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yto yoae newspaper 

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jtFftris; kmdimi Zurich, - 


WHATH01OATA APPEAR ON PAGE 16 


No 31,762 


INTERNATIONAL 



Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 


** PARIS, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Pressure in Pretoria 

Siituztkni Morels 

For Full 4tiP!e of South Africa’s Officers 

By Alan Cowell prospective police officers must 
. ■•" New York r,ma Srmcr hwcbnipleted high schooL 

JOHANNBSBURG -The yd- - Thoe ttxio sjjwfic loyalty test 
tow. police van came to a flop for recrmts,he said, theassampuon 
acroK^edin road in one of South 

Africa’s black townships, and an 10 a PP‘ y .“ “*“* pkce - 

officer bearing a rifle tumbled out 


to block the path of the sedan ad- 
vancing toward him. To the rear, a 
second police car cut off retreat. 
Tht sedan's occupants were 


- Elsewhere, at the border with the 
independent, blade- ruled country 


used to be stationed away from 
then- tribal areas, but that policy 
has been changed because of logis- 
tical problems. 

When the police opened fire in 
Langa. witnesses said, some of the 
black poheemen were speaking 


SfL^a^AlSn^ - in « , area .ttominaied by 
searched the private car entering 

the coonliy and found documents . ^SSS^SXSS^ 
that he believed to be subversive, so ^ hosab to one Mothe r, so. 






' vests aj 


police. Tire papers were seized. 

. The images might be familiar to 
those who keep .up with the twists 
of South Africa's racial confronta- 
tion. But there was, in both epi- 
sodes, a difference from the stereo- 
type of white police officers 
crashing black dissent. Id both 
cases the officers were black, and 
their quarry were whites suspected 
of violating South African laws. 

By official estimates, about 40 
percent of the 45,000 people in the 
South African police are black. 
And of late, their position among 
tbdrfdlow blacks seems more pre- 
carious than ever. 

. Black officers were among the 
policemen who opened fire on a 
funeral procession of 4,000 people 
on March 21 in Langa, a Mack 
township of the southern city of 


me tensions. 

Colonel Leon Meflett, a spokes- 
man for the Ministry of Law and 
Order, which is supposed la control 
the police, said tone was no short- 
age of recruits for the police, since 
the force is seen by some blacks as 
providing steady and secure work. 

Thai its loyalty is under slrain is 
acknowledged by whi te policemen, 

(Cbstinoed on Page 2, Col. 2) 





Danes Continue to Defy Back-to- Work Order 


Angry demonstrators in Copenhagen tried to break into the 
prime minister’s department using sentry boxes as rammers. 
Wildcat strikes continued to disrupt die nation Tuesday. 


Buses, mail and garbage collection were badly Ml D anish 
radio broadcast only recorded music. The strikes protest the 
government’s imposed settlement of an eight-day conflict 


Chance of Failure Worst for Family Farmers ? in U.S. 


By Ward Sinclair 

Washington Post Service 


lion farmers hold two-thirds of the 
debt. The American Bankers Asso- 


DES MOINES, Iowa — Here is nation estimates that 3.6 percent of 
Peter Brent’s story of failure on the those 2.4 million farms could fail 
land: “I shouldn’t have bought the tiiis year, about double the usual 


Uitenhage, killing at least T9 Tand: “I shouldn’t have bought the 

vuj.. . Tarm. I wasni a land speculator, dr °P° ut rat f- 


; categories of opptobmim to the U.S. Farms in Crisis l^d dwnciS for concentration ^ kept getting 

ice. There were, said Patrick Le- ' _ . rf™™*rin a oSr.,in.ra 3 .ndfnr.hi* , , 


blades. ... 

Last year* as unrest spread in 
South Africa's myriad black town- 
ships, blade activists sought to 
draw distinctions that offered vari- 
ous categories of opprobriumto the 
police. There were, said Patrick Le- 
kota, spokesman of the United 
Democratic Front, blacks recruited 
as township policemen to protect 
black community councilors, and 
they were viewed as quislings, since 
the councils are sees by many 
blacks as fronts for continued 
white influence. . - •• 

In contrast, he said; there were 
black members of the South Afri- 
can police, who, except for officers 
who had gained personal notoriety 


and I fed I did a good job. But I've 
got nothing to show for 45 years 
except my good health, a good wife 


That works out to about 238 fail- 
ures a day. 

Such a rate has important impli- 
cations for the future of famuy- 
operated farms, for patterns of 


1 said I had to do 
more, I said I would get 
even the next year. But 


Second qf four articles 

and kids and the same 10-year-dd 
boots with hew soles." 

, Mr, Brent’s story will be repeat- 


of power in agriculture, and for the ' 

stability of rural towns and busi- ucc r ci * 

nc “ cs - . . prices bega 

There appears to be no easy way 1 
out in the next several years for the thatwasiu 
farmers deepest in debt,' even if 
there should be increased govem- 


deeper. Then land 
prices began to fall, and 


ed jmany tifniy this .year as debt meat aid, improved prices or dra- 
forres of farmers otiLof matically lower Interest rates. 


bnanest’ 

UJS.^trmers owe about $187 bil- 
lion. Thai’s not much considering 


How did’ his situation come 
about? 

Debt, after an, has been a way of 



Peter Brent 


The boom was good for every- 
one. Fertilizer and pesticide makers 
prospered. Implement makers 
prospered. Speculators made mon- 
ey as farmland prices jumped more 
than 10 percent a year. By the end 
of the decade, exports had climbed 
to S4Q billion. 

In a sense, the U.S. farmer had 
become a cog in an international 
food-production machine. He look 
on debt to provide food to Rus- 
sians and Japanese, to buy ma- 
chines tnadi- by workers in Moline 
and Chicago, and to pay for chemi- 
cals made in Midland, Texas, and 
St Louis. His borrowing brought 
profit to his banka. 

Then the bubble burst The Fed- 
eral Reserve Board and the Reagan 
administration acted to slow infla- 
tion. Land and machinery values 
peaked in 1981, and then began a 


for attacSgfclIow blacks, were that farm assets are slightly more Me for farmers: They borrowed to over the last 20 years as U.S. farm- 
looked upon as men just doing a foan $1 triffiom Or that farmers’ • buy-land and to pay yearly opexat- ing became a mechanized giant 
job. albeit in the pay of white mas- average debt ratios arc a hit health- mg and living costs. And if all went seeking foreign markets to absorb 


ssition? 


job, albeit in die pay. of white mas- 
ters. ■*•■■■ 

But in the last six months, some- 
thing has changed. When rioting 

K ed the township of Kwano- 
r recently, after the police kill- 
ings in nearby Langa, all the black 
police officers were evacuated to 
protect them from the .vengeance of 
fellow blacks. 

“The people," said Johannes Ba- 
loyi, 28, a black police constable 
from Soweto, Johannesburg's huge 
Mack township, “see us as ene- 
mies." 

Their white commanders put it 
the other way around. “We are ter- 
ribly impressed by the loyalty of 
these people,” Major Steve van 
Rooyen, a police spokesman in 
Pretoria, ssdd of the black officers. 


ier than those of business in gener- 


al Or that one-third of farmers are to let the farmers pay off their 
virtually debt-free. notes and start again. 

. But the debt is concentrated But today’s problems are differ- ports were at a relatively 
among imddfe-sizHf 'farmers,, the eat from the historic up-and-down $10 billion. Then came the 
so-called family fanners. About cycles of .agriculture. They reflect 
one-third of the country’s 2.4 mil- deep changes that have taken place 


as hoped, crops were good enough its abundance. 

to let the fanners pay off their The roots of this crisis reach 

notes and start again. back to 1970, when U.S. farm ex- 


ing became a mechanized giant exports and farm prices to historic 
seeking foreign markets to absorb high levels. 


failed around the globe, sending *** has not stooped. As re- 
extions and farm nrices to historic cession ^ and fann pnees 


But today's problems are differ- ports were at a relatively modest 
eat from the historic up-and-down $10 billion. Then came the boom: 
cycles of agriculture. They reflect the Soviet Union entered the U.S. 
deep changes that have taken place market in a big way and crops 


& Web. stagnated, the federal budget defi- 

Credit was easy, and inflation of . e P t interest rates high, 
land values made paper million- _ Fanners were faced with reduc- 
aires of ordinary dirt fanners, ti'ons in income and equity while 


Many farmers, encouraged by the cost of servicing their debt re- 
lenders and economists, took on mained high, 
the biggest mortgages they could to Now, 1985 has become a year of 

expand production. (Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 


1,000 Lebanese Prisoners Taken to Israel US- Research 

By Edward Walsh actively engaged in at tacking Israe- were transferred to Israel traveled tured by Israeli farces in the early OnNewSST 
Washington Past Senior h forces in southern Lebanon. The in a heavily guarded convoy erf bus- days of fighting in southern Lcba- 

tfhttsatfm Thp Twai-ti announcement said that the prison- es with covered windows. The pris- non in 1982. Most of the Palestm- f « iVxiin e/u f 

cxs, who will remain in Israeli cus- oners were blindfolded and their ian prisoners were released in 1983 X I UlH/MXl 

Army traasteiTea more than l. 000 j, in«nk, ni .»t n nh<m^,i n Mrr V i; -a 


actively engaged in attacking Israe- were transferred to Israel traveled 
11 forces in southern Lebanon. The in a heavily guarded convoy erf bus- 


Washinfion Post Senlce u luluc * «* buuuiciu i^uauou. iuc iua guoiuvu wuru? v- i-w ' 

JERUSALEM — The Israeli atmoimceineni said that the prison- es with rovered endows. The pris- non ml 


tured by Israeli farces in the early 
days of fighting in southern Leba- 
non in 1982 Most of the Palestin- 


Artny transferred more than 1,000 


era, who will remain in Israeli cus- oners were blindfolded and their ian prisoners were released in 1983 
jui jicvc »a« T .hoW nrisoners. mostlv ghthu tody and will be released later, hands were tied behind their backs, in exchange for a handful of Israeli 

spokesman in Mn “took an active part in lemma according to Israeli radio reports, prisoners of war. 

black officers. Z, activities against Israel” and that to Military officials here conceded The Israeli announcement was 


ICY 

, T ^ 


EXECUTIVE 


rraona, »1U U1 UlC UliKk Uiums. lanKhi IxnA. Tmrl nn Tnwlgu In acu VIUC& aiiillllSl isiaci dUUUUllU WIBIUUJ wiiuou uui. 

Th* Wart nffirort: M noHt nn release them now “could endanger that Israel has a “legal problem” in made on the same day that the 

—— —re r ts& 3 £i£S sasstt 

urgets in townsbips wiierc m** in kflo- SEWHETSiJt.'iSB ^ 


icon ? 

ceDe/**** 
gi- 


there are few hiding places from 
angiy mobs. 

Since the violence started, ac- 
cording to government figures that 
seem conservative, four Mack po- 
licemen have been slain and 56 
wounded. 


= « Shiites who were detained in prisoners that Isradhas rounded 

wfflbe rtJeased on Wednesday as a «»M«ton with Israel's attempts up and held in the Ansar camp are 

to halt the guerrilla attacks (Sts not members of i i regulai p imfit a ry 
S^tsrfs^OTLebaSom^ forces in southern Lebanon. organization and therefore not 


French Captive Freed 

A French cultural affairs official 


By Richard Witkin 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. pres- 
idential committee has called for 
accelerated research to produce a 
trans- Pacific supersonic plane and 
a broad range of new subsonic civil 
and military aircraft by the year 
2000. 

In a report to the White House 


The plan to dismantle the Ansar 
prison camp, which Israel estab- 


lished shortly after its June 1982 feiTed 10 on Tuesday, and 
invasion of Lebanon, indicated ^ about 600 will be released in 


The officials said that more than wchmcally prisoners of war but ci- he ^ d Tuesday that hisrelcase was 
1,000 of the prisoners were trans- v “an detainees. accidental The Associated Press 


was freed unharmed Monday, 10 on Monday, the committee urged 
days after he was kidnapped, and heightened research on a space ve- 


days after tie was kidnapped, and heightened research on a space ve- 
he said Tuesday that his release was hide that would be able to take off 
accidental The Associated Press from conventional runways and fly 


The black poheemen might be that the Israelis are nearing the southern Lebanon on Wednesday, 
iffic officers, security policemen, execution of the second stage in Meanwhile, attac ks on Israeli 


traffic officers, security policemen, execution of the second stage in 
or riot policemen. A couple of their planned three-stage with- 


_ Both Israeli military officials and reported from Beirut. routine 

me army communique stressed that Gflles Peyrolles, who was the sphere, 
the prisoners would be treated as if fourth of nine Westerners kid- - 

they were prisoners of war and that napped in mid-March to be freed, i nc 


routinely in and out of the atmo- 


The committee believes," 


iriMiimiuL, auouj uu uiaui : — _ 1 Z . 7 m uuu-iruuwi iv uw uvw, rrt u.l a( ,l_ ■ 

units: continued as ihe military lsrad saw no ^ternahve _ to the said he was released only because SS, SSC2? VSSJrff IS 

them, Mmorvan Rooyen said, have cfawal from Lebanon. command announced that an Israe- transfer as it conimues to withdraw armed villagers encircled his two natjnn’c 

attained foe rank of coloneL An Israeli military communique li soHier was killed and three were from Lebanon. captors. The captors identified eovemmenLand 

Pay scales, he said, are foe same said foe prisoners who will be re- wounded in two separate incidents At its peak, foe Ansar camp held themselves as members of foe Leb- -T u ndexestimates foe 

for blacks and whites of equal rank, leased are members of “various ter- in southern Lebanon. more thin 10,000 prisoners, most arose Armed Revolutionary Fac- . - 

and contrary to earlier practice, all rorist organizations" bnt had not The Lebanese prisoners who, of them Palestinian guerrillas cap- lions, a Marxist grouping, he said. (Coo turned on Page 2, CoL 5) 


By Gorbachev 
On Summit Talk 


By Lou Cannon 

and David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has disclosed in an 
interview that foe new Soviet leader 
has responded to his invitation for 
a Washington summit meeting. 
Administration officials described 
foe written reply as positive. 

Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leader, endorsed “foe idea of a 
summit’* but did not specify a time 
or place, an administration official 
said. 

In foe interview Monday in foe 
Oval Office, President Reagan de- 
clined to discuss the contents of 
Mr. Gorbachev's letter, which was 
received last week, but said he was 
hopeful of having a summit meet- 
ing. 

President Reagan extended foe 
s ummi t invitation last month in a 
letter sent with Vice President 
George Bush to the funeral in Mos- 
cow of Mr. Gorbachev’s predeces- 
sor, Konstantin U. Chernenko. 

In the interview, Mr. Reagan re- 
iterated Ms hopes for holding foe 
meeting despite foe killing March 
24 of Major Arthur D. Nicholson 
Jr. of foe UR Army by a Soviet 
gnard in East Germany. 

“This was a murder, a cold- 
blooded murder," President Rear 
gan said, “and it reflects on the 
difference between the two societ- 
ies, one that has no regard for hu- 
man Hfe and one like our own that 
thinks it’s foe most important 
thing. 

“And, yes, 1 want a meeting even 
more so,’ to sit down and look 
someone in foe eye and talk to him 
about what we could do to make 
sure nothing of this kind happens 
again." 

The official who confirmed the 
positive nature of Mr. Gorbachev’s 
reply said that foe killing of Major 
Nicholson had clouded arrange- 
ments for a summit meeting and 
that a more detailed Soviet reply 
about such a meeting was expected. 

In foe 32-minute interview. Pres- 
ident Reagan also contended that 
disaffection among Nicaraguans 
with the leftist Sandinist govern- 
ment was increasing. He again 
blamed “rival factions" among 
blacks in South Africa for much of 
the recent violence there. 

Mr. Reagan said negotiations in 
Geneva to reduce nuclear weapons 
were “going forward" despite Sovi- 
et objections to Ms emphasis on 
missile defenses in his Strategic De- 
fense Initiative, popularly known 
as “star wars." 

The initiative, “is purely re- 
search,” President Reagan said. 

He said that the Soviet foreign 
minister. Andrei A Gromyko, 
“himself said there's no way to con- 
trol that, that it's not covered by 
any treaty, and foe plain truth of 
the matter is they’ve been doing foe 
same kind of research in foe same 
areas and started it before we did.” 

Discussing his opposition to the 
San (hoists, {resident Reagan said: 
“I think there are more people who 
are opposing the regime right now 
in Nicarag u a than actually fought 
in foe revolution." 

“And it seems to be growing," he 
added. 

Mr. Reagan said: “You only 
have to look at foe flood of refugees 
that are escaping from Nicaragua 
to realize that foe people of that 
country are not lumpy with that 
totalitarian regime. 

President Reagan reiterated his 

support for anti-government rebels 
in Nicaragua. 

The president said that, “as long 
as foe people of Nicaragua are still 
striving for the goals of foe revolu- 
tion that they themselves fought, I 


think that we're obligated to try 
and lend them a hand." 

Mr. Reagan acknowledged that 
his policies toward Nicaragua were 
unpopular with Congress aod the 
public, but be blamed this on foe 
“very sophisticated lobbying cam- 
paign” by foe San d mis ts and their 
Soviet and Cuban backers. 

“There has been a dirinfonna- 
( Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 

Pentagon 
Alleges Soviet 
Has a Space 
Defense Plan 

By Joseph Firchetr 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Seeking to refute 
charges that foe United States is 
moving unilaterally to put weapons 
in space, the Pentagon reported 
Tuesday that the Soviet Union was 
steadily developing its own anti- 
missile defenses, some of which will 
be put into orbiL 
The report said that foe Soviet 
program has violated the Anti-Bal- 
listic Missile Treaty whereas foe 
treaty authorizes U.S. research into 
President Ronald Reagan’s Strate- 

Panel votes fewer MXs than 
sought by Reagan. Page 3. 

gic Defense Initiative, popularly 
known as “star wars." 

The 1972 anti-missile treaty, 
considered foe keystone of arms 
control agreements, prohibits both 
sides from erecting extensive ballis- 
tic-missile defenses, thus protecting 
deterrence by leaving each side un- 
defended against a retaliatory 

strike. 

But the U.S. report, “Soviet Mili- 
tary Power 1985,” said: “The ag- 
gregate of the USSR’s ABM and 
ABM-related activities suggests 
that the USSR may be preparing an 
ABM defense of its national terri- 
tory." 

At the Geneva disarmament 
talks, Soviet delegates maintain 
they are trying to halt U.S. pro- 
grams that they say are liable to 
start hostilities in space. 

U.S. officials say foe spec talks 
must cover both countries’ space 
programs. Washington maintains 
that UR research into ballistic- 
missile defenses is partly a reaction 
to similar Soviet programs under 
way for nearly two decades. 

[In Moscow, Tass press agency 
called foe U.S. report a “fantastic 
piece of fiction." It said: “The big- 
ger the lie and the more it is repeat- 
ed, foe more people believe it/*] 
Disclosing previously classified 
material about Soviet missile tech- 
nology, the Pentagon depicted a 
steady development of radars and 
lasers that could enable Soviet 
leaders to quickly set up an anti- 
missile umbrella over Soviet terri- 
tory. 

It made the following points: 

• Advanced radars are replacing 
old ones along Soviet frontiers and 
are capable both of detecting in- 
coming missiles and directing anti- 
missile shots. 

• The Soviet Union is develop- 
ing an anti-missile unit or a type 
thaL would take only a few months 
to erect at important military sites. 

» A possible lynchpin for a na- 
tionwide anti-ballistic missile net- 
work is a giant radar nearing com- 
pletion in Siberia at Krasnoyarsk. 

• The world's only operational 
anti-ballistic missile sykem. the 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 2) 


rf* 


INSIDE 


ONS k' 


r feura* 0 

SS£^‘ 


<*&* 


in Sudan held rallies on foe eve 
of a strike against the govern- 
ment. Page 2. 

■ 50 Honduran deputies arc ac- 
cused of “altering foe constitu- 
tion" for voting to dismiss five 
Supreme Court judges. Page 8. 

■ A Bulgarian attempt to as- 

similaieTurts has resulted in 
numerous deaths, foe U.S. State 
Dcpartmcnt.sMd. Page 5. . 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Wbp is that man hawking Ms 

sheet music on the streets of 
Paris? *; Page 9. 

» A U& Senate committee vot' 
jo require foe. president to 



Of the Pampered Paris Dog and His Sacred Right to Pollute 



GEORGETOWN —Dwayne 
Vflbtnova’s 66-64 victory over 
of the NGAA basketball 
Kentucky.” Page 17. 


By Ben Sherwood 

Los Angela Tuna Service 

PARIS — On a Sunday afternoon at foe 
elegant restaurant Chez les Anges, well- 
groomed guests sat at beautifully arranged 
tables savoring foe house specialty, poached 
eggs in wine sauce. At the same time, crouch- 
ing under the furniture, other visitors panted 
and scratched, eagerly awaiting their turn. 

Doggy bags are out of the question in this 
respected establishment on foe Left Bank of 
foe Seine. 

.“There is no reason to have them,” said 
foe mat ire (Thdiel, Jean Plahchenault, as he 
surveyed foe crowded dining room. “Dogs 
are welcomed in our rsiauram. In fact, 
when they arrive, we automatically ask the 
chef to prepare a special p<U6 of rice or meat 
for them, free (rfenarge. 

“They’re a f act oHi/e here. If we refused to 
serve them, we would lose a substantial fol- 
lowing.” 

There are almost 700,000 dogs in Paris, 
one for about every three humans, and near- 
ly everyone here caters to them — in brasse- 
ries, bars, boutiques, restaurants, hotels and 
offices. 

If dogs seem to be everywhere, so does the 
mess they make. Accenting to people who 
have studied foe problem, a careless Parisian 


would be likely to sully his tv her shoes an 
average of once every 262 feet (80 meters). 

Back, in 1856, there were so many dogs in 
Paris that a special tax was levied in an effort 
to discourage the people from acquiring 
more. The law had little effect then, and 
would probably have little effect today. Any 
talk of taxing dog-owners today would be 
regarded as heresy. A recent pall showing 
that 85 percent of all Parisians “like" dogs. 

"The right to own a dog, to take it shop- 
ping and to pollute foe streets is sacred 
here," said a French businessman who dis- 
likes animals. “Americans have their Second 
Amendment' safeguarding foe right to bear 
arms. In France, we have an unwritten right 
to keep dogs. It's taken for granted, and no 
one would dare challenge it." 

With more than nine million dogs, one for 
every six people, France exceeds the canine 
quota of the rest of Western Europe. 

About 34 percent of all French households 
have at least one dog. and 52 percent have at 
least one pet of some kind. There are 6.7 
million cats, 8.4 million birds, and 12.7 mfl- 
lion fish, hamsters and reptiles. 

“The French have an almost biological 
need for dogs and pets," said Jean-Pierre 
Hutin, a dog lover who produces a well- 


known weekly television broadcast about 
pets. “30 Million Friends.” 

“It’s in our blood and our history," he 
said. “Dens have always served important 
actual and psychological needs, and, in the 
future, their role will grow." 

Each year, according to foe Ministry of 
Agriculture, French animal lovers spend 
about $3 billion on their pets, with more than 
half of the total being spent on dogs, often 
for gourmet dog food. 

In a city where fasMon is important, dogs 
arc often dressed to the teeth. On rainy days, 
they take to foe streets in colorful slickers 
and ponchos. In cold weather, they are bun- 
dled up in chic leather and fun And on 
weekends, in restaurants and at parties, they 
may appear in plaid. 

Because dogs are welcome in restaurants 
and at home in boutiques, laws aimed at 
curbing them have proven nearly impossible 
to enforce. 

About four years ago, Paris undertook a 
cleanliness campaign. Its slogan: “Teach 
Him Where the Gutter Is." Today, posters 
show an Airedale terrier saying, "Me, I go 
where I'm told to." Embedded in many ride- 
walks is foe white silhouette of a dachshund 
with an arrow pointing to the gutter. 

The advice is not usually followed, nor are 


laws that require animal owners to induce 
their pets to relieve themselves on streets, at 
parks and in gardens rather than on side- 
walks. 


aty or mis, a figure jess than hair mat tor 
London or New York. And since foe streets 
here are crowded with vehicles, the sidewalk 
are not only convenient but far safer. 

A seven-year-old order from the Police 
Prefecture provides for fining dog owners 
whose animals use foe sidewalk instead of 
foe gutter, but foe order is ignored. 

“ft’s very difficult to treat this problem." 
said Michel Dury. an official in the mayor’s 
office of environment “It’s not foe dog that 
is dirty. It's the master." 

In restaurants and hotels, proprietors are 
left to make the decision about whether to 
admit animals. Only food stores are prohib- 
ited from admitting animals, but foe role is 
often broken. 

Given the size qf the Parisian canine popu- 
lation, few politicians dare tread on the 
rights of animal owners. 

“To pass strict regulations on dog owners 
would not go over well” Mr. Dury said. “It’s 
eiemora% infeasible.” 

Jacques Brenner, a manuscript reader in a 
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 1) 


i 




PI «_u“ia«ntJHpift u .*asfcasH 


r ■Ling - ytam&ajBSSia^^' 


W0PS 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


Goyemment 
Supporters 
Hold Rally 
In Khartoum 


;V \ 


The Associated Press 


. KHARTOUM, Sudan — The 
rulin g Sudanese Socialist Union 
turned out thousands of supporters 
.Tuesday to cheer for President 

• Gaafar Nimeiri on the eve of a 
- strike and demonstration planned 
,by major professional muons to 
■drive him from office. 

Vice President Al-Rashid al-Ta- 
hir Bakr read greetings to the 
Kxowd from President Nnneiri, cur- 
rently on a trip to Washington 
where be met Monday with Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan. 

President Nimeiri’s cable said, 
“The fact that these elements 
turned to violence proves . . . their 
attempts have failed utterly.” 

The government blamed the fun- 
damentalist Moslem Brotherhood, 
radical Arab Baathists and com- 

* munists for three days of rioting 
last week that followed student-led 
demonstrations against recent in- 
creases in commodity prices. 

On Tuesday, doctors in Orodur- 
man and Khartoum North, which 
with Khartoum constitute the capi- 
tal region, joined their Khartoum 
colleagues in refusing to work. 

- Striking doctors said only the 
^Khartoum General Hospital emcr- 
: gency ward remained open “for the 
sake of the people.'’ 

Despite the arrests, and govern- 
ment threats of more, organizers 
. said they still planned to expand 
the strike on Wednesday to involve 
lawyers, judges, university profes- 
sors, engineers and other profes- 
sionals. Their declared aim is the 
-removal of President Nnneiri 
\ Reporters estimated about 3,000 
.■people attended the pro-govern- 
ment rally in Khartoum's main 
‘Martyrs Square. Soldiers joined 
police to keep the peace, but the 

■ rally passed without incident 

. Removal of government subsi- 
dies that had held down food prices 
'and devaluation of the Sudanese 

■ 'currency had been praised by U.S. 
officials who announced in Wash- 
ington Monday that the U.S. gov- 
ernment was releasing $67 millio n 

‘ dollars in 1984 aid money that bad 
cbeen withheld p ending the eco- 
nomic measures. 

- The Reagan adminis tration also 
said it was prepared to work with 
‘Sudan to free an additional $114 

■ milli on in assistance that had been 
‘frozen. 



Reagan Warns Foreign Stales 
Against Sponsoring Terrorism 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Iran Turns Down UN Peace Proposal 


• O 4 



By Herbert H. Denton 


Washington Post Service 


established, then that business of Americans kidi 
trying to find and track down m ail nian groups in 


WASHINGTON Proident' A*® world a few terrorist individ- on trial or executai. 


r pro-Ira- 
were put 


Ronald Reagan has asserted that 
the United States would “go to the 
source" if foreign governments 
were found to be sponsors of ter- 
rorist acts. 

“There is increasing evidence 
that some terrorists in the world are 


uals for some crime — no, go to the 
source, the government that sup- 
ports them.” 

President Reagan did not specify 
what action the United States 
might take in such a case. 


the The message reportedly was con- 

up- weyedby the Swiss diplomatic mis-- 
sion in Tehran. 

ify The Sunday Times article, quot- 
tes ing unnamed Weston intelligence 
sources, said the message had not 


Mr. Reagan refused to confirm 


Uiiu 9WUW uaiviuu m uiw nmiw uv im. i\&ouu iwujvai tv v yrnnui - . , T t C ■ 

Sti?5L*.5ff5J , !L s 5te 


RIYADH (AP) —The UN secretary general, Javrer Pferez de Cofllar, 
has indcated that the Iranian leadershm had turned down hb proposals 

for a comprehensive settlement to the Iraq-Iran war. /. 

However, Mr. Krez de Cnfllar said Monday. after talks with Saudi 
Arabian leaders on the war, that his current mediation efforts would 
continue He arrived in Oman Tuesday for further, talks. 

“It appears that they want to discuss particular issues, but I have a 
comprehensive plan,” Mr. P6rcz de Cu£uar said of the Iranians. Tins 
appeared to mean that die Iranians were eager to arrange a cease-fire on 
attacks on civilian targets. Iraq has said it trill accept a c ompr e h e n sive 

settlement, but not a partial cease-fire. _• 1 


governments,” -President Reagan 
said in an interview Monday. “And 
if that's the case and it can be 


Times in London that the White 


^ ^ Iranian targe* 


U.S. Says Soviet Reply 
Is Positive on Summit 


(Continued bom Page 1) 
tion program that is virtually 
worldwide, and we know that the 
Soviets and the Cubans have such a 
disinformation network that is be- 
yond anything that we can match,” 


^nation against Iran if any of the ^™ on 8 the possible target s, ac- 
^ cording to the newspaper, were 

Iran's main nil export terminal at 

TB Kharg Island in the GuH, its emex- 

101 lieDlV gency; ml export terminal at the 

JL J Sirri Islands closer to the mouth of 

• the Gulf and its main commercial 

L Summit fflB-tahr and Bandar Kho- 

He said: “I guess I should have abSf^rroOTVraid^ do?! 


elaborated more in my answer ” jhinir i she 
“I have made it very plain,” he this kind.” 
said, “and spoken pubtidy on a Last we 
occasions and will < 


discuss any thing of 


Bomb Injures Magistrate in Sicily 

TRAPANI, Sdly (Reuters) — Cado Palermo, a magistrate who has ; SSEsD^ 
inv estigated ar ms a»d drugs gmpg gKng operations and the fS cflan Mafia, I ' 

was injured Tuesday by a bomb mat lolled a woman and her two sons, I ; 
police said. - 

Anihnri ri wiTnmrdiatrfy ordered road blocks around the qty of Trapa- ~ 

ni, on the western Sicilian coast, and called a meeting presided by the 
government’s special commissioner against tbc Mafia, j4 ! •4’s-' £ " 

The bomb, which police said was probably placed in a box on a '■ r>nTED 
pav ement or ««ndgy a car and activated by temote control, exploded as move towa 

two bulletproof cm carrying Mr. Palermo and his-police escort passed ^ for 3 ^ 
by. Mr. Palermo. 37. was slightly injured but .two members of his police ! 
escort were more seriously hurt and hospitalized in serious condition. _ n jp£ r 


Last week, Robert C MacFar- 


number of occasions and will con- inn*, the president's na tional secu- 
tinue to say, we should never forget nty adviser, specifically finWri to^- 


President Gaafar Nimdri of Sudan leaves White Hoose 
Monday after a meeting with President Ronald Reagan. 


Pretoria’s Black Police: 


The Pressure Is Growing 


White House officials said that 
the president was recently given a 
strategy plan for promoting Iris 
Central America polities and that 
it was prepared by bris communica- 
tions director, Patrick J. Buchanan. 

President Reagan said be could 
not discuss new proposals for per- 
suading Congress to approve $14 
mfllion in aid for the Nicaraguan 
rebels and did not know what he 
would do if Congress refused to 
appropriate the money. 

On the recent violence in South 


the holocaust We should never for- rorists “responsive to Iranian 
get it m the sense that this must guidance” to attacks on U.S, titi- 


agam to any people zeas, property and interests. He ad- 
er reason — m the vocatied a proportional militar y re- 
sponse against miHtaiy targets in 


But President Reagan reiterated states that direct terrorist actions 
i view that it would not be right against the United States. 


his view that it would not be right against the United States, 
to commemorate the massacre dnr- A shadowy organization calling 
mg bis trip to West Germany be- itself Islamic Jihad and believed to 
cause most West Germans “were be a group of Shiite Moslem ex- 
either small children or were not tremists with strong I ranian con- 


Neves Has Fourth Operation in Brazil 

SAO PAULO (AFP) — Prtrideatrekct Tancredo Neves of Brazil 
underwent an operation Tuesday for an intestinal hernia, die press >: 

agency ANDA reported. It was the fourth intestinal operation since a® 1 
March 15 for Mr. Neves, and his condition was not immediately known. n . jjfojivc ; 

Mr. Neves, 75, was hospitalized hours before he was to have been sen SrS 1 ■ «, or fc Tcts 

sworn as Brazil's first civilian head of state in 21 years. He underwent s& l» 1 * 

farther surgery March 20 and last Wednesday. Vice President JasfsSamey pots- 

is acting as head of state under BraziTs constitution. ■ $• 

Doctors said earlier Tuesday dial Mr. Neves was fighting off anew ' , }lC si au^ 1 - m 
bout of fever and that they were confident of defeating a bacterial ^mower wen - [ - - 




(Continued from Page 1) 

such as Major van Rooyen, who 
said he was not sure bow loyal be 
would be under the same circum- 
stances. 


don’t stop the children from their 
nonsense we will all starve.” 


bom yet" at the time it occurred, nections has Haimwi resp onsibility 
On tax reform, Mr. Reagan has for the abduction of five Americans 


infection be had contracted. 


fcflWlEii ITLit vC',1 

E0 .b#n.er.>iic- 

-4 kjsv to run ti- •>{■- 


Mr. Balcryi, the Soweto consta- 
ble; seemed also to acknowledge 
the problems — and some of the 
reasons the officers are not popular 
among blacks. “If students throw 
stones, we are told to hit them hard 
and arrest them.” he said in an 
interview. “And that's what we do. 


“I know that some people don't 
like us in Soweto.” he said. “But we 
don’t care.” 


“We are told that we must be 
hard on them,” he said. “My se- 
niors tell me black people want to 
take over the country and run it like 
a Communist country where we are 
all going to starve. We are also 
shown films of people starving in 
Africa and we are told that if we 


■ Black Baby Is Killed 
A year-old black baby was 
burned to death when protesters 
tossed a gasoline bomb that ignited 
a house and nearby shacks in Vee- 
plaas township near Uitenhage, 
The Associated Press quoted the 
police as saying Tuesday. 

Violence flared in at least seven 
townships in the eastern Cape 
Province, the jjolice said. 

At an inquiry into the March 21 
police shootings in Langa town- 
ship, Sergeant Gerhard Stunker 
testified that protesters had thrown 
“many stones” at two armored ve- 
hicles before a patrol began firing. 

His report contradicted the testi- 
mony Monday of the commanding 
officer. Lieutenant John W illiam 
Fouchc, who said that just one 
stone had been thrown before he 
ordered the men to fire. 


appropria te the money. . yet to submit a detailed proposal to who are misting after being kid- 

On the recent violence m South Congress. But be said he envisions napped in Beirut over the past year. 
Africa, he defended the admimstra- one that would have lower rates for Islamic Jihad has also declared that 
tion’s policy, which itjraJJs con- corporations and businesses but it is bedding four of the six other 
stroctive e n ga g ement." This m- wou ld raise “generally more money Westerners missing in Lebanon. 
wives m a inta i nin g rood relations ^ c^po^te sector, but by President Reagan said in there- 
with the regime in Pretoria while ^ of broadening the base.” terview that the United Stales had 
privately sreking changes in its pot- He said there would be “an end been working dosety with allies to 

ities of racial segregation. _ to loopholes that probably exchange information and deal 
“We thmk that we re doing is the were never intended to allow large with the problems (A international 
best, has the best effect, and the pr0 fit-maknig corporations to es-‘ terrorism. “We have date some- 
most effect of anything real we ^ ^ totally tax-free for years thing,” he said. “I think we've had 

could do,” Mr. Reagan said. Just fn< ^ some measure of success.” 


West Germany Sentences Guerrillas 


with the regime in Pretoria while 
privately seeking changes in its pol- 
icies of racial segregation. 

uni. -.-I J — - -- .1 


STUTTGART (Reuters) — Two West German urban guerrillas were 
sentenced to multiple terms of life imprisonment Tuesday far astring of 
murders in 1977. r-.- v- r •<,» j . 

Christian Klar, 32, and Brittle Mohnbanpt, 34, members of the pultiniro 
outlawed Red Army Faction, were found guilty of murdering a federal asU k ne ... 

prosecutor, Siegfried Buback, and the head of the Dresdner Bulk, Jftrgen 
Ponto, and of kidnapping and murdering Hanns-Martin Schkyer, prea- the cost of 

tlent of the Federal Association of Goman Employers. The y were al so ^ 
convicted of murdi-iring six bodyguards in die attacks and of tramping gccasun^ lehr r 
to kill a U^. Army general, Frederick J. Kroesen, in a rocket a tt ack in for Lbj Pent Co.. 

1982. . itiisha-.s Lihihicd d 


could do.” Mr. Reagan said. “Just 
walking away would leave us with 
no abihty to influence them.” 

He reiterated his contention, 
voiced at a news conference March 
21, that rival factions in the South 
African blade c omm unity were in 
part responsible fpr recent vk>- 


U.S. Pond Urges Research 
On New Supersonic Aircraft 


Reagan Names Trade Representative 


WASHINGTON (AP) — President Ronald : 
would nominate Clayton Yeutter, president and 


m said Tuesday he 
executive officer of 


Of Pollution and the Pampered Paris Dog 


(Continued from Page 1) 

Paris publishing house, wrote a 
book and changed his political af- 
filiation to protest the Socialist 
government’s decision in 1984 to 
ban dogs from the Tirileries gar- 
dens next to the Louvre museum. 

“For 25 years, I walked with my 
dog in those gardens,” Mr. Brenner 
said in an interview, while petting 
Falco. his griffon. “And then the 
Socialists came along and kicked 
them out. Well, that did it for me. 
No more Socialists. 

“If they ban dogs in gardens to- 


day, tomorrow they might ban 
them in big cities. The day after 
tomorrow, who knows? It could be 
canine genocide.” 

There is also, however, a vocal 
minority intent on ridding the rity 
of at least some of its dogs. Fabien 
Gruhier, 39, a journalist and unof- 
ficial spokesman for this move- 
ment, said: 

“I like dogs in the absolute sense, 
but I don’t like seeing them in cit- 
ies. They’re not weU adapted to city 
life. They crap everywhere, and de- 


stroy the sanctity of the rity. The 
dps has a need for space to run and 


dog has a need for space to run and 
express itself. It's an insufferable 


PKSONAUT1ES PLUS 

MARY BLUME 

IN THE WEEK B^D SECTION 
OF FRIDAY’S 1HT 


perversion to keep them pent up 
and to take them out only for a 


and to take them out only for a 
toilet fix” 

Besides pollution, the anti-dog 
forces cite other evidence to prove 
that the dog is more pest than pet 


Last year in France, at least four 
persons — a young girl, two elderly 
persons and a postman — were 
killed by dogs. About 500.000 peo- 
ple are bitten by dogs in France 
every year. Of the victims, 3,500, or 
10 a day, are postal carriers, ac- 
cording to Louis Mexandeau, the 
minister of posts and telegraphs. 

In many a ties outside France, 
dogowners are required to clean up 
after their animals on public side- 
walks. Paris has taken another 
route. 

Evoy morning. 80 hdmeted men 
dad in bright green jump suits 
scour the streets of the rity on mo- 
torcycles equipped with mechani- 
cal brushes. With orange lights 
flashing, the cyclists go about 
sweeping and roraying. They cover 
more than 1,000 miles of pavement 
every day, about a third of the rity. 


“Nothing can be solved by vio- 
lence,” he said. “And that isn’t the 
answer. But remember, the vio- 
lence is not just alone stemming 
from a government put-down of 
demonstrators.” 

He added: “You have, in the 
black community there, you’ve got 
rival factions, and the violence is 
sometimes between them, fighting 
each other. And we've seen evi- 
dence of that, and we’ve seen mur- 
ders and some of the 40 deaths have 
been created in among people with- 
out the government participating.” 

President Reagan ndded, “We 
think apartheid is the main prob- 
lem that must be resolved, and 
we're going to continue doing all 
that we can to encourage the gov- 
ernment in its course.” 

The president was also asked 
about another remark from that 
news conference regarding his deci- 
sion not to visit a Nazi concentra- 
tion camp site in West Germany in 
May because an “unnecessary" 
fe rimg of guilt has been imposed 
on today’s German population. 

The remark provoked criticism 
in the American Jewish community 
that Mr. Reagan seemed to be sug- 
gesting that the massacre of the 
Jews be forgotten. 


(Continued from Pkge 1) 
depth of foreign aeronautical com- 
mitment and resolve” 

The report, titled National Aero- 
nautical Research and Devdtrn- 
meni Goals, was made public by 
George A. Keyworth 2d, the White 
House science adviser. 

Mr. Keyworth emphasized that 
the government was in no way 
committed to pouring funds and 
management resources into budd- 


ing initial supersonic transports, or 
SSTs, as it did in the project that 


was canceled in 1971. But be said it 
was placing the groundwork for 
improving fundamental technol- 
ogies, such as engine efficiency, 
noise abatement and high-tempera- 
ture structures. 

“We believe," he said, “that suc- 
cessfully integrating these improve- 
ments could permit 600-passenger 
transport aircraft with speeds up to 
Mach 3JZ over ranges of 5,500 miles 
[8,800 kilometers] with over three 
times the fuel efficiency of current 
supersonic aircraft.” 

Mach 3 1 comes to more than 
2,100 miles an hour at cruising alti- 
tude. The Concorde, the supersonic 
British-French airliner, has a speed 


of about 1,350 mfles an hour and 
carries 100 passengers. 

A range of 5,500 miles would 
allow it to reach Tokyo, which is 
5,433 miles from Los Angeles. 

The 16-member committee of ex- 
perts was created in November 
1982 by a presidential commission 
on aeronautical research and tech- 
nology. 

Nine members are executives of 
the aerospace industry, and the 
<ji3i'rrnan j John E. Sldaer, is a vice 
president of the Boeing Co. who 
was the chid designer of the Boeing 
727 airliner. Five members are 
high-level government officials. 


Mr. Yeutter, 54, wfl] succeed WSKam 
by Mr. Reagan to be labor secretary. 

Mr. Yeutter was deputy special trade r 
istration of Preadent Gerald R. Ford, ai 
government negotiator in trade matters. 


E. Brock, who has been chosen 


has extensive experience as a 


For the Record 


President RouaM Br a gin and President Francois Mitterrand of Franre 
will hold private talks May 8 in Strasbourg, mere Mr. Reagan will 
address the European Parliament, it was announced. (AP) 


A businessman of Libyan origin was shot and seriously wounded < 
Tuesday in Nicosia by an unidentified Arab, police said. There have been j 
several such attacks m Cyprus ftn recent months, and two Arabs have J 
been killed. Reuters) I 


pmiol nei 

temasaKr arc bwCki: 
fl^casoTsd Rcprcsi 
uRoiienW Jr.. 
[#03 a Wisccnrix rr, 
iij plaintiffs ?? 
alienee Ccrjurser jcw 
tribnen r.c cuta ja 
the hi 1 

Hiny people igres :h a: 
bA near' joes to law 
am thin vicucb. 5u: R 
'Ms.dseconsur.iTctfvo* 
si “Never cnde:e<::rats 
fanu effect of havrr.g ii 
ai of plainin'; s' lawyer: 
wtis cfliintry whe ha - > 
'aodonrra i£ r.oiins l! 


Execution Reported in Iran 

Sew York Times Service 
PARIS — The brother-in-law of 
Massoud Rqavi, the Paris-based 
leader of the People's Mujahidin, 
an Iranian group opposed to the 
government of Ayatollah Rnbollah 
Khomeini, was executed in aprison 
in Tehran, the organization «dd 
Monday. A statement said Mo- 
jahed Asghar Nazemi was executed 
in Evin Prison in Tehran last 
month. 


A gas leak from a Bombay factory killed at least three persons Monday, 
the Press Trust of India news agency said Tuesday. The gas was identified 
as sulphur dioxide. (Room) 

A cholera outbreak at a UN refugee caa^ in Somalia has killed at least 
375 people in three days, most of them children, a spokesman for the UN 
High Commisaoner for Refugees said Toesday in Geneva. (AP) 
Britain and France set financial and safety guidelines Tuesday for 
corporations seriting to buDd and operate a bridge and ttumd under the 
En g l ish Chann e l . The British transport secretary, Nicholas Ridley, said 
he expected a plan to be selected by the end of the year. 


hiU.S., the 


Correction 


luwmned f^ m 3 

“to®?. Mien nnr.v farmer 
wr their !oin> 
aattooniinue operating, 
.toptr losses arc stasis 
JJ^highofS90Sb 

gtsssri 


In the People co lumn March 9, the International Herald Tribune 
incorrectly described the ending of the book that was to be the basis for a 
film project by the Americas director Martin Scorsese. “The Last 
Temptation of Christ” does end with a crucifixion. 


I i ® f since ihc ( 
CT of ^ IosSl- 


5°3Cs." 

s ~- 

isttf***?* 




wasec 

Oi Tgp* 




Thyssen Information 


‘Pfe"?**! 


The Thyssen Grou p had a 
good start to the new fiscal year 
of 1984/85. Last year’s areas of 
growth and profitability have 
mostly been maintained, while 
stragglers have been able to 
catch up, Thyssen’s external sales 
worldwide rose by 6% during 
the first half of the fiscal year. All 
divisions are in the black. The 
Group’s result for the first half of 
this year is considerably better 
than that recorded for the same 
period last year. At the recent 
annual stockholders’ meeting, a 
resumption of dividend payments 
for the current fiscal year was 
announced. 


this year. Thyssen steel is again 
expecting a positive result for 
1984/85. 


In the s pecialty steel division , 
all production plants are at 
present working with norma! 
capacity utilization or even better. 
So far, sales have risen by 8%. 
Significant increases in the prices 
of purchased alloying metals, 
quoted in dollars, are having to be 
absorbed. All in all, Thyssen’s 
specialty steel division is again 
expecting a positive r esuit for 
1984/85. 


ing a positive result for 1984/85. 

At Budd , most of the company's 
plants continue to work at full 
capacity. Budd will be achieving a 
significantly positive result. The 
railway passenger car operations, 
in the U.S. are now being run by 
Transit America Inc. Provisions 
were made in last year's annual 
financial statements to cover 
burdens caused by the comple- 
tion of loss-incurring orders 
booked in previous years. At 
Rheinische Kalksteinwerke . the 
positive trend in results is being 
maintained. 


fiscal year, sales rose by 6%. 
The profit situation is stable, and 
this division will also close the 
current fiscal year with a profit 


Thyssen also expects its non- 
consolidated holdin gs to again 
contribute positively to the annual 
result . . 




& 




Thyssen worldwide 1983/84 (October 1, 1983 - September-30, 1984) 


Total sales of the divisions 
Steel DM 10.3 

Specialty steel. DM 3.5 

Capital goods 
and manufactured 
products DM 9.8 

Trading and 

services DM 17.6 


Work force, 
bill, annual average 
bill. 


132,950 


Cl 


The steel division has main- 
tained its production at last year’s 
level. Prices could be gradually 
increased during the past few 
months, but raw materials costs 
have also increased considerably 
due to the strong dollar. Sales 
rose by 11 % during the first half of 


The capital g oods and manu- 
factured products division in- 
creased its sales by a total of 7 % 
during the first half of the current 
fiscal year. At Th yssen Industrie , 
incoming orders increased 
strongly. This and the product mix 
changes of the past few years are 
improving the company’s profita- 
bility. Thyssen Industrie is expect- 


The tradin g and services divi- 
sion has been strongly expanding 
its international business for some 
years. During the first half of this 


Total sales 
Thyssen Group 
Intercompany sales 


DM 41.2 
DM 8.8 


External sales 
Thyssen Group 


DM .32.4 


Balance sheet items 
Balance sheet total DM 19.2 bill. 
Stockholders’ equity DM 2.6 bill. 
Capital expenditure DM 986 mill. 

Depreciation and 

amortization DM 1,120 mill. 

Net income DM 181 mill. 



A 


THYSSEN 


THYSSEN 




• •< I 








Page 3 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1935 


Panel Votes 
Fewer MXs 


In Reagan Bastion, a liberal Step on Pay 


Than Sought 
By Reagan 


By Bill Keller 

New York Timer Service 


By T.R. Reid 

Washington Post Service 

COLORADO SPRINGS —Can 
a amsavarive, heavily Republican 
nonunion dry government find 
happiness with a bold new policy 
championed mainly by organized 
labor and feminists? 


WASHINGTON — A Senate 
Armed Services subcommittee has 
voted to approve production of an- 
other 21 MX missiles next year, 
rejecting President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s request Tor 48, according to 
congressional sources. 


"You're darn right we’re happy 
with comparable worth,” says Rob- 


ert Isaac, a loyal Reagan supporter 
who is mayor of this thriving city of 
250,000 at the foot of Pike's Peak, 


"Some of my Republican friends 
bade in Washington have been 


the city had no choice but to set tip 
a comparable-worth pay scale. 

“It was fundamentally a moral 
issue.” Mr. Zickefoose said. “Sure, 
supply and demand would have 
provided us a clerical force at the 
tower salaries. But that market fact 
wasa result of years dkcrimiiia- 
tion against women workers. We 
fdt we had no right to take advan- 
tage of it.” 

That settled, Colorado Springs 
faced the problem that many critics 
of comparable worth consider to be 
insoluble: Figuring out which jobs 


In 1981. the city committed itself 
to eliminating almost all of that gap 
in four years. The comparable- 
worth plan took full effect in Janu- 
ary. Today, the secretarial supervi- 
sor's pay is within 4 percent of the 
probation officer's. 


The change brought consider- 
able raises for about 500 female 
employees and increased the $90- 
mmion city payroll by about 2 per- 
cent, a relatively small burden for 
the city. 


The vote Monday night by the 
Republican-coo trolled subcommii- 


by i 




abated ft*” In fnxntoooi 

UPROOTED — The Fairmount Hotel in San Antonio, Texas, was put on wheels last 
week for a move toward a new site In the city. The project win eost about SI million. 


tee cm strategic and theater nuclear 
forces was the first assault on the 
president's missile-building pro- 
mam after his series of victories in 
Congress during ibe last two weeks. 


« state in 21 7^ H 


S«f Gue «i 


Companies Take On 
Product liabOJty Suits 

Lawsuits for medi a l mal- 
practice have mushroomed in 
recent years, and so have suits 
by people claiming they have 
been injured by defective prod- 
ucts. The New York Times re- 
ports. 

An overweight man who bad 
a heart attack trying to start a 
lawn mower won SI. 75 nriffin n 
from Sears, Roebuck A Co. on 


doctors’ and corporations’ feet 
to the fire." 


Aral Rain Debate 


May Move Westward 


ingt on- based Road Informa- 
tion Program says winter 
freezes and thaws dug 
55,960,970 of them throughout 
the country, or 29 for every mile 
of pavement 


Voting 7-4 in a closed session, 
the subcommittee turned bade a 
proposal by Senator Sam Nunn, 
Democrat of Georgia, to cut the 
program more deeply in the 1986 
fiscal year, producing only 12 inter- 
continental missiles and slashing 
the planned size of the MX missile 
force to 40 from 100. 


the ground that the starter rope 
was too hard to pull Victor E. 
Schwartz, a Washington corpo- 
rate lawyer, said, “If it had been 
real easy to pull the rope, they 
probably would have been sub- 
ject to liability because a child 
could have pulled it" 

The lawsuits have vastly in- 
creased the oost of liability in- 
surance, which is passed an to 
the consumer. John F. Schmutz, 
a lawyer far Du Font Oo n said 
the suits have inhibited devd- 
opmenl of new products. 

Businessmen are backing a 
lull sponsored by Representa- 
tive Robert W. Kasten Jr., Re- 
publican of Wisconsin, requir- 
ing plaintiffs to prove 
negligence. Consumer activists, 
trim lawyers and many judges 
oppose the bilL 
Many people agree that too 
much money goes to lawyers 
rather than victims.. But Ralph 
Nader, the consumer advocate, 
said, "Never underestimate tiw 
deterrent effect of having thou- 
sands of plaintiffs’ lawyers all 
over the country who have a 
vested interest in holding those 


SSteAa' 

asS: 


a Francois Mhicnatf 
fcourg, where Mtg» \ 
; announced. ^ ! 


Legislation on rad rain died 
last spring when Congress split 
along regional lines — the 
Northeast, with its sensitive 
lakes, versos the Middle West, 
with its coal-burning power 
plants. This year's debate 
promises to be different. The 
New York : 'nmes reports: Re- 
cent studies have shown the 
Rocky Mountains to be threat- 
ened with the same devastation 
that has poisoned Appalachian 
Mountain ecosystems. 

Acid rain, which has been 
Named for the disappearance 
of fish and die destruction of 
some plant hfc, arises from ox- 
ides of sulphur and nitrogen 
emitted by factories, power 
plants and automobiles. Cop- 
per smelters are the source of 
two-thirds of the sulphur oxides 
in tire West, and the pollution 
could worsen. Dozens of new 
power plants and synthetic fuel 
plants arc bring planned. 


Hyping Sin for Profit; 
A Marik Twain Letter 


Congress has already approved 
production of 42 missiles, includ- 
ing 21 to be produced this year; 
they were freed last week in a nar- 
row series of votes. 


Short Takes 

The namber of condors in the 
wild has dropped to 11 this year 
from 15 last year. There are 16 
condos in captivity, the hope is 
that eventually there will be 
enough to repopulate the Cali- 
fornia canyons. 

Potholes, tike robins, are a 
harbinger of spring. The Wa&h- 


“Huckleberry Finn" was 
controversial even in Mark 
Twain’s lifetime, as Michael 
Patrick Hearn, author of “The 
Annotated Huckleberry Finn,” 
notes in a letter to Ibe New 
York Tunes. He says that when 
the Omaha Public Library 
banned Twain's book in 1902, 
the author wrote The Omaha 
World Herald to say: 

"I am fearfully, afraid that 
this noise is doing much harm. 
It has started a number of hith- 
erto spotless people to reading 
‘Hack Finn* out of natural hu- 
man curiosity to learn what this 
is all about — people who had 
not heard of him before; people 
whose morals will go to wreck 
and ruin now. 

The publishers are glad, but 
it makes me want to borrow a 
handkerchief and cry. I should 
be sorry to think it was the 
publishers themselves that got 
up this entire little flutter to 
enable them to unload a book 
that was taking too much room 
in their cellars, but you never 
can teQ what a publisher will 
do. I have been one myself.” 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


The sources said that the Senate 
subcommittee resisted proposals to 
make major cuts in the president's 
missile defease research program, 
the strategic defense initiative pop- 
ularly known as "star wars.” 

The panel voted to cut the Penta- 
gon's S3.7-bniion request for the 
program by between $150 millio n 
and $750 million, depending on the 
ultimate size of the military budget. 

The full Armed Services Com- 
mittee was scheduled (O begin work 
Tuesday on the 1986 military 

spending bffl. 

The Armed Services subcommit- 
tees, in an unorthodox exercise, 
have been drafting three versions of 
a military budget. 

One would allow no increases 
over the current budget except to 
adjust for inflation, which is the 
level favored by the Senate Budget 
Committee. 


The others would allow 3 percent 
or 4 percent in addition. 

The subcommittee's MX vote, 
however, applied to aB three ver- 
sions of its biti. 


In all, the administration pro- 
poses to build 223 MX missies, 
putting 100 in old Minuteman sQos 
in the West and using the rest for 
testing and spares. 


Iti U.S., the 'Fatmfy Farmers 9 Bear Heaviest Burden of Debt 


pretty tougn on tins idea, says Mr. 
Isaac, immediate past president of 
the Republican Mayors' Confer- 
ence. "But I tell them, if they’d try 
it, they’d tike it/* 

Some government officials and 
business leaders in Washington 
have had harsh words for compara- 
ble worth — the idea that women 
working in jobs traditionally filled 
by women should get the same pay 
as men in different jobs that re- 
quire comparable skill and respon- 
sibility. 

A former White House economic 
adviser, William A. Niskanen Jr., 
has called comparable worth “a 
truly crazy proposaL" Clarence M. 
Pendleton Jn, head of theU.S. Civ- 
il Rights Commission, said the con- 
cept was "the looniest idea since 
Looney Tunes.” 

“Yeah, I heard that,” Mr. Isaac 
said with a shake of the head. “We 
wouldn’t call it loony here in Colo- 
rado Springs. 

"Bui what we had before, where 
a secretary is doing a job that's just 
as hard and just as important as a 
truck mechanic, and she’s getting 
$300 less — now, that was loony. 
It’s just basically unfair.” 

The liberal notion of comparable 
worth hit this conservative a ty four 
years ago. Thirty-six City Hall sec- 
retaries, all women, went before the 
City Council to complain that city 
auto mechanics, all men. were 
scheduled to get a higher raise than 
they were. 

"I was sitting at that muring and 
— boom! — there was the issue,” 
said Richard Zickefoose, the city’s 
personnel director. "We didn't ex- 
pect it to come up, but all of a 
sudden we were faced with compa- 
rable worth.” 

Mr. Zickefoose knew that the 
federal Equal Pay Act required 
equal pay for the same work, re- 
gardless of the worker's sex. But the 
law does not apply to workers do- 
ing different jobs, comparable or 
noL 

As the second-largest employer 
in town after the federal govern- 
ment, which has military installa- 
tions here, the city government was 
under minimal competitive pres- 
sure to take on the problem, and 
there was no public employees’ 
union to force the issue. 

But as Mr. Zickefoose and Mr. 
Isaac looked into the secretaries' 
complaint, they came to agree that. 


done mainly by women are compa- 
rable to different jobs done mainly 


by men. 

"The question is, is a secretary’s I 


For this price the city earned 
appreciation from its female work- 
ers. 


But the move has earned the gov- 
ernment the enmity of the local 
Chamber of Commerce and of 
many businesses. They say the dry 
adopted a liberal principle, flouted 
the free market and raised the pay 
scale for clerical workers to astro- 
nomical levels. 

Mayor Issac, a real estate lawyer 
in private life, said the Chamber of 
Commerce should stop carping. 

"We did something fair and just, 
and in return we got ourselves great 
employee morale, lower turnover 
and higher productivity,” Mayor 
Isaac said, "isn't that what the pri- 
vate sector’s always looking foi?” 


job the same as a tire repairman's?” 
Mr. Zickefoose said. “Is a payroll 


Mr. Zickefoose said. "Is a payroll 
clerk comparable to a tree trim- 
mer? And, sure, that's a tough 
question.” 

Colorado Springs drew its an- 
swers from the Hay Guide-Chan 
Profile, devised by Hay & Asso- 
ciates, a Philadelphia consulting 
firm. It assigns points to each job in 
four areas: the knowledge and 
skills required to do the job. the 
ingenuity required, the degree of 
supervision required and working 
conditions. 

This scale gave, for example, 208 


Among the riches of Beverly Hills, 
a little gem of a hotel. 


The Beverly fevllion Is one of two 
small, fashionable Beverly Hills hotels 


that are run In the European style, 
under the direct supervision or the 


under the direct supervision of the 
proprietor himself. And we offer our , 


a S&e&sjf 


guests the ultimate Beverly Hills 
experience', free llmo sendee to 


glorious Rodeo Drive. 


Beverly Pavilion 


points each to the jobs performed 
fay a secretarial supervisor and a 
probation counselor. In 1980, how- 
ever, the probation job, traditional- 


a Max Baril Hotel 

9 360 WWttneMhNL, Beverly Hma,CA90Z1Z.ltelei( Not 691 366. 


ly filled by men, paid $1,709 a 
month, while the superviror, a 
woman, received $1,389, or 23 per- 
cent toss. 


U.S. Drops Flan 
To Make Release 


Of Secrets a Crime 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —Hie Reagan 
administration has decided to drop 
a proposal by the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency to make it a crime for 
government employees to disclose 


national security secrets without 
authorization, officials said. They 


authorization, officials said. They 
said, however, that the administra- 
tion has not ruled out proposing 
qmiTnr legislation in the future. 

The officials said the CIA joined 
in a "consensus” decision last wed: 
not to proceed with a proposal by 
William J. Casey, the director of 
central intelligence, to send the 
provision to Congress as part of the 
proposed Intelligence Authoriza- 
tion Act far the 1986 fiscal year, 
which begins OcL 1. 

The proposal would have penal- 
ized government employees and 
others who have "authorized ac- 
cess” to classified information for 
deliberately disclosing secrets .that 
"reasonably could be expected to 
damag e the national security” to 
anyone not authorized to receive 
the information. 


pin Somalia has fafc 
**ren,aspokesnuBfe 
esday m Geneva, 
afety guidelines Tee 
a bridge and turns! e 
3Wary, Nicholas Rifc. 
id of the vear. 


nzenaational Hodflr 
c that was to beds to 
Vfartin Scorsese. Ik 
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(Continued from Page 1) . 

>. reckoning, when many fanners will 
‘ not qualify for their loans they 
need to continue operating. 

• Paper losses arc staggering. 
From a record high of $9081 bfflkm 
. in January 1981, farm equity has 
dropped by: 11 percent to about 
. $811 taUkm, with a further drop to 
$805 billion expected tins year. - 
“Such a string of declines quali- 
fies as the worst since the Great 
Depression of the 1930s,” says 
Deane’s Agricultural Report, an 
. industry newsletter. 

* An Iowa State University econo- 
mist, Neil E Harl, said, "Unless a 
major restructuring of farm debt 
takes place, the prospect is for mas- 
sive loan defaults with consequent 

1 economic damage of major propor- 
. dons to rural communities as wcU 

• as to lenders and borrowers. 

Emanuel Mdichar, a senior 
economist at the Federal Reserve 


False Bomb Afert inToronto 


Las Angeles Tima Service 

TORONTO — A threat to blow 
up Toronto's public transit system 
put the city imo an uqnecedented 
state of alert Monday as thousands 
of police, security agents and dogs 
patrolled the bus ami subway sys- 
tems whik riders stayed away. Sev- 
eral tours after the tnw set for the 
explosion police reported finding 
no trace of .bombs. The threat came 
last Tuesday from a group identify- 
ing itself as the Armeman Secret 
Anuy for the Liberation of Our 
Homeland. 


System,' has calculated that about 
210JXXkfann operators, of a total 
of 625,000 nationwide, have dcbl- 
to-asset ratios above 40 percent 
and are in danger of losing their 
farms. Many of them are farmers in 
the Midwest who expanded and 
took on greater debt during the 
1970s. 

Harold F. Bienuyer, professor 
emeritus of agricultural economics 
at the University of Missouri, be- 
lieves the problem is worse. He said 
that “half of aQ funtime fanners are 
in jeopardy.” 

He also describes as "so much 
fluff” the oft-heard allegation that 
farmers are in trouble because of 
mismanage ment; . . 

“The one exception is that some 
individual farmers went wQd in 
speculative leveraging of land-buy- 
ing in (he 1970s. They were greedy, 
they left themselves nocadnc® and 
tb^ deserve only a Kttle sympathy 
and no help. But they are a tiny 
minoti ty among fanners who are in 
trouble,” he said. 

Major social changes will result 
from fanner’s debt problems, most 
experts agree. 

William G. Lcsher, who was as- 
sistant secretary cl agriculture for 
economics during President Ron- 
ald Reagan's first term, said- "On 
the family level on the community 
level, the consequences will be se- 
vere in some instances. Assets are 
being depredated” as inflationary 
expects turns fad 

None of which comes as news to 
Pete Brent He lost his Iowa grain 
and cattie farm in 1983 because his 
debt was more than tbe farm could 


earn. Today he helps make ends 
meet by comudmg other farmers 
and working two newspaper routes 
in the Des Moines snbnrns. - 
’ After working for yearn as a 
hired hand and then farming on 
rented land, Mr. Brent bought 320 
acres (129 hectares) in 1979, paying 
$850 an acre with R5 percent inter- 
est on his loan — a good rate at the 
time He raised rattle and spy- 
beans. • 


"Even ttough my wife was work- 
ing and paying some of our ex- 
penses, the farm couldn’L pay for 
itself,” Mr* Brent, 47, said “In 
1980 I did my cashflow projec- 
tions on cattle and soybeans, using 
all the expert data I could find I 
actually produced more pounds of 
beef and mcar beans than I project- 
ed But die price was enoncons. I 
projected $70 rattle and it didn’t 
come in that way. 

*T lost over $20,000 that year, 
and I .was $20,000 short on my 
payments. ^ You roll your notes over 
m this situation and now you’re 
paying interest on the interest,” he 
continued 


"And then the interest rates went 
up. With the inflation mentality, I 
said I had to do more, I said I 
would get even the next year. But 
the hole kept getting deeper. Then 
land prices began to fad, and that 
was it” 

Mr. Kent reached a point at 
which tbe ratio of his assets to his 
debts was no longer high enough to 
keep him in business. 

Mr. Mdichar of the Federal Re- 
serve said that sooner or later. 


things had to change. Land values, 
dropping from their annalistic 


dropping from their unrealistic 
peak in 1981, had to reflea then- 
value as a means of agricultural 
production. 

Now, according to Mr. Mdichar, 
“the right thing is ha ppe ni ng from 
the pant of view of economists, bat 
there is human suffering. A chef 
sets op in business and fails, he 
beco m es a chef agpm- A chef fails, 
he doesn’t go out and kill himself. 
Fanning scanebowis different. I'm 
sony to say ” 

Thursday: Advances in biotech- 
nology leone mam farmers facing 
difficult choices. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1935 


Duarte Party Triumphs in Salvador Vote 


By Michael Getlcr 
and Robert J. McCartney 

(yajfringtorr Past Service 

SAN SALVADOR — The 
Christian Democratic Party of 
President Jose Napdebn Duarte 
won an overwhelming victory in 
elections Sunday, removing conser- 
vative rivals horn control of the 
National Constituent Assembly 
and of a majority of the country’s 
town balk according to unofficial 
but reliable totals. 

The assembly and the town balls 
had been the main political power 
base for the Salvadoran right, bat 
the returns from 80 percent of poll- 
ing places showed a stunning rever- 
sal. The centrist Christian Demo- 


Man Replaces Woman 
As U.K.’s Talking Clock 


Reuters 

LONDON — Tone ran out for 
one of Britain's female bastions 
Tuesday morning with the intro- 
duction of the first male talking 
dock. 

After 49 years of domination by 
women. Brian Cobby, a baritone, 
was selected from among 5JOOO ap- 
plicants as the new telephone voice 
to give Britons the exact time. His 
predecessor, a contralto, was re- 
tired after 22 years of service. 


crats and a small allied party 
increased their number of seals 
from 26 to 34 in the 60-seat assem- 
bly, while the conservative parries 
went from 34 to 26, the results 
indicated Monday. 

in addition, the Christian Demo- 
crats apparently won about 70 per- 
cent of the 262 mayoralties, up 
from about a third previously. The 
tallies were compiled by the Chris- 
tian Democrats on the basis of offi- 
cial results from individual polling 
places. 

The campaign manager of a ma- 
jor conservative party conceded 
that it had received a “drastically” 
reduced vote. 

The vote was widely viewed as a 
turning point in Salvadoran poli- 
tics and m the government's Un- 
backed war against left-wing guer- 
rillas. During his first rune months 
in office, Mr. Duarte repeatedly 
was thwarted by the conservative 
majority in the assembly. 

Although voter turnout was low 
compared to last year’s presidential 
election, the manner in which the 
election was carried out was seen as 
reflecting a consolidation of the 
democratic process here. 

Observations of the voting indi- 
cated that all parties cooperated in 
monitoring polling sites across the 
country and that the armed forces 
remained neutiaL This fourth elec- 
tion in three years was by far the 


most peaceful, with the army out in 
force. 

One big question was what 
course the conservatives' extremist 
factions wifi now take: whether 
they will remain within the demo- 
cratic process or resort again to the 
large-scale political violence of 
three or four years ago. Another 
question was whether Mr. Duane’s 
added political strength would en- 
able him to achieve progress in the 
peace talks that he launched last 
October with the leftist insurgents. 

Mr. Duarte addressed both of 
these questions in an interview with 
a small group of U.S. reporters 
Sunday night- He offered to grant 
government posts to conservative 
political parties if they endorsed his 
goals, and other Christian Demo- 
cratic leaden indicated that Mr. 


contrast between the country now 
and at the time of the 1982 legisla- 
tive elections — when the guerrillas 
were much stronger, and when 


rightist vigilante groups and ex- 
tremist elements in the armed 


Duarte would move cautiously in 
such areas as strengthening Ms land 


such areas as strengthening Ms land 
reform, which the conservatives 
have opposed. 

“I will offer my hand to help 
them," Mr. Duarte said of the con- 
servatives. “I will invite than to sit 
down, and talk to them." 

The president said he thought 
thar his opening of the dialogue 
with the guerrillas was the “deci- 
sive" factor in winning the election. 
“The people received the message. 
The people want peace,” Mr. 
Duarte 

Mr. Duarte drew attention to the 


ironist elements in the armed 
forces were murdering hundreds of 
persons each month. 

“You’ve been in these elections, 
and you've seen the difference," 
Mr. Duarte said. “This is because 
the armed faces were really there, 
helping the democratic process. 
They deserve a recognition of 

that " 

The first official results were not 
expected until Tuesday, a Central 
Elections Council official said. But 
die Christian Democrats compiled 
returns on the basis of telephone 
reports to their party headquarters 
from poll watchers who monitored 
the drawing up of the official taffies 
at polling sites. The party did the 
same last year, and its results 
proved to be accurate. 

The party’s returns also tallied 
almost exactly with results of an 
exit poll conducted by a U.S.- 
based, S panish-langnapft television 
network Sunday. Luis Lagos, cam- 
paign manager for the conservative 

National Conciliation Party or 
PCN, did not dispute the Christian 
Democrats’ returns. The other ma- 
jor conservative party, the Nation- 
alist Republican Alliance or Arena, 
declined to comment. 



Presideiit Josi Napoleta Doarte stndl]^ omqmteri2^ residts ^ El Sdrador dectibiis. 


The Christian Democrats' re- 
turns showed their party taking 54 
percent erf the popular vote nation- 
wide, compared to 37 percent for 
the conservative coalition that in- 
cludes the PCN and Arena. Smaller 
parties picked up the remaining 
votes. 


The conservatives' main losses 
were suffered by the PCN, whose 
share of the vote dropped from 19 
percent last year to an apparent 8 
percent Sunday. Arena, led by Ro- 
berto DAubuissan, maintained its 
share of the vote at 29 percent. 
Under terms of the coalition, how- 
ever, the two conservative parties 


Taiwan, Nicaragua : Unusual Couple 


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By Jim Mann 

Los Angda Tima Service 

TAIPEI — Taiwan and Nicaragua may qualify 
as one of the oddest couples in the community of 
nations. 

The Taiwan-based Nationalist Chinese, who are 
exiles from the mainland because of the Chinese 
Communist victory 35 years ago, are fervent capi- 
talists and dependent on dose, if unofficial, ties to 
the United States. The Sandinists in Nicaragua are 
Marxists and hardly fond of Washington. 

Despite such deep differences, Nicaragua's left- 
ist government continues to recognize Taiwan, 
rather than the Communist administration in Beij- 
ing. as the kgrtimaie government of China. And 
Taiwan is carefully keeping up its diplomatic ties, 
trade and loan agreements with Nicaragua. 

“Our presence there prevents the Communist 
fKitMitf from Eating in " Chang C hing -yn direc- 
tor erf Taiwan’s government information office, 
said recently. “Otherwise, you would have a much 
greater Marxist influence inside Nicaragua.’' 

Its relations with the Sandinists illustrate the 
complexities and anomalies in Taiwan’s foreign 
policy as it seeks to preserve its continuing claim as 
the legitimate government erf all China. 

Only 26 countries have diplomatic relations with 
Taiwan, the largest being South Korea, Saudi Ara- 
bia and South Africa. The United States severed 
official relations in 1979 in favor of beginning 
relations with Beijing. 

Taiwanese officials and some foreign analysis 
say that Taipei also has substantive, though unoffi- 


cial, relations with about 50 other nations and that 
these ties have improved in recent years. 

Through nongovernment agencies such as the 
American Institute in Taiwan, many of the world's 
major countries maintain missions here to handle 
commerce and other matters with Taiwan, winch, 
now ranks 13th in international trade. 

Still, these ties are tmoffidaL Taiwan is going to 
great lengths to keep up all the formal diplomatic 
ties it has. 

“It is our policy to maintain relations with all 
non-Commnnut countries," said Mr. Chang, the 
information official. 

Taiwan has also been courting small island- 
countries in the Caribbean and the South Padfk in 
its struggle for international recognition. In (he 
last three years, Taipei has established ties with Sl 
L ucia, Sl Christopher and Nevis, and Dominica 
— all in the Caribbean. 

Taiwan’s most intense efforts to preserve diplo- 
matic recognition have been in Central America, 
the one region of the wodd where it has successful- 
ly maintained a solid core of diplomatic support. 
Not only Nicaragua, but H Salvador, Guatemala, 
Honduras. Costa Rica and Panama recognize the 
government in Taipei as Me government of all 


Jeannine Deckers, 52, 
The ^Singing Nun,’ Dies 


United Press International 

WAVRE, Belgium — Jeannine 
Deckers, 52, the “Singing Nun’* 
who won fame 20 years with 

the «wig “Dominique,'’ been 

founddead along with a woman 
friend from an overdose of sleeping 
pills, a spokesman for the state at- 
torney's office said Tuesday. 


He said police had been warned 
y a friend who had received an 


alarming letter from Mrs. Deckers, 
52, who shared an apartment with 
Annie Pescher, 41. 

“The cause of dead was a mas- 
sive dose of barbiturates swallowed 
vrith alcohol," the spokesman said. 
“Financial trouble seems to have 
been one of the reasons." 


Harold Peary, 76 , 

‘The Great GfldersJeeve’ 

TORRANCE. California (AP) 


— Harold Peary, 76, who played 
“The Great Gilders Jeeve" during 


Officials of mainland China and Nicaragua re- 
portedly talked last year about improving their 
relations, but no change resulted ftom the meeting. 

A U A State Department official e xp res s ed the 
view that the relationship between the Chinese 
Nationalists and Nicaragua “is an anomaly, and it 
wonT last forever.” • * 


radio’s golden age and helped make 
“You’re a hard man, McGee" a 
catch-phrase, died Saturday. 

Mr. Peary, a Portuguese immi- 
grant boro Hanold Jcsc Pereira de 
Faria, retired four years ago after 
more titan six' decades in show 
business. He tas known Tor Ms 


Ai Severance, 80, a former VII- 
lanova University basketball coach 
who look four teams to NCAA 
tournaments, of a he&rt attack just 
before the Wildcats won the 
NCAA championshi p ganv he had 
gone to see in Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. 

Gregorio Seflthn, 84, the Rus- 
sian-born painter best known for 
his surrealistic stfll Gfes .and por- 
traits, MoSdaym Robe: 


Americans use planes like Europeans use 
taxis. Not only because their country is so 
vast, but also because their climate is so 
hotly competitive. 

They dare not miss out on any business 
opportunity. 

Of course getting them to the right place at 
the right time presents problems. Planes are 
not taxis. 

So how can an airline effectively connect 


all the major cities? 

We got around the problem by re-inventing 
the wheel. 

We have created two central hubs whose 
spokes radiate out to directly link over 55 
cities in the US. These hubs are at Dallas/Fort 
Worth and Chicago. 


Airlines 


And now we are adding three more 
spokes to our wheel. From London and Paris 
you can fly non-stop to Dallas/Fort Worth. 
And from Frankfurt you can fly non-stop to 
both Dallas/Fort Worth and Chicago. 

Which means you can get to almost any- 
where your business takes you in America on 
one ticket, with one airline, with fust one stop. 

Doesn't that sound better than flying 
around In circles? 


lb meet the demands of the 
fast-moving, time-is-money 


American business travellei; 

we re-invented the wheel. 


50 Deputies 
Are Charged 
hi Honduras 
Court Crisis 


will divide assembly seats almost 

eq uall y, 

Amongreasous died by political 
observers for the conservatives’ de- 
feat was a welt-organized grass- 
roots campaign by the Christian 
Democrats in the countryside, 
where they historically have been 
weak. 


portrayal of Throckmorton P. Gil- 
dersleeve, the neighbor of Fibber 
McGee. The character, boro in 
1937, was a blunderer with a heart 
of gold. 

lie was such a Mt that in 1941 
Mr. Peary was given Ms own show, 
“The Great Gaderdeeve." 

The show continued until 1958, 
although Mr. Peary left the pro- 
gram in 1950. He was replaced by 
Willard Wa terman, an actor who 
sounded almost exactly like Mm. 


■ Other Deaths: 

Michel Cadoret, 72, the French 
abstract artist whqpamted the mu- 
rals at the New School of Social 
Research in New Yoit symbolizing 
French-American friendship, 
March 22 near Paris. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
As a constitutional aim continued 
in Honduras, a .criminal, court 
judge charged 50 members of the 
National Assembly with the crimi- 
nal offense of "altering die consti- 
tution" by voting to dismiss five 
justices of the Supreme Court and 
naming .five new justices in their 
place. 

Judge Marco Antonio Lanza 
also asked the assembly Monday to 
strip the 50 deputies of their legal 
immunity from criminal prosecu- 
tion so that police could' arrest 
ih^TTL That is unfikriy to happen, 
however, because the 50 fonn a 
majority among the 82 members of 
the unicameral legislature. 

“We would fight until they IriU or 
imprison every last one of ns,’ said 
Nicolas Citiz Torres, a leader of the 
opposition National Party and one 
of deputies named in ihi indict- 
ment “There would be a lot of 
violence." 

“We would not beaMe to con trol 
our supporters if they deny us the 
legal right to express our opinions.’' 

Judge Lanza’s action was the lat- 
est development in a conflict be- 
tween die assembly majority and 
President Roberto Suazo Cordova 
over who shall sit on the Supreme 
Court 

Behind the crisis is a fight about 
who will be the governing Liberal 
Party’s candidate in November’s 
presidential elections. Mr. Suazo, 
who cannot succeed himself as 
president has named a preferred 
successor, while the assembly lead- 
er; Efrain Bu Giron, wants the 
nomination for bimsdf. 

The Supreme Court is involved 
in the dispute because the chief 
justice is one of the five members of 
the Electoral Tribunal, which is 
charged with settling disagree- 
ments aver the delegate lists to the 
nominating conventions that are 
scheduled to meet this month. 

The crisis began last week when 
die assembly voted to remove five 
Supreme Court justices loyal to Ml 
S uazo. The assembly accused the 
five justices of comiption. 

Mr. Suazo retaliated by declar- 
ing the assembly action illegal and 
imprisoning Ramon VaUadares 
Soto, who had been named as the 
new dtief justice, on charges of 
treason. ~ 

After a weekend Mil, the assem- 
bly refused to withdraw the 
changes it ordered on the Supreme 
Court 

The aimed forces, seen by both 
tides as the potential arbiter in the 
conflict pledged to remain neutraL 
(LAT, ATT, Ranerx} 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


sjjSS 

*4arco .A,,. . ** 

K>ng the gi i^Jotn , 

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- By Don Obcrdorfcr 

•; fKa»A/ng/£yi /»a« 5emcc ; 

WASHINGTON —A Bulgarian 

gfwgrnment progr am aimed at obli- 
terating the special identity of the 


of nnmerous ngnthc amo n g the 
population, State Department offi- 
cials say. Bdgarian security aunts 
are also reported to have been 
Irifled.- 

Tbe assistant secretary of state 
for human rights, Elliott Abrams, 
oo Monday called it a “gunpoint 
, program.*' The public statement 
y, was the first by the U.S. govern- 
ment, although the United States 
has brought up the matter privately 
with Bul garian o fficials ww lffiri* 
has denied the allegations. 

Mr. Abrams’s statement came as 
the Turkish prime minister, Turgut 
Oral, arrived here Monday on an 
official visiL 

Reports of the Bulgarian cam- 
paign have prompted large street 
demonstrations *Hmp g Turks in Is- 
tanbul and have brought at feast 
two offiriaj protests to. Bulgaria 
from the Turkish government. 

“We have reason to bdieve that 
^several hundred members of the 
Turkish minority have been lolled 
and more wounded,” a State De- 
partment official said. “We also 



Spain’s EC Pact: Erasing a Historic Barrier 1 worldwide MTERTAmrayr 


Fernando Mortal 


By Stanley Meislcr 

Lot Angela Timet Service 

RONCESVALLES, Spain — 
Here in a famous pass through the 
Pyrenees, it is easy to understand 
why Spaniards are treating their 
impending entry into the European 
Community as a momentous step 
in their history. 

A kind of euphoria has raced 
through the political life of Spain 
since the cod erf last week, when the 
agreement on the entry of Spain 
and Portugal was announced. 

In Madrid, King Juan Carlos I 
and Queen Sofia. honored Foreign 

Minister Fernando Morin and his 
negotiating team with a reception 
at their palace. Juan Carlos spoke 
movingly of “the emotion I fed 
both as a Spaniard and as a king.” 

Mr. Morin, a professor who 
likes to at in the comer of an old 
Madrid cafi and read his newspa- 
pers, has often been the butt of 
political jokes in Spain. But this 
week, Cambio 16, Spain's fearing 
newsmagazine, celebrated him. 
While the cover drawing depicted 
him as a Don Quixote, the headline 
proclaimed: “The conquistador of 
Europe: Morin wowed them. " 

ABC, an influential newspaper 
with rightist leanings, headhneti its 
mam editorial “A historic day.” El 


Pals, an influential newspaper on 
the left, headlined its main editorial 
“Hallelujah for Europe.” 

ABC said the entry ranked with 
sach events in 20ih century Spanish 
history as the Civil War and the 
restoration of democracy. El Pals 


long last, Spaniards can feel them- 
selves part of Europe. 

Here in RoncesvaHes, the reality 
of the Pyrenees curies the separa- 
tion between Spain and the rest of 
Europe. An old European joke has 
it that “Europe ends at the Pyre- 


In RoncesvaHes, the Pyrenees form the 
boundary. Hie joke 'Europe ends at the 
Pyrenees, 9 was not a joke in the Middle Ages. 


said that entry would “rupture the 
traditional isolation that has been 
hanging around our necks since the 
religious wars” of the Middle Ages. 

Politicians of all parties hailed 
the move. Newspapers on all sides 
carried special supplements ex- 
plaining the EC and European af- 
fairs. The Madrid daily Ehario 16 
promised, over an explanatory arti- 
cle: “All that worries you and all 
that you want to know about the 
entry into the European Communi- 
ty” 

As far as Spain is concerned, the 
entry into the EC has little to do 
with economics but everything to 
do with history and psychology. At 


Soviet Space Defense Plan Described 


ekend lull the as* 
1 to withdraw & 
fered on the Spa 

forces, seen bvhoti 
otentia! arbiter k ik 
^ed to remain naan! 

(LAT. SYT. ftsay 












have reports that same security 
personnel have been killed ana 
wounded, but we don’t have specif- 
ic numbers " 

The official mid the rampfligri 
began last year arid reached a peak 
early this year. 

Mr. Abrams said in his state- 
ment, “The government of Bulgaria 
appears determined to denational- 
ize nlinift and cultural distinc- 
tions” of its one million ethnfc 
Turks. 

He said that Bulgarian police 
and military have sought to coerce 
members of the Tu rkish minority 
to give up their Titridsh identity 
and to adopt Slavic names. 


by tanks have surrounded entire 
villages,' transporting the inhabit- 
ants to cehtim administrative cen- 
ters for renaming. There are also 
reliablereports that some resiszera 
have been summarily shot,” Mr. 
Abrams said. 

He also said that all Bulgarian- 
supported Turitishrlanguage radio 
broadcasts have ceased and that 
Turidsh-language newspapers are 
no longer published. . 

The Bulgarian Embassy, in writ- 
ten comments, rejected reports of 
forced changes of names by “so- 
called Bulgarian Turks,” calling the 
accounts “fabricated.' and un- 
grOIBldeds.",;;. - 

A statement issued in Sofia said 
that eveiy citizen has the right to 
choose or change a name under 
Bulgarian law mid that a “volun- 
tary change of names” does not 
jeopardize a person's rights. 

A Turkish Foreign Ministry 
spokesman, Yalhn Eralp, stud last 
week that Bulgaria had iqected 
both of Turkeys diplomatic notes 
about the treatment of Bulgarian 
Turks. 

Mr. Eralp said his government’s 
protest had been motivated by hu- 
manitarian concerns and . had 
“nothing to do with intervening in 
another country’s internal affair s** 

He added: “These people, while 
they are Bulgarians, have the same 
blood as Turks. They are our kins- 
men.” 

• Some reports circulating in Mos- 
cow, winch could not be confirmed, 
indicated that at feast 40 Bulgarian 
soldiers had been.kQIed in recent 
clashes with members of the Turk- 
ish minority. According to one re- 
port, two Bulgarian Politburo 
members had been, called to Mos- 
cow to discuss suppression of the 
Turks. 

State Department officials said 
the United States had raised the 
fate of the Turkish minority with 
Bulgaria several times, without sat- 
isfaction. 

“The government of Bulgaria 
considers thin rienarinnflliTgtiVv n 
campaign to be strictly an internal 
matter,” Mr. Abrams said. “We 
cannot agree. Bulgaria’s actions 
constitute s violation of the basic 
human rights of the Turkish minor- 
ity” 

Mr. Abrams said the administra- 
tion would continue to discuss the 
matter with Bulgaria, and would 
seek to focus -international atten- 
tion oh it . .. 


(Continued from Page 1 j 
system around Moscow code- 
named Galosh, is bang rebuilt with 
advanced radars and faster nus- 
al« It provides t raining for spe- 
cialists who could staff an expand- 
ed Soviet network. 

• A new Soviet interceptor mis- 
sile, the SAM-X-12, is being flight- 
tested. This mobile mi«fle is de- 
signed to intercept U.S. 

fn lwwin<in«nnl mreoDpc amt (be 

medium-range Pershing-2 
being deployed in West Germany. 

• The first Soviet laser weapons, 
to intercept incoming ««««>«*, 
could go into service by the late 
1980s, maddy followed by mare 
powerful lasers to destroy UJL sat- 
ellites. 

• Laser weapons exist in proto- 
type in Soviet military hues, In- 
cluding Sary Shagfln in Soviet Cen- 
tral Asia, which already is capable 
of attacking low-orbiting U.S. sat- 
ellites in good weather. Other di- 
rected-energy arms are being devel- 
oped for deployment in space. 


In the view of U.S. officials, So- 
viet opposition to the U.S. space 
defense project aims to halt US. 
research white Moscow continues 
similar programs of Us own. 

There is no independent verifica- 
tion of this picture of the Soviet 
version, ana many experts mil 
challenge some of the more omi- 
nous interpretations of Soviet ac- 
tions in the Pentagon booklet. 

But the U.S. report tallies with 
what was previously known about 
Soviet actions in the area of strate- 


an officials skeptical about U.S. 
plane Birii as Bn tain's foreign sec- 
retary, Sr Geoffrey Howe, have 
said that “not enough attention has 
been paid to Soviet research, which 
is extensive, «ud far-reaching, md 
has been going on for many years. 
To ignore or dismiss it would be 
not only myopic: it would be dan- 
gerous.” 

A fundamental difference be- 
tween the two superpowers’ ap- 
proach to defenses is that the Sovi- 


U.S. Reports Cam Ranh Bay 
Now Major Soviet Naval Base 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union, has transformed Cam Ranh ' 
Bay, the framer U.S. Navy strong- 
hold in Vietnam, into its “largest 
forward deployment naval base in 
the woridr the Defense Depart- 
ment said Tuesday. 

Warships of the Soviet Union 
can thus routinely patrol the South 
China Sea, and Sonet bombers can 
range throughout Southeast Aria 
and eastward to the U.S. Island of 
Guam and pans of Mkrooeria, the 
department said. 

The report, “Soviet Military 
Power 1985,” the Pentagon’s peri- 
odic assessment of Soviet anned 
strength, cited the complex in Viet- 
nam as a graphic example of the 
maeating‘*gjpbal reach*' of the So- 
viet mili tary. 

Just as Cuba is chebasefor Sovi- 
et access to the Caribbean and Lat- 
in America, the 143-page report 
said, “Vietnam may eventually 
jday a -similar role m Southeast 
Asia and the Pacific.” 

Since the end erf Wodd War n, 
U-S.-backcd alliances have effec- 
tively deterred Soviet power, with 
die result that “the tniid World 
has taken on new importance to 
Soviet strategists,” it said. . 


zsmm 






- .VBsW i 


jSpl ' • tiofmaM see j 

Tho Nn. York Tmi 


Approximately 24,000 Soviet 
military advisers — four Hmw as 
many as in 1965 —are based in 30 
countries, the Pentagon reported. 
In addition, il said, “the Soviets are 
striving to develop and sustain an 
interiocking and pervasive infra- 
structure of influence through trea- 
ties of friendship, active and infor- 
mal alliances, penetration and 
training of Third World military 
cadres, the acquisition of overflight 
rights and a worldwide base sup- 
port system fra the Soviet f racesr 


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nees ” but this was hardly a joke in 
the early years of the Middle Ages. 

Spain was ruled by Arab Mos- 
lems in those days. The pass at 
RoncesvaHes was used by Arabs 
trying to extend their power to the 
north and by European Chris tians 
trying to drive them back. In the 
8th century, the Arabs, waging a 
jihad, crossed into southern France 
and captured Bordeaux. They 
stopped only after they were de- 
feated in Poitiers in 732. 

Later in the 8th century, Charle- 
magne crossed the Pyrenees in a 
crusade to drive the Moslems out of 
Spain. The crusade failed, and 
Charlemagne's lieutenant, Roland, 
and his troops were annihilated as 


they tried to retreat through the 
pass at RoncesvaHes. 

Ironically, these retreating 
troops were not killed by the Arabs 
but by Basques, who rolled rocks 
down on the French soldiers. The 
battle was glorified in the epic 
poem “ Chanson de Roland,” or : 
Song Of Roland. : 

Fra Europeans, the pass at Ron- 1 
cesvalles, with its breathtaking, jag- 
ged beauty, was for centuries a for- 
bidding means of entry into Spain, j 
Even the millions of Christian 
pilgrims who crossed through Ron- 
cesvalles in the Middle Ages on 

their pilgrimage to the holy Spanish 
city of Santiago de Compostela 
knew that danger and deprivation 
awaited them. A restored shrine i 
and crypt, where dead pilgrims 
were buried centuries ago, still 
stands in the pass. 1 

The history of separation was 
reinforced in the20th century by 40 
years of dictatorship under Franco. 
As the only Fascist dictator to sur- 
vive World War II, Franco was the 
pariah of Europe, and Spain be- 
came more isolated than ever. 

Many Spaniards feel that full en- : 
try into the EC, a first concrete step 
into Europe, will consecrate the 
democratic system that has taken 
hold in Spain’in the nine years since 
Franco's death. 


O.V. GAUMONT COUS5, MONTPARNASSE B1ENVENUE, 
SAINT GERMAIN VILLAGE, GAUMONT HALLES, 

14 JU1LLET BEAUGRENELLE, PAGODE 



et Union seems to be inching 
ahead, steadily improving its exist- ( 
ing network of air-defense bases, 
many of which are being upgraded 
to cope with missiles. 

It relics essentially on nuclear- 
tipped anti-missiles to protect its 
command posts and the silos of its 
intercontinental ballistic missiles. 

The U.S. Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative is exploring nonnuclear sys- 
tems . Scientists hope computers 
can provide accurate tracking and 
targeting, enabling them to destroy 
agile or fast- moving targets without 
a nuclear explosion. 

The United States is hoping its 
surge can overtake what the Soviet 
Union has accomplished over two 
d fyatW , US. nffiriak say. 

“The Soviets never abandoned 
their substantial research into stra- 
tegic defenses, as the United States 
did 10 years ago” the project chief, 
Lieutenant General James A. 
Abrahamson, says and “in some 
areas, they may be ahead of us.” 

Military researchers have adopt- 
ed some Soviet technology in the 
U.S. program, particularly particle- 
beam generators. This technologi- 
cal pilfering, however, has become 
more difficult since Soviet scien- 
tists have stopped publishing re- 
search in this field. 

■A pivotal point in this emerging 
system is the controversial new Si- 
berian radar. At the Krasnoyarsk 
site, the US. report says: ‘The So- 
viet Union is violating the ABM 
Treaty through the siting, orienta- 
tion, and capability of the large 
phased-array, early warning and 
hatlitfir missile target- tracking ra- 
dar.” 

The Krasnoyarsk radar, U.S. of- 
ficials say, violates the treaty be- 
cause it is located in central Siberia, 
deep in the Soviet Union. The 
ABM treaty allowed outward-look- 
ing early-warning radars on each 
countries' borders, but banned 
heartland radars capable of manag- 
ing a missile duel close to potential 
targets. 

Soviet diplomats say that the 
Krasnoyarsk radar does not violate 
the treaty, that it is intended to 
track spacecraft But the radar’s 
location and angle of coverage is 
wrong for most Soviet satellites’ 
orbits, and right fra picking up 
U.S. missiles that would be 
laun ch e d in wartime from subma- 
rines in the Pacific. 


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Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


Hera! 



Sribunc 


Pab lfafaed Wafa The flew Yocfc Tna« «ad Tlx Vw hingV p n Port 


An Excuse Not to Help 


More trouble is brewing for international 
population programs in the UJ5. Congress. 
Ibis time h is sparked by concern about co- 
ercive practices reportedly used in China to 
promote one-child f amiti es. That is a serious 
concern, and one winch we share, but it should 
not be a pretext to deny wanted family plan- 
ning help to millio ns of people in developing 
countries where coercion is not an issue at alL 


verdy disrupted many family p lanning pro 
grams by refusing to award me $17 million 
earmarked in this year’s budget for the Inter- 
national Planned Parenthood Federation. The 
federation would not agree to stop performing 
abortion-related services requested by other 
countries. The funds were cut off despite the 
expressed disapproval of the House Foreign 
Affairs Committee, despite the fact that the 
DPPF, like all other U.S. grantees, is careful not 
to use UX. money for any abortion-related 
activities, and despite the fact that the activi- 
ties that the admnristnuioii is p unishing are 
perfectly legal under American law and the 
law of die foreign countries involved. 

Citing accounts ttiat the Chinese govern- 
ment is tolerating if not promoting infanticide 
and coereed abortions, the Reagan administra- 
tion has alro hdd up funds to UN population 
programs, pan of which support certain pro- 
grams — uut not abortion — in Grins. Be- 


except so-called “naturar methods. But a po- 
tentially broader source of opposition cranes 
from member who worry that a vote for 
continuing UJS. population aid might some- 
how be taken as condoning such practices as 
infanticide and forced abortions. 

Feelings about abortion — and especially 
about involuntary abortion or in fantic ide — 
understandably run high. But no one is talking 
about condoning, least of aS sponsoring, co- 
ercive programs in China or anywhere else. 
What is being proposed is to continue, and 
preferably to expand, himiane efforts to allow 
some of the poorest people in the world to 
n« kr the idmtical family planning choice that 
almost every family in the United States takes 
for granted: to have the number of children it 
feds it can best care for. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Plus Spain and Portugal 


Forget about dives, wine, fruit and fish, 
those perennial staples of Europe's family 
quarrels. It will be a bigger, freer family next 
year when Spain and Portugal become the 1 1th 
and 12 th members of the European Communi- 
ty. The good news is that more of Western 
Europe trill be freely welded to common polit- 
ical values than at any time since Cbarie- 
magnp Assuming that the 12 natimml parlia- 
ments assent, the Community’s territory will 
grow by a third and its popidation will jump 
from 280 million to 325 million. On paper that 
wiD make it the West’s largest maim. 

But mainly on paper. The Common Market 
was founded in 1957 in the fervent hope that it 
woukl free Europe's brains and capital from 
the old inhibiting fro a tiaa, but that has not 
happened. Tariffs have been cut but free trade 
is energetically thwarted by farm subsidies, 
state-promoted cartels and protectionist red 
tape. Transit delays alone, at the headers that 
were to have disappeared, squander bdions 
every year. Innovation is stifled by every na- 
tionality’s “preferential” procurement policy. 

The dream of genuine integration died long 
ago. At France’s insistence in 1965, unanimity 
was required on issues of “Vital interest” to any 


member. When the founding six became ten by 
the end of the 1970s, the scramble for national 
advantage only became more intense. Along 
. the way, the powers of the European Parlia- 
ment were hobbled. Every year seems to bring 
new external barriers to Japanese cars or Bra- 
zilian coffee. In ever larger amounts, the EC 
countries dump surplus foods and undermine 
poorer competitors m Aria and the Americas. 

With the admission of Greece in 1979 the 
French-led farm bloc grew in size and influ- 
ence. That is why negotiating the entry of 
Spain and Portugal took six years, held up 
among other thing s by Greece's demand for a 
nmltibillion -dollar “Mediterranean package” 
in compensatory aid. The final agreement pro- 
vides $4.4 trillion for Greece, France and Italy. 

StiH the betrayal of the Common Market 
ima and ttinanriiliri ha gg lin g i^nni dfflriniah 


becoming full members of western Europe. 
Neither was eligible until it completed its dem- 
ocratic revolution, a process that was begun by 
right-of-center regimes and completed by So- 
cialists. They are joining a flawed association, 
but their entry niifies a historic passage. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A New Hand lor Duarte 


The altogether admirable effect of Sunday’s 
legislative and municipal elections in El Salva- 
dor was to put into place, in a country wracked 
by war arid eamonric ruin, the full forms of 
democracy. From these ejections two devdop- 
ments were worth hoping for. One was the 
stren gthening of President Jos6 Napcdedn 
Duarte’s Christian Democrats. This happened. 
The party now clearly has its first legislative 
majority. The coalition led by Roberto cfAu- 
buisson, a man linked to unspeakable political 
atrocities, lost its former edge. 

Tbe second development worth hoping for 
was a result that gave the Salvadoran right 
enough reason to stay engaged in the political 
process but not so modi as to kt it keep 
frustrating President Duarte’s major ini da- 
tives. Something tike this may have happened. 
How Mr. Duarte plays his new hand wm tdL 

In H Salvador the way is never dear, but 
certainly Mr. Duarte has a fresh opportunity 
to press the dialogue with the left that has been 
frozen since December. The recent success of 
daylong national traces called for drild immu- 


nization campaigns of the Fan American 
Health Organization and UNICEF indicates 
the hunger for peace that is than. 

Mr. Duarte is in a position to assert more 
authority over the armed forces in order to 
farther diminish the activity of the death 
sqoads and give himself more political latitude 
all around. He is a fanrifiar — some would say 
a worn — figure. No ooe expects miracles from 
him, but he is a man of proven decency and 
courage. His frustrations in, for instance, re- 
dressing human rights violations and making 
reforms work do not come for want of trying. 

His party imp areally got none of tbe U.S. 
hdp in the clarions tins year that was be- 
stowed in the presidential election last year. 
This has produced suggestions in some quar- 
ters that tbe United States is coohng to him. 
It does not look that way to us. The hdp his 
party received last time tarnished him. He is 
much the stronger for winning on his own. 
Before, be was a good bet for tbe United 
States, and now be is a better bet 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


An Alternative toNixneiri? 

For years now Sudan has been sinking into 
chaos. The hopeful plateau of the mid-1970s 
has been left far behind. President Nunriri, 
who came to power by a military coup in 1969, 
has never brought himself to establish any- 
thing like a genuine democracy or to share 
power with any other political leader enjoying 
genuine mass support He has presided over an 
increasingly corrupt and inefficient adminis- 
tration, and his economic policies — often ill- 
conceived and invariably Ql-execuled — have 
combined with climatic disasters to produce 


widespread famine and, in many parts of the 
country, a breakdown of law and order. 

Mr. Nimeiri has f or long been an embarrass- 
ing yet seemingly indispensable ally of the 
West faced with Colonel Qadhafi and the 
Soviet influence in Ethiopia. If the coahtion Of 
“antis” that Mr. Nimeiri has succeeded in 
creating could prove ready to become a coali- 
tion of positive support for a program of 
desperately needed reforms, that would be no 
less in the interest of the West than of the 
suffering Sudanese people themselves. Oppor- 
tunity is there, but not yet the proof. 

— The Tunes ( London j. 


FROM OUR APRIL 3 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

10: Soialorg^arm to Batii Debate 1935: France Retanring to Affiances 


1910: Sarators^arm to Batii Debate 
WASHINGTON — Senators using the new 
marble baths, Turkish, Russian or otherwise, 
most now be content with the attendance of a 
citizen of the United States unskilled in the art 
of removing aches or wrinkles. There are still 

$720 a year.^ Tbe SeMte^^^^topass an 
appropriation for a professional masseur. Sen- 
ator Bristow moved to strike out the appropri- 
ation of bathroom attendants. “Why have a 
masseur? Why not have a valet to look after 
our clothes and a manicure? Why not make the 
appointments complete?” asked Senator Scott 
in fine sarcasm. “Ibis seems to be a man to 
take care of the tethers, not the room," put in 
Senator Sutiuzland. “I have never tried them. 
What little bathing I do I do at home.” 


PARIS — Faced with Germany’s intensive 
rearmament, France will rely for her security 
on her own military measures and on “nrihiaiy 
accords” with other nations equally interested 
in the preservation of peace, Premier Pfezre- 
Etiennc Flandin declared in a speech in the 
Chamber of Deputies [on April 2J. This decla- 
ration, which defines France’s policy in tbe 
present international crisis as a return to the 
pre-war system of military alliances, was made 
in the course of a review of the measures bring 
taken to ensure the security of the country in 
any emaggicy. As a means of defending the 
currency, M. Flandin annftimmd that the 
minting of gold coins would be resumed in- 
tensely, in order that gold may be again put in 
rircolation with the least possible delay. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chair man 195&I982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 

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Excatthc Editor 
Editor 
Deputy E&ar 
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O /ASS International Henitd Tribune. M rights reserved. 










cause the United States is amriar contributor 
to the UN programs, dozens of poor countries 
face a disastrous loss of family p lanning assis- 
tance unless the funds are released promptly. 

Efforts to restore funding to the IPPF and 
other affected groups arc under way in Con- 
gress, where committees arc meriting up this 
year’s foreign add authorization. Sowever, 
some members and outride groups are fighting 
any effort to limit the administration’s discre- 
tion to withhold funding. Some of there groups 


Founding FA 1He& 


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gCorloMlC (2£fU 666$ 


Misused Words, Muddled Minds and Flawed Policy 


Company? 

By William Safire 

S AN DIEGO— Ever rince Gover- 
nor Thomas Dewey made a deal 
with the jailed Mafioso Lucky Lu- 
ciano to protect the port of New York 
firms sabotage in World War IL a 
question has haunted lawmen: When 


W ASHINGTON —Now that tbe Reagan ad- 
ministration has embarked on a global war 
against “terrorism,” it becomes increaangly im- 
portant to know what the war is against. 

But wietwad of getting more precise, definitions 
arc g ettin g simmer. My own imprecision was 
brought forcefully to my attention by readers of a 
recent line in this spacefMarcfc 20) in which I said 
that Shiite “terrorists” were kitting Israeli occu- 
piers of southern Lebanon. By phone and by mail 
I was reminded that, unlike past PLO shelling of 
Israeli villages in Galilee, the Suites are attacking 
the soldiers of an illegal occupying force. 

The Israelis, one day after letting it be known 
that they were speeding up their withdrawal, em- 
barked on raids on four villages north of the 
occupation line, killing 23 people, two of them 
CBS newsmen, and at least some of them rivflians. 
So it went. The fact that tbe Shiite forces are not in 
uniform, I was told, does not make them different 
from the French resistance maquis in World War II 
or the early militia of America’s own revolution. 

“The military activities among residents of 
south Lebanon against Israeli military forces cor- 
respond to classic tactics of guerrilla warfare 
against an occupation force in one’s own country,” 
said one reader, who went cm: “Guerrilla tactics 
dictate that because of the superior firepower and 
numerical advantages held by the occupying army, 
military resistance must not take the form of a 
head-on confrontation.” Another asked: “If the 
Shiites were killing Soviets in Afghanistan, you 
would call them ‘freedom fighters’ — so why the 


By Philip Geyelin 


double standard where Israelis arc involved?” 

This was quite enough to encourage a search of 
definitions and case histories. Webster’s starts out 
making it simple: ‘Terrorizing” means “to terri- 
fy”: A speeding truck driver meets that test 

Webster went further: The “act of terrorizing” 
means “use of force or threats to demoralize, 
intimidate and subjugate [and espedattyj such me 
as a political weapon or policy. The battleship 
New Jersey standing off me Lebanese coast; even 

that test wdoes tite&A’s mining of Nicaraguan 
prats or its blowing np of Nicaraguan refineries. 

How about support of counter-revolutionary 
forces engaged, according to a flood of reliable 
reports, in atrocities of (me son or another involv- 
ing civilians in the Nicaraguan countryside? Wash- 
ington .says the rebels are doing the same sort of 
things in cl Salvador. It falls it “terrorism” in El 
Salvador, while the Nicaraguan “contras” arc 
called “freedom fighters.” And the reader is right, 
up to a point, in ms 1 ehnnnn- Af gtianisfun analo- 
gy. The techniques of resistance are the same: If 
“terrorism” fits one, it fits tbe other. 

I am perfectly aware of the distinction between 
techniques and purposes, and of differences in 


political objectives and/or ideological causes. 
From the standpoint of U.S. interests and policy, 
there are good guys and bad guys. Communists 
and mtt-Commnmsts, noble and ignoble 


RealpoHtik, tty these tests, requires a obtain moral 
myopia. But when a responsible Israeli official in 
W ashing ton lumps PLO attacks aimed exclusively 
at innocents with the Arab oil embargo as “terror- 
ism,” and when Israeli authorities talk about rerai- 
sal raids against suspected Smte hideouts in Leba- 
nese villages as an “offensive defense” military 
operation, words begin to lose all meaning and 
myopia beans to get in the way of RealpoHtik. 

Robert Knppennan, a Georgetown University 
authority on terrorism, concedes that there is no 
all-purpose definition beyond “the use or threat- 
ened use of violence in the name of a political or 
ideological cause.” So terrorism can be an extreme 
and repugnant expression of a legitimate grievance 
(the Agnandc of stateless Palestinians being the 
most pressing case) fra which the aggrieved, rightly 
or wrongly, see no alternative reco u rs e . 

That is not an argument for respecting the PLO 
as a responsible negotiating partner. It is weak, 
scattered, incapable of making reliable decisions 
and composed of dements that are irremediably 
violence-prone. Not washing to confront the un- 
derlying Palestinian grievance, the Israelis conve- 
xnentlylabd the PLO a “terrorist org aniza tion.” 

Thus does this trigger word “tenxuist” muddle 
dearheaded acceptance of the PLO as something 
to reckon with — “an important actor with a 
degree of political reality,” in Mr.Kuppexman’s 
words. Thus, as wett, do imprecision and double 
standards confound diplomacy as the safe way out 
of. the Arab-IsraeH impasse: 

- ■ Washington Post Writers Group. 



Awri 


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Misleading Graphics Don’t Serve a Fateful Debate 


L ONDON —Now that “star ware" 
t and Strategic Defense Initiative 
are household words, television has 
had to come to grips with the project. 
Naturally it set out to do what it does 
best: tell the stray in pictures. 

But there are no pictures of devices 
that do not exist, that are only a 


By Flora Lewis 

real people talking earnestly computer 
missfles being fired? There is wore. “Si 


tures of real people talking earnestly 
and real missies being fired? There is 
a danger that tbe difficult issues and 
uncertainties involved in a terribly 
serious debate are being brushed 
aside, not due to bad intentions but 


asm fra an idea that cannot come to 
fruition until some time in the 21st 


does national security take prece- 
dence over law enforcement? 

Take the case of Miguel Nassar 
Haro, framer chief of the Directorate 
of Federal Security, Mexico’s corrupt 
national police. Three years ago a 
grand jnry in Sail Diego wanted to 
indict him for master minding a vast 
car-theft ring in California. s 

When Jon Standcf er, a reporter for 1 
The San Diego Union, found out that 
the indictment was bang blocked tty 
the Justice Department in Washing- 
ton, tbe UJS. attorney, William Ken- 
nedy, confirmed that the CIA had 
described Mr. Nassar Haro as “its 

most i mpor t an t source in Mexico and 
Central America.” It was reported 
that die Mexican had arrested and 
returned a Soviet spy and had wire- 
tapped the El Salvador guerrilla 
headquarters in Mexico Gty. 

In Washington, the Justice Depart- 
ment went through the reof, firing 
Mr. Kennedy for confi rming the sto- J<r 
ty. Feeling secure in his- Jostice-CIA t - 
protection, the macho police chief 
came to California to file a libel suit 
and hold a news conference; that was 
just a bit thidt, and the criminal divi- 
rion m Washington sem ward to per- 
mit die indictment,' rince the intelli- 
gence source was blown anyhow. 

Mr. Nassar Haro was arraigned 
and bail was set at $250,000. A mes- 
senger soon arrived with the cash in a 
suitcase. Tbe Mexican dripped bail 
and is a fugitive, with Mexico not 
about to aid in his capture. 

It turns out, however, that Mr. 
Nassar Haro’s police force was also 
deeply involved in the narcotics 
trade. When the Mexican army raid- 
ed a huge drug warehouse in (Muia- 
hua, the guards arrested were from J 
the Directorate of Federal Security. w ' 

The anger of drug bosses at mis 
and other ratrasiinns . into their busi- 
ness probably led to die recent mur- 
der of an investigator far the US. 
Drug Enforcement Administration. 

Now that Washington is pressur- 
ing Mexico to dean up its law en- 
forcement, the questions arise: Was 
the U.S. government wise to block 
the indictment of a suspected high- 
level crook in tbe first place? Since he 
was likely to flee after he was finally 
indicted, why was no major effort 
made to deny bail? Why was the 
Justice Department's mam concern 
the truthful U.S. prosecutor rather 
than the suspected lawbreaker? 


^cam in a scientist’s q'e. So. to make due to good television technique, 
an extraordinarily abstruse subject The technique is already familiar 


an extraordinarily abstruse subject 
easy enough to grasp, weC-briefed in other contexts. It did show how 
artists were summoned to produce spaceships orbit and approach other 
animated graphics. There lies the rub. planets, something that was actually 
These graphics are really cartoons- happening but could not be caught 
If the designs included a sassy duck panoramically on film, 
and an ebument mouse named Mkk- People are accustomed to video 
ey, everybody would understand that games, where the pull of a lever or the 
they were fantasies. Is that under- punch of a bmton produces the in- 
standing conveyed in blips and tended effect They are used to dia- 
squirts of light packaged with pic- grams that really represent how a 


fruition until some tune m the 2 lst Tim OA tells me the story has 
computer or a washing machine will century. Even if the scientific prob- been rinsreported. It says it exoted 
wort “Star wars" graphics send a jems can be solved ami the devices .absolutely no pressure on the Justice 
subliminal message that this system, ‘engineered, defenses could never be-. Dqpextmarf to- protect Mr. Nassar 
too, is sure to work; thatrince people tested in hostile donditions; like the HaroandmertSyrespondedproperiy 
can make the designs, then they can rert of nadear strategy, missile de- to a legitimate quay from the crimi- 
bafld dtethmgs.lt appears to be only fense is a matter of abstract equations nal division. Mark Richard, an dd 
a matter of time and money. about what could happen, so as to pro at the divirion, confirms tbe CIA 

The assumption is encouraged by offer some assurance that it will not account and emlains that the fnriiei- 


and an ebuttient mouse named Mick- 
ey, everybody would understand that 
they were fantasies. Is that under- 
standing conveyed in blips and 



too, is sure to work; that since people 
can make tbe designs, then they can 
build the things- It appears to be only 
a matter of time ana money. 

The assumption is encouraged by 
President Reagan, who has made 
anti-missile defense efforts a top pri- 
ority of his second term. A vast scien- 
tific and strategic question made is 
bring turned into a poHtical litmus 
test: Are you a Reaganaut or not? 

But television's job is not to pro- 
mote an administration scheme. Its 
job is to explain it. In their zeal to 
provide simple and accessible infor- 
mation, the networks risk misleading 
the public and grossly distorting the 
controversy. It is a dilemma. They 
have to have some illustration be- 
cause that is their business, but by 
putting elaborate notions into dear 
drawings they imply that the fantasy 
is virtual fact An important matter 
of responsibility is involved here. 

It is hard to fathom why Mr. Rea- 
gan is fired with such driving enlhusi- 


Helping American Industry Compete 


P ALO ALTO, California — Last 
year tbe United States had a 
trade deficit in electronics. In fact, 
its deficit with Japan in electronics 
was larger than for cars. Since 1965 
America has lost world market 
share in seven out of 10 technology- 
intensive industries. UJS. leader- 
ship m technology and the standard 
of Irving it has made posable face 
relentless pressures from abroad. 

Thus there is compelling evi- 
dence that America's ability to 
compete in the world marketplace 
is eroding. The erosion of the lead 
in technology markets is tbe latest 
manifestation of a common chal- 
lenge faced by industries through- 
out the United States. Americans 
are faced with the increasing inter- 
dependence of the world economy, 
the easy flow of technology across 
national borders and the rise of 
strong new competitors such as Ja- 
pan and the newly industrializing 
nations of the Pacific rim. 

Tbe United States now does 
more trade in that arena than with 
all of Europe. These new competi- 
tors arc aggressively mobilizing 
technology, capital and human re- 
sources. The result has been prod- 
ucts that arc often more attractive, 
in cost and quality, than America's. 

There is no single action, no sim- 
ple solution that can reverse the 
decline in competitiveness. That is 
the conclusion of the President’s 
Commission on Industrial Compet- 
itiveness, 30 leaders from industry, 
labor, government and academia 
with whom I served as chair m an . 

Our study convinced us that 
America's ability to compete is af- 
fected by many factors — technol- 
ogy, capital human resources and 
the rules of international trade. 

Derision makers in both govern- 
ment and business should take re- 
sponsibility in strengthening the 
national ability to compete. As 
Americans look for answers, how- 
ever, they must recognize that gov- 
ernment cannot legislate success. 


By John A. Young 

European initiatives have shown 
that direct government intervention 
and support cannot make a product 
commercially successful 

Legislators and bureaucrats can- 
not predict what technologies show 
promise or what products consum- 
ers are likdy to prefer. But govern- 
ment does play an important role in 
creating an environment that fos- 
ters technological innovation and 
its successful commercialization. 

To improve industry’s ability to 
compete, public policy should: 

• Encourage private-sector re- 
search and development through 
tax incentives, which are preferable 
to direct government funding be- 
cause they allow the market to de- 
termine where funds are spent. 

• Better manage federally fund- 
ed, non-military research and de- 
velopment, which is an SI 8-billion 
annual federal investment from 
which America reaps insufficient 
commercial advantage. 

• Protect the results of innova- 
tion from counterfeiting and other 
forms of misappropriaiiug. 

• Reduce the federal budget def- 
icit and thus lower tbe cost of capi- 
tal to U.S. firms, which experience 
costs at least twice as high as those 
of their Japanese competitors. 

■ • Pursue stable monetary policy 
that reduces the cost of capital and 
encourages American managers to 
take on long-term investments. 

• Restructure the lax code to 
stimulate productive investments 
and reduce the wide differences in 
effective tax rates from industry to 
industry, a variation that works 
against UJS. manufacturing and 
technology-mtensivc industries. 

• Improve the abitity of schools 
and universities to provide gradu- 
ates in the needed numbers and 
skills and to prepare the work force 
to respond to change. 

• Change laws that hinder the 


ability to compete in wodd mar- 
kets, including antitrust measures, 
export controls and a fragmented 
trade policymaking apparatus. 

• Include trade in investments 
and services under GATT, and 
broaden GATT's provisions on ag- 
riculture and state-owned indus- 
tries. Find ways to respond when 
countries distort world markets by 
targeting an industry for develop- 
ment and export promotion. 

But it is important to remember 
that tbe final responsibility for be- 
ing competitive rests with the pri- 
vate sector. Among the steps Amer- 
ican industry most take to improve 
its competitive performance are to: 

• Recognize that lower costs 
and/or better quality are the fun- 
damentals that will nmtrrmme suc- 
cess in world markets, and that the 
best way to reduce costs is to focus 
on improving quality. 

• More aggressively pursue in- 
formation on international mar- 
kets, competitors and opportunities 
for selling abroad. 

• Focus more on manufacturing 
technology and management. 

• Collaborate with other compa- 
nies and with universities in re- 
search and development efforts. 

• Create a sense of shared pur- 
pose among all members of a firm 
by increased use of employee incen- 
tives such as stock-purchase plans 
and profit sharing. 

The standard of living that 
Americans enjoy has to be earned; 
the world market does not bestow it 
as a right. The United States must 
improve its ability to compete in 
world markets. The new reality of 
global competition requires a new 
vision and a new resolve. 

The writer, president and chief ex- 
ecutive of Hewlett-Packard Compa- 
ny, was chairman of the President's 
Commission On Industrial Competi- 
tiveness, which submitted its final re- 
port in January, He contributed this 
comment to die Los dingefes Tunes. 


Apparently Mr. Reagan has a vi- 
sion mat after hurtling America in 
this direction now he will be remem- 
bered as the man who made it secure 
forever. Nothing could be less cer- 
tain, and the people who put the news 
on television are well aware of it. Stitt, 
they have not found a way to present 
the controversy so as to include the 
many doubts as vividly as the prom- 
ises. It probably could be done. 

Scientists experienced in weapon 
design have imagined likdy counter- 
measures against “star wars.” Graph- 
ics could be based on their ideas as 
well showing the vulnerabilities. 

Strategists have begun to figure but 
many ways that might be used to 
overwhelm or escape defenses. Their 
calculations on the possibffity of a 
huge increase in offensive misalcs, or 
a rapid-bum system that would com- 
plete the boost before a missile leaves 
the Earth's atmosphere and becomes 
more susceptible to attack, could be 
included in the anima l i ons 
Television needs to become more 
aware of tbe inmheations of its mes- 
sage, because of the hidden assump- 
tions about reality on the screen. Per- 
haps the networks should take polls 
of the public’s perceptions to find out 
to what extent people realize that the 
graphics represent only theories. 

It is true that images are compel- 
ling. That imposes an obligation to 
make the distinction dear between 
visions, possibilities and facts. 

The New York Times. 

Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor” and must contain the writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be respon&bk for the return of 


Hsro^ and merely responded properly 
to a legitimate quay from the crimi- 
nal division. Made Richard, an old 
pro at the diviaon, confirms the CIA 
account and explains that the indict- 
ment was originally blocked because 
the department wanted To be sure 
that no “graymail” — threats to ex- 
pose national secrets — would be 
used in the defense. To make that 
determination, delays were required. 

That is possible; others say that 
visits by Ernest Mayersfeld, then 
deputy general counsel of the CIA, to 
Rudolph Gutiiano, then associate at- 
torney general took the heat off the 
valuable suroect and late, as part of 
the no-leaks nysteria, turned it on the 
prosecutor. I do not know enough to 
judge where the truth Res. 

I do know this: If you lie down. f. 
with dogs, you get up with fleas. No 
realist can deny that sometimes h 
may be necessary, in the national 
interest, to do intelligence business 
with thieves and thugs, but more of- 
ten than sot such “equities” (former- 
ly “assets) turn out to be liabilities. 

In light of the increased drug traf- 
fic across the Rio Grande, and with 
U.S. enforcement officials incensed 
at the lax investigation by Mexican 
police of the murder of a U.S. agent, 
both U.S. lawmen and their spooks 
surety wish they had decided to press 
for the indictment of the connpt cop, 
even if his capture was unlikety. The 
principle of the thing was imponanL 

A ray of light: Under pressure 
from Washington, the government of d 
Taiwan indicted one of its top rnteffi- f 

genre officials for the murder in 
America of the writer Henry Lin. 

Taiwanese intelligence is more 
valuable than ever to the United 
States, now that Moscow has begun 
to court Beijing. The U.S. demand 
that the criminal be brought to jus- 
tice, no matter how hdpfnl he may 
have been, shows a good regard for 
putting first values first For flint, - 
perhaps we can thank the springing 
of Miguel Nassar Hant - 

The New York Ttma.- ' 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Terror in Lebanon can public opinion m an 


Regarding *' Israel in Lebanon : 
America’s Interests Were Beside die 
Point” (March 20) by Philip Geydin: 
What would Mr. Gwdin do if for- 
eign soldiers blew up his home, car- 
ried off his sons ana shot at his wife 
and children? Would he stand by and. 
watch Israeli terrorism against Mos- 
lem ci vilians in Lebanon? 

ABDULLAH ABO MUHAMED. 

Jeddah. 

Double-Talk in Greece? 

Regarding “‘Greece First' Panan- 
dreou Provoke a Showdown” (March- 
26) by LS. Stavrianos: 

This commentary begs a question. 
Does being an ally of America mian 
bang a pawn? Thc^ writer cites Greek 
history as justifying Prime Minister 
Papandreou’s potiacs. But other UJL 
attics have national interests that they 
protect through affiance. Why is 
Greece the exertion? 

N. CUTIS. 
Athens. 


realty be foolwfinto accepting alli- 
ance commitments that it opposes, 
through a policy of rident verbal 
denunciation of those comm itm ents? 
What would be the worth'd commit- 
ments maintained at.that price? And 
should another country in a similar 
predicament "adopt the same tactic? 

XL BATU. 
Istanbul 

Some UvetoRemerober 

ColnimristTom Wicker (March 27) 
quotes President Reagan as saying: 
‘The German people have very few 
alive that remember even the war, 
and certainty none of them who were 
adults and participating... "There 
arc plenty of Americans, Britons Ca- 
nadians- and French who were about 
20 years dd in 1944 and are now in 
their eaity sixties. 1 can rcmanber 
the HitlfAi ynd, 
some of whom woe only IS. What 
tfid Mr. Reagan do in the wai?. 

NX HAYMAJl’ ' 

• Paris. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


INSIGHTS 


Don Regan: A Loner Who Elicits Fear and Respect in Washington 


By Myra MacPherson 

Washington Post Service 


■||/ T ASHINGTON — It is a long way 
\jL/ from the Cambridge of Don Regan's 

TT childhood to the Oval Office, where the 
new White House chief of staff sees the presi- 
dent of the United States daily. A long way from 
the apartment where Mr. Regan lived with his 
f amily to his spacious home overlooking the 
Potomac River m Mount Vernon. A long way 
from working his way through Harvard — as a 
“day hop" who lived at home — to the rrmldmil- 
lionaire he became before leaving Merrill Lynch 
to become secretary of the Treasury in 1981. A 
long way from his Democratic roots to becom- 
ing the consummate cheerleader of all thin g s 

Who Donald Thomas Regan is — and how 
and why he made those leaps — is not easy to 
learn, particularly from Mr. Regan himself. Sit- 
ting in a sunlit room, looking past the winter- 
covered sw imming pool to the river, Mr. Regan, 
the son of a railroad security guard, shunted 
aside questions about his pasL, saying balf-jok- 
ingl y, half-testQy, “What are you? An amateur 
psychiatrist?” 

Men who worked with him for years on Wall 
Street and those who have known him since 
198 1 as secretary of the Treasury say such things 
as “No one really knows Dot." “Not the kind of 
guy who ever had drinks with the guys after 
work." “A loner." “He doesn't have dose 
friends.” 

Tall and with a full head of slicked-back silver 
hair, Mr. Regan, at 66, looks as if Hollywood 
cast him for the corporate board room. His 
brown eyes are his most arresting feature. They 
can twiiude when he thinks he is besting some- 
one in verbal sparring, but most often they are 
wary, guarded, appraising, as he listens. 

When Mr. Regan is asked what has driven 
him to the top, to become the powerful No. 2 
man in the white House, he said flatly, “I am 
not introspective." His explanation is that, “I 
was always very competitive. I don't know why. 
It was built into me." Even in something as 
frivolous as charades, he has been known to §et 
furious at team players who don't go for the win. 
Was this competitiveness something his mother, 
or father instilled? He looks puzzled. “No. I've 
just been competitive from the time 1 was 3 or 4 
years old." 

Ann Buchanan Regan, his wife of 43 years, 
was sitting across the coffee table. She now 
enters the conversation. “He was always an 
egotist That’s why.” 

Her husband nodded- “True. Tell me who in 
Washington isn't — including the press corps.” 

His wife contained, “To get to tne top he had 
to believe in himself." 

He chimed in, “That’s true. I have believed in 
myself." 

A refreshingly candid woman, Ann Regan 
sees part of her role in a world of fawning 
subordinates as “always knocking Don down a 
peg" Now die said with a half-jab, “He always 
knows more than the fella around him. Right?" 

Don Regan: “Well you’re saying it, not L” 



young bastard I’ve seen in a long time," com- 
mented Robert Magowan, a former Merrill 
Lynch partner when he first saw Mr. Regan in 
action. ... 

Many eariy colleagues say now that Mr. Re- 
gan had a “private agenda” and a game plan for 
success that matched his ambition. “He always 
had Potomac fever," a Merrill colleague said. 
“He had his eye on a top job in Washington long 
ago." 

When asked about his vaunted temper, Mr. 
Regan tried for a joke, “You mean old lovable 
roe?” His wife interrupted. “You might as weD 
admit it Yon have an impossible temper! The 
only thing to do when you get mad is leave the 
house and go for a long afternoon walk." 

Quite another image of Mr. Regan emerged in 
Washington. He is widely regarded as a than 


people call us very private. We couldn't care 
less. If they don’t uke it, that’s tough. Right?” 
Mr. Regan nodded at her. “Exactly." 

The onry man Mr. Regan has to please is 
President Reagan, and so mr Mr. Regan seems 
more than satisfied with his own performance. 



that that old bagles-beagles, _ 
ioke? I’ve beard it a million times.* 1 m so 

it 1 " 

Mr. Regan laughed and pointed, finally, with 
pride to his framed diploma from Harvard. 
Townies often went to college, but usually not 
He aijo takes paimlOMggM flat beta not a Harvard Mr. R^aa. 
yes-man, that he h as already explained a thing nty guard, is one of , , . . . _ 
Xr^^deTa^ oSnedabou! atiendins flSST- 

repoits that the president seemed unrecepdve to Ramblic^',!^ 0 * 


* TV ha: 






Mr. Regan's proposed corporate lax chang 

thought New Deal programs should be cur- 


Vilfe- ale-cg 


the reporter who said, 'Well what do you think 
about raising corporate taxes SI Abilhon?* ” 
Mr. Regan goes on to say that he gave the 
president the benefit of his wisdom after the 
stories appeared: “What that means is that 
we're reducing the corporate rate from 46 to 33 


who suboriiut* preset » 

S* 2P5E.? Tbexraporations that don’t pay now. So it’s not 


for his ardent cheerfeadiag, especially the pre- 
mature prediction that the economy was roaring 
back. 

He seemed to be eclipsed first by the budget 
director, David A. Stockman, and then by the 
White House chief of staff. James A. Baker 3d, 
who did much of the negotiating on tax mea- 
sures on the Hffl. But longtime Rcgan-watchcrs 
insist that be did indeed have a game plan; 
purposely lying low until Mr. Stockman shot 
himself in the foot with his Atlantic Monthly 
interviews, lying low until the supply-riders 
trusted him. Detractors sneer at his inordinate 
“adaptability," admirers point to his “surviv- 
ability. 


The corporations that don't pay now. 
all corporations. And then he said, *011. Now I 
see!’ He really hadn't had time to read it all, to 
scope it out around the table." 


M ANY ardent supply-riders cannot un- 
derstand why Mr. Regan now sup- 
ports a tax simplification program that 
has bccu praised by liberals and moderates. The 
fanner assistant secretary of the Treasury, Paul 
Craig Roberts, who said Mr. Regan “stood up to 
everyone when they said we were wrong," ar- 
gued that the “proposal has been on the shelf for 
two decades.” 

“It has nothing to do with where Don’s been 
the last four years,” he said. “I think he was just 


Recently, Mr. Regan sat in his White Home 
office and talked about his views of 45 years 
ago- “My answer had to be at that time that I 
didn't like it The first time I voted was in 1940 
and I voted for Wifflde. I did not vote for 
Roosevelt.” Wendell Wfllkie irimsdf was con- 
sidered a progressive. He said, “What choice did 
I have?" 

Many Boston Irish find Mr. Regan's Republi- 
canism suspect. Said Jim Sh a im on,-tfae formed 
Massachusetts congressman. “What kind cd 
rankles me —and I think probably the speaks 
— is this kind of rich-man noblesse db&g£ 
approach to social issues from an Irish Hd from 
Cambridge who becomes a Republican." 

Mr. Regan retains a residual Boston twang, 
but he is silent about his childhood to the point 
of being standoffish. Longtime business ac- 
quaintances are struck that he never mentions 
his pre-Harvard life, and in interviews he 


0 a el Ora 
print 11 


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rial 3* 







J im Shannon 

to toe the supply-side line in ’8l in aider to 
establish his credibility with the administration 
and the president. He becomes what he needs to 
become. I feel that Regan sat by and let a 
disaster happen. Maybe he didn’t have any 
choice, but ne had to have seen that the 1981 tax 
bill was not going to be the smashing success 
that [Representative Jack] Kemp and Company 
predicted it would be.” 

In his office, Mr. Regan addressed his critics 
witheringly. 

“Isn’t it a shame that I should try to carry out 
the president's program and not my own?" he 
asked-There was anger in his voice, although it is 
his stock argument. “After all, who did the 


was willing too busy to watch the tax policy and it was just brushes aside most questions about those early ^ ^ its: 

6 mi n -n -- — ... nihirKmuJ " ‘I 

antaarta'"" 


pulled out 1 
Mr. Regan emphatically said. “No, no. Craig 
doesn't want to believe I would do such a thing. 


Donald T. Regan 


people elect and why did they elect him? And 
why shouldn’t I, either as his cabinet officer or 


T ATERin the afternoon, Ann Regan added, 

I *Tm not the least bit competitive. Nei- 

1 J ther are our children. Bnt Don is just one 
of those guys who just has to be better than 
everybody rise." 

Mr. Regan’s rise, from post-Worid War II 
trainee to head of Memll Lynch & C o„ Wall 
Street’s largest brokerage firm, was not without 
controversy. He enjoys the money he made; 
estimates range from $30 to $40 million. Mr. 
Regan’s standard answer is that he does not 
know how much, once it is in a blind trust. But 
he also savors his reputation as a maverick who 
championed changes that revolutionized the 
brokerage industry. 

Sitting in his White House office with the 
fireplace crackling, Mr. Regan smiled, recalling 
those days. “Do you know why Fm hated?" he 
asked with relish. “I broke up their cozy little 
dab. Wall Street was a cartel. They proclaimed 
capitalism but practiced car-telism. We 
shouldn’t be closet cartdists if we’re capital- 
ists." 

Mr. Regan began his business career with 
Merrill Lynch in 1946 after be left the Marines. 
He settled in for 34 years, eventually becoming 
chairman of the board. When Mr. Regan took 


control of Merrill in the late 1960s, investment 
banking was dominated by an old-boy network 
in entrenched old-line houses, in many ways the 
world found in John P. Marquand novels. Then, 
Chris Welles wrote in Institutional Investor in 
1981, “in a display of financial muscle perhaps 
not seen on lower Manhattan since the 1920s, 
Mr. Regan eclipsed most of his competitors." 

In the 19705 he pushed hard to, in effect, 
deregulate the stock market industry. A compet- 
itor receHed, “Before, if you were interested, 
say, in buying 100 shares of General Motors an 
the New Yon; Stock Exchange, there was a fixed 
fee. Then it all changed, you could charge any- 
thing you wanted. It tonight about discount 
brokers, bare-bones terms, no research, advice, 
nothing. And a lot of small firms wenL under.” 

Another competitor, Walter Wriston, former 
chairman of Gticotp, said, “I have nothing bnt 
admiration for Don. Innovators have enemies 
who are interested in the status quo. Did a lot of 
firms go under [when fixed fees ended]? Yes. 
Was somebody hurt? Sure When you move 
from regulated to unregulated yon have to get 
out and scratch.” 

Mr. Regan can synthesize other people's ideas 
and shape them into his own, unfettered by 
ideology or strong passions, except for what 
succeeds. No supply-rider in 1981 when he be- 
came secretary of the Treasury, for example, he 
embraced much of the doctrine, which holds 
that by reducing taxes, cotporate productivity 
and profits can be increased, as well as tax 
revenues. Four years later he stunned diehard 
supply-riders by proposing a tax-reform plan 
that cuts loopholes, which have enabled many 
corporations to pay no taxes at all. 

But it is the Regan style rather than Ms views, 
or lack of them, that creates the controversy. He 
ruled Merrill Lynch with an iron hand and nas a 
reputation for tyrannically chewing out subor- 
dinates. “I saw him treat men on the assistant 
secretary level in a very demeaning way," a 


framer White House insider said. “The ‘boy, 
bring my bags’ kind of approach." 

Most of those who sit mgh above Wall Street 
in airy offices thinking about money have one 
thing in common with most of political Wash- 
ington. Fearful of his power, they will not speak 
of Mr. Regan for attribution. AD their stories 
about him speak of his temper and ego. 

A competitor said, “Regan had a very good 


chief of staff, carry out his program? Why 
should I have my own program? I don't drink I 


.program? 

should.” 

He repeated his standard response. “1 will 
lake a definite point of view and will argue, 
hopefully successfully, for that point of view. 
But once the decision is made, then I support 
it." 

However, some who attended White House 


But' this is deliberate: I knew we were gong to 
have opposition. No one likes to have their taxes 
raised but there is ho way you can cut rates and 
still have the same amount without having a 
broadened base. Take anything. Take a pile of 
sand and squish it and it flattens out — and that 
is what is called a flat tax. I think when people 
understand the trade-offs, that some of the 
industries now paying a higher tax wifl pay a lot 
lower and some industries that are now paying 
little or no taxes will pay some taxes, I think the 
majority of the people wiD be convinced it’s for 
good,” 

But how is he going to combat the opposition 
of the corporate lobbies? 

Sounding not at all like a man who for years 
made a living in a world of tax straddles and 
shelters, Mr. Regan smiled and said, “Get peo- 
ple lobbies against them.” . 

Just about everyone in official Washington, 
including most in the press corps, has at least 
one Ego Wall: pictures of himself with anyone 
famous. In Mr. Regan's sprawling home, there is 


years. There are no easy anecdotes, only clipped 
responses. 

Mr. Regan’s grandparents came from Ireland, 
in those msnlar days when Boston Yankees 
posted such signs as “No Irish Need Apply." 
Don’s grandfather delivered Standard Chi in a 
horse-drawn wagon; before long be owned three 
houses. There was always a famfly push to excel, 


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sense of the jugular. Anyone who raised his head about Don," said one, “was 
too high got it shot off." Mr. Regan, agrees., “I m od* what he believed- He was usually giving 

the good news or going in for some Fed (Federal 


meetings say otherwise. “What troubled me one large room devoted to these icons of sue- 
ft— - — :j — “ — that he never said - TT * : 


chewed op a lot of people.” he once said. “Either 
they couldn't stand the heat, or I couldn’t stand 
their performance." 

A Merrill executive who calls Mr. Regan a 
friend said, nonetheless, that “if you argued 
with him in a meeting it simply was not tolerat- 
ed. Once be made his decision that was it 
Anyone who continued to argue could just get 
the blank off the team. He has a wild temper and 
can get very angry.” Would he shout, explode, 
his race ram red? “AD otthe-above." But the 
Merrill man added what others hare said at the 
Treasury Department, that jMr. Regan also in- 
stilled loyalty. “He was a strong leader, very 
articulate. You were never left in any doubt 
about what he wanted to do or wanted you to 
do." 

James M. Shannon, a framer Democratic 
representative from Massachusetts, chuckled as 
he recalled the autocratic ride of Mr. Regan in 
hearings before the Ways and Means Commit- 
tee. “He would really bristle at me and [Thomas 
J.] Downey. He almost went through the roof 
when I cut him off when he was nhburtering 
about tax cuts. Here was this former chairman 
of Merrill Lynch and secretary of the Treasury 
and some 28-year-old congressman is giving 
him fadU. He couldn't stand iL" 

The irony is that Mr. Regan himself, as a 
young man on Wall Street, was not unlike Mr. 
Shannon ami Mr. Downey when it came to 
questioning his elders. “That's the brashest 


Reserve Board] bashing." 


O 


NE celebrated story is that Mr. Regan 
I was pushing for military spending cots 
but as soon as the president showed up, 
he instantly backtracked. “Yeah, I saw that 
same story," Mr. Regan commented. “Yeah, 
and that was an unnamed spokesman and Fd 


cess. He proudly points out the many pictures of 
himself with the president: “There we are, play- 
ing golf at the Aim en bergs. There I am giving 
the president a golf lesson.” 

There are pictures of them lau g hin g together 
in obvious rapport “Dear Don,” begins the 
inscription on a picture of the president whis- 
pering in Mr. Regan's ear. “Tell 'em what I said 
or they’ll think I'm asking for a tax break. Warm 
regards. Rot” And the most recent inscription, 
“Now Don, Let’s see, is it sea, no, it must be 


S OME Boston Irish, even those younger 
than Mr. Roan, were instilled with a‘ 
sense of settling the score against the' 

Yankees. Not Mr. Regan, he Said. “Growing up, 

I never gave anything of that nature a though^ 
and I never talked to my father about iL” There 
is a story that William Regan was fired for] 
refusing to substitute fra Boston police during] 
the historic 1919 strike: 

The hardships of the strike made a lasting * - 

impresaon on others younger than Mr. Regan. 5? urpna cr. v-r.c- 
who mostly embarrassed 'when asked if -aged noise !i iz ?. mnr.ic 
the story of Ms father is true. “Oh, I guess so.’. jaadi >-'2 z* 
Remember, that happened when I was just a 
baby. 1 remember it as part of folklore growing] 
up. But kids never go into that detail about their, 
father’s past" 

Mr. Regan went from parochial junior Mgh to] 

Cambridge High and Latin. Mr. Regan, who 
describes himself as fiercely competitive, played 
no sports: “When I was the age where most kids! 
are m sports I was woriring,*ne said. 

At Harvard, while men of wealth like John F.. 

Kennedy were joining the Crimson and Hasty 
Podding Chib, Mr. Regan was a “day hqp,^ 
living at home, keeping op. a scholarship and- 
working his way through soiooL Extracnmcu-. 
lar activities were sparse. He joined Phillips. 

Brooks house, a philanthropic organization, and" 


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i American Senate rolitirs 
aSwdtsh open sizger Jsrmy 
audi ie Big Top.’ 


like Mm identified and Fd like to know in which szz. czr.1 V7i.~ :.v was vice presuxem ms semor year « au rant s \ aranEtocrain»''-;t'’a!j-».- 

meeting I caved. I asked my own staff when I dnef? WMchever. I like iL Wannest Regards CaihoBc Oub. -Few frran Ms Mgfr, school . and; ^ ^ 

read that article and none ^ us oonld xcmem- Rn " ’ ” " — "" 

her. 1 


The room means a lot to Don Regan. There 


So did he argue with the president for cuts in are cover pictures of himself on Time, News- 
the military budget? “Yeah. He is asked about week, U.S. News & Wodd Report. Farewell 
the view, shared by many Republicans on the plaques frran Merrill Lynch, a bone-china plate 
Hill, that Mr. Weinberger is pursuing a course inscribed by the UA Marine Craps, a wido- 
of kamikaze- obduracy on mSitary spending, angle shot of a banquet table with Margaret 
“Well lei’s see what happens,” Mr. Regan slides Thatcher on Mr. Regan’s right and the president 
out of the question. “Let's keep our cod. You've across from them. The camera has caught them 


been around Washington long enough to know 
what is being said one week is not necessarily 
next week's action. Let’s wait and follow the 
action." He seems to hold out that military 
spending co m promises will be made. “There is 
still time.” 

Although angered by negative views of him in 
Washington, Mr. Regan said it does not really 


hearing the favorite story the president tells 
about President Reagan and Mr. Regan: Pat 
Boone is wandering around late at niribt in 
Beverly Hills because be is worried. He nas to 
introduce President Reagan, then the new gov- 
ernor of California, and doesn't know whether 


college days remember Don Regan, who left 
borne and never looked bade 
In many ways, the year he graduated, 1940. 1 
was the beginning for Donald Thomas Regan.' 
In 1940 bie^ became a Republican, and he joined- 
the Marines. He saw action in four campaigns’ 
daring World War IL including Guadal ca nal 
and Okinawa. Mr. Regan has said often that the 
experience “changed my entire life.” 

“At age 26 I was a major on Okinawa with* 
1.200 men under me,” he said. “When people’ 
are calling you the ‘old man’ and you’re 26 years 
old and you're responsible for so many poqale,- 
it does dupe your life. You're not afraid of 
command frran then an." 

Does combat make the battles of the corpo- 


uenr 

lal Mart Brajabie'? book 
-says been a h;-bnc iffcir. 

producer. Harold 
a, seem, however, ip have 
doL wuh circuse* folding 
-as ail over, ue seed to be 
^ rf the smell of ;hs sjw- 
: >tftu«ege; at the Victoria 
' iuli a**v 
2J micrcasi and stiii a 
] - Kflund the sdzes b.-jr 
the true spirit 
5® 1 tot is -as ore 


to pronounce it Ray-gan or Ree-gan. A friend 

0 v walking his dogs says he knows it’s Ray-gan, at 

bother mm, any more than it did when he was which point Mr. Boone thanks Mm and says rate board room and Washington seem slight? 
on Wall Street. “What I believe in is what I fight “Oh, and what kind of dogs are those?" The “Let’s put it this way,” he said. “It conditions; 
for." reply: "Bagles.” you for iL Having gone through combat, you’re 

His wife added, “I guess that’s why some Mr. Regan's wife entered the room. “Oh is not afraid of ray much.” 


£5* m Kiibur! S-s 
S i “ Cara *“ " i? them- 




Cominp; Tuesday 

April 9 


PERSONAL 


INVESTING 


the International 
Herald Tribune’s 
monthly review of the 
world of investment 


* Due to the Easter holidays in many countries. 
Personal Investing wiB appear on Tuesday instead 
of Mondav this month. 


■/* 


Most Crowded Course on Campus: The Vietnam War 


for *0 

^^promber^ 




love ssc-r- 


JCt 


By Paul Dean 

Las Angeia Tuna Service 


S ANTA BARBARA, California — Viet- 
nam veterans are fighting unfinished wars 
on a campus here. 

“When I was yonr age." a former GI ex- 
plained to a class, “I watched Mule my best 
friend’s head was blown off." 

He recounted how he took to hard drugs, 
liquor, “you name it; you try anything to for- 
get-" 

“When they buried the Unknown Soldier I 
had the tube on and started crying fra three 
hours and couldn’t stop." he said. 

The students were scanned. They were hear- 


groping. There was rich, fertile ground here. 
And I was hooked. What were these vets telling 
me? What were they communicating? Maybe 
they didn't know either. 

“I didn’t stay with the center. But I did stay 


the other, bombings, tear gas, hehcoplcr swyeS- 
lance, curfews and beatings. 

Walter Capps, professor of religious studies, 
founded the course. Mr. Capps, who holds a 
doctorate in religion from Yale University, was 

an associate professor at Santa Barbara in 1970. with the topic. fn t;il l-,. » „„ 

He was ghostwriting letters fra draft evaders. Since 19^9 and the beginning of Ms 10-week J? kmf- 


He spake of coming home and the extremes 
of that first day. On an airliner he was upgraded n 
to first class. On a New Jersey street, a woman" 
spat in Ms face. 

“The army spent 16 weeks leaching me how 




& hois h 

fete $ 


undergraduates have enrolled, which makes the course more 


At the Santa Barbara campus of the University of California, 
students have enrolled by the hundreds this quarter to study 
the Yiefnam War that former students once died in, dodged or 
demonstrated against. More than 900 of the 15,000 


the heQ Fm going to do. The nightmar es are 

back because the counseling is bunging them" 
back. ... I may never be normal again. ... I still 

need help You've heard what it’s like to go 

through war. I hope you learn what it’s like to * 
come out of war. 



were growingjxp. and largely ignored by their 
>fih 


high schools. They knew Uttleoflbe horrors and 
despair that was being revealed to their class. 

Some students had tears in their eyes. They 
stood and applauded. They crowded the stage, 
standing six creep around the Vietnam veterans. 

Later a veteran discussed this sympathetic 
reception from the students. Suppose stub pub- 
lic acceptance had been offered when he came 
home 17 years ago? 

“It would have helped,” he said. “Ob, yes. h 
would have helped so much.” 

The students said it was a Eying education, as 
vital as hearing Abraham Lincoln lecture on 
emancipation. This was history hot to the touch, 
offering a chance to see its participants, to 
understand them, to assess and to challenge. 

At the Santa Barbara campus of the Universi- 
ty of California, students have enrolled by the 

■ 1 . TXT 


popular than any other on campus, including human sexuality. 


marching in peace demonstrations and joining 
protests against the Vietnam War. 

He was and remains, however, a discriminat- 
ing pacifist. His protests were not a conscien- 
tious objection 10 all wars, just Vietnam. The 
war led to Ms confusion as a teacher, as a citizen 
and, eventually, as program director of the Cen- 
ter for the Study or Democratic Institutions, a 
liberal think-tank based in Santa Barbara. 

He remembers 1977 and a postwar vacuum at 
the center when he was there. Where did Viet- 
nam fit in the liberal philosophy? 


hundreds this quarter to study the Vietnam War 
that former students once med in. 


M; 


dodged or 

demonstrated against. More than 900 of the 
15,000 undergraduates have enrolled, which 
makes the course more popular than any other 
on campus, including human sexuality. 

“It is the most profound, the most powerful 
course in America today," said Shad Mesfaad, 
regional director of an organization called tire 
Veterans Outreach Program. 

The course is called Religious Studies 155, the 
Vietnam War and American Religion, Its Influ- 
ence Upon Am eric an Social, Cultural and Reli- 
gious Lilt. 

Polemics are avoided and politicizing is out 
Still, the course cannot avoid rate irony: It is 
scholarship of calm understanding on a campus 
where 15 years ago this topic ignited what 
amounted to a 90-day civil wan flak-jacketed 
police an one side, demonstrating students on 


R. Capps organized a conference. In- 
tellectuals showed up. So did two Viet- 
nam veterans: Mr. Meshad, a former 
captain and army psychologist in Vietnam, and 
Fred Downs, a writer who as an infantry lieu- 
tenant lost an arm in Vietnam. 

The gulf between the vets and the intellectu- 
als, Mr. Capps recalled, was broader than the 
Tonkin. 

The intellectuals “were condescending and 
looked upon the vets as victims," he said. “The 
vets were angry and tired and not sure that they 
wanted to tell us anything. When they did, they 
used battle talk and four-letter words.” 

There was little communication. There cer- 
tainly were contradictions. The intellectuals 


course, the effects of the topic have become 
indelible on campos. It has grown frran 60 
students to a crowd that often overflows the 
860-capacity lecture balL It has grown from 
standard university funding to $3,000 in private 
donations this quarter to pay the traveling ex- 
penses of blue-chip guest speakers. 

Local veterans who monitor the course range 
from the scarred to the wdL They include ah 
ranks, many who were in combat, some who 
were rear-echdon and fed guilty about iL a few 
who consider themselves better men because of 
the Vietnam experience and others who were 
destroyed by iL 

Several have lectured the class. All haw been 
expert witnesses ready to adjudicate or supply 
information when there were student questions. 
They have been counterpoints, memory banks 
and ombudsmen. 


The second speaker was hesiianL It was Ms ] 
first session. Twenty years ago he was a door 
gunner on a CH-46 helicopter of the 1st Marine 
Air Wing. He began: “My name is Craig Taylor 
and Fm a Vietnam veteran. It's taken me 17 
years to say that with pride." 

Mr. Taylor, 40, a Santa Barbara carpenter, * 
talked about Cerritos College and anti-war pro- ‘ 
testers after Ms return. He did not fit not even 
with Ms own family 


the< 

isthi 


They usually enter the hall together. They sit 
together, at the from and. right of the class. 


H E rebelled. He became a Vietnam Veter- 
an Against the War. Then foflowed ex- 
periences with marijuana, LSD, a mo- 1 
toreyde gang, two divorces and “a nowhere* 
existence for myself." ] 

“Then I found out I had a special feeling' 
inside of me that kept cropping np," he said. He* 
went to the films “The DeerHunier," “Coming: 
Home and Apocalypse Now." “I found my- ■ 
self m the audience crying, breaking down,* 
especially at the sound ana vitioni of Tidicop- 1 
t«rs, he said. . jb 

^ di agno sed: PTSD, post irau-] 
mane sutks disorder. Mr. Taylor started to . 

At the end of the class there was a standing ■ 
ovation. 


!NTER 


Some have shown up in jungle fatigues. Later, Mr. Canos said- “T i« n«^r : 

On this day, PauTSffOL 37, a Santa Barbara into the topic^S^Ur and th^t^iVhS ! 
“ty ..employee, took the first 30 minutes. A academic wd objector ^ dM-fSb? I ^2 • 

Jjji*jT>ret that topic without being in there with ' 


regular, he has written an open letter, 12 pages, 
smgle-spaoed, as coarse material. He was not 
weB, he said; his mind was scrambled daring a 
tour as a combat photographer with the 1st 
Cavalry Division: deaths, drugs, depression. 


“had protested the war and now they were being booze, nightmares, divorce, emotional with- create full srudv and 7 T,l: . 

toM things they didn’t want to hear, Mr. Capps drawnl, a suicide attempt and, now, a tearful Vietnam War until edea P ent °* *e , 

said. “They'd treated the war like nn inTrilmmnl miImiikk xunrim* 1 “S* » complete under-, 


“But it’s a price I'm stifl ^ 
That s because his friends, Ms 

ans, are p' - 1 -' - ” 


to pay. 
letnam veter- 


a new challenge: to A 

~ j— ^ ^ .«■ ' w 


said. “They’d treated the war likean^ intellectual 
puzzle but were hearing stories that were close 
to the Holocaust” 


He recalled of the vets that “I had a great deal 
of identification and compassion with their 


restlessness. 

Students were sprawled in the aisles. Knees 
were bugged to duns. When Mr. Sgroi paused 
between sentences, the big hall was silent as a 
Chapel 


rf'SJ'SS?* 5 -’ ■* > 













jCSTEIlNATXONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 




ABTS/LEISUBE 


t - By Michael Zwcrin ing the Iasi Mfctro. The music is ty or indifferent. But he has come compute on your pocket calcula- 
Tmemoaonai fteraht Tribune hi a plastic bag — keyboard to a conclusion: “I don’t seem fit to tor," he says with a twinkle in eyes 

F t A&3S fWrirtB ‘ 6™ Iar Pj***. j&z woes, folk join the ranks of the gainfully em- framed by heavy spectacles. 

wnnMnnthenhirm^S^??! songs, as wcH as some poems. Five ployed." His father, an accountant, could 

is dome, he savs. if he had a , W- r When he talks about music, his make “the most horrible faces a 

a veacm IrnHa Couples often quarrel about eyes dart from side to side and his human being can make. My par- 

deal with humiliation." 8 UtW *'“ et b er . to buy. Sherwood says he large hands move over as imagi- oils committed my sister toa men- 

_ . _ has received 400 francs in counter- nary keyboard. His neglected, tal institution when she was 16. 

;Epy evening be works the tine- fat ba n k n otes. Gendarmes asked stringy silver hair, nntrimmed They said she had been born men- 


a Street Composer 


F , ARTS Gordon ■' an “ 6 raIar P«ces, J&z tunes, folk join the ranks of the gainfully em- framed by he 

as wcH as some poems. Five ployed." His father. 

M ' P when he talks about music, his make “the n 
- Couples often Qti and about eves dart from side to side and human beine 


five at Iw 6 . *, ma lines around Odfoo, stops by 
S^uatin?!^ io li ^ the Hfitd de Ville, then hawks h« 

Mnaire- a , ^of neatly copied sheets of music along 
rograms’ Ih^pSS ^ catcfa- 


him to leave the Tuileries gardens. 


and shabby clothes make tally retarded, and yet she had one 


It may be cold or raining. Waiters him seem like a prophet who is too of die highest IQ scores possible. It 
_ complain that he is blowing their busy with his inner life to bother didn't make sense. So this rebellion 
HysAea" before catch- way. People arc aggressive or snot- with outer details. built up. I ground my teeth down. 

„ Tiying to eliminate the “tyranny “My professor did not approve 

of the seven-day cycle," he works a of my music in university because 


nine-day week. “Of course, that of this Oriental influence creeping 
means that every 63 days I'm back in. He said that anybody from Ev- 


EfttfeS- *Bamum’ a Real Circus 


every 63 days I'm back in. He said that anybody from Ev- 
to die same routine." anston, Illinois, isn’t supposed to 

His rfeume, headed “Composer write like that ‘You are not from 
of Music,” lists a master’s degree Burma,’ he said. And he also said 
from the University of Michigan, that I wasn't fit to be a teacher, I 
composition mqjor. In 1935. his so- wasn’t fit to be anything, and if! 


By Sheridan Modey 

International Herald Tribune 


her own increasing milUani nata for violin and piano won first 
ambition, and Josi becomes a prize in the National Federation of 


composition raq or. 


TONDON — Every now and 
Qd g I 1 j t hen in the ^mwia) tbc- 


Basque rebd forced to deal with Music Qubs contest for young Ben 
both the communists and the fas- composers. The rfcsumi also lists places 


ever want to get anywhere I should 
get my teeth capped.” 

Being stimulated by “strange 
places mat make one fed creative,” 


cists who threaten his 


first prize in the 12th annual he went to Katmandu, where, be 



Covent Garden’s f Barber’ 
Is Just Where It Belongs 


Jeffreys 


Goan lady arranged for me to go 
see a dentist. He took the root out 


Am Under Gerard MnJgrew’s drrec- 

that great a musical Bm u is the ^ ^ gj ye a p^fo rmann - of tropoulos on May 5, 1957. After 

intensity and inteBigence. that, he went to Tanglewood to 

•i THF T fiNfiON CTifr Jeffrcys’s achievement in “Car- study with Aaron Copland. He said 

. wmiurs £ us drink not only that on a Ful bright fellowship in 

HLi «r J* about what happened to her and Hamburg, he studied with Philipp 

Jose but also a^^what happened Jamach. A quotation from Jar- 

sequence of a bullfight m Baroelo- bi Times, called Sherwood “my 
^staged to the approaching most talented pupil in 20 years.” 
rfu. virtnria Poi - sound* of Franco’s army is a quite Last month he bad a letter from 
remarkable commentaiy on the a woman m the Netherlands, who 
l ®«ting of tradition and modem bought his “Homage to Thdonious 

hi^ “Carmen" is yet further Monk" while rilling Paris; “I 
Si? ™ proof of Jeffreys’s talent as a dm- don’t know if you remember me. 

maiist. Even more importantly, it is ... You must be suffering a Iol 
* way Of welcomingim impressive ... Do you get lonely? ... My 
oewaaingSffi 10 London, husband does not nnprove of my 


monic, conducted by Dimitri Mi- free of charge." 

tropoulos on May 5, 1937. After He says he has lived in a Bud- 

that, be went to Tanglewood to dhist monasiary in India and ped- 


” and said: “Hi, Big Daddy, how are 

has lived in a Bud- you?" 

ry in India and ped- “There’s good air up here," he 
c on the streets of says of Montmartre, where be lives 


ions” for orchestra was per- _ . . ^ 

formed in Vatican Gty. While in the air is damp and polluted. I People sometimes invite him for ha” right back where it belongs, in 
Nairobi for eight years during the notice quite a difference when I a drink, but “with the time I lose I 18th-century Seville. It is conduci- 

1570s, he wrote a “Coffee Cantata” come back home." could probably get four handouts, ed as it should be conducted — in 

for mixed chorus and orchestra and In the mornings be shops for Why don’t Lhey just give me the the relatively new Zedda edition — 
dedicated it to Jamo Kenya tut. It fruit, stops for coffee, allows him- money instead? I need something by Gabride Ferro in an auspicious 

was performed by the Nairobi Or- self a croissant once every nine to eat more than something to Covent Garden debut, with the 

chestra with the All Saints Choir days. There's always photocopying drink.” Royal Opera Orchestra in its most 

• ... ... „ ■ . r- I .1 :<Tr u. .1 i “I i> M . 


there around the lie St Louis, but the juice of a squeezed lemon, 
the air is damp and polluted. I People sometimes invite bin 


By Henry Pleasants 

L ONDON — “Figaro qua, Fi- 
v garo LL Figaro su, Figaro gib," 
as Rossini's barber sings in his fam- 
ous “Largo al factotum” on his 
entrance in “II Barbiere di Sivig- 
lia.” Figaro here, Figaro there, Fi- 
garo up and down and everywhere. 

So it has seemed hereabouts in 
the past couple of weeks. A Scot- 
tish Opera production in Glasgow 
puts “The Barber erf Seville" in the 
1930s, with Figaro sporting an El- 
vis Presley hairdo and a zoot suit. 
That production, by David Mac- 
Donald, also favors its audiences, 
according to a colleague, with por- 
table radios and plastic carryalls 
and a chain-smoking, beer-drink- 
ing Berta. 

The Kent Opera, at the Marlowe 
Theater in Canterbury, in a pro- 
duction by Jonathan Hales, has 
placed the opera in a late Victorian 
English village, with Figaro a 
dratoa bM check-trouseral, bowler-crowned 
Gordon Sherwood peddling his music sport in a setting complete with 

Gilbert! an marines and bobbies. 
After lunch he chants a mantra. ° ne critic described it as “an amal- 
naps, and composes for an hour or ^^ Beaumarchais and ‘The 
two. He has no piano; the only way Pickwick Papers, 
he can hear any of the music be has There are no similar manifesta- 
written in the two and a half years lions of the producer! tis epidemic 
be has been in Paris is through “my at Covent Garden, where a new 
mind’s ear ” At bedtime he drinks production by Cologne’s Michael 
the juice of a squeezed lemon. Hampe puts “D Barbiere di Sivig- 


Last month he had a letter from 1570s, he wrote a “Coffee Cantata’ 


but “with the time I lose I 
obably gel four handouts. 


Jongs to a composer or a producer 
or a director. It is Crawfoiifs “Bar- 
hum,” and be is everywhere: up on 
the high wire, down by the orches- 
tra pit, stage center and left and 
right and aloft, hanging from the 
ropes or sliding a hundred feet 


aloft, hanging from the . . r . n _ 

sliding a hundred feet Austrian tJEfllDlt fOSter 


. . . You must be suffering a Iol 
... Do you get lonely? ... My 
husband does not improve of my 
corresponding with strangers. 
... My children do not under- 


conducted by Anthony Davies at to do, and then it’s lunchtime in a 
the Kenya National Theatre. macrobiotic co-op, where “the peo- 


u> do, and then it’s lunchtime in a He shrugged. “I guess I’m con- 
macrobiotic co-op, where “the peo- sidered some sort of social misfit 

rtf .i »... > . : . 


Royal Opera Orchestra in its most 
sparkling virtuoso form. 

The casting favors the lower 


In Nairobi, he recalled, he lived pie are very sweet Of course, they But ‘socially adjusted* is just a voices — Thomas Allen in the title 
"like a bum,” had a kidney stone complained about me several Freudian euphemism for *re- role (which he has recently record- 
removed. spent a month in a men- times. My hair wasn’t combed and signed.’ Fitting into the machine, ed), Samuel Ramey as Don BasOio 

. i . .7 J. ■w . , , . r <■ r i i 1 1 ■ i _r x"_. j to j i .i.. ik. ..j , 1 .. i.ai:... u..fr. c... 


manag in g and urging on his some- 
what ragged troupe like a manic 


He discovered jazz, he recalled, 
when he had a job playing piano in 


shook the Ugandan dicta tor’s band gave me a new shirt." 


stand me. ... I would like to tal institution. Introduced to Idi I looked kind of dirty and Td been Everybody else jumps in the river, 
change my life somehow. ... I Amin during a reception at the wearing the same shirt for 16 weeks you jump too. Everybody else 
praytar you.” Nairobi Hilton, Sherwood said, he or something, but they very kindly smokes and drinks, you do too. 1 

“ *• " i ■ — * — - • -i — i. .i — ti_ — j — j:_. — 1 . 1 _~_ j muA mu a Km " just refuse to go along with that-" 


and the veteran Italian buffo Enm 
Dara as a superlative Dr. Bartolo. 
Rosina is sung by the Argentine 
mezzo, Alicia Nafe, and Alma viva 


by the young South African tenor, 
Deon van der Walt Both sing val-‘ 
iantly and accuratdy, if with not 
quite the panache erf their lower- 
voiced colleagues. It's a delightful 
production, maned from time to„ 
time by excessive busyness and by ; 
excessive mugging on the pan of ^ 
Ramey's glonously sung Basilio. 

Further performances of the 
Royal Opera's “D Barbiere di Sivig- 
Iia" are on April 4, 8 and 11. 

□ 

The annual Borough erf Camden 
Festival has offered its traditional ■ 
exercises in operatic archaeology, 
most notably Giulio Caccini's 
“Enrhfice," dating from 1602, and 
the first opera to be printed. It was 
presented in concert form in the 
British Museum's Nereid Gallery, - 
providing an appropriate setting of . 
Greek temple and friezes. 

Caccini's preface to “Le Nuove 
Mnsiche” spells out In detail what 
the Florentine founders of opera 
had in mind, and this production 
seemed, in prospect, a welcome op- 
portunity to hear Cacdni practic- 
ing what he preached. In the event, 
a conscientious performance by the 
New London Consort pursued au- 
thenticity to the point — for those 
who have read Cacdni — of unau- 
thentic chastity and foundered on 
the work’s manifest inferiority — . 
melodic, harmonic and dramatic — 
to Monteverdi's “Orfeo,” which 
came along five years later. 

About the other exhumations, 
Boito’s “Nerone,” Richard 
Strauss’s “Friedensteg” and Mo- : 
zart’s juvenile “La Finta Semplke," 
the verdict is that, despite excellent * 
performances — Boito and Strauss . 
in concert form — some forgotten 
operas are best forgotten. 

Henry Pleasants has written about 
opera jar mam years and is the au- 
thor of several books on music 


Olympic coach set on nothing kss record price for a poster of £62,000 
than the gold. It is the victory (about §75,000) cm Monday, Chris- 
parade of a single stage talent, and tie’s auction house said, 
the curious thing is how much bet- . The poster, designed by Kolt> 
to- it is as a perfonnance than as a man Moser, d^ctSihe three ma- 

. . .* „ jor gronps of artists in Vienna: the 

; Ever since it opened on Broad- Ktastlerhaus, the Secession and 


vmmm.rmjmHfiDA 
{jQNGCOWB5fimtm/W 
\0LPAS50CM£MFL ffftWBZ- 

l / ^ I 


parochial junior higti ter it is as a perfonnance than as a man Moser, dep 

-atin. Mr. Regan, 4 „ jorgronps of arl 

%ly competitive: pliw ; Ever smee it opened on Broad- KOnstlerimus, t 

the age where way in 1980 with Jim Dale, “Bar- the Hagenbimd. 
ing." he said num has suffered from a deep 

n of wealth like fciaj unc^ty about wtetha it is sup- n 

szriz.'ssitt;- ? OONESB LRY 

FSTMife of Rmieas Ta^or Bammn was an 

h school EaraSib ?tri^ing one and had as mudi to VSAN HONEY, 1 

_ Su iSTS do-wilh Amencan Senate pohtics lONECBNVSt S 

st He joined fils and the Swedish opera singer Jenny J OPASSOClfffB 

ropicorganiuMB;n!. Lind as with the Ffe Top. - y 

smor year of Sl Fsfj . . Butin tryingtocram an that into ■. • 
m his higji schodad • ' J ^magical s omeThhig always went : . 0iL —Y Z~- 7 i 
Don Regan, whfi'rft wrirng, and Mark Bramble’s bdok ' 
bacL has always been a hybrid. affair... 

ar he graduated M Crawford and his producer, Harcdd |kTTO Al| 

Jonald Thomas Rqa Kddmg, seem, however, to have k 

publican, and he jaw realized that, with circuses folding 
lion in four camp*# their tents all over, we need to be 
including Goadiknt reminded of the smdl of die saw- 
i has said often that dnst So what we get at the Victoria 

entire life." Palace may well be a Bale tacky 

nir.n»m«e and a little undereast and still a 
le said. "Wta peefh rough around the edges but 

gass. 

lie for so man\ pare -eujJTZlp . HESVEODBPTl 

Vrt.-’ra n.i 7 affM i ceworainig. . . immepnium n 


in Beirut in 1968 after a period in 
Cairo, he said. In Egypt, he said, he 
wrote the score for a film called 
“Land of Hypocrisy” and was 
“suspected of being a spy for Isra- 
el" 

His “55 Earthen years equal 33 
Martian years,’' which is “easy to 


muRNsam&vem ^ 

EXCnEPBYTHEMORkW£R& 

Damme at am doc 

MDHM&1D HELP 05 DEVEL- 
OP OURPH151CAL PLANT! 


Don Regan, 
back. 


ar he graduated Wr 
Jonald Thomas Regs 
publican, and he jam 
lion in four tampat# 
including Gnadakati 
lhassaidoftenthalk 
entire life." 
ajor on OkuuM *4 
le said. "When peojfc 
on’ and you’re 2t»y® 
de for so manypOTt 
You're not a hw i 

e battles of ihecwF 
ishington sera sh^ 11 - 
hesaid. “Iicondiaj 
trough comhaty® 8 


ar 


aroe and the ere®* 

■liner he was upp^ 
ersev sireeL a ww* 


At the Tricyde in Kilbum, Ste- 
phen Jeffreys’s “Carmes” is the in-, 
tdligeaf idea of a playwright who 
has been called preamsmg for so 
^ long that it’s about time we started 
r^recognizmg the promise realized. - 
Stripred of its Bizel orchestrations, 
returned to the M6rim£e original, 
this is a drmnatic love, stray set 
against a military background. 
Why not, therefore, tire Spanish 
Civil War?. 

In 1936 Carmen becomes an 
army tart playing both sides off 


HgSVeODEDTD 
WDGtmBA TMfc 
MAJOR, ax&mjc- WEAZSfc! 
WN PROJECT' AUBRMY? 

r~\_ \ i> 


„ Am (FALL ' 
JSrL mxhsouz 
MA m A 

SMrt WAREHOUSE! 

'r~\/ 


•eks teachias reJ'J 
s telling me 
L** 1 don't 

. . The tughunart*®* , 
ling# W fP«B . 

ormriagam..-- 

rd what in. 

[eani whams®* 8 ^ 

s hoiant l< -Jj 

■s ago he 
pier of the Is ^ ^ 

an. It' s'*** 

a Barbara 

siss* 


^ VK SSSd* 

h 

ces ana - 

ipingUP- 

Now- I£V 


In Dubai, 

the city's first 5 Star Hotel 
is the choice for those who 
know the Gulf. 

DUBAI 

INTER- CONTINENTAL 
HOTEL 


r. T 



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and this is a dear example of it." 


This is an authentic passenger statement. 






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il awa>- 


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Lufthansa 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Vat. HIM IM 


22017 19* 
15574 13% 
15164 am 
14333 44* 
12312 27* 
10437 42% 

ran 11 * 

9490 127% 
MU 24* 
1547 38* 
8432 42% 
8233 35* 
8160 W* 
8138 7 

75*7 38* 


If* +* 
13* + * 
21 * — * 

gJST 1 * 

v&'l 

127 * — * 
24* 

37* — * 
42* + * 
35% — * 
IB 

7 + * 

38 — * 


Open HIM LOW LOt ChJlV 


Tuesdays 


'li 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most Actives 


India 127356 1280.15 124148 1WH- Wn 

Trans 4C2-75 60773 5M44 50970 — 132 

UHI 15434 155L71 15347 15454 + 041 

Camp 51734 52048 512.19 51447— 223 


Previous _ Today 
HIM LOW Oasa 3 pjw. 
Compos! I« 10450 10440 104.90 10478 

industrials 12049 1ELW 12MJ 1M34 

Transp. 98.19 9742 P8.19 9023 

UlffiMM 5531 55.05 SSL13 ,5539 

Finance 10759 10746 107399 108.16 


MISE 


Closing 


Advanced 
Cttcttnod 
unctawd 
Total Issue* 
Haw HWh 
H ow Urns 


251 W7 

290 m 

248 217 

779 787 

W 28 

3 2 


CompasUe 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

u mines 

Banks 

Trans*. 


Year , 
HtM Am 

280.94 27426 

■“W 

. — 31846 

— 25849 

— 25275 

— 25336 


Vat. HIM U» Lest am 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

utilities 

industrials 



Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


V0L0MP.M 101 469 /0H 

Prev.4PJA.vol. 8?mON 

Prev consolidated cfcoe 196,9*1769 


Hosbrs 

Oum«P 

Sprfcmn - 

SSSJ 
£35 ‘ 

WD»W 

T1 E 

OitfTMd 

NYTIffle 

CrystO 


34995 4* 
5746 20* 
35W 14* 


SS S' 

ss n* 

1194 7* 

1163 W* 
111 * 12 * 
MJ0 T 
bsj JK 

849 43* 
834 2* 


4* 4% + * 

19* 19*. — * 

S* a* T* 

II* 11* 

14* . 15 
7* . 7* 

13*. 14 + * 

12* 12* 

6* 7- + * 

2* 2* — to 

42* 42* — * 

2* 2* 


Standard & Poor's index 


AMEX Sales 


Buv Sales *Shn 
189436 519406 10546 


April 1 189436 519406 

March 29 167449 45&W 

March 20 1744*5 446423 

Ataixt?27— .. 17*567 627.2® 

March 26 171*504 461463 

'included In the soles ttaures 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
«» to the dosing on Wall Street and! 
do not retted late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Prev i o us __ Today 
HIM Law Cloie . 1 PJL 
Industrials 20234 20139 20225 30141 

Trans*. 15630 15439 15629 153.97 

umWes 4ft* ora W75 »47 

Finance 2H71 2X53 20.71 2072 

Composite 10127 18043 16127 18141 


AMEX Stock index 


4 PJA. vaiuaw 
Pw. 4 PJW. volume 
prev. cons volume . 


Preview „ TSST 
HIM Lew Owe 3P.M. 

22 ISO 22923 22943 22843 


NYSE Lower on Higher Volume 

O 


H Month 
HIM Lew Sleek 


Dto.YM.PE tikHhhLow OUM-CKW 


24* Emhart 1400*4 9 

14* Empos 1.76 84 7 

4 Emept 30 103 
EnExc 

22* BnoKP 72 24 17 
IB* EnbBu 36 14 13 
17* Bnsareti 140 54 18 
51* EnschPf 6340113 
91* Enschpfll38o112 
1* Bnsrce 24 

9* Enters 

16* SnbcEn 1470114 
16 Enfaxln 130 74 6 

15* Eaufxs 13 

3 Eau tmk 

11* EamkPl 231 14,1 
28* Eat Res T72 41 7 
9* Eauttcn .12 LA 8 
8* Eftmnt JO 24 14 
12* EwBsn 44 25 11 
15* Essence 40b 33 13 
20* Estrlne 72 33 10 
n EfftVfs II 

1* vIEvanP 


ft 


& 




370 57 10 
275 ia* 
247 34 
140 15 16 
46 33 13 
44 25 15 

2.90 54 II 
240 115 
270 1221 
676*214 

12 

1.90 34 12 
52 19 25 

236O105 B 
138 XI 15 
64b 23 12 
140 34 9 


STDs 74 
335 5.1 
244 44 
148 35 9 




United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices were lower ai the 
close of the New York Stock Exchange Tuesday 
in moderately active trading 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which 
gained 5.97 Monday, was down 7.07 to 1,264.90 
at the NYSE close. Declines led advances by an 
8-7 ratio among the 1,994 issues crossing the 
NYSE tape at 4 P.M. EST. 

Big Board volume rose to 102.2 mill i nn from 
89.9 million traded Monday. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Slock Exchange issues. 

“It would appear — even in today's soft 
market — that the consolidation is drawing to a 
close.** said Joseph Broder of Stuart, Coleman. 
He said the market may approach the 1,300 
level by the end of the month. 

Over the last two months, the market has 
been uneasy, affected by lack of leadership, bad 
news from major companies and the unstable 
dollar. Now, be said, there is “less reaction to 
unsettling news." 

“Even the fact that you have all these take- 
over issues indicates that the market is underva- 
lued,*' he said. 

“The sell-off wiD come to pass,” Mr. Broder 
said 

Harry Villec of Sutro & Co., Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia, ‘also is predicting a return to the 1,300 
level, possibly before the end of ApriL 

Before seeing 1,300, though, he said a short- 
term drop to the 1,240-1,250 level was posable. 

One reason the market will gain, he said is 
pessimism. “A lot of people are saying it isn't 
going to happen.” 


Mr. Villec said the fundamentals for many 
companies are the “best they’ve been in 20 
years.” 

“We're building a tremendous base here," he 
said 

Kevin Keeney, of Southwest Securities, Dal- 
las, said Tuesday's market had seen “some pret- 
ty good buying on blue-chips." 

He also sees the market heading up toward 
the 1.300 level in the next two to three weeks. 
But he added “people are kind of cautious, and 
there’s a lot of uncertainty." 

Trans World Airlines was near the top of the 
actives, and higher. 

Hospital Corp. of America was also active, 
and up slightly. The company said it would 
merge with American Hospital Supply. 

AT&T was unchanged in active trading. 

Unocal was slightly lower. It filed suit in a 
California federal coon, charging that a group 
of investors violated securities laws in acquiring 
its stock. The group, led by T. Boone Pickens, 
owns about 13.6 percent of Unocal 

Other petroleum issues were softer, with Ex- 
xon, Mobil and Phillips Petroleum all off a bit. 

In technology issues, IBM was up. It an- 
nounced new versions of its personal computer. 
Digital Equipment and Data General were up 
fractionally. Tandy Corp. was off a bit. 

Among auto stocks. General Motors was off, 
while Chrysler and Ford were slightly higher. 

A.H. Robins was lower. The company an- 
nounced a 1984 loss of 546 1.6 million compared 
with net of $58.2 million in the prior year. The 
loss stemmed from reserves covering litigation 
costs for its Daikon shield. 


511 29* 28* 29* + 16 
16 19* 19* If* 

235ft 4* 4* (* + » 

6120 * +* 
5= 30* 30 30 — 16 

34 34* 34* 34* 

2943 29* 28* 29* 9- * 
aiooz 55U 55 55 + * 

2 102 101 102 +1* 
26 2* 2* 2*— * 
44 11* 11* 11*— 16 
57 17* 16* 17 +* 

227 18* 18 18 

14 25*. 2S* 25* + V6 
65 6* 6 6* 

12 1£* 16* 16* 4- * 
391 41* 40* 41* +1* 
194 12 11* 11*—* 

52 12* 71* II*— * 
4V 16 17* 17* 

152 24 22* 24 +1* 

5 22* 22* 22*— * 
2(42 19* 18* 19 
51 216 2* 2*— * 

21 M 3* 3*— * 

3 4* 4* 4*— * 

106 36* 35* 35* 

14 15* 15* 15* 

4501 SO* 49* 49*— * 


Mb 33 13 
72 33 10 
II 


2* vIEvon pf 

416 viEvnpfQ 


30 ExCoto 140 (J I 
13* Excrisr 1460114 
38 Exxon 340 67 7 


AV/L6R/P ? 



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ENVlRO'SPRA'Y* 


194 12 
52 12* 
49 18 







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£ St 







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ss 

74 

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22 + * 
31*— « 


sty 


34*— * 
30*+ * 




84* + * 
28*— * 


36 + ’6 

54 + * 

aa*— * 


36 *— * 
34 — * 
36 

19*— * 


5* 

23 

5* + * 


12* 

17*— * 


34* + * 
22* 


6* 

39* + » 
77 +1 

10*— * 
12* 

22 + * 
2914 + * 
5736— * 
26* 

17* 

29b— * 




14 a sj 
152 111 » 
7,40 134 
7.56 134 
40 47 
123 132 
144 102 
UO IS II 
■10a 2 18 
I4W M 10 
I.W SO 
40 24 9 
40a 14 9 
1.19 22 
143 XV 
2.96 43 15 


ITS 4J 12 
138b U 28 
475 100 


44 30 8 
.16 7 16 


140 5.1 9 
UD 42 10 
U« 1U I 
848 10.7 
345 

242 124 
2.16 « * 
144 57 12 
70 17 12 
M 11 14 
3 

100 1M 7 
143 4J 
1«0 124 
200 >25 
038 124 
237 104 
2S7 114 
232 94 5 
130 37 11 
36 7 25 
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thermaluet?, 


' AU- EARTHLINGS 
CAN EVER P<? ISTALX 
ABOUT GtROW 6ROUP 
c PRODUCTS' > 


2 re* COuSu 


0. 




380 3 
1.90 a2 
144 XI 
m 

1.12 47 
f 296«IX7 


79 78* 

17 16* 

23* 22 
7* 7* 
24 25* 

14 13* 

54* 54* 
59* 5V 
3» 4 53* 
33* 33* 
24* 24* 
25* 25Vb 
5* 5 
44* 42* 


3616. 35* 
18* 18* 
37 38* 

62* 02* 
75* 75 
23* 23* 
47* 46* 
•* 8* 
II* 18* 
26* 26* 
13* 12* 
15* 14* 
18* 18* 
29* 28* 
25* 25* 
37* 36* 
27 26* 


78*+* 

16*-* 

33 

7*+* 
26 +14 
13*—* 
54*— 14 
59* + * 
39*—* 
33*—* 
34*+* 
25*— * 

4i*=i* 
38 + * 
» + *, 
18*+ * 1 
36*—* 
82*— * 
7* — * 
23* + * 


70 47 
70 17 
UP 87 
40 4.1 
23*147 
276 94 S 
270 1X1 
650 129 
270 1X6 - 
233 127 
170 17 
276 127 
ZM 87 
273 117 


#15 6 

UO U ' 

735 HU! 
174 17 14 
U0 37 7 


8* 

18*— * 
26* + * 
12 *— * 
14*—* 
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29*— M 
25* 

36*— * 

27 +1 


I 


17* 17* 
ID* 10* 


ID* 10* 
28* 28* 
16* M* 
25 26* 

EM 19* 
35* 35* 
61 <0* 
63* 63 
60 J9* 

46 46 

44 64 

17* 17 
41* 41 


33* +1* 
17* + * 
10* 

25*— * 
16*—* 
24* 

20* + * 
35*— Vl 
60*— 1* 

63 

S9*— M 
44 — * 

64 — * 
17* + « 
41* + * 


274 9A * 
M 37 
170 M 
1.10 .27 26 
IE U I 



To Oar Readers 


Because of (he seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris until April 27, 
some items in the Market Summary above are 
from 3 PJvl New York time instead of the usual 
4 P.M. Also because of the time difference, 
some other items elsewhere in the Business; 
Section are from the previous day’s trading. We ! 
regret the inconvenience, which is necessary to 
meet distribution requirements. 







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• ••-* -. .. ;. -.- - 

jkkeX'KKn -Rm enrntoa* reports P.n 
fihBX l iR*O a ptP .U. FBob mi notst r,u . 
iftsE'erfcaT P30 OaUmvMs mi 
& wVse NaMflawi P.12 bum rafts p,n 
|^l>Mh»ilKfa P.V- HwWamwvPjt 
''CbnwqMiM Ml Options p.T2 

CkmiBCteWor.- M2 OTCftock MS 
pu m oos M3 OWnrwarmt PM ' 

WEDNESDAY, APEJDL 3, 1985 


ItmlQi^&ribune, 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 




U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 10 

Page ll 


1 ‘^T- • 

77 ~ $ ? 

i 

5^! 


«. lmrSNATlONAL MANAGER 

% e 

^ International Agencies Lure 
fci , Few From the Private Sector 


Dresdner Brazil’s Exports Take a Perilous Dip New Senate Bill 




P 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

International Herald Tribune 

ARIS — Profft-orienicd executives don’t become do- 
gpoders overnight. According to the Worid Book, the 
Org an i z a tio n of Economic Cooperation and Develop- 
ment and the General Agreements on Tariff and Trade, 


• ?aniqj ' ment ana tne tjeneral Agreements on Tarul and Trade, 

J few senior general managers make mid-career moves from the 
*- corporate world to the world of inter na tional civil service. 

re P f Hcr k The most notable exception is the World Bank president, AW. 

^ iw Clausen, previously the president and chief executive of Bank of 

b |%w; America. World Bank presidents are not recruited by the World 
5 Bank, bat are appointed by the U.S. government. 

*%D|g Of 19 vice presidents at the World Bank — the most senior 

J e Qa l, officials reporting directly to 

15^ the presidin’ s office — only 

•’■a* 1 * one came from a private com- ' Converts say that 

Z % pany. Rio Tinto-Zinc Carp. , . A , ; , . 

^ % The others were recruited being 8W6 to heb 

“"adij from within the bank, from 
P national civil services or from poorer countries 

- r , ac ^? r> l? ' motivates Aem 

- . Pte - At the senior management 

"'ti level we don’t hire rands from 

, the outside,” said Anthony P. Williams, director of personnel 
J J , a *kQ; .*j nanage meat at the Wraid Bank. Mr. Williams recently jorned the 
ie ^ ^ ,ank fr° m a private consultancy company. “For line managers it 
nJ ; # ** important to know the oiganizatiod, because they have to 

- supervise people,” he added. 

: According to GATT, OECD and the WoddBank; some senior 

managers interested in moving to the ipuMic sector may not have 
■ ®ife the right drills; some may not find the money or titles they are 
Jr' 1 ’ 0 * accustomed to; some may perceive limited opportunity for career 

. advancement, and some simply don’t bdieve in the effectiveness 

uli of the organizations. 

The best fit between the corporate world and the World Bank 
is in the project finance business. “We recruit most of our 
u j. enc H- specialists, like power engineers, forestry experts, biologists and 
. chemists, from the corporate sector,” said Mr. William* of the 
orcev * World Bank. “But we don’t recruit them as managers.” 

(ie **** Like private multinationals, the World Bank is m the business 
^ of raising money in the international capital markets. As a result, 

it draws some numbers of its financial teams from commercial 
^ and investment banks. 

‘ra> wf & ® ut riiere has been no oonsdoos effort among the organiza- 

JsBlI “ linne frt Man nn raaniitmanf affnrt, fmrn flia mmnnfa natnr 


>5$ 

!'S 

***** 

-^esiS; 

-• wT 

■ *pWiJ 

■rSi 
> ilmi 

^TUtonalk 
W CTdlfl> 
the bm. 

■ an\h» ’ 
w ana*. 

tR* 

ure. * 
.• - er. thj| u 

•'Orceijj^ 

he 

-•anarnrj^ 
JscinQfe 
t noefe 


iwssesaj t ' ons 10 stcp Q P recn °tment efforts from the corporate sector. 

uo r 1 1 be organizations’ tax-free salaries are sometimes lower 

k rea® e fl than those paid by US. multinationals for senior interna- 
'"‘B A tionalpoas 

nunisiia^ World Bank salaries for professional staff range from $26,980 
on is prtE- t0 sg5 ( 33o. More than 90 percent of the Worid Bank’sprofesaon- 

p Mi Jir aj staff 25 based in Washington. “At higher levels, World Bank 
salaries tend to be lower than those in the U.S. corporate sector.” 
said Tim Cullen, chief of external relations for Europe. Mr. 
Cullen himself is a convert He joined the World Bank after 
Kw working for Ford Motor Co. and Continental Illinois Corp. 

^ Some executives who do move from the corporate worid to the 

< World Bank get frustrated by the bureaucratic approach. “Re- 
mam cop Search projects tend to be much longer and don't feed directly 
. JT; into decision-making, ” said a recent Worid Bank convert 
. breaker’ Others find bureaucratic procedures a phis. “In & private 

the unr- pompany, you are controlled by many individuals. Some people 
.... J: . may not Hke you. In the Worid Bank the system controls you. 
-L, l~ f l There are more safeguards in that situation,” said Yves Gazzo, 


:i Mr. Ns 
. Mjdenipnc 
‘romthti. 
jchard a>: 
nfi/msdcQ 
that Jr he 
locked hes 
ed 10 wt 
- tbresij e; 


who is in charge of p ro cu r ement for the Worid Bank ia I^mope.' 
Before joining the Wodd Bank, Mr. Gazzo was an anditorwnh 
Arthur Anderson & Co^ where he was involved in restructuring 
bankrupt companies- - 

* Most converts say that being able to help solve poorer coun- 
tries' problems is part of what motivates them. “At some point 
you start thinking about what wiD be on your tombstone,” said 
Mr. Cullen of the Worid Bank. ■ 


Currency Rates 


Lota interbank rafts on April 1 . wcUxSoq fees. 
r Official fixings for Amiterdam, Basset, Frankfurt, Milan, Park New York rates af 
4 PM 


Amstemain X5» 

Brvssets(a) 6US 

Frankfort 11401 

Voodoo <M TJ0H 

r*m oa ‘ 10(000 

teW TomW 

Ports 9sus 

Tokyo 251725 

Zurtcti 24615 

1 ECU 17094 

I SDR 1983772 


E . DJM. 

4205 inn* 

74455 '20.1 li 


FJt. MX. Oter. 

3#JJ“ 0.1773 

AMS 11572 • 17X315. 


3271* 1J71 x 224 

12012 11.5942 2412.10 422 

437 JM 200X2 . 544. 

1102 - 949 1,»753)0 15 

18503 — 4797 X 1 

2842 2M7 IZM* 71. 

24585 * 27725* 0.1327 74T 
22357 12199 142520 252 

102*23 *4382 HA. 34* 

Dollar Values 

I ftr 

loo*. °* nm * D 55 
1507 Irtstlf 29*3 

OOOU UrwBflHkOl 11*20 

33347 ttnrafKdhur OJSK 

02944 Malay, rbmfl 2JM5 

. Aim. narw.krw 15725 

00545 PMLpoh 11254 

UEI Fort.oocodo moo 

02772 SOMflltyrf 3501 


IF. SJ=. YOB 
551- 13135 *13*78 y 
23751 249425 

4973- 11222* 123*- 
74575 320*3 30752 

31545 73355 7434 

'4293- 2522 25320 

11125- 3404537235* 

40123- 97 M 

4.W13- 14474* 

*49744 19*09 120474 

822234 25134 242994 


■ S Pa I , Par S ftr 

Entiv. D * Ta0CV OSS iwlv. Can ^ mc1 095 Enow. OKTWKr ||jj 

0449 AMtraUBf 14*42 1507 JrWlf 29*3 04422 22M 

05452 Austrian scMOn 2194 00012 InwBiMUl 11920 051*8 AAMcannod 1924 

0514 BaWan fla. franc 4220 13047 ttrwnflfdfcar 03826 22812 A KkraMftM 15440 

07223 CanadJaD t U73 82944 Malay. rte2tt» ASMS M85S Snaa.PHrta 17328 

05888 DaetstHcnMO 11245 Aim Morw.krM 19725 0J09I HmUltim 9.U 

AtSI Flnnbii markka 4447 05J4S W8.P4B 1(25* 0920 TatwaaS 399* 

0502 enakdradnaa 13148. 05082 Fort. wcoda 17150 09343 TkalbaM 27935 

01222 Maao Kang S 7501? 02772 Sand rtyal 3502 22721 UJL9.dMftn 35725 

< SJtrtioo:Uia | rUft C 

fdj CoanwicU franc (MAnewdsnMdadtDlwvoaopauM (cl AmauatfnMdodtotwymeAirtor**) 
UriftofUeUl Units oH500 (y) Units of 10200 
NJ1: naf nooted: MA.’ nif avafloMn 

Sduree *; Banoue du Benelux I Brussels); Banco Commerdale Itolhma (MHan); Bantus 
ffatimaie de Ports (Parts! i IMP (SO IV I Banoue AraDe at Internationale mnvesttaement 
■Jidbw, rival, dirham). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Dollar D-Mark Praac ' - Stnrttoa Prone RCU SDR 
1M. 834 - 2% SM. - SM. 51fc - SH 13M - 13» 10H - 10U 9* ■ TO 8K 

2M. am. - 9 ft SVt ■ Sf 1 5ft- 5ft 13M-13M TOM-TOW 9 V. - lOftBft 

3>V 9ft -9ft 59V -6ft 5H -5K 13ft -13U. 10ft - 11 10 - 10ft 8 ft 

6M. Vft -*M 4ft - 6l*i 5ft -5ft 12ft- T29V lift- lift 10 ■ Wft Oft 

iv. tow - uni 6U - 4ft ;5iv raw - 12ft lift - lift wt* - w»v ru 

Pales apaUcobte to fnteroan* deposits of SI million minimum (oreouhaPent). 

Sources; Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM. SP. Pound, FF): Ltavds Bank (ECU!; Reuters 
(SOR). 


Asian Dollar Rates 


, 8ft -Oft 
Sowno: Reuters. 


.Re**®; 

■m 


, Key Money Rates 

United States cme piv. 

Dbceunf Rot* 8 0 

fftdwoi Funds 2ft .81SA4 

Prtmo Rate 10ft 10ft 

Beaker Loan Rate . 9ft 9ft 

Comm. Paoer. 30-179 dovi WO Art 

S^iwnfh Treasury Bills 822. A12 

4«wifh TraotoY Bills UO BO 

CD's 3859 days 825 MO 

CD'S 60-29 days ' 840 L34 


Lombard Rate MO 698 

OvornlaM Rate 498 ADO 

One Manfta mterbonk' 590 550 

*mm» Iniw&ank . ATS A15 

Jrt } Will interfcoift 425 ' 42S 


Britain 

Bank Sets- Rate 
Call Money 
9Vday Trwuurv Bill 
SMontli inMrtxmk 

Japan 

Discount Rate 
Call Money 
40-day (nfarOank 


U 13-Uft 
raw raw 
12ft 12 3/16 
12 15/32 13 5/14 


5 5 

4ft 45/14 
6ft (ft 


Gold Prices 


intervention Rate •- 
Call Manor. 
Ohamom interbank 
3*iarM mterOank - 
6-OVMte Intarttaak ■- 


. 10ft 10ft 
10ft 10ft 
- - 10ft 10ft 

10ft 10ft 
■ » 7/1*10 7714 


Sources: QmrietBr&piHBnt&qnlc. CrddltLy- 
ornate. Uovds Bmk, BasK of Tokyo. 


AM- PM- 

Hons Kano 31?^ 31590 - 1325 

ij o mtan 31550 — — u® 

Paris (125 UJo) 317.17 320.93 — 342 

Zurich 3I&S8 31B975 — 23M 

Lorrion 31790 31875 — 22S 

H|W York — ' 32290 + 350 

Official fixtos ter London. Paris end Liutem- 
bourarOMidno arte dartia Priw far fwo Kona 
and Zurfrtb New Vte* Canw cwTHit wnfrset 
AH Oricss to U2J rar ounce. 

Source; Reuters. . 


’84 Profit 
Slips 1 % 

Strong 2d Half 
Aids Earnings 

By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Dresdner 
Bank AG, West Germany’s second 
largest commercial bank, said 
Tuesday that 1984 group-operating 
profit was off 1 percent from 1983's 
record result, but exceeded 2 bil- 
lion Deutsche marks (about S641 
million) on the strength of excellent 
trading performance. 

In keeping with general practice 
among West German banks, no 
specific figure for operating profit 
was provided. 

Wolfgang Roeller, Dresdner’s 
chairman, said a rapid expansion 
of volume in the second half gave a 
strong boost to group operating 
profit. The figure is the sum of net 
interest income, commission fees 
and guns from trading on its own 
account less running costs and ex- 
traordinary items. 

Mr. Roeller said volume for the 
year surged 8.7 percent, to 179 bil- 
lion DM. The increase helped off- 
set a shrinkage in interest margin 
— the difference between interest 
Mmwi and interest pi»ri — to 2.7 
percent from 2.9 percent a year 
earlier, Mr. Roeller said. The mar- 
gin is likely to continue to narrow 
this year, he added. 

Parent bank partial operating 
profit, which excludes trading on 
the bank’s own account, fell 5.9 
percent, to 795 million DM, Mr. 
Roeller said. 

Dresdner said its declared group 
net profit for 1984 fell to 375.9 
millio n DM from 382.9 million 
DM the year earlier. The bank said 
it had set aside 210 million DM of 
1984 results to strengthen reserves. 

One indnstiy analyst in Frank- 
furt noted that with a 14.3- billion 
DM surge in business volume, 
Dresdner Bank's 1984 operating 
performance does not appear espe- 


Trade Picture 
Goudy Alter 
A Record ’84 

By Alan Riding 

New York Tima Servux 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Selling 
commuter planes to the United 
States, oil rigs to the Soviet 
Union and myriad other prod- 
ucts to all points in between, 
Brazil’s exporters last year be- 
came the toast of the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund and the 
foreign banking community. 

The exporters demonstrated 
that the country’s worst econom- 
ic crisis in decades could be over- 
come with salable products and 
hard work. Brazil was held up as 
a model to other Latin American 
nations 

The achievement was impres- 
sive. A record $13.1-billion trade 
surplus fueled a 4.4-percent 
growth rate last year — the first 
expansion of Brazil’s economy 
since 1980 — and supplied the 
dollars necessary to meet interest 
payments oa the country’s 5102- 
billion foreign debt. 

But Brazil’s trade picture has 
suddenly turned cloudy. The 
country is seeing a dipin its sales 
and orders abroad. The lifeline 
to recovery no longer seems so 
assured. 

The implications are poten- 
tially grave. A slump in the trade 
surplus this year could affect not 
only Brazil’s domestic growth, 
inflation and exchange rates, but 
also its relations with the IMF 
and foreign creditors, especially 
if it is unable to keep up interest 
payments without new borrow- 
ing abroad. 

The main threats to Brazil's 
exports — the strengthening of 
the dollar and growing protec- 
tionism in the industrialized 
worid — could also undermine 
the export efforts of other major 


BrazO's Trouble k* Me 

Brant s nwroiandise imports and exports, monthly date in bi&ofts Ofdota/s 
S3 p 

2 — EXPqR > ^ 

) - IMPORTS ' * S *‘\ 


Raises Pressure 
On Japan Trade 


debtor nations, notably Mexico 
and Argentina. 

Some economists argue thar a 
drop in exports could bring on 
another major f-itin debt crisis. 
Already the most recent reduc- 
tion in worid cal prices has forced 
Mexico, with debt of 596 billion, 
and Venezuela, with 534 billion 
in debt, to revise their trade esti- 
mates. 

In Brazil’s case, the reversal of 
a three-year trend of rising ex- 
ports has coincided with the 
March 15 inauguration of the 
country’s first civilian adminis- 
tration in 21 years. Adding to the 
uncertainty that normally ac- 
companies changes of govern- 
ment, the President-elect, Tan- 
credo Neves, has been unable to 
take office because of ill health. 

The outgoing military govern- 
ment has played down the 9- 
percent fall in exports for the 
first two months of 1985, attrib- 
uting it to “glitches.” 

But there is no sflencing the 
whispers of concern. During Jan- 
uary and February, exports were 
S3 14 million lower ana the trade 
surplus 5260 million less than 
during the corresponding two 
mouths last year — and dramati- 
cally below the trade figures for 
the final months or 1984. For- 
eign sales of food products, nota- 
bly coffee, sugar and orange 
juice, were 22 percent lower than 
a year ago. 


8 ouni 0 .lnien*tlonalUoiietaryFvnd | 
tea York 1W*i 

“In the most optimistic of 
cases, the trade surplus will reach 
59 billion this year,” according 
to Laerte Sc tubal president of 
the Association of Brazilian Ex- 
porters. Officials are still hoping 
for a trade surplus of 51 1 billion 
to S12 billion, but some econo- 
mists see a surplus closer to 56 
billion. 

Mr. Neves has declared his 
twin objectives to be greater eco- 
nomic development and a simul- 
taneous reduction of inflation. 
But both stand in the way of the 
easiest trade options: A big trade 
surplus could be preserved by 
further controlling imports, hot 
this would discourage growth. 
And the competitiveness of Bra- 
zilian products could be stimu- 
lated through a “maxi-devalua- 
tion*’ of about 25 percent, but 
this would feed domestic infla- 
tion 

The last “maxi-devaluation,’’ 
in March 1983, gave enormous 
momentum to exports. But it was 
accompanied by export incen- 
tives, which today run counter to 
rules of both the General Agree- 
ment on Tariffs and Trade and 
tbe IMF. 

Nevertheless, the Neves ad- 
ministration has "Hi 1 ^ the ex- 
port sector from a 60-day credit 
and spending freeze, seemingly 
aware that the country^ trade 
outlook could influence its com- 
( Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


United Press Imenumonal 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
Finance Committee approved 
Tuesday a lull giving President 
Ronald Reagan 90 days to negoti- 
ate increased access for U.S. prod- 
ucts in Japan or to take action to 
reduce imports from Japan. 

The House Ways and Means 
Committee, meanwhile, sent to the 
full House a nonbinding resolution 
similar to one approved 92-0 last 
week by the Senate, urging the 
president to restrict imports from 
Japan unless it opens its markets. 

The moves came as Japan's latest 
offers in high-level trade negotia- 
tions were being assessed in Wash- 
ington amid some confusion over 
whether they included anything 
new. 

The Finance Committee mea- 
sure. approved in a 12-4 vote, is 
much stronger than the nonbinding 
House resolution. In effect, it 
would require the president to im- 
prove the U5. trade deficit with 
Japan by S3 5 billion during the 
next 12 months. If he could not do 
so by increasing U.S. exports to 
Japan he would have to do so by 
limiting imports from Japan 
through quotas, tariffs or other 
steps. 

The committee calculates that 
Japan’s decision to relax its con- 
trols on auto exports to the United 
States will result in S4J billion in 
increased Japanese sales to the 
United States, and that in recent 
years, U.S. exports to Japan have 
risen by an average of about 51 
billion. The S3 5 billion figure in 
the bill represents the difference. 

The committee defeated a mea- 
sure to hall imports of Japanese 
telecommunications goods unless 


Japan eases the way for more im- 
ports of similar U.S. products. 

Meanwhile, a White House 
spokesman said that Mr. Reagan 
bad “great faith” in Prime Minister 
Yasuiuro Nakasone’s promises to 
push for concessions. 

Larry Speakes, the deputy White 
House press secretary, said that 
two American envoys who met 
with Mr. Nakasone last weekend 
were convinced that Japan would 
move to open its markets. 

Gaston Sigur, a Japan expert on 
the National Security Council, and 
Lionel H. Ohner, the undersecre- 
tary of commerce for international 
trade, reported to Mr. Reagan on 
Monday on their talks in Tokyo. 

“There were positive signs” at 
their meeting with Mr. Nakasone. 
said Mr. Speakes. 

Mr. Reagan said that Mr. Naka- 
sone “wants to arrive at a solution 
to these trade problems as much as 
we do." 

■ Confusion on Tokyo Pledges 

Mr. Nakasone denied Tuesday 
that be made new commitments to 
the United States when he and Mr. 
Reagan’s special envoy met, ac- 
cording to Japanese newspapers 
quoted by Tbe Associated Press. 

At a news conference for foreign 
reporters later Tuesday, a senior 
Foreign Ministry official also de- 
nied that Mr. Nakasone made com- 
mitments to Mr. Sigur. 

Mkhihpco Kuniblro, director of 
the Foreign Ministry’s economic 
affairs bureau, said Mr. Nakasone 
only “threw his personal weight be- 
hind additional assurances" to the 
envoys that the Japanese govern- 
ment would do its best to open the 
domestic market to U.S. products. 


Goldsmith Mounts Bid for Zellerbach 


Dresdner s shares rose 10 pfen- 
nigs, to 189 DM, on the Franicfurt 
Stock Exchange mi Tuesday. 

The bank had previously an- 
nounced that it was raising its 1984 
dividend to 7 JO DM from 6 DM. 
Deutsche Bank AG and Commerz- 
bank AG^the Other two banks in 
West Germany’s big three, said ear- 
lier they would keep their dividend 
unchanged, at 12 DM and 6 DM, 
reajectively. 

ra contrast to Commerzbank 
AG, which Monday reported a 
slight decline in profit for the first 
two months of the ouTent year. Mr. 
Roeller said Dresdner’s profit in 
January and February was up from 
the corresponding period last year, 
with both business volume and in- 
terest surplus showing steady gains. 

Mr. Roeller emphasized that risk 
provisions for foreign loans in 1984 
were considerably higher than tbe 
previous year. He also noted that 
with debt-repayment uncertainties 
still at issue m Latin America and 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 3) 


Los Angeles Tima Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Climax- 
ing a four-month cat-and-mouse 
game with Crown Zellerbach 
Corp., Sr Janies Goldsmith offered 
Monday to acquire all shares out- 
standing of the forest-products 
company for more than 541.625 a 
share. 

The financier’s offer, spelled out 
in a letter to Zellerbach’ s manage- 
ment, puts an indicated value of 
51.13 billion ou the US-year-old 
company. Analysts said the offer 
could smoke out other bidders for 
the asset-rich concern, which owns 
or controls 2 million acres of prime 
U.S. timberland. 

The bid was made through Gen- 
eral Oriental Investment LttL, Sir 
James’s primary holding company. 
The offer would be structured as a 
cash lender for at least a majority 
of the 28 million shares outstand- 
ing, with the remainder to be ac- 
quired at the same price. 

In the letter. General Oriental 
said its offer is contingent on the 


San Francisco-based company re- 
deeming its so-called “poison-pill” 
shareholder-rights issue adopted 
last July as a takeover defense. 

If Zellerbach fails to take action 
to redeem the rights by next Mon- 
day, the letter stud. General Orien- 
tal will mount a proxy fight to gain 
representation on Zellerbach’s 
board. Crown Zellerbach's annual 
meeting is scheduled for May 9. 

The “poison-piU" rights, de- 
signed to ward off unwanted take- 
overs, give Zellerbach holders the 
right to buy two shares of tbe sur- 
viving company after a hostile 
takeover for the’ price of one. 

General Oriental said it believes 
that its bid should be attractive to 
Zellerbach’s directors and share- 
holders, “particularly in light of tbe 
fact that the current market price is 
so obviously affected by specula- 
tion about our intentions.” 

Zellerbach’s common, which has 
traded for as little as 527.75 in the 
past 12 months, has been moving 
up recently on takeover specula- 


tion. It closed Monday on the New 
York Stock Exchange at 541.75. up 
12J cents from Friday. 

Zellerbach, in a prepared state- 
ment, said its directors would re- 
spond to the Goldsmith letter “at 
an appropriate time, which may or 
may not be on or before the April 8 
ultimatum date chosen by Mr. 
Goldsmith." 

Sir James already holds an 8.6- 
peroeat stake in Zellerbach. His in- 
terest in the company first surfaced 
last December, when he said he 
planned to buy as modi as 25 per- 
cent of the company. Last month, 
in announcing his initial stake, Sr 
James said he might seek control of 
the company. 

Zellerbach has consistently re- 
buffed Sir James’s overtures. Last 
month, William T. Creson, the 
company’s chairman, president 
and chief executive, told securities 
analysts here that be would oppose 
"any external effort to capture our 
undervalued assets at the expense 
of greater future opportunities.” 


Sedgwick Plans to Acquire 
Transamerica Brokerage 


DoOar lower JjVOTl Bourse BoWICCS OlU of ObHvWJl 

L Hf V A Cm. n/ if 


“ JnKYe After 


Gains in Europe U.S. Money, New Listings Buoy France’s No. 2 Exchange 

T3 A — .1 V MnnialAHl tsf nkniraMAK e\f ika cmoll oti/1 fWnrV] 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
finished lower Tuesday in New 
York against key currencies, af- 
ter slight gains m Europe. 

Tbe British pound rose to a 
late New York rate of 51.225, 
up from Monday’s late price of 
SL221. Other late New York 
rates, compared with late Mon- 
day rates, included: 3.102 Deut- 
sche marks, down from 3.120; 
1628 Swiss francs, down from 
2.635, and 9.49 French francs, 
down from 9.515. 

Dealers said the eariier gains 
in Europe were triggered by 
Monday’s rise in the U.S. feder- 
al funds rate — the rate at 
which banks lend reserves to 
each other. They said the sharp 
gains in early trading seemed 
overdone; and the dollar began 
falling by mid-morning. 

The dollar surged above 3.16 
DM in early Frankfurt trading 
but slipped lata- to 3.1408, still 
above Monday’s dose of 3.091. 
In London, the pound hit 
SI-2135 at mid-morning, but 
fell back to dose at 512075, 
below Monday’s 512223. 

Other late Europe rates, com- 
pared with late rates Monday, 
were: 26615 Swiss francs, up 
from 26305, and 95945 French 
francs, up from 9.4310. 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

LYON — Every weekday at 
12:30 P.M^ a gong rings in the 
spacious hall of a 19th-century 
building housing the Lyon Bourse, 
opening trading on what has be- 
come France’s second most active 
stock exchange after Paris. 

‘The trading down here is boom- 
ing, and drawing lots of outriders, 
because it reflects the economic 
growth of companies in the area, 
and their expanding capitaliza- 
tion,” said Jean Caniere, chairman 
of Sodfctfe Lyonnaise de Banque, 
France’s largest regional bank. 

Hie state-owned bank, among 
others, has played an important 
role in helping list companies on 
the exchange, which totaled 52 at 
the end of 1984, and may add about 
half a dozen tins year. 

The value of transactions con- 
ducted on the exc h a ng e last year 
rose by 23 percent from a year 
earlier, to 124 billion francs (51 .31 
billion). While that total represent- 
ed only 3 percent of the volume at 
the Paris Bourse, the growth in 
Lyon has been swifter. Last year, 
the Lyon Bourse index rose 38 per- 
cent from 1983, compared with a 
15-percent rise for Paris. 

“We are small compared to Par- 
is. but our total volume roughlv 
doubled between 1982 and 1984,'’ 
said Roger Micbaux, who is the 


AERO LEASING GENEVA 


equivalent of chairman of the ex- 
change and one of nine brokers 
authorized to handle transactions. 

He noted that the current boom 
can be traced bad: to the mid- 
1970s. For several previous years, 
volume had stagnated at an annual 
level of about 100 million francs. 
But a detailed report urging reacti- 
vation of tbe exchange, prepared 
by the Soctete Lycmnaise de Ban- 
que in 1974, triggered new interest 
Gradually, many companies began 
to list their stocks ana bonds. 

“The expansion during the past 
few years has buih up gradually, as 
small and medium-sized compa- 
nies began realizing that it was in 
their interest to have their stock 
listed, mainly to diversify their cap- 
ital base,” added Jean-Pierre NO- 
chaux, the son of Roger, who is also 
a trader. “We have been going 
strong ever since.” 

Capitalization of securities trad- 
ed cm the Lyon Bourse rose by 40 
percent last year, to a total 44,6 
pillion francs, with the largest gains 
reported among listed stocks (134 
percent) and braids (26 percent). 

“But what saved us, and is fuel- 
ing the growth here,” said Roger 
Mjchaux, was the expansion of the 
second marcte, which was estab- 
lished in 1983 and is roughly equiv- 
alent to the U.S. over-the-counter 
market. It was established by the 
Socialist government to enable 


grnnlt and medium - s ized compa- 
nies to introduce up to 10 percent 
of their stock on (he nation’s seven 
bourses. 

Volume of transactions is also 
growing at the other regional ex- 
changes in Nantes, Nancy, Bor- 
deaux, IiOe and Marseilles. But 
Lyons, which handles 60 percent of 
all stock-exchange transactions 
outside Paris, is clearly in the lead. 

Last year four companies intro- 
duced their stock on the Lyon sec- 
ond marche, which now accounts 
for about 25 percent of total trans- 
actions ©a the Bourse. About six 
companies are expected to follow 
within the next several months. 

An frequently cited example is 
CCMC, a company that uses com- 
puters to process about 1,600 ac- 
counts a day for accounting firms. 
CCMCs sales last year rose by 100 
million francs, to a record 732 mil- 
lion francs, and it expects to report 
a similar gain this year. 

Last November, CCMC issued 
about 10 percent of its 624,000 
shares on the second mardiL Tbe 
shares, winch began trading at 325 
francs, were tr ading last week at 
630 francs. “The move to go to the 
market suited our purposes of 
somewhat expanding our capital 
base, providing some outride par- 
ticipation,’’ said Jeao-Claude Mo- 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 4) 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Sedgwick Group 
PLC. realizing a long-standing am- 
bition to expand its U.S. brokerage 
activities, announced Tuesday a 
plan to buy Fred S. James & Co. 
from Transamerica Corp. 

Sedgwick, Britain’s largest insur- 
ance brokerage and the third larg- 
est worldwide, has agreed to pay 
San Francisco-based Transamerica 
142 million new Sedgwick ordinary 
shares, representing 39 percent of 
Sedgwick's equity but carrying 
only 29 percent of tbe voting rights. 

Transamerica s stake in Sedg- 
wick would be valued at about £530 
million. (5641 nriDkm.) based on 
Tuesday’s closing price of 373 
pence for Sedgwick shares. In De- 
cember 1982 Transamerica paid 
5300 million to acquire James, but 
about 575 million has been invest- 
ed in tbe business since then. 

Transamerica, a finance and 
transportation conglomerate, said 
it would regard its holding in Sedg- 
wick as a long-term investment 
Sedgwick officials made dear that 
they wanted the company to re- 
main independent, and the agree- 
ment calls for restrictions on Tran- 
samerica's ability to increase its 
holding or sell it in rate block. 

The acquisition, subject to regu- 
latory and shareholder approvals, 
would give Sedgwick a mqor pres- 
ence “on thegrramd” in the United 
States and Canada, Card Mossel- 
wrans chairman, said at a Kricfing. 

Sedgwick’s move mirrors acqui- 
sitions of British brokerages in re- 
cent years by the biggest U.S. in- 
surance brokerages, Marsh & 
McLennan Cos. and Alexander & 
Alexander Services Inc. Two years 
ago, Sedgwick held merger talks 
with AAA, but those negotiations 
broke off without an accord. 

As fra James, Richard M. Page, 
the chairman, said the combination 
would give his compam- an interna- 
tional presence that “would have 
taken years of investments and 
time we didn't have.” James spe- 
cializes in acting as a broker Ira 
individuals and small to midsize 


companies, while Sedgwick’s in- 
volvement in North America is 
mainly at the wholesale level 

Andrew Crean, an insurance an- 
alyst at Capd-Cure Myers, said the 
acquisition was a vital strategic 
move at a reasonable price; But he 
and other analysts said one draw- 
back would be some loss of busi- 
ness referred to Sedgwick by U.S. 
brokers other than James. 

In 1 984, nsing British accounting 
standards. James had pretax profit 
of $27.5 million on revenue of 
$2928 million. For 198S, the com- 
pany forecast that pretax profit 
would surge to about 533 million 
on revenue of 5360 minion, reflect- 
ing the recent acquisition of a Ca- 
nadian brokerage. 

Sedgwick last year had pretax 
profit of £78.3 million on revenue 
of £2472 mQhoa 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 



U.S. Futures 


Om Htah Low close Che. 


Season Season 
High Low 


Opoii High Low Oom Ohj- 


O RANGE JUICE (NYOn 
isxoo Ihv cents oor ttx. 

1*5X0 151X0 May 159J0 159X0 


Season Smsqt 
H igh Low 


Open High Low Oom Cfto. 


s : 

ihj» i 
inaoo i 
177X0 1: 

I £2X0 1i 


155JOO Jul 100X0 160-70 
15775 Sep M0J0 160X0 
157X0 NOV IMS 160X0 
iS6X0 Jan 
isod Mar 


WHEAT tCHT) 

SXoaini minimum- dollars per bushel 
6X5 132Vj May 3X1 A 15816 

3X0 12«I6 Jul 3J4* 2»6 

17691 126 S«P 13416 136 

163V5 136 Dec 3X3* 14616 

17416 3XJH6 Mar 151 151* 

102 147 May 

Est Sales P rev. Sales 4X83 

Prev. Day Open Int 35786 up 549 
corn (can 

5X00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
330 25** MOV 2JDV> 2X3* 

3X1 273 Jul 2X2to 18316 

121 Vb 2X616 Sep 27316 174V6 

195 2X0* Dec 2X016 2X9 

110 2X916 Mar 17616 27716 

12116 274* May 2JBVS 2X316 

2X6 2X1 Jul 2X6 186 

EM. Salas Prev. Sales 31X69 

Prev. Day Open lnt.!26XS7 up 252 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5X00 bu minimum- dal tore per buihel 
7.97 570* May 6X1 6X1 

7X9 5X0* JUl 6X7V6 6X996 

7X6 5X2 Aug 6X716 AID 

6.71 5X1 Sep 6.03 6X316 

6X8 5X316 NOV 6X4 6X6 

677 19416 Jon 11516 1T7 

7X2 6X616 MOT 67516 12816 

779 115 Mar 

6X9 6X6 Jul 

EsE Sales Prev. Sains 19715 

P raw. Day Open ml 65X34 oftl39 
SOYBEAN MEAL CCBT) 

100 tons- dollars Per ton 
205X0 129X0 May 135X0 135X0 

19150 13470 Jul 141X0 141X0 

80X0 137X0 Aug 14130 14450 

179X0 140X0 SOP 148X0 148X0 

180X0 142X0 Oct moo 150X0 

184X0 147X0 Doc moo 15500 

1&3X0 149X0 JWl 158X0 158X0 

206X0 154X0 Mar 142X0 142X0 

Eel. Salas Prev. Sales 8X85 

Prev. Day Open Int. 45,144 
SOYBEAN OIL (CRT) 

40000 lbs- doihp-s per 100 Ids. 

30X0 22X0 MOV 3039 3075 

3030 2270 Jul 28X0 28X5 

27X0 22X0 Aug 77X0 27XS 

24X5 22XO San 36X5 24X0 

26X0 22X0 Oct 2560 2575 

2S-*0 22.90 DOC 24X0 25JJ0 

2575 2160 Jan 2465 2475 

2670 24X0 Mar 2440 24X0 

24X0 24X0 May 

Est Sales Prev. Sales 9X07 

Prav.DavOeen int. 41720 up 627 
OATS CCBT) 

SXOO bu mbilmum- dollars ear bushel 
3-ZL !•“* IX9V6 1X916 
1-7816 1X3 Jul 1X6 1X6 

179 1X0 Sap 1X116 1X116 

1X216 1X4 DOC 1X5 1X5 

EM. Sales Prev.Scflea 180 

Prev. Dev Open Hit. 3X03 up5 


3X116 3X8 +JHV6 

3X4* 3X6 +21 

3X4* 3X6 Ml 

3X3* 3X6 +X0* 

3X1 3X116 +JWV6 

3X8 


2JD — >0016 
2X2* —>0016 
274 — X0W 

268* —0016 
277 -XOfc 
2X316 -JJOVj 
2X5* — 20* 


5X7 6X0* +21 

105V6 109 +J01I6 

4X6 110 +XIH. 

100V6 6X316 +JXH6 
103 6X516 +2016 

114 117 +JW6 

125 67816 +21 Vi 

4X416 

6 AM +JHV6 


73470 13110 —1.10 
1*0X0 141X0 —170 
143.90 14400 —170 
14160 14160 — 120 
149 JO 15000 —1X0 
15420 15470 —1X0 
156X0 156J0 —1X0 
162X0 162X0 —JO 


30X5 3065 
28X5 28X0 

27X0 27X0 

26X9 26X0 

2160 2575 
24X0 2498 
2460 2465 

24X0 24X6 
2446 


1X8 1X816 — JNMi 

1X5 US* —JO* 

1X116 1X116 
1X5 1X4* +X016 


I £2X0 16100 May 

Jul 

180X0 17975 Sop 

EM. Sales 600 Prev.Sau 
Prev, Day Open Int 6X24 1 


157 JO 15770 
15830 15870 
15920 159.10 
150X0 158.10 
15775 
157X0 
157X0 
157X0 
157X0 


Livestock 


CATTLE CCME) 

4ojxn lbs.- c ents per to. 

67.00 61X5 Apr 64X0 6572 

69X0 64X0 Jun 6125 6170 

67A7 6X15 Aug 6150 65X0 

6190 A1XO Oct 6375 63X5 

67X5 63X0 Dee 615/ 64X0 

67.45 6475 Fea 6530 65X0 

67X7 66X0 Apr 

Est Sales 15X22 Prev. Sales 15X00 
Prev, Day Open Int 62735 off SOI 
FEEDER CATTLE (CM El 
44000 lbs.- cants par ID. 

7120 6170 Apr 6130 **« 

7273 6495 May 6885 69.12 

SK ***" S'* 1 ® 7 “- ls 7lW0 

7100 67X0 SOP 69X0 69X5 

7272 67.10 Oct 69X0 69X5 

7370 *925 NOV 70.10 TOTS 

EM. Salas 1772 Prev. Sotos 1719 
Prev. Day Open Ml. 10798 off 117 
HOGS (CMC) 

30000 n».- eents per )b. 

5445 4390 Apt 6370 4175 

5540 48X0 Jim 48X5 4815 

5577 4875 Jul 5(160 5075 

S4J7 47 Ja Auo 50X0 50X2 

5175 4520 Oct 4770 4775 

50X5 46J0 DOC 4875 4825 

4675 Feb 49J» 49J0 
4775 4190 APT 4690 4690 

49XS 47X0 Jun 4840 48X0 

GM.Salw,, Prev. Sales 10960 

Prev. Day Open im. 25744 up 6 
PORK BELLIES <CME) 

31000 tab- cents per lb. 

K-DO 61.15 May 69 JO 69X0 

8247 6119 Jul 7890 7047 

MX5 6070 Auo 6900 6940 

7670 6315 Feb 74X0 74X0 

7540 64J» MOT 7450 74X0 

?5n2 TOAD MOV 73X0 73X0 

_ 76X0 7090 Jul 

EM. Sales 1163 Prev.Sates 7979 
Prav. Day Open Hit. 12458 alt 103 


6447 —40 

6122 — l!5 

6165 +JJ8 
6382 +X5 

64X5 

6570 — >10 

66X0 +.10 


68X7 — >15 
7820 —.10 

69X0 

69 JJ —>15 
7810 — >15 


42X7 —1X8 
4825 —77 

30X7 —>61 

30J2 — 65 

46J3 — >55 


67.95 —1.95 
6870 —2X0 
67X7 —1.91 
7330 —2X0 
7330 —ZOO 

73X0 —1X5 
7350 —1X0 


COPPER (COMEX) 
25X00 Ibe^ cento per lb. 





6295 

£2 

Ajar 6290 

82.90 

6290 

6430 

+U0 

9250 

Mav 6X40 

6475 

6115 

6470 

+1J0 

sum 

61X5 

Jun 



65X5 

+1JS 

8875 

57X0 

Jul 64.10 

6545 

6175 

6535 

+U5 

82.10 

5750 

Sep 6*50 

6575 

6420 

65X0 

+140 

8473 


DOC 65.15 

6640 

6445 

6645 

+145 

SJTfl 

59X0 

Jan 



6645 

+1A5 

80X0 

5950 

Mar 6550 

67X0 

6550 

67X5 

+145 

M.0D 

61.10 

May 



6755 

+145 

7449 

6170 

Jul 63X0 

66X0 

63X0 

6005 

+145 

70S0 

62J0 

Sop 



4855 

+145 

70 M 

64X0 

Dec 



6975 

+145 

6570 

65J0 

Jan 



6950 

+145 

Est. Soles 17X00 Prev.Satos 12793 
Prev. Doy Open Int. 84X48 uplXSS 




SILVER (COMEX) 

3X90 tray car cants per iroy be. 





660X 

S57X 

Apr 644X 

644X 

644X 

4564 

+12X 

1513X 

553X 

May 643X 

661 X 

643X 

440X 

+13X 

1461X 

5620 

Jul 6510 

6705 

6515 

6494 

+110 

11B3X 

573X 

SOP 664J) 

681X 

664X 

48K1 

+13X 

+13X 

1330.0 

590X 

Dec 6S0X 

699X 

MQX 

6974 

7014 

1215X 

59SX 

Jan 



+13X 

1193X 

Mr/x 

Mar 702X 

7045 

7080 

7157 

+13X 

10480 

421X 

May 7180 

713X 

7100 

7284 

+13X 

+110 

f45Jf 

635X 

Jul 732X 

732X 

732X 

74L9 

940X 

641 X 

Sep 



756X 

+110 

799X 

667X 

Dec 762X 

777X 

762X 

7774 

+I3X 

78TX 

763X 

Jan 



784X 

+13X 

EM. Sales 25X00 Prev. Sato* 18.124 
Prev. Day Open Int. 74705 oft 1X39 




PLATINUM (NYMI) 





50 Irav at- doikm per tray ot 
44750 236X0 Apr 26650 

27550 

3*650 

27570 

+4X0 

251X0 

251X0 

Jun 



9X0 


44950 

241X0 

Jul 2/150 

281X0 

271X0 

30020 

+9.10 

393X0 

250X0 

Oct 28050 moo 

27950 28670 

+6L 90 

37350 

moo 

Jan 28850 

290X0 

28550 

29230 

4890 

39850 

27950 

Apr 



29950 

+880 

EM. Sale* 

1,959 Prev.Salas 3X56 




Prev. Day Open Ini. 13X62 un206 




PALLADIUM (NYME) 
TOO troy on- dollars per oc 





19950 

10650 

jun nixo 

11250 

11075 

112X5 

+1JS 

14175 

106J3 

Sep 11075 
Dec 11075 

HITS 

11825 

111.15 

+1J5 

14150 

10550 

11L75 

110X0 

11065 

+125 

12750 

M6JD 

Mar 



110.15 

+1J5 

EM. Sales 

164 Prev.Salas 

716 




Prev. Day Open inf. 8*97 off» 




GOLD (COMEX) 






1 ao troy at- dot tors ptr irev ox. 





51450 

38240 

Apr 318X0 

323X0 

317X0 

mini 

+340 

327X0 

292X0 

May 31850 

32420 

31850 

mro 

+350 

510X0 

287X0 

Jun 32150 

327 JO 

321X0 

32620 

+350 

485X0 

291X0 

AUO 32650 

332X0 

32640 

33070 

+350 

491X0 

297X0 

Oct 38250 

33520 

33050 

33570 

+350 

48950 

30150 

DOC 33650 

342X0 

33650 

341X0 

+350 

48550 

306X0 

Feb 34250 

344X0 

34250 

34670 

+150 

496X0 

314J0 

Apr 34650 

353X0 

34850 

3SL40 

+350 

43570 

32050 

Jun 35540 

35540 

35540 

35850 

+350 

42840 

33TX0 

Aug 361X0 361X0 

361X0 

34470 

+350 

39570 

335X0 

oct 



37120 

+350 

37100 

342X0 

Dec 



378. K) 

+350 

Est. Solos 28X00 Prev. Sales 25X16 
Prev. Day open mi.119749 of! 2.145 





CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 
s nor dir- lDolnt eauals SQX001 
7835 7054 Jun J248 7276 7248 7264 

.7385 7(05 Sop 7241 7249 7233 7246 

7566 7006 D#C 7231 7245 7231 7236 

.7304 X9B1 Mar J0 1 

.7260 7070 JWl 7228 

EM. Sales IJMl Prav.Sales 1720 
Prev. Day Open Int IT#IX7 up A 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Speriranc-I point eauals soxoooi 
.11020 X9410 Jun .10400 .10450 .10400 .10450 

.10430 X96SS SOP .10410 

X9670 JS95JO Dec .10305 

EM. Solas 5 Prev. Sales 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1X70 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Spot mark- 1 paint equals 10X001 
-3733 7905 Jim JIM 2237 Jl87 J227 

J545 7930 Sep 7324 2262 72TV 7254 

-Mid 7971 Dec 22H 2275 7240 7291 
7251 JOffl Mar ttk 

Est. Sales 27763 Prev.Salas 28730 
Prev. Day Open Int. 45X71 off 31 19 

JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

S per van- 1 paini eauals 50X00001 
004450 -003826 Jun X03958 X03970 XOJ9SO X03966 

004150 JNQ870 SOP X03992X04005 X03989 X04000 

ooaso Mam oecMmMttmMmaMuat 

004100 XlMtflO Mar X04C79 

EM. Sales 8X96 Prev. Sales 8X46 
Prev. DavOpan Int. 22,149 UP 816 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 
sperlrano-lpabitaaualssoxooi 
.4900. J439 Jim 7740 7840 3779 J830 

-4B3S J480 SfP JB13 JB75 7813 JM 

4360 7531 DOC 7887 -3900 7885 2917 

X000 -3835 Mar 7960 

EM. Sales 18,144 Prev. Sales 14X92 
Prev. Day Open int 22X87 off 399 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- pis of loo pet. 

VIXI 87.14 Jim 9173 9176 

S3 04.9* SOP 90JM 90X6 

WJO 8577 DOC 90J8 9044 

SS B6X0 Mar 9008 9812 

98» 87X1 Jun 99X7 89X2 

HUM 88X0 Sap 8972 8972 

89X3 89X5 Dec 

Mar 

f 8t,s 9. h **.^ Prev.Salas 0707 

Prev. Day Open Int. 39760 ottm 

WTO- TREASURY (CBT) 

lioaooo prlnjns & 32nbs of 100 pet 

827 70-9 Jun 797 79-10 

Sr, 1 ! sf® »w »» 

W-22 75-13 Dec 

80-6, 75-14 Mar 77-3 77-4 

JM6 74-30 Jun 76-17 76-18 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales 8.130 

Prev. Day Open inr. 44X13 UP 98 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 bet-SlOOXOO-pfs &32TKU of loo pen 
77-15 57-20 Jun 69-11 69-17 

7M 57-J0 5«> 68-15 68-19 

76-5 57-8 OeC 67-34 67-24 

JJ® 57-2 Mar 66-30 6+30 

JO-16 56-29 Jun 66-7 66-10 

«W 56-29 Sep 65-22 65-22 

52"=* 56-25 DOC 65-3 65-3 

6J-12 36-27 Nlar 64-20 64-20 

*9-2 63-12 Jim 

S£S« 6J4 SOP 63-24 63-24 

6W 62-24 DtC 

p 8 ?*- 5 ? 1 ”.. Prey.soleslozwe 

Prev. Day Open intTISXSS up 1418 
GNMA (CBT) 

S, 9M5P ortn-Pts&Ittidaol 100 pet 




Paris Commodities 

April 2 


COFFEE C (NTCSCE) 

37X00 lbs.- cents per to. 

153X0 122X1 MOV 143X0 14SAS 

14970 121X0 Jul MUD 145JM 

j<mo J2-B Sf® ' tLn 14 *- 13 

144X5 129 JS Dee 142X0 143J0 

143X0 12850 MOT UIA I4U0 

141X0 131X0 Mav 141 AS 142X0 

M0XD 13850 Jul 

13*X5 13275 SOP 

t=M. Sales 2X50 Prev. Sates 1X81 
Prev. Dor Open Int. 13X35 up62 
SUGAR WORLD n (MY CSCE) 

112X00 lbs.- cants per lb. 

10X0 180 MOV 1«9 4X2 

JM ITS Jul 4.12 414 

975 407 Sop *72 432 

9X5 417 Oct 434 43$ 

fJS 465 Jan 473 4J5 

9-33 104 Mar S.19 571 

7,15 125 MOV iC 543 

669 S49 Jul 

Em. sales nps Prev. Sales 122*5 
Prev. Oar Open InL NBf upixot 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tons- se*r ton 

2570 1991 May 2340 2271 

MOO 1998 Jul 2*0 2180 

Mtt t«T Sen jus 2152 

2337 IMS Dee 2082 21D5 

2190 1955 Mar 30M wwo 

2130 1980 Mav 

_ 2035 I960 Jul 


1414S 14491 
142X5 14465 
142X0 14407 
142X0 143.13 
141A0 148X0 
V41A5 142X0 
142X0 
141J0 


3.79 328 

3X9 390 

4X2 403 

4)3 414 

460 460 

5X6 5X7 

£20 529 

M3 


(Indexes compiled shortly before market Man) 

SP COMP. INDEX (CMB) 
point* o nd Ltiiti 

189.10 15410 Jun 184X0 U4X5 162X0 182X5 —ITS 

19270 160X0 Sep T86J0 186J0 MOJO UeJO —US 

77440 17570 Dec 29L2S 19775 U960 18960 —US 

Eft. Salea Prev.Sates 42455 

Prev. Day open tnt. 57,160 off 504 

VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
pohittondeeflM 

21960 173X0 Jim 200.10 200X5 19866 19865 — 1J0 

21130 18875 SOP 202X0 202.95 20890 202.95 —1.95 

EM. Sates Prev.Salas 3X14 

Prev. Day Open Int. 4194 up 5X75 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 

pafttfs and omti 

110X0 90X0 Jun 10495 WM 106X0 10670 —SO 

111X0 91 JS Sea 10VJD 109X0 10830 10830 —AO 

11373 10170 Dae 111X5 111X3 110X0 110X0 —65 

EM. Sales Prev. Sales 9,185 

Prev. Day Open int. 9X86 up 182 





Close 



High 

LOW 

Bid 

Aik 

Cb'se 

SUGAR 






P ranch francs per metric ton 



May 

1285 

1275 

1276 

1280 

+ 26 

AUO 

1J47 

1237 

1240 


+ 26 

Oct 

1292 

1275 

1XS 

1281 

+20 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1425 

1430 

+ to 

MOT 

1548 

1540 

1J« 

1543 

+30 

MOV 

1590 

1505 

1565 

15M 

+ 23 

ESt. VOL 

1 JM lots of 50 tons. Prev. actual 

sates; 1760 lots. Open Interest: 

23248 


COCOA 






French francs per IM kg 



May 

2JM 

2280 

2286 

2287 

+ 17 

Jly 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2250 

— 

+ 25 

Sep 

2.165 

2.165 

2236 

2260 

+ 14 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2,140 

— • 

+ 30 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2,145 

re— 

Uncn. 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2,140 

— • 

unen. 

Jly 

N.T, 

N.T. 

2.135 


uncn. 

Est. vol 

tw lots Q| 10 ton*, prev. actual 

n*n; 140 lots. Open inlartst: w 


COFFEE 






French Irenes per HM kw 



MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2520 

2550 

Unch. 

JTV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2570 

toe# 

+ 8 

Sen 

Nov 

2445 

N.T. 

2440 

N.T. 

3J2D 

2550 

2580 

+ W 
+ 40 

Jan 

2490 

2450 

2510 

2540 

+20 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T, 

2570 

— 

+ 5 

Mav 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2535 

—* 

+ 7 

EjLvoI. 

M tots at 5 tons. Prev. actual sales: 

0 lets. Open Interest: 175 




Source: Bourse tfu Commerce. 




London Metals 
April 2 . 


Previous 
95630 f 
1,89560 
122.95 
20.90 


Eat Soles Prev.Salas 3*70 
Prev, Day Open IM. 27684 o«21S 


2US 21M 
2127 2139 

2073 2083 
2070 3083 
2083 

3083 


Commodity Indexes 


Oosa 

Moody's 95560 f 

Reuters — 1,98160 

0_t. Futures NA 

Cam. Research Burcou. NA. 

Moody’s ; base 1M : Doc. 31, 1931. 
p ■ preliminary,* f - final 
Reuter* : base 100 : Sac. 10, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base IDO : Dec 31, 1974. 




Chicago Board of Trade 
CMcaao Mercaufle Exchange 
intomanoMi Monetary Market 
Of cnicctoa Mercamie Exdtango 
New York C ocoa Sugar, Coffee Exchange 
Now York Cotton Exchanaa 
Commodity Exchange. New York 
Now York Mercantile Exchange 
Kamos Cltr Beard of Trade 
Now York Futures Exchange 


COPPER CATHODES (StoMBTd) 
Starling mr metric foa„' u . ' 

sbot I.WtJfl LT94W USSjn 

forward 1707.00 1208X0 1,172X0 

LEAD 

Starling per meMcton 
mol . 31160 JU9 3MJ0 

forward 32800 33060 314111 

NICKEL 

Sterling per njetrietoa 
spot 4625X0 463500 4260X0 

forward 4440X0 46S0X0 4X73X0 

SILVER 

Pence per fray emef „ „ 

•pat 539X0 S38M 529X0 

forward 347X0 *48X0 4*7X0 


London Commodities 

April 2 


oosa Previo u s 
Hie* Low BM Ask Big Ask 


May 11580 11160 111X0 112X0 11360 115X0 
Aim 11860 11440 11440 114X0 11760 118X0 
Oct 12160 117 JO 117JD 11760 12160 121X0 

oee 127X0 125X0 12220 12360 127X0 131X0 
Mar 13960 134X0 135X0 134.00 13e 70 139X0 
MOV 1*4.40 14360 140X0 1*1 20 14360 14460 
Alia 149X0 149X0 145X0 147X0 146X0 151X0 
Volume: 3.(01 lots of 30 tons. 

COCOA 

5 To rung per metric ton 
May 2X00 1J04 1,986 1,987 2X11 2X12 
Jly J.963 1.950 1,953 1,953 1.973 1.974 
SOP 1.934 1.927 1>26 1X27 1.«45 1X47 
Doc 1X74 1X63 1X65 1X67 1X73 1X73 
Mar 1X65 1X35 1X40 1X62 1X66 1X68 
Mav 1X60 1X58 1X58 1X64 1X65 1470 
JLr N.T, N.T. 1X55 1X63 1X60 1X73 
Volume: 3X70 loll of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Slerttaa per me trie tea 
May 2725 2705 27 IS 27» Z19f 2703 
Jly 2770 2753 2761 2763 2747 2748 
5*0 2710 2790 2J94 Z2P7 2778 27M 

NOV 2734 2716 27H 2730 2795 27K 
JOB 2705 27M 1394 2797 2775 $380 
MOT 2764 2760 2755 27S9 2730 MO 
Stay N.T. N.T. 2740 2230 2700 27*0 
Volume: 2.173 lots of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

U.S. dollars Per metric ton 
API 235X5 717 Q0 32373 S W jUl 23475 23450 
MOV 23250 229X0 229X0 22975 33150 3l75 
Jun mOD 22450 22450 223X0 22850 228JS 
Jly 227.75 234X0 224X0 m50 2&7S 23650 
Aim 238X0 228X0 225X0 ZHX0 22750 27875 
Sep 229X0 227X0 226X0 234X0 227X0 SlXO 
Oa N.T. N.T. 236X0 236X0 OTX0 233X0 
No* N.T. NT. 226X0 24800 229X0 236XD 
DOC N.T. N.T. 226X0 240X0 23800 34800 
volume: 1X30 lots of 100 tans. 

Source*: Rouion and London Polrohum £*- 
cnange laatolH. 


Brazil, IMF to Resume 
Talks on Economic Plan 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Brazil will 
shortly resume talks with the Inter' 
national Monetary Fund on its 
1985 economic program. Citibank, 
said in a statement as chairman of 
the country’s ]4-bank ddvisory 
committee. 

A Citibank executive, William 
Rhodes, said in the statement Mon- 
day that the committee has agreed 
to resume talks '.'on a multiyear re- 
scheduling agreement in the first 


Asian Commodities 

April 2 


Cash Prices April 2 


Dividends April 2 


TIN (Standard) 

Storwif per metric ton 


week of May. Talks with the Paris 


S&P 100 Index Options 
April i 


DM Futures Options 

ApriI2 

w -(tninNBUSninbiniiperint 


NYCSCE: 

NYCB: 

COMEX; 

NYMEs 

kcbt: 

NYFE: 


9753X0 9735X0 MOMQ 

9753X0 9JSSX0 9AB5X0 


xttffHw nor motile ton 



B»«PM IBM wL 8714 

can: Men. WLL964 eoMM,}U27 

Fob : Man. wri. lan aeon Int 1944* 

Source: CMC, 


U3. Treasmy B31 Rates 

Apcfl 1 


M Yield Ykt* 
146 M 


nur . ion nui _ .dm dm» ♦ uj 


Sfi 


F.'A JUItUp 



































































ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. APRIL 3, 1985 



« are 


fcFfw 

jp H|| I 

|||i Central Soya 

§ S Sr! "• 7&AB**x*d Pmt 

ft fife LOSvSNOELES — Aa mvert- 
'&.>! ln“! gn»P W ty Ray E Disney 
acquire Ccntnil Soya 
Cd^Misna-ha^foodMOC^ 
a&SfefL' soj; for about S03imllioQUicai3j. 
?& jft gKJf ' agreement, announced 

ar Si jKj ^Monday, came two- weeks after Ml 
??“ £*, SL. Disney's limited partnership, 
]gj Shmnjodt.Capital, announced that 
scoured I0J percent of 
« Central Soya's stock and was pre- 

ssS^j pared to bay dm entire company, 
g $>} The agreement calls for Shaan- 
^ ^ 1 nick topay $24.25 for each of Cen- 
tral Soya’s shares, np from an im- 
ml offotrfSB a share. Tbc Disney 
£S ftW'O’ vrocp already owns LS nriffian of 
? S4 A* *S «ntral Soya’s 14 minion shares 
<****& ** 


ESM to Seek to Recover $50 Million 

By James Stemgold prefrantial treatment over other appointed receivership sine 
New York Th^a Service creditors in being able to withdraw March 4, when it was closed hr 


*2 ^ AT; 


. * 5* Central Soya’s stock closed 

5 11 *8 § 3 $ %'i Monday on the New Yoik Stock 
n 13 ft Exchange at $23,875 a ■dar e, op 

o £ St sub. 


By James Stcmeold preferential treatment over other 
item York IteMr creditors :in being able to withdraw 

MIAMI— American Savings & some °* “““V- 

Loan Association of Miami has es- It was an insider, be added, be- 

dnmieri that its transactions with cause Ronald Ewton, EM’S chair- 
the faded ESM Government Sees- tntn, sat on American's board, and 
rides lxtc.w£Q cost it more than $55 became , of the connections bc- 
mxffion in losses, after taxes. But wwn ESM and Marvin L. Warner, 
SwuSteAefinaim whoonotwasdiaiimanaKimcoa- 
, . „ nol of American. 

. in respoiBG m a question Mon- 
day, Thomas Tew, ESMs tank- Asked about soch a suit, Shepard 

ruptcy trustee, he would Broad, 78, the foander of American 

seek to recover about S50 who stiD ats on its executive com- 

ihat A inmean managed to with- niince, said Monday that Amcri- 
draw before ESM’s.o'Sape. can had already pSatmea that it 

w T . . ■ ,, would defend itself on grounds h 

Mr. Tew Boosted that he would was mi. in fact, an inskfcr. 
file a IawsmL American has said it 

was aware of the trustee’s inieo- Those individuals may have 
tiara and is prepared to defend been, but in no way was tins insti- 
itsdf. mtkm an inrider," he insisted. 

Mr. Tew said be would seek the ESM was pot into bankruptcy 
return of the money on grounds proceedings last week under Cfaap- 
that American enjoyed status as an ter 7 of the federal bankruptcy 
ESM "insider” and therefore had code. It had been under a court- 


appointed receivership since 
March 4, when it was dosed by 
court order, and faced fraud 
charges by the Securities and Ex- 


Mr, Tew, the recover, was ap- 
pointed interim trustee^ 

One of die critical factors in the 
dedson to move to a bankruptcy 
proceeding, according to the law- 
yers involved, was what son of ac- 
tiafl would produce the most assets 
for ESM, to he eventually divided 
among its creditors. 

Bankruptcy was chosen because 
it provides that, under certain con- 
ditions, the trustee can return to 
previous transactions between 
KM and its customers and ruHfltm 

some of the assets, Mr. Tew said. 

‘ ESM’s failure led to the tempo- 
rary closing last month of 70 pri- 
vately insured Ohio savings- and- 
loan associations and disrupted 

foreign-exchange markets. 


Buyer Reported 
For Home State 

The Associated Press 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — a 
buyer has been found for Home 
Stale Savings Bank, whose dos- 
ing last month sparked a state- 
wide crisis, Governor Richard 
F. Cdesze of Ohio announced 
Tuesday. 

After meetipE privately with 
several depositors, representa- 
tives of about 400 who had 
marched on the statefaouse, Mr. 
Celeste announced that an out- 
of-staie banking institution had 
offered to boy Home State. 

hfr. Celeste refused to identi- 
fy the buyer but said, “It's not 
Citicorp,” referring to the New 
York-based bank that was re- 
portedly interested in Home 
State. He said he would hold 
the out-of-state offer until 
Wednesday to give Ohio banks 
a chance u> match or exceed it. 


Unocal Sues Pickens Group 
And Increases Its Dividend 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Unocal 
Corp. says it is suing T. Boone 
Pickens, the Texas oilman, and his 
partners for alleged violations of 
federal securities laws, seeking to 
force the investor group to give up 
its holdings in the international oil 
company. 

In another announcement, Uno- 
cal said Monday that it was raising 
its dividend by 5 cents a share, or 
70 percent Holders of common 
stock as of the dose of business 
April 12 wiH receive the new 30- 
cent-a-share payment on May 10. 

Unocal said Monday that its 
suit Hied in U.S. District Coon, 
alleged that Mr. Pickens, the chair- 
man of Mesa Petroleum Co., and 
his partners violated U.S. securities 
laws in buying Unocal stock. 

The suit contends that Mr. Pick- 
ens* group falsely said that it was 


purchasing Unocal stock for in- 
vestment purposes. Last week, in 
disclosing that it had raised its in- 
terest in the company from 9.7 per- 
cent to 13.6 percent of the shares, 
the group said for the first time that 
it was considering a takeover bid. 

The suit also alleged that Mr. 
Pickens* group violated a lending 
agreement and with violating terms 
of a 1984 court injunction barring 
Mesa Petroleum and its partners 
with violating disclosure provisions 
of securities laws. 

Unocal said it asked the court to 
bar Mr. Pickens’ group from voting 
any of its shares or soliciting the 
votes of other shareholders. It also 
asked that the partnership be or- 
dered to dispose of the stock. 

Unocal shares closed at $49,875 
on the New York Stock Exchange 
on Monday, off 50 cents. 


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Exchange at $13,875 a share, up 
S1JB. 

The partnership agreed to in- 
crease its offer “to encourage and 
enhance a friendly transaction,” 
said a Shamrock spokesman. Previ- 
ousty,, Central Soya had been sflwn 
about the offer except to say that it 
was unsolicited. 

DooaM Ecfaicfc, president and 
chief "executive of Central Soya, 
fr^Hed die offer "very favorable.” 

Central Soya operates more than 
75- facilities involved in food pro- 
cessing, .grain merchandising, soy- 
bean processing and feed manufac- 

turinc-m the United States, Canada 
and Europe. In 1984, il had sales of 
about S1.7 bQlkm. 

Mr. Disney’s funds Cot the part- 
nership were put up by his fanuly- 
cootiTMled investment Cnn, Siam- 
rock Holdings Inc., based in 
suburban Burbank. He is the 
brother of the late Walt Disney. 

Shamrock , said it has received 
commitments from banks for 
ghoul fiSfl milHon in fTnwrw-mg 


COMPANY NOTES 

Alex Harve y industries told the 
New Zealand Stock Exchange that 
h will recommend to shareholders 
dial they accept a takeovs bid 
from Carter Holt Hokfim. 

Btee Circle Lon- 

don, has agreed in principle to buy 
Atlantic Cement Co„ a subsidiary 
of Newmanl Mining Corp. of the 
United States, for $145 million is 
cash. The price wiH be paid on 


f ffiwrfM iw ; t £ bank holding 
company in Detroit, has filed witii 
the Federal Reserve Board to buy 
Michigan National Corp., a bank 
holding m rp pa Tiy is Bloomfield 
HTTls Michigan. The new company 
would rank among the top 25 fir 
naru-rai fa nirin g institutions in the 
United States. 

Eastman Kodak's proposed 
$175^n3tion aoquisitioii of Verba- 
tim Ccop- will be studied by the 
antitrust division of the U.S. Jus- 
tice DepartmenL Spokesmen for 


I a V4 a* r 4 * fci i ac* t 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied toy Funds Listed 
- - 2 April 1985 

TIm Mt and vfllM aaotatloDi tkown bMow an mppUmI fcv n* Portds BM wHfe *t» 


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both companies said the leanest is 
routine and is not expected to af- 
fect the merger. 

Occidental Petroleum Coqx raid 
its Netheriands-Cities Service unit 
sold its one- third interest in Chan 
Petroleum Co. to Maralon Nether- 
lands Partnership, a Texas general 
partnership, for about $90 million. 

Pentnsrigr & Oriental Steam 

Navigation Co. said it had agreed to 

sell a 50-percent stake in its ik[ue- 
fiod petrolenm and chesiical- 
gac ocean transportation business 
to Overseas Shipholding Group for 
$35 mOfion. 

Protefl Assurance Co. said it will 
acquire 100 percent of the issued 
share capital of Phoenix Prudential 
Assurance of South Africa, from the 
Sun Alliance Group for L75 mil- 
lion new Proiea ordinary shares. 
Value of the accord, which will cre- 
ate one of South Africa's biggest 
insurers, was not disclosed. 


Lyon Bourse Buoyed by U.S. Money , New Listings 


Robins Sets Up 
Daikon Resen e 

The Associated Press 

RICHMOND, Virginia — 
AH. Robins Co- which faces 
hundreds of lawsuits claiming 
injuries from its Daikon Shield 
birth control device, said Tues- 
day it had set aside a S615- 
million reserve to cover claims. 

The reserve, charged against 
1984 earnings, resulted in a loss 
of S461.6 million. Operating 
earnings for the year rose 21 
percent from a year earlier, to 
S128 million, while sales rose 12 
percent, to S631.8 million. 

As of last Dec. 31, about 
3,800 claims were pending 
against the company in federal 
and state courts in the United 
States. The company had dis- 
posed by that date of about 
8,300 claims, paying out $314.6 
million. Since Jan. 1 , about 900 
suits have been filed The com- 
pany sold about 2.9 mil l in n of 
the devices from 1971 to 1974. 


(Con tinned from Page 11) 
rd, CCMCs president, in a receox 
interview. 

Mr. Michaux noted in a recent 
interview that the brisker t rading 
an the exchange reflected a chang- 
ing mood in the region, and the 
nation as a whole. Trading, re- 
flecting new confidence in the 
economy, cotrid.grow even more in 
the months ahead, particularly if 
the government becomes more lib- 
eral in supporting business 
growth," he said. "We expea a bet- 
ter year in 1985.” 

U-S. institutional investors have 
shown interest in the Bourse here, 
and last year alone bought shares 
valued at about lOQmSbon francs, 
exchange officials said. 

Much of the American interest 
appear, to have sprang from an 
investment seminar sponsored 
jointly last October by Merrill 


Lynch & Co„ the U.S. financial- 
services company, and Sorifctfc Ly- 
onnaise de Banqne. The event drew 
about 25 important investors, in- 
cluding mutual and pension funds 
and insurance [Companies from 
New York, Boston and Chicago. 

"Much of the new activity on our 
Bourse stems from the American 
interest, and we expect there will be 
more,” said Lonis Tanuberger, who 
directs the bank’s relations with the 
Bourne and the news media. 

Bat there are also formidable ob- 
stacles to expansion of the Bourse, 
wbkh is m tnrnpartly related to the 
rapacity of aD French companies to 
grow. That cautionary note was 
struck by Emile Vfiron, who in 1977 
became ibe first Lyon business 
leader in about 10 years to list his 
company on the exchange. 

The conqnny, Majorette SA, 


makes immature toy vehicles at a 
plant in a suburb of the city. Its 
share values have more than tri- 
pled, which enabled the company 
to split its stock three times. “We 
have gone through three capital in- 
creases thanks to the Bourse,” said 
Mr. Vcron, who with his family 
controls about 47 percent of the 
company’s 854,796 shares out- 
standing. 

“Although the Bourse has helped 
us grow, we should be a far larger 


company with about 3,000 employ- 
ees,” he said, blaming government 
restrictions and regulations. 

Some businessmen here shun the 
Bourse altogether, at least for the 
time being. "We are solicited regu- 
larly, particularly for the second 
mardii, but I would prefer going on 
as we are,” said Bernard Brocmer, 
who owns a small company special- 
ized in making symheue textile ma- 
terials. which generates about 90 
million francs in sales annually. 


Gold Options (piloefta s/«a.). 



Gd± 313D3-3KID 

Valean White Weld SwA. 

L Oral du MM-naac 
1211 Centra L Snfezerfand 
TcL M02S1 - Telex 2*305 


Profit Slips 
AtDresdner 

(Continued from Page 11) 
with the growing number of insol- 
vencies among «m*n and middle- 
sized companies ax home, the need 
to keep n&k provisions at a high 
level in 1985 remains. 

Dresdner’s finance director, 
Wolfgang Lecb, said that provi- 
sions far foreign lending alone had 
doubled, to over 1 billion DM from 
a year earlier. 

Jnergen Sarrazin, board member 
in charge of Latin America credit, 
said 350 nriTHon DM was allocated 
to cover risks of its subsidiary, 
Deu&che^uedamerikanische 
Bank AG. The Hamburg-based 
bank has considoabte exposure to 
Latin American dcbL Mr. Sarrazin 
said Dresdner Bank last year pro- 
vided 335 mflhon DM in so-called 
“fresh money” credit to aid re- 
scheduBng efforts. 

Williams & GLyn’s Bank 
Cots Base Rate to 13% 

Reuters 

LONDON — Williams & Glyn’s 
Bank PLC said h was cutting its 
base rale to 13 percent from 13ft 
percent, effective Tuesday. Interest 
on seven-day deposits goes to 10 
percent from 10n. 

The bank's base rale is now in 
line with National Westminster 
Bank PLC, Lloyds Bank PLC and 
Royal Bank of Scotland PLC. Bar- 
clays Bank PLC and Midland Bank 
PIC stay with 1354-percenl base 
rates. The Bank of Scotland recent- 
ly cut its base rate to 13tt percent 
from \3Vl 


Brazil’s Exports Falling 
From Record 9 84 Levels 


(Contimed from Page I!) 
ing talks on restructuring its debt 
with its New York-based Advisoiy 
Committee, which represents 600 
creditor banks and fi nanc ial insti- 
tutions bolding BraaHan debt. 

The negotiations were suspend- 
ed in fare January after the IMF 
refused to condone overspending 
by the outgoing government, bnt 
they shook! resume once the IMF 
approves the new administration's 
money-supply and ddim targets. 

■ Meanwhile, the negotiating envi- 
ronment has been altered by the 
dip in Brazil’s exports. The two 
rides had come dose to a|reemenl 
0D res cheduling $45 J btifiOH of 
commercial debt coming doe be- 
tween 1985 and 1991, rath Brazil 
panting ait that its record 1984 
trade surplus eliminated the need 
for “new money” tins year. 

In the short term, Brazil could 
tap its reserves to cover die gap 
between its irade surplus and the 
$12 billkm or so reorard to meet 
interest payments this year. Fur- 
ther, it could {fiscratrege imports in 
areas where “import-substantiem” 
by local producers is stiB possible. 

A right Sd on imports has been a 

key in Trapp in g die t rade 

surplus high- Imports feO last year 
by $1.5 buian, to $13.9 bffiion (af- 
ter a record S229 bflficm in 1980). 
Bat the real thrust of the trade 
surplus has come from exports, 
winch jumped from 52 1 j 9 trillion in 
1983 io$27 billion in 1984. 

BrariTs exporters have proved to 
be tough, dynamic and imagina- 


tive, finding new markets for exist- 
ing products and developing fresh 
approaches to established markets. 

Brazilian products are still in de- 
mand worldwide — if the price is 
right The boun try’s traditional ex- 
ports, agricultural goods and raw 
TTMrtffria'h 'r emain important: Cof- 
fee brought in $235 billion and 
iron ore S1.5 bfition last year. 

Even more impressive has been 
the growing sophistication of Bra- 
zxT 5 industrial and manufactured 
exports. Its steel, leather and textile 
goods, although constantly fighting 
pr ot ectionist barriers, have long 
found a' place on world markets. 


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IN THE FINEST 

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A commitment to mutually re- Consolidated assets of some 
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nolog)-- based economy. 





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Head Office: Theatinerstrasse 11, D-8000 Munich 2 
Tel ; (089) 23 66-1. Tx; 5 286525-27 


OPTIONS ON EURODOLLAR FUTURES 


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The Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the 
world’s most successful futures and options 
market, announces yet another way to 
manage business risk more effectively - 
Options on EurodollarFutures. 

The CME’s underlying futures contract 
in Eurodollars, introduced on its Inter- 
national Monetary Market (1MM) In 1981, 
quickly became the most active short-term 
interest rate contract offered by any 
exchange, in fact current trading volume 
has averaged more than 40,000 contracts 
per day, representing an underlying value 
of $40 billion. 

Now that Eurodollar futures and 
options are trading side-by-side, liquidity in 
both markets will be enhanced and, in 
addition, their comparative values can be 
assessed. 

Leading banks, institutions and 
government dealers can now also use 
Eurodollar options as an integral part of 
their interest rate dealing operations. 
Options enable them to provide attractive 
and innovative services to their customers, 
resulting in increased fee income 
opportunities. 

Corporate treasurers can use 
Eurodollar options as “insurance policies’ 1 


against future interest rate fluctuations in 
their borrowing and investment needs. 
Additionally, they can employ these options 
to enhance investment yields or reduce 
borrowing costs. 

Eurodollar options, in becoming a part 
of the CME’s already-impressive range of 
interest rate products, now give bankers, 
dealers and corporations even greater 
flexibility in managing rate uncertainty. 

For a free copy of “Options on 
Eurodollar Futures: An Introduction,” write 
to or telephone Keith Woodbridge at the 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange, 27 
Throgmorton Street London EC2N 2AN. 
Telephone (01) 920 0722. 



CHICAGO 

MERCANTILE 


EXCHANGE 

International Monetary Market • Index and Option Market 

FUTURES AND OPTIONS Wdi MSE 

27 Throgmorton Street. London EC2N 2AN 01-920 0722 
30 South Wacker Drive, Chicago. Illinois 60606 
312/930-1000 

67 Wall Street, New York 1 0005 2 1 2/363-7000 






















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TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


BUSINESS PEOPLE 




• W: J v:-. -- - - 


ToBead2 NewES. Offices 


*m 

cMl 


• “By lynric Cutty.. 

totmuatmud Herald Trnme 

LONDON «— Amsterdam Rot- 
Ta tian a Bank NV, the Netherland’s 
' 'second-largest bank, has opened 
- regional marketing offices in Hods- 
£ Jon and Los Angeles as part of the 
t expansion of hs U& operations. 


dent responsible for production, 
operations and cost management, 
as well as the group’s US. project. 

Bank of New T^fanyt the coun- 
try’s largest bank, has appointed 
Robert B. McCay its group chief 
executive. Based in W ellington, 


Sheraton Chief 
Named by ITT 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — John Ka- 
pkJtas was named chairman 
and chief executive of Sheraton 
Corp., succeeding Howard P. 
James, the hold company’s par- 


Unemployment 
In West Germany 
Declined in March 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Unemploy- 
ment in West Germany, unadjust- 
ed for seasonal factors, declined to 
147 million in March, or 10 per- 
cent of the work force, from 161 
million in February, when the un- 
employment rate had been at a 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ITALY 



AUTO SHIPPING 


PARIS £ SUBURBS 


* Mftkmg lor (he fare headquarters a 

Data Processing 


\ expansion of its US. operations. Mr. McCay is now deputy general 
The new office? arc an extension of manager. He will begin his new job 
. Amro New York, a fuH branch. when WxDum Shaw, the current 
. Amro has appointed Jan .R, chid executive, retires June 11 The 
;. frins vice president of the Houston bank has also appointed Ronald 
" -office. He was previously based in W. Mear as general manager New 
• New York as vice president and Zealaod busmess. and Peter Tra- 
group head of the bank's Sooth- vers as general manager corporate 

■ Central region. and international; both are now 

' , : Charles G. Riepc was named so- assistant mural managers in Wd* 
& nior vice president of the Los An- hngton. Thomas Tennant, chief 
"ogles office. He was formerly with "Mirct yr For New Z e aland branch 
1 chare Manhattan m Tpc An grfw , h a nking, wiU become assistant gen- 

■ where he was a vice president in ^ manager. 

ebaree-of the West Coast region. Boots Co. PLC the British- 
. _ wiih its regional xepresemaiive h as o d pharmaceu tical «v>n prr". 
office in San Frandsco, Amro now named Robert Gunn ch^mtan. 


cut, ITT Corp., has announced. 

ITT said Monday that Mr. 
Kapidtas retains bs titles of 
president and chief operating 
officer of Sheraton, which is 
based in Boston. Mr. Kapioltas, 
who joined Sheraton in I960, 
was named president in 1983. 

Previously, he was a senior 
vice president of Sheraton 
Corp. and president of Shera- 
ton Management Corp., the 
company’s British-based divi- 
sion for Europe; Africa, the 
Middle East and South Asia. 


luyujcm ana oecn at a p . » e _ . 

-record Wi percent, the Fed- “WoOSSy Service Mnrmnor 
Labor Office in Nuremberg •*sJ:!*** manager 


office m Sanfirandsco, Amro now named Robert Gunn chairman stay in Bangkok, where he wasdi- 
^as four offices m the United Previously vice chairman and chief rector and general manager of Mer- 
? lates - executive, he succeeds Dr. Peter can tile Bank Ltd, which was ac- 

1 : Nissan Motor Co^ Japan’s see- Main, who is retiring. quired in May 1984 by Gtibarik. 

ond-lar^«t automaker, has ap- Banque bdosnez has appointed % succeeds Tatsuo Kubota, who 


**r\ near-record w.5 percent, the red- 
cral Labor Office in Nuremberg 
it Mr. said Tuesday. 

■*®®. °* When seasonal factors were tak- 
cn into account, unemployment in 
*“ is March climbed to 132 million 
from 130 million in February, the 
Labor Office reported. 
l98 *. Improving weather conditions 

scruof were died as the reason for the 
laton decline in the unadjusted figure. A 
year earlier, unadjusted unemploy- 
mem in March was 2J9 million, or 
9.6 percent of the work force. 

**. ™ c Separately, the economic minis- 

lSja - try in Bonn reported Tuesday that 
seasonally adjusted industrial pro- 
duction eased 0.6 percent in Fcora- 
wasdi- “y-tfhsra revised 1. 8-jperoentdrop 
ofMd- “ Januaiy. 

The nmustxy said severe winter 


75008 Paris 
Telex SIAM F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562-1640 


Tin is a toy pashm Within if* informa- 
tion services department carrying with 

• rapomibSty far: 

* Managing and coqrtSnDtmg a data 
procunig staff of IS persons. 

- Spednoafcon, irtnoducrion and 



KHANDAR 

tCW YORK WASHNOTON 

One way F2090 One way F213D 
Sound trip F329Q Round trip F3270 

OIUM» 

CtoTWjg ra?90 ^ Round vgT3890 

One Wav F2350 ■ Sound trip F359Q 
t 2 pan (l) 742 52 £ 



MATMA SHWPMB 
Shipping to/from UJJL 

MAIWAs Antwerp ( 3 ) 234 36 M 

234 as « 

Spaded CendHom at the teadfag 

infleiam — - J ' m * -«-■ 

Ahiwiip jwuh mi am . 


4TH VffiW ON 


L-. : : r 4 :lk T i ; • 


IEDE IAOTE 

5«i. 2nd floor, 285 sqjn. 4/5 bed- 
reana, perfect eondtion, modem <xd»- 
•eoure, FB^OO .000. VJ.GJ. 76603 26. 


• - • Nissan Motor Co^ Japan’s sec- Main, who is retiring. quired in May V984 by Gtibarit to . Name for the 2 - HtOK llw vw 

. oiid-largest automaker, has ap~ Banm htdnwer Hk mminMi He succeeds Tatsuo Kubota, who ^ decline ra combined Janu- 5 .w w, 1 amh ffaor, a. 

. poinied^caka Kume as its pr«- cSSiSS ^be based in New YoAteGti- •g^fa^^^nwagai^ 

-.^J^mouslycmiivcvicc torofBSKSmCiS bank’s Intoidual Bank Group, the November-Pecember 1984. d.r^an 

‘ x !? ^^Jokyo and Italian ^SSary. which ^ has ot- consumer banbng division. — 

- I ^ ub ^ a i who fices in Milan and Rome. Mr. Dda- Metd Box PLC, a British metal, mm. u™-.. r 


who EDS?;' 


• -1 aa t e . * uxc uaiiLa m niicn uiac. auumaui 

mala, 80, who is shaping down to of Imperial Chemical Industries, 

bccQTO a consultant to the compa- Otihank has named David H. where he has worked for more ih»n 
py. Nissan has also named Kmchi Mortlock Jr. its country corporate 30 years. Mr. Smith wiD move to 
Kanae as vice chairman. He was rfficer in Thailand with additional Metal Box in July to succeed Denis 
formerly an executive vice presi- responsibility for Burma. He will Allport, who retires at year’s end. 


mem box nA-, a nnrnn mwi, 1 Mid. r 

paper and plastics packaging 

group, has named Brian Smiihits T7a* Associated pros 

chairman. He is currently a director MINNEAPOLIS — General 

of Imperial Chemical Industries, Mills Inc. has rg>oried a loss of 
where he has worked for more than $74.1 million in Us latest quarter. 


atmg charges related to its decision 
to sdl its fashion businesses and 
spin off the toy group. 


MAUORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 

Vi be bay erf P*na, 5 rrws. Polma, 15 





SERVICES 


** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

re* A HAl V.LP. YOUNG LADY 
Datinguched. Begart, MiitilngudL 


* PARIS 527 01 93 * 




PARIS: 520 97 95 

KUNQUAL TOUNG IA0Y fA 


YOUNG OEGANT LADY 

MniyKngpwd PA. Mk 525 *1 01 


PARIS 704 80 27 
VW PA YOUNG LADY 

MuWfaiguaL 


* PARIS 527 01 93. * 


THE MAGNIFICENT 
5TH1A 



'infl yotBig bdy guairf 

nitiL 


• P-VIk- 


7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES |doyounesah£NCH4<gum- 

To Ihe Gredi Islands, Turfcsy. 

E(jypl & feraaL 

ScSng Every Monday {ran Piraeus 

THE YACHT-UKE 
STELLA 
OCEANS 

3 AND 4 DAY CRUISES 


1 i'.'V'i 1 ni, .i m: 


UM.TD. USA & WOODWB3E Tat 
21J.76S77V3 / 7&J79* 


RANKRIKT. Young lady oompmiaa. 


PAHS NOUS TUB PWK4E AT ONCE 

757 62 48. Trustful VJJ>. lady, Iravd 


To dw Greek Words & Ttrfcsy. SoAng 500BE DIANE PARS 260 87 43 
evtry Monday & Friday ran Hraeus Men & women g rides, security & renf- 


”■*** suKrut* 7 ” 1 * 1 A ® o<t, ** 

Z Kar. Swvias St, Athens 10562 
Tales 215621, Phone 3228881 

Paris fat 1S5 80 36 
Munich tot 395 613 
Genova let 327 110 
Zurich fat 397 36 55 


lear tervioei. 8 am . 12 pm. 


■sMcAriffr iiom 


SINGAPORE MTT GUIDES. Colt Srv 
popon>734 96 28. 

TOKYO LADY COMPANION, PA 
Personal Assistant 03^566539 




PM» YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 
VIP PA & bSnaud irtmtrr>; 


747 59 58 TOURBT GUIDE. Park, 
airports. 7 an/midnicht. (ml travel 


HONG KONG 3471267 young lady 


ASIAN LADY DIPLOMAT loves PARIS YOUNG LADY, tourist guide, 
sport, muse; Bne food, wine,, tranl Tat Peris 807 84 95. 




YOUNG LADY 

PA/Infarpreier & Tourism Guide 

PAMS 562 0597 


***** 

YOUNG BEGANT1ADY 
Representative services br VIPs 
ZURICH *3058.88. 


PARS LADY DHBtPRETER. Travel 
com pa n u n. Paris 633 68 09. 


YOUNG OCEA88C LADY 01-145 
9002 London/' Airports/Travaf 


HAMBURG- YOUNO LADY compav 
n*V muifinauaL Tit 27 04 570. 


HONG KONG 3-697006. Oxjmv, 
female/ mole comamwi * 


HONG KONG - 3-620000 Young 


HONG KONG 3-661525 VP bdy 


PARS YOUNG SaPHSMCATm VIP 
lady, triingual PA. 500 89 72. 


A1HMS. lady caraMfliari and person- PARS. YOUNG HBICH EDUCATED 
d uuaiunt fat 8wS19A Uxfy companion, pride. 574 81 9S. 


Piac* Your Cktssfficd Ad Qutckty and Eaaily 

In Hm 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE - 

*y Phenac Col yow local IHT representative with year text You 
wil be informed of the cost immedatefy, end once prepayment is 
made your ad will appear within 48 hairs. 

CaehThe baric rate is $9-80 per Gne per day + load taxes. There are 
25 letters, sfoisaid spaces in the fir* fcie end 36 in the following line s . 
MWnwm space b 2 Beet No abbreviations accepted 
CredH Cards: American Express, Diner's Club, Eurocord, Master 
Card, Access and Vea 


■venae Altos: 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312] 

Guayaquil: 431 943/431 
Unto: 417 852 
ftman t a. 64-4372 
San Joea: 22-1055 
S imf i uMM- 69 61 555 
Sae Paula: 852 1893 


Baftewn: 246303. 
Jordan: 25214. 
Kuweit: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 34 00 44. 
Oalee: 416535. 

SaurB Arabia: 
Jeddah: 667-1500. 
U-AX: Dubai 224161. 


Bangkok 39G0657. 
Heng Kong: 5-420906. 
ManRa: 817 07 49. 
Seout 725 87 73. 
Si ngapore : 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 3^2 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504.1925. 


















































































































PEANUTS 

ALL MY LIFE I WANTED 
TO BE AN ONLY CHILD- 
I HAP A GOOD THING 
GOING ‘TIL YOU CAME- 


INTERNATIONAL 


LITTLE BROTHERS SPOIL 
EVERYTHING ..LITTLE 
BROTHERS ARE A BOTHER 
AND A NUISANCE-. 


TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


WHY ARE YOU TELLING 


ME ALL THIS 7 


3IIII3IIH1IIII 




THERE'S 
NOTHING 
GOOD ON 
TV l . 


BOOKS 




BLONPIE 

ISN'T THIS STORM 
TERRIBLE? r— — ^ 


IT'S LIRE A MONSOON 
TO DEATH 


ANO TUOBURV’S 
HAS A 50^>-0R= 
SALE w-W' 


WHATS V COMPARED 
A FEW TO. ^ 

RAINDRO^?V^% j 




*A 


ACROSS 

1 “ Side 

Story" * 

5 Gram fungus 
10 Insecticide, for 
short 

13 Apiece 

14 John Ringling 
or Sheree 

15 Three spot 
10 Despot 

17 Wane 

18 Calendar 
contents 

19 Flowed 

21 Regard highly 

23 W. W. II area 

24 Prevent 
legally 

26 Fool 
29 Globe 
31 Printing 
mistakes 
34 Endemic 
36 Third son of 
Jacob 
38 Not any 
40 **. . . rode 
madly off 

Leacock 

43 Adjective for 
Robert Parish 

44 Roman road 

45 Protein in 
muscles 

46 Somewhat 
tardy 

48 Bad . 

German spa 


50 Observe 

51 Feels 
antipathy for 

53 Devoured 

55 Shooting star 

58 Napless or 
sleepless 

63 Assert 

64 Ferberand 
Best 

66 It’s served in 
Attica 

67 Ruffle one’s 
feathers 

68“ of the 

Border" 

69 Ireland 

70 Wright wing 

71 Indian in 
Clive's army 

72 Trust, with 
“on" 


IMoistens 

2“ of Eden” 

3 Cicatrix 

4 Proverbial 
crowd 

5 Fill with love 

6 Mantle 

7 Rate 

8 Baseball great 

9 Affected 

10 “Die 

Pintos." 

Weber-Mahler 

opera 

11 Beloved 

12 Seaport in 
Lebanon 


15 Like a drum 
20 Coral island 

22 Louis , 

former French 
coin 

25 Harsh 
28 Finished a 
flight 

27 Sound 
producing 

28 Cochlea canal 
30 Carefree 

32 Casper's wife. 
In comics 

33 A Merman rale 
35 Not bonkers 
37 Before, to Prior 
39 Domestic 

slave of yore 

41 Misery 

42 Sample 

47 Fish bait in 
Hawaii 
49Paludoti5 
52 Aurora’s big 
moment 

54 Nitrite, e.g. 

55 nostrum 

(our sea) 

56 Bad 

57 Legendary 
Swiss 
marksman 

59 Western 
alliance, for 
short 

60 Fatigue 

61 Gilels or 
Jannings 

62 Contradict 

65 Female rabbit 


^really?' * 


G\ 

il-X a 




BEETLE BAILEY 


THE SIDE THAT WINS THIS 


MANEUVER WILL BE THE ONE 


With the best rm>er supply 



ANDY CAPP 

tfVEMANA3E>TO 
OUT TH E NAM E OF 
HIS LATEST. FlO\ 


HER WHO WORKS. 
IN THE FISH SHOP? 


HEHIHEH'HEHI 

HEHJHEHf EHSHEHi 

^fiSjHEH/HGH' ^SESSFn HEHfHEH! 


HEH-I 


HEH-l 


WIZARD of ID 


© Netc York Tones, edited by Eugene Mdleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 






/ rtfcajw? A 
noutf&TO 
I ccwfamz 

TD <M?" 

V sum?** 


*5,1 

WfcJUW? 


.effls.iZMlMlVf'- 
WITH THl^ >MN 






REX MORGAN 


PRESTON, THIS IS A 
WONDERFUL PARTY- 
AND I'M HAVING SO 
-=H MUCH FUN ' M 


EVERYBODY HERE 
LOVES YOU, 

^ CLAUDIA ! r~ 


I DON'T WANT TO SPOIL THE J 
EVENING- BUT 1 THINK WE'D 
BETTER GET BACK TO THE HOTEL/ 

its almost two o’clock—and j 

1 HAVE CUSTOMER CALLS TO r~M 
MAKE IN THE MORNIN G— -AND jt=^ 


WHERE 
DID THE 
TIME GOT 


THE FIFTH SON 

fly Else Wiesel Translated from the French 
by Marion Wiesel 220 pp. $15.95. 

Summit Books, 1230 Avenue of 
the Americas, New York, N. Y.10020. 
Reviewed by. Richard F. Shepard 

T -1 HE stay that ElieWiesei tells in. his latest 
1 novel, ‘Toe Fifth Son," would seem to be 
about the generation of Holocaust survivors' 
children, the offspring of his own tortured 
generation, the oiae that left the extermination 
camps wiih no belongings other than the intol- 
erably burdensome luggage of Tcmembrance. 
It would seem to be about this new generation, 
bom into a different world, but it is not alto- 
gether so. 

There are. two main currents running 
through this novel by one whohas come to be a 
most-heard voice of the Holocaust, aypice that 
is humanistic and universal even as it is Jewish- 
minded and spedaL There is the story of the 
Brooklyn-born young man of tbeT96Qs, whose 
father, onetime head of the Jewish Council in a 
German-run ghetto in Poland, shrouds his life 
in spence and whose mother has gonejnadand 
lives on in an institution. 

There is also' the searching, philosophical 
question of revenge. Is it ever justified? when 
may one kill an oppressor, and what are' the 
reasons that permit it? These matters consti- 
taie the cement that ties the generations to- 
gether, that are the axis on which the story 
revolves. The young man learns that the Ger- 
man villain s till lives, as a prosper ous industri- 
alist under another name. It bad been thought 
that ids father had lcffled this man after (he 
war, but the assassination had been, botched. 

The German had not only uprooted the 
Jews, but he had also brutally killed the young" 
man's infant brother in the ghetto. Hie father, 
EDcd with guilt at having killed despite the 
admonitions of a rabbi he admired, spends his 
time endlessly reviewing the morality of killing 
with a fellow survivor. 

Wiesel is essentially a poet, or at least as 
much of a poet that any fme writer who deals 
with such mighty themes must be. The poetnr 
is preserved in Marion WieseTs translation. It 
is, m the Wiesel style, writing that is not intent 
on name-brand detail, in the fashion of the 
documentary novelist, but writing that seeks to 
capture in one passage after another the sensi- 
tivities and the moods that are the realities of 
our lives. The realities he writes about are 
rooted in (he Nazi past but extend to'. New 
York, to Israel to drags, to the entire world. 

“Most people think that shadows follow, 
precede or surround beings or objects. The 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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□□□ aaaaaa □mao 
□nanaa anBnaaQa 
ncHcii3 aaa aaasa 
□EHoanaj] niuaana 
□S30Q aaasna asa 
□□□□ annaaa 
BBncDa aaaa □□□□ 
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anasa aaa □□□□□ 
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truth is that they also surround wards, ideag, 
desires,, deeds.- impulses and memories,” ^ 
character, a man vmo deals in shadows, says. 
And it is shadows that Wiesel is himself deal- 
ing with here, the shadows case by an unhapgy 
past and that threaten to darken, by our own 
thoughts, our very future. A shadow is not-? 
shadow, he is saying: it is as real as the fle§h 
that shapes iL 

How well be represents the feeling of chil- 
dren bom to Holocaust sumvorsj only those 
children themselves can say, and, as with any- ^ 
thing in life, one suspects there are as many 
reactions as there are people. But the. author 
does rank* all of us “ children" of that genera- 
tion, all of us who were not thrix, in- the sense 
that he outlines for ns the burdens of gcfiL ^f 
revenge, of despair, and passes onto us ni sown 
ideas on how he balances those hardens while 
leaving ns to decide bow to deal with them in 
our own minds. 1 - -A- • 

Richard F. Shepard a on thzstaffofTke Nek' i 
York Times. 

BEST SELLERS 

The New YoitThaes 

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‘I NEED A SCARF, MOW.. 
MY NOSE IS RUNNY . 4 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 


GARFIELD 

LEAVE IT UP TO ME TO GET 
STOCK IN THIS MAILBOX. 

50 MUCH FOR MV AMBUSH 
ATTEMPT ON THE MAILMAN 


f&urf-l ? 

I 


■ HERE HE ' 
COMES NOW / 


Unscramble tfwsa four Jumbles, 
one letter to Bach square, to lorn 
four onfin ary words. 


AMLET 


By Alan Tmscoct 

O N the diagramed deal 
North was temporarily si- 
lenced by a one diamond open- 
ing on his right but came to life 
on the next round. When he 
dzose to continue with a natu- 
ral three-diamond bid over 
three clubs. South tried three 
no-trump. 

Three rounds of hearts were 
led, and when South won be 
bad to decide how to play 
dubs. The bidding and play 
strongly suggested that West 
held four cards in each major 
suit. It was virtually certain, in 
view of the opening bid, that 

West held the dub queen. 


BRIDGE 


South therefore led to, the 
dub ace, returned to the king. 
As he expected, he collected 
the queen, made his game and 
emerged with an open pair ti- 
tle. 

Later South noted that he 
would have been deceived if 
West had falsecarded imagina- 
tive! v with the club queen cm 
the first round of the suiL He 
-would have assumed a single- 
ton and would finessed against 
a presumed 10-9 in the East 
hand. The false card would in 
theory permit! South to make 
an unmakable contract if East 
held the dub jack. But if this 
were the case, the declarer 
might well have played for 


West to have false-carded with 
a Q-J doubleton. 

NORTH 

4KQH 

*10 

4QJS743 

*A5J 

WEST CTO EAST , 

liiV 11 Sf'"" 

4>Q0 4117] 

SOUTH 
4 A1 . 

9QJ4 

MOOS 


4KI804 - .if 

North and South wan vutoorohi? 

TbobMOag: 
Vmi North 

Ea« 

9Mb 

1 9 Btas 

10 

pm 

20 DbL 

Ptfa 

3* 

PW« S 9 

PM 

3N.T. 

tom Pwm 

Pam 


Wm M On bant two. 




Ojtrif to 















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1985 


SPORTS 


‘vpfts i. 

v V 


VillanoYa Wins NCAA Title in 66-64 Upset 

Wildcats, on 79 Percent Shooting, Deny Georgetown's Bid to Retain Crown 


> , -ly'i* x. 


Complied bp Ov Staff From Dispatches 1 

LEXINGTON, Kentucky — the 
The dynasty talk will have to wait as : 
for anftthw time and another team, she 


* 

7J 

'& 

g 

1 

*’$*' 

SgS 




$ 




rional Collegiate Athletic Assoria- 
tion basketball tide here Monday 
night about as well as any champi- 
on could, but Vijflanova was better, 
by 66-64. The Wildcats’ staggering 
upset of the Hoyas was one of the 
best-played, most evenly contested 
games the spot has seen. 

With an NCAA tournament-re- 
cord 79 percent i fli«nm g from the 
Held, villanova also made 10 


two m the final min ute; it tbeabdd 
on to spoil Georgetown's hope of 
becoming the first back-to-back tit- 
list since UCLA in 1972-73. 

' Villanova. with masterful work 
by almost every player and rpprh 
Roilie Massimino, dethroned 
Georgetown primarily on sharp- 
shooting that broke the toorna- 
ment record of 75 pereem by 
Northeastern, in the opening round 
a year ago, and Ohio State’s title- 
game mark of 67 percent against 
California in I960. 

The Wildcats bit 13 of 18 shots 
from the field in the first half and 
nine of 10 in the second. “They 


own, led by David Many considered this George- the moment. 


iTru-*. h'iB ^M rrrw^HTJTTTBfTTi^irni'^. if. i» Lta(F> r, .. r .i r J.'^»;iJ^i7t!Tk«irn7i'^Bi,7 


been invited to the 64-team NCAA 
tournament Once Villanova was 
in. it was the underdog in every 
game it played, and it beat four of 


Ewing’s 14, shot 55 percent (29 for 
53). Ewing alone missed as many 
shots as the entire Villanova team. 
bitting 7 of 13 from the fidd. 

The Hoyas twice led by ax 
points in the first half as Reggie 
Williams scored all of his 10 points. 
But Villanova was so hot that 
Thompson took Williams out in 
favor of guard Horace Broadnax to 
provide extra defensive pressure. 

The Hoyas (35-3) held a 54-53 
lead with 4:47 remaining in the 
game, and when Vfflanova's Ed 
Pinckney missed a shot they were 
only four minutes from repeating 
as champiwK 

Georgetown went into a delay, 
hoping to burn up the dock and 
pull the Wildcats out of their mat- 
chup zone. But senior Bill Martin 
bounced a pass off Broadnax's 
knee, and the ball landed in the 
arms of Vfllanova’s reserve guard 
Harold Jensen. 

Massimino called timp- with 3:25 
left, and Vfflanova took the lead for 
good, 55-54, on a jumper by Jensen, 
a sophomore who went five-for- 


Honston in the 1984 title and came 
into this one a 9%-pomi favorite, 
having won 17 in a row this season 

and 16 straight post-season games 
since a second-round loss two years 
ago to Memphis State. 

Half an hour after Monday’s 
game, Thompson said of his play- 
ers: “I don't want them to hang 
tVirir run around ^ cry 

and make excuses. We know how 
to win and now we have to know 
bow to lose.” 

Massimino was ju bilant . His day 
had begun in tragedy, when Alex 
Severance, a Villanova coach for 25 
years, died in his Lexington hotel 


we had a chance to win,” he said. U I 
wanted our kids to think about mo 
things. One, to play not with the 

idea not to lose but to win. Second, 
I wanted them to udl themselves 
they were good enough to win. In a 
one-shot deal, yon can beat anyone 
in the United States.” 

No team has ever come out of an 
NCAA final with a poorer record 
than VDlanova’s 25-10 (North Car- 
olina State was 26-10 two years ago 
after upsetting Houston). 

If the unranked Wildcats hadn’t 
beaten Pitt in the opening round of 
the Big East Conference tourna- 
ment, they ought not even have 


ond-ranked Michigan, fifth-ranked 
Memphis State, seventh-ranked 
North Carolina and top-ranked 
Georgetown. 

Georgetown had downed Villan- 
ova twice in the Kg East season — 
52-50, in overtime, and 57-50. 

Said Wildcat leader Pmdmey. 
“Tonight we might have been the 
better i«m Bui 1 wouldn't want to 
play them 10 times. I think they'd 
win a lot of those." 

Yet as he spoke, someone in the 
Georgetown student section was 

holding up a sign. It read: “Cinder- 
ella, Midnight Is Here.” ('BT, AP) 


Ominous Reflections for Soccer’s Kids 


Jmemuitmal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The feeling that 
you could judge a society % the 
way it treats its children may have 
to be revised. Soccer, without 
doubt symptomatic of much else, 


nize kids at Holloway — not one of 
London's more salubrious districts 
— to reap 55 trophies over the 
years. 

Yet he withdrew the quest for 
No. 56 after four boys failed to 


" < ■ fii'i'- ri r> i r, j 1 1 i,l I TTB i .7-1 i iv< i rci i r • ' I , ' . ( /, ii C rTT- 


SSiSt* 



April 2 


BmenAirittd fan fatamoiiQfld 

’fflanova’s Ed Pinckney, the tournament MVP, going to tbe basket in Monday’s first half. 


could they?” mused Georgetown 
Coach John Thompson. 

The display against a de- 
fense that bad held opponents to 39 
percent during the season and to 36 
percent through five in the 
tournament 

“I don’t know whether anything 
was wrong with our defense,* 
Thompson said. "When you shoot 
that well in the championship 
game, from the fidd and from the 
line” — the Wildcats hit 22 of 27 
free throws — “all praise should go 
to Villanova.” 


Ai 1 1 lU RVinT-B ihn 1 1 


from the free- throw fine. 

Wingate missed two shots and 
Villanova kept hitting free throws. 


boys and hence is a part of society thr e atene d a spectator and others 
on the run from its young. 

Here in London, a games master Dnn UttCHTC 

cries enonflh is enough He has jLlA-FfS ULljllLj 


Pinckney, who scored 16 points cries enough is enoug h He has JkUD XXIJ4 jJXI1i 3 
arid was named the tournament's barred his own team from playing 

most valuable player, made two in a schoolboy cup final for under- ***& stolen food from another 
foul shots for a 57-54 edge. Foe- sixteens, saying: “They cheat oppo- sdwxd. “It’s time.” said Wright, “to 
ward Dwayne McClain, who had a nents and they rhnrt themselves. mal i e 8 stand for honesty and in- 
game-high 17 points, finally missed They don’t deserve to play in a cup tegrity. Soccer is still a great game 
the front end of a one-and-one in final, and we could not run the risk and we ve got to protect it, or we 
the last 59 seconds, as did Jensen, of furthff damage they might do in WODt have a game left." 


the last 59 seconds, as did Jensen, of furtho- damira they inL- * 

But a missed shot by Ewing, a the name of tbe school.” For once the hurrahs were heard 

turnover by Wingate and another That teacher, Alan Wright, lives in unison. Wright apologized to the 
off-target shot by Williams kept and breathes soccer almost to ex- ttree *°y* be exonerated, and 
Georgetown from getting closer cess. He glows in his ability to orea- schod authorities united behind a 

statement by the opposing team’s 
headmaster: “Xt*s a reflection of 
society and the bad influence of the 
professional game.” 

— - It also reflects the way we jour- 

Hnflrpv nalists feed wrong messages to the 

y coming generation That schoolboy 

* * story broke in The Mail on Sunday 

National Hockey League Leaders bdnl e 


u "*vCiS? 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 


lie 1985 NCAA. Tournament 


sr# h> loqji 

bleated 


ml Mils 

im 

S3 40 

w S 

IX} 

zti in 
jwtswi nu 
mtr-tat tosses 
n w J.VBJ//TOT 
«faan*rn*tare.' 
55 S miWan vV, 
nm mm, 

■ Jjiauarferaoo 

jrmcsny 
tier Bonk 
im hu 

rs 3 m 


EAST REGIONAL 

First Round 
lorgetown U. Lehigh 43 
ntpM ML Vkgtata Tech S3 
rota, iil sr, Iona si 
rthtre MethbdM IS, Old Dominion 68 
taols 76. Norttmeatofn ST 
orsto B. WkWfa St. 59 
trace 70, DeFuul 45 " 
ora la Tacit 4 & Marc w 9 
Secant Round 
orgetown AX Temot* 46 
rota, lir 7a Southern Methodist 57 
Wb 74 Georgia SI . ' ' 

frtia Ttcb ia StracaH 52 
Setnfftaab 
•fato Tocti AT, Illinois 53 
raMown U. Loyola. HL 51 - . . . 


lUtaota S». sa SautiMrn CdtfonHq 55 
Mw* Ms St <7, Patmsyfvanla 55 
AtafaantaWrmMsiiam 7a Mkftistan St. U 
BMai CaDeae 5 5. Taxes Ttch 53 
Data 75. PMwardltia a 

SECOND ROUND. 

Louisiana Tocti 79, Ohio Si. a 
OUfllMma 75. llUnols St <9 
Mantnhls St 47. Ahii-BIrmbiBticnn 66. OT 
Barton Callosa 74. Duta 73 
SmoHMs 

Oklahoma LMUkua Tach St OT 
MompUs St. 59, Barton Coltag* 57 


NCAA Tournament Champions 


NCAA boucoitaa ctampians (ttann ant- 
laal i a cu tes bi panaltosssl: 

I9CS— Vffionovo (25-101 
1984— Gaorartown (34-3) 

1983— North Carolina Slot* (24-10) 

1982— North Carolina (32-2) 
ntl— Indiana (24-9) 

HB0 — Louisville (333) 

1979-MfcMoan Stars (24-4) 


roatown sa Gaoraia Tach 54 
v ; SOUTHEAST REOIONAL 
FI n* Round 
■as 49. Ohla U. 38 
uni 59, Purdaa SB 

Ht Carolina 7k. MkfeSa TannaBM 57 

V 0»na 79, Oraaofl SL 70 

V 7a Louisiana St. 55 
ykmtf 4f. Miami, Ohio 4a OT 
lloan 59. FalrMah Dickinson 55 
•nova 51. Davfon 49 - 

hc-taSxrsL., 

mu. Kansas 54 . 
nova 59. Mlchloon 55 
riant 44. Navy 59 
- - - B ondHn c H 
nova 44. Maryland 43 
k Caraitna 62. Auburn 5k 
ChanviOMMo 
nova 56, North Carolina 44 
MIDWEST REOIONAL 
First Round 
SL 73. lavra St. 44 
Mona Tach 7a PHttbursh 54 
Vxma 94. North Carolina AST B3 


MamoMs St. 4& OUahama 41 

WEST REOU2KAL 
First Round 

SLJohnl 83. Southani.UL59 . ■ 

Arkansas 43. Iowa 54 
Novada-Lao Voaas 85. San Dingo 5L n 
Kantucta 4a Washington 58 
North Carolina St. 45, Novada-Rono 54 
Tcms-El Paso 79, Tata 75 
Virpfnio CammotMoanh 51, Marshall 45 
Alabama sa Arizona 41 

socoad Round 
SL. Mho's sa Arkansas 45 
Kmtucky 64. Novj-Los Vegas 41 
Alabama sa Va. Conunonwoaffh 59 
North Carallno SL 86. T«xas-EI Pan 73 
Son Wools 

Nam CaroHna St. 41, Alabama 55 
SL John's 84. Ksaruckv 70 


NCAA Tille^Game Box 

VILLANOVA 

-lb too ft no raofots 
Pronicy 4 * 3 4 4 1 1 11 

McClain 3 7 7 8 1 3 3 17 

Pladuiay .5 7 4 7 4 5 3 14 

Wllbur» 0 8 » 8-9-8 0 

McLain ' 3 322 111 8 

Joason S 5 4 5 1 2 1 14 


WOO ~ 1978— KnSuctV (30-2) 

1977 Mor auntto (25-7) 

1974 — Inal ana 132-0) 

1975— UCLA (28-3) 

°> 1974— North Coral Ina State (30-1) 

1973— UCLA (300) 

1971— UCLA OH) 

1971— UCLA (281) 

1970— UCLA (28-1) 
n 1949— UCLA (281) 

1 BOX 1948— UCLA (281) 

1947— UCLA (30-01 
1944— Toxat-EI Paso (281) 
r O Of MS 1945— UCLA (282) 

4 1 1 11 1944— UCLA (38C) 

1 3 3 17 1943— Loyola (IB.) (282) 

4 5 3 14 1943— dncfimah (282) 

8—9-8 0-M9I49— Cbtciimotf (273) 

2 2 2 8 • 19(0— OMo' Stato (25-3) 

1 2 1 14 19S9— CaUtorola (254) 

0 0 1 0 1998-Kontudcy (254) 

0 8 0 0 1957— North Carottna (32-0) 


Millions had seen mi television 
Scotland’s captain, Graeme Son- 
□ess, lunge at Wales’s Peter Nicbo- 


Hockey 

National Hockey League Leaders 


NHL leaden through March 31: 



Riga in 

4A72 231 

2 299 

OVERALL OFFENSE 



Washington (7) 

4472 211 

4 297 


G 

A 

P 

Plro 

Freese 

•63 34 

0 230 

Gretzky, Edmonton 

69 

131 

200 

40 

Lindbergh 

1738 193 

i no 

Karri. Edmonton 

70 

44 

134 

30 

Jensen 

40 7 

0 730 

Howerchuk, Winnipeg 

51 

7* 

127 

74 

Philadelphia (31 

4441 219 

2 ISO 

Dtonm, Lae Angeles 

4* 

77 

123 

42 

Roy 

20 0 1 

0 030 

Boasv. N.YJ. 

57 

57 

114 

38 

Penney 

3.127 142 

1 XII 

Coffey. Edmonton 

34 

77 

in 

92 

T n ■Try a irl 

oofruon 

1444 87 

0 338 

Ogrodnlck. Detroit 

53 

5D 

TOS 

X 

Montreal (4) 

4493 253 

1 323 

Savord, OHcago 

38 

65 

no 

54 

Sevlgnv 

14)44 57 

1 321 

B. Softer, N.Y.1. 

42 

59 

101 

51 

Gasset In 

1430 M2 

1 336 

MocLean. Winnipeg 

41 

57 

98 

114 

Bouchard 

1.738 Ml i 

0 349 

TonellL M.Y.I. 

41 

57 

98 

91 

Quebec (1) 

4*3224) : 

2 339 

P. Siastny, Quebec 

32 

44 

98 

fl 

Heinz 

■ 78 3 1 

9 237 

Gartner, Washington 

47 

50 

97 

71 

Milton 

485 25 

0 389 

Nichofts. Las AnoelM 

44 

51 

97 

72 

Warns ley 

Zm 119 

0 325 


FoOorta. St. Louis 
NlltMn.'Caloary 
Korr. Philadelphia 
Carpontor. Watftlnetan 


St Jatura 49. N.- Carolina SL 40 

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP 
(At Laxinotta. taatucky) 
Sa i w H loa to 
. . - March 30 

VIHanoua 52. Memphis SI. 45 
i Oo ofaet on n 77. SL John's » 

-ntte eam 

Aortl 1 

VU Ionova 44. Georgetown 44 


Team Rebounds 




3 



1954— San Francisco (29-0) 

GOALS 


Totals 

22 

28 22 27 

T7 14 12 

a 

1955— San Francisco (28-1) 




GEORGETOWN 




W54— LnSolto (2*4) 

KurrL Edmonton 



fa 

too ff Ita 


a of pts 

19SJ— Indiana (23-3) 

Gretzky, Edmonton 


Martin 

4 

6 

2 

2 


1 2 

10 

1 M3— Kansas (26-2) 



wnilama 

S 

9 

0 

2 


2 3 

to 

195)— Kentucky (32.2) 

Ogrodnlck, Detroit 


Ewing 

7 

13 

0 

ft 


2 4 

14 

1950 — City College of N.Y. 134-5) 



Jadcsan 

4 

7 

0 

0 


9 4 

8 

1949— Kentucky (12-21 

ASSISTS 


Wingate 


14 

0 

0 

2 

2 4 

U 

1948— Kentucky (36-3) 


GP 

McDonold 


1 

0 

0 


0 0 

0 

1947-Hoiy Creet (27-3) 

Gretzky, Edmonton 

77 

BraoCnax 

1 

2 

2 

2 


2 4 

4 

1946-OWohteno State (31-2) 

Coffey. Edmonton 

77 

Dolton 

0 

1 

2 

2 


0 1 

2 

1945— Oklahoma State (27-4) 

Dionne, LA. 

77 

Team Rebounds 







1946— Utah CBM) 

I lowtrchuk<Wfnf)lMO 

78 

Totals 

29 

53 

4 

8 

17 W 22 

44 

190— Wyoming (31-2) 

Federka, SLLouls 

72 


1943— Stattard (284) 
29 37—44 1941— Wisconsin (382) 

28 34—44 1940— Indiana (21-3) 

1929— Oregon (285) 


POWER-PLAT GOALS 


SL Loalo (S) 
Keans 
Paetero 
Sylveetrl 
Daska(aUs 
Boston CD 


(Fuhr and Moot shared shutout Jan. 

Ed araHw (31 4471 283 

Lomeiln 3.111 178 

Edwards 1564 IDS 

Calgary (4) 4477 290 

awfert 20 o 

SkarodefBfcl 1571 73 

Ba nn er man Mil 214 


AD-NCAA Tournament Teams 


ttional Basketball Assodatimi Leaders 


NCAA ol ( to urna ment teraiu (x^enotss Wilson. OndnoaH; Ron Bonham. dndaaatL 
nest vahraMe Player ): 194s: »*Mt Haaard. UCLA; Jelf NtoOta. 


A leaders through March 31: \ 


New Jemv 

75 

8201 

1093 


TEAM OFFENSE 


Utah 

74 

•324 

1093 


G 

PL 

Avg 

Chicago 

75 

8221 

TOM 

er. 

74 

ASM 

1202 

LA. Lafcers 

74 

•113 

109-4 

Latort 

74 

8451 

-1163 

New York 

75 

8278 

TIM 

Ht 

. 72 

8491 

11*3 

Phoenix 

75 

8278 

1104 

n ■ ■ 

74 

..BE 

1143 

la. CUspers 

74 

8452 

1113 

Vntonto 

76 

8733 

1143 

Cleveland 

74 

8240 

1)1 A 

snd 

75 

8592 

1U6 

Portland 

75 

•354 

1114 

iCMif 

75 

8573 

1143 

Detroit 

73 

8389 

lira 

MpMa 

74 

8384 

1133 

San Antonio 

74 

8664 

1143 

mtae 

75 

*W7 

11IJ 

Indiana 

75 

• 8574 

1143 

% 

75 

BUM 

1KL7 

Kansu City 

75 

8744 

1)43 

an 

- 73 

■044 

1102 

Golden state 

IS 

■77* 

1178 

n State 

75 

.8191 

1893 

Denver 

74 

$472 

1173 

feraer 

75 

8183 

H>9.1 






so 

75 

8154 

KML7 


SCORING 




74 

8258 

1086 


G FG 

FT Pts 

Avg 


1954: x-Tora Goto, La Salle; Chock Sing lev. 
. La Salle; Jesse Arne lie, Penn Slate; Roy Ir- 
vin, SouHwm Coflfornla; Bab Comer, Brad- 
1093 l^y, 

19S: x-bih Russell. San Franrtsca; Tam 
TO-* Goto. La SaUa; ICC Janes. San Francisco; 
TO . Jim Rongtas, CMerado; Carl Cain, imn. 


Duke; Bill Buatln. Michigan; WIUIo MurrofL 
Kansan Slate; Gall GoodrhJv UCLA. 

1945; x-BIH Brocfley, Princeton; Gall GooO- 
rtatoUCLA; Carrie RutselLMIrtilgan; Edgar 
Lacey, UCLA; Kenny Washtoaton, UCLA 
1944; s-Jcrrv Chambers. Utah; Pat Riley. 
Kentucky; Jock Maim, Duke; Louie Damp!- 


1954; x-Hoi Lear. Tgmgie; Witt Oramner- H "lL T ! TO J*“^ a 


lain. Kansas; Carl Cain, (awa; Hal Ferry, San 
'Francisco; Bill Logon. Iowa. 

1957: x-Wllt Chamberlain. Kansas; Leo Ro- 
senbluth. North Carolina; John Green, Mlchi- 
oon State; Gone Brown. San Francisco; Pete 
Brennan. North Carolina 
1951; x-Elgin Baylor. Seattle; John Cox. 


1947; x-Lew Aldndor, UCLA; Don May, 
Dayton; MHco Warren. UCLA; EMn Haves, 
Houston; Ludos Alton, UCLA 
t9SS: x-Lew Aldndor, UCLA; Lynn Shock- 
toford, UCLA; Ndta Warren, UCLA; Lodus 
Alien, UCLA- Lurry Miner, North Carolina 
1949: x-Lew Aldndor. UCLA; Mck Mourn, 


8744 114J Kentucky; Gay Itodgerv Temato.* Olartey Pvr ^ M! 5cntt Norm CorXtoa; Willie 

877* 117J3 McCarter. Drake; John Voltotv, UCLA 

•“* ,w 1959: x-Jerrv'wesf, West Virginia; Okot 

™ fl n I ■ ■ ■ I ■ i „ rinrTrmnll ~ Dm sun liihnft P«*|L UIH» KB* WWXtCO biurt, JWUl VOJltiYi ULUS; 

T Pts Ava .. UCLA 




TEAM DEFENSE 

G . No. 
UkM 73 7789 

) ‘ 74 7798 

Won 74 78)5 

i 74 7977 

B 74 8815 

75 S132 

etoftto- 74 BBSS 

in 73 7929 


Football 
FL S tanding s 

1 EASTERN CONFERENCE 
i W L T PCt PF PA 

Mom -5-1 8 J33 141 118 

> Bay 4 2 0 - 447 149 134 

Ml 3 3 0 JOB 123 1» 

jtreev - 3, 3 B 500 Ml 156 

taro 2 3 1 417 189 90 

MHO . 2 4 ' 0 .332 ”141 177 

fa - 0*8 J)08. 92 TO 

- WESTERN CONFERENCE 
n . 5 10 J33 283 132 

ft -' 4 I 1 J50 Ifl OB 
» . . 4.20 . MT. 135 . 93 

■ : 4 2 0 M3 U2 124 

«d ’ 2 4 0 J33 81 125 

karfo - 2- 4 » \m n 119 

toe toe I S- 0 .10 124 147 

' MONDAY'S RESULT 
(ton* 33, Portland 0 


bOntion Baseball 


f MONDAYS RESULTS . 

ttC-MBM 4 nthberah 0 - 

yitrtt Yankees I 
fffciai Anaetas 5. 

M J-CWeaoaWhHeSax 2 
, xltmet CBy 5, 
&Si*f*tdrttd 4. W tontow 
Wa AHoarton 3 
Ir. San Dieae 3 

Cttpr/OsIHarato 4 


. Kina. N.Y. 

Bird. Boo. 

Jordan. ChL 
Short, GJ. 
English. Don. 
WUfclflS. AIL 
Dartney. Utah 
Aguirre, DaU. 
Malone. PMI. 
Cummings. MIL 
Halt Den. 
woolrtdae. CM. 
Johnson, ICC . 
GrtMth, Ulan 

Vandewegho, Prt. 
Sampson, Hoa. 
AMuLJabbr, LAL 
MonerM.MIL 
Free, Ctov. 

Smith, LAC 
MlteheK, SA. 
Thomas. Def. 
Gwln. SA. 
Chambars. Sea. 
Otoluwon, Hau. 

Gs-wnuoms. wsn. 
ErvhKLPML 
Btodanon, DalL - 
JNetardsan, N_L 
McHota. Sot. 


55 491 424 1809 319 


Ftapatrlek. CalKorala. 

1948: x- Jerry Lucas. Ohio St.; Oscar Robert- 


1971: stave Patterson, UCLA; Sidney 


2 £ 25222? *°ACWietanafl;MeJ NowefLOhlo State; Oar- "S* 


70 420 376 1414 21) 


1972: x-BIU watfon, UCLA; Keith Wlltas. 
UCLA; Beg McAdoo, North Carolina; Jim 
Price, Louisville; Ron King. Ftortda State. 

*972: x-BIII WaltotvUCLA; Stove Downina, 
Indiana; Ernie DEGreoorto, Provktoaee; 


uSX womcS ^ : dbS^-^; 

74 850 340 2U1 27 A 1. 1 — r«i. «> , a„h inn...., Price, Louisville; Ron Kina. Florida State. 

*> ^7. tTTXuU — . "*l: x-Jerrv Lucas, onto St.j Bob Wiesen- ■ 

2 In | w^i"rtnncrt; Larry StoBfrtoaOhtoSfatof 

49 441 387 1309 2L7 mr t Boutdin- Cincinnati; 1 snot vacated. ‘nateno, erote Dturaaono, proviaaace. 
« S ill Si ,M2: K-PtaOl Hoaue. Cincinnati; Jerry Li> Stof * : Lanv Kenan. 

71 550 662 1762 24J ^ qku state; Tom Ttackir. ClndnraK: 

72 701 324 1724 20 ryViT Thompson. North Carolina 

72 *43 405 1491 235 Len ChoeoelL stjBIll Walton. UCLA; Tom Burtaron. North 

2 OB 374 1414 m WM^ArtttovmosL Duke; Tom Thacker. Tow.. North Carallno St.; 


Memahls State. 

1974: x-oavfd Thompson. North Carolina 
Stj Bill Walton, UCLA; Tom Burtetan. North 
Carolina St.; Monte Town. North Carolina St.; 


Z? a ". 17 ®2® Cincinnati; Les Hunter. Loyola, IIL' Georoe M°urlce Lums. Mcrouetto. 


76 ns zu 1734 223 
*5 551 340 1467 224 


74 6u m \ wm NBA Standings 


M, MIL 44 512 «0 1451 228 

aev. 43 534 271 1384 224) 

LAC 75 431 344 1429 2U 

USA 74 498 343 1444 ZL6 

8 Def. 72 583 340 1553 21 A 

.SA. 72 480 324 ISM 2L2 *' p * 

erg. Sea. 73 554 4)2 1523 209 

on, Hau. 73 404 309 1517 203 ‘* ow 

toms. Wsn. 71 584 234 14S2 285 Tont 
;PML 72 548 322 1441204 

tan, DalL • 74 547 387 1444 19J 

dson, N_L 75 403 233 1445 I9J 

i. Bib. 72 544 314 1406 MS 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE ™ w *“ na 

FG FGA PCI 7 n 5 nW 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W L Pet GB 
59 15 J97 — 

Heftia 54 28 J30 S 

an 37 37 J00 22 

toy - 37 38 .493 221b 


“ TfJS: x-RIchard WasMnatoa UCLA; Kevin 

Grevey, Kentucky; Dave Myers, UCLA; Al- 
ton Murphy, Louisville; Jim Lee, Syracuse. 

1974: x-Kent Benson, Indiana; Scott May, 
Indiana; Rickey Green, Michigan; Morgues 
:B Johnson, UCLA; Tom Atiemeitiy. Indiana. 

1977: X-Butch Lee. Marquette; Mike 
Pet GB o'Karan, North Carolina; Cedric MaxwelL 

777 — NX. Charlotte; Bo EIUa Marquette; Walter 

730 s Davis. North Carolina; Jerome Whitehead. 

370 2* Marquette. 

4 ** W* ifTS: x-Jodi Gtvers, Kentucky; Ron Brew- 



GP 

PP 

Pono 

40 4 

0400 

Kerr, Philadelphia 

71 

21 

Chicago (» 

4342 294 

1 38) 

Gartner. Washington 

. 77 

17 

Hrudey 

2235 135 

2 382 

Howerchuk, Winnipeg 

78 

17 

Smith 

2805 128 

03183 

Dionne. LA. 

77 

1* 

Metonson 

<25 35 

0 494 

SHORT-HANDED GOALS 


PLY. Islanders (31 

4345 381 

2 287 


GP 

SM 

Beaupre 

1300 102 

1 332 

Gretzky, Edmonton 

77 

II 

Metortie 

L777 111 

0 375 

Ptopp. Philadelphia 

73 

4 

Metansan 

1.142 78 

0 410 

Oerlaoo, Toronto 

59 

5 

Sands 

139 14 

0 4JM 

Kasper. Boston 

73 

5 

Minnesota (5) 

4748 310 

1 292 

Maestor, Edmonton 

52 

5 

Janecyfc 

2877 174 

2 333 

TraHter. N.Y.L 

45 

S 

Elfat 

1822 134 

0481 

GAME-WINNING GOALS 


Los Ansetos (5) 

4399 313 

2 480 


GP 

GW 

Staniowskl 

90 1 

0 320 

KurrL Edmonton 

72 

13 

Uut 

4)1 33 

0 324 

Gartner. Washington 

77 

10 

Worts 

1837 8V 

2389 

PStastny, Quebec 

43 

9 

MTUen 

2359 187 

1 422 

Kerr, Philadelphia 

61 

8 

Hartford Ol 

4337 311 

3483 

Nesiund, Montreal 

77 

8 

Hayward 

31354 215 

0 384 

SMsata, PMUxtotohki 

47 

8 

Holden 

213 1$ 

0 423 

SHOTS 


Boh rend 

1.173 87 

1 445 


GP 

S 

Winnipeg (4) 

4742 323 

) 489 

Gretzky, Edmonton 

77 

33* 

Low 

1204 74 

1 338 

Bourque, Boston 

49 

319 

Reset) 

27 59 180 

0409 

Niche Its. LA. 

77 

311 

Kammnurt 

*45 54 

0 582 

Gartner, Washington 

77 

310 

New Jersey (4) 

4810 322 

1 419 

Dionne, LA. 

77 

301 

Hon ton 

21390 168 

0 422 

Ogrodnlck, Detroit 

77 

301 

VanMetarowck 

2298 1M 

1 420 

SHOOTING PERCENTAGE 


N.Y. Reapers (4) 

4380 334 

1 431 


GP G 5 

Pet. 

Bernhardt 

2.182 06 

0 374 

Young, Pittsburgh 

714 38 )34 

304 

Besfer 

447 45 

1 417 

Karri. Edmonton 

72 70 257 

272 

SL Croix 

548 45 

0 475 

Simmer, LJL-Bes. 

45 34 129 

2L4 

Wrogget 

1278 103 

0484 

Naslund, Montreal 

77 42 174 

233 

Toronto CS) 

4378 337 

1 422 

Larmer, Chicago 

77 44 198 

23 2 

Mfa 

376 27 

0 431 

Tovlar, LA. 

76 37 140 

23.1 

Stefan 

2813 182 

0435 

AStostny, Quebec 

75 38 145 

238 

Mica let 

1791 134 

0449 




Detroit (4) 

43M 347 

• 435 

GOALTENDING 


Romano 

1829 120 

1 442 

(Empty -net gaob In peren theses) 

Herron 

2273 140 

1 443 


MP GA SO AVB 

Dion 

553 43 

0447 

Barrasso 

3348 144 

5 234 

Ford 

281 33 

0 725 

Sauve 

1334 71 

0 322 

PHtsbwgn (4) 

4892 344 

2 474 

Cloutier 

45 4 

0 339 

Bredeur 

2810 219 

0 438 

Beffato (S) 

4437 234 

5 230 

Ooprice 

1,458 118 

0 484 

Jensen 

743 30 

1 2A2 

Garrett 

487 44 

0 449 

Mason 

441 31 

1 231 

Vancpow (77 

4875 388 

0 488 



323 close to Nicholas’s Adams apple 

^ and the other around the back of ap 

ia? his neck. Sotmess: Talent and malice. 

3 » Then, as Nicholas attenmted to 

^ rise from the ground, sotmess . “Everyone insults ibf ^irn>«L 

325 stan^ed at his efaedebone. men every week.”' « ^ ■ 

» “It was not premeditated,” ar- _ probably so, biit 'rtn.thfV'Trhnnl 
uo gued Souness. “I swear it never is. I ■ masters are sayisg l ‘lt’£tira0’go call a 
352 sensed Nicholas was going to bite halt. 

S S??S tI ^ tI T 8 Ui ri y< l a Otherwise the game, already a 
*ss ^ y cri L^'! c ^ catalyst for hooliganism, might 

ZZ suck hi the most^^d inS- 

378 311(1 1 ^ ^ppy 10 ^ inanity. That, by all accounts, hap- 

aj, cc P t t tm. pened in Adds Ababa last Sunday.. 

5 J« Souness is an enigma — one of , ^ 

► soccer’s sweetest talents (whom I ^ 
personal commended to the pres- ^ nie 
4.14 ident of his new dub, Sampdoria.) P 4 ei ^. e ? ^va ©5 nomg dur- 
*32 encased in one of the most wQlful mg which ^ectatx^rsi^OTMwam- 
S streats of malice yon arc likely to 


the field, beating several young NV 


Everyone in England was talking 


Souness who gloats about “the best 
punch I delivered in my life,” 
which broke the jaw of a Bulgarian 


‘a disgrace' 
lunched ever 


race” who kicked and 
everything that moved. 


A trigger might have been the 
moment a Nigerian flattened an 
Ethiopian, incensing tbe crowd of 
35,000. But more sinister was the 
stoning that had gone before. 

This, we are told, was a direct 


Nigerians who threw bread at the 
Ethiopian players during the first 
leg in Lagos —African against Af- 
rican using tbe games as an excuse 
for obscene and insensitive nation- 


«8t Even professionals shuddered at alism. 

the tackle on Nicholas. “He could Lately, whenever soccer kicks it- 
£2 have decapitated tbe feller,” said sdf in the teeth, we have been 


Souness, merely booked, denied 


our troubled consciences with thrir 
cavalier sport. In Yugoslavia on 
Wednesday, France has its most 


on television that there was any difficult away match in a couple of 
kind of feud between him and years, but dare we hope this week 
Nicholas, another bard man. “I may be tbe same? 
didn't know it was him until after- I find it disturbing that Michel 
wards. 1 apologized. 2 can't say Platini, the prince of those cavafiers 
nothing more man that.” and the most pleasing player in the 

Alas, it is so often how things are world, should say: “The enjoyment 
said that attracts the violent and went rat the window a long time 
disorderly. England's team manag- ago. I enjoy training, but that’s the 
er, Bobby Robson, voicing his an- limit of it. For example, after we 


aitritional performance in Belfast, what I enjoyed was not a sense of 
said recently: “It’s time for retribu- success but bring able to relax.” 

tion If you kick me in the stom- Even France, says its captain, no 

ach, HI lock you bade a bit lower ” longer congratulates itself on play- 
We mink we know what he mg the most attractive brand of 
means. But bow do those words football “That’s not what matters. 


Transition 


come across to youngsters? 


Happiness is not having lost your 


Donaldson. LAC 
Gflmor* SJL 
AMuKtattoar, LAL 
Than*. KX. 
None*. PtlM. 
Quota. PMI. 
Worthy. LAL 
Mchato. Boa 
J ohnson, LAL 
WMlrtdBO. QiL 


227 508 444 
485 783 419 
485 141 480 


Chicago 

CtovolaiK! 

Attoita 

Indiana 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
M ld ur ort Dtvtrtoo 


366 416 59* x-Dwror 


515 877 487 


372 *44 at iHTailos 
549 W irf *"«**> 


Molon*, PMI. 
Williams. N_r. 
LaHnbwr, Dot 
Otottiwta, How 
Eaton, Utah 
Parish, Bos. 
Thomason. ICC. 
Sammon, Hou. 
Sauna. S*a 
Bird. Bos. 
Smith. Gi. 


-544 959 449 

M39 ’-S9B Knnsca c 
430 1)29 449 
REBOUNDING 

G Oft Dot Tat Avg 
71 343 579 922 TOO L™*?" 1 


Factfic DMstoq 

r-LA. Lakers 55 19 743 - 


24 51 J20 35» er. Arkansas; Mlta GmbisfcL Outa; Rick Ro- 

Caxlrai Division boy. Kentucky; Jim Saanartcrt. Duta. 

54 21 -730 — 1979: x-Eorvto Johnson, Michigan SL; 

40 34 441 13V2 Lorry Bird, Indiana Sfj Grog Krtrar.MJchl- 

35 40 JO 19 aon sij Mark Asuirrn, DgPauli Gary Gar- 

31 43 419 22t» lonADOPouL 

30 45 400 24 19SS; x-Darrrtl Griffith. Loutsvllto; JM 

20 55 - -247 34 Berry carrau, Purdue; RacbwyMcCrov, Lou- 

(FERENCE Isvlito; 2 spot* vacated. 

•hrtotoo 1981: x-lslah Thomas, Indtona; Joff Lamp, 

* 34 bn — Virginia: Jlsn Thanes. Indtona; London 

44 30 495 4 Tumor. Indiana; Al Wood, North Carolina 

41 34 J47 m 1912: x-Jonm Worthy, N. Carolina; Pa! Ew- 

38 31 -500 11 Ina. Georartaum; Erie Ftovd. Goorgetown; 

37 39 487 12 Mlrtiart Jordan, North Carolina: Sam tor- 

30 45 400 1TO Uns. North Carolina 

irtoton mi: x-Ataom Otaluumv Houston; Thurl 

55 19 743 - BoHgy, North CAfoihW Stats; Sidney Lowe. 

87 38 493 1818 North Carolina Slate; Milt Wagner. Louts- 

32 43 427 23to rtlto; Dprota WMtfcnburg. North Carol too 

30 45 400 25W State. 

27 49 .355 29 19*4: X-Fatrtck Ewing, G«oro4(0wn; MJ- 

20 55 J*7 35Ki ch04l Graham, Georgetown; Akeem 

13 Otoluwon, Houston; Michael Young, How- 

> ton; Alvin Franklin. Houston. 

IE3ULTS 1985: x-Ed Plnauiev. Vlllanave.' Dwayne 

25 24 35 38—114 McClain. VI I knave i HaroW Jenna VTItort- 

21 39 11 23— Hi ova; Gary McLMn, VHknovo; Patrick Ew- 


UOU I And what are Idds to Ttmim of last game.” 

1 1 - 1 * Italian idol Bruno Conti’s reaction Please, Michel, shut up, keep 

texas— wot rod Ned Yost, catcher, and U7 a five-maich suspension for in- playing, and let us tell the joy of 


ATLANTA— Autooad Milt Thonmaa out- 


Jim Andersoa htftoMer. 

TORONTO— Wcdved Roy Lao Jackson. 


fielder, and Tony Brtzxatoni and Steve pitcher. Optioned Alexis Infants, shortstop. 
Shield* Pltdiers, to Richmond of the Interna- Jenv Keller, outftokfar, and Tom Henke. 
Nona! League- Pffcher, to Syracuse af International League. 

CHICAGO— Traded Tito Hanoi, first base- WotrodBrvqnClark,pltelier. lor Bw purpose 
man. to ColHarnla far Angel Morona pitcher, of granting him his unconamoMl reteasa 


48 28 449 - 
44 38 495 4 

41 34 447 7ft 

38 31 400 11 

37 39 487 12 

30 45 400 IBM) 


37 31 493 IBIS 

32 43 427 23)4 

X 45 400 2SVI 

27 49 4)S 29 
20 S 363 35» 


71 343 579 V22 lit 32 43 AO Z»S vtlle; DaracA WMtfenburg. North Carol In 

75 381 428 929 124 S * ott ** * * ABB 25)4 Stole. 

73 » 435 893 122 *-*■ 27 49 JS 29 19*4: y-Patrh* Ewing, Geerg4town; MU 

73 395 479 174 12J) G* 1 ™ 5>n ^ B 20 55 J*7 35Ki ch04l Graham, Georgetown; A keen 

74 197 .470 147 1U Ow:liocftrl rtavo,f berthJ Otoluwon, Houston; Mkhort Young, Horn 

72 241 527 741 10L7 dlviston Mtta) Km; Alvin Franklin, Houston. 

75 250 549 799 107 MONDAY'S RESULTS 1*85: x-Ed Pincxaev.. Villanova; Dwaym 

73 199" 578 777 104 AtUntO 25 24 35 28—114 SAcCIaln. Villanova; HargM Jenisa Vlltan 

48 144 559 723 RL4 Detroit 21 39 11 23— 188 ova: Gary MfaLMn, VWaaove; Patrick Ew 

73 T44 427 771 RU Wilkins 1241 SS 27, Rfven 9-14 34 22; Trl- tog, Georgetown. 

73 359 412 771 JQ4 PUdW B-M 44 2L Thomas 4-12 M 17. Re- 

baands: Atlanta 54 {Lavlngston 13); Detroit mr/^. » m /j 

G Nol Avg. 52fLalmbeer,Ciirefan9). Assists: Atlanta 23 1 X LAA 1 OtiTUCT SCOrCTS 

72 985 117 (EJatman ?}; Detroit 20. (Thomas 11). J 


HOUSTON— Sant Ty Galnav. outfleMar, to BASKETBALL 

Tuoon of ttn Podflc Coast L soout. Plotioaal p** 1 * 1 "* 1 

PHILADELPHIA — Traded Len Matussmu GOLDEN STATE — Stoned Jerome White- 

firs* b as eman, to Toronto for Jose Escobar, Bead, cantor, to a one-yoar a m trart. 
shortstop; Ken Ktanard.autfletdsr.and Dave . . 

SnlPOMft pfleher. AsStanod Escobar and ^n nm..ri i ■i.nna 

Kionord to Roodlog of the Eastern League 

ix>d Shi peneff I o Portland of the Ptaclffe Coast CHICAGO— Stoned Tim Wrtanmm 

onaa^pemen Kcrr.o^ ar m. rocuc uxa. ^ ^ phllltos, rumtog bac 

5AN FRANCISCO— Optioned Phil OueL HOCKEY 

lefts, catcher, to Phoenix of me Podflc Coast National Kedkey Lsafvs 

League. Outrtghted too eootroos at Fran BOSTON— Recoiled Lyndon tan 


NaHe(wMtomed L lootot United Press International play wdl OU defense a g a in st HouS- 

CH I CAGO— Stoned Tim Writoitmon. ttodt wpATTI F —Thr Vattle Suner 1011 Counterpart AlttriH Olajuwon, 

end, and EOtfie Phllltos, rwvitaB bo*. „ “'J 1116 Deanie SiyCT- vs-TJ! Jn J 

hockey. Somes lost a game Mond^n^ht, 10 * j 

Noftonof Hodkey Leetus bmimprovedlhdrdifliiccsof gain- Ji “° ^ 

BOSTON-Itocoiied Lvndeta Bron, rtow ing a spot in the National Basket- woman t tbe Janies icwe w move 

wtae. from Horohoy of Dw Amsrtcan Hacker ^odaiion lottery —whCTC & ll«6-f<»t-ll P.10-meter)S0ClMtO 

1 "Tds*ang 6LES— 5taned Ken Henunend. — . — .■■■■.. - pOTW fomrf DOt year to make 

aeto ns emn n . \RA FOfTTS IO0m fOT fiWing? 

N.Y. RANGERS— Stoned KM Iv IWfcr. left Settle, lOSff Of tiX Straight fdl 

arino, to o fiveracm e oma_ contract. ^ a onc-in-sevcn chance of to 3(M5 and is tied withKansas 

INDIANA STATE— Homed Mike Calhoun «Mff PSttlCk City tWO games britisd PhOotix in 

and Alan Penry assistant basketball ceoelws. Ewing its No. 1 pki m the COhCge the battle for the Oghth and final 
. ^ AYETTE-Humed join Fnaar otsis- drafL Western Conference playoff berth. 

Seattle, with Frank Brickowski Ralph Sampson was only 9-of-21 

for injured all-star center from the floor, but connected on 10 
(out for the year with a of 12 fool shots to lead the Rocket 
G. Lvm LashbroOk emetic director. uu^s uyuij), dropped 8 127-116 at t ac k . U* 7-f00t-4 fOTWHld had 
Syracuse— N amed Timethy Hankiman dcosion to the Houston Rockets, seven points in the final two and a 


salting a linesman? “It’s unfair,” he that to the boys. 

’Sonics, in Losing to Rockets, 
Improve Their Draft Chances 


United Press Imerthidenal 


13 985 13L7 . (EJohnson ! 
71 B99 t27 HoestOT 
76 754 9^' 

75 432 84 Sompwn t 


31 » 34 29—127 
25 21 4* 36—116 HCAA bBdcetbatl tomomeBt: 
Chrts MuflUv SL Jam’s. TO 


75 432 U Sompwn 9-21 18-12 26, Uoyd Ml 3-3 17. 

74 618 U Oraniberj 9-20 1-11 24, McCormtck 7-13*0 18. W^tor Berry, SL John% 93 

75 ■ 604 11 wood 9-14 M 18. RefaeawN: Houston S3 Warman TlsdWe,OUotnroa,tl 

75 588 7J (Olaloioon TO; 3eotU*57 (McCormick 9 ). as* Dwayne McOata, vuianava, 90 

71 540 7J sNts: Houston 38 (Lloyd 9); Seattle 31 {Hen- Parrtcx flwtns. GeontotowaM 

71 539 ’ 74 ***** A). Ed Pinckney. Villanova 87 


MiMUns, taflektor; John RaBb, outfielder, vd wtas. from Hurohur of Itw American Hocter 
George Rltov, Pilcher, to Phoenix League. 

| Bi H| U< LOS ANGELES— Stoned Ken Hammond. 

^ON-Wdlrod John ttonrv Johnsoa C ^*^ 0ETa _^ s ^ ^ 

CHICAGO— Waived Jerry DvtazbuM and wlrra. to a flve^^atour amfract. 
Tom O'Malley. InfMders. Sent Steve Flreovld 

and Bab Fallon, pit chert; Bryan Uffle, to- INDIANA STATE— Homed Mike Calhoun 

flefder. and Joel Aimer, catcher, to Buffalo and Alan Perry asdstani basketball coaches, 
of the American A«diiHnn. Purotwsed Net- Lafayette— N amed John Fnaar Atsfs- 

■on Bornrro and Manny Salinax InfieWers. t “ rt fpotbafl coach, 
and John Ca neel e sL outfielder, from Mexico 


CHy af the Mexican League. 

CLEVELAND— Traded Jay Bailer, pitcher, Mike Nemeth assistant afliMfc director. 
totheailco0OCubsforD<nivRohn.!gflelder. SO. ILUNOIS-EDWARDSVILLE— Named 

SaM Glen Edwards. eutflsWar. to Winston- G. Lvm LoshbroOfc aBdeHc director, 

Salem of fhe Corel Dto League. SYRACUSE— Named Timothy Hanklraon 

NEW YORK — Sent Clay OtfMtoniefi aid soccw epoch. 


font fautbafl coach. 

MISSISSIPPI STATE— Named Brando 


NEW YORK-Sent Clay CltfWtoniefi aid soccer epoch. 

Jhn Deahales. pMdiera, fa their miner toaeue TULSA Named Don Morton faolball coo « « , L, m t L_ „*l_- 

i nimr far remrigiwnent ch and Mike Daly, Poi Ommers . Phil Emle. Stale, Shot W3S I-IOT-7 tTODJ uie In MOtkdayS only Other 

SEATTL E Released Dave Beard, pitcher. Crato boh I and Ken Eltottamisianl coaebet. floor and had three pOmt$, but < hi W8S Atlanta 1 14, Detroit 1 


Houston Rockets, seven paints in the final two and a 
Brickowski. a rookie from Perm half minutes to keep Seattle at bay. 
ate, shot was l-for-7 from the In Monday's only other game it 










wt * a w » w w 1 i ■ a ; W « ■» » ;t< :i«M « vd™?. 


OBSERVER 


Take Me Over, Jesse! Some Al6sts Bringing the Frame Into the Picture 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — Miildewey. our 
Wall Street man who covers 


1 NWall Street man who covers 
hostile takeovers, tells me ! am 
next 

“It’s all over the Street that you 
are about to be hostilety taken 
over,” he said. 

“About to be taken over hostile- 
ly" I said. 

Call it pointless sentimentality, 
but I don't want the end of my life's 
work to be announced in a split 
infinitive. For that matter, maybe 
the great capitalist who yearns to 
take me over doesn't want stan- 
dards lowered, either. 

“True," said Miildewey, “they 
usually don't like to completely de- 
base the product until they put in 
their own management" 

‘To debase the product com- 
pletely," I said. 

“That's the name of the game, all 
right" he said. 

□ 


stooped to paying for his vodka 
with food stamps or driving his 
Cadillac to pick up a welfare check 
— such a man is of no interest to 
the glamour boys of hostile take- 
over. 


I still have no idea who is plot- 
ting hostile seizure of me, but Td 
like it to be the Bass Brothers. 
There has always been something 
app ealin g to me about the Bass 
Brothers. Maybe it’s because the 
name — the Bass Brothers — 


These sour reflections were 
chased by an inspired thought: 
Senator Jesse Helms! 

In politics he is known simply as 
Republican of North Carolina, but 
rarely has there been a grosser 
piece of political understatement, 
for his true constituency is all of 
Absolutely Righteous America. 

“Could it be Jesse Helms behind 
this hostile takeover?" 

“Do you mean Senator Helms, 
Republican of Absolutely Righ- 
teous America?" MQldewev asked. 
“Isn’t Helms a little big to be inter- 
ested in a Mom-and-Pop column 
operation like yours?” 

There it was again — the con- 
tempt one met from people without 
the slightest understanding of the 
power of the column. I had sensed 
it what Senator Helms, who should 
know better, called upon all citi- 
zens of Absolutely Righteous 


“Modern pictures have made the 
very definite effort to leave the 
frame. Bu do they stay out, do they 
go backandif they do is that where 
they belong and has anybody been 
deceived.'’ 

Gertrude Stein, 
“Lectures in America” 




By Grace Glueck 

New York Times Service 


N EW YORK — The picture 
frame, an endangered species 


1 v frame, an endangered species 
for the past few decades, gives 
signs of creeping bade, with the 
aid of artists. 

For the 500 years or so since ofl 
painting be gan, the frame has 
helped define the tricky boundary 
between art and life. At its peak it 
was an ornate, assertive piece of 
architecture that saved more ar 
less as a proscenium arch for 
“presentation" of the work. But it 
has been downgraded in the 20th 
century, pared to a sliver of itself 
by the impact of Modernism. As 
paring became more abstract, 
diminishing in ifiusionistic per- 



Painting on boards cut to fit the 
frames, he rinds that — at fust 
unconsciously, now with aware- 
ness — he incorporates motifs 
from the wu^ding s into the work. 
Now he is having frames made 
especially to fit his paintings. - 
Munk" constructs his frames 
within the boundaries of the can- 
vas, tearing the edges unfettered 
to give a double border effect. In 
two works from a series at the 
Gabrielle Brycrs Gallery, he 
bounded gritty scenes of urban 
life with rococco swag “frames" 
composed of heavily impasioed 


Zooms Up Charts in V. & 

“We Are the Worid,” the song 
recorded by 4S American popular 
music stars for reEftfoTtfetainm 


in Africa, is rising ufctbt top of the 
sales charts faster than any disc in a 
decade, industry sources say. Bin- 
board, the music ihdus&T-weekly, 
says in its current editkyL r th»,the 


gold paint and shiny mirror tiles 
appHed directly to the canvas.' 


Robert Morris’s “Astronomer": Seeking a play of movement 


spective, artists no longer needed 
the rigid, enclosing frame to lead 
the eye to the action wi thin. They 
began to let the edges of the pic- 
ture define its boundaries vis-i- 
vis the space of the real world. 

When Abstract Expressionism 
came in, with its flattened space; 
non-illusionistic imagery and 
large canvases, the frame was 


America to buy CBS stock so they 
could be Dan Rather’s boss. 


sounds like one of those cheery 
singing groups, like the Mills 
Brothers and the Andrews Sisters, 


who made life just a little bit better 
while the worid was waiting for 
Elvis Pfesley. 

Miildewey says I can forget the 
Bass Brothers, though, as well as T. 
Boone Pickens, Saul Steinberg and 
Cart Icahn. All are too busy to 
fiddle around with the small-bore 
“leveraged-buyout potential” of 
my operation. 

“Are you telling me, Miildewey, 
that a man who owns not only three 
magnificently thumbed editions of 
Marcel Proust's ‘Remembrance of 
Things Past' but also the complete 
works of Art Buchwaid bound in 
hard covers is not a rich enough 
prospect to lure the nation’s lead- 
ing depreciation artists?" 

□ 


Don't mistake me. Dan Rather is 
a fine man, an admirable journalist 
and a great American, not to men- 
tion charming , grarious and witty. 
However — 


1 still resent Senator Helms’s 
suggestion that Dan is a more un- 


spurned as decorative. The pic- 
ture. taking mi the status of an 


portanl person for Absolutely 
Righteous America to boss around 
than I am. Sure I realize the senator 
wants a takeover of CBS so that 
Absolutely Righteous America can 
fire Dan. and — I'll admit it — 1 
was furious about this evidence 
that Helms thinks Dan is more vital 
than I am in determining the desti- 
ny of the nation. 


In my anger I may have said 
some things about Das that I 


Yes. that apparently is the way it 
is. With entire TV networks up for 
takeover, not to mention the finest 
magazines, newspapers and pub- 
lishing houses, the little fellow of 
the communications industry, the 
faithful toiler who has never missed 
delivering a column, no matter how 
crushed by Qlness, grief or hang- 
over — such a man who has never 


didn’t mean. Things like, T never 
denied Dan is an influential fellow 
but face it: Where does be get his 
ideas? From reading my column." 

Very likely these words have got 
bade to Senator Helms, who rea- 
sons that it's cheaper to squelch 
Dan by a takeover of me than of 
CBS. I guess I deserve it for talking 
too much. StiR I hate to think of 
my Proust and Buchwaid collec- 
tions bong sold to pay off those 
bank fmaglers- 


Ne w York Times Service 


hire, taking cm the status of an 
object in its own right became 
part of the viewer’s arena. Since 
the 1950s, frames for paintings 
have been more or less vestigial. 
The Museum of Modem Art re- 
cently replaced many of the or- 
nate fraxnes on its 19th- and 20th- 
century paintings with flat, 
narrow borders of antiqued gold. 

True, many contemporary art- 
ists — mainly of figurative per- 
suasion — have tied in frames 
with their imagery, among them 
the West Coast “funk" painter- 
sculptor Roy de Forest and mem- 
bers of the Chicago “imagist” 
school such as Jim Nutt, Art 
Green, and Barbara Rosa. But 
now, with the general revival of 
interest in figurative and Diusion- 
istic p ainting, the frame seems to 
be regaining wider appeal. A 
number of artists, especially 
younger ones, have turned to the 
frame for'its ability to enhance, 
expand, even establish a 
with the painted surface of the 


canvas, much as Seurat did at the 
end of the 19th century when he 
stippled his frames “in opposite 
harmony" to the picture. 

The season’s boldest case in 
paint was the show of enormoos, 
outrageous baroque frames in 
bas-relief by Robert Morris — at 
the Sonnabend and Leo Castelli 
galleries — that all but over- 
whelmed his painting s. Layering 
apocalyptic images of elongated 
hands, bones, fetuses, skulls in 
swirling sculptural patterns, the 
frames set up a play of movement 
with the vaporous, fire-and-brim- 
stone imagery of flat pastels, 
whose colors and linear dements 
were swept into the frames' seeth- 
ing surfaces. Pan sculpture, part 
painting, the objects came about, 
Morris said, because he wanted to 
see how his recent paintings 
would combine with dements of 
plaster reliefs. 

Not many artists have gone as 
far as Morris, but the frame, or 
the concept of it, is of interest to a 
wide spectrum of Realist painters 
and photographers. Its form 
ranges from the somber, bulky 
architectnral creations of Neil 
Jenney to the kitschy beads and 
sequins that surround the deliber- 
ately tacky paintings of Rhonda 
ZwiUinger. There are other mani- 
festations in the work of such dis- 
parate artists as Ed McGowin, 
Brad Davis, Philip Pocock, Sam 


Messer. Gwrenn Thomas, Loren 
Munk, Will Menton Robert 
Helm and Donald Roller Wilson. 


Jenney has been framing his 
simple but monumental composi- 
tions since 1970, shortly after he 


gave up sculpture.. His dark, elab- 
orately architectural wooden 


frames employ such Jenney-in- 
vented devices as “mantel-light- 
ing," in which a flat surface dose 
to the image is toned in such a 
way as to mhanre the illusion of 
light emanating from it. As in 
Morris's work, the image is often 
overpowered by the sculptural 
mass of the frame, which bars on 
it a boldly lettered title. And Jen- 
ney, like Morris, painting and 

frame as a totality whose parts 
reinforce one another. 


While acknowledging the 
frame’s importance in presenta- 
tion, EdMcGowin regards it 
more as an aid to “intensifying" 
his quietly painted but often men- 
acing views of interiors and ob- 
jects. Since the late 1970s, he has 
been surrounding these views 
with heavy, dark frames of metal 
or vacuum-formed plastic in sim- 
plified “cookie-cutter” outlines of 
such everyday things as a chair , a 
car, an apple. In one of his more 
light-hearted examples, recently 
shown at the Grade Mansion 
Gallery, a levitating birthday cake 
is bounded by the outline of a- 
bunny. “I try to make the frame 


‘echo’ the painting so it adds to 
the content,” McGowin said. “In 
this case there's a connection be- 
tween. birthday cakes and the leg- 
endary fertility of rabbits. The 
lock between the frame and . the 
image is more interesting than if I 
had painted each separately” 

A smrilar -'lock” between im- 
age and frame is noted in the 
satirical went of Donald Roller 
Wilson, recently shown at the 
Holly Solomon Gallery. These 
precisely painted visions of dogs 
m human garb are wlwnni^ by 
heavy black “ancestral" frames in 
cut-out shapes or padded with 
fabric that resembles the material 
used for lining coffins. 

Three younger artists in whose 
work the frame makes “dialogue" 
with the image are Sam Messer, 
Loren Munk and Will Mentor. 
Messer, who has worked as a 
frame-maker, paints composi- 
tions in which near-abstractions 
of such forms as «knll«, fish and 
bodies are juxtaposed. .Using 
paint or modeling paste to create 
Oat and relief surfaces, he ab- 
stracts motifs from the work and 
deploys them around the wide, 
flat surface of his frame. 


Theorizing about the frame's 
resurgence, Munk said, “Jackson 
Pollock introduced us to endless 
space, where the edge didn't mat- 
ter.. But in the last 20 years we've 
fouruLtbe world is finite; endless 
expansion is not a reality. Frames 
reflect our sense of boundaries.” 
Flashy materials are also the 
specialty of ZwiUinger, who sends 
up pop culture of the 1940s and 
'50s. Painting tacky images of 
Marilyn Monroe, muscle men. 
postcard scenery, she encloses 
them in old frames heavily gar- 
' oished with beads, paillettes and 
sequins. 

Photographers are also branch- 
ing out. In his recent exhibition at 
the Tim Greathouse Gallery. 
Philip Pocock showed composite 


6-minute, '19-secondsrTOfejumped 
to No. 2 in the U*. R Sajjarbnly 
three weeks after fo;iefcaa£-fti^ 
Grain, Billboard 
dieted it will hit No J 
the first single- to 
month since Ettod . 

GirT.in 1975. The Afri- 
ca" album, featuring, Are dje 
Worid" and nine on^*songs,>as 
released Monday. Thc>albtna in- 
cludes Brace Springslerfs version 


Are t]|e 
Songs, has 


Prince's “4 the Tea^:,4kvYoor 
Eyes," and Tina Ibwfs -^otaha 
Control" ' ™ 


impressions of Berlin, with heavy 
frames especially made for each 


picture. Barbed wire sprouted 
from one that encloses an ima ge 


-of a bombed Nazi transportation 
center and a shot of a soldier 
guarding a building in East Berlin 
was surrounded by a ratable- type 
frame in 15th-century style that 
resembles a sentry box. 

Another photographer, Gwenn 
Thomas, who is also a painter, 
inflects her camera images by 


framing them, then applying col- 
ors or motifs from them to the 


Mentor, whose crisp composi- 
tions deal with forms between ab- 
straction and realism, lias recent- 
ly begun to adorn his paintings 
with (rid American frames, ba- 
roqucly carved and patterned. 


ors or motifs from them to the 
fr ame or extending the photo im- 
agery by painting out over the 
frame. In this way, she feels, she 
creates a “solid object, a totality,” 
arid a bridge between photogra- 
phy and painting. 

Io short, opder artists' auspic- 
es, the frame in its many guises is 
having a small resurgence. Not a 


Hugh Hefner, thcpuBBsher of 
Playboy magazine, dat^aS Mod- 
day that Peter Bogdaoorichbadan 
affair with the 13-yau^ sister of 
Dorothy Strutted, a former. 1 Ray- 
mate of the Year rn^vie 

director’s former lewervwho' was 
murdered in I980J^hetbusbm& 
Hefner, speaking to reporters and 
{y^piaintimra of StraEten’s-ai the 
Playboy mansion- mios Angeles, 
denied allegations, in; Bogdano- 
vich's book, “The IsKtfmgof a 
com,” that the publisher led Strai- 
ten into a lifestyle that resulted in 
her death. Hefner, who had been 
feuding with the director before the 
book was published last August, 
contended that after the murder, 
Bogdanovich had pursued $ [rat- 
ten’s entire family, including the 
“seduction" of ha younger sister, 
Louse. now 16. Hefner alio assert- 
ed that this information had caused 
him to have a stroke on March 6. In 
a statement released later, Bogdan- 
ovich said, “In my opinion, Hefner 
sells sexual lies every month. This 
one about Dorothy’s ; surviving 
family is just his latest-" 



jxjrtjr Ronald 

SiTuerda.' w 

Zh* w! ® "> 

rfrief of 


tike H. 
isSudi 


Jit vUn Sit* r 


Paul Newman, whose 28-year- 
old son, Scott, died from an alcohol 


and drug overdose, said be will give 
$L2 milli on to the Unxversriy of 
Southern Calif ornia for a research 
center dedicated to preventing drag 
abuse. The money will come from 
the Scott Newman Foundation, 
created by die actor and his family 
after his son's death, m 1978. 


major comeback, mind you, but 
— while not resolving Gertrude 


— while not resolving Gertrude 
Stan’s befuddkmcnt — ■ it's at 
least enough to give ha question 
new relevance. 


ODD - fe'Jpv 

jytm rens i2lC 

^ jE Wednesday 

Ss&Kctffiu! jfsr rr.'Jc'f 
siriw : 

ii toil President Gu-^a: 

3IH2L 

newr# -z: 
fttsalisa iuier.er: r, 
ialDnija tLii tier: u c 
ds inn ’Ju: leader: c 
meseerrejlsd. !: 
rim isdiusc baci sr-y 
‘.iruilrs’.ers.easL'ee ’ 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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from 5 to 15 yrox 


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OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Min k n o m hiye e hnent $2730 
Cortdnerworid Servos Lid manage 
and operate a first dau worldwide 


t on ioiner leasing service to the 
stxppng industry ond ipeoaGze 
in providing muertex s With a 
HK3H HXED INCOME 

with scatiorr 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


I fior M detok of titis Krfi Income Plan 
(NOW 1NCOSPOSAUNG h€W 
CAJTTA1. REPAYMENT OPPORTUNITY] 


U-MATIC VIDEOCASSETTE KCA 
25,000 used Sony /3M muted length 
lot -Best offer over S3 each. Tet 617- 
484-5600 Orfoly, 61 Bright, Behnonl, 
MA 0217k 


JACOMO HANDBAGS. 23 E 61 St, 
NYC 10021. 272-832-9038. Boutique, 
stock War lease separately. 


capital xs»AYMB>ir opportunity) 

contact: CONTAMBtWORLD 
S8TV1CE UD 
25 OUSTS TERRACE 
SOUTHAMPTON 
SOI 1BG, H4CLANO 
Tab 0703 335322. 

Tbu 47616CNTWLD G 
Persons interested in beconung an rter- 
"jedory. please contort Mike Garter at 
Container World 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MAH EASY 

Attorney 5Ree4torob4aias visas 5 per- 
manent readme. Helps to set up USA 
businesses 8 loaves conraeraal. indus- 
trial & reader a id rad estate. For free 
brochure wnte: David Ffrson, 1201 
Dave Sh, Ste 60U Neuroort Beach, CA 
92660 USA. (714$ 752 0966. 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTDCOMPANJB 

Incorporation ond m onogern er a eeUK, 
We of Mar, Turia. AnguRa Channel 


blonds. Panama L ib eria end meet rther 


roue ohw company mi 
SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH - ZU G-lUZ HtN 
From 5F50Q per oaouni • up. 
ConSdeia, Bcartntr. 36 CH-63CO Zac 
Id: 0041 42 21 32 88/11* 86 49 II 

A Present for Your Son 


e Confidential profession^ 
advice 

• Smmedate nvtslabity 

• Nansnee services 

• Boat tegatrabara 

• Accounts-* & odmsastronon 

• MU. te kfh o r e & telex 
Free exp l uim t u ry b n e M et form: 

»KT CORPORATE 
SBtVICESUD 
Hex! Office 

Ml H easro s l ; Douglas, Me of Man 
Tab Douglas (06241 23718 
Telex628554 S8JCT G 
London B eprese n twe 
2-5 Old Bond sLUjndon W] 

Tel 01-493 4244, Tlx 22247 5C51DNG 



BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE SERVICES 


UMVBtSAL CONTAINERS UD. 
Kgh inter**! Income Plan 

m% p/a 


FOR SALE. NORTH COYSWOLDS. 8 


miles Stratford on Avon. Plant engi- 
neers & plcrtf hire business with worts 
yard, wori d top ft officer Honing 
perroriwon exats for new develop- 
mrnit oonprising workshop starts & 


in US$ 


ibw UO. provides imcssori with a high 
fixed meametwlhseewTty byoperatiog 
Wed oflfcbduxeuinerlrcsinff ord manage- 


offices, Togjther with 4/5 bedroom 
bungalow. lord *»e oraa dmosj 1 


Me nwnt service, bawriei at 19% offer wd 
•^rthrme to be dedt with at reemved. 


an*. Bert offer secures. Bra 40691. 
Kt. 63 Long Acre, London WQ£9jM 


•^nhnue to be dedt with at received. OOKC 
ay |'For detods of Ihit fulhr guaranteed and Ui 
1 00% -raurod irvertmenl dan. contort: 

!» UMVBtSAL CONTAB^tS LTD. Hr ; 
P.O- 6 QX 1 97 LONDON 5 W 3 3 ST £nc 
Tel 350 0667 , Tbo 896757 Box 




UX nan tended} c ompanies with 
nuuxnee drrcKxt. bearer shorn tmd 
co<*dert w l Ux Ro au una.Fti8b|Oclwp 
A mpport servieet. Panama ft bberian 
compor ts , firs? rata coaSdentid 




.Sssr* 


prafesriond terwoef. 
XP.CJL 17 Wkleopn St, London 
07WLW: 01 3771474, Tbt«39IT G 


Your best buy. 

fine cSamonds in any price range 
et lowest wholesale pnees 
ttifotf from Antwerp 
e arner of the dnmood vrodi 
Fuff Quorantae- 
fix free price Srt wnlB 
J— dwn GuldnnHin 


ihV;; 

i PrssidsRj 


Busmcss Setvxx 
Assistance 

pams HBUSfLft,,, 


EsnbWmd 1928 

Pefl u sonstroat 62, BJ0T8 Antwra 
Betaaxt i - WTp2 3 2 34 07,51 1 
Tbt 71/79 syt b. At the Dtamaad CM> 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond rtfastiy 


union h „- „ . . 
CT triu--.:. 

1I - 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


rm AY HOME 
DONO turners M NUBS 


CARLSBBtG 

One i o f Ccftfarnia's matt succe afiil R eal 
Ertota companies has a l e l e rtto n cf 
landpmceh awslafcta far intamotionN 
ewestors. The properti es , located 


throughout the state nra m pice 
from >W, CCC lo 36 C CK, » amiable 
wMt terrnt. For intomatfca d>out (he 


,* SAFETY IWST* 

When intererted in a second tiorel 
do cumei e , please got in touch with w: 
lAMSCO, Apdo. 195. 

ALTEA / ABeonte / 5pom. 





BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIS 


HUVATE DETECTIVE SCANDINAVIA 
ft firiand. aaB Norway: 24 houn 02- 
42 72 U. Tbt 18949 Aoert. Manager 
G. ReWev. former poSce/crmy am- 
eer, coreods woridvixie. Part to Jam- 


OFFICE SERVICES - 

YOUR WSTANT ANTWERP ORKE 
(Beipum) near harbor mi btarw- . 9® 
Hanoi arpart. M *ervtt» n*** 1 ' 
goal secttaary.rw&ax^lBta.Wl* 0, \L», 
per, offices aid o on f aance ipopA -C**)' 

Wte filtWM nrvl mAh ntrrftr? 




l^nwire 

.? S Kt'TuL-i* 


Ul4 


Woridwide 
From £75 

liin!Lvi Telta t n-ie . ToUtr 
•* • IWW 

SKretanal 

UJL, bJe of Mtn Jersey. Guemety. G- 
brerffar, Ponama, liberia, LuxeniiOurg, 


AntSes, Ready mode or toedciL Free 
esp lr m atory booMe*. 


Arton Company Formation* 
Oepf Tl. B Victoria St 


Drxigkn. bte of Man. 

tS o&TI 26591 
Telex 627691 SWA G 


KH. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUNUTEDmC 
OSA. 8 WORLDWIDE 


A co rep leta toad ft busmen service 
provitSng a unique ooBection of 


provirtng a unique coBedton of 
Ktorutd, vwrsraEift mehringaal 
in tfivi du alt for aK o c c u p a nt. 


71 2-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 66ft St, N.Y.C 10019 
Service bpr«Mmtmves 
MeededWorldvrata. 






FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


GONRRMADON 
OF NtGBUAN 
LETTBQ OF O&DfT 

We p ra dde txmfi rg mrioo by prime 


DISCOUNT COMMISSIONS CM 

sroac a commoout irads 


bento for letten rf credo opened by 
wort borta m Mgena Plecae telex 


e ti orm u tion to fine 6raorf 

telex 261426 ADFOPC-^G m London 


We are geared to hon*i mdMdud ft 
eorponrte form dates pad ore 
etpeppod to hedge your ponfcfto with 
?*’!*** ht ua n.Pcst response to your 

"J bj- ouwele profesuor xjM a ansi- 
oUe. Oredyour mqtines to- 




lift, MAUXETMO EXECUTIVE 


6330 .Augusta Drive 
fi^mofieirf va 22150 USe 


fCxanrdia. fortran. Gifts) 
EurOpecxi boefayexmd, neAar ft weB 
a x m ated with rt Lift. Depr. sforo, 
reody to open dootskx your tttmany 
hi the US. Box 19)9. Henrtd TrSunft 
92521 NeaBy Cedex. France 


l tstoSnasbm 


jjjwrtneaj. Canada M4K 2K. V 

337-5612. -