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Published With Hie New York limes and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, SATURDA Y-SUNDAY, APRIL 6 - 7, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 



By Bill Keller 

- Hew York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON —Tbe "Senate 


S10 

t Ronald 
Reagan’s request, and the panel's 
chairman, Barry Goldwater, 
waned the president that he would 
be lucky if Congress did not cut 
mor&- 

•Td advise them to accept these 
figures and be very happy, Sena* 
tor Goldwaier, as Arizona Repub- 
lican. said Thursday after more 
than two days of closed meetings. 
“We can live with this.”’ 

The White House announced 
Thursday afternoon that it would 



sma > ■« Srifi^J 


percent 

aver the current year on top of 
another increase 10 make up for 

infliutvB I. 

Earlier Thursday, Senate Repub- 
licans and White House aides had 
agreed to a spending plan for fiscal 
year 1986 that halved Mr. Reagan’s 
requested increase in military 
spending, cut many popular pro-. 
at redu 


its bin l*u> 6. with Sam Nunn of 
Georgia, John Glenn of Ohio and 
John C Stands of Mississippi, all 
Democrats, joining the panel's 10 
Republicans, committee aides re- 
ported. - 

By the same vote, the committee 
rejected an alternative that would 
have given the Pentagon only 
enough money to make up for in- 
flation. 

Senator Goldwater said Thurs- 
day that the bill would not get 
through the full Senate without 
concerted assaults- “There’ll be 
mare attempts to amend this bill 
than any bill teal’s ever come to the 
floor,’' m declared. 

Senator Cart Levin, a Democrat 
of Michigan, who voted against the 
bill, complained that it was overly 
generous to nuclear weapon pro- 
grams while cutting, into “ungja- 
morous” conventional military 
needs such as spare parts and mine- 



U.S. Will Take 

A Larger Role 
In Mideast Talks 


President Reagan with Alfonso Robelo CaDejas, left, of the 
Democratic Revolutionary Alliance, 8 rebel grovq>; Arturo 


Jos£ Cruz, a L 
Portocarrero of the 


leader; ami Adolfo Calero 
Nicaraguan Democratic Force. 


Reagan Nicaragua Plan: Bargaining With Congress 


?*ed to cancel a cS: 
?* "M fan* 5 

•ms a protest hv ■ 


get deficit to $100 billion by 1988. 

The Senate Anns Committee’s 
measure will go to the full Senate 
loaded with divisive provisions, in- 
a L - chiding more MX nustiks, a surge 
£s\ = The^u 1 h - ^ t ' «f spending for space weapon re- 
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chemical weapons. 

' The Senate committee also at- 
tached hotly disputed provisions 
giving the Defense Department 
new freedom to dose m£Btaxy bases 
and «*wnp«ing tiie Pentagon from 
a variety of labor laws. - 

However, Senator Les Aspin. a 
Democrat of Wisconsin, who 'is 
chairman of the House Armed Ser- 
vices Committee, predicted dial in 
the end Congress would approve a 
freeze of some kind on mQiiaiy 
spending, cutting $8 billion to $10 
billitHiinote^' . 

The Senate conntattee; tradilion- 
ally tbemDilaiy’s most synqjathet- 


He also strongly objected to a 
package of provisions sponsored 
by Senator Hnl Gramm, Republi- 
can of Texas, and approved on a 
. lO-to-9 party-line vote. 

One of them would permit the 
defense secretary to close military 
.bases sifter giving Congress 60 
days’ notice, withwit tire currently 
required public hearings and envi- 
ronmental impact statements. 

The Senate committee did not 
vote to dose any militaty 
Senator Goldwater pro- 
duced * Pentagon list of 22 treses 
that were Hkdy candidates for do- 
sure, and said he believed as many 
as 400 could eventually be dosed. 

The bill approved Thursday in- 
cluded money for 21 of the 48 MX 
missiles requested by the president; 
$3.4 Mfion for space weapon re- 
search, a an of $300 milfcon; $5.5 
bQHon : Ior 48 B-l bombers; $1 J 
tnlfion for arrew Trident submarine 
and $2.7 biQioa for a highly accu- 
rate new missile it will cany, and 
the foil, though secret, amounts for 
research into, tire Stealth bomber 
and an advanced cruise missile. 


By Joanne Omang 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — President Ronald Rea- 
gan's policy initiative on Nicaragua is essential- 
ly a plan to make peace with Congress, not with 
Nicaragua. 

It would give tire anti-government rebels in 
Nicaragua the right, after 60 days of negotiating 
with tne Sandmist government, to choose 
whether to continue talking while $ 14 million in 
115. aid is spent on food, clothing or medicine, 
or to take what would be left of the money in 
guns. 

Their incentive to make concessions would be 
minimal. 

In effect, the plan gives Nicaragua 60 days to 
agree to the demands of the rebels and Mr. 
Reagan before U5. funding for the rebels' war 
resumes with full congressional backing. Nica- 
ragua, and most Democrats, rejected the pro- 
posal Thursday for that reason. 

But the plan would alter the political debate 
by allowing Congress to vote, at least initially, 
funding for tire rebels that would not involve 
war materiel This would affirm tire legislators' 
distaste both for blood and for the Sandinists as 
well as offer them a chance to look tough. 

The proposal marked the second tune this 
that Mr. 

into' bargaining chips. He got his way in 
gress ontheMX xmssde, ami he hopes to make 


the $14 million in aid to the insurgents a bar- 
gaining chip against the Sand'inkt^ . This is just 
the alternative that many members of Congress 
have urged the president to find. 

Democrats in Congress and Nicaragua’s left- 
ist government denounced the proposal. The 
House speaker. Thomas P. O'Neill Jr„ Demo- 
crat of Massachusetts, called it a “dirty trick." 

However, some members of Congress were at 
least cautiously favorable. 

David F. Durenberger, a Minnesota Republi- 
can who fhaire the Senate Select Committee on 
Intelligence, said the initiative was "a positive 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

step^ that he would endorse if the eventual 
conversion to military aid were eliminated. Mr. 
Durenberger had decided earlier to oppose Cen- 
tral Intelligence Agency funding for the rebels 
and he influenced several colleagues. 

However, Mr. Durenberger tempered his re- 
action by saying the plan was not Mr. Reagan's 
“Central America policy, not his Nicaragua 
policy; it's just a way to get rid of a bad policy 
Lhe Congress wrote." 

Richard G. Lugar, an In diana Republican 
who is chairman of tbe Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Co mmi ttee, said that “many who were 
polarized by the old formula will be willing to 


step back and re-examine" tire new one. Mr. 
Lugar was one of those who had told Mr. 
that his old approach to Nicaragua 
never be approved in Congress. 

Prospects in Congress for the new formula 
could be improved, Mr. Lugar said, but he 
slopped short of predicting victory. 

the visiting Colombian president, Bdisario 
Betancnr, also was cautiously favorable, 
tire plan “a positive sup.” He said he 
offer the plait at a meeting next wed: of the 

si on in tbe agenda. The Gxuadoramrap.com- 
p rising Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela and Pana 
ma, is seeking to negotiate peace in Central 
America. 

Democrats, however, predicted defeat for the 
idea in Congress. 

They were so unimpressed by it that House 
leaders asked Lee M. Hamilton, aa Indiana 
Democrat who chairs tbe House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence, and Michael 
D. Barnes, a Maryland Democrat who heads the 
Western Hemisphere affairs subcommittee, to 
devise an alternative. 

Mr. Barnes said he hoped for a bipartisan 
approach because “there are a lot of Republi- 
cans here who are also very concerned about the 
president’s policy." 

He also said that Mr. Reagan's proposed 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


By Bernard Gwcrczman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Tbe United 
Stales has decided to play a more 
direct diplomatic role to keep alive 
the latest Middle East peace initia- 
tives by Jordan and Egypt, accord- 
ing to Reagan administration offi- 
cials. 

They said Thursday that, in ad- 
dition to the previously announced 
visit to the region this month by 
Richard W. Murphy, assistant sec- 
retary of stale for Near Eastern and 
South Asian affairs. Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz is planning 
a visit next month if Mr. Murphy 
reports progress. 

Mr. Shultz, who will accompany 
President Ronald Reagan on a trip 
to Western Europe in early May, 
has already announced that’ be will 
fly to Israel on May 10 to an end 
ceremonies at the Yad Vashem me- 
morial 10 the Jewish victims of 
Nazi Germany. 

Previously, State Department of- 
ficials said that Mr. Shultz would 
return directly to Europe. He is 
scheduled to be in Vienna on May 
14 for talks with Foreign Minister 
Andrei A. Gromyko of the Soviet 
Union and to take part on May 15 
in ceremonies marking the 30th an- 
niversary of the postwar indepen- 
dence of Austria. 

But now, officials said, Mr. 
Shultz is fikdy to go to Cairo and 
Amman, Jordan, and possibly oth- 
er places to see if he can advance 
the prospects for direct talks be- 
tween Inael and a delegation of 
Jordanians and Palestinians who 
are not identifiable as members of 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion. 

One possibility, officials said, is 
for Mr. Shultz to meet jointly with 
the foreign ministers of Egypt and 
Jordan. 

Edward P. Djerejian, a State De- 
partment spokesman, said Thurs- 
day that Mr. Murphy “plans to do 
whatever might advance the likeli- 
hood of achieving our goal of direct 


negotiations and to avoid what 
would detract from that goal.” 

He said that, while Mr. Murphy 
would not meeL with “declared 
members" of the PLO, he would 
like to confer with “individuals 
from the West Bank and Gaza," 
which are predominantly populat- 


ed by Palestinians. 



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MIDDLE EAST 


itUL 


It May Enter 

Sidon Battle 


The Associated Pm* 

BEIRUT.— Syria has threatened 
to send its soldiers into the Sidon 
area of southern Lebanon unless 
tbe government erf President Armn 
Gemayd ends fighting between 
Christian and Moslem f orces, a 
newspaper reported Friday. 

An independent Beirut news 
per. An Nahar, said that Mr. < 
mayel had received^a “semi-ultima- 


-.v. 


Swdnor 


REALfijf 

fors^L 


Christians and Moslems are 
caught op in ‘urban warfare’ in 
soudMznXdmnon. Page 2. 

turn" from Syria to end the fighting 
in Sidon before it engulfed Leba- 
non in another civil war. 

The Syrians said- tbat if Mr. Ge- 
mayel failed they woold intervene 
militarily, tire newspaper reputed. 

Asked about the reports, a 
source In the Gemayd administra- 
tion said: “Syria is determined 10 : 






■i n* 1 




bility, and it wflf not tolerate those 
s y obstructing tbe^ ; peace process m- 
definitely.” 

tSdw'v'r j'&'n '-'v Syria maintains an estimated 
„ ,^ *30,000 soldiers in' eastern and 
northern Lebanon. 

Christians and Moslems fired at 
each other again Friday, kdmg'a 
policeman and wounding 11 civil- 
ians, police said. Other fighting was 
reported in Beirut and in the cen- 
tral Lebanese mountains. 

During the last right days, 48 
persons have been killed and 190 
have been injured in Sidon. 

Meanwhile, an Israeli soldier 
was injured Friday when guerrillas 
detonated a bomb as a patrol 
passed near the village of-Qas- 
imyah, jmt inside the front Israeli 
line in Lebanon, the Israeli military 
command in Tel Aviv announced. 

In Tel Aviv, Brian E Urquhart, 

the UN iradersccretary-gcneTal, „ 

met for an hour with Defense Min- centnries-old industry whose pres- 
ister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel to ervation had been almost a point of 
.^.HOTfl^^.^discuss the future role of UN national honor. 

'] l, 1 troops in southern Lebanon. Tbe decision, adopted in a cabv- 

v*&****s r ■ INSIDE 

■The ILS. ’Denny chief warned that theUnited States might lose a 

trade warwfth Japan. ^*8*3- 

w -Mjy. i BIhe United -States started wok on a “prospective agenda" for 
| Reagan-Cktfhadiev talks. Pfcgel 




TV» tatoexted (W 

GOOD FRIDAY IN JERUSALEM — Christian pilgrims, carrying a cross, foBow tbe 
Via Dolorosa, tbe route Christ is said to have traveled to tbe CnidfbdkHL At the Vatican, 
the pope beard confessions and later carried a cross through Roman ruins. Page 2L 



‘or’s 



Revived Dispute on East-West Policy 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Penta- 
gon has said that there are no dif- 
ferences between Secretary of De- 
fense Caspar W. Weinberger and 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
over the response to the Soviet 
Union for the shooting of a U.S. 
Army officer. 

The Defense Department's chief 
spokesman. Michael L Burch, said 
Thursday that Mr. Weinberger “is 
not at odds with George Shultz 
over this issue." 

Earlier, officials of both the State 
and Defense Departments said the 
issue had revived fundamental dis- 
agreements between the two agen- 
cies over dealing with Moscow. 

Mr. Burch said that Mr, Wein- 
berger considered the shooting of 
the officer, Major Arthur D. Nich- 


olson Jr., by a Soviet sentry in East 
Germany on March 24 to have 
been “an act of murder.” He said 
Mr. Weinberger thought “that an 
apology is certainly necessary and 
he feels that we should also explore 
tbe issue of compensation" to Mar 
jot Nicholson’s family. 

The officer, who was with a liai- 
son unit attached to Soviet forces in 
East Germany, was taking photo- 
graphs inside a Soviet military in- 
stallation when he was shot. 

State Department officials said 
that Mr. Shultz also believed that 
an apology should be required and 
that the issue of compensation 
should be explored. But they said 
the issues should be discussed with 
Soviei officials rather than be a 
condition for a meeting, as Mr. 
Weinberger seemed to suggest 


For several months, the adminis- 
tration has been annoyed by fre- 
quent media references to differ- 
ences between Mr. Weinberger and 
Mr. Shultz on East-West policy. 

The latest issue arose without 
much warning and seemed to catch 
the State Department by surprise, 
because department officials said 
they believed a formula for resolv- 
ing questions that had arisen in 
connection with the March 24 kill- 
ing of Major Nicholson had been 
domed with the Pentagon. 

Last Saturday, while Mr. Wein- 
berger was returning to the United 
States from Europe, Mr. Shultz met 
with the Soviet ambassador to 
Washington, Anatoli F. Dobrynin. 

Later, a State Department offi- 
cial said that Mr. Shultz was 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


ie Middle East Policy Review, 
a weekly newsletter, said in its lat- 
est issue that Mr. Murphy was 
ready to confer with a joint Jorda- 
nian-Palestinian delegation, pro- 
vided there were no PLO members 
involved. 

The United Slates has been un- 
der pressure from King Hussein of 
Jordan and President Hosni Mu- 
barak of Egypt to be more active in 
Middle East diplomacy. Hussein in 
February signed a framework 
agreement with Yasser Arafat, the 
PLO leader, endorsing the idea of 
recognizing Israel in return for the 
evacuation of Arab land occupied 
in the 1967 war. Mr. Mubarak also 
called for a joint delegation to ne- 
gotiate, in an international forum, 
on the Middle East 

Mr. Mubarak and Hussein urged 
the United States to take this agree- 
ment as a first step and to use its 
influence to make further progress. 

They proposed that the United 
States receive a joint Jordaman- 
Palestinian delegation in Washing- 
toa But the United States was cool 
to this idea unless there was a guar- 
antee that this would lead to direct 
talks with Israel. 

Moreover, Jordan and Egypt 
said, any joint delegation would 
have to include PLO representa- 
tives. The United States continues 
to refuse to deal with the PLO until 
it is explicit about recognizing Isra- 
eTs right to exist. 

Because of these questions, the 
United States for weeks remained 
skeptical about becoming directly 
involved in the diplomatic talks , 
and Mr. Shultz, in particular, was 
reluctant to go to the area. 

■ Peres, Mubarak May Meet 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres of 
Israel said there was a chance that 
be would soon meet with Mr. Mu- 
barak but added that that was not 
the most important thing for im- 
proving the two countries' rela- 
tions, The Associated Press report- 
ed Friday from Jerusalem. 

Egypt already has reopened a 
dialogue with Israel, which is "pref- 
erable 10 paralysis and severance" 
that marked their relations for two 
years, Mr. Peres was quoted as say- 
ing in Davar, a newspaper. 

Asked if he ought meet Mr. Mu- 
barak in the next month or two, 
Mr. Peres replied: "There is a 
chance, but I don't regard that as 
the be-all and end-all.” 

Meanwhile, a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said that Israel and 
Egypt arc trying to find a new date 
to resume talks on their dispute 
over the border along the Red Sea 
coastline at Taba. 

Other officials said Egypt had 
suggested three days of talks at the 
end of next week. But Israel reject- 
ed the proposal because the dates 
fell during the Jewish holiday of 
Passover, which commemorates the 
exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. 


Newport Loses an Attraction: The VonBidow Trial 



in ’88 


By John Burgess 

HtoHitpon Past Service 

TOKYO — Japan yielded Fri- 
day to pressure from tbe United 
States and weed to end all com- 
mriaalwbaung in 1988. 

The' announcement marked the 
first time Japan has pubtidy com- 
mitted itsdf to bring to a close a 







■oi*: iv 


BU&NESS/FiNANCE 



er discusses the lessons of the Vietnam War. 


net meeting Friday, followed 
lengthy negotiations with Wash- 
ington, vrindb had threatened to cut 
Japan's fishing quotas in Uil. terri- 
torial waters unless the 1988 ban 
was adopted. 

The decision was not formally 
linked to tense negotiations over 
bilateral trade now in progress be- 
tween the rwp countries, but Japa- 
nese officials see it as a major con- 
cession to the United States. 

Foreign Minister Shin taro Abe 
told cabinet ministers he would 
send a letter to Malcolm Baldrige, 
the U5. commerce secretary, for- 
mally conveying Japan's inten- 
tions. He said the agreement would 
include a condition that a U.S. ap- 
peals conn uphold a UJ5. govern- 
ment decision to delay putting fish- 
ing quotas in effect against Japan if 
it failed to stop whaling ty 1986. 
The United States is appealing a 
riding byalowo- court that ordered 
the government to apply the sanc- 
tions. 

The Japanese move was immedi- 
ately denounced by the Japan 
Whaling Association, whose mem- 
bers naught 4,600 whales in the 
1982-83 season. Motonobu Ina- 
ti, president of the! association, 

lamed tee derision on the jrawtir 


of tee international anti-whaling 
movement He said he was M dis- 
heartened" and teat (he govern- 
ment should compensate tee indus- 
try. 

. Some private companies were re- 
ported to be contemplating suing 
the Japanese government 

Some government officials were 
also displeased with it “The maj or- 
ity of tee Japanese people are in 
favor of continuing whaling," said 
Susumu Akiyama, director of tee 
Foreign Ministry’s fisheries divi- 
sion. “But we have been receiving 
some kind of pressure from the 
UJS: government Nobody is hap- 
py" 

In the 1950s, whaling was a ma- 
jor industry, employing about 
15,000 people. Today it has shrank 
to about 1,300, with only a tingle 
mother ship and fleet. Whale meat, 
once a major source of protein in 
Japan, has become a specialty food. 

Japan has argued that whaling 
makes economic use of the carcass, 
does not threaten tee survival of a 
specie* and is an important aspect 
of Japanese culture. It ridicules 
moral objections to whaling, noting 
that they often come from societies 
where beef is widely consumed. 


By Dudley Ciendinen 

New York Tima Service 

NEWPORT, Rhode Island — 
Last Monday the early tourist sea- 
son here began, and tee gleaming, 
big-windowed tour buses rolled 
once more down Bellevue Avenue, 
past Newport's legendary man- 
sions: past Rosediff, past Marble 
House, past Tbe Breakers, past the 
walled elegance of Clarendon 
Court, made famous by tee von 
Balow trial two years ago. 

Newport, which thrives on tour- 
ism, has become a kind of Hying 
museum of tee ways of tee rich. 
George Oakley, tee owner of Vi- 
king Tours, calculates that his com- 
pany bases alone take 50,000 pay- 
ing customers past Clarendon 
Court each year. “A lot of people 
still ask where it is," he said. 

Like tee America’s Cup yachting 
races, tee long trial of tiaus von 
Bulow, on charges that he had tried 
twice to murder his wife in her 
mansion by iiyecting her with insu- 
lin. enhanced tee aura that is New- 
port's fame. 

“It reinforced tee image of New- 
port as a place of millionaires, of 
mansions, of things going on be- 
hind high walls," said Paul W. 
Crowley, a restaurateur who is 
ehaimum of the Newport Tourism 
and Convention Authority. 

This Monday, as tee buses roll 
past Clarendon Court, Mr. von Bil- 
low's second trial on the charges 
will begin. His first trial ended in 
conviction in March 1982, but the 
Rhode Island Supreme Court over- 
turned the conviction on technical 
grounds. _ 

But tee new trial will be held in 
Providence, tee state capital, not 
here. And “Newport is not happy 
about it," said Dr. Earle Cohen, a 
retired pediatrician who owns tee 


Viking Hotel, where ranch of tee 
press coips stayed. 

In fact, when Judge Anthony A 
Giannmi, the presiding judge of the 
.slate Superior Court, ordered that 
tee retrial be held in Providence, 
Newport was so unhappy that Mr. 
Crowley, who is also a state repre- 
sentative, filed a bill requiring that 
felony cases be tried in tee county 
where they arise. 

The General Assembly conduct- 
ed hearings. Judge Giannizri and 
Arlene Violet, tee attorney general 
of Rhode Island, were called to 
testify. Governor Edward D. Di- 
Prete, observing tee furor, said, 
*Tm all for tourism, but 1 don’t 
think that should be tee deciding 
factor where a trial’s going to be 
held.” 

The Providence Journal, which 
dominates Rhode Island as few 
newspapers do any state, quoted 
the governor in an editorial teat 
scorned tee Newport protest. 

“Tbe cry of some protesters that 
the judge is secretly trying to bene- 
fit Providence lunchrooms at tee 
expense of Newporters is ridicu- 
lous,'* tee editorial said. The real 
purpose of the bill is to create an 
off-season bonanza for Newport 
restaurants and hotels, plus ven- 
dors of ‘Claus’ tee shirts and other 
tasteful souvenirs." 

The editorial, published in Feb- 
ruary, still stings. T think lhaf s 
really unfair," Joseph T. Houlihan, 
chairman of the Newport Trial 

of^^he Providence Journal’s 
charge. Tm sure they're delighted 
that all tee business is going to the 
Bfltmore Hotel — which they own 
a big chunk of." 

Indeed, the press corps for the 
trial is rapidly booking rooms at 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 



Ua AngdM Tinm 

An aerial view of the district around Newport's harbor. 



Sidon Area Divided by 'Urban Warfare’ 


WORLD B1 



By Dan. Esher 

Las Angeles Tima Service 
HILILEA, Lebanon —A young 
militiaman with an impish face 
stood amid a litter of empty car- 
tridge cases in the rubble of an 
unfinished apartment building, 
playfully waving his arms like an 
orchestra conductor to the sound 
of mortar and automatic rifle fire. 

His name, he said, was John, and 
he was 16 years old. For most of his 
life, people had been shooting at 
each other in southern Lebanon. 

Three weeks before, John was a 
high school student. But now, 
along with two classmates, he was 
mann ing an observation post on 
the front line in the latest fighting, 
which broke out on the outskirts of 
Sidon in mid-March. 

All three youths were armed with 
assault rifles. John's was a Soviet- 
made Kalashnik ov with a picture 


of Jesus Christ taped to the stock. 
He said he has had some kind of 
firearm since he was 13. 

John and his friends were fight- 
ing with the Lebanese Forces, an 
organization of Christian militias 
that serve as the nnlitaiy arm of the 
Christian Pbalangjst Party. 

A few hundred yards away, in 
predominantly Moslem, central Si- 
don and in the Palestinian refugee 

S i of Ain d Hdweh and Mieh 
people say that Christians in 
the villages like Ffililea, in the hills 
just east of town, started the latest 
round of fighting. According to re- 
ports from Sidon. at least 60 peo- 
ple, most of them Palestinian refu- 
gees, were killed last weekend by 
Christian artillery, rocket-pro- 
pelled grenades and rifle fire. 

Some Lebanese officials, among 
them Nabih Beni, the leader of the 
Shiite Modems, charge that the 


Christians are acting as proxies for 


the departing Israeli forces, trying 
to drive anti-Isradi Shiites and oth- 


to drive anti-Isradi Shiites and oth- 
ers further from the border. 

The Christians say they cirne un- 
der harassment by Palestinian- 
backed Moslems in Sidon soon af- 
ter the Israeli troops evacuated the 
city Feb. 16 in the first stage of the 
Israelis' planned withdrawal from 
Lebanon. 

Nazar Nazarian, the regional 
commander of the Lebanese 
Faces, said in an interview that 
aboit 2,000 fighters from the Pales- 
tine liberation Organization have 
returned to the Sidon camps and 
are “doing everything possible to 
return in a strong way, politically 
and militarily, to southern Leba- 
non.” . 

Whoever started it, the battle of 
Sidon has evolved into die kind ot 
urban warfare that has become 


commonplace. Citizen-soldiers 
may fight fa a day a two. then go 
off afew miles and resume relative- 
ly normal lives in another village. 

What the Lebanese call villages 
are actually urban neighborhoods. 


A strizm of such villages stretches 
up the nul east of Sidon. HIKlea, at 


up thehfll east of Sidon. HUilea, at 
the front, is virtually empty of peo- 


ple except fa fighting men. But 
two mfles (three kflometers) away 
in Majddyoun, children play in the 
streets and people go about their 
business seemingly unaware of the 
firing down the hill in Sdon. 

Even here, one Christian family 
has refused to leave, though then 
building has twice been hit by mor- 
tar fire. 

“My daughter doesn’t want to 
leave, so I was obliged to come and 
be by her side,” one of the occu- 
pants. a wholesale food distributor, 
said. 

They are the only residents still 
in the bufldmg the man said, as a 
Fffipino maid served coffee to a 
group of Lebanese Farces fighters. 
The apartment was richly fur- 
nished with antiques and Oriental 
carpets. 

Mr. Nazarian said the great ma- 
jority of the Christian fighters here 
are local residents and that only a 
dozen people from die Lebanese 
Forces are on hand to provide 
“technical assistance.” 

Mr. Nazarian said his casualties 
included seven dead and 15 wound- 
ed «ri«ce the fighting began. Asked 
why the casualties were so much 
higher on the other side, id Sidon. 
an aide responded: “There are so 
many more of them that when we 
shoot a bullet we most hit some- 
thing.” 

Mr. Nazarian said the latest 
fighting started March 18, when 
three Christians were kidnapped in 
Sidon. Armed Christian s went 
looking fa them and were fired on 


Key Groups , Including Some Troops , 
Abandon Nimeiri in Sudanese Crisis 


By Jonathan C Randal 

Washington Pat Service 

KHARTOUM — Spreading civ- 
il disobedience in Sudan has under- 
lined the lengthening odds against 
President Gaafar Nimeiri retaining 
power. 

Major General Nimeiri, who is 
visiting the United States, has re- 
mained in power fa 16 years, in 
large part because of his oppo- 
nents' lack of cohesion. However, 
many Sudanese say they have 
learned not to underestimate the 
durability of the president, who has 
survived many attempts to ovct- 

rhrn w him. 

The mass anti-Nimehi demon- 
stration Wednesday, winch was the 
starting point for a three-day gen- 
eral strike that has paralyzed the 
country, was of particular signifi- 
cance. however, because of the ab- 
sence of either the regular police a 
the armed forces in putting down 
the protest. They apparently would 
not intervene in a purely political 
dispute. 

The tactics of striking profes- 
sionals — doctors, lawyers, engi- 
neers, university professors, bank 


contain the demonstrators, who 
proved their planning skill by ap- 
pearing at many points at the same 
time as if by arrangement- The 
demonstrators vastly outnumbered 
the audience the government was 
able to muster Tuesday in front of 
the palace in its own support 
Symptomatic of the political 
mood was the presence in the 
crowd of several of the old yellow, 


Among the slogans chanted by 
the crowd were “Dam, down with 
the U-SA,” “The scoundrel Ni- 
meiri has gone to the United States 
while we are starving.” 


Despite the anti-American slo- 
gans, the mood was dearly focused 
on internal politics and directed 
against die president, who faces 
avil war, severe financial prob- 
lems, a huge influx of refugees from 
Ethiopia and the threat of famine 
due to prolonged drought 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


green and dark blue flags that Gen- 
eral Nimeiri replaced when he took 
power in a coup in 1969. 


Some Sudanese said they had de- 
ded to demonstrate when they 


employees, insurance workers — 
ana students are to win over the 
armed faces and police, which 
they claim constitute General Ni- 
mriri’s remaining support 
It was left to loyalists among the 
uniformed riot police — and secu- 
rity forces in civilian clothes — to 


tided to demonstrate when they 
realized that the state-run televi- 
sion was naming old footage of 
pro-government demonstrations 
disguised as Tuesday’s govern- 
ment-sponsored gathering to hide 
the poor turnout. 

A demonstrator said the 
government’s tactic of blaming the 
Communists and the Moslem 
Brothers, the recently disgraced Is- 
lamic fundamentalists who had ex- 
erted great political influenc e, “fa 
all the country’s troubles may go 
down fine when Nimeiii talks to 
President Reagan in Washington,* 
but hoe we know better. 

“It sounds like the shah b laming 
his troubles on the same kind of 
opposites just before he fell" in 
Tran the demonstrator said. 


Mr. Randal filed this dispatch af- 
ter being deponed without explana- 
tion Thursday from Khartoum, 
where international communications 
remained cut off Friday for die third 
consecutive day* 


Explosion Reported in • 

BAGHDAD (UPD — A large titoloaon ^ ] 

Friday shortly after Iran said it had fired a m issile at tnuepgcapftaliQ I 
mraba ti nn for Iraqi attacks on Iranian border towns ^ ; 

least 39 persons. - • 

Iraq didnot confirm the attack and reporters who beard?j||i|g^ 
were barred from traveling to the area in central jj ‘ 

Iran also <=»ri a delegation flew to Moscow an Eridayj^^pcfcvrah 
Kremlin officials on improving relations, ban’s offici a l pcTOage ncyaid. . 
The writ comes one week after talks in Moscow 
Minis ter Tariq Aziz of Iraq and Kremlin officials. -4 

Palestinians Claim Attack on AsiSs-i-.l 


PARIS (AP) —The Palestinian organization Blade . 

responsibility Friday fa a rocket attack Thursday on aJodanutotraftier } 
at Athens airport. • ■ - ".S-'-'-r 

A caller to Agence France-Presse said one of our combat units shot i 
rocket at a plane of the Jordanian regime at the momeRtif WasTarving 


Athens airport” . ... . . 

“Tareq Alaa d Din, a security official fa Jadaman institutions and 
j-mhqccL-c abroad was aboard the' plane,” the caller said in-Anhui 
according to the French news agency. The caller said the Jardamrir 
security official had just finished a tour “during which he applied what he 
recently learned from the CIA.” A man fired a shCHilder-latmched rocfai 
at a passenger jet of the Tn ntanian national airfinc, Alia. The rocket failed 
to Aetrmate and no one aboard the Boeing 727 was injured. 


IhAaocMdfM 

A Moslem nuKtaman ran for cover Friday dining fighting 
between Christian forces aid Moslem mffitiamen around 
the village erf Syroup, near Sidon in southern Lebanon. 



MORIAM 


Pope Hears Confessions 
In Easter Ceremonies 


Liberia Arrests Senior Army Officer 


by units of the Lebanese Army, 
which had moved into the area 


Threats Reported 
Against Nimeiri 


United Pros International 

WASHINGTON — The Secret 
Service said Friday it is investigat- 
ing death threats made against 
President Gaafar Nimeiri of Su- 
dan, who is in W ashing ton seeking 
financial aid fa his nation. 

’There have been some threats 
made against the Sudanese nartv.” 
William Corbett, a Secret Service 
spokesman, said. 

Mr. Corbett said the threats were 
made-in telephone calls to the Su- 
danese Embassy. 


which bad moved into the area 
when the Israelis left in February. 

He said the special battalion of 
Moslems, Christians and Lebanese 
sent to Sdon was dominated by- 
radical Moslems, who have joined 
the Palestinian-backed local Mos- 
lem militias a gainst his Chris tians . 

He said that two Christian' 
churches in Sidon were looted and 
bnmed a few days ago. 

“Becanse we have been attacked, 
by the Palestinians and by the 
proxies of the Palestinians, we 
Christians dwjdwd to defend OQT- 
selves," Mr. Nazarian said. The 
70,000 Chris tians living in the vil- 
lages east of Sidon “don’t want to 
go back to the pro-1982 situation 
when they were ruled by the Pales- 
tinians in the area,” be said. 


The Associated Press 

VATICAN CITY — Pope John 
Paid U donned the garb of an ordi- 
nary priert and slipped in to a booth 
in St. Peter’s Barihca on Good Fri- 
day to hear the confessions of .13 
worshipers at the start of a long day 
of mourning. 

Later, the pontiff commemorat- 
ed the death of Jesus Christ by 
carrying a wooden cross through 
Rone’s pagan ruins in a torch-tit 
procession. 

In Jerusalem, Christian pilgrims 
from around the world retraced the 
steps of Jems through the narrow 
streets of Old Jerusalem to Calvary. 

Meanwhile, religions Jews 
cleaned their hones of bread and 


other leavened foods as they pre- 
Dared to celebrate the Jewish Pass- 


pared to celebrate the Jewish Pass- 
over holiday commemorating the 
exodus of the Israelites from slav- 
ery under the Egyptian Pharaohs. 

Passover began at sundown Frir 
day with a traditional feast known 
as the Seder. It continues fa tight 
days. 

The start of Passover tins year 
coincided with Good Friday. 
Thousands of Jewish tourists and 
Christian pilgrims have arrived in 
Israel in the past few days. 


Led by Franciscan, priests, pil- 
grims marched from St Anne’s 
Church at the start of Jerusalem’s 
Via Dolorosa to the Church of tire 
Holy Sepulcher. The Crusader- 
built church encompasses both the 
H31 of Calvary where tradition 
says Jesus was crucified and the 
tomb where his body was placed. 

The narrow dkys through which 
the crowds passed havc been vener- 
ated since the Middle Ages as the 
route taken by Christ after be was 
condemned to die. 

Church bells tolled, min g lin g 
with the Arabic calls to prayer from 
nearby mosques. Out of view of 
most pilgrims were Israeli border 
police, watching (be procession 
from the rooftops. 

John Paul joined the worid*s 
nearly 800 million Roman Catho- 
lics in one of the year’s two fast 
days. Catholic adults are allowed 
only one full meal on Ash Wednes- 
day and Good Friday. 

All the bells in Rome’s 917 
churches were silent. Good Friday 
is the only day in the Catholic year 
when Mass is not said. 


MONROVIA, Liberia (AFT— The deputy commander of the pita- ] 
dential guard. Colonel Moses Flanzamaton, was arrested Thursday, three i 
days after the Liberian leader, Samuel K. Doe, said the officer raked his j 
jeep with machine-gun fire. Radio Monrovia said. - 

It was also repeated that three opposition political leaders had been 
arrested. They are Tuan Wreh, chairman of the Lfbmar'Action Party; 
Hhrxy Greaves, the party’s vice chairman, and Gabriel Baton Matthews, 
the dbrinnan of the united People’s Party. No reason was given fa fh&» 
arrest. ■ ■ f . * 1 

In jnvvh*»r development, a criminal court on Wednesday sentenced a 
former U.S. marine to 10 years in prison fa cons pir i n g to.over throw Mr. 
Doe. wmiarn Henry Woodhouse, who said both ms legs were paralyzed, 
pleaded guDiy to being a mercenary. Prosecutors said that a Liberian, : 
tamw Johnson, bad hired Mr. Woodhouse fa $200,000 in the United 
States last October to help a group of Liberian soldiers overthrow Mr. 
Doe and install a Marxist regime. 




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Germans Protest at U.S. Missile Base 


MUTLANGEN. West Germany (UPI) — Police detained Friday at 
anti-nuclear protesters who climbed a fence at a UJS. mis sile base; erected 
a ax-foot wooden cross and lit a small “peace” candle. 

On the first of four days of planned national peace demonstrations, six 
persons threw a piece of carpet over the barbed wire bn top of an eight- 
foot fence at die Mudangea military base and climbed into a security ; 
zone in front of an inner fence of the base, police said. Eight other 
demonstrators, wearing masks, escaped after stating upotice car near the^; 
base, which is 30 miles (48 kilometers) east of Stuttgart No one wa£ 
injured. 

In Britain, hundreds of anti-nuclear demonstrators marched towards 
planned US cruise m iddle site noth of London to begin an Easter 
weekend rally expected to attract 20,000 protesters. Three grams of 
demonstrators, organized to protest the basing of riudear misafa in 
Britain, left tlm towns of Leicester, Stevenage and Cambridge to ccnvnge 
on a base at Molesworth, which is scheduled to house 64 ermse imssOes by 
the end of 1988. 


U.S. WarnsonSprayCaa Propellants 


Mag New 1« 

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INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


U.S. Denies 
Rift on Major 


WASHINGTON (WF) —The Environmental Protection Agency has 
released a new study suggesting that the Earth’s protective ozone layer 
will remain in jeopardy unless deeper cuts axe made in the wqridwide 


production of chlorofUiorocaibons, or CFG, cnce widely used in die 
United Stales asspray can propellants: 


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(Co ntinue d from P*ge 1) 
pleased that the two sides had 
agreed that the commander ofU.S. 
forces in Europe would meet with 
his Soviet counterpart in East Ger- 
many, to discuss ways erf avoiding 
such incidents in the future. 



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Mr. Weinberger, who accused 
the Russians of “shooting first and 
asking questions later,” has not en- 
dorsed the agreement. At a news 
coftieresce on Tuesday. Mr. Wein- 
berger said that, before the two 
generals meet, the United States 
should wait “until the Soviets make 
same land of an apology that 
vexges somewhat more slightly on 
civilized behavior than they nave 
exhibited so far.” 


United Stales as spray can propdiants: | 

The report projects more severe potential damage to the ozone layer . 
than any major study to date But it agrees wHh'Ine others that severe ! 
effects — such as allowing significantly more cancer-causing ultraviolet : 
radiation to reach the ground — are not likdy to occur until well into thcj£ 
next century. ... * 

Overall use of CFC has dropped in recent years, chiefly because its 
employment as- an aerosotpropdlant was largely banned in theUnited 
States and somewhat restricted in Europe: But its use is stiH growing in 
other applications, especially as a coolant in refrigeration and air- 
conditioning systems. 


For the Record 


President Erich Honedrer of East Germany will visit Italy April 23 and 
24 in what wft be his first trip to a NATO country, the news agency ADN 
confirmed Friday. (AP) 


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The State Department, caught 
by surprise by Mr. Weinberger's 
statement, said: “We think it is 
appropriate fa the Soviet Union to 
apologize, but it is not a precondi- 
tion tor the talks already agreed 
to” 


Than 12S Major US CMas 
Uetto Rico A wrereo Canada 


On Wed ne sda y , appearing on 
television, Mr. Weinberger said it 
was “absolutely required” that the 
Soviet Union compensate Maor 
Nicholson’s family. “We think it’s 
vital there be some form of com- 
pensation fa Mrs. Nicholson," 
Mr. Weinberger said. 


escalate Monday as traffic is swelled with returning vacationers. (AP) 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm BaHrigewiU travel to the Soviet Union, 
China and India in May fa talks on expanding U.S. trade, the Commerce 
Department announced. (AFP) 

Taocredo Neves, 75, prcsideni-dect of Brazil, was breathing through a 
respirator Friday following a fifth abdominal operation and the govern- 
ment said he had improved since an earlier report that he was in criticzk 
condition. fAJPf 

P resident Mobntu Sese Seko erf Zaire will pay a visit to Israel next 
month. Israel radio reported in Jerusalem on Friday. Zaire is one of the 
few African countries to have relations with Israel (AFP) 

In d i an and Pakistani troops have been exchanging fire for the past 
month in the disputed Kashmir region, leaving four Pakistanis and as 
Indian soldier deul, the United News of India reported Thursday. (AP) 


Beagan Aims Plan at Congress 


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(Conthmed from Page 1) 
“humanitarian assistance” of food, 
medicine and clothing fa the re- 
bels “is really logistical supplies for 
an ararv.” 

Mr. Barnes said that the national 


the Nicaraguan Army be separat- 
ed. 


Mr. Barnes said that toe national 
security adviser. Robot G McFar- 
lanc, •'was told by both Republi- 


cans and Democrats that people 
win regard this as a subterfuge for 
Siting the money.” Mr. McFar- 
lane briefed congressional leaders 
on the proposal Thursday’ 

Mr. Reagan did not help his case 
when he made dear that he will 
somehow continue to aid the re- 
bels, "no matter what happens.” 

A senior administration official 
argued that Nicaragua has only to 
make some concessions to keep the 
talks going and toe fighting halted 
indefinitely. 

“The president wfll not allow the 

contras to walk away from the ta- 
bfe,” toe official said. “This is toe 
first time toe Sandinigtas wm be 
sure that their actions win deter- 
mine whether there is funding a 
not” fa toe rebels. 

But the Nicaraguan ambassador, 
Carlos Tunnennann, said Thurs- 
day that Nicaragua rejected the 
agenda for toe talks. 

“This is a threat against our gov- 
ernment,” Mr. Tunnennann stud. 
“It is only a maneuver to impress 
the Congress and get them to pro- 
vide toe S14 milli on” 

Mr. Tunnennann said that Mr. 
Reagan’s entire plan was based on 
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11»c plan also called for govem- 

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to censorship and toe state ofemer-J 
gency, and a cease-fire while a con-7 
Terence of Roman Catholic bishops 
and other Central American na- 
tions organizes peace talks. 

The agenda, for the talks under 
this' plan, would, include disman- 
tling netgjbboshood “defense cen- 
tos,” dissolving toe National Con- 
stituent Assembly, restructuring 
toe electoral system, agonizing 
new elections and voting on bow to 
choose a new president 



Managua Reaction 


for Arturo Jos£ Cruz, a former San- 
dnust ambassador to the United 
Stales who became an opposition 
leader, along with exiled Nicara- 
jgn^ businessmen, and political 


To place an adx mt lee ment 
in this section 
p h aoectmtaa: 

Mb EUnbet 1 * 


United Press f mern ationai 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan brushed off Nica- 
ragua's rqc c ti oD erf bis peace ptaL, 
and voiced hope Friday that ototf 
Central American countries wohw 
pressure them to accept it. 

Mr. Reagan was about a 
statement by For eig n MHjjster ^ 
gud cTEscoio Rrodunauntoat tv 
a dministra tion’s call for tc bctBt- 
fire and negotiations ^wifli "tfc.i* 
be!$ amounted to “a dedaraoon® 
war.” He said: **I nndetstad it* 
They don’t want to pve t^ ,^ 
cusirr spat toat toey F ve.HS t Pff ,, 
now” . 

In interviews ThursdayEn^^ - j 
day. Father cTEscoto 
ed the Reagan tdan. SpadS® 4 *^ 
ABC he said: -What Bcoaw: 


IS Partly 

*°Un>al ' 


5^ss 




TeL 022/53195^ 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD 



, SATURPAY-STJNDAY, APRIL 6-7, 1985 


Page 3 







ssy^SiV 

S£s$*. 


INMEMORIAM — Coretia Scott King, widow of the 
Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., is Joined by family 
members in Artama in placing a wreath at the tomb of 
the civil rights leader, who was IdBed on April 4, 15168. 




Manors suTZ'fe 

J-S. Missilej. 

ssassa 

>»ce candle. 


Airlines To End 
Reservation Bias 

United, American and Trans 
World Airlines, under growing 
pressure from the Reagan ad- 
ministration and Congress, 
have agree*} to end a bias in the 


and climbed • • 

- base, police said. 
liter stoning a po^^'. 

) cast of Stuttgart. No J * 

lemonsiraiors marched i* 
London to bqn^“ 
>00 protesters. Time J 
c basing of nuclear n& “ 
nage and Cambridge toe* '' 
Jed to house 64 cruise ni^ * - 

Can PropeDa .. 

nnjentai Protection Aj* r 

- Earth's protective azm; r 
vis are made in the wafe 
CFC, once widely used e " 

itial damage to the ozuati 
Fees with the others date - 
more cancer-causing tin, 
ikdy to occur until wd it. - . 

•r 

ecent years, chiefly beos 
is largely banned in this: ■ 
c. But its use is scD gm 
viant in remaerajiai w 


my wiD visit Italy ApiE : 
rouniry. the news agon! ■ 

f 

iwn strike at sir and sat 
aid delays for Easter rt 
va, they - fear tte 
returning vacation® 1 

will travel to the Soria t • 
idingU.S. trade. iheC* . 


reservation systems that shuni- 
ed passengers toward the air- 
lines’ own flights, The New 
York Times reports. 

• The three airlines account for 
80 percent of all computerized 
sales of air tickets in the United 
States. Their systems coughed 
up computer listings for travel 
agents that gave preference to 

thqr own flights 

. .Medium-size airlines had 
charged that the bias amounted 
to unfair competition. Now that 
ft has been stopped, people will 
be able to ask tram agents to 
select flights on the basis of 
lowest fares, most convenient 
schedules or closest airports, 
rather than on which aiding 
owns the comparer. 


Finding New Uses 
For Old Cabooses 

Now that the caboose is her 
ing replaced by an electronic 
monitor an American trains, a 
minor problem for the railroads 
is how to dispose of the thou- 
sands of cabooses now heading 
for the end of the line. 

“You keep bearing about 
these private rail bulls who are 
sure ip ramp op and bid for an 
old /Caboose," ' says Tom Le- 
Ho^bfUnii^Padfic;“Bufwe ~ 
haven't found any of them.” . 

Instead, some rad lines are 
simply giving away the friendly 
little cars. Many parks across 
the Great Plains now feature 
bright red, yellow or green ca- 
booses for children to dftnb ou. 


ShortTakes 

More Mack and Hispanic 
Americans are graduating from 
high schools today than a de- 
cade ago, but a smaller propor- 
tion are going on to college, 
according to reports by the 
American Association of State 


Colleges an/t Universities and 
The College Board research 
group. The Washington Post 
says this suggests that student 
financial aid has not risen as 
fast as college costs. 

So far dus year fully 600 of 
New York’s subway cars have 
been kept of the usual 
filth. and graffiti. “That’s 10 
percent of the fleet,” David L. 
Grain, Transit Authority presi- 
dent, recently said at a press 
conference. “We’ve got another 
90 percent to go.” 


Texas Faces Up 
ToNo Pass/No Play 

Under a law (hat has just 
gone into force in Texas; about 
one- third of the stale’s high 
school athletes have been dis- 
qualified for six weeks at the 
height of the spring sports sea- 
son because they received fail- 
ing grades in one or more sub- 
jects. . . 

The driving force behind the 
law is H. Ross Perot, a comput- 
er magnatr Noting that Texas 

students rank near the bottom 
on most nnriAnal achievement 
tests, he said, “We’ve got to 
learn if s more important to be a 
winner for. life than to be a 
winner for a few hours on a 
Friday night” 

Parents have filed lawsuits, 
and bills to soften (he measure 
have been introduced in both 
houses of the state legislature. It 
is widely expected that the rule , 
-wifr-be -changed before the fall 
madness of high school football 
sweeps the state. - 

The Washington Post says, 
“The ultimate wisdom on the 
flap may have been offered 
years ago by Bobby Cremins. 
now basketball coach at Geor- 
gia Tech.” Daring his playing 
days at the University of South 
Carolina, he had to show his 
coach a report card with fourFs 
andaD. 

Asked what the problem was, 
the young Cremins said, “Well, 
coach, 1 guess 1 spent loo much 
time on one subject” 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


UhJWBBC^i- 

viai io tadj 
Zauri*® 1 * 
a 

eftrfer* 


Thnsty 


South Africa Steps Up 
Use of Combat Troops 


n at Corf 

Nicaraguan Arffiyk* 


By Michael Parks 

Las Angeles Tones Service 

JOHANNESBURG — TYoops 
wiD be sent to bdp police maintain 
order in South Africa wherever 
necessary in a major move to quell 
continuing racial unrest, the gov- 
ernment has announced. 

Adriana J. Vide, the deputy de- 
fense minister, said Thursday that 
the move is one of a series ordered 
by President Pieter W. Botha to 
maintain law and order in the face 
of undiminished violence, especial- . 
ly in eastern Cape province where 
at least 42 persons have been tolled 
in the last two weeks. 

Army troops have been used oc- 
casionally during violence in black 
townships, but under the new po- 
licy they will be regularly available 

Th e troops will be usal largely to 
man roadblocks, to coition off 
black townships when unrest flares. 




The Trial of Von Billow 


voiced 

... 


- p-fiaflt *y 

• doat VZtfT* - • 
\****^*& 






(Continued from Page 1) 

the Bfltmore in Providence. And 

- indeed, the hotel is partly owned by 
the Prudence Journal Co., which 
invested in the hold’s refurbishing 
and reopening several years ago. 

- “Our editorial position has abso- 

lutely nothing to do with our mi- 
nority position in the Btftmore,” 
said Stephen Hamblett, executive 
vice president of. the Providence 
Jouniaj.Gj. . ..... 

Judge C^atmmi himsdf was un- 
prepared for the storm of feeling 
his decision “1 didn't give 
the slightest thought to the reaction 
I’ve received,” he said. Tm drink- 
ing about vying cases.” 

Beneath all this argument fa 
Newpon's sense of possessiveness 
and TKrjehtoasy of Providence. It 
lost the state capital to Providence 
years ago, and the loss of the trial; 
coaringOH lop of the loss of . the 
Ameriea>:Cup races' to Australia. 


has removed the town’s two great- 
est attention-getters. 

■ Witnesses' Testimony 
Mr. yon Billow’s former mistress 
and another witness who may fur- 
nish a possible motive fra the at- 
tempted toning of Mrs. von Bulow 
probably will oe allowed to testify 
in his trial. The Associated Press 
reported from Providence, 

In. another development. Judge 
•Corirme P. Grande of Superior 
Court denied on Friday a request 
by prosecutors to postpone the re- 
trial indefinitely. 

Judge Grande said Thursday 
that she did not have enough infor- 
mation to decide whether von flu- 
low’s former lover, Alexandra Ides, 
and h£s wife’s financial adviser, G. 
Morris Gurley, should be allowed 
to testify. Bnt die gave both rides 
“guidance” that a prosecutor, Hen- 
ry Gemma, said led' him to believe 
tne judge-would allow both- to tes- 
tify.- 


Japanese Trade Official Fails to Make Rush U.S. Trip Pay Off 


By Philip Shcnon 

New York Times Service 

Washington -—in ending a 
trade war. timing is everything. 

Did anyone ever pas that along 
to Reisbi Teshima? 

Mr. Teshima is the Japanese 
trade official who was rushed to the 
United States tm Thursday feom 
Tokyo to quell the trade crisis with 
the united States. But because of 
what U.S. officials drink was a 
monumental scheduling mix-up — 
the Japanese insist it was not — 
Mr. Teshima was not able to meet 
with many of the big names he 
came to see. 

“People are flying the coop," 
said Senator John C. Danforth, a 
Missouri Republican, alluding to 


the Easter and Passover holidays. 

Other US. of Goals would not» 
see Mr. Teshima because (hey sim- 
ply did not want to. They were 
angry and say the time for talking is 
past 

‘ Good Friday was the start of a 
I(Way recess on Capitol HiH Pres- 
ident Ronald Reagan was prepar- 
ing to leave town and had indicated 
be would not be seeing Mr. Te- 
shima, who is Japan’s deputy for- 
eign minister for economic affairs. 

Many members of Congress 
could not or would not meet the 
envoy. Despite the pleas of officials 
at the Japanese Embassy', a number 
said they were too busy or too an- 
gry. 

Senator Robert J. Dole of Kan- 


sas, the Senate majority leader, 
spent Thursday hammering out a 
budget compromise and was leav- 
ing for Europe on Friday. 

Senator Bob Packwood, chair- 
man of the Senate Finance Com- 
mittee, received two “pretty fran- 
tic" last-minute calls from 
Japanese officials, a spokesman 
said. But the senator, as Oregon 
Republican who has few kind 
words for Japanese trade policy, 
turned them down. 

“He had no interest in a meet- 
ing,” said the spokesman. “The 
time for negotiations is far beyond 
us. It’s past. It’s over.” 

Officials at the Japanese Embas- 
sy said they were well aware of the 
holidays. It was a concern, said an 


embassy spokesman. But because 
of the congressional furor over last 
year’s STMriHion trade deficit with 
Japan, the trip went ahead as 
planned. 

Mr. T eshima got to work within 
minutes of his arrival from Tokyo, 
a flight of mare than 12 hours. 
Despite the burned preparations, 
several meetings were arranged. 

Mr. Teshima met with William 
E Brock, the U.S. trade representa- 
tive, and four members of Con- 
gress. 

He spent Friday with officials of 
the Commerce Department and ihe 

State Department and was to re- 
turn to Tokyo on Saturday morn- 
ing. 

Senator Danforth, chairman of a 


foreign relations subcommittee on 
international trade, has a simple 
rule about trade delegations from 
Japan — he will not meet with 
them. 

“I am not convinced that these 
meetings accomplish anything," he 
said. For Mr. Teshima, be said, he 
might have made an exception. “I 
don’t want him to fed snubbed,” 
he said. “It’s not my intention to be 
rode or insulting.” 

But the embassy never called, 
and Mr. Teshima seemed to have 
missed his chance for a meeting. 

On Good Friday, Senator Dan- 
forth, an Episcopal minister, was 
leafing worshipers at a Washing- 
ton church. 


■ Baker Warns on Trade War 

Treasury Secretary James A 
Baker 3d has warned Americans 
that the United States might be the 
Loser in a trade war with Japan. The 
Associated Press reported from 
Washington. 

“We dc need more access to Jap- 
anese markets for beef and agricul- 
tural products and telecommunica- 
tions and a lot of other things." Mr. 
Baker told the Senate appropria- 
tions subcommittee on foreign op- 
erations on Thursday. “Tin just not 
sure that the way to get there is to 
have an all-out trade war.” 

*Tm not sure we’d win that," he 
cautioned. 


U.S. Working on f Prospective Agenda 9 
For ReaganrGorbachev Talks in Fall 


By Lou Cannon 

Washington Poet Service 

WASHINGTON — US. offi- 
cials said they have begun work on 
a “prospective agenda” for a meet- 
ing between President Ronald Rea- 
gan and the Soviet leader, Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev, with the expectation 
that it will take place this fafl. 

While emphasizing that the Rus- 
sians have not agreed to a dale or 
place for a meeting, the officials 
said Thursday that work on the 
agenda has begun so that it can be 
discussed by Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz and the Soviet 
foreign minister, Andrei A Gro- 
myko, when they meet in Vienna 
on Min 14. 

Under preliminary consider- 
ation for inclusion on an agenda, 
officials said, is a new “declaration 


of principles” similar to the one 
sgned by President Richard M. 
Nixon and the Soviet leader. Leo- 
nid I. Brezhnev, when they met in 
Moscow in 1972. 

That declaration, in which both 
nations agreed to principles of 
peaceful coexistence, mutual re- 
straint and regular meetings of 
leaders, was symbolic of the era of 
dfcteme. ■ 

Mr. Reagan invited Mr. Gorba- 
chev to a meeting in Washington 
soon after he replaced the late Kon- 
stantin U. Chernenko as Soviet 
leader. 

On Monday, Mr. Reagan said 
that Mr. Gorbachev had replied to 
the letter and U.S. officials had 
found the response positive. Mr. 
Gorbachev agreed in principle to a 
meeting. 


Suspect in Drug Murder 
Captured in Costa Rica 


By Richard J. Mristin 

- New York Times Service 

MEXICO CITY — One of the 
key suspects in the killing of a UJS. 
drug agent has been captured by 
the ponce in Costa Rica, American 
and Mexican officials have report- 
ed. 

The suspect, Rafael Caro Quin- 
tero, qrho is believed by authorities 
to be one of the major figures in 
Mexico's cocaine and marijuana 
traffic, was captured early Thurs- 
day in a house that authorities said 
he owned in San Josfc, the Costa 
Rican capital 

Mr. Caro Quintero had been 
sought by authorities since early 
February, when an agent of the 
UJL Drug Enforcement Adminis- 
tration, 1 Enrique Camarena Salazar, 
was abducted from a street in Gua- 
dalajara.' Mr. Camarena Salazar’s 
beaten body, along with that of a 
Mexican pilot who sometimes 
worked with him, was found on a 
ranch southeast of Guadalajara on 
March 5. 

The Mexican attorney general’s 
office said that Mexico had already 
begun proceedings through diplo- 
matic rnannds to obtain Mr. Caro 
Quintero's extradition to Mexico. 

It said the head of Interpol in 
Mexico, Florentino Ventura Gu- 
tierrez. had flown to Costa Rica 
soon after the capture, accompa- 
nied by members of Mexico’s Fed- 
eral Judicial Police: 

In Washington, Attorney Gener- 
al Edwin Meese 3d, calling Mr. 
Caro Quintero “one- of the mqjor 
drug traffickers in the world,” said 
the Justice Department would re- 
view whether to extradite him from 
Costa Rica. 

[A UJ5. Embassy spokesman in 
San Jos£ said Friday that U.S. offi- 


cials had decided not to try to ex- 
tradite Mr. Caro Quintero because 
the/ believed the suspect would re- 
ceive “appropriate justice" in Mex- 
ico. United Press International re- 
ported. 

{A Costa Rican official told The 
Associated Press on Thursday 
night that Mr. Caro Quintero rould 
be returned without formal extradi- 
tion proceedings because he had 
entered Costa Rica illegally.] 

Ihe Mexican attorney general 
said that Mr. Caro Quintero was 
wanted in connection with investi- 
gations into “criminal acts related 
to narcotic trafficking that oc- 
curred on recent dates in Chihua- 
hua and Jalisco ” and that he was 
subject to several outstanding ar- 
rest orders. ^ • .- 

Although Mr. Caro Quintero has 
been described by both Mexican 
and U.S. officials as one of the 
“intellectual authors" of the kid- 
napping and later slaying of Mr. 
Camarena Salazar, no specific 
charges have been filed against him 
in that case. 

With Mr. Caro Quintero at the 
time of his capture, according to 
Mexican and U.S. officials, were 
three other men and a woman. The 
woman was identified as Sara Co- 
da Martinez, the niece of a high- 
ranking Mexican political leader, 
who authorities said was kid- 
napped by or on behalf of Mr. Caro 
Quintero from Guadalajara earlier 
mis year. The three men were not 
immediately identified. 

The last time Mr. Caro Quintero 
was seen by U.S. agents, he was 
leaving Guadalajara in a private 
jet, right in front of a group of 
Mexican aguits who had been sent 
lO Hgfafa hrm. The co mmand er of 
the unit that allowed him to leave 
was later relieved of his duties. 


Subsequently, U.S. officials said 
they anticipated a meeting either in 
September or October, when Mr. 
Gorbachev is expected to attend a 
meeting of the United Nations in 
New York. 

These officials said the president 
is willing to meet Mr. Gorbachev at 
the United Nations rather than in 
Washington, if that is the Soviet 
preference. 

Publicly, both Mr. Shultz and 
Mr. Gromyko have been trying to 
dampen expectations. 

Mr. Gromyko was quoted by the 
Canadian external affairs minis ter, 
Joe Clark, as saying to him 
Wednesday in Moscow that the 
Russians “certainly were nowhere 
near choosing a date or a venue” 
for a meeting. 

Mr. Shultz told a Senate sub- 
committee that U.S. officials were 
“devoting a lot of attention" to it, 
but said. “My opinion is that a 
pure-and-simple get-acquainted 
session is not the way to go.” 

■ Prarda Warns Boon 

The Soviet Union hinted strong- 
ly Friday that Bonn's relations with 
the Soviet Union and other East 
bloc nations could suffer if West 
Germany joins the U.S. research 
project on space arms, Reuters re- 
ported from Moscow. 

Western diplomats in Moscow 
said the thinly veiled warning ap- 
peared to be part of an attempt to 
drive a wedge between Washington 
and its European allies over the 
U.S. Strategic Defense Initiative. 

The suggestion occurred in a 
tougbly worded article in Pravda 
which said that Bonn bad leaped to 
support the program while ignoring 
Soviet arms proposals. 

Pravda's correspondent in Bonn, 
Yolr Yakhontov, noted that West 
Germany was Moscow’s top West- 
ern trading partner and had active 
links with other East European 
countries. 

“But ft must be taken into ac- 
count that the further development 
of relations will be largely deter- 
mined by West German policy on 
matters concerning these states’ se- 
curity interests," he added. 

“They on the Rhine sometimes 
forget this key prerequisite,’' Mr. 
Yakhontov said in an article head- 
ed; “West Germany Is Drifting.” 

The Soviet media have given 
prominence to reports on West Eu- 
ropean misgivings about the space 
ini dative. 

Pravda depicted the U.S. invita- 
tion to join its research as an Ulti- 
matum- 

Diplomats noted that Moscow 
made similar warning to Bonn 
over its decision in 1983 to allow 
the United States to station cruise 
and Pershing-2 missiles in West 
Germany. 



RauMfvUnMd Pnm merrobond 

WRONGLY ACCUSED — Gary Dotson with bis mother, Barbara, and sister, Debbie, 
after be was released from an IQinois prison. He had spent six years in the prison after a 
woman accused him of raping her, hot die woman said she made up the story after her 
first sexual encounter because sbe feared her parents’ reaction if she became pregnant. 

Pentagon Presses General Dynamics 


By Michael Weisskopf 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The De- 


expenses on weapons systems dar- 
ing the past 12 years, according to a 
Pentagon spokes man. 

. The Pentagon hasracouped $120 
million of that amount^ Michael L 
Buich. a spokesman, said Thurs-' 
day, and it plans to recover the 
balance “to adequately protect the 
government’s interest.* General 
Dynamics either wiD be assessed a 
lamp sam or will lose its monthly 
overhead payments for current 
projects, he said. 

A spokesman for General Dy- 
namics, the largest military con- 
tractor in the United States, de- 
clined to comment, saying the 
company had not been formally 
notified of the Pentagon findings. 

The overpayments arc among re- 
cent revelations involving the bill- 
ing practices of militaiy contrac- 
tors. Congressional investigators 
said Thursday that the overpay- 
ments represent the “tip of the ice- 
berg” of the General Dynamics 
case. 

The overpayments were uncov- 
ered over the past month by a team 
of 20 Pentagon auditors. Kir. Burch 
said. The auditors had been or- 
dered to review earlier bfllings after 


company officials acknowledged at 
a congressional hearing that thqr 
had improperly charged the gov- 
ernment for such expenses as a chili 
cooking contest, country dub dues, 
liquor bills and housing a corporate 
executive’s dog in a kenneL 

The overpayments cover over- 
head expenses, a vaguely defined 
class of. “administrative and gener- 
aT costs related to weapons pro- 
duction. Contractors recently have 
been found to pad their overhead 
billings with expenses fra public 
relations, political contributions, 
entertainment and lobbying, and 
personal travel. 

Overhead payments are made to 
contractors every month before 
thqr spend the money. After the 


bills are submitted to and reviewed 
by auditors — a process often tak- 
ing years — they are judged for 
propriety. 

“We will collect," Mr. Burch 
said. “If the corporation wants to 
contest the amount, they may do so 
but we will be holding the money." 

■ 30 Contractors Audited 

The deputy secretary of defense, 
William H. Taft 4th, said Thursday 
that all of the nation’s top 30 mili- 
taiy contractors were bang audit- 
ed, the Los Angeles Times report- 
ed. 

In cases where outright fraud can 
be shown, “we intend to put people 
in jail,” Mr. Taft said. 


to escort buses and delivery vehi- 
cles entering troubled areas and to 
protect government fadfities there, 
Mr. VIoksakL 

The government announcement 
added that the troops will be used 
in “other situations as tircum- 
siances may demand.” 

The decision to use troops regu- 
larly is believed likely to generate 
widespread opposition among 
blacks and among liberal and mod- 
erate whites. 

These critics say that the use of 
troops, trained for combat rather 
than for riot control increases 
chances for another incident such 
as that two weeks ago in which 
police lolled 19 blacks outride U»- 
tenhage. 

[Two blacks were killed in over- 
night violence in Cape province, 
Reuters reported from Cape 
Town.l 


Nicaragua Said to Force Accused Foes to Confess 


By Shirley Christian 

New York Tunes Sov ice 

NEW YORK. — The Nicara- 
guan security police use death 
threats and other forms of psycho- 
logical coercion to obtain confes- 
sions from people ac cused of anti- 
Sandinist actions, according to a 
report by a human rights group. 

The group, the Lawyers Com- 
mittee for International Human 
Rights, also criticized the People’s 
Tribunals established outride the 
regular court system in Nicaragua 
to try such people. 

Two of the three members of 
each tribunal are lay people select- 
ed on the basis of their political 
activities in support of the ruling 
Sandmisis. 

The group emphasized that none 
of its criticisms were intended to 
justify the efforts of the Reagan 
administration to get more money 
fra the armed opposition, which is 
called the “contra” in Spanish. 

The lawyers noted that the insur- 
gents themselves have been ac- 
cused of human rights abuses and 
that the Sandinists have used the 
rebels’ existence to justify repres- 
sive actions. They also said that 
recent critidsms of the Nicaraguan 


government by the Reagan admin- 
istration have included “seriously 

mwlffflding an d exaggerated allega- 
tions of human rights abuses.” 

“We don't mean to say there 
aren’t all kinds of problems and 
complicated reasons why the con- 
tra was created,” said the executive 
director of the Lawyers Commit- 
tee, Michael H. Posner, who re- 
leased the report Thursday in 
Washington. 

“We recognize that and that the 
contra' is violent and sometimes 
brutal” he said.“But a lot of what 
the Nicaraguan government has 
done in response is unwarranted 
and unjustified. We find it doesn't 
meet minimum standards from a 
human rights point of view.” 

The 159-page report, “Nicara- 
gua; Revolutionary Justice,” is 
based on four investigative mis- 
sions to Nicaragua over a 15-mcmth 
period, the last in January. 

The finding s focus on the legal 
procedures used by what are called 
Anti-Somorist People’s Tribunals 
and the detention and investigative 
methods used by the General Di- 
rectorate of State Security, the se- 
cret police organization set up by 
Interior Minister Tomis Borge 


Maria ez, reportedly with Cuban 
advice and training.' 

“Psychological forms of coercion 
typically include threats of physical 
harm, including death,” the report 
‘says. “Some detainees reportedly 
have been undressed and told they 
would be raped; others report that 
they were taken outside and told 
they would be killed. A number of 
former detainees also report that 
their interrogators told them false 
reports concerning the death, ill- 
ness of arrest of family members.” 

Some former prisoners have 
charged that they were seriously 
physically abused by security 
agents, but that is infrequent, ac- 
cording to the report. Another 
complaint is that the security police 
sometimes disregards court orders 
to free or transfer a prisoner or to 
provide medical care. 

The report also rites charges by 
former prisoners that the General 
Directorate of State Security fre- 
quently bolds prisoners incommu- 
nicado for months, though Mr. 
Borge denied that such detentions 
ever exceeded 30 days. 

Representatives of the commit- ■ 
tee were refused permission to visit 
E Chipote, the main security po- 


lice detention center in Managua. 

The lawyers found that while 
there were reports of “disappear- 
ances” in Nica r a gu a, most people 
reported missing were eventually 
found alive. 

It also said, however, that 69 
Misldto Indians who disappeared 
in 1982 have never been found. 


Subway Robbers 
Slay Man in N.Y. 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — A 23-year-old 
man, Alfred Riddick of Brooklyn, 
was shot three times and lolled on a 
subway after refusing to surrender 
three gold chains to two gnoma, 
officials said Friday. 


Fahd Nephew and Another Saudi Prepare to Ride Shuttle 


The Associated Press 

HOUSTON — Two Saudi Ara- 
bians, including a sultan who is the 
nephew of King Fahd, are prepar- 
ing for a space shuttle flight that 
could be launched as early as this 
summer, the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration has an- 
nounced. ‘ . 

The king’s nephew, Sultan Sal- 
man Abdel Aziz al-Saud, and Abd- 
ul Mohsen Hamad al-Bassam ar- 
rived Tuesday at tire Johnson 


Space Center to begin their train- 
ing. said Doug Ward, a NASA 
spokesman. One of the two men is 
expected to fly on a mission during 
which a Saudi communications sat- 
ellite win be placed in Earth orbit. 

Mr. Ward said he had no other 
details of the mission activities, 
adding, “That probably will be 
something for the Saudi govern- 
ment to decide.” He said that a 
launch dale had not been selected. 

NASA has a policy under which 


customers may accompany their 
payloads on the shuttle. Astronauts 
from Japan. France and China are 
expected to fly aboard the shuttle 
in the coining months. 

Such shuttle passengers, who 
carry the title of mission specialists, 
gp through a modified astronaut 
t rainin g program enabling them to 
respond to emergencies and to op- 
erate equipment for routine living 
in space. 


second in two days on the city’s 
subway system. On Wednesday, 
Maria LaFortunc, 22, was shoved 
from a platform in front of an on- 
coming train in Manhattan. No one 
has been arrested in that daymg. 

In an unrelated Incident, a man 
was listed in stable condition at a 
Bronx hospital Friday after be was 
shot in the stomach, “possibly dur- 
ing a rdbberv,” on a subway plat- 
form Thursday night, authorities 
said. 

FURNESS, Oenge Abbot, 88, sudden- 

S f April 2. 1985 at home in Tokyo, 
span. Born in Elizab e th, N J. Gradu- 
ated Harvard 1918 and from Harvard 
Law School 1921. Long term resident 
of Tokyo. Leaves 2 da ug hters Anne W. 
of Cambridge, Mass, and Sarasota, 
Fla.; Jesse C. of San Francisco, Ca^ 
one son, George A ir. of ChetyChase, 
Md- and 3 granddaughters. Funeral 
arrangements m Japan mcompleie. j 



Bulgari quartz watch. 

Bracelet in alternative strands of 
yellow, pink and white gold. I8K gold. 

BVLGARI 

10 VIA DO CONDOTTI ■ ROMA 
HOTEL PIERRE ■ NEW YORK 
30, RUE DU RHONE ■ GENfiVE 
AVENUE DES BEAUX-ARTS ■ MONTE CARLO 
HOTEL PLAZA-ATHEN£E ■ PARIS 




ft* -i- - 


A-'" ' i i 

ggj^grgy? ::V-^- ’W^ 


Page 4 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune. 


PobHfhed With The New York Time* and Tbe Washington Port 


This Problem Is Global 


Comment on the threats by the U.S. Con- 
gress to set up new barriers against Japanese 
goods can miss an important point: The 
threats imply serious danger for the world as 
a whole. This is not a private fight. Anyone 
can get hurt The international implications 
can be enormous. This is not an affair that 
can be left to tbe two present protagonists. 

America's problem is not just a bilateral 
trade deficit with Japan; it is in deficit with 
virtually all countries because of its own 
policy. Japan's problem is not just that it is 
in large surplus with America because of tbe 
overvalued dollar, it is in huge surplus with 
the whole world because its domestic de- 
mand is too weak and obstacles to imports 
are being broken down only gradually. 

U.S. sanctions against Japanese goods 
would be harmful for tbe whole world. To 
some extent they would shift America’s ex- 
cess imports away from Japan to other for- 
eign suppliers, thus turning U.S. congressio- 
nal wrath elsewhere. More important, they 
would divert Japan's massive exports to oth- 
er recipients, thus merely transferring the 
problem across frontiers. This could quickly 
lead to a real international beggar-my- 
neighbor contest, each country trying to 
oa tdo tbe rest in trade controls. That could 
trigger a new crisis for the capitalist coun- 
tries of the world — the 1930s come again. 

Zt would not take much today to topple 
the global economy. Social tensions are 
high. Exchange markets are on thin ice. The 


Ankara Should Do More 


The visit to Washington of Turkey’s prime 
minister has revived the difficult question of 
bow the United States should treat a strategic 
partner and NATO ally whose standards of 
democratic practice do not meet the Western 
norm. Turkey again has an elected govern- 
ment, but a new and fragile one with limited 
powers; the military still rules directly in one 
province of three. Turkish human rights poli- 
cies continue to evoke international concern. 
In addition, Ankara maintains a military occu- 
pation in a neighboring state, Cyprus.' It has 


acted in a way to persuade Greeks, who bear 
their own responsibility for the friction, that it 
is building up military power to use in its 
several serious disputes with them. 

The Turks deeply resent it, of course, when 
Americans condition their aid or even their 
moral and political approval on matters that 
Turkey considers ether internal or irrelevant 
to American-Turkish friendship. They react 
with stubborn displays of nationalism or with 
gpdging explanations of their special political 
circumstances, not least the fierce campaign of 
tenor and destabilization that Turkey suffered 
in the 1970s, apparently at Soviet instigation. 
They complain that their grievances — See the 
assassination of their diplomats by Armenians 
— go relatively untended in Western eyes. 

To Reagan administration officials, it is 
pretty much an open-and-shut case. They are 
u n abashedly sympathetic to Turkey, its securi- 
ty requests and, lately, its new Reagan-like 


economic policy. The Greek government of 
Andreas Papandreou inadvertently ’helps'' 
with pronouncements like the one Mr. Papan- 
dreou made while Turkish Prime Minister Tur- 
gut Ozal was in Washington. He said Greece 
sees no danger from its Communist neighbors 
but feels threatened by its ally, Turkey. 

The Reagan administration does not avert 
its gaze from human rights, stating in its latest 
report that Turkish torture cases number “in 
the hundreds" But, unlike many of its critics, 
the adminis tration sees no value — sees a 
negative value — in injecting human rights 
directly into Turkish-American consultations 
on political questions and military aid. The 
prevailing view is that the prime minister is 
already doing his best in heavy circumstances. 

Jf he is, it is not good enough. The Turks 
deserve much respect for their efforts to build 
a stable and just society and for their contribu- 
tion to Western security, but sometimes they 
ask for excessive allowance. That the military 
and police may not be under adequate rivOian 
control does not make the torture cases and 
other alleged violations any more palatable. 
Turkish officials appear to believe that only 
naive liberals who do not understand Turkey, 
or cynical extremists who understand Turkey 
all too well bring up issues of human rights 
and democracy. This is a distortion that sepa- 
rates Turkey from the Western community 
whose full favor it seeks. 

— the Washington post. 


Other Opinion 


Illegally Deporting Lebanese 


The only way Israel could make tbe deporta- 
tion [of Lebanese} legal would be by recogniz- 
ing the detainees as prisoners of war, in which 
case they would be removed from the domain 
of the Fourth Geneva Convention into that of 
the Third. This, however, would entail recog- 
nizing them as members of an organized resis- 
tance movement and allowing a neutral coun- 
try to act as protecting power to look after 
their interests. Israel is not, it seems, prepared 
to grant that degree of legitimacy to the Leba- 
nese resistance, which for her is simply “terror- 
ism." Perhaps the most disturbing aspect of 
the affair is that the Israeli authorities have 
told the International Committee of the Red 
Cross that the prisoners will be taken back “to 
a new prison camp now being buQt in southern 
Lebanon." If Israel is in process of withdraw- 
ing completely from Lebanon, what is it doing 
budding new prison camps there? 

— The Times (London). 


the highest priority at the impending summit 
meeting between President Reagan and the 
new Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. 

Cooperation instead of confrontation win 
be no easy endeavor, given tbe history of the 
past four years. President Reagan will have to 
ignore the shrill voices dying that the Soviets 
are not to be trusted one inch, that they want 
all give and no take. As Paul Nitze has made 
dear, a minimum degree of trust is essential in 
any negotiation; otherwise, we can just forget 
the talks and get on with the arms race. 

— The Baltimore Evening Sun. 


Bath’s Last lines Look Ahead 


Priority to Space Cooperation 


The problem is that we hear a lot more 
about competition than about cooperation. If 
we are to have cooperation on space defenses 
research, then it stands to reason that this 
ought to be the highest priority of the Geneva 
talks. For that matter, cooperation ought to be 


Although a pious believer, Johann Sebastian 
Bach saw no conflict between “sacred" and 
“secular" music and could compose a canatata 
on the pleasures of drinking coffee. He got in 
trouble at his first post, as organist at the New 
Church in Arnstadt, for “going into the wine 
cellar during the sermon" and for allowing a 
“strange maiden” to solo in the church. 

Bach died on July 28, 1750. His final work, 
riicaat ftri from his deathbed, whs the unfinished 
chorale prelude “Before Thy Throne I Now 
Approach," with a final verse that sums op his 
faith: “Grant that my end may worthy be, and 
that I wake Thy face to see." 

— David E Anderson (UP I). 


FROM OUR APRIL 6 PAGES , 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Alaska to Get floating Justice 
NEW YORK — The Treasury Department in 
Washington, acting on the suggestion of Gov- 
ernor Clark of Alaska, has dedded upon a 
novel plan for coping with lawlessness m the 
salmon canneries dotting the Alaskan coast. 
These localities are inhabited only in summer, 
and hitherto it has been difficult to bring 
offenders to justice. In Governor Clark’s plan 
justice will be taiem to them, and those con- 
victed w31 be brought back to civilization and 
jailed. Judge Cushman, accompanied by a 
deputy marshal an assistant 1 I S district at- 
torney, a grand jury and a petit jury will soon 
embark on a cutter which will be converted 
into a floating court of justice. The cutter will 
cruise along 2,000 miles of coast, stopping to 


pry and sentence prisoners and stowing them 
in the bold until the end of tbe anise. 


1935: Strachey Returns, Denies Guilt 
SOUTHAMPTON — St. John Strachey, 
Communist, writer and former Labor M.P. 
whose views on Communism led to deporta- 
tion proceedings by the United States, stepped 
ashore here this afternoon from the liner Bera- 
garia with tbe message ilmt Communism is 
growing in America. Mr. Strachey said be 
thought that the American government au- 
thorities studying his case would find they had 
been justified in dropping action. He said he 
had established that “I neither attempted nor 
advocated the overthrow of the United States 
government during my lecture tour.** Mr. Stra- 
chey said be had not made a false statement in 
applying for a visa to visit America when he 
answered “no" to the question asked of all 
prospective visitors, whether be intended to 
overthrow the United Stales government. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FQISIE 
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CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Publisher 

Extaant EtBtor RENE BONDY Depan PubBriur 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Ax wtau PabBtker 

Dtpm Editor RICH ARD H. MORGAN Associate PiAhshcr 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W, CONAWAY On xtor of Operations 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director 3 S 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Dtrmw of Sides 


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© 1985. International Herod Tribune. All right! r es erv ed . BSSusl 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 6-7, 1985 


* i - 


Why Reagan 
Truly Should 
Visit Dachau 


financial position of the poorer debtor coun- 
tries — and of the banks who have lent to 
them — is still perilous. The level of confi- 
dence in most of the industrialized world 
remains low. A trade war could quickly tilt 
the balance toward disaster. 

The bilateral arguments between America 
and Japan look faintly absurd when it is 
realized how tittle power the leaders on ei- 
ther side of the Pacific really have in eco- 
nomic affairs. Prime Minister Nakasone is 
probably as sin cere in his desire to liberalize 
trade as President Reagan is in his desire to 
reduce his budget deficit, but neither has full 
power over his warring parly factions. 

If what America wants is a fairer system 
governing imports into Japan of, say, tele- 
communications equipment, the problem is 
arguably not about the system itself but 
about howit is administered once it has been 
put in place. We must recognize that Japan 
is traditionally highly inward-looking. It is 
trying to look out, both in trade and in 
capital movements, but that will take time. 

Instead of sailing into violent attack, the 
United States should see how Japan's new 
systems work in practice. Unilateral action 
should not replace international procedures 
for settling trade disputes. What America 
does about Japan will affect the world as a 
whole, and this is not the moment to take 
risks. There is a global problem that needs to 
be discussed and treated globally. ,, 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


By Charles William Maynes 

W ASHINGTON — West Germans have a 
deservedly positive image. From the ashes of 
defeat they built a society that compares favorably 
in almost every way with any society one might 
name. In international affairs the German, voice 
has been "intwl, but die German contribution has 
been constructive. Why humiliate friends? Why 
visit the sins of the fathers on the sons? 

So President Reagan, explaining his derision not 
to visit the site of a former concentration camp 
during his trip to West Germany next month, has 
said: “I think [the Germans] should be recognized 
for the democracy that they’ve created and the 
democratic principles they now espouse.” 

But this stand overlooks both the real signifi- 
cance of the Holocaust and an important presiden- 
tial role. Regarding tbe former, the key issue is not 
what happened, but why it happened. And the 
answer is unlikely to embarrass only Germans. 

It is tree that the historical relationship between 
Jews and Germans is troubled. Germany's greatest 
religious figure, Martin Luther, denounced Jews in 
terms that now seem taken from manifestos of the 
Nazi period. Luther, attacking this “damned, re- 
jected race" who had wealth because “they have 
robbed and stolen from ns by their usury,” called 
for a “merciful severity” that would include “set- 
ting fire to their synagogues and schools and cover- 
ing over what wul not bmn with earth so that no 
man will ever see a stone or cinder of them again.” 

But Luther was not the only religious leader, nor 
Germans the only people, to place another people 
outside the code of the community. It is a charac- 
teristic of modem nationalism for each people to 
claim qualities that it denies can exist in others. 
The first European settlers in North America, 



P*?. 

Ii pightt 


This Time? 






By George F. Will 


W ASHINGTON — William 
Manchester enjoyed his 63d 


birthday on April 1 more than his . 
23dl during which be thought, rea- 
sonably: How unlikely 1 am to have a 
24th. On April 1, 1945, he was among 
the marines who began the battle of 
Okinawa. One of his memories of. 
that expedience is relevant to some- 
thing occurring in Wa shin gton today. . 

The marines were amazed by the 
extraordinary . proficiency of Japa- 
nese artillery on southern Okinawa. 
Every road and other vital point was 


.-‘I*:: 

OL'KA 








briUiantjy targeted. So amazed'were 
the marines that a surmise -became 
widespread: The Japanese must have 
German artjHexy advisers. Similarly, 
the brilliance of the Japanese attack 
on Pearl Harbor had caused some 
American officials to suspect that the 
planes had beat piloted by Germans, 
lliere were other explanations. 

' Before tbe war, Japan had an artfl- 
}ery school on Okinawa. A standard 
exercise for fledgling officers was to 
answer this question: How would you 
defend the school ag a i n st attack? A 
generation of officers had . thought 
hard about fighting on Okinawa. 

And beginning in 193Uevery grad- 
uate of Japan's naval academy had 
been required to answer, 'one ques- 
tion: How would you execute a sur- 
prise attack on Pearl Harbor? 

In the 1940s many Americans had 
a racist impulse to assume that Japan 


nuv uwuwvu yju nijvi wwu w wu avmuwwu 

blacks as inferior and exterminated the Indian 
tribes that stood in the way of white Christians. 

The Western colonial powers were convinced of 
their own superiority and therefore felt no qualms 
in their ruthless use of force to bring “civilization” 
to “lesser breeds without the law." 


Today Iraqi generals speak of Iranian soldiers as 
“insects." Most Arab leaden, through their ex- 
treme rhetoric, attempt to dehumanize Israel and 
its citizens. A former Israeli army chief of staff 
recently called for a policy of control over the 
Palestinians on the west Bank that would treat 
them like “drugged roaches in a bottle." 

Franklin Roosevelt once observed that the presi- 
dency is not merely an administrative job, it is 
“pre-eminently a place of moral leadership." Presi- 
dent Reagan would have gone to Dachau not to 
remind the world of German crimes but to honor 
the dead and instruct the living. 

In that role he would have helped all to remem- 
ber a period in history that should be unforgettable 
but is not. In the mid-1970s, 102 West German 
teachers asked students in different grades to ex- 
plain what they had heard about Hitler. The results 
were a disaster. Many had never heard of him. 
Some believed he was bom in the early 19th centu- 
ry or thought he was an Italian. 

Gordon Craig, an eminent scholar of Germany 
and professor emeritus at Stanford University, has 
correctly panted out that young American stu- 
dents might reproduce similar inanities if asked to 
write down what they had heard about Franklin 
Roosevelt. The point, while true, is not reassuring. 

In the 1930s mid '40s Western civilization broke 
down. It almost disappeared. Ignorance of that 


period — in particular, abandonment of efforts to 
determine the reasons for the breakdown — can 
pose a much greater threat than similar ignorance 
about any other period in modern history. 

Many non- Germans find solace in a belief that 
Hitler’s success could have taken place only in 
Germany'. They then increase their personal con- 
fort by urging Germans to confess their unique 
culpability. Smce German officials carried out tbe 
Holocaust, the German nation does shoulder a 
special responsibility. But we all know that ex- 
treme movements of the national socialist variety 
exist in many countries. The United Stales, for 
example, has recently learned of a small, viciously 
anti-black, anti-Semitic movement in Idaho. 

Other countries have not faced Germany's mis- 
fortune of having their extremist movements led 
by someone with Hitler’s extraordinary political 
gifts. Were that to happen, can we be so certain 
mat tbe institutional barriers to extremism would 
prove any stronger than they did in Germany? 

Hitler was an extreme deformation erf modem 
nationalism, which exalts a community at the ex- 
pense of those outside it This form of distorted 
nationalism has already plunged us into two world 
wars and may one day bring on a third. Identifying 
m Hitler and in his spoety what may remain in our 
own is therefore essential to our survival 
© 1985 Charles William Moynes. 


read: The Japanese must have JK. (•*■ 
a artillery advisers. Similarly, •vAjtec 1 - 51 '- . ~ 

fiance at the Japanese attack ;l®r* . f; '-'-’C : - 




■ 

<&■ ures-riO- 
, i thi ^ 

ir. Eu- 


f.-r i 


‘ sErans & 


could not be such a peril without 
Caucasian assistance. But the Japa- 
nese were good warriors because they 
were what they stiUaraagjieat disci- 
plined people, tenacious in pursuit of 
their interests as they saw mem. 

In his marvelous history, “The 
Glory and the Dream," Nu. Man- 
chester recalls the complacent, -con- 
descending American altitude imme- 
diately after Pearl Harbor, as. 
jukeboxes blared “Goodbye Mama, 
I’m Off to Yokohama." Scoffers said 
that a Japanese soldier on parade 
“resembled a poorly wrapped parcel 
of brown paper — soflea, crumpled, 
and threatening to come apart.” 

But Japanese sharpshooters were 
accurate at 1,000 yank ^ Infantrymen ; 
carried 400 rounds of ammunition' 
(twice what U.S. infantrymen car- 
ried) and five days’ rations of fish and 
rice. In 1941 their ships were faster, 
their guns bigger, their torpedoes bet- 
ter that America’s; and they had 
more and better aircraft. .... 

It has been asked: Who is 1945 
would have believed that, a genera- 
tion later, Japan and a Jewish state 
would be considered a great trading 
nation and a great warrior nation, 
respectively? But meat nations do 
what they must do. In 1985 it cannot 
be said too frequently dial Japan, a 
densely populated nation dependent 
on imports, would be a formidable 
commercial competitor even if it re - . 
spected the roles of free trade. 

Free trade ranks just below Cbris- 


■ a -a __ ■ __ jukeboxes blared “Goodbye ! 

About Propping Up Privilege With Innocent Pam 

J. 1 C7 A C7 “resembled a pooriy wrapped 

. . . ,, , .. .v . . n n il I .1 D li -O. .L Ukl. Of btOWB DSOff — SOflftt CTU 


C AMBRIDGE Massachusetts — History’s 
memorable trials — those of Socrates, Gali- 


By Harvey Cox 


headed John the Baptist earlier when the rabble 


leo. Dreyfus — often tell more about the persis- 
tence of malice than about the defendants. The 


tence of malice than about the defendants. The 
trial of Jesus is no exception. 

A piecing together of the sometimes contradic- 
tory evidence of the Gospels with more recent 
knowledge about Roman-occupied Palestine still 
leaves questions unanswered, out it completely 
discredits the stubborn myth that the Jews cruci- 
fied Jesns for claiming be was the Messiah. What 
emerges is a story of intrigue, power-mongering 
and buck-passing that mignt have happened any- 
where ana still goes on today. 

Take Pontius Pilate, the imperial procurator 
and Rome's chief representative in its turbulent 
eastern province: He wanted more dim anything 
else to avoid a bad report to the capital where 
Sejanus, his patron, had lost influence. The San- 
hedrin, the council of elders through which 
Rome tried to rule its Jewish subjects, lived with 
the awareness that some outbreak of national 
unrest might call down repression by the legions; 
indeed, this happened 40 years later. 

FQate and the Sanhedrin watched uneasily as 
thousands of unruly Jews streamed into Jerusa- 
lem for the Passover. One fervid ultra-national- 
ist, Barabbas, was already behind bars, but the 
festive crowd demanded that he be the prisoner 
traditionally amnestied on the holiday. A young 
rabbi from the north who had won support from 


“Son of David," a title with dear monarchical 
overtones. He then created a noisy disturbance in 
the Temple by expelling the money-changers and 
overturning tables. For some of the most jittery 
Sanhedrin members, this was too much. They 
had to get rid of Jesus or lose credibility in the 
eyes of the Romans, with what they foresaw 
would be catastrophic consequences. 

They moved quickly. Without the consent — 


had begun to support him, in the end he would 
not take Jesus off Pilate’s hands. 


Pilate complied. The life of one 
more Jew seemed a small price 
to pay fora litde stability. 


ing the dawning of the kingdom of God was 
among the pilgrims- There could be problems. 

If Jesus had slipped quietly into the holy city, 
things might have been different He arrived 
riding an ass while bis followers hailed him as 


possibly even without the knowledge — of the 
rest of [tbe council they had Jesus seized at night 
to avoid popular opposition, and interrogated, in 
clear defiance of Jewish legal procedure. But 
their original charge, that he blamhemed against 
the Temple, had to be dropped. Like many Jews, 
Jesus probably felt that the leaders of the Temple 
were corrupt and connived with Rome, but he 
never opposed worship in the Temple, so when 
no witnesses could be found to make a blasphe- 
my charge stick, his accusers decided to get Pilate 
to execute him for subverson. 

Roused from bed, Pilate at first refused to 
condemn Jesus. Learning that Herod, tbe gover- 
nor of Galilee, Jesus’s home province, was in 


not take Jesus off Pilate’s hands. 

Exasperated, Pilate told the accusers of Jesus 
that he could find no cause for capital punish- 
ment, and suggested that tbe prisoner be flogged 
and rdeasedHere the trial might have ended, 
bat the antagonists of Jesus, now joined by a 
crowd recruited from Temple merchants and 
employees who had reason to impose Jesus, told 
Pilate: This man claims he is a fang. We have no 
king but Caesar. If yon let this man go, you are 
no friend of Caesars. Free Barabbas. 

Pilate was surely not fooled by this show of 
patriotism; he knew these people had little loyal- 
ty to the emperor and no use for Barabbas. They 
were threatening a complaint to Rome in order 
to rid themselves of the Nazarene and assuage 
the ire of ultra-nationalists by getting Barabbas 
out. That way, everybody might make it through 
one more Paskjver without an insurrection. 

Pilate complied. The life of one more Jew 
seemed a small price to pay for a tittle stability. . 
So Jesus was executed, not by stoning, as a 
blasphemer, but on a Roman cross, a punish- ' 
meat reserved for rebels against the imperium. 

Christians give the death of Jesus a variety of 
theological meanings. On the historical plane; he 
was one more victim of a cynical power pky. His 
death tells us nothing in particular about Jews or 
Romans, but it speaks volumes about the human 


-*3* _ -.t .. 

•as 

*r 

ji ' “VI,, 

5aed bu.^iC--. Bn. 

*<i *" 

'a fe «!> 


iriet Move 


■ i<c ir’W! 

CTpf — Tne 5o\rel 

Jatodoctai secures tc 

■jSSEZL 2 USl i'i thSut.ST' 
a i EC Soviet Mik- 

■jjpthei. to shake Srvsc! 
.-fei at fll- of corruption. 
^addnmkcnnes. 1 . 
ibaiav, the Polriburv 
i’lms of -octal polu- 
sbbic. idrair.isiraiittf 
aaidtosscarre' to in 
iaaugle j nc±- 

aikMsffi' acl :. ebn:- 
ajbwnei:: from ufe \i 
an." ik official pres- 
rukiqxina: Tnuriuia;. 
tferaegnsno: ’.hemes- 
•fe *ere s aorta: a: ih 
jfeMtbure’ * third y.nc* 
, stock, look roa-r or 

f 


; above joggmg on the 
fist & things constantiy praised but 
only sporadically practiced. As a 
cause of the U.S. trade deficit, Ja- 
pan's protectionism, although signifi- 
cant, is less so than the U.S. deficit, 
which drives up the value erf the dol- 
lar and the {nice of U.S. exports. 
Another factor is U.S. restrictions on 
such exports as oQ and lumber. 

Today Japan is seen not merely as 
commercially aggressive or candidly 
protectionist. It is considered dis- 


llege with the pain of innocent people. 


town for the Passover, he adroitly tried to palm 
the case off on him. Although Herod had be- 


The writer, professor of drtimty at Harvard Univer- 
sity, is author ef'ReUgai in the Secular Gtv* He 
contributed das comment to The New York times. 




ingenuous, and con temp tuous about 
U^. readiness to retaliate. WeD, Jar 
pan is disingenuous: It uses dilatory 
negotiations as distinctions, ana 
keeps its markets closed with mad- 
dening re gulations, such as until re- 
cently the st i p ul a ti on iimr American 
cigarettes cannot be advertised in 
Japanese. But disdain for U.S. re- 
solve is not unreasonable, given tbe 
years of US. tolerance of Japan’s 
tactics. Besides, a nation that has no 
response when its soldiers are backed 
to death with axes (Korean Denufita- * 
rizedZone, 1976) or shot and allowed 
to bleed to death (East Germany, 
1985) should expect tougher nations 
to doubt its determination. 

If Japan wonders why retaliation 
may at last occur, it should listen to 
Horace Busby, a Washington consul- 
tant. He notes that as long as the 
focus of contention was automobiles, 
U.S. resentment was regionally con- 
centrated in the Great Lakes stales. 
Now attention is focused on electron- 
ics, telecommunications, pharmaceu- 
ticals, forest products and other 
goods, so the base crf caogressonal 
resentment is com-qXHKllingiy wider. 

The U.S. Congressman m good 

ctmscieiiceprodtnuCeq^adimms- 

tration to push Japan toward a more 
open market But Americans should 
not make the mistake of assuming, as 
was done 40 and 45 years ago, that 
Japanese successes are to be ex- 
plained away withobtrefereDce to the 
proven fan that die Japanese do 
many things veiywdL 

Someday both they imd Americans: 
may be amazed to learn how fittfe 
they needed the co mm erc ia l tridri-. 
ness that has become a big problem. 

Washington Post Writers Group. T. 


Democracy Is Winning, but the Betting Stays Open 


L ONDON — Freedom House, the 
/ human rishts monitorme orca- 


JL t human rights monitoring orga- 
nization, says 1984 was “a good year 
for freedom.” In its recently -issued 
report it confirms a trend it has been 
noticing for several years — that de- 
mocracy seems to be on a winning 
streak. Yet there are many who 
would dispute the ofganization's op- 
timism about tbe long run. 


By Jonathan Power 


could be “a natural trend due to a 
general law of social progress.” 

But tbe trend was reversing as he 


spoke. World War L supposedly 
fought for democracy, can seem in 


fought for democracy, can seem in 
r etr ospect to have been the opposite. 
In the years after it democracy died 
in Germany. Italy, Austria, Poland, 
the Baltic States, Spain, Portugal, 


Uruguay and Brazil entered the dem- 
ocratic fold, leaving in South Ameri- 
ca only Chile. Guyana, Surinam and 
Paraguay oat in the cold. Id Central 
America all bat already democratic 
Belize and Costa Rica took steps to- 
ward becoming freer societies. In the 
rest of the wond countries as varied 
as Egypt and Jordan. Iran and South 
Korea loosened the political reins. 

In hindsight we can see four phases 
in the historical emergence of modern 
democratic regimes. The first was led 
by the United States in the 18th ora- 
tory. By mid-century the American 
colonies were more democratic than 
Britain. In fact tt was the threat to 
their political freedoms by the re- 
imposition of British parliamentary 
mfe that precipitated me secession. 

During the following century dem- 
ocratic regimes gradually emerged in 
Europe, the British d omin ions and a 
few Latin American countries. James 


Tbe tmrdphasc was the aftermath 
of World war n, when the allies 
successfully reintroduced or imposed 


democracy in West Germany, Aus- 
tria. Italy and Japan and tried unsuo 


postulated that the “more well-to-do 
a nation, (he greater (he chances that 
it will sustain democracy.’’ Wealth 
produces higher levels of literacy, 
education and mass media develop- 
ment. It also moderates the tensions 
of political conflict since it gives fall- 
en political leaders alternative oppor- 
tunities and produces the wherewith- 
al to facilitate accommodation and 
compromise. Moreover, the more in- 
dustrialized and complex a society is, 
the more difficult it is to govern effi- 


Christiamty and Hinduism seem hos- 
pitable to democracy; Islam, Confu- 
cianism and Buddhism are less so. 

The chief influence, for Mr. Hun- 
tington. is a market capitalist econo- 


tmgioQ' is a mantel camtanst econo- 
my. Capitalism demands a dispersion 
of economic power and this creates 


oi economic power ana uns creates 
alternatives and counters to state 


power. He sees this as an absolute 
precondition of democracy. He is 
skeptical about democracy taking an- 
other leap forward; it can happen, he 


tria. Italy and Japan and tried unsuc- 
cessfully to do so in South Korea. At 
the same time there was the great 
surge of decolonization. Fes' the first 
few years of independence many for- 
mer British ana French territories 


riently by authoritarian means; 
If that argument is right, econ 


adopted Europe's democratic forms. 
Tne fourth phase has been volatile. 


The fourth phase has been volatile, 
particularly in the Third World. After 
rising in the 1950s and early ’60s, die 
number of democracies fell in the late 


’60s and eariyJTOs, only to rise again 
in the late 70s and early '80s. At 


Biyce, the British historian, speculat- 
ed that movement toward democracy 


in the late 70s and early '80s. At 
present the curve is upward, the rapid 
progress in Latin America being the 
principal influence. But will it last? Is 
a fifth phase under way? 

The long-run argument about 
whether democracy is advancing is 
complex and contradictory. A decade 
ago Seymour Martin Upset pub- 
lished a cwninfll study in which he 


If that argument is right, economic 
development in the Third World and 
in the Communist countries should 
encourage the emergence of demo- 
cracy. Is this happening? Not neces- 
sarily, argues Samuel Huntington, 
the Harvard academic and former 
U.S. National Security Council staff 
member, m a recent essay. The East 
Asian countries have had a phenome- 
nal rate of economic growth in the 
last 25 years, yet they have made hllle 


Raymond Gastil author erf the 
Freedom House report, disagrees. He 
notes tha t very democratic regimes, 
such as in the S candina vian coun- 
tries, have major socialist ingredients. 


Conversely, capitalism can reinforce 
dictatorial power, as in Anastasio So- 
moza’s Nicaragua or in Chile, Saudi 
Arabia and South Korea. 

While it is true that communism as 
presently practiced has not spawned 
democracy, it is conceivable that a 
noucapiUdist society could become 
democratic. Much of Eastern Eu- 
rope, without Moscow’s braking 
mechanism, might do so. China, once 
the thousands or students it has sent 
to the West reuirn, may loosen up 
further. To say these countries must 
renounce socialism to become demo- 
cratic is to play into Moscow’s hands. 

Mr. Gastil for one, expects a near- 
democratic world within a century. 

International Herald Tribune. 

AO rights reserved. 


Mr. Huntington argues that other 
factors besides wealth have to be con- 
sidered. An autonomous bourgeoisie, 
he argues, is one of the most impor- 
tant contributory factors. Democracy 
has seldom if ever been instituted by 
mass popular action. It is a creature 
of the middle dosses. 

Religion also appears important. 


1 


^{ l ^3 2 Teie Pbone: 

ifc. Its I ■ 


On Terror in Lebanon 

In response to the report “Israelis 
Raid Visages East of Sidon , Kill 21 
Guerrillas (March 22): 

When Jacques Abouchar, a French 
journalist, was arrested in Afghani- 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 




stan for entering the country ille gall y, 
one French government protest fol- 
lowed another until he was released. 
After Israelis killed two CBS journal- 
ists on March 2J. President Reagan 
all but justified tbe killing. 

Israeli soldiers have committed 
acts erf cold-blooded murder in Leba- 
non. Their tanks drove over cars 
filled with civilians. They dynamited 
homes, erased orchards, bunted 
crops. This was reported blandly be- 
cause erf Israel's claims that tbe vic- 
tims were suspected terrorists. 

Whether or not someone resisting 
foreign occupation is a terrorist, it is 


obvious that what the Israelis have 
done in southern Lebanon is terror- 
ism. I wonder what the reaction of 
the American media would be if one 
day Arab armies swept through Israe- 
li villages the way the Israelis have 
been doing in southern Lebanon. 

I do not represent any particular 
government or party, but I represent 
a new generation of Arabs who are 
growing frustrated with the United 
States — not because we do sot like 
Coca-Cola or hamburgers, but be- 
cause the American stand on the 
Middle East is grossly unjust. 

ABIR &AMIEH, 
Paris. 


et troops have been helping Mr. 
Karmals government put down a 
Moslem insurrection since December 
1979, and Soviet media often accuse 
Western nations of aiding rebel 
camps in Pakistan." 

That wording gives a distinct aura 
of legitimacy to “Mr. Karxoal's gov- 
ernment.” Has it been forgotten that 
Afghanistan was invaded by the Sovi- 


et Union and is at present occupied 
by at least 120.000 Soviet troops? 
Babrak Karmal was brought to Af- 
ghanistan and installed as the head of 
a puppet regime after the invasion. 

Afghanistan's battle against over- 
whelming odds has entered its sixth 
year. Were the freedom fighters who 
formed the Resistance in occupied 
Europe during World War II referred 
. to as “rebels: . 

TAR3QAREF. 

*• Rome. 


'Rebels’ in Afghanistan? 


A front-page report (“Leaden Re- 
ceived in Russia," March 15) coo- 
tamed the following sentence; “Sovi- 


Bases, Missiles in. Greece 

Regarding “ 'Greece Fust' Papan- 
dreou Provokes a Showdown’' (March 
26) by LS. Stavrumos: . 

Constantine CaramanHs was per- 
fectly correct in his negative answer 
to Andreas Papandreou ’s question in 
Parliament in 1979 on whether or not 
nuclear weapons were stored at US. 
bases in Greece. Such mid car war- 
heads as are stocked m Greece nnder 

special agreements were then, and arc 

to this day, stored under the control 
of the Grade armed forces and the 
double key system, which means that 
they cannot be used without permis- 
sion from both the Greek and the 
U.S. governments, Mr. Papandreou 
has not contraded otherwise since 
becoming prime minister in 1981, 

Mr. CSramanliff was equally cor- 
rect in stating that U$.«dfifies in 


Greece could not be used for - war 






“ ut UlCdC UUUUldUUUh, IV 1VUAW 

Professor Stavrianos is referrin g, ^ ' 
plies to peacetime and not wartime 3 . 
operation and is justified by thc fad'_ 
that the U.S. HeralcMon base isnot-fc 
military operational farifityjHitaiL 

electronic m teTliffm rr carhrrinft UfflL ~ 





The 1983 Defense andEcononSc Cpv.. 
operation Agreements smiled by tne 
Papandreou government Jrave essb*?; 
tia&y confirmed these arrangemenB^. 
The one and only mi roW i ranfe<; 

in Crete is a NATO mhringreffiife ' : 
manned and operated exclusively by 1 -: 
the Greek anoed forces. ,r V 

JCMHNA.TZOUhto^ 


w 


The writer is a member of ## 
peat Parliament and afotmer j 








r « 


**** 

®E° N ' 

■ Apnl i. ijs [3S* 

S^' 

sjflSiB 

“■Sai&S 

“tts Ihat a ? a ®Sd ^ 
3d: The u SUr ^S*L^ 
artilKv 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 6-?, 1985 


Page 



ew Approaches 
nemployment 


By Paul Lewis 

Nev Jerk Tima Service 

PARIS— Whma business etto- 
utivt from Troyes, a small city 
southeast^ Pars, lost lss job two 
yeaivago.he became dmble to 
pick up 12 monthly uneznplbysteai- 
diedc^ for 9Q penxm of his fonna 
salary. 

fmrtwwi, like thousands nf others 
$ v recently laid off in France* be chose 
b an option that provided six 
months' ^unemployment pay in. a 
loop sum and used it to start a new. 

business. 

EBs. messenger' arid transport 
companyis one of 40,000 buaness- 
es started each year with imero- 
it benefits as capital 


BS 

he school a^^n! 

*«t fighung^ 


"aval 


pared t 0 


.tv turu.i i ans *fir onf ." WWO. *»OJ,-U UlOVCU llJWJ UL)U U1C 

ick mo ^ digits, and titisyearit will pass 11-5 

lon/k Pearl Hatbuf l5, ‘ •gjpercem, affficmtg almost 20 mD- 
JT*? “any W. , ^£on Eur 

?stow3 


method, which 'accounted 

\ *j.for a third of all new French com-: . recent years. 

* ’ — “ ia<w *“■“ *“ — copied by But even Europe’s relatively gen- 

Italyand 
d in the 

United States. 

Until the late 1970s, 
meat was higher in the Umted- 
Siates than in Western Europe. 

Now the trends have been reversed. 

Since it rose to 9.5 percent in 
1982, U.S. unemployment has 
droned steadily to the current 73 
percent, while joblessness in Eu- 
rope has risen relentlessly for ado- 
cade. In 2983, it moved into double 


country, with double-digit unem- States has created 15 mil li o n new 
lt Wow. Britain, Bdgium, jobs in 10 years while Europe was 
lost 2 million, AD their govern- 
ments have centralized information 
about job openings and are teach- 
ing new sldBs to the unemployed. 

The Netherlands says it has cre- 
ated 50.000 jobs by adopting a 32- 
hour workweek, while cutting 
wages 20 percent. Belgian compa- 
nies are bong urged to take similar 
action. 

Increasingly, European govem- 
anring their difficulties 
_ regulations. Originally 
to protea employment, 
sane of these rules are pricing 
workers out of jobs and convening 
higher demand into inflation. 

Economists try to estimate how 
much unemployment is needed to 
stabilize inflation, a concept known 
as the NAIRU, or non-accelerating 
inflation rate of unemployment. 

European NAIRUs are rising, 
suggesting inflexible economies. 
West Germany achieved stable 


Italy, Ireland, Portugal 
and Spain, .with a peak rate of 20 
percent, share this problem. France 
may join them litis year. 

High unemployment tend* to be 
sdf-papetuanng. About 40 per- 
cent of the unemployed in Britain 
and France and 30 percent in West 
Germany have not worked for 
more than a year. Often these peo- 
ple lose skills, suffer declining 
health and become discouraged. 

. . However, high unemployment 
has no! shaken political stability in 
Europe, probably because benefits 
are usually generous. Conservative 
governments ^ '’have been re-dected 
u> West Germany and Britain in 



erous benefits trail away after two 
years. In France, unemployment is 
a leading reason for President 
Francois Mitterrand's uncertain 
prospects in pa rliam entary elec- 
tions next year. In Britain, Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher says 



such a 
in assistance. 


U they still are' a _ - 

* marvt* ni»c L- 


a ‘ter Pearl 

* “Git 

0 Yokohama. "Scoffed 
2“®* soldier m ^ 

a poorly &tbd— ,P a * 

1 paper — soile 


A handful of countries — nota- 
bly Sweden and Austria with an^ti- 
tious social programs, Norway, 
which is rich m oQ, and Luxem- 
bourg and Iceland, which have 
small populations — have kept un- 
employment low, often by subsi- 
dizing troubled businesses. But 
elsewhere it has snared In 19 1 0, 
Turkey was the only European 


of a huge budget 

President Mitterrand tried this in 
1981 and wound up wi th unaccept- 
able inflation, a severe trade gap 
and a collapsing franc. 

“The American option, which 
rests on the unique position of the 
dollar as a reserve currency, isn’t 
open to others,’' says Britain’s 
chancellor of the exchequer, Nigel 
Lawson. 

So the West Europeans are pro- 
moting job-creation plans and try- 
ing to discover why the United 


prices with unemployment of only 
1.6 percent in 1971-75. according to 
a new study by the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation and De- 
velopment. But by 1981-83, the 
jobless figure was 8 percent Simi- 
lar increases were reported for 
France, Britain and the Nether- 
lands. 

Meanwhile, the U.S. rate has 
fallen. 

Some rigidities are being eased. 
Italy. Denmark, the Netherlands 
and Belgium no longer tie wages to 
inflation. Spain and Belgium have 
made it easier to dismiss young 
workers, but not old ones, . France, 
the Netherlands, Denmark and 
West Germany recently cut social 
benefits slightly, and Britain has 
cm payroll taxes a bit 



iu— * 


ASIAN WELCOME — Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of Britain is accompanied 
by Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad of Malaysia after arriving in Kuala Lumpur 
Friday for a three-day visit and talks on trade, air service and armaments. This is the 
first stop on a tour of Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India and Saudi Arabia. 


Soviet Jews See Hope 
Of Easing on Exit Visas 


X&E Ozal Defends Martial Law in Turkey 


By John M. Goshko 

Washinpon Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Prime Min- 
ister Turgut Ozal has defended 
Turkey’s continuing crackdown on 
Terrorists” as necessary to ensure 
that his country's return to democ- 
racy is successful He predicted 
that “if everything goes all right, 
martial law wfl] be ended in a year 
to a year and a half " 

At a meeting with editors and 



to 



ptt 

sterling to come -wf^ >• , 
ipanese sharpshMm* 

« L000 yards 

JS 2 , 7 ??* of aBS 

■bat O.S. infamnmen cj 
five days mionsoffae 
1941 their ships were [ tt 
s bigger, their torpedoshe 
America's; and ihn t 
1 better aircraft, 
been asked: Who in 
ive believed that, a a® 

r, Japan and a tariSit 
i considered a great ua^ 
nd a great warrior mot 
ely? But great nations 4 
y must do. In 1985 it cat 

00 frequently that Japa; 
xspulated nation depot 
rts, would be a finflfc, 
rial competitor even if nr- v - 
he rules of free trade. 

■ade ranks just bekwCfc 
id just above jogging at 
rings constant!) praised i 
radically practiced As. 
the U.S. trade defied fc 

itectioaism. although sni 
ess so than the U> 
ives up the value of 
the price of US. ap£ 
factor is US. restrictionsr 
arts as oil and lumber 
Japan us seen not merit: 
iaDv aggressive or canfc 
nisL It is considflrii- 

s, and coatetnpnkW tic 
liness to retaliate. W 
sincenuous: It uses ^ 
ons as distracucras. k 
markets dosed 
•gulauons. such as > 

• stipulation thatAigcy» 
: cannot be advoth® 1 
. But disdain 

tot unreasonable, p®' 

U.S. tolerance oTg 
esides. z nation tM 

when its soldiers aitbg 

*ith axe. t Korean 

r .l976lorstoag£ 

to death (Hast OJ 
>uld expect ioo#** 0, 
its deicnninauca 
in wonders 

occur- u should^ 

5bf.»w*Hj5 

•cntsnuonwasainjp 

in the Gk* ■ 
ntion is focused ot, , 4 
Snmun.cauons.pj: 

>rest prooucu-^: 

1 ,Jjc 

c Congress w" 

« prod the Kagjj.- 

•sssgfe 

0131 

SSSSJS'tf 


. Agence Frwux-Prast 

MOSCOW — The ruling Soviet 
PoBttaro has adopted measures to 
curb datiKtiism, a s^n of tbe deter- 
mination of the Soviet leader, Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev, to shltice Soviet 
societyfra of tire ife of coauptiau, 
indisapHne mA drunkenness. - 

pn : Thursday, the Politburo 
adopted, “a series, of. social, politi- 
cal, economic, administrative, 
ro« d>f3>i other measures to in- 
tensify the struggle a gainst drunk- 
enness and alcoholism and todimi- 
nate these phenomena from life in 
our society, ” the official press 
agency, Tass, reported Thursday. .= 

No’detafls were given of the mea- 
sures that were adopted at the 
meeting, the Politbuitrs third since 
Mr. Gorbachev took power on 
March 11. 


The official newspaper Pravda 
noted last week the disastrous ef- 
fect of alcoholism cm the national 
economy and pointed out that in 
many shops cannot find fresh 
milk or cream, tot plenty of vodka 
is available. 

The first staiement on discipline 
under Mr. ' Gorbachev, releas e d 
March 21, set the new ltme, under- 
lining “the need to strengthen dis- 

at vn ihg jaale and the 

party, to lead a determined fight 
against pretense, irresponsibility 

the rm^u^rodahst 

Soviet youth is tire prime con- 
can, as efforts to implant Marx- 
ism-Leninism in the national con- 
sciousness come up against 
indifference among youngsters. 

Also on Thursday, the govern- 


ment newspaper Izvestia published 
a report from the Crime Prevention 
Insutute about the rising numbers 
of youths who do not want to work. 
They are referred to as “parasites.” 

Refusal to work, which is pun- 
ishable by two years in prison, 
leads to drunkenness, according to 
the institute, which also said that 
80 percent of “parasites” were said 
to be alcoholics and the cause of 
three-fourths of crimes. 

The concern is by no means new, 
as the authorities have long hit om 
at drunkenness, absenteeism and 
laziness at work. President Yuri V. 
Andropov stepped up tire attempts 
to cure such evils during his brief 
period in power after the death of 
Leonid I. Brezhnev in November 
1982. 

Absenteeism cost the Soviet 


Union 125 billion working hours in 
1983, equivalent to 60 million 
workers a year, according to Izves- 
tia. 

A confidential report from the 
Soviet Academy or Science, ob- 
tained by Agenoe France- Presse 
last December but whose authen- 
ticity was challenged by Soviet offi- 
cials, said there were 40 million 
alcoholics and drunks in the Soviet 
Union in 1980, in a population of 
267 ntilhoc. 

Luxembourg Cathedral Fire 

Reuten 

LUXEMBOURG — Fire raged 
through Notre Dame Cathedral in 
Luxembourg on Friday, reducing 
its spire to nibble and threatening 
to bring down the roof of the nave. 


reporters from The Washington 
Post on Thursday, Mr. Oral de- 
fended his government against 
charges that human rights viola- 
tions were continuing more than a 
year after the Turkish aimed forces 
ended four years of military rule. 

Mr. Ozal who was elected late in 
1983, acknowledged that from 
7,000 to 8,000 people arrested on 
political charges are still in prison. 
But he maintained that “they are 
terrorists, mostly of the Marxist- 
Leninist type,” and he said that the 
number is far below the 30,000 un- 
da detention at the height of the 
military crackdown. 

Mr. Ozal noted that since he 
took office, martial law has been 
eliminated in all but 23 of Turkey’s 
67 provinces. While the most popu- 
lous areas around Ankara and Is- 
tanbul are still under martial law. 
he said the situation is reviewed 
every four months, with the aim of 
eliminating martial law in roughly 
a year. 

Reagan administration officials 
publicly have praised what they 
consider improvements in Turkey’s 
record on rights and have said that 
they expea progress to continue. 
However, rights groups contend 
that torture, imprisonment of peo- 
ple without formal charges and 
tight press censorship are still 
prominent features of Turkish life. 

Mr. Ozal also expressed concern 
about an alleged 
neighboring Bulgaria for 


in 


campaign 
the forced 


assimilation of tire Turkish com- 
munity there. Rioting by Turks re- 
sisting the Communist Bulgarian 
government's efforts to force them 
to give up their Moslem religion 
and adopt Bulgarian has 

been reported recently. 

The Turkish leader said the Sovi- 
et Union, which has enormous in- 
fluence ova Bulgaria, “has said 
nothing at all” in response to Tur- 
key’s pleas that Bulgaria cease 
these activities. 

He added that Turkey’s only re- 
course was “to do our best to awak- 
en public opinion in Islamic coun- 
tries and elsewhere” to the plight of 
Turks in Bulgaria. 

“We can’t make a war against 
Bulgaria,'’ he said. 

Wednesday. Mr. Ozal broadened 
what has become known as his “ol- 
ive branch campaign’’ toward 
Greece in a speech sponsored by 
Georgetown University’s Center 
for Strategic and International 
Studies. 

He caOed on Greece to sign “an 
agreement of friendship, goo d- 
naghborliness. conciliation and 

cooperation." 

He also repealed his offer that be 
is “ready to meet any time. , any- 
where" with Prime Minister An- 
dreas Papaodreou of Greece. But 
Athens has already turned down 
this proposal as neither “serious 
nor responsible." 


By Serge Schmcmann 

f/ew York Tima Seniee 

MOSCOW — A flurry of exit 
permits issued in Moscow has 
raised hopes among Jews that the 
upturn in relations with the United 
Stales may lead to more emigra- 
tion. 

Jews who have long been waiting 
for visas and Western diplomats 
note that overall figures have not 
shown any significant increase and 
that the impression of movement 

may be the result of a dispropor- 
tionate number of visas issued in 
Moscow. 

But they agree that the approval 
of visas for several people who have 
long been refused permission to 
emigrate and the fact that so many 
visas are bring issued here suggest a 
deliberate signal from the authori- 
ties. 

According to officials in Israel 
97 people received visas in March, 
only marginally more than in most 
recent months. But most of these 
visas went to Moscow residents. 

Reports from Israel spoke of as 
many as 30 people a day receiving 
visas and of 280 expected depar- 
tures in April But Moscow sources 
said these figures could not be veri- 
fied. 

The new expectations derive 
from the experience that the Soviet 
authorities nave treated Jewish em- 
igration as a leva in relations with 
the United States. Emigration for 
Soviet citizens in general is severely 
restricted, but Jews, apparently as a 
result of pressure from within the 
Soviet Union and from abroad, 
have been allowed to emigrate in 
large n ambers since the late 1960s. 

Departures peaked at 51,000 in 
1979, the last year of more or less 
smooth Soviet-American relations, 
and then declined precipitously as 
relations deteriorated ova the So- 
viet intervention in Afghanistan, 
the rise, and then the repression, of 
the Solidarity movement in Poland 
and the collapse of the arms talks in 


late 1983. Only 896 Jews left the 
Soviet Union last year. 

But the decision last year to re- 
start arms negotiations led many 
Soviet Jews to expect an upturn in 
emigration. Tire flurry of visas giv- 
en to Moscow residents in March, 
coinciding with the opening of new 
arms talks in Geneva and prospects 
for a summit meeting, have been 
viewed as a signal of Soviet inten- 
tions. 

'*1 think we can expect substan- 
tive changes at this tune.” said Al- 
exander Y. Lemer, a physicist who 
has been refused an emigration visa 
for more than 15 years. 

He and others said that, in addi- 
tion to the renewed arms talks, the 
Russians were looking to a visit 
next week by Representative 
Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., the speaker 
of the U.S. House of Representa- 
tives. and a visit next month by 
Secretary of Commerce Malcolm 
Baldrige. 


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77.Lottery 

May 11, 1985 
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■>***<»» -«mm35 




Page 6 


'Dream and Reality’ 
As Seen in Vienna 


By Alan Levy 

V IENNA — The international 
vogue for turn-of-the-century 
Vienna has now reached Vienna 
itself, in an exhibit of spectacular 
proportions, the architect Hans 
Hollein, who just won the S 100,000 
Pritzker Architecture Prize, has 
transformed the KUnsllerhaus. in- 
side and out. into a dramatic colli- 
sion of artistic, social and philo- 
sophical ideas. “Dream and 
Reality: Vienna 1870-1930" illumi- 
nates with intensity- and hindsight 
and 2.200 objects a series of ten- 
sions that were seminal in shaping 
the 20 th century. 

Gold for the dream and gray for 
the reality is the motif and the mu- 
seum's exterior and interior have 
been repainted accordingly. Out- 
side. atop the gold-painted wing, is 
a giant gilded statue executed from 
a drawing Gustav Klimt once sub- 
mil ted as a proposal to decorate the 
University of Vienna Medical Fac- 
ulty; at the other end is a front 
portal of the Karl-Marx-Hof, the 
Viennese housing development 
built between the two world wars. 
It is pan of where the dream ended, 
with Ausiro-fasrism and then Nazi 
socialism. 

On the grand staircase is a pa- 
rade of mannequins in Renaissance 
costumes designed by the court 




t* \\ 

& y 







Josef Hoffmann. There are 18 
works by Egon Schiele, a dozen by 
Oskar Kokoschka, and 27 by Klimt 
— some ot their best work: 
Schiele's tormented self-portrait 
with spread fingers: his room in 
Neulengbach; Kokoschka's city- 
scape of Vienna from the children’s 
home in Wilhelminenberg: Klimt's 
“Judith P and “The Kiss." 

■ The piice de resistance is 
Klimt's “Beethoven Frieze," a fres- 
co painted on the walls of Vi enna' s 
Secession gallery for its 1902 exhi- 
bition and not seen by the public 
since then. Sold in 1903 toa private 
! collector, it was detached and re- 
moved to Switzerland, but acquired 
by the Austrian government 70 
years later and restored at enor- 
mous cost Parts are missing, but 
the quintessential Klim t illustra- 
tion of the Ninth Symphony's 
“Ode to Joy" remains, with an odd 
mix of biblical severity and Art 
Nouveau humor. The room that 
was its original home has been re- 
created. complete with Max 
Klinger’s marble statue of Beetho- 
ven, on loan from the Boston Mu- 
seum of Fine Arts. 


BUCCELLATI 


4 Place Vendome 
Paris 1" Tel. 260.12.12 


What electrifies “Dream and Re- 
ality' is its creators' skillful use of 
juxtaposition. Hitler shares a room 
with Theodor HerzL Although Hit- 
ler didn't come to Vienna until 
Herzl bad left, both addressed 
themselves to the Jewish problem: 
Herzl with the Zionist solution; 
Hitler with the Final Solution. First 
editions of “The Jewish State" 
0896) and “Mein Kampf" (1925) 
make the point eloquently. Freud, 
Mahler and Karl Lueger. the anti- 



todu/.rva Fj:r 3 •-■I - -y: .:-.0 4!’. 

i:um il .• m io S p rr. 

f:?~ It t. J r> ).i>; c.t\ ( t irr. ii j n in '■ r ■ 


26 ,h 

Art and Antiques Fair 
of Switzerland 

R ocpl 

April 13-21, 1985 


Src.i.i : 

'3oeV.s jrd L.nt.-r- oi Fi. ; Ctr.iur.i-..* 
^ v-.'r.-i/L'.i . . ;hr 
l r.u.T'a:. Lit fur. v ■ lU'.ol 


) 


?r::cr.^. The Swiss \n:ii<ue jr.J \:i Uejl.-n \$soc:i'ion 
bfor-.ui.on Sccr.-Un.i! KAM, P.0 Bo*. C'i I- -tOI 


INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 

MUS&E RODIN 

77, rue de Varerane, Paris (7 - ) - Metro Vorenne 


Robert JACOBSEN 


Daily (except Tuesdays] 10 am ■ 1 ls30 am. and 230 pjn. - 6 p.m. 
LAST DAYS 


xALERlE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


,6, Rue JearvMermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.82.44 , 


t reasons ^ 
L to visit J 
r LE LOITYRE J 
r DES 1 
ANTIQUAIRES 

250 ART DEALERS OPEN 
FROM TUESDAY 
THRU SUNDAY 
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

2. PLACE DU PALAIS-ROYAL 
75001 PAF»S-TEL(1)297 2700 

Now Exhibition ■ 

T1RELIR6S ■ OSJETS I7AAT 
*■ I’Anriquit^ flu XIX* aft#* 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 6-7* 1985 




painter Hans Makart (1840-84) for 
a procession honoring Emperor 
Franz Joseph's 25th wedding anni- 


H? ? re 


versary in 1879. This last gasp of 
the old order gives way to a gasp of 


the old order gives way to a gasp of 
wonder at its antithesis: the Seces- 
sionist purity and Byzantine beauty 
of the architect Otto Wagner(1841- 
1918). a year younger than Makart, 
but a century apart Wagner is rep- 
resented by grills and designs and a 
lovingly re-created telegraph agen- 
cy storefront that once stood on 
Vienna's Kaminerstrasse. 

According to Robert Waissen- 
berger, head of the Historisches 
Museum der Siadi Wien, the city 
historical museum, which is pre- 
senting “Dream and Reality," it is 
“not just for an lovers." but a pop- 
ular celebration. Chi the ground 
floor are no fewer than 500 exqui- 
site originals — from eggeups and 
letter openers to vases and gems — 
fashioned by the Wiener Werk- 


FELIX VERCEL 

presents 

TAURELLE 

«r danse at paysage » 

march 20 - aprii 10 


9 AVENUE MAHQNON 
PARIS 8* 2S&25.19 


ArlExUHdMs 

& Auction Sain 

appeals every Saturday 


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static, the crafts shop founded by 
Josef Hoffmann. There are IS 


Klimt-designed statue of 
“MedMane” being placed 
on roof of gilded wing of 
Kunstlerhaus in Vienna. 


philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein 
(1889-1951), who was a soldier in 
the first world war. On its inner 
wall are inscribed his words: 
“What we cannot speak about we 
must pass over in silence." 

“Dream and Reality: 1 870- 
1930.” Ktinstlerhaus, Karlsplatz 5, 
daily through OcL 6 . Next year, the 
exhibition (probably minus Klimt’s 
“Beethoven Frieze'*) will go to the 


Centre Pompidou in Paris, and 
Museum of Modem Art in New 


Alan Levy is a Vienna-based au- 
thor and journalist. 


AUCTION SALES 


gunmiunmutninuiuitnutniiiuaiiiine 

| A large Sale ot f 

1 FINE FURNITURE I 



— Set* of 12 & 8 QUppeodal* chain. 75 
= Cfwpw & Victonui Library Boofc-E 
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S William & Mary Walnut double DorneE 

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= Qocka. Brossea. Booheur Mene (420= 
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ntiin rnmnuumnni isniinii miiim imriE 


ARTS /LEISURE 


■ *.-J r- ■* F 

■ • ^ • - -- ' . r.-'f a 

s-v . - 

p< ?ri ; :: 

, islSs 


Louis Malle’s r Alamo Bay 9 Is a Clumsy and Superficial Film, jco»*Si 


By Vincent Canby 

New York Times Soviet 


N EW YORK — After the collapse of 
the United States- backed government 
in Saigon in 1975, more than 500.000 Viet- 


namese refugees made their way to the 
United States, approximately 100.000 set- 

MOVIE MARQUEE 

tlfng in Texas and many of those along the 
coast of the Gulf of Mexico. They fished 


harriw and put in longer hours than die 
white Texan — or “Anglo" — boatmen,. 


Because of the language barrier, the 
Vietnamese kept to themselves in th drown 


makeshif t communities. Initially times 
were eood. but as crices to fish and 


namese and the Anglos intensified until, in 
1979, an undeclared war broke mil It was 
an ideal situation to the Ku Klux Klan. 
The next couple of yean were marked by 
fijebombings of Vietnamese boats and 
houses and the destruction of their fish 
traps, with the Vietnamese retaliating in 
kind. In 1980, a young Vietnamese shot 
»nH tillftri an Anglo fisherman named BiQy 
Joe ApKn. 

These are the sad, complex, real-life 
events that serve as the source material to 
“Alamo Bay,” directed by Louis Malle 
from an original screenplay by Alice Alien. 

At the heart of the film are three poten- 
tially interesting people. Glory (AmyMad- 
igan) is a pretty, tough, headstrong young 
woman woo has returned to the small fish- 


Shaag (Ed Harris), who used to “spark" 
Glory when they were in high school but is 
now married to a shrew who lives in hair 
curlers, is a Vietnam vet having trouble 
meeting the bank loan on his boat. Shang 
has the manners and mentality of a red- 
neck bigot, but he also has a lot of primitive 
charm. 


Dinh (Ho Nguyen) is a bright, shining- 
faced, optimistic young Vietnamese refu- 
gee, newly arrived in Alamo Bay, who goes 
to work for Glory and, in almost no time, is 
in a position, to purchase his own boat. 
Dinh is a very rare creature, too good, you 
ought say, to be true or, more important, to 


be effectively dramatic. His sunny nature 
eventually wins over the skeptical Glory, 
who stands by him when the white fisher- 
men declare their war on the “gooks." as he 
stood by her when the Anglos threatened 


were good, but as prices to fish and 
shrimp fell, competition between the Vot- 


ing port of Alamo Bay to help her ailing 
father in Us shrimp-shipping busmess- 


to dose down her business because she 
deah with the Vietnamese. 

i ilft* many other movies that have their 
origins in a general idea, “Alamo Bay" is 
almost shamefully clumsy and superficial 
— it's manufactured “art." Watching it is 
an unhappy experience that never becomes 
illuminating. . 

Its mediocrity is especially surprising 
when one realizes that it comes from a 
director who. in the pasu has virtually 
made a personal style by evoking humane 
comedy and drama" from the most unlikely 
situations, including incest (“Murmur of 
the Heart”), child prostitution (“Pretty 
Baby") and a couple of guys sitting around 
talking ("My Dinner With Andnr). ' 

It's unfortunate to a film when its most 
lifelike character is a smooth-talking Klan 
organizer. 


^Ceonai 

{3 . Straw 

B- 1 t0 - 


'David,’ a Discovery Among Old Masters, Draws Top Price 


Semitic mayor of Vienna (honored 
with a throne and flag designed by 
Ouo Wagner) come in for similarly 
uncompromising treatment. 

World War 1 erupts in a large 
room crowned by a barbed-wire 
wreath above the bloodstained uni- 
form in which Archduke Franz 
Ferdinand was assassinated at Sa- 
rajevo. 

“What we want to show, howev- 
er, is not the whole war, but the 
transformation of mankind into 
the impersonal, inhumane machine 
we know today,” said Gunter Dflr- 
iegL curator of some of the best 
rooms in the show. He succeeds in 
his purpose in the World War 1 
room: a pair of I914greeting cards 
showing dead French, English and 
Russian soldiers hanging from a 
Christinas twi^ and a room- with- 
in -a-room paying tribute to the 


International HeraLl Tribune 

L ONDON — Old Master sales 
/ retain the fun that seems to 
have gone out of the Impressionist 
and Modem master market Dis- 
coveries are possible, with just 
enough uncertainty about the na- 
ture of the discovery to leave the 
poker-game touch that is the essen- 
tial lure of the an market 
The game reached a dimax on 
Wednesday at Sotheby’s as a vast 


SOUREN MEUKIAN 


and grimy printin g on Canvas, 84 
by 50 inches (214 by 127 centime- 
ters), described as “David With the 
Head of Goliath" by Guido Reni, 
dirribed to P-f- million ($ 2.6 mil- 
lion). 

The price was the crowning point 
of a that started last Novem- 
ber when a black-and-white print 
landed In Sotheby’s Old Master de- 
partment A letter from Newcastle, 
En gland requested an opinion on 
the artist’s identity and the proba- 
ble value of the picture. 

The dark print showed enough 
detail to allow Sotheby’s experts to 
make out the subject: A muscular 
lad in his 20 s, leaning on the stump 
of a stone pillar as he wistfully 
gazes at a giant’s head that he has 


just cut off. Improbably dressed in 
velvety lean doth, with a for sash 
thrown over his shoulder arid a 
plumed hat he stands with his head 
thrust bade in a chiaroscuro that 
increases the theatrical atmo- 
sphere. The distant Caravagesque 
derivation is obvious. So was, to 
Sotheby’s experts, the manner of 
Reni. if only because a famous ver- 
sion of that subject by the master is 
hanging in the Louvre. 

The experts wrote back to say 
drat they could not venture an 
opinion without seeing the picture, 
lire owner dispatched it forthwith 
to 34 New Bond Street London. It 
was there, under the low ceiling of 
Sotheby’s vault that Eric Turquin, 
Sotheby’s leading Old Master ex- 
pert, and his colleagues John Som- 
erville and David Fyf e-Jamieson 
aw it in December. The canvas 


was too dirty to allow any judg- 
ment as to the touch of the brush. It 


Festival in Britain 
Will Celebrate 
American Arts . 


For years, the ethnologist Wit- 
tigo Keller, who is also a designer, 
photographer and graphic artist 
ha$ made his living as an employee 
of the federal funeral office in Vi- 
enna, designing gravestones, cof- 
fins and urns. Now he has underta- 
ken a “Funeral Art” exhibit at a 
new interdisciplinary art gallery. It 
is surprisingly upbeat (a Peruvian 
death doll giving birth to life) and 
bittersweet (a gravestone photo of a 
fat middle-aged woman identified 
only as “Fraulein”). There is a 
walk-in coffin that served as a 
bookcase in a Viennese borne until 
its owner was ready to depart in iL 
Another coffin, painted by Otto 
Bede of Salzburg, is lively enough 
to wake the dead. The true treasure 
of Wittigo’s show is a mid- 19th- 
century photo of “the late (but very 
recent) Dr. Penns" by Albin Mut- 
terer (1806-1873), who specialized 
in posed studio “farewell pictures" 
of the newly deceased sitting in a 
chair and dressed in Sunday best 
“Funeral Art Designed by Wit- 
tigo," Kunstkanzld, Riemcr ga ssc 
14. Tuesday through Thursday, 
through April 18. 


New York Tunes Service 


L ONDON — The most extensive 
* celebration of the American 


-I— » celebration of the American 
ails ever held in Europe is to take 
place in London and other British 
cities in May under the patronage 
of the Duke of Edinburgh- 

Called the American Festival, it 
will indude music, dance, theater, 
film, exhibitions and folk art Jen- 
nifer Williams, its associate direc- 
tor, said it had already attracted 
more than $600,000 in commercial 
sponsorship from British and U.S. 
companies. Sir Ian Hunter, chair- 
man of the London concert man- 
agexneat company Harold Holt, is 
the director. 

“The festival hopes to challenge 
many Europeans' rather limited 
view of the United States and its 
artistic Hfe," said Williams. In 
1983. as part of the celebrations of 
the 200th anniversaiy of the Treaty 
of Paris, which fonnaHy ended the 
American Revolution, the United 
States staged a festival called Brit- 
ain Salutes New York. This year’s 
event, a sequel will mark the bicen- 
tennial of the opening of diplomat- 
ic relations between the two coun- 
tries. 

Three American orchestras will 
take part in the festival — the St 
Louis Symphony under Leonard 
Slaikxn, the Dallas Symphony un- 
der Eduardo Mata, and the New 
York Philhar monic under Zubin 
Mehta. Also appearing will be sev- 
eral major London orchestras, 
whose programs will include works 
by such composers as George 
Gershwin. Aaron Copland. Leon- 
ard Bernstein. John Philip Sousa, 
Samuel Barber and Henry CowelL 

Among tbe soloists will be Isaac 
Stem, James Galway, John Ogdon, 
Jean-Pierre Rampal Murray Pera- 
hia and Wynton Marsalis. 


menl as to the touch of the brush. It 
was not until two cleaning tests had 
been carried out that the experts 
began to feel that they really had 
something. 

How did it stand in relationship 
to the famous Louvre piece? What- 
ever the case, this was not a copy 
but a different version or tbe same 
subject In the painting from New- 
castle, David’s head is seen three- 
quarter face, not sideways. The gi- 
ant's head is smaller. The hair and 
beard are not so thick. Most impor- 
tant, the lighting is far less con- 
trasted. One is reminded of the sub- 
dued interpretation of the 
Caravagesque manner at the hands 
of Northern European artists, 
mainly French and Flemish. 

Was the Newcastle “David With 
the Head of Goliath” an o riginal 
produced by Reni many years after 
his Louvre painting? Or could it be 
a derivative painting produced by 
a foDower? 

An encouraging facto to Soth- 
eby’s experts lay in the conclusion 
drawn long before by an historians 
that Reni had executed a later ver- 
sion of his “David With the Head 
of Goliath." Otto Kurz said so in 
1927. That conclusion is shared by 
D. Steven Pepper, the American ait 
historian whose Reni catalogue rai- 
sonne was published last year by 
Phaidon. 

There are several other nth-cen- 
tury versions, not just one — in tbe 
Ringing Museum at Sarasota, 
Florida; in Dresden, East Germa- 
ny, and elsewhere. But the cleaning 
convinced Sotheby’s experts that 
the Newcastle piece was from the 
master’s own hand, and therefore 
must be the second version. Cau- 
tion was nevertheless needed. Tbe 
next step was to get Proper’s opin- 
ion on the picture itself 

Pepper, a former assistant pro- 
fessor at Johns Hopkins University 
in Baltimore where be gave a course 
in 17th-century Italian painting, 
has zeroed in on Reni's work more 
than any one else. In addition to his 
catalogue raisonnfc, which allowed 
him to study 214 works over a 10- 
year period, and to a number of 


on his early work." Such a desire. 
Pepper insists, is to be inferred 
from quotations found in Carlo Co- 
sere Mai vasia’s “La Felsina Pa- 
trice," a collection of biographies 
published in 1678. 

Heartened by Pepper's assur- 
ances, Sothebys mounted a so- 
phisticated, discreet marketing 
campaign. It would have been a 
mistake to project into the time- 
light a hitherto unrecorded work 
with a hazy past: Nothing is known 
about the painting beyond its ac- 
quisition m Northern England 
around 1900 by tbe vendor’s father. 

Curators, collectors and dealers 
were contacted A climate of inter- 
est gradually built up as one after 
the other came to see the murky 
picture The press release artillery 
was kept to a minimum. The cata- 
loging was highly detailed but de- 
void of the fanfare that gpes with 
obvious winners. It had the seem- 
ingly casual, business-as-usual fla- 
vor of old-time sales that the old 
guard of collectors, dealers and cu- 
rators is so keen on. And it worked 
beyond any hope. 

On Wednesday, Agnew’s, the 
oldest London gallery dealing in 
Old Masters and a bastion of coo- 




% Bangui- ^ 

air top w \r;r + ,, 
0 “ v ‘. ' 
^kpoiiiiui -- 

. Va-ir 

aiatiatteta.M-4- 
M he called 

*Brtfnme. Mr vj 
jot mote than !'• > 


servative British dealing, bid up to 
about £1.5 nnflion. The rest of the 


about £1.5 nnflion. The rest of the 
fight was left to two commission 
bids, one placed with a dealer’s 
agent in tbe room, another with 
Sotheby’s experts. 

At £L2 milli on, paid by an un- 
identified private buyer, the new 
Reni more than tripled the previ- 
ous highest auction price, the 
$600,000 paid in January 1984 at 
Christie’s in New York for “Ma- 
donna and Child With Saint John 
the Baptist in an Interior.” 

Steven Pepper who, in addition 
to being a Reni expert has been a 
private dealer for seven years “on a 
modest scale," said, “Astound- 
ing," repeating the word twice. One 


“David With tbe Head of Goliath* by Guido Reid. 


can only agrees Sotheby’s estimate 
of £250,000 to £500,000 seemed 


of £250.000 to £500,000 seemed 
about right 

The £22 million reflects three 


factors. The first is the surprise 
effect of a painting that is not just 
from a private source but one that 
had not been seen by any living 
collector. Tbe second is tbe impact 
of scholarly writing oa the art mar- 
ket these days: Without Pepper's 
catalogue raisonni of Reni's work, 
“David With the Head of Goliath” 
would not have reached half that 


figure Third, there is the pervading 
realization that high-quality work 


is becoming scarce right across the 
board, witness last week’s Impres- 
sionist sales. 

Under. the circumstances, the 
moment an unrecorded important 
piece geia its certification from the 
pandits, it turns into gold. We have 
probably not seen the end of the 
increase in prices for the nth-cen- 
tury Italians. They are the market 
substitutes for the vanished Late 
Renaissance masters. 


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35,fclr. 

aouid !•- lio’A 
4 sfowi!!d be unique; > 
32 to change rn me 
..mac structure 
' ate Mr. Binary 
•sau 3 major poi’trca: 
ifesm -riemer:* of . 

3 DOT. 

■ ’»Is Germans, he :nc 
sjpotturjtiii the So’oet 
as already the Ru^sur, 
a conning. Close eco 
Jaras years ago when 
jffidi.Breritn;'.. the !* 
same ctop^ri non j- 
“athere by Nfi Brezhn: 
patent of comnerc 
/fryar period, rer.e^ai 
-wren i West German 
iafcrHehu; Kchi'? C 
Free Dem-xta: 
♦Continued o 


Currei 


Ice nra'-c-i - = y 


Looking for f The Immaterial 9 in Paris 


By Michael Gibson 

International Herald Tribune 

F I AR1S —The Pompidou Center 
has Just inaugurated a curious 
exhibition called “Les Immatfcr- 


exhibifion called “Les Immatfcr- 
iaux" (Tbe Immaterial) that at- 
tempts to deal with the practical 
and psychological impact or new 
technologies and the way they may 


be perceived as reducing contact 
with other persons, tangible objects 


papers, he is writing a critical cata- 
log of 1 7th*century Italian painting 


log of 1 7th-centuiy Italian painting 
from Emilia — works by Ron, Do- 
menechino, Guerdno and others — 
to a traveling exhibition. 

The Reni specialist came to Lon- 
don, inspected the painting and 
gave it his blessing. In a telephone 
interview, be characteiized it as “a 
work of great importance . . .an 
example of his desire to restate tbe 
early Caravagesque image and of 
his desire to improve upon it and 


with other persons, tangible objects 
and with what is perceived as “real- 
ity-" 

Tbe show is complex, ambitious, 
ambiguous, sometimes self-indul- 
gent not always easy to figure out 
but at tbe same time it is teasingly 
brilliant and original. 

The mast striking innovation, 
and one that gives tbe show its 
originality, is the use of headsets 
that each visitor must wear to pick 
up different threads of voice and 
music through the delicate meshed 
maze that covers the entire exhibi- 
tion space on the fifth floor. The 
“immateriality" that is the subject 
of the exhibit is thus signified by 
the disembodied sounds addressing 
the viewer and telling him about 


sion designates the absence of a 
reassuring bodily contact the im- 
palpable nature of certain material 
phenomena (such as electricity) or, 
to give a more specific example, the 
awareness that what we once took 
to a smooth and straightforward 
surface — be it the human skin or a 
sheet of paper — is, in fact, no 
more than a hasty no- man’s- land in 
which the microscope discovers all 
sorts of thickets and uncertainties: 
“an insubstantial dream.” 

The first thing a viator discovers 
is an Egyptian low-relief of a god- 
dess presenting a pharaoh the sym- 
bol of life. There is no comment 
only a sound of breathing in the 
earphones, although the catalog, 
more garrulous than usual declares 
that the major issue of the show is 


that the major issue of the show is 
set forth here: “Human brings 


once received life and meaning: the 
soul. They were required to give il 
back, intact perfected. Is there 
anything in our world today that is 
intended for them?" Beyond that 


antique piece and its poetic beauty 
lies tbe main body of tbe show and 


tbe things be is looking at. Without 
them the displays would be incom- 
prehensible. 

Even with tbe sometimes ques- 
tionable assistance provided by the 
sound trade, the show presents a 
challenge to the mind, but at least it 
is a beautiful challenge, like that in 
some of Alain Renais's early films. 
The issues are dealt with in a decid- 
edly French form of crystalline 
opacity, and they all present broad 
ramifications that day summation 
and suggest the nonselective proce- 
dure oTa brainstorming session. 


AUCTION SALES 


Me Stephone DEURBERGUE 

Auskmar 

19. 8d Montmartre. 75002 PAHS. TeL 261.34.50 


HOTR DROUOT - PARIS 


SUNDAY, APRIL 21th, 1985 ot 2 p.m. Room 6 


1900 GLASSWARE 

Collection of Pierre BOTIBJX and others 


another world altogether; comput- 
ers. holograms, slide shows, video 
dips, packaged food, works of art. 


all set out in a sparsely populated 
space. 

Tbe issue of meaning makes 
only a brief appearance. Something 
in the show does suggest that a link 
exists between the coming of new 
technologies, the new representa- 
tions of the world offered by the 
scientific view and the discomfort- 
ing sense people may sometimes 
have of living in a world full of 
t ech n ica l capability - but devoid of 
any satisfactory, fulfilling meaning. 
The idea is suggested but not ex- 
plored. Indeed it cannot actually be 
explored through the predominant- 
ly sociological avenues the show 
takes. 

But the odd and chilling poetry 
of the exhibition does raise a ques- 
tion: How do we manage lo live 
with the realities brought on by 
swift change, without renouncing 
ourselves and what we consider to 
be the most fundamental values of 
life? This question is the driving 
force behind the feeling of home- 
lessness (and sometimes hopeless- 
ness) one finds in parts of the in- 
dustrial world. 

“Les lmmatfrrianXk” Centre 
Pompidou, through July 15. 


terei 


^Vocy Deposjj, 


DOONESBURY 


Hsy.BRo, rnmKZMMBe 
DJHY7H& f ^ TBOUBL&, 
LONGFQCE 7 CURTIS. I JUST 
| AGREED TO WORK 

WBRBNNBZSAIR 

rtS3L> 


mb an mmcumxt- 

■ YOU INS ITHINKH&SPIAN- 

FAROOrf MNGONSOMB- 

THING SHAD/.. 


i-tft 

*-f, ^ U S '* • 5 -* 

. * m **,Z* s,l **sr. 


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ARGENT AL, DAUM, DECORCHEMONT 
GALLE 
LALIQUE, MULLS 


Tbe kaleidoscopic approach Is 
>t only the reflection of its com- 


Export: M. J.P. Canard 
on vine Saturday April 20 from 1 1 a-m. to 6 p.m. 


— - FRANCE ■ HOTEL DES VENTES ■■ ■»■ 

2 Rue du Dodeur-Loroy, 95880 B4GMEN-LE5-BAINS. Td.i {3} 412. 68.16 
SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 1 985 at 2 P M. 

EXCEPTIONAL SALE OF ORIENTALIST ART 
BY MASTERS OF THE XIXtfi AND XXth CENTURIES 


PAINTINGS - SCULPTURES - FURNITURE 

Expert*, Mr. Morrfhoc, Tot. 326^d7Mj Mr. Marumo, T mi. 360.PB.2B, 
A ton. SowctM and David, Td. 563.44.63 . 562.27.76. 


P*4»fie viewing*] Friday, April 26, from 9 p.m. to 1 1 pjn.; Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 1 2 noon and 
from 2 p.m. to 6 pjn.; Sunday, April 28, from 1 T <ww. to- 12 noon. 


not only the reflection of its com- 
plexity. It also bespeaks a new in- 
tellectual fashion that has come 
uno vogue in this ciry. where peo- 
ple go in for ideas the way chic 
ladies once went in for hats. That 
fashion is “post-modernism." . . . 

A number of notions can be 
found brewing in that particular 
cauldron. One of them is that the 
current reality of the world is so 
complex chat it can only be grasped 
piecemeal. But the word also sug- 
gests a parting with the underlying 
ideals of “modernity" and that can 
imply a complacent and aesthetic 
form of pessimism — a fin-de-sfr 
de morbidity reminiscent of the 
verse of T. S. Eliot: “These frag- 
ments I have shored against my 
■ruins.” 


&PiDNr&va&a*E 

v OUT ANPSfif IT, BUT 

rve got a ousts/ feel- 

iNs&smmsM- 

—X*. RECORDS! 


'ihs 


AND YOU AND CHERT A 
rXNTLMZ WNHALENOUT 


Mdtra Ginxd CHAMPIN, Fronds LOMBRAR and DonisaGAUTER, S.CJP. Aaodatod AucSonMra 

— M CM dDgan m u nt a H Ix ul ll a ifJ.IM,— f— aa^— — 


The “immateriality” referred » 
in the titieis of course no more than 
a manner of speaking. Things are 
not “demataialized” The esqinsn. 



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’cam wiS*... OTc«oa p— 

BtvMwflx' ~ OtWmonarx 

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 6 - 7, 1985 


IleralbSS&^Sribune. 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


** 


Page 7 


ECONOMIC ilNS 


m ihe „ ‘ Ctl ««s r - 


utia fr 0n : “''to: 

SfrSfSK 
SorC® 1 ^ 

r ° r » film u* *"i 

T “ asm ^^ 



on Soviet 



■#£*i 




By LEONARD SHE 

■Vew W Tunes Service 

EW YORK — Economics lies at the heart of the 
conflict between the United States and West Germany 
over strategy for dealing with the Soviet Union. The 
-Reagan administration means to put heavy pressure on 
th£ Soviet Union by a rapid increase in military spending, new 
1 technology and economic development. This will, the United 
Slates hopes, either put unbearable strains on the Soviet economy 
It* or force the Russians to disarm and reduce their threats to the 
West and elsewhere. 

But the West Germans see high risks in theUJS. approach, and 
prefer to build closer, complementary economic relations with 
the Soviet Union and its satel- 
lites as the means of achieving 
greater stability, safeguarding 
their independence and fur- 
thering their economic devel- 
opment. 

Martin Bange mann . the 
West German economics min- 
ister, warned in a recent inter- 
view in New York that, if the 

United States pursued its own line so aggressively as to damage 

’■ — ,J *- — “a very negative effect on 

Europe.** 

v o pp or tuni ties, with the accession of Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev as the Soviet leader, for improved East-West relations 
as a result of -changes in the Soviet economic system. He also saw 
reasons for hope that (he Soviet system, under Mr. Gorbachev, 


?West Germany 
means to capitalize 
on changes in the 
Soviet Union/ 

JIIU4UW iu vnu 1111C 

i European interests, it could have 
j ' ^political relations between the United States and Eurt 
He saw new 


would be evolving in ways that would open up greater possibili- 
ties for stable political and economic relations 1 


i with the West. 


Mr. Bangemann suggested, 
’ Soviet leader but in 






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Amsterdam 
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Frankfurt 
London CW 
Milan 

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9.44254 147052 14973 513516 


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2194 

6145 

13775 

11455 

0475 

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77995 


3794 
63745 
116 
. 10529 
8040 
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12353 
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Dollar Values 

S _ I 

termey 


teF. SJ=. Ym 
5414* m2* *140.14* 
2377 2543 • 
11001-14425* 
371 303755 
74940 7497 
2455 25440 
3595 3793* 

9550 

14524“ 

14941 179907 
24247 249400 


4.971* 

75.175 

31444 

5159 

15771* 


14M IrtekB 
04011 teroafliMkal 
37058 KHoSIKaor 
07957 Motey.riwW 
OlWl Morw. kroM . 
05*5 PUL raw 
84051 PorLBicodo 
07772 SowBrlraf 


P* 8 

U44 Enotv. U44 

. 0.996 04*99 EnwOT S *XP» 

074.10 0512 S. African rood 19531 

03825 04012 S. Koran woo 057J0 

Z5205 04050 Span. MMta 17175 

94031 01095 load, krona f.13 

U3S5 04253 Taiwan 8 3949 

17140 04362 Thai haM 27435 

16075 02722 UJULOrlMra 34735 


inuseo 


BStertaB:17l36 Irish £ 

(d) Commercial franc n>) AnmomanOHM to bur ana noon* (cl Anwunsnndcd to tw* one dollar (*l 


I (h-.i.-rh (he ordwt*' ■ Unite oflOO (x)UdlteoM400(VI unite oflS400 

1 U.I>. -• rfo .*i NO.: not uintad.- NJL: not ounUabla. 

r^ic.ji iiraues lw 


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yv do *e ‘t 
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s are 

toil funding ^ 

iiird Ji 1 - hrr 

A % 

i* -• 


HQ.: not ouotad; NJL: not ovoUobie. 

Sources: Some Hu Benelux (Brussels); Banco Commentate itattana (Milan); Banaoe 
Nationals He Porta {Porta); IMF (SOU); Banaoe Antta et tntwmottanota H’lmmsttasemeat 
(dinar. rfyoL dtrhom). ctberdafa from Reuters and AP, 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


April 4 


ijRi. 

. r,r 


•r. Vi* 


Storliao Prooc 
13 Ni • ISO. 1056 - 1006 
13(6 - tm NB4 - 1016 
13*.- 13*. Wlh - 11 


ECU SDR 
9*r - TO Ih 
9 9L - Uh Vta 
10 - TOW Wh 


weru* . i r 
-,U. ihrv^^' 1 - 



Donor D M ark . Franc 

1M. 0 S65- 8 9w H6 -5*1 jh'-SMi 

2M. -9 S9L-59L SH • SVl 

SAIL 9M.-9IL SV. - lb. 5M.-59L 

6M. 9*i -9*1 6H-69 W-SM- 9V. 

IV. 10'*.- 10*. 6»h -69& SVS'iJH 

«b»w aunlfcoti* to Interbank deootUts of 91 mttdan eatalmvm lor eoutaotant). 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty ( dollar. i OM, SF, Pound. FF); Lloyds Bonk (ECU); Reuters 
(SDR). 


1249 - 1» 
12V* - 1216 


11**- 11 1* TCVL- 10*. 9*9 
1149 • 1199 10VW- 10*> 916 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Apr3 4 


a*. -o% 
Source: Reuters. 


2 max. 
n -9 


Jiml 
9 -9Vt 


4 BIOL 

98, -9*. 


10*. -10*. 


Key Money Rates 

United States a 


Discount Rate 
Federal Fund* 

Prlma Rata 
Broker Leon Rate 
Coram. Pwar. 30-179 days 
3-monm Treasury Sills 
frmontfi Treasury Bills 
; ; CD's 3059 dov*. 

Ft CD* 68-09' da vs- 

Wcst Germany 

Lombortf Rate 
OvarnMii Rate 
One Month intarfiaak 
3-raenth lAlerbmk 
6-month Interba n k 

France ' 

i nte ru w t i qn Retd 
CflJl Nonet 
One-coomb interbank 
Smooth irtferbanX 
6^wutfti interbank . 


8' 

Closed 

10V9 

9V» 

: Closed 


- .8 

OVj 

TOVJ 

9 Vb 

875 

&a 

848 

873 

SJ6 


640 640 

Claiad 590 
— • 590- 

— 615 

— 675 


1095 1095 

Closed 1Mb 
— 10** 

— iok» 

- . Tft9 


Britain 

Bonk floe Rote 
Call Monov 
9Pdav Treasury Bill 
3-morrtb interbank 

Ja»n 

Discount Rom 
C all Monty 
to-day i n te r ban k 


Close Prow. 

13-13(6 13-13(6 
Closed 13 

— 1 2*i 

— 13 5716 


1 5 

616 6*9 

5*9 6*9 


Gold Prices 




“ S • - Sources; Reuters. ConuntntKmk, CrtaM Ly- 

^ ir^-Wvonnol 1 * Lloyds Bank. Bank ofToJcve. 

■Z-; JrT • ..- 


Komi Kona 
Luxembsurs- 
Porii (115 teUot 
Zurldi 
London 
Now York 

Official ftttnas far London, Pom ond Uwenv 
Doura-openteD ond cfosfas orteoi ter Meiw Kong 
and Zurich. New York Comes arrant con trad. 
All Prices h U44 oar oum*. 

Source: Reuters. 


AM. 

PM. 

ora# 

317.15 

SI MS 

— *60 

31450 

— 

-4JB 

31M7 

3T797 

— 133 

21645 

31740 

— 125 

31740 

31435 

— 440 

— 

mm 

+ 138 



Markets Closed 

AO U.S.- and Canadian financial markets were cj^ ^nday 
for Good Friday. Also, all European matfe* 
closed as; were most major Asian markets, except Toicyo. . • 


Japan Led 
Economic 
Growth 

U.S. Panel Sees 
More Expansion 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Japan contin- 
ued to lead the world in economic 
growth during the latest month 
measured, and brisk growth in 
West Germany and Britain helped 
lift those nations out of “the eco- 
nomic doldr ums ," according to a 
business research organization. 

Japan's leading index showed an 
annual growth rate of 9 percent in 
December, the Conference Board 
said Thursday. Taiwan’s leading 
index rose 6 percent in the latest 
month and Australia's rose 5 per- 
cent, as those two nations contin- 
ued their brisk growth, the board 
said. 

It added that West Germany's 
leading index rose 6 percent in the 
latest month and Britain's rose 5 
percent, as both nations "have fi- 
nally dnnb£d out of the economic 
doldrums that held them bade last 
year 


Ex-Head of French Computer Effort 
Aims to Fight On From Sidelines 


T HE most significant change, 

was not in the uniq ue ideas of the new I 
what he called “the personal condition of Soviet politics — 
and the factor of -rime.” Mr. Gorbachev, he said, ought to be able 
to count on more than 10 years as general secretary of the 
Communist Party — "time to put sufficient pressure far change 
on the system." 

Systemic change^ in nthar fi >mmiin« t co mmeii, such as Chw)* 

and Hungary, increased the probability of a more flexible Soviet 
economy, Mr. Bangemann suggested. But he did not think the 
Soviet system would follow either the Chinese or Hun garian 
models but would be uniquely Russian. He said there was greater 
resistance to- change in the Soviet Union and a more rigid 
bureaucratic structure. 

Nevertheless, Mr. Bang^miinn said. “ China in five years' rime 
will present a major political challenge for the Soviet system.” 
Indeed, he saw "elements of a readiness for change” among the 
Russians now. 

The West Germans, he indicated, mean to capitalize on the 
trade opportunities the Soviet changes will represent. West Ger- 
many is- already the Russians’ biggest trading partner among 
Western countries. Close economic ties between the two were 
forged seven years ago when Helmut S chmi dt, then chan cellor, 
ana Leonid I. Brezhnev, the Soviet leader at the rime, signed a 25- 
year economic cooperation agreement in Bonn, following a four- 
day visit there by Mr. Brezhnev. The accord set a framework for 
the development of commerce, industry and technology in an 
initial 10-ycar period, renewable in three five-year periods. 

The current West Goman coalition -government that links 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s Christian Democratic Party to Mr. 
Bangemann's- Free Democratic Party, has held to the line on 
(Coatmoed on Page 8, CoL 7) 


• tale interbank rales on Apr3 4/5, excluding fees. 

Offidd fixings for Amsterdam, Broads, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rate* a) 
* PM. ... 


gish in most other nations on 
Conference Board's monthly Inter- 
national Economic Scoreboard, 
compiled by the business school at 
Columbia University in New York. 

But despite slower growth in 
some nations, Edgar R. Fiedler, a 
Conference Board economist, said 
that the composite measurement 
for all nine nations in the survey 
"strongly suggests that the world's 
major industrial nations win con- 
tinue to expand." 

In the United States, the leading 
index showed a modest annual 
growth rate of 1 percent in the 
latest month measured. Canada's 
leading index showed 4-percent 
growth, as did Italy's. In France, 
the leading index rose at an annual 
rate of 3 percent 

Mr. Fiedler noted that "although 
growth rates have slowed in some 
countries, especially the United 
States* the leading indexes them- 
selves are at or above their highs of 
lastyear in virtually all countries." 

The Conference Board’s month- 
ly scoreboard surveys leading in- 
dexes and performance indexes. 
The leading index, designed to 
forecast future economic perfor- 
mance and includes such items as 
budding permits, factory orders for 
goods and other factors (hat fore- 
shadow business activity several 
months in advance. 

Performance indexes trade the 
current course of each national 
economy rather than its future di- 
rection. These indexes indude such 
factors as current levels of factory 
production and unemployment 
rates. 

January was the latest month 
measured in the United States and 
Taiwan. December was the latest 
month measured in every other na- 
tion except Italy, in which Septem- 
ber's figures were thc latest avail- 
able. 

The Conference Board said the 
economic eaqianson was continu- 
ing in the right nations excluding 
the United States. After including 
U-S. figures, the world economic 
expansion appeared to be slowing, 
Hsaid. 


By Amid Komd 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Outspoken and 
keenly critical, Jeas-Jacques Ser- 
van-Schrobcr has a flair for 
placing himself at the center of 
controversy in France. The 61- 
year-dd former minister and for- 
mer journalist has engaged in 
one tattle after another since his 
days as a World War II fit 
pilot- He clearly disdains 
compromise and retreat. 

He avoided both again last 
week when, in protest over the 
government’s handling of the na- 
tional computer-literacy plan 
that he hari championed, he pub- 
licly announced his resignation 
as president of the government- 
funded World Center for Com- 
puter Science and Human Re- 
sources. 

“If I stayed 1 would be morally 
tainted by a compromise that I 
couldn’t defend," be said. “What 
would people think?" 

He had quietly promoted the 
project since August, with Presi- 
dent Franqois Mitterrand’s 
backing. By creating 50,000 com- 
puter-training workshops 
throughout the country, he 
hoped to help French children 
ana adults familiarize them- 
selves with modem information 
technology and stimulate devel- 
opment of a computer-literate 
vrork force to help speed eco- 
nomic modernization. 

Unique in its size and ambi- 
tion, die project was considered 
by many observers as a way to 
catapult France into a position 
of worldwide technological lead- 
ership. 

But complications and their 
attendant compromises arose. 
Scientists ana educators in- 
volved in drawing up the blue- 
print for the proposal insisted 
that the best possible machines 
and software be used. They se- 



Jean-Jacqoes Servan-Schrdber 


lected the Madnio&h 
computer of U.S.-based Apple 
Computer Corp. as the preferred 
candidate for equipping the 
workshops. 

A powerful, easy-to-use, pro- 
fessional computer with many 
innovative features, the Macin- 
tosh could nm sophisticated pro- 
grams for (he professkmal-traid- 
ing pan of the project. Experts 
felt that people using sophisticat- 
ed auto-didactic programs could 
learn new skills at the work- 
shops. 

By the time it had been 
chewed over by (he government, 
the objective of the program de- 
viated from an educational goal 


io an industrial one. With legisla- 
tive elections coming in 1986. die 
political capital to be gained by 
Improving the balance sheets of 
nationalized industry became 
significant 

Apple, which does not manu- 
facture in France, offered to li- 
cense the technology to French 
electronics companies. But when 
the proposal was submitted to 
the cabinet several ministers 
balked under pressure from 
French computer makers. 

The plan announced on Jan. 
25 by Prime Minister Laurent 
Fabius opted for the purchase of 
mostly French-made computers 
(Continued on Plage & CoL 1) 


Bimbaum Moves From Rival Amex 
To Head New York Stock Exchange 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The New York 
Stock Exchange has named as its 
president Robert J. Bimbaum, who 
currently serves as president of the 
rival but mudi smaller American 
Stock Exchange. 

The post had been vacant since 
John J. Phelan Jr_, 53, was namot 
chairman and chief executive of the 
NYSE last May, following the re- 
tirement of Wuhani M. Batten at 
74. 

Mr. Bimbaum, 57, also will serve 
as chief operating officer and a di- 
rector of the exchange. He is to 
assume the posts on May 6. 

Mr. Phelan and Mr. Bimbaum 
denied after the Thursday an- 
nouncement that the appoi n tment 
was a step toward a merger of the 
two exchanges. And Mr. Bimbaum 
said that he was not leaving the 
underdog Amex “for negative rea- 
sons." 

However, the news of Mr. Bim- 
baum's move stirred talk on Wall 
Street of a posable future marriage 
of the two institutions, which are 


located two blocks apart in the fi- 
nancial district. Observers note 
that the Amex is strong in options 
trading, an area in winch the Big 
Board is eager to expand. 

The appointment marked the 
first time that a senior exchange 
official has left the Amex or the 
NYSE to go to work for its rival, 
Mr. Phelan said. 

“I don’t have a secret merger 
plan in my pocket.” Mr. Bimbaum 
said. 

“We're not even considering that 
at this time,” Mr. Phelan said, not- 
ing that the Big Board was engaged 
in previously announced discus- 
sions with the Pacific Stock Ex- 
change and the London Stock Ex- 
change about possible links aimed 
at extending the trading day. 

Bob Shabazian, a spokesman for 
the Amex, said, “There are no dis- 
cussions underway that I know of 
now" about a merger. 

The two exchanges came close to 
a meiger in the mid-1970s when the 
securities industry was in a down- 
turn, but the talks broke off. 


Arthur Levitt Jr., chairman of 
the Amex, issued a statement that 
read in pan: “Naturally, we at the 
American Stock Exchange fell very 
happy for Bob." 

Mr. Bimbaum was given a three- 
year contract at a salary of 
S 500.000 a year. Mr. Phelan said. 

Mr. Bimbaum has been presi- 
dent of the Amex for eight years 
and on its staff for 18. 

Before joining the Amex. he was 
branch chief of regulation and in- 
spection with the New York office 
oif the Securities and Exchange 
Commission. 

Meanwhile, the NYSE said that 
it was restructuring its operations 
into seven distinct lines of busi- 
ness: equities; bonds; options; fu- 
tures; market data: regulation; and 
automation services. 

At the end of 1984, more than 
1,540 companies had 2,319 issues 
of common and preferred stocks 
listed on the NYSE it said. 

In comparison, about 800 com- 
panies have 930 issues listed on the 
Amex, Mr. Shabazian said. 


Little Impact 
Seen From 
M-l Increase 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The $L& billion, 
jump in the nation’s basic moaey. 
supply in late March broke a string 
of three consecutive weekly de- 
clines, but analysts said the in- 
crease was no cause for alarm. 

“If it is a precursor to other num- 
bers on down the line, we will have 
some difficulty," said Raymond 
Stone, a financial economist at 
Merrill Lynch Capital Markets, 
“but at this point it appears it just 
reverses some of the weak numbers 
we have teen in recent weeks." 

Other analysts agreed that the 
report was unHkeN to prompt any 
change in the Federal Reserve 
Board's policy, Much is designed to 
assure steady economic growth 
without a resurgence in inflation. 

The Fed said M-l rose to a sea- 
sonally adjusted 5572.8 billion in 
the week ended March 25 from 
5570 billion the previous week. The 
M-l measure includes cash in cir- 
culation, deposits in checking ac- 
counts and- non bank travelers 
checks. . . 

For the latest 13 weeks, M-l av- 
eraged S567.1 billion, a lOJ-per- 
ceni seasonally adjusted annual 
rate of gain from the previous 13 
weeks. . 

Hemy Kaufman, chief econo- 
mist at Salomon Brothers, said that 
slower tax refund payouts caused 
by computer problems at the Inter- 
nal Revenue Service and the im- 
provement in tax revenues retell- 
ing from an improving economy 
wiu curtail the Treasury’s need 

“All of this will temporarily slow 
money growth" but will result in a 
rise in M-l later in April and May, 
be said. 

' The Fed has said it would like to 
see M-l grow between- 4 percent 
and 7 percent from the fourth quar- 
ter of 1984 through the fourth quar- 
ter of 1985. . (AP, UPIl 


Foreign Role in China Onshore Oil Seen Soon 


The Associated Press - 

BEIJING — China wiH open ne- 
gotiations with foreign oil compa- 
nies by the end of this year for 
exploration and drilling in 10 
southern provinces, an official said 
Friday. 

Participation in China’s oil in- 
dustry by foreign companies has 
previously been limited to offshore 
fields. 

Li Xianglu, vice president of 
China National Oil & Gas Explora- 
tion ft Development Corp., also 
said a standard contract for China- 
foreign ventures covering onshore 
oil extraction probably will be 
available by the beginning of 1986. 

“I would like to sign the first 
contract as soon as possible," Mr. 
Ii said. “I think we can go into 
negotiations by the end of the 
year." 


But he added, “It is very hard for 
me to say when we will sign the first 
contract.” 

Mr. Li’s remarks follow an an- 
nouncement by tiie government 
last month that it plans to allow 
foreign companies to explore for oil 
and gas reserves on the mainland. 

The southern provinces con- 
cerned will open 1.83 million 
square kilometers (732,000 square 
miles) for exploration. 

China has allowed foreign com- 


panies to explore for offshore oil 
since 1980, but this has failed to 
yield the large quantities expected. 

Mr. U would not elaborate on 
possible details of onshore con- 
tracts, but said they would be simi- 
lar to the standard agreements for 
joint Chinese-foreign offshore ex- 
ploration. 

Under those contracts, the for- 
eigners assume all risks and pro- 
vide the modem technolog)’. 


On the French Riviera 

THE ONLY FRENCH 
CASINO WITH A FULL 
COMPLEMENT OF 
FEMALE DEALERS 



Loews 
La Napoule 

five minute drive 
from downtown Cannes, 
on the bach 


FOR INFORMATION: 
PLEASE CALL 
(93) 49.90.00 


U.S. Jobless Rate 
Held Steady at 
7.3% in March 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Civilian un- 
employment held steady in March 
at 73 percent, the awenunent re- 
ported Friday, as the creation of 

430.000 new jobs just accommodat- 
ed the number of Americans enter- 
ing the labor force in search of 
work. 

About 8.4 million people were 
jobless, while the number at work 
set a record at 107.1 million, the 
Labor Department reported. As 
has been the case in recent months, 
the bulk of the gains were in service 
industries, and not in manufactur- 
ing. 

One of the biggest gains, accord- 
ing to a separate job survey, came 
in retail trade, which reported 

80.000 new jobs last month. Manu- 
facturing employment, on the other 
hand, has shown no growth since 
August. 

Commenting on the new report, 
Janet L. Norwood, the commis- 
sioner of labor statistics, noted in 
congressional testimony that adult 
women, traditionally a' heavy per- 
centage of service workers, benefit- 
ed more than any other group from 
the new jobs. She said adult women 
had taken more than half the jobs 
created in the past 12 months. 

Civilian unemployment has been 
moving in the narrow range of 7.1 
percent to 73 percent for nearly a 
year — since last May. Analysts 
predict civilian unemployment will 
drop to 7 percent, or slightly lower, 
this summer, then edge upward. 

The rate, which hit a post-De- 
pression peak of 10.7 percent in 
November 1982. dropped to 7.2 
percent in June, then headed up 
before falling to 7.1 percent in No- 
vember, the low point since the 
1981-82 recession. At the post-De- 
pression peak, about 11.9 million 
were out of work. 

In the 28 months of recovery 
through March, the number of job- 
less has been cut by 33 million and 
the jobless rate has declined 3.4 
percentage points. 

The department also rqiorted 
Friday that 13 million people were 
counted as “discouraged workers" 
in the first three months of the year. 
Discouraged workers are people 
who say that they want to work out 
hare not sought a job in at least a 


month because they thought the 
search was fruitless. Such people 
are not counted in the labor force 
and do not play a part in the unem- 
ployment rate calculation. 

The number of discouraged 
workers has fallen just 100,000 in 
the past year. 

An alternate unemployment 
rate, combining, the 1 153 million- 
member civilian labor force with 
about 1.7 milli on members of the 
armed forces in the United States, 
was unchanged at 73 percent. 

The unemployment rate is not 
expected to improve significantly 
as most economists project that 
economic growth — and, tints, job 
creation — will be relatively mod- 
est this year. A rule of thumb 
among economists is that when the 
economy grows at a 3-percent an- 
nual rate, the unemployment rate 
remains stable. 


Chemical Bids 
ForHomeState 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Gov- 
ernor Richard F. Celeste said 
Friday that Chemical Bank of 
New York had submitted a let- 
ter of intent to purchase Home 
State Savings Bank, whose clos- 
ing set off a crisis in (he slate’s 
savings-and-loan industry. 

The letter of intent included 
the baric financial and legal 
terms that would be part of a 
final purchase agreement, but 
details of the agreement were 
not immediately released. 
Chemical Bank said in New 
York that under that the agree- 
ment. it would establish a newly 
chartered, federally-insured 
commercial hank in Ohio. 

The governor said that the 
acquisition of Home Slate by 
Chemical Bank would be sub- 
ject to various conditions: pas- 
sage of state legislation; receipt 

provafby l ^einiS , s board of 
directors; and approval of the 
transaction by state courts. 

(AP, Reuters). 


G 

3minff 

Tuesd 

ay 

Apri 

19* 

J 

F 

’IHS< 

0NA] 

L 

E 

NVES 

MM 

n 

ur 

the International 

Herald Tribune’s 
monthly review of the 
world of investment 

* Due to the Easter holidays in mam 1 countries. 

Pasoaal Investing will appear on Tuesday instead 
of Monday this month. 


Putnam International Fund 

Soctcit Anonyme dlnvesissemenc 
Lu xemhou m. ■tf. Boulevard Royal 
R.C. Lunrnihoiin! B 11197 

Notice of Meeting 

Messrs. Shareholders ore hereby convened 10 aiiend ihe Annual General 
Meetmc fallowed hy an Extraordinary General Meeting which are lo be held 
on April iSih. I9RS ai .1.00 p.m. and 3-10 p.m. respectively, ai ihe offices or 
Kredieihank S.A. LuxemhaurKcoise. 43. Boulevard Royal. LlnemKxm:. wilh the 
fbl towing agenda: 

Annual General Meeting 
Agenda 

1 . Presenminn of ihe repans or ihe Board of Direciors and of ihe Sunu lory 
Auditor. 

2. Approval of ihe balance sheet and profit and loss account as ar Dec era her 31. 
19*4. 

.3. Approval of ihe remuneration of Directors for ihe period ending on December 1). 
i9S4and WKJ. 

4. Discharge of ihe Direciors and the Statutory Auditor for the fiscal year ended 
December 31. 1984. 

a. Action on nomination for election of Direciors and a Statutory Auditor for 
the ensuing year 

b. Miscellaneous. 

Extraordinary General Meeting 
Agenda 


i. 


Amendment of Article I to insert therein after “societe anonyme" ihe word 
’dlnvesiuscmenr and of Articles .3. third paragraph, and 31 to replace the 
reference to the law of July 31. |M29 governing bold mu companies hy a 
reference to the law of August 25. 19H3 on eotleeri ve investment undertakings. 

2. Amendment of Article 14 lust paragraph hy adding at ihe beginning of the first 
sentence the words "except os stated hetow’- addition of a further paragraph 
to Article 14 as follows: 

"In case of emergency, the direciors may also approve hy unanimous vote a 
circular resolution. l»y expressing (heir consent on one or several separate 
instruments in writing or hy teles or telegram confirmed in writing, which 
shall altogether const irate appropriate minutes evidencing such decision 7 

3. Amendment of Article 16 hy deleting the second and subsequent paragraphs 
thereof and replacing them js follows: 

"The Board o! Directors has in particular power ns dcicraime the corporate 
policy and the course of conduct of the management and business of ihe 
Corporation, provided however, that the Corporation shall not efTecl such 
investments or activities as shall fall under investment restrictions ns shall be 
adopted from lime to lime hy resolutions of the Board of Directors and as shall 
be described in any prospectus relating to the offer of share* of the Corporation. 
To the extent the Board of Direciors shall haw so decided and disclosed m the 
current prospectus. such restrictions or certain of them may not he changed 
without the approval of a general meeting of shareholders." 

4. Amendment of Article 21 second paragraph fourth sentence, to add the words 
“and shall be paid normally in dollars within seven days of the relevant 
valuation date!* 

а. Amendment of Article 23 third paragraph by adding an additional event of 
suspension under n new sub-paragraph if i as follows: “in case of a dectrion io 
liquidate the Corporation, starting the day of the publication .V the first notice 
convening the general meeting or shareholders which will have lo resolve such 
liquidation. Tbe Corporation shall suspend the issue and redemption of its 
shares fortliwiih upon the occurence of an event causing it to enter into 
liquidation or upon order of the Luxembourg Supervisory' Authonivr 

б. Amendment of the fifth paragraph of Article 23 to replace the first sentence 
as follows: 

The Net Asset Value shall he determined in respect of any Valuation Dale by 
dividing the net assets of ihe Corporation being ihe value of its assets less its 
liabilities at tbe dose of business on such date, by the number of shares 
of the Corporation then outstanding, specifically excepting any shares of the 
Corporation held by it .The assets shall be valued in accordance with valuation 
peinciplesand guidelines approved from time lo time by the Board of Direciors 
and described in die prospectus currently effective for Ihe issue of shares of 
the Corporation. In determining ihe Net Asset Value, the following principles 
are applied: 

at securities for which stock exchange quotations are available ate valued at 
the closing price reported on the day preceding the Valuation Date, or if 
there has been no such closing pnccoii the most receni bid price qurted on 
the relevant stock exchange or hy recognized market makers. In ease where 
securities are traded on more than one exchange, the securities are valued 
at prices quoted on the stock exchange which is ihe principal market for 
such securities: 

bi securities for which no .slock exchange quotations are available, but which 
are actively traded on un over-ihe-counter market, are valued at such price 
(being not less than the bid nor greater than the asked price at the rime ol 
valuation! as K deemed hy the Company's Board of Directoi* to represent 
the best price a( which such securities might then he sold: and 
cl all other assets are valued at their respective loir values at which it is 
expected that they may be resold, as determined in good faith by or under 
the direction of the Board of Directors of the Company" 

7. Amendment of Article ]4io odd the Mowing sentence: 

" Payment for shares purchased or issued shall be made in dollars within four 

business days after the day of allotment? 

There is no quorum requirement for the Annual General Meeting and the 
resolutions ibtteon will he passed pt Ihe Simple majority or ihe shares present or 
represenled ai (he Meeting, subject to the restriction tlwi no shareholder either by 
hinudf or ly proxy can vole for a number of shares ul excess of I 5 of the shares 
issued or 2 ol ihe shares present or represenled al the Meeting. 

Resolutions to he taken at the Extraordinary General Meeting will require a 
quotum of one half of (he «har« issued and outstanding and the affirmative vote of 
two thirds of ihe shares present or represented at the Meeting. 

HuUers of hearer shares may we al the Meeting in person hy producing 
at the Meeting either share certificates or a certificate of deposit which will he 
issued a them again si deposit of their share certificates with Kredieihank S.A. 
Luxcmhourgeotsc. 43. Boulevard Royal. Luxembourg. 

Holders of hearer sfaurcs may vote ul the Meeting hy proxy hy completing the 
form of proxy which will he made available to them against deposit of the share 
certificates as aforesaid. 

Share certificates so deposited wiR be retained until Ihe Meeting or any 
adjournment thereof has heen concluded. ... 

Holders of regisiered shores may vote at the Meeting cither in person or proxy 
hy completing the form of proxy which will be sent to them. 

By order of the Board of Directors 












Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, S ATURD A Y-SUNP AY , APRIL 6-7, 1985 


sac 



Servan-Schreiber Aims to Fight On for Monetary Reform Seen 

/Continued from Page 7) ogy. “government policymakers ter was embroiled in controversy. J J . U 


/Continued from Page 7) 
from Cie. des Machines Bull and 
Thomson-CSF. Only about 10,000 
workshops, all in public schools, 
will be created. Stressing tradition- 
al educational objectives rather 
than the professional training ad- 
vocated by Mr. Servan-Schreiber, 
the Fabius plan became little more 
than an extension of a computer- 
education project already under- 
way for French schools. 

Mr, Servan-Schreiber wrote to 
Mr. Mitterrand on Dec. 31, 1984, 
of his concerns about the course the 
project was taking. And, in a 
March 15 letter to the president 
announcing his decision to not seek 
renewal of his three-year term as 
head of the World Center, he wrote 
that his “fears about the govern- 
ment's choices in the delicate and 
crucial Held of social computer use 
. . . have only worsened.” 

Despite his disappointment, Mr. 
Servan-Schreiber appeared opti- 
mistic. With typical bravura, he 
said recently: "In spite of this tem- 
porary setback, advance is irresist- 
ible.” He added that due to "a 
great, great appetite” of young peo- 
ple for the most advanced technol- 


ogy. “government policymakers 
will be forced to give them what 
they want. That wifi force a change 
in die technology” used in the 
workshops. 

He also expressed confidence 
that French reluctance to accept 
U.S. technological cooperation is 
diminishing . “The anti-Amcrican- 
ism that de Gaulle put into the 
blood of the French is not only 
finished, but people now even have 
an admiration for the Americans,” 
he said. 

The World Center was created in 
1982, shortly after the Socialist 
electoral victory. Mr. Servan- 
Schreiber, already well-known for 
his support for the decolonization 
of Norm Africa, as well as his op- 
position to the development of the 
supersonic Concorde and nuclear 
testing in the Pacific, was put in 
charge. The World Center en- 
shrined his crusade to seek techno- 
logical solutions to the world’s so- 
cial problems, such as 
unemployment and Third World 
development He had already out- 
lined his views in a book, “The 
World Challenge." 

But before long, the World Cen- 


ter was embroiled in controversy. 
The top two scientists, both Ameri- 
cans from the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, left due to ir- 
reconcilable differences with Mr. 
Servan-Schreiber over the adminis- 
tration of the center. 


As that and other conflicts have 
proven. Mr. Servan-Schreiber does 
not retreat readily from a fight The 
case of the computer-literacy cen- 
ters will be no exception; he is far 
from ready to abandon the high- 
tech crusade. . 


"This is the final battle,” he said, 
“and the most important one of 
aB." 


After a ax-month hiatus from 
public view, during which he will 
begin work on a new book, Mr. 
Servan-Schreiber intends to return 
to the national forum. “Will the 
country understand that we are en- 
tering a new era?” he already asks, 
with a trace of apprehension in his 
voice. “And that <56 is too late?" 

Undoubtedly, be wQl return to 
argue the case with zeal. “My 
duty," he said, “is to be part of the 
debate.” 


By Axel Krause 

Iniemanonal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — French government officials who are 
helping prepare high-level meetings of industrial- 
ized democracies say they are encouraged by re- 
cent statements indicating that the Reagan admin- 
istration would be wining to discuss reform of the 
international monetary system with Western Eu- 
rope and Japan. 

In an interview with U.S. News & World Re- 
port, U.S. Treasury Secretary James A. Baker 3d 
acknowledged that monetary reform would be 
raised by participants at the annual summit of 
industrialized nations in Bonn next month. 

Mr. Baker said the Reagan administration 
would be “willing to consider, or look at, any new 
approach” to reforming the international memo- 


linkage of trade and monetary issues, said, “We 
would like progress made on these issues in the 
upcoming meetin gs, anf l although not much is 


expected to happen until Bonn, we were encour- 
aged by what Mr. Baker said.” 


aged by what Mr. Baker said.” 

“He sounded open and willing to talk about a 
range of international economic issues, which is 
what we are seeking as well," the official said. 
The French of ficials , who declined to be identi- 


fied, did not modify their government’s position 
that world monetary reform must be tied to the 


Paris Expects Big Soviet Orders Soon 


that world monetary reform must be tied to the 
beginning of trade liberalization negotiations in 
1986. The Reagan administration wants a commit- 
ment to that date placed high on the agenda of the 
Bonn summit 


The leaders of the United States, France, West 
Germany, Japan, Britain, Itafy, Canada and the 
European Community Commission are scheduled 
to attend the summit May 2-4. 

But France apparently is softening its approach 
to caHing for a world monetary reform conference 
in 1986, mainly because erf resistance from West 
Germany, Britain and the United States. 

“We would be isolated." one of the French 
officials said. 

The proposal for organizing “a new Bretton 
Woods conference” Gist was made by President 
Francois Mitterrand of France before the 1983 
summit meeting and was revived by Jacques Attali, 
his special adviser, daring a meeting last month to 
prepare for the May summit 

The 1944 monetary conference in Bretton 
Woods, New Hampshire, aimed at restructuring 
Western industrialized economies after World War 
n, led to the creation of the International Mone- 
tary FtmrL 

Mr. Mitterrand and Mr. Attali said that any new 
conference should be aimed at reforming the 
world’s monetary system, stabilizing exchange 
rates and developing technological and trade coop- 
eration with developing countries. 

The linkage of trade and monetary reform also 
will be discussed at the annual ministerial meeting 
of the 24-nation Organization for Economic Coop- 
eration and Development in Paris on April 1 1-12. 

In the magazine interview, Mr. Baker, who will 
bead the U5. delegation to the OECD meeting, 
specifically ruled out “another Bretton Woods or a 
return to fixed exchange rates.”' ' 


West Germans See High H 
In U.S. Strategy on Soviet 



(Continued from Page 7) said. But, entire otiier suk, tht 

German-Soviet economic relations closer an cconoimctdationsh^ ts| 
taken by the Social Democratic ** dependent you are. i 
leader, Mr. Schmidt. “Working ‘YJotadiev, to my mmd,” Mr. 
- - *-«- — — =•*- D — -“mann said, may have at- 


rial 


with our Eastern neighbors, with 
lots of contacts.” Mr. Bangemann 


» mann said, “may have at- ■" o: - 

what can be the great line of *'h 


United States, and suggested that their political system. 1 
America ought to "relax a little.” Mr. Ba ngema nn cc 
Mr. ttungftman n made no effort there could be a matoi 
to the strong West Ger- ing that there would b 

map and European interest in ex- from the West or pi 
panning economic relations with East, there would N 

m - vr ■ t«sn. _ lianr A/ymAlTlifr • 


UUili UK v* Mh VI Vfc l JM llVUi LUC: ^ l Ulx . v 

East, there would be a common' .mi. 


’ If the West Gcnnans press *~ :r , 

line hard at the sumnrit conference^ idP-r*. "ser-uri ■ 


joint ventures with than. We want ; If the West Gentians press 
to introduce more co mm ercial ac- line bard at the sumxnil confer 
tivities. There is a certain interest in Bonn next month, there are 
on the Eiirooean side to do that — to be fireworks with the Ament 

. . • r uct i Du. r~-«. 


on the European side to do that — to be fireworks with the Americans. u* f- 

that is the major difference be- But the West Gcnnans are caught 2 s * s’ 
tween American and European ap- in a bind, n e e ding the Americans, ; : .$ s,3!u .-VS-" 
proaches to the East.” and access to American markets ' d ^ 

Mr. Rftnymflnn conceded that and technology, even more than >t-; 

there was a danger that this would they do expanded economic rda- XV “* 
strengthen the Russian hand, and . tions with the Russians. There is a - :T sS2 '' Cm . 
that greater Soviet economic cap a- good chance that, as in die past, the 
bilities would augment its power West Germans WflT put up a great .J c • 


.4 genet France- Presse 

PARIS — France expects to ob- 
tain two equipment contracts from 
the Soviet Union worth a total of 
$400 million (about 3,840 million 
francs) within days, Edith Cresson, 
minister of industiy and foreign 
trade, announced after a four-day 
meeting of a French and Soviet 
trade commission. 


German group. Mrs. Cresson indi- 
cated Thursday that the French 
share will be at least 60 percent. 


Technip also hopes to win a 
S 300-million order for a drilling 
tube manufacturing plant. 

Spie-Batignolles and other 
French concerns are competing 
with an Italian company for a sled 
plant contract at Orel The contract 
is estimated at SI billion and 
France hopes to win at least half 
this business. 

In addition. Thomson-CSF is in 
talks for the supply of 300.000 col- 
or television sets worth S30 million. 


One contract is for a gas-process- 
ing plant at Astrakhan, to be han- 
dled by Technip SA. 

The other is for a gas-desulphur- 
izing unit at Ten g iz , to be supplied 
by Lurgi-France, part of a West 


France also hopes to increase its 
shipments of gram and other farm 
produce, coeds exports which last 
year totaled five million tons. 

Last year was disappointing for 
France in its trade with die Soviet 
Union. 

But a joint communique Thurs- 
day said the two countries intend to 
develop their trade “on a balanced 
basis, allowing for extra deliveries 
of Soviet gas to France:” 

At present bilateral trade is well 
in the Soviet Union's favor. The 
communique gave no target date 
for a return to balanced trade. 


Yamazen Announces 
$4rMillion Soviet Order 


Canadian, stock da AP 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Yamazen Co. said 
Friday it has an order for 30 com- 
puter-controlled machine tools 
worth 12 billion yen (S4.7 million) 
from Stanko Import, a Soviet ma- 
chine-tool importer. 

The Japanese concern said it wflj 
ask permission from the Ministry 
of International Trade and Indus- 
try’ to export the machines before 
early 1986. 


575 AMI Pnc* 

7 8 WO Aon! co E 
2140 Alt EMT0V 
200AWOCMW 
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400 Arson 
31 Asbestos 
15266 A to) 1 1 
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24505 Ban* SC 
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216720 BC R«S 
5065 BC Pllone 


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22V. 2216+16 
23* TSVt — Vj 
IV IV 
6H Mb- fa 
9fa 916+14 
32* 32fa-ifa 


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131 131—5 

425 430 +S 

4» 5+5 

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245 245 —5 

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16% 1646 
23*. 2384— 14 
16th 16tb— 16 
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5 6 

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24 2416— Vb 

■29V. 29*— fa 
32fa 32fa— fa 
141b Ufa 
65V, 66 +Vl 
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200 Brunswk 
B75BuddCan 
1290CCAE 
200 CCU A 
35000 CD Mb B I 
1607 Cod Frv 
1000 C Nor West 
lOOCPodue 
27140 can Trust 
SOOCTuno 
52CGE 

20770 Cl Bit Com 
7000 061 Nat Res 
205960 CTlroAt 
60 C UNI B 

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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page) 


1 SERVICES 

! TOKYO 645 2741. Touring & shop- 


YOUNG LADY AS GUIDE & asdstart 

in NYC 212-517-2097. 


HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


RESTAURANTS 

NIGHTCLUBS 


SERVICES 


HONG KONG (K-3) 723.12 37 


RG TEAM 


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MBtCBCS / PORSCHE 
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TeL Germany |0) 6234-1092, Iht 464986 


THE MAGNIHCM 
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7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek Isksids, Turkey, 


SWITZERLAND 


AU VIHJX CAVEAU - PUU.Y: Superb 
Swiss style gourmet titling, bar. ootc- 


PAKS 704 SO 27 
VIP PA YOUNG LADY 
MJrifngud. 


PARK YOUNG IADY 341 21 71. 
VIP PA & fahnaud interpreter. 


I NYC COMPANKM VIP. Society 
aware of NTs best. 212-757-6068. 


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Summer terrace. Let the famdy Moret 
i serve you at the beautiful Au Vieux 
Caveau, II roe de la Gars, 1009 
PuOy/loaanne. 021 / 28 2749 


PARS LADY GUR3ES 224 01 32. 
■ Young, elegant, educated, inti for 
j days A driners A fraveir pauibla in 
1 Paris & Airports. 


NEW YORK VJJ>. Young lady com- 

pamon. (212) 3556642. 

HONGKONG 3-671267 yamg lady 


29 

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to 

■fa 

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4fa 

4* 

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299 —1 

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111 

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213—2 
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40 —16 I 
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103 — V. 1 
205 —5 , 
2116- 1b 


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27%+ 16.. 
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274 

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716— Vb 
4216 
50 —6 
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3016— (6 , 
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150 —12 
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36 Vb — Ml 
2116— 16 
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150 LOnt Com 
14040 Lacana 
257? LL Lac 

5205 LototewCo 
6000MOSHA 

1 MICC 

55D0MCMMHX 
4700 Mert and E 
4*217 Molsan At 
300 Nabisco L 
40392 Norando 
5903 Nor cen 
113344 Nvo AltA f 
21206 HOWSCOW 

26095 NuWst s»A 
30OOOakwood 
172D1 Ottawa At 
650 Pamoar 
4600 PanCan P 
oso Pern etna 
4100 Ptvanhr Oil 


*70 Pine Point 
5900 Place GO 0 
26090 Ptocer 
1061 Proviso 

1200 Oue Stiirp o 
1300 Royrock f 
18634 Rodham 
StBURdStmtuA 
8300 Res Servf 
959 RevnPrpA 
415 Rosens A 
2700 Raman 
100 Rothman 
3200 Sceptre 
7710 Sears Can 
33953 Shell Can 
40917 Sherrlft 

100 stoma 

500 Slater Bf 
aiOOSoutfm 
50OSt Brcdcst 
1TO3B stelcoA 
1000 Suiotro 
20 Steep R 
65Suneor pr 
15076 Sydney a 


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512fa 12H 12fa 
S1316 Ufa 13fa+fa 
535 34Vi 35 +16 
S17fa 17 17 — Vi 

51816 18V6 1016—16 
240 240 240 +15 

S25fa 2516 2Sfa+16 
425 415 420 —5 

516*6 16 16—16 

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51736 77fa 1716+ fa 
51616 1616 1616— 16 
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532*6 32 32fa+fa 
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S28U 20 2816 

120 114 116 — 4 

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12216 2116 2216+1 to 
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330 325 325 —15 

265 265 265 —5 

523% 2 » 23fa- fa 
24 23 24 +1 




1250 Tot core 
10700 Tara 

«X20TeckCorA 
104574 Tech B I 
S50 Telodvne 
11844 Tex Can 
2300 Thom N A 
40443 Tar Dm Bk 
TOOOTorstarBi 
735 Traders At 
1 225 T ms AM 
5200 Trlnltv Ras 
21606 TmAHnUA 
1306* Tram PL 
2452Trlmoc 
4704 Trtajc A f 
126050 Turbot 
950 un Conoid 
10405 u EntprtM 
2600 U ICenO 
STOOVerstt Af 
1700 Vests ran 
RMOweetmin 
6150 Weston 
6472 Woodiwd A 

14430 Yk Bear SUfa in 

Tefal sales 9.BW 707 shares 

Ctese 


W - V7 . W — J 
52ZJ4 2214 2214— Vi. 


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0714 7fa 7fa+ 16 
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S24fa 24fa 24fa— fa 
430 <30 430 

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01116 1116 1116 
01516 . 15 ISVb— lb 
573*4 73 7314+116 

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SIS*. Ufa Ufa ■CS'II* ' — 

Total sales 9J80207 shares ’.. j.-J 

. dose Prrrfaas ■ 3»- -« i — “ 1 „ . 

TSESM index: 14000 ZOOM ssss ,Vf r..d 

: " 77-}:.,an« 1 iSVSZrt 

JWo " tre " ■r'if.L tens is Fez- 

S2Sfa 25fa'25fa « R*-V'T. r. nvru-'* 

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532 22 22 — fa £Zl2C 05 •' •- 

52814 2016 2»fa- fa. . 

iwvb mb ivfa— fa * z 

.... nhrpA 534 34 34 - fa , « -m-V 

Total Sates 1+76062 shares. .OBOD 

dose Preview ; .v jduJ i.OT.C-r.c^Lr.- 
IndDStrkds Index; WIM lll ». C CXTi .’f N’c« 


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Sweden. 06 7569229. 

Hens Kens 5-213671. 

MonBu. 817 Iff 49. 

Tel Auha 03455 559. 

Seoul: 725 8773. 

Vieiuta: ContocJ Frankfurt. 

Stogfapam. 222-2725. 

Taiwan* 752 44 25/9. 

UP0TH> STATES 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 


AUSTRALIA 

New York: [212] 752-3890. 

Sydney: 929 56 39. 

Wee! Genet: (415) 362-8339. 

Melbourne: 6908233. 


tjw3i to 

a 


MIX GUIDE TO 
BUSINESS TRAYB. & 


FOOD LOVER’S 
GUIDE TO PARIS. 


idd 




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Theres never been J 

a guide qufre See it. ’ 

Trib busness readers afl 

across Europe sbansd ^ 

fher most- treasured 

travel secrets with 

joumafist Peter Graham. 

The resufr. a book for 
business traveiers with 
conh^aufon s from busness travelers. 

Turn an orcSnary business trip into a pleasant, more 
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Lyon, Mian, Munich, Paris, Stockholm, Zurich. Over 
300 fact-filed pages, this hadcover edition is a great gift 
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Seven subdivisions for each dty include; 1. Basic aVy 
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Rave reviews from the (ravel whisky experts? 

"Where to stay; efine and revel in Europe ~ a handy 
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Revel and Leisure, America n Express, 
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As restaurant critic 

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7he gastronomic 
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varied, historic, abundcHTt - and too defcious to be left 
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W 2 & indudes critical commentary, anecdotes, 
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from the notebooks of Pariscn chefs. , 

Paperback, over 300 pages featuring. aJFrench/ 
Engfeh food gfossary and 140 evocative ph^^fophs. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. SATURDAY-SUNDAY. APRIL *- 7, 1985 


=3/~ 





«**!**£> 


CB$ Restricts Criteria 
For Special Meetings 


is saying NEWYORK- — JDirrctors of holders in good faith," Mr. Cain 

r™ ■.wontrfc CBS Inc., die reported target of a said. “We will withhold further 

PwiUeai sysia® 01 io^> istewer attempt, have amended comment until we havea chance to 
L " > the company’s bylaws to restrict review the bound's acuon." 

5 could heTrm, Co, ' I % a ' d* co0t “^ onx under which a spe- The New York Times has report- 

there wooS? : dtdrecetmgof s h a r e hddg s could ed that Ted Turner, an Allan ta- 
1 West^^Jto^^.odted. bawd braadcastmg and cabte «- 

. there wo u li PJJ4 fojr £BS refused to comment Thurs- ureprencur. has received some 
i for ecoQ<w a Zji day on the reason for iis action. Bui financial backing in his quest for 
ions that would l? 0 *! A* wove came after an announce- CBS. 

Rust build a ipentlast wed: by the group Fair- CBS officials have strongly re- 

alrilc Tn re aessin Media that, although it jeered the idea of il merger or take- 
the West p. ^ wbukl not mount a proxy battle u w*r. 

hard at the Tr 0113 ^ ta, annual shareholder meet- “T don't think there’s any wav I 

^nemm Sl ^>cw® “gte Chicago cm April 17, it ra^ht could overstate how hard we would 
: faewod? seek* special meeting in the future, fight an acquisition,” the CBS 
the Wen rvT ^ An^ i The group, affiliated with Sena- chah m an. Thomas H. Wyman, said 
bind, Jess* Helms, Republican of Wcdnoday on the “CBS Evening 

access toA S I,U! 'W* Carolina, has said that it News. ... . . , 

technolraJ' n * r *an^ would continue efforts to gain con- ® *■“ that its bylaws were 
do exna^’ ^ tid of CBS to end what it perceives amended so a special meeting 
: eCH as a liberal bias in CI&s news could be caOcd only by the chair- 

reporting. . man of the baud jomtly with the 

■ gS? “**»«« tbl^t Tf ihe reports of the board’s cfaamnan of the board’s executive 
^ p»2*f vote are accurate, then just as we committee, by vote of a majority of 
S"? Z * fe expected, CBS management has lit- ** fetors or at the ramies of 
game tic respect for the rights or interests [WO directors. There are 12 mem- 


The Associated Press 


not dealt with us or with the stock- 


NEWYORK-— JDirrctors of headers in good faith," Mr. Cain 
IBS hie., the reported target of a said. “We trill withhold further 
gfceoyer attempt, have amended coxnmem until we have a chance to 


[could beTml c ° t %L die conditions under which a spe- 
nat there shareholder could 


Tdlcorp 

Tara 

gsa? 

TTwniN A 
Tor Dm Bk 

TorstnrBI 

Traders M 
TmsMt 
Trinlfv Res 

TrnAitauA 

TrCon PL 
Trlmoc 
Trlzec A t 

Turbo! 

Un Corbin 

8te- 

SS& 1 

Westmln 

Wesson 

WoodwdA 

Yfc Bear 


W oTr ,,,s N f OT Fairness in Media at Raleigh, 415 ““dng c 
North Carolina. reqaestoi by 

vjS; ^ •"We feel that management has shareholders. 

1 1 Gas Finn Set 

57\. 'tf ft 

SB^W*** - The Associated Press York, Penns' 

^|i ^ WASHINGTON ; — One of the Virginia, Vii 
lamest nafnral one nrra*Iin^ mn. Maryland. Ki 


aild be called only if 
10 percent of the 


Komatsu Posted 
13.8% Decline 
In Its 9 84 Profit 

Reuters 

TOKYO— Komatsu Ltd re- 
ported Friday that net fell 13.8 
percent to 22.64 billion yen 
($89.1 million) in the year end- 
ed Dec. 31, down from 2627 
billion in 1983. 

Sales declined 3.1 percent to 
713.47 billion yen from 750.53 
billion, mainly due to a drop in 
parent company exports, the 
Japanese construction machin- 
ery and industrial equipment 
concern said. 

The group expects consoli- 
dated net will rise 14.8 percent 
to 26 billion yen in the current 
year, with a 3.7-pereent rise in 
sales to 740 billion yen, a com- 
pany spokesman said. 

The company said it expects 
continuing good exports to the 
United States, which -trill help 
the earnings per share to recov- 
er to around 30 yen in 1983 
from 2720 yen in 1984. 

Group overseas sales of con- 
struction equipment feD 20.5 
percent from a year earlier and 
industrial machinery fell 9J 
percent. 


Exxon, GM Keep Top 2 U.S. Ratings 


iJTTTnJWTc!] 


‘ The Anodaicd Press 

NEW YORK — Exxon Carp, 
retained its ranking as the largest 
industrial company in the United 
States, while General Motors 
Corp^ still in second place, moved 
closer to the top spot, it was report- 
ed here. 

The most prominent newcomer 
to the Fortune 500 rankings, For- 
tune magazine said Thursday, was 
newly-divested American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co., which 
ranked eighth. U had formerly sot 
qualified as an industrial company 
according to the magazine’s criteria 
for the list. 

The magazine requires that a 
company must derive more than 50 
percent of sales from manufactur- 
ing, mining or both to qualify as an 
industrial concern. 

Chrysler Corp. vaulted into the 
top 15 for the first time since 1978. 

The list, which ranks industrial 
companies according to 1984 sales, 
appears in the April 29 issue of 
Fortune. 

Exxon sales totaled 590.9 billion, 
while GM*s amounted to $83.9 bil- 
lion, the magazine said. It noted 
that the sales gap separating (he 
two companies had narrowed to 57 
billion this year from $14 billion a 
year ago. 

Mobil Corp. was in third place 


with sales of $56,0 billion, followed 
by Foni Motor Co. with sales of 
$52.4 billion. Both maintained 
their year-carte positions. 

Texaco Inc., which acquired 
Getty Oil Co. last year, moved up 
to fifth place from the sixth spot a 
year ago with sales of $473 biBion. 

International Business Machines' 
Corp. fell one place to sixth with 
sales of $45.9 billion. 

Retaining its seventh position 
was Du Pont Co. with sales of $35.9 
billion. It preceded AT&T, which 
bad sates of $33.2 billkm. 

General Elec trie Co. came in 
ninth, up one place from a year 
ago, with sales of S27.9 billion. 
Standard Oil Co. (Indiana) feS two 
places to No. 10. Its sates totaled 
$26.9 billion. 

Falling from the top 10 was 
Chevron Corp., which had ranked 
ninth last year but was 11th on the 
latest list It had 1984 sates of 526.8 

billion. 

Chrysler Coip. rose seven places 
to No. 14 with sales of $19.6 bOliaa, 
a gain of 563 bQEon over 1 983. 

TTae magazine also ranked com- 


Exxtm at 553 billion, followed by 
GM at $4.5 billion and Ford at $2.9 
bilfion. 


Chrysler ranked fifth, the third 
automaker among the top five com- 
panies in profitability. It jumped 
from No. 20 as its net tripled in 
1984 to $14 button. 

The biggest money loser among 
the Fortune 300 was A.H. Robins 
Co. Inc., which it said had a loss of 
$462 million in 1984. Thirty-four of 
the Fortune 500 companies had 
losses in 1984 compared with 60 a 
year earlier. 

Golden Nugget 
Says Bid Rejected 

tea Angela Tuna Service 

BEVERLY HILLS, California 
— Golden Nugget Lie. has ac- 
knowledged that the executor of 
the Conrad Hilton estate has reject- 
ed its $488.3- million offer to buy 
27.4 percent of Hilton Hotels Corp. 

As reported earlier, James E. 
Bates, executor of the estate of 
Conrad N. HQion, founder of Hil- 
ton Holds, described the S72-a- 
share price for the 6.78 million Hil- 
ton snares owned by the estate as 
“inadequate.** 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
change Thursday, HD ton shares 
dosed down 52.62 at 569.61 Gold- 
en Nugget shares ended up 23 cents 
at $1235. 






pa 









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B 











Gas Finn Settles Suit 


!»,% if: The Asuxiated Pro* York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West 

^ m $£ WASHINGTON — One of the Virginia, Virginia, New Jersey, 
largest natural gas pipeline con- Maryland, Kentucky nnd the Dis- 
sn^^s.cerns in the United States has trier of Columhia by averages rang- 
ing ]]* £ agreed to effectively refund up to mg from 523 to $75 a year, 
ft at $1 boson to 4.2 million customers. The agreement ends fonr years of 
^ Jfc Columbia Gas Transmission challenges before the agency and in 
jj Corp. of Charleston, West Virginia, federal court over Columbia’s prac- 
> that it would cat its tice in tbe early 1980s of buying 


Eastern Is Recommended 
For Miami-London Route 


s said Thursday that it would cat its rice in the early 1980s of buying 
Due . wholesale gas rates byll5 parent high-priced supplies — in some in- 
_ I: ^ retroactive to Monday and fogp stances from ns own affiliated 

any rate increase for the next two companies — white cutting back 
years, as part of a settlement to purchases from producer charging 
^"Born"' several challenges before the Fed- less. 

SKT/rS* 1L ’Sc*: eral Energy Regulatory Commis- The commission last year con- 
fWrSrp miv rioo- doded that “Cohnntea's gas acqm- 

RoikandA kT* * Cohimtna is a unit of Columbia sidon policies and practices evi- 
R^TraST Gas Systems Inc! of Wilmington, deuce a reckless disregard of its 

as^JS rt Delaware. ' duty to provide service ai the low- 

rtt Qn k. The rate cut would effectively est reasonable cost” But the panel 
binder m* reduce the annual home-heating stored short of ordering a refund. 

costs of consumers in parts of New The states of Ohio and New 

York, along with many of the 71 


iots Index: 


I S&P 100 Index Options 
April 5 ; 

Sifta ' CaRtLoxt | Mat 
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s» m - 


local utflides that distribute Co- 
lumbia gas and several public inter- 
est groups filed suit m the U3. 
Court of Appeals challenging the 
panel's reluctance to order a re- 
fund. 

1 UA Treasury BiH Rales 
April 4 

PIW, 

. Oflar - . BW VMd VMd ] 
Mh' Ml SM -09 hO 

HMUltl Ml 9JB 9.12 9.W 

OniVeor MB . BJS 9J0 734 

Sourm: Salontoo Brafitm . 





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United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Govern- 
ment transportation officials have 
reversed an earlier decision and 
plan to recommend that a Miami- 
London air route be awarded to 
Eastern Airlines, a U.S. Transpor- 
tation Department official said 
Thursday. 

Eastern, based in Miami, has 
been seeking the London route for 
16 years to gain entry to Europe. 

Jeffrey Shan e, the Transporta- 
tion Department's deputy assistant 
secretary for policy and interna- 
tional affairs, overturned an earlier 
ruling by Administrative Law 
Judge John Vi none awarding the 
route to World Airways of Oak- 
land, California. 

Mr. Shane reversed the January 
ruling after bearing arguments on 
the case. The matter then was re- 
ferred 1 to Matthew Scocozza,' the 
department's assistant secretary for 
policy and international aviation. 

Mr. Scocozza said Wednesday 
that he agreed with "much of the 
analysis” of Mr. Shane's view that 
Eastern should be awarded the 
route. 


Company 

E arning s 

Revenue and profits, in millions, 
ore in local currencies unless 
otherwise indicated 



Japan 

Komatsu 

ms 

‘ 

? m 

Revenue 

711470. 

750J30. 

Net Income — 

21640. 

26^70. 

Per Share — 

27 JO 

3160 





f.H 


Gold Options (prtewfa Vox.). 



OoU 317JI1-J17J0 

Vakan WMteWdd SLA. 

1. Q-i <k Mom-Mok 
1211 Cana 1. S wtoi it U 
Td. 310251 - Telex 2ft JI5 


The department’s recommenda- 
tion soon will go to President Ron- 
ald Reagan, who can overturn it 
only on the basis of foreign policy 
or national defense considerations. 

Asked whether Eastern would 
get the route, a Transportation De- 
partment spokesman said, “Proba- 
bly. That’s the way it looks today” 

Mr. Viuone had concluded that 
World Airway’s fare proposal was 
superior to Eastern’s. On review, 
however, Mr. Shane said that the 
administrative law judge, who 
works for the department, should 
have excluded premium fares in his 
calculations when making die deci- 
sion. 

Mr. Shane said that World's fare 
advantage was outweighed by oth- 
er considerations, such as Eastern’s 
connecting points. 


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Nat cmU* wrhw the USA. 


Aetna Seeks to Sdl 6 MUUon Shares 

The Associated Press 

HARTFORD, Connecticut — Aetna Life & Casualty Co. stands to 
raise more than $250 milli on of badly needed capital under a proposal 
to offer the sale of 6 million shares of common stock. 

An Aetna spokesman, Thomas J. Collins, said Thursday that the 
company filed a registration statement Wednesday with the Securities 
and Exchange Commission seeking approval for the offering. He 
called it the insurer’s first public offering of common stock in S3 
years, adding that the company has offered preferred shares as 
recently as three years ago. 

In addition to offering 6 million shares, the prdiminaxy prospectus 
calls for the right to sell an additional 900,000 snares. 

At Thursday’s dosing price 1 of $40,625 a share on the New York 
Stock Exchange, the 6.9 millio n shares would raise 5280 million. 

Aetna is an insurance and financial service organization mar keting 
virtually afi forms of insurance, bonds and pensions. Its operating 
earnings for 1984 fell 44 percent to S182.5 millio n- 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


Engineering Management 

We are a leading manufacturer of precision industrial com- 
ponents currently seeking a “hands on” accomplishment-oriented 
engineering leader. In this senior position, reporting directly to 
the President, you will have responsibility for research and 
development, product support engineering, extensive labora- 
tories, and administration of a departmental budget in excess 
of S2 million. 

This opportunity requires proven hands on engineering manage- 
ment experience. An engineering degree is required. 

in addition to a desirable mid-west. U.S.A., suburban location, 
we offer a comprehensive salary and benefits package. Please 
submit your resume including salary history in complete con- 
fidence to 

Box D-2144, International Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neuilly Cedes, France. 

Equal Emptoymcni nppununiu Empii»rr 


OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENTS 


Contract positions are available for qualified professionals and 
technicians in Asia, the Pacific Basic and the Middle East 
Candidates must have a minimum of 5+ yean experience and 
appropriate training or educational background in Construction, 
Petroche mi c al . Communications, Logistics awl most Medical and 
Engineering disciplines. Housing, Travel, Medical Insurance and 
excellent salaries are available. Some positions are tax exempt 

For consideration forward resume/C.V. to: 


13 Floor OTB Towor 

TANTALUS INTERNATIONAL 8 Owens Rood. Central 
THE TfeHTfcLViS GROUP Hon} Konq 

2 1 4446 




KaB lillS 














NIMARBEN 

— (didos A 

— tw) ClowB-US._ 
— (w) CiossC- Japan. 


; zmm 






MriiiiiiiTiiiJ 


WVrtrV-I r--, 










DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs; a — asked; + — Offer Prtan.'b — bid 
chanoePyVSIOtaSl nerunlt; N.A-— Not Available; N.C. — MatCommunlcated.-g — 
New; 5 — suspended; S/S — Stock 5PUf; • — Ex-DMdend; ■■ — Ex-Rts; — — 
Grass Perform once Index Feb.; • — RedempNPrice- Ex -Coupon; «e — Formerly 
Worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 — Otter Price inct. 3% prelim, charge; ++ — dally stock 
price as on Amsterdam stack. Exchange 


entorv, criedcfc UNICEF 

ic fads fret*!** UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND 


To recreate 



‘Theriseof female education booe of the great achievements ofthc last twenty years and one of the most hopeful signs for the next twenty . . . For any 
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wnuui i w///.vv\v\ii iwwJ 

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A Conference on 
Trade and Investment 
Opportunities 

Budapest, June 13 - 14 1985. 


The IntemoHond Herald Tri- 
bune conference on ‘Trade and Invest- 
ment Opportunities in Hungary” wiB be 
of keen interest to any executive con- 
cerned about future economic relations 
between East and West. 

Speakers at ihfe landmark 
conference will indude Hungarian 


government ministers, business leaders, 
bankers and economists. 

For further information, 
please contact the I nternationa l Herald 
Tribune conference office, 181, avenue 
Charles de Gaulle, 92521 NeuiftyCedex, 
{France. TeL 747 1265. Tele* 613 595 F. 





































TTSS 


. tr-i_ .■ 7 1 


mmsm- 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HKRATTI TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 6-7, 1985 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


Don’t Con Me! 


1 Bench wanner 
G Big birds 
10 Bar sear 
IS Carriage in 
Kensington 
19 Russian skater 
Rodnina 


48 Fiddler Isaac 

50 Draft-board 
letters 

51 AT THE 
SAME TIME 


28 JosipBroz 

21 Nerve: Comb, 
form 

22 Alter 

23 FARMED 
OUTWORK 


55 Wasp 
50 Sauce staple 
59 This gets 
wetter as it 
dries 


25 FREE 

27 Pool's black 
ball 

28 Jargon 

30 Scribble 

31 Beard of grass 

34 Of bees 

35 BOULEVARDS 

36 Googly-eyed 
comedian 

37 Malayan boats 

38 Officer's 
civvies 

39 Gone up 

40 PONDERS 
42 Famed N.Y. 

bldg. 

45 Slur over 

46 Ear: Comb, 
form 

47 Annoy 


60 of lead 

61 Rise of opera 

63 Tear up. as 
paper 

64 Intimates 

65 Truthful 

66“ to be 

bom. . 

Eccles. 3:2 

67 Fermenting 
agents 

68 Part of a cast 
of thousands 

69 ACADEMIC 
ASSEMBLIES 

71 Bribe 

74 Eliot’s Mamer 

75 Miss Piggy, to 
herself 

76 Mus followers 

77 Bart or Brenda 

79“ port in a 

storm” 

80 NOT 
SETTLED 


84 Palmer, to 
pals 

85 What funam- 
bulists take 

88 Take the 
stump 

89" 

Restaurant" 

90 SUPEREGO 

93 Heads and 
shoulders 

94 Defames 

95 Home of the 
Gewtirz- 
traminer 
grape 

96 Biblical mount 

97 Farewell, in 
Fontainebleau 

99 PATRONIZ- 
ING 

101 IMPORTANT 


BY CHARLES M. DEBER 

Ffo 


PEANUTS 



Base 

fatorec 


%h tlto* 




A: 


«3T0\ Ed! 


a* th 


£ . ,*a£e NO PL4r « J Ta* si* ^ 


# ‘r ; .« : op. hom 

is i 




106 Leap, in Lyon 

107 Trace 

108 Long-standing 
quarrel 

109 Hundred: - 
Comb, form 


adP ^ 2S ;- r this d:v 


110 Dollar bills 

111 Velocity 

112 Affirmative 
votes 

113 English county 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1 Girl, to her 
brother 

2 Vineyard 

3 Tease 

4 LIKE SOME 
ELECTIONS 

5 Choir member 

6 Engrave 

7 Glove for Fisk 

8 Southwestern 
Indian 

9 Soft drink 

10 bug in a 

rug 

11 This goes 
jointly with a 
mortise 

12 Dispossess 

13 Food scrap 

14 Golding's 

" the Flies" 


15 A (deduc- 

tively) 

16 Pulls apart 

17 An Astaire 

18 Ways 

24 Type of gel 

26 August, in 
Arles 

29 Iranian coin 

31 Land units 

32 Wekas, e.g. 

33 ERRATICALLY 

34 Galahad's 
garb 

35 Cod’s cousin 

37 Word with 
chemical or 
dollar 

38 She played 
Sophie 


40 Turf mavens 

41 Like shower 
walls 

42 SCOUTING 
OUT 

43 Minotaur’s 
land 

44 Some bets 

48 Individual 
efforts 

49 Council site: 
1545-63 

51 Whines 

52 Moral 
standard 

53 Actress 
Talmadge 

54 Canary's 
comment 

55 Israeli dances 


THE LAST ROMANTIC: A Biography of 
Queen Marie of Roumania 

By Hannah Pakula. 510pp. Illustrated. SI 9.95. 
Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of 
The Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020. 



DOWN 

57 barrel 

(in trouble) 

58 Tablelands 

61 “ 

Woman," 
Beatles song 

62 Poison 

63 Uncomplaining 

64 Perfume a 
' room 

66 Three English 
rivers 

67 James 
Taylor's " — — 
Got a Friend" 


73 Iron 

75 Hammer found 
in whodunits 


77 Highlight 

78 DONATES 

81 Took it easy 

82 Sky Bear 

83 Please 


91 Spotless 

92 Offspring 

93 Spree . 


„ Murray. . 

:SaMcCrescr2fK5iorz 

dtfcjoore. UoyuMcsei’? 


BOOKS 


Reviewed by John Gross 

H ANNAH PAKULA ushers in her biography of 
Queen Made of Romania with a quotation. 


some celebrated lines by Dorothy Parker. 

Oh, life is a glorious cycle of song, 

A medley of extemparanea; 

And love is a thing that will never go wrong; 
And I am Marie of Romania. 


ways, she was an anachronism, a survivor from the 
19m century; within a few years of her death, in 
1938, the dynasty she fought to preserve had been 
swept away forever. But me was also one of the first 
monarchs who had no qualms about submitting to 
the demands of 20th-century publicity — a favorite 
with interviewers and reporter: ’ 
amid the popping flashbulbs. 


At first sight this may seem an odd epigraph for a 
Marie ' 


bode about Queen 


about Dorothy Parker), but on 
a good choice; it underlmi 


to a book 
lecfianl thirikitls 
res as effectively as any 
dirge just how transitory the glories of this world 
can be. For few people today are likely to have much 
of an idea who Mane of Romania was, and the odds 
are that, in the English-speaking world at least, she 
is more widely remembered for ner fleeting appear- 
ance in Dorothy Parker's verse than for anything 
else. 

In her own time it was a very different story. For 
20 or 30 years she was one of the legendary figures 
of the international scene — admired, deplored, 
feted, gossiped about, idolized from afar. In some 


She was undeniably good-looking, as photo- 
graphs confirm; she had style; and if rumor exag- 
gerated the number and physical nature of her love 
affairs, she was undoubtedly given to forming ar- 
dent attachments — to the dashing Prince Barbo 
Stir bey, head of the Romanian royal household; to 
Waldorf Astor, the future husband of Nancy Astor; 
to Colonel Joseph Boyle, a Canadian-born soldier 


had failed she could probably have made a respect- 
able living as a romantic novelist 

Pakula doesn't allow herself to be carried away 
the more florid aspects of Marie's personality. She is 
a level-headed commentator, who sets the queen 
firmly in her historical context (drawing extensively 
on unpublished diaries and letters, including those 
in the archives in Bucharest), and she strikes a fair 
balance between her strengths and her limitations. 
Nor is she in any danger of confusing Romania with 
Rnritania. “The Last Romantic" has a serious tale 
to tell as well as a picturesque one, and its excur- 
sions into the labyrinth of Romanian politics and 
Balkan diplomacy are an integral part of the story. 

It is a story that gets off to rather a slow start 


ijste*. Dave Such. Dev 


WIZARD of ID 


Marie’s father, the Duke of Edinburgh of that 

i Victoria; her 


of fortune (and former fQondike prospector) who 
of daring missions for Romania 


undertook a series 
during World War L 


epoch, was the second son of Queen 
mother, the Grand Duchess Marie, was the only 
daughter of Czar Alexander H Between them her 
grandparents ruled about half the world, and the 
opening chapters of the bode are crowded with 
dynastic detail and royal comings and goings — a 



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Hit* ritora®- 
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(our AL Ebi teuc 

"*** -W — -M. '.'I. 


REX MORGAN 


3 *itli better records <25 
aid the AL Wes; Divisioi 
PL let ns anticipate th 
'^pfflmnalef W5. 


Not quite “the last romantic" of Hannah Pakula’s 
title, perhaps, but a woman to whom purple patches 
and flamboyant attitudes came naturally, someone 
who fully exemplified what Pakula calls *the rhetor- 
ical extravagance ... of the era.” She wrote a great 
deal — everything from fairy tales to syndicated 
articles (“A Queen Looks at Life'*) — and if all else 


little too much so, I would say, for anyone who is 
■ ’ " - Tthmgs. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 



anno □□□□□ □□□□□ paaD 

□□□u □□□□□ uLirjuu uouu 

□□□!!□□□□□□ □□aapccjaao 
□naaaaaa □□□aa geduud 
□ddo □□□□□ □QUO 
□□□□□a □□□□□ anLioaan 
utjuatj □□□□uaaaau uuu 
□aaa dddg any naauu 
uma □□□oaaauoaa uanao 
□□□uaaaa □□□□□□ 

UaULJU □□□□□ LIDLIUU 

□□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□BaaaD 
ulkjliu □ouuuaaaauiu □□□ 
□□□□□ □□□ anau □□□□ 
uua ljuljuuuuuucj uuuuu 
Baaaaca unaoa DDnaao 
unou Li mi II LJ □□LIU 
□□□□□□ uuuau □□□□□□□□ 
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not heavily addicted to suchi 

Nor do the early years of Marie’s married life 
with the awkward and inarticulate Crown Prince 
Ferdinand make particularly enthralling reading, it 
was only when he succeeded to the throne in 1914 
that she really began to come into her own, and only 
when Romania entered World War I on the side of 
the Allies that she became a full-blown internation- 
al celebrity, a propaganda heroine and “warrior 
queen.” 

After the war, when the Romanian delegation at 
Versailles botched its case, she descended on Paris 
to help it out, installing hersdf in a suite of 20 rooms 
at the Ritz (“I feel that this is no time to econo- 
mize”) and dazzling the assembled statesmen with 
her wardrobe — pomi de Milan lace for the Italians, 
blue silk over silver brocade for the French, mousse- 
fine de soie with hand-painted noses for Lloyd 
George. 

There were other aspects of Queen Marie's later 
years that were no laughing matter, above all the 
growth of Romanian Fascism, while the intrigues of 
her sou King Carol D constituted one of the most 
sordid of royal soap operas. Worse still was to come 
“it might be said.” Pakula writes, “that she died just 
in time,” and it is hard to disagree. 



SWEET DREAAY5, DARLING f 
1 LOVE ' — * 



jBkDstmt Tigers wc 
tide by 15 games, til 
inmafcteN $pen 


jetting better. Yes. th 


GARFIELD 


ever miy Live izn 
toff more thin anv etfce 
twdii 

Wtioroe Orioles, wort, 
in 1983. were so npse 
to fifth place that the; 
riffion for three fre 
5", instead of having , 
m center field. , 
la vacuum at th 
border, the Oriole 
ic Fro 


® ^ bullpen anc 
' -unabsmi utiur 


^hitter to begin raliie 


lb 

J^KMmhascehvero 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York Times. I—; 



Grand Prix Auto Season 
Begins Sunday in Rio 


1 What does 7wr word meam, Mr. Wilson v 


WEATHER 


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The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK —The Formula I 
grand prix auto racing season 
opens in Rio de Janeiro Sunday 
with the McLaren team, which 
steamrollered the opposition last 
year with world champion Niki 
Lauda of Austria and runner-up 
Alain Prost of France, aware that 
its task will be tougher in 1985. 

“Everyone will be looking to see 
us fall flat on our faces,” said Ron 
Dennis, the director of the 
McLaren team. 

But, Dennis said, that will not 
stop the team giving Lauda and 
Prost three untried new cars in Rio. 
McLaren did just that there last 
year, and Prost won. 

Rivals have put in long test ses- 
sions in Rio and elsewhere, while 
the new McLaren-TAG-Porscbe 
turbos, with only a few laps on a 
damp British track, are “fresh out 
of the box.” 

“A lot of the others would like to 
put their new cars back in the box 
already,” Dennis said, joking. 

Michetia. the giant French tire 
company, pulled out of Formula 1 
racing after winning the title with 
McLaren last season. That put the 
red and white cars on the same 
Goodyear tires as such rivals as 
Ferrari. AJfa-Romeo and Arrows- 

BMW — all much improved in 


two more years with BMW, ending 
rumors he would get the Ford For- 
mula I engine nowin development. 

Briton Harvey Postleth waite de- 
signed the 1985 Ferraris. Their first 
lest sessions have been impressive, 
with Italian Michele Alboreto con- 
sistently fastest in Rio and France's 
Rene Arnoux dose behind. 

Renault, which had a poor 1984 
season, fired team manager Gerard 
Larrousse and designer Michel 
Tern, who brought turbos to grand 
prix racing with Renault in 1977. 
Both were quickly signed by Ligjer. 

Meanwhile, the new Renault 
RE60 and much-modified engine 
have proved disappointing' in rariy 
trials by France’s Patrick Tambay 
and Britain's Derek Warwick, 

The Williams team has its first 
carbon-fiber car and a smoother 
Honda engine than the “all or 
nothing” power unit Finland's 
Kekc Rosberg struggled with last 
season. 

Arrows showed strongly in test- 
ing. with TMeny Boutsen of Bel- 
gium third fastesi in Rio and fastest 
at Imola. Italy. 

Britain's Nigel Mansell replaced 
Frenchman Jacques Laffite at Wil- 
liams after losing the Lotus drive to 



7>u Asaodatsd Trot 

Peugeot 205T driven by Bruno Saby of France skidded 
around turn during first leg of Kenya Safari Rally. The 
favored Audi team ran into trouble Friday, with both 1984 


ion StigBlomqvistof Sweden and 1982 cham- 
of Flnlan 


'Inland having gearbox failures. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


h* et baUAss 


Ban on Young Tennis Pros Recommended^ 



■S» 

«T 

431 

«3 


t *nn "* a 

NEWYORK(AP)— Players under the age of 14 should be banned from turning 
professional or even playing in a pro event because erf 1 the physical and meniak, 11 x 

stress, a special commission of the International Tennis Federation has recom*^ £ ^ 

mended. ^ » J 

The riF still has to approve the recommendations, which mil be presented by it>. .3 r ^ 

eligibility commission in Paris in June during the French Open. The commissions 
recommended that, at the age of 14, a player would be alloweato compete in four 
eight professional events a year as an amateur; that at age 15 the quota would be V « a 

increased to 12 tournaments, and at 16 a player would.be allowed unlimited access ^ f? n 

to all pro tournaments. ^ 2 * 

If such a ruling had been in effect before, at least three top 
Austin, Andrea Jaeger and Kath " ■ - 

pro vdien they did. Austin, now 

of injuries. * 

If the guidelines go into effect next January, likely the earliest passible date, it is\ 
believed that only one player would be affected: Mary Joe Fernandez,T3, of Mium. \ 
who has played in two pro tournaments. Among the several ranked players wbd- 
turn 16 thisyear, and consequently would not be affected, are Steffi Gnu of West 
Germany, Gabrida S ab a tim of Argentina, Katerina Maleeva cf Bulgaria, - ^ 
anie Rehe of Highland. Illinois, and Melissa Gurney of Palos Verdes. California. 


14;. 

TO 

XT’ 

3 

34 


m i. — Tracys w < 4 

ithy Rinaldi — would not have been allowed to tom "t? 40 * 
'22, and Jaeger, 19, cmTentiy are not playing bccao«.; ^ | 


■445 

Sr> 

■553 

■SC4 

39£ 


1CV 

I-' 

19 


Camacho to Fight Ramirez for WBC Tide 

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Unbeaten Hector (Macho) Camacho of- New York CfaJ, 
wB challenge World Booting Council Kghtwright champion Jose Luis Ramirez «J 

mPVlTA I ihl in B htlai li - - — - T - _ >■ 1 a m 1... i 



^ehaO 


Mouco City in a 1 2-round title bom on June 6. it was announced Thursday. k 

Camacho wall be going for bis second world championship. He war the WBCw 
junior lightweight crown on Aug. 7, 1983, beating RafadUmon, and defe 
once, bestmjs Rafael Solis, before relinquishing the title because of “ 


the quick Brarifian Ayrton Senna. 
Laffite w 


resting — Renault, Lotus-Renault 
and Wil 


cloudv; r-rulnf SlvWiowtra; iw-*oow; M-ttormy. 


filliarnSrHonda. Brabham- 
BMW and Ligter-Renault are on 
Pirdli tires. 

Gordon Murray, another design 
engineer, has drawn a typically 
neat new Brabham for two-time 
Brazilian world champ ion Nelson 


went back to Ligjer for 
what, at the age of 41, could be his 
final season. 

Brabham dropped Itaiiaa Indy 
car driver Teo rabi for Frances 
Francois Hesnaulu 
Ken Tyrrell made peace with.the 
International Auto srnrt Federa- 


tion and, is a suprisedeaL got Re- 
nault turbo engines, though he will 
stan in Rio with underpowered 

li.** r*. ■ 


SATURDAY* FORECAST — CNMIfSLr CP»JW. FMJJPIIJT: 5*ggg± , - 

(S-54). PARIS: 5tawv Tma 15—7 (3»— 45 }.rO«E: Shemrra Temp, often had the McLaRQSS 5p«d 

19-8 (44-44). tel *VfV: Fair. TwiW. 38-11 {72-531. ZURICH! SMB. r 

Tams- TO— 4 144 —43). BANGKOK: Jsryi 34 — H m— 51). MONO 

KOMO: Cloudy. T«mD. 21 — IB tTO— 411.^ MANILA: Ctaitfy. Twuajl— M 
US— 751. SEOUL: FOOT. T«N. 15— 2 (59— Ml. SIN® AFORE: ThwWW- 
norms. Tenia. 33— 3S(9i— -7n. TOKYO; Foot. Temp. 1* — T2 (41— Ml. 


PiqneL Die car will be powered by .Cosworths for Britain’s Martin 

Brundle and Germany's Stefan 
Belief. 


last year, but the engines did not 
prove reliable. Still, Brabham team 
owner Benne Ecclestone signed for 


Two teams disappeared and two 
came is, with a third on the way. 
ATS folded and under-rated driver 


Manfred Winkelhock of West Ger- 
many and designer Gustav Brun- 
ner went to RAM-Hart. 

Toleman had to drop out be- 
cause it could not find hres for an 
excellent car with drivers John 
Watson and Stefan Johansson. It 
broke last season with Pirelli and 
moved to Michdia. Goodyear re- 
fused to take on Toleman for 1985. 
saying it was fully committed to 16 
others care. 

The Italian Minardi team will 
run one car for Pier-Luigi Martini 
with a Cosworth until a new motor 
is ready from Carlo Cbiti. formerly 
of Alfa. Germany’s Zakspeed, 
broadly experienced in many other' 
rbcM , built a grand prix car in- 
house and signed Britain’s raring 
medical doctor. Jonathon -Palmer. ■ 


It will compete only in European 
races this season. 

A new U.S. entry, run 
gp businessman Carl ! 
sponsored by the giant 
Companies Ina, is due to start late 
in the season with former world . 
champion Alan Jones of Australia 
coming out of semi-rctiremenL The 
team is preparing for a full two-car 
championship run in 1986. 

There are i6 races scheduled, die 
European Grand Prix in Rome 
’having been canceled because Of 

municipal opposition. 

The New York Grand Prix, 
scheduled but not run the past two 
years because of problems in find- 
ing a site, remains doubtful Brit- 
ain’s. Brands Hatch is pitching to 
fill that Sept. 22. 


m a k i ng the 130-pound weight finch. 

Slirnian Leads Lyle by 1 in Greensboro 

GREENSBORO, Noth Carofina (Combined Dispatches) — third-year pro J <£ 




on the U.S. lour. He was the first 


tournament to seerne his foil paring rights or. _ ^ , 

off the tee on the Forest Oaks Country Chib course and got his 67 on 
before the spring winds kicked up. . < 


5 

^TS 


Pa 

*3 

JO 

« 

ST 

SS 

S3 

ST, 

SO 

as: 

A* 

M. 

■C 

■4# 


Ewing, Miller Voted Best College Players ^v 

.. ; 

_ the star center on Georgetown’s NCAA i 

jimior^dtaflie . Sotnlreffi ream that^ lam _in ;rin>- 

■•" Z V , '■ 


A1> 

-5* 

■S&f 

sr 

-5« 

sot 

sc 

.41, 

Aft 

■ist 

■ze 


wereboaored at the annual Naxs 




Wi 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-STJNDAY. APRIL 6-7, 1985 


SPORTS 



Page 11 


Blue Jays Favored to Win the East, 

Bui in Tight Race With Tigers, Orioles 

Larry Sheets; a young right-handed 
pheher with a U.0G earned- run av- 


s die 1985 Season, AL Finds Itself Leagues Apart 


KSE&Jflf- 


Thomas Boswell 

PosfSerrice — 

_ __ WASHINGTON — At the mo- 
/^pfjnent, the American League East 
* Division is big-leagoe baseball. 
i ... . More of the best teams and the 
■jtest players caD this division home 
o-can he gathered together in aO 
rest of baseball combined, 
division is such an exnbar- 
ll of riches that fang hardy 
whether to applaud or be- 
this state of affairs. 

Overthe past seven years, the 
five best cumulative records in ma- 
jor league baseball have been built 
by teams in the East., 

An all-star team from this divi- 


Pick in West Is Turns or White Sox, 
But Mariners Could Surprise Them AU 


. _ in Kca Dixon and 

baseman, Fritz Cotmally, 
acquired in a trade from San Diego. 

The Toronto Blue Jays already 
had youth, starting pitching an d 
power. What they needed was a 
bullpen. So, the Blue Jays, whose 
team record for saves was II, trad- 
ed /or Caudill, who last season bad 
45 victori es-plus-saves, and left- 
hander Gary Lavefle, who had 19 
saves. 

In the process, the Blue Jays apt 
rid of powerful but moody Chff 
Johnson, who had hit 16 horae 
runs; swift but fragile Dave Col- 




sion probably could put together Kns, who had 60 strien bases, and 

more impressive statistics, more #fc '*-***- * 

HaQ of Fame credentials and more 
marquee punch than a comparable 
squad from the majors' other 19 
teams. 

Think: not? 

How about a team of T Par- 

The AL East Division 
will be fun to watch, 
but it is far from easy 
picking a champion. 



tCHA WAS LYING ft 
ND I THINK rP5 
ST TIME 6HE EVER 



rish, Lou Whitaker, Alan Tram- 
mell, Kirk Gibson, Jack Morris, 
Dan Petty, AnreEo Lopez and Wil- 
lie Hernandez of Detroit; Cal Rip- 
ken, Eddie Murray, Mike Bod- 
dicker; Scott McGrreor and Storm 
Davis of Baltimore; Lloyd Moseby, 
Wiffie Upshaw, Dave Stieb, Doyle 
Alexander and Bill Candfll of To- 
ronto; Dave Winfield, Don Mat- 
- tingly, Rickey Henderson, Dave 
Righetti, Phil Niekro and Ron 
Guidry of New York, and Jim Rice, 
Wade Boggs. Dwight Evans, Mike 
Easier, Tony Armas and Rich Ged- 
man of Boston. 

And that’s only from five teams, 
leaving out the lDres of MDwankee's 
Cedi Cooper and Robin Yount, 
and Cleveland’s Bert Blyleven and 
Andre Thonuon. 

Instead of grumbling about the 
injustice of four AL East teams 
fmKhrng with better records last 
year than did the AL West Division 
champi on, let us anticipate the 
marv^ous potential of 1985. 

Because the Detroit Tigers won 
the division tide by 15 games, the 
iest of the gang immediately spent 
•itevrinter getting better. Yes, die 
"virion ever, may have inh 
itself moire than any other 
erer itfidr^ • ' 


the overrated Alfredo Griffin, a 
shortstop who combined no range 
— be had the fewest assists per 
game among regulars at his posi- 
tion — with a .248 on-base percent- 
age. 

With top prospect Tony Fernan- 
dez at shortstop all season and Len 
M at u szek, acquired from Philadel- 
phia, adding power as left-handed 
batting designated hitters, the Blue 
Jays easily should surpass their 89 
victories of 1 984. How many more? 
They lost 1 5 games last year when 
they had led dj the eighth inning. 

It was not likely that George 
Sionbrenner would stand idle and 
watch all this. In center field the 
New York Yankees now have Hen- 
derson, who some day may be re- 
membered as the greatest leadoff 
man in the history of the sport. 
They also have a new pitcher, Ed 
Whitson, fresh off winning 14 
games for National League pen- 
nant-winning San Diego. 

Henderson was placed oh the 15- 
day disabled fist Wednesday and 
will miss the first four games of the 
season, the team said, having 
sprained his left ankle sliding dur- 
ing an exhibition game March 17. 

Still, the Yankees may have trad- 
ed some of their players of the 
future for Henderson, but they 
gave up little of their present. 

The Boston Red Sox, who had 
the most feazed batting lineup in 
baseball after a midseason trade for 
dutch hitter Bifly Buckner, im- 
proved by doing nothing. For once 
the Red Sox did not panic and 
trade their young pitchers. Instead, 
they are determined to kt Roger 
Gemens (9-4), Al Nipper (11-6) 
and Demits Boyd (12-12) grow up 
in Fenway Paric. To help their stag- 
gering bullpen, they switched left- 
hander Bobby Ojeda (12pI2) to re- 
lief and traded for much-uqured 
veteran Bruce Kisoo. 

Even tbie Tigers refused to help 
thar’fd«^y'‘rian£fin ( g ? paL They 



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Bobby Merchant played a fittie football with Toby Harrah of the Rangers on Thursday as Yankees won exhibition, 6-3. 


Tiger Stadium with a home run. 

AH this obviously means that 
five teams in the AL East will end 
up in a tie with ] 05 victories, right? 

No, there are weaknesses. So 
great are the strengths in the divi- 
sion that the only way to handicap 
is by the reverse process of spotting 
flaws. 

First, the Yankees cannot win. 
Not enough pitching. They cannot- 
beat all these powerhouses with a 
starting rotation that includes a 46- 
year-old knoddcballer, Niekro; a 
former fastball er who needs a 
change up, Guidry; a 30-year-old 
who only once has won a dozen 
games, Whitson, and a pitcher with 
arm trouble, John Montefusco. 
Montefusco has been put on the 
21-day disabled list because he has 
been bothered by a nerve in his left 


die left side of the in- 
fidd looks ordinary, at best. 

The Red Sax could win. But they 
also seem vulnerable in such dan- 
gerous waters. Can either Gemens 
or Nipper, the latter currently out 
with an ulcer, win 20 by himself? If 


they cannot, who can? Boyd, Ojeda 
and Bruce Hurst all were 12-12 last 
year. No team can win this division 
without three starters who have the 
potential of matching the 54-27 re- 
cord of Morris, Petty and Wilcox in 
1984. 

The Red Sax are better, but not 
good enough. Also, almost all their 
hitters had a near-peak season last 
year. 

That leaves the Tigers, Blue Jays 
and Orioles as the only dubs with 
the three ingredients necessary for 
winning 100 games: three 17- to 20- 
game winners, a 175-homer lineup 
and a deep bullpen. 

The Orioles are the long shot. 
McGregor and Boddicker have 
looked fine in Florida, but Davis 
seems to have misplaced his confi- 
dence. Dennis Martinez and Dixon 
may compensate for the loss of 
Mike Flanagan, whose injury will 
him out until August, bur a 
season from Davis is manda- 
tory. 

In the 1980s it has been the 
hungry, rising teams that have suc- 
whfle nothing has failed 


tike the memory of success. Al- 
ready, the Tigers have shown 
cracks. Whitaker agreed to try to 
play third base, then changed his 
mind, annoying the old-school dis- 
ciplinarian, Anderson. 

Catcher Parrish, the team’s 
linchpin, still has shnnlHw prob- 
lems and is slated to be a designat- 
ed hitter against left-handed pitch- 
ing. Finally, the word this spring 
has been that Tr amm ell, after both 
knee and shoulder surgery, may not 
be able to start in the fidd day after 
day. 

These Tigers, because of their 35- 
5 start last year, never have had to 

race. You\ever know whidneams 
can handle it 

The tigers now look only slight- 
ly stronger than did the defending 
league champion Brewers in 19S2 
or the Orioles in 1983. 

Remember the “Big Blue Brew 
Crew?” This year Milwaukee could 
finish last Baseball's law this de- 
cade is flux. 

This spring’s popular pennant 
pick is Toronto, and wisely so. 


The Blue Jays are young and 
greedy, fed they have been over- 
looked too li 


experience. Bobby Cox is a sharp 
bench manager who could look 
very smart with a top bullpen. Out- 
fielder George Bell has joined Mo- 
seby and Upshaw as a blue chip 
hitter in the middle of the order. 

Even the Blue Jays, however, 
have thdr worrisome points. Just as 
the Orioles prospered in 1982 and 
the next season with overachieving 
platoon players, so Toronto has 
been stealing with the statistics it 
has gotten from the third base, 
catcher and designated hitter spots 
in its order. 

Finally, the Blue Jays had only 
one player on the 15-day disabled 
list in 1983 and one last year. No 
team is that lucky with injuries. 
Toronto is due for some sprains 
and maybe worse. 

This division will be far more fun 
to watch than to pick. 

So, let's hold our breath, dose 
our eyes and predict: Toronto, De- 
troit, Baltimore, Boston, New 
York, Milwaukee, Cleveland. 




needed^ 


in ’1983, pitcher -Walt Tend! 

_ tn fifth - place that mey rJ “to' badOUp Milt Wilcox, who had 
12 ™nkm for three free shoulder surgery. And Wilcox has 
No*, instead of having a come back just fine. So now the 
in center fidd, a Tigers have even more starting 
and a vacuum at the pitchers. 

tltthattmgorder, the Orioles Even though their manager, 
a trim and 
Lynn in center, 
ing Don Aase in 




when he returns from a hand injury 
in May, a .300 hitter to begin rallies 
in Lee Lacy. 

As if that were not enough, the 
Orioles’ farm system has delivered 
a powerful designated bitter in 


may have as ferocious-looking a 
frame as Waller Payton of the Na- 
tional Football League’s Chicago 
Bears. Someday, the 6-foot-l (1.85- 
meter) 200-pound (90-kilogram) 
Simmons will break a seat bad: in 


If They Are Wearing Masks, They Must Be BasdxM Players 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Major league baseball 
may have given itself a tnck instead of a treat. 

Wednesday, the two rides in baseball's on- 
going labor negotiations agreed to expand 
league playoffs from five to seven games, 
which will push the start of the Worid Series 
bade from Oct. 15 to Oct 19. If all seven 
games are needed to decide the Scries, it 
would end Sunday, Oct 27 — if there are no 
ramouts. 

That is four days before Halloween. Half- 


way through the National Football League 
season, and a season approaching winter in 
some northern dues. So what wm be done 
about what may become the longest season? 

’There's nothing you can do about it this 
year,” said Jack McKean, general manager of 
theNL champion San Diego Padres. “Some- 
day, I suppose, we face the posribfliiy of 
starting the season a week earlier. 

“If we’re in It, I don’t care if we play until 
the middle of November," be said, echoing a 


prevalent “so-what-tf-it’s-late” sentiment 

In cdd-weatber dries such as Montreal, 
Toronto, Detroit and Chicago, an early start 
might create as many problems as a late- 
finish. The dtizens of Montreal, annually 
threatened by early season rainouts and cold 
weather, have voted the money to dome 
Olympic Stadium. 

“You’re going to catch it one way or the 
other, at the beginning or al the end of the 
schedule," said the Montreal Expos’ general 
manager, Murray Cook. 


By Thomas Boswell 

Washington Pm Service 

WASHINGTON - Who can 
win the AL West? Well, the New 
York Yankees figure to have a pret- 
. ty decent farm dub at Columbus, 
Ohio. It would be a good bet 

But, since the Columbus Clip- 
pers play in the International 
League, how about the Seattle' 
Manners? 

Does not this division deserve to 
be represented in the playoffs by a 
ream that never has had a winning 
season? 

If not the Mariners, then why not. 
Minnesota? Would it not be justice 
if the Twins won a flag the year 
after Calvin Griffith finally sold 
them? Besides, in the playoffs, how 
can baseball do without a manager, 
Billy Gardner, named “Slick.” 

The most talent belongs to the 
Chicago White Sox. Did last year 
and does once again. Few question 
that. But bow can yon love a team 
that wins 99 games one year, then 
the next wins only 74? 

That .154 percentage drop is the 
biggest in the majors since 1949; 
and the White Sox did not even 
have an excuse. They were the 
worst team in dose games, going 
17-32 in contests decided by one 
run: the worst in coming from be- 
hind, winning only 29 times, and 
the worst at losing by more than 
five runs. 27 times. 

Adding Ozzie Guillen at short- 
stop and Bob James in the bullpen, 
plus a team rebound from the 
shame of 1984. may well pul the 
White Sox back in the playoffs But 
do they deserve it? 

The Kansas Gty Royals are the 
defending champions But they 
also are probably the worst team in 
the history of baseball to finish 
first. Nobody dse ever got out- 
scored for the season and ended up 
with a new flag for their stadium 
pole. The Royals may have George 
Brett and Willie Wilson available 
for the full season, but what can be 
expected from the rest of the 
Royals's suspect crew? 

The California Angels Still can 
put the division’s most glamorous 
team on the fidd; that is, for televi- 
sion's game of the week But Rod 
Carew, Reggie Jackson. Bobby 
Grich, Doug DeCinces, Bod 
B oone, Brian Downing and Tom- 
my John seldom all make it out of 
rick bay on the same day. 

Gene Mauch has returned as the 
;ds*s manager. He has a tough 
Mauch, looking at his team’s 
weakness up the middle, said of his 
catcher. Boose, who batted 202 
last season; his shortstop. Dick 
Schofield (J93), and his center 
fielder, Gary Pettis T227J, sad; 
^The offense could improve 100 
percent if those guys improve 30, 
30 and 40 percent.” 

The Texas Rangers should not 
be a bad team. They just are. 

It is not easy for an organization, 
in a few years’ time, to pvt away 
the following Ditchers in trade: 
Bert Blyleven (19-7 in 1984), Doyle 
Alexander (17-6), Mike Smithson 
(15-13), John Butcher (13-1 1\ Rem 
Darling (12-9). Dave Righetti, Rick 
Honeycutt, wait Terrdl, Ray Fon- 
tenot and Len Barker. 

Even with their sBfy deals and 
dumb free agent buys — last winter 


the Rangers spent 55 milli on to get 
old Cliff Johnson, Burt Hooton (3- 
6) and Dave Roxana — they look 
pretty good on paper. 

But when is Arlington Stadium 
going to get a paper field? 

Toe Oakland A’s still are paying 
the long-range price of playing 
then-manager Biliy Martin's “Billy 
BalT in the early 1980s. He burned 
out one whole generation of arms 
with his complete-game binge. 

Oakland had the worst earaed- 
run average in the majors last year. 
The staff that had 94 complete 
games in 1980 had 15 last year. 
After trading reliever Bill Caudill, 
Oakland's pitching should be even 
worse now. 

That leaves the Twins and the 
Mariners. 

If the Twins, eliminated on the 
final weekend of last season in a 
game in which, they blew a 10-0 

U the AL West 
Division is not ripe for 
weirdness, what 
division ever was? 

lead, do win the West it will be no 
thanks to the dub's new owners. 

What reason has the new boss, 
Carl Fohlad. for not getting a re- 
liever over the winter to help Ron 
Davis, who squandered 15 save 
chances last year? Two of those 
came in games when a title might 
still have been won. 

Except for the bullpen, the 
Twins are a young and talented 
team. Only Detroit and Baltimore 
had three starters who won more 
games than the 46 of Frank Viola, 
Smithson and Butcher. Kent Hrbek 
and Tom Brunansky, between 
them, hit 59 home runs. Rookie 
Kirby Puckett shored up center 
field. Tim Teufel and Gary Gaetti 
bring good bats to second and third 
bas& Mickey Hatcher hit J02 and 
Dave Eagle is a decent catcher. 

Thai is a lot of pluses. Of course, 
the Twins desperately need a short- 
stop. but who in the West does not? 

Baseball’s mystery team could be 
Seattle. Due, the Mariners won 
only 74 games last year. True, they 
are built on youth True, no one 
should bet real money on them. But 
they could be fun. 

The rotation of Mark Langston 
(17-10), Jim Beattie (12-16). Matt 
Young and Mike Moore has poten- 
tial. Ed Vande Bog, fastballex Ed- 
win Nunez and Salome Barajas 
could become respectable in the 
bullpen. 

The batting orderls built around 
such young players as Alvin Davis, 
who batted in 116 runs last season; 
Ken Phdps, with 24 homers in 290 
at bats, and Phil Bradley, who bat- 
ted ,301. And such veterans as Al 
Cowens, Steve Henderson and Bar- 
ry BouneEL Spike Owens can play 
shot just fine, thanks, and second 
baseman Jack Perconte blossomed 
at age 30, batting .294. 

If the AL West is not ripe for 
weirdness, what division ever was? 

However, the more rational fin- 
ishing order would be: Minnesota. 
Chicago, Seattle, Kansas Gty, Cal- 
ifornia, Texas and Oakland. 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 

Transition 


® SL National Basketball Association S tandings 


AASEBft.lL 


Canadiens 
Win a Rout 


■ASTERN CONFERENCE 
AltanHc Dtotskm 


IEFS 


£ 


Recoi 


-x~D*nv*r 
x -Houston 
x-Datlns 
x-San Antonio 
x-Utofi 

Kansas City . 


USe Of UK F".*— 

French Open. 

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38 

39 

JM 

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J87 

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New York 

24 

53 

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Caatral Division 



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22*i 

jr" Atlanta 

31 

46 

JOS 

25 

Indiana 

30 

57 

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WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MtohMsf Civilian 


49 S3 MS — 

41 32 SIS 5 

42 34 J53 7 

M M SOL TOV, 
37 40 Jfl 13fe 
30 44 MS I* 


fleeted- 

„ _ ..-hi? O r ' c V Bontmors 
3) CM***, . . : *wYorfc 

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pacific Division 

v-LA, Labors 54 20 , J37 — 

x-Porttand 38 30 J00 10 

33 41 ,A» 23 VS 
31 46 . .403 25M 

CUppars 28 4* 364 3»Vi 

GoMon State- 21 54 -.273 3M 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 

» 36 M *— m 

34 23 32 41 — ISO 


Outrun! nos 14-24 1-1 », Prossov 8-12 4-5 20; 
Trlpwcka M-3S 4-5 32. Long 10-17 3-4 21 Ro- 
betmtfx: Detroit 54 (Lalmbw 12); Miiwtv- 
k0042 (Lister 13LAfNHs: Dotro!TJ4 (Thomas 
20i; Milwaukee 31 (Hodae*. Moaoiet 6). 
Atlanta 31 U 37 28— ISO 

New- Vent it n it IS— 7?» 

Levirssten t-16 4-522. D.WIIUns 7-21 4-4 It; 
wofkar Mi 8-10 18, Grunfold 4-11 6-7 14. Re- 
beaodo; Atlanta 74 (Levfnattan 13); New 
York SS (Walker, Grunfold 7). AssteD: Atlan- 
ta M (Johnson ill; New York to (WaHter 4). 

» » H 21 — 110 
28 25 M 14 — W3 
English 14-253-331, Nan 8-12 Ml 23; Adams 
11-24 9-‘U31,Hwnohries5-T34'5T4.Mocy 7-120- 

TIARehowMts: Denver 5Z( Enal Wit); Phoe- 
nix 40 (Adams 131. Assists: Denver 2t (Lover 
11); Phoenix 32 (Adams II). 

Saettte 31 48 3f 22— lit 

Wall 24 32 25 27— 1W 

Chambers 73-22 9-ID 34. Wood 14-24 45 32; 
Oanttev 11-21 12-13 24, Griffith 13-25 3-5 30. 
■teMenda: Seattle SO (Wood 8); Utah 46 (Eo- 
taa t). Assist*; Seattle 28 (Hensersont] j Utah 
25 (Green 13). 

21 28 25 22— IN 
V V 38 1MU 
Short 1244 3-8 27,S>ntth 8-165-671; Otoltiwon 
11-14 4-4 26, Sampson 7-14 H it. Rebounds: 
Houston 51 (SormMon 12); Golden State 64 
ISmttti 161. Assists: Houston 27 (HoUlnS 8); 
Golden State 24 (Short •>. 


Exhibition Baseball 


Football 


■Toronto 
California 
Otfcnoo. 

i? fit f ' c sr. - HaHtaiore 




Oakland 
Oewetand 
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AMERICAN LEAGUE 

W L Pfl. 
18 7 J20 

14 t AOt 
18 12 JM 
. 14 12 J71 

14 12 -X» 

13 12 J20 

15 14 .517 

12 12 -500 

12 14 M3 
12 14 Ml 

H 15 444 

12 16 A2t 

f 13 AW 

11 14 *487 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

11 ID 415 

A -*• -•PWtodetoMo ■ W 9 M» 

MW.* 

'Kh-Vont 11 W 5K 

CNcboo 14 12 -OT 

* -OMbkMH. ' 14 11 JM 

■ Mil FroncHco • 13 23 JOfl 

tattoo " ’ 12 14 M2 

12 17 JM 

- io » J* 

. 7 11 ‘ MB 

the Iff* 5 17 527 

' V-\ THURSDAY'S RESULT? 


U5FL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Blrmtaohom 

Tompo Bov 

New Jersey 

Memphis 

Bottfmore 

Jocfcsonvuia 

Orlando 


Pet PF PA 
sn 161 n* 
MS 169 136 
JM Ml 156 
<C9 140 157 
J17 109 90 
.333 141 177 
J43 128 193 


boston— P laced Jerry Remv. second 
basemaaon the Zl-davdtsau led list. Ret eased 
Jeff Newman, catcher, lor itw Purpose of eiv- 
tao him his unconditional release. Ooiloned 
Ed Jurak, I nW older, and MIW Brown and Ed 
Styim, Pitcher*, to Pawtucket of the I ntemo- 
t tonal Lfldpit, 

CLEVELAND— Placed Andre Thornton, 
designated hitter, an the 21 -day disabled Ifcrt 
effective March 24. Sen) Jhn Shw and Keith 
Croat, piKAere; Gene Petrolll, catcher, and 
Danny Rofm. tnfMder, to Maine of the Inter- 
national Lftaoue. Acquired Kevin Buckley, 
cotcbarauNMder.fram Texas fbr a (Mover la 
be named tatar or cash, and Sent Buckley to 
Maine. 

KANSAS CITY— Traded Mika Brewer, oth- 
ftefder.fo Cleveland In exchange for a plover 
to be named later and cash. 5en) Pat Putnam, 
first baseman; Dave Useaar, outfielder ; Jim 
Scranton, (nflekter, and Tom Niemann, catch- 
er, to Omaha el The American Association. 
Sent Mark HuUmann and Ren la Martin, 
pitchers, to their minor league complex for 
nensthmnenl. 

NEW YORK — Optioned Rex HucHer and 
KeHti Smith, 1 "fielders, to Columbus of the 
International League. Seat Brian Fisher, 
pitcher, mta Juan Espino, catcher, to Ihoir 
minor le agu e complex ter I'euuhmment. 

SEATTLE— Traded Tom Bums, pitcher, to 
the New York Mete for Paul Ham ns, first 
bat m an dee le nol s a h i tter nod assigned Hot- 
Jlns to Chattanooga of the southern Leaaoe. 
Sent Roy Thomas, Karl Best and Dave ToWk. 
pitchers; and John Moses. ouHMder.lo their 
minor league compl ex tar reassignment. 

T EXAS— Placed Mlckov Mem outfielder, 
on waivers for the Parana of giving him an 
unconditional release. Traded Donnie Scott, 
catcher, to Seattle tar Ottawa Mercado, 
catcher. Signed Gtann BnmtiMHVcatcher, too 
minor league contract. 

TORONTO-Sen) Ride Leach. outfleMer. to 
Syracuse «f tag Internal tana* Leaaue. Sent 
Fred Manrtaue. Inflektar, to their minor 
leoaue complex for reatstanmenl. 


LEAGUE— Suspended Laraile smith of st. 
Louts for three days and fined him an und to- 
dosed amount for an ottered Ion with an um- 
pire to an exMMtfon game March 20. 

ATLANTA— OPHonod Randy Johnson, In- 
flalder, to Rldimond of the I n ternotl o not 
Leogue. 

NEW YORK— Placed Ray KntaM, third 
baseman, cm the 21-day dlsitaled UsS effective 

5T. LOUIS— Sent Vinca Coleman. outtMd- 
er,and Ron Jackson and Bin Lyons. Infteldara 
fa Louisville of the Amorteon Association. 


8 Persons Indicted on 26 Charges 
Involving Tulane Basketball Games 


Hockey 


NHL Standings 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Tennis 


92 354 293 
7V 331 319 
SB 277 393 


Houston 

Oofckmd 

Artrono 

Denver 

Portland 

Son Airtonld 

Las Anseies 


THURSDAY'S RESULT 
Orlando 28, Memphis 17 


JDS 203 132 

J5V 158 130 
M3 135 93 

MU 133 126 
J3S 81 m 
J33 79 1W 
.167 T24 M7 




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Lradino noflmpwlnners 
Tour W i re u g h March 31: 
i; Curtis srrong* 
z Calvin Peete 

3. Mark O'Meara 

4. Lqnnv Wodklra 

5. Crate StatBer 

6. Fuzzy Zoollor 

7. Tom WatMn 

8 . Larry (tinker 

9. Mika Smith 
ia Frtte Cauptes 

11, DA we taring 

12. Peter Jocoumb 


In the 1985 PGA 

5336,991 
5249 JM 
£09,185 

J197J30 

515X801 

5131177 

S121J32 

5T21J04 

*114309 

*11X897 

S112J07 

09300 

msts 


MNNY MONTE CARLO OPEN 
(At Monte Cartel 
Third Reond 

Ivon LtndL Czochostovakla. def. Jan Gon- 
nareson, Swed en. 4-& 7-5. 

Francesca Cancel IcttL Italy, del Joaklm 
Nyslram, Sweden, 6>Z .7>4 

Tomas Smld, Czedmievakta. Art. Jese Hl- 
aueraL Soabv 64, 6a 

LJbor Pbrwk, Czechottevakla, def. Martin 
Jolte. Argenlliw, tA. 6-1. 

.. Mots Wtkmder, S woden, det. Victor PwcL 
Paraouav. 4-1 4*1 

Aaron Krfcfcchrtn, UJ4, dot Jese-LuN Otrc, 
AraanHna, 5-7, M, M, 

QwrtgfliHi 

Lendl del Concettotti, 64, 6-1. 

Henrik Sonetttroem, Swkmi, def. Michael 
WestohaL WM) Germany. 6-4, 6-3 . 

Wl lander del Plmek, *-3,6-1 

KricketaM def. Smld, HrtW 


World Cup Soccer 


AfRKAN ZONE . 
Secgsd ReamL Pint Leg 
Egypt 1. Madagascar O' 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pts GP GA 
V-PhlladelpNa 52 20 7 111 342 240 

x- Washington 44 25 9 97 308 233 

x-N.Y. islanders 40 34 5 85 340 307 

x-N-Y. Rangers 26 43 10 62 294 342 

Pittsburgh 24 49 5 53 269 371 

New Jersey 22 47 9 53 258 335 

Adeem DMslen 

x -Montreal 40 27 II 91 300 254 

x -Quebec 40 29 9 89 318 272 

X- Buffalo 37 27 14 n 281 230 

x- Boston 35 34 9 79 294 282 

Hartford 29 40 9 67 265 313 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris w» w«. 

x-St. Louts 35 31 12 82 289 280 

X-Oilcago 37 35 6 <0 304 296 

* -Detroit 27 40 11 65 306 349 

x -Minnesota 25 42 12 £2 265 3T7 

Toronto 20 50 ■ 48 250 348 

Smyrna DMstoa 

V- Edition ton 49 19 10 108 391 287 

X-Wlrsntooa 42 27 9 93 34B 323 

x-Cateary 41 27 10 

X-Loe Angeles 33 32 13 

Vancouver 25 45 8 

(x-cJlnched otayoH berth) 

(twctl netted division tHIe] 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
N.Y. fhnmers 2 3 e— s 

*L Loots 18 3-4 

Wlomor (7). Osborn# (4), Stmdslrom (29), 
HeOtara2(2D);Mgnen2(3l),Paslawsfel (22), 
Sutter (371. Shots on goal: N.Y. Rangers [an 
MHIen) 5-10-7—22; 51. Louis (on Hanlon) 21-13- 
1-41. 

• 1 S-J 

2 2 1-8 

Middleton 2 (29), Bourque 2 (201. McKenna 
(18); McKanna2(l9), Ruff (12).Shotsaa pool: 
Buffalo (on Keane) 16-11-13-28; gotten (on 
Souve) 18-7-12—99, 

IVf. Magder* 8 8 8-8 

PhUadotehla • 3 O—l 

Kerr (54), HoBxxtor 13). Beraen (9). Stef* 
on goal: N.Y. isiendan (on Undberph) 16-ft- 
9-34; Phlloaelpnia (on HrvMY) 5-10-11-24, 
WasMnetaa 8 8 8-8 

Hartford 1 1 8-3 

Malone (22), Ferrara (18). Shots on otxd: 
Washington (at Out) 1 3-10-17— 40; Hartford 
(on Rtoaini t-M— 18. 

ON bee 18 0—1 

Huntar (21), Tramway (30), Cdrbonneau 2 

OH. Robinson (Wl.Turoatte (7), Niton (zi); 

Souve (Do. Shots in goaf: Quebec (on Pen- 

ney) 104*15—30; Montreal (on Sevtgity, Goa- 
sennl ifrM-33. 


The Associated Press 

MONTREAL — What was 
billed as a potentially epic battle in 
La Belle Province fizzled into a 
one-sided rout for the Montreal 
Canadiens. 

The Canadiens and their archri- 
vals, the Quebec Noidiques. were 
tied for first place in the Adams 

NHL FOCUS 

Division entering Thursday night’-s 
game. The winner would get the 
inside track for (he division title 
with two games remaining this 

weekend. One Montreal newspaper 
even devoted five pagestopreview- 
ing the contest 

But the Nordiqnes, who have 
Stltlggjed against the Clanndranfl 
this season, winning one and lying 
one in eight contests, feD apart in 
the second period as Montreal 
scored four goals, two by Guy Car- 
bonneau, en route to a 7-1 romp. 

The Canadiens have 91 points in 
the National Hockey League's 
most competitive sector. Quebec 
has 89 and Boston 88. Montreal 
hosts Boston on Saturday and 
plays at Buffalo Sunday, while 
Quebec has a homc-and-homc sc- 
ries with Hartford. The Sabres’ oth- 
er game is Saturday at Toronto. 

Elsewhere, it was Boston 5, Buf- 
falo 3; the New York Rangers S, SL 
Louis 4; Philadelphia 3, the New 
York Islanders 0 and Hartford 2, 
Washington 0. 

“We started thinking about this 
game two weeks ago ” said Carbon- 
neau, who scored one goal with 
Montreal shorthanded. “We knew 
we would have to meet Quebec and 
beat Quebec. The way both teams 
were playing the last five games, I 
thought it would be dose. 

"I think everyone in tins room 
expected a dose game tonight. But 
I think that on most of our 2-on-Is 
or 3-on-Ts, we put the puck in the 
net And onCe we had the lead, we 
knew we had them in our system.” 

After the teams ended the Gist 
period tied at 1, goals by Mario 
Tremblay, Carbotuwau’s two and 
Larry Robinson's score on a power 
play clinched maWers- 


United Press International 

NEW ORLEANS — A grand 
juiy returned a 26-count indict- 
ment against three basketball play- 
ers, thine students and two suspect- 
ed bookmakers Thursday in the 
allffg ffd, point-shaving case that re- 
portedly involved cocaine and cash 
and has brought basketball at Tu- 
lane University to the verge of ex- 
tinction. 

The New Orleans district attor- 
ney, Harry Connick, said the play- 
ers were indicted for fixing three 
games, not two as had. been report- 
ed since last week when the first 
arrests were made. Connick also 
-said the investigation could widen. 

The indictments dtaim that the 
players fixed Tulane's Feb. 16 loss 
to Virgiziia Tech in addition to the 


two games previously mentioned, 
against Southern Mississippi and 
Memphis State. 

A few hours before the indict- 
ments were announced, the univer- 
sity's president, Eamon Kelly, said 
he would propose that men’s bas- 
ketball be abolished. He said he 
was taking that step because of the 
criminal charges and because of a 
school investigation that has con- 
cluded that cash payments were 
made to players by the coach, Ned 
Fowler. 

Kelly said be had accepted the 
resignations of Fonder and two as- 
sistants, Mike Richardson and 
Max Pfeifer, after learning they 
paid cash to players in direct viola- 
tion of NCAA rules. He said 
Fowler was not connected with the 
alleged point shaving 


Hawks Make King-Less Knicks 
Fed More Common Than Ever 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The New York 
Knicks lost their first six games 
after star forward Bernard King 
suffered a season-ending knee inju- 
ry on March 23. But the wheels did 
not really start coming off the wag- 
on until the seventh game. 

That was Thursday night, when 
the Knicks had one of the worst 
shooting games in recent years in 

NBA FOCUS 

losing, 100-79, to Atlanta, 
the Hawks’ flickering Natioi 
Basketball Association playoff 
hopes alive. 

“We've missed 180 games be- 
cause of player injuries, but the 
Knicks have missed over 300,” said 
Atlanta’s coach. Mike Fratcflo. 
“When you have to play back-to- 
back games like they aid, it’s awful- 
ly tough.” 

The Knicks, who were averaging 
106.5 points in thdr first six games 
without King, gpt only 22 field 
goals against the Hawks, only two. 


more than the NBA futility record 
of 20 set in 1955 by the Rochester 
Royals. The previous low this sea- 
son was 27 by Cleveland on Nov. 3. 

New York took 76 shots, for a 
field-goal percentage of .289. The 
previous NBA low this season was 
'311 by Dallas against Utah on 
Feb. 26. 

“We dun 28 percent, missed 12 
free throws and gave op 23 offen- 
sive rebounds, so I think any any- 
hmnan being who paid to get in 
here would be upset,” said the 
Knicks’s coach, Hubie Brown. 
“You would have to be a die-hard 
Knicks fan not to be.” 

Elsewhere it was Milwaukee 130, 
Detroit 121; Denver 110, Phoenix 
103; Seattle 119, Utah 118. and 
Golden State 113, Houston 108. 

■ Griffith Breaks Record 

Guard Darrell Griffith of. the 
Utah Jazz broke his own NBA re- 
cord for three-point goals in a sea- 
son Thursday night in Salt Lake 
City, making his 93d three-pointer 
on. nis first shot against Seattle. 


The indictments name senior 
center John Williams, 23, and 
sophomore guard-forward David 
Dominique, 19, on two counts of 
sports bribery and three counts of 
conspiracy to commit sports brib- 
cry. 

Senior guard Bobby Thompson, 
who testified to the grand jury ear- 
lier in the day, was dunged with 
two counts of conspiracy. He re- 
portedly has admitted arranging 
the point shaving with the other 
players. 

The most serious charges are 
against Gary Kranz, a junior from 
New Rochelle, New York- He was 
indicted on nine counts of distrib- 
uting cocaine to the players, one 
count of possession of cocaine, 10 
counts of sports bribery and three 
counts of conspiracy. 

Two of Kranz's fraternity broth- 
ers were charged Mark Olensky of 
Fair Lawn, New Jersey, faces 10 
counts of sports bribery and three 
of conspiracy. David Rothenberg 
of Wilton, Connecticut, was indict- 
ed on two counts of conspiracy. 

Suspected bookmakers Roland 
Ruiz, 48. and Craig Bourgeois, 23, 
both of New Orleans, each were 
indicted on five counts of sports 
bribery and one of conspiracy. 

Sports Illustrated magazine, in 
an article published Thursday, re- 
ported that Williams received 
$8,550 for his part in manipulating 
the point spread in game* against 
Southern Mississippi and Memphis 
State. 

The Times- Picayune States-Item 
newspaper reported that Williams 
said he received $10,000 in a shoe- 
box from an assistant coach when 
he agreed to play for Tulane in 
1981. This season. Fowler gave him 
an envelope containing $100 every 
week, the report said. 

The paper identified the assis- 
tant coach as Tom Green, now coa- 
ch at Fairldgh Dickinson in New 
' as denied the charges, 
admitted to the 
payments — which are unrelated to 
the alleged point shaving — in a 
taped statement given authorities 
after his arrest, the newspaper said. 












* - ‘ 
. • -J, ‘ 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUKDAY-SUNPAY, APRIL 6-7, 1985 



ART BUCHWALD 


A Profitable Cell Game 



\t WASHINGTON — I always 
W depend on Simon Wallin for 
inside information on the stock 
market. * 

The other day I got a call from 
him. “I have 
only one word to 
say to you,” he 
whispered. 

“I’m listen- 
ing,” 1 told him. 

“Prisons." 

“Prisons? 

What the hell 
kind of stock 
market tip is 

“^Private pris- BuchwaW 
ons are soon going to be bigger 
than private hospitals. Incarcera- 
tion is a growth industry. There's a 
new company just starting up 
called Big House Inc." 

. “Come on. How are people going 
to make money on prisons?” 

“Good management and tax 
’breaks,” Simon said. "There's an 
unbelievable demand for new pris- 
ons in every stale in the union. The 
public wants criminals locked up, 
but they refuse to pay for the jail- 
houses. So they are giving out fran- 
chises to private entrepreneurs who 
have figured out a way of maldng 
money on the penal system.” 

□ 

*T don't get it If the government 
is running in the Ted putting people 
away, how can the' private sector 
get the system in the black?” 

“It's the way prisons are fi- 
nanced. When the government 
builds a prison complex it has to 
borrow money from the public. If a 
private company builds it, then it 
Becomes a tax shelter ” 

“They're going to lock up prison- 
ers in tax shelters ?” 

“We’re not going to put prison- 
ers in tax shelters, we're putting 
investors in them.” 

“O.IC, so Tm in a prison tax 
shelter. Now what happens?” 

“Big House Inc. leases it back to 
the government and gets a manage- 


ment contract to run it We receive 
the depreciation on the prison as 
well as a daily fee for each prisoner 
we take care of.” 

“I’m not sure I want to make 
money on people who are locked 
up” 

4< You’Il be doing the inmates a 
service because Big House Inc. will 
treat the prison population much 
better than the bureaucrats treat 
them now. After all. they have a 
vested interest in the convicts’ hap- 
piness. In order to make money 
they have to count on word-of- 
mouth. If fonner inmates start bad- 


mouthing Big House in the under- 
, offende 


world, offenders will ask to be sent 
to the competition’s prisons after 
they’re caught." 

□ 

“What about conflict of interest? 
Suppose a person is up for parole, 
and Big House doesn’t want to give 
it to farm because they'll be stuck 
with an empty bed.” 

“You have nothing to worry 
about on that score. There's a wait- 
ing list for every prison in the Unit- 
ed States. Most states are guaran- 
teeing private prison corporations 
105 percent occupancy for the next 
20 years.” 

“Won’t prisoners be resentful 
that people are trying to make 
money on them?” 

“Not when they realize private 
companies have a lot more to offer 
than public institutions. Big House 
is putting in the best security equip- 
ment money can buy, so no one can 
break into a prison that doesn't 
belong there. We’re also installing 
the latest athletic facilities, cable 
TV, workshops and leisure activi- 
ties. Their guards have been in- 
structed to wish every prisoner a 
nice day. They have put ‘How Did 
We Do?' questionnaires in all the 
cells asking inmates to compare 
them with other prisons they've 
been in. Our business is to make the 
consumer, in this case the inmate, 
consider Big House a home away 
from home. That's the only way 
you get repeat business." 

□ 


Americans Abroad in 1984 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Spending 
by Americans on trips abroad 


jumped 15 percent last year from 
J983 to 


i a total of 5214 billion, the 
Commerce Department reported 
Thursday. 


“It sounds awfully good on pa- 
per, but I still don’t understand 
how, if they’re going to provide all 
these services. Bis House win stfll 
make a big profit on running a 
prism institution.” 

“It's quite ample,” Simon said. 
“They're going to serve all the in- 
mates airline food" 


Bombay Yacht dub: Genteel Remnant of the Raj 


By Elisabeth Bumiller 

Washington Post Service 

B OMBAY — The Royal Bom- 
bay Yacht Club seems 
caught in a prewar haze, a time 
when young British officers 
lounged in wicker chairs under 
the fans, boasting of their 
tides thro ugh the Himalayas and - 
tiger bunts in Assam. 

It is a late Victorian hulk of 
crumbling sandstone and Burma 
teakwood dance floors, facing the 
arch of the gateway to India in a 
city where the heat, coconut 
pahns and ramshackle 19th-cen- 
tury architecture create a feeling 
of sensuous decay. Inside, the 
dub has water-splotched walls 
from years of monsoons, bearers 
in white unif orms serving steak- 
and-kidney pie and a gentlemen’s 
reading room that offers The 
Times of London and Punch. 

Walk in the door and enter a 
dusty anachronism where one of 
the more remarkable social lega- 
cies of tile British Raj still exists. 

Here in the lounge, under the 
portrait of Queen Elizabeth II, are 
the Indians commonly referred to 
as “more British than the British.” 
They manage-. enough Hindi to 
order a Scotch and soda from the 
servant, just like the British who 
stayed on. Other Indians like to 
call than “brown sahibs,” anuld- 



•* ‘India was much simpler 
then," said Gita Mehta, the au- 
thor of “Karma Cola,” a book 
about the failed cross-fertilization 
of Indian and Western culture in 
the '60s. ‘You had half the popu- 
lation. You had aQ these chaps in 
starched- white uniforms running 
around. The trains ran on time. 
The assumption was that the 
country worked. You didn’t have 


the sprawling urban messes we 
jw. So 


Ebobrth Boedhr/The WdMngttn PM 

Kerse Naoroji (front), Hakim Subir of the Royal Bombay Yacht Chib. . 


ly derisive variation on the origi- 
itle- 


nal “sahib,” the English gem 

man. 

Considered camp by the more 
Americanized younger Indians, 
or viewed as schizophrenic mi- 
mics by disdainful writers such as 
V.S. Naipaul, the brown sahib 
often has an exquisite Oxbridge 
accent and may have gone to New 
Delhi’s Doon School long before 
Rajiv Gandhi. The dub, founded 
in 1 SSI, didn’t even admit Indians 
until 1959, a dozen years after 
independence, and now proudly 
retains the title “Royal” in its 
name. The membership is mostly 
Indian, but many still refuse to go 
near the place. 

“The ‘Royal’ surprises people," 
said Kerse Naoroji, the Indian 
industrialist who is president of 
the dub. “But none of us have 
wanted to remove it We just like 
to carry on the old traditions.' 


"Sometimes my friends s a^ I 


haven’t gotten over the Britu 
said Hiro Shroff, a chib member, 
public relations executive and for- 
mer yachting correspondent for 


The Times of India. “But there 
are many institutions that are 
ready-made; The British left 
houses here — do you stop occu- 
pying them? We're independent 
now, and we set the rules.” 

In India, the legacy of the Brit- 
ish Raj is everywhere. The civil 
service, the courts, the schools, 
the trains and the roads were all 
created by a foreign invader that 
united the country and ruled it for 
300 years. Today, the Indian up- 
per class remains largely angli- 
cized. It is the dominant minority 
that grew up on cricket, polo, 
Shakespeare and Shaw. There is a 
vague awareness among these In- 
dians now of the rage for the Raj 
in the West, but there are no mov- 
ies or tdevirion series to stir the 
old debate about whether En- 
gland left India better or worse. 
Neither of the two British produc- 
tions, “The Jewel in the Crown” 
or “A Passage to India,” has been 
shown here because of complex 
restrictions on foreign films. 

Instead, there are institutions 
like the Yacht Club where the 
debate still exists on its own. 
Many of the members had par- 
ents who worked closely with the 
British in the elite Indian Gvfl 
Service, and many still fed like 
the young Jawahadal Nehru, who 


told thejudgeai his 1922 trial that 
while studying at Cambridge, “In 
my likes and dislikes I was per- 
haps more an En glishmamhan an 
Indian.” 


But a Yacht Cub member of- 
ten sees himself as doubly superi- 
or — professionally and morally 
English, but spiritually Indian. 


“They think of it as complexity 
rather than confusion,” said Sud- 
hir Kakar, a prominent New Del- 
hi psychoanalyst and the author 
of “Tne Inna- World,'' a study of 
childhood and society in India. 
“They see it as a positive thing." 
Hiro Shroff, for instance, feels 
that the part of his personality 
that is British is his “sense of 
discipline, keeping time, work, 
planning, keeping appoint- 
ments.” His Indian half, he be- 
lieves, is his “sense of family, 
sense of togetherness.” 

Not everyone is so adaptable. 
Prakash Tandon, the first chair- 
man of the Hindustan Lever cor- 
poration and the author of a 
three-volume autobiography 
brimming with social history, re- 
calls the early days after indepen- 
dence in his book, "Beyond Pun- 
jab." He recounts being invited to 
the Yacht Chib, but felt he had to 

Hnrlinn 


“I felt doubly upset at this iro- 
ny,” he wrote, “upset because in 
the past there had been places in 
India closed to me only because I 
belonged to India; and perhaps 
more upset that they were now 
open. ... I still remembered 
bow a friend of mine who was 
invited to play in a.tenms tourna- 
ment at the gymkhana had found 
his clothes removed from the 
dressing room on the secretary’s 
orders.” Tandem said .his son 
joined the 650 Bombay-based 
members of the Yacht Club, al- 
though he had to quit when it 
became too expensive. (The initi- 
ation fee is almost SI, 000.) 

‘To him,” said Tandon, “it was 
a past he hadn’t experienced.” 

Even Indians who say they 
can’t stand the okl imperialists 
manage to overlook the discrep- 
ancies in their own lives. “I hate 
the British.” said Dilip Thakore, 
the young_ editor of the Indian 
magazine BnanessWorld. Yet be 
was sitting in the bar of the Bom- 
bay Gymkhana Gub, the place 
for the city’s smart sporting set, 
surrounded by a painted mural of 
Englishmen playing polo and 
cricket on a dewy green lawn. 

Some do miss those English 
polo players, or at least fed a bit 
erf the nostalgia for the Raj. 


have now. So anybody with a 
taste for rational oligarchy would 
miss thrvs/» days." 

The Yacht Gub is not the only 
chib in Bombay to have a racist 
past. The Breach Candy Bath and 
Swimming Trust has a pool the 
shape of British India — includ- 
ing what is now Pakistan — that 
overlooks the Arabian Sea. 
Breach Candy didn’t allow Indi- 
ans in until well after indepen- 
dence, and today only 30 percent 
erf the membership is Indian. It is 
still difficult for them to get in, 
although Europeans and Ameri- 
cans who drop into town are en- 
couraged to come by for a swim. 

The Gymkhana Gub, filled on 
Saturday nights with the younger 
crowd that looks down on the 


Yacht Gob for its spotty past. 


didn't admit Indians until 1947. 
The WiQingdon Gub, now con- 
sidered somewhat seedy, was 
formed in 1917 as a reaction to 
the other dobs when Lord Will- 
iqgdon, then governor of Bom- 
bay, invited his friend the maha- 
rajah for dinner at the Yacht 
Gub. The maharajah was refused 
entrance, and Lord Witiingdon, 
enraged, began bis own dub that 
allowed anyone in of any color, 
provided he knew the right people 
and had enough money. 

Kerse Naoroji was the first In- 
dian asked to join the Yacht Gub. 
He declined. 


“I said, Tm not going to be the 
first sucker,’” Naoroji recalled. 
“So l kept them hanging for five 
or six years. 1 got quite a thrill out 
of it they were aD dose friends of 
mine, and I told them exactly 
what I thought I felt ihe/d kept 
us out for too long. It should have 
been more of a spontaneous move 
on their part” finally, in 1959, 
Naorqji decided with two other 
friends that they’d all join togeth- 
er. “If I didn’t want to join,” he 
says, “nobody else wanted to 
join." 


PEOPLE 




De Lorean May Make 
$1 .3 MUHonon Movie 

John Z. De Lorain witt receive 
more than $13 million; for exclu- 
sive rights to a movie of his fife. The 
Los Angeles Tunes sakl thata'new- 


ly formed group called the De Lor- 
eau Hus Film Group of Newport 
Beach. California, will nay De Lor- 


Beach. California, will pay De Lor- 
ean S200.000 cash in advance and a 
percentage of the profits De Lor- 
ean, once the youngest vice.presi-~ 
dent of General Motors Corp„ was 
acquitted last summer after one of 
most widely publicized, ding trials 
in U. S. history. In. the course erf the 
trial and afterward, De Lorean ran' 
up hundreds of thousands of dol- 


lars in legal fees; hiswife, Cristina 
s. filed 


Ferrara, filed for divorce^: and he 
became a born-again Christian. - 



EHon John left his bath running 
at London's Savoy Hold early 
Thursday and flooded thiee other 

rooms incl 

the American composer 
Hamfisch and the British TV host 
Michael Parkinsoft Damage was 
estimated at thousands, of pounds. 
John said: “I ran dm bam, then 
phoned my wife in. New York. I 
completely forgot about the wa- 
ter.” He apologized and. said be 
would pay to repair the damage. 

A woman abandoned as a child 
in Vietnam has won .the U. S. 
teaching prcrfesskmVfaigfaest hon- 
or: the 1 985 NationaLTeacher of 
the Year award. Tliaese. Knecht 
Dozier, 32, who teaches world his- 
tory to 10th graders in Columbia, 
South Carolina, was borii in Saigon 
■to a Vietnamese woman and a Ger- 
man man who had beeri.a colonel 
in the Waffen SS and fled Germany 
in the closing days of World War 
IL Sent to French Indbbhina in the 
French Foreign Legion, be married 
parier’smother, who died after she 
and her younger brother were bom, 
she said last fall. “My father sold, 
my brother and me to a Chinese 
businessman, who planned to sell us 
to a childless Chinese couple,” she 
said. But French authorities began 
searching for the children, and Ihe 
businessman, fearing arrest, gave 
the children to a Chinese woman 
living on a sampan on the 
River, she related. Authorities 
covered the severely undernour- 
ished children and tumid them 
over to a French orphanage- A 
U. S. Army adviser and his wife 

theUnited States in 19^4* 


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tact Ji-Lefwre.Frarie B3| 91 44 28 
GEL, Chateau de la Vdoute. 24490 
La Roche Chcdais. 


ALCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 
. Pans.- 634 5965. Rook 
1032a 


Eating 
Paris 3489042 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - Eurqjel detv 
Write Keyser, FOB 2, B1C 


MOVING 


FOUR WINDS 
INTERNATIONAL 


Offices Worldwide 


PADS . 
LONDON 


(3) 036 63 11 
I 101) 578 66 II 


HKST OASS SBtYKX 
ASSUtO EVOY MOVE 



Exclusive DAKS 
clothes and 
accessories for 
men and women 
available from 
DAKS stockists 
around the world. 


MOVING 


ALLIED 

VAN LflffiS 1NTL 


OVH1 1,000 AGENTS 
in U5JL - CANADA 
350 WOR1D-WDE 
flHT ESTIMATES 


PARIS Peril nrrilte hs t ernoffonol 
(01) 343 23 64 


FRANKFURT JSJft & 


UVLS. 


(069)250066 

MUNICH 

(089) 142244 

LONDON WMBtfclB 

(OT) 953 3636 

BRUSS&S: Zfeafor&A. 

(02) 425 66 14 
CAIRO ABM Von Lines Inti 
(20-2) 712901 

USA ABM Von lines Inti Cwp 
(0101) 312-601-S7OO 


INTERDEAN 


WHO H5E FOR YOUR 
NEXT WTHNATKJNAI, MOVE 


FOR A IS® ESTIMATE CAU 


AMSTERDAM. 

ATHENS: 

BAHCBjONA: 

BOWt 

BREMEN: 

BRUSSSS; 

CADIZ: 

HtANKRJRT: 

GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADRID: 

MANCHESTER: 

MUNICH: 

NAPLES: 

PARIS: 

ROME; 

VKICIA: 

ZURICH; 


[071189.93.24 
[01)961. 


— .1X12 
03)6523111 


■■1166062 
0421)170591, 

02) 720.95.63 
956)863144 I 
06190)2001 
022)43-85.30 
01)961.41.41 
01)671.2430 
061)7072016 
089)1415036 
081)7801622 

3) 0249000 
06)5269342 
0222)955520 
01)36X20.00 


DEMEXPORT 

PARIS e LYON e MARSSUE 
LILLE • MCE 

Ml moving by sptoaSst From major 
alias bi Ei in ice to eft dims m the world, 
‘ 24 10 82 


Tot free from Prance 16 

HtaesnMA: 


CONTINEX Costbustm to 300 cries 
worldwido - Air /Sea. CoS Charlie 
281 1881 Paris (ma- Operal Cars too 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


INTERNATIONAL 


MIDDLE EAST BASE. V3ai, Han, Irmd 
froni USS2OQC0. Brodmre and Ssfc 
Theoniariq, ftOi 4282. Unwssol, rel 
051 7291 7 the 4565 Theoni Cy. Cyprus 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNS CAiflORME. Unurieus2S0 
sqjn. apartmert. Roception 71 tarn. 3 
badmams, 3 balhioonB, Garoge. 
Fonrmhcviewanieo.mou ii i ism .Uhl- 
DBt VALUE. P32OOJ0OO. SSI, 47 La 
Crasene, 06400 CAh8«5, Tel (93) 38 


CAMNE54>UIORME. Facing is- 
’, very hran- 


lands, e xa epeanot view, very _ 
ous apartment, 83 sqm., air axidhian- 
ed, comer terrace 50 sqjrv, lap 


3U sans. 

emipment. to psep erty, pool, parage, 

ccSctki snxil high dots oompiex low 
chorflcs. F1,900j0a (931 43 6688. 


TOUXAINE ESTATE for safe or rert. 

1X000 sc -ra. perk, large tving, fee- 

‘ 5 bedroann^ail modem 
dorm. 47.29 68 60 


CAP O’ ANTIBES WATERfSONT. 

Beautiful 44wdroam via with 1 aero 
seafront. Tek (93) 99 44 14. 


GERMANY 


COUNTRY ESTATE - GAME FARM 
Mansion, 45 room, pod, nodes for 
40 hones, matew gem*, rod deer, 
wdd bocr, (fear, vm dude. 2,CO(5 
acres. US$12 m*ai. No opens. 
Please reply to Bax 2129, Fricdndafi’. 
14 6000 fraiSfordM., W. Germany. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON THURLOE SQUARE. SW7. 

| 5 ffins Horrods. spanous ma a pne l te 
foanp garden square. Recently med- 

eniizedon 4 floors. 31 foot diawrn 
room, drinp roam, forge IntdmnX 
breamm MdUMriyl 


GREECE 


LOUTRAW. vaa kiia. 


pBd.ua 57 m 


74MJ44* 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREECE 


sum LUXURIOUS ltboora vflo, 5 
baths, 3 fireplaces, swimming pool. 5 
terraces, phone, park etc UnjKiT for 
reasons of depormre/bargmnprica. 
GuuiuiSeed rerrtd. Writer IHT (ext. 
DBQ, 26 Pindarou Si, Athens 10W5, 
Greece. 


ITALY 


CAM CAPRI CAPRI CAPRI CAPRL 

Centred beautiful pun a; a ntic top floor 
apartment, newly foo»had. spaoout 


Mario Ranicri. Yn Cercaia N. 1 Capri 
My Tel 081/8379547/8661097 


MONACO 


MONTS CARLO 
PARK PALACE 


Mogn Uk er* u p m hnenf, 1 16 iq. me*en 
partly furnished a) Pane Pdlace, op(x> 
rife Ihe ccmno and Hotel ds Pbris, in the 
Golden Triangle of Morrte Cota new 
bukfng, 54 j Hoar with front end rear 
terraces, eelar & parking. 


Far Urfonnatiort Please cal: 
Miss H Schledtfer, at Rhsinbei 
Wert Germany Teli (02843) IS 


MONTE-CARLO 


Sumptuous apartm ert^ d ines, in te^ 
nerous balm. 


deuce, numerous 
race on tea , . 
Vacant, Paris 


bdoony/ter- 
.TdrGobrief 
67 or 60623 10. 


SPAIN 


MALLORCA’S NEW 
SUPER PORT 


In the boy of Pdma, 5 mins. Pbfma, 15 
mins, airport, 664 berths 8 to 38 meters.. 
2 for up to 60 tartan eodv InsSvidud 
IV/mams/MMr/phone comedians. 
P re f e s ifond part nunugemeni ca Fiji 
marine services; lower, rorfcj, dp, tsav- 
eUift, repair, fuel station, u & outdoor 
writer hcrdrtmds, Uground oar- port 
Lodcers. Compleniemary service & M- 
sure foafctfes; medical, boniang, shop- 
ping, entering, eotertaament GaS A 
tarns nearby. Coromssrad ana com- 


ums on 13.171 i sqm.Jn > c4. 



PUBT °d£^ A c^^< 5, SA 
C/Marma lOIJfo^Nou* 
Mafanca, Span or ife 68686 CALAJ E 


MALLORCA - BBT POSSIBLE ad. 
dm very high deal apartment, 4 
bedrooms + service siucSa, garden, 
pool, sauna. fxmJe oarfang. scroga. 
Urique shraiion ond vwwt tumthed 
to hmh stpndord-_SF55yj00 eqeivo 
lent. Tel 


Teh Pofon 40 17 


SWITZERLAND 


SUNNY SOUTHERN SWITZERLAND 

LAKE LUGANO 


bcoutifol 


» a keg* 

(17.000 iq.n) with Man- 
ming part, private manna and pnvafe 
beach, lrt quatsy. Apjfments 80 styn. 
up to WO sqjn. + terraces 24 - 47 
tqjjj- Prio»fc^453jOOO - SF1.12360O 
an The faedena Rridago in the South 
vea of the Lake ofws up arwa uitt 
from 57 sq.m. (o IX sqA, averiooldng 
the fee ad the mounkxns. Prices; 
SRM 0/50 - SF <85,450. Free for to 
fortegners. Mortgages at lew Soria. 


EMERALD - HOME LTD. 

YOUR PARTNER IN EUROPE 


Via G. Cattori 3. 04-6900 L 
91-542913 - 


Tab 069 

Tim 73612 HOW OH 


SWnZBOAND 

cai buy STUWO APAJff- 
/JHNB. U9S OBfVA . 

' at m those vrarid fanout 

USMONTANA, LE5 DIA8- 

LERETS, VERBS, VXIARS. JURA. etc. 
fiaaSnilO^Oti 

Mortga g e s 60% OT 616% interest 
REYACSA 
52 MartfefikatbCH-IZB 
GENEVA Tefc SSi34154ft 
Tefew 22030 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


In the dwrming mountain resort of' 

LEYSIM- 

RBIDB4CE LES RS4E5 


Overlooking a spiendki Alparsa panora- 
ma Xnvv from Mantreux end lake 
Geneva by cor. 

■ you can own quotity res i dences 
with indoor swimming cod and 
fitness fodffles man iaed 
erwironment for leisure and sports 

- finanangc# low SF. ratal 
up to 80% mortgages. 


Rartdeara le e Frene e. 1854 Leyrtn 
SWTTZBttAND 


Teh (025)3411 55 TfeiMoIca 26629 CH 


LAKEGB4EVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

lovrty apartments with mog w Bowit 
views of Lafai Geneva and mo u ntaim. 


Mantreux. Wkn, Verbier, Las Diabler. 
rts. Chateau (TOm near Gstaad, ley- 

b u ri ta rt Opport u s u ffiee For 


Prwa from SF121000. 

(MX ri 
1 SLA. 


liberal inter set. 


Ay Mon Repos 24, 

CHI 005 Lowteine, SwitofcM. 
Tel (21) 22 35 11 Tbu 251 85 MBJS 


Es tahfishad Since 1970 


LAKE GENEVA - LUGANO - MON- 
TREUX GSTAAD VALLEY & many oth- 
er famous mountesn resorts, fioragn- 
en con buy: magnificent 

APARTMENTS / VftiAS / CHALETS. 
Prices From about US5W.OT. Mort- 
at <W% inferefl. Please vast or 
: K SEBOLD SA, Tow Grae 6. 
.1007 Lausanne. Trt 21/25 26 11. 
lie 24298 SBO 04 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


SANTA BARBARA CAUF. USA 

Showcase in March 1984 awe of 
AnMadiird Digest, this Venebem 


Gothir estate djocned by renowned 
liian Manor is one of Vie 


ofdxtad Addaion i . 

meat rasidenoes m America Poksce- 
ft* gates open to nerxiy 13 acres of 
formed gardens with ccoastSng foun- 
tains and baronid bdustradc ~ 
pnwomafeiy 17,000 sq-ff, wi 
room, 20-foot high cathedral a 
caned wooden doors, ma 


aAigs, 
doors, enornious 
room cdorie me asu res 


(tving.ro 



a Hoorst Casflo n muds 


h!friv2r3rt* * * an * i>t>Cm 


better taste era on more manogeable 
ruFor further 


scale. Price US$15 mSon. For 
urformofton amtaa Wifam Capo c/o 
Alexandra Veto Red Estate. 1101 
Coair vaoge Rd. Santa Barbara, 
CdS. 931 08U5A. Tel: 805-969^371 
805-969-6895. 


CENTRAL PARK SOUTH, NYC Smdl 
ili u ent Unobstructed, 


2 bedroom upu ili i emc. . 

spectacular parkviews. One of NT's 
most secure bukfcip. Fufl hotel ser- 
vices. Buideig for those who seek 
privacy m NT-SmtA, totcAy complete 
modem tatchen, 2 morWa brthi with 
jocuza & stan shower. Mid eon*- 
non. Asking S800IXX). Prindpdf only. 
,212-26-2631 


Tel,: 


CORAL 


81 £t MIAMI. SUPBD 
.... .2 forge bedrooras, 2 

bad*, convert ib le. Residential area, 
overlooking gdf dab. 1S25 sqit ex- 
chKfing kegebdeony. Phase oantoch 
USA Kll 305661 5629 or Switzerland 
031/44 34 57 or write Amber & Am- 


ber, Suita 202, 7731 5.W. 62nd Ava. 
South M**ni.rL 33143, USA. 


NYC UPPBI EAST SRX ? Spooous 2 

uildmg CO 


bedroom, 2 bath luxury builcfcng con- 
dominium. 28th floor. Spectacular 


v«wi of Contrd Por^foe'totrvoir. 


6 the 

George 
by owner. (212) 
Fn 10 am - 2 pm. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


AUSTRIA 


VBMA’S HOUSING AGENCY. 

0222-527964, I 

Renidst deluxe 


0222-527964, Hodow, Grabrti 31 
■ fkris & houses. 


DENMARK 


COPH4HAGEN, 5 room, ttdwr, 
bah. from Apd 15, near beads & 
forest. SlOOO/montK Tek 45/1 


611738 or 921438. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANMS. ftnthouH. 2 bedrooms, 2 

bdh^ fra fiving, tartacM, patoramic 
view. PSG/weeE (93) 99 45 39. 


MANOSQUE, Manor, garden. 3 bed- 

rao^ l^tofn, Moy/june/Juty. Teh 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSMG CENTRE 8.V. 
Detune rentds. Vakxiuntr. 174, 
Amtardom. 020621234 or 6233Z 


FETER BRUIN MAKBLAARDU 
tan Hearing Set vice-R e ntoh 

Aatrterdmn. Teb 020-768022. 


ITALY 


When in Rom 
PALAZZO Al vaABSO 
Luxury oportirani house wdh formhed 
flob, available for 1 week and mare 


Phone: 6794325, 6793450. 
Wnhe Vo ddVetebro 16. 
001B6 Rome. 


ROME 

RESIDENTIAL. AREA 
Lovely apartments by day, by week or 
by month. Direct phone. Auwnomaus 
heating. Ekr. Restaurant. Garage. 
2d hour service. 

RESIDENCE COCTNA O AM PEIXO 

(396) 3387012 - 3387015 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBWON EXECUTIVES 


PutEsh 

in the ti if ernofitfoaf / f er d d Irr- 
barm, nthermmarm than a Hurd 
at a f iri B fan n odsn worfd- 
iriak east of wham art hi 
Bsaete e e end industry, wflT 
road IL Just Wk in (Pans 
613595) before IOomu. on- 


2595) b 

mg that we am telex you 


twang 
back, and 


id year me na ge wB 
wiffro AShoars. 


The 


fSTh US. S9M or local 
equ iv a lent per Bne. You mutt 
include co mple t e t sad verift- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


■THIS WEEK 
APRIL I5fh, 


BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 


• RmUmm Or Mpoirh Em p loyee 
’ Ownentap Plcsii 


drirax To* Mach Copbdran? 
tadudry 


C«m i ipolili re *By Pvttmg 
S qu e er e On Weefceee 


The 


• tae Tbo SoddMs Are Tha 
Unexpected Cbteseriar u Of The 
Statfc Marta*. 


NOW ON SALE 
AT ALL INTBNATKJNAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES? 

YEH Inve rt m one of Americo's most 
bulling todvwoocd bnuJjiuDuohs in 
a fcjffion ddUx mdifllry. We hove 
pl it eri am ieneHreeeln 1984thm 
any other d ev e lo pe r m eur SMe 
High anoud ewrwigs assured for many. 


many years. 


MOKEXS’S BNQUflDQ INVTFH). 


Matan d avsriaUe ei^^Srij. French. 


German, Arabic. Bo* 1W. Hi ./d Tn- 
bune, 92521 Nrnrity Cedes. France 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 


T-SHRT F0T05 
NOW M RA1 COLOR 


on gfrenh buones: that am earn you 


58000 - SlOreO/ntah htaw and toed 
from ST 


$9500 - 326,500. 

- __Jt. A12, Postfodi 170340, 

6000 fronkfurt/W. Germany. 

Teli 069747808 Tbu 412713 ICEMA 


MAM1ATTAN. MEW YORK 
Investments m 


Capnd regdrenenb KL5 mSon mini, 
mum, rata KL5 mhon. High profit 
pdenhd- 

Porter rma nce ltd. Part Bra 611 
Qi«27 ZU3CH. Te-fc 017211 27 91. 


FRESH WATS PEARL strand and 
loose pearban sale in Hong Kang. 
Own factory and best pnee, More 
dctoAh The 57719 POXAj HX Tel: 
6832767. 9/F, Vtira Lot Mansion, uE 
A, 14 PdangRdTSn.XIn. Hong Kong. 


MAOBNB A ENGMES hr earth 
moving, moterid fending, forestry & 
amriruetem. At makes A fypts. 


AJO CONSULTANT IN lift A 19tb 
cent ur y Engish po inlingi wB eicocuta 
box, commanora etc, & adnse on 
pwwtw jw pnvota or rnwrimenf 
purpoML Bom «K2, IN.L, 63 Lorn 
Acre, Londmt WCE 9M 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SWISS LOCKING for poable business 
ae il rt cl i in South America, espeddly 

& exjxxl trodo frarn fcuropo. 

FuMdtas, P.O. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


MTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMITB) MC 
U5A. A WORLDWIDE 


A complete sadd & busmen servin 
pravKtng a unque eoflection of 
talented, vm iuii le 6. muUSnoud 
mdmduab for dl accotfora. 
212-769-7793 
2 J 2-765-7794 
330 W. 56th SL. N.Y.C 10019 
Service BuresentaAves 

LI I I U/pHrh.eiL 

i"9oPQ ca wanawwii. 


BUSINESS 50V1GES in Luxembourg 
secretarial service / telephone / tax 
l mol. service / invoicing, tachnkd, 
odminiiti oli ve rad finoood guidonce 
/ customs a gency / storage space / 
udveitumg consultant f creatM 
wor ks hop. Pbasr contort LLKCCKP 
SA. P.O.a 2436. LI024 Luxembourg. 
Tek 49 56 43. Tlx 2251 LUXOO.tU. 


KOUMAlUAcCABE Peraond 5ervicBL 
Make 'seftkng down' in Switzerland a 
heme ta home affair. Hats, schools, 
an. permits. B. Koumar-McCobe. 


46, 1020 Renera/lau- 

Tel 021/34 82 


118.31x 25074. 


TAX SERVICES 


UK CHARTERS Accountants provid- 

ing US fedettf tax s ervices. Lo>ufl 
ynbomspn A Co. Teh (07073) 393jQ 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


WALL STWST; whd's next? GMUet- 

ter has the enwen. SEC tegstand. 
GML CP. St, CKKRM busame T. 


OFTICE SERVICES 


YOUR ORKE M GBUMNY 


High ri on daul offieM.^lw mritfcgud 
penomd, ol foofioes. - 
Gfi - <Sh SdutedL Bvnw Servke 


P7, SOJT. WBDOWondirim 1 . 
Tek fa 421-22) 34/Itr 463740 89 0 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PAHS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMP5-ELYSSS Wh 


Stwfio, 2.or itooni apcrtjient 
One mdith or i 


_ iqorf, 

IE OARIDGE 359 67 97. 


SHORT raw in L rftr Quarter. 
No agents. TeL 329 38 83. 


SPAIN 


IBIZA 

HRLTOP RNCA, fantastic sea view, 
secluded barton, mar beach, 10 mini 
Gdf flora Lisin 5 mini Puerto Ibiza, 5 


bedrooms, 4 baths, big pod. deaning 
women. Far rent May T ■ Od 15J700- 


rwVMay 

MOO weekly ranmum 3 weeks. Call 
AusbraJQ54 314 « Pdris 256 0255 or 
Box 19EUtaaldTnbune. 92521 Neufl- 
ly Cede*. France. Evwitualy for ide. 


BEAUIUIIL. NERIA VR1AGL View, 

Bwimmi n g pool, sports roam, TV-Vid- 
pol Sleeps ftJriy through September. 
Ring Spain 952-52325J or write: M. 
Poota, CdEfo Obto 58, Nsrja, Mdaga. 


EMPLOYMENT 


FOR MORE EXECUTIVE POSmCNS 
lOOKUpma 

H MTBIflATXMAL POSITIONS” 
PAGE 4 


EXECUTIVE 

POSmONS AVAILABLE 


Ita INTI fCIAID HBBME 

b sh long for the Pmis headquarters an 


IBM System 38 
Programmer/ Tedmkkm 


The ideal c a ne fa tae wfl have: 


■ Hands-on ex p erience n ipecifying. 
developing ond mstoUmg commercial 


knowledge of the IBM 38 
operating system and its control 


- At Mart 2 year* of rixperienoe in 
(xogramrang in RFG IB &/ or Cobol 


- Good working obftty n I 
8. Engl jh lc 
German a i 


French 
of 


The sdary offered a higfey competitive. 


Apply tot 

Stephen W. Cbnawqy 
fotartxrtond Herdd Tnbuno 
181 avenue Qtarlei de Gaulle 
92S2I Neefly-iurJeine, France 


BfOmStWOOIE EAST 
Battery Mram fuctor tag/ fty CeB 

5-6 yean inptant production superviso- 

ry experience .reoiued. 12-18 monta as- 

rtgmienl m Midcfe East. Attractive sdo- 
ry. Send CM. to Bn 2012, Hocdd 
Trtaie, 92521 Neufy Cedes, Frcmce 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


SAUE5 RB>RE»«TATmE5 WANTS) 
to seli South Amiricon hontficrafll to 
nwrriber* of. US. Farces m Europe, 
“imes pad. Heaftf 
Munich 0)89) 966' 


ROAVE4T ALT BASS) erehneeWen- 
gmoenng firm, offers Mteparary pees- 
eon tor praduamn orchnea/de- 
Apnl 85. Teh 06-585407 ■ 


GENERAL 

POSmCKNS WANTED 


AMSOCAN MALE 46. 15 yecr od- 
nxrxrtrative petsonnel mgsenenee. 
Shmj watery badgreand. Dtdra 


under emplgyment in West Europe. 

d.sm 


Free to travel. Richard Levhdhol, 

gmo, Ave.. Woodfond KDs, CA 
W367 USA, 


vary 'ATTRACTIVE FRENCH Woman, 
31 E* taffeta Itawndm USmuporf 
wilh homes m London & Paris,extatv 
me knowledge of Third World court- 


fa«, it baking for^dxJ«ign^^ 


tan anywhere 

raB London 351 5453 


raomflONAI, CAPABLE, educoh 
•d.rravetadAmeneonlodyvWfpo- 
utejnmlfo^MaHWoniQrgirlfriiiy 
for wgrtvi man/womon. Curry. 
Teh 5)3/337-8266 USA. . ' T 


WSBP»' 


EMPLOYMENT 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 

VACANCY FOR TEACHBt of Frradi 
S BL to navactfee ipectan begin- 
ning September, grades 6-12, Ann- 
con section or rteraotiond bog 
boarring school n SwtfzertondL 30 
dassra per Week + some dormitory 
duty. Itoom ‘ & board provided on 
campus. Appfcont must be sngk 
- possess a unnmnty degree and prefer : 
ably have previous teaching experi- 
ence Send CV. mmdataty to 
GPHEK ) 178. IVA AG, Postbox CH- 
8032. Zurich. 

Experienced US & British 
Primary School Teachers 

required by Intemotionol School web 
exdusivB ckontele from SepL 1981 
Resumes to Potffoch 260121, 
5300 Bonn 2, West Germany. 

UJ. FAMILY stab foSrtme private 
tutor francophone for (tommy school 
children. Reside USA. Travel. Box 
8501, Sataa MA 01971 Tek (617)631- 
7593 weekdays. 

NATIVE ENGUSH teacher, experi- 
ence, papers necessary. Tri Hcmrton, 
Paris: nr686 15 78. Tuesday. 

DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

AU PAIR GIRL to five m Ihe USA (NYC 
vidnily) with 0 fanfly of 4 inducting 
one 5 yor old 8. one newborn. Must 

S^ow^wr ‘u’osre ^ 

Non-smoker, drivers Scene pre- 
ferred. Minimum of one year commit- 
merit requred. Stating June 1985. 
Rease send photo & 2 references to 
HJX Kane*, 122 Pcxtor id. South, 
PUmbora, frU 08536 USA. 

AU PAUL Responsible young English 
woman. On of 21 month old boy & 
help with household in Pohn Beach. 
Honda. Send resuow. picture & refer- 
enced to L Kubmsmn, 1001 SW 86 
Ave, Mtan.FL 33155 USA. 

AU PAIR WANTED - Must few d* 
dran, Enafish speaking, non-smoking, 
neat, vnf prawde pnuoip room, 2 
days leisure. Send references, photo 
to D. Goodman. PQ. Box 27032, 
Tamarac. Florida 33320-7032. 

AU PAObHOUSSCEB'E*. 2 needed. 
Monroe, N.Y. (IK hour from NYQ. 
Dr. Mark Newman IS Winchtater 
Dr. Monroe. NY KlfeO USA. 

SEEKR4G MAIIRE DYWia & mods. 

1 peering f7ands/BmSsb, uriaa ref- 
erence*. WnM BERNARD, 1 Ave. P. 
Granier. 92100 Boulogne. France. 

AU4>AU COFBMAOM, near mo & 

forest. Teh 4571 611738 or 921438. 

DOMESTIC 
POSmONS WANTED 


BSm 



AUTOMOBILES 

RSO SL/ gS^n^xAmxno leather. 
500 St/85 cnthrouJe/patoixno 

tartar, 

tak (D) 711/760966. tta 7&8. 

BBflLEY 53 AM. 1965. PHD, up- 
holsHry. phone, .port wort.- Oxford 

btee-trendi mranre^m eKoeneonct 
oantatan# fii Bdory. Cbfl everanr 
Pons 5605348 orBrwsb tCffl 344 DP 
84 or write Box 2006, HvrtdTnbiiK. 
92521 NeuSly Codex, France 

fCW AMD USED CARS FOR SALE. 
Aba eMnmn.' Buy in Europe m«d 
srae.-UifernoltonoJ export. Agents 
wand, worldwide. Ke®» win id 
B ax 48. 1W344 GfogemTfls. West 
Germany.'-' 


19S4 PORSOC 911 CABBA. 

11000 taw extras, for. sole ban 


fun 




AUTOMOBILES 


BMW MS FOR5A1E0 km. 286 PS. 
Pfcase write; Box 2131 UiT. Frie- 
drirtstr. 15, 0-6000 Frankfortfurf/M. 


MOCEDG5 COlire 1966 with (op 230 
SL 13 hp. frag 51.33.08 Mr 


AUTO RENTALS 


OfARC RENT A CAR. Prestige can 
with phone: Ro8s Spirt, Mercedes, 


Jaguar, BMW, fenouanet smcArars. 
“ “ orrav 75008 Pork Tri: 


46s PSerre Chcrron, /suuu rank Teh 
73X30A0.Tdex 630797FCWaOC 


AUSTRIA A EAST EUROPE US5I5H0 
per dcm..Aiitohoma. Frarmnbriiadc- 
enstr. 8, A-1020 Varna. Tel: Z41694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
, CAR INTO THE UJLA. 

Thrs d ocument explains My whar one 
must do to bring a oar into the IL5. 
safety axf fegoty. It tndudta new 6 
-xlto prices, buying tips, 
DOT & BPA convxmon oddrenes, cus- 
tom dearonce & shipping procedures 
as v«efl as legd pomti. Become of the 
strong doflar, you can save op to 
U5SI8JX)0 when buying a Mercedes, or 
BMW m Europe & s ny or fen g if to ihe 
States. To receive thi manual, sard 
LtSSlBiDfodd USST JO for portend to; 
PJL Sdmidt, Pwfach 3131 
7000 Sutrgort 1, West Germany 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


Hanj 


MERCEDES 

506 SBt: ... 
500 SEC ; 
500 SL. 


>JCS2I 

'HE- 


AR cars «nme(fataJy,o)rriaUe ' . 
Ex Munich / Wart Cdtixiiy 
A7 an ore braid new 35.nedeb 
Otr service 




Airport Pidnift Shipping ta ra rwee 
Cuitoin Flafei flowdng. 

Uf- 


Cdl fisr .^^er^Smnaficxt 




CWWANONO CORPORADON 
MUNKH Wt5T GERMANY 


FHONEJ8t4T) 26622 
527697 <X3S D 


TBJEX i 


LMJ.SA 

OfflOAL ROLLS ROTCE 
DEALER FOR B&GflJM 


TAX FRS CARS 
ROLLS ROYCE BBJTlfY 
RANGE and LANDROVBl 


CAR SHFRING A SBMCE5 
As spa aafoed German car forwarder 
we are y^gur best connection for Euro- 
seo/taHrmgfe. US cus- 
_ con v ersion DOT / epa 
, York, Houston, Los Angeles, 
if needed we aba Wp in purtfertng. 
Free extensive fofoinxhuni 
DtEBOGt A V. KOS5 OHG, 

31 HmmAddM, W. Germ. 
(0)51 1 - 7305651, Tbt 9230963 


MATTNA SHIPPING 
Shfophiy te/from USA. 


MATWA-- Antwerp (3) 234 36 68 
234 35 72 
Specks! Conditions at the leading 
Antwerp SvrM EurstoL 


SWP YOUR CAR TO i FROM USA 

VIA ANlWBO* AND SAVE, Free ho- 

tel Regular sabtgs. Airport detvery. 
AMBCo, Knbbertraot 2, Antwerp, 
BrigiMn. Tel: 231 42 39. 71<69. 


’.H. 


FRAMWURT/MAB4-W. .. . 

bermonn GmbH. Teh 069. 

PidHto oB over Europe ‘ra.'rorixps. 


WOlHDjWB® Car stippmo 8> remov- 

ed ATK NV, AitamTKMOO Ant. 
werp. Belgium. 03^231 1653 Tx 31535 

ril Tn m. Ira Cnira.- ICIW 


1MNSCM 20 rue la Sueur. 75116 

Ports. Teh 500 03 04. Nee.- B&9533. 
Antwerp: 233 99 85. Cental 39 43 44 


AUTO CONVERSION 


HAVTYOU* MERCHJB, BMW, 

FOftSOR, JAGUAR converted for im- 


tfd t^U4 ApprovolyunTmteed 
Vr OTonoea papsrwani., ta rtin a , 
oJ far pnea quote. 


a Bo* 

7003 44, Q-7000 5tattoart70. Tet 
B|71 1-721013 or 767815^6: 


OOT/B>A CONVBtSIONS to US. 


njOTM® ZT224, Tel: 301-6334611. 
Tic 4995689 VIA US. Auioi ovoriabte 
mBetaum. Teh 32^0-715071. TU; 
82209. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


, HUM STOCK 
Merra** 500 SEC new, dart b*ue 


Mercedes 500 Stinew^btocC 
I 5L?fe./5fc. new 


Mercedes 500 _ _ , 

- „ and many others os: 

other fearing motas, 
some day regstraHan possible. 

ICZKOVTTS 


Otfadmtrarte 36 CH4Q27 Zurid: 
Tel: 01,-202 76 10. “ 1 


. Telex- 815915. 


rue MIDDELBOU8G 7482 
1170 Bruneb 
TBs 2-673 33 92 
71X 20377 




30 YEARS 

We Defiver Css to (be World 


Aucrhj.-n 


TRANSCO 


Keeping a constant dock of more Rita) 
300 brand new on, 
moking 5000 hoppy efiems every yen'. 
Send fbr file muftkoforaftifog. 
Tronsoo SA. 95 Noordelacxv 


4 V 

fa l • • ■« 


^ to t’Pfil me j 




Tel 323/^0 62401& ^^TRANS a' 


DAWAJI TRADE 

MTL DELIVERY 




We keep a la y sto ck of 
Xff bnroi 


m otf car ! . 

Td: 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 nn Lens, 
1050 Brussels- 


atiei 


NEW 1985 MfllCHJB B«Z 
500 2 Diamond Bbo/Bhe I Ue*w 
500 SEC Badi/Mertrine Urijr 

380 SL Bledc Ffartt/Gwi tafaher 
3805E DtanMBd IkNi/Btoe LwAer 
Phn 2S0 SI/5EL/5E 


^Out 


All ears more irfor 


mraon. eefl Munich, West 
' -465WT « 42 Oflta 
Hows 10 am. - 10 pin. 


EUROPORT TAX 
. FREE CARS 

Gal or write for . free atdog. 


SccK 


;wsm 




■ok 12G1T, 

Rottordam Airport, HeRdnd 


Telex 




EPCAfl-ht 


GERMAN CARS 
. FROM GBtMANY . 

Exp eri enced car trader for My ura°- 


Poneita or'BMWr hwoerirard^!^ 


Fufl service m ^est/wspon Ui L_- - 
ffA for tounstaed derier. OCM. Tea- 

5WWI ZSSiZ&ZS&R 


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