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INTERNATIONAL 



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■SfiSte^IS No. 31,766 


552 SSS 

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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

• ZURICH, MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


Nimeiri Deposed 
By Sudan Military 
After 16 -Year Rule 


LoiuW? ^ baft Cw ** W Pr o# Stuff From Otguttfte 

rsday and n°- v How* CA®0 — President Gaafar Ni- 
ns inchiH; ‘ °°ded iC ^ mein of Sudan was overthrown this 
AmS? Slhc ««(S ! >' weekend in a military coup. He had 
i&ch and L Co ®P&te5?’ nited *** cot ? lti y for nearty 16 
i » » r’^BriiaA veers sod had iustconmieted a visit 


Q3led « 

* said: -i r.^kolfcL 
ray *ifeVv?V- 
*■£* *<****&£ 


years and had just coi 
to Washington in an i 


ricteda visit 

iort to shore 


telephone and Idea communica- 
tions were stiD cut. 

The new rulers said in Sunday’s 
communique that they wanted to 
build roads and brides in an at- 
tempt to end the isolation of south- 
ern Sudan, which has min eral 
wealth and where a rebellion has 


up Ids faltering government. wealth and where a rebellion has 
Mqor Genera] Nimeiri, a long- gained strength since General Ni- 
trate ally of the United States, was meari. introduced Islamic law in 


He apoi^>; 

fiS’S?!--., 

^ I1 g prof ess!on . t ’“ 4c[- 

fc , 985 N !Ua yK 

rear award Twi^ 
^32 ,-aHo JcU* 1 ** 

Vietnamese 


aboard the Sudanese 
jet on his way home i 


September 1983. 

General Swareddahab banned 


fense minister. General Abdul General Nimeiri from returning to 
Rahman Mohammed Hassan Sudan, where protests against in* 


Swareddahab, relieved him and his creases is food prices had virtually 
aides of their posts early Saturday paralyzed the capital for several 


□mined in exile. 


US. officials in Wi 
that General S wared 


[cm said 
seemed 


“»n who had 

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e closing da VSo /« 
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Spit 

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“«■ '‘earing^ 

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on a sam ran on 

■ she related. Arnhonl 

children and timS 
to a French orphan,” 
Armv adviser and 
™ them and brought 
rated States in 1954 

1 altos tax nsr 


The new government has or- ' tobe^esrabfahineni figure" and 

Pope John Paul U greeted crowds in Rome after his traditional Easter Sunday address, 
the dismantling of the internal coup, __ w-rr- ’ ‘ _ 

SSU^SUSLSSSS ^Sfi££ 2 £?jR Pope , at Easter. Invokes War’s Sacrifice 

agency. of the new leader to handle the 7 «7 

In a conununiqui broadcast oonMim: and political problems fty £ T njonne Tr Easter message, “but to affirm a mamems race which increases the 
Sunday by the stale*nm Omdur- uud had raused General Nimcxn ^ Tlma Sa ^ ce ' right and a freedom for themselves threat of total destruction.” He also 

man radio and monitored in Nairo- much trouble in recent years. ROME Pone John Paul II 311(1 others, also for the children of denounced the fact that millions 

bi, the coup leaders said they want- The United States considered : ^ amuy-ran, of those who were then the oppres- are “left to die because of want, 

t^SSS&^Sl^SSL 22 *aES.‘AEJS 2 Sr ... — -d.-tarid-,' 



Gorbachev Suspends 
Deployment of SS-20s 


bi, the coup leaders said they want- The United States considered 
ed “a democratic Sudan.** General General Nimeiri a dose and valu* 
Swareddahab bad said in an earlier able ally. Sudan is the largest coun- 
siaiement that he would hand over try in Africa and a vital strategic 


jwtiouMUdu iuu sum m on coiuct mj. >wuui u uit uu»»l vouu- 1MMM CimJmi **iW» 

statement that he would hand over try in Africa and a vitafstrategic 

power to a civilian govenunent af- link that borders the Red Sea and EiMSfaJJSSS 
ter “an interim period" of about six eight other nations. General Ni- 
months. . meiri was one of the few Arab lead* 

Reports from Khartoum on Sun- ers to support the Camp David of ^ human Person, 

day said that life was quickly re- accords aim the Egyptian-Israeli _ “They faced (teeth as defenseless 
turning to normal f ol lowin g wild peace reaiy. . victims, offered in holocaust, or de- 

street celebra lions in support of the Even though the overthrow of fending with their arms the free 
new military regime General Nimeiri was seen as popu- way 01 life." the pope told a crowd 

The streets or Khartoum were l*r m Sudan, it was far Iran cer- of more than 200,000 in St. Peter's 
reported littered with crumpled tain, U.S. officials said, what Gen- Sqnare. 
and half burned portraits of Geoer- oral Swareddahab's policies will be. “They fought not to answer vio- 


Worid War II, delivered an Easter drought and malnutrition.** 

message S unday in praise of “the For rcaso ^ wcre raar- = The pope’s oFten somber mes- 
men and women in «wh country ffl*. 31,(1 heroes," the pope said, sage came on a sunny, festive day 


“This was their resistance. that brought worshipers, marchers er of the House of Representatives, 

John Paul recalled Nazism as “a ngnind hunger and tourists to St Thomas P. O'Neill, a Democrat of 
mad imperialist ideology" and con- Peter’s' Square for Christianity's Massachusetts, arrived in Moscow 
the atrocities it bred, in- most joyous dav. at the head of a congressional dele- 

he slaughter of the Jewish John Pau I said the Easter Maes Wj" , lh » 1 ™ “ P**? ! ° °y 

a vivid Urbi n Orbi ad- md w^L 0ort,adKV b “ m ^ 


By Serb Mydans 

W«t.' York Times Semce 

MOSCOW— Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev announced Sunday that the 
Soviet Union was freezing deploy- 
ment of medium-range SS-20 mis- 
siles in Europe until November. 

[The Reagan administration 
swiftly rejected Mr. Gorbachev’s 
statement and called on Moscow to 
negotiate significant reductions at 
arms talks in Geneva, Reuters re- 
ported from Santa Barbara, Cali- 
fornia. 

[“At first blush. Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s statement seems to revive 
previous Soviet offers designed to 
freeze in place a considerable Sovi- 
et advantage,” the White House 
spokesman, Larry Speakes, said}. 

Making his first major statement 
on foreign affairs since becoming 
Communist Party general secretary 
last month, Mr. Gorbachev also 
confirmed that he bad responded 
poathrely to an invitation to a sum- 
mit meeting with President Ronald 
Reagan. 

His remarks were in answer to 
questions by the Communist Party 
daily Pravda. The interview was to 
be primed in the Monday edition 
of the newspaper. 

The interview came as the speak- 


possibility has been raised that the 
two leaders could meet in Septem- 
ber if Mr. Gorbachev attends the 
opening session in New York of the 
United Nations General Assembly. 

Mr. Gorbachev said his corre- 
spondence with the American pres- 
ident also dealt with ways of im- 
proving relations and making them 
more stable and constructive. 

“I am convinced that a serious 
impulse should be given to Soviet- 
American relations at a high politi- 
cal level,” he said. 

He characterized Lies between 
Moscow and Washington as tense 
and as giving some cause for alarm. 
But he said possibilities for im- 
provement existed and “these pos- 
sibilities should not be missed.'' 

As an impulse to achieving a 
breakthrough in relations. Mr. 
. bn** Gorbachev voiced support for mor- 

Miknai l S. Gorbachev atoriums on space and strategic 
. , _ arms and announced the Soviet 

? ra - lh ?, an There is no freeze 0D deployment of imermedi- 

rnevi lability at all of its conunua- ate-ranae missiles in Eiirone. 



lion. We regard the improvement 


ate-range missiles in Europe. ■ 
“We are for an honest dialogue. 


of Soviet- American relations not We are prepared to demonstrate 
only as an extremely necessary but our good will again,” he said. 


also as as a possible matter. “And starting with this dav, and 

The Soviet leader said be had I want to emphasize this, the Soviet 
corresponded with Mr. Reagan Union is introducing a moratorium 
about the possibility of a summit on the deployment of its intermedi- 
meeting and that I can say a posi- ale-range missiles in Europe ” he 

fma 4Hl«url« fA nink niaatinft kd. • ■ 0 * 


M m . j . £ * ukurnai wv auuuura u uj vu, 

“piey faced (tenth as defenseless duding the slaughter of the Jewish 
vKtuns. offered m holocaust, or de- pcopj^ 
fending with their arms the free But in a vivid Urbi et Orbi ad- 

dress — to the dty of Rome and to 


live attitude to such a meeting be- 
ing held was expressed from both 


said. 

He said the moratorium would 


ades.” Mr Reagan said last week hold until November. “The deci- 
that he had received a positive re- we **]] ai, er de . 


a gokl-encrusted white miter. 


Mr. Gorbachev said he did not 


ply to the suggestion 
leaders meet. 


the two pends on whether the United States 


the world — the" pope also called During die Mass, several thou- believe that confrontation was the 
attention to the failings of the post- ““I* of them cany- natural stale of relations between 

.varunrM rag blue balloons bearing the mes- Unwnf Mf iw.d.; A « nn 


al Nimeiri. Bat the airport res 
mained closed and international 


9ol Swareddahab s policies will be. “They fought not to answer vio- war world. rag blue balloons bearing the mes- 

“He has abolished the constitu- lence with violence or hatred with He castigated the continued vio- “Be “Apocalypse No," walked to 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) hatred,” the pope said in his annual )nriw> qt bunmn ri g his an d a p “ay- (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Moscow and Washington. 

“Confrontation is not an inborn 
defect of our relations.' he said “It 


leaaersmeet. follows our example: Will it stop or 

Its time and place will be the not the deployment of its ituetme- 
subject of subsequent arrange- diate-range missiles in Europe?" 
mem, Mr. Gorbachev said c , e 


White House officials have said 
that Mr. Reagan would prefer a 


Shultz 00 Soviet lies 

Earlier. Gary Lee of The Wash- 


Civilian Elite Provided die Trigger for Sudan Coup 


mbrcedb 

500 sa PARIS — In announcing that it Ke I B ^J!^ asa ^ m A £ UDUC ^ sea thathadposuaded himtoim- elite a weekto organize peaceful Within 24 houraof the fimdem- 

eno ccr was “temporarily” seizing power S: General pose Islamic law m an actively processions that at times seemed r-onstratiem by mostly miMe^lass 

W5K from President Gaafar Nimem, the !1 , bccome hostile ammist and Chnsuan south throwback to the nationalist upris-' and middle-aged Sudanese in 

500 SI Sudanese Array followed^ das- obvxous ^ Wash ragtoa alone was and a scarcdy more enthusiastic mgs of 19th-century Eure?*. - Khartoum on Wednesday, the 

% • : sic African couppattem. The mfli- VCTC ' ' ' &4osto l ? orth - • _ , . . - , .Thdr mai was tn r d the lvw) ->' caT msurfection 

urv felt cfehgedlft'^rotmsearetmn - AI^LV^S ■ ■■ - • ■ -FaCfcd; wth^rebellion nTthe *»»e son* azaqocxiaed-itat he was* 

tocivfliannite. sn pport in g his increaangly unpop- south, widespread drought, an in- T 964 when intellectuals emrineered w*th the Sudanese 

Whatever happens — and con- alar rote: Dux of refugees from Ediopia and the downfall of the militS^oycm- f™rifora^ThatrdJdlion,kdby 

os cSirt? 1 temporary Third World history is General Nimeiri's downfall t* 3 consequences of his ntisman- mcnl headed bv IbrahimAbSmd. Jo ^ n Ga f ang ’- a sou i heni 9? 150311 

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By Jonathan C. Randal 
• Trahlogum Feet service DapiSt taaam 

PAWS-l aanoupdogtai. 

Ni«»swifSiiSss 


the leaders of the Moslem Brother- After those violent initial dem-* Amin." He was referring the for- 

hood, the L s la mi c fundamentalist onstrations, it took the profesaonaf mer dictator in Uganda. 

sect that had persuaded him to im- elite a week to organize peaceful Within 24 hours of the first dem- 


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to crvflian rule. 

Whatever happens — and con- 
temporary Hurd World history is 
strewn with examples of armed 
forces remaining m power after 
similar pledges — the immediate 
stimulus for ending General Ni- 
meiri's 16-year reign came from the 
Sudanese civilian elite and not 
from the armed forces. 


supporting his increaangly unppp- south, widespread drought, an in- 1964 when intellectuals endneered ^Sprift^g with the Sudanese 
alar rule; flux of refugees from Ethiopia and the downfall of the mihtannywem- 3 r ™‘£fo r ces.^ That^ rdxffiorated.by 

General Nimeiri's downfall & e consequences of his ntisman- menl headed bv IbrahimAbboud. Jo 5 a 3 touriim* Clmstian 
came about with the realization by ngnd economy. General Nimeiri • ■ 33(1 33 American-educated former 

the doctors, lawyers, engineers and helped bring about his own down- A Khartoum University profes- arm 3' officer, had demanded the 
other ntiddk-dass professionals fall by pushing his contempt for his sor acknowledged last week that overthrow of General Nimeiri from 
that the president was politically adversaries too far. He almost this goal was probably unattain- th ®*“ rL 
isolated at last and could no longer dawd them to get together while he able. “I know Nimeiri will proba- This confirmed the professional 


— T— 


■j' * • 



'y. 

'* VV;-- \ n' 


isolated at last and could no longer them to get together while he able. “I know 

i_ j... j- -j- - .1 _ . n— . ~rt 


rule by dividing the 
The Iasi card in 


ml flew off for an official visit to the 
[-used United States as rioters were ran- 


this goal was probably unattain- 
able. “I know Nimeiri will proba- 


Nor does the UJS. government deck was the arrest last month of sacking his capital. 


bly be replaced by annthw miliary elite's hunch that the armed forces 
man,” the professor said, “but any- initially Would refuse to take part 
one would be better/ even Idi in crowd-kxmtrol operations, and 


U.S. Is Attaining Trade Goals in Japan, Envoy Says 


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By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — Mike 
Mansfield, the UJS. ambassador to 
Tokyo, says that the United States 
has achieved 90 percent of its ob- 
jectives in talks to open the Japa- 
nese telecommunications market to 
US suppliers, and that the remain- 
ing 10 percent will be reached with- 
in three months. 

Mr. Mansfield’s assessment was 
the most positive administration 
evaluation yet of UJ5. gains in tele- 


Heart Patient 
Moves Out 
Of Hospital 

By Lawrence K. Aleman 

New York Times Service 

LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — 
William J. Schroeder has become 
the first person to live outside a 
hospital with an artificial heart. 

The 53-year-old retired federal 
worker, admitted Nov. II to Hu- 
mana Hospital Audubon, was re- 
leased Saturday. It was his 133d 
day with an artificial heart, a peri- 
od longer than any previous recipi- 
ent. 

Mr. Schroeder moved across the 
street to a specially equipped. 800- 
square-foot (74-square-meter) 
apartment where he and bis wife, 
Margaret, will live: Mr. Schroeder, 
who will continue his recuperation 
from the artificial heart experiment 
as an outpatient, remains severely 
impaired because of a stroke suf- 
fered Dec. 13. 

The move is an important mea- 
sure of the success of the artificial 
heart experiment, since most pro- 
spective recipients of such a device 
might hesitate if they knew they 
bad to live in a hospital the rest of 
their, lives.. It will also provide a 
better test of. the quality of life with 
the device, which is made of plastic 
and metaL 

Mrs.. Schroeder said at a news 
conference before the move, 
“We're going home in a sense — 


communications trade negotiations U.S. ambassador to Tokyo for They are the major beneficiaries of At first glance, General Ni- 
with Tokyo. right years, tempered his praise for a free world trading system and will meiri's downfall is a blew to the 

Other administration trade (till- Japan’s liberalizing moves in tele- be hurt the worst if it breaks Reagan administration. From the 


that they then could be won over to 
deposing General Nimeiri. 

Just bow far the army leaders are 
willing to go remains open to ques- 
tion, since they were supporters of 
General Nimeiri only last week. 

At first glance, General Ni- 


dals, key congressmen and indus- communications with a warning down," Mr. Mansfield said. 


president on down. U.S. officials 


uy representatives remain skepti- (hat Tokyo has to continue allow- Mr. Mansfield, who met twice have recently praised the Su d anese 
cal over the actual effect of Japan's rag foreign companies greater ac- last week with President Ronald fouler in language that now seems 

efforts, however. They contend cess to its markets in all areas. Reagan over the crisis in UJS.-Japa- as ironic as the Carter administra- 

that U.S. access to the Japanese The cry with Japan should be nese trade relations, expressed con- Uon ’ s endorsement of the shah on 

market depends to a large extent on “access, access, access — like foot- cern in the interview over the in- the eve of the Iranian revolution. 


that UjS. access to the Japanese The cry with Japan should be 
market depends to a large extent on g<w* ss. a rxys* — like foot- 

how fairly the new regulations are ball fans ydl ‘defense, defense, de- 
applied by the powerful Japanese fense,* " Mr. Mansfield said in an 
bureaucracy, which traditionally interview Friday, 
favors domestic suppliers. “We want them to open thdr 

Mr. Mansfield, who has been the markets in their own best interests. 


ill fans ydl ‘defense, defense, de- creasingly emotional congressional . But tf U.S. concern for both Iran 
nse,’ " Mr. Mansf ield said in an attacks on what is seen on Capitol ““ 33(1 Sudan now turned on 
terview Friday. Hill as Japan’s protectionist trade geostrategic considerations, the 

“We want them lo open Hot P 01 ^ He aid be hoped that administration stands a 



jlides. He said be hoped that R**gan administration stands a 
(Continued tm Page 2, CoL 8 ) (Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


An Egyptian security policeman guarding the Sudanese 
Embassy in Cairo on Sunday. The presence in Eevpt of 


Embassy in Cairo on 
Sudan's deposed presi 
cal problems for Egyp 


meeting in the United States. The ington Post reported from Woshing- 
ton: 

■ Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz has outlined a strategy for 
insulating U.S.-Soviet relations 
against what he called Soviet “out- 
rages." 

His proposals, published Satur- 
day in the journal Foreign Affairs, 
grew out of events surrounding the 
Soviet shooting down of a civilian 
South Korean airliner in Septem- 
ber 1983, according to rides famil- 
iar with his thinking. 

More fundament Jly, the pro- 

■ posais reflect a shift in Reagan .ad- 
ministration thinking toward a less 
confrontational approach toward 
Moscow. 

Underscoring this change, Mr. 
Shultz also said that he saw in the 
accession of Mr. Gorbachev, “a 
fresh opportunity” for the two su- 
perpowers to explore “more con- 
structive possibilities." 

The U.S. response to the slaying 
of a U.S. Array major by a Soviet 
officer last month demonstrated a 
State Department policy of pursu- 
ing a strategy geared to overall U.S. 
goals and interests in the face of 
events that might otherwise nega- 
tively affect U.S.-Soviet ties, aides 
to Mr. Shultz said. 

They said the shooting of Major 
Arthur D. Nicholson Jr_ which oc- 
curred after the magazine article 
was written, was the kind of inci- 
dent Mr. Shultz had in mind in 
developing the strategy. 

After tne killing on March 24. 
_ the administration agreed that 

ian guarding ih^ Sudanese V^°f. *ookl be 

tinufav Tho mnrnnrn i n iT mm * n* resolved in a meeting between the 
>tm^r. The wesence m Egypt of commander of U.S. forces in Eu- 

ent, G^ar Nunein, creates polifr- rope and the commander of Soviet 
which is allied with Sudan. Page.2, forces in East Germany. 



TNi Anacuiad ftw* 



U.S. Reports Northeast’s Population, 
Surprisingly, Now Not Down but Up 


By William K. Stevens markedly less than it was five years government considers the Nonh- 
h’e* York rimes Service ago, and the flow in the other direc- east to be New England and the 

PHILADELPHIA — Despite tion is a bit more. At the same time, three Middle Atlantic states of 
earlier forecasts to the contrary, the birth rates have risen somewhat. As New York, New Jersey and Penn- 
popidadoD losses that plagued the a result, the Middle Atlantic’s pop- sylvania. 

Northeast of the United Stales in illation is growing again and with it As recently as August 1983, the 
the 1970s appear to have been re- that of the Northeast as a whole. UJ5. Bureau of the Census predict- 
versed since 1980. “The turnaround in the North- ed that the ooDulation of the 


Northeast of the United States m ulauon is growing again and witn it As recently as August 1983, the 
the 1970s appear to have been re- that of the Northeast as a whole. US. Bureau of the Census predict- 
versed since 1980. “The turnaround in the North- ed that the population of the 

Some experts cautiously inter- east, which I think is a real one, is Northeast would shrink steadily 
pret this development, indicated in not uniform," said Samuel Ehren- the rest of this century, declining 
recent data from two authoritative halt, the regional commissioner of by 1.7 percent from 1980 to 1990 
government sources, as evidence labor statistics for New York and and by more ihan 4 percent from 
that the Northeast has reached an New Jersey, who is a recognized 1990 to 2000. 
equilibrium in population and may authority on the subjecL For exam- But the Census Bureau’s most 


Between 1970 and W for the SSSk^SA S 
Msco^r. the Northeast and grew by 364,000 people, or 1 


- ,| ,-f f . . LilUS. UJ IUJWIJ, LumuiUMUl iuu VJ ->u*r,uw Ud’UIC. 

fhl- ^ “ 3 whole kfl* 1 to register an percent, from April 1980 to July 

appreciable population growth, ris- 1984. reaching a population of 
I9TO, they sty,, ts that the Middle mgonlyfrom49.06milhonto49.14 37.15 million. The &east as a 

whole also turned upward, its pop- 


W3Eam J. Schroeder, with his son, right, and wife, left, moving into an apartment in Louisville, Kentucky. 


in a wheelchair to a $45,000 van and an exercise bicycle has been 
fined with wheelchair Ills and se- brought in. 
n»irin£ devices and adapted to ao In the two-bedroom apartment, 
commodate compressed air »*nks Mr. Schroeder will be attended by 
and the 323-pound (146-kilogram) private nurses, technicians and se- 
mschme that powers the air-driven curity agents. The staff will Hve in 


artificial heart 

The remodeled apartment has 


we re going home in a sense — doorways, three compressed pressed hope that 
not our hone, but we ve lived m the ^ Q^jjets and alarm buttons to improved by' the 


an apartment in the building. 

Mr. Schxoeder's family has ex- 
pressed hope that his morale will be 


air force for years, and home was 
wherever we were at," 

One of Mr. Scfaroeder's sons, 
Mel, pushed him out of the hospital 


_ _ alarm buttons lo improved uy tne move, accompa- 

summon medical help. The bath- nied by home cooking, a greater P". maiana. 
room has been modified to allow degree of privacy and indepen- Despite the 


the Humana artificial heart team, pound portable Heimes power sup- 
said his team and the family were ply only about two hours a day 
making plans for Mr. Schroeder to. untfl the Food and Drug Adminis- 
travd in the van to go fishing. ' nation approves its use for longer 

Mr. Schroederis doctors and his .. . , ....... 

family hope that with further recu- JJ- DeVneshas saidjhat it is 

peration at ihe apartment, he wfll **1 Mr. Schroeder could 

eventually retuni to his home, 90 ^ a permanent move to Jasper 
m3cs( 145 kilometers) away, in Jas- a PProval > from the Food 

per Indiana. .and Drug Administration because 

. . *2 the offirial guidelines for the ex- 

Despite the move, Mr. Schroeder^ ptriment require Mr. Schroeder to 


1980, they say, is that the Middle 
Atlantic subregion, with New York 
at its heart, has somewhat unex- 
pectedly followed suit. 

The Middle Atlantic’s resur- 
gence, these authorities say, reflects 
in part New York City’s transition 

from an economy with a strong r&jCTTfcir 

emphasis on manufacturing to an DM jIJJCi 

economy based more solidly on tiu i^— — — 

Md f S 1 mdfaS‘l bl S ■ Prcs ‘k? Napolefid Diaute’s mrat dccdon victory could 
city’s traditional position ’is an to dmn^thepoliocul power stracturc tn HSalvudor. Page 3 . 

temational center of Finance and ■ U^. foreign aid is increasingly bring used by members of Congress 
creative activity. as leverage to influence foreign policy. Page 3. 

® Heoiy Bssiager discusses the lessons of the Vietnam War. PugeS. 

did in the late 1970s when bun- BUSINESS/FINANCE 
dreds of thousands of job-seekers _ , . . , 

fled the icon’s shrinking econo- aAnew stody raises questions about a plan to delay completion of 

my for greener pastures elsewhere. ^ ^.S. strategic oil reserve. Page 7. 

NorS lo'SSnd wlsUs * Mm! are , "™ ng; 10 ,heir ™' n "in'rcp™™'' ”IV 7 - 


million; the Middle Atlantic lost whole also turned upward, its pop- 
426,000 people, dropping from illation increasing by 592,000, or 
3721 million to 36.78 mfllion. The 12 peroent, to 49.73 million. 


room has been modified to allow ' degree of privacy and indepen- Despite the move, Mr. Schroeder} ptrimeni require Mr. Schroeder to m y for greener pastures elsewhere. 
Mr. Schroeder to take showers dence from a hospital environment, remains in an extraordinarily riskyilive within « minutes of ihe hospi- But now the migration from the 
while tethered to the power supply. Dr. William C. DeVries, head of experiment. He can ..use the 1 !■ • tal. Northeast to the South and West is 






1 




2 s ES&r^i 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TBJBtDNE, MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 


U.S. Offers Compromise Plan for Cuban Pullout From Angola WORLD BRIEFS 


By David B. Orta way 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Hie United 
States has submitted its own com- 
promise plan for the withdrawal of 
Cuban troops from Angola in an 
effort to break the deadlock be- 
tween South Africa and Angola 
over the troops’ presence. 


A senior administration official 
said it was the first time Washing- 
ton had presented its own propos- 
als to break the deadlock over the 
Cuban issue. He said the more ac- 
tivist U.S. diplomacy represented a 
“major new step" by the Reagan 
administration to get an agree- 
ment, and that it had been ap- 
proved at tbe highest levels. 


ing a vial to the region in mid- 
March by Chester A. Crocker, the 
assistant secretary of state for Afri- 
can affairs, who has been heading 
the U.S. mediation effort to ar- 
range for the independence of the 
South African-administered terri- 
tory of South-West Africa, or Na- 
mibia, which lies between South 
Africa and Angola. 


The official said the timetable 
was submitted to tbe two sides dur- 


In tbe past, the United States has 
sought to work out agreement be- 
tween die conflicting positions of 
the two governments rather than 
present its own plan in the search 
for an overall regional peace settle- 
ment that would including the 
bolding of United Nations- super- 
vised elections in Namibia, the 
pullout of South African troops 
there, and the withdrawal of about 
25,000 Cuban troops from Angola. 


Both South Africa and the Unit- 
ed States have been demanding the 
departure of the Cubans, and the 
issue has become the main hurdle 
to carrying out a United Nations 
plan approved in 1978 for Namib- 
ian independence. 

Tbe official also said the plan 
reflected a realization that tbe 
United States would have to be- 
come more directly involved in tbe 
negotiating process if any agree- 
ment were to be reached, because 
South Africa and Angola were still 
far apart on the timing and extent 
of a Cuban troop withdrawal. 


For Mubarak, Harboring ofNimeiri 
Could Damage Relations With Sudan 


By David Lamb 

Lot Angeles Times Service 
CAIRO — For more than a year, 
Egypt has viewed the behavior of 
Gaafar Nimeiri as eccentric and bis 
political longevity in Sudan as a 
liability, but tbe neighboring coun- 
tries are linked by tbeir mutual de- 
pendence on the River Nile and the 
closest alliance in the Arab world. 


diplomatic ties when Egypt made 
peace with Israel in 1979. • 

“Of course Nimeiri has alienated 
alot of people, but 1 don't think the 
new regime will bold it against us 
for keeping him," a senior Egyptian 
official said. “It is traditional for 
Arabs, particularly Sudanese, to 
take asylum here, and I think the 
new regime would rather have him 
in Cairo than running around some 
place else. In a way this can work to 
everyone's advantage." 

The Egyptian foreign minister, 
Esmat Abdel Meguid, announced 
Sunday that Mr. Mubarak has been 
in contact with the new Sudanese 
leader, General Abdul Rahman 
Mohammed Hassan Swareddahab. 
He affirmed that Egypt stands sol- 
idly beside the people of Sudan, 
and said that Egypt would continue 
contacts with the new leadership in 
Khartoum. 

Two radical Arab states, Syria 
and Libya, applauded the over- 
throw, largely because General Ni- 
meuri had aligned himself with 
those willing to make peace with 
Israel and because, as an ally of 
Egypt and die United States, he 
represented all that the hard-liners 
rqecL 

Egyptian intelligence sources did 
not find Libya's initial response 
significant nor do they believe that 
General Swareddahab has ties to 
Tripoli or any other foreign capital. 
They point out that Libya’s ruler, 
Moamer Qadhafi, has constantly 
tried to undermine General Ni- 
mdri and would have welcomed 
any change in leadership. 

The Egyptian intelligence read- 
ing — whim is usually accurate in 
Sudanese affairs — is that the coup 
was not really plotted or planned 
but rather was a spontaneous result 
of public discontent exerting politi- 
cal pressure on the army to show 
moral leadership. The soldiers had 
the choice of responding to thede- 


So when Major General NV- 
meiri's while Boeing 707 jetliner 
touched down in Cano on Satur- 
day, carrying the Sudanese presi- 
dent en route to Khartoum from 
Washington, President Hosni Mu- 
barak of Egypt was at the airport to 
greet — aim perhaps counsel — the 
man whose country’s stability has 
always been crucial to Egypt’s own 
well-being. 

Genera] Nimeiri talked quietly 
as he and Mr. Mubarak walked 
into the presidential airport lounge 
for two hours of private discus- 
sions. There Mr. Mubarak con- 
firmed the news, broadcast from 
Khartoum by way of Nairobi only 
minutes before, that the Sudanese 
aimed forces had taken power and 
ended General Nimeins 16-year 
reign. 


nuiMU iiiuiu uutw m i n 

i running around some 
a wav this can work to 


According to highly placed 
Egyptian sources. General Nimeiri 
was determined to return to Khar- 
toum anyway. He strode to his 
plane and for five minutes he and 
Mr. Mubarak stood at the ramp, 
with Mr. Mubarak finally persuad- 
ing him that it was too dangerous 
to return. 


Mr. Mubarak will need to estab- 
lish good working relations with 
the new Sudanese regime, yet har- 
boring the man it overthrew might 
be an obstacle. At the same time he 
does not want to turn his back on 
General Nimtiri, who has been a 


loyal friend to Egypt and was one 
of only two Arab leaders not to cut 


Nimeiri Overthrown in Sudan Military Coup 


(Continued from Page 1) 
lion, abolished the country’s single 
party, fired all the top officials, 
dosed the borders and said the mil- 
itary is in charge everywhere," a 
U.S. official said. “But that does 
not tel] you anything. Can he carry 
out such things as critical economic 
reforms, reconciliation with the 
non-Moslem south, and win the 
backing of the city intellectuals and 
professionals?” 

Sudan has been the largest 
American foreign aid recipient in 
Africa after Egypt. It has been re- 
ceiving about $200 million yearly 
in military and economic aid. But 
in recent months, because of tbe 
failure of Sudan to put certain eco- 
nomic changes into effect, the eco- 
nomic aid had been withheld. Dur- 
ing General Nimeiri's visit to 
Washington, President Ronald 
Reagan released £67 million from 
the aid for fiscal year 1984. 

The State Department said in a 
public comment: “We have had a 
dose relationship with the Sudan. 


CwiHanEtite 


Spurred Coup 


based on a convergence of endur- 
ing national interests. We expect 
that this relationship will continue. 
We are obviously monitoring the 
situation closely. Our diplomatic 
relationship with the government 
of the Sudan continues." 

General Nimeiri, who came to 
power in a military coup in May 
1969, had cut short an overseas 
tour to return to Sudan (o try to 
quell the growing unrest He ar- 
rived in Cairo from Washington for 
talks with President Hosni Mu- 
barak of Egypt shortly after the 
bloodless military coup took place. 
The deposed president was met by 
Mr. Mubarak and two senior Egyp- 
tian officials. 

Egyptian officials said tbaL Gen- 
eral Nimeiri was later dissuaded by 
his pilot and by Mr. Mubarak from 
trying to return to Khartoum be- 
cause his return would endanger 

hini- 

Thc coup came as Sudan was 
sliding rapidly toward political, 
economic and military chaos. Since 
Wednesday, a general strike led by 
doctors, lawyers and other profes- 
sionals had cut off all telex and 
telephone communications with 
Khartoum. 


French Prime Minister 


Arrives in South Korea 


A rebellion backed by Libyan 
arms in the Christian and animist 


(Continued from Page 1) 


southern provinces of the country, 
meanwhile, has steadily gained mo- 


better chance than President Carter 
did in Iran. 

Unlike Iran. Sudan is not an oil 
power. Rather, it is one of the poor- 
est and most ill-managed of third 
World countries. And it is totally 
dependent on U.S. grain shipments 
to avoid mass starvation among its 
population of 22 million. 

That leverage alone — if tactful- 
ly manipulated — should be more 
titan enough to prevent any radical 
anti-Western government from 
taking over in Khartoum, accord- 
ing to observers. 

Neither the army nor most of the 
professional elite is anti-Western. 


meanwhile, has steadily gained mo- 
mentum. 


Guatemala Rights Aide, 
2 Others Found Dead 


although many intellectuals are fu- 
rious that the United Slates insist- 
ed on backing General Nimeiri to 
the end. 

Tbe Sudanese elite, one of the 
most respected in the Third World, 
has convinced itself that the Rea- 
gan administration backed General 
Nimeiri largely because it did not 
have the courage to live with the 
uncertainties that necessarily must 
follow his removal 


Nae York Times Service 

NEW YORK —The body of the 
secretary of tbe Support Group for 
Families of the Detained and Dis- 
appeared in Guatemala was found 
in her car at the bottom of a ravine 
south of Guatemala City, accord- 
ing to a spokesman for the group. 
Hie bodies of her brother and 
young son were found with her. 

Tbe official. Maria Rosario Go- 
dyo de Cuevas, was reported miss- 
ing Thursday on her way to a meet- 
ing of the group. Her body was 
found Friday. On March 30, the 
group's press liaison officer. Hector 
Orlando GOmez, was abducted as 
he left a meeting of the group, ac- 
cording to the group. His body was 
found the next day outride Guate- 
mala City. 


United Press International 

SEOUL — Prime Minister Lau- 
rent Fabins of France arrived here 
Sunday for a visit officials hope 
will strengthen bilateral relations, 
which had been soured by France's 
decision to upgrade a North Kore- 
an trade mission in Paris. 

In meetings with Mr. Fabius, the 
first French prime minister to visit 
South Korea, South Korean offi- 
cials will try to obtain assurances 
that France mil not further im- 
prove relations with North Korea, 
government sources said. Before 
leaving Paris, Mr. Fabius was 
quoted as saying: “We hope to 
nave relations with all Korean peo- 
ple but only on the conditions that 
are acceptable to the whole of the 
Korean people.” 


Police Defuse Bombs 


At2 Spanish Resorts 


Church Fire Called Accident 


UNIVERSITY 

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Reuters 

LUXEMBOURG — A fire that 
destroyed a nth-century spire of 
Luxembourg's Noire Dame Cathe- 
dral and damaged the roof of the 
nave on Friday was probably 
caused by a lighted blowtorch left 
behind by workmen, police said 
Saturday. 


VALENCIA, Spain — Spanish 
police defused two bombs timed lo 
go off near large hotels in tbe east- 
ern Mediterranean resorts of Ali- 
cante and VDlajoyosa during the 
Easter holidays, police said Sun- 
day. 

No group claimed responsibility 
for placing the bombs, but Basque 
or Catalan separatist guerrillas 
were suspected, polk* said. Mean- 
while, a bomb wrecked the offices 
of a construction firm in the south- 
western port of Huelva. A spokes- 
man for the firm said (he attack 
could be related to recent threats 
against construction companies by 
GRAPO, the Oct. I Anti-Fascist 
Revolutionary Group, a leftist 
group. 


partureof most, but not necessarily 
alL of the Cabans, as pan of an 
overall Namibia settlement. 

Complicating the Cuban issue is. 
the breakdown of a U.S.-arranged 
agreement in Lusaka, Zambia, in 
February 1984 under which South 
African would withdraw all the 
troops it sent into Angola to curb 
incursions of Namibian nationalist 
guerrillas based there. The South 
African forces halted tbeir with- 
drawal about 25 miles (40 kilome- 
ters) from tbe Namibian border. 


security problems created by their 
departure. 


South Africa wants all Cuban 
troops to withdraw almost immedi- 
ately upon the start of the seven- 
month ejection procedure in Na- 
mibia. Angola announced last 
November its agreement to tbe de- 


ll .S. officials refused to disclose 
details of the proposed UJS. com- 
promise. But it was understood to 
support the South African objec- 
tive of getting ail Cuban troops out 
of Angola through a phased with- 
drawal. This would allow the An- 
golan government time to adjust to 


State Department officials said 
that Washington had sought unsuc- 
cessfully for the past four months 
tp extract “ideas’* for a compro- 
mise from the South African and 
Angolan governments. 

“After four months of trying to 
elicit ideas, we decided to come up 
with our own ideas," an official 
said. 

Hesaid theU.S. plan was a “syn- 
thesis paper” and represented an 
extrapolation from the declared 
Angolan and South African posi- 
tions on the Cubans and amounted 
to “an outline of what an agree- 
ment might look Eke." 

“It represents where we see the 
two sides going," he added. 


The officials said the U.S. plan 
took no position on another issue 
the Angolans consider delicate: the 
possible formation of a coalition 
government in T-iianHa that in- 
cludes the opposition National 
Union for the Total Independence 
of Angola, or UNITA. The group 
has been carrying on a guerrilla war 
against the central government 
since Angola's independence in 
1975. 


UN Chief Visits Tehran to Discuss War 


■ Rebels Oaim Success 
UNITA said its guerrilla forces 
killed 156 government troops and a 
Cuban soldier in recent fighting, 
The Associated Press reported 
from Lisbon. UNITA said eight of 
its forces were killed, 32 were 
wounded and one was missing in 
the fighting. 


TEHRAN (Reuters) — The United Nations secretaj^-gen m l .' Javig 
Perez de CuiUar, arrived Sunday saying that he wanted only 40 discuss 
Iran's position on its war with Iraq, rather than to offer speafi^pnoppsals 
on enoing the conflict. . 

Mr. Perez de Cufllar, who plans to visit Baghdad later m me weefesad 
last week during a tour of Saudi Arabia, Oman. B ahr a in and Qatar that 
be would visit the capitals of tbe warring countries only rfhecpulddgcuss 
all aspects of the four-and-a-half-year conflict. ... "• -vr : ; . 

But the diplomat apparently changed his mind and decided taktsii 
Tehran and Baghdad anyway after meeting in Doha. Qatar, with ejgggs. 
from Iran and Iraq. He had indicated earlier that Iran wasblbckm^ie 
visit by refusing to discuss all aspects of the war. • 


Chri s tian Units Shell Center of Sidon 


mands in the name of General Ni- 
meirj or the name of the people, 
and they choose the latter. 

General Swareddahab is wdl 
known to Cairo authorities. He 
traveled here often as army com- 
mander in chief, the post he held 
before General Nimeiri placed him 
in charge of all of the armed forces 
as defense minister March 18. He is 
described as a low-profile soldier 
with no apparent political ambi- 
tions. “He has never been a star 
and no one gave him much notice,” 
an Egyptian official said. 

Egypt’s uneasiness with General 
Nimeiri, though never publicly 
spoken, was well known over the 
past year. As General Nimeiri’s sit- 
uation began unraveling in the face 
of internal economic and political 
woes. Mr. Mubarak went on record 
saying that he would help protect 
the Nimeiri regime militarily in 
case of foreign intervention — a 
reference to Libya — but would not 
interfere in internal unrest. 

In his statement Sunday, Mr. 
Abdel Meguid reiterated Egypt’s 
willingness to aid Sudan militarily, 
saying: “Egypt warns once agam 
against any aggression against the 
Sudanese people or interference in 
its internal affairs or a violation of 
its sovereignty and rights, and as- 
serts its determination to uphold its 
commitments to this dear nation." 

Although never publicized, 
Egypt has a training carter for 
army officers and an air force pres- 
ence in the Sudan. The two coun- 
tries are joined by a 25-year defense 
pact, signed in 1976, and an agree- 
ment for economic integration, 
signed in 1982. Mr. Mubarak has 
often spoken of Egypt and the Su- 
dan being “one country secured by 
the same artery,” the Nile, whose 
flow, which can be controlled by 
the Sudan, is crucial to Egypt's sur- 
vivaL 



SIDON, Lebanon (Reuters) — Christian militiamen shelled fo-center 
of. tbe southern Lebanese port of Sidon on Sunday, residents said, after 
heavy overnight fighting against Moslem forces in which four persons 
were wounded. • ■' 

The fhriitiian Voice of Lebanon, a rightist radio station, said two 
Christian areas east of Sidon also came under rocket and artillery attack. 
Mean while, sources said about 100 Christian leaders, including former 



presidents, politicians and militia chiefs, will meet Tuesday totfisci 
political crisis involving Syria's role in Lebanon that has split 
Christian community. 




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BONN (NYT) — Gebrfl Denali, an exiled c 
Moamer Qadhafi, the Libyan leader, was shot and killed Saturday by a 
Libyan gunman on a crowded Bonn street. 

A police spokesman identified the gunman only as Fatahi T., a 29-year- 

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Saturday by a 




U.S. Grime Rate Fell 4.5% Last Year 


WASHINGTON (AP) — A government survey snows overall crime in 
tbe United States fell 45 percent last year, but there was no drop in the 
rate of such violent crimes as rape, robbery and assault, the Justice 


Department said Sunday. 

The National Crime Survey, which measures crimes not reported to 
police as well as those reported, also showed that the rate of household 
burglaries and larcenies fell to the lowest level in the 12 years of tbe 
survey’s existence. 

The crime survey is based on interviews with a national sample of more 
than 125,000 people. Based on the pr eliminar y figures for 1984, there 
were 35 3 milli on “victimizations” compared with 37 million a year 
earlier, the Bureau of Justice Statistics said. 


CHnSESE-ITALIAN ACCORD — The Italian defense minister, Giovanni Spadofim, 
signed a military agreement Sunday in Beijing, as his Chinese counterpart Zhang 
Aiping, far right, watched. Under die agreement, Italy will sell weapons technology to 
China, ami may train Chinese troops in parachute jumping and mountain fighting. 


For the Record 


Greek Parliament Votes to Approve 
Limitations on Powers of President 


The Middle East News Agency, 
the Egyptian news agency, said that 
General Swareddahab is 51 and 
was bom in Omdurraan, across tbe 
Nile from Khartoum. 

The agency said he was graduat- 
ed as a second lieutenant horn the 
Sudan Military Academy in 1958 
and served in most units of the 
army. He was a military attach* in 
Uganda and has had military train- 
ing in Britain and Jordan, the agen- 
cy said. 

The Egyptian agency said he was 
believed lo be a devout Moslem, 
but not an extremist. 

The Sudanese ambassador to 
Nairobi Ibrahim Taha Ayub, said 
of General Swareddahab: “I don't 
think he has any political ambi- 
tions; he is vety much an apolitical 
person without political inclina- 
tions." 


ATHENS - The Greek Parlia- 
ment has given preliminary agree- 
ment to . constitutional amend- 
ments trimming presidential 
powers, paving the way for early 
general elections that are expected 
to be held in June. - / 

Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
dreou, whose Socialist government 
is faring a constitutional crisis, has 
asked President Christos Sartzeta- 
tas to call elections as soon as Par- 
liament approves the amendments 
in two rounds of voting. . 

In Saturday’s first round, 182 of 
the 300 deputies, two more than the 
required minimum of 180, voted 
for the changes, while 100 conser- 
vatives voted against and 18 mem- 
bets were absent 
The second vote will be held in a 
month, but the changes cannot get 
final ratification until after the 
elections. 


The proposed would limit the 
president's powers to dissolve Par- 
liament, appoint the prime minister 
and call referendums. 


Mr. Sanzetakis, whose election 
by Parliament on March 29 
sparked tbe crisis, has stated offi- 


cially that he “reserves judgment” 
an Mr. Papandieoti's request for 


day to hold a referendum on a 
proposed new constitution on May 
5, Hie Associated Press reported 
from Nicosia. 

The assembly approved the new 
constitution on March 13. It also 
approved a derision to hold general 
elections on June 23. 


elections. 


Turkish Cypriots started prepa- 
itions for general elections after 


But commentators say be is vir- 
tually certain to proclaim elections, 
probably for June 9, once be com- 
pletes a formal exchange of letters 
with Mr. Papandreou. 

The conservative opposition, 
which regards the election of Mr. 
Sanzetakis as invalid, wants gener- 
al elections immediately. 


■ Cypriot Referendum Set 
The constituent assembly of the 
self-proclaimed Turkish Republic 
of Northern Cyprus decided Satur- 


rations for general elections after 
tbe breakdown of talks, sponsored 
by the United Nations, between 
Cypriot President Spyros Ky- 
prianou and Rauf Dmktash. the 
Turkish Cypriot leader, in January 
in New York. 

The Greek-Cypriot and Turkish- 
Cypriot parts of Cyprus have been 
divided since Turkey invaded tbe 
Mediterranean island in 1974 and 
occupied the northern pan. The 
Turkish Cypriots proclaimed inde- 
pendence in November 1983, but 
only Turkey has recognized the 
breakaway slate. 


Thousands in West Germany 
Protest U.S. Nuclear Policy 


United Press International 


Soviet Said to Bug French Embassy 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Past Service 

PARIS — Soviet intelligence ser- 
vices secretly bugged communica- 
tions equipment at the French Em- 
bassy in Moscow for more than five 
years, according to official docu- 
ments obtained by te Point, a 
French newsmagazine. 

The revelations, published this 
week, are likely to add fuel to a 
controversy here over the scale of 
Soviet espionage operations. 

A spate of officially inspired 
leaks of intelligence information 
carried by the French news media 
in the past week marks the second 
anniversary of the French govern- 
ment's expulsion of 47 Soviet offi- 
cials in Paris for alleged spying. 
The Soviet Embassy’ here has pro- 
tested the leaks to the French Min- 
istry of External Relations. 

French journalists have been 
told by contacts in the French 
counterintelligence service that 
many documents being leaked to 
the press were supplied by a colonel 


in the Soviet secret service, the 
KGB. The colonel, whose name 
and whereabouts are being kept 
secret, is said to have supplied 
names of KGB officers stationed 
abroad. 

Le Point said that the Soviet col- 
onel's revelations had led to die 
expulsion of 148 Soviet officials 
worldwide in 1983, a sharp increase 
Over the 34 expulsions in 1982, 

It published a message from the 
French Embassy in Moscow to the 
Foreign Ministry in Paris on Jan. 
11, 1983, slating that electronic 
bugs bad been found in all of tbe 
embassy’s teleprinters. 

’ Thierry Wolton, Le Point’s imel- 


fused to comment on the maga- 
zine's allegations. 

Soviet Intelligence documents 
published by Le Monde and the 
government-owned television 
channel TFl last week suggested 
that 65 percent of the Western 
technological secrets stolen by So- 
viet spies were of U.S. origin and 8 
percent of French origin. 

A French translation of one of 
the documents, signed by Leonid 
V. Smirnov, head of the Soviet Mil- 
itary Industrial Commission, 
claimed that the Soviet Union had 
succeeded in finding ways to jam 
the U.S. antitank guided missile 
system known as TOW. or “tube- 


MUTLANGEN, West Germany 
— Thousands of people demon- 
strated Sunday through out West 
Germany against President Ronald 
Reagan's Space Defense Initiative 
and the deployment of U JS. nuclear 
weapons in the country. 

A spokesman for the peace 
movement said that at least 20,000 
people took part in dozens or dem- 
onstrations and rallies Sunday in 
every state, many of them at U.S. 
West German and allied military 
installations. 

At the U.S. Pershing-2 missile 
base Mutiangen east of Stuttgart, 
more than 200 people staged a to- 
ken blockade of the main gate and 
12 protesters got through a net of 
barbed wire and entered the facili- 
ty. Police chased the demonstrators 
oat but witnesses said that at least 
two were detained. 

The protesters framed the main 
gate with a banner saying “Free- 


(Contmued from Page I) 
“sanity and reason will take over” 
during the Easter recess. The U.S.- 
Japan relationship, he said, “is too 
important to be disrupted by a 
wave of emotionalism.” 

“The relationship is too yalu- 


dom through Pershings,” a parody 
of the “Freedom through wort’ 
signs mounted over the gates of 
Nazi concentration and extermina- 
tion camps before and during 
World War IL 

Elsewhere, police said that about 
2J100 people demonstrated on the 
Baltic coast, in Kiel, Lflbeck and 
Flensburg, all of which have impor- 
tant West German and NATO na- 
val bases. 

Tbe traditional Easter peace 
demonstrations were organized by 
trade union, church, student and 
opposition politicoJ groups. 

On Saturday, Friedrich Zimmer- 
man n, the interior minister, 
charged that Communists had 
played an unprecedented role in 
organizing the protests. 

In Molesworth. England, dem- 
onstrators gathered in rain and 
sleet outside a planned cruise mis- 
sile base Sunday to protest deploy- 
ment of nuclear anus in Briton. 

The Campaign for Nuclear Dis- 
armament said it expected 20,000 
people to attend two days of deni- 


able, too strong, too prerious-to lei 
differences of the moment create a 


gmg oi me teleprinters, installed in 
the embassy between October 1976 
and February 1977, meant that the 
KGB had access “to all the diplo- 
matic messages received and sent 
by our embassy in Moscow, includ- 
ing the most secret.” 

A spokesman for the French 
Ministry of External Relations re- 


launched, optically tracked, wire- 
guided” missile. TOW was used bv 


guided” missile. TOW was used by 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion forces in Western Europe. 

Mr. Smirnov, a Soviet deputy 
prime minister, was quoted as 
praising the work of Soviet “special 
services” In carrying out their work 
abroad. But be criticized delays in 
“analyzing the documents." 


Pope Invokes the Sacrifice of War 


(Continued from Page I) 
the square to show their desire for 
an end to hanger and war. 

The pope offered Easter wishes 
in 46 l angua g es, including, for the 
first time, Cambodian. He also 
gave a Passover greeting in He- 
brew. 

In his address. John Paul spoke 
of the followers of Jesus who, ac- 
cording to the Gospel, went to his 
tomb and found it empty on Easier 
morning. 

“Before every tomb, humanity 
questions itself," be said. “It ques- 
tions itself especially when the 
tombs are the legacy of the hurri- 
cane of violence and destruction 
cased by war." 

“Spontaneously” he said, "our 
memory goes bade to 40 years ago, 
when, in Europe and Asia and oth- 
er continents, the Second World 
War, unleashed by a mad imperial- 
ist ideology, was coming to a 
dose." 

“For more than five years, hu- 
manity had lived a horrendous ex- 


perience," he went on. “Tens of 
millions of people massacred mi 
the battle fronts, dries razed to the 
ground, slaughter in the air and on 
the sea, populations ruined by hun- 
ger and privations.” 

In addition, the pope said, "oth- 
er tens of millions of human be- 
ings” were “decimated and de- 
stroyed in concentration camps." 

The Jewish people," he went 
on, were “condemned to extermi- 
nation." 

At the end came “the terrifying 
revelation of the first atomic explo- 
sions," he concluded. 

John Paul said that at the war’s 
end, the victorious allies issued the 
Universal Declaration of Human 
Rights and other statements de- 
signed to reaffirm "the fundamen- 
tal rights of all men and women, 
4nd of all nations, big or smalL" 

•: “Their intention was thus to 
diitimate the very root of war," be 
said, “since war is born of the viola- 
tion of the rights of individuals and 


of peoples and shatters the just so- 
cial order." 

Yet the pope sketched a bleak 
landscape in describing the world 
that followed the war. 

“Forty years ago, the war end- 
ed." he said. “Has peace, as the 
result of a just social order, been 
truly affirmed? Peace, which is 
grounded in real respect — not 
only for the letter but for the spoil 
— for the rights of human, beings? 
And for the rights of nations?” 


differences of the moment create a 
situation which we will be sorry for 
in the future," he said. 

While an anti-Japanese feeling 
“exploded" in Congress, Mr, 
Mansfield said. “I’m not at all cer- 
tain it exploded in the country." 

Mr. Mansfield said he was “dis- 


turbed at the way Japan is being 
made the scapegoat" for the U.S. 
merchandise trade deficit last year 
of $123.3 billion, nearly S37 Wfiioa 
of which resulted from trade with 
Japan. Mansfield urged Congress' 
and the administration to work to- 
gether to solve the country's own 
economic problems — the overval- 
ued dollar, high interest rates and 
rising budget deficits — that bear 
the major responsibility for- the 
trade deficit. 

“The Japanese have to open their 
markets," he said. “We have to do 
our thing here," 

But Mr. Mansfield, 82, who had 
been a Democratic senator from. 
Montana for 25 years, said that 
strong attacks on Japanese trade 


practices by legislators who have 
been noted for their free-trade atti- 
tudes. such as Swintpr John H. 
P*afee, a Republican of Rhode Is- 
land, helped speed the trade talks. 

He said that Mr. Chafee’s intro- 
duction of a bill that would baf 
Japanese telecommunication* 
products Iron the United States if . 
American companies did not get 
equal access in Japan was. “the 
straw that broke tbe camcTs back" 
during the Tokyo negotiations. 

“It probably had a large part lo 
play in bringing tbe negotiations to 
a successful conclusion, " Mr; 

Mansfield said. 

Mr, Mansfiddsaid PrimcMnii> 
ter Yasuhiro Nakasone took great 
political risks to gain the trade con- 
cessions the United States demand- . 
ed. 


Five in Egypt Sentenced 
To Be Hanged for Rape 


Brigitte Bardot Awarded 


French Legion of Honor 

The Associated Pros 
PARIS — Brigitte Bardot, 50. 
was named a knight of the French 
Legion of Honor Sunday for her 
“36 years of cinematographic activ- 
ity." - 

Miss Bardot, an actress who re- 
tired from films in 1973, has spent 
much of her time since then in 
semi-seclusion on the Riviera. 


Reuters 

CAIRO — An Egyptian court 
has sentenced five men to hang Tor 
raping an 18-year-old woman, the 
Egyptian Middle East News Agen- 
cy has reported. A sixth man was 
sentenced to seven years of hard 
labor. 

The rape, which took place in a 
suburb of Cairo last January, 
caused an uproar in parliament, 
with members calling for stricter 
punishment for rapists after an in- 
crease in the number of cases, the 
agency said Saturday. 


,‘g Colleges 


mal e passer-by was grazed by a bullet, the spokesman said, adding that 
Mr. Denali, 30, had been shot in tbe head several times and had died of 
his wounds in a hospital 

The slaying of Mr. Denali, who was seeking political asylum in West 
Germany, was the latest in a series of killings involving political oppo- 
nents of the Libyan leader, and tbe second one in Bonn. 




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Union Carbide Corp. will resume production of methyl isocyanate 
within two weeks at its West Virginia plant, the company said. It halted 
production after a leak of the chemical from a plant m India killed more 
than 2,000 people. (AP) 

John Lawn, 49, will be nominated to head the U.S. Drug Enforcement 
Administration, replacing Francis M. Mullen Jr„ President Ronald 
Reagan announced. Mr. Lawn is now acting director. (UP I) 

Henry G. Cisneros, the mayor of San Antonia Texas, defeated five 
challengers overwhelmingly to win a third term Saturday. (AP) 

President-elect Tancredo Neves of Brazil is suffering from a lung 
inflammation, his doctors said after a sophisticated X-ray examination, 
but will not require additional surgery for mtestinal problems. Mr. Neves, 
75, was described Sunday as. being in good condition. (AP) 

TUrty-seven persons died when a bus carrying about 45 people plunged 
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the passengers were building workers returning home to the town of 
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Pope John Paul U wdl receive President Erich Hooecker of East 
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WINNER’S CIRCLE — Pnskknt Rfma W Reagan, 
surrounded by members of the Vfllanova University 
basketball team that won the national championship last 
week, bolds a Vfflanora jacket at a White House cere- 
mony. From left are EdPindmey, Harold Pressley, Mr. 
Reagan, Steve PSnooe and the coach, RoSe Masrinfanu 

AMERICAN TOPICS 


Women’s Colleges 

Adapt and Survive 

A survey by the Women’s 
College Coalition shows that, of 
5,000 women's college alumnae 
of 1967-1977, 71 percent said 
they would go to ihesameinsii- 
mucHi if they were starting over, 
and 58 percent said they would 
encourage their daughters to at- 
tend a women’s college. 

There were 142 women’s col- 
leges in the early 1970s, when 
the service academies and most 
men's colleges started admit- 
ting women and prominent 
women’s schools lute Vassar 
and Skidmore began admitting 
men. Today, 1 10 colleges exclu- 
sively for women have survived, 
with 110,000 undergraduates, 
or 2 percent of female college 
students. Enrollment at wom- 
en's colleges is actually up 25 
permit in the past decade. 

"There are whole new fields 
opening to women, so obvious- 
ly women’s colleges had to ex- 
pand their offerings," says Rho- 
da Dorsey, president of 
Goucher College in Towson. 
Maryland, which now has 
courses in managemen t, public 
affairs and communicatio ns. 
Randolph- Macon Woman's 
College in Lynchburg. Virginia, 
offers computer sciences and 
business administration. 

Nanneri O. Keohane, presi- 
dent of Wellesley College in 
Wellesley, Massachusetts, says, 
“We have a very important and 
validated mission in preparing 
women, and wo have a pretty 
good sense of how to do it 
best.” 


Pittsburgh Bemnsed 
At No. 1 Ranking 

Pittsburgh, accustomed to 
being called a grimy steel town, 
is still getting used to its title as 
the best place to live among all 
329 of the metropolitan areas in 
the United States. 

Although Pittsburgh has 
more office buildings than sled 
mills these days, Peter Leo, a 
columnist for The Pittsburgh 
Post-Gazette, wrote, “On be- 
half of Pittsburgh, I demand a 
recount.” Warning that all the 
publicity' would attract even 
moreof the young professionals 
who already have invaded the 
city, Mr. Leo said, “We don’t 
have enough jogging shoes to go 
around." 


’Hate Crimes’ 

Held Unloggable 

Justice Department officials 
said at a recent hearing of a. 
House Judiciary subcommittee 
that it would be too difficult to 
include “hate crimes" — those 


racially, ethnically or religious- 
ly motivated — in the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation's crime 
statistics and suggested that 
Congress collect newspaper 
clippings to obtain su ch infor- 
mation. 

The burglarizing of a syna- 
for example, could have 
motivated by personal 
officials said. Steven R. 
irieanger. director of the de- 
partment’s bureau of statistics, 
said, “In certain clear-cut cases, 
such as a cross burning on a 
lawn or the p aintin g of a swasti- 
ka on a temple, the racial or 
religious overtones are quite 
dear. Most crimes, however, 
are not of this nature." 

JbhnCooycsJr., a Michigan 
Democrat, said, “These prob- 
lems are bigger than going to a 
clipping service. That's a sim- 
plistic solution.” 


Notes About People 

Senator Edward M, Kennedy, 
when asked again by reporters 
last week if he still wanted to be 
president, replied, Tve said 
that for years and years. I think 
that's probably the least well- 
kept secret of public life." 

Jeaae J. Kirkpatrick, the for- 
mer U.S. ambassador to the 
United Nations, has signed for 
a series of speaking en g a ge - 
ments in the United States and ' 
abroad with Harry Walker Inc, 
a New York lecture bureau. Mr. 
Walker-sahl her fees will rank 
with those of “the most sought- 
after speakers of the world-" 
That amid mean as much as the 
$20,000 or more an appearance 
commanded fay Harry A. Kis- 
singer, the forma secretary of 
state, who also is a Walker cli- 
ent, as are such former leaders 
as Gerald R. Ford, Edward 
Heath and Helmut Schmid L 

Although he has no intention 
of retiring soon. Jack Anderson, 
62, the Pulitzer Prize winner 
who took ova his Washington 
cohnnn in 1967 from the late 
Drew Pearson, who started it in 
1931, has named two of his 
chief investigative reporters as 
his heirs apparent: Dale van 
Atta and Joseph Spear will 
share the byline on alternate 
days. 

The president and vice presi- 
dent have official residences; 
now the State Department is 
looking for one for the secretary 
of state, who currently is 
George P. Shultz. As Clement 
Conga, curator of the White 
House, the State Department 
and Blair House said, “It’s get- 
ting too expensive to put in all 
the security equipment needed 
every rime secretaries change.” 


ARTHUR HIGH 


Congress Using Foreign Aid as Leverage to Influence Policy 


By Scevcn V. Roberts 

Nnu York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The House Foreign Affairs 
Committee derided last week that an aid program tor 
the Upper Huallaga Valley in Peru could go forward 
only after the Agency for international Development 
determined that cultivation of coca leaves, the raw 
material for cocaine, had been reduced in the valley . 

Aid to Paraguay, said the panel, would be baited 
until a “good faith effort" bad been made to determine 
the whereabouts of Josef Mengele, a Nazi doctor 
reported to be hiding out in that country. 

Jordan could not purchase sophisticated American 
weaponry under the bill until the president certified 
that Amman was “publicly committed to the recogni- 
tion of Israel" and ready to enter peace negotiations. 

These are only three of the dozens of clauses, 
conditions and constraints contained in the 121-page, 
$14.5- billion foreign aid bill adopted by the commit- 
tee. Thor arc another demonstration of the determina- 
tion of congress to influence foreign policy. 

“We feel this is our one chance to express our views 
on a number of issues," said Representative Howard 
L. Berman, Democrat of California, who is on the 
Foreign Affairs Committee. “Some people would ac- 


cuse us of micromanagement, but that starts from our 
frustration. This is the only vehicle on which we can do 
anything. Otherwise it's ail talk.*' 


Congressional activism on foreign aid reflects the 
fact that more and more senators and representatives 
want to have a say. “One hundred senators all have 


The growing tendency of Congress to encumber foreign policy interests now.” noted Mr. Lugar. 
aid b ills with all sorts of restrictions and th^y tel they ought to play a role.” 


and 


foreign 

provisos has caused the legislation to stall in recent 
years. No authorization bill has become law since 
1981. leaving the foreign aid program to be financed 
through « rehalt spending hilU known as continuing 
resolutions under which Congress cannot specify 
where and how most aid is spent. 

Senator Richard G. Lugar, Republican of Indiana 
and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee. said he was encouraged by the “spirit of 
comity” that marked his committee's drafting sessions 
on the foreign aid bill last week. 

He expressed “some optimism" that this year the 
bill would go through. But it still has problems. 

“There is a danger that we get too detailed," wanted 
Senator Daniel J. Evans, Republican of Washington. 
“As a fundamental policy we ought to be working on 
the major thrusts of foreign policy. Sometimes we 
spend too much time and effort on micromanaging the 
aid program.” 


wimple, a number of Jewish members °f P revisions adopted by the House committee, at- 
op the House panel in pan because of a dudm £ following: 

in Israel F «An additional Si 5 billion in economic aid for 


The foreign policy committees have also attracted 
lawmakers with strongly held views rat particular 
issues. For exam' 
sought places 
deep interest 

Since jailing the committee this year Representa- 
tive Christopher H. Smith, Republican of New Jersey, 
has concentrated on pressing his anti-abortion views. 

With the Democrats controlling the House and the 

Republicans in charge of the Senate and the White 
House, the Democrats have tried to use the foreign aid 
bill to influence government actions. 

“Democrats here don't feel that we have enough 
ability to quietly convince the administration of our 
concents,” said Mr. Berman. “So this becomes our 
vehicle.” 

In the view of Representative Howard E. Wolpe, 
Democrat of Michigan and chairman of the House 
subcommittee on Africa, many lawmakers have been 


moved to activism by what they regard as the nusjudg- 
men is of Reagan administration foreign policy. 
“What you’re seeing," he said, “is a breakdown of 
consensus and a low degree of trust between the 
administration and congressional foreign policy- 
makers," 

This assessment seemed to be borne out in a number 


Israel in the current fiscal year. In the process, the 
panel brushed aside an administration request for a 
delay. 

• A requirement that aid 10 El Salvador be contin- 
gent on a report by the president detailing that coun- 
try's progress toward ending violations of human 
rights. The administration opposed any required re- 
port and the Senate committee did not include rate. 

• A clause malting military aid to Guatemala con- 
tingent on the installation of a democratic 
government. 

• An allocation, opposed by the administration, of 
S5 million in military aid 10 non- Communis: guerrillas 
in Cambodia fighting the occupying forces of 
Vietnam. 


Next Step for Duarte: 
How to Define the Rules 


By James LeMoyne 

Net* York Tima Service 

SAN SALVADOR — Politi- 
cians and foreign diplomats here 
say President Jose Napoledn 
Duarte’s electoral triumph ova his 
rightist opponents is almost certain 
to give him the power he needs to 
alter the economic and political 
structure of El Salvador. 

But if he is to govern effectively, 
these officials say, Mr. Duarte must 
use his office in a way that has not 
previously been open to him. 

“He has to define the rules of the 
game and what he really thinks of 
social reforms," a dose confidant 
of Mr. Duarte said in an interview. 
“He has to reach out in a way that 
be has not done up to now." 

Advisers to the president, mem- 
bers of conservative parties and 
Western officials said in interviews 
last week that, because of the land- 
slide victory Mr. Duane’s Chris- 
tian Democratic Party won in na- 
tional legislative and municipal 
dec tions March 31, the political 
fortunes of the leftist guerrillas 
fighting the government had 
plunged to the lowest point ever. 

The advisers say the rebels now 
confront a centrist president who 
has won two elections and who will 
govern with the authority of having 
his party in power. 

The vote also is Iikdy to force a 
major realignment among Mr. 
Duarte’s conservative and ultra- 
conservative opponents. They face 
the prospect of having the Chris- 
tian Democrats established as the 
d ominan t political force in El Sal- 
vador for years to come.’ 

That likelihood prompted a con- 
servative coalition, led tty the Na- 
tionalist Republican Alliance party 
of Roberto d’Anbuisson, to de- 
mand that the election be nullified. 
But the effort collapsed when tire 
army high command challenged 
the conservatives’ assertion that (he 
vote had been fraudulent 

That reinforced Mr. Duarte’s po- 
sition and is being interpreted as a 
turning point in El Salvador’s 
struggle for political stability. But 
it also showed the delernrimng in- 
fluence the army Still maintains 
ova political affairs, which could 
limit Mr. Duarte's efforts to stop 
human rights violations and to ne- 
gotiate with the guerrillas. 

Perhaps most important factor 
in the army’s d e ci s ion, according to 
a forma army officer, was tire high 
command’s realization that its for- 
ma alliance with extreme rightists 
and landowners had helped set off 
a civil war that cannot be con- 
trolled through rigged elections 
and indiscriminate killing . 

An official vote count of the elec- 
tions is not expected to be complet- 
ed until this week. But unofficial 
returns considered reliable indicate 
that Mr. Duarte’s party has won 
almost 54 percent of the vote and 
the majority it was seeking in the 
National Assembly. 

Conservative parties have domi- 


nated the assembly until now, ob- 
structing the changes that Mr. 
Duarte promised when he took of- 
fice 10 months ago. 

Now, said a political analyst 
with close ties to the right, the Na- 
tionalist Republican Alliance is 
faced with deciding whether it is a 
movement tied to Mr. d'Aubuisson 
or a party able to survive in opposi- 
tion. 

Hugo BaiTera, a founder of the 
alliance, has said Mr. d’Aubuisson 
has failed to lead effectively and 
reportedly is likely to form a new 
party or to uy to take control of tire 
alliance. Leaders of tire other party 
in the rightist coalition, the Nation- 
al Concilia lion Party, have said 
they would like to make a deal with 
Mr. Duarte. 

■ Villalobos Reported Shot 

There is increasing evidence that 
the guerrillas’ top commander in 
eastern El Salvador has been shot 
and killed or badly wounded. The 
Associated Press reported Saturday 
from San Salvador. 

The loss of Joaquin Villalobos, 
33, would be a major blow to the 
rebels. His Peoples' Revolutionary 
Army is the largest of the five rebel 
groups battling the government. 

Rebel sources in Mexico City 
and San Jose, Costa Rica, denied 
reports that Mr. Villalobos may 
have been slain. But Major Carlos 
Aviles, head of the Armed Forces 
Press Committee, said Friday night 
“we are 'almost 100 percent sure” 
Mr. Villalobos was killed or seri- 
ously wounded March 31 in a bat- 
tie in northern San Miguel prov- 
ince. .... •* 

A UJL adviser said Mr. Villalo- 
bos had beat identified from pho- 
tographs The adviser said intelli- 
gence reports indicate the rebels 
are meeting to pick a new leader. 



SHUTTLE DELIVERY — Robert Stewart, left, and 
David Hflmers, two of die astronauts who wiD be on the 
maiden mission of die space shuttle Atlantis in Septem- 
ber, took delivery Saturday of the craft at the Rockwell 
International assembly plant at Palmdale, California. 
Atlantis is die fourth and last of this series of shuttles. 


Strike by Civilian Crew 
Confirmed by U.S. Navy 

By Fred Hiatt 
and Rick Atkinson 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — A U.S. 
y ship! 
in the 


counsel for the 12. 000- member 
Masters union in Linthicum, Mary- ' 
land, said: “it was tire action of the 
company which precipitated tire in- 
cident. If you’re told” that the' 
union members are “no longer 
members of the pension plan, that 
your wages are reduced, you can 
choose to continue working or you ■ 
can ask to be relieved.” 

The company sent replacements 
to the base, but the striking officers 
prevailed on the new crew to join 
the strike, company officials said 
By the time a second crew could 
reach the island, 11 days had 


Pentagon Will Withhold 
Payments to Contractor 


ose in tne Indian Ocean was de- 
layed for 1 1 days last fall when its 
civilian captain and deck officers 
went on strike, navy officials have 
confirmed. 

The SS Monnac Star, a tanka, is 
one of a growing number of ships 
owned or leased by the navy but 
operated by civilian crews. Nine 
other ships were affected when the 
Internationa] Organization of Mas- 
ters. Mates and Pilots called a 
strike Oct. 3, although none was 
delayed as long as the Monnac 
Star, Lieutenant Dave Morris of 
the navy said last week in response 
to questions. 

The navy is growing increasingly 
dependent on civilian crews as 11 
expands toward tire Reagan admin- 
istration's goal of a 600-ship fleet 
Ci vilians now operate 123 navy 
ships, up from 78 four years ago. 

These include supply, repair and 
submarine-tracking vessels. 

“We have a limited field of peo- 
ple to operate our ships,” Evaett 
Pyatt, the assistant secretary of the 
navy for shipbuilding and logistics, 
told a congressional subcommittee 
last year. 

Naval officials said civilian 
crews on submarine-trackers would 
not present problems in wartime. 

Foreigners BuyingL'S. land 

dans with military personnel, nor 
is one deemed necessary” the 
House Appropriations subcommit- 
tee on defense was told. 

The navy’s Maritime Sealift 
Command controls the 123 ships 


The nine other ships affected by 
the strike found replacement crews 
soon enough to meet sailing dates, 
or met their schedules by steaming 
faster than planned after leaving 
port. Lieutenant Morris said. Most 
of the vessels were oilers. 

The navy is building a dozen 
submarine-tracking ships that will 
be manned by union seamen and 
contract tec hnicians The ships are 
to cost $39 milli on including an 
extra S1.75 million for each “to 
incorporate single-man state- 
rooms" as union crews demand, 
navy officials said. 

The unions contend that they op- 
erate such ships more cheaply Ire- 
cause they use fewer sailors than 
the navy and because of the high 
retirement costs for navy sailors. 


Goetz Bid to Buy 
Gun Is Reported 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Federal 


au- 


thorities are investigating a report 
that Bernhard H. Goetz, who has 
beat charged in the shooting of 
four persons on the New York sub- 
way, may have tried to buy a gun in 
Florida while he was under indict- 
ment on gun possession charges. 

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco 
and Firearms has obtained records 
indicating that Mr. Goetz bought 
two guns last fall in Or land a Flori- 
da, the UJS. attorney, Rudolph 
Giuliani, said Thursday. He said 
there were indications Mr. Goetz 
lata tried to buy a third gun after 
he had been indicted. 

US. law requires persons buying 
guns to sign a tonn saying they are 
not under indictment. Mr. Goetz 
was indicted in January on three 
counts of illegal gnu possession, 
one Cor a revolver he is accused of 
using to shoot four youths Dec. 21 


By Michael Weisskopf 

Washington Pass Service 

WASHINGTON — The De- 
fense Department, moving to re- 
cover the $124 million it says it has 
overpaid General Dynamics Corp. 
for overhead expenses, has an- 
nounced it will deduct the amount 
from current billings for producing 
weapons. 

The Pentagon also said Friday it 
would continue to freeze $30 mil- 
lion in monthly overhead payments 
until the nation's largest defense 
contractor reforms billing proce- 
dures 10 prevent frivolous claims. 

These moves came one day after 
Pentagon auditors concluded that 
General Dynamics had been paid 
$244 million more than it should 
have for overhead costs since 1973. 
The Pentagon said h previously 
had recovered $120 million 
through normal accounting proce- 
dures. 

Rather than waiting fra General 
Dynamics to reimburse the balance 
of tite overpayments, the Pentagon 
now plans to pay the contractor 
about $576 million for its next bill- 
ing for labor and material. General 
Dynamics receives about $700 mil- 
lion every month from the Penta- 
gon in “progress payments" to cov- 


er the costs of building weapons. 

Auditors were ordered to review 
General Dynamics's past overhead 
bQlings last month after company 
officials admitted improperly 
the government for pa- 
entertainment and travel as 
well as kennel fees for a corporate 
executive's dog. Usually, because 
of the shea number involved, Pen- 
tagon audits of military contractor 
accounts are performed only years 
lata to ensure that the claims woe 
in line with procurement rales. 

When the secretary of defense, 
Caspar W. Weinberger, announced 
the audit of General Dynamics on 
March 5 as the opening of a “get- 
tough" policy against military con- 
tractors, he froze the company’s 
overhead payments. 

Friday, die Pentagon said it 
would continue the suspension of 
those payments until General Dy- 
namics changes accounting and 
management practices to prevent 
billings for expenses unrelated to 
weapons production. 


Agaue France- Prase 

WASHINGTON — Foreigners 
or companies controlled by them 
own 13.832 mil li nn acres <5.6 mil- , 
lion hectares;, or 1 percent, of the 
forest and agricultural land in the 
United States, the Department of 


and hires civil service crews to op- 
erate about half. The rest are qper- Agriculture has reported, 
ated by private shipping lines, 
which generally hire union crews. 

The Monnac Star, for example, 


example, 

is owned by the Moore McCor- 
mack Bulk Transport Lines of 
Stamford, Connecticut, and is 
leased to the navy to deliver fresh 
water to an Indian Ocean flotilla 
that carries ^propositioned” weap- 
ons and equipment for the Rapid 
Deployment Force. 

Last October, when the ship was 
supposed to sail from the naval 
base on the Indian Ocean island of 
Diego Garcia, three unions repre- 
sented different members of the 
crew: the Masters, Males and Pi- 
lots union, for officers; the Marine 
Engineers Beneficial Association, 
for engineers, and the National 
Maritime Union, for seamen. 

But Moore McCormack and 
four other shipping lines had de- 
clined to renew their contracts with 
the officers’ union and the nni mn 
called a strike. 

Burton M. Epstein, general 


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Battle Over U.S. Budget Centering on Social Security Cuts 



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By James R. Dickenson 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — As Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan acknowl- 
edged that he faces a tough fight on 
his proposed budget compromise, 
senior citizens and Democratic 
congressmen opened the campaign 
against tt by accusing him of break- 
ing a promise not to reduce Social 
Security cost-of-living increases. 

Besides the Social Security re- 
ductions, the measure would re- 
duce by half the president's re- 


Mr. Reagan, leaving the White 
House on Friday tea 10-day vaca- 
tion rat his California ranch, sod 
be was “very optimistic and 

ful” of getting the compromise i 
be reached with Senate Republi- 
cans approved by Congress. 

“It’s going to be a fight. It's been 
a fight since 1981” Mr. Reagan 
said. “There are factions there that 
just want to keep rat spending in 
Congress." 

The original budget proposal for 
fiscal 1986 that Mr. Reagan sub- 


of defense and not enough out of nation that exceeds 3 percent. In- 


icit. 


jv— . -Miuy- - 




quested increase in military nutted to Congress is considered to 
spending and would end or curtail be dead, 
dozens of federal programs, indud- The president has rejected a sub- 

ing the Amtrak passenger rail sys- sequent resolution worked out by 
tem and the program to share reve- the Senate Budget Committee be- 
nue with local governments. cause, he said, it took too mudt out 


domestic programs. 

Defenders of dozens of pro- 
grams that the compromise would 
curtail or efiminate were preparing 
to fight it out in Congress. 

One of the principal battles is 
likely to be ova the proposal to 
limit cost-of-living increases in So- 
cial Security and other federal re- 
tirement programs. 

Under the compromise proposal. 
Social Security cost-of-living in- 
creases for the next three years 
would be limited to 2 percent a 
year, plus the amount of annual 
inflation that exceeds 4 percent. 

Under current law, Social Secu- 
rity recipients receive an increase 
equal to the amount of annual in- 


flation is not expected to exceed 4 
percent next year under the admin- 
istration’s current economic pro- 
jections. 

Two Democrats in Congress, 
Senator Daniel P. Moynfltan of 
New York and Representative 
Claude Pepper of Florida, an- 
nounced Friday that they would try 
to force separate floor votes on the 
Social Security provisions. 

The impetus for the limit on 
benefits came not from the con- 
gressional negotiators, but from the 
White House. The White House 
chief of staff, Donald T. Regan, 
asked who proposed it in the bud- 
get negotiations, said, “I did. on 
behalf of the president” 


U.S. Plans to Stamp Car Parts to Thwart Thieves 


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take apart stolen can and sell titan 
piecemeal, often realizing more 
than the cars were worth whole. 


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By Irvin Molorsky 
New York Timet Senke 
WASHINGTON —The federal 
government, having just about con- “The numbers are a concession 

ceded that automobile thieves win that thefts cannot be stopped,” said 
be able to defeat almost any. anti- Richard O. Elder, a vice president 
theft gadget devised by manufac- of the Highway Loss Data Insti- 
turcis, is completing regulations tme. an insurance industry group, 
that win make it easier to recover He said that the numbering system 


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cars after they have been stolen. 

Under rules being drawn up by 
the Department of Transportation, 
automobile puts most attcactive .to 
thieves would be stamped with 
identification numbers that the au- 
thorities could use to trace than. 

Themksare aimed at shops that 


would address the problem “post- 
theft. at the pram where the thief 
would be sdling the car or cutting it 

H 

Up. 

Brian McLaughlin, an official of 
the National Highway Traffic Safe- 
ty A dminis tration, said that pro- 
posed federal regulations would re- 


quire numbers on engines, 
transmissions, hoods, grilles, 
bumpers, front fenders, rear quar- 
ter panels, trunk fioorpans, frame 
or supporting structures, passenger 
doors and “the deck lid, iailgate or 
hatcbback, whichever is present" 
The deck lid is the cover ova the 
trunk. 

Mr. McLaughlin said that the 
numbers would probably be re- 
quired on all cars whose theft rates 
were above average. He said the 
regulations would be approved in 
time for use on 1987 models. 

The matting, which will be done 
as the cars are made, will not cost 


buyers more ihanSI5 for each vehi- 
cle, Mr. McLaughlin said. 

Automobile theft is a major 
problem in the United States, 
where more than a million cars 
woe reported stolen in 1983, the 
most recent year for which figures 
were available. Government statis- 
tics show a slight drop in thefts in 
recent years, but also a sharp de- 
cline in the rate at which stolen cars 
are recovered. 


There were accusations, denied 
by Mr. Reagan and other adminis- 
tration officials, that the Social Se- 
curity provisions violated a Reagan 
campaign promise. 

Id last year's presidential cam- 
paign, the Democratic presidential 
nominee, Walter F. Mondale, al- 
leged that Mr. Reagan had a “se- 
cret plan" to cut Social Security 
benefits. 

In a debate with Mr. Mondale on 
Oct 7, Mr. Reagan said: “A presi- 
dent should never say ‘never.’ But 
I'm going to violate that rule and 
say ‘neva.* I will never stand for a 
redaction of the Sodal Security 
benefits to the people that are now 
getting them.” 

After his re-election in Novem- 
ber, Mr. Reagan began to soften his 
stand. In a news conference on Jan. 
9, he said he would have to "look 
at" Soda] Security changes if faced 
with an “overwhelming bipartisan 
majority in both houses." 

Mr. Pepper said Friday, Tm 
. shocked that the president of the 
United Stales would deliberately 
repudiate a solemn commitment be 
■ madetothe semor citizens of this 
- country that he would not cut So- 
dal Security benefits." 

Mr. Reagan noted Friday that 
the Senate Budget. Committee had 
proposed eli minatin g the cost-of- 
living increase for one year, while 


m the new compromise “we’re ap- 
The Department of Transports- ^proving a guaranteed increase, 
don estimated that car theft cost more than & percent because it's 
Americans $5 billion in 1983, cither ; ^compounded ova a three-year pe- 
directly or through rising insurance .Hod, regardless of what inflation 
premiums, is." 



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Page 4 


Hcralb 


Publixbrd With The New York Tune* and The Washington Posi 


eribunc. 


Get Diplomacy Working 


Notwithstanding tbe Sandinists' quick and 
defiant rqection of it. President Reagan's new 
Nicaragua, plan is a step forward in one impor- 
tant respect: It points a way to suspension of 
the war for at least two months in order to give 
negotiations a better chance. 

The regime in Managua refused to accept 
the basic terms of the Reagan offer —a cease- 
fire and talks with the resistance — when the 
resistance put them forward on March 1 ■ But 
now the official U.S. weight is behind those 
terms. And with Colombia’s president pro- 
nouncing the new plan “positive,” Mr. Reagan 
has some basis for asserting that “we’ll have 
the support of the Contadoras” — the Latin 
democracies that have been trying to mediate. 

Mr. Reagan does not dispute that it was 
congressional opposition to funding the “con- 

■ tras” that led turn to his new plan. It reflects 
his still intense and lopsided focus on keeping 
them in the field. He insists that the Sandinists 

' will not negotiate unless Congress releases $14 
milli on for nrmmili tary needs of the “contras” 
right away and leaves him free to fill their 
military needs if laHcs do not pan out soon. For 
this he is being widely accused, by the Sandi- 
nists and others, of demanding unreasonably 
that Managua negotiate with a gun at its head. 
This is so, although, given the Sandinists’ 
treatment of their opposition, it is not far- 
. fetched for Mr. Reagan to fear getting trapped, 
in a situation where talks drag on and on. 

The more relevant question remains what 
will best move the Sandinists toward respect 
for their neighbors and — much the more 

■ difficult and controversial goal — toward re- 
* conciliation with fellow Nicaraguans. The 

Nicaraguan resistance has some notably dem- 
ocratic elements. But the three-year record of 
this U.S.-backed insurgency does not build 
confidence in its utility as a bargaining lever. It 
has given the Sandinists the high ground of 
' Nicaraguan nationalism, undercut mediation 
by the Latin democracies and kept Mr. Reagan 
? fighting a costly uphill battle at home. 

! It needs to be underlined chat (he reluctance 


of many Americans to support the “contras" 
militarily comes not from favor for the Sandi- 
nists but from an objection to reliance on 
military intervention in Central America. That 
the Sandinists also object to intervention does 
not make it more palatable. The element that 
the Contadora group is encour agin g in U.S. 
policy is not the threat of a return to interven- 
tion in 60 days — this runs counter to the 
Contadora charter — but the possibility of a 
wider ambit for the group’s own diplomacy. 

It would be a waste if all Mr. Reagan's new 
p l an produced were a hotter argument over the 
“contras.” Believers and skeptics alike ought 
to try to profit from the fact that he offers a 
new way to put together a military policy and 
the pursuit of a political settlement. He has 
reshuffled some of the cards. Perhaps more of 
th<»m can be reshuffled at the same time. 

The prime requirement is an intense com- 
mon effort to get a prompt and unconditional 
cease-fire. Hie initiating ride, and its patrons, 
will deserve much credit The ride that drags 
its feet will lose accordingly. A cease-fire can 
save lives. lower the temperature and improve 
the atmosphere for talks. 

One can imagine a clutter of talks and of 
bids for talks: between Nicaraguans, between 
the United States and Nicaragua, and in the 
Contadora group. The Sandinists and their 
Nicaraguan opponents have much to talk over 
and much to compromise on. Washington and 
Managua could usefully resume the bilateral 
talks that the Reagan adminis tration broke 
off. On the Contadora group, however, falls a 
special responsibility to use the moment well. 
Its urgent task is to address the objections that 
other Central American nations have to the 
, Contadora draft that Nicaragua accepted last 
Sept. 7. These objections relate mostly to in- 
spection and verification of crucial noninter- 
vention measures binding on both sides. This 
seems to us the likeliest place for early progress 
to demonstrate what desperately needs dem- 
onstrating: that there is an alternative to war. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Soviet Oil Problem 


Soviet oQ production fell last year for the 
first time in a generation. It must have been a 
profoundly unpleasant shock in a country 
■ that, like America until the early 1970s, was 
.accustomed to a steadily rising supply. There 
have already been repercussions. In the past 
couple of months the ministers of oil and of 
electric power have, as the Soviets say, retired. 

The immediate cause of the trouble seems to 
be the inadequate maintenance that is com- 
mon in Soviet industry. Perhaps improved 
- management, under anew oil minis ter, can put 
’ Soviet oil production back on that rising curve 
■— for a time. But somewhere ahead of them 
! lies a more intractable limit. Although Soviet 
resources are enormous, the geology of Siberia 
!has important similarities to that of North 
America. Development of America’s ofl fields 
‘started several decades earlier, and it seems 
; likely that Soviet production will follow the 
‘same general pattern. American production 
peaked in 1970 and fell in the following years. 
Despite the enormous price increases, the sup- 
ply of American oO has not risen. It has only 
stopped failing, and now seems to be stabilized 
at roughly 8 percent below the level of 15 years 
ago. Simply holding that level is requiring a 


gigantic effort by the oil industry, with high 
capital investment There have been slight 
gains in production in the past several years, 
but those gains have been won only by a 
dramatic expansion of drilling. The number of 
oil wdls drilled in the United States last year 
was more than 41,000 — a record, and more 
than double the rate in the late 1970s. 

Soviet ability in this technology is not to be 
underestimated. For more than a decade they 
have produced more oil than any country in 
the world, and have done it in a region with an 
unforgiving c limate. Several years ago they 
surpassed the United States to become the 
world’s leading producer of natural gas as well. 
But to hold the present output steady is going 
to require an increasingly strenuous exertion. 

The United States responded to the con- 
straints on its domestic oil production in the 
1970s by increasing imports. The Soviets are 
unlikely to do that One reason is that they 
now depend on oil exports for most of their 
foreign exchange earnings. They may be ap- 
proaching a time when the struggle to main- 
tain oil production joins their agricultural 
struggle as a source of economic strain. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


An Arms Vice Closes on Japan 

The international military situation in the 
Far East surrounding Japan has become tense. 
We wonder if it is not possible for the United 
Stales and the Soviet Union to have talks to 
prevent the further spread of military deploy- 
ment and whether Japan, with the cooperation 
of other Asian nations, can work for a similar 
purpose. The superpowers' military buildup 
race around Japan wtil needlessly heighten the 
tension in the region, inviting a dangerous 
situation not only for Japan. 

— The Maimchi Daily News (Tokyo). 

Anti-Anti-Semitism in die ’80s 

Without [traditional Christian anti-Semi- 
tism] the Nazis could not have created the 
Holocaust. They used the demonization of the 
.Jews by the Christian churches to condition 
ihdr own citizens to indifference, their murder 
^squads to insensibility and the rest of wcdd to 
-dosing its eyes, ears and doors. 

. The Jews and the Christians are now ap- 
proaching each other on a mutual moral basts: 
'the perfectibility of the world, in this world. 
'Terrible acts such as those recently in Paris 
.show that our fight is by no means over. But 


today's anti-Semitism, rather than racial or 
even economic, is predominantly political. 
Therefore the fight against it should concen- 
trate on political means. 

— Gerhart /Wegner, who has long worked 
for Jewish-Christim rapprochement, 
quoted in The Sunday Times (London). 

Not the Way to Help Blacks 

Many people are tempted to regard the 
recent upheavals in South Africa as the begin- 
ning of the end of the white-dominated regnne. 
It is almost equally tempting to believe that the 
cause of the blacks could now be farthered by 
pressure and threats from other countries. But 
both assumptions are entirely false. Political 
motives may be behind the riots in isolated 
cases, but their main cause is die economic 
recession, which affects lower-income groups 
most severely. And although the chief sufferers 
are the blade masses, the number of whites 
who are feeling the pinch is growing. The same 
for racial reform is thus restricted, for the 
considerable cost would have to be borne by 
whites who are now even less inclined to ac- 
cept compromises that would be an additional 
threat to their livelihoods. 

— Neue Ztircher Zeitrng (Zurich). 


: FROM OUR APRIL 8 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: China Cats London From Tour 
PEKING — Coincident with the departure of 
Prince Tsai Tao and a military mission from 
Yokohama for San Francisco, the announce- 
ment is made that the Prince will not visit 
England. Great Britain had notified China 
that the prince would not be welcomed there 
unless Chmn agreed to meet British demands 
on certain pending claim cases. This demand 
was regarded in diplomatic circles as tanta- 
mount to an insult, and the Imperial family 
met it by promptly cutting England from the 
itinerary. The Chinese construe the cordial 
welcome which had been given to Duke Tsai 
Hsum in London as inspired solely by a desire 
to sell warships, while the refusal to welcome 
Prince Tsai Tao reveals a recognition that 
Great Britain is unable to compete with Amer- 
ica and Germany in army equipment. 


1935: Qrarch Bells Silent on Sunday 
BERLIN — The difficulties from Evangelicals 
and Catholics with which Nazi authorities are 
being faced were revealed in church services 
[on April 7] of both denominations. Many 
Protestant churchgoers had the unpre cedented 
experience of church bells being kept silent 
and candles on altars unlit. The services were 
directed against what was termed a new mysti- 
cism preached by certain Nan “false proph- 
ets.” The passive demonstration of muted bells 
and dark altars was given by pastors who are 
opposed to Rdchs-bishop Ludwig Mueller’s 
church regime and who have banded as the 
Confessional Synod of Priests against the ar- 
rest of many of their colleagues. A new arrest 
was reported of a pastor who was preparing his 
Sunday sermon. He was released later but 
forbidden to enter his own church. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, CJuumta * 19581982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S, PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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Associate Editor FRANCOIS DE SMA 1SONS Director cf Cirrsfatum 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Director ef Adv ertisin g Solo 

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© 1983. International tienM Tribune All rights reserved 



xf A4' 


MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 







Japan , Canada, Europe, Taiwan, OPEC, Mexico 


W ASHINGTON —The United Stales has a 
trade deficit problem with the world, not 
just with Japan. In part stimulated by a faulty 

deficits in the 


By Hobart Rowen 


economic 


that allows 


5200-billion range, it imported Sl^ bfflion more 
than it exported it 


last year — a 554-billion in- 
crease over the $69-billion deficit in 1983. 

The huge trade deficit has caused a horrendous 
current account deficit of more than S 100 billion, 
transforming the United States from a net credi- 
tor country Into a net debtor. 

Virtually all the increase in the U.S. trade 
deficit last year ($50 billion) is traceable to a 
surge in imported manufactured goods, much of 
it caused by an overvalued dollar that made 


access to Japan's 1 
considered tne “litmus test” of its willingness to 
cooperate — even though free access would add 
up to just a small part of the total trade. 

“It’s a watershed issue because we believe 
it in the world in that techno- 


were 



$17 billion with Western Europe, 511 biDion with 
vith OPEC 


Taiwan. 514 billion with OPEC members, 56 
billion with Mexico and $4 billion with South 
Korea. So the first problem is global Washing- 
ton must cope with it globally rather than pre- 
tend that all will be well if Japan imports more. 

A second problem is the restricted nature of 
access to the Japanese market But this, as Law- 
rence Krause, an Asia expert at the Brookings 
Institution, points out is a problem for the whole 
world — not only for the United States but for 
European and various Asian nations that have 
been frustrated in their efforts to break into the 
second-most-important economy in the world. 

Undersecretary of Commerce Lionel Olmer 
has been leading the current round of negotia- 
tions with Japan. He explained the other day why 


logy,”Mr. Olmer said. “We can sell our products 
anywhere in the world on a fair, competitive 
basis, and we want that opportunity in Japan 
because we need access to tbe world’s second- 
largest market to sustain that competitiveness.” 

Sir Roy Denman, head of the European Com- 
munity’s delegation in Washington, pointed out 
recently that Japanese imports of manufactured 
goods from the rest of the world have remained 
constant since 1960 at about 15 percent of GNP 
— less than half of the American-European ratio. 
“In fact, imports into Japan are mostly imports 
of raw materials or food that they cannot get 
from inside Japan,” be said. 

In an interview, Mr. Krause said total Japa- 
nese! 



percentage of GNP — 13.1 percent compared to 
Japan’s 


14.2 percent. By contrast, Japan's exports as a 
share erf GNP bulged in the period from 1 15 to 
20.6 percent, “which means mat Japan was put- 
ting tremendous pressures on the rest of the 
world by expanding its market shares.” 

So despite 44 “packages” to open up the Japa- 
nese market since 1973, foreign penetration has 
been stnafl. Who is to blame? Says* the West 


German economics minis ter, Martin Bange- 
znaon: “You can’t blame die Japanese govern- 
ment for decisions of the market there. Some of 
the products [Westerners] make are not fitting 
for the Japanese market.” He warns that an 
attempt by the U.S, Congress to punish Japan 
with bilateral retaliation wiH backfire “and en- 
danger the whole multilateral trading system.” 

Adds New York economist Henry Kaufman, 
just back from a trip to Japan: “Tbe question is, 
bow well are we ready to do business in Japan 
today? More of us must learn how to speak 
Japanese, leant their styles and their ways. We’ve 
got to make a commitment in time and effort far 
beyond what we’ve ever done.” 

But it isnotjust the foreigners’ fault. Japan has 
done a masterful job of throwing up roadblocks, 
protecting infant industries and using every 
known bureaucratic device possible to limit the 
purchase of foreign goods. 

The danger is that in its frustration with the 
trade deficit —really, with the Reagan adminis- 
tration's economic policies as well as with Japan 
— Congress wiD act emotionally. 

“It’s a big mistake to think that if we act tough, 
the Japanese will act rationally,’' Mr. Krause 
nid. “If you think emotion s run high here, you 
should measure the emotions there. The ’trade 
tendons' story is Topic A in the newspapers and 
on television: The main theme is that ’America 
demands more from Japan.’ Emotion usually 
turns the Japanese inward. That's not good for 
the rest of the world —it wasn’t good in the '30s 
and it won’t be good in tbe ’80s. 

The Washington Post 


Peres Needs Discreet American Pressure on Israel 


N EW YORK — ■ One often hears 
that Israel is divided into two 
major blocs that neutralize each other 
— (me favoring and one opposing 
withdrawal from the occupied terri- 
tories in accordance with UN Securi- 
ty Council Resolution 241 One also 
hears that no Israeli leader can defy a 
growing majority opposed to territo- 
rial concessions in tne West Bank and 
Gaza, and that any attempt toward 
progress would therefore be futile. 
So, the argument goes, why try? 

In fact this is quite wrong. 

To begin with, the Israeli public is 
no less prepared now than ever be- 
fore to accept a compromise leading 
to peace. Israelis are tn fact divided is 
three camps. Certainly, at the two 
extremes there are ideologically com- 
mitted blocs: One remains adamant- 
ly opposed to any withdrawal and is 
ready to risk an indefinite state of 
war; the other is prepared to ex- 
change virtually all the territories for 
a peaceful settlement. Yet neither of 
them constitutes more than 15 to 20 
percent of the population. 

The remaining 60 percent are 
somewhere in the cuddle. Those cen- 
trists feel that Israel should retain 
control over as much of the territories 
as it can but return as much of them 
as it must. The key words there, 
“can” and “must,” point to tbe dif- 


B 7 David Shabam 


ference between the world of wishes 
and the world of reality. 

Above all the centrist bloc is prag- 
matic It aspires to Israeli strength' 
and greatness, but it realizes that not 
all wishes can be fulfilled, that there 


percent of Israelis polled objected to 
itndrai ‘ 


constituency that opposes change, 
snoufcl be 


are limits to power, that compromise 
' sTwhethe 


is sometimes unavoidable wnetner 
these centrists learn to distinguish 
between the desirable and the possi- 
ble will depend on Israel’s leaders. 

Were the government to give the 
public a feeling that Israel can hold 
on to the occupied territories unchal- 
lenged, it would be indicating to the 
people that their wishes are realiz- 
able. Were it to introduce a concrete 
withdrawal plan, it would demon- 
strate that the centrist block must 
forgo some of those wishes. The ma- 


jority would follow other lead. 


history of the last decade or so 
dearly supports this. Most opinion 
polls have shown that the majority of 
Israelis do not favor withdrawal as an 
incentive for a peace settlement. Yet, 
over the years, major withdrawal 
agreements have had overwhelming 
public support. Why the discrepan- 
cy? Polls measure preferences in hy- 
pothetical situations, not actual be- 
havior in concrete situations. 

In January 1974, for example, 80 


the notion that withdrawing from Si- 
nai could bring peace. Two weeks 
later, 62 percent supported the dis- 
engagement agreement with Egypt, 
which entailed a pa rtial withdrawal 
from Sinai. By 1977, Menacbem Be- 
gin, then prime minister, won the 
support of an unprecedented 82 per- 
cent of Israelis for the Camp David 
accords, which called for a complete 
withdrawal from Sinai and the re- 
moval of all Israeli settlements. 

What tipped tbe balance? The 
forthcoming Egyptian recognition of 
Israel helped considerably to con- 
vince the public to support the agree- 
ment. But Mr. Begin’s major argu- 
ment in its favor was that American 
ressure would ensue if Israel re- 
rained from signing. 

Q early, then, even if Israeli leaders 
are willing and ready lo supply the 


F, 


necessary guidance to the public, 
they still need tangible proof of both 


Arab acceptance and outside pres- 
sure in order to convince the hesitant 
majority that concession is unavoid- 
able. Without either ingredient the 
peace process cannot move forward. 

The situation in Israel is further 
complicated by tbe existence of a 
coalition government, part of which 


Democrats Must Make Economic Sense 


N EW YORK — Leaders of the 
Democratic Party continue to 
attribute the election debacle to 
Ronald Reagan's invulnerable pop- 
ularity. That false perception wtil 
prevent rehabilitation of the party. 

A new pattern of conservatism 
has asserted itself worldwide, ir- 
respective of the popularity of lead- 
ers. Canada defeated Pierre Elliott 
Trudeau and elected a conservative. 
Brian Mulroney. Britain turned 
from Labor to Margaret Thatcher. 
West Germany defeated Helmut 
Schmidt and chose a conservative, 
Helmut KohL Sweden has changed 
course, and France under Socialist 
Frames Mitterrand has yielded to 
increasingly conservative policies. 

Extreme governmental paternal- 
ism has been found wanting, de- 
spite tbe nobility of its purpose. 

The Depression of the 1930s was 
alleviated in America by Franklin 
D. Roosevelt’s daring relief pro- 
grams. At a time when hanks were 
closed and apples were sold on the 
streets by the unemployed, he saved 
the nation by accepting the respon- 
sibility of the government for relief 
in all directions. This became a 
great tradition. But when times re- 
turned to normal and the relief pro- 
cess accelerated, the public became 
disillusioned — not because it 
failed to recognize tbe need for 
compassion but because the pletho- 
ra of relief programs was self-de- 
feating by its excessiveness. Aside 
from the enormous bureaucracies 
required to execute it, greed raised 
its ugly head. Almost every pro- 
gram begat a flood of fraud.' 

One need only look at the idealis- 
tic titles of the statutes now being 
cut back ro understand i he revul- 
sion in many quarters. Their pur- 


By Louis Nizer 


pose was humane, but can any gov- 
ernment indulge in largesse as a 
continuing policy? In far too many 
cases these wdf-intentioned mea- 
sures did not achieve their objec- 
tives despite billions spent. The 
Reagan administration, for exam- 
ple, claims to have given more sub- 
sidies to fanners than any previous 
one, yet fanners now rank high on 
the desperation list. 

Where is the legislator who can 
resist a bill that offers aid to any 
group of citizens suffering distress 
in a volatile economic system? But 
the public is disillusioned by the 
Democratic Party’s undisguised ap- 
peal to interest groups. 

The concept of coalition has 
veered dangerously toward dema- 
gogic appeals to special interests. 
Today no special- interest coalition 
can guarantee an ejection. Jn I9S4 
even the young voted two-to-one 
for Ronald Reagan. So did women, 
despite the vice presidential candi- 
dacy of Geraldine Ferraro. 

The Democrats need a balance 
between governmental compassion 
and the inability of the Treasury 
to create unlimited doles for any 
group with outstretched hands. In a 
capitalistic democracy there are 
constraints that force difficult 
choices. More and more Americans 
are embracing the notion that they 
should focus energies on improving 
the general health of the economy 
for tne well-being of all rather than 
focusing fa relief medicines. 

Viewed in that context, the solu- 
tions beiife offered by those Demo- 
cratic leasers who seek party unity 
are too generalized to be of value. 


■Hie parly must modify tbe extreme 
liberal policies of tbe past and pre- 
sent a palatable program of hu- 
mane conduct Demagogic money 
solutions for every ill no longer ap- 
peal to tbe public. It seeks a respon- 
sible governmental approach. 

Democrats should reread the 
speeches of Adlai Stevenson during 
his two presidential campaigns. He 
was an educator rather than a ha- 
ranguer. He asked labor to give up 


the arrogance that employers had 
viously dis 


previously displayed when they 
were on top of the heap. He asked 
manufacturers to accept their re- 
sponsibility to the public. He lec- 
tured the American Legion on the 
distortions of superpairioiism. He 
told politicians not to approach ev- 
ery subject with an open mouth. 

Unless the party changes its 
course it will lose more members 
like Jeane Kirkpatrick, who com- 
plained that the party deserted her. 
not she tbe party. And Republicans 
like Ronald Reagan will continue 
to invoke the names of Roosevelt, 
Truman and John Kennedy more 
often than Walter Mondale did. 

The Republican Party has been 
the beneficiary of an oil glut that 
reduced inflation and interest rates. 
It has profited from a favorable 
cyclical tide in the economy. But it 
will be vulnerable in the next presi- 
dential ejection, portly because the 
shadow of the deficit may loom 
larger and even more depressing. 

j:.: 1 


The Democrats' tradition as a pop- 


ulist party is stilt healthy and nobL 
It needs to reflect deeply on the 
reasons why it has been rejected. 


The writer, a lawyer, is a veteran 
commentator nnpuNtc affaire. Heart- 
trihund this to The AVu York Tin in. 


The writer, an Israeli journalist, is 
executive director of the Tel Aviv-based 
International Center for Peace in the 
Middle East. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Tunes 


The Politics 
Of Italians 





Are Shifting 


1 as '^ 


By Adolfo Battaglia 


The writer leads the Republican group 
in Italy’s Chamber of Dqntties 


R OME — Italy enjoys a wide au- 
dience abroad for its fashions 
and wines. Has comparable attention 
been paid, by Americans in particu- 
lar, to Italy’s new politics? Will for- 
eign friends be prepared to read 
May’s regional ana local election re- 
sults in the light of an electoral trend 
that stems from a deep transforma- 
tion in postwar Italian society? 





iff* 

.4 r ^.V:e: 


One sign of change has been the 
first 


^mergence, for the first time since 
World War H, of the so-called minor 


3i*?L The 


,IS : 


* --Hi ;hji 1 ■ ■ ■ 1 


? -J.i 


parties — Republicans and Social- 
ists, around whom.c 


.orbit the Liberals 
and tbe Social Democrats. These are 
intermediate parties between two 
poles — the Christian Democrats and 
the Communis ts, both parties. 

The emergence of the intermediate 
forces means a shift from an ideologi- 
cal to a pragmatic approach — a shift 
being driven by the underlying soci- 
etal change that has seen a reduction 
in the electoral strength of the Chris- 
tian Democrats and the Communists. 

This means that in. the coming 
years a strengthened Italy is likely to 
play a more dynamic role m Europe- 
an unity. Western defense and Mem- 
ternanean stability. 

The decline of the old politics has 
been especially evident since 1981. 
The . Christian Democrats have beld 
the prime minister’s office for only 
eight months, under Amintore Fan- 
fare; the Republicans for 17 months 
under Giovanni Spaddini. now the 
defense minister; arid the Socialists 
for 20 months under Bettino CraxL 
For 37 months, intermediate parties 
have headed the gove rnmen t. 

The new trend emerged after the 
1976 parliamentary elections, when 
the intermediate parties won 172 
percent of the vote and the Christian 
Democrats and Communists together 
73 percent. In the 1979 elections the 
four parties edged upward to 18.5 
percent; the two major parties 
dropped to 68.5 percent. In 1983 the 
intermediate parties again rose, 
reaching 23 J percent, and the two 
majorparties declined to 62.6 per- 
cent The Communists rallied a bit in 
the 1984 elections for the European 
Parliament (a sympathy vote after the 
death of the party leader, Enrico Ber- 
linguer), but the trend re-emerged in 
municipal elections held afterward. 

To be sure, the trend to. the inter- 
mediate parties was Aided by the 


at* 1 




guaonnti^- ^ 




multiple crises that came to ahead in 
early 1981: 


is aligned with the small hardline 


But there should be no doubt about 
Prime Minister Shimon Peres’s readi- 
ness to supply the necessary leader- 
ship. Not only does he wish to create 
a new momentum for peace, bat his 
whole political future depends on iL 

His interests are reinforced by 
what seems to be growing realism 
among the Palestinians. He also has 
support — some open and some im- 
plicit — from several crucial Arab 
states. Finally, he has a time limit — 
September 1986, when the Likud 
leader, Yitzhak Shamir, is to become 
tbe prime minister of tbe coalition 
government — and this can only prod 
him to move toward peace. 

What stands in Mr. Peres’s way? 
The other vital ingredient — the cre- 
ative, energetic and persuasive in- 
volvement of the United States —has 
been misting. America is the only 
major power that can bdp Mr. Peres 
in his effort. As a proven friend, it 
could apply discreet pressure on Isra- 
el's leaders and at the same time pro- 
ride ample incentives to the Arabs. 

When it stands aside, America 
helps to perpetuate the deadlock. It 
pays lip service to the search for 
peace, encouraging the parties direct- 
ly involved to enter into “direct nego- 
tiations." yet such talks could bear no 
fruit without active outside involve- 
ment. Meanwhile, American inaction 
encourages the rejections fronts in 
both the Arab world and Israel. 


terrorism, galloping infla- 
tion (22 percent at the time) and 
political immorality, chiefly the “Ital- 
ian Watergate” scandal of the “P-2” 
Masonmlra^e, with' its misdeeds and 
corruption in high places. But the 
-trend also has deep roots in three 
waves of modernization that have 
struck Italy since the war. 

First, from the late 1950s through 
the early '60s the economy went from 
an essentially agricultural to an in- 
dustrial base, introducing fundamen- 
tal changes in the style of life. 

Second, secularization took hold. 
In a nation in which the Roman 
Catholic Church is enormously influ- 
ential, divorce and abortion, what- 
ever we may think of them, became 
I in the 70s after nearly a century 
■ political struggle — decisions con- 
firmed by overwhelming majorities in 
successive referendmns. 

The third wave — movement to- 
ward a post-industrial society — was 


'asms tw 

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times is the increasing maturity of 
labor unions, especially evident in 
1984 in the dramatic reduction in 
hours lost through strikes. 


Of course, with pockets of pre- 
lopment ren 


industrial underdevelopment remain- 
ing, the economic picture is varied. 


ay against 
Mafia, steps toward long overdue tax 
reform ana movement toward consti- 
tutional change aimed at streamlin- 
ing government operations. 

An understanding of why parties 
long deemed minor hold the reins, 
and why they arc crucial to Italy’s 


democratic growth and international 
wm heh> 


position, will help avoid misunder- 
standings and tensions with these 
growing political forces. 

The New York Tunes. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


'Right’ Is the Wrong Way 


lUceni Arab peace feelers have 
dialed ritual references by press and 
politicians to the PLCs refusal to 
recognize explicitly “Israel's right to 
cost.” The refusal is cited as suffi- 
cient grounds for avoiding talks. 

This approach is not reasonable. It 
is a major obstacle to peace. 

Tbe word “right” has unavoidable 
moral connotations. Few would ar- 
gue today that the Zionist settlers of 
Palestine or the European settlers of 
North America, South Africa and 
Australasia had any moral “right” to 
conquer and colonize the lands of 
their choice and to dispossess, dis- 
perse and, to varying d eg re es , destroy 
their indigenous pop ulati ons 
Such things happen. But there is a 
profound distinction between asking 
tbe dispossessed to acknowledge die 
new reality as a fact and demanding 


— are grave injustices in their own 
right, arguably the gravest inflicted 
on one people by another since 
World War II. From tins acceptance 
flows the widespread nonrecpgnition 
of Israel by non- Western nations that 
have experienced colonization. 

It is vindictive to require the self- 
humiliation of a people who have 


litde left but thdrpride. It is unrestis^ 
: Palestmit 


tic to expect the Palestinians to yidd 
what little leverage they possess be- 
fore negotiations even begin. It is 
counterproductive to the cause of 
peace to demand from the Palestin- 
ians the one thing they cannot give. 

“Right” is the wrong word here. 
On a human level, miking constitutes 
mutual recognition. Let’s get started. 


JOHN V. WHITBECK. 

Paris. 


that they acknowledge the “right- 
ness” of it At issue is an avowafby 
the losers that they were not just 



A Gvil War Precedent 

Regarding the opinion column "For- 
eign Polity: Set Your Own, Just 534" 
l March 28) by EUen Goodman: 


lmehow less than fully human. 

Furthermore, formal recognition is 
the sole significant card in the Pales- 
tinians’ hand. Their strength is a mor- 
al one: the acceptance by most of the 
world that the continuing disposses- 
sion and dispersal of the Palestinian 
people — often justified in Western 
minds in the context of restitution for 
grave injiivlices inflicted on Jewish 
Europeans bv Christian Europeans 


That the writer opposes private 
anti-Communist efforts in Nicaragua 
is dear. What is less clear is whether 
it is anti-conunmnism per se of the 
non-offldal nature of these efforts 
that bothers her. If the latter, I look 
forward 10 a Goodman column retro- ; 
actively attacking the private, non- 
official anti-Franco efforts of the 
Abraham Lincoln Brigade irt tee ‘30£ 
JACK JOLtS..; 







wt P o K 


' Adol| 0 j, 

,tgr leads ih * a oli| 

T amb ^k\ 

sSSatS 

tends be J^^cs? fi*/ 
Postwar j lal gP tiw& 

2P? fc S5S?^ 

H ce » for ii^V fo, 

w " n. ora-'S* aS? 

— Ren,,ki? eso ^wf^ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 


Page 5 


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?&**»? V ( > 


By Henry A. Kissinger 

Vietnam: A Noble Goal but a Flawed Strategy 


of the fall of Saigon is 


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■arties declined 10424 1 

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t elections for the &W 
Jntja sympathy voitafa 

die party leads. Eumv 
but the trend re-eme*. 
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sure, the trend so time 
parlies was fueled hi 
crises that came makes; 

51 : terrorism, gallopt^t. 

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anwiwnn'^S 


T HE 10th awuversuy 

upon us. The pain of the day win not go away, 
nor will the memory of thewarttme casualties, 
American and Indochinese, and the massacre of mfl- 
Boos diM folkiwed the collapse. 

Vietnam ended America’s innocence is internation- 
al affair?. It was the first warm which its involvement 
was not triggered by overt aggression of organized 
units across a clearly demarcated line, ft was the first 
war in which some sort of military outcome (lid not 
precede negotiations. It was the first war witnessed in 
the living roams of America. It was the first war in 
which prominent Americans opposed their country's 
policy during highly publicized visits to the enemy's 
capital. 

In the process, Vietnam turned into a tragedy in 
four acts. 

ACT I: The Flawed Assumption. In his inaugural 
address, President John F. Kennedy announc ed that 
the United States would “support any friend, oppose 
any foe to assure the survival and success or liberty.” 
No one challenged that sweeping commitment or the 
proposition that Indochina was a key outpost in the 
defense of liberty. Within sx weeks marines were salt 
to Thailand; a year later 16,000 U.S. military person- 
od wee assigned as “advisers” to hdp South Vietnam 
resist Hanoi-led guerrillas. Hand was regarded as the 
cutting edge of Chinese-Soviet global strategy. In 
retrospect, we know that Hanoi was working Tor its 
own account; in fact, it cleverly exploded the split 
between Beijing and Moscow of which Washington 
was as yet unaware. 

The commitment of thousands of advisers put U.S. 
global prestige al stake; yet the commitment was not 
enough 10 be decisive. Throughout its Indochina in- 
volvement, the United States never solved the rela- 
tionship between means and ends or even adequately 
defined its ends. 

The ultimate political gral of the United Stales was 
noble; to enable a distant people to resist tyranny. On 
the other hand, the so-called free countries of Indo- 
china, while far less oppressive than North Vietnam, 
were hardly democracies. Guerrilla wars are randy 
pristine. The pace of guerrilla war and the pace of 
reform are different: bringing about democracy in a 
developing country requires a decade or more: de- 
struction and chaos can be produced in weeks. 

Refusal to face this reality caused the Kennedy 
administration to encourage — to put it mildly — the 
overthrow of South Vietnam's authoritarian ruler, 
Ngo DinhDiem, in 1963. The collapse of dvdl govern- 
ment was the watershed Leading to two fateful deri- 
sions: it committed the United States to sustain the 
junta that replaced Mr. Diem and it tempted Hanoi to 
commit its regular forces. 

ACT 2s The Ambivalent Strategy. President Lyn- 
don B. Johnson felt obliged to carry out the logic of his 
inheritance; the cabinet left over from the Kennedy 
administration urged him on. An expeditionary force 
of over half a million U.S. combat troops was sent as 
for from American soil as our globe permits, but the 
United States lacked a strategy for bringing it home. 
The United States historically has sought to use its 
vast resources for a strategy of attrition; attrition, 
however, cannot work against guerrillas that defend 
no territory and are able to choose their own time for 
combat In Indochina, moreover, they woe operating 
from sanctuaries in all neighboring countries and were 
fought by the fashionable theory of gradual escalation 
designed' to create pauses that would encourage com- 
promise. in fact, gradual escalation convinced Hanoi 
that the United States lacked resolve. 

As the war dragged on, demands for a political 
solution mounted. But. they .were, bedeviled by the 
traditional American tendency I to treat power and 
diplomacy as separate. It becasup a commonplace that 
.North Vietnaai would not negotiate — indeed could 
riot be asked" to, negotiate — white its territory was . 
being bombed, - never mind the North. Vietnamese 
troops illegally invading Laos, Cambodia and South 
Vietnam. President Johnson finally overcame his in- 
stinctive doubt and agreed to a bombing halt shortly 
before the 1968 election. In Korea thedcasian to end 
offensive operations after negotiations had started 
was responsible for 60 percent of U.S. casualties; in 
Vietnam the bombing halt — which I supported at the 
time — surely deepened the stalemate. 

evapOTtoLBetween 1963 antulieend of ftH^media^ 
public and congressional support had been nearly 
universal. The few opponents relied cm methods of 
traditional American democratic debate. 

But by late 1966 the war became a rallying point for 
heretofore fringe groups seeking a radical transforma- 
tion of society. For them, Vietnam was not a painful 
geopolitical dilemma from which to extricate America 


with honor; they preferred a calamitous outcome that 
would discredit the bated Establishment. Convinced 
that only a viable hnnnHation could curb America's 
penchant for foreign adventures, they mocked appeals 
to American credibility. And those who had the 

United States into the war were so demoralized that 
once out of office they were either silent or encouraged 
the extremists. 

Too often, the media became unwitting collabora- 
tors. It was easy to record the honors of modem 
warfare, much more difficult to distinguish between 
what was inherent in modem weaponry and what 
represented deliberate cruelty. Similarly, it was fairiy 
simple to construct the vaunted credibility gap by 
reiterating the difference between governmental state- 
ments and what in fact happened. 

A fairer analysis would have sought to determine 
what was due to genuine confusion and what was 
actual misrepresentation. In the process Hanoi 
learned that it could use the media to foster tire 

This is the ninth in a series of 10 articles by the former 
U.S. secretary of state The last is to appear May 5. 

illusion that Lhe search for peace was like a detective 
story in which the North Vietnamese would throw out 
ambiguous dues and the administration had to guess 
at the answer. Thus, the diplomatic impasse was 
ascribed not to Hanoi's aggression but to a series of 
lost American opportunities. 

ACT 3. The Painful Exodus. No one familiar with 
Richard M. Nixon’s career could have believed that 
his campaign promise to end the war could mean 
simple abdication. On the contrary, it was surprising 
that a president, elected by a conservative constituen- 
cy, went to such lengths to placate the liberal critics — 
adopting in effect me peace program rejected by the 
Democratic Convention in 1968. But in the prevailing 
atmosphere of radicalizatioo, every concession elicited 
further demands culmina ting in pressures to withdraw 
unilaterally and to overthrow the government of 
America’s ally. 

Mr. Nixon was convinced that it was immoral and 
dangerous for America to extricate itself by simply 
abandoning millions who had fought with it in roi- 
ance on its word. He undertook to salvage America’s 
honor as he saw it by a tour de force: phased troop 
withdrawals to placate the protesters, private negotia- 
tions, sporadic pressures on North Vietnam and major 
assistance to South Vietnam. Domestic pressures 
forced Mr. Nixon into compromises that often can- 
celed themselves out Every withdrawal encouraged 
Hanoi and every lunge inflamed the peace movement. 

In the end, a president cannot conduct a war amid 
such passions by himself. Faced with congressional 
resolutions that progressively edged toward unilateral 
withdrawal, violent demonstrations and the hostility 
of the media, Mr. Nixon should have gone to Congress 
early in his term, outlined his strategy, and demanded 
an endorsement. Failing that, he should have liquidat- 
ed the war. Mr. Nixon rejected such advice because he 
fell that history would never forgive the appalling 
consequences of what he considered an abdication of 
executive responsibility. It was an honorable, indeed a 
highly moral, decision. 

Despite all obstacles, Mr. Nixon came heartbreak- 
ingly dose to success. By the end of 1972, his adminis- 
tration had forced Hanoi to accept two irreducible 
conditions: The United States would not end the war 
by overthrowing an allied government; nor would it 
forgo the right to assist peoples that had fought 
valiantly at its side. What destroyed these prospects 
was the collapse of executive authority due to Water- 
gate after the Paris accords were signed in 1973. 

ACT 4: .The Post-1973 Period. The apostles of 
America's- inherent iniquity have propagated the ca- 
nard that all the Nixon administration sought was a fig 
leaf for South Vietnam’s inevitable collapse. This is 
untrue and unworthy. To be sure, there were terms 
that one would have preferred to improve, but the 
Nixon administration believed it had achieved an 
acceptable settlement — all the more so as the alterna- 
tive was a congressional cutoff of funds leading to a 
total collapse. 

We were not naive about Hanoi’s goals but we saw 
several dements of enforcement: continuing aid to 
enable the South Vietnamese Army to handle low- 
level violations; the threat of American retaliation 
against massive, cross-border violations; the restrain- 
ing influence of Moscow and Beijing, winch had 
growing stakes in their relations with the United 
States; and an offer of American aid to Hanoi if it 
chose to rebuild the North instead of conquering the 
South. 

But the peace accords did not end the fevered 
Vietnam debate, now reinforced by Watergate. The 


rewards and penalties so 


assembled were 



“in, over or near" Indochina. It cut appropriations to 
Vietnam by 30 percem in 1973 and by another SO 
percent in 1974. It put a paltry ceiling on aid to 
Cambodia, prohibiting any American advisers and 
even the transfer of American equipment from nearby 
Asian allies. It launched an assault on detente at a time 
or maximum weakness of the executive branch. 

President Nguyen Van Thieu panicked when it 
became dear thaihe would not receive the supplemen- 
tary appropriation he bad been promised for 1975. 
And Hanoi decided to throw the dice after having 
occupied a provincial capital, demonstrating that not 
even the grossest violation would be met by U.S. 
retaliation. 

We shall never know whether South Vietnam could 
have held out with a more generous and resolute 
American policy. Biit that is not the point. The United 
States owed the people of Indochina a decent oppor- 
tunity for survival; its domestic divisions made it 
impossible for the United States to pay this debt. 

What is one to learn from this sequence of events? 

• Guerrilla wars are best avoided by pre-emption, 
by generous programs of assistance and reform in 
countries the united States considers yitaL But once a 
war is in progress, victory cannot be achieved by 
reform alone. 

• Before America commits combat troops it should 
have a dear understanding of the nature of the threat 
and of realistic objectives. This presupposes two con- 
ditions: (a) a bipartisan consensus of what constitutes 
a vital interest and (b) a recognition that the global 
balance of power is more likely to be overturned by 
seemingly marginal increments than in grand assault. 

• When America commits itself to military action, 
there is no alternative to achieving the stated objective. 
Qualms cannot be stilled by halfhearted execution; 
prolonged stalemate will inevitably sap the will of a 
democracy. 

• A democracy cannot conduct a serious foreign 
policy if the contending factions do not exercise some 
restraint in their debate. 

If Vietnam is to leave any useful legacy, America 
owes it to itself to make a fair assessment of the lessons 
of that tragedy. That has not yet occurred. 

Radical critics seek 10 impose a version of history 
according to which bloodthirsty leaders sustained a 
war with do purpose except to satisfy twisted psycho- 
lopes. But the boat people of Vietnam, the hundreds 
of thousands of Vietnamese who are still In concentra- 
tion camps a decade after Saigon's fall, the poison gas 
in Laos, the genocide in Cambodia, bear their own 



French Overseas Groups 
Meet on Independence 


Hw Woduspon Pea 


Henry A. Kissinger 

witness. To have striven to prevent snch horror is no 
shame. 

The right distorts history by simply ignoring Viet- 
nam. Its isolationist wing bad always been mare com- 
fortable with strident anti-Commnnist rhetoric than 
with commitments to fi gh t communism on distant 
battle fronts. Most neoconservatives in fact belonged 
to the peace movement after 1973. Hence, in the 
conservative version of history all frustrations of the 
1970s are blamed on dfctente as if there had been no 
Vietnam War and no Watergate. 

The lapse of a decade should enable America to face 
its past. As it turned out, the dominoes fell visibly only 
in Indochina. But the experience of Vietnam is deeply 
imprinted in the intangibles by which other nations 
judge America's staying power and even more in the 
willingness of America 10 defend its vital interests or 
even to define them. Chi the other band, the Soviet 
Union after a spurt of expansionism is mired in 
contradictions. Vietnam, by its singleminded brutal- 
ity, has turned itself into a pariah. 

America failed in Vietnam, but it gave the other 
nations of Southeast Asia time to deal with their own 
insurrections. And America’s very anguish testified to 
its moral scruples. Once again, free peoples every- 
where look to America for safety and progress. Their 
greatest fear is not America's involvement in the world 
but its withdrawal from it. This is why 10 years after 
the sadness of Saigon's fall, American unity is both its 
duty and the hope for the world. 

C JOSS. Los Angeles Times Syndicate 


The Associated Press 

MOULE, Guadeloupe — Activ- 
ists from one French territory and 
five French overseas departments 
have called on France to grant 
them independence. 

The appeal was made Saturday 
at the end of a two-day Interna- 
tional Conference of the Last 
French Colonies, held 18 miles (29 
kilometers) east of Pomte-&-Pitre, 
capital of this French overseas de- 
partment 

Bm at present, those favoring 
independence from France have 
little political power in Guade- 
loupe or elsewhere. 

The conference host, Claude 
Makoukt of the Popular Union for 
the Liberation of Guadeloupe, 
opened the conference on Friday 
with a call for the United Nations 
to place all French overseas depart- 
ments and territories on its colonial 
list. 

France considers overseas de- 
partments equal to the 95 French 
mainland departments. 

On Saturday, other representa- 
tives from the territory of New Cal- 
edonia and five overseas depart- 
ments followed suit. 

Representing the departments 
were Dr. Mohammed Monjoin of 
the Democratic Front of Mayotte; 
Yves Frames of the National 
Council of Popular Committees, 
Martinique; Alain Michel of the 
French Guiana Workers' Union; 
Serge Shumate of the Indepen- 
dence Movement of Reunion; and 
Roland Tbesauros of (he Popular 
Union for the Liberation of Gua- 
deloupe. 

Three- of the departments, 
French Guiana, Martinique and 
Guadeloupe, are in or border on 
the Caribbean. Mayotte and Re- 
union lie off the southeast coast of 
Africa. 

Yann Cetene Uregri, minister of 
foreign affairs for the provisional 
Kanak government of New Cale- 
donia and a member of the Kanak 
National Liberation Front, reject- 


ed a plan offered by the French 
government in an attempt to end 
recent strife in the Pacific islands. 

Edgard Pisani, a special French 
envoy, cm Jan. 7 offered New Cale- 
donia political status as an "mde- 
pendmex- association," providing 
the islands jurisdiction over domes- 
tic affairs, while France would take 
care or international matters. 

Mr. Uregd rejected Mr. Pisani's 
plan as "colonial'' and called for a 
Kanak Socialist order. New Cale- 
donia is inhabited by French na- 
tionals and Melanesians, or Kan- 
aks. 

The Caribbean Revolutionary 
Alliance issued a statement dis- 
claiming responsibility for a bomb- 
ing in Guadeloupe last month that 
kilted three persons. The clandes- 
tine group has c laim ed responsibil- 
ity for other bombings on the is- 
land in recent years. 

Million in U.S. 

Are Estimated 

ToHaveAWS 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A scientist 
who helped to discover the suspect- 
ed cause of acquired imm une defi- 
ciency syndrome, or AIDS, has es- 
timated that more than one million 
Americans are infected with the 
AIDS virus and predicted that the 
disease could reach epidemic pro- 
portions in Europe. 

Dr. Robert C. Gallo, chief of the 
tumor cell biology laboratory at the 
National Cancer Institute, also said 
in a telephone interview on Satur- 
day that as many as 10 percent to 
20 percent of die infected Ameri- 
cans might contract AIDS or some 
other disease. 

“Whether all will die is unclear," 
he said. “Some might simply have 
an enlargement of the lymph nodes 
and go no further." 


Beijing Aide Finds 
Climate Better for 
Talks Willi Soviet 

71ie Associated Press 

LONDON — A senior Chinese 
foreign polity adviser said Sunday 
that the atmosphere has become 
better for Chinese-Soviet talks that 
resume in Moscow this week on 
improving relations. 

“This, is the first time that the 
atmosphere around the talks is a 
little improved compared with be- 
fore,” said Hugo Xiang, deputy efi- 
rector of the Foreign Affairs Coun- 
cil of the National People’s 
Congress. 

"But whether the relations could 
be improved more, that has to de- 
pend on what comes out of the 
talks," he said in a radio phone-in 
program broadcast worldwide by 
British Broadcasting Coip. 

China's deputy foreign minister, 
QianQichcn, flew to Moscow Sun- 
day for the sixth round of talks 
since 1981 

Mr. Huan, a former ambassador 
and the director of the Center for 
International Studies in Beijing, 
said that the last four Soviet lead- 
ers, including Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the current leader, have said 
they would like to improve rela- 
tions between the two nations. 


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Hawke Weighs Political Risks of Economic Reform 


By Steve Lobr 
New fork Times Serna 

CANBERRA — Prime Minister 
Bob Hawke, who completed his 
second year in office in March, has 
attracted an unusual galkxy of fans 
for a Labor Party leader. 

The Labor Party has traditional- 
ly portrayed itself as a party of 
soaal reform and wealth redistri- 
bution, while serving largely as the 
political arm of Australia’s power- 
ful trade unions. 

Yet bankers, business executives 
and conservative leaders are prais- 
ing Mr. Hawke, 55, a former trade 
union chief, for his economic pro- 
gram, which stresses growth and 
market forces, and his foreign po- 
licy, which centos on a dose alli- 
ance with the United States. 

The sharpest criticism of the 
Hawke government comes from the 
left wing of his party. It favors 
looser ties with Washington and 
fears that Mr. Hawke is forsaking 
the party's traditions. "We’re in 
danger of losng our heart," said 
Gerry Eland, a Labor member of 
Parliament. 

The mixture of praise and enti- 
rism reflects the course that Mr. 
Hawke has taken in his first term, 
seizing the middle ground of Aus- 
tralian politics in a nation generally 
conservative on most issues. 

Now, at the beginning of his sec- 
ond term, Mr. Hawke and his se- 
nior advisers in the Labor Party’s 
right wing want to open the econo- 
my to free competition, to revise 


the tax system to increase incen- 
tives to work, to reduce tax evasion 
and to improve industrial relations. 

Without these policy changes, 
some economists warn, Australia 
could become the "Argentina of 
the Pacific.” Still, the economic 
benefits from such changes would 
be uTw^ertain and gradual. 

The political nsks of reducing 
protectionism or altering the tax 
system, which would mean with- 
drawing favored treatment for 
some groups, are high. 

The Hawke government is thus 
at a crossroads, deciding between 
political caution and economic ac- 
tivism. “Ibis is a very testing time 
for Hawke," said Greg Lindsay, 
executive director of the Cotter for 
Independent Studies in Sydney, a 
conservative research group. "For 
the gpod of Australia, Hawke has 
got to aggressively cany forward 
some of the things he has been 
trying to do economically. Now we 
will see if he’s up to iL” 

Two recent political setbacks 
have raised questions about Mr. 
Hawke’s willingness and ability to 
win the legislative support neces- 
sary for his initiatives. 

In the general election last De- 
cember, the Labor Party’s majority 
in the House of Representatives 
was reduced and it failed to win 
control of the Senate. Then, in a 
reversal widely viewed as a victory 
for the Labor Party's left wing, a 
protest within his party forced Mr. 
Hawke in February to retreat from 


a pledge to allow U.S. planes to use 
Australian bases to monitor an MX 
missile test 

Asked recently what stood at the 
top of his agenda for the second 
term, Mr. Hawke replied without 
hesitation; “Keep the economic 
growth of Australia going in a sub- 
stantial way." 

Under the Hawke gpvernment, 
the Australian economy rebounded 
strongly out of recession, unem- 
ployment was trimmed and the in- 
flation rate was halved. 

The task now will be to show that 
the improvement was not just a 
cyclical recovery but the result of 
structural changes introduced by 
the Labor government, such as an 
accord under which unions have 
restrained wage demands and busi- 
ness has moderated price increases. 
■ Australia to Share Spy Data 

Australia has agreed to provide 
New Zealand with more data from 
its intelligence operations in the 
South Pacific and Southeast Asia in 
(he first major step to shore up its 
relations with its neighbor since (he 
cutoff of U.S. defense cooperation 
and intelligence to New Zealand, 
The Washington Post reported. 

As part of an agreement between 


Australia and New Zealand, the 
armed forces of the two countries 
will also increase their joint mili- 
tary exercises to compensate New 
Zealand for the U.S. withdrawal 
from the annual exorrises of AN- 
ZUS, the defense alliance that links 
the three countries, the Australian 
defense minister, Rim Beazley said 
last week after returning from a 
five-day visit to Wellington. 

Since New Zealand tanned visits 
to its ports by U.S. nudear war- 
ships m February, the United 
Slates has cm off bilateral or multi- 
lateral mihiary exercises with New 
Zealand, restricted the flow of in- 
telligence and limited contacts with' 
New Zealand personnel in consul- 
tation and training. 

When Washington cut off the 
flow of intelligence to New Zea- 
land, Mr. Hawke declared publicly 
that Australia would not pass on 
U.S. intelligence to New Zealand. 

ise las^w^amTsrid at a^press 
conference in Wellington before re- 
turning home that the American 
caveat on prohibiting U.S.-sourced 
intelligence from bang passed on 
to New Zealand would be “ob- 
served to the letter.” 



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International Bond Prices - Week of April 


Provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Te l.: 01-623-1277 

Prices may wry according to market conditions and other factors. 



RECENT ISSUES 


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>SU Canada 
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AUSTRALIA 


SOS Australia 
ISO AuriroOa 
Sl» Australia 
s TOO Australia 
V 15000 Australia 
SM Australia 
S 150 Austral kj 
y 15000 Aarintfkj 
SAB Australia 
SIS Australia 
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SM Broken HIM Ptv 
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1100 Broken 1-511 Ptv 
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*20 Ctvnakfi invest Eurapo 
SM Cwnalco Invest Europe 
525 Coma lea Limited 


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175 Csr United 
S4 Homonlov Holdings 
IX Hamerslev Iran Fin 
12S Hamerslev Iran Fin 
S2s Homemev iron Fin 
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125 Mount Isa Finance 
SIM Mount Isa Fimmca 
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ecu « Primary Industry Bonk 
SWO Quaonslaad 
5 JO Queensland Alumina 
>25 OueenskmdAAimino 
>50 Rural industries Bonk 
SIM Slate Bk New 5 Watts 
120 Tnt Overseas Flnanco 
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158 western Mhlng Core 
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S1S0 Austria 
150 Austria 
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S2so Austria 
>12 AtobuMonlan 
1150 Austrian Contra! Bonk 
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IX Austrian Control BarA 

>9 Austrian Control Bee* 

SB Austrian Control Bank 
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ISO Cred Hunstu lt-flankvor 
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12ft 19 May 
11 70 May 
14ft 71 00 
8 ft 14 Nov 
■ft 17 Mar 


KBte 1462 
99ft 120 
93. 1125 
n*W 1435 
94ft 1877 

98ft 1U) 

Uft 71 Dee il*ft 1242 
raw 79 Mar 9714 1271 
17ft 17 Nov 105 15.15 

14ft W Aur HD 1531 

9ft 19 May rite 124912461044 
11 ft 70 May 97ft 1255 1218 

12ft 7800 102ft 1151 034 

Uft 73 Jun 107ft 1292 1360 

17 17Auo 187ft 1100 IU1 

17 74 Dec 113ft 1469U81 1438 

lift 70 Dec *Sft 1234 11.71 

U 71 Oa 103 1124 1159 

17ft 17 Feb 103ft 1431 1157 

Pft » No* IXft 1451 1/JO IkX 

9 7200 81ft 1198 1175 1UN 

17ft 19 AW 111 1142 1563 

Uft 72 Mav W 1431 1434 

10 71 Jot » 7491 1469 1114 


14 Jim 95ft lira 
raw 7i Feo UNft 1245 
IF* IV Aug 103ft 12*1 
Uft 14 Mar 102ft 1819 
Vft16J an 99ft 1024 
17>1 17 Mav 100ft 1256 
1314170a UJJft UJ0 
Ilk. 17 Nov 101 IUI 
TOWBSJan 9v ins 
H 18 MW 94ft IMS 
lift 19 Fob Wft 1148 
12 19 NO* 100ft 1130 
lift 19 Dec 94 1264 

Wft 70 Feb 98ft 1123 
17ft 7B Sep Drift 1158 
12ft 73 Mar 101 11.92 

lift 7300 98ft 1164 
RftWMay W0 11*1 
12ft IS Nov 100 11J4 

17*1*00 10 1241 

12ft 17 5*0 10014 1229 

unit jui 9*»4 iu4 

fftVMar n ra« 

1714 71100 W8 1434 
14te 72 Dec rate 1330 
lift 74 00 100ft 124! 


.... Imperial Bk 

STS Canadian imperial Bk 
SWO Corodiea Imperial Bk 
□050 Canadian Imoertol BA 
00 75 Canadian Imperial Bk 
0040 Canadian Imperial Bk 
in CanocSon Imperial Bk 
SIM Canadian Imperial Bk 
IK Common Natl RallMiv 
□040 Canadian Natl PaUvmr 
SIM Canodimi N0I RoHwv 
0040 ConodkmOccW Petrol 
0040 Canadian Poctflc 
attSQ ConadtaaPocHIc 
SX ConaqSan Poctflc 
□075 Conodton Pacific 
S75 ConactanPocHk: 

>75 Conactan Poelflc 
a0 35 Canadian UHlIUes 
0050 Canadian Utilities 
s» ConoAHl Wheat Board 
ad* Chrysler Credit Con 
0048 ConsoOdaled-Botnurst 
s» Censgudolw-Bathursl 
575 ConsonnoMd- Bathurst 
o0X CradH Fgnc FranoCon 
5 SO Dam* PermWum 
SX Dam* Petroleum 
S3 DrniMonBrkMc 
S4# DuPoMCawda 
0050 EdmgntoaCUv 
IX EWorodo Nuclear 
SIM Export Develop Cara 
SIOO Export Develop Caro 

I TOO Export Develoo Cora 
SIM EnoftiDoveiapCora 
SWO Extort Develop Carp 
SR! Easerl Develop Carp 

S 150 Export Devetoo Cora 
SWO Export Develop corp 
O0IOO Export DevekiP Coro 
SIX Exmrt Develop Coro 
coin Form Credit Core 
enSM Farm CradH Cara 
>2 Porni Credit Coro 
STS Feder Busbass Dev Bk 
SX Feder Busbieos Dev Bk 
<30 IDO Feder BuPimss Dev Bk 
cnSX Feder Business Dev BA 
0040 Feder Business Dev Bk 

cnSTO Ford Motor Crorat Con 

cpSTV Cox Melropolltaln 

□048 Cox Metnuautolii 

O0» Gnr MefraoomaJn 

enSM Goneral Maters Aesop) 
cns50 Ceaend Motors Accept 
O0SO General Motors Aceeol 

0073 General Motors Accept 
□060 General Motors Accept 
cnSX Gonoret Motors Acccel 
□0M General Motors A Knot 
SX Gemiar 
S» Censtar 
S JO Genstar 
sno Gair Canada 
13 Hiram walker Holdings 
sn Hiram walker HeMnes 
S3 Hiram waliar HaMnos 
S3 Home Oil 
□060 Hudsons Bov 
□060 Hudsons Bov 
□040 Hudsons BOV 
□0X Hudsons Bay 
S7S Hudsons Bev 
SM HodaonsBav 
SX lorn Canada 
SX Irmncu 
SWO men 

<3050 iMeraravla Pipe Line 
□03 mo Harvester Credit 
SB iMConaSan Fkionce 
□03 is* CawdUifl Flame* 

COS 30 LavtMGtV 

«rtX Loraicny 

crass Loefenr 
SX MaCnvtlan BIOMM 
S5D Macmillan Blcesw 
SIS Manitoba Province 
1 2 Mam icta Province 
tw Mwufebe Pwim 
tia Manftaba Pmkci 
SIM ManHobo Province 
tin MenOoDaProvIna 
Bd» Morilbne Tri A Tet 
ITS AUBSev-ForauNVi Nod 
SS7 Montreal City 
□dX Mostraoiarv 
0040 Montreal Cllr 
(7050 Montreal arv 
l TO Maltreat Gtv 
enx Mailr«ataiv 

aato MailRdCBv 
SIM Montreal City 

aOX Martinet ttatiOxjK 

STS Montreal ureaacmiiftirt U 79 Nov raft 1234 
O03B Nalcan Peaflv Coro lift TO Feb 10014 1141 

enSX National Bank Canada BftlOFeb 107 IUI 

SM New Bnmeeeick Eifclrl 17 11 Da t1lki 1172 


1254 

1238 

lit! 

1427 

1U7 

18X 

1211 

114B 

1433 

1569 

1549 

1522 

1281 

11.94 

ISJO 

IX 

tax 

1244 

1490 

15.99 


16 

1237 

1129 

1231 

954 

1272 

1234 

110 

last 

1034 


iu 


n IS Jun 
WjieFeb 
in-MJim 
14 17 Jan 
is 17 oa 


lira 

1138 
IBM 
RIO 
7200 

1139 
1225 
1225 
163V 
1247 
1169 

941 

1537 

1415 

047 

1137 


MOft 1020 . _ 

raft 1140 1140 9*4 
107ft 11*1 1551 

WOte 1551 15.92 

Mite 1702 1732 

93 122*1295104* 

Wft If Feb TO* 14X 1557 

18 If Jim Ml U43 1L17 

17ft T90d 107ft IUI 1432 
14ft 71 AW Wlft 14JSU2214S2 
Wft 72 AW UHt 12*5 U/f 
Uft -maw 101 lira 1411 
1* l&Jua 104 115V ISJO 

14 19 Mw nm 1304 1475 

.•teVJUl 97ft TIM 1131 934 
II 17NOU Wft 1559 1722 

10ft 19 Aar ra 1117 KD 1141 
17 19 May TO 1533 1419 

Wft V Jul 101 V. 13JB 1407 
87ft 15.10 1114 

uft raw ua> 1161 
in ms iox 

105 11*6 1476 

7V» 1240 IUJ 
•Oft 1154 1244 

w 1440 17X M37 
97 1^ 939 

97ft 1264 1218 1024 
IB 1113 1169 

97 HAS 1031 
rate «8J. 7249 

00 1147 1413 H35 

00 12X12991156 

Wft 1153 1*28 9 JO 


lift 70 jun 

ID 7* Feo 
Uft 15 Jui 
lift iv Jon 
9 vine 
174 731037 
9ft14Aor 
7ft 14 MOV 
U 14 AuC 
UtellSn 
N 74 Jul 
12 ft 10 Dee 
9 72 Fdb 
9ft 72 Mw 
fftlSAar 
9ft 19 Mor 
Uhl 19 see 


1268 

1161 


lift 19 NOV MM 1169 
18ft 70 Jun 94ft 1151 


ID 11.92 
H2ft 1230 

Bft 1447 
95ft 1257 


12ft 74 on 
174 7. Od 
9ft 71 JIHI 
10ft 17 Jut 
17 VMW ns 
10 IV Jun 92 1254 

n ra Dec raft iu* 

l2ft71MW 10M 12J1 
1216 71 MOy 99ft I2J4 
17A 71 N» HI 11.19 
15L7JMW Hlft R77 
I7te17F(b m 1117 


105* 

1264 

1164 

M32 

R14 

12.90 

7150 

1073 


1521 1469 1419 
1057 


RIB 

1241 

1231 

1213 

KJ2 

1454 

1211 

1247 

1541 

1538 


SS mw Brunswick Eloari 
575 Hew Brunswick ElOCtrl 
STS New Brunswick prevlnc 
□075 New Brunswick Provlne 
si Newfoundland Lao Hvdr 
SB NcwfoundWnd LOb Hvdr 
SB New ta paflond MUdPO 
□■SX Newtouivfland Province 
SX Kowfoundlnd PravlKB 
sx NgwtomvSana Province 

SU N ewf o u ndland PravMco 

S40 Nevrioundhiod Province 

IX NewfoundhiM Pravkn 

sn NewtaundkHd P ravines 

S7S Newfoundland ProvtiKS 

SX Newfamdami Pravlace 
its m wto u ndlond Praotnco 


UftWMar H9ft 1584 HS7 
n. 74 Mar B 1244 UX 1147 


1*54 

1215 

9.90 

>532 

10J* 

1041 


□040 Nareon Energy Res 
SiM Nova An Afterta Caro 
SX Novo SeflUc Power 
<7010 NovoScahoPowor 
SU Nova scflflo Province 
IS Nova Seotie Province 
575 Nava Scotia Province 
sx Nava 5csHa Province 
1 MO Novo Sentln Province 
S7S Nova Scellg Province 
30HO Nava ScoHa Province 
SUN Nava Scat la Province 
SIS Ontario HHko 
SIM Ontario Hv*o 

sns Ontario Hvdro 

SIX Ontario Hydro 
S2fl0 Ontario hvdro 
S2X Onkrlo HvWo 
lag Ontario Hydro 
SUB Ontario Hydro 
SIX Ontario Hvdro AUQ 
S20D Ontario Hydra Nov 
SIX Ontario Hvdro 
S2M Ontario Hydro 
SOT Ontario Hvdro 
SB Ontario Hwko-EUar 
SB ottawgcarietai 
aSX Dttawa-Corietan 
IX OttavtaCarieron 
□045 Pcnamodtan Petroleum 

csi X Panavwaton PatroWum 

SX Poivw 
□0M OvetMcCity 

0025 Ouebecoty 
□015 Quebec Oty 
0015 Quebec Cl lv 
SIM Quebec Hvdro 
011 50 Quebec Hydro Mar 

<70 X Quebec Hydro MOV 

<70 75 Quebec Hydra 
5150 Quebec Hvdro 
0040 Quebec Hydra 
SIOS Quebec Hydra 
a0X Quebec Hydro 
1 15 Quebec Hydro-Electric 

SB Quebec Hydro-Electric 

5 125 Quebec Hydro- Electric 
SX Ouritec Hydro- Electric 
SX Quebec Hydro- Electric 
IUD Quebec Hydra- Electric 
SIM Quebec Hydro- Electric 
SR3 Oueoec Hydro- Electric 
IX Quebec Hydro-Electric 

S75 Quebec Hvdro-ElKlrtc 

erd M Quebec Provhica 
173 Quebec Province 
IB Quebec Province 

0054 Quebec Province 
0050 Quebec Province 
SX Quebec Pravtnca 
0053 Quebec Province 

<70 X Quebec ProYhicr 

0053 Quebec Provlne* 

138 Quebec Province 

SIX Quebec Province 
SIX Quebec Province 
cM» (Xebec Prwlnc« 

SIX Quebec Province 
30150 Quebec PrcMna 
SX Quebec ProMrca 


13ft 17 Alls 104ft R44 
R TSJao 9M R21 
91*14 MOT 9WS 1167 
17ft VNov UNft 14.16 
7ft IS SCO n 1257 
HftlSOec rate 1241 
Bte16Mar K 1867 HUB B67 

9 w peb » an ia.il 

T7ft-»Oa IDTft 1469 1532 

13ft 70 Feb 101ft 1201 1285 1U0 

9ft 70 Jun 87ft 1267 1857 

ISftTOAUB V® JUI 422 

13 71 AW 100ft R93 1267 

U 74 MW 16 1230 1163 

T0k 75 Mar 92ft 1239 R33 

17ft TS Aug 98ft 1267 1261 

Uft man ICS 1437 1548 

«WMay n \ixlvui nua 

9V574JU 94 1077 960 

9 a Mav 99 17441024 969 

15ft 19 MW Wft 1262 1442 

15ft19AaO 108ft 1245 U62 

lOftmjm *4 1223 1247 IUI 


lift 71 Feb 
15 71 Jun 
Ute 75 Feb 
lift 70 Fab 
SteVJua 
■te 14 Sen 
a w aw 


99ft 1139 
10€te 063 
94ft 1224 
97 1231 

99ft RM 
97 M3I 

_ 94te 1168 

14ft 19 Aw m 1160 
lift 1* Dee 99te 1134 
10ft 70 MOV » 116 

lift 70 Sep Wte 114? 

T3te71 Fed 10»ft 1163 

14 71 Aug U2ft 1265 

U 71 Nev 112ft 1257 

15 72 Aug 113 RIB 

ITftTlOa 105ft 1143 
llte 74 Feb 96 ft 71.0 ._ 

■ft 14 Jan 97ft 11651164 844 
9ft 71 Mar 91 12611114 1844 

lZri 7-1 Dec taw ttfl 1247 
14ft 77 Jun 70691 7260 12121285 


1138 

1435 

1265 

12.11 

856 

834 

845 

1X66 

11J1 

1039 

1165 

1245 

1432 

U19 

1137 

mi 

rax 


WIT TJ Dec 107 1368 

UteTaAW 79te 12*0 
9te 14 Dec 95ft 126* 
141017 Feb KBte 1293 
lift 72 Dec 103 1259 

HftTIOd 96 1143 

10 79 NdV 94 1064 

Uft M F0) lEUte 1291 
lift 1* Mar. lOtte 1468 

UteWMev WSte 1459 
U TIJl* 104te 1267 
\Tu 7i oa lie 129* 
14 72 Nov rate 7220 
llte 72 Dec <6 12J0 


12ft 71 Sen 

n-ISOd 

BftHMar 
■ft 14 NOV 
IftVNOV 
■tea Feb 


TIC 

1254 

967 

1564 

1264 

lira 

1064 

1112 

lira 

1144 

1148 

U42 

1153 

IMS 

1232 


lMft 1164 

90ft 7125 1233 939 
97 1134 113* 151 

95te 1130 890 

95ft 11631238 893 
88ft 1243 7209 960 
7255 


1191 

1036 

11.18 

lira 

104* 

1361 

1469 

14JI 

1467 


□015 Quebec Urban Cammimll Uft 18 Jim 


525 Radsalh tnaiarrles 
SIM Ravel Bor* Ot Corrode 

SIS 

SIOO Rovoi | Bonk 01 Canada 

< S > 10D SrSiSkOTCmada 
140 Rovdl Bank 01 < 

JUN Korot Bor* Of l 
cn54Q Royal Book 01 ( 
cn> 40 Rural Bank Of < 
o0W Royal Trastca 
130 RnvoJTlUStal 
IX PovtaaM 
□040 Ravnet 
S75 Saskatchewan Provtace 


11 7i Fra raft R07 

lift 72 Jun *6 1135 

9 72 Ago SJte 7255 

4ft 73 Jul 85 1260 

10 79 May 84 7265 

10ft 14 Aar n 12® 

Wft 14 Jilt HI 6.1) 

IStelTAw 107 1IX 
18 170a 784ft 1460 
77ft 17 No* UNft 1432 

7ft W Jan 91 1162 1343 834 

17 KMor 734ft 1437 1437 

Wft 18 Sec Iff 1468 
Wft a Aw Mite 7434 
Wft 19 Aug lKJte 1137 
151* T9 Dec 106ft 1232 
73 TONov 703 1178 

12 71 Jul 9Bte 1227 

89ft 12J3 723* 7131 
mi 1207 1264 

O 1169 1222 1804 
104ft 1462 1403 

MV; 7115 1040 

IIBft 1131 11*4 

97 12« 1831 

aft 1 LB 1758 965 
95ft 11.98 1165 

939 

. „ 1134 

VTA 1144 11.18 

99ft 1264 1257 

87 1164 I2J9 1034 

_ iu* mi itra 


raw 74 Feb 
12 75 Jan 
9 75 Nov 


1195 

1569 

1132 

105 

12*2 

till 


9 a sen 
14 16 Aw 

to 26 May 
9ft 18 Aw 
lift 19 Feb 


15ft 19 Mor IOTA 639 
Uft 70 Mor fate 1261 


SHJ8 Saskatchewan Province 
SIB Saskotchewon province 
S108 Saskatchewan Prgvfcicv 
1125 Saskatchewan Pravtnca 

SIM Sqshnkhewon Pnn ri nce 

SIX Saskatchewan Piratno 
SIM SaaorantCo 
5125 SeagramCaW/w 

cnSX Sears Accepta nce 

SIN Shell Caaoda 
SIB Shell Canada 
140 SlmPtaa-SoanACODt 
afi40 Stmasons-Sears Accra! 

adSD Sac HaMattan Quebec 

O0B Sac HypeONaoe Praam 
SW Suncorlnc 
00 25 Tenzmutl Canada 
SB Tordam 

SIM TaraniaOeni talon Bank 
SX TorantpOamlnian Bank 
O0X Tarool oOdm talon B«v* 

O0X ToronkHItan Ideality 

□09 Tronsclta Dlimies 
30100 Trwaglta UlUlllts 
S2B Troraoonoda PtpaOrws 

SB tnmscanaaa PtaaitaB 

S10D Transconoda Ptaaltaa 

sno T r anf um ooa Plpaftaas 

□0X TrtMcCarn 
cnSX Unton Cart loa Canada 

cnSX Untan COrtUde Canada 

cnSX Vanco u ver 

ii vflimioaa City 
>48 wlimfsta City 
SX Wlnrieeacihr 
cnSX wMpaaciiy 

0040 Xenix Canada 


108k 71 Doc 

77ft 77 Jen 

9 72Fga 

10 74 May 

12te *88 Nov 

lift* JUI 

lift 15 Jun 
77ft 16 Dec 
5ft 16 Sen 
ii* - " 


99ft 1263 
Hite 1167 
99te mo 
IB 1261 
979. 1134 
118 1264 


U V Mar )□ 1169 

llte 19 Nov 100ft 1168 
KP4 70 Mar Ml 11*1 
MM 72 Mar 94ft 12JT1 
15 72Aog lira* lira 
raftWOd lBite R13 
7 TlMov in IU 
14 71 Aud 185 1276 

i5ft7is*n mw inn 
1434 72 Mav rwft 1251 

77ft X Nov 111ft R17 
Wft 19 Apr W 1270 
15ft18Jtxl 1M 1365 
779516 DOC 906 1118 


71 Nov 101ft 12X 



1232 

1264 

IUI 

1443 

194 

M77 

74.14 
1137 
1L10 
1161 
1130 
ELS2 

63S 

7133 

14.14 
1124 
75JD 
15J7 
1514 
1831 
1267 


17ft 1237 1264 1034 


ran*, lira 
raw, 72.18 
NS 1141 

rate 1238 

102 7Z59 

112 1264 
112 11.14 

98 R24 

ID 14.92 

I Dec 104te 1453 
1MW 114ft 1445 
._ XOd lOOVi 1239 
9ft 16 Mar 94ft li61 14.14 
>4 JfJm 787ft UB2 
13 74 Apr left 047 
17 8*Od lOdte 116* 
IteSMOf ft 11X 
15ft 18 Jun 105ft 1257 
' " lHUi 1262 

181 rax 


12ft 71 sen 
» IB Sen 


DENMARK 


SX Denmark 
SX Denmark 
RIM Denmark 
SIM DeamwkXA* 

1 75 Denmark 
30100 Denmark 
SX Denmark 
SIM Denmark 
ecu 75 Denmark 
SIOO Denmark 
1M0 Denmark 
SIM Danmark 
SMB Denmark 
<20000 Denmark 
SIOO Denmark 
S250 Danmark 
*r258 Denmark 
s 180 Denmark 
1 1X00 Denmark 
SIM Denmark 
>15 Cflrtsdtrv-TuOcrg 

SIS ConenhobenCUy 
SIS Couenhaoer ary 
SX Cooenhaoen atY 
SU Caprahagra County Avt 
SU Cnainhn o r u Teieotoe 
>10 Coeertaoo en Ti ta pfW 
SR Mortaoue Bonk Denmark 
>25 Morigoge Bark Denmark 


7ft 17 Sen 


98ft 1188 lira 40 
98ft 115* 1155 939 
» RXU40 8JD 
lift 11 Aug Wft 1205 1314 

HRk 19 AW 97 1133 1168 

11 If Oct Wlft 1240 1261 

7ft 70 Jan 87 TUIRM 842 
lift 70 Jun 8M 1224 
WteTlMcr 18*ft 9*5 

12 71 MW 99ft 1231 
U 77 MOV 7CVi 1237 
14 71 Jut 1M 1257 

M3ft 1267 
94ft 737 
Ml T2J5 
99ft 7279 
98V, 960 
95te 1242 
732 
1242 


lift 7| Sep 
4ft 72 JOB 

Uft 

9ft 72 Mw 
lift 72 AW 
5U77MOV US 
nftTSDtC 19 
8ft 16 Apr 
9 -BOd 
4 IS NOV 
4ft 17 AW 
7ft 17 Feb 
ift-ttFeb 
stele aw 
4ftl*Jai 
7ft 71 Jot 


SX Mortgage arnlkOewaork U T3Jao 


1137 
1031 
Rll 
1240 
1221 
7282 
*38 
7287 
1238 
964 
11.99 
766 
1237 

fBte «D UU4 864 
98ft 1201 116* 9.14 
ftft 7203 1205 432 
91ft 1140 TUI 7.18 
*4 1147 1243 13* 

90U 1833 1433 865 
9ift 1063 10*6 U9 
961* 1U6 1138 449 
87 1042 R19 843 


112 Prtvatbankffi 
ecu 40 Privatbonken 


Ml 1237 
«3 ran 
105ft KM* 


1267 

1468 

1844 


FINLAND 


SIM Flnlrad 
>75 Finland 
vUUOO Finland 
SIOO Finland 
IX Ftatand 
nkr 200 Flntand 
ft 70 Flntand 
,15000 Flntand 
SX Flntand 
STS Ftatand 
SX EmcKtatzall 
SX FlmlXEkaartCmMt 
115 FtanWiEttaarl credit 
SX FtanlNi Export Credit 
175 Fkerlxn Export CfTdff 
SWO Finnish Enart CrX/w 
SU FtanMiMuafctaoLom 
SIS FVaiiXMuilctaaLaan 
SIS Hatsinkl City 
SX indMlgtBcmk Finland 
SB inAHtrl Fimd-miond 
su MorioaafBaikFinlona 
IU MarftaueBaakFInlaM 
IU PakemaOy 


9ft 14 Mw 99ft 1044 
15ft 17 AW W4ft1163 
*H-S7Jan Wlft 745 


lift -M Jan 
lift 18 Sen 
lift 19 Jim 
lift 1*00 


rift H37 

1E-* 1UB 

W5 962 

Soft 113411.181141 

111 T9 Nov IHft 731 Sffl 
85.72 Od 17 II J9 1210 1064 


K57 

1632 

833 

7153 

TUI 

1083 


12ft 74 No* 
lift 70 Mar 

rate is Jui 
Ute ■» AW 
1456 14 DCC 


99ft 1237 
T7te RH 
rift RM 
181 1262 
KB 11.17 


« 

1U9 

US5 

IUI 

W05 

I2JS 

1248 


rTft it nov rai JUT 
17ft V Nov razte 1201 
■■*176407 95 1133 RI2 168 

IftWFeb 90ft 1166 R94 967 

8ft 14 NOV 97ft 1044 I1X 897 

I 17 Dec 91 R05 1143 839 

8ft U Son 9x 11.13 1133 4JB 

IftMPeo *lft M33 1031 843 

lift 19 Nov 1M 1171 1130 1L7S 
Ste-MDtc 9*ft 11.10 1162 967 


FRANCE 


HUB AoreportOd Ports 
sx AoulWnaSnpa 
ROT Baaava Franc Com Ext 
s ow Baram Prune Com E0 

ESSE 

IS BrnSaflSSS Ports 
sis BontaM National Ports 
iu - 


ra* 17 Aud 103 nn iass iw 

10 IS Nov « 1163 1163 10.10 

14ft 14MW rar<* 1881 1404 

16 16 NOV 196ft 1161 1469 

14ft 17 Jan 104ft 1187 1384 

lift TB Mar TODft 1U0 1164 

9 VM6T ,93ft lt.ll 1214 963 


CC04S CnfemAktyEnuCaad 
siM CatsMCentrCaaneao 
>75 CabMCentr Coon Eca 
fltt Cats* Cotar Cora Eeo 
SUM CeiaeF<isic Motions 
575 CottM Nat Autorcuiri 
SX CiAHNatAutanwtis 
sis Cotari9MiAutarautas 
STS Cafsse Not Autureufes 
sn Cohta, Nat Automates 
SX Cotase Not A u tarn u las 
S125 Cote* Net! Cred Aerie 
SNO Cater Nat Cred Auric 
sns Cotea Nat cred Aorta 
SIM Cotea Nat E norma 
cnSX CotaoNdEnomto 
ecu 50 Cote* Mol Enargla 
SX Cotea Nat Tctacomm 
stM cotea Hat Tatacnmm 
>75 Catea 7M Tetaeomm 
IX Catea Nat Triacsmm 
SUB CateeHatTtatcamm 
aeaX Cotea Hal Tataamm 
STS CoteeNgf Triaeumm 
R4M Ocrbaanago France 


U 8» Mew 788 1218 

U* 19 Aug 109 1240 

14 71 Aug 103ft 1117 
lift 72 Sag 96ft 1236 
HftlfOd UNft 1211 
14k. 70 MOV 105ft 1261 
Uft 77 tan 103ft 72X 
12 73 Jun 97ft 1249 
111* 71 Jul 105 7871 

15ft 72 Jun USft 1247 
72ft 75 Sop 107 - - 


UBf 

1299 

7251 

1266 

1293 


1204 
1211 
T8M 
1134 
R4I12J0 


lift 77 Dec 96 T2J7 RX 1231 
7235 76 Nov 101ft 1261 tin 
9 -UMOV 98ft TU48 9.14 
9U 71 Sea f r* rax 1241 iku 

12ft 75 MOV Ullft 1251 1259 

Uft76Jun 111ft 1X34 1271 

ISIS 77 Mar TUft 011 12871397 
•ft 77 Mor 84 11*71266 7266 


TlftTOJai 99ft 1264 
UftDMoy UDft lira 
lift 72 Aw 9*4* 1239 
Uft 71 Jan 101 R47 

11. 71 Feb W*ft RU 

lift ■9J Jul 94ft R27 

I 14 Mw 97 1161 HAS US 

9ft 16 Jun rift 185* 9*2 

IftlfOCt V ran 1446 948 


116 

1277 

11.93 

12*2 

1247 

R13 


*75 OaBanadre 
6X8 Cla Fla De Paribas 

SB a* Naf Du Rhone 
SX Clmenti Lofarue 
ffIM amonfs UXarea 
0050 Credit Eauram Petit M 
SOT email FoncSrFrXte 
SOT Crndd Fsnctar Franca 
"OrTOO Crndn Fnma ar Fmncu 
ecoX Credit Fteefar Fnmca 

& 

ecu 50 Credit National 
MX Cndtl Natlamd 
S TOD ElecWdfe Froaca 
SX Elachtaba Franca 
SM ElamrieflaFroicu 
SIX ElaclridltFiTO 

sns eiearicne Fma 

SIS ElectrtcBeFraaat 
su» ENcfridta Franc X/w 
SUB Eindrtatta tana 
swo ENcfnena Franca 
rUGO etsctricita Fiona 
fUO EHAeulfatTC 
SX EroplfrdfKel 
SX Francata Ptfrrias 
SM GezDeFrnaar 
r*r too Car Da Franc* 

0075 Gw De Franca 
>175 GarDoFrapci 
S« LofargaCMasa 
>21 La Nickel 
STS Mlchctta 
SX MlcWin 
>123 MtaboHn 
SH Mt4haArO/i 
SB Pochtaev 
177 Pwgfff 
HRS Psuptof-OTram 
I9HB PanTA-MauHen 
S40 Part Authcrl lies 
sen** Reg Auta Trams Paris 
HUH Reason 
H200 Rsnguft 
RIM RtrawPouhne 
HUB sotaf-OdtotinMNas 
tx swDevMapitiaiaaai 
** SndNaiaemiDsFgr 
SX Sod Nor Chem kaFer 
IX WftlOmoifrr 


72ftriOa ID 115* 
73ft 71 Jun ICSft 1217 
Uft 72 Jrni 710ft KLU 
f 7] May S4ft nm 
Uft 15 Dec 192 1056 

lift vs Jun raft ax 
Ute 70 Jun lOft RI7 
Ute 19 Sen » IUI 
•14X00 96ft 1135 
■ft VMW 

rAXJut 


RU 

U62 

rax 


R1S 

U41 

034 

9J77 


1117 RIT 982 
r* 1331 1U2 847 


124* 

rax 

TZJ3 


Uft 70 Feb WBV* IU 
UP* 71 MOT Wft RU 
f» TJ/ol Wfft 1217 

lift 73 FeO 107 1IUS 

lift 7t Aug IOTA RX 1057 
Uft 16 Jen 101ft 1134 1255 

IV, 6* Dec y*ft 16801132 SSI 
115*71 Fab 10* *97 1033 

UP* 74 Dec 1025* 9.91 ran 
*ft 16 Apr 99ft 10*1 938 

97 11X1364 176 



15ft 19 AW 
9 16 MOV 
9ft 14 Mar 

2ft II Feb 

n 74A00 

WNScs 

■ SJLtt 


11631263 819 

ISl 1197 I3J7 
... 106 1007 12X 

15 XHuv tfljft 1283 UX14A9 
77ft 73 May 995. 029 1ZX 
U6 1367 |I97 1462 
98 1094 1233 9.U 

raft ara lira sx 
n R2SUJ2 M 
lift R9! I3J3 1163 
n TU7 12J8 10. It 

9Pi< »jj2 tom 967 

M TJAog HZ au HOT list 

95* 17 Fob 9751 1 LU 1169 9J7 
ns V Aug n 1267 MS u 
9 71 HOV 87 1L93 lira mu 

raje HUO RH H5J 

95* IS Jul fTa R19 985 

TmVHKT 91ft 1260 13.15 7,92 
7ft 17 Aar Ifft 1335 1*56 U 
94* H Mar tf» lire ftD 
Uft 72 AW 116 1L10 1146 1462 

IZftlSMnr 180ft 759 1231 

4ft 35 Jon ri 1168 IIS) *57 

HfWNnv mi IH7 11 n 


S7S SadNgigamtasFer 
SX SncfNatOtafflhBFar 
SMB Snd Nat ttemhu Far 
SIM Snd Not Oam In* Far 
160 Snd Hal Chanim Far 
ecu *5 Md NX anting Far 
•fix Total Oil Marine 


71 Fob 18214 1262 12251271 
9 73 Dae ■ 1161 1288 103 

175*72 DSC 9944 123 IS9 

lift 73 mgr « 1190 liras 

lift 74 Mar 98'A 1167 1145 

Tift 74 Mar 106ft 1017 1066 

MWMsr 9654 113 967 


GERMANY 


SB BasfFImmca Europe 
SIX BasIFlnenceEurana 
3165 Bod Dvtr taaXJw 
RUB Bed T rm s o tf o r m ai 
SOD Bavar loll Fbnnc XAr 
SOT Bayer UrBFlooncXTw 
STS BayariscM Voratrabk 
SX BmwO/iEnfarertes 
5 tec C o mmenbcnk Rrera 
SWO Cammenbank Flmnca 
SIM CammaRtaik Rnanca 
SiM CominaRtnnk ItaiWte 
SIM Commenbcnk Inti X/w 
SX Doousm inll Fin wa> 
SX Degusxa MU Fki X/w 
SUM Deutsche Bonk Ftnaice 
sxa Deutsche Bank Fmonea 
SOT Dautscbo Bank Flmaicc 
SWO Deutsdw Bonk Luo WAv 
SIM Deuteh* Balk Luv X/w 
SWO Dresdner Ftaonea 
S2S GatabaHnungNaietta 
S12S Hoednt Flnoace X/w 
SIS Hoecfnt Flnoaca X7W 
149 Severing mil Fin x/w 
sx Siemens West ere Ftn 
>2» liemem western 3Uw 
170 Veto Inti Ftaonea X/W 
SIX VblkswaaenOvaneDS 
sm WanoFtnerxa 
ecuX West lb Fine nca 


1212 

1224 

1163 


lift X NOV 
914 19 FOO 
11 '88 Mor 
7ft 17 MOV 
IBft 17 Jun 
7ftl»Fdb 
1314 19 OU 
UM71 Mav 
IMVOct 
11ft 70 Jan 
II 71 Mar 
7 -njua 
7 XJCT 
8ft 73 Mav 
SftTJMov 
115*17 Dd _ 

MU If Aug 706ft Rif 
ISftWSes TO4ft 1767 
6ft 71 Mar 186 SJB 
6ft 71 Mav 74 1267 

11 70 AW 94 7268 


1148 

1062 

1L22 


91ft 1238 1491 820 


97ft 1160 
SM 1268 
M2 1269 

94 1167 

1BE54 RS* 

96 063 

92ft 1287 
S55* 1273 
IX 699 

95 9.15 
79ft 1240 

IX 11.S 


714 X Fab 
*5419 Jut 

8 93 Feb 
4ft 96 Aug 

9 '55 DOC 
754 90 Mor 
■ 73 Dec 
75.17 May 
77* 70 Dec 
raft 71 Jan 


W77 
865 
7299 
113 
UB) 
1L98 
1169 
8)4 
7J8 
168 
10JB 
11*2 
U 
1292 
5.90 
845 

11JI 

92ft 1895 R39 831 
II 126 133 

7Sft 1260 1022 

89 93 792 

9854 10811089 9.11 
Sift 1289 9.17 

7454 7262 1062 

72 1223 842 

97 726) 1224 

104ft 930 10,19 


ICELAND 


SM KXand 

SIS Iceland 
SM Iceland 
SX Iceland 


8ft 16 Jan 

8 17 Fab 

9 87 FrC 

12ft 72 DK 


41 11641143 853 

01* 1211 1227 865 
93V, lira 1*4* 963 
99 1273 1291 1288 


IRELAND 


ecuX i re land 


1ft 19 Feb 
115*74 AW 
MV. 75 Jan 


B8ft RU 1481 U2 
97 rax 1123 
UCU 921 993 


ITALY 


SX CatasrztaDi Create 
S2S Eni EnteNa Idracw 
SX Ed Enta Maiidrecw 
SX EM Ente Naz Idracar 
SB Eni Eat* Naz tdrocar 
525 Ferrovta Delta Start 
SU Olivetti Inll (lax) 

SU Turin Cfty 

JAPAN 


7ft 70 Jon 
6ft X Jun 
7 '88 Jan 

Aft 18 Jun 
454KN0V 
81* 14 Feb 
9ft IS NOV 
0 71 MOV 


■ 108SQ92 852 

72 1082 1184 7JJ7 

B6ft 13JH 15J0 85? 
94ft 8M MX 7.14 
94 875 1049 T.1I 

Uft R3I UX 987 
4| 1182 1282 9*9 

93ft 1849 1161 963 


SIX Bank Oi Tokyo Curacoo 
>725 Bonk Ot Tokyo Curacoo 
SUB BaikOf ToiivoC 
ecu <0 BctecOfTakraC 

>100 Bonk Of Tokyo ( 

■CUX Bank OI Tokyo! 

Six Beak Of Tokyo! 

SM Casta Comoulerw/w 
S80 Casio Comautarx/N 
SX Chubb Electric Power 
SX Ougoku ENdrPomr 
SB Curecoa TekVO HokSra 
SIX oat-lchJ Kngvo Bank 
S7S Exaart-lmaart Bank 
SIM Full Inti Ftaonea Hk 
SX Fulflojra LM WNt 
iX FulIkuraLHXte 
SX HazoTMFCumtLtdri/w 
SX HazumoGuml Ltd X/w 
360 HtecMZaMII 
sx Hokkaido Eieetr Power 
sx HokurikuEledT Power 
SiM Indus! Bank Japan Fin 
S12S indusl Bonk Jacon Rn 
ecu 48 Indusl Bank Japan Fin 
SIM Indiat Bonk Japan Fin 
SKC i adust Bank Joaan Fin 
IX Indus! Bank Jmaan Fin 
SIX Industrial Bank JctaOll 
s 125 Industrial Bank Japan 


l3h195*o 
11 70 Apr 
lift 70 Dec 


IBft 1115 
96ft 1197 
9Fft 1190 


101*71 Fib 166ft 9J8 
lift 71 Jun Wft 1223 
WTO 71 NOV 104ft 922 
72ft 92 Jar 100ft 1249 
pySTMar 124ft 38 

5ft WUtr 82ft 1164 
Uft 71 Aug lotft 1116 
135* 89 Aug 104ft 1194 


8ft 88 Dec 

12U70Od 
UttTljun 
105* 70 May 
7ft 19 MOV 
7ft ■» May 


1115 

1L« 

UX 

ran 

1291 
1036 
1266 
471 
7.12 
1268 

1280 

19ft IU 1171 964 


99ft R33 
ID 1168 
96 I1X 
*2 H22 

84ft 1174 


9V. 19 NOV 100ft 9JB 

91* VMM 89ft 7233 


12J1 

7221 

1163 

142 

9.14 

120 

1034 


IlftTBMar 97ft 1127 1261 1183 


72ft W Nov 700’i 1281 

13ft W Od W2V, 1121 


99ft 11.16 
IX 11X 

108 887 

T04V. 1166 

lift 71 Nov 100ft 1121 

lift 75 Dec 10156 1162 1124 1161 
Uft X Feb 97*. 1183 11.18 

DATUM 1M 124* 1389 


18ft MAW 
lift 79 Mar 
HUM Jun 
lift 79 Oct 


720* 

12X 

iox 

rax 

1142 

1225 

UX 


HIGHEST YIELDS- 


to Average life Below 5 Years 


SX Traolptne Fincra 
SB Gus Intarnoflocat 
S28 Colombia 
SU Nova Scotia FrovtaC* 
SIS Word Freds O/S Caote 
i« Amerada Hess X/w 
SX Braril 

SU Venezuelan Telephone 
SI2 Alpha Mantan 
HUB ChortarCnmelMOre 
□025 I nil Harvester Croat 
H too Rhono-Poutaw 
ft too aments Lafarga 
RIM Pod A M O UW OB 


65675 Jul 
8ft 7* Mor 
BUM Feb 
9 75MCY 
556 78 Nov 
656 77 Jul 
SU S7Dtc 
B ft 17 DOC 
5TO 75 Jun 
7ft 77 Od 
9*. 7* Aw 
7ft 17 AW 
7ft 77 Jill 
7ft 77 Aug 


91 4294004 762 

U 527 2783 »X 
83ft 1589 2020 988 
99 1744 1824 9J» 

73V1 1868 RM 7 31 
87ft 7362 1724 771 
If R37 1762 927 
a 082 166* 9J6 
98 16.17 1422 5S7 

82 MJ6 1783 9.U 
M ta.« 17X1027 

19ft 7325 166* 831 
■ft 1174 1822 867 
90 7247 14.15 813 


-HIGHEST YIELDS- 


to Average Life Above 5 Years 


SX Dorn* Petroleum 
S75 Efl» Euroe Invest Bank 
sx Moanlltaa Bleedai ' 

SX HudaamBay 
SX MoanlUan Biaeeel 
SX TAdkto 

SX Corad Waled- Baitiorsi 
S75 Now Brunswick Eledri 
SBS Mfctefln 
□0H Canodan UmHt« 

112 Rothschild Jnv Hakso 
□040 Roval Bank Ot Canada 
□040 Royal fiaik Of Canada' ' '18 
IU Elb Enron I avast Bank 12 


U) 74 Jul 
85k 7* Dec 

9 72 Feb 

10 71 Feb 
ft. T3 Ma- 
cs* Ti Due 

9 7200 
94k 74 Mar 
a V* Aug 


7* lift IUI RM 

79 R34 14.14 1123 

■ 1347 14J3 11X 

Mft 004 1*84 7183 

80 1360 1369 1164 
E 7290 IOX 1067 
81ft RH UTS 1104 
B R64 1368-1147 

.. 84ft 1262 1163 7181 
77 7* Dee lOft M49 Util 1*3 
lift VBAes 184ft 1122 112J 7361 
I 72FM, r 1186 7219 1QJ4 
74 May ID 1U411W1L11 
71 JUl MO I IX 1156 1200 


-HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS— 


S775 Mexico 

SU Petna* Potroteas Manic 
SM Bril Cot umbto Mwtfdp 
>75 Trenscaaodo PI aalinas 
six cttfesSarvicaOre 
SM G«t1 Starts O/S Ftaon 
170 Northern inaano Publ 
>73 Onto Edison FJaanc* 
>75 Ohio EdtenFIngnol 
0060 Ganwot Motors Aecaol 
ariM Nodonai FtateCJaro 
cnSX Hudhaa Bgy 
a04O Canadian Pacific 
cnSX Quebec Prorine* 


lift 77 jm Hf 1667 
17ft 76 Nov UNft 1153 
17 IS Oct lOft 1129 


UMMOCt 
17 MSea 
17ft MOd 
17UMOU 
171* 77 Jul 
ITftMOCl 
11 7700 


1D7 UK 
UDft IUI 
TB5ft li» 
m* 1539 
10*7, 1464 
10* 1587 

181ft T7JD 


175* 17 Mar 18T1 1741 
II 77 Nov UNft 1559 
17TO 77 No. 185 U.U 
II 17 OQ I0*ft 1461 


1697 

1675 

1659 

1831 

1659 

1669 

1859 

tail 

1*51 

1723 

7766 

1722 

1*90 

1650 


□085 lmhntrtal Bank Jason 
SHO industrial Barit Jcnwi 


SX ItahCCaLtOW, 

IX Italic Co LtaXtw 
SX ItohCCn LiflW/w 
SX Itofi C Ca Ltd X/w 
SU 1HBCCBLM 
SIOO HahCCeLtd 
SU Jaoon AirBnei 
ITS Japan Atallnes 

5740 Japan Writes 

S94 Janan Ahilms 

M Jaoaa AtrOna* 

SX Jodoo D cvetao Bank 

STS Japan Dgvrien Bonk 
SX Joumi Syidh RiMa W/*r 
SX Jcsmi Svnth Ruhba XJn 
IX JaseoCoLWW/w 
SX J uses Ca Ltd X/W 
SIM Xoraot Etaefric Power 
SX Kavnba Industry w/» 
SX kmrteo Industry x/w 
SHO XyowaFtnoncv Ih*) 

SX Kvutfto Electric Power 
SHTO Lana-Tarm Cr«8t Ban* 
St2S Lsna-Tarre Cre* Bank 
CBS 78 Long-Terra Crus r Bcnk 
SIM Long-Tonw Credit Bonk 
SU Lonu-TenP Credit Bonk 
SIM L00*-Ttrtn Credit Bank 

IBS Laou-Term Credit B ct* 

>125 Long-Term Credit Bank 
stM Lone-TarmCradRBank 

SNO LanwTem OM11 Bonk 

SNO MarubcaiCaro 
S700 MJneeec Ca w/w 

SHO M in eheoChX/w 
SX Mitsubishi Oenilc W/w 
SX MRwbtelCBemicX/w 
stag Mheubtahi Cara w/w 
STM Mitsubishi Carp X/w 
SN8 Mitsubishi carp 

SUB Mitsubishi Care 
SIM MHsu84Sl!Carp 

Slot Mttsublshicare 

SOT MRsuMsIUCarp 
sx Mitsubishi Estate 
SIM MIteJbtshj Fftlfhklx/W 
am MTtebJkkl Fkxnw 
SX MRsuhtaMGaft/w 
SX MISsubMCteX/w 

>40 Mltsuhlshl Metal W/w 

s« MitsubWU Marta x/w 

SIOO MJts*4>WiiMartlW/tt 

SUM Mkyuetshi Metal X/w 

112 MHxuohht Rovan 
SX Mitsui EnatacetlnW/w 
SX Mitsui Eisinearin X/w 

IS Mlrtul Eftointario W/w 

SX Mittal EnataaerM X/w 
SM Mirtol Fioaacs Asia 

SUM Mitsui Flnmc* Alla 

1700 MITSUI Ftaaece Ana 

SUM Mitsui Trust Fin (hhl 
SIM Mitsui Trite Fla n*i 

SUM Ntapan CradH Bank 

SM Nlaoan Credit Book 
SUM Nlopan Credit Bank 
SIM Ntaoon Credit Bank 
SIOO tttaoon Credit Bonk 
ecu So Ntoaen croon Bank 
SIOO Ntocan Credit Bcnk 
SIM Ntaaaa Credit Bank 
SIM NtaeonKafcanKabushlk 
SX Hlpren MlntagW/w 

SX nIopsp M ining X/w 

SX KloaanaiaBan 
SIM Ntopoa Steel Corn 
SX NiaDanTatawaTataW 

SX NtnaanTetaaraTattah 

SHO Ntaaaa Totagra Totoph 

SUM Mtoaon Tataaro TNtah 

SIM Ntaaaa Talaara Tataon 

SX Nlcnan Yunn kobuihl 
>78 NJsNUlwnl Core w/w 
>78 Ninhoivmt Cara x/w 
SUM NtebolwatCare 

stM Nomura Eumwe 
SOT Nomura SoaxHItsW/w 


R37 

1153 

1126 


72 T1 Dec 97 1266 

705* 72 Jon 931* 1225 
lOte YS JO* 92ft 1221 
11 17 Feb 1S»V| 721 
11 17 Frt Uft 1190 
7ft 19 Mot 97 18 

7ft 19 Mot M 1197 
1354 19 Aug «2ft 1191 
1BM72FM 93 1230 _ 

17 13 Jun 94 1127 1197 114* 

Uft 14 May 7C754 11J9 716B 

135*14 Aug 109TO 7187 722* 

11 17 Nov 9* 1180 1164 1146 
UA 71 Aw 93ft 11X7 7287 11*3 


11.17 
7.n 
827 
1341 
. >’96 


15ft 17 Feb HD IU* 
12ft 1900 1B7V, 1146 
7TO19May Oft 924 
7TO19MOT SSTO 056 
I B Dec 151 *27 

I 18 Dec M’4 12S2 
12ft 1900 MOft 1230 
416 19 Fib Wft 926 
60 Feb Bft 1275 
tlAYOMor 181ft 1251 
1214 19 Jul 182ft 72*1 
raikifAw Wft ii.Ti 
UftlfAua 106ft 034 
1154 VO Jon ftv. R22 

II it Mar 96ft 11J7 

12 IMP 1XTO 1)39 
xtro-ra/uo asta ujn 
72ft 10 Sag in ora 
ute 71 Jul 105ft 123 
rate 17 NOV W5* 1228 
n 13 Dec 98ft 1212 
lift 71 Dec 98 1225 

Aft 1* Fab 114ft 222 
iluHFOb n 1221 
11 17 Jan 154ft 112S 
II 17JBI 97ft 1256 
sro aa Nov *5 7X 
STOXNbv B 1133 
Uk.1T Jul W5 116* 
70ft 70 Mav 95ft 1131 
T2ft 77 ft*ay 184ft 1142 
19ft 77 Feb «ift 1169 
18ft 75 Feb 93ft H3I 
lift If Mar «8ft RX 
12H 19 Nov IBft 1KJ 

llte to jun wft 1259 
Ate 19 Mar 95 8C 
61* 19 Mar BVi 1214 
554 If Frb 156ft 447 
5T0 19 Fib E 1134 
7A19NOV 701 746 

7te19Nov 84 1259 

9 *89 Aar a 1JJU 
T8ft 17 Dec 111 425 

IB5*17Dfc W 1239 
701800 Wft 849 
7TOTBOC1 85 12J0 

lift 19 d*c rai 1 , ran 
12te 10 Aug 991* >238 
720 73 Feo 98 126* 

RH. 19 Mav HR5* 1201 
72 71 Feb 98 1248 

UA19J14 HJSft 1210 
UikirAiie 188ft 1254 
11 784409 94'* RSI 
JJ NAM «l* RJ* 
llte 70 Mav 9Tb 11.96 


1469 

1135 

629 

909 

230 


1264 

651 

7X 

7272 

12.93 

HE 

1422 

rax 

1140 

11.91 

1139 

RX 

R91 

ran 

1259 

1165 

544 

7.72 

7.n 

UX 

605 

653 

1262 

18.99 

11.01 

11.17 

1126 

1133 

1256 

11.79 

73* 


167 

7JR 

7J0 

•X 

1023 

9.M 

IIX 

751 

653 

1127 

1222 

1250 

1251 
IUJ 
1115 
i486 
1163 
>259 

raw 


11 71 May 1850 9JB 931 HL4J 


I2te72Jmi 181ft 1251 
1107) Ftb f» ratu 
lift 71 Sen 103 1231 

65**89 Mor b*V] 477 
6TO-87MW 83ft ran 
rat* worn W2ft rain 

18ft 7) Fri, 97ft 111* 

IteWMor 96 KLS2 

185*78 Jan H 112711X1835 


726* 

7132 

717* 

*« 

108 

1256 

1125 


lift 70 Fab 99 11*4 

120 71 Aim H40 11*2 
1 Bft 72 Feb 94ft 1162 


l» Qhoa 


4 W/w 


SX OnodaCwnanlCora/w 

3 Cement Co X/w 


sx Dnadat 

STS Orient Leasing laxl) 
SM Rmwnincvr/w 
*48 R e nown toe X/w 
ix RkaflCaudX/w- 
S53 Sonoma Inti mm 
IX Sum mi Finance Hk 
SM Stmra Inll Flnoaca Hk 
Six SenaraintIFtaeaHa 
sx SoogoraBr a wa nai 
SX stlnc TtwwrTijt ra/w 

SX Satao Timnnoriut X/w 

Sli letyu Stores Mcr x/w 


SX Sabu Starts Dk 

ctr P o we r 


SX ShtkakeEiecfrPmM. 
SX Sumlfu m u Coastruc W/w 
sx samMameCcratawxrer 
5 WO Sumitomo Carao nd l u n 
SM Sumitomo gnonc o Atlc 
SW S u ndicn iB Ftaonea Alta 
SUO SumitamsFInonegAsifl 

Six sumtemoFInaBceJiiia 

S« Suma a ma Heavy in W/w 

S40 Sumitomo itaovy Ln X/w 

S40 Su mi t o mo Beatty W/w 

SOT Sumitomo Trust Fin He 
SOT Toivo MX FlnaocaSft 
SX Tabaka Etactnc Power 
SOT TohaSAMLM 
sn Tokya Etoarlc Co w/w 
S7D Tokyo Elodrtc Co X/w 
SOT Tokyo EJectrtc Power 
SX Tokya Meh iw c Pj 
SX Tokyo im Etad W/w 
SH TakvaSaivaEMX/w 
sx Toravindudriotw/w 
SH Torav laMrleiX/W 
SX Tavo Engtnee ring wav 


13ft 79 Are 
kft-89FtO 
Aft If Feb 
100 72 AW 
12ft 71 DOC 
10 X NOV 
60 X Nov 
70 19 AW 
70 19 AW 
Aft 19 tar 
6ft 19 AW 
7ft If AW 
7ft If AW 
9ft "Se Jo I 
6 XFeB 
* VFeb 
50 19 Mor 
lift 78 MW 
lift 19 Dec 
Ute 78 Sea 

71073 Jon 

lift 19 Ja I 

AVWr 

AM* Mar 
II 17 Mar 
31 VDk 
llTOTgjai 
7ft -MAW 
7ft If Aw 
ran 72 wr 
isjujm 
raft 70 Jun 


112 


182ft RM 
lift H*l 
87ft 1287 
940 7207 
99ft 7238 

142 429 

82 1237 

119ft 25* 

85 1273 

92ft 651 

•Ift 777* 

129 J| 

87ft 7131 

97 12.14 R66 1.79 

S* I US 7.14 

BBft 1238 745 

840 7008 1.19 

96 1262 11,11 

97ft 1244 rass 

ma 1233 7238 

1213 1216 RB 


1117 

763 

7.98 

1161 

R19 

448 

7*2 

649 

9.12 

T.H 

613 

181 

137 


183ft 123! 

a iiu3 

13 1253 
97ft 1249 
97ft 1286 
*5ft 123! 
IX 61 
Si IIA 
94ft 1162 
IB 1261 
« 1193 


UTOY1MOY 182ft 12.1] 

11 5*72 Mcr 9856 1202 

4V. If Alar V 1145 
Mi 19 Mor 87 1221 

I *89 DeC 109 US 
raw 72 Fes 1000 1744 

12 to Dee Bft 1141 


130 1* Sen 
130 rai f« 

6ft 19 Mw 
ift 19 Mgr 
DteVJal 

Ute 74 Jui 

raft 17 Jan 
ITftWJim 
Ute 17 Mw 
WeVttW 


KBft 7224 

99 7248 

91ft MS 
B 1252 
USft 1161 

ran 112 

241 2168 

99ft 1IJ1 
in 474 
97 1201 


i’llfMor 126 JJ9 


RM: 

ix 

na 

nx 

1178 

SJ1, 

832 

1U4 

1422 

11X 

1244 

11.90 

7.11 

763 

734 

1233 

ran 

R5*l 

w) 

-I! 

1057 

Sli 


I 5*6 Mexico 

SX Mexico 
S175 Mexico 

S3 CSmWonFtd Electric 
SU Comlsian Fed Elect rlc 
a0X ttactooot Flnondarn 
SU Pema* Paramos Mexie 
IX (temaxPttratanMaic 
SX Patim PatraleiB Miextc 
S12S Ponte* Petraleos Maxic 


SX Toro Enahtoering X/w 

SHO VomokH fntf 

s iod YasudoTrastFinenco 


6ft 19 MW 82ft 1237 
11071 DOC 93ft 1265 
125619 AW OT 1237 


LUXEMBOURG 


S3* BM-BenklnUW/w 
S3* BhMtonk inti X/w 
cute SodSocNotCredlnv 


7ft70Moy HI 70S 
7ft 78660V 79ft 7229 
rate 7( May Kftk 1021 


MEXICO 


IV, 17 Mor 9* 1212 1300 93* 

ITO 71 DK 82 1258 1350 UL47 

18ft 77 Jrf UR 1*67 16.97 

8 17 Feb <30 1238 1367 458 
U 17 Nov 97 >437 1140 

170 17 MW MOft 1741 >7*6 

17ft 16 Nov Wft 1153 1*35 

16ft 17 AW K»5 1251 1531 

■ft 17 SW 93ft 11*91340 9JJ9 
lift H Jul N 128614141223 


MISCELLANEOUS 


6X Bauxites Do Gotnee 
STS Develop BkSngwore 
cuU MeaalFlnopca 
SX Slnoopwe 
sX Tronsuietne Ftaonea 
SZ7 Trenototoi Ftoonee 


I 70 Dec IX 739 735 734 
15ft 19 AM 111 1205 UN 

10ft 75 Aw Wft 1688 HUH 

70 17 Nov 98ft 639 123 707 
' ' 91 48J9 JOW 762 

97 not TLri 678 


60 15 Jul 
Aft IS Oct 


NETHERLANDS 


SX Aaoon 
s 40 AmevNv 
s» Amro Bonk 
1725 Amro Book 
>48 Dom Dutch State Minas 
sn Dim Dutch Start Minas 
SIX Dim Dutch Start Mtam 
SU EimtoNv 
sx Gist -Brocades inn 
SUM Holland Airtlnn FVi 
sn NtdarianeMGaaunrt 
su Ncderiandse GasuRta 
su Naderiandu Graunie 
SOT PbfDre deaUamp W/w 
SOT PH1lnsC<ab8anipX/w 
S75 Robebonk Nederkxrd 
S40 Shea 1 atl Rnanca 
S70 5b*tl Inll Finance 
SOT SheU InilFInanca 
S58D Shen iBtTFtnance 
sn Ttirtsai Bg Flnmea 
SOT UalicverNv 
am UmirvarNv 


llte 71 Feb 
I S7AUS 
11 19 Nov 
H0 7OAU8 
•ft 17 Jan 
8018 AM 
Ute 71 Mar _ 
Uft 17 May 10 
IT0 15 Jul 9B 

120 rai mot 
tote 78 aw 
110 70 Od 
110 71 Mw 
60 70 Jut 
ATOYOJol 
11 71 Mor 


7ft 17 Jan 
70 17 (War 
IV. 70 Feb 
lOftXMar 

00 W Jul 
m vo Jui 


Wft 1223 03* 

rift 127512*6 867 
ID 1235 7275 

92ft 1273 1162 

93 1281 1218 887 

93 1131 HJ9 941 

95ft 1248 1151 

1283 U*2 

15451562 842 
99ft R35 1221 

94 1227 >138 

9716 1151 1137 

m. 1L91 1137 

ID 628 612 

79 R37 656 

93 1271 1133 

«$ft 1U4 1L2) L38 

93 128* 1236 10 

94 IUI 824 

570 1135 944 

gift 1242 1131 

96ft 1101 939 

Mft >1.16 7737 7U2 


NEW ZEALAND 


SX Mew Zealand 
>15 Haw Zealand 
six NewZaatand 
y 15030 New Zeeland 
1 1« NewZeotond 
v 15000 New Zealand 

SX Bonk Ol Hew Zealous 
SX Dev Fin Now Zealand 
S2S Nf Forest Product* 
sx N: Forest Products 
SX Offshore Mining 


50 15 Jut 
ift 16 MW 
80 16 Dec 
NVDK 
lOte V Aw 
7te It Sea 
rate 73 mw 
( telSJun 
16 Mw 


120 V Nov 180ft RH 
IU IS Dec 99ft in 


99 433 935 531 

97 9.94 9.95 6JS 

ft 1054 U 9 
104 4J9 885 

97 1138 ra« 

107ft 6.94 744 

93 1232 1223 

9fft 1122 IUI 142 
■ft IU2 9.14 
1289 
■29 


NORWAY 


Bergtn CRv 


115 

SIS 

sx Dea Norriji Crodltimfc 
sx 0*n Nanle Crcdtltxink 
nkr 100 EkSDeriRnons 
nkr 100 Eksoorlfmons 
SX EkspgrtthvxH 
SH EksParMnon* 

S 75 Eijnortflntxil 
SHO Eksportflncm*X/w 
nkr 200 EkseorttlnaBS 
S» EkSPOrtflrems 
SOT Ekswtflrexa 
SOT Ekwortfl nan 
nkr 250 Ekseertltaaas 
mu lot NorgusHyaoMkrtrenln 
SX Norges Kammunalbank 
SX Koran Kammured bonk 
S40 Karats Kommunalbank 
su Hbm KomnnmaBimk 
>75 Noraes Kommunalbank 
SX Noram 

sn Naratot 

nkr SO NorskDcto 
SJO Norsk Hydro 
SJO Norsk Hydro 
IX IMnkHvdta 
IX Norsk Hydro 
IX Norsk Hvdro 
SX Monk Hydra 
nkr 200 Norsk Hydra 
SH Horri Hydro 
SIOO Norsk Hydro 
SX Norsk Hvdro 
SB Opotaxlskrofl Kraflia 
515 OstaOty 
nkrW OsJoCtty 
SIS Osiacnv 
R TOO DstoCRy 
SX DPaGty 
nkrino (MaCItv 
nkrJJB OstaOtV 
SX OrioCHv 
SIS RoktaFSufdaJ KroR 
1K0 Stated Dan Norsk* 

SIM start II Den Nareke 
sm Startll Den Narske 


I 17 Aw 95 1092 1127 842 

BTO *84 Fab 99 9.99 959 83* 

43 70 Mcr 104 1139 R» 

HU 73 Mav m. 7255 7203 

taro 15 Od MBit 932 1823 

110 16 Jon 101 102* 1114 

9 16 Sep 970 U*6 ran 921 
110 f7 Jem 99ft 1131 1U1 

9ft 17 Jul 770 1061 1U0 922 
73017 Sep 1(00 1L33 1227 

12 19 Jon KMft 1047 1148 

Uft 19 May W2 11X0X1422 
79. -TO Feb « 113412321062 

lift 78 NOV 970 1234 1176 

180 73 Jen 102ft *21 1800 

10ft 18 Aw 1000 183918221147 
7ft 17 Fab 93 1154 071 806 

7ft TO Dec 85 11.18 1338 832 

Ift 71 Dec B8ft 1859 OS* fit 
8ft "92 Mov 89 10281241 935 


>139 7146 1824 
1141 1130 fit 
1145 7142 9J4 
762 1034 

9J6 93* 92$ 
1873 1873 968 


11 J 


6UV50CI 
U 18 Aw 
Uft V Jul 
9ft 19 Aug 
SOUTH AFRICA 


91*78 AW 
9016AW 98 

JftWMw 7) 

1BTO 79 DOC 104 
90 IS Jim TOO 
ift It Fab 99 
lift V Jul IHft 1130 
72 78 FX M3 11.74 
lift 71 Mor 1830 1073 
9 715*0 19ft 11J* HUM 
12 71 Od 104 10*518121132 

8ft 72 Mar 91ft 1027 11 S7 939 
120 72 NOV UDft Rif 1266 1244 
90 74 Jan 880 11421234 1848 
97 1U6 1TJB 644 
99ft 824 182 578 
99ft 1833 930 

« K62MJ3 142 
920 11671251 7J2 

H 10*5 1129 938 

W6 70 Feb I81ft *33 9611818 
7)0 71 Aug 716 9.X 704) 

8077 Nov 82 113112521867 

97ft 1888 1854 641 

xbvj rare mi 
1150 ran R7> 

940 IU9 1154 T8H 


4te IS DOC 
50 15 Jun 
90 Ii Jon 
10 1* Mor 
70 17 Mar 


SX Sautti Africa 
SX SauBl Africa 
m« South Africa 
IX Soolh Africa 
sn ArglaAjmriconCarB 
SX Escnm £ lectr Soopfy 
SU EscotnElsdr Supply 
SIS Escam EtodrSapply 
SU Escort Ertcrr Supply 
ecu « past Telecom Pretoria 


I VFeb 
7T0 17 Dec 


110 If Mor Wlft >127 
17ft If Jui 


7ft 17 Mor 
■ft 16 Dec 
lift n Jun 
90-0 Mar 
120 7T Fab 
11017 Od 


1129 Rll 831 
U27 1224^861 

WI 1114 >238 

94ft 1082 11JS 7.94 
97 104911.17 826 

M 1153 1223 

93 1736 1223 95$ 

970 1251 1268 

NZ0 1049 1127 


SOUTH AM ERICA 


SX Brain 
SX Cotambta 
SB Veoezurto 
led 10 EtatreBras 
SIS Veneaieton Telephone 


80 17 Dec 
8te 18 Fab 
80 720 a 
80 70 Dd 9* 
80 17 DOC 80 


» 13271732 927 

Sift 1539 2028 938 
79 13JI 1634 1138 
f.W 859 
UBM&54 93» 


SNO Soohl 
SB Autapfrias 
SX lailRSlHulNaclndu 
SIS Patranw 
SIS 


SPAIN 

15017 Aw 101 

7 17 Jul 95 

8 17 Dd 97 

.•70-»S; 93 1077122* 

SUPRANATIONAL 


ran 1438 

9351149 727 
926 18)8 825 
1847181* 876 


ecuX African Deve4op Bonk 
00,15 African Devriop Bcmk 
IH Alim Devrfoo Bank- • 
yuan Asian DwriaPflonk 
visooo Arion pev hop Boo k . 
V1SM3 Aikp Davtiao Bank 
sin AskPiDoveiopBank 
V 15000 Alton Develop Bank 
IX CuuocA Of Eorepe 
ecuX Council Of Eurapi . 
sh Eo Eure Cool A Steel 
H1X Ed Eure Cool 6 sim 
>15 Ecs Euro Cool A Steel 
SX Ed Eure Cod A Stax 
SX Ere Eure Cool t Steal 
sn Ere Eure Cba( A Steel 
HOT Ere Eure Coal A Steel 
SX Ecs Eure Coal A Stem 
SOT EaEuroCooiASteei 
in Ere Eure Coal A STttl 
ecux Ecs Euns Coal A Steel 
SH Ere Ewo Cool A Steel 
IX Ere Euro Coal ASteei 
ifrxo E a Euro Cam A Steal 
SU Ecj Euro Cool ASteei 
SOT Ere Eure Coal A Sael 
sx eaEoreCooiA5f»« 


‘SSTidoc W20 ii 


1 X Dec 1010 II 






mi 1866 

960 463 


nx 

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554 

&S 

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x Ea Eure Coal ASM 


sn Ea Eure Cod A 
SIOO Ea Eure Coal ASM 


SN8 Ere Eure Coal ASM 


SX Ea Euro Coal A 

>50 Ea Euro Coal A Stem 
SX8 Eec Eurap Eeonam Cam 
MR EecEirepEcmtomCem 
ecoX Eec Earaa Ecanam Com 
iH Eec Ewaa Ecanam Cawi 
•can Eec EWflP Econom Com 
SX Etc Eurap Eooaem Cam 
ec»X Eec Eurap Ecanam Can 
ecu TO Eec Eurap Econom Com 
I KW Eec Eurap Etkewm Com 
IX Eec Eureo Econom Com 
ecu X Etc Earea Econom Com 
SH Eec Eutop Econom Com 
150 Eec Eurog Ecanam Com 
>200 Etc Evrcp Econom Com 
SU Etc Eureo Ecanam Cam 
SU EecEurop Econom Com 
I/O Eec Eureo Econom Com 
sio Eec Eureo Econom Com 
SX Elb Eurap Invni Bank 
IX ER> Euroa Lnvait Bonk 
SSB Eft Eurap invasf Bank 
SX Eto Eureo Invest Bc»k 
SX EB Euroa loved Bank 
115 ETO Eureo Inveif BtWk 
650 E Q> Euroc Imwi Bane 
f X Eto Euroe lewd Bonk 
swo Eta Eureo invest Bonk 
BIX Eto Eureo unmet Bonk 
>58 Elb Ewap Invest Bonk 
SU Elb Eurap fnveri Bank 
S IBB Eft Eureo Invest Bonk 
STOB Elb Eureo invest Bank 
ix era Eutop mrasi Bant 
lfr«0 ER> Eureo Invest Bonk 

SIOO E IDE iron rnvyrt B<y* 
ISC Elb Eureo Invtjl Dm* 
SOT Elb Euroa inveit Bank 
hot Eto Eurap invest Bank 
SX Elb Em Inead Bank 
•cun Elb Eureo I mrasi Bonk 
SOT Elb Earaa lnv«s> sank 
stag Eto Euroe Imesi Bonk 
STS Era Eurap tawsl Bonk 
y 15800 Eft Eureo Invest Bonk 
SX Eto Eureo loved Bonk 

>108 Eto Eureo Uweri Bonk 
>180 Eto Eira Inretf Bart 
SW Eta Eerep loves' Bank 
ecu so Eto Eureo loved Bonn 
V 75800 Elb Euroa loves! Bonk 
sxa Eto Eureo laved Bank 
SIOO Eto Eureo Ineasl State 
IX Eto Euroe invest Barb 
sus Eta eurap laved Bank 
ecux Eta Eurap laved Bank 
SX Eto Euroe imattBoNi 
ix Eto Eurap loved Bank 
111 Eta Euroe laved Bank 
in Eto Eurap tavtst Bank 
Sin Elb EaeoPImrari Bate 
cnSX Eta Eureo hived Baa* 
SX Eto Ewap Invest Bank 
158 Eto Eureo Irued Book 
SSD Eto Eorao Invest Book 
r 15800 Eto Eurap invest Bam 
ecu 75 Eto Eureo wrest bom 
sot Eto Eureo Imesi Bank 
IX Eta Eureo lm*« Sank 
SOT Eto Eurap invest Barte 
SOT Eto Eurap invest Book 
■ MO Eto Eureo laved Book 
SIC Eto Eurap IMC Bor* 
ecu SO Eta Eurap Invest Bank 
ecu IX Eta Eme Inved Bate 
fcaigg Eto Eureo ipv*« Bonn 
sm Elb Euroe Invest Bank 
ecux Eft Eureo inved Bonk 
sm Eto Euree inved Bank 
sm Eto Euroa inved Bonk 
ITS EB Eureo Invest Bon* 


1 AW 104 1M 

■»5sr» 

770 73 Mar 990 1743 
1 7ft 73 MOT UTft HU 929 10n 
9te X Jan *9 18331131 924 
140 RAW 103 1831 1333 

Aft 76 Jur 95 lLnU34 664 
ift 16 Dec 91 11291168 4-2 

Aft 17 MW 92ft 1 1-04 1257 743 
T4TO17MW 104 11X U52 

70 TAW 92 11591144 738 

6H TOO 91 18*1251 728 

IlftTMOV Wl 1138 WTO 1129 
UftROd 153ft R16 1114 

nrovseo 1 tsro 9.1a ra.1T 
1019 Oct V 12.1J I2H 9X 
ftelfOeC 9JTO IIJ9 1722 HU1 
II 70 MW Ml 923 968 9-to 
lift 78AM MO 1164 IUI 
90 71 Jul 86 123912X1076 
9 73 Apr 82ft 1260 ISA) 1891 
11074 Sep I860 10X19 1034 

* 75 JUI Uft 1267 113 IUJ 
9 *96 May 85 11. 45 058 1839 

■0 7700 Uft 122512X1139 
90 78 AW 71 1ZS1 1237 1134 
9 79 Jan Tift 1268 R18 112* 
11 WJ«P TOO 10.94 1138 

lift V Jul WHi 945 1877 

llte 70 Jd HB0 9.T9 1829 

llte 71 Feb 1810 1143112*1167 
11071 Feb W7 1027 955 7034 
14073 Aar 188 1108 1231 U68 

lift 73 JUJ 79*0 957 Nil 
110 73 SeP H60 XLZ7 9X1069 
17 73 Od Wft \ZOi UM 
llteYJOd H20 1142 1161 

11 ylDee 184ft 1818 933 1833 

12 7JDVC 9* 1274 1238 

1 THY* Feb W10 113* 11.18 

lift 75 JOT 960 USA 1224 1139 

90 TU* 1348 11.94 

950 1132 Rll VLB 
<1 na 1229 123* 
97 1237 1238 

98ft 921 946 609 
Uft 1037 10E Ut 
«Sft 1120 964 

91ft 18231031 Ut 
*» 18*41164 1*7 

97 854 18X AM 

95 11.11 861 

9*ft U1 960 424 
970 I1.1S WJ) 
*5ft I IX) JUI 73* 
93 1849 1134 730 

91 1899 11X 769 

OT 1121 RX 
930 1129 923 

96 1144 1131 UU 

WJ 9.90 9281136 


110 71 MW 
11 75 Mar 
II 75AM 
MrtYSOec 
t 75 500 
fteli Jan 


iron aw 

Ift -M May 
6ft 16 AM 
10 77 AW 
ift V Jun 
9T0 17 Jul 
70 37 Aug 
70 17 0a 
7 17 Dec 

720 18 Jan 

IftWF* 
9T0 18 Feb 
lift II Aw 
11 hjui 
IT 0 18 See 


11. 

92ft 1149 
W30 14.92 
Wft 1054 
10 1156 

*70 813 

15ft If Mw IU 12.13 R15 1439 
170 19 AW 1810 RIT R53 
90 19 May fi ran tax 
70195*0 1820 659 73* 

7ft 78 Fob 98 1028 1124 823 


90WOU 
Ift 78 Dec 
IBft 19 Jan 


1138 
*46 
1898 
TO. TO 
944 
936 


12ft 70 Aar 1010 1U4 
130 70 May 103 1116 

9 TO Sec re IZ*7 
1607000 1050 924 
50 70 Dec 1050 737 
Uft 70 Dec 980 1171 
9071 Feo 67ft 12J4 
11 71 Mor 102ft 1236 
II 71 MW 960 >1.78 
IITO71 Mar llfte MS 
90 71 Mar ■ R74 

lift 71 Jun OT 11, 

17 71 Jul OT 
>10 71 A« 101ft 1127 
16071 Nov 112ft 1169 
Oft 71 Dec 730ft 113* 
11 TO Y2 Jui 95 RX 


1157 11.X 1258 
’ ~ 1138 


WTO 72 F*B 
•077 Per 
■0 72 JUI 
lift 73 Jun 
Uft 72 Jui 
iTOYZOee 
ITO 73 Feb 
»0 to Mar 
9073JU 

1107300 ... 

lift 73 No* 104*7 954 
Wft 74 Jem KOTO 94* 
Wta 74 Mw W30 963 
17074 Apf 183ft 1221 
Uft 74 Od UNTO 1069 

11 73 Mar 9*0 IMM 


97ft 1123 
83 1234 

105ft 721 
TOT *52 
1WTO 1106 
•2ft H23 
X 12.95 
93 RU 
89ft 11.12 1241 
980 1269 


ZERO-COUPON BONDS 

Security fm OrtetMOfMnau 

Part Year Prfa 


■SB 


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S Feb 19*2 
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71 Apr 1993 
II AM 1992 
II Feo 19*4 


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17 Feb 1993 SX8 
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ecu 108 rnfer -American Dev Bk 
v 15880 Infertemcrtam Dev Bk 
nkr WO Nerric Invedmenl Bk 
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SU Nanbc imiattnwntBk 
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11 71 MW 180ft rus 
12ft To MOT 111 TZ34 
11 72 Jui 7775ft 968 
70 74 Mar 101ft 7.14 
IM 17 Dec 106 R22 

110 71 Mar 9*ft H4* 

80 71 Nov 107 74T 

130 71 Nov HJ10 U31 


11 to Dec *2 iu* ran ran 


1*63 
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nkr in Nordle tnvedmeal Bk 
SU Nordic luvadment Bk 
SOT World Bank 


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UK 18 Mar 708ft 7162 M6* 

max aw 98ft iu* ran 

U RMn 186ft 1J37 IUI 1562 

15 X AM U8TO 1161 U79 

lift X AM 100 1UD 

110 x am 100ft ran 

Uft X Sep 1U0 1176 

18ft 18 Nov UN 861 

1101* F«b 1000 1166 

Mft W AW 91ft 11.18 
100 X NOV 105ft 174 
Kite 19 Dec 980 1855 
Wft TO Jon 97 I1J0 
UftlOAM 9* 1L72 

ns. Tooo loiv, nx 

lift 7100 970 T1J9 

10 71 Feb 108ft 494 

llte TO MOV W3V, 1L7B 

I20TOOO 103 RS2 

11 72 Feb ft RIB 
80 72 MW U50 7 69 

8 73 Mar 105 7.15 

Mft 73 AW « 1288 

13 TO Sep 990 1282 

7ft 13 Nov NO 764 

II 73 Nov 1040 9 J7 

12ft74Sep W* RU 
12ft 74 NOT 1010 1288 
Uft 74 Nov 104 963 

II TO Dec Wft 1164 
lift 75 May « ran 
lift 78 Jan 91 1169 _ 

Ift 72 MOV U 1264 1289 1161 

SWEDEN 

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120 15 Sec 100ft 10*1 IUI 

Ift 77 jun 940 11631161161 
14ft V Dec 1870 TT62 1344 

120 19 Apr 101ft 116* 

90 19 May 930 1L73 
lift 7* Dec 990 1168 
Ift 78 AM 1SJ0 760 
11073AM 99V5 1162 

lift 74 Dec Wft 1204 
lift 75 Mw 970 1164 
9ft X Jun 94 1L56I291 964 

■ft 1l Mar 970 1218 11.19 W 
fftXAM *9ft M.7TW67 9H 
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9ft 15 Dec 990 1061 1U2 962 
4ft 76 MOT 96ft 18LS 1164 »-74 
Ift 19 Aw V 1210 UR 955 
90715*0 V 1365 7246 1863 
18019 Apr 96 1L93 MJJ7 

lift 7200 104ft 1269 I25S U19 
80-875*0 93ft 11651151 169 
Ift 17 Dec 94 1141 961 

*0X700 92 H46R72 7J* 

Ift 19 Feb 91 HX Rll 96* 

9 16 Od 97 11.14 76R 

150 15 Dec 702ft 1162 1567 

1 3ft 17 Jul HSU 1234 1SX 

72 7* NOV 980 1241 7261 

IftXMW 81ft 1264 940 

9ft to AW 99 1231129 948 

9 XAM 98 18801162 9.18 

8 15 Jun 99ft IOX 1862 884 

80X800 91 7164 1264 *61 

7ft 78 Dec 85 11.181259 163 

1 1ftXMW 99ft 1168 1168 

9 TO Dec 98ft 1LD71234 994 

I 17 Jon 95 1160)144 142 

9ft to Dec 17 1147 1225 969 

8TO X Jan 9*ft 11.12 1222 *66 
9ft to Mcr 910 UL71 KL72 9J7 

. _ lJTOXApr WZft R80 TL45 

sm SvaMbaHaadabbvikan nrox* Feb *9 128* IZX 

Sdr2S Everiga Invert Bank 9 15 Dec 99ft 96* tJS 

SI 5 SverlaB Invest Bank 70 17 Nor lift 1L7I U67 847 

nr 5M Svertore Imed Bank lift x Jun 103ft 9» 8»I8J7 

SX S«odM Ereorf Cradtt 12ft 15 MOV Wlft 5J7 UM 

Wft to Mar 990 mil 

UK to Jun M10U6B 
1HXFM nx» 1169 
110 X Jui 99ft 1148 

120XSCP in 012 

II ft X Fas 980 1169 

150 It MOT I860 1X11 
UK 78 Fab 107ft 1263 
140 78 MOV 106ft 1251 1264 UB 
W074FfO 910 HJB 185* 
15ft 17 Jon 106ft 1143 H79 

9V. 16 SOP 97 IUI 067 964 
I 17 Mar 93 1260 864 

I 17 SCP 93 11431272 860 


71400 Sw eden 
sin Sweden 
sm Sweden 
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SWO 


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1708 Sweden 
SX AoaAb 

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SX ErlCMOfl Lm 
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>35 EriasaaLjn 
ix Fersraorits Krotlonm 
175 FeramarksKrattaniap 
IX GaatONrtM 
IX Gofhwtoureahr 
SIS Ci ueimta erg 
S15 Grocrpjceberg 
SX ModoMoOchltamdo 
SB OkoA/b 
550 PMxmken PasbOOl 
S75 PkbmikenPari-Odi 

sn kuMwib 

SX Sondvfc 
SU Swbk 
sx ScamflnavtanAJrilnea 
SX Sconraff 
SX Scoratf 

SIOO StarndfEnstaMoBank 
sx SkanriEmkBdoBank 
sx staAta 
SX sadreskagsagaroa 
SX Sporbankernas Bari 
SX Sv nk a Handalsbankrii 
SX 


raw 

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11J* 

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1161 

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1161 


SWO Swu*h Export Credit 
sn Swedish Export CradR 
erd 50 SwadlSh Ekpofl Cradf! 

IX Swadish Expert Credit 
era 50 Swpdbh&iport Credit 
St Bo 5wedbbEkP0f1 Credit 
sm Swedish Erport Credit 
SIR Swedah Epport Cftafll 
SMO Swedish Export Credit 
sm Smash Ereort Credit 
sn SwodUSMtCo 
115 Syderenrio Kraff 
SJ5 Volvo 
S25 Volvo 
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iox 

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1161 

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1167 


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SX POTBI Inti W/w 
SOT Start* Brilk Gore O/s 
sm Start* Bank care wA* 
SIX Swire Bank carp XA* 
SOT. Union BkSwUrefkmd 
SMB Uufan BkSw frta rtand - 
SOT Union Bk Swttzailand 
UB unrtnBkSnttreritaM 


60 73 Nov 820 9.90 
18ft 19 Dec 15 1161 

rtftTOMor 95 T749 

7 70 Jal W 777 
7 TOJai ary i36i 
11072 Fefi 98 Rlt 
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60 73 Jun *1 
60 73 Jun 72 
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sx Air lea* laUFhmao 
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SHO Bal inflFlncsc* 

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sm Britt rfiOxraenFiaonc 

3150 Brtibh Petrol Coptto 
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5 50 Brin ib Steel Cere 
1125 Briroa Ftaonea 
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SX CemrearcM Union 
SX CoariookM lift Fta 
IX CourtouMs Ml Fin 
acuta EbeoFtaance 
5 58 Eml Fbtance 
SX Flnapci For Industry 
IX Ffnonc* For Industry 
IU Ftnmux For totuMnr 
IX Ftaonea Fwiaduilry 
112 Ptaance Far industry 
ix Finance Fwmramnr 
SX Finance Far tnOMtrv 
140 Ftaonc* For indurirv 
SX FIsaosiRfIFtaanra 
118 FrtensInilFtacxxi 
SB Flioni tall Finance 
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in Mvnters In InOriPTY 
SU Klrimrart Benson Lam 
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SX LaariCeneralAisur 
SMB Upyai Eurritaaoc* 

S« LPMM kill Finance 
SIS Mrirapri Estate 
SU Metrapd Estate 
SU Mid land kit) Finance 

SU Midland udf Finance 
SUB Midland mil Ftaonea 
SOT National Coal Bowd 
sn Nallanri Coal Board 
SX NoR-Grindiavs Bank 
S 7} NuBWeitmlretar Bimk 
S5S Hcfl WHimteihu- Book 
sm Nan Wkstaraanr Fhi 
SOT Nan Weitm taster Rn 
525 Ffassey IRfl Finance 
SU RankOraoniiolion 
125 Radkmd Finance X/w 
125 Reed Inedertondl 
S« Reed tartmoHnri 

SX Rhan imernoitanel 

544 f»m Overreos Ftaonee 


SHTOMOV ISft M6S1ZX 962 
• HAM *7 1147 12W US 

80190a 91ft 1161 U91 *6* 
180 78 Altar 97 116611231067 

60 71 D*C 97ft 763 1*2 

11071 Feb 96 1241 an 
1207300 ra2ft T3JI7 nj2 
10 14 Dec 97 10341169 851 

Ift 72 StP Wft 7247 1056 

7ft 17 Aug 90 12671*61 S63 

7ft 17 Nov 89ftR39U.fi AX 
II If Doc *70 IUI 1125 
100 71 Dec 990 1068 1071 

80 16 FOb 97 RitRU 161 
7017 Fib 93ft 1167 1187 829 
90 to Jui 97 1Z31 HUB 

*0 72Mov 87 11861261 1063 
8 17 Nov 91ft 1167 1429 874 
H707OJUI 92 1289 H6t 

110 71 May 103ft 18.91 HJS 

rate 73 jan Ira nn am 

96 U68 1169 

97 1764 ran 
fin 1169 1236 943 
9* R89 TIJ9 


110 72 Feb 
Wft 77 Sep 
itewjtta 
llte 70 Dd f* 
707000 85 

9 to Nev 93 
9ft "17 Dec 92 
7ft 17 00 87 

17073AM MB 
BfttoDec *5 
90 *8500 99 


1161 un *.n 

1145 1363 944 
U.75 UM 1863 
1414 1763 ».T5 
TARS 114* 
IUB Rif 865 
1LM1L1S 964 


fro w Dec e*ft ran urn raw 
110 7300 KBft 111* >864 

90 19 Apr 91 H2» 126* 10. I* 


14 14 Apr Ml 
9017D*e 91 

II RSFob 97 
7701*00 W4 


1367 1265 Uto 
U59H69 965 
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ion ran 


18 19 Mar 97ft 10801864 M2* 
12ft T9 Jul 182 1163 1164 RU 

1514 19 Juf UM R65 14J2 

Uft to Mor lift ran km 

80 V Jul 94 11X1263 178 

180 17 Dec to RBI 1861 
80 TO Aug O I269I368H64 
11 71 May 97ft llJfl 1287 1US 
>80 15 Jul 990 1BJI18nWX 
WteTOSw 970 116* 1U8 

9ft to Jon 98ft 1)62 1131 969 
7ft 17 Dec 99ft 1L77 74.10 869 
I 17 Jul 93 1167 7447 SJO 

tfttoMar 16 7JJ1UM 968 
9ft 19 Apr 97 7234 1466 1063 

Pft 75 Dec 990 9J4 774 962 
701700 93 11061162 133 

» RDtt 97 7264 1237 

1)0 71 Sep nift 1Z6S 13J5 
Ift to Nov 95 12681132 895 


9ft 7) JiPI 14 
90 TO Jun u 
80 17 Jon 98 
7ft TO Feb 93 
18 to Mor Wft 1146 
» 19 MW 99ft RU 


U46 1561 IUI 
1277 18.96 

HJ1 1274 an 
860 9X 806 
1864 
1266 


12 to Jul 

■0 74 Dec 
I 7| F*o 
•016 DK 
■0 721 


SIX Rio TMo-Ztac Ftaonc 
112 Ra*hKMUtavHaldta 
lit RawntraaMoAhmth 
IX RawnbaaModniusdi 


» 1*AM ItSft 96* 1143 

lift TO Dec 1070 11-0* 7160 

7O0 7JOO 97ft >1.19 HID 

8077MOY 92ft 12461862 892 
13 TOJri «2 1263 R7S 

70 to Feb Mft R71U74 162 
lift TO OK 94 12580741263 

97ft 092 R21 

W 1145 Rt8 9.11 
S3 7263 1441 944 

« nn 1U8 f.n 

a OUU27 1864 
lift 72 DK 950 11*7 7267 

I 17 Sep 73 1143 1165 SJO 

801800 94ft 1053 1162 ».n 
70 17 Nov 93 1092 1464 863 

9 to Jun *70 11X 965 

• toJol 970 14*5 1287 961 

140 TO Dec W*ft U53 5147 

>10 72 Nov 98 RU 1L99 

Ift to Jun to 0X1463 865 
10 16 Nov to 1X91263 9-11 

tv, 71 mw m 12*7 aa ran 

160 1* Mor 185 I4J* 1195 
9 TO Mar 94 I2J6U7I 967 
■ -after flft 1169 un 864 

* 72 Aug U R17 IZJB HJ* 

11073 NOV *4 IZU 1237 
UftTOAM UMft 1162 UX IUB 
>00 18 Fib 98 1X08 11.13 1844 

7ft 1903 SO W6S 875 


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sn Sadtana ibK Ftaanoe 
SSD SealtandlBliRparica 
115 Sean inrtrnottanol 

SX Soled lonTruO 

sx Slough Estates Fin 
S12 Slough Estates Lux 
515 TSmCjtvstatariarid 
125 UB Finance X/W 

SX UnlteSsSuitelukl 

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SX wefleon* Fcundathn 
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80 19 Aug S3 IU5 ItU 961 
98 1367 1466 Sta 




11 TO Jul ft UU Us lire 
9 to May 91 Ilf ms ire 

60 to Dec 91 menu w 
■017 Jun *3 1288 7668 IS 
Uft 70 AW 95 1767UI911K 
,80 to Jun « 11681238 838 
71 . 73 Jun 9Bft JZn I3.it iSJ 



UNITED STATES JVMERICA 


sun Targeted US Treasury 
SHOO Torgatad Ut Trensxv 
1 2fl Mona 

5 150 Aetna Lite Casuolte, 
SIOO AtaefcaHuvUTtaFtaCo 
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SU Amax Inll Ftaonea 
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SS5 AmerlconAirtinMO/> 

SUO Amerteon Branats 
SUO Ainorican Express trad 
SU American ExpressO/l 
sin American Express a/s 
IX American Exwrs&Ort 
5M Amwlcan Foreign Pwr 
SM American Farete n.Pwr 
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S1U Amerteon Savinre [no 
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S4DQ American TatcdhTeiag 
>25 AmaeoOU Holdings 
s NO Artwuser-BuKhlim 
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sso Artana Ps Ftatmca 
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560 ArbanaPsFtariKa 
SSO ArtncoCV* Finance 
525 Asfttand Oil Ftaonea 

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so ArtanHcRlcMrtMOs 
S4i Avco 0/5 Capital 
<26008 Avon Copilot Cara 
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SOT Bank Of America 
SOT Bank Ot America 
jm BObkamerica O/S 
S15B Baotrery Trust Ny 

5190 Bonkers Trust Nv - 

5*0 Bear Steoro Co 

SOT Baatrtea Ftaonea W/w 
S18B Benefldal 0/sFlnaoc 
IX Benetldri O/s Ftaonc 
IX Benefldol O/S Flnonc 
SHO Benefldol OfsFtanic 
SX Blue Bril tall _ 

SM Baba Cascade Cara 
sioo Borden me 
sm Bostan Inti Ftaonea 
SX Burlington O/s 
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S50 ConweoU Soup 0/s Fta 
S«0 Cwritae Power UgRJ 
SU Corner IM1 

SSO Carter Hcwtev Hate Os 
SIM Cbxlac 
148 Cbslac 

>m ChetabraiJBtFPonas 
StM Chevron Cnpttri _ 
ecu 60 curvstarFinaictoICa 
S15D Chrysler FlnaacW Co 
SUO aticarpOTs Ftaonea 
SJM Cttiarp O/s Ftaonc* 

13M ailcarp oft grave 
5135 emeurp O/J Ftnonce 
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IX CMtcarp O/s FH m» 
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SW Cltknrp O/s Fkreoca 
SUB Cities Servtca OH 
SU CTtv Federal Savkips 
SQ5 Coost Fed Inti Ftaonc 


UUtU 

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1T07S5OP 1880 1163 . Ms 
It 78 Fob 97TO 1141 . |S 
U 150K 781 1245 u£ 

15 i6 rax- 1D10 rao . 53 

11074 Feb 98 UR Rll raw 
8016 AW 97 1232 Rlt iS 

160 73 AW 187ft 14*7 Rn 
« 17 Jai <7ft US 176* 7J1 
15016 Aar m R98 iu* 

11 17 Dk M60 Kli Jr 

lift 18 Od 1020 1165 UK 

14019 Aw 1070 US no 

IVkTSAW 940 1169 nr 

11072 AW 9f ft rx« lljn 

rid 17 Jan OB'* IIS in 

S XMar 40 ft 124] 

760 TO AW WJ 1211 1225 

11075 Feb 99 IUI Kb 

U 19 Aw . 990 1265 
170 ft MOV HQ 1263 
140 19 MW 114ft 1Z72 
50 15 Od 98 1J2 

110 TO Jun 950 R39 

721572 Fab 97ft T3.M 

uh to jui ra tux un 

1*0 19 Feb raft u.93- - lilt 

U VFeb 183ft 1461 U4 

llteTOJtn 95 R19 S3 

15016 Dec IHft (Ut 15X 

■ 17 Jan 97ft IX Rite 861 
U012FM 18*0 1438 7566 

13ft TOMav 1030 IUI 
730 TO May 1830 1241 
180 TO Mav « ' UM 
»0TO DrC 960 767 
50 to Jai B 962 

R 17 AW BBft 1169 
I 11 MOT I90 7U4 
WS TOSea 120 1268 
770 VOd H7A 1360 
lift 78 Mar MV, 1239 
>3 to Sep IHft TTJR 
Wft TO Sec 188ft 1931 
*0 TP Jul 950 Rif 
(40 78 MOV Hi 1118 
lift TO OK 184. TLU 

12 71 Feb 9*ft 1286 

7TO170d Uft 1068 1181 838 

12 72 JM 91 7243 1264 

12ft 17 Od 7010 I1J8 1229 

uroitjaa ran urn utt 

70 TO AW -95 - XL*ft 1151 8.16 
1514 toMar HQ ft UX UZ 

u if pw raft 1115 iu 

14ft V Feb M4ftUM UB 

s it Jui tm ii47un asa 

W«J«. *7 U» 1885 
IgaTBOK . «ft. 1287 
700 74 Dec Mi 1147 
12 TO Jan IS IM 
IKVQd mft 1285 
IB 71 Jul IH 1066 
730 74 Nov Wl 1103 
17ft to AW NSft 1156 
n 16 Jul 180 raw 
12 17 Oct 181ft 1188 
TTXIIMar -ITte 1246 
UftTOMav 930 1287 
UteYBOd 990 UX 

1107] Fen 97ft 1269 

il 73 Mar 95ft 1187 1U4M47 
110 77 Fob 92ft 1181 IUI 
rate 79 AW 99 UM 
17 to Sep raft UR 
72ft 19 OK MW 1263 
120 to Mar *90 1252 



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sm Caca-Coio itdl Fhtaac 
SUO CocmCoto inti FtannC 
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SIM Comsat infl 
SX Conoco Euroftooncn 
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S1D0 Continental Greun O/S 
SU Continental GrouoO/x 
SIX conttawtediiflnots 
5180 Canttaentai minris 
SX CanttaanM Teleriioaa 
SM Corn Preducft Coe 
SX Cerntaa mtarnatlaml 

S7S Crodter /Wtona/ Sank 

SB CamndasO/s Ftaanoe 
SU C u ita i -H u mmer 
SOT Dade SavtanB Loan 


1U7 

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SIX Deer* J Credit 
SIM DteHriEositemanlO/i 
SIM DuvrOwtnlCOlO/S 
5200 Dow&emiCriO/t 
sx Dav Cwntae O/S 
SU Dresser O/s Ftaanoe 
sxa DuPantateCdpHal 
5 <80 DuPont Q/1 Capital 
S2M DuPantO/sCoPHai 
SIM DuPont 0/1 Coritri 
sso Duke Power OA Ftaonc 
SIM Eastman Kodrir Go 
S5B Eaten Ftaonea 
SIM Enmrdi Finance 
SX EsreQMFinann 

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SOT Mteln Loan Books 

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SHO FteWf 


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SUO Fort Motor 1 

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sm Gcoond Feeds Crad Co 
SX GriwrolMnisFdione* 
sm GenerriMilli foe 
sm Genial MenraAcoPl 

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SX General 6lolBrx O/i n 
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sot Gone o/s Fteonct . 
sm Gmaca/i Rnoaca 
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SIM Game O/s Ftaanoe 
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sm Gmac DA Finance 
SIM GnmcOA Ftaonc* 
sm Gmac OA Finance 
sns GraocOA Finance 
SXO Gmac OA Finance 
sm GamcOA Ftaonc* 

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550 GteFlnanra 
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SHO Gulf Ob FloanOr 
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>40 Gult State* 0<i Final, 

SM GrifStatesOA Ftaon 
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SXO I bnt Credit Core 
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5700 Ibm Credit Cora 
SXO Ibm Credit Cora 
SIM Ibm Credit DA X/w 
*280 ibm World Trade 
sx ic industrial 
SU tctodiBirrts 
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SIM tc tndsatritsxrw 
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>75 Ic Industries 
S58 IRtaatsPovrif Ftaonc 
StM lUlnetsPawK Ftaonc 
550 tnorrreUJtaad InO 
>115 tmi Harvester OA FI 
SU tattHarvesterOACa 
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su infl swaera Etecm 
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SJM Manutod Hanover X/w 
SMO MonataCtHtsmvertJi/s 
SOT Moreriod Hanover O/i 
SM Moonfod Hanover O/i 
SIM Matmtad Hanover 0/s 
175 McdangidsCorparallpi 
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*U Medoaaids Ftaonea Ce 
*75 Mcdana l ds Ftaonea Co 


11071 Od WI 11X9 

100 to Jun fift ran 
120 vam rank 1M3 
110 WOO 1010 1L19 
9ft Y2ADB 980 11 JO 
110 75 Feb 930 1286 
Ute 71 May X 12X8 

8 16 Feb toft R42I2X2 869 
TftTl Jon lift 12.11 np 938 
9016 Jul flft 1264 967 

lift TO Am, Mft R43 12J1 

9016 Jut 96 1363 lib 

150 ■»» mw na ram- vut 

■TO to Feb toft 1281 12J8 855 
iftetoSap Hite UM 16X6 
■Vito *60/ 91 IBM UM UT 

70ft WAPT flft 1627 1767 

ISft 71 DK- m 1256 U35 

8 17 Jun 94rt 70.91 7268 647 

UltVSra KD 12X5 I2J7 

1 17 MW 940 116* Rn 147 
70 71 Nov 97 8.11 769 

11075 Mw 92ft 1JJ1 1357 
llte TO Mw 1800 1149 1146 

I toDec 94te IU# 849 
9ft 74 Mm 87 aaiuaran 
8ft 16 Jun 97 1163 7109 Ul 

12ft If Od nx» 1362 12X1 

t3te17May 104ft 1161 UH 

UfttoDK 183 IU 

Uft TO Aim M40 1264 
llte 75 Jan ra 1158 

Uft TO Aw 184ft UH 
Wft 75 Mor 93 1U9 

130 TO Jon 10M 13.11 
[IftTOMay N 085 

9 ISSra 9914 185)1153 U7 

D toMar 97 11X11X9 tn 

8 56 Nov lift M39 1851 869 

>1 78 Fab 97 11J3 1U4 

>1 19 Dec 95te aw 

lift 71 Dec 9*0 1267 

UU.19 Jul 7B7ft tZXl 
72te If May 99TO 12X3 
1* tosan nm mi 
llte 78 Feb *7te u.99 


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(Continued on Page 8) 


..DK 98 12X2 1264 

ft toMar 960 1165 1834 

6ft 70 Frb 970 7.18 448 

n to AW W >150 DR 

80 VAua 97 I2I4I1X2 9R 

raro-pod in. nx 
14017 AW 182ft U13 
U TO May W4ft 1251 
RTOtoJon IDOft UR 
90 to Jut 91 M.97 

u to Jul raite IUI 

15 UMOV »ita 1X54 

12 170d HI 11X4 

I2ft to Frb Hite RH 

U to Feb 110 11X6 

14ft to Aim W#te 1241 

15 TO May I860 1152 

Wft 70 Feb toft 11X6 

UteTOOd 990 1153 
12ft 17 Jun m 12X6 
60 74 Dec tote 7X1 
llte 75 Mw 93 1154 

UftTOOm 1810 1267 
150 to Jun Wlft 14JH 
Q 17 Aw 980 1260 
♦TOW Jut 93ft 12MIUIH54 
15ft 72 Aw I WTO *52 RUf 
WtoNov 97 1829)899 851 

UteTOOd Milk 1154 lira 
WAT4DK 91te 1169. 

17ft 18 Od IBSft 1561 UJ 

M to Aar 104. Mil UH 

13 UMu UB 1299 12* 

Oft 19 Mar ftro 1253 726! 

StetoJon 97 173 UR IB 

UteWApr rank «6» „«£ 

70 17 NOV 94ft H6* H56 828 
TW- TOMar 96 HR IlH 

IS toDec W2TO 0*1 UR 

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Eurobonds • DM Bonds • Schuldscheine 
for dealing prices call 





. 7 m; 5r fee- 


dOsseldorf 


Wwlrieu tsche Laretebank. HOT Offices, RO. Box D28. 4000 Ousseldorf 1 
10x1 Sa,88: Taeptone 826 3122/8 26 3741 

Telex 8 581 881/8 581 882 


London 


'5* ^ 

Y* 1'S* '455 

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Wastdeutsche Landesbank. 41. Moorgate. London EC2R 6AE/UK 
Telephone 6386141 - Telex 887 984 ^ 




UBgwhgfl 


WestLB Interrational S.A^ 32-34. boulevard Grande- Du chesse ChartoCa. 
Luxembourg. lefephone 44741-43 - Telex 1678 


S ' < 

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Hong Kong 


Westdeutsehe Landesbank. BAIbwer. 36th Floor. 12 Harcourt Road 
Hong Kong. Telephone 5-8420288 -1816x75142 HX 


Marketmakers in Deutschmark Bonds W©St I R 

ieutsche Landesbank 


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MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 


ED STATES^ IS 

T ' W * r * {j^Sfc. - 
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In. lfc 

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mooes 

Inonce 

jnws, 

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EUROBONDS 


ha as 

1 . -Sitar 5i hS 


Move to Cut U.S. Deficit 
Is Good News to Investors 


H§ vs 

ftwo? ■£-.?= 

's.ti.w ■* ' 'o 1 

KS" 1 ip-lj 

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ll ’jsw & ii long-term Treasury bonds 

T R dropped 12 basis points and For WmJc Endwf April 3 

'o-I 4 q jj£. v *£" !T W short-term yields slipped 4 UAS to form, mt*f Inst. 1Z06 % 

k X * basis points. (One hundred *«* lnd -,— * 

,J '■'>■’ £■ (Ji ’ . UiSj j rn^jiufy, | Wm# Ind. _ 12.13 % 

3 'S'I basts points equals one per- cons medium term aw % 

%‘? J W &■'» cemage point) French Fr. medium lerm 1142% 

!*•*£ £‘5. The news also buoyed the «•*«« nudium i»rm — 11.11 % 

•f. 1*4? n nAir.!, r - _ r__ Van medium lerm. Inll Inst. 7.13% 

V? 1 !# &.‘y dollar, which set a high for Y «n ig term, urn inst. 7.13 % 

*•:!!? the week at 3.18 Deutsche ecu short term 9J» % 

»?£?« i- 5» 1 marks before closing at 3.16 ECU metnum term 9JB % 

!■ 'sfi Jr* : i DM. ECU lono tenin 9 - w * 

S 4 w ’J u ■ EUA long term 9.T2 % 

IS *;=; fft Tbe e»ph«>na was tern- flx ib term, urn Inst. — 1043 % 

!-iucb Si -j pered by the fact that the flx medium term - 10 . 19 % 

rii budget still must be ap- Cofcvkrfd ay m# UawmotK/rs Stock Ex- 

gs proved by Congress. The VT", _ 

!!;5SP 9^ni outcome is by no means cer- Market Turnover 

?. jgS ?'g.- tain. In addition, even if the far. Woofc Ended April 4 

J^-waS ^-k'- cuts are enacted they may 

i ?r jlj come too late to head off a _ Ta,0, DoUor h< w i »°j* , 9 

fr-Sfc'S-isI C * de ' 1148640 9447.10 2439 JO 

renewed increase in interest Euroetear 2Z362 joi94boso 2421 to 

rates. This could result if the — 

pace of the economic expansion heats up and credit demand runs 
into conflict with the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy. . 

At present, however, the progress on plans to cut the deficit — 
which bond markets view as putting the greatest upward pressure 
on interest rates — should be good news for the Eurodollar bond 
market 

Two aggressively priced issues were launched late last week for 
Union Pacific and General Reinsurance. Both companies, whose 
domestic debt is rated double-A. are offering SI 00 millio n of 
seven-year bonds carrying coupons of 1 116 percent 
In contrast to recent Eurodollar offerings, which were priced to 
yield investors more than comparably dated Treasury paper, the 
new issues were brought to market at an all-in cost (including 
front-end commissions) of 10 basis points below Treasury’ yields. 

G IVEN the demonstrated reluctance of international inves- 
tors to make new commitments in dollar bonds — even to 
issues yielding more than Treasuries — the terms were 
widely regarded as outrageously aggressive. This was reflected in 
the warp decline in the price of the new issues, which were 
offered at par. Union Pacific was quoted at 9714 and Genoa! 
Reinsurance at 96ft. discounts well outside the total commissions 
and representing a significant loss for underwriters. 

To put the terms in some perspective, the recent triple-A-rated 
Canadian government five-year notes carrying a coupon of 1 1ft 
percent ended the week at 99ft. * 

Meanwhile, South Africa — a rare, albeit unpopular name — 
tapped, the market for $75 njilliork. offering six-year, 12ft-percent 
paper at a discount of -99ft for a yield of 12.62 percent. . , . 

Overall, the' market: registered Ji, dear interest in non-dollar 
alternatives — going so far as to accept the Spiith African rand, 
making its first appearance ip the international market. South' 
Africa’s Electricity Supply Commission made a private place- 
ment of 50 million rand of Eve-year notes carrying a coupon of 16 
percent Tins was sold almost exclusively to investors in West 
Germany. 

With the rand, and recently the Danish kroner and the Austra- 
lian and New Zealand dollars attracting investors, it was hardly 
surprising that the French would decide to reopen the Eurofranc 
market 

Gaz de France this week is scheduled to offer 500 million 
francs of 15-year retractable bonds — meaning that every five 
years holders will have the option, to Tequest redemption. 

Continental bankers said they were confident there was inter- 
est in the franc in the Benelux countries but the big question was 
whether the terms would be pitched high enough to woo inves- 
tors. On Thursday, with domestic five-year government paper 
(Continued on Page 9, Col 1) 


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Markets Qosed 


Most European and Asian financial markets will be closed Monday for 
Easter Monday. However, Singapore and Tokyo markets will be open, as 
will North American markets. 


Last Week’s Markets 

AO figures are as of dose of trading Friday 


Stock Indexes 


United States 

LestWK. PravjM. 

,DJ Indus L2SMJ5 UAU1 

DJ Util 15183 tS&m 

DJ Treats— 5W.79 AOOfl 

Si P 100 17445 176,14 

S& P500 179X0 UKL66 

NVSECP— 1(071 10450 


ravjwk. . Cti-Bs 
1266JB —OA3% 
15301 +050% 
6(006 —2.16% 
176,14 —085% 
16066 —091% 
>0450 —096% 


Money Rates 

United States 

Discount rota 

Federal funds role 

Prim* rot* 


Swa?: PraJuntW/BatUr Sucurtaes. 


FT5E 100__ 137300 
FT 30 96100 

Hong Kong 

HansSma. I471J85 


127630 +013% 
96500 —039% 


138204 +045% 


: . 1 ^ S . !-■ 111 — — 

|-: r i • NBckelDJ— 11627.10 1150076+007% 


: . ir.'s" 4 z- 

N ;: c p ; ; 

••-i « .1 




Cocnnterzbk 1,19470 1.16090 +1.17% 

Sam: Janas CaeHia»Ltt0n. 


Dteawil i 

CoUmoner 

60day Interbank 


Lombard 600 600 

Overnight 500 505 

1 -month Interbank— 500 605 

Britan 

Bank base rote 13 13 

Coilmoney 13 13 

3-month Interbank „ 133/16 13V* 

■ ' ' -j sannmBs aT- — -■vra i 

Dolhr La*twt prwjm. cm* 

8k Enel Index M NA MU» — % 

Gold 

London run. fix. S 31675 32VJ25 —300% 
Mnwfwtfdda Sure O/aueUtva James CaptL 


Currency Rates 


iidscheine 


aSS^ 1 


Late interbank rates on April 4/5, exdadng fees. 

Official firings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 
4 PM 



% 

c 

OM. 

PJ. 

ILL. 

(Hdr. 

■J. 

SJ. 

Yen 


1561 

4302 

11202" 

36.97" 

0.1772* 

— 

1614 • 

13128 "14016 V 

Bruuetota) 

6X4975 

7655 

20J2S 

bjn 

3.1523 * 

1704 

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2X77 2503* 

Franltfnt 

1156 

3604 

— 

32.76' 

13675 X 

B&62* 

4371 * 

1 1181 "11425* 

London (b) 

1JV55 

. 

3794 

110811 

£40090 

47745 

76.175 

371 303755 

JMHan 

£019.20 

£41000 

£37.25 

209.16 

— 

567.10 

31044 

74900 

7097 

MnrYark(e) 



1705 

116 

9035 

201080 

3567 

4X59 

2665 25400 

Pam 

9A35 

11417 

10529 


4083 X 

2706 

11171" 

3396 3793- 

Tokyo 

254725 

30576 

0150 

3637 

1207 * 

7131 

40044* 

9SJ0 

Zurich 

£6725 

37257 

84775* 

27355’ 

01331" 

7S08* 

471" 

14524 * 

1BCU 

07086 

05878 

12353 

AJB25 

1^22.1* 

’.W 

449*648 

10941 179.987 

1 SOR 

0962111 

0814354 

309954 

946264 

177462 

30973 

623616 

20267 249907 


VTrhDMtft® - 


04407 AatraHanl 
00456 AadrMnscklMM 
00156 B«WaaftR.lranc 
0726 meadlwS 
oont omnium 
0.1544 FloBbli BMftta 
00074 GratkOrecftoa 
01262 Horn Kona l 


Dollar Values 

Eqnlv. COTT ” Cy i 
1004 I rtf* I 

00011 liraafl ib*fc*l 8 

1X58 ICnaltUDiiar 0 

07967 Mabrr. rtnwdt 2 

o.ini Harw.kma 9 

0445 PW.W 1 

coon Pert.otetm l 

02772 Soodl rival 2 


* Currmcv ^* r 
East*. UAS 

04499 Sbeaaaraf - 2.7778 
0517 OAfneoarowf 1,9571 
00012 5. Karen won 85700 
00058 5m,Wttta 17375 
0.1095 SMd.knaa VJ3 
0JES3 Tatwonl 39J9 
00142 TU baht 27635 
02722 UJLE.fStrham 36735 


tiS 


osMiw:ian6iiWtc 

|aj COrtmwnlal franc IM Amounts flooded to Uuyonepouid (c) Amnums tw*d«i to ouv am tuiar (* | 
Units of 1H <*) U'dtsoflOOO Cy> Uadiof IftOOO 

tub nor auoted; NJL: natavaflaUt. _ 

Souran; Sanaa* db Seneftnr (Brussels}; Banco Commentate VMfot «r (M/Hm): Sanaa* 
National* tie Parts (Parts); IMF (SOKJ; Banaue AnstK e! Internal bmrfe tflrmstkacmenT 
{dinar, rival, ttthom J. «h*r date from Reuters onaAP. 


Reralb^gribunc, 

BUSINESS'/ FINANCE 


Page 7 


\ — 

Intmpremuring ’: A Corporate Can-Do Theory Study Questions 


By CARL GE WIRTZ 

InlawuwraJ Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — ^ Drift in the bond markets — as investors clung 
to the sidelines awaiting some clue as to where interest 
and foreign exchange rates were headed — evaporated 
with dramatic suddenness late last week. 

The spark was the report from Washington that the Reagan 
administration and Senate Republicans had agreed on cuts to 
trim the projected federal budget deficit by about S300 billion 
over the next three fiscal years. 

The news came too late to affect the Eurobond market, which 
had already closed for the Easier holiday, but sparked a rally in 

New York where yields on ■■■■ ■ 

long-term Treasury bonds Eurobond Yields 


By Eric N. Berg 

jVrx' York Times Serwe 

NEW YORK - For years, 
management gurus have argued 
that enirqjreneur&hip would be 
the panacea for the U.S. econo- 
my’s competitive ills. Now, a the- 
ory has come onto the U.S. busi- 
ness scene that, if not questioning 
the conventional wisdom, cer- 
tainly casts it in a different light. 

The theory goes by varying 
terms: corporate entrepreneur- 
ship, corporate venturing, “intra- 
pr to airship.” But they all convey 
the same idea: Lhai employees 
can be entrepreneurs while work- 
ing for large companies. 

The idea appears to be catch- 
ing on. In December, the presi- 
dent’s Commission on Industrial 
Competitiveness issued a report 
on entrepreneurship with an en- 
tire section devoted to intrapren- 
eurship. Since that, articles men- 
tioning the subject have appeared 
in the Sloan Management Review 
and the Harvard Business Re- 
view. A number of companies, 
including International Business 
Machines Corp. and General 
Motors Corp., have established 
small, separate business units to 
foster intrapreneurship. 

Late in February, moreover, a 
book titled “Intrapreneuring” 
was published. According to its 
publisher, Harper & Row, it is 
already a best-seller in certain 
major markets. 

“Intrapreneurship is hot be- 
cause entrepreneurship is hot," 
said R. Donald Gamache, presi- 
dent of Innotech Corp., a Trum- 
bull, Connecticut, consultant spe- 
cializing in innovation. Zen as 
Block, a professor of manage- 
ment at New York University 
who teaches a course on corpo- 
rate entrepreneurship, said, “Me- 
dia publicity given to private en- 
trepreneurship has been 
considerable, and that has had a 


Intrapreneurs at Three Major Companies 


Reagan Proposal 
On Oil Reserves 


3M: Spencer 
Silver, left, and 
Arthur Fiy, 
developers of 
Post-1 t-Notes. 


Hewlett-Packard: Charles H. 
House, whose video tube was 
used to monitor a space flight. 


__ 


Texas Instruments: From left. Gene Frantz. Richard 
Wiggins, Paul Breedlove and Larry Brantingham, 
with their electronic learning device, Speak-u-SpelL 


major impact on large corpora- 
tions.” 

Indeed, the conspicuous suc- 
cess of such entrepreneurs as Ste- 
ven P. Jobs, chair man of Apple 
Computer Inc., and William 
Gates, chairman and chief execu- 
tive of Microsoft Corp., a com- 
puter software company — con- 
firming that you can still strike it 
rich on your own — has piqued 
the interest of big companies 
wanting to be intrapreneuriai, 
too, management specialists say. 

Intrapreneurship is also getting 
a welcome ear because, the spe- 


cialists say, managers are tired of 
losing their most talented em- 
ployees to more freewheeling 
start-ups. Employees, in turn, see 
intrapreneurship as a way to in- 
ject excitement and urgency into 
otherwise dull jobs. 

“Many people in older- style 
organizations fed under-recog- 
nized and that rewards aren't 
commensurate with achieve- 
ment,’' said Rosa be th Kanter. an 
authority on organizational 
change. “The idea that, yes, you 
can take action inside large com- 
panies — that you can run your 




Uw Now Yoric Tunai 

own show — is very appealing.” 

Intrapreneurship is not new. 
For years such companies as 
Control Data Corp., Minnesota 
Mining & Manufacturing Co., 
Hewlett-Packard Inc. and Texas 
Instruments Inc. have encour- 
aged employees to chase their 
dreams by giving them the mon- 
ey, equipment and time to pursue 
personal ideas as company pre- 
lects. 

It was an employee’s project at 
3M, for instance, that led to the 
development of Post-It-Notes, 
(Continued on Page li, CoL 5) 


By Lee A. Daniels 

JVeH- York Tima Service 

NEW YORK - A Reagan ad- 
ministration proposal to temporar- 
ily delay completion of the Strate- 
gic Petroleum Reserve may set 
back the United States’s ability to 
withstand an oil shortage, accord- 
ing to a study by the General Ac- 
counting Office. 

The study, which has not been 
released to the public, is the first 
independent examination of the 
possible effects of the proposal to 
stop filling the reserve when it 
reaches 489 million barrels at the 
end of September. 

The reserve was begun in the 
mid- 1 970s to create a 90-day emer- 
gency supply of oil to protect the 
country against a shortage. 

The proposed moratorium was 
incorporated into the deficit-reduc- 
tion package agreed to Thursday 
by the president and the Senate 
Republican leadership. 

The current appropriation for 
the reserve is 51.7 billion. The re- 
serve now holds about 466 million 
barrels and is supposed to reach 
750 million by 1990. Of the re- 
serve's six sites, two are full, three 
are partly filled and one is under 
construction. 

The study by the GAO, the in- 
vestigative arm of Congress, does 
not make formal recommenda- 
tions. It says, though, that “serious 
consideration” should be given to 
continuing to build the reserve's 
storage facilities and instituting an 
oil-purchase policy that would flue- 
mate depending on prices. 

William A Vaughn, the Depart- 


Bank of England’s Move AT&T Rivals Seek More Competitive Rules 

r I - __ Hew York Times Service municationS Co mmissi on, MCI assignment prOCCSS is at North- 

ff myiirio f if-jhfg) §\gyjft /"fl/lTI WASHINGTON — The main Communications Corp., GTE western Bell Telephone Co. 

MJM %Arvl/& JLtt/i&MZ M. ItJilA/I/II/l 1/ rivals of American Telephone & Sprint Communications Coro, and It has beam a program under 


Hew York Times Service municationS Co mmissi on, MCI assignment prOCCSS is at 

WASHINGTON — The main Communications Corp., GTE western Bell Telephone Co. 
rivals of American Telephone & Sprint Communications Corp. and It has b< 


is at North- 


It has begun a program under 


By Carl Gewirrz 

Iruemaiwnal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The initial reaction to 
the Bank of England's Iong-await- 


Telegraph Co. have recommended Aunet Co mmunica tions Services which customers who do not make 
adering their own arrangements major changes in the process by Inc. said the current long-distance a long-distance choice are assigned 
with respect to this business.” which Americans select a primary selection process was unfair. They randomly to long-distance compa- 
Bat no others immediately fd- long-distance telephone company' said it favored AT&T because, in nies in the same proportion as 
lowed- and banking supervisors in U enacted across the United nearly all cases, customers who those who did make a choice. 


edmove to temper the accelerating Washington, Tokyo, Bolin, and States the changes could help 
^ „r. e _r Luxembourg said no such moves smaller companies compete with 


growth of underwritten Euronote 
facilities last week was a yawn. 
The rapid expansion of the mar- 


wexe imminent 

Thus, the yawn. Commercial: 


at&t. 

/In filings with the Federal Corn- 


said it favored AT&T because, in nies in the same proportion as 
nearly til cases, customers who those who did make a choice, 
failed to choose a long-distance AT&T’s rivals say they would have 
carrier were automatically assigned a far higher market share if that 
to AT&T. approach were adopted throughout 

The exception to the automatic the United States. 


mem of Energy's assistant secre- 
tary for fossil energy, told a House 
committee last month that a nearly 
20-percem decline in petroleum 
imports since 1977 has reduced the 
need to follow the original schedule 
for completing the reserve. 

But Representative Mike Synar, 
Democrat of Oklahoma, chairman 
of the House Subcommittee on En- 
vironment, Energy and Natural 
Resources, as well as other critics 
of the administration proposal, 
challenged that view. 

Mr. Synar said the GAO study 
shows that a moratorium would 
simply delay spending for the re- 
serve, ultimately making it more 
expensive to complete. 

The study, setting a basic five- 
year maintenance cost for the re- 
serve at $828 milli on, said addition- 
al costs for completing the facilities 
would range from nothing under 
the Reagan proposal to S53S mil- 
lion for the completed reserve. 

The total cost of a storehouse 
with 750 million barrels is estimat- 
ed at $24 billion; $16.7 billion has 
already been spent on the reserve^ 


California Bank 
Forced to dose 

Reuters 

WASHINGTON —The fail- 
ure of Capistrano National 
Bank in San Juan Capistrano, 
California, has been announced 
by the Federal Deposit Insur- 
ance Corp., which said its liabil- 
ities were being assum ed by an- 
other bank. 

FDIC officials said Friday 
that it was the 22d bank failure 
in the United States this year 
and the third in California. 

The FDIC said the failed 
bank's liabilities were being as- 
sumed by Farmers & Mer- 
cian ts Bank Of Tong Rearih, 
California, which took over 
about $41 milli on in 8,900 de- 
posit accounts and other liabil- 
ities and agreed to pay the 
FDIC a purchase premium of 
$3.05 milli on. 


A MW 1MWIV Vrtl/M iM IVU Vi U1V IIIUI 1 1 . a m m 

ket is assuniedtobe closely linked ban J cr l ^ ^ (xr ‘ 

to the fact that the underwriting m Britain, tinady as- 


SYNDICATED LOANS 

commitments of banks do not show 


sign their own internal weightings 
to such business — meaning the 
new ruling will not dramatically 
effect the willingness or ability ‘of 
UX banks to take on new busi- 


up on thor balance sheets (at least mss. As for the foreign banks in 
not until the underwriters are Britain, they can escape the control 
railed on to provide funds) whde altogether by booking the business 
the fees immediately generate prof- m any of their other offices, 
its which can be rued to boost ram- Hus raises the question of why 

ial and improve the critical capital- the Bank of England acted alone 
to-assets ratio that bank examiners London has always been the center 
wa “ L of the market and in the nearly 

To slow this “free ride,” the three decades of the market's exis- 
Bank of England said that it would tence the Bank of England has al- 
asagn a weighting to such off-bti- ways steadfastly resisted calls to 
ance-sheet items to assure that a impose controls, arguing that un- 
bank’s capital was adequate to its less the measures were applied 
commitments. The weighting will worldwide regulations would only 
be half the weighting given to a drive banks to do business in those 
straightforward loan to a nonfinan- centers where no such rules were 
dal institution and more than dou- applied. 


blethe2wi 
made to am 
This will 
business of 


fi ring given to a loan But official sources make dear 
er bank. that opposition related to different 

riy to the worldwide issues — name&y monetary controls 
itish banks and the aimed at preventing offshore finan- 


UX operations of foreign banks, dal operations from derailing do- 
The bank also announced it had mestic policy objectives. This is 
discussed the move with banking quite different from the prudential 


discussed me move wim na n Kin g quire omereni rrom me prudential 
authorities in the other leading fi- controls that the Bank of England 
nandal centers “who are also con- (Continued on Page 9, CoL 1) 

'All-Frills’ Regent Air Corp. 
Posts Loss of $4.4 Milli on 


An International Conference 
Organized By 

Plant Location International 
In Cooperation With 
The International Herald Tribune 

The Investment Climate 
And Incentives in Europe 

April 25-26, 1985, Brussels 

The conference will provide senior executives with an in-depth analysis of the current 
and future investment climate and the incentives offered in sixteen 
European countries. Question and answer periods will follow each session. 


Thursday, April 25, 1985 

Chairman. Christiania Bank Oslo, Austria: Mr. ( 


The Associated Press fo unding 2ft years ago 10 $39.1 

LOS ANGELES — Regent Air million. 

Corp H which bills itself as the “all- J. Roger Faherty, Regem’s chair- 
frills” airline, announced losses of man and president, blamed the 
S4.4 million in the fourth quarter losses on “a combination of exces- 
and of S21J million for all of 1984. sive operating costs and of operat- 
Tbe Los Angeles-based carrier “SJ “ *■“ passeraer levels 
also said Friday that it expects a substantially below the break-even 
loss of about $3.2 million in this e X? L . .. 

year’s first quarter. That would “«« ■“ 512 "d- 


Nonvay: Mr. V. Hveding, Chairman. Christiania Bank Oslo, 
former Minister of Energy. 

Denmark: Mr. M. Osterganrd, Managing Director, Industrial 
Development Council of North Jutland. 

Belgium: Baron A. Bekaert, President, Bekaert N.V. 

The Netherlands: Mir. AAM. van Agt, Commissioner 
of the Queen, Governor of N. Brabant Province, former 
Prime Minister. 

Guest luncheon speaker. Prof. Dr. P. Mathijsen, 

Director General of The EC Regional Policies. 


Austria: Mr. G. I. Gam, General Manager, I CD. former General 
Manager, General Moiras Vienna. 

Switzerland: Mr. Carl Meyer, Vice-President Finance, 

Swiss Asuag-SSIH. 

Sweden: Mr. IC Lewenhaupt, The Wyatt 
Company AB. 

Luxembourg: Mr. Z. Magnus, General Manager, 

Kredietbonk, Luxembourg. 


lasted by Minister of Brussels, Mr. P. Hauy. 


bring Regent’s total loss since its ^ <&*: 

^ a ting for only about 2ft months of 


( Continental Gets 
London Route 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON - The 
U.S. Department of Transpor- 
tation has approved Continen- 
tal Airlines to fly a direct route 
between Houston and London, 
airline officials said. The airline 
said Friday it plans to begin 
daily service April 28, providing 
it receives the necessary clear- 
ances. 

It will be Continental's first 
service to Europe. Continental 
with main hubs in Houston and 
Denver, has expanded its inter- 
national network to 28 cities. 
The carrier also has requested 
authority to fly nonstop be- 
tween Tokyo and Texas. 

Continental filed for protec- 
tion from creditors under feder- 
al bankruptcy laws in 1983 and 
began a reorganization. The 
carrier reported a $30-nuHion 
profit last year. 


1983, so comparable revenue fig- 
ures aren’t available. 

Regent operates three Boeing 
727s that were stripped down and 
remodeled to carry 34 passengers in 
luxury, rather than the usual 120 
passengers carried by those plane. 
The Los Angeles-New York flights 
offer haute cuisine, spacious 
lounges, six staterooms and private 
secretaries. 

Regent charges $785 for a one- 
way flight, slightly higher than nor- 
mal firat-dass seats on regular air- 
lines. It is about half of what 
Regent first charged, but it attract- 
ed few customers at the hig her 
prices. Regent has about 15 passen- 
gers per flight. 

Initially, Regent hired another 
company to operate its planes be- 1 
cause the founders, Clifford ant) 
Stuart Perlman, were unable to get 
an operating license due to allega- 
tions that they had links to orga- 
nized crime. 

The Perlmans sold last year to 
Mr. Faherty, a New York invest- 
ment banker. He got the company 
out from under the costly charted 
arrangement, and Regent now CHes 
its own planes under a temporary 
license. 


France: Mr. J. Paul Home, Senior Econormst Smith Barney, 
Harris Upham & Co. 

West Germany: Mr. B. Layton, former President, Ford Europe. 
Portugal: Mr. E Lopez, Minister of Finance. 

Spain: Don Ftenelfr?s„ General Assistant Di rec t or 
of Economic Planning. Ministry of Economics. 

Guest luncheon speaker Mr. W. Martens, Prime Minister 
of Belgium. 


Friday, April 26, 1985 

umey, Italy: Dr. Gianni Varasi, President of the Federation of 
the Chemical Industiy, Italy. 

Euro P e - Greece: Mr. S. Papadsimhiou, Deputy Governor, Heflenique 
Industrial Development Bank. 

United Kingdom: Sir Edwin Nixon, President, IBM (UX). 
er Ireland: Mr. L. P. Doyle, General Manager, Allied Irish 

Banks Limited Europe. 


r:-: i;-;: *r; . 

h'Keamto: TittftudnifcliQ^^ Rue Rebate 250. 

&£*■ J81 Awe. CSmfcs-ifcGacaks;^^! NfeuafyGWa; France. r : .TCOOSnsseb, BdgaiaiT&i 62-2194640. Tdex: 61871. . 

T QU««d* riulnllnn itfvrTitii^nmbhV m rlv Mii i i i am n’ ' - ''-‘Portirirfaiftm 115'tT t¥YI wrr mvnUi>ln asiinn 


First Name — ...... — — 

Position 

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Postal Code - City - 

Phone Ida 

8 

VATMr (companies in Rrigtirm) - - - 


tfraude dS&crfhkh^|Tst wffibe<torgedthc fuHIee. 

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accommodation form 


iiiiiHHiiMiRimiRBnnuisi 














International Bond Prices - Week of April 4 

Provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.: 01-623-1277 

Prices may vary to market condition* and otbex factors. 



Middle Aw 
Mel Price Mot LKeCurr 


(Continued from Page 1 


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1548 Prudential Realty Sec 

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ins Revlon Inti Finance 
19 Reynolds Metals Euroo 
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19 Rtchardson-MeyreU 
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S9 Soon Oft Finance 
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SKO Soars O/s Finance 
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STS South Colltam Edison 
STS South Cal Hum Etfton 
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19 south Cal from Gas 
SM South Cafflom Gai 
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SUN Sperry Curoam 
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sim Tonneco mn Mav 
19 Tonneco Inti 
S 9 Tentnco Inti Nov 
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3308 Texaco CopBal 
119 Texaco Canttol 
ISO Texaco CaoBal 
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S19 Texts instrueneiits iru 
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s Transca Inti 
550 Tramcnlntt 
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S9 TraMoceanGhflOU 
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yuan Tn. Inc 

320 TrwO/4 Finance 
150 Uw O/i Finance 
STD Union Cano* O/s Flnanc 
sue union Cannae o/s 
59 Union OB I nil Flnanc 


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12ft 94 Dec 
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9 '84 Aoa 
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■*■84 Jul 

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n% 12 Feb 
MVESJnl 
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IBft 10 Mav 
lift 10 No* 
14% V Sep 
12% 11 Oct 
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15 19 Sep 
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>fe 17 Jui 

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1» 1157 145* 

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IHb IMF 
194 14.17 

77 1157 

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106 15X7 

77ft 1U1 1111 923 
H2fe 14X9 1545 

H4 1425 
155ft 1342 
103ft 1173 
aw nil 
9914 12U 
99% 7.15 
93 10X3 1225 AH 

IM 1425 UU 
Tlfe 1141 K21 

105% 1247 13X0 

91 723 4X6 

m nxz Tom 
100 1232 1238 

10914 941 1X47 

99% I1J0 UXD 
7TVJ 1238 14X4 045 
95% 1M2 IUT 

99 90 TJ4 859 

un aw uxs 
9vft iixs rc.rj 

91% 6X5 4» 

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93% 11X7 1L33 

W MW 1055 
88% 1225 1141 

97ft 11.95115811.98 
100ft 1101 TOO T2 jM 

95 W5t 1121 7X9 

102ft T1JS 1144 
82 1421 1443 742 

93 1421 12» 

W% 11X4 1U7 

583ft 1436 15X4 

lent lixT 1241 

9Bft MJ4MX* 8X1 
95ft 1238 12JM 
101% T245 13X1 

Hft 1351 TZ58 «W 
97 11J512X9 — 


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11X7 

ms 

12.18- 

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1141 

1263 

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110 

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1651 


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96% 134 18X1 

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98 1250 1337 

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103 1445 15X5 

154 1346 1442 

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74ft 1048 1105 A99 
93ft 1857 11.14 8X5 
N 11W 1AM 

96% 724 4X5 

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104ft 1351 1340 

97ft 110 1128 

N 1146 1246 851 
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92 1323 842 

105 1158 T3X2 

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1142 




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99 1879 18X1 9W 

97 1141 1142 125 

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96ft 1127 TOT 90 
lDDft DJ4 U24 1843 

98 TOO 11X9 

ID 1428 1460 

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Middle Aw 
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WeHs Fargo inWFha 
Wells Forge Inti Flno 
Wtreraoe uie r Capital 
Wtvertmvser Cepihl 
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11% W Sea 
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1114S*" 1 

8 t7Mar 
13ft H7 Oct 
12ft WANT 
5* V Nov 
WftlOFeb 
nib 11 Sop 
12% 11 Dec 
15 VS*a 
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nftHNav 
12% 87 Oct 
14 VAao 


113 10X2 1141 

inft iixs n.19 

97% 70 478 

<n iuo 110 

Hft 1128 1281 847 
KOft 1121 7322 

707 770 EM 

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102ft 1224 IIM 

91 015 1288 

101 1341 140 

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101 1149 un 

102 12X7 1133 


DM STRAIGHT BONDS 


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dm 300 
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AUSTRALIA 

Australia 7 H7Feb 

Australia BftVOcl 

Australia t 18 Sep 

ssffi Sfs 

Australia 7% 12 Nov 

Australia tftUJai 

fcSaile 714 14 Nov 

Australian led Dev Co A%-g7Nav 

Counted Invest Eenme 7%«Jun 

Homersfev Iron Fin MJ V Jut 

Mount lie Ftnanai ™2?° r 

Mouni Isa Flnaace 7% 12 Aw 

Papua New GUneo MtSJut 

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Rural radisfriei Bank ftftWAuo 

AUSTRIA 


Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austrian Control Bonk 
Austrian Control Bank 
Austrian Control Ban* 
Austrian Cttdral Bank 

Austria* Contra! Bank 

Austrian Cantrai Bonk 

Austrian Control Bar* 
Austrian Central Bonk 
Austrian Central B«k 
Austrian Central Bank 
Austrian Central Bank 

Austrian Control Bm* 
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Genasnn Zenrraflnnk 


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T 17 Fefi 
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8% 12 Od 

0 13Jul 
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11 -SkOct 
9% 16 DOC 

1 TFP 
f sr May 

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OU 12 Jul 

7 H7 Feb 
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9ft 13 All, 

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UB 

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103% 

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112ft 

186% 

100ft 

101 % 

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50 5X7 6X6 
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60 1.15 

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7X7 7.16 

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7.18 7J7 60 

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70 70 844 
60 7X5 4X5 


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dm KM Beigsfedric Fbmce 


lOftWJun TOB 
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5X9 529 6X7 
741 70 

60.70 4.14 
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6X3 70 ATI 
684 70 6J9 
674 70 5X5 
7X7 878 

819 70 M3 
5.17 5.10 10 
8X5 70 840 
7.10 738 1X4 


CANADA 


dm 298 
dm TOO 
dm wo 

dm 180 

dm WO 

anion 
dm H)0 
dm u# 
dm 200 

dm 209 

dm» 

dm 10 

dm in 

dm WO 

dm 100 
ann 
dm 10 
dm 100 
dm 100 
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dm 100 

dm 100 
dm 100 
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dm 2oe 

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dm 190 

dm 100 
dm too 
drain 

dm loo 

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dm 150 

dm WO 
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dm 200 

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dm 10 


Canada 
Atr Canada 
Ah’ Canada 
Amen Inti 
Brtaan Inti 
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Export Develop Cara 

Manitoba Hvdra-tQeetr 
Manitoba Province 

Manitoba Province 

Mootrsfll CBy 

Montreal ahr 

Montreal CBy 

Montreal as* 

Montreal CHv 
New Bruaswtck Provtnc 
Newioundland Province 
Newftwndkmd Pravhct 

NesriounOond Pravbtee 

Nova Sadia Power 
Novo Scotia Province 
Ontario Hvdro-Electr 

Oatorto Hydro-Oear 
Ontario Hydni-Electr 
Ontario Province 

Quebec Hydro 

Quebec Hydra 

Quebec Hydro 

Quebec Hydro 
Quebec Hvdra-Electric 

Quebec Hydroelectric 
Quebec Hydro-Electric 
Quebec Hydro-E Metric 

Quebec Hydro-Electric 

Quebec PravlDca 

Quebec Pro* Vice 

Quebec Prarincs 
Quebec Province 

Quebec Province 

Quebec Province 

Quabsc Province 


IV. -8? AW 185% 
9 12 Aug ms 
7H13Jun 101 
SfellDec wr% 
■ft 18 Oct Wife 
7 Iff Mov 99ft 
6ft moo 99ft 
wtgjjun 99% 
7ft 71 May in 
7ft 14 00 Wife 
■ft -U Jot 100ft 
7 17 Jul 100ft 
7 VAN 99* 

6 125*0 95% 

5% 13 JU1 97ft 
6%¥Nov 99Vt 
9 16 Aufl 99% 
6ft *87 Nov 109 
6ft *0 Aw raw. 

7 97 Dec K0 
7% 16 d»c nn 
7ft is Dec inn 
6ft 17 Jan 99% 
6ft 0 MW KOft 

6 17 SeP 91ft 
7ft 19 Mav Wlft 
10% 11 Dec 112% 

8 13 Feb 184% 

7% 14 May 100% 
I 16 Sea 102 
6ft 97 Aw 99ft 
6ft 97 AoB 99ft 
6% 17 Dec 99 
6ft 18 Mor W1 
7ft 17 Feb 103% 
7% 17 Jun ram 
6ft 17 Jul «9ft 

6 go May 97 
7ft 11 Aw 100% 
lOfemsep H3ft 
16ft12Fab 110ft 


6X1 

7X3 

70 

730 


104 

833 

70 

80 


8X5 70 840 

7.18 7JM 

A 97 6X1 

686 6.92 677 

7J7 70 

70 70 

8X1 7X9 846 
673 173 6X7 
7X7 7X9 70 
60 70 630 
7.16 70 692 
894 7X6 679 
8J5 827 9A 
173 671 6J5 
*41 636 648 
698 698 70 
7X5 *7* 747 
7.13 70 70 

687 7.17 6X5 
6.40 635 648 

687 7.12 6X9 
70 7J9 

771 9X9 

7.19 70 

70 7X9 

60 546 70 

B 60 1X3 
ISO 

70 60 

111 5X2 60 
5X7 73* 

115 729 

673 40 40 
671 729 619 
734 70 

7X6 947 

8X7 9.16 


dm 200 Quebec Province n*Feb Wft >49 70 

dm WO Row* Bank Of anode 7%10Aae 101 >0 7J7 

DENMARK 


drain 
mans 
dm in 
drain 
drain 
Up W0 
dmUO 
dm WO 
drain 
An 150 
dm HO 
dm WO 
dm HO 
dm 700 
dm 10 
dm 10 
dm 180 
dm 75 
dm 75 
draw 
dm U# 

dm 40 
dm 73 
dm 10 
dm HD 
draw 
dm A) 
MU 
am 50 
dm HO 
wn in 
dm MO 
dm HO 
dm HO 


dm in 

ss 

II 

1 

•nSB 
dm HO 
dmH 
dm 50 


dm SO 

dm in 
dm 100 
dm 10 
dm in 
dm 10 
dm in 
dm in 
dm W 
An in 
dm 75 
dm HO 
drain 
dm lflO 
dm in 
dm in 
dm in 
dm SB 
dm in 
dm w 
dm UO 
dm Too 
dm IDO 
ora 10 

An 200 
dm in 
An in 
dm 200 
dram 
dm 200 
An 10 
dm 10 
dm 65 
dm HO 
dm in 
dm 100 
dm 100 


dmUD 
dm 10 
dm 600 
dm in 
dm 10 
dm in 
dm 20 
dm 2» 
dm 20 
dm 20 
dm 70 
dm 10 
dm 10 
dm W 
dm 10 
am JOB 
dm M 
drain 


Denmark 

Denmark 

gj 


i|5g 

Mortgage Bonk Denmark ,7fegiOa 


TftHFeb Hi 
7% 17 May un 
6% 17 Dec 99% 
6 IB Fan 96% 
H -38 Mar 106ft 
7%-MMOV 100% 
ifttr Fee 97% 
9% 19 Mar 104% 
7% 19 Apr un 
7%19Nav MO 
9ft 10 May 104ft 
8% 12 Fab U9% 
10ft gi Mar 119% 
I 13 May HOft 
7ft 14 Aw 1D0% 
7% 14 NOV 99ft 
7% 16 AW xmb 
7ft 16 Dec HOft 

6 "90 No* 96% 

■ft 16 Jan 101% 
7* IS Feb 94% 
7ft 17 Jan 99fe 

7 IT May n% 
iftlBAw 98ft 
SfeWJuf 104% 
1%-HNav 100ft 
6% 17 MW 99 
7%-nFea mt 
Ift-MFriJ UZft 
7 IS Jul 111 

tn 

99ft 


B 


^5 

iS 70 p 




Jtotaaae Bank Denmark UftHNav 110ft 
Mortgage Bank Denmark IftHFeb 183 

FINLAND 


M 

m 


EtSSS™ 
assist 

SSL. 

FRANCE 


S»14 Feb 

Hft 16 NOV 

l -note 

7 17 AW 
7ft UMOV 
9% 19 AW 
I 10 Nov 
7ft 71 Aw 

7 *2 Jen 
BftlZJun 
1 17 Jan 

8 16 Dec 

7 17 Jul 
5%«Aw 

8 11 Sea 
t 18 Feb 
Ift-SDec 


AaranarlOa Paris 
Banwe Franc Com Ext 
Banaue Franc Cora E*1 
Banana Franc Cam Etd 
Bonaua FixmcCam Ext 
Baaque Franc Cam Ext 

Banaue Franc Cam Ext 

Banoue Franc Com Ext 
Banaae Indasmz 
Baiqot NoMnol Pwts 
CahseCenr Coop Era 

Catsne Centr Coon Eoo 

Catme Nat Autataufas 

CaheeNatEnenile 

caisseNatTefeamim 

Qabee Nat Tefecnmm 

Cotsse Nat Tetoccmm 

Calsse Nat Teteamm 
CrmfltEaulPm Petit M 
CrndltEaainm Petit M 
Credit Fonder Franca 
Credit Fonder Francs 
Cnd» Fonder France 
Cnmn Notfenol 
Credit National 
Eiectriclts Fiona 
Eledridt* France 
ElectricHc France 
Franakse Petralee 
MkJvHin Finance 
Renault Acceptance 

Ronaufl Acastance 
sarDewtoFWMnai 

5dr Develop Regional 

Sacf Nd dusnlns Fer 
Snd Nat Chemlra Fer 
5nd N« Chemlns Far 


8% 12 Dec 
7% 17 Jon 
7 "87 Feb 
5% 18 Jan 
<K1tAaa 
IfelOJui 
■ft 14 Sen 
Eft 15 Jm 
7% 10 Mar 
J%10Mw 
BftWJid 

7 19 Apr 
8ft 14 Aug 
I 13 Jan 
8ft 15 Oct 
6% 17 Mar 
9ft12AU0 
7% 13 Feb 
I 11 Mav 
7% 17 Fab 
8%g0Jd 
7% 12 AW 
8% 12 May 
6 17 Od 
8ft 94 Feb 
8% 18 NOV 
8fe 92 Sec 
8% 93 Oct 
Bft-ffiMar 
7% 10 AW 
lOfeHJai 

8 90 Jon 
7ft 16 AW 
7ft93Jun 
M12MOV 
7ft 13 MW 
IftlSDoc 


GERMANY 

AMBRneace 7ft 14 Fab 

Bayer CaptU Carp - 71* 19 Nov 

Baser CoptWCwW/w 2% 95 Feb 

BaytrCimlMCorXAv 7% 95 Feb 

Dorinifr- Bern ( IS Kov 

DegusM Inti Fin 7ft 9* Feb 

DresAier Flaance W/w 4 90 Jun 

DrettJner Ffaance X/w 4 10 Jun 

Drwdner Finance W/w 1 92 Sep 

DresdnerPtaanceX/w 8 125ec 

HAndl Finance ■ 91 Jul 

KauttafFlaoncaW/W 3% 14 Nov 

Kouflwt Finance X/w 3%l4Nov 
KloeduHf-tfiimbOldt 6% 17 Mav 

Unto Intel Wrw 3ft 94 Dec 

vmm inti Finance W/w 4 13 Dec 

Veba Inti Finance X/w 4 UDec 

Voflawagen litfl Fin 7% 93 Mor 

ICELAND 


9<rft 

weft 

101 

99ft 

101 

107 

103% 

100ft 

97 

nn 

164ft 

ram 

99% 

97% 

111% 

97ft 

97% 


H3ft 

in 

IB 

96% 

106 

102 % 

TOM 

102 % 

101 

101 % 

100ft 

99 

763% 

!0lfe 

1B% 

0 

187ft 

unit 

lBlft 

95% 

101 % 

101 % 

ICXft 

91ft 

H2 

lBlft 

105% 

183% 

WO 

100% 

vsn. 

101 

700% 

Wl% 

104% 

111% 

102ft 


100ft 

101 % 

H2ft 

70% 

100 % 

UB 

105% 

90 

126 

103 

W3% 

97% 

76ft 

99 

HEft 

115% 

H 

100% 


dm 0 Iceland 
An 75 Iceland 


dm 100 Ireland 
An 100 Ireland 


7% 17 Aw 100ft 
9% 12 Jan 106ft 


IRELAND 


10ft 14 Dec 104ft 
IftWSfP H3% 


$ 


CONVERTIBLE BONDS 


ft Mat 


Carr 

MM. CAfe.Yhfe 

Price — Canv.Peried— — Corn. Price p/sb- Prm.»% 


SS AaaAb 
170 AMO 2140 
SS Alusutae CanH 17X1 
SM Alusutuelntl 
S25 Amro Ban* 85.92 

SS Babcock Nederland 

SSI BOC Brawn BdverlSJ* 4%i3Dec 
S57 BbC Brawn BOverilOXO «%15D»e 
SM Beecham Fki 33*42 6% 93 S«p 

IP Booh Co Ltd 6% 13 Aufl 

*99 ODo-GetavO/xZXB 4 14Jul 
1UD Credit Sufese Bohamas 4% H Dec 
*TO Cradlt Suisse Bahama 4% n Dec 
*£1 Efedrowatt FlnancB 5 II Jun 

*25 EimloHvel* 

S2S EwriteAb 
tt 700 Cenml&Daaane J3 
125 Hanson O/s Finance 
*25 Hanson O/s Finance 
*40 HoaaomsliM 
MM id Finance 125 

1W0 let inll Fhi Q4J7 

*35 indicaMBennuiIlJ) 6% 92 Aw 
SM IncriOTW BwTnu 9127 1 95Aufl 

*24 lnfershop O/s sm _ 

S24 mitniiep 0/s uxo 
*35 Motropaiitan Estate 
S0 Moet-Hemessy 4B5 
ITS Rank Oramtbal 6886 
Hm28 Rottunraa inti 14810 
10 Sandaz Finance 5X0 
164 5aadmO/s5A5 
*35 SandvOc AbZljr 
SB Staler WaUcer 31445 
*49 Survcnkma 
*0 Surveillance 
Sira Mis Bank Co o/s 
*20 Tarter Woodrow (nil 

125 Thera IMI Finance . 

SCO UbsllurentfMurunjn 4ft 17 Mav 
5115 urn (pancmal 15X0 5 VI Hey 


9ft 16 Sep 
4%w Jan 
6ft 93 Jan 
4% 17 Mor 
5ft 19 Jon 
7 12 Od 


7% 71 Jun 
7% 19 Mav 
5 17 Jun 
9ft 95 Oct 
9ft 96 Od 
niSAua 
8ft 190a 
6% 17 Oct 


5% good 

6 130d 
8% 16 Jan 

7 19 Jon 
4% 13 Feb 
6% 12 Jun 
5 IS Dec 
8% IS Doc 
*% 18 mar 
5% 17 MOV 
6% 93 jun 
4ft n Jun 
kfelDDec 
MkiODec 
7 IS Jul 


EUROPE 

T32 IFebC 15 Junta *krl75-skr2ll8Ml 
92ft 1 Sea 69 maturity Ml 12140- Ml 120283 
74 M Jan 61 maturity 55fli9 

86ft 1 Sea49 matortty *12275/8 

170% 1 Jon 70 31 DecBB Ml 4170- 1*14020 
«4ft 17 AWH IS Sep 92 pllj-p 141089 

68 1JM79 maturity 

93 I Feb 14 maturity 
140% 15 SOP 71 IB Aug 92 

95ft i Fen t* umn 

129 3 Sen 79 maturity 

93 10 Joe 77 maturity 

71 lOctit maturity 
lift I70dD 29 Jun 98 
793ft 15 Jun B maturity W5U2-M«Si267 
171ft 15 Sea 79 3 May 89 Mr 151 -rtr 318X27 
141% 15 Sep 77 maturity 
377 IS Jon 81 7 Oct 95 
290 TAUBlI 7 Oct 96 
87ft 1 Jon *9 maturity 
HSft I50cfl4 I Od 99 
112ft 1 Mav 78 1 Sep 97 
78ft 150077 11 Mar 92 
72% IS Feb 81 15 Jul 95 
UN 2 Apr 79 maturity 

lOdSJ mafurtty 

1 Feb ll iSDecn 

2 Jon 15 2 Aw 99 
14 Feb 71 motor tty 

1 Jan 73 maturlly 
1 Od*3 mahjrfhr 

31 Od77 maturity 


*01 

12% 

104ft 

62 

C2M 

in 

164 

n» 

86ft 

94 

85 

B4ft 


*2003/1 
*108 
P10-P243J84 
p 1U - p 169.107 
*675 
SHOO 
*120 
*1350 


ft 1366.100 
P»-P5*174 
P4S-P72X31 
hfl 91 -Mi 98.930 

PM 

0460 - p 4*155* 
P 385 -P 547X44 

P45S-PBS7JH 

*240 

*265 

D239 - D469406 
I2B6.U6 
0618 - 01302X95 
P 67 1/7 P 1311/2 
*421 
52*3 


2 JonB 8 Morn per 2010- S 42.123 
l.Jmn UMeyP D 1 15 -u 247X83 


820 Aloa Endnterlnp 5H.16MW 

*40 AllnuRianCa 7% 95 after 

SM AiinamotaCe 5%i6Mar 

SKO AitnamtoCe 3 19 Mar 

*30 aotW O ptical Ca 7 14Mar 

SIS Alla Ca 5% 13 Jan 

*W Bridgestone Tire Ca 5ft in Dec 

S0 Conan inc 6% 9J Dec 

50 Canon Inc 6% 95 Dec 

SS Conca Inc _ 7 97 Jun 

SIS OolNiopoa Priming 6%16Wter 

*K Dateline iftieAug 

JfO DoMpm ink chemicoo -ftMar 

SH Oaim Hone industry 7% 11 Mar 


S1I0 
*190 
*2ta 

P247-PMIJ8* 

P348 -D5O20 
1120 
5762/1 


l.NovW 15 Mar N V4S7J8- 521X35 
15*0 78 I Jan 93 Y 40650- 477X19 


S JAifl 21 Dec 95 VS82.W- 687JJ4 
‘JUn 20 Jun 97 Y 591X8- 44X49? 


*0 Datwa Securities 
SM Oalna Securllies 
*80 FonocLtd 
S0 Fui Ibu Ltd 

SIR FultouLIO 
**0 Funjfcam Electric 
*40 Hitachi Cnbw Ltd 
SM Hltocbi Credil Carp 
*10 HitadULtd 
*0 Honda Malar Ca Ltd 
tn Honda Motor Ca Ltd 
Sin Hondo Motor Co LM 
10 Ito-YakpdoCbLld 
*25 JbCOCaLW 
*25 jocaCnLid 

*40 JvkcaCoUd _ . _ 

SW Jve victor Camp JaoaaS 97 Mor 
SM KaltaaCerporatten SfelOMav 
SB Kao Soap Co l_W 
SMI Kawaswl SKci Co 
S0 KamatnLId 
10 Kanbhlraku Pttota 
10 KonteMrehu Photo 
125 KotaDuklvaCoLtd 
SM Kvtn»oHo*toKooyo 
S9 iwaUta Elec Work* 

SB Moral Co LW 
SU Moral Co LW 

iioo Moral Co Lta 

Sin NteTBtehlta Elec Indus 6% 10 Nov 
SUM Matsud^U Elec works 7ft IS Nov 
580 MbwbeaCaLtd 5ft 96 Sea 
*38 Minolta Camera Ca 7%1SMar 
SM Minolta Camera Co 
m MiteuMucore 

SM Mitsubishi Coro 
S6d MilxubfeM Cora 
10 MltwbiiN EJedr Co 
tin MlhubteM Electron 
sna Mitsubishi Etoetr Co 
sin MitwtMWii Heavy led 
SB MlfeulPeair 

*35 MltkulRiali ... 

SUM IWurataMawtaduring 3ft 99 Mor 
*100 MarraoMonifocturine IfefeMar 
110 H#c Corporation TfeWMOT 
*30 NUaataEneHteerinB 7ft 96 Mar 

SU Nippon Electric 

560 fttopanttmoMi 
Sin Ntooon Koton 
*0 Mfepcnoii 
*0 HtepanOil 
*30 NtaeanSeikD 
STD Nippon Soda 
*100 Ninon Motor 
SM NtelholwoiCon. 8 96 Mar 
*V5 Nitlu Electric induri 6 92Seo 
*20 mho Eiectrie induct 6 94 Sea 
*40 Nitta Electric indat 5% 96 Sep 
*0 Mvk UncNiPben YuMh7%96Mar 


5ft 96 Sep 
JftWSeP 
3% IS Sep 
Sft965iP 
3 19 Mar 
5% 96 Mar 
5% 96 SCP 
5 96 Sep 
5% 96 MW 
5ft 19 Mar 
5ft 17 F«b 
5% 18 Feb 
S%93AU0 
7ft 13 Mar 
5ft 16 MW 
92 Feo 


6 925ep 
5% 16 Mar 
7% 10 Jun 

6 96 Aw 
4 It Aw 

7 9* Feb 
6% 17 Dec 
4% 99 aw 
6ft II Jan 
6 96 JOT 
3ft 19 Jan 


5 96 Mar 
6% 91 MW 

6 12 Mar 
6ft 9t5ag 
5% 9k Mar 
5% IS Mar 
2ft IM Star 
4% 9? Mar 
. 92 Sot 
7% ft Mor 


5% 97 Mor 
4 1»S*P 
6ft 16 AWT 
5ft IS Mar 
3% 19 MW 
7% 9400 
3%9fOd 


i Jul 83 maturity 
1 Jul 14 maturity 
IMpM matwtty 
Hft 15 Jon 81 INovN 
85 1 Nov 71 ID Jut a 

IIS lJin77 maturity 
17 iFtbH maturity 
JAPAN 

iS .J29!l 2°!9ar94 Y0IXO- 64U17 
2H 11 FebS# MMwfS V 53290- 559X99 

128% llJnin 22 Mar 9( ‘ 

H» 30 Aw 84 22 Mar 99 
n 

77% ... „ 

in% 1 Merc 20 Dec 96 
250% 23 Aufl 79 30 Dec 94 
194ft - 

1 May 71 BApi-Bk r 1340- «X7| 
3 J9°"3 Y643 - 9*403 

92 BAugB] 75 Mar 96 Y 268X0- 297734 
33 5.*a» n Y5UL40- aun 

171 18 Dec 81 3 Sen 96 Y44lxo- asswc 

174% 100 83 25 Sea 98 Y4SU0- 4J3JJ2 

M0 s Jan I* 23 Sep 98 Y 513110- 5881691 
181 1 Jul 81 21 Sou 96 Y548M- 632J96 

97% 1 May 84 23MW99 Y12UU0- 1338X55 
»fe 15 Ad K 21, Mar M YW - M.975 

’3 Si**** Y 515 - 575253 

74 16 Jul II BSepH Y 16120- 1799.112 

win ii Moral j»mot« y 48*40 , jtvjqs 
251% 1 MOV 79 24 Feo 8 ? Y435l50- 549JJ91 

172 7 Mor 82 B Feb 97 Y 7590- 5165* 

148% 28 Jun 13 17 Feb 9, Y 884 - 954X74 
261 22 Jun 78 XAugH Y 758X0- 89240 

81ft IHwRnHorH Y386JD- 44809 

68fe 1 don 71 Mor 96 Y 487.10 - 51205 
95ft f JUI 77 TtFeon Y 767-70- 710X03 
89% It Jot 82 KIMW97 Y 2221 - 25*44*5 
•ft TAWBBMoyn Y20- 281X0 

an i oct 77 is Sean Yina-saxii 
7TA I Sea *1 25 Mar 96 Ym-7/asn 
1*1% » Jun 75 maturity YJ4870- xwn 

9TA 250083 UAor9l Y *73 - 77702 
10*% 12 Sep 14 19 Aor 99 Y61I- 6*530 

116ft 1 AW ll 15 Feb » Y 419 - 743X09 

124% IFebO IPOerW Y725J8- RUD 

1X2’* 79AWU64 If Aaa99 YM60- 1125454 

183 I Jul 76 M Jan 91 Y 608X0 - 517X73 
127 » Julll 30 Jon 96 Y6990- 714529 

83ft 10 Jul 84 T ..’99 YlliJ- 125202 
OS's 20N3V75 i 1 Y4#9 - 342J89 

112% 20 Nov H ar,uv9S Y590- 7K4S5 
88% 17Mcy«3 Jf. Sen 98 Y 667 - 71130 
11*% 4NovH 38 Mor 95 Y 42130- 4401 
82% lOdll M Mar 96 Y 82140- 989X93 
170% 1 Mar 74 maturity Y30J8- 29*963 
134% 1 AUO 77 38 Mar 9] Y30M8- 370J66 
100% 150079 maturity Y 45138- S12.103 
1BS% 4 JOT 82 20 Mor 96 Y33 - 362X27 

H 1 Jun 62 83 war W Y394 - 4HXJ7 
93% 1 MOT 85 20 Morn Y02 - 411.111 
in 4 Jon 14 24 Mw 99 Y253- 27X60 

154% 1 Oci 77 2»Sep«2 Y 421 0- 399406 

HJ% 15 Jon 81 25 Mor 9* Y 494 - 583426 

117 71 Feb 84 ft Mot 99 YZUJ39- 2539.175 

118 16 Jul *4 17 Mor SO YZm- 266U74 
S7VJ 7 JOT 85 34 Morn Y129S- 1330312 
73 UJOTll 25 Mw 96 Y 327 - 38U91 

141ft 5F*OC BMW 97 Y 69*20- 7n.lA 
tf7% 150084 OSeeff Y12422B- 1303X19 
79% 1 Jul 81 B MorH Y 10 - 217.90 
96 11AW0 30 Mor • YfM - HkUeX 

85ft BMarH 17Mcr99 Y1052 - 1141301 

let J Dec 7f 14 Oct 94 Y 311*8- 3610* 

It NOV 84 200 a 99 Y *36 - *443 n 

5Asrn MMwH Y*3*Afl- kCUffl 


178 Oil Electric 
*40 OtymguiCteUeaiCo 
*60 One Wte i mnceaHcel 
HO OricnlFManceCo 
*0 Orient Leoalnu Cp 
SU Ricoh CeLta 
S3 5cp4rraEleciTicCa 
*0 Sanya Electric Ca 
540 SecomCoLU 
SB SecaraCaUd 
*0 Sekttul Hama Ltd 
IB HwMffl 
STD Sumitomo Cora 

S0 SwnitonioEleesrlc 

55 BumjtamoMHoi indusi 6 91 Mar 

23 '>>*«» ? '»5«p 

J0 SumikwniMetatindasiSUitsaa 
*46 TAtetaRSkthCoUil 3% DO Mor 
sun Tokyo sottyoEwortc 3ft w Kov 
170 Tok.ru Cora 7%9SSea 

‘5 lekYV LydCorp 7% 96 MW 

ts MSr taCo 

120 Tova Monks Kabila 
S» WaakriCara 
ISO YamofcN Securities 
10 YomanwRbl Phanaa 


5ft 19 S«P 
6% 17 Del 

»S“* 

S% 17 Mar 
SfetSSH 
6ft IS Sep 
Bfe 15 MOT 
5 YSNpir 
5 91 Nov 
3% If Nay 
3 it Jan 
fftVFeb 
7ft 99 Mar 
5ft Y7 Mor 


7% 14 See 
7% 96 Mar 
8 99 AW 

s "wsep 

8 18 Dec 


103 

M% 

n 

2Ull> 
186 ft 
177 

wr 

■7 

112% 

111 


llOdna^wH Y 361.10- 4UD39 


1 SdP 77 29 Sea *2 Y 6773U- 651X97 
1 Jul 79 29 Sep <4 YJ3S- 149X13 
? 5*0*1 B Sep H VIM- 9072(9 
1 April 25 Mo- 9* Y 790X0- 3*1963 
10384 225*3! ft V US - 838512 
7 Dee® 3*0097 Y 1157 JO- 1134.1ft 
SS”" Y 5*31X0- 4310X39 
,84% 'Mm'S BMarta V 97/20- 1653594 

J0% ajuno bsotib van- 3011x0 
w Wsw*? Y 557.10- 566679 

S3 2 i S orW Y 577X0- *58.152 

84% loan 20 f*0V 9* YS92JD- 651 JB3 
12W MMay 81 BNovn Y29B-318&3B2 
74ft ]WU »Nov99 YSQ4- 5709^06 
S' 5 ®7Bhft Y 612 - 673JQ2 

* WOtaM ?JF»bM V2J470- 2WX45 
.Wft 17 Mav U 19 Mar 99 Y593 . *48.109 

JO <> Mor 12 29 Mar 97 YJ77J0- 0446 
in I NOV 76 S Mw 12 Y 13? JO- 12106 
80 2 FlBII 29 Sep IS Y175J0 - 295418 
Cfe I Oct 81 205tnH Y 296.10- J20J49 
Tgi 25 Oct 14 20 Mar 00 Y 7663 - 784850 
93% 3 Dec 81 lVNflv99 Y773 - 3K4H 
IBft 1 D«C 80 23 Sep 95 Y30- Z»0B 

IH 8 Apr 81 2* Mar 9* Y2RM0- 341A3B 

,97% 3 sec I* BSeaH rue- raunr 
191% 1 NdV 79 29SeoH Y 18*98- 205*5 
K% I DKB nMarfe r 181X0- 214343 
110084 UAd8 99 YID1 - 227X0 
, 3 ,UHS 35* « Yffl.1t- 451 jn 
2SJ 31 Octq 21 Dec K Y143J0- 150X77 


S40 Bow VeUevlnva 0.92 
140 EldmHvlMkll 

iS 

»» BawtSeteOteninx# 


MISCELLANEOUS 

1JS* 55 8r « "wVttv cn*».12S 0*264*7 
lift 94 Jill USfe 28 Sep 84 7 Jul 94 aaSUX7aul4.lil 

I5YHJ0I KM 1NWM UJtftH «S 105 M* 1715 
6ftg»MW JSBW 1 5eo/l 31 Jar 86 n»JJJ7JJI2/t 


125- 134 
254 169 
4444 10X8 
1533 MB- 
ITS- 436 
139 481 
3738 232 
U0 232 
658- 20 
444. 849 
141 139 
533 447 
U31 40 
20 254 
0X9- 2JM 
439 235 
SS7- 232 

45- 239 
XV 239 
47.51 

1X0 XJ 
2X4- IIS 
645 450 
6035 40 
2JD- 192 
147- 3X4 
2fe.IT 240 
1131 933 
119 JS 235 
532- 335 
0- 139 
2X3- 139 
30 251 
12038 237 
1136 131 
6X2 133 
22X7 237 
2732 431 

1290 MS 
2JI- 233 
80 278 


145- IX* 
2X1 JU 
80 M 
M3 JS 
2J7- 143 
131 2X7 
32- 10 

11X5- M 
129 .95 
Ml 3S 
Kin- 97 
W32 730 
*0 zxe 
0 10 
5X9- 0 
622- 48 

133 .15 

41 0 

821 M 
147- 141 
60 121 
230 L11 
10 0 

146- 0 
31 0 
143 44 

1141- 32 

K2J 203 
13.9? 2X3 
4.13- 257 
7* 0 
1X6- 141 
1X0- 1.92 
3747 129 
7X6- 10 
404 135 
39- 10 
730 101 
Jl JO 
110 US 
SB- UO 
.11- 10 
40 UO 
6JR- 0 
3X7 129 
U7- 117 
045 10 
1847 118 
523- 111 
6X9- 131 
432- IJ1 
177- 10 
10 149 
234. 10 
X*. 1X2 
5J3- 1X4 
6XP- 10 
210 2* 
3*74 0 

UB 46 
2U7 *44 
JO 46 
115 51 
25i» 405 
110 47 
Ml 47 
WXl- 2X1 
125- 24* 
J* .90 
2970 233 
X2 47 
,32- 47 
10 47 
61.15 10 
M34 38 
AST U1 
2X1- .14 
9X7 .ft 
*32 0 

3X9- U2 
171 139 
190 10 
<0% 0 
6X7 0 
355 10 
IN 0 
10- 10 
132- J7 
*23- U1 

134 321 
3806 321 
1222 .18 

Ml UO 
11X5- 132 
1*0 U* 
0 0 
*XV 131 
4X6- 238 
131- 10 
874- 34 
9* .IT 


7931 M3 
330 US 
927 *31 
r.rn *37 


Atat Security 


% Mat 


Mid. 

Wee —Co«». Period— 


Carr. 
Caav.Ytd*. 
-CdttvJPricep/ifr- nmSh« 


*15 

ISO 

IB 

*25 
*75 
3 SI 
*30 
*25 
*20 
*40 
120 
*25 
*25 
*25 
125 
*35 
*7 
*15 
*50 
350 
*60 
350 

ino 
125 
330 
115 
SB 
IB 
am 7ia 
ll 
su 

SIS 

in 

*15 

SU 

SB 

IB 

*30 

560 

175 

*12 

ISO 

*15 

*SU 

*75 

*1S 

*30 

*60 

*15 

*58 

sn 

5JO 

SU 

SS 

*31 

SB 

*15 

IB 

*30 

*50 

*30 

*40 

*40 

*30 

SB 

*25 

SIS 

su 

*35 

*7* 

SB 

12* 

*58 

*50 

*7 

*50 

1SB 

*38 

*» 

12* 

*35 

1?5 

in 

sso 

*0 

ISO 

*9 

*12 

SU 

SU 

*50 

*30 

135 

SU 

*0 

*50 

sim 

1500 

*75 

*25 

*30 

*50 

sn 

(» 

sn 

sn 

SB 

*0 

*36 

SB 

175 


Addremnaraph 12X9 
Alaska Infanta 4243 
American Can 17X9 
American Exprts 3X33 
American Medial 4126 
American Motor 161 Jl 
American Tabacc 550 
Ami mcorp 19.14 
AaoCMInfl Fkl 4324 
Banfcen Inti Lii 34.13 
Barnett O/s Fin 2SJ4 
Beatrice Food* 57.1 4 
Beatrice Food* J377 
Beatrice Food* 3571 
Beatrice Foods 096 
Blacker Energy 4571 
Bro OT itThHnto 24.18 
Carrier O/s 340 _ 

Qc Control DOT 1855 
Charter tall FI 2051 
Chevron O/I FM <437 
Chrrfier O/i 16,13 
Chrysler O/i 13X1 
Comal Inti 2846 
Cenll Tel Int! 42.15 
Crurcher Flnanc 2*0 
Cummins Ini Fin U3S 

Cummins Ini Fin 270 
Damaa Carp 1175 
Deutsdto Tonal 50 
DictaBhc»#la4IJ4.1t 
Dtgiam Finance 33X0 
Dynolectrwnnt 810 
Eeaman Kodak U42 
El Era Utao Ini 210 
Electron Memort2fJtS 
Eflertbie NiM2S21 
Fed Dept Store* 2U9 
Fed<fenCapimin.H 
Firestone O/* 340 
Fort tab FkmHJS 
GatavOII I nit 5043 
General Efedri 24.77 
Genescn Wbrkl 36J2 
GUfetteCmnn U.T3 
GtMteO/iFlH52 
Grace WrO/i 17.45 
Great western 30X0 
Heuncrkb Povne 17X2 
HoHdoy lnm2B57 
Haneywen CobR U0 

ItaO/j Finance js'H 

ina D/» FIrbics 33X1 
Inti stand Elec 180 
latt Stood Elec 150 
imi Stand Elec 17.14 
inti TMeabaae 17X2 
intwcam Hotel B8J0 
lee Fin HokBngVJI 
I It Sheraton 1855 
Kufeer Alominucn 42X2 
KtaderiCwa lit 55X7 
War Petrol Lee 42X4 
Lew Petrol LK 3106 
Ltv Inti 55X7 
Marine MidtondTSXO 
Mw Ian Inti Fin 670 
MaumaRiqlMiarlLXI 
MaumtuolMtar5O0 
Mils Cwdtol Co I2B 
MDf llrtt Fm 42X7 
MUel Co Inti 31 JS 
Monaco Inh 3043 
NOM Uffl 2134 
Moran Energy 42JU 
Maroon 00/93827 
Nottonai Can 530 
NlcwO/»Fln77J9 
Northern TeiecaDJi 
Pan American 77X5 
Potw Finance 21X1 
Peteenr Jc Eurao ik*7 
PemrJc mn 12-19 
Pm4eoCckHM2U2 
Romoda Casual 6423 
Rea Inll Deveta I8U 
Readine Bates 270 
Revton inewp2S24 
Remolds Metals BJ7? 
Bonn IndaUria 4*47 
Sera O/kCiatM 220 
Scorfe inti Cab i486 
SoutaCollf Edl&lJS 
SoutMead Cora 45 ft 
SauHmeriAu1126.ll 

SPeani- Physics 2339 

5eerrvRimdCatf0 
ioribblnh Rpl/0 
Texaco Capital 20X9 
Teraca Coattoi 30X0 
Taxacp taumee) BAD 
Totoi Inri AMI 64X7 
TlsceF Inane# 33.U 
TokCU Inti Fin 54.74 
Tramai mu 16X3 
Trfcoro Oil Gai 22X0 
Trw infl Ftaone 19X5 
Ueetr Finance 2tX7 
varee tall FM32J1 
Vtoroer Lonteeri 2U3 
tiarner Lambert 1626 
Warner Loiebert 3«0 
Xeran Cera 474 


UNITED STATES AMERICA 
72 1 Dec 61 maturity 

.80ft 20 aw 81 maturity 
95ft lMava mstfurity 
139ft 15 Mar 77 maturity 
126ft 30 Aua 12 maturity 
79 10d72 molurjY 

380 15 Mav 6V maturity 
8] 1 Jun B matwltv 

7? 140011 mwurlty 

2n 1 Dec 47 maturity 
127 1 Aufl 13 maturity 

164 1 Jut 71 maturity 

t» 1 Mar 77 mat u rity 

187ft I aw 73 maturity 
126 1 Apr 74 maturity 

43 200080 maturity 

.87 U Jun 73 maturity 
ltd 31 Jul 70 maturlly 
B 15 Oct iff matwltv 
Mft 5 Feb 10 maturity 
219 I Aug M maturity 
92ft 15 Aua M maturity 

91 15 Dec M maturiiv 

17ft 15 Oct II matwltv 
Hft 1 Aw 69 mtduritv 
ft j Mav It mriurifv 

129 38 Jun 72 maturity 

IM 1 May 6f maturity 
77ft l Jrd 73 matartty 
77% 1 Nov 67 15 APT 16 
244ft i Oct £8 matwltv 
69 23 Feb 81 maturity 

T30 9 Sen 10 maturity 

90ft 15 Mav 69 maturity 
83ft 1 Oct 73 maturity 
77ft 18 Jut *9 maturity 
82ft 7 Awll matwWy 

130 15 Jul 0 marurttv 
54 IS Dec 73 maturity 
65ft Jl Dec 41 maturity 
TWft 30 aw 74 maturity 
X 7 May II maturity 
147 l5Jan7! maturity 
75ft 1 Navtl maturity 
M 30 Jun 73 mat u r it y 
IHft 1 Mar 13 maturity 
97ft 1 Aua 67 maturity 

92 38 Dec 13 nunwttv 

M 6 Mav II roo tardy 
Utt6 I Mav 71 maturity 
197 l Jul 71 maturity 
!41 1 May 78 26 Jul 97 

113 1 Aw XI 25 AlteH 

17 Uauptf a w f u rtty 
13 l Jones maturity 
56 15 May B mohelty 
88 15 Aw 73 matortty 

95 BMW 73 maturity 
94ft I JOP 67 3Joa(6 
0 I Feb 70 matwltv 
■5ft 1 Aug if matortty 
HO 15 Aug 13 maturity 

S 17 Dec 77 maturin' 

4 Feb 11 mat w tty 
■4ft 1 Feb if mafurtty 
n 15 Dye *4 matortty 
U 5 Jan 81 matortty 
■7 15 Mw 73 maturity 

94ft XI Sep 11 mrfluriTy 
D I Jan 76 maturity 
7ft 13 Mar 81 maturity 
93ft e Apr n matwltv 
U U Mar 73 n i uhm ty 
77ft lMayM matortty 
.tlft ii Fean matortty 
179 15 Jun 73 maturity 

216 1 Jim 69 maturity 

>01 1 Dec IB matortty 

119 T9JWD 31 Feb 98 
76 1 May 89 maturity 

32 IJufll matortty 

97 1 JW7B matortty 

17 1 Aua 73 mamrltv 

142 2SOCID1 motor by 
91 15 Jet 72 maturity 

90ft I May 6? maturity 
.64 3 Mw II matortty 

UO 2 Jan 71 nut id By 
93 31 MW 89 matortty 

.31 30 Aw 73 matortty 

101 I Jan 70 matortty 

364 l jan 49 maturity 

111 7 jot S3 maturity 

10 1 Feb 73 maturity 

19ft INovEJ maturity 
» 2 Acr 10 maturity 

109 15 Mw 74 matortty 

102ft 15 May 7] matortty 
100W l Mav 14 maturity 
99ft 15 Mar M maturin' 

If 15 Aw If matortty 
n u Dec 78 matortty 
N 16 Oar marurttv 
.30ft 1 Awll 70 Oct 95 
100 14 Auon maturity 

.0 24 Fob If maturity 

U4 1 Feb 89 matortty 
lB5ft 15 Mor 64 maturity 

94 Mor « 30 oct ll maturity 

4ft«7AW *4 I Apr 73 matortty 

4% B Aw ,84ft I AW 26 moturtfy 

JftBAutf UO, 9 Movie maturity 

1 9* Dec nft l Jan 75 maturity 


4% 90 May 
IV>9SDec 
4% KIMay 
/% 17 May 
9% 97 MOV 
8 92 Aw 
SfeWAOD 
5 V5ep 
9ft 96 Jun 
5 ■BJan 
7% 98 Aufl 
7% 90 NOV 
6V. 91 Aufl 
4ft 92 Sea 
4116 93 Asp 
8%95JUI 
4% *87 Jun 
i 17 Dec 
5 "88 Ajar 
8% 94 Oct 
5 V Feb 
5 *8 Feb 
4%’BMay 
7% 98 Oct 
5ft ■» Mor 
8% 95 Dec 

FA Hi Oct 
5 B AUO 
5% 17 Dec 
5 MMay 
5ft 88 Mar 
8ft 95 OCI 

9ft 95 MOV 
4ft 81 Mav 
0687 Dec 
5ft 81 Dec 
5% 95 Oct 
4ft 85 Dec 
5 93 May 
5 BMay 
5 81 Mar 
IftgiJan 
414 g7 jun 
5ft 88 Mar 
4% 97 Dec 
I 50 Mor 

5 »Aw 

7ft 91 Jun 
7ft 95 DC1 
I TOOtJ 
i 86 Nov 

6 97 Aim 
8% go *SP 
5 ’88 Fob 
5% 88 Dec 

6fe19NW 
4% 87 Od 

7 W Jun 
4ft BMW 
6ft 89 Jul 
5 88 FeO 
6% 98 Aufl 

8 w Jun 
I 95 Oct 
5 B Jul 
5 81 May 

9 95 Oct 
6% U Ail 
1 94 Jul 
5ft 87 MOV 

Bfe 95 Dec 

7 97 Dec 
5 87 Jan 
4ft 850a 
1 95 Kw 
4%8IJwi 
5fe87DeC 
10% 95 May 

7 f* Mar 
5ft B Sec 
8ft 95 Dec 
t 8* Dec 
4ft 87 Aim 
S 96 Apr 
4ft 84 Nov 

5 88 Feb 
I 95 Dee 
4% 87 AW 
5 8* Jun 
5% 87 Oct 
5% 87 Mw 

4% 86 Mar 

12ft 97 Aua 
5 87 Jut 

6% 9* Jul 

8 94 Dec 

4% 81 Feb 
*% 87 Jun 
life 94660V 
11% 94 Mav 
1ft 88 Jul 
7ft 93 Aug 
8ft 96 MW 
I 95 OCI 
8% 95 Dee 
4ft 95 See 
5 81 Feb 


sn 

*21461 
*581/7 
SJ 0 _ 
120778 
1 6.18* 
*11 
SSI/4 
*231/8 
*29 JOB 
*39 5/1 
II7T/3 
*227/8 
*21 
sni/6 
*217/1 
*41 1/2 
129 _ 
*0420 
148 3/4 
*11535 
*42 
1731/2 
*47/1 
*21710 
131X44 
*541/2 
*38.160 
8723/4 
dm 179 
*291/4 
* 211/2 
*12220 
596 _ 
5451/2 
*331/2 
13907 
*41 

1 471/4 
129 3/8 
*3700 
*19 3/4 
103/1 
*31 
*67 
*54 

15700 
121 
1571/4 
*35 
*60 
* TOM 

*42 

552.970 

564738 

*«25D 

*010 

nun 

S0L45U 
151910 
*24X20 
*11.160 
121230 
IB 1/4 
SIXMO 
*0 
1141/4 
1121/4 
SB 
*12 
*1500 
1311/2 
1010 
*43 
*23 1/3 
12*1/8 
*11700 
534172 
*29X0 
517X78 
*321/4 
151X50 
* 01 X 20 
*38 
*1*570 
IB 
IN 
1393/4 
*41480 
*1* 
IOI 
111230 
HAIM 
*72 13B 
*38308 
101/4 
*51 1/2 
*57 
SH 
SH 
*441/4 
I U 1/2 
*38.180 
13719 
S620O 
lit 1/4 
191/2 
1347M 
SB 1/2 
10 
14) 1/2 
*29 
SMB 


130*45 
110 2X2 
4.10 SXI 
.95- 1X3 
UO 221 
44X9 
1X1- 50 
14*32 2X2 
57.15 141 
3J0- 180 
.15 2J1 
SX|. 5X8 
511- 5H 
Jl- 5X0 
5*3- 5X0 
5270 
XUI *50 
621- 721 
6528 2.18 
*9429 
2X0- *0 
42X9 2X4 
■924 2X4 
29X5 10 
0- 70 
1 07623 
*35- 222 
1ST- 223 
4860 10 
49 Jl 7*5 
756- HI 
34477 
372- 10 
250 542 
2829 353 
2100 
4SA5 2M 
*41- 438 
30824 
36X0 40 

m a 6 

2714.19 

MJ- 3X7 
410X4 
ra.18 40 
222 *45 
340 423 

11.93 124 
1225 *57 
541- 122 
90 323 
10- 5X7 

.18- 5X3 
3821 139 
4924 229 
190 2.79 
37X7 22V 
12*20 
655 139 
2723 229 
580 *29 
12X2 27 

Mil 0 
470 .96 

17.93 
100 4X1 

4)X7 9X7 
XI- 9X7 
638X0 

34*57 
29X5 127 
250- 525 
570 4J® 
22k- 40 
125- 20 
2027 9.93 
0 10 
101.12 
127*00 
US It) 
49X4 3X2 
.16 112 
79.92 

512X2 120 
1490 4JC 
70 429 
1129 174 
3650 
125- 4J1 
250- 10 
525- 154 
430- 3X7 
2*92 0 
4931 
*97 Iff 
1X7 156 
3955 *36 
3920 Ut 
9.78 126 

1 10720 
5510 
MX9 IX* 
170 M 
4X1- IS 
<0 0 
347 J3 
1*0 1 X 1 
3161 3J1 
3X2- 111 . 
MOJO *76 


HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS 


On convertlblee having a conversion premium 
of lees than 10 %. 


*50 Nil Onraa* nun 10ft 0 Jul 
S5S Saudi Cdiit Ed! it Jl 1 2ft 97 Aufl 
*55 5uimtamoMe(onnduit7 95 Sot 
SB SaflfcvaEMricCo 4% 95 Mor 

136 lacncape Bernta 1510 6% 92 Aw 
SH MapwiptoeiMTpejanX VM 
IB TunraMen6eKateno 7%96MW 
SH inaOtaFuaneeMI ttfeBStP 
*15 Aiks Co 5% 93 Jun 

135 BubMdk NedefWB 7 92 M 
*23 AaMrtconM«8ca4|0fiuT7May 
H5 Dvnatcctranlidim 9ft 95 Mar 

*75 GtnetieagFlILB 8 9] Mar 

IM A«a«b fft9B5eo 

*30 xxotaOuttaiCa 7 94 mw 

*30 Beat* Co Ltd 6%73AUB 

■ 25 EssanuAB 7% BMay 


Jgft INovM MJaiM mjljogiujljli 
129 7XBAB maturity *1*10 

n IFtbH 305*095 Y1717B-2BUM 
Wi ItarH 20 Mor 75 Y577JJ- 40LIS 
nn IS Oct 77 IS /tarn p3B-bS 47X44 
Mfe 3O0PU mpfurUy J» 

92% 1 Dec 80 21 MW 96 Y 1810- 21*30 

112 1 Aprkl 25 Aw 00 *4 

77% 1 S*P 71 ■ Jun 93 Y 40*50" 477979 

Wft 17 AW 71 U Sea 92 Pill- p HUM 

126ft 30 Aug 12 matorrty *2*730 

UO tSeaM maturiiv HUM 

““ J Mor 13 matortty SH 

1 Feu a 15 Junto Brin- *r2KJ|ai 


inn 

132 

*1 

»5W 


1 NOV 7V UMWU Y 45750. SUMS 
l Feb 79 l Jul »3 pl0.piB.io7 


Itlft 155*079 5 May If Hop 1H - *r 318XB 


93 4J1 

5JS- 154 
50 121 
U1 1 79 
us uo 
JJ- M7; 
*fe> 20' 
-18- U2i 
171 2X7' 
10 4X1 
10 271- 
172' 1J2 
222 4X8 
225" JJi 
137- 10 
4X4- 5X7 
40 135; 


tern 12 I reload 7X503 
dm 100 Ireland 
dm 158 Ireland 
am in Ireland 
dmlB Ireland 
dm ISO I nrtond 
dm 200 I retold 


7 90 Jan 5 7X1 

sngojm ns 777 
Sfe 9 r Sot «nv> 7.95 
81A91DK Wl% 70 
■ft 92 May 111ft TM4 
X 94 Od 10Bft 7.71 
7% 95 Feb 96ft 729 


*35 

115 

80 

7J96 

7X4 


ITALY 


dm KM AdendaHaztov-Strode 
dm 180 ComaretoDlCrBcUlo 

dram CrnUub CredKo Opkni 
am iso Ferravfe Delhi State 
dm 100 FerrnvteDeite Statu 
drain onvetn inti llira) 


IfeVJon 102ft 
■ft 91 Jen 103ft 
I gyjan ui 
l%g*Mor W% 
I lifer W 
I%91 Jan 183% 

JAPAN 


70 1X5 
7J1 724 821 
171 1 JR IM 
70 147 
771 752 
7X1 721 


55 3 

7X5 7.18 UO 


724 

70 S 

Hi 

jPi 

70 7X8 6X2 
7X4 739 727 

725 80 
6X3 40 *93 
777 US 

726 70 

134 9X0 

70 825 


60 STB 

70 5805 

70 7.92 

70 70 7X4 
7.12 7X3 

7X5 9.11 

70 775 

70 7X6 

7X7 70 

829 8JI 8X2 
50 4X4 7X6 

7*3 7 JO 726 
70 7X2 7X5 
479 70 5.91 
70 7.90 

*29 7X9 *15 
70 7 25 *63 


70 720 8X5 
7.11 7X7 

628 *36 70 
7X6 7J4 524 
7X5 10 

7X8 BLB3 

70 725 

7.71 70 721 
7X9 7X7 

7X4 7X5 

UI 7X9 846 
70 729 7X7 
7X9 70 

70 70 

70 70 80 
7X0 60 

ao? o*i 

7X3 7X5 

70 70 

70 7X7 

70 10 

7X1 7X5 

70 837 

6X5 7X5 6X9 
70 727 

70 8.13 

70 843 

70 811 

8JB 111 10 
726 7X9 

7X5 1U1 

135 1 31 

UB 60 7X4 
7X4 7X4 70 
70 70 827 
7X7 7X5 13* 
131 7X9 70 


724 7J4 

7.15 7X9 

2X6 248 

695 30 

7X7 7X2 70 
7J4 7X3 

280 178 

UI 4X4 

U9 *35 

7X5 137 

732 735 

W 334 

6X4 425 

7 37 740 40 

20 m 

m< 14? 

7.16 5X0 

7.12 720 


7X7 70 721 

8X1 80 


Explanation of Symbols 


c» Canadian DoUw 
■CU European Currency Unit 
IUA Euratwan unit of Account 
L Pound Sterling 

DM DtUlXtfeMWK 

hmo warteMiem Kranrr. dm 


SDR Soeriol Drowtno RtgM* 
Y Yen 

UFR Luxembourg Franc 
JF* Stetn Franc . 

PF Franoi Franc 


*s t 


Bank Ot Tokyo Curacao 
Bank Ot Tokyo Curacao 
Full Electric Co te/w 
Fail Inti Flnaice Hfc 
HaromthGaml Ltd 
Honda Motor Ca w/w 
Honda Motor Co X/w 
Japan AM Ina 
Japon DfvukP Bank 
Japan DevetaP Bank 
Jaeea Finance Manicte 
Joses Co Lid 
Kansai Electric Poew 
Kobe City 
Ktmeaiv 
Fob# a tv 
Kobe at? 

Kobe atr 
Kobe atr 
Knife Ohr 
Kubota LM 

Lsnp-Term Credit Bank 

Mltkubista Heavy 
Mitsubishi Htbvvw/N 
Mitsubtebl Heavy X/w 
MituotsM Metat w/w 
NtenoB Credit Bonk 
Nlpeen Bfeuxui W/m 
K tePOP Sltlnaai X/n 
Ninon Steel Cara 
N tenon Tkfeara Tatesih 
Rti/ttwi Watcn W/w 
Rhvlhm Watdi X/n 
Sumitomo Flmtc* Asia 
Sumitomo Finance Aria 


090 Jun HI 70 80 

TUYOFab W8% 7X5 70 

3lh 9* AW ram 136 221 

7% 72 Feb 101 7X5 7X7 

1% -85 Jun 180ft 6X2 8.71 

3fe90Mw 104 2X1 125 

3% 90 Mor 85% *84 30 

BRUNO* Wl% 70 729 

Tfelf Sea 102% 6X6 7X6 

7ft gq Jut 181 735 7X3 

7ft gi Jul lorn 70 7X2 

5% *8 Fib 138% 4.11 4X0 

7% *84 MoV TWft 133 60 7J1 

7% 84 Fib IB7U 40 429 7X4 

5%16Jlli 99 US 581 

4% TT MOV 99 70 7X0 *0 

4ft *7 Jun T9 7X1 6X7 

7ft *9 Oct WO 7.11 7.13 

a 90 Jul lBft 7X0 7 JO 

7 YSJsd 99fe 7.12 7X5 

7ft 90 Apr 99% 7X6 7X6 7X3 

■ 90 Aufl 10% 70 739 

7fe0Dec UBfe *65 7X4 

2ft 99 AW MB% L99 3J1 

3ft 99 Apr Mlb 40 317 

3ft 99 Dec We 330 115 

7ft91AW « 7A7 7X0 

3fe90 JOT 95% *25 30 

3% 90 JOT 84ft 70 30 

6% 99 Dec rife *0 

5ft 97 Feb lift *38 

5% 98 JM 128ft 1 55 

5% 98 Jul N 7.16 

7% 90 Nov 181 


8 tl Aufl 102 


_ s 

7X1 7X0 767 
7J “ & 


dm HO 
dmH 
dm IB 
dm IB 
dram 
dm 150 
dm UB 
dm W 
dm HO 


dm an 
dm IN 
dm HO 
dm IB 
dm 100 

dm2* 
dm 250 
dm HO 
dm 200 
dm in 
dm 200 


dm 254 
dm 100 
ten 108 
dm 200 
ten 100 

dm HO 
dm 200 
dm 210 
dm IH 

ten 280 
dm 250 
dm 250 


ten 50 
dm 75 
dm 90 
dm 50 
dm 50 
dm 125 
ten 50 
dm 60 
dm SO 
item 
dm 158 

dm 100 
dm IB 
dm 200 
dm IB 
dm ISO 
dm ISO 
dm M0 
am B0 
an UO 
dm MO 
dm ISO 
dm IB 
dm 100 

dm 00 



tftWMay 

lBlft 

30 

Yohehama City 8 liAw 

LUXEMBOURG 

Hlft 


Sec Ceotr Nuciealras 

Sec Cantr NudMlros 

ME 

1 gum 

Hlft 

737 

7*94 Nov 

RICO 

97ft 




Wft 

7X4 70 



10 

in m 

Camtston Fed Electric 


100 



6* 98 AW 




11 gaMar 

H7 

9.16 


r "Si Jan 


733 

Penin PtfroMBMexlc 

11 SOFSB 

m 

188 

MISCELLANEOUS 



1 g&sro 

TOO* 

731 

irtoMinifl DOT Bk iron 

7ft*M0V 

raw. 

4.U Alt 


7% 17 Jul 

99 



61-jlB Sen 




lfe go Mav 

Hlft 

7 Ml 



Wft 

130 70 


lfe t4 Jon 

H216 

7X7 70 


(ft W Nov 

Tflfe 


Tran* Enron Nairn Gas t viNw 
NETHERLANDS 

100ft 



7% 94 Fab 

m. 

7X4 

Commodurr Finance 

7ViT2Jon 

97 

80S 

Estef (hoeidi-Haoaov) 

■nil Jun 

IBft 


t*H inoeKh-Hanauv) 

7* 18 Aug 

rife 



8 16 Dec 

101 


PMItos Gtoeflranoen 

ffeWDec 

IIM 


Philips Gtoeflamp vr/w 

3ft gi Dec 

Wlft 

7J1 


Bft gz Jun 

HHfe 



7*g40cl 

rife 

7X5 


6ft 17 AW 

IM 

60 646 

sneu inti Ftaonee sfeOfFab 

NEW ZEALAND 

UBfe 

651 6X7 



rift 

698 


7ft it May 

rife 

7J3 7X3 


7* 16 Nov 

18816 

753 IM 


6U 17 Jan 

99 

60S 


7 17 Feb 

100 

MB 6S6 


ffeVJol 

UM 

13k 


7ft 17 See 

unu 

Ui 


71k 18 Jut 

101ft 

733. 

New Zealand 

F.1IOd 

NTfe 



w. 19 Dec 

lBIfe 

70 


7fegiAw 

n 

7 M 

NewZeahnd TfeYlOd 

NORWAY 

99 

IM 


10 17 Dec 

IBlfe 

635 


1 WOT Jul 

07 

8x8 

Bergen Chy 

Bfe IS Mar 

10fe 



Bergen Ohr 
Den Nenfceindustrvok 
Den Noreto inouMrtok 
Norato HvwiMttorenln 
Nargei HYPOteMWinln 
Nwges Kammunaioenk 
Norge* Kummumtoenk 
Neren Kammunamank 
notbbj Kommunatbanh 
Hornet KummuiKUbadt 
Noigeo Kommuiwibank 
Korgea KommunoJboafc 
Nome* Konunonotcank 
Koroes KonununQloanfc 
Kerpipe 
jtafwlpe . 

NomaGai 
NutmoGos 
H ank Hydra 
Nank Hydra 
MwikKydm 
Dilo Cllv 


100 

70 

HU9 


00 

70 

70 

8X7 

90 

70 

70 


<0 

1005 


7% 0 Feb 111 .... 

6ft 99 Jun 91% 7.10 70 684 
6 90 May 96fe 650 7X3 623 
7U97MOV HDfe 7.10 629 70 

6 99 Nov 97 *77 70 619 

aft TO Oct 180ft 70 737 *44 
8% 97 MW lBlft 766 760 862 
6fe99 Jon H% *43 66t 60 

7 99 Aw IM 7X0 428 7X0 

7ft 99 Aus MB'* 70 7.12 70 

6 97 Dec life 6X4 *49 *11 

4 90 AUO 97ft 

7% 91 Jul MM 
Bfe gt Dec H3 
■ 98 Jun 101 

97ft 


6 99 Nov _ 
7% 98 Dec I011A 

7 99 Jul 
6% 99 Jim rift 
8ft 92 Jim W4 

9 92 Sep 185% 
7ft 97 Jon IB 


6X6 624 *15 
70 7X7 769 
779 7X4 8X1 
7X2 734 7.92 
*64 450 *15 
..._ feli *59 7.14 
rift 7.13 7.19 TJJ* 
60 *96 40 
13* 7X7 8.17 
70 731 8X1 
7X7 7X5 70 


am to 
dm 81 
dm 99 
dm loo 
dm 80 
am 10 
■Ml 10 
dm 35 


dm IB 
dmUO 
dm 100 


» 

SS 

ris 


aetecuy 
MtoCltv 
Oteoary 
Ode Cl tv 
Sira-Kvtne 
Statuii Den Hank* 
Stated Den Norsk* 
Truntetehn Cttv 


9 97 MW T02 70 

0% 90 Mar 104% 70 
0% 90 Jul 99% 60 
7% 93 Mar UB 7X8 
sftgsjun wft *17 
6 98 Sot rife *24 
6ft 97 Mor rife 7X2 
5% 98 AW Hft 7X9 


7X9 8X2 
*98 135 
*84 *77 
733 70 
5.10 1X6 
60 60 
70 *62 
7.71 556 


SOUTH AFRICA 


South Africa 
South Africa 
South Attica 
South Africa 
South Africa 
Esceai Eleter Supply 
EKom EledrSuopiV 

Etcern Etecfr Supply 
EKumElectr Supply 
Escorn e«lrSuppty 
Eacom EJKtr5uP9fy 

Escom Etedr Supclv 
Escam Electr Supply 
Ucwlron Steel 
I9cw Iron Steel 
new I run Steel 
teoarirenSteei 
near iron Steel 

Jatapefetber* CUv . 

dm 50 Jehannenwg Cttv 
i city 


Pott Telecom Pretoria 
South Africa Ralteav* i 
Saufn Africa fflteBwd 


I 5 

a 

5 

Gc5>uSi* D?BoPM^ . 


Spohi 

Saafti 

Aumar 

Autanltw 

Auteptetao 

EuranlteM 

Europfttas 


Rente Red Nodonal 
Rente Rad Nadenal 


SIS 

ss 


ten US 

Si 

dm 10 

dm HO 

II 

II 

tea 10 

Si 


ten 200 
dm 08 
dm IB 
dm HD 
dm 100 
dm HO 
tenHi 
dm IB 
■taiUB 
MM 


ten HO 
dm HO 
dam 
ten IB 
tenlB 
dm Hi 
ten 208 
ten UM 
draw 
draw 
dm 10 
dm 10 

dm 10 
ten2M 
ten 288 
dm 00 
ten HO 

draw 

ten 60 
ann 
ten Ql 
ten TOO 
■tains 
dm MO 
am tot 
dm 10 
dm 180 
dm 108 

ten 125 
dm 160 
dm 10 
ten 10 
dm 10 
ten 280 
dm 108 
dm 75 

ten 125 
ten HD 
ten HO 
ten 10 
ten 10 
ten IB 
dmUO 

ten 10 
dm 10 
dm HO 
dmUO 
dmUO 
dm U0 
dm 10 
dm 40 
dm 20 

dm 200 
ten 20 
dm 100 
dm 201 
ten 200 
dm 200 
ten in 
ten in 
drain 
drain 
ten in 
drain 


OftBNflv 100ft 
7% 94 Nov 103% 
T 97 Now 99ft 
IftYIDM 101ft 
7% 92 Dec HOft 

8 96 Mw M0 
Oto 97 Sep 98ft 
7*4 97 Nov nn 
1 91 May rift 
1ft 98 aw M2 
5ft 90 Jun 104ft 
I 92 Acr MM 
tfegssep in 
7% 94 JOT MOft 
7 97 AW 100ft 

7 91 Mar 99 

9 98 MW 112ft 
8ft 91 Nov 100ft 

8 96 Sot 101ft 
U 96 Oct I03ft 
614 97 Sep 97ft 

9 99 Oct 101% 
SfeVlJim 101% 
7ft 98 jun ri 
7H92NDV 96% 


SOUTH AMERICA 


6ft 98 Nw 
7ft 95 MOV 

M16DC1 

7ft 97 JOT 
8 97AU0 
6% 97 Ot* 

9% 91 Jim 
4 9IMw 
fft-HNov 
9% 90 Nov. 
7ft 94 Mor 
4% 98 Mar 
8ft 97 AW 
7 97NOV 
■ft 96 Dec 
6% 94 AW 
7 97 Feb 
7 97 Sot 
6% 96 MOV 
IftBJon 
7 91 Oct 
I 99 Od 


*6 

99 

Wft 

50ft 

99ft 

99tt 

Wlft 

94% 

93 

103ft 


HOft 

96% 

99 


SPAIN 


■ BMar 97 
Sft-WAao HOft 
7ft 98 Feb 1B1 
1 9600 W2 
6%970Ct rife 
8% 96 Feb 101 
0 97 Jon HI 
TfegjJm 78% 
Ite -91 May 102 
W Y2 MOV 189 


7X3 7XS 8X6 
5X1 4X3 7X1 
7.19 70 7X4 
80 837 

7X5 731 

7X7 752 80 
452 737 *35 
799 9X0 

7.11 70 7X4 

8B 833 
80 'J* 

7,95 758 

824 825 

135 6X4 7J1 
<32 U0 *57 
70 7X7 7X7 
8X9 80 

831 822 8X6 
60 623 70 
70 9J4 

70 8.15 6X1 

8.11 1X7 

UO 70 


70 8X7 *77 
739 793 70 
7X6 *36 8X6 
833 70 

121 aw 

655 7X5 6JB 
1X7 9.11 

829 90 *37 
1X9 US *99 
*0 L47 9X2 
111 70 

80 *0 
794 731 *42 
7X2 73* IMI 

Sg 7 *KS 

7X7 8.T2 751 
*24 *85 

8X2 *37 10 

108 *84 734 
825 8X2 *08 


7.11 60 

IM 799 

7X8 60 7X1 
6X1 50 7X6 
7JK 733 60 
*92 *<2 117 
is* im m 


in 

7X2 

827 


7X7 

1X9 

9.17 


SUPRANATIONAL 


Ablcon Dmtep Bonk 
Africoo Devetap Bw* 

Asian Devniw Bonk 

Asian Dewlap Bank 

iSSEKES 

Allan Dtrited Bank 
Aston Develop Bonk 

SSr 

Council Of Europe 
Council Of Buraot 
Council Of Eunve 
CouncHOt Europe 
Cauncfl Of Europe 

Counch Ot Europe 

Cauncfl Of Ewupe 
CnmcU Of Europe 
Council Of Europe 
Council Of Europe 
CouncB Ot Europe 
council or Europe 
Couadl Oi Eurupl 
Councfl Of Europe 
CeundlOf Emp* 
Coimcfl Of Europe 
Caundf Of Europe 
Ecs Euro Cool * Steel 
Ecs Euro Coal 8. Sleet 
era Euro Coal* Steel 
Ere Euro Cote 8 Steel 
Ere Euro Cad 8 Sleet 
Ere Euro Coal tested 
Ere Eure Coal A Start 
Ere Euro Cool 8. Steel 
Ere Euro Coal 8. Steel 
Ere Euro Coal 8. Steel 
Ea Euro Cool * SM 
Ere Euro Cbal 8, Steel 
Ere Euro Coal* Steel 
Ere Euro cod* Steel 
Ere Eurn Coal * S7e«l 
Ea Euro Coni 8. Start 
Ere Euro Cool * Steel 
Ea Euro Cool 8. Steel 
Eec Eutop Eccnom Cora 
Eec Earoa Econom Cam 
Eec Eurep Eeanwn Com 
Eec Eutop Eamera Com 
Eec Eutop Eanrni Cora 
Ere Eun» Ecnnren Cam 
Eec Euroo Leonora Cod 
Elb Eutop invert Bcmk 
ElbEurop Invest Bank 
Elb Eutop Invest Bank 
E to Eutop invert Baft 
EtoEuroe Invest Bank 


7% fek Jot 
I 17 Nov 
8 gi Apr 
5ft * MOV 
7ft -89 Aua 
tiBWOct 

10 TO Mav 
mgONav 
7%giMor 

n gi Apr 
9ft gi aw 
9V. -92 Aon 
it* 32 nov 
8ft gs NOT 

7%g4AW 

8 gxsw 

6S4 87 NOV 
tftBMOV 

7 BJill 
mBJuf 
HBN09 
7ft BMay 
7ft gf oct 

10 ff AW 
Wft Y1 Od 
10 72 Feb 
1% "72 JOT 

8 72 Jul 
Bfe 72 Nov 
7feg3Feb 
8% 73 Jut 
BfegSftov 
1ft 74 Fall 
7ft B Dee 
7ft -86 May 
7%W0d 
9ft B Jen 
6ft 77 JO! 

7 BJan 
6ft 0 Aw 
4 BNOT 
7% 0 Nov 
fftBDec 
7feg0jan 
MTOAw 
1 70 An 
HI gi Mar 

7 71 Aw 
7ft 72 Sep 

7ft gs jot 

9% 74 Jot 
I 74 Nov 
1 72 Jen 
BU-HJot 
10ft 73 oct 
Ml 74 Apr 

8 74 NOT 
7% 75 P*h 
7ft 74 NOT 
7ft 74 Mar 
7ft -86 Oct 
4ft 77 Mar 
4 VSeo 
*%BFeh 


100ft 

Ulft 

100ft 

95ft 

Wft 

111 

106% 

182ft 

W 

117 

vn 

106ft 

112ft 

IH 

10016 

Wfe 

97% 

97 

99 

102 

97ft 

99ft 

111 

WU 

109ft 

109ft 

Hlft 

181ft 

lBSb 

HOft 

102ft 

iiofe 

HSft 

98ft 

100% 

99% 

104 

99ft 

100% 

99ft 

97 

101ft 

103% 

Hlft 

» 

102te 

rat 

Nft 

108% 

99% 

UB 

101 % 

102 

IM 

107% 

Hffft 

Ulft 

700 

98ft 

101% 

UI 

IBft 

Nft 

in 


723 
7J1 
7X4 
7.0 
737 
735 
*31 
739 
732 
*46 
7X7 
7 39 
7 39 
7X3 
731 
it 


731 

70 

754 
534 
729 
9X8 
937 
*17 
70 
935 
862 
847 
8X5 
*17 
733 
150 

733 738 *39 
722 *14 *21 

734 748 7X7 

70 757 

656 7X5 60 
7X6 7X5 7 JO 
731 7X2 7X3 
852 758 937 
829 7X7 9J6 
*U 7X4 935 
BOB 70 *45 

731 10 
7 39 IB US 
738 7J6 7X1 
7.N 7X4 *17 
IMS 739 8X7 
70 7X5 8X7 

732 735 IM 

476 6X5 7X4 
70 *02 737 
727 90 

40 40 652 
*67 *31 *H 
44V *71 *53 
*56 *19 

726 *06 7X4 
825 753 9.14 
IM 734 

6X5 7X3 553 
7X6 70 

877 754 936 
7J7 70 7.T2 
7.73 7X6 70 
70 7X6 70 
8X2 70 9X3 
731 IB 70 
70 7X6 

7J7 m 

838 10 90 
856 8X5 9X7 
736 7X3 70 
135 133 135 
IM IM 

SX7 5X6 737 
*98 648 7X7 
625 *27 *68 
6X7 7.12 *0 
624 *75 *75 


Mlddb |2~ 

M0I Price Mflf Lth Cbrr 


am m 
dm 10 
dmUO 
dm 250 

pm no 

ten 256 
dm 200 

dm 290 

dm 150 

ten 50 
dm UO 
dm 50 
dm 50 
ten 80 
dm HO 
dmW 
dm H10 
ten HO 
ten HO 
ten no 
dm tv 
drain 
dm in 
dm IH 
dm W 
drain 
dm 100 
dm 50 
dm 60 
ten in 
dram 
dm 10 
dm 10 
drain 
■mao 

dm 250 

dm 20 
ten 400 
dm 250 
ten UO 
dm 200 
dm3H 

dm an 

dm 200 
ten 780 
dm in 


dm in 

dm no 

ammo 
dm 75 
Ora 200 
dm no 
tenH 

ten 10 
drain 
Ora 125 


Eta Ewdp invest BOTk 
EtoEuTOP Invest Ban* 
Elb Eutop Invert B<mk 
Eto Eutop laves? Bank 
ebEursP invest Bank 

Elb Eutop Mveri Bank - 

EtoEwap invert Bank 

Eurataai 

Eurotom 

Eureflmo 

E u ra il itei 

Euraflma 

EursAPM 

Euraflma 

Euraflma 

Euraflma 

Euraflma 

Euraflma 

Euraflma 

Euraflma 

Euraflma 

Euroflmq 

hrier-Xmeiicon Dev Bk 
Inter-American DwrBk 
lutor-AmericaaDevflk 
intortoUiwricOT Dev Bk 
later -American DevBk 
Inter-American Dev Bk 

Nordic investment Bk 

world Bonk 
world Bank 
WWW Bank 
World Bonk 
world Bank 
world Bon* 

WWW Bank 
nuridBank 
World Bank 
World Bank 
World Bank 
WWW Bank - 
wwW Bank 
world Bonk 
World Bank 
World Bank 
www Bank 


' “ 3 

7X7 747 

7X7 7jj 

uo - is 

i 7* £5 

70 7« 

70 70 CM 

7.13 . Tin 

*73 *7F a 
^ W UI 
7X5 *41 

7-« 70 

60- te 

IJ-2 6S 

50 . 10| 

« 40 70 

*» . w 


SWEDEN 



iKniftwuap 
PaseOcb 

Si 

. Cs&Sfl 

Export Credil 10%7 INot UT 


SWITZERLAND 


60 7.16 50 
A67 7X5 50 
70 733 133 
70 20 

70 7X5 rjs 
*2 431 425 
UI 60 70 
70 g.w 
UT UI M 


draw twin Bank Cora Oft 
drum s«tae sank Core Fin 


7feV*Jut 
mg* Dec 


99% 7J7 

96 342 


7J4 

126 


UNITED KINGDOM 


ten 125 
dm no 
dmHO 
ten 20 
tentt 
(tails 
draw 
dm 50 
dm UP 
dm 50 


AS lad Chemical O/i 
Barctavf O/s Invert 
BorctaveOAInvtar 
Baratovs 0/6 Invest 
Bam Centtneneol Flit 
Beeriian Ftoandering 
Baechom Group 
Bawotarlntl Finance 
BtrFInona 
DuriMhOfl 
Caurtaukta Uitl Fbi 
Guen Kean NettlefaM 
id 1 


drain id Inti FUKBcn 
ten too Metropoi Esto4» 

ZZ MigfKanc. 

Zrz rlSl Wrtmlr^w Fto* 

ii m 


zzssr, 

dmHO id inn 


7ft g< Feb 
6% -89 MOV 
mgejua 
eft g* Dec 
8ft -*2 Od 
8ft*920cf 
7% 74 NOT 
M19JUI 

TfegiDK 

■fttSHuv 
6ft 17 Jul 
EfeHNOV 
7ft ■» Dec 
W87MOT 
6ft Y2 Mar 
7 ga May 
7ft 72 Fib 

8ft good 
■ -»od 
11 -»1 od 
ffeTlJan 
7ft 73 Apr 
7fe ffjBl 
7 *88 Feb 
6ft 88 JOT 

6ft VOd 


HH 70 
Nft 7JI 
m IN 
182% 2X4 
Hue 70 
IHft 7J1 
HT% 7J1 
IH 73* 
97ft 724 

no% 7xi 

W 6XE 
M2M 7X9 
no 7X6 
19ft 7X1 
96% 7.11 

tr ui 

TTfe *JB3 
lUfe 7X6 
m 7X4 
115 IH 
110 7X9 

no 70 

HO 723 
99% 70 
91% 721 
99% 681 


7X4 
60 
70 tn 
70 7.75 
70 un 
70 
135 
*17 

6X6 LA 
*17 
IB 19 
733 6JI 
7X6 67] 
*21 *0 
7 31 
131 
7X6 in 
90 
ut 
70 
722 70 
7,11 7X1 
642 
10 AS 


UNITED STATES AMERICA 


tea to 

dmHO 
dm UB 
dm 130 
dmUO 
dm no 

dm 125 
team 
drain 
tenlU 
ten 73 
tenHO 
dm 180 
dmHO 
dmlDO 
dmHO 
ten 206 
dm HO 
draw 
dmHO 
tenia 
ten 250 
ten 10 
tenHO 
ten US 
ten 125 
ten 150 
dm 20 
dm HD 
draw 

dm W 

draia 

dm 50 


Amtneon Etpren uni 
A vsn inti Finance 
BankranaricaO/i 
Beatrice Feed* O/* 
BemMal 0/5 FJoanc 
Stock* Deck W Flnanc 
OFHmewtB BuU 
cntosro O/s Flnanc* 
EmbwioreCanttra 
Gmae o/s Finance 
GaaMimt Finance 
GauM inti FlateMX 
Inti Standard Eledri 
Infl Stoadwd Eledfi 
Infl Staedard Eledri 
ittAnffflM 

m am nn 

in Coro mm> York 
flicdanaWs Finance Co 
McttnaWi R nance Ca 
McdDnow Ftoanca Co 
PmlcoO/eFbaia 
FMip Morris Infl Co 
Fbflto Morris tail Ca 
PhfltoMwrliinnCa 
Reynokta ffl O/i 
Snory Curacao 
Perl ing-Wlnttirop Pro 
San InHFInanre 
Tarawa) toll 
U rifled Tedmatopire 
Untied Technotoaies 
Wetis Fargo toll W/w 


5W87JOT 97 

TftgiFtb tooft 
SfeYBNev wft 
7% 13 Sep Wife 
?ft if May ns 
9ft 29 Sen M4% 

8 ft 10 Aug unit 

t gum m 
9% V Jul 106ft 
Bfe 1700 lHfe 
IfeWDec Hlft 
7% 11 MOV 100% 
7% 18 Dec Hlft 
7% 13 Aug mn 
7Vj-WMuy ho% 
TfeHAug UM 
7 13 Jon 98 
7 29 JOT W% 
SfeHOd H4fe 
7ft 12 Dec 97 
7% -94 Jill lOZfe 
7% 14 Feb HOft 
9ft 29 Feb 106ft 
1% 10 Mar 106% 
TMtlODec 103ft 
7% 14 JOT Wife 
I 14 J<ll UZft 
7% 14 Mw 99ft 
7ft 18 Aua HOW 
9 12 Jul USfe 
7% 11 Od 101 
7ft 12 Dec 101% 
Cft-HNW 168 


70 
7X1 
*96 
7X5 
BXI 
722 
70 
70 
8X2 
*36 
70 
7X4 
70 
7X1 
7X6 
7X9 
724 
473 
7 JO 
1 31 
7X0 
7.17 
7X7 
7.10 . 
622 
7.T7 
7X1 
733 


SB 

IM 

60 

7X1 

90 

10 

*19 

7.72 

933 

721 

10 

7X7 

727 

7X9 

74 

*67 

734 

*71 

7.91 

70 

70 

721 

*92 

70 

725 

70 

70 

729 


BXI 731 8* 
7X4 7.H 

739 753 

10 17X2 IS 



SaWs In Nat 

1008 High unit Lad Ch-we 


M *3 


aa imp 
ABSh 
AFP 
AA*Cbl 
AST 
ATfliE 
AcnpRs 
ACMAT 

AcmaG 30a ix 
AcraEn 
Acraun 
Actvin 

Ada 4Wt 3 

AOvRos 

AteCnt 

AdvSem 

A4ML08 

AerSvc 

Aantcop .13 

Aiomb 

Alamos X0 *3 
Afaooo 
AbkAB 
AfSkBc 

Ajoten 20> sx 

Alcan wt 

Aktan 28 b 4.1 
AlexEn 
AllSaoe 
AttdRsn 

AtoSctrr 

Altai r 
Aliron 

AmrlBC 122 *4 
Am Busp 

AmAoor 1-DOa 3X 
ACeiin 

AContPf 3X4 15X 
ArnEcoi 

AFrjpfD 1JJ0 T1J 

AFnpre ixo nx 

AFnpfF 1X0 132 
AlnsMt X5e 22 
Aintapr 
ALand t 
ALndud 
AMdCir 
A/MMlwt 
AManlt 

ANIHId 1.14 SX 

ANatPt 

AmPoe 

ARea- .16b 12 
Am Rest 
AmSnnf 
ATnrat 

Am to tor 

AmPol Pf 22 *4 
Amdrpf xs HL5 
And ran 
Andraln 

AnoSA Mo 5.1 

AratAGl M3 AM 

APtdClr 

AptdDt 

Arden 

Arlvoca 

Arnold XO IX 
AsnenR 
AeoRwn 
AitrSv un 
AttraFd 

AllPrrn X6P 3 

Audvw 

Ault 

AdtOChr .16 IX 

AuTAtod 

AufnCa 

Avalon 

Avalnpf 


9ft 

% 

4% 

a 

5 

4%. 

2ft 

7% 

4ft 

ID 

7ft 


M3 J 3 
210 9ft 9W 
158 2% 2% 
Writ 2% 
105318ft 16ft 
90310ft 9Vb 
115 Aft 4ft 
82 0 7% 

415 14ft 

3 1ft Ut. 
1ft 1% 
4310 ft ft 
7A12DU) 19ft 
370 6fe 6Vk 
» 2ft 2ft 
22513ft Mfe 
15 2 ft 2 ft 
954 3ft 3% 
HOOlWi lift 
m a 3% 
74 1016 
46S 

224 ft 
34 6ft 
3039ft 
5 

74 Oft 
6 Oft 
10 7ft 

707 4ft 

na 

3* 7ft 
27A12V. 12fe 
2223 20ft 
05 7ft 7ft 
29 9 

31 3ft 3ft 
SH23 23 
34017ft 16ft 
9 Bft 
■ft 8V5 
411ft lift 
33519ft 19ft 
77125% 34ft 
58 aft oft 
9 8 7ft 

"K 

12« 5ft 4% 
2120 % » 
632 ft 

15 3ft 3ft 
9710% 10% 
30 3ft 3ft 
256 0 ■ 

8 4% 

105 7ft 

J * 

12 Oft 
206 2ft 
16 4% 
96613% 12ft 
1414 • 0ft 
339 1ft 1ft 
12 4ft 4ft 
20919 17ft 
94 1ft 1% 
. 33ft 33ft 
311 3ft 3ft 
103 7ft 7ft 
_ 16ft IS 
3M1» 15 

31 aft Bft 
147021ft 30ft 
103 2% 2 
27 9% 9ft 
476 5U 49k 
25 Oft 6ft 
83 5ft 5ft 
5ft 5Vk 


3% 

7 

9 

4ft 

2ft 

4% 


9 ft— % 
2 % 

28* . 

IB — ft 
9ft— ft 
Oft 

B + ft 
IS + ft 
1ft— ft 

19% — ft 
Oft— ft 
2ft 

14ft— 1ft 
2ft 

3ft + ft 
12ft 

3ft— ft 
9ft- % 

ft-h 

6ft 

0 —1 
5 — ft 
65* 

2 ft 
7ft 
4ft— ft 
ID 
7ft 
12% 

0Ffe— % 
7ft + ft 
29 

3ft 

23 

17%+ ft 
Bft— ft 
Oft— ft 
lift 
19ft 

24ft + % 
4ft— ft 
7ft— % 

Tf* 

5ft— ft 
20 — ft 
+ 

3V!i 
10ft 
3ft 
B 

416 
7 — ft 

9 
aft 
Zft 
4ft 
17ft— ft 
8H — 
lft— ft 
4ft— ft 

I’m V'* 
Ilk +fc 

33ft 

3ft + ft 
7ft 

14ft + ft 
15%+ % 
Bft 

20ft + ft 
2 

9ft 

4ft— ft 
6ft 
3% 

5ft 


BcktVF 

Butfels 

Bumth 

Burrtt 

BurtH 

Butrfld 

ByorC 


SqWs In N«t 

100* Hloh LOW Lost Chita 

mm row low— ft 

XVto IS 39342ft 41% 41ft— 1ft 
.14# 5.7 77 2ft 2K 2 ft-ft, 

I 16214ft 14% Mft+ % 
1 B6 re re— 

7 1ft 1ft lft 
B2 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 


CCXNt 

CNB 

CNLFn 

COMB 

CTG 

Ctxfmvs 

CcrtBio 

ColJky 

Colmar 

ConoGwt 

Canon! 


30a 63 


30 IS 


190a 20 
Ma A 


Bocard s lJ12a *2 
BncOpf 550 03 
BaneaP Z20 5.1 
BcOklPt Z50 MX 
BnTxcv IX* 12J 
BkDal s 1X0 4X 
BhLev 

BkManS 3X0 Tx 
BkNHm 1.12 U 
BnkFsr 
BkrNta 

BTrSCs 1X0 35 
Bklawa 156 *1 
BkMAmrt50 135 
BarbCr 

Barden 1JU 3X 

BorrJek 

BlTnB 

BosESC 

BeRlnff 


JOe 70 


3234ft 24ft 24ft 
3*3% 63 63 — % 

2743 41% 43 + 1% 

S 24 23fe 24 + % 

1011ft lift lift 
9127 27 27 — ft 

417 17 17 

36 0 36 

32 32 32 

9812 11* 12 + % 

84 3ft 1% 3ft— ft 
23441% 40% 40% — ft 
3450ft 50 50 

11 Wft 19 19% + % 

229 5% 5 5% + % 

29 29 — lft 

1 1 — 

9 9 

ft ft 


Sauk No 

Bov Poe 

B ayFdl 

Beamni 

Beachm 

BtUPlr 

Befwat 

Benhnun 

BeriUne 

BaricMa 

BlnaKp 

B io wwd 

BiMetJun 

BloTCC 

Btrdipf 

BIrdvw 

jiirtchr 

BUtefnd 

BtoacO 

BtorafhJ 

BlufDSo 

BlFMa un 

BhNHky 

Bivuoor 

Bahema 

BaataB 

BaothFs 

Bowafr 

Bra Imp 

BTOiNI 

Bnmnar 

BronfS 

BrdoFd 

Bril LC0 

BrpfltfF 

BrokHil 

BroKTM 

BnraiRb 

Bruc«Rb 


Me 7.1 
J» 3 
.14* *2 


1X3 112 


JO* 23 
1X0 13 


J2HT0.1 

.IM 


X0 15 
XS* 13 


ja *s 

.128 10 


Xltt J 

J4T 4J 


X# M 


«3» 

75 1\ 
4214 1% 

494 Sft 
» * 


1B1 2ft 
34 


4% 4% 

10 10 
5ft 5% + ft 
. _ Sft Sft— ft 
8021ft 21 ft 21ft 
1370 4ft 4ft 4ft— % 
2911 2ft 2ft 
‘ 2% 2ft— ft 

.. 33ft 54 + ft 

32512% 11% 12% + 1% 
*33 n5 BSD +3 
124 M6 3ft 3ft + ft 
277 4ft 4ft 4ft 
19 6ft 4ft 6ft 
320 2ft 2% ZVIl— Hi 
»«14 u l5% 14. + % 
4337 69k 5ft 6ft + 1 
94 6ft 6ft 4% + ft 
10 6% XI* Xfe 
1830% sow 30ft 
245 2ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
30119ft IB* 19ft + ft 
OK 139* 13 +.1% 
tilth » 3V1* — Ik 
1110 0ft 8ft 
343 M* 9ft 
155 Bft B 
123204b 0 
3 2ft 
' 3« 

4 
7 


Bft- ft 
9ft— ft 
I — ft 
20%— ft 
2ft— ft 
3ft— ft 
4ft + ft 

Pft ft 

4 4 — ft 

9ft 9ft- I 

7ft 

IBBllW 11 11% + % 

3141*56 U% 14*— 2 
740 3* 5 5 — * 


Cartes 

Carpttln 

Cascade 

CanllSv 

Centbnc 

Cmtfm 

CnBfcSy 

OLherBk 

CnJerSv 

CnPacC 

CPacMn 

CnPaSv 

CRsvLf 

Certran 

Chapral 

ChapEPf 

CharOi 

cneeiD 

Chet I m 

Chanrtx 

OmtfKun 

Charoks 


.11* X 
134 4.1 


IXOa 3X 
JO* 2.1 


Xt» 25 
1J0 55 


IJ0 11 X 
-10r 20 


Cfl/AUl 
Chiron 

Cb-clnc 1X4 lljn 
CfzFIni 

CtzSLn XOa 65 
CllzSPs t 
CtvFdPf U0 95 
OFdpfB 2.10 105 
ClmWF 
CfavSIv 

CUwCp J8 2 O 
CoaslM 
CCKWIHV 
CobRsc 

CoInBCO 50 2.9 

CalSv wt 

Camcaa 

Cora Be pf 

CmlDcJ 

CmclFd 

Co mi Nr uo 4jo 
CwNlFn 50e U 
Cmwfit XBe *2 
CmwSv 
CmeVM 
CmpraL 

Cmptak Ota a 

CjttoOdt 
C mHzun 
CmpRsh 
CmpSvc JMa 
CmSvn 
CoiicD ■ 

ConcCol 

Candctr 

CanStP 

Canna JB lx 
CnCapI 1X1 BM 
CnCal wt 
CnEqt 

ConsFn XS* 15 

CttHllwt 

CtiHUun 

CantStl 

CookDi 

Cares of 3X7 11 J? 
Corns Lf X6o 25 
CeurDlB 
CavsnH 
CrilHag _ 
CrtvMC 31 AM 
Creslk 

CrvmA 50 U 

CiMlna 

Cumo 

CuotCr 

CasCrim 

Cufco .14 4.1 

Cyberik 


25219% 

545 

3 

77016 
423 2 
4119 
193 7ft 
4332 
20410% 

48 Sft 
100636ft 

34ft 
1614 7 
283 Sft 
946 
914 
•114* 
522 9% 
5415* 
0522 
Bll 

171 5ft 
10W ft 
5512 
9011! 
10 1 
56 
24611 
197 6ft 
146 5 
763 fc 
640 4 

34 9ft 
>7313 

13 6ft 
5617ft 
306 6ft 
2313ft 

49 2ft 
17 6ft 
1110ft 

213523 
13620 
21 6ft 
103 3* 
130114% 
9 * 
33 3ft 
W9 3Vfe 
702* 

50 2* 
299 21b 

1 15ft 
4ft 
1127 9ft 
337 25 
1142 
611 
■312ft 
229 4ft 
346 4 
1610ft 
323 6ft 
Oft 
29 2ft 
155b 
130 9% 
112210 * 
10 65* 
23 3ft 
2115* 
40 ■ 
54018ft 
29 lft 
4% 
32 3ft 
90 7ft 
619ft 
75* ft 
M 356 
5525ft 
7618ft 
77 6 
775 7ft 
IB 3 
276 IB 
19 75* 

51 * 

35 2% 
1044 lft 
454 3* 
283 Sft 

37 3ft 
109 6 


18ft 19%+ ft 
43 43 

3 1, 

IS 13ft + ft 
lft lft 
W% IBft- % 
7% 7V. — % 

31 32+1 

18 18% + % 
Sft Sft 
2S4b 355*— * 
33 33 — 1ft 

6ft 6ft— ft 

5 Sft + ft 

46 46 

14 14 

14* 14* 

Bft Bft— ft 
15* 15* 

21 * 22 + % 
11 11 

* nu 

10ft 10ft— % 
6* 6* 

4* 5 „ 

ft ft— Kl 
3* 4 + ft 

Bft 9% + % 
12ft 15 + Sft 
6* 6*— ft 

17ft 17ft 
6ft 6ft 
13ft 13ft 
2* 2* 

6 Bft + ft 
10ft 10ft 

23 23 

19* 20 + % 

Bft Bft 
3ft 3ft— % 
lift 14% + 29* 
6 6 

3ft 3ft— % 
3* 3*— % 

28 21 
2ft 256+ % 
2ft 2ft 
15ft 15ft 
4ft 4ft 

9 9ft + ft 

24ft 25 + 1 

42 42 

11 11 

12ft 12ft— % 

4 4ft + ft 
Sft 5ft + ft 
IBft 10ft 

Bft 6ft+ % 
■% Bft— % 
2ft 2ft 
15% 15% — ft 
9ft 9ft 

10 10W— fe 
656 6* 

3ft Oft 
lift 11*+ % 
B B 

IB 18 — ft 
1* 1* 

4% 4% 

3ft 3ft 
Bft Bft + ft 

3ft Sft 
25ft 25ft— ft 
IBM IBft— % 
Sft Sft + % 
7ft 7ft— ft 
3 3 

IB IS 
7ft 7ft 

E 

3ft 3ft + ft 
4ft 5% + ft 
3% 35* 

6 6 


DAB I 

OH Tch 
DMI 

DNAPUfl 
PST JO. 

Dohlbnr 
DOT El 

paiwn JOe 

PoiAre 

OataPC 

DatoTr 

DotepY 

QaMfm 1.96 
Omar 
pexorwt 
DBott -IS* 

Dectosv 
OUpOn 
PenlM A 1X0 
PenIMB 1X0 
Pal Can .90 
OetNth ' 
Dttvtricn 
Dtccrvs X0 
OfckwtA 

Dickan B 

Dletcwv 
otreR* 
□fplElc 
Dislrib .10* 

JvlH 

DlYfun 


76 Bft 
203 lft 
1259 ■ 
485 lft 
IX 8112% 
89 4ft 
4ft 

1J 15 
2SS Sft 
39 7 
31610% 
103 3 

SX 15415% 
317 4ft 
556 2ft 
2* 20(39 S 
199 2ft 
4)354 
66 Bft 
133 ■ 
412* 
436 7ft 
171 Sft 
2027ft 
292 A 
2S 4ft 
8313% 
30 lft 

M 3 
Sft 
3511% 
20511% 


7.1 


IS 


20 


6% Bft + % 
3% 3%— ft 

7% 75* 

7ft 7ft— ft 
12% 12ft + % 
4ft Bft + * 
Bft 4ft 

15 95 

Bft 5 — % 
6 6%— ft 

10ft low + ft 

Bft 4ft— ft 

35 35%+% 

4ft 4ft— ft 
2ft 2ft— % 
5 5 - % 

256 Zft— ft 
23* 13* 

Bft Bft— W 
7ft 7ft— ft 
12* 1254 

Bft Bft— ft 
13 U% + % 
lft lft 
3 3 - % 

Sft SVb 
11 11 — % 
11% 11%— % 
9 9 — * 


Sates In 


NOf 


1008 Hloh Low Last OTBC 


OualUtt 
DUmoo ' 

DwSyj 

Durskn 

Owteht 

DvnRs 


177 4ft 4 4 — 

39 * 3ft 4 +• 
16122% 22 22 
8611% lift lift 
71 3 4* 5 + ft 

112 Bft Bft 6ft 


EB Mor 
EMC Ins 
Eatemf 
Eatvan 
EdaSti 
EKSara 
Elctmg 
EBCCo 
EmpCa* 

Enrvnf 
EnexRs 
EnaWiaa 
Envmp 
Epsca 
EatBcp 
EafBcB 
EttlloA UB 5J 
Eroum 
ErckGd 

EsexCI Z32 9X 

Eepdtn 

Ettpdt un 



5310% 

9* 

9*— ft 

-4BD SX 

3 Sft 

B% 

Bft H 

% 

19.1 

948 Sft 

3ft 

3ft 



4025ft 

25% 

25ft H 

% 

1 

16841ft 

39 

41ft 4 

2ft 


30 4* 

4ft 

4% — 

* 


5520% 

19* 

19*— ft 


315 

15 

15 


130 3X 

6940ft 

•Wft 

40ft 



2 Bft 
273 1* 

« 

7*— * 
7* +ft 


109 3* 

3* 

3ft + 

ft 


2*5 5% 

3 

5% + 

ft 


56 B 

7* 

S 


X4b 3X 

25225% 

lift 

24ft + 

2 


12 

11 

12 + 

! 


2D 26 25* 

3S010* 9* 
miift wft 


23ft 24 + ft 
23* 

9ft- ft 
10ft— ft 


FMI wt 

FaicUa 

FOletaH 


FWFdlj 
FUNPn 
Fioocf 
Flnllnd 
FlnNBc XB 3X 
FliwAun 
FABkPBAJO 2J 
FABkPBBJO 2J 
FIAFM 

FBncTx Xfl 6X 
FKaot s 1J7 45 
FlCarin JO 2J 
FtCatBs JTa 2J 
FDMtat 

Ftemp uo 2X 
FEX*C pf ZX0D10L2 
FFdfBM JO* 1.1 
FFdAud 

E 8 & " 

FtFdSC 15#U 
FfFWSL 

FtFTICl UBO SO 
FFncrp 

Hind Be lXKt 2J 
FU*n» loo is 
FJernfB 2X8 93 

ESS. MS * 
SS5. - “ 

HPeaMJ 

FPaopf U* 14X 



399 1* 

1% 

Ifc 


1674ft 

72* 

74 

+ 1% 


233 6 

5* 

6 

+ ft 

X4 

2012 

11% 

1T%— * 


26 2% 

2ft 

Zft 

7X 

3444 

42ft 

44 

+ lft 


mu 

11 

11 



21% 

21% 

21% 

29 

114% 

14 

14 

- ft 


6 3* 3* 3* 

529ft 29% 29ft 
7% 7% 7% 

334 9% 9ft 9% + ft 
3 Bft Bfe B* 

9312* 12 12* + 1 

Sft 3ft 5% 

9828% 20 28% + % 

2919ft 19* 19ft + ft 
■2 9ft 9 9 — ft 

317% 17% 17% 
14249% 48ft 49%+ * 
41523ft 23% 23ft 
1X8 IBft 17* 1fft+ * 
34226* 25% 25% — lft 
W W IB 
189 9ft 9ft 9ft 
6011* 11% lift— % 
6B3 0 7ft B + ft 
228 8* ■% B*+ ft 

533 35 35 

6 Bft 4% 6%— % 

242ft 42 42ft + ft 
344 43ft 43ft— % 
3531% 31% 31%— % 
53117* 10* TO* 
47930* 27 28% — 2ft 

7X8 41 48 

7515* 15% 15%— ft 
13710 9% f*+ ft 

1714% 14 14% + % 


Consolidated Trading 
Of NYSE Listing 

Week Ended April 4 


ATAT 

PtdtaEI 

are 

Unocal 

IBM 

CrwZoI 

Arrnco 

FardM 

AHoea 

KanGE 

GilVftt 

Phil Pat 

AMR 

AmEip 

TWA 

Calvin 

Gen El 

GMai 

SchUTip 


Satei High 
5X44400 21* 
5XSL500 16 

44 7J 7n n re* 
16844100 36* 
3X55300 SO* 
1155X00 129 
2X30000 42ft 
2X07JXM Bft 
3.740300 43* 
2X44X00 34* 
2X01.900 IV* 
U94X00 39ft 
2550000 3TA 
2X48X00 42* 
2J2SJOO 42* 
2X11J00 13* 
2X24500 IB 
2J9UOO 60* 
2J19XOO 74* 
ZJ86X00 Mft 


low Laitarae 
20* 30* —I 
15* IS* — % 
41* 43* —Jft 
34ft 35* —i fe 
0ft 49ft —1% 

T? 127 

39* 41% — * 
6* 7% — 1* 

41* 42ft +ft 
31% 33 —4 

IB* 19* +* 

34 35* +lft 
37ft 37* —ft 
« 40* —lft 
a% 41 —46 
12jh 13 +* 

Wi IS* —3ft 
SB* 60% +tvj 
77ft 73ft +ft 
36* 37ft —I 


inuti Traded In: 2193 
Advances: B45 : declines: 1X65 
unchanged: 283 
New hlens; 201 : new laws; 17 


Voleme 


19B4 aame week. 

1903 fa date 

1984 to dale 

19S3 to date 


■ 373,950X00 shares 
466vl4(L0Q0 shares 
454X90X00 SflOT«8 
7X96X71X30 snares 
4X71X10X00 Shares 
5X45X00000 sham 


Consolidated Tra ding 
Of AMEX listing 

Week Ended April 4 


BAT 

WonoB 

T/erUtm 

GltCOo 

DttfflttP 

Fttnhps 

EehoB a 

BefttBr 

Sprkmn 

Amdahl 


Safe* 

4X90X00 

3X95X00 

US2JOO 

942500 

934X00 


HMtl 

4% 

7* 

14ft 

on 

IT* 

24* 

9* 

IS 


vl 'R- 1 ' 

ij% ii* _* 

2* -S 

37* 2S — % 
11% 1|* — % 
23* 34ft +* 
lft 9% +1ft 
14% 14* 



: XL51&000 shoree 
Dow ; rtWjMOO Mures 
traded to: 092 

: 301 ; decHnes' 414 
! 177 

J*. new km*- >7 


Safes la Ner 

1008 Htefi Law Lost oifte 


-Pltftd 436 u 
FttmkIH UO 6 M 
FshffuH 1.12 2X 
Ftaith 

Ftsane MSa 5A 
Flock in 
Ftorftt* 

FloCVpr JOttSX 
FacBtttr .10 21 
Formst 

FtWvne 1X0 M 
Forum wt 
Form wtSS 
FndrFn 

FrfliFn 1.16 A3 
Fours tr 

Fmkfdl 200 A3 
FmkBc XOa 49 
FreeSG UOo 6X 
FrmFdl 
Frees L. 

F react 
FrtFSLh 
Frosts .10e 3J 
FranFd JB 23 
FutlPh X7r S 
Fdsnet 


57 56 
5218 17% 

946% 46 
1M39 39 

167 K* 14* 
1 3* 3* 
370 Sft 3ft 
139 3* 3* 
15 5 4* 

N 1% 1% 
5144 42ft 
7316ft lift 
439 3ft 2* 
32 3% 2* 
16327* 27% 
1 X% 4% 
242ft 47ft 
17216% 16% 
61721ft 27* 
541 7* 7* 
IN 9% 9% 
N 2* 2* 
5 Sft 5ft 
71 3ft 3ft 
212ft 12ft 
489313ft 13% 
136 4* 4ft 


57 +1 
17ft— ft 
.44%+ % 

M*— * 

3* 

W 

3* 

4*— % 
lfe 

42ft— 1ft 
IS*— * 
2ft— % 
2*- ft 
27ft + ft 
4% 

42ft 

16% 

28 — * 
7* 

9% 

2* — ft 
Sft 
Sft 
12ft 

U% — * 
4ft— ft 


GACLq 

GalOhrA 

Gatoob 

Gambrs 

GTelHpf 

GTelSof 

GenesB 

GttaWMl 

GermF 

GIPortPf 

Gtomfs 

GfaxH 

GoktCo 

GUFId 

GoldRa 

Got date 

GUCYCI 

Goody 

GIAmC 

GAmPrt 

GtAMa 

GTAmRS 

GtSoFd 

GuarMt 

GuardP 


275S47X 240 5* 
JB X 19236* 
58115 

X2» J 105 Tft 
.90 12J BI 7% 

1X0 I1X 68 Bft 
UQa 3J 19N 
265 3ft 
JOtt IX 7814ft 
527ft 

.10e IX 21B 5* 
.17e 1J1746B13* 
871 8% 
X71 2X 23616* 
14 2* 
I* 
234 4 

XO 2A 17913* 
.71 JJ IBft 
JOelU 217 4 
21 IS* 
30 1% 
31510* 

733 5% 

X4 3 A 613 


5ft 5* + % 
36ft 36ft— % 
14% 14% — W 
7* 7* 

7 7%+ % 

8* Bft 
0 0 
3% 3% — % 
14 14 — fe 

27 27 - ft 

5% 5% — ft 
12ft 13% — % 
17% 17% — 1 
16% Wft— ft 
Zft 2ft 

r% 1* . 

2ft 4 + lft 

12ft 12ft— % 
lift IBft 

4 4 
15* IS* 

1% 1% 

10 10 * 

5 * — ft 

13 13 


H 


hmoiit 

HPSC 

Halml un 

HamOpf 

HarknO 

HawhC 

HawthF 

HUAwt 

Her ff En 

Hlottvkl 

HkwsL 

Hoihrln 

HtwdPk 

HFdm 

Hooper 

HatizRi 

HsmOF 

HstnOpf 

HwrdB 

HydrOp 

Hviekun 


X8r IX 

1X0 5X 


X7e 3X 
1X0 2X 
JO IX 
1X0 8J 


*7 3.5 
8 7 7 

186 7* 6* 

4014* M* 

102 lft lft 

16 5 4* 

225 

127 8* Bft 
MS Jft 3H 
40 2 lft 
5138ft 36ft 
ISft Hft 
3520ft 19ft 
T7 6* 6* 
lift lift 

17 71k m 
429 2* Zft 

12 9% 9 
522ft 22ft 
251 Sft 4% 
8510% B 


5 

7ft- * 
25 

Bfe + % 
3* 

38 + lft 
ISft _ 
19ft— » 
6* 
lift 

£:s 


181 

ICEE 

IDB* 

■ DC 
I EC 
I PC 
IRE Pn 


imli .. an 
imprBc 
Imres 
Inca Rea 

tnasas 

IndBnc 

indlrsr 

ladnaF 

IndlNBf 

IdptWaf 

IndnHB 

I rid Rot 

Irdolntl 

lafSalu 

initio 

■nmedC 

InsITuE 

I CP 

InsfCps 

intek 

fnfertl 

inlrSBk 

intrcDv 

inn. te 

Intikea 

inf Lab 

intAm 

inCrna 

InDotry 

InfFim 

InFimwt 

InFlm m 

Inf HRS 
llURttSft 
InThr un 
InfHMa 

IntPlpg 

Itllrtm 

inirwit 

InvfDt 

InGNMA 

Irwin p 

frwtnnv 

Hornet 

(wiHtv 

IWwi 

itaYokd 


1X6 12J 
XBr At 
1X2 AO 


166 OS 

1JH . X4 


Air 2X 
.10 IX 


X6 SX 

1XO 

XO 4 A 

LMelU 

36 

30 

233 10.4 
-13r X 


45 6* 9 

17 7ft 7ft 
78512ft 9*. 
512 3* 2W 
10015ft 13% 
7% 7W. 
5333ft 33% -I 
6 4* 4* 
24 2B 20 
73430 27% 

7130 29ft 
351 3ft 3* 
8214% Uft 
77 Sft 3% 

75 2% 2% 

403 13* n 

95 7ft 6* 
113 B* 8ft 

zsa st 
ISSSS, 

73 M n 
21911* W* 

B * * 

AM 4% 4* 

1218 3* 3W 
1173 7 4ft 
3043ft 47ft < 
529 2H 2* 
IM 1% * 

678 4* 5% 
253 2* 2% 
191 7* 7 
4129 T4* IT 
84 3* 3ft 
3226* 26. ! 

g,i i'» 

11 7ft 71ii 

U 7 U * 1 
4 A 
14 2% 2% , 
' IllSi -ITO ! 

zn <ft. 6 

10441* 40% ‘ 


JMBf 

JP Ind 

■teWOcP 

jevnRec 

JefAvn 

JoneVs 

Jaeim 

Jtldyg 


1X4 « 4310 !• 

3916* M* 

t 16ft H* 

“ i» a 

.Me 2J 25 » » 
1X0 AM 32029% -SM 
.B 2X 3 i 


IB — % 
life 

% 

5h+ * 

29W.4- » 
. 5 


Komnaf 


TM 3*’ 3»- 


(Conlinueff on^agf 





Kawtank 

sssgss; 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 


Page 9 




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New Eurobond Issues 



Issuer 

Amount 

(raitl/ons) 

Mot. 

Coup. 

% 

Price 

Price 

end Terms 

.week 

floating rate note 

GoldStar 

5 30 

2000 

y* 

100 

— Qwfr month libo>. Cafablo ot por afar 198B. Redeemable 

a per In 1968. 1991. 1994, and 1997. Deneminafittw 
JtOjOOO. Sms 1HV 


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S500 

2005 

1/16 

100 

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SltUXfi. Fm 0m 


Tofoi Bonk . 

$» 

1989 

1/16 

100 

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*»ra 0 fHr. Golohl* « pof in 1986. FfeoSng Halo CertHkort* 
of Daposir. Oswoiniiiunora StjOOOjODO. 

FIXED-COUPON 

Genera! Reinsurance 

$100 

1992 

11 % 

100 

9650 CoBatfe crtlDlft oftw 1990. 

Mitsui Trust finance 

$100 

1990 

lift 

100 

97.12 Noneofcblft. 

South Africa 

$75 

1991 

121* 

9916 

97.25 Nnncoflobfe. 

lira on Pacific 

5100 

1992 

lift 

100 

97 JS Cofeftfa oMOlh nfw 1990. 

Asian Development 
Bank 

DM200 

1997 

7K 

9916 

99.00 NpneeBabVh 

E5COM 

DM200 

1993 

m 

9916 

99.00 Nonenlobin. Incruud from DM150 miSan, 

Pearson & San 

ClOQ 

1992 

zero 

4866 

46JQ0 Nonoofabh. 

ANZ Banking 

ECU50 

1992 

9% 

100 

99515 Nonecfebta. 

Rabobank 

ecu75 

1995 

9M 

100 

99.12 NonoaBabia. Inaeoiad From ECU50 tnfifion. 

Chrysler Credit 
Canada 

csSO 

1992 

12% 

100 

9775 NancdtaH*. 

Hydro-Quebec 

aioo 

1995 

1214 

100 

97J37 Cobble a! 101 in 1992. 

N.V. Philips 

DFlOO 

1990 

716 

100 

99 JO NoncafloMe. 

ESC DM 

SAS50 

1990 

16 

— 

98 75 Nonafabfa. 

WARRANTS 

Sony 

$100 

1990 

open 

100 

102JX) Eodi $5,000 bond wlh ora warraiti exertsabie info compa- 
ny ihores at on crtieipatwJ 2 premium. Term to be set 
April 9. 

EQUfTY-UNKH) 

Chugofcu Marine 

Paints 

S100 

2000 

3% 

too 

— Sanaanrnidty. CaBabie ta 104 ei 1988. Convertible at 378 
yen per dm and at 251 JS yen per dollar. 

Sumitomo Speed 
Metals 

$50 

2000 

3 

100 

— Semiannually. Callable at 104 in 1988. Convertible at 4,185 
yen per share. 

Yokogawa Hokushin 
Electric 

DF100 

1990 

3tt 

100 

— Semiarmuofy. Convertible at 1,340 yen per share. 

Fanuc 

y20,000 

1995 

open 

100 

9975 Seniannuol coupon vxScated at 2%. CaBabie at 102 after 
1990. Convertible at an ontieipatad S% premium. Terms (a be 
set April?. 

Nisshinbo Industries 

Y15.000 

1995 

open 

100 

98.00 Seinianiiud coupon indicated of 214%. Caflable-at 102 after 
1990. Convertible eA m vdiopated 5% premium. Terms lo be 
set April 9. 

Sek»ui House 

vl 5,000 

1995 

open 

100 

9825 Semanmid coupon inrSceAed at 2WX.Cefc±*e at 102 idler 
1990. Convertible or an antiapated 5% premium. Terms to be 
set April 11. 

Sony 

Y30.000 

2000 

open 

100 

9975 SemianmJQl coupon indicated at 2%. Calable at 104 in 198& 
Convertible at an anticipated 5% premium. Terms to be set 
April 9. 


Deficit Plans Good News to Investors 


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(Continued from Page 7) 
yielding just under 11.15 percent, 
bankers estimated the new issue 
would come to market with a cou- 
pon of 11% percent and would be 
offered (less the IK percent selling 
commission) to institutional inves- 
tors at a yield of 11.6 percent. 

This is considerably more than is 
available on paper d enominated in 
Deutsche marks, guilders or Euro- 
pean Currency Units and ride, of a 
franc devaluation is seen, limited as 
these currencies are all part of the 
European monetary system. 

Yields on British pound-denomi- 
nated paper are about comparable 
to the expected level on the franc, 
but the pound is a “petro-curren- 
cy" not finked to thcEMS and 
therefore volatile. The recent heavy 
volume of pound issues has glutted 
that market and even the newly 
inaugurated pound zero-coupon is- 
sues have fallen out of favor. 

Bankers argue that the lax sav- 
ings that zero-issues represent for 
domestic UJC investors (which 
were supposed to be the major sett- 
ing attraction) do pot match the 
advantages of buying discounted 
bonds in the gilt market. As a re- 
sult, the £100 millioa nominal 
amount of seven-year zeroes of- 
fered by S. Pearson at 48% percent 
of par value ended the week at a 
214-perceat discount 

Canadi an -dollar bonds also car- 


ry highyields, but last week’s issues 
from Chrysler Credit Canada and 
Hydro-Quebec failed to attract 
support as the terms were unattrac- 
tive compared with what investors 
could buy in the domestic market. 

Yield levels were obviously a 
matter of indifference to investors 
rushing to buy the first Euroyen 
convertible bonds issued by Japa- 
nese companies. Sony and Fanuc 
both sold 15-year bonds which are 
expected to cany microscopic cou- 
pons of 2 percent. 

As of April 1, Japanese compa- 
nies are allowed to issue Euroyen 
bonds free of withholding tax. Up 
to now, only foreign issuers have 
upped the straight Euroyen mar- 
ket. The Euroyen paper, however, 
can only be sold to investors in 
Japan three months after the 
launch abroad and for them it will 
not be tax free. Brokers win be 
expected to withhold 20 percent of 
the coupon payments for the tax 
authorities. 

The yen will obviously appeal to 
many Japanese borrowers eager to 
eliminate the currency risk. But 
bankers say tins does not mean 
Japanese borrowers will shun other 
markets. Sony, for example, simul- 
taneously offered $100 million of 
straight debt carrying warrants to 
buy shares at a premium of about 
216 percent over the prevailing 


little Reaction to U.K. Bank’s Move 


| 19J. I'i 


j::c 


a ; 


if -r 


u; 


(Continued from Page 7) 
is now unflaierally imposing to as- 
sure the soundness of b ankin g op- 
erations in Britain. 

The first of these was put into 
effect last May, when the bank 
moved to halt what it feared was a 
dangerous pyramiding, of bank 
capita] via the floating-rate-note 
market where banks are the biggest 
purchasers of other bank-issued 
capital notes. The Bank of England 
said that banks would have to de- 
duct from their own capital base 
any holdings of another bank’s 
capital paper. 

At the time, that move was seen 
as the death knell of the FRN mar- 
ket. In fact, FRNs last year for the 
first time exceeded (by about SI 
billion) the volume of fixed-rate 
straight dollar debt on the Euro- 
bond market and so far this year 
the volume of FRNs is running 
about 33 percent ahead of fixed- 
rated dollar issues. In short, the 

business is arranged in London but 
obviously booked elsewhere as no 
other regulatory body imposed 
similar restrictions. 

Thus, as matters now stand, the 
bank’s move on underwritten note 
facilities is not seen as directly driv- 
ing up the (very low) cost on these 
transactions. 

This is not to say costs will not 
increase. To the contrary, the ex- 
pats putting these packages to- 
gether believe they wifi- And, ironi- 
cally, they see the market evolving 
in exactly the direction die Bank or 
England would prefer. 

At present, the wafer-thin front- 
end commissions and annual un- 
■i. .. ,, derwriting.fees paid to banks is 
st ... J i s - £• ' seen by them as their ante for ac- 
-•* :> . >’ cess to the short-term notes to be 

- : ‘ "" sold to investors. The assumption is 

that the profit earned from buying 
the notes from the issuer at one 
price and selling them to investors 
at a higher price will more than 
cover the tow fees earned for pro-. 


(which obliges banks to buy the 
notes at a fixed maximum cost if no 
other lower bids are submitted). 

But market experts say that few 
banks supplying the backup lines 
are bidding aggressively enough to 
receive paper. The commercial 
banks then find they have tied up 
their capital resources for little in 
return. 

The experts see this as ultimately 
leading to a separation of the note 
sale from the credit line — mother 
words, the creation of a true Euro- 
c omm ercial paper market where 
the placement of notes wQ] be done 
on a best-efforts basis by one group 
of banks and (he hap jrnp line at full 
market prices will be provided by 
another group of banks. 

A few such Don-underwriuen 
note facilities have already come to 
the market and many experts be- 
lieve this is the wave of the future. 

Meanwhile, the only major oper- 
: ation launched last week was an 
underwritten note facility of $600 
million for Deere & Co., the 


floating rates of interest and de- 
nominated in cither dollars or Brit- 
ishpounds. 

These medium-term notes fall 
outside the underwriting commit- 
ment, meaning banks are under no 
obligation to bid for or take such 
paper that would be transferable 
for sale to others. Theoretically, 
Deere could issue $600 million of 
short-term notes and as many me- 
dium-term. notes as underwriters 
were willing to bid for. 

Ind o nesia this week is expected 
to announce terms it has accepted 
for a $4flO- milH nn, eight-year un- 
derwritten facility. 

Bangkok Bank, which is arrang- 
ing a $75-inillion, five-year under- 
written facility will nay underwrit- 
ers an annual fee of 1/16-perceot 
(6.875 basis points). The certifi- 
cates of deposit the bank issues will 

bear a maximum interest charge of 
10 baas points over Libor. The 
bank will pay a commitment fee of 
5 basis points for any amounts un- 
drawn and a front-end fee of 10 


world's largest maker of farm basis points, 
equipment machinery. The facility Spain’s Autopistas del Adantico 




SiS* 1 


il ,• 

I'.f 


! J2 


J.K* 


;iu - 

y'i- ■ << r 

£ -7* *• 

■'* 2 r- 
£«> 

II* 

4. 

J 2» 1 
H-; if 
•5 k £ • 
n 


runs for five years ana underwriters 
will earn an annual fee of 15 basis 
points for the first three years and 
17 j basis for the final two years. 
(There are 100 basis poims io one 
percentage point.) 

The notes, which will be offered 
for maturities ranging from one to 
six months, will bear a maximum 
interest charge of 22J basis points 
over the London interbank offered 


is refinancing $230 million of exist- 
ing debt through a new 10-year 
syndicated bank loan of $115 mil- 
lion and $115 million of eight-year 
FRNs baring a coup on erf 1 1/16- 
point over Libor. TheFRN is guar- 
anteed by the government while the 
credit is guaranteed by a govern- 
ment-owned bolding company. 

Hungary is in the market for a 
with the World 


rate or, if used as a backup for the Bank. Commercial banks are being 
sate of commercial paper in New asked to put np $264 million for 



Yak, 225 basis points over the 
New Yock interbank offered rate. 

Deere has the option of 
its own *ft*«%»* on the notes 


eight years with interest set at %- 
point over Libor. This is much low- 
er than Hungary has previously 
paid (1% points over ubor) and 


offering paper to underwriters or much lower than the split %-%- 


asking for bids from a tender panel 
The tender panel of senior un- 
derwriters (those committing for 
$50 millio n) may also be asked to 
bid for xnemum-term notes (one to 


spread , that some bankers 
weted — a further indica- 
tion of how hungry hanks are for 
new business. 

The World Bank will provide an 

I -ii* . * m/ 


riding the backup line of credit -five years), bearing either fixed or additional $36 million for years. | 


price compared with the 5 percent 
premium expected on the yen 


In part, bankers said, the curren- 
cy choice was dictated by the large 
amount of capital Sony is seeking 
to raise and in part because the 
company wanted daUar-denomi- 
nated liabilities on its balance sheet 
to neutralize any effect currency 
changes would have on its dollar 
assets. 

Bankers expect that companies 
which desire to see a rapid conver- 
sion of convertible bonds into 
shares will continue to tap the 
Swiss franc or Deutsche mark mar- 
ket (because those private place- 
ments lack liquidity, which can 
only be achieved by buying the 
shares). The dollar market will con- 
tinue to attract those companies 
that are less eager to see conversion 
and the yen market wiD appeal 
most (aside from currency consid- 
erations) to those seeking to delay 
conversion for as Jong as possible. 

Bankers said that the Sony and 
Fanuc (a major player in the. robot- 
ics market) offerings were grabbed 
up by retail clients while institu- 
tional buyers went for Nisshinbo 
Industries (textiles) and Sumitomo 
Special Metals, which are seen as 
having greater speculative poten- 
tial if a cyclical recovery gets un- 
derway. 


Mood Shifts 


With Market 


By Michael Quine 

.Vew York Tima Sente* ! 

NEW YORK - Faced with a 
host of conflicting economic devel- 
opments, the credit markets seem 
vulnerable to continued sudden 
shifts Of mood that may be exciting 
for traders, but are anathema to 
many potential investors. 

“Concerning near-term econom- 
ic prospects, market opinion has 
fluctuated widely in reccm weeks." 
analysts at Aubrey G. Lanstnn & 
Co. said is a market newsletter. 

The fluctuations have played 
havoc with interest rate forecasts, 
since expectations of lower interest 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

rates stem from signs of a weaken 1 
ing economy, while forecasts for 
higher rates follow from economic 
, strength. 

New Treasury notes and bonds 
sold in the Iasi week of March are 
still trading above their average 
auction prices, but specialists in the 
government securities market said 
speculative and investor activity 
was light last week. 

By the time trading stopped late 
Thursday, yields on government se- 
curities were little changed from a 
week earlier, with three-month bills 
at 8.11 percent, two-year notes at 
10.46 percent, seven-year notes at 

1 1 .64 percent, and 30-year bonds at 

11.65 percent. 

Yields for notes and bonds 
would have bam slightly higher, 
except for a rally Thursday after- 
noon following a U.S. budget com- 
promise that could cat more than 
$50 billion of the 1986 federal defi- 
cit. 

Analysts at government securi- 
ties firms said lower deficits would 
contribute to lower interest rates, 
especially for notes and bonds, but 
added that they needed to learn 
details of the legislative package to 
be sure it would result in a $50- 
billion reduction in the Treasury’s 
borrowing needs. 

Friday’s employment statistics 
were an ambiguous development, 
despite the sironger-than-expecied 

381.000 increase m non-farm pay- 
roili The gain, which was coupled 
with an increase in the hourly work 
week, was stronger than the 

1 12.000 in February, and led econ- 
omists to predict healthy increases 
in personal incomes, retail sates 
and industrial production this 
month. 

Although the consensus forecast 
is for continued economic expan- 
sion through 1985, some econo- 
mists see the condition of the man- 
ufacturing sector as a glaring 
weakness that could Might the rest 
of the economy. 

Rather than worry about rapid 
money supply growth, stronger 
credit demands and higher interest 
rates associated with the third year 
of an economic expansion, they say 
the credit markets should be pre- 
paring for a drop in economic ac- 
tivity and lower interest rates. 

Walter J. Williams, president of 
A me ri can Business Econometrics, 
said the economy is likely to slump 
into a recession this quarter, led by 
weakness in spending on capital 
goods. 

Even if the economy does not fall 
into a recession and bring on the 
one-perceniage-point drop in over- 
night interest, rates and nearly half- 
a-percemagp-point drop in Trea- 
sury bond yields forecast by Mr. 
Williams for June, there are other 
analysts who see enough weakness 
in the economy to argue against 
higher rates. 

One reason the Fed is un 
to encourage higher rates, a 
ing to Irwin Kellner, chief econo- 
mist at Manufacturers Hanover 
Trust Co. is because “doubts still 
exist regarding the strength of to- 
day’s business expansion, particu- 
larly in the goods- producing sector 
of the economy where numerous 
industries are being negatively af- 
fected by rising imports.'’ 


U.S. Consumer Rates 

Far Wmk Ended April 4 


Passbook Savings. 


5 JO % 


Tax Exempt Bonds 
Bond Buyer 20-Bond Index. 


9.63 % 


Money Market Funds 
Donoghue's 7-Day Avorago. 


139 % 


Bank Money Market Accounts 
Bank Rata Monitor Index 


72S % 


Home Mortg a ge 
FHLB av er age.. 


.1170 * 




Din 

Bto 

Ask 

YW 

4-tl 

SJ» 

490 

434 

4-U .. . 

777 

7A9 

7J1 

4-73 .... 

7.45 

7J9 

7S2 

S- 2 .... . .. .. 

7J1 

7A7 

741 

S- 9 

7JJ2 

772 

748 

S-14 

. .. 7.99 

7.93 

811 

S-23 

. . 8JO 

777 

814 

sao 

... . wn 

737 

817 

4-4 

7JI 

7J3 

804 

4-13 . . .. 

... 0.14 

BPS 

891 

4-90 

8.11 

us 

820 

4-27 

. . 0.12 

BJM 

832 

?• S 

0.13 

811 

839 

ftll 

877 

821 

858 

MB 

BJ0 

824 

855 

7-9S . 

8J8 

824 

854 

J 

8Jt 

827 

841 ' 

4-8 . 

tM 

838 

874 

US 

ur 

840 

878 

8-92 .. . 

8AB 

844 

80 s 

8.99 

MS 

844 

US 

W 5 ... 

&51 

847 

890 

9-19 . 

BJ5 

849 

894 

9-19 

U4 

850 

896 

MS 

ass 

8S3 

921 

10- 3 . . 

. .. 041 

859 

«J» 

1W1 

844 

U2 

9.14 

11-29 

172 

848 

973 

19-94 

070 

844 

97* 

-1994- 

M3 ... 

... • 874 

872 

US 

MO . . . 

. ... 879 

873 

942 

M# 

... . AS1 

879 

9J2 • 


Source- Federal Reserve Bank, 


Gold Options (prices in S/obi}.! 


Mm 

*V 

** 

Nor. 

320 

1250)45) 



330 

775-975 

167M 873 



3C 

500- a® 

1300-1500 

71752125 

350 

350- 500 

WS11T5 

1700-1900 

360 

25S <00 

875 825 

11754535. ; 

370 

ITS 125 

475-825 

1075-1225 | 

380 


125-475 

825-975-1 


Get* 31740.3175) 

Wens White WcMSL&j 

I. Qori <fa Moat-Mane = ' 

!2II Geneva I, Swtasertsad 
TcL 310251 -Tries 28305 


U.S. Trade Nominee Is a Pragmatic Negotiator 


By Steven Greenhouse 

.Vew York Times Semee 

CHICAGO — Ten years ago. the United States was e n gage d in 
what was known as the cheese war with the European Community. 

The United States accused the EC of subsidizing its cheese, and 
Clayton K. Yeutter, an assistant secretary of agriculture for interna- 
tional affairs, was in charge of negotiating an end to the trading war. 

Mr. Yeuuer considers that as his finest hour. 

“That was (he first time in Common Market history that they 
agreed to withdraw some of their agricultural subsidies,'' said Mr. 
Yeutter, nominated last week by President Ronald Reagan to be 
United States trade representative. "It made some of the Common 
Market's agricultural ministers very unhappy.’ 

Many of Mr. Vernier's associates said that the Chicago executive 
seems to have spent his whole life preparing to be the nation’s special 
trade representative. He currently is president of the Chicago Mercan- 
tile Exchange, erne of the world's leading futures trading arenas. He 
served as deputy special trade representative from June 1975 to 
February 1977. 

Before that he helped oversee the rapid expansion of UJ>. grain 
exports as assistant secretary of agriculture in charge of intemanoua] 
affairs and commodity programs. 

Mr. Yeutter’s associates described him as a tough, tireless negotia- 
tor and an ideological free-trader with a pragmatic bent. 

“He is imbued with principles of free trade but he recognizes the 
importance of furthering the interests of the United States,” said 
Donald M. Nelson, an assistant spatial trade representative for 
agricultural affairs who brows Mr. Yeutter from their days in the 
Agriculture Department “Thai means he won't be doctrinaire, be wiD 
be very pragmatic.” 

Discussing bis views an trade at a news conference Wednesday and 
in an interview in his office overlooking the Chicago River, Mr. 
Yeutter said: “There's no question that my basic philosophy in trade 
is 100 percent in line with that or President Reagan. That is, an 
orientation toward a free and open system, but with a recognition that 
trade has to be fair. 

“There has to be a level playing field out there,” he said. “It’s 
important for the US. to protect its own interest on trade issues, and 
that certainly does not put me in the protectionist category.” 

During his seven years as president of the mercantile exchange, Mr. 
Yeutter has remained involved in international relations. For in- 
stance, he is in the middle of negotiating with, the Japanese for the 
right to use a Tokyo Stock Exchange index for futures and options 
trading. He also has traveled extensively to Europe to uy to persuade 
investors there to trade Eurodollar futures and outer currency futures 
and options at the Chicago exchange. 

The exchange, often called the Merc, is a bustling trading center 
where people buy and sell contracts on agricultural, currency and 
interest-rate futures. During Mr. Yeutter’s tenure there, its volume 
has more than tripled, to 44 million contracts last year. 

Gaytan Keith Yeutter (rhymes with writer), who was bam Dec. 10, 
1930, in Eustis, Nebraska, has come a long way from his childhood in 
what he described as a 2^00-acre (about 1,017 hectares) “com and 
cow” farm. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of 
Nebraska in 1952 and after spending five years in the Air Force, he 
returned to ran the family farm. 

He received a law degree in 1963 from the University of Nebraska 
and a doctorate in agricultural economics there three years later. 

“He is an extremely intelligent man,” said Michael S. Tomer, a 
professor of agricultural economics at the University of Nebraska 
who was iftaehmfl there when Mr. Yeutter was a graduate student. “I 
think his most outstanding characteristic is his capacity to work. He 
just has a phenomenal ability. He is one of a half a dozen people I 
know who I would put into that category.*’ 

Mr. Turner remembers traveling throughout Nebraska with Mr. 
Yeutter as the recent law graduate explained estate p lannin g and a 
new stale code to fanners. Mr. Yeutter was hired as a professor at the 
university and later became director of the its agricultural and 
technical assistance program in Bogota, Colombia. 

It was at that time, from the fall of 196S to the fall of 1970, that he 



T>» N«w fort Timei 

Clayton K. Yeutter, nominated to be U.S. trade repre- 
sentative, at his Chicago Mercantile Exchange office. 

not only learned Spanish but also developed an abiding interest in 
international trade, especially as it relates to agriculture. 

With regard to the hottest trade issue of the day, trade relations 
with Japan, Mr. Yeutter refused to discuss what he might do to relieve 
the tensions. 

“The Japanese relationship is an extremely important one,” he said. 
“In the western world, that is our most important economic and 
political relationship by far. The rhetoric certainly has become in- 
creasingly harsh, not always without good reason.” 

“Perhaps the tensions will be defused by actions of other nations” 
rather than by actions of the office of the trade representative, he said. 

Mr. Yeutter is married to the former Jeanne Vierk. who also 
graduated from the University of Nebraska. They have three sons and 
a daughter — three are university students and one is a lawyer. 

Mr. Yeutter, who colleagues say' often works from 7:30 A.M. to 6 
P.M., said he had little time for fun. He skis occasionally, and said he 
tries to walk around Chicago as much as possible for exercise. 

Minutes after Mr. Reagan announced that Mr. Yeutter would be 
nominated as trade representative, Mr. Yeutter telephoned the news 
to his 88-year-old mother in Nebraska. 

“When I called her from the White House, all she warned to know 
was how long I’d have to stay in the job,” Mr. Yeutter said. “She 
always wants to know why anyone would want to live in Washington 
when they could live back home in Nebraska.” 



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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 


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a 14 

® 2. 15 

Kevlln 

Kevean 

KeystFn UM SA 

Klnelnt 

KngWM __ , , 
Kinney -10e 1.1 
Klnavpf 127 11* 
Kfatnrt 

KloafG 123* A3 
KlosVd 

KnapaV L30 14 
KvteTc 


BSVz + 2 

6* 

TVi 

14 + to 

1016— to 

live. 

SW— W 
II -1 
in 

7%- ft 
2zw— % 
8% 
raw 

sw— to 
mb— lib 
6H + W 
381b— 2 
3W— lb 



Sales in 
100| High 


Net 

low Last aim 


LCSs 
LSILtO 
Lacan a ,15a 
Ladlwnf 2*3 4* 
LUTTAS 


LdITBl 

LonoTl 

LasarCo 

LeadDv *4e 12 

L tct 

UbtvHa 20 20 


Uohnrt 

Lielna 

UncFIn 1*0 U 


LlncLta *0 3* 
UrtcSv 

UttlArt 20 32 
LoonAm 

LouGSpf T2S II* 
LouGpt 1*4 11* 
LvonM 


7to 714 
164b lib 
Mb 9H + va 
mt 2916 
914 JVC— *b 
gib a lb— ft 
z% 2 % 
b a - w 

17 17—44 

1014 KJV* — to 
20to 20V.— 44 
44b 444 — lb 

48 48 

itib mt— is 

2V. 2V. 

22 22 

llU 1TW + IS 
1046 104t 
154* 1544 
1B4* 104* 


MARC 
MCI wi 
MCMCp 24 
MMI 

MP3 Be 1*0 
MSI El 
MooelPI 
MooicC 
Moonol 48 


41417V. M'S H»— W 
7150 In lft fib + lb 
22 12111 11 11 

353 5ft 44ft 444 — 14 
25 1034- 34 34 

22 31S 3V. 31t 

214 3th 31* 3W + % 
1121 Vb lb lb 
1*041540 144b 14*1— > 


r+ % 

194b— lib 

2544 

15W 

74b + 1* 

T- « 

54m— lib 
51b— lb 
42 
2V* 

3 — lb 
31Kb 

9lb+ 4b 
44b— lb 
121b— lb 
zrs 4- v. 
214* 

10 1 
T24b— 4b; 
11 

111* + • 1* I 
24b— lb I 
13 


3544 34 + It 

13tb 131b— It 
144* 1744 + 11* 

14b lft +ft 
T2W 1214 

27 27 

sit ns 
“■ft 38 * 

20V. VfA 
195 WSW+1 

Tt 1 *- 

3V, 34* + It 

124* 131* + lb 

2% 2% * 
551b 54 
Mb Mb 
424* 4344— lit 
204* 284* — )b 
7 7 — 4b 

3 3 

171b I mb + 1 
14V. 14V.— 1 


14 84* 

24a 1* 2719 

12 4 

120 5* 2918 

in 

451 7V» 
2*4 1SB 23154* 

1*0 3.1 4532 

1« 
1073 34b 
.14 2* 35 7 

.14 2* 32 7lb 

29 34b 

2Ae A 227317V. 

3438 
261 SV. 
122 54* 
284 51b 


5Vb — 4b 
251* + lib , 
tit 

3W+ to , 


171b 

2014 + Tib 
19 

18 - V. 

14lb 


2.10 7* 201281b 
1.20a 44 9281* 


1*2 0* 2930V. 

4115 

3337 

1*9011* 129144b 


121b 124* + 4b 
5 54b + 4b 

31* 3U> 

4h 1 + «b 

2th 2th— * 

k L + * 

AW AW 
9 V 

24b 24*— to 


T7to 171b— W 
31* 31* — ft 

31* 3U 
41* 41* — W 

2BM 281b 
27W 271b— 1 
25 251*+ 1* 

15 14+1 

37 39 + 2W 

144b 144b 
54* *W— lb 
37 37 —1 

Alt A4h — Th 
W lb 

T2W 121S — AH 
24* 24* 

17Vb 17W 


AO 401 Alb 
1 4 

15 171 14W 

431 
11345 

1* 184 1244 
94 54b 
1931414 
55 2M 
50 SW 
113 2tb 
103 94* 
47 71* 
109 44b 
40 SW 
AJ 528284* 
8* 434314b 
.139 24* 
7* 15 4 

54 4 
538 3tb 
1141W 
442 3 
114134b 
125 2% 
2* 34301b 

318 4Yb 
34 1432 

207 51b 


11 18 
10 io- 

1th 2W+ 1* 
154* 154* 

314* 32 + V. 

WW TOto 
4* W.— ft. 

3tt 31S— 4b 

7 7 

7Mj 7W 

34* 34b 
171b 17W 
35 35 —3 

8h SW 
54* 5H— W 
44* 44*— 4b 

W 1b— M 
«W 0W 
4 4 

MW UW 


+ 

114* 124* + T 
«H 54b 
124* 141*. + lit 
2W 2W 
BIS 81*— IS 
2lb 3W 
9W 9W— IS 
71* 7V* 

0W 5W — V. 
84b BW 
20H 271*— 11b 
294* 304b— 14* 
24b 24* 


250 8.7 22729 284* 284*— IS 

34* 34* 34* 

t 9924 23V. 23W + IS 

J»e 3 282 4% 4W 4 vs— 4b 
IJOa A5 839 39 39 

2xe 93 131 Z44b 24W 34H + W 
1379 6.7 3919 19 19 

ZA2 6% 6to AH 
159 3 ZW 2W 
JMo A 209154!. 15W 154* + IS 
- 45 34b 31b 3W— IS 

J0 15 133 33 33 




1487 7ft 71* 7W + W 
48 44* 4 IS 44* + W 
*3 StA 81* BIS . 

29 34b 34b Mb— H 
1M 3.,, 2W 2%— Hi 
1094 4b 4* to— K 


SPIPfl 
STV 

saeeAl J2a u 
SaooDii 

SIHIGd UOe 9 JO 
StJae 


4 4 

31b 3tb 
41W 41W 
24* 24S — IS 
131* 13Vb— W 
2V. 24* 

201* 2514— W 
34* 34*— H 

31 32+1 

44* 5W+ 4* 


I iUOO 

SahnNt 
Salic* 

Sand Rag 

StMonB 40b 25 
Santas JNe 25 
Saul .14b 4 9 
SavBa» .lSe J 
SavrFd 
SamnO 
Saxtnln 
SeanO wt 
SconOun 


Ji 10 
Saaftwk t 

SaalleT f ■ 

Sebmcun 
Shonlov 


BW BW— WI 
MS* 23 + 2« 

51* 6%— l* 
181b 181b 
SW JW 
10 10W— W 

■1BW 1BW 
94* 94* 

154* 154* + W 
1B46 II + 1* 

2 2 — W 

2T1S 21to — W 

2W 2W— lb 
44b 44b 
22W 22W 
3tb 4 — 4b 
BIS IIS 
84* 84*— W 
12 12 — W 

2W 21* + W 
25Vh 20W+ 1 
5W SW 


1 50 10W Wto 
200324* 32 
8221** 21 IS 
ZJ 54* SW 
103411* 404* 
990 U 
87 2th 24b 
7W 
121 * 
2*W 

MS 

SW 
3W 
SOW 
4 

04* 
2W 
23 
41* 
204* 
30W 

m 

12W 
4W 
3W 


W<S— to 
32—4* 
21V.— W 
5M— IS 
41 — W 
it— ft 
. 21b 
7W 

124b + W 
SOW + is 
91* 


3W— tb 

20W 

4 — Va 
6V.— IS 
2W— H 
23 — W 
4W— IS 
204*— 14* 
XW— 2 
7H 

T3W + 1 
4W— W 
31*— 4b 


ToktoF 

TpBroe 

Tor Roy 

Toyota 

TmNLS 

Tmstct 

TrwIBc 

TrovRE 

TrovRty 

TrlChm 

TrbC on 

TrtcoPd 

Trilogy • 

TrlnRsg 

TrloTch 

TrltanG 

TrttpfC 

TrotNJ 

TurtPar 

TumrB 

TmrBwt 

202 Oto 


,JM * J SW 71 ^ % 

58r 5 199510* 9% Mb— % 
t 5 5 5 

- 155 8 7H 744 — IS 
t 13 04* 04* AH . 
AS* AJ 78 5% -9W 91b— ft 
7A019W 1IW 18W— 7 
5910W 101* TOW— % 
3194b WW 19% + lb 
150 25 4737 39 39 ^ 

2500 1 1W I + „ 
X 21% 24* 24*— ft 
143101b 9% 10 — W 
- 3784 1H lib lft— ft „ 
150 135 791 9th Bth BW— W 
Mm 28 1532 X 32 

110 514 514 ». 

BAA 24 22 2346 + 1W 

1388 716 51* 7W + 4* 

i«m m m 


VOOlRl 591 U 3*2 74* 94* 7W— l* 
VocOry 25 5 5 5 


VoaDry 

VofjAsc 

VatyBO) 158 *A 
VINBC* 150a 35 
Vawtpun 
VectAut 

Velcro -72 U> 

VfFoai 

vicom 

VlctMkt 50b 27 

VMDJbP 

vtewMi 

vaFst ,i0o 20 
VMaRs Me J 
Vulftan 


24291* 2BW 38W— 4* 

« S WM 3jw + ^ 

.12 1 "1 | ••• 

- iw- JW . IK. 

12351* 3»* BW ■ 

»111« 11 11 — ii- 

157 44% 4 A _ £ 

8515 - 144* 144*— 2 
132 7W 04* Mi— 2 
149M. 13 131*— £ 

5 

8194* 194b T94h— W 


15 10W + W 

27 27 

2W 2W-W - . 

14 14Vb+ W 

2H 24b 


U UW— Vi 1 
94* 94* 

40W 41W + 1 
12W 12W— W 
19 . 19W + W , 
10W 17 + W 

I0W 10>4 
22W 23 — 4* 
13W I3W— W 
2 2 — V. 


NEC .13T. 5 771 21 W 2Ub 2114- W 
Nanamt 183 81* 8K BW — « 

NorroC 3500 75 27444* 44W 44W 

NattlFm t 327 4 3H 4 + 4b 


PCAInt 

PDA 

PNC Pf 150 75 
PNC BfO 1 JO 7J 
PTCmpo 
Paclnk) 

Pacln wt 

PocWB .lie 15 

PockSy 

PoaoSt 

PooeA 

Panaxe 


451 7W 64* 7W+ W 

372 BW 8W BW 

21W 21W 21W 
A4Z31* 231* 23V. + IS 
204A11W 11W 11W— 4b 
1210 10 10 .. 

HWI* 

10 8 5 5 

22 94* 94h 94* 

15519 U4* 184*— U 

859 2W 2 2 — W 

1424 » 24 


36 34h 3H 34b 
13 3W 3 3W + W 
A3 IW B 8W 


SMsakl -15c 1 
ShapGs 50 1.1 


ShpWld 

ShoreSv 52 LI 


StemeA jo 15 
SIwnaR 


252 4J 549 47W 49 + 1W 

M3 3 3 

190 3 24* 3 + H 

US 45 422 21W 22 + W 

M 35 579 Op 54* 54*— W 

.15* 3J 353 4W 4 A — 

XI *1* A AH+ W 


SllvUs 
SJvKtafl 
StvStMn 
SftnKar 50r 15 


SlmrtFst 36 35 


21 2144 + 4* 

17W 174*— 1 
24b 2W 
124b 124*— 4b 
59W 5916 
4W 454+ U 
34b 34b + H 

% r-«. . 

16W MW 
X 30 
34. 3%-W 
84* 84* 

134* Mtb + 1W ! 


TSCCO 

Tocvuo 

Tmcvt 

TchCaal 

Tecum 

TecaPr 

ncm wt 

TlcmB 

TelMex 

TanVEn 

TeraCp 

TtmMe 

Tewa 

TCBYg I 

ThmAV 

Tbuntfr 

TidaRh 

Tlnsly 


350*3X8 543 IS H 10 10^.— H 

1127 14b 1W Ilb+ H 
16 14* 1W 14m 

35 5V. 5 5 — V. 

85 2V. 2W 2H + W 

WWW 

3,20a XI . 7404 103 ,103 — I 
AOeHJ 3B lib 1W 1W 

2100 94* 9W 94* 4- IS 

^S4,23S“^ M K + * 

ao 75 ion m m 

147 4th 446 4th + ..lb 


1% % V 

45 2M 2W 2W 


166820 15 20 + H 

4A 5 42* 44*— IS 

.100 25 117 5H 5 5 — H 

51* 55 34 7W 7W 7W 

23 8V, H I — W i 


UCI 

UCIIHI 

UMCEI 55 

US PCI s 

UST 54 35 
Unit! wi 

vfUnimt 55elX3 
UnFeai 

UnNatl 2.04 55 

unsme 

UnBkrs 20b 15 
UCarBc MW A1 
U Count 150 *5 
UFdBfc 52 15 
UFlreC* JO A1 
UHltcr 
UnHmg 

UMaBn 1.00b xi 
UnBkNJ 120b 25 
unOkk. 24 28 
UnSvMa M 1 9 
US Meb 

US Mail J0T17J 
US Play 
US PI wt 
US Suer 
USVoc 

UVaBk PI2JS 59 
U Money 
UnvSOC 
UnvTlA 

USBc Pa 150 £0 


2W 

5H 

9W+ W 
IS + W 
4W 
4h - 
0W+ lb 
X 

Ul* + w . 
104* 

24H — IS 
35W 

14th + W 

19W— 2W 

2*4* 

32W— H 


Wocoal 53* 1-7 
Waktt, t 

WlkrTwt 

WflkrTun 

weiaTr X X 7 

vtem& 35% 92 

WBtaun 

Wstcao 

WnCmcI 

wDeaa U0* A5 
WtFdPR 

WHOM 3lS3o 95 

WnWBta 

WHBCP 

WsbBc 

WshvdGp 

Wharf 

WheolC 

Wlckes 

Wtdwwt 

Wiener 50 35 


BW— W 
IS 

S4h + Vh 
14* 

134* — 4* 
51* 

53 

4 

394* 4- 4* 
IW— Y» 
34b— 4* 
. 9 

32 4- W 


Wiener 50 3J 
WIIVJA 1.10 19 
WllyJB ,9V 35 
WlraiEWT 
wtnetMl 
WUcRE 

WWvTS 20 25 
WrlghtW 58 35 
VtYXC 


UK I3H 
92518W 1BW 
149 24* 3K 

111W low 

21I1H 11H 
445 in Bfc 
77 *H 6V. 
1945121* UW 
211 31S- 24* 
710454* 44 
B24 BH IW 
29735W. 3M6 
88 BW HW 
2410V. 18H 
.168 3W 3H 
aw 

407 » 24b 
2W 

m 

Mb 

miow uis 

A528W XW 
3629 2Mb 
207 4fti 34* 
111 4W-4- 
6 4W 41b 
49 7H 74h 
23912 114* 

12X11H 10H 


a-* 1 ■; 

«- n i 

a. w : i • 

AW ,i <* 

12 + w J.'i 

St* ft #'3^ 

44th— W Pi? 

:N 

ibh , ; «» 

M • 

.fr* i»“ 

: ■ 

IT- * ;! r 

■fft s ; 

ws- h w <: I. 

T 1 • V' 


YBeora .12 


4821 OH 94*. 10 + W 


Zen Nil 58 55 234 12W «H 12W4- It 
Zeus 302 10H 1016 Wit 

Zvcoci 95912 Ills 11H + W 

Zyao *7 9 BW 9 + Vt 


NASDAQ National Market 


Sam In 
100s High 


Sales (n Not 

100a High Low Close ChUe 




1859224* 
11344 22W 
42 41b 
18 9W 
51621th 
3 AH 
1 907 10W 
IX 94* 
) 1445204b 
128 171* 
10424W 
05 a M 
727 9 
I 50S34W 
5417 84* 
252 4H 
476 6* A 
268 44b 
495 2W 
21BW 
’ 43S214W 
9531W 
12 44* 

' 54 lift 

1003 131* 
66 7 AW 
313 

! 75254* 

’ 492 XH 


■ 


137 7W 
S24SW 
1315 19th 
1421 19th 
7604244b 
74 21W 

^1* 
1113 74b 
444 7H 
104* 
15W 
2398 Mb 
403 WW 
45174* 
105512th 
513 11W 
XI AH 
US 4th 
149 MH 
29 XW 
152 7W 
254 43 
7912 
3483 33H 
937 11H 
11716 


54b SH + H 
12W 12W— W 
XW 27 
Z1U 221S + X 
I4W 15 -AH 
4 4 

9 9W + W 
214* 21W— H 
6H AH— W 
Mb 91b- M 
9H 9H— W 
19W 194* — Vh 

16 16H— W 

23 24 

5W 54b 
8H BW— 4* 
33W XW— 1 
71b 7H— H 
44b 4H 
4 5W + I* 
4W 4W— Vh 
21* 2W 

17 1BW +1W 

13H 14 + Vk 

304* 30H— H 

4H 4H + W 
10H 1046 — H 

13 13 

25H 754* 

XW 3816 — 16 
1946 174b — 4* 


Sorn In Not 

100s High Law Close Ofae 
1M 81* ■ 8 

791 8H 7W 8 
50 25 V9X0W 19 20W 

.920 35 XXX 
150 45 3045 4 IV, 39V, 411* +1W 
13010H 10W. 10W— H 
107 164* 16 16 — H 

2272 61* 546 54*— H 

184 SW B SIS 

t 1 10 10 10 


184 BW S BIS 

1 10 10 10 

X 3th 346 3W + W 

430 31b 2H ZH— H 

590 4H 4 41* — H 


551 3J 1155 19H IBH IBH— W 


45 47 

IBH 1946 + H 
17 174*— 1H 

2346 23W- W 
21 21 — H 

2W ZH— W 

114* lit* 

a 71* + 4b 
7 + Vh 


low 10M— 4* 
AW 61* — W 
4W «. 

14 141b + W 

X X 
71* 71* — 1* 
42 43 + W 

1144 12 + U 

324* 33W + 4* 
T0H 10th — W 
T7V6 17W— W 
5H 5W — H 
SH 91* + 1* 
M 104* 

20 21W +1W 

15H MH + H 


Asoior 

ASurg 

AWMCn 

Amrttr 

Ammo 

Amggn 

AmskB 

Anvak 

Anloolc 

Analyl 

Anoren 

AndrGr 

Andovr 

And raw 

Androi 


a 15 351520th 
25 


IJfflo 29 544 

50 72 17620 
.10 15 39 71* 

2175 1316 
428 8W 

241 44* 
.12 15 208 9W 
1713825V. 
33304 22H 
26X21H 
77816 
5Z7X 
70S 9W 
40 W 


34 34 — W 

*a MR 

21W 244* +2W 
1BW 19 — W 

\ ?*-» 
61* 6H— IS 
59W 50H + H 
I9W 19W— 11* 
546 546 + 16 
SO 2BV. + H 

42 42 —2 

174* 4 816— 116 

AM 7 — V. 
121* 1216— W 
BW BH 
12W 13H— w 
111* 11H— H 
7W 7V, — H 
224b 2244 + I* 
4H 4W 
IH OH— H 


21W 22W — 2H 
20W 20th— IV. 
20W 20th— W 
14 J4H— 1JS 
MW 27 — W 
* 9W + H 
W H — W 
7 7 

5M 5th— W 
2DW 20W— 1 
25 25M + W 

15H 16W 
43W 43W 
7V. 7W 
BW 9 + 1* 

a 251* + IS 
121* 12W— H 
BH 8W— H 
4H 44*— H 
11M UM— W 
71* 74b + V* 

18V. IBH 
19H X — 1 
51* 5ft + H 
31 311* — H 

19M 201* + W 
» 29 — W 

T0H 10W 
9H 9H + H 
35H 351*— 34* 
X 21W +1 
44b 44b 
IBH 1*H— H 
BH BW— 1 
944 *44 — V. 

AW AH — H 
5W 5W + W 
AW AW — W 
118 72H . 

22W 22W 
17H 1IH + H 
171* I7W — H 
41s 41* 

2v> 2V. 


AtSaArs 

Austnm 

AtwdOc 

AulTrT 

AutoSy 


297 10W 
773 71* 
173 54b 
17 7 
6*5 121* 
2651 2ZW 
335 IBH 
326 T7W 
20 47 143x44b 
30 21* 


220 45 1755481* 474* 481* — 1* 
184 14b 1H 1H 
34 74k 7» 716— K 

92 4W 4 6 — IS 

576 3 246 3 + H 

585 104* T0K 10H + H 
165 744 7W 746 
8335W 35 3SW— H 
133 BH 744 BH— 4b 
Bb s ,■»«?» inn 2144 +n* 
44W At —3 
73T9W 19 19W + H, 


Baird C 

BofcrFn 150a 28 
Saiteks 
BallBo JBe 3 125622 
Bn Pane 224 49 7448 

Bancokl 90 45 73T91 


BCPHw 154 45 6772BH 2SW 2BW + t* 


Banctnc 
BanoH 
BkGran 50 15 
284 43 


301 11 10W IBH + H 

JO 97 533 8H 8 81* 

AO 15 7Z7W 77 Z7W + W 

UM 45 480 MW 63 V. 66W +3 

58b 27 274 25 24 25 + H 

33 UW U 131* — H 
75 IB 14 16 — IW 


BkMAm 1JM 98 516 10H WW 10H— H 


BOnkvt 10712H 1144 1254 + W 

BantaG 33 22 S5537H 31 H 3ZW— lb 

134 9 BH 9 + Vb 

62415 141* MH— H 

163 344 3H 34b 
132 FH 9 9H 
1023 WH 9H WH + W 
500 23 36739 UW 34H 

BayBks 232 49 37347H 46H 47H + W 
BOV hr .12 17 193 74* 7H 7V.— H 

479 8 64* 7H — W 

853 444 4 4W — W 

.10B 13 27V I 7 8 + H 

157 Blh XI* 8ft + W 
^ 199JOH 2DW 201* + W 

Beaton wt 74 ue mw 14H + H 

Berkley 32 21 252 J5H 1444 15 

BerkGe 200 «.l 222, 22 22 +1W 

BesICa 1274 ft W W— W 

Beth Lb 130 35 2478 3544 34H 35 — 44 

BevHS 388 5W 41b S — H 

50 29 15921 XW » 4- ft 

151 154* U 15 — H 

58 IH IW IW 

0815 14H 14W 

lings 1138 SH 4H SH— ft 

5923V. 23 234* + W 

498 5H 5H 5H 

3(5 7 AW AH 

1142 15W 15 15*6 


244 4H 4 416— H 

104 BH 8 IH 
*98 8 7 8 +1 

18 AH SH 544 — Vh 
56 SH SV. 54* — ft 


Beaten 150 45 


JO 15 1050 X 


33H 33H 
191* 17W — 1* 


CalFBk 

caiMIc 

Caistva 

CaiWtrs 

CaHonP 

Cahrry 

Oaftraif 

CaniRn 

C ononG 

Conrad 

CapSvrf 

COOFSL 

CoaTrn 

CapCrb 

CardDH 

CnrrOo s 

CaraarC 

Carol ki 

Cartert 

Caeevs 

Cencor 

CtitrBc 

Cenlcor 

CanBcp 

CnBshS 

CFdBk 

C WttBn 

Centran 

Cenlurl 

CMvPs 

Cerdvn 

CarbrA 

Cenntk 

Calue 

ChadTh 

OmpPt 

ChncCp 

SM 1 

Cftrmsa 

ChrtFdl 

Charvax 

OnttiM 

ChaMin 

ChkPnt 

OlkTch 

ChLwn 

Chnmox 

OiFab 

OiryE 

ChasUtx 

ChlOil 

CWPae 

Chills 

am nmi 

Chomer 

Chnmr 

dbOwJ 

Chyrn* 

OnnFn 

anMIc 

Clntas 

Clptiar 

cSS? 

Urahl 

axsou 

CtzSGa 

CtzFWs 

CtzGtP 

CtzUIA 

CtxUtB 

a tv Fad 

CtyNCp 

CltvBcp 

ClalrSts 

CJartU 

CtaalcC 

OaarOi 

ClevtRt 

Cttfttma 

CoaetF 

Cjtilnt 

CstSav 

Cabo Lb 

cacoBtt 

Ooaor 

Caaanlc 

Cahrnls 

CotabR 

Cotaoen 

ColFdl 

Coillm 

ColABn 

CBcaaA 
Co nGas 
Cot&iPf 
CO LIAC 
Coh-TlM 
CotoNt 

ColuFd 

CdSov 

CohiMII 

Comars 

Comarc 

Camests 

Camdta 

Comdlal 

Comorc 

CmdAIr 

Com Be 

Com Bih 

ComClr 

CmceU 

QtiBCoJ 

QndBn 

CmlShr 

CwifhF 

CmwTl 

Cam Am 

Cam bid 

ComSvs 

CarnShr 

CmoCds 

C mpUe 

Compaq 

CmoaT 

CmnCr 

Cmpcre 

Gompch 

CmpSve 

Compus 

CCTC 

Cm pas 

CptAuT 

Cm pot 

CptEirt 

CmptH 

Cmpldn 

CmpLR 

CmotM 

CmoNel 

CmpPde 

CmnR* 

CmTosk 

Cmputn 

Cptcft 

Cmnlrc 

Cnarvo 

Comshr 

Com it K 

Cnrnhp 

Comic h 

Cancptl 

ConHrs 

OwmWT 

CnCao 

CCopR 

CCobS 

ConFtor 

CnPaps 

CeniPO 

CnTom 

Const IB 

Consul 

ConWti 

CnHBcp 

CHFSL 

CtIMIts 

CtlHItC 

Cant Ini 

Cl Lost 

ConvFd 

Convsrt 

Comma 

Copt Bio 

CeoraB 

Coovtei 

Coreem 


40 1 
177 3W 

1J8 57 619 

1107 BH 

1142 44b 

250 7J 57X 
299 3H 
.16 15 621 121* 


30 20 509101* 

750 43 X 6 


5973 2H 
JMr 7 111 IBW 

95710ft 
JDH 15 64 4H 

1286 2ft 

» 2974 101b 

220 184* 
BA30W 
IJ0 35 I90534W 
358121* 
10Sb 45 2424*1* 
152 55 45823 
1.12 39 SS929H 
J4b 37 82fl 
JO 27 1682354b 
_ _ 764 IH 


1 + W 

SW 

19 — H 
BH— Vt 
4W— H 
27 
3W 

UH— H 
7H — ft 
13 

21ft + W 
7H + W 
1711 + W 
10 

544—1 
2ft +.H 
IBW +1W 
im + ft 
4V6 + IS 
2ft— ft 
9ft + lb 


OLIta 

DNAPI 

DOC 

DatrMt t 
DottySv 
DalaiF 
Dm n Bio 

DartGp .13 .1 

DatcrdB 

Dta lO 
DtSwteh 

Datuwr 
DaflCP 
Dtnsth 
Datum 
DavtW ■ 

Dawson 

DcbSh 70a T.l 

DadiD 

Daeom 

DekibA 72 25 
Daictim 78 15 
DattaDt 

DnltNG 1J4 92 
Delta k 
Dnltaus 
Oanelcr 
DentMd 

DepOly 220 XI 

Daeanh 

DatecEl 

DetrxC LSD 39 


15ft— H 
30W +3 
33 +2H 

121S 

45K— W 
X + W 
29+1* 
26W +1W 


-091 7 1814V. 

.12 1J 109*7 


3SH + H 
IW— ft 
13H— W 


1- 


TOW + W 

1 

6 — W 


"if 

127018 

X 13 Sjft 
* 415 5H 
36 7 


.IX 1J 19712ft 
150 53 31 XH 


646411W 

761 28W 
745 9W 
X 25 884 UH 
.10 13 3220 10W 
171 92H 


SW— ft 

ISJ= T {S 

low +1W 

14V6— H 
22W + 4* 
171* 

171* 

1 

jL+i* 

iaw — h 

MW— 

15 + 1* 

BH— 1ft 
91He- V. 
1544 

31ft +'ft 
2i w— aw 
BH- W 


Durlth 
Du rim) 1 
Durlron 
DurFII 
Dvcom 


fiat 

low close aim 
1344— u 
6W — 1 
6H + IS 
101* + H 
274* — 3 
2 * 1 * — 1 * 
Aft— ft 
95 —1 
17ft— ft 
1U6- H 
SH— 1* 
4 — H 
17 
346 

7V. + lb 

13 

*H + W 
lift 

ISH— lit 
3ft + ft 
25H + h 
17ft + W 
lft 

UM + ft 
7W 

IH — ft 
5W— ft 
6th + 4h 
43 + ft 

6 — W 
444— ft 

31 — W 
5W 

10H + ft 

3H— ft 

32 — 116 
UW + ft 

7ft -3ft 
54b— H 
22W + ft 
221* — ft 
9ft 

31 — ft 
6 — ft 
10 
51b 

22H — ft 
29ft 

19 + 1* 
IBH— ft 

14 — W 
20ft— l* 
1244 

15 


12 ^ sa 

' ^Al^ 
4930 ft 

907 3% 

3 6 
99 Oft 
200a HD 162SW 
7910 

UM 35 76129H 


J9a 9 175 9ft 

■ M* 


130 35 199331* 
76 37 17972044 
UM 33 55727W 
58 a 27 9*174* 

t „ Ml 34ft 
1JM 5J 64 32W 
TSe 2515548 10H 
J8b 37 23727W 

95 21 177314* 

.10 5 1892 191* 

J8 33 110025H 

8 F 


33H + W 
20H + IS 


152 M 17318ft 
392 72ft 


50a 10 107 12W 
152 9J> 29217 


150 109 14 15ft 

1J0 U 314 34 W 


131818 

74 37 1898 199b 
45 7ft 
142 Bib 

170 28 5X 
1377 M 
J2 .1 18216 
.12 5 344125th 

.16 17 1657 UH 
1481 3 

210 S 8 500 MH 


92 27 19834ft 


50o 4.1 237 12W 

174*150 750 BH 


55 IBM 
436 39b 
17 207222W 
Ul 1DW 
67 44 94* 

4289 23W 
132 7W 
934* IH 
357412V. 
15 740 Xft 

937 12W 
337 IW 
1257 8ft 
477 3ft 
258710ft 


.1* 19 1*0 8ft BH BW— H 


78 7 W (H Mb— W 
309 3th 3H 39h + W 
11D319W 17 191* +2 

3 7H Oft 7H + W 
BrtnFC 70s 17 336I5W MH 15 + It 

BradvW .M8 7 123 34 32W 32W— IW 

BroaCp >161 UH 15W ISH— ft 

BmchC IX 38 13332k. jift 31ft— H 
Branco .13 27 299 » 51* SH— ft 
BrwTom » 3539 3H 2ft 2ft + W 


Baffton 

BwlldTr 

Brnhm 70 l.l 
Burnos 
BurrBr . 

BWA US 35 


„ 2S9h 25th— H 
2223 lft IH IH— H 

BAS XI* as 254* + ft 

70 1.1 14S19H IBW 19 + W 

nun i ■ — v. 

3 IBW 18W 1IW— H 
LOB 35 8957 56 57 +11* 

1950 716 AW 64* 

Me A 1717W I5H 15ft— ft 


Coras* 

Corvue 

Cosmo 

Courari 

CowP* 

Covngt 

CrkBii 

CradTr 

Cramer 

CrazEd 

Cronus 

CrosTr 

CnAutS 

CwnBk 

Crump 

CulbiFr 

Oullum 

cum 

Cvcnra 

CvarSv 

Cvpnwt 


721 84* 
U 7ft 
177 6th 
90S 5ft 
96 8 
lSVtafft 
44 4H 
425 19V. 
454 9H 
74 6ft 
X 9H 
189 SW 
327 9 
89111b 
917 SH 
3S6 24b 
330 7H 
44233 
90718 
8832244 
11*171* 
917224 m 
54 8 
82937V. 
113 5 
634W 
208 XW 
757 5H 
54 25H 
4133W 
912 
45513 
183 5W 
760*4 W 
347 7 
1 I 
6245 9 
394 17 
789 4W 
853 14H 
909211b 
386 7 
1332 9ft 
1535521* 
13d? 3W 
35* 5ft 
5523W 

iNzn* 

1525 IW 
96 14W 
12211 
98 BH 
404622ft 
532 134* 

1027 24 Vi 

14 5 
4011H 
540X1* 
57519th 
46S22W 1 
117b XH 
47 24 
X12 
12 3K 


27W— 1b ; 
17H 

M + ft | 

3ZW +2 1 

99h — ft I 
271* + H 
31U + ft I 
18 — ft 1 
23ft— ft 
7 — H 

17 — H 

18 —1 
72W + H 
MH + ft 

*H + ft 
T4H— H 
12H +H 
37H— 1 
15W— ft 
2U — ft 
17W — W 
Aft— W 
14 +lft 
UH + 4* 
Aft + ft 

18 + ft 
12 - ft 
169b + ft 
16ft 
Xft 

17ft + ft 
T9H + ft 
74h + H 

sw + w 

X 

131* — ft 
14ft— H 
2SH— Vb 
1JW— ft 
3 + W 

36W— IW 
4W 

IX* + H 
49ft + ft 
ra 

34ft +ft I 
14ft ] 
39W + ft 
12H + ft 1 
BH— W 
29 — ft 
3W— H 
20ft— lft 
10W + H 
94* + H 
22H— U> 
7ft + ft 
79k— H 
12ft + 1b 
27W— ft 
1244— ft 
IH 

TV. — IH 
34b — 1b 
9 — TH 
23 —24* 

744 — lft 

lift— W 
6ft— ft 
BW— H 
7H— H 
6H— IS 
4H— W 
7H— W 
9 

4H — W 

19 — W 
BH— H 
AH— ft 
BH— ft 
3W — U 


Oik: 

I Pas UM 1 00 2558 14H 

tm JJ7* J 769UW 

(Wig 31610% 

teas 31 43 3717ft 

JX 15 6 MW 

-Mb J 581174* 
23 5ft 
2 5ft 
1152 7ft 
832 34W 
501 MH 
639 MW 
19121ft 
11113 
335 AH 
24432V. 

3 rv 

399 91* 
1X12 9H 
14 5H 
SCO 7W 
214414ft 
150 74 703 21 W 
LOB 65 1417 


yanow 
177 8H 
270 ft 

JO 1J 15712 
144 18 
. 531 13W 
TBS 3W 
453311b 
27816ft 
72717 
26015 
3840 1546 

17 5H 
IX 5J 22224W 

20 72 830 7W 

-940 2 9 20U33 

18 03 

9 44* 
127713V. 

32 41* 
13 

104115ft 


lift 

5ft + ft 

24b + ft 
7 

23 + ft 

18 +2ft 
22W 
16W— 1 
22W 
7H 

XH— 1 
Xft + W 
34W 

2Sft + H 
SH— W 
25 — H 
32H 



IX 4 A 54314b 

14473 UW 
11817 
301315H 


12H + H 
S4h 
33 
6ft 


IH — W 
16H— W 
3H— H . 
15ft + ft 
20% + H 
7 + w ! 

9H— ft | 
5Zft + H 
3 -ft 
SH— ft 
23ft 

+ S 

14 

UW— ft 

BH 

21H 4-2 
UW— ft 
24ft + ft 
Aft — ft 
lift + 4* 
XH + It 
194* + W 
2214— ft 
BH 

23ft -lft 
Uft— % 
3H + ft 




A720V. 
6*14 
72 XH 
262 314* 
146 27W 
10234th 
1319ft 
1 4H 
247 
4 BH 
7B53U 
662 15W 
7318ft 
IdSUU 
1B40H 
210 9ft 
18B33H 
2811 274* 
132 VH 

437 24 u. 
1021 
98134* 

friow 

2US36H 

1900384b 

7532ft 

23646 
3237 7ft 


> 23H I 
. Oft + H 
i 4 

131b + W 
5 — H 
9W + H 

2SH— IH 

20W 

4 — H 
Uft 

55ft — ft 
Uft + ft 
10—1 
29ft 

5 

UW— ft 
50H +11* 
43W 

31H— ft 
15W— H 
Uft + W 
3H- H 
BW 

#H + ft 
TH + H 
9% 

354* 

17H + ft 

MU 

MH — H i 
XH— lft I 
2BW+ w : 

52W +IW , 
15W 

6 + ft ; 
x — ft 
34H + ft 
37ft + 4* ! 
2ZW 

31 — W 
13W— ft 
15ft— H 
U + ft 
314* + ft 
17 +1 

31 +14* 

11W + W 
3TH + ft 
WW + H 
33W + ft 
£W +1W 

204* — . ft ! 
I9W— ft 
lift + ft | 
3346— ft 
30H— ft 
2*H — 1 
34H + W , 
»W + H 
«. + H ! 
47 


BuffrMf IX M 180X1* 25% XH + W f 


2232V. 31W 31W- H 


631 15% 15 15% +1 

4JSe 74 MS59W MW S8W +2W 
Ul 4 3% 3ft + W i 

733 OW 9 9W 


2X A3 T4948W 
XX 20 25 11 W 

UK AH 
M M 1701416 
9 3% 

560 20 2429V, 

.He 3 3069 19ft 

2 Uft 

.72 2.1 218 Xft 
633 13 


53 53U 

UH ISH— ft 
IB 18 — H 
13% 13%— ft 
39 39ft + W 
8% 9 

32ft 33ft— W 
73 XW +316 
VH VH 
23W 29W— H 
2D - 21 +1 

13H 13ft 
10 IDW 
15ft U + ft 
37% 37% — ft 
31ft Jift 
Xft Xft 
6ft 7 +9h 
19 IV —3 
47 47 — W 

10H 11 — ft 

64b AW— ft 
1316 Uft— H 
31* 3% + ft 

XW 28W — 1 
16% (AW 

UH MU 1 
XH 34W— W 

iaw iaw — w 


sales in 
100s High 

24 Z0 


Net 

Law Close Ch'ge 


12ft— ft 

16 

15W— ft 

27W 

151* 

10W— ft 
14% + ft 
1Mb + * 
4%— Hi 
2316— ft 


14 14—16 

M* 64*— ft 

10 10 + ft 

3H 3W + 16 

28H 39H + H 


iSb + ib 


to m* + h 

MW 14H +ft 
W, 10 +1* 

9th 10ft + ft 
M lfl* + H 
MW 14ft 
T7W T7W 
5W 5ft 
5W 5ft— ft 
64* 69k— ft 

31ft 22W— 1% 
13% 13% — 1 
MV. 14ft 
21 . ZIV. + H 
12W 12W— ft 
6ft 64*— ft 
19W 19W— lft 

Tt Jit 

X4* BH— ft 
BW BW + W 
4H 5ft + ft 
7W 716 
1391 14V. + ft 
2016 21ft + % 
Uft 17 

75 2SW— 1b 
W IQ 

*H t-* 
111* UH 
T7W 17ft— ft 

a 1 *:* 

30 30ft 
11 15H +446 

ISH Uft + ft 
13U 13ft— lft 
14H IS — % 
5W SW 
ZJW 24W +1 
7ft 71b + ft 
31H Xft— lib 
99 101 
4H 4% 

12W 124* — ft 
4ft 4ft 
13 13 

MW 14% — H 


584 
3545 
2JD 7J ZM 
1633 
JO U 21 
781 
45 
182 
175 


SH— W 
9H — W 
33ft 

aw— h 

8H- H 
3JJ+ ft 
4% 

X —1 




1.92 S3 64 
2084 
Xe J 391 
TAD 33 
256 2J 



7H— H 
4%— ft 
2 — ft 
SW— W 
37H + W 
35 + ft 

10% 

36ft— W 
9 + W 

3ft— H 
AH + ft 
2H — 4* 
3844— IH 
22 — IH 

7W— ft 
28H— Zft 
3W + ft 
5ft— IS 
7 

10% —1 
SW + H 
20 %— 1 
AW 

27% — W 
5H— H 
X*— w 

134* + % 
9W— W 
14H + W 
7U 

55 —5 
7W + 44 

164b + % 
10 — ft 

12Va + H 
10ft— % 
4 + H 

14 — H 

16V. — % 

BH— ft 

?W=’£ 
25ft + W 
25H 

AH— Vh 
10% + % 
4W + ft 
5ft 

10% — Vt 
401* + ft 
lift- 34 

a + w 

UH + l* 


SA U 490X 19ft 19W* 
IX 6ft 6 6ft 
( 767 AH Aft *4h - 

980 MW J7W XV, 

A0 2J) M30H » 704b- 

60318% 17 irw. 

38219W 18% 19iA 

140 4 1 - 115 39 X 39 


Sam In Nat 

100s Htah Low Close Ch'ge 


Sate* In Nat 

tOQs Htah Low Close Ch’ge 


Sam In 
TOOs High 


Nat 

Law Close Ch'ge 


'Salas in . Net 

lOOs Htah Low Close Ch’ge 


11% 12ft— ft 
3% 3W— Vh 
16% 164*— ft 
13% 134* — U 
284b 2BH— W 
79% 199b + ft 
6 *W + ft 
18% 19% + ft 
IH IH— ft 

9 9ft— 4* 

5% 41b + ft 
27W 27% — ft 
T3W 14W+I 
15% Uft + ft 
22W 37W 
27W Z7Vh— 1 
9ft 94b— ft 
15ft 15U — 9b 
4 5+1 


JeffNLS Ad 
JeBmrf joa 
JofMart 
Jarlco .12 
jffy 5 
JhnsnE 
JonlctK f 

Jonol A t 

Joi p l wn 
Juno 

Justin a JO 


1J 94*5% 
20 18220V. 

526 8ft 
J 9018184* 
1530 S 
41 616 
528X6H 
200x59b 
471 9% 
9530 
2.1 7919 


24ft— lft 
19% + ft 
7ft— 1 
17%— H 
ft 
61* 

Aft — H 
5% 

94b + ft 
WW— ft . 
18% + ft 


15U 15W + ft 
104b 10H— lft 
lift 124* — W 
10W 11 — ft 

a srzjf 

45% 49W +3W 
SH 546 — ft 
13 13W— 1 

18 19 +1 

6% 7 — H 

II 11 - ft 
9% 946— W 

14% 15% +1 
3 3 -H 

2 % 3 

7 7ft— ft 
49W 40W 
44* 5ft— 4* 
Aft 4% + ft 
516 5ft 
12M 141* +2W 
7 7 

UH 12ft + ft 
30 22% +24b 

19 19 — ft 

27% 284b + 9b 
104* 10% 

17ft 17ft— lb 
104* 10% — lb 

’“ft 18 % 

14Tb 15ft 
12H 729b 
Uft 17 +ft 
11 12 +1 • 
8H 9 — 1 
BW 8%— ft 
10H 12 +1% 


18% 
13ft 
5ft 

56 25 93329* 
’"’"TTft 
14ft 
9W 
_ 1 

i 54 1J 3M35 
\ 52 15 T 3A 

IX 35 52951ft 
329 49b 
JO 22 14740V. 

156 

54 35 U 

952 

54 1J 62 

160 


17% 18 — % 
13U Uft — ft 
5 5ft . 
54* 64b + th 

2BH 28H— ft 
17 17% + H 

13H 741* — ft 

% 

33 33 — IW 

X 34 
SOW 57 W + % 
4W 4ft 
40 40 —ft 

Aft 6% 

12H 12% — lb 
8% 9ft + ft 
32 32 —ft 

5% Aft + W 
7% 74* — ft 

15% 159h— % 
TH IH 
7ft 7% — ft 
AH 7% + ft 
154* UH— ft 
19% 20 + ft 

7ft 7ft— U 



26H 37U + W Rovmdl 30 2.9 
5 ' 5ft — % RnvEn 24 \A 

4M 4W— W Reeding 

30 30 —IV* Recoin 

BH BH— % ReaknL M 12 
12 129b + % Peeves 

3% 3H + lb Refoc t 

3% 3%— W RgcvEI 20 32 
S SH— % Regis » 29 J 

5ft 5H + ft ReldAsh 

lft 1% + ft ReUab 

7% 74*— lb Renal 

61* 7% + ft Ropco 

8W BH + ft RntCntr 

23% 33W— 1 RRAuta jM 45 

5 5 — % RpHtth 

XW X - ft Reshinc Xa 2J 
8% 844 — W ROsExp 

32% X + ft RestrSy 

224b Xft +19b Reutarl ,15e 1J 

23% 24W ReutrH Jlo J 

5 3. RaverA 144 1Z4 

n u Rexon 

irs + ft Ray Roy U24 34 

10ft— W Rhodes* 34 22 
22 — % Rihilm 

Aft + ft Rich El 


24 

UH— % 
19% 

6 — ft 
32 + ft 

9W— ft 
.13% — ft 
6U 

11%—% 
Aft + ft 
7ft— % 
4H + W 
49b— ft 


576733% 22% 234*— ft 
7531 7th 3% 2%— Vb 

411018 UH. 16ft— IH 
1534 SOW 19 30 +1 

310 546 41b 5W + ft m 

422 2ft 2W 2W-K# 

48 8 7W 79h— ft ■ 

' 23 3V. 3 3 - ft 

39X 214* 22 +1* 




15W + H 
11 % 

W ,, Thor In 
1!5— < ThouT S 


303 7ft 6H AH— % 
3 IH IW IW— I* 

xi i% in in 

J5e 15 2871 AH 15% 151b— 4* 
752 121* 104b 11%— 1 
A115W 144* 14% — H 
mia 9% » + ft 


ThdNs IX 3A 30937ft XW 371* + H 


JL. t Tlmbrld 


3ft + ft RigosN ZOO 45 
ft— W Rttxva 
BW — ft Rival JO SjO 
8H + % RoodS * IX 35 
4W + ft RabMvr 

22 — W RuAesn t 

7944 — ft RobNua M J 
3*4* — lib RotoVm 
41 +16 Rocfcor 

7 + W RdcwH 56o U 

10ft RMUnd 

6%— ft RkMIG 40 55 

Z5W— W RasesSt Xa 12 
31ft RoseS B xa 1.1 

4 + W Rosptch .so a? 

23 W— ft Rouse 1J» 2 J 
74b — % RoweFr .12a 12 
Aft— ft RoyBGp 

16ft +1W Rayplm 
174* — W RoyIRs 
26H RovlAIr 
35 — H Hid Bind 

Xft RustPel 

6H RyanFa 

8 + ft 

lift— lft I - 

29b— ft * 

459b +1 5ABHO a .13 1 J 

13%— ft SAY Ind 

5%— ft SCI Sv 

14ft + W SEI 

7ft- % SFE .10r Ul 
2» SP Drug t 

7ft— ft SRI 58 35 

14 — ft Soatchl 2Se J 

I Scdecrd 

Safeco IX 4J 
SQfHllt) 

2B4 lib 1% 7H— ft SfJudff 

249 3% 3ft 3% + ft SI Paul 3J0 5J 

2ft Zft— ft SaiCPt 

3 3 Sea. Bar JJSr 5 

14 14% + % SandChf 

2% 24b— ft Satelco 


5% 54b — W 


LDBmk 

LJN 

LSI Loo 

LTX 

LaPetai 

LoZBy 

LackUt 

LadFm 

LoSdJw 

LorpRs 

LamaT 

Lancasl 

Lance 

LdLnSL 

LndBF 

LdmkS 

LaneCo 

Lanfidy 


UW BW— ft 
raw raw— % 
mi 20 +16 
15ft 15W 

r$2i5S-lft 

,8 4H 1< 4%i # ft 

1L, 


7ft 76b- 
1244 1291- 
12% 124*- 
17ft 17ft- 
14% 15ft 
41ft 41ft- 
20ft 20ft- 
75% 76 
13H 13% - 
94b W 
14 14 - 

14ft 144b- 
33ft 33ft ‘ 
84b 9 ■ 
M 16 - 
9% 10% ■ 


IX 

73 21 


une 

33 14 

27 


IX 

*.1 12 

34W 


320 

8% 


66 

AH 


5 

WW 

IX 

8.1 MH 

1816 

M 

Z* 554 

i*% 

X 

23 718 

TSH 

ZIO 

9J 172 

774* 

.14 

23 685 

644 


4SW 48W- 
64* *44- 
M Xft 




17 17 — ft . 

,5% ,3S- T * 

UK uft— i* 


28% 29 
51* 5ft 
1275 12ft 

aw an 

2% 29b 
2 2ft' 
19. 19ft 
42W 43 
IBW 19 
43ft 43ft 
* 6W 
Ml* 14H 
15W 17 


— ft OCGrTC 
— 1^ OokHill 

i# 

-ft 


USB 

37 Tofu s 

4TW +3W TDfwfTr 1J0 45 
^ „ TolTrjBf 290 95 
U + W TopsyA 

■»+» Tetisyi 
13 „ TrotcAu 

g tJSIl? lx’ 43 

MT ‘ 


10 - ft 
7% + % 


11% + JJ TrtbSi 

l rton 

25 — H Tnn In 


4411% 11 II — H 
7241 UW 844 9 — H 
3006777b UH 16% — % 
UH BW 7% 7H— % 

15 V 9 9 — H 

12 5% 5ft SW- • 

420311ft 94* 109b— % 

1629 14% 73% UK — H 
57084b X 38H + ft 
3O0ft 30ft 30ft— ft 
3 4% 4H 4H 
144 MH 1* 16% + lb 

A2Z1AU 13 14(6 +Z% 

20 34* 3% 394— lb 

■4920 194* 28 +H 

16 7% 7 744 + H 

492 3 246 24* — I* 

897 9ft 9ft VH— W 
128 6% 6% Aft 

545 3W 34b.. 3%.+ % 
108 9ft 9 9- 


2ft — H 
8% + H 

-aw— % 
9ft 

4ft— W 
14ft + ft 
M —1 


Trtor X LO 108 9ft 9 9- 

TruiJo ja 15 46Z7H 27% 27U 

TBkGo 7.00 30 341 31% 33 33 — ft 
** 728ft V 27 

IK If % 

^ S 17ft IB 
V942U 47ft 43H + ft 


TnNYJ IX 45 
1“ + J Tuck Dr 

££l£ Twncty 

.ES + S Tyion 

™ Tyson F 20 2 


■ BU— lb. 
Mft 13 + ft 
12% 139k +1% 
IBW 19 + % 

9ft 9ft 
13W 139* — 9b 
17 17ft— ft 

31% 31% — % 
21ft 21% + ft 


USLICs 

USP R1 236*225 
«JTL 

UlfrBCP 7-28 45 
Ultrsv JAe 9 
Ungrim 
Urrihcp 

Units: pf ix 11 J 
Un lfl 


3421% 21% 21ft + ft 

17 TOW 10 10ft + W 

32122ft 21ft 21ft— H 
30 AS 44 38ft 28 XH — W 
JAe 9 3412 7ft 6W AH + Vb 
1407216% 12U 134* -3W 
2413 12% 1244— Vb 

UM 131(1 13% + % 

516 9% 9ft 9W— W 


Si? i 9 UnTrac ZAO 42 29920 


8 9ft +lft 
241 39 39% + 44 

78720ft 19% MH 


UW lAH + ft 
11% 12 — » 
Mft 60ft -lft 


| Scsi Bar JD5T A 


IBH— 1 
10ft — W 
Aft — ft 
13% +1 
4% 

Uft— lft 
31 + ft 

19 + ft 

444— ft 
2H— ft 
14* 

Aft + ft 
ZH— ft 
149b— 1 
5% + W 
36ft + ft 
31 — W 

28% + H 
BO +3W 
45 +3 

13W— ft 
17ft + ft 
19ft- ft 
BW— ft 
17H + % 
17% —2% 
4ft— I 
3% +1 

73% — H 

25 + H 

744— % 
SVb— % 
32U — H 
37 + ft 

454b + ft 
Uft +lft 
6ft + ft 
JVb 

2046— ft 
Uft + ft 

sft— w 

23% — ft 
31W +1H 
I5W 

10% + ft 
lift + ft 
17% +1% 
10W — ft 
BH— ft 
Ml*- % 
18 + ft 

XW 
279* 

6 

4W + lb 
19% — % 
SH— % 
264b— % 
104b 
39ft +1 
41* + ft 
lift + ft 
5 

4W + H 
7ft— W 


5ft 5ft- 
II 43 
24ft 24W- 

16% 17ft 
9H 9ft 
21% 22ft- 
ZSft Z7W- 
15 15 - 

22H 22ft- 
Mft 2DW- 


394* 40% + 1b SatefSv .12 T5 
46 48ft +lft SavnF 150a 43 
S1W 51ft— ft SvBkPS ’ J4 Z9 
2t 34ft + W SaxtOp 
Aft 5*6- + H SconTr 
34 251* + H Scberar X 32 


i a 

B ov. —ift 
TH— ft 
H % 


W0 42 29V50 57 S9ft +3% 

XI 13 9% 10 +ft 

12631691 U T6H— ft 
20 25 445335ft 33 34% +JW 

st 

4073W 13 13W + W 


37ft 3«W +2W Schokis 
»ft 29% — ft ISdihnA 


ScJlIlltA AO 23 

29 HI Sdmed 

20% 21 —ft SdDvn 
11% lit*— ft ScICmp X 45 
lS9b 16% + % Sclincs 
Aft 416— ft 3d MIC 
2H 2H — ft SdSft 
14% is —1 SdSvSv 
X Uft —3ft Scitaic 
17% IBW + ft ScrlPH 20 23 
17ft 17ft— % Sea Gal 
AH 64* — Vb Seagate 
94* to + ft Sea I Inc 
5ft 5ft SeaWFd M 4A 
17ft 17W— ft ScNIBId 1.18 73 
T7ft IBH + H SecNtt IX 4J 
29% 38ft + H SeeAFn .10|» A 
Uft Uft + ft Sec BCD 1.13 S3 
MH 15% +1 SecTog 
3% 3% SEED 

I Salbel M 15 
select 

— Sendai 

4ft 6W + ft Senear 25 2 

49 4V — W Srvmat 
9 V SvcMer 20 A 

45H 45ft— t* Svmasr U12 3J 
«i 10ft + ft servloo t 
234* Xft + Vh SvcFrct 

12% 13M + ft SevOak .16 1.1 

13 121* -lit ShrJIMd .48 15 

4ft- H Shwmli IX SA 
7 7ft + lb Sfioibya .16 5 

16% 74% —IW SheWlA 
1«- Uft +2% Shoneve .15 5 

17 17 — ft shonSo S 

U% lft- ft shwml .10# 25 

M, M ... SlomCs 


7ft. m + ft 


IX .45 1»42«HI ^ 


24 — H 

2%— ft 


+ Unborn - 92 69 Ml 
122=2 ' 

ZH — 
S$S K *” j 

*•*— USBcp IX 33 5636 
5£“ * US Cap «“ 

£* u, usown 

2vb"+ w Hi Enr 

,S5 t £ US HIS 4*35 

52 f,2 USHWI 60 

!Jft+lft us Shit .128 30 in 
f* i 5 USSur -Too 5 420B 
+ .S USTrtc IX 9.1 353 


UCtvGs IX U 10317% 17ft 17ft + ft 


97 69 14113ft 


MCI 

MIW 

MPSIS 

MTS 8 

MTV 

MDmds 

Nlacgrg 

MachTc 

MackTr 

ModGE 

MasmP 

MagBk 

MaaCI! 

MobGp 

MalRf 

Malrlta 

MatSd 

ManRw 

ManiHs 

MtraN 

Marcus 

Manrux 

MktFct 

Manat 

Merest 

MarshS 

Marsnil 

MrtaNi 

Mecaln 

Masstor 

MathBx 

MatniS 

Max ere 

Maxwei 

MavPf 

MavSu A 

MaynOI 

Maw) 

MCCrm 

Me Fad 

Me Fart 

Modex 

MadCre 

MeddSt 

Madid 

Medpis 

Meadte 

NHntar 

MentrG 

MbtcB 8 

MercBk 

MerBCa 

MerBPa 

MerNv 1 

Mr chCa 

MerctiN 

MrdBC 

MrdBpI : 

Men Bs 

Mart me 

MervGi 

MervLd 

MeebAv 

Metrtai 

.'^otAIr i 

MairFn 

Motrmi 

Mlesm 

Micro 

Mknvw 

Mlcrdv 

MicrTc 

Ml a- OP 

Mlcrpro 

MlcrSm 

MdANtl 1 

MdPCA 

MdSIFd 

MWBk e I 

MdwAIr 

MwOn 1 

Murrch 

MiiiHr 

MlDlcm 

Mllflpr 

Mlniscr 

Mlnefnk 

wunetar 

Mieener 

MOa> 

Mfteul 

MoblCA 

MotllC B 

MotoGae 

MOCON 

Moatao i 

Moleclr 

Malax 

ManCa 1 

Moncor 

MonfCI 

MonAnt 

Mono lit 
MonuC 1 
MoareF 1 
MoaraP 
MerFlo 
MorKO 
AtC SB 

Mornn 
Mosaiev 
Moslnaa 
MotOb 
Mueller 1 
mu mm* 
Mutlmd 
Mrtane 


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64* + 16 
6 

774* — % 
23ft +1% 
28» + ft 
12ft— ft 
7 — 4* 
13% — to 
23ft + % 
7W + W 
IBW— ft 

14 — H 
Uft 

fft 

16H + ft 
II — ft 

22ft— W 
17W + H 
51% +lft 
IAW + W 
7ft — W 
1TW 

12% + ft 
im + % 
17 — W 
59% — ft 
23% +llb 
4 OH +1 
4H— H 
13 

37% + 1* 
25ft + % 
16% — ft 
5ft— ft 
164*— W 
3% 

10 

Mft— % 
lift — ft 
12W— % 
9ft 
7% 

13 —Aft 
4%— H 
25 +2ft 
4 

19% — % 
2Ito—2to 
35 — W 
4716 + H 
7ft + ft 
36% 

74 

17% + H 
4BW +1W 
43% — ft 
30ft— ft 

15 — H 
Uft 
UH +2 
10% 

TOW + ft 
13H— ft 
12% 

1916 — % 
27ft— IW 
4 — % 
BW— ft 
SW + H 
12to + H 
AW— ft 
2% + W 
SH— ft 
21W +1 
4W — ft 
2IW + % 
29ft + W 
5V. — V* 

33 — W 
H— ft 
34H— W 
3H— ft 
3*7* — ft 
3W— H 
7% + W 
27ft— ft 
16H 

124*— W 
26W— W 
9 

9W— W 
13% + ft 
5H— ft 
46W + ft 
7W— W 
33W— % 
43W— 3W 
3H + H 
17 — W 

1346 + H 
30% + W 

2Sto + to 

75% + 4* 
17% 

13 — I* 

19 i 

lfft + ft 
SW— ft 1 
13% 

14to— 116 

3IW 

32 

SOW +1% 

73 +19b 


10 TOW + to 
Uft 17 + H 

T7to T7H + 4* 
7V. 7% + ft 

816 BW— ft 
4 Aft— ft 
5% 54* — 4* 

41* 4% 

9% 10 —to 
5W Aft + l<» 



lK-% 


. _ 9% 10*— V* 

IX 9% 9W 9to— % 

1546 4% 39b 4% + % 

““HaH 

374 9to lft Bto— H 

463528ft 27W 38 •+ ft 

S «» IW 9W + W 

4 8% 4 +ft 

.70# 5 42X21% UH 21% +2% 

IX 9.1 35313ft 12% 13W 

IX AJ 06020 27W 27%— % 

X 9 678221* 20% 22ft +1 to 

30 7 AH 6% — ft 

164622W n 72 +2 

5511ft WK 104* — H 

— B17W UH 164* — ft 

IX 4.1 202)40% 39% 39W— % 

.15# 3 45*21% 21ft 21% + W 

16920 19W X +1* 

180914% 14ft 14W— ft 

335 5% SH Sft— % 

136 TOW TO 10 
... 47 Sft SH 51* 

100 705 31 19 Uft 19 + ft 

»2 JH 5 SW 

.14a 2J 819 SW 5 5 — to 

IX 4 A 4425 24% 24% 


3044 + H 


17% lift + H 
3SW Ml* +1» 
«* OH + ft 
AH 7 + 1* 

AH 416 — to 
UW 15ft 
14% ISto 

U T7W +1 
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2 3 — ft 

3W 3H— ft 
22H 22% 

9V. tft 

8 8ft— ft 


USTre IX AJ 063 M 
USfatd* X 9 67822’ 


UStafflB X 9 
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A * —ft Utah Be IX 4 a 


uft |5ft— lft Ismcoo 


20W 20W Silicons 

J?* , ^ + .S SUICVOP 
12 13% +1% silicnx 

71 II SUtec 


1 II SUtec 

5ft Sft— ft SJmAir 

f 3 +4* simpin x S3 

1 8 — % Stapln 

?ft a . snco 


MW 334*— to Sizzier 


JJb 75b— to SioonTc 
J^ft lg + h SmlthL 
22ft 23. + ft SmlfliF 


18ft 18% + H 

4 6 — ft 

14 14 — H 

29% 27% — ft 
31ft 31V.— % 
17ft 17W — to 
1216 13 + W 

27% MW + to 
14W 14W— % 
Aft 5 + 16 

6% i% 

7H 7H — l* 
lift 12W + to 
161* 16W + to 
19W 19% — W 
7% 7W— W 

IBW 11 — to 
ISH 15ft + % 
15W 15W— 16 
4W 4% + to 
11% 19 +16 


2151 8 7% 7ft— ft 

1 328 II to 10% II —to 
397* 7W AW 7ft + % 


.16# 15 127 10% 10% 10% + ft ft) 
1368016% 12 12W — 3% f" 


17% llto + W SoctySv 

12ft 12to + to softoch 

24V. 2416— W 5ofn»A 

13 13 Soneita 

.» BH- % SonocP 


MW 48W 
29ft 29W 
224* 23% 
11W 12H 


M A 651 

iw iaw tow— iw 

361 

7V, 7 7 

T7K 

3% Ito 34b— to 

143 

8 7% 7% + W 

IX 45 1556 

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A62 

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1S5 

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1456 

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AO 14 M 

7 24W 25W — IW 

130a 16 484 

46% 45% 4*ft— % 



153B Sft 108 

7 15% 17 +lft 

IX 74 1M1 

aw 22% 23 +1 

633 

5W SI* SW— ft 

X IJ 589 

BH 27W 28ft— ft 

IX 33 288 

6 25% 2SH— ft 

.10 14 949 

7W 7 7to— to 

IX 43 1288 

Oft 391* 40W + W 

M6 

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656 

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1 

316 3V, 316— W 

230 

14 13% 13% — to 


1368016% 12 12ft -3% 

4617% 16W 17 + % 

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.13 IS 7 *16 SH 6% + to 
IX 3J 19293CW 35ft 3*% +1 
50 3.1 599 774* 18% I9H— W 

— ■ ' 75 AH 6 *to + 16 

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“ — -8973 12% 12%—% 

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491116 11 11 + ft 

24 A 1U 10 91* 916— ft 

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21* H % H . 

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1X0 3J 5 30ft 29W 30W + % 


Me 1A 

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353 % to JW-W 
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322826% 23% 25 —1% 
IX 4J 234 25 W 25 25 + ft 

MS 41* 3% Aft— ft 


S'* 22m 7 J A0012H 12to 72V, — W 


*W- W 
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13V. 

23H 

35ft — ft 
19H— I 
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39h +.% 
45ft + to 
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8—76 SpcMIc 
13ft 5ponA 
9ft— IH SpecCm 
416 +% 5pecdv 
2m— ft Sect ran 

,2W SoecCII X J 
12ft SpertIO 
9 — % SPlra 

8 — to Star Sr e 

9 StalBid X U 
16 — H Slandy s IX 35 
2%— J" StdMlc 
7 —ft SMRea 1.16 11 

23% +1H Standun 
22% + % SlonfdT 
2344 + to stanhe I IX 45 
IV — H StaSIB IX II 
30% + to sitfeG .ISb 17 
8W + ft Stainer 
28W Starnru 
4H— 1* StewStv 
31 — lit stwinf .73 11 
TOW + ft StawSn .15 45 
2AU — 11* smal 
V +% StckYle .16 1J 
22% + H StockSy 
2H Stratus 
l*H — 116 StrwCe UM II 
7W— % Stryker 
24 —10ft SluartH 25 12 

294* Subaru 158 IJ 

.5W— ft SutaAIrt x 1.1 
24% +1H SubrB IX 19 
16 +ft Sudbry 

3% + to SutfSB ,T2e 5 

*H— W Summa 
11H— % Sumtos JA 4,7 
55ft —OH Sum BA 120 4.7 
.6ft _ SumfHI 2*6 3 
13H -a SunCel 
4% + ft Sum It 34 A3 
5W SunMod 
111* SunSL t 

5% +.1* Surat Fd 
4)4* — 1 Sunwet 1 AO 14 
SW— % SupRte .16 9 

UH — H SupSkv 
14 +lft Super EJ t 

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94ft -2 ISK?? 

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1935 616 SH 6 — 1* SVBtGn 

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12* 9, BW Mb— to TLS 5 5 

41510ft fW 10 . TIC Inc 1X9 

2418072W 11% 12ft- H T31 X 1.1 S3 B 


14 14 —l 

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14% IS + to 
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131* 1316 
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51 51 —1 

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AH 64*— Vi 


4»ri% 71 I1K— “ 
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84 7 6W 7 +% 
738 1% IW 1% + ft 
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347011% 10H WH— H 
47 4 3% 3ft— ft 

2ni7W IW 17 — W 
892 SOW 30% 30% —ft 
■T3r 13 29910 IK TO +1% 

40 7% 7ft 7% + ft 


MH UH— to 
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52 54% +2% 

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54.— ft 

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JO 

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17 — % 
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lift lift— % 
X, 20% — ft 
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1777 Sft «ft 3 + % 

2931 9 a Ito— ft 

7804 727b lift lift— to 


258 94* fto . 9% 


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American Exchange Options 

For the Week Ending April 5, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TIUgjLJffE, MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 

THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY 





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Steel Dispute With U.S. Is Reaching Critical Stage 


By Steven J. Dryden 

fn/emunontd tier aid Tribune 

' BRUSSELS — The latest dis- 
pute between the United States and 
the European Community over 
steel could reach a critical point 
this week. 

The United States notified the 
EC in February that it believed the 
level of community exports of 
semifinished steel products violat- 
ed their 1982 carbon steel trade 
accord. 

The agreement provided for a 
60-day period of consultations 
when violations were suspected. 
The period ran out Monday and 
the United Slates has said it might 
impose limits on community semi- 
finished steel products. 

The EC commission said it 
would react “vigorously” to any 
U.S. curbs on steel and is studying 
a list of U.S. exports, including 
agricultural products, that could be 
limited in retaliation. 

The EC and the United States 
have held two meetings on the issue 
since February without reaching an 
agreement. A request by the com- 
munity last week for another meet- 
ing has not been answered by 
Washington. 

■ The United States said the com- 


munity boosted sales of semifin- 
ished steel products to get around 
limits on other types of steel in the 
1982 accord. The agreement does 
not cover semifinished products 
but provides for consultations if 
one party believes trade is being 
diverted to avoid the restraints. 

The EC has rejected the U.S. 
charge, saying the high value of the 
dollar and demand from American 
manufacturers have caused the in- 
creased sales. 

Bonn Blamed for Delay 
On Farm-Price Accord 

The failure of community agri- 
culture ministers to agree on farm 
prices last week will probably delay 
an accord until at least mid- May. 
EC officials said. 

Normally, the 1985-86 prices 
should be agreed upon by April 1. 

West Germany, which’ has been 
heavily criticized' in the community 
for its position, was blamed for the 
breakdown of the meeting, held in 
Luxembourg. 

The West German agriculture 
minister, ignoz Kiechle, refused to 
go along with the Commission’s 
recommendation that grain prices 
be cut by 3.6 percent. Bonn argues 


that its farmers’ incomes have suf- 
fered unfairly compared with oth- 
ers in the community. 

France and several other coun- 
tries criticized West Germany for 
taking what they said was a contra- 
dictory approach to community 
policies. They said Bonn called for 
strict overall EC spending limits 
while seeking exemptions when 
West German interests were threat- 
ened. 

Filippo Pandolfi, the Italian 
farm minister who chairs the agri- 
culture session under the ECs ro- 
tating leadership, has not ruled out 
a vote to overcome the West Ger- 
man objection. 

Italian Representative 
Is Given a Promotion 

While Italy still faces difficulty 
in arranging an agreement on agri- 
culture, it has a major achievement 
to its credit: the conclusion of the 
expansion talks with Spain and 
Portugal. 

Giulio Andreotri. the Italian for- 
eign minister, assisted, by the Ital- 
ian permanent representative in 
Brussels, Pietro Calami a, conduct- 
ed the six days of nonstop negotiat- 
ing that led to an agreement last 
month, meeting the EC deadline. 


Last Wednesday, Mr. Calamia 
received what his colleagues said 
was recognition of his efforts: ap- 
pointment to the rank of full am- 
bassador bv the Italian council of 
ministers. Italy has only 18 full am- 
bassadors in its foreign service. 

Mr. Calamia, 55, is on his third 
tour in Brussels, including one as 
deputy chief of mission from 1978 
to 1980. He then served as Italy’s 
envoy to Yugoslavia before return- 
ing to Brussels last year. 

Delon Cautions Japan 
On Trade-Barrier Moves 

The Commission president, Jac- 
ques Ddors, has told Japanese 
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 


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IF YOU GET A KICK 
OUT OF SOCCER, READ 

ROB HUGHES 

WEDNESDAYS IN THE IHT 


Chemical’s Ohio Bid 'Makes Sense’ 


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Band 627 557 

GvtSec 512 533 
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The A updated Frets 
NEW YORK — Chemical New 
York Corpn which signed a letter of 
intent Friday to acquire the busi- 
ness of a dosed Ohio thrift, is 
known as a leading lender to mid- 
dle-sized businesses. 

As a result, analysts said, they 
were not surprised by the interest 
which the U<S.’s sixth-largestbank- 


54rvicas: 
584 NL 
1357 NL 


Growth 7J» NL 


es are abundant. 

Fred Wightman, who follows tbe 
banking industry for Duff & 
Phelps Inc. in Chicago, said Chemi- 
cal hftH demonstrated “a real tal- 
ent" for cultivating retail and 
“middle-market” business through 
its prindpal subsidiary, Chemical 
Bank. 

"Their long-term strategy calls 
for applying such expertise in other 
pans of the country. The national 
expansion motive is evident here,” 
he said. 

Lawrence Cohn, a banking ana- 
lyst for the securities firm of Dean 
Witter Reynolds Inc., in New 
York, said: "This makes tremen- 
dous sense. Ohio is chock-a-block 
with those kinds of companies." 

Mr. Cohn made his comments 
earlier this week after it had be- 
come rumored that Phrmiral may 


be interested in acquiring Home 
State Savings Bank of Cincinnati. 

A spokesman for Chemical, Ken 
Herz, said it has long been ranked 
as the top lender to middle-market 
businesses in the tri-stale area of 
New York, New Jersey and Con- 
necticut. He said the bank consid- 
ers middle-market businesses those 
with annual sales of $5 million to 
SI 50 mill i nn . 

Chemical said Friday that it had 
signed a letter of intent with the 
state of Ohio to buy Home State. 
Under the agreement. Chemical 
would establish a newly chartered, 
federally insured commercial bank 
in Ohio providing comprehensive 
banking services. 

Home Slate closed March 8, as 
depositors descended on the thrift 
to withdraw their money. The de- 
positors were worried because 
Home State had disclosed that it 
stood to lose about S145 million as 
a result of its transactions with a 
failed Florida-based securities 
firm. 

Tbe Home State closing jeopar- 
dized a private deposit insurance 
fund and prompted tbe governor of 
Ohio to dose other savings and 
loans insured by tbe same fund. 
Although most of the others have 
reopened for at least limited ser- 


vice, Home State depositors remain 
cut off from their money. 

Chemical’s agreement is subject 
to several conditions, including a 
detailed evaluation of Home 
State's assets and liabilities, the 
passage of enabling legislation by 
the Ohio legislature, approval by 
Chemical’s board and regulatory 
approval. Federal law prohibits in- 
terstate banking except when tbe 
laws of the states involved permit 
iL 

This would be Chemical’s first 
commercial bank outride its New 
York state base, although it oper- 
ates corporate lending offices else- 
where in tbe United States. Mr. 
Herz said Chemical had opened 
offices specializing in middle-mar- 
ket lending in the past two years in 
New Jersey and Connecticut. 

Mr. Herz said it had agreed in 
1982 to merge with Florida Nation- 
al Bank in Jacksonville, but legisla- 
tion has not been passed to permit 
the merger. 

Chemical Bank is the sixth larg- 
est in the United States with assets 
of S35.1 billion. It has 260 domestic 
branches. Its parent has assets of 
$52.2 billion and a staff of 20,000 
worldwide. 

In 1984, Chemical New York's 
net was $340.8 million, up 1 1 2 per- 
cent from $305.6 billion in 1983. 


Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakn- 
sone of Japan that the EC should 
not be left out of coming Japanese 
trade liberalization moves. 

In a message to Mr. Nakasone, 
Mr. Ddors emphasized the com- 
munity's interest in seeing Japa- 
nese administrative procedures and 
import rules simplified, as well as 
increased Japanese purchases of 
EC products. 

Mr. Delors said the EC would 
not accept new Japanese trade poli- 
cies that only benefited the United 
States. 


Mitsubishi Says 
It May Buy Gear 
From IBM Unit 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Mitsubishi Elec- 
tric Cotp. said it was consider- 
ing purchasing telecommunica- 
tions equipment from Rolm 
Coip. of Santa Gain, Califor- 
nia, and marketing it in Japan. 

Mitsubishi, which made the 
announcement Friday, said it 
has not reached a final derision 
on purchasing digital private 
branch exchanges, or PBX’s, 
from Rolm, a subsidiary of In- 
ternational Business Machines 
Corp. of Armonk. New York. 

But analysis said the pur- 
chases would be a way for Mit- 
subishi Electric to tighten con- 
nections with IBM, greatly 
improving Mitsubishi Electric’s 
position in Japan’s telecom- 
munications market 

Since Japan's telecommuni- 
cations market became liberal- 
ized April l, Toshiba Corp.. one 
of Mitsubishi Electric’s com- 
petitors, already has begun dis- 
cussions with American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co., 
apparently aimed at coopera- 
tion in marketing telecommuni- 
cations equipment in Japan. 


'Intrapreneuring’: A Corporate Can-Do Theory 


(Continued from Page T) 

tbe highly successful yellow pads 
with me gentle adhesive. Arthur 
Fry, a product designer for 3M, 
wanted a book marker to note 
pages in a church hymnal, but one 
that would adhere to the pages 
without tearing them when re- 
moved. 

So, using an adhesive already de- 
veloped at 3M by Spencer Silver, a 
colleague, and taking advantage of 
a company policy that permits 
technical personnel to pursue their 
own ideas for the company 15 per- 
cent of the time, Mr. Fry developed 
a manufacturing process in his 
basement to produce Post-It- 
Notes. 

For his efforts, Mr. Fry was pro- 
moted to the post of senior scien- 
tist He also won the Carlton 
Award — “3M’s Nobel Prize,” Mr. 
Fiy said. 

Similarly, Texas Instruments’ 
successful Speak-n-Spell electronic 
learning aid was developed by engi- 
neers who received financing out- 
side the company’s normal funding 
channels 

In a variation on intrapreneur- 
ship, IBM produced its first per- 
sonal computer by spiriting em- 


ployees to Boca Raton, Florida, 
giving them their own budget and 
ignoring long-standing policy of 
not buying pans from tbe outride. 

And there have been countless 
other cases of corporate tinkercrs 
who turned bobbies into big busi- 
nesses for their employers. 

“The idea is not new at all" said 
Howard H. Stevenson, a Harvard 
Business School professor who has 
written and lectured on entrepre- 
neurship. 

But it is because many compa- 
nies lag in imrapreneuiriup that 
the new book has gained a hearing. 

Gifford Pinchot 3d, 42, the 
book's author, is a management 
consultant in New Haven, Con- 
necticut, who has spent several 
years promoting intrapreneurship 
at some of tbe nation's largest in- 
dustrial concerns, including Exxon 
Corp., Du Pont Co„ Ford Motor 
Co. and American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. 

Since going into national distri- 
bution a month ago, his Tntra- 
pren curing" has sold more than 
65,000 copies. 

Mr. Pinchot’s argument, in 
shon. is that American companies 
excel at generating ideas but are 
poor at converting them into busi- 


ness successes. The reasons, be said 
in a recent interview, are many. 

For example, most large compa- 
nies want to know beforehand what 
a new business will earn, which is 
impossible in the case of truly new 
ventures, he said. And the “pas- 
sum” of an innovative idea often 
gets lost as it moves from product 
development to manufacturing to 
marketing, he added. So Mr. Rin- 
chot provides a checklist for man- 
agers and employees wanting to be 
more intrapreneuriaL 

For employees, for instance, Mr. 
Pinchot offers an “Intrapreneur’s 
Ten Commandments." Among 
them: “Come to work each day 
willing to be fired.” 

Some call that nonsense: “It’s 
simply not a realistic possibility for 
a significant proportion of the 
work face working in traditional 
organization," Miss Kanter said. 
“If they went to work each day 
expecting to get fired, c han c es arc 
they would." 

Managers, by comparison, are 
urged to end the “home-run philos- 
ophy," in which companies favor a 
few ’well-planned projects, and to 
concentrate on developing many 
small, experimental businesses. 
They are also encouraged to give 


employees corporate “slack": the 
time, money and equipment to tin- 
ker. 

But the successes aside, intra- 
preneurship has its problems, and 
can backfire if not handled wisely. 
According to banking experts, it 
was partly the intrapreneurial out- 
look of lending officers that led 
many big banks to make large loans 
in the energy industry in the mid- 
1970s. Many of those loans have 
soured with falling oil prices. 

Similarly, Bankers Trust Co., 
which has been trying to be more 
intrapreneurial by adding invest- 
ment banking capabilities to its tra- 
ditional commercial banking s kills, 
has reportedly been struggling with 
a problem that many companies 
face: how to compensate its intra- 
preneurs. By paying investment 
bankers more, according to sources 
inside the bank. Bankers Trust has 
bred resentment among other em- 
ployees. 

For his part, Mr. Pinchot says 
tbe problem is surmountable: Pay 
intrapreneurs more, but make them 
incur more risk, such as tying their 
job security to the success of their 
projects. 


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Page 12 




ACROSS 


1". . .baked in 


5 Repaired tire 
10 Mop the deck 

14 Fizzy drink 

15 Color called 
bleu Louise 

18 Part of an oriel 

17 Equal 

18 Value 

20 Puncture 

21 Ballet 
performer 

22 Not difficult 
25 Pleasure, in 

Paris * 

28 Work list 

29 Family 

31 An arm of 

HUD 

34 Dishonest 

36 Epochs 

37 Birch's cousin 

38 Sonny's sibling 

39 Timers 

40 Layer 

41 Outline of a 
figure 

43 Peculiar 

44 Recess In a 
church 

45 Kind of drama 

46 Atmosphere 

47 Insect's feeler 

48 Star 


53 Singer 
Fitzgerald 
57 Frauds 
50 Bright light at 
night 

68 Sly gaze 

61 Choice 

62 Jacket or 
collar 

63 Decoy 

64 Frozen rain 

65 Charge 

DOWN 


27 Extremely 
cold 

28 Over 

29 Sheer cotton 
fabric 


1 Reptiles in the 
Nile 


30 Marsh plant 

31 Worries 

32 Creator of 
Truthful 
James 

33 Property, e.g. 

35 Mother of 
Homs 

36 Something 
startling 


2 laureate 

3 Brainstorm 

4 Bore 

5 New Deal 

6 Vacant 

7 Head, in 
Milano 

8 Ouse feeder 
6 Promises 

10 Part of a tome 

11 Woman soldier 
in 1942 

12 Poker term 

13 Porter's 
relative 

19 Concern 

23 Hebrew month 

24 Pouch 

26 Famed Italian 
baritone 


<S> New York Tunes, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 





‘IF 'TtXJ'LL BUYMEA VO NY, I'LL & VE 
UP MY COLLEGE EDUCATION. v 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
- by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble Ouse lour Jumbles, 
one leilar to each square, to form 
lour ordirwuy words. 


Hey— how do you expeel a 
guy to gal any sleep? 


LYMIF 


m 


DALIP 




DORFIL 




OPPELE 


WHAT THE ANGRY' 
MUMAAY PIC?. 


Now arrange the circled letters lo 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


(Answers tomorrow) 

| Jumbles: GUILE CROAK INNING PSYCHE 
Fl ™ oy * Answer. Could be a roundabout way ot showing your 
love— A HUG 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


■ " ■ ■ ■ HIGH 

C F 

Abram 19 66 

AnuterUam 14 57 

Aftwns 31 70 

Barcelona 72 71 

Bel ero d e 34 15 

Berne 16 61 

Brunei* 14 57 

BOCtiaraU 36 79 

Budapest 31 70 

Copentiaeea 5 41 

Carte Del Sol 35 77 

Dublin 14 57 

Ediatiunrti ii 53 

ntrwa 18 M 

Frankfurt 15 59 

Geneva 14 57 

HetstakJ 3 37 

Istanbul 30 68 

Lot Palmer* 34 75 

Lisbon IB 64 

London 15 59 

tUata-M 14 57 

Moan 14 47 

MOSCOW s 36 

Munich 17 63 

tnca 16 61 

Olio 0 33 

Porta 13 54 

ProBwe 18 64 

Reykjavik 9 48 

Rom* 19 66 

Stockholm I 34 

Strasbourg 14 47 

Venice 18 64 

Vienna 22 72 

Wdrsaw 22 72 

Zurich 13 55 


MIDDLE EAST 


LOW 
e p 
15 St Cl 

7 45 d 

15 5V d 

8 46 tr 
13 S3 0 

8 46 o 
6 43 r 

13 54 h- 

10 S3 d 

2 36 r 

9 48 tr 

6 43 III 

3 37 o 

11 H d 

7 54 Cl 

2 36 cl 
-7 19 fi- 
ll 52 rr 

16 61 fr 
15 59 o 

5 41 fr 
It 52 o 

4 P fr 
-2 28 sw 

6 43 O 

7 45 fr 
-4 25 O 

6 43 in 
IQ SO Si 

3 37 r 
9 41 o 

-1 30 0 

6 43 a 
10 so r 
9 48 a 
10 30 fr 

4 39 a 


Bangkok 

Bed fata 
Hoag Kong 
Manila 
New Delhi 
Seoul 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Tolnei 

Tokyo 


AFRICA 


Algiers 

Cairo 

Cope Town 


If 66 10 
17 63 10 
19 64 96 
30 68 13 
27 II 17 

30 84 25 
26 79 U 
23 73 16 


LATIN AMERICA 


Bueno* AJrex 26 79 20 

iJma 26 79 20 

Mexico City 36 79 e 

Rlade Janeiro 30 86 25 

Soo Paulo — — — 


NORTH AMERICA 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Daaascoi 
Jerusalem 
TSI Aelv 


OCEANIA 


I 34 fr 

13 55 fr 

10 50 et 

7 45 fr 

10 50 fr 


Auckland 17 61 10 50 d 

SWtaetr 21 70 IS 59 fr 

M1 £j^ toU{ ty; fojauov; fr-falr; tt-half: 
cloudy; r-rabi; O mow e r*: sw-snow; 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 

Boiton 

Otlcago 

Denver 

Detrait 

HenalulD 

Houston 

loe Anoeiei 

Miami 

mIbhoopoII* 

Montreal 

Noiiau 

New York 

Sen Francisco 

Seattle 

Toronto 

Washington 

na- not aval table ; 

sf-starmy. 


0 32 .7 
20 68 55 
11 2 I 
9 48 -2 
10 SO -4 

1 45 -2 
27 81 16 
36 79 13 
22 73 14 
38 82 19 

6 43 -4 
9 48 3 

26 79 18 
14 57 4 
20 68 11 
It 66 4 

6 43 1 

18 64 0 


19 PC 
41 PC 
43 PC 
38 PC 
25 DC 

38 pc 
61 fr 
55 PC 
57 pc 
M K 
25 cl 
37 r 
64 pc 
49 PC 
SS PC 

39 fr 
34 sw 
32 PC 
oe-purfty 


RSK ^VISF® ^snsm=i 

- *iW — 4HSI.ZUIRICH: Rain .Tme. 12-7 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 


PEANUTS 


A Sad Story 


r lUi5 ISNT^ 
A SAP 
.STORY., j 


THIS IS 
A DUMB 
STORY' 


THAT'S WHAT MAKES 
IT SO SAP 



BLONDIE 


I WHAT'S UP, '^v ' — 1 I'M * H y |WHATT IS 
SWEETHEART •>[' SEARCHING ? I UFE?f 


THATS EASY 


LIFE 6 WHAT HAPPENS 
~r SETWEB4 NAPS > 


IF CM UA6JUY,THAr » 

THE TRUTH ! -* 


POP THE 1 1 
TRUTH Til 1 


BEETLE BAILEY 


39 Obtundor 
obtuse 

41 Elves 

42 Wood sorrel 

44 Is not up to par 

46 Venerate 

47 Actor Duilia 

del 

48 Ants' creation 

49 Ostrichlike 
bird 

59 Imitator 

51 and void 

52 Where Perry 
triumphed 

54" Smile Be 

Your..." 

55 Pillage 

56 Queen, or 
princess 

58 Harden 



ANDY CAPP 


ANY HINT YET’ 
OFWHATHPS , 
► GOING TO -< 
GETMXJjRO?] 




SHE’S AUkflMSA BIT EDGY K 
BEFORE /YH ANNIVERSARY 
— WORRIED TO DEATH IN CASE 
SHEtL BE GIVEN SOMETHING 
SHECANTAFRDRD ^ 


WIZARD of ID 


&me 
a mem? 


wclm &J& to 

W& K4Vll«^ 

zomims to &4t 

PPlNKINt^, BUH& 


17 

F04OI 

nr rN 

mwx 




= 11 nm 


REX MORGAN 


•CONCERNED OVER "THE LATE - 
NIGHT PHONE CALL HE RECEIVED FROM HIS WIFE, 
BRADY BISHOP RETURNS TO DR. MORGAN’S OFFICE. 


1 KNOW I'M BEING A ] h 
NUISANCE BY COMING UN 
HERE WITHOUT AN M 
APPOINTMENT— BUT W‘ 
I'M CONVINCED THAT » 
SOMETHING’S WRONG Gr 
WITH CLAUDIA ! SOME- 0 
TIMES I THINK 5HE'S i 
A MANIC DEPRESSIVE— , 
k UP ONE DAY. DOWN rH 
ham ANOTHER/’ r—^^7 


1 DON'T THINK SHE 
FITS THAT CATEGORY, 
MR. BISHOP.' DOES SHE 
DRINK ALCOHOL OR ^ 
^31 USE DRUGS? M 


[ SHE 
TAKES AN 
OCCASIONAL 
SOCIAL J 
DRJNK— BUT 


SHE'D NEVER USE 
DRUGS / «- 


BRAPL6Y 

BX*i£Sf> 

THxM-ta 


GARFIELD 



BOOKS 


A CHANGING ISRAEL 

By Peter Grose. 129 pp. Paper $ 4.95 . 
Vintage, 201 East 50th Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by J. Robert Moskin 

T HE troth is Israel has cfaangsd drastically. 

With the occupation of the West Bank and 
the Gaza Strip in 1967 and the rise to power of 
the leaders of the pre-state right wing Irgun 
and Stern . Gang undergrounds 10 years later, 
the pioneer era is over. It has been succeeded 
by discordant values, divisiveness, an economy 
out of control and a million conquered Arabs. 
Israel has traded a measure of external safety 
for internal trouble. 

In this brief, fact-studded book; Peter 


higher Arab birthrates wfll evenuaUy over- 
th* fonnsh state. He points out that 


identifies tour major changes that oear on 
Israel’s domestic well-being and external rela- 
tions with the rest of the world. These percep- 
tions of chang e will be surprising even to those 
who have been paying attention. 

The first change Grose emphasizes is that 
Israel has become a “fractious society." He is 
not referring to (he familiar split between the 
Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews — which he sees 
as "cultural divisions of the Diaspora [that] are 
losing their relevance" — but the clash of 
rigidly observant and secular Jews betw e en 
whom ’Tensions and bitterness [are] growing." 
He says that “the conflict between the varying 
demands of religious observance is the most 
potentially disruptive threat to the unity of 
Jewish Israel" 

Secondly, Grose decries the disastrous, self- 
indulgent inflation that has “brought the na- 
tion to a genuine economic crisis." As a result, 
350,000 Israelis (10 percent of the population) 
have moved to the United States and many 
others ship their savings out of the country. 
“Israel is an economic ward of a foreign power, 
the United States," Grose adds. “The state of 
the Israeli economy is no longer a purely inter- 
nal matter to be left to Israeli politicians. It is. 
to an ingeasipg degree, the United Slates 
Treasury and the American taxpayer that un- 
derwrite the economic priorities defined in 
Jerusalem.” 

Third, he says, “The undeniable reality, not 
planned and not pleasing to either side, is that 
the extended Jewish state of Israel is becoming 
a h i nati onal society.” But he disagrees that 


other time in their history, Israelis began to 
Question the legitimacy of their government's 


question the legitimacy of their government's 
military judgement. ... A serious break- 
down of civil responsibility had occured. 

Now, the so-called “unity government" 
headed by Shimon Peres is trying to escape 
from Lebanon, bring the economy down to 
earth and restore the Israelis’ faith in them- 
selves as a righteous people. It has a lot of 
sweeping up to do. Peter Grose explains some 


of the reasons why. His book, the product of a 
Council on Foreign Relations study group on 
Israel is short enough, clear enough 


Israel is short en 
often enough to 1 


ah, clear enough and right 
er a reader a quick once- 


over of the state of Israel today. 

But Grose goes a step further. He recom- 
mends what Americans should do about this 
changing Israel If the United States were to 
follow Peter Groses’s controversial prescrip- 
tions, it would: 

• Keep the U-S. Embassy in Tel Aviv; 
Grose says to move it to Jerusalem, Israel’s 
capital is “a foolish and irresponsible” propos- 
al — despite repeated, political promises to do 
.so. 

• Put a cap on economic support to Israel to 
slop fueling the runaway inflation that Israeli 
politicians do not have the courage to deal 
with. 

• Send financial aid to improve the living 
conditions and productivity of Arabs on the 
West Bank, since. Grose says, they are not 
about to get either national self-determination 
or Israeli annexation. 


Solution to Friday's Puzzle 


• Accept the premise that the 1967 borders 
a the Iordan River and the Golan. Heights 


□□□ EIEI 93 D 13 13 13 
□E 3 E 2 G 3 E 13 Q 033 L 3 QQ 

□nnnnraEO aaaaQa 
□one naa Enaass 
QEQBSH □□□□ 

□□□a aaaa 
asaasaaaaaann 
EQGjnaaaQQaaao 
OEEaQaaaHEiQBE 
□EdE □□□□ 

SEED □□□□□□ 

□EQOE 1 Q □□□ USDS 

EDSQ 3 Q Q 3 D 3 QQE 3 

QEQHEta aaiaanama 
□□□a ansa □□□ 


“may well hold firm for a long time to come." 

• Somehow arrange “a stand-off under- 
standing" between Israel and Syria to mini- 
mize the danger of renewed hostilities. 

• When the time comes for Middle East 
mediation, invite the Soviet Union to be “in 
the supporting cast, rather that carping from 
thegaDeries." 

These very debatable recommendations are 
an attempt by Grose (and presumably the 
council’s study group)io ontling an American 
policy in response to a changing Israel. They 
deserve to be poured into the pot of the ongo- 
ing debate. 


J. Robert Moskin, senior editor of World 
Press Review, is the author of "Among 
Lions, "the story of the battle for Jerstialem in 
1967. He wrote this review for The Washington 
Post. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


V_/ cue-bid by North showed 
spade support with at least in- 
vitational values. Three spades 
would have shown a desire to 
reject an invitation, so South 

.* : J - 


It made no difference, for 
North would have continued 
over three spades. 

The opening heart lead was 
won in the dummy, and South 
tried a trump finesse. West 
took his king and continued 
hearts. When the declarer 
ruffed, he had to worry about 
the possibility of losing a trick 
in each minor suit. There was a 
faint chance of avoiding a dia- 
mond loser, so he considered 
the possibility of leading the 
diamond jack eventually from 


the dummy to pin a hypotheti- 
cal doubleton ten in the West 
Hand. 

In view erf the overcall it 
seemed probable that West 
held either the diamond king 
or the dub queen or both. So 
South laid a little trap by lead- 
ing the diamond deuce from 
his hand. West might have 
asked himself why the declarer 


was doomed to lose, and West 
was thrown in with a diamond 
lead. He had to concede a ruff 
and sluff, so the club loser dis- 
appeared, and the game was 
made. 


would play diamonds at this 
point, but he failed to scent 


point, but he failed to scent 
danger and routinely played 
low. When the jade won in 
dummy. South had a road 
open to success and found it. 

Trumps were drawn, and the 
diamond ace was cashed. It 
was now dear that West had 
begun with three spades, five 
hearts and at least three dia- 
monds. So the top clubs were 
cashed, spuming a finesse that 


WEST 
♦ a 75 

■ 7 KQ 182 

9X14 

*95 


NORTH 

* Q J 4 3 
<7 A 10 5 
0 JB3 
**34 

1111 

1IMIIII g 10 B 7 5 - 
* Q 10 8 4 3 
SOUTH (D) 

* A 10 S 8 2 
9 73 


O A Q 2 
♦ K78 

North and Sooth were vulnerable. 
The MdtUog: 

Sawh Wen North Eat 

1 * 2 7 3 9 Pen 

4* Pass Pen Pen 


West led the heart king. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Frost Victor in Formula 1 Season-Opener 


USFL: A SpreadrFormation Question Mark 


RIO DE JANEIRO (UPI) — Frenchman Alain Prost, driving a McLaren, 
defeated Michele Alboreto to win the season-opening Brazilian Formula One 
Grand Prix race here Sunday, taking the event for the second consecutive year. 
Early leader Kekc Rosberg dropped out when the turbo broke on his W illiams , 
and Frost took a solid lead over Alboreto midway through the race. Alboreto. in a 
Ferrari, finished well ahead of Elio De Angelis (Lotus). 


Eternal Prince, Skywalker Win Prep Paces 


By Dave Anderson 
NEW YORK — If the United 
States Football League were an oil 
company or a television network, 
the corporate raiders would be 
lurking, ready to pounce 
Instead of Doug Flutie, the new 
USFL name would soon be the 


NEW YORK (UPI) — Eternal Prince, at 18-1, was never seriously challenged 
here Saturday in beating favored Pancho Villa by five lengths to win the one-mile 
(1.61-lrilonieter) Gotham Stakes, a stepping stone to the May 4 Kentucky Derby. 

Meanwhile, in Arcadia, California, Skywalker won by a nose over Fast Account 
in the imle-and-one-righth Santa Anita Derby. Southern California’s final prep 
race for the first leg of the Triple Crown. 

Eternal Prince clocked one minute. 34 and two-fifths seconds, one second slower 
than Secretariat’s track record, set in 1973. 


Moorhouse of U.K. Sets Breaststroke Mark 


MANCHESTER (UPI) — Adrian Moorhouse of Britain clocked a world record 
of one minute. 0J8 seconds in the 100-meter breaststroke at the national short- 
t»urse (25-meter) swimming championships here Saturday. Moorhouse. fourth in 
the men’s 100-meter breaststroke final at the 1984 Olympics, shaved three- 
hundredths of a second off the mark set last year by Victor E&vis of 


Bass Brothers or T. Boone Pickens 
or Capital Glies Communications. 
Instead, the new name might be 
Enefel, at least phoneticaDy. Isn’t it 
time for Commissioner Pete Ro- 
zeQe's raiders to move in and ab- 
sorb a few franchises? 

With the USFL in the seventh 
weekend erf its third season, it con- 
tinues to stagger on its springtime 
treadmill Its planned 1986 switch 
to a fall schedule is still not com- 
pleted. Attendance and television 
ratings are down, and its new com- 
missioner, Harry Usher, acknowl- 
edges that by the end of the season 
dub owners will have “invested" 
about 5150 million over three sea- 


• The defen ding-champion Bal- 
timore Stars have been denied the 
use of Memorial Stadium next 
spring by Edward Bennett Wil- 
liams, the baseball Orioles' owner. 
Meanwhile, the Stars, who play 
their games at the University of 
Maryland's stadium, continue to 
practice at Veterans Stadium in 
Philadelphia, where they played for 
the league’s first two seasons. 

• The Denver Gold’s attendance 
is averaging 13,969. compared with 
44,000 two years ago and 33,000 
Iasi year. When the Gold offered 
spectators at the season opener 
their money back if not satisfied, 
the dub ha'd to refund 516,981 to 
1,484 fans. 

• According to their co-owner, 
Alvin Lubetkin, the Houston Gam- 
blers may be forced to move if a 
new investor isn't found to ease the 


Sept. 1 payment of a SI J million 
loan. 

• The Portland Breakers, previ- 
ously of New Orleans and Boston, 
could sell every ticket for every 
game at their 3 2^ 00-seat stadium 
— and still lose S2 million this 
season. 

• With the departure of Dr. Ted 
Diethrich from the Arizona Out- 


laws. only four original 1983 dub 
owners remain — Alfred Taubman 


owners remain — Alfred Taubman 
and Ted Taube in Oakland, Myles 
Tanenbaum in Baltimore and John 
Bassett in Tampa Bay. 

• Thai same Bassett has threat- 
ened “not to pla/’ a fall schedule 
next year, provoking Usher to an- 
nounce that Bassett would be fined 
for his remarks. 

By requesting “partial reim- 
bursement” from the other dub 
owners. Trump obviously didn't 


believe Flutie was worth S8.3 mil- 
lion. AH this is a reminder of a 
lingering question: Why did 
Trump give Flutie all those mil- 
lions when no National Football 
League team (notably the Buffalo 
Bills with the No. 1 draft choice) 
had made a bona fide offer to the 
Heisman Trophy winner? The an- 
swer is that Trump obviously 
looked upon sig nin g Flutie as a 
show of strength for the entire 
USFL, which is why he sought con- 
tributiom from other dabs. 


Trump’s request for “partial re- 
imbursement” has deflated Flu tie’s 
value not only to the Generals but 
also to the USFL’s image. 

Until now, Flutie thought 
Trump loved him for himself, not 
for his value to the other dub own- 
ers as a symbol and attraction. If 
you take your best girl to the prom 
in a limousine, you don't want her 
to know you’re doing it to show off 


Floyd, Blaekmar Greensboro Golf Leaders 


sons without a penny of profit. As 
proof that the league's most dan- 
gerous enemy is itself, consider 
these developments: 

• Donald Trump hopes lo be 
partly reimbursed by other dub 
owners for having signed Flutie to 
an 58.3 million, five-year contract 
with the New Jersey Generals. 

• The Los Angeles Express re- 
mains a team without an owner. In 
the absence of one, the league of- 
fice is supervising the operation of 

" the franchise, prompting the quar- 
" terback Steve Young to say: “what 
if we win the league? Does Usher 
give hims elf the trophy, or what?" 

• Marvin Warner resigned as an 
owner of the Birmingham Stallions 
following the collapse of his Cin- 
cinnati thrift institution that trig- 
gered the Ohio banking crisis; the 

- dty of Birmingham is considering 
5 *Lhe purchase erf his stock. 

„ • The Jacksonville Bulls, seeking 
“fresh money, will make 49 percent 
1 of their stock available to the pub- 
lic ai S 100 a share. 


GREENSBORO, North Carolina (UPI) — Ray Floyd and PGA newcomer Phil 
Blaekmar were tied at four shots under par Saturday through three rounds of the 
Greater Greensboro Open golf loomamenL 
Floyd, a 22-year tour veteran, and Blaekmar, who qualified only last fall, 
compiled 54-hole totals of 212 going into Sunday’s final round Floyd's 66 was the 
best score of the third round; he carded birdies on seven of his first win* holes and 
added two more on the back nine. Blaekmar had a 68 Saturday. 

Bobby Clampett for second at 213 with Peter Jacobsen (a 70) and Dan 
fu Sluman, who had held the lead alone through the first two rounds, 

fell to 77/214 when his putting faltered. 


Ueberroth Lifts Bine’s Baseball Suspension 


NEW YORK (AP) —Peter Ueberroth has reinstated pitcher Vida Blue, who is in 
trainingcamp with the San Francisco Giants, the baseball commissioner's office 


announwd late Friday. Blue had bam suspended for the 1984 season by Ueber- 
roth s predecessor as commissioner, Bowie Kuhn, as a result of a 1983 conviction 


ran s predecessor as commissioner, Bowie Kuhn, as a result of a 1983 conviction 
for drug possession. 

The suspension required that before he was reinstated tins year. Blue had to 
prove he no longer uses drugs and to demonstrate his compliance with a probation- 
ary progra m. Tho se conditions have been satisfied. Ueberroth's office said. 

Blue, 35, compiled a 24-8 record with Oakland in 1971, when he was named the’ 
Arnenon League’s most valuable player and Cy Yoong Award winner. In 1978 . the? 
A s traded him to San Francisco. Four years later, he was traded to the Royals, who 
released him m August 1983. 



io the neighbors. And the devalua- 
tion of Flutie has surfaced iust 


**o»vUvt«d fV«» rnMnrAcrci 

Free safety John Sullivan intercepted, fumbled (above) and 
fheh Anally recovered a pass intended for Oakland’s Larry 
Willis Saturday night: Portland won the USFL game, 30 - 1 * 7 . 


tion of Flutie has surfaced, just 
when die Generals need him most 
— during the baseball season. In 
their first two gami-c at Giants Sta- 
dium, the Generals drew crowds of 
58,741 and 41,079, primarily to see 
Uutie an average erf nearly 
50,000, by far the USFL’s best 

Only two other learns, Tampa 
Bay and Jacksonville, are averaging 
more than 40.000 at heme. 

But after Sunday's dnd between 
Flutie and Jim Kelly of the Hous- 
ton Gamblers, the Generals will be 
competing against the New York 
Mcts and Yankees for spectators, 
as wdl as agamst the televised Na- 
uwtal Basketball Association play- 
offs and the lure of spring weather 
itself to outdoor sports partici- 
pants. 

™l U li d i. il l pr ? blcms - tiB USFL 
Sf?. t J, 1 “banking its future on 
us 5 1 , 32 bi llion antitrust suit 
against the National Football 
League that 15 expected to eo 10 
trial m the fall — inSere is a IJSFL 


whelm the Jewish state. He i points om .that 
between 1967 and 1982, the W«t Bank birth- 
rate was indeed 4.1 percent, but the actual 
population growth was only 1.4 percent, ^ne 
fact is Arabs are quietly leaving the West 
Bank." And, “The regime of martial law that 
existed since 1967 serves the interests or Jewish 
Israelis quite well and the Arab Palestinians 
under occupations have not yet rallied to dial- 

fourth! Israel replaced wars of survival with 
a war of conquesL Israeli troops "had always 
believed that when they were sent to the front 
line, it was to defend Israel’s vital interests and 
survivaL That faith was lost in Lebanon. . . . 
Disillusio nment spread to the civilian popula- 
tion." Ariel Sharon's arrogant 1982 invasion of 
Lebanon (which the United States “unwitting- 
ly underwrote"' turned adventurism into de- 
spair and 600 Israeli dead. It was a "tragic and 
costly blunder." Grose says, “more than at any. 


veHead* i 


Canadic 

^Division* 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TBJjflJNE, MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1985 


Page 13 


SPORTS 


grates win ^ 

* state, h! 

,. 4 - 1 Patent 

riSf-Ss? Cubs, Padres Still die National League Te ams to Beat 


ste&s. 


ESss® 1 


tuted 


fit 

toned advS?® V 
Grose savs. -£**>£* 

or nisir^. 


^ serves ih^ tn ariL' 1 
^ and Se 25 ?htfK 

113 have not V p, PakS V«* Times Service 

quo.” w ral^5t- : NEW YORK — The Mowing 

National League baseball preview 
nos prepared and written by Jo- 
■ ... -mc*. ->*, seph Durso. The order erf teams 
end Israel'. reflects the predicted cider of Tin- 

to V •' EASTERN DIVISION 
eiv. 1 .?^. Trades built CKc^ao into a divi- 
sion champion in 1984, when the 
team won 25 more games than tire 
year before and rose from fifth 
place to first with the best record in 
history the League. But the Cubs remember 

lir&acv of Ik ■ ^ bJ?' how “cy blew the pennant to San 

tent. * A Deu Diego, which lost two straight 

PonsibCiiv K t 1 ga®« in the playoff before sweep- 
■cailed S.-T 1 < *W* • * dnee. 

on Peres u ,v got*? ~ So they’re still searching far their 
hrbe ih e Z. ^8 to*J P 600301 m 40 years, and they 
e the ter. *5? 0nc nnv have help. It’s- not so much that 

sous oeoni S M ?S; **“* added S"* 1 Hlent, *«» dial 

top JL n c ' h b tirey kept it Their three top piteb- 

w hStL^Wc ejiDiJ^! cts — Rick Suidiffe (who won the 

Cy Young Award as the best in the 
league), Dennis Eckersley and 
Steve Trout — were re-signed, as 
free agents, at a collective cost of 
around SI 0.5 million. 

Six of Chicago’s eight regulars 
drove in more than 80 runs apiece, 
including Ryne Sandberg, the 
‘ iyer, who 
19 home 

1 14 runs, and 32 stolen bases. 
The Cubs scored more runs than 
any other team in the league (762) 


,8n 


°f Israel 

3 . a **ep iurtha h. 
ncaiK v«.,..,T-V >* 


K?iSg&& 

s conircver^f'^t league's most valuable p3aj 
, c ^ batted J 14 with 19 triples, I 

im b- tnibas^ a ■»* ’ v runs, 1 14 runs, and 32 stole 


last year, and 110 more than (be 
second-place New York Mets, 
whom Urey beat 12 times in 18 
games. That was probably the title 
right there. 

It’s a dichi, but New York Man- 
ager Dave Johnson can't help voic- 
ing tt when he ev aluates the Mets' 
chances: “We're going to go as far 
as our pitching lakes us." 

So the Mets may be facing a 
more arduous time than they fore- 
saw when they opened spring train- 
ing — in the last wo weeks, the 
young pitching has begun to come 
apart. Starter Bruce Berenyi devel- 
oped a sore shoulder. Sid Fernan- 
dez ballooned to a preseason 
eamed-nin average of 8.38 and 
won a ticket back to the minor 
leagues. And reliever Brent Gaff 
win go on the disabled list Tuesday 
with shoulder problems. 

The bullpen still includes the ef- 
fective Jesse Orosco and Doug 
Sisk, and there seems to be no 
doubt about starter Dwight Goo- 
den's virtuoso ability (276 strike- 
outs as a rookie last year). 

The young arms will open with a 
powerful ally — All-Sun catcher 
Gary Carter, picked up from Mon- 
treal. A JO-year veteran. Carter has 
a strong throwing arm and a com- 
manding personality. He also bat- 
ted in 106 runs last year and should 
help first baseman Keith Hernan- 


dez and outfielder Darryl Straw- 
berry to achieve Johnson's most 
urgent goal of increased scoring. 

St, Louis scored only 652 runs 
but stole 220 bases last year, and 
nobody else came close. Soys Man- 
ager WhitCT Herzog: “We've got 
the best defense in tne league, and 
the most speed." 

But Ire also has a hole in ihe 
bullpen with the loss of Bruce Sut- 
ter, who saved 45 games last season 
before signing with Atlanta os a 
free agent. He also does not have 
George Hendrick (traded to Pitts- 
burgh) or David Green and Dave 
LaPoint (who went to San Francis- 
co for Jack Clark, the power- hitting 
outfielder). 

The key is Neil Allen,” says 
Herzog. “If we don't dribble away 
a lot of late leads, well be a 
dub.” Allen, now the 
stopper, is supposedly the clone of 
the great Sutter. Andy Van Slyke 
moves into first base, and Terry 
Pendleton already rates as a fixture 
at third after hitting .324 in 67 
games m his first season. 

After years of missing the gold 
medal, Montreal has made pro- 
nounced changes in the cast. Bob 
Rodgers is the new manager. Car- 
ter was traded to the Mets for four 
young players, three of whom will 
make the starling lineup — catcher 
Mike Fitzgerald, Hubie Brooks at 


T 

SsSft College Heads Urge Tough Guidelines 


a) aid to improve ri*. 
.roducLvuv ,5 
e. Grose sav* 
■^uonaise^ 

«niise tot ik iijtf • 
aver 3110 ti>e Golan |w 
m for a long am 


By William Gildea 

VfK TM Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Presidents and chancellors of 
the National Collegia le Athletic Association's mem- 
ber institutions expressed deep concern late Friday 
about financial abuses and the “state of integrity in 
imercdkgjaie athletics” and announced proposals in 
both areas that they plan to introduce at a special 
Tange “a stand iR VJ * . NCAA convention in June, 
m Israel and Sviu i ^ " - John w - chairman of the NCAA Presidents’ 
,-t . u ' ft v Commission and pesident of Indiana University, said 

the group would urge NCAA guidelines requiring 


rf renewed hostilities 

nre comes for 


the Sonet Union 
tst. rather that catping^ 

jaiable rccommendaij®; 
jrose <and presume i 
roup no outling an 
e to a changing IsraeLTb. 
jed into the pot of theof 


kin, senior -:dm ,i| ^ 
s :.he ju:h-r of 
■J ‘he t>si:le icr ]vmaa> 
is re i/cfc jer Tne H'olse- 


tighter control on athletic department budgets by 
college heads, stricter enforcement procedures and 
tougher rules against coaches involved in infractions. 

The co mmissi on's recommendations are based on 
tbs results of a nationwide survey of college officials. 

The 44-member commission, formed 15 months 
ago, voiced its alarm coincidentally against the back- 
drop of a point-shaving scandal in the basketball 
program at Tulane University. Also by chance, June's 
special convention will be held in New Orleans, where 
Tulane is located. 

The commission proposes that: 

• Athletic budgets be controlled by the institutions, 
be subject to normal budgeting procedures and be 
approved by the schools’ chief executive officers. 

• An annual audit of all expenditures for an institu- 
r tion's athletic programs be conducted by an indepen- 
,4 dent auditor. 

• The NCAA's enforcement procedure be revised to 


parent of the 
concerned about integrity prob- 


spdl out major and secondary rules violations, and to 
establish specific penalties for violations. 

• Restrictions be earned over on nties-breaking 
coaches who might leave one institution for another. 

In addition, the commission will sponsor resolu- 
tions calling for penalties against athletes knowingly 
involved in NCAA rules violations and for a limit on 
the number of basketball games a school may play in a 
season. 

In what Ryan called "apparently the most compre- 
hensive and definitive national survey of presidential 
views regarding athletics ever taken," 99 percen 
college heads were ' 
terns in athletics.” 

Eighty percent noted concern over income-generat- 
ing demands of major sports, 75 percent feared illegal 
inducements to prospective athletes, 71 percent feared 
rules violations by alumni and boosters and 62 percent 
cited athletes’ academic work as a serious problem. 
Another concern was violations by coaches. Sixty 
percent of the 791 NCAA college heads responded to 
the survey. 

Ryan said the proposals were ‘^just a be ginnin g," 
and that the updating and enforcement of rules had to 
be “vigorous." 

Ryan said he was not familiar with the verifies of 
the Tulane case but that the school's "reaction," which 
includes dropping basketball is “an attempt by a great 
univeraity to deal with its problems." 

He commended the NCAA's enforcement arm, but 
said tire staff was small and overworked and needed to 
be enlarged. 


shortstop and Herm Winningham 
in center field. 

Andre Dawson, the club's main 
man. has long been plagued by bad 
knees, but reports he’s currently in 
good shape. And Steve Rogers, 
who lost 15 games last year with a 
bad shoulder, also is healthy and 
reclaiming his role as the No. 1 
pitcher on a deep staff. 

PhOadelptHa skidded from first 
place to fourth last year after mak- 
ing trades that helped make win- 
ners elsewhere, sending Gary Mat- 
thews and Bob Dernier to the Cubs 
and Willie Hernandez to Detroit. 

Manager John Felske has good 
news and bad news. The good news 
is that the top three men in the 
lineup can fly — Jeff Stone (27 
stolen bases in 51 games last year), 
Juan Samuel (72 steals, a record for 
a rookie) and Von Hayes (48). The 
bad news is that the infield defense 
is a menace: Samuel made as many 
errors (33) as the entire Chicago 
infield. 

A1 Holland saved 29 games but 
lost his touch entirely down the 
homestretch. Felske is trying to 
convert Charles Hudson to the 
bullpen to help Holland support 
old pitchers Steve Carlton, 40, and 
Jerry Koosman, 41 

Once the hardest-hittiug club in 
the business, Pittsburgh scored 
only 615 runs last year and plunged 



Sutter: A Cardinal no more. 


into last place, although the {nich- 
ing staff had baseballs best ERA 
(3-11). 

“We were in 93 games derided 
by two runs or less," says Manager 
Chuck Tanner, “and we lost 63 of 
them. We didn't have the 'Lumber 
Company' of 1979. Wc had to go 
out and get some bats." 

They did, too — George Hen- 
drick from the Cardinals and Steve 
Kemp from the Yankees. Last sea- 
son’s most important casualty was 
Bill Madlock, the four-time baiting 
champion who hit only .253, with 
shoulder and elbow injuries, before 
surgery ended his season in August. 

Biggest experiment: Switching 
John Candelaria from the starting 
staff to the bull pern “I put Goose 
Gossage arid Terry Forster in the 
bullpen once," Tanner says, “and 
Candy can be just as great." 

WESTERN DIVISION 

A lot of things went right for San 
Diego last season: The Padres suf- 
fered no major injur\ until Kevin 
McReynoIds fractured his wrist in 
the playoff; they drew dear of tire 
pack by midsummer and won the 
pennant for the first time even 
though they played only .500 ball 
down the stretch. 

They made two significant 
moves during the winter, acquiring 
pitcher LaMarr Hoyt from the Chi- 
cago White Sox (for Tun Lollar, 
Luis Salazar and Ozzie Guillen, the 

S irize rookie shortstop) and signing 
erry Royster as a free agent, add- 
ing depth at second and third base 
and in left field. 

Hoyt was both expensive and 
mysterious: In 1983, he won 24 
games and the Cy Young Award; 
in 1984, he was 13-18. He joins a 
rotation that also includes Eric 
Show and Andy Hawkins and left- 
handers Dave Dravecky and Mark 
Thurmond. 

Manager Dick Williams has yet 
to figure out why his five World 
Series starting pitchers lasted a to- 
tal of just over 10 innings with a 
composite ERA of 13.94. 

Joe Torre is gone as Atlanta's 
manager after finishing first once 
and second twice. The new man is 
Eddie Haas, but the main new man 
is relief whiz Sutter, whose 45 saves 
and 1.54 ERA last year for St. 
Louis brought him a free-agent 
contract of S10 million. 

“I’m not the piece that fits the 
puzzle," Sutter says. “That goes to 
Bob Hornet's wrist." Third base- 
man Horner has missed 188 games 
in the last two seasons with wrist 
injuries, including the last four 
months of 1984. Then be under- 
went surgery a g ain , leaving Dale 
Murphy to cany the power-hitting 
.load. Murphy, the league's- most 
valuable player the previous two 


years, hit 290 with 36 home runs 
and 100 RBls. 

With 79 victories and 83 defeats, 
Los Angeles was fourth last year 
fits worst finish in IS years), mostly 
because its 244 team batting aver- 
age was last in the league. The 
Dodgers also ranked last in runs 
scored (580), eighth in home runs 
1 102) and 10th in defense A memo- 
rably bad season. 

The offensive collapse was dra- 
matized by Greg Brock, who had 
been touted as the rookie replace- 
ment for Steve Garvey; in ins two 
seasons. Brock has nit 224 and 
225. 

People rightly get the feeling the 
Dodgers mice more have players 
out of position. Pedro Guerrero 
struggles at Ron Cey's old position, 
third base. Guerrero made 30 er- 
rors in 157 games in 1983 and 16 
errors in 76 games last season; he 
led the chib with a 203 baiting 
average, but hit only 16 home runs, 
half his previous total And the 
Dodgers signed A1 Oliver for his 
bat, but also intend to play him in 
left field, which is a good trick for 
somebody who can't throw. 

Houston is showing some age. 
Knuckleballer Joe Niekro is 40, 
strikeout artist Nolan Ryan is 38 
and Jos6 Cruz, the team’s best of- 
fensive player, is 37. But the Astros' 
main worry is Dickie Thou, their 
best young player, who is 26. 

Thon played in only five games 
last season before he was hit by a 
pitch and suffered a serious eye 
injury. He is still struggling to see 
the ball at bat, but he's back at 
shortstop. 

The old guys are still going 
strong. Niekro won 16 games last 
season and went 248 inning s, club 
highs. Ryan missed six weeks with 
injuries, but won 12 games and 
struck oat 1 97 (his 3,874 strikeouts, 
two more than Carlton's total are 
the most in baseball history). And 
left fielder Cruz hit .312 and 
knocked in 95 runs. 

There are few new faces, and 
Manager Bob Lillis will continue to 
platoon. Mark Bailey, a power-hit- 
ting rookie last year, will share the 
catching with Alan Ashby. .Enos 
Cabell may share first base with the 
rookie Glenn Davis. And Phil Gar- 
ner will share third base with Den- 
ny Walling. 

Pete Rose’s chief target as a play- 
er is to get 95 hits and pass Ty 
Cobb’s all-time-record 4,191. His 
chief target as manager is to get 
Cincinnati moving on its return 
from the pits: Last year the Reds 
finished in fifth place, 22 games 
under 200, and were nexi-to-last in 
team pitching and hitting. 

Rose, soon to turn 44, took over 
as manager of his old team last 
August, and intends to apply one 



United Prta Inmn a tonal 

San Diego Padre LaMarr Hoyt: An expensive mystery man. 


problem against the other. TU use 
the Cobb record to psych my play- 
ers," he says. 

The catcher's job has been a 
wasteland since Johnny Bench re- 
tired. When spring training 
opened. Rose had four candidates; 
he apparently has settled on Dann 
Bilardello, who also opened last 
season but was sent back to the 
minors at midseasoa- 

The Reds marti* no significant 
deals last winter, but they do have 
several young players with good 
labels, lire best is Eric Davis, a 22- 
year-dd center fielder who hit 10 
home runs and drove in 30 runs in 
only 174 at-bats last summer. 

■ Mario Soto won 18 and lost 7, 
and reigns as the No. 1 pitcher. He 
may get help from youngsters Tom 
Browning and Jay Tibbs. 

There's big trouble in San Fran- 
cisco. The Giants may be sold or 
moved even while they struggle to 
revive from the disaster of losing 96 
games. Last season's was the worst 


record in the big leagues and the 
team’s worst in nearly 40 years. 

The Giants face their future with 
a rookie manager, Jim Davenport, 
and Davenport faces it without 
Jack Clark, the best hitter on the 
team, who was traded to the Cardi- 
nals for four players. 

One of them, David Green, 
opens at first base. Another, Dave 
LaPoint, opens in the pitching rota- 
tion. Another, Jose Gonzalez (who 
has just changed his name to Jose 
Uribe), apparently wOJ open shar- 
ing the shorn top's job with Johnnie 
LeMasier. 

All is not lost. Bob Brenly hit 20 
home runs and grew into a force as 
the catcher. Dan Gladden, who hit 
.397 at Phoenix, was called up 
when Clark tore up his knee and 
then hit .351 at San Francisco. 
Picther Atlee Hammaker, who 
made only six starts, returns from 
surgery on his rotator cuff and el- 
bow. And Vida Blue, who did not 
pitch anywhere last year, surfaces 
in the bullpen for one last try. 


as doomed io kutailr 
as thrown m with a Am. 
id. He h^ri LC i-cnadise 
id sluff. so the club tori.- 
»peared, and the znr* 
ade. 

vORTfi 

*V JC' 

: A 10 5 
: ; 9 j 
* a :: 

a/ 4 

WITS lOl 
A Aiesn 
: *3 

ao: 

Non ! i Swat 

■w 

:■ ; 
p3.Ti 


Blues, Ganadiens Clinch 
NHL Divisional Crowns 


SCOREBOARD 


Mf!) 

4> 


Vc3l ;*S *-*» iMP *** 



All - “ fki 

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.vhes w 

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Los Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Sl Louis 
and Montreal clinched division ti- 
tles on Saturday, tire next-to-last 

NHL FOCUS 

day of the National Hockey 
League's regular season. 

In Bloomington, Minnesota, tire 
*31ues won the Norris Division by 
coming from behind to beat tire 
North Stars, 4-3. The Canadicns 
more or less backed into tire Adams 
title by lying Boston, 4-4, while 
Quebec was losing to Hartford, 2r 1. 

Elsewhere it was Chicago 2, De- 
troit 2; New Jersey 5, the New 
York Islanders 5; Buffalo 5, Toron- 
to 2: Washington 7, Pittsburgh 4; 
Winnipeg 6, Edmonton 5, and Van- 
couver 4, Los Angeles 4. On Friday 
it was Calgary 5, Edmonton 5 and 
Los Angeles 4, Vancouver 3. 

Minnesota, which finished 
fourth in the Norris Division and 
will open the first round of Stanley 
Cup competition Wednesday night 
in Sl Louis, jumped off to a 3-0 


jur i in the first period. Bui the 

I- 'Tr.'P-T' Blues, 6-1-1 against the North Stars 

Trum?^. this season, got a goal back in the 

‘j 




..... 

. foi 


Mavericks Hurt by TKOs 





A vo'- — An ‘d ld: ... 

!* 


Uniled Pros International 

DALLAS — The Houston 
Rockets won Saturday night’s 
game, and they weren't even in- 
volved in tire war. The National 
Basketball Association contest was 
between (he Rockets and the Dal- 
las Mavericks, the Rockets winning 

NBA FOCUS 

by 139-127 in double overtime. The 
battle was between the Mavericks 


a technical foul on Derek Harper in 
tire third quarter,. he called two 
quickies on Motta. 

Aguirre's first technical came 
early in the second period. As the 
teams were leaving for the locker 
room at the half, Strom called an- 
other. After tire game, Strom said 
only that Aguirre had committed 
an unsportsmanlike act. The head 
of Reunion Arena security said 

sfi *"*, w; oattie was between me wavencits £?. ?? 

' and referee Eari Strom, who caUed ^ 

Six technical fouls and kicked my face, -fo Mavericks aired a 






•.p J'** -tl Af 


ooter Aguirre and coach 
Motta out of the game. 
Almost lost in the proceedings 
was the game itself. Akeem 
Olajtrwon keynoted a run of 13 
straight points in the second over- 
time to break open the game for 


Houston. 

** 40.itf0 al Elsewhere it was Chicago 117, 

D-‘ Arlanta 114. 


videotape of the incident that 
showed Aguirre about right feet 
from Strom and walking away 
when the technical was called. 

During the third period Rolando 
Blackman of Dallas and Houston’s 
Lionel Hollins took toms throwing 
the ball at each other and doable 
technicals were called. “He came 
— Atlanta 114; Washington 109, over to our beach t , ‘ Mona said of 

Cleveland 101: New Jersey 108, Strom, “and wanted to explain it. 


Cleveland 101; New Jersey 108, Strom, “and wanted to exp 
^ Milwa ukee 104 ; Indiana 121, Phil- He can’t do that — he’s sit 
nfc r * srs £lt & ^ addohia 117: Utah 105. Phoenix to explain it to the captain. 1 


explain it to the captain. He said 
to me he’d explain itto me iff was 
interested. I said 1 wasn’t, particu- 
larly. So he gave me a tedmical" 
During Strom's dealings with 
Motta, the crowd threw tee and 
debris onto the conrt- 
Lewis Lloyd and John Lucas 


addphia 117; Utah 105, Phoenix 
.94, and Golden State 141, Kansas 
On Friday it was Phila- 
16, Chicago 113; Cleve- 
land 119, Detroit 118; Boston 115, 
Washington 104; the Los Angeles . 
Clippers 126, Dallas 122; Portland 
145, Seattle 120; Denver 118, San 


" rf 

vvrrA ^Seattle 120; Denver 118, San Lewis Lloyd ai 
. ,u t . Antonio 109, and tire Los Angeles each scored 28 points foe the Rodt- 
t : ?: Lakers 132, Kansas City 125. ets; Olajuwon had 27. The Maver- 

’• \.:l *■' „• 

if* ' 


Hockey 


Basketball 


Transition 


NHL Standings 


second and exploded for three in 
the third period to win. 

After Dave Bare cut the lead to 

3- 2 at 8:10, the Bines tied it cm 
former North Star Craig Levie's 
fluke goal four minutes later. Levie 
fired a high shot from tire point 
that struck Minnesota defenseman 
Dan Mandich in the back and car- 
omed into the net. 

N _With just 3:48 left in regulation. 
Bare scored his 1 6th goal to make it 

4- 3. The victory gave tire Blues 
their first division title since 1981. 

In Montreal, the Canadicns 
fought back from a 4-2 deficit to 
gain the cure point they needed to 
win their first division title since 
1981-82. MomreaTs Mike McPhee 
and Alfie Turcotie closed out (he 
scoring with goals three minutes 
apart; Turcotte's came with 3:16 
left in the second period, after 
which rookie goalies Clint Daska- 
lalds of Boston and Steve Penney of 
the Canadicns took charge. 

In the last 28 minutes, including 
overtime, Daskalakis stopped 12 
shots and Penney 11. Daskalakis 
made a clutch save os a shot by 
McPhee from a sharp angle with 
one minute left in overtime. 


WALKS CONFERENCE 
Patrick Dlvttjan 

W L T Wt GFW 


Strom ejected Aguirre at the end 
of the first half. Then, after calling 


icks were led by 23 points from Jay 
Vincent. 


v-PtillodofpNa 
x-WosMnutan 
»*N.Y . islomtort 
k-ri.Y. Ronoars 
Now Jwr-joy 
Pimburofi 


52 20 7 

45 25 9 

40 W h 
» 43 10 
22 47 10 
34 50 5 


v-Montr«ol 
x-Butfolo 
x-Quebrc 
x- Barton 
Hertford 


Moms Division 
40 27 13 
30 27 14 
40 30 9 

35 34 10 
30 40 V 


111 342 340 
9* 315 237 
W 1*5 311 
42 294 342 
54 243 340 
53 273 371 

92 304 25> 
W 384 232 
» 319 274 
M 798 94 
49 242 314 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AltonHC Division 

W L Pet. GB 

y-fioston 41 14 .792 — 

x-pnnadoipuro 54 22 Jia svi 

*-Now Jww 39 39 .500 22V» 

H-Wostilnoton 38 40 MO Z31S 

Now York 24 53 J12 37 

Control Division 
y-Mlhvoukoo 54 22 

X-Dotrilli 41 34 

X-GMCWO 38 41 

Oovoiattd 34 44 

AHonm 31 47 

Indiana 21 57 


v-St. Louis 
x-Oilcooo 
x- Dot roll 
x-MbinouJa 
Toronto 


M 293 283 
B1 304 298 
44 308 351 
42 348 331 
48 252 353 


95 354 328 
93 359 298 
82 339 324 
59 284 481 


34 31 12 
37 35 7 

27 40 12 
25 43 12 
20 51 8 

Stnvtho Division 
v- Edition ton 49 28 II 109 401 298 

x-Wbinhwo 43 37 9 

x-CaHmrv 41 27 11 

x-Lot Anastas 34 32 14 

Vaflcowar 25 44 9 

(x-dincliKl playoff bortn) 

(v-eilnchad division tttla) 

FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

Caioarv 12 3 0-5 

Edmonton 3 1 t 9—5 

Nlhona C171. nointort (3H.Lnoh2tm.Ona 
(4) ; Gretzky (731. KnisholrtysJcl 2 (43). MmsI- 
•r(23>.CaHay 1 371. Stoic on ml: Colon rv (on 
Fidar) 9-15-14-2 — (2: Edmonton (an Lanwflnl 
8-9-12-1—00. 

Los Assalos 1 0 3-4 

Vancoovtr * 1 2-0 

Ruskavak) 2 (14). Tavtor (3*1, Hammond 
(11/ Lon Hilar (41. LuouJ (121/ McNab (231. 
Shots on ooal: Los Angelas (an Brodow) 13-4- 
10—24/ Vancouver (on Eliot) 10-11-14--35. 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
Vancoover 2 0 3 0—4 

Los Anaaias I 1 1 0—4 

DoignorMl (4), Klrton f 17). Tan tl (39), Naalv 
(21); Taylor (40). Hakanssan 112), Taylor (5). 
MocLaiian (3l).SHotsongoal:Voncouvor(on 
Janocvk) 4-12-4-2—24; Los AnMIes (on Co- 
price) J2-TO-144— 44. 

SL Lotto • 1 3-4 

Mlnniwntn 3 8 0—3 

Cvr (4), Barr 2 (14), Lovle IHs Holraoren 
ULBerolund (iQ).Maruk (19). Shots on ooal: 
SI. Louis (an Bandore) KLIMS— H; Mhmaio- 
to ion vwumlevJ 13.11-4—28. 

Boston 3 10 0—4 

MOntraoJ 3 2 0 0-4 

Fergus (301. O'Reilly (12), Sotstor (12), 

Coring (15); waller (19). Mondou (181. 

McPhee (17). Turame (8). Shots on goo): 
Boston (on Penney) 8-8-10-1 — 27; Montreal 
(on Daskolaklsl 4-10-8-2—24. 
wtoafpto O 5 1—4 

Samoa to* 1 3 1—5 

Watters i7),Tumbull (27),Ho«nrctiiifc (321. 
Bosctunan (32). Mullen (31). Wilson €101; 
Kurrl (71), Hunter 07). Andersen 2 (42). Se- 
rnenU (4). Stotsoa ooal: Wlnnlpeo (on Fuhr. 
Mood) 18-14-7-39; Edmonton Ion Hayward I 
19-9-12— 4& 

Buffalo 1 2 3— s 

Toronto 1 1 4—2 

Orlteide m, RuH (13>,Selllno (15>,Mc Ken- 
no (20). PorreooJI (30); Derloao (31), Ander- 
son OD.Stotionoool: Buffalo (on Better) 13- 
13^-05; Toronto (on Sou vs] 5*8—21, 
Washington 4 13-7 

Ptttswna 2 1 1—4 

Sampson (KHrDddMMM (IS), Murphy (17). 
Carpenter (57). Gould (14), Gartner (48), 
Haworth (23); Babvtdi 3 (19). Lamoureux 
til). Buitord (31). Shots on goal? Washington 
(on Herron) 11-13-14— 40; Pittsburgh (on Jen- 
sen) 9*10—25. 

Quebec 18 0—1 

Hertford >11-3 

MocDermW (41. Ferraro (ill; KumoM (8). 
Shots oa goat: Quebec (on Weeks) 11-5-JZ-M; 
Horttoril (on Bouchard) imw-25. 

Now Jersey 1 t t 0-5 

N.Y. Islanders 3 110—5 

Meoaher 2 (11 l.HItolns (19), SuKIman (27). 
Lever (10): Gillies 2 (15). LnFonKrine (19), 
Bossy (58). Tone) ll (42). Shots on Beat: New 
Jersey (on Smith) 13-11-84-34; N.Y. 1 Mort- 
em (on Reseti) 10-10-U-2—33, 

CMcMe 3 0 0 0-2 

Detroit 1*1 0-2 

F noser Oil, Secant (15) ; Park f 13). Duguoy 
(38). Shots on goal: Chicago (on Mtcaloi) 14- 
iioim»--»; Detroit (on StondensKI) 9-10-12. 
1—32. 


.718 - 
J32 U ft 
A81 WT* 
434 22 
J97 25 
M? 35 
WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MM west Division 


x-Denvor 
x-Hooston 
x- Dallas 
x-Son Antonio 
x-Ufah 
Kansas CHy 

v-l— A, Lakers 
x- Port land 
Phoenix 
Seattle 
t_A CUppers 
Golden Slate 


50 77 
45 32 
42 34 
39 39 

38 40 

30 48 
Pacific Division 

57 20 

39 38 
33 45 

31 41 
29 49 
» 56 


A49 - 
J84 5 

538 tv, 
500 ilia 
.487 12to 
X5 20to 

.740 — 
534 18 
423 24 to 
397 2f.V» 
J72 2810 
582 35V3 


(x-rilncned ptovott berth) 

(y-cllnched division HHeJ 

PRIDAYhS RESULTS 

Washington 27 23 28 24— 104 

Boston 33 24 3D 38—115 

Bird 8-18 9-18 26. McHalr 9-17 2-3 30; Gus 
Williams 10-27 M 21, MaJons 7-16 3-3 17. Re- 
boento: Woshlnalon 38 [Jones Bl. Boston 63 
(Bird 151. Aisirtf: Washington 30 (Gin wn- 
I tarns 7), Boston 31 lAlngo 7). 

Cleveland 39 39 26 25-119 

Detroit 28 38 34 21—118 

Free 15-21 4-6 37. Bagley 13-17 2-3 28; Trl- 
mefca 10-77 5-635. Laimbeer 9-16 9-4 23. Thom- 
as 9-174^ 23. Retounds: aevetand59 1 Hinson 
9), Detroit 56 (Lahnbaer Id). Assists: Cleve- 
land 27 (Boo lev 13), Detroit 31 (Trlpucko 8). 
Chicago 11 28 32 15-113 

MiUadelpMa 38 27 32 27—1 U 

Malone HI 15-T727. Ervlno 9.281-219) Jot- 
dan 13.31 14-15 4a Wool r Ida* a 10 2-2 18. Re- 
bounds: Chicago 28 (Green 10). Philadelphia 
39 ( Malone 19). Assists: Chlaxw 22 (Whatley 
9), Philadelphia 27 (Cheeks 9). 

LA. Clippers M 28 31 27 13—124 

Deltas 29 34 31 19 B— 133 

Smith 13-21 7-T0 31 Nixon 12-21 4-4 28; 
Aguirre 12-22 8-10 32, Blackman 8-17 9-9 2SL 
Rebounds: LA Clippers 40 (Donaldson is). 


Oaltas48 ( Perkin* 91 . Assists : LA Clippers 24 
(Nixon 15), Dallas 28 (Harper 9). 

Seattle 31 25 31 33-120 

Portland 39 37 29 40— MS 

Paxson 10-13 0-1 20, Vandowegne 4-10 7-7 1 9; 
Chambers 9-14 M 2 Z Henderson 8-13 34 20. 
Rebounds: Seattle 47 (McCormick. Brick- 
owski 10), Portland 47 (Bavrie 13). Assists: 
Seattle 27 (Henderson 61. Portland 44 (Cotter 
7). 

SOB Antonio 25 33 29 23-109 

Denver 33 26 38 33-118 

N aft 8-11 1A1 4 ML Erwllsh 10-20 7-7 27: Mitch- 
ell 13-268-12 24, Gilmore 3-57-9 n Rebounds: 
San Antonio 53 (lavaronL MllchalL Gilmore 
7), Denver 49(Natt 8). Assists: San Antonia 22 
(Robertson lot, Denver 32 (Lever 12). 
Kansas City 21 31 33 36—113 

LA Lakers 37 13 38 24—132 

ScotT 13-174-5 la Worthy 1MB 1-1 25; Thorpe 
8-13 5-8 21. Woodson 9-17 2-3 2a Rebounds: 
Kansas CHy 34 (Thorpe 7). LA Lakers 48 
(Ramble 9). Assists: Kansas City 33 (Drew 
12), LA Lakers 37 (Worthy 8). 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
Phoenix 31 23 » 11— *1 

UM 26 25 22 32— 105 

Pont lev 9-2410-1528. Ballsy 7-lODO 14, Eaton 
5-11 4-6 14; Adams 12-26 4-4 28- Jones 9-15 5-10 
21 Rebounds: Phoenix 52 (Jones 171. Utah 59 
(Oanttev 17). Assists: Phoenix 78 (Mocv 7). 
Utah 31 (Green 9], 

Houston 23 27 33 30 7 38—139 

Ooflto II 30 14 38 7 8—137 

Uoyd 1 1-196-9 28, Lucas 9-14 7-928, Otofirepn 

10- 20 7-17 27; Vincent 7-16 9-9 23, Perkins 5-15 

11- 12 22. Blackman 6-15 10-10 22. Retatmos: 
Houston 75 (Olaluwn Ml, Dallas 41 IBrvanl 
12). Assists: Houston 27 (man 91, Dallas 25 
(Harper B>. 

Philadelphia 32 39 si 35—117 

Indiana II 21 29 33—171 

Kellogg 1 5-20 S-4 35, H.Wll Homs 11-20 2-4 24; 
Malone 11-20 15-25 37, Richardson 7-13 3-3 17. 
Cheeks 8-15 0-0 17. Roboands: Philadelphia 51 
(Malone 1 7), l ndlona 50 ( Kel tarn 16). Assists : 
Philadelphia 34 (Cheeks 11), Indiana 22 
iHomlnn 6). 

Chicago 34 34 32 77—117 

Atlanta 33 39 31 31—114 

Jordan 12-18 9-9 33, Woolrldpe 7-12 6-6 20; 
Wllklns 13-29 4-10 3a E Johnson 7-21 5-5 19. 
RetHwnds : Chicago 49 iGreenwocd 11 ),Atfm- 
ta 43 (Wilkins 13). Assists: Chicago 22 1 Mat- 
thews ll), Alton la 32 (Johnson 17). 
Cleveland 21 34 31 23—181 

WasMngtoa 36 38 35 28—189 

Malone 13-23 ID-10 36, Gus Williams 6-14 64 
IS: Free 10-25 4-10 26. Hubbard 7-4 7-11 21. 
Rebound*: Cleveland 58 (Hinson 13). Wash- 
ington 59 (ttabiition, CJones 10). Assists: 
Cleveland 22 (Boalev 12), Washington S3 (GuS 
Williams 13). 


Milwaukee 25 26 27 25—104 

Now Jersey 31 24 25 20-MS 

WUnon»9-22+422, RlChordlon 11-19 W>22. 
Kina 6 15 3-3 »; Moncrlef 7-17 11-1125. Pressey 
9-13 3-1 32. Rebounds: Milwaukee 48 (Cum- 
mings 12). New Jersey 54 (Williams 13). As- 
sists: Milwaukee 17 (Moncrlef 7j,New Jersey 
25 (Richardson 12). 

Kansas Cfty 32 29 30 34—125 

CMdan State 38 43 22 38-141 

Short \M5 13-13 42, Ftavd 7-13 3-3 17, Conner 
4J9.11 17; EJahnsan 13-24 5-631, Drew 7-124J 
18- Rebounds: Kamos City 36 IE Johnson 8), 
Golden State 56 (Smith (5). Assists: Kansas 
City 33 (Drew 131. Golden Stale 27 (Floyd. 
Connor 7). 


BASEBALL 
American Leegoe 

BALT I MORE— Sent Dove RolsJch. pitcher, 
io Its mlnoMoooue camp for reassignment. 

CHICAGO— Placed Rich Dotson.pUeher.on 
the supp l emental disabled list. Uncondition- 
ally released Ron Reed, pitcher. Sent Jose 
Castro, infieMer. to Buffalo of the American 
Association. 

CLEVE LAN O-P laced Rick Beheitna, 
pitcher, on the 15-dav disabled list, retroac- 
tive to April Z 

DETROIT— Sent Doug Baker and Mike 
Uoa. Infletdars, (0 Nashville at the American 
Association. 

NEW YORK— Sen! Mike Armstrong a n dAl- 


fonso Pulido, pitchers, to Columbus of the 
International League. Placed Marty Bys- 
trariv.pttrtwr.an the 60-day dVsa&Md list. Add- 
ed Juan Bonilla. tatleMer, and Henry Caffs, 
outfielder, to Ibe raster. 

Motional League 

CHICAGO— Oplloned Tony Castilla, catch- 
er, and Derek Botslha, pitcher. W Its minor- 
league cams for raasstonnwiL Released 
Tom Veryzo r, InfieMer. 

HO U5TON— Signed Ron Mathis, Pitcher, to 
a one-veor contract. 5 toned Nolan Ryan, 
Pltctor.to a tw-year con trod; Bob Knepper, 
pUrtwr. to a three- vear contract plus two aa- 
lion years, and Terry PuhL outfielder, to a 
lour-vear contract. Optioned Jett Heathcock. 
pficher. to Tucson of the Pacific coast 


Exhibition. Baseball 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 



Chi coso 

18 

12 

400 


W 

L 

Pa. 

UN Angeles 

15 

11 

577 

Toronto 

18 

9 

M7 

Cincinnati 

IS 

12 

554 

California 

15 

10 

jSCKJ 

New York 

13 

11 

342 

Chica ao 

18 

13 

581 

San Francisco 

13 

14 

481 

Detroit 

17 

13 

J67 

San Diego 

12 

15 

444 

New York 

IS 

12 

554 

Houston 

13 

17 

433 

AUlwauKM 

17 

14 

-548 

Monireal 

12 

16 

427 

Oakland 

13 

12 

520 

St- Louts 

7 

14 

533 

Baltimore 

14 

14 

500 

Pittsburgh 

6 

17 

561 

Mlrmasota 

13 

16 

448 





Seattle 

13 

16 

448 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 


Kansas City 

12 

75 

444 

Chicago White Sax 10, Buffalo (AAA) 0 

Boston 

12 

16 

429 

Kansas City 6, Memphis (AA) 2 



Cleveland 

12 

16 

429 

Montreal (ssl 2. Atlanta 0 




Teams 

10 

14 

417 

New York Yankees 10. Baltimore 5 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Cincinnati 1 DelroH 1 




Philadelphia 

14 

9 

409 

Oikaao Cubs B, Seattle (ss) 5 




Alton to 

17 

11 

407 

Minnesota 6. San Diego 2 





Soccer 


WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
EUROPEAN GROUP 4 
Bulgaria 1. East Germany 0 
Points Steadings: France 7, Yugoslavia 6, 
Bulgaria 5. East Germany 2, Luxembourg 0. 

ASIAN GROUP 3-A 
South Korea 4. Nepal 0 
Paints itaaam; Malaysia 5, South Korea 
4. Nepal i.RemaMng match: South Korea vs. 
Molevela. 

ASIAN GROUP S-B 
Bangladesh 1, Thailand 0 
Inala t. Indonesia 1 

Points sftuHflngi: Indonesia t, Indio <, Bon- 
oiodDsh 4. Thailand 3. Rerntdalng nwtrttes: 
April 9, India vs. Thailand; April 12. India vs. 
Bangladesh, 


ASIAN GROUP 4-A 
Brunet 1, Hang Kang 5 
Point* stanSogs: China 7. Hong Kong 5, 
Macao 2. Brunei (L Remo Inlne matches: April 
13- Brunei vs.MP£oo: April 28, Macao vs. Hang 
Kona; May 4 Hong Kong vs. Macao. 

AFRICAN ZONE 
Kpnva D, Ntoerta 3 


MONTREAL— Sent Jack O'Connor. Dick 
GrapenthWv. and Romtv si.Ckiire.PttrttM's.to 
Its mlnor-loague camp hr reassignment. 

new YORK— Sent Sid Fernandez. Calvin 
SchlraldL and Wes Gardner, plicbers, to Tide- 
water at Ihe International League. Recalled 
up Bill Latham, pitcher, and Terry Blocker, 
ouHletder, tram Tidewater. 

PHILADELPHIA— Traded Ivan Dejesus, 
marts top. and Bill CampbelL Pilcher, to St. 
Louis tar Dave Rucker, pitcher. Assigned 
Rucker to Port) art of the Pacific Coast 
League. Re-signed Klka Garcia InfieMer. 

PITTSBURGH— Placed Stove Kemp, out- 
fielder, on the 15-dov disabled list. Sent Sam- 
my Khalifa, s hort s top, to Its minor-league 
comp tor reassignment. Sent Hedl Vanns, 
first baseman, to Hawaii ol the Pacific Coast 
Lmmub. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Traded Alex Sanchez, 
outfielder, to Detroit tor Rooor Mason, pitch- 
er. Assigned Mason to Phoenix of the Pacific 
Coast League. 

ST. LOUIS— Sent Kevin Haaen.otfcher.Bnd 
Wline Lflzodq. taflelder, to Louisville at Ihe 
American Association. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey League 

HARTFORD— Cal led up Dean Evasoa cen- 
ter. and Mark Paterson, defenseman, from 
Binghamton at toe American Hockey Leoaue. 

5T. LOUIS— Announced H10L Jurgen Pel- 
tereson, left wing, and Craig Levie. defense- 
man, hove signed multi-veor contracts. 


ENGLISH FIRST DIVI5ION 
Arsenal 2. Norwich 0 
Aston Villa 3, Sheffield Wednesday 0 
Chelsea 1. Queens Park Rangers 0 
Everton 4, Sunderland 1 
loewtch 1, Nottingham Forest 0 


Football 


USFL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


****** -: 



TSa Aaodmwf Ptbb 

DOUBLE FIGURES — Oxford’s eight, left, beat Cambridge for the 10th consecutive 
tune in the University Boat Race Saturday on the River Thames. Oxford covered the 
four-mile course in 17:11 — 13 seconds faster and 4% lengths better than Cambridge. 
Oxford has won 62 times in the series and Cambridge 68; there has been one dead beat. 


Leicester a Liverpool 1 


w 

L 

T 

Pet 

PF 

PA 

Manchester United 5. Stoke 0 

Birmingham 

5 

I 

0 

333 

161 

TIB 

Newcastle 1, West Bromwich 0 

Tampa Bov 

5 

2 

0 

514 

200 

153 

Wolford 1. Southampton I 

New Jersey 

3 

3 

0 

400 

141 

156 

west Ham L Tottenham 1 

Memphis 

3 

4 

0 

429 

140 

157 

Points standings: Everton 09; Manchester 

Baltimore 

2 

3 

1 

417 

109 

90 

United 65; Tottenham 61; Liverpool 57; Arse- 

Jacksonville 

2 

5 

0 

586 

158 

201 

nal 55: Southampton 54; Sheffield Wednesday 

Orlando 

I 

6 

0 

.143 

130 

193 

52: Nafthignam Forest 50; Chelsea Aston VII- 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


ki49: Leicester, West Bromwich, Norwich «2; 

Houston 

5 

1 

0 

J33 

703 

132 

Queens Park Ransers. Newcastte41 ; Watford 

Arizona 

4 

2 

0 

467 

135 

93 

38; Weo Ham 37: Sunderland, Covenlrv 34; 

Denver 

4 

2 

0 

467 

133 

126 

Ipswich 33; Luton 33; Slake 17. 

Oakland 

4 

2 

1 

443 

175 

160 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 

Pomona 

3 

4 

0 

429 

101 

142 

Brest a. Rouen 3 

San Antonia 

2 

4 

0 

533 

79 

119 

Par is- Saint Germain 1. Sochaux 1 

Las Anaeles 

1 

5 

a 

.167 

124 

147 


Baltic i, wets 3 
Tours a Auverre I 

Toulouse 2 1 Marseille 0 
Lille D, Laval 0 
Teuton X Strasbourg 1 
Bardoaux 2, Lens. 1 
Nancy 1, Monaco 1 
Nantes l, rc Paris 1 
Points stmtlsoi: Bordeaux 50: Nantes 44: 
Toulon 39: Amtsrre 38; Metz 37: Momoa 361 
Brest 32; Sochou*, LtrtS 3! ; Lovd 29; Nancy, 
Paris SO, Maraefile 27; Ulle, Toulouse. Rou- 
en, Bos He 26; Strasbourg 25: Tours 22: RC 
Paris 19. 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Sevilla 2. Barcelona 2 
VaUadaHd a Gllon 0 
Alhlellc Bilbao 4. Hercules I 
EtpcAol 0. Brth 1 
El cue 1, Real Satiedad 1 
Saotonder 1, Vrtenrta 1 
Zaraoaza i Murcia a 
Real Madrid a Attoflco Madrid 4 
Osawno 1. Malaga 0 
Points standings; Barcelona 51; Attetica 
Madrid *3; Gllon 39: Athletic Bilbao 38: Root 
Madrid 3o; Real Soctadod. Ousuna, Espanof 
32; Samander. Sevilla 31; Valencia. ZaroBom 
30; VailodoikL Belis, Malaga 27; Hercules 2o; 
EICM 24; Murcia ». 


SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
Tampa Bay 31, Jacksonville 17 
Portland 30, Oakland 17 


Tournament Tennis 


MONTE CARLO OPEN 
SemHlMls 

Mats Witonder (2), Sweden. M. Aaron 
Krlcluteln (4J, 6-Z64. 

■van Lendl n).C2Mhastovakla.d8f. Henrik 
Sundslrom 13). Sweden, 4-6, 7-6 (7-3J.7-6 (7-5). 
Final 

Lena) det WHander, 6-1. M, 4-6. 4-4. 


MEN 

(At Chicago) 

Second Round 

John McEnroe, u J. def. Paul Annocone. 
UJ. 44. 6-4, 6-1. 

Scalt Davis. U&, Terry Moor, UA 6-4. M. 
Arrtret Gamez, Paraguay, as). Tim 
Movwto, UA, 6-3. 3-6. 6-1. 

Jlmmv Connors, del. Brad Gllborr.u.SL 

6-4, 4-4, 7-$. 

Semifinal* 

McEnroe del. Davis, 6 a 6-1. 

Connors del. Gomez, m. 6-3. 











Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, APRIL 8. 1985 


LANGUAGE 


Makine President’s Day Richard Chamberlain’s ’Hero Space’ 

v/ — • »• • it' rfil nr. l j nr it >. -z. ■»:- 


PABTS POSTCARD 

The New Breed of Exiles 


By William Safi re 

W ashington — “i have 
only one thing to say to the 
tax increasers," said President Rea- 
gan, delighting in a mock-tough 
line submitted by one of his writers. 
“Go ahead and make my day." 

Mary McGrory, the liberal col- 
umnist, responded: “At last a slo- 
gan for the second term of Ronald 
Reagan. It’s short, provocative, a 
shade more genteel than ‘Drop 
dead,' which is what it really 


approached its zenith in 1983 in 
“Sudden Impact." one of the Clint 
Eastwood Dirty Harry movies, 
script by Joseph Stinson, its central 
character a cop who gives short 
shrift to the civil liberties of the 


By Michael E. Hill 

Washington Past Service 


W ASHINGTON — Actress 
Melanie Mayron was de- 
scribing a scene she played off 
camera with Richard Chamber- 
lain. On camera she plays his sec- 
retary in “WaDenbcxg: A Hero's 
Story." 

“I told him 1 thought it would 
be a good idea if a couple of times 
I might straighten his tie for 
him," she said. 

"You want to straighten my 
tie?" she remembered Chamber- 
lain’s saying. She furrowed her 
brow like his and stroked her chin 
the way he did as he sauntered 
away to think about it 
Then be drifted back and asked 
her why she wanted to do it. To 
show a secretary's concern, she 
explained, to add a bit of mother- 
ing to the scene, to add a subtle 
action to the dialogue. 

“1 asked him why be'was trou- 
bled by the idea," she said. 

“He said, “No one’s ever invad- 
ed my hero-space before.' ” 

From well-received roles such 
as Dr. Frederick A Cook in the 
TV movie “Cook and Peary: The 
Race to the Pole," to his portray- 
als of Lord Blackihome in "Sho- 


accused, in Mickey Spillane's 
zrand Mike Hammer tradition. 


means. 

Not quite. In current usage, it 
ii wns “Give me the long-sought 
opportunity to respond devastat- 
ing! y" and its route to the current 
meaning shows the movement of 
meaning at its quirkiest. 

One of the many meanings of (he 
verb make is “to secure the success 
of," which can be found in John 
Lyly*s 1579 observation: “It is the 
eye of the master that fatteth the 
horse, and the love of the woeman 
that maketh the man.’’ Shakespeare 
used it: "This is the night, said 
Iagp in "Othello,'’ “that either 


makes me or fordoes me quite.’" 
The dictum of Polonius in "Ham- 


The dictum of Polonius in "Ham- 
let," "The apparel oft proclaims the 
man," was shortened in common 
use to "clothes make the man"; 
that sense is transmuted now to 
"dress for success," but the big 
achievers still use the colloquial 
phrase making it, which is far more 
fun than having it alL 

Then, in her 1909 novel “The 
Rosary," Florence Barclay wrote, 
"I knew I wanted her; I knew her 
presence made my day and her ab- 
sence meant chill night; and every 
day was radiant, for she was there." 
That male the day for "made my 
day." P.G. Wodehouse followed 
that up in 1935 with "That will be 
great. That will just make my day.” 
The Briticism crossed the Atlantic 
and appeared in the soft rock of 
Carole King’s song "Brighter," 
published in 1971: "And I can't 
think of anyone else / Can make 
me feel as good asyou. /.Yeah, you 
make my day." W illiam Styron told 
Newsweek m 1979 of his satisfac- 
tion in writing: "If it's only one 
paragraph, but it’s felicitous, that 
makes my day." 

The sunniness of this image be- 
gan to beclouded in the 1970s. “Go 
on, dare him," said a shady charac- 


grand Mike Hammer tradition. 

Interrupting a stickup in a diner. 
Dirty Harry Callahan aims his 
Smith & Wesson at a thief and 
challenges him with a snarled 
“Make my day." 

The phrase is becoming the rally- 
ing cry of vigihntism, thanks io the 
Dirty Harry association and the 
subsequent episode in the New 
York subway when a passenger 
shot four youths he says he felt 
were threatening him. 

By using the expression jocularly 
regarding his reaction to those who 
would reduce the deficit by increas- 
ing taxes, Reagan has deepened the 
phrase’s roots in American collo- 
quial speech. You can imagine 
what he has done for students of 
slang. 

In A related development, Rea- 
gan was asked in a recent news 
conference whether he was advo- 
cating the overthrow of the govern- 
ment of Nicaragua. He indicated 
no, not "if they'd say Unde.' " 

"Yes, the pages of the Fourth 
Supplement of the 0. E D. that 
include uncle have just come from 
the printers," Robert Burchfield, 
editor of the Oxford English Dic- 
tionary, said. "The expression is To 
say, holler or cry "Unde" ' — any 
of those verbs will do — and we 
define it as ’to acknowledge defeat, 
to cry for mercy.' Very current in 
America, isn't it?" 

Very. The recorded origin is reia- 


gun" and Father Ralph de Bricas- 
sart in “The Thom Birds" — two 


sort in “The Thom Birds" — two 
blockbuster miniseries — Rich- 
ard Chamberlain has indeed qui- 
etly and persistently established 
himself as a player of heroes. 

This week, in a two-part film 
on U. S. TV, Chamberlain takes 
the role of Raoul Wallenberg, a 
diplomat who left the comfort 
afforded him as a well-bora, mili- 
tarily neutral Swede during 


tivdy recent, according to Milford 
Mathews in his Dictionary of 
Americanisms. Mathews’s earliest 
citation for the expression was The 
Chicago Herald-Examiner of Oct 
1, 1918: "Sic him Jenny Jinx — 
make him say Unde.' " 

What made the president's use of 
the kids' street lingo so effective, 
and so infuriating, was the doable 
meaning of “Unde.” As both the 
signal for surrender and the short 
form of “Unde Sam," the president 
gave a special emphasis of knuck- 
ling iwoer to the United States. I 
think die double meaning was not 
intentional; it was delivered in en- 
tirely too offhand a way for that 
New York Times Service 


ter in Hugh McLeave’s mystery, 
"Question of Negligence,” in 1970: 


"Question of Negligence," in 1970: 
"It’ll make the evening.” 

The sinister ride of day-making 



Wallenberg in 1943. 


World War II to win credit for 
saving thousands of Hungarian 
Jews from being shipped off to 
Nazi concentration camps. ° 

"The experience of getting this 
part was similar to ‘Snogun’ and 
Thorn Birds.' ’* Chamberlain 
said. "Td been after it for three 
years. The ball landed in NBCs 
court, and I got to do it” 

Chamberlain said that at one 
point Jon Voighl was considered 
for the role of Wallenberg, a man 
who was a persistent thorn in the 
Nazis' ride, and who at war's end 
was arrested by the Russians. 

‘1 find the man enormously 
intriguing," said Chamberlain. 
‘Tm sorry to be 40 years too late 
tellin g people who he is —or was. 
He would be 72 years dd now, in 
a Soviet prison. The Soviets 
claimed he died in 1947. But as 
recently as 1978 he was reported 
sighted." in 1975. 

"I came away from ’Wallen- 
berg' feeling the unfathomable 
depth people can sink to and the 
extreme highs they can reach,” 
Chamberlain said. “Wallenberg, 
through his perseverance, wit, 
magnanimity and bis acting abili- 
ty, was able to do incredible 
things. 

"Why he did it — I would have 
to talk with him about that. 

“It’s an intriguing question. 
Once I absorbed all the informa- 
tion I could about him, I treated 
his story as a fiction and rilled in 
the gaps as best I could. I made 
up his feelings and inner life. I 
had to find the motivation.” 

Chamberlain indeed projects 
all those views of his character, 
who becomes convinced toward 
the end that he can single-han- 
dedly cow the Nazis. 

Hus prime antagonist is Adolf 
Eichmann, played in an under- 
stated — and thus memorable — 
fashion by Kenneth Colley. 

As the war winds down, and 
Wallenberg and Ei chmann dis- 
cuss the Nazis' inevitable fate, 
Eic hmann expresses no regret. 
He has enjoyed money, power 
and the finest whores in Europe, 
he tells Wallenberg in the film. "I 
will go to the gallows with a 
smile.” 

The Wallenberg story is based 
on the book "Lost Hero: The 
Mystery of Raoul Wallenberg," 
by Frederick E Werbell and 
Thurston B. Clarke. The script 
was written bv Gerald Green 



Chamberlain encounters Eichmann (Kenneth Colley). 


("Holocaust”), Dick Bog and 
Lamont Johnson. 

Johnson, who carries impres- 
sive credentials ("The Execution 
of Private Slovik." “Fear on Tri- 
al"), directed the filming in Za- 
greb, Yugoslavia. Berg (“A Ru- 
mor of War,” “The Martian 
Chronicles") is the executive pro- 
ducer. 

Chamberlain, who has an eye 
to becoming an executive produc- 
er himself, has been in Africa 
recently, working on a remake of 
“King Solomon’s Mines,” in 


which he reprises the role Stewart 
Granger played in the 1950 film. 

And there’s another TV mini- 
series in the offing, with Cham- 
berlain playing John C. Fremont, 
politician, general and explorer 
of the American West 

One day, Chamberlain joked, 
he'd like to play a simpler charac- 
ter, with no hero-space to worry 
abouL 

“I’d like to play the guy next 
door," he said, "with a couple of 
kids and a lot of problems." 


By Greg MacArthur 

The Associated Press 

P ARIS — The Lost Generation 
>f American literary expatriates, 
whose brief self -exile in Paris was 
part adventure and part cultural 
salvation, bas been replaced by an- 
other group of important foreign 
writers for whom exile is a matter 
of survival 

Today's exiles come from the So- 
viet Union, Eastern Europe, Afri- 
ca, Latin America and Iran. They 
are older, mostly in their 50s, and 
they live and write in Paris because 
for political reasons they cannot do 
so at home. 

Most did not choose exile but 
were forced into it by repressive 
governments. What they share with 
their exuberant Jazz Age American 

predecessors is that they chose 
France. 

“We Romanians have a special 
relationship with France,” Paul 
Goma, 50, the novelist and human 
rights activist, said in an interview. 
“Wp share a Latin language and we 
are francophile by tradition. There 
is something in the air about 
France for a writer.” 

“like most South Americans, I 
didn’t want to settle in Spain,” said 
the Uruguayan poet and journalist 
Ricardo Paseyro, 56. “We have an 
anti-colonial prejudice about 
Spain, which was, of course, fascist 
until recently. So where do you go? 
You go to France, to Paris.” 

The Persian poet Nader Nader- 
pour, 55, was a student in Paris in 
the 1950s. "I was here for the last 
days of the last French giants — 
Audit Gide, Albert Camus, Sartre. 
France, for me, has always been my 
second country,” he said. 

However, life in exile "has some- 
thing of a false flavor" for Nader- 
pour. "It isn't real. It doesn't give 
you that extraordinary sensation of 
life, of pleasure, of joy, even of 
sadness,” he said. 

Although France's culture con- 
tinues to seduce artists from 
around the world, life in the City of 
Light, as some of the current Paris 
exiles made dear, can be something 
less than what Ernest Hemingway 
once described as "A Moveable 
Feast" 

"For the Americans who came in 
the 1920s, Paris was a vacation, a 
lark," the Soviet novelist Vladimir 
Maximov said. “For the Russian 
writers here now it’s no vacation; 


it's a trial, and most of us have to 

fight to survive.” . 

. . ■ ca .niiaJ Pone nn 


of his dtizensiup. His puDusnea - 
novels in the west include the ' 

semi-autobiographical "Farewell 

From Nowhere" and the cntuaDy el 1 „ 
acclaimed “Sewn Days of Cre- j[)U * 

ation.” . _ 

Like South Africa s Breyton 
Breytenbach, Goma, the Camer- 
oon author and publisher Mongo : - 

Beti and others, Maximov served - 

prison terms at home before being 
forced into exile. r ' " 

Naderpour left Iran on July 31, - 

198 Q, repelled by whal he saw as 
the culturally reactionary aspects 
of the Islamic Revolution. He 
chose exile after publishing at 
home became impossible. \ 

Some of the exiles, including the ... 
Czec hoslovak novelist Milan Run- •' ’ 

dera and Breytenbach. have ■- 

achieved international acclaim ^ : 

since leaving their native countries. -. ' ' 

Kondera’s latest novel “The In- .. 

credible Lightness of Bang,” was ■ . - 
an international literary event. 
Breytenbach gained critical ac- . 

claim this year for "The True Con- 
fessions of an Albino Terrorist." 

But some writers, although y-v 

translated in small anthologies into l i 

English, French and Italian, re- Jj jtT U 

main largely unknown outside ibeir g 
own countries. ; 

In exile, Naderpour is cut off iMVJf/J 
from his readers and his original i*. v ‘ 
source of inspiration. Most of his 
recent poems have been unusually i.'-- - 
nostalgic, he said, and he is not sure •. 
they will ever be published in Iran. - 

“A writer in eatile can live on his 
memories only so long, cut off from 
his readers and his own language,” s' m - r 
Maximov said, through an inter- - ... 
preter. "From the point of view of ' 
creativity, I lost everything. Immi- ‘ :: . . 

gration was only a matter of saving ' r 
myself physically. You feel like a . ; 
fish, thrown up on the beach by the 
waves. You just open your mouth 
and lie there until you die." ; :. . - _ 

“When I was at home in Tehran . 

and I dosed all the windows, I 
could still hear, with my inner ear, 1!' ' 
the slightest vibration from the 
street,” Naderpour said. “In exile, " . 
if I open the windows wide, I re- 

main deaf. 

“I hear the noise, but the noise ~~ / 

does not concern me. There is ”~77 
something broken between me and 
the country in which I live. That is .77 7 ; 
exile." — ■ '■ ’ • 


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Frankfurt (069] 72-67-55 
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Now York. (212) 752-3891 
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VIP LADY GUIDE 


Young, educated elegant & IribtguaL 
PARS 533 80 26 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

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