 

woods ............. $26,000 

3 br. fr., cor. loc. with lg. yd,, good cond. throughout; appl. 

included ....... . $26,000 

3 br. fr,, with lg. kitchen & dinette; fenced yds., good loc. 
& pkg......... $32,000 

1 br. fr. apt. sec. fl., new kitchen & bath .... $16,500 

OTHER 1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM PROPERTIES AVAILABLE, 

FOR INFORMATION AND FOR SEEING OUR LISTING, 

OUR SALES PEOPLE WILL BE MORE THAN HAPPY TO 

ASSIST YOU. 


OFFICE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

8;30 - 5 Mon.-Fri. ^ 

10:00 - 5 Sat. & Noon to 5 Sun. f 

WE ARE LOCATED ON HAMILTON 

PLACE JUST OFF RIDGE ROAD. _ 

474 - 41 fil 474-4331 474-4244 EQUAL HOUSING 

474-4161 474 4331 474 4244 0 p p0RTUN|TY 







































PRICES 
EFFECTIVE 

SIPT 17,1980 
THRU 

SIPT. 23, 1980 J 

QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED 


I null 

IMJJ. 


cc 5 ifc>p 

CONSUMER SUPERMARKETS 

A DIVISION OF 

GREENBELT CO-OPERATIVE 


BOB EVANS 

SAUSAGG 

HOT OR REBIILAR 
$! 


1 -L* 

MG 


r* 

I ;l 11 j |: ■ 


STEAK 

a« 


CENTER CUT RIB 

PORK CHOPS 
'175 

_ I LI 

Uhi A Thin Chops u *1** 



PORTERHOUSE 
& T-BONE 

STEAKS 


‘ 3*5 




HUDCO 

SLICED BACON 

98* 




GOOD SIPT 17 THRO SIPT. 13,1910 

COL* MEDAL 

FLOUR 

»78 c 

WITHOUT COUPON 88* 

WHh Thi* Coupon Limit On* Par Family-Good Only At 


I-LB 

VAC PAK 


PICK of 

THE CHIX 


3 Breast Vs, 3 Thighs, 3 Drumsticks 

$H1 A 


CHOICE 


■€ 

|L, CHICKEN 

IrM 




COMBINATION PORK 

LOIN CHOPS 

3 RIB END, 3 LOIN END 
A 3 CENTER RIB 


TABLE TREAT FROZEN 

STEAKUMMS 

*^49 


12-01 

PKG 


2 


WHOLE 

PORK LOIN 

144B AV6 - CUT TO QMER 

*155 

I 


COUNTRY STYLE 

SPARE RIBS 

*1 





BUDMG 

SLICED MEATS 

SMOKE* BEEF SMOKE* CHICKEN, SMOKED RAM, 
SMOKE* PASTRAMI, SMOKE* TURKEY or CORNER REEF 


SPCCIAI BONUS BIM 


CAMPBELL'S 

PORK & BEANS 

3«~89* 


SPECIAL BONUS Bin! 


CO-OP ASST. 

PAPER TOWELS 

RVC 

JUMBO B 

roll mtm am 


2.5-01 

PKO 


49 


SPCCIAI BONUS BUS! 


CO-OP LIQUID 

BLEACH 

i:j AA* 



Double Savings 


|AANUTA ctURERS 


A MINIMUM PURCHASE OF *10.00 OR 
MORE WILL BE REQUIRED BEFORE MAN¬ 
UFACTURER'S COUPONS ARE DOUBLED. 

(Cigarettes & milk are excluded by 

■ _ \ * 


Any manufacturer's "cents oft" coupon 
(on brands and sizes we carry) will be 
redeemed for double savings. For exant- 
ple, .if the coupon gives you 40* off 
COlfOP S'ves you double value or 
80* off!!! 


Coupons 


inis otter does not apply to COlfOP, 
cigarette, free or any retailer coupons, 
or coupons valued at $ 1.00 or more, or 
where the total will exceed the price of 
the item. Limit one coffee coupon per 
customer. Quantity rights are reserved. 



KRAFT 


$■ 34 

Mayonnaise sr 1 

co-op soup jam 

Chicken Noodle 4 r 1 


cmf mm jm 

Macaroni & Cheese4 ss?l 

«-» m $m 

Tomato Sauce 9 ss 1 


GUO 


C(3f(£)P EVERYDAY 
“LOW PRICES" 


CO-OP 

Sandwich Spread 

CO-OP CREAMY 

Peanut Butter 

CO-OP 

Apple Juice 


H-OZ 

SIZE 


noz 

JAR 


37-01 

•n 


88 * 

$]83 

83* 


14-02 

CAN 


59 < 


CO-OP 

Fruit Cocktail 

BETTY CROCKER 5 VARIETIES 

Specialty Potatoes 4 s?69* 

SWISS MISS REG. OR W/MARSHMALLOWS 

Cocoa Mix $ 2° 9 


KEN-L-RATION EGG OR LIVER l BACON 

Burger Dog Food 

REGULAR OR W/IRON 

Similac R.T.U. 


Trash Bags 

NABISCO 

Saltines 

Plus N 

$1«6 Pe P si 

$|08 


*119 

MT 

KG ■ 

68* 


34-01 

KG 


OT 

CAN 


Junior Baby Food ...31 4 

HOUSEWARES A ROM FOODS 

ID 4 OFF 

Aim Toothpaste 69* 

ANTt PERSPtRANT FRESH A SCENTED 

Dial Deodorant «“ $ 1 59 

FROZEN FOODS 



TOKAY GRAPES 

SWEET EAC 

RED l.97 


MACINTOSH 

APPLES 

HOME GROWN 

PEACHES 

LOCAL BARTLETT 

PEARS 

TINA NATURAL 

SPROUTS ALFALFA r?G 


SWEET LUSCIOUS 

HONEY 

DEWS 

<128 

IA 


12-OZ PKG AA m 

BRUSSEL SPROUTS 98* 

5«*1 

3-,*l 

$]38 


YELLOW COOKING 

ONIONS 

SOUTHERN 

YAMS 

MARIE'S BLUE CHEESE 

DRESSING 


17-02 - 

JAR 


r CHEF 4'S 

r IMPERIAL SOFT 

PIZZA I 

PEPPERONI CHEESE A SAUSAGE 

MARGARINE 

r97 C J 

“ 73* 

halves mm 9HP 


“EVERYDAY LOW PRICES’ 

CO-OP 

Orange Juice 

CO-OP 

Cauliflower 

CO-OP 

Sweet Peas 

MEADOW GOLD SUPREME 

Ice Cream 


1J-0Z 

CAN 


20-01 

FAG 


70-OZ 

FIG 


HALF 

6AL 


78* 

$]45 

85* 

$]89 


I-IB 

BOX _ 

Plw Moot. Co- Tax - Mt. Dow, Saaklrt Orango 

4 / 14-01 $ ^ 49 

CO-OP 


RIG. OR DIET 


M.t. ms. 

virwr 

Lawn & Leaf Bags 5 ? s 4 88 

CO-OP 2 PIT BLUE/YiUQW A WHITE 

Toilet Tissue 4 JS‘ $ 1 18 
Dove Liquid 

HEALTH A BEAUTY AIDS 

G.L - 60-75-1QQ WATT - ^ 

Soft White Bulbs'££FREE 

BUY ONE GET 2 FREE 

Bic Pens cs 59* 

DAIRY DEPARTMENT 


“EVERYDAY LOW PRICES” 

KRAFT YIUOW, SWISS, PIMENTO 

American Singles ss 1 *1 33 

CO-OP YIUOW SHARP 

Cheddar Chunk s l 68 

CO-OP YELLOW 

Colby Chunk 

CO^OP 

Mozarella Chunk ’« 0 2$ 1 53 


_ GREENBELT 

■ ■ llfff B IB 121 CENTER WAT ROAD 

11 GREENBELT, MD. 

WESTMINSTER 

RT 140& ENGLER RD. 
WESTMINSTER, MD. 

ROCKVILLE 

205 N. WASH. ST. 

! ROCKVILLE, MD, 

FAIRLINGTON 

1603 N. QUAKER LANE 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 

KENSINGTON 

3715 UNIVERSITY 81 VO. 
KENSINGTON, MD- 































Thursday, September 18, 1980 


GREENBELT NEWS REVIEW 


Page 7 


CLASSIFIED 

$1-59 for a ten word minimum, 
10q each additional word. Submit 
ads in writing, accompanied by 
cash payment to the News Re¬ 
view office at 15 Parkway before 
10 p.m. of the Tuesday preceding 
publication, or to the News Re¬ 
view drop box in the Twin Pines 
Savings & Loan office before 4:30 
p.m. Tuesday, There is no charge 
for listing items that are found. 
BOXED ADS: $4.50 minimum 
for a m inch, 1 column box; $1.50 
each additional ha lf inch. 

CAR TOP CARRIER WANTED— 
hinged, box type. 588-4166 or 261- 
5398. 

FOR SALE — Portable washer, 

dryer; Sears Kenmore, good con¬ 
dition. $100 each. 474-9457 eve¬ 
nings. 


Need 

Bathroom Remodeled? 

CALL JOHN 

345-7497 

Specializing in Ceramic Tile 

f 1 * 3 * 5 OR SALE — Kenmore portable 
dishwasher, $85. 3 45-6390, 

WANTED — 2 strong youths to 
clear attic. Please call 474-1395. 


Beltway 

Appliance Service 

SAME DAY SERVICE 
on 

• Washers •Refrigerators 

•Dryers •Freezers 

• Ranges • Dishwashers 

Discounts to Senior Citizens 
Phone 345*5511 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

DOG FREE to good home. Male 
mixed breed, 6 mos. Has all shots' 
474-9151. 


FOR SALE — Complete Stereo 
Unit—Harmon Kardon 630 receiv¬ 
er, Garrard SL72B turntable, two 
large Royal speakers, A-l shape 
$295. Phone 474-3673 after 5:30 
p.m. 


Photography 

By 

J. 

PORTRAITS 

ADVERTISING 

INSURANCE 

J. Henson, Photographer 
441-9231 

CARPOOL—Driver wanted — 18th 
and G St., N.W.—8 a.m.-5 p.m 
Edmonston Road/College Park 
Estates area. Call 474-7819 after 
6 p.m. 

MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE 

Saturday mornings (beginning 
September 27). 9:30-11 Basic and 
alignment, 11-12:30 Advanced ele¬ 
mentary and intermediate. Call 
345-8826 to register. 

PIANO LESSONS in Greenbelt 

from qualified teacher. 345-5143. 

WILL BABYSIT in my home, 

Mon-Fri. Experienced. 441-9070. 

SALE—TV, Polaroid, movie out¬ 
fit. misc. 207 Lakesid e #203. 
SENIOR STAFF POSITION 

OPEN—min. age 25, must have 64 
hrs. ECE and experience in. day 
care. Call 9 37-3133. 9-4:30 p.m, 
FOR SALE—Trumpet, silver Get- 
zen. $295. Used less than 1 year. 
Beautiful tone. Call 474-2605 eves. 


SF-171 

& 

RESUMES 

Frustrated and confusing are 
two terms frequently associat¬ 
ed with applicants seeking 
Federal employment. Now a 
group of professional person¬ 
nel specialists offer their ser¬ 
vices in completing Federal 
applications that obtain the 
highest possible ratings based 
on individual qualifications* 
We do the writing, the typing 
and the footwork. 

We prepare RESUMES that 
bring out the best in you. 

FOR INFORMATION CALL: 
345-0324 (or 474-4418 after 6 
p.m.) 


EXPERIENCED TEACHER will 
tutor any primary/secondary sub- 
ject. Call 345-5124. _ 

HELP WANTED — Permanent, 
part time Branch Receptionist po¬ 
sitions available days in our Belt- 
way Plaza, Seabrook and Laurel 
Branches. Candidates should have 
light typing/clerical background, 
good communicative skills, neat 
public appearance and possess the 
ability to deal with customers in 
various situations. We pay excel¬ 
lent starting salaries commensu¬ 
rate with experience. For infor¬ 
mation and interview call 431- 
17C0. EQUITABLE TRUST BANK, 
1751 Elton Rd., Silver Spring, Md. 
EOE M/F. 


Reasonable All Work 

Rates Guaranteed 

Odd Jobs a Specialty 

HOME & YARD 

IMPROVEMENT 

SERVICES 

Everything for your home or 
yard - No job too small 

Free estimates 

Bob WlUiide 345-8368 

Mechanic Lien—1975 Ford Truck 
serial #F60ECV66438 to be sold at 
auction, as is, where is, 10:30 AM, 
9/26/80. Econowaste, 5105 Creston 
St., Tuxedo, Md. 

WANTED—Retired or unemploy¬ 
ed carpenter or cabinetmaker for 
kitchen remodeling in old Green¬ 
belt. 345-8826. 

FOR RENT: 2 br. frame, lg. cor. 
loc., house in exceiln. cond., appl 

& carpeting included; unfurnish¬ 
ed; Owner prefers No Pets 
please! Lease for 2 years begin¬ 
ning 10/1/80. 

3 br. frame with Ig. addition; un¬ 
furnished; 6 mo. lease—immediate 

occ, FOR INFORMATION CALL 
GREENBELT HOMES, INC. 474- 
4161 474-4244 Mon-Fri 8:30 am to 


PAINTING - Interior, exterior, 
papering, drywall, plaster repair, 
paneling, ceramic tile, carpentry. 
Grady’s Painting, Greenbelt, Md. 
Call 441-9078. _ 

TYPING DONE IN MY HOME— 
by expert typist, $1 per page, 25c 
per carbon, 25c per card. $1.25 
per page for dissertations, thesis, 
or term papers. Call 345-9162 be¬ 
tween 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. 


Licensed Massage Therapy 
for Women 

Practicing 

DEEP MUSCLE THERAPY 

to alleviate crippling conditions 
such as arthritis, lower back 
pain, foot problems, headaches, 
chronic tension and fatigue. I 
am a neighbor, and I may be 
able to help you. Call 441-8417 

PAINTINUr - Interior, exterior, 
wallpapering, light carpentry, and 
ceramic tile. Good Greenbelt ref¬ 
erences, excellent workmanship, 
Frank Gomez, 474-3814. 

UNIVERSAL CARPET CLEAN- 
ING - Quality work at reason¬ 
able rates, steam cleaned. 474- 
8035. Free estimates. 
RIVERDALE—8% VA assumable. 

Young beauty, 3 bedroom, den, 
Bob Neri, Douglas Realty, 577- 
9200, 474-3569. 

James Lockard 

Licensed Electrical Contractor 

Specializing In 
Heavy-ups 

Rec Room Additions 
Emergency Service 
552-1653 
or 

after 5 p.m. 

552-9535 

CALDWELL’S WASHER SERV- 
ICE. All makes expertly repaired. 
Authorized Whirlpool dealer. GR- 
4^5515. 

PIANO TUNING AND REPAIR - 

Expert and Reliable Piano Service 
to Greenbelt since 1960. Benjamin 
Berkofsky 474-6894. 

P/T and F/T positions available. 
Free training and good company 
benefits. Call Mr. Greg Shannon at 
474-5700. 

HOUSE FOR RENT - Available 
Sept. - Dec. 3 Bedroom, addition, 
rent negotiable. 332-3645 evenings 
or weekends. 

PIANO LESSONS: Peabody Con- 
servatory Graduate. Beginners - 
Advanced. 490-8208. 

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR 
PAINTING - General repairs, 
plaster patching, wall covering, 
drywall. Don Williams 474-4719. 


5 pm. 


Edgewood 
TV & Audio 

Dependable Guaranteed Service 

4932 EDGEWOOD RD. 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 20740 

Licensed & Bonded 


LEGAL CLINIC of DOUGLAS I. MALCOM 


Divorce, Uncont. 

200.00 

FREE INITIAL 

Incorporation 

Simple Will 

200,00 

35,00 

CONSULTATION 

Bankruptcy 

225.00 

Beltway Plaza 

Adoption 

200.00 

Shopping Center 

Guardianship 

100.00 

Greenbelt, Md. 20770 

Auto Accident 
Hourly Rate 

25% 

$ 35.00 

474-8808 

(Fees Exclude Costs) 

Call for appointment 


SPECIAL 

$5.00 off on all 
Repair Jobs 
With This Ad 
CALL 441-9116 


ROOM FOR RENT IN A WELL 
FURNISHED APT. $170 / month. 
ALL UTIL. INC. CALL 474-3 576. 
WILL BABYSIT Mon.-Fri. in my 

home. 474-5404. 

ELLERS TYPEWRITER Re£ 

PAIR - Electric, standard, and 
portable. Call 474-0594. 


Attention 
G.H.I. Members 


FOR SALE: 4 br. townhouse, 
cor, loc., baths; full 

basement, central a/c; 
carpeting included; 


For information call G.H.I. 
on 


474-4161 474-4244 


Mon.-Fri. 8:30 am to 5 pm 



F. Johnson of 

In-Home 
TV Service 


visits Greenbelt 
4 days each week 
y Always estimates within 10% 
y Always calls before visiting 

V Works some nights & week¬ 

ends 

V Top rated with consumer 

groups 

\ Prompt, fair - 18 yrs. exper¬ 
ience - He listens? 

\ M[ost repairs done in your 
home 

Master Charge, VISA accepted 
CALL 588-4166 IN DAYTIMES 
565-0001 Evenings & Weekends 


Please ask us how*we can help 
do-it-yourselfers over the 
phone 


REVIVAL MEETING 

Greenbelt Baptist Church will 
have a week of renewal and re¬ 
vival, Sept. 21-26, Richard Bum- 
pas, Baptist Campus Minister at 
the U.S. Naval Academy in An¬ 
napolis, will be the speaker. 
Frank Helms, Music Director oi 
Greenbelt Baptist Church, wil; 
direct the choir and congregation¬ 
al singing. 

The times of the meetings are 
Sept. 21, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. and 
September 22-26, 7 p.m. The pub¬ 
lic is invited The church nursery 
will be open. 


TRANSCENDENTAL 

MEDITATION 

A free public introductory lec¬ 
ture on the Transcendental Medi¬ 
tation (TM) Program will be giv¬ 
en Tuesday, Sept. 23 at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Greenbelt Library. The 
lecture, ’‘Perfect Health and the 
Aging Process,” will be given by 
Mark and Pauline Stickels, 
Greenbelt residents and TM 
teachers. There will be a film. 

TM Meditators are also invited. 
For more information call Mark 
Stickels 441-9398, 

YARD SALE- 12C Hillside Road. 
All items excellent condition. 
Clothes, books, miscellaneous it 
ems. On Sat. and Sun. from 10 to 6. 
SUPER YARD SALE: Household 
items, clothes, color TV, fire 
screen, curtains, maternity clothes, 
etc. PLUS BABY ITEMS GA 
LORE—Peterson carseat, stroll 
ers, crib, changing table, playpen, 
clothes, toys, and other gear. Sept. 
20 9:30-12:30. 127 Lastner Lane. 
You’all come. 

MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE 
7A Southway. Clothes, odds and 
ends, electric train track. Sat. 20, 
9-4. Raindate Sun. 21, 9-3. 


YARD SALE — Sat., 9-20-80 
Things you may need or use in 
your home are to be had here. 
Moving Thurs. 9-25-80. Will miss 
Greenbelt very much. 7T Research 
YARD SALE - MULTI-FAMILY. 
Furniture, toys, other goodies. 24 
Court Ridge Fd. Sat. 9/20; 10-3. 
Raindate Sunday. 

Notice: 

Gil I Owners 

All Vinyl Replacement Windows 

Before you buy any Replacement Windows, 
Call us for Free Brochure 

Go by and see our Sample House. 


3C Gardenway Mr. Wood 

(App. G.H.I. Inspectors) 



A. T. George & Son Storm Window & Door Co. 

6415 OLD BRANCH AVENUE-CAMP SPRINGS, MARYLAND 20031 
TELEPHONE: 297-4705 


_ Yard Sales _ 

GIANT YARD SALE: Saturday, 

Sept. 20, 10-3 p.m. 3i Court Ridge 
Rd. 

YARD SALE — Several families. 

Sept. 20, 10:00-2:00. Toys, antiques, 
limited editions, girls’ clothing (8- 
more, B5M Rids-e 












































































FREE WALLPAPER CLINIC 

Will's Home Decorating Center, 
a division of Will's Hardware Inc., 
is offering Greenbelt residents a 
unique opportunity to learn the 
art of wallpaper hanging. This 
free class is being held at 10502 
Baltimore Blvd., Beltsvilie, on Oc¬ 
tober 15 at 7:30 p.m. Reservations 
are required, please call 937-3733* 


Democratic Club 

by Tom White 

The Eleanor & Franklin Roose¬ 
velt Democratic Club will hold its 
first regular meeting after the 
summer vacation on Thursday, 
Sept. 25, at 8 p.m. at the Green- 
briar Community Bldg. The meet¬ 
ing has been changed from the 
original date of Friday, Sept. 19, 


due to the Jewish High Holy 
Days. 

The budget for 1980-81 will be 
on the agenda. After an enjoyable 
summer recess, plan on bringing 
a friend to the meeting. Refresh¬ 
ments will be served. 

Many thanks to club members 
who volunteered their time for 
the “Funnel Cake Booth.” Thanks 
to all patrons too! 


DOirTTHKE 



If you smell gas, call 

750-1000 promptly! 


Gas leaks may occur 
from faulty appliances, 
loose connections, 
service lines inside or 
outside your home, or 
from gas mains. Such 
leaks should be dealt with 
immediately by experts. 

We add a disagreeable 
odor to natural gas to 
warn people in case any 
gas should escape. 

If you ever smell gas — 
even if you do not use 
it in your home — take 
these precautions 
promptly: 



1. Call Washington Gas at 
750-1000. 

2.lf the odor is strong and 
^ you are indoors, open 
windows and doors to 
ventilate. Call us from a 
neighbor s house. 

3. Do not turn any 
electrical switches on 
or oft. 

4. Do not light 
matches, smoke 
cigarettes or 
create any sources 
of combustion. 

However slim the 
chance of danger, 
dorVt take any 
chances. Call us if 
you smell gas. 


Never use your gas range or oven to heat a home 
or apartment. This is extremely dangerous. 

Washington Gas 

WASHINGTON GAS LIGHT COMPANY ^ 


Passbook Rate 


per annum, compounded daily 



30 month Money Market Certificate 

$500 minimum; 

CALX, FOR RATE 


MONEY MARKET 
CERTIFICATE 

$10,000 minimum 
182 day term 


Call for weekly rate 

Note: A Substantial Interest Penalty will be charged for early withdrawal of certificate 


accounts 


<§)TWIN PINES 

SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

105 Centerway 

Hours: Monday-Thursday 9-6, Friday 9-8 
Saturday 9-12 jm ■■ jm m 
Member MSSIC 4 # 4*0900 




Buying - Silver &. Gold 

Jewelry & Flatware ^ 
TOP PRICES 

937-911? 

. 11110 Balt. Blvd. Beltsvilie 

* Shopping CmV 





1. GREENBELT 


$34,000 


MORE FOR YOUR MONEY 


This end unit townhome will give you the room you 
need, 3 bedrooms, a first floor addition, plus a patio and 
a beautiful, shady yard. What are you waiting for? 


2. GREENBELT 


$48,900 


PRIVACY AND CONVENIENCE 


are both yours with this end unit brick townhome lo 
cated close to shopping. Enjoy 2 bedrooms, a first floor 
addition, and separate dining room. Owner will help 

with financing. CALL NOW! 


3. GREENBELT 


Low 70’s 


WANT TO STAY IN GREENBELT? 

If your family size is growing but you’re still in love 
with the Greenbelt area; this rambler in Lakewood will 
give you all the extra living space you need! You’ll 
enjoy 4 bedrooms, 1% baths, family room, central air, 
and a quiet cul-de-sac location. CALL TODAY! 

4. GREENBELT $39,900 

3 BR Frame & Basement 

Yes, this townhome not only has these features but also 
2 baths, end unit, and great location. Come and see 
this one immediately!! 

WE NEED PROPERTIES FOR SALE!!! 

Due to our continuous Backlog of Buyers our properties are 
sold within short periods of time. Call our experienced staff 
today for a FREE Competitive Market Analysis. 

Call 474-5700 

NYMAN REALTY INC. 

151 Centerway