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WWHER MIA ***** ON PAGE 14 

No. 31,768 ~ ~ 


INTERNATIONAL 




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Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

**■■ PARIS, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1985 


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~~ ESTABLISHED 1887 


Gorbachev Tackles 
Lagging Economy 


By Cclesnne Bohlen 

- Ifta thutgtaa Past Scmce ~ 


"The important thing now is to 
overcome the lag, to fulfill every* 


- lYayhingeoa Past Senur~ Overcome U1C Wg, fO lUOtlf every* 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- that has been planned." he 
che*. the Soviet leader, has tnrued " II » ncccssaiy to work vigor- 
10 domestic ccefoomic proWems, «ward raising die rcsponsi- 

alling for a vigorous effort to com* bihw of personnel for their work 


“"'Mors md l w t r ‘ jrmancc sdoww a siacKcning or 

rous aniclft ” ^ W- production rales, and on Monday. 

an sed siufcrnl j °V in * ^"S agricultural and -problems and obstadk 
ades. wiu industrial managers, Mr. Gorba- - ■ _ . 

Orderof lv-k ch^ s3 * d » not enough to Tb* year the Soviet 

ned abou ,h b rvT Home the harsh Russian climate. 1 ** fiv^yearpbn ends; t 
> weeks f e teS 1 “Of course, one should not disxe- “ be adopted this fall 
I. “I w rr’ rurn Buaij-i, gard the severe winter. but the re- 


analysis and a realistic evaluation 
of the Soviet Union’s economic 


ta«ed -ik.' 5 ur Pnfe* U suits of ibe first quarto: were to no 
said. -I small degree affected by poor orga- 

m it cair ■ ° U1 ®f t Qi^rion, sometimes complacency. 

secT^- and in some places, irroponsM- 

had by" he said. 

«*£>**- Sir Daic\% A he issued his first 

ni« "■‘jnitoiuijAf pajor foreign policy statement. 

24 ' ifceS?»^fc< SorbacKv,' following a line 
tnu , the da\ from the era of the late President 

students leave for Yuri V. Andropov, urged a drive to 
i supposed to du’W/ restore discipline and accountabil-; 
ls lQtfv fijve Ljj ^ itv to ihe workplace. 

— 


Pavairini «r, 

canceledTour 

aalssaid. 

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uier Miami Onefi... 
tc the ZOUi 

In }^ c United Sujj*. 

P . l5UDd <f 

* lc l -. K * J rest owe l# t 

* " l ' eeh5 - ; iui Robert IW 
srai manager of fe 

Nubzhj Tydisco, j 

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China Seems 
To Readjust 
Approach to 
Soviet Talks 


Arum 

BEUING — Hu Yaobanj 
eral secretary of the Chinese 


This year the Soviet Union's 
I Iih five-year pbn aids; the F2th is 
to be adopted this falL Although 
the past two years showed a modest 
boost in economic growth, up from 
a period of near-stagnation, reports 
published over the weekend 
showed slowing growth in most of 
theeconomy. 

In his acceptance speech March 
11. when he was chosen to replace 
the late Konstantin U. Chernenko 
as Soviet leader, Mr. Goriachev 
said the country was approaching 
“a decisive turn in switching the 
national economy onto the tracks 
of intensive development,” 

In the Soviet economic lexicon, 
-intensification" has meant in- 
creasing levels of productivity, 
making better use erf reserves, in 
contrast to an earlier period when 
growth could be (tided with exten- 
sive outlays of labor and resources. 

Monday’s meeting, reported on 
television, touched on reforms 
pushed first by Mr. Andropov, con- 
tinued under Mr. Chernenko and 
now renewed by Mr. Gorbachev. 





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Japanese Unveil 

Plan to Promote 
Imported Goods 


lAnoaoud PtodI 


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. it! .epiacePavarat,; munist Party, appeared Tuesday to planners were told to channel “the and unmwliatdy afterwards Iraq 
l 5 JJt ^ Aar. signal a change in Beijing's negoti- bulk oS capital investments" into announced it was continuing its at- 
» 'vkr the vircaiet Vmt ating tactics with the Soviet Union rebuilding and retooling existing tacks against Inm. 
oppositr orjan Suited, as a new round of talks between the factories rather than ccmstructing Two hours after Mr. Perez de 

? prc-auuuon of Doma* . two countries in Moscow. new ones, and enteiprises were : — : , . . _ 

via di ’ In a significant change of presen- . warned to raise product quality. ei ^ lire a 


Reuters 

BAGHDAD — Javier Perez de 


Work collectives were urged to Cuellar, the UN secretary- genera L 
draw on all available reserves in said Tuesday he had nude no pro- 
drafting thdr next five- year plans, gress toward peace in the Gulf war, 
planners were told to channel "the and immediately afterwards Iraq 


| employment 

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e- , e'Wi.'ir.c.cftsasocto 
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In a significant change of presen- 
tation in a meeting lore with re- 
porters from Hong Kong and Ma- 
cao, Mr. Hu seemed to play down 
the long-held Chinese insistence on 
the removal of three specific obsta- 
cles as a precondition to improving 
relations with the Kremlin. 

"1 cannot say clearly how many 


irned to raise product quality. Iraqis and IraniaM endure a 
■ - ‘war of the cities,’ Page 5. 

Ptrisfament for Shoddy Goods 

Managers of stores or factories GM* o*A a , 34-hour visit to 
whaarehdd responsible for the Baghdad.anlraqimililaryspokcs- 
sale of shoddy goods to the Soviet ™» n anncjinced that Iraqi war- 

public risk lab^Smp terms as of had slruck -f ^ “ l 

Tuesday target” —a term often refemng to 

. . 3 '_. a merchant vessel — near Iran’s 

A meeljns or the Soviet Supreme Klumi Wand oiHeminuL 


"• i » I cannot say clearly how many A raect^ 0 r the Soviet Supreme “ 5 iTZ iZ?A rt :i .“Z!: "f 

i Obst^les there are." thejouraalists Coun^S instructions to <£uns. ^ jSfSii^pUuiS s?S ii 4 

s. t quoted Jum as saying, Init tBe ob- «definiflg and widening the extent a.M. when Mr P4rez de Cuellar 

n. 1 fc - ,■ -Stacie regarrhngJiate ^cunty nmst ^ crinaMl resptmsibifity for the A - M *- W 1 de tueuar 

be removed.” r >• . . , • - , pnxtuctionorsale of deficient, sub- 


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By John Burgess 

H 'ashing ion post Service 

TOKYO — Citing “dangerous 
times” for Japan in world trade. 
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
sone unveiled Tuesday a market- 
opening package with broad prom- 
ises for liberalization and tariff 
reductions but few specific new 
steps to be taken immediately. 

Mr. Nakasone said that Japan 
will devise an “action program” to 
be conducted over the next three 
years to open its market further to 
foreign goods and reduce a growing 
trade surplus with ihe Untied 
States. It will be ready in outline 
form by July, he said. 

[The U.S. secretary of the Trea- 
sury. James A. Baker 3d, said Tues- 
day that the United States would 
wait and see whether Japan carried 
out the program before passing 
judgment, Reuters reported from 
Washington. 

[In ihe first reaction from a high- 

in a television appearance. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone of Japan unveiled a -program to promote imports. -level U.S. official, Mr. Baker said 

in a televised interview. “We have 

. to wait and see what the results are, 

Perez de Cuellar Peace Mission Fails; Israeli Patrol SSSBS 1 ** “ 

Iraq Announces New Attacks on Iran ^ Attacked be enough to soften demands from 

A T T the U.S. Congress and the Ameri- 

Before leaving, Mr. Perez de IT1 LcDallOIl. can people for protectionist mea- 

Cuellar said. "We should be very 7 sures. Bui he said he was willing to 

careful not to raise expectations np 1 1| give Japan a reasonable length of 

and not to give the impression that J. Oil I /IgPllTPil tune to carry out the deration. He 
progress has been nude." L declined to specify a timetable.} 

Mr. Aziz said Iraq was prepared Vmted Press lmemamml Mr . Nakasone made his in- 
fer immediate UN-sponsored talks BEIRUT— An explosives-laden nouncemem in a highly unusual 

for a comprehensive solution to the car was driven into a group of Is- television address to the nation, 

conflict- but reiterated his coun- raeli military vehicles Tuesday in Using colored charts and a pointer, 

try’s opposition to partial solu- southern Lebanon, and a guerrilla he told viewers that the Japanese 

lions. group said the suicide bombing surplus was creating ill feeling 

Iran says it wants an end to at- killed 50 persons. Israeli officials overseas. “I call on you, the Japa- 

tacks on exilian targets and ship- said two Israelis had been killed nese people, to buy as manv im- 
ping in the Gulf, and for Iraq to lift and two injured in the attack. port^ g00 ds as possible," he' said, 
its declaration of a war zone in The guerrilla group, the Leba- n; ,. . fnrtl .l, n c 

Iranian airspace. National Snort Front, » "f * f ®« J** 


its declaration of a war zone in 
Iranian airspace. 


ported goods as possible," he' said. 
Bills now before the U.S. Con- 


will come closer to balancing ex- 
ports, they said. 

U remained unclear what role the 
government would play in any shift 
toward imports. Officials here said 
it planned only publicity and moral 
suasion to speed the changeover. 
Market forces would be the main 
impetus, they said. 

The government bad been work- 
ing on the measures since Mr. Na- 
itasone met President Ronald Rea- 
gan in Los Angeles in January. The 
two leaders agreed then to concen- 
trate on further opening Japan's 
market in four specific sectors: 
telecommunications, electronics, 
forestry products and pharmaceu- 
ticals and medical equipment. 

In recent weeks, Mr. Nakasone 
repeatedly reminded visiting 
Americans that Tuesday's an- 
nouncement was coming,' appar- 
ently as evidence of Japan's good 
faith in trying to cool off escalating 
trade tension with the United 
Slates, which recorded a S37-bil- 
lion deficit with Japan last year. 

Some senior officials in the Japa- 
nese bureaucracy, however, wor- 
ried that Japan was creating an 
expectation that the package would 
not satisfy. This is Japan's seventh 
market^ -opening package since De- 
cember 1981- 

Mr. Nakasone's plans would still 
face an uphill battle through Ja- 
pan's powerful government bu- 
reaucracy and through the Liberal 
Democratic Party, which does not 
appear to be completely united be- 
hind them. 

Japanese prime ministers have 
rarely taken their cases directly to 
the public. Mr. Nakasone’s use of 
television reflects his more asser- 
tive leadership style and. apparent- 
ly. a desire to show the United 
States that he means business. 

Mr. Nakasone chided U.S. busi- 
nessmen for not trying hard 
enough to sell in Japan. “All Japa- 


Mr. Aziz said the visit was useful said the attack was carried out by a 
to enable Mr. P£rez de CuHlar to young woman who drove a car 
hold direct contacts with both packed with 440 pounds (200 kilo- 
sides. But he said, "The Iranians grams) erf TNT into the vehicles. 


gress to keep Japanese exports out nese businessmen in America speak 
of the United States, tf enacted, English. But no American busi- 
could cause a serious depression in nessmen in Japan speak Japanese, 


Japan. Mr. Nakasone said 


he removed.- ■ •- prochictiorror sale of deficient. 

Since talks ontonnalrnng rda~ standard or unfinished godds. 

na^a^di^Siree kev issues: the Store managers who accept Iraq also reported new attacks Asked if the fighting would re- 

Soviet trnrvnsnd missfle concentre- shoddy goods from producers and on Iranian towns. A military sume now that Mr. Perez de Cita- 
tions atoSthe Chinese horde? the faaor >‘ bosscs wh ? blamc P 00 ^ spokesman said Iraqi planes had lar had left. Tareq Aziz, the Iraqi 

Kw*mH^s cnrmnrf fnr Vietnamese quality raw materials all ran an attacked the Iranian towns of Sar- foreign minister, said, “The war is 

Kjeraan s support tor- Vietnamese . nu< , ; .L nvni _^p rt t^j 7 ah,h *rvt r. ii.™- r.wfc v.a ,r- .h- » 


A.M.. when Mr. P6rez de Cuellar i ar i- r Pww A> 
was still in Baghdad Shippii* « ™«e r 
sources around the Gulf said they 

had no confirmation of any attack, on the central war front Tuesday. 

Iraq. also reported new attacks Asked if the fighting would re- 
on Iranian towns. A military sume now that Mr. Perez de Cud- 


have not changed their attitude in 
such a way that creates any opti- 
mism." 


do they?" he said he had told an 

a ■ rrr _■ i 


The attack took place on a road 
between the villages of Bater and 
Jezzme in southern Lebanon. 

Lebanese television showed what 
it said was film of the woman, Sana 


Iran accused Iraq of using chem- Mohaydaleh, 16. talking about her 
ical weapons again Tuesday on the mission before it was carried oul 
baitlefront in the southern Iraqi She was identified as a member of 


; policy in Cambodia and ihe Soviel risl 01 P^ ta “ 1 - 
presence in Afghanistan. 
fc Mr. Hu said Tuesday that China 

; Xtl £!£££?£& Sudan Coup 

■ safe.’While citing a threat to Chi- L 

nese borders, be did not identify • ■ m 

the source of the threat. f/ V gninKH mult/iry 

Western diplomats in Beijing J-TUiUMIiy 

sa, , d J hai , Mr - -1 s T racni S’ By Bernard Gwertzman 
naled a change in the Chinese post- ' Nn . YaHi Tmes Seni „ 

1 SS 1 ' MiiJjtaddrStS WASHINGTON - The mfli- 
• Jd not mrap Bqjmg had dropped , ary Icaders ^ Sudan overthrew 

ruHcnrrv ihp Gaafar Nimeiri to forestall a move 
\ V , “ 9°^ by younger military officers who 

t ^ues in Mblic, an analyst said, ^ plotting a purge of the coun- 
'but tite Chinese remain adamant . leadership, uS officials be- 
that the Soviet Union must reduce “J* ^ 

1 its support Tor Viemam." - .. _ _ 

Mr. Hu made his remarks as the J Our understanding. a Reagan 
sixth round of Chinese-Soviet talks admmistrauon official said Mon- 
armed at improving relations began day, “is that the sraior figures in 
in Moscow. Both sides have indi- lhe military establishment, the lop 
rated their desire for better rela- ^ « four officers, were worried 
cions since Mikhail S. Gorbachev . ibar their juniors — colonels and 
became the Soviet leader last majors — would act if they did 
month. n 9** 

The Chinese news agency, Non- The UB. officials would not di- 
bua, Jatef quoted Mr. Hu as saying vujge the source of the information 
at the same meeting: “Why about Saturday's coup, which was 
shouldn't we have relations- of officially led by General Abdul 
friendship and good-neighborli- Rahman Swareddahab, who had 


Pogs 17 
FOR MOU 

CLASSIFIEDS 


national 

il Position* 

iEOJETtriU 
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CCMMW.f “ ■ * 

! r* 1 r£r- 

■ *««r k . 

1 


lesday mat uuna ___ 

■ttSs Sudan Coup Seen as Pre-emptive Act 

; a threat to On- J. JL 

did not identify ■ ■ • • 

D^ L .: U.S. Thinks Military Moved to Prevent Junior Officer Revolt 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The mili- 


*F.CRfrW 


SJESAYd* 


> i RANDSTAD- 
i SfljNGUAt 


-e-PoI-e-Zahab and Gilan-e Gharb continuing and xb are the attacks." ter* reported from Tehran. 


mature economy in which imports 


about the stability of the new mili- 
tary-ruled government. 

“This coup has all Lhe earmarks 


tary leaders of Sudan overthrew of a pre-emptive coup in which the 
Gaafar Nimeiri to forestall a move “P brass went along to save thar 
by younger military officers who a . u - s - official said, 

were plotting a purge of the coun- rauiCS “ «mportam question, 
uys fadrahip, US officials be- ^ iatga ^ ^ ^ Smbn 

. _ 0 is described as a devout and can- 

“Pur understanding, a Ragan dous man. Page 5. 

administration official stud Mon- 

day, “is that the senior figures in if General Swareddahab only 
the military establishment, the lop ousted Nimeiri before other mili- 
thnee or four officers, were worried men would oust him, how 
that their juniors — colonels and smjng is his base of power?" 


majors — would act if they did 
not," 


Another official said the senior 
generals also were worried that bc- 


The UB. officials would not di- cause the growing public demon- 
vulge the source of the information strations against General Nimeiri 
about Saturday's coup, which was were widespread, anarchy might 
officially led 'by General Abdul break oul if General Nimeiri were 
Rahman Swareddahab, who had not forced oul. 


expected the younger officers to 
demand (he removal of some of the 
senior military men. who, like Gen- 
eral Swareddahab. were closely as- 
sociated with General Nimeiri. 

General Nimeiri ran a one-party 
government after he took over in 
his own military coup in 1969. 

The new military government 
has promised to form an interim 
government pending the return of 
rule to civilians. But officials in 
Washington said they were far 
from confident that there could be 
a smooth transition. 

General Nimeiri departed for 
Washington on March 27 as dem- 
onstrations broke out against him 
because of an end to price subsi- 
dies. He was in Washington 


miam." • Jezzme in southern Lebanon. facing such dangerous times." 

_ r* . - u, „ ft Lebanese television showed what Japanese officials depicted his 

■ Chemical Weapons Charge it said was film of the woman, Sana speech as marking the start of a 
Iran accused Iraq of using chem- Mohaydaleh, 16. talking about her shift away from an export-oriented 
ical weapons again Tuesday on the mission before it was carried oul strategy that helped to build Ja- 
baitlefront in the southern Iraqi She was identified as a member of pan's postwar prosperity. The 
marshes, killing 11 soldiers, Reu- the pro-Syrian Popular Syrian Par- country is moving toward a more 
ter* reported from Tehran. ly. mature economy in which imports 

— ■ Israel Bombs Village 

Israeli planes bombed a moun- 

^]ZEEX4^ dT.l« d n e S‘oS Swedish Sur 

v, / ' ^As*V lion said that one of its positions 

' s f J [1 l • s had been hit and that two persons t 1 « A 

cJ % fr™S? lloi ' Ra, ‘ e,sreporled Implants Ar 

H Omdurmaiu/tf,. An Israeli railitarv spokesman in 
fsS*jb \ Tel Aviv, however, said the raid on The Associated Press 

d \ J the village of Shemlan, seven miles STOCKHOLM — Doctors at 

s ; j f ■' (11 kilometers) southeast of Beirut, Karolinska Hospital here have car- 


“Many people would be unetn- American official, 
ployed." he said. "Japan is now But he said that Japan still needs 

facing such dangerous times." to change. “The important thing is 


to change. “The important thing is 
that all foreign countries have an 
equal chance to export" he said. 

Many of his promises were 
drawn from a report released Tues- 
day by a 10-member study commis- 
sion headed by Saburo Qkita, a 
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 6) 


Swedish Surgical Team 
Implants Artificial Heart 


5UDAN j 

.-J 


■ Khartoum-^ 

fe; 


The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — Doctors at 
Karolinska Hospital here have car- 


r -j£> >v was on a two-story building used as tied out the first artificial heart 
ethiora a base by pro-Syrian Palestinian implant operation outside the 
guerrillas." United States, it was disclosed 

Beirut police sources said a post- Tuesday. 
rt tion of a small, pro-Syrian Palesiin- “The patient, a Swedish man in 

. -k •*-- ian group called the Popular Strug- his 50s, received a metal and plastic 


r-V KENYA 


gle Front had been hit. 

Political observers in Beirut said 
that pro-Syrian Palestinian guerril- 
las had been fighting from posi- 
tions of che Draze group, the Pro- 
gressive Socialist Party, in the 
mountains above Beirut." 

They said the raid, whether 
against the Progressive Socialists or 
their Palestinian allies, might be an 
Israeli warning to the Druze leader. 


r i "/border? 


ness with a socialist country which 
shares with os ihe longest common 


65/ SEC®* 

vee 


But he said:. “Improvement of 
Chinese-Soviet relations cannot be 
determined by the- desire of one 
side." 


-- I’ll 

5 'S? 0 , 

s.’SS*'' 


■ e ■ ; t cor. 
use o' a " 


LvadoO^ 


'-i'* ] 

■d 



been defense minister and com- Since Saturday, officials said, 
mander in chief of the armed some of the top officials in the 
forces. But they said that because Nimeiri government have been ar- 
the impetus for the overthrow of rested, including key members of. 
General Nimeiri came from the the security apparatus and senior 1 
lower ranks, questions were being economic and political advisers, 
asked by Western governments The U.S. officials said they now 


INSIDE 


■ Dramatic social change is drawing Spain closer 

to the rest of Europe. Page 2. 

m Thai soldiers escorted the body of a Siamese 
queen io her ltaioiy funeral pyre. Page Z 

■ Tbe Soviet Union reportedly has a new missile to 

replace the outmoded SS-20. Page 3. 

■ President Reagan's budget agreement with Sen- 

ate Republicans would curtail dozens of domestic 
aid programs. Page 3. 

INSIGHTS 

■ The Douglas DC-3, the tugboat of (he air that 
• "you can’t kill with an ax " celebrates a half- 

century of flight. - Page 6. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Muscovites flock to see “My Friend Ivan Lap- 

shin," the first Soviet nonpropagandistic movie m 
half a century.. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ A New Jersey. securities firm allegedly misrepre- 

sen ted its situation to investors, Page 9. 


through last week. Dun ng that ano ordered a seven-day cease-fire W alidJumblai, nouo attack Chris- 
time, theme ivement for Jus removal Tuesday, but he said the rebels turn militiamen fighting Moslems 
S rew . ,n . S ™ aiu W!I ^ , ^ would resume their fight against around the southern city of Sidon. 

paralyzed by a g en eral strike mat ihe new junta unless a civilian gov- In another development Tues- 
thc security forces seemed unable was named within the sev- day. Israeli troops took over the 

10 en days, The Associated Press re- southern port of Tyre and rounded 

■ Warning by Rebel Cmei ported from Khartoum. Mr. up about 250 people on the beach 
The leader of the main rebel Garang made the offer in a speech ' 
force in southern Sudan, John Gar- broadcast over clandestine radio. 


Jarvik-7 artificial heart two days 
tit said ago," said Tanja Blanck, a press 
guerril- officer at the hospital. 
i posi- “He is awake and his condition is 
ae Pro- satisfactory," she said. “He had 
in the had several heart ai tacks. There 
was no other alternative.” 

'better The patient was removed from a 
tlistsor respirator Tuesday morning, ac- 
it be an cording to hospital officials, 
leader. Mrs. Blanck said that the surgi- 


alid Jumblat, not to attack Chris- cal team was led by Dr. Bjarne K. 
m militiamen fighting Moslems Sembe, a Norwegian who is the 
ound the southern city of Sidon. head of the hospital's thoracic sur- 
In another development Tues- gerv department. 


implantations of permanent artifi- 
cial hearts, all Jarvik-7s in the Unit- 
ed Slates. 

The first permanent recipient of 
an artificial heart was Barney B. 
Clark, who received an implant at 
the University of Utah Medical 
Center on Dec. Z 19BZ and lived 
1 12 days. 

The second was William J. 
Schroeder, who received the Jarvik- 
7 heart on Nov. 25. 1984 at Hu- 
mana Hospital- Audubon in Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and has surpassed 
Dr. Clark’s 112 days. Murray P. 
Haydon became the third Jarvik-7 
heart recipient at Humana on Feb. 
17. Mr. Schroeder and Mr. Haydon 
are still alive. 

Dr. William C. DeVries is the 
only U.S. surgeon authorized to 
implant the Jarvik-7. 

A spokesman for Humana Inc., 
which owns Ihe LouisviJle facility. 


The patient requested anonym- said Tuesday of the European im- 
ity and the hospital released" no plant: “We knew 1 about it yesier- 


in a search for Shiite Moslem guer- 
rillas, security sources said. 


details on his identity and personal 
life. 


day. Dr. DeVries was consulted 
about the operation and was in 


There have been three previous contact with the surgeons. 


U.S. Doctors Are Swallowing a Bitter Pill: Marketing 


Bv John C Freed patients, like the use of credit cards, were 

/Vrtr York Times Service frowned upon. 

mPW YGRK — Dr Andv p Morlev Bul ,n 1975 ,he Federal Trade Commis- 
sends a quarterly newsletter to each of Ms ** 

patients ihai erffers information on treating advertising were too r«tnctive a d^ion 
She nu, handling high blood pressure and lha[ u J^ le| y 
generally staying “out of my office." He says more and more doctors are 

if helps his ^ti^ts, in the Atlanta suburb of adverting 

Decatur, tolwld down the cost of health care wa >' s w W ^JS^JS^SSS 
helnc his hucinesc at the same time. are cven uu S ht ,n W med,caJ 


patients, like the use of credit cards, were New Jersey, says the changes in the way 


doctors market their services are a response 
io patients' demands. 

"We can no longer have the autocratic, 


passage. Why not give the patient a free 
session ir he has to wait more than, say. an 
hour or so?" 


and helps his business at the same time. ar 5 , 
Dr. L. Sam Musallam keeps his Oklahoma sc ™? ls 
City office open until 9 P.M. on Tuesdays 1 , 


-we ran no longer nave me W ig«uov t ^ h( , wouId nol advocate such a 

chauvimsuc and paternalistic doctor hat ^ in ^ cast lcs , a physician return 
was common until a decade ago, ^ Dr. Bruck- c rom ^ j 0 face a waiting 

ham said. It snot good mough wsay, You room f u n pf patients demanding free care, 
have this disease. 1 11 cure you or 1 11 cut it g u| on ^ch a gesture “becomes a 

ouL pretty good marketing tool." said Dr. Mor- 

Today's patients ask questions about their ley. who, with Mr. Brown, is writing a book 
treatment. Dr. Bruckheim said, and doctors on marketing for physicians. 


k., 4 , W...V* “ Thcr * are 500,000 physicians in this who wan t to cultivate thdr practices will 

and Thursdays, he says, so "the mothers c ? u /' tr> '- ^d Stephen w. Brown, president answer lhem. 

don’t miss work and the kids don’t miss of the American Marketing AKonauoa |md He fldde( j ^tat techniques of developing a 
school.” His waiting room is comfortably J _A ( , f practice are now a standard part of the 

furnished, “like a living room,” he says, adtf- University. ^ medical curriculum and are taught in pro- 

ing; “Pec^le are doctor-shopping. You - just ! n ° “ of S^ng' importance, grams offered by professional groups like t' 

have to compete." ,l fl ?Sy '■ AMA and the American Academy or Fami 

Faring what is incn^singly de^ritod Ka ^dM^ow^ who wos^ “ no1 a ^ WOrd 

glut of physicians u Ac United Stales, doc- adviwr , he Amcrican Acadcmy of Famil> . Dr. Brackheim swl. 
tors are marketing their services as never physics for ^ years . - A few groups even In Oklahoma City. Dr. Miaallam said ti 
before. ^ jf j ^ k 3 lhe word -nurketing’ atientuin he now pays to his patients h 

In the most noticeable aspect of this trend, oul 0 f my title. It used to be equated with helped expand his seven-year-old practice, 
some have even brought their offices to their u&e d^, r salesmen." Sf t _a whole Iol fewer requests to send n 

patients, opening clinics in suburban shop- B uti M r . Brown said, "there has always patients charts to someone rise." he said. 


Competition From ihe rising number of 
new physicians has increased as more and 
more potential patients bypass the old-style 
family physician when they need medical 


1 ^ care, turning instead to over-the-counter 

?! treatments or a variety of new forms of 


AMA and the American Academy or Family 
Physicians. “Marketing is not a dirty word.” 
Dr. Bruckheim said. 

In Oklahoma City. Dr. Musallam said the 
attention he now pays to his patients has 
helped expand his seven-year-old practice. “I 
get a whole lot fewer requests to send my 


Page 9. ping malls. These clinics, virtually unheard been marketing of physicians. 


SNOW BALL — Bert Bleyleveh of the Cleveland 
Indians working in the snow against the Detroit 
Tigers. Despite snow squalls in parts of the East 
andMiddle West, the U.S. baseball season started 
do schedule Monday. Page 15. 


■ Businesses m the UJS; plan to boost their capital 

spending at less than half the rate of increase or 
last year. Page 9. 

■ The khrifiut is being hailed as the wave of the 
future for.New Zealand's economy. . Page 9. 


of 10 years ago, are booming. 


Scheduling two or three patients for the 


“It used to be called 'bedside manner,* or a same time period, a once-common practice. 


Only a few years ago the medical prores- 'pleasant office environment,’ " he said. “All is becoming increasingly rare. Dr. Morley 
sion considered marketing unethical. The are marketing." said. 


American Medical Association's canons Dr. Allan H. Bruckheim, director of the “This isn't an airline, you can't just over- 
barred most advertising, and many practices residency program that trains family physi- book." he explained. “Of course, on an air- 
ihat are now considered a.convenience for dans at' St. Mary’s Hospital in Hoboken, line, if you get bumped, they give you free 


treatments or a variety of new forms of 
health-care delivery. These include health 
maintenance organizations, ambulatory sur- 
gical centers and convenience dirties. 

The clinics, generally open 7 days a week, 
12 to 16 hours a day. treat such maladies as 
sprains and colds and do not normally re- 
quire appointments. 

The National Assodation for Ambulatory 
Care, a clinic trade group, says there are 
2J00 such clinics. It expects 1200 more to 
open by year's end. Fees are roughly compa- 
rable to the cost of a visit to a doctor's office 
and are considerably lower than the charges 
of hospital emergency rooms. 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1985 


Swift Social Change Drawing Spain 
Closer to the Rest of Western Europe 


By Edward Schumacher 

New York Tunes Service 

MADRID — There is still the 
blood of bullfights, the sultry 
swishing skirts of flamenco, the 
shuffle of old women in black going 
daily to Mass. 

But as Spain tries to assess the 
political and economic effects of 
joining the European Community, 
as agreed in Brussels late lak 
month, a dramatic social transfor- 
mation is drawing the country clos- 
er to the rest of Western Europe. 

The popular Spanish images de- 
picted by writers such as Ernest 
Hemingway and George Orwell 
have not disappeared. Bat over the 
last two decades, and particularly 
since the death of Franco in 1975, 
Spaniards have been casting off 
nearly four centuries of isolation- 
ism. 

“It is spectacular how a very dif- 
ferent Spain has been created,'' 
said Juan Pablo Fusi, an historian 
at the University of Salamanca. 
“You can see the changes from one 
day to the next Few countries have 
had such a rapid change of such 

intensity." 

The changes can be seen in the 
streets. Middle-class women and 
shop assistants wear French fash- 
ions. Teen-agers sport spiked and 


brilliantly colored coiffures equal 
to the test of the London punks. 

The venerable Spanish bar, with 
tapas such as marinated octopus 
and blood sausages to pick on, has 
been closing to make way for ham- 
burger franchises and a popular 
chain called VIPS, where the latest 
rock albums and movie videos are 
served up along with Italian pastas. 

A virtual revolution has taken 
place in sexual mores. Pedro Ruiz, 
a popular actor, recently advertised 
condoms on the state-run televi- 
sion. The ad provoked a dispute 
and was withdrawn, but it was a far 
cry from a decade ago when Mr. 
Ruiz’s former wife was evicted 
from a pharmacy, he said, for even 
asking for condoms because they 
were socially frowned on. 

Divorce was legalized in 1980, 
and the parliament approved a law 
permitting abortions in limited 
cases two years ago, although the 
measure's constitutionality is being 
contested. 

Spaniards are divided over what 
many see as a drop in morals, but 
almost all welcome a parallel ex- 
plosion in high culture. Plays by 
Beckett, Kafka and Werner Fass- 
binder are featured in Madrid's 
theaters as Spaniards try to catch 
up with 20th-century European 


drama, much of which was banned 
under Franco. 

The changes have a dark side. 
Grime, much of it related to drugs, 
is up as cocaine has become popu- 
lar among the middle class, and 
heroin addicts are numerous in ma- 
jor cities such as Bilbao. 

Spain, geographically isolated 
from the rest of Europe by the 
Pyrenees, began to pull into itself in 
the early 1500s. The country resist- 
ed the Reformation and other 
movements that swept the Conti- 
nent. Franco, backed by a strongly 
conservative Roman Catholic 
Church, continued to emphasize 
that Spain was different ana moral- 
ly superior. 

But Spaniards began to chan g e 
socially in the 1960s as an extended 
economic boom brought industri- 
alization and higher living stan- 
dards. The population went from 
being mostly rural to one in which 
roughly three-quarters of the al- 
most 37 minion people today live in 
tides. 

The death of Franco meant the 
end of censorship, but new ideas 
had already been infil trating with 
the waves of European tourists 
coming here, mostly from West 
Germany, Sweden and Bri tain. 

According to a recent poll by the 




.1 


WORLD BRIEFS 


4 






India Rejected Union Carbide Offer 

NEW DELHI (AFP) — India’s d™*® ' 

taken after it had spurned a “ridiculously low company °“*r of . 
compensation for the Bhopal gas disaster, a minister told Parliament hoe ; ; 

^The^awsuit for unspecified damages and compensation was filed in* •• ' 
New York court Monday on behalf of the 

Veerendra Patil. minister of chemicals and fertilizers, said that an 
ouT-of-coun settlement was possible the U S compaav Wpay an 

adequate amount to the victims of the world s worst mdustndMadmL - 
An estimated 2.500 people died and more than 200,000 others were • 
affected when poisonous methyl isocyanate gas leakodfrom a Union • 
Carbide pesticides plant in the central Indian ^tyon Dec. 3. Thtte has ... 
been no official confirmation of the amount offered by Umon Carbide, 
but the Indian Express newspaper reported last week that it amounted to r • 
about 3 billion rupees (S250 million) to be paid out over 30 years. ; - : 


Young Spaniards enjoying night life in a disco bar in Madrid. 


Umd Piw* It WiM wenol 


Catholic Church, 30 percent of 
Spaniards still regularly attend 
Mass, among the highest percent- 
ages in Europe. 

But the Socialist government of 
Prime Minister Felipe Gonz&Iez, 
elected in 1982, today sets the more 
secular tone for the new Spain. 


U.S., Soviet Negotiate on Space Arms 

GENEVA (Renters) — U.S. and Soviet arms negotiators held more 
than three hours of talks Tuesday on space-based weapons, the longest -. 

session to date on the subject . ■ 

The meeting was the third devoted solely to space weapons smee the - 
superpowers started new arms control talks on March 12. The session atr 
the Soviet mission lasted three hours and 20 minutes. Delegation spokes- .. 
men refused to give further details, citing a confidentiality pledge in force . 
in Geneva. 

The three-tier raiks are to hold a session Wednesday on mtercontuen- . • 
tal nudear missiles at the U.S. Arms Control Agency and a session on 
medium-range missiles at the Soviet mission on Thursday. 


Social scientists say that perhaps Spaniards are finally even laugh- 
the most profound change has been ing about the rivii war. A current 

a displayed sense of political mod- comedy film hit, “The Small Cow," n >T (1 . n l T c 1 yv 

era lion since Franco’s death. An ends with matadors from opposite [J.g, I in Pl JxCVCrSRl IS OlTUCK LlOWH 
attempted coup in 1981 failed, and sides in the war competing with 
today the far right and the far left their capes over a cow caught be- 
together hold less than 10 percent tween the opposing tines. The cow 
of the vote. drops dead. 



Wage Strikes 
Erupt Again 
In Denmark 



Gandhi Increases Efforts 
To Negotiate With Sikhs 


The Associated Press 

COPENHAGEN — Anger over 
a government-imposed collective 
wage agreement aroused renewed 
labor protests Tuesday, and Den- 
mark braced for Large-scale demon- 
strations and possible nationwide 
strikes on Wednesday. 

After a five-day Easter holiday, 
new walkouts and continuing wild- 
cat strikes idled as many as 15,000 
workers in the private sector, pri- 
marily in Copenhagen and other 
cities, according to a survey by the 
Danish Employers Association. 

There was no count of public 
employees involved in action af- 
fecting hospitals, schools, day-care 
institutions, mail delivery and gar- 
bage collection. 

Strikes and rallies on Wednesday 
die expected to show to what de- 
gree militants have managed to 
take control of Denmark's labor 
protests from the National Federa- 
tion of Trade Unions. 

The federation, representing 
about 320.000 workers, has been 
calling for an end to further at- 

S ts to undo a legislated wage 
meat engineered by the cen- 
ter-right coalition government of 
Prime Minister Pool Schluter, a 
conservative. 

wa^Sd^Tio 5 S Funeral Is Carried Out With Royal Pomp and Ceremony 

strikes that began March 24. ^ x ' 


Tha Anodcted Pma 


Chariot bearing Queen Rambhai BarnPs body to her funeral pyre in Bangkok. 


By Steven R. Wei smart 

New York Times Service 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi is stepping up the 
Indian government’s attempts to 
negotiate with Sikh leaders to avert 
a confrontation that many fear 
may occur next weekend. 

Sikh leaders have set April 13 as 
the da te for a renewal of agitation if 
their demands are not met. There is 
concern that demonstrations and 
violence may resume in Punj ab, the 
state on the Pakistani border in 
which Sikhs predominate. 

A month ago, Mr. Gandhi in a 
change of tactics, began making 
concessions to the Sikhs, releasing 
eight leaders held in prison since 
June and directing his aides to 
make contact with these and other 
Sikhs. 

The Sikhs have two sets of de- 
mands. First, they seek greater self- 
government in Punjab; second, 
they demand an end to what they 
call Indian government repression. 
For example, they demand the re- 
lease of thousands of prisoners ac- 
cused of seditious activities and the 
lifting of a ban on certain Sikh 
groups. 



WASHINGTON (Combined Dispatches) — A federal appeals court 
on Tuesday reinstated a libel verdict against The Washington Post, saying 
the newspaper had shown a “reckless disregard" for tire truth in an article 
about the former president of Mobil Oil Corp., William Tavoulareas. 

The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, in a 2-1 
decision, said that evidence introduced at a 1982 trial was sufficient irJ 
show that The Post held “actual malice" toward Mr. Tavoulareas wbar 
the article was published. The stoiy said he had used his position at Mobil 
Oil to “set up his son" in a lucrative job in 1974 in Atlas Maritime Co„ a 
London shipping company. 

The case will now return to the trial court to determine how much The 
Post must pay Mr. Tavoulareas in damages. In July 1982, a federal jury 
awarded him S2.050.000, after finding that The Post and its reporter, 
Patrick E Tyler, had libeled Him. But on May 3, 1983, a U.S. district court! 
judge reversed that decision, finding that there was no evidence to 
support the jury’s verdict of malicious libel. (UPI. A?) 


Polish Priest Burned by Assailants 


WARSAW (UPI) — A Catholic priest suffered second-degree burns r \ \ 
last weekend mien unidentified men poured a chemical on his face and : ’ 

body in the southern city of Krakow, a Polish cardinal said Tuesday. 1 - "i 
Cardinal Franidszek Macharski of Krakow notified the church hierar- 
chy in a telex message that Krakow’s residents were “shocked arid 
concerned" by the attack on tire Reverend TadeuszZaleskj in front of his 
house on Saturday. The incident came just six months after three secret 'rrr 
police agents killed the Reverend Jerzy Popieluszko, a supporter of the ___ 
banned trade union Solidarity. — 

Church sources could not say whether Father Zalesld supported 
Solidarity. Cardinal Macharski called on authorities to find the assailants 
and to guarantee that the accident would not be repeated. 






Rajiv Gandhi Trial Ordered in Hong Kong Case 


people in what is regarded as a 
historic episode in India's battle for 
independence. 

Indian government officials say 
negotiations will be difficult as 
long as Sikhs do not unite around 
one set of leaders. Two leaders re- 
leased last month, Harchand Singh 
Longowal and J.S. Talwandi, are 
jockeying for position and each has 


Bangkok Cremates a Siamese Queen 


HONG KONG (Reuters) — A Hong Kong court Tuesday ordered 
George S.G. Tan, former chairman of the Cam an group, and four other 
businessmen to stand trial on charges linked to the 1983 collapse of the 
property company. 

Magistrate Brian Suttill ordered Mr. Tan, his deputy, Bentley Ho, and 
three advisers to stand trial. No date was set but it was not expected 
before October. Carrian collapsed in October 1983 leaving debts of SI 
billion. 

The defendants pleaded not guilty to charges of conspiracy to defraud 
shareholders by malting false and misleading statements and by conceal- 
ing profits. Judge SuitQI rejected a move by prosecutors to revoke bail fo A 

Hr Toil nil\A ff m — — J J <»f C "t ~ " tf 1^ 


maki ' ps Els " 32 i Bucket 1 

Cl al commission to investigate the Mr. Gandhi, meanwhile, has at- U ^ u t X 



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By Denis D. Gray 

The Associated Press 

BANGKOK — To the wafl of 
conch shells and the boom of can- 
non, 206 soldiers in ancient uni- 
form pulled a chariot containing 
the body of a Siamese queen to her 
10-story-higb funeral pyre. 

The funeral on Tuesday of 
Queen Rambhai Bami, wife of the 
late King Rama VO, was regarded 
as the grandest royal ceremony 
held in Thailand in recent decades. 
The queen died last May at the age 
of 79 and her body was placed 
inside a gilded urn within Bang- 
kok’s Grand Palace. 

In accordance with religious cus- 
tom, the cremation was scheduled 
on an auspicious date nearly a year 
after her death from a heart attack. 

Princess Rambhai, a beauty in 
her youth, was proclaimed queen in 


1925 and held that position until 
her husband's abdication nine 
years later. 

Rama VII was Thailand’s last 
absolute monarch. A revolution in 
1932 ushered in a constitutional 

monarchy, it marked the end of 
Siam and the begriming of the 
modem state known as T hailan d. 

The urn with the queen’s body 
was taken from the Grand Palace 
on Tuesday morning and placed on 
the Royal Great Victory Chariot 
for a two-hour funeral procession 
over a 1.7-mile (2. 8-kilometer) 
route through old Bangkok. 

Five battalions of troops in dress 
uniform formed the vanguard of 
the funeral train. They were fol- 
lowed by a lesser chariot bearing a 
high-ranking Buddhist abbot and 
the Victory CharioL 

Rows of drummers, trumpeters. 


conch-blowers and royal pages 
flanked the chariots which were 
followed by members of Thailand’s 
royal family and four battalions of 
troops. 

Four cannons fired 300 times 


investigate 
anti-Sikh rioting that occurred in 
November after the assassination 
of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi 
Mrs. Gandhi's murder by two Sikh 
security guards led to several days 
of violence, in which an estimated 
2,400 Sikhs were killed by Hindus 
in New Delhi alone. 

Several independent groups have 
said that the riots were far from 
spontaneous, and were planned 


Mr. Gandhi meanwhile, has at- 
tempted to shore up his position by 
meeting with his own 


k_ 


■ • - h d • ^ Greece Sign New Airways Accord m-Rpniihlirnn i 

postuon here and wmnmgjiroad ATHENS (Reuters) -G^ce, which last year rooked its postwar 1 J 


suDDOrt for his anoroach. He has 77 wnKn 1351 3*® revoxea us postwar 

«« United States on the ground thatit was 
iC 5ZS SdSnand “P* a provnnonal new air agreement with Washington on 

A government spokesman. Dimi trios Maroudas, said the new accord 
did away with provisions in the 1946 pact that in theory allowed an 
untamed number of U.S. companies to compete with Greece’s Olympic 
Airways on the Athens-New York route. He said that Greece revoked the 




an end to extremism by Sikhs. 

The government has pledged to 
crack down on terrorism. But there 
have been several shootings of 

• utu wuuivtu >umi rfwv iwiu ii|nuiHuiww, “*•“ —~* w }*•—»•*•* moderate Sikhs and others m the .u ~ r r n c — «■««. iv.'vn.uun, 

and a funeral dirge was played and executed by political leaders, last few weeks, including the killing t ° u , airlme ? applied to fly the route alongside 

throughout the procession, which including people close to the Gan- 0 f Krishan Lai Mancbanda, a lead- lrans wortQ crimes, the sole American carrier at present. 

dhi family. er of the National People’s Party in p ,i n 1 . 

In the last two weeks, Mr. Gan- the state of Punjab. The killings Jr Or tUe KeCOIXl 

dhi has hinted that he may beready were said to be the work of people ... . f 

bent on creating turbulence to fur- a “ of srnkes Wednesday and 

ther their objectives of breaking f ° r ,m P rovcd W 80(1 working conditions, 

away from India altogether. umon officials Tuesday. (Reuters) 

Aides to the prina minister had Goran socialist. Oskar Lafcmtaine, took over as. 




-'-J. 


---: ~\: s-- 




ended at a 87-foot edifice specially 
constructed on the San am Luang, 
or royal field, in the shadows of the 
Grand Palace. The pyre is located 
within the elaborately decorated 
rectangular building known as the 
Golden Mere. 

Later Tuesday, King Bhumipol 
Aduiyadej lit the pyre. Rites and 
ceremonies prescribed by both 
Hindu and Buddhist traditions 
were (o continue until Saturday. 

The queen’s ashes will rest at the 
base of a Buddhist image in Bang- 
kok's Ratchal 


to appoint an inquiry commission, 
despite the suggestion by some that 
his own government could be em- 
barrassed by the findings. 

Aides to the prime minister said 
last weekend (hat the selection of 
such a commission should be part 
of a package agreement that could 
bring about an end to Sikh agita- 
tion. 

Government officials also have 



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abophii Temple along- said that Mr. Gandhi is prepared to 
side those of her husband. The release more Sikh leaders from 
bone relics of the queen will be kept prison and consider other demands 


in an urn within the Grand Palace. 

The last royal cremation was 
held in 1955 for the current king’s 
grandmother. 

The government, armed forces, 
fine arts department and royal 
household were mobilized for 
Tuesday's ceremony, which was 
viewed by millions on television 
and seen by more than 100,000 
people who flocked to the royal 
field. 

Thousands of fanners and work- 
ing class people gathered at the 
field, many intent on laying scent- 
ed wood and flowers on the pyre. 

Despite the grandeur of the cere- 
mony, royal funerals in earlier 
times were even longer and more 
elaborate with the pyres sometimes 
as high as 30 storier. King Rama V, 
Thailand's 1 9th century moderniz- 
ing king, ordered a scaling down of 
such events for the sake of econo- 
my and his dictum has been fol- 
lowed since. 

King Rama VII accepted the de- 
crease of his power but felt uneasy, 
and went into self-imposed exile' 
with his wife in Britain. He died in 
1941 and because of the war his 
funeral in London was attended by 
only 16 members of the royal fam- 
ily. 

The queen returned to Thailand 
in 1949, living in an eastern prov- 
ince where she helped the rural 
poor by reviving handicraft indus- 
tries. She moved back to Bangkok 
in 1968. 

King Bhomipol, also known as 
Rama IX, is an extremely popular 
and powerful ruler. He ana mem- 
bers of the royal family spend most 
of each year in the’ countryside 
helping people with many royally 
sponsored prefects. 

The American-born king is also a 
linguist, composer, jazz musician 
and artist .His political involve* 
meats are low-keyed but he has 
stepped in on several occasions in 
recent years to defuse crises within 
the government and miliiaxy. 


by the Akali Dal Party, the princi- 
pal political group of the Sikhs in 
Punjab. He also is understood to be 
considering pulling at least some 
Indian troops out of the state. 

Mr. Gandhi’s most dramatic ges- 
ture came 10 days ago. when he 
traveled to the state and promised 
to build a hydroelectric project and 
take otter steps to improve its 
economy. 

Despite these steps, even the so- 
called moderate Sikhs have said 
that they will not negotiate until 
Mr. Gandhi meets their demands 
for greater self-government and 
restitution of damages from the 
November riots. 

Attention is now focusing on 
April 13, a day that marks two 
anniversaries. One is the so-called 
baptism of (he Sikh religion in 1699 
by the last of its gurus, who enunci- 
ated the principle of fighting to 
protect the religious freedom of 
Sikhs and Hindus. The other marks 
the day in 1919 when British troops 
opened fire on a crowd in Amritsar, 
killing and wounding thousands of 


. : ; uivuuuui, IUU& UVGI 

premier of the Saarland on Tuesday. His Social Democratic Party woe 
control of the Saarland from the Christian Democrats for the first time in 
an election two weeks ago. (Reuters) 

“S 1 *? fo *^_ s e®«aiy» Sir Geoffrey Howe, met Tuesday for 
talks in Berta with Ench Honeckcr, the East Goman president and 
Communist Party leader. fupjj 

A landslide covered a town in the Peruvian Andes, killing at least 60 
villagers, the civil defense authorities said Monday. News reports said al 
least double that number died in the avalanche of mud. (AP) 

, TTie second major earthquake in just over a month struck central Chile 

army raid on the Golden Temple at on Monday mghL rocking buildings, causing power cuts and sending 
Amritsar last June. The Golden thousands of people rushing into the streets. (UPI) 

Temple, the holiest shrine in the An Indian Air Force jet fighter crashed into a village in northern India 
Sikh religion, was being used as an on Tuesday, killing at least 14 persons and injuring six. All India Radio 
arms base by Sikh militants. reported. ■ ° (UPI) 


hoped that a role could be played in 
fashioning an agreement by some 
of the Sikhs who serve in Mr. Gan- 
dhi’s government But these Sikhs 
have met with opposition within 
their own community. 

For example, Buta Singh, the ag- 
riculture minister, was excommuni- 
cated last week by a group of 
priests because of his role in the 


. •; 
."‘Xkr'l. ' 


Vfc'-S-itTc-- 




Japan Unveils Plan to Open Markets 


(Continued from Page 1) 

former foreign minister. The group 
was appointed by Mr. Nokasone to 
offer guidance on bow Japan 
should cope with its changing 
stance in the world economy. 

The report concluded that the 
United Slates bore most of (he 
blame for its trade deficit with Ja- 
pan, a view shared by many in the 
U.S. government. It cited economic 
recovery in the United States and 
the high value of the dollar as the 
prime factors behind a wave of im- 

? orts into the United States in 
984. “Japan’s trade is not deter- 
mined by Japan’s policy alone,” 


Mr. Okita said at a news confer- 
ence on Tuesday. 

[William E. Brock, the U.S. trade 
representative, expressed a similar 
view on Monday, saying that prob- 
ably two-thirds to three-quarters of 
the U.S. trade deficit with Japan 
was the responsibility of the United 
States, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington. 

[“The dollar has gone up by 6S 
percent against other currencies in 
the last four to five years and what 
that means is that we've increased 
our prices in relative terms overseas 
that! 


Dublin Bank Thieves Miss Jackpot, 
Find Bathroom as Tunnel Goes Awry 


The Associated Press 

DUBLIN —A gang of robbers spent the Easter weekend tunneling' 
into a Dublin bank, but their tunnel took a wrong turn and they fled 
after breaking into a women's lavatory, police said Tuesday. 

A police spokesman said.the gang was believed to have spent three 
days underground in an attempt to rob a large central Dublin branch 
of the Allied Irish Bank. 

The robbers used cutting and digging equipment to cut a 250-yard 
(228-meter) tunnel They used a gas cylinder, pickaxes and crowbars 
to penetrate a thick, wall of the bank, the spokesman said. 

But the tunnel was slightly off the mark, and instead of reaching (he 
bank's strong rooih, the robbers found themselves in a women's 
lavatory, he said. The tunnel was discovered after the robbers -trig- 
gered an alarm late Sunday. 

The gang apparently was after about 7 million Irish pounds ($7 
million) in cash and bonds, the Daily Star of London reported- Bui. 
the bulk of the money had been transferred out of the bank before the 
weekend, the newspaper 


by that much,” he said. “Converse- 
ly. their prices are that much cheap- 
er coming in. and we’ve been acting 
like a dry sponge, pulling in im- 
ports.”] 

Mr. Okiia’s report said that Ja- 
pan should offer to eliminate all 
tariffs on manufactured goods in 
concert with other industrialized 
countries and continue to work to- 
ward a new round of multilateral 
trade talks. 

Market access in Japan could 
also be improved through initia- 
tives in such areas as import regula- 
tions, technical standards, ccrtifi- 


Mr. Nakasone endorsed the re- 
port’s objectives and promised ac- 
tion to cany them otu. The goaJ 
will be to ‘leave the options as well 
as the responsibilities to consum- 
ers,” he said. 

Mr. Nakasone also listed other 
steps or intentions in the package. 
The government paper said that: 

• After financial aid is chan- 
neled to Japan’s ailing forest prod- 
ucts industry, the government in- 
tends to consider reduction of 
tariffs on plywood “with a view to 
starting implementation approxi- 
mately from the third year." 

• Decisions on other unspecified 
tariff reductions will be made by 
the end of June. Many of these are 


£5 -:b 


- v: - ^:re- 



aturaT 


^ of Long 




>re r\. 


ration, government procurement, 
financial and capital 


markets and 

services, it said. 

The government should pay 
more attention to fostering domes- 
tic demand, it .said, winch would 
result in more imports and less 
pressure to export It said this 
could, be done through deregula- 
tion of business, upgrading of pub- 
. tic f aciJities. shorter working hours 
‘ and' tax reform. 


1986, to be carried out, as they 
must be approved by the Diet, or 
national legislature. 

• Japan has agreed to accepttw- 
eign test data for certain medical 
equipment and pharmaceutical. 

•The government will wort to 
encourage the importing of manu- 
factured goods. Measures will in- 
clude lower-cost financing, re- 
quests to businesses to increase 


purchases abroad, public adverfe- 


F auiuau, pUDUC aovalo-i 

mg campaigns and the holding of* 
import fairs. 


1 ;... 





•The government will work to 
get jt settlement “as early as possi- 
*° f°re*gD lawyers’ long-stand* 
mg fight for tighter to practice in 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1983 


Page 3 


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-7.-. 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Yk&jmTo Get . 

Tbefc Bay in Court ... . 

New Yorit state Ins enacted a 
taw that gives victims of crimes 
. — or their survivors — an oppor- 
tunity 10 present their views in 
court when the defendant is con- 
victed, and 10 idl the judge, be- 
fore sentence is imposed, what 
they fed the penalty sbonM be. 

. .“‘Before this, we hare always 
concerned omsdves with prc- 
sentence inftmatkm concerning 
the defendant,’ 4 said Senator 
Ralph J. Marino, a Republican 
and co-sponsor of the measure. 
"Now we're gening 10 victims' 
rights, for a change. The victim, 
for the first .time, really has ac- 
cess to ih* judge’s ear — whether 
there should be restitution and 
how much, what the jail sentence 
should be." 

Another co-sponsor. Assem- 
blyman Richard N. Gottfried, a 
Democrat, said: “In many cases, 
a judge never sees the crime vic- 
tim or hears the victim’s side of 
the stoiy.” 


A Not-So-BIeak 
View of Youth 

"Death rates for adolescents 
and young adults have reached 
an alJ-time low," according to 
Lisbeih B. Schorr, a Harvard lec- 
turer in public health, in an arti- 
cle for The Washington Post. 
The overall death rate for Ameri- 
can IS- to 24-vear-dlds was 106 
per 100,000 in i960, reached 129 
id 1969. began falling in the 
1970s arid had dropped to 96 by 
1983. 

Car accidents are the chief 
cause of such deaths; others in- 
clude homicide, suicide and 
drugs. Ms. Schorr reports. She 
credits the decrease to such mea- 
sures as the 55-nril&per-hoor 
{89-kitoraeter-per-bour} speed 
limit, the campaign against 
drunken driving and seat belts. 
But she notes that “many young- 
sters m our inner dues" are 
largely untouched by the forces 
for improvement.' 


Short Takes 

For years, the repository of 
federal records has gone by the 
short, serviceable name of the 
National Archives. A new law 
making (he agency independent 
of the General Services Adminis- 
tration, however, has encum- 
bered it with a name twice as 
long, National Archives and Re- 
cords Administration, and the 
inevitable bureaucratic acronym, 
NARA. 



IntmUntd Praii hnnxawao! 


GEORGIAN IS HELD — Amy Carter, the daughter of 
former President Jimmy Carter, is arrested for protest- 
ing at the South African Embassy in Washington. 


With three months io go be- 
fore the highest slopes are closed 
for the summer. Colorado bas 
had eight ski deaths this season, 
compared with Five for all of last 
season. Resort officials blame 
bright, mild weather, which 
brings out more skiers at faster 
speeds. Most victims are young 
and expert, and most of them hit 
trees. 

Alaska leads the United States 
in per capita spending by the 
federal government at $4,642.17, 
according to the Census Bureau. 
Iowa taxpayers get the least fed- 
eral money back, 52,716.18 per 
person. 


What Dewey Did, 
Cuomo Is Undoing 

In 1948 Thomas E Dewey, 
then governor of New York and 
the Republican candidate for the 
presidency, posed for life maga- 
zine sitting at his huge carved 
desk in the capitol building at 
Albany. Life's caption said the 
desk was so high that Mr. Dewey 


actually was propped up on a 
couple of telephone books on the 
seat of the chair. 

This revelation, as much as the 
remark made famous by Alice 
Roosevelt Longworth (hat be 
looked "like a bridegroom on a 
wedding cake," was widely be- 
lieved to have cost Mr. Dewey 
votes in his losing campaign 
against Harry S. Truman. The 
governor got his revenge on his 
capitol office by installing red 
carpeting and red wall-covering, 
giving the chamber its nickname, 
“The Red Room." 

Grover Cleveland, Charles Ev- 
ans Hughes and Franklin D. 
Roosevelt were other predeces- 
sors of the present occupant. 
Mario M. Cuomo, a Democrat. 
The ornate chamber is now bring 
restored to its splendor of a cen- 
tury ago at a cost of $400,000. 
John Mesick, the architect who is 
overseeing the restoration, says 
that when the mahogany walls 
were cleaned. “You should have 
smelled the cigar smoke that 
came off on the rags." 

— Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Soviet Has New Missile to Replace SS-20, U.S. Says 


By Walter Pincus 

Washington Pint Semce 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet 
Union has begun flight tests of a 
successor to the SS-20 nuclear mis- 
sile, indicating that further deploy- 
ments of ibe 18-year-old weapon 
were doubtful even before the Sovi- 
et leader, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
announced a moratorium Sunday 
cm intermediate-range missile sys- 
tems, according to expem inside 
and outride the U.S. government. 

This information suggests that 
Mr. Gorbachev's plan to halt fur- 
ther deployment of the medium- 
range SS-20 until November comes 
at. a time when Moscow may be 
switching to a more modem mis- 
sile. 

The new Soviet missile has been 
given the designation SS-X28 by 
the Pentagon, according to one 
source. 

A brief reference in “Soviet Mili- 


tary Power," the U.S. Defense De- 
partment's annual review of Soviet 
weaponry, refers to a modified SS- 
20 that will "have even greater ac- 
curacy and other improvements 
over the current. SS-20." 

If the Soviet moratorium re- 
ferred only to further SS-20 deploy- 
ments, it was “like him saying the 
Soviets would stop doing what they 
were planning to stop doing any- 
way," Steven Meyer, an expen on 
Soviet weaponry, said Monday. 
Mr. Meyer, a consultant to U.S. 
government agencies, is an asso- 
ciate professor at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 

He said the rhythm of Soviet 
missile production over the past 25 
years indicated that a modernized 
intermediate-range missile with 
greater accuracy and reliability 
than the SS-20 was long overdue. 

According to Reagan adminis- 
tration officials, the Soviet Union 
has deployed 414 of the three-war- 


head, rood-mobile missiles at bases 
across the country. With their 
2.500-mile (4.000* kilo meter) range, 
the roughly 270 SS-20s west of the 
Urals could hit targets in Western 
Europe and North Africa. The re- 
maining SS-20* in central and east- 
ern Soviet territory could reach 
China. Southeast .Asia. Japan and 
most of Alaska. 

The deployed missiles, which 
carry more than 1.200 warheads, 
have been “far more than you 
could rationalize for military pur- 
poses." Mr. Meyer said. 

He suggested, and government 
sources agreed, that die last 50 to 
100 SS-20s deployed over the past 
two years were “for political pur- 
poses, to match American deploy- 
ments" of 108 Pershing-2 and 464 
cruise missiles. 

The U.S. missiles, which are to 
be fully deployed by 19SS, were 
designed to balance the introduc- 
tion of the SS-20*. 


The number, of U.S. missiles was 
set at 571 not enough to present a 
serious first-strike threat to Mos- 
cow. The range of the Pershing-2 
also was limited to 1.000 miles so 
the missile could not reach Mos- 
cow. 

Before the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization approved the “two- 
track decision." which called for 
both negotiation and deployment. 
Leonid f. Brezhnev, then die" Soviet 
president, offered to reduce Soviet 
missile* unilaterally if no U.S. Per- 
shing or cruise missile* were sent to 
Europe. The NATO allies rejected 
that approach. 

The Reagan administration in 
1981 made ns “zero option" offer, 
proposing in the negotiations that 
the United States would drop its 
plan to put missiles in Western Eu- 
rope if the Soviet Union destroyed 
all its SS-20S. 

Mr. Brezhnev’s response at that 
time was to call for a moratorium 


by both sides on deployments of all 
such weapons while talks were un- 
der way. Faced with U5. rejection 
of that approach, a year later he 
offered a unilateral freeze of SS- 
20s, if U.S. deployments were de- 
layed. It was an offer similar to the 
one made Sunday by Mr. Gorba- 
chev. 


U.S. Says Summit With Soviet Will Require Work 


By Bernard Gwerrzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration said Monday it was 
pleased that Mikhail S. Gorbachev', 
the Soviet leader, had agreed in 
principle to meet with President 
Ronald Reagan but that "much se- 
rious work” was needed before a 
meeting is arranged. 

Seeking to reduce expectations 
or an early Reagan-Gorbachev 
meeting, the Slate Department 
spokesman said the United States 
believed that "a carefully pre- 
pared" summit meeting should be 
Lhe goal of the two sides but that 
much remained to be done in work- 
ing out an agenda. 

The stress on the need for the 
meeting to be well-prepared was in 
contrast to the seeming readiness of 
Mr. Reagan to meet Mr. Gorba- 
chev as soon as feasible when he 
initiated talk of a summit last 
month. The calf for easeful prepa- 
rations was said to reflect the view 
of George P. Shultz, the secretary 
of state. who has opposed a get- 
acquainted session. 

The While House, dearly irritat- 
ed with what it regarded as Mr. 
Gorbachev’s attempt to gain influ- 
ence in Western Europe and cause 
problems for the United States 
with his latest aims proposal also 
was more reluctant now to have 3 
meeting without a guarantee that it 
would produce positive results. 

“We don’t need another Kenne- 
dy-Khrushchev summit," one aide 
said, referring to the meeting in 
Vienna in 1961 between John F. 
Kennedy, who had just taken office 
as president, and Nikita S. Khru- 
shchev, then the Soviet leader. The 


conference produced an angry con- 
frontation over Berlin. 

Bernard Kalb, the Slate Depart- 
ment spokesman, repeated the 
American rejection of Mr. Gorba- 
chev's call for a freeze in deploy- 
ment of new nuclear weapons and a 
moratorium on space arms. But he 
noted that arms control issues were 
just pan of the possible agenda for 
a high-level meeting. 

Noting that in his interview with 
the newspaper Pravda, Mr. Gorba- 
chev had stressed the importance of 
finding ways to improve relations, 
Mr. Kalb said that Mr. Reagan 
“has attempted to do just that. 

A top administration official 
said that the United States was 
waiting to hear something new 
from Mr. Gorbachev to show that 
the Soviet side was interested in 


: UiS. Budget Pact: Wide Guts at Home u - s - Ends Ustin % 

Of Haitians as an 

v Airways Ac® Reagan-Republican Plan Would Curb Dozens of Programs jtfDS Risk Group 

h last year revoked inpa- 1 


fares on the ground for 
agreement utrh Waring? 

Maroudis. said the ksc 
iuci that in theory dose 
compete with Greece; Cfc 
He said that Great rest: 
'pi:ed f!> Lhe routs be 
t writer jrpittem. 


of stakes Wrists®* 
d pjv and RorbiH 

ifc 


By Margaret: Shapiro 

Washington Pat Service 

WASHINGTON — The broad 
budget agreement worked out last 
week by the White House and Sen- 
ate Republicans contains, more 
than 100 specific proposes for cut- 
ting the deficit, from limiting farm 
price-support payments ana col- 
lege student aid to levying new fees 
for the use of national paries. 

The agreement would kill or 
phase out 17 domestic programs 
. and revamp, freeze or curtail doz- 
ens of others, for an estimated re- 
. eduction of $5222 billion from aext 


Amtrak, the national passenger rail 
network, subsidies for mass transit 
operations, rural loan programs, 
the Small Business Administration, 
federal crop insu ra nce, oust postal 
subsidies and direct loans by the 
Export-Import Bank. 

Other items proposed for termi- 
nation are Urban Development 
Action Grants, the Job Corps, the 
Appalachian Regional Commis- 
sion, the" Economic Development 
Administration, revenue sharing 
with local governments, a type of 
federal aid for most local school 
districts and school lunch subsidies 


, . , ur i {g! -.auction or ouuon irom next 

“SEEJSsh V .year’s projected deficit of $230 bil- for famibes wth rncomes of more 
f xx-ia. DonfJ ion. It would trim $295 billion ihan about $19,600 a year. 


i DemvH.TJb for info 3 *? 

Ho«. nci T®* 

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. 


from deficits over the next three 
years. 

The agreement proposes cutting 
military spending less and that of 
many popular domestic programs 
more than the Republican-led Sen- 
ate Budget Committee agreed to 
last month. Many of the cuts 
adopted in the agreement were pro- 
posed by President Ronald Reagan 
in” 

Senate officials said Monday 
that an inf onnal count showed thai 
only 30 to 32 of the 53 Senate 
Republicans were willing to sup- 
port the plan, which is scheduled to 
be considered, on the Senate floor 
during the week of April 22; 

Among programs and agencies 
to be eliminated under the agree- 
ment are the federal subsidy to 


Programs that pay fanners to re- 
duce their plantings would be elim- 
inated. The Farmers Home Admin- 
istration would continue to service 
existing direct loans, but would 
make no new ones. New borrowers 
would be aided through federal 
guarantees. In addition, electric 
rates would increase for some users 
of rural electric cooperatives. 

There alscr would be a three-year 
moratorium on funding for devel- 
opment and filling of the strategic 
petroleum reserve. Funding for 
some energy conservation pro- 
grams would be reduced next year 
and then allowed to grow with in- 
nation after that. 

m _ . . The plan would reduce funding 

The Senate Budget Committee., for federal highways and for the air 
had proposed freezing or scaling control -computer replace- 


back many of these programs, but 
not eliminating them. Another 30 
or so programs, including college 
student aid. Medicare and Medic- 
aid, would be cut or restricted un- 
der last Thursdays agreement. 

Medicaid provides health ser- 
vices for the the poor Medicare is 
his 1986 budget request. fce medical insurance program for 

the elderly and disables. 

The plan also would limit new 
National Institutes of Health re- 
search grants to 5,500 a year. 

In farm programs, the agreement 
would limit income support pay- 
ments to individual grain, rice and 
cotton fanners to $25,000 a year, 
half the current amount. 


ment program. 

It also would cut the community 
development block gram program 
by 10 percent and would impose a 
two-year moratorium on rental re- 
habilitation aunts. In ' addition, 
federal subsidies would be elimi- 
nated for flood insurance to home- 
owners in flood-prone areas. 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The federal 
Centers for Disease Control in At- 
lanta has eliminated a separate list- 
ing of Haitians from its weekly re- 
port of patient groups with a 
known risk of incurring acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome, or 
AIDS. 

Officials on Monday sought to 
minimize the change, saying it rep- 
resented an internal decision re- 
flecting new understanding of the 
way that AIDS is spread and new 
studies about the Haitian connec- 
tion with the syndrome. 

While other risk groups have 
been linked with sexual activity 
and exposure to needles and blood, 
the Haitian link has always been 
more difficult to explain. 

"The whole list was based on 
what one does," said Dr. Walter 
Dowdle, head of the Center for 
Infectious Diseases, "The one thing 
that stuck out was the Haitians, 
who were listed not because of 
what they did but what they were. 
Thai has always bothered us." 


U.S. Arrests 
Ex-Minister 
Of Belize 

Reuters 

MIAMI — A former govern- 
ment minister of Belize has been 
arrested by U.S. agents on charge* 
that he conspired to smuggle ions 
of marijuana into the united 
States. 

The U5. Drug Enforcement Ad- 
ministration said Eligio Briceno, 
47, former energy and communica- 
tions minister, faced a 14-count 
U.S. indictment charging that he 
and three others had put together a 
scheme to export up to 5,000 
pounds (2J70 kilograms) of mari- 
juana a month to the United States. 

Agency officials described Mr. 
Briceno as a major grower and ex- 
porter of marijuana in Belize, the 
fourth biggest source of the drug 
for the United States. He was still a 
member of the Belizean cabinet 
when he first began arranging the 
drug deal with undercover agents, 
according to William Yout, an 
agent of the drug unit. 

In Washington, the Justice De- 
partment said that if convicted, Mr. 
Briceno could receive up to 48 
years in prison, a fine of 5790,000, 
or both. 

Mr. Briceno’s arrest on Monday 
in Miami occurred just over a 
month after the arrest and resigna- 
tion of another high political offi- 
cial from the region, Norman B. 
Saunders. Mr. Saunders, the chief 
minister of the British Caribbean 
colony of Turks and Caicos Is- 
lands, was arrested in Miami along 
with three other men early last 
month on charges of trying to 
smuggle South American cocaine 
into the United States. 

The agency said undercover 
agents arrested Mr. Briceno on 
Wednesday at a meeting in a Mi- 
ami hotd, where he had expected to 
receive a first payment or $35,000 
Tor his part in the alleged drug 
trafficking plot 


U-S. Bans 'Natural’ Hormone Dhea, 
Notes Lack of Long-Term Testing 


m.; 






■ „o\fdP> 


United Press International 

WASHINGTON — The Food 
and Drug Administration ordered 
a halt Tuesday to the sale of dhea, a 
steroid hormone promoted as a 
“natural" product that’ brings 
weight loss, an enhanced sex lue 
and longer life. 

The FDA said it told manufac- 
turers and distributors to stop sell- 
ing the product because it had not 


been tested adequately or federally 
approved The agency said it has 
received few reports of adverse re- 
actions to the drug, but that the 
risks from long-term use are un- 
known. 

Dhea is manufactured from hu- 
man urine and sold throughout the 
United Stales without prescription 
in retail stores and in the mad, the 
agency said. 






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breaking the stalemate that has ex- 
isted for years on various issues. 

“It doesn’t have to be on arms 
control,” the official said, "but that 
is the most visible forum and one 
that would have the most reso- 
nance." 

Robert C. McFarlane, the White 
House national security adviser, 
expressed open irritation at the 
publicity given Mr. Gorbachev’s 
arms control statements, 
a new direction," Mr. McFarlane 
said Monday on CBS News. “In- 
stead. what we had is a discredited 

Continuation of this moratorium 
is dependent on an American deci- 
sion not to deploy any more Per- 
shing-2 and cruise missiles in W'est- 
em Europe. 

“The president had hoped for 
something new coming from a new 
leader with an opportunity to take 


proposal which was first raised 
about two years ago that had the 
effect of trying to freeze in place 
the Soviet advantage.” 

■ Reaction in France 
Paul Lewis of The A few York 
Times reported from Paris 
A spokesman for the French Ex- 
ternal Relations Ministry said 
Tuesday that his government has 
“noted with satisfaction” reports 
that Mr. Reagan and Mr. Gorba- 
chev plan a s ummi t meeting. 

But the spokesman said the 
French government also "recalls 
that it was precisely the deploy- 
ment of these new missiles by the 
Soviet Union between 1977' and 
1983 which led the members of 
NATO's integrated military com- 
mand to try to correct the disequi- 
librium thus created." 


V 


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quartz movement. 

Initant time- rone change. 


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‘35mm Photography’expressed their amazement 
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• - -'i-zze&sa 


•■sunt' ay.fjg '■ 


Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1985 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Strt Kim t A. Clean New Page for Europe, Open for Text in Milan 

^ ^ _______ hnuwuiT rhw would constitute a blocking 


Published VhhUwNnr York Hmn and Tbe Wsabrngton Port 


Some SS-20 Moratorium 


B RUSSELS — Newspapers tend to be un- 
easy about good news. Thus, the European 
press has- on the whole been grudging in its 
praise for the EC summit in Brussels that final- 
ly cleared the way for Spain and Portugal to 
join. One headline summed up the mood by 
offering only “Two Cheers for Europe.” 

During much of the March 29-30 meeting the 
talks seemed close to failure, risking both the 
collapse of tbe summit and of the European 
Community's scheduled enlargement to 12 
countries. Thai b rinkmanshi p, while nine of the 
heads of government haggled with Greece over 
its price for permitting enlargement to go 
ahead, has perhaps colored some commenta- 
tors' views. Yet the truth is that the successful 
Brussels talks usher in a new era for the EC. 

The summit ended a lengthy period of inter- 
nal bickering over EC budget contributions. It 
also demonstrated that despite tbe European 
nations' economic woes they have the political, 
commitment needed to construct what from the 
beginning of next year will be tbe West's largest 
trading entity, with 320 million people. 

The European Community now has a blank 
sheet of paper before it. Tbe question is what it 
should write on iL The future shape of the 
Community is clear, but not its direction. 

The member states need bold and imagina- 


. in 1977. while the European strategic scene 
was essentially in repose, the Soviet Union 
started aiming new, menacing, mobile, triple- 
warhead SS-20 missiles at Western Europe. Its 
evident purpose was to test the post- Vietnam 
possibilities of weakening Europe's Atlantic 
tie. Through two U.S. administrations, a 
NATO response was shaped and put into 
effect: to negotiate and, when that failed, de- 
ploy countering missiles. The response had its 
costs and flaws but — the essential point — the 
Atlantic tie held. Through it all, far eight years, 
SS-2Qs were being relentlessly wheeled into 
place at the rate of one a week. Sooner or later, 
all knew, Moscow would have to stop, there 
being no valid military reason and no political 
reason, beyond intimidation, to go on. 

Now Mikhail Gorbachev says Moscow has 
stopped. As everyone expected, he presented 
the halt as a good-faith moratorium for which 
the Soviet Union should be recompensed, by 
November, with a halt to the U.S. deploy- 
ments. Otherwise, he said, his government will 
review the moratorium. In something of a 
similar tease, he held off from public confir- 
mation of a summit with President Reagan. 

Some moratorium. It gives the Soviets an 
advantage in intermediate-range missile war- 
heads on the order of, at this moment, 8 or 10 
to 1. Meanwhile they are working up a new 
mobile missile. Their plain strategy is to make 
political capital especially in Europe, out of 


the moratorium and out of the familiar, stale 
calls for a freeze on strategic weapons and for a 
ban on space weaponry that Mr. Gorbachev 
also made in his Sunday statement. By this 
reach for Western opinion, Moscow evidently 
hopes to improve its bar gaining position at Lhe 
arms control talks under way in Geneva. 

In the earlier period the Soviets went for 
broke and tried to block U.S. deployments 
altogether while proceeding with their own. 
They ended up creating a disparity in the 
□umbers tha t was bound to be extremely diffi- 
cult to narrow by negotiation. And the earlier 
talks brought no narrowing, only deadlock. 

In the talks going on now in Geneva, tbe 
Reagan administration apparently means to 
concentrate on reducing the longer-range of- 
fensive strategic arms and, meanwhile, to try 
to fold in the intermediate-range missiles, 
which are militarily less significant but still of 
major political importance. The Kremlin is 
still trying to make the U.S. deployments a 
wedge between the United States and Europe. 

The requirement for the Western allies is 
unchanged: to continue negotiating on the 
whole range of strategic weapons with Mos- 
cow and to keep it dearly in mind why they 
resolved to respond to the SS-20s in the first 
place. Those weapons represented an effort to 
establish an intimidating nuclear presence. 
They are, in very large numbers, still there. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Who Can Govern Sudan? 


Last week President GaafarNimeiri risked a 
visit to Washington despite dear warnings of 
trouble at home. Food riots and a general 
strike darkened Khartoum. Mr. Nimeiri final- 
ly hurried homeward, but too late. He now sits 
in Cairo, brooding about his ouster by General 
Abdul Rahman S wared dahab, his handpicked 
defense mini ster. The new regime proclaims its 
earnest hope for better times, free elections 
and ‘‘dialogue" with the disaffected. Mean- 
while, the United States has lost an important, 
generally sensible friend. And the carpet 
pulled from under him bore the initials of the 
international Monetary Fund. 

At the fund's insistence, and with S67 mil- 
lion in blocked American aid as an induce- 
ment, Sudan was pressured into raising prices 
on essential goods. That sparked the riots that 
undid its president. The point will noL be lost 
on other supplicants in the same queue. 

The United States bad sound fiscal reasons 
to press for those reforms. Overborrowed, 
parched by drought and drained by futile 


development plans, Sudan virtually squan- 
dered $200 milli on a year in U.S. economic 
and military aid. But in misjudging the sturdi- 
ness of the regime, Washington was actually 
overes timating Mr. Nimeiri's political skill 

He seized power in a 1969 coup and pros- 
pered on a pragmatic course. He ended a civil 
war by unifying the Moslem North and the 
non-Moslem South. But in recent years, 
pressed by Islamic radicals within and with- 
out, he robbed the South of its autonomy and 
imposed a brutal Islamic justice. 

This disarray now passes to the military, 
whose senior leaders evidently acted to bead 
off a coup by more radical officers. At risk is 
the brighter half of Mr. Nimeiri’s record: sup- 
port for the Camp David accords and friend- 
ship with Egypt, defiance of Libya's Colonel 
Moamer Qadhafi and the recent generosity to 
Ethiopan refugees. Who can now control this 
country of seven frontiers, two regions and 
a multitude of hungry people? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 

Gorbachev’s Equivocal Gambit have to start if th 

1 mmru-K** nrirh tVi, 


What substance there is in Mikhail Gorba- 
chev’s inaugural essay in East-West relations is 
useful, but there is not yet enough of it to 
establish in what way his policy, as opposed to 
his style, is going to differ from that of his 
predecessors. Mr. Gorbachev can be read in 
two ways. Either this is a conciliatory move 
toward an early summit meeting with Mr. 
Reagan, for which there is some evidence in 
the generally positive tone of his other re- 
marks. Or it is what the White House and Mrs. 
Thatcher suspect it to be: a derice to recreate 
discord in the Western camp. The Kremlin has 
not been above such stratagems in the past; 
but the hope here is that Mr. Gorbachev is 
already better informed about West European 
opinion than the Soviet rulers who preceded 
him. and will know that although there can be 
a lot of internecine Western argument, the 
basis of the alliance is not in serious doubt 
Tbe West's response should take into account 
the possibility of influencing Mr. Gorbachev 
early in his tenure by taking him at his word. 

— The Guardian (London). 

The way Washington rqected the idea is an 
indication of confusion and concern about the 
possible psychological effect of Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s move. The United Slates would have 
done better to be more diplomatic about the 
announcement and view it as a new element in 
the Geneva East-West aims talks. 

— He: Laaisie Nieuws (Brussels). 

EC Membership Has a Price 

The euphoria with which Spain and Portu- 
gal greeted the agreement on their inclusion in 
the EC will undoubtedly give way to a degree 
of disillusionment before long. One of the 
more serious illusions cherished by many 
Spaniards and Portuguese is that membership 
in the club will automatically bring them pros- 
. perity. In reality, a demanding process of eco- 
nomic reconstruction and modernization will 


have to start if these countries are to be able to 
compete with their new partners. The example 
of Greece shows that economic imbalances 
may become even more pronounced for a time, 
as a relatively rapid elimination or tariffs on 
industrial products accompanies a period in 
which the new member's chief exports have to 
fight for a foothold in the Community. 

— Neue Zurcher Zatrng (Zurich). 

The biggest concern of the Community was 
that admission of the two nations would great- 
ly increase the output of agriculture and the 
fishing catch within the trading area. But con- 
cern was offset by the big consumer market, 
particularly Spain’s 38-m31ioa papulation. 
This trade-off seems to favor the present num- 
bers of the EC, since they are far more indus- 
trially developed than Spain or PortugaL 
— The Japan Times (Tokyo). 

Helping f Contras’ Won’t Help 

The “peace plan" that President Reagan 
offered to the government of Nicaragua last 
week is a cynical ploy to win over a few 
members of Congress who resist his belligerent 
policy. But aid to the “contras" will not bring 
peace. It will only prolong the bloodshed. Mr. 
Reagan and his aides refuse to face reality. 
They are wedded to an ideological wish-dream 
in which the Sandinists are forced to reshape 
their revolution to meet Washington’s terms 
simply because the United States insists on it. 

— 77it? Los Angeles Times. 

No Idea How Japan Ticks 

Americans have no idea how Japanese think 
and feeL Inevitably, the most flagrant Ameri- 
can blunders in dealing with the Japanese are 
committed by people who not only lack know- 
ledge of Japan but see no need to acquire any. 
— Robert Christopher, a former foreign 
editor of Newsweek, quoted by columnist 
Hobart Rowen in The Washington Post. 


FROM OUR APRIL 10 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Berlin lifts Ban on Meetings 
BERLIN — Herr von Jagow. the President of 
the Police or Berlin, has given permission for 
open-air meetings to be held [on April 10], but 
orders also have been given to confine the 
Berlin garrison to barracks in readiness for all 
eventualities. The Democratic papers are natu- 
rally very jubilant over the change in the atti- 
tude of the police authorities, which they assert 
is the first step toward recognition of (he claim 
for a direct universal and secret suffrage. The 
reactionary papers express great astonishment 
at the removal of tbe prohibition and declare 
that the Police President will be responsible for 
anything which may occur as a result. Some 
ask whether this sudden turn over of the Police 
President is not consequent upon orders re- 
ceived from higher quarters. 


1935: Full Penalties for Soviet Youth 
MOSCOW — A decree issued here [on April 9] 
states that henceforth, children and young 
people from 12 to 1 S who commit a civil crime 
will be sentenced to tbe full penalty of the 
criminal law for adults. Despite the unquali- 
fied wording oF the text, it was said officially 
that in no case would a child cri minal be 
sentenced to death. In the case of a crime by a 
child, which, if committed by an adult would 
result in the death penalty, the conn will find 
ground for leniency. The decision to place 
minors charged with crime in the hands of the 
criminal courts is intended to put a stop to the 
juvenile crime ware which recently rivalled 
that for which adults were responsible. Refer- 
ence to juvenile crime was made when the 
Moscow police were reinforced months ago. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEEW. HUEBNER, PMsktr 

Executive Editor RENfiBONDY Deputy PubSsKer 

WALT|R WELLS Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

K-McCABE Deputy Editor RICHA RD IL MORGAN 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Duanftf Optmtu mr 

CARLGEWIRTZ Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAJSONS Dirtau-^Oadatlai 

. ROLFD. KRANEPUHL Diraurcf Advertising Sde 

International Herald Tribune. 1S1 Avenue Ch&ries-de-Gaolk, 92200 Neufflwsur-Srine. 

Franca Telephone: 747-1265. Tdec 6 1 27 18 (Herald). Cables Herald 

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0 International Herald Tribune. All ritfas reserved 


By Giles Merritt 


tire policies to reverse their decline. They need 
tbe market unification, monetary stability, in- 
vestment confidence, technological partner- 
ships and job-creating business climate that the 
Community has in principle always offered but 
in practice been unable to deliver. 

Instead of the often ingenious compromises 
that patch various national schemes together 
enough to stop them from conflicting, the 12 
will need supranational projects that can over- 
ride and eventually destroy national consider- 
ations. It is an old European ambition,' of 
course, and one that always risks being dis- 


cellor Helmut Kohl who has gained stature of 
late as a man of widening vision, has stressed 
that overhauling the whole concept of Commu- 
nity-level policies is the new priority. Left un- 
said but understood is the fact that' such flexi- 
bilities are essential to stopping West Germany 
and France from forming a “fast-track Europe 
with the Benelux countries and more or less 
ignoring the rest of the Community. 

The membership negotiations with the Iberi- 
an candidate countries dragged on for almost 


however they would constitute a blocking mi- 
nority in the EC Council of Ministers even were 
the Community to adopt majority young to 

streamline decision- making. What influence 
they may exert to switch farm subsidies from 
temperate northern crops to Mediterranean 
produce remains to be seen. 

The outlook for institutional reform is un- 
certain. AH European governments agree, that 
the Council of Ministers can no longer struggle 
along with the system of unanimous decision- 
taking once there are 12 member states. Only 
the Benelux countries, though, favor the sort of 


it#* 


nae «uiu cvcuuuuiy ucauuy lumuuai luumuci- aii kuiuumk tuuiiura . . .. . _ _; nr , r 

aliens. It is an old European ambition,' of eight years — and they are only the beginning European mte^tiOT that sii ® 
course, and one that always risks being dis- of the adjustments that enlargement will de- ously applied majority .v:, :«ue of 
missed as idealism. But the European nations’ - mand. The Community will from next Jan. 1 be lan summit is due to grapple -lth 
nmmwiun reforminz the Council and perhaps strengtnen- 


economic indicators show that tbe need for EC f undamen tally different, and that prospect will 


strength through unity has increased with each 
one of the Community's 28 years in existence. 

That, though, is where tbe old-style prescrip- 
tions for Europe should end. The message that 
many policymakers are finding hard to grasp is 
that European solutions that were correct in 
1957 are not always valid for 1985. The guide- 
lines that suited' the homogeneous original 
Community of six cannot be grafted onto the 
much more heterogeneous Community of 12. 

Extremely flexible new programs are needed 
to allow member states to opt in or ouL Chan- 


dominate the EC leaders' discussion of institu- 
tional reforms when they meet next in Milan at 
the end of June. Until they can agree about 
these reforms, there is little chance of any EC 
strategic blueprint for tbe 1990s. 

There will in future be a powerful bloc of 
poor sou them countries whose focus is not high 
technology so much as the creation of a “peas- 
ants' Europe." Portugal's GDP per capita is 
only 26 percent of tbe EC average; for Spain 
and Greece the figures are 53 and 41 percent, 
respectively. Together with Italy (76 percent). 


reforming the Council and perhaps strengthen- 
ing the European Parliament, but no very satis- 
factory forumula has so far emerged. 

When the 10 heads of government assemble 
in Milan they wifi, for the first time in.a good 
many years, have no EC squabble to resolve. 
They will be free at last to act like political 
strategists rather than like farm or finance min- 
isters. That also means that they will have no 
alibi for failing to map out a new route for 
Europe. “Milan." as Helmut Kohl observed on 
March 30, “will be the moment of truth." 

International Herald Tribune. 


Peace in Southern Lebanon Depends on the Shiites 


T EL AVIV — Israel is in the 
final stages of redeploying its 
army, and soon it win have no 
troops in Lebanon. This prospect 
raises a number of questions about 
our relationship with our Shiite 
neighbors. We Israelis have made 
our position dear. Tbe future now 
depends on the Shiite leadership. 

Several Shiite leaders — includ- 
ing Nabih Bern, the well-known 
spokesman for the community’s 
mainstream political organization, 
Amal — have let it be known that 
once the Israelis leave, the Shiites 
will have no further cause to initiate 
terror against us. Is Mr. Bern's 
statement to be taken at face value? 
Should Israel be encouraged to take 
the risk of forgoing elaborate securi- 
ty arrangements in the zone north 
of the border with Lebanon? 

This indeed is the time to remind 
ourselves of the wisdom and moral- 
ity of the Shiite tradition that the 
best of friends in the eyes of Allah is 
he who is the best of friends to his 
friend and the best of neighbors to 
his neighbor. This motto should 
guide the future relationship be- 
tween Israel and the Shiites in 
southern Lebanon. Is this, however. 


By Uri Lubrani 

The writer is coordinator of Lebanese affairs for the Israeli government. 


at all feasible? Can Israeli policy- 
makers and strategists base their 
planning on such an assumption? 

It is dear that this will depend 
largely on the outcome of the 
internal struggle raging in the Shiite 
community — a ruthless struggle to 
determine the nature and composi- 
tion of its leadership and its rela- 
tions with other political groups in 
and outside Lebanon. 

For our part, we Israelis have 
already declared our intent: We 
have proceeded with a unilateral 
redeployment of our army out of 
Lebanon and along oar northern 
border. We are now looking for- 
ward, not backward, and we tope to 
open a new and constructive chap- 
ter in our relationship with our 
northern neighbors. 

It is in this spirit and for lack of 
any other plausible partner across 
the border — there is after all no 
national authority capable of as- 
suming effective control over areas 
to be evacuated — that we have 
consistently tried to establish a dia- 
logue with the responsible Shiite 


leadership. We hope to discuss and 
eventually work out —as confiden- 
tially and discreetly as need be — 
pragmatic arrangements that would 
allow the Amal movement to as- 
sume direct control ova- all pre- 
dominantly Shiite areas in southern 
Lebanon. To us, this now seems the 
most likely way to ensure an orderly 
and safe transfer of authority. 

The latest message calling for 
such a dialogue was transmitted on 
Jan. 25 in anticipation of the first 
phase of the Israeli pullback. This 
message was never acknowledged, 
nor were any of our similar preced- 
ing appeals. This forced Israel to 
resort to unilateral action — not 
always, inevitably, in conformity 
with die immediate interests of the 
local population — and in the end 
many Israeli and Lebanese lives 
were lost as a result. 

Quite obviously, any relationship 
between Israel and its Lebanese 
neighbors will have lo be based on 
the principle of reciprocity: Only a 
tranquil northern Israeli border will 
ensure tranquillity in southern Leb- 


anon. Whether this can be achieved 
depends on the Shiite community. 

Will the constituency that be- 
lieves in peaceful coexistence with 
Israel be able to contain more fanat- 
ic factions — inspired by Tehran — 
from upsetting the peace? Will the 
moderates be strong enough to pre- 
vent Syrian-orchestrated terrorist 
groups from disturbing these ar- 
range men is with Israel? Will they 
be in a position to withstand (lie 
pressures of Palestinian fighters 
who hope to return to southern Leb- 
anon and use it again as a spring- 
board for terrorism against Israel? 

The answer to these questions 
will determine whether the impend- 
ing departure of the last Israeli sol- 
diers In Lebanon will be the portent 
of a new and more happy era in this 
war-tom region. If not, this with- 
drawal could turn out to be merely 
the end of one act in the Lebanese 
tragedy — and the beginning of a 
new and possibly a more awesome 
period for all concerned. 

Let us all hope that the Shiite 
leadership will rise to the occasion 
and courageously choose the path 
that leads to brighter horizons. 

The New York Times. 


Sometimes 
More Harm SsL 
Than Good 


By Stanley Karnow 

W ASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration's effort to get 
Congress to vote funds for the guer- 
rillas fighting the regime in Nicara- 
gua is in effect designed to under- 
write coven operations by the CIA, 
which manages the anti-Sandinist re- 
bels. But the CIA’s record in such 
ventures is very spotty. Its present 
role in Central America could end up 
doing far more harm than good 
I have observed several of the 
agency's clandestine actions around 
the world in the past 30 years or so, 
and there is truth to tbe quip (hat “it’s 
the gang that can't shoot straight." 

Of course, as many CIA men con- 
tend, successes are rarely disclosed, 
while failures may be widely publi- 
cized Yet in delicate political situa- 
tions the danger of failure is often too 
high a ride to take. For the United 
States cannot daim to respect the 
integrity of sovereign nations, what- 
ever their ideological complexion, 
and at the same time be involved in 
trying to subvert their governments. 

I am not making this point on 
ethical grounds, although the moral- 
ity is worth noting. My reservations 
are based on practical grounds, since 
clandestine bungles invariably back- 
fire against America's best interests. 

In the 1960s tbe CIA's abortive 
attempt to stage a rebellion against 
President Sukarno of Indonesia only 
served to strengthen his power, giving, 
him the chance to assert that he had 
set back the United States. 

Fidel Castro benefited from reve- 
lations that the CIA had tried to 
eliminate him by such ludicrous 
means as giving him exploding cigars 
and exposing mm to depilatory pow- 
der to make his beard fall out 
One of President Kennedy's great 
blunders was the plan to topple Mr. 
Castro by sending an army of bis foes 
into Cuba in 1961. The result was the 
Bay of Pigs disaster, which was to 
haunt and embarrass Mr. Kennedy 
for the rest of his term in office. 

In many instances the CIA mobi- 
lizes opponents of a regime ear- 
marked for ouster, then leaves them 
stranded when U.S. policy changes. 
Such was the case of the Hmong 
tribes in Laos, which are still pay ing 
the price for having worked for the 
agency against the Communists. 

The CIA-backed movement de- 
signed to overthrow the Sandinists 
has been a series of miscalculations 
from its inception in 198L 
First, the Reagan administration 
never clarified its aims. Congress vot- 
ed money for the “contras" in the 
belief that they were halting arms 
shipments to El Salvador. But the 
“contras" themselves thought that 
they were being encouraged to over- 
throw the Sandinists, and so their 
aims differed from those of Congress. 

The CIA made another grievous 
error when it relied on the right-wing 
military dictatorship then in control 
in Argentina to tram the “contras,” 
as a way of studding the United 
States from involvement. The trans- 
parent device fooled nobody in Cen- 
tral America. Worse still, thdrassod- 
ation with tbe quasi-fascist Argentine 
generals further discredited the “con- 
tras," who sought to create the 
impression that they were fighting 
to restore democracy to Nicaragua. 










CIA- 


Congress Isnt A’wahe 

m 


Now The Wall Street Journal has 
discovered as well that the CIA vio- 
lated the law by engaging directly in 
combat. Among their activities, CIA 
soldiers of fortune flew and fired 
from helicopter gunships, which were 
protected by U.S. aircraft. 

President Reagan has now slated 
plainly that his objective is the over- 
throw of the Sandinists through the 
use of the “contras" and their CIA 
tutors. But even General Paul Gor- 
man. who has just retired as the U.S. 
commander in Central America, dis- 
misses that goal as unrealistic. 

The CIA is a valuable institution 
with many achievements to its credit, 
especially in the realm of intelligence 
gathering and analysis. To assign it to 
futile crusades is to destroy its image 
and morale, which are already shaky. 

Tribune and Register Syndicate. 


Why Anti-Sandinist Forces Deserve Help 

W E Nicaraguans see tbe main issue as internal — a struggle by Nicara- 
guans for self-determination, democracy and social justice. It is a 
struggle against other Nicaraguans and foreigners who, tike tbe Polish regime 
of General Wqftiech Jaruzelski, haw imposed a tyranny on their fellow 
citizens with the help of the Soviet Union. • 

There are two reasons why we feel justified in asking for help. First, we are 
in danger of being destroyed by weapons sent into our country by the Soviets. 
We ask only for enough help so that we can have a reasonably even chance in 
our fight for freedom. Second, the United States joined in the Organization of 
American States intervention in our country that led to the removal in 1979 of 
the Somoza dictatorship. I and the other leaders of the Nicaraguan Democrat- 
ic Force welcomed that action by tbe United. States and the OAS, for almost 
all of us worked for Somoza s removal The very conditions that justified tbe 
hemispheric intervention against the Somoza regime exist again. 

Above all we believe that the United Stares and other democratic nations 
have no right to confer upon the Sandinisi regime the legitimacy that it has not 
been able to achieve within the country. The people of Nicaragua do not 
regard (he Sandinista regime as a legitimate or acceptable government. 

— Adolfo Calero, a leading political opponent of the Somoza regime and 
now a leader of the Nicaraguan resistance, writing in The Washington Post. 


Cambodia 
Was Mostly 
Negligible 

By Sydney Schanberg 

N EW YORK — Now let's look 
at Cambodia. We've made a 
conscious decision not to send Amer- 
ican troops in. There will be no 
American combat troops or advisers in 
Cambodia. We will aid Cambodia. 
Cambodia is the Nixon Doctrine in 
its purest form ...In Cambodia what 
we are doing is helping the Cambodi- 
ans to help themselves. 

— President Richard Nixon at a 
press conference on Nov. 15, 1971. 

That's what we paid for. That's why 
we built the Cambodian army. To fight 
for us. To help us with our withdrawal 
from Vietnam. And it worked. 

— Brigadier General Theodore 
. Mataxis, forma head of the U.S. mil- 
itary mission in Phnom Penh, at a 
cocktail party in Singapore in 1973, 
referring to a military offensive by 
the U.S. -supported Cambodian army 
in 1971 in which at least 25 Cambodi- 
an battalions were wiped out Tbe 
general called the operation “an un- 
mitigated success" because it had 
distracted North Vietnamese troops 
from their main arena in Vietnam. 

The difference between these de- 
scriptions of policy in Cambodia — 
Mr. Nixon saying be was “helping the 
Cambodians help themselves" and 
the general saying they were paid “to 
help us" — is the difference between 
obfuscation and candor. The general 
was offering a tare moment of official 
. truth about the war in Indochina. 

. . S i e bai d N ixon’s aew book-abou* 
that war, “No More Vietnams" (re- 
viewed today on Page 14 % offers little 
candor. He rails, and blusters and 
heaves mightily to preserve his flame. 
He blames everyone but himself for 
the messes, failures and tragedies. 

Mr. Nixon is far from the only 
distorter of this piece of history, ana 
a forma president certainly has a 
right to try to make a buck by hus- 
tling his product in the marketplace. 
(The book costs $14.95.) But the buy- 
er should be aware that Mr. Nixoo 
and the other revisionists are count- 
ing on a public that is either unin- 
formed or has a short memory. 

Mr. Nixon seems to Jfoigei the host 
of people who were present in Indo- 
china watching his handiwork — not 
just the press he so ffoH.-mig but his 
military officers, his diplomats, his 




ir in Spain 


aid officials. Many of these witnesses Jf 
— his people — will not remember 


— his people — will not remember 
things the way they are in this book. 

Of Cambodia, for example, Mr. 
Nixon writes: “Out critics accused us 
of engaging in indiscriminate terror 

tered hundreds of civilians. But the 
record shows that our air strikes were 
directed against enemy military tar- 
gets and were highly accurate.” 

What the record shows, is that the 
bombing was carried out on the basis 
of very old, very inaccurate maps, 
and that many hundreds and indeed 
possibly thousands of civilians in the 
countryside were killed. Anyone who 
via ted the refugee camps in Cambo- 
dia and talked to the civilian survi- 
vors of the bombing learned 1 quickly 
about the substantial casualties. 

Mr. Nixon talks of efforts to nego- 
tiate peace for Cambodia and Laos, 
but everyone with eyes in Indochina 
mew that the Paris agreement he and 
Henry Kissinger produced in Janu- 
ary 1973 involved only Vietnam and 
was meaningless and toothless vis-S- 
vis the two other countries. 

ioft e ! ? SS t5 r in 

but his own ambassador in 1 
Phnom Penh, Emory Swank, at a 
time when Washington spoke of “ded- 
icate negotiations* for Cambodia, 
called these nothing mine than “nor- 
mal diplomatic contact" that he 
would not describe as negotiations. - 
Mr. Nixon talks, still more about 
peace efforts and forgets to say that 
slater ambassador, John Gun tha 
Dean, appealed to Henry -Kissinger 
to initiate contacts with the Khmer 
Rouge and was rebuffed twice. 

. ^ forgets to teB ns that in 
April 1970, when he sent CJ.S. trodps 
on a two-xnomh incursion into Cam- 
oodia. he did not inform the Cambo- 
«feus that he was-tothidingkm ttaftr 
teentory (and making a full-scale war 
there inevitable). He told the Fhn&S 
government after the fact - 
From start to finish, no thin g m the 
■ -JvJSj Of OR involvement in - 

J^opodia suggests that the fate d 
Cambodian people was a major, 
concern. On the contrary, thejffi&ft 

book makes clear that Washington!* 
owning concern was getting out of 
the quicksand m neagh;?ori»lwiet . 

S’ “bS^da&ie 

whcn America g6t out , tfifc 
Aa honest tocjt 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


No Iranian Nerve Gas 

We would like to draw your atten- 
tion to a grave error. It is stated in 
your repot “Iraq Used Poison Gas 
Against Iran, U.S. Says" (March 27) 
that American officials last year said 
Iran had been using nerve gas. Iran 
has never used chemical weapons of 
any kind, and this is so clear that 
there have never been any allegations 
from any party to the contrary, U-S. 
officials or anyone else. 

M. ABTAHI. 

Public Relations Department, 
Iranian Embassy. London. 

Lopsided Fault-Finding 

How does the International Herald 
Tribune expect to keep the confi- 
dence of its readers when we see 
morning after morning an endless 
stream of avid writers finding ever 
more arid words for the faults, genu- 
ine and construed, of “Western" gov- 
ernments, while having nothing, in 
the best cases, to say about Commu- 
nist rule-by-foroe governments? 

For days we were deluged with 
reports and comment about a small 
number of deaths in South Africa. 
These deaths are as deplorable as are 
the demonstrations that are provok- 
ing them. It is sad that people have to 
riot to advance in their society. Still, 
in Sooth Africa they can riot 

To put it quite bluntly, how impor- 


tant are a small number of political 
activists — God bless them and (heir 
spunk — from a comparatively well- 
off group, when thousands are butch- 
ered systematically, women and chil- 
dren included, by dull ideologists and 
their henchmen? Yet these continue 
to do their work almost protected. 

MICHAEL J. KIRCHHOFF. 

Bare, France. 

Students Killed in Kenya 

Regarding the report “ Unrest Re- 
flects Kenya's Insecurity" (March 24): 

As a visitor to Kenya during the 
month of February, 1 was present 
when, on the fifth day of a peaceful ; 
boycott of classes by students at the 
University of Nairobi main campus, 
Kenyan not police brutally attacked = 
students assembled for an imerde- 
nonunational prayer meeting on the ' 
university sports ground. I must take 
exception to your report. 

At least 15 students woe killed, 
although the Kenyan press admits to 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- ' 

er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and- ; 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolidted manuscripts. 


only one death. At least one hundred 
students were injured by police beat- 
ings and bums caused by the gas that 
police sprayed into the crowd. 

Calling the demonstrators “Marx- 
ists" is erroneous. The students’ 
grievances concern pressing issues — 
economic conditions, misuse of legal 
institutions, corruption and student 
welfare in Kenya. The question of 
- Marxist or non-Marxist ideology has 
no relevance in their current position. 

VIRGINIA THOMAS. 

Hemenoord, Netherlands. 

Inscrutable Westerners 

-First Washington imposed “self- 
restraint" On Japanese automobile 
exporters to avoid flooding of the 
.U5. market. Then import quotas 
were lifted, having proved detrimen- 
tal to American consumers. Now one 
bears quotas advocated to help Japan 
’ understand that it should grant reci- 
procity. If. I were Japanese, all this 
.would only confirm my opinion that 
Westerners are unpredictable. 

In any case, Japanese may be 
tough businessmen out were -U a in- 
terest groups and governmental agen- 
cies more cooperative when they de- 
cided that Corcorde, die French- 
Briti$h supcrscmHi plane, sboukl for 
all practical pmpoKsbe denied land- 
ing or flying rights? - , i- 

AIM&MANDEL. 

' ••??•*'=» p km. 


share fo that calamity. 8 -*^ 

The New York Timet 





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Page 5 


Isplfames 
Newliabmet; 
Key Positions 



Iraqis, Iranians Endure r War of the Cities 9 


Baghdad and Tehran Regularly Bombed in a Conflict With No End in Sight 


NotGhanged 


Vliiffd Pftin Intontatfotud J ' \ 

BEIRUT — Syria’s prime minis- 
ter named a hew cabind on Mon- 
da^ ieepii^ the sanwr ptofie in 
dafcnse, foreign affairs and infor- 
mation but removing oflent after 
Presdeni Hafez al-Assad criticized ’ 
inefficiency, Syrian, television re- 
poned. 

State-run udevisioa said that Mr. 
A&sad issued two decrees,, accept- 
ing the resignation of the outgoing 
cabinet of Abdul Raouf al-Kasm 
and ordering him to form a new 
cabinet and retain his poet. 

Mr. Assad, who began his third 
7-year term in office last month, 
told the parliament that some un- 
named rranisters were, incompe- 
tent, inefficient and lacked consci- 
entiousness in running government 
departments. 

The new Syrian cabinet as an- 
nounced by state- run television in- 
cluded: 

Abdul Raouf al-Kasm, prime 
minister; Mustafa Tlas, deputy 
prime minister and minister of de- 
fense; Salim Yassin, deputy prime 
minister for economic affairs, who 
replaced Abdel Kader Kaddura; 
Faro ok al Sham, foreign minister. 



Judge Gieng Chnn-chia reading sentences Tuesday for two convicted gang members. 


Taiwan Convicts 2 in Writer’s Kitting in U.S. 


Other appointees included Ah- 
med Ghabbash, minister of interi- 
or, who replaced Major General 
Nasir ad-Din Nosin' Yassin Rag- 
jouh, minister of information; 
Mahmoud Al Amadi, minister of 
economy and foreign trade, replac- 
ing Salim Yassin, who was made 
deputy prime minister for econom- 
ic affairs; Rub tan Syoufi, mmiszer 
of finance, who replaced Dr. 
Hamdi as-Saqqa, who was appduit- 
ed deputy prime minister for public 


lot tonp rift Timet Service 

TAIPEI — Two Taiwanese gang members were 
convicted Tuesday of rmndering Henry Liu, a 
Chinese^ American journalist who had frequently 
criticized the Taiwanese government. Toe two 
were sentenced to life imprisonment. 

Both defendants. Chen Chi-li, 41, leader of 
United Bamboo, Taiwan's largest underworld 
gang, and Wn Tun, 35. a gang member, had been 
subject to the death penalty. A third suspect. Tung 
Kuei-sen, 33, is still at huge: The murder was 
carried out last Oct 15 in California. 

The presiding judge, Cheng Chun-chia, said he 
spared Mr. Choi's life because he had confessed 
ms crime to investigators. Mr. Wu, the judge said, 
received a Hfc sentence rather than the death 


penalty because he had killed Mr. Liu, who fre- 
quently wrote articles critical of the Taiwanese 
government, at Mr. Chen’s behest 


On Friday, a military court is scheduled to take 


up Lhe case of Vice Admiral Wang Hsi-Iing, former 
chief of military inteltieence, and of two bubor di- 


chief of military intelligence, and of two subordi- 
nates, who have been implicated in the killing. Mr. 
Chen has said that l>c arranged Mr. Liu's murder 
on Mr. Wang's orders. 


Mr. Liu. a frequent critic of the Taiwanese 
government was snot to death in the garage of his 

L fi t Mi. « p _ ■ « * a | 


home in Daly City, a San Frandsco suburb. Mr. 
Chen and Mr. Wu were tried in Taipei because 
Taiwan has no extradition treaty with the United 
States. 


Sudan Coup Leaden Devout, Cautious 


Air Travel Called 


Risky in Spain 


A getter Frante-Praie 
MADRID— A group of air traf- 
fic controllers warned Tuesday that 
air travel in central Spain was “un- 
safe” because of defective radar 
and stressful working conditions. 

Easter holiday traffic increased 
the hazards last week, partkedariy 
at Madrid's Barajas Airport, where 
radar relays “false info rmati on, 71 
said a statement from an ornxaza- 
u’on representing 141 cootrooen in 
the central region. 

An Iberia Air Lines Boeing 727 
crashed Feb. 19 en route from Ma- 
drid to the northeastern city of Bil- 
bao. killing all 148 popple aboard. 
It was the third major plane crash 
in Spain in less than J5 months. 


. New York Times Service 

CAIRO.— When General Abdul 
Rahman Swsreddabab was pro- 
moted to be Sudan’s minister of 
defense and chief of army staff 
three wedcs ago, he was viewed by 
many Sudanese and foreign diplo- 
mats as a loyalist who would stand 
by ibe teetering president^ of Ma- 
jor General Gaidar Nimdri 

Today, General Nimeiri is a for- 
mer president md it is General 
Swareddahab win lias been pro- 
claimed Sudan's .tew leader. He 
took power in a coup Saturday. 

But speculation continues over 
whether the general is a surprising 
new strong man or just a bland 
front for other army officers. The 
eni gma arises in part from the pic- 
ture drawn, here by diplomats and 
friends of the 51 -year-old general 
of an uncomipt, apolitical and reli- 
gious imn'vrao rose m the mfljiaiy 
not by .dint of brilliance buL by 
.ploddmg caution. 

“He was a man who provoked no 
fears and no misgivings." an Arab 
official- said. - 

But foreign diplomats noted that 
ibe'geoeral also was known fora 


sense of duty and nationalism, 
characteristics that may have led 
him to overthrow General Nimeiri 
at a time when Sudan, geographi- 


hol. and everyone interviewed said 


he was known for scrupulous hon- 
esty. “He lived modestly and sim- 
ply,' 1 a diplomat said. 

However, friends and foreign 
diplomats said, the general did not 
favor imposing strict Moslem prin- 
ciples on Sudan's 22 million peo- 
ple, about one-fifth of whom are 
either Christian or animisL 

The new Sudanese leader is a 
member of his country’s Khatemia 
sect, which combines Sufi mysti- 
cism with reformist pragmatism. 


caily Africa's largest country, has 
been crumbling politically in 


been crumbling politically in 
strikes, drought, corruption and 
armed rebellion. ' 

General Swareddahab was born 
in 1934 in Omdurman, across the 
Nile River from Khanoum, to a 
middle-class urban family. His 
name means “golden bracelet, ** in- 
dicating that his forebears were 
probably gold merchants or were 
known for wearing gold bracelets. 

The general, according to his 
friends, is a deeply religious man 
with mystical leanings, a trail he 
bolds in common with the many 
Sufi Moslems in Sudan. 

Western diplomats said he has a 
wife and two children. According 
to a friend who dined often with 
General Swareddahab, the new 
leader’s sense of Moslem tradition 
is such that the friend never met the 
wife either at home or at official 
functions. 

The friend said he had never seen 
General Swareddahab drink alco- 


By Judich Miller 

A'm ) vrA Tutors Sinne 

BAGHDAD — Last week, in the 
55th month of the war between 
Tran and Iraq, Iraqi planes pound- 
ed the Iranian capital of Tehran 
daily. Baghdad was rocked by its 
eighth powerful explosion since 
mid-March. 

The “war of the cities.'' as these 
attacks on each other's capitals and 
border towns have come to be 
called, is just one particularly nasty 
aspect of a conflict that seems to 
have no end. People who live here 
call the war “confounding” and ask 
what each side hopes to gain by 
attacking the other's civ ilians . The 
contradictory information they re- 
ceive does not help. 

Iran and Iraq disagree, for exam- 
ple. over who first violated the mor- 
atorium on attacks on cities bro- 
kered by the United Nations last 
June. Most diplomats here trace 
the resumption of such attacks, to 
March 4, when Iraq bombed the 
Iranian city of Ahwaz. Iraq said it 
had aimed at a factory, which it 
called a military target.’ Iran retali- 
ated with renewed shelling of the 
Iraqi port of Basra. 

After Iran launched its land of- 
fensive in the Hawizah marshes bn 
March 12. attacks on cities in- 
creased. The explosions in this 
drab, sprawling capital began on 
March 14. while the Iranian offen- 
Tsive, which ultimately failed, was 
under way. The first blast severely 
damaged the top four floors of 
Iraq’s 13-story suite bank. Officials 
described the blast, and the next 
one two days later, as the work of 
Iranian "Kjboieurji 

But there were no such an- 
nouncements about subsequent 
blasts. Their cause is in dispute. 
Iraqi officials have said that Iran 
has launched an unspecified num- 
ber of missiles against Baghdad. 
But the explosion on Friday, in 
which a section of a major elevated 
highway here collapsed, had all the 


estimate because of heavy security. 

Iraq has not acknowledged the 
attacks of late, nor given casualty 
figures. But diplomats here have 
expressed surprise at the “puny” 
size of the explosions. Deaths in 
Baghdad are estimated in the tens; 
Iraq's air strikes against Tehran are 
believed to have caused deaths in 
the hundreds. 

Hie periodic explosions do not 
seem to have had traumatic effects. 
A diplomatic observer reported 
"increased concern” but “no sense 
of panic among Iraqis." One sign of 
tension reported by residents was 
the removal of valuable objects 
from the national museum. But 
nightclubs and restaurants appear 


busy and the city’s race track and 
sporting events draw- huge crowds. 

Major General Thabit Sulatan. 
commander of the Iraqi Army's 4th 
Carps, said that the war of the 
cities was designed to extend the 
war to Iranian civilians so lhat they 
would demand peace. If they did 
not agree to do so. they would face 
total war. General Sulatan said. 

But up to now, Iraq has refrained 
from total uar on any front. 


“There is hardly a front on which 


both sides have not pulled punch- 
es." a defense specialist said. 

Diplomats in Baghdad said that 
Mr. Hussein might hesitate because 
Iraqi forces have not excelled when 


fighting off their own soil. They 
tried it four years ago when they 
seized Iranian territory, only to 
withdraw under Iranian pressure. 
Iraq also was described by diplo- 
mats as having come very dose to 
failure against the recent Iranian 
offensive in the south. 

Despite the tough military talk, 
the war of the cities seems far more 
a product of Iraqi frustration at the 
failure to score victories elsewhere. 
Its air force is hampered by a heavy- 
overlay of civilian political control 
and by instructions not to lose 
planes.’ This has led pilots to shoot 
at maximum, rather than optimum, 
distances, according to military an- 
alvsts. 


“The T70 offers the beginner 
Q decision-free photography 
■E& and simple operation . . .the 
HB experienced photographer 
has a camera unsurpassed 
|n in versatility.” 

X s ; M A quote from ‘SLR Camera’ in the UK. 


earmarks of a planted bomb, peo- 
ple familiar with explosions said. 


European diplomats said that 
eneraJ Swareddahab was not par- 


General Swareddahab was not par- 
ticularly known for championing 
the sect's political views. But he has 
stressed the need for national rec- 
onciliation in the past and on Mon- 
day met with the leaders of striking 
professional and labor groups. 

On Saturday, he promised a re- 
turn to democracy within six 
months and offered to talk with the 
leaders of a secessionist rebellion in 
the south. 

The offers are part of what many 
Western and Arab diplomats said 
may likely be a collegial style of 
rule inside the military. 


pie familiar with explosions said. 

Foreign correspondents who vis- 
ited the site said the explosion did 
nor seem to have been caused by a 
missile. No sign of a crater or hole 
could be seen and there was virtual- 
ly no collateral damage near the 
road. 

U.S. Embassy officials said ibey 
believed that the Baghdad explo- 
sions had been caused by missiles. 
Bui other embassies have theorized 
that the blasts were from p reposi- 
tioned explosives. 

Iraq prefers to blame the blasts 
on missiles rather than planted 
bombs, diplomatic sources said. 
Missiles represent an external 
threat, whereas bombs indicate an 
internal threat to President Sad- 
dam Hussein's government. The ef- 
fects of the attacks are difficult to 



fPTO ■ S 
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LlumfOTOCRARl 


Catiotilb 

European camera of the year ’84. 


OLLEZ 



A I’attaque : 

des industries de pointe. 
En milieu de terrain : 
des sous-traitants HI-TECH, 
une puissante industrie 
de transformation. 

Dans les 18 metres : 
universites, formation, 
recherche. 

A I’aile : 

des communications 
Internationales. 

En reserve : 
un environnement de qualite. 
Maillots : 

Bordeaux. 

la couleur du bon gout. 






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INSIGHTS 


Confounding City Slickers, 
Iowan Gains a Following 
By Standing Up to Reagan 


By James R. Dickenson 

Wtahinffon Post Service 


W " ASHINGTON — There are a num- 
ber of political truisms in Washington 
and even a fool knows this one: Don't 
cross President Reagan, who is riding high on 
his landslide re-election. It's really risky. 

So, who is this fool who keeps crossing Ron- 
ald Reagan, insisting on an across-the-board 
freeze on the federal budget that includes the 
Defense Department along with everything else, 
earning him threats of presidential retribution 
when he runs for re-election neat year? 

He is Senator Charles E Grassley. a Republi- 
can of Iowa, and on first sight be looks like the 
sort of Central Casting character who comes in 
from the sticks and gets ripped off in the big 
city. He has big farmer's hands, cracked ana 
stained from decades of manual labor, and talks 
like a hick. He says “gosh” and “golly" a lot 
He's been known to mangle the queen's En- 
glish and often sits in committee hearings blink- 
ing and looking as if he just fell off a turnip 
wagon. He's the first person to whom a con man 
would try to sell the Washington Monument. 

But Mr. Grassley is the sort of rube who 
winds up taking city slickers to the cleaners 
instead of the other way around. His act plays so 
well in Iowa that he has become the state's 
dominant political figure and he is well rat his 
way to becoming a folk hero. 

Many Republicans are fearful that their party 
is going to take a beating in the Midwest next 
year because of the desperate state of the farm 
economy. But Mr. Grassley is conadered such a 
shoo-in for re-election — his job-approval rat- 
ing is at about 70 percent — that Democrats are 
having trouble finding a candidate to oppose 
him, 

“You couldn't beat him with a dub next 
year," said James S. Flansbuig. editor of The 
Des Moines Register’s editorial page. “He fol- 
lows his own agenda, picks his spots, learns 
about an issue like defense spending and makes 
his mark on it.” 

Mr. Grassley was the first to propose the 
across-the-board budget freeze, and his mark on 
defense spending is considerable, according to 
Representative Thomas J. Tauke, an Iowa Re- 
publican. 

“He has shifted the focus of the debate on the 
budget and has turned the momentum on de- 
fense spending.” Mr. Tauke said. “Having a 
conservative champion a freeze on defense 
spending has made it politically acceptable for 
other conservatives to oppose growth in defense 
spending.” 


Mr. Grassley was holding out until the air force 
gave him the missile data that be bad requested. - 

Mr. Grassley responded immediately. He de- 
last fall at a time ^^h^Rollimw^^isper- 
ated with Mr. Grassley for trying to have the 
attorney general at the tune, William French 
Smith, died for contempt of Congress for not 
helping more in investigating fraudulent mili- 
tary contracting practices. 

Mr. Grassley said Mr. Rollins attacked his 
positions, using profanity, when talking with 
erne of the senator's supporters. 

Mr. Rollins denies iL 

Mr. Grassley said: “I like the president, but 
my job is to work with him, not for him and 
there's a difference. I didn't pick a fight. I'm just 
reacting.” 

Mr. Grassley ’s combative response to people 
who try to pressure him is to tell them to stick it 


in their ear. It is just one of many things his 
constituents like about him. 


D ESPITE the apparent differences in 
their styles, Mr. Grassley and Mr. Rea- 
gan have a lot in common. Both have 






Plane’s History Combines 



By Paul Dean 

Los Angela Tima Service 




D DU GtRS 


B J gan have a lot in common. Both have 
acute political instincts and both inspire such 
confidence in their integrity and decency that 
most of their actions are viewed as being rooted 
in honest conviction, even by people who dis- 
agree with them. 

One non-stylistic difference between him and 
Mr. Reagan is that he is popular in Iowa and 
Mr. Reagan is not. Mr. Reagan's most recent 
disapproval rating was 49 percent His approval 
rating was 42 percent 

Projections by Iowa State University farm 
specialists are that 15 percent of Iowa's fanners 
will go bankrupt in the next three years. 

Opposing the president on increasing military 
spending also is popular in Iowa, which ranks 
38th in the amount of money its industries get 
from military contracts. The Des Moines Regis- 
ter responded to the White House threat on the 
MX vote with a front-page cartoon showing the 


Senator Charles E. Grassley 


state legislature, be was a sheet metalworker in 
Waterloo and a member of the machinists’ 
union. 

He was elected to the Iowa legislature in 1 958 
and to the U.S. House in 1974. succeeding H. R. 
Gross. He modeled hims elf after Mr. Gross, a 
dogged fiscal conservative, and after coming to 
Washington continued Mr. Gross's practice of 
submitting a bill requiring that the federal bud- 
get be balanced. 


W T Mr* Grassley defeated Senator 
%V/John C. Culver in 1980. winning the 
f T highest number of votes in a Senate 
race, the jokes were that the state’s senators 
were “Tweed! e-dumb and Twecdle-dumber.” 

But Mr. Grassley has long since put that to 
rest. 


White House spokesman, Lany Speak es, say- 
ins. “And vou can foreet about the president 


M R. Grassley ' s latest run-in with the 
Reagan forces was a few days before 
the Senate vote on the MX missile, 
when an assistant of Edward J. Rollins, the 
White House political director, indicated that 
the president would campaign and raise money 
next year for friends who supported him on 
issues like the MX and other defense spending. 


ing, “And you can forget about the president 
campaigning for you in ’86!” with Mr. Grassley 
responding. “Could I have that in writing?” 

The root of Mr. Grassle/s political strength 
is that Iowans view him as one of them, which he 
is. He is an old-fashioned Midwest fiscal conser- 
vative and a tee totaling Baptist. 

His wife and family live on a farm in New 
Hartford so his youngest son can play high 
school basketball there, and Mr. Grassley goes 
home every weekend. He gets angry if he hears 
that someone from Iowa has been in his Wash- 
ington office and he did not get to meet them. 

“One thing I have going for me is that I 
haven't waited until the fifth or sixth year” of 
his Senate term “to campaign or to establish my 
independence," Mr. Grassley said. “I try to gel 
into every one of the 99 counties to speak and 
meet with people at least once a year. 

For 16 years, while going to the Uniyeraty of 
Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls and serving in the 


L OS ANGELES — There is a new, quiet® 
breed of professional -piloL He flies' in 
i smooth obedience of every book apd all 
the numbers. He went to eoH^gelortwo years, 
dates one woman at a time,-doesn’t smoke plays 
racquetball and, at journey’s end. has a li gh t ■ 
beer before dinner: a cheeseburger. - - •“> - 
“Sometimes I think I'm too careful? con- 
cedes one. “But then 1 want to be around a long 
time.” 

Dwindling now, retiring by daily dozens, is 

the older, lustier guard. Some still wear leather - — a, 

jackets and fly with hangovers that would drop 1 

a horse. 

Others bounce between comments where ^ 

strange loads call for pilots with high expert- 

cnee, no questions and horseshoes in their hip ^ — - 

pockets. It is a life of navigator jokes, multiple - 
divorces and a bowl of Camel cigarettes for 
breakfast. 

“We used to break our necks to take off and 
get the job done, even if it did mean bending the 
rules,” remembered a veteran of 20,000 hours of 
airline flying. “The kids today are different cats 

who ask: ‘Are we legal to go yet ? ” I 

Generations apart. Except that a certain 
plane still is flown by both the new breed and 
the gray eagles: That tugboat of an airplane, 

called the Douglas DC-3, tins year celebrates a — 

half-century of flight — 

The DC-3 is the only plane to have outlived ~~~ - 

its first pilots and outflown their sons, and 

doubtless will outlast the grandsons now just 

learning to fly iL . — 

The twin-engined transport is bong celebrat- 
ed not as a relic of transportation past but as a 
50-year-old workhorse that just won’t stop car- 
rying passengers, hauling freight or piling up 

accomplishments. , rir\\\ ! D * 

“You can’t kill it with an ax,” said Patricia ’ 

Madera, a Texas air freight operator. “Safer lLi 1 ^ 

than a crutch," said Dave Elliott, a re tire d air 1 

force colonel from Manhattan Beach, CaHfor- J. - 

nia.“rve flown it on one engine, no engines and . — 

out of situations where in any other airplane Td „ . . . ... 

have been a headline.” said Bob Stevens of It was so routine, hesaid,addii 

Fallbrook, California? an aviation cartoonist been flying the Is aiot and then the 








' C V- ‘‘r -WlM 


,f Film si 





he said, adding that “we'd lives shaky 
and then thef>C-2 and so ishing with 


“One of his greatest assets is that he is consis- 
tently underestimated by his opponents,” Mr. 
Tauke said. 

Mr. Grassley has a master's degree from the 
University of Northern Iowa ana he is only 
lacking a dissertation to complete a doctorate in 
political science at the University of Iowa. 

Even his opponents admire his political in- 
stincts. 

“He’s very shrewd, with good gut- level in- 
stincts,” said Lyn Culler, vice chairman of the 
Democratic National Committee and an unsuc- 
cessful candidate for Mr. Grassley's House seat 
in 1980 and 198Z “You don’t beat someone as 
good and smart and terrific as John Culver 
without using all your weapons, and he ham- 
mered to death the idea that John was not an 
Iowan and didn't care about the folks there. He 
hit a nerve because there might have been a 
grain of truth to iL” 


and former military piloL 
“I’ve probably had more fun with this air- 


the 3 was just another airplane in the line.” 
Carl Cover, the Douglas test pilot on that first 


plane than with my wife.” said another flyer, “ a plane crash in the 1940s. Fred 

grinning. He requested anonymity to avoid a Herman, a Douglas engine® and third person 


divorce Thai he became serious. “Now, if aboard the auplane, also is deatL Bu t Art Ray- 


tives shaky and the truth has a habit of dimin- 
ishing with altitude. ■ ‘ ; 

- But for this year’s anniversary of the maiden - J 
flight of the DC-3 from Clover Field, now 
enlarged as Santa Monica Municipal Airport, - 
the problem will be balmicing all that is aoso- Mi— 
Iutety legendary with everything that is truly ~ 


they’d b u ilt a DC-3 that could kiss bade . . _** ....... . _ _ - , . , , 

The wonderful stories began on Dec. 17, California, fa 1935 he was vice president of Passengers: ^e December issue of Fkghl 
1935, at Santa Monica, California, when no* agmeenng at Douglas Aircraft Then thae are IntemanonaL a Bntish periodical not® that of 
body showed up to witness the first takeoff of Shcgan, a power plant engineer hving in the lW26^-3s bmhan the United Stats - 
the DC-3 Laguna Hills, California; Bailey Oswald, who an estimated 3.200 were built under license by 

^ worked in aerodynamics and lives in West Los Japan and the Soviet Union — about 375 of a 

S UBSEQUENT yams are a constant brag Angeles; and Mai Oleson of Pacific Palisades, surviving 1,500 or so remain in regular service 
about the plane’s indestructibility. It has California, a- project engineer for the 1936-46 with 150 airlines from Florida to Ethiopia. Prov- 
hit Arizona mountains and- flown home production life of the plane. They are the men of incetown-Boston Airlines, the largest U.S. com- 
with 12 feet (3.65 meters) missing from one the original team whose longevity, to date; has muter axrime, operates a dozen DC-3s on short 


- mood survives. He is 86 and lives m Brentwood, extraordinary about the plane. 


Passengers: The December issue of Flight 


wing. It has crash-landed on the Pacific Ocean been, a pretty close match for their plane, 
only to countermand its pilot by bouncing 50 . And to these aviators, occ urr ed uk cot 


only to countermand its pilot by bouncing 50 And to these aviators, occurred the common Freight: Some days ago, a package was re- 
feet into the air. It has flown out of a jungle strip question: What touch of genius or miracle was coved alVandenberg Air Force Basem Calif or- 


I9BLDWIBE 
BUIXMEKT j: 


wearing a replacement wing from a different performed in building this plane? 


plane. And it has stayed aloft following a colli- 
sion with a Japanese fighter. 


“Nothing, really.” Mr. Raymond said. “As a 


ma bom the Johnson Space Center at Houston. 
The package, containing white mice and guinea 


Indestructible? Shortly aft® World War IL before we started because we were so far ahead” of 


MRU! : 


sion with a Japanese fighter. matter of fact, the DC-3 was two-thirds done pigs from Charies River Breeding Laboratories 

Indestructible? Shortly aft® World War H, before we started because we were so far ahead” of Wilmington, Massachusetts, was flown in on 
the fuselage of a wrecked DC-3 was converted in design and development “with work done on a 1942 DC-3 owned by Atone Air of H Paso, 
into a din® in Australia. It was recognized ^ DOl and the DC-2.” Texas. Thercalso are a Salair of Seattle and aj£ 

several years later, piuthastd and ; returoed to The DC-1, which was short for Douglas Com-- Farida Airmoti^ arid an Air Molokai and a 


[W W.7tt.3J12 

WFWttKI 


' 85 


several years lit®, purchased and returned to 




v . 






ge air as a replacement fuselage for another inereial ^ a i wasbu atm 1933: The D02 flew °*2 .U^lm® making aJhmg from the 

i_._ q„*i. ui durable, reliable, uiston-emnned DC-3 and its 


" • «•> -rt, i v . . , a year later. Both were built to answ® airline duiabte, reliable, piston-engined DC-3 and its 

Ommpresen ? The plane has c®ned at kast d^ands for larg®, fast®, warm® alternatives purpose: . short runs to small towns 

^n^cal^mrtxa^i^R^ to air travd in^ Wanes, and to the clanking wben d^very timeis not that important and an 

TriMoUmoJFXSFokto. h^tte^o^hBndmk, not thousands of 

Gooney Bird, Dakota, Efey Three. Skytrain Oleson flew new DC-3s in 1936. Last ur M - f twnwi el TVmrtL ♦ T\ CmhIumiim 


and The Beast, the last an odd title obtained year, be conmiandedan old DC-3 anaduut® described his four most important weapons of 
from the French Navy. ^ttoMCTco.Jnbetw^hehplogged5«» World War IL The Jeep, thebazodkaanatheA- 

s^.^autfSSS £ry.teDsor^C3 “It is toigm^^^later^un^e md 

that left the Doug^factoiy m 1942. Logbooks ^ ^ “ Korea - ^ tSTrench in 

of the plane, which mil is in service with the w was ine. pest mmg nying wnen people indorfuna and with the Americans in South 

French Navy, show that it has used up 700 tires, Jdn t know what : IongitndW stability meant. Vietnam. The Berlin Airlift. Algeria. Suez. 
35,000 spark plugs and 160 engines. And it s around today mainly because there 5 Twentvvearcawvin VTptTwmT 

FrankOiUbci 78. of pSScrt, Califor- still not anoA® “j^ewth that KflndOat 
ma, has a monumental confession concerning “J * «■ and out erf short fields at slow speed. fiued ^ ^ Gatling gun&ThhSptoe 
the first flight of the DC-3. He cannot rememb® Within a business as romantic and as dashing became “Puff the Magic Drawn." “PufF te- 
iL And he was the co-pilot. as flying, exaggerations are common, superia- mains at.war, inJQ Salvador. 


Wars: General Dwight D. Hsenhow® once 






v. 






i-J- 





A Political Post for an Apolitical Man 




By Shirley Christian 


New York Tima Service 


amanlis’s leaving the presidency last month. Mr! 
Caramanlis resigned aft® Mr. Papandreou 


N EW YORK — Even before Christos 
SartzetaJds was elected president of 
Greece on March 29. sane movie the- 
aters in Athens had adorned their facades with 


posters reminding people that be was a real-life 
h®o of the movie “Z.* 


Lady with the basket — terracotta figurine, Indus Valley Civilization, 3,000 B.C 


Mr. Sartzetakis, 56, a Supreme Court justice 
with an apolitical background, established a 
reputation for courage as a young prosecutor by 
cutting through an official coy®- up to prove 
that the death of a leftist legislator at a disarma- 
ment rally in 1963 had been a murder. “Z.” the 
award-winning 1970 film by the Greek director 
Costa-Gavras, was dosdy based on the episode. 

Movie houses began showing the film a gain 
aft® Mr. Sartzetakis was nominated for presi- 
dent last month by Prime Minist® Andreas 



Caramanlis resigned aft® Mr. Papandreou 
shifted the support of his majority Socialist 
Party in the presidential elections from the vet-; 
eran conservative lead® to Mr. Sartzetakis. - 
la 1967, whOe Mr. Sartzetakis was pursuing 


I i 




postgraduate studies in Paris, a group of colo- 
nels staged a coup to take ov® the Grok gov- 
ernment Less than a month lat®. hewas called 
home by the new rulers to resume his duties as 
an assistant judge. 

But the next year, be was dismissed from the 




bench for purported partiality. He refused to 
accept his dismissal quietly, contesting 'it whh j 
public statements and petitions. 

On Dec. 24, 1 970, while he was stilt contesting 
his dismissal from the judiciary, police officers 
burst into his house in Salo nika and arrested 
hkn. He was placed in solitary confinement 
although no charges were filed. 

Six months later, he was among a s c o re of 

nmirimral ftmte T ■ - . 


Papandreou. As the voting in Parliament pro- 
ceeded through three rounds before Mr. Same- 


- - M. , 


On Pakistan International, you’ll find that 
our traditions have not faded with time. 


takis finally won with 180 voles, the minimum 
required, the posters outside the theaters show- 


ing “Z” proclaimed, “This Is Your President.” 
His victory, however, has been marred bv ; 



His victory, however, has been maned by a 
constitutional crisis caused by the refusal of the 
opposition conservative New Democracy Party 
to recognize his election. In addition, Mr. Pa- 
pandreou, who is seeking to hold parliamentary 
elections in June, has introduced a constitution-: 
al amendment to reduce the powers or the 
president. 

Mr. Sartzetakis was described by a source 











. a JWlV is* 

prommeni Greeks accused or conspiring against 
the nnfatmy regime. In Novemb® 1971, howev-- 
w, he was. freed.- 

h was not until 1973 that Mr. Sartzetakis saw 
the fum inspired by his skills as a prosecu- 
tor. . _ 

1 can onty tell you that the film covers only a 
anafl pan of reality," he told an interview®. “If 
barely touches the surface. The real case was 
thousand times worse.” 

A bespe ctacled man with a receding hairline, 
Mr. Sartzetalos has a severe demeanor, broken- 
onty by his colorful ties and an occasional smile.' 





close to him as “an outstanding legal expert with 
a great deal of moral courage.’ 7 Mr. Papandreou 
bailed him as the embodiment of the Symbds 
of democracy, justice and freedom." 

The president, who has been reluctant to 
release detailed current biographical informa- 
tion, was bom in Salonika, in northern Greece, 
in 1929. His family is said to have lived in 
difficult economic and political drcomstances 
aft® his fath® was dismissed from his job as a 
police officer in 1935 for supporting an anti- 
monarchist rebellion. /- 

Mr. Sartzetakis studied law at Salonika Uni- 


Christos Sartzetakis 




Pakistan international 

Great people to fly wtth 


FLYING TO: ABU DHABI. AMMAN. AMSTERDAM. ATHENS. BAGHDAD, BAHRAIN. BANGKOK. BEIJING. BOMBAY. 
CAIRO, COLOMBO. COPENHAGEN. DAMASCUS. DELHI. DHAHRAN, DHAKA. DOHA. DUBAI. FRANKFURT. 
ISTANBUL. JEDDAH. KATHMANDU. KUALA LUMPUR. KUWAIT. LONDON. MANILA. MUSCAT. NAIROBI. NEW YORK. 


when hit by a van ar a rally in Salonika on May 
22. 1963. .. . J 

Senior police officials were found to be impli- 
cated. Mr. Sartzeta Iris's broth® Yannis, a math- 
ematics professor, said recently that the two of 
them received many death threats during the 
Lambrakis investigation. “Many times be would 
hide vital documents of the case under bis bed,” 
he said. 


Always claiming to have no poBtica] align- 
ments. he said he had accepted the presidenuaf , 
nomination because the post is not linked to a 
particular party. u ■ 

"It is unexpected for one who nev®'had 
»^tiimg to do with active politics," he said 
wien he was nominated, “though I am proud to» 
say I have a full political conscience. But I anr 
always above parties. _ . 

thTLSSSr 10118 35 1 ”ty serviets to* 

rnegood erf the country, for freedom, justice an cT 
democracy — ma word, for all elements that 




PARIS. RfYADH. ROME. SINGAPORE. TEHRAN. TOKYO. TRIPOLI and 24 destinations within Pakistan. 


IAL|PAK|-8S 


married to Efie Arwriou, an archaeologist and 
historian, and they have one daughter. 

He fast attracted public alien tioc when he 
beaded a team investigating the death Of Grigor- 
ies Lambrakis, a popular fqgislatorfraqi a Com- , 
mumst- front party, who was faiaDy injured 


T HE Lambrakis case occurred vdi3c Com-, 
stantine Caramanlis, whom Mr. Sartre-, 
takis replaced as president, was prime 
minister. There were some allegations of “moral 

responsibility” by the prime minister in the 
Lambrakis killing, but he was not implicated. 
Nevertheless, the case was considered tobc cate 
oftbe factors mtheprifteimQisi^ 
the sameyeat 

Mr. Sartzetakis also was iavtrfved hi Mr. Car^. - 


Mr. SartzmJas might well ban shared th^ 
^ Gredt s at one scene : 

in the recent rcsereenings of *Z" •» 

at - Matter reacted wiih‘ Jf 












L r «i - Tri'.? r jr- V.y L »- 




T.. • 





;D Ci 

gon Ky 




yjW?i PAVt'-!*.-' 


PSTERNATIONALmRAlP TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1985 



Page 7 


JM S» 



! -.H • 

' 

v '•> 

; • 

: '■ v*. 

-- * *r^ 





CRUISE OP THE FUTURE — A scale model of a cruise ship with sails, being built in 
die harbor at Le Havre, France, fen* U. S. Winds tar Sail Owing, was displayed in Paris 
Tuesday. The 134- meter (440-foot) liner, which is planned for use in the Mediterranean 
and Caribbean, will cany 200 passengers and will be launched in July 1986. 


Soviet Film Shows the Forgotten 9 30s 


mia Monica 

'ill be balanr 


By Dusko Doder 

Washington fast Semce . 

M OSCOW — It took the cen- 

sors more than two years to 

- a = a » deride whether the film should be 

shown to the Soviet public, but 
since its release in February, “My 

— — ■ i Friend Ivan Lapshin** has taken 

-Moscow by storm. 

/TY'>' Every performance since it 

y l A opened has been packed even 

g-L \ Ui though ihe film is not advertised. 

- v But many foreign residents have 
‘ X — gone to see it after struggles to 

~ ~ s fry _ L obtain tickets, and most have been 

baffled by what the fuss was afl 
about. For the film is basically 

— — without a plot or in-depth charac- 

" teroation. It evokes atmosphere 

, , through disjointed scenes andun- 

itude tn,thhaSahah "rfi- connectede P isodes - 
vt ,, r .‘ What made “My Friend Ivan 

DC.; r I1J1JveTSar y of ifc* Lapshin," by the director Alexei 
im/xj - m Gherman, an instant hit was its 

-nr vJu?® i, subject matier and the way it deals 
rv ‘ P a anc ’ n ? all ifoij,. with iL It is the first Soviet noo- 
with i eveiyihing propagandist: movie about the 

about the plane. E V i 93 (K 

a Britishn^fJS ® 1116 1930s are one of the most 
*-3s built Wb ^ iraumatic periods in Soviet history, 

i 3 o"!S.”lJSE U ™ iS ' II I^Scadc or die GrcalTa- 
Soriet 1 feg ror, marked by Stalin’s diaaior- 

3 or ’ to® $ ship, the gulags, forcible cdlectri- 

ization of the countryside, mass 
5 /JSUSShS purges and executions of “enemies 

operates a dozen D G 3 sa : 

nc days ago. a parka^Q 
raberg .Air Force Baseinfc 
rfinsoc Space Ceniejife 

oniaining white meed* 

rles River Breeding Laboc 
. Massachusetts, was (tat 
mw led by Atone Air dE f : 
dso are a Sabir of Saak;*. 

•the and an .Air Mokiar* 

S. lines making a hvingfe 
le. piston-engmed BC’z! . 
rase; short runs toads 
ame Is not that impoitaasl 
costs hundreds, not tfussE 


ral Dwight D. Esrahroi 
our most important rap 
The Jeep, the bazookaandh 
e other three. The DC-1: 
he Hump in Burma audit 
*r D-Day in Europe anise 
in the Battle of tSeBoteP 
s in Korea, with the m 
with the Americans a* 
Berlin Airlift. AW 
jo in Vietnam, no«a» 
?.SL .Air Force as theCv 
s of Gatling guns. Ther? 
the Magic Dragon." Tf 
n El Salvador. 





of the people” — brutalities cm a 
monumental scale. 

But ask anyone under 50 what he 
or she knows about the 1930s and 
the answer invariably would be a 
blank stare. Nothing, or next to 
nothing, the person eventually 
would admit If there are family 
talcs of suffering and misery, you 
occasionally can hear a person say, 
they had belter not be revived. 

History bodes and documentary 
and feature films have all skirled 
around the traumatic decade as if 
their authors deliberately sought to 
spare their audiences pain. 

. What is written or diown about 
the 1930s deals almost exclusively 
with the country's industrializa- 
tion. Historical accounts of the pe- 
riod read like reports of a large 
construction company, with statis- 
tics u> demonstrate a steady growth 
in the number of power plants, ma- 
chine-tool factories or steel com- 
plexes. 

Films about the 1930s show a 
country happily engaged in con- 
struction projects, with a patriotic 
and pure average man as the hero 
supposedly enjoying bliss through 
the self-denial demanded by the 
building of Communism. 

Now comes “Ivan Lapshin,” a 
dashing young police officer, to 
narrate scenes from his life and 
contrast them to those remembered 
by him as a boy. The director takes 
his viewers to a small Rusaan town 
to give them a feeling of what it was 
like to live in the 1930s. 

That the audiences sit riveted 
throughout this slow-paced film re- 
flects a widespread curiosity here 
about that traumatic decade. 

It is as if the director had sought 
to reconstruct something that is 
largely missing in the inteilectual 
baggage carried by the younger 
generations. 

Lapshin is the head of a small 
police unit hunting a band of crimi- 
nals engaged in thievery and smug- 
gling. The unit is joined by a jour- 
nalist mi assignment 

DOONESBURY 


The movie seeks to re-create 
faithfully the grim physical condi- 
tions of life. Food is scarce, people 
live in jammed hostels or cramped 
communal apartments. Yet the rig- 
ors of life lead them to assist and 
support one another in a spirit of 
camaraderie that does not exist 
anymore: 

We see Lapshin mercilessly in- 
terrogating an old man and finally 
leading an armed raid on a ram- 
shackle home in the suburb where 
the criminals are hiding It is a 
scene of abysmal poverty, where an 
old man suddenly stabs the jour- 
nalist 

Lapshin, who has become friend- 
ly with the journalist, rashes the 
wounded man to a hospital and 
that leads the hunt Even though 
lira criminal gives himself up and 
raises his hands, Lapshin kalis him 
in cold blood. 

But Gherman avoids politics, al- 
though there are pictures in the 
background of Communist lumi- 
naries of the 1930s, including Sta- 
lin. There are no kulaks (rich farm- 
ers) or other “enemies of the 
people” shown, no idealized work- 
ers heroically braiding Commu- 
nism. no construction projects. 

What transpires on the screen is 
everyday life, devoid of party pro- 
paganda. But audiences detect in 
the process the major aspects of 
that life — terror, poverty and end- 
less hardship. And while other au- 
diences would find it tedious, Sovi- 
et audiences see it as a peek into a 
decade that has been obliterated 
from their memory. 

Soviet reviewers, however, have 
been cautious in assessing the film. 
They have emphasized the qualities 
of Lapshin’s generation in coping 
with the hardships of the period. 
v-As one reviewer put it, Lapshin 
was a strong, hearty and pure man. 
Those qualities, he said, character- 
ized the generation that managed 
“to withstand the blow” of Nazi 
Germany and emerge victorious in 
World War II. 


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ARTS/LEISURE 




f After the Ball’: Douglas Home Outlasts His Actors 


By Sheridan Morley 

Iititfiuiiattii HeruU Tribune 

L ONDON — When the drama 
/ students come to write a thesis 
on the social significance of the 
postwar stage comedies of William 
Douglas Home, they are going to 
have a lot of explaining to do. 

Here is a dramatist who has writ- 
ten about three of the best and a 

TOE LONDON STAGE 

dozen of the worst drawing-room 

comedies, apparently without be- 
ing aware of the difference. 

A wartime prisoner of con- 
science for refusing to obey the 
bombing orders of his own side, be 
went on to write a trio of comedies 
(“The Chilean Hundreds” and lat- 
er “The Reluctant Debutante'' and 
“The Secretary Bird”) that I believe 
will survive with the best of Ter- 
ence Rauigan and Frederick Lons- 
dale, and even Notf Coward. 1 have 
always thought him to be a more 
ambiguous and intelligent writer 
than his house-party image would 
ever allow. 

The trouble is that, although 
there is no better recorder of stately 
homes in social and political decay, 
he has outlived most of his best 
players. People like A. E Mat- 
thews, Ronald Squire. David Tom- 
linson and Wilfrid Hyde- White just 
don’t exist around the West End 
any more. So when his latest work, 
“After die BaH Is Over” (now at the 
Old Vic), hits the stage like a lead 
balloon it is largely because neither 
of its principal players — the other- 
wise admirable Sir Anthony 
Quayle and Maxine Audley — are 
what you would call light comedi- 
ans. T rue, there is also Patrick Car- 
gill as the butler, but years of televi- 
sion sitcoms have, alas, turned him 
into the paperback version of 
Hyde- White. 

It is to the credit of the director, 
Maria Aitkcn, that she has man- 
aged to prevent the play from 


lurching, to 3 halt more than about the play with everything: Blooms- Edward Herrman now plays ever, and neither Andrew Living- 
half a dozen times. A creaky farce bury. Roaring Twenties. British ar- Tom. more convincingly American stone (as Jack) nor Jane Clifford 
ab 5 ul . autocratic wife-swapping istocracy in loony decay, feminism, than Tom Wilkinson originally. It (as long-suffering Liz) can disguise 
and the end of fox hunting cannot young Jamesian American come to is still Julie Covington's evening, the fact that this is not really a play, 
sustain the classical grandeur of Sir London in search of fame and for- and she makes of Viva rare iheain- it is a few isolated moments from a 
Anthony. It would have been better tune. 


10 go back to one of the vintage and 


ne- cal feast. In her gradual decline to marriage, spotlit scenes of social 

But Hastings has brilliantly ihe meatal home is mirrored the histoiy that might have been useful 
oided most of the more obvious frenzy of an unfulfilled life. Al- in compiling some larger son of 


stately homes that still work in re- avoided most erf the more obvious frenzy of an unfulfilled life. Al- in compiling some larger son of 

gionai repertory companies up and pitfalls: Nobody here is afraid of though the plav brings us up to documentary but here are made 

down the country. Then maybe I Virginia Woolf, and we never even 1947 with medical explanations of extremely fragile. There is mne- 

could have proved my point about get to see Viv pouring her hot choc- her hormonal imbalance, that is thing vaguely moving about a cou- 


down the country. Then maybe I Virginia Woolf, and we never even 1947 with medical explanations of 
could have proved my point about get to see Viv pouring her hot choc- her hormonal imbalance, that is 
the author as the last great chrooi- olate through Faber's mailbox in merely the postscript to a tragedy 
cler of the upper classes in sexual that great gesture of publishing dis- of ihe * 20 &. 
and social misordcr. content. We don't even get thefam- AhhoUflh lhe h , s h «n re- 


erely the postscript to a tragedy pie compelled through five decades 
ihe*20&. ~ io argue but not aciually about 

Although the father has been re- anything, and Jack and Liz might 


Back at the Royal Court a year 
after it first opened there and a’fcw 
weeks after its short season off- 
Broadway, Michael Hastings's 
“Tom and Vtr'” is holding up very 
well. It remains a spare, elegant ana 
enthralling account of the waste- 
land of T. S. Eliot's first marriage 
to the sexually and mentally crip- 
pled Vivienne Haigh Wood. It is 


ous Edith Sitwell quote (about 1 EBot ^ ralher W ,lw- shr&iKi Tv- conceivably work as characters in 
going mad and promptly certifying Mck Jnd David Haig are slil j some daytime soap opera. 

Jus wife, instead we haw a wry, ^ l0 p | 3 y Viv’s mother Bui nothing much happens to 
loving and very touching play brother in all their eccentricity, them here and as a result nothing 
about a young Anglophile religious -jpj, e resu | t j s a carefully document- much happens to their play either, 
poet coming from America to £u- ^ 3nd srv jishi v $mg e d ( bv Max It just sits there on the stage like 
rope m search of sex, fame and Q..rr«,jri«L»:.Uui,Sf ,kL i7L..i 


revelation and finding himself temperament that richly deserves a 

C3U $!m cF *? at -i C * w ?n^ fe k? lone West End ran later in the year, 
an Old English family sufime in a 


an Old English family .stifling in a 
lost world of dust arid suppressed 
lunacy. 


Sellars Closes Play Early 


H ashurgtiHi Ptai Senitv 

W ASHINGTON — The Ken- 
nedy Center's new American 
National Theater, formed in the 
hope of shaking up the nation’s 
theater scene, dosed its inaugural 
production Saturday night, two 
weeks earlier than scheduled. 

Peter Sellars. 27, ANTs chief op- 
erating officer, said be decided to 
close Shakespeare’s “Henry IV, 
Pan I.” which has been drawing 
audiences or about 400 in the 
1,100-seat Eisenhower Theater, for 
both financial and artistic reasons. 


lunacy. At the King's Head in Islington. 

— ■ • John Godber's “Happy Jack” is a 

sieichv dual biography in which a 
31 tx 1 Yorkshire miner (the “Jack" of the 

I fly i^ariy sarcastic title) and his wife bicker 

J J through 50 years of marital memo- 

which opened March 28 to general- nes. Godber’s point would seem to 


!y unfavorable notices. 


be that out of the trivia of old 


“I did feel that it was badly treat- son &> and half-remembered seaside 
ed by the critics, and not fairly summers can be gleaned something 
ireated.” he said. “We have handed symbolic about life in Britain as 11 
out response cards, and the re- once was l> ve d- 


s ponses from ihe audience have 
been very warm.’* 


Sepia snapshots work better in a 
photo album [ban on a stage, how- 


them here and as a result nothing 
much happens to their play either. 
It just sits there on the stage like 
■ hem. drifting aimlessly" back 
through the decades as we are occa- 
sionally asked to find some sort of 
dignity in an inarticulate slob and 
his downtrodden bride. There was. 
we are told, enough love there to 
sink a mine shaft, but you could 
have fooled me. The only shock in 
discovering that Liz had died of 
cancer is that she hadn't passed 
away years ago of sheer boredom at 
the conversation of her husband. 
You feel ihat somebody should 
have sent in a canary', as down the 
mine shaft, to see whether there 
was any form of human existence 
in the script or production. I sus- 
pect it would not have come out 
alive. 


Kurosawa Film, Withdrawn From Cannes 


1,100-seat Eisenhower Theater, for Rruun order to be ready for Cannes." Greenwich and Masato 

both financial and artistic reasons. T" 1 9 KY0 “ The latest film by Japan’s foremost Hara. a Japanese producer, jointly put up S9.4 million 

.... .... A director, Akira Kurosawa — a tragedv based on for the film, called “Ran” (Rebellion). Shooting was 

wanLiil In hi?" PSlrfS Shakespeare’s “King Lear” and set in 16th-centuiy completed in February , 
production? direct^ bylliMthyi ^pan-^ been pulled out of next month’s Cranes Silberman said Kurosawa. 75^ had agreed that the 

Maver r ? fesu '“: „ film should be further edited. He added that “Ran 

’ Serge Silbernun, a French producer erf the Paris- was “wonderfuL excellent work. This is maybe (Kur- 

Sellars said that oiher than hir- based Greenwich Film company, said that after seeing osawa’sl best picture. I love iL" 
ing the cast and director, he was the rough cut, “1 have proposed to Mr. Kurosawa that He said the film would be premiered on the opening 
"independent of the production, be should not be in a haste to complete the film in day of the first Tokyo Film Festival on May 31 


“Your airline paints a beautiful 
picture.” 


This is an authentic passenger statement. 






'• : /~V. • < .s':-; 

XBMwra r « fc ,via a : --i 


Lufthansa 






















•Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 



VBL 

High Low 

Last 

48 

Cba. 

—ift 


B L/Z ' ; B 


16ft 

17ft 





19ft 

20% 


KonGE 


19 

18ft 

IS* 

— to 

EostAIr 


8* 

7* 

8% 


PanAm 


5* 

4* 

5* 

+ % 

AlldCpc 

10050 

40ft 

40% 

40* 


IBM 

9697 

I2S* 

124 ft 

134* 





49 



AT&T 

9026 

21 

20% 

20* 


PhilPef 

8809 

Mto 

37* 

38* 


AMPS 

8617 

Mto 

29* 

29* 



6400 

33* 

33ft 

33% 

+ % 

CmwE 


X 

29* 

29* 


Poprcff 

6185 

19* 

18% 

18ft 



Dow Jones Averages 


Open HUM low Lot a». 
Indus 125X21 126204 134*58 1B366 + OJf 

Trans sbsji mm sb 2 m mu + ia 

Ulfl 1509 155-16 15151 1504— AM 

Comp 50821 51266 SIMM 50924 + 024 


NYSE Index 


Previous Today 

Hteh LOW Close 3 PM. 

10191 10116 10128 10132 
119.29 11137 11144 11152 

9664 9173 9SJ5 9107 

5428 54.76 5(12 54J5 

10764 10622 10620 10636 


Gomooslte 

i ndustr ials 

Transp. 

Uriiiiies 

Finance 


Dow Jones Bond Averages [ 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Close 

7124 

7007 

7141 


7127 

70.10 

7645 


NYSE Diaries 


Close Prev. 


Advanced 
Dec lined 
Undunped 
Total Issues 
New Hiatts 
New Lows 


744 

782 

515 

2041 

as 

7 


664 

085 

438 

2009 

58 

12 


April 8 
April 4 
April 3 
April 2 
April 1 


Buv sales 
21164B 551589 
101-271 09438 
188.738 437221 
194514 490195 
189436 519,606 


Indudita In the Hies figures 


•suit 

5488 

2-075 

5510 

10446 


Tiiesday fe 

MSI 

Oosine; 


VoL at 4 PM 81988,010 

Prev.4PJM.V0l 79,968 JM# 

Prev cobmI Idafed date 95JK2M 


Tobies Include the nationwide prices 
up to ttie closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unc t ion god 
Total Issues 
New H lofts 
Now Lows 


250 

281 

245 

776 

13 

5 


219 

332 

236 

709 

14 

8 


NASDAQ index 


Composite 

Industrial, 

Finance 

insurance 

utilities 

Banks 

Tnuno. 


Week Tear 

Close Noon A no 
27645 276.72 380J2 
391.84 29102 298.15 
132.17 — ^14; 

333^8 — 326.71 

;&Z> _ 368.75 

HSJ» — 254.70 

2509 - 258.71 


AM 

281-30 

301.21 

33045 

32002 

26404 

249J7 

26001 


Standard & Poor's index 


Previous Today 

HMi Low Close 3PJUL 
IndusirlalS .20011 I90ZZ 19842 19066 

T ran so. 15X59 15140 15140 151JI 

Utilities 80.43 30.00 6009 80X17 

Finance 2053 202 3136 3037 

Composite 17946 177.84 178.03 17BTO 


AMEX Sales 


A PM. volume 
Prev. 4 P.M, volume 
Prev. carts, volume 


4460400 

5480X100 

5480.000 



AMEX Stock Index 1 


Hfgti 

227.79 


previooi 
Law Close 

22441 22741 


22835 


12 Month 
High Low Slock 


51s. Close 

DIv. YW. PE 1 POSH Wl Low Quot.OiHe 


91 

321 

65 

619 

2119 


239k 16Mi AAR 48 24 14 
191k 9* AGS 8 

M% 10 AMCA 
T9to 1336 AMF JO SJ 41 
4391 34 VI AMR 9 

2 0% 1845 AMR pf 2.18 106 
25T% 227 b AMR of 247 108 
23 19 ANRpf ZI2 109 

Uli 8% APL 39 

67(6 44% ASA 240 3J 

St 36ft AMLflh 1J0 27 16 1972x5716 51* 52% 

g* SS3S"2 S 17 iS? K gg 

J2h 34 II 13 
211e136 114 

42 TJ 7 28 

17 42 


189b 18* 18* 

11 to 10*6 11 to + 16 

10% IOVj 10% 

78to Uto Mto 

... 40%. « 40* + to 

35 20to TO* 20to 

2 2446 24ft 2446 + Vi 

2 19*4 1916 19V6 

25 9 9 9 

468 53% 53% 5346— Vk 

110 17% 17 1716 


.12 


10% a to AcrneE 
1716 15 Ada Ex 
20 11% AdntMl 

19% 8% AdvSvs 
41 to 2Sto AMD 
1246 6% Advesf 
1446 5*6 Aerflex 

4246 2716 AelnU 
38ft 52% AetLpf 
34 1546 Ahmns 

4% 2% Alleen 
51 3896 AlrPrd 

2446 13 AlrbFrl 
2 1 AIMoas 

32 26M. AlaP off 

7V2 6 AlaP dpf 47 124 
102 85M AlaP ef 11JD0 114 

7916 63% AlaP pf 944 124 
68% 57 AlaP pf 
68 56 AkiPpf 

1346 11 Afaoscs 
21ft 916 AMlAIt 
1646 10% Atbrtos 
3146 22% Albtsns 
32% 23% Alcan 
36% 27V6 AlCoStd 
32 17 AlexAlV 1X» 

26% TO* Alexdr 


9 8% 9 

16% 1616 16% 

17% 1646 1646— % 

_ 10% 10% 1044 — % 
13 1019 3146 30% 3046—% 

14 95 846 846 8*6- 46 

12 35 12% 12% 12% — ft 

264 6J 38 649 3746 39% 3916 — % 

SJQelQA 54 5444 5444 5446 


120 36 


1020 

33ft 

33 

33* + 

to 

21 

21 

2ft 

2* 

2ft 




611 

47ft 

4714 

47% + 

to 

60 35 


45 

20% 

20% 

20ft — 


25 

X 

1ft 

1ft 

1ft 


3.92 127 


10 

31 

30ft 

SOft — 

% 


8.16 1X7 
038 7X5 
SI 12 11 
.14 3 9 

.38 24 20 
J6 15 12 
120 
120 

IS 

19 


89% 65M AUsep 2XMt 27 30 
2*46 23 AiflCppf 286 112 
3V. IBM Alolnt 140 52 
2286 15ft AlOInpf 219 112 
94% SI AlOI pfC1125 122 
3146 24% AllsPw 270 07 9 
2146 1544 Altaic 400 XI 13 
40% 28% AlklCni 1J0 45 ‘ 

62% 5376 AldCppf 074 112 
109% 99 AldCpoflZOO 112 
107% 10044 Aide Pt 12390120 
23% 1146 AlldPd 
59% 38 AlktStr 112 U 
12% 5% AJUsOi 
3446 24 AUSCpf 
27 20 ALLTL 

39% 3046 Alcoa 
27% 15% Amax 
33% 2214 AmHes .. . , 

144 98% AHes pi 150 £7 

246 116 ArtiAor 


1946 15% A Baler 

m 53 ABrand 190 52 

2746 24% ABrd Pf 175 102 

7046 S3 ABrd of 167 19 

115 55ft ABdcst 

2616 19% ABIdM 

27% 19% ABusPr 

5546 40% Am Can 

2446 21% ACanpf 

48 36 ACan p( 


35 7% 7 7% 

saaoo 99% loo + % 
401 76 76 76 

2«h 64% *4% 4<%— % 
201 Mto 66% 64% 

23 12% 1246 im— % 
138x1946 19 19% — % 

12 1546 1546 1544 
_ 333 30% 2946 Mb + % 

47 10 3669 25% 25% 25% — % 
17 II 136 32% 32% 3246— % 
1595 29% 28% 2846— % 
32 23 2246 23 + % 

26 7646 76% 7646— 16 

7 2544 25% 2546— % 

143 27 27 27 — % 

23 1944 19% 1946 + to 

8 92 9116 92 + % 

505 31% 31 31—16 

_ 215 19% 19% 1946 
8 10100 4046 40% 4046 + % 
137x6146 61 61% + % 

14 107% 106% 107 +1 

30 103% 103% 103% 

7 22 22 22 — % 

1927 56% 55% 56 + 4* 

142 6% 6% 616 

19 29 28 28 —1 

. 74 2646 26% 2646 

15 11 1334 3446 34% 34%— 46 

1.1 318 18 1716 IB + % 

16 15 2869 3046 30 30*6 + 46 

2X131 131 131 —346 

173 2 1% 2 


154 70 * 
1.20 
20 
1.10 


8 53 18% 1746 18% + % 

9 563 67% 6646 67 — % 

23 27 2616 2646 + % 

2 U U 68 — % 


11% 6% ACentC 
56% 4346 ACyon 
2946 1846 ADT 
2146 15% AElPw 
64% 25 AmEXP 
14 AFcmll 
1946 AGnCo 
6 AGni wt 


160 15 

M 

1198 105*105 

UK* 


56 14 

13 

11x25* 25% 

25* 


64 24 

15 

4 TOft 26to 

26% 


290 55 

11 

461 52% 52% 

57* 

— 

280 11J 


30 24% 24 

24 

+ 

350 65 


45 46 46 

46 


220 115 
656e2M 



18* 

30* 

+ 

+ 


11 

M 8* Bto 

8* 


150 36 

12 

17M 53ft 52* 

53% 

+ 


h 

gw 

67 

62 


. _ 26 1566 23% 2346 2346 

1260115 8 1977 2146 2146 21% + to 

128 3.1 15 5260 41% 4046 41 + % 

34b 25 11 89 26% 25% 25%—% 

LOO 35 9 3682 2846 28% 28%— % 

1016 10% 


5146 AGn| p|A6JB«n-5 500 . I 5446 54% 


58% AGnl pfB 

4446 AGn |pf L2S 
40% AGnpfD 164 
32% 2546 AHerll UM 
lift 7% AHotst 
62% 46% A Home 190 
38 26% A Hasp 1.12 

84% 62% Amrtch 660 
78 52 AlnGrp M 

130 112% AIGppf 555 
28% 18% AMI J2 
5% 3% Am Mot 
65 27% ANIRS8 122 


6 17 
44 

341 12 
84 
35 12 



77% 78 +1% 

■ft 


43% 24% APresId J4t 14 
1316 Sto ASLFkl 4 

18% 12% ASLFI Pf 219 175 
16 10% AShlp JO 65 14 

35% 22% AmStd 150 SJb 17 
56% 26% AmStor 64 12 10 
66% 46% ASIr pf A 428 65 
55% 51 AStrpfB 650 113 
22% 14% AT4T 120 55 17 9024 21 20% 

3746 30% AT&T pf 164 9S 121 36*6 36% 
ffl 31% AT&T Pf 324 1DJJ 
27% 13% A Weir* 

67 35% A Wot pf 163 It 

12% 10 AWoSof 125 124 
28% 20% AmHott 148 112 
*8 53% ATrPr 564 85 


1227 
52 2 

46 37 

35 9 lx 

45 13 39U 61% 60% 60%- % 

36 10 3906 33% 3246 32%—% 
85 8 464 83% S3 83 — 46 

419 70% 69*. 6946— % 

7 imr'etr* 

666 3% 3% 346 + % 
141 64% 64 64 — % 

1209 30% 29% 30% + % 

81 516 5% 

82 1' — ' 

95 

370 

349 54% 

47 6446 
7 55% 



11*6 4% ATrSc 
79% 58% ATrun 564 
33 26% Amenxt 160 

36% 17 AlTMOl 20 
«% 60 Ames Of 522 


29% 21% Ametek 
28% 18% Atnfdc 
16 8% Amfesc 

38% 26% AMPi 
24 13% Ampco 

21*6 1246 Am reps 
28% 19 AmSttl 
3946 2546 Anufed 
4% 146 Anacmp 
30% 1946 Analog 
3046 19% Anchor 
4246 24% AnCkry 


50 30 14 


7 

SO 8 
4 A 12 


158 

122 

20 

56 


18 
65 

U 21 
12 16 
„ 17 12 
100 25 11 
62 

15 18 
2 14 
A*b AO 6 

28 15 11 

246 % ApchPwt 

19% IS* APChP unllO 115 
32% 27>A ApPwpf 4.18 132 
30 26 ApPwpf 350 132 

39% 17% API Ota l.iat 35 1* 
Z1U 8 AppIMo 
2146 1546 ArchDn 
23% 14% ArtZPS 
29% 23 ArIPpf 
2346 13% ArkBst 


9*6 AndrGr 
33% 16% AnaellC 

80% 57% Anneus 

3 . Anheu pt 360 

20% 1346 Anlxtr 28 
1646 8% Anthem 04 
13% 10% Antony 
1446 9% Apache 


24% 16 Arkia 
_ % ArlnRt 


13 37% 37% 37% — % 

88 26% 26% 26%— 46 

20B 67% 67% 67% + % 

500r 12 12 12 + % 

121 2246 22 2Z% 

19 66% 66% 66% 

W 10% 18 IB 

1 7646 76*6 76*6 + % 

9 31% 31% 31%— 46 

349 3546 35% 3546 + % 

94% 93% 94V6 + % 

26% 26% 3616 + 46 

27 26% 

4Q 3016 10% 1046— % 
24 16 8617 30% 2946 2916 — 46 
13 17 126 13% 13% 13% 

6 16 1516 16 + % 

35 28 2746 2746—% 

482 3646 36 36 — 46 

243 3% 346 3% 

42 25% 25% 25% + % 
SI7 2146 21 2H6 + 4* 

55 4046 40% 4046— 46 
15 11% 11*6 1146 
889 20% 2046 20% 

439 00% 79% 7946 
a 57% 5646 57% + % 
293 IS Wft IS + % 
30 13% 13% 13% + 46 
93 11% 11 11—46 

175 1146 11% 11% 

396 146 1% 1%— % 

498 1816 18% 1846 

1 31% 314* 3146 + 46 
8 2846 28% 2846— % 

71 28% 28% 28%—% 
.. .. 78 1246 1246 1246 

,14b 3 14 1006 20% 20% 20% — % 

250 115 7 1225 23% 23 23% + % 

358 113 13 29 2816 29 

.* 25 8 188 2<F162D46 2046 + % 

158 5L1 17 911 2146 21, 21%—% 

68 h S— 

26 1 11% 11% 11% 

3907 7% 7% 7% + 46 
66 17% 16% 17% + 46 
106 1 944 19% 19% — 46 
652 32% 32% 3246 
19 30 30 30 — % 

100 14H 1346 1346 — 46 
44 25% 2446 24%— % 
156 20% 20 20 — % 

3 46 48 48 —2 

499 27% 26% 26%— 46 

69 2946 2946 29% + U 

250 42 41% 42 + % 

13 3946 3846 3946 + % 
79 5746 57% 5716 + % 
6 92 92 n — to 

2 19% 19% 19% 

1*2 2544 25% 2546 % 


248 


13% 10% Armada 
1946 646 Armco 
29% 14% Armcnf 210 110 

24% 15% ArmsRb M 15 7 

38 22% Artnwin 150 17 9 

34% 19 AraCp 15D <0 8 

26% 13% ArovvE 50 15 7 

26*6 16 ATtra 52 5 

234* 14 Arvjn* -SO AO 8 

54% 3446 Arvln pf 100 45 

32*6 17% Alarco 
3146 2046 AshlOJI 150 £4 

42% 3346 AstllO pf 4J0 1IL7 

39*6 31% AlhlOpf 196 10.1 

61% 45% AedOG 250 45 10 

98 73 Asaopt A75 55 

25% 18% AIM pne 150 8.1 9 

25% 19% AtCyEI 248 95 1 ._ _ _ 

52% 40% All Rich 3X» 65 23 9033 50% 49 4946 + % 

125 97 At [Rent 250 14 10 120 117% 11146 +1% 

20 11% AtlasCP 16 1446 14% 1446 

3346 1846 A rent 50 15 17 236 23 22% 2ZK— % 

46M 29% AutoDt 52 15 19 1447 44% 43% 43*6 — % 

27% 15% AVEMC 50 2.4 13 6 2441 24*6 2446 

39% 23 Avery 50 15 14 67 33*6 3346 33% + % 

!p6 10 A Vial r n 8 SO 14% 144* 14% + % 

41 27 Avne* 50 1.7 142*99 30*6 29%30 — *6 

»6 9to Avan U» 95 10 1039 21 2044 20% + % 

30% 18 Aydln n 28 2146 21% 21%— % 


B 


58 45 28 
JO 1J 11 
52 57 IS 
56 15 15 


17 11 
15 

12 

350 75 7 


158 

50 


20 10% BMC 

M% l» Balrncs 

23% 15 Bkrlntl 

244* 18% Balder 
2% *6 viBaldU 

50 28% BallCD 

23% Uto Bally Mf 
14% 7% Bollypk 

41% 30% DdltQE 

44% 36% BallcfB *J0 10J 
30to 21 BncOne 1.10 35 10 
lOto 8% BncOrn 52e 55 8 
546 3to Bon Tex 
62 39% Barxjoo 150 12 12 

47% 29 BkBas 140 55 5 

41 Uto BkNY 104 55 6 

UJ6 15*6 BnkVas U» 3.9 9 

30% 14% BnkAm 152 8.1 11 

52% 40 BkAmpf5.1VeII5 
86 66 BkAmpf 8580115 

14% llto BkAmpt 258 

32% 23*6 BfcARty 240 75 If 

66 374* BankTr 170 *5 7 

1 9 Ui BkTrpf 250 104 

12% 7% Banner 53e 5 17 

29*6 19 Bara 

24% 18 Bam Go 
50% ax'* Barnet 
33*6 19% BaryWr 
13*6 ,84 m BASIX 
2846 17% Bautch 
18% 11% BaxfTr 
25% 1746 Bay Fin 
3146 1946 BayStG 

2? S*°CL n « , - 0fl 

33V. 34% Beaten 150 

g 4MJ Brel Dt 338 65 

Sto % iST r D «" M 15 

32?? Bekerpl 1J0 165 
18% 12% BeldnH A0 35 7 

30% S Be Hwl 56 25 9 

SI? 450 12 « 

29to 2246 BCE a 228 

W6 Belllnd J2 15 11 

2?* SJ* W*M 250 7.9 ■ 

3H6 BelOAH ,50 15 30 

S5 S'* 1 S* 1 !!? 1-00 37 11 

37% 23 BenfCa ZflO 5J 9 

341. Xto Benefpf 4J0 127 

35,. getlMBf 450 115 
“W >04% Senel pt 550 35 
20% 17 Benef of ISO 115 

5"*!? 23m U 2* 

23% 7% BereEn 

6*6 316 Betocey 

1716 10% BoMPd 
Wto 14 to Beths tt _ „ 

74* 37to Bethstpf550 115 

28 18*6 BethSf pflSD 115 

2S ?L gfwiy 52 15 18 

24% 19% BIsThr “ 


A* 15 12 
50 37 9 
156 17 9 
50 21 13 
.12b 15 11 
78 25 14 
37 U 75 
30 5 40 

160 84 9 
" 29 II 


34 

50 


14 
an 
Lf 26 
23 


18% 13% BtoCTTj 


50 35 17 


26% 17to B! 

31M 3046 BIckHF 
40 14% BlfllrJn 

51% 37 

ten 37 


54 35 11 
L92 6.1 9 
- 56 25 17 

BIckHR 240 45 13 
Boeing 150 24 7 


^ » tt 

g. « . BofeeCpISJO 93 

!?• .10 4 29 

72% » BOTOen 204 45 TO 


426 12 10% 1046—1% 

N 30 29 U* 2916 — 46 

1915 16% 16 14to— to 

4 22% 22% 22% — % 

U0 T4h 1% 1% 

142 47to 46% 46%— % 
1926 15(6 15% 15%—% 

391 114* 1QR6 11% + to 
224 41% 41U 41 to — % 
aSOB 44 43 43 —1 

154 29% 29% 29%— % 

50 916 9% 9to + to 

302 3% 3% 3% 

95 S46 55 5546 +46 

144 45% 45 45 —16 

122 3816 38*6 38% + 16 
137 25% 2546 25%— to 

3277 IBM 18% 184k 
1300 44 V. 44% 44 <4 to 16 
993 Tito 70*6 71 
88 1516 1546 1546 
23 30% 30% 30% — % 
888 67% 6546 67 +1% 

11 34% 23*6 24% +46 
1 11 11 11 
361 38% 2SU 28% 

20 21% 21*6 3146— % 

143 SO 4946 SO 

235 2216 21% 2146— % 
212 11% 11% 11%+ to 
111 26% U Uto 
3305 15% 15% 15%—% 
14 21% 21% 21%—% 
25 31% 30% 31 +46 

32 34*6 3416 3416 
1347 30*6 30% 30V. 

8 56*6 55% 56*6— % 
271 47% 46% 4646— % 

123 5% 516 S% + % 

28 1046 10% 10% 

10 13% 13% 13% 

1043 28% 38 28% — to 

88 27% 27% 27%— 46 

442 S3 82% S2H— % 
166 28% 28% 28W— to 

05 21 to 21% 21% 

1594 15*6 35% 35*6 + % 

75 50% SOU. 50% — % 
45 28 27*6 27*6— % 

48 36% 3546 3M6 

5 84 33% 33% — % 

11b 36 36 36 —1 

1WZU2%162% 162% — % 
240x20 19% 20 

155 546 5% 5% + to 

7H 23% 23% 53% 

21 5% 5*6 5*6— to 

6 12% 12% 1216 

789 17% 1746 1746— to 
U 4Zto 42U 42 to— % 

It 21 20% 21 

452 33to 32*6 33to + % 
*n 24 23% 23% — % 

202 17% 17 17% — % 

1520 21% 21% 2116— % 

33 31% 31 31 to 

443 S 2246 2246 — 46 

5S 49% 4886 49*6 + % 
3820 59% 58% S8%_1 
347 38 37% 37% 

13 54% 53% 54 —44 
55 2646 25% 2446 + to 
312 « 4744 U + to 


Stocks Close With Slight Gain 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Slock prices showed co dear 
tread Tuesday in another drifting session. The 
Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose 0.88, 
lo 1.253.86. 

Declines slightly outnumbered advances on 
the New York Stock Exchange. Big Board vol- 
ume totaled S3.98 milli on shares, a gains t 79.96 
million in the previous session. 

The NYSE's composite index gained .04, to 
103.32. 

The market has been stuck in neutral for the 
past couple of weeks. Analysts say this slu gg ish 
behavior has become a cause, as well as a 
symptom, of a general apathy among investors. 

investors are cautiously watching first-quar- 
ter earnings reports as they begin to come in 
from the nation's major corporations. 

These may produce a good many disappoint- 
ments. analysts say, because the economy in 
general — and manufacturing industries in par- 
ticular — have experienced slower- th an-expect- 
ed growth lately. 

However, observers also point out that inves- 
tors have had plenty of advance warning of this 
prospect by now, and much or all of it is 
presumably already reflected in stock: prices. 

“Fundamental economic and technical indi- 
cators are all giving mixed signals" to investors, 
said John Brooks of Shearson-Robinson-Hum- 
phrey in Atlanta. 

“They’re di g gin g up all the old negative feel- 
ings from last year," such as fears about interest 
rates and the economy, Mr. Brooks said. 

But considering a host of negatives, including 
the deficit, the currency situation, earnings dis- 


appointments from blue chips and problems 
with government securities and thrifts in Ohio, 
“we've done pretty damn good," he said. 

The bottom line is. without inflation in the 
picture, youYe got some real values out there, 
Mr. Brooks said. 

He said that the market was trying to digest 
the influx of funds from runs in January and 
February. Any. positive news could “have this 
market to new nigh grounds in a heartbeat, 
Mr. Brooks said. 

“If all these concerns really were weighing on 
institutional accounts,” Mj. Brooks added, 
“they’d be scrambling to get out of this thing, 
and they're just not going out" 

Chester Pado, of A.C. Securities in Los Ange- 
les, said that the overall market is approaching 
1.240. a fairly major support area, “what we’re 
really doing is testing that area." he said. 

A 'lot of the pressure on the market recently 
has been in institutionally oriented issues, ana 
is now lifting, Mr. Pado said 

The market is in a better position for an 
upward move, but “the problem is that there is 
no spark," he said, adding that until that spark 
comes, “chances are we're just going to have a 
very dull market." 

In late trading, Unocal was near the top of 
the actives, and lower. The company is being 
sought by Mesa Petroleum in a two-step trans- 
action valued at 58.1 billion. 

Kansas Gas & Electric was off a bit in active 
trading. 

Diamond-Shamrock, also active, was slightly 
higher. 

(AP, UPI). 


12 Mon It) 
HlohLow 


Slock 


SB. C3059 

□tv. YW. PE jiPiHkm Low dug. Qi'oe 


2416 

846 

3946 

77 

10 % 

1246 

2516 

31% 

58M 

4% 

30 

17% 

20% 

32*6 

2646 

30 

45% 

4046 

4046 

16 

19% 

1746 

21% 

29% 

58% 

746 

22 

50% 

18% 

65% 

20 % 

1146 

15 


1686 Boro Wo 
4to Bornm* 
25% BosEd 
63 BOftEpt 
9 BosEpt 
10% BOSE re- 
1416 Bowtrn 
25% BrtaSt 
43 BrtstM 
3% BrltLnd 
21% BrllPf 
9% BrttTpp 
2*6 Brack 
14% Brcfcwr 

28 BkvUG 

29 BkUGof 
13 BwiSh 
22% BrwnGo 
26% BnmF 
2346 Bmmrtt 
25% BraliWa 
12 BocvEr 
1316 Bundv 
15% BunkrH 
14% Burin Cl 
23 BurUnd 
35 BrlNIti 
6% BrlNopf 

19 BrlNnf 
44% BrlNpf 
1246 Bumd y 
47% Bon-gti 
12% Butlrln 
386 ButtM 
10%-ButWPf 


52 45 9 

354 85 8 
858 120 
1.17 117 
1.46 115 
72 15 8 
150 55 9 
158 35 16 
aa 

1530 62 8 


152 7.1 24 
3.12 85 8 
395 122 
J IJI I 
156 &4 14 
150 25 16 
150 28 8 

M 15 15 

54 11 35 
50 45 8 

2.16 125 

12 

144 65 20 
150 25 7 

55 LI 
Z12 94 
5500115 

54 55 14 
240 45 71 
52 25617 

2J0 18.1 


1842 20% 
13 6% 

&S* 

1 12% 
811 20* 
199 2946 
1402 5(46 
8 4% 

*28 »% 
210 17% 
244 2* 

30 18% 
58 3746 
19 32% 
70 Z1 
255 25% 
238 44 
1152 37 
164 34 
319 14% 
26 17% 
17 17% 
33 17*6 
364 26% 
4081 51% 
2 «% 

79 g* 
50 1446 
2359 5PM 
33 18% 
35 446 
1 11 % 


20% 2U%— % 
6% 6 Vil— % 

3786 38 — % 
74 74 + to 

10 10 — to 

1246 1246— to 
20 % 20 % — % 
29 29% — % 

56 56% + to 

4% 4% 

26% 26» + % 
16% 17 — % 
2% 246— % 

18% 18% + % 
37% 37%—% 
3ZV6 32% 

20% 2046—46 
25 25%— 4k 

43% 4346 + 4k 
36 36%—* 

33% 3346— to 
14% 1446— % 
17% 17% + % 
17% 17%—% 
17% 17% — % 
26% 2446— % 
58% 50%— % 

iU 

22% 22% + 
50*6 51 + 

14% WH + % 

5 * n + 1 % 
18% 18%— 
446 446 + 
11 % 11 % 


33* 

114% 

8% 4 .... 

50* 27 CIGNA 

40* 2146 CNA Ffl 15 

10% 8* CNAI 1500115 
44% 34% CPC It* 250 55 II 



150 65 
1JM 45 
150 25 

52 32 
52 17 


23% 14% CP NH 

2746 18% CSX 

40% 22 CTS 

12% 746 C 3 Inc 

3346 22% Cabot 
14K 8% Caoaor 
19% 11% GalFad _ _ 

47% 32*4 CalFd Pf 473 105 

23*6 13% Gallhn 25b 15475 

1846 11% CantrnJ .12 S 

28% 15% CHUtB 50 

946 3% CmpRg .141 
14% 1046 CpRpfg Z5D 
73% 54% CaraSP 250 35 12 
4546 28% QfPocg 7-40 
21% 14% CanPEg 50 


222 140 COPCItS 20 




107% 107*6 — 2% 
6% 6* 6— to 
4 48% 

29 29% 

21 5% 5% 5%— to 
33 36% 34% 3446 + % 
2 10 % 10 10 % + % 
8» <2% 41% 42% + % 
9 40 20% 2046 2046—% 

8 3024 23% 22* 23% + % 

100 35% 35 35% 

32 436 9% 9 9%— % 

9 416 28 27% 27*— to 

17 1628 14% 14 14% 

7 1433 19% 18 19% +1% 

183* 4446 4344 4446 +1 
77 19% 18*6 19 + % 

289 14 14 14 

655 2146 21% 21% + to 
44 4% 4% 446— to 

,2 Uto Uto Uto— to 
114 70% 49% 69% 

727 -OH 42% 42% + to 
16 20% 20% 2BI6— to 


48% 30% CaoHHS 134 35 II 
108% 100% CapHlrfl0l49OllU 
1486 10 Caring o M 
40% 24% CarTWa 152 35 10 
2(46 1346 Can, Ft AQ 15 10 
27* 19% CarPw 240 95 7 
23% 19*6 CarPpf 237 115 
48 35* CarToc Z1S 53 9 
11% 7% Carrel -07 J U 
44% 30*6 CarsPlr 150 35 7 
32% 1846 CartHW 152 
34% 1946 CartWl 52 


20 1079208 205% 205% —576 


75 8 


16% 9% CtncNG 150 
14* 9% CosMOfc 
29* 1546 CstfCpf 123 
31% 2J7* CatrvT JO 15 
2746 16 Cm 56 35 11 
94% 4246 Cokrnre 450 45 9 
15 7% Conoyn M J 

41* 32% Con to! 238 55 
26% 17 Contoxn 
23* 17 ConSoW 202 85 
2646 14% Can Hud 254 115 
24% 18% CanlILt 222 95 
43 36 CnlLlBf 450 115 

19 14% QUIPS 150 83 

25 7746 CnLoEl 156 85 

35 29% CLaE1Cf4.il 123 

11* 7* CsMPw 150 14J 
24 14 CnSOVO 

18% 10* Cm PS 
12% 3% CantrDt 
10% 746 CntrYTl 

23% 1B4| CaftvJJJ 
27% 15% Cr+taad 
Wfc 1646 CeisAIr 
3646 16* dunoln 
27*6 19 dimlpf 150 55 
54 43% Climl pf 450 9J 

8 ChoraSp 50 45 12 
1 vlChrrC 

% vfCtlf wt 
1% vlCbrtnf 
55% 35*6 ChOM 380 75 i 
46 36*6 Chasapf £25 T24 

57* 51 CltaM Pf 9J0al75 

2146 14 CMm 52 45 8 

34% 24* OMOHd 152 5.1 13 

43 23% ChmNY 248 65 6 

42% 23* CUNY Df 157 55 

58% 48 ChNYpf 6538125 

39% JIM Chase* 154 35 10 

3846 31% ChasPn " 

40% 29% Oleum 

3346 17* CNWSt 

200 124% ChlMlw 

75 53% CW MI Of 

2446 i6* enipnr 
15 7% QlkPull 

49% 24* OirtsCr 
11% 10% OlCHpf 150 
12% 5 Chrlstn 
13* 9* Chroma 


347 4746 47% 47%—* 
53 W«46 10446 10446 + % 
10 1H6 10* 10* + % 
414 3S% 34% 34%—]% 
856 22* 22 22% + 46 

B31 26* 36* 26% — % 

I 21* 23% 2346— % 

34 3744 37% 37%—* 
61 10 946 9*— % 

26 40to 39* 40% + to 

45 M 2793 27% 26* 26*— % 

15 11 238 >1% 31% 31% — * 


10% 

7% 

3% 

9% 


26x15* 15* 15% + * 
406 10* 1046 MM + 16 

S3 20% 20% 20% + to 

3*51 3J* 3046 — * 

TO 22* 22% 2246 — 46 

399 92* 92* 72* 

24 m 846 8* 146 

9 59 41% 40* 4U6 + to 

* 65 27% 20* 21 + * 

7 1045 23% 23 21 

6 172 25* 25 25% — % 

V 125 24* 24 24% — % 

808 41 41 41 — 1% 

7 35* 19 1846 1846— % 

7 137 2444 24% 24ft— % 

13 33* 3346 33* 

5 1180 9* 9* 9%— to 

-84 35 18 2775 24 24 24 

150 105 6 33 18 17* 17* 

19» 4V6 4 4% 

50 L0 7 TO 10% to 10 —to 

240 733 8 33 20M 19* 19*6— % 

30 35 1133 23*22*23% + % 
- 24 29 1418 17 16% 16*— % 

If 2274 2046 20% 2046 + to 

6 23% 23% 23%— % 

50 48* 48* 48* + to 

IPS 8% a* Sto + % 

ft 2% 2* 2*— to 

22 * 46 * 

.19 2* 2*6 2M 

941 52* 52% 52* + % 
44 42* 42% 42% 

15 53% 53* S3*— % 

38 18% 18 18% 

15 2946 29% 2946 

742 38* 38 38% + % 

37% 3746+1 
135 54* 54* 50%— % 
_ ... .. 44 34* 34* 34* 

200 62 9 847 3Z* 32% 32%—* 

240 65 I 3327 35* 35 35% 

15 113 19% 19% 19% + to 

61 2 14846 148% 148%— 46 

1 72% 72% 72% — % 
.10e A 7 13 24 2346 ZM 

331 34M1 38 9% 9% 9% 

•481 15 48 4646 46* 46% + % 

L9 i im n% u% 

78 11% 10* 10*— to 
38 TO* 1016 10%—% 


36% TO* dirretr 150 28 3 S6S8 35* 34* 25% + * 
62* 34* Chutrtj* 220 35 13 1773 5746 57 57*— to 

V 2(9 51 SM6 4046 

38% 2246 Church JO — 


... 21 17 

19% 11* Chrctl ml 
46 35% OllBoll 3.12 7.1 8 

15* 8* CkiGE 216 143 6 

68% 50 ClnGnf 930 143 
54 39 CfaiGpf 754 143 

68 48 OnGRt 938 145 

69 50 ClnGpf 952 144 

2816 20 OnMlI 32 U 38 
36 21* CJrdK 

31 l«% ClrOTY 

•au. u% ci ran 

47% 27* atkTP 236 53 
8* M% attaPRf LlfalLi 
9946 W% CltCP pfA934«105 
44% 32* Otylnv 
SI. 53.. CtylnPl 200 33 
?S% 2146 Civ In pf 287 115 
10* 6% ChrtJlr J2 95 

33* 23* ClarkE 1.10 27 
i( 4% CiayHm 
22% 17 ChrCIf 150 53 
21 13* ClevEI 252 121 

58% 46% CIvElpf 7 A0 129 
59 47 CtvElpf 756 128 

16* 10 CJ*vpk M 45 

30 1646 CtvBkOt 154 113 

34* 22% Oarax 130 25 It 
21% 14* avtMn .109 5 18 


31% 23 auenP 150 
20 15 C1U9I of 150 

21% 12% Coodim JO 
44*6 23% Coastal 
« , 24% cm Of 
AtMi 24% Citlpf 
7016 53% CoCoQ 
19% 9* Cofaco 

34 25% Colimn 

26% 20% ColO Pm 1380 84 
2346 18* Col Aik a 44 25 
22% 9* GolFda s .16 5 

31* 30* Col Pan 140 5J 
63% 39* Coltlnd 250 44 
36 2646 C01 Gas 3.18 10.7 

ISto CSOPf 242 129 
I0B% 96 CSOPf 01535 1(4 
108* 97 C5aefnl53S 147 
(5% 27% Cemfern 2U 45 
37% 2546 CmOEn 
17% 8 Comal* 

20 Uto Comm 
39* 946 Comdrn 
30* 23% CmwE 
30 22% CwEof 

M* 13 CivE Of 


343 37* 37% 37% + * 
9 19 W 19 + % 

44 43* 43* 43* + % 
10MK15* 15 15% 

350* 65 65 65 

680* 52% 52 52% +1 

1020* 65 6( 64 — % 

510* 66 66 66 — % 

170 2Z* 22% 27*— % 
34 23 15 1400 34 33* 34 + % 

58 J 11 175 74% 25* 29*— * 

14 97 22% 22% 27*— * 

7 2138 43* 43% 43%— % 

100 79 79 79 + % 

100 92* 92% 92* + * 

9 1407 39% 38* 38*— to 
5 60 ttt 60—1 

1054 34* 24* 74* + % 
6 (5 7* 7M 7% 

19 191 29* 79% 29% — % 
14 32 12% 12* 12% + % 

8 167 19% 18* U* 

* .fiLS?* 20* 20* + % 

3000* 58% 57% 57% — 1V6 
2100* 59 58 59 +1 

37 12* 12% 13%—% 
5 16* Uto 16* + % 
564 34 33* 33* + % 

ITS 20% 70 30 — % 


22 10 339 31% 31 31% 

il 41 If* 19% 1«M + to 
.28 8 517 UM 14 14% + % 

■40a 9 10 2155 45* 44* 44% — * 

1.19 25 1 48 48 48 +2 

153 35 3 48% 48% 48% 

356 4J ]4 1351 99 48 (S* + % 

879 14* 14* T*%— to 

156 28% 27* 78* + * 

MS Uto 2M 23*— ft 

227 22% 32 22% 

M 21 to 20* 21 
102 27% 27% 2716 
588 58*6 56 ?«%—!% 

1398 29* '29% 29* + to 
11*% 16* 18* + * 
970*W6 . 103 106 +2* 

3208105% 104 104 —3 
426 44% 44to 44%+ to 

493 35% 35% 35H + % 

US 15% 15% 15* 

3 17* ins 17* 

in w% io% raw— to 

6394 30 531* 29* + % 

1 29% 29*6 29% 

25 15% 7 Sto 15to — to 


150 45 13 
27 


154 52 12 
50 1J 13 
J6 21 M 

350 105 7 
142 45 
150 72S 


12 Month 
Wot, Low 


Stock 


51s. CI0M 

DIv. YIL PE lOQlHlati Law Quaf. OToe 


17 

68 

22% 

25to 

67% 

25% 

32* 

34 

36% 

17% 

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30* 

23% 

18* 

26 

17* 

32% 

43 

44*6 

36 

46% 

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28% 

45% 

46% 

46% 

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21* 

22* 

23* 


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10% 

4to 

48% 

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38* 

33* 

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34% 

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27 

20* 

21* 

21% 

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27* 

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40 

45 

77* 

9% 

37 

78% 

27 

23% 


5Dto 

65 

29to 

33* 

88% 

to* 


250 124 
858 128 
257 1L6 
257 114 
840 128 
252 94 
150 19 
.24 J 
50 15 


13% CwBpf 
53* CwEpf 
18* CwEpf 
20* CwEPf 
54% CwEpf 
16% ComES 
20* Comsat 
19 CPSYCI 
26 Compgr 
11 CompSc 
15* Cptvsn 
19* CanAas 57 27 
13to Canal r 54b L0 
13* Conn El 150 94 
19% CnilNG 240 95 
10* Connie 50 35 
23* CttlSEd 240 75 
35 CanEpf 455 115 
38 Cone Pf 550 115 
20th CmFrt* 150 35 

31 CMNG 252 55 
4% GansPw 

13 QlPafA 4.16 T75 
13% OiPDfB 4J0 175 
23to CnPpfO 755 1L1 
25* CllPpfE 752 185 
25 CnPpfG 756 183 
11% QlPptV 450 1L3 
Pto CnPprU 350 185 
1016 CnP nrT 358 184 
Uto CnPprR 450 1L6 
1071 CnP ptf* 298 784 
1014 CnPprN 355 185 
7% CnPprMZSO 775 
7 CnPprL 253 775 

11 CnPprS 452 184 
7to CnPprK 243 785 

23% CnttCn 260 65 
4* Coat I It 

* Contll rt 

12 cmuipf 

* CtllHdn 
4% Cut Info 

18 Corvrirt 
24* CtData 
21* comm 
1 vICookU 
26* Coopt 
351 Coopl pf 298 
12% CocoLb 
12* CaPTTr 40 21 
13* CooPvto 40 15 
11* Copwtd 44 35 
19U Cpwtdpf 248 125 
17% Cardura 54 23 
10* Corein J6 44 
30 CornGs 158 35 
22* CorBlfE 150 24 
44% Cox Cm 

(to Credo 

32 Crane 
38% CrayRx 
Mto CruckN 
Wto CrmoK 
34* OrwnCk 
27* Crwzm 150 24 
43 CrZsIPf 453 95 
50 CrZal pfC4J0 75 
19* CuRro 50 25 
12% Cutkwft 

61 to CumEa 23D 35 
Sto Currinc 1.10OU5 
38to Curtw 150 35 
27% CVdOPS 1.70 22 


16 16% + % 
65% 65% — to 
22 * 22 * 

24* 24* 

65% 65% 

24% 24* + * 
30* 30% + % 
31% 31* 

32 32% + % 

14* 15 
15* 16* +1 
30% 32% +1* 
ZJto 23to 
17* 17*— % 
2S* 25* + % 
13to llto 
32 32 — % 

39* 40 to— * 


11 16% 

•SrJta 65* 

3 22* 

TO M* 

10k 65% 

5 76 U* 

11 170 30* 

24 287 31* 

11 63 32* 

8 O 15 
13 5295 16* 

15 553 32% 

12 242 23to 

9 5 17* 

ID 2 25* 

6 63 13% 

7 779 32to 
730x41 

6 43* 

U 907 21* 28% 28* 

9 1103X45 44* 44* + to 

5 2159 <% (to (to — % 

80x 24% 24% 24% + % 
150z 25* 25* 25* + to 
8008 41% 41 to 41to— Ito 
8501 42% 41 41 — 1% 

250X43% 42% 42% 


42% 43% + % 
— i + to 


172 75 
72 23 
1.10 16 





24 — 

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M 1129 30% 
12 280 31 

il 

30* 

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152 


15 


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116 3(* 
250 14* 
198 19* 
570 21% 
31 12% 
8 19* 
17 28 25* 

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U 1376 36% 

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A 25 3786 76* 
31 9 

1500 47 11 509 UM 

23 421 65* 

50 15 245 25* 

120 SJ 9 Zt 21% 

II 22 52* 

16 5050 41% 

129 47% 
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35 2989 24% 

3 320 67 


& 


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38* + to 
34% 34* 

14* 14* + to 
19% 19to— % 
20* 20*—* 
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19* 19*— % 
25* 25* + % 
12* 12* 

34* 35* + * 
41* 42* + * 
76 76%- * 

8* 9 + % 
33* MM + * 
65 45 — to 

25* 25% . 

20* 21% + % 
52% 52%—* 
40* 41* + % 
46* 47% + * 
60* 61% + * 
28* 28% + to 
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66% 66* + % 
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94% 

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59% 

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JO 20 
34 U 


737 133 
J6 1.9 
150 34 
152 83 
50 15 

52 28 


13* Dallas M 21 
9M DamanC 30 15 
21% DanoCp U8 47 
5% Donahr 
»% DanM .IK 15 
70* DatlKT 434 45 
39% DatoGn 

13% Datpnt 
8% DtoDau 
12% DCWO _ ... 

77 DayCPf 435 43 
26% DartHd 74 24 
11* DOYtPL 240 122 

45 DPLPf 730 133 
(5 DPLPf 
21% DeanFd 
24* Doom 
17% DtimP 

27 DeltaAr 
4% Deltona 

18% DbcCJis 
17* DenMfm 130 S3 
26* DeSofo 150 43 
11% DetEd 158 1L1 
(7M DetEpf LSD 55 
59 DetEpf 932 1X4 
47% DetEpf 758 1U 

46 OetE pf 755 128 
45% DetE Pf 736 1X0 
19* DEefF 27S 115 
20 DEPTH 334 U3 
19* DEPfO 213 111 

19 DE PIP 112 1X0 

20 DEpfB 275 11J 
19* Oe P«3 350 134 
19% DE PfM XG 1X2 
24* DEnrL 440 135 
24% DEPfK 412 UJ 
72% DfltE Pf 972 105 
13% DetE or 23S 127 
17* Dexter 50 35 

9* DIG lor 54 43 
16* DtamS 176 85 
34* DloSh pf 400 105 
(5 DlebMa 140 24 
77% Digital 
45% Disney 130 14 
30 DEI 260 63 
3% Dlvrein 
6* Dooms 
21* DamRi 
16 Donald 
35% DorUev 
23% Dorsey 

32% Dover 

25* DowCh 
Uto Dewjn 
10* Drove 
Uto Dresr 

14* D rex II 
23* Drevfu* 

43% do Pont _ 

30* duPM Pf 150 106 
39 duFnf Of 4JD 104 
22* DukeP US 77 
97 OukOPf 675 54 
64 Oufceof L70 114 
59% Dukepf 830 114 
21* Duke pf 269 103 

28 Dukepf 355 115 
77* DufcpfN 854 103 
51% DanBrd 158 27 
11% DuaLf 246 1X0 
14 DuaafA 210 124 
12% Duqpf 240 1X1 
12* Dug Pflt 210 1X3 
13* Dug PT 231 133 
22 Duo PT 275 1L1 
43% Dag Pi 730 123 

8% DycoPt 50 48 
17% DvnAm 30 5 


9 133 20 
50 95 n 

a ass am 
44 51 7* 

94 llto 

10 381 92% 
12 3294 43% 

1957 15* 

11 30 ID* 

9 81 IS* 

100X99 
17 1746 37 
7 2358 U* 
lOOOz 58% 
lOOx 55* 
16 78 30 

27 880 29* 

9 503 23* 

7 3444 44% 

9 5% 

16 507 32* 
10 46 24* 

9 25 33% 

8 1835 16* 

1 93% 
1050x72 

20x58 
10x50 
3501 56% 
7 24 
9 24* 
22 34 

2 24 

7 2416 
73 26% 


19* 19*—* 
10 * 11 + % 
27 27% — % 

7* 7% + * 
11% 11%— % 
91* 91*— % 
4216 43% +lto 
ISto 15*— % 
» 10% 

78* 18* 

99 99 —2% 

36% 36% 

16% 16*— % 
58% 58% + * 
55* 55*- * 
29* 30 + % 

29* 29* + % 
22% 23 — * 
43% 44% + * 
5* 5* + % 
32% 32* + to 
23% 23% —IV. 
32* 33 +% 

16% 16*— % 
93% 93% 45* 
69% 49% —2% 
SB 58 
58 58 +1 

55 56% 

24 24 

24* 24* 

23* 23*—% 
24 24 

24 24% + to 

25* 26M + * 


.12 

272 93 
56 28 
1.16 21 
130 45 
52 23 
150 (J 
38 1.9 
JO 41 
50 40 
200 107 
50a l.l 
350 57 


* 29* 29* 39* 
25 30% 30% 30% 
102(0x 89* 89* 89* 
24 IM 17* 18 

11 380 21* Z1 21% 

140 15% 14* 14* 

1213091 20* 19% 20% 
1 37% 37% 37% 

12 120 51% 50* 50* 

13 3038 101* 100* im* 

61 969 m% 79 79% 

4 3 42 41% a 

4 72 5% 5* 5% 

688 9% 9% 9* 

8 1030 29% 29% 39* 
t J 17% 17% 17% 

16 152 54* 54 54* 

12 1 25M 25% 25% 

13 942 38% 37% 37* 

9 2861 2>* 28* 28% 
21 1136 42* 41% 41% 

Z722 12% 12% 12% 
15 1354 20* 20 20 

16 19 18* M* 

453 45 44% 45 

314* S3* 51* 53* 
12 33* 33 
11 42% 42V. 42% 
719 32% 22% 32% 
3 135% 13516 733% 
100* 75 75 73 

30X71 71 TO 

8 26% 25* 26% 
43 32% 23* 33% 
3*1 85% 85% BSW 
531 70% 49* 49% 
874 16 15% 15% 

20QX 17 17 17 

100X ISto 15% 15% 
5 IS* IS* 15* 
40SE17* 17% 17* 
1480x 24* 24% 24% 
2U& 54 Vk 54% 54% 
19 12* 12* 12* 
23 25% 24% 25 


12 


+ % 
— % 
+ * 
+ % 
+ to 
— % 
+1% 


+ % 

+ % 
+ % 
+ % 
+ % 

+ to 
+ % 
— * 
+ % 
— % 
— % 

* 

— % 
+ * 
— % 
— 1* 
— 1 

+ % 
+ * 
— l* 
— % 
— % 
+ % 
+ to 
+ to 
+ * 
+ % 
— 1* 
— % 
+ % 


40 26% 

17% 17 
31* 22 
28V. 2D 

19* 12 
7* 3% 
3% 1* 

1% % 
16% 6* 
19 6* 

21 9*6 

28* 21% 
II* 12% 
78 40% 

40% 37* 
30* 20% 
32* 20% 
39* 31% 

UH 13 
34% 19 
29% 25% 
28% 23* 
15% 9% 


EGG M 13 
EQKn 

ESvst JO 15 

EnptaP UM 46 

Eases At 22 

Easuur 

EAL wtO 

EALuftA 

EsAlrof 

EAiTPtB 

EAlrpfC 

castGF 1J0 SJ 
EastUH 154 1L4 
e*Kod 3LXD0 43 
Eaton 130 24 
ECUHn 58 X3 
Eck*rd 144 27 
EdUBr 150 45 
EDO 34 !J 
Edward 50 27 
EPGpf ITS 111 
EPOpt 
EIT ont 


20 344 
1U 
U 573 
8 324 

94 

13127 

383 

on 
u 
220 
13S 
32 255 
7 107 

12 4X35 
6 37(7 
12 312 
12 362 
11 22 
12 73 

20 110 
6 
13 

15 28 


37* 36* 
17% 17% 
27* 26 
22 * 22 % 
19* Ifto 
8* 7* 

ft ^ 

16* 15% 

19% 18% 
21* 21 
23* 22* 
18*6 18* 
48* 48* 
50 49% 

28* 25* 
28% 27* 
33* 33* 
16* 16% 
38% 29% 
28* 28* 
27* 27* 
14* 14* 


37% — * 
I7to 

26%— 1 
22%— to 
19% — % 
1% + * 

16% + * 
18* + to 
21* + * 
23 — % 
«* + % 
48% 

49%_ % 
26* 

28% + * 
33* 

is* + to 
30 + to 
28* + to 
27* 

M% + % 


12 Month 
HlohLow Slock 


Sis. Clad* 

DIv. YM. PE lOOsHlgli Low Quot. Ch'ge 


14% 8% 

7J6 V* 
B* 4* 
10% 7* 
28* IS 
18 11% 
16% 5* 

78% 58% 
14* 5* 
20% 11* 
32% 24% 
20% 14% 
5 4 

Tt 7 

32% 22* 
35% 18% 
29*6 17% 
3% 1* 

21*6 9% 
20 15* 

21* 16 
26% 75% 
6% 3 
17% 11% 
43 38% 

14* 9% 

14* 8* 

22% 12* 
24* 15* 
31* 19% 
19* N 
7* 1* 
9% 2* 
13 4% 

41* 30 
16% 13* 
90* SB 


Elcor 54 35 
ElecAs 

EMM 85 

EMMpf U» 95 
Ekdxpi 58 J 26 
Elgin 50 52 18 
Estdnt 

EmrsEI 260 35 14 
Em Rad 54t 75 17 
EmrvA JO 27 11 
Emhart L4KLB 9 
EmoDs 156 85 7 
Emppf JO 105 
Emppf 51 1LS 
EnExc 

EnatCp 32 25 17 
EnliSu J6 16 13 
Enssrch L60 L4 II 
E nsrce 26 

Entarn 

EntxEn 1570115 
En toxin 130 7.1 8 

Eoufxi IS 

Equlmk 

EamkPf 231 135 
EqtRrs 132 45 7 
Egutten .12 15 8 
Erbmnt JO 27 15 
EssBsn M 25 11 
EsmxC 406 14 13 
Estrlns 71 17 I 
Ethyls 36 25 11 
vIEvanP 
vlEvanpf 
vlEvnpfB 

ExCato 150 43 9 

Excata- !J4e7L7 
Exxon 350 63 7 


6 10% 
21 4* 

172 8* 
37 10W 
1289 24 
12 U% 
32 4*6 

1328 71* 
6U 13% 
249 W* 
134 29% 
21 19* 
230x S 
SOOx 8 
804 

116 29* 
43 3416 
604 29* 
80 2* 
244 11 
74 17% 
31 10* 
11 25% 
106 5* 
TO 16% 
234 43% 

a 12 

323 11* 
550 17* 
104 23% 
290 19% 
944 19* 
17S 2% 
43 3 

10 4* 

in 33U 

6 15% 
4567 50* 


10% 

4% 

8% 

10% 

23% 

U 

6* 

70* 

13% 

18 

28% 

19* 

4* 


10%— % 
4* + % 
8% 

10% 

23% 

is — to 

4S6 

71% + to 
13*— % 
ISto 

28*— * 
19*— % 
5 + % 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Sis. Close 

DIv. Yld. PE IDOsHMfl low Boot. OVge 


% to — 
28% 28% + to 
34 34 

29% 29*+.% 
2ta 2* 

ISto 11 + * 

17 17 + % 

18% 18% — % 
25* 25*—* 
5% 5*— V6 
16* 16*— % 
42* 43% + * 
II* 12 + V6 

Uto llto— % 
17* 17% + to 
23* 23% + to 
18* 19% — % 
19 19V6— % 

M 2% — to 
2* 3 + to 

4% (to— to 
34 34 —1 

13* IS* + to 
5DV6 30% + * 


30 20 17 

154 SJ 7 
26 
43 70 
1.1 

35 6 
65 14 
55 12 
45 8 
45 11 
7.1 9 


152 

.16 

3D 

154 

50 

254 

130 

250 


11 6% FH lad 3 

67* 43* FMC 220 3J 51 
23* 17* PPL Gp 158 85 10 
13* 9% FabCtr 38 24 U 

if* 9% Facet 
20* ISto Palrctid 50 43 
39* 33* FOJncpt 350 95 
16% 9* Fairfd .18 13 9 
24% io* FamDis 26 

19* 14* Fanstel 50 29 12 
28% 14* Farah 
13 a* FayDn, 

7 4% Fader* 

37* 29* Fed! Co 
45* 27* FodE xp 

39 29% FdMoo 

19* 10* FedNM 
27 16* FedPBs 

23 16 Fad Rif 

19* 13* FdSorrt 
57* 42* FedOSI 

29% 22% Ferre 

37 25% Fkicst 

17% 4 FblCpA '551 
5% 3% FlnCppf 50 125 
47% 14% FlnCppf 6738223 
7* JVt FnSBor 
19* 16 Flrastn 50 45 9 
21% 12* PlAtlS 50 05 9 
57 50% FtAfl pf L1761L3 

as 21% FBkSys 150 45 8 
35 25% FBkFlQ 130 35 II 

7116 34* FBoat 130 15 11 
27 18* FstOdc L32 S3 19 

87* 70 FChl PfB 8536715 
19* 13% FtBTex 7 JO 9.1 7 
55% 40 FfBTX pf 4.1 lei 4.9 

51 38% FIBTxpf 934013.1 

21 9% FTCItY 10 

20* 10% FFedAz .TSe 5 6 
48% 30% Flnlsie 234 SO 8 
30% 21 Flntstpf 237 83 
U* 7% FtMto 34 23 9 
50* 31% FNS1B 288 65 7 
7* 4% FsSPo 8 

30% 20% FstPn pf 252 95 
31* 22% FHJnRI 1J2 65 14 
7ZHk 14% FtVaBX 54 35 9 
28% 16 FfWIsc 130 45 8 

52 45* FWlsepf6J5 125 

56% 30% Plsehb 150 28 34 
11* Bto FlftlFd 550 J 
34% 20% FHFflG s 132 35 9 
28% Mto FleetEn 36 15 8 
39% 22% Ftanno 58 23 14 
33% 23% FIOXlV 50 26 14 
13% 10% Flexl pf 151 1X1 
37* 19% FHetSI 30 5 17 

31% Mto FloatPt IS 

40 29% FlaEC .16a A 12 

3% BS ^SsT ^ S3 ,5 

7% 3% FlwGtn 
21 11% FIOWTS 52 25 17 

22% 14% Fluor 50 21 
S5* 46% FoOhrC 220 4.1 11 
51% 33* FOTdM 200 4J7 3 
12* 10% FIDear 1J6 I1J 
47* 48 FtHawd ’154 25 U 
15% 10 FaglWh M 2.1 14 
11% 6* FaxSIP 58 75 10 
35% 25* Faxbro 154 X9 76 
11* 6% FMOG 2188226 
24% 13% FrpiMc 50 25 16 
34* 20* Frtafm 50 24 M 
28% 19 Frudhf * 50 IS 6 
32% U Fruftf Pf 250 75 
36* 20 Fuqua 50 13 9 


r 9* 
S3 62* 
2019 23* 
12 11 * 
32 13% 
45 17% 
17 36* 
48 13* 
1082 22% 
2 15* 

64 IB* 
91 10% 

65 6 
183 33* 

1763 35 
19 36% 
3111 Uto 
143 18 
M 22 
16 16% 
497 55 
244 27% 
110 28% 
1773 6* 

2 4% 
62 30% 

316 4% 

993 18* 
58 19* 
X 54% 
244 33* 

4 33* 
124 67% 
697 23% 

75 78% 
190 14% 

5 41 
100 40 

16 10% 
174 11% 
1232 46* 
410 29 
307 10% 
0 48* 
114 7% 

140 29to 
21 29% 

’SIS 

300x 51 
1238 34* 

584 31* 
201 

13,1 
43 T... 

£l£ 
1778 30 
375 54% 

32 S% 

3 9% 

SS'R 

1047 21% 
183 24* 
594 24% 


9* 9* 

61* 62% + % 
23* 23* + 16 
11* 11* 

13* 13*— * 

17 17 — * 
36* 36% + * 
13* 13% — to 
21 % 22 * + * 
15* 15* 

18% IV* + to 
,0 10% 

5* 6 

33% 33%— to 
34* 34%— * 
36 36% + % 

14% 15 
17% 17% + to 
21% 21*— to 
16* 16*— to 
54% 54% + % 
26* 27% + to 
28* 2816— * 
6* 6* + to 
4% 4% + Ml 
29% 30*—* 
4 4 — to 

18 18% + % 
IB* 18*— to 
54% 54% + % 
33% 33%—* 
33% 33* + * 
6 S% 66%— % 
22* 23 + to 
78% 78% 

14% 14% 

41 41 

40 40 +1 

10* 10V6 
18% IB* + V6 
46% 46* + to 
28% 28% — % 
10% 1M6 + to 
48% 48* 

7 7% 

28% 29 +* 

29* 29% + to 
21* 21* 

26% 26* + to 
50% 50% + % 
34* 35% + to 
10* 10* 

34* 34% — % 
19% ms 
37% 38 —1 
30* 30*—* 


rss+to 

;» k: 

19% 19%—* 
54 54% + to 

42 43* + * 

11* 11* 

Stotts 

36% 26* + % 
9% 9* 

21 21V6 — 

24* 24* 

23* 24 + to 


12 


150 


63 

12 
15 11 


X06 74 
250 LI 
248 113 


31* 15* GAF -15e J 
39% 20% GAFpf 130 X2 
37% 25% GAT X 130 35 14 
47% 33% GATXpf 250 
34* 19% GCA 
77* 48* GBICO 
10% 4 GEO 
13% 5% GFCP 
44% 35* GTE 
26* 22% GTE Pf 

»% 19* GTE Pf 

10 4* GaJHou 

SMb 36% Ganeft 
25* 18% GopStr 

30* 10* Gearht 

19* 13* GO ICO 
,0% 9* Gam IIC 
11% 10 Gon.lll 
43* 30% GnCorp 
17% 14* GAInv 
46% 29% GnBcsh 
34* 16* Gemma 
33% 16% GCnpfs 
21 12% GnDtrfs 

84 44 GnDvn 

65% 48% GmEJ 
43% 46* GflFdS 
7 5* GGfhn 

to 5% GoHme 
14* ■% GHostl 
12 ft SflHOUS 

27% 15% Gninst 


298 30* 30* 30* 

48 38% 37% 37*— % 

44 32 31% 32 + to 

6 39% 39% 39% —3 
364 25* 25 2Sto + % 
21 73 72% 73 + % 

74 5% Sto S% 

81 7% 6* 6*— to 

3431 40* 40* 40%— to 

17 24* 24* 24% — to 

13 21* 21* 21* 

4 5% 5% Sto— to 

490 S8’A 57to S7* + to 

49 22% 22* 22% + % 

255 10* 10% 10* + to 

474 18* ISto 18% — to 

163 10* 10V1 10% — % 

281 11% Uto 11*— to 

150b 14144 1879 44* 43 44* +1% 

1530105 61 M* 16* 16*— to 

150 25 8. 98 41* 40% 40% —I* 

50 1J 10 371 30% 30% 30% 

54 1J 2 30 30 30 

16 25f 14% 13* 14 — to 

150 1 J I 2277X M* 66 66U + % 

230 X7 12 4050 59* S9% 59*— to 
250 LI 10 285 61% 40% 40* + % 
50o 9 5 79 4* 6* 4*— to 

10 IM 7H 4% 7 

JO 23 3 1304 13% 12* 13M + * 

34 24 31 22 10% TOM 10%— * 

JO 29 17 667 17% 14% 17* + 


158 

JO 

50 

J6 


26 21 
22 16 
17 16 
35 IS 


60* 45* GflMllb 224 45 34 1162 57 56% 56*— % 

« 61 GMot 5J»r 6.9 5 5932 72* 72 72* + * 

72 33 GMEll .Ito J 084 60%5V%60% + % 

40 33% GMot pf 275 95 12 37* 37* 37* + * 

SZ% 44% GMot pf 550 9.9 1 50% 50% 50% + to 

9 3* GNC .16 22 22 361 7% 7% 7*—* 

13U 7to GPU 6 447 12% 12* 12% + * 

74 46% Gen Re 1J6 21 21 1493 73* 72% 73% — to 

,2* 5 GnRefr 6 3S 11* 11% 11%— to 

S3* 39* Gnsionl 158 43 11 
12 9* GTFIpf 135 105 

12% 10 GTFIpf UD 11.1 


Ito Sto Gensco 
13* GnRod 
23* 15 Gonstg 
22* 16% OsfPf 
36 24 GenuPt 

27* 18 GoPoc 


.10 

150 

150 

1.11 

50 


13 
J 24 

■3 

U 15 
35 23 


37% 33 GoPcpf 234 
37 32% GaPpfB 234 

35 30% GoPcpfC224 65 

28% 22* GOPWPf 354 719 
30 25% GaJPwpf 3174 719 

21 17% GaPwpf 256 125 

21% 17 GaPwpf 252 7X3 
25% 27 % GaPwpf 235 11.1 
66* 52 GaPwpf 750 128 

68 51% GaPwpf 732 125 

30% 20% GerbPs 1.16 29 11 

23% 12 CarOS i J2 5 14 

12% 8% GtartP 

U 5% CtarFn 

27 14% G Iff Hill 

40% 42* Glllatte 
17* llto GleosC 
9% 4* GloWM _ ... 

25% 17* GlobM Pf XSO 175 
12* Bto G Id If DO 52 

ItoGIdlfwT 

29* 11 GIOWP 50 3 I 

Mto 24* Gdrlch 1 Jfl 5.1 12 

■3 73% Gdrctl Pf 755 95 

29% 23 Ooodvr 140 (0 7 

19 13% GordnJ JZ 33 18 

32% IP GouM 58 29 58 

44% Grace 250 (5 10 

69 47 Grolngr 134 21 12 

_ ’ 50 25 


J2 22 19 
240 43 12 

34 S3 


9 
8 

150 26 TO 
155010.1 7 

1J2 (5 


30 


Mto 8% GtAFst 
If . 13* GlAfPC 

(Sto 27% GILkln 

21% 15% GNIrn 

43% 31 GINNk 

28% 16% GtWFln 

IWa 9% GWH4P 
16* 11% GMP 
29% 18* Grevh 
4% 2* Grader 

ink 8% GrowGs _. .. 
12* 6% GTUbEI 58 3 M 

30 22* GniRUi 150 45 7 

24% 24% Gram Pf 250 T05 
■to s?h Gruntol .16 X0 
27* to Gunrra a u i 
39% 25% GHWlt .90 

24% 11% GulfRS 

14% 10 GlfSfUt 154 115 

5% 34% GlfSU Pf 54)8 125 

30 24 GlfSU PT 355 133 

3 316 27 GlfSU PT 450 135 

WU 12* GAero 5*0 55 17 
19* M Gullon 50 25 13 


299 43* 42% 42*- % 
7DQx 11* 11% 11* + to 
3SBX 12 II* 11* 

42 S* 5% Sto— to 
435 W* 16% 16* 

329 21 20* Z1 

12 20% 20% 20% + % 
382 32* 32* 30% + to 
924 22% 22% 22* 

3 35 as 3$ 

3 35 35 35 

2 35 35 35 

32 26* 24* 26*— to 
37 2*6 38* 29% + to 

2 20% 20% 20% — % 

15 20% 30 20% + % 

■ 34* 24* 24* 

1201 61 61 61 — * 

71 Ox 61* 60* 61* + * 

462 29* 29% 29* + * 

404 19% 18* 19 + % 

44 10* 10* 10* 

770 10% 9* 10* 

139 24% 23U 24% + * 
321 60* 59* 40%— % 
37 12* 12* 13* + to 

SKSk 4% 4* 4% + % 

77 20% 19* 20% + * 
614 12% 12 12 — % 

135 3% 3% 3% 

892 30* 29* 30 + % 

387 31 30 30% + * 

430z 82 82 >2 + % 

2875 27* 26* 24*— * 

64 16% 16% 16% 

279 23* 22* 23% + to 

782 41% 41% 41* + % 

206 59% 58* 58*— % 

2179 16% 15% 16* + * 

209 17* 17% IT* + to 

21 39% 38* 39 — * 

3 18* 19* IS* 

_. . 299 35 34* 34% + % 

XI 11 1954 28* 27% 28* +1% 

47 374 17 16% 16* + % 

132 1L9 8 60 15% 15% 15*— % 

130 4J 10 1678 27% 24* 26*-% 
II 292 - 5 4* 4* — * 

24 M 64x12* 12% 12% 

442 12 11* 11*— * 

1« 25* 24* 25% — % 

311 36% 26% 26% + * 

51 5% 5* 5* + to 

___ 36 24* 24 24—* 

26 12 3371 35% 34% 3S + % 

24 13 84 15* IS* 15* + to 

- - - Rga 14% 14% 14% + to 

40X 39% 39% 39% +1% 
15 29% 29% 29%—* 
23 Xlto 32* 32*— % 

21 13* ,3* 13* + % 

26 16* 16* 16% 


49 

30 

25* 

6U 

12 * 

37% 

34* 

29 

17% 

43% 

11 

13% 

44% 

38 

19% 

13% 

26* 

73% 

44% 

S3* 

81* 

27* 

»n 

9* 

34 

16* 

40% 

66 * 

35% 

38* 

10 


150 X4 12 
15 

34 1J 34 


340 47 
58 15% 
621 22* 
3 5% 

5 12 

9 1453 g* 

36 47 23* 

36 28 
339 16% 
150 X5 12 71 (0* 

2 7% 

8 13% 

15 3943 33* 

16 108 26 % 

11 110x17* 

9 76 12* 

13 361 24 

17 1401 71* 

1, 219 32% 

379 53% 
.. 164 83* 

29 244 16 

B 2352 24* 

7 KmeGPf 1.10 135 27 8% 

20% Hirutke 30 5 44 1816 26* 

8* HiratFn AO 25 5 136 M* 
43* Hondo JBe 3 9 176 52% 

46* ! L t .well 1.90 23 11 1730 58 

2D HoovrU 154 X0 13 71 34* 


32 Heinz 
12* HetnrC 
18 HelmP 
3* Hern Co 
11* Ham Inc 
27% Her cull 

15* HerlfC 
19* HerlfC pf I JO 5.4 
16% HerSPln 

28% Hereby 

5% Hessian 
9 Hestnpf 
31% HewIPk 
18* Hex cot 

12 HI5hoar 
8% HtVolt 
17% Hllnord 
45% Hilton 

31 Hitachi .. 

35% Ho) Wav 1.00 1.9 15 
52* HolIrS 150 13 14 
12 HmneD 
11* HmFSD 


,90a 75 

uo 

45e 3 


32 .7 

JO 23 
JS 28 
.15 13 
■54 23 
150 25 
33a 15 


17x25% 
86 5 

JO 1 A 13 4594 43* 


19% HrxnBn 

3* Horizon 

48* 34% HosoCp 

30% 22 Hotel In 260 93 13 
37% 21* HouohM 56 25 ,4 
19* 13% HouFotl 48 27 10 
37* 24% Housint 135 4j 9 
83% 54% Moll rat 04 2J7 3JJ 
55% 36 Holntpf XSO 43 
77* 61 Hotntpf 635 83 


3x27* 
20 34* 
160 18% 
144 36 
1 79* 


52* 

75% 


rtl 


264 112 

6 

\ S . 1 


39* HouNG 

8 HouQR 

272 46 
264*2X3 

11 

,62 46ft 
64x Bft 

23ft 

13ft HowICP 

60 

32 

73 

19 18 

76ft 

20% Hubbrd 

2.28 

03 

17 

31 26% 

13* 

21 

1 

A0 

40 

34 

U 

0 

177x12% 
640 15% 

35 


33 

,6 

9 

■T Mr. 1 

33 

21* Human 

68 

25 

13 

1696 27* 


18% HunrMf 

50 

1.9 

14 

20x26 



50 

22 

IS 

454 35* 



24)0 

76 

9 

22 2611; 


46% 

ISto 

22 % 

5* 

12 

33 

23% 

27% 

16% 

40% 

7 
12 
33 
26% 
17* 
12% 
23% 
70% 
32 
52* 
81* 
15* 
Mto 

8 
26 
13* 
51* 
56* 
34% 
25% 

5 

43% 

27* 

34% 

17* 

35* 

79* 

52* 

75 

23* 

46% 

8* 

IB 

26% 

11* 

14* 

17* 

26* 

25* 

35* 

26% 


46* + % 
15* + % 
22* + * 
5* + to 
12 

33* — % 
23% — to 
27* + % 
16% 

40 to— % 

7 

12 — to 
33to— to 
26% + * 
it* + to 
12* + to 
23% — * 
71% — * 
32 - to 

52 9l 

83% +1% 
16 — to 

24* + to 

8 —to 
26% + % 
M* + * 
52% + * 
57 — * 
34% 

25* + to 
5 

43* + % 
27* +-% 
34*— % 
17*— * 
35*— % 
77*— 3 
52*— Ito 
75 

23to— to 
46 Vi— * 
8* + to 
18 
26% 

11*— to 
15 

77* — % 
2716— to 
26 + % 
3516 + % 
26% — to 



COLLECTOR'S 


130 


35* 21V6 ICInds 
>9* 16* ICMn 
11* 5* ICN 

30 22% ICN Of 

17% M INAln 
25* 23 iPTlmn 
20% 14* IRTPrs L68 
40* 25* ITT Cd LOO 
73* 46 ITT pfH 450 65 
64 40 ITTpfIC 450 6J 

63% 44% ITT pfO 550 Ll 
67* 42% ITT PfI 450 7.1 
21* 15% IU Int 130 75 63 
42* 30* ldOtwP 228 73 8 
22% 73% IdooIB 
25* 17* IHPOWT 264 105 6 
35% 27% llPowpf 4.12 121 
32% 25% llPowpf 338 123 
52M 48* llPowpf 535 ,13 
5U% 45* llPowpf 553 UJ 


29 U 1299 33* 33 33 — * 

36 17* 17* 17* + % 

372 10* ,0* 10to— % 

230 IjS 5 28% 28 28* 

132 115 40 76% 76 76% 

65 74% 24* 24% 

83 7 28 19% 19* 19* 

29 11 5226 34% 3T6 34% — * 



IMPORTED 

“ 


IUCIM-Dll] 



ENGLISH CLASSIC; 

PRESTIGIOUS; EACH A SIGNATURE PIECE. 


12 Month 
High Low 


Stock 


Sis. Close 

DIv. Yld. PE HM&Hlpfi Low Quor. cti'ce 


1 66% 66 Va 66%— % 
185 62* 61% 61% —1 

18 59* 59% 99 %— V6 

2 .63% 63 63 — % 

128 17to 17 17% 

385 42* 42* 47%— to 
648 16 IS* 16 + % 

1467 24* 24% 24% — % 

100x34 34 34 

3Mte 31 31 31 + % 

7 51 to 51 to 51% 

56 50% 50% 50% +1% 


To Our Readers 

Because of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris until April 27, 
some items in the Market Summary above are 
from 3 P.M. New York time instead of the usual 
4 P.M. Also because of the time difference, 
some other items elsewhere in the Business 
Section are from the previous day’s t rading . We 
regret the inconvenience, which is necessary to 
meet distribution requirements. 


37 28*6 llPowpf 457 ,25 


34* Uto |TWa M L9 14 


39* 


A S£ ,m * CB 


ImpChtn 56e 24 8 


30 ,5 


13 


23 


56* 45 IndIMpf 758 128 
17* 14 -IndlMPf 215 126 
,1% 14* IndIMpf 2X5 128 
38* 23% IndIMpf 263 121 
25% 20% IndlMPf 27S 115 
28* 17% IndlGSS 158 73 
15 5% inekoo .14 20 

24to 13% Hifmlc _ 

InserR 260 S3 17 

IngRpf 225 75 
11% InorTac J* AS 20 

_ . 19* InldStl JO 21 

48% 38* inldSIPf 4.75 103 
21* 14 Insllco 150b S3 10 

11% 3* InSPRi 
26% 11* I mo Rue 8 

30to 19 IntgR pf 353 11.9 
37% 15% IntaRpf 4.25 125 
13U 7to intRFn 116 

19 15* IlcpSe ZIOolIJ 

45% 55 In tar CO 358 55 11 
140 120 Inter pf 7.73 5.9 

M* 9% intrfjf M S3 6 

S3* 41 Intiik - - 

16% 8% IntmeQ 
M% 14% InfAlu 

138+ 99 ISM 

M% 15% IntCtrl 
29% 22* IfifFlav 
1IM 5% IntHarv 
7% 2% intHrwt 
50 23% infHpfC 

42 70% IntHplA 

34% 17% IftfH pfD 
43% 32* Int Min 2*0 65 11 
35% Mto InfMn Pf 450 115 
29* 33 IntMutt 136 LI 9 


IS 

(KM 

iro 


300X35* 35* 35* 

83 34 33* 33*— % 

722 36* 36% 34% — % 
13 9 8% 9 + % 

3121 ■ 13% 13* 13* + % 
30002 SSVb 55% Bto +1* 
38 17% 17% 77% 

~~ 17* 17% 17* 

27% 27* 27* . 

25 25 29 + % 

24to S* 76 to 
7V6 4* 7 —to 
279 18* 18 18* +1 

147 46 45% 45% 

5 31 30% 30%— to 

12 12% 12to IZto— to 
173 23% 23* 23*— % 

3 43* 43% 43* + to 

177 T9* 19% 19% — to 
297 5% 5to Sto— to 

B47 20% 19% 20% + % 
231 25* 25 25* + * 

30 Mto 34 34 

31 12* 12* 12% 

38 It* ISto 18* + to 

424 63% 61to 61% — to 

4 133U131%ir%— 3% 
946 10* 70% 10% — * 

44 50to 50% 50* 

412 9 B* 9 + to 
7 18* Uto 1S%— to 
440 25 13 0496 12* 124* 134% + * 
50 14 10 71 21* 21% 21*— to 

1.12 40 15 449 28% 277k 28 
1851 9% 9to 9* 

534 6% 5% 6 — % 

47 47% 44* 46% —1 

B K* 35V. 35% + * 

48 29% 29 29* + * 

410 39% 39 39%— * 

1 35 35 35 — % 

10 Z? 28% 28% 


260 21 8 
33 29 9 


57% 46 intPapr 240 4.9 26 1063 49 48% 48% — * 


17* 9to IntRcs 

54* 32% Uimrth 248 

74% 68% IntNtpf 640 

90% B2to IntNtpf L4B 

40% 27V. InfpbGO 158 

I7to 10 intBakr 

20 15to InfxTPw . 1,90 

20 16% inPwpf 238 123 

19* Mto IcnwaEI 1.90 10.7 8 

30 21* IdwHG 274 92 7 

20% 17 lowlllpf 231 115 

32V. 25 lOwaRs 358 93 8 

34% 26 I pa ICO 354 BJ 8 

13* 9% IpcoCp 54 20 11 

35 23% IrvBk* 1J6 27 7 

54 42% IrvBKPf 2150103 


16 98 13* 13 ,3 

55 9 2750 49% 48to 49V. — to 
30i 74% 74% 74% + * 
100x90 90 90 

67 39 38* 39 + % 

10 16% 15* 15* 
n 19* 19* i9% + % 
7O0x 78* 18% 18% 

90 19 U* 18to 
84 29* 29* 29*— * 
TOOT MTO TO + * 
no 32 31% 31*— * 

177 34% 34% 14* 

,93 llto II lift + to 
296 34% 34* 34*— % 
155 50% 50% SO*— to 


L6 
9 A 
28 13 

9.7 I 


45 13 

24 19 
15 24 

25 9 


15 
20 
L5 
13 17 


150 

30 


35 12 
11 


85 5 


347k 24% LSWVTr 130 

37% 21% LeeEnf .92 

15% 9 LeoMos 20 

21% 15% LMPla, 58 

4U 2* LehVal 
15% 13* Lehfim iJBeliJ 
15% 9to Lennar 30 15 19 

24% 10* LeucNts 4 

36* 23 LevISt 155 55 28 

39 25ft Levttz 32 
50% 40* LOF 132 
79% 65 LOF Pf 435 
32 to 22 UbtyCp 32 
79% 53 LJIIv 220 

40 to i5V> Limited 32 

45% 26% Undlfl 154 
22* IBto Linen 
80 61% Lilian 

53% 32* LocktKf 
42% 29to Loctile 
46 33% Loews S 

35 18 Laglcon __ 

33% 19 LomFIn 1.16 
25% 16* LomMts 

2* 2% LsmM Wt 

Z7* 17* LnStor 1J0 _ 

53 44 LoneS pf 537 II J 

C* 3ft LILCO 
28* 16 LIL PfB 

24 14% LIL PfE 

43 21% LILPfJ 

44 23% LILOfK 

20% 8% LILPfX 
20% 9 LILpfW 

20* 9% LILPfV 
Mto Uto LILPfU 
19% 8* LILRfT 
15* 6 LILpfP 
17% 7 LILRfO 
27% 17 LOOODJ 

33to 19% Loral 

15 10* LaGeaf 

38 22to La Land 

25% 17 LaPac 

32% 28* LaPLof 450 153 
23% 16* LaPLpf 216 14.1 
28% 22* LouvGfl 244 65 7 
49% 36 Lowsfs 200 4J 
30 16to Lowes 
25* left Lubrxi 
32 23* UlCVXk 

20to 15* LudcvS 

16 lOto Lukens 


141 32fft 32* 32* + * 

TO, 38V> 37* 38V. +1 

■ 14 13* M 

38 20% TOto 20to— % 

238 2ft 2* 2% 

184 14 13% 14 + to 

35 12* 12% 12% — to 

50 20* 20% 20* 

82 33* 33% 33* + to 

21 39 38% 38% 

199 45 44U 44to — to 

1 72% 72% 72ft— * 

_ 37 31 to 30* 30ft— * 

4L2 II 1004 7716 76* 77 — * 
5 24 326 36!k 36% 36% + ft 
11 ,2(7 38 37V. 38 


2340103 5 22 21* 22 + * 

250 20 10 409 67V. 66* 66%— % 

50e 13 9 3819 46% 45% 46 — % 

50 25 11 556 29ft 29 29 — % 

23 12 2570 45% 44% (Sto + * 

A 19 52 32% 32to 32*— to 

56 XV. 30 30to — to 

35 24% 24% 24%— to 

119 2* 2ft 2ft— to 

293 22 21* 22 

29 46* 46% 46*— to 
758 6ft 6to 4% 

190x 25% 25% 25% 

30x 22 22 22 —1 

2SQx 42 41to 41to + % 

7 Mi 41% 41 to 41 to + to 

11 17to 17 17to + to 

40 77% 16* 17to + * 

13 17 17 17 + * 

4 20% 20% 20% 

22 16 15* 16 + % 

18 12ft 12 1216 

19 Mto 13* 13ft— to 

261 25* 24* 25% + % 

818 29 28% 29 + % 

17 12to •” 


13 

M 13 17 
35 4A 9 .. 

150 29 II 1347 35 
50b 4.1 16 300 19% 



34* 34ft— * 
- »+ a 

48% 48% + % 



-“I 


M 


23% 13* MACOM 24 1J 19 
54* 38to MCA 58 L7 37 
24ft 16* MCare 15 U 4 
41ft 34 MCarpf XSO 9 A 
14* 7ft MDC XL 27 9 

42 34 ME! JO 13 15 

14ft 9% MGMGr M 33 35 

Mto 10 MGMUa 308 15 

Sto 2* MGMuwf 
25 17% MGMHa 50a 24 17 

24 77ft MB LI a 381 
58% 27V. Macmn uw w u 

53ft 38% Macy I.T6 

19* lift Mod Res 
39% 24 MagJCf 150 29 

29% 3% Mat Ad 1850c 
23% 12% Manhln JOb 21 64 

21ft 13* MonhNt 32 15 19 

24% 11 ManrCs .16 3 32 


30% 

34Vi 

24* 

13ft 

43 

68 % 

S» 

59 

92to 

16% 

•ft 

42% 

«to 

29ft 

26ft 

27% 


20 JWTl 
23% J River 
13% Jamiwv 

1D% JnpnF 

26* JeffPli 
5«to J arc of 
46% J ere pl 

47 JerC of 

7B'A Jercpf 113» 7X2 
12% JerC Pf 218 127 
5ft Jewlcr 


1.12 19 1 
J6 23 
.12- 5 I 
154al1.9 
132 X6 , 
936 126 
L12 135 
L08 135 


2E6 28% 
7(7 25 
47 21% 
92 12% 
613 J7V, 
200x 48%. 
llOi S9% 
IOOi 58 


2816 

2 

21 % 

12 

36 

68 

59 


28% + to 
2**- to 
21W 

12% + to 
J7%— to 
68 % + 1 % 
59% + % 
58 +1 


(20i 90% 90% W/5 
93 Mto 15* 14 — ft 
141 9% 9V. 


28 JohnJn 

IJ0 29 

15 

2582 

41 

40% 

40ft + 


37% JatwOi 

1660 44 


4V 





21* Joraan 

16Q *6 


43 

27ft 




15* Jos**n s 

50 34 


99 

23ft 

33% 



21* Joy AMs 

140 S3 

13 

436 

24% 

24ft 

Mft — 

ft 


10% 7* KDI 
77 Yft KLM» 
39% 33 KMrpf 
41% 24% Kmart 


38 24 


H 


6* 414 
27* 19* 
A Uto 
1% % 
10% 516 
36ft 25% 
13* 11% 
20 15* 

65% » 
20* 15% 
23% 16* 
53% 25 

30ft 16* 
12% 7* 
33% ,4% 
35 , 22* 
18% 10* 
28* 19 
33ft 23% 
Uto 13ft 

23% 15* 
13* 8 
34* 23% 
72% 9 
13* ** 
33% 13to 
27 74% 

29 15* 


HRT 

HollFB 

hoi urn 

Hatlwa 

Holwdpf 

HamPs 

HanJS 

HonJi 

Hgnaun 

HOOOH 

Hanna 

HarBrj 

Hadnds 

Horabti 

HrpRw 

HarrU 

MarGrn 

Hareee 

Harmix 

HoftSa 

HowEI> 

HovtSA 

Hozlehi 

HazLoD 

Heels 

HeetaM 

Hellmn 

Mamo 


150 4.1 
180 45 10 
58 55 17 
J4 55 ( 

1570129 
1J40 93 
1.12 25 M 
33 19 
11 24 
20 14 
13 28 
28 

50 25 13 
58 33 12 
8 

138 45 11 
138 25 10 
150 115 11. 
154 75 ID 
30e 15 t 
36 15 IS 
32 22 l« 
38 23 
30 13 38 
58b 24 12 
36 13 12 


140 

56 


26 5* 
183 24% 
1599 30% 
773 1% 

147 10% 
92 29* 
16S U% 

55 19* 
2*1 45% 

56 19* 
36 10* 
234 51 
126 30* 
100 10 * 

8 30ft 
634 » 
95 17 
33x24% 
211 33% 

11 15% 
42 21% 

12 Uto 
39 24% 
19 Mto 

114 12* 
78* 17* 
1573 20* 
273 21* 


5% 5% 

54% Wto 
29ft 30 — % 
i* ift— % 

ion ion 

29% 29*— to 
13* 13% + ft 
lf* 19% — to 
(S 45% + to 
19% 19*— to 
18% IBto— U 
5016 50% + to 
29* 30V. — % 
M* 10% 

30% 30ft— to 
27% 27% + % 
17 17 — * 

26% 26% 

37to 33% + ft 
M% 15% + to- 
ll* 31 w— n 
U II 

25* as*— to 
Mto IB*— to 

isto is* + % 

17 Tto + to, 
19% 20* +1% 
21 n* + % 


(JO T2J> 

154 35 

40to 28 KN Eng 158 3J 17 
17% 12% KalSTAI 50 4.1 
32% 14*6 KalsCe 20 15 
20% 15% KalC pf 137 85 
Uto B* KaiMb 50 43 
101* 87 Katietl Pll2S4eM.fi 
24 14% KCJrPL 234 IL4 5 

31 35 KCPLpf 350 121 

3(% 29 KCPLpf 433 1X4 
18% 14V. KCPL at 230 122 

20 15% KCPLpf 233 1X4 
54ft 36% KCSau 150 ZT 10 
Mto 10% KCSapf 150 87 
19* 12% KonGE 2J4 7X3 
35* 28ft KonPLI 256 BJ 
2zt* is KaPL pf zn loj 

21 77% KaPL pf 233 109 

(5 18 Katvin 

115 49 Katypf 154 15 

TO 10% KaufBr 5 U 5 
88 68 Koufpf 8J5 113 

50% 29% Kellogg IJ6 35 14 
34% 32 KHIWd 130 35 7 
3ft 1 Krntri 

29* 19ft Kemnt 50 33 U 
26% 2 Oft KvLftll 254 *5 9 
,6% IDft KerrGI 44 28 

56% 18% KarGPf 1JD BJ .. 

Mto » to KarrMc 1.10 27 25 

27% 16% KevBk. 130. S3 8 

S 2% KovCon _ 

19* 14 Kavslnr 58 26 18 
36% Uto Kldaa 130 35 9 

a 42% KKUenf 154 33 
Sift 39ft KlmbC ft Z33 (5 11 
36% 22ft KngniRd M 22 16 
28* 17% Ksger 130 J* 54 
29% 15% Kolmar 32 23 15 
23% 17% Kapere 30 -45 22 
Mto 30% Koprpf 430 7JJ 
104 96% KOPPT PflftflO. 103 


9 

100 

Sto ift 

8ft — 

% 


412 

16% 14% 

MV. 


8 





4053 

33* 32% 

33ft — 

ft 


41 

39 38 to 

38ft 



11(2 

74* 14* 

14* + 

ft 


23 

IS* 15* 

,5* 



T 

M 16 

16 + 

to 


798 9% 9* 9Vi 

6J0fe 89% 89% 89% + % 

4012 23 22ft 23ft— % 

TOOi 29 29 29 —1 

300t MV. Mto 34% + % 
21 18 ,8 18 
5 19 18% 18% 

86 48* 48ft 48* + * 
*00i 11% Uto llto — to 
613272 19 18% 18*— % 

7 96 35 34% 35 

30 2lto 2rw 21% + % 

1 20% 20ft 29*— % 

313 35* 33* 25* +2 

2 89 89 89 —2 

5 740 16ft 15* It* + ft 

2 79%‘79to 79% — % 

742 46* 46 44% — ft 

56 31ft 30% 31ft + ft 
37 IV, I* Ift 
70 71* 21 21ft + ft 
159 36* 25* U 
(1 11% IT* lift + ft 
4 19% 19 19% +1 

464 TOft 27* 30* + * 
62 24% 2Sft 34* + * 

3 7* 2* 2* — to 
46 18ft 18 ISft + * 

m 34% 34% 34*6— * 

1 54ft 54 ft 54ft 

943 SOft SO SO* + to 
161 35 34% M%— ft 

41 27ft 36% 24%— ft 
99 16% 16* 14ft— ft 
699 IB 17% 17% — % 
302 35ft 35ft 39ft + % 

2 100 100 100 
25 13* 12ft 13* + to 


8 

.9 37 
23 


27 40 

27 

M> 15 
1.9 IS 
15 15 
9J 12 


41* 22% TVHrHan 120 95 5 
58* 47 MfrHpt 6330125 
56* 40 mrH pf 5520115 
lift 5% vIMonvl 4 

28ft 18ft viMnv! pf 
31% 21 MAP CO 150 11 8 
4ft 3 Marntz 
2* to Marcde 
3Sft 19% MarMkf 150 
so 30% Marion J2 
12* 9ft MarkC 32 _ 
18% 14* Markpf 120 73 
B6* 59% Marrkrt St 5 16 
67% 35% MrifiM 250 * 

54* 30ft MartM 1J4 
13% 8* MaryK .12 

33% 22% Masco 56 
13ft 7ft MossMr 30 
30 15% MOSM 150 

3% 2 MosovF 

27* 20* MosCp 288 18J 
J1J6 .Wk Wioslnc 132 115 
80% 51% MatsuE 5Jr 5 11 
l(ft 6% Mattel II 

10* 4ft Motel wt 
32ft Mto Mottl Pf XSO U 
15% 9ft Moicam 4 

49% 30ft MavDS 158 4.1 9 

49ft 36ft Movlo 2 jSQo 54 10 
31* 25% McDrpf XTO 8.1 
31* 23% McDert 150 65 17 
12 6ft MCDrl wt 
10% 6% McDItJ 30 23 18 

4^6 4W6 McDfll S 52 15 ,3 
B4Vi 47ft McOnD 154 2J 9 
64* 31* McGEd X00 3.1 97 

S' 4 M5P 1 ? 1 , - 40 12 w 

38 19ft Mcinta 

^ 5KT-“» 230 55 12 
15% 10 Me Loan a 

6% 3* McU wt 
27* Ito McNeil JO 33 7 
fift 27* Mead uto 33 e 
34* 13* Mesnnt 24 15 10 
34% 24% Medtm J6 2J 9 
51* 33% Mellon 258 SJ 9 
27 22* Mellon Pf250 10 l7 

«% MtaftWIvIlt - 
44ft 40ft Merest 
VK* 78ft MerS 
48% 2* Marath 
»* 22 MwLvn 
3* 2 McsaOf 
22 13* NlesaPt 

35* 26ft MexaR 
Mb Sto Mereb 
5* 2ft Mestek 
TO% 21* MtEpfC 330 133 

*?£ K ,ewi «s >ta 

3* 2% MexFd .17# S3 

12% 17 Mhcn pf X0J 7XO 
1,9 1L2 

16% iy- McflER IJ8 85 


428 18* 18% 18* 

1294 5396 52% S3 — * 
<27 21ft 20* 21 Vi + * 
2 37% 37% 37% 

435 12 lift lift — ft 
26 40% 39ft 40% + ft 
83 14 13% 13% 

321 12% 12ft 12% + ft 
7 2% 2% 2% 

188 24* 24% 24% + % 
71 18* Iff* 18ft— Ik 
43 53% 52*6 S3 + % 
26 11 1636 44* 44 44% 

*» 12% 12ft 12% + % 
4 363 35ft 34U 34%—% 
33 3ft 3% 3ft 
Jffl MV. 14 14%— % 

185 20% 19% 20% + *t 
152 24* 23ft 23ft— % 




1255 35* 35* 35* + ft 
80 52ft 52* 52%— ft 
.29 50 SO 50 — % 
179 7% 7ft 7% + % 
54 24 23ft 24 
290 32ft 32 32 

^ tS? s nti# 

45 8 44 34 33* 31*— ft 


44 34 33* 33*— ft 

184 55ft 55 55V. + ft 

83 9ft 9* 9*— to 
,13 15* 15% 15% 

184 B3ft 83* 83%+%., 

897 « 44 64% —1 .vf. 

234 49ft 48% 48ft + * 

334 11* 11% 11%—% 

Ml 29 28* 29 +ft 

47 12*6 12% 12ft 

122 19 18% 18* 

364 2ft 2% 2ft + to 
39 27ft 26% 26%— % 

30 71* 11% 11% 

546 38% 58 ft 58ft — % 

561 13ft 13 13% + % 

236 9% 9ft 9% + to 

79 30% 30* 30*6— * 

278 14% M 14* + * 

290 (6ft 45* 46 + * 

172 48 47ft 47% + to 
a 27 26* 27 + ft 

170 26 25ft 26 + ft 

14 (ft t* 6*— to 

17 9 8* 8% + ft 

872 59ft 58ft 59% 

,415 73* 72% 73to + *k 
10£ 64* <4* 64% 

557 44* 43* 43ft 
58 38ft 37ft 37ft— ft 
113 43ft 42* 43 + to 

93 12% 12 12 

518 4ft 4 4%— % 

13 27 26ft 27 + ft 

IMS 36* 35% 36% 

213 16% 16ft 16ft + ft 
257 3,16 30* 30% 

93 48% 48ft 48ft— * 

24 26% 26ft 26ft— % ' 


. ■ 






50 


1326 53 
JBeU.l 


154 34 12 2735 44% 40ft 42% —7ft jp 

JJg H JO 91 55ft S5ft 55% + % ▼ 

330 XI 15 1266 103ft 102V. lttZft— % 

’•00 14 IS 25 63ft 4216 62*6 + ft 

27 29 5104 29ft 29* 29ft— to 
_ .3?1 2% 2ft 2% + 16 

1233 19* 19 19 

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(Continued oa Page 10) 


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Dn.gft«fa '•■ *.W -Otter apriia ts' P.14 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1985 


KrralbSSribuiu. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


* * 


Page 9 



Wiah 

227.711 




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ENGLISH •' • 

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IHTERNATlOWAt MAHAOER 

Foreign-Affairs Graduates 
little Valued by Business 

By SRERHY BUCHANAN 

Iititmaamal fiendtf Tribune 

ARIS — Many U.S. multmaiionab still have a provincial 
world view — according to a recent survey, they would 
rather hire a good product manager fresh out of business 
school who has never set fool outside the United States 
dun a well-traveled imcrnaiional-af fairs graduate who doesn't 
know the first thing about product management or marketing. 

According to the survey, by the New- York based Institute of 
International Education, U.S. corporations value business skills 
over international expertise. • 

[ Most executives survejred said 
they prefer to hire graduates Managers expressed 
with a master's degree in busj- 0 , ,, 

□ess administration over grad- 30 overwnel Plfng 

uates with degrees in interna- *-*.!*■—**.„„ ra- 
tional affairs and economics, pTCI6rCHCC for 

-taffSaSaftra 

vanced International Affairs ' 

of Johns Hopkins Uoh’ersity in Washington, half of the graduat- 
ing class is hired by the private sector. Of this group, half are 
commercial banks and the rest are mostly trade associations and 
consulting firms. 

“Major multinational companies are not recruiting with us 
because we don’t offer marketing, management and accounting 
courses.” said Mary Goldman, head of the scbodTs placement 
f office. 

Yet, this bias in favor of pure business sp eciali ties comes as 
U.S. companies have become far more international in the past 
few years. According to the Conference Board, a business- 
sponsored research organization, more than 200 of the 500 largest 
U.S. companies generate at least 20 percent of their revenue from 
abroad and over 60 generate 40 percent from abroad. From 1950 
to I960, the board said, the number of foreign subsidiaries of U.S. 
companies doubled; from 1961 10 1975, they doubled again, to a 
total of 10,849. 

Schools for international affairs, such as SAIS, the Fletcher 
School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, the Woodrow 
Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton 
University, the School of International Affairs at Columbia 
University and the John F. Kennedy School at Harvard Universi- 
ty, originally trained their graduates for public service. But in the 
past 10 years, some of the schools, in an effort to make their 
graduates more attractive to the private sector, have stepped up 
their economic and financial courses. 

i HE main lakers, according to the schools, have been the 
big U.S. commercial basks. These banks, such as Citibank, 
Chase Manhattan and Chemical, are the only multination- 
als that regularly recruit graduates from schools of international 
affairs, the schools say. The banks, which run intensive manage- 
ment-training programs of their own, believe it is easier to train 
someone in basic credit analysis than in international economics 
and finance. 

Bui there is no easy way to make it on Wall Street without 
heavy business training. Some international-affairs graduates 
who moved into the investment business from commercial bank- 
ing did so after obtaining a master’s degree in business. 

“With this type of degree on Wall Street, you have to have 
something else." said Syms Farr, a graduate of the Fletcher 
School who successfully made the transition from Chemical Bank 
to the New York investment firm of Cyrus J. Lawrence. “One 
place you can start is in a commercial bank." At C J. Lawrence. 
Mr. Farr is how in charge of developing institutional relation- 
ships with European investors. 

According to spokesmen for the schools of international af- 
fairs, many large insurance companies, such as American Inter- 
national Group and Chubb Corp., and such accounting firms as 
Arthur Andersen & Co., have also started recruiting their gradu- 
ates. Still, most U.S. multinationals look for skills found other in 
(Continued ou Page 11, CoL 5) 


Currency Rates 


3 ■ 

I 

DJU. . 

Ff. 

ILL. 

Gfdr. 

BJ. 

IF. 

Yen 

150 

42W 

112.925* 

30.96- 

0.1774* 

— 

sou- 

13355- 

139X4 y 

AXS25 

7046 

30.1290 

4599 

11565- 

1753 

— 

23539 

2x87 • 

3.1S3 

3J0 

— 

33.7* * 

1549 * 

8858 • 

*968 ■ 

11135 ■ 

12355* 

1-3B5 

.... 

3TO25 

115933 

2x12.70 

45885 

74395 

32663 

7971 

lOOfJO 

Z474.00 

43&J0 

206J3 

— 

544.99 

3X493 

75530 

7271 

— 

1.213 

3.1* 

912 

1.99500 

3 555 

43X5 

3X575 

25420 

94345 

1L603 

10525 

— 

47W* 

27043 

11141 ■ 

3L6W5 3.7705- 

2S4J25 

310.73 

81.7* 

uen 

1253 - 

72X8 

40169- 

*4.99 


14715 

3.2105 

84X55- 

2719* 

aua* 

74X49- 

42035* 

— 

UM4* 

0.7093 

0.5877 

2JZ345 

Ktnat 

1X2X37 

2SZ3S 

44.9796 

1.8845 101.132 

0.961081 

0JJ1447 

10*524 

9X5801 

1,97X38 

3X977 

423413 

24137 

249.74 


5 1 •;* w 

"v • : ••• '■ 

153 '5 rt !“ 

it 3>iJ 

irt 

IS ft? 

m tt l- 

* Currency 

Fee 

Dollar Values 
• c™, 

_ *. Currency 

Per 


£ 

Eqnlv. 

UJU 



E«dy. 

USX 

-Vi ^ 

0x554 Australian! 

15353 

0904 Irish £ 

10147 

04491 Stanmnl 

22341 

"T"- ; . ’ 5* 

13 * V. 

00*48 AosSrtM idlllllM 

2323 

00011 Iwoefl SMkel 

901X5 

0507 2 African road 1.9721 

: . j«i 

00154 OMgfaafla franc 

4X90 

13113 KowolU (floor 

0262 

00013 2 Korean won *41-55 

lx 


0 7363 Canadian 1 

12733 

02944 Malay. rineoH 

25215 

00057 Span, peseta 

175X5 

- =.* 

ie'T u f 

00883 Drnibfi kroo» . 

112* 

0.11*1 Men*, krone. 

9515 

0.1697 swtd-kraoa 

9.115 

r 7 _ 7 yr. 


0.1534 FbuHii markka 

654 ' 

00545 raft peso 

163475 

90253 Taiwan! 

39.51 


• ’ ifa ** 

3! U| 7 

0.0074 Creek drachma 

135X0 

00050 Porl.cMDdo 

17100 

00141 TMibohl 

27X35 



0.1282 Hem Kanos 

756 

02771 Saudi rival 

3J083 

02733 UXE-dlrham 

3X729 


74 . f 
. ftp 


,S£fi- 

ir* ’i \r 


■’ , • i; r 

& S 'If! SSsr 
S J * SfiSSN- 


C5KrllM:<ai] irWit 

(oi Commercial franc (b) Amounts needed fo txxy one po u nd (cj Amounts needed to Buy dm dolfor 1*7 
Units at VM 1*1 Until ol 1,000 <y) Units of HUM 
N.O.: not auoted: MA: not ovaltotrit. 

Source*: Banov* ou Ban * Au iBrvuol *>: Banco CorrmerdaSa ttaUano IMItan); Botmm 
National do Parts (Paris); IMF ISOM ; Banana A rob* at InrerpotioncHa d'lnvtstlcsommii 
tamer. rtyaL tUrham). Other data from Reuters and AP. 



Eurocurrency Deposits 


April 9 


DOHar 
8 V. . B V. 
low ■ 8 V. 
8V. - ? H. 
Wt . 

Wi • 10V, 


D-Mark 
MA - 5* 
In. - Ss 
5%. - iH, 

All - 4U 
th ■ A tv 


Swiss 
Prone 
5'fc ■ 5H 
5% . SM 
SW ■ PA 
54* - PA 
to • to 


Preach 
SMfWnv Franc 
13 ik- is w in - ina 
134k- llh 1046 ■ 10% 
134k- 134k 10% ■ 11 


ECU SDR 
9% - 10 8% 

9Sk - 10 H. 8ft 
10 • »ft 8% 


n% 

ljlk 


1546 

1246 


11 lk- 11 «k » Ik - 10 4k 14k 
lift - lift Wft - IITM. m 


Rates owMnbli (a tnteroank aaoosits at St minion nrtntmvm tor emdvaknu). 

Source?: Maroon Guaranty taottor. DM. SF. Poona FF); Lktrtis Baras (ECU!; Reuters 
tSDRt. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


April 9 


1 mo. 

Bik -BV. 
Source: Reuters- 


liras. 
Bft -9 


3 mas. 
» -tft 


<mtts. 

-9ft 


l nor 
10ft - 10'A 


■ m r 


Key Money Rates 




-us. 


l«5 


.1 Cl 


United States 

Owe 

Prev. 

Diicounl Rale 

6 

s 

'■ Fedetol Fonda 

-8ft 

a >- 

Prime Bale 

10ft 

10ft 

Broker Loan Bore 

9ft 

*W 

Comm. Paoer, 30-179 dans 

8X0 

2«S 

3^nonth Treasury Bills 

213 

8.10 

wnanm Treasury Buis 

8X4 

254 

CD1 30-59 dors 

215 

215 

CDs *049 daus . 

230 

820 

West Germanv 



Lomoord Rate 

too 

4JU 

Overmah) Rale 

505 

290 

One Monlh imetbank . 

290 

496 - 

J -month iniertenk 

4.15 

215 

4-monHi interbank 

425 

'.4JS_ 

France 



i /ntervwiflon Rare 

Wft 

KWr 

Call Money 

10ft 

10 ft 

One-monm. interbank . 

10ft 

»ft 

j-monin inieroons 

lflft 

10ft 

4-monm Interbank 

18ft 

10ft 

Sources: Reuters. CemmenbonK. Cnat f-v . 
anaats. Liard* Bank. Book ot Tokyo. 


Britain 

Bonk Base Rate 
Coll Money 
Ol-dovTYmrturv Bin 
S ntofiih Interbank 
Japan 

OKCouni Rote 
CoU MOtfty 
tiO-aov Inlorbonk 


Close Prev. 

13-13% 13-13% 
■ 13161 13 

13 Ik 12% 

13 Ik 13 S no 


5 

5ft 

6% 


5 

4W 

5ft 


Gold Prices 


] 


AM. PM. Ch'oe 

323 55 33355 + 7.40 

23175 - + 7JS 

32370 322X1 + MS 

mSO 322.05 + MS 

323,10 323.10 * 135 

- 324.10 — 0.90 

OUXial flalngs lor Londort. Pam 0M Uixttn- 
boor«.oMnM90Mci(Hira oricn (or Horn Kom 
and Zurm. New York Come* turreni conlrocr. 
Alt orices la D.5S per ounce 
Source: Reuters. 


Hon Kora 
LUAembours 
Rons 1125 Mini 
Zurich 
Lonooo 
New York 


U.S. Firms 
Plan 7.3% 

Expansion 

Capital Outlays 
To Slow in 1985 


The Associated Prat 

WASHINGTON — U.S. busi- 
nesses plan to boost spending on 
expansion and modernization in 
1985 at less than half the rate of 
increase of last year, the govern- 
ment reported Tuesday. 

The Commerce Department pro- 
jected that the gain inis year would 
be 73 percent after removing the 
effects of inflation. Thai compares 
with a 14.9-percem surge in 1984, 
the biggest increase in 18 years. 

The jump in capital spending last 
year was a key force powering the 
United States to its best year of 
overall growth in more than three 
decades. The economy, as mea- 
sured by the gross national prod- 
uct, grew 6.8 percent in 1984, a feat 
unmatched since 8.3-percent 
growth in 1951. 

Analysts have been expecting 
that capital spending would cool 
off somewhat this year and have 
revised their expectations of 
growth downward as well. 

The Reagan administration is 
forecasting 4-percent growth in the 
GNP, which measures the total val- 
ue of goods and services, including 
income from foreign investments. 
But many private economists be- 
lieve that the United States will be 
lucky to achieve growth of between 
3 percent and 3.5 percent. 

The department's information 
about 1985 plans came from a sur- 
vey conducted from January 
through March. That survey put 
spending for 1985 at $384.4 billion, 
beTore adjusting for inflation. That 
compares with spending in 19S4 of 
$3533 billion. 

Before removing inflation, capi- 
tal spending rose 16 percent in 1984 
and is expected to rise 8.7 percent 
in 1985. 

The latest survey reflected a 
S!.3-billion increase in 1985 spend- 
ing plans compared with a survey 
conducted in late October and ear- 
ly November. 

The new survey found that man- 
ufacturing industries plan an 11- 
percent increase in spending, be- 
fore adjusting for inflation, 
compared with the previous survey, 
which found a 10.4-peicent in- 
crease. 

The largest increase in manufac- 
turing was in the auto industry, 
which was planning a 38.2-percent 
increase in spending for modern- 
ization and expansion. 


Kiwifruit as an Economic Sweetener 




By Steve Lolir 

(Ynr York Tima Smut 

TEPUKE New Zealand — It 
may be homely on the outside, 
often likened to a small suede 
potato or dubbed the “hairy ber- 
ry." hut the kiwifruit is now be- 
ing hailed as the wave of New 
Zealand's future. 

Prime Minister David Lange 
points to the kiwifruit as a sym- 
bol ihaL, economically speaking, 
there can be life for New Zealand 
beyond sheep. Traditionally, the 
country has tied ib well-bang to 
lamb, beef, butter and other ani- 
mal products that represent 70 
percent of New Zealand's export 
earnings. 

Moreover, the government has 
subsidized sheep and dairy pro- 
duction, although foreign mar- 
kets have dwindled due to 
changed dietary habi is and rising 
protectionism. As a result, New 
Zealand today is a nation of 3.2 
million people, 70 million sheep, 
rising foreign debt and a declin- 
ing standard of living. 

To arrest the decline, Mr. 
Lange, who wus elected last year, 
plans to cut the subsidies and 
open up agriculture to market 
forces. What the country needs, 
be insists, are new products like 
kiwifruit. 

As a food, the kiwifruit rates 
highly. The succulent green flesh 
is dotted with minute edible 
seeds. Its taste often is described 
as melon-like, but distinctive. 

A recent study concluded that 
it has more fiber than bran, and 
twice as much vitamin C per 
weight as an orange. While low- 
calorie and sodium-free, it con- 
tains hefty amounts of potassi- 
um and calcium. 

Three-fourths of the nation's 
kiwifruit exports are grown in 
the Bay of Plenty, a verdant area 
facing' the Pacific that has be- 
come a wellspring of entrepre- 
neurial activity and a magnet for 
new investment. 

A bumper crop is hanging on 
the vines now, waiting to be 
picked starting later this month. 
An estimated 21 million trays of 
kiwifruit will be shipped abroad 
this year, or SO percent of the 
crop, up from 13.7 million trays 
in 1984. 

Kiwifruit represents more 
than half of the fresh fruit ex- 
ported by New Zealand, 13 per- 
cent of total exports, but it is 
gaining fast. Export earnings this 
year are expected to reach $105 
million (about 226 million New 
Zealand dollars)', up from $70 
million in 1984 and shipments 
overseas are projected to triple 
by 1990, to nearly 72 million 
trays. 

The New Zealand Kiwifruit 
Authority, which was established 
in 1977 to assist growers and 
promote sales, is pursuing im- 


Who Buys the KM 

llfteenl ol lolnl b.iyi eipoiied) 


Other !4.2ft> 


— Belgium 3.9% 



i MS- 1 <496 *•> Kivrifeul Aumonlf f***LUM 


provements in marketing, culti- 
vation and even in the product 
itself. 

“There may be a case for one 
without die hair," Peter S. Beny. 
chairman of the Kiwifruit Auth- 
ority's scientific research com- 
mittee. said solemnly. 

The kiwifruit boom of the past - 
several years has brought new 
growers here in droves, mostly 
former sheep and cattle ranchers 
and dairy farmers. It has ■■d^i 
spawned a cottage industry of 
consultants, investment advisers 
and others. 

“Oh sure, there are plenty of 
experts now.” said Roly Earp, 
61. a grower and one of the pio- 
neers of the industry. 

Land prices have soared. So. 
typically, a group of individuals 
will pool their money to buy 
acreage. One of them may be a 
farmer or an agronomist, but 
most of them are bankers, law- 
yers, doctors and the like, who 
arc simply investors. 

Just the mention of a few of 
the well-known towns in the area 
evokes images of great wealth, 
justified or not. “If you are from 
Te Puke, .everyone just assumes 
you are a kiwifruit millionaire,'' 
says Terry A. Cornins, 35, a 
grower who worries about his 
mortgage payments. 

Growing kiwifruit is small- 
scale. capital-intensive and high- 
ly productive after the six to sev- 
en years it takes to get an orchard 
yielding at peak levels. Some of 
the big syndicate-owned or- 
chards are as large as 200 acres 
(about 81hectnrcs). but the aver- 
age holding is less than 20 acres. 

Kiwifruit cultivation lakes 
time and patience even in the 
Bay of Plenty, where the weather 
is temperate and rainfall is just 


The New Tort Tunes 

right, at 50 inches to 60 inches 
(about 129 to 154 centimeters) 
annually. 

For instance, Fred Berryman, 
a Te Puke grower, bought an 
additional 18 acres in 1979 for 
more than 550.000. Since then, 
be has invested three to four 
times that amount in planting, 
preparation and cultivation. This 
year, for the first time, that acre- 
age will return a profit on an 
anticipated yield of 25.000 trays. 
Once in full production, howev- 
er, the return from the land is six 
to eight times what it was when 
animals grazed on it. 

The international success of 
the kiwifruit is attributable to the 
product and its marketing. The 
kiwifruit hoik an unusually long 
shelf life — essential for export 
because it can be shipped by less- 
expensive ocean freight and keep 
for many weeks on supermarket 
shelves. 

The control of marketing is Lhe 
other key element. It is possible 
partly because despite increased 
cultivation in America. Italy, 
France and Japan. New Zealand 
still accounts for more than half 
of the world supply. 

New Zealand has long had on 
advantage over these rivals. The 
fruit then known as the Chinese 
gooseberry, arrived in the coun- 
try around the turn of the centu- 
ry’. In the 1950s, government 
agronomists began developing 
hybrid strains, including the 
now-dominant Hayward variety. 
At that time, the' fruit was re- 
named after the country's mo- 
tional bird, the kiwi 

Still, it was not until the late 
1970s that production reached a 
level where foreign marketing 
methods became a central issue. 


Securities Firm 
Misled Investors, 
SEC Says in Suit 


Compiled Ay Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEWARK, New Jersey — A 
government securities dealer that 
filed for protection under UB. 
bankruptcy law on Monday mis- 
represented its financial condition 
to investors, a Securities and Ex- 
change Commission official said 
Tuesday. 

U.S. District Judge Dickinson 
Debevoise froze the assets of the 
New Jersey-based company, Bevili, 
Bnesler & Schulman Asset Manage- 
ment Corp., at the request of Uie 
SEC. At a bearing Tuesday, the 
judge said be would approve an 
SEC request to freeze the assets of 
three affiliated companies. 

The order does not include a 
regional broker-dealer related to 
the companies, Bevili Brcsier & 
Schulman Inc. SEC officials said 
the broker-dealer has about 25.000 
public customers. 

Ira Sorkin, the federal agency's 
regional administrator, charged in 
court papers tbat Bevili Bresler & 
Schulman Asset Management 
Corp., BBS Government Securities 
Group Inc., Bevili Bresler & Schul- 
man Government Securities IntL, 
Bevili Bresler & Schulman Inc„ 
BBS Securities Group Inc., and five 
people misrepresented the condi- 
tion of .Asset Management Corp. 

.According to the SEC official, 
customers of the unregulated Asset 
Management were led to believe 
that they were dealing with the reg- 
ulated company — Bevili Bresler & 
Schulman Inc. 

The SEC also alleged that the 
firm had failed to disclose that its 
ability to meet its obligations to 
customers was impaired by a $65- 
million loan to an affiliate. The 
company included 565 milli on la- 
beled “due from an affiliate" 
among its assets. 

An attorney for Asset Manage- 
ment Corp. declined to comment 
on the allegations. 

Mr. Sorkin said the firm will 
have at least $140 million in debt 
coining due by June 30 that it will 
be unable to pay. 

The company said in court pa- 
pers that as of Dec. 31, 1984, its 
asseis were $1502.7 million while li- 
abilities came to $4982 million. 

Court documents filed by the 
firm showed that it owes money to 
at least 61 creditors, most of them 
savings and loan associations. The 
papers did not specify whether the 
debts were secured. 

The three largest creditors listed 
in the filing were American Federal 
Savings & Loan. Oak Park, Dlinois, 
$30 million; Fort Lee S&L, Fort 


late interbank rotes on April 9 , exdudng fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rotes at 
4 PM. . 


Amsterdam 
BrusMlsta) 
Frankfurt 
London <b1 
Milan 

Newvorktcl 

Paris 

Tokyo 

Zorich 


World Bank Halts Payment of Development Loan to Brazil 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

Nor York Timet Sfrru-e 

WASHINGTON — The World 
Bank has stopped disbursements 
on more than $250 million of loan 
commitments for development of 
Brazil’s northwest frontier because 
conditions lor protection of Indi- 
ans and the environment have not 
been met, according to members of 
Congress and environmental 
groups. 

The action was taken in mid- 
March, but was not made public 
until sources revealed it on Mon- 
day. 

“It represents ibe first time the 
bank has ever halted disbursements 


ft 


for environ mental reasons,** said 
Bruce M. Rich, staff attorney for 
the Natural Resources Defense 
Fund. 

The World Bank's action was re- 
lated only to environmental con- 
cerns and not to Brazil's financial 
roblems with the International 
dnetary Fund and commercial 
banks, bank officials stressed. Nor 
is it expected to affect other loans 
to Brazil. 

The project, to develop agribusi- 
ness in a region known as Polonor- 
oestein Ronddnia Province at Bra- 
zil's western extremity, has drawn 
criticism from environmentalists as 
well as Indian rights advocates, an- 


thropological associations in the 
United States and Brazil and Re- 
publican and Democratic members 
of Congress. 

Critics say the development was 
poorly planned. They argue that it 
has spawned unsustainable land 
use. deforestation, invasion of Indi- 
an lands and violent land conflicts. 

The project, which calls for con- 
struction of a 1 .000-mile ( 1.609 ki- 
lometer) jungle-penetration road 
and for a variety of agricultural 
services, has been subjected to a 
good deal of heat from congressio- 
nal committees. 

There is a “growing congressio- 
nal concern that sustainable, eco- 


logically sound development must 
be a basis for international devel- 
opment assistance efforts," said a 
report last September by the House 
Subcommittee on International 
Development Institutions. 

“This is very good news," Sena- 
tor Robert W. Kasren Jr„ Republi- 
can of Wisconsin, said about the 
suspended payments, “and we look 
forward to working with the World 
Bank and the Treasury to resolve 
these environmental concerns.” 

H. Martin Koelle, the bank’s act- 
ing director of information and 
public affairs, said the bank and 
Brazil had been “reviewing” the 


project and that “Brazil has re- 
quested the bank in the meantime 
to suspend disbursements.” 

“The bank has suspended dis- 
bursements." he said. 

Brazil, which has fallen out of 
compliance with conditions on 
loans from the International Mon- 
etary Fund, has earmarked about 
SI. 6 billion for development of the 
Polonoroeste project, of which 
S434.4 million in six separate loans 
was to come from the World Bank. 

The bank has disbursed $178.3 
million on these loans. The effect of 
the suspension is to freeze the re- 
maining $256.1 million. 


Dollar Gains Some 
In N.Y. Trading 

Compiled by Oar Staff From DupatJies 

PARIS — The dollar made slight 
gains Tuesday in late New York 
trading. 

The dollar was at 3.140 Deutsche 
marks, up from 3.131 on Monday. 
The British pound was the only 
major currency that gained against 
the dollar in New York, rising to 
$1.2130 from $1.2125 on Monday. 
Other late rates, compared with 
Monday, included: 9.62 French 
francs, up from 9.57: 2.6575 Swiss 
francs, up from 2.6350. and 254.80 
Japanese yen, up from 254.75. 

Earlier, the dollar finished with 
small lasses in Europe where reac- 
tion was mixed to the news that a 
U.S. securities firm, Bevili, Bresler 
& Schulman Asset Management 
Corp., had filed for protection 
from creditors under U.S. bank- 
ruptcy law. Most dealers said that 
it was not a sign of general weak- 
ness in the U.S. financial system 
and would not influence currency 
trading, but others said the news 
could have longer-term implica- 
tions. (IHT. Reuters) 


Lee, New Jersey, S19-3 million: and 
Worthen Bank, Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas. S12L5 million. 

The bankruptcy filing came a 
month after another small securi- 
ties dealer, ESM Government Se- 
curities of Fort Lauderdale, Flori- 
da, was closed by the SEC. The 
agency found that the firm may 
have left dozens of its mostly bank- 
ing and governmental customers 
with $320 million in losses. 

The failure of ESM led to a run 
on one Ohio savings and loan and 
eventually led to the state-ordered 
closing of 69 others insured with it 
under a private program. Many of 
those thrifts have since reopened. 

Meanwhile, the chairman of the 
Federal Reserve Board, Paul A. 
Volcker, said Tuesday that the Fed 
and the SEC are considering tighter 
regulation of government securities 
dealers in the wake of the failures. 

Answering questions at the an- 
nual meeting of the Export-Import 
Bank, Mr. Volcker said, “The fail- 
ures of fringe government securi- 
ties dealers are a matter of concern 
and have provoked a rethinking at 
the Fed and the SEC." 

He did not elaborate, although 
he suggested that some kind of reg- 
istration might be considered 

(AP. UN. Reuters). 

■ Legislation Proposed 

Representative Timothy E. 
Winh, Democrat of Colorado and 
chairman of the House Energy and 
Commerce Committee's finance 
subcommittee, will propose legisla- 
tion next week to impose limited 
regulation on lhe government secu- 
rities market, Reuters reported 
Tuesday from Washington. 


rr= CHARTER =n 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE" 


go anywhere. 

:k Islands. 


125 ft. 12 

Wc sure rhe best in Gree 
Mediterranean Cruises Ltd. 

3 Stadiou Sc, Athens. 
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Profits for Arms Makers Outpace U.S. 

By Jeff 

fir York Tt 


Gcrth 

New York Times Sen-ice 

WASHINGTON — The na- 
tion’s largest military contractors, 
whose high earnings are being 
questioned by (he Pentagon and 
Congress, enjoyed a rate of profit 
last year that was much greater 
than the average for U.S. industrial 
corporations, according to corpo- 
rate annual reports. 

The reports for 10 of the largest 
weapons makers showed that, on 
average, they realized a 25-percent 
return on equity in 1984. In con- 
trast. the average return for manu- 
facturing corporations of all sorts 
was only 12.8 percent, according to 
figures the Census Bureau released 
last week. 

The measure of profitability — 
which shows after-tax profit as a 
percentage of shareholder equity— 
is widely used on Wall Street and 
accepted as fair by the companies. 
Shareholder equity is the amount 
by which a company's assets ex- 
ceed its liabilities. 

The 10 companies whose annual 
reports were reviewed were Boeing 


Co., General Dynamics Corp.. 
Grumman Corp.. Litton Indus- 
tries, Inc., Lockheed Corp., Marlin 
Marietta Corp., McDonnell Doug- 
las Corp., Northrop Corp., Rayth- 
eon Co. and Rockwell Internation- 
al Corp. 

Six of the companies sold two- 
thirds of their output to (he federal 
government, and the other four 
sold at least 40 percent, according 
to the recently released annual re- 
ports. 

The 25-percent average return 
on equity actually understates how 
much the contractors make on their 
military business. The measure in- 
cludes commercial sales, where 
profit margins are generally lower. 

The can motors' reported profits 
are also conservatively staled in the 
sense that after-tax figures subtract 
deferred taxes, as well as taxes ac- 
tually paid. Under tax law, the 10 
companies were able to defer, or 
put off until future years, more 
than SI.! billion in taxes last year. 
Thus, they retained that money, 
just as they did after-tax profits. 

When profits are recalculated on 


the basis of taxes actually paid, 
instead of simply provided for, the 
contractors' average profit rate in- 
creased to 35 percent on equity, 
from 25 percent. 

Profit rates among the 10 com- 
panies reviewed ranged from 16 
percent, for Litton and McDonnell 
Douglas, to 42 percent for Lock- 
heed. Even the least profitable ex- 
ceeded the average for all manufac- 
turers. The results continued a 
trend of high profits over the last 
five years. 

The 10 companies also reported 
that their backlog of government 
orders, an indicator of future prof- 
its, totaled more than $80 billion. 
Their backlog of commercial busi- 
ness is considerably smaller. 

As profits of the industry have 
increased, so has the questioning of 
that profitability. Last month the 
Air Force requested that two con- 
tractors return S2QS million in ex- 
cess profits. Next month the Penta- 
gon will complete its first study of 
weapons profits in a decade, with 


Industry 

recommendations expec 
whether to change the Pentagon's 
profit formula for contractors. 

“The defense industry is awash 
in cash," said Senator Lawton 
Chiles, the Florida Democrat who 
is ranking minority member of the 
Senate Budget Committee. 

The contractors also continued a 
trend of increasing the share of 
their earnings derived from the fed- 
eral government. 



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The "SUR-MESURE” 
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SIPTAPMAN 

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COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDU 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY! 

OF EACH YEAR 
yielded the Inflowing 

after aR chwges: 

IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: —24% 

IN 1984:— 34% 

APRIL*/ 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $81,865.43 
More than 550,000,000.00 
currenriy under management. 

CaS or write RoyaS Frazier at 
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New Ytxk 10005 212-269-1041 
TfctocBMl 667173 UW. 



ROMULUS. A model registered by Corum in 1966 
and always in fashion. Now in an ultra-slim, quartz, 
water-resistant version. Four sizes. In 18 carat gold 
or platinum. 


3S 


Corum matches arc on vie* ai the lines! jewellers. For ihc 
address of the one nearest you or for a brochure, write 
or phone to: France. S.A. Michd Nurgum. 177. Bd dc 
Creiril.V41iWSaini-Mjur.icl. I 'SM 36.36 Germany. 
Austria, Holland. Helmut Tenet GmbH. Hrinnch-Heine- 
AllecA, 0-4000 Du.-»cldorf. id. 021 1 320.446 Great Britain. &iun<fer» 
Si Shepherd LuJ.. 1. Bleeding H«n Yard. Gioillc Sircw. London 
l-CIN KSJ. iri. Italy, Corum lulu di Amedeo Medu- 

Fole. Via Tito Vipiuli 44. 2014ft Milan, tel. 242.77.43 Other eomurle*. 
CORUM. 2300 La Chimi-de-KomK Switzerland, tel. 39 2S.66.66. 








Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1985 


11% + % 
m- % 
10% + % 
a vs 

17% — 1% 

2W* + % 

nu 

im-H 

IS* + % 
ISM 

329h— Ti 
32 % + 4 h 
32 • + a 
aa— Mi 
42% + K 
37 + % 
21H— % 
37 th— ft 
16 — Hi 

i*=a 

l»- u 

4T1& — V4 
20% + th 
ISM 
7 * 

23U, + ta 
716— 16 
7VS 
«V» 

58 — % 
52 + % 

£1 —1th 
fifi 

46k— Vk 
10W— 16 
15% + % 
JJtk +.M 
12th + U 
114k + 4k 
1146 + 46 
26th + 16 
Z74h— Ik 
12th 

3246 + 16 

35 

1746 

54th + 16 

20 

in 

13th + th 
60th + Vk 

at* 

nth + th 

7 + th 

14th + Ik 
1516 + 16 
2516 + 16 



■ EuropeanGuide j 

« toGdd \ 

B aiKlKnj^errands. | 

® _ j.. -..Micluvi hm-hiim miens _ 


This newiy published brochure reviews _ 
investment advantages of gold and pro- | 


I the investment advantages or row ana pro 
oiiidance on how and where to bu\’ 


34th 17V1 
3316 17% 
71k 4% 
3446 2746 
471k 3516 
2446 12 
21«h 1216 
38 Z7V6 
3716 2346 
71 Vi 481k 
S% 27V6 


RieselT tJKI 9.1 
RlteAkJ 30 U 
RvrOkn 

RotHhw 1.12 36 
Robtsn 1*0 40 
Robins 

Roche 220 1X5 
ROCtlTI 144 4-5 
Rockwl 1JJ0 11 
RodmH 200 34 

Rohr In 


7 20!* 
17 877* 20% 
12 93 SM 

7 29 314h 

20 53 4016 

2247 20t6 
6 188 2146 

10 170x3816 

9 1972 321k 
9 313 59Vk 
9 138 4S46 


19*1 1916 
2844 TBit + 16 
446 4*6— Vk 
31 Vk Silk— 16 
39th 3916— Vk 
20 20 — % 
20*6 2016 — 46 
37% 3716 + 4b 
32% 324h + V> 
at 5916 
4716 48th + th 


Open High Low Close Che. 


Season Ssaoon 
High Low 


Open HWi Low Close Chg. 


2110 I960 Juf 

Est. Salas Pr*v. Salas 2006 

P rev. Day Open ini. 27*0? off 22 


Sookwi Season 
High Low 


Open HWi Low Ctaee Chg. 


Grains 


WHEAT CCBTJ 

5*00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
i05 332 *i (Way 049 X71% 

±90 32416 Jul 140% 14044 

174% 320 Sep 32916 33916 


u76% 320 Sep 32916 3391k 

43% 320 Dec XJ9 350 

.74% 340% Mar 35146 353% 

S2 3.47 May 

st. Salas Prev. Sales 10201 

rev. Dov Open inf. 39210 uaB22 


32416 32716 —23 

326% 320%— JC» 
32016 320 —.0116 

346% 349 — *016 

351 35316 +2046 

349% 


ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15000 llwv- cents per ih. 

18500 151.00 MOV 156.10 16020 

10425 15500 Juh 15740 160.10 

18220 15525 See 15650 15820 

18120 * 15640 Nov 10020 160100 

18020 15520 Jan 15920 15920 

17750 15*20 Mar 

16250 16020 Mav 

Jul 

18050 17925 Sep 

Eat. Sales 700 Prtv-Sales 314 
Prev. Day Open Int. 6585 oft 71 


156.10 15750 
15740 15720 
15650 15750 
15640 1 5670 
15620 15720 
15725 
15725 
1562S 
157.15 


EUROOOLLARSCIMM) 

SI mill lon-pt* of 100PC1. 

9028 82.49 Jun 9025 9048 9021 9046 

9053 0453 Sea 8941 8921 8957 8920 

8927 8420 Doc 89.14 8920 09.11 8921 

8948 86.10 Mar 0025 88*4 8825 8823 

89.15 8623 Jim 8848 8848 8848 8843 

8824 8728 Sep 8822 8826 8821 8825 

8927 8728 Dec 87.96 87.96 8726 88.10 

8723 1744 Mar 8723 8723 >723 8726 

Est. Sales Prev.Salas 30213 
Prev. Day Open lnt.102417 un 1259 


IRN(CBT) 

no bu minimum-collars per uustwi 
30 24916 MOV 223V6 28316 

21 273 Jul 224 225% 

21% 246% Sep 274V6 225 

.95 24016 Dec 248% 269 

.10 269% Mar 227% 227% 

31% 27416 May 

U 281 Jul 


t. Soles Prev. Sales 1657* 

Pyev. Day Open In (.126460 up 710 
SOYBEANS (CRT) 

5*00bu minimum- dal tars per bushel 
7.97 5.HW May 624% 629% 

7.99 3JMB6 Jul 6.14 6.1IR6 

256 522 -AU0 6.16 6.19% 

621 521 S«P 6.10W 6.16% 

648 523% Nov 6.15% 620% 

6.79 294% Jan 625 620% 

743 0JM% Mar 628% 6.40 

729 6-15 Mav 046 646 

649 641 Jul 

Est. sales Prev. Sales 22603 


282% 222% — JXnt 
224 284 — 20*1 

273* 274 —21 

267* 248 -J>1* 

226 276 —21% 

222% -JJ1W 
225 — JWVt 


679 5.94V 

743 6*4V 

729 615 

649 641 

Est. Sales 


6*4% —23 
412m — -04 

614* — JBW 
410 —JO 
613* —42% 
625 —42% 

436% —JO 
644% — JM 

650% —22 


Prev.DavOaenlnl. 62469 off 870 
SOYBEAN MEALCCBTI 
10a Ians- Oaf lam per ran 
20540 12940 May 13020 13020 

19650 13470 Jul 13400 13640 

18000 137JS0 Aua 139.10 13950 

17940 14020 Sep 14120 14240 

18050 14250 Oct 14450 14520 

18400 14750 Dec 14920 I5UJ0 

16200 14920 Jan 15250 153J» 

30650 15400 Mar 15750 158-00 

May 16220 16250 
Est- Sates Prev. Sates 12403 

Prev. Day Open ml. 45290 up 120 
SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

60000 lbs- dollars per 100 lbs. 

3227 2220 Moy 3255 3220 

■3SJ31 22.70 Jut 3022 3123 

2948 2350 Aua 2945 3025 

28-70 2250 Sep 28.65 29.15 

2745 22.90 Oct 2745 2X15 

2628 22.90 Dec 262* 2725 

■2462 2340 Jan 2655 27-05 

2420 2440 MOT 2625 2750 

2440 2440 May 2445 3645 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 18596 

Prev. Dav Open int. 53.119 uo 1244 
OATS (CBT) 

SJWO bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
1.91 146% May 149% 149* 

1.78% 143 Jul 145* 145% 

129 140 Sep 142% 142% 

142% 144. Dec 145 145 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 71 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 3287 up 37 


12920 —140 
13520 —120 
13040 —140 
14050 —150 
1*340 —120 
149.00 —1.10 
15140 —20 
15450 —120 
16050 


32.14 3245 
3045 3045 
2940 29.55 

2840 2845 

2740 2745 
2645 2497 

2*55 2620 
2630 2655 
2445 2645 


147* 147* —41% 
143% 143* — 41% 
141 141 — JJ1V. 

144% 14*% -vOMt 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMC) 

40400 lbs.- cents per tb. 

6940 6155 Apr 6340 6*20 

6950 64.60 Jun 6532 6650 

6747 6X15 Aua 6520 6420 

65.90 6140 Oct 6335 6*45 

6745 6X6G DOC 6*30 6*37 

6745 6425 Feb 64.75 6540 

6757 6400 Apr 6635 6625 

ESI. Sates 17281 Prev. Sales 13209 
Prev. Day Open un. 62421 atf609 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMS) 

*4400 dm.- cents per lb. 

7430 6620 A or 6720 6&1Q 

7225 64.95 MOV 6730 6940 

7320 6460 Aua 6945 7035 

7340 6740 Sen 6«20 6945 

71K 47.70 OCf 49.10 6950 

7320 6945 Nov 69.75 7040 

79.60 7040 Jan 7045 TIMS 

Est. Sates 1421 Prev. Sales 1433 
Prev. Dav Ooen Int 9452 aHM 


HOGS(CMB) 

30400 lbs.- een Is per lb. 

54*5 4240 Apr *359 *440 

5540 4745 Jun *9.10 4940 

55.77 <8.95 Jul 5040 5142 

5*37 *750 Aua 5025 5147 

51.75 *540 OCT *740 *725 

50*5 *630 Dee 4850 <822 

5040 4625 Feb *950 *920 

*735 *550 Apr *625 *6.97 

49.05 47.00 Jun 4845 4843 

Est. Sales 74*3 Prev. Sales 7469 
Prev. Day Ooen int. 2*499 off 22 
PORK BELLIES (CMC) 

38400 lbs.- cents Per lb. 

8240 61.15 Mav 6625 68.47 

82*7 6215 Jul 6740 69.15 

8045 6040 Aup *640 6740 

7630 6X15 P*B 7125 7245 

7540 6440 Mar 7240 7240 

7540 71140 MOT 

7440 70.90 Jul 

Est. Sales 6460 Prev. Sales 642* 
Prev. Day Ooen Int. 1 1426 OH 11 



BRITISH POUND CIMM) 

Saar pound- 1 point equals 30*001 
13350 14235 Jun 1.1970 13075 1.107O 1.1990 

14450 14200 Sap 1.1055 1.1900 1.1810 L1920 

13710 14200 Dec 1.1860 1.1960 1.1800 1.1905 

13330 14680 Mar 1.1895 

Est. Sales 13488 Prev. Sales 6473 
Prev. Day Open Int 29,979 up 737 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (I MM) 

SOeraln-1 pomT equals KUXK71 - .■ " 

2835 JUS* Jun 2269 3282 2055 2265 

2385 .7025 Sep 2255 2256 2255 2246 

2566 2006 Dec 22a 22a 2248 2235 

2304 49*1 Mar 2227 

2260 2070 Jun 222* 

Eat. Soles 2405 Prev.Soles 1255 
Prev. Day Open Int 11463 oft 53 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM1 
% Per franc- 1 point equals SXQTOOI 
.11020 49*10 Jun .10330 .10400 .10330 .1(000 

.10*30 49600 Sep .10355 

.09670 49670 Dec .10375 

Est. So Ha 52 Prey. Sales 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 1470 


GERMAN MARKCIMM) 

Seermark-lPOlnfeauatsSUioai 

4733 3905 Jun 4192 4217 4173 4190 

4545 -2930 Seo 42215 JMffl 4281 4217 

4*10 -2971 Dec 4240 42*0 4240 4253 

4251 40*0 WOT 4293 

Em. S ato 12*35 Prev.Soles 2X7*2 
Prev. Day Open Int 4X932 up 2*86 



6 f 

% 

% 

% re- 

.. 

% ii. 


Si*g 

% ' « 


19%— % 
43 + % 

50%—% 


at + vk 

14% + % 
54% 

20m— =» 
17% + % 


JAPANESE YBN(IMM) 

Seer yen- 1 Poin t equals BM0BM1 „ ___ 

004*30 J03S26 Jun JM939 - 003952 JW OTl. *03930 

00*150 *03870 Sep 40397* -KOWI 4039*3 4039*9 

00050 403904 DOC J004010 804012 J004007JDIMNO 

00*100 JXMOfO Mar 804055 

Eat. Sato 6221 Prev. Sales *337 
Prey. Dov open Int 21,547 off 335 


Paris Commodities 

April 9 


London Commodities 

April 9 


Asian Commodities 

April 9 


Cash Prices April 9 


SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Sner franc- 1 point equals MUnoi 
*900 4439 Jun 4790 4806 476* 4773 

*830 4*00 Sep 4825 48*5 4805 48M 

*360 4531 Dec 4885 JUS 4860 4855 

*000 4035 Mar 4900 

Est.Sato 26364 Prev.Soles 15*42 
Prev. Dav Dean Ini. 26.145 up 24*0 


1 


ISU 

GA 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- ptsatlOOpct 
9181 87.1* Jun 91*6 91*1 

9143 0&-9* Sea 9XM VI-03 

V?-90 85-77 Dec 9050 90*1 

9055 86*0 Mar 9017 9032 

9037 87.01 Jun 

me® fiooo Sep 

8959 8945 Dec 

_ Mar 

Esl. Sales 11426 Prov. Sales 12*22 
Prev. Dav Open inJ. 39*78 up7*s 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 


91*2 91*0 
9086 Vt-OS 
90*7 90*0 
90.17 9025 

09.99 
8937 
•956 
0946 



London Metals 

April 9 


(Indexes compiled shortly i 
SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 


mantel ctaee) 


paints ana cents 

189.10 15610 Jim 1B0*0 18140 

19X70 160.00 Sep 184.15 10*35 

196*0 17540 Dec 187*5 18020 

Ext. Soles Prev.Soles 52.910 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 56*52 up 1*55 
VALUE LIME IKCBTJ 
Points and cents 

219*0 17X00 Jun I953S 19655 

21240 18535 Sep 20040 20040 

Est Sales Prev.Soles 1834 

Prev. Dav Ooen int. 3*58 off 71 


10 YR. TREASURY (CUT) 

SI 00*00 Drln-Pts 6 33ndi Of too act 
0-3 76+ Jun 78-28 7 


81-13 75-18 Sep 

«W2 75-13 Dec 



804 75-14 Mar 

79-26 74-30 Jun 

Esf. Sales Prev.Soles 6*52 

Prev. Dav Oatn mi. 43*16 ud421 
U*™=5J^Y BONDS ICBT1 
w £Ft/ l0M S?'£!!* a, 3ancisofi00BciJ 
77-11 n-20 Jun 68-26 69-19 

7+2 57-10 Sea 67-38 68-20 

76-5 57-8 Dec 4M 67-26 

72-JO 57-2 Mar 66-11 66-31 

70-14 56-29 Jun 65-21 66-8 

70-3 56-29 Sep 65-7 65-20 

69-26 56-25 Dec 6M 65-4 

*9-12 56-27 Mar 

69-2 *3-12 Jun 

68-26 634 Sea 63-7 63-23 

484 63-2* Dec 

Est. Seles Prev. SawsT22460 

Prev. Dav Oom Int 212407 up 2492 


71-26 7W15 
78-1 70-21 

77-30 
77-10 
76-24 


777.90 1(040 +40 

18340 103*0 4v*0 

18745 1S8JD0 +130 


195*0 19S40 +45 

19930 20X10 +38 


60-2* 69-17 
67-25 68-18 

67 67-23 

66-9 66-20 

65-21 66-8 
65-7 65-20 

6S-2 65-2 

6+18 


NYSE COMP. INDEX CMYPE) 
pom % and cants 

11X00 9X00 Jun 104*5 10530 

11140 9 US Sep 10635 M73S 

11X75 10130 Dec 109.15 109.15 

Est Sales Prev.Soles HMXM 

Prev. Dov Open Int. 8387 off 289 


HXJ5 10*35 +45 
10635 10635 +30 
108*5 10X15 +35 


Commodify Indexes 



Close Previous 

sugar'"*' Low 8,0 ^ 

Sterling per metric Ion 
May 11030 10X60 108*0 10930 11X80 11140 

Aug 11X00 11120 11X00 11340 11540 TIJ40 

OCf 118*0 116*0 11680 117 J10 118*0 11940 

Dec N.T. NX JZLOO 12*40 12540 12600 

6W 13740 134*0 13**0 13440 130*0 13840 

May 1*1*0 1*0*0 139*0 139JB 14X00 14X20 

Aug N.T. N.T. 144*0 146*0 148*0 14940 

Volume: 1.130 lots of 50 Ions. 

COCOA 

SWtlpg per metric ton 
May 1*86 1,967 1*73 1,97* 1,958 1,959 

JIT 1.968 1.951 1*51 1*52 1,9*5 1,946 

SOP 1,940 1*28 1*28 1,929 1*30 1*40 

Dec MW 1*67 1*68 1*72 1*70 1*72 

Mar 1*02 1*64 1*65 1*67 1*71 1*72 

May 1*76 !*« 1*65 1J6V 1*70 1*77 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1*63 1*78 1*60 1*00 

Volume: 1,498 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric ton 
MOV 2.180 2,167 1170 1173 Z193 1195 

Jly 2422 2401 2414 2415 24X 2432 

Sap Z36* 24*0 7399 9794 r?A-» 

Mav 2*07 2458 2476 247V 1-7M 2409 

Jan 24BJ 2460 2476 2478 2485 2486 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2450 2460 2465 2490 

Mar 2440 2440 2425 2440 2400 2480- 

Volume: 999 lots of 5 tons, 

GASOIL 

U.S. dollars per metric toe 
API 231.75 230*0 230*0 23045 229.73 23X00 

MOV ■ 228.50 227*0 220*0 32845 224*0 22635 
Jun 22S35 22445 22545 225*0 223*0 22X73 

Jly 22435 224*0 22435 225*0 22X00 22X25 

Aug 227*0 226*0 225*0 227*0 224.00 22550 

SOP N.T. . N.T. ZU.00 22V JO 225*0 229*0 

Oct N.T, N.T. 227J» 232*0 226JU 232JD 

NOV N.T. N.T. 228.00 235*0 228*0 235*0 

Dec N.T. N.T. 229*0 237*0 229*0 238*0 

Volume: 1*«S lots of 100 tans. 

Source*: Reuters ond London Petroleum Ex- 
change (smalt}. 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
u** per ounce 

High Law Bid°*A«fc Buf^As* 

1 — H-I* H-I- 2?“ SS-W 31**0 318*0 
MOV - N.T. N.T. 324*0 326*0 317*0 319.00 
JW1_ N.T. N.T. 326*0 328*0 320*0 322*0 

As? - Ji-I: JS-Ii 5 - 00 324X0 326*0 

Oct 3^*0 337*0 336*0 338*0 329*0 331*0 
Dec - N.T. N.T. 341 ..GO 343*0 334*0 336*0 
349*0 340*0 34XW 
Volume: 2t Ms aflDQ oz. 


Commodity and Unit 

Coffee < Santos. It>_ 

Prkltcfottl 64/30 38 %, vd - 

Steel billets I Pitt.), ton 

Iren 2 Fdry. PHIkt, ton 

Steel scrap No 1 hw Pitt. . 

Lead Spat, lb 

Copper elect, lb — - 
Tm (Streltsi. to .. 

Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb __ 

Palladium, oz 

Silver n.y.oz 

Source: AP. 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 

(14* per ounce 


High Low Seme Settle 

API N.T. N.T. 323*0 318*0 

Jim 327*0 327 JO 327-70 322.10 

Aug N.T. N.T. 33X90 327.10 

Volume: 210 lata of 100 oz. 


DM Futures Options 

. April 9 

W,G*rn™Mcrt-K*)0it*rt5.centaprrrTwt 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBIER 
Mate vstan cents per Ufa 


Volume: 50 lots. 


BM ASK 

Exp. — 
30X50 209*0 
210JO 211 JO 

211*0 27ZB0 
21150 21450 
21550 2I6J0 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
705.50 20*50 

20745 20750 

209 45 20950 

21158 21250 
213*0 214*0 
215*0 216*0 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Mag n por e cents per ktto 

.PrevWti 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 
R5SIMOY- llfljn 18050 17750 178*0 

R551 Jun_ 10X00 lS» NmI _ 

RS53MOV. 176*0 177*0 Ne£ — 

RS5 3Mov_ 174*0 175*0 — 

RSS 4 May> 14V 0D T71JM Nra _ 

RSSSMay. i*4*a 166*0 New — 


Nme CWS4SHM Pofs-Setfiv 

Sf 1 " Dee Jon Sop Dec 

30 2.10 270 — 0J0 D*S 0® 

S ?S 7 3^® ** '** 

S S-H ZQS '*» u» 

2 i-2 '-90 1* - 

34 0,® 079 IJB 2J7 — — 

35 0.11 US " 342 348 — 

Estimated (QtDl voL 682S 
S?!?| !&■ ¥0 i- J* j; OPtn 1st. 35599 
Pm : Mon. wl. 2J52 open Int. 21417 
Source: CME. 


U^. Treasury Bill Rates 
April 8 






Prr» 


Otter 

B« 

YleM 

Yield 

3vnanm 

8.13 

611 

641 

619 

6- month 

IB 

656 

9JB 

9.t2 

One year 

679 

617 

953 

950 1 

Source: Solomon Brothers 





KU ALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgits per 25 tons 
Close 

BM Aik 

API 1,00 1,100 

Mav JJ9S iJiS 

Jun 1-MO U90 

Jfy — — 1J4S UTS 

Aug U35 1J6S 

Seo 1 J28 USO 

Nov U00 U* 

Jon 1 JOD Un 

Mar U9S 

Volume: 0 loti at 25 tons. 
Source.- Routers. 


Previous 

Bid Aik 
1J7D 1^20 
L34! 1*05 

1*10 1*70 

1*00 1*50 

1*90 1*40 

1.180 1*20 
1*60 1*00 
1*60 1*00 
1*50 U00 


NYSE Higiu-Lows April 9 


GNMA (CBT) 

sioaooa Brin- pt8&32ndsof 100 pa 

4+27 57-17 Jun $9-2 *9-11 

69-4 59-13 Seo 68*16 6+20 

68-13 59-4 Dec 

68 5+37 Mar 67*15 67*15 

67-8 58-25 Jun 

67* 65 Sep 

Est-Saies Prev. Sain 97 
Prev. Day Ooen Ini. 1693 ofTW 


49 *9-10 

68*14 <8-19 
67*1 
67-13 67.13 
66-29 
06-15 


. Close 

Moody's 961.40 f 

Reuters L936J0 

Dj, Futures.— NA. 

Com. Research Bureau. NA 

Moody's : base 100 : Doc. 31, 1931. 

A - preliminary; I - (Inal 
Reuters : base 100 : See. IB. 1931- 
Dew Janes ; base 10 a : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Previous 
962.30 f 
1,932.70 
12480 
246.10 


S&P 100 Index Options 
Aprils 



AiitedCas 

BnkTrNY 

CalFed 

DetESSOpf 

EastnAlriH 


N«W HIGHS 59 


UBnimrwi 

Idaho Pi* 


PorkerPen 

Tennc740or 

UnEi29Saf 

WICOR 

AmWotrpfC 

BlUflllPw 

CaastatCn 

DuKePpfA. 

estMUrpre 


GoMWStAr 

HartantLIh s 

lntNrtti640 

LeeEnf 

HIM 340M 

RachTei 

Tnanst Ind 

Uneiraoi 

Warm-Cam 

ArtsPnbSve 

Burl No pf 

ConAgra I 

EasBiAirL 

EstnAH-oK 

OrtAmPst 

'»JSB 

MdntyrMa 


PodflCorp 
SCANA 
TmanEP 
Uni royal 
WnPacInd 
AtlCUy El 
BuriNaadl p 

DaytnPwLl 

EALwtO 

E nuW R es 

GIWnFln 

HmeFdUD 

JerCenapr 

MeoreMc 


SourotCoppf 
UnEKgfm 
UnJersy Bk 


NEW LOWS 7 


CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- Pts of MOocI 
9140 65*0 Jun 90*3 90*9 

9050 85.00 Sop 09.99 9 X 19 

9 X 17 85*4 Dec 8951 8941 

19.78 8458 Mar 

19.44 86*3 Jun 

88*5 87*6 Sep 

88*4 88*4 Dec 

Est. Solas 479 Prev. Sale* 208 
Prey. Dav Open int. 6.928 up 99 


Market Guide. 


*0*3 90*7 
8958 90*2 
8951 89*9 
1951 
19*9 
8X7 S 
8850 


Oifcooo Board of Trade 


Chicago Mercantile BmftanG* 
international Monetary Mortal 
Of Chicago Mercantile Endtangc 
New York. Cocoa. Sugar, Coffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Exchange, New York 
New York Merca n tile Exchange 
Kansas City Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


NYCSCE: 

COMEX: 

nyme: 

KCBT: 

NVFEf 


urat CeAMJHt Psb-LBSt 

Mg taf May JM Jly AN Mot J W JM 

140 — 16 _ — ■— 1714 1/16 

165 Wh HU 12 % — IIM H 1 

in 6i in n - vu m w » 

m is/iijvi i w. » n » w 

IN 5/14 IH 3 A M* A A I 

115 1/18 7716 17/llTH IK IB - - . 

m i now un* i sn. - ip* UW — 

195 - 1/16 5/16 — I- - - - 


TnocaUMuaw U1M 


Total coll KanM.IBUU 
Total put wiuaw rota 
TWol put now tat 4I7JM 
Mix; 

NWl 176*1 Low 17292 06*17121-1*6 

Saarea: CEOE. 


Rise in Japan Margin Buying 

Reutrrs 

. TOKYO — ■ The outstanding 
balance of margin- buying positioru 
on the Tokyo. Osaka ana Nagoya 
stock exchanges rose 1 1.4 billion 
yen ($44.8 million) to 2.943J bil- 
lion at (he end or Iasi week, the 
Tokyo Si 


Armcolncpf fiomorawl Kvacera 
LeefUeCP Bsferfne 

CennoAlr SMMotr 


?t- '.9- »5 

--1 -» l H 


WHAT WOULD LIFE BE UKE 
WITHOUT fT? 















































































II>l l tltPIAUUrtAL UizJtAJLD TiUBUINfc, WEDNESDAY* APRIL 10, 1985 



EOUK'IIIP . 

- IIS. Firms’ 


l ^J 


HrlfcfrTl 


For 2. French Steel Firms 

** on (vjT?^ of t.g ' 




^PJOUtOrU 

es^s 

-“'opy.^ij 
“onalc^f. ^ 



By Axel Krause 

I mraua tmal Herald ffdupte 

PARIS — Although Usinuradd 
■ 5aci?c*r. France's two largest, state* 

: owned sled companies, substan* 
tially reduced their losses last year, 
they plan to report combined 1984 
losses of about 7.6 billion francs 
. [S7S0 million), company sources 
said Tuesday. 

The reports, lo be made later this 
"t month, also will indude nonreem- 
i P ring charges of about 8.4 biHioc 
francs, the sources said. 

The two ailing companies have 
not reported a profit in more than 
10 years, but are under intense gov- 
ernment pressure to reduce their 
losses and eventually return to 
profitability. The government still 
fej ( is studying a plan to merge the two 
W |. companies, but no decision has 


r Tprn^^ 

■ Jl Yp MR i | I k uui uu W MJ i v n uaj 

Jibcen reached said'ihe sources, who 

!?y°“«anh» ' ■ 


askdd not TO be identified by name. 

Usinor and Sadlor have sharply 
reduced didr work forces, which 
explains the special charges paid to 
workers for early retirements and 
Other work-reduction schemes. The 
industry currently employs about 
90,000 people. 

Ustnor, the larger of 'the two 
companies, expects to report on 
Aon!. 25 a 19&4 loss of about 4 
button francs, down 35 percent 
from a 5.4-billion loss in 1983. The 
company's consolidated sales rose 
18 percent to an estimated 39 bil- 
lion francs last year from 33 billion 
francs in 1983. the sources said. 

Sadlor last year reduced its loss 
27.8 percent to 3.6 billion francs 
from 4.6 billion francs in 1983. on a 
sales increase which the company 
did not specify. Sales in 1983 to- 
taled 31.5 billion francs. 


SIA Forecasts 
Record Revenue 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Singapore 
Airlines said Tuesday that it ex- 
pects revenue in the 1985-86 fis- 
cal year to rise 7.6 percent, to a 
record 3 billion Singapore dol- 
lars ($135 billion). 

in the latest edition of its 
house newspaper. Outlook, the 
carrier said expenditures are ex- 
pected to rise by 8.6 percent, to 
2.9 billion dollars, because of 
increases in aircraft standing 
charges, staff costs and fuel and 
Oil costs. 

Capital expenditures for the 
year, which ends next March 
31. will include the purchase of 
six Boeing 747 aircraft and one 
Airbus Industrie A3 10 at a total 
cost of 821 million dollars, it 
said. 


ideabuvta-. 

mm 


COMPANY NOTES 



I-20QI3J) 

Ai " 

5-*° UU 
111 
Jao m 

7-45 1 -, 

i; 
17 1 ? 

a.i ? 

S" 

488 


•v 


net 


^ of die plant, which forms part of 

fell 18.2 percent to 15.67 billion yen Pohang’s steel complex at Pahang, 
(£61.21 million) in 1984 from 1852 South Korea, 
billion yen in 1983. The Toteo* 
based tire maker forecast 1985 


zao 

230 

97 

M 


SX 

88 

BlAO 

lA« 

1M 

as 

138 

■136 

laa 


u 'l 
* 

■ 2 S *■* n 

■30 2.1 10 


i* § 

2, f lit 


group net at 23 bill km yen. 

Kader Industrial Co, a Hong 


Loews Corp. of New York said 
that it is negotiating to sett its ma- 
jor chain of movie theaters to a 
group beaded by A. Jerrold Peren- 


Kong toy maker, said that it would duo, a Los Angeles film and iclevj- 
offer shares worth 200 million - si on entrepreneur. Loews, a con* 



H ” 
a* 7 

IB l| 




operates 

larged shore capital. Kader said movie screens in six states, 
that about 25 percent of the offered McDooneB Dongas Gun. of Sl 

Lot* wapHSoSooSo settle 
Jareholden and 75 percent would , ax-year W legal battle with Nor- 
be new issues. throp Corg^ of Los Angeles over 


domestic and foreign, and Nor- 
throp will be the principal subcon- 
tractor. 

Nippon Telegraph & Telephone 
has signed a 5 1.3- mill ion contract 
for joint research and development 
of new technology with Encray 
Conversion Devices of Troy, Mich- 
igan. 

Reckltt & Cobnan PLC, a Lon- 
don-based food product and 
household goods maker, said that it 
is restructuring its U.S. division, 
R.T. French, by consolidating its 
household products activities with 
Airwick Group to form a new uniL 


IBM to Sell 
Mil-Spec Unit 
To Loral 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — IBM said Tues- 
day that it has agreed to sdl tbe 
military-computer division of its 
Rolm Coro, unit to Loral Corp. for 
about $100 million in cash. 

Loral nukes sophisticated elec- 
tronic systems and parts for mili- 
tary aircraft. It also has interests in 
telecommunications equipment. 

A month ago International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp. said it had 
reached conditional agreement to 
sell the division, called Mil-Spec, to 
a group of Mil-Spec’s employees. 

IBM emphasized at the time, 
however, that no definitive agree- 
ment had been reached and that 
other companies had expressed in- 
terest in acquiring Mil-Spec. 

The employees' group was un- 
able to arrange financing for the 
purchase that was acceptable to the 
U.S. Justice Department, which 
must approve Mil-Spec's sale, on 
IBM spokesman said Tuesday. 

Last November the Justice De- 
partment required IBM to divest 
Mil-Spec as part of its £ 1 .26-billion 
acquisition of Rolm. a Santa Clara, 
California-based concern that is 
primarily involved in office-based 
telephone systems and other com- 
munications products. 

Loral said that in the year ended 
Dec. 28, 1984. Mil-Spec — which 
employs 970 people — posted pre- 
tax operating income ot about S20 
million on sales of £85.9 million. 


Hiring Choice Citib ank Names Head of European Division 


(Conramed from Page 9) 
practical professional training or at 
business schools. 

According to tbe report by the 
Institute of International Educa- 
tion, only 10 percent of the manag- 
ers interviewed said international 
expertise was the most crucial fac- 
tor in recruitment. The managers 
said specific technical and func- 
tional business skills came first. 
And less than 50 percent said inter- 
national expertise was important 
while about 39 percent said inter- 
national expertise was “nice to 
have" but a minor factor for re- 
cruitment. Six percent said it was 
not important at all. 

One factor militating against 
new international-affairs graduates 
is that most U.S. multinationals 
reserve foreign postings formiddle- 
and senior-level managers. De- 
pending on the company and the 
job, international posts can be ei- 
ther a convenient way to kick a 
senior executive upstairs or to 
groom an up-and-comer for further 
responsibility. In any event, inter- 
national postings typically are re- 
served for managers who have 
come up in the organization. 

Thus, for entry-level posts, com- 
panies like to know wrxat they’re 
getting for their money. "If I am 
going to shell out all that money, 
with an MBA 1 know exactly what I 
am getting." said the personnel di- 
rector of a major U.S. multination- 
al. 

Multinationals can be sure that a 
business school graduate has basic 
accounting and marketing skills 
and can easily be easily fitted into a 
product development or marketing 
job. 


By Brenda Hagerty 

Internal tonal Herald Tribtae 

LONDON — Gtibank has ap- 
pointed Tim M. Kelley as institu- 
tional bank division head for Cen- 
tral, Southern and Eastern Europe. 
He will be responsible for activities 
in Austria, West Germany, Greece, 
Italy, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland 
and Eastern Europe. 

Citibank's European technology 
and electronic banking group ww 
also report to Mr. Kelley, who wd 
be based in Fnnkfun. He succeeds 
George Fugdsang. who moves to 
New York as head of Citicorp’s 
information resources business. 

Allan H. Williams succeeds Mr. 
Kelley as institutional bank divi- 
sion head for the Middle East and 
Africa; responsible for the 22 coun- 
tries where the bank has branches. 
Mr. Williams moves to Athens 
from his post as Citibank's country 
corporate officer for Mexico. 

The Port Authority of New York 
& New Jersey has appointed Louis 
Zwarcverwer general manager and 
John Cannizzo assistant general 
manager of its European opera- 
tions. The two, who formerly head- 
ed the organization’s Zurich office. 


responsil 
ties of the Fon Authority’s world 
trade department in Europe, the 
Middle East and Africa. 

De Zoete & Sevan said Simon 
Grove has joined the firm. He wttl 
be responsible for establishing a 
Tokyo representative office for the 
Lot don-based stock brokerage in 
the near future. He formerly was 
the Tokyo representative for Grie- 
vesoa. Grant & Co, another Lon- 
don-based stockbrokers^. 

Alcan Ahmnnhm of Montreal 
has named Lord Peyton, David 
Norton and Patrick JJ. Rich to its 
board. Lord Peyton is a director of 
British Alcan Aluminium Ltd. and 
chairman of Texas Instruments 
LtcL a British unit of the American 
riectronies company. Mr. Morton 
is regional executive vice president 
for the Americas for the parent and 
is president and chief executive of 
Aluminium Co. of Alcan’s 

principal subsidiary. Mr. Rich is 
regional executive vice president 
for Europe, the Middle East and 
Africa for the parent. He is a direc- 
tor of Bekaert NV, the Belgian steel 


wire and wire products concern, 
and BOC Group PLC. They suc- 
ceed Paul Leman, John Hale and 
Joachim Zahn, who did not stand 
for re-election. 

Standard Chartered Bank PLC 
has opened a branch in Taipei and 
named JJ.C Brinsden manager. 
He previously was In tbe bank’s 
Hong Kong office. 

Schraders PLC the London- 
based merchant bank holding com- 
pany, has elected Alva O. Way a 
director. Mr. Way was until recent- 
ly president of Travelers Corp-, * 
U.S. insurance company. He previ- 
ously held tbe posts of president of 
American Express Co. and chief 
fina n cial officer of General Electric 
Co. of the United States. 

Sanrael Montagu A Co. said it 
has recruited Chris O’Malley to 
bead up sales in the international 
capita] markets division. He joins 
Montagu, a London-based mer- 
chant bank, on May 1 as an assis- 
tant director from Credit Suisse 
First Boston, where he worked for 
more than two years as head of 
sales. 


Gold Options (Trim ibs/al 


13581750 
UUSIttS 
700- VQ 
OS vs 
2 ®. 4ID 

ias v s 




19J52M5 

I42S-I72S 

nama 

USKU 0 

4®. an 

jjja 


aaosm 

nenta 

1325-1725 

naua 

noHia 


GcttZZUD-StOD 

Vilens White WeM&A. 

I. Qwi do MnwHlir 
1211 Genera f, “ 

TcL 318251 • Tc 


niaUMBA INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION DEL ECUADOR 

Notice to the holders of shares in 
VUcabamba International Corporation Panama. 

The holders of the above-mentioned shares wishing to awnace their 
subscription rights for the new shares of VUcabamba International Corpora- 
tioc Del Enniiinr are required to excha ng e their shares no Inter pian 
Friday, 10th May 1985. 

Administration fee will be charged for tbe exchange of each share. 

Quito, 9th April 1985. 

Ahogado Manuel Rosales Cardenas 
Edifido Faria mento 6 de Diefemhre y Pazmino, Of .409 
Quito Ecuador South America 


. Air Liqrade SA of Paris has re- which of the aerospace giants can 
edved a letter of intent from South act as prime contractor for fo 
Korea's Pohang Iron & Steel Co. to sales of the F-I 8 Hornet at 
, _ build the second stage of an oxygen fighter jet made jointly by the two 
1 U. production plant, according to companies. Under the agreement, 
French officials in SeouL Air U- McDonnell D 


■SR* 

<3 9W; oa, 

• 20 c la 12 , 5 * r - fc 

■78 13 is 2 to* 

2.40 4J g , • 

■ 2 -so las i 3 Ji § 5*5 French officials in SeouL Air U- McDonnell Douglas will be prime 

m if j? m. SJ £ quide is working on the first stage contractor in all sales of the F-18 

120 ^ m 


l.M 


2m njj 
114 lu 


!> 


1.00 

1J2 

1 J 0 

180 

4JD 

US 


100 

JJ0 

OK) 

M 


14C U 7 

.10 U 1« 
\M 48 13 
-10c * 14 


208 tt 
8 J 0 

244 7.V 
288 
1 «S 
3* 

m 

I J 0 
220 


1 J 0 o 2 » 11 


J2 27 9 
40 XI 7 
130 78 !’ 
£45 15J 
44 24 0 
ta: 47 % 
84 S8 17 
400 2 14 
7 
16 


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7.i 1 2. a. 

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10 «4 2«* 1ft a 

9 3^1 22S a a! 

241 

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J« *+ «, t. 

31 7H 

U%s. 

359 IA1 A fc. 

47 M Tfr 
2 4 4 4 

77 13V: BW 
<W0: 77V- m, H, 

IE 2K. Jte£. 

11 BU Si Z' 

99 3» av S. n 
181 11 TOW 
633 221 . ffl]& 

463 4116 41 ft. 

5 m. B.S- 
17 « n m 
135* tJV. 4IM B * 

53 *4 IU 
H \Vk 1W IV 

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4.4 V 

17 


-ADVERTfSEMENT- 


rNTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
? April 1985 . 

Th« nat owl raise WMtanwii Moimi bdow ora wwPodbip Fmds Ustad win Itw 
exorotfon of some fumn wtem owto-src basotf aa Ism price*. The fottawfa* 
marelnnl tuiMeli hxHcnrr irewn cy of mteBpa s w p nt J for the IHT: 

(el -dally; (w) -weekly; (Id - M-emUttfy; (r) - re ou tn rt y; (U-Irrawlarly. 


At MAL MANAGEMENT 
<w) Al-Mal Trust, S. A_ 


08 LI FLEX LIMITED 
S 15340 ~l«*i Mumcurrency. 


BANK JULIUS BAER S CO. Ltd. 

—10 > Baertxmd 

—Id 1 Conbor ; 

—id) Eounsaer America _ 

—id 1 E ou loner Europe 

—id i EautDoer Poclllc— ... - 
— Id ) Crobsr. 


Dollar Xtotftom Term. 

s | F iS22 MSaStfK2= 

S 4 .hmm — iwi Pound StertlM 

uliEnS — IW) Deutsche Mark 

SF 1ISS80 Dutch Florin 


■SMU09 


110.13 
-S 788 


— Id > Siochbar. 
—Id ) CSF Fund. 


—id 1 CraMBdw Fond. 

— Id) ITF Fund N.v 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 
—id ) Asian Grpwfh Fu 

— <w> Ol«^n>onfl 

— (wl Fi F— America _ 

— iw) F1F — Europe 

— Iwl F1F— Podflt- 


1f 103480 —tw) Swfit Franc 
SFIOBJW ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

PBiSn-TUsHaSM {0014000 
SF2U8 — tdl BevcBs l epa l no ml ¥ 


E 10.13 

.DM 1081 
_PL 1007 
SF 9.n 


—Id I IndonerMumoondS A. 
—id ) Indttuez Muiilbands B 


SF1I29 
. S 1132 PARI5BAS-GROUP 

— id ) Coma tniemaWMi 

— MOBUOU 

- * -iw) OBUGESTfON 

-iwlOBUDOU-A 

■ — («*> OBLl-TEN 

■ -IwlOBLKaiLDEN 

'■fUS — Id rPAROlL-FUMO 

, S ,55 —Id | PARlNTER FUND 



137 ; a ate- 
n 5ii» » ss- 
4757 SL Nfc 3 . 

a .1 *.mr 

»rt 14VI M* Ur 
J11 SATO S 
37* WlTOft- 
02 17% 17% nv 


Cash Prices Apl? 


nodltr caa Uni! 

i i Sxr-n 1 * ‘5- 

3101ft 64 Z2 4 • I »C — 

OiileD ..Pin i. ix — 
■Fd'» Pr..!=- — 

SC-vO fto 1 n. • r... - 


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11 

ii ; 
cm e 

« IT 


f MU! ^ J par US Triosory 

B ftLToJ| , » , |Wl2P|Si2; M * DW ' J "7nW* ROVALa.OFCANADAPOB«fcGUERNSEy 

-f* gf -Tied RSC Conation Fond Ltd SlI.W 

— j* ■+**» R*C ForEMiLPodflC Fd S 1044- 

~l?.? Bf It-. Mj i IIS, -«») RhC Inf I Income Fd 11089 

— iw) Brlt.Universal Grewfh_— *9.*« ^Hd I RBC MaaCumaai F(L 4ZL23 

-Hwl RBC Morin AlMf. Fd2__— — _ >942 


— iw) BrtLGoU Fund. 


— iw) Brit8Banaa£urrency-» 
—id ) Brit, jam Dir Perl. Fd. 

i-lM) Briuersey Gin Pond 

-id I Brit. World Lets. Fond — 
—id 1 Brit World Team. Fund. 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— iw) Capital Inn Fund. 

— (m| ceaUai Honor' 


BUSS 

SIAtS SKANOl FOND INTL FUND (4VS-2K270) 
48221* — iwtlnCrBld — -S4J4« QHer. ... IS 30* 

5 1870 — (W)ACC.: Bid _.._84J6 Otter SS22 

S0804 svENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTDl 
17 Devonshire Sa-Lonaon-01 -3778040 

S3 S3* — il>l SHB Bond Fund —1214* 

3 TUB — twl SHB Inn Growth Fund 3 1988 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES! 

—id 1 Actions Sutnos SF34L2S* —id 

—id) Bono volar Swi— 5F 1 03.W —id 

—id) Bond valor O-mark DM U6J9 —id 

— Id) Bond Voter U5-DOLLAR — S 11087 — Id 

— idl Bond Votar T«i Ten 100480 —id 

— (dl Convert Voter Swf SF 1UJ0 —id 

—idl Convert Valor US-DOLLAR. 1 1 11.78 —la 

—id ] Coikhoc.. ... — SF 84980 — Id 

“ SF 7580 —Id 

SF 10680 —id 
S 185080 


SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

SF 3BM5 


—Id I C5 Foods — Bor* 

—Id I CS Fond*— inn. 

-Id > CS Money Market Fuad — 
—Id 1 CS Money Moricet Fund 
—id ) Erterule— Voiar_ — — 

—Id I U3SCC 

—id J Europo— voter, 


Amerlco-VdtarXH 
D-Mark Bond Setedten 
Doflcr Bond S o l eetlon^, 
Florin Bon d 5eioeUon_ 

I nt«rvalor.^W^H^M 


DM 11486 
- S 121 87 
FL 11882 
SFB9JU 
SFI5BJ0 
C 10024 


Start Ino Bond Selection 
Swiss Foreign Bond 5«i. SFias.18 
Swinvaler New Scries.. SF29580 
Universal Bond SetacL— SFBL50 

Universal Fund SF 11981 

DM 102988 —Id ) Yen Bond SelecMoo Y 1000580 


—id ) Pacific— voter 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
— Kd I Concentre. 


SF9MM UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

SFirem — (d>AmcaU8.Sh. SF4080 

SF — W I Bond-inv er t — _ 

ei-uuu _<u) FomoSwWSft., 

—Idl. 


Hdl tall Refl lmlon d 


DM2447 — id) Sa(U South Afr.Sh.. 
OM87JS —id ) Slmo (Stock Ortce) . 


SF 4725 
SP 13130 
SF 95580 
SFSdJD 
SF 19780 


Dunn & HareKti Uovd Georae. Brussels UNION INVESTMENT Fronklurt 

— (m) D&h CommooHv Pooi_ S30CL77 — — id I Unlrenta 


" II SJ_ ! I — im)CurrencvlG0WPW>l^ST8984— — td)Unllona»_^_ 

IT — (m> Winch. Ufc Fut. Pool— 341480— —id) Unlrok 

SrSfe.:*b ::i — .*£? a -:- , -< m » Twnsworta Fut . pool 197924— . . . other Funds 

E. SI L iBIl — fpy i T’ FAC MGMT.LTD. INV. ADVISERS lun r... 


DM AM 
DM 22-50 
DM 77.15 


— ** 


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April 9 



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— iw) FAC European 
— (w> FAC Oriental- 


32183 

310.72 

3380 


(w) Aauila International Fond— 311074 

* 24412 tr) Arr* Finance I.F 304082 

FIDELITY POB <70 Hannnn Bermuda ID) Arione 3184829 

— (ini Amerlam Values Common_ 30480 (•*) Tnalcor Inti Fd. (AEIFL — 3102! 
— im) Amer Values CumFref—^ 310184 (wi BNP uoerMnd Fund ____ S Tin 83 

—Id) FldeNtyAmer. Assets 34589 iwi Bondsetex-ttm Pr. SF 13480 

—id I Fidelity Australia Fund 3823 (m) Conada Gtd^Aortgage F d..... 3 983 

“ 11021 id } Capdai Preeerv. Fd. Inti 31123 

! 12227 (wj Citadel Fund 3182 

S2027 id > CJJL AuWrollO Fufld 3986 

335.11 id ) C-i.R. Japan Fund. _ — _ se.98 


—Idl Fidelity Discovery Fund.™, 
—id I Fidelity Dfr. 5vBS.Tr. 

—id ) Fidelity For East F 
— Id 1 FKMIIIV UHL Fund 


— Id) FtairtitvOrieni Fund 
—id l FldtHtv Frontier Fund 
-id i FioeUtv Pacific “ 


32481 im) Cleveland Offshore Fd S1SW23 

s 12J0 jw> Columbia Securities FL 11112 

r 313029 lb ) COMBTG URN 

—id I Fidelity 5PCL Grown Pd. 31485 (wi commn, Fd. mn A Certs 39.10 

—id) FMeiinr worm Fund — - — - 33027 iwt Qmven. Fd. Inn B Certs— s MB 

FORBE S P O BBB7GRANO CAYMAN }d J D.’wnter Wld WMe tvtTsL— STO» 

Lxidon Aw nt QH3 9-X13 (H ) DraHVar Invest. Fund N,V^ 31.11086 

-Iwl GoKI ineomt — ■ 3784- m ■ Dreyfus Fund ,nr > - - 32AM 

“i w l 5*S7 IW1 Drevtas Irtercwillnent S3143 

— Iw) Donor income. . (w> EaaUlUvmnt Trust 3J88 


—(ml Siratealc Trots no. 

GEFINOR FUNOS. 

—Car) Eost Investment 
— cw) scottlsfl world Fund. 
— twl srctc St. American 


CaaiLGuWAtd.LoaAsentAl -491 *Z30 


; 31.14 

334023 

41U8440 

315424 


(d ) Europe OWtaattans. 

ted First Eaata Fund — 

- 


FI tty Stars Ltd 

PlntOurv Otood LKL 


fur) Fixed Income Trans— 
(■>) Fometex issue Pr,„ 

(w) Forexfund ______ 

fw) Formula Select i on Fa. 
Id ) FonddoHa. 


GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 

PB 119, SI Peter Porv Guernsey. MW -2371 3_ 

im) FuturGAMSA 311545 <d ) Gaveram. Sec Fuad* 

(m)GAM Arbilraae InC S T2321 (d ] Frank! -TriW naerdns DM4184 

(wl GAAnerlca |IK (to) Haussmann HldVC N.V S 111.13 

IW) GAM Boston Inc >JRU2 (w) HcHIa Fundi 310427 


5982 

3 14.10920 
_ S 87889 
- -311424 
_ 11082 
SF 21485 

3729 

. SF 71.91. 
— . 32280 
38341. 


(«•) gam Ermitaoe. 
{wl GAM Fronc-vaL 


a l GAM Inter nelional inc. 


Jw) GAM Norm Amerlcn b ___ 
(wl GAM N. America unit Trust, 
iwi GAM Poclfic me.—. — 

Iwl GAM Start A Inti Unit Trad 

Im) GAM Systems Inc, - 

[!•) GAM Worldwide Inc. 


* SI? (wl Horizon Fund 

S /.S-Z! (A 5 1 LA Intt Gold Bond, 
la » intartand SA 

JJB* (w) Inter mark el Fund. 


(ml GAM Tvctw SA. Qoss A — 

G.T. MANAGEMENT lUKtUO. 

—id I G/TA^tedlcIwi'IIl— . * (X) Ktabmivt 

-id I G.T. AieonKK. GwttiFg — W227; }*} 

— <w)G.T. Asia Fund *ao»* i«ifce»™«r. 

—id ) Q.T. Australia Fund ... id I Uovibam- 


SL105.T3 

_ 1922 
- 31284 

.... . S 33040 

10580 p (a > Intarcnlnltto Mut. Fd. CVB'_ 330428 

*11423 ir 1 Inn Securities Fund ... *921 

13080*0 Id ) Investa DWS 
.31*31 (r) invest All ’ 

4.12447- jr I ttoBfortiine Inli 

*11149 (w) Jopan SeMctlon Fund 


w) Japan Pacific Fund 
ten iml JeHer.Ptns. Intt ua_ 
*«Sl* Id I tetemworf Benson I nil 



—id ) G.T. Europe Funq~_ 
—Iwl G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund 
— Id I G.T. Deilor 

—Id I G.T. Bond I 

—id ) G.T. Gtabol TecbrUftv Fd 


Jop. 

■ in. Id l Letom Fund 

SYlJEr < W 1 Lweraoe Cap Hold- 

Id > Uovibaer 

tWJff Iw) Lloyds loll. Smaller I 
- twimirfund 


51MI ml Maanofund N.V„ 

— SJ384 a 1 Med takmum See FO.. 


— |d ) G.T. Honshu Pottalmtar. 


_ 3 7225 
3 1.TS424 
. 117120 
3128980 
_ 31X79 
- 3 71.91 
. 319724 
31140 


Y11A119 

41783 (wINAAT i 31033 

£?«e? id ) Nlkke Growtn Pocfeoue Fd 3929484 
V57?e (w) Nlpean Fund,. __ . 3 30.14* 

, 13 * iw) N ovolec Investment Fund 39423 

(WINJLM.F 3144.17 


S 25.14 

id ) G.T. inveitmenl 
—id) G.T. Japan Small OLFund— 

—id l G.T. TecBncltWf Fund 

—id 1 G.T. Souin Cnina Fuad — _ 

EBC TRUST CO.IJERSEYI LTD. (ml MSPF.iJ - .- * ISS21 

F 3 SeataSt!st Heller ;0534O4331 iwl PANCURRI Inc 3 1486 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. (r ) Parian 5w. R Ell Geneva SF 129780 

f iafta Btal__.SV29- otter I9J39* IrllJ. ^malVotae Food N.V. *18044 

(flCaa!: BldZri*ia24 Otter *10878 ]bl PWmtes ... ■ S102S84 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND . (w) PSCO Fund N.V. S131J7 

—Id ) Short Term 'A; f Acevmt — 1 

-Wl Snort Term 'A* (DWr>- 

—id) Short Term -B'iAccuml — 

— id i Snort Term D 1 (Disirl— 

— fw) Long Term — ■ . . ■- — 


314431 Iw) PSCO mil. N.V 

*18123 Id ) PutBom rnn Fund— 

1 1.1142 IP ) PH — Tecft 

308503 (wl Ouonium Fund N.v. n 

321.49 W i Renin Fund - 

Id) Renitnvest-. 


35724 

- 314387 
, 3325*24 
LF 285480 
LP 18*51 


JARDlNE FLEMING, POB JOGPONeKa <d ) Reserve Ipwred Denoslls- 3107122 

— in) J.F Jooon TriuL- - . T«g (w) Samurai PertfoHs SFJ11J0 

— 40 ) J.F Soutn East AW *3085. u } sci/Tedi. SA LunemOourp — 1 92* 

-10 1 J.F Japan Teennoloov — V 23W7 {M>) snie jjj, Bank EaulTy HdnNV 3 927 
— IDI J.F Pacific SetS-lAttl IW (w) strategy Investment FumL— 1)929 

-lb ; J.F Auslrd te *«S ia ) Synta* LM.TOoss AJ 1 3720 

LLOYDS BANK IMTL, POB 438. Geneva 11 Iw> TgfiweGrowfii Fund, SP B77I 

-+i») Ltards inn Dollar * }«20 « T»va Poc. HoW. iSeoI %m*5 

-tin) Lloyds Inti Europe— SF »*{ Z °*. _ r °j7 . . «k« 

— Mw) Uavds intIGrowiJi— SF 179^ (w[ Trmwad^ Fund 

rt!SH 2 £ KSSff- 'M TiSggrSig ^essr.MgS 

wl TweedyJJrowne rtvChnsS 114H42 

.d) UNtCQFund ONTO . 

W I UNI Bond Fund „*,!55-£ 

— Iw) Class B-U8 — *”■« lb ) UNI Capitol Fwd SIMA 

— fw 1 Cktsa C - Japan — .. iw) vanderMH Asseta — . . - *iui 

im) winchester Financial Ltd. — S 10.15 
. (ml WtncnefierDlversiaeitae— SjBJB* 

fd ) World Fund SA 3144) 

iw) worldwide Seevrffln S/S 3tt. 3084 
(W) WG rt flwWe SOtClal S/S 2Vt. *127924 


Kiwi Lttwfc inti Poaflc — . SF )3780* 

NIMARBEN 
-id) Clou a 



wSrtMd? nSSoLMi « : wif Priee'kKl. to drew n. owtsk; da«v nock 

price os on Amstardam Stock E*ehafme 


lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllfllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltttlllllllllllll 

Another First for 

Nikko 

Another Plus for 

Investors 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

NMO MO-YIN MONEY MARKET FUND 


Nikfco is pleased to offer investors the new Nikko Euro- 
Yen Money Market Fund. This is a unique opportunity 
to participate in a mutual investment fund consisting of 
yen-denominated money market instruments — the first 
such fund to be licensed by the Japanese Ministry of 
Finance under the Foreign Exchange Control Law. 

The introduction of the Nikko Euro-Yen Money Market 
Fund is timely. More investors, from individuals to large 
institutions, are turning to yen assets as they diversify 
their portfolios. In doing so, though, they are finding few 
short-term instruments that provide both liquidity and 
favorable yields. 

Nikko offers both— and more. 

High yields. The Fund offers a higher rate of return than 
would usually be available with a demand cash deposit. 
This is achieved through investment in such money market 


Australia 

England 

Luxembourg 

The Nikko Securities Ca, Ltd. 

The Nikko Securities Ca, 

The Nikko [Luxembourg] SA. 

Exchange Center. 28th Floor. 

[Europe] Ltd. . 

16. Boulevard Royal. 

20 Bond Street. Sydney. 

Nikko House. 17 Godliman 

Luxembourg, Grand Duchy 

Australia 

Street, London EC4V SBD. 

of Luxembourg 

Tel. 233-7166 

England 

Tel. 248-9811 

7 W. 42384 

Bahrain 

Singapore 

The Nikko Securities Co., Ltd. 

Hong Kong 

The Nikko Merchant Bank 

7th Floor. Unites House, 

The Nikko Securities Ca, 

[Singapore] Ltd. 

Government Hoad. Manama. 

(Asia) Limited 

6 Shenton Way. No. 13-03 DBS 

Bahrain 

St George’s Building. 19th 

Building. Singapore 0106. 

Tel 271098 

Floor, No. 2 Ice House Street, 

Singapore 

Denmark 

Hong Kong 

Tel. 5-249011 

TeL 2233390 

The Nikko Securities Ca, Ltd. 
Qestergadc 42, 

1100 Copenhagen. 

Denmark 


Til. 326020 




instruments as certificates of deposit, bankers acceptances, 
commercial paper, treasury bills, and other short-term 
investments issued or guaranteed by first-class debtors. 

Liquidity. But the Fund has the liquidity of a demand 
cash deposit. Another advantage is the low initial minimum 
investment of ¥1,000,000— well below the minimum for 
Euro-yen deposits or certificates of deposit. 

The Fund is based in Luxembourg and sponsored by The 
Nikko (Luxembourg) S.A. Managed by the Nikko Euro-Yen 
Money Market Fund Management Company (Luxembourg] 
S.A., the Fund has at its disposal the expert investment advice 
of Nikko International Capital Management Co. (Europe) 
Limited as well as the broad skills of the Nikko organization. 

For more details on this distinctive investment oppor- 
tunity or a copy of the Prospectus, please contact one of 
the information centres listed below. 


Switzerland 

The Nikko (Switzerland] 
Finance Co., Ltd. 

Zurich 

Holbrinsuasse 30, 

8008 Zurich. 

Switzerland 
TeL 259-91 II 

Geneva 

17, rue de la Croix d’Or. 
1204 Geneva, 

Switzerland 
Tel. 283455 


Any person outside the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg who wishes to make an application must satisfy himself as to full observance of the laws of the country where he resides. 

No subscription will be accepted if made ou tbe basis of this advertisement. A subscription can only be received on tbe basis of the current Prospectus. The units may not be offered 
or sold in Japan or to residents of Japan. 


NIKKO 









m- 


mm 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL 




k lr%, I 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing an Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Dlv. Yld. PE TPOsHUti LnwQuOf. OVge 


4V4 LazKap 
25 LearPP 
2ft LooPh 
i» Lrttfshs 
396 LetturT 
5 Levitt 

71* LJMFPti JO 10 
2V3 UtfM 


iv Lodpe 
23V. Lor Fair 19 

SH Lumex M j 34 
6ft LundvE 19 

MU Lurta 9 

13ft LYnCSv JO 1 JD 17 
8V. LyndtC JO 2.1 9 


Sft . 

24 + Vk 

Aft — IS 
Z7 Vj— 14 
5V. — W 

m 

ir* + h 

244 — ft 
2ft — to 
37to — ft 
Mto — to 
I2H— to 
HH— Va 
304* + M 
944 


T 9 M + to 

tow + to 




12 

a 

15 

589 


14 


JS 


25 

13 

3 

102 

31 

18 - 

366 : 


5 . 


U 

9 

15 

M 

S7 

450x1 1 


5894 

SBft. 

4U 

4V*. 

1694 

1694. 

2% 

29k. 

IMnk 164 

2ft 

Zft. 

29 

29 

91* 

9ft 

9M 

9»- 

39k 

3ft- 

594 

5)4- 

259* 

25ft 

m. 

lDVk 

61* 

Sft- 

20 ft 

20ft ■ 

294 

3 

4M 

4ft 

49k 

4ft- 

3W 

3ft 

57 

58 

47M 

67ft- 

7ft 

1194 

7ft- 

lift 


914 5M 
14 10*4 

27 1214 

19k 1 
1944 111* 
1444 1034 
20 Vj 13 
441* 2514 
694 444 

1444 1194 
lift 56* 

3Vi 214 
1394 10 
It 13W 
5V. 294 
T19k *94 
1414 9 


Nontofc 15 

NIGsO -40b 3.1 9 

NtPairit -ID J 15 

NaliLB 

NMxAr Jtt 4J 12 
NPlnRt .99 43 1& 
NProc l-20r AJ 10 
NYTIme SI 1J 17 
Newb£ 4 

NwpEI . 180 NU 9 
Nlcttob 8 

Nohnc 19 

NondRn 8 

MoCaOu 

NuHnn 5 

NucIDt 8 

Numac 


It 8 . 
1 13 13 

134 15ft 15ft 
A IK Ift 
21 IK' 18ft 
93 1SH 1514 
113 1944 1944 
350 43ft 421* 
20 514 5 

26 IMt Uft 
111 1194 MM 

io m m 
n ii« im 
30 1494 1414 
42 3V4 3 

9 994 914 

74 1094 1DV4 


I 

13 

15 ft — ft 

IK 

irw 

159k 

19% 

4294 

56*— ft 
141* — 14 
lift + 94 
2V* 

1194 — 1* 
149k 

3 — ft 
994 

1(M — to 


2414 

1614 OEA 



13 

63 

22ft 

21ft 

22 

22ft 

Mft Oakwd 

M b 

A 

12 

10 

1914 

Uft 

19 + M 

12 

4 Oort A n 



39 

57 

7ft 

7ft 

794— ft 

Mft 

ift OdefBs 



48 

37 

10 

9M 

91k— 1 

19W 

10 oistms 

24 

IJ 

16 

87 

18ft 

lift 

lift— V4 

7ft 

3ft OOklep 




3 

Aft 

664 

*14 

7ft 

39* OPtiUin 

JtSa 

J 

29 

b 

694 

49* 

.69* + ft 

8 

514 OrlolH A 

.15 

2J 

16 

B 

Aft 

Aft 

Aft 

Sift 

214k osullvn 

J2 

20 

14 

4 

35ft 

35% 

35ft— ft 

1094 

Aft OxrrdF 

A2» 

4J 

9 

37 

9M 

Bft 

9 

11 

7ft OzarfcH 

JD 

23 

8 

58 

9 

Sft 

Sft— ft 


1794 

12 Jactyn 

500 34 

9 

3x14 

14 

14 . 

9 

5V» Jacobs 




14 

AH 

AM 

6M— ft 

594 

2ft JoiAni 



6 

95 

2M 

2V* 

294 + Vk 

29k 

ft JrtAwt 




26 

ft 

ft 

ft ‘ 

8M 

4ft Jrtron 

491 

6.1 

16 

13 

8 

7ft 

8 +14 

AM 

2ft John P d 




5 

4 

Sft 

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11 2ft 
172 1594 

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179k— ft 
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21ft 
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1694 Fablnd A0 22 7 
2 FairmC 
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9ft FtOmn iJOOa U 7 
18ft FtFSLn Mb 20 7 

11 FWvmB 80 68 10 
lift FbcfiP J8t SJ 11 
7ft FttoGE 4 

22ft FltGEpf 4J0 15L7 
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25ft FlaRck JO TJ 11 
22ft FhJko IJOt 5J 10 
6 vc. Foadrm 10 

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402 24ft 
23 9ft 

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244 8ft 
110* 97ft 

7 20ft 


1094 1094 
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414 4ft 
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1194 lift — ft 
1234 1294 + I* 
894 894 + 1* 
25ft 25ft 
994 994— Vh 
43ft 43ft 
24ft 24ft— 9k 
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8 Oft + ft 


34ft 2814 
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17ft 8 
2ft 114 
9ft 7ft 
4ft 214 
4ft 3ft 
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KearNn 40 XI U 
Ketctun -58t 3J 
KeyCo JO 27 
Koypn JO 21 14 
Korea wt 
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294 2ft + ft 


391 994 

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714 79k + ft 
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3ft 39k + ft 
■4 4 

49k 49k 
3ft 39k + ft 
49k 5 

2ft 29k— ft 
14ft 15ft + ft 
13 13 — ft 

26ft 241*— ft 


2 20ft 
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531 2 

1 399k 
32 23ft 
735 7ft 
71 18ft 
145 139k 
44 1194 


9594 9594—1* 
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20ft 20ft— ft 
18 It — ft 
194 2 + ft 

39ft 39ft— ft 
2294 23 +1* 

794 79k— ft 
U 18 — ft 
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2ft 1ft LSB 
3ft 2ft La Bare 
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38ft 2394 LOksSfl -15s 

14ft lift LrxlBnn J4 3J 9 

17ft 11 Ldmks J2 10 11 
16ft 9 ft Laser 49 

13 894 Laura n 17 


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14ft 10ft 
22ft 10ft 
8ft 4ft 
19ft Mft 
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4 13ft 
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35 794 7ft 79k— 94 

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AMEX Highs-Lows 


April 9, 


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April 9 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Sales In Nat 

188s HUH Law IPJVLCh-M 


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» « nv » 

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I 152594 25ft 25ft 
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18194 81ft 8194+ ft 
287 2894 279* Uft + ft 
l 7 19 18ft 19 + ft 

50 2794 27ft 2794 + ft 
114 9 194 9 

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! 269 8ft 7ft lft+ ft 
91 92ft 9194 92 — ft 
1451594 15ft 15ft 
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25 UM 17M MM + 9k 
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1309k 309k 3094 
91 Mft 18ft 181* + ft 
1228 2414 2394 3414 + 14 
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14 1*4* U9k 169k— ft 
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224171* 17 17ft 
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5 33ft 33ft 33ft— I* 
274 179k 171* 171*— Vk 
1874 20ft 19ft 20ft + ft 
75 81* 7ft 86* + ft 
414 13ft 129k 121* 
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1061 t2V5t 12 12ft 
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52 369k 3AM SAM 
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5534U 34M 34ft 
3* 139k T3 139k + M 
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17 8 794 794— ft 

M 29ft 29 29ft— ft 

47 39k J9k 3H — ft 
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2081014 «ft 994— ft 
1 9ft 99k 994 
15023 216* 211*— 1ft 

1 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
35V 7ft 79k 79k— ft 
45 12 12 12 

3*1 271k 27ft 2791 
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98 19k 19k 1ft + ft 
IA4 8 79k 794 — 9k 

152 39m Sft 39k 
245 Bft 89k Bft + ft 
428 24% 22V* 2394 + 9k 
9* 79k 7ft 7ft— ft 
6111* 11 11 
100 Aft Aft Aft— 14 
8 8 8 8 
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*69 49k 4ft 49* + ft 
4019ft IBft 19ft 
SO SM 89* 89k 
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52 6ft Ift Bft— 6k 
321194 116* lift 


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18 91* 9 9Vj 

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I 10 99k 994 994 

471 29V4 279k 281* + Ml 
186 29M 2894 28ft +21* 
121 5 494 4ft + ft 

.13 .1 29 97M T* 97 

121 179k 1714 171* 

151 lift 101k 11 

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JO# 1.1 192 189k 18 1» 

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JS 14 1718ft 1794 1794 

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22 79k 714 714— ft 

10A 1ft 1ft 1ft 

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228 5.1 364314 43ft 43ft 

125 *1* A 4 

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3 494 494 494— ft 

7711 II II 

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1JM 11 19 3294 32 3294 

20 111 * 11 11 — V* 

415 7ft Aft Aft— ft 

25 Sft. 59k 5ft + ft 

37 21ft 2094 21 — ft 

1100 2214 216* 22 + ft 

212 31 301* 301*— 94 

25 4 6 « — ft 

■34 3 A 1352 10ft SO loft 
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J4 1.1 12522 91ft 21ft— ft 

1J0 4.1 3429M 299* 299k— Ik 

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JO 1.1 18 H 18 18 — ft 


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11 Mft 16 16 — ft 

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1914 139b 13M— 9k 

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186 3*k 3M 3M + i* 
157 151k 156* 15*k + 9k 
273 19 1794 IHk + H 

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17 3317 23ft 236* + ft 
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385 15 144k Mft— M 

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20 17 23 79k 79k 79k— ft 

M>£? 234329k 331k 3TH 
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02# J 57 A 5% tft 
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as 

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ift 

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INTERNATlbyAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY APRIL 10, 1985 


INTERNATIONA 


Over-the-Counter 


April 9 


NASDAQ National Market Prlc 


Ex 

Be J3 XT 

nr 


m 

it 

aim Wm 

« m m 

111 111b T0H 
mm me 
Hint 17 
12117* m 
7to 
M. 




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301 

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140 

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IS 

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Page 13 


IED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


EEH2Z2I! 


MANHATTAN, NYC 

THE ULTIMATE M 
CONDOMINIUM UVMG 
TRUMP TOWER ■ on Fifth Avenue 
MANHATTAN PLACE- Ur A* & 38 5* 
New, elegant. prarignui until feature 
sfataKtwe. secure and private Z 4, 5. 
bedrooms. (1500 to 3000 iq ft) Avtri- 

obhs from Ownerv 

Contact. Mr. M. Ponton 

Em-Ess Management Cars 
118-35 Queer* Bvd. 
fvwrHtt, NY 11375 USA 
Tel 718-SKFJ84S 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


7THBAC 

Eweptewroi, redone, on gradeo, 
receptions, 2 bedrooms. 2 bad*, 
poking FlAjOOO. 5o3 *8 38. 


REAL ESTATE 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPOST A EUROPEAN 
CAR INTO THE USJL 
THi document npfcera fuHy wto one 
must do » bring o car no the US. 
safely and legnSy. k indudes new & 
mod Europrai auto puces. buying dpi, 
DOT & ErA conversion odd esse*. cus- 
tom clearance & dipping procedural 
at vvefl as legal pom. Because of the 
drag dollar, you can ton* up to 
US$13,000 when bnmg o Mercedes, or 
BMW «i Europe 8> importing it to the 


AUTOS TAX FREE 



wanted/exchange 

Pi Sehtwft, fcwfaeh 3131 

7000 5netj5fi 1, Wen Germany 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNE5 

Residential OBarinmi 
overioeUng CANNE5. 

FA 500 monthly. 

Wrap around balcony. 2 bathroom, 
th bratoomj. 3 W.C. *. large kvuig 
double fridge. Mete dahwrahei end 
waileng moefune. Stereo equipment 
Ndtomid* multi lystem TVr'Sala VHF 
ihp receiver & nereo, styfah furniture, 
decorat e d. Ready to move m. 

Puce far furniture FI 25,000 
Phene Holland 31-1650 56707 



LEGAL SERVICES 


SERVICES 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 
RepresentOiw twv«R iff w * 
ZURICH 83058.8*. 


+* PARIS 553 62 62** 

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PA YOUNG LADY 
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MATMA: Antwerp (3) 234 36 68 
234 35 72 

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A n twerp SwM EuroteL 




EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 







YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 
LOW COST FLIGHTS I Mutfa!o » Kj PA - *** 52s « 


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YOUNG LADY TRILINGUAL Y1P4»A 



AUTO CONVERSION 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


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7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek blonds. Turkey, 
Egypt & Israel. 


PARIS 704 SO 27 
VIP PA YOUNG LADY 
Multftnguai 


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Every Monday 



GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 




IBIZA 

HUTOP RNCA. fantastic sea view, 
seduded locator, near beach, 10 min 
Golf Roca Lina, 5 mins Puerto faizn, 5 


YOUNG GOMAN ACTRESS, hgjhly 
educated loob for an m t eresnng post- 
boa London 2454)080. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


bedrooms, I baths, big pod, demno 
woman. For rem May T ■ Oa 15 $700- 
1100 weekly minimum 3 weeks. CoS 
Paris 256 0255 or Box 1983. Herald 
Tribune, 92521 NeuOy Cede., finance. 
Eventually for tale. 


PARIS AREA 



SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 




Embassy Service 

8 Av* de mraraia 
7500V Pm 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562 7B 99 


AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AG89T 

. 764 03 17 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 



AUTOS TAX FREE 


FRANCO 

BRITANNIC 

TAX FRS CARS 

ROLLS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

JAGUAR 

ROVER 

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European & Worldwide 
delivery 

21 Ave Kieber 
75116 PARIS I 
11:( 1)757 50 80 
Telex: 620 420 


10 YEARS 

We Deliver Cwv to the World 

TRANSCO 

Keeping a constant stock of more than 
300 brand new an, 
making 5000 happy dienes every ye ar. 




THE YACHT-LIKE 
STELA 
OCEAN IS 

3 AND 4 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek Islands 5 Turkey. Sating 
every Monday & Friday from Piraeus 

Please apply to your Trove! Agent or: 
SUN UNE 

2. Kor. Servos St.. Athens 10562 
Tela: 215621, Phone 3228881 

Paris Set 365 80 36 
Munch wJ: 395 613 
Geneva let 327 110 
Zurich mL 39! 36 35 


Cruise in Elegance 


EGYPT, ISRAEL & TURKEY 

CHOICE OF 7-4-3-2-1 DAY 
CRUISES out of Athens I Proem) 


RANKHJRT. Young lady ee wpam oa 
Englah. French. German spoken Free 
to travel. 067/44 77 75. 


SOOETE WANE PARIS 260 87 43 
Men & women gwdes, security & rent- 
car lervices. B am ■ 12 pm. 


: :ijl 2 •« 3; ;« ! * 3 J . c I L 


Msse-'' 


PARIS NOTE THB PHONE AT ONCE 

757 62 4B. TrusrW V.IP. tody, travel 
companion 


LONDON. Young German -'French affi- 
ance to meet you on vow visit to 
London Tel: UK 01-381 6852, 
SINGAPORE NTl GUIDES. Cdt Sn- 

e 734 96 28, 

TOKYO LADY COMPANION. PA 
Perianal Assistant 03456-5539 




HONG KONG (K-3] 723 12 37 
sopheticated companion. 


BIROTna CRUISES 

Itarte. 2660324 

Hamburg] 443032 

London: 7340805 

Rome: 4757806 

Athens 4526641 6 9 

New York (2121 5991750 

Lm Angeles 213 8551736 


HONG KONG 3-671267 young tody 
fOnentd/Europuan) companion. 


HONG KONG - 3-620000 Young 

lady (Auan/Weuem] Companion 


HONG KONG 3-661525 VB* lady 


BOOKS 


HONG KONG 3-697006. Germing 

female/mete companion 


MUNICH - GSIMAN LADY compoiv 
ion and atv-ravde. Td: 3T1 11 Oi 


PAHS YOUNG SOPHISTICATE) VIP 
lady, hi Enauc) PA 500 89 72. 



ALWAYS AVAILABLE - AU PAIRS, 
dddreni nanny, mum's helpers & at 
brandies of Isr doss Win domestic 
help worldwide. Cad Soane Bureau. 
London 730 81227514204 hours] U- 
CEMP.AGY.Tbt 895DSAKLOANEG. 


DAWAJI TRADE 

INTL DELIVERY 

We keep a lorae dock of 
most car brands 
Tel: Q2/64B 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 rue Lens, 

1050 Brusseb. 


74 CHAMPS-EYSSS 8th 


Studio, 2 or 3 /omti apartment. 
One month or more. 

LE QAR1DGE 3S9 67 97. 




AUTOMOBILES 


Mac* Year Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

In Hi* 


By Phono: Cod your beat IHT representative with your t ext. You 
win be informed of the oost knmediatdy, and once prepoyment is 
made your od wil appear within 48 hours. 

Coat: The bade ratals $9.80 per 8ne per day + load foxes. There ore 
25 fatten, sign end spaces in the first Ene and 36 in the fbfcwmg Ena. 
Min imu m space is 2 fact. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Cade American Express, Diners Cub, Eurocrat!, Master 
Card, Access and Visa. 


NOTRE DAME 

View on Seine, charming 3 roams. 
F3.80D. 563 68 38. 


Brad new double oir cootftionmg 
maroon iv il iffi f Minor 

Madrid (Spain) 4567564 



AUTO RENTALS 



AUTO SHIPPING 


EUROPORT TAX 
FRS CARS 

Call or wee far free catalog. 
Bax 7201 1 

Rotterdam Akpart Halid 

TeLffl 10^3077 
Telex 25071 EPCAR NL 


TAX FRS CARS 
P.CT. 

AH makes, off models, brand new 
faeriaan 1, 2008 Antwerp. Brighrn 
Tet 3/231 ^ 00. Tix 3S*6 PHCAlfT I 
Send US>5 lor analog 


GOVERNMHMT SECURITIES FUND 

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BANQUE PBIVCE S JL - Snecnraale de laxonbowg 
20, Boaleverd Cmmaimel Semb 
depuia le 21 Mara 1985, la part eat cotfe ex-dividende. 


PARIS AREA 


16TH MOZART 



TRANS 


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forte. F3750 net. Smdfl key money. 
Tet B0623 10. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


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USA A WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 5tfh 5t, N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 



HEAD OFFICE 


Praia: (For deified only): 
7474600. 

EUROPE 

Ametenken: 26-36-15. 
Afcenet 361-8397/360-2421. 
Broeealm 343-1899. 
Cnp o nh open: (01) 329440. 
FYonktart: (069) 7267-55. 
Lrasonm: 29-5B-9A 
Ikbon: 67-27-93/ 66-25-14 . 
London: (01 1 8364302. 
Madrid: 455-2891/4553306. 
Mian: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (03) B4554S. 
Rama: 679-3437. 

Sweden: 06 7569229. 

Tal Aviv: 03455 559. 
Vieraiai Contact Frankfurt. 

UNTO) STATES 

Now Yratc (212) 752-3890. 
Weal Coast: (415) 362-8339. 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buenoe Aim 41 4031 
(Dept 312) 

Guayaquil: 431 943/431 
Lfanra 417 852 
Rcmamra 64-4372 
5ai Jan: 22-1055 
Srartievra 6961 555 
Sao Paulo: 852 1893 

Ml DOLE EAST 

Beivaei: 246303. 
Jordan: 25214. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 34 0044. 
Qatar 416535. 

Sawd Arabia: 

Jeddah: 667-1500. 
LULL: Du bra 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Bangkok: 390-06-57. 
Hang Kang: 5-213671. 
ManRra 817 07 49. 
Seoul: 725 87 73. 
Sbigaporn: 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Sydneyt 929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 690 8233. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & 


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MEAN ESCORT 

SERVICE 02 - 69 762 402 


LONDON. HEATHROW A GATWICK 
Tel: 01 890 0373 


We are pleased to announce 
the formation of 


TENDLER BERETZ ASSOCIATES LTD. 


7 West 51st Street. New York, New York 10019 
Telephone (212) 315-2611 . 

. Telex 276524 TBA UR 


mv&m M 


Private Memb er i hipt AvaMde 

HA award winn i ng eanrice has 
boon featured as the tap 6 meet 
exclusive Escort Serve* by 
USA A Intamafiamd newt medki 
indudittg radEa raid IV. 


REGENCY 

WORLDWAOE MULTILINGUAL 


NEW YORK OFFICE 

Tab 212-838-8027 
B 212-753-1864 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

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EVERYWHERE YOU AK OR (SOL. 

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Col free from U£: 1-800-237-0692 
Can free from fbAkb 1-800-282-0392. 
Lowell Eastern welcomes you bodd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 

IN NEW YORK 

TEL- 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Escort Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Poriman Escort Agency 

67 CMtaro Street, 
London W1 

TeL 486 3724 or 486 1158 
Al major rretfif cards araeplad 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SERVICE 
TBj 200 8585 


LONDON 


* MADRID ★ 

TASTE ESCORT 5ERVKE 
TH: 41 1 72 57-259 61 96 


ZURICH 

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TBj 01/363 08 64-022/34 41 86 


f AMSTERDAM * 

SHE Escort Service. 227837 


LONDON GABROEUA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Teh 01-229 6541. 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Service. 
Heathfow/Gatuick. Tet KM 7945. 


LONDON: JULIAN 8 ALAN Mde Es- 
cort Services. Tet 328 5300/341 9531 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Sernce. 

■ Tet 0711 7 26211 50. 

GBCVA-HHBtf BCOKT SERVICE COLOGTC- BONN- Duessddorf First 
Tab 36 29 32 Ock Escort Serwra. 0221 /S4 33 04. 

FRANKFURT AREA -Femde + Male 
escort + travel service. Tel: 62 84 32. 




ROME CLUB BJKOPE BCOKT 
& Gutie ServkaJefc 06/589 2604- S89 
1146 prom 4 pm to 10 pm) 


CHEUEA ESCORT SStVlCE 
51 Saauchaaip Place, London SW1 
Tel: 01 584 6513^49 (61? pm) 



AR1STOCATS 

London Escort Service 
128 Wigmore Sr. London W.l. 
AH major Craft Cards Accepted 
Tet 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - mkftight 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUIDE SERVICE from 5pm 
ROTTERDAM 10) 70-254155 
DC HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 96 


MADRID INTI 


GENEVA * BEAUTY* 


TBj 29 51 30 


GENEVA ESCORT 

5BIV1QL Tet 46 11 58 


GENEVA- BBT 


TBj 022/86 15 95 


AMSTERDAM JASMINE 


LONDON ZOE WEST Escort Agency 
Tel: 01-579 7556. 


AMSTERDAM SYLVIA ESCORT Ser- 
20255191 


CARIBBEAN BCORT SStVICE. Tnkn- 
Basel. Tel: 061/54 34 41 


MUNICH HEL&TS Escort + Guide 
Service. Tet 089/4486038 


AMSTERDAM, Brussels, Hogue. N. Eu- 
rope Escort Service. (0201956472 


BRU55&5. CHANT AL BCORT Ser- 
vice: Teh 02/520 23 65. 


HJANKfURT - ANMFS Escort Service. 
Td: 069 / 2881-03. 


RANKHJRT “TOP TBO" Escort Ser- 
vice. 069/59-60-52 


RANKRJRT/MUMCH Mat; Exon 
Service. 069/386441 & 089/3518226. 



LONDON GENE ESCORT Servira I TBj 2456548. CRBJfT CARDS 
Teh 370 7151. ‘ 


AM5THDAM NICOLE 


AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SERVICE. 020-954344 


DOMNA JADE GENEVA Escort Ser- 
vice. Td: 022 / 31 26 73. 


PUSSHD ORKOLOGNKacn-Botm 
^^MBcort Service 0211/ 3831 41 


MUNCH - BLOhOY 8 TANJA Escort 

Service. Tet 311 79 00or 311 79 36 


VIENNA'S HRST ESCORT service. Td: 
02244-4191 or 722-432, )3 indmda. 


AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Service 
Teh (0201 326420 or 340110. 


FRANKFURT SONIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Teh 06948 34 42. 


FRANKRIRT JENNY ESCORT + mw 

durvica. Tel- 069/55-73-10 


HAMBURG - CAROLS® Escort Ser- 
vice. Teh 040 / 652 91 30 


MONTREAL. CANADA, CLAIRE Es- 
cort & Gude Sendee! 51 4-7684535. 


HAMBURG BCORT + GUIDE Ser- 1 STOCKHOLM ESCORT AND GUDE 
wee. Tet 54 17 42. I Service Tdi 68 34 cA 



HOUANW8 BCORT SERVICE OS- 
1222785. 030-944530. 02997-3685. 
















































































































































PEANUTS 


1 1 ALWAYS WEAR AW CAP 
TO BED ON THE NIGHT 
BEFORE A BIG GAME._ 


I GUE5S IT'S JUST 
A SUPERSTITION 


H 


I WONDER IF ANY OF 
MV OTHER PLAYERS WEAR 
"THEIR CAPS TO BED... 


BOOKS 


*»- 

_S*A 



BLONDIE 


NO MORE YIETNAMS 

By Richard Nixon. 240pp. $14.95. 

Arbor House, 235 East 45th Street, 

New York, N.Y. 10017. 

Reviewed by Bernard Gwertzman 

S AIGON fefl to the Communists on April 
30, 1975. And former President Nixon has 

■ s ia.l - * nn4i o UncflinO 


Sin ce it was his administration that signed" 
the papers that ended the U. S. presence m 
Vietnam, Nixon seems determined to make 
dear that he was not responsible for the tteba- 
. . ■ t_ - — „ 4 r«l m Ann! 30 . In a 


de that is bang marked on AgrilJ&ln a 
chapter called “H 


ACROSS 


1 Early love 
feast 

6 A sixth-day 

creation 

lQN.F.L.team 

14 Fable’s finale 

15 vu 

16 Gray's text: 
Abbr. 

17 Ancient 
Roman port 

18 even keel 

19 Pioneer 
heroine Betty 

20 Town near 
Antietam 

22 Augury 

23 Pit 

24 Rio Grande 
city 

20 Trued 
302,4,6.8... 

32 Word in 

Texas’s 

nickname 


51 Petition 

54 Aarhus native 

56 Page 

57 Kind of range 
where a miss is 
strange 

63“ Do Is 

Dream of 
You” 

64 Rumanian dty 

65 Almost 
inaccessible 
nest 

66 Units of 
reluctance 

67 Split rattan 

68 Item found on 
a spine 

69 Net 

79 “Sustineo 


U.S.A.F. motto 
71 Ruhr dty 


DOWN 


33 Riley's love 
35 Strike out 
38 Ulna's locus 
46 Condensing, in 
away 

43 Scatters newly 
cut grass 

44 Dali's land 


46 Knee, to an 
M.D. 

47 Fix in the mind 
49 Reunion and 

Spectrum 


ITekoa prophet 

2 Mild expletive 

3 Ionian gulf 

4 Brace 
5Slipby 

6 Playa day 

7 Strips 

8 Discordant 

9 Laundry gear 
10 Maugham 

novel, with 
"The" 


11 “What's 

in r 


12 Having a 
leonine 
coiffure 

13 Pool member 

21 Passover feast 

25“ Love 

Her,” Beatles 
hit 

26 Landon 

27 Swag 

28 Concerning 

29 Voracious 
underwater 
creature 

31 Swerve 

34 U.S.A. 

36 Possible 
prelude to 
foreclosure 

37 Sicilian dty 

39 On the Laptev 

41 Inclined 

42 Astronaut 
Grissom 

45 Book by 
George Sand 

48 Llama 'skin 

50 Detroit sales 
gimmick 

51 Tocsin 

52 Martinique 
mount 

53 Cloys 

55 Llama’s 

habitat 

58 Type of 
thermometer 

59 Kona garlands 

60 Part of B. A. 

61 Aswan's river 

62 Astute 


ONSWOOO, I 'M DESPEBATE. J 
r NEED TO 0OHHOW $20 



h-Ti 


VES, THERE'S 
A CHANCE... 



marked the l Oth anniv ersary with a bristling 
volume on the lessons he believes should be 
drawn from the Vietnam experience. This is a 


very lively issue in Washington these days as 
the debate goes on over U. S. milit 


BEETLE BAILEY 



iitaiy imrolve- 

meat in Central America. There seems to be an 
agreement that there should never be “another 
Vietnam" but disagreement over just what that 
means- 

Nixon wants to be heard in that debate 
b ec ause the "pin thrust of his book is that the 
United States should not be deterred from 
-becoming involved in Central America and 
other places in the Third World by fear of what 
he relic the “Vietnam Syndrome." To those 
who say that the United States should stay out 
of countries like H Salvador and Nicaragua. 
Nixon replies that the lesson of Vietnam is not 
he United 


couple *Iow We Won theWar," he 

says that when Secretary of State WHiam P. 
Rogers signed the Paris accord with Haan in 
January 1973, “we had won the war in Viet- 
nam." But the “peace was lost” he says becauw 
of “a spasm of congressional jrrcqxmabflitjr 
and a biased press that never reported on 
Vietnam fairly from the start Complaints 
about congressional weariness about Vietnam 
and the press’s fascination with South Viet-(/ 
flam 's vices instead of the North’s are worthy * 
of serious discussion, but Nixon puts t hem 
forth in a stridency that does not seem to serve 
his case welL 


tb B (,n 


Bernard Gwertzmanis on the staff of The New 

York Times. 


BEST SELLERS 



out such 


that the 'United States should stay 
places but that “we will not xaU again.' 

Nixon’s goal in this book is to argue 
for a tougher U. S. posture around the world, 
and only secondarily to talk about Vietnam, 
this book is not a place to turn for a good 
summary of the war. As history, it is second- 
rate, with many questionable assertions about 
the past This is a highly contentious book, 
with Nixon’s language disappointingly shrpL 

Thefirst paragraph sets the mood for tixi entire 

book: “No event in American history is more 
. misunderstood than the Vietnam War. It was 
™i<repo rted then, and it is tmsremembered 
now. Rarely have so many people been so 
wrong about so much. Never nave the conse- 
quences of their misunderstanding been so 


The New YoAThoes 

This list b based on reports from more than 2.000 book* tons 
throughout the United Motes. Weds on list air not necessarily’ 
consecutive. 

FICTION 

71 b Last Weeks 

Week Week wUst 


FAMILY ALBUM, by Daniel 
IF TOMORROW COMES. 

Sheldon — — 

THINNER, by Richard Bachman 


DanieQe Steel 

by Sidney 


THINNER, by Kjchaid Baconian 

INSIDE, OUTSIDE, by Herman Wot* _ 
THE LONELY SILVER RAIN, by John 


D. MacDonald 


THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, by 
Torn Clancy 


— 1 


7 PROOF, by Dick Francis 

8 GLITZ, by Elmore Leonard 

9 MINDBEND. by Robin Cook ....... 

10 THE FINISHING SCHOOL, by Gail 
Godwin ... 


9 


it 



SEE YOU LATER ALIGATIOR. by WH- 
riam F. Buckley Jr. . 


HOTEL DU LAC by Anita Brookner — 13 

MEXICO SET. by Lett Deighion 8 

THE SICILIAN, bv MarioPuzo 12 

VIRGIN AND MARTYR, by Andrew M. 
.Greeley 


7 

A 

6 

21 


— 3 




military zeal he ‘is very understanding of his 
"" vs mat when he took office 


NONFICTION 


WIZARD of ID 


© New York Tana, edited by Eugene Maleska. 



own caution. He says 

in January 1969, “the only strategy for pursu- 
ing a military victory that deserved serious 
consideration would have been to order a ma- 
jor escalation Of the conventional war." He 
said the United States had the resources to 
achieve victory in six months of heavy fighting. 
Why did he not do it? “None of these options 
Vas compatible with political reality ” 


IaCOCCA: An Autobiography, by Lee In- 
cocea with With am Novak 


BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
kady N. Shevchenko 

LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Bnscag- 
Ua 


CITIZEN HUGHES, by Michael Dnman 


.byMicha 

SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 


-rvrif 
• • c 
- Jt y 


EvanS. Connell ..... 

"SURELY YOU’RE JOKING MR. 
FEYNMaNN." by Richard P. Feytunann 
THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 
Richard Bach . 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


B 

ID 

□ 

□ 

□ 

ID 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□i 

B 

□ 

a 




H 

a 

□ 

□ 

□ 

a 

a 

Q 

□ 


□ 

□ 

□ 

a 

□ 

a 

a 

B 

□ 

□ 

□ 

a 

□ 

□ 

□H 

a 

a 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 


a 

a 

a 

B 

a 

□ 

□ 

3 


□ 

□3 

□ 

a 

□ 

□ 


THE LIVING PLANET, by David Alien- 
SM a£t WOMENTfCWUSH CHOKE& 


17 


% 

4 




bv Connell Cowan and Mdvvn Kinder ... 
THE COURAGE TO CHANGE by Dcn- 


— 1 


nii, Wholey 

SESTHEKI 


A LIGHT IN THE A’ 


!N. bv las 
•TTICby 


SbdSflver- 


~-'S 

. - A 


AS 


_□ □□□□□ 

□□□□ (DEIS 

H aQDQl DOD3 


THE SEVEN MOUNTAINS OF THOM- 


AS MERTON, bv Michael Moil 

)NMENT OF THE JEWS. 


14 THE ABANDO 

by David S- Wyman 

15 DISTANT NEIGHBORS, by Alan Riding 


10 124 
12 8 


■■ % 

\ 


.. 13 


l 'V~— s « 


□ 

B 

□ 

Dl 

B 

□ 

□ 

□1 

B 

ED 

□ 

□1 

□ 

B 

□ 

□ 

B 

□ 

□ 

0 



ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 
WEIGHT WATCHERS QUICK START 



□ 

□ 

Bi 

a 

□ 

a 

0i 

□ 

a 

0 

□ 

a 

□ 

0 

1 


PROGRAM COOKBOOK, by Jean Ni- 
deteb 


r-t- 


NOTHING DOWN, bv Robert G. Allen 
J-T TEACH YOU AT 


WHAT THEY DON- 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 

Mark H. McCormack .... 

THE ONE MINUTE SALES PERSON. 


Johnson and Larry Wilson — 
F AGI 


4/10/85 


/OMEN COMING OF AGE by Jane 
Fonda with Mignon McCarthy 


29 

20 

1*. 


"1 


BRIDGE 


Ja'V 


By Alan Truscott 


' Her ! tuR lias are twice as ions as wine, so tou 

GOTTA WALK HAIFASFAST...0R6M^YME(' 


GARFlELP, voo eat like a pig. 

VOO SHOULD CHEW VOOR POOP 
ZS TIMES BEFORE SWALLOWING 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
| j by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


TALUF 


n 




SBELS 


rrn 


CATATH 



m 

m 

m 


LOWEE 


nci - 

C j 

Print answer here 

: TO C 



«3Wi PAvre 



the diagramed deal four 
KJ spades would have been 
relatively easy, but East-West 
saved accurately in five dia- 
monds. This could have been 
doubled for a penalty of 500, 
but South was not prepared to 
give up his chance of a vulnera- 
ble game worth more than 500 
points. 

It might seem that South 
was doomed to lose two heart 
tricks and at least one trump 
trick. But appearances are de- 
ceptive. The diamond opening 
lead was in dummy, and a low 
trump lead forced the ace from 
East The shift was to a low 


bean, and the obvious finesse 
would have led to a two-trick 
defeat. But since East had 
passed originally and then bid 
and doubled, it seemed likely 
that he had two aces but no 
queens. So South judged cor- 
rectly by putting up aking. 

He then drew [trumps, ruffed 
dummy’s r emaining diamond 
and played clubs. When this 
suit divided favorably he felt 
happier. A heart lead now 
completed a difficult assign- 
ment West had to win with the 
queen and end-played. He had 
nothing left but two diamonds, 
and South could ruff in either 
hand and discard his heart los- 
er. 


NORTH 

•Q 75 « 

010972 

OA4 

•KI3 


^ 7- — 




WEST 

♦J«Z 

OQ 5 

OKQU96 

*1054 


SOUTH 

*KJ 098 J 

OKJ 43 


EAST(D) 

OA96 

0/87932 

*J76 


So* 

\ 

iA-. 

and 






• *AQ92 

North mti South non vtdmnUe. 
TtebUdh«; 


30 


XML 


1 * 

«M 

Pass 


*o 

PH 8 

80 

5 * 

Pun 

Pan 

Pm 


2* 

4* 


XT' 


^OE Poll 

» 

SonoiW 


wiwciodttBfflMwndldqE 


m £ 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumble* GAMUT BULLY POCKET JOYFUL 


Answer: How the anesthesiologist's patient (all — 
VERY "PUT OUT - 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


el 


cl 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

15 59 7 Jj 

W 50 6 43 

2D 48 13 S5 

17 41 W M 

23 n 12 54 

13 55 7 45 

13 55 7 AS 

24 75 11 S3 

17 63 # 48 

a 46 4 39 

19 4* 13 55 

11 52 4 39 Jfl 

4 43 3 37 r 

1* 66 7 45 a 

11 52 4 3* o 

14 57 5 41 r 

1 34 -a 2B sw 

W ti 11 52 

15 64 17 63 

12 54 

12 54 4 39 

12 54 6 43 Cl 

14 57 11 52 o 

a 46 1 34 a 

10 50 2 36 

16 61 10 50 

2 36 0 32 

15 5V 7 45 

12 54 3 37 

6 43 D 32 

22 72 IS 5V 

2 36 -3 27 

11 52 4 43 

17 63 ID 50 

17 63 B 46 

16 61 7 45 

W SO 5 41 

MIDDLE EAST 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Bo la rode 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Casta Del Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt . 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Ml ten 

MOSCOW 

Munich 


Ir 
cl 
46 U1 


Oslo 

Paris 

Prague 

Revfetavik 

Romo 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


cl 


Aakara 

Brim! 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 

Tel Aviv 


18 64 1 J4 

21 70 14 57 


— — — — no 


» 68 10 30 
24 75 V 48 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Sranev 


17 <3 13 55 
24 75 18 M 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 


BancSto* 

34 

97 

26 

79 

Ir 

Beilina 

14 

57 

10 

50 

a 

Hoaa Kona 

21 

70 

17 

63 

si 

Manila 

33 

91 

25 

77 

cl 

New DeUri 

32 

90 

21 

70 

si 

Seoul 

22 

72 

9 

48 

tr 

Shanghai 

17 

63 

9 

48 

0 

Singapore 

32 

90 

27 

01 

cl 

To Lori 

27 

61 

18 


0 

Tokyo 

20 

*8 

12 

54 

Ir 

AFRICA 






Algiers 

23 

73 

13 

55 

cl 

Cairo 

25 

77 

14 

57 

Ir 

Com Town 

16 

61 

8 

46 

ei 

Casablanca 

19 


14 



Harraro 

22 

72 

13 

55 

o 

Logo* 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Nairobi 


81 

14 

57 


Ten l« 

26 

79 

20 

60 

Ir 

LATIN AMERICA 



Buenos Aires 

25 

77 

11 



Lima 

27 

81 

1* 

57 


Mexico City 

23 

73 

10 




29 

84 




Soo Paolo 

— 




nq 

NORTH AMERICA 



Aaehorogo 

0 

32 

-A 

71 

Ir 

Aftanio 

17 

63 

i 

34 

Ir 

Boston 

8 

43 

i 

34 

PC 

Chicago 

5 

4r 


21 

DC 

Donvgr 

16 

64 

i 

34 

PC 

Detroit 

1 

34 


23 

PC 

Honolulu 

26 

79 

IS 

64 

N 

Houston 

16 

61 

10 

SO 

St 

Las An sets* 

26 

w 

13 

55 

tr 

Miami 

26 

79 

19 

66 

PC 

Minneapolis 

11 

52 

5 

41 

(r 

Mwitresl 

6 

43 

• 3 

27 

Ir 

ftawau 

28 

82 

20 

6B 

tr 

New York 

7 

45 

0 

32 

PC 

San Fnmclsce 

21 

70 

10 

50 

tr 

Seattle 

18 

64 

l 

45 

fr 

Toronto 

3 

37 

-5 

23 

fr 


wash too ton 


7 45 g 32 PC 


ckuuav: io-ionov. ir-fair: ti-tiall; oevercost; popcrrtv cloudy : r-rain: 
■b-shawers; iw-snow; ji-slprmy. 


WE OhCS DAY'S FORECAST ■— CHANNEL: Slight. FRANKFURT: Showers. 
Temo. 10 — 4 150 — 39). LONDON! Shawera. Temp. U — 4 152 — 391, MADRID: 
Overcpsl. Temp. 13—7 [55—451. NEW YORK: Fair. Temo. 8—0 146—32). 
J5F 1 ! MM: Overcast. Temo. H— 13 (M— 51). 
TEL AVIV: Fair. Toms. 23— ID (73 —501. ZURICH: Showars. Tempi 10— 3 


£S0 — 37). BANGKOK; Cloudy. Temo. 38 — 27 (100— 81 ). HONG KONG: Cloudy. 

y. t« ~ - - — 


Temo. »- 17 (68 - 431. MANILA: Ctouffy. Temo. 33 - 24 (91-75). SBOUL; 
f oyv . T crflp.. p_— Z 1/3— 451. SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temo. 32— 27 
(W -DU. TOKYO: Foeov. TWJ. 31 — 11 (70 — 52). ' 


W)Hd Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse April 9 

Qosuig prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

AKZO 

Ahoto 

AMEV 

A'Dum Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

Buohrmonn T 

Co land Hldo 

Elsevier -NDU 

Fokkar 

Gist Brocades 

Helnefcon 

Hoooavens 

KLM 

Noarden 

Nat Nedder 

Nedllovd 

Oce Vender G 

P OK hoed 

Philips 

Robecs 

Rodomca 

Rolfnco 
Rorenro 
Rovol Dutch 
Unilever 
Van Ommoren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


398 397 JO 
197 197 JO 
184 185 

I1DJD 108J0 
213 211.50 
217 215 

ms 105 
7120 7130 

204 20150 
39J7D 91 

3180 34 

109 JO ill 


182 181.50 
157 156-60 
61.90 58 

57.70 5780 
4780 4770 
69 JO 6960 
183J0 181 

31*50 313 

47-40 66 

57-50 57,40 
71.80 72.10 

13860 138 

67 47.20 

44 JO 44J0 
20160 2012) 
341 340.70 
3050 30 JO 

14860 14850 
207 20450 


Brogue In 


Arbed 
Befcoert 
Cocker ill 
Cobeoa 
E8ES 

GB-Inno-BM 

GBL 

Gevoerl 

Hoboken 

Intercom 

KredlelBOfUt 

Petrolina 

See General# 

Satina 

Salvor 

Traction Elec 
UCB 


Unerg 

Viellle 


Mon: 


1750 1750 
5900 5930 
251 261 

3470 3470 
3135 3140 
3165 3125 
2015 2005 
4005 4035 
5720 5870 
2295 2300 
0390 8310 
6900 *850 
2010 2030 
7620 7510 
4350 4300 
4125 4125 
5330 5320 
1750 1760 
6400 6400 


Frankfort 


AEG-Tetefunken 

Allianz Vera 
Bast 
Borer 
Bov er. Hypo. 

Bov or. Ver .Bonk 
BMW 

Cammentjonk 

ConltaummL 

Dglmtor-Beru 

Deoussa 

OeuFKhe Babcock 

Deutsche Bonk 

Dresdoer Bank 

DUB> Schott 

GHH 

HochHel 

Hoecnst 

Hoesch 

Hoizmonn 

Horton 


11020 11020 
1053 10S5 
20590 205 

213J0 712.10 
337J0 336 

328 329 

371 371 

1*4 163 

1 39 JO 139.50 
651 660 

340 360 

lo3 166 
440 438.78 
189.90 189.99 
223 JO 7JB 

157 157 JO 
475 47$ 

269.78 208 

114 112711 
395 3*5 

170 170 


J Close Prev 

Kail + Salz 

252 253-50 

Karstodt 

211 JO 

711 


22 * 

22* 

Kloeckner H>D 

249 J0 249 JO 


73 

72.10 


11211020 


413J0 

*15 

Lufthansa 

196J0 194JO 

MAN 

154 JO 

154 


164 JO 

165 

Metal toed Lsehaf 

249 

250 

Muench-RuecL 

1195 

1195 

Preussag 

275 77230 

Ruetgers-Werke 

345 

347 



155 




Siemens 

53SJ0 

538 


10Q.9Q too JO 


183 

184 

Veba 

170 178 10 


126A0 126-50 

Volkswogenwerh 

203 

202 


j Prtvtou* 1)94 J0 



11 1 

BL East ASM 

23.10 

22.70 


1SA0 

15.10 

China Light 

15*0 

15-50 




Hong Song Bank 

4875 

49 



7.75 

HK Ha lets 

33 

3275 

HK Land 

5J5 

575 

HK Shanghai 



HK Telephone 

71 JO 

75 

HK Wharf 






■lordlne Moth 

11J0 

11 

Jardine Sec 







3 M 

375 

SHK Proas 

975 

9.70 

51 me Darby 

645 

6A5 

Stelu« 

IJO 

1J2 




wheetock A 

775 

7JC 



— 

wtnsor 

4775 

4A0 

world JntT 

2075 

£05 

Haag Seng Index 

148072 


Previous : WMi 



j jQhNime 


AECI 



Anglo American 

2615 


Anglo Am Gaia 



Bar tows 

1055 

1050 

Blwoor 

1650 

1650 

Button 

8400 

8225 

De Beers 

1025 

1020 

Drletonieln 



Eianas 

1700 

1688 

GF5A 

3300 

3Z75 

Hormonv 



HIveld Sleel 

390 

390 

Ktoof 

8100 

7950 

Nedbonk 

980 

99S 

Prwsteyn 

6100 

6000 

RWPtat 

1790 

IBM 





13)0 

turn 


585 


West Holding 

6800 

6700 

Composite Slock Index : 1 *59.79 

Previous : tssojo 



1 1 


513to 

*u: 

AiHoa-Lvm 

172 

173 


Clave Prev 

Anoto Am Gold 588 587 


Barclays 

Boss 

BA.T. 

Beechom 

eicc 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Bowoter Indus 
BP 

Bril Home St 
Bril Telecom 
Bril Aerospace 

BTR 
Burmoh 
code wireless 
Cotfijury Schw 
Charier Cans 
Coals Patens 
Commercial U 
Cora Goto 
Ceurraulds 
Datoetv 

Do Beers* 

Distiller* 

Drietontetn 

Flsons 

Free SI God 

GEC 

GKN 

Gk»oc 

Grand MOt 

Gulnnoss 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 


149 

334 

537 

343 

361 


37 

478 

274 

178 

246 


140 

425 

674 

206 

S37 

153 

195 

148 

215 

537 

140 

478 

517 

271 


37 

486 

376 

170 

246 

543 

269 

141 

428 

677 

70S 

535 

154 

1*5 

ISO 

714 

532 

141 

478 

513 

278 


SZ7V* 577W 


306 


178 
233 
HI 51/64 
290 
245 
794 
203 
407 

762 

184 


Lloyds Bank 529 

Lonmo 175 

Lucas 2*9 

Marks and 5P 142 

Midland Bank 324 

NatWest Bank 594 

Panda 
Pllklnalen 
Plassev 
Pa col IE led 
Randtonteai 
Rank 
ReedUitl 
Renters 

Soval Dutch c 
RT2 

satnew 

Solmburv 
Shell 
STC 

Std Chartered 
Tone and Lvie 
Teseo 
Thorn EMi 
T.l, group 
Tretutvur Hte 
THF 

Udrotnar 
Unilever 8 


310 

5289s 

ISO 

235 

ID3L 

29* 

248 

810 

207 

407 

747 

IBS 

300 

534 

172 

273 

142 

377 

602 

34 

775 

19* 

198 


united Biscuits 
Vickers 
w^cee 
w -Holdings 
War Loan 3<4C 
wgoftvortn 


343 
273 
194 
194 

SIOBVi SW* 
343 338 

556 552 

351 352 

475/6447 37/64 
639 639 

S5 rts 

322 350 

721 725 

194 196 

474 472 

420 423 

253 253 

394 399 

238 2M 

333 333 

138 139 

243 345 

11 29/6411 3$J64 


177 178 

261 2SS 

S46'A S45 

041* 531 

35to 35*4 

777 781 


F.T.se indie : tsut 
Prevtan : 962J8 


Mbn 


Banco Cstnm 18850 16400 

Cert role 1*52 3450 

ClMheWS 7400 7400 

Cred Ital .2040 2030 

Farm Mol la - 11850 11900 


1 CHma 


Flat 

2880 

3835 

Flrolder 

52 

ST 


41900 41990 


7670 

7*65 


81600 80400 

Itolmobillor i 

*701 D 

66900 

Mediobanca 

80000 79350 

Monied too 

1500 

1504 

Olivetti 

6253 

6180 

Pirelli 

2189 

2148 

RAS 

63200 63590 


659 64575 

SIP 

1995 

1940 

Solo 

Z749 

2*99 

Slanaa 

12030 

12000 

Sfet 

2570 

2540 

1 MIB Current Index ; 1183 


[ Previous : 1174 



H ^ 1 


646 

649 

Atsfhom AH. 

313 306.90 

Av Dassoull 

1350 

1330 

Bancolre 

643 

*40 

BIC 

521 

520 

Bouvgues 

MO 

*79 

BSN-GD 

2405 


Correlour 

2137 

2140 

Club Med 

1188 

1170 

Cotlmeg 

293J0 

M 

Dumez 

632 

625 

EK-Aoultolne 

246 JO 

745 

Europe l 

VI 4 JO 

985 

Gen Eaux 

628 

630 

Haeneiie 

1950 

1925 


109 JO 



494J0 496JQ 

Legrond 

2125 

2110 

I'D real 

2480 

2485 

Matra 

1063 

1869 

Micheim 

975 

978 

mm Pw mar 

97.90 

95 JO 


1870 

18*0 

Moullne* 

US JO 

111 




Occldontolo 

701 

70S 


700 


Pelrale* Itol 

265 265.10 

Peugeot 

311 JO 

314 

Poclain 

S1.90 

51.90 

Prhilemoi 

334 2J3JD 

Roa/olectwi 






Roussel Ucial 

1700 

1778 




Sour. Perrier 

SOO 

500 

Tdemeean 

2620 

2600 

Thomson CSF 

5*9 

568 

Valeo 

229 

223 

Agefi Indei : 209 J6 


Previous : anji 



Prev loci : 213JD 



11 Staflgpor*- 1 

Bousteod 



C rid S lares e 

2.72 

2.75 

DBS 

675 

675 

FroserMaave 

570 

M0 

How Par 


7.11 

mchcape 

244 


Keeper shio 



Mol Bonking 

8 

6 

OCBC 

9.15 

9.15 

OUB 

NJD. 

190 

5c mb Shtevord 

N.Q. 


Slme Darby 



SSieamsnia 



51 Trading 

4J0 

476 


4.46 

4A6 

OUB Index : 412J8 
Previous : 4T2J6 



1 StoekiMsffli 1! 

AGA 

N.O. 

415 

Alia Lavol 

192 

194 


357 

35> 


175 

« 


109 

BDltoen 

NJ3. 

210 


317 

314 


291 

291 


NX). 


Kandelsbonken 



Pharmacia 
Sqqd- Scania 
SanCvIk 
Skantka 
SKF 

SwedlshAkalcti 

Volvo 


Ctose Prev. 
206 211 
N.Q. 445 
NjO. 385 
90J0 90 

208 206 
220 217 

250 245 


AffoersvoerMen index : 390J8 
Previous : NA 


1 Sy**y 1 

AC1 


211 

ANI 

■ 

290 

ANZ 

W. ’ 

465 

BHP 

678 

*12 


318 

318 


245 



395 

388 


372 

370 

Coma ico 

IT 

286 


pH 

610 

CSR 

Fra 

296 

Dunlop 

222 

222* 

Elders 1*1 

320 

320 

Hooker 

160 

160 




MIM 

IJ 


Mver 

BZl 

183 

Ookbrldoe 

■ ;| 

80 

Pefco 


420 

Poseidon 

405 

390 

HGC 



Samos 

622 

634 


175 

175 

Sourmond 






Worm aw 

355 

355 

All Ordinaries Index 

8*5JB 

Prev teas : 84100 



Source: Reuters. 



1 Toby J 


A lull 

467 

469 

Asahl Chem 

900 

870 

Asahl Glass 

894 

890 

Bonk ot Takve 

B20 

820 

erldaeslone 

528 

SI 

Canon 

1770 

1270 

C-lteh 

257 

374 

Dal Nippon Print 

1010 

1010 

Dolma House 

554 

545 

Full Bank 

1560 

I860 

Full pnoia 

1*90 

1680 

Fujitsu 

1110 

1080 

Hllocbl 

824 

813 

Honda 

1330 

1300 

Japan Air Lines 

6160 

6320 

Kolimo 

300 

283 

Kansoi Power 

1390 

1430 

Kawasaki Steel 

147 

147 

Klrm Brewery 

617 

611 , 

Komatsu rid 

448 

446 

Kubota 

350 

330 

Matsu Elec lads 

1490 

1490 

Maisu Elec Work* 

768 

758 

Mitsubishi Bank 

1530 

1540 

Mitsubishi Chem 

461 

456 


CteM 

Pwr. 

Mitsubishi Elec 

403 

400 

Mitsubishi Heavy 

2*7 

266 


S25 

S29 

Mitsui and ca 

350 

355 

MltsiAoshl 

490 

495 


N.Q. 


NEC 

1080 

10*0 

HGK Insulators 

913 

906 

NJkkaSec 

763 

751 

Nippon Sleel 

151 

130 

Nippon Yusen 

245 

249 


*56 

*58 

Nomura Sec 

1190 



1160 

11S0 


2610 

2570 

Ricoh 

901 

B« 


1000 

990 


4370 

4310 

Sumitomo Bonk 

1710 

17X 


222 

223 

Sumitomo Mriol 

151 

ISO 


ms 

209 


4 55 

452 


B9S 

880 

Tdk 

5510 

5500 

Tallin 

470 

4*8 

Tokyo Elec. Power 

1650 

1*30 

Tokyo Marine 

B&3 

846 

Torn, Ind 

480 





Toyota 

1260 


Yamalcnt Sac 

815 

814 

NKdrel/D J. lean 

1263M3 

Previous : 12549.98 
New laaex : 986J* 
Previous : v**j 9 



II ?«!** 1 


2740 

7750 

Bank. Leu 

3575 

3590 


1635 

1*45 

Clbo Getev 

2840 

2B2S 



2420 



Georg Fischer 

730 

735 

Interdlscounl 

1930 

1930 


6380 

6375 


19*0 

1980 


1675 

1*70 




OerllkorvB 

14H 

1485 

Roche Baby 


7800 


ms 


Sulzer 

380 


SBC 

36F 


'Swtssalr 


1080 

10050 


1400 





Winterthur 



Zurich ins 


SBC Index: 416.99 
Previous : 431.11 





■not 

avgltebte; >d: e* -dividend. j 


U.S. Backs Phone Plan 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Justice Depart- 
ment has endorsed a plan under which customers 
who don’t choose a carrier to handle their long- 
distance phone service would be automatically allo- 
cated to one of several companies vying for the 


long-distance marfcet. 
Thcc 


deportment urged the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission to mandate nationwide use of an 


"equal access" plan currently used by Northwesl- 
which 


em BdL, 
Dakota. North 


serves Minnesota, Iowa, South 


Toronto 


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14134 Bank BC 
39850 BortkNS 
38689 BorrickO 
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2700 Bonanza R 
900 Bra tome 
2000 Bramalea 
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69167 BC R«S 
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430 425 430 

*2794 271k 27Vk— to 
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*12 12 12 

51394 Uto 1394 . 


TSE 208 index: 


Gon 

2,599 JO 


Previous 

16000 


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fogg Con Bom 

1108 Dam Txt A 
BkCda 
^PpworCers 
600 RdFano a 
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831 30* 31 +1? 

*22 2194 21 to— to 

£2894 289* 2894+ Vk 
*19 19 19 — ■ h 


Industrials Index: 


CbM 

1TZJ5 


Prewxff 

I1IA4 


The Dally 
, Source far 
International k; 
Investors. 1 












y * ! ****&*$$£. .• 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 1985 



'age 15 


SlSBS 


J73, > • 

the Staf-™** WJ M&ffi ' 1 


Sjmss.' 


As Reds Win Openei 


That Time of Year: It’s Up to the Goalies 


Q«p*r! ty Q** Staff Firm Dupadta while Hernandez retired the side b 

CINCINNATI — While the order is the ™nh 
MoioiHsl Expos seemed numbed . - , . . 

by the cold, the Cmcinnaii Reds vmo«s«», » 

KocVM in the warmth of another * n Baltimore, : 


Orioks4, Rangers 2 
In Baltimore* Eddie Murray’s 


Gwenzr 

S. 


Monday’s rain, snow te mp era- 2 verdict over Texas, 
turns dippmg to 3.8 degrees ccnti- Baltimore didn't get a hit off 
grade (39 degrees Fahrenheit) by awier Charlie Ho^h, but the 
driving in three runs with a double knuddebaUer walked eghl (indud- 
and F sin rie, wyir iring fm/nnrum in UJg four in the Sixth UUUDgl and 
a 4 _j victory. catcher Don Slaaghi contributed 


DrnnT^w a 4-1 vicuny. caicncr uo u Die 

Dll ST SPl Tr^S. ^ die National League season wo passed_ balls. 
- — — — opener, twice delayed by snow "Doo ^ a , 


New Ynj - "'V 

fu /ep.-,ri r r . 'tan ^ 


opener, twice delayed by snow “Don did a great job." said 
" - Hough, who traded 2-1 after six 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP * h ?. S'. ™ 

— — ; — — You don i catch m that kind of 

squalls. Rose ran bis career bix total wind very often in a big- league sia- 
to 4,099 and moved within 93 of diiim. I’ve bad some strange out* 
breaking Ty Cobb's aD-time re- jjrgs and this ranks right up there 


cord. with them/* 

isfosssssr** 

•onaid S,LX ® t* . e’U be prasuriL Rf 1 ta AP"*S^ r Bud .KL™f 

for r - “I’m not thinking -about getting P^msc^ “ ** 

i? • JC 7 °fiES. l ■ 05 hits. I houe I cet 195 " nipped Toronto, 2-1. 

»aSit F ES: - ^ D"*! 

re^vS standing ovations from a nuo the seventh wnha ihree-hitier 

i I A-rr,, . *> 4j Vofaea two-run double down th* doubled leading off and went to 

ucllcj j r KfiSiddStaitefiSiSSiSd jhirim Frank Vhiirt tong am- 


After his 2-for-3 day at the plate, 
Rose said chasing Cobb's record is 
“nm going to be pressure — it’s 
fun. if I go into the last day of the 
season needling six hits, then ther- 
e'll be pressure. 

“I'm not Thinking -about getting 
95 hits. I hope I get 195." 

Rose, 43 and a Cincinnati native. 


Sobiarij received standing ovations from a 

Ntsm^fi scHooi v.:;" ddlout crowd of 52.971 after rip- 


iSS^-wviia; 
lUlN.Vy ™ 6 **T 

N ONF1CTIO. V "• ■ 

&KE *«**.«•< 

feCHCiTHtr.^fc 

vnncll 

DC.E ACROSS FOlSl^ 

wortvar^^-j- 


ire's long sacri- 


ficc ^. Alter pinch hitter. 

IUJ aiuft. *« lore out oo ^ pitches, 

“Great players get up for big ^ pm what turned oui to be the 
games," said Buck Rodgers, wbd nin <m hue by hitting 

lost in bis Montreal managerial do- Ouix ^oncqxxon with, a PJ lc h- 

buL **The mediocrcSawSback Mo A ! ®y ^? nce R c !S n 

scored when Wilson lined a shot 



JiUerrutiona/ Herald Tribune 

LONDON — We have reached 
the time of year when viselike pres- 
sure mounts against a goalkeeper's 
temple. One yip. and 10 months' 
hard Labor could disintegrate. One 
magnificent save, and his team 
might share the prize of a lifetime. 

In London last Wednesday. 21 
players, the referee, linesmen, and 
48,000 spectators stood in disbelief 
as Neville Southall brought ofr one 
of the most spectacular saves most 
of them will ever see. 

In that split second, the goal- 
keeper’s extraordinary reactions 
may well have decided the champi- 
onship of English soccer. Three 

Rob Hughes 


“He's genuinely brave. 


Catch Bruce David Grobbdaar 


merits Mike England, the Welsh in a serious mood (said to happen 
team manager. “He has a great pair every three months) and you leant 
of hands and reactions incredible that his determination to spread a 
for a big man. All he thinks about is little fun into sport comes from fear 
goal-keeping, and he's so strong I — fear that uakes him in the night, 
wouldn't want to be around if ever recalling mates who died in the 
he lost his temper." bush and one who was crippled 

He rarely does. Neither is he after a bullet nicked his spine, 
prone to losing his nen e. although Grobbelaar was bom in Durban, 
the odd lapse in concentration is South Africa, and obtained his 


punishable. 


work permit on the basis of ances- 
tors bom in Cape Town Castle. 


Goalkeepers are different. They which was British soil at the time of 
have to be. to dive head-first at the the Boer War. 

Teel of some of the uncompromis- He is a white man who played 
ing characters they meet on a soc- soccer on a team of blacks.’ so 


cer pitch. 


locked into voodoo that when they’ 


And goalkeepers in the city of lost they fired the witch doctor. He 
Liverpool are more different than became Zimbabwe's national goal- 
others. That one place, with Ever- ie. and wound up being court-mar- 
ton and Liverpool occupying the tialed for skipping army duty for a 


match — and he admits he nearly 
blew his Liverpool career the same 


Evenon gallops after the league, way. 

Fa and Cup Whiners’ Cups. Liver- He is toning down the circus 
pool refuses to throw in the league tricks, but you can sense the laugh- 
towel bur is concentrating on lift- ter inside.’ Grobbelaar communi- 
ing both the FA and European cates with the crowd the way an 


ing both the FA and European cates with the crowd the way an 
Champions' Cups. actor does. He draws on their emo- 

And, tale of two city dubs, this is lions. He was first spotted at age 18 
also the tale of two phenomenal (by Roy Bailey, an old Ipswich 


goalies. 


goalie whose son Gary is Manches- 


wuming run on base oy tutting 
Onix Concepcion with a pitch. 
Motley kaa Concepcion both 


Pete Rose Monday in Cincinnati: So what’s a little snow? 


Pacers Withstand Bulls 


minutes of the match remained wn 300 uvraot occupying me uaiea tor supping army outy lor a 
when Tottenham's Mark Falco same quarter-mile, throbs with soc- match — and he admits he nearlv 
crashed in a point-blank header, «r power. New his Liverpool career the sami 

Southall, defying credibility for Evenon gdlops after the league, way. 

such a big man, somehow arched FA and ^CUp Winners Cups. Liver- He is toning down the circus 
his back and deflected the ball over P 001 t0 throw m «« league nicks, but you can sense the laugh- 

his crossbar Thus Evenon dung to ,owe * bur is concentrating on lift- ter inside. Grobbelaar communi- 
a 2-1 victory ing both the FA and European cates with the crowd the wav an 

A week previously, in Glasgow. ch . ara P i01 ? 5 ’ ? U P S - . , w u . . “ r £«- He draws otuheir emc> 

Southall had contributed three stu- Am, tale of two city dubs, this is uons. He was first spotted at age 18 

pendous saves to Wales' defeat of “bio the tale of two phenomenal (by Roy Bailey, an old Ipswich 
Scotland - a result which, with „ . . . . . goalie whose son Gary is Manches- 

Wdsb coffers bone dry might just Southall, as shy as he is redoubt- ter United s keeper) playing for 
preserve an independrai future for * b «j- °“ Jc Rhodesia, 

his nation: Elimmation at that ear- Reld - Liverpool s Bruce Grobbe- “I remember him making this 
Iy stage of the World Cup qualifiers ^ ,s one ^ game s great en- tremendous save and then lying on 
haw fWxtar-H Wat** imaioCTS. Who else do vou know the ground spuming the bail on a 

nJwSSSSSS^S&m^ ^ ^ Jr^ 

ny, Southall wfll be Evenon's last and monkey gland? Who dse mds keeper, with beauuful handling, 
line of defense in the European m ti* nickname Jungleman? Who And once he decided 10 pass up a 
Cup Winners’ Cup against Bayern d* can make you faff about .laugh- U.S. basketball scholarship, he 
Munich mg with his acrobatic tricks one played with soccers Vancouver 

And on Saturday, against Luton and chill you the next with Whitecaps and on Joan with the 

in the FA Cup semifiMThis task stones of life and death as a private English Founh Division club, 
will be to Evenon toward a ”S- ..... 


Iy stage of the World Cup qualifiers 
would have devastated Wales. 


Southall, as shy as he is redoubt- ter United's keeper) playing for 
able, creates all his images on the Rhodesia, 
field. Liverpool's Bruce Grobbe- “1 remember him making this 
laar is one of the game's great en- tremendous save and then lying on 
tertaioers. Who else do you know the ground spinning the ball on a 
who lists his favorite food as slidza finger,” said Bailey. “He’s a bom 
and monkey gland? Who else revels keeper, with beauuful handling." 
in the nickname Jungleman? Who And once he decided to pass up a 
else can make you fall about laugh- U.S. basketball scholarship, he 
ing with his acrobatic tricks one played with soccer’s Vancouver 


unique triple. 


flushing guerillas out of the bush? Then-Crewe Manager Tony 


Waddington. who has handled 
great goalkeepers like Gordon 
Banks and Peter Shilton, recalls: 
“Bruce would be national class ut 
anything he tried. He e\en took our 
penalties, and when he changed 
ends the kids changed with hint!” 

Waddington invited Bob Paistey 
down from Liverpool to see the 
man’s capabilities — and was stag- 
gered to see Paisley leave the stand 
before the maich kicked off. "Tve 
no need to see any more.” Paisley 

told him. “He's a "natural, and I’ve 
seen enough in the warm-up." 

A natural many critics mistook 
for a clown. Twice Grobbelaar - s 
strange lapses have cost Liverpool 
the European Cup: unlike others, 
he admits his errors. 

O 

But as Liverpool will tell you. 
there is no sentiment whatever on 
Merseyside. If Grobbelaar survives 
his mistakes it is because time after 
time he pulls off the seemingly im- 
possible. Like every South African, 
he loves winning, but as he says: “A 
leopard can't change its spots nor a 
tiger his stripes. Mistakes are bred 
into me. but 1 hope to keep down 
the number." 

Liverpool's crown is on the line 
against Panathinaikos of Greece on 
Wednesday, and while Grobbelaar 
may make his colleagues' hearts 
flutter, they believe in him every bit 
as much as Evertonians swear by 
Southall. It is a French goalie. Joel 
Bats, who says. "The position of 
goalkeeper in our team is a sort of 
ejector seat — and that means no 
room for error." Perhaps. But cer- 
tainly there is no such thing as a 
safe landing without a talented 
man guarding your net. 


fust seven innings, scattering Inis 
- Z? and allowing the lone Expo run. 

The Reds brake open a scoreless 


!«£&£ “SanBraaKn-d ™=“ , «■ <- ^ h. ^^ksssisis 

4roughM0lher.temalsraKm.Iii- had four road ga mes in a» 

saves for *e past live vmk fin- & ^ » wtosnd. (unous ^buijou^i^ure^B ^horcsnjingbSdaon&g 




in two runs and Dave Parker fol- mas and Dwight Evans, the' out- 
lowed with an RBI single. field trio that accounted for over 

“I really don't think anybody on 300 runs batted in last season, 
our team felt cold because of the picked np right where they left off. 
way we played," Rose said. *1 told Rice hit a three-run homer, Armas 
them before the game that if you go a two-run shot and Evans one with 
0-for-4 and lose it's going to oe a Jot the bares empty to lead the Red 
colder than if you get a couple of Sox to a 9-2 pasting of New York- 
hits and win." Armas, the 1984 major-league 

fleets 5, huEaos 4 home ran Mid RBI champion, ued 

_ , 7 ^ . _ . _ the score, 2-2. with a homer high 

In the Andean League, m De- ^ ^ m lcft af^ 

tKMt, rorfae Chris Pittaro had thrre Easier led off the second with a 
singles and drove m the first run of jingle. After Boston went ahead, 4- 
the game-wmmng rally as the Tt- Z m a double by Evans and four 
-a«*lhDri._5-4- . walks in the third, Evans hit a tow- 

Thc dcfaidmg world dpmpions oing shot over the screen with two 
traced by 4-3 m the eighth inning, ouTm the fifth. In the sixth. Rice 


VOMEN.FOJLKH^U= ,owcd wt* 311 K" 1 su® 6 - 
k c** jr iud “I really don’t think anybody on 

jRAGETocHAKoLfcfc. - our team felt cold became of the 
4 t Kn-rrs: t,. > - way we played," Rose said. “I told 
"in THt \ Tit them before the game that if you go 

~k- - 0-for-4 and lose it's going to be aiot 

V , v 1 n s of th(^ colder than if you get a couple of 

jlsmssi asafi: 

VI l 5 k , sr ® singles and drove in the first run of 

m < nook b. j m v ihc^amc- winning rally as the Tt- 
g down R.jwn r, ^ g«rrs beat Geveland, 5-4. 
^ E \r K ?.':!J ' W 1 it The defending world champkms 

s ’ - Hc ‘° 1 - h trailed by 4-3 in the eighth inning, 
Emin urt s\les but Pittaro's onoout srn^e up the 
r L'hnoa „:.j i^m u-iwe . middle scored Larry Herndon and 
R Jn • L senf Chet Lemon to third; Lenmn 
> — .i scored on Lou Whitaker’s sacrifice 
fly off reliever Ernie Camarim. 

Pittaro, who had never set foot 
on a major league field until he 
walked into Tiger Stadium for bat- 
“ ting practice, smgled for his first hit 
mra to start the fifth. Infield hits by 
ck Whitaker an d Alan Trammell that 

a! loaded the bases for Lana Parrish, 

•ic axu who grounded a two-run single up 

•Iv west s the middle, 

w *i\ z I 1* Jack Morris and Willie Hernan- 


;se 


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Tbetoddtos: 


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hii a three-run home ran near the 
flagpole m center. 

Backed by a 10-hii attack against 
Phil Niekro and relievers Bob Shir- 
ley and Joe Cowley, Dennis Boyd 
earned the victory with two-inning 
relief help from Bob Stanley. Boyd 
allowed five hits, struck out five 
and walked four in his seven in* 
rungs. “The guys came through 
with the long ball for me, and oth- 
ers played super defense," said 
Boyd. “You can’t ask for anything 
more than that on an opening day. 

Niekro, at 46 the oldest opening- 
day starter ever, lasted four innings 
and took the loss. (UPJ, A?) 


A’s Bar Norris 
After2dArrest 

The Associated Press 

OAKLAND, California — 
Pitcher Mike Norris has been 
ordered back into a drug and 
alcohol rehabilitation program 
and baned from any team ac- 
tivity, following bis arrest here 
Sunday on suspicion of ‘'driv- 
ing under the influence of alco- 
hol or a chemical substance.” 

NonisjtanedtheA’sin 1973. 
He had shoulder surgery two 
years ago and did not pitch in 
1984. He was arrested in Febru- 
ary on drag charges, underwent 
therapy and was in a “strict 
af tercare" program when he ar- 
rived at m e team’s Arizona 
training camp this spring. 

A dub spokesman said Mon- 
day that Norris would not join 
the A’s in Seattle for the season- 
opening series and that he has 
been directed to resume a drug 
and alcohol abuse treatment 
program immediately. The 
t«ini also placed him on the 
rehabilitation list of the joint- 
major league drug program. 


ond half as the Bulls down 21 ^c seen Southall perform over 
points at the break, dosed to within ^ laSl Q \ year s and, al- 


then canned four free 


>y- though I would never ask him to 
“ make an after-dinner speech «- 
f 5 plaining his craft, I would trust my 


Indiana iced a 107-103 vkuuy in If TSw on 1 

the night s only National Basket- buniijlg ]edge five stories up. 
bah Asscaauon game. Southall is one of those sdf- 

“We mishandled their press to doubting peop ie who has never 
the third period and 1 thought we learned to drive a car. He also ad- 



• * * ~ * 




me truro period ana i mougnt we [earned to drive a car. He also ad- 

i\mA fivttc mits he learned little at school; and, 

ruuug sharing the journey home after 

played poor defensively," said Pac- Wales had lost to Ibe Soviet Union 
er Coach George Irvine. “But we in Tbilisi some time ago, I confess I 
hung tough in the fourth quarter was more than a little distressed to 
and made the big plays when it draw him as partner in a general- 
counted." knowledge quiz. 

“In the first half we couldn’t Yet this placid Welshman has 
make a shot." said Kerin Lough- instincts of a genius. He stands 
ery, the Chicago coach. “We were over six feet (1.82 meters) tall, 
lucky we weren't down 40." But the weighs, .oyer: 170 pounds (77 .kilo- . 
Bolls, with 10 points each from grams), and when he flings himself 
Jordan and Orlando Woolridge, to prevent the ball's entering his net 
dosed to within five points with nothing physical impairs ms judg- 
2:06 remaining in the third period. menL 

Indiana rebuilt its lead to 95-80 Everton’s manager, Howard 
with 7:16 left in the game, but the Kendall, actually rootled Southall 
Bulls then went on a 1 8-7 tear that keeping goal in nonieague competi- 
induded six points from from lion before Kendall joined the 
guard Wes Matthews, who scored Merseyside club. 

17 of his 21 points io the second Fourth Division Bury saw his 
half. Jordan contributed five points potential too, and paid £6000; 


r - 


t” 

; 



during the streak that pulled 
go to within 102-98. 


lea- Kendall subsequently bad to pay 
£150.000 to get him. 


I; 


Th# Allocated Pf«» 

Engaged in midair combat with Queen’s Park Ranger Simon Stainrod, Everton goalie 
Neville Southall was — & la UverpooTs Bruce Grobbelaar — momentarily caught out of 
position in a league match; but teammate Peter Reid (No. 6) was protecting the line for him. 


VANTAGE POINT/Tony Komheiser 

■tao 

s I If It’s Snowing, It Must Be Day 1 


;*T*M'T* 


Baseball 




1 3M1* Nve ■ 4 ^*- 
Ntf**—* 

d4y0 _ 

16 jT S Psn'-fZ 

iij O" 

rraJ P'£rt u - £ 

n >00Plai»r 

■?jC PisrlK 
IMOQ—SjgV* 

>i» SSiRf*' 

6 J1 SitesO^ . 

•<is*ePCS 

—UP fffi * ?ri 
■; jft! Rtf’ 5 " . 

sa: 

r?M 

4r1W 

jjjB? 

I 5IW * 1 
iK5u"e«?i 
eoc Tec $ 

-.os*? * ! 

i?x i ,ln ,,.-uJ 

rr-rci 1 r *■ 

aSSs^A' 

ggiS^'" 

'ak 6 

woe 5 *: 

TDS3' 5= ^ 


We are the cold. 

We are the freezing. 

We are the mes who came to Opening Day, 
So let’s start shivering. 

There’s a choke we're making 
We’re giving up oar health, 

It's true, we’ll catch some awful colds. 

Just vou and me. 


H ** ^ - We’re giving up our health, 

5 E £. It's true, we’ll catch some awful cole 
l Just vou and me. 

|T\* ** • 

Ci^ \ ‘ B'flf/wigian Poa Service 

a. ¥/ BALTIMORE — BasebalL the < 
,n : n among pensioners, Huey Lewis and 

fi 1 5 > Rnhmfn imimnliclc nrvnnl Mnnda 


rah stepped up for t he Rangers and hit the first pitch e 

for a suilc. 

Gary ward was on his way to walking when aptly 
named Storm Davis looked in for the sign and found j£^^ or * 
his vision obscured by an uncontroQu substance: Mt roii 
more snow, and Jots of it Mtiwukw 

Two minutes later, with Pete O’Brien coming to bat, {££■£££ 
home plate umpire Larry Barnett decided it would be Toronto 
prudent to delay the game long enough to hand out c . 
shovels to the able-bodied and to pul snow tires on the 
bullpen car. cm«wo 

The crowd booed the decision to cover the field; just 
as predictably, by the time the ground crew got the 
small, round tarp over the pitcher’s mound, the squall tmos 
was over and the sun came back out. 1 

1 may be making too much of the weather. But then 
why was the man seated to my right — a learned ctivcooo 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Ent DIvUM 

W L Pet. 


51. Louis 

0 

0 

-000 

— 

Montreal 

0 1 

Mtotl Division 

.000 

9a 

Cincinnati 

1 

0 

u»a 

— 

Atlanta 

g 

0 

J»0 

V3 

Houston 

a 

8 

J#Q 

Vt 

U» Anoeies 

0 

0 

M 

v» 

Son Diego 

0 

0 

MO 

Vt 

Sen Francisco 

0 

0 

M 

Vt 


Basketball 

National Basketball Association Leaders 


Moore. SA 
Nixon. LAC 


[?■* V ^ _ ljnn Washnpon Pm Serncc shovels to the able-bodied and to put snow tires on the 

; ?/ BALTIMORE — BasebalL the sport of choice bullpen car 

V * L among pmsictncrs, Huey Lewis and The News and Tbecrowd booed the decision to cover the field; just 
jR ft; Brahmin jouraalrsls, opened Monday m five parks ^ predictably, by the time the ground crew got the 
£, % throughout the major leagues including Memorial cm Ml round tarp over the pitcher's mound, the squall 
n v } Stadium, but excluding Chicago’s Wrjgley field, the was over and the sun came back out. 
s v- Wailing Wall of the op-ed pages. I ^ be making too much of the weather. But then 

if*f Ah, openmgday. vdiy was the man seated to my right — a learned 

t , Are we in a full-moon cycle? I mean it was rampant veteran of such opening days — - carrying a plaid, 

weirdness out there. woolen blanket for his legs and wearing the following: 

r-. V. LI shin, thick sweater, scarf, hat, gloves and a down- 

S p; ■ The game was strange — the Orioles got two more fifled, mountain-climber’s jacket guaranteed to keep 
** runs (four) than they got hits — and the weather was him maiiated down to 40 below? 

bizarre. And as be said to me in the top of the third, after my 

J ? Charlie Hough, the Texas Ranger knuddeballer, hands had long since turned blue, “Wefl, HI tdl you 
S?;. didn’t allow a hit for six innings, yet was losing, 2 - 1 , what, at least the beer’s cdd." 

S p • thanks to four straight walks and two passed balls in My favorite comment on the weather came from 
in' £< the sixth. , Rader. Before the game, with the wind gusting to 40 

1‘ % ■■■ . Although Hough's no-hiuer still was around into mijes an hour {64.3 kilometers an hour) and a flock of 
the seventh. Hough wasn’t. Doug Rader, the Texas robins heading gung-ho to the south, Rader was asked 
manager, pulled him in favor of Dave Rozema. if there was any special clothing he'd recommend his 
'to? And despite the fact that Hough later got oTf the players to wear. “Yeah,” he said. "I think they ought 


Woct OtvltlMI 

KMM City 1 0 uno — 

Co I Horn to 0 0 JOOO Vj 

CtildWD 9 0 000 Vt 

MlimMOtO 0 0 -000 Vt 

Oakland 0 0 H00 Vs 

Seattle o D -000 fc 

Texas 0 I JJ00 I 

NATIONAL LBAGUI 
East Division 

W L Pet. GB 
Ctiicaao o 0 .000 — 

Now Vork O 0 .000 — 

Philadelphia 0 O JKO — 

nnsbuiwi a o mo — 


him insulated down to 40 below? 

And as he said to me in the top of the third, after my 
hands had long since turned blue, “Wefl, TT1 tdl you 
what, at least the beer's odd." 

My favorite comment on the weather came from 
Rader. Before the game, with the wind gusting to 40 
miles an hour (64.3 kilometers an hour) and a flock of 
robins beading gung-ho to the south, Rader was asked 
if there was any special clothing he'd recommend his 


Monday’s line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


CMvaland 

Detroll 


IN 0U OtO—4 « l 
no IN Bbt-S 19 0 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American Laaaae 

BALTIMORE— Sent John Shetbv. ootflew- 
er.ta Rochester of me inwmoHonal League. 
Purchased the contract of Fritz CannoHy. 
third baseman, from Racnester, 

CALIFORNIA— Sant Rafaef Lirao. pitcher, 
to Edmonton ot the Pacific Coaif Loaoue. 
Announced If will not grant contracts W Cra Eg 
Swan.pltdier.and Rati no UnareL outfielder. 

SEATTLE— OaUanad Damefl Coles. In- 
neUer, to Cateory of Hie Pacific Coast 
Leaaue. Placed Larry Melbourne. u> fielder, 
on the 15-day bilured-rcMrve list. 

H dH oml Lfopui 

ATLANTA— Optioned Paul ZuveHdihrflefd. 
er, to Richmond of the International League. 

HOUSTON— UncondlltanaUv released Joe 
5amtXta, pitcher. 

NEW YORK— Placed Brent Gaff, plfcher. 


BlVleven.Jeffcoat (SI. Waddell 191, Canto- on lhe21-dovdlsabkdlW,retroacflwto April 
cho CBS and Banda; Morris. Hernandez It) 3, Purchased aint Hurdle, catcner, from Tide- 
and ParrlriLW— Morris. W.L— Cnmacno.H. "“iw ot the Inlemattanal Leaaue. 










Bagiev. Clev. 

71 547 

8-4 

I 

] 

i 

Association 

toaewrs 

TEAM SEFEN5E 


Trteus. K.C 

78 426 

B0 

through April 7: 





G 

NO. 

Avg 

Richardson, N J. 

78 625 

B0 

TEAM OFFENSE 


Milwaukee 

79 

8234 

1012 

Green, Utah 

73 547 

7.7 


G 

PI. 

Avo 

Washing) an 

78 

8253 

105-8 

GS.WII llama. Wash 

75 549 

7.5 

Denver 

78 

9356 

1195 

Seattle 

79 

8432 

104.7 

JahiHon. All. 

59 518 

7J 

l_a. Lakers 

78 

9144 

117.2 

Boston 

78 

8395 

1074 

FREE THROWS 


Del roll 

78 

9057 

T16J 

Atlanta 

78 

8413 

107.9 


FTM FTA 

PCI 

Portland 

78 

8998 

115A 

Philadelphia 

78 

8473 

1084 

vonoewidhe. Port. 

353 395 

.Wl 

San Antonia 

7V 

9090 

115.1 

New Jersey 

78 

8513 

109.1 

Cheeks, PniL 

143 183 

.891 

Boston 

78 

8955 

IU8 

Dallas 

78 

8518 

109.2 

Bird. Bos. 

373 419 

.890 

Kansas GW 

78 

8*45 

IU7 

Chicago 

79 

1534 

1092 

TriPucko, Dei. 

231 250 

n> 

Philadelphia 

78 

8831 

1112 

Utah 

78 

8537 

1094 

Davis. Dali. 

157 177 

887 

Dallas 

78 

8*80 

IIU 

Houston 

78 

8538 

109.5 

Adams. Phoe. 

238 349 

885 

Milwaukee 

79 

9781 

1112 

LA. Lakers 

78 

8597 

1112 

Brtoaeman, LAC 

179 204 

877 

Houston 

78 

8538 

1117 

Phoenix 

79 

8712 

HU 

JoliflSan, K.C 

307 350 

£77 

Golden stale 

79 

8591 

ITOJO 

New York 

78 

I4QS 

non 

Green. Utah 

231 25S 

M7 

New Jersey 

78 

8498 

108.9 

Cleveland 

78 

8484 

11U 

rtieus, K.C. 

3?4 374 

J55 

Cnicaoa 

78 

8594 

108J 

LA. Clinpers 

78 

8496 

1IL5 

THREE-POINT FIELD GOALS 


Utah 

78 

8473 

imw 

Parilond 

78 

8722 

Mil 


PGM FGA 

PCf 

Cleveland 

78 

8452 

108j* 

San Antonio 

79 

8?97 

1119 

Scan, lal 

25 58 

A31 

Indiana 

78 

8435 

1092 

Detroit 

78 

8884 

1119 

Bird, Bos. 

51 119 

429 

Pimento 

79 

8538 

108.1 

Indiana 

7B 

8934 

1144 

Davis, DaiL 

45 109 

.413 

LA Clippers 

78 

8344 

107J1 

Denver 

78 

9127 

117.0 

Tucker, N.Y, 

27 67 

A03 

Al Ionia 

78 

8294 

I0&3 

Golden State 

79 

9244 

117J 

Ellis. Doll. 

J8 99 

J84 

New York 

78 

8344 

1017 

Kansas City 

78 

9143 

117J 

Free. Clev. 

49 183 

J77 

Washington 

78 

8214 

105J 

— 


— 


Toney, Pfsll. 

39 105 

J71 

Seattle 

79 

8067 

102.1 


SCORING 



Evans, Den. 

55 149 

J69 






G FG 

FT Pis 

Avg 

Bus#. K.C 

31 84 

■369 





King. N.Y. 

55 491 

424 1809 325 

IIMi 

93 357 

J58 

! ' . 



1 

Bird. Bos. 

76 877 

373 2178 28.7 

STEALS 





Jordan. CM. 

79 an 

604 2234 2X3 


G 511 

Avg 

iiu 


I 

Short. GJL 
English, Den. 

75 792 
78 899 

485 2115 282 
373 2172 27J 

Richardson, n_I. 

aimatm. A A 

78 777 

79 M5 

2.91 

2J5 


Texas 

Balflmare 


Mfl 010 •!*— 2 8 8 
•90 802 8Jx— I 2 8 


ST. LOU IS— Sent Kevin Hagen, pitcher. ond division SEMIFINALS 

Willie Lotorto. Inftefder, to Louisville of the (BM af 

American Association. Placed Jeff Lahti. Apra m 

pitcher, on the ISdav dteaWed I In. j>ly, Rangers af Philadelphia 

JSSXSSS^SSSSiSSS NY - l5kjnder! « 

Inflcidcr. on tno2 l-oav duablefl IW.OPlloneo Bosioo av Moniraal 


NHL Playoff Schedule 


hook and didn't lose the game, you have to wonder if 
he fell cheated, being yanked with a no-hitter intact 
“Not at all," said the 37-year-old, who has never 
pitched a no-hitter. “1 was straggling like crazy with 


to wear a bat and pants Anything after that is 

optional/* 

Did I mention that it snowed here? 

Did 2 mention that Charlie Hough left the game 


Hougn, Rozonvo (7) ana Si ought; Davis. American Association. Piocsd Jeff Lahti, 
Aom IB) and Dempsey. W— Afise. T-Q. l— Rd- pitcher, an the 15-dav disabled Hr. 
zemo, 0-T. HR— Baltimore. Murray (I). 5AN FRANCISCO— Placed Ouano Kulper, 

Toronto tie BM BOO— T s 1 lnfiefder.onthe21-dav disabled list. Optioned 


the wind. I didn't feel like I ever had control of the losing. 2 - 1 , while still pitching a no-hitter? 

a. , i f. -I* Tj:j.'..nll,LuiJiav 'TaV. «u mil nf im ’ - ■ i * : J n nn... - 


m 00* Mx— a ft 2 B«* LaceY ond Jeff Raalnwn. oitctien, fa auHato M Qu**c 


Minnesota m Si. Louis 
Detroit af Chkasa 
Las Angeles a! Edmonton 


rS E n» ww* 


fc knucklebalL I didn’t walk in and say. Take me out of What is it about opening day? What makes il so 

15 Jif 1 « here/ •" important that newspapers devoted so much space, 

,6 & . -Bui f won’t argue with him. Nobody can manage cover to cover, to baseball stories Monday morning? 

^ c* ’’ for one player. You can’t do that. He had to do what If I wqre a tree, the two days I’d fear most are 
,fS he did." opening and election. What do they teH them at 

\ - - Said Rader “I had no choice. He’d given up eight Weyerhauser? You’re one of the lucky ones — you’re 
^trfg^jifwalk s. fight walks is the same as eight singles —there becommg a box score? 

L,|« Vui, anu Hnncinn ihorp. Thp wind was n 


Snob, Laval l* <71 ond Martloftz; Block. Qul- Phoofilx of fno Pacific Coast League. Minnesota « Si. Louis 

senberrv (91 and SunaaenkWathan <81. W— BASKETBALL dm roll at Chicago 

Block. l-O. L--Sileb, 8 - 1 . NaflOPOi Basketban AModafian uvs Angeles al Edmonfan 

Hew York 929 809 MW -2 6 9 LEAGUE — Suspended Earl Cunrfoa. De- caloary at Winnipeg 

Boston 922 112 98x— f 19 I troftantor.foronegameand lined WmSUOO April 11 

Niekro, Shirley (SI. Cowlev (4». Murray (81 for striking Indiana's Granville Watters Our- h.y. Rangers al Phlladelpnia 
andWvnagarjBovdStanlovIBIandGedman. Hw a gam* !«*• week. n.Y. islanders at Washington 

w — Bov 0 , ml L— Niekro. u-l. HRs— Boston, PHiLADELPtllA— Placid Andrew Toney, Boston a t Monireal 

Armas ID. Evans 111 . Rice (»). guord.on fhelrriured list Reactivated Clemon Buffalo at Quebec 

national LEAGUB Johnson, cantor. Mlnnesoto al SL Louis 

MeafTMl 998 899 199—1 A 9 COLLEGE Detroll of CMcaao 

Cincinnati 808 038 Tlx— 4 11 0 EAST TENNESSEE STATE— Named Les Los Anoeies at Edmomon 

Rogers, Bwrfce tS>. Roberge (SI and Ffhoer- Robinson basketball coach. Catoarv al wlrwtoeg 


Wilkins. AIL 
Dantlev, Utah 
Aguirre. DalL 
Malone. Pull. 
Curnminas. MIL 
Naff. Den. 
Woolridge, Chi. 
Johnson, ICC 
Griffith. Utah 
Vandeuwghe, Prt 
Free. Ciev. 
S am p so n. Hou. 
About- JObbr, LAL 


77 902 wama; 
51 481 409 1371 2A9 

77 7A2 431 1982 25.7 

75 578 718 1874 25LO 

75 737 332 1806 238 

76 555 434 1784 212 

74 555 394 1704 210 

78 733 307 1785 22.9 

78 728 216 1754 225 

58 585 353 1534 225 

57 572 291 1504 224 

78 721 297 1739 22J 

77 711 285 1707 212 


Lever. Oen. 

Jordan, ChL 
Rivers, ail 
T homas. Det. 

Drexier, Port. 

Gs williams. Wash. 
Cheeks. Phil. 


78 W1 145 
7« 187 2J7 
55 1S3 135 
77 173 2J1 

76 171 125 

75 168 124 

74 la! 118 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Johnson, cantor. 

COLLEGE 




wouldn't have been any decisioo there. The wind was 
ss givinghim alLynds of trouWe. T think he’d done all he 

could db" . „ 

■li. ri _ , i a .i Dn^ 


aw; Sou. Willis <9> and Bnard»1l8.W— Safa. !■ 
A L— Rogers. 8 - 1 . 


What makes it so important that 50,402 people 
would come out on one of those rare days when you 


. S-.ol 80 ", Im 

S-7« c -’ --si -in?#** 

% 


woukl cook out on one 01 mose rare uays wnen you r 1T 

could get both a tan and frostbite? -C OOtDSOl 

Reant history indicates you could still get a seal 1 1 " - ■ ■ - 

late^^^n—wenonawaraday Wyear USFL Standings 

the OntHes chew 5IJ27 on opening day and 8,644 for o 


Fairfield— N omad MHeh Buonaauro April 13 

baskettMlI coach. Washington at N.Y. islanders 

IDAHO STATE— Named Jim BoulM Ms> Montreal at Boston 
ketball coach. Quebec at Buffalo 

NCAA— Restored the tvl> rfgnfs and oriw- Ptiiiaas lento at N.Y. Rangers 
legos of NCAA membership to Wlchl la State SI. Louis 01 Minnesota 


Calgary ot Winnipeg 

Smith, LAC 

77 

458 

384 1703 22.1 


At tool Ic Division 



April 11 

Mitchell, SJL 

79 

735 

258 1733 21.9 


w 

L 

Per. 

GB 

N.Y. Rangers al Philadelphia 

Moncriet Mil. 

70 

534 

441 1520 217 

y- Boston 

52 

16 

.795 

— 

N.Y. islanders at Washington 

Thomas. Der. 

77 

421 

385 1454 21.5 

K-Phllodeluhie 

i 56 

32 

.718 

ff 

Boston at Montreal 

Chambers, Sea 

78 

504 

452 1655 113 

x-New Jersey 

39 

39 

■500 

23 

Buffalo at Quebec 

Gervin. &A. 

72 

409 

324 1524 212 

x -Washington 

38 

40 

487 

24 

Minnesota ol SL Louis 

Otaluvnon, Hou. 

78 

445 

327 1619 208 

New York 

24 

54 

JC8 

3a 

Del roil or CMcaao 

Ervlno, Phil. 

74 

583 

325 1494 202 


Central Division 



Los Anoeies at Edmomon 

Gs-wmiams. wsh 

75 

407 

241 1502 200 

^Milwaukee 

54 

33 

709 

— 

Caloary al Winnipeg 

Blackman, DalL 

77 

591 

332 1519 19.7 

n -Del roll 

42 

35 

£38 

13"= 

April 13 

McHaie, Bos. 

76 

578 

338 1494 19.7 

a -Chicago 

38 

42 

.475 

18’: 

Washington of N.Y. islanders 

RKhardson, NJ. 

79 

434 

234 1S33 197 

Cleveland 

34 

44 

X36 

2!"S 

Montreal af Boston 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

Al Ionia 

31 

47 

J97 

to 1 -: 

Quehec af Buffalo 



FG 

FGA Pd 

Indiana 

22 

57 

278 

34 


Donaldson, LAC 
Gilmore, 5JL 


335 S2S A3> 
584 809 A23 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 


Crazy, isn’t it, to open the season on April e in boston r Recent nmoiy indicates you cornu smi get a seat 

.Those’ New Englanders must be putting a Krtle extra later in the season — even on a warm day. Last year TJgfT G 
sauleme in the chowder, hub? the Orioles drew 51,327 on opening day and 8,644 for 

Snowed here, loo. Right here, south of the Mason- their second game. 

Dixon Line. As Jack Paar used to say, I kid you not But the tease of opening day is so effective that the . B irmuwtMm 

Monday afternoon, about an hour before game time. Orioles were actually billing Wednesdays game Tanwoeov 
snow showers started falling cm our heads. Ithad to be against Tern as "The Second Opener," and are ex- ^' (i ^ y 
snow* rain usually melts before it hits you. pecung a near sellout. Momnnis 

The snow lasted for about half an hour as a be- Hey, if h works, go with it. Maybe they can push j«kMnvm> 

■« 3 .i s — ■ f- — CJ4 -t - • — : — — ff*-4.i- aa 59th 


rtfLg l/rfo The snow lasted for about nan an nour as a oe- Hey, ^ n wooes, go wim it. Maytx 
RVnumbed UJS. Army' band played on in center field, their Aug. 29 game against Seattle 
causing people to wonder what indeed was opening — Opener " But enough of cynicism. 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T PCf. PF PA 
tarn 5 2 0 J14 173 133 

BOV 5 2 8 .714 200 153 

**Y 4 3 8 J71 172 161 

» 3 3 1 400 >29 95 

I 3 4 0 429 U0 157 

irilla 2 5 0 m 159 20* 

1 6 0 .143 120 193 
WESTERN CONFERENCE 


University. 

Oil com at Detroit 

Abdul-Jabbar. LAL 

711 11U 

■900 

y-Oenver 

51 

27 

554 

— 

PENNSYLVANIA— Named Ditto FBI too «• 

Edmonton at Las Angeles 

Thorpe, KLC. 

385 047 

an 

^Houston 

45 

33 

57? 

6 

srttonl football coach. 

Winnipeg at Caloary 

Nance. Phoe. 

SIS 877 

-S87 

K-DollOS 

42 

36 

538 

9 

TENNESSEE STATE— Named Larrv Reid 

April 14 

Worthy. LAL 

593 lire 

571 

x-San Anionlo 

40 

39 

506 

II’* 

baskelball coach. 

(If Necessary) 

cneok*, Phil, 

394 599 

571 

y-Utah 

38 

40 

437 

13 

VIRGINIA— Extended toe contracts ot 

Philadelphia ot N.Y. Ronoeri 

McHale, Boa. 

578 10TB 

568 

Kansas City 

30 

4B 

J8S 

21 

George welsh, football coach, ond Terrv Hel- 

Washington al N.Y. Islanders 

Johnson. LAL 

485 970 

559 


Pacific Division 



Iockl basketball coach, for ftv* years. 

Montreal al Boston 

woolridge. cm. 

- 555 1185 

553 

vUL Lakers 

58 

» 

.744 

— 

WEBER STATE— Namftd Ltotv Former 

Cnteaoo at Detroit 

REBOUNDING 


x-poriiand 

39 

39 

500 

19 

basketball coach. 

Quebec at Buffalo 

G 

OH Def Tat 

Avg 

y- Phoenix 

34 

45 

430 

24lb 

WISCONSIN-GREEN SAY— Named Dick 

Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers 

Malone, PhIL 

75 357 418 985 111 

Seattle 

31 

48 

592 

37W 

Bennett basketball coach. 

St. Louis at Minnesota 

Williams. NJ. .78 31B 453 971 114 

LA. Clippers 

29 

49 

J72 

29 


Winnipeg at Catpary 

Lnfmbeer. Del. 

Tt 778 483 951 

12J 

Golden Slate 

22 

ST 

J78 

34-z 


Edmonton ot lm Angeles 

Olottiwoa Hou. 

tit <21 SID 931 

11.9 

U-cllnaied PlavofI berth 1 




Ixerr l 1 C* . . .1 

Apra 14 

Eafan, (Jtoh 

78 198 619 887 1L4 

(v<iinched division ling} 





A the baseball season or the Winter Olympics. Even if it fdt Kke winter, baseball really doesushar 

The snow briefly turned to rain, which finally gave in spring. ■ . • 

way to bright sunlight, cSdring a tremendous meer , Look on the bright side. The Orioles are already in 
IP V-ijgf. from the crowd . first place, and there are 161 games left to fuBy explore 

The temperaiure at game tune was announced as 4.4 wbo’s on first, what’s on serond and whether 1 don’t 
'OB • degrees cenligrade(40 d^roes Fahreflhflt). Toby Har- know is still on third. 


Even if it fdt Kke winter, baseball really does usher 

M ■ i Qoktona 

:ve m spring . . , „ ^ . , - • . . atm 

»r . Look on the bright side. The Orioles are already in powimvj 

Bnrt nUm» onrl iW. ftrp 161 Him Irftln fuHv Bmlore Son Antonio 


SSS World Cup Soccer) 

M2 |75 150 - 

^71 142 121 ASIAN QUALIFYING GROUP 3-B 

A29 101 142 imtto 1, TTWltanl 1 
jQ9 94 133 Point* ttoodlan: Indonesia 9; lixllaS; Ban- 

,143 130 154 oUxtosh. Thailand 4, 

ULT RMMlnUfl naidu AMli 12. inula vtBan- 

Btodesh. 


ASIAN QUALIFYING GROUP 3-B 


MONDAY'S RESULT 
Denver 28. Arizona 7 


(If nacnmYl 
N.Y, Rangers at PhUaUcipnta 
N.Y. islanders at WasMnolon 
Boston al Montreal 
Buffalo at Oueeee 
MimtoMto at st ueub 
Detroit at Chicago 
Catoary ot Wbmlpeg 
Las Aagem at Edmonton 


Parish. Bos. 
Smith. GS. 

Slkmo, Sag, 
Bird, Bos. 
Sampson, Hou. 


Thomas. Del. 
Johnson, LAL 


74 2S5 547 823 1M 

77 390 44* BM 1QJ 

40 164 559 723 194 

74 IS3 453 804 104 

78 211 612 823 104 

ASSISTS 

G No. Avg. 
77 1854 117 
74 936 114 


MONDAY’S RESULT 

Chicago 14 If 41 29 — 103 

Indiana S* M » at— IB7 

Kellogg U-26 4-7 34. Fleming 5-15 4-8 IB; 
Jordan 4>» 10-14 22. Matthews 8-11 4-4 21, Dai- 
ley 8-14 5-0 21. Rebounds: cnicona M (Wdm- 
riege. Jordan 0), Indiana 57 IKiHion 141. 
Assists: ciucaoo if (Maniniw&4); maiana 2s 
(Thomas 7). 











OBSERVER 


Gringos and Geography 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — The world is 
always changing in unpredict- 
able ways. Latin America, for ex- 
ample — five years ago anybody 
who tried to tafic Larin America to 
a North American audience was 
bound to end up talking to himself. 

It took the narcotics racket to 
change boredom into fascination. 
We gringos still love a gangster 
story, and Latin America is sud- 
denly providing one of the great 
ones. Newspapers, magazines and 
television titillate us with stories of 
corrupt governments in steamy cli- 
mates and Hispanic godfathers so 
powerful they can make war on 
governments that bother them, in- 
cluding the once-fearfu! colossus in 
Washington. 

Not since Ai Capone's day has 
there been such a gripping story 
about crime on this scale. In fact, 
the bloodshed produced by the 
Latin American mobs makes the 


in America. By the start of the next 
century, IH bet, 999 of every 1,000 
Americans asked to find Colombia 
in relation to Mexico will no longer 
either shrug or reply that Colombia 
is Mexico's capitaL 

I can’t guess how our neighbors 
to the south — at least those not 
getting rich in the drug trade — feel 
about the intellectual gain bound 
to result from all this. I imagine the 
fussbudgets among them will com- 
plain because it took gangsters to 
get us interested in them, when we 
should have been fascinated all 
along by their art, their history and 
their culture. 

□ 

Chicago fussbudgets have com- 
plained of the same thing for years. 
Even in Paris you will hear them 
complaining that despite Chicago’s 
magnificent art treasures, the 
French want only to hear about Al 
Capone. 


gangs of Capone's era seem, by 
trisoo, like 


But of course the thing about 
theF« 


comparison, 
old school 


se gentlemen of the 


Periodic news stories report en- 
tire families murdered — father, 
mother, babies, grandparents, 
aunts, uncles, cousins and pets — 
even in Yankee cities like Miami 
and New York. 

“Drug-related killing” has be- 
come routine police jargon for 
these mass slaughters. They seem 
peculiarly chilling to a Yankee 
public raised to believe that every 
hood had at least enough Robin in 
him to spare the women and chil- 
dren. 

□ 

This new-style hood is alarming- 
ly like something escaped from one 
of our modem horror movies, those 
Grand Guignols in which maniacs 
swinging chainsaws and meat 
hooks wipe out entire neighbor- 
hoods. 

Grisly as all this may be, it at 
least has the virtue of tempting the 
Yankee to read a little about Latin 


:rage person can handle. You're 
: likely to sit in the caft all night 


America. As a result, a lot of people 
ere Co- 


now have a rough idea where 
lombia, Venezuela and Mexico are 
situated. 

In the same way, the Prohibition 
laws aimed at stamping out alcohol 
in the 1920s got millions interested 
in Canada, Long Island and the 
Jersey shore, the places the illegal 
booze came from. 

Today’s narcotics boom will 
probably do simil ar service for Lat- 


Chicago that interests the French is 
its gangsters rather than its art trea- 
sures. When you have the Louvre in 
the neighborhood you have more 
art treasures to deal with than the 
avera^ 
not likely i 
praying for a Chicagoan to wander 
In and tell you about his town’s art 
collections. 

Of course a Frenchman, as soon 
as he recognizes a Chicagoan at the 
next table, is going to lift his glass 
in salute and say, “How about 
those great gangsters, man!” 

Larin Americans will probably 
have to get used to the same sort of 
thing eventually, and they may as 
well face it — you have to take your 
fame any way you can get it these 
days. It's ironic that a modem form 
of Prohibition (this one outlawing 
narcotics) has brought the Larins to 
North American attention, just as 
the Prohibition’s last version 
(against alcohol) brought Chicago 
its global fame. 

With alcohol now legally avail- 
able, you might think the middle- 
class Yankee millions wouldn’t 
think it worth paying fortunes for 
illegal stuff to reach the abnormal 
mental states so essential to fulfill- 
ing the gringo personality. The ex- 
planation. of course, is that the 
Yankee fears alcohol more than 
narcotic weeds and powders be- 
cause of alcohol's dreaided calories. 
Drugs don’t ruin his diet 


New York Times Service 


By Cohen and Hart: Senators Collaborate on a Spy Novel 


By Lois Romano 

Washington Post Service 


ASHINGTON — He’s dashing, he’s 


dedicated, he’s patriotic and pure. 
He's a U. S. senator, appealingly driven 
and predictably obsessive. He’s the man of 
the moment, looking for love and truth, 
caught in a quagmire of sinister forces out 
to destroy his chances of becoming presi- 
dent 

“His life is in shambles,” said Senator 
Gary Hart, Democrat of Colorado. “He's 
not very smart politically. He doesn’t play 
the game.” 

“He’s never been on the inside of the 
club, so to speak.” said Senator William S. 
Cohen. Republican of Maine. “On the one 
hand, he has pressure bang put on him to 
spend more time with his constituents. And 
the press is putting pressure on him to run 
for president” 

“He’s not pretty,” said Hart “Of all the 


things he is, be is not pretty." 

, “he's a white male. 


“Well” said Cohen, 

So to that extent he's like us.” 

Meet Thomas Chandler, a “moderate” 
senator from Connecticut and the protago- 
nist in “The Double Man,” a collaboration 
and first novel by Hart 48. and Cohen, 44, 
just published by W illiam Morrow & Co. 

Any resemblances to persons living or 
dead are coincidental and not intended to 
stan sparks flying in the Senate. 

“Pieeeaase,” pleaded Cohen. “We really 
did not model him after any one of our 
colleagues.” 

Cohen and Hart have spent nearly five 
years — in between presidential and sena- 
torial campaigns — writing this intricate 
spy yam, filled with plots and subplots, 
beautiful women and plenty of slimy char- 
acters that all lead to the CIA and KGB. 
There are fathers looking for daughters, 
fathers- in-law trying to ruin sons-m-law. 
Cubans and Sonets and Mafiosi, and a 
deep-seated conspiracy that resurrects 
John Kennedy’s assassination. 

There's even a spy in the Senate — a 
“snake in the tower" — whose identity is, 
of course, never revealed. 

The plot and prose are fast-moving and 
well developed and impressively crafted, 
particularly considering the level of harmo- 
ny it takes to produce a double byline. 

' Those close to the project say it was a 
congenial undertaking but note that there 
was a certain amount of reconciling of the 
writing styles to be done. Cohen, a pub- 
lished poet, tends toward the descriptive, 
while Hart, a published political writer, 
uses words sparingly. 

“Cary thinks a sentence over eight 
words is too long,” said a friend of both. 
“There was a little bit of a problem with 
that. Bill would always put in stuff about 
the purple moon or something, and then 
Gary would take it out When Gary was 



attempt to unravel a terrorist plot that is 
bring funded by drug trade in the United 
States and controlled by a renegade arm of 
the KGB. His investigation starts to take 
over his life and eventually causes the col- 
lapse of a promising career. He loses girl 
job and respectability. 

Chandler's romance is with Elaine Dun- 
ham, his staff assistant on the investiga- 
tion. She and Chandler tap-dance around 


sleeping together for half of the book, and 
when the}’ do, the description is less than 


Senators Hart (left), Coben: 


James K. W. Artwrten/The Wtartngton fart 

Haikn-baroque” writing team. 


cam p ai gnin g last year, and Bin was work- 
ing on the book alone, he put back in an the 
purple moons.” 

Sitting in Han’s Senate office recently in 
their matching navy pin stripes and crisp 
white shins, the senators remained polite 
about their differences. There was a famil- 
iarity between them, the kind that comes 
when two people are veterans of the same 
war. They are described by staff members 
as somewhere between “good acquaint- 
ances" and “friends.” 

“It's very hard to convince people that it 
was fun,” Hart said. “The way it truly 
worked was over time. It took us a long 
time.” 

“We got accustomed to each other's way 
of thinking ,” Cohen said. “After a while, 
we were both so familiar with each charac- 


ter that we could write scenes and they 

Ac. I 


would virtually be in an identical style, 
would take a section, and Gary would take 
a section. We would each wntc a section 
and swap. We did that over the whole 


and swap, we did that over the wnoie 
history of the project so the styles became 
one, they merged.” 


“We started out with somewhat different 
styles,” Cohen said. “Gary has a more — 
uh — ” 

“Austere,” Hart offered 
“Yes, austere — a haiku-like style,” said 
Cohen, in a joking reference to the sparse- 
ness of the Japanese 19-syllable verse. They 
chortled at the witticism. “My style is more 
baroque,” he continued “and over a period 


of time I think both of us became — uh— ” 

“We became baroque-haiku,” Hart said 

They guffawed though bardy vibrating 
their pin stripes. 

Coben and Hart are probably more alike 
than most members of Congress. They are 
well-manicured and handsome and often 
described as “moderate” politically. Gen- 
erally, they are in sync on the social issues 
and on opposing sides of defense issues. 
Cohen voted for the MX, for example, and 
Hart against it 

“Fd say I'm just to the right of the center 
and Gary is just to the left, so I guess that 
puts us smack in the middle,” Cohen said 
“There were no conflict issues when we 
were writing the book because we stayed 
away from specific votes. We didn’t even 
give Chandler a party.” 

They are considered equally ambitious 
for the White House, although Hart got 
considerably closer to tins goal during the 
1984 campaign. 

Cohen has published “Of Sons and Sea- 
sons.” a collection of poetry, as well as a 
bode about his first year in the Senate 
called “Roll CaB.” 

Hart has written two books. In 1 983, he 
published “The New Democracy," and in 
1973, “Right From the Start, 6 a book 
chronicling the McGovern campaign, 
which he managed before being elected to 
the Senate in 1974. 

“The Double Man” is about Chandler's 


steamy. 

“We were concerned in the sense that we 
didn't want it to take away from the story.” 
Hart said “The story is not a romantic 
novel. What we wanted to do was handle 
that pan tastefuDy without detracting from 
the story.” 

“We didn't want to use language that 
was maybe very scintillating but not in 
good taste.” said Cohen. “We wanted to 
handle it with some delicacy.” 

But a senator sleeping with an aide? Isn’t 
that the stuff scandals, are made of? 

“It couldn't have bent anyone else be- 
cause he was totally absorbed in the inves- 
tigation and she was working with him,” 
Hart said *Tt had to be somebody he bad 
to relate to. They weren't married” 

One of the more revealing aspects of the 
book is its irreverence for the Senate as an 
institution, where legislators are described 
as “too small too timid too unimaginative 
to call for action before calamity struck 


PEOPLE 






. . awe-inspired to do so after the fact." 
“It’s not anti-SenateT Hart said “It’s 


just meant to put things in perspective. 
Chandler has the 


right perspective. You 
live in several worlds in this institution. 
Chandler is meant to show that you can’t 
go back and forth in those worlds." 

Hart said that, in a way, the book al- 
lowed him to release certain impressions be 
acquired when he first came to the Senate 
and was on the special 1973 intelligence 
committee, chaired by the late Senator 
Frank Church, to investigate the CIA, FBI 
and foreign intelligence operations. 

“Talk about intense, that was intense in 
terms of amount of time spent and what 
you were hearing,” be said “I constantly 
had to fight through that two-year period 
with reality. You walked into this hearing 
roam, and all the doors were shut, people 
chased out. and it was debugged You hear 
all this gosh-awf ul stuff. And then you had 
to walk out and say hello to the Colora- 
dans. It was an amazing experience. It’s the 
constant shifting of gears, and Chandler 
tries to keep it in perspective." 

Hart and Cohen were reluctant to say 
what lies ahead for Thomas Chandler. 

“God knows,” Hart said. 

“Oh, he’s in a big mess,” Cohen said 

Which is really a roundabout way of 
saying that they do not want to discuss the 
possibility of a sequel 


Sinatra, Mother Teresa 
To Get High US. Medals 

president Ronald Reagan has 
named Frank Sinatra, Jimmy Stew- 
art Mother Teresa, the test pilot 
Chuck Yeager and nine cohere as 
recipients of the Presidential Medal 
of Freedom, the United States's 
highest civilian award The awards 
will be presented al a White House 
luncheon on May 23. The other 
honorees: the late jazz pianist 
Count Base: Jacques-Yves Cous- 
teau, the marine explorer: the late 
Jerome Holland, educator and am- 
bassador Sidney Hook, the philos- 
opher and educator: Jeane J. Kirk- 
patrick, former ambassador to the 
United Nations: the late George 
M. Low, educator and NASA ad- 
ministrator the late Frank Reyn- 
olds. ABC-TV anchorman; S. Dil- 
lon Ripley, former secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institution in Wash- 
ington. and General Albert Coady 
Wedemeyer. ... It may have 
been nearlv 40 years since they saw 
duty, but Lieutenant General 
James H. Doolittle, 88, who led the 
first bomber raid on the Japanese 
mainland in 1942, and Lieutenant 
General Ini C Eater, also 88, who 
played a kev role as commander of 
U.S. and Allied air forces in Eu- 
rope and the Mediterranean, have 
been confirmed by the Senate for 
promotion to full generaL 
□ 



The sister of Dorothy Sfrartea 
the slain Playmate, has filed a S3- 
million libel suit against Burl El- 
dridge, her stepfather, and Hugh - 
Hefner, the Playboy magazine - 

founder. The suit filed in Los An- 
geles, contends that Eidridge and 
Hefner falsely told reporters last 


gCKCa, U'HKIiuj mat. ljuiiu^ juu jg 

Hefner falsely told reporters last -rp 

week that the director Peter Bog- 1 U C/I 

danovicb “seduced” Louise B. v 


Hoogstraten, 16. when she was 13 
and that Bogdanovich also had se- 
duced her mother, NeUy Schaap. 
Hefner responded in a statement: 
“It appears the truth will finally be 
known.” Stratten, 20, who was 
Playboy's 1980 Playmate of the 
Year, was shot to death in August 
1980 by her estranged husband. 
Paid Snider, who then killed him- 
self. 

□ 


■w’ed 


r/~ 


Chariene Tilton, who plays Lucy 
Ewing on the “Dallas” television 
show, was married to the Scottish 
entertainer Domenick Allen in an 
Easter church ceremony in Califor- 
nia. It was the second marriage for 
Tilton, 23, and the first for Allen. 
27. a singer, actor and composer. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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REAL ESTATE 
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SWITZERLAND 


SUNNY SOUTHERN SWITZERLAND 

LAKE LUGANO 

in a large 
beautiful park (17,000 sq.ra} vnth sum- 


ming pool, private mama and pnvrte 
80 sam. 


beach, lw quokfy. Apartments , 

to to 190 sq-m. + terraces 24 - 47 
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The ftesWema Rivoiago in the South 
area of the lake offers a p artments 
from 57 sqm to 130 iqm, avertookmg 
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Av Mon Repos 24, 

04-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Tel: pll 22 35 IZ The 251 85 MEUS 
EstafaBried Since 1970 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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GREAT BRITAIN 

MONACO 

MONACO 

PARIS* SUBURBS 

Lake Geneva & Lugano 

In these exceptional regions of Swtaer- 
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TOUR GB5E 6 , CH-1007 Lomomi. 
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wound 065,5X1 Tefc M25/1 5985. 

MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 

For sale m luxurious modem residence, 
pleasant 2 rooms, loggia, sea vew, 
equipped kitchen, bant. WC, cellar, 
partang. n* 00 J 0 a 

EXaUSTVEAGP^CE INTERMEDIA 
B.P. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO CEDEX 
Tri 193) 50 66 84 
ux: 449477 

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8 Av*. de Mewine 

75008 Prate 

Tain 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
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PHONE 562-1640 

GREECE 

SUPER LUXURIOUS lOraom v3fo 5 
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Mortgages 60% al 6 W 6 interest. 
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52 Mornbrflonr CH-12Q2 
GSCVA. Tel; (*22- 34 1 540. 
Tele*! 22030 


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PARIS A SUBURBS 


VILLA MONTMORENCY 


DUPIEX. MAGNIFICENT 
■ATHJER D* ARTIST 175 SOM. 
on beautiful 65 sqm. garden, triple 


i sqm. garden, 
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EXCEPTIONAL CONDITION 
EMBASSY SERVICE 5*2 16 40 


TROCADERO, IHtGENT 


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Tri 266 15 47. 


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PARIS & SUBURBS 


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ideal pmd- 6 -te/re, upper floor. 

2 roam. SpUndd view. 265.13.05 


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FRENCH PROVINCES 


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sqm. residence. 300 sqm. waled gar- 
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double Sving. tutly eqi 
balcony & terrace. Pans : 


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Beaubrul 4-bedroom vJlo with 1 ocre 
seafront. Tel; (939 99 44 14. 




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Card account 
number: 


Cara expiry dale . 


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My name. 


Address. 


City. 


.Country. 


■M. 


-Telex. 


10-4-85 




ATTBrnON EXECUTIVES 
PubBeh your bu i 


in the k it mmatwnal Herald Tffr 
bunt, where mare than a Hard 
of. a mXen readers worid- 
widm, most of whom an m 
botktoee aid industry, w9f 
read it. Ant telex us (Paris 


613595) before 1 Oo.uk ms- 
that wo 


mmng mat wo can telex you 
badt, and your massage wE 
appear wmwi 48 hours. The 
rate is U.S. $9 JO or load 
equivalent per One. You must 
indude co mplet e and veriH- 
cMe bJlmg oddest. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


WITHIN 30 DAYS - OR LESS 
You con how your own business, 
—and pedeot mart maoty in a dev 
them most people earn in a week. How? 


Easy. It's not hard at aB when you own 
as* 


•mo Computer Fortrart System. 

A sure winner that c ontbm 3 of to- 


day's hottest trends- video, compneri 


and inslant petms... plus 
how and guarantees of Texts Iratru- 
merts, Ponasarac and femo. An al cash 
business. Customers come to you. No 
seAng. No stress, h's not a frandvse. AS 
the money end the profbi are 100 % 
yours. Idea for Families, mrimdueb or 
absentee owners. Part-time, fufl-tvne or 
weekends. There's no need to leave 
year present job. With the fema system 
you take someonespehee with a T.V. 
camera and instantly .pant o with a 


computer. It's so pinh-bunon simple, a 
dvla con run <r. But the profn aren't lad 


stuff. The Kema system is avodoble in 
block ond wbto or full color; <s porta- 
ble, sete up n 30 mnirles or lea, wry 
tene. anywhere. The world is your teirr- 
lory. There are Ihouands of loco) 
wortmg to b e fifed-- p lus tremendous 
tqq 4 order — ..J ^ Syrtem pees 
start at ISS9J0D to USS26.500. 
fema Dept. M35. Pasmxh 1753*1. 

6000 Frankfurt / W. Germtxty. 

Tri 069 > 747806 Tbc- 412713 KEMA 


CONTAINBtWORU) SERVICES LTD 
HIGH INCOME PLAN 
EARN 17% PER ANNUM 
On iu vee tm oi ts of $5320 
from 5 to 15 yean 
Minimum lavedmnnt $2730 


Cowo i nerworld Services Lid m anage 
and operate o Fnt doss worldwide 


core a ner leasing service to the 
shppng industry and spedo&M 


i prowdmg vwestors wrth a 
HK3H HXH3 


INCOME 
WITH SECURITY 


For full deicds of Itu Ugh Income Plan 
{NOW INCORPORATING NEW 
CAPITAL REPAYMENT OPPORTUNTTrl 


OPPORTUNITY] 
contact OONTAtNBnVOUD 
SERVICE LTD 
25 QUEEN'S TERRACE, 
SOUTHAMPTON 
501 1BG, ENGLAND 
Tefc 0703 335322. 

Thu 47*!*OfTWID G 
Penons mteratted m beosmam an viter- 
■nedary. please contact MSe Gate* at 
C ontener World 


For Sale 

SURPLUS PLANTS 
OXYGEN-NTTROGEN- 
ARGON 

J Ton Per Day 130 Meter) 

5 Tons Per toy (150 Meter} 


750 


25 Tons Per Day 

73 Tons Pei Day 

Modern Liquid 
E*ce 8 w# Conation 


LOW PRICES 
FINANCING AVAILABLE 


Itecsia Jaffa Cora., 9171 Wiidw. 
Beverly Kfc, CA 90210 Th; 674*38, 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE & UK 
LTD COMPANIES 


heorsjorotion ond monogemcm jn;UKj 


Iste of Man, Tytks. AnguiBa, 

Wends, Panomo. Liberia and most other 
offshore areas. 

• Confiderttd professond 
advice 

• Immeriote avatabity 

• Nonwiee services 

• Boat Re^sfratiofts 

• Accounting, & admmitranon 

• Mai. telephone & tele* 

Free explanatory booklet form: 

SELECT CORPORATE 
SBW1CES LIU 
Head Office 

Mt Pteramit, Pougra, Me of Man 


Tel: Douglas (0*241 237 IB 
Telex 628554 SELECT G 
London Representne 
2-5 Old Band St. London W1 
Tel 01-493 <244. TU 28247 SCSLDN G 


AMERICAN HIGH TECHNOLOGY, 
raecdry dtetncoi company s looking 
for investment, ocpinsrtion/ merger 


Opwriuntties m Europe. We hove in 
ploce in Eua 


i Europe, and efaewhere m the 
world, an outjtancfrig marketing or- 
i along wtth highly 


of < d mtx w foctunnc and Ikstnbutnn 
ny rXB 


skJs. Our company hos a vervstroog 
comnvtmeflt lo research ond develop- 
ment. a good cash position and a 
wftmgness to lake risk. Our easting 
sales anount to approximately $1 
billion per year. We are searching out 
investment opportuntxs that wit 


compbnert our strengths and help us 
to continue w expand aw ‘ 


lour busmen at 
mare rapd rate. We serve the 
petroleum, transportcAon. codings, 
picotio, textile and chermoal process 
mdustries. We would be p l eased to 
have exotorotary dueussani with 

anyone looking for an assooawsn 

with a company with o ur strengths. 
Please write Box 2003, Her aid To- 
bme. 92521 Neuily Cedex. France 


INVESTMENT PARTNERS 
reiDED 

• Select land strateareBy located raa 
Disneyworid i Orlando. 

• Option to purchase at wri below 
current marlet value • 

• Addhonol fronted partners required 
to complete pie chose and take 
*o higkiy vofoabte tend 

a Short bolting penod before very 
profitable resale (protected at 100 % 
plus) to deve lo pers interested in 
buSding inter national tourist 
otuochon. hotels, shqapng tenrer 

• Investment remge US SI 5.000 to 

ussiiauw) 

S i te Am erican Investment Cara. 

ICO N Became Bbd 
Sure 1209. Mot. R. 33132 
Tet , ftJSj 3S&80P7 
Trie*, B03237 EURO Ml A. 


, , SWITZERLAND 

Safely fw for you and your famjy: W« 
hrip ter up 'busmen and reridmiisl 


r up tu 

property, tttfan permone n t resdency 
(pernsf 3. work permit, permrC & nau- 
r ofaotionL Confidential information 
only by a personal interview m Europe. 

Svnd ut your telephone number & 
worm you PfOrtjgby. Newwv mwest- 
menr cretin d U5S5DOOO . U5S65J30Q. 
Please write Bo* 2126. 1KT» Fne- 
driehsfr. 15, 6000 FranCfort/^m 


roue own company w 

SWITZERLAND 

ZUBQ1 - ZUG - LUZON 
From SF5QG pa* omum - wi 
Gonfidcso, Sower*. 36/04-6500 Zua 
Tri 0041 -42 2) 32 88. Tb; 8649 If 

A Pr««nt for Yow Son 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


UNIVERSAL CONTAINERS LTD. 
High Interest Income Ran 

17%% P/A 


in US$ 


UCL provides mveswo with a tegh 
fitted name wWi wcwrty by operHing 
a global tprwwter leasing and monage- 
mert service, knirin of 19% offer vrifl 
continue to be dealt with as received 
For deraik of this My guaranteed and 
rawed investment plan, contact; 

UNIVERSAL CONTARSS LTD. 

P.O.BOX 197 LONDON SW3 3ST 
Tri 350 0667, Thu 896757 


CARLSBERG 

One of GaBfornio'i mast successful Seal 
Estate companies has a selection of 
land parcels avofable for mtemohcnal 
investors. The properties, located 
fhe state range in price 
K. of avTjfobte 


Iteouchot* _ 

frornSlO.OOO t o $ 600 *. d 

swth terms. For information about the 


c ompan y, t hw Ho ck record rad the 
properties, contort: 


CARLSBERG LAND CORP. 

PO Box 412 
London NW3 4PP 
Tri 936 9119. Telex: 266048 Ort30)3 


THE FRUIT OF THE FUTURE 
THE VBtSATlLE & PROFITABLE fBJOA 
This lovely green ar omatic fruit whkh 


lovely green aromatic hurt vvTnrti 
be produced in wide range of seih 
& di mates has been deve l op e d *i New 
Zfduid £ has o great jtotenhri Under 
good management wil be m M pro 
auction witfin 7 years producing 10 
tons of frwi par acre showing a net 
profit of about NZ57,00Q 

INVEST AND PLANT IN 1 995. 

For further detab Contort The HORTEX 
Group of Convenes, F.O. BOX 523, 
AueUandiNew Zeatend 

Tel: (09) 793-204, tbc 21469 Horm. 


ATTENTION 

American corporroion located in CcB- 
I rehnono 
property. 


fomioa seekma refinancing of its oper- 
and real property. A loan or US 


•rfy a approeedor over USS15 i»*oh. 
and. annual gross revenue PuCerth US 


_ _ annual gras revenue e xc eeds 

S3J nxttoa Autiredfciraod stote- 
rneirts and Other mforrnutMi ve wal- 
able. Heose contact Mr. Mo rfc Beau- 
champ, Afne PataTty. 2B779 Via La 
Hares FTl, Murnefa, Co 92362. Phone: 
(714) 677-7451. TU: 294223 ARFM UR 


AA1 NBZAL WATER-EXPORT. Known n 


Portugal by AGllAS SANTAS DO 
VlMEftaDii 


. Diuretical, good For kkfiiey. 
bladder & Ever disease. 40 tides from 
Lisbon, torrent of 150,000 Hers/hour. 
We export bolded m plastic PET, sev- 
erol sees, with gas or without, spedah 
fy for USA & Arabian countries. New 
factory reach in May 1985 which is 
coiroosed or sophme nte d Jcsxmese 
moebnery. production. We 
eepl prapocois t o sefl oB the asm 
wdud rathe sources. QmtoefcTi 
telex 42/07 EMAV1M P. Av. Cbnsel- 
hero Fernando de Sousa 1, 1000 
Lisbon, Portugal. TeF680566 - 651202. 
Emprew dot Aguoi do Vbiwto. 


WTBWATTQ NAL Qff 5 HOK 
COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
FROM CITO 


Comprehensive Admovstfotfoa. 

*ovwn of Attorney. 


Nommee wrvfoes. PBwea . 
Registered office*. Tefcx, telephone, 
mol forwarding. 

Maid R eeaur ce i 
Bolocutrie Hout*, 
Summerhffl, 

Me of Mon. 

Tri 10624] 29023- 20240-28933 
Trie* 628352 Mood G. 


Imprint par Offprint. 73 rue de I’Evangik. 75018 Paris. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

SEEK PARTNER 

for exploitation France & abroad, 
NEWADVB7T1S1NG MHXA 
IMMEDIATE HIGH PROfTT MARGIN 
patented r 7 countries. 

TeL France ( 6 ) 430 80 38 
from 9 am to 9 pn, 

Tlx 250303 Pubfic Paris Reh(430 8038). 

CAUFORMA WRC VRETARD with 
winery ate. 500 off* premum varietal 
wine grope. Vineyard ei best masted 
growmg region of CoL We ptonled 16 
yean rao. Toted 2500 acres of fond 
One rmfe of frontage on motor Cabf. 
teghwoy for winery. Winery permrti 
oSrired Joint venture or sale. Cur- 
rent management avalcfois. Owner 

K Sehworfe 9056 Somo Momco Bfrd, 
Las Angetei.CA 90069. 

M U5. • FOR MUL7TNATTONAI5 
CPA HUM 

fort 4 U5. tox planning, accounting, 
fronod 5. buemrai sennas - red e> 

nisssnaafs^ 

225 W. 34 SL. New York, NY 10122. 
Tefc 212-594^/1. 

PANAMA COMPAMB with nonnee 
directors ond confidential Sww / ftm- 
aern bank aeeount formed ei 48 hours 
w ’“ofte^adfc Offshore bonks 
formed for S7000. Currenoei or finds 
moved «tto Eurocurrency time deposit 
oceounti wish ton free interest ond 

London SWlA 1LT. Tri 01-406 3017 

Dotrfoteoa needed for 

KOREAN BUNN PRODUCTS 

USJ 10,001X000. Unque opportunity 
refafed with conslrurtmn busmea. For 
stnedy perscml reasons se*n g fac- 
tory m Prance. Extremely profiabte. 
Hgh terinotogy but 5ghf industry, 
foterophonol commeroed network, 
tegh . parlormance monogpnent. Al 
rrierances. W me Baa 1&3. Herald 
Tribune. 92S21 NeuAy Cedex France. 

INVESTOR. BUYBI SOUGHT for rnd 
sse New Yoric Stole Wmery/60 mies 
NYC Modern, production focAty/no 
vineyards/ tegwnol & mport tfcsnbu- 
tior /strong brand, unique tessory- 
/ierge aah tounc vatorne/mdodei 
beouhful home. Quotfied pnndpefi 
only. Ropond la P.O. Box 17VNY 
10914 USA. 

. * SAFETY FAST • 

When interested in o second VovH 
documerd, pterae get in touch with gs; 
LAMKCOjApdo. 195. 

ALTEA / Afeonte / Spain. 

USA PMANCE COMPANY pays 15% 
on ora rtynd occoura nores in US 

SI 000 denominations. No imumurn. 
Farwgn exrioiy service ovaiefcle. 
Gosh America rranaul Center, P.O. 
Bax 1987. Karaumee. R 32742 USA. 
Trietu 8C&48 STEH1 HSS. 

CYIUC 6 ACRE PRIVATE afond re- 
sort fbr sate. 1 mite from Tortola's 
Beef hfcmd Airport in the Britoh Virgin 
' ktonri. Contort: first Resort Coro., 
200 Madison A«e- NY. NY lOOflS. 
(212) 689*3043. [8001 255-3505. Trier. 

43123. 

EXPORT ASSISTANCE l 

Marketing lit US. r 

or wsot-veth export, wnt venture 

mikriiyMyUtM 


BUSINESS 

OHroRTUNITIES 


DRECT FACTORY Distributors 
high i 
wore-! 

5i©r7 . . 

sonic or visual cover knob • 

Box 1646, Herald Tribune. 
NeswBy Cedex . Fnmce. 


sportswear. 90 cenh/yiyd 
/yard for 


guofity. 60 cents/' 1 . . 

H41 piece rafts. ). bebermon & Ca, 
Morkef St- Pas 
(201) 779-466). 


NJ. 071*55 USA 


EOSKM GOODS hove proven 
record n US. British Co. wari 


investment m . _ 
shore. Contact; Box i .... 
long Acre, London, WC2E 9JH 


MACHMES A 


asnstrudton. All makes & 
Tronsmundi 1 
B-2241 Zoanel.l _ 

10 54. Tbc 3Z302TSANSM B. 


kerchief Fobory. Modern, up-todose. 
Capable of producing 40,000 dozen 
/week with nsrinwn nria C 


enter toevnent A rrioxatian 
pounds in Rons, Foreran capac 
come. Tri Paris 670 S 90. ev 
mesiofle, wR call you bock. 


»i u v^Bien lout. n. worm. 

76) 14 USA. Tri 214-438-2486. 


U-MATtC VIDEOCASSETTE 
20,000 used 5ony73M mixed 


MA 02178. 


hr. Far sample / analyte ca 
«J6B9, l>lT, 63 long Aero, London, 

wc^rn 


agent. PI 
Geneva 


Please contort- Telex 42 


stock &/or lease sepaotriy. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


OFFSHORE 
LIMITED COMPANIES 
BANKS 


AAfn iWi 
iruRiNuo 

From C75 

Mairig - T el ephone - Triex 
Seeehnri 


Armtlei_ Ready modear^sjteori 


expkmatory I 


Aston Company For ma tion s 
pi Tl, 8 Victoria St 


Dept 


Dougjts^Wf^Man, 


AS91 

Trite 627691 SWA Q 


UA MARKETING EXECUTIVE 
(Cosmetja, Foriion, Gifts) 


-i*.- 




& 


BUSINESS SERVICES 

if INTL 

3. beautiful people 

UNUMITH) INC. 

U.SA. * WORLDWIDE 

_ A complete wool & bunnes service 
a provnkog a ungue eoflecrion of 

a talented, rmatfe & muMnguai 

individuals for oU occasions. 
212-765-7793 

2 212-765-7794 

X 330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 
Service Hepresemotrve 
- Needed Worldwnde. 

0 

j OFFSHORE SERVICES 

UX non resident oomponfos with 
- " 0 ™** £ fi , ect?r5. bearer sham ond 

\ confidential bank cccbums. FuPbodi-up 

& support services Panomo & Liberum 
i. companies. First rote Confident™! 

Business Servio 
Assstance 

PARIS I -5 111 3SO oi is 

° Tfoer 220064 F «t ISIO 

FEB. AT HOME 

DOING BUSINESS IN PAMS 

B YOUSTYFIVnBTBtBUGGH>?Oe- 

jtfcsesnsasB: 

297 5600 tlx 215524. 

COMP»««IVE SERVICES, bus- 
. *"*«*■ occoumoncy, 
»|*tou^forim«. transfotfon. iKfoi! 
ca raid financial guidance, fosurona 
ato reinsurance GETTCO Geneva. 

72 r. de Lraname, CP.2881. 1211 
Geneva 2. Switeertond 

v 

TRANSLATION Alt LANGUAGES 
Gonmeraal. legal, technical TitBrory, ( 

oct^^ieofo^OT tiUnscSS. ; 

HONG KONG. YOUR TAX Shelter K 

ro-irivowjnB.cetner- nommees. hade 

SB- l ? ,d 0 » Jor Chma mraket, at room 

"SF? J^ABl^ Cornbll 

AtnusLEna 

USA Tri SJ5-561-0993 Thu 33242S. 

SKOAUmm UAA. busmesi. ^ 
OTW USA. ^ 14 ”*^ ^ 

’esawnuee 

CH-1 201 Geneva, fri (023) 4547 S T 

unanoal Y 

INVESTMENTS 

EARN 13.5% 

■*■*.** "teunniin S100000 m. S' 
Yrimmg m Deed of Trust ffaSn ^ » 
and by red esata m U.SA Seaxit 
tmd principal Goorwteed. 

\2b%- Thomas, US.VJ P fW 6 CH ] 


M 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


W Study 5 


dorfcr piano in London. We can 
qirote wdusivB package stepped to 
USA Joke this opportunity now to 
■nveymthawaldsfinea.mogndu- 
K»e pwno. Bosendorter London Piano 


^Regimi 


Centre. 38 Wtanore Sired. London 
W1H IDF. Tri 31-4 _ 


^ . . 01-486 31)1. Telex: 

298944 BOSKWtG 


:n 


TAX SERVICES 




torns. Pans bused US CPA 339 63 Dl 


by professional. Paris 563 91 21 


DIAMONDS 


~e 

fv£ 

ial 


DIAMONDS 


Your best buy. 

fine tfiamonds in any pnee iraae 
of towest wholesale prioes 
cfcect from Antwerp 
center of the diamond world. 
Full guarantee . 

For free pnoe list write 
-food u ni Goldanstein 
rfiamantexpart 

Estobfahed 1«8 

Prikaonstrool 62J B-20IB Antwerp 
Briaum - Tefc (32 5 234 07 51 
‘ IQub 


.'^l - - 


Leri 

I: 




OFTICE SERVICES 


IBelgjun^ near harbor and intenio- 
hond airport. Fu8 services: muKfev 
seoetory, malbox, kdex. leteco- 
pwr, ofticei mt conference roam, 
wcutive ond sales support eompony 
for motion and odmi mB r ut ion, faced 4 
K» matters, oS lands of computer 
jnrwces. ward processing etc. For de- 
Jms write to-. Monogement Assafonce 
Group NV LUbrekSngstraar 184. 
Bachem. Brinum or td?a23/2l8 7$ 
44 or telex 734Q4 MAGNUM B 


105 ANGEUES 


Executive 


addre s s. Thu ntaL 
services. 

Services 


Tetex; 472- 


are. our, c 


1671. 


GENEVA 


KARSTENS BUS4KSSS 
„ SBtVICB 



YOUR GaCVA OFHCE 

with 

SAS . LA . _ 

‘ servkw 




AAJ. SJL. • 3T£ 

C^nprierow r ® 5 £of servk» k 

Yefi 22736% 40 The 23342 ‘^3 #wk 


YOU* LONDON OFHCE - 

OffKTAM EXECUTIVE CENTRE 
womprriienaviB range el Mmeas 
London WI. 

ri (01) 439 6288 Tbc 2*142* 







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