Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


re Lhf n, . tl p 'V 



Newspaper 

, : : Edited in Paris 
^^rinred Simukaneouslv . 
? ;> r in Paifi liODdon, Zurich. ' 
j^+ikng Kong, Singapore, 

' :F : ’■ The Hague and Marseille 


INTERNATTONAL 


;WSA7«* DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 12 




Published With TTie New York Times and Tlie Washington Post 


AJgra 400 On. 

At*la 33 i 

Bohan QUO On 

Mptrn 45 IfT. 

Canda cats 

Cyprus CX&70 

EW* — : IMP. 

Retold 7 ho f-M. 

Fk*cm— AJS P. 

■ Gomno»_liOWA. 
Gnat toon SDR 

firmrm HTlD, 

Inn I IS Be* 


Wy- 


i«W) Nen-or_7J» HSi. 

-1 3» Lr. Oaafl (UDQIok 


Kmw So. liffl 

Cmat SDfifc 

liJwum ncrvi 

ity. i rw 
luwibawfl— iS LFr. 
-MS be. 


Ataeew—SSODti 
hMariandl -175 FL 


Qf#_ , ft f ) U| 

bp.atMtmiJQP 

SarfAnfcaUjnL 

Span— — llOhaL 
&««!» — 7D0SXi. 
S-wrtmLiajSJFi 
Tanma DSDODw 

Twin TX.40QDO 

UAt iSJDrh 

UiWU.(bifJ_jaBS 
YlflMbra 300 D. 


,763 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


iS i ^' 

‘^second 

sty®. 

SSSvSS* 
“^ d0 ^T' v ' 

•I '“"wing^'w^ 

?^eoiL Wc VJ 

Monday Tk. ^gs. *■ 

«s4K 
i r£ jp 
□ 

rfner. the 
agarine. 

SSUs 

*king io ^ 1 ^ 

^s°uS> 

gsgtftS ^ 

Hefner, 




resuhaj. 


published u«jk 6 


h had 


‘ «« pursued C, 
famdy. indodi®? 
of her vounB*? * 


„V 6 - ^neraiso^ 

nformauonhad^ 
a on Manffi 
released later, jfci' 

In my opinin g: 
ha every noat{ 
Dorothy's smn; 
•t his latest." 

□ 

WQJ *°’ ^ose 2h* 
«, died from 
exdose, said he vi&K. 
i to the Universm, 
Uiforma for a reso; 
ated topreseutureiir 
“<Mey will omeE 
Sewsnan Foaming 
k actor and his 
's death in 1978. 

REAL ESTAH 
FOR SALE 

GREAT BRITAN' " 

5TSw5 Wflwjaw 

6 cert view; ovanaip-Hr. 

HearfOb^iSSS 

!. toef-aas^ we* & 
i £ 165.000 MTHttSE 

MONACO 

MONTE-CARLO 

<uv epamrenb. c£ sauc 
numsoot baths, totart 
sea.pool whang lit it- 
Pots- 35?T5b7otBfc5v 


The ABodaMi Rm 

President Ronald Reagan strained to hear a reporter’s question following a White House 
meeting on Tuesday with the prime minister of Turkey, Turgiit OzaL Next to Mr. Reagan 
were, from left to right, his secretary of defense, Caspar W. Weinberger Jr*; the 
presidential chief of staff, Donald T. Regan, and the secretary of state, George P. Shultz. 

Police Said to Break Up Rally 
As Sudan Unions Stage Strike 




PAGE 15 
•OR MORE 
LA55IF1EDS 


diamonds 


DIAMONDS 

Yet- t*tf bay 

jmonS ifl QTi 3« 
ZVrtSl r/Tv^de W* 
itrecT «o m Aw**? u 
- 0 f !*■•£ iarw) 

Fyll gufflorte* 

1 

» s’ 

n- W £ VJLSfc 
• ivl fc. At the 
Ateweip Ditjnw™ ** 


■-ICE SERVICE 

ISTANT ANT«»7g 

) neyv tartw £ £ 

TDOrt Wl 

■efttry 
Ices red 

H-ZU«CWf 

tINHCWre 

BCE aw™ 

£TlSl¥ 


ios 

)fci ,, SwV 

SB 


s?*t3r 




TheAssoaartd Preu 

’ CAIRO — Security forces in 
Khartoum were said to have used 
tear gas Wednesday to disperse an 
unauthorized demonstration in the 
Sudanese capital after professional 
vsuoDshdd a one-day strike to de- 
mand that President Gaafar Ni> 
mein resign. 

The Sudanese news agency, 
SUNA, said in a statement moni- 
tored in London that there were no 
casualties but that leaders of the 
march were arrested. It said the 
marchers included bank employ- 
ees, doctors, lawyers, engineers and 
students. 

The statement did not say what 
the demonstrators were protesting. 
Major General Nimeui, who has 
been the Sudanese president since 
1969, is currently on a visit to the 
United States. 

International telephone opera- 
tors in Cairo said that connections 
with Khartoum were down and 
that the problem was in Khanoom. 
.They' said.' theyr did' ndrlmow the 
cause. Tdex calls were met with the 
reply, “No dreuits." 

in London, the British Foreign 
Office said that the situation in 
Khartoum was relatively calm, 
with no reason to believe that dra- 
matic events were occurring. 

A Foreign Office source said it 
had contact with Khartoum and 
speculated that the nondiplomaik 
communications problems might 
be because communications work- 
ers had joined the anti-government 
rally. .... 

Earlier this week, doctors org*-_ 
nized the one-day strike and dem- 
onstration for Wednesday with the 
declared aim of toppling the coon- 
try’s pro-American president 

The doctors' union had elicited 
support from other professional 
groups, including lawyers, engi- 
neers, university professors and 
judges. 

The Sudanese news, agency said 
Wednesday*. 

“A number of doctrinaire stu- 
dents gathered this rooming in a 
march led by bank employees, doc- 
tors, lawyers and engineers in 
Khartoum. Security men dispersed 
the march, and arrested its leaders 
and instigators. 

“In. a statement to SUNA, an 
official source said security mat 
explained to the marchers that this 
was an illegal march because per- 
mission had not been obtained. 
The source added that security 
forces used tear gas to disperse the 
march and that there were no casu- 
alties.” _ . 

Independent verification of me 


SUNA statement was not possible. 
Repeated attempts by news organi- 
zations in Cairo to contact staff in 

Gaafar Nimeiri says Moamer 
Qadhafi offered Sudan $5 bD- 
tion to sign a unity pact. Page 5. 

the Sudanese capital were unsuc- 
cessful 

In Libya, the Tripoli radio 
quoted the SUNA statement, but 
added in unamibuted reports from 
Khartoum that Sudanese soldiers 
and police were also involved in 
breaking op'the demonstration and 
had “opened fire on the demonstra- 
tors at close quarters.” 


Jordanian 


Tripoli radio said: “The number 
of casualties was not immediately 
known. Large numbers of demon- 
strators wore arrested.” 

The Libyan news media, howev- 
er, often issue exaggerated reports 
about political developments in Su- 
dan. 

The Sudanese government has 
Mamed members of (he fundamen- 
talist Moslem Brotherhood, Com- 
munists and followers of the radi- 
cal Socialist Arab Ba'ath party for 
three days of rioting last week 
The riots erupted after demon- 
strations at three Khartoum uni- 
versities to protest recent increases 
in the prices of essential commod- 
ities: , 


Summit 
Expected 
In Fall 


US Officials 
Point to UN Visit 
By Gorbachev 

By Lou Cannon 

Washington Peat Senior 
WASHINGTON — Adminis- 
tration officials say they expect a 
summit meeting between President 
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail SL 
Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, this 
fail in Washington or New York. 

The officials emphasized Tues- 
day that no dale or site for a sum- 
mil had been set and said that fur- 
ther diplomatic exchanges were 
needed Wore a meeting could be 
arranged. But, they said, one possi- 
bility was a meeting about Oct, 24 
if Mr. Gorbachev attended a spe- 
cial observance in New York that 
day (tommemorating the founding 
of the United Nations. 

In an interview Monday, Mr. 
Reagan said that Mr. Gorbachev 
had replied to his invitation for a 
summit meeting in Washington; 
other officials termed the reply 
positive but said that Mr. Gorba- 
chev had not designated a date or 
place. 

At a White House ceremony on 
Tuesday for the Turkish prime 
minister, Turgut Oral, a television 
reporter asked Mr. Reagan about 
the summit meeting: “Whose court 
is the ball in?” 

“Theirs," Mr. Reagan replied. 
Pending a more specific Soviet 
reply, administration officials tried 
publicly Tuesday to dampen sum- 
mit expectations. . 

“There are no negotiations for a 
summit ,' 1 said the White House 
spokesman, Larry Speakes. “There 
have been no discussions about ar- 
rangements fora summit, no meet- 
ing set, no time set. nothing along 
those lines. Nothing has taken 
(Condoned on Page 2, CoL 3) 




Interior Minister Pierre Joxe and Social Affairs Minister Georgina Dufoix discussed 
Wednesday in Paris the government’s plan to change rules governing French elections. 

French Vote Reform Is Outlined 

Opposition Calls It a Scheme to Keep Socialists in Power 


ifyAi 


m 

icked 


, Reiners 

ROME — A man dainung to be 
a member, of the Palestinian Black 
September guerrilla group fired a 
bazooka on Wednesday at the Jor- 
danian Embassy here, police said. 

It was the second attack on Jor- 
danian property in the Italian capi- 
tal in two weeks. No injuries were 
reported. 

Police arrested the man. They 
said the missile was fired from a 
hand-held weapon in a -square 
about 200 meters (220 yards) from 
the embassy bufidlmg in' the Pariah 
district, where many foreign mis- 
sous are located. 

The rocket narrowly missed the 
embassy offices on the top floor of 
the five-story budding and hit an 
apartment bdow, blowing out a 
window. 

The man dropped the bazooka 
and fled, but guards at the state 
electric company stopped and held 
him until police arrived. 

The man said he was a Palestin- 
ian and a member of Black Septem- 
ber, police said. The same group 
dowsed responsibility for attacks 
in which five persons were injured 
in the olfitts of Alia, the Jordanian 
national airline, in Rome, Athens 
and Nicosia mi March 21. 

PotictTsaid the man identified 
himarff as Ahmad Mimour, 20, and 
that he told them he had arrived in 
Italy on March 27. 

Fuad Bitar, a representative of 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Idea That life Began 

upport 



By John Noble Wilford 

New York Times Service 

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CaH- 
fomia — Scientists in Califor- 
nia have reported a major dis- 
covery that supports the 
emerging theory that Kfe on 
Earth began in clay rather than 
the sea. 

The discovery, announced 
Tuesday at a symposium, 
showed that ordinary clay con- 
tains two basic properties es- 
sential to life: the capacities to 
store and transfer enerey. With 
such energy, coming from ra- 
dioactive decay and other 
sources, the early clays could 
have acted as “chemical fac- 
tories” for processing inorganic 
raw materials into the more 
complex molecules from which 
the first Hfe arose about four 
billion years ago. 

In their analysis of common 
ceramic day, the scientists said 
they had found evidence that 
“mistakes” made normally and 
repeatedly in the formation of 
day crystals presumably create 
the conditions by which (he ma- 
terial traps energy and holds it 
for perhaps thousands of years. 
Such defects in the day micro- 
structure could also be rites for 
storing information necessary 
to direct the chemical reactions 
and organize the eventual 
proto-organisms. 

So, if the theory can be con- 
firmed, it would seem that an 
accumulation of chemical mis- 
takes ted to life on Earth. The 


theory is also evocative of the 
biblical account of the Cre- 
ation. In Generis, it is written: 
“And the Lord God formed 
man of dust of the ground,” and 
in common usage this primordi- 
al dust is called day. 

The chemists and biologists 
who made the discovery, how- 
ever. emphasized that their 
findings cud not prove the clay- 
life theory but did make it a 
more reasonable explanation 
worthy of further resrauch. 

The research was conducted 
by a team of sdentists at the 
National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration's Ames 
Research Center in Mountain- 
view, California, where studies 
of the origin of life have been 
under way for years, in part to 
learn how to search for lile on 
other worlds. The leader was 
Dr. Lelia Coyne, a research as- 
sociate at Ames and also at San 
Jose Slate University. She de- 
scribed the findings, the result 
of research begun m the 1970s, 
at a symposium held at Ames 
and in a telephone .interview. 
Commenting on the report 
telephone from Ames, Dr. 

Iraham Cairns- Smith of the 
University of Glasgow in Scot- 
land, who first proposed the 
day-life hypothesis in the 
1960s, said: “It's another talent 
that the clay has. It's the kind of 
thing you sued if you are to run 
a chemical factory.” 

According to the doctor’s 
(Continued on Page 5 , CoL 6 ) 


% 






■reive 



nfiU 0 non< 



SgpiPj?,* 


INSIDE 

■ Tmkey’s prime minister, in 

Washington, has been promised 
continued arms aid by Presi- 
dent Reagan. Page 2. 

■ Gams in farm technology 

.soon wQl bring more milk, and 
grain to bulging UJ>. - ware- 
houses. . Page 3. 

■ The Soviet Pofitbero has or- 
dered high schools to train stu- 
dents to use computers. Page 5. 

■Deep driHmg in the Earth’s 
crust may answer questions 
about the continents. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE . 

■ British Aerospace shares fell 

as the company released a draft 
prospectus for the sale of 146.9 
mfllrori shares. Page 7. 

■Deutsche Bank reported an 
increase in 1984 group operat- 
ing profit. rage I* 

TOMORROW 

European nations look for a 
way to cut their soaring unem- 
ployment rates. 


dates stood a chance of winning in 
the second, run-ofl round. 

The new system, in which the 
scats are allotted on a proportional 
basis in a single voting round, will 
enable smaller parlies to count on 
getting a few seats in parliament 
without having to merge them- 
selves into larger parties. 

For example, on current form, 
the change guarantees that the 
rightist National Front, led by 
Jean-Marie Le Pen, will get assem- 
bly seats for the first time. 

With the reform, the Socialist 
Party, which now commands an 
absolute majority, would remain 
the assembly’s largest single party. 
In the current assembly the Social- 
ists hold 289 of 491 seats and, de- 
spite their waning popularity, are 
expected to lose less than 100 of 
them. 

.. Under the new proponionalsys- 
tem, Jean-Luc Parotfi," electoral an- 
alyst at the Political Science foun- 
dation in Paris, says that current 
poll data project a parliament next 
year in which the Socialists would 
have 158 seats, the RPR-UDF 264, 


A <h Etchetr 

International Herald Tribune 
PARIS — The French Socialist 
government Wednesday spelled 
out its plan to conduct next year’s 
parliamentary elections by propor- 
tional representation, outlining 
what is potentially the most funda- 
mental reform in French politics in 
more than a quarter of a century. 

The change, the Socialists say, is 
intended to make the elections 
more equitable and to reduce the 
polarization of French politics be- 
tween leftist and rightist blocs by 
giving full representation in parlia- 
ment to smafiftr political parties. 

Conservative spokesmen de- 
.. scribed the move as a maneuver to 
help the Socialists stay in power 
' despite their dedining popularity. 

A commentator on state-con- 
: trolled - .radio said President Fran- 
..'qois Mitterrand, who reportedly 
-^aade ti& d ecisio n on the electoral 
reform himself, wanted to “make 
the Socialist Party the indispens- 
able component in any stable gov- 
ernment coalition.” 

Public opinion statistics show 
that the change away from the cur- 
rent mqjority-vote system trail aid 
the Socialists dectorally, but it win 
also certainly strengthen the Com- 
munists and the ultra-nationalist 
party, the National Front 
The changes will be sent for ap- 
proval next week to the Socialist- 
dominated National Assembly, 
where it is virtually certain to pass. 

Under the new system of electing 
the assembly, all political parties 
will present lists of candidates in 
each of the country’s 
native regions, or 
The scats m each department will 
then be allotted to each party's list 
in proportion to its share of the 
vote in that department. 

Based on current polls, analysis 

predict that the new system will ^ nomination Tuesday, 

produce an assembly with a major- ^ House ^ ^ 
ity consisting of the two mam ot- ^ ^ routinely ap- 

poation parties, the : neo^Gaulhst Sovedby the Senate. 

for the Republic, led by the Representative Ed Zschau, 
Democrat of California, who has 
battled to open foreign markets to 
high-technology companies from 
bis district in California’s Silicon 
Valley, said he was optimistic that 
Mr. Yeutier would follow the lead 
of his predecessor, William E. 
Brock, in pressing for freer trade 
with the Japanese and others. 

A Republican Senate trade ex- 
pert said Mr. Yeutier, 54, had the 
strongest trade background of any 
of the more than two dozen candi- 
dates considered by the White 
House. 


the C ommunis ts 31, the National 
Front 18 and the ecologists 3. 

These prelections do not take 
into account several minor aspects 
of the change: The new law, to 
respect population shifts, redistrib- 
utes seals among departments and 
adds nearly 100 seats. 

Roland Cayrol, research director 
of the Louis Harris France potting 
group, said that the redistribution 
and addition of seats would benefit 
the So cialis t Party slightly. 

But both analysts said (hat these 
modifications would not funda- 
mentally affect the share of seals 
eventually won by each party. 
More influential, they said, will be 
political factors such as the risk to 
Mr. Mitterrand of being seen to 


Tokyo Sending 
Official to U.S. 
To Argue Case 

By John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 

TOKYO — The government, re- 
acting to the growing mood for 
protectionist trade legislation in 
the United States, said Wednesday 
it was sending the deputy foreign 
minister, Reisni Teshima, to Wash- 
ington to argue Japan’s case. 

The trip was ordered by Foreign 
Minister Shin taro Abe after the 
U.S. Senate's Finance Committee 
approved a bill that would require 
President Ronald Reason to take 
action against Japan if its trade 
surplus with the United States is 
not reduced. 

The Senate committee voted, 12- 
4, for mandatory tariffs and quotas 
unless Japan further opened its 
markets to UJ5. products. 

The House of Representatives 
approved a non bin ding resolution 
Tuesday, 394-19, that urged Presi- 
dent Reagan to take “all appropri- 
ate action” to gain new markets for 
U.S. products. 

The Japanese government issued 
a formal statement Wednesday 
condemning the Senate bill, culling 
it “a threat to the entire free trade 
system.” The statement expressed 
hope that Congress would not pass 
the bill. 

The statement, issued by the 
chief cabinet secretary, Takao Fu- 
jinami. said Japan had moved 
quickly to deregulate its telecom- 
munications market and that new 
regulations that c ame into effect 
Monday made Japan “second only 
after the U.S. in the world" in liber- 
alization. 

“Japan has accomplished dereg- 
ulation in about three years, whne 
it took the past 10 years in the U.S. 
to accomplish such deregulation," 
the statement said 


Senior members of the governing 
, _ . . .. liberal Democratic Parry were re- 

make ml opportunutm change m ported to be discussing inviting 
the dertora^ hw and whether the ftout 30 to 50 membeil of Cnt- 
reform further unites or divides the ^ to . ^ Japan this month to 


opposition conservatives. 

In the coming months, the So- 
cialists hope to narrow the gap to a 
point where some factions of the 
center-right opposition coalition 
(Condoned on Page 2, CoL 8 ) 


view, first hand, it economic sys- 
tem. 

Both steps appeared to grow 
from Japan's long-standing con- 
tention that trade tensions are, to a 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Congress Lauds Choice 
Of U.S. Trade Delegate 


By Rudy Abramson 

Los Angela Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The 
nomination of Clayton 
ideal of the Chica- 
go Mercantile Exchange, as U.S. 
special trade representative has 
been greeted with enthusiasm cm 
Capitol Hill, especially among 
farm state lawmakers. 

President Ronald Reagan &n- 


ranaiuaies m nnjmnwjw 
; 99 adnrinis- planned nominatk 
departments. Veutter, the preside 

vmmmi wffl go Mercantile Exc 


mayor of Paris, Jacques 
and the Union for French Democ- 
racy, led by Valery Giscard d’Es- 
taing, the former president. 

But this theoretical conservative 
majority is narrower than it would 
be under the present system, which 
is weighted to turn small marg ins in 
the popular vote into substantial 
parliamentary majorities. 

The old system favored large 
parliamentary majorities because 
elections involved two rounds, 
forcing smaller parties to lend their 
support to larger ones whose candi- 


Mr. Brock was nominated to be 
labor secretary after Raymond J. 
Donovan resigned when a UR 
judge refused to block a fraud in- 
dictment against him. 

Before becoming president and 
chief executive officer of the Chica- 
go exchange. Mr. Yeutier served in 
the Nixon and Ford administra- 
tions in trade and agricultural 
posts, including deputy special 
trade representative. 

Key members of Congress 
praised bis appointment 

“He knows the plays and the 
players,” said Representative Dan 
Rostenkowslti, Democrat of Illi- 
nois and chair man of the House 
Ways and Means Committee. 

“He knows first-hand the need 
for vigorous export markets,” said 
the Senate majori ty leader, Robert 
J. Dole, Republican of Kansas, 
who called the nomination “good 
news for the American farmer, as 
well as every other American whose 
livelihood is tied to international 
trade.” 

Mr. Yetuter grew up in Nebraska 
and for several years ran a 2 J 00 - 
acre ( 1 , 000 -hcctare) farm and feed- 



Clayton Yeutter 


er cattle business while at the same 
time teaching at the University of 
Nebraska. As deputy special trade 
representative, he took part in 

trade talks with the Soviet Union 
and was involved in early negotia- 
tions with the Japanese on allowing 
American automobiles into Japa- 
nese markets. 

“He is very much a free trader,” 
said a longtime Washington ac- 
quaintance. “He is not a protec- 
tionist by any stretch of the imagi- 
nation. 


Self-Conscious Dallas Is Advised to Grow Up by Getting Down to Earth 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Seme# 

DALLAS — Hey Dallas, gel 
down and dirtyi Moss up your 
sidewalks. Gutter up these dty 
plazas and parks. Take (he big 
plunge: risk a few public benches. 
If a bag lady winds up sleeping on 
them, well. Western civilization is 
still going to be here in (be morn- 
ing. 

Don't get frazzled if a kid drops 
a hoi dog wrapper an Gty HaH 


Lighten up on jaywalkers. 

And, while we’re at it; how about 
some retailing downtown? How 
about a real downtown? 

The eminent dty doctor. William 
H. Whyte, has paid a house call 
here. Mr. Whyte, an urban ologisc, 
has been studying Dallas for seven 
years the way he studies all cities; 


sioned plea to what is almost indis- 
putably the most tidy, most up- 
tight. most setf-constious, most 
aspiring, most adolescent — in the 
sense that it still is figuring out 
what kind of dty to be — most 
Calvinistic big dty in the United 
States. His plea was: let your hair 
down. 

Mr. Whyte, a Pennsylvanian and 
New Yorker whose books indude 
“The Organization Man" and “The 
Social Life of SmfQ Urban Places,” 
was warmly received by audiences 
of 200 Or so on separate nights. 
That, in itself, was taken by some 
asameasureof the city’s progress. 

“Dallas is ready to broaden its 
notions of what constitutes a 
downtown,” said a civic leader, 
Gail Thomas, who hdped organize 
the lectures. "Six years ago, Dallas 
wasn’t ready to think about 


^ ^ ^ to togdte. 
That’s changed.” 



other. The response from 44 was, in 
effect, “What center?” 

The respondents identified 
Thanksgiving Square, a one block 
park in the middle of downtown, as 
their favorite outdoor spot The 
park’s gate are locked at 5 P.M. 
each day for insurance reasons, and 
a new skyscraper across the street 
Mocks oat the sun for hours each 
afternoon. 

“I must say, you’re too easy on 
iere,” chided Mr. 


develt 

Whyte. Last year, he recommended 
that one of Dallas’s sleek and mon- 
umental but, on the whole, unbo- 


chmers up downtown, were, in 
fact, desirable. 

There are other explanations for 
Dallas not having benches. “A lot 
of people in Dallas think you can’t 
sit, because sitting means you're 
not working,” said Bill Marvel ar- 
chitecture critic for the Dallas 
limes Herald newspaper. 

But attitudes may be changing. 
Developers of skyscrapers in Dal- 
las have started including plazas in 
their “amenities packages.” They 
have decided that it is good busi- 
ness. just as the dty fathers have 
decided that building a downtown 


spitable public places, the concrete - arts district is good business. Ibis 
plaza of the Gty Hall building de- is a city that wants to be taken 


es and height of buildings ledges; 
observing tor ambulatory patterns 
of window-shoppers, office work- 
ers and mere strollers. 

' His prescription was delivered in 
recent lectures at the Dallas Public 
Library. It amounted to an ixnpas- 


StiJL if downtown Dallas is to 
attain Mr. Whyte’s ideal to be- 
come a bustling, congested and 
lively place for people, it will need a 
long reach. like so many Sun Bdt 
cities whose explosive growth came 


IfcaAaoMfedfrm 

Many of the respondents to a poQ could not name any location in the center of Dallas. 


after suburban mails were well es- 
tablished, it is inhabited by office 
workers accustomed to a soulless, 
9-io-5 downtown. 


Earlier, Mr. Whyte had distrib- 
uted questionnaires about the dty, 
and the answers were revealing. 
Asked to identify the “center" of 


Dallas, fewer than one-third of 560 
respondents named any downtown 
location. One-tenth said the city’s 
center was on one freeway or an- 


signed by the architect, LM. Pd, be 
warmed up with pavilions and food 
kiosks. 

Nothing doing "The reaction 
was, *We don’t want to profane the 
sacred place,' ” Mr. Whyte said. 

He said that even though pro- 
gress was being made, ne was 
amazed at the scarcity of places to 
at downtown, a lack he attributed 
to the Southwest's outsized fear of 
“undesirables,” or street people. 

He said he thought that such 
undesirables as vendors or newspa- 
per stands or anything else that 


seriously, and, if art and plazas are 
the ticket, it win pay. 

“HI do anything you want to 
help the Dallas Symphony" went 
the wen-known quote from the for- 
mer mayor and civic booster, RJL 
Thornton. “Just don’t make me 
go." 

Bui this can be said for Dallas: 
when it gets a notion, there is no 
Slopping it. Ten years ago it built 
the world’s biggest airport; Five 
years ago it started to latch onto the 
arts. Next, who knows? A Utile 
funkiness? 










>„ xj<- - . -iii&SiateMl 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


Turkish Leader Hears 
Reagan Pledge to Keep 
Up Military Aid Level 


By Bernard Gwcrtzman 

Sew York Tuna Service 
WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has told Prime 
Minister Turgut Ozal of Turicey 
that the administration remains 
committed to high levels of mili t ar y 


aid for bus country. 

Mr. Reagan also said that he 


would use his influence to block 
congressional efforts to reduce, aid 
to Turicey. 

In remarks at the White House 
on Tuesday, Mr. Reagan told Mr. 
Ozal: “You’re a good Mend and an 
important ally.” He welcomed eco- 
nomic changes set in motion by 
Mr. Ozal and said the United 
States was determined to help Tur- 
key achieve a rapid modernization 
of its armed forces. 

Mr.-Ozal noting that he was the 
first Turkish leader to visit the 
United States in 14 years, discussed 
his government’s problems with 
Greece, which like Turkey is a 
member of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization. 

He said, .according to a partici- 
pant in the talks, that he had been 
trying to “cod down the disputes 
and rhetoric.” Mr. Ozal had said 
that “he was looting for a more 
stable relationship with Athens, 
but noted the difficulties with the 
current government in Athens,” the 
source said. 


taking Greece's security concerns 
about Turicey seriously. 

Mr. Reagan, according to an 
American participant in the talks, 
said the United States also “has 
frictions with the government in 
Greece.” 

The problems were underscored 
by an Hn»q»al effort by the Greek 
government to denigrate Mr. OzaFs 
government during his visit. The 
Greek ambassador, George Papou- 
lias, said Monday that Turkey was 
not sincere in seeking to ease ten- 
sions, 

A Washington public relations 
company, registered to the Greek 
government, distributed “fact 
sheets” listing Greece’s grievances 
against Turkey, which stem to a 
great extent from disputes in the' 
Aegean Sea. 

Mr. Oral's visit also rekindled 
the highly charged debate between 
Arm enians and Turks over the kill- 
ings of Armenians during World 
War I by the Ottoman Turks. Ar- 
menian terrorists have killed Turk- 
ish. diplomats around the world in 
recent years in retaliation. 

The administration is hying to 
persuade Congress not to adopt a 
resolution that would mark April 
24 as a National Day of Remem- 
brance of Man’s Inhumanity to 
Man and calling on thepierident to 
memorialize all victims of gene- 



Carter Urges Reagan WORLD BRIEFS 

To Extend Arms Treaty P cii&riyEieai 

■wwn • Tk n 1 i<rrmie / a m " ' - Ifinirtar Andmc Pansndmm 





on 




ve* 


JlV* 




When It Expires Dec. 31 • call an early na tional election several months 


By Don Obcrdorfcr 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — Former 
President Jimmy Carter has called 
on President Ronald Reagan to ex- 
tend the limits of the second strate- 
gic aims limitation talks treaty 
when it entires Dec. 31. 

He said that failure to do so 
“would be a very negative signal to 
the world that our interest in arms 
control is not sincere." 

Mr. Carter, who negotiated and 
signed the unratified treaty with 
the Soviet Union, said Tuesday in 
an interview that his first prefer- 
ence would be for Mr. Reagan to 
ask for Senate ratification of the 


mj ore his Socialist govern- 
ment's four-year term runs out later this year, a Greek government 

ratification and a formal extension, spokesman said Wednesday. .... . . , 

Mr. Carter said, “a verbal agree- The spokesman, Dumtn Maroudas. said Mr. Papandreou would meet 
ment could be reached quite easily Thursday with the newly elected president, Chnstos Sar twaaln s, and ask 
----- ’ - ■ ■ - - him to dissolve Parliament “soon after it has approved planned-constitu- 

tional amendments.” He gave no date for the election, but government 
officials said it would be held in June or July. 

Constitutional revisions, already submitted to Parliament and due to 


dtfjrch V.’. 






with the Soviets that the terms of 
the treaty be extended and ob- 
served on both sides, as has beat 
the case in the last five years.” 
Any dear departure from the 
treaty limits, whether before or af- 
ter its expiration date at the end of 
tins year, Mr. Carter said, would 


-* l !L 

,U5i 


0 f 

01 -hlU'lt’r- 


shm-' 1 


be voted on next week, must be approved by tire 300-member house in 
two separate votes held one month apart. Electic 


ons can be held one 

month 'after Parliament is dissolved. 

i % The spokesman, cited the stalemated Cyprus issue as a reason for 

mean removal of limits that have calling an early election. “In the opinion of the premier, there are serious 
been deemed advisable “even by reasons for recourse to elections for national reasons, and these reasons 

concern the course of the Cyprus issue,” Mr. Maroudas said. 


fcAtp- «■ 
thc r 


SmSSS 'Pojre JotaPauTri had presented aborted picture of Poland and given 

“shodring" publicity to the ouflawed Solidarity union movement in an 


Reagan" and by the three succes- 
sors to Leonid L Brezhnev, the So- 
viet leader who signed the docu- 
ment with Mr. Carter. 

Mr. Reagan has declined to say 
whether the United States will con- 


Polish Communist Party Assails Pope 



WARSAW (UPI) — Poland’s Communist Party said Wednesday" hat ^ ■fS.t* . c r : 

_. . - ’ w rewrite 


S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, 
that tire document be extended for 
five years. 

■ Mr. Carter said that this 
“wouldn't be an embarrassing re- 
versal for the Reagan administra- 
tion” even though Mr. Reagan con- 
sistently opposed the treaty, 
because the administration for the 


Former President Jimmy Carter in Washington tins weds. 


past four years has pledged not to 
the tre 


undercut the treaty. 

If Mr. Reagan declines to seek 


the treaty limits when a new Tri 
dent nuclear missile submarine 
goes into service late this year. To 
maintain the limits, the administra- 
tion would have to compensate for 
this addition by destroying older 
weapons. 

Mr. Carter was in Washington 
on a promotion tour for a new 
bode, “The Blood of Abraham: In- 
sights into the Middle East” He 
made the following points in an 
interview: 

• Mr. Reagan's Strategic De- 


btirity 


“shocking" 

address to pl„ 

The Communist Party weekly Polityka said that the pope, m a recent 
address to Polish pilgrims, had described Poland as divi ded b etween 
Solidari ty supporters and groups sympathetic to four secret, police 
officers convicted in the murder of the promrian priest, the Reverend 
Jerzy Popieluszko. 




cam -*■ * 

feSK* - 

iS r£OJfi.’ 


“The pope’s statement made tire shocking and groundless daim that 
the whole natic 


4* 


•.eiTi- 

fitpjy 0:1 L,c ' 




i nation is made up either of fotiow ss of Pop ie luszko or of those 
who support a handful of his murderers," the article said Father 
Popieluszko was kidnapped and murdered by secret police officers in 
October. Four secret police officers were tried and sen traced in February 
to long prison terms lor tire lolling. 


^structure 

a«edp*®--V‘- 


ifcsd nun> 
'Tpblera 


SstW 


tecs 


TT S Offirinh Emert Summit in Fall IRA Bomb Kills 2, Injures 9 in Newry 

u.z. ujjicims nxpeci dummu mrau ** ^ of vs.- newr Y . 


Prime Minister Andreas Pap an- cide, especially “people of Arme- 
dreou of Greece has declared that man ancestry who were victims of 
Greece’s chief security problems the genocide perpetrated in Tur- 
ore not with the Communist conn- key.” 

tries to the north but whhTurkev, ^ ^ immediate problem for 

to the east. ^ h^ been highly Turkish- American rdations is tire 
critical of the United States for not administration's effort to persuade 

Congress to end its insistence that 


Top Leather Fashion 

European export prices 



Marie-Martine 


50, Fbg. Saint-Honore, 
Paris 8th. TeL: (1)265.68.22. 


military aid to Turkey and Greece 
be maintained at a 10-to-7 ratio. 
Arguing that Turkey has more le- 
gitimate military needs than 
Greece and noting the problems 
with Mr. Papandreou, who has 
threatened to dose U.S. bases in a 
few years when current accords ex- 
pire, tire adminis tration is seeking 
about $785 milli on in nnhtaiy aid 
to Turkey for 1986 while keeping 
Greece at $500 million. 

But tire Senate Foreign Rdations 
Committee voted last week to cut 
the Ttiikish aid to $715 million. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
place cow and I don’t know of any 
specific plans for any meetings or 
arrangements.” 

Nonetheless, officials who spoke 
on condition they not be identified 
were optimistic about prospects for 
a Mr. Reagan said Mon- 

day that he was hopeful. 

UJL and European officials said 
it was unlikely that Mr. Reagan 
and Mr. Gorbachev would meet in 
Helsinki this August when high- 
ranking officials of several nations 
gather to commemorate the 1975 
agciqg of a human rights accord by 


35 countries, including the United 
States and the Soviet Union. 

European diplomats eigrect that 
Mr. Gorbachev’s first mp to the 
West, since assuming tire Soviet 
leadership in March, probably will 
be to Pans. He is expected to go to 
New York tins fall to address the 
United Nations. 

Some officials think it is more 
likely that Mr. Gorbachev win at- 
tend the October founding obser- 
vance rather than nrid-September’s 
opening of tire General Assembly. 

Officials said a summit probably 
would be a wide-ranging meeting 
and not limited to discussing nucle- 


ar weapons, which the superpowers 
are negotiating in Geneva. 

Discussing tire strategy of both 
sides in these taiw i Mr. Reagan's 
special adviser on arms control. 


Edward L. Rowny, said in speech 
in Sl Lads on Me 


Mr. Reagan told Mr. Ozal that 
"the United States remains com- 
mitted to high levels of security 
assistance to Turkey to speed up 
the modernization of your armed 
forces and to support your eco- 
nomic reform program.” 

“1 will continue to urge the Con- 
gress to fund my full security assis- 
tance to Turkey for 1986,” he said. 

The two men also discussed the 
Cyprus question, and Mr. Reagan 
praised conciliatory Turkish ges- 
tures last year at UN -sponsored 
negotiations that failed to achieve 
progress. 


A Bazooka Shell Is Fired 
At Jordan Embassy in Rome 


(Continued from Page 1) 
tire Palestine liberation Organiza- 
tion in Italy, was quoted by ANSA, 
the Italian News Agency, as saying 
the attack was as attempt to sabo- 
tage the recent accord between Jor- 
dan and tire PLO on a joint bid for 
peace in the Middle East. 

The incident aroused fresh de- 
bate about foreign entry and resi- 
dence in Italy. Some politicians say 
Italy has become a crossroads for 
guerrilla groups. 

On Monday, three persons were 
injured by a bomb that destroyed 


tire offices of Syrian Arab Airlines 
in Rome. 

In the most recent previous at- 
tack claime d bv Black September, 
two gunmen snot to death Fahd 
Kawashmeh, 45, a supporter of 
Yasser Arafat, the PLO chairman, 
in Amman, Jordan, last Dec. 29. 

The attack on Wednesday was 
one of a series a gains t Jordanian 
targets in Europe in recenj years. . 

On Dec. 4, 1984 . 3 gunman fatafc-; 
ly shot a Jordanian diplomat in 


londay that tire 
Russians were “diverting atten- 
tion" from U5. efforts to limit of- 
fensive nuclear weapons by con- 
centrating on the president’s 
advocacy of a missile defense sys- 
tem. 

“Rather than allow the Soviets to 
divert attention from this objec- 
tive” of limiting offensive weapons 
“by focusing on the defense and 
space issue, where systems don’t 
even exist, we should work at 
reaching agreements aimed at re- 
ducing nuclear arms, which do ex- 
ist,” Mr. Rowny said. 

Mr. Reagan said in a speech last 
week that the ultimate impact of 
his defense proposal known as tire 
Strategic Defense Initiative, would 
be to make offensive nuclear weap- 
ons more negotiable. 


Bucharest A telephone caller to a 
news agency said Black September 


was responsible. 


Listen to your mother. 



All that good advice doesn't 
have to be a thing of the past just 
because you’re apart. Keep In 
touch with your family by phone. 
You'll stay close even though 
they're in the States. 


AT&T 


ready complex 
Soviet arms control negotiations, 
creates an "almost insuperable" 
obstacle to an agreement 
• The United Slates should en- 
courage movement in the Middle 
East peace process by the diplo- 
matic intervention of Mr. Reagan, 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
or someone like former President 
Gerald R. Ford or former Secretary 
of Stare Henry A. Kissinger. Any 


NEWRY, Northern Ireland (AP) — An car bomb planted by tire Irish 
Republican Army exploded Wednesday outside tire town courthouse, 
killing a policeman and a court security guard as it engulfed a police 
vehicle in flames, police said. Nine persons were injured. 

The outlawed IRA claimed responsibility for the attack in Newry, 
which straddles the border with tire Irish Republic, and where an IRA 
mortar attack on the police station on Feb. 28 killed nine officers. 

Four police officers and five civilians suffered minor injuries and shock 
Wednesday, according to a local hospital administrator. Police officials 
in Belfast said the car containing the bomb was parked on tire Ni 
Belfast road outside Newry Magistrates Court, afew hundred 
the police station. 


fonservati 

all for An 


j Robert. 

•jftjtojwrf- 


MlO-tpc 




lesser figure would be ignored by 
the contentious parties in the re- 

^•The tune has come for (he Senate Panel Approves 21 More MXs 

United States to explore the peace WASHINGTON (NYT) — Tire Senate Armed Services Committee, in 

process with Palesttman^ mdud- a dosed session, has approved production of 21 more MX missiles in the 

1986 mtiiary budget, rejecting Democratic efforts to cut the program 
more sharply. Senate aides said. 

The action Tuesday by the full c ommi ttee, confirming a decision 
Monday by its strategic and theater nuclear forces subcommittee, was a 
reduction from the 48 tire administration requested. All 10 Republicans 
on the panel voted for tire mfcriles. All nmi» Democrats voted against 
them. 

The administration wants to build 223 missiles, putting 100 into silos in 
the West and using tire rest for test flights and spares. The derision was 
made after a succession of presidents considered, and abandoned, a 
variety of proposals to hide the missiles in multiple silos or move them 
around on trucks or airplanes. 



Sfl! 

,0BDpa) djfiww '•* 
i admit Chnstian 


De; 


mg Palestine liberation Organiza- 
tion adherents who may be part of 
a Jordanian delegation in Middle 
East peace talks. Mr. Carter said 
this could be done while maintain- 
ing tire letter of tire 1975 U.S. 
pledge to Israel not to negotiate 
with or recognize the PLO until it 
ebangpri its policy toward the Jew- 
ish state. 

• A slow, methodical “easing out 
and reducing of American forces" 
in South Korea would still be “the 
. thing to do,” Mr. Carter said. 


.sunk claime*! j s w«ey: 
jjy.teixmtiv ‘hitf elect 
aaii 

foSumvra. president of 

3d0ffUMbCoucci ia:d : 

ssel btcadcasi Tnesu^;, rj 
ikftiiofldlisi Republics 
2 Bdfteconser\ - ztive Nat: 
imfotioo Pirn hi c jra 
ddiam$ of Lrauiantia 
term fAuhutswn. leader 
iSmcoilisi Republic ar 4 
zwqraaib} The Avcv: 
tes a eying “Ballot rv 


Greek Deputy Survives \ote 

The Associated Pros 
ATHENS —Parliament rejected 
Wednesday a censure motion 
against the deputy speaker of tire 
House, Mihalis Stephanidis. for vi- 
olating the secrecy of last Friday’s 
presidential ballot while acting as 
interim speaker. 


Hanoi Is Said to Start Troop Pullout 


estimate that North Korean troop 
strength was much greater than 
previously projected, a report that 


caused Mr. Carter to suspend his 
U.S. ground 


derision to withdraw 
forces. 

• Mr. Carter did not regard the 
revolution that overthrew Presi- 
dent Anastasio Somoza in Nicara- 
gua in July 1979 as "a Communist 
revolution" and his administration 
tried “to bring the new Nicaraguan 
government into the democratic 
circle" and “not to drive them into 
the camp of Moscow.” 

Mr. Carter said “there’s been a 
great exaggeration, primarily from r it* 1 

President Reagan” about Nicara- f Or ttlP, l\CCOrd 
gua’s political alignment “It’s not 
a Communist nation." he said “It 
probably has as much free enter- 
prise, private ownership as exists in 
Great Britain.” 

• The Democratic Party will re- 
gain control of the Senate in tire 
1986 congressional elections and 
has a good chance of regaining the 
presidency in 1988 with a middle- 
of-the-road candidate and philoso- 
phy. 

Mr. Carter said he recommends 
economic conservatism, including 
reductions in the federal deficit 
deregulation of industry and dc- 


BANGKOK (UPI) —Vietnam on Wednesday began tire largest troop 
withdrawal it has ever made from Cambodia, bolstered by its successful 
offensive against Combodian Khmer guerrillas. Radio Phnom Penh said, 
monitored m Bangkok. ... 

The pullout of 15.000 “volunteer troops" was the fourth and largest 
Vietnamese troop withdrawal in four years, indicating the security 
situation in Cambodia was firmly under control Radio Phnom Penh said. 
Vietnam claims to have pulled out 10,000 troops a year for the past three 
years, but Western diplomats familiar with the situation said all of the 
soldiers have secretly been replaced with fresh forces. 

Cambodian guerrilla leaders on Wednesday issued a statement de- 
nounring Vietnam’s daim oF a troop withdrawal calling it “nothing more 
than a ploy to deceive international public opinion when in fact the 
enemy is simply proceeding to a troop rotation as was the case with 
previous so-called troop withdrawals.” 


iyAlexa 


» ktawdfa fre; 

■i'SUOTTE Nmh Orw 
■aMfaander Sr, 2 
-ingm crusader and ch; 
-s je Naira*! Aacoati 

Jwmcemeat Ci - C)? j e| 

ri, 1 k*t Tucsdav 

!£■£* 

r® 6 rawer, was -Ik’ 

^.kwiofdir 
J950 and had been act: 

for more than" 


President BeSsario Befancnr of Colombia has begun a three-day visit 
to Washington aimed at winning U.S. support for peacemaking efforts in 
Central America. He is to meet Thursday with President Ronald Reagan. 

The Famnoont Hotel completed a four-block journey Tuesday toanew 
location in San Antonio, Texas. The three-story buil ding , which was 
purchased for SI0, took three days to move. (UPI) ^ 

Britsft customs officials said Wednesday that they would begin a 
slowdown strike over pay on Friday, a move likely to cause delays at air 
and sea ports over Easter. (Reuters) 

A bomb wrecked a French car showroom in San Sebastian, Spain, and 
police broke up demonstrations in several Basque cities late Tuesday on 
the fourth day of protests against the murder in France of a Spanish ' 
Basque journalist (Reuters) 


Unsolved ” acase! * 


fense budget growth of 2 to 3 per- 
liber- 


cent yearly, in a mixture with lit 
al goals such as human rights, civil 
efforts 


rights, environmental 
arms control 


forts and 


Japan Sending Aide to U.S. 


gar n 

*rl 

73. 


■ Carter Tells of Warnings 

Mr. Carter said that when the 
American hostages were seized in 
Tehran in November 1979, he qui- 
etly warned Ayatollah Ruhouoh 
Khomeini that if any Americans 
were injured or killed “we would 
respond with military attacks” 
a gai n st Iran, The Associated Press 
reported. 

He said tire warning was passed 
“through the actual leaders — not 
just tire ambassadors — of Germa- 
ny, Italy, France, Great Britain and 
Japan." 

Probably as a result, Mr. Carter 
said, the Iranian revolutionary 
leader “never put a hostage on trial 
and never deliberately injured or 
lolled a hostage.” 


UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


ForLto. Acwtomtc* 

Wumcyuu _ 

BACHElOR S MASTERSOBpOCIOBMt 
Send deleted resume 
lor ■ h*e evetuet ton 
PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 
1 ® Vftlfcra W nut Mu GV7TQS US* 


EXPERIENCE COUNTS! 
non*re§idential 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Or «b proonm In Mrawwi 1 , dBtwrwnM 
work MtMtei ntfeeg of tolh* demon. 


E» E SS3 o ttarderd thmw Th* utn 
imdtoe- . Om ftra* tor ujmty Kc n ■ ibort- 


•wd □— on«d fen wkm OBfasNontB, 
^rpgro m oamurfhr In Cetom Uipet. 
rent o» Edmeon. Stodne mUixfo 

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY 
for ADVANCED STUDIES 


P J 1 PtfimmnJ UiMinTianl 

dcnooi Of rfurcUwfXfl nWKJgwTWni 
Room HT-1 


Office of the Peon, 

too Gain Drive, 

Novato, CA MM7. {413? M2-I AQO. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
large degree, the outgrowtii of mis- 
understanding. 

“The Senate still does not see 
what the reality is here." a senior 
Foreign Ministry official said. 

Mr. Teshima’s mission will be to 
elaborate on the Japanese position, 
not to negotiate changes in it. a 
Foreign Ministry official said. 

Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
sone told a visiting U.S. senator, 
Frank Murkowski, Republican of 
Alaska, that Japan was working to 
open its markets. The prune faints - 
ter repeated promises that Japan 
soon would announce steps toward 
that goal Mr. Murkowski told re- 
porters. 

Mr. Murkowski, chairman of the 
Senate subcommittee for East 
Asian and Pacific affairs, said he 
told the prime minister of the "frus- 
tration” felt in Congress over Ja- 
pan’s trade surplus with the iJ .g., 
which reached $37 billion last year 
and is expected to continue grow- 
ing. 

Mr. Nakasonc made no refer- 
ence to a bill introduced by Senator 
Murkowski one td 1 several ahned at 
Japan, that would place a sur- 
charge of 20 percent or more on 
Japanese goods if the trade surplus 
did not rink below certain levels. 

Senator Murkowski said that 
“meaningful progress” was bring 
made by the Japanese government 
to get rid of protectionist regula- 
tions. But, be said, tire Japa nese 
private sector was not doing 
enough to increase imports 
ease the suiplus. 

Mr. Teshnna, the deputy 
minister, has been in charge of ne- 
gotiations with the United States 
over opening Japan’s market in 
four specific sectors, including the 
divisive talks on telecommunica- 
tions sales that are still in progress. 
He also is Mr. Nakasone’s personal 


representative for the Bonn eco- 
nomic summit conference in May. 

Officials in Tokyo acknowledred 
it was unclear what access Mr. Te- 
shiraa would have on Capitol H2L 
Senator John Danforth, the Re- 
publican from Missouri who is the 

sponsor of the bill that sparked the 
trip, has in recent weeks refused to 
receive visiting Japanese. He has 
said there was nothing to discuss 
until Japan showed it was prepared 
to act. 


•fAlAlCv 





Vote Reform 
Is Outlined 


. '""ft 

ON 

Fed® 




(Continued from Page 1) . 
could be induced to join a center- 
left coalition. 

Opposition politicians have ac- 
cused Mr. Mitterrand of bringing 
back the voting system that pro- 
duced a succession of weak govern- 
ments in postwar France, in which 
small parties shifted »hwr alle- 
giances constantly at the expense of 
stable government. 

Mr. Mitterrand's aides counter 
that the proportional system is 
more democratic, more representa- 
tive of national trends. Tms system 
is practiced in West Germany and 
Scandinavia — in fact, in almost aQ 
industrial democracies except the 
United Stales, B ritain and Austra- 
lia. 

In contrast to postwar France 
under the Fourth Republic, (he 
,e Fmh Ret 




char 


w 


tc JJJ 

- or 1 ? fc 




? 4nd & 
and 

in a - 26 




«.H - IQ 


— * -w amum IwytiVWVf 

. presidency under the Fifth Repob- w \ 
deputy foreign tic, introduced by Charles 

°.” 1 ^ r 8 c ne- Gaulle, has stronz constitutional: 


Gaulle, has strong coa su tuti on ri 
powers to counterbalance as unsta- 
ble parliament. 



Bin these have never been tetfal- * 7 j W hSj 

reridoit' . - 


because no recent Frrachpresj&ot 
bas had to deal with a podia — ~ l 
dominated by the opposition. 


we© «5S 


• -• T-. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


Page 3 



Gains in Technology Soon to Bring More Milk and Grain to Bulging U.S. Warehouses 


nstos 

^proved 




■“» issue ^ a 


IP 


' Jaroudas ^S 

Assaikp 


By Ward Sinclair 

Washington Poti Service 

ITHACA, New York — Milk 
from the American cow feeds a 
nation 'and dogs government ware' 
booses- Now, research ai Cornell 
University toe indicates that by 
1990, America’s dairy herd may in- 
crease its output 20 percent 
through use of a hormone devel- 
oped though biotechnology. 

The advent of bovine growth 
hormone, or bGH, is just one of 
many advances in plant and animal 
science- that complicate the prob- 

Farms in Crisis 


Third of four err ic/as 


- 

y union *V‘ *** £ac “8 Congress and the cxec- 

CrDo UiDj utree branch this year as they pre- 
that the nor*. • P are to rewrit e basic farm 

as ESj?"* ****■■ 

K to four New production gains in milk 

priest, * * 


and grains, coming, on tbe heds of 


makers is bow to adapt U A farm 
policy to these fast-approaching 
and mghly promising chWeswith- 
om creating additional upheaval in 
this troubled sector of the econo- 
my. 

Some examples of the changes in 
store for U.S. agriculture: 

• The UJS. Agriculture Depart- 
ment says that improved animal 
technologies indicate ‘Taster 
growth rates, less feed ose per unit 
of output, increased disease resis- 
tance and more offspring per ani- 
mal.” These developments will af- 
fect farm and ranch operating 
costs, the need to grow additional 
grains and the avaOabtliw of red 
meat in a United States, where per- 
capita consumption has df-Hmrd 
over the past decade. 

• Work continues oc a growth' 
hormone that could help plants 
mature more quickly. Success 
would mean that crops could be 
grown where the dimate now is too 
hostile much of the year. 

• The long-heralded era of hy- 
brid wheat has arrived, with a num- 


ud groundless 

MPopieluszko 


surpluses that have pushed the cost her of companies marketing lixrut- 
. of federal farm programs to record ed supplies Of high-yield seed. But 


«■* WEIS'S 

Police tfjS 


wheat already is a big stuplus crop, 
gwd average yields are 
steadily with traditional seed. 

The same technology that 
brought hybrid wheat, according to 
the Agriculture Department, ap- 
tly can be used to hybridize 
V another grain supported by 


Conservatives Complain of Fraud, 
Call for Annulment of Salvador Vote 


highs in recent years, could create 
major new strains on the country’s 
agricultural structure. 

But they also offer the possibility 
of vastly increased production that 
could feed many more of the 
world's hungry. 

gg 9 in ;/ So, the problem facing policy- 

sfsy&S 

3r the aiuct ■ N 
^hc. and wtaeJS 
silled nine office^ ** 

^juries and 4* 
aistraior. Poli.-T^r* 3 
parked 

few hundred jjJjJ 

'IMoreMlj 

t^^Comnuite, , cratic rivals daimed a sweeping r 

more MX missiles imb V victory, the country's chief election . was undear whether the conserva- 
orts to cut the proa- official said. tives were sedting to overturn the 

Mario Samayoajpresidtait of the Sections or werejust trying to save 
Central Elections Council, said in a face with theax supporters, 
televised broadcast Tuesday night The Christian Democrats claim 
that the Nationalist Republican Al- to have won a majority of the 60 



alternative to the com and soy- creases are pushing 40 percent. 


the federal farm pro g ram and a 
major ingredient in beer and live- 
stock feed. 


ItaNmYcATmi 

• New varieties of wheat have 
been marketed recently by a Cali- 
fornia company as a high-nutrition 


beans typically fed livestock and 
poultry. This purple-seeded wheat 
reportedly yields up to 125 bushels 
an acre with irrigation. It *lvi 
thrives in arid zones and could be 
an attractive crop for com and 
wheat farmers in the Plains states, 
whose irrigation is fast depleting 
the mid-continental underground 
aquifer. 

• Still other developments in 
wheat, combining better seed vari- 
eties and new planting techniques, 
indicate that farmers m the North- 
east may soon achieve yields of 100 
bushels an acre in an area that now 
averages 30 bushels. Extensive test- 
ing shows that these higher yields 
are readily attainable by most 
farmers. 

None of these developments 
seems quite so immediate and 
threatening, at least to fanners and 
to the federal dairy support pro- 
gram that has governed me indus- 
try for 35 years, as the bovine 
growth hormone. Unlike other de- 
velopments, bGH has the potential 
for almost immediate impact 
through its ability to stimulate 
large increases in milk production. 

While, auestioas remain about 
commercial production and federal 
approval of bGH, tests suggest that 
it could increase U.S. dairy produc- 
tion 20 percent nearly overnight. In 
the carefully managed Cornell 
dairy research herd, the top jh- 


The prospect of large new sup- 
plies of milk adds another layer to 
the already perplexing situation in 
the dairy industry. A generous fed- 
eral dairy support program, crafted 
largely by the dairy lobby, and oth- 
er economic factors have led fann- 
ers to produce far more milk than 
the nation consumes. Buying and 
storing it cost the government more 
than $6.1 billion over the last three 
years. 

As studies of bGH continue at 
Cornell, agricultural economists at 
the university are studying bow the 
hormone might affect U.S. dairy- 
ing. 

Robert J. Kalter, the economist 
who heads the project, said New 
York dairy farmers surveyed by 
Cornell indicated that they would 
adopt the hormone quickly even if 
they had to inject it into each cow 
every day. “The fanners that re- 
main after throe years will have an 
80 percent or higher adoption 
rate," he said. 

The best-managed commercial 
herds, in the view of the Cornell 
experts, trill profit the most from 
bGH. That is another way of say- 
ing that farmers who are poor man- 
agers or heavily in debt could be 
overwhelmed by more efficient 
competitors. 

If, as some research indicates 
feed rations must be increased as 
the hormone is used, then farmers 


By Robert J. McCarmcy 

Washington Post Service 

SAN SALVADOR — B Salva- 
dor's two lamest conservative par- 
ties have called for annulment of 
Sunday’s nationwide legislative 
and mmridpal elections in which 
their moderate Christian Demo- 


disappeared, were transported 
from one place to another without 
official observation, and were 
stuffed.” 

The challenge apparently sur- 
prised Christian Democratic lead- 
ers, including President Jos& N; 

Ie6n Duarte, and upset wl 
seemed to be a calm atmosphere. It 


. confirming a dec^ 
ses subcommittee, 
sted. AH 10 Rep^ 
Jemocrats voted agt 

.putting 100 into afe: 
pares. The derinot*' 
ted, and abandoaed, 1 
liple silos or move de- 


party had won a clear majority in 
all eight provinces from which re- 
sults were available. Another six 
provinces have yet to report. 

In a surprising twist to the con- 
servatives' complaint, Mr. d’Au- 
b uisso o and Raul Medina Martinez 
of tire National Conciliation Party 
alleged in their petition to the elec- 
tions council that the Armed 
Forces ba d the nirimian 
Democrats in the election, Sa- 
mayoa said. 

‘They are involving the armed 
forces, which they accuse of having 


liaoce and the conservative Nation- assembly seats and 262 mayoral participated in favor of a certain 


al Conriliatias Party had brought 
forward charges of irregularities. 

Roberto (TAnbuisson, leader of 
the Nationalist Republican Alli- 
ance, was quoted by The Associat- 
ed Press as saying, “Ballot boxes 


posts. 

The elections council, on which 
the conservatives hold atwo-to-one 
ion ty, released Tuesday the first 
results of the elections, 
which showed that Mr. Duarte’s 


political institution,” (he elections 
council president said. 

Mr. d'Auboisson is a former 
army major, and the military estab- 
lishment is considered conserva- 
tive. But the armed forces have in- 


Kelly Alexander, NAACP Leader, Dies 

llcfATi-ri h |I I TZ ftlrvw ^ 1 


1 began the largest on* 
■lstered by its suoc& 
tadio Phnom Praha 

i 

; the fourth and lac 
indicating the seac 
ladio Phnom Penhai 
a year for thepajnfe 
situation said aD rf fc 
areas. 

issued a suiemeaB 
calling k “nothing nm 
inion when in fart fe 
3 as was the case ** 


begun a three-day ns 
peacemaking eifixtst 
sident Ronald Reis 
(0 

umey Tuesday 
v biiilduu. whuin 

u they would 
iy to cauv dstosS* 
3 .A* 

3 Sebaiuan. Spain, s 

; cine* 1 zkTu»W* 

a France of a Sp®> 
iKaP 


■ to VS- 


.■e for ibe 

lit confera** , 

i Tokyo 

ir wb-ti access ^ 
[have on up ' ** 
n Dsnfonh. * ! ■ 
mMxiswn^^ 


The Associated Press . 

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina 
— KeQy Alexander Sr„ 69. a veter- 
an dvif rights crusader and chair- 
man of the National Association 
far the Advancement of Colored 
People, died here Tuesday. 

Mr. Alexander, a Charlotte fu- 
neral home director, was elected 
chairman of the NAACP in Janu- 
ary last year. He had been a mem- 
ber of the NAACP board of direc- 
tors since 1950 and had been active 
in dvfl rights far more than 40 
years. 

As president of the North Caro- 
lina conference of the NAACP for 
35 years, he built the group into one 
of the country’s largest with a 
membership of 27,000. His home 
and those of other black leaders 
were bombed in 1965, a case that 
remains unsolved. 

,) ‘This is a different South,” Mr. 
Alexander said last year when he 
was elected chairman of the 
NAACP. “Now blacks are getting 
better jobs. There have been impor- 
tant changes; more blades are in 
political office. But we are now 
moving into an area that weshould 
have moved in years ago — eco- 
nomic equality lor blades in this 
country.” 

Victor Iiismchi, 73, 

Geneva Correspondent 

GENEVA (AP) — Victor Luan- 
da, 73, a correspondent for The 
New York Times in Geneva and 



Kefly Alexander Sr. 


dean of the foreign press corps in 
Switzerland, died Wednesday. 

He died at a hotel near the 
French city of Grenoble where he 


and his wife had stopped on their 
way to an Easter hohday. 

Mr. Lusinchi, who was born in 
San Francisco, first reported from 
Geneva in tire prewar period, cov- 
ering the T-cagne of Nations. After 
serving in the U.S. Army Air Force 
during World War D, he returned 
to Geneva to cover the new United 
Nations and Switzerland. 

He was first a correspondent for 
the Exchange Telegraph, a British 
news agency, and men joined The 
New York Times. 

Mr. Losindii was one of the 
founding members of the UN Cor- 
respondents Association, and was 
dec ted its first president after 
chairing the constituent meeting of 
the association in 1949. 

■ Other Deaths: 

Dr. Mario E. Jascderkh, 57. the 
New Jersey surgeon whose trial on 
charges pf murdering five patients 
turned into a test of the rights of 
journalists to protect news sources, 
in September of a cerebral hemor- 
rhage in Mar del Plata, Argen ti na, 
members of Us family said Tues- 
day. 

John-Michad Tehdak, 36, a 
playwright who wrote the book for 
the Toctgospel hit “Godspdl” 
Tuesday in New York apparently 
of a heart attack. 


seed weeks wJJj, 
ng Japans- % 
a? nomas 
hewed 


U.S. to Seek Rules 
On Airliner Seats 


Reform 

itlined 

ucedtojcHns 

i 

UllerraI1 r ^^ 

ing 

rssion 

, V » ‘Sf * 


Los Angela Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — Partly be- 
cause of test data from the remote- 
controlled crash landing of a jet- 
liner in California, the Federal 
Aviation Adminis tration plans to 
propose new safety standards to 
improve the strength of passenger 
seats on commercial airliners. 

The FAA administrator, Donald 
nEngen, said Tuesday in congres- 
sional testimony that the stan- 
dards, which are designed to im- 
prove passengers’ chances for 
surviving some lands of crashes, 
will be proposed next June and win 
apply only to new aircraft 
the test Dec. I, an $1 1.8-m3fion 
joint effort by the FAA and the 
ft. National Aeronautics and Space 
Fran** ,n £ - Administration, ended in a largely 
u 01 .* unanticipated fire even though the 
aMiner’s fuel was a special kero- 
sene mixture designed to prevent 
such occurences. However; Mr. En- 
gea called the test successful be- 
cause of the value of the safety data 
it produced. 


men- . ... cpy 

■raw? * 5 ' 

i OS* 

-**£58 

?: ctfjjf 


DEATH NOTICE 


iter 

i«n* ver 

efltf 1 


be* 




FURNESS, Geome Abbot, 88, sudden* 
tity April 2, 1985 at home in Tokyo, 
rtjapaa. Bom hi Elizabeth, NJ. Giami- 
‘ aied Harvard 1918 and nom Harvard 
Law School 1921. Long terra itadah 
of Tokyo Leaves 2 daughters Anne W. 
of Cambridge, Mass: and Sarasota, 
Ha; Jessie C-of San Frandsco. Ca^ 

one soo, George Ait rfChwy Ouse. 

Md. and 3 ganddangfaten. Funeral 
arran gwnenui in Japan ncDBplett 


MARINER SG 



Concord Mariner. For her. 18 karat gold, black chromium 
stainless steel, diamonds. Quartz. Water-resistant 
An art carried to perfection in Swiss watches. 


Concord Watch Company SA„ 
i>3, rue Centrale, 2502 Bienne, Switzerland. 

European Watch, Clock and jewellery Fair Basel 85, 
hall 1, stand 3(i I 



Brazilian President-Elect 
Recovers After New Surgery 


Roberto dTAubmsson 


sisted that they acted in the election 
only to safeguard the democratic 
process, and the Christian Demo- 
crats praised what they called the 
military’s neutrality in the election. 

It was not dear what role the 
conservative parties charged the 
armed forces with having played. 
But sources cited several rumors 
that military personnel had accom- 
panied government officials who 
confronted poll watchers of the 
conservative parties, and had 
searched homes of conservative 
supporters. 

■ US. House Votes on Rights 

fa Washington, the House For- 
eign Affairs Committee, in a rare 
show of bipartisanship on Central 
America, agreed Tuesday to with- 
hold U.S. aid to El Salvador next 
year unless Pres dent Ronald Rea- 
gan reports progress in human 
rights there, the Los Angeka Times 
reported. 

The measure, adopted by voice 
vote as an amendment to' a $13- 
billion foreign aid bill, would block 
a proposed $429 million in aid to El 
Salvador unless that country’s gov- 
ernment attempts to negotiate with 
leftist guerrillas, increases its con- 
trol over the conduct of the aimed 
forces and acts against rightist 
death squads. 

Current law requires that the 
president report periodically on 
human rights in El Salvador, but it 
does not tie the disbursement of aid 
to his reports. Congress passed sim- 
ilar restrictions in 1981 and 1982, 
but the measures lapsed after Rea- 
gan exercised a “pocket veto” in 
1983. 


Reuters 

SAO PAULO — Brazil’s presi- 
dent-elect, Tan credo Neves, 75, 
was recovering Wednesday from 
his fourth operation since March 
15 and the infection was receding, 
bis spokesman said. 

Antonio Brito said Mr. Neves's 
temperature was normal after sur- 
gery on Tuesday to c or rect a 30- 
year-old hernia which had revealed 
new sources of infection. 

Mr. Neves missed his sc hedul ed 
inauguration as Brazil’s first civil- 
ian president in 21 years when an 
inflamed intestine required emer- 
gency surgery. 

Five days later, he underwent 
surgery again because of conmhca- 
tions from the first operation. Then 
on March 26, he was rushed from 
Brasilia to the S2o Paulo heart in- 
stitute for surgery to stem internal 
bleeding. 


Vice Pres dent Jos& Sarney has 
been empowered to act as president 
and politicians from both the rul- 
ing party and the opposition have 
pledged to maintain constitutional 
order. 

The constitution states that the 
vice president automatically takes 
over Tor the full four-year term if 
death or incapacity prevents the 
elected president from being sworn 
in. 


New Heart for Intfona Youth 

The Associated Press 

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — 
Doctors transplanted a heart 
Wednesday in to an Indiana teen- 
ager who had been kept alive for 
five days by two plastic pumps as- 
sisting his own diseased heart, offi- 
cials said. Michael G Jones. 16, 
was in critical condition. 


DOONESBURY 


..ANPTWT5 
msiuBtr 
WUJUNGZfMt. 
VTHSPUT7M 
GF&i. \ 


lefiSGOPOUN 

THERE,me/.n? 

UK£TOTALKUm\ 

soHesnxttns. 



mL.TMTzm 

rim ASK, 

siR,umL»e SSKKSf 

OFWOKKARS MOMM.tMSrU. 


WUIN? 


MW- 

CUUURE. 



l&£S5?U.ALmG0EAMRM- 
6F. AT HEART. ONCBiOJVBTlUa? 
THE SOU, THERMS NO TUfm6 BACK. 
FARMINS JUST 6BT5 tN YOUR. 
BL00PANP5BWSTHERZ! , 



GOSH. 
UHEREDO 
TOUFARM. 
l-'w*. SIR. 7 . 


wemum, 

ABMxm? 

DRIVE-INS. 

IHAMBTO 

ROIAJBMY 




In Singapore 

our faultless service is only matched 
by our spectacular architecture. 

THE PAVILION 
INTER • CONTINENTAL 
SINGAPORE 





THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 

(• INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS 

One Cuscaden Road 1024, 7338888, Telex: RS37248 
For res ervati ons call: Hone Kong: 3-8440311/3, 

Tokyo: 2150777, Osaka: 2640&66, or call your nearest 
InterContinental sales office. 



hybrid wheat, rice and com im- 
provements that are sure to come,” 
Mr. Bund said. 

Thursday: A harvest of tax 
breaks. 


in high production-cost areas such technological impact on agricul- 
a5 the Northeast, which imports ture, but it won't be as great as the 
much of its feed-gram from outside 
the region, would be at a competi- 
tive disadvantage. 

A Cornell rural sociologist, 

Frederick H. Buttd, noted that 
“under the present federal dairy 
program, with higher production 
there would be a fantastically high 
cost to the taxpayer." 

He added that be found it ironic 
“that fanners who use technologi- 
cal advances do not benefit from 
them. Technological change tends 
to be production-enhancing, put- 
ting downward pressure on prices. 

And abnormal profits are bid back 
into a farmer’s assets, so he doesn't 
reap the full benefits of technol- 
ogy ” 

"Tins will be the first major bio- 


Minnesota Officials Fas ting 

United Press fnt emotional 

ST. PAUL, Minnesota — About 
30 Democratic members of the 
Minnesota House of Representa- 
tives were fasting Wednesday in 
support of fanners seeking a ore- 
year moratorium on mortgage fore- 
closures. None of the Republicans, 
who hold a 69-to-65 majority in the 
chamber, has taken part in the 
three-day fast. 




'ccabat 


30 fab, Rim da Pmtu fa , 

75010 PARIS 

{thru Itw ordway) 

TaL: 770-64-30. 

Finest Crystal since 1 764 

When in Paris*, visit our Museum and Showrooms 
Open Monday to Fnday, 9 am.4 pm. 

Saturday 10-12 ojh. 2-530 pirn. 

Abo m selected stores near your home 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


PRESIDENT AND 
REPRESENTATIVE 
DIRECTOR 

JAPAN 

A major Fortune 50 us. consumer 
products company has a position for an 
executive with a proven track record in 
japan to directa Joint venture operation. 

we are seeking a senior, well-rounded 
businessman with a strong marketing 
and general management profit and 
loss responsibility in consumer packaged 
goods; with a record of accomplishment 
In achieving sales and profit objectives, 
new product launches and people 
management You must be a mature; 
forceful line executive capable of moving 
into an established organization and 
quickly developing effective relationships 
with present management and Joint 
Venture partner executives. 

Excellent compensation package and 
benefits. Relocation costs paid, if 
interested, please submit curriculum 
vitae to: . 

Department 4RA023 
P.O. BOX 59299 
Philadelphia, PA 19102 


£gu*l Oopdrtur.ty Employ*' M.'F 


uflfeef 

The United Notions Children’s Fund 


With Headquarters in New York and office! 
wcxkkig with developing i 
chfldren and their mothers with 1 
develop seeks. 


New York and offices throughout 
country governments to provide div 
rs wrth the basic services they need to 


the world, 
disadvantaged 
survive ond 


CHIEF OF INFORMATION 

Geneva, Switzerland {Ref.: VN 564). 

with respansobitHy to (dan, coordinate and support Unicefs information 
raid oommuT i k ot i on oertvities with o view to increasing awareness of child 
related problems and to mobilizing moral ond fmemeio] public support for 
Unicefs efforts on their behalf. 

QUAURCAnONS: 

University, degree, preferably in the sociaJ sciences or arnimunications 
specialist. Training in reports writing or public relations an advantage. 
JO-12 years progressively responsible experience in national and /or 
international organization in the field of i n formation or communication or 
public relations. Excellent knowledge of EngKsh and French for drafting 
and speaking. 

Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. 

Send de b a te d resume to: 

Mkhaede. Corbett, 

Bri ef R e q wr teme nt and Placement. 

UNICEF 

866 CIV Plaza, New Yerlu NY 16017, IJJiA 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


IM 


L'Agence Noftiomdw Pour F Cmp loi 

AGENCE SPfeClAUSfeDB WG&HEURS ET CADRES 
12 Rue Blanche, 75436 Pons CEDEX 09 


tet. = 280.61-46. Ext. 71. - 285.44.40. Ext. 42. 

A EXECUTIVE, 36 yean oM, graduate In 
Japanese, knowledge of Japanese market- 
ing. One year experience in shipping and 
e n g e i— ring field [1 year md a berit}. Trilin- 
gual Japmwie, English, French (P re vious 
experience in J^san for 2 years). Wishing to 
jrin any company exporting or having oetivi- 
*es in Jewess. Passible residency In Japan. 

ML- 425-PABS CADRES 1/MS. 


• EXHKT IN INTBNATlONAIi SA1E5 
AND MARKETING of industrial products, 
equipment and services. Over 35 yearesoU 
business experience in North America and 
Europe. American ran£ng 18 years h Paris. 
Fluent English, French, Germai and Hefian. 
SEEKS any fora of csftdsoreiien with com- 
pany aiming to p e n etrate new fields or 
expand exsstmg markets short and long term 
missions acceptable under f re elan c e cotrf- 
tfams. Ref., 426-PARS CADRES I/JCB. 

• DHIOW, Ails dkorotKs Diploma Pdr- 
is, ALA. University of CaGformo. Lot Angeles 
seeks dxsQengmg postfen in hfemationaly 
minded firm, either as designer of c on tent- 
poraty l«nps (preferably wood) or as an 
ex hfcitoi designer. Experience in the l US. 
out in France. In charge of die layouts of 
many exhibitions at the P om pid ou Centre. 
Position should be based n Paris, but wB 
travel. Refs 42SPAUS CADRES 1/LA. 


• EXPORT SALES POSITION SOUGHT 
BY YOUNG MAN, free to travel bi any 
commercial field of activi ti es (actually in the 
MBXCAL field], IS years of SALE experi- 
ence fluent EngBsh, Spanish, Frenchr food 
aver 12 yean in Ae USA. Refj 42OPAI0S 
CADRES 1/GR. 

• LOOKING FOR JOB AS INTERNA- 
TIONAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR COSMI- 
TJCS, PERFUMES OR ANY KING OF 
LUXURY PRODUCTS. 46, bachelor, free 
mnedisMy. 8 yeses of experience with 
OfidSTlAN DIOR product* 1ft the Ccrribean, 
central ond south America a wefl as U.S.A., 
spoken Engtkh, French, Spanish ond Hdian. 
Wishes to travel in any countries. Ref.: 422- 
PARS CADRES 1/GR. 

• PROJECT AND INDUSTRIAL ENGI- 
NEER, 39, AJL Formation, fluent French, 
Engbh, Portuguese and Spanish. 19 years 
of experience Ip protects ( e l e ctr o medn nt- 
cd] departes n ent. industrial management, 
manufacture, sub-contractors, technical as- 
sistance in imal, medium and mu h mationoi 
industries wtih high technology irtdudmg 13 
yean abroad. Good kdrodudion in adadniip 
li uli ve and techni c al in ft wl r u cferc in Brazil 
mid very important relations. Industrial re- 
search int e niktned to develop activities by 
the creati o n of One subikScry in Latin Amert- 
as. Bef.i 421-PAHS CADRS UJCB. 


al 



1 


Page 4 


THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



eribunc. 


PublUwd Villi The New Yak luM* and The Wahfa^ton Pot 


No Secrecy Ad, Please 


In February a British jury refused to convict 
a civil servant charged with violating the Offi- 
cial Secrets Act. That 191 1 statute had been 
invoked against Give Pouting, a senior official 
of the Defense Ministry who sent two govern- 
ment documents concerning the sinking of the 
Argentine cruiser Belgrano to a member of 
Parliament. The Unites States does not have 
such a broad secrecy law in this country, and 
we do not want ont Two recent events, how- 
ever, raise the possibility that British- type 
restrictions might be adopted. 

In an opinion released in Baltimore cm 
March 15, U.S. District Court Judge Joseph H. 


White House confirmed a : 


; in The New 


i report : 

York Times that the CIA has proposed a 


Young ruled that a 1917 espionage law could 
civil s 


be usel to prosecute a civil servant who sent 
classified photographs to a magazine. The stat- 
ute has never been used successfully to prose- 
cute in such a situation. No foreign agents or 
spies were involved. The government did not 
need to prove that the defendant acted with 
intent to injure the United States — only that 
the material was properly classified and re- 
leased without authority. Lawyers for the de- 
fendant, Samuel Loring M orison, a naval in- 
telligence analyst, argued that the government 
should be able to discipline or dismiss him for 
this act, bat not to prosecute him criminally 
under the espionage law. Judge Young's ruling 
allows the case to go forward; if Mr. Morison 
is convicted there will undoubtedly be an ap- 
peal For the moment there is some doubt 
about the breadth of the 1917 law and how the 
Reagan administration intends to use iL 
Within days of Judge Young's ruling, the 


secrecy law potentially as sweeping as the old 
British statute. The bill would make it a crime 
for a government employee to disclose to the 
press or other unauthorized people any classi- 
fied information "that reasonably could be 
expected to damage national security.” The 
proposal is believed to cover disclosures by 
members of Congress as weQ as by employees 
of the executive branch but would not make 
the publication Of such material a crime. A 
draft of the bill is bong circulated for com- 
ment by the Justice, State and Defense depart- 
ments, and the adminis tration has not yet 
derided whether to send it to the H2L 


The arguments against sweeping secrecy 
laws are f amiliar and persuasive. The difficulty 


always arises in determining which informa- 
tion is potentially damaging to national securi- 
ty and which is simply embarrassing to the 
government in power. Which whistle blowers 
do a service by forwarding information to 
Congress and the press, and which — can you 
think of a single case? — actually put the 
United States in jeopardy? 

In a society dependent on informed debate, 
the presumption must be that the work prod- 
uct of the government belongs to the people. 
The exceptions — real military secrets but not, 
for instance, cost overruns — must be few and 
far between and should be covered by careful- 
ly crafted statutes. Broad secrecy laws cripple 
a free society and must be resisted. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Now Back Down to Earth 


During the close of the Cretaceous era some 
65 million years ago. all dinosaurs disappeared 
from the Earth. Paleontologists, the students 
of fossil life forms, have for decades debated 
inconclusively the reasons for that extinction, 
but five years ago their game was suddenly 
snatched away by two brash Berkeley scien- 
tists and a crowd of astronomers. 

Luis Alvarez, a physicist, and his son Wal- 
ter, a geologist, contended that a meteorite had 
slammed into the Earth raising such a storm (tf 
dusf chat the sun was blotted out and whole 
species of animals fell extinct worldwide. 
Stretching a provocative idea, other scientists 
claimed to discern a pattern in the fossil re- 
cord: mass extinctions every 26 million years. 

The notion of regular extinctions got astro- 
nomers excited because the deus ex machina 
that would be required to make giant meteor- 
ites crash into the Earth like clockwork every 
26 million years would clearly reside in their 
province. Some posit that an unseen compan- 
ion of the Sun, christened Nemesis, shakes 
loose comets each time it passes near a comet 
cloud. Others contend that the Sun, as it bobs 


up and down through the plane of the galaxy, 
is buffeted by comets or dust clouds. 

These are rich hypotheses. Why. then, with- 
out any further evidence, do they seem so 
unsatisfying? Perhaps because complex events 
seldom have simple explanations. Invoking 
regular squads of meteorites to dispose of the 
dinosaurs and other vanished species is only to 
exchange one mystery for another. 

On closer scrutiny, the alleged repeating 
pattern of mass extinctions has faded. Dino- 
saurs and other vanished species did not turn 
feet-up in a day; some were in decline before 
the end of the Cretaceous. The thin layer of 
iridium that has been found in many geologi- 
cal strata dating back 65 million years could 
indeed have come from a meteorite, as the 
Alvarezes suggest, but eruptions of vulcanoes 
are now known to be sources or iridium, too. 

Terrestrial events, like volcanic activity or 
changes in climate or sea level are iimnatfwm 
possible causes of mass extinctions. Astrono- 
mers should leave to astrologers the task of 
seeking the cause of Earthly events in the stars. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 

A Reform Vote in El Salvador 


The ballot box has yet to prove it is more 
powerful than the bullet in H Salvador. Never- 
theless, the victory of President Josfc Napoledn 
Duarte’s Christian Democrats in Sunday’s 
congressional and municipal elections is a con- 
vincing demonstration that the Salvadoran 
electorate wants this state of affairs to change. 

It lodes as though the Christian Democrats 
have roundly beaten the main right-wing par- 
ties and acquired a working majority in Con- 
gress. President Duarte can now rightly claim 
his moderate reformist policies, that include 
negotiating with the left-wing guerrillas to end 
the civil war, have been endorsed. 

Now seems an ideal opportunity for the 
United States to use the very considerable 
influence it possesses in this tiny Central 
American country to ensure the military and 
the right-wing parties do not destabilize Mr. 
Duane. The United States should encourage 


reforms that the old National Assembly gut- 
ted. But it is more important that he renew (he 
peace talks with the rebels as soon as passible. 
Only when the shooting stops can the difficult 
task of building a just society proceed. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


Much will depend on the stand the United 
States takes toward Mr. Duane. If he is to have 
much chance to cany ont his mandate, he will 
need solid support from Washington, especial- 
ly if he manages to resume dialogue with the 
guerrillas. Without that support, he will be 
hard put to impose his moderate reformist line 
against the coalition of conservatives and some 
elements in the military. 

— Le Monde f. Paris). 


Put Famine Aid Above Politics 


the military to realize that the popular vote for 
I his han d in talk- 


Mr. Duarte has strengthened 
ing toughly but honorably with the guerrillas. 
— The financial Times (London). 


The fact that the Christian Democrats won 
in the face of difficult odds shows how effec- 
tively Mr. Duarte captured the imagination of 
his people last October when be dramatically 
offered to begin peace talks with the guerrillas 
fighting to overthrow his government. The 
outpouring of emotional support that followed 
his announcement, particularly the joyous 


mob scenes during the opening round of peace 

showed that 


talks in the village of La Palma, si 
Salvadorans are desperate for peace after five 
years of civil war and 50.000 deaths. 

Mr. Duarte most now act on his electoral 
mandate before a counterattack from the 
right, which is still well financed and rigid in 
its refusal to accept the need for reform. He 
must certainly revive the judicial and land 


Bread for the World, an anti-hunger group, 
is making a valid point in complaining about 
the way African famine relief was held up in 
the recent controversy over how to help debt- 
ridden fanners in the United States. Several 
Democratic senators from farm states delayed 
faminerdief legislation in an attempt to attach 
emergency credit assistance for U.S. fanners. 
Bread for the World was joined in its com- 
plaint by several groups — Catholic Relief 
Services, CARE, Lutheran World Relief. 
World Vision, the National Farmers Union 
and the Rural Coalition. 

Obviously many issues before Congress will 
become apart of partisan politics, whether it is 
highways or military bases in certain congres- 
sional districts. But issues like famine relid 
should remain above this kind of partisanship. 
The United States appears selfish to the rest of 
the world with this kind of behavior in Con- 
gress. The response of the United States to 
starvation ought to be weighed on merits, not 
on political horse trading. 

— The Indianapolis Netvs. 


FROM OUR APRIL 4 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Reno Rues Its Reputation 
NEW YORK — Parties to prospective di- 
vorces are thoroughly alarmed over a bill 
which is to be introduced shortly into the 
Nevada Legislature raising the period of resi- 
dence [for divorce eligibility] in Reno from six 
months to one year. The good folk of Nevada 
declare that their State has achieved an un- 
enviable notoriety and that it is time it was 
noted for something other than its divorce 
colony. A journalist asks, “What would our 
newspapers do without Reno? Even the most 
Puritanical never fafi to read the message from 
that ciLy if only for the pleasant sensation of 
being shocked.” The writer predicts that Reno 
will fall into the monotonous oblivion into 
which Sioux Falls has already sunk. 


1935: Warsaw Shies From Pact 
WARSAW — The result of Anthony Eden’s 
visit, looked at from any other than the Ger- 
man angle; gives little satisfaction. The British 
statesman desired a definite “yes” or “no” to 
the proposed pact of mutual assistance in 


Eastern Europe. The cqmmuniqui issued after 
lister Beck was of a 


talks with Foreign Minister 
nebulous and evasive character. It apparently 
means “no” to the Eastern pact without saying 
so. It is explained from the Polish side that this 
country desires to cooperate with Great Brit- 
ain in the consolidation of European peace. 
Poland stands to lose more by a war than any 
other European country, but feels that by 
accepting the pact it would expose itself to the 
full fury of German expansionist activity. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1058-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chtarmm 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubbstur 
Extaane EJuor RENE BOND Y 

Educe ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Edna- RICHARD H. MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY , 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAB0NS Director of 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL DmOorofAdwt 


Dtptay Pub&Arr 

Assam Fubbdur 
Assoaasc Publisher 


Duedor of Adicmstng Sales 

International Herald Tribune 181 A venae Ouries-de-GanllE. 92200 NcmUy-scr-Scine, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 


Dtrecuur de la publication: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Harness? RtL, Hong Kang. Tel. 5-285618. Telex 6117a 
Manapng Dir. U.K.: Rabin MaJSdun. 63 Lang Acre. London WQ. TeL 836-4801 Tdex 262009. 
S- A an capital de 1.200.000 F. RCS Nomem B 732021126. Co mmissi on Parilmre No. 61337. 
V.S. subscription: $284 yearly. Second-class postage pad at Long Island City. N.Y. 1 1 101. 
C 1 935, Iniemuwaal Hertud Tribune. AU rigfia reserved. 



x ,, *** 



Exit Major Nicholson, On With Detente 


W ASHINGTON — The Soviets murdered a 
U.S. officer on March 24 but they promise 
not to bear a grudge about >l The American side 
promises to work with them to prevent such 
“episodes.” Detente is back and standing talL 
The Soviets have been intimately involved in 
killing scores of thousands of U.S. servicemen, 
but generally have used Korean and Vietnamese 
surrogates. Still, who will remember Army Major 
Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. a month from now? 

Who remembers Peter Fechtei? He was shot in 
1962 while trying to climb the Berlin WaD and 
was left, like Major Nicholson, to bleed, while 
persons eager to help were kept away at gun- 
potnL Today the Wall is a state-of-the-art killing 
machine with automated firing devices. Behind 
the Wall is a U.S. Embassy. “Normalization.’ 


By George F. Will 


action against an American ally, Pakistan, if it 
continues to aid Afghan freedom fighters. 


to aid Afghan freedom fight 
About four hours after Major Nicholson was 
murdered, the president, breakfasting with jour- 


nalists, was asked about Soviet violations of arms 
control agreements — violations that his admin- 
istration has documental He spoke about ‘lan- 


guage problems” and “ambiguity” the 

Soviets to a different but equally sincere “under- 


standing”^ what the agreements require. He 


The Soviet empire requires low-tech murder, 
too. The day after an Afghan officer led a defec- 
tion from a convoy reinforced by Soviet troops, 
die Soviet troops arrested 40 civilians. Patrick 
David, a doctor with Aide MMicale Internation- 
ale, told Helsinki Watch: “They tied them up and 
piled them like wood. Then they poured gasoline 
over them and burned them alive.” 

The Soviet empire is based on murder, retail as 
well as wholesale. A Polish priest is murdered by 
secret police wholly subservient to the KGB. The 
attack on the pope is organized by Bulgarian 
secret police subservient to the KGB. The Soviets 
watch Major Nicholson bleed for an hour, and 
they stalk Korean Airlines flight 007 for two 


hours, and what price do they pay? 

Pay? President Reagan said the 
Major Nicholson madenim especially 


murder of 

Major Nicholson madehim especially eager for a 
summit with Mikhail Gorbachev, who used Kon- 
stantin Chernenko's funeral to threaten military 


spoke of finding “ways where we can by deed 
prove what our intentions are.” The Soviets are 
in the 68th year of a murder rampage and the 
problem is a miqmiterttnnriing- if we can just 
prove our benign intentions . . . 

In 1982 a French officer operating under the 
1947 agreements that covered Major NichoLson’s 
activities was killed when his car was run off the 
road by East German forces. British officers 
operating under the agirgpimLs have been in- 
volved in suroidous “accidents.” 

Six days after Major Nicholson was shot, and 
on the day he was buried in Arlington National 
Cemetery within sight of the office where Secre- 
tary of State George Shultz met Soviet Ambassa- 
dor Anatoli Dobrynin, those two men discussed 
having discussions to prevent such “episodes.” It 
was “murder" one day, an “episode” the next at a 
State Department dissolving in pleasure because 
the Soviets had agreed to cooperate. 

Will the murder interrupt even momentarily 
the talks whereby America gets the Soviets to 
agree to allow U.S. taxpayers to subsidize, with 
credits, the sate of high technology to the Soviet 


war machine? No. So mesmerized is the adminis- 
tration by the arms control “process” that it is 
too paralyzed to respond even to murder, lest a 
response jeopardize that “process.” 

Historians may conclude that it was during 
this aritTrinioratinn that the United States con- 
clusively lost the Cold War. By “lost" I mean 
forfeited the last chances to embody in action 
correct thinking about the Soviet threat. 

Thb severe judgment is justified in spite of the 
fact — actually, because of the fact — that this 
adminis tration is wiser than its recent predeces- 
sors were ami probably titan its successors will 
be. It is the wisest America has had in a genera- 
tion. Measured that way, it is commendable. 
Measured against the task, it is unsatisfactory. 

This conclusion is compelled by things done 
and left undone, Born tnc failure to use the 
weapon of enforced debt default against the 
Polish regime to the current squandering of ener- 
gy an the charade of arms control The debacle of 
policy toward Poland demonstrated the degree to 
which a conservative adminis tration is incapable 
of subor dinating commerce to geopolitics. The 
Carteresque deration of arms control to the rank 
of centeqriece in U-S.-Soviet relations demon- 
strates the degree to which democracies allow 
their wishes to control their thoughts. 

One week after Major Nicholson bled to 
death, Mr. Reagan called the killing “cold-blood- 
ed murder." There has not even been a Soviet 
apology. Has Mr. Reagan asked for one? If not. 
why not? If lie has asked, what price will he make 
the Soviets pay for refusing — for compounding 
cold-blooded murder with ostentatious disdain 
for the murdered officer's commander in chief? 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


Let America Not Disinvest in South Africa’s Mess 


D URBAN, South Africa — They 
write to me from the United 
States, they come to see me, they call 
me long-distance. Some of them are 
my friends, and they are anxious 
about me and my family. They want 
to know if South Africa is blowing 
up. Why do the police kill so many 
black people? Is it civil wax? Is this 
the end? Is this the revolution? 

I hope that some of them will read 
these words. They are not meant to 
disturb or to reassure. They are 


By Alan Patou 


The children hate these laws more 


than their parents do. They show 
their hatred by stoning and burning 


buses, schools, shops. In recent 
months their hatred has been direct- 
ed against what is called “the estab- 
lishment” and against anyone who 
works for the establishment In some 
black townships the lives of black 
policemen are m danger. 

These hated laws are the laws of 


Uitenhage) black people have come 
into conflict with the police, and 
many have died. Nineteen died in 
Uitenhage, with a small number of 


police officers confronting some 
'refused to 


meant to state the plain and simple 
ived ii 


truth as seen by one who has lived in 
this strange country for 82 years, who 
belongs to no party, who bolds no 
ideology, who doesn't believe in Uto- 
pia, who holds firm beliefs about the 
rule of law and the total freedom of 
the citizen under the law. 

At the moment, our country is in 
a hell of a mess. This mess is physical- 
ly encountered in what are called the 
black townships. The black people 
who live there work in the factories, 
the offices, the shops of the while 
towns. Their relations with white 
people are often good. But they hate 
the laws that control their lives, and 
it is a bitter hatred. 


apartheid. But, more profoundly, 
they are the laws of conquest, the 


conquest. 


laws made by the conqueror for the 
They are tne 


conquered. They are the laws made 
by whites for blacks, and they control 
movement, work, place of residence 
and other innumerable matters. 

These laws affect some white peo- 
ple, but only minimally. Very few 
white people have to enter black ar- 
eas to work: most black people have 
to enter white areas to wort Black 
people experience an amount of po- 
lice surveillance unknown to the vast 
.le. 

i (at the Sharp evilic massa- 
cre), in 1976 (in (he riots in Soweto) 
and now in 1985 (at the funerals in 


majority of white 
In 1960 


thousands of blacks who 
halt their procession. If the Uiten- 
hage incident were isolated, it would 
not have attracted world attention, 
but it is only rate of many. We appear 
to be entering a period of endemic 
unrest and violence. The countiy is in 
a state of deep depression. 

Our President, P.W. Botha, has ap- 
pointed an urgent commission of in- 
quiry, beaded by an eminent judge, to 
lode into the uitenhage shootings. 
To me, the incident reveals two 
things — that the training of our 
police officers in riot duties leaves a 
great deal to be desired, and, second- 
ly. that the selection process for po- 
lice candidates is equally defective. 

During the last century there was a 
long series of frontier wars between 
Afrikaner trekkers, or frontiersmen, 
going north, and African tribesmen 
coming south. The memory of these 
wars lies deep in the Afrikaner mind. 


of black hatred of his apartheid laws. 

of this confrt 


Mr, Wretch Learns He’s Glamorous 


N EW YORK — After the sale 
of The New Yorker magazine 
and Capital Cities' acquisition of 
the American Broadcasting Com- 
panies, Mort Zuckennan, owner of 
The Atlantic and U.S. News & 


By Charlotte Curtis 


World Report, said there was more 
se deals than profits. "The 


to these 

media are glamour businesses.' 

1 could hardly wait to teU the Ink 
Stained Wretch. “Mr. Wretch," I 
said, newspapers being formal 
places, “did you know the media 
are glamour businesses?” 

“You gotia be kidding!" Mr. 


fires, auto accidents and spicy mur- 
ders. Now he was preparing to re- 
place two commas with semicolons. 

I tried again: “Mr. Zuckennan 
wasn’t talking ‘Dynasty’ or Joan 
Collins glamour. He was talking 
real glamour. The thrill of sellin 
blue jeans and dog food throu " 


that smart, rich guys ‘aren’t just 
interested in profitability but in 
what's going on in the world.’ If 
they’ve got big bucks, they want 
more than a subscription to The 
New Yorker. They want to own iL 


‘Having a damned important win- 
rs,’ be called »L” 


television, magazines and newspa- 
pers have Ph.D.5 


Wretch said, barely looking ug. 


Mr. Wretch is like that, 
a newspaperman of the old school 
a street-smart word artist. When 
something really big comes up, say 
a blackout or a mid-air plane colli- 
sion with 15 minutes to deadline, 
the bosses call him in. He sorts it 
ad oul Writes iL as the wire ser- 
vices used to say. so a Kansas City 
milkman p»» understand. 

Twenty years ago, in the name of 
modernization and the health code 
(Kansas Gty having given up door- 
to-door milk delivery), the powers 
that be took away his spittoon and 
his upright telephone with the 
headpiece that fried his hands, and 
banned whiskey in the newsroom. 


pets. How n 
and find oul things that people are 
dying to know. The sex appeal of 
the Agriculture Department The 
downright seduction of the budget 
problems of Indianapolis.” 

Mr. Wretch still didn't look up. 
“Mr. Zuckerman says educated 
people knowing thing is glamorous 
by itself.” I said. “But when you 
mix up alluring sales potential, sexy 
information, profits and the peo- 
ple's right to know, it's more glam- 
orous. So much more so that the 
media have already replaced sales- 
men and we're seeing ‘the withering 
away of political parties.* ” 

“The withering away of what?" 
Mr. Wretch asked, incredulous. 
“Of political parties," I said. 


dow on world affairs,’ 

“Why are you telling me this?” 
Mr. Wretch said, fiddling with his 
Delete Character key. 

“Because it’s news,” I shouted. 
“Not really," Mr. Wretch said, 
studying his monster. 

I rarely contradict Mr. Wretch. 
He has no doctorate but he knows 
who has the goods on whom at City 
HaU, where to find a good $2 marti- 
ni and bow to ferret out unlisted 


phone numbers. I mustered the 
courage to insist: “But you didn't 


you 


know we were glamorous until I 
didn't know media 


(old you. You 
had replaced salesmen, political 
parties were withering away and 
rich men want to own us because 


we're windows on public affairs.” 
“And I still don’t,” he said gent- 


ly. “And you don't either.* 

“Mr. Zuckerman said. Think of 



“Mr. Zuckerman says media glam 
poutica 


puiated bis typewriter, 
twilight years, Mr. Wretch com- 
mands a video display ter minal 
This electronic monster can do al- 
most anything and frequently does, 
periodically ranging compositions 
into oblivion. But it rarely breaks 
down more than once a day. 

Mr. Wretch had just wrestled the 
monster into confecting a master- 
work on the relationship between 
ofl and inflation. That and the inner 
workings of Bahrain have replaced 


our translates into media political 
power. He thinks we can do more to 
change the world than the Demo- 
crats and the Republicans.” 

“He said that?” 

“No. but that’s what he meanL 
What he said was. The media is 
replacing political parties' and The 
main talents in this country aren’t 
interested in steel They want the 
media. Everybody’s grabbing the 
elephant ana trying to hold on.* " 
“Oh yeah?” Mr. Wretch 
served. "When was that?” 

“Now, " I fairly shrieked, 
you seel? Mr. Zuckennan is 


it! You get paid to learn!’ ' 

“I knew a critic ont*.” Mr. 
Wretch said, “who though! it was 
— 'Cun,' I think be said — that this 
building’s open 24 hours a day ” 
Clearly, there was no way this 
story at glamorous people in a 
glamorous business was going to 
get into our glamorous newspaper. 
But I did hear that after writing his 
third definitive study of the day, 
Mr. Wretch repaired to his bar, or- 
dered his second or third martini 
and took the bartender into his con- 
fidence; “Hey Joe, did you know 
businesses?” 



will help 

material harm to many black people. 

hat they 


Americans ought to be told that 


cans cry: “We don’t mind suffering. 
We are used to it.” But this ay usual- 
ly comes from those articulate b lacks 
who will suffer leasL I, as a Christian, 
will have nothing to do with disin- 
vestment- To believe that disinvest- 
ment will bring our government “to 
its knees” is to believe nonsense. 

What would happen if the West 
withdrew from ns completely? (Ex- 
cept for trade in a few strategic min- 
erals, of course. LWhat would happen 
if the West left South Africa in a 
vacuum? Who would fill the vacuum? 
Readers can have one guess. 

Must Americans leave us alone to 
our own sweet way? Certainly not 
e Afrikaner nationalist boasts that 
he is an African but is much more a 
man of the WesL He is very sensitive 
ro the moral judgment of the WesL 
He b more sensitive to it now than at 
any other time in my 82 years. He is 
certainly less arrogant than be was 30 
years ago. He is readier to listen to 
righteous judgment, but reacts nega- 
tively to sdf-rigbteous denunciation. 

The economic power of America 
is awesome, but Americans mustn't 
underestimate their moral power. 
The one thing they mustn’t do is to 
isolate us from the world. That would 
bring danger for us aH 
As I put down my pen. it is 
louncea that our minister of law j 


Nicaragua: i 
A Crusade 
Or 


fur 





By TomWicker 


•0 l 

. V 


3. 

a 




y- 


TOD 


0 


and some of our white policemen 
think they arc stiH fighting them. The 


civil oontrol of the police-- exercised 
by the minister of liawanc 


r and order (for- 
merly justice) — has left much to be 
desired. It has — to a huge extent, bnl 
not entirely — been the control of 
black people by white authority. 

I now come to the heart of my 
subject — and I will undoubtedly 
antagonize some readers. It is one of 
the great ironies of my political life 


that, just as the Afrikaner nationalist 
bat Last I 


. beginning to realize that the 

J uest has gone and that the 
o conquest has cook, and 
just as he b taking hb fust loitering 
step toward the undoing, be is con- 
fronted by tins violent manifestation 


What will come of this confronta- 
tion? I do not believe that he will give 
up hb limited efforts at “reform.” It 
is. however, very possible that he will 
lose more of hb fellow Afrikaner na- 
tionalists to the extreme right. The 
future is hard and challenging. J can- 
not tell you what it will be, and no 
one else can either. 

I have a word to say to those Amer- 
icans who think they can hasten the 
“day of liberation” by damaging the 
South African economy, as. for ex- 
ample, by disinvestraenL I do not 

think that d amaging OUT economy 

will help us to do better. It will do 


W ASHINGTON — President 
Reagan's highly charged re- 
marks about Nicaragua are “a bit 
premature, because the game here is ’ 
far from over,” in the opinion of A 
Ramiro Gurdi&i, the anti- Sandinis t 
head of the Nicaraguan Union of 
Agricultural Producers. “There is 
Sandinist rhetoric, there U Reagan’s 
rhetoric and then there is reality. 

They are three very different things.” 

Mr. Gurdiin's point was under', 
lined by the fact that he was' sp eaking 
to more than 1,000 Nicaraguan busi- 
nessmen and landowners. They met 
in Managua last week, denounced the A 
government for its Marxist- Leninist ' 
program and accused the Sandinisis 
of having betrayed the principles of 
the 1979 revolution. While dong so 
they were neither harassed by the 
police nor. apparently, inhibited in 
their harsh cnucism. 

That does not sound like the Com- 
munist “tyranny" that Mr. Reagan so 
frequently blasts the Sandinisis for 
imposing, nor does it sustain George 
Shultz’s charge that Nicaragua is al- 
ready “behind the Iron Curtain.” No 
such meeting of angry capitalists op- 
posing the government b likdy to be 
held in GuxAoslovakia or Cuba. ** 

Mr. Reagan paid no attention- In- 
stead. in his radio address last Satur- 
day, he tuned hb rhetoric a few deci- 
bels upward, declaring that the 
United States had an “obligation” to 
resist what he called the Soviet 
Union’s effort to turn Central Ameri- 
ca “into a beachhead for subversion." 

How b that obligation to be met? 

By renewed support for the “con- 
tras,” the CIA-connected guerrillas 
who have been waging war on the 
Sandinbts from bares m Honduras. 

Mr. Reagan rails them “freedom 
fighters,” but many of their leaders, 
including their military commander, 

Colonel Enrique Bennddez, were of- 
ficials of the repressive, U.S. -in- 
stalled and U -backed Somoza re- / 
gime that the 1979 revolution ended. P 
“Our support for the freedom 
fighters b morally right and intimate- 
ly linked to our own security,” Mr. 

Reagan told hb radio audience. He 
wanted it “dearly understood” that 
“if we fail to meet thb obliga- 
tion ... we would have sent an un- 
mistakable n gngl that the greatest 
power in the world b unwilling and 
incapable of stopping Communist 
aggression in our own backyard.” 

Behind this inflammatory rhetoric, 
of course, b the president's plan to 
ask Congress, probably this month, 
to approve S14 rniTH rm in additional 
military aid to the “contras.” The 
Russians are coating again, folks, thb 
time to Central America. 

No doubt Mr. Reagan has been, 
emboldened by hb success in wring-it 
ing 21 more MX missiles from a re- 
luctant Congress. StiH, he had to pull 
out all slops to win that one — calling 
home Max Kampdman from Geneva 
to dramatize the winning argument 
that to reject the MX would be to 
undercut Mr. Kampdman and the 
other negotiators. Even so, the mis- 
sile money was authorized by a mar- 
gin of only six voles in the House, 
and many who voted for it swear they 
will not do so again. 

Mr. Reagan expended much of hb 
political capital for a victory that 
could yet prove Pyrrhic. One conse- 
quence might be reduced support for 
the increased military spending that 
he wants, from those who resented 
but succumbed to hb peculiar argu- 
ment that a vote against the MX was 
a vote against arms control. 

The only case of comparable politi- 
cal power that Mr. Reagan can maHJ 


m 

Q 

m 

st 


d 


PC 

ha 




Ui 

» 

th 

mj 


fern 


D 


i 


mjl 

F« 

1 

iag 

P* 

m 

i 

brat 

con 

shd 

sho 


0 


c 

wtv 


k 

the 


Dia 

floe 

T 

off] 


C t 


It Hi t 


CO® 

sms 

“1 

Spot 

drae 

son 

his-} 

CKDC 

. H 
iron 
tbei 
<*•« 
rent* 
at& 


m support of financing the “contras ' 
hb claim that a “Soviet be 






is his daim that a “Soviet beachhead” 
will grow out of Nicaragua’s “Com- 
munis! tyranny.” There is no real 
evidence for that proposition, aside 
from ritual anti-communist Red- 
spotting; but Mr. Reagan showed in 
the MXdebate that he may be able to 
do without evidence as long as he has 
a strong emotional line to pursue. 

The “Soviet beachheacT argument 
raises some awkward questions for 
Mr. Reagan. Why, for example, does 
be not simply declare that the United 
States will not tolerate a Soviet mili- 
tary base or any kind in Nicaragua? 
That policy could be verified and 
enforced, it would remove whatever 


j* 


i‘5 




a 


need there may be for the overthrow^, 
of the Sandinisis, and — unlike thc^ 




■■contra” war — it would be support- 
ed throughoQt Latin America. 

And i/this persuasive pres deni is 
able to convince the public and Con- 
gress that a Soviet beachhead really is 
a prospect, what will be the conse- 
quences if. as b likely, a renewed 
“contra” war proves as ineffective as 
the effort so far has been? Might Mr. 
Reagan not then find hims elf under 
powerful political pressures to, 0 #* 
U.S. forces to meet the “obligation” 
he so emotionally describes and to 
counter what he pictures as a threat 
to vital U.S. interests? 

77hr New York Times. 


LETTERS 

Interested in Nicaragua? 


an- 

• of law and 
order has clamped down on meetings 
by 29 organizations. It will achieve 
nothing except to strengthen opposi- 
tion- f believe that the Afrikaner 


It might be good to have a congres-' 
sional investigation of all those in the 
Reagan a dminis tration who are cur- 
rently engaged in the hysterical 
McCarthyite campaign against die 
Sandinisis, so as to identify any bus* 
ness, property or other fmanaal.m- 
tercsts that would be served by re- 
moval of the Managua incumbents- 
DAVID WARDEN- 

Manila. 





i be Sa 

z ■ 



pH 


"See 

,Si 

. More© 



i 

as 



ft 




gg 

deqeys 

1 


pntn 


& • 


! 

Roots 

tantl 

§ . 

tbei* G 

■ 

& ... 

Mata 

(fae.Ita 


Two Daniel A. Mitriones 


tion. I believe that the Afrikaner 
nationalist government is facing the 

crisb of its life. So are we aU here 
in South Africa. 


The writer is the author of * Cry 
the Beloved CotounT (1948 l among 
many other books. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


Is it possible that Dan A. 

Jr., die unfortunate former FBI 
in your Miami drug story f“£x 
Agent Admits Taking Braes, * Maw 

/dj.bthesonrfpotoadviso’Ebina 

A i-f > J L-.yjJjgJJ 


guerrillas in Uruguay in' l 1 

BOBFIEDLER. 

AUschwii, Swiberiaod- 



if' 




*8* 

?sad e 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. APRIL 4, 1985 


SCIENCE 


IN BRIEF Veep Drill 

Terra-Cotta Figures Found in China 

BEIJING {CombinedDispatches} — Thrc* pits containing more than T None of Arthur Conan Doyle's 
3,000 terra-cam figures depicting waraore and horses have been un- * stones. Professor Challenger, 


Deep Drilling May Answer Some Mysteries About Continents 




earthed in Xuzhou, Jiangsu province, Xinhua news agency has reported. die mad scientist, decides that 
. Chinese arcbaeologicdexpe^ Tuesday said that the discovery was the Earth is alive and its crust is the 

iiuj most important discovery since the figures guarding the tomb of Emperor creature's shdi He drills right 

^~Nicar!! e aatSM Qin Shihuang, founder of tic Qin Dynasty <221-307 B.C). wereiound miles through the crust in Scotland 

ral ProdM 40 E? 1 -' outside Xian, Shaanxi province, in 1974. The three pits are believed to be and reaches a heaving, evil-smdl- 
attached to the tomb of a duke of the western Han Dynasty (206 mg surface into which he drives a 
0.C-AJD. 24). 7 7 1 shiro, drilL The Earth emits “a 

Archaeologists also have reported finding traces of mercury at the howl in which pain, anger, menace 
emperor’s underground palace, evidence that ancient lore about “rivers tbe outraged majesty of Nature 

of mercury" flowing through his tomb may be based on fact. (AFP, AP) all blended into one hideous 
• • shriek. 

/v « - T ■ q n' n n No one has yet penetrated quite 

Gravity inversion said to Har m Eyes ^ miles (about 13 kilometer*), 

WEttrvnov/rrorv • : v ■ .. ; although scientists have long 

NEW YOWC (UPI) — Gravity inversion — hanging upside down to dreamed of sampling the crust at 
relieve bade p am and ease tension — can damage the eyes, two dociors those depths in hope of finding 
4 . • ■ _ ^ , answers to such basic mysteries^ 
I 1 ? W m a r 6 ™ 01 PWO®. Praam wju the the origin of continents and of the 

tyeball and blood vessds of the eye increases, aid Dr. Thomas Friberg of forees fhat cause them to rise and 
the Uruyeraty of CaMonna at Davis and Dr. Robert Wemrtb of the faU ^ousands of feet. It is « S 


Gravity Inversion Said to Harm Eyes 

nt - S flCDh.. ^ ’! V1CRI vnn» nmT> ■ • _ ■ ■ . . 


NEW YORK (UPI) — Gravity inversion — hanging upside down to dreamed of sampling the crust at 
relieve bade p am and ease tension — can damage the eyes, two dociors those depths in hope of finding 
4 . ■ ■ _ ^ , answers to such basic mysteriesas 
15 m 3 POO.^PT^sure within the the origin of continents and of the 

tyeball and blood vessds of the eye increases, Mid Dr. Thomas Friberg of forees fhat cause them to rise and 
the University of California at Davis and Dr. Robert Wemrtb of the f -11 thousands or feet h u at such 
Umveraty oTTexas Health Sciences Center m Dalias. Added pressure ^^^VSiil aiSSS 
can cause Mood to accamnlaiem the ewes, liny blood spots to appear on ra Slv alter the rocks 

the eyelids, excessive waring and bleeding into the membrane surround- produce ore deposits, some or 

mi f a , , . . . , which later reach the surface. 

Inversion devices, which suspend a person head-down by the ankles or The <?nvi« it™™ h»< ninrrct 
fwt, are used in health spas, fitness centers and homes. Dr. Friberg said. JJSJ * d «Ttf PrS 

Challenger's fictitious penetration. 

Demise of South China Sea Predicted 

PARIS (AFP) — The South China. Sea will disappear SO million to 170 September, the Russians began 
million years after it was first formed — or 20 million years from now — a drilling a nine-mile hole near Kri- 
Frcncb-Chmese marine study has concluded. voy Rog, in the southern Ukraine. 

The French Research Institute for the Exploitation of the Sea, report- These and other Soviet drilling 
ing the findings of Chinese and French scientists aboard the oceano- projects, combined with the use of 
graphic-vessel Jean Charcot, said the sea between China, Borneo and the underground nuclear explosions 
Philippines was formed 30 million to 130 million years ago. for deep seismic sounding, are part 

The scientists used a device to draw up a m»p of the seabed. By of an intensive effort 10 learn more 
trarins 700 kilometers (435 milesi of seabed, the scientists reached thor about resources that underlie the 


PARIS (AFP) — The South China. Sea will disappear 30 million to 170 September, the Russians began 
million years after it was first formed — or 20 million years from now — a drilling a nine-mile hole near Rri- 
Frencb-Chmese marine study has concluded. voy Rog, in the southern Ukraine. 

The French Research Institute for the Exploitation of the Sea, report- These and other Soviet drilling 
ing the findings of Chinese and French scientists aboard the oceano- projects, combined with the use of 
graphic vessd Jean Charcot, said the sea between China, Borneo and the underground nuclear explosions 
Philippines was formed 30 million to 130 million years ago. for deep seismic sounding, are part 

The scientists used a ■jfnp r device to draw up a m»p of the seabed. By of an intensive effort to learn more 
tracing 700 kilometers (435 miles) of seabed, the scientists reached their about resources that underlie the 
conclusions on the creation and eventual demise of the sea. The seabed is Soviet Union, especially the prcs- 
sBding eastward under the Philippines several centimeters a year and cnee of metallic ores deep below 
should disappear in 20 milli on years if it continues at that rate, they said, the surface. 

Similar projects are also under 

Hottest Water Discovered in Pacific 

om-te a on W«r Germany an. 


CORVALLIS, Oregon (Reuters) — Scientists at Oregon Slate Univer- 
sity have reported discovering the hottest water recorded on Earth on the 
floor of the Pacific Ocean. 

Jack Diamond, an oceanography professor, said that a hot spring on 
the Juan de Fnca ridge, 480 kilometers (300 miles) oil the West Coast, 
measured 750 degrees Fahrenheit (about 400 degrees centigrade). Mr. 
Diamond’s team used a research submarine to probe the volcanic ocean 
floor of the Pacific coast near (he U. S .-Canadian border. 


off Mexico's Pacific coast 


Cancer Said to Peak in Certain Months 

SAN DIEGO (UPI) — The diagnosis of cancer seems to peak in tolag considerably behind those of 
certain months of the year, and victims of the disease appear to be more the Russians and Germans, 
susceptible to treatment at certain times of the day, a scientist says. The most ambitious proposal is a 
“Female breast cancer occurs with a very sharp rhythxmdty peaking in ax-mile hole in the Appalachians 
spring, and younger males with prostrate cancer have a winter peak in ^ ^ Georgia-South Carolina 
disease diagnosis,” Dr. William J Hrushesky said. Speaking at a four-day bonier. 

seminar sponsored by the American Cancer Society, Dr. Hrushesky said Some geologists bdieve the zone 
his studies also point to a posable seasonal occurrence of glandular marks the kadmg edge of a slab of 


way in other countries. A few 
weeks ago. West Germany an- 
nounced plans to bore nine miles 
beneath the Blade Forest and to 
drill another hole near the Czecho- 
slovakia border. 

Until the drilling of the Kola 
hole, the deepest man-made hole 
was the Bertha Rogers ofi well in 
Oklahoma. Drilling there stopped 
at a depth of six miles when the 
drill penetrated molten sulfur. 
While a program of continental 
deep drilling has been proposed for 
the United States, it seems destined 

the Russians and Germans. 

The most ambitious proposal is a 
six-utile hole in the Appalachians 
near the Georgia-South Carolina 
border. 

Some geologists bdieve the zone 


cancers and certain m alignancies m men. distant origin that was pushed over 

He said victims of the disease are more susceptible to successful ^te continent’s rim as Africa ap- 
treatment at certain times of the day. Dr. Hrushesky and researchers at pr03C hed the East Coast several 
the University of Minnesota, are treating patients with advanced cancer hundred million years ago The 
on time-regulated programs called chronotherapy, he said. Minnesota p^ect could help confirm or deny 
researchers have designated the hours of 6 A. M. to 6 P. M. as the best this hypothesis and identify the 
times to adm ini st er cancer drugs. original continental material be- 


. m it tio n ' 
Dow n - 

wp* 


-.Afamtona^ltov 




Push to the Cores 

Instead d rotating bt eiQhMWIe-tang drift, 
muddy walBf la pushed down aUnnioum- 
alk>yplpM and forced ttraigh a turtw- 
drHL aiming a Mtal the bottom. Mud 
water and rock are returned through 
span outside the pipe, which is narrower 
than the cML In this way, Soviet englnaera 
bored Earth's deepest hoia. 


.UMIItlMl v 

'ZMOIMH North'’ 

V 1000 
\«00 
\M“uoo 

\.jjw 


uoo 
-MO Mm — 


11.000 

COMBR S\P 


The Wandering Bit: 

As depicted from above, core bfc wander* 
from a vertical fine at auccaanlve depths, 
flhen here In meters. K mom a total hori- 
zontal distance ot 840 meters. 

tlw N«w York row 


neath it, as well as seek deep-lying at the base of the sediment the crystal slate and electrical proper- to Y. A. Kozlovsky, the 
oil resources. temperature is high enough to melt ties, its permeability, and the pres- ister of geology, who is 

Nevertheless, according to Dr. granite. sure of fluid within its pores. in mineral exploration, 

Barry Raleigh, director of Colum- Supporters of the proposed pro- Any one of these factors could “copious flows of hot, I 
bia University's Lamom-Doherty ject hope it win be possibfc for the provide dues to the imminence of a erahzed water " 
Geological Observatory, the $60- drill to penetrate to the region major earthquake. . . . 

million project is probably too ex- where the temperature is 752 de- ^ ~ii - w “ ra “ e K 

pensive for the current chmate of grees FahnS(4G! degrees ccd- ? wa ? “P™? mt ? 

tight federal budget constraints, tigrade.) The bottom oftbe Kola Xj? ^ de P OSK n 

ESSy’SEK', 


extent to which the od and nmicralj The drill pipe was made of an alii- csasttoi , iic ^ sudl ^ ^ TO] . 

mdustuB provide financial and mmum a% ta ns sirfflgl ^njc S' or caWoa, in Yellow 
lectoro! support ^e 250 degr« Fahrenhal, but s^SrSpitrL 

Dr. Raleigh is chairman of an 18- the Russians believe a titanium al- “ 

university consortium called Deep toy may allow to reach depths Panel members see king to nnder- 
Observation and Sampling of the as great as a dozen miles, where stand how ores are formed identi- 
Earth's Continental Crust Last rock distant from local sources of Awl the mining district around 


Dr. Raleigh is chairman of an 18- the Russians believe a titanium al- 
university consortium called Deep toy may allow them to reach depths 


July the consortium submitted a heat should be at 750 degrees Fahr- 
proposal for the project io the Na- enhdL 


tional Science Foundation. In Oc- A possible drilling 

tober. the idea was endorsed in a interest to Dr. Raleigh, an author- Mountain, Arizona, and Butte, 
congressional resolution. ity on movements along CaUfor- Montana. Long ago, heat-driven 

Tie consortium report riled an ma's San Andreas Fault, would be water circulating deep under these 
address 90 years ago by Grove Karl one into that deep crack in the crust rqjons seems to have extracted 
Gilbert, president of the Geological where inexorable northwest sliding “rials from the rock and deposited 
Society of America, outlining ma- of the Pacific floor is dragging with them as veins of ore. 
jor unanswered questions about die it much of California’s rim, indud- Direct knowledge of this process 
Earth. They included the nature of ing the entire Los Angeles basin. is a central goal ofthe Soviet deep- 
the boundary between continents There is no direct knowledge of drilling project, which is wirmg 
and ocean basins, the origin of con- deep-seated conditions that deter- ways to search for new ore depos- 
tinents, whether they “float" on mine when and where the fault wtil its. The rite on the Koto Peninsula 
soft foundations or are rigidly sup- slip, causing earthquakes large and chosen for the very deep hole was 
ported, why they rise and fall, and small. The uncertainties, according in the Pechenga copper and nickel 
whether they are permanent. Only to Dr. Raleigh, include the state of mining district 
the last question has been an- stress and temperature within the It has produced a number of dis- 


dc distant from local sources of Tied *b® mining district around 
at should be at 750 degrees Fahr- Crccde, Colorado, as their first 
Vtt choice for drilling, followed by the 

A possible drilling site of special Tonopah District of Nevada; Red 


Mountain, Arizona, and Butte, 
Montana. Long ago, beat-driven 


mnals from the rock and deposited 
them as veins of ore. 

Direct knowledge of this process 
is a central goal of the Soviet deep- 


the last question has been an- stress and temperature within the It has produced a number of dis- 
swered, the consortium's report rock, its chemical composition, coven es. Among them, according 

said: The continents are constantly 

subject to dismembennent and re- 

asscm Wy. T .o • rv . . mt -m 


to Y. A. Kozlovsky, the Soviet min- 
ister of geology, who is a specialist 
in mineral exploration, have been 
“copious flows of hot, highly min- 
eralized water." 

Where the water is able to make 
its way upward into other forma- 
tions, it can deposit its dissolved 
minerals to form veins of ore, Mr. 
Kozlovsky wrote in a recent issue 
of Scientific American. Such water 
release, or "hydraulic disaggrega- 
tion" of metamotphic rock, had 
never before been observed. At aD 
levels the drilling also released such 
gases as helium, hydrogen, nitro- 
gen, carbon dioxide, methane, and 
other hydrocarbons. 

-A. MAJOR surprise occurred 
when the drill penetrated what was 
thought to be the Conrad disconti- 
nuity, a worldwide feature thought 
to separate the upper crust and its 
lower, denser region. Seismic waves 
from earthquakes or nuclear explo- 
sions travel considerably faster 
through the lower layer, which led 
geologists to assume that it consists 
of basalt, like the dense, homoge- 
neous rock forming the ocean floor. 

Seismic evidence on the Kola 
Peninsula put the top of this layer 
at a depth of 5.6 miles, but no 
basalt was found. 


X HE report suggested a number 
of drilling sites. It favored obtain- 
ing complete samples, or “core sec- 
tions,'’ of the penetrated rock. 
Some oil-well specialists believe 
this will not be necessary, citing 
sophisticated new ways, with in- 
struments lowered down the hole. 


uggested 
It favort 


Life’s Origin May Have Been in Clay 

(Continued from Page 1) This theory was a major depar- from the clay when it was wetted 

■ sail I .■ a tlirA frArn tlia ni^kiKiiTivin nrafli np-if af Ar ApammIa VIaii! Jn 


c liquids, 
irradiated. 


sophisticate! new ways, with in- shores of the ancient oceans. It is ^ uss ^ an scientist. In this view, vast 
s tinmen ts lowered down the hole, often undergoing a commons pro- st ? r ^ J °f compounds that con- 
to determine many properties of cess of formation and rhang p , in ^ 0 “ carbon and hydrogen and 
the rock. It is also possible in some response to the enviro nmen t, and som ? °, ther chemicals accumulated 
cases to punch out small samples so could have been an ideal medi- pmuculwly in the Earth's early wa- 
from the hole walls. um for chemical evolution. And its f® 5 - E f er S r lightning and so- 

One proposed project of special mineral structure, scientists are “ rcmation then caused the corn- 


cases to punch out small samples 
from the hole walls. 

One proposed project of special 
interest to Dr. Stehli. he said in a 
recent telephone interview, is the 
bole being drilled into California’s 
Sal ton Sea rift zone, which, he 
pointed out, is the only active zone 
of crustal spreading in the United 
States. 


particularly in the Earth's early wa- 
ters. Energy from lightning and so- 
lar radiation then caused the com- 


now finding, is almost as intricate P““ds to evolve spontaneously 
as a molecule of DNA (deoxyribo- mto living matter. 


it is gradually widening Lhe Imperi- replication, 
al Valley, which holds the Salton r _;_ 


bole being drilled into California’s nucleic add), the master chemical Despite the arguments for the 
Salton Sea rift zone, which, he of heredity. clay-life theory. Dr. Leslie Orgd, a 

pointed out. is the only active zone o. «_ . . , biochemist at the Salk Institute, at 

Stmud idling iZffuriS aESEtoSmlSSfi LaJolla, California, said: “If yon 
States mat ctay _nas meamuty to act as a took a vote, the majonty of people 

catalyst in important chemical re- „, hn „. nr {. __ ' - 1 ^, 

The rift has already opened the actions and could even be capable would D robablv stiU°vate for the 
Gulf of^orma, androtfe north of such, lifelike attributes 1ft* SdSlfiSd^fft^S 
it is gradually widening the Impen- replication. soon hdievw 

Sea andfinme 3 ^ Cmn^Smhh argued that in- The research at Ames found that 

organic “proto-organisms" in clay the clay minerals acquired and re- 
TV *" pSutsora »f td ^ energy ta^the environ- 

■we 3£ building-block molecules of life, meat, primarily radioactive decay, 
Arlantie af such 35 am i no acids, but also may and somehow transfer il from the 

have provided a transitional evolu- deep interior to the mineral sur- 
y nonary structure for it. That is, lhe far*. Hus is more than the simple 
gn empeiaiuro. synthesis of later living organisms retention ofheat from sunlight, be- 

As a result the Imperial Valley based on organic compounds, con- cause the energy persisted far many 
has bees exploited as a source ra sisting primarily of the element car- days and possibly years, 
geothermal energy. At least four bon could have been initially di- Dr. Coyne said the evidence for 
miles of sediment cover the valley reeled by an inorganic pattern, or these energy properties was in the 


Sea and some of southern Califor- 
nia’s richest irrigated farmland. 
The spreading process, similar to 


were not only precursors of the tamed energy 
building-block molecules of life, meat, primarfl; 
5?f l rvS!? af such 35 amino acids ' ^ 3150 may “ti somehow 

ntic Ocean along the mid-At- , a , 


one that 
Atlantic 


floor and it has been estimated that template, developed in day. 


ultraviolet light that emanated 


ground np, fractured, or irradiated 
The types erf light signals were a 
further due that energy came from 
deep in the mineral, not from the 
immediate subsurface areas. 

The sdentists further concluded 
that the energy was being trans- 
ferred to the surface by some 
means because the emissions were 
triggered by agents that acted only 
upon the clay surface. 

According to the research, the 
day minerals appear to be able to 
store and transfer energy through 
the temporary capture of highly en- 
ergetic electrons at rites of irregu- 
larities in the clay's interior struc- 
ture. These may also explain the 
processes of day catalysis and rep- 
lication. 

“When nature puts together a 
day. mistakes are made," Dr. 
Coyne said “Places where you 
should have al uminum atoms, you 
may find magnesium substituted 
Places where silicon should be, you 
may got aluminum by mistake. The 
czystaLs grow fast and under some 
hydrothermal conditions tend to 
have many defects. They trap the 
electrons and can keep them stored 
for an exceedingly long time, thou- 
sands of years.” 




Nimeiri Says Qadhafi 
Proposed Unify Pact 


By David B. Ottaway tors and the International Mont- 
and Don Oberdorfer ' ^ 5 md ^ 1 kx * 

Woshmetoi Post Service 35 a s P ecial case f and to give 11 

WAmmrmN "four or five” years to recover from 

i m ty agreeinmt snnflar to that t h«T Sudan immediately pay 
which Colond QadhaC worked out F J 

'MSSSrS- dday«i 

ro&atod SSSn’s !a rffa 

T l cvIj j was never aware that the United 

even though Sudan is rndirc need States ^ hdd back on n ^ y 

rvf KTOiranif ■jccrtfoni'i- Wono» nf n “““ 7 ^ -* 


of economic assurance because of a 
severe dnmght 

The Sudanese leader said in an 
interview with The Washington 


$200 million in economic aid be- 
cause of Sudan’s difficulties with 
the IMF. 

Presklent Ronald Reagan an- 


Pc« that the -Libyan offer™ 

made several months ^ wten thc ^ u.S. aid to Sudan would be re- 

Sudanese ambassadm- m held sunwd akm ^ ^ m 

talks with a representative of Colo- n-. 


JcSfi. 225,000 tons in emergency food re- 

laltinff M^or General Nimeiri said that 

taltong .with him. President >5- ^ ^ ^ Colcmel Qadhafi 

Nmroiri s.idhc 

jhc Sudan i© mate ca.ua with *L7Zn 

setupago^mmeol dm. Libya 


thought Colond Qadhafi was seek- 
ing through his offer to "get inside 
the Sudan” to make contact with 


■ U^. Warns Libya 

“Because be was successful with Following up on a stmilar wam- 
Morocco, he wanted to use this ing to Iran made privately in recent 
with the Sudan," Major General weeks, the Reagan administration 



Members of the United Democratic Front talk with a Citibank security officer dur 
first of a series of protests intended to embarrass multinational companies in South . 


Soviet Starts Computer Gasses 

Politburo Says High School Training Must Begin This Year 


By Serge Schmanann in the Moscow province newspaper Western computer manufacturers 

New York Tmm Service Leninskoye Znamya that the new since the start of this year that the 

MOSCOW — The Soviet leader- course would require more than Russians may be planning large 
ship under Kfikhafl S. Gorbachev 50,000 computers. purchases of personal computers. 


ship under Kfikhafl S. Gorbachev 50,000 computers. purchases of personal computers, 

has ordered high schools to start There have already been com- possibly in the tens of thousands, 
training students in the use of com- plaints about slow production of Although Soviet publications 
puters next falL one computer to be u sed , an Apple have made no mention of possible 

According to a commumqni of look-alike called Agate. purchases abroad an article in the 

the weekly Politburo meeting Another exuert on leadline com- ™ T ® t . ls f u ® Kommnmst, the 

aftastfws sSSg SSsg 

nntpr rr\rrmMe^re nf tfndrnrs in H equipment and better service than 

°° e for sduxrfs with com pu ters, gvtot manufacturers. 

SSn ^^nnSer do It remained unclear whether the 

work, and anpthacourse on the- Soviet government would be ready 

9 £y> for ^00^ computers. spend huge sums of hard cuneii 
Computer training _has been a He revealed the existence of a see- fnr 


goal of the new education program ond computer, not previously men- 
adopted in April 1984. But the Po- tioned, called Timur. 


Iitburo instruction, coupled with a ju. _____ „ r 
directive to stut teaching the 

SSS'm ?^w Seen3< ? -° when^^d inhe^ 

Sciences, Anatoli P. Al, 


He revealed the existence ot a seo- cy m comptilers for schools, 
ond wmpuiCT, not previously men- Anothohuidle not discussed in 
tioned, called Timur. Soviet publications, but often cited 

The concern of Soviet scientists by Western experts, is the apparent 
was indicated at the start of 1984, dash between the Soviet Union's 


of perceived need for more computer 
w, literacy and its concern with secre- 


__ Aiuuuu r. /ucMUUiuv, mcioky auu iu wutau wiui xuo- 

called for efforts to rase computer' ey. Western experts have ques- 
ThpflOMnni m sweriiera ip h-flin- consciousness comparable to the tioned whether the Soviet leaders 
which is In he c^paign to eliminatfi illiteracy af- could ever allow the sort of easy 
ter the Bolshevik Revolution of access to baric data and statistics 


r* _| i P • I) _ _ m _• %red' to^eSh and 10th grades Sit* 16 BoIshevilc RevolutjQn of to f S^5 dati3n ^ *“ 

South African Protests Targeting ,9 ^ S^sSSira.^ ° 

-a s # 1 -_-w • 1 that they are being left behind the 

Multinationals Begins at Citibank w S£^^,h™, US. Begins F-16 Deployment in Japa 

press reports ihat the schools may m ° , 1 (J . m 

ed more than an hour. NeO Munro, the ride of the enemy, you profit find it difficult to find enough com- Jji Hl<Z tO KuXtl SOVWt IjUUuMD VlAsUl 
hunt’s ncrannod director and a from the enemv D liters and trained teachers to meet 


1917. that has fueled much of the com- 

There have been reports among puier revolution in the West. 

K& Begins F-16 Deployment in Japan 


Nimeiri said of Grfond Qadhafi* s 
offer. 

Libya and Morocco ratified a 
treaty of unity last September- The 
treaty called for a rotating preri- 


Washington Post Service 


has publicly warned Colonel Qa- South Africa reached the offices of 
dhan that be would be held "fully Citibank NA this week in what 
responsible” for Libyan terrorism protesters said was the first in a 


gainst the United States, TheNew 
brie Times reported Wednesday 


dency and a mutual defense agree- from Washington. 
menL King Hassan Q of Morocco Colonel Qadhai 


Hassan II of Morocco Colonel Qadhafi said Sunday in South Africa. 

, wanted the accord to that "there is no alternative to con- In singling out Citibank on Tues- 

cement Libyan support for Maroc- fronting the enemy with violence." day, spokesmen for about 40 dem- 
co in its war agains t, the Polisario Speaking in Tripoli al lhe end of onstrators asserted that the U.S. 
Front guerrillas in the Western Sa- the first meeting of the Pan-Arab banking giant and other multina- 
hara, Libya previously supported Command for Leading the Arab tional companies were indifferent 
the Polisario Front Revolutionary Forces, he praised to the plight of the country's 24 

leral Nimeiri said that the suicide attacks on U.S- and oth- million b lacks 
■ting with Colond Qa- et installations in the region. The demonstrations are intend- 

iy was “not a new "We want every one of us to say: ed to force the companies to take a 
ras “the 10th time or 1 have decided to die just to spile more critical stand against apart- 
f ji had happened. America," he said. "If we could heid and other South African poQ- 


By Michael Parks ed more than an hour. Ne3 Munro, the ride of the enemy, you profit find it difficult to find enough com- In Bid to Rival Som 

Los Angeles Times Service CStibanl^s personnel director and a from the enemy. putera and trained teachers to meet 

JOHANNESBURG — The white ; South A&ican, called it “a Mthoafr Citibank announced tiieSeptei^deadlme. Washington Post Service 

campaign against apartheid in usdnl dialome. ^t it would The Soviet Union has 60,000 seo- TOKYO — Three U.S. Air 

South Africa reached the offices of Sidney Mofumadi, the acting mzke no ^ Ioans to ^ pubIic ondmy schools, with more than Force F-16 fighter-bombers have 

Citibank NA this week in what Transvaal province president of the ^ African econo- ag ^ 1 students in the senior arrived at an air base in northern 

protesters said was the first in a United Democratic Front, told m ithas aeeressively sought busi- computer science is Japan, lie first of about 50 due to 

series of demonstrations intended Gtibani executives at the start of ^ theprivate s^torthrouch bc tau p t - Tentative plans an- be deployed there to strengthen 
to embarrass UJL, British and oth- the two-hour demonstration at lhe i(s ^ Johannesburg, Cape “ unc « d , ncw striking power against the Soviet 

er European companies operating downtown offices: "We came here Town __j rv^n it has about cduca£l0n P r0 ® ra ™ caDca for com- Union m northeastern Asia, 

in South Africa. ro^otest your indiffacccn" J20 employees hero. pgaJB™ coon- to a« m No us . eomtatja, ^ been 


shu Island by the end of July, to 


in South Africa. wotest your indiffereuc^" 2^'^toyt^Thcrc. 

In siuglingoul Gttbank on Tues- WSsy are you keeping quiet 
day, spokesmen for about 40 dem- about the massacres erf our peo- | Turn Leads Protest March 
onstraiois asserted that the UA pie?" Mr. Mofumadi said, nrferririE 

banking giant and other multina- to the recent killing by police of 19 ■ 


education program called ror com- 
puter training courses to start in 
250 schools by 1986. 


TOKYO — Three U.S. Air make up one squadron. A second 
Force F-16 fighter-bombers have squadron is due in 1987. 
arrived at an airbase in northern Th* three jets appeared over 
Japmi, |he fort of about 50 due to Misawa in formation with Japa- 
be deployed there to strawthen ^ F .j fighters, as a symbol of 
striking power against the Soviet ^ose military cooperation between 
Union m northeastern Asia. the two countries’ armed forces. 


No U.S. combat jets have been 


the Polisario Front. Revolutionary Forces, he praised to the plight of the country s 24 Port Elizabeth. Anyone assooat- 

Major General Nimeiri said that the suicide attacks on U.S. and oth- millio n Blacks. ed with tiie apartheid regime is an 

the Paris mating with Colonel Qa- et installations in the region. The demonstrations are intend- accomplice in these crimes." 

dhafi’s envoy was "not a new "We want every one of us to say: ed to force the companies to take a In a statement issued later, the 

a " and was “the 10th time or 1 have decided to die just to spile more critical stand against apart- bank said it regarded apartheid as 
2th time" it had happened. America,” he said. "If we could heid and other South African poQ- “morally unacceptable* and “dc- 
“The last time he said, 'I am bring this nation to the point where ries, the protesters said. They were plores its continuation in South Af- 
gning to pay S5 billi on to you,’ ” it possesses this detenmnation it drawn from member groups of the rica." The statement said the bank 

a i * i ■ ■ . 1 .1 . p . f fTl J - J. w m nl T ImiBjiiI ■ ■>! f n«n tl m lirfrl myirrunffl^ Ortrl nrmilrl nnnttnna 


he said. "If we ccwld 


banking giant and other multina- to the rect 
tional companies were indifferent blades net 
to the plight of the country’s 24 Port Eliza 
millio n blacks. ed with th 

The demonstrations are intend- accomplic 
ed to force the companies to take a In a stt 

more critical stand against apart- bank said 
heid and other South African poQ- “morally 


totherecent killing by policeofl? Desmond M. Turn, the Anglican Committee and the government Joesoay.wtncti was piaxmea two The Associated Press 

blacks near theto^ttSceater of bisho P Nobd Pnze wm- had ordered a high school coarse “» ^ ^ “““ HARRISBURG, Pennsylvania 

Port PifogHftth “Anyone assodat- ner< a protest march on Johan- on the fundamentals of informa- °y the Umted States and Japmias3 — The state agriculture secretary, 

ed with the apartheid regime is an “sburg’s security police headquar- don science and computer technol- res P 0I ^f 10 a .Soviet mmtaiy mnld- p enrose HaUowel!, resigned 

nranmniim m rhftw rrfmi-c " ters Wednesday m d e fi a n ce of a oev to be introduced when the next “P m r ^ 1011 - Wednesday following his second 


The Politburo communique said northern l Japan since 

that the Communist Party Central IF 2 -. 1 ** ST 1 ^ “ 


blacks near the iMis tnaTcmter of bishop and Nobd Peace Prize win- had ordered a high 


limenl Tuesday, which was planned two 
caar5e and a half years ago, is considered 


About 20 robed ministers and 30 around and thorough mastery of: 


Major General Nimeiri said erf Col- 
onel QadhafTs offer through the 
representative in Paris. “He thinks 
I am in need of money so that I wil] 


will definitely win." 

He said violence should be 
brought to bear against the United 
States and such countries as Egypt 


anti-apartheid coalition, and labor and other subjects to the South 
union affiliates. African government as forcefully 


obey his instructions. He doesn't and Sudan, which have been his 
know that in the Sudan we have chief adversaries. 


had worse famines before. We lost Ref 
about half our population, but we ened s 
didn't go to Libya." istrari 

Major General Nimeiri blamed that il 
most of Sudan's current financial ousfy. 


Rcflectzng Washington’s height- 
ened security concerns, the admin- 
istration moved quickly to indicate 
that it took Colonel Qadhafi seri- 


to (he South test detention without trial and, in technolog cal progress in this coun- 
l as forcefully particular, the detention since Oc- try ” according to the commtmi- 
tober of the Anglican priest, Geoff qo&, published Friday, 
s committed to Moselane. The call was promptly picked up 

rm," the state- Witnesses said the protesters ap- by the press. The Moscow newspa- 


union affiliates. African government as forcefully particular, the detention smee uc- try. 

Citibank, one of the most pn> as it could, tober of the Anglican priest, Geoff qo6 

gressive of the 350 UJL companies “Citibank remains committed lo Moselane. T 

in South Africa, was selected as the peaceful social reform," the state- Witnesses said the protestors ap- by i 
first target for protest because of its mem said, “and in the bank’s view peaied to have taken police off per 


up in me region. Wednesday following his second 

Twenty-one more of the jets are conviction for shoplifting a 54.99 
to arrive al the joint U.S.-Japanese cassette tape from a department 
Misawa Air Base on northern Hon- store. 


BROADCASTING TO CABL£ COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


by the pi 
per Me 


rail was promptly picceo up 
press. The Moscow newspa- 
oskovskaya Pravda said 


prominence. 


this can I 


and economic problems . on 
drought, which he said has reduced 
agricultural production to 10 per- 


“the world cannot tolerate the 
lawlessness and terrorism which 
Qadhafi so openly advocates ” Ber- 


cent of normal in many areas and nard Kalb, the Staic Department 
brought more than a million refu- spokesman, said Tuesday. “He 
gees into Sudan from neighboring should know this and be aware that 


Company officials, hoping lo continued presence in South Afri- 
avoid a major incident, did not call ca." 

the police when the rhantj flg, sfrg- Mr. Mofumadi said foreign com- 

ing demonstrators filled the lobby pames -should make thrir presence 
of Citibank's 22d-floor offices and idt “in concrete terms.” 
the corridors outside. “As long as you are indifferent. 


guard. They were not hindered as Tuesday that a program of 102 
they marched through the center of class hours in the 9th and 10th 
the dty, but caused considerable grades had been worked out with 


the dty, but caused considerable grades had been worked out with 
surprise. . the help of the Siberian division of 

In the police station's lobby they the Academy of Sciences in Novo- 
sang hymns, then Bishop Tutu sibirsk, one of the more innovative 
handed the head of the security research centers in the Soviet 


PROGRAM. THURSDAY 4lU APRIL 

13.35 FAMILY 
14J0 STAR FLEET 
15.00 SKY THAX 1 
1545 SKY THAX 2 
18.30 SKY TFIAX 3 
1730 MR ED 


''Europe's Best View' 


18J30 THE LUCY SHOW 
1830 CHARLIE'S ANGELS 
1920 SKYWAYS 
20.10 THE UNTOUCHABLES 
21.05 FUJI DOUBLES TENNIS 
22.00 SKYTRAX 


couuines^ 

He pleaded with Sudan’s crcdt- 


Libya will Jbe hdd accountable for 
its actions.” 


Officials invited the group to you will be identified with the ene- police. Colonel Genit Erasmus, a Union, 
send in a ddegation tor what mies erf the people,” he told Citi- petition while dozens of riot police The director of the Research In- 
tunied out to be a sometimes sharp bank executives who met with five surrounded the entrance to the stitute of the Academy of Pedagog- 
bul still polite discussion that last- of the demoDStratora. “You are on building. ical Sciences, V. Monakhov, wrote 


SKYCHATMEL TV AEftffRTBNfi SELLS PRODUCTS FAST- FOR MORE atfORMAWON, 

RATES. MARKETING A AUDtNCE MA COMTACT THE SALES DEPARTMENT 
SKY CHAIWEL SATELLITE TELEVtSiON PIC TEl: LONDON (01) 536 4077 TELEX 266943 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


Page 6 


• * 




NY5E Most Actives 



V0L 

High 

LOW 

Last 

AT&T 

14745 

21(6 

208* 

201% 

FPL G« 

14338 

239% 

23V* 

23% 

Am Exp 

12330 

41% 

409% 

4B86 

GHWst 

11051 

39% 

36 

369% 

AHmp 

9187 

329* 

31% 

31% 

HospCp 

8298 

43 

418k 

419% 

ITT Cp 

7974 

358* 

34% 

34% 

Unocal 

7579 

49 

48% 

48(6 

IBM 

7139 

1278* 

126% 

1369% 

Xerox 

7071 

449% 

43 

43% 

TWA 

6B9B 

1JM 

ure 

13 

CrwZel 

6687 

408* 

398% 

40 

FardM 

6612 

m 

42% 

42% 

Catvsn 

5897 

17% 

TOV% 

16% 

NtSemI 

5815 

118% 

11% 

11% 


— TO 
— l* 


Dow Jones Averages I 


Pmrim Today 

Opco Hiob Low Close 3 PJZ 
Indus 1273.96 1280.15 H61AB 1 265.66 12S4.W 

Trans 60275 607.73 5HJ6 59970 590.12 

Util 15*34 1557B 15147 U4X4 15178 

Coma 517J4 52048 51119 51*47 50945 


NYSE Index 


Composite 

Industrials 

TransP. 

utilities 

Finance 



PretlBM 

High 

LOW 

105.15 

104A3 

12873 

11773 

tesi 

9773 

55X5 

5576 

108X0 

187X7 


9772 96.12 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

utilities 

Industrials 


CRM 

7104 

69J6 

7033 


Today 


7198 

a * a 

76.17 


Previous NYSE Diaries 


Oom Pros. 


Advanced 
□aerified 
Unchanged 
Total tuues 
New HIsM 
Now Lows 
Volume up 
V olume dawn 


735 


451 

3016 

WO 

6 

39X697BU 

4*371,150 


700 


2000 

"l 


'Anil 3. 
■April 1 . 


March at 
March 30 
March 37] 


■Included m the sale* flaunt* 


My Mm •Stift 

194414 49QLT9S $910 

SISIK « 

174445 44*523 1A09 

17*567 427JB3 1.175 


\Miesda^ 


MSI. 


3pjR 


VoLafSPjM 

7&78MM 

Prey.3PJA.Y0L 

82J2L8BB 

Pi*y consolidated dose 

133,753,958 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up fo tire closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Previous AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 

251 

297 

DecHned 

280 

273 

Unchanoad 

248 

217 

Total issues 

779 

787 

New HMt 

18 

28 

Now Low* 

3 

a 

Volume up 
V olume down 

S5SS2 



NASDAQ Index 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Tramp. 


Week rear 
Close Noon AM 
27974 27184 276.18 
29*05 29578 

S3 = S55 
S3S - 

_ 25374 


217.10 

31024 

33147 

33*57 

24*65 

WW 

248-58 


Standard & Poor's Index 


I ndustr ials 

Trararo. 

UtllMes 

Finance 

Comaositt 


Pr s rh ms Today 
High Lew Close 2 PJZ 
30183 200.90 30173 199.19 
157.15 155 j04 1S*2D 15244 

81.17 tan mss bis 
20J1 3043 2045 20J8 

1BLB6 18078 18053 17167 


AMEX Sales 


3 P.M. volume 
Prev. 3 PJM. volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


*170000 

7-5*M™ 

9480000 


AMEX AAost Actives 


wanaB 

BAT 

GHCda 

Vsrtjtm 

Conast 

BeroBr 

EchoBO 

MlchlE 

Hosbrs 

CuroEn 
DomeP 
Olsten s 
TeXAE 
SFNpfA 

ASHtnC 


VOL 

tnoh 

Law 

Lott 

m 

1916 

18% 

rare 

FTfI 

4% 




14% 

138* 

rare 


78% 

7% 

. 79% 

1804 

68* 

24% 

6(6 

24% 

aft 


ure 

11% 

im 


15(6 

15 

15 


3896 

28% 

288% 


U% 

TO 


1199 

3% 

2% 



rare 

17% 

rare 


6% 

JW 

68* 

J 

786 

7% 

78% 

IWl 

1% 

18% 

1% 




AMEX Stock Index 


22970 


Previous 
Low CtaH 

77*23 23857 


ME 

moi 


k 



Q Month 
HM Lm 5tack 


Dtv. YhL PE 


51* 

DM HlohLow 


3 PJM. 
OuaLQi’oe 


JO 


111 117 
247 114 


ISO u 


140 


ZIlelZB 
.32 14 


.13 11 


164 *5 
543*107 
140 17 


828 115 
.92 7.1 12 
.14 J 9 
48 35 19 
74 IS 13 


23M IM AAR 
20% 91% AGS 
im lou amca 
18% 13% AMF 
*3f& 24% AMR 
20% im AMR sf 
351% 229b ANRpt 
14% 8% APL 
47V. 444% ASA 
27 14 AVX 

54 3686 AbtLnb .. . 

351% 164% AccoWd 8 44 
22 ra* Acntec ao Z5 
lot* 816 AcmeE 
17% is Ada Ex 
20 119% AdmMi 

191* m> AdvSys 
411% 251% AMD 
128* 69% Advest 
149% 894 Aerfltx 
479% 27V. AetnU 
50% 52% AetLaf 
34 15% Almnw 

41* 21* Attoen 

51 38% AlrPrd 140 15 

249% 13 AlrbFrf 40 M 
2 1 AiMoat 

32 26% AlaPafA 353 117 

71* 6 AlaP dpf 47 124) 

73V* 611* AloPpf 9J» 127 
791% 6m AlaP pt 944 116 
68 56 AloPpt — 

1394 II AklBOCO 
2U6 916 AlskAlr 
1494 IOT6 Albrtut 
31% 221* AIMm 
34% 211* Alcan . 

36% 271% AlcaStd 170 14 11 
32 17 AWxAlX 1X0 34 

■71* 65% AllgCo 1061 24 30 
28% 18% Atolnl 1.40 M 
229% 1516 Alain pf 119 1U 
749% 81 AfelPfCIITS 112 
3114 249% AllgPw 170 87 9 
22 15% AltenG Mb 11 13 

40% MVi AJIdCAS 1X0 *9 7 
62\* 539b AldCPPl 674 10J 
1091* 99 AUCpPflZOO IL3 
1071*100% AldC pf 1139*120 

231* 11% A lid Pd 

59V* 38 ATIdStr 112 19 8 
12% 51% AIIIsQi 
27 2D AU.TL 1J4 

351* 20% AJfrflPr j» 

40% 30% Alcoa 120 

371% 15V* Amex 70 

42V* 32V* Amaxpf 100 

33V* 2296 Am ties 1-W 

144 98V* AMopf 3L50 

2% IV. AmAor 
179% 151% A Bata- 8 

70 539% A Brand 350 57 10 

27% 249% ABrd P* 275 ltu 

709% 53 ABrdPf 247 U 

115 55% ABdcst 140 

26% 191* ABMM M _ 

26 19V* ABusPr 44 34 U 

0% 40W AmCan 270 S4 11 

341% 211* ACanpf 280 128 

48 36 ACanpt 380 64 

110 103 ACanaf 1375 127 
Iftt 16% ACapBd £20 120 



8 

19 

18% 


■1 

12% 

12 


93 

rare 

10 


3322 

1916 

188* 



42% 

48% 



20% 

308* 


2 

238* 

23% 


15 

9% 



ITS 

57% 

53 



17% 

17% 

15 

1807 

53% 

519* 

IB 

252 

23 

2216 


54 

15 

158* 

11 

53 

9% 

are 


17 

169* 

rare 


a 

17% 

17% 


217 

11% 

tare 


1551 

33 

31% 



98% 



IS 

128% 

13% 


3008 

41 

409% 



549% 

54% 

19 

3431 

33 

31% 


21 

39% 

29* 


6A8 

48% 

47(6 



308* 


33 

736 

19* 

19* 


5 

30% 

30% 


36 

716 

7 


19+9% 
12—9% 
10 % — 16 


916—1% 
52V%— lVh 
179%+ V* 
519% — n* 
22 % — % 
15% — 1% 

S%— 9% 
161*- V* 
171*— 16 

nv*+ % 

3I%— 116 
916— 1% 
rev* + 9% 
40?%— V* 
544%— V% 
329%— % 
2H+ Vk 


19%+ V% 


7V6 + V% 

160s 71 71 71 

KH 75 75 75 — % 

100l 661* 66% 661* + V* 

9 13 im I2A 

220 201% 191* 19V*— 9% 

fl 15* 15% 15% 

4V 304% 309% 30%— V6 


L20 44 10 MV9 26% 26 


41 

763 

19 

47 

10 

2 

453 

9* 

1513 

95 


3316 33 
30 29 


+ t% 


7.1 9 


34 11 


1.1 


34 15 3286 
24 1 


789% 

77% 

77%— 

re 

27% 

27 

27 — 

% 

m* 

198* 

198* 


92 

93 

92 


31% 

308* 

31 


1986 

19% 

198*— 

% 

37% 

369% 

369%— 


63(6 

62% 

62% — 

% 

1058* 1058* 10586— 

% 

103 

on* 103 


ZZ% 

32% 

32% 


5M* 

349* 

55 — 

V* 

716 

7% 

7% — 

% 

36% 

26 

36 


22% 

72% 

22% 


34V% 

33% 

34 


rare 

18 

W — 

re 

34% 34% 

MVk— 

% 


13 

243 

2 

5 


33% 25V% ACdPCV 646*214 
119% 6V* ACentC 11 

5616 43% ACvtm 140 34 12 
29% 18% ADT 
21% 15V% AElPw 
44V6 25 AtnExP 
X 14 APomll 
301% 199% AGtlCp 
121* 6 AGnlWt 
57 51% AGnl pf A 6480114 

S»* 58% AGftlPfBSLMe 74 


32 309%. 31 — % 

1351*1351*1351*— 2 
21% Z 21%+ H 
1816 18% 1IV%— v% 
67% 68V* 68% — % 

26 V* 26 % am 

701% 70 70V* — % 

14 M 1736 106 105% 105%— V. 
U 13 27 25% 21V* 25%+ V% 

73 26% 2616 26% + 9% 
«7 53% 5386 539%- V* 
4 239% 23% 239% — 16 
22 46 4596 459%— V. 

I 100 TO 108 — 1* 
53 181* 18% IM 
301% 30 301*+ 1% 

■96 81* 81*— 9% 
529% 52% 521* + 16 
2396 239% 2396 + 9% 
3196 719% 219% 

41V* 409% 4096 — 96 
271* 2716 Z7V6 
29% 289% 2896—9% 


17 
14 

1S4 

42 34 26 232 
224O104 I 1931 
148 XI 1512320 
44b 23 12 173 
1.00 24 9 723 


43 40U AOnpfD 264 

3296 25% AHerlt 148 
1316 71* AHolSt 


119% 11% 1116— 16 
549% 549% 549%— 16 
79% 77% 77V*— 2% 


5916 5696 5696 —39% 
30% 38% 3B%— V% 

.... 10 7% 79% — V* 

62V* 4696 A Home 240 44 13 1305 6196 619% 619% + 16 

X 2616 AHOSP 1.12 34 10 9109 329% 31% 31V*— 116 

841* 62% Amrtdi 640 74 8 920 839% 8316 016— 9% 

78 S3 AlnGrp 44 4 18 770 729% 711% 7116—11* 

IX 1121* AIGOPf 545 <7 1 125 125 125 —196 

28% 18% AMI 42 24 12 2586 25% 249% 2496- 9% 

5% 316 AmMot 81 999 3V* 316 316— 16 

65 2796 ANtRflS 122 X5 12 176 6496 63% 63% —1 

43% 24% APTttdd 74t 24 3 3005 191* 2196 29% + % 


13% 5% ASLFJO 
18% 1216 ASLFlpf 2.19 1X2 

16 10 AStllR 40 64 14 

359% 32% AmStd 140 5J 12 

MV* 26V* AmStOT 44 14 9 

6696 46% A5lrp<A 4J8 64 

5516 51 AStrpfB 640 1X2 4 

22% 149% AT&T 140 5J 1714745 



4 

184 

IX 


379% 20% AT&TPf 164 102 

X 31% AT&Tpf 344 KU 

2796 1396 AWntrs 
12 10 A Wot pf 145 104 

28% 2016 AmHotl 248 114 
68 5396 ATrPr 544 05 

119% 496 ATrSC 
79% 5816 ATTUn 544 74 
X 26% Ameron 140 So 
36% 17 AmesD 8 48 4 
96% 60 AflMSPf 542 54 
29% 31% Ametek 40 U 14 
28% 18% Amide 
16 B96 Amfosc _ 4 

38% 261% AMP* 42 U 
34 139% Amoco 30 Zl 

. Amrnpo 

‘ listed 140 44 12 

19% Anaanp 

XV6 199% Analea II 

3F6 1996 Anchor 148 64 
429% 24% AnOav 132 U 21 
1216 996 AndrGr 40 14 16 
2% 1616 Anoolic 46 28 11 
8096 5796 Anheus 200 24 11 
58 4596 AnlMUPf 340 63 

3016 1396 Anlxtr 48 19 18 
1691 an Anthem 34 3 14 

15% 10% Antnnv 44b U 6 
WH 916 Attache 48 ZJ 1/ 

396 % ApchPwt 

1916 15% ApchP un2JWell.l 
32 2716 ApPwpf 4.18 134 

39% 1796 ApIDta 1.121 34 16 
2% 8 APPUMB 248 

2196 15% ArehDn ,14b 4 15 2775 

21% 14% ArtxPS 240 114 

91% 71 AliPPl 10410114 
29% £3 ArIPpt 348 124 

97 79 ArIPpt 10.70 1L1 

23H 13% ArkBft 40 15 

»% M A/Mo 7X8 5X 17 1531 

Jk 16 ArtnRI 112 

1316 10% Armada X 1 

2196 796 Armco 2W0 

2996 17% Amtcpf 210 124 34 

24% 15% AoraRb 48 24 7 116 

X 22% ArmWIB IX 17 I IB 

36 29% ArmWpf 343 104 

26% 1314 ArowE 40 13 8 

2S% 16 Artra 42 J 15 

2396 14 Arvins 30 35 ■ 141 

5416 34% Arvtn pf 230 43 1 

32% 17% Asarca 739 

3196 2D% Aswan 140 55 598 

42% 33% AlhIO Pf 440 1U 5 

399% 31% AtfllOpt 356 104 2 

61% 45% ASdDG 240 44 18 150 

98 73 ASdDpf 445 SL1 X 

2596 1896 Attuono 140 85 9 4 

2516 199% AlCvEI 248 94 I 114 

52% 40% AtfRIdl 330 64 32 2787 

125 07 AtlRcpf 230 24 

20 118% AtlrraCo 

3396 18% AUOOt 
46V. 29% AlltoOt 
271* 15% AVEMC 
39% 23 Avery 
159% 10 Avloll n 
41 27 A met 

259% 1916 Avon 
35% 18 Avdln 


5% 5%— Vk 
129* 1296— % 
12% 128%— % 
3016—8% 
52f%— 16 
6396+ % 
559%+ 9% 
Mb— W 
3596+ 16 

22 2SS-1* 

1116 1196 + % 
‘ 2ZV% + V* 

66% — 16 

10% W%— % 

18% 318% 318% — *16 

^^^96=5 

36% 2696 — V* 
25% 3616 3696 + % 



1096 W% 1096+ V* 
3296 319% 31%—' 1% 


40 

230 


14 17 
14 X 
24 15 

13 14 

8 

14 14 
94 10 

11 


14% 14 14—9% 

1596 1596 1596 
145 37 37 37 — 16 

935 3% 316 396— % 

~ 26% 259% 259%— 8% 
2216 22*6 2296— 16 
4096 4016 4016— I* 
119% 1196 118% 

198% 1996 |9% 

809% 8016 BOW.— % 
5796 5796 S7%+ 16 
1516 15 15 — % 

14 1396 1396 + V% 

1196 11% 119%— % 
11% 1116 7796— W 
116 1% 1V%— V6 

18% U 18 
32V% 3116 32V6 + 16 
2996 29% 2916 + 9% 
12% 1296 1296— 96 
21% Zl% 21V*— 9k 
7 3457 228% 22% 2296 + 96 
Kb 89% •»% 0f%— 1% 
47 29 28% 73 + V* 

llOl 97% 96% 9C% 

TO 21V6 209* 2D96— 16 
21% 21^ 27j%— % 

12 12 12 — % 
78% 7 7 —8% 

17% 17 T7V* — % 
20 19V* 20 +16 

7» 3396 32% 32% — 116 
3001 35% 35% 35%—% 
46 159% 15% 1596 

25 2496 248b— M 

21% 309% 2096- % 
S8 50 30 

27% 268% 26% 

29*6 2S% 29% + % 
419% 419% 419% 

39% 2* X — % 
58% 57% X +% 
92% 92% 92%— 96 
1996 199* 1996 
25% 348% 25%+ % 
4916 48% 4896 - 96 

2 117 117 117 —2 

3 14% 14% 14% 

517x24% 23 2316—1% 

306 44% 44% 44% + % 

)0 24% 24* 341*— 96 
215 33% 339% 3396—96 
112 1496 14% 1<%— % 
BOO 3216 31 31 — 1% 

Ml 21 2096 30% 

15 22 2196 2196— % 


Sell-Off of N. Y. Stocks Resumes 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Stock prices lapsed into a 
broad decline Wednesday in a carryover of 
selling from late in Tuesday’s session. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials 
dropped 12.48 to 2,254.20 about two horns 
before the dosing. 

Losers held a 2-1 lead over gainers in the 


Although prices in tables on these pages are 
from 3 P.M. in New York, for time reasons, this 
article is based on the market at 2 P.M. 


overall tally of New York Stock Exchange- 
listed issues. 

Volume on the Big Board came to 66 million 
shares with two hours to go, against 67 million 
at the same point the previous day. 

Analysts said the market's recent sluggish 
behavior has prompted investors’ interest in 
stocks to dwindle, at least for the mommt. 

Though many analysts insist that the econo- 
my r emains healthy, talk of a possible business 
slump starting later in the year continues. 

Tlx: firm of Oppenheimer & Co. recently 
forecast a recession beginning around aria- 
1985. The economy is “losing, not gaining, 
momentum," said Oppenheimer's Franas HJvL 
Kelly in a commentary published Tuesday. 

Brokers also say there is a great deal of 
uncertainty about the future course of the Fed- 
eral Reserve's credit policy. Advance estimates 
are that the Fed's weekly report after the dose 
on Thursday mil show a large increase in the 
money supply. 

On the trading floor, AT&T was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, off Vi to 201k 


Gulf & Western followed, up IK to 37. The 
activity was linked to rumors that the Minne- 
apolis investor Irwin Jacobs may be accumulat- 
ing a position in the company’s stock. 

Trans World Airlines was third, off ft to 13. 

CBS was up 1 to 107}J. Published reports 
again said Ted Turner was trying to organize a 
takeover attempt. 

Golden Nugget Inc. said it was p lannin g an 
offer far about 25.4 percent of Hilton Hotels 
Carp, for $488 million, an offer Hilton termed 
"inadequate. 1 ’ Golden Nugget was up ft to lift. 
Hilton was np 5ft to 69ft. 

AJL Robins established a $615 millio n re- 
serve to cover daim5 related to its Daikon shield 
and omitted its quarterly dividend, was off ft to 
21ft. 

ITT Corp. was off ft to 34ft. The company 
said it would not submit any proposals from 
shareholders that encourage liquidation to its 
iirmnal me eting 

Todd Shipyards was off 5ft to 30ft, after the 
government awarded a S322- miTli on contract to 
a competitor. 

Auto issues were lower, with General Motors 
off ft to 72ft, Chrysler ft to 34ft and Ford ft 
42ft. 

IBM, which announced price cuts and new 
versions of its personal computer, was off 1 to 
126ft. 

Tandy Corp. was off ft to 33ft and Digital 
Equipment off ]ft to 102ft. 

Teledyne was off 5 to 237ft. 

Some of the regional Bell companies were 
lower following a published report that they 
may have tronble topping last year's perfor- 
mance. 






SUL 



3 PJM. 

] HtoOLDW stock 

Dhr. YhL PE 

HkHtobLow 

QuaLOfte 


718* 


LA3e 67 

8 

386 

369* 

36% 

268*—% 

179% 

9% 

BrttTpp 



49 

1716 

rare 

rare 


78% 




76 

m 

are 

2% 

2 ore 

149k 


172 7.1 

24 

18 

18% 

rare 

189k- 8* 

39 

28 

BkyUG 

2.12 87 

8 

111 

37% 

37% 

are— re 

239* 

19% 

BkUGef 

2X7 107 


2 

338* 

2286 

329% 

79 


395 127 


11 

33V* 

31% 

3Z%— % 

268* 

13 


70 .9 

9 

6 

21% 

219* 

219*- % 

30 



176 SA 

14 

IM 

3586 

25% 

25%— re 




1X0 2X 

17 

334 

44% 

44% 

448*— % 

40% 


Birawfc 

1X0 23 

8 

574 

37 

36% 

369k— 16 

408% 

35% 


A8 17 

16 

27 

358* 

389* 

358*— % 

r 

13% 

BucyEr 

A4 3X 
JO 47 

36 

7 

■1 

5 

I486 

168* 

14% 

16% 

U9*_ % 

rare + re 

17% 

15% 

BunkrH 

ZM 1Z7 


6 

17% 

17% 

17 %+ re 

21% 

14V* 



12 

71 

17% 

17% 

17%+ % 

29*h 

33 

Burl ind 

1X4 XI 

20 

109 

77% 

2W» 

a6%+ re 

588* 

35 


1X0 23 

7 

531 

53% 

519* 


78% 

6% 

BflNoef 

35 BX 


1 

6% 

68* 

sfi 51 tt 

13%—% 

508* 

44% 


5XM117 


193 

50(6 

50% 

Mii* 

138* 


J4 67 

13 

334 

14 

13% 

65% 

479% 


2X0 4X 

11 

1185 

598* 

58% 

589*—% 

209% 

12% 


32 27625 

1186 

rare 

IM* 

188* 

118% 

3% 

Batten 



36 

4% 

4 

4 

1 




C 




i 


31 


1.40a 54 13 
3X0 24 l« 
1X0 14 

340 54 49 
245 94 


1400IZX 


15 


338% 24% CBI in 
111(6 48% CBS 
48 CBSOt 
4% CCX 
27 CIGNA 
23% CIG pf 

40% 2196 CNA Fn 

44% 34% CPC inf 240 S3 IT 
23% lAkCFNfl 1X0 67 9 
27% 18% CSX 
40(6 22 CT5 
12% 796 C3!nc 
3396 2296 Cabot 
1396 8(6 Camr 
19% im Cal Fed 
47% 32% CalFd pf 435 IM 
238% 13% Comm -25b L44S3 


81 2716 2fl% 30%— 1* 
39M 109% 107% 10796+1 

1 7496 74% 7496 +2% 

2 7% 796 7H— % 
485 4896 478% 4896—96 

78 29% 29 » — 16 

U* 396 .596 


33(6 X 36%- 96 


TO% 


1X4 AA 
1X0 24 

31 

-92 34 9 
IS 

42 U 7 


419% 42% + % 
20% 2096 + % 
23% 2396— Vk 


35% 2SU. 3596—% 
9% 9% 9%—% 


2343 


1896 11% Cammi .12 
29% 1516 CRLkB M 
9% 39% CmpRo .Ml 
14V* 10% CpRpffl 240 
7316 5416 CamSP 240 J4 12 


45% 

21% 14V 


CdPoca 140 
Can PE o ” 


322 136*6 CapOfi 
48% XV% CavHM 


149% 18 


40 

144 


X 
34 11 


208 

52 

33 

2*7 

25 

5 

77 

439 

10 


1X12 2 9 10 
AO 1J 10 
2X0 94 7 
247 114 
Z10 JL7 9 
X7 J 14 


Carinas 
fOJ6 24% Corlllia 
2696 138% CaroFt 
27% 1916 COTPw 
238% 19% CorPpt 
48 35% Con-Tee 

11% 7% Corral 

44% 30% coraPlr 12D U 7 
3E16 1096 CortHw 1.22 44 10 
34% 19% CartWI 42 14 12 
16V* 916 CascNG 140 74 8 
179% 9% CastICk 
3116 1596 CltfCPf 120 
51% 28% CotroT 40 14 

27% 16 Ceco J6 34 11 

9416 «2% Catenae 4X0 41 

15 7% Censrn X4 4 

41% 32 CanM 248 48 

26% 17 Centex n 

23% 17 CenSow 2X2 OX 

2696 16% CanHwd 284 11.1 

2416 18V* CanlILt 222 M I 

19 14% CnllPS IX U 7 

24% 17% CnUaEI 1X6 OX 7 

X 29V% CLaElpf4.18 12J 

139% 7% CeMPw 1X0 UX 5 


28% 2796 X — % 
U% 13 U 
18% 1796 18% — 16 
45 4496 45 

19 18% 1«%— % 

13% 1316 1316— 16 
2196 28% 20V*— % 
4% 496 4«%—9% 
119% 119% 1196 
7196 7096 71 — 96 
429* 42% 42%— 16 
20% 2096 .2896— 16 
m 205 205% —296 
47% 47% 47V%— 96 
11 11 11 
3596 3496 3496—1 
22 % 22% 22% — % 
2157X 2716 27 27 + 1* 

21 23 22% 23 + 16 

~ 3*8% 3*96 3*96— 1% 
1016 10 1016 + % 
40% 39% 40%+ 16 

27 258% 388%—% 

33% 32% 33 — 9k 
1616 16 16 — 9k 

111% 1096 11% + 9% 
2096 »9* 2096 — 96 
3296 3196 3196— T 
23% 22% 23% + 16 
92% 9216— 8% 
M 896 


706 

44 

175 

80 


53 

37 

227 

87 

X 

44 

aai 

10 

1W7 

3 


8 

316 

93 

a 

3/4 

H9* 

9 

J) 

41 K> 

9 

332 

21(6 

7 

4S8 

2316 

6 

89* 

26 


21 14 cnSaya 

1896 io% cvrps 
14% 3v* ContrOt 
10% 796 entry Tt 
21% lBn Cenvlll 
27% 1596 Crt-taefl 
249% 17 CMtAIr 
25% 16% Clvnaln 
54 4316 Chml of 4X0 94 

109% B CtmmSD A0 44 12 
996 1 vtdrtC 


23 23 — 16 

259* 259k— 16 
It 23% 239% 234k— % 
304 IS% IM* 1896— % 
73 244* 24% 24%+ % 
30 33% 33% 33%+ 1* 
154* 1094 BM TO%— % 


44 34 18 331* 24 23% 24 + % 

1X0 VU 6 46 18% 18 18(6 + 96 

• 130 496 4% 49*. 

JO 7.9 1 54 10% 10% 1Q%— Vk 

2X0 125 9 M 20% 2096 2096 + % 

JO 3.1 10 W1 2294 229* 229% + 96 

X0 13 X 1526 II 17(6 1796—116 
A0 IX 2107 209* 2096 2096— V% 
2* 4*96 4816 48%— % 

179 89% 8% 816—9% 

223 2% 29% 2%+% 


X 1016 BMC 


A8 4X 32 


231 

*496 

r* 

50 

5* 

419% 

3816 

. 10 % 

59% 

42 

*7% 

53% 


189* Bonnet 40 1J 12 


41 


15 Bkrlnfl 32 U M 

18% Baldar M IX 15 

9% vlEaWU 
Z BMUpt 

28% BoIICp IX 2J 12 

11% BallVMf JO u 

79* BOllyPk _ 11 

30% BollGE 120 73 7 

21 BncOne 1.18 IX » 

89% BneClr n 42a SX 7 
316 BkaiTex 

39% Bandog 1J0 11 12 

29 SKtBO* 140 U 5 

43 BkBMPf 5.13*10.1 


50 12% 
35 3014 
363 un 


14 22% 
105 1% 


110S 41% 
110 39 


24% 

30% 

52% 

(6 

169% 

2* 

2496 

12% 

X 

24% 

50% 

339* 

139* 


2516 BKNY 2X4 54 i 


159*BnkVas 1X0 3X • 
MS* BakAm I JSZ U IT 
40 BWUnpt 5.19*114 
M BkAmpf OJOellJ 
1116 BkAM Pf 2X8 
239* BkARtv 240 7X 11 
3796 BankTr U0 4J 7 
1F6 BkTrpt ISO 108 
7% Banner X3e j 17 
If Bard A4 IX 12 

18 BarnGp xo ax 9 

33% Barnet IX U 9 
19% Borywr X0 ZJ 13 
896 BA5IX .!» IX 11 


17% Bauacft J8 ZJ I* 

lMk 1196 BaxtTr 37 U H 

2S% “ — - - 

3196 


3896 27*4 Bearing 1X0 19 11 
33% » BeaTCo 1J0 6X 9 


46% Brat pf 131 ax 
3096 BectnO 1 JO 15 15 
496 Better 


12 12 

3014 3016— % 
1*9* 159*— (6 
229* 22% 

196 196 

6 * i — % 

479* 47% 47%+ % 
15% 141* 1496— % 
1096 109* 109* 

Wi 40% — % 

- »% 289*— V* 

• 9 88* 9 

W 3% 39* 39% 

30 56% 5*9* 56% 

86 46 45% «% — % 

H TO Wt + 16 

11 371* 379* 378k— % 

IM 2514 23% 2596+ % 

MI 19 189* 188* 

0« «% 4386+9* 

2 7096 7094 7096— 16 

9V 15% 159* 15% 

22 308* 309* 30%— % 

B7 *496 5316 6316—1% 

4 23% 2316 2316 + % 

10 TK* UP* 108* — Vk 

HI 2f 2896 B8h— % 

■ 2Z1A 2214 2216— % 

4996 4*94— % 
22 % 22 % 

119% 1196+ % 
2*16 24% — 14 

15% 158h— 16 

2196 2196— 16 

30% 3016—9 
34(6 3414 + % 

54% 56% 54% * 

456 *8% 4Mt— 16 


206 50 
3TO 228% 


80 119h 
94 268* 
Z192 16% 


22 
32 31% 
12 34% 
*51 30% 


155 


9% Betcerpf 

170 

167 





21V* BfriHwl 







Tire BUHwP 







44 MIAtl 

6X0 






27% BCE O 

278 













27U BeOSoi 

2X0 

73 

8 

2062 

359* 


358* BcfoAH 

XO 

IX 

21 

116 

54 


209* BeflllS 

u» 

06 

11 

39 

289* 








36% 

xre Bcncfef 

4J0 

12J 


4 

3416 

34™ 

33 EUMfDl 


127 


n 

37 

37 

17 B*nef pt 

Z50 



270. 

20(k 



72l 





SV» 

7(* Bergen 



14 



23 

3% Berkev 



31 

W9 

t 

5% 

10U SrttPd 

74 

19 

25 

334 

129* 

12% 


— % 


■316—1 


3*16+16 
37 +J 


14% BttlStt AO ZJ 
37(6 Beftistptsxa II A 
189% BethS! Pt 240 1U> 

21 Beverly J2 .9 1 ? 


m* Blglbr JO 34 14 

U% Btocftn 


* 2 S im re**- u 

2 4316 43 43 — % 

16 2116 71 31 — % 

— 33^ 33ffc _^ 


17(6 BloetD X4 3X 11 
2096 BICfcHP IJ2 64 I 


1596 BoMBer .10 A 29 
52 Borden 2J2 34 U 
16% BgrgWO .92 44 9 
416 Burnuis 

35 BosEd 124 IX I 
9 Base or 1.17 1U 
10% BasEpr 1A4 UX 
14% Bowtrn 71 U I 
25% Brig SI 1X0 54 9 
43 BrisIM 33 17 

316 BrltLna X 


4750 2796 
520 1796 
3791 21(6 

74 3016 
107 22% 
48 90% 

5633 41 
500 38(6 
135 2496 
142 71 
XI 219% 
X 6% 
134* 3196 
W 1016 
I 129% 
812 72 

75 299% 
3053 57% 

7 4% 


27% 224%+ % 
179* 1796+ 16 
5 DU 71%— 1* 
29% 30%+ U 
229% 2296+ % 
49% 499k— 9* 
58 58% -7% 

37% 37%-% 
2596 2596— % 

208* 2091 — 9% 
«* «%— % 
3816 389*-“ 9* 
10 % 10 % 

129* 129% + % 
21% 2J9%— 9% 
29% 29%-% 
57 57% — % 

4% 4% 


J®* 1% WQirt Pf 19 2% 2% 29* 

55% 359% cnose 180 7A 6 5692 5196 5116 51%— % 

44 359* Cliaiepf 5JS 12A 4 42% 429* 4Z%+ 16 

58 4J Chase Pt 643el22 35 539* 539* 5J%— 9* 

578* 51 Chase Pt 9J0el7X 22 539* 539% 5M— V* 

3f6 ay* CJiemed 142 JJ 13 

«. 23% ChmNY 2A8 *7 6 


1J4 3X 10 
2XD 6J * 
2X0 69 8 
15 
61 


.10* X 7 
J3t 34704 
A» IX 
U 


39% 31% Cbesde 
3896 31% CtwsPn 
4016 2916 Chevrn 
36% 179* CNWst 
200 IM CMMIw 
75 53% Chi Ml pt 
2696 169* Chi PnT 
IS TV* CbfcFuil 
«% 299* ChrtsCr . .. 

11% 1016 ChCftPt 1X0 
12% 5 Christn 
13% TOt Chroma 
3«* M% ChrvMr 1X0 29 3 
429* 34% Chubb s 2J0 38 14 
30% 2296 Church JO 2.1 17 
19% 119% Chrcti w< 

46 «% Chi Bell 3.12 7J ■ 

159* 8% ClnOE 2.14 135 A 
24 CMGpf 4X0 137 
2*9* ClnGpf 4J5 13X 
SO OnGpr 


MS J0% 79Vi 2«4— % 
2796 37% 37% — 8* 


3 

63 

57 

1 

11 

30 

3244 

361 


31 

37 

68 % 

54 

59 

2816 

35 

31 


37 dnGPt 


CtnSpt 


M ClnMU 
219% r 


7 JO 144 
7A4 143 
942 145 
72 3.1 29 
74 22 15 
Xfl J 16 
14 

2J5 5J 7 


... .. ClreiK 

}*96 ClrCItY 

73V. 1416 arcus 

47% 27% Cltlern ... 

86 58% atlcppf 8.1M1CL4 

44% 339* Cltylnv 9 

48 » Ctyinpt ZOO 34 

25% 2196 Ctylnpf 2X7 117 
10% 4% aablr 73 *4 7 
36 239* CloricE 1.10 37 19 

1* *% ciavHm 14 

22 % 17 ervat us u 1 

21 1396 CtetrEI 243 12.1 4 

Civ El Pt 740 UX 
15% 10 ClevwK XO 47 
17% 15% Ovpbpl 273 132 
20 1494 Clvpkpt 1X4 112 

348* 32% Clare* 120 34 II 
71% U96 aubMn 
31% M chrottp 
is awtPt 
21% 12% Coachm 
44% 23% coastal 
?*% CstiPl 
«% J*% CstlPf 
W6 53% Cocoa 
W% M> Caieco 
3* B)6 Cotemn 

26% M% catePai 

CotoPot *SS 10.1 
1JJ* CotAHtS 44 U I 
22% TO* CM Ml 1 .16 3 16 

3»* 209* CMPM 140 5.1 9 
£%> 39% CMlind 240 43 10 
g 2546 CM Gas 3.18 114 8 
4096 CalGepf 5A8 I1X 


.10* 4 18 
1X0 SL3 10 
1X0 52 
AO 27 9 
A9o IX 9 
l.lf 2X 
1X3 4X 
2X6 42 14 


170 4J 12 
178b SA 2i 


«9* 45% CMC* Pt 5.17 107 

« COIGsaf 5X8*1 IX 
'SS? E. 0S0pfnU2S IO 

Si 5SS 1 2 . 1 * £0 9 

CmbEn 1X4 57 18 

IT 6 ,* 20 1 j re 

» 15% ComMtl JA 2.1 14 

»* TO6Cerwm* ■> 

**i 31% CmwE 
30 21% CwE ft 

It** 13. c«*ept 

” 1J% CwEgf 

X% 20% CwE pt 
» 44, Cwtnf 

25% 1416 ComES 
778* 3096 Comsat 
34 18% CPsves 

36% 2* Comagr 
17% 11 campsa 
4416 1AH CPtVln 
309% 199% CoaAae 
23% UUi Canalr 
188% 1396 CoctbE 8 1X0 
X 19% CmNG 2X0 


179% 10%% Conroe 
32% 2J9* cansEd 


3X0 10.1 7 

IAS 4J 
120 124 
2X0 1Z4 
2J7 1IX 
724 124 
U M I 
120 22 II 
24 J 24 
JO 17 II 

« 8(14 
74b IX IS 
"* 9A 8 

57 10 


.40 10 
240 7 X 


12 34Tb 149% 34% 

704 32% 32 32 — % 

1588 35 349* 348k— 16 

533 19% If 19 

11 14996 149% 14TO6 + 96 

21 719* 71 71%— % 

Z»* 2316 239*+ % 
9% 9(6 TO*+ 16 
41 478* 479*+ (6 

11% 11% 1116— (6 
TO* 1086 1096 

ion 10 % 10 % — % 

358* 3*9* 349*— % 
58(6 58 SB — % 
W in* 38 38 — % 

4 1916 1916 1916 + % 

13 4396 439* 439* 

M7 159* 138* 15% 

W0l 2916 29% 2916— % 

30z 35% 35% 35% +1 
100Z 54% 44% 44%— 9 
269Hz 52% 51% 52 — % 
3S8r 65% 65% 65% 

159 ZM 23 33 — % 

185 3496 34% 34% — % 
400 27% 2496 268h— % 
119 229* 2216 23% — % 
1303 429* 4216 42% — 8* 

2 7S% 71% 78% + % 
3282 38% 31 3Bt+ % 

9 59 St 59+1 
128* 2496 24% 249* 

If 79* 79* 79k— % 
397 388% 10 30 — 96 

* 1296 12% 12% — W 
7 188% 1886 1896 
1439 21 2096 208* 

MOl St 57 57 

76 1296 1296 1296 
T7 16% 16% 16% 

19 M% 16% 1<%— % 
347 34% 34% 34% 

12 20% 3016 2016— % 
833 31% 30% 3Q%— 86 

11 20 1916 19%— 96 

1213 IS 14% U9h— 9* 
1837 4186 319* *186— 86 

3 44% 45 *6 — 1% 

5 45% 45% 4816— 2 
lira m 6886 69 —8* 

tea 148t 14% 1416— Hi 
46 28% 271* 28 
795 34% 2386 338%—% 
2B0Z 42 42 43 — % 

331 219* 21% 21% 

SO 2196 21% 21%—% 
U 279* 278* 27% 

ZD » 58% 5*%— 96 

2081 2*9* 27* 28 — % 
2 SO 50 50 — % 

1 48 48 4< +9* 

5 508* 9P6 508* — 8* 
130zl0796 107% 107% — 1 
129 44 41% 43%—% 

308 35% 34% 34% — (fa 
an VS% 158* 15%—% 
3* 17% 17% 17% 

lira 18% 104* 1086 

9U »Jfc »6 8996+ % 
1 3996 2986 2986 
1 15% 15% W% 

14 14% 1* HV%+% 

A VU IfU 

W0r 58% 58% 54% +1% 

12 348% 2* 249*+ % 

844 nv, 30% Jflk— % 

- 3 1 2196 31%— 9* 

3186 31% 3196+16 
15% (516 1516—% 
17% M% 1416— % 
90% 298% 30% — V* 
ZM 2316 2316— % 
17 17 17 + % 

95% 25% 2586 + 8* 
13% 13% 13%— % 
92% 5186 91*9 — % 


427 

22 

N 


ttt 

m 

u 

29 

82 

two 


U Month 
Hhh Low S tock 


Otv.YkLPE 


*, 

MMHMiLmt 


JPJYl 

QuOtOitje 


43 35 

448* 38 

36 20% 

46% 31 
10 4% 

94 13 

28% 1316 
45% 23<6 
46% 2586 
258% 11% 
218* 916 
228* WH6 
4586 258% 
238% 11V* 
23% W8k 
15% 716 
MVk 7 
94% 11 
15 716 

43 23% 

10% 4% 

416 8% 

48% 19 
4V% 8* 

TOk 4% 
24 18 

38(6 248* 
40% 33 
338% 239% 
3% 1 
34% 948% 
379* 30 
27 12% 

209% 129% 
249* 12% 
21% 118* 
2716 1916 
279% 17% 
1516 108% 
40 30 

45 22% 

44% 4286 
9% 416 

37 92 

78% 38% 
27V. 1616 
22 15% 

21% 19% 
a 3486 
429* 2786 
51% 43 
65 E0 
2916 199* 
339* 12% 
88% 4116 
109% 016 
5216 27% 


ConEpf 44S 1TJ 
ConEpt 5X0 114 _ 
CnsFrts 1X0 34 10 
CraNO 2J2 5.1 9 
ConsPw 4 

CnPPlA 4.14 17J 
CnPpfB 440 177 
CnPptO 745 nx 
ChPpfE 732 114 
CnPprV 440 104 
CnPprU 3X0 187 
CnPprT 378 I&I 
CnP pfH 7X8 184 
CnPorR 4X0 10J 
CnP or P 340 19X 
CnP arM 240 177 
CnPprL 223 177 
CnPprS 4X2 1IX 
Cap prK 243 UX 
CirttCp 2X0 4X 7 
Conti 1 1 
Canlllrt 
cntillpt 

CtitHdn 

Cm Info 4 


CotitTel 172 74 ^ 


CtOata 72 24 
ChOlPf 440 rex 
Conwd 1.10 37 11 
WCoofcU 

COOPT 142 5.1 14 
CoaM pf 270 04 
COopUt X3e 7 9 

CoorTr X0 ZD 8 

Caopvts A0 IX 14 
CamtW A4 37 
£pwtd pt 248 124 
Comoro X4 17 17 
Comtn 44 43 12 
ComG* 178 34 14 
CortUk 1X0 13 _ 
CaxCm J4 X 20 
Craig 

Crane 1X00 47 11 
Cray Us 32 

CrocfcN A0 IX 
CrofcN Pt 2.10 114 
QwK 170 57 9 
CrwnCk 11 

CrwZel 1X0 24 15 
CrZMpf 4X3 10X 
CrZel pfC440 7J _ 
CM bra JO 24 7 
Cuflnsti 35 

CumEn 270 37 3 
Corrlnc l.lOdllX . 


1301 41 
3 43% 
214 298* 
110 45(6 
8S0 4% 

220z » 
loos as 

2SDz 4216 
SOI 43 
25 23% 
5 199* 
73 20% 
100s 41% 
20 211* 
IX 21% 

3 14% 

4 13 
XI 218* 

8 1386 
1580 2996. 
96 8% 

an 2% 

4 44 
235 II* 
20 M 
1052 228% 
957 30% 
500x 37% 
209 308* 

in i(* 

410 308* 
139 38(6 
132 149* 

a ire* 

1129 22% 

1 73 
13 198* 
64 25% 
12 128% 

326 348% 
11 43% 
la 41% 

2 8% 
404 3416 
330 47% 
157 25% 

2 19 
4 31 
45 5296 
6407 4896 
352 479% 
UO 42 
15 2896 
1904 278* 
*27 72 
20 10 
127 52 


<1 41 

43% 43% 

29 29(6 

45 45V* — 96 

48% 68% 

24 24 + % 

26 24 

41% 4216+ 86 
42 42 

23Vk 21(6 + % 
1916 19(6 + 16 
20 »+ 8 * 
41% 41% + *6 
21 2116 + 1* 
20 % 21 + % 
14 14% + 8% 

13 13+16 


21(6 21 *% + % 


13% 13% 

398* 39H— % 
8*6 ffVk + V* 
296 296 
44 44 —16 

1 lHr+ t* 
VU 816— (6 
2296 22% 

2TO* 29%— 8* 
37% 3716 
30 30 + 16 

116 116—'% 
299* 2996 — 9* 
34% 348* 

14% 14%-- 
199* 1996 
219* 218%— 8* 
12 13 

1996 W86— V6 
25% 25% 

128% 128%+% 
34 34%— 8% 

4316 4316— % 
*1 4114— % 


8»* _«% t % 


3396 33%+ 

44 46 —116 

259* 2596 + % 
» If 
21 21 
529* 529*— 8% 
3TO* 40 —18* 
44(6 44% — 1% 
418* 418*— 29* 
28% 2B%— % 
24(6 26% —IV* 
48% 481% —48* 
9% 10 + (6 
508% 52 +1 






O 




» 

23V* 

138* Dallas 

M 

18 

9 

122 

20% 

20% 

am— re 

raw 


70 

1.9 

49 

25 

lore 

M% 

1086+ I* 

30% 

21% DonaCp 

178 

47 

■ 

153 

a/% 


2716— 8* 

8% 

5% Donats- 



44 

17 

7% 

/% 

7% 

15 

8% Daniel 

.180 u 


340 

rare 

11% 

1186+ % 

94% 

7086 DartKr 

474 

4J 

10 

542 

fare 

92 

92 - re 

76 

39% DataGn 



12 

2318 

44% 

4286 

42% —ire 

25% 

13% Oatpnt 




1817 

16% 

1516 

1586+ re 

iare 

8V. DtaDM 

70 

SX 

11 

64 

10% 

10 

10%— % 

1986 


74 

17 


300 

19% 

19% 

198*+ % 

3986 

36% DavtHd 

JA 

1.9 

18 

981 

38% 

38 

38%— % 

16% 

119* DavtPL 

ZXO 

12A 

/ 

405 

16% 

15% 

16%+ (6 

33% 

27% Deal Fa 

36 

19 

15 

7B 

2984 

2916 

2986+ % 

33% 

2*9* Deere 

1X0 

32 

17 

Ml 

30% 

39% 

29*— re 

3486 

17% DtlmP 

172 

87 

9 

72 9x 2386 

23re 

23%— % 

4896 

27 DetfoAr 

XO 

17 

7 

MS6 

45% 

4486 

44(6—1* 

8 

«U DeHona 




49 

5% 

5% 

58%— V* 

34% 


72 

29 

16 

176 

32% 

32% 

32%— V* 

38V* 

rare DenMfs 

170 

5.1 

10 


33% 

33% 

23%— re 

37% 

268* OeSata 

1X0 

XI 

9 

29 

33% 

33% 

3386 

rare 

11% Dated 

1X8 

I0X 

8 

4863 

17 

16(6 

1686+ 16 

72% 

59 DetEpf 

972 

1Z3 



70 

70+86 

619% 

47% DetEpf 

7X8 

111 


40Z 58% 

58% 

58% 

59(6 

46 pefEPf 

7A5 

137 


wta »re 

56U 

56(6— 16 

60 

45% DetEpf 

7J36 

137 


400* 55% 

55% 

55% 

rare 


024 

I3X 


TO 

as 

24% 

25 + (6 

259% 

198* DEpfQ 

113 

110 


V 

24 

238* 

34 + V* 

25V6 

19 DEPfP 

112 






24 — re 

24(6 

1916 OEpfB 

Z75 

11A 


3 

24% 

24% 

24% 

27% 

19% DEpfO 

ZXO 

107 


49 

36 

2S86 

35(6 + % 

2716 

19% DEplM 

3X2 

112 


14 

25% 

25% 

25* 

31% 

24% DEPTL 

4X0 

13J 


9 

29% 

39% 

298*— % 

31% 

24% OEPtK 

112 

117 


30 

30% 

295* 

a 

18% 

13(6 DetEpf 

278 

12X 


3 

17% 

rare 

17*+ % 

24 

17% Orocrar 

JO 

37 

11 

104 

21 (fc 

2116 

2116 + 16 

1596 

9% DIO For 

X4 

47 


66 

IS 


15 

229* 

1686 bknnS 

176 

97 

11 

3332 

198* 


19V*— V* 

3M* 

34 re OtaShpf 

AM 

70S 


27 

37% 

37V* 

371k— U 

59 

45 DUfetoi 

1X0 

IT 

12 

111 

52% 

51(6 

52 — % 

135% 

77(6 DfoiJn! 



12 

2774 

f04** 101 % 102 % -are 

81% 

4516 Disney 

170 

IX 

59 

533 

77 

76V. 

76(6— * 

42 

30 DEI 

ZXO 

67 

6 

16 

43 

41% 

42 

614 





206 

sre 

5% 

S%— (* 



.12 




9% 

8% 

9 — Vh 

30% 


272 

M 

• 

432 

29% 

29(6 

298k— V* 

21% 

16 Dencdd 

X6 

18 

8 

9 

i/re 

17V* 


56(6 

348* Donley 

1.16 

11 

16 

412 

55% 

5486 

5486— % 

37 


170 

46 

13 

46 

26 

a* 

a 

42% 

3ZUi Dover 

73 

27 

13 

560 

35% 

36 

36 V*— u. 

31% 

2586 DowOl 

1X0 

6X 

9 

30» 

28% 

a 

a — re 

51% 

36(6 DowJn 

71 

17 

31 

180 

42% 

42% 

42%— % 

13% 


70 

4X 


33 

12% 

12% 

rare— re 

23W 

15(6 Draw 

XO 

19 

TO 

1579 

20% 

20% 

ao% — re 

19 

ixre DrexB 

ZOO 



16 




499* 


Mb i.i 

12 

112 

45% 

45 

45 — % 

545* 

43(6 (toPsnt 

3X0 

58 

9 

2274 

52% 

51% 

si%— re 

4416 


470 107 


6k 43 

42 U 

4286— V* 

3316 

23(6 DufceP 

2X8 

7J 

• 

1013 

33 

32% 

32 % — re 

69 


7X0 1IX 


20* 67 

67 

67 

asre 

21% Duke pf 

2X9 IDA 


10 

258* 

25% 

25(6+ V* 

34 

21 Dufcepf 

IBS 11J 


1 

33% 

32% 

32%+ V* 








73 

51(6 DurtWd 

1X8 

27 

21 


70% 

AH* 

70H 

16% 

11% DuoLT 

2X6 127 

7 

446 

16% 

TO 


16% 

12% DuQPriC 

Z.1Q 114 


2 

15% 

15% 

15% 

17* 


Z31 

116 


m to 


ra 

58(4 

43% Dun of 

770 UX 


14602 56(6 

5516 

5616 +116 

raw 

8% Dv co Pi 

xo 

4X 

10 


12% 

12% 

12% 

2514 


M 


12_ 

25 

25% 


35 

H E t 

WTM 







27% + re 

Biii 





4 

178* 

17(6 

rare 

■ . 

2 ire C5yst 

70 

17 

14 

543 

29 

27(6 

2784-1% 


B> EealoP 

1JM 

4X 

■ 

18 

22% 

22% 

22%+ % 

199* 


A4 

27 


286 

19(6 

18% 

T9V.+ tt 

7% 





2300 

7% 

6% 

6*— re 







2% 

3_. 

ire 





1 



15% 

6% EbAItpS 





IS 

ure 

1486+ % 








lfi%— % 

19% 

996 EAlrefC 



51 

19% 

18% 

1B%— 16 


21U EaslOF 

170 

56 32 

3SS 

33% 

22% 

21 % ~ re 


12% Eestutl 

1.94 10A 

7 

a 

18(6 

18% 

lire— v* 


60(6 EMCad 

3700 47 

12 

204 

69* 

68(6 

*8(6— % 





7 



51% 


30% 

30V* Ectilla 


U 

TO 


27% 

26% 

27 — (k 


20V. Bcfcerd 

1X4 

u 

11 


28 




31% EdlsBr 


4J 

10 



»% 



!? EDO 






MV* 

16**— 16 


19 Edword 

xa 

27 

30 


31 

29% 

30%—l% 


19(6 EPGdPt 275 MX 



22% 

K-ii" 


29% 

35% EPOpf 

175 112 


7 

28% 

28% 

28%+ % 

15% 

9% EIToro 



IS 


15% 

14% 

148* 


39% ElecAS 




17 

4% 

M 

48*— % 

are 

4% EMM 



88 

926 

5% 

8% 

886 + % 

rare 


1X0 

9J 


3 

lore 

1016 

3016+ re 

28% 







ZM 

zm— re 


1114 CIO In 

xa 

57 

18 


15 

15 

IS 


5% Etoelnt 








7814 


ZXO 

17 

13 


Mre 



14% 

5% EmRad 

74t 6J 

17 

339 

I486 

138* 

13*—% 


lire EirvvA 

70 

2X 

11 

>1W 

rare 

ra% 

17 % + re 


24% Emtrort 

1Mb *S 

9 

90 

sore 

79 

» — % 


ure ernpo* 

176 

67 

7 

19 

1986 

19% 

rare 



JO 1DJ 


SOU 

4% 

At 

4(6— V* 

i 9k 





934 


V* 


3296 

229k Bneica 

73 

27 17 

132 

29% 

29% 

29(4— re 

3816 

18W EntsBu 

76 

16 

13 

33 

34% 

348* 

348k— re 

29% 

17% Enserdi 1X0 

14 

17 

673 

29% 

a to* 

a8i— re 

58 

51% EroOiPf AMsllX 


TOCO* 55% 

55% 

55% + % 

107 

918* Erocfl ofl 17*eUJ 


i» un 

in 

in —i 

3V. 

M* Ensrce 



24 

77 

216 

2% 

3% 

21% 





73 

II 

ion* 

10*— * 

28 

16% f stxE n 

IXTbUJ 


195 

17 

IM 

76%— % 


1* Entmln 








26% 

15% EealxB 



IS 

8 

asre 

2SK 

258*+ re- 

6% 





71 

6 

5 re 

4 — Vk 

rare 

11% Eamkpf 271 

UX 


7 

16% 

168% 

TO% + % 

411% 

28% EetRee 

L72 

4.1 

7 

185 

43 

41% 

iire— % 

14% 

9% Eoulttn 

.12 

IX 

• 

22 

TO 

11% 

11 % 

14% 


70 

26 

M 

85 

in* 

11% 

ure 

22(6 

are Bnsrn 

A4 

27 

11 

143 

rare 

1786 

17* 

24% 

15% EssexC 

7Sbl4 

13 

43k 24 

23% 

23%— re 

31% 

20% Citrine 

72 

M 

10 

77 

22(6 


21H— % 


n Month 
High Law Stock 


SB. 3PJL 

Dtv. YM. PE HttWohLow OuttOiVe 


1986 10 Efftyfs 
786 186 vIEvanP 
«% 2% WEvanpt 
13% 4(6 vIEvnpfB 
4186 30 EnCtoO 1X0 


1486 138* Exeetsr 
508* 30 Exxon 


1X6*114 
63 


11 2342 1946 10% 15% — % 

ire 2 % 2 2 % 

32 3% 3V% 3% 

5 49* 4% 49*+ H 

44 9 13 36 3596 3596— M 


12 1596 159* 1586 
7 4400 4796 49% 499* 


II 

616 

fh ind 



2 

2 

9% 

9% 

9V. 

6786 

43% 


270 

25 

51 

615 

63* 

6186 

63 — % 

23% 

17% 

FPLGp 

1X8 

Zl 

10 14338 

23% 

ZK* 

33V6 

13% 

9% 

FoOCfr 

at 

2A 

16 

9 

lire 


11 %— re 

148* 

9% 

Facet 




9 


138% 

13%— % 

308* 

15% 

Falrchd 

JO 

47 


9M 

jo* 

rare 

14%+ % 

39* 

33* 

Pedro of 

ZXO 

9X 


a 


are 

36% + % 

168* 

9% 

Fa! rid 

.18 

17 

9 

62 

ure 

14 

14 — % 

2416 

wire 

FamDie 



25 

137 

31% 

2116 

3116 

198* 

I486 

Fonstel 

X0 

U 

12 

2 

15* 


i5%+ re 

33(6 

33 

FrWstF 



5 

5 

as 

28% 

a% + % 

are 

14% 

Farati 

J8 

48 

8 

14 

18% 

18% — TO 

13 

88* 

PoyOra 

70 

ZO 

17 

64 

108* 

10V* 

10(6— % 

7 

416 

Fnton 



8 

148 

8% 

5* 

s%— re 

378% 

29% 

FedtOi 

1J4 

5A 

7 

70 

& 

34% 

348* 

45% 

278* 

FedEx? 



27 

9K 

25% 

35% — Kt 

39 

29% 

FdMoo 

152 

47 

10 

50 

« 

358* 

are + re 

198% 


FedNM 

.16 

IX 


1832 

1516 

1584— 86 

27 

16% 

FCdPBs 

70 

3X 

6 

33 

18% 

1816 

rare 

73 

16 

FmfRIt 

1A4 

45 

14 

33 

72 

21% 

23 — Ik 

198% 

13* 

FdSanl 

XO 

4.9 

12 

at 

16% 

ure 

16(6 

578* 

42% 

FadDSt 

Z54 

4J 

8 

aii 

SA 

55% 

55% + TO 

29* 

22(6 

Ferro 

1.7TI 

4X 

TO 

34 

are 

26 

36(6 

37 

3516 

Fldcst 

2X0 

6X 

18 

183 

39% 

29%— 86 

rare 

4 

PlnCoA 

ASI 



1773 

7% 

6% 

686— re 

5% 

3% 

FlnCp el 

X0 137 


3 

4* 

4* 

4* 

47(6 

78* 

1416 

2% 

sar 

5339322 


St 

at 

31 

30% 

4% 

30K— % 
4%— % 

19* 

18 

FTrssfn 

M 

44 


719 

m 

18 

lire + 1 * 

21(6 

13% 

Ft All* 

XO 

15 


84 

30 

19% 

19% — % 

35 

21(6 

FBkSvs 

1X0 

4J 


321 

338% 

32* 

33 + V* 

a 

35% 

FBkFta 

170 

U 


3 

34 

33% 

34 

71% 

34% 

FBast 

170 

17 


95 

69 

68% 

68(6— % 

27 

18% 

FstCMc 

172 

6X 

11 

655 

22 

218* 

21%— TO 


1049* 06 PChlntCtOTODllJ 
1986 1316 FtBTex 178 SX 
51 38% Fiats pt 574*130 

21 9% Ftdty 

309* im* FFodAz .15e X 
4016 3016 Flntste 271 S.1 

30(6 21 Flrtttt pf 277 8J 

11% 716 FIMIS3 74 23 

508* 31(6 FNStB 2X8 60 

7% 4% Fat Pa 


200 40(6 
116 10 


126 18 
213 44(6 


14 3 % 
149 10% 


94 48(6 
309 716 


93V* 93% 93% + 8* 
15V* 1496 1496 - 9* 
~ 40(6 4016— 16 

986 986+ % 
1796 1786— 8* 
458% 44 —8* 
21% 20%+ 16 
lOVk 188*— % 
40% 41V* + % 
7 7(6 + % 


are 

30(6 

FstPapf 2X2 

97 


83 

38% 

are 

28%+ re 

31% 

23 

FtUnKJ 

1.93 

6J 

15 

6) 

.lore 

30% 

30%— TO 

33% 

I486 

PtVaBk 

X4 

39 

9 

207 

37 

aire 

2186— % 

28% 

U 

Ftwisc 

170 

4J 

8 

75 

26% 

are 

268%— % 

5486 

are 

FUctib 

1X0 

7X 

34 

18 

36 

358% 

35%—% 

lire 

8(6 

FbilPd 

X5* 

J 


75 

lore 

10% 

io%— re 

3416 

are 

Fit FnG s 172 

3J 

9 

485 

34 

33% 

33* + % 

47% 

43% 

FIlFpf 

4XaeMX 


B5 

46% 

46% 

46% + % 

2886 

M% 

Ftaef&r 

M 

13 

1 710 

21 

20% 

799* — TO 

39% 

3216 

Flemno 

■a 

37 

14 

349 

mk 

a 

a — % 

3316 

338* 

Flex IV 

xo 

Z5 

15 

a 

33 

3316 

are— % 

1316 

rare 

1 

1 

LL 

1X1 

3X 


44 

13% 

13% 

128% 

37* 

19% 

PllgtSf 

70 

X 

17 

M 

31(6 

31% 

lire— re 

31 U 

14% 

FloatPt 



15 

471 

25% 

26% 

26%+ TO 

40 

3986 

FtaEC 

.160 

X 

12 

1 

3886 

3886 

38(6 + re 

a 

1886 

FtaPry • 

"14 

AS 

9 

849 

2586 

75% 

25% — TO 

IB* 

11% 

FlaStl 

A0 

ZX 

13 

69 

17% 

17 

17 


7% 3(6 FlwGan 
21 U% Ftowrs A0 27 18 
22(6 14% Fluor 
5586 44 

5196 33 _ 

IM 10(6 FfDear 174 114 

47% 48 FtHowri 1X4 26 IS 

1516 10 FastWh A4 3.1 14 

1116 69* FoxSTP X0 74 


A0 11 
FooteC la « B 
FortM 2J® 4 J 


54 

909 


5% 4% 4% 

17% T7 17% 

2264 19(6 19% 19%+ 9% 

_ 32 54% 54 548*+ 16 

3 4412 42(6 42% 429*— 9* 

21 118*118*11%+% 
43(6 62% 42% — 86 
14(6 14(6—% 
9% 9V% — (fa 


400 I486 
20 9(6 


35% 259% FOXbro 1X4 39 77 295 27% 36% 27 +16 
118* 486 PMOG 278*25.1 142 99* 9% 9% 

25(6 13% FrptMc X0 2J 14 1999 21% 2184 21%— 9* 

349* 20% Frtptrn ..ifi 27 14 100 2584 

2S8fa 19 Fruehf* X0 ZJ 5 

32% 25 FruMpt sum 7X 

349* 20 Fuqua A0 17 9 


25(*+ % 
220 21% 23 23 — % 

19 29% 28% 28% 

427 32 31% 3186— 14 


318* 15% 
3916 2084 
37% 25(4 
34V* 19% 
7786 40% 
101* 4 


GAF 


.154 J 12 548 30% 


1 38%. 


2S- 5 * 


GCA 
GEIGO 
GEO 

. GFCp 
. 358* GTE 
248% 2216 
22K 799* 

10 4% 

5B% 34(6 
259% 189% 

309* 109* 

19% 13% 

10% 9% 

11% 10 
43% 3016 
17% 14% 

44(6 29(6 
34(6 1486 
33% M9e 
21 12 % 

84 44 Gnpvn 


OAF Of 170 XI 

GAT X 170 37 14 It 32% 

12 502 25% 

1X0 1A 11 53 73 

"3 

3X0 7J 7 2424 41 
9 24% 


5(k 

7 


GTE pf 2X0 OX 
GTEpt 240 I1A 


GatHou 

SSffi 

Georht 
Geica 
GMlJIC 
Gemili 
GnCorp 1 JOb 37132 
GAInv 1X3e 9X 




GnBcsh 1X0 24 0 
17 10 


GCbmts ao 
OCnpfa M is 


4516 40(6 GenEI 
42% 45% GnFcb 


GnOais 17 *0 


Fd* 

7 586 GGttin 

144* 8% GHosts 
17% 8% On Nous 

2786 15% GMnsr 
60% 45% 

IS 41 


2J0 4.1 10 971 61% 
-Wa 92 
70 27 3 


40% 41 +86 

^^S+S 

aLffn=S 


Wt 8 
£ 



74 27 31 
S i 10 16 OD 17 


12 % 12 % 


— % 


72 

« 3386 

52% 44% 
916 3% 
1316 71A 
74 44(6 

12% 5 
53% 39% 
12 986 

12% 10 
B% 5(6 
2016 13% 
23% 15 
2Z% 14% 
36 24 

278* 18 


GnMflli 274 19 14 1494x 58 
OMgt 5L00r 4.9 5 4873 73% 


763 61% 
3 37% 
16 51% 


OMEn .180 J 
GMOtfri 375 9J 

GMotpt 5X0 93 

GNC .16 2A 20 102 7 

GPU 4 165 1216 

Gen Re 1X6 21 22 SK 74 

GnRefr 4 

GnSlonl 1J0 4.1 12 

GTFjpf US TIA 

GTFlpt 170 10J 

Gmsco 
GnRod .10 
Gwulg 1X0 

Gsrpt 1X0 87 _ . . 

GtnuFt 1,18 3X IS 336 32% 
GoPoc XO 3X 23 1471 22% 


44 119* 
Ml 44 
3001 11 
20(ta 12 
13 133 58* 

X 24 TO 17% 
52 21V* 
22 


20% 22% GaPw pi 3X4 12X 
30 25% GaPwpf 376 13X 

21 17% GaPwpf 2X6 ISA 

21(6 17 GaPwpf 2XZ 12.1 
25% 21(6 GaPwpf 275 11.1 
66% 52 GaPwpf 7X0 
30% 2DV* GerbPs LI6 
23% 12 OerbOa .12 

12% ■(* GlantP 

11 596 WbrFn 

27 1696 GlffHHI 52 

5996 429% Gllletle 2X0 
1786 nv* G lease 
TOk 48% GMblM 74 
24 1786 GfoDMpf 3X0 

128% 8% GMNuo 
496 196 GldN wt 

299* 11 GhtWF 
36(6 2*9* GdflCh 
29% 33 Gaodvr 
19 1386 GordnJ 


22 
5 29 
13 209% 
2S% 


»«#=* 
57 57 — % 

729* 7286—% 
6016 60(6—9* 
37% 37% + 16 
50% 51% + 8* 
686 68fa— % 
12% 12% 

7486 7486— 1 
11(6 11 % 

43V* 43% + % 

11 11—8* 

12 12 + (6 
5(6 514—% 
16(6 14%—% 
21 21% + % 
20 % 20 %—% 
129% 32% + % 
22(6 22% + % 
2696 24% + % 
2886 29 


II 


20(6 209* — % 
208* 2086 


1 + 8% 


77 24% 248* 2*%+% 


13X 


90fe 

61 

60 

60 — 


3.9 

n 

563 

30 

29% 

298%— 

% 

X 

u 

117 

19(6 

18% 

19 




25 

11% 

11% 

11%— 

TO 


5 

1181 

I0TO 

10 

10% 


Zl 

1* 

59 

24* 

24% 

»%— 

% 

4A 

11 

344 

5916 

58% 

58*— 

% 



26 

1216 

»% 

12V* 


57 


3*8 

4% 

48* 

4% — 

TO 

175 


ia 

30(6 

a 

20 — 

re 


51 2935 118* 11% 11% , 

139 3% 3 3% + % 

499 29% 28% 2f%— % 
_ 140 30% 29% 29% —1 

1X0 57 7 1014 279* ZJ 27 — % 
52 37 fl 19 14% 148% 168%+% 


70 3 7 

1X4 5A 12 


32% 19 G<X>1d M 3J> 58 971 23% 2Z% 21 — % 

+m 34% Grace 2J0 AS » 148 41% 4086 4SH- 44 

69 47 Gralngr 174 ZO 13 “ — 

14% 8V* GtAFst A0 24 I 


10 13% GIAIPc 

45% 27% GtLkln 
21% 15V* GHIm 
43% 31 GfNNJt 
28% 14% GtWFln 
1986 9% GWHj 


29 41% 
149 15% 


«% 60%— 1 
15(6 15% 

17% 17% 

40% 48(6— (6 
IM U% 1886+ % 
3516 34% 35 — % 
17 10 ion 278% 27% 2716 
43 74 16 159% 1594 - 8% 


un u m 

IJSetJ 7 
1X2 4J • 


104 179% 
3 40% 



ure gmp 

173 107 

8 

11 

16% 

TO 

16% — TO 


11% Grew. 



10 

206 


26% 

2*%— % 

6(6 

2(6 G roller 



12 

W 

5(6 

S 

5% + % 

13% 

B% BrowGa 

70 

27 

17 

46 

13 

12(6 

12* 

12% 

686 Grub El 

M 

7 

IS 

388 

ra 

lire 

un— % 

a 

22% Grumn 

IM 

3J 

7 

513 

26% 

26(6 

26%— % 

8% 

416 GruntM 

.TO 

3X 


57 

5% 

SV6 

516- TO 

27% 

a GuFlfrd 


2X 

• 

52 

34 

a* 

23*— TO 

35* 

25% GlfWst 

.90 

Z4 

T211M1 

79% 

36 

36* +1 


57 GFfW £>f 

575 

97 


2 

62% 

ta 

62% +1% 

are 

11% GuTfRa 


XA 

13 

110 

15% 

15(6 

15(6— % 

30 

16% GutfRpf 1X0 

67 


5 

21% 

21% 

21% + TO 

14% 

W GJfStUf 

1X4 UX 

6 33» 

14% 

TOTO 

MU. + TO 

a 

34% Girsu pf 5X8 1X4 


90i a 

a 

a 

X 

2A GHSIjpr 3X5 129 


42 

298* 

29% 

2986+ 8* 

3386 

27 GK5U pr 4A0 137 


16 

33 

33% 

33 + % 


Otb OAmra 

Me U 




13% 


JB. 

Ji— CimOB— 


3X13 



U 


H 


49% 4% 
27% 19% 
44 26% 

1% 84 

10% 586 
3686 25(6 
139* 11% 
198* 159% 
55% 25% 
20% 15% 
Z3V6 MW 
5386 25 
30% 16% 
1286 781 
33% 14% 
35 22% 

1886 109% 


19 


338% 23% 
1416 138% 
2386 159% 
13% 8 

349* 23V* 

13% 9 
094 98* 
23% 1316 
27 1X8* 

25 159* 

49 33 

30 1 28* 

259* II 
4% 39* 

08* 118* 
37% Z7V6 
3486 159* 

29 198* 
I7V6 14% 
42V* 2B% 
114* 5(6 
44% 31% 

30 188* 
19% 12 
13% J% 
268* T7% 
649* 45% 
44% 31 
528* 35(6 
01% 5286 
27% 12 
2316 118* 

98* 7 
■416 am* 
1684 886 
6816 43*% 
64% 448* 

35% » 

34 33% 

am m% 

10 31% 

409* 30% 
30t* 22 
37% 216* 
198* 139* 
378* MV* 
238* 188* 
54V* 399* 

if a 

3316 138% 
248* 18% 
IM TO* 
21% 12% 


HRT 

HoUFB 1X0 4.1 
Hatotn 1x0 6X ID 
Holtwd XI SX 17 
Halwdpf X* SX 
Hampi 8 

HanjS 1X70109 
HOnJI 1X40 97 
Hanami 1.12 ZX 14 
Han«H X* 37 19 
Hann a A0 Z1 24 
HarBrj 17) U U 
Harinds 56 IX 20 
Honlril 28 

HrpRw JO 27 13 
Harris JO 37 12 
HorGrn 8 

Horace 178 47 11 
H Brims 178 U 10 
Hotrs* ixa ha 11 

HOWEI* 1X4 77 10 
HOVMA 70* 1 J 7 
HMWn 76 1A IS 
HaiLab 72 ZO 17. 
Heda 7B 27 
HocfoM 7S 17 37 
Hellnwi Atb 27 » 
Hedlg 76 17 12 
MSini 1X0 3A 13 
HeflWC 15 

HetfhP 74 IX 22 
Hsmca 

Hemtne .90# 7X 
Heraub 1X0 4X 9 
Herne Ale 7 S 
HerffCpf Mg SA 
HerSotn 

Hereby ias 3X « 
lie W on 

Hewipk 72 7 15 

Hexcef 40 U W 
HQhnr 60 19 14 
HIV Oil .15 17 10 
HUnbnS X4 17 13 
Hilton 1X0 ZJ 16 
Hitachi Tie 3 It 
HalKtav 1X0 1J 15 
HallyS 1X0 U 13 
HameO 29 

HmFSD I 

HnleG pf 1.10 14X 
Mmsnw TO J 44 
HnMIFp A0 27 a 
Hondo JBe J VO 
Hanweii 1.90 >7 11 
HaavrU 1X4 zi M 

KoovU wd 

Man Bn l.n UA 9 
Horlwa 

HaaaCn AO 1A 12 
HJMIO 2M 93 13 
HauanM 36 33 14 
HOUFab A8 2X 11 
Hauafnf 173 4J 9 
Heulnd ZAO MLS 4 
HouKG ZR 4J 11 
HevOR 2X9*937 . 
HawtCo AO 24 24 
Halford 948 17 IS 
Huffy AO 11 f 
HuotiTt Ai 37 


237 Ml 
414 25% 
1004 208* 
477 18% 

51 986 
77 308* 

’Of 

52 90 
114 459* 

40 20 
4 119% 
222 51 

116 30 
298 108* 

5n 301* 
748 Z7V6 
184 17% 
221 27V* 

126 3396 

4 1586 
21 219% 
It 11% 

484 3M6 
126 W* 
49 12% 
307 14% 
205 1BV6 
145 21V, 
404 47% 
24 14% 
53* 239* 

5 58* 
20 12 

3*« 338* 

un as*. 

si* 3* 

1U 409* 
54 716 

3905 14% 
4 26% 
134 17% 
120 1Z% 
751 24V6 
4250 73% 
503 33% 
944 53% 
30 79 
39* 14% 
952 238* 

117 7% 
783 24% 

19 1186 
487 54% 
975 598* 
75 34 
320 3386 

13 B16 

nre 4* 

* ai* 
370 3*16 
49 18% 
.344 3496 
1917 3M 
437 47 

re ** 

1 18(6 
£ 248* 
75 (3 
589 14% 


59* 5% 

an* 249* — % 

2986 30 — (6 
116 18* 


30 30 — % 

13% 13% 

1986 1986 
45(6 45% — 8* 
1986 1986— % 
109% 189*— % 
SOW. 51 +84 

299% 29% + M 
10 % 10 %—% 
30 30% — % 

26% 27—16 
17% 17% + % 
2686 27% + V* 
339k 3386 
159% 1586—% 
21% 218% 

11 II 

24(6 2416— 4* 
108% 109*— V* 
121* 128* 

16% UK* — % 
17% T7%— 8* 
21 21 %—% 
47% 47%— % 
14% 14%+% 
228* 23 — % 
586 5(6—% 

12 12 

23 23 — 8k 

88 28 — 4* 

I486 1*96+ % 
40 40 — % 

7 % TV*— Vh 
33% 339%— 1 
249* 24%— V* 
17(6 1781— % 
12% 12%— 14 
34 24%— % 

68% 89% +586 
32% 32%—% 
528* 339*+ 8* 
7016 79 +% 
150% U — 9% 
23 ZM + V6 
786 79% 

259* 2694— 16 
13% 1J86+ » 
539% 538k— 4k 
S8V6 sm— % 
33% 34 +9% 

OV» 3386 . 

34% 2516 + 9* 
5 5 

J|% 4196-1(6 
3816 3M + U 
34 34%+ % 

158* 188*— % 
34% 34%— (6 
23% 2396— Vh 
4416 44(6— % 


11(6 1IV6— % 
34% 24% — % 
13% 13 +4% 
I486 1481— % 


n Month 
HtahUnr Slack 


Eta. 3PM. 

Dtv. YkL PE BuBtCtfO* 


25 1714 HughSp 

33 21% Human 

27% 18% HimTMt 
418% 23% HutfEP 
27 18% Hvdral 


32 U 9 
Xi 2A 14 
JO ZO 14 
JO ZT 18 
ZOO 7A 9 


75 18% 10 T8V* 

1448 29% 2814 288*— % 

54 258% 259* £8*— % 

IM 3M 35% 35% — 8* 

77 279* 27 27 


358* 21% iClnds 170 19 12 1212 34 . 3M MV6-1 


198* 149* ICMn 
IT 9* 5(6 1CN 
JO 22% ICNpf 270 9J 
17% 14 INAIn 1.92 1U 
25% 23 IPThnn 
20% M8* IRTPri 1X0 IT 7 


34 1786 178% 178* + % 

313 109* w% urn— 3 * 

2 28 28 20 — V* 

20 1«* TJV 6 IM + % 

325 2486 24% 249*— V* 

48 20% 19% 19%— (* 


418* 209* tTTCp 1X0 29 12 7974 358* 34% 348*—% 


49 44 ITTpfJ 4X0 4X 

49 4Z% ITT pfl 4X0 7X 

22% 15(6 lUInt 770 7X 43 

418* 8086 IdahOP 378 73 8 
238* 13% IdsalB 
258* 179* inPawr 2X4 108 4 
19% 14% IIPOMPf 2.10 1VT 

n 15 llPawpr Z21 110 

32% 25 IlPawpf 3JB TOT 

34(6 21% ITWS X4 TX 14 

39% 2784 IfflaOm «e U 8 

9% 58* ImpICp 12 

149% 89% INCD 70 IX 
»n% 91% indWPfiaxo 122 
1784 14 IndMApf 2.15 12X 
T8% 149% IndlMpf 275 UX 
23% 20% IndlMpf Z7S 11.1 


1 41% 41% 41% +1 

3 648* 448* 648*+ 8* 
134 17(6 17% 17% 

47 419* 419* 4T96 + % 
321 1586 15V* 15% + % 

1251* 248* 24% 34% 

SOy 18 IS It — » 
4B0r 17 17 17—9% 

300* 31 31 31 +% 

48 34(4 339% 33%— Ml 

841 37 349% 349*— 8% 

39 08* 88* 884— V* 

2157 138* 13% 13% — % 

4b 98 re re 

5 17 17 17 + Vfa 

2 178% T79* 178h + % 
320 24% 2486 248%+ V* 


15 


KI1 

IndIGss 

1X8 

7.1 

i 

ra 

26(6 

a% 

»%+ % 

5% 

InexCD 

.14 

It 


119 

7V6 

7 

7 — re 

13% 




22 

49 

17* 

rare 

17(6 

an 


ZXO 

S3 

17 

52 

45* 

458* 45% .. 



1» 

73 


4 

31% 

aore sire + re 

IT~1 


34 

43 

20 

14 

12% 

138* 

12% 

198* 

lows 11 




505 

8--I.T 

23% 23%— TO 

38% 

HUdStpf 475 107 


ia 

44% 

44(6 

448%— 16 

14 


IXObSX 

10 

306x 30V* 

19% 

19% + TO 

3% 

ImoRs 




221 

5% 

5TO 

5TO— TO 


34% 118% IntaRsc 

308% 19 InfgRpf 3X3 124 

54(6 42 IntaRpI +58*14.9 

37% 2516 IntflRpt 475 13J 


1314 714 IntRFn 
If 15% ItCpSd ZTOUI1X 
45(6 55 Intern 3X0 50 12 


9% 

Intrfst 

XO 

5X 

6 

41 

intrlk 

2X0 

SX 

a 

886 

148* 

Intoned 

IntAlu 

72 

Xf 

9 

99 

IBM 

4X0 

3J 

12 

1516 

InfCtrt 

70 

IA 

10 

22* 

IntFlov 

1.12 

AS 

15 


1116 5% .... ... 

7% 21% IntHrwt 
50 .23% lntHpfC 

42 OT* IntMpfA 
MV6 1786 IraHctD 


8 24% 238% 34 — % 
25 44% 4386 44(6 + % 

2 31 31 31 +V% 

23 121% 12% 12%— V* 
43 188* 1BV6 1886 + % 
307 42% 42 <2 — % 

2514 108* 10% 109* + % 
173 51% 518* 51% + % 
291 78% 9% TV*— Vfa 

9 188* 18% 1(8*+ 14 
7129 1279*126% 124*%— IV* 

104 22 21% 21% — % 

135 38(* 28 28 — % 

2320 10 99* 99*— 8% 

258 4% 4% 4Vk— 8* 

7 48 47% 41 

J 37% 37% 37% 




438* 327* 

299* 23 

578* 44 . 

179% 9(6 iRtfiCl 
54% 3284 IntNrtb 
185 134 IntNtPt. 

40% 37(6 IntpbOe 

17(6 10 iRtBokr 

20 159% mtsiPsf ._ 

20 I486 InPwpf 270 12.1 

198% 14(6 Iowa El 170 VOX 1 

29% 214% lowllG 274 97 7 

20% 17 lawlllPf 231 1IX 

314* 25 I OMRs 3X0 97 8 

348* » J paten Sim m a 

138* 98* IPCOCP 74 27 11 
35 23V* IrvBKl 1.94 53 7 

54 4286 irvBkpf 215*187 




48 

38% 3016 30 Va— 16 

JX 

17 

495 

40* 40% 40%— % 

6.1 

9 

■4 

28* 28% 38*+ % 

49 

a 

1352 

48% 48% 48%—% 


17 

33 

138* 128* 13% + 8* 

IX 

9 

1670 

30* 40* 49TO— (* 

Zl 


7 

173% 172 172 —4 

ZB 

13 

93 

38% a a — re 



5 

16 15* 15* 

97 

8 

42 

19% 19% 19% + Ml 


AOOz 18% 18% TOV* 

50 19 188* 19 

713 30 299* 39% 

t»az an* 20 »(%+»* 

42 31% 31(6 3114— V* 
131 348* 34(6 34% + % 
23 11% 114* 119b— % 
130 34(6 341% MV*— % 
270 50(6 50 SO — % 


3086 

34% 

249* 

M46 

43 

59 

5684 

14% 

914 

42V* 

44(6 

29% 

34% 

27% 


20 JWTa 
23% J River 
13% Jammy 
1096 JfopnF 
28(6 JttHPIS 
44% JerCpf 
47 JerCpf 
1396 JerCpf 
5% jewter 
38 JaMUti 
37% JotmCn 
21% J organ 
159% Jaatens 
ZP6 JayMfa 


1.12 40 13 
M 13 l 
.12 X 10 

!A4eII7 
172 3X 4 

8.12 137 
0X0 137 
211 13X 

23 

178 3X 15 
1 J*a 4A 9 
1X0 37 10 
XO 3X 14 
1A0 5J M 


190 288* 
187 249* 

52 229* 
44 128* 

191 399* 
SB* 59 

tOTOz 578* 
37 16% 
73S 9% 
4028 41 
716 419% 
18 27 
319 23% 
79 35(4 


38(4 28V6 — 8% 
34% 24% — Vfa 
211% 211b— % 
12% 1216— Vb 
39% 3914+ % 

579% 57(4+1 
16 14% 

88% 9 +1% 
40% 40%—% 
41% 41% + (4 
24(4 2686 
23% 2386— Vh 
2486 25 — Vk 


10% 


17 


398* 

41% 

481% 

ia% 

2286 

20(6 

16% 

24 

56% 

541% 

19% 

359% 

22% 

45 

30 

11 % 


5014 

3486 

4 


786 KOI 
996 KLMs 
33 KMIpf 
268* Kmart 
21 KNEag 
V29* KatorAI 
149% KataC* 
15(6 KalCpf 
(96 Kanab. 
14(6 KCtvPL 
3914 KCPLPt 
36% KCSau 
12% KanGE 
2196 KonPLT 
10 KaPLpt 
10 Katyln 
109* KaufBr 
1216 KautPf 
60 Kaufpf 
29V* Kafloaa 
23 Kellwd 
1 Kenal 


70 ZX 


4X0 1ZQ 
174 37 
1A8 3J 
X0 47 
70 17 
177 97 
A0 47 
276 107 
4l5D 1Z5 
1X0 ZO 
236 12.1 
276 OS 
273 11J 


AS Z5 

ixo as 

0JS 107 
176 37 
170 37 


9 100 Mh 

11 1177 16% 

1 379* 
9 1599 3386 

w a iw 

259 148* 
21 15(6 
6 15V6 
1425 986 

5 408 2384 
WOT 34 

TO 243 51% 

6 682 1TO* 

7 IM 341* 

1 21 
104 368% 
S 69 169* 

2 17 
a 8086 

14 1167 47V* 
7 9 328% 

37 1(6 


88* 

■8%- 

% 


IM- 

% 

37% 

378% 


33% 

33(6— % 

39(6 

39(6 


ure 

ure 


13% 

rare— % 

ISM. 

rare- re 

9(6 

916 — % 

23 V* 

23(6- 

-% 


36 34 +1 

49% 49%— 3% 
1TO6 19% + % 
3496 3486— % 
21 21 

36(6 36%— V* 
1614 1616— % 
17 17 — % 

8086 RRt— (A 
47 4714—16 

an* 328% 

11 % IV* 


To Our Readers 


Because of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris until April 27, ihc 
New Yoric and American Stock Exchange ta- 
-bJcs in this edition contain information from 3 
P.M. New York time. Over-the-counter stock 
prices are from 2 P.M. New York time. Canadi- 
an stock prices, U.S. futures prices and some 
other item are from die previous day’s trading. 

We regret the inconvenience, which is neces- 
sary to meet distribution requiraneuts. All edt- 



299% 199% Kenmt 70 37 
a*<4 209% Kvum 2A4 97 
1694 10% KorrGI A4 if 
34(6 2614 KarrJWC 1.10 3X 
2784 
586 
199% 

55 42V6 K MdfPf 1X4 37 

51% 399% KbnbCs 272 47 
3 » 22% KngWRd J6 27 


2% KeyCon 
M Kovslnt 


2986 

aw. 

104 

14 


948* KoPPrpfUXO 10.1 
T»* Korean 


ZP* 

47% 

3314 


17 

75 

21* 

21% 

21%+ % 

* 

111 

are 

a 

am. 


39 

11% 

lire 

lire 

25 

3823 

31% 

30% 

30%— % 

8 

At 

are 

35* 

a + to 


1 

28* 

28* 

38* 

18 

116 

rare 

17% 

18 + % 

9 

92 

a 

34% 

3486 


1 

54% 

54% 

5*%— re 

10 

445 

4VTO 

41% 

49 + TO 

TO 

414 

a 

»U 

35(6— % 

54 

a 

//re 

26% 

26%— 8* 

15 

too 

148* 

158* 

16%+ 8* 

75 

380 

11% 

lire 

188*— V* 

1 

99% 

99% 

99% 


31 

13% 

13% 

13% + V* 


145 

40% 


Wk- % 

a 

23 

238* 

zm 

2986 

75 

n 

44% 

44% 

44%+ * 

6 

17x18% 

18% 

18% + TO 


229% LN Ha 204eWJ 9 
79% LFE 

129% LLE Rr 2.19k V4X 
2 LLCCP 
0 UXPt 
8% LTV 

14 LTVA A3t 27 

45% LTVpf 

1116 LTVpf 3X6 1Z9 

13 LTV Pf ITS 77 .. 

10% LQubil 17 

1614 LOdGs 170 7.1 7 

*8* Lnforoe 78 27 
23 Loire Pf 3A4 10X 
9(4 Lxunur* 74 20 4 
Ufa LamSes IM 

1086 Lawtini X* 4A 15 
un LoarPt to 17 ii 
20% Learppf 2X7 12X _ 
37V* LearSg 1X0 17 9 
97 LOOTS pf 275 IJ .. 

14 Lea Rnl ■ AO 2.1 15 
24% LswvTr 1X0 47 13 
21% LMEnf 72 ZJ II 

9 LeaMos 70 1A 23 
15% Leg Plat AI 27 9 
ZVk LstiVal 

139* IXtHnn 1X6*117 
986 Lennar 70 IX 19 
109k LeucHts 4 

23 LevISI 1X3 57 » 
2586 Levttl 33 17 9 
409* LOF _ IX! U • 
2186 LfotvCa 72 27 17 
53 Utly 370 AI 11 
!5V» United 72 S 24 
26(6 LtacNH 1X4 AX 12 
18% UncPI 2740103 
614* Litton 1X0 JX 10 
33% Locknd xOe 17 * 
2914 LOCtlfe xa 27 11 
23% Loewis 170 5 

18 Loolcen 70 A 31 
If LpmFIn 1.16 31 13 
149k LemMts 11 

2(6 IjDRlMwf 
179k LitSfar 1X0 07 5 
44 Lanes Pf 5L37 11 J 
38* LILCo 2 

16 LILPfB 
14% LILPffl 

8% LILPfX 
9 LIL PfW 
9% LIL PlV 
11(4 LILPIU 
88* LILpfT 
4 ULPfP 
7 LIL PfO 

17 LongOi 13 

19% Loral AI 17 17 
2314 La Land 170 ZO 11 
17 La Poe . JOB 47 16 
3S*k LaPLpf AJO 157 
169% LaPLpf ZM 1A1 
239* LouvOe 244 U 7 
36 Laws) 1 2X0 47 4 
16(4 Lowm J6 17 16 
1816 Labrd 1J4 57 11 
239% LWUV6* Jf U 18 

- - - 6.1 10 


13 2«k 369% 348% 
59 159* 15% 1514 
145 15(6 15% 159* 
26 34* 296 28* 

5 10% 1014 1016 
753 11% 108% »“ 

1 16% 14% 14% 

1 49% 49% 49% 

95 23% 23% 3396 

108 14V* 14 14% 

253 1186 11% 119* 

10 23% ZJVJ 23% 
10 7 49% __ 

38 238* 23% 23% 
44 12% 118% 119% 
52 4 3(6 386 

131 1284 129% 129% 
T4 20(6 20% 20% 
18 24% 231* 34 
106 49% 49 49 

1 12116 121(6 12116 

6 19% 19% 19% 

96 3Z% 32% 3314 
371 37% 3696 37V* 

65 149* 14% 149* 
■6 21% 20% 21% 
106 2% 28k 386 

103 14% 14 14 

24 11% 129* 129* 
21 20% 20 20 
3T6 37% 32% 329* 
4 30% 301* 389* 
40 4* 45V* 45% 

13 31% 3186 319* 
292 77% 77% 77% 
753 JTJk 17% 378* 
20X40%, 40 40 

62 218* 21 2186 
371 68 47% C7V* 

2044 48*k 4786 478* 
•33 308* 20 30 

1402 449* 44 44% 

WO 3486 348* 349* 
630 301* 3086 2086 
54 25% 25 25% 

100 28* 29* 396 

« OTk 21** 219* 

» 448* 4486 4696 

tW Ok 4% 4% 

1«8 25% 25% 35% 
2901 22 22 22 

« J7V* 17 17% 

15 17(6 17 17 

21 169k 14% Ml* 
15 3096 20% 20*6 
4 14 U(k 159k 

2 12 % 12 % 12 % 

IS 14% ^* 14% 

.!£ i? 1 « ^ 

M ST 39% 28 V> 38(6 
5*4 35(6 35 35% 

431 30*6 20% 30% 
15 318k 318k 318k 
35 23% 2296 328* 

i9i 20 % 2 i% am 

42 44% 4* 44% 

433 2*8* 26(6 3*8* 
150 324* 22 23% 

46 at 279* 27% 
511 19% 19 19 

B 154% 15(6 15% 


— % 
— % 
% 

— % 

V* 

— % 
+ % 


+ % 
+ (6 
+ % 
+ (6 
— % 
— % 
— (6 
(6 

— % 


— % 
' % 
— % 
+ % 


— % 
— % 
— % 
— % 


— 4% 
16 

— % 
— Im 


— 4% 

— 16 
— 8* 
— V* 
+ % 


— 9% 


+ % 
— % 
+ 16 
— % 


- 1% 


— »% 
+ % 
— V* 
+ % 
+ 96 


+ (6 


— % 









iA pouieendta-.s^^ - 

'V s ad 


^ ci V ^ 

JL 

. Ob 

wtd 


"SS-. CT *i% ,r.v^; 

JTirruurr 

bes 3 *55' 4 i r 

jjjJjcaiLr m ^ j,. 

1 makes tns r*;** *_/, 
VoullMia*-- V,;- 
Sifflcliw — - — r*. 
jjujiraoiig l-^ - 

(wya.qons sir.L^ 

Theonly -N 

[vai ]he bi? k - r ‘ > - • ' 

^^hete's n-> ® 

“tos-umtiorr j — ^ 

herds. Lei i fe» ; fj“= 
-It’s clear tur. r — >-■ 

bbv have." ths 
enough. 22* r -' 

Mr. Crasar. a_a o* 
nderstaacina -ax 

-\0U “ 

to enjoy the » ' : - 
, Lisilo 3irin>'. 

1 there when the be’ 
aboard the ril> “ 




AreOaUe it loading |m dte l woiWwfdg 
Choperd ft a* SAL, B. rug da Vayrat -Genive 022 82 17 17 


UMndb 
Kfohuw Stock 


Sts. IPJfL 

OIK YhL PE nmWiLow OuotQi'o# 


781 
1X0 19 15 
1.16 Z6 11 
473 11X 


& 

40 

133 

64 

» 

123 

10 


516 2% MGMuwt 
25 17% MGMHo X0O Z5 16 

36 179% NUB LI O 

50% 2716. MocmU 
53% 38% Mac y 
42 36 Mocypf 

1996 111% MadRes 
3946 at MoolCf 1X0 2J 6 
29% 3% IHgtASt UXOc 
23% 12% Monhln 70b ZJ 65 
21% 139% MartlNt -32 7.7 17 
344* }1 ManrCs .14 3 23 

414% 22% MtrHan 370 U 5 
58% 41 MfrHpf 6X36T2A 
56% 40 MlrHPf 55391Z0 
118% 5% vfManvt 4 

38(6 18(6 vIMnvl pf _ 

33 21 MAPCO 1X0. 11 0 

35V* W8* MnrMId 1X0 4J I 

518* 40(4 MorMpf 5780116 
40 30% Morton 52 VX 35 

38 Morin wl 

12% 916 MarKC 72 37 
1886 149* Marie pf 170 IX 
■686 58% Marrlol 54 J 14 
67% 3586 MrstlM 
54% 3016 MartM 
13% 89* MaryK 
33% 33% Masco 
13(6 716 MOSSMT 
»> 15% Mas M 

3% 3 Maaeyp 

278% 208kMo»ep 
11% 9% Mnlnc 
■0% 518* MotouE 
14% 6% Mattel 
KB* 416 Motel Wt 
3316 168* Matltof Z50 

15% 916 Maxam _ 4 

49% JOWMSVOs IM 4.1 9 

49% 34 V. AtaVIO 2AOa 5A 10 

3186 25% McDrpf 230 U 

21 20% McDrpf 2X0 1Z2 

319* 21% McDert 1X0 &9 17 

12 4(6 McOrl wt 

10% 4% mcDM 70 Z2 19 

42% 4086 McOnls X2 IX 13 

>4% 479* McOnP 1X4 3A 9 

*AV* 3184 McGEd 2X0 Zl 99 1557 

48(6 36 McOrH 1A0 11 1J 1*97 

37 19(6 Mclnta 34 

45(6 3284 MCKOTO 2A0 JX TO 50 

15% 10 McLean 0 588 

6% 3% McLsawt 142 

3786 19(4 McNefl .90 3A 7 1 

... 402 

ZM 


are is a 

1X4 13 
.12 IX 16 
51 IMS 
70 IX 16 
1X0 9X 12 


5 29* 29* 3% 

309 X8h 23(6 24% + % 
21 18® 189* 109% 

303 53% 51% S3 
1437 45V* 449* 449%— 8* 
50* 38% 38% 38%+8t 
SO 12% 12% U% 

244 36V* 35% 36 — % 
2 3(4 3*4 38* 

30 .148* 14% 1486 
146 189% 179% 188% +1% 
303 3484 34% 24% — % 
419 368% 35% 3S%— 16 
21 529% 52% 52%+ % 
430 4986 49% 498%—% 
368 7% 78* 786 

23% 23 2J% + Vh 

32(6 318* 32V* + 16 

* 3 £ 3=* 

49% 49% 499* + (6 
54% S3 53(6—1% 
9 28 28 

99% 9% 

.. 15 15 

347 83(6 82% 

410 6196 61% 

50% 50 


'IS ioap'Jier 
i2din-Ju?J invf 
.iwiv from socc 
ihroiigh sapp*?n ic* 
diort-ririrciiiteji the 
sad 

“In January, indi’-id, 
ife mark! ever- da* : 
commiued b\ retaii act 
of gas in January. No : 
nstituuoiu or inoivdi. 

Mr. Birin v; said h? :r 


hghs, bu*. icr m.-'t 


208 103 
TJ7 11J 
jar X 12 
11 


LI 


1277 

265 

504 

34 

43 

JV44 

25 

11 

723 

472 

157 

101 

72 

1416 

63 

II 

2 

536 

20 

11 

984 


3 A 7 
US 13 I 
74 1J 11 
71 IS I 
259 St S 


£ IV. 27V* Mood 
24% 13% MMTVX 
3486 34% Medttn 
51% 33» Mattdn __ 

27 22% Mettonpf2J0 107 

45% 308* Metvfll 
64U 40% Merest 
1058* 78(6 Merck 
688* 4086 Menttfi 
36% 32 MerLvn 
3% 2 MnoOt 
33 138% MesoPt 

TO* 5% Meeab 
5V% 2% Mntok 
28% 2186 MIE PtC MO 1*7 
9* 7% MtxFO .179 45 
28% 2316 MDCnpf 119 117 
U% 1216 MchER 1J8 BX 18 
7% 416 MtcVlD* — 

52% 33% Ml oaxi 
14% I'M MkUUI 
zm 17% MldRas 
28% 32 MWE 
17% 1116 MJIfnR 
86 OPM MMM 
32% 2386 MIpPL 
19% C% Ml in ins 

20% 15 MQPSv 

21 178* MOPS pf ZA4 I1X 

22b. 18% MoPSpr 2X1 127 
34% 28% Mo PS pi 4.12 1Z5 
I 4 Mitel 
31% 23% Mobil 270 7J 
4 % viMablH 

9(6 5(k ModCct 


99* 

W %-% 

..(4 + % 

iaississ +,% 

2% 2 2V* 

27% 36% Z7 + V* 

11% 11% 118*— V* 

59% 59% 59% — % 

13% 13% 13%— (6 
10 9% 9%— 16 

318% 31 31—8% 

138* 13% 13(6 + Vh 
46% 45% 46 — Vh 
47% 47% 478*— V% 

26% 36% 219b— (6 
21% 21% 218% 

36% 26% 26*— (* 

68% 69% 6% 

9% 9(6 916— M 

9916 58% 588*— 9* 

768% 738* 758*— 1% 

64(6 *4V6 64% 

45% 45 15 

36(6 36 3616 + 8% 

438% 43% 4}% 

12% 12 12% — 16 
4% 4(6 416—% 

2TO6 268* 2686 W 
379% 3686 3686— % 

18% 17% 11 —16 
40x30% 30% 301% + % 

258 49 47% 47% — 116 

43 268% 36(6 36(6- Vk 


-drifting citri m nrr. 
Jack Laver*, esreetr; 
Memll LvTicn. • 

wrscuon ear!> spring 
“We’re against Lhecc 
the year below current 
drop a point 10 nbcut 
aach 1.450 in ' 

On the same these, 
“wesuoent no lie. corrjr 
(Cert 



Wooljiargsf-r Amj-rsa 

6* JfL 


Si !2 if ; 

^ I.RII' ... 

Nfoktt, 


1A4 

37 

12 

1075 

45 

44% 44%+ 1% 

170 

Zl 

10 

321 

56 

55% 55* 

320 

Zl 

16 

1540 104*104(6104116 

1X0 

U 

U 

43 

62 

61% 61*— * 


23 29 4477 

30% W% 30 — * 




267 

2% 

28% 3%— I* 



5 

1483 

19% 

IB* 18%— % 

78011.1 

7 

a 

7V* 

7 7 — % 


5 a ! ;S ( 


15 


76 IX 29 
276 48 9 
178 11* S 
1X0 5J 
2jM 9J 10 
A0 XI 13 
3X0 47 13 
ZM 8A ■ 


9 

3074 

1763 

17 

48 

3 


173b 64 6 


A0 L3 TO 1729 


32 UV6 Monosc 
15 6 Mtm*Df 

31(6 1*9% Moarch X0 LI 24 

51 4M% Morons 2J0 57 

31% at MfltOU Z56 BA . 

are* 7*9* MooPw 2X0 S3 It 

n% 148* MonSt 1X00107 
9Ut *86 MONY MM! 
MV> 3486 MooreC 2JW 4X 12 
23(k IIS* MorsM 1X4 47 U 
»6 23% MWM pf 2JO 9.1 

49% 38(6 Moron* 270 4.9 t 
»* 7386 Morel pf 777% f X 
42(6 268* MorKnd 1AB 3X 9 

3016 18% MorseS X0 33 13 

21 12 MlgRIy 1.7% BA 11 

31(6 23*6 Mortons X4 Zl U 

44 Wt 29(6 Metric 1 X4 1.9 ID 

3 Uk ;n Mfonfrd Mbzi ra 

238* 15 MUnsag 405 

43 2TO* MurpftC 1AQ ZX 9 

38% 23% MutpO 1X0 37 11 

2Mft in* MwrryO 170 57 10 


5 38* 3(% 38% 

into 278* 278* 2781—1% 
85 286 29* 29* 

am ai% am 

1* 15% 16 + 1% 

6 6* 

498*. 48% 48%— Ilk 
14 13(6 13(6— % 

179* 17% 17%— % 
27% 279% 37% + % 
13 13 13 + % 

81(6 00% »1%- % 
32% 329* 33% + % 
8% 7% 8 — M 
20% 30 20%+ % 

109* 209* 20%+ 16 

21 % raw raw— % 
33 33 3M + % 

... 69k 6% 6%— % 

2»0 

12 17 6% <86 6% 

318% 30% *T%— J* 


ttowncT Ptr 

=■ !"*«** I;, ; 


sail- 


'«5r£F : w : 

I* » 


'(Wflru 




*55 A 


44 

152 




1 

2 

I 

369 




4. 




1597 69% .6% 6%— % 

43 158* 1586 1S86— % 


■ 2864 438* 47% 438*— % 


93 

183 

14 

89 

57 

25 

3 

405 


309* 308* 309*+% 
22% 229* 229*+ V* 
179% 17% 17% 

9 8% 9 

Sl% SW+ 5M%— 1% 
24 23% 24 + (6 

27% 27% 27%— % 
45% 4486 4486 — 9% 

io% bo% an* 

38(6 38% 318* 


44 71% 218* 21% 


18 

425 

74 

34 

41 


20(6 m* 30(6 + % 
SffiK, 3Kfe asm— 9* 
34 32V* 33V*— % 

258* 25(6 2S%— % 
209* 20% 20(6— 8* 
41% 41(6 418% 

30% 3016 30b. — H 
20% 2016 3016— % 
13% 121* 13 — % 
38* 386 386— % 



-'Vet 

• % - ■ r. 

:;.-5 X ;: 

o «. ;; 

v •’ •ca.’icr. 


y* 


N 


238* 

T 

E 

348* 

1% 

Vlfa 


16 

40 

128* 

17% 

23 




29% 

411* 

r 

29% 

2286 

4»6 

f 

r 

r 

vn* 

nv. 

1S8* 

top* 

34% 

TO 

r 

re% 


10 % 

25% 

8k 

33% 

38% 

21 

218* 


11% 

22(6 

11% 

18% 

19% 

27 

2% 

23% 

779* 

2196 

9% 

71% 

ITOk 

10 

21 « 

149* 

14% 

8% 



NAFCQ 1X0 AS 18 
NBO ZAO 4X 8 

NBI 9 

NCH 72 ZX 13 
NCNB IX U t 

rcr s xa 37 a 

NL Ind 70 IX 
NUI 272 45 9 

HVF 

MWA .90 27 17 
NobscB ZJB XX 12 

Np 1 ?* un sx » 

NmWn £ 

NatCcn 1X0 2A ID 
NtCnvs 76 2X 14 
Narotst 270 7.1 n 
NoTEtfu ft 

NDTFGl 1X8 AS 7 
NFOpt 270 inj 
NCtGlrO 3X0 47 J 
NtHem 

Nil 75 S 18 
NMwrE 72 ix |4 

NlPreit 1X0 23 12 

NtSemI 13 

Ntswcln 1X0 37 it 
n si ana ao ax e 

Hereon Atm 47 7 
NevPw 336 fA t 
Novppf 1J4 llJ 
NmrPpf ITS 11 J 
N+fSvL XS 47 7 
NBnoEl 3X0 fx 7 
«< 276 11X 
NJRac 2X4 87 9 
NYSEG ZX4 107 7 

NYSpt 8X0 111 
“YSpI in 127 
NVSpfO 3J$ 12.9 
Newell, xo 20 10 
N*wtip( M 13 30 
Wwnii 47M1.1 
HwniRe X«e u 
tomuml 1X0 27 31 
MwBortc 

niqmp zm nx 4 

NIoMof Sn 137 
NMMgf XfO i m 
NiaMof 4.10 RJ 


M 20% 
» 599* 
2E3 14% 
30 21 
727 3*** 
2025 274k 

6V4 11% 

U 


1273 42(6 
523 59% 
933 24 
248 25% 
529 41% 
253 138* 
*37 3186 
317 13% 
28 27% 
I 32*6 
302 44% 
79 4 

1748 279* 
1467 » 

4 26% 
5815 118k 
83 298k 
36 144* 
17 11% 
3000 29% 
Ml 18% 

4 17(6 
H ITOk 

102 4016 

5 25 
.119 25% 
1979 24(6 

W fa 67 
15 17% 
4 39 
141 IM 
» 48H> 
8 158% 
8 9% 


160 JV* 
15*1 18% 
.384 27 
1502 31 

reo2 am 


(Continued on Page 8) 


208* 20%+ % 

5916 Sl%— 8* 

MU 1416— % 

21 21 

3616 24%— V* 

2716 Z7V4— % 

11 1t(k— 16 

41 41 —1 

SX* 58%—l(6 
ZH* 24 
25 25 — % 

4l*k 419*— % 

12 % »K 
31 31% 

13(6 1316+% 

27 2716 + 16 

228* 22%— 8% 

44 44 — 8% 

-5 

274* 27%—% 

368* 269*— % 

11 % 11 %—% 

289* 288k— % 

148* 149k— % 

118% 11% 

2m are +.* 

TO 8 * 1696— 1 
17 1716+16 

un* rare 
are* 40% 

348* 25 + % u 

are* as — % s 

atw 34V* + » 

re re +w 

17 17 % — % 

» a + re 

16V. 16% + TO 
4* 48%— *% 

15(6 IS** + % 

9 f%+ % 

«% 4B%+Vb 
3V* 3% + % 

% im+ » 

77 V — re 

30 38 —1 

xh* an* 












*• Statistics Index 


a * 
a ® 


* 0 * 
§ ! 
5» '*i 




*TS2°« 

23AJ3 5J?*« 

3SJ7 ?«■ 


0 iMMllen wo-ewid, 

>■ Vgyret . jgj B Pf 


Sli 13. 

L PS Itju-estf. g ', 

1 M 4 & & 5>. 

. .. -I iPt 1(5, m, 

’ iS Jvo S 3 \- JJ 7 L n 

I 11 ' 4 ?I f? 1 * “*• <*-. 

1 sfly iSlf; Hi* 9 -. 

. . » » 1 * U* l> 

I 4 :<w ^* in> ., 

- !>■ JtL 

*5 ii 1 *i* T 41 , yu 

57 U* Ms 

23 203 ?4 ~ 2rt* w . 

s *? H5 » sC 

2; wi. n . 

*29 cF- i»i 5«.; 

4 2 * r, \ li 

„ si zr„ 25 jfc., . 
6 4VS 21- JS1, *,.. 

?33 *« 5: 

a 54 i)-. 3311 Jf, 

3 *M* *W» *.. 
25 123 Sj-. S S~ 

' a j 3 

22 •»% Wi b. 

W i: Is « 

W W7 £2-4 R- 
35 412 ail MLi II* 

i:r sah st ay-t 

16 2 ±£ 12 W ll’l is 

IS 5 W a*. *>» 3S*-‘ 

14 « ij»j '»•' 

12 « ! 3 : i >a-k m 

3U« :•„ : T, 

3 :r, 2 * 5 , r 
il .lo n* Uto-« 

II 723 *>‘-l 5*-c jfc-. 

11 471 li'a .^t Bt- 

IS 1 :c r, »t- 
-.01 2'*. 31 Ji - 

4 »;u uv* uy-t 

9 141c w-t 4ft « — 

10 63 47toO»:f»" 

« •j'laH 2 A- 
: ,’i^ 2 i=* s* 

17 Ki ?»»» ^r- 

70 {.'■» »•« fi 

19 15 Wr> «4 K- 

13 TO* £»'■. g* g *- 1 
9 S3 Vi «to 

W 1SS7 iH'- M * *• 

14 Ii?7 si»t «} <J 

;* IS— ^ j--* 

12 5C *2to U* *" 

s ssa nto 1 : '?*-• 

141 «-7 41. «“* 

a <32 sth »*; 

11 2 ia p il,:; 

9 4£2« a 5 '£'■ 

n n/g 40 jr*i 4. i^" 

,2 

5 :«S 

14 43 «c jJi S\, 

^=SV; 

5 la ' :<•: *S to * 1 " ( 

7 * 

10 fc !7^ 

« 

to s n ■ »f- » “ 

5ag 

„ -i j? h. 

5 ^ P « u *: 


I'M *'■ 4'l #l 

I-'’? .i'- ifC U’-'i 
«4J <2^ flN'‘ 

« a*s5^’ 

* jfa E l,-t 

<7 S' to ^ P' 

i 

J2s *T:I g 


S tsp 


— r—.-. a* 

? 50 lr ;t S 

I ass -J S * . 

, ,1^ c.- JP 

; § ra*i:i 

J ;i£ 5=^ Ji*t g 

I k {»!pJ.. 

' 5? ti~ E- 3;! 

■ ^ ssrh 

• »s J ? y 
,.2 p» 2^ g- 
•tf 3-ftjS-; 

< :?ai 1 |14 

55!? ®S iS»" 
fJiS iif,* 

m% 

tm* 


MMX wtW P.» E ar ni ng <mm P. a 
4MXlMHawiP.ll renBratanotm p .11 
KVSE ariCM. P,4 GoMmvtate P. 7 
MYSe-WshtflowP. Inlarut ram p. 7 
Condai stoda P.H Martot«nnonr p. a 
cunwcy rmi p. 7 Octo* P. a 

CRMwatiM. p. 1 ore am p. 9 

OMtom* P. a Otor matoa P .11 

THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


WAU STREET WATCH 

Investors Try to Anticipate 
3Iarket’s Erratic Rallies 

By EDWARD ROHRBACB 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Picture a pizza —let’s say my favorite, peppero- 
ni smothered with anchovies — covering 75 rabbling 
acres or 30 hectares. Anyway you slice it, that’s how 
such of tlx stuff Ameri cans cons ume every day, accord- 
ing to Harper’s magazine. Bat what does that have to do with the 
price of AT&T on Wail Street? 

“This bull market is like eating pizza,” said Roger F. Cruise, 
who manages investments for his own firm, C api tal Finance, in 
Paris. 

“You have to wait a long time for it to come, and when it 
arrives it’s too hot to touch," he said. ’’Afterwards yon get a few 

good bites, but before you 

Enow it, most of the pina has _ 
turned cold." Institutions do most 

Mr. Cruise is lamenting . , ,. , 

what has given investors in Ot uie trading today 

U.S. stocks heartburn since i j . i . 

the bull market started 21 4 mifl they tend to full 

years ago: The fact that rallies mliords* 

since August of 1982 have mu * s ™- 

been sharp, erploave flurries 

accomplished in little more than two weeks’ time. 

Indicator Digest, a New York-based investment advisory let- 
ter, m akes the point by entitling its current issue, “Don’t Blink, 
You’D Miss the Market Move." 

Supplied is a chart of the Dow average’s 500-paint ascent, 
illustrating that stocks have leaped to higher levels on five frantic 
occasions since 1982, languishing for long periods in between. 
The only exception is a steady climb over the first quarter of 1983. 
Even die big drop, in January-Februaiy of 1984. was short and 
steep. 

“There's no doubt about the reason," said Indicator Digest 
“Institutions do most of the trading today and they tend to run in 
herds. Let a few leaders start buying and the stampede is on. 

“It’s dear that trend-following doesn’t work as wdD as it once 
may have,” the advisory letter said. ‘Trends just don’t last long 
enough, and must be anticipated rather than followed.” 

Mr. Cruise, in his own market letter, adds that this is done by 
understanding that Wall Street is just like the pizza business: 
“You have to place your order early and realize you are not going 
to enjoy the whole thing." 

Laszlo Birinyi Jr. of Salomon Brothers said, “If you’re not 
there when the bell rings, the chance has been to climh 
aboard the rally.” 


H IS computer analysis erf Wall Street trading shows that 
individual investors have learned this and are staying 
away from second-thought buying. That lack of follow- 
through support to institutional maneuvering has been what’s 
short-dranied the rallies, including January's 100- point surge, he 


“hi January, individual buying was done by people who are in 
the market every day anyway," he said. “New funds were not 
committed by mail accounts. Basically, the market just ran out 
of gas in January. No fresh cash was put on the table, either by 
institutions or individuals.” 

Mr. Birinyi said he thinks Wall Street will again “test” its 1985 
highs, but for most of this year, stocks will stay in a “1984 mode 
— drifting with an upward bias." 

Jack Lavery, director of securities and economic research at 
Merrill Lynch, sees the stock market as “vulnerable to an interim 
correction early spring,” but is optimistic about 1985. 

“We’re against the consensus in believing interest rates will end 
the year below current levels," he said. “If 30-year Treasuries 
drop a point to about II percent, we could expect the Dow to 
readx 1,450 in 1985 * 

On the same theme, Edward M. Kerschner, chairman of the 
investment policy committee at Paine Webber, said he thinks any 
(Continued on Page 9, GoL 5) 


Currency Rates 


Late interbank rates on April 3 , excluding fees. 

Offidai fixings lor Amsterdam, Brwseb, Franidwt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 
2 PM. 


s 

Amsterdam 3.154 

KlMMd <255 

Frankfort 3.1078 

Leaden (b) 1.2125 

IMae 1.991 JO 

H dr wfc M 

Parti 9 J 86 

Tokyo 25105 

larten 2A«5 

1 ECU 117151 

1 SOU (L9S75B5 


17*28 .114015 
63920 399-00 

3.1435 ?J» 

1053 

81.88 2L90 

84J3- 2774 1 

22357 aomii 
306993 978790 


ill- BMr. 87. 

1 0-1766 • 1611- 

1157 • 1773 

1-567 X 8841" 477" 

241673 47788 7642 

56670 3172 

200170 15495 AMO 

478 X 2707 15.181" 
1286" 7273 40876" 

0.1328" 75765" 47825’ 
1*42584 27228 447775 

1.944X6 &47D4 617734 


Sf. Yea 
13133 *13970 r 
23773 2*728- 
118-16 *17345 ■ 
37113 307775 
75240 7773 

2663 25370 
160537635" 

KS3 

17433* 

17939 188783 
27969 249 JM 


Dollar Values 


Eto«. C " T “ W HAS Eeotv. 0wnaa UTS 
0*615 AeftroOant 17117 09965 trMs uoas 0*585 StowweS £21 

0X453 AertrtaetcUflOoa 22J3 00812 isreoU abeiui 819X0 0516 S. AM cm read 17379 

00151 BaMm Ha.kBsc 6375 37102 KMrotfldhnr 0301 00012 Oltoemaoe 85670 

072*4 CaeediaeS 1771 0797 Matay-rteselt 2719 00057 imnMk 17575 

UM1 Dantahkreee 11725 01106 Herw.feraee 97* 01104 fimOtnae 9755 

OM89 FfMMMMrtfca <74 05C PMLpMH 18X55 OKS TahWl 3977 

8X875 OfwkdradUH 13UD OM51 ParLescodo 17100 0X3*4 TMMI 27.945 

01282 Heagtows 7J005 02773 SeetOrtml 16063 02721 UJLE.<Mera 3X725 

cSJeffleg:12M5 irttfii 

1o) Conenerdal franc (b) Amounts needed to boy one pound (cl Amaunts needed toburonedoltar f *j 
UnHt al 180 <xl Units at 1708 (v) Units of 18X00 
NA: mtawried; njl: ml awonadt*. 

Sources.- Bonaue du Benelux ( Brussels! ; Banco Co mme rc bl e italKma I Milan); Chemical 
Bank {Mew York); Banaue Natbnato de Paris (Parts); IMF (SDR); Banova Araba at 
Internationale O'lnvasUssemanl ItUnor. rival, dimam). Ofberdata from Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Serin F react 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Stamm Franc ECU SDR 
1M. 8 8 b - 8*1. 516 - 59k 5U - » 13 tv - 13 <1 10H - I0M 9ev - 9ev in, 

2M. Bib - 9 J"k.59. IS - ilk 1»-1» 1». KRb K - 18 W, 8 Vb 

3M. 9 -91b 5M. - 6 K 1 *5M -5» 13X.-UH 181b - 11 TO - JOVb BW 

AM. 9Vi - 9Vt 6 Vb - iVb 5%b - SH U«t • 129b UK - 11 9. 10 Vb - 10 «. 81b 

1Y. 16V, - KM 54W - Alb 510 - 511 I2Vb - 12W, 119b - 119b IBW-lOfblW, 

ROMs applicable to Interbank deposits ot SI million minimum (oraovIvaMnt). 

Sources: Ataman Guaranty taoUar. DM. SF. Pound. FF); Doras Bank (ECU); Reuters 
(SDR). 


Asian Dollar Rates 


3 mo. 
in, -Bet, 
Source: Rooters. 


Key Money Rates 

United States am Pm. 

Discount Rale 8 8 

Federal Funds 81* 

Prime Rale 10Vb !0V» 

Broker Loon Ran 

Comm. Paper, 30-179 daVJ U5 VS 


3-menlfi Treasury Bills 
A^nantti Treosurv Bills 
COto 30-59 days 
CD's <089 days 


Lombard Rate 
OvarnWit Rate 
One Atanth Infertxmk 
3-nwntti interbank 
<-*nanHi IntertMek 

France 

Intervention Rdi 
CaU Money 
Pne-mo nf ti'T n terbo nfc 
3-manth Interbank 
A mont h In t erbank 


8.18 8.19 

875 &55 

US 8.19 
OX5 0X4 


MO <00 

sss <00 

190 190 

4.13 115 

OX5 OX5 


10Vb 10Vb 
IOVj Wb 
to 9/1 S Wfc 

109b 10» 

» 7/W 10 7/10 


6 mas. 

»fc -»*, 


Britain 

Bonk Bose Rota 
Call Money 
91 -daw Treasury Bill 
X-moniti interbank 


Discount Rate 
Cali Money 
<Mav imerbcmk 


13 - 135 * 13-13 Vt) 
1314 13 b 

12H 1» 

12 7/1613 15/32 


5 5 

Mb <U 
Mb Mb 


Gold Prices 


Sources: Routers. Commerzbank. Credit Ly- 
onnais. Lloyds Bank. Book of Tokyo. 


JLM. PM CBMe 
Horn Kona 32275 32175 + OBJ 

UetMiUMW? 33170 — +080 

Pads (125 kHO) 32286 321J0 + 077 

Zwfdl 32175 33075 + 1775 

'union 321.10 32175 + 150 

New Yoft — HA — 

Otfldol flxtaas tor LaadBaParbandLuxeni' 
boura. odealeo and etosfao prices for Horn Kano 
and Zbrtcfb New York Cenex currant contract. 
Ml prices in UTS (Of ounce. 

Source: Roman. 


Reralh^^Sribmte. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 6 

Page 7 


Deutsche 
Bank Has 
Profit Rise 

1984 Improved 

On ’83 Record 

By Warren Gedcr 

international Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Bank AG oo Wednesday became 
the only one of West Germany’s 
“Big Three" commercial banks to 
report an increase in 1984 group 
operating profit from 1983’s record 
results. 

In an apparently inadvertent 
move, Deutsche Bank also came 
dose to revealing the Tardy dis- 
dosed specific operating profit, 
which appears to have been 3.7 
billion Deutsche mnyVc ($1.18 bil- 
lion) for 1984. Earlier, Commerz- 
bank AG and Dresdner Bank AG 
had said that 1984 operating profit 
fdl just short of 1983 results but 
exceeded “I billion DM” and “2 
bilHofl DM,” respectively. 

F. Wilhelm cnriaiians , a man- 
agement board spokesman, said 
operating profit at Deutsche Bank, 
West Germany's largest bank, rose 
13 percent from 1983 on the 
strength erf the bants best trading 
performance ever. The operating 
profit, which Mr. Christians de- 
clined to specify, is the sum of net 
interest income, commission fees 
and gains from trading on its own 
account minus operating costs and 
extraordinary items. 

In his wttinwi«n) about the 
group’s strong gains from trading 
on its own account, Mr. Christians 
revealed the size of the trading 
profit as “about 1 1 percent" of the 
group's returns from non trading 
business. When added to the 
bank’s reported partial operating 
profit of 2377 bmion DM, which 
exdudes own-account trading, the 
trading profit of about 820 minion 
DM points to group operating 
profit of about 3.7 billion DM. 

When a reporter added the two 
sums together and asked Mr. Chris- 
tians whether a full operatingprofit 
of 3.7'bfltion DM was the actual 
result, the entire Deutsche Bank 
board appeared taken by surprise, 
paused silently for a few 
and then broke into laughter. No- 
body refuted the arithmetic. 

Analysts had speculated for 

(Canfioaed oo Page 9, GoL 9 


Foreign Capital Growth in U.S.: 
Is It Becoming Risky Addiction? 


By Martin Tolchin 

New York Times Senlee 

WASHINGTON — A spirit- 
ed debate is developing in the 
financial community about the 
risks and benefits of a huge in- 
flux of foreign capital, which has 
strengthened the dollar and 
helped finance the Reagan ad- 
ministration’s large budget defi- 
cits. 

In the last decade, foreign in- 
vestment has at least quadru- 
pled, helping to create jobs and 
financial opportunities and, to 
some extent, a stronger U3. 
economy that encourages yet 
more foreign investment 

A number of bankers and 
economists say that the enor- 
mous growth of foreign invest- 
ment has weakened the national 
resolve to reduce the federal defi- 
cit. They also fear that a sudden 
withdrawal could lead to a finan- 
cial crisis. 

“It’s becoming an addiction, 
and a sudden withdrawal could 
produce convulsions." said Felix 
G. Rohatyn, an investment 
banker with Lazard Frtres & 
Co., who has represented some 
European and Japanese inves- 
tors. • 

Similarly, Paul A Volcker, 
chairman of the Federal Reserve 
Board, has warned that the bud- 
get and trade deficits “imply a 
dependence on foreign borrow- 
ing by the United States tha^ left 
unchecked, wfl] sooner or later 
undermine the con fid ence in our 
economy essential to a strong 
currency and to prospects for 
lower interest rates." 

Senator William Pro xinir e of 
Wisconsin, the ranking Demo- 
crat on the Rankin g Committee 
and its former chairm«n l said 
that “as time goes on, as foreign 
investors get a larger and larger 
share of tne national debt, they 
get into a position where they 
can impose tough terms or cut 
off the credit” 

“You lose some part of your 
sovereignty under those circum- 
stances," Ml Proxmire said in a 
recent interview. “You lose your 
independence.” 

Some bankers and economists 
believe that these fears are exag- 
gerated, and at least some of 
them are saying that the criticism 
of foreign investments has over- 
toues of xenophobia. 


Foreign Investment in the U.S. 


Insider Deals Hid Losses 
Of ESM, Says Receiver 


By David A. Vise 

Washington Past Serrlce 

WASHINGTON — Thomas 
Tew, the court-appointed receiver 
for ESM Government Securities 
Inc., said that a Cincinna ti finan- 
cier, Marvin L. Warner, made nril- 
lions of dollars by arranging special 

TWnider tran«rtinn< and closing his 

own account at ESM before il 
failed. Mr. Warner is the owner of 
Home State Savings Bank of Cin- 
cinnati, whose failure touched off a 
run on 70 other savings and loan 
institutions in Ohio. 

Mr. Tew, who testified Tuesday 
before a U.S. House Energy and 
Commerce subcommittee on the 
failure of ESM and the resulting 
crisis in the (Mo savings and loan 
industry, said Mr. Warner kept 
ESM in business by directing S&Ls 
that he controlled to put money 
into the Fort Lauderdale, Honda, 
company. 

Mr. Warner, a former ambassa- 
dor to Switzerland in the Carter 
administration and a financial 


(lolden Nugget 
To Make Bid for 
27%of Hilton 

Reuters 

LOS ANGELES— Hflion Hotel 
Corp- said Wednesday that it has 
been advised that Golden Nugget 
Inc. plans to make an offer to ac- 
quire 6,782,000 shares, or about 
27.4 percent, of the company’s 
stock owned by the estate or Con- 
rad Hilton, the founder of the hotel 
company, for $72 a share, or $490 
nriwon. 

Golden Nugget also said that if it 
acquires the mares of the Hilton 
estate it plans to make a similar 
offer to ah shareholders, Hilton re- 
ported. However, it asserted that 
this offer would be in negotiated 
transactions that might involve 
cash and possibly other forms of 
payment. 

Golden Nugget added “the pur- 
chase offer is not subject to any 
financing or other conditions." It 
added that il was prepared to close 
on the acquisition immediately af- 
ter the expiration of the waiting 
period required by U3. antitrust 
law. 

The Hilton Hotel chairman, Bar- 
ron Hilton, said that he had ad- 
vised Steven Wynn, chairman of 
Golden Nugget, that the offer was 
inadequate. Hilton’s common 
stock dosed Tuesday on the New 
York Stock Exchange at $63.75 per 
shares no change. 

Hilton Holds had 1984 earnings 
of SI 972 nriffion on revenue of $2.6 
billion. Golden Nugget’s 1984 
earnings wee S529 nmhon on op- 
erating revenue of S84.9 million. 


backer of Governor Richard F. Ce- 
leste of Ohio, later denied Mr. 
Jew’s assertions, which be said “go 
far beyond the bounds of fairness, 
especially for an officer of the 
court” 

Mr. Warner added, “I am 
shocked he (Tew) would venture 
opinions and theories when he ad- 
mits to not having studied all the 
facts and records m the case. His 
theory that I was in the ’driver’s 
seat* is totally inconsistent with the 
facts.” 

Mr. Tew gave the subcommittee 
copies of a report, filed Tuesday 
with a Florida court, qathning the 
findings of Ms investi gation into 
ESM’s operations ana how its 
problems escaped detection. 

IBs report concluded that the i 
company was losing imflions of I 
dollars trading government securi- 1 
ties, but hiding its losses to contin- 
ue to attract new funds, while its 
management pursued a lavish life- i 
style. I 

“That was the most abusive cor- 
porate raping I’ve ever seen," Mr. 
Tew said, referring to the way in 
which insiders benefited while the 
company was sustaining large 


The report about ESM said that 
Mr. Warner had made more than 
$4 minion in one series of transac- 
tions in which ESM gave him pref- 
erential treatment Mr. Tew also 
told the committee that Mr. 
Warner had closed his account and 
withdrawn his funds on the advice 
of his lawyer, who realized that a 
collapse was imminent 

Besides being the owner of 
Home State. Mr. Warner also is a 
former director of Fort Lander- 
dale-based American Savings & 
Loan. 

Both Home State and American 
Savings did significant business 
with ESM Mr. Warner was one of a 
small group of individuals who had 
a personal account with ESM, 
winch dealt mainly with large insti- 
tutions, Mr. Tew said. 

It is not clear yet how much 
control Mr. Warner exercised over 
daily decisions at ESM, but several 
con g ressmen at the hearing indicat- 
ed they believe he played a central 
role in the scandal that led to 
ESM’s collapse. 

The bearing, called to examine 
the causes of the S&L crisis in 
Ohio, also indicted the accounting 
profession as Mr. Tew testified 
about the failure of three erf the 
nation’s hugest accounting firms 
to detect fraudulent activities at 
ESM. 

The crisis of depositor confi- 
dence touched off by the failure of 
Hook State Savings Bank could 
have been avoided if the three ac- 
counting firms had used standard 
auditing procedures, Mr. Tew said. 

Hie two firms that Mr. Tew criti- 

(Coutined w Page 9, Col 5) 


in onion* of (Man 




BAe Shares Fall 
After Release of 
Sales Prospectus 


Total U.S. 
Asaeta Abroad 

I N^- 


l ! 

Foreign Aosats 
in the United Statue 


| 5mw CdfTvners* D«oflmne*n 

“I don’t believe in the bogey- 
man of foreign investment," said 
Walter B. Wriston, a former 
chairman of Gticorp, the na- 
tion’s largest bank holding com- 
pany. “It's painted by some folks 
who don’t believe we live in a 
global economy.” 

Others in the financial com- 
munity see both positive and 
negative aspects to the situation. 

Henry Kaufman, the chief 
economist at Salomon Brothers 
Inc, for example, noted that 
“foreign investment has contrib- 
uted to the strength of the dollar, 
which has contributed to the 
trade deficit.” 

It has also contributed, he 
said, to the “restructuring of the 
U.S. as a service economy.” Mr. 
Kaufman sees that as a desirable 
development, because, “over the 
longer term, societies should do 
what they’re most efficient do- 
ing." 

The debate has been height- 
ened by an influx of Japanese 
capital, at a rate of $25 billion to 
$50 billion a year. This money 
represents Japan’s growing sur- 
plus in foreign trade, and much 
of it is being invested in Treasuiy 
securities issued to finance bud- 
get deficits. Japan’s surplus in 
trade with the United States was 
$36.8 billion last year. 

The known cumulativ e foreign 
investment in the United States 
has leaped from $174 A billion in 


Tho Nm Tort Torn 

1973 to $781.5 billion in 1983, 
the last full year for which statis- 
tics have been compiled by the 
Commerce Department’s Bureau 
of Economic Analysis. Of that 
amminf foreign investments in 
government securities, stocks 
and bonds has jumped from 
$153.9 tnDion to $646.1 billion. 

In 1983, there was a reported 
influx of $81.7 billion of foreign 
investment in the United Stans , 
of winch. $70.4 billion was in 
portfolio investments inrimtina 
government securities and bank 
deposits. The rest consisted of 
direct investments, such as fac- 
tories and real estate. 

In the first three quarters of 
1984, new foreign investments 
totaled $62.3 bmion, of which 
$46.8 billion was in portfolio in- 
vestments. 

However, no one knows die 
full extent of foreign investment 
in the United States anti finan- 
cial experts caution that the in- 
flux is probably si gnificantly un- 
derreported. 

Ago Ambte, a Commerce De- 
partment economist, said that a 
5115-billion discrepancy was 
found in reports on the flow of 
money into and out of the Unit- 
ed States between 1979 and 
1983. 

“The suspicion 'is very strong 
that this was capital inflow not 
properly reported," Mr. Ambre 
said. 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Shares of British 
Aerospace PLC tumbled Wednes- 
day as the company released a draft 
prospectus for the sale of 146.9 
million shares in May. 

BAe shares closed on die Lon- 
don Stock Exchange at 413 pence, 
down 20 pence from Tuesday. In- 
vestment analysts cited BAe’s 
warning that demand for civil air- 
craft was lower than expected and 
that the company was cautions 
about short-term profit prospects. 

“People expected the prospectus 
to be more bullish,” said Wyn EHis, 
an analyst at thestoci&rokerage of 
James Capel & Co. 

Analysts expect the shares to be 
sold at a discount of 10 percent to 
15 percent to the market value, sug- 
gesting that the sale will total more 
than £500 million ($604 million). 
The offer price is scheduled to be 
announced early in May. 

The sale is designed to allow the 
British government to dispose of its 
97 million BAe shares, 48 percent 
of those outstanding. At the mme 
time, BAe is offering 50 million 
new shares to bolster its equity 
base. 

The government plans to retain 
the right to block foreigners from 
gaining control of more than 15 
percent of BAe. Al present, the 
company estimated, foreigners' 
bold 4 percent to 5 percent of die 
shares. That leaves room for for- 
eign investors to buy shares in next 
month’s offering , but the m anhunt 
banks acting for BAe and the gov- 
ernment said they would concen- 
trate their promotion of the offer- 
ing on British investors. 

John Nelson of Kleinwort, Ben- 
son, Ltd., the bank advising BAe, 


of BAe’s business in making air- 
craft, mi-reites and satellites makes 
it a less-predictable investment 
than last autumn's sale of shares in 
British Telecommunications PLC 
BAe draws most of its profit 
from military jets and missiW It is 
investing heavily in the civil air- 
craft business, which showed a 
small operating profit last year, 
and the space operations, which 
were in the red. 


BAe said it was confident that 
the longer-term outlook for Us civil 
aircraft business was good but that 
“the upturn in demand for larger 
aircraft, in particular, has been 
slower than anticipated. Against 
this background, the board consid- 
ers it prudent to be cautious about 
the short-term profit outlook for 
the company." 

The prospectus pointed to 
“fierce competition” facing the 
BAe-146, an 80- to 100-passenger 
jet, as well as jets produced by 
Airbus Industrie, the European 
consortium in which BAe has a 20- 
percent holding. 

-Nonetheless, analysts expect 
BAe to increase its profit this year. 
For 1984, the company had pretax 
profit of £120 million on sales of 
£2.47 billion. BAe declined to fore- 
cast its profit, but Mike Costello of 
Grievesoo. Chant & Co. predicted 
pretax profit of £145 million for 
1985. 

BAe’s chairman. Sir Ansiin 
Pearce, said the company’s pro- 
ceeds from the sale were not ear- 
marked for any particular purpose 
but that the company would con- 
sider acquisitions. 

“As far as 1985 is concerned, 
British Aerospace doesn't need the 
money,” Sr Austin said. 

Dollar Is Lower 
In Europe Trading 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS —The U.S. dollar ended 
Wednesday lower against most cur- 
rencies in Europe. 

The dollar was at 3.1078 Deut- 
sche marks in Frankfurt, down 
from Tuesday’s late rate of 3.1408. 
In London, the British pound end- 
ed at S1.2125, up from $1.2075 on 
Tuesday. 

Other late Europe rates, com- 
pared with Tuesdays late rates, in- 
cluded: 9.5060 French francs, 
down from 9.5945; 3.514 Dutch 
guilders, down from 3.S49; 2.6405 
Swiss francs, down from 16615, 
and 1,991 AO Italian hie, down 
from 100100. In Japan, the dollar 
traded at 253.050 yen. down from 
253.725. 


ii 1 'ir.w ."iirArin w at ■« vvti.tu ai ii umi 

IIL» ito iiki vj «*> vvmh 

■I iril>f«FW%FT ■■ ■ IHF n "I ■■■■■■■■■■ 

■i III 1 1 r. 1 1 1")MH • «r+m im i ii Mimiimir^al 

prn wiii* n mi nnir^iiiig 

W‘ t ii f II ( Vl'4 ipji PH mmmw ' .m mmmmmM 


Millions of U.S. dollars. 


ITEM 


Loans and Discounts 


Capital and Reserves 
Customers’ deposits 


Cash Flow 


Income before taxes 


Net income 


Number of Shareholders 


1 U.S. dollar equivalent to 1 73.22 Spanish Pesetas. 

* Banco de Santander, S A. and financial institutions in which it has a participation of 20% or more. 

** The “Group" column includes the above mentioned plus other Banks which are less than 20% owned by Banco de Santander, S.A. and have 
common management and directors. 

GROUP BANCO DE SANTANDER IN SPAIN: Banca Jover. Banco Comercial de CataJuiia. Banco Comercial Espaflol. Banco de Murcia. 
Banco de Santander. 

1,535 offices in 23 countries. 


Santander 

Consolidated* 

Group** 

3,060.38 

3,720.71 | 

4,991.59 

. 571.97 

579.30 

956.56 

5,651.69 

7,433.28 

9,425.78 

208.98 

216.67 

287.01 

89.24 

101.37 

149.67 

65.56 

73.98 

115.96 

369,766 



BS 


BANCO 1)1 SANTANDER 


Established 1857 in Spain 




INTERNATIONAL 


Over 


Season Season 
Htah LOW 


U.S. Futures 


Open Hhjh Low 


Season Season 
Utah Low 


Open HMi Low a dm Cho 


Grains 


tSm TJT» Mav 15950 15950 157J0 

juu 155X0 Jul 16020 UQJO 159-30 

lEno 15775 Sep 16050 MQ5D 159X0 

T81XO 157X0 NOV 1S95S 1«X0 159A0 

180X0 154X0 Jan 

1 77 JO 154-38 Mar 

16220 .14000 May 

Jul 

18050 T79JS _Sep 
Est. Sales 400 Prey.Sarw H7 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 6524 OT72 


Metals 



Wfednesda>& 

MSE 

3 p.m. 

Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do mot reflect late trades eisewlm. 



industrials 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

jaxoo Itar-amts per Rt. 

49X0 61JH APT 6480 «22 

6920 6440 JOT 4435 66JD 

6747 6115 Aim 6550 45X0 

65X0 41.60 Oct 4173 4195 

&7X5 6160 DOC 6457 64X0 

SS FOT 6530 65X0 

6757 46X0 Apr 

Eat Sales 15X23 Pipv. SjriWlXjMO 
Prev. Day Open Int 62.735 off Eli 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMEI 

'44X00 Ibs.- cent. par lb. 

7430 66J0 Apr 48X0 M55 

72-75 44X5 May 40X5 69.12 

7170 64X0 Auo 70.15 70X0 

73X0 47X0 5ep 89X0 49X5 

7232 67.10 OCf 6928 HUB 

7ZM 49X5 NOV 70.10 7035 

Est. Sales U72 Prav.St4ail.n9 
Prev. Day Onen Int. 10398 off 117 

HoeacCME> 
aoxoo its.- corns per ib. 

54X5 415® AW 4170 4175 

S5.4S 48X0 JOT 4X55 XI B 

5577 4195 Jul 5060 M-75 

5*37 47 JO AUQ 50.P! 50X2 

5175 45X0 Oct 4730 4725 

50X5 4630 Dec 482S 4825 

■ 50X0 462S EOT 49JB 49 JO 

47 JS 4520 APT 46X0 46X0 

49X5 47X0 Jim 48X0 4850 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 10X40 

Pfwv.DavOpeaint. 25744 up 4 

PORK BELLIES (CMC) 

38X00 lbs.* cents per Bl „ 

82X0 41.15 May »20 6960 

82X7 62.13 Jul TOJ® M 

8065 4030 Auo 49X0 49X0 

701 4115 P«b 74X0 74 XU 

75X0 44X0 Mar 7430 7450 

7560 71U0 May 7X40 7360 

mxo mo jot 

Est Sales 8.163 Prev.Sab» 7X79 
Prev. Day Open Int. 12X58 off 103 


*05 64X7 — XO 

66-17 6632 —.15 

45X5 4565 +XB 

4360 61B2 +XS 
AAjn m65 

4570 6120 —.10 

4660 +.10 


67X7 6X35 
6860 6867 —.U 

69X0 7030 —.10 

49 JO 69X0 
69.10 49 JS —.15 
69X0 70.10 —.15 


4270 42X7 —1X8 
4732 4835 -77 

49X5 50X7 —66 

49X5 5032 —65 

4630 46X5 — JS 
4765 48.15 — X2 

4X75 49.10 —X 
itn 46X0 — XI 


67.90 4735 -1 Jg 

6830 4830 —2X0 

67J5 67.57 —138 
7130 7130 —2X0 

7X30 7130 —2X0 

7160 7140 —165 
7150 —460 


Financial 



Stock Indexes 



SP COMP. INDEX (CM*) 

« and S?0 JOT 184X0 mx 
1*270 160X0 Sep 18760 *L45 

196X0 17570 DOC 19175 19175 

19430 WaiD Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 42X53 

prev. Day Open int 57.160 off SO* 
VALUE UNEQtCBT) 
OTlntaandc^w m« 

212J0 18575 SeP 204X5 204X5 

210X0 209.50 Dec 

Est. Sal as Prev. Sates 1514 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 6,194 UP 5.975 
NYSE COMP. INDEX CNYFBJ 

P fJSa° m,C 5Sa JOT 10695 107X5 
111X0 9175 Sep W.l 109-50 

11375 10130 DOC 11173 111-35 

11335 112X0 Mar 11165 11365 

Est. Solti T1J35 Prev. Sates 1534 
Prev. Dav Open Int 9X86 uo182 


18260 162.95 
186.15 18660 
109X0 189X5 
19215 


19160 19850 
909 M 30170 
20778 


10600 10675 
10870 10875 
11070 11060 
11165 11265 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

MoodVs- NAf 

Reuters—. — — 1.0367C 

DJ. Futures—————. NA 

Com. Research Bureau- NxV. 

/Moody’s : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; t* final 
Reuters : bose 100 : Sap. IS. 1931. 
Dow Jones : bose 100 : Dec. 31,1974. 


Market Gui 


Previous 
9S5X0 f 
1,942X0 
124.06 
■ 244.10 





Paris Commodities 

April 3 


SUGAR ^ «*" 

Francis francs per metric ton 
Mav 1778 1735 1745 1749 —31 

AUO U30 1J33 1J06 IJ13 —24 

OCf U7D 1J4S 1J50 U55 —25 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1X10 1X20 — IS 

Mar ] J2S 1215 1J10 1J15 —30 

MOV . 1X70 1J60 1555 L560 —25 

E*i. voL: 1600 loti of SO tan*. Prev. actual 
w»e: 1X00 lots. Open Interest: 2X305 
COCOA 

French francs per 110 kg 
Mav 2785 2746 2755 2758 — 31 

JlY N.T. N.T. 2320 — — 30 

Seo 2730 2705 2310 2715 — JO 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2.110 2.M0 —30 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 2.135 —25 

May N.T. N.T. — 2.130 —10 

Jlv , N,T, N.T. — 2125 —is 

E£l- »L: 320 tot* of 10 tons. Prev. actual 
sates: 280 lots. Open Interest; 752 
COFFEE 

nench franc* per 100 kg 
Mar 2630 2630 2620 2630 uncti. 

Jlv 2670 2640 2620 2660 —50 

Sap 2695 2X95 2698 2X10 —22 

NOV N.T. N.T. 3X91 2622 -38 

JOT 263® 2X30 — 3X20 — 40 

Mar N.T. N-T. — 2X00 —35 

MOV N.T. NX — 2690 —40 

.?£: “8 1 " lots afS tons. Prev. actual sales: 
8 lots. Onen interest: 180 
Scorer: Bating On Commer c e. 


DM Futures Options 

April 2 

iff. Gtmoi Matron mate. cast per on 


Strtta CoUsSetfle 
PTNe Jw sea Dec 

27 — — — 

28 431 — — 

39 135 172 — 

jo uo n - 

31 178 221 275 

32 1.16 133 2.1* 

33 — 1-33 1X0 

M — 0.98 US 

3S — LH - 

Eeftaoted total ml 1714 
Cant: Mon. vet. 3X44 oaea I 
Pat* : Mon. voL 2329 Beta I 
Sourer: C ME. 


Psh-Sente 
Jua Sep oec 

B.M 614 — 

0X7 0.18 — 

0.11 0J1 — 

02* 853 065 

052 0JE 0X5 

" a « 


London Metals 

April 3 


Close Previous 

Bid Ask IU Ask 

ALUMINUM 
StarBm per mi Me ton 
SPOl 907X0 9IBX0 906X0 908X0 

fanfare! 935-50 936X0 KDL00 934X0 

COPPER CATHODES CHlob Grade) 

SferHna per mi Me ton 

spot 1.196X0 1,197X0 1,192X0 1.193X0 

forward 171360 1714X0 1788X0 170860 

COPPER CATHODES l Standard) 

Starling per metric Ian 

OTat LI97X0 1.199X0 I.19IX0 1,194X0 

forward 1715X0 1716X0 1787X0 1708X0 

LEAD 

Stemaa per metric toa 

_ 313X0 314X0 31160 31260 

forward 321X0 32160 32000 33060 

NICKEL 

StefHna per metric ton 

apat 4635X0 444580 4625X0 463508 

f or w ar d 4635X0 4640X0 4648X8 4650X0 

SILVER 

Penn per Troy ounce 

spot 51160 53260 52960 53060 

forward 54»X0 550X0 547X0 548X0 

TIN (Standard) 

Stemaa per metric tea 

spot 9.7*000 9745X0 9751X0 9,755X0 

tor ward 9750X0 9755X0 9753X0 9755X0 

ZINC 

Stemaa per metric ten 
ssal HOXD 802X0 803X0 B05X0 

forward 733X0 734X0 738X0 74000 

Source: Reuters. 


UJS. Treasury Bill Rates 

April 2 



Offer 

BIO 

n«M 

Prev 

Yield 

3-CTKBim 

070 

8.11 

858 

144 

t-month 

I5B 

456 

9X9 

985 

Onevrar 

878 

■76 

9X1 

958 

| Source: Salomon Brothers 





London Commodities 

April 3 


Close Previous 
Mob Low bm Ask Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Start too Per metric ton 
May 112X0 11170 11160 111X8 111X0 112X0 
AUO 116X0 11460 11460 114X0 11460 11*80 
Ot* 118X0 11770 11760 117X0 11720 117X0 
Dec N.T. N.T. 12260 124X0 12220 123X0 
Mar 13760 136X0 136X0 136X0 13SX0 136X0 
MPT 142X0 142X0 140X0 141X0 140X0 14170 
Asa N.T. N.T. 145X0 147X0 145X0 147X0 
volume: 848 lots of 50 Ions. 

COCOA 

Starting per metric ton 

May L909 1.953 1,954 ljMS 1.916 1787 

Jly 1X62 1.927 1733 1.93* 1752 1753 

Sep 1735 1715 1715 1.919 1.926 1,927 

Dec 1X73 1X50 1X31 1X32 1X65 1X67 

Mar 1X68 1X46 1XSD 1X51 1X60 1X62 

May 1X65 1X60 1X50 1X60 1X58 1X64 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1X55 1X70 1X55 1X61 

Volume: 4099 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE _ _ 

Sterling pot metric ton 
Mav 2.195 2,168 2668 2.170 2715 2716 

Jty 2733 2705 2206 2709 2761 Z2« 

Sep 2765 2743 2743 2744 2794 2797 

NOV 2785 2763 2763 2764 2J16 2JM 

Job 2 7S» 2754 2751 2755 22W 2297 

Mar 2730 2720 2718 2720 2755 2759 

Mav 2719 2710 2700 2711 2740 2710 

Volume; L«66 tots of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

UJ. dollars per metric ton 
API 23475 23175 21175 232X0 23275 23250 
MOV 23175 22875 228X0 22875 229X0 22975 
JOT 23475 22*75 32475 225X0 22*20 225X0 
Jly 226X0 234X0 22475 22*50 224X0 22*58 
AUO 2Z7J5 227J0 225X0 ZZ7JD0 22SX0 ZHX0 
Sep 22BJQ 228JB 226X0 230X0 226X0 23*08 
Oct N-T. N.T. 227X0 23100 226X0 236X0 
NOV N.T. N-T. 233X0 236X0 226X0 2*0X0 
Dec K.T. N.T. 229X0 238X0 226X0 248X0 
Volume: 1736 tots oflOO Ions. 

Sources: Reuters and LonOon Petroleum &r- 
ctwnae (srasoW. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

.April 2 


Cash Prices April 2 


CofliRiedlty and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santos. U» 

PriimtothM/30 38 Vf, yd . 
Steel Mltots (Pitt), tan — 
Iron 3 Fdnr. Phltou Km — 
Steel scrap No 1 hw Pitt. 

Lead Spot. Rr— 

copper efect- lb 

Tin (Straits!, lb 

zinc. E. st. L. Basil, lb — 

PafkxflunLU 

Sliver N.Y. az 

Source: AP. 


Dividends 


April 3 


13 J 9J Conander 
71$ 62 Angelica 
36$ 18 Orris 


3-8 

1-2 

28 

3 

23 

-L 

20 

8-6 

7 

69 

70$ 

80 

+ 

*i 

3-7 

542 

24 

65$ 

93 

-L. 

26$ 

3-0 

UO 

13* 

13 

56} 

4- 

43} 

6 

69-6 

17 

12$ 

67 

+ 

44$ 

6 

132 

56 

23 

110 

J- 

87 

7 

56-3 67 

40 

567 

-L 

517 

6-8 

72 

82J 23$ 9S7$ 

+ 964 


Some*. Any discerning bm In Europe. 


xa 

18 

13 

45 

1A0 

42 

9 

312 

XO 

15 


319 

1X4 122 


36 

172 

95 

7 

TOO 

132 

75 

12 

375 

1J0 

*5 

14 

99 

JHr 

J 


19 

sjffl m 


13 

JO 

IS 

11 

229 

572 

82 

a 

1351 

2J2 

84 

8 

1011 

4X7 124 


19 

XO 

15 66 

923 

125 

73 


5 

120 

11 

14 

363 

JO 

IS 

9 

29 




3320 




30 

20 

12 

16 

573 

230 

6.1 

10 

1720 



18 

593 

JO 

45 13 

163 


27 

41 



11 

90 

.16 

25 


948 

L12 

15 

10 

513 

52 

18 31 

163 



13 

620 

50 

45 

12 

ns 

.16 

5 

18 

279 

20 

25 


102 




12 



12 

135 

236 

5X 

• 

.518* 

256 

94 

9 

5*0 

33 

127 

JW 


■ 

12 

■40 

119 


«k 

325 125 
XTS 13X 


'i 

38 


44S 

270 

57 

12 

34 

250 

*4 


5 

150 

67 


9 

220 

45 21 

W9 

8X0 

*2 


20z 

120 

73 

8 

157 

48 

1.1 

16 

146 

158 

32 

24 

3690 

56 

22 

14 

£> 



31 

aim on* 

Wh 7P* 
4H 486 
m 2Hr 
16 U 
37V. 37V) 
5Vfc S*i 
16H W6 
im 

1516 
6Wi 
31*1 
1796 
116 


112 
132 
49 11 

26 

64 

37 

75 9 

391 

15 17 

54 

52 7 

22 

13 

Ml 

4 34 

365 

48 12 

1739 

25 23 

34 

34 9 

26 

95 8 

878 

115 

l«te 

115 

5 

127 7 

383 

15X 

300* 

119 

4001 

142 

■401 

164 

280x 

14X 

3501 

164 

XJCr 

165 

2401 






56 

15 

154 

82 

1X0 

37 

144 

19 

140 

46 

28- 

LI 

150 

82 

124 

65 

128 

!W 






152 

35 

152 

45 

1X4 

5.1 

150 

25 

XO 

19 

54 

27 

22 

25 

UO 

SA 

2X0 

4.1 

52 

35 

.96 

15 

1X0 

11 

120o12X 

.12 

16 

L16 

37 

128 

65 

158 

18 

1X0 

85 

150 

3J 

40 

22 

1X0 

13 

1X4 

V 


396 
262 
131 
103 
123 
1601k 
449 
315 
500 
122 21*i 

2SMx 5196 
3«6 
1002 3696 
0*3 56 
412 
234 
369 
946 
086 
a 

64 
137 




72 
136 

N , 

384 5V6 

984 7396 
54 20 


rrm 




VU1L 


M-* 


Asian Commodities 

AprUS 



SOM 1716 
10*1 496 
1096 8 
56 am 
2114 12 
51 3416 

9*16 47V6 
39*i 2894 


***'- 


271 

ac 

3» 

Be 


Be 

□j. 

451 

Be 

sr 

Bi: 

211 

El 

311 

Bli 

3? 

91. 

s 

BI: 

2F 

Bl< 

37 

BI 

19' 

51: 

■XT 

BI: 

21 

51. 

St 

9>i 

25 

511 




32 




W4 




4196 28V6 CtaokOs 1JM 2X 13 4fl «J6 4M6 

22M IS QuakSO JO U J M » »l ffl* 

11*t 696 Quanox .. _ *! JS JS* 

3+W 23 Qwestar L60 *9 9 “ » »} MB 

2516 14 akRell J4a IX 19 70 2M6 ZM 2316 


An encouraging end to the day with all 
Bo tan i cals showing strongly. 

The news of the Cabinet's new open 
door policy pushed Dry Martini cocktails 
in front of the gilt edged Gin & Tonics. 
Though somewhat surprised by this 
advance, the market remained calm. 
D. F. Glienburger Jr. of Glienburger, 
Glienburger & Glienburger commented 
“We are shaken, but not stin-ed.’* 

In general, spirits were raised by the 
performance of Bombay Gin. It's unique 
distillation keeps one amused. 



• »hkt»U->:ii urvui 


Company 

E arning s 

Revwiva and profits, in miffiom, 

era in local currencies unless 

othttwise u x fi cqiBd 


West Germany 

Boyar 

Y«T 1984 1983 

R 8 V 8 WHI— — ■. — 43 , 030 . 37740 . 

PritoxNrt im 2.1» 


Deutsche Bonk 


... i 1 Net Income- 








i ~ *M p i jl 9* |i p~» >r A j 



































































(j.bM.utfabki.i.k.b ii6.ec. he sq seecsesE; s gkjsg cce m 


INTERNATIONAL 


Over-the-Counter 


100* High Lew 2 P.M.Ch'ge 

Pw*P j* U 2Z714 2716 77V, + ft 

Owm* 3 1SV, Ktt 1S16 — 44 

Durfima 1JB 3J 7Wft J*rt am 

oirlm Jt 54 255 W 10 10 

DurFH .1* 1.1 31 1M UH 143i + 4* 

evwn i 44 44 m m— ft 
OwBcllC 1524 2M Sh 


lOOi High Lsw 2 P.M.Ch'fe 

niBUi la li — ft 
3* * A 0 

133 tv. m in* 

ri2sn m 2SV.— v. 

H 7 M Ul 

40 m mtm low urn + ft 
4la J HO M JVi sw. 

Mm 12 22 51k 5 51* + 1% 

•721 WH »!»+* 
UO U 440ft 40V. « W 

511112 lift )lft — ft 
100 • 71* 710— V* 



TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 



Chemical Is Reported 
To Court Home State 


To our Readers 
in Germany. 

We would like to hear 
from you. 

If you are having difficulty 
obtaining the International 
Herald Tribune on a timdy 
basisplease let us know. 

This applies whether you 
buy your copy at a newsstand 
or are a subscriber. 

Our representative jn - 
Germany will try to solve any 
problem you may have in 


to improve quality of the 
service. 

Please contact: 

Foreign Press Services 
Gleisstrasse 5 
6832 Hockenhdm-Talhaus 
Tel: 06205 20131 
Telex: 465826 

HcralbS^Sribune. 








A 1H 

154 + 14 


1 344 344 

344 


767 2t* 244 

244—16 


rlJ 3 

3 

3 -W 


541444 MV* 

1416— 14 


» 244 314 

344 + 14 

u 

•Q40 Yi 40 

40—16 

SJ 

74 

48 

48 

54 

1075244 Sltt 

5144— M 


15 514 5V4 

516+16 

4JS 

5925 

304 

25 

13 

•93814 3M 

3H4 

7S 

33816 29K 

2946 

129 

420 

20 

20 

19 

331644- WS4 

U44 + Mi 


2 7 

616 

7 +44 


41 214 344 

.244— Vm 


2301514 M94 

1414— 9k 


33240V*.. 3914 

3914- V* 


By Robert A. Bennett 

New York Times Stniee 

NEW YORK — Chemical Bank 
has emerged as the most likdy buy- 
er of the failed Home State Savings 
Bank of Cincinnati, but despite an 
announcement by Governor Rich- 
ard F. Celeste of Ohio that a buyer 
had been found, the New Yak 
bank said there barf been no agree- 
ment 

Mr. Celeste has been under in- 
tense political pressure to find a 
way to protect Home State’s 92.000 
depositors, who had almost 5700 
million in the thrift institution. 
Home State's failure more than 
wiped out the reserves of its insur- 
er, the Ohio Deposit Guarantee 
Fund. That fund was not federally 
insured. 

Hundreds Of angry demonstra- 
tors marched on the Ohio State- 
house in Columbus Tuesday chant- 
ing, “We want our money." The 
demonstrators cheered, however, 
after Mr. Celeste announced that a 
buyer had been found for Heme 
State. 

Mr. Celeste declined Tuesday to 


Chrysler Studies 
Mitsubishi Share 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Mitsubishi 
Heavy Industries Ltd. and 
Chrysler Cotjl, owners of Mit- 
subishi Motors Coip., are dis- 
cussing an increase in Chrys- 
ler’s share of the Japanese 
automaker, a Mitsubishi Mo- 
tors spokesman said Wednes- 
day. 

The financial newspaper, Ni- 
hon Keizai ShimHim. said that 
Chrysler and Mitsubishi Heavy 
Industries had agreed that the 
American automaker would in- 
crease its share to 25 percent i 
from 15 percent. However the 
Mitsubishi Motors spokesman 
denied that the two companies 
had agreed on a figure. 

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries 
owns 85 percent of Mitsubishi 
Motors. Lee A. lacocca, Qnys- 
ler’s ehairnian is due to visit 
Mitsubishi on April 14 before 
visiting South Korea. 


Merrell Dow Buys 
17% Of Funai 

Return 

TOKYO — Merrell Dow Phar- 
maceuticals Inc. said Wednesday 
that it had acquired a 17-percent 
share in Ftmai Pharmaceuticals Co. 
of Osaka in an agreement that 
makes it FunaTs largest single 
shareholder and gives it direct ac- 
cess to Japan's pharmaceuticals 
market. 

The companies will conduct 
joint research and development, 
but Merrell Dow. a subsidiary of 
Dow Chemical Co. of Midland, 
Michigan, will provide most of the 
new products using Funai manu- 
facturing and marketing services. 

Merrell Dow specializes in anti- 
biotics and cardiovascular, respira- 
tory and central nervous system 
drugs. 


name Home State’s “buyer," ex- 
cept to say that it was not Citicorp, 
also of New York. Earlier, Ohio 
officials had strongly hinted rh»i 
Citicorp was the most likdy pur- 
chaser. 

Banking sources in Ohio said 
Tuesday that Mr. Celeste was refer- 
ring to Chemical New Yak Corp^ 
which owns Chemical Bank in New 
Yak. But Chemical issued a care- 
fully worded statement stressing 
that negotiations were far from 
complete. 

Mr. Celeste said the out-of-state 
offer fa Home State would beheld 
until Wednesday to pvt Ohio 
hanks a chance to match or exceed 
!L 

Even if Home State was sold, 
Mr. Cdeste said, the state would 
have to put up money to assure that 
all depositors in Home State would 
be fully repaid. Mr. Cdeste de- 
clined to say what the cost may be 
to the state, but the state Senate 
president, Paul Gillmor, said later 
that it was expected to be $70 mil- 
lion. 

Home State’s failure caused a 
run on 70 other savings and loan 
associations in Ohio that had been 
insured by the private, state-regu- 
lated fund. They have been re- 
opened, bat the majority have been 
ordered not to allow depositors to 
withdraw more than S750 a month 
from their accounts. Home State, 
whose owner is Marvin L. Warner, 
a Cincinnati financier, is still 
closed. 

Acknowledging that Chemi cal 
b^d held discussions with Ohio, 
Kenneth B. Here, a bank spokes- 
man, said, “There was no agree- 
ment regarding purchase of Home 
State by Chemical." 

Mr. Here added, “There are sub- 
stantial regulatory, legal and other 
issues that would have io be re- 
solved before any basis for acquisi- 
tion could be developed." These 
issues include state legislation that 
would allow Chemical to convert 
Home State and its 33 branches 
into a commercial bank with full 
commercial- banking functions. 

In addition, analysts said that 
Chmiral hart not fully appraised 
the value of Home State's assets, 
and that therefore it could not offer 
a definitive price. 

“Bob Upp’s no dummy; he’s not 
going to plunge into Ohio at any 
cost,” a New York-based bank- 
stock analyst said. Robert L Lipp, 
one of Chemical's three presidents, 
is in charge of the bank’s activities 
with consumers and with small and 
medium-sized companies. 

Mr. Celeste has proposed that 
Home State’s buyer would pay a 
premium to enter the Ohio market, 
and that the state would supple- 
ment the purchase price with a 
guarantee to assure that depositors 
get all their money. 

The guarantee would not be pay- 
able for three to five years, Mr. 
Cdeste said. It could be paid by the 
state from money acquired through 
pending lawsuits against Marvin 
Warner, Home State's owner, and 
against ESM Government Securi- 
ties Inc., the Florida company 
whose collapse caused Home 
State’s loss, be said. But analysts 
said ESM is bankrupt and has no 
resources. Home State lost about 
SI45 million as a result of the ESM 
collapse. 


ESM Insider Deals Are Cited 


(Continued from Page 7) 

dzed pubBdy fa the first time at 
Tuesday’s hearings were Arthur 
Andersen & Co., Home State’s au- 
ditor, and Deloitte, Haskins & 
Sells, audita of Fort Lauderdale- 
based American Savings & Loan. 
Alexander Grant & Co- ESM’s au- 
ditor, -was criticized again Tuesday 
fa dying ESM a dean bill of 
health when the company was los- 
ing millions of dollars, and because 
one of the company's partners al- 
legedly received at least 5125,000 
from ESM officials to cooperate in 
a scheme to hide those losses. 


Mr. Tew said Arthur Andersen 
and Ddoitte would have uncovered 
the problems at ESM several years 
ago if they M sure ihfl i 
Home State and American Savings, 
.the S&Ls they-audited. had posses- 
sion of government securities that 
were collateral for loans the S&Ls 
made to ESM. The auditors appar- 
ently never asked whether the 
S&Ls had taken physical posses- , 
si on of the securities, the S&Ls nev- 
er took possession of the securities, 
and ESM apparently used them as 
collateral to get multiple loans 
from other municipalities and 
S&Ls. 


Deutsche Bank Profit Rises 


(Continued from Page 7) 
some lime that Deutsche Bank’s 
operating profit would surpass 4 
billion DM in 1984 a that it could 
already have been that high in 
1983. 

Deutsche Bank said its declared 
net profit increased 3 p ercent to a 
record 674 million DM from 654 
million DM in 1983. Group assets 
increased 10.5 oercertt to Ttt.TR 
billion DM from210.I7 billion 
DM a year earlier, Mr. Christians 
said. 

As previously announced, the 
bank said it was keeping its 12 DM 


Tracking a 
Market Rally 

(Cordimied from Page 7) 

worthwhile advance by stocks will 
require a “significant — 75 basis 
pants — pullback in bond rates." 
i To help investor anticipate fu- 
ture sharp advances, he offered this 
insight: “Every surge has keyed off 
the bard market, so look for your 
lead from the fixed-income mar- 
ket." 

Until rates fall sufficiently, be 
projected that Wall Street would 
trade in “no discemable patten." 
That he said, “You don’t 
play the market today, you play 

stocks." . . . 

. ' This week Paine Webber turned 
very positive on big capitalization 
issues. 


dividend, unchanged from 1984. 
Analysts said the failure to raise tire 
dividend and the market’s having 
discounted a result equal to or bet- 
ter than 1983 were the reasons be- 
hind the weak boost to Deutsche 
Bank's shares on the Frankfort 
Stock Exchange Wednesday, rising 
30 pfennigs to 439.8 DM. 

Mr. Christians said the bank ex- 
pects to see trading play an increas- 
ingly important role in boosting 
profits, particularly at a time when 
interest margins are being 
squeezed. Last year, trading profits 
jumped 1 1.6 percent, he saia. 

The h*nlr has no plans this year 
to increase its 5-percent share in 
the London merchant bank, Mor- 
gan Grenfell & Co., but Mr. Chris- 
tians said Deutsche Bank would 
watch developments carefully in 
London, where it last year estab- 
lished a new subsidiary, Deutsche 
Bank Capital Markets LttL, which 
is to begin operations shortly. 

Mr. Christians said risk provi- 
sions in 1984 were substantial, but 
dedined to be specific, A managing 
board spokesman, WHfried Goth, 
said Deutsche Bank had to make 
one of its largest provisions ever for 
a single foreign nsk last year in the 
case of European Asian Bank AG 
of Hamburg, of which it owns 60 
percent 

The bank has had serious trouble 
with loans made to Southeast 
Asian nations, particularly Taiwan. 
Deutsche Bank officials indicated 
that the bank may have made pro- 
visions of about 300 million DM to 
cover loan risks for the Eurobank. 


Bayer Profit 
Rose 34.3% 
In Last Year 

Reiners 

LEVERKUSEN, West Germa- 
ny — Bayer AG, the West German 
chemicals concern, said Wednes- 
day that pretax profit surged 34 3 
percent in 1984, due largely to the 
world economic recovery and the 
Strength of the dollar. 

A company statement said world 
group pretax profit was a record 19 
billion Deutsche marks ($920 mil- 
lion). up from 116 billion DM in 
1983. 

Parent company pretax profit in- 
creased 19.1 percent to 137 billion 
DM from 1.15 billion DM in 1983. 
Higher-volume sales boosted reve- 
nue 10.7 percent to 1632 billion 
DM. Bayer said. 

Sales also reached a record high, 
increasing 153 percent to more 
than 43 billion DM from 373 bil- 
lion DM in 1983. Foreign sales, 
benefiting from the dollar's 
strength, rose 14.4 percent and do- 
mestic sales increased 43 percent, 
the company said. 

Bayer said exports accounted for 
653 percent of parent-company 
revenue last year, up from 63.4 per- 
cent a year earlier. 

The statement gave no details erf 
net a dividend. 

Last November, Hermann-Josef 
Stronger, chairman of the manag- 
ing board, pledged to pass on some 
of the gains to shareholders 
through a higher payout A divi- , 
dead announcement is due later 
this month. 

Bayer paid a dividend of 7 DM 
on 1983 results. 

The statement said world-group 
investment in buddings, plant and 
equipment would be boosted to 2 
billion DM in 1985 from 1.8 billion 
DM in 1984. 


Lasmo Profit Rose 
26% Last Year 
To £113.1 Million 

Reuters 

LONDON — London & Scot- 
tish Marine Oil PLC reported 
Wednesday that 1984 pretax profit 
rose 26 percent to £113.1 milli on 
(5135.7 million) from £89.9 million 
the year before. 

Lasmo said profit was boosted 
by the strength of the UJ5. dollar 
against the British pound as well as 
the start of production at the La- 
lang ofl field in the Malacca Straits 
and increased production from the 
Beatrice field in the North Sea. 

The oil and gas group also said 
that it was p lanning a £67 J milli on 
one-for-four rights issue at 285 
pence. The company said that it 
intended to recommend that divi- 
dends for 1985 at least total the 
1984 dividend of 122 pence per 
share. 

Lasmo’s shares eased to 328 
peace a share Wednesday after the 
results were announced, down 
from 348 pence at Tuesday's dose. 

Lasmo said that it had 23 suc- 
cessful oil and gas wells completed 
in the first two months of 1985, a 
70-percent success rate. The com- 
pany said it plans to participate in 
about 250 exploration, appraisal 
and development wells as part of its 
total capital spending program of 
£150 mtiUon in 1985. 


OptlOIlS (prices In S/azJ. 



May 

** 


30 , 

14257625 

. 


330 ! 

975-1175 

19JB.21XD 


340 

625 as 

1 <25-1625 

22752475 

330 

400-60) 

1075-1275 

18002000 

360 

275 475 

77S975 

USD-1650 

370 

350 

ITS 375 

575 77S 
400-600 

11751375 

92-1125 


Grift 32020-3210 

VUcmWUteWcM&A. 

1, Qtei da Mem-Btec 
1211 Geneve I. Sviimlari 
TeL 310251 - Telex 283*5 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
3 April 1985 

The art mart yotaequofet ta c s shown be low a rc supplied by the Fundi lilted wtttffic 
exception of lomo finds whoso motes an based on issue prices. The following 
maratnal symbols imflartfl frequency of quotations supplied for ttto I HT: 

(d) -doily; (w) -weekly; (b) -bi-monthly; (r) -regularly; CD- Irregularly. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

(w) Al-Mot Trust, SA S 15X40 

BANK JULIUS BAER &CO.LHL 

— (d ) Boertsond SF 91175 

—Id ) Coobor SF lima 

— td I Equlboer America S 1109.00 

— Id) Equlboer Europe SF 117X00 

—Id) Equlboer Pacific SF 116000 

— Id 1 Grobar SF 105X00 


— idlGrobar SFloszoo 

— id } StocWwr SF1M8JXT 

— (d)CSFFand SF2SJ3 

—Id) Crossbow Fund 5F 11.21 

— Id) VTF Fund H.V 51X68 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 

— (d ) Aslan Growth Fund — Siam 

— Iwl Dtvwtmnd SF 62.90 

— PIP ll m. r lm S 1857 

— iwj FIF — Europe S10L75 

— Iwl FIF— pacific- S1599 

— Id) Indosuez Muttfbanch A SS7J5 

—Id ) Indosuez Multfixmds B SUU3 

BRIT ANN I A^OB 271. St. Heitor, Jersey 

— Iw) BrltDeUar Incomo SUd* 

-<w) Brits NUmoeTurr lire 

— IdlBritlntLSSIanaoLPOrN SUDS 

— td) Brtt. KitLCManoaJ’ortf £1.186 

— Iw) BrilUdwnal Growth $ 0-166 

— [w) BrttGofd Firryl . — S 0.820 

— <w) BrflJWanoaXurrsncy 114.17 

—id i Brtt. Japan Dtr Pert. Fit Si Xta 

— Iwl BrtUereey Gilt Fund £0221' 

—Id) Brtt. Warm Lots. Fund S 1.071 

—la ) Brit. World Trdn. Fund SOUS 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-Iw) Capital mn Fund S 35-96 

— Iw) Capital I taQo 5A ■— S1ZM 


OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

— Iw Multicurrency 

— <• Dollar Medium Torm_ 

— Iw Dollar Long Term 

— Iw Japanese Yen—.. . . . . 
— (w Pound Sterling— — 

— iw Deutsche Mark 

— Iw Dutch Fterhi— 

— Iw) Swim Franc 

ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB C37B. The Hague [HO) 4SK70 
—Id ) flever BetoBHlnoan* ft 

PARIS6AS— GROUP 

—Id ) Coriexa International.- — 

-Iw) OSLH3M — 

— Iw) OBLIGES! (ON 

—Iwl OBLI-DOLLAR 

— IW) OBLI-YEN 

— Iw) OBLI-GULDEH 

—Id ) PAROIL-FUND- 

—Id j PAIUNTER FUND 

-Id) PAR US Treasury Band — 


SW.1t 

DM 1.16100 
_ SF92JH 
_ S 1.10026 
Y 105,950.00 
. FLt048.11 



5 KAN D I FOND INTL FUND I4M-2MZ7D) 

— Iw)int: Bid si-90 Offer SSJi 

— IWIACC.: Bid 5492 offer S&23 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire So. Ux*)«>-01 '377-8040 


— (b)SHBBond _ 

— Iw) SHB Inti Growth Fundi 



— <d 

[1 

—Id 

1 

-Id 


—Id 


—Id 


—Id 

i 














































.***._ •» . i - ■P’.KfcT - ‘ ■*? **C*. 


INTERNATIONAL 



m a* 

7% 2*4 

am rot 
in inn 
m 11 

1M4 9V* 
13 

&Va 4V. 

am as 
m m 
aa ia«. 

8% 5 
i6v* m 


LnBore 

LoPrtf 

LatoSa .IS* 

LndBnn 34 U 

Ubnki -3*o 13 

Lenar 

Laura n 

LazKaa 

LnarPP 

LeoPh 

LaMgh* 

LataurT 

Lovttt 

LMFPh 


. IBz 34% 
a 2V4 
15 15 
M 13V* 
T7 Wit 
212 10 
as «* 

M 2 
a nt 

W 4 
10 4 

5 M 

173 3% 

2B 4% 

6 TV, 
M T44t 
44 13A 
51 am 


. 4 nt 

a sv* 
a am 

15 MV* 
33 Utt 
22 13 
9 11th 

12 sv* 

3 271* 
110 fl* 


MV* 34% + V* 
2V. 2V, 

M9W 15 + 1% 

13 13 + Vi 

1M Mtt— 9* 
W4 91*— Wr 
6Vi fl%— 4* 
2 2 — V* 

m m*— % 

M* M4— it 
4 4 

4M «* 

3% m— Mi 
44* 44* — V* 
24* 244 
1444 MV*— tb 
UV* 13V* 

25 2514 + V* 


2V* 21*— 1* 
SVt SV* 

34V. 34 V* — 4* 
14V* 14V*+ 1* 
10% 15V*— 14 
12V* 121*— V. 
11V* in*— 1% 
514 5V* + 3fc 
27V* 27V*— 14 
04 5V. . 
27V* 271* — V* 
S* 51k— V* 
TV* 71*4- V* 
15 15V* + 1% 


i?! >: 

i m HTirC- 5c 
! ■: vrr. 1.2-s aJ 
:S.N'7"*e r. ■; 

i iS »wt= >? *1 

I e» Newer ?. Li 
ihinwsi ; jj ;c» 

I SNUJ 

I tl HOW! 

: "i Noeiine 
: I- Wn 
!l SWS7S 

^nccs 
?s mips ri »li :;j 
1 FtNeurr- 
N W f 

| ’ ioto: 


(Continued on Page 11) 




French Company 

Handbook ms 



Now in the 1985 updated edition, 200 
pages of indispensable information in English on 
a selection of 84 of the most important French 
companies, as well as basic fads on other major 
firms. Includes information on the French 
economy and major sectors of activity, an 
introduction to the Paris Bourse, and a bilingual 
dictionary of French financial terms. 

Each profile indudes detailed information 
on: head office, management, major activities, 
number of employees, sales bredodown, company 
background, shareholders, principal French 
subsidiaries and holdings, foreign holdings and 
activities, exports, research and innovation, 1979- 
1983 finanaal performance, important devel- 


AEROSPAHALE 
AJR FRANCE 
ALSTHOMATIANT1QUE 
AVJONS AVWCa DASSAUT- 
BREGUET AVIATION 
AXA (MUTUHiES UNJE5- 
DROUOT) 

BANQUERvOOSUEZ 
BANQUE NAnONALE DE PAfOS- 
BNP 

BEGH0+SAY 
BDBtMANN 
BONGRAJN SA. 

BOUYGUES 

BSN 

CAMPfiNON BERNARD 
CGEEAL5THOM 
CGM GROUP 

CHARBONNAGES DE FRANCE 
(CDF) 

CHARGEURS&A. 

QMO'JTS FRAN^AIS 
CT ALCATEL 
ajJ&MfiXTBKANGE 
COGEMA 

COMPACT DU MIDI 
COMPAGNE HIANCAISE OES 
P£rROLES - TOTAL 
COMPAGNEGfrfeAlE 
D"ELECTOGT£ (CGE) 

COMP AGNE G&4&ALE 0E5 
EAUX 

COMPAG70E LA H&^N 
CR&XT AGKJCOLE 
Otton COMMERCIAL DE 
FRANCE |CCF] 
CR&XTDUNORO 
CR&UT NATIONAL 
CROUZET 
DARTY 
DUMEZ 

BECTRONK9UE SERGE 
DASSAULT 
Elf AQUITAINE 
EPfeA-BERTRAND FAURE 
ESSB.OR 
FJVESULE 
FftAMATOME 


FRANCHISE HOECHST 
G&^RALE BISCUT 
GROUPS VICTOWE 
IMETAL 

JBJMONT-SCHNSDB? 

LOR&ML 

LomsvunoN 

LYONNAEE DCS EAUX 

MATRA 

MB0DB4 

MBOJNGSON 

MfCHEUN 

moEt-hb««ssy 

PARIBAS f'Z 

PStNORICARD £ 

PEUGEOT 
POUET 

PHNTEMPS GROUP 

PROMODES 

QUttlHlY 

LAREDOUTE 

RENALH.T 

RHONE-POULENC 

ROUSSEL UCLAF 

SACHjOR 

SAiNT-GOBAJN 

SANOH 

SCOA 

SCREG 

sa GROUP 

SHTA 

SNECMA 

SOOElt G£n£RALE 
SOCtlt GEN&ALE 
DBfflBWSBSAWRAPT 
4 BRICE 
SODEXHO 

SOMMER ALLRen 
SPIE BAUGNOUES 
THEMECAMQUE 
THOMSON 
THOMSONGSF 
UMON 065 ASSURANCE 
DE PARIS (UAP) 

USINOR 

UTA 

VALEO 

VALLOUREC 


opments and 1984-1985 highlights and trends. 

Indispensable for corporate, government 
and banking executives, insfitutiond investors, 
industrial purchasers and other decision-makers 
who should be more folly informed on major 
French companies. French Company Handbook 
is being sent to 8,000 selected business and 
finandd leaders in the United States, Japan and 
the Middle East. 

Other interested parties may purchase the 
Handbook at $38 per copy, including postage in 
Europe. Five or more copies, 30% reduction. 
Outside Europe, please add postal charges for 
each copy: Middle East $4; Asia, Africa, North 
and South America $7. 

Hcr alb ^S Srib ttnc 

frb«:h Company handbook 1985 

Published by 

International Business Development 
with the 

Intern a tional Herald Tribune 


* That’s the date the rates go up. 

By subscribing to the International Herald Tribune 
now, at our special introductory rates, you will save 
nearly half the newsstand price on a one-year 
subscription (48%, to be exact, in most European 
countries). 

More important, youH never miss an issue./; / 

This special introductory rate is 25% 
less than the regular subscription rate and / , 
is applicable only the first time you sub- , f > 
saibe. So check the 12-month box below/ / 
for maximum savings. There is no risk. />/ 

You can cancel your subscription at / / ^ 
any time and receive a full refund v 7 V 
on all unserved copies. //. 

But don’t delay. Order now! r . 




4 M 







htemafkand Herdd Tribune, Book Division 

181 avenue Chcriesde-Gaufe, 92521 NeuiUy Cedex, France. 

Please send me ; copies of French Company Handbook 1985. 

[H Enclosed ts i ny payment. (Payment may be made in j 
oanvertfixe European currency of your choice at current 
exchange rates.) 

□ Hease charge to my credit aadiVBAD raNBSD AMEXD 

CARD MJMBSl BP. DATE 

SGNARRE—, 

NAME 

POSmON 

COMFANY 

ADORES 


OTY/COUNIW- 


4-WS 


% 


□ My paymem is enclosed 

(dMdc or nmn order n the JHT1 



Phase charge my credit card: 

D Access □ Eurocard 
American Express 
Mastercard 

ifW EZI Diners Club Clvisa 


11 1 1 IP 1 ll 





1-jXa 

















































Sts. 

15 

Hi 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


ID* Turner Scud to Get Help in Takeover Bid for CBS Bank of F.nglanH Curbs Euronotes 


II: 
It'} 
III 

,g a jSSjfei 

J|tt< 

a St ts,, 

&. SS? ^ 
Svjii 

If II 

ill 

J” 235 -L f ' 1 

f f §S£? 

I Ml 

* Sc $ fr* 

a S' h S* 


By Sally Bedell Smith bid, these sources said Tuesday. 

According w the sources, Mr. 
NEW YORK — Ted Turner, Turner has secured financial com- 
wno was reported lace in February rmtments of about J50 million each 


to be seeking a takeover of CBS 
Inc., is preparing for a move on the 
company, according to sources in 
(be broadcast mdustrv. 

The Atlanta-based cable and 


By Carl Gcwircz 

Internal tonal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The Bank of England 


a i’ll say. cemly had conversations with Ivan 

Since the fust reports of Mr. F. Boesky, a New York investor, 


f T . — — ■ — __ — —J’ ihiu MMHaaauuio wiui irnu laaiiUCS, 

X x 5 * 00 ? ^P 01 ^ of Mr- F - Boesky, a New York investor, The move, which has been antid- 

ISfLSSfJ-^ . an Monday annountsd that he paled, «m disused ®id> ihe an- 


facilities. 

The move, which has been antid- 


.. , , — — 4 ,—* — , •““‘a, uiwjcjji lu \_oo. w an who mi iwanaay annuimcea inai ne nated_ disci 

^ J** ^ 10 “vesUMnt houses Street analysts have expressed held 8.7 percent of CBS's stock. SStt"bth? 

Vteh.n g M ^ $[“ 1 “ &g 4 hosule akscm about his ability to raise _ CBS's common stock closed nancia! centers 

to line up financing for a takeover Rea 


* uwuk uuuwvcr sAcpuosm aooui ms acmiy to raise CBS's common stock closed 
i , , _ , , . , * e minimum S4 billion that ana- Tuesday at 5106.75 per share on 

Reached Tuesday at Ins hotd lysts said would be needed to ac- the New York Stock Exchange, 


thorities” in the other leading fi- 
nancial centers “who are also 


com m itment does not show up on 1 given for a straightforward loan 
the balance sheet — it is a coutm- to a nonbank borrower and 02 for 
gent asset. a loan to a bank. 

However, banking supervisors Bahkm ^ ^ puls 

undrawn note facility credits on a 
Sdv« worry that the backup cred- maent footing { ' om undrawn 

its nskteng drawn at exactly when syndicated bank loans. Bank of En- 
tt wD be most inconvenient for the w^TArniRin 

bank: ^ rbe no« nwto shots 

Sfc intended and thai its current review 

d™»t»eal|y. 0 f all off-balance sheet risks wfll 


considering their own arrange- -d their M ratio d* 

mems with respect to this busi- chne, at the moment when concern £ y 

mss,” the Bank of England said, about the wefl-bemg of banks is ^ . 

However officials atthe Federal hbely to be greatest. _ Bankers m London, who believe 

Thus, the Bank o 


Whhesda^ 

AMEX 

3pm 


Tobias include the nationwide prices 
up to »ha doslaa on Wall street 
and do nat reflect late trades elsewhere. 


« *w*i 
HttlU* Udt 


„ sa JPAL 

Mtf.YidPe laatwaiiow Osaoi-D* 


Mto isto PrnttL M 4j 0 t 

<|* PfortRd .12 u 

Tto MS PraiH ai M *.l 

ito vs PramR* 

ito Pro*R D M M 4 

J FtoM IS 


2»k 2» fflk 
WWW 
7U 7V!i 7U 
ns ito ito + to 
MS «* Mk— v* 
M M » 


!» ptpcts is 2 7s ii ioo an* sw aoi* + v* 


gh in* ProwCn zu u 
1* ink PotpfC 2 M 12A 
33 2St* PatoiE 07 1X7 
VW 4A PuntoO 


mtonm 

H HO Low Stoct 


to. _ 3PJA. 
wthHWiLo* Opotorw 


(Continued from Page 10) 

m unm i 3* aw » 

3WJ. 23V* Lwluir 20 W 3SV> 30U> 3SVI— 1A 

1MJ MS Lumex M J2J U) UK MV ]«— Hi 

1?* LundyE 1* * 12*4 124* 124k— vk 

14 '04* Lurlci jflr 3J f « 12 114* 114k— IS 

35* iav> LynCSv jo. i.i is in 29 m 2ns— to 

» Bto LVDCOC JO 11 f U 94k 94k 94k 


9to 5 
ISVfa 138k 
20 nvk 
Mfc to 
4W Tto 
17** TOVz 
jOto 274k 
32to 3m 
n k 5to 
4tk 3V. 

^ Tt 

28 Ik I1K 
304k 20VS 
7 2 

sv«i at* 

34 23 

71k 31k 
14V2 llVk 


Alt 54 11 
.12 3 as 

n 42S47 


e 13 

r 11 

.20 1 J U 

l J2 IB 21 
■12 4 13 


440 1 J 11 


AO 2d 11 100 15V. \S 


1 27to 27to 27to— Vk 
11 in. 184k lS4k 
1 JIM 311k 211k— Vk 
I » » 51k— Ilk 


4 4Vh 6Vk 4to + Vk 

7 1444 UV» 1444 

18 l Tto 17 17 — Ik 

2 lVfe IVk Ilk 

22 » 34* Sto— I* 

3 131k 174* 121k 4- Vk 

441 491k «V Mk-V Vk 

500z 1214 394k 51 Vi— Ilk 

31 IVk ■ BVk— »k 

1 4 4 4 — Vk 

« 11 1044 lMk 

22 to to to— 'A. 

15 24Mi 34 24 

19 2tto 20 U. 2SV. — Vk 

130 3Vi 3to 3Kr+Vk 

21 4to 4to 44k+ Vk 

1 3144 3144 3144 
1 M Ik A 


TJAtatn 
H Ion Low Slock 


W4fc 94k VST n JO* XI 

27 15V. VaJIvR 2.10 71 V 

Z7to lJto Voters M Id 14 

12Vk 4to vorwm 

5 24k Vorit 17 

23to l«k VIAmC 40b 2.1 9 

71k 34* VI Rah 

IV. to Varna 

151k tto Vomit A0 1.1 11 

M 31k IWM* .10 2.1 

914 SV, VLcon 13 

4Vi 7*4 vintM 

IMk llto Vlrca Mr A I 
Ftt 4lk VHuotC At 3J 11 
l»k B Voplni A4 14 13 

llto 134k VuIcCP AO 44 11 


Sit 3PM. 

Wt HMi Low QwtQiw 


However, officials at the Federal 
Reserve Board, tbe West German 
and Luxembourg h anking commis- 
sions and West Gennany’s Bundes- 
bank said they do not anticipate 


Base Lending Bote Qtt 

To 13V4%byBardays 

Reuters 

LONDON — Barclays Bank 
PLC cut its base lending rate 
Wednesday to 13ti percent 
from 13K percent It cut inter- 
est it pays on 7-day deposits to 
1014 percent from 1016 percent. 

Last week, National West: 
minster Bank PLC and Lloyds 
Bank PLC lowered their base 
rales to 13 percent. Midland - 

Rank PLC has maintained its 
1356-perceni base rate. 


st German BaQk ^ England an- 

ngcammis- nounced that effective immediately 
iy^ Bundcs- il ^ include such backup lines in 
r anrirtnaii* the risk-asset ratio calculation it 


... _ — _ ban* said tney do not anticipate uauuauuu n 

« 27 2 M » any “immmenr rhan g ^ in their usesmexanuntng balance sheets to 
im ^ a 7 to ^ own regulations determine the appropriate amount 

i in* i2vS The facilities, which combine ca P i “ 1 a tank nods to toie. 

? % 4 & w short- term capital market transao- This will aimly to the woridwide 
53 i»k rnvk loto+ik lions with medium-term bank activities of British hank s and to 
15 7 to 74 il loans, were fim introduced in late ^British operaiions of foreign 

’* iSSiSkiMS* 11 * 1981. It is currently estimated that ban ^ s - 
5 im ioto w5- v* S35 billion in facilities have been Tbe Bank of England assumes 
io laik isi 4 iav 4 — I* arranged and ihp? $12 trillion of thm the r uling will tnmp^ q* the 
\ notes are outstanding. pressure on banks to increase their 

t* 7 ^ Tbe growth of toe market, how- capitalization. 

§h ?»k -1 ever, has been increasing sharply. The provisional weighting, pend- 

isto uto—iik London-based International Fl- jug a review of the treatment of aU 
ii* ivk— vk nandng Review estimates that off-balance sheet risks, is set at 0.5. 
ltoSiiSk + vk S10J billion in facilities were ar- This compares with a wdghtine of 

it ranged during the first quarter of 

7 iik ’lik=i 4 tiiisyear. 

ii** to The note facilities appeal to issu- •»•••••• 

iaw + to ers because of the low cost and to 

il 44 V 2 V* + w banks because toe business gener- •* i \r\o 

3 Sto an 5 - It 3165 fees widiout automatically in- *• I 

ii 4 ito— to creasing their balance sheets. •• J UNITED C 

vSt wt- S Since the outbreak of the Third *1 s| \ 

V 2 U in*— k, World debt aids, all banks have •• I V 

ah 25— to been under pressure from bank su- *1 t JL J 17 few dm a 

27 m.— 5 P erv * SOTS 10 improve todr capital- •• 

mm to-assets ratios. One way to accom- •! _ . 

m , 15 +k " plish that is to increase profits and I- To support its un 

25 _ E retained earnings while limiting tbe •" (Luxemboure) S.A. i 

growth in assets. Z» ^ nds at l0 ^ % , 

'IS 4 to- to This is what note faciliues do. •* 
is isto— is Bants eam a profit buying toe !• r™. „ . . 

* ‘ -» note tom the £sw at price •; ^ P n ' a,e P J f eem ' 


own r^ulations. 


detenrune toe appropriate amount 


-s. 

■i S&lit 


MS* 12 
Mk 14k 
fto 74* 
2 to 1 
uto 9Vk 
54k 3 
Zto 
Mto 
ISto 
35 
944 

in* 

2744 
2 »to 
148k 


78k 4Vj 
38k 2 Vk 
IMk 744 
Mto 52 
ink 174* 
9to 54k 
Uto 84* 
20 
25 
BVk 
118k 

24to 
HRk 
17ft 
I7» 

«H 

ms 

?Vk 

nto 

74k 


n 

10 

s 

15 

JOa 1A I 
u 

.12 A 13 
9 

as 

100 ISA 35 

■80b 22 12 
200422.9 

as 

■10a 44 
.12* 1.1 S 
1.U 14 14 
A0 1A 17 
A7f 54 I 
.15 1 A 13 
1A 9 
34 
23 

M 93 IS 
40 1J I 
■34* JA 3 
A4 U 20 
04 IS 7 
Job 1 A 17 
ABD TA 17 


134k 1341 
214 2¥ 
844 BVi 
ito IK 

m «u 
3Vk 3H 
Fto 144 
Wto 1 M 
VJto into 
tt 1. 

fto *K 
30 30 

25to 25to 
158k M 
44k ito 
J58k Wk 
15to 1544 
338k am 
15 158k 

33to 3544 
A 844 
5to 514 5V4 

2to 2to 214 
1044 Ulto 108k 



7T8k 218k 218k 

A 13 i 20Vr 20 20—14 

33 30 3 78k 71k— 8k 

49 8 1014 fto 98k— 8k 

r? 35 lxUtolitoUto— to 
U1S 12 198k 1f8fc 198k 

1A 17 1145 ink 17V* lg* + 8* 

A 39 I H M SkT to 
11 U 5 7 7 7 

18k 11* 18k 

3SV4 35 Mto— to 

» o 9 —to 


221* lOtfe Ryfcoff 40 25 12 IIS 30 198k 198k— to 


22 ito ato sto + 8* 
16Z7 74k 7V. 744 + Vk 

3 38* 3to 38k 

233 9 BH Bto— 8 k 

20 78k 78fc 78fc + to 
i ito ito ito 

21 Tto 78k 7to— to 

1 th nt Ito— v* 

50z Mto *0to Mto + to 

4 20to 20V* 20to + 44 
1» IS** 354* 358k + to 

4 22to 22to 22to— H 

5 57 57 57 — to 

110 IMk 10 10 — to 

4 «k 48k 88 k— to 

2 2014 SOI* 20 Vk— V* 

5 13to 1314 13to + to 
74 5to 484 41k— 8k 

11 29 2S8* 23V* 

1 J7to 37V. 37to 

21 1414 U 18 — to 

5 ilto ilVk 41*. — 14 

5 Ito Ilk 18k 

7U0x 514 514 Sto— Ik 

19 1344 1344 1344— to 

3 nk ito ito— to 

IS il 4 4to— to 

1 iito iito llto— to 

3 «lb 984 984— to 

3 171k 17V* 17to 

iS ^ "V'VX 

17x Mto 1344 14 + to 

u ioto ioi4 ioto— 4* 

TO 1444 14 1444-9 84 

2 54* 444 48k— to 

14 14V* 137k 14 + to 

3 38k 2to 38k 

2 344 J4k 544 + to 

14 17 1444 Iito + to 

4 1484 Mto Mto— to 
13 148k U44 1484— to 
30 7to 71* 7V* — Vk 

4 98k tto 9M 

13 91* fto fto— to 
23 984 tto 98k + 8 k 
1150Z 44 44 44 

in im 13 — I* 

8 w 19 19 — to 

959 98k 9 tto— to 

13 7to 714 7to + Ik 
u I58k 158k 158* — to 

3 IDto ISto 138k— to 

41 1984 TO 10 — to 
23 28k 2 to 28* 

14 484 48* 484 — 14 

434 2214 22 22 —to 

■ 72 718k 72 4- 8 k 

100 Ito Bto Bto + to 

4 1984 198k 198k + to 

12 284 214 214— to 
U 308* 20 Vk 208k + to 
44 4ta 4to AV4— to 

9 28k 2to 28k 

10 51k 5to 5to 

t4 278k 27to Z7V!i— to 
44 I to to— to 
55 1284 Uto 1214 + to 
» MV. Mto 14V. + to 
9 484 484 484— to 

32 1» 184 Fto- Vk 

32 251* 248* 25 + Vk 

32 int in* ink— to 


54 2A 11 
4 14 14 
.10 2.1 

12 

a uii 


A4 2L9 21 
22 

.12 3 12 

IjOO* 15 4 

.14b 1.1 
ATI U 
AO 24 11 
JO 3.1 23 
AO 1 A 13 


384 Ato 
2784 1784 
1584 101* 
3lto U 
3214 IflVo 
384 84 

91* 38* 
113 441* 

34 17V. 

148h 634 

llto ito 
58* 24k 
348* llto 
514 JV. 
17to 118k 
Ato 31* 


ISto 78k 
131* Bto 
14 58k 

l*to 7V. 
itto 141* 
30 M 
20 984 

584 214 


2314 198k 
4014 as to 
4V4 21k 
148k 11 
AH 284 
171k I28fc 
34 37to 
71* 3to 


21 41 

AO 13 13 S3 

.40 2Jb 10 13 

.16 3 11 6839 

.11 A 11 7 

17 
5 53 

.94 .« 13 14 

TAB 4.7 15 I 

AO Z2 5 1 

.to L5 4 22 

29 

262 14.9 4 

13 24 

XO* A 12 KM 

.12 2A 7 4 

13 22 


4A0 11.7 20z 

14 (1 

AO 12 92 

20 948 

17 30 

1A2 4A 15 14 

A3* 1A 21 80 

27 S4 
4 

5 94 

20 

2A4O10A 51 

4 S6 11A 410z 

.10* 2.9 If 3 

JJ U 7 20 

143 

MB 11J 17 

60 16 12 14 

AS* 20 14 


714 Tto 
2314 2314—1 
15H 158k 
UVk llH-1 
188k 1 * 8 *— Tto 
11* Uk— to 
7Vk 7to— to 


11 ll —to 
51* 5to— to 
118* 178*— to 

414 48* + M 
13 Uto + to 
si* ito + to 
13 12 V* + V* 

3*3 3*k — *4 
28V. 28V.— to 
Ito Ito— to 
3714 378k— to 
108* 108*— V. 
TBU 108k 

12 llto— to 
17to 178* 

158* 148k— 1* 
27 27 — 84 

2714 2714— to 

39k 28* 

II 118* + to 
ito ito 
318* 21to — to 
39to 39V,— to 
3to 3to 
Mto Mto— to 
4to 4 to— v* 
15 ISto— to 
31 31 

A 4 — to 


Bankers in London, who believe I iJ 

that most banks active in the mar- 
ket have been assigning their own Australian Commission 
weightings for internal use by man- . _ _ 

agement, said they were not sure Approves Wage Increase 
what impact the formal move to 

ehseSmK 

cost of such facilities will increase h 5JS“ 

from the rock-bottom levels now &“L a W increase 

prevaiHnR. effecuye April 6. the Arbitration 

v _ Commission said Wednesday. It 

One likely outcome is that an will be the first increa se in a year, 
increasing number of facilities will Tbe increase mil lift the average 
be arranged without any formal un- weekly malt? wage of about 390 
derwriting. A few such deals have Australian dollars (5260) by about 
been brought to market whereby 10 dollars. However, it fail* short of 
one or a group of banks agree on a the 2.7-percent increase sought by 
“best-efforts" basis to tty to sell the trade unions to cover the rise'in 
short-term notes, ranging in matu- consumer prices in the second half 
rides from 1 to 12 months, of 1984. 






U 

CO 


UOB (LUXEMBOURG) S.A. 

UNITED OVERSEAS BANK (LUXEMBOURG) SA. 


17 too d*t Bairn, 2018 Unambourg 


To support its improving activity, the United Overseas Bank 
(Luxembourg) S.A. issued Lux.Fr. 250 millions 5-years subordinated 
bonds at 1014%. 


Mto 58k Yank Co 
Sto 4 vartnv 


58* 5fe 5*fc 
58* 51* Sto 


A8 25 

AS 20 
250 ISA 14 
ran 15 

pt 152 112 
Pf 154 1L5 
at 15* 112 
(tf 458 92 
Of I AS 112 

of 221 11 A 

Ain 

' 150 U3 

59 AM 
24 22 21 


and selling the paper to investors at 
a slightly higher price. In addition, 
banks earn an annual fee for pro- 
viding a backup line of credit that I 
the issuer can draw upon if the ! 
notes are noribid for. 

As long as me line of credit is not 
drawn, the banks generate income 
and profits without any increase in 
their reported assets. The loan 


TRANSCAR 


THE C« SWUNG 
SPECIALISTS 


58 12 47 
50 14 4 
11 

AB 15 12 

Vi 

.13a 11 25 


50a 1A 11 
-34 15 H) 

130 45 11 


LOS ANGELES (213 568 92 
MONTREAL 

AGMTS WOtUJ WIDE 

Uav* il to us to bring it to you 



Ato 2to UNA 
4 2 USR Ind 

Mto Sto uttn.lv 9 

to to Unlctxp 14 

158k llto UirtCT.pt JS &5 

llto 88* Unlmrn JOo 43 

21 Mto UAIrPd Jib 35 U 

23 1684 Ur>Co«F k U 

3to 19k UFootfA .10 57 22 

Mto 10V> UtMkd 651 45 15 

Sto *1* Unftorv J4t14J 13 

lfto Mto UoHtln AO* 21 

211* 10 UnltvB 1850c 
Mto 78k UnvCm 17 

108k 5to UnlVRs 35 

1584 98k UnvPat 


4 284 28k 28k 

B 38k 3 Sto 

2 "5 "ft"*-* 

7 138k 138k 138k— to 
181 1084 108k W8k 

15 171k 1784 17to— to 

39 229k 2714 2214— to 

N Ito 184 Hk— to 

38 138k 138* 138*— to 
9 6*4 4V. ito— 1* 

1 188k 138k 188k + 1* 

187 101k 10 M — Ik 

ss Uto isto llto 

XI 8 8 + to 

14 14tt Mto Mto 


me issuer can araw upoi 

Unocal Chairman, 

drawn, the banks generate 

Pickens Exchange Sl p "'TS y “ 
Insults at Hearing 

By Philip Shenon 

Ne* York Times Senice 

Washington — The gloves came off 

Tuesday on Capitol HOI as the flinty chairman camvk/njce U 39 ® 44 
of Unocal Crap, traded insults with T. Boone bo si 

Pickens, theTexas oilman who says he might try I^^dbi 

to take over Unocal. wJmch bMioas 

While waiting to testify at a House hearing on 
corporate mergers, tbe two men did not even Houston n| 931 705 
shake hands. ii ^ 

“I decided that he wasn’t entitled to shake my agmts wotro wide 

hand,’* said the Unocal chairman, Fred L Hart- to “* to brino * *» y°“ 

ley. 

“That’s a strange way to treat your largest 
shareholder " Mr. Pickens answered. 

They were in town to appear before a House 
oversight subcommittee that is scrutinizing tax 
implications of the large number of recent cor- 
porate takeovers. But the hearing was overshad- 
owed by the verbal hand grenades being thrown 
by Mr. Hartley and Mr. Pickens. 

Mr. Pickens has said be might offer to buy 
Unocal, the company that Mr. Hartley has led 
for nearly 20 years. A group headed by Mr. 

Pickens, the chairman of Mesa Petroleum Co, 
controls 13.6 percent of the stock of Unocal, the 
parent company of Union Ofl of California. 

Hie attacks were highly personal. 

“Mr. Pickens has somehow created a specula- 
tive frenzy that has convinced his camp follow- 
ers that there’s easy money to be made in 
attacking ofl companies, and to hell with tomor- 
row.” Mr. Hartley told the congressmen. — , 

Mr. Pickens, a frequent critic of ail company 
executives, responded with criticism of Mr. for y*x mfcwVad purdo* roM*» 
Hartley’s management style. In his most biting ^ ^ 

attack, he questioned why a piano had been put - ** do the vwrfc 
aboard a Unocal corporate jet to yow 

The plane, he said, was worth S25 million and Send tor a quo*ofe>n ta 

used by “the guy in the back,” nodding toward 
Mr. Hartley, who sat four rows behind. “The ps imwtn fra^TSSon Airport) 
piano cost $500, but it cost $50,000 to install it 5 . yfadto r s^ .Uffidy. 

aboard the airplane,” Mr. Pickens said. “Who Tot uK'a^^^a/rjira ’ 
paid for all this? The shareholders.” n* 1 * eai327i gecoms g 

Mr. Hartley said the piano had been a gift MYCAR 

from grateful employees. And the jet he said, 
was 1 3 years old and now worth only $3 milliocL 
He described his rival's statements as “the same 
old crap.” 

His race a mix of anger and disdain, Mr. 

Hartley tried to paint Mr. Pickens as a greedy 
financier with no concern for other sharebokf- 


This private placement arranged by the Banque Nationale de Paris 
(Luxembourg) S.A. was extremely successful. 

The United Overseas Bank (Luxembourg) is a wholly owned subsidiary 
of the United Overseas Bank in Geneva, one of the First four foreign 
banks in Switzerland whose capital is held for 41% by Banque 
Nationale de Paris, 41% by Hank of America and 18% by Dresdner 
Bank. 


auto shipping 1 INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOS TAX FREE I LOW COST FLIGHTS 


SERVICES 


SMMFORE JNTL GUIDES. CtA Suv 
734 96 ZB. 


TOKYO LADY COMPANION, PA 
Parsoral AtMJnrt 03456-5539 


Pfaj.-4.-T.' 

P'-T -IV— .i:.l„. i 



TAKE THE PROFIT 

Oi your now Bjo peo g nirio puttoe 


BOATS & 
RECREATIONAL 


Send tor a quotation to: 
MYOUK 

of Uxbridg* 

[15 nwwtol from London Airport) 
5 Wmdior Street, Uxbridoe, 


Itoddtecr, Er&ond UB8 TAB. 

Tat UK 09571 073/771 03 
Tk UK BB13271 GECOMS G 

MYCAR 



LOW COST FUGHTS 


KBANDAIR 

NEW YORK WASMNGTON 
One FJ090 On* way F213Q 
Bound top F329D Round trip F3370 

0KLAM30 

On* Way F2»0 - towel t rip F30 9O 
OKAOb A DETTOtT 
One Way F2350 - Bound trip F3590 
T*fc Pcm (11 742 52 26 


** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

FOR A REAL VIP. YOUNG LADY 
DWnauatel, Ebflort, Minute. 


AMSTODAM 182197 


duioin^ oduaAx^ Irovvl 


Vff LADY GUIDE 

Yaang, aducotad eleq ai V & IrShguaL 
RAMS SU50 26 


★ PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG 1APY TMUNQUAt VWA 


PARE: 520 97 95 

MUNGUAL YOUNG LADY PA 


YOUNG BJEGANT LADY 

Mufefingkai PA. Pate 52S 81 01 


The Global 
Newspaper. 



Floating Rate Notes 


April 3 


Dollar 








pFFT 7 

f. 









J»- 

4? 




i m 



ESCORTS & 




& GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA l WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 56th St, MYjC 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARPS AND 
CHECKS ACCEPTS) 


LONDON 

BBGRAVIA 


Tel: 736 5877. 


MADRID INT’L 

ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL: 245A54A. CSHXT CARDS 




AMSTBDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SBVKE. 020-954344 





Tab 36 29 32 


SWITZBUAND 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

escort sannex. 
EVHYWHHE YOU ME OR GOL. 

Ml 3-921-7946 

Col free from florid* 1-900-2S2-089Z 
loMeft EoetoRi ' udn uxos you baeU 


CAPRICE 

BCOR1 SBVKE 
W NEW YORK 
TEL 212-737 3291. 


LONDON CLASS 

ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON, HEATHROW A GATWtOC 
Tab 01 890 0373 


★STAR ESCORT* 

Service T*b toM 1 01/ 55 It 49 


_ * AMSTERDAM* 

LONDON ^ 227837 

BEST ESCORT SBWICE 
TEL 200 8585 




AB DM^or <r*i& card* o ree p tad - 


ARISTOCATS 

London Eeeart 5*rvie* 

12S VAgom Sk London W.t. 
Al major Cradh Cords Acceded 
Tab 43/ 47 41 / QQ. 

T2 noon » imdniahl 


G8CVA - BEST 


TBj 022/M 15 95 


GENEVA RRST ESCORT S8VKE 
EASTS + TRAVEL + WEEKEND 
A SKI STATIONS. IBs 31 49 U 


GENEVA •BEAUIY* 
ESCORT SBtVKS. 
IN: 29 51 tt 


GB4EVA BC0RT 

SamCE. Tab 4A 11 SR 


AMS1BBMM JASMINE 

ESCORT SBVICL 020-36AA55 


MILAN ESCORT 

SERVICE 02 - 99 702 402 




ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MUMCH lean Esoorl + Guide 
Service. Tet 009/4486038 


HEATHROW LOWX3N ESCORT Ser- 
vies. TeL 994 6682. 


LONDON UICY ESCORT & Guide 
Service. Tet 01-373 0211 


MONTREAL RBDEZ-VOUS brort 
Service. 514591-2441. 


BWSSaS. CHANTAL ESCORT Ser- 
mi Td: 02/520 23 dS. 


FRANKFURT 50NJA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tet 06968 34 42. 


MUNKM WHCOME Escnrf Service. 
Tet 91 81 32 


FRANKFURT “TOP TBT Ewxl Sar- 
vioe. 069/59 60- SL 


XARB1 - FRAMCflJST ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tet 069/88 62 88 




VIBMA W ESCORT SBtVlCE Tet 
Memo) 65 4) 58 . 


AMSTERDAM FOUB BOSES Escort 
Sendee (01 20-964376 


1MOON GAMBIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tet 01-229 6541. 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Service. 
HecKhrow/Gatwicfc TeL 834 7945. 


LOMX3N £OE WEST Enert Ageney 
Tet 01-579 7556. 


m. Tet 4011507. D«ft C6rtk 


AUX ESCORT S9YKS, Mmteideni 


■ i.”’,'] n/r.' 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Ekwi Service. 
Tet 071 1 / 262 11 50. 


AMSTBtPAM iANET Eiajjl Service 
Tet (02Q 326420 or 3401 10. 


COLOGNE ■ BONN - DueoeklcKf Bm 
Qaa Escort Service. 0221/54 3304. 


ftAMOURT AKA-Femah + Male 
escort + travel service. Tat 62 84 32. 



Escort Service 0211/ 38 31 41 


LONDON JAMNBE ESCORT Ser-I IOTOON - UHJDIE ESCORT Smce. 


vice. TeL 01 821 0627. 


Tet 01-373 8849. 


tOMMN GEME ESCORT Service. 
TeL 3707151. 






















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 



PEANUTS 



BOOKS 


BLONDIE 


I'M SELLING 
SOMETHIN© 
VOU CAN'T 
RESIST ,-*1 


IT'S CHOCOLATE- 

PLAVOREP ' 

PUTTy ,_y| 




\ WOULD NOU ^ 
S HAVE BOUGHT 
: MOCHA £ 
I ALMOND? 


THE PENTAGON AND 

THE ART OF WARsThe Question of 

Military Reform 

By Edward N. Luttwak. 333 pp. 

Illustrated with charts. SI 7.95. 

Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the 
Americas. New York, N. Y. 10020. 
Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupr 


growth of the U. S. command bureaucracy 
since 1945, exacerbated by a swelling of the 
ratio of the chiefs to the Indians, and the lack 
of a single integrated authority to tell lie duels 
what to da 

The reform be proposes is to “provide a 
central military staff that can present the true 
choices of national military strategy for the 


choices of national military strategy for the 
policy decisions of the president aim secretary 
of defense.” The head of such a National 


L IKE so many vocal observers, Edward N. 

/ Luttwak is highly critical of the U. S. 
military establishment. In his new book,“Tbe 
Pentagon and the Art of War: The Question of 
Military Reform,” he questions the emphasis 
that the Reagan administration is putting on 
matters of defense, he wonders at the way the 
U. S. defense budget is allocated, and he ex- 
presses skepticism over the seriousness with 
which Americans take the threat of Soviet 
military migh t. 

But there is a difference between Luttwak 
and most critics cm the scene these days. He 
thinks Americans put too Uttle emphasis on 
matters military. He believes that they need 
more so-called “waste and mismanagement” in 
the Pentagon's development of weapons. He 
doubts that Americans take the Soviet threat 
nearly se cions enough. In short, Luttwak 
shares the view that there is waste in the 
Pentagon. But he ihinks the source of the waste 
is different from what other critics believe. 

Luttwak is a senior fellow in strategic studies 
at Georgetown University’s Cents for Strate- 
gic and International Studies, and serves as a 
consultant to the Defense and State depart- 
ments. His half-dozen previous books include 
“The Grand Strategy of the Soviet Union,” 
“Dictionary of Modem Wax,” and “The Politi- 
cal Uses of Sea Power.” In “The Pentagon and 
the Art of War,” he identifies what be believes 
to be the symptoms, the sources, and tire conse- 
quences cl U. S. defense-system ailments, and 
he proposes an astonishingly simple program 
for reform, in fact, ins analysis is a model of 
ease and clarity. 


ACROSS 


■ I Obscures 
.5 Won 

.SN.D.'s largest 
• city 

13 Plant of the lily 
! family 

14 Southern 
constellation 

16 Marketplace 

17 Bairn 


18 Beatles' meter 
maid 

18 Pardon or 
■ slacken 

20 “Leave ," 

variation on 37 
Across 


43 Dame Myra: 
1890-1965 

45 Swine genus 

46 Goiter Gary 

47 Canal for Sal 

49 Kind of pearl 

50 “Leave 

variation on 37 
Across 

56 Trunk vessel 

57 Coagulate 

58 Overlay 

59 One of a 
laundry duo 

60 Organic 
compound 

61 bien 

62 Roofers' tools 

63 Foogid 

64 Went under 


23 Concept, to 
Camus 

24 Stowe book 

25 Fraud 

28 Dutch city 

29 0penabit 

33 “ Give You 

Anything . . 

34 Stocky person' 

36 Darling stat. 

37 “Leave 

Delphic advice 
to Polycrates 

40 Carol 

cover girl 

41 Type of 
croquet 

42 hand 

(helped out) 


1 Bambl.e.g. 

2 Dieter’s 
spread 

3 Small 
antelopes 

4 Conscious 

5 Attic 

6 Suppose 

7 Costume for 
Coppelie 

8 Denmark's 
Islands 

9 Committee’s 
program 

18 “Tony” 

Sinatra film 


11 Grating 

12 Pilcom 

15 Saharan sight 

21 Type of 
computer 
program 

22 Negotiate 

25 Alice’s cat 

26 Place for un 
maitre 

27 T routers' 
specialties 

28 Shaffer hit 
play 

30 Jackass’s 
mate 

31 Alpine feature 

32 Detection 
device 

34 Continuous 
series 

35 Kind of pass 

38 Polite refusal 

39 Espouses 
again 

44 Small sofa 

46 Mortar's 
partner 

48 Builds 

49 Pry 

50 Ibsen’s “doll” 

51 Gemsbok 

52 Radius's 
companion 

53 City E of 
Osaka 

54 50-50 

55 Lectern 

56 Carpenter's 
tool 


BEETLE BAILEY 



ANDY CAPP 


-SdtwIns' 



r IMS DO, Mira MmtMn. IW 
Nil Sr Km, Afflitlca SvndKit* 


To put his case even more simply than he 
does: the symptoms be identifies are the Unit- 
ed States’s failure in almost every military 
engagement that it undertakes since Vietnam, 
as well as its continuing inability to match 
Soviet militaxy strength with a properiy bal- 
anced array rtf nuclear and conventional 
forces. (He believes that the Soviets have now 
achieved endear parity with the United States, 
which, coupled with their superior non-nuclear 
forces, creates a highly dangerous situation.) 
The problem he sees simply as the cancerous 




WIZARD of ID 


"3 Net? York Times, edited try Eugene Maleskc-, 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


fteuxiA&m&r 

mxe? 


Defense Staff, as he calls it, “would be the 
nation’s chief military officer: not a command- 
er- in-chief, rtf course, but rather a chief adviser, 
as the chairman of the Joint Chiefs now is — 
except that instead of quite suddenly having to 
think in mnltiservice terms after a fifemne 
devoted to one service, that chief adviser will 
have had many years of experience as a nation- 
al-defense officer." 

The rank and file of such a staff would 

way down thecHain of command — something 
that has been sorely lacking lor dccadca now 
and, in Luttwak’s view, accounts for every 
recent U. S.nrilitary disaster, from the future 
of the Iranian hostage-rescue mission to the 
terrorist bombing of the Marine headquarters 
in Beirut 

What Luttwak writes makes solid sense, pro- 
viding of course that the reader bdkves in 
some sort of defense system for nations, and 
accepts the author's hypothesis that the best 
way to prevent war is to prepare for it His 
logic Is precise: “Just as the invader is always 
peaceful — for he seeks only to advance and 
not to fight, while it is his victim who caiues 
war by resisting — so the Soviet Union has 
every reason to avoid nudear war, because it is 
now stronger than the West in thesost-nsdear 
military forces.” His statistics are fflummating: 
tor instance, they reveal, surprisingly, that the. 
portion of the military budget devoted to stra- 
tegic nuclear forces went from 7 percent under 
President Carter — “the aims-amtntfler ” as 
Luttwak him — to only 10 percent under 
President Reagan, “the great advocate of nu- 
clear strength.” 

His explanation of the differences between 
military and civ ilian logic makes one under- 
stand why Congress’s incessant review of mili- 
tary appropriations may possibly be missing 
the whole poin l Indeed, Lattwaks case seems 
so compelling and straightforward, a reader 
must wonder why it wasn’t implemented yes- 
terday. He offers some answers when he writes 
that “the new cadre of non-service officers will 


immediately evoke the dread prospect of all- 
service unification, arousing much congressio- 


nal opposition for all sorts of reasons, from the 
plain sentimentality of some veterans, to an- 
tique fears of military usurpation by armed 


HMK?N0U5e Tt 


.jtHen WHY 
A^YOi 

mz? 


Koole^waiN (SB 
mt *=- /3=~ 


"Solution to Previous Puzzle 


forces that are no longer divided.' 
My question is whether his i 


' ** 


! • ■ ' ! . 


AH 




: 1 1! 


: *V 


* / M*§i 


m :» 


REX MORGAN 




BRADY, YOU SOUND 
U HALF ASLEEP— 


I GUESS I AM, CLAUDIA f 
IS SOMETHING WRONG? 
IT’S FOUR IN THE MORNING/ . 


E3ESE3 EQ3EQD □QQ 

□□Ben aataan deed 
oboe nanaE aaoa 
EnEoaaaa naanas 
EQH EE03Q 

□be □□□ aaaaan 
0EHDES asan asaa 
nEnnamnaQHanaaa 
□□as □□□□ aanna 
□□ansa □□□ ebb 
□□□ee nag 

□EQE3E QEEEEDEG] 
□CEE EEEQE D0OB 
QOOE Q3ETQCI 3300 
ODD EEdHQ EEDQ 


My question is whether his proposal for 
reform isn’t jast too ratibnaL As he points out 
several times, the United States's system for 
military aeenmyiiighinent has always followed 
a pattern of bang unprepared at the start, of 
fatting at first, and of reorganizing while fight- 
ing, cranking up oar industrial base, and final- 
ly overwhelming the enemy with more equip- 
ment and personnel — in short, by gating 
bigger, not smarter. To alter that pattern might 
involve deeper changes in the way Americans 
live than they would want to make. 

On the other hand, as this book also paints 
out emphatically, no one is likely to get bigger 
than the Soviet Union. So maybe it’s time the 
United States got a little smarter. And maybe 
Luttwak has shown part of Lbe way.” 


- Christopher hehnumn-Haupt is on the staff of 
The New York Tunes. 




~\°nrK 


BRIDGE 




By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagramed deal 
North demonstrated un- 


1 A/W "Dad's golf umbrella sure covies 

IN HANW ON Wt5 LIKE THIS 1 ■ 


GARFIELD 




Unscramble inese four Jumbles, 
ore letter lo each square, 10 farm 
tour ordinary words. 


STALN 


Mitsubishi Own 
Mitsubishi Eloc 
MHautXsM Heavy 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mttaulandco 
AUtartwM 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nikita Sac 
Nippon steal 
Nippon Yuson 
Wfrsan 
Nomura Soc 
Olympus 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

Sham 

Sony 

5am noma Bank 
Sumitomo Cham 
Sumitomo Mohri 
Totsal Carp 
Tobho Marin* 
Tufcsda Cirnn 
TOk 
TWIftt 

Tokyo eioc Power 
Tokyo Marin* 
Taravlnd 
Toshiba 

Toyota 

Yomolchl S«C 



W North demonstrated un- 
selfishness in the bidding. Af- 
ter bearing a weak two-bid on 
his right, he might well have 
overcalled two spades. His 
take-out double allowed his 
partner to become the declar- 
er, and be admired his skill 
instead of demonstrating his 
own. 

North was perhaps too un- 
selfish. for with Smith as de- 
clarer a low diamond lead puts 
the contract in jeopardy. South 
would have had to judge the 
play perfectly, ducking in both 
hands and eventually discard- 
ing a diamond on the heart 
queen and ruffing hearts high 


in dummy. The unlikely lead 
of the diamond jade would 
have been unanswerable. 

As it was, the opening dub 
lead was ducked in dummy, 
and East won with the queen. 
He shifted to a heart, and West 
woo with the ace and led (he 
dub jack. This was covered 
with the king and East's ace 
was ruffed. Now South could 
afford to draw throe rounds of 
trumps ending in his hand, for 
he did not need to rely on the 
postion of the diamond king. 

The 8-7 of clubs in dummy 
was worth a trick, thanks to a 
loser-oo-loser play. The eight 
was led and a diamond thrown 
from the dosed hand. East 
took tire third and last trick for 
the defease, since the club sev- 


en now furnished another dia- 
mond discard. 


HtHTB 

*A»I3 

OK 

OQS2 


"WEST 

A— 

OA39732 

ojre 

♦J982 


EAST 

Am 

vu 

Mini 

*AQM 


♦QJW4 

9QIM4 


»AS« 

49 

Both Mm ton* fWwMto.' 
MdOos: 


P*as 2® ML 

W Ena 4* 


Wanted (tec**) two. 


*W1 436 

401 401 

773 2*9 

537 536 

336 340 

420 425 

1010 991 

1100 1090 

910 907 

711 BOO 
15* 158 

244 242 

as ta 

1240 12* 
TIBO 1200 
2790 2*70 

911 190 
ttf *95 

4400 4370 
1730 1740 
225 Z2S 
153 151 

210 209 

470 477 

070 078 

478 «1 

1720 ino 


Caeahon stockt txa AP 


495 500 
<30 429 
1270 12S0 
024 040 


MkkaVOJL Inds* : 12*8X24 

pvavtom : UOM* 

NWl«4w:fNJI 
mriw : *97 *1 


Bank L*u 
Brown Bovurl 
Obo Golov 
CradHSutoM 

etaefrawoit 

Gaoro Ftacher 

I nTorOHcounl 

, Jacob Suchord 

Jotmall 

lojxJI* Grr 

NMlto 

OartHugn-B 

RocttoBoby 

Sandu 

SctrtnOIW 

5*4z»r 

SBC 

swMaair 

Swiss Rslnsurancc 
Swiss VaOMBatok 
Union Bonk 

wnrisnimr 

ZurR2i Ira 


2730 2200 
3570 35*0 
1*20 1630 
30*0 20* 
2405 2*5 
20*5 fflO 
730 730 

1920 

6390 *S0 
1*10 1*10 
Uts 1*75 
4340 *340 
14*5 ISM 

77M 7500 
3950 *050/ 

32 345 

373 373 


10W ioSoo 
1405 MIS 
3*55 3855 
4450 4310 
31000 21080 


300 AMI Pres 
7100 Aek lands 
gooAgmcoE 
2300 Anra Ind A 
3>235 Ali Enarav 
2200 A«e Not 
250 Also Cent 
3134AloemoSt 
UOAnetn 
IMAsoosta 
*456 Alco J I 
31568 BP Canoda 
1*4*2 Bank BC 

7*642 Bank NS 
7053 Ba (Tick O 
400 Boien A f 
21341 Bonamo R 
11350 BroEama 
2900 BromoWa 
3*00 Brando M 
115051 BCFP 
30620 BC R«* 

*031 BCPnone 
12*41 BrUMOWk 
2700 BlMM Con 
9*00 CAE 
485CCLA 
51300 CD mb B I 
jn* Cad Fry 
ltSDCMer Wssr 
SMC Pockr* 
7*00 Con Trust 
*1*27 Cl Blc Com 
2*80 Cdn Nat Rn 
JMnCTIraAf 
n* c utn b 

5050 Cora 
H3SC«taMH 
100 CHUM 
sroMccanBi 
23550 CTi. Bank 
5oacorruanlm 
SOOCo n wa U A 
TfSIOCoMkaR 
1300 Confon A 
lOSOCrawiw 
V70M Czar Has 
77*53 Doan Day 
1*00 Doon A 
2*0* DOllaon A a 
27*73 OmJnn B I 
MOODsvsicon 
14000 Dicknsn At 
mooicknsciB 
7050 Daman A 

1200 Dv tax A 
ISMBEKfham X 


Htoh Low Close Owe 
SSI* 5*» sm 
*U» 1* 14 — 7k 

S UH 16H 16V+W 
S *% 66k W 

52H* 21 2l — U. 
>l4Vl 14VS 14Y, 
g? 77 22 + Vi 

S2» 23 2314-f I* 

V Wt m. 1FA + U. 

If*. *4* ** 

» m v + w 

S32U 32 121* + 4* 


S5H M » 
512H 1210 12V* 


4W 

* + W 
321*4- 4* 


512H 121* 12V» 

1S1 1* 150 

»5Hr lSVi 15»+ 4* 


SBC IMbjt : 431 JO 
Prcviov* : 43U0 


NA: net eualsd; N>.: not 
avonaots; zfl: •k-atvldsod. 


**70 EauttySwr 

330OC Poteen C 
MgFtaibrao* 
MOFsd I rut A 

I QlOO FCUvFlB 
WOO Prasar 
iMFrusnauf 
.001 conatiA 
JSgsoeComo 
2*500 GaacruM* 
RSGRraitBr 
38*OGoMcorpf 
4300 Gooevar 
MOO Grandma 
270QGronduc 
507SGL Porssf 

inGTPodnc 
WSOCravhnd 
lOt H Group A 
412SHnHnoAt 
tMHawkar 
naoHavsao 
4DHI«vet 

nwnma 
toooiwtet 
300 Inalis 
IHO Intend Gh 
amimt Thom 
*0*7 


440 430 435 — $ 

MS* SVk ?U+V* 
1171k 171ft 171ft— I* 
*W» M 91ft — h 

§ »ik « *»+ tk 

243 253 +5 

to 318* 31* 
to UJ* ]«fc+ to 
23Vj 23 IV- to , 
*17 1*1* 17 

saw a 2svft + 4* 
MS* * * 

S15?i 15*» 15ft 
«jto 3ilft 24i»— Mr 
Q«k 2*8s 2941, + * 
*338* 33VI 33to 
SWto 2*Vk 2*to 
avft 281ft 281ft— 1 
Wto. IV: Blft Sk 

Jl» 17Sft 178k 4- Ik ' 

*112? ” 

.Mlk t*i M 
*41 41 41 

Mto * a 
*10W» 10 10 

ISto Sto 

IH M 

310 2*5 305 +10 

•Jl*o lm 111ft- to 

a*is?*jp fc+ * 

s ^ ^ 

SUM 111ft Il»*+it 
Sit Wto u 
S7 *8* T 
S6H ilk «*+ Vk 
*«* *«■ «*+ to 
215 212 212 —3 

*27Sk 2*to 3* to— to 
*15to 15to 1 54ft + u. 
*S 3*to 3«to— vs 
a ,78ft- 8k 

ST7 TftVft 141ft— k, 

. STM 71* 71*+ Vk 

S20Vft 20 20Vi+ to 

fitto ii ia 
ini* 101 I02to + 2 
saito 318k jin- to 
8K. 22to 33V» 

«3 12Vft 128k + 4k 
y .fi * jtto wk+to 
*338, Bk 228V— to 
*27to 27to 378*+ V, 

309 210 200 — 3 

WW 9»+ to 

»42V> 428k «7Vft 
*4 *2 *4—2 

45 45 45 — 1 

»W *0 90 

Kgto 30to 30to+ to 
»ft 2«k 258*+ to 
C80 7*| 7*k 

MS 180 155 +15 

Uto 204* Sto- to 
tiito n 11%— % 

*T*to in* istoZ; 

tan 2*Vft 3*% * 

*JK* 121ft 121ft— is 

vt r iF 75 , 

nift n* *ft_to' 


Byanova 
Tara 
Tack Car 
TackBt 
Tax Can 


78| 74k 

IL. llto— to 


As-* I 







far fnmerJ 

DQnH - The iean:f 
simsuhi; ±es co res 
qaipmmng. and a her. 
<bthf> .Wies Lake 
W with i victory Ti 
?,50wihm« no one els 
aioativ^nu’ctiw 

alias. Lulir.i: rv >t- 


•sthe dm 
5*0 pt 




































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 




SPORTS 


rJjU 




Page 13 


E5S 


r:r^ Kongers Bow to Flyers, 2-1, but Back Into Playoffo I ffo# and Farewell: Georgetown’s Graceful Losers 

Iff »ho*^. to V. • The Axsodaed Press losinfi Tliesdav nkhL the Ranwrt Rnk l?mM . 10 “U/» •> linl. i^fan- the O v 


■ -■ The Assodaud Press 

HEW YORK — Given j no th^ f 
week, the New York Rangers might 
have lost enough games to blow a 
National Hockey League playoff 
spot Hie Pittsburgh Penguins and 
New Jersey Devils simply beat 
them to iu 

With Pittsburgh and New Jersey 


losing Tuesday night, the Rangers 
staggered into a Gist- round meet- 
ing with Philadelphia despite losing 
to the Flyers. 2-1. Elsewhere it was 
the New York Islanders 4, Pitts- 
burgh 3; Sl Louis 8, New Jersey 4; 


Quebec 6, Boston 4; Buffalo 2, 
Hartford 1, and Edmonton & Los 


Hartford 1, and Edmonton 6, Los 
Angeles 4. 


Goal tender Bob Froese made 29 
saves and rookies Len Hachbom 
and Todd Bergen scored to pace 
Philadelphia to a seven -for-seven 
record against New York this year. 
Froese had a few kind words for the 
Rangers after his performance 
helped hand them a franchise-re- 
cord 43d loss. 


the reader 

« system for JjKj 


1 * ‘o Prepa^S 
KtastheinvSi?H 


JSfcSSg: 

>d nuclear war bS** 
be West in the 


s statistics are 

- • rsaSs ' 


■ “ lhe 

- to only 10 ^ i 

■*«»*> Jess 


•i* d Ssrsj5 

1 s incessant levS* 

straighu'orwanL , 5* 
t wasn't imploatiX 

me answers u-benhti 
ofnon-sen-iceoffwS 

ihe dread prospco^,-' 
arousing rauchc^ 

J sorts of reasons, tf®: 

’ some veterans, nl ■ 
ary usurpation h 
mger divided." ' 
whether his prows! t, 
rational. As he Minn* 
Jnited Slates’s sisal 
meat has alfiaviibbi* 
^prepared aiihe^ 
reorganising wbflrfc 
industrial base, adfe 
: enemy with morest 
■3 — in short. In- at 

To alter that DaitenjW 

ges in the wav Anaa 
i want to make 
1 as this book also® 

>oae islikelv tegn^f 
mi. So maybe it's met 
little smarter And an 
part of the way " 



“We talked a little before the 
game that this would be the last 
time we played them before the 
playoffs,” Froese said “Both teams 
played a heck of a game — there 
was playoff-type intensity with a 
lot of body checking and nice play- 
nuking." 

“I realize this whole season has 
been disastrous, especially the sev- 
en losses to the Flyers," said the 
losing coach. Craig Patrick. “We 
have to forget the negative and get 
ready for the new season next 
week." 

Captain Dave Poulin doesn't 
think the Flyers' domination of the 


NHL FOCUS 


Rangers will mean much in next 
week’s playoffs. “No one here is 
talking about the regular-season 
sweep ” he said, "ft’s a brand new 
game every time the puck is 
dropped." 

With the Flyers leading 2-1 en- 
tering the third period. Froese, who 
won bis fifth straight start, pre- 
served the victory with spectacular 
diving saves on Mike Rogers and 
Peter Sundstrom. 

The Flyers scored the lone goal 
of the first period on Hachbora’s 
fifth of the year at 11:36, on a 
cross-ice pass from Bkka Sinisalo. 
They widened the lead on Bergen’s 
eighth goal of the season at 13:52 of 
the second period. Tim Kerr found 
Bergen alone in the slot and the 
rookie drilled a 15-footer past goal- 
tender John Vanbiesbrouck. 

Ranger veteran Anders Hedbog, 


retiring at the end of the season, 
scored a power-play goal at 16:40 
of the second period of his final 
regular-season home appearance. 

The victory gave the Flyers 109 
points, tops in the league, and ex- 
tended its winning streak against 
the Rangers to nine straight. The 
Flyers also continued their domi- 
nation of Patrick Division foes, 
winning their llth straight. 


■aitaffrUnMd Pm Immoeond 

Wayne Gretzky beat Los Angeles goalie Bob Janecyk three times (the first above, 46 
seconds into the game) in Edmonton's 6-4 victory Tuesday night. It was the NHL scoring 
leader’s sixth hat trick of the season. The two teams wiB meet in a first-round playoff series. 


By Tony Kornhdscr 

Washington Past Sendee 

LEXINGTON, Kentucky — 
One by one their names were 
called, and they pranced up the 
stairs like show horses. Gary 
McLain. Ed Pinckney. Harold 
Jensen. Dwayne McClain. Har- 
old Pressley. They held their tro- 
phies high, like candles in the 
night, for all the world to see. 

Sian ding on the sidelines Mon- 
day night, .the losing players 
watched the celebration that sur- 
rounded but did not embrace 
them. For ViHanova to win 
Georgetown had to lose, and that 
h actually had happened left ihe 
Georgetown team stunned. 

They hadn't thrown the NCAA 
championship baseketball game 
away. They had been beaten by a 
team that not only rose to the 
occasion, but rose way above it. 
Gracefully, respectfully, continu- 
ously Georgetown's players ap- 
plauded Villanova’s. They all 
clapped, but Patrick Ewing was 
more animated, more enthusias- 
tic with his applause than were 
his tMmmaiiK Maybe the great 
ones appreciate greatness most of 
all. 

ViHanova was 22-of-28 from 
the field — 78.6 percent, the best 
title-game shooting percentage in 
the 46-year history of the NCAA 
tournament — and won by two 
points. Had the Wildcats gone 
2Q-of-28 <71.4 percent, better 
than any previous ream in the 
final), it would have lost 

The characteristic mood in the 
Hoya locker room was resigna- 
tion. “There comes a point when 


thing like: “You're playing good 
defense — just stay after them. 
They can’t keep shooting like 
this." 

They didn'L They shot belter. 
They only missed one of 10 shots 
in the second half. Count it: One. 

Georgetown, which usually 
gets 40 rebounds a game, got 17, 
proving that the best way to keep 
a team off the defensive boards is 
not to miss. 

To put Georgetown’s season 
into reasonable perspective, the 
Hoyas won 35 of 38 games, and 
their three losses were by a total 
of five points. 

“I’m not sad, and I don't think 
any of my teammates arc,” re- 
serve center Ralph Dalton said 
after the game. "We’ve lost games 
before. We came out and played 
hard. We got beat by a good 
team. We have nothing to be dis- 
appointed in, or ashamed of, be- 
cause we’ve had a very successful 
season." He smiled gently. "And 
in our hearts we still fed we’re 
No. 1." 


On this level the players and 
the coaches know the score, even 
when it doesn't jibe with the total 
pants. And perhaps that's one of 
the reasons Georgetown was able 
to accept defeat in the national 
final so gracefully. The Hoyas 
know theirs was the better team 
over the season, if not on the 
season’s final night 

And alone with how they lost is 
whan they Tost to. Vtilanova is a 
Big East team, which is like keep- 
ing it in the family. 

All week long it was obvious 
that the Georgetown and Vfllan- 
ova players had genuine affection 
for one another. It hurts less to 
lose to a good, honest team that 
you know well and care for. 

ViHanova had earned George- 
town’s respect over the years. 
Now it has earned its admiration. 
Monday's result was a jolt, but 
not a fluke. Other than Arkansas, 
which still lost to Georgetown by 
17 points, Vfllanova was the only 
team to hold the Hoyas in the 50s 
all season — and did it mice. 


losing once by two and once by 
seven. Nobody played George- 
town tougher than ViHanova. 

But 1 come back to Ewing and 
the way he applauded for V Ulan- 
ova. Ewing is the gem of his bas- 
ketball generation. Yd for a vari- 
ety of reasons — some valid and 
some vile — he never has been 
embraced by the public. A few 


days ago Pinckney, the ViHanova 
center who likes his Georgetown 


counterpart. lamented the way 
Ewing had been vilified “You 
hate to see those signs," Pinckney 
said, “the ones that say ‘Ewing 
Can’t Read.' It must have been a 
terrible four years for him." 

There were more of those signs 
here Monday night, and once 
again sane cur threw a banana 
onto the court when Ewing was 
introduced. 

It wouldn't surprise me if Ew- 
ing applauded so enthusiastically 
both out of admiration for the 
way the game was won and out of 
relief that these four years were 
over. 


you concede you have come 
across a team of destiny," Frank 


Lakers Outgun Nuggets, 
Take Conference Honors 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

NCAA Adopts Basketball Shot Clock 


The Associated Pros 

DENVER — The teams took 
turns dong what they do best, run- 
ning and gunning , and when it was 
over the Los Angeles Lakers left 
Denver with a victory Tuesday 
night, something no one else had 
done in nearly three months. 

The Lakers, trailing by 86-84 af- 


NRA FOCUS 


i nn-Haup: is on ihrJ: ^ - 


3W furnished anodere- 
d discard. 


NORTH 

AAJEM2 

VK 

C-Q3J 

*K875 


ter the Nuggets oulscored them, 36- 
26, in the third quarter, rewed up 
their own game with a 34-18 final 
period and pulled away to a 118- 
104 National Basketball Associa- 
tion triumph. 

The victory broke Denver’s 20- 
game home winning streak, dating 
from Jan. 5. It also clinched the 
Western Conference’s best record, 
assuring the Lakers of the home- 
court advantage in all conference 
playoff series. Los Angeles has won 
14 of its last 1 5 games and 25 of its 
last 28. 

“I think both Denver and us are 
the best running teams in basket- 


game. “We did a great job in get- 
ting bade, taking away some of 
their easy shots and forcing them 
into a perimeter gpie. I feel good 
about only giving them 104 
points” 

Elsewhere it was Milwaukee 109, 
Boston 103; Cleveland 122. Wash- 
ington 107; Detroit 124, Indiana 
121; Philaddpbia 102. Atlanta 91; 
Chicago 108, New Jersey 94; Phoe- 
nix 119, Seattle 109; Dallas 127, 
Golden State 121, and Portland 
127, Houston 113. . - ..... 

Bob McAdoo scored 15 of his 20 
points in the fourth quarter to lead 
the late Los Angeles charge. 

“Our incentive was to end their 
streak and their incentive, obvious- 


LEXINGTON, Kentucky (AP) — The National Collegiate Athletic 
ssociation on Tuesday adopted the 45-second shot dock for all basket- 


Association on Tuesday adopted the 45-second shot dock for all basket- 
ball games beginning next season. The dock was used experimentally by 
25 conferences this season, but was not employed during the national 
tournament. It will be used in all regular-season and tournament 
next year. 

A committee spokesman said the dock “won't prevent the upset, like 
ViHanova beating Georgetown” in Monday’s national title game “but 
will Himinqti- the farce, the travesty of the pure stall.” 

In addition to data recorded by the 25 conferences using ihe dock, he 
said, the committee also considered a poll indicating that 68 percent of 
the country’s coaches favored using the dock. 


Rienzo, the Georgetown athletic 
director, said after the game. 

The players must have sensed 
they were involved in something 
extraordinary. Not even the com- 
bative Michael Jackson, who 
wears his game face as if it be- 
longs in a shoulder holster, was 
angry. “Every time we got ahead 
of them, they’d come right back 
and get the lead again” he said. 
“They deserved the win." 

Cain you imagine what the 
Georgetown coach, John Thomp- 
son, must have said to his team at 
halftim e, with Vdlanova shooting 
722 percent? It had to be some- 


y<:r 





, !•' /-A 

... fle- . . 




pfo w ■/***“ 

f ^ ' ' •• i,. - 

ftp 



Ed Pinckney of VBbmova, hoisting the NCAA trophy at a victory raly Tuesday in Phfladdptria. 


SCOREBOARD 

Hockey 


Football 


Sutton Gets Kentucky Coaching Post 

LEXINGTON. Kentucky (AP) — Eddie Sutton, who coached the 


National Hockey League Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 


ly, was to keep it going.” McAdoo 
said. “We really wanted this win 
because Denver is one of the teams 
we may have to play against in the 
playoffs." 


McAdoo said one of the keys was 

bolding all-star forward Calvin 


University of Arkansas to mne straight 20-victoiy basketball seasons, was 
appointed Tuesday to succeed Joe B. Hah, who is retiring from his 
cokhingjob at the University of Kentucky. 

Under Sutton. 49, (he Razorbacks have made nine consecutive trips to 
the NCAA tournament and qualified for the final four in 1978. Including 
a five-year stint as coach of Creighton University, Sutton's 16-season 
mark is 342-125. “When you think about basketball, that’s Kentucky ” 
Sntton said. “It’s the only job I'd leave the University of Arkansas for.” 

Hall. 56. announced his retirement from the position March 22 after 13 
years. After succeeding Adoip Rupp, Hall lea Kentucky to one NCAA 
title, one NIT championship and eight Southeastern Conference crowns. 


ball,” said Laker Coach Pat Riley. 
“Both teams are great at getting the 


SOfTSPJ 
•QJ8&4! 
CQlftSl 
O A3* 

rids mwi** 


“Both teams are great at getting the 
ball up the court” 

Although the Nuggets and Lak- 
ers rank 1-2 in NBA scoring, it was 
defense, said Riley, that woo the 


Natt to 10 points on 3- for- 10 shoot- 
ing. “We came in at halftime and 
learned we had held Calvin Natt to 
five points, and we were just 
thrilled — he usually kills us," 
beamed McAdoo. 

Denver’s other all-star forward, 
Alex English, led all scorers with 31 
points. 


Chitalada to Defend WBC Tide in May 


MEXICO QTY (AP) — Sot Chitalada of Thailand win defend his 
World Boxing Council flyweight tide against Gabriel Bernal of Mexico 
May 17 in Bangkok, it was announced Tuesday. Chitalada dethroned 
Bernal on a split decision last October. It was Bernal’s first defense of his 
title: he has not fought since. 

The May fight win be Chitalada’s second defense. He defeated Charlie 
Magri of Britain, the former division titleholder, in February. 



w 

L 

T Pis GF GA 

y-PItlladripWa 

- 51 

30 

7 

109 

339 

240 

s-wnmirwton 

44 

24 

9 

97 

308 

211 

x-NY islanders xo 

33 

5 

85 

340 

304 

x-NY Rangers 

25 

43 

10 

40 

W 

331 

Pittsburgh 

24 

a 

5 

53 

347 

341 

Now Jersey 

22 

44 

9 

53 

358 

330 


Adam Dlvfsloo 



x-Ouebec 

40 

28 

9 

09 

J17 

245 

x-Mentreal 

39 

27 

11 

89 

293 

253 

x-BuHalo 

37 

24 

14 

81 

278 

225 

x- Boston 

34 

34 

9 

77 

289 

279 

Hartford 

2$ 

40 

9 

45 

243 

313 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Herrtx 

DMstan 




X-St. Louis 

35 

30 

12 

82 

285 

275 

x-CMcooo 

34 

35 

6 

78 

29» 

294 

x-Oetralf 

24 

40 

11 

43 

303 

347 

x-Mlmesuta 

24 

42 

13 

40 

254 

310 

Taranto 

20 

49 

■ 

48 

243 

2)9 

Smytho Division 



v- Edmonton 

49 

19 

10 

108 

391 

287 

x -Winnipeg 

42 

27 

9 

93 

348 

323 

x-Calgary 

48 

27 

10 

» 

349 

290 

x-Los Angeles 

33 

32 

13 

79 

331 

319 

vmaouver 

25 

44 

1 

58 

274 

388 


H); MdCLean Cl3). Bridgman (22). H tools* 
Ht>.Sulllman(21).Statso0goal: NewJeraev 
(an wonatov) 7-12-17— 36; SL Louis (on 
Resell! MH— V. 

Edmonton 3 ■ *— * 

1 AcWtfRR 0 l J 4 

Gretzky 3 (72). KnjjJwInvsJcl (41), Napier 
(19), Rumor (4); Fox (301. Williams (7), 
Miller (4). Tovfor (3B). Shots an ml: Edmon- 


United States Football League Leaders 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Team Offense 


Tampa Boy 

Baltimore 

BJrmlnahacn 

New Jersey 

Memphis 

Jacksonville 


Yards rush Pass 
2483 774 1709 
2175 747 1428 
2075 872 1223 
2013 1085 928 
1892 922 970 
1814 711 1103 


Arizona 
Portland 
Las Angeles 
San Antonio 


Arizona 
San Antonio 
Portland 
Oakland 


1924 

1841 

1*43 

1244 

Team Defense 
1*38 
1707 
1732 
1889 


721 1205 
835 1004 
494 947 
355 489 


455 983 
712 995 
675 1057 
511 13»B 


NKfi 2 
DM. 2 


,VwVU*cl»iW*. 


srs"*? 

Kb. 3 « 

Sf? 5* f.- 

4? “L *«■ 

s!f* if* fa; 


Tiger Relievers Find a Mixed Message in Perfection 

By Thomas Boswell elegant, soft-spoken Hernandez, world title. “To come to the States ry of gout and the wear and tear of 
Wa/rhingron Post Sendee whh his stiff-wnsled screwball, and after 11 years pitching in Mexico 18 years of pro pitching. 

LAKELAND. Honda — As the fat, jolly, mischievous Lopez, and then see aft my dreams come 1 1 never worry, he says. “My 

Willie Hernandez jogged off tire Smr*C* tr, f»m and SeRor true 1 feel it from the heart” mmd is strong. It l have pam, like 

field, his day’s work done (three up, 
three down, seven pitches), Audio 
Lopez, the other member of De- 


(x-d inched PtavoH bertlil 
I y-d Inched division tltte) 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
How Jtnw 1 I 3—4 

SL Louis 1 5 J— I 

M. Johnson (23). Paslowskl (21), Reads (f). 
Hickey 2 ( iW.Cvr (3), Pederko (29), Anderson 


ten ten janecyk) 14-11-7—31} Los Aneeles (on 

Orlando 

1343 

719 

423 

Denver 


mi 

4B4 

1235 

Fuhr) 17-11-14-44. 


Team Defense 


Los Angeles 


1924 

498 

1228 

Pittsburgh 1 2 0—3 

Baltimore 

1789 

586 

1203 

Houston 

2200 

453 

1547 

N.Y. Islanders 1 2 1-4 

Tampa Bay 

1733 

444 

1047 


QaartertMdu 


Flat ley (2B),Troltter (281, La Fontaine 111). 

Birmingham 

1816 

744 

1052 


ATT COM 

YDS 

TD INT 

Gill les 1 13) ; Lem leu x (41 ), Hannon (6), Veuia 

Memphis 

1995 

774 

1221 

Kelly. HOU 

249 

144 

2319 

21 9 

(39). Shots an aoal: Pittsburgh (on Hrudov) 

New Jersey 

2114 

798 

1316 

Hebert, oak 

141 

83 

1322 

15 4 

15-14-11—40; N.Y. Islanders (on Ford) 14-12- 

Jacksonville 

2283 

1012 

1270 

Williams. ARIZ 

175 

105 

1243 

7 7 

11—37. 

Orlando 

2325 

1209 

1114 

Youna. LA 

117 

41 

888 

3 5 

Bootee 3 8 1—4 


Quarterback] 

1 


Evans. DEN 

220 

107 

1404 

7 12 

Quebec 2 2 3-4 


ATT COM 

YDS 

TD INT 

Neutalsel. SA 

9* 

48 

578 

3 6 

Cool* 2 (54l,Sauve2 (11). Price (l).Ashten 

Lewis, MEMP 

124 47 

1154 

13 3 

Woodward. PORT 99 

44 

408 

2 5 

(31); Bauraue (17), Slmaneftl (1). Crowder 

Stoudt. BIRM 

158 89 

1301 

12 8 

Robinson, PORT 48 

35 

489 

2 8 

132). simmer (35). Shots on goal: Boston (an 

Reaves. TB 

195 in 

1531 

9 6 


Ruftan 



Gasseliftl 9-5-10—24; Quebec Ion Daskotokls) 

Fustna. BALT 

171 110 

1389 

S 6 


ATT YDS 

AVG LG TD 

9-13-1V- a. 

Beiue, JACK 

44 36 

290 

3 3 

Beni lev. OAK 

45 

413 

64 

57 1 

Hartford 1 » 0—1 

Fhrtle, NJ 

to? a 

1034 

B.10 

Jordan, PORT 

40 

403 

X7 

25 3 

Buffalo 1 • 1—2 

Golsteva ORL 

101 49 

483 

3 5 

Johnson. DEN 

55 

353 

44 

29 4 

SetUne (tol.Tucker (21 ); Dlneen (34). State 

Luther. JACK 

97 49 

428 

4 9 

Brown. ARIZ 

58 

324 

54 

44 5 

on pool: Hanford (onSouve)5XS— W; Buffa- 

Callter. ORL 

45 28 

3U 

0 S 

LOOP. ARIZ 

71 

215 

XO 

17 4 

lo (on Weeks) 11-9-8— 2X 


Rushers 




Receivers 



Philadelphia 1 I »-2 


ATT YDS AVG LG TD 


NO YDS 

AVG 

LG TD 

N.Y. Ran oors 0 1 0—1 

Anderson. TB 

110 519 

4.7 

48t 9 

Verdin, HOU 

37 

484 

1X1 

74 4 

Hachbom IS). Bergen IB); Hedbera OB). 

Roller. JACK 

116 501 43 

19 4 

Johnson. HOU 

29 

373 

TX9 

52t 4 

State eo aoal: Philadelphia (an Vanbies- 

Walker. NJ 

« 500 5.7 

tor 5 

Lewis, DEN 

28 

404 

144 

28 1 

txouck) 15-9-9—33: N.Y. Rangers (an Froese) 

Btedsoa, ORL 

99 403 XI 

20 1 

Harris. DEN 

27 

293 

1X9 

39T 2 

9-13-8—30- 

Crtobs. BIRM 

80 334 43 

15 4 

Bonks. OAK 

19 

327 

T7J 

43 4 


trait's Z Squad, sat in the bullpen, 
watching. “I know how he feds. It’s 
just like the last game of the World 
Series all over again. Every pitch 
right where you want it." 

When it's ri g ht , it’s all so easy. . 

Hernandez, 35-1 in save situa- 
tions last season, the A me ri can 
League's most valuable player and 
Cy Young winner; Lopez, 12-1, 
counting the postseason, and 14 
savesTwben you’re going that well, 
the manager waves to you the way a 
saftor stranded on a raft waves to a 
ship promising saftey. 

Your name could be Tug Me- 
Graw or Kent Tekuhfe, Rich. Gos- 


i*-' 

Cg; S > , 

OM '<? .ill- 


i *r$\ 

$£■ 

sg 


sage, Don Stanhouse or Tippy 
Martinez. Steve Howe or Terry 


r* 

lyl j. 1* . 
Si. fc S' 


5* 

'ir.'tf, 




+ t 


??; i* fa: 

s * a !! •* 


411* i S* i- 

!l 

IF. 4* \V 

vr* «'•« * 
Sl] -* I) Li 
Pi « L* 
it i«* 5 . 
* K 

j-4 i*u 2i' 

*’.?• I)" * 


iS§y 
& »• 


r' a s*f 

& he &. 

'cos CL 5 ! 

r tw 

Sr f ^ 


CI9" 

S3* ? J 


Martinez, Steve Howe or Terry 
Forster, RoDie Fmgers or A1 Hol- 
land. It doesn't matter if you throw 
right or left, overhand or sidearm, 
hard or soft, or if you’re tall or 
short, thin or faL Doesn’t matter — 
you’re invincible. For a while. 

Your skipper, your teammates, 
the whole town ride you while 
you’re hot- You’re the ace. YouH 
take them to the Series and every- 
jL body knows it You're magic. 

* Every year it’s somebody. But — 
hoe's the rub — next year it’s usu- 
ally somebody else. 

In recent years, the two safest 
bets of any spring have beat that 
the rigfannmg champion couldn’t 
possibly repeat, and a key reason 
would be the iiyury ex’ fauure of a 
star reliever coming off an unrepea- 
table season. 

Think of the last dozen pennant 
winners, six. in each league, and 
recall how many died with their 
buftpen kings. The injuries to Gos- 
sr sage and Forster in 19. Stanhouse’s 
collapse and Tekulve’s- fizzle in ’80. 
The fadeaway of McGraw in *81 
and Howe in *81 Hngem's elbow in 
'83. Martinez’s sore arm and Hoi 1 
land’s fatigue in ’84. 

if any two relievers look suited to 

beatthe jinx, they are the tall. slim. 


elegant, soft-spoken Herna ndez, 
-with his stiff-wnsted screwball, and 
the fat, jolly, mischievous Lopez, 
Sefior Smoke to fans and Sefior 
Joke to teammates for his pranks. 

Each has pitched almost flaw- 
lessly m spring training. And each 
has tried io learn from the disasters 
of others. 

“I can’t believe how peoplechase 
you,” said Hernandez, 30, who’d 
never saved move than 10 games in 
a year before Sparky Anderson 
used him 86 times for 150 innings. 
“How can you share one day with 
100 people? I feel bad to leave one 
person ... but I have to keep my 
head in baseball, too, or Tm gonna 
ruin my career." 

A middle-inning set-up man 
with the Cubs ana Pfafflies. Her- 
nandez always believed he was just 
one break and one extra pitch away 
from greatness. The break was An- 
derson’spasaon for left-handed re- 
lievers. The extra pilch was the no- 
strain screwball he learned in 1983. 


world title. “To come to the States 
after 1 1 years pitching in Mexico 
and then see all my dreams come 

true I feel it from the heart” 

The Series? “I was waiting for 
one chance. Maybe HI never be 
there again. AH theworid^ was look- 
ing to me. My friends, my family. 


port, l can never lose my conn- 
deuce," said Lopez, wbo retired 
seven straight in the final game 
against San Diego. 

If Hernandez must cany the bur- 
dens of celebrity, expectation and a 
fat new contract, then Lopez must 
overcome weight problems, a histo- 


mmn is strong. U L nave pam. like 
when my hand was swollen twice 
its size {with gout], I say, 'Lopez, tty 
— forget everything-’ \ get them 
out Afterward, ‘Qnhhhnh.* The 
doctor said, T don't know how you 
throw at all' 

"Sure, sometimes, they hit me. 


Basketball 

National Basketball Association Standings 



NO 

YDS AVG LG 

TD 


NO YDS AVG TB 120 LG 

Alexis. JACK 

30 

382 

1X7 

51 

2 

Tallev, OAK 

29 

1224 

4X3 

2 11 

58 

Truvillton. TB 

29 

452 

154 

64t 

S 

deBrulln. ARIZ 

It 

734 

4X8 

1 

7 

54 

Smith, BIRM 

24 

482 

1X5 

541 

6 

Partrtdoe. LA 

29 

1176 

4X6 

1 

7 

53 

Fttzkee. BALT 

24 

355 

13J 

37 

0 

Gossett. PORT 

23 

926 

40J 

3 

5 

54 

Moser. MEMP 

22 

455 

207 

59 

4 

Wallers. HOU 

23 

934 

4X2 

3 

3 

56 


Peeten 




Pont Returners 





That’s O.K. They get paid, loo. I 
enjoy my life. I have to die some- 
day." 

That could be one of the lessons 
of the bullpen, where, no matter 
what you did last year, the next 
wave could always be goodbye. 


“We had fun last year. Every- 
ody was smflmg all (lie time. Ev- 


body was smflmg all the time. Ev- 
erything was — perfect,” said the 
Puerto Kican native, dwelling on 
die mixed message in that last 
word. “We can win again, but I 
can’t do the same: Impossible. Fm 
not gong to try to do the same. If 
yon try to do that, you screw up.” 
Thai surely is wise: Since no man 
ever went 32-0 before botching a 
save situation, one can assume Her- 
nandez won’t duplicate perfection. 

What doesn't concern Hernan- 
dez is the state of his rubberish 
arm. “Pitching nine or 10 games in 
a row is all right with me. 1 like to 
throw every day anyway.” 

Lots of foam* have aces. But at 
the moment, perhaps only the Ti- 
gers have a second-banana reBever 
as valuable as Lopez. He can be a 
late- inning stopper when Hernan- 
dez. is tired, do the middle- innings 
job and even work long relief. 

Lopez, 36, sits in the bullpen, 
rolling his eyes and cracking jokes. 
“OhJ don’t usually pitch very well 
in spring training. You see; 1 have 
some trouble with the daytime.” 
Like Hernandez, Lopez still lives 
in the afterglow of the Tigers’ 



EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic OlvUton 

W L Pel. GS 

x-Baston 59 14 J87 — 

x-PbftodnlpMa 55 20 .733 4 

x-Washlngton 37 38 .493 22 

x-N**J«rs«V 37 39 ASJ 22Vj 

Now Yortt 24 51 mo 35 

Control Dfvttkw 

y -Milwaukee 55 21 -72< — 

x -Detroit 41 34 Ml 13V* 

Chicago 34 40 .474 19 

Cleveland 32 O .427 22Vj 

Atlanta 30 44 J95 25 

Indiana 20 54 .243 35 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MldwMt DtvtaUui 

* -Denver 48 27 .440 — 

X-Houston 44 31 387 4 

x-Oclkn 42 34 353 <1* 

x-San Antonio 38 38 300 Wto 

Utah 37 39 A87 llto 

Kansas a tv 30 45 .400 18 

Pacttlc Dhrliioa 

v-1— A. Lakers 54 19 JO — 

K-Parttand 38 31 300 UK 


Transition 



MINNESOTA — Optioned JoH Reed, catch- 
er. and Andre David, outfielder, to Toledo at 
toe International Leasue. 

OAKLAND— Sent Danny Goodwin. outfield- 
er. to IMr itilnor-loague complex for nm- 
stonm o nt . 

National Leooue 

CINCINNATI— Stoned Tony Perez, ftrsf 
baeeman, to a one- rear contract. Sant Skeeler 
Barnes, InfleWer. to Denver of too American 
Association. 

MONTREAL — Sent Fred Bralnlm. altcMr. 
to Indiana pods of toe International Leaaue. 
Waived Max Venable, outfielder. 

N EW YORK— Traded Je*e Oauenda. snort- 

staavond NtorL Davis, pitcher, to St. Louis tor 
Arsen it 5a l mar. shortstas. and John Young, 

PROMT. 

PITTSBURGH— Aareed to torms efltti 
Lnnv McWilliams, pitcher, an a flve-wcr 
contracL 

ST. LOUIS— Placed Rk* Ownbey. pitcher, 
an toe 21-day disabled (1st, 

COLLEGE 

UOl SE STATE— Named Cheryl Kvatnlcfca 
snorts Information director. 

■ Davidson— N amed Vic Gdtto football 
coach. 


Soccer 


UaPed fts« ItownakoaoJ 

Willie Hernandez, after the final oat of the *84 World Series. 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
European Group S 
Romanic X Turkey S 

European Creep 5 
Hungary X Cyprus 0 

ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Southampton L Luton 0 
Watford 5. West Horn 0 


Phoenix 33 .43 AU 23W 

Seattle 30 46 .395 24V. 

I— A- Clippers 27 49 .355 29VY 

Golden State 10 54 30 34VY 

ix-cJ Inched etoyof f berth) 

(v-cl Inched division title) 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
LA. Ltoters 38 21 24 34— iw 

Dover 29 21 34 1S-1M 

AbduKJctolwr 9-17 *2 20. McAdoo 7-14 44 20. 
Wortov8-14>4 19; Erwllsh r»-20M031.Ltv» 
4-954 IX Issel 4-95-5 IX Rebounds: LA. Lak- 
ers 5B ( Abdul- Jabber 13) : Denver Sl (English 
T2). Assists; LA. Lakers 25 (Johnson >3); 
Denver 20 (Ewarts 5). 

seethe 22 33 29 25-109 

Phoenix 21 33 » 34—119 

Adams 9-22 10-12 38, Maey 10-15 0071; Simt- 
vold 9-12 4-4 24, McCormick 9-14 4-5 22, Cham- 
bers 5-13 12-12 2X Rebounds: Seattle 51 1 Mc- 
Cormick. Chambers 8); Phoenix 43 (Sanders 
131. Assists: Seattle 22 (Sabers 9); Phoenix 34 
(Aeams t). 

Boston 22 34 25 20—181 

Milwaukee 21 29 30 22-109 

Cummins* 8-19 58 IX Pressev 7-14 34 IX 
Monerlef 8-14 2-3 IX MokcsM 4-13 1-2 13; 
McHote s-t2 9-12 25, Parish 4-15 1MB 24. Re- 
bounds; Boston 48 (McHale 12); Milwaukee 
S* (Cum ml nos 13). Assists: Boston 24 (John- 
son, Williams 7); Milwaukee 29 (Pressey 91. 
DOlltn 31 28 34 34-07 

Gotten State 30 21 30 33-121 

Aguirre 17-25 7-8 4L Blackman 10-U 6-7 24; 
■Short 15-291-1 3XFloyd 11-183-4 SXRebsiinds: 
Dallas 45 (Brvom 12); Golden Slow 54 (5mlto 
14). Assists: Dallas 28 (Dovts. Hamer 8); 
Gotten state 24 (Ftovd 9). 

WatbttBton 17 22 21 37—107 

Cleveland 27 27 34 M— 122 

Free 14-27 4-4 22. Hinson 4-9 4-4 16; Malone 
10-20 « 24. Boitord 70S 4-5 IX Rebounds: 
Washington 45 [Robinson 8): Cleveland 54 
(Hubbard. Snelton 8). Aiflcts: Washlncrton 29 
(Gus williams 7); Cleveland 35 (Bagiev ML 
PMIadeMH 22 24 31 25-102 

Atlanta 20 24 28 17— 91 

Malone 5-18 13-14 22, BatHlsy 10-18 14 21; 
Wilkins 5-12 4-7 IX Rivers 5-13 13. Re- 

bounds: Philadelphia 62 ( Berkley 15) ; Atlan- 
ta 48 (Levinaston 8). Assists: Philadelphia 21 
(Moient, Cheeks, Threat! 51: Atlanta 22 
(EJohmon 8). 

Detroit 39 22 13 30-134 

Indiana 34 33 39 25-121 

I. Thomas 11-» 74 29, Trlpwdw 9-175421; 
KaHoob 10-17 0-12 28. J. Thom 03 10-17 5-7 25 
Rebounds; Detroit 51 (Lobntwer 17): Indiana 
31 (Kellogg 10). Assists: Detroit 27 [[.Thomas 
17); Indiana 23 U .Thomas, S). 

Near Jersey 27 31 22 17-94 

Chico* 31 38 24 33-118 

Jordan 1M9 7-8 31. Wooirtdpo 18-18 5-7 25; 
Richardson 14-24 1-2 29. WDItoms 9-18 3-3 21. 
RcDoands: New Jersey 44 (Wlirams to); CM- 
cago 57 (Green 12). Assists: New jhut 22 
(Ramey mi: CMcoeo 29 (Matthews toll. 
Houston 23 31 33 28-113 

Portland 31 XI 32 29—127 

Drexler 13-20 4-4 3X Vandeweghe 10-17 44 
24; Otoluwon 1 M3 3-5 23, Sampson 1-194422. 
Rnboonds: Houston S7 (Olalmran 15); Port- 
land 50 (Carr 13). Assists: Houston 29 (u*ws 
8); Portland 32 (Valentine 9). 


NO YDS AVG TB 120 LG 


S wider, JACK 21 909 43J 3 4 57 

Cater. ORL 34 1459 425 4 V 44 

Miller. MEMP 23 943 41.9 4 7 S3 

Anarusvshvn. TB 19 794 4» 15 S9 

Partrtdoe, NJ 27 1099 4X7 3 6 61 

pent Returners 
NO YDS AVG FC LG ID 
Me Padded, BIRM 9 143 TX9 7 3 7 0 

Jackson. ORL 13 143 125 1 71 0 

Lana, BALT 16 143 105 2 20 0 


McNeil. HOU 
Gum. LA 
Martin, DEN 
Harris: ARIZ 
Bonner, SA 


NO YDS AVG FC LG TD 

14 170 1X1 I 791 1 

9 100 11.1 3 451 1 

9 94 1X4 2 33 0 

20 195 95 2 23 0 

6 59 95 1 27 0 


Me Pad den, BIRM 
Jackson, ORL 
Lana. BALT 


Williams. MEMP 10 97 9.7 0 


Porrtstv ORL 
Harris. BALT 
Peguai, NJ 
Hackatt, NJ 
Comrttv BIRM 


13 71 55 3 15 0 

Kkdcoff Returners 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 

21 515 245 95 I 

9 199 2X1 48 0 

8 170 2U 28 0 

6 127 2U 30 0 

M 9 188 20.9 24 0 


Verdin. HOU 
Faulkner, OAK 
Harris. ARIZ 
Bentley. OAK 
Ricks. PORT 


28 195 95 2 23 0 

4 59 95 1 27 0 

Kickoff R* tamers 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 

11 329 295 941 1 

K B 228 285 57 0 

9 254 2X4 76 0 

7 177 25J 38 0 

7 172 245 39 0 


Golf 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Team Otfaaia 

Yards Rush Pass 
Houston 2442 232 2230 

Oakland 2129 831 1298 

Denver 2008 499 1309 


Exhibition Baseball 


Toronto 

Oiluw 

Detroit 

California 

Bolltnma 

New York 

Cleveland 

Milwaukee 

Seattle 

Kansas City 

Texas 

Oakland 

Minnesota 

Boston 

NATIONAL 
Las Anatitt 
Atlanta 
Now York 
Philadelphia 
Cincinnati 
San Francisco 
Chicago 
San Oiego 
Houston 
Montreal 
SLLoub 
pmsbufoh 


LEAGUE 

W 

16 

17 

15 

12 

13 

12 

12 

13 

12 

11 

9 

10 
11 
10 

LEAGUE 

13 

14 
12 
12 
13 

13 

14 
12 
11 

9 ' 
7 1 
5 - 


TUESDAY’S RESULTS 
Cincinnati 7, Minnesota 6 
Pittsburgh X Houston 4 
Philadelphia X Kansas Citv 2 
Detroit (u j to. SL Louts 2 
Belton 2. Now York Yankees 1. (7 (no. rain] 
son Diego X ChlcoOO Cubs & 14 Inmnos 
San Francisco 7. Seattle X 10 Innings 
California A Milwaukee 2 
Cleveland 11, OeMand 4 
Baltimore X Gilcogo WMfe Sox 0 
Toronto 14, Detroit (as) 1 
Seattle IX Arizona State 3 


statistical leaders on the PGA tour t hrou gh 
the Tournament Players Champ lea dUp: 
EARNINGS 

1, Curtis Strange S324.99X X Calvin Peel* 
S24958X X Mark DMearo S209.1BX X LarniV 
Wotflc Ins $197530: X Craig Stodlsr $153501. X 
Fuzzy Zoeller $13X177. 7, Tam Watson $121532. 
X Larry Rlnker S121534. o. nuke Smith 
$11X109. IX Fred Couplet SII3897. 

SCORING 

1, Craig Stabler. 69.72 X Lannv Wodklnx 
4951.X Dan Pooiev. 70JH 4. Lorry Mize. 70.14. 
X Colvin Peete. 7X17. X Corev Pavin, 7031. 7. 
Ed Fieri, 7042 X Tam Watson. 7G4X 9, Scott 
Simpson. 705a IX Curtis Strange, 7D55. 
AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
l.Grea Norman. 2775. 2 BlllGlasson,27UX 

Andy Been, 374JX L Mac O'Grodv. 2735. 5, Fred 

Couples. 2735. X Jim Deni. 2711. 7, Don PohL 
77X*. X Greg Twiggs and Tom wotoen. 2733. 
IX Fuzzy Zaelier. 2495. 

DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1. Calvin Peele, J9X X Mike Reid. J7X % 
Hale lrwln,.74XADavld Edwards. J44.X Tim 
Norris. 534. 6, Doug Tewell-753.7, Tom Kflb 
749. X Jack Renner, 747. 9. Wayne LevL J4X 
IX Bruce Uetzke. 729. 

GREBNS IN REGULATION 
1, Jock NlckioM. 7BX X Corey Pavin. 74XX 
Bruce Ueftfcft 742. X Doug TevwJl„73?.& Dan 
PohL 737. x ai (Mberw and Catvtn Peete. 
73I.X Jdek Ronner.727. 9. Scott 5lmDeoa 727. 
IX Mike Reid. 724. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
1, Fuzzy ZoeltoT,2757. X K«n» A mi, 277X1 
Morris Hatalsfey. 2757. X Lonny Wodklns. 
2X4X s, Crate Stodler and Dan Foreman. 2X46. 
7, Sevo Ballesteros. 2873. X Rex Caldwell 
287X9, Frank Conner,2X7X IXLnren Roberto, 
2879. 

PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1, Crate Storfler.TSlZ Lannv Wodklns. 24X 
ITom Watsan.797.XGII Morgan, 727.1 Andy 
Bean, 724. x Curtis strange, 721. 7. Calvin 
Peete, 72 ft. X Tze-Chuno Chen. 719. 9, Larry 
Mize and Fred Couples. 21X 
EAGLES 

1. Carey Pavin. Curtis Strange, Howard 
Twttty end Larry Rfaher, 7. 5. Fred Cauttet. 
Buddy Gardner and Dan Pooiey, X 
BIRDIRS 

1. Fred Couples. 141 X Curtis Slranoe. 14XX 
Lorry Rlnker, 157. X WUIle Wood and Craig 
Stodler, 142 X Loren Roberto. 14 L 7, Larry 
Mize. 13X X Brad Faxon, 134. 9, Don Pooiey. 
135. IX Hal Sutton. 131 












. . _ - i 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 

Pushing the PR Buttons 

W ASHINGTON — One of the want them to think I can open air 
better jobs in Washington powerful doors for them just be 


W better jobs in Washington 
these days is working for a public 
relations' Firm. There are hundreds 
of them ail over the city and anyone 
with a decent name in the govern- 
ment can find a home at one — at 
triple his or her present salary. 

There was a time when PR com- 
panies worked cheaply and secretly 

for their clients. 

Now they 
charge enor- 
mous fees and 
get their names 
in the newspa- 


m 



pers as frequent- 
ly as the people 
they're sup- 
posed to publi- 
cize. 

What do PR 

companies in *wcnwaw 
Washington do to earn their mon- 
ey? I dropped in on Robert Rack, 
founder of one of the hottest com- 
panies in the business. Among 
those listed as vice presidents on 
Flack's door are two retired assis- 
tant secretaries of state, the wife of 
a congressman, an ex-presidential 
advance man, a South American 
general and the former emperor of 
Tubistoland. ■ 

Flack’s large penthouse office 
overlooks the White House. 

“Boy,” 1 said. “Yon have some 
view.” 

He smiled as he pointed out the 
window. “Some of the happiest 
days of my life were spent in the 
Rose Garden over there.'* 

“IH bet you miss it,” I said. 

He sighed, “It’s only a stone's 
throw away and the old man said I 
can smell the flowers anytime I 
want to. What can I do for you?” 

a 

"There’s been a lot of stuff about 
Washington PR firms in the papers 
lately and I was curious. Why the 
high profile?” 

“Well, first and foremost, we 
need clients who can afford our 
services. In order to get them we 
have to make sure everyone is 
aware that we know the right but- 
tons to push. Excuse me just a mo- 
ment . . . Miss Blackwell if Ed 
Meese calls tell him I'm still out to 
lunch . . . What were you say- 
ing?" 

“Is the diem buying access to 


people in power?” 
“Let's get this s 


“Let's get this straight. I never 
mention my White House or HQ1 
connections to get a client. I don't 


want them to think I can open any 
powerful doors for them just be- 
cause I'm asking for a six-figure 
retainer.” 

“Then why do you have that au- 
tographed photo of Tip O’Neill on 
your desk?" 

“It makes me feel good just to 
look at him." 

□ 

“OJC, so you don’t use your 
government connections for your 
business. What do you do for your 
clients?" 

“Hold it,” he said. “Miss Black- 
well caB Caspar Weinberger and 
tell him he looked great on the Ted 
Koppel show last night” 

“You know Caspar Wember- 
ger7" I asked. 

“I never talk about anybody in 
Washington that I know,” he said. 
“Bade to my business. What we do. 
is present our client's image in the 
best light. That does not mean we 
lie or are dishonest But there are 
two sides to eveiy story. Here’s a 
perfect example,” he said, holding 
up a photo of dead people lying in 
the street. “A foreign government 
retained us because American tele- 
vision kept showing their troops 
shooting demonstrators. We imme- 
diately put out the story that the 
only reason the people were shot 
was because demonstrations are 
forbidden in the country and the 
people were breaking the law.” 

“Didn’t President Reagan say 
that about South Africa at his press 
conference a few weds ago?' 

“We bad nothing to do with 
that,” he protested. “South Africa 
isn’t our client." 

“I didn’t say it was. Sc- what do 
you do besides make bad countries 
look good?” 

“We don’t make bad countries 
look good. We make strong coun- 
tries look go«L We also represent 
U. S. industries under attack from 
the government, and create favor- 
able dimales for businessmen who 
are gping to be indicted by a federal 
grand jury. We provide junkets for 
the media and will even write their 
Stories and film their TV news 
spots for them. The United States 
couldn't have an informed public 
without people like us.” 

“I believe it. Thanks for your 
time.’* 

“Don’t mention it. Oh, by the 
way, if you see Henry Kissinger out 
in the waiting room tdl him 1 
haven’t forgotten he’s there.” 


AIDS Deaths Prompt Wave 
Of Plays on New York Stages 


PEOPLE 




By Samuel G. Freedman 

!Vew York Times Service 

N EW YORK — When Wil- 
liam Hoffman began writing 
a play about the mysterious dis- 
ease called AIDS nearly three 
years ago, he thought he was 
alone in his calling. He was writ- 
ing out of a personal pain — the 
death of a friend who only 
months before had been robust 


While writing “Fever,” for in- 
stance. Holt took the Gay Men’s 
Health Crisis training course for 
“buddies” who support AIDS 
victims. One of the major charac- 
ters in the play is a “buddy.” In 
the case of “As Is,” the Glines — 
an organization that produces 
works by homosexual artists, like 
Harvey Fierstdn’s "Torch Song 


It was obscenely difficult to get anyone 
to pay attention to AIDS. There’s a line in 
one play in which the young tnan who’s 
dying says, 'There’s not a good word 
to be said for anybody in this entire mess.’ 


enough to run a marathon — and 
he was facing a subject that 
seemed far too grisly for the 


By the time Hoffman’s “As Is” 
opened last month at the Circle 
Repertory Company, it was part 
of a wave of days about acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome. 
Moreover, “As Is” has become a 
critical and financial success that 
is likely to transfer to a Broadway 
or a commercial off-Broadway 
theater. 

The first New York play about 
AIDS — the often fatal disease 
that weakens the body’s resis- 
tance to infection and that dis- 
proportionately afflicts homosex- 
ual and bisexual men, 
intravenous ding users, hemo- 
philiacs and recent immigrants 
from Haiti — was Robert Ows- 
ley's “Nightsweat,” which played 
last May at the Meridian Gay 
Theater. Four months later, Ste- 
phen Holt’s “Fever of Unknown 
Origin” opened at the Theater for 
the New Gty. Preview perfor- 
mances of Larry Kramer's “Nor- 
mal Heart,” produced by Joseph 
Papp, began Tuesday at the Pub- 
lic Theater. A play at the Public, 
“Coming of Age in SoHo" by 
Albert umaurato, also refers to 
the fear of AIDS among homo- 
sexuals. 

AH these plays share a sense of 
mission that goes beyond ait 


Trilogy” — put up half the bud- 
get of about $ 100 , 000 . 

“If there’s any topic people 
don’t want to see onstage, it’s 
AIDS,” Chesley said. “But this 
tragedy is so immediate. Writing 
a play about AIDS now is compa- 
rable to Euripides writing about a 
current war that was affecting his 
audience.” 

Each play was born in death — 
the death of a friend or lover, the 
fear of one’s own death. From 
there, however, the plays repre- 
sent extremely different ap- 
proaches, form the personal “As 
Is” to the political “Normal 
Heart,” from the black comedy of 
“Nightsweat” to the deathbed re- 
alism of “Fever.” The plays also 
indicate the divisions within the 
homosexual community about 
the relationship between AIDS 
and the casual sex available in 
bars and bathhouses. 

“When I found out otherpeo- 
ple were writing about AIDS,” 
Hoffman said, “I was relieved 
It's such a large area, such a gi- 
gantic story we’re dealing with. 
One person can’t do it” 

Holt said: The enormity of 
the tragedy is so great that there 
will be many artistic responses.” 

The common problem for any- 
one writing about AIDS is how to 
convey the disease without trivi- 
alizing it, how to humanize a trag- 
edy without sugar-coating it. 


“The subject itself is so horrify- 
ing,” Innaurato said, “that it’s 
hard to do it justice. It’s also so 
mysterious it doesn’t lend itself to 
tire traditional ways you would 
write about a disease.” 

Hoffman's solution was to 
write not about the disease, but 
the reaction to it “As Is” charts 
the relationship between Rich- 
ard, a novelist who contracts 
AIDS, and Saul the lover he left 
before becoming HL In “As Is,” as 
in “Nightsweat” and “Fever,” it 
is the jilted lover who returns to 
comfort the dying man. 

Critics lauded the play’s hu- 
manity, as well as the perfor- 
mances and the direction of Mar- 
shall Mason. But several critics 
also complained that “As Is” de- 
scribed Richard's sexual adven- 
tures, from leather bars to a Mar- 
rakesh graveyard, in elegiac 
terms. Thae was little indication 
that he migh t have developed 
AIDS through sexual promiscui- 
ty. 

T think some critics warned 
me to be moralistic,” Hoffman 
said “And Vm not inclined to be. 
I don’t think people need to be 
told what to do or what not to da 
I don't think bawling people out 
has ever stopped anyone from do- 
ing anything.” 

Chesley, m “Nightsweat,” de- 
fended sexual freedom as a cor- 
nerstone of the homosexual life- 
style. When a dmrarttar with 
AIDS cries out, Tm going to 
die,” another responds: “Yes, 
yes. But meanwhile you’re going 
to five! Live until the very mo- 
ment you die! And make love in 
every possible, safe and sensible 
way!" 

“AIDS isn’t just a question of 
losing young lives,” Chesley stud 
“It’s meant reneging on our eroti- 
cism. People for the first time in 
their lives were at borne with 
themselves and were expressing 
themselves through eroticism. It 
was not simply a question of hav- 
ing fun.” 

Holt argues the other side of 
the same issue in “Fever.” When 
an exercise teacher is hospital- 
ized one of his friends suggests 
that “if he hadn't been into all 
these heavy sex scenes he never 
would have gotten AIDS.” 




Jndt Marwtng/Tht teto* Yet* 

Larry Kramer 



*<yV« 

William Hoffman 


“My play stood for a lot of 
values that were unfashionable in 
the promiscuous 70s,” Holt said 
Tve seen that lifestyle do noth- 
ing but cause torment, disease 
and heartbreak. I’ve tried to raise 
the consciousness of gay people 
so that love and Oddity become 
more important than «Jaml sex." 

“My play is very angry and 
accusatory, Kramer said. “I got 
involved in the AIDS mess early 
on — I lost two friends and some- 
one I was in love with — and I 
knew it was the saddest thing Td 
ever know. And it was obscenely 
difficult to get anyone to pay at- 
tention to AIDS. There’s a line in 
the play in which the young man 
who's dying says. There's not a 
good word to be said for anybody 
m this entire mess.' It seems to me 
that was what had to be said” 


Gallery Design Scratched 

The National Gallery said Toes- had a landing permit Sanchez, 44, 
day that it has scrapped a design is an industrialist and three- time 
for a new wing in London's Trafal- winner of the air tour of Spain, and 
gar Squat*, which Prince dories Hidalgo, 42. is a Malaga anpest 


once called a “monstrous caibnnde controller. The two were common, 
on the face of a wdl-loved friend” orating and retracing a flight made 
Up to six architects will be invited in 1926 by Eduardo Gamdfez GaU 
to submit new designs. The muse- hrza. 
urn extension will be funded by Sir □ ■ 

John Sainsbary, chairman of Sains- Oakland Auckland Say the 

billy’s supermarket chain, and Jus wor ds slowly. Carefully. Hear the 
brothers, Sunoo and Timothy. The djff—nw-? You learned fee easv 


92-foot (28-meterl glass tower memo, ^oniia, colkge 'smdcnt 
topped with staimras-steel flag- reWm ed to Los Angeles od Thes- 
poles. Toe new wing should relate from a traveler’s nightmare — 
sympathetically to the present ^ in-flight reahzationlkthe was 
building, have architectural^ oa the wrong plane -—-bound for 


memo, uunonua, college student 
returned to Los AngdeTon Thes- 


Tm a little sensitive about my 
age,” said John J. McQoy, who 
turned 90 on Sunday. The United 


House in Washington. McQoy, 
who has also been president of the 


John Sainsbury, chairman of Sains- Oakland Auckland Say the 

billy’s supermarket djain, and Jus words slowly. Carefully. Hear the 
brothers, Sunoo and .Timothy. The $ SSeTeo/x ' ! You learned fire easy 
£18- million (about 522-milli0a) de- Michael Lewis found out the 
sign rgected by die trustees had a ^ way. The 21-ycar-ddSacra- 
92-foot (28-metert glass tower memo, California, college student 



unction worthy of the site and be Auckland, New Zeabml^abow 
complementary to Trafalgar 6 600 miles (lO^OdkDometias) far- 
Square,” said a galleiy spokesman, ther than where be tbaaOkbc was 


going — Oakland Odifomin On 
three occasions, accordine to a 
spokesman for Aar NewZealahd, 
Lewis misunderstood afitfbe staff 


Stares' first civilian high conunis- members who asked hhnif he was 
doner for Germany was made an going to Auckland Shortly after 
honorary citizen of West Germany takeoff, Lewis heard a wesd that 
in ceremonks Tuesday al the White did not sound anything lie Oak- 



land: Tahiti. Lewis explained his 
dilemma to a flight attendant and 


Wodd Hank, rimirman of Chase later was told that the airiine would 
Manhattan Bank and the Ford fly him to Los Angeles free of 
Foundation and served the govern- charge, 
ment under nine presidents, told □ . 

President Ronald Reagan he was More pop stars axe coming to the^ 

interested to note “compared to ^jjef q[ famine victims in Africa. * 
me, what a spring chicken you are. sixty- two Lytin music stars, in- 

eluding JuEo Igtesbs, Jose FeB- 
0 . . _ - dano and Sergio Meades, wiD re- 

Pnncess Margaret has not ©ven corf a song W week to raise 
up smoking, despite surgery three monC y for the hungry in Africa and 
months^o. when doctors ^^oved Utin America. Hermanos del 
a piece of her lung and said it was Tcrcer Mimdo> Brothos or the 
not mah^ant Tbe princess. 54, lit ^ World ^ ^ ^ 9 - m 

op twice Tuesday, during a tdevi- ^ ^ ^ Rccord / stodio 
sum and radio dub luncheon at where 45 American singers record- 


which she presented awards. 

□ 


ed the single “We Are The World" 
in January. It was also disclosed 


Two Spanish pilots arrived in this week that a reggae recording 
Manila Tuesday at the end of a li- called “Land of Africa" and featur- 
day ni ght aboard a two-engine ing more than a dozen singers will 
rwnn 414 plane from MAlaga, soon be released in the United 
Spain. “In tire air it was wonderful States. And SO of the top U.S. gos- 
but the bureaucratic red tape on pd singers will record “Do Some- 
land was hefl,” Atfoeso Sanchez thing Now” a song and video to rP- <- , 

PbdOa said shortly after be and raise money for famine victims. ■' 

Miguel Hhbdgo B eato arrived. The . . . Hundreds of radio stations 
red tape meant having to him back across the United States and 
to India as they were about to enter around the world are pled ring- to 
Burma’s air space last Thursday play “We Are The World,” the trib- 
and being hdd by Indian military ute to the starving in Africa, at fee 
officials on the Andaman Islands same time on Good Friday, 10:30 
in the Bay of Bengal because the AuM. EST. in a gesture inspired by 
garrison there was not aware they stations in Georgia and Utah. 


for famine victims, 
ds of radio stations 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

SUBSCRIBE 
to the 

INTERNATIONAL 

HERALD 

TRIBUNE 

AND SAVE 

As a new subscriber to tile 
Intamabond Herald Tribune, 
yrxj am save up to hdf 
the newsstand price, depend i ng 
00 your country of reside n ce . 

For detak 

an Ms special introductory offer, 
write foe 

WT Subscription* Department, 
1ST, Avenue Qwrtes^fe-Gonflw, 
92300 Nelly ey e Seine. Ranee. 
Or fefc Pei 747-4)7-39 

IN ASIA AND PACinc 

contact our local efisnbutor on 

fertemafienri Horrid Tribune 
TOOS Tee Sana Comment Bunting 
2 *-34 T tan n o M Y Bead 
HONGKONG 
T«fc HK 5-286726 


US NEWS 4 WOULD REPORT 
ON SAIE AT 
HROrrANO’S 

37 Ave. de r Opera, Paris 2 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

0056 TO 
MONTE-CARLO 

M agnificent 3 5 ocre luxury 
estate, perfect condition. For further 
detals cantor t 

AGEDI 

26 be Bd Princess* Charlotte 
Marde Carta MC 98000 Monaco 
Tefc (93 ^ ^00^ 155) or: 

lrufsrlto^ 06500 
MENTON TeU (93) 57 08 05 

UMOUE - CANNES - fa head of 
'Suquef. overlooking the old part and 

El^XieMmeiM A n ■ 4uin(iiu i 

TOOTwrOTcan. nn encncnwiQ 

ily house of erxty 19th century 

*KB» * DCffDOnlk 

with large terrace. DeS^tf- 
Fantatie sea view. 
4 7 La Croseffe, 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


SUN. N.Y. TIME - Euraet drihery. | 
Write Keyser, POB 2, B1000 frusseh. 

MOVING 

• 

ALLIED 


VAN UN ES INTL 

OVBt 1000 AGENT5 
M UAA. - CANADA 
350 WORU1-VHDC 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
PARIS A SUBURBS 

NEUliLY ON BOIS 

New build ng Sgfe doubU Bwq. 2 bed- 
rooms. 2 baths, equipped latcren, 4fh 
floor + 2 rxrtngs + 2 maids' rooms. 
Tri-. Tfc *9 48. 

4Hfc EGU9E SAINT MBS) 
Historic XVlith century 
Freestone Ixdcfing 
EXQgnONAL 90 gQJ H • 
vast uvuia on garden 
GARBLS67 22 M 

MANTES, New 

18th cent, tauriau estate, 10.000 sam. 
land, river + caretakers house, rer- 
fcd co ndi t i on, 10 roam. Teh 265 S3 9*. 


MAJORCA'S NEW 
SUP81 PORT 

In thw bay of Wraa, 5 mint. Pal ma. 15 
mint- carport, 664 berths 8 to 38 metm. 
2 for up to 60 meters each. tmSndud 
TV/ mea nt/ water/ phone connectio ns . 
Professional port management co. Ful 
marine services: tower, rotfo, stip, tew 
•Wft, repair, fuel station. «n & outdoor 
winter hardstmds. Unround car. Doric 
lockers. Comple m e n tary service 4 lei- 
sure facfitiefc ntecScof, banfangL shop- 
ping, catering, ertertonsne rtf. Golf 4 
tenses nearby. CbneefOd area com- 
prises 85 unts an 13.171 sqjo. m ofl. 
rfia2 1 super tportmerfs above 4 78 ri 
separate luxury condo . aS in front Kne 
dona mam piers. Top mvestmertfl 45% 
sokSHurry now before mart pnee-rise! 
Contact rfrecfl y developer* 

PUERTO PUNTA PORTA15, SA. 
Director Coaierod 
C/Mama JflJ Parfds htons 
Motional Spam or far 66686 CAUU E. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

HOLLAND 

DUTCH HOUSING CBtTK A V. 

Oetuw renick. VcrferiLSrtr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020421234 or 623222. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 1 575 62 2Q.Tku 


Embassy Service 

I Ave de m ee sme 

7500# Paris 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT IN PARK 

WOW 562 71 99 , 


AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

764 03 17 


74 CHAMPS-ELY5EES 8Ht 

Studio, 2 or 3room upu t m a m. 
One month or more. 

LE CUUBDGE 359 67 97. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

CUT rOU* HOTEL MLL tiy □ Hatokt 
upm hn enl near the Bffel Tower. Liter- 
try stuc&o* to Sroora apartments, 
from ore week upwards. RaTOTEL, 
?4 rue du TMfltre, 75015 Pern. Tet 
575 62 2Q.Thu 205Z11 F. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


SPAIN 


KAUlffULMKJA VUAGE. View, 
swmrrwig pool sports room. TV-Vid- 
eo. Seeps 6 - throgjh September. 
'Rtiw Span 952-520253 Or vteitr M. 
Pa&e. £5e Crrsto 58, Nerja, Mafopa 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 



EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVE 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 

WOMBfS READY TO WEAR hod- _ ___ 

riRor^ • *®«kina Far the Pom headquarters a 
once. Senior espeiiemj i in luxury 

dotting 4 knewfedge of ItoScsi Ian- . _ . 

^ Processma 

curricuium to Bo* 52, P lnt'l Herald Tri- 

bwn^ Sa i Fetat To no 5, 2DCW- fc- 


EMPLOYMENT 

EXECUTIVE 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


Data Processing 
Manager 


Pfocfl Your Ctttstfbd Ad Qukldy and EasRy 

|H ^§Kp 

(NTBLNAnONAL HStAIO TRIBUNE 

■y Phone: CoS your k>cd 1HT representative with your text. You 
wifl be informed of the cast immediately, and once prepayment is 
made your ad wiD appear within 48 haws. 

CoehThe basic rale a 59^0 per ine per day + toed taxes. Tliene are 

25 fetter^ egns end spaoes to the first ioe and 36 in the fafawwH ferns. 

Wnmim spaa* is 2 lines. No abbreviations accepied 

CraA Cards: American Express, Diner's dub. Eurocord. Master 

Card, Access and Visa 



eggs 

Jj 


P 

-4 


CHAMK R.Y5EES. High doss studo, 
View, TV. Short/lang term. 562 93 32. 


IBIZA 

HHJJOP FMCA. Fantastic sea view, 
seduded bantian. ne» bead\ 10 me* 
GojfRoaa Us w,5 raws Puerto toim, 5 
feduoan 4 baths, big pooi- d swig 
woraaa For rent Moy T - Oe» 15 $?0t> 
1 100 weekly mnmuni 3 weeks. Cal 
Autl»ioS3S^ 3148 or Poris 256 0255 or 
Ben 1933/Hvald Tribune, 92521 Nwil- 
iy Cedr c t . France. Evsriaaly for i de. 


LOOiaNG FOR 44wdraom house A 
garoen to rent in Ruefl Mdmqban / 
Sr. German / Vettoef omo tar staff 
with BVwnateood corporation. Phone 
Paris 501-54-J2 bt. 363. 




fOR MORE BOCUnVE PORTIONS 
LOOK LtNDSt 

H MTBMAT1QNAL POSITIONS" 
PAGE 3 




OCEAT BRTTAIN 


PARIS Desbanfes Irdematloaal 
(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

{069] 250066 

MUNICH I.M.S. 

{0R9J 142244 

LONDON 

{Ol J 953 3636 

CAIRO ABM Van Unei ton 
(20-2) 712901 

USA ABiad Van Lines InPI Carp 
(0101) 312-681-6100 


WORLDWIDE 
Nol MOVER 
FOUR WINDS INTI 

CALL US FOR YOU* NEXT MOVE 
PARIS 13)036 63 11 
LONDON COT) 578 66 11 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 




SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovefy rnetmems with mapificent 
views cf U*e Geneva and mountaim. 
Meitteux. Wlare. Vorbier, Lei Ottoler- 
els, QkPbctj cfOe* net* Gstoori, Ley- 
snv CKB s i e nt QnMfflBHn For 
fsn tou H 

Prices From 5023000. 

Ubard morta a get at 6 HX intere st. 
gldSepian SA. 

Av Man Repos 24. 

CH-1005 Lausanne, Svwteeriand. 
Tel- ffl) 22 3S )Z 7ht 251 85 mjS 
MMndSncs 1970 


International Business Message Center 



indudm camf M m and verify 
Mo bXna oddrnm. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 




BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


cevnputrr lystams on on 
IBM system 38/model 40. 

• SpecmcatK4i and expeewinn of a 
larpo raOe text hooding system 
(Af&) b«ed on 0£C pap 11 


LATEX) band an DEC pdp 11 
Computers, 

- Lcepe .scale trieatewnaniastiora. 
aonieei to indudo tpsdfyny and 
■mrtftnQ tries, modems, jWhdted 
muFtipfcteen, sync and bsync 
cwnmuricntioni Termnaa, 6 printers 

- Deveiopmert md irtraduenan of I8M 
PC bened systems for remote office 
and one-off opp fctriom . 

The ideal canddole wil have bad at 
least 5 years e x perience a a EDP man- 
agw aid wfl be able to rfajday tignifv 
cart occomphhments in the areas aien- 
honed djow. 

Working bvxrier dge of bath French 
and Engtsh is r spared 

This is o results onssUed po el i w and 
as such the salary offered a highly 
cotesietihve. 

Apply fa 

Stephan W. Conaway 
in t er no ti ond Herrid Tribune 

101, avenue Charles de Cadfe 
92S21 NewBy-sur^eine, France 


HiAPoma 

Pari*: [For classified only): 
747-4600. 

BKOPC 

A to etardo m: 263615. 
Alltons: 361 -8397/360-2421 . 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhagen: (01> 329440. 
I kwHdb H r P69) 77-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29J8-94. 

Usbort 67-27-93/662544. 
ImMok {01 1 8364802. 
Madrid: 455-2891 /45S3306 
AMfeee (02) 7531445. 
Norway-. (03) 845545. 
R«w. 679-3437. 

Sweden: 06 7569227. 

Tel Avfvt 03455 559. 
Vtonnnr Contact F ra nkfur t . 

UWTO STATES 

New York: (212) 752-3890. 
West Coaril {41 5) 362-8339. 


LATIN AWflUCA 

Buenos Aires: 41 40 31 

(De*31* 

Guayaquil: 431 943/431 
Uma: 417 852 
Panama: 64-4372 
San Jw 22-1055 
Santiago: 69 61 555 
Son Paula: 852 1893 

MWOUIAST 

Miraim 246303. 

Jordon 2S214. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 34 00 44. 
Qatar: 416535. 

Saudi Arabia: 

Jaddrin 667-1500. 
UAX: Dubai 224161. 

PAR BAST 

Bangkok: 29046-57. 
Hong Kens: 5420906. 
Manta B17 07 49. 

Seoul- 725 87 73. 
Sktgaftotnc 222-2725. 
Taiwim: 75244 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Sydneys 929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 690 8231 


OFFSHORE TAX 5HBJH5 FRENCH WEST IfBMES 

from £75 . PUMICE STONE (Pirn Pence) 

UK, Ue of Man, Tirfa. Channel W«b. far ^ Quan y operator yefa mdus- 
P o ncnio,lberia6mwto H shu i eoiep. trial eiterestod m mb rtxwi mctrrri. 


far s afe. Qug ry operator se ries mdui - 
triol trrterestod n this raurii m ot m d . 
For mtorTTietfior tel/wnte: V. T2APET. 
27 rue de Suede La Rachrife, France. 
Tek 146) 34 83 fc. Or OvaMme 
33/WM67M7 March 28/ April 15 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


Embassy Service 

8 Ave. de Messina 
75008 Paris 

Tries 23169# F 

YOUR REAL STATE 

AGOT IN PARIS 

PHOM 562-1640 


NSflUY 

UPPH HOOT SUN 
VERT BEAUTJHJl RECOTCN 
+ 2 BOROOMS. garage, irufs 
toem, EMBASSY 562 16 40 


CtxTclete nppert fontties. 
Veryrtrictiy confidertki 
Fne# amu^ateon; 

Boger Gnffin I LB. F.CA. 
Braden e; Corporate Mon o ganeHt Ud, 
W estern Home. Vktona 
Qauglas, Wo of Mao. 

Teh J06241 23303/4. 

Tries 67389 CORMAN G. 


;? 

I FOR SAIE PAJ9S WART of Mortfpar- 

niBHL ROTnlClrt tAlQllftffi toWI Dfl* 
vote ga dm. 5250,00 U Far detofe 
write Ben 1976, Herald Tribune, 
92521 Nealy Cede*. FTonc*. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


MPl 

BEAUTHFUL PEOPLE 

IINUMITB) INC 
USJi. « WORLDWIDE 

A complet e tooal & bums service 
pravirting a urique ccBsdion of 
<4erSec L f veaa bte 6 m ritfeguat 

meWao ob TDf O CCU VPre. 

212-705-7793 
212^65-7794 
330 W. 566 St. N.Y.C 10019 
Service gepr es ent utw e s 
wanowoB. 



-OtoK^lia M1VM. IMIbteUt 1 0*41 

rOTOTOfl, wlB(9CM)n Old WOO- 

agement - UK & ofljhore corapania 


buiWB m t ernota n ri touna 
oJtadet, hotsh, shccpna center, 
• Investment ro^e USaiSjOOO to 

usiJKum 

Euro-Amertaas hw e slui a U Corn. 
10DN. Bsaryne Bfvd 
Sus* lSO^Man FI 33132 

Mitotan* i Trie^S^W 
PALAZZO ALVRABRO 

Phara.09CS. 6793450 
Write: Via dri Vridvo 16, 

00186 bate 



Peikrmsraet 62, 62018 Antwerp 
BrigKim • Tel. (32 3)234 07,51 
Tbn 71779 1 / b. Ar the Dromond Oub. 
Henri of Antwerp Desmond mdustry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR MNW q W C t 
M IOMKM 

•7 day 24 how access aj w sr^Toiw 

• Fid support services mdudrSf 
ncretanri, telex, copjeng, etc 

• Gxporrie RepresentcAon Semen 

• Short or torn term a va3o Wt y 
World-Wide Butin*** Centres 

11 OTbeStevnd London WC7XOAA 
Trie Ol 836-1911 Tbc 24973 


YOUR LONDON OHW 

CF03HAM EXKUIIVE CMTH - 
Camprritotfive ranbs pf servica 
150 Hnad Streri/lmrisn W1. 
Teh (01)439 6288 Re 161426 


.■^Kbaci:: 
^Bcndsu l« 
'fsai&nr 
: '3T pifporuc 


; RDtnsi*j 2 

^ fee old 

^PriUlDiij