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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Pim . 

... Printed Simultaneously . 

\ in Paris, London, Zurich, 


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The 


Uhls. Ab “ h as C V- — ■ 


Kong. Singapore, 
and Marseille 


INTERNATIONAL 




WEATHER DMA APPEAR ON PACE 18 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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ZURICH, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


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In Europe, Space Defense Spiel Is a Flop 


By Don Oberdorfcr 

Washington Post Service 

. DALLAS — President Ronald 
Reagan’s Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative is aimed at Soviet nuclear- 

died it could score a £oct hit on 
tbe ptdibcal fortunes of the Eu«>- 
peanaflies. 

The U& administration has 
been surprisingly ineffective in 
addraa i ng the concents of major 
European allies. A lack of defini- 
tion and consensus in die U.S. 
approach has caused trouble 


The lack of forethought in such 
ini datives as Defense Secretary 
Caspar W. Weinberger’s offer 
last week of techiralogica] part- 
nership, if the allies responded 


within 60 days, has compounded 
the problem, since many of the 
allies interpreted it as an ultima- 
tum. 

These conclusions arise from 
two days.of public and private 

■NEWS ANALYSIS 

discussion here during the week- 
end among 120 West Germans 
and 80 Americans, including a 
number of senior government of- 
ficials and parliamentarians, at 
(he 13th biennial American-Ger- 
man conference, sponsored by 
the Atlantik-BrOcke and the 
American Council on Germany, 
both private organizations. 

Although rite agenda for tbe 
conference raneea widely, Mr. 


Reagan's Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative, popularly called “star 
wars," aomniHteri the political, 
military and at titne* even the 
economic discussions. 

On the surface, the West Ger- 
mans and other European allies 
are going along with the Reagan 
program as shown by last week's 
unanimous approval of research 
by NATO defense ministers. 
However, West German officials 
and political figures are deeply 
concerned about what the project 
means for their security, their re- 
lations with the Soviet Union and 
their internal politics. 

In tbe face of European con- 
cern, calls for intensified US. 
diplomatic efforts came from two 
former senior US. officials, Wil- 


Mr. Hyland, noting there was 
poEd- 

ation, no consultation 


: preparation, 


Space Project’s Leader 
Is an Old Europe Hand 


sh Ficchett 

Imernaaatai Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The U.S. Air Force 
officer in charge of the Strategic 
Defense Initiative, Lieutenant 
General James A. Abrahamson, 
has spent much of his career 
working on cooperative mOitary 
programs with European allies. 

Selling the idea of space-based 
anti- mi wile defense is proving to 
be on of his toughest assignments 
and one that he acknowledges is 
frequently complicated by con- 
flicting or misleading statements 
by U.S. officials. 

General. Abrahamson, 53, an 
aeronautical engineer and a fight- 
er pilot who flew 49 combat mis- 
sions in Vietnam, runs the Penta- 
gon department created in 1983 
to handle the Strategic Defense 
Initiative. - ■ 

He divides bis time between 
managing the $26-billion re- 
search program and explaining 
and de fending it to government 
officials, businessmen and jour- 
nalists. 

General Abrahamson, who 
was in charge of the U.S. space 
shuttle program before taking 
command of the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative Office, is sup- 
posed to be The tnan with the 


answers. But he admits that no- 
body has Them all , and his credi- 
bility among European officials is 
high, according to several who 
have dealt with him. 

His goal now is to persuade the 
allies to participate in the re- 
search phase of the program. 
That task is especially difficult 
because tbe proposal is often 
viewed in Europe as a device to 
simply gain political support, 
rather than provide access to sig- 
nificant new technology. 

At a breakfast last week given 
by Evan G. Galbraith, the U.S. 
ambassador to Paris, General 
Abrahamson's commitment 
seemed as dear as bis technical 



[ Abrahamson was bora 
in North Dakota. He graduated 
from the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology in 1955 and re- 
ceived a master of science degree 
from the University of O klahoma 
in 1961. 

He joined the air force follow- 
ing his graduation from MIT and 
got his pilot’s wings two yean 
later. He received his third star in 
1982, the year before moving to 
his present position, in which he 
reports directly to. the defense 
secretary. Caspar W. Weinberger. 


Camara Proa 

James A. Abrahamson 

The general is married and has 
two children. 

Aside from combat duty in 
Vietnam, most of his career has 
involved manag in g sophisticated 
weapons-devdopmem programs. 

He was selected to be an astro- 
naut but failed to make it into 
space when the air force canceled 
its Manned Orbiting Laboratory 
project in 1969. 

His exposure to the dipl omac y 
of space projects came later when 
his respmmbflities included Spa- 
(ContinaedoaPage 2, CoL 7) 


Ham G. Hyland and Lawrence S. 
Eagleburger. 

' It. Hyb 
“no public ] 
cal 

with allies and no game plan 
about how toprocmrin the ear- 
of Mr. Reagan’s prqpos- 
said in an interview that the 
plan “has the makings of a major 
alliance crisis unless handled 
carefully, perhaps with some US. 
concessions.” 

Mr. Hyland, editor of Foreign 
Affairs magazine and a former 
CIA and National Security 
Council official, suggested for- 
mation of a high-level Atlantic 
alliance group to discuss bow to 
accommodate tbe defense pro- 
ject, at least for the rest of Mr. 
Reagan’s term. 

Mr. Eagleburger, who retired 
in May as undenjecretaiy of state 
for political affairs, recommend- 
ed in an address the adminis- 
tration begin diplomatic discus- 
' sions “right now* centered on the 
French and British, whose own 
nuclear arsenals are “clearly 
threatened" by the anti-missile 
defense plan. 

Mr. Weinberger's efforts to co- 
ordinate with this European allies 
last week woo no plaudits from 
West German officials and politi- 
cians here, some of whom ex- 
pressed puzzlement and irritation 
at his offer last Tuesday to permit 
European nations to participate 
in the research if they responded 
within 60 days. 

The West German political op- 
si tion, which was represented 
. accused Mr. Weinberger of 
laying down a 60-day ultimatum 
and treating Germany as “a colo- 
ny" of the United States. West 
German government officials in- 
volved in the response to Mr. 
Weinberger said their study 
would take longer than 60 days, 
leaving the impression that they 
would lose face by responding 
within this U.S. “deadline." 

U.S. officials said Mr. Wein- 
berger’s deadline was not dis- 
cussed in advance with the State 
Department or National Security 
Council, which were taken by 
surprise and considered it pro- 
vocative and unwise: 

Official comments also sug- 
gested a lade of clarity within the 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 





U.S. Farm 



Police , Crowds 
Clash Following 
Demonstrations 

The Astodmed Press 

COPENHAGEN — Thousands 
of workers on Monday defied a 
governmen t- imposed settlement of 
Denmark's worst postwar labor 
dispute. Nationwide wildcat strikes 
continued to paralyze tbe country. 

Walkouts, blockades and dem- 
onstrations were reported through- 
out Denmark, interrupting busi- 
ness and curtailing most transport, 
mail ddiveiy and public services. 

Riot police fought repeatedly 
with protesters in the capital after a 
large demonstration outside Parlia- 
ment The police said at least 

100.000 people converged on 
Chri5tiansborg Palace, the seat of 
Parliament in central Copenhagen. 

Danish radio reported dashes in 
the dty of Odense, where about 

3.000 gathered It said unoccupied 
police cars had been attacked by 
protesters after police moved away 
to avoid further violence. 

Copenhagen hospitals reported 
they were handling, only acute cases 
after walkouts by unionized em- 
ployees in the morning. 

There were no public buses in 
most cities, and vraai few ferries 
still sailed among the countiVs 400 
islands largely were manned by of- 
ficers and nonunion help. 

Traffic in and oat of Copenha- 
gen's Kastrup Airport, the coun- 
try's biggest, remained limited. 
Most flights were rerouted through 
other Scandinavian dries. 

Radio Denmark played nonstop 
music, interrupted only by hourly 
newscasts, after technicians struck. 

After the Cop enhage n demon- 
stration, protesters blocked 'streets 
and were repeatedly repulsed by 
riot police when they tried to re- 
enter a palace courtyard. 

‘The protests were against legisla- 
tion to impose an end by Monday 
to a week of strikes and lockouts 
affecting more than 320,000 work- 
ers in the private sector and to head 
; 



Tha Aaodamd Praa 

Danish protesters and police faced each Monday in Copen- 
hagen after a demonstration in front of Parfiament 


an 


off strikes in the public sector by 
additional 200,000. 

Tens of thousands of demonstra- 
tors protested in other Danish dt- 
ies after widespread wildcat stop- 
pages, the radio reported. 

The settlement was part of an 
economic package that the center- 
right government poshed through 
Denmark’s legislature by a slim 
majority late Saturday night. 

It followed the breakdown of 
five months of collective bargain- 
ing between Denmark's employers’ 
association and the federation of 
trade unions. 


, a Tangle of Contradictions^ Hurts Resources 


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By Ward Sinclair 

Washington Past Service 


Police Fired 
In Uitenhage 


Threw Stone 


tempting to write legislation to guide U.S. farm barley, 12 percent of rice and 3 percent of wheat 
naming ton ran oemce and food policy. This time. Congress is ap- are grown with subsidized water. » » 

FRESNO, California — AH the way to the Poaching the task in the most antagonistic and The issues faring Congress are cnonnoos and \ 1X#*I* W flYflj) ¥1 

horizon, it is a view of paradise. crisis-driven air since the farm programs were difficult *nd the debate cnnM determine the tv uujuu 

Irwin Efird, a farmer, sharply banks his twin- cniated dining the New Deal era. 
engineplane through the smog of the San Joa- U.S agriculture, the most productive in histo- 

qum Valley and drops down closer to see the ** “ studded with contradictions and curios- 
movement in the fields. 

On the left are tomatoes and ofl derricks. On These are aggravated by conflicting federal 
the right, garlic and fieM hands. In the distance, taw “>d policies that encourage the abuse of 
grapes and fruit trees. And, straight ahead, six U.S. natural resources and, in the long run, may 
big red combines harvest an endless golden hurt as much as help farmers. These mclude: 
of ripe wheat. * Policies that encourage production for the 

kind of yields do they get?” the pas- “ports that bring in about $35 billion a year 
asked. - 


a’t know,” said Mr. Efird. “Two-and-a- 
half, three tons per acre.” 

“Well, what's that come to in bushels?” 
“Don't know ” said the fanner. “Out here we 
measure in tons.” 

That is f aiming. Calif omia-style, and it is 
phenomenal. Three tons of wheat is 100 bushels, 
two and a half times the average U.S. yield. 

Such yields in parts of California and Arizona 
are made possible by federal irrigation water 
sold to farmers at a fraction of its real cost. 


Farms in Crisis 
Policy at a Crossroads 


First of four articles 


difficult, and the debate could determine the 
shape of U.S. agriculture for decades. 

During the great export boom of the 1970s, 
expanding foreign demand sent fanners’ prices 
soaring and raised the possibility that, finally, 
U.S. agriculture's golden era had come. Govern- 
ment officials, bankers and agricultural experts 
at the land-grant colleges urged farmers to get 
more land and machinery to cope with the 
boom. 

Many fanners followed that advice. Marginal 
land was brought into production, fanners and 
developers rushed into expanding output, and 
during the 1970s, export sales climbed to $40 
billion from $10 billion. At least 40 percent of 
U.S. harvests during that time were exported. 

The American landscape was transformed. 

Great rangelands in the West were plowed. 
On millions of acres of irreplaceable wetlands in 
the Southeast'and North Carolina trees were 
cut, the land was drained and crops were plant- 
ed. The fragile Sandhills of Nebraska were con- 


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A fanner steps off a combine in a Kansas wheat field. 


also drive farmere and investors to topple for- 
ests, tear up fragile rangelands and pump irriga- 
tion water without thought to the future. . . „ - ... „ ,, 

• A policy designed ostensibly to nurture ve ^ ed fr ® n tand to com fields. 

Moreover, they and the fanners in 15 other family-sized farms is undermined by a tax po- But . TOth cxportmarke^reeling from 

Western states that receive below-cost federal licy that helps big fanners get bigger and brings rec ^ SSI011 new competiti on, U- S- farmers are 

water also can qualify for the same Agriculture investors seeing tax shelters into agriculture as P 3 )^ ® heavy cost: depressed prices from 
Department loans and subsidies designed to competitors. overproduction; bank notes they cannot meet; 

help all farmers stay in business. • A policy that subsidizes fanners to conserve overwhelming losses from f alling values of land 

By contrast, Kansans and Noth Dakotans their soil is undermined by other policies that machin ery; and topsoil lost by erosion, 
and other farmers must provide their own water encourage farmers to abuse the land, silt up The U.S. Fish and Wildli 
or rely on nature. Left at a competitive disad- lakes and riven and lace them with toxic pesti- 
cide residue. 

• A policy that pays farmers to reduce sur- 
pluses by not planting crops conflicts with tax 
policies that encourage surplus production on 
marginal lands and make it profitable to do so, 
at the general taxpayer’s expense. In the United 
States, about 18 percent of cotton, 14 percent of 


vantage, with far lower yields and profits, they 
plant more in order to compensate. 

As a result, bins in the United States spiD over 
with unsellable surplus wheat that most be 
bought and stored by the government at enor- 


mous cost to the taxpayer. 

As it does each four years. Congress is at- 


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says that 
between the mid-1950s and the mid-1970s, the 
United States lost more than 1 1.7 million acres 
(4.7 ntiDion hectares) of wetlands that were vital 
to wildlife, flood control and water-quality pro- 
tection. About 87 percent of this was converted 
to farm production. 

A 1 980 study by Leonard Shabman, a Viigin- 
( Continued on Page 4, CoL 6) 


A Basement Full of Ancient History 

Jerusalem Man *s Obsession Brings Rich Haul of Artifacts 



By Thomas L Friedman 

Sew York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Theo Sie ben- 
berg is a man obsessed with his 
basement. 

But who can blame him? 

It is not every house in Jerusalem 
that has “3,000 years of Jewish his- 
tory h amming away underneath 
it,” he said with asmfle. 

Mr. Sebenberg and his wife, 
Miriam, live in what may be the 
most unusual house in Jerusalem. 
The upstairs is a multistory, stylish, 
white-walled town bouse in the re- 
bnflt Jewish Quarter of the Old 
City. The basement is an archaeo- 
logical dig of more than 1,600 
square yazw(1 4 140 square meters). 
Itis adusty.dmy hole where, in the 
last 15'years, the Siebeabergs have 
bemdfcccwermg artifacts that span 
3,000 yean of Jewish history. 

Tunneling underneath their 
home, asm donkeys to bring out 
the piles of nibble for sifting, tbe 
Sid»&boigs]oTO uncovered 


time of Jesus, to a rusty Czechoslo- 
vak-made machitift gun left behind 
by the last Jewish defenders of the 
neighborhood, who fought during 
tbe 1948 war. 

“The sense of the continuity of 
Jewish histoiy comes right up from 
the basement,” Mr. Sebenberg 
said, raising his aims to emphasize 
his point ^Herc, in one spot, you 
can see Jewish history vertically. It 
is not like taking children to a mu- 
seum and showing them arrow- 
heads with this date on them or jars 
with that date. It’s all hare. Here we 
were, and here we are.” 

The tale of the Siebenbeig home 
began in 1966, wheat Theo emigrat- 
ed to Israel from Belgium after 
amassing a fortune in investments. 
He comes from one erf the most 
prominent famili es of Jewish dia- 
mond merchants in Antwerp. 

Having married Miriam, an Is* 
radi artist, Mr. Siebenberg settled 
in a rented viQa in Haifa. But im- 
mediately after the 1967 war, he 


iietienrisrgjhave uncovered every- mediately alter me war, ne 
thmgj&omawi/baA, or ritual bath, and his Removed to fuM a leng- 
ths! wastsed T^ Jews riming the time desire to live in s^eunified 
Second Temple Period, about the.' Jerusalem. They began,, budding 


their own villa in a new neighbor- 
hood, RamalEshkoL 
Their real ambition, however, 
was to live inside the ancient walls 
of the Old City in the destroyed, 
but newly captured, Jewish Quar- 
ter, whae Jews had hved on and off 
since the lime of King David. 
Eventually, the municipality of Je- 
rusalem put real-estate lots there 
up for sale. The Siebenbergs 
bought one and began building a 
borne, one that would eventually 
turn out to be more interesting for 
its foundations than its structure. 

As the finishing touches on the 
house ware being . completed in 
1970, with a duster of apartment 
houses around it, Mr. Siebaiberg 
became fascinated watching ar- 
chaeologists from Hebrew Univer- 
sity excavate in tbe Jewish Quarter 
not far from his home. 

“I went over one day and asked 
the archaeologists if they had 
checked (Ik area where my house 
was,” Mr. Sebenberg said. “They 
said they had and that they were 
sure no thing was there.” 

This answer did not make sense 
(Continued on Page.2, CoL 4) 



Israeli Grip 
In West Bank 
Is Detailed 


By Edward Walsh 

Washington Past Service 

JERUSALEM — Israel has 
seized effective control of more 
than half of the land in tbe West 
Bank during the almost 19 years h 
has occupied the territory, accord- 
ing to a study by an independent 
research organization. 

The study says that 567,125 acres 
(228,221 hectare), or 41 percent of 
the West Bank, is in the direct pos- 
session of Israelis. It says Israel has 
imposed prohibitions against 
rand other land-use restric- 


The Asso ciat ed Press 

JOHANNESBURG - A police 
officer testified Monday that be 
ordered his men to open fire on an 
approaching crowd of black 
marchers last month after a woman 
threw a stone: 

Nineteen persons died in (he 
shooting, which the government 
has justified by saying that the po- 
licemen had come under attack. 

Lieutenant Johan William 
Fouche said dining an inquiry into 
the March 21 shootings that the 
crowd did not surround the two 
armored riot vehicles and pelt them 
with stones, sticks and gasoline 
bombs, as the government had al- 
leged 

Lieutenant Fouche, who was in 
command of the unit of 19 police- 
men in tbe industrial center of Ui- 
lenhage’s black township, said: 
“My main reason in giving the or- 
der to open fire was to protect the 
lives of my men and myself. When 
the woman threw the first stone, I 
expected there to be more.” 

He added, “I believe my men 
and I would definitely be overrun 
and killed if I didn't give the order 
to fire." 

He' was testifying on the fourth 
day of an inquiry into the conflict- 
ing versions of what happened 

Black witnesses have been 
quoted as saying there was no 
stone-throwing or other provoca- 
tion. 

Tbe police, meanwhile, reported 
that townships were relatively quiet 
after a weekend of unrest. 

They said Sunday that a black 
man was killed and several people 
injured in clashes in the Port Eliza- 
beth area. More than three dozen 
people have been killed in 10 days 
of disturbances in eastern Cape 
Province. 


Iraqi Raid 

Kills 15 

In Tehran 

Bombs Strike 
Bus Terminal, 
Turn Suburbs 

Reuters 

TEHRAN — Iraqi aircraft 
bombed Tehran on Monday, kill- 
ing at least 15 persons. It was one 
of the deadliest raids since Iraq 
began attacks on the Iranian capi- 
tal March 12. 

[Iran gave conflicting reports of 
the number of casualties. United 
Press International reported. Iran’s 
official news agency said that at 
least 15 persons were killed and 76 
were injured. Tehran Radio, moni- 
tored in Athens, reported 18 deaths 
and 45 injuries. 

[Tehran residents said that many 
more people died in the bombings 
than the official death tolls given. 
They said that Iraqi bombs fell on 
tbe suburbs of Naziabad and Var- 
zeshgah and on the city’s main bus 
terminal.] 

In Baghdad, a military spokes- 
man said that Iraqi jets afro at- 
tacked a “large naval target” near 
Kharg Island early Monday. Iraq 
uses the term to describe ail tank- 


ers. 


In another attack reported Mon- 
day, an Iraqi mflita^r statement 
said that Iraqi helicopter gunships 


destroyed 22 Iranian boats carry- 
ing soldiers and six large boats fit- 
ted with machin e grrm in the east- 


The government limited annual 
increases to 2 percent or Iras, 
among the lowest pay increases in 
Weston Europe. 

It reduced the 40-hour work 
week by one hour, bat not until 
three months before the contract 
period expires March 1, 1987. - 
Unions had demanded bigger 
raises and a reduction of the work- 
week to 35 hours. They said the 
intervention led by the Conserva- 
tive prime minister. Poul ScMnter, 
marked an end to democracy in 
Denmark’s system of collective 
wage agreements. 


era Tigris River region. All the 
helicopters returned to base, it add- 
ed. 

The Iraqi statement afro said 
that Iranian artillery shcTiftri ihc 
suburbs of the southern Iraqi port 
of Basra. It did not report damages 
or casualties. 

Iran, meanwhile, said il had re- 
taliated for earlier attacks on Teh- 
ran by launching seven surface- to- 
surface missiles at Baghdad (Ml 
Sunday. It said it afro shelled mili- 
tary and economic installations in 
seven Iraqi cities and carried out 
three air strikes into Iraq. 

Government newspapers in Iraq 
said the Iraqi forces would contin- 
ue to attack Iranian cities, as well 
as ships using the. oil depot at 
Kharg Island, until Tehran re- 
sponded to peace proposals. 

There was stiU no indication that 
Iran was prepared to accept an of- 
fer of mediation from the United 
Nations secretary-general, Javier 
Pfirez de Cudllar. 

The UN leader said Sunday in 
Riyadh that he was ready to visit 
Tehran at the end of his four-na- 
tion Gulf tour. UN sources said he 
would want to discuss all aspects of 
the war, which began in September 
1980. 

Iran said that. Mr. P&rcz de Cuel- 
lar would be welcome in Tehran. 
But Iran made it dear that it was 
only interested in discussing, a par- 
tial cease-fire covering rivihan tar- 
gets and shipping in the Golf. It 
rejects mediation aimed at ending 
the war and says it will fight on 
until President Saddam Hussein of 
Iraq is toppled. 

Iraq has invited Mr. Pfcrez de 
CuSDar to Baghdad. 

The raid Monday on the residen- 
tial suburbs of southern Tehran 
preceded by a few hours a rally 
marking the sixth anniversary of 
the Islamic revolution. 

Diplomatic sources speculated 
that Iraq;, by concentrating Us at- 
tacks on the crowded southern sub- 
urbs, Iraq hoped to shake the mo- 
rale of the people who form the 
backbone of support for continu- 
ing the war. Only two of the eight 
raids on Tehran have been on the 
middle-class northern districts. 

At least 28 persons were reported 
killed and 199 were wounded in 
Iraqi attacks on the city Wednes- 
day. 

In Tokyo, meanwhile, the Iraqi 
foreign minister, Tariq Aziz, reject- 
ed a Japanese appeal for a cease- 
fire against civilian targets, but 
urged Iranian leaders to negotiate 
an end to the war. 

Mr. Aziz, in Tokyo to brief Japa- 
nese leaders on the war, said Iran's 
leaders should “stop this crazy war 
and sit down for negotiation on an 
honorable, equitable and peaceful 
solution.” 

“We are ready to discuss and 
consider seriously and sincere]} 
any suggestions or ideas for a com- 
prehensive cease-fire,” he said at a 
news conference. 


imposed ] 
building an 
tjons that 


T)U N*w Y\>* Tkw 


Theo Siebeoberg in the basement of Iris Jerusalem borne. 
His wife, Miriam, is standing on tbe ground-floor level 


lions that prechide independent 
Arab development on another 
142^00 acres, owned by Arabs 
Outright expropriation and the 
land-use restrictions give Israel ef- 
fective control of 52 percent of the 
West Bank, enough territory to 
support up to one million Jewish 
settlers, the report says. 

The report, produced by the Je- 
rusalem-based West Bank Data 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


INSIDE 

■ Saras! professional unions in Sudan reportedly agreed to hold a 

one-day general strike Wednesday. Page 1 

■ The American pub&c bofafr the Camp David peace accords in high 

regard, a New York Tunes opinion pail found. Page A 

■ Id Hungary, a class of tbe “new rich” is developing because of the 

government's policy of providing economic incentives. “““ e 


ses new problems for U.S. planners: protecting 
diplomats without damaging an Ttnag e Page 9. 

BUSINESS/HNANCE 

■ Financial Carp, reported a 1984 loss of $590.5 million. Page 11. 
■j^panRportejfiyoflBodatndeaMicesaontolheU.S. Page 1L 







'SnPPPSySfPPSSISSffff BPS? J?SifiJ222EaaS53BEE22E?IfSJIP?BS"S?S.?S!PBffPB5BBBtiBP9?PPWWflei«««BB»Bin 




T" 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HE 


R^UD 




TRIBUTE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


Sudan Unions Reportedly Plan 
One-Day Anti-Nimeiri Walkout 


The Associated Press 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sever- 
al professional unions have agreed 
to a one-day general strike 
Wednesday to bads demands that 
President’ Gaafar Nimeiri step 
down, Sudanese sources said Mon- 
day. 

The agreement was reported as 
lawyers in Khartoum began a strike 
and the government arrested the 
l eader s and some members of the 
officially disbanded doctors and 
lawyers unions. 

Mohammed Osman Abu-Sag, a 
secretary of the ruling Sudanese 
Socialist Union, said Monday that 
security authorities had arrested at 
least 10 leading members of the 
doctors' and lawyers' unions. 

Asked whether there had been 
arrests of military men, Mr. Abu- 
Sag said the army and police “al- 
ways have been faithful to the re- 
gime.” The remark was an 
apparent effort to stop minors 
about possible anti-Nimori feel- 
ings within the military. 

Mr. Abu-Sag gave the first offi- 
cial casualty toll erf three days of 
noting in Khartoum and Omdur- 
man last week, saying that five peo- 
ple had been killed. Government 
officials said earlier that more than 
2,600 people had been arrested. 

Western diplomats in Khartoum 
have said that the rioting was a 
protest against food-price increases 
brought on by removal of govern- 
ment subsidies. This emergency 
measure was among the economic 
rhang es demanded by the United 
States and other creditors. It was 
supported by the International 
Monetary Fund. 

The diplomats said that a general 


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strike, if successful could pose a 
serious threat to the pro-American 
Nimeiri government, which has 
been in power since 1969. The pres- 
ident is now visiting the United 
States. 

Major General Nimein was to 
meet Monday in Washington with 
President Ronald Reagan to dis- 
cuss economic aid. The frail Suda- 
nese economy is a major factor be- 
hind the unrest in Sudan. 

Sudani sources said the unions 
of lawyers, judges, engineers and 
university professors derided Sun- 
day to call die general strike in the 
Khartoum area. These unions had 
been urged to stop work by the 
doctors' union, which had ordered 
a strike by its members in Khar- 
toum last week- 

The Sudanese sources, who re- 
quested anonymity for fear of re- 
prisals, said that the Wednesday 
strike would be a warning. They 
did not rule out the possibility of it 
being extended. 

“The situation can no longer gp 
on in tins way,” a young striking 
doctor said. “The present regime 
has to go.” 

Two other striking doctors said 
Saturday that the doctors’ union 
was seeking a civil disobedience 
movement to unseat President Ni- 
meiri. 

The sources said the unions 
hoped to organize demonstrations 
Wednesday to back up the general 
strike. 

Khartoum appeared cruiet Mon- 
day but with a noticeable increase 
in the number of army troops post- 
ed at key installations. 

■ Nimeiri Requests 

Earlier, Jonathan C Randal oj 
The Washington Post reported from 
Khartoum: 

In his talks with Mr. Reagan, 
President Nimeiri was expected to 
invoke the anti-government dem- 
onstrations to bolster his case for 
unfreezing nearly $200 million in 
U.S. aid to Sudan, according to 
diplomats in Khartoum. 


The United States suspended aid 
to Sudan late last year because of a 
steady deterioration in the econom- 
ic and political situation in Sudan 

Many Sudanese suggest that 
President Nimeiri purposely toler- 
ated the demonstrations, which be- 
gan before he left far Washington 
last week, to underline demand* for 
lifting the financial conditions 
blocking disbursement of the 
funds. 

The students who led the demon- 
strations denounced what they said 
were conditions imposed by the In- 
ternationa] Monetary Fund and 
the World Bank. Economists and 
diplomats in Khartoum said it was 
the Reagan administration, and 
not the Washington-based interna- 
tional institutions, that had the 
power to resume aid to Sudan. 

Many times before in his 16 
years in power. President Nimeiri 
has left the country during a crisis 
to make it clear to Ms people and 
his foreign allies that without him 
Sudan could collapse. This time he 
plans to be abroad 16 days for 
official visits to the United States, 
Egypt and Pakistan. 

In the face of civil war, an influx 
of foreign refugees, drought, fam- 
ine and a mi smanag ed economy. 
Major General Nimeiri can point 
to tough decisions he has taken 
recently, apparently at U.S. insis- 
tence. 

In the four weeks since Vice 
President George Bush visited Su- 
dan, Major General Nimeiri has 
announced a series of political and 
economic reforms. Following up 
on a February decision to devalue 
the Sudanese pound from 13 to "L5 
to the dollar , he raised bread and 
gasoline prices by about 60 percent. 

He also allowed the Central In- 
telligence Agency to fly 900 Ethio- 
pian Jews to IsfaeL Several thou- 
sand of the refugees had been 
airlifted between November and 
early January in commercial air- 
craft. 


Fuel, Electricity Rates 
Are Raised in Poland 


By Michael T. Kaufman 

New York Times Service 

WARSAW — The costs of elec- 
tricity, natural gas and heating fu- 
els were raised Monday as the sec- 
ond phase of price increases were 
put into effect without visible pro- 
test or unrest 

Police were on guard near the 
Warsaw steel plant but there was 
no indication of stoppages to pro- 
test the increases, which varied 
from 20 to 32 percent. These fol- 
lowed last month’s increases in the 
price of bread, cereals, flour, tea. 
milk, and sugar, which ranged from 
30 to 75 percent. 

The underground press of the 
outlawed Solidarity union had 
called for demonstrations and dis- 
cussions Monday to demand wage 
increases and bonuses to offset the 
rises in prices. After the last round, 
there were scattered work stop- 
pages but no significant protests. 


Guatemalan Assassinated 

United Press International 

GUATEMALA CITY — Gun- 
men on Sunday assassinated Ma- 
nuel Francisco Sosa Avila, 65, a 
retired army general and brother- 
in-law of the former president, 
Efrain Rios Montt The motive for 
the killing was not immediately 
known, officials said. 


SM1RE IN WORDS AND PCTUSE5 
DOONESBURY 
DAI WIN THE tHT 


The official trade unions, set up 
with government endorsement to 
replace Solidarity, are becoming in- 
creasingly open about revealing 
their displeasure with the way in 
which their recommendations on 
price policy were rejected. The gov- 
ernment press, however, reported 
that because of the pressure of 
these unions, planned price in- 
creases were reduced. 

Officials of some of these unions 
have made it dear that the conces- 
sions have not gone far enough, 
and they are continuing to seek 
cuts in the third round of increases 
— cm butter, oils and meat — that 
is scheduled for June. 

The Solidarity underground, 
whose effectiveness in calling dem- 
onstrations has been blunted in the 
last year, has announced through 
its dozens of factory and regional 
newspapers that if the authorities 
do not increase wages by at least 10 
percent to compensate for the price 
rises, it will call for a general strike 
in June. 

The government, headed by 
General Wqjciecb Jaruzelski, is 
aware that price increases set off 
the soda! turbulence that led to the 
downfall erf the governments of 
Wladyslaw Gomulka in 1970 and 
Edward Gierek in 1980. 

■ Yugoslavia Raises Prices 

Railroad passenger and cargo 
transport rates were increased 15 to 
32 percent and newspaper prices 50 
to 66 percent. The Associated Press 
reported Monday from Belgrade. 
Gasoline prices were raised recent- 
ly 3 to 9 percent. 



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JORDAN 


Israeli police examine the place where 7ahnan , 
an Israeli settler, was shot and killed Sunday while 
ping at El Bireh on the occupied West Bank. The gunman 
escaped. At Bethlehem, Israeli border police shot and 
wounded four Palestinians on Monday after students threw 
stones at Israelis, military and Palestinian sources said. 

Report Details Gains 
By Israel in West Bank 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Base Project and believed to be the 
most extensive study ever made of 
Israeli land expr op riation policies 
in the West Bank, was released 
Sunday. 

The study warned that Israeli 
policies have been designed to cre- 
ate a “dual system” for the benefit 
of Israelis, and to leave the territo- 
ry’s 800,000 Palestinian residents 
isolated in “a patchwork of hostile 
regions, alienated and severed” 
from each other. 

“The Israelis, by imposing direct 
control over half of the West Bank, 
have actually created two spatially 
segregated regions, ethnically di- 
vided, separate and unequal,” the 
report said. 

The report also noted that the 
long Israeli occupation of the West 
Bank has helped to almo st com- 
pletely reverse the historic pattern 
of land ownership in what was the 
British Mandate of Palestine until 
the creation of Israel in 1948. 

“Thirty-eight years ago, in 1947, 
iheJews possessed less than 10 per- 
cent of the total land of mandatory 
Palestine.” it said. “Now, the Arahs 
(including the Arab citizens of Isra- 
el) are left in possession of 15 per- 
cent of that land.” * 

The West Bank Data Base Pro- 
ject is an indepe nde nt research Qg 
ganization that monitors the 
growth of the Jewish presence in 
the West Bank. It is headed by 
Meron Benvcnisti. a professional 
city planner and former deputy 
mayor of Jerusalem, and is funded 
by grants from the Ford and 
Rockefeller Foundations. 

The study documents the meth- 
ods Israel has used to seize land in 
the West Bank, including the take- 
over of property abandoned by its 
owners, the ‘‘compulsory pur- 
chase” of land for public purposes 
and the closure of vast tracts for 
military use. 


Israeli ’s Obsession Puts Him 
In Close Touch With History 



(Continued from Page I) 
to Mr. Siebenberg, a man who was 
driven not only to locate himself in 
his ancestral homeland but also to 
anchor himself there by establish- 
ing a link with his people’s past. 

“The temple was just over 
there,” he said, motioning to the 
Wailing WaD. which is viable from 
his home. “Why wouldn’t Jews 
have built here tom? Every inch of 
land near the temple must have 
been very valuable.* 

Mr. Siebenberg asked his archi- 
tects and engineers if it would be 
possible for Finn to conduct an ar- 
chaeological dig under his house. 
The engineers were incredulous. 

“They said the houses in the 
neighborhood behind us were all 
resting on a raft of concrete, and if 
I excavated under mine tbe whole 
neighborhood above us would 
come sliding down the hill,” Mr. 
Siebenberg said. “But I kept pester- 
ing them.” 

Eventually, tbe engineers said 
there was a solution, but it would 
cost a fortune. A retaining wall, 
held down by dozens of steel an- 
chors, could prevent the neighbor- 
ing houses from slipping away. 


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Fusing Ban in New York 

New York Timrs Service 
ALBANY, New York — The 
slate of New York has banned 
commercial fishing for striped bass 
in New York Harbor and along 
both shores of western Long Island 
because of dangerous levels of tbe 
chemical PCB in the fish. 


NTT 

However, the most important 
land expropriation method used by 
Israel was developed in 1979 under 
the government of Mcnachem Be- 
gin, the former prime minister. Un- 
der the provirions of a law dating 
bade to the Ottoman Empire, Israd 
declared that West Bank territory 
that was not being cultivated and 
had not been legally registered with 
Jordanian authorities before 1967 
was “state land,” with the burden 
of proving otherwise left to the 
Arab claimants. 

According to the study, this 
method allowed Israel in a single 
stroke to triple the amount of 
“state land” in the West Bank, to a 
total of 537,500 acres. The study 
estimated that 425,000 acres of this 
land has already been formally tak- 
en over by Israd, with the remain- 
der still to be processed through a 
series erf government declarations 
and appeals by Arab claimants that 
are almost never successful 

Mr. Benvcnisti said Sunday that 
he expected critics to dispute many 
of his conclusions, but be said the 
fadings on the extent of Israeli 
land seizure in the West Bank were 
all based on official documents and 
not subject to challenge. 

There has been no Israeli govern- 
ment reaction to tbe study. 


Residents 
flee Spread 
Of Violence 
InSidonArea 


United Press International 

BEIRUT — Christian and Mos- 
lem mtlHiampn battled Monday 
with artillery and heavy machine 
guns in the southern port of Sidon, 
injuring at least seven people and 
forcing thousands of civilians to 
flee. 

“The fighting is so bad that the 
Red Cross is finding it difficult to 
reach the wounded,” said a city 
official in Sidon. 24 miles (38 kilo- 
meters) south of Beirut. 

Meanwhile, government sources 
said Major General Mohammed al- 
Kholy, tbe national security advis- 
er to President Hafez Assad of Syr- 
ia, arrived in Beirut for talks with 
President Amin Gemayel and other 
officials on halting the violence. 

State-owned Beirut radio said 
Vice President Abdel Halim Khad- 
dam of Syria bdd talks Sunday in 
Damascus with three Moslem lead- 
ers, but there was no word on 
whether Syria might help end the 
strife around Sidon. 

The shelling in Sidon was partic- 
ularly intense between the city’s 
Phrictian eastern Suburbs and the 
two nearby Palestinian refugee 
camps, Miyeh-Miych and Ain Hel- 
weh, the sources said. 

“There is some very heavy fight- 
ing going on and the shelling is very 
heavy, too,” a resident said. “The 
confrontation lines are up in 
flames.” 

The fighting involves Lebanese 
and Palestinian Moslems on one 

ride a gain Christian militiamen 

At least 41 people were killed Sat- 
urday and five Sunday. 

In Beirut, tbe independent news- 
paper An Nahar said unidentifi ed 
gunmen had kidnapped ImV Sas- 

son, 65, the fourth member of the 
city’s tiny community of Lebanese 
Jews to be seized in Moslem West 
BeiniL since Friday. 

Police sources told the newspa- 
per that Mr. Sasson, a manager of a 
large business firm, had been 
forced into a car by a number of 
gunmen and driven away. 

None of Beirut's anti-Israeli Is- 
lamic groups has claimed responsi- 
bility for the kidnappings. 

The area has turned increasingly 
tense after a series of raids on near- 
• Israeli 
12 

militiamen 

against the policies of President 
Gemayel 

■ Kidnapping Investigation 

Police said Monday that they 
had found a “badly decomposed 
body” in the eastern Bekaa Valley 
that they bdieve is that of a kid- 
napped Dutch Jesuit priest who 
disappeared 16 days ago. United 
Press International reported from 
BeiniL 

A police source in the valley 
where the Reverend Nicholas 
Kluiters disappeared March 14 
said their investigation was incon- 
clusive. 

A spokesman for the Jesuit con- 
gregation in Beirut said “it is al- 
most certain” that the body found 
near Baal beck was that of Father 
Kluiters, 43. 

He is one of six Westerners who 
disappeared or were kidnapped in 
Lebanon in the last month. 

Two Britons and a French wom- 
an working for the French embassy 
in Beirut, were also kidnapped Iasi 
month but were later released. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


occupation troops and a Marc 
revolt by Christian militia 
against the policies of Pieri 


B ritain Blocks Shipment to Soviet 

LONDON <AP) — The British government has blocked shipment to 
the Soviet Union of key components for furnaces that would have 
allowed the Russians to boost their nuclear missile technology, the 
Department of Trade said Monday. 

A department spokesman disclosed that 95 percent of the shipment 
had been delivered before the authorities acted Feb. 8 in line with 
Western efforts to halt the export of high-technology equipment with 
potential militar y applications to the Soviet bloc. 

The remaining shipment was banned because it contained vital compo- 
nents far vacuum induction furnaces that government officials say the 
Soviet Union could have used to make carbon-carbon, a highly heat- 
resistant compound used to cost missiles cones. The spokesman was 
unable to say what these key components were. 

Duarte’s Party Expects to Get Majority 

SAN SALVADOR (AP) — The Christian Democratic Party of Presi- 
dent Jos* Napoledn Duarte said Monday it was virtually assured of 
w inning a majority of die 60 National Assembly seats in Sunday's 
election. 

Official returns from the contest for the National Assembly and 262 
municipal councils are not expected at least until Tuesday. None erf the 
other eight parties Adding candidates revealed their counts. 

Few political analysts had expected Mr. Duarte's party to win a 
majority. If the Christian Democrats’ victory is confirmed, it would 
would bolster Mr. Duarte’s polities and his efforts to negotiate an end to 
the five-year civil war. 

Officials Dismissed in Soviet Republic 

MOSCOW — Many leading Communist Party officials and govern- 
ment ministers have been removed from office in the Soviet republic of 
Uzbekistan under Russia’s new leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, it was 
reported Monday. 

The party newspaper, Pravda, reported that there had been Rule 
progress in the republic since senior officials were dismissed last summer 
for corruption. It said 9,000 extra people bad beat dratted to serve in tbe 
Uzbekistan police force and courts as pan of a drive against corruption. 

Egypt Says It Uncovered a Libyan Plot 

CAIRO (Reuters) — Egypt’s security organization has uncovered a 
Libyan plot to destabilize Egypt through a secret group taking orders 
from the Libyan leader. Colonel Moamer Qadhafi, an Interior Ministry 
official said Monday. 

Tbe official General Fakhreddine Khaled, confirmed a report by tbe 
Middle East News Agency that said Libya had recruited young Egyptians 
into its “revolutionary committees" and trained them in the use of 
weapons and explosives. 

Cambodia Leader Says Pence Possible 

NEW YORK (AP) — Hun Sen, the prime minister and foreign 
minister in the Vietnamese- Installed government in Cambodia, said a 
political settlement in his country was possible if rebel leaders distanced 
themselves from the Khmer Rouge. 

“If the people want to join us, they have to abandon Pol Pot," the 
guerrilla leader, Hun Sen told Newsweek magazine. He said “we can 
talk” to Prince Norodom Sihanouk, president of the anti- Vietnamese 
coalition. “If be abandons Pol Pot today, I can talk to him tomorrow,” he 
said. 

He described two possibilities he said would lead to the withdrawal of 
tbe 180,000 Vietnamese troops in Cambodia. “First is a political solu- 
tion,” he said. “In that case, the Vietnamese Army can be withdrawn very 
early.” Hun Sen also said that within five to 10 years, tbe Vietnamese 
would be withdrawn completely even if no political settlement were 
reached with the guerrillas. 

For the Record 

A man 

was found 


attempting to cross from Zimbabwe to Sooth Africa 
d Monday near a recently constructed electric fence at the 


man was the first victim 
20.000- volt current 


border, a South African military spokesman said in Johannesburg. The 
of the South African-built barrier, whit* has a 

(UPI) 

A forma- president of the Greek Writers' Union, Ibanassi Nasioutzik, 
was jailed Monday on charges that he murdered another leading Greek 
author, Thanassi Diamantopoulos, in September, the Athens district 
attorney said. (AP) 

Pan American World Airways reached a tentative contract settlement 
Monday with negotiators for the Independent Union of Flight Atten- 

. The attendants negotiated beyond 


L. 


darns, a federal mediator announced, 
a strike deadline that had been set at midnight Sunday. 


(AP) 


The Si e ben bergs told their engi- 
neers to go ahead and worry about 
the expense later. 

“I had to dig," said Mr. Sieben- 
berg, 59. “I don’t know why, it was 
just something I had to do.” 

Tbe work began is 1970. Some- 
times as many as 30 workers were 
hired. For two years they burrowed 
and sifted for signs of tbe past 
They discovered nothing but dirt. 

Finally, in 1972, they hit an ar- 
chaeological mother lode. First, a 

bronze key ring, probably used by a 
woman to lock her jewelry box dar- 
ing the Second Temple Period, 
rolled off a pile of dirt. 

As they dug deeper, the Sieben- 
bergs discovered the remains of 
what had probably been tbe homes 
of wealthy Jews that the Romans 
destroyed in 70 A.D. Arrowheads 
used by the defenders were un- 
earthed, as were pieces of jewdiy 
now displayed in the Siebenbcrgs' 
living room, stone weights, ink- 
wells, coins, a glass cup. jars, mosa- 
ics, two mikvans in excellent condi- 
tion, and a huge cistern from the 
Byzantine Period, about the fifth 

The objects alone are not excep- 
tional in archaeological terms. But 
put them together with, the archae- 
ologist, the site of the dig, and the 
determination that led to their dis- 
covery. and they amount to a re- 
markable find. 

One day, Mr. Sebenberg says, be 
may have run into an ancient 
neighbor. 

“The workers called to me, and I 
came running over," he said. “They 
had uncovered a skull Tbe earth 
fell off it, and it was just staring at 
me. It was probably one of the 
Jewish defenders who was behead- 
ed fay tbe Romans when they de- 
stroyed the Jewish Quarter. It was 
one of the people who lived here I 
stood there looking at it, and I had 
tears running down my cheeks.” 


Doe of Liberia 
Survives Shooting 
Outside Residence 

United Press Internationa! 

MONROVIA, Liberia — Gun- 
men opened fire early Monday on a 
jeep driven by President Samud K. 
Doe, shooting about 30 rounds into 
the vehicle, the Liberian state press 
agency reported. 

Mr. Doe escaped injury, but two 
officers of his bodyguard were seri- 
ously wounded, according to the 
agency, LINA. It said police were 
searching for Colonel Moses MJD. 
Flanzamaton. deputy guard com- 
mander at State House, the presi- 
dential residence. 

"The press agency said Coload 
Flanzamaton. who was previously 
thought to be dose to tbe Liberian 
leader, was seen escaping in his 
private car. 

LINA said Mr. Doe, returning 
front a suburban retreat, was driv- 
ing into the gates of State House 
shortly after midnight Monday 
when an unknown number of men 
opened fire from both sides of the 
strocL The jeep, riddled with bul- 
lets, its windshield shattered and its 
tires blown out. crashed into a utili- 
ty pole. 

Bonn Win Make 
Its Own Decision 

Reuters 

_ BONN —West Germany’s deri- 
sion on whether to join the research 
cm the U.S. Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative will not depend on the atti- 
tude of its European allies. 

A government spokesman. Peter 
Bocmsch, said Bonn preferred a 


Leader of Space Project 
Is an Old Europe Hand 

(Continued from Page 1) 
celab. a cooperative research pro- 
ject of the shuttle program in which 
major West European nations pro- 


vided part of the investment and 

technology a 
tific results. 


rand shared in tbesrien- 


Spacdab involved many of the 
problems now associated with sug- 
gestions for European participa- 
tion in the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive. While General Abrahamson 
defends Spacdab as a success in 
trans-Atlantic technical coopera- 
tion, European participants have 
criticized U.S. restrictions on Eu- 
rope's use of the technology devel- 
oped for the mission. 

General Abrahamson was also 
involved in the successful U.S.-Eu- 
ropean consortium that was 
formed to build the F-16 fighter 
plane. General Abrahamson head- 
ed the F-16 program, winch spent 
S2.5 billion in Belgium, Denmark. 
the Netherlands and Norway to 
equip their industries with the 
means, in just 18 months, to manu- 
facture components for the plane. 

Now, General Abrahamson is 
hying to mobilize a similarly rapid 
European involvement into the 
vastly more expensive technologies 
involved in strategic defenses 
against ballistic missiles. 

The general's argument is that 
Europe cannot afford to ignore any 
opportunity to familiarize its re- 
searchers and industries with Stra- 
tegic Initiative technologies — 


mainly computers, but also com- 
munications, lasers and other op- 
tics. 

“These are important not only 
for Europe's own strategic defense, 
but they are going to have an im- 
pact on conventional weapons and, 
beyond that, on civil develop- 
ments,” General Abrahamson said 
emphasizing potential commercial 
benefits that could stimulate econ- 
omies. 

Many European countries, par- 
ticularly France, would like to form 
a European consortium to 
strengthen the allies’ bargaining 
position in dealing with tbe United 
States. 

That approach concerns the 
United Slates. General Abraham- 
son said. "That’s why we encour* . 
aged the allies to answer our pro- *?; 
posal on an individual basis." 

He said the United States feared 
it would take too long for the Euro- 
peans to establish their own pro- 

“I would like to point out that 
this is an incredibly Fast; moving 
research program." he said. “We 
are using special contract proce- 
dures in the United States and a 
year from now well be a long way 
down the rood.” 

Commenting on the diplomatic 
damage caused tty misleading U.S. 
statements about the space defense 
system. General Abrahamson said: 

“It’s unfortunate, tail we do it all 
the time.” 


Europe: U.S. Insensitive on Space Arms 



made it dear that Bonn would con- 
sider its decision independently. 

Contrasting with Mr. Bocnisdt's 
statement, the West German for- 
eign minister, Hans-Dielrich 
Gcracher. said at a meeting of his 
Free Democratic Party on Monday 
that a common European approach 
to research on the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative was vital 


(Continued from Page 1) 
government about the essence erf 
Mr. Weinberger's offer, notably 
how far the United Sates was will- 
ing to go in transferring the valu- 
able results of its research to the 
Europeans and other partners in 
tbe defense project. 

Mr, Weinberger, speaking on his 
way home from Europe, said “there 
wasn’t anything rigid” about his 
60-day deadline. 

“Tbe only purpose was to show 
that we are ready to and are in fact 
proceeding with a lot of research" 
(and are eager to have European 
participation, he said. 

.Mr. Reagan and some of his 
aides, in appeals for the spaced- 
based defense pregea, have raised 
doubts about the long-term viabili- 
ty of deterreice through the threat 
of retaliation, called Mutual As- 


sured Destruction, and at times ’ 
have suggested it is immoral. 

The degrading of deterrence is 
“one of the most difficult problems 
of the years to come,” saw a West 
German official. Noting that previ- 
ously the West German peace 
movement, rather than the united 
States, had attacked the morality of 
nuclear weaponry, the official add- 
ed, “I think it is a mistake by (be 

U.S, government” to make the 
question a moral issue. 

Mr. Hyland said it was essential 
lor Washington “to reaffirm the f.. 
strategy of deterrence and flexible 
response to dear away any doubts 
that are creeping in because erf 
SDI 

“Tbe only basis for an appeal ip 
European support is to make H 
dear you’re not throwing out the 
old policy,” he said. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 



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out the world of word processing. 
Correcting and re-typing the same 
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even the most devoted secretary a little 
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Doing it on a PC might save a dinner 
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About making more presentable 
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When it comes to selecting from the 
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The original IBM Personal Computer 
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It can tackle secretarial, bookkeeping 
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For all those jobs that scream details, 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


Congress Is Blamed 
For Pentagon Waste 


■W* 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A senior 
Defense Department official has 
asserted that Congress causes at 
least SIO billion a year of waste in 
military spending. 

Lawrence J. Kerb, assistant sec- 


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retaiy for manpower, said Sunday 
on a television interview program 
that “pork banel" spending costs 
“the taxpayer at least SIO billion a 
year, ihtng s we don't want, things 
we don't need, but are in there to 
protect vested interests.” 

Reached later by telephone, Mr. 
Korb listed several economies he 
said Congress has blocked, includ- 
ing multiple -year procurement of 
weapons and consolidation of pur- 
chasing, while forcing extra spend- 
ing on the Pentagon. 

“They come at you in droves," he 
said. 

Mr. Kerb’s comments, the ad- 
ministration's sharpest criticism 
yet of congresaonaDy sponsored 
military spending, ?dds to the wid- 
ening debate of President Reagan's 
S3 13 billion military budget for the 
1986 fiscal year, which begins OcL 
1. 

At the moment there appears to 
be rising sentiment on Capitol HOI 
to reduce the a dminis tration' s 1986 
military spending plan by allowing 
current spending of S285 billion to 
grow only enough to cover infla- 
tion. Backers of this view argue that 
the Pentagon is wasteful with the 
money it already receives. 

The Senate Armed Services 
Committee was considering a “con- 
ditional authorization." Senate of- 
ficials said, in which three separate 
military budgets would be present- 
ed on the floor so that senators 
could see what items would be cut 
if the military budget were reduced 
or frozen at its present leveL 

Two subcommittees of the 
Armed Services Committee have 
recommended three budgets, one 
to rise by 4 percent plus inflation, 
another by 3 percent, and the third 
to rise only enough to cover infla- 
tion. The administ ration budget 
calls for a S.9 percent increase 
above inflation. 

Among the items to be cut in the 
subcommittee plan that would bold 



U.S. Public Holds Camp David Pact in High Regard, Poll Says 



Lawrence J. Korb 


spending at its present level plus 
inflation is a reduction of 175,000 
in military and civ ilian personnel, 
which would mean less spending at 
military bases across the country. 

On Sunday two Democratic sen- 
ators. Sam Nunn of Georgia and 
John HL Glenn Jr. of Ohio, criti- 
cized that proposal which was ad- 
vanced by Senator 'Warren B. Rud- 
man, Republican of New 
Hampshire. 

Mr. Nunn, the senior Democrat 
cm the Armed Sendees Committee, 
said Mr. Reagan's budget had to be 
cut, but “you don't have to use this 
approach." 

Mr. Korb, in his list of wasteful 
congressional actions, said that 
Congress had added to the cost of 
M-2 Abrams tank engines by pre- 
venting the Defense Department 
from asking for competitive bids. 

Congress, Mr. Korb said, has 
also voted in the last two years to 
buy 840 Abrams tanks instead of 
the 720 requested by the army, 
largely at the insistence of Senator 
Cad Levin, Democrat of Michigan, 
where many of the tanks are made. 

Mr. Korb said Congress had 
blocked Pentagon proposals to 
consolidate die Military Sealift 


By Adam Clymer 

New York Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — The Ameri- 
can public regards the Camp David 
peace negotiations of 1978 as 
Washington’s most successful for- 
eign pqncy ventured! recent years, 
according to a New York Times 
poU The poll also shows considera- 
bly broader support for the Middle 
East accords than for the invasion 
of Grenada in 1983. 

Tim poll suggested that success- 
ful diplomacy appeals to the public 
at leak as much as successful mfli - 
tary activity, in the view of several 
public opinion experts, even at a 
time when support for the military 
and willingness to use U.S. troops 
abroad is increasing. 

Asked to rate Washington's han- 
dling of five foreign policy situa- 
tions on a scale of 1 to 10, the 
public gave the Camp David nego- 
tiations, involving President Jimmy 
Carter, Pres deni Anwar Sadat of 
Egypt and Prime Minister Mena- 
chem Begin of Israel the highest 
rating, at an average of 6.45. They 
were followed by the Grenada situ- 
ation at 5.66, the Iranian hostage 
crisis at 4.95, the bombings of the 
U.S. Embassy in Lebanon at 4.18 
and the response to the Soviet 
shooting down of a South Korean 
airliner at 3.96. 

Everett Caifl Ladd, director of 
the Roper Cotter for Public Opin- 
ion Research at the University of 
Connecticut, said he felt the poll 
showed that “Americans want a 

ocL^that is not bellicose? 0 ^ 

Robert D. Putnam, chairman of 
the department of government at 
Harvard University, said he was 






Reagan's handlin g of foreign po- 


' Americans want a strong, assertive foreign policy, but one 
that is not bellicose, 9 explained one pollster. 


licy and 34 percent disapproved. 
The survey was taken from Feb. 23 
through Feb. 27. 


w- e , 
>^ cIn 







The questions asked about the 
U.S. handling of particular foreign 
policy events did not mention the 
names of the presidents who were 
in office at the time. If they had 
considering Mr. Reagan's popular- 
ity, the episodes from his presiden- 
cy might have ranked higher. 

However, a Thnes-CBS News 
Poll takeafrom Oct 14 to OcL 17 
among 1*253 registered voters, 
showed that 24 percent of tire pub- 
lic thought Mr. Carter had 











lllf 






more for world peace than any oth- 
er recent president, compared with 


pub- 

done ".ij 1 "' iN 


21 percent who gave top rating to 
Mr. Reagan. President Richard M. 
Naan was rated highest, chosen by 


■x’tst*" 




32 percent 
Viewing 


iewing the findings as a whole, 


fife* 


Ri‘-“ 


Richard A. Brody, professor of po- 
cienceatSt 


Anwar Sadat, Jimmy Carter and Menacbem Begin signing the Camp David accords. 


not surprised at the results, because 
“Camp David can't be cast as any- 
thing other than Americans using 
our power and leadership to bring 
peace to the world." 

Grenada, on the other hand, can 
symbolize either standing up force- 
fully for a position, he sard, or “bul- 
lying and shooting from the hip." 

The data supported that analy- 
sis. Hie Chip David negotiations 



who voted in 
1984 for President Ronald Reagan 
«wt those who supported his Dem- 
ocratic challenger, Walter F. Man- 
dale. Those who voted for Mr. Rea- 
gan gave Camp David a 6 JO rating. 
Mondale voters gave it 6.56. 

But Grenada divided them 
sharply, with Reagan voters mark- 
ing u at 6.63 and Mondale voters 
giving it only 4.41. 

Peter D. Hart, a Democratic 
poll-taker, said the relatively strong 
rating for the handling of the Irani- 


an hostage situation “is the surprise 
to me, but I guess it’s a tempering 
overtime." 

Warren E. Miller, professor of 
political science at Arizona State 
University, said he fdt the public 
had come to conclude that, with the 
return of the hostages “it all turned 
out fine." 

Even though Camp David, an 
accomplishment of Mr. Carter, was 


highest, the telephone poll 
id that 49 per- 


of 1,533 adults found . r _ 

cent of the public approved of Mr. 


Htical science at Stanford Universi- 
ty, said. “The public remembers 
most fondly successes that don’t 
use troops, that posed no great 
threat, and which have proven to be 
enduiing." 

“Camp David was the most suc- 
cessful in the eyes of the public," he 
said, “because it involved peaceful 
shuttle diplomacy, which was con- 
summated with a treaty and proved 
to endure beyond leadership 
changes. Grenada was also an in- 
stant success, with relatively tittle 
loss of life, and it too has endured. 
Hie hostage situation, even though 
it did not involve loss of lives, took 
forever to resolve; The Lebanon 
bombings and the KAL incident 
have been unresolved black marks 
on Mr. Reagan's record." 






' p?>ne-; 

r 




Command, ran by the navy, with 
tire Military Traffic Management 


Command, run by the arm^ Later, 


he said, die Military Airlift Com- 


mand, run by the air force, could 
added. 


have been 
The Defense Department want- 
ed to convert furnaces at American 


U.S. Court Rejects 
Homosexual Ban 


military bases in Europe from coal 
to oil but 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court refused Monday to 
allow let Texas A&M University 
ban from campus a homosexual 
student group. 

The court, citing a lade of juris- 
diction, let stand a ruling that offi- 
cials of the state-supported univer- 
sity violated the rights of 
homosexual students by not giving 
the group offidal recognition. A 
federal judge had ruled that the 
Texas law h arming homosexual be- 
havior is unconstitutional. 

University officials say that rec- 
ognition of the organization. Gay 
Student Services, could lead to “in- 
creased overt homosexual activity 
and resulting physical psychologi- 
cal and disease ramifications." 


was prevented by Con- 
gress, which required the Pentagon 
to buy coal in the United States 
and ship it to Europe, Mr. Korb 
said. 

In another instanrr he Said, the 
Defense Department wanted to 
consolidate plants that made ex- 
plosives since one plant was operat- 


ing at only 17 percent of capacity. 
Instead. Congress voted to build 


eight more factories in various 
pans of the country. 

Congress has been reluctant to 
allow the Defense Department to 
order weapons, equipment, and 
supplies through multiyear con- 
tracts that would permit contrac- 
tors to plan ahead and operate in a 
more economical manner, Mr. 
Korb said. 

Further, he said. Congress has 


consistently been late in approving 
which 


the military budget which means 
“we can’t do business in an orderly 
fashion/ 


Powell, Back After 10 Weeks, Is U.S. Court’s Swing Vote 


By A1 Kamen 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Justice 
Lewis F. Powell Jr. sits second 
from the left when the Supreme 
Court takes the bench; seating 
follows seniority. But if justices 
were arrayed by philosophy. Jus- 
tice Powell would sit exactly in 
the middle. 

In an illustration of how evenly 
the justices are now divided. Jus- 
tice Powell has been the court’s 
decisive figure this term, its swing 
vote for a majority. 

In 50 cases in which Justice 
Powell has participated, he has 
been in the minority only once. 

Nine times this year the coon 
has split 5-4. In eight of those 
cases Justice Powell made the dif- 
ference; the ninth was his only 
time in the minority. In 12 cases 
this year. Justice Powell who has 
been OL did not take pan. Five of 
those, intendin g two important 
cases last week, ended in 4-4 ties. 

That record illustrates’ a ga in 
the significance of each justice's 
presence on a sharply divided 
court where five of the nine mem- 
bers are at least 76 years old. 



the court for 10 weeks following 
surgery for prostate cancer in Jan- 
uary. He returned March 25. 


His recovery from surgery has 
been slow and difficult, prompt- 
ing rumors that be will retire at 
the end of thi* term. But he has 
chosen clerks for next year and 
has indicated that he does not, at 
this time, have any intention of 
resigning. 


binding in other appellate cir- 
cuits. In most instances, tie votes 
thus have no more weight than if 
the high court had never taken the 


case. 


In his absence this year, the 
court beard oral argument in 56 
cases. It has since dealt with 13 of 
those. Three it decided unani- 
mously. and two by 6-2 votes. But 
three others it ordered reargued 
next month, apparently because 
the justices were closely divided 
without Justice PowdL 


The five ties this term are the 
most since 1970. Records dating 
back to 1927 show that the court 
has not had more than eight tie 
votes in one term, a record that 
was set in the 1940 term and 
might well be eclipsed during this 
term. 


in a few cases where there are 
dose votes. His colleagues appar- 
ently have not pressed him to take 
part in any cases. 

If Justice Powell stays on his 
present course, 43 more cases will 
be decided by an eight-member 
court. It is possible that more wfl] 
end up as ties. 


Lewis F. Powell Jr. 


If President Reagan has an op- 
portunity to replace Justice Pow- 
ell, 77; William J. Brennan, 78; 
Tburgood Marshall 76; or Harry 
A. Blackmun, 76; the court could 
be turned decisively to the righL 
Justice Powell was away from 


On the remaining five, the 
court tied. Two of these five, cases 
involving a Christmas nativity 
scene in a public park and the 
right of teachers to discuss homo- 
sexuality in school, were disposed 
of last week. 


Justioe Powell has the option of 
voting in any or all of the remain- 
ing 43 cases on which be missed 
oral arguments. He can read the 
lawyers’ briefs, listen to a tape of 
the oral argument and vote. He 
can do nothing at all, in fart, and 
simply vote. 

There is no law or rale on the 
matter, only a tradition that if 
justices are ill for an extended 
time and do not hear oral argu- 
ment or participate in tile confer- 
ence after argument, they general- 
ly stay out of a case. 


Those cases include Lowe vs. 
Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission, which involves the SECs 
right to censor certain financial 
newsletters; Devine vs. NAACP 
Legal Defense Fund, which asks 
wether advocacy groups can be 
excluded from the Combined 
Federal Campaign, an annual 


charity drive; Brocken vs. Spo- 
whelher 


kame Arcades, involving i 

materials inciting “hist” can be 
banned as obscene. 


By court rules, a tie vote affirms 
the decision of the appeals court 
that beard the case but is not 


Justice Powell appears to have 
decided to follow mat tradition, 
rather than selectively participate 


But Justice Powell heard argu- 
ments and is expected to vote in a 
series of cases that involve 
church-state relations. Those 
cases question the constitutional- 
ity of a “moment of silence" in 
public schools, government aid to 
parochial schools and Sabbath 
dosing laws. 


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Policy Is a Tangle of Contradictions 


Incentives Encourage Damage to Natural Resources 


(Continued from Page 1) 
la Tech agricultural economist, 
found that a combination of tax 
and crop subsidies made wetlands 
conversion a profitable, low-risk 
venture. 

Tax law allows large deductions 
for land-clearing and soil and water 
conservation costs, including 
drainage. Equipment needed for 
land conversion depreciated for tax 
savings. Interest expenses and oth- 
er costs can be deducted from the 
tax bilL Part of the fanner's and 
land investor’s costs are shifted to 


the taxpayer- 

After this, the farmer is eligible 


for federal crop-support loans and 
cash subsidies that guarantee a 


price on his crop. If he suffers a 
crop failure, be may get federal 
disaster payments or subsi di z e d 


federal crop insurance. The laxpay- 
rites the 


er, in other words, underwrites 
risk. 

The circle is completed with oth- 
er policies that provide flood con- 
trol for farmers whose newly 
deared swamps are inundated by 
the inevitable runoff. 

During the past decade in Colo- 
rado and Montana, hundreds of 
thousands of acres of fragile range- 
lands have been plowed under by 
land speculators and fanners, who 
create wheat ranches that qualify 
for the federal crop support loans 
and cash subsidies. 

With one pass of the plow, graz- 
ing land — which nature took cen- 
turies to establish with native grass 
on thin topsoil — is gone. 

Conservationists say that once 
wheat production is abandoned on 
the delicate soil, the grass coyer 
that prevents erosion is almost im- 
possible to restore. 

Economists at Montana State 
University concluded in a recent 
study that plowing in the West has 
as much incentive for investors, 
who get tax benefits through land 
resale, os for ranchers seeking the 


income supports of federal pro- 
grams. 

But while the Soil Conservation 
Service tries to regulate increased 
plowing through persuasion, it is 
powerless in the face of farm-pro- 
gram subsidies that encourage iL 
And while Agriculture Department 
crop programs attempt to regulate 
surplus production, tax laws en- 
courage it by providing investment 
credits and capital guns advan- 
tages to speculators who may mate 
as much as 5200 an acre reselling 
converted rangelands. 

“This became particularly seri- 
ous about four or five years ago 
when the farm economy began to 
slow," said Ken Pitney, assistant 
state conservationist. “Some farm- 
ers and ranchers were getting kind 
of desperate and started to convert 
rangeland to wheat." 

‘There were others from Canada 
and from our cities who came in 
and bought ranches to plow out, 

I ilan t to wheal and then sell the 
and at a profit," he said. "The 
whole plow-out is so serious that it 
has brought to a head tire contra- 
diction in the programs." 

The greatest of all policy contra- 
dictions. however, may be found in 
the Sandhills region of central Ne- 
braska. 

For decades, ranchers grazed 
their cattle on these sand dunes, 
whose 19.000 square miles (49,000 


and depletion allowances on water 
pumped from the estimated 10,000 
wells drilled into the aquifer. 

The federal farm -suppo rt pro- 
grams increased the profit poten- 
tial for the investor-corn growers. 
With the supports, the tax breaks 
and the free Ogallala water, land 
that cost no more than $500 an acre 
to buy and develop could be far 
more profitable than richer land 
selling for five times tint much in 
the Iowa-IHinais bean of the Cara 
Belt 

Sandhills com prod notion 
climbed to 500,000 acres from 
95,000 acres during the 1970s, add- 
ing to the glut that keeps com 
prices generally low and. to the de- 
partment's crop-program outlays. 
The heavy use of nitrogen fertilizer 
and toxic chemicals, filtering easily 
through the sandy seal, threatens 
the aquifer’s purity. 

And removal of the sand-holding 
grass cover has added to wind ero- 
sion problems. 

There is a final twist to the con- 
tradictions that allow an area such 
as the Sandhills to be changed from 



fragile prairie dunes to row crops. 
The Sandhills i 


square kilometers} made it the larg- 


est expanse of grassland on 
continent But huge center-pivot ir- 
rigation systems, perfected after 
World War U, made it possible to 
pump water from the underground 
Aquifer and spray it over 
of land. 


quarter-mile sections < 

Outside real estate investors, in- 
cluding Prudential Insurance Co. 
and the wealthy Bass f amil y of Tex- 
as, flocked into the Sandhills in the 
1970s. encouraged by ibe chance to 
get tax breaks on land and equro- 
ment purchases, on clearing costs 



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; region has become 
one of the state’s most financially 
pressed farm areas. Fanner- run 
production credit associations at 
O’Neill and Valentine went out of 
business in the past year, pulled 
into insolvency by ihdr heavy com- 
mitment to expensive cenler-pivoi 
irrigation development for growing 
com. 

Over the past four years, as corn 
prices stagnated and interest rates 
stayed high, land prices fe8 and the 
develop meal evaporated. The real 
estate promoters who trahrfonned 
the Sandhills count on land turn- 
over for their profits and tax bene- 
fits, and now. the land is not mov- 
ing- 

So, even with markets pr esagin g 
continuing low com prices, agricul- 
tural interests are fighting to. get 
congressional approval dfitbe 
O’Neill irrigation project # the 
Sandhills. It is a S407-nalh(ta:pfr :n 
to aUow about 80 fannets to put 
subsidized federal water on 77,000 
acres and expand their plantings of 
still more com: ' ? • 


Next: Middle-sized ^prMily 
forms" are the ones, ma&ftyten 
caught in a credit squeeze . T ;‘ 


AUTHORS W 
BY N.Y. PU 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


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Some Hungarians Get Affluent 

New Economic Incentives Create a Class of *New Rich’ 


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By Bradley Graham 

Washington Post Service 
BUDAPEST — At Clara's, 
where Hungary’s elite has long 
done its shopping for fine clothes, 
the clients are no longer just the 
famous and powerful friends of 
riafB Rothschild, the former man- 
age who gave the store her name, 

lady tagged the “new rS” 

A few doors up Vad Street, Bu- 
dapest's mam shopping thorough- 
fare, the Ofotert camera store sells 
Japanese-made NIkons and Can- 
ons for the equivalent of five dines 
the average monthly salary, and 
still the store cannot keep enough 
in stock to meet demand. 

Across the Danube River at one 
of the rity^s few indoor tennis facQ- 
ities, the license plates on the Mer- 
cedes and BMWs show toe cars 
belong not to tourists, foreign dip- 
lomats or government officials, but 
to private Hungarian citizens. 

In the nearby hills of Rosza- 
domb, a residential district with 
Budapest’s poshest homes, the 
lumber and brick foundations of 
numerous villas under construction 
crowd in among toe grand dwell- 
ings of an earlier era. 

Such sights attest to an expand- 
ing corps of moneyed Hungarians, 
people fishing in on an economic 
rhwng e that has finally made get- 
ting rich officially acceptable. 

Theoretically, under commu- 
nism, no one is supposed to be 
much richer, or much poorer, than 
anyone else. But after years of see- 
ing initiative weakened and pro- 
ductivity lowered by paying work- 
ers toe same no matter how much 
they produced, Hungary’s Commu- 
nist Party is the first in. the Soviet 
bloc to revise the principle of 
equality and declare that people 
ought to earn as much as they are 
worth cm the job. - 
Equality of opportunity, not 
simple equality, is the new catch 


phrase. Hungarians are being 
asked to accept wider income dif- 
ferentials, toe widest in Eastern Eu- 
rope, as a natural outcome of intro- 
ducing better material incentives 
and market mechanisms. 

But old kssons die hard. The 
conspicuous consumption of a 
growing number of affluent Hun- 
garians is feeding envy and resent- 
ment among poorer people. 


A stagnant economy has aggra- 
vated the tension. WhDe flourish- 
ing Budapest boutiques cater to 
those with money, the overall stan- 
dard of living has eroded in toe past 


five years. Real wages, those ad- 
justed for inflation, supped about 2 
percent in 1984, making those who 
are less well off — unskilled work- 
ers, pensioners and young families 
— more bitter about those who are 
prospering. 

Articles critical of growing in- 
come disparities have been appear- 
ing in the state-controlled press. 

“It is basically jealousy clad in 
socialist conservatism.’* said a se- 
nior Western diplomat. 

Nevertheless, the political reper- 
cussions of these attacks are worri- 
some to people like Katalm Mo- 
gyoro, a sociologist and radio 
journalist who has studied toe 
problem and debated the critics. 

“My articles answering toe criti- 
cism were not meant to be in favor 
of toe rich but of toe reform,” she 
said in an interview. “Much was 
being pubh'dzsd against the rich, 
and I was afraid tins could under- 
cut toe reform effort.” 

Many of those considered rich in 
Hungary would not be rich in toe 
West. Just having a bouse, a car 
and a few Western products is a 
mark of affluence in a country 
where the average worker earns toe 
equivalent of $100 a month, hous- 
ing is in desperately toon supply 
and goods from toe West are a 
luxury. 

In tme respect at least, toe 
wealthy here are toe same as every- 


where else: They rarely confess 
how rich they are. In toe absence of 
an income tax and toe obligation to 
report total earnings government 
officials are left guessing at the 
amounts bring privately amassed 
and at the number qualifying as 
rich. 

According to specialists on toe 
subject, the new rich is a heteroge- 
neous class and its sources of 
wealth vary. Some inherit their 
wealth. Others, particularly law- 
yers and doctors, get rich taking 
tips on the side, which is a standard 
but unofficial practice in Hungary. 

A few people have prospered by 
inventing something. Some jour- 
nalists, engineers and entertainers 
are fortunate enongh to work 
abroad, earning hard Western cur- 
rency. A few ambitious entrepre- 
neurs have taken advantage or re- 
cent regulations permitting toe 
operation of private companies on 
a broader scale. 

All these methods are more or 
less legitimate. But huge profits are 
also being made by price gougers, 
profiteers who sell such scarce 
items as auto parts, or middlemen 
in toe fruit and vegetable trade. 
Everyone seems in agreement that 
money earned this way should be 
policed closely and discouraged. 

Hoping to put some sort or brake 
on the rich, the government is de- 
veloping an income lax in consulta- 
tion with experts at the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund. A 
value-added tax on purchases is 
also bring considered to dampen 
conspicuous consumption. But au- 
thorities say the tax plans will not 
be ready for a few years. 

“It’s a touchy issue,” said Janos 
Hoos, a Central Committee mem- 
ber and one of Hungary’s chief 
economic planners. “We don't 
want to create an atmosphere in 
which people who are productive 
and earning a lot would feel their 
activities are not desired.” 


Carrillo Rejects Spanish Communist Order 


fUuiers 

MADRID — Santiago Carrillo, 
toe former leader of toe Spanito 
C ommunis t Party, rejected Mon- 
day an ultimatum that he withdraw 
criticism of toe present leadership. 
He said he would challenge at- 
tempts to remove him from his 
posts in the party. 

Mr. Carrillo said he and 18 oth- 
ers would not bow to an order de- 
manding that they recant by April 
14 or lose their posts in toe policy- 
making executive and central com- 
mittees. 

Leaders of toe party set the 


deadline at the end of an emergen- 
cy national conference Sunday on 
the split between supporters of Mr. 
Carnllo and his successor, Gerardo 
Iglerias. 

The conference also removed 
Mr. Carrillo from his position as 
the parliamentary spokesman for 
toe party, whose electoral support 
dropped from 10 percent in 1979 to 
4.5 percent in toe 1982 general elec- 
tions. 

Mr. Carxilla, 70, opposes plans 
by Mr. Igksias to open the party to 
other leftist and non-Communist 


parties to form as alliance for next 
year’s general elections. 

The Carrillo camp, which con- 
trols about one quarter of the par- 
ty, boycotted the emergency con- 
ference. Mr. Carrillo said. 

He said his supporters, who con- 
trol key regions of Madrid, Valen- 
ka, toe Basque country and Gali- 
cia, would fight attempts by toe 
leadership to remove them from 
their local committees. 

Mr. Carrillo said he refused to be 
driven out of toe party and had no 
intention of j oining another rival 
pro-Moscow Communist Party. 







You feel good sharing your trip with the 
folks back home. They feel good 
knowing you’re okay. And everybody feels 
good because an international call 
costs less than anyone imagined. 




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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE^TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


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■- • 

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U.S. Aid to Philippines Disputed Anew 


By David B. Ottaway 

Washington Pmt Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration is again at logger- 
heads with a House subcommittee 
over military aid for the Philip- 
pines. 

The administration has asked for 
S100 million in military aid for the 
next fiscal year, which would be a 
150-percent increase over last 
year’s $40- million authorization. 

But the House Foreign Affairs 
subcommittee on Asian and Pacific 
affairs, led by Representative Ste- 
phen J. Solarz, Democrat of New 
York, has approved S25 million, 
arguing that the steep jump would 
be “a serious mistake" and would 
send “the wrong signal" to Presi- 
dent Ferdinand E. Marcos. 

It is the second straight year in 
which the subcommittee has voted 
to curtail the administration's mili- 
tary aid request. 

While cutting military aid, the 
subcommittee voted to boost the 
administration's economic aid re- 
quest, from S95 million to SI 55 


million, signaling its conviction 
that U.S. priorities should tie in 
promoting change. 

The Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee on Wednesday narrow- 
ly defeated an amendment by Sen- 
ator John F. Kerry, Democrat of 
Massachusetts, that would have 
made more than $25 million in mil- 
itary aid for the Philippines contin- 
gent on certification by President 
Ronald Reagan that Mr. Marcos 
bad made “significant progress” in 
h uman rights and that the Philip- 
pine Army had made “substantial 
reform" in eliminating corruption 
and mistreatment of civilians as 
well as a “substantial effort'’ to 
stop its “extra-judicial killings." 

It approved the administration's 
original SI 00-million request, set- 
ting the stage for a battle between 


the House and Senate, and proba- 
bly a final appropriation of slightly 
more duin this year's S40 million in 

mili tary aid. 

Underlying the struggle over the 
military aid level is a more funda- 
mentaf disagreement between the 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


Ic H A N N E 


"Europe* Best View’ 


PROGRAM. TUESDAY 2nd APRIL UK TIMES 


administr ation and congressional 
opponents over their assessments 
of Mr. Marcos’s intentions and 
how the United States should pro- 
ceed in seeking to “reform"’ an ally 
that is in deep economic trouble, 
facing a spreading Communist in- 
surgency but clearly reluctant to 
make substantive concessons, even 
under mounting internal pressures. 

Mr. Solarz said “there are differ- 
ing perceptions how best to go 
about getting the necessary reforms 
— holding back aid or giving it" 
and asking for reforms. 

\ “Our approach has a better 
chance of succeeding," he said. 

Mr. Solarz says the Philippines 
basically is in “a transition period" 
with Mr. Marcos on the way out, 
when it is far more important for 
the United States to forcefully 
place itself on the side of reform 
and change, rather than to worry 
about saving Mr. Marcos. This 
would preserve the U.S. position 
with his successors, if that is possi- 
ble, Me. Solarz says. 

Both sides say the stakes are the 
future of the U.S: presence in the 
< Philippines. Clark Air Force Base 
and Subic Bay Naval Base are key 
bases. 

Richard L. Armitage. assistant 
secretary of defense for interna- 
tional security affairs, has told 
Congress/ that these bases are es- 
sential" io U.S. strategy in the Pa- 


cific and Indian Oceans anti to 
countering the Soviet military 
buildup in Da Nang and Cam 
Ranh Bay in Vietnam. 

Rep lacmg them with facilities at 
other Pacific locations, he said in 
testimony March 21 before the 


House Appropriations subcommit- 
tee on military construction, would 


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64 U.K. Protesters Arrested 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — Police arrested 48 
anti-nudear protesters Monday af- 
ter they broke through a perimeter 
fence at the U.S. cruise missile base 
at Greenham Common. Also ar- 
rested were 16 protesters who tried 
to erect tents outside another base 
in Molesworth. 


tee on military construction, would 
take several years and cost- the 
United States “several billion dol- 
lars.” 

Administration spokesmen are 
warning that the New People’s 
Army, a rebd Communist group 
estimated to number between 
10,000 and 12,000, could in three or 
four years reach a “strategic stale- 
mate," in which the Philippiiie 
Army could no longer defeat it, if 
the trend continues and U.S. mili- 
tary aid is not stepped up. 

Arguing in defense of the admin- 
istration’s request for S100 million 
in military aid, Mr. Armitage said 
in an interview that the Philippine 
Army has been deteriorating for 10 
years, and “we don’t have 10 years 
to get them back where they are a 
capable fighting force.” 

He said the bulk of the $100- 
milli nn request for the Philippine 
Army was not for “big ticket items” 
such'as helicopters, planes or ships, 
but for essentials such as spare 
parts, repair and maintenanc e of 
existing equipment and even 
trucks. 

“They have no trucks." he said, 
citing instances in which an entire 



~ . ■■ ' ; -i ‘ 

Council Tries to Entice 


Students to Liberal Arts 


Group Seeks to Offset TrendinV,S. 
To Get Bachelor 9 s Degree in Business 


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By Gene I. Maeroff 

• New York Times Sendee 
NEW YORK — Until the 1970s, 
Albertus Magnus, a small college in 
New Haven, Connecticut, was de- 
voted entirely to the liberal arts. 
But then, seeing the increasing de- 
mand for training in business, the 


giving students the impression that 
those who major -in business are 
more likely to get jobs. . - 
“I think business helped create 
the situation by tin lands of people 
it has tended to hire,” John Voss, 
executive officer of the American 


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college expanded its tiny econom- 
ics department to enable students 
to major in such areas as account- 
ing, management, finance and in- 
ternational business. 


Academy of Arts arid Sciences, said 
erf the reluctance of students to ma- 


Tbe shift away from the liberal 
arts at Albertus Magnus and many 


Ramon Layoso, a guard who had been a missing witness in 
the Aquino murder trial, appeared Monday at the court- 
house in Manila after he was found by sheriffs officers. 


cuing instances in wmch an emu 
battalion was sharing one truck. 


“If we don’t help the military" 
Mr. Armitage said, “we will find 


ourselves with a much more narrow 
range of options.” 

He said they needed a great deal 
or money quickly, before the New’ 
People's Army reached a position 
or “strategic stalemate.” 

Mr. Armitage, who is considered 


the Pentagon's chief expert on the 
Philippines, argued that the Mar- 
cos government bad sufficiently 1 
shown that it intended to make 
political economic and military re- 
forms. 

■ Missing Witness Foimd 
One of four missing witnesses to 
the murder of Benigno S. Aquino 
Jr. has been located and will testify 
when the trial of the opposition 
leader’s accused assassins resumes 
April 10, officials said Monday in 
Manila, according to United Press 
International. 


Ramon Layoso, 58, a private 
iiard, was found by sheriffs and 


guard, was found by sheriffs and 
brought Monday to the courthouse 
where the armed forces chief. Gen- 
eral Fabian G Ver, and 25 others 
are on trial in connection with the 
August 21, 1983, assassination. 

His testimony is considered Vital 
to the proseention's contention 
that Mr. Aquino was killed by 
members of his military escort 
while descending the stairs from a 
plane that brought Him home to 
Manila after three years in the 
United States. 


other colleges and universities has 
occurred as students have increas- 
ingly concluded that the best route 
into business and industry is a ma- 
jor in business, not Eberal arts. It is 
a trend that has caused consterna- 
tion among educators who main- 
lain that students are being nar- 
rowly educated by focusing on 
technical business courses, but the 
educators have been unable to stem 
the tide. 

Today, at Albertus Magnus one- 
third of the 350 students are major- 
ing in business. 

“X suppose in an ideal world ev- 
eryone could major in the liberal 
arts, but in a less-ihan-ideal world 
you also have to look at what the 
market wants,” said Julia M. Mc- 


Namara, president of Albertus 
Magnus, which rill make another 


large accommodation in the fall 
when it accepts male students for 
the first time. 

A sign that some business people 
may now be ready to confront, the 
trend was an announcement last 


month by CBS Inc. that it would 
donate $750,000 to establish a Cor- 


donate $750,000 to establish a Cor- 
porate Council on the Liberal Arts. 
The council is to be administered 
through the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, which has 2,400 
members who have distinguished 
themselves in the arts and sciences. 

The council will sponsor re- 
search exploring the influence that 
a liberal arts education has on ef- 
fective business leadership. 

The diimni* in which the council 
arises is indicated by the growth in 
the number of students getting 
bachelor’s degrees in business, 
which increased to 212,474 in 1982 
from 1 13,254 in 1971, according to 
the National Center for Education 
Statistics. During the same period, 
the number of bachelor’s degrees 
conferred in literature, English and 
the classics declined to 34^34 from 
64,933. 

One problem is that business 
itsdf seems to have contribute t0 
the flight from the liberal arts by 


jor in the liberal arts. 

“The establishment of the coun- 
cil is an indication that the leaders 
of lai^ industrial concerns are be- 
ginning to realize that the/ are 
missing sometlmig in not recruiting 
liberal arts graduates,” Mr. Voss 
said. « : • 

“I hope the chief executive offi- 
cers in their commitment to this 
new council will send the message 
to the personnel officers who do the 
hiring,” Joseph S. Murphy, chan- 
cellor of the Gty- University of 
New York, said -of the new group. 
“Far too often, it is more secure 
and safe for personnel officers to 
hire people with narrow profes- 
sional and vocational skills rather 
than people who are more risky and 
have a broader liberal - arts back- 
ground.” 

Even the purity of the liberal arts 
degree has been diluted at some i 
institu tions in an effort to hold 
onto liberal arts majors. The hire is 
a block of courses in business that 
students majoring in. say, philoso- 
phy or history, can take to enhance 
their chance of finding a job. 

At Temple University, in Phila- 
delphia, tor instance, the faculty in 
the arts and science college voted 
last year to allow its students to 
increase the number of credits they 
could pursue outside the college. 

“We see it as a gain for our 
college because it win give students 
the sense that they can afford to 
take an arts and science major and 
not fear they won’t have enough 
technical courses to pi hired,” said 
Carolyn Adams, acting dean of the 
coHege at Temple. 

One business executive who be- 
lieves that the liberal arts provide 
adequate preparation for a high- 
level career in business is Thomas 
H. Wyman, chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive officer of CBS, who is the 
force behind the creation of the 
countiL 

“For most of business the need 
to find people who really know how 
to read and write and talk and 
think exceeds by a wide margin arty 
other need,” Mr. Wyman, sate. “A 
person who writes a thesis on Yeats 
ought to fed comfortable going to 
IBM or Citibank or CBS. It should 
be recognized that such people 
have a head start in haring their 
minds open.” 


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ARTS /LEISURE 




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Belgium’s Small Record Labels Make Their Mark 


By Mark Hunter 

B russels — it was snowing 

on a recent March day, but the 
offices of Himalaya Records bad a 
warm, even jubilant, atmosphere. 
Johann Janssens, the founder and 
owner, was smoking a dgar lo cele- 
brate the birth of his first daughter, 
while down the hall Annik Honoii, 
the promotion chief, explained 
that the initial pressing of Front 
242's album, “No Comment," had 
sold out so quickly that no copies 
were left for reviewers. 

Front 242. a Brussels- based 
band, was at number 23 on the 
week's domestic sales charts, ahead 
— at least for the moment — of 
such international stars as Lionel 
Richie and the Scorpions. For Hi- 
malaya that amounted to a certi- 
fied hit, the company's first since it 
began in 1982. 

Front 242, which toured six cities 
in the United States last fall, is one 
sign of Brussels’s growing reputa- 
tion as a vital center for new music. 
Another is the fact that Himalaya, 
and the other independent record 

and ^distributes through ImI Bel- 
gium — notably An tier Records, 
Disques du Crepuscule and 
Crammed Discs — are prospering 
at a time when worldwide record 
sales are still slowly recovering 
from a 1982 slump. 

“Himalaya's sales are going up," 
Janssens said. “Every time we re- 
lease a new record for one of our 
artists, we sell more of their bade 
catalog, too." 

Noting that this year such Brus- 
sels-based bands as Tuxedomoon 
and the Honeymoon Killers are 
touring and selling records in the 
United States, Europe and Japan, 
Janssens allows hims elf some hy- 
perbole: “The artists in Brussels 
are spreading over the world." 

Starting, of course, with Bel- 
gium. Since 1980 Brussels indepen- 
dent labels have released hundreds 
of records by local bands, among 
them T. C Made, whose first al- 
bum came out on the independent 
Parsley Records. Now signed to 
EMX T. C. Made topped the Bel- 
gian rode group category in the .’ 


•*’ £ / ■ 



Front 242 is one sign of Brussels’s growing reputation. 


annnnt pop poll of the Flemish- 
lan guage nut prane Humo. Four of 
the poll's top five Belgian groups 
were veterans of the small label 
movement. 

Belgium’s top groups — includ- 
ing Arbeit AdduNachi und Nebel, 
De Kramers, and 2 Bdgen — are 
survivors of a wave that began in 
the wake of the En glish punk 
movement of the late *70$. 

“Five years ago a lot of groups 
started,” said Marlene Wqnands, 
assistant producer of the BRT tele- 
vision network’s “VQla Tempo," 
which regularly features Belgian 
bands. “Now a few are left who 
make good records and are com- 
mercially viable." 

Janssens said: “At first there was 
more cooperation from the public 
toward Belgian artists. The public 
has changed its attitude: A record 
must be of high quality to sdL H 

Moreover, Belgian artists must 
have a distinct sound, said Arno 
Hmtjens, singer with T. C. Malic. 
“There’s no use to being a copy of 
English and American bands," he 
said. “People can already buy 
those." 

A strong influence on the Bel- 
gian sound comes from foreign mu- 
sicians who work with the indepen- 
dents. They include the French 
composer Hector Zazou, who re- 


leases Afro-Europcan fusion music 
on Crammed, and such Americans 
as bluesman Walter (Harmonica 
King) Tore; Tuxedomoon, which 
specializes in ambient electronic 
compositions, and Anna Domino, 
a New Yorker who records jazz- 
tinged rock songs for Crepuscule. 

The chief attraction of the Brus- 
sels scene, Domino said, is artistic 
freedom. 

“If 1 wanted to work at this level 
in New York," said Domino, whose 
third Crepuscule release, “New 
Songs,” is just out, “I’d have to go 
to a record company with a com- 
plete package, a certain sound and 
image. Here 1 can take my time, 
and do different sounds; Fm not 
restricted" 

Eclecticism has been and re- 
mains an evident characteristic of 
the independents' rosters. 

“Most of the Flemish groups in 
Belgium are into rock," comment- 
ed Crammed Discs 1 director, Mare 
Hollandaire. “But the indepen- 
dents are still on quite a broad 
spectrum.” 

Crammed, for example, has pro- 
duced records as diverse as the 
Honeymoon Killers’ novdty hit, 
“Route NatiouaJe 7,” Minimal 
Compact's “Next One Is Real,” 
which has scored a minor hit in 
U, S. dance dubs, and the “Made 


The Digital Dash and Other Auto Twists 


to Measure" ambient music series 
of albums. 

“We like different kinds of mu- 
sic, including commercial music," 
Hollandaire said. “The idea is to 
make what you like successful" 

For the independents, success 
generally means a sale of more than 
5,000 for a record. Unlike the ma- 
jor labels, for which an album tends 
to sell immediately or not at all, the' 
independents take a long view. 

“Most of our music doesn't de- 
pend on fashion,” Janssens said. 
“We won’t say it’s eternal, but re- 
cords by Soft Verdict and Blaine 
Reminger” —both of whom record 
electronic music for Crepuscule — 
“will still sell in two years. 2 want a 
catalog that generates steady 
sales.” 

The big question for the inde- 
pendents now is whether they can 
continue to build an audience 
abroad. 

“The problem with Belgium,” 
commented Paul Vrijens, manager 
of Jo Lemaire, Belgium's most pop- 
ular female rock singer, “is that the 
territory is so small. Eventually, 
you must look further.” 

The independents are well aware 
of the fact 

' “We don't want to be apart, in a 
tiny market — geographically or 
musically,” said Himalaya’s Hon- 
ort. “We’re working to be on the 
same level as everyone else, only 
with different music. It’s taking 
time, but we’re getting there.” 

Mark Hunter is an American 
journalist who writes about cuhurajf 
events from Europe for a number of 
publications. 

Uncompleted Moeqne . 
In Lisbon Is Inaugurated 

Reuters 

LISBON — Lisbon's first 
mosque in eight centuries, still un- 
finished after five years' construc- 
tion work, has been inaugurated by 
the Islamic Center of Portugal. 

About Sli millio n has been 
spent on the project, most of it 
ingifts from Islamic nations. 


By James Barron 

JVn* York Times Semin 

D ETROIT — In the days of tail 
0ns and bumper-to-bumper 
chrome, Detroit’s automakers did 
not worry about speedometers that 
were hard to read or control knobs 
that were hard to reach. 

But they are worrying now. In 
the late 1970s, foreign competitors 
upstaged the three major U. S. auto 
companies in both design and per- 
formance. So today Detroit’s auto- 
motive styling studios are design- 
ing interiors in the image of 
imported models. Chrome and fake 
wood are on their way out. Nonre- 
flective surfaces and a high-tech 
look are itL 

That is not alL The car compa- 
nies have been asking themselves 
baric questions about the way they 
lay out dashboards, which they pre- 
fer to call “instrument ponds." Are 
digital speedometers better than 
conventional ones? Should horn 
buttons be placed on steering 
wheels or on turn-signal levers? 
What is the best place for the head- 
tight and windshield-wiper con- 
trols? Do knobs or sliding switches 
make ibe best heater controls? 
Does it make sense to mount the 
radio or heater controls vertically 
instead of horizontally? 

The answers depend on whom 
the carmakers expect to buy their 
products, for Detroit has learned 
that a dashboard can clinch a sale. 
Susan Martin, a vice president of 
the Detroit Symphony, bought a 
Buick Century T-Type last year be- 
cause its instrument panel had no 
chrome and a distinctly functional 
appearance. “I picked that because 
it didn't have any fake plastic 
wood,” Martin said. “I hate fake 
wood." 

For Detroit's carmakers, “the in- 
strument panel is at least hs impor- 
tant and at least as time-consuming 
as any pan of the process after the 
exterior." said Anthony Richards, 
a strategic planning executive at 
Chrysler Coip. 

Every model is designed for a 
particular type of buyer, and Bill 
Scott. Pontiac's chid designer, said 
that nothing is more critical in set- 
ting the mood of a car than the 
dashboard. For that reason, dash- 

how the drivar^sea^mself — or 
herself, since surveys show that in- 
creasing numbers of women are 
buying cars. 

A recent white paper from Ford 
Motor Co. that was distributed to 
technical societies, for example, 
said that a sports car’s interior win 
typically involve an “energetic 
theme" with a tachometer and 
gauges, “whereas a luxury sedan 
might call for a warm, understated 



Ford’s Taurus will have a digital speedometer and headlight and heater knobs that twist 


theme, possibly employing elec- 
tronic digital readouts.” 

General Motors Corp.’s smaller 
new N-cars, such as the Buick Som- 
erset Regal are intended to appeal 
to young professionals who feel 
comfortable with electronics. Thus, 
the Somerset Regal has a dash- 
board radio with more features 
than some home stereo systems and 
a digital speedometer, which GM 
says women like. 

And Ford’s Taurus, which is 
scheduled to go on sale next fall, 
will have headlights and heaters 
controlled by dashboard knobs 
that twist instead of pull or slide. 
Ford says it made the change after 
researchers found that women be- 
lieved they could adjust these dials 
more easily. 

But Ford does not want to lose 
its male customers, so it is no acci- 
dent that the knobs bear some re- 
semblance to those on Saabs, the 
Swedish car that appeals to perfor- 
mance drivers. 

“One of the issues is to get the 
primary items up real high so the 
reading time and the time it takes 
for your eyes to leave the road are 
minimal," said Jack J. Tetnack, 
Ford's chief design executive for 
North America. 

In keeping with the trend away 
from the tightly symmetrical in- 
strument layouts of the 1950s and 
1960s, which paid little attention to 
functional relationships, Detroit is 
also grouping controls by impor- 
tance, putting frequently used con- 
trols within easy reach. Minor 
switches are relegated to less conve- 
nient positions. 

At the moment, one of the hot- 
test debates in Detroit concerns 


whether digital speedometers are 
preferable to traditional analogue 
gauges. Telnack of Ford said that 
drivers who are interested in per- 
formance tend to favor nondigital 
gauges, in part because the digital 


readouts do not give them enough 
information quickly enough. With 
analogue speedometers and ta- 
chometers, they can watch the nee- 
dles climb and can anticipate ex- 
actly when to shift gears. 

L.J. K. Setright wrote in Car 
and Driver magazine when elec- 
tronic gauges were first appearing 
in automobiles: “The digital read- 
out is one of the fashionable follies 
of our times. Only by welding your 
eyes to it can you eventually detect 
the rale at which engine speed is 
rising." 

Confusion over the differences 
in instrument panels can be acute 
for drivers who rent cars. 

In 1981, Herbert Brown, a Wash- 
ington lawyer, rented a Ford Escort 
at the Detroit airport He had just 
pulled out of the parking lot when 
another car swerved into his lane. 
He slammed on the brakes and 
pounded what he thought was the 
bom on the steering wheeL But the 
horn made no sound. Because on 
(hat model Ford had put the horn 
control on the turn-signal lever. 

Brown, who owns a Chevrolet 
and a Datsun, was upset. “You 
can’t change instincts you’ve 
learned over 25 years the moment 
you get into a strange car," he said. 

Ford, after receiving complaints 
from other drivers, agreed^ and, 
starting with some 1984 models, 
relocated the bom to the center of 
the steering wheeL 

“The driver reaction time was 


good, once you got used to it,” 
Tdnack Mid of the signal-lever 
bom, but he acknowledged that 
many drivers fo und it confusing 
the first time they had to use it. 

“Now," he said, "we're going 
back to where God intended the 
horn to be in the first place." 


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Page 8 


TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 




Reralb 


PubUMbed With Hm New York Timn and 1W Wadnngt on Port 


eribune ^ Nicaragua Time Bomb Must Be Defused 


Marketing the Twelve 


The long wrangle to bring Spain and Por- 
tugal into the European Community may 
not have raised the Community's image . 
Arguments about the fish trade and the wine 
market are a cold welcome to nations which, 
unlike some of the founding members, over- 
threw Fascism by their own efforts. The 
concept of European unity seems dimmed, 
with commercial bargaining obscuring what 
Churchill called the broad sunlit uplands. 

But it is wrong to castigate Europe on 
these grounds. The Community was found- 
ed on the postulate that doser economic ties 
had to precede closer political links. No 
route from emerging commercial union to 
political unity can avoid the nitty-gritty of 
competitive trade negotiation. This is not 
romantic, but then Europe happens to be a 
business, not just an ideal. 

The Iberian negotiations virtually over, 
the Community can tackle new tasks. The 
problem is to select the right targets. 

Decision-making in the Community has 
always been difficult, and the adhesion of 
Spain and Portugal will make this worse 
because their problems are quite different 
from those of their richer neighbors. It is 
tempting to suggest that reform of the voting 
system should be the next target — reduced 
veto power for individual countries and 
greater acceptance of the principle of major- 
ity voting. But too many countries, particu- 
larly Britain, are recalcitrant. 

Even within the circle of the original six 


members — for some have suggested a “two- 
speed Europe'’ — majority voting might not 
prove meaningful. Would France accept a 
majority decision to stop steel subsidies? Or 
West Germany surrender the right to boost 
prices for its grain producers? 

Another suggestion is to extend the use of 
the Community’s synthetic money, the Eu- 
ropean Currency Unit. The ECU has facili- 
tated transactions between central banks 
and helped private business hedge against 
exchange-rate risks. It is unlikely to become 
any thing more in the foreseeable future. 
European currency union will not be real 
until governments have achieved a far great- 
er convergence of policies and surrendered a 
major part of their economic sovereignty. 

When Jacques Delon became president 
of the European Commission, he suggested 
that Europe should achieve genuinely free 
trade by 1992 — a seemingly remote date, 
but dose enough given the slowness with 
which institutional change takes place. 
Trade inside the European Community, al- 
though free from tariffs and quotas, is still 
trammeled by a vast array of controls, rang- 
ing from safety regulations to openly protec- 
tive government purchasing policies. From 
the point of view of both economic efficien- 
cy and greater political cohesion, there is 
much to be said for concentrating on the 
founding fathers’ first aim — making the 
European Community a common market. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Bonn: An Uphill Summit 


The point of holding the annual economic 
summit of Western leaders earlier than usual 
this year — May 2-4 in Bonn — was to 
manifest their unity on the 40th anniversary of 
the end of Europe’s great war. The preliminar- 
ies manifest any thing but. 

America's frustration with Japanese trade 
curbs exploded last week in an extraordinary 
92-0 Senate vote urging retaliation. A more 
profound dispute pits the United Slates 
against France cm the issues of global trade 
and finance. The seven summiteers face a 
critical moment for statesmanship. 

Americans are not alone in their anger at 
Japan. Western Europe restricts Japanese car 
sales more rigidly than did the U.S. quotas that 
expired Sunday. The Europeans keep tight 
rein an other Japanese imports as wdl The 
United States and other industrial nations 
have been unable to match Japan’s obvious 
talent for producing good products and mar- 
keting than in alien cultures. But Japan has 
been vigorously selfish in harasring and legis- 
lating against dearly superior Western prod- 
ucts, such as US.-made communications satel- 
lites and advanced medical equipment 

Compounding the problem is the fact that 
America's overall trade balance is worsening 
by the month. Last year’s record $123 billion 
excess of imports over exports is expected to 
grow to $140 billion this year. Surging imparts 
and flagging exports are hurting many indus- 
tries— -and the farm belL The strong dollar, by 
overpricing American goods abroad and un- 
derpricing imports, makes matters still worse. 

Here is where trade issues bear on Washing- 


ton's new dispute with France. President Rea- 
gan wants a commitment from his summit 
partners to start a new round of global negoti- 
ations to reduce trade barriers. The French are 
balking until they get a commitment to global 
talks about the world's monetary system. 

The administration main rams that the cur- 
rent system of free-floating exchange rates 
needs no fixing — that the currency market 
reflects only underlying economic truths. But 
the French con tend, with some reason, thatlhe 
long and painful effort to negotiate trade con- 
cessions could go for naught if the big swings 
in currency values go unchecked. 

The French are talking about the dollar, of 
course; they want the United States to reduce 
its heavy borrowing and high interest rates. 
President Reagan mam tains that if the market 
puts a Ugh value on the dollar, so be ft. He 
wants no conference at which the world gangs 
up on his budget deficits. 

Mr. Reagan’s pursuit of lower trade barriers 
is sound and politically courageous. He faces 
rising protectionist pressures, as die Senate's 
vote shows, and wants other governments to 
hrip resist Japan, in particular, had better 
heed the mounting American frustration. 

But it is tactically wrong to turn aside sug- 
gestions that U.S. policies also need scrutiny. 
To deny that these policies disrupt the world’s 
economies is wrong and arrogant The indus- 
trial summits are celebrations of common val- 
ues and, this year, of a long and treasured 
peace. To keep celebrating, the leaders bad 
better also decide to do some hard work. 

— 7W£ NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


The Growing Community 

! There is, for afi Europe, a special impor- 
; ranee in bringing Spain and Portugal into 

• membership. They already are members of the 

• North Atlantic Treaty Organization, although 
! any delay in EC membership might have en- 
couraged those in Spain who maintain reserva- 
tions concerning NATO. But full economic 
participation has been seen as the best possible 
insurance for democracy for these two coun- 
tries that had been under totalitarian rule 
through most of the postwar era. 

— 77ie Los Angeles Times. 
Differences in the interests of member coun- 
tries mil not fade away with the entry of Spain 
and Portugal. That is why the enlarg ement will 
probably lead, sooner or later, to the establish- 
ment of a two-speed Europe. Such a Europe, in 
which a core group would lead the way in 
budding a coherent whole, is indispensable if 
there is to be substantial progress in areas such 
as high technology and defense. It remains to 
be seat whether such an initiative is compati- 
ble with European structures, or whether it 
demands greater revision of the present order. 

— Le Monde (Paris). 

The Community has grown not only in size 
but also in moral stature. In a process perhaps 
unique in human history, peoples of different 


languages and traditions are being brought 
together, their societies and economies are 
bring gradually integrated, without recourse to 
violence and with respect for the particularism 
of each of the peoples involved. 

It is not to be expected that this process can 
be either painless or easy. It requires both of 
officials and of national leaders a remarkable 
degree of patience and dedication, a delicate 
combination of obstinacy with a spirit of give- 
and-take, an ability to pad/y passionate and 
vocal interest-groups at home while keeping 
their genuine grievances in reasonable propor- 
tion to the wider interests at stake. 

— The Times (London). 

The successful conclusion erf the negotia- 
tions spared the beads of government the in- 
dignity of having to wrangle about lemons, 
wine and fishing-boats. Another piece of smart 
footwork by the Italians [who hold the rotating 
presidency] ensured that the summit was not 
disturbed by the very serious difficulties on 
farm prices that have yet to be resolved. Half- 
way through its term, this Italian presidency 
has a strong claim to be one of the most 
positive so far. Accustomed as they are to 
juggling with fragile political coalitions at 
home, the Italians seem to have brought the 
right skills to the right place at the right time 
and deserve to be congratulated. 

— The Guardian ( London j. 


FROM OUR APRIL 2 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Etna Devastation to Continue 
ROME — The predictions of scientists regard- 
ing the eruption erf Mount Etna continue to be 
pessimistic. Mr. Perret the American volca- 
nologist states that the quantity of liquid lava 
which the volcano contains must still be con- 
siderable and expresses the opinion that any 
cessation of the eruption will only be of a 
temporary character. Professor Rico has left 
the Mount Etna Observatory. “No one could 
resist that noise for more than twenty or thirty 
hours,** he said, “without going mad." The 
village of Cavaliero, which consists of about 
fifty small bouses, is now completely covered 
by the lava, but the inhabitants are safe and 
sound. Another stream of lava is slowly mov- 
ing in the direction of Mount Nodlla. 


1935: Gafti-Casaraa Retires from Met 
NEW YORK — GuOio Gatti-Casazza. veter- 
an general director of the Metropolitan Opera, 
strode alone through the darkened foyer of the 
Metropolitan at midnig ht last night, ending his 
opera career with a single sfleal bow after 
4,000 of his admirers had laughed until they 
cried at the funniest program ever beard in the 
staid opera house. Mr. Gatti-Casazza. 66, has 
been with the great American operatic institu- 
tion for 27 years. Every kind erf entertainment 
was shaken up into one glorious farewell cock- 
taiL Beatrice Lillie, a Negro Orchestra, motion 
pictures and popular songs were a few of the 
added attractions, while singers burlesqued 
Alda, Carmen, Pagliacri and other operatic 
characters in a riotous, roaring program. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1953-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWBtTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PwbEAtr 

Executive EidUor REN&BONDY D^uty PtddaMr 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Aswcwte MMv 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN AswciMe PMskv 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dtreaor of Optronom 

Arnault Editor FRANCOIS DESMA1SON5 Director of \ 

ROLF D. KR 


KRANEPUHL Dnreter of Atbenatug Sato 

International Herald Tribune. 18! Avenue Chartet-de-Gralle, 92200 NemUy-mr-Srine, 

France. Telephone; 747-1265. Tdex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Pais. 

Dvecieur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Htnnessv RjL, Hong Kong. Tel $-28561$. Telex 61170. 
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S.A. au capita/ de 1.200.000 F. RCS Namerre B 732021126. Commission Parilaire No. 61337. 

US. subscription: 5 '284 yearly, Secml-dass postage paid at Long Island City, N.Y. Hid. 

C 1985, International Herald Tribune. AU rights reserved, 


N EW YORK — It must be dear 
to everyone that the confronta- 
tion bet w een the Reagan administra- 
tion and the Sandinist government is 
near a breaking point loth the San- 
dinists and American policy-makers 
seem unwavering in their determina- 
tion to survive each other. Only Con- 
gress can defuse this time bomb. 

Soon Congress is to decide whether 
to support the administration’s war 
against Nicaragua by voting an ex- 
pected $14 million for aid to the 
“contras,” or to seek a peaceful solu- 
tion to the region’s problems. Latin 
Americans hope common sense and a 
healthy awareness of self-interest will 
move the lawmakers to aid the war 
against the tiny republic. 

The Reagan administration, has 
done its best to create an atmosphere 
conducive to deepening the conflict. 
It has waged an undeclared war 
through the contras. For Nicaragua, 
one of the world’s poorest nations, 
this aggression has resulted in post- 
ponement of economic development. 
Material damages, inflicted with 
UJS. taxpayers' money, are estimated 
at more than $400 million. The fight- 
ing has killed more than 2,300 people, 
among them many women, children, 
students and workers. The adminis- 
tration’s rationale fra- its policy has 
been the Nicaraguan government's 
alleged totalitarianism, its denial of 
basic freedoms and the menace it 
poses to its neighbors and, ultimate- 
ly, to U.S. security interests. 

During several trips to Nicaragua 
and the United States, I have grown 
convinced that these arguments are, 
at best, overstatements designed to 
justify an essentially unjustifiable po- 
licy of aggression. The debate on 
Capitol fiul will, I hope, reveal the 
distortion and manipulation of fact 
by high administration officials. 

Yes, the Sandinists have made mis- 
takes — but they have also registered 
remarkabl e achievements that far 
outweigh their shortcomings. Cer- 
tainly, their mistakes do not justify 
the terrible punishment Washington 
is meting ouL My conversations with 
Nicaraguan leaders in virtually all 
sectors of society made it clear that 
the Sandinists recognize that a better 
understanding should be developed 


By Adolfo Perez Esquivel 


with the Roman Catholic Church, the 
ition party, the press and the 
dto Indians. 

But common sense dictates that we 
all take into account the dramatic 
social changes that Managua has im- 
plemented. The revolutionary gov- 
ernment has outlawed capital punish- 
ment and demonstrated extraordi- 
nary restraint in dealing with 
defeated adversaries: the 
forces of Anastasio Somoza Del 

While the Sandinists most divot a 
large portion of their financial and 
physical resources to defense, they 
have carried out policies that have 
resulted in a sharp decline in infant 
mortality rotes and have greatly in- 
creased medical care for the popula- 
tion. Their health program caused the 
World Health Organization to select 
Nicaragua as one of five model coun- 
tries for primary health care. These 
successes are mirrored by advances in 
education, with marked declines in 
the national -illiteracy rate following 
one of the most effective literacy 
campaigns in Latin America. 


The administration ignores these 
accomplishments in its need to esca- 
late the conflict. Through its support 
for the contras and direct interven- 
tion by the Central Intelligence 
Agency, it has bombed and mined 
Corinto, the main port, in violation 
of international law. It has disregard- 
ed the International Court of Justice 
while advocating terrorism against a 
sovereign state. It unilaterally with- 
drew from talks with the Sandinists 
in Manzanillo. Mexico, and under- 
mined the peace initiative of the Con- 
tadora countries — Colombia, Mexi- 
co, Panama, Venezuela — when it 
failed to manipnlalff that initia tive 
toward its own desired ends. 

These acts of hostility and terror- 
ism, far from breaking the Sandinists* 
spirit, have only galvanized them in 
their resolve and rallied *nnrh of Lat- 
in America to their support. Even 
high Pentagon officials acknowledge 
that further assistance to the contras 
will not bring about the military de- 
feat of the Sandinists. 

Existing evidence, a feeling for bds- 


„ and common sense should en- 
™j(e Congress to reject the arimira s- 
tration’s counterproductive policies. 

At this critical moment, tt seems 
the Sandinists are ready to support a 
policy of nonintervention in the re- 
gion ’by any external power and an 
end to arms shipments and use of 
militar y advisers in Central America. 

The Congress should make dear its 
respect for self-determination of all 
peoples and reject the administra- 
tion's proposal for continued aid to 
the contras. At the same time, it must 
implement measures that would 
mnVff it virtually impossible to cir- 
cumvent that decision. 

The Reagan administration should 
resume talks with the Sandinists and 
seriously support the Contadora ini- 
tiative. The administration's choice is 
dear either a continued policy of 
destruction and death or a policy of 
cooperation and life. 

The writer, an Argentine, wem the 
1980 Nobel Peace Prise. Tins com- 
ment, translated from the Spanish by 
Cesar A. Chelala . was contributed to 
The New York Times. 


miTr-Tim 
iW'GMe&L . 
mfwsim/ 





'Star Wars’ : Again, a Generous Idea, Hi-Conceived 


P ARIS — The large and unoonsidered gesture 
that ends badly is something of an American 
presidential specialty. Woodrow Wilson's Four- 
teen Points with their promise of universal nation- 
al self-determination. the 1930s “quarantine” of 
Japan, unconditional surrender in World War O. 
the idea of world organization through world par- 
liament (not to speak of UNESCO), the domino 
theory — all seemed good ideas at the time they 
woe put forward, usually off-the-cuff, by an 
American president Each then was turned into a 
reality by an energetic bureaucracy. Each, in the 
aid, proved to be not quite whai had been in the 
president's mind, nor necessarily an improvement 
m the world’s condition. 

A generous but ill-conceived idea can begin 
that ends in tears. The most striking 
talentof the Reagan administration has been in the 
realm of imagination and image, while successfully 
avoiding the pain of reality. This seems unlikely to 
go on, though Ronald Reagan has proved to be a 
very lucky man. His successors may be left to bear 
the pain. Mr. Reagan may be remembered by a 
nostalgic people as the president who wanted, 
but failed, to obtain a constitutional amendment 
mandating a balanced budget. 

He is sure to be remembered for the Strategic 
Defense Initiative, the so-called “star wars" pro- 
gram, which he has presented as the way to abolish 
the threat to mankind of nuclear war. 

The research is already under way, and the 
administration intends, if it has its way, to spend 
$30 billion on this ova the next five years. It is a 
serious affair. It takes us into a new realm of 
strategic hardware — particle beams, laser energy 


By William Pfaff 

and hyper- velocity electromagnetic rail guns — of 
unprecedented complexity. 

Nothing seems likely to stop the United States 
from going ahead with this. Certainly nothing the 
Russians at Geneva can. do. nor the European 
allies or Japan, disquieted as any of them may be 
by the implications of what has begun. Even if the 
new administration elected in the United States in 
1988 wanted to step “star wars" — which is by no 
means to be counted upon — four years of work 
would already have been done. The momentum of 
the program in the scientific and strategic commu- 
nities would be such that the essentials would 
continue in one guise or another. Doors are being 
opened that will not again be shuL 

All erf this will not, however, end in abolishing 
the threat of nuclear war, nor in invulnerability for 
the United States, not to speak of invulnerability 
for the Allies or for the Soviet Union (with whom, 
Mr. Reagan has said, the defensive systems eventu- 
ally created should be shared). 

Invulnerability is not, alas, within the power of 
strategic hardware to confer, however irresistible 
the idea of invulnerability is to a historically isolat- 
ed nation. What the wont being done on SDI will 
produce is a defensive system of finite effect 
against incoming strategic missiles. It may enhance 
strategic stability by reducing the vulnerability of 
some retaliatory systems. It may provide a measure 
of population defense. Then again, it may not. It 
may destabilize the present deterrence relationship 
and subvert arms agreements that now exist or 


might otherwise be possible. On these questions, 
professional and public debate now is furious. 

SDI is one more step in the measure, counter- 
measure, counter-countermeasure competition 
that has been going cm between the superpowers 
since 1945. Hat is the way the Russians see it 
They could not possibly (not to say prudently) see 
it in any other way. If the United States were really 
to share its research with the U.SiSJL, it is possible 
that some of the more pernicious aspects of tins 
development might be arrested. That is not 
to be done at tins stage of the game, when 
only has begun, and it requires a large act of 
optimism to believe that it ever wiU be done. 

Mr. Reagan might do it, because be has a ro- 
mantic notion of what this is all about. Mr. Rea- 
gan, however, will not be president after 1988. - 

SDI is in the American presidential tradition of 
y, highminded initiatives only Kghtiy tied to 
fity — taken up, then, by interested parties in 
government, politics and business, each attaching 
to it its own ambitions. What in the end wiQ come 
about mil be a new, altered, and much mare cost- 
ly strategic balance. 

Whether it will be a more, or less, dangerous 
relationship between the superpowers cannot be 
foreseen. But the American people are funding 
SDI and supporting it because they are entranced 
by Mr. Reagan's interpretation of what this is all 
about. They believe in the dream. 

To borrow the phrase, they are such stuff as 
dreams are made on. We will not think about the 
rest of the hard’s line, which says “and our tittle life 
is rounded with a sleep.” 

© 1985 William Pfaff. 


For Real National Security 
Look Earthward, Earthling 


By James Reston 


W ASHINGTON — There was a 
kind of April Fool's Day lope 
about the MX missile debate here 
these last few days. The administra- 
tion insisted that the way to reduce 
the number of nuclear weapons in the 
world was to build more MX missiles. 

Last year, it told the Congress that 
it wanted the MX missiles because 
the Russians were not at the bargain- 
ing table. This year, it insisted on 21 
more because the Russians were at 
the bargaining table and would not 
believe American negotiators unless 
they had them. The president's argu- 
ment was that while the MX might 
not be an effective military weapon, 
it was an essential bargaining chip to 
get promises for (he future from the 
Russians, whose promises have not 
convinced him in the past. 

How is the success of this argu- 
ment in the Congress to be ex- 
plained? President Reagan, who 
promised to balance the federal bud- 
get, has added more to the national 
debt in four years than all the other 
presidents combined in the 192 years 
of the Republic. 

As the majority leader of the 
House, Jim Wright of Texas, pointed 
out at the conclusion of the MX de- 
bate, “We are spending more on 
weapons and on military might this 
year than we spent in any year during 
the Vietnam War, in any year during 
the Korean War, and. ves. in any year 
during World War II* Yet the presi- 
dent’s argument prevailed, by just 
enough to finance more missiles. 

One explanation is that Mr. Rea- 
gan is strong politically and the Dem- 
ocrats are weak. He masted that to 
defeat him on this issue when nuclear 
talks are beginning in Geneva and at 
the start of a new regime in Moscow 
would demonstrate that the United 
States was “irresolute and divided.” 
He also argued that defeating the 
MX program would cost defense con- 
tracts and jobs in the representatives’ 
districts and states, and maybe their 
seats in the next election. Such things 
arc not Ignored on Capitol HHL 
On one thing, however, the presi- 
dent and Congress agreed: The goal 
both rides had was tire security of the 
nation. Where tbey differed was on 


the meaning of “security” and the 
means to that end. This is the funda- 
mental question on which there are 
honest, unresolved differences be- 
tween and within the political parties. 

The president sincerely believes 
that the threat to U.S. security lies 
primarily in the buildup of Soviet 
nuclear arms: that Moscow is im- 
pressed only by military power; and 
(hat Washington must, therefore, 
proceed with its ground-based missile 
and “star wary’ programs to per- 
suade the Gorbachev regime to nego- 
tiate in good faith for a safer world 

This is a policy that has to be taken 
seriously, but it is rqecicd by the 
equally sincere people who think 
there is already a dependable balance 
of nuclear power, and who believe the 
security of the United States lies not 
abroad but at home. 

According to this view, the main 
threat to America's security lies in its 
budget and trade deficits, in the do- 
cline of its old industries in the cities 
and its farms on the prairies, in the 
loss of control of its borders, in the 
threat of crime, drugs and racial ten- 
sion, and in the moral decay erf an 
increasingly acquisitive society. 

At the end of the MX debate in the 
House. Mr. Wright tried to redefine 



By Mum* m H4 tonal {Anwanka). CartoonM A Wntan Spi i tw n. 


the meaning of national security. It 
depended upon so many things other 
than missQes, he said. 

The industrial base was declining 
Last year the United States had a 
trade drain of 5123 billion and in the 
process lost 3 J million jobs. 

We had to wonder wnat was hap- 
pening in America, be said. Otir secu- 
rity depended upon a productive ag- 
riculture, yet the whole fabric of U.S. 
agriculture was eroding, with thou- 
sands of farms in foreclosure and 
thousands more on the brink. 

With eight million, people unem- 
ployed, Mr. Wright added, the presi- 
dent says we cannot afford to extend 


unemployment 
says that the job 


compensation, and 
says that the jobless need job training 
— and then he cuts the job- training 
program by 28 percent. 

“In the ultimate analysis ” Mr. 
Wright concluded, “national security 
“ itened and 
of leading 
century, but 
. . . Japan, with half our population, 
is graduating more than we are grad- 
uating in science, in engineering and 
in the technologies.” 

Mr. Wright's appeal for anewdefi- 
■ nation of national security moved the 
House. Bui the problem remains. 

The New York Times. 


LETTER TOTHE EDITOR 


On the Soviet Dead 

As an aigumeat in support of the 
Soviet Union’s gigantic arms pro- 
gram. the Russians refer repeatedly 
m print and public discussion to the 
20 million lives they arc said to have 
lost during the Second World War. 
Numerous and diverse examples can 
be given of the persistent use erf tins 
figure in Soviet propaganda. Yet the 
exact number of Soviet war victims 
during World War II is not known. 

In 1947 the number of dead was 
being pot at 7 million. It was in the 
1960s that Sustov and Khrushchev 
introduced the number of 20 million. 
It has never been explained. 

Nothing has ever been said about 
bow many of tbe dead were military 
and how many civilians. The figure 


may be nothing more than the differ- 
ence between a population forecast 
for 1960 made by the American de- 
mographer Frank Lofimer in 1946, 
and the actual population as shown 
by the census of 1959. That differ- 
ence was about 20 million. 

The Soviet demographer A. 
Bqyarsid wrote in a textbook on de- 
mography*. “If the population of the 
Sonnet Union had increased after 
1939 at the rate of the 1950s, in 1959 
the Soviet Union would have had 257 
miltiotx inhabitants Instead of 209 
[million].” This demographic catas- 
trophe was attributed to toe war. But 
during the same period Stalinist ter- 
ror daimed many victims. 

Tbe Soviet geophysicist Josif Diai- 
krn made a study of the number of 
victims of state repression in the So- 


viet Union. He found that World 
War n cost 20 million lives, and in 
the same period 10.1 million people 
died in camps. Tbe Soviet authorities 
“rewarded” Mr, Diadem with three 
years in a concentration camp. 

In his book “Statin's Secret War,” 
Nikolai Tolstoy arrives at a total 
number of dead or 27.5 million to 30 
million in the period 1940 to 1945. He 
records how these people died: Be- 
tween 115 million and 13-5 million 
Soviet citizens and soMias were 
killed by the Germans, and Sialin fa M 
the rest on his conscience. Among 
them are many of the 5.5 mtifiou 
repatriated Soviet soldiers who were 
shot oo arrival ot seat to Siberia. 

In his book “The Great Terror.” 
Robert Conquest writes that from 
1936 to 1959 an average of 8 million 


Don’t Comer 
A Mexican 
President 


By Jorge G. Castaneda 

M EXICO CITY — In its con- 
frontation with Mexico ova 
the United States is breaking a 
role of its neighbor’s poli- 
tics: Don’t coma a Mexican p rest- 
dent. Mexico knows no greater wrath 
than that of its president when his 
dignity — or that of his countty — is 
co m pr o mised By leaning too heavily 
on Mexico on drug-related matters, 
the United States is risking a drastic 
Mexican response. 

U.S. pubhc opinion and the Amer- 
ican government have a valid point: 
Mexican exports of drugs are au the 
rise, and Mexico is, at least theoreti- 
cally, in danger of becoming another 
Colombia or Thailand. Mexican 
dnigr-cnforceinent officials and agen- 
cies are, as elsewhere, largely allied to 
and bought off by the criminals they 
are meant to pursue. Nor are the links 
between drug traffickers and officials 
limited to low-level police officers cm 
the tflkfr The United States knows 
this; so does Mexico. But neither 
knows what to do about xl 
I f President Miguel de la Madrid 
Hurtado were leading a prosperous 
nation, sane of itself and its leaders, 
the sedation to the problem would be 
obvious and in place: a vigorous 
Mexican anti-corruption, anti-drug 
campaign. With UJi. help If neces- 
sary, but preferably without! t. Mr. de 
la Madrid would act dedsivriy, disre- 
gard! 

trail led to _ 
would let their 1 
the office, the harder they would TalL 
But far from bong the paragon of 
political stability, economic develop- 
ment and tourism that it was once 
thought to be, Mexico is in deep trou- 
ble. The economy seemed to improve 
in early 1984, after two years of se- 
vere recession and a 40-percent drop 
in real wages, but the upturn proved 
to be short-lived. In the fitk two 
months of 1985, inflation reached a 
yearly rate erf more than 80 percent. 
Large-scale capital flight is up once 
again. The price of oil, which ac- 
counts for 75 percent of Mexico's 
exports, is down. Mexico has man- 
aged to continue paying the interest 
an its $95-bfllion foreign debt; yet 
even this could become a problem. 

Politically, the situation is equally 
serious. A conservative opposition 
party, the National Action Party, 
known as PAN, has been capitalizing 




Letters imetuled for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor” and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, mane and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject' to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the rctum of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


prisoners were held in concentration 
cantos, of which 10 percent died an- 
nually, including both war victims 
and victims of terror. Many trains 
were used to transport hundreds of 
thousands of camp inmates to Sibe- 
ria, and the best trained and aimed 
troops woe often used to guard 
them. It can be said that Static con- 
ducted war on two fronts- against the 
Nazis and against fads own people. 

That the Soviet definition of vari- 
ous matters, has found acceptance 
wirh a great many opinion makers in 
the West is dear evidence of tbe suc- 
cess of Soviet publicity methods. 

HENKWOUAJt 
Director, Bukovsky Foundation, 
Sakharov Institute, 

Amsterdam- 


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Piedras Negras burned down city hall 
and dosed a bolder bridge, protest- 
ing the government's refusal to honor 
PAN’s apparent victory in local elec- 
tions. Toe government’s response 
was to bring m the army. The ruling 
Revolutionary Institutional Party 
may have to accept major defeats in 
state and congressional elections in 
July, or call u the army once again, 
bn a water scale. 

If, in addition to these problems, 
Mexico has to face Amcncan pres- 
sure, the strains on its already weak- 
ened government may prove too 
strong. For some time now, Washing- 
ton has openly questioned Mexico s 
commitment to dnig-enforcement. 
The United Slates has implemented a 
go-slow customs and immigration 
policy on its southern border, wreak- 
mg havoc in northern Mexico It has 
in effect subordinated all Mexican- 
American relations to a prompt solu- 
tion of the drug issue. 

Washington apparently does not 
understand the political cost of such 
a solution: Tim drug issue would per- 
haps be laid to rest, but far more 
serious problems would emerge. 
Mexican corruption cannot be eradi- 
cated overnight, unless one throws 
the baby — the Mexican political 
system — out with the bath water. It 
is hardly in the interest of the United 
States to tinker with the delicate 
checks and balances that have guar- 
anteed Mexico’s political stability for 
more than 50 years. 

Nor should, Americans pressure 
Mexico to do so; only Mexico can 
solve its drug problem and it can do 
so only on us own terms. Mexico’s 
president must be left with an elegant 
way out of tbe present confrontation; 
Mexico's digmty must be preserved. 
The United States should not push 
too hard. Mexican pres^enls have a 
history of reacting drastically to such 
pressures. In the past, they national- 
ized oil companies and banks. Who 
knows what will happen the next lime 
the United States provokes the dor- 
mant furies of Mexico? 

The writer is a professor, of political 
science at the National Autonomous 
University of Mexico and a political 
commentator for the Mexican weekly 
Proceso. He contributed this comment 
to The New York Times. 











’tCo 


idem 


INTEFVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


sgacss 

®?«s£ 

•SlSSyffe 

Miguel del, UvL 
> were leading a 
®«of itself andft?*' 

HOT. to the problemL^B. 
and in place; 

i anti-comipuon 

?l Wiih U.S & 

?Ssass8 * 


•rfram being ifa e 
stability, econorac® 
^ toumm thatu^ 
to be, Mexico is in 


issws-ag 

saon and 3 40-^7 

snatvs; 

of 1985, inflation re ache, 

ite of more than 80 pam 

ale capital night is ml 
[Tk pnce of oil wto* E 
fat 75 percent of Mob -{ 
is down. Mexico has v 
continue paying the fate 
!95-Mlion foreign debt « 
s could become a probbi 
catty, the situation is tq® 

A conservative oppose 
the National Action Pm 
a. PAN, has been capuafe^ 
dar discontent. mainly it 
U the beginning of the p 
mts of the border m< 
Negras burned down cnvfc 
sed a border bridge, pris 
government's refill toker 
mpanenl victory in locals 
Toe government's Rspa 
bring m the army. The rc 
denary Institutional fa" 
vc to accept major defers « 
id congressional elecn&j ^ 
f can in the army oncsai 
cter scale. 

\ addition to these pn& 
has to face Amencsi p 
e strains on its already^ 
jovenunem may picwo 
For some time now. Wah| 
i openly questioned Mon 
meat to drug-enftiWE 
died Slates has unpltscffili 
r ru st"™ and innmHJE 
m its southern border- *es 
oc in northern Mexico, li la 
subordinated all M®s 
an relations to a promps* 
the drug issue, 
trington apparently ®» * 
[and the political costa 31 
on: The drug issue worn pt 
e laid to rest, bin fir ®- 
i problems would em* , 
m corruption cannot 
overnight unless 
by — the Mexican F® 
-—out with the tain"*: 
[yin the interest rf & 
to tinker with 
and balances that « 

Mexico's poll deal stf* 

ban 50 vears. . ^ 

should Amen-^ K 
Mo do so: only 

is drug problem awl ^ 

v on its own terns- - ^ 
iu must be left wtJS 

« of the present canfJJJ 


s. in 

eompames anj 

hat wiU happ® igjjj, 
cd States provoke 
ies of Mexico. 


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Escalating protests: Paint 
bombs stain U.S. Embassy 
signs in Bonn, above, pro- 
testers gather outside the 
embassy in Managua, 
which is guarded by a San- 
dinista police officer, left, 
and Robert Dillon, then 
U.S. ambassador to Leba- 
non, discusses the 1983 de- 
struction of the embassy in 
Beirut in which 63 people 
were killed. 


Photographs: The New York Times, the Associated Press, United Prex'niematianal. 



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U.S. Embassies Try to Maintain 
'Open Society’ in Tight Security 


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By Fred Farris . |* 

International Herald Tribune SI^V^SlSlS'S! 

\B~T ASHINGTON —Tie partial evaorn- 
W/ tion of the US. Embassy in East Bdrut . b S«rS 

I? this winter highlights a probkm faced • I I-SS» I B 1 2sY 5S' &**$ S 

by State Department planners: how to protect m y\ EJf’2* f »*» f CIST 

American diplomats without jeopardizing the ■' £mm SJS’S tWV i SS.^ kwt 

image of an “open society" that the United ■ II^ISSf'KIHlKfl* 

States wants to project abroad. 9 «mv m mm y jmi y '&rS7'5iWn af ^ i ^ yf”' '- ^ SI« 

The problem, has already led to efforts to : 

make dmlomauc buildings and people more - I 

secure. TTie department has also started a ven- mm aJoiB '£55 

turn for axjperarion and exchange of security ..•■ a * :- n Til' Fr^f ' ***•****! 

information with American businesses operat- .. .. |.g» 

But when it comes to a choice between image * '• £#'11 85 ^ 

and safety, clearly the safety of its Foreign " 5-y TmrTy wir-^r 

Service personnel, and other Americans abroad, ,-! . ..H S «M* Im YS Mi m\w* 

takes preceden c e, officials indicate. Terrorist " 

threats against Americans by militant Moslems ■ 

in Lebanon, kidnappings and bombings, have , : ^ ‘>r“ 

brought this problem to the forefront ' -fr ^ "i 

During the last 10 years, spending on State - • |HHk ^ 

Department security has increased more than 1 . - • ‘ *'■ — 

20-fold to J497 J million planned in 1985 from - • ~v ”-■• 1 • 

S2Z6 million in 1975. The sharpest upward leap ^ ' .1- ■ • v ' .• W • •- - 

flowed the Iranian embassy crisis in 1979. . .'-V . ~ 7^* • • ^ 

The memory of America’s humiliation when ^ - ; ' v ' ... {.: X «}*. 'l&KBjfBm * 

the U.S. Embassy in Tehran was overwhelmed, ' ' ‘ I- z : "&J 

its personnel seized, beaten, paraded before '■*' 

jeenng throngs and held for more than 400 days, . aHBHBi- -SfL' 

has been burned deep in the consciousness of - ^ ■ ~ ~ 

the department as well as the nation. But now . ' 

“Qeariy, we can’t retreat in the face of the — ?' ' — 

terrorist threat,” Secretary of State Georee P. ' ' . •'." !' : = ' ■ ? ■ [ '<'[ .-■ 

Sh^z said last month. “Just as clearly , wehave .' ’ • ' ■' ' '=< : ' ! • '■’■*•' '.?■ • 

must leSra*to adapt to the new and tlangerous 1 . : ^V ? 1 A '* , 

circumstances that the terrorist violence has 1 ^ v Vj^ v-i" "• 

A State Department official, referring to the " ‘ ; fci, L BpB jP" . ■••• '.■: , ’* V 

Americans kflled in three matw bomb attacks in ■■ ^^mupwp ... 

Bdrut in the last two years, said recently, “This v-—m-‘^^^^^—*n*^^—^mtwemmmmmnemmmemmeimmmmmiit—iei*i^iiaiemmMimmettaol 

£aS&"S^ ^ front of U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv has been 

Lebanon.” sandbagged for protection. 

The problem occupies David C Fidds, depu- 
iy assistant secretary of state for security, and 

his staff. One of the department's chid planners _ _ _ .... , _ 

in the area, Mr. Fidds said in a recent interview* The Sum Department has also devised a plan “Our architects are charged with trying to 
“Historically, we built our embassies with ^or^iercoopmQtm between the government pixmde necessaiy security but not to do any 
easy access to reflect our open society We have JJ-J b £ smcss< ? abroad . **« .Mr. Shultz said architectural damage to the buDdings.” Mr. 






•*&?*> MS* - 






: s v.L^»-y> : "-L 


The front of the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv has been 
sandbagged for protection. 

The Sute Department has also devised a plan “Our architects are charged with trying to 
for greater cooperation between the government provide necessary security but not to do any 


asked the National Acad 
at how to preserve this 


of Sciences to look 
ction of our open 


would “enhance the security of all Americans 
overseas.” 


Matthews said. 


SffX^rotection^iS^ t We < H poses .the same kind of ASKED ifthe rebmlthng pro^m would 

want to protea the freedom that the American <hfficulties 30(1 dan L er ? ^ businessmen abroad l\ alter architectural style, Mr. Fields said: 

people are all abouL” “ 10 80 vcmmcnt offiaals, he said m the Feb- -L M. “We are looking at all arrangements for 

Mr. Fields said the department was contract- niary speech in Ariingtrai. Vuginia. “And the . securityino^ ladings. Much is on the perime- 
ing with the academy “on how to build a more secw ? ,y m ^ surc ^ ™ed to protect businesses ter, which should not affea the architecture of 
secure building.” are ako substantially the same. the buildings. 


the buildings. 

“Many people have seal what we did in 


ties and on the new technologies for enhancing Rome, what security devices were me talled on 
security. We can coordinate our security efforts the building perimeter, the hydraulic devices 

ki. aa.:j »r. — .i . i-f. . *ii • j . i -i » 


“We are going to the foremost companies in - ^efan share information on terrorist actm- “Many people have seen what we i 

the United Stales to find ways to buCdmissjons aes ^d ^ the new technologies for enhancing Rome, what security devices were install 
to withstand the effects of blast,” he said. security- We can coordinate our secunty efforts the building perimeter, the hydraulic d 
Mr Fields said seenritv was a raw stand v overseas, Mr. Shultz said. In short, we can that lift to stop cars,” he said of the bufldi 

^ki secunty was a constantly ^ threat together.” Rome’s Via Vketo. “We haven’t done an' 

“Monday terrorism started in the 1960s,” Mr. Shidttan^adfonnati<m of the Over- on the facade, 

be said. “As we have improved our coontennea- se^So^irit Advisory CounaL whose members “Nor have we in Paris, where the J 

sures, their tactics change. They find a new way be said %all co^ from a widerange of Amen- guard post and the couple of gendara 
of getting at us. can busmesses that operate abroad, as well as main,” he said. “In London, we have no 

-The most recent thin* is suicide attacks ” he F 003 l “ e Department, _ American law en- anything to the facade of the embassy bu 


changing game. ' m^ tnreat togethor 

“Mo^ra^day terrorism started in the 1960s,” Mr. Shultz aonotmeed f ormaucm of theOver- 
be said. “As we have improved our coontennea- Advis ? ry Coun .“ 1 ' whosc nianbers 

sures, their tactics chlmge. They find a new way *■ ^ 
of getting at us. ■'can busi n esses that operate abroad, as well as 

ThlSost recent tlung is suicide atiacfcs.” he tram the Suit Dqwlaait. Amaicm hw ro- 
said. “Wc now arc fa&JilK threat ofsroKone foreMl agmciei. md other foragn pohey 
■ who is wiling to give up his life to get to u&” u. Lu „ 


“Nor have we in Paris, where the Marine 
guard' post and the couple of gendarmes re- 
main,” he said. “In London, we have not date 
anything to the facade of the embassy building, 
either. Two years ago, the metropolitan police 
pnt up a wire fence, but that was mainly to 


H E said that there had been no increase in contact between security officials in both the 
the number of professional security of- public and private sector, to provide for regular 
fleets, who are civilians with special exchanges of information on security devdop- 


The objective, he said, is to set up regular control demonstrators at the rime of the protests 
intact between secunty officials in both the against deploying cruise misiciW in Britain. 

SS2SW *T!raS£tt£f!r£&Sl 

ents and tn reenmmmri nlnns fnr hrtin- nwr. . . *?^lUies and degree of threat, Mr. 


J-JL fleers, who are dvflians with qjedal exchanges of information on security develop- ^ countries and degree of threat”Mr 
training in anri-terrorism methods, until last meats aud io recommend plans for better coor- Reids s^d^fh^nS^l^Sdin^ 
October, wtai the budget for fiscal 1985 pro- dinahon between the US. government and JJ f S^SfiCte iSSSf ?2S£ 
vided funds for recruitment and training. Mr. businesses overseas. Srv* 35 

*uu» _ ^ uuuu ouu ^ „ p . . loose which have been altered would be obvi- 


Fidds would not give overall numbers, citing “Tm sure that, by working together to en- t anv v^ver^u IrS’twJnr I n 

security reasons. hance security,” Mr. Shultz said, “we can be ^ ^“7 «cwer, but I dont want to help 


secunty reasons. nance samniy, mt. anuitz said, -we can oe ’ r 

From 1979 td 1 983, Congress tripled the State more effective in saving lives and reducing the J * , o 

Department’s authorization for security and last dangers of doing business abroad.” Mr. bhultz, who said the department would 

year authorized $361 million in supplemental lo the program to build more secure struc- continue to test new technologies for improving 
funding for emergency security work. tures, 13 new ones are being planned. They are physical security to U.S. missi ons abroad, put 

The department has asked Congress for mon- i° T^ucigalpa, Honduras; Manama, Bahrain; the problem this way in his interview with re- 
ey to recruit and train 141 more security people Doha, Qatar; Kuwait; Mogadishu, Somalia; P°^ms fra - State, the dqiartment’s newsletter: 
for overseas posts, including 77 regional security Muscat, Oman; Dhaka, Bangladesh; San’a, S erv ?ce culturehas taught its 

officers, 31 overseas security engineers — the North Yemen; Amman, Jordan; Damascus: 

men who design, in-itall ana maintain security Djibouti; Cairo, where the Marine security 


equipment ■ — and more U.S. Marine security guard residence will be oepanded; and for a 
gnards for 12 embassies. consulate office building in Lahore, Pakistan. 

Thirteen b uildin g s will be constructed to re- At 35 posts, construction will begin this 
place more vulnerable structures, and the do- spring on longer-term improvements, 
partment has begun work to increase security ai Frank J. Matthews, a public affairs officer at 
141 of the 262 embassies and other diplomatic the State Department, said architects for the 
posts, largely adding a 100-foot (30-meter) air- new UJL mission structures would “go out and 
rounding security zone as protection against study the local environment and try to make the 
vefaidcr bombs. The total cost is estimated ai new buildings fit into the local architectural 
$3-3 billion. style.” 


continue to test new technologies for improving 
physical security to U.S. missions abroad, put 
the problem tins way in his interview with re- 
porters far State, the department’s newsletter: 

“The Foreign Service culture has taught its 
practitioners always to project friendliness, to 
encourage the flow of people into our embassies, 
our libraries and whatever. But we find now that 
the worid has changed, that the library, for 
example, might be subjected to terrorist vio- 
lence. 

“So we have to not so m uc h chang e our 
thinking and our disposition but rather add to it 
an awareness of the danger,” Mr. Shultz said. 
“If we invite people to use the library, and then 
those people gel the idea thauhe library isn’t a 
secure place, then we court trouble.” 



* 4 : ' 


'Vs r -V 



-3FV 






Among security measures taken at 
U.S. missions in Europe to stop bomb- 
ings by suicide drivers are, clockwise 
from above, concrete blocks behind an 
iron fence at the consulate general in 
Frankfurt, a car parked to block the 
entrance to the embassy in Paris, and 
boulders around the grounds of the 
embassy in Stockholm. 


•V.- --S - 


SI. VS' 








"Jv 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 



NYSE Most Actives 


Vo*. Hlaft uo m 

11836 4W «% 
11663 44* 44 

9S a* £ 
'SSSS 
gs g* s: 
ssas »ss 

S S* 

jal W M 

55X1 28* TO 

SS ® am 


44* -3* 

St -* 
££ TS 

25* + * 
a + * 
21* — Ml 
127% + * 
34* -HI 
42 

4* — % 

ax. + * 
29* — * 


Dow Jones Averages 


Previous _ Toto 

Otxn HMh Low Oo** 3 P4X 

India 126347 1270.65 1M545 1266J8 1269.10 

KT ®S ®JS 8H1 SI 

Comp 5T248 51730 50945 515.11 51597 


Previous NYSE Wanes 


NYSE Index 


Prtvflllll Ttdn 

wa iTew zp.m. 

Camp<a)t« 1BA60 104X0 10X60 U4J1 

BS* ’if ^ u «g 

ffli i£53 £3 iSS 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Ippw Jones Bond Averages! 



Pm. 

Today 


dose 

Moan 

Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 

7191 

6947 

7595 

73X5 

70X0 

76X2 


OocJhwd 
Untfansod 
Total Ihm 
N ow HMo 
Now Lows 
Volume up 
volume down 


3 

its ™ 

1 m 7 


March 2? . 
March 28 . 
March 27. 
March tt. 
March 25 - 


-included in Hm soles nouns 


ur soles *s»ti 

167,649 455,989 5330 

174445 44Xffl 1409 

174567 427382 l.TO 

171AM 461,8*3 953 

184431 496434 1114 


Monday^ 

N1SE 

3pjm. 


VoLanpM , 75J2MW 

Pm.3 PJA.vol._- IUHM 
Pm conoDdsted dose 12UKM 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on wall Street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issuei 
How Hlahs 
Now Lows 


1 » 
tf US 



Industrials 

Tronsp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


masdaQ jndex 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Tronsp. 


JtaS ABO A« 
27941 gxw 

“SSSSiS 

- m2 »lto 

26147 210® 

- §133 

25730 228.19 



AMEX Sales 


AMEX Stock Index 


3 P.M. volume 

Pre*. 3 PJVL volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


6X00400 

'■ 4 S 8 SS 

ll/BUw 


Previous Today 

High Low Close 2 PM. 

22941 227JJ9 22949 22946 


12 Month 
HMlLow Sjgdt 


23* IMS AAR 48 16 14 
20* 9* AGS 9 

18* 10% AMC* „ __ „ 
17* 13* AMF JO IS 39 
43* 24* AMR ... » 

20* IS* AMR Of 2.18 107 
14* 8% APL 40 

67* 44* ASA 240 34 
27 16 AVX 32 14 H 


S* 3PM.,. 

MOtHMlLaw OuQtOl'W 


- " ■} as if 


NYSE Volume Is Picking Up 


13 ID* W* , 

- m s« 

t,,Tft7 40 3? _ 

« a n “ SS &=* 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The New York Stock Ex- 
change was s taging a moderate advance early 
Monday as investors studied new evidence of a 


cators would most likely help the market, he 

Said 

Hie bond market, he said, seemed to be 
slower in responding to economic indicators. 
Peter Furrnss, of Snearson- American Express 


S3* 36* AWLob l3S 24 16 T79S ®% 52* »*+* 
25* 16* Ac^Ml 44 1.9 18 W®® ?f£_ w 

= ™ AC owe * “ ’g JS 32? 5?= 2 


17* 15 Ada Ex tllolM 
30 11* AdroMI J2 14 

19* E* AdvSvs Jit 74 

41* 25* AMD , _ 

12* 6* Advert .12 13 


76 1496 14* 16*— U 

7 7 18* 18* 18* 

17 27 11 10* 10*— * 

14 12n 33* 31* 33*+ * 


-*fesa?sfisa- wmassas 

3J4 to 127032 two hourc before the close. 1 ’SSSIFZ&Z SSSt™ 


Gainers held a 7-6 edge on losers among NYSE- 
listed issues. 


a cautions atmosphere prevailing. 

Economic reports are stOl contusing, he said. 
“We know we have continued growth,” he said. 


S’g&L - “-IIP?*: A s^of corporate purchasing executives njUfti act as upbear” as many analysts had 

gj n* SSCtt txtrtu * raj si* S% £* + * found several signs that the economy set a 


IF* AlKWB 120 34 19 3M 33% X 


Si'* Wk Allard ! JO 25 11 4» 48* g* g* ^ 
24* 13 AlrtiFrt 40 2.9 11 294 21 20* 2D* + * 


2 * 2 * 2 *-* 


“LrasSs ^sa” S is If if*; g*± H hase . dm !!± markn Its Aerospace Division 

fl&'£S2flb85 it ^Tvl Maich * “ at *• bcsm ' nE— 

aIST ijS U 10OT Ae National Association of Purc b aa ng MIDDLETOWN, Ohio ^ocolna,mov- 

fiSSSK S 13 1J Managers said the numbers of participants re- ing to restructure itself m an effort to recover 

S 1*1 24 3 ? 4 f^^^S+Mi pOTtiimincreases in new orders, production and from three years of losses, said Monday that it 
Ataim 140 SJ 14 S S* 22 ^ inventories ah declined last month. The Com- was adding its aerospace equipment division to 

ahopv? 2 3 L£ 5 1 ? , f 5 gj + merce Department reported Monday morning the list of subadianes to be sold. 

that newfactory orders dropped 02 percent m Armco. a diversify steelmaker tesed m 
£!£S 5 m 3 !u ” ^la'iSMJS February. However, the figure for January. Middletown, has aheady soU. ns West Virginia 
Ajfcgi uutaUfl 435 X S which had originally showed a 0.9 percent drop, coal operations and announcedm 19 84 it would 


ii i* i* i* 

II 30* 30* 30* + W 
28 7* 7 7* 

41 U 12* 72*—* 


tfrWmZJSl % Armco Planning to SeU 

article is based on the market at 2 PM __ T. A fUiTrci/in 


1SS '1* uSuir 1 ” 7 3" mb XU ’I* wi+ « slower pace in March than it did at the begin' 
I?* rn 4 X 23 20 as M. n ;„. nf the vear. 


ii*. 2Wi Alum H 12 S5 "SSL S£+ 2 

34 U 23 Mi Alccvt 1^0 AA 70 3919 24 Vfc 2 S 4 b 25 w ▼ JJ 

rrssis^: :4SiS=« 

89* 6«S aSSoo 2J«2431 ** ^ 

2B* IB* Alfllnt 140 f2 146 27* 2&n 27 + * 

5T 24* JlfoW US M 9 1687 3?E 3« 3I*T* 
3? 15* AllonG 40b XI 13 1« l»* 19* 19* 

40 * 28 * A 1 WCB 6 140 B 1 l» ^2 6V*— * 

62* S3* AldCouf 6J4 0-9 97 S 

i^,ss* sssrftfi ^ 

SBSTfiB air x. 


13* 5* AIIUOi 
3S* 24 AUjCpI 
27 20 ALLTL LB4 49 

40* 30* Alcoa 1^ X5 
27* 15* Amax JO 1.1 


120 34 11 551 34* 34 


183 7* 7* 7*+ * 

4 31* 31* 31*— * 
31 26* 26* 24* 


27* 15* Amax JO 1.1 648 18* 18* 18*+* 

i5* « s» s s * ^ ifir,s;+,* 

2* I* AmAor . 2J7 2 1« i*— * 

19* 15* ABakr • 74 18* 18* **— * 

n ctS AB?Srt 190 56 10 499 6W6 69* 69* - * 
mi . 24k ABTdpf 175 1QJ 12 27 2 W* 2Wfc 

ITS A%££ 1 M 1J I* 1035 mw 1»-2 


was revised toanhicrease of 0^ percent sell its insurance and leasing businesses. Last 
While recent data pose uncertainties for the Wednesday, the company said it was cutting its 
earnings outlook, analysts said, they could also work force at headquarters by 25 percent ^ _ 
be read as a positive portent for interest rates. Armco smd Monday that it planned to sell its 
Volume on the Big Board came to 63.29 Aerospace and Strategic Materials Group and 


26* 19* ABIflM 
25* 19* ABusPr 


J6 3J 13 
44 XS 15 


15 25* 25* 25*— * 

16 36 25* 25* + * 


33* 25* ACapCv 6J60Z1J 20 30* 30* 

56* ACwf 1J0 34 12 1131 52* n 


W* 40* Am Con 290 54 11 411 ^ g* O* + * 

2T Z* 25S "d iS 22 S* 22 + * 

S „ S ISt » S»=8 

^ 190 34 | 1131 ^ 

21* 15* ACIPW 2J60105 0 2706 21* 31* ^ , 

44* 25 Am Exp 1J0 10 15 3519 42 41* 42 + * 

So T* 44b U 13 413 20* 26* » +1 

30a 19* AGfiCp 1J0 34 9 2420 »J»l|inj+Vi 
12* 6 AGrf Wt 38 11* 11* 11* 

83* 58* AGfllPfBS90o7J 6 7Wl 78* 7H* + » 

67 44* AGn |pf 3JS 5J I gf « « “ » 

62 40* AGn pf D 244 45 206 58* 57* 58* + * 

32* 25* aStB \M S 9 J 31* 31* 31 1 * 

13* 7* AHOlS) _ .. . 87 W* 10 10 — * 


market, which was wavering Monday morning kntte Haskins & Sella, noted a qualification 
and for much of last week, was probably re- about Annco’s final audited 1984 financial re- 
sponding to concerns about a weakening econo- salts, filed Monday with the Securities and 
my. Any economic strengths forecasted by indi- Exchange Commission. 


12* 6 AGrtWt 38 11*11*11* 

83* 58* AGfllPfB5J0o7J 6 78* 78* 7B% + * 

67 44* AGn |pf 3JS 5J I gf « « “ 

a * 

J&4 RtttSSo 290 *7 «uS SS»Slk=J 


62* Amrfeh 640 84 i 


B39 34* 34 34*— 2* 

872 B2* 81* 82* 


3 52 AlnGrp 44 4 18 716 73* 72* 72*— * 

112* AlS* 545 46 15 MMXU* 

3* IB* AMI -72 28 12 8219 25% 24* 25* + * 
a, 3* AmMot 81 1796 3* 3* 116 

65 27* SStSa 222X4 12 152 65 64*64*+* 

O* M* ApfSw y*t 3J 4 2«n 34* 31* 32TJ-1M. 

13* 5* ASLFIn 4 74 _4* 6* ,6* 


ANtRss 222 X4 12 152 65 64* 64* 

APrmW 941 23 4 2080 34* 31* B* 
, ASLFIa 4 74 6* 6* 6* 


18* 12* A5LFI Pf X19 159 262 13* 13* 13* + * 

U 10 AShta JO 6J 14 « 13* 12* 12*—* 


16 10 AShlp 

35* 22* AmShJ 
S6Y1 26* ArnSloi 


56* 26* AmSIor 44 19 9 172 

^SrSSS^258i§ i7 i1 
^tSfitSTSpfSSig 17 77 ^ 

38 31* AT&T pf 174 1G2 2 

26* 13* AWWrs 9 22B 

65 35* AWal pf 143 22 

12 10 A Wot Pf US 114 IQ 

20* 20V. AmHotl ua 11J 9 157 
68 S3* ATrPr 6J3* 94 9 

11* 4* ATrSc 2 

79* 58V, ATrUn 6J3o 84 3 

33 26* Ameren 140 5A 7 1 

35V, 17 AntesDs JO 4 18 2D1 
96* 60 Arrmpf 592 54 26 

29* 21* Ametek 40 39 U 224 
28* 18* Amfue 73 

16 8* Amfesc 4 120 

38* 26* AMPS 92 22 17 1617 

26 13* Ampco 90 XI 19 435 

21* 12* Antreps 7 If 


40 69 14 40 12* 12* 12*— * 

140 5912 206 70* 30* 30* + * 
44 19 987254 S3* 53* + * 


I Pi. 

64* 64* 64*— * 


a Month 
HMlLow Stock 

39 20 

23* 19* 

32* 29 
26* 13 
M 22 * 

44 26* 

40* 23* 

40* 25* 

16* 12 
21 13* 

17* 15* 

21* 14* 

29* 23 
58* 35 
7* 6* 

50* 44* 

IB* 12* 

65* 47* 

20* 12* 

11 * 2 * 

IS 10* 


Sts. 3PM. 

plv, YldPE WBsHWiLmr QuotOrVe 

112 LI I 21 38* 38* 38*— * 

247 109 1 23 23 23 

195 129 11 32* 32* 32* 

90 i 10 32 21* 21* 25+Jh 

196 34 IS 115 27* 27* 27*— * 

140 24 17 1331 4516 43* 44* +116 

140 29 8 282 37* 36* 2714 + * 

48 14 16 570 35* 35* 35*—* 

44 34 36 70 14* 14* 14* 

40 44 7 34 16* 16* 16*+* 

2.16 129 9 1716 17* 17* 

12 25 17* 17* 17* 

144 4.1 20 362 26* 26* 26*+* 

140 29 7 870 52* 52* 52*— * 

35 8.1 B 6* 4* 6* 

540ol 19 52 49* 49* 49*+* 

44 64 12 513 14* 14 14 — * 

240 44 11 1344x 59* 59* 59* + * 

92 27633 132 19* 19 19 — * 

27 4* 4 4*— * 

2.10 1X9 10 1116 11* 11*— * 


157 22* 21* 


2 

66*+ 16 
11 

htx 


33* 24* 

111* 60* 

50* 27 CIGNA 240 £2 50 102 
31 23* CIG Pf 295 99 01 


1400 XI 13 122 27* 27* 27*— * 
,00 


4936 49Vs 4W4 

i L i a|!r " " ml*- 

4416 34* CPC Inf 220 53 11 *90 42 41* 41* + * 

23* U* CP Nh 1-40 64 9 40 21* 21 21*— * 

27* 18* CSX 1JM 44 ■ 34M 23* ZJ* S* + £ 

40* 22 CTS 140 24 126 35* 35 35*— * 

12* 7* C3lnc ,, 32 2 V, 1* 9 W 

33* 22* cabal 42 39 9 166 78 w 28 2S* + * 

13* I* Caosar 16 9M 13*13*13* + * 

19* 11* CalFxd 92 19 7 7H 17 1W6 If — * 

47* 32* Cal Fa pf 495 104 40 45 44* 45 

n* 13* CallS. 95b 19469 298 IS* IS* 18*- * 

g * n* Camrni .12 4 113 14 Wh 13*— * 

* 15* CRU1B 40 531 2V* 2M6 21*— * 

9* 398 CmpRs .161 .32 «6 jTf, 4*— * 

72* 54* ComSp 290 X4 13 Ml 2* » »* +>* 

45* 2B* CdPoco 1.40 111 SS £5“ 5 

21* 14* CanPEB 90 125 20 * 20* 20*— * 

222 U6* CopCltS 90 20 302 213*710 212 —1* 

40* 30* COPHItf 194 39 11 477 40 47H 40+ * 

14* 10 Caring 0 M 23 11 10* 10*— * 

40* 24* CarHsto 142 Z9 10 Iff 36* 25* 35*— 1* 

26* 11* Coro Ft 40 19 10 246 MH 22* £* + * 

27* 19* CarPw 240 99 7 833 27* 27* 27*+ * 

23* 19* COTPpf 247 124 3 22* O* «*— * 

48 35* COTTK X10S6 9 87 37* 37 37* + * 

11* 7* CflTO J07 9 14 47 10* 1016 10* + * 

44Vi 30* CarsPIr 190 24 7 5 41V. 41V. 41V6 

32* IB* CartNw 192 49 ID 79 27* 27 27 — * 

34* 19* CartWI 92 14 12 117 33* 33 33*— * 

16* 9* CascNG 190 74 0 165 16* 16* 16* 

17* 9* CostICk 1463 12* 11* U*— * 

31* 15* CstICpf 114 7 5* 21* 27*— * 

51*8 28* CatTOT 90 14 1158 XI 3Z* 32*+ * 

27*6 16 Ceco 96 13 11 4 22* 22* z?*— * 

94* 62* Celofuo 440 49 9 436 93* 92*8 «*— * 

40* 34 CBlanpl 490 119 2 39 38* 39 

IS 7* CaflOy n JM 9 23 « B* 8*8 M8— * 

41* 32 Clfltet 248 19 9 139x 4CA8 40 40J8 „ 

26* 17 Centex n 10 231 22* g* gu— * 

23* 17 ConSoW 102 X« 7 8025 23 22* 23 + * 

,26 16* Cenhud 244 104 4 153 26* 26* 26*+* 

. 23* 18* CoolILf 292 99 9 1W 34 23* M + * 

IB* 1416 COI1P5 140 Hi 7 270 18* 18* 18* + * 

24 17* CnLaEI 196 89 7 24 24 ZJ* 23* 

13* 7* CoMPv, 140 139 5 136 10* 10* 10* + * 
22* 14 CnSova 44 15 n 1458 23* 22* 2M8 +1* 


a* 19 AmStti 140 59 8 
39* 25* Amxfod 140 43 12 
4* 1* Anacmp 

3014 19 * Analog 18 

30* 19* Anchor 148 44 
42* 24* AnCIOV T 92 39 2D 
12* 9* AndrGr 90 IJ U 

23* 16* AnOellC 96 24 11 


4 120 10* 10 10*+ * 

J2 29 17 1617 32* 31* 32* + 96 

JO XI 19 435 14* 14* 14*— * 

7 19 15* 15* 15* 

40 59 8 19 27*27 77 — * 

140 43 12 99 37* 37 37 — * 

254 3* 3* 3Vi 

18 a 24* 26* 26W— * 


a 26* »* a*— * 

194 23* 23 23 — * 

37 40* 39* 39* — * 
4 11* 11* 11* 

87 19* 19* 19*— 18 


57* Anhous 240 23 11 675 80* 79* 80 


SB 45* Annou pf 340 63 
a* 13* Arrlxfr X 1J 18 
a* 13* Anta 940c 
16* 8* An mem M J 14 
15* 10* Arttwv 44b 39 4 
14* 9* Apache a 24 12 
2* * AuChPwt 

19* 15* AocRP un2JD0ell4 


31* 27* ApPwnf 4.10 1X1 _ 

29* it ApPwpf X80 1X7 7 30 38- 30 + * 

39* 17* ApIDfn 1.121 X9 16 23 28* 28* 2£8— * 

21* 8 AppIMb 258 56 13 1Z* 12*— * 

21* IS* AfchDn ,14b J 15 1643 21* 21 21* + * 

22* 14V. ArtzPS 240 119 7 4680 23* g* 2?*— * 

29* 23 ArlPpt 398 124 8 28* 28* 28*+* 

97 79 AriPpf 1090 11.1 121b 96* 96* 96* + VS 


63 31 57 57 57 

14 18 107 15* 15* IS*— * 

3 15* 15* IS* 

J 14 U 14 13* 13*— * 

39 4 14 12* II* 11*— * 

24 12 96 11* 11* II*— * 

121 1* 1V6 I* 

U> 226 1M6 17* 18* + * 

111 7 32 31* 32 + * 

U 2 30 30 - 30 + * 

X9 16 a 28* 2H* Iff*— M 

258 56 13 12* 12*— * 


12fb N* ** 


23* 


40 

1.9 

0 

52 

20% 

2D* 2D%+ * 

24 4L 

16 

Ark la 

1X8 

5.1 

17 

547 

Zl* 

21% 

21% — % 

% ArlnRt 




16 




13% 

IQ* Armada 



36 

8 

12* 

12 

12* 

21* 






1294 

8* 

8* 

B%— * 

29% 

18 


110 114 


11 

19 

18* 

11*—* 

24* 

l5H ArtttsRft 

M 

14 

7 

69 

2044 

2048 2TO8— * 

38 

32* Armwin 190 

34 

9 

74 

33* 

33 

33 — * 

35 

2V* Arrow pf 395 104 


100E 36 

36 

36 +1 




190 

AX 


23 

30* 30* 

30*— % 

26* 

13% AnwE 

90 

1J 

8 

67 

15* 

15* 

15*— % 


16 


92 

.9 


62 

25 

24% 75 + % 

ZJ* 

14 

Arvlns 

40 

34 

8 

172 

21% 

TO* 21% + * 


833 27* 27* 27*+ * 
3 22* 22* 22*— * 
87 37* 37 37*+ * 

47 10* 10* 10* + * 
5 41* 41* 41* 

79 27* 27 Z7 — * 


1» 33 3Z* 32* + * 

6 22* 22* 22*— V8 
436 9j* 92* 92*— * 
2 39 38* 39 „ 

40 B* 8* •*— * 
139x 40* 40 40* 


S4>4 34* Anrinpf 240 44 
32* 17* Axarco 
31% 20* Ash (OH 140 59 
39* 31* AshlOpf X» 10.1 


I a SO so « 

576 26* 26* 26*— * 

1262 29* 29 29 — * 

24 39* 39* 39* + * 


61* 45* AsdOG 240 43 10 145 58* 57* J7%— * 

25* 18* Alhl am 140 XI 9 30 20* 19* 19*— * 

25* >9* AlCyEI 248 TOO B 187 24* 24* 24* 

52* 40* AH Rich U0 61 8 3407 49* 48* 49* + * 


S 32* AHReof 395 1X4 

125 97 AH Red 240 24 

70 11* AIHhCp 

33* 18* AODQf 40 14 18 

46* 29* AutoOt 42 14 a 

27* 15* AVEMC 40 24 13 

39* ZJ Avery 40 14 14 

15* 10 A violin 8 

41 27 Avnot 90 19 IS 

25* 19 * Avon 240 94 10 

35* 18 Aydln 12 


175 TO4 lOr 36 34 34 — * 

240 24 3 118 117 118 +1* 

10 14* 14* 14* + 16 
40 14 18 224 24* 24* 24* + V. 

42 14 » 541 44* 43* 44* + * 

40 24 13 10 24* 24* 24*— M 

40 14 14 82 33* 33* 33*— * 

8 72 14* 14* M* + * 

90 19 15 OO 33* 32V. 32* + Ik 

2X0 94 10 1149 20* 2D* 20* + * 

12 42 22* 22* 2218+ 18 


a ID* BMC 40 14 
25* IS* BalfTICS 90 14 
ZJ* 15 BkrtnH .92 59 
24* IB* Baiclor J6 14 
2* * vIBcleru 

2 BWU Bf 
28* OallCp 1JB 29 
23* 11* BellvMf JD 14 
15 7* BallvPk 


4 US 111 12* 12* 12* 

90 14 12 111 30* 30* 30*+* 

.92 59 15 HI 16* 16* 16*— * I 

J6 14 IS 0 73 22* 22*—* 

42S 1* 1* 1* 

4 6 5* 4 +* 

JO 29 12 3747*47 47 — * 

JO 14 1136 IS M 14*+ * 

11 45 TO* 10* 10*— * 


41* 30* BaltGE 390 74 7 1220 41 40* 40*— * I 

30* 21 BncOne 1.10 XV 10 188 28V* 27* 2HV, + * 

5* 3* BonTox 79 3* 3* 3*— * 

62 39* Bandog 1J0 XI 12 33 57* 56* 56*— * 

47* 79 BkSas 240 3J 6 746 44* 45* 46 + * 

53* 43 BkBOl Pf XlSolOJ 1 50* 50* 50*—* 

41 26* BkNY ZM SJ 4 583 38* 30* X*— * 1 

26* 15* Bnkvas U0 U I is 2 25* 25*+ * 

a* 14* BiUcAm 192 XI 11 3473 li* IN 18* + * 

92* 40 BkAmpI X19B1I9 14 43* 43* 43*+* 

16* 11* BkAm pi 248 99 15* 15* 15* + * 

32* 23* BkARtV 240 79 11 54 30* 30* 30H— * 

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To Our Readers 

Because of the seven-hour ti 
between New York and Paris 
New York and American 5 

Wes in this edition contain 

P.M. New York time. Over-the- 
prices are from 2 P.M. New York 
an stock prices. US. futures 
other items are from the 

We regret the inconvenience, t 
sary to meet distribution reqi ' 
dons will again cany closing 
after April 27, when Daybgbt 
begins in the United States. 


25% 15* FrptMc 40 34 16 3173 
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FniMPf 2-00 7X 
Fuqua 40 19 



Where Will You Be 
Without Gold If The 
Dollar Drops Again ? 

The “almighty dollar” today is 
not quite so almighty. 

Its recent fluctuations on foreign 
exchange markets may be just a 
hiccup. Or the beginning of the 

greenback’s long-awaited decline. 
Whichever the case, Krugerrand gold 
bullion coins are your best 

protection against currency 
instability. 

Can you think of a better refuge 
when the dollar is in doubt? 

Ask your bank or broker about 
Krugerrand gold bullion coins. 

International Gold Corporation 
Coin Division - 1, rue de la Rdtisserie 
CH - 1204 Geneva - Switzerland 



krugerrand 

j Money you can trust 

Please nous that lntimutional Gold Corporation 
does not provide a buying or selling service. 


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GMMnMftna PJ2 OTC stock p.15 
nvMMfls f.12 omof mnrktn . P.» 


TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


. FUTURES AND OPnOiiS 

U.S. Soybean Market Is Hit 
By Dollar Strength, Rivals 

Bj ELIZABETH M. FOWLER 

New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK — The market for soybeans, one of the 
world's leading sources of protein and edible oil, is 
confusing analysts, commodity brokers, farmers, pro- 
cessors and foreign nations. Richard A. Loewi, senior 
grain and oilseed analyst for Pnidential-Bache Securities, calls 
the market “tricky — tenderly tricky, that is,” meaning it is 
volatile. 

Kyung EL Lee, a idee president in the commodity division at 
Paine Webber Who handles domestic and foreign commercial 
accounts, calls it “the toughest market to predict” Walter Emery, 
director of research for the Commodity Research Bureau, says, 
"Nobody wants to hold inven- 


BmliQKSribmifc 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


tones because nobody knows 
where prices axe going.? 

One of the problems seems 
to be that the soaring value of 
the dollar has caused foreign 
buyers, such as Japan and 
some European nations, to 
turn away from the United 


Interest rates 
are adding 
uncertainty 
to the market 


Steles, the world’s largest pro- 

dneer of soybeans, and place orders in Brazil, or Argentina, or 
hold back from purchasing altogether. 

Both South American nations, faced with enormous interna] 
financial difficulties, have begun to harvest what appears to be 
record crops — 16 million metric tons for Brazil and 7 million for 
Argentina, equivalent to about 46 percent of the 49.4 million 
metric tons produced by the United Stales last faD. 

According to Mr. Loewi and others, the UJ5. dollar would have 
to drop 30 percent to make soybeans in the United States 
competitive with the South American crops. 

Soybeans, when pot through a crushing process, yield soybean 
meal, which goes to feed livestock, and oil, which goes into a 
multitude of foods. Recently there has been a rally in soybean oil 
prices because of relatively strong demand, but a lack of buying 
of meal for feed. Both Bunge Corp. and Cargill Inc, two leading 
grain companies, recently closed some crushing plants because of 


poor profit margins due to low meal prices. 

A DDING to the uncertainty in the market is the direction of 

Z\ interest rates, which affect the cost of carrying inventories, 
XT*_and the price of Malaysia palm oil and other oils that 
compete directly with soybean oiL 

Another important factor is whether the Soviet Union will 
place any major orders. The Russians have been large buyers of 
U.S. com and wheat but so far, Mr. Lee said, have done "nothing 
much in the way of confirmed orders for soybeans.” But Mr. 
Emery noted that Oil World, a trade publication in Hamburg, 
West Germany, recently predicted that the Russians would be 
buying soybean o2 “pretty soon." 

“The fanner's game plan nowadays is to get at least S6 cash for 
Ms beans or wait,” Mr. Loewi said. Some have already protected 
themselves by selling futures contracts earlier against their crop 
at higher prices than that, he added. However, as the planting 
season gets under way, many farmers will face cash flow prob- 
lems, and "we anticipate a surge of farm selling in April,* Mr. 
Loewi said. 

On Friday, the May contract on the Chicago Board of Trade 
dosed at $6.05 ft, down from $6.0714 Thursday. The contract has 
ranged in price from a low of $5.7044 early in March 1985 to a 
high of $7.97 in June 1984. 

“I can’t talk about the otrtloojc for May delivery prices because 
of the Brazilian situation,” Mr. Loewi said. 

The next delivery month after May is July, of which Mir. Loewi 
said: "My perception is that we will get down to $5.25 to $5.50 a 
bushel (35 liters) in terms of July, which now is selling around 
$6.18” 

"Soybean exports have been lagging 10 to 15 percent behind 
last year, while com and wheat exports are ahead of last year,” 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL ]) 


Currency Rates 



S 

f 

DJUL 

Ff. 

IU- 

Otar. 

BJ=. 

2F. Yea 

Amsterdam 

I486 

42*5 

112*4“ 

34.94* 

0.1748 

— 

tlUW • 

13215 “13&52V 

Bnmatstal 

P-M 

74*1 

20.1275 

6*9 

33543“ 

17*445 

— 

227135 24*0 * 

Frankfort 

1091 

SUH7 

— 

>277“ 

HLA.X 

BB*25* 

4*67“ 

11BJM*13265* 

LOMhMttt) 

1.2223 

— 

2*195 

11*995 

2420*3 

43013 

76*25 

3328 308.115 

Milan 

1.97.400 

2J4&J0 

*38*0 

209.11 

— 

565*7 

31728 

75330 7*6 

NMYtrKd 

— 

1334 

1114 

9*925 

1,982*0 

3*13 

62*5 

2633 S2*5 

Parte 

9*31 

11*05 

IM 

— 

4JI2X 

27059 

15.177“ 

3*022 17615“ 

Tokyo 

250*5 

>1X31 

8231 

24-95 

1290“ 

73*2 

4HB*7“ 

97*6 — 

zertefr 

2*305 

X2157 

B4J3“ 

27.711“ 

0.1326 

74.915* 

4305* 

1*395“ 

1 ECU 

071*4 

05874 

22349 

4*212 

1*2530 

25317 

44*582 

1*975 191302 

1 SDR 

0-969707 

0*034 

3*5918 

93393 

1.954.18 

24501 

61*518 

25925 247*74 




Dollar Values 




% 


Par 

i 


Par 

f 

P«r 

B»te. 

UJ* 

Eoalir. 

carmw ^ Bw}y a-tew ^ 


0302 taMlNl 1X245 

00*58 A«irin idmnwi 21 J4 
ami a utl anfin. franc 6ZS0 
BJJ14 cawritaK 1-3471 
sum Dntt krone 11.10 
0.1551 FlMWi markka LUT 
0*072 GrMkdnsckm 13X40 
O.I2B2 Nona Kona 5 7.7995 


13X17 

HOOK UraaUiMkai 
U0U KdmiHI tflimr 
03W Mftlnv. rlnsatt 
0.1114 Non*, tan* 
0*542 PDB.0W 
0*051 PUrtoscodfl 
0*772 Saudi rival 


04515 Unaware* U15 
05198 5. African rood 1*24 
000130 S. Korean woo B4V*0 
00058 SMR.MMta 17130 
01112 Smo krona MM 
0*253 Taiwan * 39*4 

00344 TMboM 27.225 
0*723 UA£.dlrbam 24725 


tSMUna: 1*1*5 IrUftC 

lol Cammwrtial Irene (tl AmowtteneoOed In buy one pound Id Amounts naaMi to buv one doUor(-) 
Unltx of 100 (x) Units of 1*00 {vJlMft of 10*00 
HA: not oribMi KAj not ovotkAlo 

Scorers: Honour do Bmatux (Brussrtsl; Banco Carnrnrrdalt ttaUana (Milan); atomical 
Bank (Now York); Bonauo Nartancdt dr Parts (Parts]; IMF (SDR); Bonaus Arabs st 
tn f rmatkmalr tnnvrsHssrntrM (dinar, rival. tBrttom). OHtrrdato from Rautan andAP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


sum FtMcn 

Dollar P Mark Frooc Stniloa Franc ECU SDR 
1M. BW.-aib5H-5«5*<‘5n.l3ft.-n'M>im- l lMiVK-M an, 
2M. aaw-aw, 594 -51k 56k - 5 Vj Uk.-13h 1034 - lWk 9>*w-ltm »\h 

3M. H - fh 51k - * 5 hi - 5 6k 13 K - 13 K lOTk - II 10 -lOKiMk 

iM. 115 -Ih 4 -4Vk 5 66 - 5 66 126k - 12V, 11 h. - 11 96 10 -UMBIk 

1Y. 8 16 • IWk DU - 6 Ik 56fc - SVk 12 - 12W 11H - 119k lOVk- 10 66 96i 

Ratra asclicaMr fa iatmrbank dmasltrofS] million minimum ler aaulvatral). 

Seurats; Morgan Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FF); UoyrH Book (ECU); Rwutmn 
(SDR). 


Asian Dollar Rates 

1 mo. 2 moo. 

m -an n -9 

Sourer: Rrutrrs. 

^ Key Money Rates 

1 United States ch» 

Ottawa! Rato 8 

Federal Funds **> 

Prlma Ram lOVk 

Broker Loan Rate W* 

Comm. Pour. 30-179 days 070 

3-manHi Troasury Bill* S.14 

i^rwnWi Tnooary Blili BJ3 

CD's 3V5t don MO 

CD's 6M9 davi BJ5 


Same. 
196 -916 


Caws. 
996 -916 


>r*v. Britnui 

B Bank Bom Rate 
816 Call Mow 
10M 91-dav Tromurv Bill 
91k Unonth inrtrtw n fc 

IS) Discount Rate 
ISO Coll Momv 
045 <64ay Irtltrtwik 


13(6 13V, 

13 14 

121fe 126k 

12 15/32 UK 


5 5 

6 5/14 4 Vi 

A M 


West Germany 

Lombard Rate 
OvtrrUflM Rate 
On Mantti interbank 
3-monMi interbank 
interbank 


IntorvanHui Rote . 
Con Monty 
Ofte-montb interbank 
Trnaiid intarbcnk 
frmantn interbank 


un «» 

6*0 S 95 

AM 5*0 
6.15 6.15 

&35 6JS 


10VS IW 
1036 Wk 
1066 W6 
1M6 10% 

10 7/16 10% 


Gold Prices 


Sourcrt: Rrutm, Commmbank. Cre<St U* 
onnots. Lloyds Book. Book Tokyo. 


AJJL PiL CkTte 
Hoot Kano 331425 32135 —MS 

Uncombouro 32840 - -150 

Paris 025 kilo) 32464 32435 -4.92 

Zirdcti 32175 32US — 8*0 

London 32*45 3H.1V — SIS 

Now York — NA. — 

Of) Idol fJxHws lor Lamtao. Paris and Luxem- 

bourw oaonlrte and etosteo prtCB tor Hano Kano 

and Zurich, Now v ark Came* cwrmi eonlrad. 
All Prices la uA* por own. 

Sourer; Rrutrrs. 


FCA Posts 
Losses in 
Quarter 

Problem Loam 

Are Blamed 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Financial 
Corp. of America, the parent of the 
largest savings and loan association 
in the United States, reported 
Monday that it had losses of $512.1 
million in the fourth quarter and 
$590.5 million for 1984, mainl y be- 
cause of writedowns on loans and 
real estate. 

The annual loss was one of the 
largest ever by a U.S. financial in- 
stitution. Continental Illinois 
Corp., the Chicago bank holding 
company, lost $1.09 billion last 
year. 

In the fourth quarter of 1983, 
FCA earned $56 3 million, or $ 1 . 1 8 
a share, and its full-year profit was 
$172.5 million, or $5.u a share. 
Fourth -quarter revenue rose to 
$880.6 million, a 22-percent in- 
crease from $721.8 million. Full- 
year revenue climbed 79 percent to 
$3.28 billion from $1.83 billion. 

FCA had said in March that it 
opened to post a Joss of $500 
million to $700 million for 1984. 

FCA, the parent of American 
Savings & Loan Association of 
Stockton, California, said it in- 
creased its loss reserves for loans 
and real estate to $421.6 million, up 
from $97 million in late January. 

Meanwhile, in a filing with the 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion, FCA said it had been advised 
that the SEC intends to investigate 
lending practices under the man- 
agement of Charles W. Knapp, 
who resigned in August under pres- 
sure from federal regulators. FCA’s 
chairman, William J. Popejoy, said 
the company also is beginning an 
investigation. 

Last week, a group led by Mr. 
Knapp offered to purchase most of 
FCA’s problem loans and then to 
allow FCA to receive 20 percent of 
all profits from the resale or other 
disposition of properties securing 
the problem loans. 



Nakasone Is Said 
To Offer die U.S. 

New Concession 


A newly buflt pedestrian mall In downtown Lyon. 

Lyon Revamps Its Business Image 


By John Burgess 

Washington Pan Service 

TOKYO — Prime Minis ter Ya- 
suhiro Nakasone has riven private 
assurances to the United States 
that one or more Japanese em- 
ployed by a U^. -affiliated compa- 
ny would be named to an influen- 
tial council that advises the 
government on telecommunica- 
tions policy, according to an in- 
formed source here Monday. 

Meanwhile Monday, measures 
designed to reshape Japan’s tele- 
communications and tobacco in- 
dustries went into effect. These 
steps were part of a long-term pro- 
gram initialed by Mr. Nakasone to 
sell off government corporations 
and open industries to foreign com- 
petition. 

The company from which an em- 


advice will be considered seriously 
once it is received. 

The Japanese government has 
said that though its laws do not 
require prior publication of draft 
rules, as U.S. laws do, it would 
make strong efforts to see that for- 
eign companies can m ake their 
views known. 

With the latest move, Mr. Naka- 

Unit^Stams" that^e b^serious 
about opening the Japanese market 
and reducing the U.S. trade deficit 
with Japan, which last year came to 
$37 billion. 

The panel in question is the advi- 
sory council of the Ministry of 
Posts and Telecommunications. 

Japanese officials prepared 
Monday for further telecommuni- 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

LYON — Lyon, France’s second-largest city, 
which is perhaps better known for its gourmet 
cooking than anything else, has a major program 
underway to turn the city and its surroundings into 
an international business center. 

The effort represents the resurgence of a tradi- 
tion dating bade to the 16th century, when Lyon 
was a European center of banking trade and 
silkweaving Even as Paris subsequently solidified 
its role as the center of France's political, business 
and cultural life, Lyon cultivated its fiercely con- 
servative, independent and pro-business character. 
That also reinforced the city's reputation for bring 
stodgy and hostile to outsiders — an image that 
locafleaders reject 

"What you may bear about us as being closed 
and unfri endly is very simp ly depasse,' 1 said Fran- 
risque Collomb, Lyon’s mayor and an indepen- 
dent conservative in the Senate. He is currently 
helping to direct the development program with 
the city's chamber of commerce ana industry, the 
regional government and business groups. 

"Our goal is to build on our past traditions and 
develop a regi onal metropolis here that is highly 
international and oriented towards business activi- 
ty,” added Mr. Collomb, who also owns a small 
manufacturing company based in the Lyon area. 

Drawing on its annual budget of 2 billion 


French francs ($212.7 million), the city is complet- 
ing a 1 1 -kilometer (seven-mile) extension of its 
subway and budding sdemific-rcsearch centers to 
have close links to local industries. It is encourag- 
ing business expansion and for rim investments, 
mainly from the United States. On the cultural 
side, mere are plans to refurbish the opera house 
next year. 

The latest projects complement a more ambi- 
tious development program started in the 1960s — 
the most important in Lyon since the end of World 
War IL In the program, slums were pulled down 
and hotels, hospitals, highways and the subway 
network were built. An international airport, an 
international exhibit complex and a business cen- 
ter. known as Part-Dieu, which also contains a 
modern railroad station, were also created in that 
program. 

"We are still evolving but that earlier phase in 
the ’60s firmly established the hardware,*’ said 
Jean Chernaia, director of the Association pour le 
D6veloppemeni Econonomique de la Region Ly- 
onnaise, known as Aderly. The association is help- 
ing to finance the latest development program. 
"Now we are focusing on the software, which 
means working on creating a sophisticated envi- 
ronment, mainly far business and international 
organizations,” added Mr. Chemain, who also is 

(Continued on Page 17, CoL 3) 


ployee would be named to the advi- cations talks after a special U.S. 
sory council was believed to be emissary sent to Tokvo to seek new 
IBM Japan, a wholly owned sub- concessions left Monday for Wash- 
sidiary of the U.S. computer con- ingion to report to President Ron- 
glomerate, International Business aid Reagan. 


Machines Corp., which is a major 
figure in the td ecommunica dons 
industry in Japan. 

The move is meant to help an- 
swer U.S. deman ds that foreign 
companies be given more say in the 
debate and drafting of Japanese 
government rules on telecommuni- 
cations. The United States bad 
pushed for appointment of foreign 
nationals to the bodies. But Japa- 
nese law specifies that members 
must be Japanese. 

The United States has long con- 
tended that in telecn mminifcarinnfi 

and other fields, roles devised by 
Japanese ministries without foreign 
input are a prime means by which 
Japanese companies are given an 

unfair ndv antap* 

Getting a voice on the councils is 
considered an important first step 
in assuring the openness of deci- 
sion-malting. If a precedent is es- 
tablished in triecommumcations, it 
might spread elsewhere, it is felt 

However, the key question to 


Commerzbank '84 Profit Hutchison Says Net Fell 12% in ’84 

T DvHvavi • By Dinah Lee who is chairman of both compa- corporate history, with the 2.9- 

x il Iffff * » 1 ' " 9 tom }/ International Herald Tribune nies, replaced Lhe chief executive of lion-dollar purchase of 34 DM1 

.JL " HONG KONG — Hutchison Hutchison, John Richardson, with of Hongkong Electric Co. To 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 


As annfttinrffd, the bank said it 
was leaving its 6-DM dividend un- 


By Dinah Lee who is chairman of both compa- corporate history, with the 2.9-bB- 

; ■ ' - International Herald Tribune nies, replaced Lhe chief executive of lion-dollar purchase of 34 percent 
HONG KONG — Hutchison Hutchison. John Richardson, with of Hongkong Electric Co. To pay 
Whampoa T aL , a leading Hong a former Jardine Matheson Hold- for the purchase, Hutchison used 
Kong trading, property and ship- mgs executive, Simon Murray, as profits from its sale of shares in the 


A-NvrpnoT r^TTimpn chanced on declared net orofit of ping-serviccs company, earned net group managing director. tunnel company as well as a large 

profit afttr wu7m billion .5imdma±ct rumors that Mr. U shm of its Sou dollars in caS 

lion DM in 1983 At its Mav share- Hon 8 Kon S dollars ($131 million) had found Mr. Richardson’s man- reserves, and was able to limit its 

hofde*f i° l®°4> nboo 1 12 percent less than agement too conservative, Mr. bonowingtoaboutabilHondol- 

banks to disclose 1984 eanungs, Holders mcetm&_ ^mmeracaalt 1QRr . ahnm , , Murrav set about streamlining lars. 


FRANKFURT — Commera- changed on declared net profit of 
bank AG, the first of the three 263 million DM, up from 213 mil- 
leading West German commercial lion DM in 1983. At its May share- 


said Monday that group operating 
profit feO just below 1983’s recora 
result but nevertheless exceeded 1 


will seek approval to issue 500 mil- 
lion DM of participation, or profit- 
sharing, certificates — instruments 


Murray set about streamlining lars. 


The profits were achieved with- Hutchison’s activities, selling off . The company 
out the benefit of the currency- Hutchison’s 21 percent stake in exposure to si 
translation gains of 233 milli on Cross-Harbor Tunnel Co. in Janu- Murray also sail 


The company plans to reduce its 
posure to ship-chartamg, Mr. 
array also said. He said that this 


rr.. -~r ■ thfll nZUmt advantMts both to translation gams ot Hi million ijoss-naroor i unnei sjo. in janu- Murray aiso saio. ne said mat tms 

^ tocSSidto tte baSd?, Mr. 4911mm ;^(m lb; company 1 , tty, md moving ahetd wilh lb» was pqi on the sole ri the ram 


Lota interbank rates on April 1 , excluding fees. 

Offtricd fixings for Amsterdam, Brus*efc, Frankfort, Milan. Paris. New Vorfc rates af 
2 PAL 


the bank’s expectations. 

Dresdner Bank AG and Deut- 
sche Bank AG are expected to re- 


investors and to the bank itself, Mr. 
Sdpp said. 

Commerzbank’s shares on Mon- 


port similarly strong operating re- day climbed to a peak of 165 5 on cording to the company’s chair- percent of Hong Kong’s container dollar loss for 1985. 

♦ his week tile Qrrwt Fvrhino- r . J 1 J1J mr.i e i_: 


suits this week the Frankfurt Stock Exchange, be- 

Commerzbank’s chairman, Wal- fore closing 20 pfennigs down from 


ter Sdpp, said at a news conference Friday at 164.50. 

that priority was given to malting ^ ^ ^ pr<3specls ^ 

good for another so^dyesu^ 1985. 
and strengthaung raaves m the Hc railtioned< however, that the 

bank raustreckonwitha diminish- 
mg interest margin, which declined 


to 32 "problem countries” amount 
to about 5 percent of the bank’s 
business volume of 125 billion DM 
($40.85 million). 

The bank’s reported risk provi- 
sions for 1984 were 510 million 
DM, compared with 645 million 
DM the previous year. 

Mr. Seipp, following general 
practice among West German 
banks, declined to specify group 
operating profit, which is the sum 
of the bank’s net interest income, 
commission fees and gains from 
trading on its own account less run- 
ning costs and excluding extraordi- 
nary items. Group operating profit 
for 1983 was previously described 
by Mr. Seipp as being “markedly 
above 1 billion DM." 

Parent bank partial operating 
profit, excluding own-account 
trading, fell 8 percent in 1984 to 
635 million DM from 690 million 
DM a year earlier, Mr. Seipp said. 
He added that trading on the 
bank’s own account brought a re- 
sult equal to that of 1983. 


(Gontinmed on Page 13, CoL 1) 


To Our Readers 

Because of the seven-hour 
time difference between New 
York and Paris until April 27, 
lhe New York and American 
Stock Exchange tables in this 
edition contain information 
from 3 PJtt New York time. 
Over-the-counter stock prices 
are from 2 P.M. New York 
time, Canadian stock prices, 
U.S. futures prices and some 
other items are from the previ- 
ous day’s trading. 

We regret the inconvenience, 
which is necessary to meet dis- 
tribution requirements. All edi- 
tions will again cany closing 
prices and indexes after April 
27, when Daylight Savings 
Time begins in the United 
States. 


m a n , Li Ka Slung, the property volume is handled. "We have five ships on 10-year 

entrepreneur. "It could be argued that the con- charter and we’re chartering them 

Mr. Li’s mai n holding company, tamer terminal is more important on short-term contracts at a lower 
Cheung Kong (Holdings) Ltd., re- to Hong Kong than the airport,’ (Continued on Page 17, CoL 3) 

ported Monday that its 1984 net said Mr. Murray Monday, adding^ 

profit after tax dropped by nearly that although he had not yet decid- 
49 percent, to 213.5 ntiffion dollars ed whether to proceed with a pro- 

from 408.8 miTTinn dollars. The posed third terminal far Hatch!- ■M^^T3TT3I73 
1984 figure was before an extraor- son, “the existing terminals’ use is 
dinary loss of 112 minimi' dollars expanding at an annual rate of 5-6 


U.S. specialists were expected to 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 1) 


DoUar Genercdfy 
Up in Europe 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — The dollar rose 
against most currencies in quiet 
European trading Monday, re- 
covering slightly from three- 
month lows reached late Fri- 
day, but weakened ma rgin all y 
against the Deutsche marie 

Gold was quoted in London 
at a late bid price of $319.75 an 
ounce, down from $330.00 late 
Friday. 

The British pound fell to 
SL2223, compared with $1,236 
late Friday. Other late dollar 
rates, compared with late Fri- 
day’s rates, were: 3.091 Deut- 
sche marks, down from 3.093; 
9.431 French francs, up from 
9.427, and 2.6305 Swiss francs, 
up from Z62. In Tokyo, the 
dollar dosed at 250.85 yen, up 
from Friday’s 250.75 yen. 


ARGENTINE 

REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL U.S. $ BONDS 

AND 

B0N05 NOMINATIVOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

Enquiries to: 

00-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Rue de la Paix. 
Telex: 25869. 

Tel.: 021/20 17 41. 


The year marked aggressive go." 
chang e for Hutchison, in which In Februaiy, the company con- 
Cheung Kong holds an estimated eluded what was billed as the big- 
40 percent. Last August, Mr. Li, gest agreement in Hong Kong's 


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I IV1IVIL. — .-r-.- — --- ' — - — m 

(BLOCK CAOTALS) I 

ADDRESS: - — . ( 

I - 

__ __ 













Mondaq& 




3fun. 


Tables include Hwj 

up to the dosing o n Woll 5 jreet _ 
ami cto not reflect late trades eUewtiero. 


PE HMtHMlLlW art-CWj 


U.S. Futures M««h29 



HWl UJW OSH CIO, 


Grains 


230 

43 

38b 23 

JO 

13 

34 

3 

238*164 

3* 

L5 

40 

13 

140 

S3 

32 

13 

L72 

LI 

U0 114 



■88 
140 
40 
1J>0 
I 54 12.1 
172 M 
132 7-S 
110 44 
XOr 4 
100 114 
40 24 
572 LI 
40 10 
232 04 
407 124 
40 1-5 
125 70 
110 11 
JO 15 



industrial* 






s nt 

55V. 40% 
55% 44% 
2740 19% 
37% 30 
67% STM 
27% 2 JUi 
AMU 56% 
VPU 23% 
29% 25% 

w 


12 4704 52V* 52% 52%+% 


10% 

35 25 

A3 50V. 

® 9% 
6% 

10 AH 
70 55 

57 44 

ZOM 15V. 
W. £2% 
25 10% 

A0V. 2A 
5A«i 33% 
28% 16V. 
32M 22% 
32% 21% 
21 
40 
34 
43V* 

64 
14% 

15% 


M • s 

*“ 3 

17 ‘ £ 

i5B H 

2113 * 

31 

IB 653 
SOI 


82% 32% 

m m 

22V. 22 
2* 3% 
24% 24% 
3% 2% 

32% >1% 
12% 11% 
20% 20% 
4 3% 

10 10 
41% 40% 
72% 72% 
73 73 

00% «OH 
62% A2 
19% 19% 
39% 39% 


»* 1% 

92% 




SOM 

58% 

to 

to 

54 

54 

4% 

10% 

4% 

10 

14% 

12% 

MM 

12% 

13% 

a 

109b 

11% 

10% 

11% 

26 

25% 

27% 

12% 

27% 

12% 

43 

17% 

42% 

17% 

54% 

19% 

62 

64 

64% 

54% 

19% 

42 

At 

*4% 

W% 

76% 

3% 

59% 

76% 

3% 

10% 

7% 

10% 

7W 

14% 

MH 

16% 

25% 

15* 

24% 


m 




239 

84 

.92 

23 

40 

33 

38 

38 

14 



45 

14 


43 

J8 

X* 

148 

XI 

146 

u 

138 

4X 

230 

5.1 

248 

I2J 

JO 

1J 

36 

U 

30 

XI 

140 

74 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

g* eg 

ss as a ss ss 

6SJ0 M40 Oct 44.15 6430 

47J15 61*0 DK 45.10 6542 

as 4415 Fab 6545 ALAS 

EASotOS 2M09 PlwSate 12312 

prov.DavOPtnhrt. A1014 o«38 
FEEDER CATTL* (CMB) 

•isr'°25r£ r as jj- 

7235 4455 MW 49 JK W 

7170 6640 *«» 7125 

run 67-M s*i> nug 

7232 67.10 Oct 7030 Tfl-jS 

7120 4905 NOV 71 J5 7131 

Eat. Solas _1 516, 1W. SfflTO. >3» 
Prav.DovOpanlnt. 1AS24 up II 

HODS (CMS) 

w^asrjfr ss «* 
§5? as iff ss as 

5^37 47 jo auo oa na 

5£ ss §2= as gs 

as ss s? ss 

EASolw 

Prav. DOV Opan Int. 26381 01*420 
PORK BELLI EStCMB) 

3LO0Q IbL- cants par Kk _ _ 

tOM 61.15 MW 7130 7335 

*147 6115 Jut 7422 7430 

mm Atm 72-BO 72 J9S 

754 a S» «!r H» na 

7540 7040 MOT TSJffl 75.33 

76J00 70J0 Jul 

Eat.Solat 6^, Pw.Solas <J72 
Prov. Dov Opan Int- 123H up» 


*537 +30 

67 JO +J3 

66.17 —00 

64.12 +36 

*530 — JS2 
M« — .10 
66J5 —32 


tt -* 

as =| 
as =5 


4435 —38 

49-57 —-«5 

51-37 —90 

4L30 —35 

4L90 —55 

49 JO —20 
46-AD —30 

4U5 


7132 -L6B 
72-57 —135 
7&®J — 1J&3 
7537 —28 

7530 
7535 
75.10 


Financial 


sagg er 


n 


coffee currcscm 

37Jbou»^ cants parra. 

15230 12231 MOV 14230 14430 


14938 12130 Jill MA01 1 

14750 12730 Sap 14225 W3 ; 

14435 129 25 Dac M23£ JO-95 , 

lSS 12630 MOT MUD 14230 

14130 13130 MOV 

MOJO 0530 JPl 

e st. sate* xnp hw»ML»n 

PrWv. Day Opan int. U,WP offW 
5USARWORLO 11 CinrCSCNJ 
1 12300 iol-omw par m 
1030 i» Mov fS tJS 

935 335 Jul jU" 434 

9J5 AW Sap 4.15 4» 

935 420 OCt 427 441 

735 Ul JDI> 43 |3 

o-r. <m Mar 5.12 5-17 

7.15 545 Mar 541 |39 

639 547 Jul _ 549 S4» 

Eat. Sato* AW JJWJlS’TL J£S» 

Prav. Dov Opan Int. 04353 uP3Si 

COCOA (MYCSCEI 

"^■"sartt M* «g 
«g \i2 i& SS 

2337 1945 Dac 21J2 25 

2190 W55 Mar 2130 2110 

2130 I960 May 

205 IWO JW _ _ -u. 
EiLSohm Pw.Sala* 1564 

Prw. Dov Oaan Inf. 27,907 up 47 


London Metals 
April 1 


14130 14443 
141.90 14434 
14130 14330 
14130 142.70 
14230 14230 
14135 
14035 


CnmmodBv Indexes 


332 3JB 
139 430 
431 4.10 
431 431 
445 445 
535 53* 
535 

549 549 


2442 24*9 

2244 2251 

2212 2225 

21 SO 2154 
2M5 2150 

2158 
2150 


Market Oil Me 


2* In * [TML12 ZOSO 


^ksalaoriicMoni 




46% 33% X*n» 330 64 17 2094 4«J gA *Wi + % 

51% 4514 Xaraxpf 545 1L9 7 «% wh w 

29 19 XTHA 44 24 10 170 27» 26% ■" 


a.a»|sa ’s s J a 
Ikgji's 6 « ” ^ H Uts 

31% 21% zSriln 132 4110 *77 27%27%27% + % 


Oam Pravtow . 

RM A* EM A* 
ALUMINU M 

—i non 

toward 92430 91730 91130 

COPPER CATHODES, tit Wl Orwtaj 

“5"" wr ^yHSa 1.1SLD0 1,14530 1,14630 
fonmrd l.inS U7430 1,16530 1.11*30 
COPPER CATHODES CSWnvtpnO 

^ I " W TSSo TO L 1S430 1,12730 1.13930 
tonranl LlSSo 1.17430 1.15530 l.U030 
LEAD 

053# 29730 29030 

(onward 31430 31 LSD 30 LSI MJK 4 

NICKEL . 

Sy** 'SSSSoljTOJIQ 4J9X00 430030 
fenrand 4^30 431030 433230 433330 
SILVER , 

rtncopartmywact n*^ 

tonword 54730 54930 S3 554S5 

TIN Uliim t B J ) 

"y** l ** r 7*S« h ?4903Q 943030 943530 
SSLord 9 SS ?55oS 943030 943530 

ZINC 

^^pwmawete. M 

Snwnrd SESS mS 73030 71130 

Savrco: AP. 


London Commodities 

April 1 


CtoM Pravlaw 
Hiok li» M « W ** 

StWltnepW^iMblC 2 jQ12 2326 2329 


45% 28% QuakOs 134 2A 13 1 276 4SV. ffl* 44—1% 
TO 90% QuaO pt 936 103 !9? +1 ,. 

22% IS auaLSO J» 14 27 l« S» ™ 72 — % 

11% 4% Guana* » sa Otb 9% Jgg 

a Quaxtor 140 47 a 42 34 33% 33%— % 

£2 M ovnad J«a 13 19 114 23% 23% 33% + % 


XX 








m 


tW3- 








Canada to Reduce Levies 
On Some EC Exports 

Reuters 

BRUSSELS — Canada bas agreed to reduce 
import levies on certain Europran Community - 
exports in an anempt to defuse a dispute 
brought about by Canada’s restnctions on foot- 
wear imports, officials said Monday. 

Canada will reduce tariffs over one to three 
years on 17 products imported from the EC to 
compensate for bruits on boots and shoe im- 
Dorts. The EC had already prot«ted_ to the 


the restrictions, which mainly affected I talian 
shoes. Originally imposed in 1977, they bad 
b ee n dne to run out in November 1984 but were 
extended by Canada for a year. 

EC officials said Canada, which argued that 
the damage caused by the restrictions was only 

a fraction of the EC’s estimate speed to reduce 

the price level below which the quoUK would 
apply. They would n ot give details of the proa- 
nets covered by the agreement 
The EC is still involved with Canada in an- 
other dispute over beef exports. Officials smd 
the EC Commission on Monday was to submit 
to GATT a list of retaliatory mosaics over 

pla^ to restrict EC exports to 2,7<KJmetoCWM 

(2,970 short tons) this y“S “®“P^ mth 
20,000 metric ton exported in 19M- 


Asian Commodities. 

April 1 



DM Futures Options 

March 29 


5 2« 277 149 B36 041 095 

3 fjj 114 246 LM 131 ~ 

23 RW 144 2.11 l.to 147 — 

S «» iu! - 247 17J - 

Pnvi : Thun. onL &U4 e04d M. I/Jfii 
Sourcm: OH£ 


U^. Treasury Kfl Rates 

March 29 


Paris Commodities 
April 1 


KM LOW Bid AM ChU* 

F^nmwnMb* 

Mov 1J52 1328 1350 1352 +14 

» }g S ES IS il 

SS ISi 1%- 353 if ig 

'eSi. voU "iao fc& rt 50^* . Png- oeto* 

tatu: 2380 lots. OMfl bitaml: Z1J20 

^*75r&* =«o 23« -ar 

NT, N.T. 2.160 XI 80 -IS 

NtaV fLT* kTtI Xl« — UltOi. 

J 3£l vt*L: "i«‘ M8 of lO^p: aeturt 
■Sm: 121 Mi.Oo«i Mtarnt: 730 

COFFER 

24» ZS*S +» 
M n!t: K:t: 2410 2430 +» 

S K nx N 8 “5 il 

mSt M. NX XSM tew — 

e*L VOL: o lot* 0» 1 bronw. octwoi iota*: 
19 loti. Oowi MiorMt: 178 
Source: Bonne On Common*. 


New Consumer Credit 
InU.K. Fell in February 

Remen 

LONDON — New consumer 
credit advanced in Britain in Feb- 
ruary by specialist credit grantors 
and retailers slipped back to £1.02 
faillioo (SI .26 bulion), seasonally 
adjusted, from a record £1.17 bil- 
lion in January, the Department of 
Trade and Industry said Monday. 

Government officials said credit 
advances remained high, but fell 
back from January's record level 
after the new year's special sales 
and the further increase in Interest 
rates in February. The February 
leading figure was the second high- 
est on record. 


Cash Prices March. 29 


Dividends 


CNWomr Pot AnU P«* Iwe 

USUAL 

Amor Ham. Supply 9 ■£ fcvl £?* 

Clear Care Q 39 5-15 4-J* 

Prod. Op erator* O ■« 

Ramon Purina Q 35 6-7 5-1 

A- Annual; M M oa H ri »; <MtuarWnr; S-Mnh 


Company 

Eanungs 


Ravanus and profit*, in riffion*, 
an m local currandes unless 
otherwise ii denied 



East German Swims to West 
BERLIN — A 22-year-old East 
German man escaped to the West 
on Sunday night by swimming 
across the Spree River separating 
East and West Berlin, the police 
said Monday. 


lies 



4 Swim Dwm Avalanche 

The Associated Press 

SION, Switzerland' — Foiir 
young Swiss were killed in a snow- 
slide m the V alais Alps on Sunday. 
The number of dead fins sea*® 
from avalanches in SwHzeri&flti ^ 
4S, a 15-year high* 



















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


Page 13 




BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


2 Hospital Groups to Merge in U.S. 




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By Todd S. Purdum 

JV<w 7orir 7imo Senice 

NEW YORK — Hosjital Corp. 
of America, the largest U.&. hospi- 
tal management chain, and Ameri- 
can Hospital Supply Cotp,, the 
largest distributor of hospital sup- 
plies, have agreed to merge: 

The merger, announced Sunday, 
comes in a elirnatg of increasing 
consolidation in the J400-fa21ion-a- 
year health-care industry in the 
United States. Since 1980, accord- 
ing to a Standard & Poor’s survey, 
more than 400 oT the 6,800 U.S. 
hospitals have joined larger cha ins 
and multi-hospital chainc now ac- 
count for more than 30 percent of 
the total hospitals. 

At the same time, hospitals have 
been scrambling in the last two 
years to cut costs, spurred by 
changes in Medicare regulations 
that provide reimbursement on a 
fixed-fee schedule, and by new cor- 
porate health insurance plans that 
discourage long hospital stays and 
expensive procedures. Partly as a 
result of the cost-cutting, demand 
fox hospital supplies has shrunk 
and suppliers have suffered. 

Hospital Corp. and American 
Hospital Supply said the merger 
would allow them to provide more 
cost-effective care in an increasing- 
ly competitive environment. It 
would link the 4 22 health-care fa- 
cilities owned or managed by Hos- 
pital Corp. with American Hospital 
Supply, which makes or distributes 
130,000 medical products, includ- 
ing catheters, blood oxygenators, 
heart valves and surgical instru- 
ments. 

“The economies of scale of two 

West German 
Bank’s Profit 

(Continued from Page II) 
last year to 161 percent from 164 
in 1983. 

Downward pressure on the inter- 
est margin and rising administra- 
tive costs during January and Feb- 
ruary this year kept parent bank 
partial operating profit about 3 
milli on DM short of the result of 
2/I2ths of the previous year, Mr. 
Seipp said. 

Another area that could temper 
optimism, Mr. Seipp said, was the 
growing nwnhw of bankruptcies 
seen in 1984, particularly in the 
construction industy, and expected 
to continue in the current year. 

Mr. Seipp said a decline in the 
general levd of West German inter- 
est rates depended on investor ex- 
pectations of an appreciation of the 
Deutsche mark. As a means of bol- 
stering the mark as an investor cur- 
rency, Mr. Seipp repealed his call 
to create Tree trading zones” for 
Euromarket business in West Ger- 
many. 

The Bundesbank’s response to 
Mr. Seipp’s initiative has been 
lukewarm thus far, chiefly as a re- 
sult of legal complications concern- 
ing minimum reserve regulations. 
The president of the central bank, 
Karl Otto WH, said a review of 
those regulations was in order, not- 
ing at a recent banker’s conference 
that “it would be desirable if Euro- 
business could be repatriated to 
West Germany through modifica- 
tion of the minimum reserve regu- 
lations.” 


organizations working like this to- 
gether is going to help bring down 
the cost of products to all our cus- 
tomers,” said Kari D. Bays, chair- 
man and chief executive of Ameri- 
can Hospital Supply, which docs 
about $125 million in business a 
year with Hospital Corp. and is its 
largest supplier. 

No cash would be exchanged in 
the merger, which was unanimous- 
ly approved by the boards of both 
companies but is still subject to 
shareholder approval Under the 
agreement each share of stock in 
American Hospital Supply would 
be exchanged for three-fourths of a 
share in a new company, which has 
not yet been named. Each share of 
stock in Hospital Corp. would be 
exchanged for a full share in the 
new company. 

Based on Hospital Corp.’s clos- 
ing price Friday of $46,125 a share, 
the combined companies would 
have a market value of $6.6 billion, 
making the merger tme of the larg- 
est in history outside the oD indus- 
try. 

Dr. Thomas F. Frist Jr„ presi- 
dent and chief executive of Hospi- 
tal Corp., would be president and 
chief executive of the new compa- 
ny. Mr. Bays of American Hospital 

thelxiard and chairman of the ex- 
ecutive committee. 

finm its founding in Nashville, 
Tennessee, in 1968, Hospital Corp. 
has grown into the leading U.S. 
operator of profit-making hospi- 
tals. The company, which nad reve- 
nues of $4.1 billion and earnings of 
$297 million last year, is also the 
leading manager of nonprofit hos- 
pitals, and runs 190 Of them, many 


for umverrities- It has operations in 
seven countries other than the 
United States. 

The company owns 17 percent of 
Beverly Enterprises, the largest 
U.S. nursing home operator, and a 
25-percent interest in Scientific 
Leasing, which leases medical 
equipment to hospitals and clinics. 

Because its profit-making hospi- 
tals are run with an eye on the 
bottom line, the company and oth- 
ers like it, including American 
Medical International Inc., Hu- 
mana Inc. and National Medical 
Enterprises Inc., have benefited 
from the fixed-fee Medicare regula- 
tions that reward cost-effiaency 
and haw been phased in since Oc- 
tober 1983. Previously, Medicare 
paid the costs accrued in treating 
patients. 

But suppliers have suffered. Af- 
ter growth of about 15 percent in 
each of the last 10 years, American 
Hospital Supply's revenues rose 
only 4.2 percent last year, to $3.45 
billion. The company, which han- 
dles about a quarter of the U.S. 
hospital amply business, reported 
record net income in 1984 because 
of some extraordinary gains. But its 
operating income declined for the 
fast time in more than a decade, to 
$296.6 mtQion, from $323 J million 
the previous year. 

Besides offering American Hos- 
pital Supply a built-in market for 
its products, the merger would 
strengthen the financial position of 
Hospital Corp. American Hospital, 
based in Evanston, Illinois, has less 
debt than Hospital Corp.; thus, the 
new company would have a lower 
debt-to-equity ratio. 


Pan Am Readies 
Tentative Pact 
With Attendants 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON -Negoti- 
ators for 6,000 flight attendants 
for Pan American World Air- 
ways Inc. reached a tentative 
contract settlement with the air- 
line Monday, a federal media- 
tor said. 

Walter C Wallace of the Na- 
tional Mediation Board an- 
nounced the settlement, saying 
it had come after 27 hours of 
negotiations. Mr. Wallace said 
□o details of the agreement 
would be disclosed pending rat- 
ification by the membership of 
the Independent Union of 
Flight Attendants. 

The attendants had set a 
strike deadline of midnight 
Sunday, but shortly after I 
AJM. EST, Mr. Wallace an- 
nounced that the union and the 
airline had agreed to continue 
talks indefinitely. The «5Hin»» 

said last week that it would fly 
65 percent of its normal flight 
load Monday regardless of any 
job action by the flight atten- 
dants. 

Pan Am is seeking ehauj y s IP 
work rules to make its employ- 
ees more productive and to re- 
duce labor costs. 

The union is concerned about 
job security. One such issue has 
been the company’s desire to 
replace flight attendants with 
foreign nationals on some inter- 
national routes. 


Board of McGraw-Edison 
Endorses Offer by Cooper 


The Assoaated Press 

HOUSTON — Tbe board of di- 
rectors of McGraw-Edison Co. has 
agreed to recommend to its stock- 
holders a “friendly" takeover by 
Cooper Industries Inc. that would 
involve the purchase of all 
McGraw shares outstanding for 
565 each, the companies an- 
nounced Monday. 

McGraw-Edison is an electrical 
and mechanical goods supplier. 
Cooper makes industrial power 
tools. 

Cooper’s tender offer amounts 
to about S1.4-biHion inctudingeach 
of McGraw-Edison’s 16.9 million 
outs tanding shares and areirmp ti o n 
of some S300 mfllion in debt. 

The Cooper offer caused another 
McGraw-Edison suitor, Forst- 
mann Little & Co., to drop its 51.3- 

IacoccatoHold 
Talks in Korea 

Realm 

SEOUL — Chrysler Corp.’s 
chairman, Lee A. lacocca, will visit 
South Korea April 18-20 to discuss 
the possibility of a joint-venture car 
plant in this country with Samsung 
Co., Samsung officials said Mon- 
day. 

They said Mr. lacocca and Sam- 
sung’s chairman, Lee Byung-Chufl, 
were to discuss the venture. 

The operation reportedly would 
involve the supply of auto parts by 
South Korean companies and tech- 
nical assistance by Chrysler. 


billion merger offer. Forstmann 

was offering S59 a share in a 
buyout, whereby a group of inves- 
tors would take the company pri- 
vate. 

At midday Tuesday, McGraw- 
Edison stock was trading on the 
New York Stock Exchange for 
$6425 a share, up 25 cents from 
Friday’s dose. 

McGraw-Edison, based in Roll- 
ing Meadows, Illinois, had revenue 
of $1.72 billion in 1984 and profit 
of $10.8 millio n. Cooper had reve- 
nue of $2.03 billion and profit of 
$10.7 million last year. 


Orders for Manufactured Goods Drop 
In U.S.; Construction Activity Rises 

United Press Tniemananoi 

WASHINGTON — New orders to U5. factories for manufactured 
goods declined in February but construction activity increased, tbe 
Commerce Department reported Monday. 

Orders for production of manufactured goods declined by $500 
million, or 02 percent, to $1 93.5 billion, the department said. 

A 12-percent decline in orders for durable goods -—major consum- 
er items and business equipment — more than offset an increase for 
nondurables of 0.9 percent. The figure for durable goods was revised 
from an earlier estimate of a 02-percent drop. 

In a separate report, the department estimated the amount of new 
construction put in place in February at a seasonally adjusted animal 
rate at $320.6 billion, up from a revised January figure of $3162 
billion. The February rate was 7 percent above that of a year ago. 

Unfilled orders to factories for manufactured goods were up $1.5 
billion or 0.4 percent at the end of February to $357.8 billion, the 
department said. Manufacturers’ inventories increased by $900 mil- 
lion, or 0.3 percent, to $285.7 billion — the first increase in inventories 
since October. 


Detroit Braces to Battle Japanese MutrRange Cars 


3 TV frh Rjinlw Pjrt.SnrrhflrgR 

Reuters 

AMSTERDAM — Three mmor 
Dutch banks, Rabobank Neder- 
land, Algemene-Bank Nederland 
NV and Nederiandsdie Midden- 
standsbank NV, said Monday that 
they wifi cut their surcharge on 
credits and overdrafts to 05 per- 
cent from 1 percent 


By John Holusha 

New York Tima Service 

DETROIT — Hating conceded 
Japanese superiority in low-priced 
small cars — at least lor now — 
Detroit is bracing to meet its adver- 
saries head an in a marketing battle 
over the SIQJXX) car. 

Japan’s relaxing of its auto-ex- 
port restraints, effective Monday, 
came as no surprise to car makers 
in the United States. Detroit has 
used the period of restraints to un- 
dertake the most thorough rebuild- 
ing in its history and has positioned 
itsdf to concentrate on the inter- 
mediate price range, where Japan's 
cost advantages wQ not be so pun- 
ishing. 

Indeed, the cornerstone of De- 
troit's plan for coping with the eas- 
ing of the export restraints follow- 
ing four years of quotas is to buy 
large numbers of small cars in Ja- 
pan to sell under U.S. labels. And 
while the “captive imports” fill out 
its model lines, Detroit’s true test 
will come in the compact and 
small-specialty segments of the 
auto marirrt, where it seeks to 
thwart the Japanese push to move 
“upmarket.” 

“At the low end, Detroit will 
become more a distributor than a 
manufacturer.” said Scott MerHs, 
an analyst with Shearson Lehman 
Brothers. “The next battleground is 
in small luxury and sporty cars.” 

The marketing straggle is pitting 
cars like the Mazda RX-7 against 
such Detroit offerings as the Chrys- 
ler LeBaron GTS, the Dodge Lanc- 
er, the Pontiac Grand Am and the 
Q ld-ynfMe Calais. 

The key customen are the com- 
fortably off young people, the gen- 
eration that bought droves of 
Toyotas, Nissans and Hon das as 
basic transportation and now. 
grown older, has its eye on some- 
thing nicer. 

Auto industry people expect the 
Japanese to cut into Detroit’s share 


of those markets and to start chal- 
lenging European makes si m h as 
tbe lower end of the Audi, BMW 
and Volvo lines. Japanese cars like 
the Nissan 300 ZX and the Toyota 
Cambry are considered strong en- 
tries in the $I2,000-to-$18,000 
price range. 

However, in today’s market the 
small-car category is much less im- 
portant than it once was. Three 
years ago, the low-priced subcom- 
pacts — which now sell for $7,500 
or less — made up 30 percent of the 
market. Last year their share 
dropped to 15 percent. 

Beginning on Monday, Japanese 
imports to tbe United States will 
jump to 23 million cars a year from 
the previous ceiling of 1.85 million. 
The 243-percent rise follows Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s recent deci- 
sion not to press Japan to continue 
“voluntary restraints” on car ship- 
ments. Tbe Japanese government 
imposed the new ceiling to insure 
“orderly markets” at a time when 
industry sources said that exports 
might soar as High as 2.8 million 
units. 

Much of tbe new increase will 
likely gp to the captive imports sold 
byUJ>. companies, so the financial 
impact on the Big Three auto cam- 
parties is expected to be minimal. 

General Motors Corp. already 
sells cars made by the Isuzu Motor 
Co. and the Suzuki Motor Co. as 
.the Chevrolet Spectrum and Chev- 
rolet Sprint Tbe Chevrolet Nova, 
which is to be introduced in June, is 
a thinly disguised Toyota Corolla 
made by GM*s joint venture with 
the Toyota Motor Corp. in Fre- 
mont, Calif omia- 

Chiyslex Corp. has been selling 
cars made by Mitsubishi Motors 
Corp. as Dodges and Colts and is 
seeking to increase its imports from 

that company. 

Ford Motor Co. has no captive 
imports at the moment 

All three companies have ad- 
vanced projects, such as GW’s Sat- 


urn Corp., to build competitive 
small cars in tbe United States, bat 
all are at least three or four years 
from actual production. 

Four years ago, theU.S. automo- 
bile industry was in dire trouble. 
The economy was in a recession, 
more than 300,000 auto workers 
were in unemployment lines, and 
tbe Big Three had posted losses of 
$4 billion in the previous year. 
Chrysler was teetering on the edge 
of bankruptcy. 

At the same time, auto imports, 
mostly from Japan, were capturing 
an ever-larger share of a shrinking 
market. At one point, every fourth 
car being sold in the United States 

ramff from J apan . 

When assistance came in the 
form of the supposedly voluntary 
restraints in 1981, the tacit under- 
standing was that Detroit was be- 
ing given breathing room to rebuild 
financially and overhaul its busi- 
ness to become competitive with 
the Japanese. By all accounts, De- 
troit has fakfm that break to bean. 

Detroit's model lineup is almost 
completely changed from four 
years ago — a transformation tbar 
consumed a staggering $50 billion 
in capital investment. U3.-made 
cars now equal or exceed compara- 
ble Japanese models in fuel econo- 
my, according to U.S. government 
mileage ratings. 

The LI3. industry's financial re- 
covery has been spectacular. The 
combination of reduced costs be- 
cause of more efficient operations, 
modest contracts accepted by the 
auto union, and a shift bv car buy- 
ers back to bit option-laden cars 
produced profits totaling almost 
$10 billion in 1984 for the Big 
Three. The recovery has been less 
robust for labor, with more than 
100,000 fanner auto workers still 
off the iob. 

The U3. industry has also made 
progress on productivity. Reduced 
staffs, leaner inventories, union 
concessions, and more sophisticat- 


ed operating procedures have cut 
the industry’s break-even point 
from 112 million cars and tracks in 
1980 to about eight milli on now, 
according to the government 

Despite the improvements, the 
ILS. industry’s most critical handi- 
cap, its cost disadvantage in pro- 
ducing cars, persists. 

“The Japanese have a $2300 to 
$2,600 cost advantage in small 
cars,” said James Harbour, a De- 
troit-based consulting engineer. 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PBCB AT 27^85: 
As US. DCUAR CASH $1030 

h MULTICURRENCY CASH {1003 

G DOUAR BONOS $1054 

D> MULTKDRR0>CY BOOS $1019 

B STRUNG ASSET £1048 

F0R8GN & COLONAL 
MANAGEMNT (JB5EY) UMTED 
14 MUlDkSia ST8ST,STi*iSVBSEr.CL 
TEL 053427351 TELEX 4192063 

FOR OTHSFSiC FUNDS, S& 
INTERNATIONAL FUNDS UST 





gSMT 


B 



PBUCKUIWB 

SEWN EXKSITVLtORSfflJJWr. 
m TBMM8T SPECIALIST 

fai E ir optw uuvunMi. Variad 
Ui/6»op#an/L*w Anwrian «pra no*. Hu- 
in tretJtrJG*rJ\UtOitiSp. Fonnv to.- 
igi Qfln’a ip on d M O . Vlfafc «i conBdeaa la 

Bn 02141, MwB w l fcrttf Trfton, 
inbLttataM*. 

_ ran MBrMo.ifan_ 


HOUSTON, TEXAS, IIJUL 


For information contact: 

Und J. Wffliram Realtors 
5629 FH I960 W eat. Sail* 210 
IfooMen, T*. 77069. 

TeL: (713) 586-9399. Tbo 387356 


|f Gold Options * x/m.). 


Mar 

A* 

ffa. 

320 

330 

34 

350 

360 

37D 

» 

15011710 

msm® 
7JUMB 
43D-6SD 
306 50) 

3492700 
195031 JO 
isayvm 
novum 

BOM0 00 
A2S-83S 

nmsso ’ 

22352425 

18003003 

isavaoo 

122SU25 

|t.Quaf 4n Mm 
■ 1211 Gnm l. 
iTcL 310251 -T 

07XD-32UB 

MteWeM&A. 

Dhr 

StriaeriMrf 
da 28305 


STOCK BID ASK 

m 15$ 

DeVoe-HoIbdn 

International bv 546 6% 

Gty-Qock 

International nv 296 39k 

Quotes as ofc April h 1965 


Investors seeking above average 
capital grins in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securit ies bv 

Herengracht483 

1017 BT Amsterdam ‘ 

The Netherlands - 
Telephone: (0)3 1 20 26090 1 
Telex: 14507 firco i*l 


Rhein-Saar^Lux-LB 
Balance Sheet *84 


1984 1983 

In Million DM 

Balance Sheet Total 

4*032 

4.021 

Due from Banks 

1.543 

1.181 

Due from Customers 

L049 

2.480 

Volume of Credit 

2.887 

3.256 

Securities 

246 

137 

Capital Funds 

117 

115 


o 


Landesbank Rheinland-Pfalz und Saar 
International S. A. Luxembourg 

SharehoJde/s: 

Landesbank Rheinland-Plati - Gnozenlrale - Mainz. West Germany C74J996) 

Saar LB, Landesbank Saar - Giiozentrale - Saarbrucken, West Germany 125.1 

6. rue de rAfioen Alhenfie. PO. Box 8J. L-U44 Luxembourg, Telepnone A 7 5921-1, Talar - 1 635 rpshj 




1984 RESULTS 


HIGHLIGHTS 

Authorised Capita! 

USS 1,200.0 Million 

Shareholders' Funds 

S 

568.5 M 

Total Assets 

5 

816.3 M 

Loan Balances 

S 

404.7 M 

Equity Participations 

$ 

64.9 M 

Treasury Investments 

s 

298J2M 

Deposits from Banks 

$ 

218.5 M 

Net Profit 

5 

53.2 M 

1 


Total Shareholders’ Funds 
(US$ Million) 


Total Assets 
(US$ Million) 


Loan Balances 
(US $ Million) 


568 


535 




405 


326 



80 81 82 83 84 


8081 828384 


8081 82 83 84 


□krtlaHdl uljLeuiiiLil ohMi*dl riSjutll 

ARAB PETROLEUM 
INVESTMENTS CORPORATION 

P 0 B&x 448. DHAHRAN AfRPORT 31932 SAUDI ARABIA TE L E X 67006# APIC fj 








INTERNATIONAL WEB Am TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


M onday^ 

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Page 15) 


,:s i? 


m 


UTCHISON -Whampoa is one -o £- 
Hong Kong’s oldest and largest trad- 

H ing companies with major, profit cen- 
tres in property, China trade, ship- 
ping-related businesses, engineering, 
consumer products, retailing, quarrying and energy 
supply and technology. 

The signing of the Sino-British agreement has given 
Hong Kong a clearer sense of direction and the 
business community is regaining its confidence. 

The strength and resources of The Hutchison Group 
continued to develop steadily throughout this diffi- 
cult period. 1984 ended with the group stronger and 
better structured than it has ever been, with net 
shareholders' funds at HK$ 5,078 million, negligible 
borrowings and good cash reserves — an attractive 
position in an economy poised for recovery. 

The group’s consolidated net profit after tax for the 
year ended December 31, 1984, was HKS 1,023 mil- 
lion, compared with HKS 1,167 million in 1983, a 
reduction of 12 per cent. Earnings per share were 
HK$ 1.81, compared with HKS 2.54 in 1983. Ex- 
traordinary income of HKS 269 million arose mainly 
from the sale of shares in HK-TVB Ltd. 

The Directors recommend a final dividend of 56 
cents p'er share. This, together with the interim 
dividend of 28 cents paid on October 15, 1984, gives 
a total dividend of 84 cents per share for the year— a 
48 per cent increase in the total dividend paid in 
respect of 1983, having taken into account the 76.13 
million new shares issued during 1984 as a result of 
warrant conversions and elections for scrip dividend. 

In general, 1984 was a satisfactory year for Hutchi- 
son, with most parts of The Group performing well. 
While the depressed conditions in the property mar- 
ket continued until the latter part of 1984, there are 
now signs of an improvement in demand in the 
residential sector. The first phase of The Group’s 
major residential and commercial development in 
Hunghom, Kowloon, will be on the market early this 
month. 

Today almost 45 per cent of Hong Kong’s container 
throughput utilises our container ter minal opera- 
tion, Hong Kong International Terminals. However, 
continued improvement and expansion of facilities 
will be vital if Hong Kong is to maintain its competi- 
tiveness and we are actively considering ways in 
which we can further upgrade our own operations. 

The profits from out trading and retail operations 
have shown a solid increase over 1983 in a fiercely 
competitive market. This has been largely due to 
good knowledge of the Hong Kong market and a 
sales and distribution capability second to none in 
Hong Kong today. New developments include our 
51 per cent owned Mobile Radio Telephone joint 
venture, which will come on stream during the sec- 


HUTCHIS0N WHAMPOA LIMITED 
22nd Bow, Hutchison House, Hong Kong 


Floating Rate Notes 


April I 


Dollar 


Coupon Kaxt BU ASM 


Coapaaimt BU AMU 


ond quarter of 1985 and should provide sound 
recurrent earnings in the future. 

The acquisition for HKS 2,930 million in February 
1985 of the 34 per cent shareholding in Hong Kong 
Electric Holdings, the earlier decision to invest 
HKS 4,000 million on the Hunghom development, 
combined with the growth of existing businesses, 
underline that The Hutchison Group is firmly com- 
mitted to playing an active role in building a stable 
and prosperous Hong Kong. 

Our trading and container terminal businesses in 
particular have good potential for development 

China offers increasingly interesting opportunities 
now that it is committed to a role of growing impor- 
tance in international trade. Hong Kong and Hutchi- 
son China trade have major part to play in this. 

Li K^-Shing 
Chairman 
April 1, 1985 


AHM trouts 
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AttMlrWlD 
Allfad IrbiiParpl 
Arab Bko Cora 19961 
AflonttcFtnlrtlfMl 
BcaConra-UaLM 
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Banco EX Roman 
Bar Dl Sarto SaL 91 
banco PMo 15 
Bank U America *7 
Bk Of Green 91/94 
BkWGr*Kb97 
Bk Of (retard 59 
Bk Of Intend 92 
Bl Montreal ft 
Bk Of Montreal 96 
Bk Of Montreal f! 

Bk Of Now York* 

Bk Of Now Scotia M/13 

MOf now Scotia 91 

Bk Of Tokyo 93 

Bk Of Tokyo 19 

Bk Of Tokyo 87 

Bk Of Tokyo foMB/91 

Bk Of Tokyo «MB/91 

Bk Aimrkn 96 

labanTraill 

Bonbon Trail « 

BonfeorsTruMH 

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BNP9* 

BNP IV 

BNP 61/91 • ■■ . 

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KBwfMoM 

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Boroan Bank Oct M/91 

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CNCAtB/95 

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CEPMEM 



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9* 64 
98. 30-7 
f* 174 
W* 14 
10* +9 
9* 1 24 
W* 114 
ta 394 
9* 314 
8% W4 
9* 9-7 

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9* 154 
9ft 74 
lift 164 
IN 84 
f* 264 
9* 64 
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9* 385 
Bl 31-7 
9* 54 
9* 27-12 
fft 84 
•* 114 
10ft +9 


Crodtt Du Hart 19/92 
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Croat For Eioc 12 
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Flnf Bonk System 96 

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Oa nB nanea 92/9f 
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Hydra Qmbac 85 
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fft ttf 
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9* 294 
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thsm-FJnt Bostort LUL 


597 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 

FOR LEASE 










mmWri # - r 
















35,000 S.F. 


i 


.5> 


OPPOSITE ROCKEFELLER CENTER AT4fth STREET 
PUT YOUR CORPORATE NAME ON THIS LANDMARK BUILDING 

SEVEN FULL FLOORS-PLUS PENTHOUSE ABOVE 

SCRIBNER’S BOOK STORE AND RIZZOU CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS 
O w Ibc i N«ntW0 BricMi «r SbhIoji Maikowliz 
1212) 54UJJ7 • Tdea RCA 2J8-724 
Ejchaiwf Ajcrn 

brickell associates 

I»I AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS. NEW YORK, NY Iona 

SocneniiBck-CMtem Oon>./Miiapnt a^cm 


-'"-r • • - 


























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 



3pm 


- ToMMbKlndel1ie(xittoawid»prlCH 
wto itM dosing on Wai J stmt 
and do nor reflect let* trades rtseurtwra. 


(Continued from Page 14 ) 


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Over-the-Counter 


April 1 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


UFMB 
UtMMI ASf 
USAQwt 
UnlMV JUS 

Unity ll IXOOc 

UnvCm 

UntvRs 

UnvPnl 


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of International Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 


Trib ads work. 


AiSaArs 

Austren 

AlwtiOc 

AuTTrT 

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Autmtx 

Auxton 

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16 14ft + ft 

15ft 15ft— ft 
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3110 39ft + ft 
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2ft 2ft 
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0-50 km/h very quickly. 



' We hope you’ll never see a long queue 
at ari Avis rental desk. Not that.we don’t like 
ibeii^ popular. Wedo. 

,-j Which is why weVe introduced wav's 
of. getting you into f yoiir car. faster than 


Our Avis Express Card for instance. 
AU those tedious questions you’re usually 
asked are encoded on a magnetic strip. 

When we run it through one. of our 
computer- terminals your rental agreement 
is printed automatically. 


But it’s not just our speed that’s made' 
us the largest rental company throughout 
Europe, Africa and the Middle East. (Around 
the world weVe represented in 126 countries 
and more than 1100 airports) 

We may have the only direct world- 


wide computer link in car 
rental. 

• But we also owe a lot 
to those three old-fashi oned 

words. m 

We try harder. I1=J 


AVIS 


Avis features 
Opel cars. 






























































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U.S. Supreme Court to Hear Appeal 
From Japanese in TV-Dumping Case 


Untied Press International 

' WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to 
hear appeals by Japanese television manufacturers in the long* 
runnipg dispute over dumping television sets in the United States. 
The Japanese government had, joined the TV makers in urging the 
court to intervene. ... 

• The justices will hear arguments next tom from a federal appeals 
court ruling that cleared the way for trial on allegations the Japanese 
co m pa n ies conspired to dump low-priced sets in the United States in 
violation of TJ.S. antitrust law. 

National Union Electric Carp* and Te rn th Radio Corp. filed suit in 
federal court in Pennsylvania in 1970 against 24 companies, including 
seven Japanese television manufacturers and U.S. companies that 
purchased Japanese television receivers for resale. 

In 1981. a U.S. district court ruled there was no evidence a 
conspiracy existed. But the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appals, 
reversing the ruling, in December 1983 ordered the lawsuit to t rial 



INTERNATIONAL C 


FIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


(Continued From Back Page) 


SERVICES 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GB&VA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

lovely aparhneng wish mografiectf 
view* of Lob Genera end rooumaro. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


AUTOMOBILES 


LEGAL SERVICES 


BEAumpjuplona* 

ZUBOi 8305S.88. 


Martrev*, Wloa Verbfer. La ftabier- 
ets. Chateau rfQex near Gntaad, Lay- 
on. faeeBart OpporhmifiH For 


ROOM WITH FAMILY or mad oport- 
mort wilh ottasoAd tda of kitchen. 
5*n*Of couple with top references de- 
ar* first ck» PARIS oanvonianity b- 
cond room & both br any 4 to 6 
week period between Juno (swj 5*0- 


NEW MERCEDES 190E 


Bght hand Awn. Optical mdudfc 
if P«ar Htwna «r eon d n aw w, oloc- 
cwtWMrtb Jne sunroof, automatic «ko& win- 
& Doth lor any f to 6 dnmm uhvh • 4r Tmr Iw 


IK IMMIGRATION vara, AIM. SpEot 
& Rodney 1935 Bnckel Av, Man R. 
33129. T4 (3DS) 609600. to 441469. 


tombnr. Goan, soft umundteg* i 
smhd. Detafed in fer rn aii on wfl in. 
ure pranpt reply. LOTMAN, 2100 
So. Ocean Lana. Fort fcouderdole. 


daws, rturmm wfaeb, etc.. Tax free 
ex-Rotterdam. o3 HotEoneb 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


nuns 704 SO 27 
W PA YOUNG LADY 
MuUmguaL 


Price* from SF12&AQQ, 

Liberal mortgages at 6’A% Merest. 

gukTunla. 

Av Men Repot 34, 

CH-I0Q5 loam, Switzerland. 

Teh (211 22 35 1Z Tlxi 251 85 MSJIS ! 

mrihlhfcerf Sana 1970 


Tel: (0)1 0-2*1155. Thu 30744 
AUTO CENTS PETERSEN IV 


Honda 33316. 


Lara, Fort Leuderdde, 


AUTO QMS NETHSEN IV 
W nnflm von ZZ 6, Rot toni um. 



* PARIS 527 01 93 ★ 

YOUNG LADY TUUNGUAL WMA 


SffiONG FURNISHED Wy villa ta 

rent 3/6 months, 6 bedrooms + j*r- 
vans quarter*. Ph« a no abied. ana 
wuthwetf at Pars. Beat 1965, Herald 
Tribune, 92521 NeuAyCedex. France I 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


American 

Pbris 3961. 


Japanese Move Is Reported 


Lyra Graduate School of homos 


(Continued from Page 11) equipment used is Japan's tde- 
comc io Tokyo within days to can- communications network: must 
fer with the Japanese on wavs to meet- 

• . .vr_. - _ . ■ >* « . . , • . av. 


amplify fw^micol standards' that 


Soybean Sales 
Hurt in U.S. 


Standards questions appear to 
be the Last immediate tfnmhling 
block in the t ^M-rvmnmmrfltinnc 


Lyon Revamps hs Image 
As Key Business Center 


CHOOSE 

SWTTZBUAND 

We hove for fomoian. A very big 
choice of boourifuT APARTMENTS/ 
VU1AS / QUIETS in whole 
region of Lake Geneva, Montrewr & all 
fanout mountain rssorft. Very raaiort 


SCHOLAR A WIFE wedi ta Moplher 
apartnxwt on Amsterdam cand with 
your 2-rtxvn Bal, New York Qfy stort- 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAXTBI A YACHT M GREECE. IX- 
rea from owner of larged fleet. 
American management. Excetatf 
er owl, govt, bonded Valef Yochri, 



cy owl, govt, bonded Valef rochn,| 
AU nSnitokUoss ZXL Hraevs, 
Greece. Tefc 4529571. 4»M86. Tbe. 
21-2000. USA offices. Hr Rood, Am- 
bfer, PA 19002. Td: 215641 1624. I 




I. j I -I i 


EMPLOYMENT 



UNLTD, USA & WORLDWIDE. Tel: 
212-7657793 / 7657794 


FRANKFURT. Young lady aampcnioa 
EhaGdv French, Germai spoken. Free 
to trawi 069/44 77 75. 


oWy priced but abo the best end most 
•wduBve. Price from about US$40,000. 
Mortgages at 6WL. PW vwt us or 
phone bem you mala a decision. 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


efore you mala a decision. 

KSOODSA. 


TKA 

THE 

PARS 


CAD ctrr a WINTTnl RAWS NOTE THIS PHONE AT ONCE 
fUK SALE & WAN l tUl 757 6240. Trwtful VJJ». lady, trawl 


(Continued from Page II) 


negotiations, which the two sides general secretary of the chamber of 
have been conducting since Janu- commerce. 


Gty planners are proud that In- 


U.S. companies moving into the 
area or expanding there cite the 
lure of the strong dollar, high pro- 


Tour Groo 4 CH-10C7 Lausanne. 
Td. 21/25 26 11 Tb 24298 SfflO CH 


SWnZBLAMD 


_ ... J Foreigners can buy STlSXO AFART- 

ducctvuy among workers, an ab- j / Oi<u£T. lake g ^eva - ] 
sence of “militant” unions, and ac- 


Negotiators had hoped to reach icrpcA, the internalional police or- 
fmal agreement on the new regula- ganization, decided last month to 


The WTL HBtAID TRIBUNE pAJ0S 

a HeUng far tho fao heodquarten oJJS>IE 5/MCE 
aqiKMad FRANKFURT 

BONN / COLC 

Text Processma / stuttgart 

MUNICH 

Telecommiinfcatioiis 

.... NEW YORK 

Tedmiaan 


(Continued from Page 11) to keep talking when agrecn 
Mr. Lee noted. “I think that the standar ds remaned dusive. 
May soybean contract at around £6 Meanwhile, m Tokyo M 
can be maintain^ and below that ““pantes began regxstenn 
price it could mean buying oppor- the Ministry of Posts and Te 
tunities.” Noting “increasing sis- tPunicattons to set up cw 
nals” that the dollar has probabiv network setyices. Before M 
peaked in value, he said that could such networks were highly r 


tions by Monday but were forced build a headquarters in Lyon it 
to keep talking when agreement on 1 989. Since the end of World Wai 


II, Interpol has been based in 


Meanwhile, in Tokyo Monday, Saint-Cloud, a Paris suburb- Sever- 
mpanies began registering with al other French cities competed for 
e Ministry of Posts and Telecom- the Interpol base, 
mications to set up computer “Getting Interpol proved our de- 


malce current prices of soybeans od - 


0 ppo r - ^ Ministry of Posts and Telecom- the Interpol base. 

□grig- municaiions to set up computer “Getting Interpol proved our de- 
network services. Before Monday, termination and the attraction of 
x could 5UC * > networ ^ cs were highly restrict- this city,” said Mr. Chemain. Inter- 


more attractive. 


Also on Monday Japan’s sole 
telephone company, Nippon Telc- 


pol is expected to spend about 100 
million francs on the headquarters. 


million francs on the headquarters, 
to be built on a 1.4-hectare (3.7- 


Mr Lee said he was doxHv l£lc P bonc company, Nippon Tele- to be built on a 1.4-hectare (3.7- 
watchingSe BradEan harvesS bccamc acre) site^bdng provided to Inter- 

wond^wtehcrBraziliml^ a private compapy aftg,33 years as pol by tte ;aiy under a renmable, 


cess to nearby European markets. 
Other attractions are a celebrated 
university, as well as dozens erf 
technical and scientific research in- 
stitutes. 

“Our students have no problems 
finding jobs — each get around 3 to 
4 offers each upon graduation,” 
said Yves Reale, general manag er 
of the Lyon Graduate School of 
Business, which offers a three-year, 
graduate program in business ad- 
ministration. 

Many bankers, lawyers, govem- 


xSaTS: I *" ccro ^ u * Qtaifid c te wS how: 


LERETS, VBfflIBE. V1LIAK. JURA, ttc- ™ " raBaul nroo °* wu 

MortflaJ^Slfli® intaewt. ■ l!^ 


HOUSTON 
LOS ANG&ES 
MONTREAL 

AGENTS ’ 
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and printers. 



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London. Tot UK 01-381 6852. 


SNGAPORE INTI GWDB. Cat Sin- 
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AUTOS TAX FREE 


YOUNG LADY 

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PARIS 562 0587 


GENEVA 

Exquisite modem vfla with mad spec- 
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word proa* 
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TAKE 

On your new 


also posHsie al SF15£00/raonih. 
Furnished 


mofce fail ' 

terwsce m progr am n w ig for your 
p 11 computers m macro import 
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you take tfi 
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ooiteSy^d astetecoipcfationand.lostitsmo- 100-ycar ka« for a symbolic 1 
moreT hdr crop in advanti Sa "?*** m * dec0nmun,catl0, “ fr ^ s- K 

is known at nnsent That m,,i a VKSS ' The French government docs not 

lead to more nSSases frcwS°lhe In a related step, Japan Tobacco consider Lyon, nor the Rhflne- 
imJJ ^ & Salt Public Corp, which had had Alpes area, as qualified for special 

Urnted States by foreign buyera. a ^^ondiSributionofdgar iaibrei£ suSadies for aSng 

In addition, he is keeping an eye reites, lost it and became a private jobs and other incentives. It usually 
on weather in the United States, company Monday, which is the restricts these enticements to areas 
which has been quite wet recently, first day of (he Japanese fiscal year, with high unemployment, such as 


mem officers and other profession- 
al people are drawn to Lyon from 
Paris because of the high standard 
of living. They cite the fact that 
restaurants in the Lyon area offer 
some of the best eating in the conn- 
try; housing is comfortable and rel- 
atively inexpensive, and there is ex- 
cellent theater and opera. In 



Previous uponence in the newspap er 
industry is fs^iy durable. 


He/ihe wifi manage and expand da 
existing teJeconunixiiooiions, page foe- 
strife network and ATEt text process- 
ing system. 


oi 

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Apply ta . 




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FOR A REAL V.LP. YOUW LADY j 747 59 58 TOUU5T GUIDE. Pare, 


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ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
1 April 1985 

The mtassoT value quotations stawn bJlow are tupolled bvtlw Fowts lilted wife the 


exception of tome foods whose quotes are based on Issue prices. Tbe felloWHia 
marginal symbols btdleaff Frequency of quo tattoos sinml ted for rbe iht: 
{tn-OatTv; iw) -weekly; (b)-M-monttily; (rl-regoiartv; (l)-lnegelartv. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w) At- Mai Trust, iA— 


BANK JULIUS BAER 6 CO. Ltd. 


Ofl LI FLEX LIMITED 
* — (wi Multicurrency _ 


— (wj Dollar Modi am 1 


—Id ) Conbar_ 
—Id I EqttUxmr 
—id) Eauibaor 
— (d)Equlbaer 

={S}SS£? 


. SF 91540 — <w Dollar Lons T# 
SF HBtLOa — iw) Japanese Yen_ 
_ siiokoo — Iw) Pound Sterltas. 
SF117U0 — ^ (w) Deutsche Mark 
SF 1145JM — iw) Durai Florin — 
SF 1037 JM — (w) Swiss Franc—. 
SF 141*00- AB . IKeu .uu,Av 


auibaer Eunwe. 
quiboer Paclllc- 


— tdicsF Fund. 
— td ) Crossbow I 


— td ) ITF Fund N.V_ 


BANQUE 1NDOSUEZ 
— (d ) Aslan Growth Fond.— 
— Iw) Dfveritond— — 

— (w) RF— Anwlco 

— twl FIF— Eunwe 

— Iwl FtF— Pacific 

— (d ) indosuerMuIttbondsA. 
— td > tndosuex MuttlOonds B. 



141*00- ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
SF2U4 PBHSn. The Hague (OniMMn 
SF 110* —td) Sever SeteDOlnpwH-h— 
, S 1X45 PARI5BAS-GR0UP 

— td I Carlexa International __ 

SIDS —twl OBIJ-OM— — — 

SPS305 — tw) OBLIGE5TION 

S1B47 —<W1 OBU-OOLLAR 

S 10J7 — (Wl OBLI-YEFL— ■ ■ 

S15J9 — Iw) OHU-GULPEN 

SI7J5 —Id ) PAROIL-FUND 

S 14303 — fd J PARtNTERFUNP .. .. 
„ — I W PAR US Treowrv Send— 


IMJF 

DM 1.14200 
_ SF 9205 
. SLIOOJ4 
Y1I&9S0OO 
FL HM8.1T 

— S 10144 

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_ S101 03 


Lorraine, in eastern France. 

Aderly is not alone in seeking 
new investments, . however. “We 
compete against DATAR, the gov- 
ernment development agency, 
when it comes to attracting U.S. 
investments to France,” said Nina 
Liebman, trim beads Aderiy’s of- 
fice in New York. “Companies that 
decide on Lyon usually do so on 
the merits of the area’s facilities, 
and their interests.” DATAR is the 
acronynm for Diligation ft l’A- 
mtaagement du Terri toire et ft 

1‘ Action Rfegionale. 

U^. companies that recently 
have announced major expansions 
in the area indude Hewlett-Pack- 
ard Co., a large computer maker. 
Carrier Corp., a maker of air-con- 
ditioning equipment that is a whol- 


addition, living in Lyon means easy 
access to the ski slopes of the Alps. 


CRODC-VAIMBL ST TROPE. Juno. 
BoutiW now vila. fegh dan. uo- 
shara. viaw, 1 ha. aAn,S bodroooB. 
hugs bvmg. Tat Peril 722 6 b 76 


access to the ski slopes of the Alps, 
to the Mediterranean coast, or Par- 
is. 

Executive-search firms say at- 
tracting people to the area is rela- 
tively easy. “The Lyon area is 
unique, mainly because of the ex- 
cellent quality of the living,” said 
Fraxmois Cam of Russell Reynolds, 
a U.S. recruiting firm that is based 
in Paris. “It is easy to get executives 
to go there, but extremely difficult 
to get them out” 

Economically, tbe Lyon area is 
doing better 'than the rest of 
France. During the past several 
yean, the jobless level has been 
falling, with unemployment now at 
7 percent of the work force, com- 
pared to 10.4 percent nationwide. 

Although slightly more than 1 ' 


181. uvenua Chevies de Gaufle 
92521 Neuky-sur-Sema, France 


CHEAT BRITAIN 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


AMERICA 

wo an offer YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 


PARK YOUNG SOPHISTICATED VIP 
tody, trifaoud PA 500 89 72. 


PARIS BIUNGUAL ASSISTANT ta 
bus n«ss executive*. 500 58 17 


LUXURY RJU.Y RJRMSKD new flat. ■ 
1 double bedroom, reception, kddwn ; 
& bathroom, very qutf tocobon. Into- 


■pec BMW 

ranty and 


Muffittagud PA. Ftafa 525 *1 01 


& bathroom, very qunt tocttoon. Inte- 
rior dcsqned- Excellent access West 
End and pty. £175 per weeLIrtdud- 
m^d eaninp . London 01-221 0749 or 


'Wecanalu 

! drive tax free 


We oho supply 
{proof BMWs cn 
'range tax free. 

! loD London 


LONDON. For the bext furnished flab 
and houiaL Consult tho Spedahts: 
Phittp*. Kay and Lewis. Tet London 
352 8111. Telex 27B*6 RESOE G. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

B Av die men In ■ 

75008 Pari* 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGBrfT IN PARIS 

PMOf* 542 78 99 



NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 


ro. Mania for m 

■N1B1IGB4T, COMPETH4T, Sntish r , 9 

■wetay 26, perfect Gernxm. good ^ “SE* 
Spanish random Frankfurt area, COT T 

Meta chance to be more than rust a 1 

Moetary. Hoom write Bax 2127, t™™™* 

K5iiSr d,id, " ' 5 ’ n< “ lta,t w<S“ 


for JMMBXAJt defivery 
BE5TSOVKX 

For Aipptag, InwReica, bond, 
eomranion in USA 


RUTE INC. 

Taunustr. 52. 6000 Frankfurt, 

W Germ, y (ffl 69-232351 . tlx 41)559 
Information My by phono or fefaoc. 


ly owned subsidiary of United million jobs, mainly in farming and 
Technologies Coip., and Wang heavy industry, were eliminated in 
Laboratories Ino. a computer-soft- the Rhdne-Alpes area since 1975, 



i ware company. Half a dozen U.S. 1.6 million jobs have been created. 


companies in such sectors as spe- The new jobs were mostly in rc- 
j oalty chemicals, and electronics search and services, including sc- 


arab LADY 3A Fluent Engfch/ 
French, good preunUion, law de- 
AT HOME M PARIS w* mfergmgjtoilmn with 

PARIS PROMO Labtmon. 

FOR RBir OR SA1E PRIVATE SECRETARY/ ASStSTANT, 

<3 Ava nodre C40 OE EA F r ^nH w i n n JEi mmniitBr 


10 

WnDeBnr 


are considering investments in the counting, finance, consulting and 


Lyon area. 


computer services, according to tbe 


563 25 60 

i bmistions. Sto- 
re, hily aouipped 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— <wj Capital lnt*l Fund .. . 
—twl Capital llalla SA 


SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

• um 17 DevomWr* SaJJHKton-Ol-377-aiMO 

* 12.1* Zftj |hb tat?Grawfti Fund 1 ffcM 


On the financial-institution side, government's National Statistics 
the French-Bdgian Banque Louis- Institute. . _ 


Dreyfus recent^ opened a branch 
office in Lyon, while large, U.S. 
pension funds and insurance corn- 
panes have started investing sub- 



SF 57273 
1M1U54 
S I21JQ 
FL 11841 
SF 87.00 
SF 85745 
Bond.SM. SF total 


Raymond Barre, a former prime 
minister who has been a deputy 
from Lyon in the National Assem- 
bly since 1978 and has made the 


NEW 15* Pare du Expoafiom. Sto- 
dos, 2 and 3 rooms, hJy eauippod 
lotcnon, one day, am wuclc, an 
month or more Contact: RATOTEL 
55 nm sfOrodair l/Gtano 75015 
Forte Tel: 554 97 56. The 2&M6 F. 
fax national pnere. 


6unan 45. oompidor Pxporienco 
i wnridwide Engfeh, Eaitorn Eu- 
an Irenwiges. £wl99l, Herdd 


FHMCTIY BUNGUAL FfonchAineri- 
con woman, hmntmi & fine arts 

tszwtiiMr”** 


riwusss 

£5^^ making SOGu 


Send fer! 
Troreeo 
2030 
Tel 323/5*2 62 40. 


74 CHAMP54Y5SS 8th 


LOMKM. YOUNG MAN. 21, pri- 


stan dally in the Lyon Bourse. The city a political base, dies the 
bourse is booming and is seen as a growth in the area. He has hinted 


Studio,. 2 or 3rooni apartment. 
One month or more 


One month or more 
IE CLARtDGE 359 67 97. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


■ Series 5F 294JD 
SF BITS 


DtT INVESTMENT FFM 

— HOI ) Concentre 

— Hd ) Inti Renhnfond_ 


UNION BANK OP SWITZERLAND 

—Id ) Amco UA. 5tv SF 39 JS 

— (d 1 Bofii.' lnvest— SF 4650 

—Id Forma Swtis Ml. SF 13UD 

— id l Japan-Invert SFW1S0 

— ^ td ) Soft! SoufttAfr.Sn. __ SFS4AD0 
— id J Slmo titoc* price) SF 19450 


symbol of tbe dry’s expansion. 

The Lyon area in duties France’s 
“Silicon Valley," an area to the 
southeast of Lyon that stretches to 


that he will announce his candida- 
cy for the French presidency from 
Lyon for the I9S8 election. Lyon is 
a center — some say a fief — of 


SHORT TBM STAY. Advantages of 
an hotel without moonwenienoa, feel 
tt home in race Audios or one bed- 


VACANCY FOR TEAOfflt of french 

6 BL la non-native speaker* beglrv 


service import / 
EPA for towel & 

f in I ill a * 

trXHUI*, 

darf. W, 



roam apartments m Fans. Contact 
SOflBJM: 544 39 40. 80 roe de rtin- 


veniM, Paris 7lh. 


Grenoble. The area accommodates bedrock conservatism, which was 
several thousand small and medi- reflected in a landslide vote here 


DM 2*37 — 1 Slmo litodc price) SF 1MJ9 

DM8637 UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

— id) Unlrento- — DM4150 

— id ) Unitonde. DMsat 

— (d)UMrok DM 7475 

Otter Funds 


um-sized high-tedmeftogy compa- 
nies. 


FAC MGMT. LTD. FNV. ADVISERS 
1, Lounmce Pountv HtlL EC*. 01-423-4480 

—iwl FAC Atlantic S11JS 

— i«r) FAC Eurneecil IKUM 

— (w) FAC Oriental *25.97 

FIDELITY FOB 47a Hamilton Bermuda 
■H"! American values Common- ss*30 

— (m) Amer Values Ci>m_Prel S 101.16 

—id) Fidelity Amer. Assets 56645 

-id) Fidelity Antratta Fund *838 

—id ) Fidelity Discovery Fund *1021 

— td) Fidelity Dir. Svns.Tr 1122.10 

— (d ) FkMIfY Far Eost Fund_ *2054 

—id 1 FVdeUtv inTL Fund. 


—Id I Fidelity Orient Fund. 

— id ) F mm tty Frontier Rinc 

— td ) Fidelity Pacific Funa. 
— id ) Fidelity SpcL Growth I 
—id) Fkktllv World Fond- 



GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— Iw) Eos) Investment 


— iw) Scottish warid Fund 

— iw) state SI. American 

CtopllJMdJ.tiLLanAaenUn-*t1*230 


_ 15U* Y", 
_ 527JB }“ 
_ *1W3 I” 

, *13*31 5* 
_ *1*44 (S 
- *3M7 £ 
N (to 1 

57 Sf !wi 

*84? Id 
*1.11 w 

, 534033 
C1140O40 w 
,515188 [Z 



Hutchison 
Says Net Fell 


(Continued from Page 11) 
rate. If we can caned those con- 


fer center-right parties in regional 
elections in March. 

On the investment front, Si- 
parex, a privately owned invest- 
ment company based in Lyon, in 
which West Germany's Dresdner 
Bank, the Union Bank of Switzer- 
land and the Stale of Kuwait have 
minority shares, said that it has 
targeted about 2,400 private com- 
panies in the area (including the 
Riviera) for possible investments. 

Siparex already holds minority 


SHORT RENTAL IN PARIS: dufica 
and 2 room. bwutifeBy decorated. 
Contact: Sanrepe, 6 are Masse, 
7500B Paris Tel- (1)359 99 50 


dosses I per week + sane dpmxlary 
ttoty. Boom & board provided on 
canpw. Agpfcont mud be pnde, 
pojMW a urxvwSy de^ee and prsfer- 


«*»y hova previous teaching experi- 
ence. Send GV. immediately to: 



NEAR RASTUE Independent room in 
private flat fer 1 month or more. All 
comforts. No ogerts Tefc 37D-0S-9& 


•not Send GV. onmedaMy to: 
OTtHJ 1 78, IV A AG, Postbox CH- 
8032, Zurich. 


BOATS & 
RECREATIONAL 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SHORT TBUH in Labi Quarter. POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

N ° ?g ^- Te t]° 93a83j AU RAM- DALLAS, TEXAS. fbmiyrf 

PENIHOUSAVE MONTAIGNE. By 4; dddran 10 & 6 Vet {817)491-9597 


week/mextih. High dost 723 4 28 


CHAMPS ELYSSS. High dots studio, 
view, 7V. Short /long tetm. 562 93 32. 


6TH 5BNE. Artats 2-bsdraom dudo, 
"tras ehie". $1100 neL 633 51 96. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


TROCADitO. LUXURIOUS & Rmny 2 
rooms, terroca. 647 5282 


rate, u we can cancel rnose con- siparex already Holds minority 
tracts we will, and we will certainly shares in more than 30 industrial 
have to pay a price to do so. It’s an companies in the area. Their activi- 


iirilant not an ulcer-maker. Thank ties range from furniture and meat 
God our exposure to The shipping processing to ski equipment and 
market is not greater than it is.” toys. Three are quoted on the Lyon 
Hutchison’s other two areas of imii.qtwT securities market, and ust- 




Pbxa Your OassHtod Ad Quickly and Easily 

In Gw 


1 1 ^ ll^TTv f • V | w "it I 


By Phoi* Cal your tool IHT representative with your text. You 
will be informed of the cost immediately, and once prepayment is 
made your ad w3l appear within 48 haws. 

Cash The banc rale a $9JD per Kne per day + local taces. There tra 
25 letters, sifya aid sparmm the firs) lirtt and 36 in the foltowinginK. 
Mirimum space n 2 firm. No abbreviations aaxpted. 

Credit Cm: American Express. Diners dub. Eurocord, Master 
Card, Access and Visa 


HEAD OfflCE 


Farit: (For dastfied ardy^ 
747-46-00. 


EUROPE 


Amsterdam 26-36-15. 
Alhons; 361-8397/3602421. 
Brussels: 3*3-1899. 
Copenbagen: (01] 329440. 
Frirnktaft: (069] 7267-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Urimm 6727-93/66-2544. 
London: (01) 8364802 
Madrid: 455-2891/4553306. 
Mflai: {02} 7531445. 
Noway: (03) 845545. 
Rome: 679-3*37. 

Sweden: 08 7569229. 

Tel Avhr. 03-455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfort 


Baenos Airesi4l4Q3I 

(Dept 312] 

Guayaquil: 431 943/431 
tana: 417 852 
Premna: 64-4372 
San Jose: 22-1055 
Santiago: 69 61 555 
Sao Paula: 852 1893 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain: 246303. 
Jordan: 2S214. 
Kuwait 5614485. 

Lebanon.- 34 00 44. 

Oalar; 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 
Jeddah: 667-1500. 
UJLE: Dubai 224161. 


MR EAST 


UNITS) STAIR 


Banausic 390-06-57, 
Hang Kang: 5-420906. 
Mania: 817 07 49. 
Seoul-. 725 67 73. 
Sbiga p or e. 222-2725. 
Tahwsai: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


AUSTRALIA 


Now York: (212] 7523890 
Wert Coast (415) 3623339. 


Sydney: 929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 690 8233. 


The DaOy Source for 
International Investors. 


w3 be avoid: 
London from 
London 
£3wd 
8580, Tt™ w 



expansion arc a 51 percent mobile- ing of others was 
radio telephone joint venture, and Siparex executives 


ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & GUIDES 


the planned expansion of its on 
market chain of Park □' S 
Stores in Hoag Kong to incl 


“Despite what one often hears in 
Paris about everything being 
blocked in the French economy. 


INTERNATIONAL 


some 140 branches on the Chinese Lyon and the Rhdne-Alj 


mainland. 


represents the other side 


Hie completion and sale of the arid a key investment oj 
first phase of a residential-apart- in Europe,” said Michel 
meat complex in Hunghom, a for- Paris, who beads tbe Em 


meat complex in Hunghom, a for- Paris, who beads tbe Eur 
mer dockyard area of Hong Kong, eratious of Investors in I 
will be earlier than scheduled, and British investment com 
600 units will go on sale this month, purchased a 6-percent si 
“AH eyes are down, and there is parex in 1979. 
no element in the company that The typical company Mr. Bie- 
isn’t flat out, or in a situation where gain said he was assessing in the 
they don't know what they have to area has annual sales of 100 million 
do,” said Mr. Murray. to 250 million francs and employs 

The directors recommended a ft- 100 to 500 pearfe. 
nal dividend of 56 cents a share. Along with its attractions, Lyon 


re- Alpes area 
ide of the coin 
it opportuni ty 
hel Biegala in 
European op- 
in Industry, a 
»mpany that 


ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Hood office in Ngw York 
330 W. 56lh St, NYC 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Sarvfeo. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


ZURICH-GENEVA 


GENEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tab 46 11 58 



vies. TaL 994 6681 


G04GBTS ESC 
TEL 01/ 363 08 64 -022/ 34 41 86 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Seneca. 
Tefc 0711 / 262 11 50. 


AMSTERDAM JASMNE 

ESCORT SBtVICE. 020-366655 


LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 


MADRID INTL 


LONDON LUCY ESCORT & Guide 
Service. Tefc 01373 0211 


MONTREAL RBOEZpVOUS Escort 
Service. 514-931-2441. 


ESCORT 

TH: 2456548. CRGDTT CARDS 


MILAN ESCORT 

mtVKX 02 - 69 762 402 


BRUSSELS- CHANT Al ESCORT Ser- 
vice: TeL 02/530 23 65. 


MAJOR CREMT CARDS AND 
CHECK ACCEPT® 


67 CHtera Street, 
London Wl 

Tab 486 3724 or 486 1158 
AB ma(ar cmdB mb occapfed 



FRANKFURT SONIA ESCORT Ser- 
vkb. Tel: 069-68 34 42 


MUNICH WHGOME Escort Serves. 
Tab 91 81 32 


This uw<ad winning eanrica ho* 
bean featured aa me tap S mart 
axduove Escort Service by 
USA A b rta n rebu ild nowi maJa 
incbaBng radio and TV. 


★STAR ESCORT* 

Service Tdb 01/ 55 11 49 


G8CVA - HOBS ESCORT SERVICE 
Tab 36 29 32 


FRANKFURT “TOP TBT Escort Ser- 
vice. 069/596062. 


giving a total dividend for 1984 of has its share of c rime, high youth 
84 cents, up 48 percent from 1983. unemployment, substandard hous- 


Mi. Li was unavailable for com- ing for immigrant workers and lit- 
meat on the results of Cheung tie to do after the (heater except 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMER/CAN 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SBtVICE 
TEL 200 8585 


ZURICH 


Sonredha'i Escort A Guide Service 
Mala X Female. Teh 01/56 96 92 


Kong (Holdings) Ltd. However, dine out “There are, of course, 
the company reported an tmsped- problems in an area like this, and 
fied operating loss from an assod- there is no Parisien-stvlc nightlife," 


^bjjIfjSSit^wSSoy--^ Y2»ro [» 

— (to i JJ= Podflc SeCi(ACC) S5J3 Iwj 

—tb)J.P Australia 5425 fwJ 


a ted company. Green Island Ce- said Christian Benoit, marketing 
ment Co. because of export director for Hewlett-Packard, 
dumping by overseas producers which plans building a 4fl. milH nn- 
asd resulting loss of demand, as franc plant to make peripherals 


escort sanno. 
EVStfWHERE YOU ARE OK GOL. 

14113-921-7946 

Col free from Ui 1-800-237-0992 
Col free from Roridtt 1-80G2820B92. 
lowail totem vwtcorw you bodJ 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 


* AMSTERDAM* 

5MF Eacart Swviea. 227837 


escort service 

10 KENSINGTON CHURCH STW8 
Ta,- 987 9136 OR ,937 9133 
Al mafv wnfit in occaptad. 


MADRID CHIC 

EHori service. Visa 25951964117257 


well as a loss for another associated and mini -computers, just outside 
company, Internationa] Gty Hold- the city. It is tbe company’s second 



ings Ltd, after providing for the major investment in France, the 
diminished value of its land hold- first being in Grenoble. 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 


mgs. 

Mr. Li predicted that "the worst 


“We do not care what 
about Lyon bring closet 


N IMARA EM 

-rain— A 

— Iw ) Clast B-Ui. — 

—i ur ) Ck&s C - Joaan . 


[91 1* m 

iw.M 
F73L06 « 


of the recessioa is now behind, and —the young crowd doesn't care,” 
the group can look forward to an said a senior executive of Sod£t£ 


IN NEW YORK 
TEL 212-737 3291. 


AR15T0CATS 

liau tm Emit 5orvka 

128 Ytfgraora Si x London W.l. 
All major Credit Cards Accepted 


ROHE CLUB EWOFE ESCORT 

, & Guide Smvice .Tefc 06/589 2604- 58? 
1146 prom 4 pm Id 10 pm] 



VIB4NA-S FIRST ESCORT senate. Tefc 
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vice. Tefc 022/31 26 73. 


DOMMA. AMSTERDAM ESCORT 

Glide Service. Tefc (020] 762842 


I . H r TTFlVr.' \ J 


and Travel Service. Tefc 069/44 7775 


KAMB4 - nuratHiRT ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tefc 069/88 62 88 


MUNCH - PRIVATE ESCORT + 
Guide Service. Tefc 91 2314 


ii ■ 1 .V 1 ' m J :LW' ■>£<-: // |"1 


65 41 58 


ANbtTBDAM P QUS ROSES Escort 
Service (0) 25-964376 


,N.Eu- 


Tefa 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - nndmf^rr 


CHBSEA ESCORT SStVICL 


51 Beoudurap Place, London SW1 
Tefc 01 584 6513^49 (4-12 pm) 


VBMNA ETOUE ESCORT SBUDCE. (LONDON GAMBIA ESCORT Ser- 


vim. Tefc 01-229 6541. 


upward trend in profits based on a Lyonnaisc de 
firm foundation of shareholders’ hugest regional 


[ue, France’s 
k. “And at 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GIRDE SBtVICE feon 5pm 
KJTTEEDAM (0) 10-25 415 3 


GBCVA - BEST 


DM — Deutsche N 
Uwernboura Franc 

Change P/V S 10 ton 


lands exceeding 5 billion dollars, tlxBigh we are linked to Sl Louis, 


and a strong cash flow.’ 


Missouri, as our twin city, we really 


Gran Perfemwiee Index Feb.; •- 

Wtorldwhta Fond Lid; ® —Offer Price Incl. 3 % prelim, cfwrpe, ++— tseity rtoek 


The company recommended a fit- resemble Dallas — (hat is the im- 
nal Cheung Kong dividend of 30 age we prefer." 


LONDON CLASS 

ESCORT SERVICE 


ROTTERDAM (0) 10-25*153 
THE HAGUE (6) 70-60 79 96 


THi 022/16 15 95 


GBttVA FIRST ESCORT SBtVICE 
EASTS + TRAVEL + WffiCBR) 
« SKI STATIONS. TEL 31 49 87 


ZURICH 


orice as on Amsterdam Stock ExchOflCK 


cents, to make the. 1984 total divi- 
dend 45 cents, the same as 1983’s. 


Tomorrow; Lyon Bourse booms. 


LONDON, WATHROW « OAIWWK 
Tefc 01 890 0373 


ALGOS ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL: 01/ 252 AT 74 


GEMVA •BEAUTY* 

escort samcE. 
TH: 29 51 30 



LOMXM ZARA ESCORT Service. 
Heattoow/Gatwid. Td- 834 7945. 


MADRID SHECTIONS ESCORT 5er- 

vioe. Tel: 4011507. Qedit Cards. 


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1 41 42. 


HOUANDrJB ESCORT SERVICE 020- 
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LONDON mW£ ESCORT Service. 
Tefc 01^3 8849. 


lONDCN ESCORT Service. 
Tefc 370 7151. 












































r - - 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2,1985 



PEANUTS 


ACROSS 

1 He wrote 
“Ulysses” 

6 Jillianor 
Miller 
9 She wrote 
“Three 
Weeks- 

13 German sub of 
W.W.II 

14 Life story, for 
short 

15 Lieutenant, to 
G.I. Joe 

17 Black eye 

18 Broker: Abbr. 

19 Grown-up 

26 Type of house 

21 Feel flu 
symptoms 

22 Goddess of 
agriculture 

23 Publish 

25 Hardy girl 

26 Mather or 
Maxwell: 
Abbr. 

28 Having a 
handle 

30“ Gun for 

Hire- 

33 Evil intent 

35 On (free) 

37 ear and 

out the other 

38 Piggery 

39 Not married 

40 Type of terrier 

42 "Eternity and 

I 

Howells 


43 Water: Comb, 
form 

44 TV 's' ‘Rem- 
ington " 

46 H.S.T.’s 
predecessor 

47 Trumpeter A1 
49 Rust and 

alumina 

51 Type of orange 

53 Narrow reef 

54 Food fish 

57 Monopolize 

58 Author 
Whitten 

59 Long scarf 

89 gander 

(look over) 

61 Skill 

62 Underground 
drain 

63 Jumble 
04 Yak away 
65 W. German 

city 


1 A move in 
checkers 

2 Hautboy 

3 Wouk novel 

4 Hindu social 
class 

5 A season, in 
Aries 

6 Calculating 
device 

7 Marx Brothers 
film, with “A" 

8 Short letter 


9 Candied 

10 Magnetite 

11 Caesar-Coca 
TV program: 
1950-54 

12 Cleopatra's 
river 

10 Dolls named 
for a film alien 

21 First-class 

24 Be silent: Mus. 
dir. 

25 Golf gadget 

26 Some 
Mennonites 

27 Caprice 

29 “ kingdom 

come. . .” 

31 “Whom shall 

. . .?”: 

Isa. 6:8 

32 Jewish feast 

34 Schemes 

36 Enticed 

38 Concorde 

41 Adherent of: 
Suffix 

42 Dismounted 
1 451s 

48 Meal, in Metz 

50 Kefauver 

51 Bone: Comb, 
form 

52 Sewing line 

53 Dross 

55 Toward 
shelter, at sea 

56 A “Coming 

' Horae” star 

59 Compass pt. 


0 New York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska . 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



‘tow CANYOUTEfcJt/YIETHE VALUE 0FATXXMR 
WHEN TOU ONLY GAVE ME A QUARTER ?' 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• Oy Henri Arnold and Bob Lea 


Ikwcrambie these tow Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to farm 
four ordinary wonts. 


(k *\ 


GALOW 


DRYIT 


• / /*; 

* / 



OUT THERE! 


GOOD M0RNIN6, MY 
NAME 15 LUCY VAN PELT.. 
I7W EI6HT YEARS OLD, 
ANP I PLAY RI6WT FIELD... 
I’M RNE ..HOW ARE YOU? 


I MEANT, ANP 
YOU KNOW IT!! 



BLONDIE 

I SOUGHT THIS SILVER 
POLISH IN NOUR STORE 
YESTERDAY... r-, — 


AND ITS TERRIBLE.' 


Iltf WHY ARE YOU 
COMPLAINING?. 
YOU'VE ONLY GOT 
THAT ONE JAR 


IYE GOT A THOUSAND 
— OF ©K/ 


BEETLE BAILEY 






i'll ^ /Sal) 2 — ^ 


THEY LOOSE P LIKE THEY WERE 
HAVING SO MUCH FUN 


ANDYCAPP 


ClSSS Da* ■ 

total tr, Mm 





HEhOTtCEDi 


WIZARD of ID 


& me*? 






wm 


‘ggissss r £SSStSS £»? 
wasr tr^usa. ..«r 


s> it m 


U'lli.u^.V 


REX MORGAN 


YOUR FRIEND CLAUDIA 
IS A VERY ATTRACTIVE j 
WOMAN. CARL— AND J 
SHE SEEMS TO BE - i 
HAVING A GOOD TIME ' 
TELL ME ABOUT HER/ 1 


m ‘SHE'S SMART. 1 
■ MARRIED TO A I 
3 COLLEGE I 
PROFESSOR,! 
P* PROBABLY M 
i MAKING TWICE AG 
MUCH AS HE IM- 
PROBABLY MAK/NG 
, MORE THAN 1 AM ! 


SHE'LL BE COMING THROUGH 
TOWN ABOUT TWICE A MONTH 
—AND SHED LIKE TO DO A 
BUSINESS WITH YOU / SUES 
BEEN TO -THE UPSTAIRS POWDER 
ROOM THREE TIMES SINCE / 

' — -m. WEVE ARRIVED/ 


■ SO I'VE J 
~ NOTICED/ 1 
SHE’LL BE AN 
EXCELLENT 
CUSTOMER / 


ba«le y 

EDm&OJ 


GARFIELD 

HERE I AM. GARFIELD THE CAT, 
DOOMED TO SPEND THE REST 
OF MV DAVS IN THIS STOPID 
MAILBOX.WHAT A CRUEL 
tev TWIST OF FATE 


HEV.F’ATE/ HERE'S WHAT, 
k I THINK OF VOO/ 




BOOKS 


A SCIENTIST AT THE SEASHORE 

By James TrefiL 208pp. $16.95. 

Scribners, 597 Fifth Avenue, . 

New York, N. Y.100I7. 

Reviewed by Edwin M. Yoder Jc. 

T HE strenuous contemplation of Newton’s 
laws of motion (or, still less, of angular 
momentum) isn’t everyone's idea of a vacation. 
My own slovenly habit at the seashore, for 
indimw, is to tiy to drain my skull of any but 
the most diverting trifles. 

But now that Professor James Trcfil has set 
forth his energetic alternative in this clevei 
book, he half persuades me that I’ve been 
mimtmg something. The lotus-eating vacation 
is in danger. 

Here is his alt ernativ e. When Trcfil, a physi- 
cist, sees a wave waiting up the beach, be 
doesn’t just see a >wzve. He sees many interest- 
ing illustrations of mathematical constants be- 
tween wave frequencies and l wiph s, applicable 
not only to water but to electricity. Tides and 
sailboats, similarly, lead far beyond ihc viable 
world. Even t& most routine sights at the 
seashore suggest thoughts of increaang com- 
plexity. 

You begin, say, with tides. Soon you're in as 
engaging discussion of the moon, planets, their 
orbits, their illustration of the laws of universal 
gravitation, and even how the observed “per- 
turbations” of planetary taints can suggest die 
presence of undiscovered bodies in toe solar 
system. For a bonus, Trefil tells you how the 
moon was gradually “tfcspun” so that you 
always, from earth, see only one face of iL Or, 
turning to sailboats, you are gradually led into 
an enlightening refredhrr course on tha t basic 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


□Ban aanas naan 
Ecaa Eagan ansa 
DEQaaaanaQaanna 
bee □□□□ 000011 

□0000 aaaa 
BDoaaa ataEanaap 
hede aaaaaa aaa 

EECJQC3 [HQQ 09HLJU 

□□a annaan 0000 
QBQEaaaa □□□□□□ 
□□sa oaaaa 
□□□□□ aoaa 000 
□DaaaaaiiQaanaao 
□ebb aaaoa □□□□ 
aBGa 00000 000 a 


■Btiiff of physics, vectors of face. Or, improba- 
bly, Trefil begins by reflecting on the common- 
place pleasure of slipping flat stones on water 
or sand and, before you know it, has insinuated 
a «=rn»n course an the raystories of ungnlifr 
mamen torn. From there, its a mere spin of the 
top to inertial guidance systems, which, linked 
to computers, keep missiles, s pacecraft and 
advanced aircraft on course, a proper* atti- 
tudes. 

MuditrfiiisthesOTtofthmgthatusedTbbe 
studied, and still may be, in ctflk^e asfranhmy 
and high school physics; but it ispfcasartto 
haw one’s memory so e n g agh ^ l y jogged,' and 
science so amiably sagarcoatea. —i?:.- 

Along the way. as with most good.books of 
popularized science, one stands to leanUjgood 
deal that is completely new. This reMewer 
learned, for instance, that our days areTengdir 
wring (by two milliseco&ds per centay} and 
fhat the significantly shnrtPT Hays nf pri^Rl fty. 
ic times are now verified in oceanic ootid de- 
posits. I am not sure X knew, or remembered, 
that most of the saltiness of seawater comes 
from upweDing imndals at the various oceanic 
rifts, rather than from die runoff in rivers-And 
Professor Trefil has taught me so much ^boot 
the el ffmical and physical p rope rti es of and, 
salt, and day that a footprint will never again 
look the same. 

Only rarefy does Trefil become, to my taste, 
a bit lcmgwiadcd (on the subject of waves) or 
make unnecessarily heavy going of a fairly 
simple principle (the air foSL as in sails and 


wings). But maybe I missed a sobriety there. 
Ana it is doubtful that a sailor worth his 
sodium chloride has ever contemplated the 
familiar impossibility of sailing into the 
“teeth" of the wind; make that “eye.” 

Bnt such trifles aside, this is an ingenious 
and well-written book, albeit rate that rite 
world's beach bums may greet with a certain 
dread. Trefil anticipates the obvious objection 
that one’s eqjoyment of nature might be 
spoiled by an excess cS knowledge (we murder 
to dissect); but his answer, surely correct, is 
that enjoyment was never decreased by under- 


No, the deeper worry is the danger of the 
precedenL Treffi has made, and made wdl, his 
point about science at the seashore. But “A 
Scientist at the Seashore” intimates the possi- 
bility of sequels — “A Scientist in the Kitch- 
en," shall we say, or even “A Scientist in the 
Bedroom”? Not everyone mil welcome the 
intrusion of physics into every place of restand 
refuge. 


Edwin M. Yoder Jr. is a syndicated columnist 
with The Washington Post Writers Group. 


By Robot Byrne 

I N the game between the 35- 
year-old Russian grandmas- 
ter Viktor Knprekhnc and the 


ter Viktor Kuprekhnc and the 
21-year-61d Brooklyn interna- 
tional master Joel Benjamin in 
the Hastings International 
Tournament, the black king, 
tarrying in the center, appeared 
to be an inviting taiga. Still, 
that factor was not enough to 
pin White’s hopes for a mating 
attack on — there was the mat- 
ter of a concrete plan of break- 
ing through, and Kupreichik 
never formed a clear one. 

Countering the Richter- 
Rauzer attack (6 B-KN5) by 
6... Q-N3 never bad a wide 
following, but Benjamin and 
Igor Ivanov of Canada have 
been doing quite well with it 
lately. Instead of the standard 7 
N-N3, Kupreichik tried 7 B- 
K3I? which seems to have been 
played only once before, in the 
Balashov-mitmaim game in 
Hanover. 1983. 

It is not clear whether the 
gambit can be accepted with 
7 . . . QxP; 8 N/4-N5, but 
Hartmann played the faint- 
hearted and poor 1 ... NxN; 8 
BxN, Q-R4. Benjamin also 
begged off, with 1 ... P-QR3 
(avoiding 8 NxN, QxN; 9 B- 




QN5); 8 QQ 2, Q-B2. 
After 10...N-K4, 


Kuprei- 


CHESS 


chile might wril have tried 11 P- 
KB4!?, N-N5 (11...N-B5?; 
12 Q-B3. P-QN4; 13 P-QR4! is 
tremendous for White);12 B- 
N1 which gives the white pieces 
superior scope. 

With 12...N-B5; 13 BxN, 
QxB, Benjamin obtained the' 
bisbop-pair and Kupreichik’s 
retreat with 14 N-N3 was nec- 
essary to protect the QP. 

On 16 . . . P-KR4, the alert 

17 P-B3 would have guarded 
against material loss, but 
17...P-QR417; 18 K-Nl, P- 
R5; 19 N-B I would then lead to 
complex unclear play. Kuprei- 
chik’s 17 K-N l?!did not pamit 
him, after 17 . . . B-K5!, to play 

18 P-B3. BxQP; 19 QxB? be- 
cause ofl9 . . . QxR. 

After 18 ; BxQP. the Rus- 
sian should have played 19 
BxP, P-K3; 2Q R-K3. R-B31; 21 
B-K3 with roughly even 
chances. However, wrongly 
thinVipg that the blade long 
was easy prey in the center, he 
chose 19 Q-K3?! 

The delicate yet effective 
dance of die black queen bish- 
op at moves 22-25 efficiently 
dispersed the white rooks, thus 
providing abundant evidence* 
that the white attack lacked 
substance. It was not surprising 
that Kupreichik. out of frustra- 
tion. would blunder with 26 R- 
KR4?, allowing Benjamin to 


■ n 

'1* ' 'tj 

U. 

rn 

■ 

n ■ 

u 

■ 

0 J 



L@! 

■ 

Bi0 

0 


til 



VwMoa altar 17 K>Kl ■ 

won a piece with 26 . . . P-B3 
(27B-B4.P-KN4). 

Despite the American’s usu- 
al time-pressure, he played ex- 
actiy, soon winning a rook with 
35 . . . BxR. Kuppridtik wanted 
to see if Bayamin could make 
the time control — this was the 
only reason that he waited to 
give up until 40 . . . BxKNP. 


s sis' a*;- 

PIP M K/Mp M3 . 
BUI Mi 

S3 MJ • 

WO 37 !UM J*S* 

nm M QzP JtM 

a So runt- 

NOT » Kd QiN 

IUU n B/MM i*t 

a Q43M MO - 

N-Bi n MT mut 

K m mb b iuh 
B £w» faX 
Ml 31 KSi PO* • 

nau xi rip mj 

M3 n P M M 

BAP » N3M PO> 

HD « MO BODn* 


aUtttt’B. 

.(yfi! omc> 5trc2> 

^aso ItiaSMla -f'Trc 

-tesnK— v 
- jai-iim rur. K -' 

\ jjjjicd siu^iVi 

*. .i ^B ca ; JieiJir; her, liz 
•jljylsH |jj AtiiT.U i‘? - 

Stators. 

imti ; i: un:--. irs 
•amillniK^M' -zlp/L' 
.ulhno S-no xr.-i c- 
sitfcds' n r.ih in t 

iCdticiiU: 

"rid tn e*-i 
< 2tew*iLL~.tf ivv-d: h 

Llimbo his cocrriiiirvi 

:3Bnaii elbc-J, ■'! ’■? ’o: 

sAfijwt ie:urc 
thnhe crowd — *. ov. r, 2 «r : 
K'St£>. fho tii'r w r •-* j-_ 

v.;tu- 

?8»aaiuieu pr.cr ths 
j, -iipse M'r.treii . 
i wno dronr-j w ■ 
third- 1 - 
■sahQaiiu>» ;t; r.-v ?. 

.•'‘sb that c,ialc ^ 

2,% ll * wiii-:os:ar fr! 
me 

.•^■fcembrkaTer.’ that 
;*W,0berltfei! ro 


SMiLFY 


GAROUC 


WHAT THE 
PERCUSSION! 
PLAYER! ENJOYED 
WITH HIS DINNER. 

Now arrange u» dieted letter? to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


AnswBrtieru: 


Yesterday's 


EUROPE 


(Answers tomorrow) 

JumNes: NOISY SNORT BLUISH HEAVEN 
Answer What lionesses might be— "NOISELESS" 


WEATHER 


CMMDetSal 

DnMb 


Manic* 

Mem 

OUa 

Ports 

Pram 

RnMerA 


ZUries IS S» 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara U Si 

Mnrt 13 S3 

BCMMfl a AS 

h n wl t w W 41 

TaiAvt* W M 

OCEANIA 


LOW 
C F 

13 54 fr 
S 44 r 

«i 43 1r 
7 a fr 
A Cl o 
7 45 r 

V 48 e 
11 32 tr 
ll S3 cl 

3 37 d 
S 44 tr 
7 45 r 
A 43 r 

V 48 Cl 
A 43 d 
0 33 B 

-4 25 el 
5 41 r 

14 57 fr 
13 55 d 

t 41 o 

3 37 a 
s 43 tr 

-i 33 r 
31 M a 
9 48 cl 
•3 27 O 
11 55 O 
5 41 r 
-5 23 o 
5 41 fr 

•* 2i fr 

9 48 d 
5 41 tr 
ID SO a 
■ 41 Cl 

4 39 cl 


Mains 
Hons Kami 
Manila 
Hmoctbl 


AFRICA 

Alston 


man LOW 

C F C F 

34 93 a 73 a 

14 At 4 a o 

17 A3 12 55 a 

a K 34 75 a 

35 95 » 41 d 

13 55 3 37 Cl 

TA 41 4 39 b 

31 St 25 77 B 

19 M 13 55 r 

14 57 4 a r 


Damn 

Hsnolobl 


HUM 


* efiooudv; to-tooov Tfr-ftflr ^rwnui ; 
Ctoutfv; r-rolrt.' UMlHIwen; shhmow; 


Nsomu 
Nsw Yon 
5an FnmciscB 
Ssatlle 
Toronto 
WaAiaeiAn 
iw-nct avaiianto, 
it-fformr. 


-4 as -is 

U 44 4 

10 SO 2 
3 37 -I 

14 57 3 

1 34 -3 

» 79 19 

a a 4 

» S4 12 
» 94 21 

a a -s 
6 0-5 
29 M 17 

11 52 3 

» 73 W 

14 57 a 

5 41 -1 

15 M 1 

IMIMIUlU: 


Workl Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse April 1 

Ooung pnees in local currencies unless odiencise indtcaXed. 


Alston a 73 7 45 fr 

Com B 77 14 57 a 

COBBTBm 31 M 19 AA fr 

On» “M«"C a a 84 13 55 fr 

Moiera U 44 u s cl 

LAM _ _ jy. 

WB l ra M a 77 14 57 cl 

TBBH a AS 7 45 It 

LATIN AMERICA 
iMtuMn, a >4 17 a tr 

Umn 27 81 a 48 o 

Mexico City- a S2 4 43 fr 

RtoitoJaiwm X 84 cl 

Sob Paolo — — — — no 

WORTH AMERICA 


ABN 

ACF HoWlne 

AIOO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

AtToro Ruttwr 
Amre Bonk 

bvg 

BuohnuuHi T 

Co land HMD 

Etaovtor-NOU 

Fakker 

Gtot Broaoda 

Hcfnakan 

Hoobovbibi 

KUM 

Noonton 

b i ■ ■ — ■ -■ — 

IVUJ 1IIUU1J 

OcoVonderC 

Pokhood 

PhWw 


•town Dutch 
IMtovor 
VonOfflnwM 
VMFStor* 

VNU 

ANFXBS 6— r ol le 



Cmm Pro* 

Koll + Sotz 248.16 247 JO 

Kontodt 212 21058 

Kaafhcf 224 217 

WoKknerH-D 248J0 258 

•Oo^duwr W«r*» 7110 49 

ktubb Stahl 113JOTOOJO 
Unda 413 411 

U^Thorrsu J9I 793 

MAN 1S5J0 ,154 

M nenetmotin 144 liojo 
Wtotahondtachoft 250 2«JB 
MmmlRvkIi 1175 1140 
PreuMas 272 272 

fturtOarwnrtA 334 3M 
RWC USJO 1S150 

Schertne 44750 44S 

Stoaiem 52740 52BJ0 

Timnn 99JC 7720 

Varta ID IK 

vmbn 173J0 ITS 

VEW 134.10 123 

VW fcw wBea win r k 203 199 


GB-lono-BM 

OBL 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


Page 19 


+ 


The Only Hope for VUlnnam: Get the Lead and Stall, Stall, Stall 


By Ken Denlinger 

Washington Past Seme? 

LEXINGTON, Kentucky — 


men t,” he said ^WeYe very com- picket fence around the opposi- anything that might h»ra« the exceptional from the outside lately, games in which neither team gets 


fortable with it" 

A dear majority of those who 

. .. . . i__. v 



The argument goes something like wtaituster basketball, who play it, 
this: The only way ViDanova could who coach ii and who watch it are 
deny Georgetown the NCAA bas- D ^ t comfortable with iL Massunino 
ketbaQ championship here Mon- ^ il four-to-score; most call it 
day night would be oy putting ev- fous-to-snqre. 
cry body else to sleep. It won’t be around next seaso n. 

Id a r eal g am e — everybody run- ^ tournament. And one 


don's inside players. 

That is not exactly an original 


dcats oat of ibexr routine. 


If there were a three-point shot freedom inside. 


That has allowed him even more 60 points. 


“We win 90 percaii of the games 


ning up and down the court and these years, when the NCAA 
shooting after a decent enough 8^ more enlightened, there 

■ . .t ■ ■ r ..'il k. i. .l.i i 


f it, thought Even a few newspaper (and more than a few dozen players Much as he knows that a shot in which we hold the other people 

are stiffs know that the closer the ball around the country are actually ca- dock and three-point play would in the 60s." Massunino said, 

ino is released to the hoop the better pable of hitting an open jump shot boost his ehara** of winning a sec- “Twelve years ago, teams got into 

] it chance it has of dropping through, regularly), even simple-minded ond straight NCAA championship, the 90s cm us and we won only 

Zones are fine. They add variety teams could stretch zones — and Thompson hopes die combination seven games.*’ 

on, to games, and in fact usually are frequently break them. never comes to pass. Scoring 51, 59, 46, 56 and 52 

ane necessary when a VQlanova plays a John Thompson is Massimino’s “I'm conservative, kind of old- points with the clock stopped, the 

AA, Georgetown. menial equal His Hoyas also have fashioned,” he “I don’t like Wildcats have slipped into the 

£xc But the wizards who brought the the speed and depth to force VH- too much change.” NCAA finals. They’d bold George- 


Much as he knows that a shot in which we hold the other people 

i f .i - ■ i i • .1 «l If ■ ■ . . _ 


seven games. 

Scoring 51, 59, 46, 56 and 52 


never comes to pass. 


time to dissect the defense — will be a three-point shot from a shot clock — and the zones it Ionova into more errors than usuaL 


Georgetown would breeze. 

The Hoy as have better players, 
or at least ones more suited to the 
game played Airing the regular sea- 
son. That game had a 45-second 
shot clock; Monday night's game, 
like all those in the NCAA tourna- 
ment, would not. 

VQlanova is deliberate on of- 
fense, complex and relentless on 
defense. Georgetown’s one alleged 
weakness, perimeter shooting, was 
to get its most severe test 

In the teams* two Big East meet- 
ings this season, the Wildcats took 
11-2 leads. Then the 45-second 
dock forced them to be less patient 


reasonable distance. spawns — to the college game for- 

feiting and screaming, college got one thing: All but a few coaches 
b a s k et b all eventually will realize all are too dumb to know how to 
its potential for both speed and a zone, except by stalling, 
innovation. So in many ways, the 45-second 

What might not be clear here is daft has been counterproductive, 
that I like Massimino. He is bril- encourages faster play, but less 
lianL, deeply devoted to his playeis thoughtful play, 
and competitive in a way more be- Lots of fftame perhaps most, 
coming man many of his more re- pass the ball close to a dozen limes 
Downed peers. and still take a terrible shot How 


John Thompson is Massim i n o 5 *Tm conservative, kind of old- points with the clock stopped, the 

nemal equal His Hoyas also have fashioned,” be “I don’t like Wildcats have slipped into the 

he speed and depth to force Vfl- 100 much chang e." NCAA finals. They'd bold George- 

anova into more errors than usuaL But it's coming, for the simple town under 65 points Monday 

Also, Patrick Ewing’s smaller reason that there 3re larger areaas night, but woaJdn t get 55 them- 

Georgetown teammates have been to fill and not enough excitement in selves. 


Canadiens Take Division Lead 


erhaps most. The Associated Press vm rAnTC “It wasn’t pretty, but well take 

a dozen times PITTSBURGH — It didn’t UHL fUlUS ii,” said Montreal center Bobby 

lie shot. How come as easily as they might have Mats Naslund, Chris ChpHos Smith. “We couldn't afford to lose 

eea repeated? expected, but Montreal is in sole and Ron Flockhart scored Grsi-pe- , 

d around and possession of first place in the Na- nod as the r-atiaHi^nc beat Neither could Pittsburgh, which 
[y notices that donal Hockey League's Adams Di- the Pittsburgh Penguins. 4-2, here ** “ a desperate chase to catch the 

under !5 sec- vision. Sunday night fourth-place New York Rangers 


It would be nice, as well as ap- often has this scene been repeated? expected, but Montreal is in sole 

propria te, if be or one of the Big The ball gets whipped around and possession of first place in the Na- nod gnglc as the r-atiaHi^nc beat 

Five’s Philadelphia crowd could over a zone, somebody notices that donal Hockey League's Adams Di- the Pittsburgh Pen guins. 4-2, here 

advance to the final four every few the clock is dipping under 15 sec- vision. Sunday night 


Those five coaches and schools 20-footer. 


onds and throws up an off-balance 


NHL FOCUS 

Mats Naslund, Chris CheKos 
and Ron Flockhart scored first-pe- 


than Coach Rollie Massimino love the college game in a unique The last time, even without a 
wanted. Georgetown caught VII- way, and the rest of the country dock, was in the first semifinal 


game here Saturday. When Mem- 


Tta AaodoNd Pna 

Roffie Massunino: The master enyhasaes sophisticated mooge. 


lanova each time and won. should experience it. game here Saturday. When Mexn- 

Masamino is a master of tempo. That said, I also believe the style phis State's inside players moved. 
With no shot clock and a lead mid- of play Massimino empha si zes is they were in perfect rhythm with 
way or so through Monday night’s sophisticated snooze, coring be- the VQlanova zone, 
second half, be just might have de- yond belief; team needlepoint. In dance terms, it was like the 
manded that the proceedings come Whatever trickery might be in- girl leading, 
to a screeching halt volved that causes other cerebral Massimino could not have 

“We’ve gone to it” — the delay coaches 10 genuflect, Massumno’s prayed for a more predictable at- 
offense — “sooner in the touma- defense essentially is a five-man tack Rarely did Memphis State try 


That said, I also believe the style phis State's inside players moved, 
of play Massunino emphasizes is they were in perfect rhythm with 
sophisticated snooze, coring be- the VQlanova zone, 
yond belief; team needlepoint. In dance terms, it was like the 
Whatever trickery might be in- girl leading, 
volved that causes other cerebral Massimino could not have 


Pitchers Valenzuela, Soto Find the Early Going a Little Rough 


Compiled by Our Staff Front Dispatches 


Fernando 


sr Jr. is a syndicated ci>w aa 
pan Post Writer, 


park grand-: 


antes Sunday. 

alenzuela dropped his fifth 
tog — losing on an inside- the- 
u nome run. Ken Oberkfefl’s 


bases-loaded mruKh, which landed between the soap opera nature of last week’s events 
Los Angeles outfielders Ken Landreaux and 


Valenzuela gave up six hits in seven in- bade to second, he wouldn’t allow third to 
ngs while striking out six. “I felt strong,” become a revolving door again. 

:sakL “I thought! threw the ball welL" The He said Pittaro — “the best young player 

former rookie of the year is tr ying to bounce Tve had in 15 years” — would now be the 
his fifth back from last season’s 12-17 record. regular third baseman, a position he has 
side- the- O never played regularly before, 

berkfdl's Detroit catcher Lance Parrish reflected on Elsewhere in the champions’ camp: 

e soap opera nature of last week's events • Kirk Gibson got cortisone and crutches 


Mike Marshall, led Atlanta to a 5-3 victory — — - - 

over the Dodgers. SPRING TRAIN 

Meanwhile, in Tampa, the New York 

Mets scored 11 runs in six innings off Cindn- and suggested it be titled, “As the Infield. 


SPRING TRAINING NOTEBOOK 



nati ace Mario Soto and went on to a 15-2 Turns.” 
laugher, the Reds’ ninth loss in their last 12 Manager Spari 
games. Cincinnati’s player-manager, Pete decision to move 
Rose, called the game “bad in every aspect” creating a vacanc 
Of the fans who started booing his bauclub, pittaro, that it v> 
he said: “I don’t blame them.” cement.” 

Said Soto, who has complained recently of So much for n 
pain in his right elbow: ‘Tve got to get my playing third, W 
arm ready. I’m just getting work. You can’t clause and asked 
pitch for the crowd — you have to get your he was part of wh 
work in.” Soto, who gave up 14 hits ana saw and is baseball 1 
his earned-nm average climb to 8.00 in 18 combination, 
innings, is scheduled to pitch the National Anderson was 
League opener against Montreal April 8. decision, but ac 
Valenzuela, who dropped to 1-5, seemed clubhouse win so 


Petition after 17 EA 

rin a piece with It- \l 
27 B-B4, F-KN4) 
Despite the Amaica'sE 
1 time-pressure, he plawd? 
alv. soon winning i;oald 
5 . . . BxR. Kupreidisiiz: 
j see if Benramii: endert 
it time con ire! — fetst 
sly reason iha: he aisd : 
ive up unci 40 . . BiSNP 

JJCliA' SETBQr 


SW8 W 
u rva « 
» 

W B 

i .*» 

sir S 
S5F g 

I 

fc«*a 


unruffled by-OberkfeIPs third-inning shot 
“He hit the ball at just the right spot There 
wasn’t much that could have been done.” 
The long fly to right-center fell between 
Landreaux and Marshall and caromed off a 
palm tree in the embankment that surrounds 
Holman Stadium. By the time Marshall re- 
trieved the ball, Oberkfell had rounded the 
bases. 


Manager Sparicy Anderson had said of the 
decision to move Lou Whitaker to third base, 
creating a vacancy at second for rookie Chris 
Pittaro, that it was “etched in stone, set in 
cemenL” 

So much for masonry: After four days of 
playing third, Whitaker exercised an escape 
clause and asked to return to second, where 
he was part of what his manager believed was 
and is baseball’s strongest up-the- middle 
combination. 

Anderson was not pleased with Whitaker’s 
decision, but accepted iL There bad been 
clubhouse whispers that the move would 
disrupt the Tigers'- valuable depth, and dis- 
place rede players Tom Brookens, Barbaro 
Garbey and Marty Castillo, all of whom saw 
actum at third last year. 

Anderson wasn't happy on that count ei- 
ther. He indicated the grumbling was noway 
for champions to act and that he would 
probably lecture the offending players. He 
also said that although Whitaker was moving 


ck to second, he wouldn’t allow third to out of the bullpen, I won’t have time to let 
x>me a revolving door again. my mfnrl wander.” 

He said Pittaro — “the best young player How tough is he on left-handed hitters? 
e had in 15 years” — would now be the “If I was forced to face Ojeda every day. I’d 
pilar third baseman, a position he has be making SI million a year — in iheUSFL," 
vex played regularly before. said Detroit's Kirk Gibson, a former Michi- 

Elsewhere in the champions’ camp: gan State football star. 

9 Kirk Gibson got cortisone and crutches The Boston rotation now has Roger Cle- 
ments, Bob Hurst, D ennis Boyd and Bruce 

— — ■ - - Kison. McNamara thinks he can get by wiih- 

r NOTEBOOK out a fifth starter until AI Nipper returns 

April 10 after a bout with ulcers. 

Sunday for a bruised right instep that will □ 

keep him sidelined for a few days. Del Crandall, now a Chicago White Sox 

• Pitcher Willie Hernandez, is day-to-day broadcaster, got a telegram from American 

th a stiff neck. League President Bobby Brown last week, 

• A lingering shoulder problem will Hmit reminding Crandall that he still owed 5100 


with a stiff neck League President Bobby Brown last week, 

• A lingering shoulder problem will Hmit reminding Crandall that he still owed 5100 
Parrish to catching simulated games and for being ejected from a game lastyear when 
serving as a desi gna ted hitter in exhibition he was managin g Seattle. Said Don Diys- 


games until the season starts. The restriction dale, also 3 member of the Chicago broad- 
15 considered precautionary. casting team: “Del is waiting for the statute 

• Veteran reliever Aureuo Lopez gave up of limitations to ran ouL” 
five runs in two innin gs Sunday while wear- □ 

ing contact lenses for the first time. Lopez American League batting champion Don 
said he wouldn't wear them again because Mattingly, returning from arthroscopic knee 
they blurred his vision. Besides, be said, “I surgery, homered and doubled in bis first 



fourth-place New York Rangers 
for the final Patrick Division play- 
off spot. The loss, the Penguins’ 
sixth in seven games, puts them 
seven points behind New York 
with four games lefL 
Smith’s third-period goal helped 
the Canadiens win their fourth 
straight and put them two points 
ahead of Quebec, which lost to Buf- 
falo, 3-1, and three in front of the 
Sabres. 

Elsewhere it was Calgary 4, Win- 
nipeg 4; Edmonton 7, Chicago 3; 
the Rangers 7, Toronto 5, and Van- 
couver 3, Minnesota 2. 

With 5:38 left in the game, Pitts- 
burgh goalie Denis Herron lost the 
puck behind the net Smith gath- 
ered it in, skated in front and 
stuffed it in, giving the Canadiens a 
safe two-goal lead. 

“It was a mistake in communica- 
tion — my mistake,” said Herron. 
“I thought our defenseman was 
there to take iL and I gave it away.” 
“It sort of took a little steam out 
of us,” said Pittsburgh Coach Bob 
Berry. 

If the goal was a gift, it came at 
the ririu time for Montreal “We 
only have four games left,” said 
Smith. “We wouldn’t have been in 
a realistic position to get first place 
if we had lost tonight We have our 
fate in our own hands now.” 
Naslund gave Montreal a 1-0 
lead at 3 : 1 5 with his 42d goal of the 
season. Mike Bullard tied it at 6:06 


casting team: “Del is waiting for the statute WSrtl c, nu «o» play score before the Canadiens 

of limitations to ran ouL” With nothing else to dowhfle pumecT to die boards Sunday ahead to stay. CheHos scared 

D night, Toronto's Jeff Brubaker gave Ranger Dare Gagner a at 9:28 ^ Floihart convened 

American League batting champion Don vigorous forearm- to-neck massage. Brubaker scored Iris Tom Kurvers’s rebound at 11:56 to 
Mattingly, returning from arthroscopic knee eighth goal of the season, but New York won the game, 7-5. make it 3-1. 


don’t need them. I know where the plate is." two exhibition at-bats last week, prompting 
□ Yankee hitting instructor Lou Pinidla to say, 

John McNamara, the new Boston Red Sox “It’s just "not right He makes it look too 
manager, marie a bold move last week. He easy, 
assigned Bobby Ojeda to the bullpen as the □ 

left-handed complement to Bob Stanley and The Baltimore Orioles got some bad news 
Mark Gear. Ojeda was 12-12 last year and when they learned outfielder Lee Lacy, their 


rankee hitting instructor Lou Funella to say, n* | |>/» nm If /I J, 1 1 O 

ri^ He m*. it .ook ux, ffistons W ing Birclless Celts , 1 1 3-1 05 


Cooqtiled by Our Stiff From Dispatches 

DETROIT — The Detroit Pis- 


NB A FOCUS 


On March 3, Boston defeated the 
Pistons, 138-129, and Kevin 
McHaie scored 56 points. Detroit 


has been concentration,” he said 


t promer 
^Comin 


ig through mid-May. 


(LAT, UP I, AP) 


Trading by as many as 14 points, Isiah Thomas each chipped 

points in an pivotal 18-6 spu 
in the second quarter. 


jeo in ax 
spun late 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Standings 


Basketball 


P-3W a 

S ac » i‘r? 

„N I .t» 


r-XEi - Pi? 

B-O ?!« 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pt* GF GA 
y-PMfadolphla 50 2D 7 107 337 239 

i x-WazhlnaTon 44 24 9 V7 308 231 

^ X-N.Y. Islandon 39 33 J 83 336 307 

N-Y. Ransers 25 42 10 40 288 336 

Pittsburgh 24 47 S S3 264 364 

New Jersey 22 45 9 53 254 322 

Adams Divtotoo 

x -Montreal 39 27 11 09 93 253 

x -Quebec 39 28 9 87 311 261 

x-BuHafo 36 26 14 86 276 224 

x-Boskn 34 33 9 77 2BS 273 

Hartford 28 39 9 65 262 311 


SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
Edmonton 2 8 5-7 

aucoge 1 1 1-3 

McClelland (8). Gretzky (69]. KrusMynskl 
(40). Coffey 3 136), Huddv (7); D. Wilson (21). p ch^fc, 
B. Murray (5). Savant (38). 5tefe on Baal: ^ 
Edmmtan (on Skorndenski) 11-7-11—9; Chi- ... ~ 
case (an Fuhr) 6-0-13-31. 

Cnhwry 2 9 2*-* 

WlnalMB 3 8 10-4 


(14); Salmi no (6), Valve (35). Anderson (38). 
Denaao (271, Brubaker (8). Shots an Baal: 
Toronto (an Hanlon) 9-9-11— 9; N.Y. Rancors 
(on B ern h ar d t) 13-11-11—35. 

Quebec 8 8 1—1 

Buffalo I | i— j 

McKenna (17), Hamel (18). Perreault (9); 
P-Stastov (32). shots an anal: Quebec (on 
Barr ossa) 5-12-4—55; Buffalo (on Sevignv) 10- 


Tbe victory, which snapped a 10- 
game Celtic winning streak, was 
Detroit’s third straight and fourth 
ip jts last five games. 

Elsewhere it was Washington 
1 1 1 , Indiana 105; the Los Angeles 
Takers 123, Phoenix 98, and San 
Antonio 126. the Los Angeles Clip- 
pers 115. 


Montreal 3 8 1-4 

_ °T V J J ‘ pmsMrah l 1 8—2 

.. ... .. “TT . Nastand (42). Cheflo* (9). Rock hart (9). 

“"'“S? 1 ,[ 6) ' J! 1 ?* .?!' Smith 04); Bullard (31). Babveh (17). Shots 


Quinn (19) ; Hawurchuk (51 ). WUson (9),Mul- 


goal; Montreal Ian Herron) 14-9-10— 33; 


ten (30), ArnM 121) Shaft ooboo): Cafoary pm * ^ lon PBn r»y) 6-104-24. 


ifc’ 



Norris Dlvlston 




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x-5L Louis 

34 

30 

12 

80 

277 

371 

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*-Chicm» 

36 

35 

6 

78 

299 

2*6 

:b 


x-Datroll 

26 

40 

11 

63 

303 

347 

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x-MlniMsota 

24 

42 

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60 

256 

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20 

49 

8 

48 

243 

339 


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48 

19 

10 

106 

385 

283 



v-Wlnntoop 

42 

27 

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93 

348 

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k-Coloorv 

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27 

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79 

327 

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58 

274 

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(on Havword) 16-9-10-4—35; WtnnlPea (an La- 
mella) 14^-7-0-30. 

Toronto 2 > 1—5 

FLY. ROBCers 5 2 8-7 

Rooers 2 (26). Ruolsalalnea (9). HedDors 
(17). McPhM (12), Sandstrom (9). Povellcli 


Wniuds 1 1 8-2 

Va n co uve r 8 2 1—3 

smyf an. McNaB (22), Skriko (5); PleH 
(M), Wilson (3). Shots an coed: Minnesota (an 
Caprice) li-t-2—22; yancauver (an Beauore) 
16-12-8—36 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
Americas Lbovuo 

BALTIMORE— Waived Todd Crux, third 


League. Optlonad Terry Blocker, outfielder, 
to Tidewater of the International League. 
PHILADELPHIA— Sent Joey McLaughlin 



Tyler sizzled in the fourth quar- McHaie finished with 29 points, 
ter, going 4-for-5 from the field, to but admitted that Curetozr 5 late 


contest. Long reciprocated for be- 
ing shoved by McHaie. and both 
players were assessed technical 
fouls. In the fourth period, Earl 
Cureton also took a technical for 
going after McHaie. 

“We were pushing, but I'm not 
going to let Mm take Us poation on 
the floor.” said the reserve forward. 
“He got 56 points last time, and 
that was embarrassing to the whole 
team.” 

McHaie finished with 29 points, 

.j— > k.i r.— V i.t. 


baseman. Placed Lae Lacy, outfielder, an the and Ralph Cllarella. Pitcher*; Mike Diaz. 


Golf 


21-day disabled list. 

BOSTON— sent Charlie MHcheH, Tommy 
McCarthy and Robin Pusan, pitchers; Dove 


ca toner rand Rick Scfti*(nneMer,toftsmlnor- 
leaaue complex tor reasstenimm. 
PITTSBURGH— Acautred Mary Foley. 


A | & 

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SJ ■ P 1 I 

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Top Raisbeni cmd eamlnas tn the Toomo- 
meot Player* Championship, wblcXi ametod- 
«d Sunday oa the kXSX yard, par-72 Ptayen 
Club Sawarass coarse at Poole Vedra, Florl- 


Malpen. caldter; Sam Horn, first baseman, ca t ch er, from Nashville of the Amorfcvs Al- 
and Gus Burgess, Mike Greenwell and Kevin socutlan and assigned him to Hawaii of the 


ft & P\ 

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Colvin Peers, fiszooo 
(XA. Welbrino. S97 J00 
Lorry Rlnker. 861 J00 
Gary. Hal Ibero. *0300 
Hale Irwtn, 834JOO 
Den Haildarson, 834J00 
I Mo AoU.SZ7.112 
Bem h on d Conor, 527.112 
Lon H inkle, 127.112 
Bruce Uetzfce. S27.112 
Doug Tewaii, S225B0 
Pal McGowm. 120700 
Craig Sladtar, 814475 
BIO Regers. S1AA75 
Dan Parsmen, 81L875 
Payne Stewart, *16-875 
■ton Dent, siZeOQ 
Mark O-Meara, 5TZ600 
J.C. Snead, *12*00 
Dan Pooler, S1M00 
Jack Nkktoua. S12AOO 
Ken Bnmrn, S&640 
. Dmm Barr, S&660 
ft BreM Upper, M64D 
"■ Hal Button, SW« 


70 6 9 6 9 66 -374 
040.7249—277 
0-72-71-70-281 

72- 71-67-72—282 
67-72-69-75—283 
70-68-72-73— 283 

70- 75-74-45—284 
6MB-75-71 — 284 

71- 73-71-70—284 
TV- 72- 70- 71 — "BA 
7567-72-71— 285 

70- 74-70-72-286 

73- 70-7539—287 
73-72-71-71 — 287 
744949-75-287 
73-7049-75-287 

71- 74-7449—288 

70- 75-72- 71 — 288 

71- 71-74-73—281 

72- 72-71-73—288 
71-70-71-76-288 
7570-73-71—289 
7530-71 -73— 289 
7330-73-74—789 
7649-70-74-289 


Romlne,oulfteldera,to Its mlnor-leaaue earn- 
plex for reassignment 
CHICAGO— Traded Randv Niemann, pitch- 
er. la me N.Y. Mels lor Ken Reed.tftofier.arKl 
Gene Autry, third baseman. 

CLEVELAND— Sent Junior Naboa. second 
baseman; Jim Wilson, first baseman; Dwight 
Tevlar, outfielder, and Jeff BarUev and Ray 


Pacific Coast League. 

BASKETBALL 

Nattaaal Basketball Association 
PHOENIX— Activated Lorry Nana, tar- 
ward. 

FOOTBALL 

Hattenai FeottaH Laaeae 
INDIANAPOLIS— Signed Mark Smith, 




key the Pistons' derisive saiga. 
Thomas scored 26 points and 
banded out 15 assists for Detroit, 
which improved its record to 40-33. 
John Long added 22 paints. 

Scott Wedman, replacing Celtic 
forward Larry Bird (out of action 
with bursitis of the right elbow), 


tactics worked. “They collapsed 
beater in the fourth quarter," he 
said. “1 bad a hand time f ree in g 
myself up for my moves.” 

Boston coach K.C. Jones was 
qected by referee Ed Rush at the 
8:37 mark of die final period for 
disputing a call, and Long prompt- 


pumped in a season-high 31 points, ly sank Doth free throws to give 
Starting Celtic guard Danny Ainge Detroit a 95-87 advantage. 


was also out, because of bade The’Celtk 
spasms. 97, but Tyle 

“Boston rose to the occasion and with 4:41 to 
made a game out of it,” Tyler said, jumper, brir 
“and they almost beat us. All they 103-99, but 
did was pul Scott Wedman in and Tyler and 1 
the guy hits 31 points like Lany throws each 
Kid is in there.” with 3:35 lei 


Detroit a 95-87 advantage. 

TbeTjeltics dosed to within 101- 
97, but Tyler hit a 12-foot jumper 
with 4:41 to go. Wedman canned a 
jumper, bringing Boston to within 
103-99, but Detroit held firm as 
Tyler and Thomas sank two free 
throws each to open a 107-99 lead 
with 3:35 left (UPI.AP) 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Th* Apobcrtfd Pies; 


wide ry«rtv»r.oncl Stov, Wroy. ouartortx** t 
League. Seat Jerry Reed. PtWier, to their WASHINGTON— Announced Ihe retire- « 

minor lyue camtfe» : tor reoMnent. Re- ^ * J(m ^ qoortert)cck . RKcMd * 

rw,i*and John wftt. Rick Donna I toy. offensive S 

. **?* 8A *S! l T* lineman. and Babe Lautenberg. auorterboek, 
T? 1 ? P wrtfraa'tf AUke on a s^tos of one-yeor contracts. 

Grimn. tftohen, and BrtanPuldberB. catch- (Jeltod SMee Football Leaawe K 

erjo lb mtoor-feague complex tor reassign- ARIZONA— waived William Davis, wide " 

receiver. Grunted to klm Anderson, defensive 

MILWAUKEE— Waived Tern Tellmana a ttiree-day tryout. 


Tracy Ctaxton wore the winners’ netting and Coach Marianne Stanley, rigid, embraced T c 9 Cf-olro Winnoi* nf TPT Cnlf 

Donna Harrington after Old Dominimi defeated Geor^a, 70-65, Sunday in Austin, Texas, x D*01TUJie WloneTOl 

to win the national women’s college basketball championship, daxton, who scored 17 points PONTE VEDRA, Florida (AP) — Calvin Peete, winner of the 1985 

in ti(|P fmiil, vote d flw tonr namenf s ryits tnnifin g player- W inning itc third national title in Phoenix Opoa and ri^it other PGA tour events since 1979, won the 

seven years. Old Dominion finished its season with a 31-3 record and II straig ht victories. Tournament Players Championship by three strokes over 


NCAA Women’s Tournament 


Football 

USFL S tanding s 


BASTE Rif CONFERENCE 



. w 

L 

T 

Pet. 

PF 

PA 

Birmingham 


1 

0 

M3 

161 

118 

Tampa Bay 

4 

2 

0 

AO 

169 

136 

MampM* 


3 

0 

JOO 

123 

129 

-torsoy 

3 

3 

0 

joa 

141 

156 

Baltimore 

2 

3 

1 

417 

109 

90 

. -leduonvllla 

2 

4 

0 

333 

141 

177 

lOrioado 

0 

6 

.0 

too 

92 

175 

8 WESTERN CONFERENCE 


NOWtOfl 

5 

1 

0 

J33 

203 

132 

Oakland 

A 

1 

1 

JSC 

158 

130 

Artamo 

4 

2 

0 

Ml 

135 

93 

Donvor 

4 

2 

0 

Ml 

133 

126 

Portkmi 


3 

0 

JOO 

81 

92 

San Antonio 


4 

0 

M 

46 

119 

Lot AngtfK 

1 

5 

8 

.167 

124 

147 


SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
BtfHfimre 27, Houston 14 
Denver 2L Orlando 17 
Oakland 30, Lab Anatfas 6 


pUdiar. 

OAKLAND— Retoasad Jim Esslan.catcti«r. 
Stonad Stove Handarson. outtlelaer. to a one- 
vaar contract. Sent Ricky Paters and Ron 
Harrison, autffaldars, mad Reece, InfhHder, 
and Tim Blrtsas and Stan Kvlas, tfteDers, lo 
tnrir minor league camp for reassignment. 

SEATTLE— Son! Paul Miraneita, Dan 
Swiff, and Lea Guaffarman, pitchers; Dan 
Provo, catcher: Damv TanabulL thortttoo, 
and A I Chambers nnd Ricky NebatLOUtflald- 
en.to Its ntinor-leaBue comafax far raassign- 
ment. 

Na t U m M L aoBaa 

CHICAGO— Sent Jon Paarlmoa pHcher. to 
in minor-league complex for reassignment, 
optioned Reasia Patterson, pitcher, to Das 
Moines of the American AssodalKm. 

N EW YORK — Traded Frank Wilts, phehar. 
fa Seattle for Wrev Beryortdahf, tftchsr. Sent 
BanwndaM to Lynchburg of the Carolina 


Exhibition Baseball 

SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Ne» York (M 15. Clndnnatt 2 
Atlanta 4, Baltimore 2 
AUantfl (is) & Las Angelas 3 
PMtadeMila A Pittsburgh 5 
Texas 11, Houston 8 
Seattle 9, OMtond 4 
5L Louis & Montreal 3 . 

Chicago (A) (ss) 6. Kansas Cltv 5 

Toronto 2, Cnicago (A) (ss) 2 (13 Innings) 

oetraff 7, Mlnnasota 5 

Sim Dieoo A Mlhmkoe 3 

New York (A) 8. Boston 4 

Catttoro la 2. Chicago Cubs 1 

Sim Francbco A Oakland 4 


HOCKEY 

Nat tonal Mocker LOaeo* 


EAST REGIONAL 
Ftrtt Round 

North Carolina Stale 67. St. Joseph's 63 
Old Dominion BE Syracuse 61 


LEAGUE— Fined N.Y. isJandergoattonder state 102. Holy Cross 60 

Blllv Smith u» for derogatory statamants s t, n, North Carolina 79 

concarnlna on official. 

LOS ANGELES— Coded ut» Brian Wilks, C1 _ 

center, from KitchenaroM he Ontario Hockey Suo's^sifpwn st. 5 ‘ ° 

Leaaua. 

anmptaasMg 

Old Dominion 72. OMo SI. &S 

Soccer “ mE ^^ 0HAL 

Tens 84. western Michigan 62 

WORLD CUP QUALIFYING MIsslwlPol 81. Southern Mississippi 48 

Sooth American Droop 2 Tennessee 6S. Virginia 55 

Ecuador 0. Uruguay 2 Western Kentucky 90, Middle Tennessee S3 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
Sooth American Group 2 
Ecuador a Uruguay 2 
Pa Into Stand bias: Chiles. Uruguay a Ecua- 
dor I 

R etDritfag Match: April 7. Uruguay yl 
C hile 


SemMeab 
Mississippi AX Tennessee to 
western Kentucky 92. Texas 90 
ChampMastfP 

Western Kentucky 73. M is si ssi ppi 68 
MIDWEST REGIONAL 

First Pmif*** 

NE Louisiana S5, Missouri 84. OT 
Louisiana Tech 8). Illinois St. 57 
San Diego SI. 70, Nev.-Las Veoas 68 
Auburn 82. Memphis St. 64 

Semifinals 

NE Laulstana 76, Auburn 71 
Louisiana Teen 94, San Dteeo SI. 64 

Ctomptoosfrfp 

NE Louisiana 85, Lauisiono Tech 76 


WEST REGIONAL 
Pint Round 

Southern California 74. Idaho 51 
UCLA 78. washlnatan 62 
Georsto TV. Tennessee Tech 74 
Lana Beoch St. HZ Brigham Young 85 
SemMnaU 

Georgia 78. UCLA 42 
Lena Beach SI. 75. Southern ColHomto 72 
Championship 
Georgia 97, Lena Beach St. 82 

NATIONAL SEMIFINALS 

(At Austin. Texas) 

March 29 

Ota Dominion 57. NE Louisiana 47 
Georgia 91. western Kentucky 78 

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP 
March 31 
(At Austin) 

Old Dominion 70. Georgia 65 


National Basketball Association Standings 


Alton Group »A 

North Yemen 0, Syria 1 

paints Standbys: Syria 4 Kuwait St North y -Boston 
Yemen 0 x-Phllodi 


North Yemen; April 12. Kuwait vs. Syria; 
April 19. Syria vs. North Yemen; April 24. 
North Yemen vs. Kuwait 

Alton BneeH 
South Yemen 1. Bahrain 4 
PofattStandtogs: BahroH) i South Yemen 0 
RentoMae Match: April 12, Btdirain vs. 
South Yemen 

African zone 
(Second Round} 

Angola Q Algarla a 
second Lea: April 19, at Algeria 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


s-San Antonia 

38 38 

500 

11 


Atlantic Written 



Utah 

37 39 

487 

12 


W L 

Pd. 

GB 

Kansas City 

38 45 

.400 

IBta 

» -Boston 

59 IS 

37T 

__ 


Pacific WvNtofl 



H-Ptiltodeitfila 54 20 

.730 

5 

y-LA, Lakon 

55 19 

743 

— 

Washington 

37 37 

500 

22 

Pori land 

37 38 

A 93 

18 Vi 

Nn Jofsay 

37 38 

A93 

22V> 

PhWllK 

32 43 

xa 

23 Vs 

Now York 

24 51 

520 

35 Vt» 

Seattle 

X 44 

/as 

25 


CMtra) Division 



LA. OIppws 

27 49 

755 

29 

y-MUwoukoo 

54 21 

728 



Golden Stole 

20 55 

747 

Wh 

vOatrott 

40 33 

548 

U 

(x-d Inched playoff berth) 



Chicago 

35 40 

J67 

19 

iv-d Inched cflvUton title) 



Oevetond 

31 43 

,419 

22V» 

. SUNDAYS RESULTS 


Atlanta 

29 45 

792 

24 to 

Beslan 

32 38 

23 28—185 

Indtana 

20 55 

767 

34 

Detroit 

21 35 

21 29-111 


Washington 31 27 22 31-111 

Indiana 24 32 29 28-185 

Gut Williams 13-24 0-226. Makne S-16 7-821: 
Kellogg 10-18 U 22, Ftoming 8-M 44 20. Ro- 
bevods: washlmten 47 (Robinson ll); Indi- 
ana 61 (Kellogg ID-Aulcts: Washington 25 
(Gus Williams 7); Indiana 24 (Thomas 6). 
Phoenix 26 M 35 23- 91 

LA. Lcfkere 34 38 38 29-123 

AfadBhtafabor 9-U M 20. B. Scott 8-11 4-4 2D. 
Spriggs B-li (M> 16. McGee 7-102-4 16; Adams 
13-15 1-1 27, senders 8-11 2-2 18. Retaands: 
Phoenix 48 (Lucas 7) : LA. Lakgrsd2 (Spriggs 
9). Assists: Phoenlx27 (Macv9); LA. Lakers 
41 (Johnson 14). 


red 17 points PONTE VEDRA, Florida (AP) — Calvin Peete, winner of the 1985 
itional title in Phoenix Open and eight other PGA tour events since 1979, won the 
tilt victories, prestigious Tournament Players Championship by three strokes over 
D. A. Weibring here Sunday. In posting a 6-under-par 66 for a 14-under 
total of 274, ftete displayed the steady pby that has earned him more 
^£ >AL than SI million In the past three years. 

ctaiw 51 Hie victory was worth 5162,000, putting Peete in second place on the 

1985 tour earnings list with a total of just under $270,000 after only seven 
oiom Young ss tournament appearances. His 10-year career earnings climbed past $1.3 
•u million. 

wro California 72 Peete started the day in a three-way tic with Weibring and Hale Irwin, 

uhi, but neither could match the eventual winner, who ran off three straight 

st. 82 birdies midway through the back nine. 

mfinals Weibring, with three consecutive front-nine bogeys, finished 69/277, 

Texas) while Irwin ballooned to a final-round 75 that tied him for fifth with Dan 

» Hafldorson (73/283). Lany Rinker (70/281) took third and Gary Hall- 

SSV 7 bog (72-282) was fourth. 

Banner Bob, Yiolada Win Prep Races 

s J FLORENCE, Kentucky (AP) — Banner Bob outdueled favored Image 

31 27 29 ai-iii of Greatness for a three-qbarter length victory in the Jim Beam Stakes, a 
m » 29 28—185 prcp ^c& to the Kentucky Derby, here Sumiav. The three-year-old’s time 
i Makne s-i6 7423 : of one minute, 42 seconds tied die Lalonia Race Course mark for a 1- 
imp B-M 4-6 20 . Re- 1/ 16-mile race. 

Meanwhile, in New Orleans, Violado, already nominated for the 
na 24 (Thomas 6). Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes, beat Creme Fraiche by a nose in 
u « « the 1-1/8-nnle, Louriana Derby. The winner’s time was 1:50-1/5. ' 


Knicks 9 King Has Right-Knee Surgery 


x-Dtrtvof- 
x-Houaton 
x -Dallas 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MWwcft Dfvtolaa 


Th6iho*M4M2fc Lons 9-174-6 22; Wodman 

13-23 5-7 31, McHato 18-1? 58 29. Rebounds; 


48 26 ,649 — 
43 30 589 ift 

41 34 SO TV* 


p£Sk» (moSyj?Gl1^ new YORK (AP) —Bernard King, the National Basketball Assoria- 
i (Johnson i4>. don’s leading scorer with a 319-pdnt average, on Monday underwent 

jlcs!*£» ^Iiis two hours of reconstructive surgoy on his right knee. King was injured 

Mitcheuu-z* 46 32, Robertson 9-is 34 2 i: March 23 attempting to stop a ay-up by Kansas City's Reggie Thens. 
smith 9-ii 6-i 1 24. Bridgtman 4-iB t-8 16 . rb- Man Hay's operation included a partial reconstruction of the tom 

^ : ,mi£TJ^d’'d£nSx antmor cruciate Hgamnil and a pamal rra.oval d damaged cjm 2 agc. 
Moon is),- la. aipom si (Nixon 8). King is expected to be ready for the start of tr ainin g camp next fall 


Boston 47 (parish w); Detroit ss i RouncttiBid anterior cruciate hgament and a partial 

SSZr~ miB ~ m Kine is exixcted tobereadv for tbe sui 


(Moon is),- la. aipeore 24 (Nixon 8). King is expected to be ready for i 









.u-iayaariRit-aasftaaa l£2 f“*“ H * ,llll|l—,-IBI11 ^”" 1 | 5 


„. _ . - r 


' ' ,jV u!r 


Page 20 


UVTE RIVA TIOIYAL HERALD TRIBUNE , TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1985 


ART SUCH WALD 


Nakasone’s Trade-Offs 

-^^ASHINGTON — President 


' Reagan picked up tbe phone 
and called Japan's Prune Minister 



Bucbwald 


apa 

Makasone in Tokyo. 

“Yasuhiro," the president said. 
“What are yon doing to me? I end- 
ed ‘voluntary’ U. S. import quotas 
on Japanese autos and now you're 
sending in 23 million cars to com- 
pete with our domestic industry. 
Detroit is 
screaming 
bloody murder, 
and fm on the 
spot. You've got 
to give me some- 
thing in return." 

“Of course, 

Mr. President. 

We in the in- 
scrutable East 
believe in fair 
trade. What 
would you like?" 

“In exchange for selling an un- 
limited number of Japanese cars, 
you have to buy American goods 
from us. I have to prove to Con- 
gress that you're serious about 
helping our balance of payments." 

“If you insist," Nakasone said. 
“Put us down for a dozen eggs, a 
pound of butter, two loaves of 
Wonder Bread and a can of Log 
Cabin syrup." 

“You have to do better than that, 
Yasuhiro. Our trade deficit to Ja- 
pan is S37 bQUon." 

“Ah so, Mr. President. I will au- 
thorize a special import license for 
Cabbage Patch dolls." 

“How many?” 

“Three. One for each of my 
grandchildren." 

“You have to be serious and 
open up your doors to American 
s.li 


“You have to make a gesture 
even if it means offending your 
people, Yasuhiro." 

“If you feel so strongly about it. 
Til take two Princess phones —one 
for dowostaircand the other for my 
bedroom." 

“1 don't think Congress would 
accept (hat as a fair exchange for 
500,000 automobiles," the presi- 
dent said. “How are you fixed for 
pharmaceuticals? Would it hurt to 
buy a six-pack of extra-strength as- 
pirin? You must have a lot ofhead- 
aches in Japan." 

“We haven't had too many since 
our balance of trade has been so 
good.” 

□ 


“Yasuhiro. you're toying with 
me," the president said angrily. 
“The strong dollar plus foreign 
dumping of goods on the American 
market is costing the United States 
jobs and threatening my economic 
plan for recovery. I'm a free trader, 
but if you don't make a serious 
commitment to buying our prod- 
ucts, the trade barriers will go up 
and I can’t do anything about it.” 
“I understand your problem, Mr. 
President. But the United States 
doesn't produce anything that Ja- 


pan 


products. I can't tell you what pres- 
sure I'm getting from the National 
Association of Manufacturers," the 
president said. “How about some 
telecommunications equipment? 
We make the finest in the world.” 
“If I buy telecommunications 
equipment from you I will lose face 
with the Nippon Telephone Com- 
pany." 


Mansion's Maze Too Effective 


The Associated Press 

BAKEWELL, England — 
Chats worth, the mansion of the 
Duke of Devonshire, opened for 
the summer season Sunday, but the 
garden maze will remain closed be- 
cause too many visitors lost them- 
selves in it last year. 


“What about military weapons? 
We've got the best that money can 
buy — fighter planes, bombers, 
tanks , aircraft carriers, the MX 
missile." 

“What would we do with an MX 
missile?" 

“Yon could use it as a bargaining 
chip when you negotiate a trade 
agreement with the Soviet Union in 
Geneva." 

“Mr. President, my people don’t 
want me to spend any money on 
armaments. We’re a peace-loving 
nation, and all we ask is to be left 
alone and comer every automobile 
market in the free world." 

“Yasuhiro. that's just the point I 
can’t let you do that Ether you 
issue licenses for American imports 
or I'm putting the auto quota back 
on." 

□ 

“You drive a hard bargain, Mr. 
President. All right, send me some 
Kentucky bourbon." 

“Now we're getting somewhere. 
How many casts?" 

“One bottle will do. I find most 
American congressmen who come 
to see me to complain about Ja- 
pan’s import quotas always ask for 
Scotch.” 


The Specialist’: Fact or Spy Fiction? 


By William Tuohy 

Los Angela Tima Serrice 

L ONDON — It reads like a 
/ James Bond thrill er, but an 
author's note insists that “every 
incident in this book is true, and 
thepeople are all real” 

Writing under the pseudonym 
Gayle Rivers, the author de- 
scribes himself as an anti-terror- 
ist killer trained by the SAS, Brit- 
ain's Special Air Service. The 
book, entitled “The Specialist," 
has just been p ublishe d in Britain 
and is to be brought out soon in 
the United States. 

On the jacket, it says that Riv- 
ers has hunted IRA terrorists in 
Northern Ireland, killed IRA 
gunrunners in Europe and the- 
Middle East, assassinated Basque 
terrorist leaders in their hideouts 
in France, led commando raids 
against Ir anian oh installa tions, 
carried out missions in Lebanon 
to help protect the U. S. Marines 
and lea U. S. Special Forces 
teams on a mission to assassinate 
Syrian intelligence officers. 

A colorful account of derring- 
do, the book has generated con- 
troversy in Britain because 
knowledgeable military people 
have seriously questioned its ac- 
curacy. 

Brigadier M.F. Hobbs, the 
British Army’s director of public 
relations who has served in Ul- 
ster, said: “The passages in the 
book that refer to Northern Ire- 
land do not appear to bear any 
resemblance to reality at alL” 
Another British officer said 
that to “anyone who knows how 
the SAS works on the inside, it 
rings all wrong." 

A ballistics expert Peter Eliot 
was quoted in the Sunday Times 
as saying: “Everything [the book] 
says about firearms or ballistics is 
rimer wrong or misquoted from 
technical journals." 

Nevertheless, its publisher, 
Sidgwick & Jackson, and Rivers’s 
agent George Greenfield of John 
Farquharson Ltd. are standing 
by Rivers. 

“I have every reason to believe 
his account is accurate," Green- 
field said. *Tve checked the story 
with some SAS sources of my 
own." 

According to the Sunday 



West Beirut The mission: to cap- 
ture or kQl three senior Syrian 
intelligence officers. 

To carry out the operation. 
Rivers says, be and his associates 
used mountaineering gear and 
techniques to cross from one 
bunding to another; and he says 
they killed a dozen Druze and 
Synans. 

Americans familiar with U. S. 


operations in Beirut question 
whether 


Covers of British edition (top), l). S. version. 


Times, Gayle Rivers is the pseud- 
onym of Ravine 


aymond Brooks, the 
37-year-old head of Mesa Corp n 
a Swiss-based arms company that 


has run into financial difficulties. 
The newspaper said Brooks once 
volunteered for an SAS reserve 
unit but failed to qualify for ex- 
tended service. 

Neither Sidgwick & Jackson 
nor the U. S. publisher, Stein & 
Day. will acknowledge that Gayle 
Rivers is Brooks. 

Sol Stein, president of Stein & 
Day, said: "I am satisfied that 
Gayle Rivers is who he says he is 
and did what he says he ad.” 

The American publisher sug- 
gests that British newspaper arti- 
cles that raise doubts about Ri- 
vers’s story are "disinformation, ” 
planted by intelligence agencies 
that do not want to admit to hav- 
ing used Rivers’s services. 

Stein said his publishing bouse 
plans to bring out the book April 
15 in the United States with a 
first printing of 50,000 copies. 

Parts of the book have been 
serialized in the Mail on Sunday, 
and the book has been chosen by 
the Military Book Society in Lon- 
don as its April selection. 

Howard Cooley, an officer of 
the Military Book Society, said: 


“We bought the book on the basis 
that it was offered. I am not in a 
position to judge its veracity. One 
has to rely on publishers all the 
time in malting judgments like 
these.” 

According to promotion mate- 
rial put out by the British pub- 
lishers, Rivers joined the New 
Zealand Special Air Force and 
somehow managed to get to Viet- 
nam, where he was attached to 
the U. S. Green Berets, the Spe- 
cial Forces of the U. S. Army. 

It was there, this material says, 
that “he received the grounding 
in spatial warfare that was to car- 
ry through 10 a lifetime of, special 
covert operations as an elite pro- 
fessional." 

In the opening chapter, the 
reader finds Rivers driving his 
Porsche alongside Lake Geneva. 
The phone in the car rings; it is a 
U. S. Marine Corps major calling 
from Beirut after the bombing of 
Marine headquarters there. 

Rivers is summoned to Beirut 
and paid 5160,000 to lead a five- 
man Special Forces team in a raid 
on a Druze apartment building in 


the U. S. Marine Corps 
or tbe Central Intelligence Agen- 
cy. both of which are said to have 
approved his selection, would call 
on a Swiss-based mercenary to 
lead such a raid. 

The scene then shifts to North- 
ern Ireland, where Rivers says he 
was enlisted by the SAS, as a 
reservist, to conduct operations 
against Irish Republican Army 
terrorists moving across the bor- 
der. 

“It'S absurd,” a British officer 
who commanded a brigade in Ul- 
ster commented. “It's against our 
law to use reservists m Northern 
Ireland." ■ 

Military sources said privately 
that a man named Raymond 
Brooks did serve briefly as a vol- 
unteer in the SAS reserve but 
failed to qualify far extended ser- 
vice. 

Michael Evans, tbe defense 
correspondent or tbe Daily Ex- 
press m London, also identifies 
Rivers as Brooks. Evans said he 
interviewed the author of “The 
Specialist,” who told him that 
some of the incidents desaibed in 
the Northern Ireland section 
were a combination of incidents, 
a composite, to give the public 
“an ioea of the sort of things 
encountered by the SAS." 

The book ends with Rivers's 
accounts of work that he said he 
did on behalf of the Iraqi Army in 
the war with Iran. 

Tbe final chapter has Rivas 
entering the Iranian town of Dez- 
ful.at the request of the Iraqis to 
place mines and booby traps. Ac- 
cording to Rivers, the Iraqis had a 
“large garrison" in the heart of 
Dezful, were planning to with- 
draw and needed Riven to blow 
up key installations before the 
arrival of Iranian forces. 

Historians say that the Iraqi 
Army once claimed to have seized 
and briefly occupied an air base 
and radar station near Dezful but 
that it never occupied that city. 


PEOPLE 




Sellar’s Staging Panned 


.Mr** 


The critics were mostly hostile 
toward tbe premiere production of 
Peter Seflans’s new national theater 
company at the Kennedy Center in 
Washington. Some called his ver- 
sion of a Shakespeare historical 
drama “tedious,” “turgid" and 
“sluggish.” The American National 
Theater production of “Henry IV, 
Pm I,” directed by Dmatby & 
Mayer, bad been eagerly awaited 
because of Sellars's widely publi- 
cized promises to enliven the Ken- 
nedy Cotter and chart a radical 
new course rex’ the American stage. 
The Washington Post said it "of- 
fers nothing to stir the heart or 
activate tbe funny bone." Tbe New 
York Times said the production “is 
both inattentive to detail and uml- 
f uminatfng about the grander pic- 
ture of a play that should breathe 
youthful vibrancy.” Sellars, 28, 
said he was eager to begin rehears- 
als on “The Count of Monte Cris- 
to ” which he will direct. 


A $20,000 libel verdict against a 
idebook that sharply criticized a 
linese restaurant in Manhattan 
has been overturned. In a trial in 
1983, a jury derided that the East 
Side restaurant, Mr. Chow of New 
York, had been libeled by the 
Gault-Mfllau Guide to New Yorit. 
The review called the restaurant 
“the latest darling of fashionable 
society," but assailed its food and 
service. Tbe verdict was overturned 
by tbe 2d U. S. Circuit Court of 
Appeals. After the review appeared 
in the 1981 edition of the French 
guide edited by Henri Gault and 
Christian Mfflau, the restaurant 
sued, contending that the review 
contained false and defamatory 
statements. Michael Chow, the 
founder of the restaurant testified 
and a chef demonstrated how the 
restaurant made Chinese pancakes, 
which the guide complained were 
“the size of a saucer mid the thick- 
ness of a finger." 

D 


competition run by the -city of 
Portsmouth, England, YetaA Me- 
nuhin, chairman of tbe internation- 
al panel of judges, announced. The 
quartet won the £6300 (about 
58,000) first prize over 18 quartets 
from 10 countries. The Shanghai 
Quartet received the £3 T 2Q0-twund 
second prize. The winners wm give 
a London concert Tuesday. 

□ 

London’s Tate Gallery will buy a 
surrealist painting by Giorgio de 
Chirico for just over £1 million 
(about SI-2 million) after the gov- 
ernment refused the work in lieu of 
tax payments, a spokesman said. 
“The uncertainty of the Poet,” 
painted in Paris in 1913 and Valued 
at £3 million, isewned by the estate 
of Sr Roland Panose, tbe British 
art critic and chairman of Britain’s 
Institute of Contemporary Arts. 
“The executors of the Penrose es- 
tate offered the work to the nation 
in lieu of tax with the wish that the 
painting come to tbe Tate;” a gal- 
lery spokesman said. “Although it 
is certainly a pre-eminent master- 
piece, the minister for the arts said 
. he could not accept it" 

□ 



fress lire 

JJi 


fas 






France has chosen its only, worn* 
the first fe- 


an general to become the 

male of a military t raining 
school the Defense Ministry an- 
nounced. It said the cabinet ap- 
proved the appointment of General 
MRhefine Rebod-Chantefaube to 
head a training college for army, 
navy and air force medical officers 
in Lyon from June 1. Of the col- 
lege’s 531 students, 94 are women. 
Tbs ministry said her appointment 
forms part of Defense Minister 
Charles Heruu’s policy of “feminiz- 
ing’” the armed services, winch has 
led to a 30-percent increase in 
women officers since 1980. 

□ 

A sculpture honoring the Rever- 
end Martin Luther King Jr. was 


Kooi and the Gang, the American 
rhythm-and-blues group, and sing- 
er Deniece Williams, also of toe 
United Stales, walked off with tbe 
top prizes Sunday at the 14th annu- 
al Tokyo Music Festival Kool and 
the Gang captured the S 12,000 
Grand Pnze lor “Cherish." Wil- 
liams took the Best Singer Award, 
which carries a 54,000 pri- 
ze. ... . Tbe Alexander Quartet of 
New York won the international 


Hfdira>t«! Sunday at the Wasfdng- 


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MONCEAU SUPERB 


WSC&nON, MOOM AWUTTMBW 
5 bedrooms, 3 imfcb'rooras. 

N o work to be don*. 
SAINT-PIERRE (1) 563-11-88 


APARTMENT B5 SOM. +■ terrace (ft 
rved in, ka than 
Vob from 2 jQ0 - 


jam- new. never lived in, Isa than 
Fl7,M0 the kjjil, VHt flam 2 
600 pun, M rue Jauverwt, Idfo 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 


in the Intrmafioncd Herald Tri- 
bum, where more them a MM 
of a /ruffian readers world - 
wide, most of whom ore it 
business and rndvttry. wS 
read H. Just feint us (Paris 
613595! before lOa.m H err 
wring that we eon tele * you 
bock, c etd yoor message wffl 
appear mriHon 48 hours. The 
rate h US $9.80 or local 
eq u ivalent per tine. You must 
nidode ct mphl e and voriB~ 
tdde bdiktg otMms. 


TAX SERVICES 


(JSA NCQME TAX ADVICE & fte- 
tum. Pare baud US C7A 359 63 01 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SWflZERUND 

We m looking far sedan parwen 
who ore mMrcsMm m i eMu i fl tag first 
dan red estate (reject. USSSJXDJXXi. 
fatermr 8% + pa n i a patfan in lino) 
profit first das Swin guarantees. 


SOOIMSJL 
Trie* GE5E CH 456211 


FRENCH WEST IffflffS 


PUMKE STONE (Pierre Ponce) 
For sde. Quarry operator reekimous- 


tnd interested *i tfi* roudr maiericA 
For information tel/ write: V TfcAPET, 


27 rue dc Suede J La Bodwfa. f ranca. 
Teh m 34 83 fa. Or Guad el oupe; 
33/590867007 March 28/ Apdl5 


AWork of Art. 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


JMTTfiN 30 DAYS - OR IBS 
Yea am have year own b 


year 

...and pecfael more m o n ey in a day 
than motf people earn in a vfoek. Hotw 
Easy It's not hard d all wlan you own 
a Keen Computer ftxtrarl System. 

A sure winner that cantina 3 of to- 
day's hottest trends— video, computers 
end inriont ptofcres— plus the maw- 
how end uuumsei of T«u testae 
awnrr, fisnasonc and Keraa. An aS ash 
biomass. Cutonen come to you. No 
sriSng. No tirea. It's not a frandwe. AS 


foe money and foe profits eve 100% 
fun cum , incSvsdirab or 


yon. Ideal for 
abse n tee owners. PorJ-wna. fofl-Ww or 
imetienrir There's no need to leave 
yaw present jab. With foe Kama system 
you take someone's pidure with aT.V. 
camera and instantly pan it with a 
computer. Its so pushbutton skrfh. a 
riv fcl mi i tun it. Bol foe pr o fit s merit fad 
stuff. The Kema system a awrioUe m 
block tmd white or fiA ootorj a pai» 
bh, sets up in 30 minutes or less, any. 
Bme, anywhere. The wortd is you terri- 
tory. There ora thousands of facofora 
waiting to be fffled — plus tremendous 
mod Order apsAcuhon. System pros 

start ot usjy^ota usslejoa 
Kema. Dept. M35, Portfod. 17034). 

MOO Fnmkhrt t W. Germany. 

Td. 069 / 747808 TV- 412713 KEMA 


MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 


fci foe bay of Patino. 5 mins. Palma, 15 
mns. orport, 664 berait B to 38 meters. 
2 for up to 60 meters each. Irxfwdual 
TV/mams/water/phone Connectio n s. 
Ptofmuond port management as. Full 
marine lerviaek tower, radio, stip, trav- 
eWfr, repair, fori station, m & outdoor 


wner hmdiJandv Unround »- part 
" servKO&les 


Comwoal one cans 
t epw oteES^ condo ■ tflinhqd hw 


85 i 


an 13,171 iqm m aO. 
apartments above £ 78 di 


atoms man piers. Too w siw e u tg 45% 
KrfiflHuny now before next pncorael 
C on tact directly devriaptra 


WBnO PUNTA PORTALS. SJL 
Director Comerexd 
C/Nem lOl.Portris Nous 
MoBoms. Spam or Th 68666 CALIU E 


INVESTMENT PARTNERS 
NEEDED 


e Select bodOr ceracotty located near 
i/ Orionda. 


Diuw y warid 

• Ophon to purdue at ml brio* 
current marfcri value 

• Adtttionrf friamcai partren raqund 


to OB otiria^ u ^ aaie and tabs trie 


to l*BWr * - 

• Shwt hettng ported before very 
profitable (eSafe (protected at 100% 
fA*d » developers mtemted n 
bu&Sng in te mtl nonol tourist 
atraCMn. hotels, shopping cuSm. 
■ In vestment range USSTSjKn to 
USSlJQOjDOO. 

C u r e em a iim Wivudinenl Cerp- 
100 N. Bacay** Bfcd 
Stele 1209. Aflteav, FL 33132 
Teh (MS) 35MW7 
Trie* 80323? EURO MIA. 


NHDtt ECONOMIC ADVICE to «■ 
von a certaas Eneted tmouflc of moo, 
or to share or p a ttiopcite with 
. ..er, partners. Contact Hotel bdeniu- 
bo"dL Teh Zorich 01 /311 .43 41. Room 
2306. Mr. Mohammed. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


LIQUID GOLD 


JOJOBA 

Jojoba, foe (wo de bean grown m foe 
USA has 0 naturd We man rflOO- 
200 yaers. Usee U&rfccrian, am 
ice, pbart uucu ttenli, food, me_ 
fari u riofl. Dr. D. Yermanat, CaWornw 
Oevererty. stated, "No other pfont 
product «i the wand a capable of re- 


pteang petroleum based lubncantx". 

mrinafteltfa provide 


... . return on |n- 

vortment In ml year. Entire amount 


retomed by 6#h year, hapebms show 
annual income thereafter of 331 




33%. 

ImreeSeri and 


For complete destak c on tocL 
AU0MRE9 


RESEARCH Bn 1992 hvM 

tribune. 92521 Newfly Cede*. France 


OfFSHORETAX SHELTERS 


from (75 

UK. Ue of Mon, Turks, Channel Wendt, 
PenamcL Ubera & most offshore was. 
Complete support focAtits. 


Very dridty axif id ent io l 
Free cam 


_ Eg mu bulioni 

Koger Griffin ILB, F.CA. 
Brachyre; Corporate M oite flegurt Ltd. 


grpOrOB 

i Home. Victoria Street, 
Douglas, hie of Men. 
TriTgW/) 23303/4. 

Tele* 627389 GORMAN G. 


MONEY TREES ? 


181 liMtt in orm of America's most 
ueotwfl tee h notomcri breofctorouqht in 
a Moan dollar etemlry. 8J000 nut trees 
(tinted & adchwnal 30J00 la be pfam- 
ed soon. High annual tarings caused 
tor iTKrry, many years. 

BROKBtS*S MB® NVHB7. 
Material avoAtie m English, Frendk 
Gcrmito. Arctic Bax l99%Herdd Tn- 
bone, *92521 Nesrity Cede*. Franca 


INVESTMENTS 
SEE OUR AD ON 
PAGE 11 

TRANS CONTAINS 
MARKETING AG 


nUUGUTKM TO USA 
MADE EASY 


Attorney 4 Bedfor^oitams vnoi &^r- 


iHateni resdenoe. Hripi to set up ujn 
buHieiui & teades cammBrad. ntuu 
tricti & reseterori red estate. For foe* 
brodwe write- Dowd Hrrjon, )3J7 




WOBD CONQRESS OF 
FSOOUCTON AND INVENTORY 
CONTROL 

WBNNA AUSTRIA Mw 27 - 29 

O u trefa il brochure avafobie flora 
World Congress Trier 25710«BflMJ 


USA FM6NCE COMPANY pays 1 M 
■on our capita l account notes *i US 
SWOP tfenom in owe. No wa teaea. 
I ‘ ®Ta^r 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


HK3HLY SUCCESSrUL UK baud in- 
vestment Adviser / Sotesman seeks 
addbonal products / connections 
With sanom orgmottens / mtfivid- 
uobfor mternationd markets. Box 
40W l>LT„ 63 long Acre. London. 
WQE 9JH 


FRESH WATBt PEARL strand and 


loose poarh on sde in Hong Kong. 
Own factory and best once. Mora 
deStefaTbr: 5771? PCBCAfl MK Tek Of 


6832767.9/5 

A.14J 
Prionq 


. Lok Mrauion, — 
' Kin. Hong Kong. 


PROSPECTIVE muon h French My 

net io. Far an eoanotn i c L - 

foe heart ai foe Prxshc. 

Mazmra, Pons (1)550 26 35 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


OFFSHORE 
LIMITED COMPANIES 
BANKS 

MSURANCE COMPANIES 


Worldwide 
From £75 

MoSmg ■ Telephone - Trim 
Secrete id 

UX, We of Mrat, Jersey, Guemtfr.Gi- 
brdtor, Panama. Liberia. Liratnbourg, 
AntiBey Ready made or ' ’ 
enplanatory ' 


Aston Company Formations 
Dept Tl. 8 Victoria 5f 
Datake, We of Man. 

let 0521 26591 
Telex 627691 5PWA G 


«n. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMUB7MC. 
IL5JL 6 WO8U7WI0E 


A co mp lete sood & busmea samos 
. prawning a unique coOectian of 
saWed. venatti & rnuMfcngud 
indnoduab for al occanon. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th Si., KY.C 10019 


Needed 


London-lonckm-London 


CU Bond Strae). W1 

* Mai. triephone, telex eervice 

* Secretraial service, adnunstraUon 

* Formebon, dom io fation and mom 
ogtmnt - UK* offihora companies 

SHECT 


CORPORATE SannCES (UK) LTD I 
2/5 OM Send St, lanrion VtX 3TP 


Tab 01-493 4244 
Tito 2*247 SI3UM O 


WSMER SStVICES m Luxembourg 
Mtrexnof sennai f fetephona / telex 
/ mo 1 service t invtKmg. tedtokfll, 
u d mumbo ti ve and Rnonool gutdanee 
/ customs agency / iterag* spaot / 
odrar s ui ng eorauBant T crecowe 
worbbopt Please contact OJXCOKP 
S A P Ofl. 243ft, 11024 Luxembaurg. 
Teh 49 56 43. Tlx 2H) UJXCO LU. 


BUSINESS SERVICES W QBCVA 
w oe te i ii service f tromfohone / 
te tep hone / telex 7 md arvtee / 
actwdng / aunpertf foemohons / 



BUSINESS SERVICES 


OFFSHORE SERVICES 

UX non resident composes with 
nominee dromon, bearer shares and 
confidential bcr* account. Tt*l backup 
& support services. Panama 8> libenon 
Camparim. first rote confidential 


ajTUjAllMO' 'll" IBW ieisswpenn 

profewanri services. 
JJ'.CJU 17 WricgamSl.jlondoj 
EITmKibI: 01 37714/3. Tim &93911 G 


MVE5T 2 WBKS m fierier Heotifa 
Enter Caicfoc Ibsk Prmmntion & 
Health Bec o raltioning Program now. 
Begant mansitm. S«e» 

awntrysxte, higHy quafified iratiod 
sunannuon. Vwt Enton Medioal Cen- 
tre, Entofl near Godatewig, Surrey 
GU8 SAL 45 mn. Undon. ting 
ffX2) 8792231 


YOUR OmCE ADDRESS GENEVA. 

jltairo. 
4725. 


Trtm Mail Service. 16 rye Yoftoro. 
CH-1201 Geneva Tet p^ 45 


DIAMONDS 


MAMOND5 

Your best buy. 

fine tfianondi m any price range 
at towafl wholesale prices 
dnd From Antwwp 
center of foe tfcsnand world. 
Full guarantee. 

For free pnee Kb w 


i write 


ssibhinra 

Pe ilm a n sboM 62. 820)8 A nhurp 
BeHcn - TeM32 3| 234 07 51 
Tte; 71779 cyl b. AJ the Drtmood Club. 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond ndustry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN ZURICH 

FULLY INTEGRATED 


BUSW6SS SERVICES 
CLOSE TO FB'IANOAL CB4TB! 
Fnrna h ed Offices / Co nfe rence Booms 


Tetephone / Telex / Mo i Sermon 
Word Prams na / Transk 
Compraiy Formation 
INTHBNATKJNAL OFFICE 


32 ftermeg, CHflOOI Zurich 
Teh 01 / 214 6H 1. TTxr 812656 INOF 


MEMBER WOALD-WIOE 


YOUR LONDON QflHCE 

CHBHAM EXECUTIVE ONTRE 
Coraprahentive tange of services 
ua Regent Street. London W1. 
Teh (0TJ4S9 «2M The 261426 


YOUR OFFICE M PAWS? TBflX. 


ANSW6HNG SflMCE, secretory, 
errands, mcriban, foe 24H/day. 
Td. PAT; 6099593. 


IMPBUS • ZURICH * 232 7621. 
Phone / triet / mofco*.. 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


PARIS 

near QUMPS BYSEB 


RBIT 

YOUR OFHCE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


AGENCE DE L’ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGWT 

764 03 17 


BAC 

Od Ngh doabulcSna about 70 iqjtl. 
ImpeceabJs. No lit, brae fivma 
+ sedraora. TEL 223 64 54 


NOTRE-DAME 

View on befi tower in XVUth buddmg, 
3 roams, cakti, sua very charnwiQ. 
R.IOOroa CIPA 22i 08 T9 


Very 
beautiful 


FOCH MAILLOT 

2 


4 bahoona, 
squn. 766 3300 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA'S NEW 
SUPER PORT 

In foe boy of PaifBO, 5 mem. Palma, 15 


mint, rarpori, 664 berths 8 to 38 meien- 
todfoidua 


2 for up to 60 mean each 
TV/ mains/ wafer/ phone oonne iflu t a- 
Profewonoi port won ug ement co. Fid 
mramc tewm tower, rodfo, sfift trav- 
eUfl, repair, Fuel doAorv^n & outdoor 
winter h udslo nd s , LLgraund cor- park. 
Loden. Compienientofy service & tet- 
tore focSbes. medied. VmUna shop- 
ping, catering, entertoinmonf. Golf £ 
terms nearby. Commorod area 0301- 
poms 85 unto on 13,171 ujjh. in tA 
Fla 21 super apartinirts above & 78 m 
separate utury amdo - afl in bort en# 
dong mom pten. Top inwtmetyfl 45% 
raid! Hurry now before next priceratsl 
Contact dreedy dcv el ope mi 


PUBITO PllNTA PORTALS, SJL 
Director Comeraol 
C/Manoo 101, Portab Nous 
Moflorea, Spam or Thr 66686 CAUU £. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


In tha c h arming mountain resort of 

LEY5IN: v 

RBH7fiMC£ LES HUBNES 

Over footing a stdantfrl Alpine panaro 
ma 30 uin. from Mantraux and Late 
Genera by oar. 

- you can own quoity residences 
teth indoor iwwnrang pool and 
Sines* fiariHw in an ided 
environment for tenure and sports 

(to to •* 


mort gug e t . 
focss omitact 




51W 


Tet JD29 3411 55 7}*: Mete 26629 CH 


Page 17 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MiNtVVE for AMERICAN 
milVCKVC FIRMS n P/Uffis 


English. Bekyon, Dutch or German 
secretaries, Inawtedge of French re. 
qured. Enghih shorthand. B6ngml 


telexisti. Write or riune 138 Aww 
Vklor Hugo, 75lli Ptrfa " 

727 61 « 


75116 Paris, France. M: 


8UNGUAL EXECUTIVE Seoetty & 
persond un i rt o n l required for m l 
argaruatian in Pont, written & sno* 


ken French & Enafosh an p ortonf. 

Knowledge of IBM PL a +, Working 
paper* irnof EEC naftonat ftoncfwnr. 


TCta. resume & salary raqure. 
merit to Bov 1996. herald Tribune, 


92521 Neufly Cedw, Froncu 


EXPHOENCB5 French/ Engfah secre- 
tary, french mother tongue, roquretf 
for advertisiig iriat director <n Paris 
bated American Pubftthng Co. Inefr- 
wduolmuti beriynornfa. respons ib le & 
able to work under pressure. Send 
CV, referanox + t dorr retire- 
ments » Bar 1999, He* da Trtime, 
92521 Nmfty Cedte. FrraiQB. 


MTL OTCAMZAriGN series Un- 
gual secretary, Fren ch & wth English 


at matenti foraugga. Mint have UK 
“6 70* 7? « Paris 


Pcesport. Tet i 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


PARK ORGANIZATION series experi- 
enced sacratcry with good English 
lhorttemd. tecriteni typing sUh, ex- 
perience m wCTtf pracKung an ad- 


vantage, flow* French. Safary F8J60 
per morth x 11 Send CV. & pfwto 
bricue 10 Ajvil, 1985 to Per sonnel 


Section, 4 nw Jean Key, 75724 Paris 
C»de* l£ 


WBBOU PHARMACEUTICAL 
Company, seeks executive seeretanr 
iun e to Pw wber. British olae nptnf- 

Franck Tet*S ?^72 40 Mrs. gJmtS? 
Dot 2000, Herald Tribune, 92521 
Nnufly Cede*. France 


SJiEA. m teekt 
5KXETAKT 


Para 23361 


0420. 


wr ancuiATioN depaumbd’ h 

taotev for temporary b&wal %- 
Hh/Ftench seaetcry, cmriable eis- 
• ‘ Phone M - ■ - 

m- 4302 


mefootehr. Phone Mrs Bbbanol Pera 
747 12 65 te — 


fofTL OtOAMZATlON seeks Ameri- 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


BENCH LAW HUM in Paris seeb 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


bandstad 


BtUNGUAL AGENCY 

Temporary Often 
tote 758 12 40 Personnel 


TO4CH EXECUTIVE Ungual fitfsh 
ry, foortharo iml tevri, wfo 


secretary, 
processor, seeks permane n t passoa 
west Pans, msponstifoes. Teh Pans 
772 1602 / BotWS, HeraWTnbwte. 
92521 Nwfty Cedee. France- 


PARISIAN YOUNG LADY, My h*n- 
gud. executive secretary seeks p» 
ngeposmoa- ' 

ences. 




Gfo - THE OB5S4E DE 1A CB®® *"**■ 
poroiy help pcopte retrub b*vial or 
Engfidi mother longue secretanes. 


Perns 758 82 30. 




Parfums 

K^AtNn^URENT 

recherche 

SECRETAIRE ASSISTANTE 
DU DIRECTEUR DES OPERATIONS 

parfaftement bilSngue anglais 
region COMPIEGNE 


U jeune fam me g ug nous techarchooa. da pnMnsnca da double ruomalte. 
amdrtcaina ou angaso dovra saccmdar A tous mornan te ist manaav dynanfraja fll 
eidgenit. ■oudauxde prAsaraomn afficadid dans Is directfon da noire tinM inta>Tnlto- 
naia do production R da ttetributon [7DC porsorsnes). 


r _ b- 'T 

Outra Im itftchas de socnMatted 6 haul ravoau (eidnodactytograpHe sttraflemant da wxia 
Cnangtatoetenfrangtea), ^FfunebaancnaraororganisalionadfTtiritetr a tivpot toautta 
daa di h OnBOondw Opfttftora. la tanua at fe sund das budgets, la misa A 
jow du tHbfoau de boro apttia ooHacle daa Jr fo t m B Uun a y arfWtara. 


t ^ a * raffia*** 

■“* 81 «tocr*h»8rtraaon 

patron, touts la atruduro, al ia attga du grouped New-Yodc. 

Bte prtpafwa auwf da p ia c t ner fla . reunions. aWsdons de tafaHonB nubfaues 
ausequaSoc ate pwTWpert, saehsrti fl'irat^iir A uneti^^e^aiM 

Encore plus v'A «on pvcqtn protasslomel, eftoctuA ai Doaaifaia dastt . antnuyka 
bn gtot ta mnna. now aecordarona da nmaortonpw a 

» goto, - SKTriS 


capedtfode progre»ar | 


tit . .n.-'Ji' 

^■5sia®. v ' l V “I:*; 


jnihcre 

•* ^ min ;.wi i 


ton Cathedral, where King 
preached his last Sunday sermon 
before he was killed 17 yean ago. 
Tbe work, by Vincent Pakmbo, de- 
picts King in robes with arms ex- 
tended. The sculpture, slightly 
more than two feet (60 centimeters) 
high, is above a gothic arch, so that 
die civil rights leader seems to be 
looking down from a ^ 

King was shot in Me . 
nessee, on April 4, 1968. 


.pm*- - . 

iflffceatf i ro:n .. 

.j"i sine rolu- - 

ta Hat CL««rt» ir * 

SdfiiBS ftrs i 

SiSmrii Afrcr. ^ v " 

SMiBlJ!*. 

a aBf<V>X»rfo.T* sr: ; 
- .ton poius xt 
,g|jl£. itlSE r-J r.liCP 
iMtoLsssriniTf?! 
2‘4Slfl.T 

i-poaa ■ 
\3siii0 : ‘T- 0T. 

.’iraNwuriP 1 ■ V- ' -v.'" 


■ys wp rot. 7 .-** v.. 

ri|BB«e of pe-:; 

.'id :! a Ljsu. a ?:.4 
■35 & 1I1: wuiiier: .ir* 
iatkiliict 3: sx: 


•jie* 8 tc. fid Pu:n:-. L 
TTtezz. y 1. 7>;: 
sacFram zioj- re. .'m - ,:; 
.sawocerier. 
iasan-. i:ourc;!':rv 
-iWRSGasijusl^i* -1::, 
j : ®i- ffc ieen l-T mj; 
y.3j fe to: i--.vjr.-jc 
W--3SX. 

J o*ecf Lie S'L-ri \i: 
■rjt*».«xce?; tV: 

^farfpsncnilr. 'v--! 
n men jm: coir.z 

ra\ of m% 




10