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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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WEAIHSl DATA APPEAR OH PaOC 16 

No. 31*764 ■-’ • ' . ~ 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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Israel 
Assailed 
By U.S. 

Shift of Prisoners 
CtiBed Violation 
Of Rights Accord 

By Bernard Gwertzman • 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration says Israel appar- 
ently violated an international 
agreement when it transferred 
more than 1,000 Lebanese detain- 
af ees from southern Lebanon to Isra- 
Michd Rocard Henri Naflet tL 

The State Department said 

■w-y ■* -m m-» - * -n • Wednesday that the transfer of the 1 

Jbrench Minister Resigns ^&3g7iP££ 

" . ’ , pyjng power^ —in this case, Israel 

To Protest Mitterrand’s s?^i?isSS &£ 

Geneva Convention of 1949, deal- 

TTh i T t ' m i STt ing with treatment of prisoners and 

rroposea V oung \Jutnge 

_ T r- , , ... • It was the department's first crit- 

By Joseph Ktchett lected m a two-stage process w cv- idsm of actions ^ soun^m 

international RcnM Tribune ery constituency, a system that Lebanon since the Israelis began to 

PARIS — Michel Rocard, meant that a party with small win- their troops from the 

France s agriculture minister, re- rung majorities nationally gamed a area e t ax ^ er ^ February 
signed Thursday to protest Presi- bigparbamemary edge. In Jerusalem, the Israeli Foreign 

<knt Frauds Mitterrand s doa- The proposed^systean would allot Ministry denied that Israel had vio- 
sion to introduce proportional by quota in 99 administrative lated the convention. A ministry 

representation m parliamentary jjjstjjcts throughout France, so that spokesmra died the section of Ar- 
riections. each party’s parliamentary repre- _ tide 49 that permhsihe occupying 

- -The resignation of Mr. Rocard. would reflect its national power to evacuate an area “if the 






Henri Naflet 


To Protest Mitterrand’s 
Proposed Voting Change 



Reagan Reaches 
An Accord With 
Republicans on 
Cuts in Budget 


TTw AaseieMd Pm 

Israeli soldiers walk past debris in Ansar prison camp after the evacuation of the prisoners- 

Experts Say Japanese Trade Barriers 
Don’t Exceed Those of Other Nations 




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OALB TRIBUNE , 

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dy to pro- peradve military reasons so de- 


oahsts m poprlanw in opiniem ^ ^ believed dxhc tikdy to pro- peratrve military reason 
PPj 5 ’ “ a P 011 ^ =^£, 4 * diKe coalitions rather than strong mand.” The same parag 
oalwi “any- Ham Nailct, gcwfO Tting ma j orhiea dominated by sjys **protected persons” 


duce coalitions rather than strong mand.” The same paragraph also 


confidant of Mr. Mitterrand and a single party. be detained “in an area particularly 

Mr. Rocard had described the exposed to the dangers of war." 
nanyd to rqilace Mr. Rocanl ^ “ < j e fe aI j S T " danma the The spokesman said that there 

SodSsts were admiu^that they was aJitady considerable fighting 
SwmSS* expect to be beaten by conservative among Lebanese factions m the 
TOKpie Nacrt^ spoke swom an for ^ ^ area and that the atuation would 

the Socialists. The dqjarture is ex- . . . . M become more danger ous as the Is- 

tstsjssssBt %s£Ess&£z: jaafiSEsss 

As x-s 'sgsaiess 


rand’s decision to change the elec- 
tion process. 

Conservative opposition poiiti- 
rians accuse Mr. Mitterrand of en- 
gineering the change to . prevent 


l potiti- presidditial candidate in the 1981 

dSflfr , .... . . 

orevent - Mr. Rocard, as a cabinet mmu~ 


ci'id r orang nim out of omcetierore ““ 

his term ends in 1988..: 

They said tiienew system of dec- eveatuaBy adopted by the 


paignto become prea- Moreover, he said dial the transfer 
Eessfully challoigfid .was temporary and that detainees 
and as thTiodaEt would be released as developments 
«mdidflte in the 1981 m “"““p Lebanon ipenvt. 

He said the guerrillas had been 

tL as a cabinet minis- aatorded aD the privile^s duepris- 

Sriy, and unheeded, ^ 

igoiSiseconSEl- ^vention. althoii^ he said they 

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uons by proportronal repnaenta- _ . approndmately 1,100 prisoners to 

uon would lead to political insta- As agnadture mmsta^he had ^5 The braeli mfli- 

biUQT by prevffltag ^^ence tary indica^uesday that those 


1,100 prisoners to 
1 . The Israeli mfli- 


of strong governing majorities. aits in aid to F rench fanners by the pnioaers j t considered to be the 

Under old majority voting of a S^Seat had been moved there 

system, parharoenunaos were se- package to save the EC budgeL •temporarily" so as iwt to impede 

‘ — 1 " r— —————— the Israeh' troop withdrawal Most 

•. of the prisoners were Shiite Mos- 

Khartoum Is Shut Down laj^werealso involved. XCost woe 

. said to have been arrested far "se- 
_/ Wl - - » ■'■T\ 1 entity violations,” according to 

As Protesters Demand 

’• freed by the Israelis on Wednesday 

Resignation of Nunein ^ b tt ,oa “ wnnrar 

• O w ' [Prisoners rdeased from the An- 

1 . The Associated Press nes s , a hi gh price for your ineffi- s®* dl^cd Thursday that 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Air dent economic policies." * they were physically and psycholo- 

traffic, businesses and commimica- A British Broadcasting Ccop. gicafly tortnred at an rntwrogaricn 
lions in Sudan were shut bv a aen- broadcast mooitored is Cairo re- center, Reuters reported from iJei- 


By Nicholas D. Kristof 

Sew York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Despite the up- 
roar in Washington over Japanese 
protectionism, most trade experts 
say Japan has erected fewer tariffs 
or quotas than many other indus- 
trial countries. 

Although Japan's tangle of bu- 
reaucracy ana regulations has 
served as a trade barrier, experts 
conclude that on balance the Japa- 
nese government is not much less 
of a free trader than governments 
. in Europe or the United Slates. 

But even without intentional re- 
strictions, they add, the Japanese 
market remains more elusive than 
most because of deep cultural dif- 
ferences — the way Japan orga- 
nizes its society, arranges its econo- 
my and views the world. 

While same of the regulations 
and bureaucratic obstacles can and 
probably will be reduced, the cul- 
tural barriers to- trade cannot be 
easily negotiated away in talks with 
Japan’s prime minister, Ydsuhiro 
Nakasone. 

“In formal terms, the Japanese 
market is open,” said Stephen D. 
Cohen, author of a recent book on 
American-Japanese trade. “In 
commercial terms, it is impenetra- 
ble." 


Japan’s complex distribution 
system, its emphasis on long-term 
relationships and procedures that 
depend more on discretion than on 
-law all confound foreign business 
executives who do not understand 
Japanese culture. Even the Japa- 
nese find their market difficult to 

Japanese Envoy 
Arrives in U.S. 

United Press haenatimal 

NEW YORK — A special Japa- 
nese trade envoy arrived in the 
United States Thursday for talks 
aimed at quelling an escalating 
trade crisis with the United States. 
He said: "The situation is very 
bad." 

' Rdshi Teshima, deputy foreign 
minister for economic affairs, was 
sent to the United States to explain 
Japanese policies to U.S. officials. 
He said he was not sure who he 
would meet, adding that the Japa- 
nese Embassy in Washington was 
malting arrangements for the talks. 

“We have mutual problems and 
there are certain frictions," he said. 
•The climate is hoL I hope to ex- 

E lain onr position and what we 
aye already accomplished." 


break into, and until recently their 
bankruptcy rate was six rimes that 
of the United States. 

“The system doesn’t simply dis- 
criminate against foreigners. It dis- 
criminates against newcomers," 
said Jon K.T. Choy, an economist 
at the Japan Economic Institute in 
Washington. 

Despite Japan's limited use of 
formal barriers, however, in Wash- 
ington the prevailing view is that 
Japan is a protectionist scoundrel 
who abuses the free-trading system 
of Much the United States is a 
paragon. It is a view backed by the 
S37-biQioii U.S. trade deficit with 
Japan last year, which undoubtedly 
has been aggravated by the U.S. 
export problems resulting from the 
dollar's strength. 

Three lands of trade barriers can 
be easily assessed and compared: 
tariffs, quotas and visible non-tar- 
iff barriers such as voluntary ex- 
port restraints. In each. of these, 
Japan compares well with 'Mb# 
countries. 

When the latest round of negoti- 
ated tariff reductions are complet- 
ed in 1987, for example, Japan's 
average tariff on industrial imports 
will be Zil percent, compared with 
4.4 percent in the United Stales 

(Continued on Page2,CoL5) 


The AsrocUaed Press 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan and Senate Repub- 
lican leaders, working 10 gain con- 
trol over federal deficits, agreed 
Thursday on budget cuts that 
would slow the increase in Social 
Security benefits, cut back Mr. 
Reagan's military buildup and rati- 
fy many domestic spending cuts. 

The plan also calls for eliminat- 
ing ihe federal subsidy for Amtrak, 
the national rail network, imposing 
a freeze in Medicare payments to 
doctors and hospitals and making 
cuts in dozens of farm, education, 
health and other federal programs. 

The proposal would trim an esti- 
mated $65 billion from President 
Reagan's defense buildup over the 
next three years, but still permit 
Pentagon budget authority to rise 
by 3 percent a year after inflation 
through 1988. 

The change in Social Security 
programs, which include retire- 
ment and survivor benefits, would 
hold next fiscal year's cost-of-living 
increase to two percentage points, 
half the expected rate of inflation. 
Any inflationary increase above 4 
percent would be covered with an 
additional increase in the benefit 

In all, the plan would trim $52 
billion from next year’s projected 
deficit of $230 billion, and $295 
trillion over three years. Deficits 
would decline from $175 billion in 
fiscal 1986 to $99 billion in 1988. 

“It’s a very tough package," Sen- 
ator Pete V. Domeniri, a New Mex- 
ico Republican and Senate Budget 
Committee c hairman, said as the 
agreement was announced after 
several days of private negotiations 
between Senate Republican leaders 
and White House aides. 

The Senate Republican leader, 
Robert J. Dole of Kansas, said Mr. 
Reagan would formally endorse 
the package later in the day. “He's 
fuflv aboard. He's going, to br -rs 
'enthusiastic' plays- in this,” Mr. 
Dole said. 

Even so. Mr. Dole conceded it 
would be extremely difficult to win 
approval for- the plan when it 
comes before the fim Senate later 
this month. 

In effect, the budget represented 
a trade-off between Mr. Reagan's 


Khartoum Is Shut Down 
As Protesters Demand 

• • * r i- . • 

Resignation of Nimeiri 


West German Jews Grapple With the Past 

44Hh Anniversary of the War’s End Sharpens Ambivalence, Pain and Guilt 


The Associated Press 


ness, a high price for your ineffi- 


KHARTOUM, Sudan — Air dent economic policies." 
traffic, businesses and commimica- A British Broadcasting Ccop. gmauy tortnrea at an mittroj 
dons in Sudan were shut by a gen- broadcast monitored in Cairo re- center, Reuters reported iror 
era! strike Thursday as demonstra- ported that the demonstrators 111 . . , . . - 

tors called for the removal of shouted slogans against the United s 5 ul , 11101 

President Gaafar Nimeni States, as wdl as against Mr! Ni- ® eat f n ■“* they received el 

■ t ° ?merC Ml ^£? l4S, SdfSa swarmed around 4c cm- i 

tagAnsar.J - . 

tmntimal nimnrf Time m_ against the president, accusing him _ I 111 separate inlmiews, 


duv&ubu mwaoitf uyuiJ i mu * * * w ■ v 1 

States, as wdl as against Mr! Ni- “d they received electric 

fnwn shocks during questioning at the 




mentions with the outside world 
were severed and Khartoum’s in- 
ternational airport was dosed in- 
definitely. -. 

It was the second day of a strike 
that organizers said would contin- 
ue until Mr. Nimdii leaves office. 


center in Nabatiyeh before reach- 
ing Ansar.] : - 
[In separate interviews, seven 


oFbdng a butcher and an Ameri- former prisoners said they were de- 
can spy," the rgwrt said. “At one pnved of food and sleep for days 


lint, they chorused, ‘Down, 
own, USA.’" 

Air traffic to Sudan was disrupt- 


before and during questioning. 
They said that if they failed to 


ae until Mr. Nimdii leaves office. Air traffic to Sudan was disrupt- answer, the Israelis applied physi- 
The Sudanese leader, in power ^ Dimmi Hetherington, spokes- cal and psychological pressure.] 


since 1969, is on a private visit to woman for Sudan Airways in Lon- 
osfliogi the United States. don, said, “We have not heard from 

“There’s been a lot of demon- Khartoum in any way, shape or 
SECE « / *enAY$ V crating and marching around to- form.” 

Iw* . dav but no risns of violence.” a . 




“We’ve consistently taken the 
position that the Fourth Geneva 
Convention applies to areas of 
Lebanon under Israeli occupa- 
tion,” the UJS. statement said. “Ac- 
cording to the convention, protect- 


>osj]]£S^ 


553CV fob ^^,37 

•= tatit Thursday in Nairocn, according 10 

?5S^*flS25; The strike began Wednesday. Raters. 
adg V when 15,000 toSSfiOO Sudanese J^trnce Strong head of. the UN 
demonstrated in the capitate cat- office for anagney. operations m 
^ *2S3 sS iV to demand Mr. NinSrf s rtsig- Africa, said that besides the medj- 
■ e S;/5^ m lion. Hundreds of riot police dis- ernes and a nntim tons of food 

4 .%S,Yi!.* 5 * 0P persed them with tear gas and gimn aiready pj^^ other food 

bat^ and rounded up the leaders, supp^sand tructo ito Atiiverthem 
r S0^S0< TTie cutoff ol cZmn^uoos cmfcd. 

prevented reporters from filing sto- ■ - • - 

ri 6 overseas Wednesday. on the — • _ # . # 

^ Nimdn vowed M u„a : Jordanian An 

i view published. Thursday in Saudi « i in, 

uw w . . .Arabia to return home and retam Ky KflP.KPt r IT 
^ ^ oww, despite what he called the J- U 

‘ “transimt matted of the strike. . . - 

The Sudanese leader is considered ^ , 

Sf® one of the finnest U.S. allies in ATHENS - A man fired a 
Africa. shoulder-launched rocket Thnr^ 

tt- % sjf’i In Khartoum, a reporter saw at day at a passenger jet of the Jorda- 

least 30 demonstrators being herd- man national airhne at the Athens 


day, but no signs of violaice," a Jntf . , _ . ^ statement saw. ac- 

wStern businSs source said in ■ UN A^ieai for Food Aid cording to the convention, protect- 

nrid-aftemoon- One million .Sudanese children 

. “The strike has hit absolutely ev- may die from starvation in Ihe next 
ervthhig: transport, commute*- few months because of drought, a 

tions, power, water, the.works," he semor United Nations official said prohibited regard 

in Narobi, accocdiog (o “JE ^ Im£rs reSonl 
tk® nriis hmistn Wfdnefidav. Reuters. • 


Africa, said that Ixsides (he medi- 
cines and a million tons of food 




IV* 


supplies and tracks to dd 
were desperately needed. 


“It appears that Israel's actions 


Mhurice Strong, head of. the UN 

office for emergency operations in g™“*^ lhe conven ' 

AfnM Mid (Vat IwiilH lh» m#vH- UOH, it flOOCu. 


f othw food K-*htam Lang, said the Israelis 

tadstodteAm ^ Ariida 

telv needed. (Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Jordanian Airliner Is Hit 
By Rocket Fired in Athens 


The Associated Press He said the plane, a Boeing 727. 

ATHENS — A man’ fired a was ready for takeoff to Amman 
shoulder-launched rocket Thure- with 62 passengers and a crew of 


* 


gsSaf 


In Khartoum, a reporter saw at day at a passenger jet of the Jorda- 13, when, the rodeet was fired 
- - Ri.. least 30 demonstrators bring had- nian national mrKneatthe Athens police sources the rocket-lauiKA- 

si into police tracks Wednesday, aiipm, a radrenno ^d, 

No figure was available to the to- to * & 1 

lalnninber of aicsis, and there was No .one aboard the Ah a plane ojdit was Po£h-made. 

no information about possible ca- was mjured, and the ™ ^ 

saalties. . swd ihepassengerewoi^beftoTO TTjc attacker, who fired at the 


suallies. 


The attacker, who fired at the 


About i,00Q doctors, nurses and to A mma n, the Jordanian capital, from inside the airport fence 
edical tertin^aiis otgarrized die aboard another aircraft. . aid dose to the runway, dropped 


medical wdnridans organized the abw 
&lemonstraticrn. . . ^ 

r A member of the doctors’ muon resp 
executive committee read, a letter ond 
calling cm Mr. Nimeiri to resign; Gro 
The regime” be sajd, lias T 
failed utteriy. At a time .when the sera 

Sudanese people are niakihgal] the tbes 

sacrifices," ’ the iptople we "only w «5 


There whs no immediate claim of ^ socket launcher and jumped 
sponsibiiity in the attack, the seo* a waiting car, the police 


finding Imriger^ pOTerw and sick- prqjectile. 


ond xm the Jordanian earner tn spokesman sai£ 

Greece in two weeks. 

“It appears that the nrissile just . "He fired just as the plane was 
scratcbedthe top of the airerstft,” rawing up for take-off, a police 
tbe spokesman said. He said police source said. “The plane would have 
were searching for the unexploded been airborne if the rocket hadn’t 


been spotted." 


By James AL Markham 

New Yprk Times Service 

FRANKFURT — A policeman 
discreetly keeps an eye on Frank- 
furt's sole kosher restaurant, which 
has no sign to advertise its exis- 
tence. A closed-circuit television 
monitors the emryway. 

On the bulletin board inside, no- 
tices from Td Aviv University jos- 
tle others about a film series orga- 
nized by the Jews of Frankfurt to 
mark the 40th anniversary of the 
Nazi surrender. Over lunch, Ignatz 
Bubis said he and his wife, both 
survivors of death camps, had gone 
to see a documentary film about 
Dachau. 

“She didn't sleep for a week," 
said Mr. Bubis, who was freed by 
the Red Army in 1945, wandered 
from Poland to West Berlin, stayed 
on in Germany and did well in the 
construction business in Frankfurt. 

“Maybe it was a mistake," Mr. 
Bubis said suddenly, musing on the 
c hain of small decisions fnai left 
him among the few thousand Jews 
to settle in Germany after the war. 
"Most of the camp people went to 
Israel. You know, sometimes you 
stay somewhere and it's even not 
. ... It’s a habit” . 

The musing hinted at the linger- 
ing predicament of the roughly 
28,000 Jews who today call West 
Germany home. 

For there Jews, the pain, the guilt 
and the unease of living in what 
some call “the land of the murder- 
ers" are sharpened. this year as Ger- 
mans try to come to grips with a 
difficult anniversary. Few Jews 
seem to find the West Germans' 
efforts uplifting. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who 
often recalls that he was only 15 
when Hitler shot himself in his Ber- 
lin bunker, seems to exemplify (he 
national mood that envelops west 
Germany’s Jews. On atrip to Israel 
ay ear ago, Mr. Kohl offended 
some of ms hosts by suggesting that 
his “postwar generation" bore the 
burden of the past more lightly 
than its elders. 

At tbs invitation of West Germa- 
ny’s Jews, Mr, Kohl will attend a 
ceremony at the Bergen-Belsen 
camp on April 21 . Tbe Jews seem to 
have selected the date so that the 
horror of the death camps will be 
officially remembered, and en- 
graved on the popular imagination, 
before the May 8 anniversary of 
Germany’s surrender. 

Some Jews say they find that 
lately, German commentaries con- 
cermng the May 8 annivetsary baye 



Heinz Galinsld 

seemed to dwell excessively on the 
bombed German dries ana the ref- 
ugees driven from their homes by 
the advancing Red Army. 

“If the Germans are sad about 
the capitulation/' said Albert 
Klein^ 74, a journalist and film- 
maker in West Berlin, “they have to 


be sad that Hitler failed. Tbe Ger- 
mans should think more about why 
they allowed themselves to be led 
by this crazy man, and what would 
have happened if Hitler had woo.” 

“There is too much talk about 
May 8 as ‘the collapse,’ ” said Mr. 
Klein. “The real collapse was Jan. 
30, 1 933, when Hitler came to pow- 
er." 

For Jews who lived to see the 
day. May 8, 1945, was unequivocal- 
ly a day of liberation; for many 
Germans, it is hard to reconcile the 
ennobling concept of liberation 
with tire searing one of defeat. 

“May 8 means the defeat of Na- 
tional Socialism, the defeat of an 
inhuman regime," said Heinz Ga- 
lindo, an Auschwitz survivor and 
patriarch of the West Berlin Jews. 
“It was only the perpetrators of 
inhumanity who capitulated. We 
only wish tbe people around us 
would also see this day, as we do, as 
one of liberation.” 

The anniversary has brought 
into relief the ambivalence that 
Jews in West Germany fed about 
the people they live among. Many 
Jews say that the “packed-suitcase 



New VoATmt 


Children attend a Jewish kindergarten in West Berfin. 


syndrome,” the threatening sense 
that one might have to leave at any 
moment, has eased, but that at the 
same time Jewish children never 
fed quite at home here. 

Last year, tbe number of Israeli 
applications for West German 
passports doubled, to 2,000. This 
steady trickle of Israeli Jews com- 
ing to West Germany has helped 
mask the stigma other Jews once 
fdt about living in Germany. Most 
of the Israelis say they are drawn 
by economic prospects, 

Michael Friedman. 29, a Paris- 
born lawyer, grew up in Frankfurt, 
was president of his German high 
school and says he never personally 
experienced anti-Semitism among 
his German schoolmates. 

“Don’t forget," he said, “when 
you are speaking about young peo- 
ple in their eariy 20 s you are talking 
about the third generation. They 
say: It was my grandfather’s gen- 
eration. Don’t bother me about 
it’” 

As another symptom of a tenta- 
tive normalization, Mr. Friedman 
said young Jews were now being 
inducted mto tbe West German 
military- He said that if be married 
and had sons, be would expect 
them to do the same. 

But for every step forward into 
German society, there seems to be a 
step back. During the Israeli invar 
sira of Lebanon in 1982, a small 
group of leftist Jews joined forces 
with West German leftists and Pal- 
estinians and staged protest dem- 
onstrations, inducing one in front 
of the Israeli Embassy in Bonn. 

Mieha Brumlick, a professor of 
education at Heidelberg Universi- 
ty, now has doubts about having 
taken part “It was correct to pro- 
test against tins invasion." raid Mr. 
Brumlick, 38, a teacher. “Whether 
it was right to do it in Germany, I 
don’t know anymore. In Germany, 
anti-Israel sentiments can turn very 
quickly into anti-Semitic senti- 
ments." 

Like other Jews, Mr. Brumlick 
says he is troubled by parallels be- 
tween the ami- Jewish hatred of the 
1930s and (he sentiments against 
foreign workers, particularly 
Turks, in West Germany today. 

Mr. Brumlick’s parents took ref- 
uge in Switzerland during the war. 
He recalls his mother's reluctance 
to move back to Germany. 

“She said it was like moving into 
an open grave," he said. "And so 
my generation grew up with this 
schizophrenic atuation, and lived 
here with a bad conscience.” 


demand for deep domestic spend- 
ing cuts and continued insistence 
by many Republican senators that 
the president scale back tbe size of 
his Pentagon budget. 

Tbe Social Security compromise 
was unexpected, since President 
Reagan has said be would not sup- 
port any change unless a bipartisan 
majority of Congress approved it 
first 

Mr. Dole said that beneficiaries 
would be helped by the change, 
since tbe law would guarantee a 2 
percent benefit Current law makes 
no such guarantee if inflation fails 
below a certain level. But when that 
appeared likely last year. Congress 
quickly approved a bill making 
sure the increase would not be 


The Social Security change alone 
would save nearly $20 billion over 
the next three years, with addition- 
( Continued cm Page 2, CoL 1) 

Reagan Asks 
For Aid; Gills' 
For Cease-Fire 
In Nicaragua 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan called Thursday 
for a cease-fire in Nicaragua and 
promised that if Congress would 
release $14 millio n in aid to rebels 
battling the leftist Sand ini st gov- 
ernment, the money would not be 
used for armaments — at least for 
60 days while a peace settlement is 
sought. 

“If the Sandinists accept this 
peace offer, 1 vriii keep my funding 
restrictions in effect," Mr. Reagan 

Salvadoran council upholds tbe 
recent election. Page 2. 

said. “But peace negotiations must 
not become a cover for deception 
and delay. If there is no agreement 
after 60 days of negotiations, I will 
lift these restrictions unless both 
sides ask me not to." 

During the 60 days, Mr. Rea g a n 
said, the money would be spent for 
such things as food, clothing and 
medicine. 

The president said that ha was 
making the announcement “after 
months of consulting with congres- 
sional leaders." 

Mr. Reagan keyed his announce- 
ment to a March 1 proposal in San 
Josi, Costa Rica, by leaders of the 
Nicaraguan resistance and other 
exiled Nicaraguans. They offered a 
cease-fire in return for an agree- 
ment by tbe Sandinist government 
to begin talks mediated by Roman 
Catholic bishops and aimed at 
holding elections. 

“] am calling upon both sides to 
lay down (heir arms and accept the 
offer of church-mediated talks on 
internationally supervised elections 
and an end to repression right now 
in place against the church, the 
press and individual rights," Mr. 
Reagan said. 

He also said that the United 
States would continue to seek free 
elections in Nicaragua, an end to 
alleged Nicaraguan aggression 
against its neighbors, removal of 
Communist bloc and other foreign 
forces from Nicaragua and reduc- 
tion of Nicaraguan military 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 

INSIDE 

■ Tax taws intended to help 
U.S. fanners in fact have accel- 
erated tbe demise of small hog- 
farming operations. Page 3. 


■ Private U.S. colleges are try- 
ing new ways to teach students 
how to write welL Page 3. 

■ Nigeria has prevented the un- 
loading of ships with food aid 
for hungry Chadians. Page 5. 

■ The prorogation of tbe War- 
saw Pact has apparently stirred 
debate in the East Page 4. 

■ Turgot Ozal has repeated his 
offer to meet Andreas Papan- 
dreou anywhere. Page A 

WEEKEND 

■ Mata Hari, the subject of a 
new book, was an unconvincing 
dancer and a worse spy, Mary 
Blume reports. Page 7. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ British National (HI Corp. 

was said to have proposed a cut 
in the price it will pay for a 
barrel of ofl. Page 11. 

■ France approved plans to re- 

open the Eurofranc bond mar- 
ket. Page 11. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


Salvadoran Council Rejects 
Appeals to Annul Election 


By Robert J. McCartney 

tt'aMngron Pose Service 

SAN SALVADOR — El Salva- 
dor’s top electoral body has reject- 
ed a petition by two conservative 
parties to annul Sunday’s elections. 
It acted shortly after the armed 
forces' high command went on na- 
tionwide television to urge respect 
for “the sovereign will expressed at 
the pons.” 

The events Wednesday left little 
doubt that the elections would be 


upheld, giving a major victory to 
President Jos 6 Napoleon. Duarte’s 
moderate Christian Democratic 
Party. 

“The validity of the entire elec- 
tion is accepted,” said Mario Sa- 
mayoa, president erf the Central 
Elections CouncL 

The military high command 
called a news conference to dispute 
allegations by El Salvador’s two 
largest conservative parties that the 
armed forces had acted improperly 
during the elections. The military 
communique, bolstered by the ap- 
pearance of the defense minister. 
General Carlos Eugenio Vides Ca- 
sanova, and the nation’s other IS 
highest-ranking officers, clearly 
threw the mQicary’s influence in 
favor of respecting the election re- 
sults. 

The armed forces’ action ap- 
peared to highlight a historic break, 
evolving for several years, between 
the military establishment and the 
political right, diplomatic sources 
said. 

The armed forces acted after the 
rightist Nationalist Republican Al- 
liance and the conservative Na- 
tional Conciliation Party proposed 
to annul the elections because of 
alleged irregularities. The parties 
charged that government officials 


had pressured voters, that there 
were indications of ballot-box 
stuffing and that military person- 
nel bad intervened in several cases 
on the Christian Democrats' be- 
half. 

Representatives named by each 
of the two conservative parties con- 
trol the three-member elections 
council, where they outvote Mr. 
Samayoa, who was named by the 
Christian Democrats. But all three 
members voted against considering 
the petition to annul the elections, 
which, if endcreed. would have led 
to another election within a month. 

Arturo Mendez, the council 
member named by the National 
Conciliation Party, insisted that the 
armed forces* position had not in- 
fluenced the council's decision. He 
said he voted against his own par- 
ty’s petition because of legal irregu- 
larities in presenting the proposal, 
because there was not enough time 
to prepare a new election and be- 
cause the conservative parties’ alle- 
gations were “more or less ab- 
stract” 

Mr. Mendez acknowledged that 
the armed forces' declarations con- 
tributed to making the situation 
“voy delicate.” 

General Vides Casanova read 
the communique, which said, ‘The 
armed forces, at ail times, has 
maintained itself within institu- 
tional limits enforcing and guard- 
ing the constitution and other rele- 
vant laws.” 

General Vides Casanova called 
for a serious analysis of the conser- 
vative parties’ complaints and re- 
jected the accusations against the 
aimed forces as “of no impor- 
tance.” He noted that the aimed 
forces had lost 71 killed since Feb. 
25 while defending the electoral 


Mr. Duarte. The military backed 
the National Concilia lion Party in 
1 972 in depriving Mr. Duarte of the 
presidency after an election that he 
now is generally acknowledged to 
have won. 


Italian Leaders Fear a New Wave 


Of Violence After Sicilian Bombing 


By E.J. Dionne Jr. 

Vw York Tima Service 

TRAPANI Sicily — Italian po- 
litical leaders, shaken by a car- 
bomb attack that missed a judge 
but killed a mother and her two 
children, have expressed worries 
that Italy may be facing a new wave 
of political violence on several 
fronts. 

The Tuesday car-bomb attack on 
Judge Carlo Palermo, which the 
police said appeared to have been 
organized by the Mafia, came a 
week after an economist for a Ro- 
man Catholic-led trade union was 
shot to death by the Red Brigades 
in Rome. On Wednesday, a man 
fired a bazooka shell at the Jordani- 
an Embassy in Rome, in the third 
attack on Arab property there in 
two weeks. The rocket missed the 
embassy offices on the fifth floor of 
the building and hit an apartment 
below on the fourth floor. 

“We’re going through days of 
particular violence,” Interior Min- 
ister Oscar Luigi Scalfaro said in 
parliament on Wednesday, refer- 
ring to Mafia violence and to at- 


substantially, they noted, and the 
government of Prune Minister Bct- 
ttoo Craxi has lasted far longer 
than almost any other postwar ad- 
ministration. And tiie government 


has made important arrests in hs 
war against the Mafia, drawing in- 
ternational praise. 

In some ways, the newly ex- 
pressed pessimism is simply a reac- 
tion to the earlier euphoria, said 
Pino ArlacchL an adviser to the 
Anti-Mafia Commission. 

“In our country, with both the 
Mafia and terrorism, we behave 
like a pendulum.” Mr. Arlacchi 
said Wednesday. “We have mo- 
ments of very strong optimism and 
very great pessimism.” 

He contended that in the war 
against political terrorism, the 
country still had reason for opti- 
mism. Over a period of years, the 


police and thejudidaiy have large- 
ly broken up the old terrorist rings. 


and the kflling last week of the 
union economist. Professor Ezio 
Tarantdli, appeared to be the work 
of an isolated remnant 


tacks by leftist and rightist terror- 
ists. “Red and blade terrorism. 


The case of the Mafia is quite 
fferent, Mr. Arlacchi and outers 


ists. “Red and blade terrorism, 
organized crime with its fights be- 
tween factions — all this is spread- 
ing distress.” 

Officials said the attacks have 
come at a time when the country 
was enjoying a period of unusual 
self-confidence, buoyed by relative 
prosperity and surprising political 
stability.' 

The inflation rate has dropped 


Agreement 
On Budget 


different, Mr. Arlacchi and outers 
said. Its roots in Sicily are deep. 
Franco Russo, a member of parlia- 
ment for a far-leftist party, charged 
Wednesday that the real problem 
was less to protect individual mag- 
istrates than “to fight the conniv- 
ance between the political powers 
and the Mafia.” 

Mr. Arlacchi said the attack on 
Judge Palermo was in part a result 
of the very triumphs of the anti- 
Mafia movement over the last year, 
bur was also a sign that “the Mafia 
is not completely defeated.” 

“For the first time in many years. 




(Continued from Page 1) 
al savings coming from an identical 
change in other pension programs, 
including civil service and military 
retirement and Veterans Adminis- 


tration programs. 

While many details were 


sketchy. Senate Republican aides 
distributed a sheet indicating that 
several programs would be termi- 
nated or phased out including rev- 
enue sharing to the states, the Am- 
trak subsidy, the Urban 
Development Action Grant pro- 


gram, the Job Corps and most 
Small Business Administration 


Small Business Administration 
functions. 

■ Troop Cot-Rejected 

The Senate Armed Services 
Committee, in a dosed session 
Wednesday, rejected a Republican- 
backed proposal to cut military 
personnel by 175,000 soldiers and 
civilians, congressional sources 
told The New York Times. 

Senate aides who had been pre- 
sent for two days of debate and 



voting in the committee said it ap- 
peared likely that the panel would 
vote to rec omm end that the presi- 
dent's military budget be cut by 
$10 billion. 

The aides said the savings in- 
cluded a reduction in the adminis- 
tration's request for new MX mis- 
siles to 21 from 48. a S3Q0-miUion 
cut in the administration's $3.7- 
billioo request for space weapons, a 
SI -billion cut in military construc- 
tion and whal one aide called “lots 
of nickel-and-dime cuts, nothing 
too painful. ” 


POTHOLE PROBLEMS — Joanne Przyborowski be- 
gan to get that sinking feeling as a leaking water main 
caused die ground to give way as she sat in her car on a 
Dallas street Workmen are shown retrieving the auto. 


JKl WUf’d &UL ® 


&t. 1911 



unjvssity 


Just tell the taxi driver "sank roo doc noo” 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Fallcencurm Sir. 9 , MUNICH 

• M/S ASTOR at sea 


B AC*: QOS IMSIERSOOPQCTQRME 
Send de toted rasumt 
for • (tn evalocnon 

pacmcwEsmmnavBtsmr 

wa® u ppox 6 ^ caiwo* us* 




process against attacks by leftist 
guerrillas. 

Tallies compiled by the Christian 
Democrats on the basis of official 
poll results showed that they had 
removed the conservatives from 
control of the National Constituent 
Assembly. The conservatives also 
apparently lost their control of a 
majority of the nation’s municipal- 
ities 

The conservatives gave signs of 

berto^Aubirisson, leader of the 
rightist Nationalist Republican Al- 
liance, denied that his party had 
accused the armed forces of inter- 



. KAWTHARIET ASSIYAD. Lebanon (AF) — At kast oght penous 
were killed Thursday in an Israeli raid on tins southern Lebanese v iihg. 
In separate incidents, three French soldiers ^ tire UN p ci C dmn n ng force 
and three Israeli soldiers were injured . 23 roadside bomfranaaxr. 




In the southern port of Siidon, Christens , and Moden a batt led fora 
seventh straight day, ltiBing two persons and figuring 22 , gptapmeaiand 
private radio stations said. Vi*' 

The Israeli military command said m Tea Aviv that eight, “aimed 
terrorists” wh o tried to flee were killed in tire raidon KawtiutattAsstyad. 

It said that five died when they tried to escape in a car, andShree were l 
Mled as they attempted to flee a cave. The three French soldiers were ^ 
injured in the Israeli-occupied zone as a roadside bmnb was detonated 
east of Jouaya, nine miles (15 kilometers) east of Tyre. - 


:VCn— v 

ri? 


vening. 

But documents submitted to the 
elections council by the alliance 
and the National Conciliation Par- 
ty to support their annulment pro- 
posal ated several instances in 
which soldiers or military police- 
men allegedly had confronted con- 
servative polling officials or sup- 
porters, apparently to enforce 
certain electoral regulations. 

TheU.S. Embassy also appeared 
to signal that it expected tiie Chris- 
tian Democratic victory to be ac- 
cepted. 

Donald Hamilton, an embassy 
spokesman, said, “Our elections 
observers were in many parts of the 






Prune Minister Resigns m jetdm 




AMMAN, Jordan (AF) — Prime Minister Ahmad O bqdafocs jgued ^ 

Thursday, and King Hussein appointed a former prone inmate, Zaid “‘; nC T. 

Rifai, to form a new government, according to a tt ^decrcfc ^-.: ... .Igp&ffi'lvrzr 
The decree, broadcast by government radio m Amman,\«aid that 
Hussein accepted the resignation of Mr. Obddafs 18-member, cabinet 
and that Mr. Rifai had been named to replace him. The decree gw no* * L - 0 nsr* s ; ;VL 

reason for the change. - . V i, £V . 

Mx. Obeidat, a former head of the state secunty police,had beat prune = s- t 

minister since January 1984. Mr. Rifai, 48, a childhood foendnfHnsscm, ths: A- 

generally is considered to have good relations yrth&fm. which is 
opposed to Jradan’s peace initiative wife tire Pak^e lib^mQrgam- gemes -“** 

ration. He served as prime minister from May 1973 to July 1976. (inner* - 




FAREWELL TO TROOPS — Thousands of Cambodians in the tovnrof S 
waved to Vietnamese soldiers in trucks as more than 10,000 troops were 


Neves of Brazil Has Fifth Operation 

SAO PAULO (AF) — President-elect Tancredo Neyes, 75, underwent 
his fifth abdominal operation in three weeks Thursday, tiregovemmCnt 

• , , < VT ...■■.Imlnrir .i .1 1 . 


Ctfi zrc*™"- jT' 


country. They didn’t see anything 
which they would have considered 


which they would have considered 
to be of sufficient gravity to nullify 
the elections.” 


Gromyko Is Said to Support a Summit 


needed to remove two new spots of infection found mmsabdomwarwalL 
He said Mr. Neves was “OK” following the latest 


The armed forces' action repre- 
sented a switch in its role regarding 


Bv William T. Eaton uay want to dejay a meeting with tory mspectrat by 

L * Tuna service Mr. Reagan until the annual meet- cases of possible dam 

uimctw tog of the UN General Assembb’ in facture of such arms. 
MOSCOW — Foreign Minister Victor L Isradim 

Andrei A. Gromyko has said that a New York m September. 

U^.-Soviei summit meeting would ■ Russia Rejects Inspection ^SPfviiSi 
be a good idea but that Washington The Soviet Union rejected 

and Moscow are nowhere near Thursday any mandatory interoa- 
agreement on a time or place, Ca- tional inspection to verify a treaty 
nadian officials said. banning chemical weapons. United 

The reaction to President Ron- press International reported from 
aid Reagan’s offer to the Soviet Geneva, 
leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, for a it accused W ashingto n of “petty 

meeting was the first official Soviet suspicions” in demanding obliga- 


l it «* uiwiMiiu/. indsioaof about 116 inches (about 4 centimeters) wt^na^H^adSal 
_ T # ' _ that Mr. Neves had developal respiratory problems and^cW-wfe 

i /Vz>/m#TSVf*l*Y examining his lungs for signs of pneumonia. \ 

- 1 1 Mr. Neves, chosen as Brazil's first civilian president i^2T yraB, ym 

v not inaugurated because an mtestmal aflment reqafiod surge^fcSsfeduR 

tory inspection by challenge in beferethe March 15 ceremony. He has had four_mon^^imal 

operations. The vice president has been acting as 

facture of such arms. ’ !i ' 

cbSdde^’S^^: Pope Starts Easter Mourning Riteg ? 

armament Conference, whkh has ROME (UPI) — Pope John Paul II led the Roman CathoMfci^ 

hear /finuenw rh*rmr»l iimrvnc into the most solemn period of the Ihnndcal veflrvrith^ Ht^Ttetisday 



banning chemical weapons. United Wadringum that e^ts to make southern walls, J&m Pawl poured, water from a silver jntdwf^fefte 


we have had a certain success 
against the Mafia, and even against 
the Mafia’s political involve- 
ments.” he said. “The Mafia cannot 
allow this to continue, so they had 
to respond, and they did so in a 
terrorist way.” 

Mario Cervi, a commentator of 


comment on the proposal. 

Mr. Gromyko made his remarks 
to the visiting Canadian external 
affairs minister, Joe Clark, on 
Wednesday, Mr. Clark's press 
spokesman, Sean Brady, said. 

Mr. Reagan has said that he has 
received a reply to his invitation to 
Mr. Gorbachev, but the American 


convention. 


betrayed and arrested. & 

“Tmsfunction of service onght to confinnaH»again^Ji^dHfiibt - 
come into the world to be served but to be a servant imasdty John Paul 
said. The Mass marked tire start of tire three-day mourniiig, p^iod 
recalfing Christ's betrayal crucifixion and buriaL . r 


Reagan Requests $14 Million recalfing Christ's betrayal, crucifixion and buriaL 

In Aid for Nicaraguan Rebels U.S. Traddng Soviet Fleet in Pacffic| 

" . . TOKYO (UPI) — The largest Soviet naval task force to appear i£ar 


the conservative newspaper U 
Glonfale. contended that tire at- 


jvu-. uoroacnev. dui ure mnenudn (Costinoed from Page 1) food, clothing and medicine and 
ode has not revealed any details, a level ^ parity ^ other support for survival. The 

U.S. officials have said, however, torirTtezhbors." democratic opposition cannot be a 

.nmiiv me nAntiw wyiwjiiuvi* ... - . .... 


^ ... TOKYO (UPI) — The largest Soviet naval task force to appesr #kr 

food, clothing and medicine and Japan in five years is on maneoveis in tire Western Pacific,5hadowe3 i 6y 


Giortfale, contended that the at- 
tack ra Judge Palermo may have 
been intended as a warning to Ric- 
cardo Bocria. the new prefect in 
c hang e of investigating the Sicilian 
Mafia. 

Judge Palermo’s case was unusu- 
al because he had aroused contro- 
versy even before gang to Sicily. 
His investigations mto anus and 
drug smuggling affected an enor- 
mous range of interest groups, in- 
cluding intelligence services. Some 
magistrates said privately that any 


U.S. officials have said, however, 
that tire answer was positive. 

The Soviet media had not even 


democratic opposition cannot be a Officers aboard the UK. flagship, tire Blue Ridge, said Thursday that 


“The formula that worked in H partner in n egotiati o ns without they hoped themaneuverswonld shed newliriit on the latest Soviet naval 

I i > a thaaj Tvarln n tparntlnr " i_ nT* if — . ~ * * — ■! 


reported the invitation, delivered to ^ self- defense, ccnnnmic dcvelop- 
Mr. Gorbachev by Vjce President nient and dialogue — will work for 


Salvador — support for democra- these basic oecesstres. 
cv, self- defense, ccnnnmic develop- Asked whether givir 



capabiHues and are monitoring them dosely from both the sea and ur. 
the rebels The Soviet task force, which left Vladivostok late last week, is led by 


stan tin U. Chernenko three weeks ported the Salvadoran government Mr. Reagan said the rebels “are not frigates, 
ago. against a leftist insurrection while well fixed enough to provide for I 

Mr. Brady said that Mr. Grom- encouraging a' peace settlement. themselves” and are ,“aose to dft.„- wp .* wi n “ 
kyo. who met twice Wednesday “To the Congress, 1 aSir for im- perate straits. : - . * - -TOT 106 RCCOiG 

with Mr. Clark, had made clear mediate release of the $14 million Asked what would happen to the imindiii 


that the Kremlin wants a confer- already 
ence but felt that it was far too said.“\ 


Asked what would happen to the 


riated,"Mr. Reagan rebels if no agreement were 


Denmark’s worst industrial conflict for decades seemed to be near an 
d Thursday as tiie country started tiie Easter holiday. Only an cstimat- 


ed 20,000 workers are Aon strike after 200,000 employees defied 


of these groups might have been 
involved in the attack. 


involved in toe attack. 

Judge Palermo, however, said he 
believed tire attack had come from 
toe Mafia, and many other offi- 
cials. including police spokesmen, 
.agreed. 

Commentators and political 
leaders across tire ideological spec- 
trum also attributed some of Italy’s 
current jitters to upcoming local 
elections that have national over- 
tones. The elections are scheduled 
for May 12. 

■ Reputed Mobster Is Kflled 

Police said Thursday that Vit- 
torio Lo Giudice, a reputed under- 
world boss on Italy’s Adriatic 
coast, was shot to death in his car 
Wednesday night in tire country- 
side near the resort of Rimini, Italy, 
The Associated Press reported. 


early to jack a date or place. jabfe. Inledge these funds will not not gomg to quit ^ walk away ~ ^ roend 


speculated that Mr. Gorbachev These funds would be used for pens. 


Iraqi Missile Attack on Iran Kills 25; 
Tehran Asserts It Ended Shellings 


officials said Thursday in London. . (UPI) 

Fifteen peraow were killed in Sri Lanka when a police patrol hit aland 
mine Wednesday planted by TarnO extremists, the Defense Ministry 
reported Thursday in Colombo. (UPI) 

Suspected Communist rebels attacked a civilian defense force de tac h- 
ment on in tire southern Philippines, killing 19 militiamen arid a civilian 
Wednesday, a military report said Thursday from Zamboanga. (UPI) 


Return . rigJll j 

TEHRAN — An Iraqi missile against 
attack Thursday on toe Iranian Tehr 


provincial capital of Bak h ta ra n Khom eini as saying, “If, God for- 
ItiUcd 25 persons and woundol bid, the United States wins this 
more than 70 others, Iran's official war” and makes President fo ddam 


news agency reported. 


, . . . _ , _ - . protect civilians, shipping in tire 

fight against Iran was a fight bulf and airlines. • 

a gainst Islam. .. n _ , 

Tehran Radio quoted Ayatollah ® Torture ADegatioos Renewed 
Khomeini as saying, “If, God for- Amnesty International said 
bid, tire United States wins tins Thursday that Iran has repeatedly 
war” and makes President Saddam denied that it tortures political op- 
H ossein of Iraq the victor, “then ponents, despite well-documented 


U.S. Criticizes Israeli Transfer 
Of Prisoners From Lebanon 


The attack came shortly after Islam will be sloped in toe face so evidence to toe contrary, United j srae] became a party to the con- 
an said that u had stopped at- that it wiB not be able to raise its Press International reported from vention in 1951; the United States 


Iran said that it bad stopped at- that it wiD not be at 
lacking Iraqi cities, but would re- head for a long time.” London, 

taliate if Iraq carried out a threat to The attack Thursday came after The worldwide human rights or- 

resume attacks on civilian targets. Iraq launc hed what an Iranian mil - ganization urged Ir anian authon- 
In Baghdad, a military spokes- itary statement called an unsuo ties to investigate alleged torture in 
man said tire attack on tire western oessful air raid Wednesday night the fcotmtry, saying such an investi- 
Iranianrity of Bakhtaran, formerly on Tehran. Twenty-two persons gation was long overdue. 
Kermanshah, and another on Ha- were killed Monday in an Iraqi The organization has re- 
tnadan. were in retaliation for Ira* attack on the capital. fused access to Iran since the revo- 

nian attacks on Baghdad, the The Iranian military statement hition in 1979 that brought Ayaid- 
soutoem city of Basra and other accused Iraq of being indifferent to lab Khomeini to power. 

Iraqi centers. Tehran had not re- efforts by “certain international Amnesty International said that 
ported an attack on Hamadan. bodies” to stop attacks on civilian violations include executions, beat- 


(Coufinued from Page 1) 

49. 76, and 77 of the convention, 
brad became a party to tire con- 


Lebanon. The United States has 
criticized Syria and Lebanon far 
f adi n g to reach an agreement with 
Israel on an orderly transfer of 
power to tire Lebanese authorities 


in 1955. power to tire Lebanese i 

Article 49 says that “individual as tire Israelis withdrew, 
or mass forcible transfers, as wcD as _ w .. . . 


deportations of protected persons ■ iHttWn unnazes Move 
from occufsed territory to the teni- The British Foreign Office 
tory of tire Occupying Power or to Thursday sharply criticized brad 


(hat of any other country, occupied for 
ornot,areprttoibited,r^ardles 5 (tf to! 
their motive.” pot 


ported an attack on Hamadan. 


Article 49 also says that “persons 
tons evacuated shafi be transferred 
back to (heir homes as soon as 


. .. , iugs, sexuri ^buse and psychology hostilities in tire area to question ingof rivfliansaS hostages is totally 

stopped attacking Iraqi dries on This was a reference to efforts by cal abuse m the form of preventing have ceased.” prohibited bv internaticmal law." 

Tuesday following what a military Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi of visits by relatives and threats of Despite toe State Department The statement -said tire Israeli 

totoXandtoeUmtedNaUfonsiec- ex^tiems witocmt triaL . . critidSm. there was pZ&SS actions^ 

reduction m attacks on residential retary-general. Javier Perez de _ The orgamzatum, basing its in- Uiat toe administration ohumed to need for tire arto emmiktioo of 


for moving the Lebanese prisoners 
to Israel, The Associated Press re- 
ported from London. 

A Foreign Office statement said 
toe government was “disturbed” fay 
toe action and added that “the tak- 


reduction in attacks on residential retary-general, Javier Pdrez de 
areas of Iran. Cuellar, to halt toe fi eh tine. 


utnuuucs iq toe area in question rug ui civilians as nonages is totanj thu 

have ceased.” prohibited by international law." u ^ 0ns h^ e 

Despite the State Department The statement -said tire. Israeli 
criticism, there was no indication actions “once a g ain hi g hfi g ht the m ^ Li 

that the administration planned to need for tire early completion cf .^.has £L; evc l writa 


ooiDued by intesnabmiM law. ■ it m.,- ' 

The statement -said tire. Israeli j. ^^-5 raoa 


Iran last reported shelling eco- Iraq has said that it would attack stud it was “dear that these viola- 
nomic and military targets in Basra Iranian towns until Tehran agrees dons of human rights are continu- 
and other border towns on Mon- to comprehensive peace talks. Iran tog, widespread and, in some 
day, a day after it said it launched seeks oily a limited cease-fire to places, systenatic” 


that the administration planned to need for tire early completion of 
penalize brad for tire move. Amer- full Israeli withdrawal from all 
ican officials, including Secretary Lebanese territory to an orderly 
of State George P. Shultz, have manner and to agreement between 
been sympathetic to brad’s prob- toe Israeli and Lebanese autoori- 


sutface missiles at Baghdad. 

Iran’s leader. Ayatollah Ruhol- 
lah Khomeini, said Thursday that 
it was Iran’s Islamic duty to fight 
the 54-monlb-old war to' the end. 
Addressing army personnel and 
other visitors at his villa to Tehran, 


leans to withdrawing from southern ties." 


Japan’s Trade Barriers Aren’t Excessive, Many Experts Say 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Ayatollah Khomeini said that all ^ 47 percent for tire European 
enemies of the Modem religion had Community. When tariffs on pro- 
grouped behind Iraq and that their cessed food are added, Japan’s av- 


my, particularly agriculture. And United Slates put pressure on Ja- States and because distributors 
eamomists in toe United Stares pan to permit imports of U.S.- may notiump to buy foreign goods 
and m Europe say that the Japa- made aluminum baseball bats. In just becausethey are cheaper. They 




Soviet Fish Rights 
Cut in U.S. Waters 


that has energetically en- 
Japanese market has sold 


Nm York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — The secre- 
tary of commerce, Malcolm Bal- 
drige, has announced that the 
amount of fish the Soviet Union 
may catch to U.S. waters would be 
cut by at least half because of Sovi- 
et violations of an international 
whaling agreement. 

According to the Commerce De- 
partment, Soviet whalers exceeded 
I their allowable quota of 1.941 
mtoke whales from waters around 


erase rises a bit higher than Ameri- V V , , auuwaros so uonstups with suppliers. <tomg 

35JE KTsbuf bSl toSer ^ oteaion ^j2! low „ level n ®[ thal «« of busing with those have faiih- 

Si C^lJs Japanese imports generaUy. But keeping out OS. bats. So far tare fnDy formed then obhgatkMis in 

man s. when experts on Japan sift through company that has energetically en- the past. This is what maitoitdifS- 

Quotas on imports are another all the information and anecdotes tered the Japanese market has sold cult even for new Jauanese coos*' 
common method of protection. Ja- and feed date into their computers, only 250 bats. ' nies to break into toemarta*. “ 

^ 'aSuSSEZ S toey gmeraDv conc^thatJapn Such is the stuff that inspires Long-term relationships are even 

2 SwS % i ^Sf*. Proiwtromst “japan-bashing.” as it is moredifficalt wctotivateforafoP- 

ca “® cL AnSSes abound of de- who does not speak Japa- 

an as^tant U ^^r^represmte- AfewCTperts even say Japan is less tays ^ jn^ecoons and arbitrary de- ncsc nor understand toe J^jaucse 
nve. said that the areas m which protectionist nmv AmrrLnc culture: While most lananSfatoe 


the past. This is what makes it diffi- 
cult even for new Japanese c o ny* 
nies to break into tire market. 


and feed data into todr computers, only 2 S 0 bats. ’ nies to break into toemSret. ‘ Jv^inPr^ 

Such “ ^ SIuff **»■* inspires Long-term relationships isre 

J? a no *. “gf* protecti onis t “japan-bashing.” as it is widely difficult tocultivateforate 1 - 4 ^ .V^an? “fcich^ f 

called. Anecdotes abound of de- *»»» who does not speak Japa* 


Japan uses quotas axe broader, cov- 


oteoiomst. _ ririons, which many Americans culture. While most J; 

It is not so much the visible bar- view as absurd, as well as toe obvi- United States speak 


r__ |i„ ,L, UN •uiuw UI MM- IK." <u auaiuu, ftS WOI to UK OtJVl* 

"" lh “ ou»f^lu« of products 10 «3L 

Wbea other visible barriers — ’ , . . But how much of rales frustra- 

“voluntanT quotas and discretion- William K, hjist, director os m- non is due io protectionism? The 
ary licensmg of imports —are add- tematioMl trade for tbc American Japanese, who commonly consider 
Japan continues to look less Electronics Association, for exam- themselves the least protectionist 
interventionist than many other complained about Japanese n> mq« country, often accuse Ameri- 
coun tries. In a recent book, Wil- SBtcnce on inspecting U.S. fac- cans of laziness and failure to studv 
liara R. Cline of toe Institute for *©ries flnd sometimes even the xnarkeL “They expect to just 


culture. While most Japanese fa toe 
United States speak English, one 
study found, that a - minority- d 

Americans study Japanese, before 
arriving in that comity aid ouljS? 
percent subscribe to a Japa rieje* 
language neiiqiqper..'v.-L .4j 
In adtotion to toe cnltural ri£I 
lingmstic golf that faces American* 

in Japan, Japanese caasmaiM 


AQtarcuca Dvaoout ine quota uam n. iume 01 tne ins unite idt “““ r j-7 w "L" i r““ u . “tr* •« ji»i f-huaant tn frv w inn 

is set bv the 'International Whaling International Economks in Wash- ifdtviduai products brf«t admit- walk m and talk to a dtstnbmor SotoSJS 
Comnnssicu. togton calculated that 211 percent tmgjoods mto Japan. Mr. Knst and «y, ’IteWmoduct,’ the 3SJE2 ESk5S 

An official of toe Soviet Embas- of Japan’s mmulactaral mporra »« rtcd ****** «y they do a said Mr. J5. 

sy to Washington, Yevgeny N. were snbject to major non-tariff accept testmg dat a coale d m toe Owy. doesn’t work tim waym 

Chaplin, said thal he was surprised barriers, compared with 45.1 per- ^ pan * • _ in cost. 

by the U5. action on Wednesday, cent to the United States and§&5 W ■ ^ expense The Japanese distribution sys- 

He said that Soviet whalers had percent to France. . ' . °* lcs 6 n S- tern, to particular, is a critical ob- 

stopped catching mtoke whales bo- Of course, Japan does ’actiyiiy There'is tnc Case oTlhti 

fore the quota was reached. protect some segments of TtsecoiuK bais. For more than five 






reflect abefcef that Japanese got 
are superior, but to.. stoves' a 
mnsets attributed titer ntacte 
to cost, uncertatow about iayi 
mcompfehensiblc tostrtkSKtor^ 
ravpropriaie size ofeprod toS 
other details that 
ittte antotoons.:. 






: V,'. 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


Page 3 


JaidiH 

SSSfiJ 

softhe®* 

roadside ^ 

«a* aada^T 

Stt three pSf ' Sad 

>«Sb« 

38 “Jorda# 

ttasT 

safis 


ur Production, Devastating Small Farmers 


...^ By WardSindaii 

K'arW/iJtfn ?oH’ S#mof 

WASHINGTON — When f^ff gnRBE decided in 
the b&Ddmga ic wfaidi hogs were raised aH 
Bcrossrihe Lhxiced Stateswerc in fact “unitary hog- 
raising fadljties,” the aim was not to burnish the 
.. jpageaf flkisog business. 

: . Ira transforms con was for tax purposes. “Facili- 
ties'' arc eligible for the-in vestment UK credit; mere 
boWings are noLThhdrga>Uity means, in effect, that 
...tbe federal government pays 10 percent of the cost of 
jbuflding new pig pens. 

Pork producers were delighted with the new tax 
^ provision. Bet they did not foresee that it and other 


But tax policy works in a contradictory way. stimu- 
lating production by bringing in investors se eking to 
shelter outside income from taxes. It also inflates the 
price of land and encourages equipment investments 
th« the fanner does not need. 

The effects show up' throughout agriculture. 


Farms in Crisis 
Policy at a Crossroads 


code” by investors will cost the Treasury more than 
$2.6 bilboa in revenue between now and 1987. 

The president’s Council of Economic Advisers re- 
ported last year that tax laws encourage the substitu- 
tion of capital for labor — machinery instead or 
le — 'and lead id larger mechanized farms that get 
tax breaks than the smaller farms. 



creates an incentive for higher-income people branches of agriculture: 


creates a 2 percent decrease in price, and vice versa. 
The increase announced by the six big corporate 
producers translates to a drop of $1.20 per hundred- 
weight (4SJ6 kilograms), a drop the corporate produc- 
ers can absorb but that could send many small farmers 
over the edge. 

Tax policies have had similar effects in other 


Fourth of four articles 


Grapes, pork, milk, wheal, com, avocados and other 



tin' -has gone up, 30 percent of the nation's bog fanners. 

^producers have gone out of busacss. Subsidized by Tlie Internal Revenue Code has more effect on the 

" corporations and investor syndicates status of American agriculture thpq th<» federal farm 

No question about it,* 1 said Ed Andersen, a 


thousands of family fanners wbo cannot compete with 
factoiy operations. 

_ ■ Now, as Congress, the administration and farm 
groups grapple with thefann credit crisis arid prepare 
-to do battle over a new farm bin, there is a grudging, 
painful recognition that agriculture's problems cannot 
be solved on til lawmakers deal with tax policy. 

Other government agricultural programs prop up 
prices, subsidize farmers and pay them not to grow 
more food. . . . 


U.S. farmer organization. “The major reason for over- 
investment in agriculture is because of tax shelters.” 

Hearings last year, and a study released this year by 
the Joint Economic Committee of Congress, hi g hli gh t- 
ed facets of the tax code that have an adverse impact 
on small and medium-sized farms. 

Sen ato r James Abdnor, a Republican of South 
Dakota, was unsuccessful last year when be tried to 
limit the amount of outside income that could be 
sheltered in sericulture. He says “farming of the tax 


iio'tite tog business, Rising the 

“MV** dairyman who Beads the National Gran^ the oktet 

SE£®S 
May lm *5^ 

fthOpe 

“credo Neves is - 

a minor o^-- ^ 
n found in 

“etersj w^ -■ 

^Problems -* 

“ President feii ^ 

•.**«* four nglgk 
*“* ^ president ^ 

the Roman Catf*^ 


to invest in farming,” the report said. “In practice, 
losses from farm operations reduce taxes on other 
income by more than the total federal tax revenue 
from farm profits, implying that total farm income for 
tax purposes is negative." 

Gerald F. Vaughn, an agricultural economist at the 
University of Delaware, said that many small farmers 
and ranchers themselves benefit from tax shelters, and 
do not realize bow little they gain from them in 
comparison to more affluent competitors. 

Hcgs are where wise investors shelter their outside 
money these days, according to Chuck Hasserbrook, a 
tax analyst with the Center for Rural Affairs, a family- 
farm advocacy group in Walxhill, Nebraska. 

Besides sheltering hog pens from taxes. Congress 
later shortened (he depredation period for such facili- 
ties to five from 13 years, allowing investors to gain 
larger tax benefits more quickly. 

Mr. Hasserbrook says that, because of such tax 
benefits, “in the past year, we have seen six major 
corporations announcing expansions that will' add one 
nnuion more bogs per year to UiL production.” 

To the many hog farmers wbo are operating at a 
very small profit, tins means trouble. An industry rule 
of thumb says that a 1 perc en t increase in supply 


• Cattle raising is regarded by many expens as the 
most lucrative tax deferral shelter available. An inves- 
tor can delay and reduce taxation through various 
accounting and levera g in g practices. As in the pork 
industry, mis has drawn corporate investment that has 
had a large effect on the small rancher’s ability to 
compete and stay solvent. 

Profits have been low for a decade, small farmers 
wbo raise cattle are quitting and more than half of the 
country’s cattle now are finished for market in about 
400>lrig feedlois. 

• Although the federal dairy program guarantees 
that the government win buy all the milk a fanner 
cannot sell, federal tax law helps stimulate overpro- 
duction by allowing investors to buy cows, write off 
much of the investme 
income. 



Th» WWimowi ftat 


investment and avoid taxation on other Hogs gather on a farm in the United States for feeding. 


• Hundreds of thousands of acres of fragile 
land in the West have been plowed under since 1978 
and converted to production of wheat, the country's 
major surplus crop. The double-dip of tax write-offs 
along with federal crop subsidies has cm Treasury 
income, increased farm program costs, intensified sou 
erosion problems and depressed farmers' prices- 


10 Laieran nesr l- 

C ^t washed dSJ 
erm Jerusalem bdoSj 

i once again thatwV.* 
i servant himsetf-j^- 

b^ ym ™W 

eet in Padfe 

'al task fora roam* 
Western Pacific. dudoRt 

ie Ridge, said Hmnfci 

ght on the latest Seres 

y from both the sea* 

ok late las: wed, is If 
nossiysk, one of wok 
paniedby seven ottot 
Krivak class gtridake 



Th* N*w VoA Tinas 


Jeff Bradley, & freelancer from Tennessee, conducting a writing class at Harvard University. 


ir\ 


jades seemed to be as; 
re holiday. Only an cat 
200.000 employes ab 
(lar 

t will •visit Britain .fijnii 

ien a police patrol ink 
lists, the Defense fife 

S 

viiian defense forced* 

IQ militiam en ind a re 

from Zamboanga. £ 


’JiTransjt 

Lebanon 

o. The United Sum- 


U.S. Colleges Try to Lighten Students’’ Purple Prose 


By Cblin Campbell , . .. 

New Yark Times Service 

' CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts 
—One of (be teachers would usual- 
ly arrive with some beer, but appar- 
ently everyone had beat too busy 
that afternoon to buy any. That 
added to their weariness as they sat 
jn a creaky-floored office in Har- 
# yard University’s Freshman 
' -Union, and for a minute . they con- 
sidered adjourning rather than 
talking about their classes. . 

Dutifully, die five teachers de- 
cided to proceed. And as they trad- 
ed tales of pedagogy and dear En- 
glish prose, roe teachers, all 
professional writers rather than ac- 
ademics, grew almost cheerful. 
j “I bad one student,” recalled Jeff 
. -Bradley, a freelance writer from 
Tennessee, “who began -a 


d Syria and Ld® 8, ;*My mother has been heavily m- 
0 reach an agree®* 1 ' volvedwitb every si 


with every single member of 
. ’the Calif ornia staie legislature.’ ” 
The teachers snorted. Ambiguous! 

Another Harvard freshman had 
started an essay, “Advertisements 
play an active part in every Ameri- 
can’s life.” “BoringT’ Mr. Bradley 
Tcried.; ' 

“Re-vision,” said Dorian FHegd, 
a freelance journalist. “I don't just 
. tell them to rewrite ii,-I want them 
to re-see it.” 

Meetings like tins one have been 
taking place al more and more fib- 
' era! arts colleges across the United 


in an orderly tnasfc. 

3 the Lehinese ami* 
iraelis withdrew. 

in Criticizes Mw 
British Foreign & 

v sh3TO>> & aa3a 
rig the LebJflse 
, The Associate! 

rom London, 
eign Office su« 

nSdaddcdto^ 

iliansas ho^^j jj, 1 

** * l . yjj d s &O sanction has been growing, ~and that they would be talking about 
tawiucii .. i_uAsA»' * over the last five years. ox so, acme and mitnHrf' T»tw 


gurated a rimilar program, and sev- 
eral other coB^ra have considered 
following stdU Many colleges al- 
ready use students as writing tutors 
on a smaller scale. 

From Dartmouth to Wesleyan to 
Yale' to Georgetown, colleges have 
been engaged in all sons of experi- 
jneots, many of them courses for 
credit, to improve student prose. 

.Concern ova the lackluster ver- 
bal abilities of high school students 
and the poor wiring of some col- 
lege graduates has encouraged new 
types of college teachers, new 
courses in composition, new writ- 
ing “clinics” and “workshops,” 
some staffed by undergraduates, 
and various other attempts to real- 
ize a fashionable academic ideal 
known as “writing across the cur- 
riculum,” or learning to write well 
in. any field, not just in English 
classes. - 

The word “rhetoric,” in its clas- 
sic. sense, the study of persuasive 
language, also is enjoying a revival. 

But Anne Greene, who runs die 
writing program at Wesleyan. Uni- 
versity, m Middletown, Connecti- 
cut, echoed the thoughts of teach- 
ers in many liberal arts colleges 
when she said. “People don’t read 
enough.” 

Lowry Pei, a published writer of 
fiction, has earned a modest living 
for seven years teaching expository 
writing at Harvard. He walked into 


. States. For rollege-Ievdwitisg in- class recently and told his students 


Vince 
the early a 
cli withdraw ^ \K 

ind 

ti and Lefr aflltf * 



ad 




& 


onn ; 

fbi^Viriian^ 

eik ** 1 * t ■ «i 
nnti W "r^Wl 


BWSr 

or. ^ 
***&<( 


private colleges, which, have tiadz- 
. ti anally excelled at getting students 
.to write wdl, have fell .a need to do 
.a better job. 

Harvard began hiring profes- 
sional . journalists, novefisi . 
other writers in 1978 to rrinvigo- 
rate its Expositcay Writing Pro- 
gram for firat-year students. . 

The program now employs 47 
such teachers, most part-time. 
Casses are small about a dozen 
'students each, and freshmen can 
- choose among sections that focus 
-on instory, social studies or the 
natural sciences as well as on litera- 
ture or creative writing. 

Brown University m Prmidence, 
Rhode Island, introduced a pro- 
-pam in 1981 in which professors 
can call on students who are good 
" writers to help those who are not 
Swaitbmore College, in Swarth- 
.more, Pennsylvania, recently inan- 


“begirinmgs and endings” rather 
than “entries and departures.” 

The earlier name for this seg- 
ment of the coarse had been “can- 
celed due to pomposity," he ex- 
plained. 

. His students were interested in 
creative writing, and he asked one 
to read ha latest essay aloud. It 
dealt with a story by the Southern 


fiction writer. Eudora Welty, and 
was written in a style (hat several 
students called “poetic.” 

Some said they liked the way it 
flowed between Miss Welly’s imag- 
ery and the essayist's own. Others 
felt confused; the essay’s first para- 
graph, for instance, had declared 
that life “is a cycle, as is the world, 
and con traductions exist in harmo- 
ny alongside, each other, on a well- 
worn path.” 

English majors often suffer from 
flowery writing. Countless other 
students never bother to rewrite. 
But a more troubling problem, said 
Richard Marius, director of Har- 
vard’s Expository Writing Pro- 
gram, is the student who says, “Just 
tell me what to do and TH given to 
you.” 

Anxious fa high grades and im- 
patient to learn the rules, whatever 
they are, such students are regular- 
ly frustrated and tend to decide 
that “good writing” is essentially a 
matter of taste. They also learn, 
more accurately, that dozens of 
courses do not require them to 
write especially weLL 

Mr. Marius, a historian of the 
Reformation who has written two 
novels, said, “1 find this very dis- 
couraging at times.” He thinks of 
good writing as aland of 
with thought, as a reflection, of 
intellectual attainment. Other 
teachers of writing share his view 
but say a lot of their students never 

get it 

An advantage of professional 
writers as teachers can be their en- 
thusiasm. Janies Slevm, chairman 
of the English department at 
Georgetown University in Wash- 
ington, noted that professors and 
graduate students in English tend- 
ed to be literary critics rather than 
writers or teachers of writing, “and 
as a result we’re not necessarily 


better trained to leach writing than 
anybody else.” 

Georgetown and many other col- 
leges have turned in recent years to 
“pea tutors” or undergraduate in- 
structors in composition. At Har- 
vard, such tutors are paid SS an 
hour to help other students tidy up 
syntax, fathom such perennial pro- 
fessorial comments as “Needs or- 
ganization” and just listen sympa- 
thetically. 

Some academics, though im- 
pressed with the thrift and conve- 
nience of luring journalists and stu- 
dents to teach writing, do not see 
such tactics as ideal Linda Peter- 
son, co-director of the Bassr Writing 
Program at Yale Univosity, in 
New Haven, Connecticut, said, “I 
just don’t fed, this is a personal 
opinion, that when you're dealing 
with the brightest kids in the coun- 
try they should be getting anything 
Iras than really good writers as 
teachers.” 

But the use of undergraduate 
writers elsewhrae is spreading. 
More than SO writing fellows, who 
earn $300 3 semester helping stu- 
dents revise their papers, are tutor- 
ing more than half of the 5,000 
undergraduates at Brown Universi- 
ty- 

Tori Haring-Smith, who devel- 
oped the Brown’s Writing Fellows 
Program, argued that students 
make "powerful tutors" because 
“they can still remember what it 
was like when they couldn’t write 
weL” 


DEATH NOTICE 


FURNESS, George Abbot, 88, sudden- 
ly April 2, 198S ai home in Tokyo, 
Japan. Born in EBzabcth. NJ. Gradu- 
ated Harvard 1918 and from Harvard 
Law School 1921. Long term resident 
of Tokyo. Leaves 2 daughters Anne W. 
cf Cambridge, Mass and ■Si*rasnta J 
FIsl; Jessie C.'af San Francisco, Ca.; 
one son, George Air. of Chevy Chase, 
Md. and 3 grandoanghiere. Funeral 
arrangements m Japan incomplete. 



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World Bank Urges less Pesticide Use 

H'cabuigum Pass Service 

WASHINGTON — The World 
Bank, concerned about burgeoning 
use of pesticides in developing 
countries, has announced new 
guidelines designed to minimize 
chemical use in projects to which it 
contributes financially. 

In a news conference with the 


Agency for International Develop- 
ment, which has also adopted tne 
guidelines, the bank said Monday 
mat its action was based on evi- 
dence that increasing numbers of 
insects were becoming resistant to 
agricultural chemicals. It said thaf 

indisc rimina te use Of pratiddes did 
not necessarily lead to profitable 
agricultural production. 


Sew York Times Serviie 

NEW YORK — A new geneti- 
cally engineered drug is nearly 
twice as effective as medication 
now used in halting heart attacks, 
according to a major study spon- 
sored by the U.S. government. 

The experimental drug, tissue 
plasminogen activator, dissolves 
blood dots, which are the major 
cause of heart attacks. If such 
blood clots are not dissolved quick- 
ly, permanent and often fatal dam- 
age to the heart muscle results. The 
damage is called myocardial infarc- 
tion. 

The study compared the experi- 
mental drug with streptokinase, a 
drug already licensed by the Food 
and Drug Administration for use in 
dissolving blood clots in the hean. 

The new drug, which actually is a 
human blood substance that can 
now be produced in large quanti- 
ties by gene- splicing methods, was 
found to be nearly twice as effec- 
tive as streptokinase. 

The disparity was ro striking and 
clear-cut that the test was halted 
Feb. S, earlier than planned, said 
Dr. Eugene R. Passamani. project 
officra of the study for the National 
Heart. Lung and Blood Institute: 

In 66 percent of patients who 
were given the new substance; the 
blocked coronary arteries were re- 
opened, or re-canalized, as il is sci- 



entifically known. In the patients 
who received streptokinase, only 35 
percent of the arteries were re-can- 
alized. 

The most exciting finding. Dr. 
Passamani said, was the evidence 
that there 
can 

when uij 
covery of such a treatment has been 
an important goal of heart research 
for many years. 

Plasminogen activator is a natu- 
ral part of the complex system by 
winch blood-clotting is controlled 
in die human body. The substance 
was produced for the study by 
Genentech Inc, a biotechnology 
company in South San Francisco, 
Califor nia 

A preliminary report of the study 
was published Wednesday in The 
New England Journal of Medicine. 

It was not dear how soon the 
new drug would become widely 
available to doctors. Larga-scale 
tests will presumably be done to 
prove the drug’s value in protecting 
against heart attacks. 

6 Guatemalan Agents Killed 

The Auodnted Press 

GUATEMALA CITY — Six 
agents of the National Police were 
kidnapped and killed Wednesday 
in the southern part of the capital, 
police said. 



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™ Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 





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By Bradley Graham 

Washington Pdsr Service 

BUCHAREST — The Warsaw 
Pact, which binds East European 
states militarily to the Soviet 
Union, expires next month, and 
reports have been circulating in the 
West of disagreement among alli- 
ance members over the length of 
the period for which it should be 
extended. 

But conversations in Romania, 
Hungary and Poland with govern- 
ment specialists and Western dip- 
lomats indicate that the treaty wm 
be prolonged easily, most likely for 
another 20 to 30 years. 

Officials involved in planning 
for a meeting of Warsaw Pact lead- 
ers, which is expected sometime be- 
fore the May 14 expiration date, 
stressed that a final decision must 
await a formal meet ing of Soviet 
bloc chiefs. But a ranking Polish 
Communist Party member, echo- 
ing remaries by counterparts in oth- 
er East European capitals, foresaw 
no serious hitches. “I’m not expect- 
ing any problem in deriding the 
prolongation.” he sakL 


Just how real the debate among 
the alliance's members ever was 
about the treaty’s renewed length 
remains open to question. 

It was Romania, playing hs char- 
acteristic role as a Warsaw Pact 
maverick, that first hinted pnbHdy 
about a dispute. 

The.deririou to renew the 30- 


A West European diplomat ob- 
served that Soviet officials in Bu- 
charest seemed relaxed about the 
question of the pact's renewal and 
have been so since Nicolae 
Ceausescu, the Romanian leader. 


gave public assurances last year 
chat Romania would agree to a 


year-old treaty was initially to be 
made in mid- January at a meeting 
planned for Sofia but postponed 
due, it now appears, to the ill health 
of President Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko, who died March 10. 

In. repent weeks, the Romanians 
have created the impression of 
pushing behind the scenes for a 
shortened extension period of five 
or 10 years. 

But in talks here, the Romanians 
were vague about what discussions 
they have had with the Soviet 
Union or other Warsaw Pact states. 
In fact, thw acknowledged, politi- 
cal and ns&aiy experts preparing 


for a meeting have never formally 
discussed differences on the exlen- . 
son issue. 


Chat Romania would agree to a 
treaty extension. 

Several Western envoys said they 
suspected the Romanians of skill- 
fully suggesting that there was 
more to me issue than in fact exists. 
“They’ve glamorized and promot- 
ed their own part in the renewal, 
dropping leaks in lots of capitals,” 
said a diplomat. “But when yon 
look more deeply into the matter, 
you find there was never any real 
intention not to renew or not to go 
along with Soviet terms. They’ve 
simply used the moment to rein- 
force their image with the West as 
the Warsaw Pact's difficult mem- 
ber.’' ‘ 

Two other East European states 
have capitalized as well on reports 
of a debate, asserting individual 
rights. In Hungary, Deputy For- 


eign Minister Istvan Roska^aid the 
treaty would berprolongeabut ac- 
cented. the independence and sov- 
ereignty of member state . East 
Germany publicized the Hungar- 
ian, minister’s remarks, sign alin g 
agreement ' 

But Romania alone goes ao far as 
to refuse to let Soviet troops on its 
soil and to keep its own/ troops, 
although not its military officers, 
from participating in Warsaw Fact 
maneuvers outside thecountry. . 

Asked why Romania stays, in the 
Warsaw Pad, officials hoe rite po- 
litical necessity and an interest in 
maintaining good toms with the 
country’s Communist neighbors. 

Unlike the North Atiantic Trea- 
ty Organization, which hasnb expi- 
ration date, the treaty establishing 
the Warsaw Pact set a .tinntjof 30 
years on the orgamzation’i: exis- 
tence. Uns served to higtdrehi the 
Soviet bloc's declared aim oLsccinfi 


Soviet bloc’s dedared aim offering 
a Europe free of exposing miGtaiy 
alliances. The treaty stipulates that 
the Warsaw Pact will dissolve if 
NATO ever does! 




Ozal Repeats 
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By John M-. GoshJco 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Prime Min- 
ister Tmgut Ozal of Turkey has 
repeated that he is “ready to meet 
any time, anywhere" .with Prime 
Minister Andreas Papandreou of 
Greece to relieve Greek-Turirish 
tensions. 

He also called on Greece 
Wednesday to sign “an agreement 
of friendship, good-neig^botiiness, 
conciliation and cooperation.” 
Last month, Greece turned down 
Mr. OzaTs proposals for talks as 
neither “serious nor responsible.” 

The State Department issued a 
statement welcoming Mr. OzaTs 
“statesmanlike proposal” and Ins 
stated readiness to meet with Greek 
leaders." It added: “The United 
States continues to believe that the 
differences can best be resolved by 
discussion and negotiation.” 

{But Greece's ambassador to 
Washington, George Papoulias, 
quickly rebuffed Mr. Oral's offer, 
Reuters reported. “He is trying to 
appear conciliatory whfc. biding 
real peace under the table," Mr. 
Papoulias said. 

[Mr. Ozal noted that Greece and 
Turkey had signed a friendship 
agreement in 1931, but Mr. Papou- 
lias said that that agreement had 



• ' .> ? \ - t 1 .• ‘ ■■ 









: r: j..H' 

: ‘ . . ‘ 



HAMBURG BLAZE — A fire destroyed a tirird of a portside warehouse complex 
Thursday in Handnirg- Thousands of tons of coffee and nibber were burned and 
exploding containers damaged bmh^ngs- Shqis were towed from toe area to safrfy. 


* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY TtoUNGUAL VTP-PA 


not prevented Turkey from invad- 
ing Cyprus in 1974. The invasion 


followed a coup d'etat on the island 
inspired by Greece’s then rightist 


dictatorship.] 

Mr. Ozal broadened what has 
become known as his “olive branch 


campaign" during a speech spon- 
sored by Georgetown University's 


sored by Georgetown University's 
Center for Strategic and Interna- 
tional Studies. 

“We think Greece should be a 


natural partner in the process of 
peacemaking," the Turkish leader 


said. Instead, he contended, the Par 
pandreou government continued 
“the propaganda of a so-called, 
imaginary Turkish threat” by advo- 
cating a nuclear-free zone in the 


Balkans and redeploying Greek 
forces along Turkey's border under 
what Mr. Papandreou calls the 
“new defense doctrine of Greece." 

But ^ Mr. Ozal argued that “We 
are neighbors. Our nations should 
know each other better. We should 
remove all obstacles so that jour- 
nalists, businessmen, artists and 
the man in the street can freely 
contact one another." 


Greek President Reseiwes Decision 
On Papandreou’s Election Request 


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Reuters 

ATHENS — President Christos 
Sartzetakis of Greece, whose 'elec- 
tion by Parliament last month pro- 
voked a constitutional crisis, said. 
Thursday he would consider a re- 
quest by Prime Minister Andreas 
Papandreou for early elections. 

An announcement from the 
president's office after Mr. Sartze- 
takis met with Mr. ftqiandreou 
said that the prerident reserved his 
decision on the request to “renew 
the people’s mandate on extremely 
important national matters.” 

Mr. Sartzetakis’ refusal to agree 
immediately to the Socialist prime 
minister’s request surprised com- 
mentators. It had been widely as- 


sumed that the new president, the 
Socialists’ nominee m the March 


The 300-seat parliament, in 
which Socialists and Communists 


presidential vote, would have no 
objection to their demands r 

Mr. Papandreou dud the divi- 
sion of Cypmsas an^or national 
issue that be said required elections 
several mouths before the Socialist 
government's four-year tennifas to 
end in October. 

An election would dear the po- 
litical air, the prime minister said. 

He said he had proposed that the 
poll be bdd after Pariument ap- 
proves constitutional changes re- 
ducing the powers of the president. 
An election, if approved by the 
president, is rapected to be in early 
June. 


bave a ma ority, elected Mr. Sartze- 
takis bn March 29 with' the nrini- 


talds bn March 29 with the mmi- 
mum number of deputies required 
by theconstitutkm, 180. 


®50NAim=S 

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Crash ofF-104 K3h 13 in Turkey 


Tliaidier Plans Sandi Visit 
LONDON — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher wDl stop briefly 
in Saudi Arabia April 14 and meet 
with King Fahd on the way back 
from an 11-day tour of Southeast 
Asian nations, her office said 
Thursday. 


The Associated Pros 

ANKARA — A Turkish Air 
Force F-104 Staifightcr crashed 
Thursday into a business district of . 
Balikcsir. western Turkey, kOling at 
least 13 persons and injuring 21, 
the provincial governor, Bayram 
Ozen, reported. 

News agency reports said that 
one of the aircraft's pilots was 
killed while the other pilot para- 
chuted to safety. 

Governor Ozen said that the 
death toll could rise. Rescue work- 
ers were still clearing the rubble, he 
said. He said the plane crashed into 
a coffeehouse in a district duster of 


furniture and carpenter shops at 
the edge of the tows. Zt exploded as 
hhit the ground and set a fire that 
spread to the shops. 

The governor declined to give 
any information ahem the aircraft, 
saying the military would make a 
separate announcement. 

The independent news agency 
Hurriyet reported that the Un- 
made fighter-bomber was on a rou- 
tine training flight when it devel- 
oped mechanical failure. It did not 
specify the failure. It said one of the 
two pilots was killed, while the oth- 
er bailed out and had minor inju- 
ries. 


refused to recognize the election. It 
alleged that (he one vote had come 
from acting President loannis 
Akvras, a prominent Socialist and 
speaker of the chamber. It said Mr. 
Alevras was hot eligible to vote. 

Mr. Papandreou’s proposed con- 
stitutional changes prompted the 
resignation on March 10 of Presi- 
dent Constantine Caramaslis. Mr. 
CammanTfo was generally consid- 
ered to have acted as a brake on 
radical policy shifts by the govern- 
ing Socialists. 

Parliament is scheduled to vote 
on the planned changes on Satur- 
day. Under the Constitution, it 
must hold a second ballot a month 
later. 2t is then expected to be dis- 
solved early in May. 

The election campaign is likely 
to be acrimonious, with New De- 
mocracy attackin g the Socialist 
government cm policy issues arid 
alleging that the country lost a sym- 
bol of stability with Mr. Caraman- 
Hs’s departure. 

The Socialists, while conceding 
that much still needs to be done 
after four years in power, are ex- 
pected to project Mr. Sartzetakis as 
the first ^democratic” — or non- 
conservative — head of state in 
Greece's history. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


Page 5 


nans 




ency Food for Chad 


DooA. Schanchc 

. _____ Aogctti Tima Service 

ROME — Slips loaded with 
eme rgency food aid for more than 
15 million, hungry people in land- 
kwfced Chad have Been prevented 
from unloading ar Nigeria’s main 
pon,UN Wona Food Program of- 


at Nia 
I Food f 
finals have complained. 

are nromag oot of time," 
sa id Jamie Wickens, the interaa- 
tionfll agency’s Chad reprtsema- 
live. He asserted Tuesday that be- 
tween IS million and two million 
Chadians are facing starvation. 

Nigeria has been the main con- 
duit for international food aid to 
Chad and Niger because its port of 
Apapa, near Lagos, is geared for 
quick anlnading ^ aod land trans- 
portation lines from Lagos to those 
-countries are well established. 


gram have been allowed to use the 
port, said Erilc L. Moliar, the bead 
of the agency's Africa Task Force 
Secretariat at the program's head- 
quarters in Rome. 

Mr. MoUef said Nigeria has not 
given any reason for the refusal 
other than to suggest that it needed 
w use Apapa for its own imports. 

He said three other chartered 
ships bearing American, Canadian 
and Italian famine aid have had to 
be diverted to lesser West African 
ports wberehandling and transport 
facilities are questionable. 

“It is vitally important that we 
leach'Cbad with this food before 
the rainy season makes roads im- 
passable, and there is no way we 
can meet the need without making 
use of the Apapa port," Mr. Moflcr 
said. 


season begins at the end of June, he 
said. 


Mr. Moller and Mr. Wickens 
said that the ships could go into 
two other Nigerian ports — Port 
Harcourt and Calabar — but nei- 
ther cun handle such quantities and 
transshipment to Chad would be 
painfully and perhaps fatally de- 
layed. 


The cargo ship Daphne is still 
waiting off At 


.. .>a after 27 days, he 
said, at a daily demurrage charge of 
£3,250 which, he said, the agency 
cannot afford. 


But since March 6. when a ship 
chartered by the food program -and 
carrying 7,000 tons of bulk wheat 
from West Germany was refused: 
permission by Nigerian authorities 
to unload, none of the 
aid ships of the World 


. He said that during March, bis 
organisation had planned to dis- 
tribute 10.000 tons of food in Chad 
but received only 120 tons because 
of the tie-up at Apapa. Another 
100,000 tests must move through 
the Nigerian port before the rainy 


Another ship bearing 2,450 tons 
of bagged rice from Italy waited 17 
days and discharged 120 ions be- 
fore being ref used further use of the 
port, according to Mr. Moller. It 
was diverted to Douala, Cameroon, 
from which he said transport to 
Chad will be difficult. 



U.S. Legislators Condemn South Africa 


naamnuiwn — * IUG v.» 

ingress has stepped up its attack 
South Africa, with the Senate 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Com 
on 

demanding a U.S. investigation 
into the recent killing of blacks 
there and House Democrats seek- 
ing to impose economic sanctions. 

The Senate, controlled by Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan's Republican 
Party, approved, 894, a resolution 
Wednesday condemning "the vio- 
lence of apartheid" and demanding 
that Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz conduct an independent in- 
vestigation of police shootings of 
blacks there last month. 


"The imposition, of economic re- 
strictions against South Africa of- 
fers the most prudent course of 
United States action toward South 
Africa," the resolution said. 


ships in Cape province, The Asso- 
ciated Pres s reported from Johan- 
nesburg. 


The Senate resolution, spon- 
sored by Senator Edward M. Ken- 
nedy. a Massachusetts Democrat 
who visited South Africa recently, 
and Senator Lowell P. Weicker Jr- 
a Connecticut Republican, did not 
demand economic sanctions. 


The police fired buckshot, rub- 
bulktsa 


ber bullets and tear gas. but no one 
was reported wounded in the clash- 
es late Wednesday and early Thurs- 
day, a police spokesman said. 


Police Blame Radicals 

The police said Thursday that 


structure of black townships. 
Again, those who represent law and 
order and other moderate leaders 
were the targets." the police said. 

Separately, at a judicial inquiry 
in Unenhage into the police shoot- 
ings of March 21, a police witness, 
who was not identified, testified 
that blacks in the crowd began 
throwing rocks before police fired 
on them. 


A third cargo ship with 7,600 
tons of Canadian wheat was divert- 
ed to Katonu, Benin, where there 
are no facilities either to bag the 
grain or to transport it to Chad, he 


said, so the entire shipment will go 
to Niger instead. 

The fourth ship, filled with 
American sorghum, was due to ar- 
rive at Apapa on Thursday but 
probably will be diverted, he said. 

Mr, Moller complained that de- 
spite repeated inquiries there has 
been no response from Nigeria. 
“We were told it has to be decided 
by higher authorities,” he said. “It 
must be some son of bureaucratic 
misu riders landing.” 


Democrats, who control the 
House of Representatives, ap- 
proved a nonbinding resolution in 
caucus urging the Congress to 
quickly pass legislation requiring 
sanctions against South Africa, 


which isgovemed by its white mi- 
nority. The votes coincide with a 


Opposition Gains Backers , Rights in Seoul Assembly 


wave- of ami-apartheid protests in 
the United States. 

The Reagan administration has 
opposed using economic sanctions 
against South Africa, committing 
itself to a policy of “constructive 
engagement" designed to encour- 
age reform through diplomacy. 

A spokesman said the House 
vote, taken during a closed caucus, 
was overwhelming. 


The resolution asked that Mr. 
Shultz report back to Congress by 

April 30 on his investigation of the 

killings in eastern Cape province. It 
referral to the shooting by security 
forces into a crowd on Nlarch 21 
near Uitenhage that killed at least 
19 blacks. 

Those killings brought to 244 the 
death toll in South .Africa during 
the past year, the resolution said. 

The statement noted and sup- 
ported recent statements by Mr. 
Shultz deploring the violence and 
saying that South Africa's system 
of racial separation was “totally 
repugnant to the people of the 
United States.” 


radicals intent on anarchy were in'* 
ing to destroy the fabric of die 


Smith Africa's black townships, 
Reuters reported from Johannes- 
burg. 

“Radical elements intent on dis- 
ruption and anarchy continued at- 
tempts to break down the infra- 


The commander at the scene. 
Lieutenant John. William Fouche, 


had testified earlier in the inquiry 
that be gave the order to fire after a 


woman threw a stone. He said there 
was no hail of rocks before the 
gunfire, as the government had 
said. 


More Unrest 


South African police said Thurs- 
day that the police were stoned and 
homes and schools were set fire in 
at least a half-dozen black town- 


Cotnpikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SEOUL — The opposition New 
Korea Democratic Party increased 
its parliamentary strength Tburs- 
to 102, a day after it won the 
it to call the National Assembly 
into session, present censure mo- 
tions and block attempts to revise 
the Constitution. 


: A major realignment look place 
‘Wednesday when 21 members of 
{he Democratic Korea Party, for- 
merly the major opposition party, 
joined the new party, increasing its 
assembly strength to 92, or one- 
third of the total seats. That num- 
ber gave The New Korea Demo- 
cratic Party parliamentary rights it 
bad not had. 


seats and the Korea National Party’ 
20 seals. The remaining seats are 
held by minority party members or 
independents. 

The New Kora party unexpect- 
edly won 68 seals in national elec- 
tions Feb. 12 It was formed by 
followers of Kim Dae Jung and 
Kim Young Sam just before the 
elections. 


U.& Protests Swiss Use 


Of Royal Commercial 


Jtiwm 


BERN — Swiss tdevisiou is to 
'withdraw a commercial showing 
look-alikes of Queen Elizabeth. 
■Prince Charles and Princess Diana 
\ tucking into a meal az a cheap res- 
taurant following a British Embas- 
sy protest. 

; Switzerland’s largest retail chain, 
Migros, launched the advertising 
■campaign two months ago to pro- 
mote their low-price restaurants. 
Accompanying shots of the fake 
royal trio a voice says: “Mi©os 
restaurant — for people like you 
and me.” The British Embassy said 
Thursday that it had told the Swiss 

Broadcasting Corporation that the 
Royal Family may not- be used in 
advertising. 


Thursday, ten minority party 
members joined the opposition 
group, backed by the dissident 
leaders Kim. Dae Jung and Kim 
Young Sam. ■■ 

The ruling Democratic Justice 
Party of President Chun Doo 
Hwan still holds 148 seats, a com- 
fortable majority-in the 276-mem- 
ber unicameral National Assembly. 
The Democratic Korea Party, a 
moderate opposition group, has 35 


The party quickly picked up 
•inact 


three more seats after independents 
or splinter party members joined iL 

The party's growth continued 
Thursday with right more Demo- 
cratic Korea Party members and 
two legislators-elect from the Kore- 
an National Party joining the New 
Korea Democratic Party. 

Despite the ruling party’s major- 
ity, the latest realignment of the 
opposition camp could have some 
unsettling effects on parliamentary 


politics. The leaders of the new 
party have called for a united oppo- 
sition to challenge the government 
in 1988, when Mr. Chun's seven- 
year term expires. (AP, VP1) 

■ Accord to Resume Talks 

North and South Korea agreed 
Thursday to resume trade and talks 
on humanitarian issues such as re- 
uniting families that were post- 
poned by Pyongyang in January, 
Seoul government officials said, ac- 
cording to Reuters. 

North Korea called off the talks 
after assailing an annual U.S. 
-South Korean military exercise as 
a provocation that had spoiled the 
atmosphere for a dialogue. 

The two stares agreed to hold the 
trade talks May 17 at the Pamn un- 
join armistice border village and 
ibe humanitarian talks May 15 in 
Seoul. 


American Yachtsman Freed by Vietnamese 


The Asxoeiated Pros 

BANGKOK — An American 
tsman was released Thursday 


>y Vietnam, where he spent eight 
nutar 


PERSONALITIES PLUS 
MARYBUIME 

IN THE WEEKEND SECTION 
OF FRIDAYS. IHT 


and a half months in solitary con- 
finement on charges of espionage 
and violating territorial waters. 

■ Bill Mathers, in Bangkok on his 
wag} to his home in Singapore, de- 
nied that he was spying or that his 
schooner, the So Fong, was in Viet- 


namese waters when it was seized 
July 21 

Mr. Mathers, 41, had been sail- 
ing from Singapore to Hong Kong. 
He said the 80- fool (about 24-me- 
ter) schooner was about 36 miles 
(57 kilometers]; off Vietnam, wdl 
within international waters. 

Looking fit and composed, he 
said, “I was treated all right. I had 
plenty of food.” • 


His crew, four French citizens 
and an Australian, was released 
earlier, after fines were paid. His 
case was hampered by the lad: of 
diplomatic relations between the 
United States and Vietnam. 

A U.S. Embassy spokesman in 
Bangkok said as far as he knew, 
Mr. Mathers’s parents paid the 
$10,000 that the Vietnamese de- 
manded for his release. 



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LET THE TRIB BE TOUR GUIDE. 


LHX GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS TRAVEL & 
ENTERTAINMENT: 
EUROPE. 



Theres never been 
a guide quite like it. 

Trib business readers afl 
across Europe shared 
their most treasured 
travel secrets with 
joumafct Peter Graham. 

The result: a book for 
business travelers wifh 
contributions from business travelers. 

Turn an ordinary busrtess trip into a pleasant, more 
efficient journey. Guide covers Amsterdam, Brussels, 
Copenhagen, DCssekkxf, Frankfurt, Geneva, London, 
Lyon, Milan, Munich Peris* Stockholm, Zurich. Over 
200 fod-fi8ed pages, tHs hardcover edition is a great gift 
idea for colleagues, business contacts, or yourself. 

Seven subdivisions for each dty indude: 1. Basic city 
overview with vital information. 2. Hotels, with emphasis 
on business services. 3. Restaurants, for on- end off-duty 
pleasure. 4. After-hours suggestions. 5. Diversions, from 
grand opera to jogging. 6. Shopping. 7. \Afeekending 
ideas. 

Rave reviews from the travel mdusfry experts: 

"Where to stay, efirie and revel in Europe _ a handy 


ccynpanion. 

Travel and Leisure, American Express. 
'La good deal of information in compact, easily 
assimilated form." 

Signature ^ Diners Club International. 
'Peter Graham and IHT have produced a smaB 
masterpiece. 0 Executive Travel 


FOOD LOVER’S 
GUIDE TO PARIS. 



As restaurant critic 
for the Trib, Patricia Wells 
has explored the 
treasures of food 
shopping and eding in 
Paris, from the bistros, 
cafes, cheese shops and 
outdoor markets, to the 
dassic feasts. 

The gastronomic 
defights of Paris are 
varied, historic, abundant - and too deTraous to be left 
to chance. Food lover's uncovers the many defights to 
be found aU over this extraordinary dty and takes an 
up-to-date look at some of Paris internationally known 
restaurants. 

Wefe includes critical commentary, anecdotes, 
history, bed lore - as wdl as basic fads like business 
hours and nearest metro station. To recreate the taste 
of France at home, 50 recipes are induded, gleaned 
from the notebooks of Parisian chefs. 

Paperback, over 300 pages featuring a French/ 
English food glossary and 140 evocative photographs. 


"Bound for France? Don't go vAthout fhfriaa Weh's 
Food Lover's Guide to ftrisf 

Houston Chronicle 

spills the beans here*. No serious hedonist 
should go to fans without it 0 

Gael Greene, New Ifork Magazine 
"An Sustrated tour through- one of the great food 
cities of the world 0 

Philadelphia Daily New s 


International Herald Tribune, Book Division, 
181, avenue Charles-deGauBe, 

925Z1 Neuilly Cede* France. 


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PuMinhed With The Vw Yack Tuan and The Washington Post 


The European Idea Lives 


When Spain and Portugal join the European 
Community next January, it will become, at 
least potentially, an economic power equal to 
the United States. The 12 countries of the 
Community, taken together, will be very close 
to the American level of economic output. 
Their population will be a third larger. The 
Community’s actual power will depend on the 
12 countries' determination to keep pressing 
toward greater unity. The final agreements on 
Spanish and Portuguese membership are the 
latest demonstration of progress there. 

The negotiations went on for eight years. 
Although the European Community is built 
around a common market, the real motives for 
f bundin g and (hen expanding it have never 
been essentially economic The idea has always 
been to use economic growth to strengthen the 
base for stable and vigorous parliamentary 
democracy. The question was whether that 
hi gh purpose would fade after the first burst of 
postwar id ealism. That has not happened. 

Perhaps there are commercial advantages 
for some of the Community's current members 
in bringing in two more, but there are dear 
disadvantages to several — France, Italy and 
Greece— whose farmers will now be subjected 
to fierce competition from Iberia. That is why 
the negotiations dragged on so long. The rea- 
son for eventual success was the strong interest 


in other West European countries in tying 
Iberia more closdy to its democratic neigh- 
bors, after the last of the prewar fascist govern- 
ments collapsed there in the mid-1970s. 

There have been other signs of real vitality 
in the Community over the past decade. It 
began choosing its European Parliament by 
direct election in 1979. That year it also estab- 
lished the European Monetary System that ties 
its currencies —with the exception of the free- 
floating British pound and the Greek drachma 
— to each other. This monetary system is 
sometimes dismissed as a mere technical ar- 
rangement, but it is much more than that To 
link currencies together requires dose coordi- 
nation of national economic policies. The joint 
monetary system is the most important ad- 
vance of the European federal principle since 
the founding of the common market itself. 

The mood of politics in Western Europe 
continues to be somber, oppressed by extreme- 
ly high unemployment and comparatively slow 
economic growth. The interesting thing is that 
in this atmosphere the Community continues 
to develop, suggesting that it draws its strength 
from sources deeper than the pasting cycles of 
prosperity. Jean Monnet, the great Frenchman 
who was the Community’s chief architect, 
would have been gratified, but not surprised. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Toward U.S. Retaliation? 


Friction between America and Japan oyer 
trade is nothing new. One U.S. administration 
after another has found grounds for protest in 
unfair competition in automobiles or rigging 
of the value of the yen or quotas on American 
oranges. And year after year diplomats have 
defused tensions and maintained the special 
relationship between the two countries. But 
this year's friction is different; this year the 
Japan-bashers are cm the march. 

Initially it was the Reagan administration 
that took a lough posture on trade, to strength- 
en America's bargaining position. But now 
congressional threats of retaliation against Ja- 
pan have taken on a life of their own, beyond 
the a dminis tration's control. Unless the Japa- 
nese are willing to see Congress dose some 
American markets to their products, they will 
have to take some serious steps to open Japa- 
nese markets to American competitors. 

The United States has little cause, in troth, 
to be righteous about Japanese trade policies. 
Japan does protect or subsidize inefficient pro- 
ducers of rice, beef, cigarettes and communica- 
tions equipment. But America protects or sub- 
sidizes inefficient domestic producers of sugar, 
textiles, ships, dairy products and mili tary 
equipment. It can readily be argued that the 
Japanese economy is as open as the American. 

Nor is it sensible to blame Japanese protec- 
tionism for America's big deficit in trade with 
Japan. That arises mainly because federal defi- 
cits are absorbing most domestic savings — 
and because the Japanese and others have 
rushed to fill the gap by investing in American 
securities. The resulting demand for the dollar 
makes American exports less competitive in 
world markets, including Japan’s. 


If the Japanese were now to buy more 
abroad, they would have less to invest That 
would weaken the dollar and help American 
exporters. But the decline in foreign invest- 
ment would also reduce the capital available in 
America. Americans who call for an improved 
trade balance without an equivalent redaction 
in the budget deficit are thus indirectly calling 
for higher interest and less credit So the 
American case against Japan is muddy. 

Yet it is in Japan’s interest to open markets 
to competitive American exports like commu- 
nications equipment and wood products. For 
all Japan's prowess as an exporter of manufac- 
tured goods, its economy remains riddled with 
inefficiencies, in cozy monopolies as disparate 
as cigarettes and stock sales. Letting foreign 
firms compete fairly would speed the reforms 
already begun by the Nakasoue government. 

More important, opening markets could de- 
flect American retaliation. In the past, domes- 
tic pressures for protection have been buffered 
by the need to keep foreign markets open to 
American goods. But, tHanlcs to the strong 
dollar, American exporters arc now in so much 
trouble that they have little left to fear. 

Influential legislators like Bob Packwood of 
Oregon, chairman of the Senate Finance Com- 
mittee. call bluntly for retaliation. Japanese 
say Americans do not understand that change 
in Japan must be built on consensus. What 
they may not understand is that Japan-bashing 
is turning into a consensus in America. 

Friends of Japan, and of free trade; can only 
hope for the changes promptly needed to still 
the marchers’ drums and protect the prosperi- 
ty that trade has brought to both countries. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 

A Trade War May Be Coming ho Jt 1 leavc 

* c billion dollars wi 


The possibility of a trade war between the 
United States and Japan no longer seems as 
remote as it did once. For years there have 
been powerful voices raised in Congress sup- 
porting protectionist measures aimed primari- 
ly at Japan, but although they may have ech- 
oed the sentiments of many voters and 
industrial lobbyists they have been representa- 
tive of protest rather than policy. Protection- 
ism has nibbled away at the free trade consen- 
sus which has dominated Washington since 
the end of the Second World War, but succes- 
sive administrations, including the present 
one. have regarded the promotion of free trade 
as an intellectual if not always a practical 
obligation. Last week’s 92-0 vote in the Senate 
in support of trade retaliation against the Jap- 
anese, the expectation that the Senate Finance 
Committee win approve legislation demand- 
ing specific retaliatory action from President 
Reagan and increasingly tough talking by 
high-level administration trade officials are 
indications that, as far as Tokyo is concerned, 
the consensus has been shattered, American 
patience with Japan has just about run out. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 

Costly Experts, Grim Results 

At any one time there are about 40,000 
foreign experts in Africa. They cost around 
5100,000 pa year each, when you allow for 
salaries and travel costs and moving expenses 


and home leave and school fees. That’s four 
billion dollars worth of so-called experts per 
year. I don't know how many work in agricul- 
ture, but it’s certainly quite a lot 

The net result of their efforts, year after 
year, has been to institutionalize famine in 
many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. The agri- 
culture they have introduced, focusing heavily 
on cash crops for export, instead of food crops 
for people to eat, works well enough in good 
years. when the rains come and prices in the 
world commodity markets are Hi gh But in a 
slump, as we have now, and in a drought, as we 
have now, the result is disaster. 

— Jon Tmker, director of the environmental 
and development organization Earthscan, 
in World Development Forum (Washington). 

For Peace in Southeast Asia 

ASEAN foreign ministers — Indonesia’s 
Mochtar Knsumaatrnarija in particular — 
would like to see the United Stales and the 
Soviet Union take a more positive diplomatic 
role in settling Indochina issues. Thai way 
maybe Washington and Moscow would not 
tend to view this region as primarily strategic 
shipping lanes for their respective navies. But 
it seems that the superpowers are demonstrat- 
ing a certain lack of political win in defusing 
tensions in this region. Jt is worth the effort, 
however, to continue the plan to bring Wash- 
ington and Moscow into a real zone of peace, 
neutrality and security in Southeast Asia. 

— The Jakarta Post 


FROM OUR APRIL 5 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Italian King Meets Roosevelt 
ROME — Mr. Theodore Roosevelt was re- 
ceived by King Victor Emmanuel at the Quiri- 
nal [on April 4]. The King questioned Mr. 
Roosevelt closely about bis expedition and 
particularly on the various species of game he 
had been able to bag. His majesty was espe- 
cially interested in the visit paid by Mr. Roose- 
velt to Mogadisbo, the capital of Italian Soma- 
liland. and the colonization project now under 
way there. The question of Italian emigration 
to America and the probable attitude of the 
United States on certain international ques- 
tions was also brought up. The entire interview 
was carried on in a most cordial spirit, the 
King and the one-time president conversing as 
freely as if they were old friends. 


1935: Japan Stands Off From Europe 

TOKJO — Japan's field of political activity is 
Asia and not Europe, the spokesman of the 
Foreign Office declared in a statement on the 
possible repercussions of the European situa- 
tion on the Far East He scoffed at suggestions 
that Japan was contemplating an alliance with 
Germany. “Before 1914,” the Japanese 
spokesman said, “peace was based cm the 
balance between the Triple Entente and the 
Triple Alliance. Japan had an alliance with 
Great Britain and agreements with France and 
Russia. Now, however. Japan has no alliances; 
only a vague agreement with France. The Eu- 
ropean countries are too busy to intervene in 
Aria, which is merely a question of prosperity 
for Europe, but a vital question for Japan.” 



FRIDAY, APML 5, 1985 


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Moderates 

By David S. Broder 

W ASHIN GTON.— If ^spring 
and so everything is possible. 
Moderate-progressive Republicans 

are plotting their comeback. 

Three Republican members of the 
House sat down on a conch recently 
and told me how tb<y and. then 
friends hope to redirect the policy of 
their party in coming years, t 


m 

♦hi 


; sjs 


zm 


Africa: Borlaug Urges Action to Improve Crops 


B ERKELEY, Calif ornia — What 
can be done to end the famine in 
Africa? We can integrate existing 
knowledge about how to improve 
crop yields, and can undertake dem- 
onstration projects in Africa. 

Africa's 14-year drought afflicts 30 
million people. The U.S. Agency for 
International Development estimates 
that up to a million people may die of 
starvation in the next year. The Saha- 
ra, meanwhile, creeps southward. 

Africa's crisis comes just as the 
Green Revolution in plant genetics 
and far ming methods nas made pro 
grass in resetting far larger popula- 
tions in Asia. China now produces 
more wheat than the United States 
and continues to improve nutrition. 
India lags in birth control bat bas 
more than quadrupled wheat output 
since 1967, exporting a little this year. 
Africa’s crisis arrived just a few 


By Richard Critchfield 


will not come for years. The Ford 
Foundation has directed its programs 
to attack rural poverty, with an em- 
phasis on social sciences. 

One member of the old agricultural 
school however, has a timely plan to 
grow more food in Africa. Norman 
Borlaug, the 71-year-old Iowa plant 
breeder who won the Nobd Peace 
Prize in 1970 for producing dwarf 
wheat, which increased food supplies 
in India and China, says the first step 
should begin during the next planting 
season. Dr. Borlaug suggests inte- 
grating amiable knowledge on com 
and sorghum at international re- 
search centers In Mexico, India and 
at Texas A Jt M. University. 

“The nuts and bolts are lying 


quite a lot of unassemble d for 
Africa on varieties or hybrids that 
have been tested in many places, on 
the use of fertilizer, methods Of plant- 
ing, control of insects, weeds, dis- 
eases and use of moisture, Starting 
this next planting season, we ought to 
pick one or. two African countries 
where we have plenty of data, pnt all 
that data together, come up with a 
production package and start putting 
tests on several dozen farms. : . . 

Within two years, he says, the im- 
proved production, accosted accord- 
ing to test results, could be trans- 
ferred to thousands of farms. 

The most difficult battle against 
famine has more to do with psycholo- 
gy and pditics than with agronomy, 
Dr. Borlaug says. Once political lead- 
ers and economic planners see that 


crop yields can be greatly increased, 
they need to be encouraged to follow 
up in three ways: get fertilizer to 
villages six weeks before planting 
tune, provide credit to farmers who 
will pay off debts after the harvest 
and ensure a fair price for crops. 

“When you’ve got the people aD 
stirred up. assuming the technology 
has created a bigjump in yield, then 
whoever’s running the program has 
got to be quite a psychologist. He’s 
got to tell the political leader, ’Here’s 
your chance for a breakthrough.’ ” 

Dr. Boriang has been improving 
crop yields for 40 years. He would do 
in Africa what worked in Aria. 
“You've got to make things happen. 
They draft happen by themselves.” 


B. McKinney of Connecticut; Olym- 
pia Snowe of Maine and Tom Tanke 
of Iowa, and they are three of the 
leaders of the “92 Group.*’ The name 
was chosen -to reflect eagerness to be 
part of a Republican majority in the 
House by 1992 and a belief that such 
a majority cann ot be achieved with- 
out broadening the party’s philo- 
sophical range beyond the confines 
of “the New Right." There are 30 
declared members of the group and 
another two dozen of what Mr. 
Tauke calls “closet members.” 

They began meeting after the 1984 
election, spurred by fear that Ronald . 
Rea gan’ S victory would be turned 
into a right-wing ideologica l t riump h 
by the activist conservatives in the 
House. The shock troops- of those 

fares form the “Conservative Op- 
portunity Society” (COS) led by Rep- 
resentatives Vin Weber of Minne sota 
and Newt Gingrich of Georgia. 

COS members became the most 
vocal Republicans in the House. 
They put their stamp on the 1984 


' Mr.OiuMt 

tor on nerd dei 
tributed this to 


isafrequenicommenta- 
pment matters. He an- 
te New York Tones. 


years after the Ford and Rockefeller 
foundations, which were responsible 

for Aria’s Green Revolution, phased A /» • TV _ 'WWT • O 11 T1_ - • • - 

Africa : Dumont Wants Small Projects 

International Development, loo, in a 


series of cutbacks, has lost much of 
its competent technical staff. 

What survives is a well-established 
global network of 13 agricultural re- 
search centers that pool data and 
genetic information on crops. New 
varieties must constantly be bred to 
combat disease organisms and in- 
sects. But the centos, mainly govern- 
ment-supported, lack the flexibility 
of the old programs run by founda- 
tions. Some agricultural scientists 
of the old guard recently formed 
the Winrock International Institute 
for Agricultural Development, near 
Morrilton, Arkansas, which may in 
time provide solutions for Africa. 

The Rockefeller Foundation has 
dropped out of conventional plant- 
breeding altogether and has replaced 
that enterprise with an S80-million 
program in genetic engineering. The 
benefits of the new program likely 


P ARIS — In the 1960s, the early 
days of independence in Africa, 
many people concerned about Afri- 
ca's future read and reread a book by 
a French professor warning that Afri- 
ca could be heading toward disaster. 
The current terrifying famine makes 
the book seem dearly prophetic. 

Professor Rend Dumont, the au- 
thor, recalls that be once told a peas- 
ant schoolboy in the old French Con- 
go, where the women do most of the 
farming. “If your sister goes to 
school you won't have anything to 


By Stanley Meisler of the pcjmLation - now live in the 
J J capital or Nouakchott, a aty of no 

agriculture, of no animal raising, of 
ca”) — have been praised and quoted no industry. It is an artificially creA- 


throughout the continent Several Af- ed capital a city of service, of bnreaa- 
ric&rileaders have asked Mr. Dumont crats and businessmen. It has fac- 
to look more deeply into their court- lories that are closed and. do not 
tries and come up with specific re- function. There is a possibility that 
commendations. But his ideas have there will not be enough water for the 


thor. re calk that be once told a peas- almost never been put into practice, aty in 20 years ... 
ant schoolboy in the old French Con- “In 1983.” Mr. Dumont said, “What is needed in the countr 

go, where the women do most of the “when I delivered a repent on Senegal is literacy in the African langi 
farming. “If your sister goes to to Presdent Abdou Diouf, he told instruction in Emp rpyed fan 
school you won't have any thing to. me, 'Monsieur le professeur, you are tedmiques, a^iraKgy'of fdod 
eat but your fountain pen/’ He was right. We must reestablish a-i belter (friction and^gamzatioB of f< 
not criticizing equality of opportune balance between the city and the into pressure groups. The: pt 
ty for women but railing against the countryside. But I carrnbi do it be- are not a political force. The d 
European school systems m Africa cause I do not have the organized not want them to become one 
that created didst Africans who political power in the rural areas to “The dties of Europe explci 
turned their backs on agriculture. counter the organized political power ral areas in die past, but they in 
The teachings of Mr. Dumont in of the urban areas.’” the fruits of their exploitation 

that 1962 book — “L’Afrique noire Mr- Dumont, who was SI on tones and productive inves 
est raal parti e” ("False Start in Afri- March 13, has written more than 20 Down there they rob the pe 

books about development in the and put the money in large ca 
. Third World; he still spends time unproductive prestige projects 


not criticizing equality of opportuni- 
ty for women but railing against the 
European school systems m Africa 
that created didst Africans who 
turned their backs on agriculture. 

The teachings of Mr. Dumont in 
that 1962 book — “L’Afrique noire 
est raal parti e” ("False Start in Afri- 


An Orthodox Jew Takes 
A Fresh Look at Easter 

By Michael J. McManus 


S TAMFORD, Connecticut — 
Jews and Christians have never 
understood each other very' wdl 
This Easier and Passover, I recom- 
mend a book that has hardly sold 
since it appeared in English in 1983 
— “The Resurrection of Jesus: A 
Jewish Perspective.” by Pinchas 
Lapide. a former Israeli diplomat. 

Mr. Lapide accepts the resurrec- 
tion of Easter Sunday not as an 
invention of the community of dis- 
ciples but as a historical event. But 
he does not see Jesus as the Messi- 
ah, and he remains an Orthodox 
Jew. How is that possible? 

First, he says the Easter event 
was chiefly a Jewish faith experi- 
ence. The Hebrew Bible describes a 
transfiguration (Saul in 1 Samuel 
10:6), an ascension (Elijah in 2 
Kings 2: 1 1 ) and three resurrections 
earned out by the prophets. Two 
were conducted by Elijah (1 Kings 
17. 2 Kings 4). and a third hap- 
pened to an unknown man whose 
corpse came in contact with Eli- 
sha's bones (2 Kings 13). 

In Jeremiah’s time, devout Jews 
suffered while Jews who accepted 
pagan practices prospered, why 
does the way of the wicked pros- 
per? Jeremiah concluded that the 
righteousness of God demanded 
that all who sleep in the dust of the 
Earth must app<ar for final judg- 
ment A just and merciful God 
would not let death be the end. 

The possibility of resurrection 
was denied by the Sadducees at the 
time of Jesus, but was supported 
by the Pharisees. In fact, when Je- 
sus asked his disciples. “Who do 
men say I am?” the answers given 
presuppose the rebirth of dead 
Jews: John the Baptist, Elijah. Jer- 
emiah or other prophets. 

But when Jesus died on the 
cross, the disciples all forsook him 
and fled, said Mark. Mr. Lapide 
writes, “How can it be explained 
that, against all plausibility, his ad- 
herents did not finally scatter, were 
nor forgotten, and that the cause of 
Jesus did not reach its infamous 
end oa the cross?" Mir. Lapide 
thinks that the only plausible an- 
swer was a resurrection of Jesus. 

When this frightened band of 
peasants, shepherds and fishermen 
who betrayed their master could be 
changed overnight into a confident 
missio n society, convinced of sal- 
vation and able to work with much 
more success after Easter than be- 
fore, then no vision or hallucina- 


tion is sufficient to explain such 
a revolutionary transformation — 
not for a world religion that was 
able to conquer the Occident. 

Mr. Lapide adds that if God’s 
power which was active in Elisha is 
great enough to resuscitate even a 
dead person thrown into the tomb 
of theprophet then the bodily res- 
urrection of a crucified Jew also 
would not be inconceivable. 

Mr. Lapide notes that all four 
Gospels say women are the first to 
find (be tomb empty. In a purely 
fictional narrative, women would 
not have been witnesses since they 
were considered incapable of valid 
testimony. And the disciples did 
not believe them (Luke 24:11). 

The resurrection is never de- 
scribed as an undeniable event that 
disclosed itself to all people. It be- 
came a reality originally only to 
those who knew the living Jesus. 
And (be Gospel accounts conflict 
in details — as might be expected 
from different eyewitnesses. 

Since the first century, some 
have charged (hat the disciples 
stole the body. But "can swindlers 
let themselves be tortured and per- 
secuted in the name of an illusion, 
up to joyful martyrdom?” Mr. La- 
pide ados that a devout Jew cannot 
explain a historical development 
that took the central message of 
Israel from Jerusalem into (he 
world of the nations, as the result 
of blind happenstance. Christian- 
izing of a billion people is a “signif- 
icant way station toward the con- 
version of the world to God." 

Mr. Lapide does not believe the 
resurrection proves Jesus was the 
Messiah. Carl Braaten of Chicago’s 
Lutheran School of Theology says 
in the book’s introduction that 
Jews think the Messiah will utterly 
change the world. The world has 
not changed, not as long as (here is 
genocide, racism, violence, war, 
nuclear insanity, poverty, hunger. 
Christians put Jesus the Messiah in 
the center, nut Jews emphasize the 
kingdom that (he Messiah brings. 

Auschwitz and (be founding of 
the state of Israel stand in the same 
spiritual relationship with each 
other as Good Friday and Easter 
Sunday, Mr. Lapide feds. Without 
the resurrection after Golgotha, 
there would not have been Chris- 
tianity, just as Auschwitz without 
the new foundation of Israel could 
have meant the end of Judaism. 

© Michael J. McManus 1985. . . . 


on Africa") was published in 1980. A 
major new work is due in September. 

He shakes his head in disbelief at 
the stupidities of bureaucrats, both 
European and African, packing his 
arguments with outrageous examples 
of foolish projects. The incessant 
growth of wnat he sees as irrelevant 
formal education still astounds him. 

“In Dakar,” he said, “we now have 
820 Senegalese who have master's de- 
grees but no jobs ... At the begin- 
ning you needed a primary diploma 
for the right to sell bread ... In the 
’50s you needed a junior high school 
education. Now you need a high' 
school diploma. Perhaps some day 
you will need a master’s degree.” 

Mr. Dumont believes that the pre- 
sent agricultural disaster comes from 


ral 3reasinthepast, but they invested 
the fruits of thor exploitation in fac- 
tories and productive investment 
Down there they rob the peasants 
and put the money in large cars and 
unproductive prestige projects.” 

In the 1960s Presidents Julius 
Nyerere of Tanzania and Kenneth 
Kanoda of Zambia adopted Mr. Du- 
mont’s views as their own. But he 
insists that neither country ever fol- 
lowed his recommendations. . 

For more than 25 years Mr. Du- 
mont has preached that specialists 
must seek ample solutions for the 
traditional backwardness of African 
farmers. He sees education and small 
loans as more important than elabo- 
rate machinery and biz projects. 


the failure of archaic fuming meth- 
ods trying to cope with the popula- 
tion explosion. But even more impor- 
tant, he bdieves, is the fact that uule 
has been done to solve this problem 
because African political leaders 
have continually exploited the rural 
areas for the benefit of the towns. 

The problem is compounded by 
the incrediblepaceof urbanization in 
Africa, drawing people from produc- 


tive farm work into unproductive ext- large dams, but we need 10 years of 
ies. "In Mauritania,” Mr. Dumont the tittle projects first.” 


said, “400,000 people — one-quarter 


te machinery and big projects. ..nesses North Carolina, Rhode Is- 
Since the agricultural revolution of land and Delaware, and there will 
the I8lh century. Europe has not left probably be more in 19S6. 
large portions of its farmland fallow. Mr. McKinney, a backer of Vke 
Yet African fanners still do so, un- Presi d ent George Bush, said: “Most 
able to afford the fertilizer that might , of os w2J end up in the same camp in 
allow them to use the land confirm- 9 1988,” But how effective they w01 be 
ously. Africans still let their cattle.- ? depends on-how much real political 
sheep and mats roam freely. Mr. Du- 7 or ganizing t h ey do off Capitol Hill in 
mom says fanners must be taught to 4 the years bewreen now and 1988. 
build corridors for thefr animais and Staff members from the “92 
to assigp guardi a n s to lead them Grotm” offices have begun monthly 
through the corridors. “Africa,” be meetings with the few, tiny progres- 
sed, “does not even have sheep dogs, sive Republican organizations that 
Two magnificent dams are going exist, such as die Rigon Society. Bui 
on the Senegal River at a cost of the ntoderate£flm$y^ donot have tbe 
50 million,” fie said. “If I had the political and finanQBf infrastructure 
DO million, I would spend 52,000 in (hat (he conservathresDiave built. 

A of 400,000 villages of the Sahel -As Mr. Tauke sikt^For too many 
■ little projects like the corridors far years, being a moderate is the Re- 
: animals. In that way we would get publican Party ha£ b&o synonymous 
mediate results. I am not against with being lapVarffticj f ^ L We are 
ge dams, but we need 10 years of learning from the conservatives that 
: tittle projects Gtsl” . w*haye to Ik activists.”-: . * 

Los Angeles Tones. ” The Washington Post. * 


up os the Senegal River at a cost cl 
S800 million,” fie said. “If I had the 
5800 million, I would spend 52,000 in 
each of 400,000 villages of the Sahel 
for little projects like the corridors for 
the animals. In that way we would get 
immediate results. I am not against 


Los Angeles Tones. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


A^cultarein Africa 

Regarding the opinion column “At- they will dry up eventually. ' 
Signs ’' Also, the great plain called the 
(March 4) by Brum W. Walker • hd is not fertile. The soils can 

The proposition that "people and 
governments cause famine — not the 
climate" is an inadequate insight on 
the African disaster. It could also 
create more false humanitarian hopes 
that early-warning systems, seeds, 
hoes and pumps will end the tragedy. 

The fact is that climate does indeed 
cause famine People have helped na- 
ture make a mess, but the Sahel pre- 
mise at the moment is no water, no 
food. The climate may have burned 
and blown the entire area beyond 
productive capability. 

We of the western world see prob- 
lems with the confidence that there is 
a solution. The Sahelians have been 
much more realistic in coping with 
their fragile ecosystem through histo- 
ry. When things got bad. they just 
moved out and waited a millennium 
or so for nature to reknit her own 
ravTed sleeve. They can’t do that any 
more. There are many more Sahel- 
ians, and the political entities to their 
south have ttrar own probienB, 

When the .fertile .Great.. Plains 
□ceded water, America tap^bd the '] 

Oglalla reservoir and pumped out a . 
miracle. This might be done, foa ex-’ • 
ample, ''rito''tteLafcoH3tad%qxafcr^ 


But in both cases the reserve are 
fossil —if not replenished by ram. 


governments, but perhaps the climate 
has- to be considered as a given. '* 

This might lead ro solutions as radj 

Also, the great plain call ed the Sa- i cal. as moving everyone out. abolish? 
hel is not fertile. The soils cannot ing hoes and seeds* dosing the wdist 
support intensive agriculture or high industrializing the entire subcontii 
population density. Rain could exa- nent and ad mil ting that food would 
ccibale the problem by encouraging best be grown elsewhere. Any suefi 
more agriculture, thus more people. idea 'will .have enormous political ret 
Early warning systems cannot stop verberations, but the world has to 


the sun from burning the soil's organ- 
ic matter and baking a lateritic cake 
that is unfarmabk even in imagina- 
tion. Nor can they stop the wind from 
Wowing the little topsoil into the At- 
lantic. Nik- the nomads from gather- 
ing permanently around the Nouak- 
chott port to await relief shipments. 

The hoe and seeds and pumps may 
keep a generation functioning, and 
should not be disparaged. But (he 
extent of the disaster demands much 
more audacious long-term Dunking. 
The eventual solutions, if (here are 
any, will be designed by people arid 


. • Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed * Letters to the 
Editor” and mat 'Contain the writ- 
eds signature; name and full ad- 
dress, Lenersshotddbcbritfand 
are subfa to e&dhg. We cannot 
■ be respdiaile^r^ the return of 


stop looking at the drought as a bad 
season and acting tike a local extent 
son agent warning fanners. In anf 
event, relief is going to be a growth 
industry for many years,, perhaps 
even after a good ram or two. I 
" . DAN DEVINE .« 

" Dakar. * 
In response to “Agriculture, Oils Poor 
Cousin. Gets RehabiliiateJ* (Special Rd 
ports on Nigeria, Monk 12 ): , ■ 

his good .that the Nigerian -ao? 
thorities have at last rtafiMd that 
rehabilitating agriculture is essential 
to rehabilitating the economy. Agrij . 
raliure is the oidy permanent asstt 
that car? be passed on to posterity Jl 
“ a not cofr to oaf] brt 

to all industries, since it cannot co& " 
P«e m prestige and other benefiisj» 


permanently * 


platform, indoctrinated challengers 
for Democratic seats and generally 
acted. Representative Snowe said, as 
if “they were the future of the party." 

Mr. McKinney said: “Two-thirds 
of my constituents disagree with the 
planks cm abortion and school prayer 


that those people pat into the 
form ... Those people may reflect 
their districts, but if we're ever going 
to win a majority wesureash^lnave 
to have people' like us running in 
districts tore those we represent 
Representative Snowe said, “We 
have abandoned traditional Republi- 
can values in the field of aims con- 
trol, environment and equal rights.” 
Mr. Tauke, going further, asserted 
that “the majority of House Republi- 
cans would be more comfortable with 

a platform we would write than the 
one that was written in Dallas;” 
That remains to be tested, but the 
moderates are mobilizing around an 
issue that will gauge the future direc- 
tion of the party as deafly as any: the 
budget. Urey are drafting a budget 
proposal of their own envisaging 
“across-the-board cuts” in both mili- 
tary and domestic pending, Mr. 
Tanke said, and have informed their 
party leadership that they will insist 
that their views be considered before 
■Duty are called upon to tine up behind 
^whatever the white House and the 


instruction in. improved farmitig^diatever the white House and the 
techniques, a^§tifdEEgy "of fdod pB£*$arty leadership finally enddise. 
due lion ahddjHSflnizatioh of farm**,. ^Tt is a measure of the moderates' 
into pressure groups. The peasants"' weakness dial not one of their mem- 
are not a political force. The dties dos.iere has a seat on the Budget Com- 
not want them to become one ... nrittet. But Mr. Tauke is probably 
“Tbe dties of Europe exploited ru- rightin saying that “if we can pull 30 


or 40 rfeopfc togeiher on the prind- 

e s of oat moderate budget, we can 
waif impact on tbe process." 

But the ultimate test of the moder- 
ates’ comeback efforts win be deter- 
mined not in Die 1985 budget battle 
hut in the 1988 convention fight. 

They are not without allies. There 
is a significant cadre of moderate- 
progressive Republican senators, in- 
duing Maority Leader Bob Dole of 
Kansas and the chairmen of the bud- 
get, finance, appropriations, intelli- 
gence, foreign relations, commerce 
and small business commiuees. 

There is a similar cadre of moder- 
ate-progressive governors in New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Ten- 


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The Truth About Mata Hari 





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P ARIS. — Sam Wasgenaar, a D utch- 
man who lives in Rome, has been 
trying to unoover the truth about 
Mata Hari since 1931. During that 
rime he has also had other activities — as 
director of publicity for MGM in Europe, as 
a journalist, as an aspiring opera stager (“I 
was a tenor with a baritone complex^), SdD, 
SO years spent mulling the case of a woman 
who was snot as a spy by the French in 1917 
would seem to amount to an obsession. Hot 
so, says Waagcnaar, a hale 77, 

’'What the hell, I’m not in love with her. 
She is one erf the most extremely interesting 

Mary Blume 

persons of this century. If you can find 
anyone who hasn't heard of her, FD buy you 
two drinks instead erf one.” 

Waagenaar's 1964 book, “Mata Hari." 
was published in 1 1 countries. “Entirely per- 
suasive,” said The New Yorker, while in 
England The Tunes Literary Supplement 
said Waagenaar “has done more than any- 
one else to tell the truth about her." 

In that book Waagenaar - argued Mata 
Han’s innocence. Now be has a new book 
just oat in France, "Mata Han, -buia danse 
macabre," (published by Fayard) which is 
just as persuasive as the first one but reaches 
a different conclusion. Waagenaar Ends her 
innocent in the sense, that the de 

Guerre that tried her had onl; 
stantial evidence and never 
but guilty in that she had agreed to spy for 
the Germans as well as the French. 

“But that doesn't make her a spy any more 
than my saying I can mate a t pfrlg me 

a carpenter.’’ She took G e rman money, yes, 
but it was her lifelong habit to take money. 
She gave no information in exchange. ‘ 

“She thought she could spy the way she 
could dance; and .by God she was a lousy 
dancer," Waagenaar says * ; 

. The second book is based on letters* new 
information from Scotland Yard that docu- 
ments Mata Han’s relations with th^ En- 
glish, and on secret French documents that 
were not to be made public until tb&ypar 
2017. Since the public was excluded from the 
trial, and the transcript and even the names 
of the jurors have never been releasA, it 
would seem, a coop for Waagenaar to be 
given access to these papers. 

“1 wasn't given. No more questions,” he 
says. “It took me a hell of a long time before 
I found someone who was kind to xat." 

M ATA Hari was a victim of rircum- 
stances and erf her own megaloma- 
nia. She was convicted in part be- 
cause the French had lost face with British 
intelligence, in part because a successful spy 
hunt was needed to raise morale after the 
French army mutinies of 1917. Mata Hari 


biee-dif 



Mata Hari . 


was a perfect scapegoat — heedless, self- 
centered, incapable of telling the truth even 
when her life was at stake, dubious, mysteri- 
ous, careless with dates and names. Even her 
habit of keeping the calling card of every 
man who gave her cate (they included Gia- 
como Puccmi as weD as an unfortunate num- 
ber of German officers) made the prosecu- 
tion’s case easy. 

“She dug her own grave," Waagenaar 
says. He first got involved in the Mata Hari 
wary when, to publicize the MGM film with 
Greta Garbo, he was asked to go to Holland 
and talk with anyone who knew the dancer 
(despite her exotic name and' appearance, 
she was pure Dutch). He found many people 
who had known her, as well as her personal 
maid, who had burned everything except two 
large scrapbooks which she gave to Waagen- 
aar. 

“When 1 started my research in 1931, I 
thought of Mata Hari as Greta Garbo. Dur- 
ing the research the Human being took shape. 
Mata Hari became a mythomamac from 
having been jost a myth." 

Waagenaar has a fSm pubHdsi’s sympa- 
thy for mythomania, and the best part of his 
book is probably not the detailed detective 
work but his description of bow she lied her 
way to the top. when he speaks of Mata 
Hari, his vokx'is full of admiring exaspera- 
tion.’ 

. “She was strong-willed, something of a 
bitch. She was a tough cookie, but as a tough 
cooki&sbe was an amazingly outgoing tough 
cookie who could wrap men around her little 
finger. 

*She was stupid, idiotic; intelligently stu- 
pid. She actually thought that anything she 
would start she could bring to a successful 
end." • • * 

She began as Margaretha Geertruida 
Zelle, bora in the town of Leeuwarden in 
IS76 (she died at 41, having been Mata Hari 
for only 12 years and 7 months). Her father 
was a hatmaker subject to /offer de grandeur 
and nicknamed .the Baron. He went broke, 
and at 18 the gjri answered a marriage adver- 
tisement placed by an officer in the colonial 
array who was older, rheumatic, brutal and, 
despite the name Rudolph MacLeod, Dutch. 
He Eater daimedthal his wife had Hat feet 
The marriage, spent mostly in the Dutch 
East Indies, went soar and by 1904 Margar- 
etha was in Paris, brche and without a 
friend. 

Within months she was the toast erf Paris. 
She first called herself Lady MacLeod and 
knew nothing of dancing but in fact per- 
formed an exotic striptease. Her “title” and 
her claim that her art was from the Far East 
made the spectacle both respectable and 

ti tillating . 

Her stage name “sun" in Malay but 

she easfiv allowed herself to be identified as 
Indian, Siamese, Javanese, Chinese and Lao- 
tian — -anything as long as it was Oriental. In 
1 934 Janet Flanner wrote of her, “Mata Hari 
was an unmental woman of mixed north and 
south blood, half Dutch, half Javanese. Both 
bloods predominated, giving ha* the benefit 
(rf neither" 

She rode daily in the Bois (she had worked 
briefly in a circus and was a fine horsewom- 
an) and gave carelessly deceitful interviews 
that even fooled Dutch journalists as well as 
the critic from The New York Herald, who 
applauded her chaste manner of revealing 
Hindu mysteries. Ambition grew and her 
social position quickly advanced: one of her 
lovers reported that she was the widow of 
Lord MacDonald, former governor of India. 

The ccnnety portrait that Waagenaar owns 
and reproduces on his book cover makes her 
look conventionally pretty, but other pic- 
tures hi his collection suggest heavy features 
and earnest exoticism. Her body was said to 
be very fine and she danced node when it 
was wrath her while. She danced twice for 
Natalie Clifford Barney, a connoisseur of 
female beauty, arriving the first time on a 
horse in a bluish haze. Either the horse was 
bine (Flanner) or Mata Hari was because of 
her scanty dress and the inc leme nt weather 
(Waagenaar). Much later, Miss Barney said 
ofhergnest: 

. “She had beauty but lacked charm. I 
didn’t think much of her as a woman or a 

tl*: highly competitive /ays of les gran- 
desharizotoalex, rite never attained top rank. 
VShe- lacked, finesse," Waagenaa r says. 
“Mata Hari has crane down in Parisian tra- 



Sam Waagenaar. 


John Sd*4b 


dilion as a great courtesan,” Flanner wrote 
in 1934. “She was noL By tradition a prewar 
great courtesan was a venal, public, pretty 
woman of enormous social influence who 
was customarily kept by a kind of cartel — 
three millionaires, or two dukes — or by one 
royalty, and who, if she knew her business 
(which she usually did), had no private fife or 
love." Mata Hari was v enal, all right, but not 
beautiful, “and of so little social influence to 
be permitted all the private life and love she 
desired.” 

As an artist. Mata Hari was such a good 
self-publicist that she was even compared in 
talent with Isadora Duncan. She made her 
way to the stage of La Scala and was really 
surprised when Diaghilev turned her down. 
In 1914 she was in Berlin for an engagement 
that was canceled by the guns of August 

For the next three years she traveled 
across the Continent looking for jobs and 
rich lovers, careless and mysterious — two 
dangerous attributes in wartime. After being 
arrested and freed by the British, who 
thought riie was a spy named Clara Benedix 
(who was never found), she went to Spain 
and, weary of languishing there, decided to 
cross France to get home to Holland. 

“She knew she was under suspicion. Only 
a megalomaniac would push her luck so far,” 
Waagenaar says. 

S HE was arrested and throughout her 
trial apparently never believed she 
might be sentenced to death. On Octo- 
ber IS, 1917 she died, with unaccustomed 
quiet elegance, before a firing squad at Vin- 
cennes, having refused a blindfold. The Lon- 


don Daily Express obi 
Dutch and Javanese and 


said she was 
learned to 


dance is Buddhist temples, while a German 
paper stated that she nad been a lady-in- 
waiting to Queen WUhdmioa. Her ex-hus- 
band resurfaced to demand half her worldly 
goods, but they were auctioned to pay the 
expenses of her trial. 

Mata Hari, says Waagenaar, has entered 
international history as **the most mythical 
and most elaborately admired spy of all 
times." 

Six films and countless television pro- 
grams have been based on his researches. “I 
don’t think there’s a thing about Mata Hari 
that I don’t know.” 

Her spying activities in effect canceled 
each other out. “She accepted money from 
both sides, but as far as we know she never 
spied for the Germans. She did give the 
French certain information, but she gave it 
to a French officer who then claimed that he, 
and not she, had got ft." 

As Natalie Barney once said in summary, 
“Mara Hari lived dangerously, died coura- 
geously. and was shot into fame." ■ 


iover 

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• 


Cafes in Paris: A Writer’s View 


by Hans Koning ; 


P ARIS — The Paris instigairai that 
most impress e d and then .seduced 
those early A merican otilcs who 
came m tbe r 1920s was doubtlessly 
the cafe The French cafe and specifically 
the Paris cafe was unique, hors concours. 

America had night chibs, bars(vcry good 
ones) and even, yes, brothels. America did 
not and does not nave cates in the real sense 
erf the word. For French and indeed most 
Continental caffes are, of course, much more 
than a spot to have a enp of Cofffeeoc a beer: 
they are places to hang out, 4o read, to look 
at people, to meet people raid itgwork. 

For poor writers and artists they are a 
haven when there is -no heat in the rented 
room, or an angry girlfriend ortuipaid land- 
lord is lying in wait; and serious writers and 
artists, are still, more often than not, poor 
(because “serious” in this context implies 
not. trying to cater to .the fads of the mo- 
ment). 

- ’In a.caffe there is privacy to work for hours 
fra the once of a coffee, a. chance to ex- 
change ideas with colleagues, a tftance to 
rechaxgC enerpes and exfiel The' doubts that 
attack the lone occupant oFan attic. .Caffes 
front as far Back as the French Revolution 
were the Welcome Wagon fqr the young and 
for the unknown freshly arriving in town, 
from Gferaxd de Nerval to Camus and from 
Hnvsmans to Picasso. Cubism and eristen- 
' tiaUrat-'wcre talked into shape in Paris caffes 
and.-so .were a wide variety of political theor - 
rfes, ;l Lis^. easy to; imagine; one single, caffe 
sbmeWherein Paris, or perhaps in Warsaw or 
m P«er^urg;(which eartyvon had caffes on 
the French model),' where at one table-Lecin 
is writing “What’s, to. Be Done?" at another 


- Chekhov is planning “The Seagull," and at a 
third Tchaikovsky is humming iq his mind 

tie opening bare of “The Nirtraudcra” 

The sad news of our 1980s, however, is 
that caffes in that true and proper sense are 
cm their way ootiAmazmgty, the Continen- 
tal caffe in -general and the Paris one in 
particular survived that mysterious spiral, or 
perhaps conspiracy is the word, of real estate 
prices multiplying ever faster. The price of 
the six square feet erf Paris in which a visitor 
drinks bis dam has ever the past decades 
gone up 10 to 20 times as fast as the price of 
the demi itself, but somehow the challenge 
has been met. 

A European tradition has. held the hne: 
very few establishments have became Amer- 
icaaized in the sease that they force you to 


order a fancy cocktail if all you want is an 
espresso, or that after 15 minutes a waiter 
comes to 


till you. get the message. It is stifl possibie to 
linger in a caffe in Europe. That, indeed, is 
precisely what you pay fra, not. for your 
order, whose price has no direct- Relation to 
its net cost., - 

1 wtt HAT vs nrimiig the caffe as a com- 
Va / mumty institution, a place fra seri- 
f? oos work and serious discussion, is 
not real relate inflation. It-is the perpetual, 
all-pervading sound of machine-produced 
rniKie, and the more or less musical sound of 
electronic war gamrs Bernard Shaw wrote 
after the invention oftbc radio, “Music after 
difflif-r is delightful, music before breakfast 
is imnaturaLrHfi was lucky enough to es- 
cape living in an epoch when there is music 
before, during and after everything. 

A newly arrived writer in Paris, clutching 
his notes, who has an image of himself or 
herself as a 1 980s Simeiion or Sartre working 


on that novel or play or thesis in the quiet, 
mirrored room of an old-fashioned caffe, will 
vainly pound the boulevards and side streets 
in search of one. 

He will not find a place where the musical 
din does not drown out the finest creative 
fancy or the sharpest political analysis. If be 
enters a caffe where nothing is heard but the 
pleasant murmur of voices and the hiss of 
the coffee machine, he'll realize once he has 
sat down that he simply happened to come in 
right between two records or tapes. (If by 
great good fortune he has entered a place 
where the music machine is out of order, he’ll 
find its role taken over by the even more 
obnoxious incursion of the beeps and bells 
‘ of video and pinball games). 

This is literally true: ft is now well-nigh 
impossible anywhere on the Continent to 
find a caffe not filled with a musical roar. 

have cringed undd^ud Muzak or^e^tec- 
shrdle thereof in a lonely outage on a Roma- 
nian mountain Uro. The last country where 
one might find the odd example of an old- 
fashioned caffe preserved is Switzerland. 
Switzerland is a country that has made Quiet 
one of its native products. 

‘So universalis this public din that a suspi- 
cion is warranted about the nervous govern- 
ments of Europe subsidizing the permanent 
concert as a means to keep young men and 
women from writing rebellious tracts such as 
used to emanate from coffee houses, and 
that they're thus efficiently silencing any 
future Lenins. But governments are not that 
perspicacious. It is more likely that the rack- 
et stems from the modern fad that it in its 
turn promotes: thoughtlessness, the absence 
■of thought ■ 

Hans Koning is a Dutch-bom American 
writer. His latest novel is ‘'The Dewitt’s War ” 
published by Pantheon in New Yak. 


Martha Graham at 90: 

The Choreography of Poetry 


The following comments were made by Martha Graham, who will be 
91 in Mom, during a recent conversation with the dance critics of The 
New York Times. The Martha Graham Dance Company is currently 
performing at the State Theater in New York. 

N EW YORK — I never discuss genius in reference to 
myself. I really don’t know what it means. I believe what 
the composer Edgard Varfesesaid to me one time when we 
were talking about genius. He said, “Martha, the difficul- 
ty is that everybody is bora with genius, but most people only keep it 
a few minutes." It r 5 the animal quality, it’s the sense of wonder, it’s 
the curiosity, the avidity foe experience, for life. And you have to eat 
it all the time; sometimes it’s bitter, sometimes it’s very sweet. 

□ 

It seems to me that choreography very often is a word behind 
which you can hide — in designs, in pattern. The necessity, the 
probing thing, the constant looking fra something is not there. 
Choreography to me is not design only, it isn’t just planning four on 
one side and six on the other. It’s a necessity of action. When you 
start with an idea, or something bits you, then you have to follow that 
through to the end, and it’s the following through to the end that 
makes the pattern. That, for me, is choreography. 

I think people love to dance, they love to move around, but when I 
ask “Why do you do that?" it’s like — well, it’s like what a girl in 
Chicago once said to Alicia Markova. She was teaching them 
“Giselle," and when the Queen of the Wilis touched another dancer, 
Alicia asked, “Why did you do that?" The dancer said, “Well, if s in 
the choreography." And Alicia said, “Well, do you know what it 
means?" And the dancer said, “Well, I was just told to bop her like 
that on her shoulder." 

□ 

There are often ideal dance bodies — no. not often, but sometimes. 
But sometimes they're so ideal that they don’t do anything. They’re 
so satisfied, like a pretty cat, you know. They stroke themselves and 
they’re satisfied and don’t have to ... to tear themselves up. The 
divine fallacy is not there. You see, when weaving 3 blanket, an 
Indian woman leaves a flaw in the weaving of that blanket to let the 
soul oat. You have to have that terrific fear, the ancestral footstep 
walking behind you. 

Dancing is just discovery, discovery, discovery — what it all 
means, the way the little bone near the ankle relates itself to the floor 
for a perfect stance, a perfect plife. 

Branch Rickey once said, “The thing I like about your dancing” — 
he didn't know a thing about dancing — “the thing I like about your 
dancing is every time you put your arm up. the ball seems to come 
right into your hand." And I thought that was the best definition Fd 
ever had. So instead of waiting for the ideal body, I wait for the 
person whose hand goes up ana the ball comes. 

□ 

I love words very much. I’ve always loved to talk, and I’ve always 
loved words — the words that rest in your mouth, what words mean 
and how you taste them and so on. And for me the spoken word can 
be used almost as a gesture. 

O 

The erotic element is life, but it doesn't have to absorb you. it 
doesn’t have to be a naughty word. It’s the love of life in many ways. 
To me, a building, if it’s beautiful, is the love of one man, he’s made it 
out of his love for space, materials, things like that. When people 
have said, “Your dances are erotic," I’ve replied that I've always 
regarded eroticism as a beautiful word. I’m not ashamed to be linked 
to it I would be ashamed to be linked to flamboyant sexuality; that's 
a part of life, but it isn’t all of it — except on Channel J. 

Y ou know, nowadays, it you’re not stark and simple the way l was 
at the beginning, you're not modem. One time Stark Young was 
asked to go and see a concert of mine. He said, “Oh, must I go? fm so 
afraid she's going to give birth to a cube on the stage.” Then he ended 
up by sending me a reliquary of a saint's robe, which I still have. 

□ 

I was brought up with money. My father’s income started the day 
he was bom, with a trust fund. His father was an immigrant 
Through all my childhood, all my education, 1 had no privation. I 
went into the Follies because my family's estate was embezzled. I had 
to work. Thank God, I had to work, and I worked hard. I cast aside 
every seduction that came my way, because I was trying, I guess, to 
do whai my father said, “You must look for the truth." 

D 

D eni shaw n influenced me very much in die handling of fabrics 
and props. I was fascinated with fabrics, I thought they were 
extremely beaulifuL I did all my own fitting and costumes, and 
things of that kind, and sewed them. 

With ‘Primitive Mysteries," I decided on a Saturday night that the 
costumes were all wrong, and. the only performance I had in a year 
was to be on Sunday night. So I went down to Delancey Street, or 
down in that area, and I bought dark blue jersey fra 1 9 cents a yard, if 
you can imagine. We came back, sewed all day, made the costumes 
and went on that night. And those are the same costumes — not the 
same dresses — but the same model that is worn today. 

I was stripping the body, but I hadn’t yet reached the point of the 
leotards. I know that I use lavish costumes now. and I know that I 

undress the men very much -—Fm perfectly aware of that— but their 
bodies are so beautiful that I see no reason not to, if (me is reticent 
and understanding. It’s not curiosity we’re after, it’s the revelation of 
beauty. 


I never set out to create a technique. I started out on the floor to 
find myself, to find what the body could do, and whst would give me 
satisfaction — emotionally, dramatically and bodily. But 1 did not 
ever dream of establishing a technique. I still can’t believe anything 
like that happened. 

Once when 1 was crossing the plains of Canada while we were 
touring I wrote in a notebook, “I know I will have subsidies someday 
but I pray that it will not be too soon." That's supreme arrogance! 

□ 

I think comedy is the most difficult thing in the world, I really do. 
One can always Lament, you know — but to laugh in the face of life, 
that's very hard. And for me the great tragedian should also be a 
great comedian. I think it was tree in the case of the tittle man with 
the big feet, Charlie Chaplin. I remember him coming back to my 
dressing room once, staying for an hour after the performance, and 
talking and talking, with his wife. He wasn’t wisecracking, he was an 
intensely serious man 

I remember in “Punch and Judy,” I had this flower and I was 
looking at Erick Hawkins's behind, not knowing whether I'd touch it 
or not touch it. I dad, and then walked right away from it. WeU, 
evidently it was extremely funny, but it was an accident, which I used 
later. 

I love comedy, you see. 1 love to play, I love funny things, I like to 
be in the middle of funny things. Fm bored with people who are 
always beating their breasts. I think you have to do what Dylan 
Thomas says, yon have to “rage against the dark. Go not lightly into 
that dark night." I think that's what comedy is, you rage against the 
dark. It takes a tittle doing, let’s put it that way. 

□ 

I have never written poetry, never. I’ve read a great deal and I can 
still say Chaucer in the old Middle English, the first part, the first few 
lines. That’s always meant a great deal to me because of the 
loveliness, the wonder of the words, and the holes in the imagery for 
you to fill in. 

Dancing is very like poetry. It’s like poetic lyricism sometimes, it's 
like the rawness of dramatic poeuy, it’s like the terror — or it can be 

Continued on page 8 



Martha Graham. 


A Rich Moment in Mexican Art 


by Marie J. Knriansky 


M EXICO CITY — The boom is 
over. The money is gone, even 
papas and paints are hard to 
come by. But the galleries and 
the museums that grew during the oil years 
of the 1970s are stiff hoe — and the artists of 
Mexico are busy. 

“This is a particularly plural moment," 
says a leading Mexican art critic, Raquel 
TlboL “It is a rich moment.” 

It was the great moralists after the revolu- 
tion of 1910, Diego Rivera. Josfe Clemente 
Orozco and David Siqueiros, who made 
Mexican painting famous around the world. 
Their pulsating morals of color and motion 
exalted the revolution and redefined the im- 
age of Mexico. 

Like the revolution, this art became insti- 
tutionalized, and was rejected by the genera- 
tion of the 1950s, many of whom refused 
commissions for state murals and turned 
abroad fra inspiration, especially to Spain. 
The 1960s generation returned to political 
activism, protesting repression by the ruling 
Institutional Revolutionary Party. 

The ail boom in the 1970s poured more 
money than ever before into art — bringing 
new markets, new galleries, a new feeling of 
freedom. That feeling of freedom reanaius. as 
do the many galleries. Only the money and 
art customers are disappearing. There are no 
dear movements, no schools. The celebrated 
groups of the 1960s have broken up. The 
individual artists have taken off in all direc- 
tions. 

Muralisn is coming back. Neo-expres- 
sionism, favored in Europe and New York, is 
strong. Also popular are abstractionism, 

isn/and photorealism — and some artists 


mix several of these dements in a angle 
work. 

The difference in generations is one source 
of diversity. Artists in their late 20s are 
developing a strong presence in the gallery 
scene, alongside the more political genera- 
tion who are now in their late 30s. The rebels 
of the 1 950s, who have always been interna- 
tionalists (19 of the most prominent showed 
in the Espace Latino-Amfericain in Paris in 
February) have grown into a respected es- 
tablishment at home. Even Rufino Tamayo, 
the great colorist who led the break from 
social murals with abstract and figurative 
invention, is still active at 86. 

B UT most of the artists have become 
individualists. “We embrace anything 
that interests us." says Francisco Cas- 
tro LeSero, 30. Most are uninterested in the 
enduring theme of the great muralists: “2 
don’t care if it’s Mexican. It is an individual 
expression." says one young sculptress, 
Lourdes Cue, wbo works with rocks and 
other natural objects. 

There are exceptions. A typical painting 
by German Venegas, 26, for example, shows 
Mexican peasants hat in hand, with a bright- 
ly colored crudfix and a fist raised in victory 
in the foreground. The Aztec imagery in the 
bright paintings of Javier Arevalo almost 
look pjre-Hispanic. But much of Mexican art 
today is a more personal view of cultural 
experience and more independent of local 
tradition than in the past. 

Some-of this independence mew with the 
livelier art scene. Artists in the 1950s worked 
under the shadow of masiers whose interna- 
tional reputation has never been equaled by 
other Mexican artists. “We had very little 
information. We were very ignorant," recalls 
the painter Tomas Parra. 'We had Orozco, 


Rivera and Siqueiros." They also had only 
three galleries and few collectors. 

Today there are more than 30 active gal- 
leries in Mexico City, and six major muse- 
ums that show contemporary art Crowds at 
the mnMiimii include peasant families in 
sandals, reverently moving from canvas 10 
canvas, with small children, mouths open, 
staring up at large abstracts. 

Art is pan of life here. “You cannot get 
away from the fact that they are still doing 
pots in the markets the way they have for 
thousands of years," Helen Escobedo, a 
sculptress and former director of the Mexico 
City Museum of Modem Art, said. “ Mexi- 
cans who are aware of their history know 
that whatever they are doing in their’ art has 
an equivalent on the streets." 

The economic crisis that began at the end 
of 1982 has hit artists as hard as everyone 
dse. There are few Mexicans now with mon- 
ey to collect art, which is a severe blow to the 
young who have not established foreign rep- 
utations. 

Almost no art supplies are made in Mexi- 
co, and imports are restricted. A No. I New- 
ton & Windsor drawing pencil can cost the 
peso equivalent of $21 Jan Hendrix, a trans- 
planted Dutch artist, is trying to find invest- 
ment from Holland to start local production 
of quality paper, which he now has to cany 
in personally from Europe. 

Even well-established artists are selling 
less. Escobedo blames the economic crisis 
for the cancellation for lack of financing of 
five different commissions in Mexico in the 
past two years. She is looking abroad and is 
currently working on a large public sculpture 
in Jerusalem. She has also bran “inventing" 
her own commissions, working with a pho- 
tographer. Paoli Gori Her cardboard sculp- 

Continued on page 8 







TRAVEL 


DOONESBUKY 





BNTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


AUSTRIA 




•Music du Louvre (tel: 2603934). 
EXHIBITIONS — To April 15: “He 


VIENNA,Musikv«eia(leI: 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS— April 7and8: Vienna 


Sympboniker, Leopold Hager conduc- 
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April 10: New Chamber E n semble, 



Ronald Singm- conductor. Maretke 
Wormsbacha violin (Beethoven). 
April 1 1 : Vienna Sympboniker, Stan- 
islaw Skrowaczewski conductor. 
Grant Johannesen {nano (Ravel, Sho- 
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•Staatsoperftd; 53240). 

BALLET — April 8: “The Sleeping 
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OPEkA — April 6: “Faust” (Gou- 
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April 7 and 10: “Parri/aT (Wagner). 
April 9: "La Traviau" (Verdi). 
•Volisoper (td: 53240). 

OPERA— April 7 and 9: “H Bar biere 
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OPERETTA— April 6 and 12: “The 
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HELSINKI. Finlandia Hall (tel: 
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CONCERTS — April II: Helsinki 
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_'AL — April 9: Janne Marttila 

i- violin (Brahms, Mozart). 


EXHIBITIONS— To April 15: “Hol- 
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To May 6: “French Engravers of the 
18 th Century.” 

•Mus6edn Petit Palais(tel: 742.03.47). 
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•New Morning (tel: 5233 1 .41). 


PRANCE 


JAZZ — April 6: LaManigua. 
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PARIS, Berggrnen Gallery (tel: 
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EXHIBITION —To April 30: “Cub- 
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•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 
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EXHIBITIONS —To April 27: “Ar- 
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April 12: Eric BftUGicupe. 

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OPERA— April 8 and 1 l:“WGZzeck" 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 


ENGLAND 


BIRMINGHAM, Birmin gham Hip- 
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The Royal Ballet — April 8-11: 
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ley, Stravinsky). “A Month in the 
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LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
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Barbican An Gallery — To April 14: 
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Barbican Hall — April 6: London 
Concert Orchestra, Robert Ziegler 
conductor, Ann Mackay soprano 
(Bach. Handel). 




m 



9 M 

fiA'jt 

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April 7: Academy of Ancient Music, 
Cans top her Hogwood conductor. 


Emma Kirkby soprano (Handel). 
April 8: London Symphony Orchestra 
Peter Schkkde conductor (Bach). 
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Vile m Tausky conductor (J. Strauss). 
•Hayward Gallery (leL 92837.08). 
EXHIBITIONS —To April 21 : “Re- 
noir," “John Walken Paintings from 
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•London Coliseum (tel: 836.01. 1 1). 
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(Beethoven). 


“Noble Horseman,' 



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EXHIBITION — To May 22: “Court 


EXHIBITION — To Ma 
Through In dian Miniature 


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To May 10: “Image and Science.” 
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Aprfl 11: “TheBarteredBride” (Sine- •Galerie James Mayor (tel: 


tana). 

•Royal Opera(td; 240.10.66). 
OPQlA — April 6. 9, 12: “Don Carlo' 


326.6034). 

EXHIBITION — To April 20: “Li 

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(Verdi). •Libranic-Galerie du Jour (tel: 233. 

April 8 and 1 1 : “D Barhicrcdi SiviglLT 43.40). 


(Rossini). 


•Tate Gallery (tel: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To April 14: “St. 
Ives 1939-64" 

To June 2: "The Political Paintings of 
Meriyn Evans(]9JO-]973). 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 


EXHIBITION — To April 20: “Jean- 
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Inseum (td: 


April 12: william Gregg Hunter. 
•Miridien Hold t td: 758. 1230). 
JAZZ — To April 14: Eddie “Lock- 


GERMANY 


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EXHIBITIONS —To April 14: “Mi- •Musfe cTArtet Essai (tel: 2603926). 
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To June 9: “The People and Places of «Mus6e de la Publicity (td: 246. 


Constantin 
dec. Count 


VatercolorsbyA 
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si: 93531.41). 


L ton Redon.” 

Places of «Mus6e de la Publicity (td: 246. 
:byAma- 13.09). 

82)." EXHIBITION — To April 15: 

H). .. “French Film Posters” 


•Wigmore Hall (td: 93531.41). “French Film Posters ” 

RECITALS — April 7 and 9: Colin •Mus6e du Grand Palais (tel: 


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26134.10V 


April 8: Raymon Cohen violin. EXHIBITIONS — To April 15: 
Anthya Rael piano (Beethoven). “Edouard Pignon.” 


AntnyaKaei] 
April 10: G 
chord (Bach). 


Malcolm 


pa- To April 22: “Impre 
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TO May 1; 
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Vladimir Ddrrwn conductor (Mus- 


■Salle Pleyd (563.0736). 

RECITALS — April 11: Darnel Bar- 
enboim piano (Beethoven). 

April 15: Isaac Stem violin. 

•Tbefitre des Champs ElysAes (td: 
723.47.77). 


RECITAL — April lOt Paul Tortelier 
cello, Maria de la Pau piano (Bach, 
Tortelier). 

GENOA, Teatro Margheriia (tel: 
58.93.29). 

OPERA — April 9 and 11: “Aida” 
(Verdi). 

MILAN. Padiglione d'Arte Ccmtem- 
poranea(tel: 78.46.88). 
EXHIBITIONS —To April 28: “Afra 
and Tobia Scarpa: ardmects and de- 
signer” “The Imaginary and the 
Real: Paolo De Poll, Candidi Fior, 
Toni Zuccheri.” 

• Teatr o Regio (td: 54.80.00). 
OPERA — April 9 and 1 1 : “TancredT 
(Rossini). 

VENICE Ca* Vendramin Caiogi (td: 


70.99.09). 

EXHIBITION —To May 19: “Figu- 
rative Japanese Art: 1873-1964.” 


JAPAN 


TOKYO. Azabu Museum (tel: 
582.14.10). 

EXHIBITION —To April 28: “Mas- 
terpieces of Ukiyo-E Panning." 
•Idemitsu Art Galtaytyd: 21 331.1 1). 
EXHIBITION — To June 2: “Land of 
Civilizations, Turkey.” 

•Japan Folk Craft Museum (td: 


467.45.27). 

EXHIBITION — To June 23: “Crafts 


of North Eastern Districts.” 
•National Musumof Modem Art (tel: 
2140531). 

EXHIBITION — To May 6: “Shiko 
Mnnakata.” 


CONCERTS— April 10 and II: Or- 
chestra National de France, Kurt 
Sanderling conductor, Stephen Bish- 
op-Kovacevicfa piano (Branms, Tchai- 
kovsky). 

April 12: New Philharmonic Orches- 
tra Emil Tchakarov conductor, Nata- 
lia Gutman cello (Berlioz, Schumann). 
•Thefitre Musical de Paris (lei: 
261.19.83). 

BALLET — Maurice Bijart 20th Cen- 
tury Ballet — April 7. 9-1 1: “Noire 
Faust” (Bach). 


MONACO 


8: “The Sanguine Fan" fflynd, Elgar), 
“Don Quixote Pas de Deux" (Petipa, 
Minims). “Sphinx” (Tetley, Martinu), 
“Etudes” (Lander, Riisagrr). 

April7: “La Sylphide” (Schaufuss. Lo- 
venslgold). 

•Salle Gamier (td: 50.7634). 
CONCERT— April 12: 1 Musid(Cb- 
relli, Vjvaldi). 

•Thifltre Princesse Grace (tel: 
50.7634). 


, BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (lei: 
341.44.49). 

BALLET— April 9: “Cqppflia” (De- 
; libes). 

April 11: “Las Hennanas” (MacMil- 
lan, Martin). 

4 OPERA— April 8: “Siegfried” (Wag- 
. ner). 

April 6: “Die Zauberfldte” (Mozan). 

. April 12: “Ftddio” (Beethoven). 

•phfl bann onie(td: 54880). 
e CONCERTS — April 6: Berlin Sym- 
phoay Orchestra Borislav Ivanov con- 
ductor (Beethoven. Dvorak). 

^ April 7 and 8: Berlin Radio Symphony 
“I Orchestra, Mstislav Rostropovich 
| conductor (Beethoven). 

[ April 12: Berlin ffiflfcm ncmk: Ontites- 
-J era. Zoltan Pesdo conductor (Bach. 
Mozart). 

•SchlossCbariouenbuxg(td: 3201-1). 
EXHIBITION — To May 25: “An- 
| wine Watteau.” 

■ COLOGNE, Oper -der Stadt (id: 
2125.81). 

■ OPERA — April 7: “Madama Butier- 
■ fly”(Pucdru)- 

I Aiml 8: “Lohengrin” (Wagner). 

! April 12: “Carmen” (Bizet). 

• HAMBURG. Staatsoper (tel: 


RECITAL — April 6: Henriate 
Gartner piano (Debussy, Haydn). 


ROTTERDAM, De Doclen (tel: 
14J29.il). 

CONCERTS— April 1 1 and 12: Rot- 
tadam Philharmonic Orchestra. Alex- 
ander Rahhari conductor, Theo Bru- 
ins piano, Michel Roche cello 
(Stravinsky, Wagner). 


PorruGAL 


ESTORIL Casino (td: 268.45 
EXHIBITION— To April 9: “Ceram- 
ics National Exhibition.” 


LISBON. CaJouste Gulbenkian 
Foundation (td: 733131). 
BALLET— April 10-22: Gulbenkian 
Ballet (“Five Tangos.” “Ghost 
Dances'). 

CONCERTS — April 11 and 12: Gul- 
bcoJtian Orchestra, Michi Inoue con- 
ductor. Yosuko Horigone violin (De- 


vea. Mozart). 

•St. Caries National Theater (ieh 
36B44W). 

OPERA —April 8 and 10: “Cosi fan 
tuite” (Mozart). 


SCOTLAND 


EDINBURGH. National Gallery (tel: 
55639.21). 

EXHIBITION — To April 28: “The 
Face of Nature: Landscape Drawings 
from the Permanent CBuectioa.” 
•Usher Hall (td: 228.1 135). 


CONCERT — April 12: Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra, Neeme Jfirvrconduc- 


tional Orchestra, Neeme Jarviconduc- 
t or. Rada Lupu piano (Brahms. Wag- 
ner). 


NEW YORK. Guggenheim Museum 
(tel: 36035.00). 

EXHIBITION —To ApriUl: “Fran- 
kemhakr on Paper: A Retrospective, 
1950-84.” 


•Metropolitan Museum of Art (td; 
535.77 m 

EXHIBITIONS — To .April 14: “The 


To Sep 1 . 1: “Man and the Horae." 
•Museum' of Modern Art 


fid: 708.94.00). 

EXHIBITIONS— ToMay 14i “Henri 
Matisse.” 

To June 4; “Henri Rousseau.” 


Bean Soup on the Giamps-Elysees ^el ; 


P ARIS — Somewhere along the line, 
they decided it was time to turn the 
gastronomic tables and offer the 
Preach a real taste of America. 

So Leon I ianiHcs. owner of Manhattan’s 
Coach House Restaurant, flew into Paris 
recently with a suitcase full of Maryland 
lump crab meat. Great Lakes golden caviar 


The response was enthusiastic. “The black 
bean soup was extraordinary, full of imagi- 


nation, you'd never find anything quite like 
tins in France,” declared Edgar Lutz, head of 
reception for the Plaza Ath£n6e. 

The young French chefs in the kitchen 
were just as curious and enthusiastic as their 
clientele. “I just never imagined you could 
make a soup out of Mack brans — this gives 
me all sorts of ideas,” said Pascal Contastiix, 
an astonished young French chef who was 
assigned to cook the golden crab cakes under 
the watchful eye of Lianides. 

Oubexta’s head chef, Jean-Michel B6dier, 
appeared unruffled as die French and Amer- 
ican teams worked in mmiwn preparing two 
totally different sorts of cuisine. Trays of 
com sticks and pecan pies sat next to the 
craleful of wild pleurotte mushrooms or 
plates of ravioli filled with fok gras and 
truffles. 

The Coach House owner seemed stunned 
by the whole affair, an event that he and 
Richard had discussed for some tune, but 
one he never imagined would materialize. 

There were, of course, a few snags along 
the -way, bat hone so serious that Lianides 
and his American assistant, Christopher 
Cannon, couldn’t cope. Thw came prepared, 
with bottles Of com syrop for the pecan pie 
and. cast-iron pans for the sizzling cam 
slides. They did riot anticipate the Crisco 
crisis, however. 


Patricia Wells 


To May 1: “From the Secular to tbe 


and Minnesota wfld rice, which he prepared 
for diners at Cbiberta, the Mkhehn two-star 
restaurant just off the Champs-Hys^es. . 

l iani des came at the request of Chiberta’s 
owner, Louis Nod Richard, a Coach House 
admirer who decided it was high time he 
introduce his customers to American food 
and wine. 

So for three evenings, black bean soup and’ 
UspetUspani demeOsckauds — better known' 
as hot com sticks — shared the spotlight 
with Chiberta’s nouvefle-inspired emsine. 


Many ^ jh e^r ^ auranfs regnlat &ters 


<»ach case guests wcb£ given a choice between 
tbe regular Ghibdrta menu and' tbe five- 
course Coach Hcuse dinner.. Each evening 
about half of the 80 or so diners, most of 
them French, opted for the American mean 
— costing about 450 francs ($45) a person 
with service and served with a selection of 
Robert Mondavi wines from California.' 


“In New York, we always make our ; conr. 
s ticks with vegetable shortening, you get a 
lighter batter. But we never ima g ine d we. 
couldn't find Crisco in France,” said Lian- 
ides. ' “ — 

The first night they tried substituting palnr 
oil and came up with a greasy, tasteless 
affair. When they switched to clarified but- 
ter, the results improved, and so butter it - 
was. ■ ' -■ 

The event, of course, attracted a number ■ 
of American enatriates in search of famfliar 
flavors. Elena Prentice, an A m eri c a n painter' 


CoHfc 


Mp - “‘.Z t--' ■ ! 
— .... rr'.' 






who moved to Paris from Boston 17 years 
ago, said she found the meal pleasingly evoc- 
ative of her childhood. 






“But I know how hard it is for the French, 
to react to this food,” she said. “After all, so 
much of what we love about food comes 
from memories of certain taste and tex- 
tures, mingled with experiences of tbe past.” 
She found tbe elegant Chiberta presentation 

a procession ot small courses, a sampling 

of everything — particularly appealing. 

Richard of Cbiberta said that the warm 
reception for the Coach House fare was his 
^ fmai to scout for another American chef. 
He may just decade that cast-iron com stick 
pans look fine next to those shiny copper 
casseroles. ■' 


V ... I-.’?-— - 








. © 1985 The New York Tima 




Martha Graham 




Continued from page 7 


vjul'&K:- \ 
’’ ■■ - " 

:&&S r -T: 

If ' r ~' 4 - 


like a torible revelation trf meaning. Because 
when you light on a word it strikes to your 
heart 

I have probably used words in some of my 
works because dance wouldn’t do what I 
wanted it to. I probably employ words in 
trying to augment that 
But I have used words in my new work, 
“Song of Songs” because I dunk they are 
beautiful in themselves. It could be done 
without them, yes, but to me, it wouldn’t be 
quite the same. 

D 


have you to do that? You have to have 
speech, and it’s a cultivated speech. And in 
that sense, I think, I use gods and goddesses. 
O • 


I twig to think of being called an achiever 
because it seems so finite to me, that fve 


finished everything. I always say when they 
ask me if my work wfll live, “Don’t ask me 
that. Ask the audience, you’re my judges. 


wfll live, “Don’t ask me 


And the critics are my judges, I leave it up to 
you.” 

□ 


Hindemith was commissioned by Mrs. 
Elizabeth Sprague Coobdge through the li- 
brary of Congress to write “Herodiade” for 
me. This was during the war and he was up ai 
Yale and couldn't travel. So I wen tup to see 
him, talk to him. Fd ceyer met him. 

He sat at the piano, and he had the idea of 
“Herodiade” in mind. He looked at me the’ 
whole time as he sat at the piano and played. 
He never took his eyes off me. I had to go 
back to New York mat day from Mew Ha- 
ven, and by the time I got home the phone; 
was rinsing. It was Mis. Hindemith. She'' 


3*r S-V/- r:.V 


To me, the body says what words cannot I 
believe that dance was the first art A philos- 
opher has said that dance and architecture 
were the two first arts. I believe that dance 
was first because it’s gesture, it's communi- 
cation. That doesn’t mean that it’s telling a 
story, but it means it’s communicating a 
feeling, a sensation to people. 

Dance is the hidden language of the soul. 


I’ve relaxed my feelings about other com- 


of the body. And it’s partly the language that 
we don’t want to show. Auden says, ‘“We all 
have these places where shy humiliations 
gambol on sunny afternoons.” We all have 
these shy humiliations, and sometimes we do 
something in dance — a movement that’s 
awkward, rough, not complete in itself. And 
with me. it's a deliberate use. 


MONTE CARLO, Centre de Coogrts 
(tel: 50.7634). 

RECITAL — April 9: Frederica von 
Siade mezzo-soprano. Lanrana Mil 
cbdmorepUno. _ • 

•Opera House (Id: 50.7634). . « 

London Festival Ballet — April 6 and 


I don't believe in imitating the street on 
the stage. Why should you go m off the street 
iand see tbe street on the stage? I believe 
^you’re gditig in& see gods and goddesses — 
although they may be Bitches and vixens and 
terrors — but at least you see a human being. 
That does not decry what electricity- and 
electronics do today. Actually, the body’s 
very like a computer. It has a memory bank, 
an enormous memory bank. 

When r speak of having gods and goddess- 
es on stage, it's not because I think they are 
perfect. Have you read about Hera and Zeus 
and some of their carryings-on? They were 
not what 1 would call moral. One is looking 
for the glorified being one would like to be, 
good or bad, and sometimes tbe more flam- 
boyant, the more attractive or repellent it is. 

I use the words gods and goddesses princi- 
pally. J think, to mean beautiful bodies — 
bodies that are absolute instruments. And I 
believe in discipline, I believe in a very defi- 


Anitwl hy nl |^ iT tymipapi«j|, Rather, it fc tfrat 

we lack the time, space and money to insure 
that they are done well To me, the only sin is 
mediocrity. Om teachers and rehearsal di- 
rectors are asked everywhere, but our own 
needs must be paramount. I would allow it if 
I could have the supervision, or someone 
from me would have it I wouldn't take it 
myself. 

But there are problems. When we toured 
the Middle East the last time, we were in 
Cairo. Three weeks after we left there, some- 
one put up a shingle saying, “Martha Gra- 
ham Dance taught here.* So that's what you 
meet all over the world, you meet it any- 
place. But how can you combat it? You can 
combat it verbally, but you don’t want law- 
suits on your hands — although there are, 
one or two things I would like to make a. 
lawsuit over. ,T * 


The music for “Oytemnestra’* was made 
sort of to order by Halim EI-Dabh ttfifle T 
was doing it, and for dances like “Night 
Journey'' with William Schuman, and those 
with Gian Carlo Menotti and Norman DeDo 
Joio, I gave them a kind of script in winch I 


was rin g in g , it was Mrs. HmactniitL anr 
said. “Are you all right? I think we were too 
strong for you.” I said, “You almost were. I- 
alznost fainted, I felt so weak.” It was the' 
energy of tbe man. Fve very seldom felt that 
energy. 

He brought me the score, and I remember' 
which door he came to at 66 Fifth Avenue 
ver^ wdL He had said, “It wfll be there at 
noon on Wednesday.” I said, “Well, if it’s a 
day or two later, an hour or two later, you 
just let me know.” He said, “It will be there, 
at noon on Wednesday.” At noon on 
Wednesday, the door knock came and he; 
gave me the score. I said how moved I was" 
and 'said, “Oh, what will happen if 1 fafl?” He 
said, “Then, I wfll write you another piece.” , 

They didn’t like what I did to his moac^ 
Mrs. Hindemith particularly. She said^ 
“Where are the bottles of perfume that, 
you're supposed to be pasring in front of? 
Where is the leopard on the stage?” She said, 
^ou didnT consuli the composer at all 
abont,]thi&” I s*u4 ‘Why* it never occurred, 
to ipc to consult the composer about the 
choreography-” WdL tins upset her no end,. 

. ' ■ ' O 


Joio, J gave them a land ot script m wmen i 
would sav, “This dance should be about five 
minutes lonjz,” “Thar one is a duet.” But I 


minutes long,” “Thar one is a duet.” But I 
never gave counts for anybody. I don’t give 


nite technique. You have no right to go 
before a public without an adequate tech- 


before a public without an adequate tech- 
nique, just because you fed. Anything feds 
— a leaf feels, a storm feds — what right 


counts. ..*• 

When I use a ready-made score, ! play it 
and I get to know it very wdl. Then T usually 
do the dance completely without tbe mu s i c. 
Bnt I am always conscious of the music as I 
work, and of the mood of the dance, the 
movements of the dance. - 
I do not interpret the music. That’s why I 
could never do a symphony or a sonata or 
something like that T fed the music inter- 
prets itself, it speaks its own language. 


I don’t try totell the dancer exactly what a 
dance means before they do it I can correct 
it and teQ them what they have done after 
they have done it and what it means to me. ■ 
But I don’t say, “Be fearful here,” “Be angry 
here,” because I think that’s intrusion. 

( said to some of the men the other day, 
“Listen, we’re just bade from Florence and 
you’re beautiful young men. But please don't 
bring Michadangelo’s David into tins studio ■ 
with you. I don’t want it” They understood 
what I meant you know. We talk very frank- 


; very frank- 


ly, very frankly. I want them to go on, you • 
see, I want every door opened. 1 want them: 
not fearful of experience. But of course may- - 
be that’s the worst tiring I could wish for' 
them. ■ 


© 1985 The New York Tima 


Mexican Art Today 


Continued from page 7 


tures, built to scale and set against his photo- 
graphs of urban sites, are photographed to 
create the illusion of a full-size work at the 
site. 

Prosperity broke up the groups of the 
1970s, such as Proceso Pentagano, which 
believed in collective work, especially post- 
ers and other public projects for political 
causes. The collectivists were lured into lu- 
crative individualism by a growing market 

Some of these artists have stopped work- 
ing, but others have remained active artisti- 
cally and politically. Carlos Aguirre, 37, and 
Iris wife, Rowena Morales, 36, are exhibiting 
this spring in Mexico's Museum of Modern 
Art. 

Morales, who rejects the label feminist bnt 


Inna Palacios’ rough- textured abstracts in 
rich coppers and chocolate earth tones re- 
mind ho - of tbe countryside beyond the 
dty*svast valley. Hendrix is trying to form a 
school of landscape artists. 


Belkins has grown to be a master moralist, 
doing heroic walls with his powerful geomet- 
ric figures set against pnotoreaHst back-' 
grounds. 


MuraEsm, fostered by state commissions, 
is undergoing a revival. In 1948, when most 
other artists were rejecting muralism, Arnold 
Belkins, a 16-year-old Canadian, arrived 
here to study mural techniques under Siquei- 
ros. While be rejected the formalism and 
dogmatism that Mexican art was acquiring. 


He has just finished a commission for the 
university at Iztapalapa, and is beginning a 
mural depicting man’s triumph over fascism ' 
and striving for peace on the interior wall of 
a school founded by Spanish Republican 
refugees. 


“I don’t see why one should not paint 
Utopia," he says. ■ 


whose constant theme is women, paints tap- 
estries with recurrent motifs: flowers, birds, 
butterflies and hearts suggesting the shapes 
of the female body. Aguirre's collages of 




documents explore the parallels between the 
2914 U.S. intervention in Mexico and cur- 
rent U.S. policy in Central America. 

The younger artists have been greatly in- 
fluenced by the 1950s generation, as in the 
carefully textured oils of Francisco Toledo, 
the surrealistic illusions of Pedro Friedeberg 
and the finely brushed expressionism of Gfl- 
berto Aceves Navarro. 

Some critics say it is unfair to talk of neo- 
expressionism in Mexico, since expression-, 
ism has always been a strong dement from 
Orozco to Aceves Navarro to such young 
painters as the four Castro Le&ero brothers, 
all of whom express themselves in powerful 
brushed oil on canvas. 

Alberto Castro Le&ero leans toward figu- 
rative painting. Jos6 uses dements erf pop art 
and photorealism- Miguel paints passionate- 
ly colored abstracts. Francisco works in 
grays with bumps of charcoal on large grim 
canvases that try to express what has hap- 
pened to life in one of .the world’s most 
polluted cities. 

The Mexican art scene is highly central- 
ized, and most Mexican artists live in this 
crowded city of Undrinkable water, brownish 
gray air, unfinished constmction like open 
wounds and 16 ntilEon people. 

Some, like Escobedo, try to evoke it, as in 
her drawing of a cityscape of crucifixes or a 
collage of photos of the darkening city, 
called “How to Make a Gty Disappear in 
Three Acts.” Others prefer to flee tne city. 



.**4-0 


"CondotnirtiO ias Hijas de Berlioz ; ” by p^dr 


i 


a- 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


TRAVEL 


wardly Mobile 


In Venice, a Battle for Cultural Capital 


by Roger Co Bis 


ISS^cte d 


*4 pleaa »siy&, 

; WditUforu^, 

1. She said. 

?b®a ffif *5 

“fences 5, 

»mall courses*?^ 

VMdS 
!“» said Ih»f ,r 
oacb House f^Ns 

:1 10 “«>se shi^ 
•w^v-rtr*. 1 


:«2S5« 

cavel.SoH^ lu ^ 

J nev er met hha * 

io aud he had theta, 

* d - He located 
at the piano and H 
i>es off me. f J?" 
that day from 
te I got home the ^ 
s Mre. Hindemhft 

You almoiiftwi 
! « so u-eafc," I, 

'■ ve very seldom fekte- 


I N thebegiiming you had the inflight 
movie, elevator music on the sound 
channels and those earphones with lit- 
tle plugs that used to bore their way 
i into your Drain. But as airlines coavert their 
outdated film equipment to video and install 
hi-fi systems with electronic headsets, in- 
flight entertainment is coming of age both as 
apowerful new advertising medium and an 
important contender in the passenger service 
stakes. - 

Airline passengers, who have little else to 
do except twirl their drinks, are the ad man’s 
dream of the ultimate captive audience. (Be- 
ing upwardly mobile in a literal as wdl as 
r < demographic sense means that they can’t go 
io the refrigerator for a beer when the com- 
mercials come on.) And video technology 
has opened a world of new. possibilities (or 
sponsored programs, from destination films 
to the latest news. Prototypes already exist 
lor individual video screens in the back of 
seats. And even live inflight broadcasting is 
technically possible, 

hi 10 years time, there may be more peo- 
ple watching films in the air than on the 
ground, according to Duncan Hilary, a di- 
rector of The Cameo Network, a London- 
based firm that supplies sponsored screen 
entertainment for a Amen international air- 
r <_ lines. About 10 million people a month pres- 
endy watch inflight films, Hilary says, and 
this may grow to 100 million before the end 
of the decade. His prediction is based on an 
International Air Transport Association es- 
timate that the number of passengers carried 
by commercial airlines wdl double from 60 
million to 120 milBrin a month within this 
time, and the expectation that video pro- 
grams will be shown on short- as well as 
long-haul flights. 

.Unless it takes a new Broadway show 
aboard, or at least screens a new release, an 
airline is hardly likely to sell more seats 
because of its inflight entertainment. But 
airlines are discovmng that high-quality 
customized programs, along with cuisine, 
seat configuration, decor and other cabin 
amenities, can help to emphasize its individ- 
uality and reinforce the image it is trying to 
k , promote. 

Whether or not an. airline exploits this 


« score, and I rem«% 
e to ai 66 Fifth Avq* 
■aid, “It will be thereg 
>’■" I said. “WduJ, 
i hour or two bier v® 

* said. “It will be Jk 
nesday." At noon e 
or knock came and 
said how moved 1 a* 
will happen if 1 fair ft 
Tite you another pro' 
vbai i did to his mi 
>anicularlv. She ad, 
Miles of pedum: fa 
be passing in from if 
on the sta^cT* Shesat 
It the composer a i*\ 
‘Why. it aster occur: ir 
je composer about i 
1, this upset her no mi 
D 

tr dancer eweth «hati 
they do it 1 can ccms 
it they have done afe 
id what it means tone 
fearful here." “Be a® 
tk that's minion, 
the men the other dr. 
ack frem Flwtnttai 
ig men. But pleasedoal 
's David into this stab 
Qt it." Thev underevfld 
ow. Wetaikvoy&ni- 
utt them to soon, w 
yr opened. 1 *ans to® 
nee. Butofcourseon- 
thing l could fe 

Vf* IV't Ti 


, be a master R"* 
ist photorealis 

pa, ana vs 
sui™p bo ” r S 

“spS> 

OT e should* I 


into malang programs, when Lameo started 
in April 1983, the concept was to rent tite 
screen from the airline and pay it a propor- 
tion of the revenue, Hilary says. “Bui what 
we do now is to produce a program with the 
auiine and retain all revenue until the agreed 
cost of the production is covered. Thereafter 
wc split the revenue 50/50.” 

' This means that an airline can efrher'get 
its entertainment free of charge or a tat 
check. But accoiding to Hilary, most of the 
major airlines “go Quite a long way down the 
entertainment road” For example. Cameo 
spends about $1 milli on a year with KLMon 
“total programming.” ;. 

* Inflight ent^ammem began in the 1960s, 
) when airlines first made deals with film dis- 
tributors to screen movies. Hus was gradual- 
ly followed by music on audro channels and 
evcntually spoxii programs. In "the eaWy 
days, advertising was hunted to a few min- 
utes of “back-to-back” commercials just be- 
fore the main feature film. 

In March 1980, a 10-minute sponsored 
magazine program made .by the New York- 
based Transglobal Films was first. tested on 
American Airlines, according to Joan Li- 
cursi, a vice president of Transgjobal, which 
is now the largest company producing in-., 
flight screen entertainment. “World on Pa- 
rade” was so well received by passengers that, 
by mid-1981 it was being shown by 15 major 
UJSL domestic and international airlines, in- 
ducting Pan Am, TWA, SAS, Lufthansa and 
British Airways. One of the first of the pro- 
grams, which every month, was a 

qredal produced by Wilkinson Sword on the 
wedding of Britain's Prince Charles and 
v Lady Diana Spencer in July 1981. 
f t Aniines started converting to video about 
three.years ago. Acconting to Cameo, three 
of its clients, Eastern Airimes, British Cale- 
donian and UTA, are still using film, bid 
plan to convert shortly. Licursi says that Pan 
Am and TWA stittcany a high percentage of 
film as they undergo their “retrofits,” or 

refurbishment. 

Tiransgjobal, she sayss is contracted to 
prodnee video films for British- Airways 
starting in May 1985. Air France plans to 
start a three-year conversion of its long-haul 
fleet in July. Swissair is introducing video on 


giant 16mm cassettes. These are limited to a 
maximum 128 minutes playing time (which 
is why yon sometimes puss the joiev parts of 
a long movie) and cannot be changed by the 
cabin crew during the flight. Video is stored 
in random access cassettes which can be 
changed or run on at any time. This allows 
the screening of same-day news, “what's on ” 
destination films, documentaries and “wel- 
come aboard" features, as well as the movie. 
There’s no limit to the amount of video that 
can be rum raising the question of how much 
is too much for the beleaguered traveler. 

So far, airlines are bang fairly sensible. 
For example, Cathay Pacific, one of Cam- 
eo’s clients, shows a one-hour documentary 
(a different version for inbound and out- 
bound flights) with four minutes of advertis- 
ing, on sectors of three to six hours. On 
sectors of six to nine hours, there’s a movie 
with another four minutes of ads. And on 
longer rectors, both of these films are shown. 

Whatever they think of the programs, pas- 
sengers don’t seem to be turned off by the 
advertising. According to Hilary, commer- 
cials for up-market products have an average 
recall of .83 percent compared with 23 per- 

Airline travelers 
are the ultimate 
captive audience. 


cent for television. Although inflight ads are 
five times more expensive than television in 
terms of cost per thousand (a one-minute ad 
on Cathay costs 57,000 a month for a poten- 
tial audience of 100,000) advertisers are able : 
- io target a group that only represents 10 1 
percent of the TV audience. “The efficiency ; 
of this medium is phenomenal,” Hilary says, j 

A survey carried out last October among ! 
35 international airlines by the World Air- 
line Entertainment Association seems to 
show that audio entertainment is at least as 
popular as video. On flights where only au- 
dio was available 82 percent of passengers 
took headsets compared with 62 percent 
with video alone. With combined audio and 
visual rhann^k 68 percent look headsets. 

Until about three years ago, most airlines 
took their audio entertainment off the shdf 
from the hardware suppliers. But today they 
are turning to specialized producers of cus- 
tomized sponsored programs, speech as well 
as music. Inflight Kamo, a London-based 
production company, claims to have been 
first in the field, two years ahead of the 
United States, with a speech program for 
Laker Airways in 1979, followed the same 
year by British Caledonian. It protides pro- 
grams for about 10 airlines, including KLM, 
Cathay Pacific and Virgin Atlantic. 

“We offer a complete package, totally un- 
derwriting the cost of production in return 
for the right to sell advertising," says Doug- 
las Moflitt, a professional broadcaster and 
founder-director of Inflight Radio. “We 
have a higher proportion of sponsored chan- 
nels on British Caledonian titan any other 
airtine to my knowledge. What this means to 
the consumer is that revenue is ploughed 
bade into making higher quality programs.” 

British Caledonian offers 1 1 programs on 
its audio channels, which are changed every 
two months. They include classical, country 
and rode music as well as comedy and a one- 
hour report for business travelers. 

Moffztt foresees Hve broadcasti ng in the 
next five years. “Since the majority of long- 
haul flights land in London between 6 AM. 
and 9J0 AM, you could beam up a signal to 
the plane and produce a half-hour rolling 
news program of weather, news, sport, 
what’s on, traffic conditions and so on, he 
says. 

But the most exciting innovations in in- 
flight entertainment are being pioneered by 
upstart airlines like Virgin Atlantic, which 
makes imag inative: use of screen and sound 
as part of its groovy image. It shows the 
latest rode videos and even live acts on about 
a third to ahalf of its flights. According to 
one Virgin executive, Hugh Band, musi cia ns 
and other entertainers are welcome to audi- 
tion. If they pass, they are expected to work 
their passage in exchange for free seals. 

.. .London Express Aviation, a new airline 


by EJ. Dionne Jr. 

V ENICE — The weather varies 
these days from delightfully clear 
and crisp to a bone-chilling damp 
cold. On weekdays the locals can 
bustle across St. Mark’s Square without re- 
sorting to the fcign-lcft, move-right maneu- 
vers through summer crowds who dog up 
the piazza Eke so many tackles and defensive 
ends. 

Even Sl Mark’s Church got dressed up for 
winter; Smack in the middle, covering the 
main doorway, workmen have constructed a 
plain wooden enclosure so they can get on 
with their task of restoration, safe from the 
winds that whip off the Grand CanaL 
The restoration at the church is but one of 
a series of signs that beneath Venice’s pre- 
sent peace and quiet there is a a Iona of 
cultural revival going on. What is happening 
is at times dramatic. But for the most part, 
people here see it as a slow comeback from a 
somnolent period in the late 1960s and early 
1970s when the city of canals threatened to 
became merely a Disneyland for tourists. 

But the ritys current cultural drive is not 
without controversy, and the arguments go- 
ing on here echo a broader cultural debate 
around (he country. The disagreements re- 
late to the role of local government in Italy’s 
cultural life, to the cultural influence of the 
political left — particularly the Communist 
Party — and to Italy's lack of a cultural 
center. 


T HIS extraordinary decentralization of 
artistic life and just about everything 
else in Italy is a key to understanding 
why Venice can bid to become an important 
center of the arts. 

“We didn't have a Napoleon,” said Gian- 
domenico Romandli, the director of the 
Venice city museums, referring to France’s 
great centralizer. “France is Paris and Paris . 
is France. You can’t say that Rome is Italy, 
Milan is Italy, Venice is Italy. It’s very hard 
to centralize thing s here.” 

Another difference between the two 
! places is that the political left, whose influ- 
ence on cultural life has sagged in France, is 
still alive here. And it is kept alive partly 
because of decentralization. 

The Italian Co mm unist Party has never 
been able to take power nationwide, but it is 
strong in the cities across central and north- 
ern Italy. In both Venice and Rome the 
officials in charge of culture are Commu- 
nists. 

And thus it is no accident, as Marxists say, 
that when an exhibition of Impressionist 
paintings — mainly French — from the 
Soviet Union’s m useums found its way to 
Italy, it was sponsored by the cities of Venice 
and Rome. (It is now being shown in Ven- 
ice's Museo Correr and will open in Rome at 
the end of April) 

RomaneUi, who is not himself a Commu- 
nist Party member, agreed that Communist 
local governments here managed to do better 
than others in winnin g Eastern European 






The Peggy Guggenheim Collection. 

exhibitions. “We have good ties with the 
Soviet museums, with Poland, East Germa- 
ny and other Eastern countries,” he said. 

The Comnmnist Party’s importance in 
cultural life here is based on more than 
control over a lot of city halls. Luciano 
PeUicani, the editor of the Socialist Party's 
monthly, n Mondo Operaio, argues that the 
Communists owe much of their cultural tra- 
dition to the party’s founder and intellectual 
hero, Antonio GramscL 

What set Gramsri apart from other Marx- 
ist thinkers was the importance he accorded 
to winning cultural and moral predominance 
for the left. In Western countries, Gramsri 
argued, intellectual and cultural hegemony 
was more important and enduring than state 
power. As a result, said PeUicani, who is 
deeply critical of the Comm unists on many 
issues. “The Italian Communist Party has 
worked to spread culture to the masses.” 

The Communists’ role in cultural life has 
been a point of attack for Christian Demo- 
crats hoping to oust Co mmunis t-led local 
governments in elections scheduled for this 
May. II Sabato, the weekly of Comunione e 
Liberation e — a Catholic movement in- 
creasingly strong among I talian youth — ran 
a long article a few months ago presaging the 
current polemic. 

The article, on the Emilia-Romagna re- 
gion, charged that the Communists — not 
unlike other parties here — distributed cul- 
tural funds to its friends and “friends of 
friends of friends.” 

The projects the article cited ranged from 
an architectural contract for a new theater, 
to money given to 12 women who ran a 
■ seminar called “Women on Women: Biogra- 


phy and Writings in German From the 18th 
Century Until Today.” 

Another line of attack has been that the 
Communists emphasize large, publirity- 
grabbing exhibitions in place of more care 
for existing institutions and ancient build- 
ings. RomaneUi referred to this as “an old 
polemic,” and said that while Communist- 
ted local governments did like to mount 
major exhibitions, they were not indifferent 
to the nation’s cultural legacy or the manage- 
ment of museums. “We nave open museums 
here,” he said, “and in Italy that’s not noth- 
ing.” 

A major source of Communist pride here 
Is that, thanks in part to Gramsd’s influence, 
the Italian party is not as burdened as other 
Communist parties, notably France’s, with 
the legacy of cultural Stalinism. This, Pelli- 
cani argued, has helped prevent the flood of 
defections from the left that has character- 
ized recent French cultural and intellectual 
life. 


T HERE is, however, one important 
trend in Italian cultural life, very 
much in evidence in Venice, that 
marks the decline of the old ideological 
boundaries. 

While the Soviet Union's Impressionist 
exhibition was showing on one side of the 
Grand CanaL the P eggy Guggenheim Col- 
lection was putting on two shows on the 
other side. A local newspaper, n Mattino, 
could not resist noting the peaceful coexis- 
tence of the two superpowers across the 
waters. 

Peggy Guggenheim's house is now a muse- 
um, affiliated with the Guggenheim Muse- 


um in New York, and Giosetta Capriati, in 
charge of the collection's office of develop- 
ment and public affairs, argues that the mu- 
seum owes its success to the growing accep- 
tance here of corporate sponsorship of the 
arts. 

In the past, she noted, corporate sponsor- 
ship was resisted, especially by the lefL It 
Cooed, RomaneUi said, “the conditioning oC 
cultural life by sponsors,” roughly what anti- 
communists worry about in the case of 
Communist local governments. 

Partly because of the efforts of organizers 
of smaller projects such as the Guggenheim 
Collection, and partly because of the pio- 
neering role in culture played by Olivetti, 
those fears are abating, even on the le/L 

Indeed, Venice is be ginnin g to profit from 
cultural competition between Italy's indus- 
trial giants, Olivetti and Fiat; Fiat' is setting 
up an art center of its own at the Palazzo 
Grassi, and has hired Pontus Hullen, for- 
merly the director of the Pompidou Center 
in Paris and the Los .Angeles Museum of 
Contemporary Art, to develop its programs. 

Hulten said Fiat had done a good deal in 
promoting the cultural life of its home base 
in Turin, but had been overshadowed by 
Olivetti elsewhere and now wants to make a 
mark of its own. 

That communists and capitalists and 
those not so easily pigeonholed are all fight- 
ing over culture here has much to do with the 
mysteries of the word cultura. 

“ La cultura," said Philip Rylands, the ad- 
ministrator of the Pe ggy Guggenheim Col- 
lection, pronouncing the word with appro- 
priate dignity. “In Italy, it has a son of 

charisma, " || 


© 1985 The Sew York Times 


In the Shadow of the Magic Mountain 


TransgJobaL she says, is contracted to that expects to fly from London to Singa- 
prodnee video films for British- Ahways pore and Hong Kong from October 1985, 
starting in May 1985. Air France plans to plans not only five entertainment but is can- 
start a three-year conversion of its long-haul verting the top dedc of its 747 into a casino, 
fl fft m July, Rw iytpir is intr o ducing video «n which will provide blackjack and baccarat- 
its Boeing 747s and DC-10, not oily fee Its chairman, Japp van der Zwan, a former 
inflig ht ente rtainm ent bn* for demonstration 'director of Anuxerdam’s Schipol airport, 
films erf life-vest and oxygen mask use, says: “We plan to put the fun back into 
Videais not only cheaper but more Head- flying and provide a total inflight experi- 
ble than film, which has to be loaded into c ne e.” H 


by Paid Lewis 

K LOSTERS, Switzerland —The Al- 
pine village of Klosters lies in the 
shadow of the “Magic Mountain" 
• of Thomas Mann, and with near- 
by Davos shares access to the great winter 
snowfields of Parseun and the Weissfluh- 
joch. Though many consider the snowfields 
the single finest skiing area in the Alps, these 
fields become equally unrivaled biking coun- 
try in the summer. 

At this time of year, the best of the ski ing 
season is drawing to a close. Sometimes the 
, snow will linger on the high slopes and 
glaciers well into April, perhaps even until 
May or June. But many of the holds in 
Klosters close down for the month of May as 
the season of slush and roaring mountain 
torrents doses in. 

These days, summer hiking in the moun- 
tains is as much a part of Alpine tourism as 
skiing is in the winter months. As the snow 
makes its annual retreat, Klosters and the 
Magic Mountain gradually change their ap- 
pearance. Yet in some ways their appeal is 
not so different. 

The cable cars ramble on, of course, 
though now they are hauling up a clientele 
dad m stout boots and climbing gear. The 
tall painted poles that in. winter protrude 
above the snow to guide skiers often serve as 
markers for summer hiking trails as wdL The 
mountain-top restaurants still do a brisk 
business, and shorn of their white covering, 
the mountains seem friendlier and more in- 
viting. 


* * ’ cum 


. * 


A 14 th-Century Manor House Y; 



by Erica Brown j. 

■w- ONDON — In 1340, Sir Thomas 
;■/ - Cawne cleared an areiilof virgin 
I ..forest in- the Weald ofiKeat and 
I / built himsdf a house complete with 
great hall and chapel, and ’ because the site 
lay deep in a valley, he suxroundtid it with a 
moat'for defense. 

Jn 1480, Sr Richard Haul made tlte house 
U-shaped Ijv adding two wings, and in 1520, 
Sir TUchard Qemenl completed' the quad- 
rangle by building a new chapel between the 
omnalhotBe and the west wing, . 

^ The house, Ightiuun Mote, was handed 
c&er io the National Trust recently by its 
. American owner,' Charles Henry Robinson, 
& now in his 90s,' in the first such gift by an 
** American. 

‘•For lovers of architecture, Ightham. Mote 
is. a -heat (Ightham is the name of a nearby 
v3lag&. and Mote refers not to the moat bat 


vifiagj^.asd Moic refers not to the moat bin 
to-t&rmoots, or local, councils^ that met at 
the ’house during the Middle -Ages.) There 
have been other alterations since 1520, of 
course^ but these have added tb.iaihff than 
detracted from, the origuraihonse, oneof the 
few genuine; examples of a. I4th-centuiy 
manor, house left in Britain. •< 

-Unfikemany English houses, tins one has. 
not bdoaged to one family for goiefatians; 
it has been bought . and sold many tones, and 


a H i my Deen DOu&ui anu imuw, «*«*■ 

*7 eachbwna* has left ^ his- marie But the result is 
cohesive father than confused; perhaps be- 
- - *11 fo nflriitig was done m, thnjocal 

bone\FOolored stone, half-timbered in* oak. 
Tod^i- as described by Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, 
ti» architectural lastonaiv it is a “low. 


The two most distinguished rooms are the 
great Hull, spanned by a single panned stone 
arch in the center and two timber arches at 
either end, ahd Sir Richard Ckment’s chapel 
with its most muhmchEke band-vaulted 
ceiling of painted wood. 

But much of Ightham's charm lies in the 
way it evokes images of the past. Crossing 
the moat, one enters the cobbled quadrangle 
and walks into the original boose, and it is 
easy to wnagma (bn discomfort of life, erven 
for the wealthy, in the Middle Ages. Howev- 
er large a fire, the great hall must always 
, have been odd, and there is ho softness in 
the stony austerity of the other rooms. 

Ightham has always been hidey. Legend, 
has H that a troop of Roundheads, seeking to 
destroy the house as a Royalist stronghold, 
got lost and sacked another one instead. 
Then, in 1953, after the death of its owner. 
Sir Thomas Colyer-Fergnsson, a groop of 
local businessmen bought the house to save 
it from developers. 

That was only an interim solution, but 
T ghtham Mote’s luck held. Robinson, a busi- 
nessman from. Portland, Maine, had. first 
sera Ightham Mote during a cyding holiday 
m the 1920s. In 1953,-he decided to nay it* 


jostalgjc visit, and discovering its 'plight, he 
bought tite bouse, repaired mid ranrnished 
it and arranged to insure its survival by 
passing it on to the National Trust. 

Ightham Mote, at Ivy Hatch, near Seven- 
oaks in Kent; is open to the pnblic on 
Sunday and Friday afternoons, from 2 to 5 
P.M. between April and September, admis- 
sion charge £130.. For .information, , tek 
732/62235. ■ 

&I985.ThcScw York Timer 


Y " ET the attraction of the Alps in sum- 
mer is essentially that of hiking 
around on the mrmntaln tracks the 
skiers race over in wintertime, enjoying the 
bright sun and the high thin air . 

In Klosters itself, the railway station 
opens onto a small but lively shopping street 
that winds down across a stony nver before 
it vanishes into the countryside. 

Grouped around the station are a few 
hotels, a post office, a church with a tall 
steeple of mountain stone, a tiny folk, art 
museum, a few discotheques and one or two 
restaurants. There is just one movie theater, 
but there are lots of chalets dotting the lower 
slopes of the surrounding mountains. 

It is an inf bimal private place, a mountain 
village of 3^00 in the eastern canton of 
Switzerland called GraubOnden, or Grisons, 
a region in which the majority are German- 
speaking Protestant, though Klosters has a 
Protestant and a Roman Catholic church 
and residents m ay also speak Italian, Ro- 
maush, French or English. 

Though much smaller, Klosters imitates 
Davos by dividing itself into Klosters Platz, 
the area around the railway station and the 
cable car to Gotsdmagrat and Paisenn, and 
Klosters Dorf, the northerly end of the vil- 
lage where, for a fare of 1 1 Swiss francs 
($3.85), another cable car swings up to Sas- 
seralp, in the Madrisa mountains on the 
opposite side of the valley. 

At Sasserab, at an altitude of more than 
6,000 feet (1,800 meters), lies what the tour- 
ist guides call the Klosters sun terrace, a vast 
south-facing terrace of 'sloping snow with a 
restaurant, six ski lifts and more than 30 
miles (SO kilometers) of ski trails and hiking 
paths. 

The sun terrace of Sasseralp is' the place to 
bask in the hot sun and gaze out across the 
shimmering .vista of snowy peaks etched 


71m Naw York Tmm 

agaiusi the peerless blue of the Alpine sky. It 
is also a good place to drink Apfebaft, the 
slightly tangy nonalcoholic apple juice avail- 
able everywhere for about 3 francs a bottle. 

Goser to Klosters Dorf are several small 
T-bar lifts that haul skiers up the easier 
slopes. And the two-mile toboggan run from 
Gotschnaboden down to Klosters offers a 
safer, slower and thoroughly welcome alter- 
native to the perilous Cresta Run at Sl 
M oritz. 


I N winter, as in summer, visitors, have a 
choice of ways to go into the mountains 
encircling Klosters. A wide variety of ski 
lift and cable car passes are on sale and it is 
best to take your time and work out exactly 
what you need. But a good bargain is the 
five-day pass entitling you to use all the 
cable cars and ski lifts m the Klosters-Davos 
region; the five-day pass costs 155 Swiss 
francs, or 117 francs for those under 16. 

And don’t imagine that tite mountains are 
reserved for ski enthusiasts alone in colder 
weather. Hikers, snugly protected in insulat- 
ed clothing and warm, waterproof boots, can 
enjoy than, just as much, riding the cable 
cars from peak to peak and tramping down 
the side of the ski runs or along special paths. 

At the Lnftseilbahn (aerial cableway) near 
the Klosters railway station, red and silver 
cable cars whisk skiers up over the fir trees to 
the snow-laden summit of the Gotschnagrai, 
a peak crowned, like so many in the Swiss 
Alps, with a restaurant that commands pan- 
oramic views over Klosters, Davos and the 
mountains beyond. 

From the Gotsdmagrat skiers can take the 
run down the Parsenn slopes toward Unier 
Laret (with a chairlift back) or ski straight 
ahead toward Ober Laret ana return on a T- 

bar. i 

But an altogether better idea is to slti, or 
tramp, through the snow along the track that 
leads to Parsenn, halfway down the valley 
side, and get on the linked cable cars that nm 
from Parsenn along the top of the Magic 
Mountain, providing access to the slopes 
and peaks between Klosters and Davos. 

The first car runs from Parsenn to the 
Weissflohjoch, where the little funicular rail- 
way up the Parsenn slopes from Davos Dorf 
disgorges its cargo of clanking skiers. 

At Wdssfluhjocfa a mountain-top con- 
crete bunker houses two restaurants, a rapid 
self-service eatery downstairs with a more 
expensive and slower restaurant on top. On a 
cold day, tty a bowl of hot Gulaschsuppe, a 
thick soup of meat, vegetables and beans 
that costs about 20 ftanra. 

From Wdssflubjoch another cable car 


makes the short trip across to the higher 
Wdssfluh peak and the start of Europe’s 
longest ski tun, the 13-mile descent to Ktlb- 
lis, a few miles north-west of Klosters. 

The alternative is to hike, or ski, down to 
the start of the Strela cable car, about a mile 
and a half away and go swinging past the 
rocky, sawtooth summit of the Schiahom to 
the Stxelapass for a break at the restaurant 
there, which has a sun deck in the snow. 
Then ride in one of the gondola cars that 
glide down the mountain to link up at the 
Schatzalp Hotel with the funicular railway 
into Davos Platz and an ordinary train back 
to Klosters. 


K LOSTERS boasts several highly rat- 
ed traditional Swiss hotels. Among 
them are the Vereina (tel: 4-11-61) 
and the Silvretta (tel: 4-13-53), each a short 
walk from the railway station. 

The Vereina, a fine old gray stucco palace 
with high ceilings, a grand entrance hall and 
paneled dining room, has been well modern- 
ized and boasts an indoor heated pool and 
outdoor tennis courts for the Sommer. It is 
open from June through September and 
again from December through March. Rates 
are offered for single or double rooms, with 
or without private bath; dining is the tradi- 
tional half-pension (half-pension, breakfast 
and one other meal is included in the room 
rate). For example, this summer, a double 
room with private bath, breakfast and one 
other meal will cost 190 to 240 francs. 

The SGvreua is an elegant six-story stone 
building that resembles the coaching inn it 
used to be. Today It has a snug, warm atmo- 
sphere and a comfortable dining room in a 
circa- 1835 chalet that is connected by a pas- 


sageway to the main hoteL The Silvretta is 
open only from December through April; 
during the Easter holidays a double with 
bath, breakfast and one other meal costs 240 
to 300 francs. 

Eating in Swiss hotels of this quality is 
never cheap: you should expect to pay about 
80 francs a person for a meal with wine. 
Vollpension, full pension or all meals, at the 
Vereina, costs an additional 20 francs a per- 
son a day; at the Silvretta, an additional 30 
francs eacL 

But Klosters also has smaller, cheaper 
hotels such as the Ghesa Andrea (tel: 4-39- 
70), open from June through October and 
from December through April, where a dou- 
ble with private bath costs 135 francs during 
the Easter holidays and 100 francs this sum- 
mer. 

Among other choices is the Aaba Health, a 
top-rated luxury hotel that features vegetari- 
an cuisine. There are also half a dozen garni 
hotels, bed-and-breakfast places that do not 
offer other meals, and four Berggastbluser. 
mountain guest-houses especially appealing 
to hikers and skiers. 

In winter a good way to explore Klosters 
for the first time is by horsedrawn sleigh- An 
hourlong tour of the village and surround- 
ings costs about 85 francs and can be ar- 
ranged by your hoteL In wanner weather one 
might simply want to walk around the vil- 
lage, past the painted wooden chalets and 
small shops. 

For information on walking tours in the 
village, as well as hikes in the nearby coun- 
tryside, contact the local tourist offices in 
Klosters Platz (id: 4-18-77) or Dorf (tel: 4- 
19-78). ■ 

© )9ft5 The New York Times 


: ADVERTISEMENT. 

“MAKE MINE A LARGE ONE.” 

BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF HAPPIER TIMES. 
WHO WOULD have thought a new play on botany would prove a 
source of constant hilarity throughout the evening ? But despite the 
lethargy the topic instantly induced in one at school, such a subject is 
keeping audiences rolling throughout Europe. 

ON TOUR 

PART OF ITS immense charm is that “Make mine a large one” has 
such a wide appeal. (Though one must confess that those with a more 
cultured taste will probably find it wittier than those who labour 
under the misconception that Shakespeare’s 'Taming of the Shrew’ 
is a course in animal husbandry.) The plot has an international 
flavour. The main personalities are drawn from ula 

countries as diverse as Morocco, Saxony and Indo- 
China and feature such characters as Coriander, 

Angelica, Orris and Juniper. Although, at first sight 
such a mixture might appear a little uncomfortable, 
it is the skill with which they have been seamlessly 
blended that guarantees the end result. 

I raise my glass to the creators of the production, 

Bombay Gin. It is indeed their unique distillation 
that keeps one amused. 

And I for one shall oft return to my favourite bar ^®jjj r 
to watch it run and run— into my glass. 








EVTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5,1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


VOL HWi LOW 

43939 Uft 15V» 
14417 7V. 4ft 

15557 so* am 

11155 2414 23 

91BJ IBtt IB . 
8794 3044 28V2 

8721 1214 12V. 

■147 114V. 109*4 
7543 «Z\* 41*4 
7177 41*4 39*4 

7173 14*6 1* 

4871 33*h 33ft 
4846 30*4 29*4 
4341 54*4 5114 
6321 73 VS 72ft 


1546 

7V. + 14 
3M — *4 
24 — <4 

IS 

29*4 —1 
1214 

ii2 +m 
42ft 

41 +1 

14 — ft 

33ft — 99 
30 

53ft +1*9 
73ft +49 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Hied Low lost awe 

Indus 12S6J® 124424 1248J4 1WM5 + W9 

Trane 59048 59444 58459 S9IL79 — 077 

Util 15403 15445 153.14 15X83 — 030 

Corn* J7IUB 51X38 50450 51079— Oil 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

UNHifes 

industrials 


Prev. Today 

Ona Noon 

73.11 7199 

7071 6JJB 

76.12 74.10 



NYSE Index 


Prsvfow Todov 
High LOW Close 3 P J*. 
Composite 10430 10354 103.77 10338 

industrials 11931 11833 11909 11859 

Tronic. 97 JB 94.12 9447 96.15 

UlimiOS 55.12 5489 5455 S474 

F Inane 10752 10481 10496 10429 


'■Ei^a^ ag pi CT TcS 


Bov 5a let ■Stm 

April 3 188938 437321 4645 

April 2 194514 490195 5.910 

April! : 1*9436 519504 10544 

March 29, 147.449 455,9*9 5230 

March 28 174445 445523 1409 

■included In the sales Routes 


Thursdaji 

NiSE 

Closing 


VoJ.at«PJA_ ttflOMO 

Preir. 4 PAl. 90 l. 9544 M 0 B 

prev consol Mated dose 11U79J70 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 




- ' 

■ - 

Om 

Frrr. 

Advanced 

- 236 

218 • 

Dacfliwd 

291 

339 

UnCfeanBod 

260 

241 

Total Ihum 

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ID 

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Nn Lows 

10 

7 


NASDAQ Index 


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KSSS3& ' W& ^ 

Finance 33132 — 32642 331-g 

insurance 32634 — SO 98 3WJ7 

Utilities . . 27095 — 24034 24320 

Banks . 255.17 — 25335 2031 

Tramp. 25049 — 25X35 26423 


AMEX Most Actives 


VML HUM LAW Last * OMO 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Prevfaw Today 

Histo Law Close J PM. 

vest* S3 ® ® ISS 

K US £3 %% £35 

composite 18053 17044 179.11 17832 


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N. Y. Stocks Stage Late Recovery 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The stock market was mixed 
Thursday, recovering late in the session after 
some early selling. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials 
edged up 39 to 1 ,259.05, cutting its loss for the 
week to 7.73 points. 

Declines outpaced advances by abour a 7-6 
ratio on the New York Stock Exchange. 

Big Board volume came to 36.91 million 
shares, against 95.48 million in the previous 
session. 

The NYSE's composite index slipped .06 to 
103.71. 

Analysts said most traders weren't looking 
for much from the market with a long holiday 
weekend approaching. The markets will be 
closed for Good Friday. 

Wall Streeters are generally pessimistic about 
forthcoming naming s reports for the first quar- 
ter. 

Several major companies have already said 
their results will come in below earlier expecta- 
tions. 

Charles Comer, Oppenheimer & Co„ said 
“clearly, the worries about the upcoming first- 
quarter earnings reports are the single driving 
force.'' 

The uncertainty in the market has created a 
shift among investors formerly bullish on the 
economy, ‘'Suddenly, this perception has taken 
hold now and we want to see these earnings and 
see how bad they are,” he said. 

Brokers said traders were also wary about 
making any big commitments before the Feder- 


al Reserve's weekly report on the money supply, 
due out after the dose. 

Advance estimates can for the figures to show 
a sizeable increase in the basic measure of the 
money supply. 

“We could get in to an inflationary situa- 
tion,'’ Mr. Comer said. 

“If you want to make the bear case; there’s 
really some good ammunition. That’s what got 
people on tenterhooks," he said. 

On the trading floor, CuHinet Software was 
near the top of the actives, and off a bit. 

AT&T was also active, and slightly lower. 

U.S. new car sales rose in late March, and 
analysts predicted automakers might have trou- 
ble maintaining that strong pace through the 
second quarter. Genera] Motors and Ford were 
off a bit Chrysler was slightly higher. 

Kerr McGee, also active, was lower. 

Gulf & Western was off on reports that 
Minneapolis investor Irwin Jacobs has accumu- 
lated as much as 18 percent of the company. 

CBS was up sharply amid continued takeover 
speculation. 

Technology issues were losing, with IBM, 
Digital Equipment and Hewlett-Packard Co. all 
off fractionally. 

Katy Industries was slightly lower. 

Hilton Hotels was lower. Golden Nugget Inc. 
has offered S438 million for 27.4 percent owned 
by an estate. Hilton termed the offer “inade- 
quate." 

Financial issues were gaining after some bro- 
kers upgraded their opinions. Citicorp., J.P. 
Morgan and Bankers Trust were fractionally 
higher. (AP, UP1) 


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One of the paradoxes of outera is the acceleration of the "pnmitive set against 
the sophistication of high-tech notogy.thebaitiaric actions oF a terrorists n , contrasted 
to what wilt hopefully be the moral conquest of the Galaxies. Our researchers are 
inundated with letters from investors who wonder whether they can structure a 
Portfolio that can blossom amidst organized chaos. 

Europeans tend to be negative; North Americans, with notable exception, caress 
the Impossible Dream. In having predicted, while the DOW was drooping under 800, 
that the "DJI WILL TOUCH 1,000, BEFORE HITTING 750”, we based our optimism not 
only on statistical factors, but on the hopes of people immunized against irrational 
fears. • ' . . • 

We live in one of the great ages of the work! An age that will witness the DOW 
catapulting over 2000 as the West reverts to the conviction that anyone can attain a 
better life through tenacity, enterprise and sensible thrift; that life's prospects are 
essentially good; that "penniless ambition" is bankable. Mankind will enjoy, despite 
abberations. what Walt Whitman hailed in "Leaves of Grass” as a "better, fresher, 
busier sphere". ■ 

To reap the fruits of the market, an investor must resist the "Crowd", the manic- 
depressive nature of the "Street". In eviscerating mass psychology, we have been 
branded as mavericks, haring recommended (before sptits), BOEING below $17, 
FORD around 518, G.M. under $40 and SEARS, when it was comatose, at $16. 

Creativity will molt clotted chauvinism, rebuke the idiosyncrasies of the "Crowd", 
and ultimately convince even terrorists, that we must ‘love one another or die". 

Our current letter muses on how to enjoy the "beautiful foolishnessof things", by 
accumulating shares coveted by "Power 0itists“.1n addition, we recommend a low- 
priced equity with the dynamics to vault 800%, as did a recently recommended 
“special situation”. 

For your complimentary copy please write to, or telephone: 


CAPITAL 
B GAINS 


C.VXX Capital Venture Consultants 
AmsterdamB.V. 

Kafveratraatf12 

1012PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Telex:1&536 


Address: 


12 Worth 
HWiLomr Stock 


Sis. CUM 

Dlv. Vkt PE VXsHtohLowQuot.OrV 




.pf 220 124 
.Pt 233 1 U 
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To Our Readers 

Became of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris until April 27, 
some items in the Market Summary above are 
from 3 P.M. New York time instead of the usual 
4 PAL Also because of the time difference, 
some other items elsewhere in the Business 
Section are from the previous day's trading. We 
regret the inconvenience, which is necessary to 
meet distribution requirements. 


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BM 


Statistic Index 

AMEX prices ftW Samtnqs raaort* P.13 ' 
AWtex MgMAnnP.M Fitao rate Min P.u 
MYSE urien P.10 GoM mmtfi P.ii 
kYSE wtfa/hwo P.W WWW ram p.71 
(/mum Mock) P.14 Morint wrunory P.18 - 
cufTttKy ram p.n Ooftcos p.n 

'^adtAadWai p.n . ore ttoex - p,u 
oivwnat P.n OHwr morMts p.n 

FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


HeralbS^Sribunc. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 



locks 

n, Page 10 


** 


Page 11 






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TKHHOiOOY 

New *911’ Service Allows 
, Instant Tracing of Calls 

'• By ERIC X. BERG 

Note York Tuna Service 

N EW YORK — In Minneapolis, the manager of- a 24- 
hour supermarket was stabbed during an apparent 
robbery not long ago. Although badly injured, the 
m a n a ger was able to dial “91!” and summon an 
’ihnbulance without ever giving his a dd res s. 

»~In Orlando, Florida, an enraged woman began firing a shotgun 
in a house where two other families lived. A second woman in the 
**■ house dialed “91V" but hung up almost immediately to flee the 
' 'attacker. Although the 91 1 operator heard only gunshots, he was 
able to dispatch police cars 


"It’s very unique 
to dial 911 in 
Orlando and save a 
life in Ann Arbor.” 


to the scene to arrest the gun- 
toting woman. 

. - What enabled the ambu- 
lance and police to respond 
without having an address is 
an emergency communica- 
tions system rapidly being put 
in place throughout the Unit- 
ed States. Called “Enhanced " 

911," the system instantly traces a 911 call and displays the 
address of die caller on a video screen. 

; - Specialists in emergency communications say 911 is 

Amoving valuable in numerous circumstances — in the case of 
"-^iny young children who dial 91 1 but do not know their address; 
of blind and mute people who might also be unable to tell an 
emergency dispatcher where they are; of om-of-towners and 
foreign-speaking persons, and of people who, like those cited in 
Minnesota and Florida, hang up before giving an address. 
..“Even if the 911 caller doesn’t say a word, it is now possible to 
know where you are calling from — business, residence, or coin 
phone,” said Eugene A Fredericks, who heads up the New York 
Telephone Ca’s efforts to sell F.whjmrwT 9 ] I. 

The technology for Enhanced 911 is not new. For years, 
telephone companies have been able instantaneously to identify a 
caller’s telephone number without asking for it. And for some 
time, reverse phone books, also called crisscross directories, have 
made it possible to determine an address from a phone number. 

B UT it has only been in the last year or so that completely 
integrated systems, in winch numbers are quickly identi- 
fied and converted to addresses, have become affordable 
v for small and mid-sized dues. System prices have dropped as the 
. prices of computers and computer memory have fallen. 

Advances in tdecommuni cations, moreover, have made it 
possible for many cities to team up and put all their residents’ 
names and addresses on one giant data base, thus saving more 
money. Largely as a result, Mr. Fredericks says, about 70 En- 
hanced 911 systems have been put in place in the United States, 
50 more are under construction and several cities, including New 
York, are considering installing one. 

Although many Enhanced 91 1 systems are on the market, all of 
them work in essentially the same way. When a caller dials 91 1, 
the telephone company^ number identification system, which is 


Eurofranc 
Market to 
Reopen 

First Issue Seen 

By Next Week 

By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — ■ Finance Minister 
Pierre Birfcgovoy has approved 
plans to reopen the Eurofranc 
bond market in what ministry offi- 
cials said reflected both a contin- 
ued easing of French government 
controls over financial markets and 
a means of bolstering confidence in 
the franc. 

The decision Wednesday had 
-been actively sought for about a 


used in normal billing, transmits the caller’s number to the 
emergency operator’s console. Separately, a copy of the number 
is transmitted to a computer holding a data base. With the 
number as its guide, the computer lodes up the address where the 
phone is and transmits that information bade to the operator. 
The system computers are also programmed to determine which 
city’s police, fire, or ambulance unit should respond. 

This can be particularly helpful in counties with many small 
v dues. In Orange County, Florida, which indudes Orlando, there 
■ (Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


year by banks and borrowers inside 
and outride France. It clears the 
way for Gaz de France, the state- 
owned gas utility, to issue franc- 
dominated Eurobonds, possibly 
next week, ministry and trading 
sources said. 

Traders said GDF planned an 
issue of about 500 million francs 
($52.6 million), led by state-owned 
Credit Commercial’ de France. 
They said the terms were still being 
determined. 

The GDF issue would represent 
the first since the Eurofranc market 
was closed by the ministry shortly 
after the Socialist government was 
elected in May 1981. 

The closure of the market came 
in response to a sudden drying up 
of the market as the franc came 
under severe pressure amid specu- 
lation that a devaluation was unmi- 
nent. France later devalued its cur- 
rency on three occasions. 

In 1980, the last year of trading, 
the issues, coming at the rate of one 
or two a month, totaled several 
billion francs, ministry officials 
said. They said they expect roughly 
the same volume in the reopened 
market. 

“The demand is there, and we 
have known this for several 
months, but we have wailed until 
now to be certain," a ministry offi- 
cial said. 

[The previous rules for new is- 
sues will be restored under the au- 
thority of the Treasury, which will 
informally control the market 
through an issue committee of gov- 
ernment officials and lead manag- 

(Cod tinned on Plage 13. CoL I) 


Lotus Development Cotp. 


Sales 

Revenues in millions of dollars 


Earning* 

Net income in millions of dollars 



Lotus was founded in April 1 982. and became public on Oct-6. 1983 


Hv K»w York Tm 


Lotus Development Is Programmed 
Into Diversification of Its Software 


Vw York Timet Service 

BOSTON — Mitchell D. Kapor, the freewheel- 
ing chairman of Lotus Development Coip., found 
it disconcerting recently when competitors started 
referring to Lotus as “the IBM of software." 

“I guess it was nattering,'' Mr. Kapor said re- 
cently, a fool up on the giant green porcelain turtle 
that supports a coffee table in his office. “In terms 
of influence in our marketplace, maybe so. In 
terms or revenues," he said, a broad grm overtak- 
ing his face, “we are still a rounding error on their 
balance sheet." 

Whether the analogy is apt or not, after just 
three years of business, Lotus has come of age. 
Buoyed by the quick and impressive success of 
Lotus 1-2-3, Its first software program for IBM 
computers, the company’s revenues tripled last 
year, to $157 million, from the year before, making 
it one of the two largest independent software 
companies in the United States. Software com- 
prises the instructions that tell a computer what to 
do. 

The fanfare that surrounded the first product 
quickly gave way to embarrassment over its second 
and third products — Symphony and the yet-to-be 
delivered Jazz. 

But according to its longstanding plans. Lotus is 
diversifying: into software specially tailored for 
engineers and scientists, and soon for people who 
use computers lo manipulate words and thoughts, 
not just rows of numbers. In addition, in May, the 
company will start a magazine, at a time when 
scores of computer publications are quiedy dos- 
ing. 

On still another front, Lotus recently made what 
may prove its most critical strategic alliance: a 
joint-development project with Cullmet Software. 
That linkage represents Lotus's first major push 
into the software intricacies of connecting personal 


computers with mainframes, the large computers 
used by businesses. 

Cullmet is the leading independent supplier of 
software for mainframes of International Business 
Machines Corp. Together, officials at Lotus and 
Cullmet hope that they can beat IBM to the punch 
for the long-sought-after sucro-to-mainframe link. 

“Making (his work is absolutely critical for Lo- 
tus," said w illiam H. Sbaltuck, the senior software 
analyst for Montgomery Securities in San Francis- 
co, who called 1985 a “risky year” for the compa- 
ny. 

With millions of PCs. and ihoosands of IBM 
mainframes installed in the largest Uf>. corpora- 
tions, few doubt that micro-mainframe links will 
become one of the greatest growth areas of the 
software market. 

But if experience is any indicator, connecting 
small machines to large ones is hardly an easy task. 
There art: a dozen or so “linking" products on the 
market, but users say that they are almost all 
unsatisfactory. 

Few, inducting those marketed by IBM, allow a 
personal-computer user to fetch data in the proper 
formats from a mainframe. Fewer still slip that 
data seamlessly into a PC spreadsheet, the elec- 
tronic ledgers that have spawned thousands of new 
uses for personal computers. 

“When we are done, a PC user shouldn't have to 
know where the data he needs come from, or even 
how to use a mainframe," said Jim P. Manzi, 
Lotus’s president. The new products are expected 
by the end of the year, and tne personal-computer 
part of the software will cost only $300. 

Ai the other end. though, the mainframe must be 
running Cullinct’s 5150,000 popular database 
manager — one of the many programs that have 
helped Cullinet achieve 50 percent annual growth 
over the last several years. “The connection has to 
(Continued cm Page 13, CoL 1) 


BNOC Is Said 
To Propose Cut 
In April Oil Price 


Reuters 

ROTTERDAM — British Na- 
tional Oil Corp. has proposed a 
S27J50 per barrel price for Brent 
crude oil loading in April, a SI. 15 
cut from the price in March, trad- 
ers said Thursday. 

They said prices of other North 
Sea crudes were also being reduced. 
It was unclear whether the final 
prices were subject to negotiation. 

• BNOC has begun verbally in- 
forming its suppliers of the new 
prices, but the British Department 
of Energy intervened to ask the 
corporation not to confirm the new 
prices by telex, BNOCs usual pro- 
cedure. 

The trading sources said the En- 
ergy Department's request to 
BNOC was an attempt to avoid a 
head-on clash with Nigeria that 
□tight spark a price war. 

Nigeria, a member of the Organi- 
zation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries, charges $28.65 for its 
Bonny light crude, which competes 
with North Sea crude. It has said it 
will match any British price cuL 

Reaction in the European spot 
market to BNOC's proposal was 
subdued, brokers said. 

In New York, traders said spoL 
crude prices in general dropped up 
to 20 cents on the BNOC news, but 
recovered quickly. 

“This type of market-responsive 
move was implicit in the British 
government’s decision to abolish 
BNOC,” said Larry Goldstein of 
Petroleum Industry Research As- 
sociates, a New York research firm. " 

The British government an- 
nounced last month that it planned 
to abolish the company and trans- 
fer some of its functions to a small 
government agency. 

U.S. oil traders said the price 
proposed by BNOC was lower than 
current spot trading for Brent load- 
ing in April, which they estimated 
at $28.40 to $28 JO per barrel. 

“But the formula which BNOC 
uses lags the current market, as it 
relies on trading data for February 
and March," Mr. Goldstein said. 

BNOC said last week that, be- 
fore the abolition of the company, 
it was scrapping its old pricing sys- 
tem in favor of levels linked to 
spot-market values. 


BNOC is currently obliged to 
buy 51 percent of the’ total oil out- 
put from British producers in the 
North Sea — an amount equivalent 
to 1.3 million to 1.4 milli on barrels 
per day — at official prices. 

It sells back about 500.000 bar- 
rels per day of this amount io major 
oil companies. Since late last year it 

has been selling the remaining 
$00,000 bpd at prices tied to the 
spot market. 

Between October 1984 and 
March 1985 all of BNOCs suppli- 
ers had been paying S28.65 per bar- 
rel for Brent, though spot prices 
were considerably lower. The pro- 
posed price of $27.50 would put the 

S ’ier broadly in line with spot- 
et prices. 

Suppliers were divided over 
whether the new price levels were 
negotiable. 

“BNOC gave us the proposal 
and that was it — end of message,” 
one trader said. 

But another company said it 
might submil a counterproposal. 


Dollar Gains 
More Ground 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — The dollar gained 
more ground Thursday against 
major currencies. 

It held within a tight band in 
thin pre-holiday tra ding. Trad- 
ers attributed its gains largely to 
dollar short-covering. They said 
investors could be awaiting re- 
ports Thursday on the U.S. 
money supply and Friday on 
U.S, unemployment. 

In late New York trading, the 
British pound lost sound to 
$1,205, down from $1,207 on 
Wednesday. Other late New 
York rates, compared with 
Wednesday rates, included: 
3.160 Deutsche marks, up from 
3.144; 9.635 French francs, up 
from 9.60; 1665 Swiss francs, 
no change; 254.00 Japanese 
yen, up from 253.65. 

(UP/. IHT) 


Currency Rates 


] 


Lota inter bonk rates on April 4 , excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Pom. New York rates at 


Sources Say GE, CBS 
Studied Merger Offer 


4 PM 




, 







s. 

C 

DM. 

rs. 

ILL. 

OMr. 

W=. 

SP. 

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Amsterdam 

3541 

4302 

11287* 

3697- 

0.1772* 

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13378* 

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Bfwsels(a) 

434975 

7455 

20125 

65M 

11523* 

1704 

■ 

2177 

2503* 

Frankfurt 

3.154 

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— 

3274 * 

14475 * 

B842- 

4.971 ■ 

11801 * 

17425* 

Loudon (M 

1.1 9S5 

— 

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114818 

240848 

42745 

76175 

371 303755 

Milan 

301250 

242500 

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20840 

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nos 

750.10 

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116 

9435 

201000 

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25400 

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306385 

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25725 

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081-054 

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623414 

24247 249.407 


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; Ewtfv. 

Australians 
AaOrian KhHflng 
i turns Batata fin. franc 
■: DJ2t CanadtaS 
0088) Danish kran* 

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1 Q.DQ74 Crack drachma 
■ 0.132 Hoag Kocs s 


its t 
14601 
21.9* 
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0775 
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6475 
13442 
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Carrancr 


Dollar Values 

i 

Booty. 

MM Irish s 
wall Israeli sbek* 
un Kuwaiti moor 
80968 Mam. ringgit 
a.1101 Harw.kraM 
2545 PML'MM 
00058 Part, escort) 

02772 Sawdl rival 


HAS Crate. CmTVKr lii* 
0996 04499 StaaporcS 22228 

174.10 0512 S. African rood US31 

0125 00012 S. Korean woo 8S7J0 

252 00058 SMBLoaeki 17175 

91801 01095 Sind, krona 9.T3 

10355 00251 Taiwan* 3959 

17150 00343 Tim Itat 27575 

14075 02722 UALdUtaO 14735 


By Isadore Barmash 

New York Times Service 

‘ NEW YORK — General Elec- 
tric Co. and CBS Inc. have dis- 
cussed an arrangement under 
which GE would come in with a 
“friendly” merger offer at about 
$150 a share for the broadcasting 
company in the event a serious, 
unfriendly takeover bid was made 
by another company for CBS, ac- 
cording to two separate Wall Street 
investment banking sources. 

If GE were to acquire all of 
CBS’s 29.7 million common shares 
outstanding, the price would be 
about $4,45 billion. CBS’s stock 
closed Wednesday cm the New 
York Stock Exchange at $109,625, 
up $2,875, on volume of 535,600 


fSterttw: 10)36 Irtail 

(ofconniwrda! Irene U» Amounts naadMl to buy one oound Id Amounts needed lo Buy on* Hollar (-1 
Unite oftOO (x) Units OMAN <vJ Units of 10OH 
NX}.: not Quota; NJL: not ovaltate. 

Sourer*: Bondue du Benelux (Brume Is); Banco Cammerdate I to If ana (MDaa); Banov* 
Nationals de Paris IPads); IMF ISDR); Banov* Arab r at intemoffonaft tflmmltssement 
(c/fnar, rival. dirham), other dam tram Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


April 4 


-it Mu • French 

> Dollar D-Mark Pram: Starting Franc ECU SDR 

*M. SHO-Oft 5ft -5ft 5ft -5ft ISft - 13 ft 10ft - 10ft Vft - U> Bh 

2M. Sft ■ 9 5ft -5ft 5ft - 5ft OTA - 13ft JOft - 10ft 9 ft -10ft 8ft 

3M. 9ft - 9ft 5 ft - 5 ft 5ft - 5ft ■ 13 ft- 13ft 10ft - 11 10 - 10ft 8ft 

AM. 9ft -9ft 4ft -<ft 5ft -5ft 12ft -12ft lift- lift 10ft- 10ft 8ft 

1Y. 10ft- 10ft Oft -Oft Sft -SH 12ft - OTA Tift - lift 10ft- 10ft 9ft 

Rates applicable la Interbank deposits of SI mllRen minimum tor eautvalentl. 

Sources: maroon Guaranty (donor. DM, SF. Pound. FF); Uovds Bank (ECU); Router* 
(SOR). 


Asian Dollar Kates 


April 4 


lmo. 
BQb-Bft 
Source: Reuters. 


2 mas. 
8ft -9 


t mo*. 
»ft -9ft 


lyear 
10ft -10ft 


Key Money Rates 

United States am 

Discount Rate B 

Federal Puma Bft 

Prime (tel* tOVi 

Broker Lean Role 9ft 


S 

Mk 

10 %. 

9ft 




Comm. Paper, 38-179 flavs 

80S 

870 



3-moolh Treasury Bills 

8.15 

8.10 



Treasury Bills 

847 

8L56 



30-59 days 

(L20 

119 



ws (0-89 days 

800 

804 


West Germany 




j 

Lombard. Rate 

400 

400 



Owmlont Rate 

5.95 

MS 


Britain 

Bank Bom Rate 
Call Money 
9Vdev Treasury BUI 
Unarirh Interbank 

Japan 

Discount Rate 
Call Monev 
M-day Interbank 


13-13IA 13- OTA 
13IA OTA 
12ft 12ft 
12 7/14 OTA 


1 

m 

4ft 


5 

4ft 

4ft 


One Month interbank 
Xmontti Interbank 

4- month interbank 

France 

lalervenlfon Rate 
Call Money 
OnMiimilh Interbank 
2-moiMti IttMrfw* . 

5- month Interbank 


Gold Prices 




5.90 

6.15 

425 


550 

4.15 

455 


10ft Hft 
10ft 10ft 
10ft 10 9/16 
10ft 10ft 
10ft ID 7/14 


■ Source*; Reuters, Comm*rzbankrCr6dtt Lv- 
Uovds Bank. Bank Of Tokyo. 


am . pak am 
HeaeKetw 317.15 31445 — 440 

LUMMftOUf* 31450 — — 4J0 

Porta (125 kite) 31447 317,97 — 133 

Zuridl 31655 31750 — 125 

London 31740 31675 —650 

New York — 32110 + 350 

Offldoi fixing* for London, Pbri* aw Luxem- 
bourg. opening and ctotfna Wien for Hong Kona 
and Zurich. New York Comes currml ewilrad. 
Ail prices bi U55 per ounce. 

Source: Reuters. 


Markets Closed 

All U.S. and Canadian financial markets will be closed Friday for 
Good Friday. Also, all European markets except Milan will be closed and 
most major Asian markets will be dosed, except Tokyo. 


The GE interest in CBS report- 
edly began several months ago and 
was renewed, with a firm dollar 
figure, this week, the sources said 
Wednesday. 

CBS strongly denied the reports, 
and a GE spokesman declined to 
comment on them. 

William I.illey 3d, a senior vice 
president and member of the CBS 
management committee, said 
Wednesday that it was “absolutely 
untrue" that GE had offered to aid 
CBS in the event of a hostile take- 
over attempt. 

“There have been no discussions, 
and there has not been any work 
done with any company taking us 
over as a white knight or about us 
taking any company over," he said. 

One Wall Street source reported 
that Shear-son Lehman / Araeri can 
Express Inc., an investment 'firm, 
agreed Wednesday to help Ted 
Turner, the Atlanta-based cable 
and broadcasting entrepreneur, ob- 
tain financing in his quest for CBS 


U.S. Industries 
Post Profit Fall 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON — U.S. 
manufacturers* after-tax profits 
fell 6 J percent to 524.3 milli on 
in the fourth quarter of 1984 
from the previous quarterly lev- 
el of $25.7 billion, the Com- 
merce Department reported 
Thursday. - 

But sales rose 2 percent to 
$59256 billion from $576.44 
billion in the third quarter. 

In another breakdown of the 
figures, the department said 
that the industries’ after-tax 
profit declined 0.4 cents for ev- 
ety dollar of sales in the fourth 
quarter compared with the 
third quarter. Profits averaged 
4.1 cents for every dollar of 


sales in the latest quarter, down 
6.4 cents from the 1983 quarter. 


after recently having declined to do 
so. 

The investment banker, who 
asked not to be identified, suggest- 
ed that Sbearson's decision might 
signify that American Express Co„ 
Sbearson’s parent, would back the 
Turner acquisition move with its 
own funds and as a partner in the 
venture. 

Peter Solomon, vice chairman of 
Shearson, declined to comment on 
the report of his film's role. He 
denied, however, that American 
Express had any intention of enter- 
ing an alliance with Mr. Turner. 

The Wall Street sources indicat- 
ed that Americas Express had held 
informal talks with American 
Broadcasting Cos. before that com- 
pany's recent decision to be merged 
into Capital Cities Communica- 
tions. The failure to obtain ABC 
they added, had left American Ex- 
press frustrated and interested in 
obtaining another major network. 

Joyce Hergenham, idee president 
for communications at GE, said the 
company has a policy of not com- 
menting on reports. 

“The GE involvement is real,” 
one investment banker said 
Wednesday. “It would come in cm a 
while knight basis and is prepared 
to move if summoned by CBS.” 

Shearson put CBS common 
shares on its restricted list Wednes- 
day, which meant that it would 
make no recommendations on the 
stock to investors. This is frequent- 
ly the practice when an investment 
banker signs a company as a client 
for its sendees. 

CBS on Wednesday dismissed 
Mr. Turner's efforts, as it has be- 
fore, contending that they were not 
serious. “CBS believes that Ted 
Turner does not have die capability 
to take over CBS, and CBS believes 
there is no financial substance to 
press reports that Ted Turner is 
organizing a syndicate with the ca- 
pability to take over CBS,” said 
Mr. J-tiley. 

“Mr. Turner has made no secret 
he would like to acquire CBS," he 
added. “He has said that repeated- 
ly. He has been unable repeatedly 
to get any support few that desire." 

The New York Times reported 
Wednesday that broadcast indus- 
try sources had said that Mr. 
Turner had been given assurances 
of $100 million in financing from 
two sources, William E Simon, a 
former Treasury secretary, and 
MCI Communications, a major 
long-distance telephone company. 

Mr. Simon declined to comment 
on the report, and Gary Tobin, a 
spokesman for MCI, confirmed 
thal MCI had taken part in discus- 
sions involving Mr. Turner on a 
CBS takeover, but he said that 
“there was no agreement or com- 
Jmlraem. ,, 

Earlier, William E Conway, 
chief financial officer of MCL had 
declined to comment on'the report, . 



The man with exceptional goals 
needs an exceptional bank. 


What makes TDB exceptional? 
Above all, our personal service. 


P ersonal service is more than 
just a tradition at TDB - it’s 
one of the basic reasons for our 
success over the years. And it 
makes an important difference 
to our clients, in a number of 
ways. 

In fast decisions, for exam- 
pie. At TDB you don’t have to 
waste time going through 
endless “channels.” The execu- 
tive you talk to makes sure that 
your requirements are brought 
directly to the people who 
decide. We make it a point to 
avoid red tape and bottlenecks. 
We assign an experienced 


bank officer to your account and 
he is personally responsible for 
seeing that things get done on 
your behalf whatever the ser- 
vice. So you can be sure your 
instructions are carried out 
promptly, intelligently and to 
the letter. 

Whether your business 
requires trade and export financ- 
ing, foreign exchange, precious 
metals or any of our foil range 
of banking services, you'll find 
that TDB has something a bit 
special to offer. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust with 


your business, get in touch with 
us. Now that we have joined 
American Express International 
Banking Corporation, with its 
89 offices in 39 countries, we are 
even better placed to serve your 
individual banking needs. 

TDB banks in Geneva, London. 
Paris, Luxembourg, Cbiasso, Monk 
Carlo, Nassau. Zuriih . 

TDB is a number of the American 
. Express Company, which has assets of 
US$ 62.8 billm and shareholders' 
equity oj US$ 4.4 billion. 



Trade Development Bank 


Shown at left, the head office 
of Trade Development Bank, Geneva, 


An American Express Company 











Page 12 


U.S. Futures A P nu 


INTERNATIONAX HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5,1985 


Season 

Season 


High 

Low 

Open High Law Close Che. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CUT) 

5*00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
4*5 X32% May 3*7% 3*4% 

3.90 X24% JUl 137% 140 

X74% 134 Sep 134% 338% 

363% 334 Dec 1« 3*8% 

X74% lffl% Mar 151 153% 

4*2 147 MOV. +« ,,+g 

Est. Sales P rev. Soto 10002 

Prev. Day Ocen int. 37*48 iip314 
CORN (CBT) . , , 

5*00 bu mini mum- dot hm per bushel 

130 149% MOV 2*2% 2*3 

131 W Jul 1£ 2*3% 

33116 2441* S8P 173V* 174% 

195 1*0% Dec 140 258% 

11 D 259% Mar 177 177 

XT’* 274% MOV 183 Z|3 

1U 181 Jul 255% 18S% 

esr. Sales Prw. Sales 11415 

Prev. Day Open im.124545 up989 

SOYBEANS (CBT) , , 

5500 bw minimum- dollars per burtel 
7.97 570% MOV X99 4JM V* 

7.99 550% JUl 407 411 

7-54 582 AUB 408 412% 

tn SOI Sep 401% 457 . 

658 503% NOV 404 409V, 

479 5*4% Jon 4M% 419% 

74.2 404% Mar 425% 430% . 

7.79 415 May 

459 441 Jul 

EsI- Sales Prev.Sales 58*75 

Prev. Dav Oden (in. 43539 off 487 

SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 tons- dollars per ion ^ , 

20500 129-50 MOV 13350 13190 

19450 13470 Jul 13950 13950 

16400 13780 Aua 14250 14250 

179J0 uzm Sep 14580 14580 

180J0 14250 OCl 147 AO M770 

18480 14750 Dec 15380 15380 

14380 14980 Jan 15580 15580 

30450 15480 Mar 14000 14080 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 10.153 

Prev. Day Open lot 45892 up 2*9 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

40000 Ibs-daiiars per 100 Hu _ 

3180 2280 May 3180 3155 

3030 2270 Jul 2953 2984 

2880 2250 AU0 2873 2375 

2780 2250 Sep 27.15 Z7.7S 

26-40 2290 Del 242S 2470 

2555 22.90 Dec 2540 2480 

2570 2350 Jan 25.10 2570 

26270 2470 Mar 2420 2SJ0 

2440 2440 MOV 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 15743 

Prev. Day Open IM. 50*41 up«92 
OATS (CBT) 

5*00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 

1.91 1*4% May 1*9 1*9% 

178% 1*3 Jul 1*6 1*6 

179 180 Sep 1-42 182 

1*2% 1*4 DOC 1*5% 1*5% ! 

Ext. Sales Prev. 5c to 150 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 3745 up 39 


3*4 3*4% +84% 

374% 340 +82% 

375% 178% +81% 
345% 347% +80% 
3*1 3*2% +81 

348 348 -*0% 


2*2 2*2% —80% 
2*2% 2*3 —MM 
273% 274 
2*7% 2*8% 

276 374% 

2*2% 2*2% +80% 
2*4% 2*5 


4JM +82% 
4.11% +82 

6.12 +82% 
6J77 +83% 

689 +83 

6.19% +82% 
470% +JD 
478% +83 

445% +83% 


i Season Season 






High 

Low 

Open 

High 

Low 

Ctase 

Chu. 

2110 

I960 

Jul 



200 

—11 

Est.saies 

2,997 prev. Sato 4909 




Prev. Day Open Int. 27,138 oHiM 




ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 





15*00 lbs.- cents per Eb- 





188*0 

151*0 

May 15535 

155*0 

155.10 

15530 

—1*5 

18485 

155*0 

Jul 15450 

154*0 

155.90 

15440 

— *8 

i82*a 

154A9 

SeP 155JC 

15430 

15X70 

154*0 

—SO 

181*0 

154*0 

NOV 15550 

155*8 

nm 

15535 

—35 

1B0JJO 

154*0 

Jan 155.10 

15560 

155*0 

15535 

+25 

17750 

15430 

Mar 154*0 

154*0 

154*0 

15825 

+S0 ■ 

i 16250 

160*0 

May 



W4« 

+J0 



Jul 



15425 

+J0 

I88J0 

179.75 

Sen 



mu 

+JD 

Est. Sato 

750 prav.Sata 

70 




Pr«v.DaY Open Int. 4577 off 7 






132*0 13210 —1*0 
138*0 13870 —1*0 
14170 14140 —1*0 
14480 14480 —1*0 
144*0 144*0 —170 
151*0 15220 —150 
15488 15450 —140 
15980 15980 —200 


30.90 3178 
2970 29*1 

2870 2*68 
27.15 2770 

JUS 2|*5 
2575 2578 
25.10 25*7 

25.10 2540 
2577 


1*9 1*9 +80% 

1*5% 1*5% —80% 
1*2 1*1% +80% 
1*5 1*5 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CM!) 

40800 Uhl- cents pw %. 

4980 *155 Apr 63*0 6425 

4950 64*0 Jun 4540 4480 

67*7 63.15 AUO 45.15 45*5 

6550 61*0 Oct 6325 43*0 

47*5 43*0 Dec 6425 6455 

47.45 4425 Feb 4580 *580 

47*7 4480 Apr 

Est. Sales 12732 Prev. 5a to 14*16 
Prev. Da /Open I nt. 42731 UP 731 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME> 

44*00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

74.70 4470 Apr 478S 67-97 

7275 4455 MOV 4870 6155 

7370 44*0 AUB 69*0 6957 

7380 6780 Sep 6975 49*0 

7272 67.10 Oct 49.15 4920 

7370 4985 Nov 4975 49.95 

79*0 70*0 Jan 

Est. Seles 786? Prev. Sales 777* 
Prev. Day Open int 9419 oH 284 
HOGS(CME) 

30800 lbs.- cents per lb. 

54*5 42*0 Apr 43*0 4*85 

55.40 4745 Jun 4885 49*0 

5X77 4845 Jul 5045 51 JO 

5477 4750 AUO 5C-50 51*2 

5175 4580 Oct 47.15 47*5 

5045 4680 Dec 4825 48*0 

5000 4675 Feb 4980 49.92 

4745 4550 APT 4780 4780 

4985 47.00 Jun 4885 48*0 

Est. Sales 8,153 Prev. Sales 7*26 
Prev. Day Open InL 24.985 up 36 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38800 lbs.- cents per lb. 

8280 61.15 May 47*5 66*0 

82*7 62.15 Jul 60.10 6957 

80*5 SOJD AUB 4685 4110 

7670 63.15 Feb 7280 7385 

75*0 6480 Mar 7287 72*0 

75*0 70*0 Mar 

7680 70.90 Jul 

Est. Sales 5.199 Prev. Sales 6822 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 12*40 up 482 


4150 4385 +.13 

6525 65*5 +.13 

45.15 45*0 +.10 

43.15 4385 

6425 6485 —10 

4485 44*5 —05 

44*0 —10 


67*5 4725 —.15 

4110 4122 —10 

49*2 4925 —15 
4920 49*0 —82 

69*0 69.10 —.10 

4925 4980 —10 

7020 —10 


43*0 4327 
48*5 4922 
58*5 5097 
50*0 5180 
47.15 47*5 
4825 4140 

4980 49*5 

4780 4197 

4105 4U5 


47*0 4822 +1.15 
*8.10 49.17 +1*7 
44*0 *727 +IJ5 
7180 72*2 +*0 

7227 7220 +*5 

7225 +20 

73*0 


Metals 


COPPER tCOMEX) 

25800 to-- cents Per lb. 

64.10 6125 Apt 

92*0 5420 May 43.15 45*0 

6425 6185 Jun 

(325 5780 Jul 4480 4420 

82.10 57*0 Sep 64.45 4620 

8425 5150 Dec 4580 <7.90 

B420 59*0 Jan 

8080 59*0 Mar 6555 6720 

7480 61.10 May <7*0 67*0 

74*0 6180 Jul 

7080 6280 Sep 4780 4720 

7080 6480 Dec 

7020 4580 Jan 

EsI.Sato 17800 Prev. 5a to 142M 
Prev. Dav Open Int 85.949 un871 
SILVER (COMEM 
5800 travel- cents per tray qc. 

4408 5578 APT 4438 455* 

15138 5538 May 444* 443* 

14418 5428 Jul 4548 4738 

11838 5738 Sep 445* 4808 

12308 5908 Dee 482* 4988 

12158 5958 Jan 6818 4*12 

11938 4078 Mar 4948 7398 

10488 4218 May 7148 7140 

9458 4358 Jul 7310 7428 

9408 6418 Sep 

7998 4478 Dec 

7898 7438 Jan 

Est Sales 20800 Prev. Soto 74270 
Prev. Day Open Int. 71340 off 109 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 troy oi.. do liars per Iroyoa. 

447*0 23480 Apr 273*0 278*0 

27100 35180 Jun 

449*0 24180 Jul 277*0 26100 

39380 25080 Oct 28380 28880 

373*0 26080 Jan 28180 28880 

30150 279*0 Apr 29480 29480 

Cst. Sato 1*0 Prev. Sales 274 
Prev. Day open int. 6*49 eff 4*19 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 troy az- dollars per os 
159*0 106*0 Jun 111.25 112-75 

141.75 106-23 Sep 11180 11280 

141*0 105*0 Dec 110*0 11380 

127*0 106*0 MOT 11180 11180 

Est Sato 251 Prev. So to 1.784 
Prev. Day Open ini. 11146 up 4*15 

GOLD (COM EX) 

100 troy or.- dollars per troy ax. 

514*0 282*0 APT 31780 322*0 

32780 29280 May 

51080 28780 Jufl 32180 327*0 

48580 29180 Au0 32X70 330*0 

49380 29780 Oct 32980 33450 

489*0 301*0 Dec 33680 34080 

485*0 30680 Feb 34420 34020 

49680 31470 APT 

43570 320*0 Jun 

428*0 33180 AUQ 

37570 33580 Oct 344*0 37070 

37380 34280 DtC 37880 37880 

Est. soles 28800 Prev. Sales 27*43 
Prev. Day Open lnt.117.154 off 1740 


44*5 
4110 6580 

4135 
43*0 6570 

4425 4485 
44*5 44-40 
4680 
45*5 4770 
<7*0 4775 
6875 
6770 6875 

49*5 
- <970 


y nfl 654* 
4398 6598 

446* 4467 
4408 4787 

6758 6957 

4818 701* 

$938 7137 

7088 724* 

738* 739* 
7548 
77S6 
7811 


27280 28180 
27980 28780 
28580 294.10 
29100 30180 


11075 112*5 
11075 111*5 
11080 11195 
111*0 110*5 


315*0 320.10 
32170 
319.18 32480 
rgjQ 328*0 
32970 333 M 
334*0 33890 
34070 34470 
350*0 
35440 
362 JO 
345*0 349*0 
37800 374*0 


Financial 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 

37*00 1 la.- cents per lb. 

15280 12281 MOV 14370 14470 

14970 12180 Jul 14375 14X90 

147*0 12780 Sep 14280 143*0 

144*5 12975 Dec 14281 14275 

14X50 12850 Mar 14175 14175 

14275 13180 May 141*0 141*0 

140*0 13*50 Jul 

13473 13275 Sep 

Est. Sales 1*00 Prev. Sato 2742 
Prev. Dav Open InL 13,108 UP 64 
SUGAR WORLD II (NYC5C8) 

112*00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

1050 3L75 May 377 3*1 

9K 389 Jul 1*1 197 

9.73 482 Sep 4*3 4.10 

985 4.13 Oct Ale 475 

775 480 Jan 

973 iW Mar 589 5.14 

7.15 575 May 572 578 

<*? *4? JUI 

Est. Sales 5820 Prev. Soles 6.982 
Prev. Day Ooen Ini. 84,151 UP 144 
COCOA (NY CSCE) 

10 metric tons-S per ten 

2570 1*98 May 2305 2330 

2400 1990 Jul 2140 2171 

24W 1987 Sep 2125 2153 

2337 IMS Dec 2075 2099 

2190 1935 MOT 2075 2000 

2130 1940 MOV 


14X70 14375 
14245 14271 
14270 14273 
141.20 14174 
WQ80 140.19 
14180 139*0 
17980 
13675 


3173 379 

390 394 

482 487 

4.14 471 

471. 

5*9 JL14 
572 574 

5*7 


2123 2143 

2115 2152 

2040 2006 

2045 2089 


1IS T. BILLS (IMM) 

Si million- pis oil do pet 

91*1 87.14 Jun 9173 9170 9177 9174 

9173 8494 SOP 9083 9086 9076 9085 

9090 8577 Doc 9X40 90*1 9040 90*5 

90*5 84*0 Mar 90.11 90.1! 9008 *0.13 

9027 87 *1 Jun 69.91 0.91 091 090 

9000 *800 5*0 WJ0 

0*9 08S Dec 0*1 

Mar 074 

Est. Sales 5839 Prev. Sato 570 
I Prev. Dav Open Int. 38409 off SIS 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

5100*00 prin- pf*&32ncfi of TOed 
B2-3 70-9 Jun 79-4 79-4 76-21 76*1 

81-13 75-18 Sep 769 78-9 77-30 78-5 

80-22 75-13 Dec 77-14 

BOB 75-14 Mar 7+26 

79-24 74-30 Jun 7+6 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 5*93 

Prev. Day Open Int. 42*74 off *44 
US TREASURY BONOS (CBT) 

(B Dd-X100*00-«ti A 32nds afioo pd) 

77-15 57-20 Jun 48-7 49-9 «B-23 0 

7+2 57-ID Sep 68-10 48-11 67-25 40-2 

7+5 576 Dec 47-15 47-16 a 06 

72-30 57-2 ■ Mar 44-19 4+19 6+70 4+16 

70-16 5+29 Jun 45-31 45-31 45-19 <527 

70-3 5+29 Sep <5-11 65-11 45-3 656 

69-26 5+25 DeC 6+24 6+26 4+19 4+23 

69-13 5+27 Mar 4+8 

69-2 63-12 Jim 43-27 43-27 43-21 4X26 

48-26 43-4 Sep 63-15 68-15 43* 43-13 

48- 0 42-24 Dec - 43-1 

Est. Sato Prev. Sales 67860 

Prev. Day Open lnUt+505 oft 1*44 
GNMA (CBT) 

5100*00 prtn-Pts &32ndto» loo pd 

49- 27 57-17 Jun 684 49-4 6+29 6+1 

4+4 59-13 Sep 48-10 4+10 60+ 60-10 

4+13 5+4 Dec <7-10 47-23 67-10 67-22 

68 5+20 Mar <7* 

67-8 5+25 Jun 6+20 

47-3 65 Sea 4+6 

EsI. Sales Prev.Sales 0 

Prev. Day Open Int. 3*34 tip 20 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

51 ml I lion- pfa of 100 PCt 

91.20 85*0 Jun 90*7 90*9 90*5 90*8 

9040 BOBO Sep 0*7 0*7 0*7 S9M 

9017 85-34 Dec 0*6 

0.78 06*6 Mar 00 

0*6 86*3 Jim 08*2 

08*4 ' 87*6 Sep 0858 

Dec 8836 8836 1836 8837 
Est. Sato 317 Prev.Sales 194 

Prev. Day Open int. 6*64 ofMS 
EURODOLLARS UMM) 

51 mlllkm-ptsof 100 PCt 

90*8 82*9 Jun 9QL18 9021 90*6 9010 

WJ3 84*3 Sep 0*7 00 0*5 0*6 

89*7 M*0 DOC 0.10 0.12 00 00 

0*8 86.10 Mar <878 8838 88*6 8871 

& 15 8633 Jun 88*5 8845 88*0 88*2 

M 0*0 S«P B+20 8820 8S30 8818 

037 B73S Dec 87*7 87.97 0*7 8737 

0*1 87*4 Mar 00 00 0*1 076 

Est. Sales 22*72 Prev.Sales 19331 
Prev. Day Open lnt.100337 upUOS 
BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

8Parpound-l aol rtf caua Is 50*001 
1*350 1JJ235 Jun 1.1955 1.1970 L180S 1.1935 

1*450 1*200 Sep 1.1840 1.1840 t.1720 1.1845 


7+21 7B-31 
77-30 7+5 
77-14 
7+26 
7+8 


6+23 0 
6+25 6+2 
a 0-8 
6+W 6+16 
6+19 6887 
45-3 6+8 

4+19 4+23 
4+8 

43-21 <3-26 
43-0 4+13 

- 4+1 


6+29 6+1 
6+6 6+10 
6+10 67-22 
67-4 
6+20 


90*5 90*8 
0*7 S9M 


90*6 9010 
0*5 0*6 
0*0 0xe 

1866 8871 
08*0 88*2 
1820 88.18 
00 037 
0*1 076 



Paris Commodities 

April 4 


Close 

SUGAR Hh,h ^ BW ** 

French francs Per metric Ion 
MOV 1269 1258 1243 12M 

Aw 1J24 1217 1219 1223 

Oct 1245 1360 12W 1249 

NX NT 1*20 1*40 

Mar 1*23 1*23 1*19 1*25 

May NT. N.T. 1*45 1*75 

EM. vpL: 2200 lots o< 50 tons. Prev . , 
sales: 1*48 lots. Open Interest: 22.917 
COCOA 

French francs Mr 100 Kb 

May 2260 2245 2252 2254 

JIV N.T. N.T. 1210 — 

Sen N.T. N.T. 221 0 2230 

Dec N.T. NT. 1120 1145 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1100 1140 

May N.T. N.T. mo 1150 

JIV NT. N.T. Ills — 

Est. val.: 90 lot* af 10 tons. Prev. i 
Mies: ]ll lots. Ooen Interest: 744 
COFFEE 

French francs oer 1D0 kg 

May 1510 1505 2*94 2*30 

JIv N.T. N.T. 1520 2*40 

S« 2*85 2*85 1570 2*99 

Nov N.T. N.T. — ? ,*70 

Jan N.T. n.T. — 2*15 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 1410 

Mary N.T. N.T. — 1610 

EifjroUIS loti of 5 ions. Prev. actual i 
38 tats. Open Interest : 192 
Swce: Bourse do Commerce. 


London Metals 

April 4 


Clue Previous 

BM Aik Bid Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Storting per metric ton 
Mbl 910*0 911*0 <07*0 90800 

forward 937*0 938*0 935*0 934*0 

COPPER CATHODES [High Grade) 

Sterling per metric ton 
wot 1.181*0 1.10*0 1.194*0 1,197*0 

toward 1206*0 120700 121150 1214*0 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling per metric tot 

soot _ 1,190*0 1,192*0 1.197*0 1,199*0 

forward 120*0 120*0 1215*0 1216*0 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ten 
SMI mOO 33X00 313*0 314*0 

toward 30*0 328*0 321*0 321*0 

NICKEL 

Starling per metric ton 

SOOt » ,560.00 4*80*0 4435*0 4445*0 

farword 4514*0 4520*0 4435*0 4440*0 

SILVER 

Pence per fray ounce 

seat 53450 535 no OTJO 53X50 

forward 548*0 552*0 549*0 550*0 

TIN {Standard) 

sterling per metric fan 

NM _ J8I0.00 9*11*0 9240*0 92*5*0 

forward 9*10*0 9Jtl*o 9250*0 9255*0 

ZINC 

Sterling per metric fen 
MW 7*X00 745*0 000*0 102*0 

forward 7*1*0 7*2.00 73X00 73400 

Sourer: AP. 


London Commodifies 

April 4 



m 





5rr 



Hr: 

IK T /''^ 

»!.TTil| 

TT“ 




ZEL 


Asian Commodities 

April 4 


HONG-KOflG GOLD FUTURES 
UjLS Perec nee 

Ctes* 

Nfglt Lew Bid Art 
API — 317*0 317*0 31400 31 B20 
May - N.T. N.T. 317*0 319*0 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 320*0 322*0 
Aua _ 325*0 325*0 324*0 324*0 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 327*0 331*0 
Dec - N.T. N.T. 334*0 334*0 
Feb _ NT. NT. 3*0*0 342*0 
Volume: 34 lots of TO di_ 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U2.S Per ounce 


Prev. 

High Lew Settle Settle 

Art N.T. N.T. 31470 32120 

Jun 32X70 32070 32070 32150 

Aua N.T. NT. 325.70 32970 

Volume: 200 lots et TO to. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mefarstaa cents per kilo 


Apl - 205. 

MOV 20. 

Jun 2t». 

JlY 211. 

Aua six 

Sep 215. 

Volume: 69 lets. 


BW ARC 
20550 20650 
2035 3050 
20.25 2095C 
21150 112J0 

21X00 21400 

715*0 216*0 


Dee NT. N.T. 229*0 238*0 229*0 23X00 
Volume: 1*31 tats of TO ton*. 

%£^ : <££'j?° adU>ndon **'*'«"" »- 



S&P 100 Index Options 

April 3 


_ . 

Sttfltt 

CoUHjW 1 


Prtet 

Art 

Msy 

Jew 

*9 


l» 

_ 

_ 

_ 



IM 


li*k 




W 

t8*k 

111; 

m 

_ 

9 

130 

Pt 

7ft 

9 

IN, 

■ 

its 

7»S 

r. 

6 



IS 

9/14 

J 


ft 


IU 

Mi 


r.» 

l 

3 

- - 

199 

l'« 

5/16 

1% 


ns 

int 

!/» 

7/14 

— 


PnN4ajt 

4e| May June Jiy 

J/l*_ _ _ 

UK 1 1/M 1114 5714 
NT* U V) % 
> 11/11)% 2 
IS 2*. 3b A, 
Sft 611 4H 64 

litt m he 

- m lit - 




SMke Com-SeiM Puta^ene 

Price Jun Sup Doc Jen Sep Due 

30 2.18 244 — 035 062 069 

31 IJ0 2*5 269 DAI X9S 1*4 

» 0.95 UO 109 139 154 

31 057 1.13 156 1.78 t.M — 

M 036 0J2 1 W 244 — - 

15 0.19 081 — 139 137 - 

Estimated Mel vei. 7*00 
CalU; Wed, vet 1317 eetn tat. 35075 
Pats: WmL «el. 2721 aeon InL 38434 
Source: CME. 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Sftnapora cents per Mia 


RSS1 Art- 174*0 175*0 

RSSlMOV- 177*0 17X00 

R 55 2 Apl_ 17X50 17450 

RSS3API- 17150 172.50 

RSS4API- 16650 16850 

RSS 5 Apl — 16150 16150 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MO Ionian rinaotti per 25 torts 
Clu e 

Bid Art 

API 1370 1-520 

MOV 1*45 1385 

Jun- 1*10 1370 

Jfy— 1300 1350 

too 1390 1340 

Sea 1.1*0 1320 

Nov _ 1340 1300 

Jon 1340 1300 

Mar - 1350 1300 

volume: 0 tola of 25 tons. 
Source: Reuters. 


Company 

Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in nations, 
are in local airrenoes unless 
otherwise indicated 


Canada 

Masey-Ferguson 
4th Quar. 198S 

Revere* 337J 

Net Lots 7*0 


Net Income — 
a: to* Results in US. dollars. 

United States 

Coffins & Aikmarr 
4th Quar. IWs 

Revenue-- 7M_t 

Net Income _ ijb 

P«- Share J~~~ *7? 


Net Income 
Per Snore „ 




ihe 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
-Internal Revenue Service, bedev- 
iled all year by a new computer 
system, has processed fewer than 
58 percent of the individual lax 
returns filed during the first 13 
weeks of 1985, delaying refunds for 
millions of taxpayers. 

IRS figures released Thunday 
showed that each of the 10 regional 
service ceniers where returns arc 
processed has completed work on 
far fewer ihan during. the cone- 


cessed. 


SAHtt IN VNOfiDS AND PtCIURB 
DOONES8 URY 
dahvinthetht 






















































































Page 13 


an 

if* 160 

48 


* 18 


3) 

a. 

* iw 
? ** 

* 31 8 2 EM 


* * I 78 

* 5 ,»s 1%^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


Bllgli^MUmilP 



* 

«i>f aisl $ i[ .s 


& 


? * Oltar; 




2 Firms, Offer Shares 


a ? is J lt$:" 

not <_S) **» ^ rL$|i> llfttmtntaut Herald Tribune 

7 s u LONDON - Saaicfaj & Saaidu 

d* ** 


Study Lists 

Whedock’s 

source dose to the company said: 1984 Losses 


r'w 33 

M. 1J0 


•32 


3r lfS ,*■» 

- 'JSg *8 


»s SS i; : f Co. announced Thursday plans for 
]2 ,/tto more small acouianons and a 


“There's no specific large acquisi- 
tion in nond.” 

A public statement from Saatchi 
said the funds would “provide ad- 


Reutm 

HONG KONG — A committee 

!J S?g£ .-thaj inOEesmaD acauiadonsiind a ^.tneraus wouifi provide aa- of ^dependent directors has csii- 

u 13 ^ £*§} - sjetom« share sale that analysis diuonal resources for continued ex- ^ Wheelock Mardcn & 

e fimds for a Co-hadalossauributaNeloshare- 

,J » I ^ „ u , £“ ^ •“* 115 ““ ?* holders of 70 million Hons Kong 

to 1 ? ,1 ■ “ dollars ($5.9 minion) in 1984 after 

ff ijh. 5n A;. .adrertJSing company, also forecast each of W top 10 wortd advertising providing f pr atraordmaiy losses 

•i « & r. «***«■* profit for the year • ■ . . . _ . , of its Whedock Maritime opera- 

m ^ s« ^ >,^;^en^igS^L 30 would total attest T&t^ee big conntnes m which tios^, \he company has announced. 
* h Z * ! U* 3 * 3 “P ^ 00 W “E* 0 )- «« Saatdu does not owsan ad agency ^ deponed a profit 

n i-g « 1 a 2 . than twice Iasi year’s £183 million are Canada. Brazil and Japan. ^ 1686 SESf dollars in 1983. 

a * fcj* ■ before tax and exceptional interest With the latest acquisitions. 


J The company saia n bad agreed auvmising, marneung Hongkong & 

5 acquire Marlboro Marketing services, management consultancy Godown Co. 

< 2K,t' Inc, a US. sate&pranotitm ana and market research. The commi 

n ««l f • merchandising company, and Sio- Formed 15 years ago by Charles fikelu that Wh 


Home State May Have an Ohio Suitor 

The Associated Prea Mr. Bolen said that “it's a posa- depositors “full protection of their 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Bankers bolicy” that an Ohio bank or group dollars ,** 
in Ohio under pressure to much an of banks would aw forward with Some legislative leaders said the 

guarantee tmUinvdie 590 mO- 

Home State Savings Bank hinted who spoke on condition he not be JET «««,» r\ y» n rvruvut 
after talks rith Slate banldng offi- identified by namt said he expect- plus an esSai 

dab that an Ohio institution might ed oie or more offers from Ohio 579 w ; t iinn from ±e state. 

The CMiio Deposit Guarantee 


make a counteroffer. - banks. 

Ralph Bdeu, executive ^ ^ Tfcenly ^ ight bankers— most of 

'dent of the Ohio Bankers Assooa- them from Cincinnati, Columbus 
Jioi^ said bankers were briefed ^ Oevdand - met for 90 min- 
Wednesday in general terms about mes with Raymond Sanver. Mr. 
an offer from an out-of-state insti- Celeste's chief of staff; Robert B. 


committee said it was un- 
likely that Wheelock Maritime In- 


% S' gel & Galelnc^ a U3. concern and Nfauricc Saatchi, the company temationa] Ltd. would contribute 
f - 2 < gjedalizing in design and corpo- has thrived on rapid-fire aoquisi- to ihe results of the Wheelock Mar- 

' m sS 11 ’3«| i. Si - rate identity programs. uons. ... . den eroon in the foreseeable /nture. 




! identity programs. 

Subject partly to profit perfor- 


in 1982. Saatchi tripled its ad 


den group in the foreseeable future: 
It estimated that, excluding 


ration, reportedly Chemical Bank 
of New York, and that the Ohio 
bankers “are now on their own." 

Governor Richard F. Celeste of 
Ohio said Tuesday that an out-Of- 
state offer had teen received for 
Home State of Cincinnati, whose 
closing March 8 triggered a panic 
among some Ohio thrift customers 
and prompted the governor to close 
70 privately insured thrift institu- 
tions on March IS. 

Mr. Celeste, however, gave Ohio 
banks until Wednesday afternoon 


McAlister. Ohio's superintendent 
of savings and loans, and Com- 
merce Director Kenneth R. Cox. 

Chemical Bank, with S52.2 bil- 
lion in assets, said there was “no 
agreement regarding purchase of 
Home State by Chennai. There are 
substantial regulatory, legal, and 
other issues that would have 10 be 
resolved before any basis for acqui- 
sition could be developed." 


Fund, a private fund, insured 
Home Stare and the state-chartered 
S&Ls that Mr. Celeste ordered 
dosed. All bui Home Slate have 
since been given permission 10 re 
open for at least limited business. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Celeste was in 
Washington to testify about Ohio’s 
savings and loan crisis before a 
U3. House subcommittee. He told 
the subcommittee that the federal 
government does not have the 
emergency powers necessary to 
bead off banking industry emer- 
gencies such as occurred in Ohio. 

“I strongly urge . . , more readily 
accessible emergency powers to in- 



W 3J5 w3 
ȣ 147 U.Q 

3 S3® u» 

b 4 Ul \34 


tune, Saatchi plans , . _ 

tn raise £95.9 mfflinn after ex- «w» Hay Group, a management 


£ 1 penses, by offering 99.5 mfiOon 6Jr consultancy. Saatchi agreed last 

' Tvrrcnt crniveriiMe-nwfw™* month to pay around $10 million 


a« 


_ Ip 

l.« if ** 


‘$$5 - Saatdu already has a strong bal- 

ti: 




> as 154 

Bi3S W 
' tA4 5 j I? 
= Z22 l” ” 
1 JQ0« 12 s 
3 2.I5S 4J id 

i aa 10.1 
n 

KLS 1U 

• 1«1 
MS 

(A 

100 

I .TO 10.9 
204 5.1 
. X53el44 

f 2J0 4j 

.-S 5® «• 

lJW 3.4 f 

> n 11 11 
S5r ! >j> 1: 
.16 2J 17 
50 A7 

• -IDO 5 a 

• 1.10 85 
3.00 JJ id 

■£ K It 

-B0 22 9 
JS 24. 6 


Some anah^ts worry that Saat- 
ance sheet. " chi is branching out too fast. T 

As of Sept 30, the company's think there’s a danger of that,” said 

_L J _C __ Mr U rtf Wa«W f^nnff 


4 » 5! cash -and shori'ienn securitiescx- ^ r - of Hoarc Govett 


ceedoi debt l^r about £35 millkm. Paula Shea of Kitcat & Aitken 



,j 'St ^ ^ * that has indnded seven 1 ^^}^ 1 ^ 
ij 11 re a t : - quisitions in the past year. 

; ! ’’‘One can only imagine they far 
\i £ 3ov Si; tend making a fairly chunky acqui- 
;l ■ i»s ■ sition," said Malcolm Kitchen of 
17 &■£>' - Hoare Govett Ltd. 


with a profit equal to 59 cents and 6 
cents in. 1983, also excluding Mari- 
time results. 

The committee said Whedock’s 
assets had a value of 2.7 billion 
dollars, or 8 dollars per A share and 
&Q cents per B share at the end of 
1984. excluding Maritime, 

The Wheelock committee, bas- 
ing its analysis of the Wharf offer 
e AfV?° on a study of Wheeiock’s assets by 
awful lot die financial advisers East Aria 
, „ Warburg Ltd, said the offer ap- 

. . peared to represent a fair price. 

mssedsuAwomes. *The Saatdus h ^ ^ ^ nnccr . 

have proved they can handle acqw- tain benefits <rf remaining a minor- 
^ *" A ity shareholder in Whedock Mar- 


s £.\- 


smoos,” he said. 

The stock market reacted calmly 
to the latest moves. Saatdri’s share 
price sJippedjust 5 pence to dose at 
875 pence. 


JSe u 
240 7S 


204 


240 E.9 


At Janus Cape! &. Co., Roger 
(jj « » , Hardman suggested that Saatdu 

s ^ V - xnake long-rumored ao- /\__i r a _ o 
“ ,g|!. -.quirition of Doyle Dane Berobach klpelKHBesLarKnces^/o 

“ .^inc.. the I0th-lmgestU3. adages- .Scum 

3* » . cy. Such an acquisition would cost FRANKFURT —General Mo- 

3 'more than S100 million and make tore Core's subsidiary. Adam Opd excluding Maritime, as d Dec. 3L 
Saatchi the world’s biggest ad agen- AG, said Thursday that it is raising It said that ah Whedock directors, 
j 4in 4*;^; * cy in billings, he said. recommended West German retail holding 746,096 Whedock A shares 

“ ~ ‘ ^ to comment of- car prices by an average 23 percent and 73,481 B shares, will accept the 

* " ' ' Wharf offer. 


den are outweighed by the more 
immediate benefits of accepting the 
offer.” 

Hongkong & Kowloon Wharf 
has already purchased more than 
50 percent of Whedock’s stock. 

The committee said the book val- 
ue of net assets was 5.77 dollars per 
A share and 58 cents per B share. 


SJl'Cym 

it ,g j£jjt ;■ -Saatdu 

> 9,0,1 X fkrially on the speculation, but one effective this week. 

40b 34 V 13 

- 

iaL 35 " ,4 i jf*}?-; 

355« *1 I 14S 6., 

*' M ** i » 

e a,*! 

4 ^ «€?•■ 

70r?I 3; 
illfc Sv~. Vr I 
Mi *'i ff.j 


Mr. Celeste said Tuesday that 

. the crut-of-state purchaser would be tervene directly" and’ ^arly in situa- 

te meet or beat the out-of-state required to “pay a premium for tions which could, left to run their 
offer. The deadline passed and bis entering Ohio*’ and that the state course, do damag e far beyond one 
whether any would come up with a guarantee of thrift or one state,” Mr. Celeste 
an unspecified amount to provide »aid , 

Allis-Chalmers’s Loss Grows; 
Massey Narrows Its Deficit 


Honda Denies 
JPlan WithBL 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Honda Motor 
Co. has made no decision on 
joint development of compact 
cars with BL PLC, but the two 
are discussing ways to strength- 
en their relationship, a Honda 
spokesman said Thuzsday. 

The financial journal Nihon 
Krizai Shimbun said Honda 
and BL were close to agreement 
rat jointly developing cars with 
1.300-cubic-centimeter to 

1.600- cc engines, which Honda 
would produce in Britain. 

Before the end of 1985, 
Honda is due to launch a new 
“XX” car and a 2,000-cc to 

2.600- cc executive car, jointly 
developed by Honda and BL. 
The sales target for the “XX" in 
its first year is 15,000 an the 
domestic market and 25,000 
overseas. BL wifi make 10,000 
“XX” cars for Honda’s over- 
seas distribution subsidiaries. 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Allis-Chalmers 
Corp- 3 Milwaukee-based farm 
equipment and machinery maker, 
said its fourth-quarter loss* widened 
to $217.7 million as it look a huge 
provision fra restructuring. 

Separately, Massey- Ferguson 
Ltd_ a Toronto-based maker of in- 
dustrial and agricultural equip- 
ment, said its fourth-quarter loss 
narrowed to 57 million from a loss 
of $26.9 million a year ago. 

Allis-Chalmers said Wednesday 
that its loss for its fourth quarter, 
ended Dec. 31, contrasted with a 
loss of S29.7 million a year earlier. 
Sales slipped 6 percent to $3293 
million from $347.8 million. 

For the year, the company post- 
ed a loss of $261 million compared 
with a loss of $1423 million in 
1983, as sales rose 2 percent to 
$133 billion from SI .3 billion. 

The latest results included a 
$161.6 million fourth-quarter pro- 


vision for restructuring. The provi- 
rion indnded S155 million for the 
estimated costs of significantly re- 
ducing the scope of operations of 
its agricultural sector. 

Wendell F. Bueche, president 
and chid executive, said that seg- 
ment has been one in which the 
company has “bad continuing 
heavy losses.” 

The loss for both the quarter and 
the full year was larger than the 
company estimated. 

Massey- Ferguson said Wednes- 
day that its latest S7-miilion loss in 
the three months ended Jan. 31 
includes a 59.2-million reorganiza- 
tion charge. 

Its fourth-quarter sales fell 7 per- 
cent to $337.7 millio n from 5362 
million a year earlier. 

For the year, Massey-Ferguson 
had a profit of $73 million com- 
pared with a loss of $68 million a 
year ago. Its sales fell 5 percent to 
$1.47 Billion from $1.54 billion. 


1.72 12J 
150 13J 
4JC 1111 

643 na 

M4 M 13.1 

a ou 

is* 124 
113 114 
744 11? 

1 800 13.1 
iao aj 1: ir« 

* mj ».? 

.jb 1.2 in a* _ . _ 

> B.00 Hi sit, * 

146 5 «t «.* 

■6 


Eurofranc 
To Reopen 


* (Continued from Page II) 
ers, ministry sources udd Reuters.] 
£ni d 1 ? :i A Finance Ministry source said 
« Ailthere would be ia systematic sched-’ 
ii «■- n H/tfing of issues. • 


Stiffer Fines Urged for Boston Bank New r 91 1 5 Service Allows 

For Instant Tracing of Calls 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — U3. House 
Banking Committee members, who 
were tcrid that First National Bank 
of Boston’s profits from illegally- 
unreported cash transactions were 


crime and exchanged them for 
cashier's checks without reporting 
the transactions to authorities. 

Mr. Brown said he thought the 
bank had been penalized enough. 
But Representative Barney Frank, 
a Democrat of Massachusetts said. 


The checks were later used to 
purchase a yacht in Fonda, be 
said, which Chang ed bands again 
before being repurchased by the 
Angiulos. 

The panel said it was not satis- 
fied with Mr. Brown’s explanation 
that the branch manager con- 


14 4 «9 44 a>. 

2.4S IS IOO Si 

tOO 113 J 174 it*. 

3.97 152 
123 142 
4J0 US 
1 S3 14.) 

J6 is >: 

2= > 

1S6 4.1 ? 


twice the amount of the bank's fine. 

The market mil be open-both to ' ■ s^stifier pcqakfasmaybe-needcd.--- ^No one has bom disciplined” Tie 
1? S 1 ' Frendi arid foreign borrowers, and Thebank pleaded guilty on Feb. noted that both the bank's profits cemed, Gloria Cushing.** had ex- 

- ~ * j j to residoit and nonresident inves- 7 and was fnwd $500,000for failing and Mr. Brown's salary had in- emp ted two Angiulo accounts from 
‘tors. But residents will be required to report $13 billion in cash trans- creased. cash reporting rules and convinced 

“*’ — — action wth foragn banks as re- “I rfuwdit we paid a heavy fine ** 


to pass through an investment cur- 
rency pool to buy and sell Euro- 


33 m 2: . franc hidings, offirials said. 

| Bond traders said they expected 

, 1 '£ Y- the Treasury to limit maturities of 
.1; 4 ■> i7os & Eurofranc bonds to seven yean. 

si 2; » s 5 s*i- There was ^ecalnrian tlui GDF 
■9g H jif- ^Sl'.TVOald deride cm a five-year con- 
i^*64 1 id pon. The traders said it wouldyield 

! J2! ^ 4» percent if it were issued in Democrat 

” ’J JS: ^*L'Trance, bull IS pacentif issued in would be. a mere blip” on the 
' ’ c ri the Eurobond market . . bank’s earnings chart, he said of 

n ^£3 is £■ Referring 10 the GDF issue, a the fine. 

£ u " iS ministry official said: "The final The panel’s chairman, Fernand 


q^n^^BankSe^AcL ^ w y AO Wtobrttch 
The bank's ciainnan. Wffiiam L the taw,- Mr. Brown said, main- 


Brown, testified Wednesday that 
those transactions earned about $1 
million for the bank. 

“It leads me to conclude our cur- 
rent penalties are not enough.” said 
Representative James Cooper, 
of Tennessee. “This 



raining the violations were the re- 
sult of administrative oversights. 

Since that time, the bank has 
announced additional unreported 
foreign transactions, including $73 
million with Haiti. 

The family, the Angiulos, ex- 
changed $50,000 in old $100 bills 
for five $10,000 cashiers checks at a 
bank branch in the North End see- 


(Continued from Page 11) 

are 16 fire districts. 8 police dis- 
tricts, and 4 ambulance districts. 
Yet, with all the tourists flocking to 
the area to visit Disney World, 
‘‘people just did not know which 
jurisdiction they were in. and 
whom to call in emergencies,” said 
Roger D. Richardson. 911 project 
director for Orange County. 

So about four years 3|Q, Orange 
County became one of the first 
counties to install Enhanced 911, 
and the results have been impres- 
Mr. Brown- repeated to the sive, Mr. Richardson says. In one 
House panel Wednesday that the celebrated case, an Orlando wom- 
interoational transactions and an received a telephone call from a 
dealings with the Angiulo family distraught daughter in Ann Arbor, 
were unrelated and there was no Michigan, who was contemplating 
intent to aid cr imin a l s. suicide. The woman dialed 911 and 

“1 can only stress that we would ” because the enhanced system 
not knowingly en g^y in or assist bas the ability also to route calls 


her supervisor to go along with her 
decision, so higher bank officials 
never knew about it Transactions 
over $10,000 must be reported un- 
less exempted. 


identify the location of a caller on a 
four- or eight-household party line 
— still common in rural areas. Is 
big-city offices, where elec ironic 
switchboards known as Private 
Branch Exchanges, or PBX sys- 
tems, are common. Enhanced 911 
produces the address of the PBX. 
which could be a skyscraper. 

Still, emergency communica- 
tions experts say they are pleased 
by results from Enhanced 911. And 
they look forward to additional en- 
hancements. In the near future, Mr. 
Fredericks predicts, Enhanced 91 1 
will be augmented to allow rescue 
workers to retrieve budding layout 
information from a computer's 
database: 



Lotus Development Programs Its Diversification 


<y.i (Cbn tinned from Page II) 


a l' be'sinmie and elegant,” Mr. Manzi 
. j .f; j!- said. “That’s what is missing on the 

* A )} ,s? 4 market now." 

*{ rf 12 14* *S. 


■3 10 k : -Simplicity and degance are what 
1 {ft£>‘‘'gav6 Lotus its. name. Lotos 1-2-3 

1 ?« rlo ' S * 

* 


17 11 


i»=£-£ : 'was the first truly ‘•integrated” 
-j; *' product, meaning that it combined 
£ £ three programs in one: a spread- 
7 v - i , .sheet, a smafl data-base manager, 


Last year. IBM brought out its 
own series of programs that com- 
pete with 1-2-3 and Symphony. But 
they have been late ana, to many 
critics in the trade press, unimpres- 


*23 « ' ^ |.2*'*aad a graphics program tlmt con- sionby3 
*.« J' ’* ’l: ip* V- verted their results into neat pie “And Lotus misjudged the pow- 
■ w ” ,g ^i-.^dbardians. er of the standard it had created,” 

~ il « SSi f Its success — Lotus 1-2-3 has said Chris Christiansen, senior ana- 



in two small software houses creat- 
ed by former Lotus employees 
where some of the most innovative 
work is bring done. 

Mr. Kapor, meanwhile, has re- 
linquished more of the day-to-day sive. 

operations of Lotus to Mr. Manzi. With IBM still without a major 
< Lotus has also created a separate micro-mainframe offering, both 

OTt^-2-3/^ older* product has “pawing and saeniific ctiviskm, technology buffs and Wall Street 
held on, outselling the newer vex- T*"* CTa £ Ic researchers to remain enthusiasiic about Lotus. 
.. - w »- 0 feed dam mio lotus spreadsheets The company has $58 miihon in 

directly from scientific instru- 
ments. Mr. Kapor, however, is con- 
centrating on more distant pro- 
grams, about which he is 
tightlipped. 

The biggest competition could 


Symphony resembled 1-2-3, but 
it added a word processor and a 
communications program and left 
room for other functions. 

But unlike 1-2-3, Symphony has 
proved complicated, its word pro- 
cessor clumsy. Although Lotus 
originally expected Symphony to 


Orlando and save a life in Ann 
Arbor,” Mr. Richardson said. 

Police and rescue officials con- 
cede that wrinkles must still be 
worked out of Enhanced 911. Most 
of the systems, for example, cannot 


Viking Resources 
international N.V. 

NAV. as at 29-3-85 
$48.46 


INFORMATION: 

Pierson, Hddring & Pierson N.V., 
Hemngracht 214, Amsterdam. 


to 1. 


% n 
75 ’J 


14 n 


.TCe 1 

rs 

=.40 




if 


'buaness. But among those that sar- better produa. 
r> ^Ji' vived, the highest hopes were hdd Even as sales of Symphony were 
^ n.^-for Symphony, the program that beginning to disappoint, another 
■ j % "iSwfis expected to prove that Lotus hc^e arose. It was Lotus's Jazz, an 
ft ■'* V was not a one-product wonder. migrated business package for 
J5 -“Everybody got carried away Apple Computer Inn’s Macintosh. 
* ^ the thought that Integra don The program was important to Lo- 

ir £,$■!* would solve the world's problems, - tus, because it made the company 

'f* «:i^ 


cash, no long-tenn debt, and seems 
tikdy to earn $48 million on $240 
miihon in sales this year. Its slock, 
which dropped as low as 16 after 
IBM’s software announcements 
__ last year, has rebounded, dosing at 

come from the company whose $25.75 bid, off $1.50 from Tuesday, 
coattails Loras rode to success: in over-the-counter trading 
IBM. Wednesday. 


aco 

114 11* 



ft;. 


3^2 

iS 

zee 

*3= 


ifr 

,f. *■» • 

3 J-fl 

id 


Jobless Total 
I § JPlRiw in U.K. 


UA 




tc * 


% ss 

ft A * ft^J 

j* Sj £ 1 

'i 

■5 41 1 

in; " * 

f4; 


Reuters 


< •» \ 

*1 


2 I 1 ’ 5 ?■ v v 
3 f ^ 


2.V 

:£> 

148 

_J4 

& 


sJ 

% \ 
n 


rare 1 ’ 


ix 

2* 


LONDON — Adult -tm em- 
ployment in Britain^ excluding 
school-leavers, rose a provision- 
al seasonally adjusted 2.600 in 
‘ March; to a record 3,146,600, or 
13 percent of the ft'ork force, 
the Department of Employ- 
ment said Thursday. . 

; In February, adult unenj- 
-pJoyment rose a revised 20,100 
and' also amounted to 13 per- 
j* of the work force. 

i« fV, The una^nsted jobless totaL. 

r! which includes school-leavers, 
■S ti; .fell 56,100 in March to 
% ■ 3,267,600, or I3i percent of the 

r '-?{ , work force. In.. February, the 
,t§ <£?■ - unadjusted unemployment rate; 
^ %$■ was 13,7 percent .. 


t * 




: j 

r -1 LZ 


desk, a Macintosh on the right.) It 
was critical to Apple, which has 
been unable to crack the lucrative 
office market — in pan for a lade 
of serious buaness software. 

But recently, Lotus — a compa- 
ny that boasted that it always deliv- 
ered its products when promised — 

said “bugs” in the program would 
delay it another two months. Fi- 
nancially, the move will have Utile 
impact. However, some are ques- 
tioning whether the delay is evi- 
dence that Lotus has grown too 
quickly — it rose from 240 employ- 
ees in January 1984 to 800 now — 
and might be losing its edge. 

. “It’s embarrassing; our reputa- 
tion was a bit tarnished,” Mr. Ka- 

■ por said. “But when Jazz goes out 
the door,. I want to make sun it is 
right.” ..- ... 

Whatever the meaning .of the 
Jazz delay, there is no question that 
Mr. Kapor’5 company has been 

■ forced to^grow up fast Perhaps 
worried about losing its entrepre- 
neurial edge, it has already invested 


ITALFORTUNE INTERNATIONAL FUND 

SodM Anonym* 

Sii gftSodd : 11, bewiavanf ft wdi D u t htw Charlotte 
LUXEMBOURG 
H-C. Luxembourg B 8735 


Messieurs la setionnaues sont pri£s d’aseister i T 

assembles; gEnerale ordinaire 

da aetion a ires qui se tieodra le 23 avril 1985 ft 15 h 30, en I'botdt de la 
Banque Internationale i Luxembourg S.A., 2. bid Royal. 

ORPRE DU JOUR 

1. Rapports do consul d’adminislratioQ M du cotnmtsmire; 

2. AppiolMtion du Man et du compie de peitea et profits au 31 dtoembre 
1984; a&ectalion des rfeultats; 

3. Dfchsige 3 domer au coasgil d*«faiixiistrati<a et au commisMire; 

A Ratification de la cooptation (fun adminblrateur; 

,5. Nominations sututaira. 

Tout actioonaiic d&iram Stre present ou reprteenlft i I’asaemblie genirale 
devrs en aviaer la society el d^poser sea actions au morns cinq jours francs 
avant I’assembtee aux gmchets des banques suivanies : 


BftoqiK In tema donate 
k Luxembourg S wA. 

LUXEMBOURG 

Bines C. Strinhaiulin and fn, 

FIRENZE 

Bua San Faolo • Brescia 
BRESCIA 
Banea Toscana 
FIRENZE 


Banco di Santo Spirito 
ROMA 

CreditoArtiduo 

MILANO 

Crediio Varesfno - 
VARESE 

Banea di Valle Camonlc 
BRENO (BRESCIA) 


La conditions devote serum cdlesd£finies dans lea amcles 67 « 71 de la 
W du 10 aoflr 1915e(deb loi modificative du.24avril 1%3. - 

- Le Cooseil <T Administration 




OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Your own vacation land on (he fabulous Lake of the Ozarks in Central 
Missouri. Right In the heartland of Amcnea Away from aties noise, 
pollution and the rat race of the workaday world 
Forbes Inc . pub&shcn of Forbes Magazine, through Its subsidiary. 
Sangre de Crtsto Ranches Inc., ss offering the opportunity of a Sfedme for 
you to acquire one or mare acres of our choice Missouri lakeland 
There’s no better time titan right now to find out if Forbes Lake of the 
Ozarks is the place for you All our homesoes. inducSng lake front and lake 
view, will be a minimum see of one aae — rangmg to over three acres 
Cash prices start ai S6.00G One or more acres of this incredibly beautiful 
lakeland can be yours lor the modest payment of $60 per month, with 
easy credit terms available. 

For complete information, including pictures, maps and tull details 
on our libera] money-back and exchange privileges, please wnte K* 
Forbes Europe Inc . DepL H. P.O. Box 86. London SW1 1 3UT England 
Obtain the Piopenv Report requrea &v Feoerai law and read it beimc 
signmfl aryin^ig No Federal agency has judged irw memo a value rf jrv 
ol this proper! r Equal Credit and houranq Opponunii/ 


gmmuuiiiiuiumiiuiiiiiiiiuHUiuiuiDiu 

I PARIS, FRANCE I 



= kitchen, irtiJify rms. & dookroom, *ur- E 
S rounded by 2,000 sqjn. mDed gar- = 
3 den, heated swfnwning pod & pod- § 
| house, 2 garages & outbuildings. E 

I FREEHOLD F.F.3,000,000 1 

| (approx.) $315,000- £256^000 1 

E Cdrtfoch Mrs. McLaren, Prerre fle urs. = 
5 VlneuS St. fimin, 60500 ChanfBy. = 
i TeL; Paris 457 OS89. E 
3uiuuiiiuiiiiuxMiitiiiniiifiiuiiiiiiiiHiii? 


Tte special 
advertising section on 

Nertii American 
Real Estate 

will appear 
on April 19. 1985 
Pacific Edition. 


AMENDMENT 

NOTICE OF REDEMPTION 


EXPORT DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 

U.S. 8100,000,000 
12% % NOTES DUE MAY 15, 1987. 
SERIES MU 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Export Development Corpo- 
ration intends to redeem on May 15, 1985 the UJS. S8 L000, 000 
notes outstanding for the 12% % Series Mil Notes due 1987 at a 
price of 10016 % of the principal amount together with interest on 
such principal amount accrued and unpaid to the said date of 
redemption. 

The redemption price on the said Notes shall be payable on 
presentation and surrender thereof with all unmatureal coupons at 
any one of the following paying agencies: 

Bank of Montreal, 

9 Queen Victoria Street, 

London EC4N 4-XN, England- 
Bftnque Internationale a Luxembourg, 

2 Boulevard Royal e, 

2953 Luxembourg. 

Bank of Nova Scotia, 

66 Boulevard de llmperatrice, 
lOOO Brussels, Belgium. 

Bank of Montreal, 

37-39 Ulroenstrasse, 

D-6000 Frankfurt, W. Germany. 

Bank of Montreal Trust Company, 

2 Wall Street, 

New York, 

N.Y. 10005, U.S.A. 

NOTES should be surrendered with all coupons appertaining 
thereto maturing after the date fixed for redemption, failing which 
the face value of any missing unmatured coupon will be deducted 
from the sum due for payment. 

Any amount so deducted will be paid against surrender of the 
missing coupon within a period of 10 years from May 15, 1985. On 
and after the date fixed for redemption, interest on the notes will 
cease to accrue. 

Dated: March 18. 1985 L 

EXPORT DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 


-ADVERTISEMESIT- 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
4 April 1985 

Thftiwr asset vain quotaf lonssdown below are sunpHed Mr the Fmau listed with the 
exception at some funds whose quotes are based on Issue prices. The tallow bis 
marginal symbols indicate freaoencr of quotation supplied for the HIT: 

(d) -dally; (w) -weekly; CM -bMnontbly; (r) -regularly; (l) -Irregularly. 


AU MAU MANAGEMENT 
(W) AJ-MOl Tn.ri.ft6 


OBUFUEX LIMITED 
S 15140 — (w) Multicurrency. 


BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. Lid. 

— (d ) Boert>on<i 

— fd ) Conbar- 


— M Dollar MKPum Term. 

, cn , K — fwi Dollar Long Term- 

(ciirim —I iwi Japanese Yen.. 

S «i?SnS -<w) Pound Sterling 

ccivnE — <w) DeufsctwAtartc 

IEJHl-82 -tw) Dutch Florin 


-SIOJU 
JS 1Q.Q5 


Jt 10L3& 


— id j Equlboer America. 

—Id 1 EQuIbottr Fu mote 

-Id ) Equlboer Pacific SF IISBjOO ISH 

—ia ) Grobar SF 1056J® 5W, “ Franc 

— Id ) stockbar- SF \(MJXr ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 


__C 10-71 
.DM958 
.FL HUM 
_SF 952 


— (a > CSF Fund. 


—Id I Crossbow Fund 

— <d ) ITF Fund N.V 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
— (d ) Aslan Growth Fund. 
— lw» Dhierbond. 


— 4w> FIF— Amertco . 
— <w> FIF— Eun»e_ 
— (w) FIF — Pacific. 


PBSS5U. The H0BtNIO») 46900 

5FU43 — I d > Bevw BaM00*WH+ 

. S 1137 PA RISDAS— GROUP 

—Id ] Cortaxa Interna Hanoi 

— twl OBLi-DM 

'SFKTO z}"' OBLIGESTION. 


ft 31 JO 
SI9.lt 


-Id I Indosuaz Muiribonds A. 



-twIOBLWXMXAR. 

— lw» OBLI-YEH 

— t w > OBU-GULDEN. 

— (U j PAROILrFUNO. 

iri I tnM,« isaiSSSg n « — w > PARINTER FUND, 

—Id 1 Indosuer Mum bonds B S 14183 _ M } PAR us Treosury 

-+lw)RBC Inn Income Fd S10J9- 

<nno -Hd I RBC MteLCumincv Fd.— — *2125 

I tJS ' Hw) RBC Horffl Amr - RL— — * 92fm 

SI 3112 SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (4ft«G3ft27D) 

£0221- — (w)lnc.:Bld S454- Otter. . ..W.30- 

SI JUS — (wlAcc.: Bid *456 Offer S5J2 

50599 


— (w) BrltS MonoB-Curr 

— td ) Brit. intUJWanogjiortf 
— Id ) Brit Infljt MwasLPortf 
— lw) Brlt.Unlversal Growth- 
—twl Brlt.Gold Fund. 


— (wl Brtt5AooagXjirreflcv — 
—Id ) BrIL Jaaan Dir Peri. Pd 
— iwl BrltJersey Gilt Fund — 
— td ) Brit. World Lets. Fund— 
—Id > BrlLWoria TecJm. Fuad 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— !w) Cnptrnl IntT Fund, 
—twl Coottol llcftlo r 


SVENS KA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

37 Devonshire 5d-Lood<xv0l-377-*>*0 

*3556 —lb I SHB Bond Fund SUM 

s 1138 — «w) shb inti Growth Fund-. ft 1958 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

— Id ) Actions Suisse* SF 34&50* — Id ) Amertco-Valor SF 584J» 

1 — (dl Bond Volar Swf SF lOZiU — Id ) D-Mark Band Selection DM I14J4 

— tdl Bond Voter Djoarit—- DM 10*25 —id J Dollar Band Selection—- S121S2 
—Id) Bona Valor USOOLLAR — 5 1UL53 —Id) Florin Bond Selection-. FL 11 loo 


Yen 1D487JJ0 — <d 1 intervator. 


SF 10870 — Id ) Japan Portfolio- 


—Id) Bond Valor Yen 

—Id) Convert Valor Swt ... 

-(d) Convert Valor US-DOLLAR. S111J4 — d > Sterling Bond Selection^. 

— td > Canosec SF K4JM —Id ) Swiss Forelcn Bond Set. 

—Id I CS Foods— Bonds SF 7S25 — <d i Swlssvalor New Series _ 

—fa > CS Rands— inti — SF 1DE2S —Id ) Universal Bond Select— 

— Id ICS Money Marlce! Fund — 1105000 — Id ) Unlversol Fun 


— id) CS Money Mnrttrt Fund 

— id ) Enerote— Valor 

— <o) msec. 


— (d I Eurnpo— Vaior_ 
— td ) Pocmc— Voter. 


SF8U0 
SF 85650 
-110032 
SF105il6 
SF 29435 
5 F 8433 

- . ... , . SF 11759 

DM1IQ9X0 — td ) Yen Bond Selection Y MUXMJ0 

SFW&aO UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

SF«1™ — (d 1 Amen U.S. Sh. SF4050 

SF 5735 


If T7DJ5 — 14 1 Bond-invert. 


OIT INVESTMENT FFM 
— Kd) Conczntra 


— Id 1 Fon» Swiss StL. 
— (d ) Jaoan-lnvest. 


— Hd ) Inti Rentenfond. 

Dunn & Horgltt i Lfovd George. Brussels 
— <mJD&H Commodity Pool- S300J7 


SF 13100 
SF 97100 
SF 54730 
SF197JW 


DM2463 — (dISafllSoutnAfr.Sh. 

DM8761 — (d)Slnw(rtocfc price). 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

. _ . . , — IdJUnlrentO DM <2.00 

—(ml CvroencY l GaM Pool — ft 18966 •“ —id ) UnHonds DM 2150 

—tm) Winch. Life Fut Port— ft 4UUO — —<a ) Unlrak DM7660 

— (m)TnmsWorWFut.PooU S97V36”’ 


Oflier Funds 

FAC MGMT.LTO. INV. ADVISERS , w , 

». Laurence Povnty Hill, EC4. 01-423-4688 }*{ I23”2 t '" VKtmon,a Fun »- 

— ( wl FAC Atlantic ft 1135 JJSleSffiSf dP* 1 

— (w) FiC European S10k06 

— Iw) Fic oriental 


S 2163 
S 1072 
>360 

525.97 (w) Aaulla international Fund_ S1U97 

Irl Arab Finance l.F s 84862 

FIDELITY POB 670. Hamilton Bermuda (b)Ariane S1J48TO 

— (tn) American Values Common^ S86J0 (w) Trust cor InPI Fd. CAEIF) S102I 

— lm> Amer Values CunU>ref_ S10164 (w) BNP Interbond Fund *10110 

—Id) Fidelity Amer. Assets S6S64 iw) Bonds* lex- Issue Pr. SF 134.90 


—Id ) Fidelity Australia Fund- 
-Id > Fidelity Discovery Fund- 

— Id 1 Fidelity Dir. 5vss.Tr 

-Id ) Fidelity Far East Fund- 

— <d I Fidelity InUFund- 


*867 
5 11X22 
t ’’2124 
*2062 
S 5560 
S 27.14 
*1264 
*134.16 
S14J0 
>3067 


— Id I Fidelity Orient Fund- 

— fd ) Fidelity Frontier Fund 

— W 1 Fidelity Pocffle Fund 

—Id J FldeCty SpcI. Growth Fd. — . 

—10 ) Fidelity World Fund 

FORBES PO B8B7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Agent 01-830-3013 

—Iwl Gold income S 764* 

— (wl Gold Appreciation >464 

— [vwj Dollar Income S8JE 


d ) CJ.R. Australia Fund 

id i CJJL Japan Fund— 

:m) Cleveland Offshore Fd. *268763 

wl Columbia Securities FL 113.12 

b) COMET E S 927.1 D 

fw) Convert. Fd. Inn A Certs J9.1B 

>) convert. Fd. mn B Certs S262J 

w) aG.C J76J4 

- D. Witter Wld wide MTS»— S1IL23 


— (m) Stratealc Trading, 


. S 36 0 - 73 IB 

(llLOMO (wl Finsbury Grown Ltd. 


GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— twl East Investment _ 

—Iwl Scottish World Fund , , - - — T 

— (wl Slate SL American *15568 W Fixed ! nca me Trans 

CoptLGftd dJJ iLLonAgentOl -491 4230 I w> Fawele x Issue Pr, 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. m'- 
PB 1 W. St Peter Port. Guernsey. 001-28715 d 

(m) FuIutGAMSlA * 11863 (d 

(m)GAM Arnltraae Inc- — S 12468 id 

twl GAMerlca Inc 


(wl GAM Boston Inc. 
Iw) GAM Ermlfaoe— 
fw) GAM Franc-voL 


m) Canada GttFMoriooea Fd 
d ) Capitol Present. Fd. Intl_ 
w) Otodel Fund. 


S9JQ 
*11 JO 
>162 
*963 
S1DJB 


Drakkor Invest. Fund N.V_ S 1,1 0274 

. Dreyfus Fund Inti S 36.12 

.Wl Dreyfus Inter continent *3163 

(w) lTie Establishment Trust SLOT 

5962 


* 1.14 jd J Europe ObllDatkmi 
First Eagle Fund 
Fifty Store Lftl 


Formulo Selection Fd— 
Fandltallo. 


Govemm.Sec Fund«_ 
_ - Frtmfcl-Trurt Intenbu. 

* <wl Mausemann Hldos. N.V_ 
(Wl Hestto Funds. 


Id ) GAM international lr»c.. 


(w) GAM Nortti America Inc, — _ 
(Wl GAM N. America Unit Trust. 

(w) GAM Pacific Inc 

(w) GAM Slerl. A Inti umr Trust 

(ml GAM Systems Inc. 

(Wl GAM Worldwide (nc. 


*1119 
SF 97.73 
1WA38 
*10366 
10360 P 
111461- 
13160- P 
*107.92 
>13660* 
*11174 


(ml GAM Tycho SA. Class A. 

G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 

— Iw) Berry Poe. Fd. LM. S 964 

— (d)G.T. Applied Science S1S39- 

— td ) G.T. Asean H.K. GwttLFd— I1Z27- 

— (wIG-T. Asia Fund *3.91* 

—Id I G.T. Australia Fima S2162- 

— Id ) G.T. Europe Fund *941 

— Iw) G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund >1067 

—Id 1 G.T. Da Hor Fund S 1454 

—Id I G.T. Bond Fund *966 

—idi G.T. Global TeamtoyFd *1263 

—10 1 G.T. Honshu Pamftnder__ *25.11 
— 4d 1 G.T. investment Fund— *1767 
—Id ) G.T. Japan Small CaFund— *4258* 
—Id J G.T. Technoloey Fund * 27.79 

— _ . JX125* 


—Id I G.T. South China Fund 


wl Horizon Fund. 

b 1 1 LA Inti GoM Bond. 


interim) SA. 


*1360265 
_ **7869 
_ *11462 
_ * 1060 
SF 21665 
_ *769 
. SF 7260 
_ *2367 
_ S 82.47 
DM4161 
_ *111.13 
_ >10436 
*1.105.12 
*962 

. . . S 1264 

:w) imoonarkot Fund *32040 

d I Intermbilno Muf. Fd. CL'B'^ S38SJO 

> ) lnt*l Securities Fund * 9J1 

td ) Investo OWS- DM 44J1 

(r > rnvesr Aflanttaues S 7.15 

r \ Italtortune (nH Fund SA >1161 

w) Japan Selection Fund S 10544 

W) Japan Padllc Fund .. S 1 T266 

.m) Jeffer Ptne. Inti. Ltd s 10,26360 

td I KMnwort Benson inrt Fd *2138 

iw) Klelnwori Bens. JOB. Fd * 7235 

(d I Letawn Fund *1.18664 

(w) Leverage Coo Hold *17061 

Id ) Llqulboer S 1.23960 

w) Uoyds tall. Smaller Cos SIM? 

w) Luxfund *7269 

ml Magoafund H.V._ S 197.74 

d ) Medtoktnum 5*1. Fd 5 1359 


b I Meteore. 
wl NAAT. 


d 1 Nlkkp Growth Package Fd 
w) Nippon Fund. 


Y 117637 
_ *1068 
*9694.94 
*30.14* 


EBC TRUST CO.(JERSEY) LTD. 

1-3 Seale SUL He Her ,-0534-36331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

0(d) Inc.: Bid *964 Offer *9430 

9(d)CopL: Bid *1061 Offer *10429 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

—Id ) Short Term 'A' (Accum) S 14626 

— (d 1 Short Term'A' (Dl*tr! *16120 

— (d l Shari Term 'B' (Accum) *1.1218 

— <d) Start Term VtOWri *06541 iwj 

—Iw) Long Term *2164 (di 

JAROINE FLEMING, POB 7S GPO Ho Kg !3 

— <b ) J.F Japan Trust Y4893 “ 

—lb) J.F South East Asia *3005 w 

—lb I JJ= Japan Technology Y 23007 

— (hi JJ=PadGcS*c54ACC)- *563 YZ 

—in) j.F Australia *<2S 

L LOYD5 BANK INTUPOB438. Geneva II W 

— f (¥rt UonJs Irrt'l Dollar S10S20 Jw, 

— Hwj Uoyds lnt*l Europe SF IW4D J*. 

— flw) Uovdft inti Growtn SF 17940 w 

— +(w) Lfovds Inll Income SF 31260 W 


w) Novalec Investment Fund . *9463 

W) NAMF, >146.17 

ml NSP F I T S 15561 

S1666 


w) PANCURRI lnc._ 

PorionSw. REst Geneva SF 169760 
- 1-E.PernMl Value Fund N.V. *162665 

b 1 Pleiades *102564 

FSCO Fund N.V. S 17167 

PSCOInN.N.V_ S 



Quantum Fund N.V. 

Renta Fund 

RentlnvesL. 

Reserve Insured Dodos! I s _ s 1070.98 

samurtri Portfolio SFllUfl 

sci/Tech. SA Lymnwourg *962 

Stale St. Bonk Equity HdgsNV *967 
Strategy Investment Fund— >19.9* 

Syntax Ltd.' (Class A) 1 S74S 

Techno Growth Fund 5F89J98 

Tokyo Poc Hold. (Sea)— S 10245 

Tokyo Pot Hold. N.V *14040* 

TransDOcHk: Fund S 85.93 

Turquoise Fund- >9662 


(W) Uovdft Inn Pwwtr. SF 13740* < w > TweedySrawn# rw-ClosjA *106568 
iw) TweedyXtrmtne av.CtassB >14«»42 


NIMARBEN 
— Id ) Class A 
— (w ) CK4S B - U5. 
— (w ) Class c - Jane 


(d ) UMICOFund 

(d 1 UNI Bend Fund — 
id) UNI Capital Fund. 
-*7206 (w) Vanderbtrt Assets. 


DM 7760 
*93368 
*106363 
>1161 


Cm) Winchester Financial Lid * KU3 

(ml Wlnaiester Dtversin«J" JZL39- 

Id ) World Fund > A *1064 

(w) Worldwide Seairlltoft SIS Vb„ M266 
(w) Worldwide Special S/S 2Ki. S 167964 

DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Francs: FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs; a — asked; + — Offer Prlces.'b — bid 
Change P/V $10 to 51 per unit; NA— Not Available; NX.— Nol Communicated ;o— 
New; s — suspended; S/S - Stock Split; * — Ex-Dividend; •* — Ex-Rta.- * M - 
Gross Performenee Indee Fob.; • — Redempt-prlce- Ex-Csupen: •• — Formeriv 
Worldwide Fund Ltd; d — Offer Price tad. 3% prelim, charge; 4+ — dally stack 
prlca aeon Amsterdam Stock Exchange 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


Th ursday 

AMEX 


Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to Me closing on Watt Street 
and do not reflect Kite trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


ON. YkL PE 1B0S HJoft Low Quot. Ql'BB 


T4 

IS 

JOB 27 17 
• 
S 


•17r U IS 
Mb 14 


.15* 14 10 
1J2 44 15 


* Fotomt 
4W. FrdHIr 
14 FrMEl 
5 Fries H n 


1 91 
St IM 
45 Ilk 
S 51k 
38 ZM 
1* B ■ 
187 185k 
8 20* 
249 1W 
11 5* 

HB 17* 


21 — Ik 
im 
1* 

5?k — Vh 
234k + Ik 
7* — kh- 
lflk 
20W + 

13* + vk 
«+ * 
1714 


4 
44 

JO 4.1 9 

13 

15 

71 

J8 40 1 
JO <3 14 
.10 J 13 

JO 14 13 

5 

JO SJt 
JO 2.1 13 

Jl 2J 4 
J0t> 3.1 12 


214 1* 
J» 2» 
71k 214 
391k 231k 
14* 119b 
179b 11 
i4u> m 

13 - 814 
2714 25 

94k 2Vh 
28 129k 

Mb 314 
14* 749 
414 24k 

3* 1* 

391k 2JVb 
144k Mb 
13* 4tk 

14 im 

T4* 10 
3514 134k 
10«k B* 


USB 

LOBara 

LoPnt 

UokbSo .ISo 
LndBfl n J4 : 
LOmks J2 ' 
L oser 
Loom n 
UoarPP 
LdOoPh 
Latittis 
LotaurT 
LOfFPft jo : 
UttkJ 
Lotto# 

Lonmr 
uma joe 

LwjdvE 

Lurto 

Lveots 

LvnCSv JO ' 

uvrtchC jo : 


40 114 

13 21k 

39 54k 

7 3414 

4 14 

8 14* 

5 12* 
12 114k 

41 Z7Vk 

41 6* 

2 Z79h 

31 59k 

M 7Mk 

3 214 
10 2 * 
45 38* 

144 1414 
38 13 

42 IM 

4 141k 
217 304k 

25 914 


47 
37 
24 
744 

54 109k 101k 10* 
40 30* 30* DOW 



4* 

3% 

39* 

22* 

3* 

1* 

5* 

3* 

9* 

7W 


2* 

26 

31 

714 

4* 

4* 

3* 

416 

2W 

m 

4 

9Vh 

4* 

4* 

1* 

32* 

11* 

8* 

774 

ffl 

35* 

5D* 

36* 

28W 

19 

30* 

19 


19k 19k + Vk 
ZVl 214 
49k 49k— * 
341k 341b + h 
14 14 

1414 MW + Vk 
129k l*k 
11 11 — Vk 

269k 2S9h— 9k 
6V, 69k + Ik 

279k 279k— 14 
59k S9k 
15* 1594+ 94 

244 2to 
3814 389k + Ik 
14V4 14W + lb 
129b 13 + 9k 
119k 121k + Ik 
14 tk T4Vk + Vk 
289k 309k +2 
99k 994 + Vk 


13Vk— Ik 
21k— lb 
81k + tk 
Ilk 

*lfc— M 
39b + 9k 


1394 + Ik 
IMk 
49b 

#94— W 
21* +-9k 
l*9k— Vk 
25Vi— lk 
M 

S9k— lk 

IS*- 1 * 

36W— W 

&b $u 


5 .uft? Sri?? 


10 . Quafiea J8 


210 249b 249k 249k + 3k 


34 

6* 

6* 

4* + * 

1 

4* 

4* 

«*+ * 

11 

294 

3* 

294 + * 

7 

14* 

HVb 

16* — * 

425 

17 . 

1494 

17 j 

27 

1* 

1* 

1*+ * 1 

29 

13* 

13* 

UVk 

20 

3* 

3!* 

3W+ * 

-48 

13* 

13* 

12*—* 

802 

49* 

41* 

49 + * 

100c 52 
2 8 

1 

52 + Vk 

8 — * 

1 

3* 

37b 

3*— Vk 

'48 

.ink. io* 

W*— * 

22 

17 

17 

17 — lk 

48 

26* 

2«4 

24* + * 

- 4 

28* 

27* 27*— * 

91 

3* 

3* 

316— * 

39 

4* 

«* 

4* 

1 

3H6 31* 319k— * 

7 

6* 

4* 

6* 

148 

15* 

IS 

15 

18 

19* 

19* 

19*— * 


4 2 

2494 89k 
* lk 
153* 119k 
11th 89 4 
21 141k 

23 149k 

31k 14b 
149b 101k 
89b 49k 
1994 141k 
219k 10 
149b 79k 
109b 51k 
239b 159b 
15*4 9«h 


USR lad 

ultimo 9 

Unicom 14 

Urdcppf J5 SJt 
UnUnrti JOe «J 
UAlrPd 54b 3J 10 
UnCooFs 14 

UFoodA .to 53 23 
UlMtd Mt 45 15 
UlKMV 54tU5 13 
unttfln j 0 b 2J 
UnltyB TOJ0C 
UnvCm 17 

UnlirR* -25 

UntvRu JM 4J 1 
UnvPat ‘ 


35 31k 

234 ink 
120 94 

71 139k 
M3 W 
IT- 18 
17 229k 

17 m 
15 13* 

5 41k 

5 ink 

18 10 
35. 14 

IS i«ft 
779 >494 


3 3 — % 

uik nu*Ak 
W WKr-rA( 
1794 179k" .A 
221k 22W.+JW 
194 W+li 
MVb IJto— ^Vh 
44k 6W~ - 
ran 189kCUJk 
9* 9*"- J4 

*S5 mU-'-ta. 


109k 99k 
27 15* 

27W 159k 
121k 494 
5 29k 

239k 149k 
74* 39k 
15* 994 
8* 39k 
IBM 49k 
9* 5Vk 
189b 119h 
8* C* 
129b 8 
19* 139k 


VST n JO* 
VoflvR 2.10 
Votapra <44 
Vtfbtm 
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VtRsb 

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vertp* .to : 
Vtetodi 
VI con 

VJrco Mt 
VtauolG J8 
Voolex . J6. 
VutcCo jo 


22 Wb 99b 

J 27 27 

4 249h 2694 
412 79k 7* 

7 994 394 

15 TTVk J9* 
79 4* 414 

M 1094 Wk 
4 3 5 

3 99b 99k 

27 794 79k 

15 1494 149b 

•2 M -8* 

27 109k 1094 
2 18* 18* 


249S-?* 


1096+16 
5. + W 
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794+4* 
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30 


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13 


111 26* 
9 494 

494 2<k 
13* 494 

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29k 194 
38 Vk 25* 
104k 6* 

214 194 
394 2V4 
994 494 

fVi 5 
14 11 

5* 294 
2* 94 

17* TVS 
7* 34k 
4 194 


JS J 12 

41 

99* 

99 

99 — * 

12 

52 

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6 Vk— * 

JSr 1J 

38 

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2 * 

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27 

35 

13 

12 * 

12 *— to 

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20 

5* 

5*4 

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42 

2 * 

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216 +ft 


58 

2 

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2 

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281 

37* 

37* 

37* + * 

10 

25 

9* 

9* 

9* — M 

9 

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2 

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2 

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3 

2 * 

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JO 

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916 

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jrt &7 r 

4 

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12 * 

12 *— * 


290 

3* 

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344 + to 


495 

1 W 

1 * 

TVk ■ 

17 

57 

816 

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8 * 

500 

1 

5 

5 

5 - * 


31 

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1847 

916 

9 

916 

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149 

9* 

9 

9 


3 

1 * 

t* 

194 

11 

27 

27 

24* 27 + * 

8 

45 

34* 

3394 

34* + la 

JB 2J 31 

n 

316 

3* 

3* 


17* 

12 Jodvn 

SM 35 9 

15 

MVk 

14 

14* 

9* 

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5 

4* 

4* 

4*— * 

5* 

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4 

106 

2 * 

2 * 

2 * 

8 * 

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J9t 4.1 16 

65 

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1 

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416 

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11 * 

716 JoAnAm 

JO U 11 

84 

9 

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9 + * 

11 * 

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4 

44 

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8 * 

SVk + Vk 

716 

4 JmeJk n 

5 

1 

4* 

4* 

4* 


24* 16* 
2294 1414 
12 4 

16* 49k 

18* 99k 

209k 149k 
IB* ID 
7th 344 
71k 39b 
• 5* 

344 1 
794 6 
Iff* 6th 
11 7*k 


OCA 

Oafcwd job 
Oder An 
OOfrtBs 
OfiArJ JM 
Oflolnd JO ■ 
Ototwto J4 
OOfctap 
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OrkrtHA .15 ! 
Ormond 
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OxfrtF J2t • 
OkarkH JO : 


3 32 

13 1994 
31 794 

18 1894 
1 14* 
5 199k 

143 19V4 

4 69k 

1 494 

7 7th 

5 l*b 
10 6th 
15 f 

til 9 


2194 2194— * 
19* 19*— 94 
794 79b 
irntw + n 
14* 14*— * 

irss-vb 

69k 69b + Vk 
49k 49b— * 

19k 19k 
4 4 

S94 9 
89b 9 


CHB -20b 1J 139 

CM I Co 

CMXCp 

CRS J4 15 II 

CnaNJ 17 

CooteA 5 

Cal RE 1J8 9J ? 
CaJmtn M 2J7 25 
Colton n 
Caltnwt 

Calprap JMH10J 4 
Comoo J 11 t 
Campnl 
CMorco JB 


253 15* 
20 8* 
58 2* 

43 18 
127 14* 
6 51k 

81 1794 
£9 22* 

S ft 
12 8 
3 15* 
5 294 

74 15* 


15* 15* 

79k I* + Vk 
2 2 — * 
1794 1794 
129b 1344 + 94 
514 514 
12* 129k 
22 22* + 94 

ft ft 4* 
794 8 
15* 15* 

29b Z* 

15* 15* 


8 * FPA 73 

16* Fab I ltd JO 2.1 7 
2 FolrmC 
5* FldOtO 

9* FtCoon 1 J0a 95 7 
1896 FtFSL n JQb 2J 7 
11 FWymB jo 43 10 
119b FlsdiP 481 54 11 
7* FltcGE 5 

22* FRCEsf 4J0 157 
84b FlanEn 

25Vj FtaRck 70 13 11 
2294 PluM IJtt 53 10 

6* Foodrm ID 

4Vb FlhlllG 19 

48vs FondCnOAjOOe 


1 109b 
50 IS* 

9 3* 

297 6* 

r iovk 

2 29V4 

3 12* 

4 12* 
98 944 

5 25Vk 

16 9* 

13 43* 

112 25* 


10* TO* 

IS* IB* + * 
3* 3*+ * 
4* 414 + * 

10* 10* 

2944 2944— * 
12 12* + * 
1294 12* 

B* 914+1 
2514 25* 

9* 9* 

43* 43* + * 
24* 25 — * 
10* 10V4— * 
8 8 — * 
94 Vk 94* +3 


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2816 KnGsaf 

450 13J 


50c 35 

349b 

34* + * 

3* 

1* KaookC 



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16 

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2* 

2* 

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111 Kay Co 

JO 

1J 23 

6 

15 

15 

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16* 

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JO 

LI 

13 

14 

13 

12* 

12*—* 

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JST 3J 


10 

14* 

14* 

14* 

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1 

716 

7* 

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17* 

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217 

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9 

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12 

8* 

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4* 

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44 

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33 

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21 

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4* 

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522 

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18 

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89k KnoM 



18 

179 

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149b 

14*+ * 


HUNGARY 

A CONFERENCE ON 

TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 




Wm-v-n ■ ; itoxWMvw.'.iwwl 

■77//II i IUUWV////1 1 1 uwvkl 

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30 

15 


14* 5* V oak Co 8 22 5* Wk Ptb— .* 

S* 4 Y MW ;j08 U 13 - 8 5* 5* 5*- . 


1794 111k 
28* 14* 
2* 14 

iStift 

6* 396 

ss & 

914 


Jl 19 1 

J4b U 1 


AMEX Highs-Lows 


Apr34 


91 $ 


11* 44b 
12 714 

20* SVk 
14* 4* 
IS* U 
10* 4* 
14* 9* 

414 296. 

4* 1* 

22* 13* 
40* 33* 

8 3* 

20* 714 

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31* 31* 
11 8 * 
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5* a* 

4* 3* 
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31* 22v* 


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J4 13 13 
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99 


19 7* 7* 
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7M 6* 6* 
44 10* 9* 

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1 7* 7* 

63 14* 14* 
8 4* 4* 

20 2* J* 
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' 6 . 5994 99* 
13 4* 4* 

20 17* 14* 
25 3 3* 

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10 9* 9* 

9* 3* 3* 

6 5* 5* 

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54 25* 2J* 


7*—* 
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■m 


Over-the-Counter 


April 4 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


SPONSORED BY 

THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
Budapest, June 1 3-1 4, 1 985 

The International Herald Tribune conference on " Trade and Investment Opportunities in Hungary ” 
will be of keen interest to any executive concerned about future economic relations between East and West. 

The conference provides an extraordinary opportunity for business leaders to examine 
how the Hungarian government is approaching questions of domestic and international economic relations 
and offers Western executives an unusual occasion for direct contact with business leaders from Ea stern Europe. 
Senior executives wishing to register hr the conference should complete and return the coupon below. 


JUNE 13 
Keynote Adtfcess: 

Mr. Jozsef Ma-joi, Deputy Prime Mntster 

The E c onomic Outtook 


JUNE 14 

The Banking System 

Mr. Janos Fekete, First Deputy President, National Bmk of 
Hungary 


Salas In Mel 

MM NWt Law 3 PM. CVoe 


2194 21* + * 
10th 9* JO 
9* 9* 9*— * 
D 19Vk 19* — * 
6* 14 14*— * 

MW 34 24* + * 

5* JVk 5W— * 
8* I* I*— * 
■* 7* a — * 

4* 4* 4* 

4* 616 4*— * 
4* 4* 4* 

n 

4* 14 14* 


Professor Jozsef Bognar, Director, Institute of World Economics Western Banking and Hungcvy 


of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences 

Foreign Trade 

Mr. Istvan Tor ok, Secretary of State far Foreign Trade 

The Five Yecr Plan 

Dr. Janos Ho6s, Secretary of State. National Planning Board 

Afternoon Address 

Dr. Armand Hammer, Chatman aid Chief Executive Officer, 
Occidental Petroleum Corporation 
Investment In centives and Tax Free Zones 
Dr. P£fer Medgyessy, Deputy Minster of Finance 

Barter 

Mr. Sandor Demcsdk, General Manager, Hungarian Foreign 
Tracing Bank 


REGKTRAJION INFORMATION : ^ 

The conferenae wffl be heictaMhe Atrwm Hyatt Hbtet 
on Jane Band l4:AhJod< of rtomslxs been reseryfidfar . 
participants at preferential rales. For deidb please ebrfbct.lbe_' . 
hoteldrediy. _j’ ' 'V 

Atrium Hyatt Hotel, Mr. T. Tajlhy, Rooseve^Sq^^;' ' ' 
Budapest 105T TeU P6-l)ia7836L Tdese 22-4954. 

The fee fer rfie conference a $595 or tfie ecfjivakri b 
o convertible currency. TNs indudes doner June 12, coddatk, " ' 
lunches, documentation and siniuiiarieous Kingqric*>&^^ - 
FrencWSerman transfatioa Fees are payotie in advance of Ihe 
conference widwifl be returned in ful fer any cafafaibn 
paetrnakedonakehreMay3B.Cona^c^omcfl^iKidak 
wffl be charged the fofi fee. . . 

The conferenae was organized in association vwlh 
Interpress in Budapest and G. Arnold Teesng B.V. in Amsterdam, 

Mc^v, The Hungori®! cwSne, s ccyrier'for 

the conference. 


Mr. Gabriel BcHer, Vice President and Gererd Manager. 

Bank of America N.T, Vienna 

Industrial Outiook 

Mr. Ferenc Horvath, Secretary of State for Industry 

Panel of Hungarian Industrialists 
Afternoon Address 

Professor Richard Portes, Director, Centre for Economic Policy 
Research, London 

Joint Ventures 

Mr. Lasdo Borb&y, Director General, Deportme nt for 
kitemationcJ Monetary Affairs, Ministry of Finance 

Ptind of Foreign Companies 

Moderator: Mr. Tomas Beck, President. Hungarian Chamber of 
Commerce 


arraxrnrr_ 


cowANTArnwrr 


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8 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985- 


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BUSINESS PEOPLE 



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Hong Kong Bank Appoints 
=|| Head of First Spanish Branch 


J2 18 


83 


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Ml X4 


By Brenda H: 

International Herald 'Tribune 

LONDON — Hongkong & 
Shanghai Banking Coip. is moving 
into Spain with the opening non 
week of a branch in Madrid. 

The branch will aid Spanish 
companies in doing business in the 
Far East, especially China, where 
’gi the bank has strong links, said Alan 

.... — Wilkinson, who will head ihe new 

branch. 


?o u o 


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100 2*4 2ft 4ft— W 
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7% 75b— % 

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3711ft 11% lift 
31514 1516 Uto 
1010 10 19+14 

170 3714 36*4 37% + % 
300 9*4 0*4 914— ft 

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506 S 7ft 7ft— *4 
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471 ITU 10ft llto— lb 


109 2ft 
14 7% 
10 3 
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117 Bft 
2 IW 
70 lto 


“We’ve come at an appropriate 
time, given the amount or interest 
Spanish companies have” in Asia, 
he added. 

Mr. Wilkinson comes to Madrid 
from the bank’s Hong Kong head 
office, where he was assistant man- 
ager of the international corporate 
accounts division. 

In addition to Madrid, Mr. Wil- 
kinsonsaid the bank hopes to open 
a representative office in Barcelona 
is the near future. The bank is 
studying other Spanish locations as 
wdl, he said. 


Samuel Montagu St Co. (Hold- 
ings) lid. of London has appointed 
Robert F.B, Logan its deputy 
chairman and group chief execu- 
tive, effective April 9. Mr. Logan 
was group chief executive of Grind- 
lays Bank, which was taken over by 
Australia & New Zealand Banking 
Coip. last year. He takes the post 
left vacant by the departure of Staf- 
fan Gadd, who left the London- 
based merchant bank late last year 
following policy disagreements 
with its owners. Midland Bank 
PLC and Aetna Life & Casually 

Co. 

Banque Indosuez has appointed 
Marc Verhille general manager for 
India, based in Bombay. He previ- 
ously was based in the bank’s Paris 
head office, where he was in charge 
of the Middle East- Mr. Verhille 
succeeds Gerard Dehforge, who, 
as previously reported, has moved 
to Milan as head of Banque Indo- 
soez Italia. 

Moody’s Investors Service, the 


New York-based debt rating con- 
cern, said Michael McMullen, a 
company vice president, will head 
its new subsidiary in Tokyo, 
Moody’s (Japan) KabushM Kai- 
sba. The unit, to begin operations 
by June, will “expand Moody's ser- 
vice to investors and issuers in the 
world capital markets, and our 
worldwide system of ratings will 
now be available for the increasing- 
ly important Euroyen sector of the 
Euromarkets,” said Moody’s presi- 
dent, William O. Dwyer. 

Esso SAF of Paris said Michel 
Kopff wiH retire in June as presi- 
dent. Claude Roux, general manag- 
er of petroleum products and a 
member of the board of the French 
unit, is expected to be chosen as 
Mr. Kopff s successor. 

Sumtomo Bank Lid. has opened 
a representative office in Birming- 
ham, England, which will cover the 
Midlands and the north of En- 
gland. Shozo Matsumoto was 
named chief representative and 
Russell Wheeler, representative. 
They previously were m the Osaka- 
based bank’s London branch, 
where Mr. Matsumoto was assis- 
tant general manager and Mr. 
Wheeler was a marketing officer. 


Electrolux (U.K.) Group said 
Jimmy James will become chair- 
man on May 31 upon the retire- 
ment of John Redman. Mr. James 
will cominae as group chief execu- 
tive of the British subsidiary of the 
Swedish maker of household appli- 
ances. Electrolux AB. 

International Petroleum Ex- 
change of London Ltd. mid David 
Kilpatrick has become a director. 
Mr. Kilpatrick spent 26 years with 
Esso Petroleum Co. before joining 
Muirpace Ltd. in 1981 

Plessey Co. has appointed John 
Bass, Vivian Butler, William Gos- 
ling and Alan W. Jones to its board. 
Mr. Bass is Plessey’s director of 
research; Mr. Butler, manag in g di- 
rector for the engineering and com- 
ponents division; Mr. Jones, inter- 
national director, and Mr. Gosling, 
technical director of Plessey Elec- 
tronic Systems Ltd. 

Pfizer Hospital Products Ltd. has 
appointed David J. Cooper to the 
new post of director of European 
business development, based near 
London. Pfizer Hospital Products 
is a subsidiary of the New York- 
based pharmaceuticals company. 
Pfizer lac. 


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113 4ft 4*6 4ft— to 
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147 45% 44% 45*4 + ft 
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400 5ft 5% 5ft + ft 
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21236 23ft 23*4 
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69 10 9*4 10 + % 

10 2to 214 2to— ft 
00 0*4 8% OH— K 

174 5ft 5*4 Sto— to 

0 916 9to 914— U 
4 4% 4% 4%— % 

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50213% 13% 13ft— % 
19.1014 10 10 

2940 914 Pto 

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58 2164 40to 6014 60% 

103 3% 3*4 3ft 

05 Bto Ito 014 

15 7ft 7ft 7*4 

11 ft. ft *6— ft 

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1029% 20% 29*4 
77 Pto 0% 9%— to 
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144 ISto w into 
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1 17ft 17*4 17*6 

38 IM 0% 0to+ 16 

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37 Ato Sft 5*4— 16 

9 4% 414 416— to 

10 10 W 10 + to 
711 616 Sto Bto + to 

3 Uto U 10 — to 

42 8ft 0% Bft 

1223 7% Aft Aft— % 

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45 15% 15% 15% 

4 1554 15 1554— to 

2 17% 17% 17% + ft 

5 10*4 19% 19% — % 

57 316 3 3 

236 3ft 3% 3%— to 

01 22ft 2216 22ft 
1 056 054 Oft 
1 5 0 0 — to 

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204 13*4 13% 13% 

14737 36ft 37 +14 

1 10ft Uft Uft 
5 4 A A — % 

46 Uft 14 Uto 
246 29% 29% 29H— to 
15131*6 31% 3114— 14 
111 17% 17% 175k— ft 
27713 Uto 12*4+ to 
270 2354 27% 2054 + to 

31 14% 14% 14% — M 

2 Aft Aft Aft— to 

204 7ft 754 7% 

. 14 125k 11% Uto + to 

5 Uto Uto 1654— to 
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45 7*4 7ft 7ft— ft 
1310% 10% IDto 

12 15% 15% 15% + to 

10 isto isu isto 

12419 Uft W + 14 
41 Wft IBto 1WA— % 
130 754 7 7 

353 3% 354 354— to 
132 7*4 7% 7ft— to 
64 .Wi 40 4054 + 54 

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7 7% 7% 7% 

473 Uto 13*4 13%— Ml 
12 25% 24% 25% — 1% 
316 46ft 45*4 46% + to 
20716ft Wft Uto 
717 Uto 17 
1832354 23 23 

70 5% 554 Sto— to 
5528 27% 27% — lb 

626 25% 25ft 

99 7ft 7% 7to+ U. 
134 40% SOW 40 -to 

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11 U Uft 13ft 
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20 7% 7ft 7*6— 54 

43 254 2to 254 

20 U 15 15 

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30 20 20 20 

256 1754* 16*6 Uft— to 


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213 % *4 to + % 

114 14*4 14 Mto+ ft 
016ft 16ft 16ft 
373 U Uft 16 +214 
358 3 2ft 2*4 

11 m m on 

0 6% Aft 6% + 5b 

13 Ito 9 « — to 

12 3316 33 33 

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1021ft 21% 21% 
1010% 10% 10% + % 
21021% 21% 71% 

1 20V. 28% 21to + 14 
205 6% 6% Aft 

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A 12ft 12*4 12ft— 54 
321 «ft 9% t%— % 
3013ft 13 U —1ft 
111 9% OH 9 +% 
6 30*4 30ft 30ft 
II 2054 19ft 2056 + tb 
2410% 30*4 50% + to 
00 10 0% 10 
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180 XS 311 Wto 24 2414 + 54 

83 3 2ft 2%+to 

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41 2ft 2*6 2ft 

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7720ft Uto llto 
184(1X0 1310% 10to 1054— 54 

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45 9*4 0% 9% 

75 4*4 4V. 414— M 

180 12 046 31 30ft 30ft + to 

1 3*4 3ft 3ft 

40 5 ito 5 

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435 20 27ft 20 — to 

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184 XI 23 30to 30to 30%— Vb 
.15 b J 157 21ft 21% 21%— to 
22 20 29 20 

54 14% 14% 14*4 + lb 
17 5% Sto 55b + 54 

22 TO ID 10 — to 
1.1 IB Sto 554 5V4 

280 108 4 10 ISto 19 + to 

111 ft 5 5% 

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181 48 524*4 24*4 24*4 

343 0 7% 7to— to 

407 7 7% ’St m+n 
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■BITto Uto 175b 




April 4 


Dollar 


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80 18 
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12 654 6to Ato + to 
2 34*4 24ft 34ft 
2012*6 12*4 12*4— 54 

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B«4iOIAlwka07 
Bk or Grtace 01/04 
Bk Of errata W 
Bk Of irrtand Of 
Bk Of intend 72 
BJMooiraolM 
HkOfMonbaaiOA 
BkOfMonlroolOl 
BkOI K+oVorVOA 
Bk Of Mcwo Sadia 
BkOf NavoSaxtaU 
BA or Tokyo 03 
Bk Of Tokyo M 
Bk Of Tokyo (7 
Bk Of Tokyo fabHrtl 
Bk Of Tokyo o#dlrti 
Bk America 76 
Banker* Tnnfffl 
Banker* Trusr 74 
Banker* Trysl 94 
Ba Arab# Ei nwra 17/91 
■BIOS 
BBLff 

BaladowuM 
BalodostiezOO 
WEJf 
BFCE87 
BFCEodn 
BFCEIonM 
BPCEOt 
BMP OS 
BNP 17 
BNP 85/88 
BNP84/96 
BMP 19 
BNP 89 
BNPU/91 
BNP W 
BNP 05 

BqPorlMlp#r 0 

Bn Worm* 10/04 

BorttoyiOHciOS 

BardovsOseaiOS 

BardaysOtanperp 

BardaviO*ea*D4 

King Baio n#m 

(UwBalg9MM 

KlnoBaWOO 

BargonBonfclO 

■croon Bank Oil M/n 

Una Bote M/B4 

KlnaBalB 00/04 

Coceol 

Cactos _ 

CNCAVOrtS 

CNTM 

CNTOI 

COMBS 


CowMiKaxf Bkf Aska 

♦ft 104 0082 00.02 
Ito 174 J80J7T00J7 
954 +7 IDOOmtU 
Uto US 9U59US 
Oft IM 9f JS 9785 
Oft 31+ HOJOUIUS 
♦to M MBlttD 
10ft 264 1O0.UUXLZ1 
<55/41+ 0030 995D 
9ft 2M 97.15 9725 
TBVj 20-5 19 JS 100JS 
0ft W WAS 00 JS 
0% 1+4 TUI TUS 
Oft IM 78X9145 
PH. 315 100.1110833 
9 287 0050 I0B2S 

OX 20A HH69HX7V 
1% 284 NXU31CTLO 
18% 3M loaffltoox 
1% 154 0068 00JI 

ion 304 •mmrnM 
oh. 11-7 nuoiaajB 

11 244 10X910X73 
Bft 274 100.I51H2S 
Oft 27-7 . 1061010070 
0% +1 JHU9IKL9J 
Oft 12+ IOOJ71O037 
0% MA M0JS1X.15 
9ft 11+ 0066 7736 
7% 256 10X5410064 
7ft 134 10X1610X21 

12 9-j nx nun 

♦to 17+ M0J51U6I 
11% 11+ 0058 1BXM 
Oft 157 lOXOUM 
Hft 21-7 loam SON 

o% 2M loaoeioxu 
6ft 20-7 H08t100.11 
10ft H4 10X3710X37 
7% 22-7 10X1010X20 
Hft 13-7 1003010636 
0% 6+ HOJMHXM 
lift 252 9975 Ud 
6ft 30+ lOailHOJl 
9ft 13+ HOSAIOXU 
Oft 56 7767 0797 
mm 94 loom 0X13 
Uft 44 101JQ18LQ 
7ft 22-7 10X0210X12 
- 7TJ7 0987 
lUO 11+ HX74100JU 
0% 66 18X0510X55 
OX 30-7 HU410OM 
Oft 17+ HX7DHU0 
10ft 1-5 MXS110X41 

Uto 44 MXI4100J* 
♦to 136 HXUH0J6 
u% ii+ Ttm5T«j« 

9ft 104 10X1110X21 
Oft 31-5 16X1610X23 
Ito 184 10X1010X30 
Oft 7-7 1600016X17 

11*6 11+ 10X1510X23 
7% 124 1002010X30 
7ft 155 79 JO 09.00 
0% 7+ 100*910X57 
lift 264 nX2710OJ7 
10ft 85 10X00 Ml J» 
Oft 264 9722 10X02 


CUc (Wkhr) M 

ritv- a* 

CorranrtS+L94 

OmaManhoftcnn 

OtauQt 

amnfcal Bk <4 
Oarnkal (WUvl N 
OtrfnkmJcBkfl 
OraUentoU 

CBIOCIHN 

UtcerpOt 

CRtcorv-UndoM oani 
CUknn>97 
Conwrannoaklf 
Commanbonk Nov 69 
Camm Urn Mart raonfOl 
CCF 86/90 

CCF forts 
CCFWHM 
CCF 97 
CEPME 67/02 
CEPME86 
CrtdB Dq Nord 89/92 
CfbdH Fender Urtl 
CfWH For Ekft 02 
Cr Lyon 7X94 
CraottLvonnaHD 
Credit Lyennali 70/07 
Credit Lyonnoit 87/44 

CradHLyotmltflrtS 
CrtdM Lyannal* dec9» 
Cradir Lyoonoit tan92/M 
aarti Lvoonab I«af2rt+ 
OradH NatlanofR 
Credit Naianol 00/714 
CradH Nobonol 06 
CndiUmtartM 
CraollanstattH 

Dot I chi Kirm« 
Dana# Oil# 90 

D«i Norike novTO 
D#aNonk#d#c70 
Denmark [ontt'70 
Denmark ocUB/Wl 
Denmark 64 
Denmark para 

Die Em Out 92/04 

DreednarBookOS 

Oreednar Bank >7 

DrbKtn#rBonk72 

Ektorado Nuclear 17 

EDFW 

EDF75 

EOF 07 

ENEL SO 

EAB03 

EABOO 

EEC 00/90 

Eitorter InflH 

FambltOf 

Flnmai Paper «J 

First BotkM Inc 71/74 

Find Bank SytftmsH 

First aucooo 77 

F Ini Chicago 74 

FTrwCttYTe.au 75 

Fim inlerWnfe 95 

Full <4/94 

Ganflnance 80/02 

Geaflnano# 02 /N 

GZB89 


Ceaeco Max] ala uefl 

05b 11+ 7U5 07.10 
7ft 10-7 lflXUnDO.17 
Oft 28-5 00 J7 79.77 
8% 31-7 79.70 10Q0O 
Oft 5+ 0930 10X30 
Oft 27-12 10X5118X61 
05b 151 TXfS 70.10 
9to 13+ 10X1010035 
Uto 6-9 MXSOHXUS 
«% 15< 7US9f.n 
Oft 19+ 97J3 99J3 
Oft 30+ 7964 77.74 
7ft U+ 101.1710137 
Ift 154 70JD 10X50 
lto X+ fOJI 79J6 
01# 21-5 99 H 10006 
Uft 20-5 10X0710X17 
Mft 184 0760 9935 
Oft 364 HUZIOUB 

fto 7-ra hojohojo 

9ft 226 10005*53.15 
Oft 224 1033 97J3 
109k 12+ HOJOlOUd 
m 6+ 1002710X37 
9% 27+ 10X00 1D0L10 
7ft 7-10 10X12111032 
9*» 1-7 7963 7963 

1l*k 11+ n04SU055 

Hft 234 10X1010X25 
Oto 7-M 10X5510X65 
9-7 neirwiwn 
255 MUIlOXn 
27+ MX 1OIOX20 
U-7 10X1210X22 
14+ 10X5510065 
u-7 nanioaa 
B% 114 10BA9MX59 
7.35 2M 7775 7765 
». IW 10X2710X37 
9ft 276 10X1510X25 
10h 13-5 HXU1DX20 
Oft 7-5 HX3S1DX45 
9ft U-S 79.95 11X150 
9» 19+ 79J5 11X150 
fft 9-7 10X3010X40 
11*6 154 10X451 OXSS 
Oto 106 10X5110061 

fto M loaxzuxu 

■to 204 Of J1 77.91 
11% H+ 1006010067 
9*h 285 97J4 1DXJH 
H 274 10X141 0X29 
♦ft 34 9957 10X12 
MOO 274 1006516075 
fto 04 10XU10X20 
Uto 12+ 0060 99.70 
1060 3-7 9737 10087 
♦ft 17+ 9967 7777 
10 26-7 10X1ZH032 
7ft +7 U0JBUXU 

Oto 21+ loxoanxio 

Uto 304 1003010640 
0060 9075 
214 0040 0060 
134 9064 7X79 
7-5 9912 99.72 
214 >6X1 51 0033 
224 0480 MOD 
6+ 0076 0060 
1+7 00.06 MU* 
26+ 10X35)0045 
22-7 10X1210X22 
134 1003310X33 


Oft 

Oto 

7ft 

0 

V 


imer/Maf. 

GZB92 

GZBpm 

SUN 

GWrtl 

Cr Tartars 92 

GrlndkmM 

Crest Wistirn Fin 94 

Orest Wttt era 95 

HH5amu#IW 

KUI Samu#l P#rp 

HUPana AmericOM 75 

Hydro QuetacW 

Hmra Quebec 05 

iCinOuitrian 

indo n ra i o 16/03 

IBJIS 

IBJnowU 

lnmdft/09 

irwaa07 

Up.irrtondU 

mie 

IWv I Republic) 07 
c non B7 
itatyftrtii 


KOf*moy92 
Kamlra0v05 
KteHMort Beraon 01 
Ktomwl Banian N 
Kona dm Bk IT 
Kenea ExaranoeH 
Lincoln 77 
LloydtU 
LtoyaeTJ 
UnyiM04 
LTCB IttBO 
LTCB65 
LTCBIdMO 
LTCB a* 

LTCB 72 

Molrs»ki 74/Cf 
Mokmiois 
MakmfatBx«/92 
Matpyskld«07/92 
MoktyMaB/fl 
MrniHoaO/SnH 
Maa Hon IWUv) 74 
/Marine Midland N 
Marine NuSaS 07 
Marine MkSmlH 
Medan Bk 74 
Midland 71 
Midland 10 
Midland 02 
Midland 01 
Midland Of 
Mltxlli Fhl76 * 
MorpanGnnWIM 
Martooo# Den 00/03 
MorisoaeDea72 
Nat 0k Defend 96 
Nat Cam 5dl Arabia 94 
NatlWeetmlnOI 
NcdlWactmlnTO 
NaKWMimlaW 
Nat) Westmlnn 
Natl WCetmln nern 

»DvN 

NewZautandR7 
New Zealand Start 02 
Nippon Cred II Bk 71 
lilpnon Credit Bk 05 . 
Nippon Credit BkK 
Monde Ini Fin 01 
OKB 06 
OLB74 
O LB 05/99 

OHrteiraMiningn . 
OAstwreMlnlneU 


Coupon Mol Bid Add 

fto 11+ 1006310X73 
10ft 144 98M OOto 
7ft 29-5 10X6110X71 
W. 3+ 1BUG51SU6 
10ft 30-7 1004210X52 
Eft 14 10X0510X15 
10ft 2W 9X55 7665 
9ft 6+ 97.12597635 
IDto 27-8 1003010041 
9ft 28-5 940O9&0O 
lift 24+ 7062 07.72 
05k 22-7 10X1510X25 
HX071DX17 
9to 15.7 7775 10025 
♦ft 0-10 07.75 IBXW 
10 5+ loaonoid 

Uto 304 1008110060 
» 16+ IDSJMIOfl.M 

10to 3X0 9970 11* 
7ft W-7 7775 10065 

I m V-* 9975 HK2S 

Uto 44 10X2110X31 
Hft 23-9 10XU10X45 
715/1 94 9773 77.70 
Oto 20-5 1007610666 
■ft 1+ 10X1210X22 

10ft 04 10187101.17 
10ft 259 10X15HX2S 
9ft 204 10X1710X37 
Hft 27-7 1BX22KXU2 
10 5+ 9960 10X00 

Oft BU 79.75 10025 
9ft 116 7767 9767 
Hft 30+ 10X6070X70 
7ft *+ 10X6310073 
lift 18+ 77 J? 10007 
7ft 287 7060 10040 
10ft U6 lOXOObtd 

II 11+ 1005410X64 

Oft 17+ 10X3310X43 
7ft 314 10X66100J6 
Ift 18+ 7760 7950 
- - 97JS 79JS 

0ft 7LH 90.95 10X10 
10 54 10X1010X25 
Hft 264 100.1510X25 
Oto 31-5 10X0X10X10 

IS+ 9780 97.15 
07 10X1010X28 
16+ 10X11510X15 
104 7750 HQ66 
31-5 100JTM041 
20-7 10X1510X25 
26+ "19X5510X65 
74 H0671W 
30+ 10X7610066 
#4 miOMUf 
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117 10X10)0X20 
Uto 117 U064HXL94 
0% 10+ 10X2210X37 
Oft 20+ 97.55 9965 
Oh 21+ 9775 7965 
OH. 117 0*4110051 
9ft 27+ wunud 
llto 16+ 1005110061 
10ft 25+ 10X0510115 
IMb 13+ HXM10LU 
IX 274 10OL2DWUO 
0-10 10X2*10X34 
26+ 10X2470X34 
"CU 10X1710X27 
28+ 9X75 Wd 
. . IM WMHMX15 
Wto 04 99J5 10X25 
Uto 26+ 1002710X17 
Hto 284 1002510X10 

llto 11+ loxMuan 
«% 6+ 10X2210032 . 
Oh 23-7 loxmoaio 


9ft 

9ft 

Oft 

Oft 

oto 

0 

fto 

♦to 

11 

m 

Hft 

0 . 


9ft 

Oft 

m 

Oft 

Oto 


lrauer/6taf. 

ptreat 91/94 
Pkfianken 00/01 
Qu#entlond96 
Rente rt 

Rep Bk Dallas 77 
Ravel BkSeeHond 04/94 
Sonoma 91/73 
Sana lid. Finn 
Sanaa 94/200* 
SonwatnLFInR 
ScanrSnovlon Fin aar03 
Soaodl newton Fin dac93 
Scotland Irt Fin 93 
Security Podfic 77 
SHCFU 
SEAT 70/02 
XF£.B* 

XF8.9I 

5odele Genernle 7C/95 
Sedan Gonarale 70 
SoeWe General# Mar T* 
SodeteGenmtoBOwH 
SacMa General 77 
5NCB71 

Spain I Khwtafn) 72/77 
KbwfamOfSpite73 
Spain 09 
Stand Chart 70 
Stand Chart M 
Stand Chartn 
Stand Chart martO 
Stand Chart perp 
State Bk Of Indio 07 
Sum Homo Trust 92/9* 

SuMonfl 

Sweden 7O/0S 
Sweden 89/94/99 
S weden 73/03 
Sweden pent 
Talva Kobe 92/8* 
TokuBbl 72/94 

Takal Asia Ltd 94/77 

Toronto Domtrton 72 
Tew Trurt 72/97 
TVO 74/84 
Union Bk Norway 77 
United a/5#ol Bk 67 
WMb Forgo 77 
Will lams +fflvnl 71 
wand Bank 74 
Yokatuim7i/w 
ZMIraH a PBri ra raafl 


CeopeaNM Bid Askd 

10ft 27+ 7X00 9760 
9ft IM 10X451 OOLiO 
10h 7-5 10X4010X50 

Wft 27+ l»35HXe 
75b 20-5 7600 7760 
Ift 16+ 1004310X53 
Tto 5+ 10X4010X50 
7% 267 lOXIUbrt 
Sft 29-7 10XUHXU* 
Tto 174 9763 7763 
llto 15+ 99.75 10X50 
71k 71+ 9765 99.15 
Uh 24+ 1008)10X50 
Tto 22+ 77 JA 7766 
Bto 38+ 99.75 10X05 
Tto 24+ 10086)0X16 
7ft 3+ 7761 10X11 
7ft 19+ 79.75 100J5 
10h 64 10X251 01 J5 
rev. 9-5 UM.M10X2O 
lOto 114 100.4010X50 
10ft 74 1003610046 
10ft UW 1006510X15 
»0ft 204 11*2510035 
1X00 27+ 1002910039 
lOto 3B+ 1005710X67 
♦ft 28 + nxsomio 
Tto 174 10X4610X9 
7to i-7 10X1210022 
TOto 20 - 5 1003210X42 
Wto 11-1 101 J61D1.II 
IM 74 1003510045 
fft 31-5 9780 10X00 
Tto 124 HIUM10X14 
Ift HA lOXOObid 
Bto 10-7 97J3 7730 
9% 3M 9937 7942 
lOto 20-5 10X1410X19 
7-7 10X1110X16 
MW. 20-5 10X2510035 
I Oft H-7 1003210047 
9ft 12+ 1004510055 
Tto 1«+ 70X5210X62 
Tto 14+ 1003310043 
fh 7-5 fxffimjs 
Tto 21+ 9000 791* 

9% 26+ 99J5 10035 
Tto 134 7745 7755 
Uto 189 10005100.95 
>67 31-5 7X70 7X70 
lift 2+ 10XBreX2S 
Tto 15-7 HX4510040 


Non Dollar 


itner/MaL 
Am 77 

Bk Montreal 7* 

Bk Tokyo ttrtO 
Balndawtxfl 
OH corp 17/91 
rnneo* looted oeid 
CEPME 76 
Credit Fancier 77 
Credit National 71/75 
Denmark 73/90 
1X1.74 

Hnodofli Belgium M 
UavusW 
MlrtteblO 
SNCF 98/73 
Yorkshire 91/9* 


Coupon Men Bid Askd 

141b 144 tOO. U1 9X2* 
Uh 27+ 10X0610X16 
Uto 214 7760 bid 
Uto 214 10X1010XZI 
13% 154 99J2 99J2 
14% 5+ Tin 996J 
Uto 31+ 11X12610036 
Wto f+ 99.73 mm 
Uto 16+ 1002710X37 
14% 274 1005610X66 
12% IS+ 7M6 7976 
11% B+ 7733 10083 
14% 24-5 1008510X15 
Uto 74 9925 10005 
Oft 26+ 1003210042 
13% 27+ 79.fr HUH 


Source 
London 


■ Credit Sufaae-Ftrst Boston Ltd. . 


180 48 
73 b IJ 


JBr 1.1 


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JM ** 

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140 07 
JOB 24 


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WAmBc 38 XI 
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WStU* J4 33 
WStaar JO XI 
WTTIAa 

WmorC 40 23 
WstwdO 30a 4 
WitwdC 

Wettra bs 13 

Wl art 

Wtacom 

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wnimi 145 <-5 
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^ TO* 

525 • 25 » 

W 4 3% 4 

41 12% 12% 12% -F % 
41156 1! 11% +- % 

55U*6 1756 18*6 4-1 
20 7 6% 1 +% 

216 1% 1% 1*6 
1 5*6 5ft 5*6— lb 
24+11 10*6 10*6— 16 

29 3% 3% 3%-% 

00 17% 16*6 Uft— % 
■630% 30% 30% 

111 10 9 » + % 

20 7% 756 7ft + ft 
47 20% 19% 19% — % 
+ 32 31% 32 —1 

206 7% 7% 7%— % 
2919% 17% 19% 

928% 28*6 28*6 
47711*6 11% 11% 
3622ft 22% 22ft 
7 6ft +% Aft— % 
11*11% 11 11% 
215% 15% 15% 

IM 7% 7ft 7%— % 
220 9*6 9% f%+ % 

207 1356 12ft 13 — Vb 
5 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

4725 2*56 23 + % 

133 9% 9% 9ft + Vb 

28 8% 7*6 8% + % 
3918% 18% 18% 

237 1316 12ft 13% + % 
29386% 64ft 66% + Vb 
2281156 11% 11% 

23 14% 1+% 14% +1 

1 9% ♦% 9% 

+12 2356 22ft 23 

20 17% 17 17% 

17 2556 24*6 25% + % 
1522 2456 23ft 2356—1*6 
HI 27 36% 36*6— ft 

109 Sft 5*6 Sft 
207 7ft 7% 7ft 
<69 Bft 7ft 7ft— Ift 

f 37 36% 37 + ft 

321 11% 10% 10%— ft 


wnimi 

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YlowFt 

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Zantac 

Ziegler 

ZtanUI 

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Zvmos 

Zytrex 


180 38 
41 34 


40a 47 
134 34 


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204 33ft 33% 33ft + Vb 
101M* 13% 13%-% 
66 4ft 4 4—16 

443 26% 2616 26%+-% 
14 3% Oft 3% + ft 
311% 11% 11%— % 
56 37 36*6 37 — % 

5 + 4 4—56 

753 556 ift S — % 
70 9 0ft — "■ 

742 3 2% ... 

1343 I ft ft 




Sid Reg 

l.U 

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Standin 



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6% 

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9055 53% 54ft +1% 
553816 28% Hft + ft 
09. 3ft 3*6 Bk— ft 
21042% Ul MJ% +2*4 
*9 4*4 456 4ft + % 

H+9ft 48% 49% +1 
133 9ft 9ft 9ft— % 
27415% Mft If . 



d Options (prices taS/M-L 


6/0/ 


Nw 


1 23X145) 
7JSM5 
500. 850 
350 500 
250-400 
175-325 

id7Sti75 
13001500 
♦75-1125 
+75-825 
+75- +25 
325- *75 

21^325 

1700-1900 

1375-1575 

1075-1225 

825-975 


G+4 *780.31731 

VakmWUteWcUSJL 

X Qrart 4ta Monr-BUoc 
1211 Geneva 1, Switzcrtaad 
Tat 31 BZ5I - TWek 28305 


STOCK BID ASK 

USS USS 

DcVoc-Holbcin 

International bv 5H 6% 

Gty-Gock 

Inlexnatiooal nv 2% SV4 

Quotes 88 oh April 4, 1985 


Investors seekini 
capital gains in global stock 
markeu can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
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First Commerce Securities bv 
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Oxford on America. 

(A Confidential Document) 

America is changing; that is agreed. 

Why, and from what, and to what, 
are not agreed. 

''fet these questions touch us all 
For two years, 15 senior scholars 
from Oxford University studied these 
questions in depth.Their findings are now 
presented in America in Perspective. 

America in Perspective is a detached, comprehensive look at 
the state of America today and the potential of America tomorrow. 
It grinds no axes and pulls no punches. It is based on fact, not 
opinion. Its purpose is understanding, not advocacy. 

In 269 pages, America in Perspective casts a penetrating light 
on American politics, economics, markets and society. And a 
controversial light on the future of the American dream. 

Above all, America in Perspective provides an objective 
account of America now and where it will be in ten years time. 
It may be the most comprehensive study of America in existence 
today. 

Commissioned privately as a major $200,000 Oxford Analytica 
study, America in Perspective had such a profound effect on its 
sponsors that they now urge that it be given a wider audience. 

Accordingly, a limited number are being released for public sale. 
"You can obtain a copy by means of the coupon below. 

America in Perspective: the more important America is to 
your company or you, the more you will profit from it 


OXFORD 
ANALYTICA 

TO: OXFORD ANALYTICA LTD.. 9lA HIGH STREET. OXFORD OXl 4BJ, ENGLAND. PLEASE SEND ME 

OF AMERICA IN PERSPECTIVE. □ I ENCLOSE MY CHEQUE FOR S285 PER COPY. □ PLEASE BILL ME/ MY COMPANY. 



COPT/IES 


NAME- 


. ADDRESS. 


5-4-&5 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


PEANUTS 



■r/mw 



YE5 MA'AM, WE HAVE 
Another, clock.. 




I CANT REAP 


BOOKS 



HAS HANDS 



THE WALL OF THE PLAGUE 

By An&6 Brink. 447pp. $17.95. 
Summit Books, 1230 Avenue of 
the Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020 l 
Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 


't\/HEN we first men Andrea, the betaine 
W of Andrfc Brink’s latest novel, she reminds 
ns of J31 Claybuigh in “An Unmarried Wom- 
an" — perversely deciding not to go off with 
the perfect man, played by Alan Bates. 

After the collapse of one longtime relation- 
ship and a series of desultory flings. Andrea 
has finally met Paul, who seems the ideal 
boyfriend — he is smart and- sensitive and 
caring, and as a fellow South African expatri- 
ate, he can understand that country's terrible 
hold on her memory. He loves her and she 
loves h im ; and they're both passionate about 
their joint project — a film about the Black 
Plague. When Paul proposes marriage, howev- 
er, Andrea says she needs a little ureatiriog 
space.** She decides to use ashqrt trip to 
Provence *— sbe's supposed to be scooting 
locations for the film — to think over his offer. 

It tiim.t out that thing s are not nearly so 


BLONDIE 


i: !ijjr CfcQWOOa I HEARD 
I / A NOISE DOWNSTAIRS 


I’LL TAKE CARE OF IT 

right now _ 


TAKE A LOOK DOWN- 
STAIRS 


ONE OF THE JOYS 
OF FATHERHOOD , 


ACROSS 


1 Sign that 
detights angels 
4 Humdingers 
8 Provokes 
wrath 

12 Face defiantly 

14 Strip 

17 Base- to- apex 
measure 

18 Daybook's 
relative 

19 Meager 

20 Forthwith 

21 Fort Bliss 
locale 

22 Mien 

24 Blue or yellow 
flag 

25 One of the 
races 

28 Earlier: Abbr. 

30 Of half the 
globe 

35 Hyperbolist’s 
report 

36 Overwhelmed, 
in a way 

37 Polar explorer 

38 Shirt for Scotty 

39 Part of E.E. 

41 Sovereign 


46 Plant used in 
salads 

49 Chinese 
pagoda 

51 Place near 
Venice 

52 First of a 
series 

53 Certain artist 

55 Requisite 

56 Monster slain 
by Theseus 

57 Space shuttle's 
org. 

58 Operatic role 

59 Map abbr. 

DOWN 


1 Mollusk, also 
called 
wentletrap 

2 Functions 

3 Available 

4 Tate treats 

5 Earls’ wives 

6 Inner: Comb, 
form 

7 Burgoo or 
swivet 

8 Empty 

9 Go unsteadily 

10 Finials, e.g. 

11 Cuban crop 


13 Subtle 

15 Mr. Arnaz 

16 Antony’s 
friend 

23 Insect sounds 

26 Urban 
dwellings: 
Abbr. 

27 ** Enter- 

tainment!” 

28 Destines 

29 Korsakov 

30 Popular 

31 Opposite of 
deciduous 

32 Office items 

33 Kett 

34 Kind of train, 
for short 

39 Black, in poesy 

40 Slangy answer 

42 Unmixed 

43 Start of a 
Garland 
vehicle 

44 Undaunted 

45 Pied-4- 

47 Turns right 

48 Earth goddess 
In opera 

49 Zestless 

50 Dyestuff 

54 Extinct ratite 




BEETLE BAILEY 


three years anp X 

HAVEN'T GOT A 
PROMOTION VET / 


I THOUGHT IP . 
YOU PUT IN YOUR 

time and kept 

YOUR NOSE 

clean s' 

YOU't? / / 

GET \ \ 

PROMOTED CL- 


f THREE i 

YEARS ! 

AN P WHAT | 
PO I HAVE | i 
^vro show l 


• AN OLP 
CLEAN NOSE 


ample for Andrea and Paul, as they seem to us 
in the West Even though both are now living 
in France, they cannot escape the shadows cast 
by the harsh radalpofides of thar native land: 
Andrea is “colored" and Paul is white, and 
bade home, their liaison would be considered 
jTHri f Marriage would they could never 
go back to South Africa to live. It would mean 
permanent exile. 

•„ As Brink — - and such other noted South 
African writers as Nadine Gordimer and Athol 
Fugard — have observed, apartheid is not 
simply an evil political institution. It is a social 
' fact that permeates daily life, contaminating 
relationships between parents sod children, 
women ana men. An interracial love affair 
becomes an act of political subversion — as 
does a writer’s attempt to document what he 
sees around him. 

' For those opposed to the established order, 
even the most personal derisions raise the 
question of commitment: To leave the country, 
say, or to write a purely “aesthetic" novel is to 
abandon the struggle for change- As Paul says 
to Andrea i “a country like South Africa has no 
place for people who simply want to carry on 
fivmg. indulge in their little sins, _ have a good 
meal from time to time, enjoy a bit of music or 
a good painting or a good booL You're forced 
to walk right into the Are." 

It is to escape this lack of privacy that both 
Andrea and Paul have moved to France. Like 
the heroine of Nadine Gordimei’s “Burger’s 


ANDY CAPP 


[I'M TALKING 
S- 7VVOU 
7 CAPP- ft) 


/At 


.....AW,. 
FORGET* 
l. IT- J 


. 2 7 H 1 NJC I’LL | 
(GOHCWEANPj 


IF 7 HERSSCNETWNG 



* FMSHMY WW3NQ&BDS1QH, WS** 
S 3 C«0(Sw3,noT WHJNG ££«H^£fcS|CN 

1 


4-5 


© New York Times, edited by Eugene MaJesha. 


WIZARD of ID 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




r, [Tatm,ncKA& | 


w 0 




mMe 


Daughter," Andrea hopes thit exile w21 give 
her a dance to invent a new seif, free of the 
definitions of race, free of anrient, familial 
guilts. She will start over, shethmks, put the 
past behind her and begin again. She can't, of 
course, and her five-day trip through the hills 
of Provence turns into a rroustian journey 
bade through memory and time ■ — a journey 
that Brink relentlessly mflks for every meta- 
phor (detours, getting lost, stopping to see 
tourist attractions, deviating from the planned 
itinerary) it will yield about Fate and Life and ; 
Art. . 

Midway through that trip, Andrea meets 
Mandla, a black activist mend of Paul's. 
Though Mandla is supposed ~to help research 
the plague film, he is in no mood to cooperate, 
and angrily confronts Andrea. He attacks her 
liberal sentiments, mocks her love for Paul 
calls her a “try-for-white." Hu denunciations 
intrigue Andrea and accelerate her attempts to 
come to terms with her past 

In a previous novel called “A Chain of. 
Voices," Brink showed how Slavery in the ’ 

century Cape Colony laid the groundwork for 
the apartheid policies of today, and this same 
theme— the hold of time past over the present 
— animates Andrea's fierce reminiscing The 
sense of iuevitablity that informed the earlier 
book is missing, however. 

Part of the problem comes from Brink’s 
heavy-handed attempts to invest his novel with 
cosmic significance, by constantly drawing 
analogies between apartheid and the subject of 
Paul and Andrea’s film — that is, the plague. 
His characters think about the Black Deauun 
bed, in the car, at dinner. It’s not that the 
analogies are inappropriate; it’s that they are 
unnecessary and melodramatic. The conse- 
quences of apartheid are themselves so tra&f: 
that we don’t really need the author's caosumf 
comparisons to carbuncles and boils to appre- 
ciate the horror. 

What further undermines the reader’s trust 
in Andrea’s story is her rudimentary psychdo- 
gy. As portrayed by Brink, Andrea often seems 
more like a man’s idea of a woman than a real 
person. She refers to hererif as a !*witch," a “cat 
person" and a walled fortress who “must be 
conquered like an old-time iorL" She spends 
an extraordinary amount of time thinking 
about menstruation and violation. And she 
makes announcements like ‘Tm a woman. I’m 
colored. I'm everything that can be exploited." 

In the md. Andreas choice between Pgul 
and Mandla is also made in terms of sexual- 
racial dichfe rather than in terms of believable 


emotions: she is ready to dump the white 
liberal she has known and loved for years -j 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 




REX MORGAN 









I’M -SORRY THAT I WOKE 
YOU, BRADY — BUT I M!*SS 
YOU? I FORGOT ABOUT THE 

mm time zones' rnmn 


WELL, I'M GLAD you WM I HAD an EARLY 
C ALLED. DARLING ' I WAS DINNER, CAME BACK TO j 

UP UNTIL ALMOST ONE O'CLOCK, 1 MY ROOM AND FELL I 
HOPING YOU'D PHONE f WHERE J ASLEEP IN A CHAIR t NOW, 


were you? 


J'M WIDE AWAKE/ 


QG0Q 03Q QQniElS 

□bho □□□□ nasan 
□bqq anon cisnon 
□EnQSD^EinEiaClGlEJ 
DG303 □□aa 

□□□□no □□□ anna 
□□□□a □□□□□ □□□ 

□□□ Qaataa aaaaa 
□□□□ □□□ anaaiaa 
□□na OOI3I3 
□□DaaaaaoaaaaEEi 
□□□□□ aaao □□□□ 
□□□□□ 3aan oaoo 
□□□□□ nao □□□□ 


liberal she has known and loved for years -y 
without so much as a angle goodbye converssf - 
tion — after the blade militant makes love to 
ha once. 

Perhaps Brink is trying to show that Andrea 
is another victim of apartheid's power to de- 
stroy the personal; that as a South African, she 
cannot help but attach huge importance to the 
color of a man’s skin But even if Andrea's 
passion for Mandla is meant as a symbolic 
acceptance of her own blackness, it isn’t vafy 
convincing, for she lends to describe him as a 
crude stereotype of the blade stud. She refers to 
him as an arrogant young animal who moves 
with “the leisurely grace and defiance of a lazy 
young predator, and a lover with a “furious 
dark body.” Such statements make Andrea 
seem almost as prejudiced as the people she 
fled from in South Africa — and a most un- 
sympathetic heroine. . 


Mtchiko Kakutani is an the staff of The \ 

York Times. ' 




f ' 


BRIDGE 


‘Spring is when winter and simmer fight 
ID SEE WHO SETS TO BE NEXT-* 


m 


BM&EV 


By Alan Truscort 


O N the diagramed deal 
East defended a contract 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
• oy Henri Arnold and Bob Lea 


‘1 GOTTA GET OUT OF TH16 
MAILBOX. MV DEOPORANT 
(6 STARTING TO GrlV£ OOT . 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary wonis. 




LUGIE 


~rr 

□ 

□ 



of five spades. Notice the 
imaginative double of five dia- 
monds. a successful attempt to 


steer his partner away from & 
potentially disastrous heart 
lead. 

The diamond lead did not 


alarm South, who happily, but 
prematurely, scored three dia- 
mond tricks and discarded a 


heart from the dummy. He 
then led a low trump and West 
perforce took his king. West 
then led the diamond ten, and 
South ruffed with the spade 
ten in dummy. 

Of 100 defenders in the East 



position, 99 would overruff 
with the jade and the contract 
would be unbeatable. East not 
only discarded a dub, theplay 
that guarantees defeat of tire 
contract, but also did so with 
such smoothness that South 
was convinced that the jade 
was in the West hand. 

The declarer was now confi- 
dent. He led the spade queen 
from dummy and overlook 
with tire ace. He expected to 
make an overtrick if the jack 
fell from tire West hand If it 
did not, he could surrender a 
trump trick and claim bis con- 
tract. 


cs and his contract failed by 
two tricks. 


NOBTB 

♦ Q103 

i". I'ife 

0 10 78 2 OOB4 

A J 10 9 9 *72 

SOUTH (D) 

♦ AB 642 
V AQ 4 
0 AJSJ 5 

• 9 

Both sides ouii vulnerable. The 


When West discarded. 
South’s jaw dropped two inch- 


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Canadian sfoch via AP 

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101 A too Cent 
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Offer to Pan Am Workers 


The Associated. Pros 

MIAMI — Pan American World Airways has 
told 2,500 unionized flight attendants to take tire 
month off while it keeps more that 1.000 recently 
trained non-union attendants oa the job. 

The decision to furlough some of Pan Am's 6,000 
union flight attendants came less than a weekafter 
the Independent Union of J^u Attendants 
reached a tentative agreement on a new contracb 


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vacation time, full leave' nr 


spokesman Mike Clark said Wednesday 


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** ' * 


nVTEHNATIONAL HERALD TiUBUIVE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


Page 17 


™ hope. . 

•■***. fitted 

■W'ovet ■“ 

.five-day 
•’ns iat 6 a 

MeiSl 

activist 



VANTAGE POINT/ Bill Shirley 




iMAagtUt Tima Sentee 

The sports section of & daily newspaper, wee 
'Mtfuge from reality to which reader? could toco 


What changed the character of sports was not 
serious journalism, of course — that only made 
them less fun to read about. Money, probably, 


mg, but It Seems to Be on the Sports Pages 


ae «mnorn 10 hdn 

? D0V * 5* 


j; for amusement, often reads today like the rest of altered them the most, although a strong case 

/’ «lu miner «uiM «1 o, («■ >k. .vJLj -j? 



^ the paper. 

^ -A sports fan can no longer retreat to ins little 

comer and escape the bad news. Often, in Fact, 
ir ~‘ - ^ he can’t even get a good laugh. 

- The precise moment that sports, and the ro- 
andacZ; rtu,u^»f porting of them, became less fun cannot be 
vith ^ documented. But, somewhere along the line, 

^ spaas turned into a business as cola and com- 
petitive as the ml or steel industries, and many 


iJST .* 1 

EJlem come., 
^P^toinSSk 
ance, bv 

™ d «=4o5J' t * assenously a 


'humor and innocence in the games they cover. 
"They tend to be the older ones. Many young 
writers seem to be as serious as today’s athletes, 
attacking the flaws in sports with the journalis- 
tic zeal of political reporters. 

The young writers* pursuit of athletic sins is 
not entirely a bad thing, of course. The scandals 
in games and the frailties in the character of 
athletes were overlooked and covered up for too 
long by sponswriters who cheered in toe press- 
box, played cards with Their heroes and wrote 
their bic^raphies. 

- still, games ought to be fun, and not treated 
as seriously as the national budget, abortion or 




could also be made for the obsession with win- 
ning. One leads to the other. 

Athletes always had good hours, and they 
made more money than most of us while work- 
ing half the time. It was hard for a fellow 
working on an assembly line, driving a truck or 
selling shoes to Uken the playing of games to 

of it. So dk^most athletes, probably, before the 


became restless. Finally, they formed unions to 
free themselves from bondage and collect their 
share. Reasoning that they could make more on 
the open market they took to court the rules 
binding them to me team and won the light. 
Sports and sports pages haven’t been the same 
since. 

In the Las Angeles Times' sports section 
recently, for example, a story ox page 1 said 
budding contractors had filed a $7.7 million 
lawsuit against Hollywood Park and, for the 
second day in a row, there was an account of 
sports entrepreneur Jerry Buss’s alleged finan- 
cial problems. 

On page 2, a. headline read: “Lloyd, Navrati- 


Las Vegas, in fact, gets little press attention and 
is not even staffed by the Los Angeles Times. 
Other tournaments «Sth purses of 5400,000 are 
me back ofi 


leva Will Play for SI 1L500 Prize.** The 
wasto come, the story said, from a purse _ .... 
m ill io n. In the same story there was an account 
of another tournament that bad a purse of 
$40,000, but in only one paragraph did readers 
learn how well anybody played. 

On page 4, high in a story on the Daytona reduced to small type in the back of the section. 
500, it was reported that tne race had prize & ut w .hat really sets Sports apart from the 
money of S1.28 million. On page 5, the score of other editorial departments of a newspaper is 
only one golfer was reported before the tourna- die attention it pays, and the space it devotes, to 
mem's purse of 5400,000 was mentioned. One die salaries or the people it covers. Virtually no 
player had won SI 16262 of his career income of player signs a contract today without having his 
S4S4.627 in the tournament, the story said. salary estimated in print — or in some cases, 
It was a typical day. The dollar sign dutters published as fact. 


with entertainment celebrities and business ex- In his 1980 study of 188 players with guaran- 
ccutives. they paid a penalty for their affluence teed, long-term contracts, Lehn found that inju- 


that most other rich people avoid. They became ries increased by 165 percent in the three years 
fair game for criticism. Many fans get an/*"' «f»T thw nonmoe **wWc <«An> £A*m««wc 
when a quarterback making $800,000 a year 1 


after their signings. “What’s more, for pitchers, 
post-contract disability soared by more than 
a bad game, reasoning, perhaps, that a player 30 0 percent," he said, adding that the percent- 
making such an enormous salary should not age of players on the disabled list rose from 13.8 
have a bad game. percent in 1976 to 21.8 in 1980. 

The pay of some athletes, in fact, seems to Detroit manager Sparky Anderson told Lchn: 

•« **’“•' eWn “A little security goes a long way with a ball- 

player. With a long-term contract, he just isn’t 


the sports pages of most newspapers everyday. 
Horse race results look like stock tables. There 
are dahning prices, purses, mutual pods and 
payoffs for win, place and show, and daily 
doubles, exactas and the Pick Six. 

Prize money is published with the scores in 


The ballpark figures have become easier for 
reporters to obtain for several reasons. Salaries 
are sometimes revealed by agents or the players’ 
associations, and when ah athlete takes his case 
to an arbitrator, his pay is publicized. Other 
numbers are leaked by players and even general 
when it serves their purposes. 


every week. Some tournaments, in fact, are 
identified by how much they are worth rather 
than by their commercial names. 

The irony of all this is that editors continue to 
publish such financial information, although 
the size of the purse doesn’t mean much todaym 


golf, tennis and bowling tournaments, and the . m a n a ger s when ii a 
leading money winners in some sports are listed Stiu, many salary estimates are wr __ 

' “ ' because some contracts are so complex that it 

takes an accountant, lawyer or computer to 
interpret them. 

It is not surprising, erf course, that sponswrit- 


ers focus so much attention on money. Most of 
us are curious about the income of others and 


sports. Money is tossed around like confetti by -fascinated by the pay of executives and celebri- 
owners, promoters, television and commercial tks. 

sponsors. When athletes moved into an income bracket 


bear no relation to their skilL 

In no sport is this more evident than baseball. 

Flayers who will not make baseball's Hall of 
Fame are malting SI million or more. A player 
who hits mostly singles and throws like a Little 
Leaguer can make that much. And a third base- 
man with little range, average arm and speed 
and a bailing average of less than .300 can 
command S7S0.000. Pitchers who lose as often 
as they win and seldom complete a game are 
paid more than the presidents of some big 
corporations. 

Such high salaries would seem to be incen- 
tives for players to improve, but that has not 
always been the case. The reason, one researcher 
found, is that owners give many of their wealthy 
employees guaranteed, long-term contracts. 

“This saps a player's incentive both to play at 
peak performance and to play hurt,” said the 
researcher, economist Kenneth of Wash- 
ington University in Sl Louts. 


the same guy he used to be." 

Sponswriters arc curious about such things. 
But should sports sections focus as often as they 
do on stories about money and the other sordid 
subjects that have made their pages less enter- 
taining to read lately? A reading of the nation's 
major newspapers suggests that editors believe 
they should. 

Still, some critics claim that a sportswriter’s 
essential craft is to report only what happens on 
the field or court, put it into perspective and 
leave non-sports subjects to other departments 
of the newspaper. 

What these critics forget is that sports are 
often dull and need e mbellishing . To say that 
Fernando Valenzuela won 12 games for' the 
Dodgers last season is not as interesting, say, as 
reporting that he made $91,666.66 tor each 
victory. 


re to herself asa^S ?* 1 
"died fonrea jjfr 

lUon and lioj J 
men* 

p'thrng that can be m! 

Andreas choia be 2 

also made in 
her than in terms n/kt 
is ready to damp 
cnown and lov^fZ’- 
1 “tangle g.wdbtti' 
: black militant 

: is trying id shew ta,. 

n of apartheid's 

alt that as a South Aim* 
attach huge imponasjr 
s skin. But eveatfig. 
ndte is meant as * *■ 
er own blackness, ilia'-, 
she tends to describe i* 

: of the black stud. Shi* 

ant ycuag animal 
iy grace and detunaife 
" and a lover wrtut 
ich statements mdtfc 
prejudiced as ikpss 
ath Africa — anjiK 
oine. 


The Hardest Problem : BecmbaUs 

And the Hardest Question Is, What Can Be Done? 


• "We're acutely aware of it It's 
: discussed all the time. The commit - 
timer is anxious to do something 
’about it But what the rigto thing to 
do is, we don't know." — Dick But- 
ler, American League supervisor of 
ampzres, speaking of the beanbaH 
stuation in major league baseball. 


v- By Mike Tully 

e United Prat International 

NEW YORK. — Almost a year 
after a pitched ball crashed into Ids 
eye, Didtie Tbonis trying to recon- 
struct Ins baseball career. 

. He can field grounders, run 
sprints and take batting practice. 
Whether he can get an honest swing 
at a curve balk however, no one yet 
; knows. 

T was there when Dickie Then 
got hit,” recalled Blake CuDcn. Na- 
tional League supervisor erf um- 
pires. “It was a complete accident 
1 The ball just got away. What hap- 
pens if tne pitcher was throwing at 
somebody, with the same result? 
It’s tragic enough.” 

Everyone agrees that Mike Tor- 

ncn; or. tb s!aHc r Tk‘<J a ^^ t throwatTTton that April 
' - • 'day in the Astrodome in Houston. 
He let go a pitch and it sailed into 
- Then's face. 

Tbon, who tit 20 homers in 1983, 
now fights double virion. He may 
also have lost the crucial difference 
in hitting; the ahffiiy tn d i stin guish 
> and his contraa between a fastball hurtling toward 
wotneks. the temple and a cuxvcbalftiiat will 

bend over the plate. 

Ihoa’s case provides a sobering 
reminder of wfaax happens when a 
baseball and tissue collide. It also 
explains why batters, in growing 
numbers, have begun chaipsg the 
mound for revenge. 

“It (the brushBack) used to be 
part of the game.” said Butler. 
“Nowadays, it seems it’s an in- 
fringement on the players' rights.” 
mil of Famers Mickey Coch- 
rane and Joe Medwick were 


skulled. So were Tony Conigliaro, 
Cass Michaels, Ellis Valentine, 
Paid Blair and Don Zimmer to 
name a few others. 

Neither Cochrane nor Michaels 
ever batted again in the majors. 
Conigliaro, Medwick, Valentine, 
and Blair never were (he same. 
Zimmer, beaned twice in the mi- 
nors, struggled to the majors de- 
spite a plate in his head. Ray Chap- 
man, hit by Carl Mays cm Aug. 16, 
1920, died the next day. 

As long as a baseball is hard and 
is thrown nearly 90 miles per hour 
(144 kilometers) by a pitcher duel- 
ing the barter lor the 17 indies (43 
centimeters) erf home plate, the po- 
tential for disaster exists. 

Under the rules, umpires assume 
much of the responsibility for mak- 
ing sure that pitchers do not throw 
at batters. If an umpire believes a 
pitcher has thrown at a batter, he 
warns both benches. The next of- 
fense results in the qection of both 
thepiteber and his manager. 

Tne umpire, however, must 
make the distinction. For "ictnnr* 


the issue of “on-field violence" is 
on the agenda in the current negoti- 
ations between players and owners. 

In the meantime, the National 
League has asked every umpire for 
a written opinion of the situation 
and how to improve it So tor, a 
popular suggestion far eliminating 
bench-clearing brawls is a “third- 
man in" rule that has helped hock- 
ey decrease violence. 

Under such a rule, when a batter 
charges the mound, everyone on 
the field must freeze in position, 
with the first violator to be qected. 

The other possible solution is to 
encourage ejection instead of a 
warning in that first inddence of 
throwing at a batter. Umpires have 
lattitude for ejection, but they seem 
to prefer a warning. The weakness 
is this: it appears to give the first 
pitcher a “free shot” that cannot be 
answered. 

“I*ve seen guys get hit in the bead 
when it was unintentional,'’ Bn tier 
said. “He gets blinded or he freezes 
and it's not the pitcher's fault. I 
don’t think anyone would want to 
ruin another man's career. At least 



If anybody can come up with 
answer, I’d sure like to hear iL" 



pitching inside and throwing a 
toushback pitch are 
things. 

^l4hmk apiteber has io establish 
himself,” said Butler. “It’s a cat and 
mouse game between the pitcher 
and the batter. There's a difference 
between backing a player up and 
hitting him. You don't have to hit 
him." 

The second distinction — much 
more critical — involves the target 
area when pitchers believe they 
must hit a barter. Sometimes, to 
protect his teammates, a pitcher 
feds corapdled to drill an 
nent A fastball in the 
hurts. Anything higher carries the 
risk of tragedy. 

“Now you're talking about JdD- 
ing someone,” said Cullen. 

Brushbaeks and mound-charg- 
ing are occurring so frequently that 


an 


TW ABOoatod 

DEJA VU — Bruno BeUone got a shot on goal Wednesday night in Sarajevo, but 
France was held to (M) draw in World Cup qualifying. The last time the European 
champion did not win was 13 games ago^ in another scoreless tie in Yugoslavia In 1983. 


Coach at Tulane 
Resigns; Basketball 
Is Being Dropped 


The Associated Press 

NEW ORLEANS — Tulane 
University, embarrassed by 
charges of pant-shaving by some 
of its basketball players, and newly 
discovered NCAA violations, said 
Thursday it will accept the resigna- 
tions of coach Ned render and two 
assistants and plans to drop men's 
basketball immediately. 

“I will not allow anything to im- 
pede our progress or compromise 
the mission of the university the 
school's president, Eamon Kelly, 


have no reason io believe that coa- 
ch Fowler or any members of his 
coaching staff were involved in the 
alleged point shaving of basketball 
games,” Kelly said. 

Kelly said the NCAA violations 
were discovered as part of a con- 
tinuing investigation of the basket- 
ball program. Among the viola- 
tions, he said, were cash payments 
Fowler made to players on his 
team. Since the investigation is in- 
complete, Kelly said, be would not 
comment further on violations in- 


said at a hews conference. volving Fowler and his assistants. 

l- Kefly 


“The only way I know to demon- 
strate unambiguously thi* academ- 
ic community’s intolerance of the 
violations and actions we have un- 
covered is to discontinne the pro- 
gram in which they originated. 1 * 
Kelly said he was certain his rec- 
ommendation to drop basketball 
would be accepted by Tnlane’s 
board of administrators and the 
university senate. 

“I want to emphasize that we 


Baseball’s League Playoffs Expanded to 7 Games This Season 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

PALM SPRINGS, Cahforaia — With time running out, 
baseball's players ana dub 


iy to expand the league playoffs tor 


negotiators for major 
owners agreed W< 
one season. 

Bui the two rides sidestepped, for the time being, a 
settlement on their main topic of disagreement: distribution 
of an additional S9 million in television revenue from the two 
extra games in each leagne. They agreed to place the money 
into escrow next Sept. 16 if the overall issue of splitting 
broadcast revenue is not resolved by then. 

A decision on the 1985 playoffs had to be made because of 
a deadline imposed by network television. 


“This was worked out separately for 1985 because wc had 
to make a commitment to NBC” television, said the chief 
management negotiator, Lee MacPhail. “However, once we 
have an agreement with the players' association to cover 
everything, the besi-of-seven playoff will become perma- 
nent." 

Under the agreement, one of the leagues, yet to be deter- 
mined, will begin its championship series on Tuesday, Oct. 8 , 
with games also on Ocl 9, 1 1, 12, 13, 15 and 16, if necessary. 
The other league would play OcL 9, 10, 1 1, 12. 13, 15 and 16. 
The besl-of-seven World Series will start on Saturday, Oct 
19, with games also on Oct 20, 22, 23, 24, 26 and 27. 

A best-of-five formal has been used for the league champi- 


onships since the American and National leagues established 
four divisions in 1969. 

■ Yankees Lose Henderson 

Rickey Henderson and John Montefusco, two of 17 Yan- 
kees to be bothered by illness or injury this spring, were the 
Fust players to be offioally designated as disabled Wednes- 
day night when the club placed them on the IS-day and 21 - 
day disabled lists, respectively, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 

The team also said that pitcher Ron Guidry will mfo his 
scheduled opening day start Monday in Boston because erf a 
stiff neck, though be was not termed disabled. 

■ Said manager Yogi Berra, "If we don’t get out of here 

soon, we’ll never get out of here." (AP, UPI) 


said he intends to 
the resignations of Fowler, Mite 
Richardson and Max Pfeifer as 
soon as certain contraa limitations 
are resolved. He did not elaborate. 

As the announcement was made 
at Tulane, Fowler and his assis- 
tants were at the Orleans Parish 
Courthouse, where a grand jury is 
investigating charges of point shav- 
ing. Eight men have been arrested: 
three players, including the star 
center, John Williams; three other 
students and two nonstudents. 

A report last week said senior 
guard Bobby Thompson had told 
the district attorney's office that he 
had agreed, through 3- middleman, 
to have five players, including him- 
self, participate in point shaving in 
the Memphis State game. 

Shaving points involves winning 
by a smaller margin or losing by a 
larger margin than the betting hne 
bookmaker establish an a game. 
The investigation centers on two 
games: Tulane, a 1054-point favor- 
ite, beat Southern Mississippi by 
64-63, and as a four-paint under- 
dog against Memphis State lost, 60- 
49. 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 


Hockey 


Transition 


Lakers Lose Jabbar, and Game 


NBA Standings 


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24 52 

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Control Division 



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55 21 

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x-DutroH . 

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37 48 

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Cleveland 

33 43 

AtU 

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:>iMtonia 

30 44 

J9S 

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20 57 

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WESTERN CONFERENCE 


MM#M* OMston 



x-Dgovur 

48 27 

MO 

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x-Houstan 

44. 31 

SB 

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x-DaJJos 

42 34 

■553 

41* 

■ x-San Antonio 

39 38 

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30 44 

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Golden State 

20 54 

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g 5 WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 

W SI 31 

fi Heston MSB 

fir . 

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Indlana-tt (stb»anovlch9) ; BoaonSP (Parish 
Ul.AJftStC Indiana 37 (Thomcn 7); Boston tS 

tBinL wiraams n. 

CMGa«a . » 23 12 W-IH 

Wasfehistwi 31 n V 25- rt 

WMirfdM W-U M 25. Jordon 13-W 1-3 35. 
Cordns WM W; Mcrtont WI-21 M 72. Dave M 
M 1A Nobsoo^K Chicago 44 (Greamvood f)j 
WosMaoton 4S (RoMnsan 111. Asdstn OilcB- . 
9023 (MernatM W; WasWnoton 23 (BracDav, 
Day* i). 

Hew York 3* M 3t M — IN 

Hmw |«w -2* .25 IS »— HI 

Kino 11-27 l-l 23, WllUotra 7-12K22.' Gru»v 
1 «W 1 1424-1 24. Orr 7-12 3-7 n.Rabo Bed: Now 
York S3 (Wilkins 13); Hew Jersey 54 (Wil- 
liams 15L Assists: Nsw York 25 (WaJksr Sl; 
Nwn Jsraev 31 (Wchardsoa 171. 
aevsteno 33 * » 31— in 

P Mfa dS l pMo 3ft 27 30 2S— 110 

FfMp-20 642S, Hutabord *-71 1 -1333; Matao# 
£-14 14-14 24. Tbreati MS 2-2 1A Rstwmds: 
Cleveland 30 (Hinson 11); PtiUadsloftio 40 
(Mataaa W. Assists: CMvstand 22 (Baa lev 


1_A. Loksrs 31 25 a 34— 110 

Son' Antonio 33 37 34 34—123 

MttcfteU15-32 4-6 Gtfmors &-t 4-4 U; Wor- 
my 14-23 44 32. Scotl 5-1 4-414. Rstewids: Lot 
Anoeiat 32 (Ronbls Ml; San Antonia 47 
(MHcMl 14>. Assists: Lo5 Anuofes 21 (John- 
son m, Son Antonio 35 (Moors 13). 

Kanos CUr 33 20 » 33-122 

i a anm 40 si if as— 1 124 

Smith 14-23 1M7 4i. MJohnsan 7-12 3-4 17; 
TbofM HI 4-1 2b Thetis 10-10 0-220. EJohn- 
M— W jot 7-11 54 1A CHbenftno 4^ 6S li-Rehoond*; 
23—119 Kansas City 44 (THomnsoaNj Los Anastas 52 


Bird M-2SM3&.McHole 7-18 12-1224; Flam- fWofton W). Assists: Kansas Otv 28 (Drew, 
ma 7-10 6-4 2b KsHoob 0-18 34 1*. RstHNKHis: Thaos 0 ); Los Anssfas 34 (Nixon 12). 


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9 


Exhibition Baseball 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

W L PCL 


Toronto Z PHtiOurah 1 
Houston 12. Now York Mats 2 
Alfonfo b Tams 4 
Kamos CHy 4. anemnoH 1 
Detroit 7. Boston 4 
CMcocw Cubs b Clavsiafld 4 
Philadelphia X 5r. Loots 2 
MAwouksa 7. Seatfte 5 
T2 12 >500 CdUfemlo 4, son cutoe 3 
12 13 .480 Minnesota X Loo Anaeles 2 
12 13 M Oakland 11. San Francisco 2 
17 12* rn Chlcood WWlB 50X11. New York Yookse* 3 
12 14 MI • 


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NATIONAL LEAGUE 

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WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Montreal % BotHmora S ' 


EN0U5H FIRST DIVISION 
Manchoster United Z Leicester 1 
Norwich L smdftoW Wadnesdav 1 
13 10 J4S sandortood b Liverpool 3 
IS 12 SSh . Tottenham I. Everton 2 

12 10 -545 Wrsi Bromwich L ipswlcti 2 

13 11 SOI WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
WoWhnf .Mwnoabn L vfB ShittBort 1 
Bochum L ETOtrocht Brcwoschwelo 0 
Bovar Ltvarkusan Z Kabmloiriom S 
Forhma Duesseldorf l Cologne 2 
Elatracnr Aroakhtn z Bowm Muntctuj 2 

- as '' Karisruha-ScZ Borasalo Dortmund 4 
Sctaike 04 x Boyer uerdlmwn 0 
B- MoanthanoJodOoeh Z A. BWaMd 8 - 

Hompura. 5 v z wtrdtr BfwwwB 


NHL Standings 

WALES CONFERENCE 
Patriot Dhrtsloa 
W L T Pis GF GA 
v-FhlhKMnMa 51 20 7 109 33? 240 

le-Woshmoton « M 7 97 300 231 

*-NY Islanders 40 33 5 85 340 3U 

x-NY Rangers 25 43 10 40 389 338 

Pittsburgh 34 49 5 53 309 371 

New Jersey 22 47 9 53 258 33J 

Adams DJvtsioa 

X-Quebec 40 20 9 89 317 245 

x -Montreal 39 27 11 89 293 253 

x- Buffalo 37 24 14 88 278 225 

x- Boston 34 34 9 77 289 279 

Hartford ~~ 28 40 9 45 243 313 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Dhrtsloe 

x-St Louis 35 30 12 83 385 275 

x -Chicago 37 35 4 80 304 2M 

X -Detroit 37 40 11 45 306 349 

x -Minnesota 25 42 12 42 245 317 

Toronto 26 58 B 48 250 348 

Smyrna Dtvisle* 

v- Edmonton 49 19 TO 108 391 287 

X-Wlmtipea *2 27 9 93 348 323 

x-Calaarv 41 27 10 92 354 293 

x-Los Angeles 33 32 13 79 331 319 

Vancouver 25 45 8 58 277 393 

x-c IT netted otavatt berth 
v-d Incited division I me 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Mew Jersey • 0 0-0 

dilcaw 1 2 3—5 

T. Murray (24), D. Wilson (22). Secant (14), 
Olcxylc (19), sutler (20). BmIs on esal: New 
Jersey (on SfcaradanskU 17-10.7—34; OUcogo 
(on Low) B*17*10— 35. 

Detroit 1 l 1—3 

Ptttstaoroh 1 1 0-2 

Dubimv (371. Marmo rtO). Gallant (4): Le- 
mleux (42). S hsdda n (35). Shots 4a ml: De- 
troit ton Herron) 10-12-11—33; PKItburoh (on 
Slefon) 10-13-7—30. 

Vancouver 1 3 0—3 

CtfMiY I I 3-8 

Nilsson 04). WUion 2 (24), Baxter (5). Rbe- 
brouoh (7) . Lemay (21 ), Neel v 2 C20).5hoti H 
goal: Vancouver (on Edwards) 4-15-11—32; 
Calaatv tan Brodeurl 11.15-12—38- 

Teroato 13 9-7 

Mtaneseta 2 5 0-9 

Clccartlll (15), Bolloua (24). Payne (29), 

Wilson (4). Moruk (isl.Holmgran 131. Breton 
(19), Shaman (tlLHarMhire (71; Anderson 2 
(HI DartooaS (W, I hnaoak TOU.Oaouct (in. 
Sbotaon goal: Toranto (on AModie. Baauora) 
13-n-]l-a7; Minnesota (on SLCrols) 10-12-2- 
24. 


BASEBALL 


• nn m 

12 13 AM 
■ TO '14 ■ _JBS 
. -10 U. .^17 
• 7 12 M 
•- S 1 * 


Tennis 


MONTI CARLO TOURNAMENT 
MEN'S SINGLES 

TTtfnJ Round 

MUdiaeiw eil FhoLWistOernwfly.dtiJIrn- 
mv Artoa, US, 7-4 (7-3). 4-4, 
H 4 nrtkSundctr 0 m.Swedan.det. GutUerroo 
VIM, Argentina. 5-7, 4-4. 4-Z 


MILWAUKEE— Sent Rich watts and Jim 
Kern, pitchers, to Vancouver oi the Poetflc 
Coast Loaoue. Cut Janie Cocaaower. pitcher, 
Mike MnTIn and Jamie Nelson, catchers; and 
Eomie Rite*. InfMder. 

OAKLAND— Acquired Joe Laneiord. first 
baseman, tram the Son Diego Padres In ex- 
cMnuior Tim PvaarskUnflalder. Asstaned 
Lunsford to Tacoma of tne Pacific coast 
League. Placed Mike Norris. p( letter, on Hie 
2T^day disabled list. 

TORONTO— Oathmed Matt Williams. 
pRdur. to Syracuse of the Inlemattoocl 
League. Returned Tom Rler. pitcher, and 
Gary Ai Jenson, aatcher, to Syracuse of itw 
inteniotlonal League. 

Nattanaf I enenn 

ATLANTA— Optkmed Jeff Oedmoa- olTclv 
ef, ml Gone Roof, outfielder, to Richmond of 
the international League. 

CINCINNATI— Optioned Alan Knlcaly. 
catcher. Bab Buchanan, Andy McGdffHtan 
and Ron Robinson, pitchers, to Denver of the 
American Association. Assigned Bred Gul- 
den. catcher, outright to Denver. 

PHILADELPHIA- Re le a s ed KHco Garde. 
Inflelder. 

BASKETBALL 

National BcaKetboH Association 

Indian a Named Wayne Embry vice 
oresideot and consultant. 

WASHINGTON— Slgnsd Don Collins, tor- 
word. far tne remainder of the season. 

FOOTBALL 

Mftfimal SMball Leaeee 

ORE EN BA Y— Released Johnnie Gray, de- 
fensive bach. 

HOUSTON— Stoned Scott Gordon, guard. 
Mart VkaHen, tackle, Tim Harris, runntao 
bach, David Klin, linebacker. Mark Sdilecfrt 
end Jock well, punters. 

United state* Football League 

ARIZONA— Signed Kim Anderson, defen- 
sive back, to « ane-vear contract. 

MEMPHIS— R eleased A Ion Duncan, ploce- 
h laker. Signed Bab Grupa. punter. 

NEW JERSEY— Released Karl YH-Btnko, 
tWnrivi tackle. 

HOCKEY 

Motional Hockey League 

BUFFALO— Recalled Mika Craig, goalie, 
tram Rochester of the American Hockey 
League. 

MONTREAL— Stoned Steve Rooney, left 
wing. 

N.Y. ISLANDERS— Returned Alan Kerr 
and Dale Henry, towards, to Springfield 0! 
the American Hockey League. 

N.Y. RANGERS— Recalled MAu Blobdell 
right wing, from New Haven of Itu American 
Hotkey League. 

World Hockey Championship 

TEAM CANADA— Named Doug Carpenter 
couch and general manager, and Tom Watt 
and Ron Smith assistant coaches. Invited 
Kl ric Mull Brand Mario Lem Jeux. centers, and 
Bruoe Driver, defenseman, to tryout camp. 
Named Rnv Ferraro. cenTOr.io me rosier to 
replace Sv twain Turgsan. who It Injured. 

COLLEGE 

CALIFORNIA STATE-NORTH RIDGE— 
Hired Ran Roliev athletic promotions direc- 
tor. 

DEO ROC WASHINGTON—. Announced ttis 
restoration of Derry DtmeUtofe, tatk*tboll 
coach, .... 


Los Angeles Times Service 

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — Con- 
sidering (hat Kareem Abdul-Jab- 
bar was in Los Angeles with the flu 
and that Magic Johnson has a dam- 
aged right knee and that the team 
had played 24 hours earlier in Den- 
ver, the Los Angeles Lakers were 
hurting Wednesday night against 
the San Antonio Spurs. 

Even without injured George 
Gervin, (he Spurs entered this 
game with the advantage erf having 
had two days off. It showed in (heir 
as they won, 122-108. 

/here, it was Boston 119, 


Indiana 103: Chicago 100, Wash- 
ington 91; New Jersey 113, New 
York 100; Gevdand 113, Philadd- 

NBA FOCUS 

phia 1 10 and the Los Angeles Clip- 
pers 124, Kansas City 122. 

Since the last day of February, 
the Lakers had won 14 of 15 games, 
assured themselves the home court 
advantage throughout the Western 
Conference playoffs with a 1 1 8-104 
victory Tuesday night in Denver 
and had gotten the notice of the 
fearless Boston Celtics. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Russo Hired to Coach at Washington 

SEATTLE (AP) — Andy Russo, 36, who directed Louisiana Tech’s 
basketball team to two straight NCAA tournament appearances, signed a 
four-year contract Wednesday to coach at the University of Washington. 
He replaces the famed Marv Hantaan, 67, who retired at the end of his 
14th season with the Pacific-10 Conference Huskies. 

Tommy Joe Eagles, who had been on Russo's staff at Louisiana Tech 
since 1979, was hired as that school’s new coach. The Huskies began their 
search for a new coach 14 months ago, when Harshman announced he 
was retiring. 


Only a few days ago, the Celtics 
had a firm bold on the race to finish 
with the National Basketball Asso- 
ciation’s best record. 

That would give them the home- 
court advantage in all of their play- 
off rounds. This advantage might 
have been the difference in their 
championship seties victory last 
season over the Lakers. 

And after two straight losses, the 
Celtics’ lead over the Lakers was 
down to three games Tuesday 
night- But, after the Spurs had won, 
the Celtics’ lead was four games 
with only six left. 

Abdul-Jabbar bad called about 
5:30 AJVL and said he was going 
home. It was the first game Ik had 
missed this season. Given more op- 
erating room inside because of 
Abdul-Jabbar's absence, forward 
James Worthy made 14 of 23 shots 
and had a season-high 32 points. 

But other thnn Worthy, the Lak- 
ers weren't effective in their set 
offense and scored more than half 
their points off fast breaks. 

Johnson, who estimates he is 
playing at 50 percent effectiveness 
after hurting Ms knee Sunday 



Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 

night, had 11 points and 13 assists. 
But he was not able to create more 
scoring opportunities because he 
didn't have the mobility to drive to 
the basket 

Worthy’s scoring was more than 
offset by San Antonio forward 
Mike Mitchell, who, working on 
Kurt Rambis, had 19 points in the 
first quarter and finished with 36. 


Robinson Says He Will Not Quit Navy Leafs Continue Falling 

ANNAPOLIS. Maryland fAPl — David Robinson, the 6-foot- 11 O 


ANNAPOLIS, Maryland (AP) — David Robinson, (he 6 -foot-ll 
(2.10-meter) sophomore center who was instrumental in Navy’s basket- 
ball team gaining a 26-6 record and a berth is the NCAA tournament 
while setting five team records, said Wednesday he will complete his 
college education at the military academy. 

Robinson had been considering leaving to play in a higher caliber 
program, then malting himself available to play in the National Basket- 
ball Association after graduation. Like other midshipmen, he now faces a 
five-year military commitment upon commissioning. 

Biit, the mathematics major said in a written statement, “I guess I still 
have a hard time visualizing myself playing" at the NBA leva “with all 
those great players. The academy has Men good for me and I want the 
chance to receive a degree from here.” 

Kings’ Move Backed by NBA Group 

NEW YORK (AP) — The Kansas City Kings’ request to move to 
Sacramento, California, was approved Wednesday by a special commit- 
tee of National Basketball Association owners, "which added that the 
league should reserve the right to relocate the Kings if Sacramento 
doesn’t build a suitable arena by the 1987-88 season. 

The decision now must be ratified by a majority of the league's 23- 
member board of governors, which will meet in New York on April 16. 


77te Associated Press 

BLOOMINGTON, Minnesota 
— Pino Occardli got a goal and 
three assists and Steve Payne a goal 
and two assists Wednesday night as 

NHL FOCUS 

(he Minnesota North Stars beat the 
Toronto Maple Leafs, 9-7, in a 
fight-filled contest. 

That ensured Toronto the worst 
record in the National Hockey 
League, and “earned” it the right to 
pick first in the league’s draff. 

Elsewhere, it was Chicago 5, 
New Jersey 0; Calgary 5, Vancou- 
ver 3 and Detroit 3, Pittsburgh 2. 

Payne’s goal 6:54 into the second 
period not only gave the North 
Stars the lead for good, at 3-2, but it 


touched off both a 15-minute brawl 
and a 4-0 Minnesota spun. 

In that period alone the teams 
were assessed 66 minut es in penal- 
ties and two game misconducts. 
Most of the penalties were doled 
out at 7:22, when Toronto’s Bob 
McGill, Jeff Brubaker ahd Gary 
Nylund waged separate battles 
against Minnesota's Willi Kelt, 
Dave Richter and Payne. 

Shortly thereafter, Doug Wilson, 
Dennis Manik and Paul Holmgren 
scored in a 59-second span to put 
the Stars 19 , 6-2. 


trying desperately to hang on to a 
job," said Minnesota’s coach, Glen 


Sonmor. “But our gu 
badly. He has a ' 
can hardly walk. 


was hurt 
and he 












Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Losing Buttons , Anyone? 


Mr. Qub Med’ in the Socialist Ranks 



By Russell Baker 
EW YORK — Three months 
ago my buttons started falling 


I didn't pay any attention at first. 
You know about buttons. One 
morning you’re getting ready to 
strangle yourself with the daily 
necktie and a collar button falls off. 

. So on this particular morning, 
off comes the collar button. A min- 
ute or so later I am buttoning a 
sleeve and what do you know? Cuff 
button comes off in my hand. 

Now that’s not a daily event: two 


buttons coming off before the oat- 
meaL On the other hand, it’s not an 
astounding coincidence either. 

I didn’t even mention it when I 


got to work later that morning and 
Finney from auditing said, “What's 
new?” 

“Not much,'* I said. 

□ 


As I now know, what I should 
have said was. “My buttons have 
started falling off, Finney.” 

Of course, without an accurate 
crystal ball, how could I have 
known that the very next day, just 
as I was going out the door of my 
house, a large black button would 
fall off my overcoat? 

This was the button that first 
made me uneasy. Retrieving it 
from the Door, I said to my wife, 
“Something funny is going on with 
my buttons.” 

“When you wear a 19-year-old 
overcoat, buttons fall off.” she said. 

For the next three days cot a 
button feU. I put the matter out of 
mind. “What’s new?” Finney asked 
each day as I arrived at the job. . 
Each day I said, “Not much.” 


a week without incident. Then a 
second week. 

Then, one morning I brought a 
box of freshly laundered shirts 
home from the laundry, opened it 
mH discovered two buttons miss- 
ing from two shirts. 

Oh sure, the laundry might take 
one button. But two buttons? No- 
body can persuade me that this was 
the work of your typical laundry 
button smasher. 

So it had started ag a in . 

“What’s new?” said Fmney that 
day. 

“Finney,” I said, “do you think 
there could possibly be a conspira- 
cy by the thread trust to create a 
thread that would all rot away si- 
multaneously, thereby causing but- 
tons to fall off en masse all over 
America?” 

“Nothing new with me. either.” 
he replied. 

Exactly three days later, while 


Gilbert Trigano Is Drawing on His Business Success to Combat French Unemployment 


By Katherine Knorr 

International Herald Tribune 


P \ ARIS — Few articles about 
Gilbert Trigano fail to com- 
ment on his height (small) and his 
energy (large), as though writers 
fed it necessary to point out that 
Mr. Gub Med doesn't look at all 
the way you might expect He is 
64, unprepossessing, rather soft- 
spoken. His secret is energy and a 
faith in the future that hailed him 
to be described in France as “a 


little old young man." Since De- 
cember, he has been spending 


struggling into my antique trench 
coat, 1 heard the sound that had 


begun to fill me with dread. A but- 
ton had hit the floor. 

ft was a button for buttoning in 
the trench coat's wool liner. 

“What is this rain of buttons 
trying to tell me?” 1 cried. 

“That it’s time you junked that 
old trench coat,” my wife said. 

My beloved old trench coat! I 
had bought it 20 years ago so I 
would look like Humphrey Bogart 
It hadn't worked yet but I was 


some of that energy as the govern- 
ment’s man responsible for train- 
ing people for the future. 

Trigano, one of France's great- 
est business success stories, has 
built up his Club Mediterranie 
over the years into a huge interna- 
tional vacation organization, with 
holiday villages scattered 
throughout the world. His nomi- 
nation is part of an effort by the 
government to draw on business 
expertise to combat unemploy- 
ment and thus show that a So- 
cialist government can be as busi- 
ness-oriented as any other. 

When Trigano, the club’s chair- 
man, was named to the govern- 


ment — he is working only part- 
time — it elicited some tight and 


reluctant to quit trying. Now the 
liner button had fallen. 


On the fourth day, I put oq my 
new flannel slacks with The button- 


down flap covering the left hip 
pocket and started down to break- 
fast. On the fifth step I heard the 
unmistakable dick of a button fall- 
ing cm an uncarpeted stair tread. 

It was gray, all right. 

I knew even before I looked that 
the button-down flap covering my 
left hip pocket was no longer but- 
toned down. 

“Sensible people are worried to 
death about the bomb getting 
them,” my wife reasoned, “and all 


The following week, wrapping it 
around me again, again I heard a 
button fall There was an epidemic 
of falling buttons and the center of 
infestation was becoming my 
trench coaL 


yon can worry about is a button 
conspiracy. You ought to count 
your blessings.” 

‘ □ 


After the disturbing fall of the 
button-down flap button, there was 


“What's new?” asked Finney 
that morning. 

“Do you think people reach a 
time in life when their buttons start 
trying to tell them something, Fin- 
ney?” 

“Nothing new with me, either," 
said Finney. 

Actually there was. He was wear- 
ing a shirt with a button-down col- 
lar and one of the buttons was 
missing, but I didn't teQ him. Out 
of gratitude he didn’t teQ me I 
looked, not like Bogart, but like 
Dagwood Bumstead in a trench 
coat. 


New York Times Service 


not-so-lighl comments. The satiri- 
cal weekly Le Canard Fnc hafa fe 
could not resist joking about 
where he was going to put his staff 
of GOs — the gentik orgtmisa- 
teurs (which means something 
like “nice organizers”) of his va- 
cation company. Others saw his 
being name d as part of a move by 
President Francois Mitterrand to 
bring in his friends to the govern- 
ment: Trigano was named at the 
same time that Roland Dumas, a 
friend of the president’s, was 
named minister of external rela- 
tions. 

Trigano, whose title is delegate 
to the prime minister’s office for 
“new training.” is charged with 
setting up training for new and 
changingjobs; his immediate pro- 
ject is to equip all French schools 
with computers by the falL He has 
done public work before, but not 
of fbig magnitude. 

“On very precise problems," he 
said, “the government is calling 
on people who have the advan- 
tage of not being in the adnrinis- 



Mr. dub Med: “We hare to sacrifice a generation. 9 


nation, of not being ‘budgeted . 1 1 
don't need a salary or anything. I 
have amply as much as I need 
from the Club Mdditerrante. You 
have to be 20 to enter politics. I 
left politics ai 20 . Tm not going to 
enter at 65.” 

Bernard AttalL who was Club 
Med’s financial director in 1980 
and 1981; - believes Trigano is 
well-suited for the job. “He is a 
creator. He does not get bogged 
down in administrative machin- 
ery, ” he said. “He has aspects that 
are extraordinarily French. He 
loves life. He loves France. But he 
is also international he under- 
stands commerce. He is a sales- 
man, in the best sense of the word. 
That's not so French. He is an 
excellent negotiator — even re- 
doubtable — because he is at the 


same time capable of charm and 
of calculation.” 

Trigano, in all his incarnations, 
is the consummate salesman and 


promoter. The club regularly 
fights a public relations battle 
about whom it attracts and why. 
It resists being seen as a singles 
club. Its best PR man is.Trigano. 

The club’s image has changed 
over the years. Long before it was 
even seen as a tingles dub, it was 
seen as a place for underwater 
fishing. “In the first years, one out 
of three members came to the 
dnb to get under water and pierce 
his fish? Trigano said. “It was a 
kind of voluptuousness. I suc- 
cumbed like everyone else. We 
sometimes committed massacres. 
We often brought back more than 
wc needed, and as it was a village 


of fishermen, we did not even 
have the solution of giving them 
to the people who surrounded us. 

“Then, year after year, the fish 
started to defend themselves. 
From three feet under, they went 
to five feet under, from five to 15 
meters, until we could not find 
them anymore except at great 
risk. Untu.the day we stooped iL 
And the fish came back. Now we 
do not kill them anymore, we sire 
them.” 

The same land, of energy and 
enthusiasm that Trigano. devotes 

apparralfy devotes to running iL 
Attali, currently the president of 
the GAN insurance company, 
said, “Hie is a rare mixture. He is 
capable at the same of having a 
long-term outlook, and of run- 
ning the company, day to day. He 
has a vision of the wond of leisure 
over 15 or 20 years, and at the 
same time he knows the first 
names of most of his employees.” 

TriganoV background is un- 
usual for French business. He was 
raised in a modest family, and he 
began his career as a journalist for 
the Communist newspaper I'Hu- 
manite in the 1940s. “1 was bom 
in the suburbs of Paris. I spent a 
childhood like all boys and girls, 
calm. Then there was the war. 
And I am Jewish. The war made 
me conscious of being Jewish in a 
very intense way; that is, it 
showed me I had a suspended 
sentence in life. So I try to live my 
life that way.” 

During the war, he was respon- 
sible for a Communist resistance 
youth group. Afterward, “I was in 
the Communist Party, so I stayed 
a year. Then I left very quickly. I 
was with them during the war, 
and I’m very grateful to them, but 
their politics do not correspond to 
my view of life." 

Whether Trigano — qr anyone 
— can succeed in his governmen- 
tal project is questionable. But his 
enthusiasm is not. “We have to set 
up informotique for all We still 
have to equip 70,000 classes, plus 
the universities. We must train 
110,000 teacher-trainers. We 
must edit die teaching manuals at 
all levels. We must at the same 
time open the schools to nousto- 
dents. adults from ail over 
France, and to train at least 


10,000 or 15,000 trainers to re- 
ceive tHwn, with fruiT|iials adapted 
• to them.” . 

The computer project is only 
part of Trigano’s duties; he must 
set 19 training programs for new 
and rapidly changing jobs. It is 
not simple. 

A tragic example of modem 
problems witb changing patterns 
of employment is the long, bitter 
coal strike in Britain. Speaking of 
the coal miners’ wishes to pre- 
serve employment for their chil- 
. dren, Trigano said, “ft is crazy. It 
is completely crazy. And it is so 
sad. We have the same problem in 
: France. It is in a way heartbreak- 
ing and noble and sad at the same 
time. We cannot judge the miners. 
Men who hold on for a year in a 
cause that is noble and lost — we 
cannot judge them quickly.” 

He acknowledges that people 
like that cannot be converted to 
space-age jobs. “It is impossible 
to re-train people without think- 
ing of the habits they have ac- 
quired. I cannot go from a mining 
drill to a keyboard. But (here are 
passages, there are intermediate 
phases of new employment that 
must use the habits, modifying 
them here and there. But to tell 
the son of a miner, Ton will be a 
mins,’ when Ire has not acquired 
the habits of his father, that is 
when it is wrong. We could proba- 
bly assure for miners, men of 35 
to 40, for whom the habits are so 

mgrainfti , fhat they remain with 

the habits they have. But the 18- 
year-old must not be sent down 
into the mine, except in such 
small percentages that we do not 
have the problem in 20 or 30 
years." 

He believes that changes can- 
not come in one country alone, 
that the only solution is Europe. 
“We must look at Europe in par- 
allel with North America, and 
maybe South America, certainly 
Japan and certainly Southeast 
Aria. We are an old continent that 
somewhere in its head still lives 
on the nostalgia of its leadership.” 

He does not underestimate the 
forces of inertia — the fear of 


Hons HoUein Awarded 


The 1985 Pritzker Aidrilecte 
Prize has been awarded- to Hans 
Hoflein, 5J, an Ausam desgHer 
known as much Jar hisexhibrnr^ 
and store and office mtenbrc as his 
architecture. The S 1 QO.OGfrtaX-frefc 
prize is considered the professions 
most prestigious jawarfcHonefift 
best known awdntecturalco mrm^ 

aion is the Abtaberg: ; iibnitipai 
museum at M&nchcn-Gladb&clt, 
near Dusseldorf, West Germany, 
completed in 1982. He ;j won two 
subsequent iniernatiqnaFcbmpet^ 
lions — for a museum of modem 
art in Frankfurt, haw under con- 
struction. and a cultural forum ifi 
West Berlin. 


iiat e 


Booth No. 5, where Gailt Gable 
proposed to Carole Lombard, is oae 
of the artifacts to be saved from tbul 
famed Brown Derby restaurant'^ 
Vine Street in Los Angeles which 
has served its last meafafter more 
than 56 years as a movidand land- 
mark. The restaurant, which 
opened on Valentine's Day 1929, 


change of older generations. 
“They say, T am a bred man, let 
me live my tranquil life.' That is 
the problem. We nave to sacrifice 


somewhere a generation. What is 
better — to shock the 60-year- 
olds or lose the 20-years-dds? It is 
better to shod: the 60-year-olds, 
of course. But they make public 
opinion. Still it is good for them 
too, given the long average length 
of their fives; it is better that they 
. by the adventure with us.” 


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tennis nearby. Commercial area aom- 
mnes 85 unts en 13,171 sq.m. m eA. 
Pius 21 super epartmerts above & /8 m 
separate wavry condo - all in front Ere 
dona main puts. Top investments 45% 
sddTHuriy now before next price-nse! 
Contact dreaty devetepert: 


COMPUTK PORTRAITS 


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Needed worldwide. 


T-SHIRT F0TC6 


NOW EN FULL COLOR 
an aB-aash business that can earn you 


$8000 - SI 04)00/ month. New aid used 


systems from $9500 - $26,500. 
tana. Dept. A 12, Postfoch 170340, 
6000 Prw*furt/W. Germony: 

Tel: 069-747806 Tht 412713 KEMA 


Attorney & Kecdtor obtons veal &per- 
monens resKtence. Hdps to ret up USA 


PUBtTO PUNTA PORTALS. SJL 
Director Camerad 
Cf Manna 101, Partob Nous 
MoBorm,5p«i or ns 68686 CAUU & 


monoru resdence. Hdps to ret up USA 
businesses & locates co mm erce), mdus- 
tnal & reuderAd rad estate. Far free 
brochure write- David Hbian, 1201 


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NEW ACWKT1SNG MEDIA 
IMMEDIATE HIGH PBORT MAIGff) 


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Id: France (6) 4X 60 38 
from 9 am to 9pm. 

Tfe 230303 Piifc tea Seh 14X30301 


RUSMBfSMEN REGULARLY 


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ly BaareaodnfoistiiJwi / med fan- 
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HHIASYACMIMOL Yacht OtoST 
Academic 28. Athens 10671 




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Pl'AMItrS JE'tL I :i !,! *;< - 


OFFICES WANTED 


FAU.CSJVF. JEV. EE> vn;»j(- : 




V* 1 33U 1 




closed Wednesday' because of 
problems with Us lease. “We are 




taking off every picture, every 
chair , every booth, every lamp- 
shade and storing them until wc 
open up our new Derby, and every- 
thing will be the same again,”* 
spokesman, Fred Lewm, said. 


An American, fqundat^ bcS^f > 
a Stradivarius- violin for use by a 
Russian defector Wednesday. The . 
Jules Falk Stradivanus, named for 
the American collector who once 
owned it. was sold Terr _ £286,000 
(about S343.0OO), the second high- 
est price ever paid al auction for a 
violin. An unidentified American 
foundation bought it for Victoria 
MuOova, 25, who defected from the 
Soviet Union two years ago. said a 
spokesman for Sotheby's in Lon- 
don. 

D : . 


Switzerland's largest retail dram 
has agreed to caned a commercial 
featuring royal famfiy look-alikes 
following a protest by the Briti^d 
Embassy. The embassy cbmplained 
to Swiss national television m mid- 
March about the commercial be- 
cause “it wasn't in very good taste.” 
The commercial showed doubles of 
Queen Elizabeth, Princess JMam 
and Prince Charles in a restaurant 
operated by iheMIgros chain, with 
a soundtrack implying the food was 
fit for royticansumptioo- * 



opened Fnd