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No- 31,769 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


U.S. Reacts to Japan Initiatiye 
With Doubts, Guarded Praise 


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WASHINGTON — U.S. indus- 
try and government representatives 
have reacted coolly and skeptically 
to initiatives by Japan to open its 
markets u> more foreign products 
while the White House: praised 
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
sone for las “courageous" moves. 

[In Tokyo. Japanese business 
leaders reacted positively to the 
market-opening measures but said 
they would not be sufficient to. 
dimmaic tensions with the United 1 
States, The Washington Post re- 
ported. 

[Yoshihiro Jnayama, chairman 
of the Federation of Economic Or- 
ganizations, or Keidanren, was 
quoted as praising the prime minis- 
ter for taking the lead in opening 
the Japanese market wider. Spokes- 
men for the plywood industry, 
..however, were strongly critical of 
the package, it supports eventual 
cuts in tariffs that protect the trou- 
bled industry. 


[Mr. Nakasone was reported 
Wednesday to be moving to estab- 
lish a special task force within the 
cabinet secretariat to implement 
the program.] 

In a television address Tuesday, 
Mr. Nakasone announced a three- 
year program to open Japanese do- 
mestic markets and urged Japanese 
to buy more American goods. The 
package is the seventh Japanese 
market-opening program since 
1981. Over this period the U.S. def- 
icit with Japan has more t hn «i dou- 
bled, from S16 billion in 1981 to 
nearly $37 billion in 1984. 

Key members of Congress said 
they did not expea the measures to 
deflect Congress from enacting re- 
taliatory legislation. 

"Much as I admire the prime 
minister, and his heart is in the 
right place, our patience has worn 
beyond the breaking point," said 
Senator Bob Packwood, Republi- 
can of Oregon, who is chairman of 
the Senate Finance Committee. 

Mr. Packwood emphasized that 


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PAGE 13 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


U.S. Warns of Backlash 
To Stymied Trade Talks 

By Axel Krause 

Iniernaiianal fJrrald Tribune 

PARIS — William E Brock, the 
U.5. trade representative, warned 
Wednesday that if his country’s 
main trading partners do not agree 
to start negotiations on liberalizing 
trade early in 1986, it could trigger 
protectionist measures in Congress. 

He said that, in the absence of an 
agreement, the Reagan administra- 
tion would be forced to start nego- 
tiations with any government mat 
wanted to participate. 

“We will be in negotiation next 
year with whoever wants to partici- 
pate," Mr. Brock said, adding that 
the administration would move 
ahead with other U.S. trading part- 
ners on “a bilateral, or some other, 
expanded basis." 

Mr. Brock’s renewed call for the 
negotiations, made at a meeting of 
businessmen in Paris, was expected 
to be tme of several femes oo the 
agenda of the annual twtvday min- 
isterial meeting of the Organization 
for Economic Cooperation ancHJe- ' 
velopment, which begins Thursday 
in Paris. Attending will be officials 
from the agency’s 24 member coun- 
tries, including Mr. Brock. 

He said preparations for the 
meeting were continuing and that 
he hoped negotiations would begin 



WDtiaiii E. Brock 

m January or Februaiy under the 
auspkcsof the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade, the Geneva- 
based agency that includes about 
90 nations. 

However, Wflly de Clercq, (he 
European Community commis- 
sioner in charge of external rda- 
(Continned on Page 2, CoL 6) 


“the passion is so great that even a 
badly crafted amendment could 
pass on (he floor" of the Senate. He 
said, “It has suddenly become a 
tidal wave." 

Senator John C. Danforth, Re- 
publican of Missouri, whose repri- 
sal bjll against Japan cleared the 
Senate Finance Committee by a 
large margin last week, likened the 
measures to a “package of prom- 
ises.” 

The chairman of the House En- 
ergy and Commerce Committee, 
John D. Dingell, Democrat of 
Michigan, said he could “perceive 
nothing that has changed." 

“The package as a whole is not 
very reassuring," said Roger F. 
Swanson, executive director of the 
Advisory Council on Japan-U.S. 
Economic Relations. “What we are 
looking for is a specific measurable 
goal with timetable and deadline, 
as well as dollar or percentage tar- 
gets of increased import levels." 

■ Brian Wynne, manager of inter- 
national trade affairs at the Ameri- 
can Electronics Association, said; 
“We’re not impressed with market- 
opening pronouncements, but rath- 
er in how that translates into ac- 
cess." His association represents 
2,700 electronics companies. 

The reaction from the White 
House was more positive. 

“Prime Minister Nakasone’ s 
statement is an unprecedented ap- 
peal to the Japanese people to em- 
bark on the path to free trade,” said 
Donald T. Regan, the White House 
chief of staff, who is with President 
Ronald Reagan in Santa Barbara, 
California. “We applaud his per- 
sonal leadership.” 

He added; “This is the first time 
that there’s been a freewheeling 
television statement by the prime 
minister in which he pointed out to 
his own people the need for them to 
change their habits." 

Mr. Regan, a former Treasury 
secretary, repeatedly praised Mr. 
Nakasone for seeking to alter 
“deeply entrenched habits and atti- 
tudes." He said that Mr. Nakasone 
“recognized that the true depth of 
this problem is (he Japanese buying 
mentality." 

But he also made it clear that the 
Japanese package “contains few 
new or immediate" measures that 
would open Japan's markets to the 
Americans. 

■ Tokyo Reaction Muted - 

John Burgess of The Washin&on 
Post reported from Tokyo: 

Conversations with a dozen or so 
people Wednesday in (he Ginza 
district in central Tokyo indicated 
that the public heard Mr. Naka- 
{ Continued oa Page 2, CoL 4) 



Ifai Ancynd fr— 


Mikhail S- Gorbacbev, right, welcomed Representative Thomas P. O'Neill, the head of a 
U.S. delegation, to talks at the Kremlin on Wednesday. At center is an interpreter. 

% 

O’Neill Gives Message From Reagan 



Untied Press International 

MOSCOW — Thomas P. 
O’Neill the speaker of the U.S. 
House of Representatives, met 
Wednesday with Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev and delivered a personal letter 
from President Ronald Reagan. 

Mr. O’Neill said that he was 
“tremendously impressed" with the 
Soviet leader but added that he 
perceived no major Soviet policy 
changes. 

Mr. O’Neill wb© is heat 


congressional delegation to the ! 
viei Union, said that Mr. Gorba- 
chev read the letter from Mr. Rea- 
gan at the start of the meeting, 
which lasted almost four hours. 
The letter apparently contained lit- 
tle new, however, because Mr. Gor- 
bachev expressed hope for a reply 
to an earlier letter he sent Mr. Rea- 
gan. 

. In \VasjiiggtQff, U^. . officials 
confirmed that Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz and Andrei ..A. 
Gromyko, the Soviet foreign minis- 
ter. would meet in Vienna on May 
14. They are expected to have pre- 
liminary discussions on the pro- 
posed summit meeting Mr. ~ 
and Mr. Gorbachev. No date 


been set for the Reagan-Gorbachev 
meeting. 

“We have discussed a wide range 
of issues in a direct and frank man- 
ner,” Mr. O’Neill said. “These ex- 
changes over arms control trade, 
human rights and regional issues 

Dutch-Soviet talks faO to alter 
decision of the Netherlands on 
NATO missiles. Page 1 

highlighted many significant dif- 
ferences between our members and 
their officials on these issues." he 
said. 

“We did not hear any major 
changes in Soviet policy with re- 
spect lo these issues." Mr. O’Neill 
said. 

Tass said that Mr. Gorbachev 
fold the U.S. delegation that “the 

e mce in the social systems, in 
eology of out countries is no 
for curtailing relations, much 
less kindling hatred." 

Accompanying the Massachu- 
setts Democrat on Wednesday 
were Rep. Robert H. Michel of 
Illinois, the House Republican 
leader; Representative Silvio O. 
Conte, Republican of Massachu- 


U.S. to Consider 



In Cambodia 


setts; and Representative Dan Ros- 
tenkowski, Democrat of Illinois. 

Mr. O’Neill described the Soviet 
leader as a formidable opponent. 

“About his ability, his talents, 
his frankness, his openness, I was 
tremendously impressed," he said. 
“There is no auestion that be is a 
master of words, a master in the art 
of politics and diplomacy." 

■ Groundwork for Summit 

Donald T. Regan, the White 
House chief of staff said that the 
groundwork and an agenda would 
have to be completed before Presi- 
dent Reagan would meet Mr. Gor- 
bachev, The New York Tunes re- 
ported from Santa Barbara. 
California. 

His statements were similar in 
lone to Mr. Reagan’s long-held 
view of summit meetings with the 
Soviet Union, a view that the presi- 
dent had appeared to be moving 
away from after he sent the Soviet 
leader a letter last month proposing 
a meeting. After Vice President 
George Bush delivered the letter. 
White House officials suggested 
that the president might be willing 
to meet Gorbachev without an 
agenda. 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

iVw fork Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration, in a policy shift, 
has declared that it would no long- 
er rule out supplying U.S. military 
assistance to the two Don-Commu- 
nist Cambodian guerrilla groups. 

The new policy, which was ex- 
pected to be discussed by Secretary 
of State George P. Shultz with lead- 
ers of the two guerrilla groups 
Wednesday, marks a departure 
from the hands-off U.S. military 
policy toward Indochina. 

A Stale Department official in 
an authorized statement, said Tues- 
day that although the administra- 
tion fell the Cambodian insurgents 
now had sufficient arms, “we do 
not think it is wise to forgo having 
flexibility on this point should cir- 
cumstances change." 

Another State Department offi- 
cial said: “We are not ruling miii- 
rary aid out if it would be the dif- 
ference in enabling the resistance 
io sustain itself. But there is no 
indication that we are close to that 
point now." 

State Department officials add- 
ed that the United States still be- 
lieved that primary aid for the in- 
surgents should come from others. 

Since President Ronald. Reagan 
took office in 1981, the administra- 
tion has repeatedly rejected ap- 
peals for military aid from Son 
Sana and Prince Norodom Siha- 
nouk. the leaders of the two non- 
Cormnunist guerrilla groups. 

But last Wednesday, the House 
Foreign Affairs Committee, by a 
vote of 24 to 9, approved a S5- 
mfilion authorization to the two 
groups as pan of the overall 5143- 
billion foreign-aid bill for the 1986 
fiscal year. The money would be 
Tunneled to the Cambodian groups 
by Thailand. The bill must pass the 
full House and Senate and have a 
matching appropriations grant. 

In response to what administra- 
tion officials called a new mood in 
Congress in favor erf military aid to 
the non-Coramunisi insurgents, 
and its own declared, policy of aid 
to insurgents in Nicaragua "and Af- 
ghanistan, the administration al- 
tered its policy. 

There are three Cambodian 
groups in opposition to the Viet- 
namese occupation of Cambodia 
and to the government in Phnom 


Penh set up by the Vietnamese af- 
ter their invasion in 1978. 

The most prominent and best 
trained is the Khmer Rouge, led by 
Pol Pot, the former Communist 
leader of Cambodia. Pol Pot has 
been accused of being responsible 
for the deaths of more than two 
million Cambodians from 1975 un- 
til the Khmer Rouge were forced 
into guerrilla warfare in 1978. The 
Khmer Rouge, said to number 
35,000 men. receives its military aid 
from China. 

The second-largest group is the 
Khmer People’s National Libera- 
tion Front, fed by Son Sarin, which 
has 17,000 guerrillas. The third 
group is led by the former Cambo- 
dian chief of state. Prince Noro- 
dom Sihanouk, and has 8,000 rebel 
soldiers. 

The Son Sann and Sihanouk 
groups have both received aid from 
C hina, Thailand and Singapore 
but less than that given to the 
Khmer Rouge. 

Son Sann and Prince Sihanouk's 
son. Prince Norodom Ranariddh, 
arrived in Washington on Monday 
and held talks at the State Depart- 
ment on Tuesday. They were to 
meet with Mr. Shultz oh Wednes- 
day. 

The administration had previ- 
ously opposed giving military aid 
to the Son Sann and Sihanouk 
forces on several grounds. State 
Department officials said. 

One was a belief that neither of 
those groups was able to fight well 
and, if given arms, would likely be 
destroyed by the Vietnamese. 

Another factor, officials said, 
was that members of the Associa- 
tion of Southeast Asian Nations 
were taking the lead in Indochina 
and that it would be wrong for the 
United States to become directly 
involved in mili tary aid, since it 
could weaken support for the Cam- 
bodian resistance in Third World 
countries and make it into a Viet- 
namese- American issue, rather 
than a Vieinamese-ASEAN one. 

The ASEAN members are Indo- 
nesia, the Philippines, Singapore, 
Malaysia, Thailand and Brunei. 

A third factor, officials said, was 
that Congress was deemed unlikely 
to want to resume military aid to 
Indochina, given its refusal of addi- 
tional aid to South Vietnam and 

(Con tinned on Page 2, CoL 4) 


financial 

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Secret Study Says Poles 
View Regime as Inept 


By Robert Gillette' 

Los Angela Tuna Senitx 

WARSAW — An internal study 
by the Polish government says that 
after nearly four years in power. 
General Wqjriecb Jan raehkT s re- 
gime suffers from poor credibility 
and an image of ineptness, in the 
He. which perceives 



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virtually every 
lish society. 

The study contends dial orga- 
nized opposition by the outlawed 
Solidarity trade union and. other 
groups is weakening and that Soli- 
darity is now “fighting for its exis- 
tence," although it poses myri- 
ad threats to the regime. 

But the report portrays the Ro- 
man Catholic Church aim Poland’s 
independent-minded artistic and 
academic communities as riddled 
with committed opponents who are 
fomenting “ideological and politi- 
cal chaos” throughout the country. 
It says church-state relations 
should be “reassessed" and calls 
for the use of financial pressure on 
intellectuals to compel their obedi- 
ence to the state. 

In addition, both the new official 
trade unions and a broad-based po- 
litical organization named the Pa- 


triotic Front for National Rebirth, 
which the government set up in 
1981 as a chann el of communica- 
tion between state and society, are 
said to be in danger of stagnation 
because neither the public nor large 
elements of the state bureaucracy 
take them sufficiently seriously. 

The 25-page report, “Dangers in 
the Social-Political Sphere in 
1985," was stamped “Confiden- 
tial." It was issued in numbered 
copies for discussion at the March 
22 meeting of tire Council of Minis- 
ters, the Polish cabinet. A copy was 
obtained by the Los Angeles 
Times. 

The report enumerates a discour- 
aging list of perceived threats to tbe 
regime’s efforts to expand its influ- 
ence over Polish society, from way- 
ward youth and resentful workers 
to anti -Communist clerks and in- 
tellectuals to subversive foreign ra- 
dio stations that feed the nation’s 
discontent. Not least among the 
regime's problems, the report says, 
is a lack erf clarity, and sometimes 
reality, in its own pronouncements. 

Singling out credibility as the 
major hurdle, the report blames the 
“insufficient growth of confidence 
in the regime and its credibility" on 
what it calls the "relatively low" 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


I 

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s > --'J 3 


INSIDE 


■ Tie trial in Taipei did not 
address the key issue: Why was 
Henry Lui murdered? Page 3. 

■ US. newspaper editors are 
dismayed at a court’s reinstate- 
ment of a libel verdict. Page 3. 

■ At least 20 villagers in El Sal- 
vador were slain by rebels dis- 
guised as soldiers. Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Cad C irahn and a group of 

investors Wd for control of Un- 
iroyal Inc. Page 9. 

■ Crude o3 production hovered 
just below toe OPEC ceiling in 
the first quarter. Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

E her Reeve has moved 
e mixed blessing of 
playing Superman to portray- 
ing Henry Janies heroes. Mary 
Blume reports in Weekend. 



Rauan 


Rashid Karami win boy- 
cott Lebanese cabinet, 
mee tings to protest sec- 
tarian righting. Page 2. 



1 >» Aaoaatod Piaa 


HANGING IN THERE — Danes in the town of Aarhus hanged Prime Minister Poid 
Schhiter in effigy Wednesday during another nationwide strike against a 2-percent ceiling 
on wage increases in both public and private sectors. Kit Mr. Schhiter stood firm. Page 2. 


A Monopoly on National Security 

Despite U.S. Probe, Arms Maker Won More Contracts 


By Michael Weisskopf 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — During the 
eight months that the Pentagon has 
been investigating charges of cor- 
rupt practices by General Dynam- 
ics Corp., it has awarded 55 billion 
in business to the weapons manu- 
facturer. 

That apparently contradictory 
practice illustrates the limits of any 
Pentagon effort to discipline a con- 
tractor dial holds exclusive con- 
tracts to produce strategically im- 
portant military equipment. 

Pentagon officials said they have 
little choice but to deal with Gener- 
al Dynamics, despite charges thatit 
has improperly billed tbe govern- 
ment for a range of expenses, in- 
cluding kennel fees for an execu- 
tive’s dog. As the largest U.S. 
military contractor. General Dy- 
namics Is the only supplier of such 
mainstays of tbe U.S. arsenal as the 
Trident nuclear submarine, tbe F- 
16 fighter and the M-l task. 

Critics contend that tbe fault is 
the Pentagon’s because it allows 
major arms makers to become mo- 
nopoly suppliers of weapons 
deemed vital to national security. 

“General Dynamics has a stran- 
glehold on the government," said 
Representative John D. Dingell 
Democrat of Michigan. “The Pen- 


tagon can't ensure that normal con- 
tract procedures are observed when 
it totally relies on the company for 
weapons that are necessary for na- 
tional defense. There appears to be 
literally no government control." 

Two recent Defense Department 
moves underline tbe difficulty of 
reining in powerful contractors: 

• Last week, the Pentagon an- 
nounced plans to recover SI24 mil- 
lion in excess overhead payments 
made to General Dynamics in (he 
past 12 years. Company officials 
had acknowledged improperly bill- 
ing the government for liquor, 
country club dues, a chili cooking 
contest, personal travel and enter- 
tainment. 

• in the month that it took audi- 
tors to uncover the overpayments, 
however. General Dynamics won 
$544 million in new military work. 

On March 28, the Pentagon 
banned General Electric Co. from 
obtaining new military contracts 
pending resolution of an indict- 
ment charging it with filing false 
claims for labor payments on a mis- 
sile warhead commissioned by the 
airforce. 

But officials concede privately 
that the ban will not cover militari- 
ly critical equipment of which GE 
is the sole supplier. Such equip- 
ment makes up the vast majority of 


GFs more than $5 billion in annu- 
al military work. 

Mr. Dingell chairman of the 
House Energy and Commerce 
oversight and investigations sub- 
committee, said he believed that 
the most effective penalty would be 
to break up monopoly supply ar- 
rangements and to sever contracts 
with companies that overbill 

In July, he urged that General 
Dynamics be replaced as the navy's 
contractor for $5 billion in work on 
two nudear submarines following 
reports that the company had given 
earrings worth S 1,125 to the wife of 
Admiral Hyman G. Rickover. The 
admiral, now retired, had overseen 
the submarine contracts at the 
company's Electric Boat shipyard. 

A clause in the contracts pro- 
vides for termination if the contrac- 
tor is found to have given gratuities 
to government employees in pur- 
suit of favorable treatment. 

The navy began an investigation 
erf General Dynamics in August 
and set up a special Gratuities 
Board to examine the case. As its 
investigators examined the compa- 
ny’s record, the navy not only re- 
tained General Dynamics as its 
contractor for the Trident and 
SSN-688 submarines, it also 
awarded $450 million in business 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 2) 


Middle Class Takes Flight as Gentrificalion Alters San Francisco 


By Dan Morain 

Las Angela Tima Service 

SAN FRANCISCO— After liv- 
ing 35 years in the same North 
Beach apartment, Frances Brando- 
lino and her husband discovered 
there was no longer room for them 
in this city. - 

A group erf lawyers bought the 
1 7-umt Victorian building in which 
they lived lo convert into offices. 
Unable to find a place they could 
afford in San Francisco, the Bran- 
dolinos ended up in the suburb of 
Brisbane, where the 5500-a- month 

rent still is more than twice what it 
was in the reni-comrolled North 
Beach apartment. 

It's not that the family is poor. 
Mrs. Brandolino, 62, part owner or 
a small North Beach hamburger 
stand, and her husband, a printer, 
earn about $30,000 a year. But the 
family simply could not afford 
apartments that in North Beach go 


for “$900 or $1,000 a month,” she 
said. 

The Brandolino’s story is being 
repeated throughout San Francis- 
co. where a decade-long building 
boom has transformed the city's 
skyline and its population. 

One example is Branddino’s old 
neighborhood, once a thriving Ital- 
ian district, later an enclave for 
beatniks, now home to chic restau- 
rants, high- rent apartments and 
increasing numbers of offices. 

! In short, San Francisco has be- 
come perhaps the most gentrified 
large city in the nation. Districts 
that a decade ago were blue collar 
are now ghettos for young urban 
professionals, who have spawned a 
consumption-oriented economy in 
which one highly successful new 
chain store mass-markets crois- 
sants through a sort of Yuppie ver- 
sion of doughnut shops. 

The change has created a new 
vocabulary: yuppification, crois- 


santification, Manhattanizauon. 
The city planning director, Dean 
Maoris, cads it the “bouiiquing of 
San Francisco.” 

Whatever its name, its result is 
spiraling housing costs, traffic- 
dogged streets, an exodus of mid- 
dle class and poor families, and 
declining black and hispanic popu- 
lations. The trend seems certain to 
continue despite a new effort by the 
dty io limit growth, restrain hous- 
ing costs and preserve neighbor- 
hoods. 

Some soda! scientists call San 
Francisco the “archetypal post-in- 
dustrial dty,” one with an economy 
based not on steel plamsor brewer- 
ies, but on silicon chips, corporate 
headquarters, international trade, 
banking, law. And its residents re- 
flect that 

Several other big dues— Boston 
and Philadelphia, among them — 
are -experiencing similar changes. 

(Continued mi Page 2, CoL 3) 



N»w Y« k Tm« 


Victorian town houses in Alamo Square in the western district of San Francisco. The 
average price of housing in the city is $129,000 — the highest in the United States. 



Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HF.RAT.n TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 



Karami, in Protest 
Of Violence, Plans 


To Boycott Cabinet 


United Press International 

BEIRUT — Prime Minister Ra- 
shid Karami angered by continued 
fighting in the southern port city of 
Sidon, said Wednesday he will not 
attend cabinet meetings until previ- 
ous resolutions to end the conflict 
between Christians and Moslems 
are imp le men led. 

Mr. Karami said this did not 
mean be had resigned from Leba- 
non’s U-momh-old coalition gov- 
ernment 

Shortly afterward, Salim al- 
Hoss, a former prime minister who 
is the education minister, said be 
was in Tull solidarity and complete 
agreement” with Mr. Karami 

The minis ter of tourism, Walid 
fiimhlar, and the minister of jus- 
tice, Nabih Beni have boycotted, 
cabinet meetings since the begin- 
ning of this year. Political sources 
said that Mr. Karami's move could 
lead to the collapse of the Syrian- 
engineered Christian-Moslem co- 
alition. 

‘Things are falling apart, and 
fast," saw one government source, 
who declined to be named 

Mr. Karami's decision, which 
was seen by some political sources 
as an attempt to pressure his Chris- 
tian and Moslem colleagues into 
greater flexibility, coincided with 
continued heavy fighting in Sidon 
between Christian militias and Pal- 
estinian-backed Moslem forces, 
and reports of an Israeli naval at- 
tack on targets around the city. 

Independent confirmation of the 
naval attack could not be made 
immedia tely, but in Beirut the 
state-run radio, quoting “reports 
from the region,” said that Israeli 
gunboats had fired on the Christian 
village of Maghdoushe, the Mos- 
lem villa ge of Ghariyeh and the 
Pales tinian camp of Am e! Helweh. 

Police said Wednesday's fighting 
in Sidon killed at least one person 
and wounded 14 others. 

The Lebanese cabinet decided to 
dispatch more troops to Sidon to 
help end. the fighting, but these 
troops were unable to get to the city 
because of inadequate equipment 
and objections by Mr. Beni to the 
use of government troops in Sidon. 

In another development, a senior 
Israeli official said Wednesday in 
Jerusalem that UN peacekeeping 
forces in southern Lebanon appar- 
ently wfll remain in their present 
positions for another six months. 

This assessment came aday after 
the Israelis were briefed by the un- 


dersecretary-genera) of the United 
Nations. Brian E. Urquhart, on his 
meetings with Syrian and Lebanese 
leaders on extending the mandate 
of the UN forces. It is due to expire 
April 18. 

■ Christians Denounce Israel 


In a political victory for Presi- 
sni Amin GemaveL SO of Leba- 


dem Amin Gemayel, SO of Leba- 
non’s senior Christian leaders is- 
sued a statement Tuesday 
denouncing Israel and stressing the 
importance of building a strong re- 
lationship with Syria, The New 
York Times reported from Beirut. 

The declaration was seen in Bei- 
rut as the most clear-cut statement 
of Christian attitudes on Israel and 
Syria in the last decade. It also was 
a significant gesture Lo Mr. Ge- 
, mayel in his struggle against Chris- 
tian opponents who have chal- 
lenged his authority and pro-Syrian 
policy. 

Hie statement was made public 
after a four-hour meeting that Mr. 
Gemayel had called at the resi- 
dence of Antoine Khoraiche, the 


patriarch of Lebanon's largest 
Christian community, the Maro- 


Christian community, the Maro- 
nites, near the port of Junieh, north 
of Beirut. 

Israel, the statement declared, 
was responsible for stirring up 
Christian-Moslem dashes in the Si- 
don area and emphasized Leba- 
non's links with the rest of the Arab 
world “with a particular emphasis 
on the strong bonds between Leba- 
non and Syria.” 



Dutch Aide, 
In Moscow, 
Reaffirms 
Missile Stand 


WORLD BRIEFS 



The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — The Dutch foreign 
minister said Wednesday that talks 
here with Foreign Minister Andrei 
A. Gromyko did not produce any 
developments likely to change the 
Dutch position on accepting U.S. 
medium-range nuclear missiles. 

The minister, Hans van den 
Brock, said be was “disappointed" 
in the Soviet reaction to what he 
raiiftH a Dutch “signal" toward re- 


Rights Spokesman Banned in Prague 

3k? eve of the arrival Wednesday of Sir Geoffrey Howe, the British 
foreign secretary, a dissident source said. , . . 

Th?wh«SSus of Mr. Hajek, 71,. who served as foreign nmustex 
during the short-lived “Prague Spring" liberalization period “ 
notknown, Lbe source said. But be is known to own a small cottage south 

°f Prague ... . . _ oianlnt trt nrevwit a 


ft? . 


possible meeting between Mr. Hajeic ana mt ™ 

German foreign minister, Hans-Difitnch Genscher, visited Prague last 
December. Mr. Hajek was permitted to stay home and was visited by an 
official of Mr. Genscheris party. 


r Bonn Recalling Ambassador to Libya 


during nuclear arms in Europe. 
Mr. van den Broek arrived Tue 


The maaring was called, report- 
ily, under pressure from Syria. 


edly, under pressure from Syria. 
The signers of the declaration in- 
cluded former presidents, all the 
Christian members of the cabinet 
and spiritual leaders. 

■ Israelis Threaten Shiites 


Heart Patient 
Identified as 


Tax Suspect 


Reuters 

STOCKHOLM — Europe's first 
recipient of a permanent artificial 
heart, in satisfactory condition at a 
Stockholm hospital four days after 
his operation, was identified 
Wednesday by his lawyer as a 
52-year-old businessman on trial 
for tax evasion. 

Bjorn Rosengren, the lawyer, 
identified his diem as Leif S ten- 
berg, who has been called “Mr. X” 
by some Swedish newspapers for 
his alleged involvement in complex 
financial dealings under investiga- 
tion by the police and tax authori- 
ties. 

Mr. Rosengren told the Swedish 
news agency Tidningarnas Tde- 
grambyra that he had asked for 
longstanding lax evasion charges 
against Mr. S ten berg to be dropped 
because of his poor health. 

“Stenberg has long been ill and 
has had two heart attacks," Mr. 
Rosengren said. “He has had a 
tough time." 

Mr. Stenberg, who had asked not 
to be identified, was given a plastic 
and metal heart by a 12-member 
surgical team led by Dr. Bjarae K. 
Semb in a 10-hour operation Sun- 
day. It was (he first implant of a 
permanent artificial human bean 
outside the United Slates. 

A spokeswoman for the Karo- 
linska Hospital declined to confirm 



, .* % -* - **v 
- - :.%* 

ji 


k 


Leif Stenberg 


the patient's identity, but said his 
condition was satisfactory and that 
be was feeling well. 

Swedish newspapers said Mr. 
Stenberg, twice married to the 
same woman, had built up a busi- 
ness empire beginning as a used-car 
salesman. 

. They said that police investiga- 
tions of his activities began with a 
series of raids on his premises 
throughout Sweden in 1976. He 
was charged with tax offenses in 
1978 but there has been no verdict 
in the case, partly due to delays 
caused by his poor health. 

Mr. Rosengren said the charges 
concerned alleged unpaid taxes of 
400,000 kronor (about 543,950). 

Mr. S ten berg’s American-de- 
signed heart, known as the Jar- 
vflc-7, is operated by an external air 
compressor. 


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(Continued from Page 1) 


Mr. van den Broek arrived Tues- 
day in Moscow fora brief visit with 
Mr. Gromyko to outline the posi- 
tion of the Netherlands on medi- 
um-range missiles. 

The Soviet leader, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev, announced Sunday 
that he had ordered deployments of 
medium-range missiles in Europe 
to be halted until Nov. 1. 

Die Dutch government has said 
that it would decide Nov. 1 on how 
many U.S. medium-range missiles 
it would deploy as a member of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion. The Netherlands had been ex- 
pected to deploy 48 cruise missiles. 
NATO decided in 1 979 to deploy 

THATCHER IN JAKARTA — Dancers entertained Prime Minister Margaret T ^ 

tbe^Xl sStJdid 

nations. Mrs. Thatcher conferred nearly two hours Wednesday with President Suharto. DO t ^ to reduce medium-range 

nuclear missiles in Europe. 

The other four countries desig- 

- • P O T7I * oated to receive the missiles. West 

cation of San b rancisco 

. . _ , . . _ . , ' . ' The Dutch said the number of 

fourths of the management and dustnes for employmenL Several missfles to be deployed in the Neth- 


Libyan exile, but said it does not plan to break off diplomatic relations. 

A government spokesman said the decision to recall Rolf finder s, the 
ambassador in Tripoli, was made Wednesday at a cabinet meeting that 
heard an Interior Ministry report on the lolling Saturday of Gebril d 
Denali 30. The spokesman said that Bonn was brazing in mind the fate of 
1,500 West Germans working in Libya. 

He reported that the gunman, Fahati el TarhonL told police interroga- 
tors that he came to West Germany in January from Libya intending to 
kill opponents of the regime in Tripoli but that he acted on his own with 
no support from the Libyan government The government of Colonel 
Moamer Qadhafi has denied any role in the assassination. 


Countdown Begins for Shuttle Launch 


CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (UPI) — The countdown began 
Wednesday for Friday's launch of the space shuttle Discovery, following 
weeks delays because of technical problems. Senator Jake Gam, Republi- 
can of Utah, is scheduled to be on board. 


Mark Hess, a spokesman for the National Aeronautics and Space . 
Administration, said the countdown, which includes about 1 1 hours of & 


The Gentrification of San Francisco 


built-in “holds," began on time. The launch is scheduled for 8:04 AM. 
Friday. 

The crew is to consist of Karol Bobko, the commander. Donald 
Williams, the co-ppot, Mr. Gam, Jeffrey Hoffman, Dr. Margaret Rhea 
Seddon, David Griggs and Charles D. Walker. They plan to spend five 
days in orbit and launch a pair of communications satellites. Mr. Gam, 
chairman of the Senate subcommittee that monitors the space agency’s 
budget is to act as a congressional observer and conduct a series of 
medical experiments. 


But here, the difference is in degree, technical jobs. Those jobs have the Migrations have moved much of elands dep^d ^ how . . . . _ ^ „ . 

San Francisco has experienced West salaries, with more than their operations to suburbs, where many sS-20 missiles the Soviet I ilTlSCrvatlVPS Aftk All) Chie f tO nft fflgfl 

each of these changes “earlier and . paying at least $25,000, mak- land costs less and where work; Union had deployed since June. wicuiwrmu rKs^m r 

to a greater extentthan any other in 8 San Francisco paychecks done largely on computer, can be NAT0 the Soviet Union WASHINGTON (NYT) — Conservative groups have called for the 
area m the country," said Kevin araon & biggest of the largest done just as easily. ^ dedoved 378 ss-20s bv June resignation of M. Peter McPherson, administrator of the Agency for 

International Development, following a stormy meeting with him last 
week. 


Israeli security sources said 
Wednesday that Shiite Moslem ar- 
eas in southern Lebanon “will 
erase to exist" if Shiite guerrillas 
attack Israel after its troops with- 
draw, Reuters said that Israel's 
stale radio reported in Td Aviv. 

“If Shiite terror continues, the 
Israeli Army will react in the stron- 
gest way with artillery and move- 
ment" into Lebanese territory, the 
radio quoted the sources as saying. 
“We will make it clear to the Shiite 
leadership their area will cease to 
exist if our settlements are shelled.” 

On Tuesday, a young woman 
drove a car laden with explosives 
into a group of Israeli military vehi- 
cles, ladling two Israeli soldiers. 


each of these ehang^s “earlier an H paying at least *z_>,uuu, mak- 

Lo a greater extent than any other San Francisco paychecks 
area in the country," said Kevin amon & the biggest of the largesi 
McCarthy, a demographer at the J ^ inencan cities. A few years ago, thei 

Rand Corporation in Santa Moni- Proponents of further growth vacant offices here Now 
ca, California. “Y “ e building boom merely re- 10 percent vacancy rate. 

Of the 13 hugest dries in the necls San Francisco's healthy RlII .min,., 

nation in 1980, San Francisco (cur- economy. Bob Hayden of the 
rent population 706,900) had the C^ber of Commerre called the 
largest percentage (22 percent) of downtown high-rise buildi n g s “ver- 
residents between ages 25 and 34, [“fj factories." And those factories 
the segment of the population mmi nold down the at/s unemploy- 
likely to have children. It also had mem rale to about 6 percenL . 
the lowest percentage of children _ May° r Dianne Ferns trin touts 
1 3 and younger. San Francisco to foreign investors. 

Of those 13 largest dries, San who “ turT1 finance much of the 
Frandsco was one of only two that construction. So far this year, she 


nan paying at least mak- lano costs less ana wnere work, Union had deployed since June, 

mg San Francisco paychecks done largely on computer, can be NATO says the Soviet Union 
among the biggest of the largesi done just as easily. had deployed 378 ss-20s by June 

American dries. A few years ago, there were no and now have 414, an increase of 

Proponents of farther growth vacant offices here Now, there is a 36. . 
say the building boom merely re- 10 percent vacancy rate. Mr. van den Broek said he told 

1 Z^iESJL b i? 1 i y But probably unique to San Mr. Gromyko it was inevitable that 
fh! Francisco is the wrarythat the dty *e Netherlands would take the 
Chamber of ^ Commerce c&Ued the may be losing its charm and diver- U.S. missiles unless the Soviet 
downtown high-rise buildings “ver- » cnarm «« aumbera are reduced, 

tical factories." And those factories * . . . _ _ ;f Mr 


Ai the meeting, the groups criticized AID polities in Mozambique and 
El Salvador, as well as the. agency’s $36 mHhon contribution to a United 


hold down the dtys unemploy- 
ment rate to about < . percent. 


“The danger is that San Francis- , **** Mr. Gromyko had chal- 
, will twcSne 9 Disneyland, a lea S^. ^ NATO figures. Or had 


co will become a Disneyland, a 


nttsiMJs* 

who in turn finance much of the here, said Paul F. Wartelle, a pub- g French-German Position 
construction. So far this year, she Uc interest lawyer who represented 

has been to London and the Far Brandolinos m their fight Forngn Minister Hans-Dictncl 
East on trade nrissjons. against eviction. G ® n ?S er °/ ^ 9®P^T m 


showed a drop in black population 
between the 1970 and 1980 census- 
es. 

A recent city report says two- 


Nations fund for population control. Paul M. Weyrich, director of the 
Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress, said Tuesday that nearly 
30 conservative groups had joined his call Tor Mr. McPherson's removal. 

Mr. Weyrich’s group charged in a recent letter to President Ronald 
Reagan that AID was violating a law passed in Congress last yea; 
prohibiting support for the fund nntil it ends its activities in countries 
that promote coercive population control 


East on trade missions. 

But while the city bustles, some 
researchers react with caution, 


thirds of the downtown work force wam ^ n 8 San Francisco as well as 
is white; and that whites hold thrt*- °^ er CI ^* es that rdy on service in- 


the Brandolinos in their fight Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich 
against eviction. Genscher of West Germany indi- 

For ihe long term, the San Fran- Tuadoy thil the Fnoch tni 

cisco Boanl of Superviiors is detas f ESSSSSII 

in, , new mnoTnlan for rfnnm. » develop a joint position 


For the Record 


!^nS^, Pian f0r d0TO ' on President Ronald fUamh’s pro- 
10m development. poscl for spncotosedSle de- 

fenses that could serve as the basis 
of a common European stance on 
Cf,. J«, C* - the issue, the Los Angdes Times 

DlUJUiy days reported from Bonn. 

~ In a written statement on Euro- 

tions against the church but says SJ w2S C ? ti ° n ' Il £' 
JL Genscher noted West Goman ef- 


Poles Find Regime Inept^ Study Says 


(Continued from Page 1) of the society, especially its youth.' 

effectiveness with which the gov- Infiltration is a recurrent tbenx 
emment’s “voiced declarations are In addition to subverting cfaildre 
implemented.” at summer camps, the church i 

“More and more charges are accused of conducting "ideologies 
raised that the regime is not able to infiltration of the scout movement' 

" it,. JilhU+ fn/rnflr fn i»Yi>arirl ilc mfluwiA 


A 24-hour strike Tuesday by 180 television reporters at the British 
Broadcasting Corp. forced the cancellation of several news and public 
affairs programs. The employees went on strike after the BBC refused to 
renew the contracts of seven senior reporters. (AP) 

President Ronald Reagan appointed Linda Chavez on Tuesday to head 
his Office of Public Liaison, making her the highest-ranking Hispanic 
woman in the White House. (NYT) 


China’s National People’s Congress unanimously approved on 
Wednesday the Qunese-British decimation on the return of Hong Kong 
to China in 1997. (Reuters) 

British police detained 20 anti-nuclear protesters Wednesday after they 
broke into the Alconbuiy military base in eastern England, used by the 
U5. Air Force, a Defense Minstry spokesman said in London. (Reuters) 
The Iraqi government accused the acting West German charge d’af- 
faires in Baghdad on Wednesday of interference in Iraqi internal affairs 
and ordered him to leave Baghdad within seven days. The diplomat’s 
activities were not described. (UPI) 


of the society, especially its youth." tions against the church but says ’ ™* 

Infiltration is a recurrent theme, the “state of implementation of po- g™*™ d l 

In addition to subverting children Iicy toward the church, and of I^?^ a D Uni ed Eur °P ean 

at summer camps, the church is church-state relations, should be 
accused of conducting "ideological mgmA' ... .... . 


execute its own decisions," the 
study says. Often, it continues, “re- 
ality is ignored when lades are set." 
And it adds, with a note of urgency, 
"The directive for today and to- 


Its ideas for dealing with Intel- F™* ip^cmicnt, it involves a 
Miinlr Qca mAfd pkamlit a French-German position as the 




whfle trying to expand its influence lectuals are more sharply defined. P™* uon “ 

in schools, faewri®, health and Coating shortly before this month’s 

t«-n«*;«T,t.i ™ th. r«,t™i non to which other interested Eu 


recreational fadh'ties." 

The rqxrrt stresses the need for 


"The directive for today and to- dealing openly and honestly with of the intelligentsia, the report indi- 
morrow should be credibility." the public cm the country’s serious cates that the government contem- 
Apathy, buck-passing and a feel- economic and social problems, plates rolling back the measure of 


Danes Resume Walkouts 

of the intelligentsia, the report indi- devd0 P’ teSiU<L 

cates that the government content- Both Mr. Genscher and the Ta PnAtAot 4 


Apathy, buck-passing and a feel- 
ing of resignation are said to afflict 
Communist Party bureaucrats, civ- 
il servants and economic managers 


alike, posing a “serious threat" lo prescriptions for Poland's ills, ex- 
the conduct of state policies. Po- cepi in regard to the two sectors of 


economic and social problems, plates rolling back the measure of French minister for external rela- 
“ihrough dialogue that is real, not freedom that universities and re- tions, Roland Dumas, indicated 
sham." search institutes gained during the last month in Brussels that France 

The study offers few concrete Solidarity era in 1980-81. and West Germany might cooper- 

prescriptions for Poland’s ills, ex- Die report says the regime ale in response 10 the Reagan im- 
cepi in rqgard to the two sectors of should “eliminate determined op- dative, but Mr. Genscheri state- 


To Protest Wage Agreement 


the regime ale in response to the 
lennmedop- dative, but Mr. Gens 


France Ratten 

cooper- COPENHAGEN — Tens of 

gan ini- thousands of Danish workers dc- 
s state- fied union leaders Wednesday and 


ccts con et 


land’s economic troubles, it contin- society seen as posing the greatest ponents, eroedaUy among academ- ment Tuesday was viewed as the went on strike again to protest a 
ues. have compounded these aid- resistance the regime: intellectuals ic cadres/ and that intellectuals clearest sign yet that (he two coun- two-year wage agreement imposed 


tudes and contribute to ^passivity, 
mistrust and sometimes justifiable 
fatigue due to living conditions” in 
the society as a whole. 

The authors of the study were 
not identified. But given the level at 


and the church. 


It recommends no specific ac- deuce on the state. 


should be reminded of thrir depen- tries 


pi yet that (he two coun- 
id conclude such an ar- 


rangemenL 


which it was reviewed, the report 
appears likely to have a broad in- 
fluence on the government’s per- 
ceptions of the tensions and divi- 
sions in Polish society. 

The study suggests the Jaruzelski 


U.S. Reaction to Japan Initiatire Is Mixed 


(Continued from Page 1) 


U.S. exports to Japan in 1984 “Given the importance the Japa- 


two-year wage agreement imposed 
by the government 

But Prime Minister Poul 
Schluter said that “the government 
will not move an inch" beyond the 
settlement which puts a 2-percem 
ceiling on wage increases in the 
public and private sectors. 

The walkouts Wednesday, fol- 


•Wisfr, 


newtoefior 


0rr ‘- spirsnir 


About 100,000 people attendeda j. 0ur p 
protest demonstration outside par- ® n uing confr&i 
hameni in Copenhagen. 17,0 wO 

The Danish Employers Assoda- j , trcctior 

non said that about 26,000 workers fro rr- 

m the private sector were on strike, |vin n w ' P‘ nn,r 

0116 “ 12 of total ^ T You °niy as r 
300.000 covered by collective ^ 
agreements. 041 

Airline officials said that Copen- , , ® c ^ e -©rat;ncx r 
hagot s airport was operating nor- ^Sq r nrr ,L- T? 
mally, with supervisors doing the hJ 
work of strikers. But train and bus "uOrB j 

service was disrupted. • 


■ *■ .Eli uu 


' 0r * WTrcierrt. j 


Takashi Kurat^ a machinery 


4 aiu, a uuiLiuuciy fo—j-- mnHc-t for II 9 ramus 5 externa; traoc retauons corn- 
regime has a deep sense of insecuri- company employee, was hard put 2, missioner. in a statement, “the ap- 

ty. which at times seems to verzeon to name one American oroduct in Many Japanese officials concede . . \ 


ECs external trade relations com- ^^^Jf^^ newrapa P ers 

government offices. 


ty. which at times seems to verge on 
absurdity. In listing social threats 
to youth and educational institu- 


to name one American product in ^ --k-— ~ »»»«» narent «h.vnw nf a cnhcmntiai “ mc «*P*«u agam 

his house. Nescafe coffee, be said, the buyToram approach ran have went uncollected and Denmark’s 

after some thought. No. it was onl y mmor ef f CCL 10 ^ view, spoose to the (temands for greater two biggest ports. Copenhagen and 


Garbage in the capital again 


tions, the report lists drug addic- pointed oul Nescaffe is Swiss. Mr. J a PM already is an essentially free access lo the Japanese market by Aarhus, remained closed, although 
non with “free summer camps for Kurata grinned. “I have nothing mar ^ e l- the EC “is a source of serious con- other harbors seemed unaffected. 


non wnn tree summer camps for 
children" sponsored by the Roman 
Caiholic Church. And it alleges 
that the church is engaged in a 
campaign to “take over the minds 


Kurata grinned. “I 
American," be said. 


Successful foreign consumer ceni - 


dock officials said. 


unaffected. 


There are millions more like the 8°°^ s * n -^pan are often luxury 
Kurata household in Japan. With a ^ tems — , French dresses, Italian 


Sweden. Some hospitals handled 
only emergency cases. 

The day of protest was called by 
leftist union shop stewards in defi- 
ance both of government orders to 
return to work and of national 
union officials, who are legally 
bound by the imposed wage settle- 
ment 




few exceptions, Japanese compa 
dies dominate the vast market foi 


shoes, Swiss watches. 

About 42,000 foreign cars, 2,400 


manufactured consumer goods of them American, were registered 


U.S. Warns of Backlash to Trade Talks 


The ultimate in condominium 
luxury at two of Manhattan’s 
most prestigious addresses: 


here. in Japan last year. The great maw (Continued from Page 1) 

Japanese people look for low the market remains firmly in the tions. told the businessmen that the 
price and high quality, said Mr bands of the locals. EC does not believe a date for the 

If vr x r + , " MAAAtl nHAMC rk/u«U Ka ral nAxn 


(Continued from Page 1) however, may not emerge until a no gnat surmises." and that in 

. told the businessmen that the summit meAt.no in Hum »“rpnaes, ana mat. in 


Trump 

Tower 


Kurata. If American goods meet 
those standards, people already ore 
buying them. 


EC Complains 


A law firm employee joked that serted Wednesday that Japan's lat- 


•nte EtucKan Community,*- S—SMSTiMfSSIiS: 


on an agenda 
squate interna- 


Americans would send some of pense of the EC, whose trade defi- 
their land and big houses, at Amer- dl with Japan last yrar amounted 


icon prices, everybody would buy, 
he said. 


J-Vy vv W. ican prices, evejybody would buy. to about $10 billion. The Assodat- ,^S t ^T ulies ‘ 

^ Efassraaws 

. ation in industrialized and 

Manhattan U.S. Eases Cambodia Policy SS5S£^ 

_ (Cootinoed from Page I) States into a new involvement in h 

WZCe Cambodia in 1975, whidh hastened Southeast Asia. disrasstons at the OECD meeting. 

X ICILv r-u .TWJlzl "Sr “ Sienea “Wh«. Ik. That meeting is viewed as the 


First Anmue and 38tb Street 


(Continued from Page I) States into a nev 
Cambodia in 1975, which hastened Southeast Asia, 
their fall to C ommunis ts “What the Uni 


States into a new involvement in 


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“What th*> UnitMf chra.M ,nai niceung is viewed as tne 
«, .-I .U vumnnuusis. WliaUhe UmtrfStatoS should ^ imp)rtailt ^ ^ wbclher ^ gation soured: 

Wanting by Hanoi founding of peaefto KdShiS and , “ What me&^e on reducing the 

Vietnam warned the United SoutheastAsia, and not the Japan «n agrees how to act to- OS- £*4g«drfcii «411 be deliv- 
atK on WpftnKHnv maeSnaML. reverse." the dailv said. S^ber to stimulate economic ered by James A. Baker 3d, secre- 


3ns. told the busmessmen that the summit meeting in Bonn next 
EC does not believe a date for the month of the leaders of the United 
negotiations should be set now. States. West Germany, Japan, 
Mr. de Gercq reiterated that the France, Britain, Can.irin Italy and 
immunity was “positively" in fa- the EC Commission. 
rc of the talks, but said the prereq- "As the OECD secretarial sug- 

site was agreeing on an agenda gests, there are elements for con- 
tilt around "an adequate interna- certed expansion of our economies, 
mal consensus" by participants, involving classical stimulation in 
eluding the developing nations. the fiscal area for example, and 
The trade negotiations would es- moving on reducing trade barri- 
blish a program to reduce grow- era." a delegate to the meeting said 
g barriers to trade and job ere- Wednesday. “Washington might 
ion in industrialized and get a date on the trade round, but 
veloping countries. But reaching only if other elements of the pack- 
consensus on the U.S. proposal age are in place. There are many 
11 be the subject of what UB. and unknown quantities." 

- sources said would be “tense” These are other key questions 
scussions at the OECD meeting, that wfll be posed during tne meei- 
That meeting is viewed as Lhc mg, according to OECD and dele- 
si important test of whether the gation sources: 
ailed States, Western Europe and • What message on reducing the 

pan can agree an how to act to- U.5. budget deficit will be deliv- 


previous statements, he has ruled 
out a tax increase. 


• What new commitments might 
European countries make to stimu- 
fabm; their economies? U.S. and 
OECD officials haw. ciivbmInI 


ation in industrialized and 
developing countries. But reaching 
a consensus on the UJS. proposal 


wfll be the subject of what UB. and 
EC sources said would be "tense” 


discussions at the OECD meeting. 
That meeting is viewed as tne 


OECD officials have suggested 
tnat West Germany consider accel- 
erating iax cuts it has planned in 
two stages for 1986 and 1988. Brit- 
ain and, to a lesser degree, France 
might adopt more expansionary 
monetary and fiscal policies, ac- 
cording to these officials. 

U5. officials also have urged Eu- 
ropeans governments to relax gov- 
eminent controls over financial 
markets, state-owned industries i) 
and subsidies. 


States on Wednesday against aid- reverse »’' Ac daily said. 


/"amkxvlln- - u a _. . _ wv .l -■ n . . KiUVTUl ill IU& ULA.U dJCd. WliZLU U** J Ul LUC UUUU1V «UU1 ICOQCT O! 

Franr^ * Fighting Reported includes North America, Europe the U.S. delegation? European 

The VietnaroeseArinv nSSnJ Cam ^ od i aa guerrillas with mor- and the Pacific. OECD members said they hoped 

nnan ^ rocket-propelled grenades According to the. OECD sec re- Mr. Baker would make a “forceful 

wmdrt abated Wainoday against a tariai and delation officials, who credible” commitment to reducing 

would nsk dragging the United Vietnamese attack on twoffienilla spoke on the Edition thwnot be the U A deficit, which c<nS teg 

i — 1 camps. The Associated Press re* identified, the elements of a plan reduce the impact of high interest 


growth in the OECD area, which tary of the treasury and leader of 
includes North America, Europe the U.S. delegation? European 


OECD members said they hoped 
Mr. Baker would make a “forceful. 


UNIVERSITY 


ported Thai military sources as say- for economic growth now exist rates and the strong dollar on the 
mg in Aranyaprathet, Thailand. The proposal would involve com- world economy, "The adminisira- 
Vietnamese troops, supported by tmtments to what one official do- tion has started, but more convinc- 


S*CH£tOHS MASTER 5 ORpOCIOMJf . 
Send a«a*M mum* 
tw a IrjM «v«fu*ttOn. 

5552W *Esnm umvotsm- 

K 3 B 8 Wa ms hm QMJlOt U 5 A 


Vietnamese troops, supported by tmtments to what one official do- tion has started, but more convinc- 
ho witters, attacked ihe Ptw Chun scribed as “concerted action" by mg action is needed, perhaps a tax 
and Rithiscn camps Tuesday and the United States, Europe and Ja- increase," a European delegate 
Wednesday, killing or wounding pan to stimulate thrir economies said. 

about 20 guerrilla defenders, they . and thrir agreement to reduce bar- Senior U.S. officials said Mr. 
said. Vietnamese casualties were tiers to trade and creating jobs. Baker’s opening speech to the 
not known. The agreements in this proposal meeting probably wouJd ^comaiu 


ddde_ S* 1 Ge nnan officials have 

ruled out speeding up tax reduc- 
rng ihe tions and taost EiSxSean officials 
< ^ ,vr " making commitments 

, sea^ to deregulate thrir economies. 

* How and when will Japan car- 
i.P“° ottt its maiket-cpenine and 

tr ^fe‘S. ber *|“ aiio, i ^ckaS un- 
veiled Tuesday in Toljo? U^., Eu- 
durag ropean and OECD sources said Ja- 
**8^ to liberalize its 
STS 2* > e on, y was a prerequisite for 
okws in their countries. 
S-' ^ who was nominated 

???« s ? crclar y °f fabOT, said 

satax Japans package reflected "real 
'legate courage^ butthat the U.S. would 
remam cautious” because, despite 
**£ E^«« byTokyotoIibcraSe 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL XI, 1985 


Page 3 



onedin 


UpsetsEditors 

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schedule 4'^ 

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nieauom saieifin, 

' Chief toResj. 

ve groups have called i? 
orator of thS; 
■wnn> meeting 

J policies in MozamW. 
Uig 1 ooncribuiloii tolfc 

1 M. 'WejTich, director J 
?** ,saiti Tuesday Zt 
orMr.M,Pher^ 
nt letter io Presuieni St 
wssed in Congress 

mas its activities in cua* 


•ision reponers at the ft 
m of several news md * 
strike after the BBCrchsa 
ers. s 

daCha-.eaonTuesdatick 
the highest-ranking ife. 

, HE 

unammoush appra*)- 
□ cn the return MHnisfe 


ita* . 
otesters Wednesday jit *•'* 
eastern England, usedh: 
nan said in London, the 
ig West German dmtt.- 
erencs m Iraqi iaierai-fe 
a seven davs. The dipiiE 
iB 


Nr* York Tuna Scran 

Washington — .Newspaper 

editors in the United States have 
expressed dismay that a UJS. a p- 
pcals court reinstated a libel verdict 
against The Washington Post in an 
action brought by a retired presi- 
dent of the Mobil 03 Carp. 

. The decision, handed down 
Tuesday by the US. Court of Ap- 
peals for the District of Columbia, 
was particularly troubling to many 
American editors, who have gath- 
ered here for their annual conven- 
tion. In recent years the editors 
have come to view U.S. appeals 
courts as bastions defending news 
organizations from the large libel 
judgments that have become al- 
most commonplace in lower courts. 

“It’s become an epidemic,” said 
Gene Roberts, executive editor Of 
The Philadelphia Inquirer. He said 
that about 21 tibd suits brought by 
public officials against news orga- 
nizations in Philadelphia were be- 
fore the courts. 

The decision Tuesday involved a 
Washington Post article that said 
William P. Tavoolareas, the plain - 
p/C, had “set up his sou," Peter, in 
"ihe shipping business. It implied 
that be bad used his position and 
corporate assets to benefit his son 
by steering Mobil business to his 
son’s company, Atlas Maritime, 
based in London. 

Critics of the news media ap- 
plauded the ruling, “We were quite 
overwhelmed ana pleased," said 
Michael P. McDonald, general 
counsel to die American Legal 
Foundation, a conservative public 
interest law firm that helps people 
bring libel suits. 

The editors said they were espe- 
cially troubled that a majority of 
the three^udge panel died The 
Post’s emphasis on “hard-hiirinjg 
investigative stories” or “sophisti- 
cated muckraking” as a relevant 
factor in considering whether a 
newspaper's employees had acted 
in reckless disregard of the troth. 

The term “muckrakers” was first 
applied to a group of American 
journalists, active at the turn of the 
century, who were committed to 
the exposure of industrial abuses 
and political corruption. 

Mr. Tavoulareas said he had 
“felt from the beginning that The 
Post either knew the story was false 
or published it with reckless disre- 
gard for whether it was true or 
false.” 

The Post's lawyers said Tuesday 
that they would ask the 10 full-time 
judges of the appeals court to re- 
hear a rguments in the case and 

overturn Tuesday’s, decision. 



TS. AttoeoMd Pres 

Tom Bradley gives the victory sign in Los Angeles- 

Bradley Wins 4th Term, 

As Mayor of Los Angeles 

living example of this priori- 
pie." 

With votes from Tuesday’s 
election still being counted 
Wejinesday, Mr. Bradley was 
ahead of his chief opponent, 
John Ferraro, by a 6/-percenl 
to 31-percent margin. There 
was a low election turnout 
among the city's 1,370,000 vot- 
ers. 

Many political expens think 
that Mr. Bradley, a liberal 
Democrat, will seek the gover- 
norship of California again next 
year. He was defeated in 1982 
by 52,195 votes out of 7 j mil- 
lion cast. 


Renters 

LOS ANGELES — Tom 
Bradley, who became the first 
black mayor of Los Angeles in 
1973, has won a fourth tom in 

office. 

Mr. Bradley, 67, led the cam- 
paign to bring the Olympic 
Games to the second biggest 
US. city last summer ananas 
been credited with rebuilding 
the decaying business center. 

He told his cheering support- 
ers: “Los Angeles has made his- 
tory. This city elects its leader- 
ship based not on color or sex. 
Los Angeles is the city of hope 
and opportunity, and I am the 


Taipei Trial* The Who, But Not Why 

Key Untouched Issue Was Government's Role in Murder 


DOONESBURY 


By Steve Lohr 

New fort Timer Service 

TAIPEI — Although two gang 
members have been convicted of 
plotting and carrying out the mur- 
der last year of a C5iinat- Ameri- 
can writer in California, key as- 
pects of the internationally 
watched case remain unresolved 

"Hie central issue that hasn't, 
been explained is the motivation, 11 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

noted one Westerner who has fol- 
lowed the case closely. 

Two members of the Bamboo 
Union, Taiwan's biggest gang, were 
found guilty of killing Henry Liu, 
who had written a critical biogra- 
phy of Taiwan's president, Chiang 
Ching-kuo. Mr. Liu was shot to 
death in the garage of his Daly 
City, California, home on Oct. IS, 
1984. 

The three-judge panel of the Tai- 
pei District Court handed down 
life sentences to Chen Chi-li, the 
leader of the Bamboo Union, and 
Wu Tun, who had confessed to 
bring one of the gunmen. They will 
be eligible for parole after saving 
10 years. 

A third gang member, Tung 
Kuei-scn, has been indicted but is 
believed to have fled the country. 

Those who watched the case said 
that in its verdict the court seemed 
to acknowledge, by not giving the 
two men the maximum penalty of 
death, that they did not bear sole 
responsibility for the killing. 

The court said Mr. Wu had no 
reason to kill Mr. Liu and that be 
was merely following the orders of 
his boss, Mr. Chen. And Mr. Chen, 
the judges said, had cooperated 
with the court and confessed. 

What Mr. Chen confessed was 
that he had followed the orders of 
the former chief of Taiwan's mili- 
tary intelligence bureau to have 
Mr. Liu killed. Thai far more sensi- 
tive issue, with the culpability in 
the Liu murder possibly extending 
to the upper levels of a government 
agency, is being handled in a sec- 
ond court case. . 



Chen Chi-li 



^s: 


Wu Tun 


Three former intelligence offi- 
cers, Vice Admiral Wang Hsi-ling, 
the former head of the intelligence 
bureau, and two aides, arc Being 
tried before a military tribunal on 
charges that they participated in 
the murder plot. The three were 
dismissed from the government in. 
January, when the charges became 
public, and are in military custody. 
Admiral Wang has denied order- 
ing Mr. Liu killed, although he did 


Query Didn’t Halt Awards to General Dynamics 


(Condoned from Page 1) 

to Electric Boat and SL15 billion to 
other company divisions. 

At the same time, the air force 
has contracted with the company 
forS2.3 billion in new work, mostly 
for assembly of the F-16. And the 
army, whose M-l tank is bull by 
Genoa] Dynamics, has given the 
company SI. IS billion in work. 

“Sometimes they’re the sole bid- 
der for work that has to be done," 
Defense Secretary Caspar W. 


Weinberger recently said of (he 
General Dynamics awards. “We do 
need these things and we need them 
quickly." 

Eleanor Spector, deputy assis- 
tant secretary for acquisition, said 
thai cutting off General Dynamics 
from new military work was “not 
cost-effective” To find an alter- 
nate supplier for such weapons as 
the F-lo, die said, the Pentagon 
would have to delay ddivety and 
equip a new company at costs of SI 
billion. 


Mrs. Spector said that, although 
competition is a worthy ideal in 
weapons procurement, it is often 
impractical to have more than (me 
supplier for expensive equipment 
bought in small quantity, especially 
if it takes years to develop because 
start-up costs are high. 

She said that monopoly suppliers 
can be adequately controlled by 
policing their claims and disallow- 
ing improper charges. 

There are dissenting voices in the 
Pentagon. The secretary of the 


navy, John F. r-ghman Jr., one of 
the most aggressive advocates of 
competition, said, “If you're single- 
sourced. your leverage is minus- 
cule." 

“We have never had a case where 
the price did not come dawn dra- 
matically as soon as the second 
source started producing,” be said. 

Mr. Lehman acknowledged that 
the navy has “no place else to go" 
other than to General Dynamics 
fqr gfpduction of (he Trideni, the 
Turnoffs nuclear-missile submarine. 


agree with Mr. Chen’s testimony 
that he had said the dissident writer 
should be “taught a lesson." The 
admiral also admitted that be gave 
Mr. Chen a photograph of Mr. Liu 
and his address. Mr. Chen, a 
known gangster, then was given 
training ny die intelligence bureau. 

StHL Admiral Wang insisted in 
testimony to the military court last 
week that the killing itself was sole- 
ly Mr. Chen's idea. “1 shouldn’t 
have to take responsibility,” the ad- 
miral said. 

The possibility that the former 
intelligence chief will escape any 
punishment seems increasingly un- 
likely, officials here suggest. Recent 
comments by senior government 
officials portray (be admiral and 
his colleagues as a handful of mis- 
fits. The comments also stress that 
associating with gangsters and kill- 
ing political dissidents are not gov- 
ernment policy. 

In response to questions from 
legislators, Premier Yu Kuo-hua 
said: “There are intelligence and 
security units in every country.- 
And in every agency or organiza- 
tion it's unavoidable that there will 
be a few misguided dements." 

Bui all the official distancing 
from the imjelligence bureau's ac- 
tivities does not explain what the 
motive; however misguided, may 
have been for the actions by Admi- 
ral Wang, who was a military secre- 
tary to Chiang Kai-shek, the Na- 
tionalist leader who died in 1975. 

Government critics and West- 
erners who watched the case closely 
are skeptical that there will be a fnU 
airing of the issues in Taiwan's 
courts, especially with the potential 
of further embarrassment to the 
government 

“These are show trials to give the 
world the impression that justice 
has been done," said Antonio 
Chiang, the editor of an opposition 
magazine. “But the government 
will try io close the case down fairly 
quickly, and it looks like Vice Ad- 
miral Wang will be sacrificed." 

By Taiwan standards, the open- 
ness of the trials have beat extraor- 
dinary. And much of the testimony 
has been an embarrassment to the 
government The local newspapers, 
which are government controlled, 
have carried thorough accounts of 
the proceedings. 

International and domestic pres- 
sures apparently have ensured that 
the court sessions would be more 
freewheeling than usuaL The U.S. 
government has demanded that the 
persons responsible for Mr. Liu's 
death be punished and that the 
facts in the case come out. 

In addition, the Daly Gty Police 
and the Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation are conducting their investi- 
gations of the murder. So any obvi- 
ous cover-up in Taipei might be 
easily exposed. 


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Page 4 


THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 


RmlbZ&ritmnc, 


Published Whh The New York Tinea ant The Washington Pom 


Gorbachev’s Real Agenda 


One month into what he must hope will be a 
[Wear reign as Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorba- 


20-year reign as Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorba- 
chev mils Pravda to give it the answers, and 
questions, of his first “interview" on foreign 
affairs. He is respectful, even hopeful, about 
the United States. Better relations are not only 
necessary but possible. There is nothing “in- 
born” about superpower confrontations. He 
looks forward to meeting President Reagan to 
give their relationship a “serious impulse" on 
arms control and a range of other issues. 

He is also shrewdly seductive to Western 
Europe. Other countries also count, he insists. 
America's allies should not take the economic 
bait of becoming “accomplices" in the danger- 
ous Strategic Defense Initiative. They should 
help terminate — note: no longer undo — the 
deployment of U.S.-buill Euromissiles. To- 
ward that aid, the Soviet Union will freeze its 
deployments a gains t Europe for six months. 

What a vigorous new performer, say the 
Kxemlinologists. Nothing new, cries the White 
House. A crafty ploy to split the alliance, says 
the Pentagon. Meaningful offers should be 
made confidentially at Geneva, says the State 
Department. These American responses are all 
true — and overwrought They neglect the 
context in which Mr. Gorbachev must operate. 
They confuse an American election, which 
concludes a contest for power, with a Soviet 
accession, which may mark the beginning. 

The expectation of a swift revival of Soviet 
leadership is understandable. Mr. Gorbachev 
is only 54 and the successor to three ailing 
septuagenarians. But he has been warily ele- 
vated by an aged Politburo. He leads a party 
and government that Pravda now denounces 
daily as unima ginative, inefficient, corrupt- He 
presides over an economy that has stopped 
growing. He confronts a formidable but 
hungry military machine, bogged down in Af- 
ghanistan and challenged by a U.S. buildup. 


new party congress and a new five-year plan 
by the end of the year. And untO then, he is 


surely scratching for consensus among the 
party bosses, the KGB, lie military command- 
ers and the budget makers. 

Small wonder that in this first pitch to the 
West he sounded like his predecessors — and 
their common foreign minister, Andrei Gro- 
myko. Of course Mr. Gorbachev has no new 
arms control plan or quick path out of Afghan- 
istan. Of course he balances cordiality to Presi- 
dent Reagan with a protective wink to Prune 
Minister Thatcher and Chancellor KohL 

Is be then saying nothing of interest at all? 
Not quite. To sharply tuned Soviet ears, he 
said on his way to the top that the ultimate 
guarantor of national security was not the 
military but the Soviet economy. In his first 
weeks in office he said he wanted a new pro- 
ductivity based on tough discipline in all eco- 
nomic sectors. And now he balances the prom- 
ise of austerity with a hope for better ties (and 
trade?) with America. It forms a pattern. 

Americans cannot yet judge Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s strength or policy. But as we are mature, 
we will reciprocate the cordiality, stop fretting 
about the fragility of the North Atlantic Trea- 
ty Organization and prepare a list of mutual 
accommodations. By the time he is ready to 
visit the White House, the Soviet leader should 
know what policy gifts are most desired and 
which he migh t expect in return. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Insecurity in Securities 


Another dealer in U.S. government securi- 
ties has filed for bankruptcy, sharpening the 
demands in Congress that these operations be 
regulated. The most recent firm to fail, Bevill 
Bresler and Scbulman Asset Management 
Corp. of Livingston. New Jersey, is smaller 
than ESM Government Securities, the Florida 
dealer that folded last month. But both failures 
will bring substantial losses to financial insti- 
tutions that were their customers. The govern- 
ment has charged both firms with fraud. 

Regulation cannot prevent fraud. Regula- 
tion ought not guarantee complete safety to 
the dealers' customers, for those customers are 
professional money managers and the govern- 
ment has no obligation to relieve them of the 
need to be careful about the credit and reliabil- 
ity of the people with whom they deal For the 
government to guarantee these dealers would 
come close to insuring financial speculation. 
Bui a modest amount of regulation, be ginning 
with registration of dealers, would be useful in 
a market that bas grown with astounding 
speed over the past decade. _ _ 

The government securities dealers used to 
be a tight little circle of experienced competi- 
tors who knew each other well But the circle 
has expanded with the rise in the U.S. federal 
debt, because federal debt — in the form of 
Treasury securities — is the dealers' stock in 
trade. The growth of this market is one conse- 


quence of President Reagan's budget deficits. 

E. Gerald Corrigan, the president of the 
New York Federal Reserve Bank, recently told 
a congressional committee that it is not un- 
common for more than $200 billion in govern- 
ment securities to change hands in one day of 
trading. In comparison, the federal budget is 
$16 billion a day and the gross national prod- 
uct, the total output of goods and services, is 
$10.5 billion a day. As one would expect in a 
boisterous and rapidly growing market, some 
securities firms are las sound than others. 

The victims of fraud and failure are usually 
incautious money managers simply looking for 
the highest possible returns. They know that 
Treasury securities are risk-free, and they of- 
ten assume — incorrectly — that the dealers 
therefore must be risk-free as well. 

As Mr. Corrigan told Congress, it is the 
professional money managers’ job to know a 
lot about the firms with which they do busi- 
ness. Much of these dealers' business is bor- 
rowing and lending with government securities 
as collateral. While a high rate offered may be. 
the sign of a successful comped tor, it may also 
be the sign of a desperate dealer sliding into 
serious trouble. It is up to investors to distin- 
guish between the two. The government is 
going to have to set some rules for this game. 
But it has no duty to protea careless players. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Balancing the Budget Cuts 


President Reagan and Senate Republican 
leaders have reached significant compromises 
on (he federal budget, but much more give and 
take will be necessary. No one can quarrel with 
the intent of the spending reductions — to 
reduce the federal budget deficit. Legitimate 
questions can be raised, however, as to wheth- 
er the elderly, those near the poverty level and 
local governments should bear tin brunt of 
increased military spending. 

— The Seaule Post-Intelligencer. 


Japan’s Promise on Trade 


Doubts remain whether die immediate mar- 
ket-opening measures announced Tuesday can 
really reduce Japan's trade surpluses. Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone stated that “Ja- 
pan will cany out its responsibilities and roles 
commensurate to its economic power." But if 
he does not pin down the outline of his “action 
program" and put a certain amount of meat on 
separate measures by the time of the May 
summit of industrialized nations, he may be 
strongly criticized by other countries for 'vio- 
lating a public promise.' " 

— The Yomiuri Shimbun (Tokyo). 

The latest Japanese package is barely 
enough to rein in the American Congress, 


which is threatening surcharges on imports 
from Japan. Even if the Japanese government 
were totally committed to trade disarmament 
— and what government is? — the Japanese 
economic system would not open op to im- 
ports in a way that could be expected to 
eradicate its $37 billion surplus on trade with 
America. But Japan is not the only trade 
offender, even in American eyes: they can see 
protectionism firing in Europe too. 

The worst resolution of the dispute between 
America and Japan would be the construction 
of new tariff walls in the United States. The 
second worst would be the opening ol private 
two-way trade channels between the free 
world’s two most powerful economies. 

— The Times (London). 

The United Slates has a tendency to define 
everything according to its own methods and 
frameworks and label as unfair anything that 
is different. It is important for Japan to dearly 
separate what should be emphasized as its own 
unique systems and customs and what should 
be reformed so that it is more acceptable 
internationally. Even if Japan opens its doors 
with the intention of taking the lead in defend- 
ing free trade, imports probably will not in- 
crease if foreign manufactured goods lack at- 
tractive price and quality. It is necessary for 
Japan to repeat this obvious idea. 

— The Asahi Shimbun (Tokyo). 


FROM OUR APRIL 11 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Envoy Is Booled for Portugal 
LOS ANGELES — Governor Henry T. Gage 
began his diplomatic career when he took the 
oath as Minister to Portugal gathered his IS 
new pair of bools and starred for Lisbon. 
When his appointment was announced, a Lon- 
don tailor who makes a specialty of togging 
out diplomats sent a circular idling Mr. Gage 
he must get a diplomatic dress, consisting of a 
pair of knickerbockers and silk stockings and a 
□eat pair of ladylike slippers. He threw the 
diagrams of the Lord Fauntleroy attire in the 
wastebasket. Then be sent out to his boot- 
maker and had 18 pairs of new boots made. 
His friends had been wondering if diplomatic 
life would at last induce him to abandon his 
life-long habit of wearing high-topped boots. 


1935: Goering Marries Stage Actress 
BERLIN — While 200 airplanes roared over 
the capital hands played, crowds cheered and 
guards of honor presented arms. General Her- 
mann Goering. Minister of Air and Prussian 
Prime Minister, was married [on April 10] to 
Frau] ein Emmy Sonnemann. blonde star of 
the Prussian State Theater. Reichsfuhrer Hit- 
ler was one of the two best men. General 
Goering, resplendent in tbe uniform of the Air 
Force, drove to his bride's home at noon. The 
couple then went to the Town Hall in a flower- 
decorated automobile following a detachment 
of General Goe ring’s special police on motor- 
cycles. Heir Hiller and Herr Kerri. Speaker of 
the Prussian Diet, were in the first car. which 
was followed by the FQhrer’s bodyguard. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1953-1982 


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*- 1985. International Herald Tribune. All nghis reserved. felaSSI 


Mr. Gorbachev’s real agenda is not yet Ge- 
neva, or Washington, or even that most invit- 
ing tourist lure, Beijing. He is maneuvering to 
get his close associates onto the Politburo and 
to build his own power base. Throughout the 
Soviet Union, party meetings report discussing 
“personnel policy in the tight of the March 
plenum,” the secret gathering that elected Mr. 
Gorbachev leader. He is building toward a 



'Walls Against Japan’: 
Belatedly, a Warning 




jllCl" “ 


,Fnrtf‘ 


By Joseph Kraft 


W ASHINGTON — Inscrutable 
Oriental mysteries such as the 
Tea Ceremony and the No Drama 
come to mind when people speak of 
“cultural obstacles" to economic co- 
operation with Japan. But such mun- 
dane thi n g s as patterns of spending 
and savings are chiefly involved. 

Japanese habits are such (hat in 
order to retaliate for Japanese trade 
restrictions the United Slates first has 
to shoot itself in the foot — ; which 
«plains why the Reagan administra- 
tion has suddenly rallied against the 


ami- Japanese mood in Congress. 

Consider. fireL, savings. Japan is 
not a consumer society in the Ameri- 
can fashion. There are practically no 
credit cards. Nor are there consumer 
loans, with tax breaks, to ease the 
buying of homes or cars or gadgets. 


Squeezing the Budget’s Wrong End 


N EW YORK — In dealing with 

Con cress. Ronald Reagan is 


IN Congress, Ronald Reagan is 
as effective as any president since 
Franklin Roosevelt — and FDR 
always had Democratic majorities. 
Mr. Reagan’s “budget compro- 
mise" with Senate Republican lead- 
ers looks like another nice piece of 
legislative footwork — although it 
is medicine for the wrong disease, 
and its political consequences re- 
main to be seen. 


By Tom Wicker 


The new Reagan-Republican 
udget package, which the White 


budget package, which the White 
House says Mr. Reagan is prepared 
to fight for. would cm projected 
spending in fiscal 1986 by S52 bil- 
lion; over the next three years, 
spending would go down by nearly 
$300 billion. If ail projections hold 
up, that would reduce the federal 
deficit to “only” $99.7 billion in 
fiscal year 1988. 

In that three-year period, howev- 
er. the Reagan- Republican package 
would mount a direct assault on 
middle-class benefit programs. It 
would restrict cost-of-living bene- 
fits for Social Security recipients, 
violating one of ' Mr. Reagan's 
strongest campaign promises; raise 
the cost of Medicare benefits to the 
recipients: and cut or e limina te 
farm price supports, student loans, 
crop and flood insurance, soil and 
water conservation programs. Na- 
tional Institute of Health grants, 


the Export-Import Bank and the 
Small Business Administration. 


Small Business Administration. 

The package would attack post- 
New Deal government across the 
board. Mass-transit aid, urban de- 
velopment grants and other pro- 
grams of importance to the cities 


would be reduced or canceled; Am- 
trak, rural electrification, the Job 
Corps, general revenue sharing and 
economic development programs 
would be killed. 

Bui these deep spending cuts 
only partly attack the fundamental 
causes of the deficit The chief cul- 
prit is Mr. Reagan’s 1981 tax reduc- 
tion; Donald Regan, the former 
Treasury secretary who is now 
White House chief of staff, has esti- 
mated that the tax cut causes $135 
billion of the prospective S213-bil- 
lion deficit this year. Yet no in- 
crease in revenues is proposed in 
tbe Reagan-Republican package. 

A second major cause of the defi- 
cit is increased military spending, 
which has risen by 60 percent in the 
Reagan years, against only a 28- 
percent increase in nonmiliiaxy 
spending. But the compromise 
is aimed primarily at rela- 
tively innocent — and in many 
cases effective — social programs. 
It would cut Mr. Reagans request- 
ed 6-percent nnmml increase for the 
Pentagon to 3 percent (after infla- 
tion) in each of the next three years, 
saving $70 billion; but it would cut 
□onnulitary programs more than 
twice as much, by $152 billion. 

A third big factor in the deficit is 
rising entitlements spending. Mr. 
Reagan and tbe Republican sena- 
tors deserve credit Tot recognizing 
this difficult fact, even in violation 
of the president's campaign prom- 
ises not to cut Social Security. Nev- 
ertheless, cost-of-living reductions 


Questions on Past Accords 
Hang Over Geneva Talks 


By John C Ausland 


O SLO — After taking a negative 
altitude toward arms control for 


V/ altitude toward arms control for 
many years. President Reagan has 
adopted a more positive tone. At the 
same time he publicly accuses the 
Russians of cheating. It is not easy to 
see how these approaches can be rec- 
onciled. In fact, the question of Sovi- 
et compliance with past arms control 
agreements has become a roadblock 
in the way of progress in Geneva. 

Paul Nitze, who is experienced in 
negotiating with the Russians, stated 
the Reagan administration’s arms 
control goals in a speech Feb. 20 in 


Philadelphia. He said the objective 
during the next 10 years is “a radical 


during the next 10 years is “a radical 
reduction of the power of existing 
and planned offensive nuclear arms , 
after that would come a transition to 


The most serious (AS. 
charge deals with a 
gigantic Soviet radar 
being built in Siberia 


a greater reliance on nonnuclear de- 
fenses against nuclear arms. 

Before the Nitze speech, the White 
House made public on Feb. I an 
indictment of alleged Soviet noncom- 


p lance with arms control agree- 
ments. Critics say this report to Con- 


ments. Critics say this report to Con- 
gress was engineered by opponents of 
arms control In any case, the Reagan 
report is now a hurdle that must be 
cleared before any arms conLrol 
agreement can be concluded. 

Up to now, the United States has 
monitored Soviet compliance with 
arms accords by using “national tech- 
nical means of verification.” This 
meant employing satellites and dec- 
ironic installations outside, or over, 
tbe Soviet Union in order not to 
arouse the anxiety of Soviet leaders 
about the fragility of their regime. 

These sources produce a flood of 
information. But while it is one thine 
for American leaders to be convinced 
that the Russians are cheating, it is 
another to persuade Kremlin leaders 
to do something about it. The 
groundwork for this task bas in the 
past been left mostly to the Soviei- 
American Standing Consultative 
Commission, which will be meeting 
this month and next in Geneva. 

The commission was set up at the 
lime of the signature of the SALT-1 
agreements in 1972. It usually meets 
every spring and fall for about two 
months. Although some information 


require regular reports from the pres- 
ident about Soviet compliance with 
arms control pacts. 

Although President Reagan’s Feb. 
1 report contains considerable evi- 
dence of questionable Soviet behav- 
ior, the significance of the various 
allegations has to be weighed. The 
most serious is unquestionably a gi- 
gantic radar installation being built 
at Krasnoyarsk in Siberia. Mr. Rea- 
gan's report flatly maintains that this 
radar “constitutes a violation of legal 
obligations under tbe Anti-Ballistic 
Missile Treaty." 

The Krasnoyarsk radar is only the 
most advertised of the developments 
that have convinced tbe Reagan ad- 
ministration that the Russians may 
be preparing to renounce tbe ABM 
treaty and deploy a nationwide ABM 
system. It should be no surprise that 
the Russians accuse (he Reagan ad- 
ministration of the same thing — in 
fact, of seeking to develop a first- 


strike nuclear capability in the 1980s. 

Even critics or the Reagan admin- 
istration’s arms control policy con- 
cede that doubts about the Krasno- 
yarsk radar must be resolved before 
progress con be made on new agree- 
ments. But they say the president is 
wrong in making public his charge of 
Soviet cheating. 

There can be little doubt Lhat tbe 
administration fully intends to do 
something about wfaat it calls “the 
erosion in the Anti-Ballistic Missile 
Treaty regime.” Secretary of State 
George Shultz code the matter up 
with Foreign Minister Andrei Gro- 
myko in Geneva in January. Mr. 
Gromyko seems to have just listened. 


American officials say they have 
not given up on getting the Russians 
to "improve their behavior" and thus 


make progress on new agreements 
possible. Yet if the Russians are un- 
able to persuade the Americans that 
the Krasnoyarsk radar is intended for 
tracking space vehicles — and not 
incoming missiles — it is hard to 


imagine them dismantling iL 
If compliance issues are : 


about the group bas been published, 
its proceedings nave been kept secret. 


its proceedings have been kept secret. 
What little the commission has ac- 
complished in recent years is largely 
due to the fact that it has remained 
out of the spotlight. 

There are sharp differences within 
the Reagan administration on the ex- 
tern of ine commission's accomplish- 
ments. The 1982 edition of “Arms 
Control and Disarmament,” pub- 
lished by the U.S. Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency, says: “Both 
(be United States and tire Soviet 
Union have raised a number of ques- 
tions in the Commission relating to 
each side's compliance with the 
SALT-1 agreements. In each ease 
raised h\ (lie United Stales, (he Sovi- 


If compliance issues are not re- 
solved before too long, tbe stage will 
be seL for a showdown withm the 


Reagan administration regarding 


arms control. Meanwhile, a large 
chunk of the money devoted to the 


chunk of the money devoted to the 
president’s Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive goes to the development of an 
American land-based system. A test 
conducted last year demonstrated 
that a nonnuclear missile could inter- 
cept an incoming warhead. 

While the space aspects of the SDI 


are dramatic and important, the key 
derisions on these will not be made 
until the 1990s. The way things are 
going, the question of going ahead 
with an American land-based ABM 
iv hkek to. arise *uxmer. 


for the elderly over a three-year 
period, coupled "with rising charges 
for Medicare benefits, will be so 
hard to achieve that they cast doubt 
on even the president's ability 
to push through this defidi-reduc- 
rion package. 

It is not just the elderly recipients 
who will resist; their children fear 
they may have to make up the dif- 


Ori the contrary, ordinary Japanese 
make purchases the old-fashioned 
way. They save the money. 

Major banks, with their huge de- 
posits, are closely regulated by gov- 
ernment, as a means of guiding the 
development of industry. Low-inter- 
est loans are available to businesses 
favored by the bureaucrats in the 
Finance Ministry or the Ministry of 
International Trade and Industry. 


Terence from their own pockets. 
Only at a time of $200 billion 


Only at a time of $200 billion 
deficits — which, ironically, be did 
more than anyone to create — 
would the kind of broad assault on 
government that Mr. Reagan now 
projects be remotely possible; and 
he has shrewdly taken advantage of 
the opening. Even the budget 
“compromise” appears to have 
been calculated; not until enough 
senators had sworn to cut domestic 
programs if only Mr. Reagan would 
agree to cut military spending did 
he “cave in” — accepting, at that, 
substantially smaller reductions 
than the senators wanted. 

Geariy, this determined presi- 
dent is gambling that his conserva- 
tive vision of a government largely 
removed from a major social role is 
now more acceptable to tbe public 
than the liberal Democratic ap- 
proach that has dominated tbe last 
half-century. 

That is a riverboat gamble in- 
deed, since there is little evidence 
that Americans want to reduce the 
deficit by cutting programs of bene- 
fit to themselves, and since Mr. 
Reagan must know by now that to 
tinker with Social Security benefits 
is to play with political fire. 

The New York Times. 


Manv Japanese acknowledge that 
the dollar should trade at a little less 
than 200 yen. Instead, it has been 
buying upward of 250 yen. 

American victims of the overpriced 
dollar naturally complain; they are, 
after all losing business, jobs and ; 
farms. They say that, unless Japan 
opens its markets, the United States 
must retaliate by closing its markets 
to Japanese goods. 

A fortnight ago the Senate voted 
92-0 for a resolution embodying such 
action. Before Easter, the Senate Fi- 
nance Committee bad voted out a bill 
translating tbe resolution into legisla- 
tion- The administration, at first, 
tried to play it cute. The 92-0 vole , 
meant the White House was not i’ 
fighting the resolution. The strategy ■ 
was to use the resolution as a stick to 
beat concessions out of the Japanese. 

But the indulgence of Japan-Gashing 
produced a negative outcome. 

Tuesday, in Tokyo, the Japanese 
concluded a review of openings for 'j 
American trade. The review offered 
little except promises. But it was ac- 
companied by an impassioned, na- 
tionally televised statement from ; 
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone. . 
Mr. Nakasone appealed “to you the . 


i iu unuuirn i iauv bum uiuwi-j. — . . ■». . 

Since Japan is a country almost people” and to the industrial car- 

a _r .! nl*’’ m Vrmf fnrHpn-msnuf.ir- 


naked of natural resources, the bu- 
reaucrats inevitably favor industries 
that can export, thus earning the for- 
eign currency the country needs to 
buy vital raw materials. The bureau- 
crats also tend to defend against out- 
side competition for the clients of the 
ruling Liberal Democratic Party — 
notably farmers and businessmen. 

One consequence of this is the fa- 
bled efficiency of Japanese manufac- 
turers. Another consequence is the 


hirers. Another consequence is the 
export of Japanese savings to coun- 
tries that offer higher interest rates 
and better returns on investment 
During the past few years the Unit- 
ed States has been the chief beneficia- 
ry. Japanese investments, mainly in 
U.S. government securities, amount- 


cles’’ to "accept foreign-man of ac- ; 
tured products in order to make your £ , 
own life richer and more affluent” 

That did nothing to assuage U.S. 
congressional critics of Japan. But it 
conveyed Mr. Nakasone's sense of ; 
impotence in a desperate situation. 
The Reagan administration, once so ;• 
passive in opposing shots at Japan, 
rallied to the alarm bell ) 

White House officials and the - 
State Department praised the Jana- ; 
nese statement as “commendable.” ■ 
Vice President George Bush said ; 
those who wanted to build “walls 
against Japan . . . would end up with • 
a cliff, and we'd find ourselves falling 
straight down into chaos.” 


O.S. government securities, amount- For once the vice president did not . — 
ed to about $40 billion in 1984. The exaggerate. American efforts to pun- 
“crowding in" of Japanese money has ish Japan inevitably boomerang. 
made it easier for the United States to Such efforts not only raise the cost of 
finance its S200-biliion deficits with- goods, they also work to increase in- jQH 
out "crowding out” credit for Ameri- terest rates in the United States. 
can consumers and business. Higher rales slow U.S. economic *** 

At the same time, the surge of growth and raise the danger of a 
Japanese investment in die United default on the billions owed to U.S. 




Japanese investment in die United default on the billions owed to U.S. <£ 
States has contributed enormously to banks by Latin American countries. ^ 
the strengthening of the dollar So in fighting the Japan-bashers, the, v 
against other currencies. And tbe su- administration has come to its senses X 
per-doUar, of course, makes many — and not a moment too soon. - % 
foreign exports more attractive. Los Angeles Times Syndicate. ft 












et activity in question has either 
ceased or additional information has 
allayed U.S. concern.” 

But critics of the SALT accords 
consider such statements whitewash- 
es. Richard Perie. assistant defense 
secretary for international security 
policy, told a Senate committee last 
year that “serious compliance prob- 


lems have generally not been resolved 
by the SCC or in any other manner.” 


by tbe SCC or in any other manner.” 
Those who support this view man- 


aged years ago to get Congress to 
require regular reports from the pres- 



ort* | 

assi 






"See? I toldyou this would work — already, Gorbachev wants a summit!’ 


S«.lcfL 






Sudan: Symbol of an Indebted Africa & *j 


N EW YORK — The economic 
and financial problems that led 


By Henry F. Jackson 


last week to the overthrow of the 

Sudanese president, Gaafar Nimeiri, averaged 80 percent to 90 percent 


are hardly unique in Africa. Several 
of America's allies among the conti- 
nent’s 50 independent states are beset 
by debt problems huge enough to 


eclipse drought and famine as Afri- 
ca's biggest disaster. 


ca's biggest disaster. 

Long before Mr. Nimeiri em- 
barked on his fateful trip to Washing- 
ton in search of economic aid. Su- 
dan's debilitating foreign debt made 
it possible to predict that he would 
fall unless he received an urgent infu- 


fall unless he received an urgent infu- 
sion of American heljp. 

Last week’s food nots, which were 


sparked by the removal erf govern- 
ment food subsidies in compliance 
with International Monetary Fund 
requirements, were no more than tbe 
coup de grace to a regime already 
undermined by economic failure. 

In 1983, Sudanese debt amounted 
to $7 billion, or more than seven 
times the country's export earnings 
that year; by last week, it had risen to 
nearly $10 billion. The percentage of 
the country's foreign exchange earn- 
ings spent merely to service its debt 


annually — an astronomical sum lhat 
by itself wiped out precious hard cur- 
rency needed to meet the country's 
full debt obligations. This left no 
money to promote lagging develop- 
ment programs in a country where 
deteriorating agriculture may mean 
starvation for nearly six million peo- 
ple this year. 

Meanwhile, Sudan's failure to re- 
pay brought a number erf reprisals. 
The Reagan administration froze its 
aid. The IMF canceled a 1984 stand- 
by loan; it also pressed Mr. Nimeiri 
to pursue several difficult economic 
reforms, including a cessation of in- 
terference in foreign exchange mar- 
kets. Britain. West Germany and 
Saudi Arabia cut off their aid in an 
effort to compel tbe president to 
comply with IMF conditions. 

Certainly, Mr. Nimeiri brought di- 


of Sudan. But dearly the root of his 
problem was financial 
Sudan is hardly alone among Afri- 
can countries caught in protracted •' 
debt crises, unable to escape bank- 
ruptcy without incurring new loans, : 
often at higher interest rales. Very 'i 
few of these cash-starved slates are -- 


Ows 


solvent enough to follow Nigeria in 
its hard-line refusal to comply with \ '- T 
IMF conditions for new credits. 

In several of these countries, debt it- 

servicing alone gobbles up a third to a '■ < • y ~ 
half of annual export earnings. In - 

1981, African countries constituted 
20 of the 32 developing countries •. f 
reported in arrears on external pay- * 
ments; in 1984, they accounted for 10 ...’ij;"?--: : i 

of the 14 countries whose accounts 
were submitted to the so-called Paris , 

Club, the international group that 
renegotiates national public debts. • • 

Unlike many Latin American 
debtor nations, the Africans owe i ,; 1 - 
mainly official debt — to other gov- 
emments or international financial .i .^' m 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Half Right on Healey 


Regarding "Parly Choice Repre- 
sents a Break With Old Guard " 
(March 12): 

You were half right when you de- 
scribed Denis Healey as “a framer 
British foreign and defense secre- 
tary.” While he held tbe defense port- 
folio from 1964 to 1970 in the Wilson 
government, he has not served as for- 
eign secretory, serving instead as 
shadow foreign secretary. 

TSUI KAI-YEE. 

Hong Kong. 


only when a doctor in attendance 
told them lhat any further torture 
would kill him. 

For lawyers throughout the world 
he is a symbol of the fearless indepen- 
dent judge. It is regrettable that such 
a man should have become the sub- 
ject of party conflict. 

NIALL MacDERMOT. 

Secretary General, 
International Commission 
of Jurists, 
Geneva. 


1983. is owed to Western Europe, - > 
which remains the Africans' main v . 
trading partner. The United Slates is, 
however, also deeply implicated. 

This is true not only because of 


-;j 


. _■ --- 


iieai rorce ana depend 

ports of African minerals — but also /j ujjfi ii rj 
because default by Africa's big debt- , 
op would severely endanger tbe glob- •- ° 

“ ^ aomic system. ... v i 

what can be done to prevent cco- 
nonuc breakdown from provoking _ \ *' of 
P^ucal upheaval across the conti- ‘ 
hMl? Remedies may include debt re- -j ^ A":' 


Hie Pentagon Pliers 


Sartzetakis’s Ordeal 

Regarding the report “A Political 


Post for an Apolitical Man" (Insights. 
April 10) by Shirley Christian: 

President Sartzeiakfc proved him- 
self 3 man of greaL physical as well as 
moral courage when arrested in 1971 
under the military regime in Greece. 
He was tortured nearly to thepoini irf 
death when he refused lo sign a raise 
confession. Hjs torturers slopped 


Regarding the report "Pentagon Pli- 
ers DeaL $90 — but Read the Small 
Print ” (March 23): 


fnn-nuiniihil IhrotJ Triune. 


Why should we get excited about 
those $748 pliers that Boeing sold to 
the air force? After all, we spend 
billions and billions on the MX, a 
completely useless piece of garbage. 
At least those pliers have some use. 

BCN LANE 
Stockholm. 


scheduling, .a debt moratorium and 
new credit. The United Slates should, 
however. Focus on encouraging Afri- 
become economically self- 
sufficient. particularly in agriculture. 
Until they do, they will not remedy 
their debt crisis or secure the future 
of the estimated 1 50 milli o n Africans' 
who are threatened by starvation. 




1 


The writer, a professor of black and } sV- 
Purno Rican studies at Hunter Co/- ' 

•ege. is author of "From the Congo to j ‘ ’ 

Snweur l .5, foreign Policy Toward 

S:nce ItoM. He iwirihuied i 
llln ' UrThc York Times. J.. ' ! - 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TKlBlNK. THURSDAY, APRIL 1 1, 1985 


STcan^V f 250J 1 iia 5 r 


JWy2&* 


Show of Hands 
Fights Racism 
Among French 




*!k losia'i 


IIS 

e 

inese 

iri nigfli ago ., 

,ra pol-^ 






8 the reioia,:!/'^ *;■■- 

-asasjfari 

-kskSS 

±3- « Tc.Ua > ' 

ded a review' nf ^ V, 
-an trade. 7^*$® 

*“P‘pronuS 
med & an jL Bu,1 C 

y .Revised SjJ*! 

Mmisier Yail*^ fr* 


'«* Mr. NauLVfe 

:nce ,n a fiSfi * 

- m opposing shJV>' 
to the alarm t 
nouse offowL 

^epanment d», J 5. 


latement as lVBT ,_ - 
"residem GeoiT> : - 

w I h0 •*« 7^' 

«TSi|-n3Sas - 

idownintothj^' fc - 

sF&sa: 

pan inevitably b(j£ 

‘forts noionl> rant nS: 

they a so wort wuS’ 

ral( * >" the 
' rai^s slow ij.S. *£ 
and raise ihe dW7 
on the billions cwbJht. 
py Latin American a®, 
ighting the Japan-bad^ 
sira non has come louse 
not a moment toe «* 

»5 .Sngeins Times S\rj6an 


Reuters 

PARIS —Half a million French teen-agers are 
sporting a new symbol to flg^u racial discriraina- 
uot, a badge that reads “Ne louche pas a man pote" 
—'‘Hands off my buddy." 

When Harlem Desir, 25. and a group of friends 
designed the hand-shaped badge last October, they 
bad no idea the symbol would oecome so popular. 

Bui racism and France's four million foreigners 
have become a focus of national debate, particular- 
ly among young people. Throughout France they 
are pinning the bright badges to their clothes and 
plastering walls with anti- racism posters supplied 
by Mr. Dfcrir*s Paris-based group, **SOS Racism.*’ 

“SOS is the biggest youth movement since the 
student uprising of May 1968," said Mr. Desir. 
who is the son of a French woman from Alsace and 
a French man from the Caribbean territory of 
Martinique. 

“We set it up after a friend was threatened by 
commuters who claimed he’d stolen a wallet, just 
because he was black," he said. 

At SOS headquarters in one of Paris's dingiest 
immigrant districts, the telephone hardly stops 
ringing. Teen-agers call from across the country to 
report cases of discrimination. 

“Skin color was no problem at school or on the 
street," said Jean- Pierre Chairman t, 22, an SOS 
organizer. “But the old people now are brainwash- 
ing us with their racist hatred." 

As in the 1930s, he said, people fading tough 
times and unemployment are turning on foreign 
^workers as scapegoats. 

In recent months there has been a wave of race- 
related killings in France. 

A young Algerian tourist was beaten and thrown 
from a moving train by four French soldiers. A 
Moroccan was shot to death for talking to a white 
woman, and an 1 1 -year-old was paralyzed after 
being struck by a man irritated by noise made by 
foreign youngsters. 

The last few weeks have seen three attacks— the 
killing of two North African workers and a bomb 
attack at a Jewish film festival in Paris that injured 
26 persons. 

The cinema attack strengthened the efforts of 
some members of the Jewish and Moslem commu- 
nities to fight discrimination together. 

“They know as well as we do (hat if blacks and 



Harlem Desir 


Arabs are in the front line, the Jews are in the 
second," Mr. Desir said. 

Church and community leaders also express 
indignation over the growing violence and harass- 
ment faced by immigrants. 

“1 fear I am beginning to Teel ashamed of my 
country, where respect for the dignity erf 1 others is 
beginning to ebb," said Archbishop Jean-Marie 
Lustiger, the Roman Catholic primate erf Paris. 

Political leaders, confronted with the re-emer- 
gence of the extreme right in France, have wel- 
comed SOS. They see it as a means to combat the 
fortunes of Jean-Marie Le Pen, whose Na- 
Front captured nearly 9 percent of the 
national vote in local elections last month. 

Opening the spring session of the National As- 
sembly last week. Prune Minister Laurent Fabius 
called on the French people to join the “pacifist 
struggle" against discrimination. 

Mr. Le Pen has joined the battle of the badges. 
His badge, designed to promote his campaign to 
“Keep France for the French," reads “Hands Off 
My People." 


Starving f Other Half Is Invisible in Addis Ababa 


Observers of Famine Bringing Prosperity and Progress to Ethiopia’s Capital 

Bv Gifford D. May 

.Vrw York Times Semte 


ADDIS. ABABA. Ethiopia — 
An official sat in his office at the 
government's Relief and Rehabili- 
tation Commission recently, an- 
swering questions about why, in 
this time of severe drought and 
famine, Ethiopia still is selling live- 
stock and other food products to 
customers abroad. 

The official said that none of the 
goods being exported would be of 
much use to those in the camps — 
famished people need enriched 
grains, not meat and hides — and 
that Ethiopia had to eam foreign 
currency to pay for vital imports. 

Then, his temper rising, he made 
a point seldom mentioned in dis- 
cussions of the counuy's plight: 
“Listen, we’ve got nine million peo- 
ple or so who are starving or close 
to il That still leaves more than 30 
million Ethiopians who ore not 
starving. Their lives can’t just come 
to a full stop.” 

There are many people in Ethio- 
pia who not only remain largely 
unaffected by the famine but also 
do not even know much about it. 
Travel is difficult in this mountain- 
ous country, and the shocking pic- 
tures and descriptions on television 
and in newspapers in the West do 
not appear in Marxist-ruled Ethio- 
pia's tightly controlled press. 

“Until all the journalists and aid 
people started coining here, we 
didn't know what was going on in 
the north,” an Addis Ababa Uni- 
versity student said. “1 mean, we 
heard stories, rumors, but we really 
had no idea it was so bad." 

Addis Ababa often seems partic- 
ularly distant from the famine. 
There arc frequent shortages of 
bread, salt and other commodities, 
but that does not moke the capital 
city different from many others 
across Africa. 

Ironically. Addis Ababa has be- 
come more cosmopolitan, more 
lively, and more prosperous since 


Ethiopia's agony came to the 
world’s attention. 

For months, the dty has been 
overflowing with aid workers from 
several dozen organizations, pho- 
tographers, writers, and filmmak- 
ers from Iowa to Asia, diplomats 
and politicians from a score of 
countries. The grander hotels have 
long been booked solid. Houses are 
almost impossible to rent, although 
new construction is proceeding 
swiftly. Restaurants tend to be 
packed. Tennis courts are reserved 
days in advance. 

A fleet of cream-colored govern- 
ment taxis takes the visiting lumi- 
naries to meetings, briefings, and 
ample luncheons and dinners. The 
cabs tend to avoid the many neigh- 
borhoods of concrete shacks with 
metal roofs rusted to various 
shades of ocher. They seldom ven- 
ture down Lhe packed dirt streets 
heavily traveled by small donkeys 
and ancient, gnarled women, all 
bearing oversize burdens. 

Instead, the taxis tend to keep to 
the wide boulevards, extravagantly 
decorated with heroic, revolution- 
ary monuments, bammer-and- sick- 
le emblems, giant portraits of 
Marx, Lenin, Engels and Mengistu 
Haile Mariam, Ethiopia's leader, as 
well as with banners and billboards 
inscribed with such slogans as: 
“Long live proletarian internation- 
alism." 

A peculiarly Ethiopian profes- 
sion is that of the “minder," who 
accompanies foreigners who want 
to travel outside the capital. Some 
of these government employees 
work hard to be helpful guides and 
translators. Others see their role as 
being basically baby-sitter and 
watchdog. However described, 
they are now mare or less accepted 
as a fact of life here. 

Recently, two British airmen 
were driving through Addis Ababa 
and passed one of the ubiquitous 
posters of Marx, Lenin and Engels. 


“Who are those blokes?" one Brit- 
on asked the other. 

“Marx and Lenin," his compan- 
ion answered. 

“Yeah. O.IC, but who's the other 
one?’’ 

There was a pause. '1 don't 
rightly know" his friend said. 
“Reckon it must be their minder." 

Refugees from the famine have 
been barred from Addis Ababa or 
transported to camps beyond the 
city limits. Nevertheless, there are 
many beggars in the streets, just as 
there are in most African cities. 

A diplomat with long experience 
in Ethiopia only half-jokingly ad- 
vises newcomers that the most ef- 
fective way to discourage panhan- 
dlers is by reciting the phrase: 
"Nyet, ya Russki," which means, 
“No, I’m Russian." There are 
about 3,000 Soviet citizens in Ethi- 
opia. and among the local popula- 
tion they appear to be noted for 
neither their generosity nor then- 
congeniality. 

When one American tried the 
maneuver, however, it only pro- 
voked gales of laughter from the 
beggar, who was then sheepishly 
given the handout he had sought.' 

The capital is not the only place 


that can sometimes seem far re- 
moved from the famine. Earlier this 
year, more than 100 priests gath- 
ered on a holy day in the northern 
city of Lalibala, where in the 12th 
century a king carved 10 churches 
from a solid-rock mountainside. 

Bearded and gaunt, wearing 
robes of many colors and carrying 
umbrellas embroidered with gold 
to represent the heavens, the 
perched on the high, narrow ledge 
erf a wall surrounding one erf the 
churches. 

There, as dawn broke, they 
swayed and chanted to the music of 
drums and bells and mournful 
boms. Watching the ritual, per 
formed faithfully over many gener- 
ations. it was almost possible to 
escape the current concerns and 
immerse oneself instead in the reas- 
suring continuity of Ethiopia's an- 
cient and enduring culture. 

Almost but not quite. 

The service was abruptly inter- 
rupted by a bhaihe we. a wandering 
monk and prophet, a holy fool, 
wearing a ragged coaL 

“1 have seen on the horizon!" he 
shouted, his eyes glazed, his arms 
spread wide. “The rains are com- 
ing! Ethiopia has cried enough!” 



Sudan Regime Names Ruling Council, 
Promises To Examine Islamic Code 





2 French Opposition Groups Sign Pact 

Main Forces on Right Rule Out Coalitions With Others 


The AuociaieJ Press 

KHARTOUM. Sudan — The 
new military regime has dismissed 
the chief justice and formed a coun- 
cil of senior officers to run Sudan 
until civilian rule is restored. 

The regime also accepted a peti- 
tion from thejudges* union seeking 
a review of “hastily passed laws," 
indicating it mighf consider revis- 
ing the system of Islamic law im- 
posed in 1983 by President Gaafar 
Nimeiri. 

The chief justice, Fuad al-Arain 
Abdul- Rahman, was known as a 
strict interpreter of the penal code. 


General Nimeiri was overthrown 
last weekend in a coup led by Gen- 
eral Abdul Rahman Swareddahab, 
who had been defense minister and 
commander in chief of the armed 
forces. 

In a televised speech. General 
Swareddahab said the military 
council would “conduct the affairs 
of sovereignty and legislative au- 
thority in the country during the 
transitional period.'* 

He said he would serve as presi- 
dent of the 15-member council and 
that General Tag el-Din Abdullah 
Fadl would be his deputy. 


The Associated Press for French Democracy, or UDF. a 

PARIS — France's two main op- federation of centrist parties whose 
position groups signed a unity chief figure is former President Va- 
agreemenl Wednesday, pledging to lery Giscard d'Estaing. vowed a re- 
oppose any future coalitions with turn to the present single-candidate 
other groups on the left or right and system if they won power, 
to “govern alone and only alone" The opposition parties rejected 
should they win next years pariia- 


rantt a sumrf 


Jean Lecanuet, left, and Jacques Chirac after signing an 
agreement Wednesday to oppose future political coatitious. 


iey win next year’s pariia 
memory elections. 

The move came as lhe French 
cabinet adopted three bills de- 
signed to change the current con- 
stituency voting system to propor- 
tional representation. 

The Socialists have been general- 
ly expected to lose their majority 
under the present system. Analysts 
say that proportional representa- 
tion could mean that although still 
in a minority, the Socialists could 
emerge as the largest single party 
and a necessary component of any 
future government 

President Francois Mitterrand, 
who names the prime minister, has 
indicated he plans to complete his 
term running through 1 988. He is a 
Socialist. 

Jacques Chirac, mayor of Paris 
and leader of the neo-GauIlisl Ral- 
ly for the Republic, or RPR, and 
Jean Lecanuet head of the Union 


"compromises or combinations, 
whether it-be with the extreme right 
or the Socialist Party,’’ Mr. Lecan- 
uet said. 

The statement appeared to rule 
out possibly crucial support from 
the extreme-right National Front 
which polled over 8 percent in re- 
cent nationwide local elections, or 
a center-left coalition with the So- 
cialists in a fragmented assembly. 

Mr. Lecanuet said on television 
that for the single-round election, 
the two parties would present ei- 
ther unified or separate lists, ac- 
cording to the situation in each 
department 

la the current 49 1-seat assembly, 
elected in 1981 after the Socialists 
ended 23 years of conservative rule, 
RPR holds 80 seats, plus 10 affiliat- 
ed deputies, and the UDF holds 51, 
with 12 affiliated. 

Last week, the government said 
it would revise the system for Lhe 


March 1986 ballot to proportional 
representation based on party lists 
for each department 
The bills that the cabinet ap- 
proved Wednesday increase the 
number of deputies by 86, to 577, 
on a basis of one for every 108,000 
inhabitants, with a minim um of 
two in each department 
A party would have to get at least 
5 percent or the vote to win seals. 
This would exclude currently mar- 
ginal parties, such as the extreme 
left and ecologists. 


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Israel Allows Reporters to Visit Arab Prison Camp 

si D.s — J YV7.LL Hmuww hir Pliirip csiri hr* rone WliiU Itrunli Amur nfftnArc th* uricAu PnA*> <a »Uan eiffi 


By Edward Walsh 

3H 5ui ckdri.^Utf r><< Washington Post Service 

v. finuncsal AL FARAA, Isradi-Occupied 
in i: hJith il«K ***1 West Bank — More than two 
uTAr.cs w-iugh'- m months after Israel was accused by 
ise-s unaric to international body of abusing 

v. iihcut :nwurr.ng “^Palestinian prisoners at a detention 
„ v.iher interest center here, the Israeli Army 
ikJsV opened the facility to foreign jour- 

enouih to folk'* JjT nalists this week and denied that 
sj ,' nc }eiu5il » the prisoners had been mistreated, 
s^^iit-ons t'-f nea ; Northeast of Nablus, near the 

,j 0 f ihe>- village of A1 Farqa, the prison is 
, up- .. essentially a detention center where 

prisoners are interrogated before 
. .rfuVuauK? a5 A being formally charged in thefsrae- 
‘ “ T- 1 ^ l^raili tary courts that operate in the 

jr ' «t Bank. 

L ‘ iheviix^; The facility is clearly ovexcrowd- 
: . n , ! . ! ed. with as many as 15 young men 

r ,' ihr sleeping on thin mattresses on the 
:btnf“i i[hina j p* ' concrete floor of a single cdl, but it 
,he ^ appeared to be clean and well run. 
•=* i: -' v r; “\ 4 ‘jViia From the guided tour and brief 
jj^T A/n^'j conversations with some of thein- 
i, _ mates, it was impossible to verify 

' made 


However, Mr. Blaide said he was 
forced to stand during most of 
three days of interrogation. Anoth- 
er prisoner said he was forced to 
stand in a corridor for 12 hours 
before undergoing a six-hour inter- 
rogation. Prison officials denied 
that any of the inmates were forced 
to stand that long. 


While Israeli Array officers de- 
nied mistreating prisoners, they 
conceded that there were two cases 
of abuse in the past. It was clear 
from their comments LhaL the sys- 
tem of interrogating prisoners here 
improved in January 1984, when a 
team of army officers who had re- 
ceived special training was sent to 


the prison. Prior to then, the offi- 
cials said, the interrogations were 
conducted by a mix of army per- 
sonnel and police. 

The report by the International 
Commission of Jurists involves al- 
leged abuses at the prison from 
1982, when the facility was opened, 
to Mav 1984. 


officio. J - u jr,J fe- t he accuracy of the assertions made 
it s i ' i ll j7 .[jjnih^in January by the International 
But ‘■ u ’ jv£RU b£*; Commission of Jurists. 

“■ r = w *?£ None of the prisoners who spoke 


pi-lb* yulf, to reporters in the presence of pris- 
;; jit !*r . on officials said he had been beaten 


:!k 

r>*J 


Ain^ _ _ 

- 'V airm K or otherwise forced to confess to 
j cv-fi alleged crimes, as the 56-page re- 

J^njins port by the International Commis- 

rjrine* , sion of Jurists asserted was a com- 
.i-o Jtf? 1 -' i, roon practice at A1 Fam. 

7, tree ^ “Here everything is O.K." said 

•t J5 “ Mohammed Mohammed Blaide, 

j " •'■* ''5, who said he has been charged 
jth writing anti-Israeli slogans on 
wall and had refused to confess to 
. n ^n m“". me charge. “Most of the prisoners 
through interrogation as it 
?sl) ^ ' . should be done. There are no com- 
*' -' jM , pjpJ; plaints, usually " 

l ^ -r* S? 





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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 


Mexico Balks at Reagan Proposal on Nkxiragua 


By Robert J. McCartney 

Washington Past Service 

MEXICO CITY — The Mexican 
government has balked at endors- 
ing President Ronald Reagan's 


proposal for peace talks between 
Nicaragua and anti -government re- 
bels, marking an apparent split be- 
tween Mexico and C olombia, the 
two most prominent members of 


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the Contadora group seeking a ne- 
gotiated settlement in Central 
America. 

President Belisario Betancur of 
Colombia praised Mr. Reagan's 
initiative last week as “construc- 
tive" and sent Ms foreign minister 
to Cuba and Nicaragua to urge 
them to lake advantage of the U.S. 
proposal. 

But after a telephone call Mon- 
day from Mr. Reagan to President 
Miguel de la Madrid of Mexico, a 
Mexican communique made it 
dear that Mexico was withholding 
its support from the CJJS. plan on 
the ground that it did not want to 
intervene in Nicaragua's internal 
affairs. 

“It was a diplomatic way of say- 
ing no," a Mexican official said. 

Mr. Reagan proposed a cease- 
fire between Nicaragua's Sandinist 
government and anti-government 
rebels who were financed by the 
U.S. Central Intelligence Agency 


until last summer. Mr. Reagan also 
proposed that the two sides hold 
negotiations to be mediated by Ro- 
man Catholic Church officials in 
Nicaragua, and that Nicaragua 
hold internationally supervised 
elections. 

Mr. Reagan made the proposal 
in large part to win U.S. congres- 
sional support for 514 million that 
he wants to provide to the rebels. 
For the fust 60 days of the peace 
talks, Mr. Reagan said, none of the 
514 million would be used to buy 
gu ns , ammunition or other arma- 
ments. If the rebels decided after 60 
days of talks that they needed more- 
weapons, however, the money 
would become available for those 



20 Salvadoran Villagers 

Are Killed by Guerrillas 1 § ^ 

Who Dressed as Soldiers ^ *T * 


purposes. 

Nicaragua has rejected the pro- 


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The deputy foreign minister of 
Panama, another member of the 
Contadora group seeking a peace 
settlement, signaled that his coun- 
try was lining up with the Mexi- 
cans. 

The fourth Contadora member, 
Venezuela, said officially that the 
Reagan proposal should be “care- 
fully studied and analyzed” and 
called for the Contadora group to 
take “a united position" on iL 

A Venezuelan source in New 
York, where President Jaime Lu- 
anda has been meeting with bank- 
ers, said that Mr. Lusinchi had can- 
celed all of his “media events” 
Tuesday because Venezuela's posi- 
tion on the Reagan proposal had 
not been determined. The source 
said Mr. Reagan called Mr. Lusin- 
chi on Monday to request his sup- 
port. 

“Venezuela is going to see bow 
we can help Mr. Reagan, but we 
don’t want to do it alone," the 
source said, adding that he could 
see the truth in the remark: of the 
Reverend Miguel d’Escoto Brock- 
man, Nicaragua's foreign minister, 
that the Reagan proposal means 
“Drop dead, or well kill you." 

The Contadora group, which has 
been trying to negotiate a Central 
American settlement for more than 
two years, has run afoul of U.S. 
policy in the past. Last autumn 
Washington pressured its Central 
American allies to reject a pro- 
posed regional treaty drawn up by 
the four-nation group because the 
United Slates felt the pact favored 
Nicaragua. 

The rewriting of that treaty has 
barely begun, although the Conta- 
dora group and the five Central 
American countries plan to meet 
Thursday and Friday in P anam a to 
continue the effort. 

Robert C. McFariane, who is 
Mr. Reagan's national security ad- 
viser, said Friday that Mr. Rea- 
gan's proposal had the backing of 
Colombia. Venezuela and Panama 
but not of Mexico. 

The Mexican communique, is- 
sued by Mr. de la Madrid's office, 
broadly supported the goal "of a 
negotiated settlement. " ti 



Relatives identifying the dead after a guerrilla attack. 


77ie Associated Press 

SANTA CRUZ LOMA, S Sal- 
vador — Guerrillas dressed as sol- 
diers attacked a duster of peasant 
huts here this week and killed at 
least 20 of the villagers, residents 
said. Some of the victims were sbou 
and some had their throats slashed, 
the villagers said. 

At least seven of the dead were 
identified Tuesday as off-duty civil 
defease troops who were dragged 
' from their homes, they said. 

Two children and a pregnant 
woman were among five people 
killed when a mortar shell struck 
their house, said Jesus Valles, the 
commander of the volunteer civil 
defense forces in Santa Cruz Loma. 
a cluster of huts 25 miles (40 kilo- 
meters') southeast of San Salvador. 

Villagers gathered at the house 
on Tuesday and stared at the bod- 
ies. Some people wept and one visi- 
tor fingered a rosary. Straw cruci- 
fixes on the wails of the one-room 
cottage, now a rubble of adobe and 
brick, were not damaged. 

The house once had been civil 
defense headquarters and was used 
as a gun repair shop. Roberto Do- 
minguez, 27, said he was on patrol 
when his house was shelled and 


machine-gunned and bis family in- 
side was killed. 


Brazilian Leader in 'Pre-Coma’ After Surgery 


United Press International 

SAG PAULO — President-elect 
Tan credo Neves of Brazil 75, went 
into a state of “pre-coma” during 
an abnormal reaction to his sixth 
operation in four weeks but was in 
stable condition Wednesday, doc- 
tors said. 

The operation, a relatively sim- 
ple tracheotomy, was performed 
Tuesday under a local anesthetic to 
aid Mr. Neves's breathing. Doctors 


said he had suffered a violent reac- 
tion to the anesthetic several hours 
later. 


The presidem-dect already had 
undergone five abdominal opera- 
tions, which have delayed his inau- 
guration as Brazil's first civilian 
leader in 21 years. Vice President 
JosA Samey has been serving as 
acting president. 

Mr. Neves first underwent sur- 


gery March 15 for an inflamed co- 
lon only hours before he was to 
have taken office. After each of Mr. 
Neves’ first three operations, doc- 
tors issued optimistic reports but 
later rushed him back- into surgery 
to overcome new complications. 

He was reported near death 


Thursday when the fifth operation 
was performed to remove an infec- 
tion spreading through his abdo- 



side was killed. . . 

He was the former head of the . . . . - 

civil defense in the town and he .7 ' ' _ 

said the rebels had passed the word 
earlier that they were going to kiD ' - . 

him and his family. 

While bodies still lay on the~ ■. . - - -■* 

smoldering rubble, the survivors re- : ; 

counted how 300 to 500 leftist re- 7 ' ' 
bels approached the village Mon- „ - . * 

day evening and left in the dawn • ' - 

light on Tuesday. . : Ij, »»***% 

“They arrived on foot and we P*** 1 - 

saw them and shot first," said ~ 

Valles. “They shouted up not to'. , r ' \ ...v 

shoot, that they were on our side. 1 . ' 

They did it to’confuse us and we : . _ . , . 

stopped shooting. We thought they- ' “ 
were part of an anti -insurgency ' *. , , 

unit. When they got closer we saw • 
they were not soldiers." V ‘ . • 

By then it was too late to stop • 7 . 
them, he said. 

On Tuesday afternoon a truck ' 

loaded with some of the bodies 
rumbled down the dusty road. - -{* 

stopping to prick up more bodies 
along the roadside. ‘ . 

In the nearby town of Santiago- ' -. 

Nonualco. relatives identified the • . * »■ 

bodies, a judge recorded * InviTUR 1 
names and workers slipped them •• aL . . _ • -....I. 
into plain coffins lined with sacks ' 
used to hold the sugar harvest. ‘ * ■■ ... . ; 

Curious children lined the ra& r-- -] ... u 

of the old truck as the adults went 
about their grim business. When v . 

the coffins ran out, they sent word ..'*: 
to another town to send more. - 

“1 gave my blessing to all of j.. - ... j 

them, that was all I could do," said • -*: - - - 
a priest who would only give his _ . 

name only as Father Octavio. He ' I \p' 
said he had served the village for 35 ‘ WSit » L - 
years. - • 

“I know of at least 20 dead and . 
there is talk of more." the priest _ 
said, “but I don’t know any more 
about them.” [l._ ■ - _ • 

An army communique later said ■ • 
that 25 were killed: 15 members of ■ ;; . - v 

the civil defense force, three other 
men, three women and four chiL-j ; “ • - v 

dren. ..".7 . . . 

Some residents complained bit- 
terly that no army troops were sent ‘ ... . 

to Help. - ' 


It was not immediately dear why ; . 7 . 
the guerrillas attacked the village, ; ” . . 

which residents said had previously "■ ! " 

been spared from rebel raids. ■■iRcnn’ri* t Wr 
The guerrillas have been battling L i * 11 f> * 

Salvadoran troops for more than - ' - ' 
five years. . - 


Danes Receive East German - _■ 


The Associated Press 


COPENHAGEN — Foreign 
Minister Oskar Fischer of East 


Germany began a three-day official 

A woman weeps outside the hospital where Tancredo Neves underwent his sixth operation, visit here Wednesday* 





W*n 77 V °>L 


7. lrri '9ate E 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 


Page 7 


i 

S °I«H 


SCIENCE 


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Electricity Said to Spur Plant Growth 

LONDON (NYT) — Researchers are finding evidence that plant cells' 
stostivity to dearie current can be exploited to enhance thor growth, 

“Until recently, only a linked amount of aiten tion has been pad to the 
very tiny but steady currents which most if not all organisms pump 
through themselves and which appear to play a vital part in controlling 
their growth and differentiation, two scientists of the Imperial College, 
London, reported in the monthly journal Bio-Technology. 

The researchers, K. S. Rn there and A Goldsworthy of the college's 

department of pure and applied biology, applied direct current of about a 
mutiaotb of an ampere to ceils of tobacco plants growing in laboratory 
flasks. They reported that the growth rate was stimulated by about 70 
percent when the culture was made negative, but that current in the 
reverse direction slightly inhibited growth. 

Neanderthal Bones Found in Siberia 

MOSCOW (UP!) — Soviet scientists have reported the discovery of 
the bones of Neanderthal man in southern Siberia, sharply expanding the 
area believed to have been inhabited by the predecessor of modem man. 


real type who came from other regions of the world has been convincingly 
refilled." A. Derevyanko, director of the Institute of History, Philology 
and Philosophy of the Siberian branch of the U. S. S. R. Academy of 
Sciences, told Tass. “It can now be affirmed that thinking man evolved in 
Siberia as well.” 

The report, calling the discovery a “world-class find." said the bones of 
Neanderthal man and animals that he was probably hunting were found 
in a snail cave in the Goray Altai region, more than 2,000 miles (3.200 
kilometers) east of Moscow. Neanderthal man , named for the site in West 
Germany of the original discovery more than a century- ago. is best known 
from the caves of Europe. 

U. S. Submarine Dives to 20,000 Feet 

uhi ^ ren tau - . WASHINGTON (UPf) —The Sea Cliff, a deep submergence research 
u iruci; as iju jj.-'-V vehicle, recently completed a successful dive of 20,000 feet (6,100 meters) 
•■°r enm L off the Pacific coast of Central America, the U. S. Navy has announced. 

The 25-foot submersible is believed to be the only underwater boat of 
its das* that can now operate independently at 20,000 feet “or more.” the 
navy said. The dive into the Middle America Trench off the Pacific coast 
of Central America was the last in a scries of depth tests after a redesign 
incorporating a titanium hull and silver rim* battery. The navy said the 
vehicle's new operating level provides access to more than 98 percent of 
the world's ocean floor. 

Astronomer Uses New Mirror Method 


'Star Wars 9 Technology Promises Host of Peaceful Inventions 




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TUCSON. Arizona (NYTA — An astronomer at the Univeraly of 
Arizona has developed a technique of casting glass mirrors that could 
revolutionize optical telescopes and reduce their cost, according to the 
National Science Foundation. 

The technique calls for mounting a furnace on a turntable. The furnace 
spins as it melts its charge of solid glass, and the centrifugal force forms a 
steeply curved face to the minor, which eliminates much of the time and 
expense of grinding the glass into shape. 

Dr. Roger Angel has just used the new technique to produce an 
experimental mirror 6 feet (1.8 meters) in diameter, when the minor was 
examined, after it cooled, be said, it was found to be flawless. The casting 
erf the mirror is one step in a series of trials that Dr. Angel hopes will 
result in lightweight, inexpensive mirrors of about 26 feet m diameter, 9 
feet wider than the mirror in the telescope at Mount Palomar in 
California, the largest optical telescope in the world. 

Panel Reports on Brain Disorders 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many cases of babies bom with brain 
disorders cannot be blamed on negligence or any other avoidable cause, a 


By Malcolm W. Browne 

New Yuri Timm Service 

TT7HATEVER finally comes of 
• W President Ronald Reagan's 
proposed “star wars” defense 
against nuclear missiles, research at 
the United States's weapons lab- 
oratories promises a bumper crop 
of spinoff discoveries and gadgets, 
many of which will spur progress in 
medicine, industry and basic sci- 
ence. 

Scientists at such weapons lab- 
oratories as Lawrence Livermore in 
California, Los Alamos in New 
Mexico and Oak Ridge in Tennes- 
see say their projects will benefit 
pursuits as arcane as the analysis of 
supernova explosions and as mun- 
dane as the processing of vegeta- 
bles. Instruments, machines and 
ideas being developed in connec- 
tion with weapons programs may 
help detect cancer in its early 
stages, screen people for genetic 
defects, custom-grind contact 
lenses and win back the America's 




National Institutes of Health panel has reported. 

The panel, in releasing a report on brain disorders in the newborn, said 
doctors rarely can pinpoint a specific event in the development of a baby 
that beats sole responsibility for a brain disorder. While a number of 
events can be factors, such as trauma or decreased oxygen supply during 
labor, it is difficult to find a specific cause, the report said. 

Dr. John M. Freeman of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, the 
panel chairman, said, people increasingly want to know the cause of 
defects in their newborns, sometimes in order to attach blame: 


the $100 million the govern- 
ment is expected to spend on Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative research in 
the coming year, most will go for 
projects having little immediate 
bearing on peaceful applications. 
Critics or the presidenual initiative 
argue that the money would be bel- 
ter spent directly on civilian re- 
search. 

Still, the development of military 
hardware has often enriched sci- 
ence and technology, and (he trend 
is certain to continue.' World War 
II. for example, speeded the devel- 
opment of jet aircraft, space flight, 
antibiotics and nuclear energy. 
Among the spinoffs of the atom 
bomb program was the creation of 
an artificial dement called americi- 
um, the essential ingredient in 
smoke detectors. 

The beams of laser light and 
charged particles that may one day 
be used in warfare show particular 
promise as tools for peaceful re- 
search and medicine. A case in 
point is the deadly X-ray laser, 
which may soon begm revealing the 
mechanisms of life in detaiL 

Military designers are interested 
in building an X-ray laser weapon, 
mainly because it could deliver 
vastly more destructive energy to a 
distant target in space than is possi- 
ble using conventional lasers. But 
producing a cascade of X-rays re- 
quires a great amount of energy. 
One way of creating such energy is 
to pump the laser with a nuclear 
explosion. The first bomb-powered 
X-ray laser was successfully ex- 
ploded five years ago at thcNevnda 
test ate. 

Aside from its weapons applica- 
tions, the X-ray laser has excited 



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biologists, chemists and physicists 
because of its possible use in a 
supermicroscope, an instrument 
that perhaps will be capable of tak- 
ing holographic three-dimensional 
movies of the genetic code of a 
living cell. And efforts are being 
made to supply it with power with- 
out nuclear devices. 

Last October, researchers at Liv- 
ermore reported success with their 
Novetie laser, a machine that fills a 
building the size of an aircraft han- 
gar. Green laser light approximate- 
ly a trillion times more powerful 
than ordinary sunlight was focused 
on foils of two metals, selenium 


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and yttrium, causing the foils to 
explode and emit thin laser beams 
of intense X-ray lighL 

Many problems remain to be 
solved before X-ray lasers become 
common research tools. But ac- 
cording to Dennis L. Mathews, the 
physicist in charge of the Liver- 
more project, the goal is in sight. 
The results will be dramatic, not 
only because of the penetrating 
power of X-rays, but because X- 
rays have much shorter wave- 
lengths than visible light and can 
therefore pick out finer details than 
the most powerful light - micro- 
scope. An X-ray laser microscope 


would also have important advan- 
tages over an electron microscope, 
m that it could look directly at a 
live specimen. 

“I would guess that we're going 
to see the first X-ray hologram one 
or two years from now.” Dr. Math- 
ews said recently. "It may be rather 
crude — perhaps showing just the 
gross internal structure of a cell 
But refinements will come rapidly, 
and eventuallv. I think, well be 
able to make holographic pictures 
even of living DNA molecules, the 
molecules that make up the genetic 
code.” 

The potential of weapons-related 
inventions for advancing medical 
research has become so imprcssve 
that private business organizations 
have begun to exploit them. At Los 
Alamos laboratory, for example, 
scientists devised an optical instru- 
ment using circularly polarized 
lighL Realizing its commercial po- 
tential if it could be adapted to 
clinical research, a group of busi- 
ness people paid the laboratory S4 
million in venture capital to devel- 
op a marketable product The re- 
sult was an instrument that can 
make fast, inexpensive assays of 
viral components of blood. 

The development of death-ray 
technology could also lead to safer 
fruits ana vegetables on supermar- 
ket shelves and might men help 
safeguard the continent's forests 
from acid rain, scientists say. The 
too] that could do these thin gs, a 
powerful miniature particle accel- 
erator called the High Brightness 
Test Stand (HBTSk already exists. 

According to the machine’s 

developer, Stephen Mathews, also 
a physicist at Livermore, the HBTS 
was invented using a system called 
magnetically switched linear-in- 
duction acceleration to produce a 
very intense beam of high-energy 
electrons. This beam, in turn, pow- 
ers a device called a free-electron 
laser — one erf the candidates for 
development as a space weapon. 
But Dr. Mathews has conceived 
some unexpected uses for the accel- 
erator. which is only about six feet 
long (1.8 meters) and which could 
be manufactured to sell for about 
SI-5 million. 

He proposes using the little ac- 
celerator to kill insects, including 
the Mediterranean fruit fly, larvae 
and parasites that infest freshly- 
harvested fruit and vegetables. His 
idea is to direct the electron beam 
from the accelerator at a metal tar- 
get, thereby producing an intense 
X-ray beam that could irradiate 
food, products. Irradiation would 
replace. ihe chemical fumigation 
used orimanrerops? thereb y t tiuni - 
oa ting all chance-thar sudrpoBon- 


ous fumigants as ethyl bromide 
might ding to the produce. 

Livermore's baby panicle accel- 
erator is also undergoing tests as a 
device for removing gases from in- 
dustrial chimneys, which are be- 
lieved to be a major cause of odd 
rain. Unlike solid particles of soot, 
these gases cannot be filtered from 
smoke or removed bv conventional 
electrostatic anti- pollution devices. 
Bui the particle accelerator would 
hurl a powerful beam of electrons 
through the chimney gas, thereby 
ripping apart gas molecules of sul- 
fur and nitrogen oxides. Farther up 
the chimney, ammonia gas and wa- 
ter vapor would be pumped in, and 
as the molecular components re- 
combined they would form solid 
panicles of ammonium nitrate and 
ammonium sulfate, which could be 
filtered out easily. 

Dr. Mathews said that laborato- 
ry tests have shown 90 percent lo 
t'OO pecent of the arid-forming flue 


gases can be removed by the elec- 
tron-beam technique. 

The batteries of supercomputers 
operated by the weapons laborato- 
ries, when not employed in design- 
ing weapons, are being used to de- 
velop mathematical models helpful 
to astronomers, weather forecast- 
ers. shipbuilders and others. The 
mathematical modeling of events 
that take place inside a hydrogen 
bomb explosion, for instance, is ap- 
plicable to the explosion of a super- 
nova star. 

Computer modeling of the tur- 
bulent flow of gases, imponam tu- 
tors in a nuclear explosion, may 
have some bearing on global 
weather patterns and forecasting 
Another type of computer model- 
ing under development at Liver- 
more and elsewhere is expected to 
help in the design of boat and ship 
hulls. A current project aims at 
improving yacht design for the next 
America's Cup regatta. 


Effects of Iodine Deficiency 
Cause Alarm in Himalayas 


By Erik Eckholm 

New York Tima Semce 

N EW DELHI — Health ex- 
perts along the southern fringe 
of the Himalayas have become 
alarmed by recent evidence that a 
lack of iodine in the diet is dooming 
millions of children to mental and 
physical disabilities. 

The findings are that the damage 
from iodine deficiency is far worse 
than previously suspected, and the 
governments of India. Nepal and 
Bhutan are adopting emergency 
measures. 

Because of the subtle effects of 
iodine deficiency on brain develop- 
ment, one international health spe- 
cialist said, in some of the worst- 
affected Himalayan villages 
“nearly half the children appear to 
be virtually uneducable and unem- 
ployable except for the simplest 
tasks.” 

The mountains and plains of 
northern India, Nepal and Bhutan 
have become known in medical cir- 
cles as the “Himalayan goiter belt” 
The soils and waters of the Himala- 
yas are so lacking in natural iodine 
that even the goats develop goiters, 
the enlargement of the thyroid 
gland that is the body's adaptation 
to the deficiency. In some moun- 
tain cultures, people with smooth 
necklines were once regarded as 
oddities. 

Health officials have viewed the 
“gorier problem" as a minor threat 
compared with -the -hunger.- -filth 
' and* epidemic- diseases that blight 


the region. Goiters are seldom life- 
threatening. 

But the new evidence linking the 
lack of dietary iodine to wide- 
spread mental and physical impair- 
ments is now spurring governments 
into more intensive action. 

Teams of health workers, often 
traveling by foot over rugged ter- 
rain, are injecting millions of po- 
tential mothers with megadoses of 
iodine. Iodine is crucial "to normal 
development of the brain and cen- 
tral nervous system in the growing 
fetus and infant. 

The governments are now also 
moving derisively to require the 
iodization of consumer salt. Earlier 
in this centuiy. the disorders that 
resulted from iodine deficiency 
were largely eliminated in Europe 
and the United Slates through this 
simple measure. 

Today, hall a billion people in 
large areas of Asia. Africa and Lat- 
in America remain vulnerable to 
iodine deficiency, according to Dr. 
John Stanbury, an endocrinologist 
at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. He and other experts 
blame government inertia and ig- 
norance about the severity of the 
problem. 

“The iodine problem is on the 
subtle side.” he said. “It doesn't 
jump out at you like polio or small- 
pox.” 

Worldwide, hundreds of millions 
of people — 40 million in India 
alone, researchers estimate — live 
with goiters under their chins. 


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Brown Boveri play a major role 

at Karakaya and Ataturk hydroelectric power plants 


TUrkey^s largest- 
supplying and 
installing the 
entire electrical 
equipment. 


Water and power 


When completed, the AtatGrk 
hydro power plant in Turkey will 
have an installed capacity of 
2400 000 kilowatts. Equipped 
with Brown Boveri generators 
together with BBC transform- 
ers, switchgear and the entire 
control system, it wifi be the 
country’s largest power-gen- 
erating facility 

Harnessing the River Euphra- 
*> tes, the AtatOrk dam will creates 
lake having a total volume of 
48 700 million cubic meters of 
water. Not only to generate elec- 
tricity, butalsoto irrigate afertile, 
but still arid, region of Anatolia 


Yet again, Brown Boveri are 
playing a major role in Asia 
: iV Minor. 


For back in 1977 BBC were 
entrusted with supplying all the 
electrical equipment for the 
Karakaya hydro plant of 
1 800 000 kW. This is a second- 
stage dam on the Euphrates, 
some 180 km upstream from 
AtatOrk. 

The new project illustrates one 
of Brown Boveri’s strengths: the 
ability to manufacture in differ- 
ent countries to the same high 
quality standards. Components 
will be made at BBC factories in 
Switzerland, Germany and Italy. 

BBC play a major role in provid- 
ing the world with facilities for 
generating, distributing and uti- 
lizing electricity. And often with 
such success as to invite a 
repeat performance. 




, i i V» i 







210631. I 


Competent - Dependable - Worldwide 


BBC 

BROWN BOVERI 


For further information please consul: your local BBC agency or write to: Switzerland: BBC Brown, Boveri & Company, Ltd., RO. Box 56. CH-5401 Baden; Federal Republic of Germany: Brown. Bowen 
& Cle. Aktlengwellschafi, Postfaeh 351, D-6B00 Mannheim 1; Aurtria: Qasterreichlsche Brown Boveri-Werke AG. Postfach 184. A-11Q1 Vienna; Brazil: BBC Brawn Boveri S.A. Caixa postal 975, 
06000 Osasco (SP); Canada: BBC Brown Boveri Canada inc., 2260 Place du Canada, Montreal, Cue., H3B2N2; France: BBC Brown Boveri France S.A., 21, rue desTrois-Fontanot, Parc de la Defense, 
F-92024 Nanterre Cedex; Great Britain: British Brown-Boveri Ltd.. Darby House, Lawn Central. GB-Telford, Shropshire TF3 4 JB; Italy: Tecnomasio ItaJiano Brown Boveri S p.A. Caseiia postale 10225, 
1-20110 Milano; Norway: A/S Norsk Elaktrisk & Brown Boveri, Postboks 263-Skoyen. N-0212 Oslo 2. Spain: Brown Soven de Espana S A, Apertado 36i2*. E-Madrid 16: USA: BBC Brown Boveri. fnc , 
2, Gannett Dnue, Whits Plains, N r 10604; ether countries; BBC Brown, Boveri & Company. Ltd , Brown Boveri International Group. P O Box 56. CH-5401 Baden. Switzerland. 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrial! 


Dow Jones Averages 


Provloul Today 

OPW High LOW CtoM 3 PM. 
Indus 12S221 12A204 124658 I2XL86 1241 JO 

Trans 5B5J1 5*229 SKUA 5B848 59546 

Util 154J9 155.14 15352 I54J4 I5S4M 

Como 90831 51166 5D6JM 509 JM 513.1: 


Previous NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


il 


ProvlaM Today 
Mah Law Close 2 PM. 
Composite 16145 10125 10132 104.10 

Industrials 11067 lisji 11031 11039 

Transp. «J7 95.99 9630 9739 

Utilities 5482 5431 5434 5513 

Finance 10730 10431 10730 107.92 


n 


Odd- Lot Trading in N.Y 


il 


'Included In the sales fisura 


Buy 5am 'ShTt 

242.174 466,147 5345 

716348 554389 5468 

181371 439238 2375 

188J38 437521 4445 

194314 495195 5.910 


Wvilkte&dayk 

1WSE 


3fMIL 


Vol.af3P.M_ 

91810901 

Prev.3 PJVLVaL 

£7,950800 

Prev ansoKdated dose 

1818714 TO 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


reviews AMEX Diaries 




Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
NOW HtBM 
New Laws 
Volume up 
V olume down 


dose Pnm. 

250 219 

281 382 

£ 3 

1 ’S 

2371450 

1463.970 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Previous Today 

High Low Ouse 2 PM. 
Industrials 19932 19841 19846 20036 

Transp. 152J1 15130 151.90 15343 

Utilities 80J6 7937 8030 8039 

Finance 2047 2X34 2Q40 2043 

ComoasHe 17846 17*99 17B31 17947 


NASDAQ Index 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Bonks 

Transp. 


week Yew . 
CIM Noon AM 
27643 27809 279-74 
29137 Sun 29635 

33334 — 33]-»0 

32239 — 32871 

— 27149 

5s&14 — 25530 

25444 - 25836 


AMEX Sales 


3 PM- volume 
pm. 3 P JWL volume 
Prsv. cans, volume 


AMFX Most Actives 


BAT 

Echoes 

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T*xAlr 

DotneP 

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1595 14 W 
1170 716 

1234 11*4 
997 69b 

905 40ft 
893 9*4 

792 1044 
791 73* 

693 314 

487 29 - 


AMEX Stock Index 


Previous Today 

mm Claw 2 PAL 

22741 22839 22944 


Prices Lifted by Interest Hopes 


3J0 

58 

140 

15 

M 

X4 

M 

2 A 

2.90 

55 

280 

1U 

100 

65 

220 

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The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange staged a broad advance 
Wednesday, getting a lift from hopes for lower 
interest rates. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose 
8.84 to 1.262.70 two hours before the dose on 
Wall Street. 

The NYSE's composite index rose .78 to 

Although prices in tables on these pages are 
from 3 P.M. m New York, for time reasons, this 
article is based on the market at 2 P.M. 

104. 10. Volume on the Big Board came to 76 JO 
million shares frith two hours to go. 

Gainers outnumbered losers by more than 2- 
to-1 among NYSE-listed issues. 

Interest rates fell in the bond market Tuesday 
and Wednesday after Paul A. Vdcker, chair- 
man of the Federal Reserve Board, expressed 
some misgivings about the economic outlook. 

At a conference of the Export-Import Bank 
on Tuesday, Mr. Volcker said that overall 
growth might falter because of problems afflict- 
ing the manufacturing, mining and farming 
sectors of the economy. 

Analysts said that his comments did not have 
upbeat connotations for the near-term outlook 
for corporate profits. 

But they added that traders interpreted his 
remarks as a signal that the Fed was likely to 


follow a credit policy that encouraged lower 
interest rates. 

At midday. Uniroyal led the active list, up % 
at 18H. A New York financier, Carl G Icahn, 
said he planned an S18-a-share offer for control 
of the company. 


Irving Reports Rise in Net 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Irving Bank Corp. reported 
Wednesday that first-quarter net was $27.3 mil- 
lion, a 2. 2- percent increase from $26.7 million 
in the corresponding 1984 period. 

Irving said the improved earnings mainly 
reflected higher net interest income, on a fully 
taxable basis, and higher non-interest income. 

Those favorable factors were partly offset by 
higher non- interest expenses. 

Net-interest income on a fully taxable basis 
increased 73 percent to $133 million in this 
year’s first quarter from 5123.9 million in the 
first quarter of 1984. 

The increase was due primarily to a widening 
in the net interest-rate spread and a higher 
average volume of interest-earning assets, main- 
ly loans and investment securities. 

There was an 18-basis-point increase in the 
net interest-rate spread to 330 percent, primari- 
ly because of a 22- basis-point widening in the 
puichased-funds margin and an increased vol- 
ume of net non-interest-bearing funds. (There 
are 100 basis points in one percentage point.) 


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21*6 21*4— 9* 
113* lift— *6 
34ft 36ft 
159* 1591 
21 31 — Vb 

31 31ft + ft 
3414 34*4 + ft 
38ft 30ft + ft 
56ft 56*4— ft 
47*6 48ft +114 
5ft 594 
1036 10*6 + *4 
13U T3ft + ft 
30 21*4 + ft 

83ft >336 +1*4 
28ft 283* + ft 

21 21ft 

35*4 36ft + ft 
50ft 5136 +116 
27ft 27ft — ft 
Mft 36ft— ft 
34*6 34*6 + ft 
36 36 . 

20*4 30ft + ft 
5ft 5ft + ft 
23ft 23ft 
5*6 5*6— ft 
12ft 13 + ft 

1734 17ft + ft 
42ft 42ft— ft 
1036 3196 + ft 
33*6 3336 + ft 

3ft 23ft + 14 
lift 17ft— ft 
21ft 21ft + ft 
31ft 21*4 + ft 

22 22 — 34 
4936 5016 + ft 
58*4 60*6 +lft 
3736 38ft + ft 
53ft 54 

2Cft 2514 + ft 
68ft 60ft +1*6 
20 2034 

«ft 4ft 
3734 3734— ft 
74 74*4 + ft 

10 10ft + ft 

123* 12ft . 
20ft 20tb + 34 
28 ft 3916 . 

56*4 57 + 36 


125 


M 


3J 

11 

43 

9 

IM 


J 23 

S3 




BJ 


1 P-4 


9J 


85 


<0 


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5 

35 

» 

1IL9 

5 


GENEVE 


544 
41 
122 
I1Z7 
43 
71 
2 

109 23ft 
90 19ft 
139 51* 

239 23 
817 26ft 
82 3S 
34 
46 
236 
30 

ms 

63 


5-25 123 
653*121 
950*174 


23 

4J 

* 

152 

50 

U 

248 

6 A 

6 

157 

4 9 


IM 

36 


200 

62 

10 

240 

85 

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15 



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A 

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33* 

34103 

Mt 

M 


MO 

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220 

U 


425 

BJ 


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4 JO U3 

9 JO lO 
7 <4 Id 
928 1ft4 


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32 

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24 

12 

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9 


IJW 5J 
2ja 72-1 
740 12 5 
7.54 iao 
M 43 
723 13.1 
IM 10J 
M0 15 11 
.10* S 10 
120 32 10 
30 23 9 

40o J 1? 
1.19 2J 

1- 83 as 

2- 96 4J 14 


120 42 12 
US) 53 28 
64 U I 
.14 3 16 

140 21 9 

250 44 10 
3.18 HL7 8 
■Il J) 

1*6 
1*6 

.... *8 9 

IM S3 12 
BUU 
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3 

UOMA T 
pf UD 03 
pf 2M 12J 
Of UB 12J 
pf 840 125 
Pf 724 125 
El U U } 
MO U II 
24 M 24 
60 12 11 
8 
13 

JO 18 15 
Mb M 12 
160 96 9 
260 92 10 
M 33 6 
W U I 
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30ft 30 JWT» 1.12 33 13 
34ft 23ft J River 56 22 8 

24ft 13ft Jomswv .12 -5 10 

13ft 10ft JoonF 164*120 
43 26ft JolfPt* M2 24 6 
60*6 54*. JorCpf 9J6 14J3 


66 28ft 2894 2894 + 1* 
354 24*6 249* 2496 + ft 
188 22*6 21ft 2Tft + 94 
102 12*4 12 12—16 

217 38ft 37ft 38ft +194 
1660y6Sft 65ft 65ft— ft 


To Our Readers 

Because of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris until April 27, the 
New York and American Stock Exdiange ta- 
bles in this edition contain information from 3 
P.M. New York time. Over-the-counter stock 
prices ore from 2 P.M. New York time. Canadi- 
an stock prices, U.S. futures prices and some 
other items are from the previous day’s trading. 

We regret the inconvenience, which is neces- 
sary to meet distribution requirements. All edi- 
tions will again carry dosing prices and indexes 
after April 27, when Daylight Savings lime 
begins in the United States. 


U 

19 

1A 

27 

63 

6 

9A 


2j6 

9 

12 

16 

21 

25 

25 


M 


24 

17 


99ft 46ft . 
99 47 . 

Kft 1296 . 
9ft Sft . 
42ft 28 . 

46*6 37ft . 
2914 2114 . 
269* 159* . 
27ft- 2196 . 


8.12 MS 770V 563b 56 56 — 1 

8J» M0 1880y 57 56 57 +1 

2.18 13.9 20* 15ft 15*4 15*6 + 94 

20 231 9ft 99* 994 
ISO 19 15 5598 41*6 40ft 41*4 + 9* 

Uta 43 9 397 41ft 41ft 41ft— *6 

M0 33 19 1 27ft 27ft 27ft 

30 33 13 39 23ft 23 33—16 

160 SJ 14 145 249* 2416 2494 + *4 


85 37ft 
147 1796 
239 27 

33 22ft 
55 l*ft 
7773 0*6 

257 3ft 
27* 1U 
70 1696 
111 1* 

51 31ft 
107 23 
92 18ft 
1M9 48ft 
1420 5096 
337 24ft 
349 28ft 
35 33ft 
33 lift 
134 30ft 
14 2296 
22 28ft 
49 27ft 

a i4ft 
iax im 

4 4ft 

535 * 

7 10ft 

5 » 

10 15 

J! 6ft 

1099 71ft 
504 13ft 
809 18ft 
653 29 
27 19ft 
40r 5 
400z 8 
m ft 

97 2Bft 
3 34ft 
1600 2*ft 
100 9894 
176 26* 

86 11*, 

80 17>.i 


37V* 3716 + ft 
17*4 17ft + *6 
2646 27 + 96 

22ft 2296 + 16 
19*6 19ft— ft 
7ft 8ft 
3ft Sft— ft 
116 lft + ft 
16ft 16ft + ft 
18ft ISft — 16 
21ft Zlft— ft 
22ft 2214— ft 
1896 lift + 16 
68ft 68ft 
4996 5094 + ft 
26 26ft + *4 
28ft 28ft + ft 
33ft 33ft 
1416 1694 
3094 28ft + ft 
229* 2296— ft 
Sft 28ft— ft 

27ft 27ft 

Wft 14ft + ft 
IMS 10ft + ft 
496 496— ft 
8ft 9 + ft 

19Vb IM +Vi 
33ft 33ft 
14ft IS 
6ft Oft + ft 
71ft 71V4 + ft 
1316 139* 
l|ft 1194 + ft 
284b 39 + *4 

1996 1914 + ft 

8 B 
ft ft 

2fP* 2894 + ft 
34ft 34Vi + ft 
29ft 29ft— ft 
919* 989* 

3ft 316 — ft 

11 1* 

16ft 17 


224* 
79* 
121 * 
Oft 
45ft 
1816 
13 

10ft 
16ft 
696 
33 
916 
19* 
10*6 
13ft 
20V* 
37ft 
97 
M 
34ft 
Zlft 
V 

ft 15ft 
ft 2ft 
1596 IM 
15ft 9ft 

249* 104* 
5396 90 

am 23 

39 » 

SOW 4044 
79W 65 
3316 22 
79*4 
4014 15V6 
45ft W> 
2294 18*4 
80 4194 

53ft 3244 
43V* 2» 

46 23ft 

25 18 

33*4 W 
2516 164* 
2ft 2ft 
274b 1744 
53 
89* 

43 
20ft 


326 121 

MS 

U 

1.70 

72 

JO 

2J 


-24 

20 

-54 

43 



2J7 1L9 

MO 

33 

225 

73 

AO 

21 

UD 

4j6 

.12 

24 


14 

40 

23 


.90 

24 

120 

3J 

24 

14 

26 

25 

268 

55 

144 

34 

TJO 

2J 

330 

11 

1-00 

14 

20 

24 


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M0ol04 

sSS 254 
iS *§ ,s 

a? 17 13 
1-71* *4 11 
M 2.1 13 

JAO 13 11 

120 «j0 10 

lAieloa 




N 

SJ 


4.1 



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22 


1.7 


U 

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32 

17 

44 


5J 

12 



24 


23 

13 

7.1 

21 


12 

1.7 

7 

44 

6 

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18 




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57 ft STto 
14ft 14 

3Ii! a” 6 

36ft 36ft 

mi im 

4116 41 
50ft 574* 
2416 339* 
36ft 26 
4196 4196 
1344 13 
3K* 3044 
13ft 13W 
ay. 2i 
439* 43*4 
_3*b 396 
26ft 26** 
Uft 56 
77ft 23 
ID»* 94* 


19ft— 9* 

57ft + ft 
14 

31*4 + ft 
3P6 + ft 
27ft + ft 
1H4 + V4 
3414—16 

41ft + ft i, 
58+1* -yft 
24—16 
26 + ft 

4191 

13ft + ft 
30ft + ft 
TJVi 

28 - ft 
4396 + 94 
39m 

a** — 9i 
56 — ft 
2796 + 96 
94*— 9* 













































































Statistics Index 




. MUBXPtUM 

r.ij 

Jaraim nwb P.H 

AMfJt W#*»/to-*P.l4 

Fnn« rate notat 

PM 


NYSE WK» 

P.i 

GMnwrfcvto 

l». 9 

> 

NYSE bWwtom PJfl 

•wfw rum 

P.9 

Conation ttoct> 

P.16 

Mortar wmrnarv P. B 


\ Currency uda» 

P.i 

Oonon. 

P.10 

- - Cenwoottm 

MB 

QIC oxx 

P.U 

A 

DiWenUt 

pro 

Otatr aarxtfx 

P.14 


5 5.^* 


**» 3 *i' 

fc. *is 


THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 


WAUL STREET WATCH 

Mid-1985 Recession Seen 
To Be Bullish For Stocks 


EN£vg 




] ; 

— % '■ I 

# I 


eCTiorj sports 


nfl iew.lhr, J 
™*'W<Z£S 0nt 

2 livi it u 

' g* OfcS ■ 

1* *2* » »«sv’' 

■ in -se:?^ 
■^-^assai 
i , pg'i 

4.1 T 7 49 4ffc j| ,, 

sg ^ 3b ml a 1 £:; 

8 3 Si.y^ 

«i? « MV lift UV-, 


« W* If., ifc 
Sft-> 

« i?> 3'i a a -•. 

* ro JT4 si-, 

« i:m ’i*i 3im 

It >. 4H, <JV *-. 

X 31 M* 1ft U „ 

JO 13H IS. 1ft 
2 r 17* 1ft B-i 
3 7h ft T,-\ 

1? AS M* it* 1* 
a ibv inn »-. 
b a; a* Eft *•• 
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3* » » > II 

i?-i rft ta-i 

s 9li X Jin a -i 
tis y\ ft Pi-« 
as «!* UH 1« Me -4 
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a S*5 Mft 3* J*-4 
i 1*351 ?<»•• 

ro cv. 5ft a 
T91 Si Ai 

:■ sr ft : 

114 U 2* Si* 4 

8 W Jft E ?•• 

:o Hi >• *-• 

634 4* J* ’ 

a 12 33V 3ft £-J 

37 gr ta sft S'“ 

it ft 5J 
i? £ j£ fift S* 

IS 5. II- 1ft .- 

g ~ ses- -4 

!* :is in. ■» » J 
:i a rS * J ! 

M I1H "ft £- 
ll s*J 5Pt 5T« £„ 

- : rm 

, r m5 ,a **' 

7 31* *£ S fl- 
IC i3i *g» J 2-* 

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r IK* 3? ^ r.-‘ 

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1 s lea S 3 

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»* 'ft £ 

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5 fa'i 

2 jug?' 

* !*.%■ 
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s i> t .is. 52 p*- 

?^2jsr, 

2 lsfE ; \ 

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\ &g£fr 
Hlgg^ 

f n IS i s .i 

* 5 ; i*=* Sk', 

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?,• si! ’f.- > 

=S3SJ£<.*» 

,3Sif? 

i'2i S' •» i 
5 ; 2 f^'i 

? is:? 

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:"i 

' : ji<i 

i>i ie ■ 


Currency Rates 


Late interbank rotes on April 10, excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, M3an, Paris. Now York rotes at 
2 PM 

s t OM. FJ=. Ifi. Otar. O.F. s^. Yon 

Amsterdam 15505 4313 112.9*5' 373125 • 0.1773 • MIS' 13XT4 -T39-C r 

Bntsmb(a) 6127 H42 20.13 6J9M 3.156* 17312 227B25 2AM* 

Frankfurt 2 UTS 180 3277* 1J67 x 82JC5' 4LMS* 1W.12-L2MS* 

London IN in 55 33108 1131 233130 A2«3> 7638 3207 308325 

Mi Mm 230500 232210 637J1 2W.HJ 544 15 31379 75430 7375 

ItowYorktCI 1319 3.128 *5375 139550 3532 6150 2649 25430 

Porto 9592 11593 10524 *716 X 2701 15.171* 33065 3708* 

Tokyo 25435 20077 >1.14 2431 1277* 71.90 40338* *63* 

Zuricn 23475 122*1 8458* 2734* W327* 74375* 4305* IMIS ' 

1 ECU 071 09 B588 2331* 63191 132SJ1 25243 44^*558 13909 181325 

1 SDR 198303* 031263 33885 932926 137137 3-4903 62J994 23149 250379 

" Dollar Values 

m. Z eoLv. Ca,mev Z *L. carTtnci Z 

0366 AestrnBoos 1397 2*836 Irbbc L0167 03477 Singapore 5 22343 

03441 Aaurtao iddnioo 2233 03011 toraedswfaK 90L65 D5QS1 S-AIrk an re n d 1.98 

03156 MMm fin. Irnoc 6U0 33107 KimW atnar 03071 noon S. Korean ««c U200 

07719 Cana«anS 1372 03*47 Motor, rtaoall 1SKB 00057 Span, peteta 17530 

0330* Daniil) luena 1125 0.1104 Hvw.krena 934 0.1104 Smdkrooa 936 

D.1S24 Ronho markka 456 03543 PMLpcu 1835* 03253 Tahnaal 3955 

03074 Oroek dnKkmo 13560 03057 Part.ncodo 17430 03363 TWOabt Z7505 

0.1282 Hoag Km S 738 OZ77 Sawfirtyrri 16105 02723 UXE-Ortom 14725 

I SterUno: 13173 lrlAC 

(ai Commercial Irene (blAmounnoMdidni buy one mxmd (OAmountsnaooltdtoboyonaiMlarl*) 
Urtls at 100 UJ Unltx of 1300 (yj Unit* of 10300 
N.Q.: not ousted; M A.: not ovallaUe. 

Sources: Bonque at/ Benehix iBrutsrts): Banco C omm erc i a l * itaiiono tMIfan }; Chemical 
Bank (New York}: Bonnue Noifonole Ho Porto (Paris); IMF (SDR): Banana Arabc n 
Internationale cTtavettissement (dinar, rival. Mltoml. Other data from Reuters and AP. 


P*r 

_ * Currency 

P*r 

vss 

Ewto. 

uu 

10167 

04*77 SIOMMCVS 

233*3 

wm 

03051 S. African rand 

1.99 

OX71 

00053 S. Korun woa 

MM 

2J3Q5 

BA057 Spoil prata 

17300 

9M 

0.110* BWKLkTDM 

*06 

IUS* 

110353 To teal 

3955 

17400 

00163 Ttalbabt 

27.535 

16118 

03773 UJUe.dfc-fcm 

34735 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


April 10 


Swiw French 

Dollar D-Mark Franc sterling Franc ECU SDR 
1M. IV. -1ft, 564 - 5tt 5V. ■ 544 13 Vi.- 13ft. 10 »w - 10 <*. 9 to. - 9 to III 

2M. IS • IH S*ft-S*ft 5ft - SVl ITi - 134k lOhft- TOfte 9*1. -Wit. flit, 

3M. IS -VI 5 eft - 6 is Jft -» l3lw-Uft.Uftft-iaw.10 - lOVk Bft. 
6M. 9V, . H* 6 ft. - 6 ft. 5H -514 12 hw- 12 *w J1S- lift. JDft.- 70 H Bftft 

1Y. 9% - 10 ft, 4ft. - 6 ft. 5VS - » 121b - 12V, 11 % - 113k 10Vk-10h9H. 

Rates aMrtfauw to Interbank deposits of H million minimum [or eoul valent). 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty {dollar. 046. SF. Pound. FFJj Uovas Bank (ECU): Routers 
(SDRI. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


April 10 


1 mo. 

Bftw -Sftft 

Source : Remers. 


linn. 

aift-aftft 


6 max. 
tift -9ft, 


Key Money Rates 

United States ooi pw. 

Dtscaont Role B B 

Federal Funds Ift Bib 

Prime Roto iovs iopj 

Broker Loon Rale 9 Vj 

Comm. Paper, 30-179 ctoys &M 855 

3-month Treasury Bills 135 835 

6- month Treasury Bills 845 343 

CDH 30-59 cun >15 115 

CD's 60-89- days 820 UO 

West Genaaiiv 

Lombara Rata 630 630 

Ovamlohf Rot* 5.90 515 

Oiw Month interbank 5.90 5.90 

3-month Interbank 6.15 6.15 

6-month Interbank 635 . 615 


Prltsiii 


Bank Bom Rate 
Call Money 
91-oay Treasury Bill 
3-menth inrertxjnk 


Discount Rale 
Call Money 
60 -dav interbank 


1M3V4 13-1 JVC. 

T29ta 13W 
12 5716 12 5/10 
12 13/32 12 7/16 


5 S 
4Vb 6 3/16 
6 S/14 6% 


Gold Prices 


Intervention Rote 
Call Money 
One-month Interbank 
3-momti Interbank 
6-month intentank 


ID* UW 
IMx 1M 
Ittb I Mb 
10ft 

Iff* - TW* 


Sourcrt; Reuters Commerzbank. Credit Ly- 
onnais, Uavds Bonk. Bank of Tokyo. 


Horn Kona 323.85 32255 —030 

Luxemboura 32330 — — 0J5 

Port* |12J kite] 323.98 32625 + 143 

zurlen 322.75 33730 + *35 

London 32130 32725 + 4.15 

New York _ tiLA. — 

QfOcUd HxteH lor London, Portt and U*«n)- 
boura, oneolno ana riosma prices (or Mona Kong 
and Zurich. New York Coma* current contract, 

AO Prim to USA «*r wnee. 

Souree: Reuters. 


RgralhSSribnnc. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

Page 9 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

laremananal HtraU Tribune 

P ARIS — As all battle-scarred investors know, it's war out 
there. So how do you outflank a stock market that takes 
no prisoners? Advance warning helps, especially intelli- 
gence about direction in which the U.S. economy is 
marching. 

Here's a report from the war zone by Francis H.M. Kelly, 
research director and chairman of the inves tmen t policy commit- 
tee at Oppenhdmcr 3c Co.: 

“The ominous moment in forecasting comes when the random 
blips on the economic radar screen fuse into the picture of an 
enemy flotilla in battle formation. The opening months of 1985 

produced a lot of blips that 

should have sent warnings to 

those who have been antici- Investors who think 
paring a healthy cyclical ex- . , * „ 

passion for the balance of the there IS a full retreat 

ycar M 

Bui investors who thintr this from Wall Street are 

fighting the last war. 

Mr. Kelly contends. He is pre- 

dieting a recession that will “not carry the presumed connotation 
for equity prices." Rather it will be very bullish for stocks. 

J His logic rests on the “unique nature of this slowdown" — not 
the result of “scarce money” that he pointed out is normally the 
culprit as the Federal Reserve acts to squeeze out inflation — but 
the fault of the dollar. Its strength has made America the 
“dumping ground for foreigners’ exports," he asserted, at the 
expense of U.S. industry. 

“The recession should hit about mid -year, prompting the Fed 
to embark on an aggressively expansionist monetary policy." he 
said. “Then equity prices arc likely to be powerfully and positive- 
ly influenced by the growing conviction that short rates and 
dollar exchange rates will fall sharply." 

With more liquidity available than usual to fuel stocks as the 
market anticipates an economic recovery, Mr. Kelly foresees a 
breakthrough past Wall Street’s record highs to “gains 25 10 30 
percent above where we are now." 

The types of stocks he thinks will perform best are “energy, 
cyclical capital goods, intermediate processing, high technology, 
capital goods and multinational stable demand" issues. 

Harry Zisson, research director and economist at Thomson 
McKinnon, measures the start of an offensive against the Dow 
average's 1, 300-barrier in weeks rather than months. However, he 
sees the drive stalling between there and 1.400 “by summertime," 
when he thinks investors should move to more “defensive posi- 
tions." 

B UT where the two cross swords is over the U.S. economy. 
Mr. Zisson views current business activity as strengthen- 
ing, powered by monetary stimulation from the Fed for six 
months last year through January. He expects a mild recession in 
late 1 985 or early next year as this liquidity wears off and interest 
rates and inflation rise in an economy operating at full capacity. 

His top stock picks are Atlantic Richfidd, General Electric, 
Emerson Electric, Warner-Lambert, Squibb, American Home 
Products, NCR and Pitney Bowes. 

If heavy smoke is obscuring events on the battlefield, Thomas 
B. Stiles, research director at EF. Hutton, has an explanation. 

“Of course. Wall Street is frequently confusing and contradic- 
tory,” he 'said, “but' it is even more so now as the prevailing 
consensus breaks doom and a hew viewpoint develops.” 

He noted that early in the year belief was widespread that the 
economy would continue to gather momentum, p ro m pting the 
Fed to “lean against the wind” and push interest rates higher. 

Mr. Stiles advises a “reflect-now-and-act-IaLer” approach to 
investing while the market decides which way it wants to go. He 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 3) 


OPEC’s 

Output 

Dropped 

Ceiling Held 
In First Quarter 

Reuters 

LONDON — Crude oil produc- 
tion probably hovered just below 
the OPEC official ceiling of 16 mil- 
lion barrels per day during the first 
three mouths of 1985, Petroleum 
intelligence Weekly said Wednes- 
day. 

Preliminary estimates indicate 
that rim-quarter production was 
15.8 million barrels per day, down 
5.7 percent from 16.7 million bar- 
rels per day in the first three 
months of 1984. 

The oil industry newsletter said 
that output by the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries 
was ai very low levels in January, 
probably breached the ceiling in 
February and tapered off to the 
official level in March. 

It put current output at about 16 
million barrels per day. 

Earlier, Oil Minister Subroto of 
Indonesia estimated the cartel's 
1985 production at 17 milli on bar- 
rels per day, down from 17.2 mil- 
lion m 1984. 

OPEC lowered its production 
ceiling from 17-5 million barrels 
per day last October in the face of 
slack demand. 

The newsletter said that Iran's 
production fell below two million 
barrels per day in March after 
reaching the country's quota of 13 
million barrels per day for a lime in 
February. Iran averaged two mil- 
lion barrels per day through Febru- 
ary. 

Output by Saudi Arabia was 
about 4 million barrels per day in 
March, 353,000 barrels below its 
OPEC dally ceiling, and has held at 
that level, the newsletter said. 

Both Iran and Saudi Arabia av- 
eraged well below their respective 
quotas during the quarter os a 
whole. 

According to the newsletter, Ku- 
wait said it exceeded its daily quota 
of 900,000 barrels in January and 
February by about 70,000 bands 
because' of higher-than -expected 
output from the neutral zone. But 
Kuwait adjusted its production 
downward last month. 

The United Arab Emirates was 
estimated to be exceeding its quota 
of 950.000 barrels per day by about 
100,000 bands per day. 

Production in Nigeria, with a 
daily quota of 1.45 million barrels 
per day, recovered dramatically 
from the 1,37 million barrels per 
day in January. 

Its daily output in February was 
1.68 million bands and the news- 
letter said that final March figures 
could run wdl above 1.6 million 
bands per day. 

In a Tuesday speech in Jakarta, 
Mr. Subroto said that the world ml 
market was not likely to change, 
because of greater volumes of 
crude and refined products and an 
increase in the number of tankers 
and refineries worldwide. 

He warned that a slight price- 
drop could be triggered if, for ex- 
ample, North Sea oil prices are al- 
lowed to fall to spot levels and if 
Nigeria’s prices followed suit. 


Budd Uncouples Rail-Car Division 


Thyssen Steers 
U.S. Subsidiary 
Back to Black 

By Daniel F. Cuff 

Kent York Times Service 

TROY, Michigan — After 
Thyssen AG. the big West Ger- 
man steelmaker, bought Budd 
Co. here in 1978, its new Ameri- 
can possession was hit by an un- 
expected one-two punch. 

First, the side of Budd that 
makes automotive products fal- 
tered when Detroit's business fell 
off. And the manufacturing side 
of Budd that makes passenger 
rail cars was hurt when the com- 
pany tried to expand the busi- 
ness rapidly to make up for the 
automotive slump. 

Budd was suddenly in trouble, 
leaving its new owner to wonder 
just what it had bought. 

Many European investments 
in the United States in the last 
decade have had similar snug- 
gles. 

They are as diverse as Schl um- 
ber ger Ltd.'s problems with Fair- 
child Semiconductor Co., Ten- 
gelmann 

Warenhandelsgesellschoft's with 
its Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea 
Co. supermarket chain, Elf- Aq- 
uitaine with Texasgulf Inc., and 
Imperial Group PLC with How- 
ard Johnson Co. 

Some have all but given up. 
Imperial, for example, has said it 
is considering the sale of Howard 
Johnson. But others are deter- 
mined to hang on. 

Thyssen, despite the misfor- 
tunes', has been working to im- 
prove its American company and 
has made some major structural 
changes. 

During a recent visit to New 
York. Dieter Spethmann, Thys- 
sen’ ■> chief executive, said, “We 
are happy with Budd." 

Mr. Spethmann did not say so, 




$306-Million Bid 
Made by Icahn to 
Control Uniroyal 





Automobile-related 
Products Dmision j 
k 88% 1 


Th« Nab Yori. Timat 

James H. McNeal Jr., Budd Co.’s chief executive, and a 
Metro-North commuter railroad car made by Budd. 


but Thyssen may be happier with 
the a u lo-parts business, which 
has returned to profitability as a 
slimmer and more quality -con- 
scious operation, than with the 
rail car business, which is still 
losing money. 

To make the two operations 
more distinct, Thyssen at the 
start of the year broke oH the rail 
car operation, which is now 
called Transit America Inc. and 
has the distinction of being the 
only surviving rail-car builder in 
ihe'Uniied States. 

The future of Transit America 
does not seem bright, however. 

There are 14 foreign rail-car 
makers, most operating with 
governmental subsidies in one 
form or another. Transit Ameri- 


ca has lost out on the last 13 rail- 
car contracts awarded in the 
United States. 

Thyssen has brought in Hans 
U. Wolf from West Germany as 
chairman and president of Tran- 
sit America, which operates from 
its Red Lion Road plant in Phila- 
delphia. 

At Budd, the breakoff of the 
money-draining transit opera- 
tion seems to have brought a 
measure of relief. 

The buyers of passenger rail 
cars far subways and railroads 
are mostly public authorities and 
the political overtones involved 
are not to every businessman's 
taste. 

“Selling rail car products to an 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 4) 


Compiled by Our Stuft From Dispatches 

N EW YORK — A group led by 
Carl C. Icahn announced Wednes- 
day a hostile. 5306- million tender 
offer for a controlling interest in 
Uniroyal Inc., one of the largest 
rubber makers in the United States. 

The Committee for the Protec- 
tion of Shareholder Rights offered 
to pay S18 a share for more than 50 
percent of Uniroyal's 34 million 
shares outstanding. 

In newspaper advertisements, 
the group said the offer would be 
effective next week and would be 
conditioned on the defeat or with- 
drawal of anti-takeover proposals 
scheduled for a shareholder vote at 
Uniroyal’s annual meeting April 
16. 

Mr. Icahn, a New York financier 
who owns about 10 percent of the 
chemical, plastics ana rubber prod- 
ucts company, said that if the offer 
is successful, he would merge Uoir- 
oyal into one of the companies he 
controls. Mr. Icahn's group said 
that it would give 518 worth or 
securities to the shareholders who 
do not tender their shares. 

After the announcement. Unir- 
oyal stock led the list of most ac- 
tively traded issues on the New 
York Stock Exchange and at mid- 
day Wednesday was at SI 8.625 a 
share, up 75 cents from Tuesday's 
close. 

Mr. icahn’s group has launched 
a proxy fight in an attempt to 
thwart Uniroyal’s management 
from putting into effect certain 
anti-takeover measures, including 
the staggering of the terms of the 
company's 12 directors. Mr. Icahn 
has said he believes the measures 
would inhibit the rights of share- 
holders. 


Thrifts See Little Effect From Bevill’s Troubles 


By Pamela Brownstein 

The Associated Press 

NEWARK, New Jersey — De- 
spite a stnnll run on one New Jersey 
thrift, several savings and loan as- 
sociations say they don’t expect 
their financial standings to be af- 
fected by the bankruptcy filing this 
week of a government securities 
dealer. 

The Federal Reserve Board in 
Washington said no problems were 
reported at financial institutions 
after the filing by BeviH Bresler & 
Schulman Asset Management 
Corp. for protection from creditors 
under Chapter 11 of the; federal 
bankruptcy laws. 

John Moffatt, vice president at 
Fort Lee Savings & Loan in Fort 
Lee; New Jersey, which is owed 
519.3 million, reported a “slight 
run" Tuesday. 

But he added that it was difficult 
to tell which customers were ner- 
vous and which were pulling their 
money from the federally insured 
institution to pay taxes. 

Mr. Moffatt said there would be 
“no adverse affect on customers." 

The Securities and Exchange 
Commission has alleged that Asset 


Management, four affiliates and 
five officers misrepresented the fi- 
nancial status of Asset Manage- 
ment and failed to disclose that it 
could not meet obligations to cus- 
tomers. 

Regulators estimated it owes at 
Ifast 5140 million to customers. 

1 " U.S. District Judge Dickinson 
Debevoise froze the assets of Asset 
Management on Monday and did 
the same Tuesday for BBS Govern- 
ment Securities Group Inc., BeviH 
Bresler & Schulman Government 
Securities Inc. and BBS Securities 
Group Inc. 

The SEC on Tuesday did not ask 
that any action be taken against the 
fourth affiliate, the brokerage firm 
of Bevill Bresler & Schulman Inc. 

The judge also named Saul S. 
Cohen, a New York attorney, as a 
trustee for Asset Management and 
as receiver for two affiliates — BBS 
Government Securities Group and 
Bevill Bresler & Schulman Govern- 
ment Securities 

The filing by Asset Management 
followed by less than a month the 
failure of a Florida government se- 
curities dealer that triggered a crisis 
at savings and loans in Ohio. 


Most of Asset Management's 
customers are small savings and 
loans institutions and banks. 

However, officials at several of 
the institutions said they expected 
minimal losses. 

John Domeier, chairman of 
Great American Savings & Loan, a 
federally insured institution in Oak 
Park, Illinois, listed as a 530-mil- 
lion creditor, said his thrift proba- 
bly would suffer no losses. 

Like executives at other thrifts, 
he said the securities were being 
held at a bank for safekeeping 

Dennis E Finnegan, senior vice 
president at Merritt Commercial 
Savings & Loan in Baltimore, said 
his institution's potential 522-mil- 
lion loss is minimal because the 
institution's assets exceed 5300 mil- 
lion. 

Ira Sorkin, regional administra- 
tor of the SEC, declined comment 
on whether any assets of Bevill 
Bresler & Schulman Ino, with 
25,000 public customers, were in- 
volved in Asset Management's op- 
erations. 

But he said some Asset Manage- 
ment creditors thought they were 
dealing with the brokerage firm. 


which is federally regulated, but 
actually were dealing with Asset 
Management, which is noL 

He added that some of the prin- 
cipals in the brokerage firm were 
the same as those in Asset Manage- 
ment and that the SEC is investi- 
gating. 

Frank Vecchione, the company’s 
attorney, declined comment on 
bow the problems originated. 

Robert Bevill, ehairaian of Asset 
Management and the brokerage 
firm, did not return telephone calls 
to Ms office, his home or his attor- 
ney’s office. 

ESM Government Securities Inc. 
of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, closed 
last month after the SEC found 
that the company may have left 
customers with 5230 million in 
losses. 

The ESM failure led to a ran on 
one Ohio thrift and eventually to 
the state-ordered dosing of 69 oth- 
er savings and loans insured with it 
under a private program. Many 
thrifts have since reopened. 


Mr. Icahn, a corporate hunter 
who last month dropped a hostile 
bid for Phillips Petroluem Co., said 
his group had offered to acquire all 
of Uniroyal on a friendly basis, but 
was rebuffed. He also said he hod 
the financing to complete the pur- 
chase. 

In addition, Mr. Icahn said he 
would not self his 3.16 million Un- 
iroyal common shares back to the 
company before the annual share- 
holders meeting or afterward, if the 
anti -takeover measures were de- 
feated, unless the company ™.ig 
the same offer to all shareholders. 

The anti-takeover, or so-called 
“poison pill" proposals would slog- 
ger terms of directors, require SG- 
percent shareholder approval to re- 
move directors, amend bylaws to 
permit shareholders to fill board 
vacancies or increase board size, 
require a similar vote to amend the 
ami-takeover proposals and related 
bylaws or to approve a merger and 
eliminate shareholder rights to act 
by written consenL 

Uniroyal. based in Middlebury, 
Connecticut, has 34 million com- 
mon shares and 61 1.141 first pre- 
ferred shares outstanding, each of 
which is entitled to one vote at the 
annual meeting. 

Uniroyal earned S77 million, or 
S2.31 a share, on sales of S2.I2 
billion last year. 

In March, Mr. Icahn agreed to 
drop his 58 .06-billion bid for Phil- 
lips after the oil company sweet- 
ened its competing offer to share- 
holders. 

Phillips agreed to pay $25 mil- 
lion of his expenses and Wall Street 
analysts estimated hispretax profit 
from the pursuit of Phillips at be- 
tween S50 million and 560 million. 


Active Dollar 
Loses inEurope 

Reuters 

LONDON — The dollar 
closed generally lost ground in 
active trading in Europe, after 
renewed worries about the U.S. 
banking system, dealers said. 

Dealers said the inability of 
Bevill, Bresler & Schulman As- 
set Management Corp„ a gov- 
ernment securities firm, to meet 
its obligations had less impact 
than last month’s collapse of 
ESM Government Securities 
Inc. “People still don't know 
whether there will be a second 
chapter," said Chad Dickson of 
Salomon Brothers Inc. 

In late trading in London, the 
British pound was at SI-2155, 
gaining ground from the 
5 1 .2055 in late trading Tuesday. 
Other dollar rates, compared 
with late rales Tuesday: 3.1418 
Deutsche marks, down from 
3.1530; 95920 French francs, 
down from 9.6345, and 2.6475 
Swiss francs, from 2.6715. 


Unions on Wane in Western Nations , Study Shows 

ILO Qtes 'General Deterioration 9 in Union Membership, Workers 9 Rights 


By Hairy Bernstein 

Las Ange/es Times Service 

GENEVA — Labor unions in 
Western Europe are experiencing 
the same decline in strength and 
membership as Lfaose in the United 
States, and union leaders in all in- 
dustrialized countries are urgently 
— some say desperately — seeking 
ways to revitalize then - organiza- 
tions. 

The Geneva-based International 
Labor Organization has just issued 
the results of a worldwide study of 
what it calls “a general deteriora- 
tion in the global labor situation.” 

The organization’s research 
“paints a disquieting picture of fall- 
ing or stagnating trade -union mem- 
bership, increasing violations of 
trade-union rights, cuts in expendi- 
tures on training almost every- 
where and alarming conditions of 
work in some developing countries, 
especially vis-a-vis safety and 
health." 

A measure of the problem in the 
United States was provided raxnl- 


People Express 
To Raise Fares 

Reuters 

NEWARK. New Jersey - 
People Express Airlines Inc. 
said Wednesday that it is ad- 
justing its fare schedule as of 
June 5. 

Although some . individual 
fares will be lowered, the 
changes will result in a system- 
wide increase of 10 percent, the 
company said. 

The airline also announced 
that it would begin service be- 
tween Newark and Columbia, 
South Carolina, on May 1 with 
three daily nonstop, round-trip 
flights and a one-way fare of 
529. 


ly by the Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics, which showed that only 18.8 
percent of wage and salaried work- 
ers were union members in 1984. 
down from 23 percent in 1980 and 
a peak of 355 percent in 1945. 

For many years, most union 
leaders in the United States and 
other countries responded to re- 
ports of dedining membership by 
blaming outside forces, notably 
well-heeled enemies of unions and 
the two recent recessions. 

In the United States, the union 
leaders would add — accurately — 
that much of the membership loss 
resulted from massive job reduc- 
tions in “smokestack" industries. 

But unions ceased shifting the 
blame in February when the AFL- 
CIO issued a blunt, well-reasoned 
self-analysis called the “Changing 
Situation of Workers and Their 
Unions.” 

In it, the federation acknowl- 
edged that its own failures were in 
no small part responsible for the 
membership decline. 

Saying that “unions find them- 
selves behind the pace of change,” 
the report recommended a wide va- 
riety of reforms, including union 
membership for workers in plants 
where a majority have voted 
against union representation, arbi- 
tration as a substitute for strikes 


and contracts providing minimum 
wages that would serve as a basis 
for bargaining between individual 
workers and their bosses. 

John F. Henning, head of the 
California Labor Federation, 
praised these departures last week, 
observing that “only rebels, dissi- 
dents or worse have ever talked 
that way.” 

As of now, though, the report is 
just that — talk. 

The ILO report did not offer any 
Finn suggestions of what labor can 
do to reverse the worldwide decline 
in union membership. 

The organization, founded in 
1919, is made up of management, 
union and government representa- 
tives from 150 countries. 

But it did bluntly lay out some 
problems facing unions in Western 
industrialized countries such as the 
United StaLes, as well as the far 
more difficult problems faring 
workers, usually without unions, in 
totalitarian nations and in non- to- 
talitarian developing countries. 

Since 19S0. there have been sub- 
stantial increases in on-the-job 
deaths in developing countries, and 
industries and “labor inspection 
services, if they exist at all, are 
unable to cope with this situation,” 
the ILO said. 

“Even in the industrialized mar- 


ket economies, where fatality rates 
generally decreased during Lhe 
1970s, governments tend to cm 
down on labor inspections," it said. 
“If this trend continues, more acci- 
dents may be expected to happen in 
the 1980s.” 

Unions in the United Stales have 
contended that the Reagan admin- 
istration is neglecting the health 
and safety of workers. 

The ILO said that “trade union- 
ism might seem in a bad way these 
days," with membership stagnating 
and reduced negotiating power, 
and “there are (hose within (ILO) 
who declare that trade unionism 
has entered an irreversible de- 
cline." 

However, the report said, the 
irend toward giving workers and 
their unions a greater voice in mak- 
ing corporate decisions means that, 
“in fact, unions have never been so 
much a part of economic and social 
life." 

“They are being given ever-in- 
creasing responsibilities at all lev- 
els, (ana) union members actually 
exert more influence than their 
overall percentage (of the work 
forces) might suggest." 

The report clearly suggested that 
focusing on such corporate democ- 
racy might well be a good way for 
unions to increase their strength. 


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■5 “-V # 


Wfednesdaj4 

MSE 

3pm 

Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up Is the closing an Wall Street 
and do eot reflect late trades elsewhere. 


26 % ONEOK 
1 JV. OranRk 
Mfe Orange 
inn OrlonC 
sie Ortoop 
2< Ortonpr 
1 M OutbMs 
17 % OwmTr 
13 OvStilp 
2 M OwsttC 
31 % Owenlll 
10 % Oxford 


Ul U I 
OH U I 
J 3 t -42 14 
Ji U SI 
3B 

ax 84 

m is a 

4 * 13 12 

sun 
is u i 
1 . 66 b 3 J * 

m w 11 


47 XM 
34 MK 
at ill* 

434 25 % 
113 me 
33 son 
914 25 % 
92 29 % 
131 16 % 
M 3 32 V 
707 44 IS 
10 12% 


3M 

am— % 
im— % 
25 % + lb 
11 % 

am— % 

25% + % 

29 % + % 

is% 

32 % + % 
44 

law + vi 


tm 






m 



Ui 9.9 8 
Lpf 140 129 
LpUMIU 
LdPf 342 122 
L PT MO 1 U 
Ldpdl 25 124 
LPT a» 132 
Lpr 270 HI 
It 220 £7 12 
Pf 140 67 
220 14 21 
170 7.1 6 

.40 1.1 IS 
148 X 2 24 
.56 23 14 
1740114 7 
78 1 J 14 
140 U U 
U 2 el 44 
177 97 
120 a 204 




«Rb 

28 % QuokOs 

154 

22 

13 

15 BB 

44 % 

43 % 

43 %— % 

22 % 

15 QuakSO 

20 

X 7 

27 

255 

21 % 

21 % 

21 % 

11 % 

6 % Quanex 



36 

92 

9 % 

9 

9 

34 % 

23 Quastar 

140 

69 

9 

105 

33 

32 % 

32 % — VS 

25 % 

14 QkRell 

24 a 1.1 

IT 

112 

22 % 

21 % 

22 % +1 


-w+j 



U.S. Futures apoj 


Season Season 
Htofi Low 


Ooen Hletl Lew CIom ChOL 


1 Season Season 






Hlah 

Lew 

Open 

HWl 

LOW 

doM 

Ctis. 

2110 

1960 

Jul 



2098 

—* 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sates 2208 




Prev. DavOoan InL 27209 off 22 




ORANGE JUICE (HYCE) 





15200 *> 4 - cents per lb. 





18520 

15120 

May 154.10 

MOJO 

15610 

15750 

+ 2.10 

18685 

15 X 00 

Jul 157.48 

160.10 

15740 

157.90 

+140 

18220 

15555 

Sen 15650 

15840 

15650 

15740 

+ 1 J 5 

18120 

15440 

Nov MOiffi 

16820 

15640 

15670 

+ 1.15 

100.00 

15520 

Jan 15040 

15940 

15690 

15720 

+ 1 J 5 

17750 

15600 

Mar 



157 JS 

+120 

16250 

16020 

May 



157 J 5 

+120 



Jul 



15645 


18050 

179 JS 

Sep 



157.15 

+30 . 

Est. Sales 

700 

Prav.salas 

314 




Prav. Dav 

Open Int. 6585 off 71 






Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits. In millions, ore In local 
currencies unless otherwise Indicated 





Growing with 
energy conservation . 

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from the Thermox 
Division are one 
example of the 
many Ametek 

instruments helping to cut . 
industry's fuel costs. 

Write for latest reports to: 

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Dept. H, 

410 Park Avenue, 21st Floor, 

New York. NY 1 0022. 


1M im UtPLPf 204 iu 


33 V» 21% 
15 % 31 b 
234 b 14 
5 Vb 2 V 4 
281 * 18 Vb 
4 Vb 216 
ISA 53 b 
46 Vj 29 % 
1 » 9 Vi 
25 % 17 % 
fib 3 % 
104 b Bit 
43 % 25 Vi 
46 54 

754b 4011 
81 4746 

83 % 48 Vb 
44 Vi 52 Vb 
617 b 49 Vb 

am* n% 

41 % 27 
78 58 


7 18 18 18 


206 31 
n 34 llti 
42 224 b 
26 2 % 

45 22 % 

56 3 % 

7 8 % 

M 3 31 % 
51 11 % 
293 20 
27 4 Vb 

46 10 % 
479 42 % 

40 x 45 % 
1201 75 
90 x 79 % 
2oaz si 
120 X 64 
108 X 61 
17 18 


23 % 
40 

% 56 % 

% 

17 % 
26 
43 
46 % 
11 % 
6% 
1 % 
18 % 
19 % 
10 % 


UEi ML 820 T 3 JI 
UnEI pf 248 12 * 




FEEDER CATTLE (CME 7 
-* 6 i>ooib 6 - cents per l&. 

7420 4470 Apr 6770 68.18 

7275 44.95 May 47.90 4990 

7370 4440 Aua 4993 7035 

7390 4790 Swo 4970 4995 

7232 47.10 Ocl 49.10 49 JO 

WTO 4995 Nov 4975 7090 

79 JO moo Jan 7045 7045 

Est. Salas 1991 Proa. SalM 1933 
Prev- Day Ooanlni 9952 oft 84 
HOGS (CME> 

30900 ibs.. cams aer lb. 

5445 4240 Apr 4395 4440 

M -*2 4795 Jim 49.10 49 JO 

’ 5 HZ ->uf 5090 5143 

54 J 7 47 JO Aua 5073 5147 

. 5175 4590 Oct 4740 4795 

. 5095 4490 Doc 48 JS 48.92 

M 9 B * 6.23 FOB *9 JO 4970 

**2 ABr 4455 *-97 
49*5 £790 Jun 4895 4895 

EsL 5 aioi WM 3 Prav. Sates 7449 
Prev.DavOnenlnt. 24 J 99 off 22 
FOhK BELLJES (CME) 

3 &gpoiba.- cents par ih. 

B 2 O 0 41.13 Alov 6475 4847 

8247 62.15 Jul 6740 49.33 

WL 45 6090 Aua 4440 4740 

7620 63.15 Fob 7173 7245 

7340 4*40 Mar 7290 7290 

■ 7540 7040 MOV 

7490 7 a 90 Jul 

EstSales 6460 Prev. Sales 692 * 
Prev. Day Open inL 11924 off 11 


COFFEE C (NYCSCE) 

37900 Itar cants nor lb. 

15290 12291 MOV 1 * 3.10 14490 

M & S MS 

M 3 J 0 12830 Mar W ” 

1*275 13190 MOV 

14030 13530 Jut 

13*25 13275 Sap 

Est. Solus 1300 Prev. Safes 898 

Prev. Dey Open InL 13 , 1*0 offU 
SUSARWORLO II (NYCSCe) 

1 12900 lbs.- cent* per m. 

10 J 0 3.73 May 371 378 

MS Iff Jul W IN 

9-75 <92 SOP *97 497 

995 4.13 Oct *71 *72 

77 J 440 Jan 445 445 

993 594 Mar SLID 5.12 

7.15 525 Men- 590 530 

649 549 Jul 546 S 44 

Est. Sales 9924 Prev. Solos 446 * 
Prev. Day Open InL 8 * 72 * off M 3 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

1 0 metric tons- Joer ton 

2570 1«98 May 2350 3403 

2*00 1991 Jlri 2145 7194 

2415 1987 Sep 2143 2145 

<037 19*5 Dec am 9110 

2190 1935 MOT 2090 2090 

2130 mo Mev 


Industrials 


7907 7445 

U 42 32M 


+ 1 i 

_ + % 
17 % -f % 
23 % + Vi 
+ 1 % 
+ % 


149 
079 
137 
42 
142 ~ 90 Vb 
120 39 % 
457 55 % 
58 97 
652 17 % 
63 20 % 
110 x 40 
48 37 % 
37 11 % 
4 % 
1 % 
18 % 
19 % 
6 % 


W 9 35 % 
441 17 % 
23 6% 
301 31 % 
70 33 % 
32 33 % 
133 34 
146 
60 S 
zu 


44 % 33 % Xerox 390 44 17 2381 44 % 43 % 44 % + 1 % 

S* *43 1 &4 „ 8 51 % 51 % 51 % + % 

29 19 XTRA 44 13 9 401 23 % 24 % 23 % + % 


30 94 Zot«Cp 133 U I 22 27 % 27 % 27 % — % 

13 % Zapata 94 59 17 181 14 % 74 % I*Te 

? 2 - 2 °*!* J 14 269 53 % 54 % 33 % +1 

52 Sm ® 16 .7 1J5! 21% 20 % 28 % + % 

21 % 14 % Zeros M 199 17% 17% 17 % +% 


PERSONALITIES PLUS 

MARY BLUME 

IN THE WEEKEND SECTION 
. OF FRIDAYS IHT 


4340 4420 

4995 4947 
saso 51.10 
5070 5197 

4740 4747 
48 J 0 4845 
*930 49 J 7 

4695 4445 
4845 4845 


4640 &J7 
6740 4840 
6440 6447 

71 JS 72 J 5 
7200 7240 

7170 
7245 


14290 14329 
14205 1*245 
V4L75 1*296 
14190 141 JH 
140 L 13 
13998 
13895 
13793 


349 170 
397 398 
498 493 
4.13 613 
648 *39 
390 SOI 
119 119 
544 149 


2350 2374 

9140 9174 

2 M 0 2152 

2184 Wl 
2090 2098 
2098 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 
si minion- ptsaf 100 pet 
9191 87.14 Jun 9144 9141 

9193 849 * Sea 9090 9193 

90.90 8177 Dec 9830 9041 

mss 8640 Mar 90.17 9122 

9027 8791 Jun 

9100 B 8 O 0 Sen 

* 7-59 09*5 Dec 

Mir 

Est. Sales 11926 Prav. galas 12422 
Prev.DayOpen InL 3947a up 748 
]• TR^TRJEASUBy (CBT) 
S 1000 p 0 prl»pts& 32 ndsefia 0 pdl 

82-3 70 * Jim 7 S-a 79-18 

81-13 75-16 Sap 7 B -2 78-22 

BO -22 73-13 Dec 

BOB 75 - 1 * Mar 

_ 79-24 74-30 Jim 

Est. Salas Prav.salas 5453 

Prav. Dov Open lm. *3486 up *21 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

U pet 4106000*% & XbMsaf lOOPCtl 

Ifcl 5 2-5 J un ** ,J1 *m* 

74-2 S 7-10 Sep 67-28 4840 

21 S®* 47 2 w-s* 

72 -M 57-2 MOT 66-11 66-31 

70-16 36 -» Jim * 5-21 64-8 

TOO 36-29 Sap 45-7 65-20 

6 W 2 f «7 MW 

6 M 63-12 Jun 

6826 63-6 Sop 63-7 63-23 

68-8 42-24 Dae 

Eat. Salas Prav.salaal 22 O 60 

Prev. Day Open IRL 21 VQ 7 wUto 

ONMArCBT] 

siMOOp prtn-pts& 32 ndeaf 100 pet 
ft? ftH 69-11 

6803 s? aj •* 

2* ts 3Sff w * u ®‘ ,s 

67-3 65 Sep 

E»t-S^as Prav, Sates 97 

Prwv.OavOpan InL 3493 Oft l* 
CERT. DEPOSITl IMM) 

II mlllloTt-ptsot loo Pd 
2 H 8 JUft 9063 WJ 9 

9060 BMP tap 89.99 9119 

9117 BU 6 Dm 89 J 1 89 J 1 

S 9 J 8 8446 Mar 

B 946 0643 Jun 

BUS 8746 SOP 

164 * p-u Due 

gM.B ^ts *7 9 Piva Salas 908 
Prev.OoyDiwiint 6^28 up 99 


9142 9140 
9186 9143 

9047 9040 

9117 saas 
8949 
8947 
8946 
8946 


78-26 79-15 
78-1 71-21 

77-30 
77-10 
76 - 9 * 


68 - 2 * 69-17 
£ 7-25 60-18 
67 67-23 

66-9 66-30 

65-21 MB 
45-7 65-20 

65-3 65-2 

66-18 
66-4 
63-5 63-23 

63-11 


69 OMS 
68-16 68-19 
67-31 
67-13 67-13 
66-29 
66-15 


9163 9187 
Ril 9122 
895 t mm 

8921 

8922 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CM El 
pa bits and cants 
189.1 Q 156.10 Jun 10040 11125 17940 18150 

1*170 -16020 SSP W 6 . 1 S 1 SA 75 1040 16 LOO 

19640 17470 Dae 18745 18 U 0 18745 1 V 45 

19420 190.10 MOT 19175 

EsLSafas 51456 Prev. Solas 52218 
Prav. Day Open Int. 56452 uaUSS 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
p rims and cents _ 

21940 17300 Jun 19 SL 75 19145 19520 

212 J 0 1 BL 75 8 PP 20150 20040 799 JO : 

21040 20940 Dec _ 

Est. solas prav.salas 3436 

Prev. Day Opan InL 1458 ottTI 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE 1 
prints and cents 

11020 9020 JUn 10445 10520 10*25 ' 

11120 7 U 5 S 8 P 10675 10725 10670 

HITS MI -20 DOC 109.15 109 J 5 10825 , 

11145 111.10 Mar 11120 11120 111.10 

Est. sates 10460 Prav.Sales lira© 

Prav. Dav Open lot. 8487 afl 289 


Commodity Indexes 


oom 

Moody's NA. i 

1 , 930 JO 

D_J. Futures NA 

Com. Research Bureau- NA. 

Moody's : bow 100 : Dec. 31 , 1931 . 
p • preliminary; f • final 
Reuters ; base 100 : Sep. IS* 1931 . 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 3 % 1774 . 


London Metals 
April 10 


Close Pravlou 

BM Ask BM Aik 

ALUMINUM 
Starting per metric ton 
spat wni® 90*20 92340 92440 

forward 93120 93140 95258 95 LB 0 

COPPER CATHODES (Hletl Grade) 

Sterling per metric tan 
■not 122 K» 122420 122680 122720 

lorwara 123220 1 3 3240 124020 124120 

copper CATHODES (Staederd) 

SterMitg per metric ton 
spot 121820 121920 122620 122820 

forward 123220 123420 12*120 124320 

LEAD 

Starting par metric ton 
SPOt 33 X 00 33520 34820 34920 

forward 32320 32340 33520 33540 

NICKEL 

Sttfilne per metric to« 

saal 445020 447020 445520 446020 

forward 443020 443020 * 42*20 *43520 

SILVER 

P eac e per troy ounce 

SPOt 5*520 5*600 55220 55320 

forward 56600 56520 57020 57120 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric Ion 

spat 943520 92*020 92*020 * 4*520 

forward 924520 925020 92*020 92*100 


Cash Prices April 9 


Com m odity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santos, lb— __ 
PrUilcJotti 64/30 38 VS. vd _ 

Steel billets (Pitt.), ton 

Iron 2 Fdry. Philo- ton 

Steel scrap Ha 1 ftvy Pin. . 

Lead saol. lb 

Capper etect- lb 

Tin (51 rails!, lb - 

Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb 

Palladium, at 

silver N.Y-ax 

Sourer; AP. 


Paris Commodities 
April 10 


London Commodities 
April 10 


Toe Ago 

128 148 

046 024 

*7100 *5320 

31100 21100 

79 -SO 100-181 . . _ 

2 B- 2 I 26-28 ft* 

49-72 75%-79 I Oct 

52849 63563 I OOC 

045-47 023 

111-114 158 % 

667 9275 


19520 19525 
19920 20025 
20*45 


10425 10*20 
10670 10690 
HUBS 10720 
111.18 111.18 


forward 
Source; AP. 


metric ton 

729.00 779 J 0 7*320 7*520 

73 X 50 73420 74420 745 D 0 


Asian Commodities 

April 10 


HONO-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U2J per ounce 

Close Previous 
Hlob Low eta Alft BM Ask 
API _ N.T. N.T. 32220 32*20 32100 33SM 
May _ N.T. N.T. 32*20 32620 32*20 324 JM 
Jun _ 32720 32720 32620 XSLOO 32420 33820 
AW _ N.T. N.T. 33020 33320 33120 33320 
°Ct ~ N.T. .N.T. 33520 33720 33400 3 J 8 J» 
DOC _ 34220 3*220 3*120 34320 3*120 34320 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 3*600 3*820 34720 3*920 
Volume: 21 hits of looax 


April 10 5S 


Previous 
96120 f 
1,93600 
124^2 
245.90 


Market Guide 


S lim 

I • ! f I * W . 1 II* I 


unrests: 

HYCE: 

5 yfe : 



High LOW ! 

API N.T. N.T. 

Jun 32740 32630 

Auo ... N.T. N.T. 

volume: 201 lets of 100 oz. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents per klla 
Close 

BM AM 

May 20650 20526 

Jim 20720 307 JO 

Jlv moo 20920 

Aua — 71050 21150 : 

SOP 21240 213 JO ' 

Volume: 43 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Sing ap ore cents per kiln 
dose 
BM AM 
R 551 MOV- 17850 17920 

nssi Jun_ 11155 181.73 

RSS 2 IMOV. 17450 17550 

R 55 3 May _ 17350 17150 

PSS 4 May . 16750 16950 ' 

R 53 5 May- 1650 16650 ; 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

Malaysian rtogells per 25 tons 


settle Settle 
32320 3 ZJ 20 

32650 337.90 

33150 332.90 


S&P 100 Index Options 
April 9 


Previous 
BM Ask 
20850 20920 

21050 21140 

31150 21220 
21350 21450 

71540 21640 


Pi-enow 
BM AM 
18020 18030 
18 X 00 18350 

17600 17720 

17*20 17 X 00 

16920 17120 
16420 16620 


Mm 6a( hEt’toS im » PoB-lAd 
n™ ** Net In Jly Am 6 bir »»— ji* 
in mm - - T _ _ ^ 

g 

I 9 S 1 /It 1/16 S/H — _ _ _* “ 

Trial ceasshm I77.N4 
Trial c«8 fete M.EX1H 
Total put yekane 1D0JU 
Trial pel *smlat,*2iiN 
WOO; 

MMI76X W» 173.11 Q*J* I7U7 + CJJ - 
SOurvt! CMOS. 


U.S. Treasury B3Q Rates 
April 9 


& 






m 


m 


BW TltM YWd 






S-inenttl 846 

Onavper M 

Sourer.- Salomon Brothers 


DM Futures Options 

April 9 

W.GcniwMii(-&Sfn mortacttibpermorli 


soo 1 ‘^ a ‘orc 

i 3 s » as s 

5 “ i-a !*» |3 lS - 

U w 13 - a a - 

S!!f?5“«9i«>i.682s 

goitt Mon- wu. 2410 epaa uo 

: Aten. yoLMHgpea iSIiSt 

*WEe.-OW£ 


WHat are n^BgBrrs saying? 

W.WJ-STffitWATCH 

BYEC6MARDRORH8ACM 

■neachthu^SSSt 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 


Page 11; 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


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441 irvc i»ft in.-. 

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April 1° 


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Daimler-Dornier Talks 
Are Said to Intensify 


By Warren Getler 

Imemotiomi Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Talks con- 
cerning tbe acquisition of a mqor- 
ity stake in Domier GmbH by 
Daimler-Benz AG have readied an 
intensive phase, Daimler officials 
said Wednesday. 

But Daimler officials, who asked 
not to be identified, cautioned that 
although they are "hopeful” about 
gaining majority control of tbe 
family-owned Donuer group, they 
do not foresee a derision by Dor- 
mer's six family shareholders be- 
fore the month's end. 

Dormer’s shareholders were un- 
available for c omm e n t Wednesday. 

Sources at Daimler’s headquar- 
ters in Stuttgart said several 
months of “sensitive" discussions 
between the automaker and Dor- 
mer’s owners have yet to produce a 
definitive answer from die share- 
holders whether the group is pre- 
pared to sell any portion of its 
stake. 

A majority stake in Domier, 
West Germany's second-largest 
aviation and aerospace group, 
which is expected to report 1984 
sales of around 1.6 billion Deut- 
sche marks ($507 million), could 
fetch up to 500 mil turn DM from 
prospective buyers, analysts said. 

Sensitivity about the talks stems 
from what is understood to be a 
family rift over the direction of 
Domier between a group of share- 

nTtoBuyNTTTeiephoDes 

Reuters 

RALEIGH, North Carolina — 
ITT Corp. said Wednesday that its 
business and consumer communi- 
cations division ordered 10.000 
telephones from Nippon Telegraph 
& Telephone Corp. of Japan. De- 
livery of the telephones wfll be 
completed by the end of ApriL No 
price was disclosed. 


holders led by Claudius Domier, 
70. and another led by his step- 
brother. Just os Domier, 48. 

Claudius Dormer has recently 
indicated his desire to sdl Us \!&- 
percent stake. 

Observers speculate that Claudi- 
us Dormer's brothers, Peter and 
Silvius, with 82-penxm and 12.8- 
percent stakes, may also be inter- 
ested in selling their shares to 

Daimler. The fate of the 27.8-per- 
eem share of Anna Donuer, the 
widow of company's founder, 
Claude Domier, who died last year, 
remains clouded. 

A takeover of Domier, based in 
Friedrichshafra, would strongly 
underpin Daimler's efforts to sc- 
enic a foothold in aeroengines, avi- 
ation and various high-technology 
fields, Daimler sources said. Such 
diversification, officials said, 
would help offset anticipated fur- 
ther stagnation in the European 
heavy- truck market, an area in 
which Daimler is dominant. 

In February, Daimler an- 
nounced that it had acquired full 
control of MTU Motoren-uod Tur- 
binen-Union MQnchen GmbH, a 
maker of airplane and automotive 
engines with gales of 12 

billion DM. 

Daimler previously had held a 
50-percem stake in MTU, as did 
Maschinenfabrik Augsburg-Nflm- 
berg AG. Analysis estimate Daim- 
ler paid MAN 500 milium DM for 
its stake. 

The government of Bad m -WOrt- 
temberg, the state in which both 
Daimler-Benz and Domier are 
based, has said it hopes to see a 
"Baden-WQmemberg solution” to 
any new configuration in Dormer's 
ownership. 

The Bavarian premier, Franz Jo- 
sef Stranss, is understood to want 
to Domier to continue its existing 
operations in Munich and to ex- 
pend them in Bavaria. 


ADVERTISEMENT - 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
10 April 1985 

TiMMtasMt vtriM MMtattom Attain Mwon WMMtatf MrtM Fund* IlflM wlHiifee 
»chwi of mm funds mm ftsof t « boMd an mm stick, tim miwIm 
mordlMd symbols tndlcnto (raotner of quotafloax soppmd tor Bm IHT: 

(dj -dolly; M-mcUy; (U-bMnoamtr: Crt-rwulcrly? Ul-lrroatarly. 


AL MAL management 
fw] Af-Mal Trust, SJ* 


08*1 FLEX LIMITED 
1 15346 — Iwj MutticurTOftCV. 


— (wV Dollar NMdhm Torn), 
w) Del lor Lons Torn 


BANK JULIUS B AER & CO. LM. _, w , „ 

2$ \ SSS g r r . — sPiniS - 1 * 1 xwr*' 

—Id 1 E art tx»r Amortco 
— Id ) EouKkmt EuroM_ 

— (d ) Eaulboor PacHIc— 

—Id I timnar 
—Id > Stockbar 


-V 70-13 


« imm — fwj Pound Storllno- 
cIISmSS -iwi DwtscMMark. 

— (“*) Dutch Florin 

SE 1151-22 -tw Swiss Franc— 


—Id ) CSF Fund. 


— Id j Crossbow Fond 

—(d I |TF Fund N.V 

3ANQUE INOOSUEZ 
—Id J Aslan Grawtt Fund- 
— Iw) Dlvorbaad. 


— (w) FIF— AmtrlcQ . 
— tw) FIF— Eutom— 
— twl FlF — PodflC- 


5F 1044-00 

SF U3R00* ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

u-KU PB CE2X Tbs Hague U7Q) 4IMH 

— |E —Id ) Bsvr B tftQ Bl nw n 1 1 

— S 1130 PAR 1SBAS— GROUP 

~ia i Ortua inwmafkMoi — 

, — Iwl OBLI-DM 

tJiSiJ — 1*1 08LIGESTIQN, 

— -IwtOBU-OOU 

-ItelOBU-YEN 

SHOT — fwlOBLKULOEN. 


smia 

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_FLML07 
SF 9.92 


— fdl PARCIL-FUNOl 
,*“U — W I PARINTER FUN 


DM I.IClUM 
- SF 9Z25 
S 1.10024 
Y 105.95000 
FL 100.11 
. 110094 
. S 102-SI 
. 1101X1 


1 iKSSSIIfi i A55ni — W » PARINTER FUND 

— (d> IndasumAftiRfDamteB— _ fIGIu -(tiPAiiusTnauif 

B ? t Ty » IftSyS H0,l * r ‘ Jt W , * CT - ROYAL B. OF CANAOAFOB StLGUERHSEY 

=i:! V&IW™ 1 CBnoaon fu °° ^ — WM» 


—Id t erIL innsManao-oartt 
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£1.1 


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— Iw) BrltUrdwMl Growth S 0.940 T>7 

— Iw) Bril. Gold Fund S0J44 

— Iwl BrlLftlonoe-Currancv E 1430* 

—Id l Bril. Jopan Dtr Part. Fd, 

—Iwl BriUarsov GW Fund — 

—Id ) Brit. World Lrts. Fund— 

—Id ) Brit worid Tactm. Fund. 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
—Iwl Caoftot Inn Fuad— — 

—Iwl Capital I ltd to SA 


CREDIT SUISSE IISSU6 PRICES! 


— id) Adlans Su toot. 
—Idi Bond Vidor Swf. 


RBC Far EadUtocdlc Fd 11044- 

RBC inn Capital Fd. J20J5- 

RBC lot'l Incaaw Fd— — S 1(109 

RBC MonC4*T»ncV Fa *2123 

RBC North Amur. Fd 5942 

nm SKANDIFOND INTL FUND 146*23*2701 

E0J2I — (w)lna: Bid— _SL91«Oftor *127* 

* 1 . 0*1 — iwlAcc.: Bio— j**30itor *&2» 

SIOT3 svEMSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD- 
17 D#vunililroSQ-Loo«>wKn-T77-»40 

*3540 —ID I SHB Band Fund * 3144 

*1104 — (w) SHB mil Grown Fund — 419J0 
SWISS BANK CORP. I ISSUE PRICES) 

DM 11495 
_ *121.74 
FL1IR93 
. SFBLSO 
SF 85540 

C1CKL24 

SFT05J5 
SF29S25 
SFU25 
SPURS 


SF342J5* —Id ) Amarlca- Valor. 


SF 104410 —Id ) DnMcrk Bond Satoaton 
DM 10626 —Id I Dollar Bond Salsctloo. 


—Id) Bond Volar D-mark . _ 

—Id) Bond Volar US-DOLLAR — Slian — Id ) FlortnBandSrtacJton — 

—Id) Bond Voter Yon You >050400 —id 1 Inlurvator 

— Id) Camwt Valor Swt — — _ SF 10B23 — id ) Japan Parttello 

—Id) conwt Voter US-DOLLAR. * 110.97 —Id » SfarUno Band Satoctlon_ 

—Id ) Canasoc SF 86000 —Id > Swt» Foraton Band 5M- 

— Id i CS Fond*— Bonos SF TWO — W I Swtesuoior Now Stria*- 

—Id J CS Fonda— mn SF 108-75 —id ) Urtwanal Bond Sated._ 

— Id ) cS Manor Market Fuad 5 1050J0 — (d 1 Univsrsol Fond 

—Id ) CS Money Markat Fund DM 1029J10 —Id ) Yon Band SatecNon— — Y 1040700 
— ld\ E (wrote— Volar. - - 

—Id I USSK. 


—Id 1 Euroop— Valor 

—Id ) Partita— ' Voter 

OIT INVESTMENT FFM 
— Md ) ConcHliu. 


SF UNION BANK OF SW1TZER1-AND 

SF 15100 — ^ MiAmeoUASh. SF 4025 

SF —*<* J Bond-lrrv««t SF 6725 

14T4S Sh SF 13150 

— Id 1 Jopon-lnvest ... SF 75700 

DM 2405 —Id ) Satlt South Afr.Sh.—. — SF 54550 
Hd ) inn Bontantond OM87A1 —Id ) Sima (stock price) — — SF 17700 

Dunn & riorum 4 Liard Gaarae. Brassed UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

— (ml DRH Cnrenwdrty PeoL. *30403 *~ —Id ) Ultimata 5*4 42.10 

—On) CUfTWKV R Goto Pool — * 199 JO — 4d ) Unlteads HK5JS 

— (ml Winch. Lift Fut. Pool-. SS9R32 — —Id I Unlrok — — — DM 77.15 

-On) Trons World FuLPoaL. *89808— Qffrff p Wute 

LlL^»^& I ^.ECl'o S ^4480 {$ AgJbrtjiN MterastmonH Fund. * 2103 

—ID FAC Allontlr ... _ 51103 


— Iw) FSG European. 
— (wj F*C Oriental _ 


FIDELITY POB 670. HomlTton Bermuda 
— (m 


*1072 

. *300 

safe 5wi MHiusimeraaiiaraii Fund— *11076 

S 2 SAI ( r j Arab Finance LF *84802 

CD)Ariane_ J1J4120 


t in74 Imt Allied Lt d 

Itet AAuO* lalornatlonal I 


— lm 
—Id 
—id 
— fd 
—10 
—Id 
—Id 
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U » T rwooiu. nsmnnn twriwn — « 

American Values Common- S8620 iwl Trvstcor Inti FO. IAE1F) *1821 

Arter Values CumJhdf S 101 M Iwl BNP Interbond Fund — — — * 'S-S 

Fidelity Amor. Assad—. 54508 iwl Bondselex- issue Pr.— — — SF 135.10 

Fidelity Australia Fuad— *842 (ml Canada Glo-Mortaooe Fd *903 

Fidelity Discovery Fund * 10.14 id ) Cartral Prssarv. FB. Inti *1124 

FKWIty Dir. Svas.Tr *12240 iw) aiottel Fund *102 

Fidehlv Far East Fund 52017 fd ) CJ.R. Australia Fund *942 

FhteUty lnt*L Fond *SS« Id 1 CJJL Japan Fund 59.94 


Fidelity Oritnr Fimd- 


Rdrtiiv Frontier Fund. — 

Fidelity Pocfflc Find 

FMmRvSpcL Growth Pd.. 
Fidelity Worid Fund 


lltST fra) Cleveland Offshore Fd. — J2JW23 
*12X1 iw) Columbia Secu rules— — FL 112.73 

SU1X9 rbICOMETE 588809 

*1449 (w| Convert. Fd. Inti A Certs *901 

*3073 I w) Convert- FG Infl B Carts * 25.96 

Iw) D.G.C — *7528 

(d ID. Witter Wld Wide IvlTst *10.19 


le) First Eaale Fond— 

*35143 (b 1 FHty Stars Ltd. 

( 1 U. 1 * . iwj Finsbury Group I “ 


FORBES PO BSB7 GRAND CAYMAN 

«TU- to > Ift^kkdirl p ue tfjfu nd N.V- slmooj 

- * Gate lncoma__ *7J4- , d , Dreytus Fund InTI _ 5 34.15 

Grtd A wreda Hon — — *f-*} (w) Drwtus interconflnant-, *31.03 

* Iwl The enabltahmerrt Trust 5108 

— im> Strategic Trading si.W !d , Europe obneottons 

GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— iw) East Investment Fun 

iwj sMiaMwieSLl^ZI iisiii (w> Fixed income Trons 

C^IJ5rtd.LM.LenAOenL01<4914ZH }*} Pr — 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT «)RP (wl Formula Selection Fd.— 5F7121 

PB nr. sr Peter Part, Guernsey. 04T-2S71 5 (d ) Pandlfaila - — 12226 

lm) FuturtSAM SA— * USAS ia j Governm. Set Fund* *8301 

imlGAM Artltrooe Inc — *12 321 td 1 Frantrl-Tnist lntenlni DM 41-58 

(wl GAMorlcn me S 13823* (w) Houssmam Hides. N.V *111.13 

iw) GAM Boiloo Inc 510122 |w> Hertto Fumh 510427 

Iw) GAM Ermitow *13.14 iw> Horizon Fund S1.19S.13 

(wl GAM Fronc-vcl ~ SF 97J1 (b 1 ILA InTI Gold Bond *923 

(0 i GAM Internaflonal Inc * JK29 id I imertund SA *«J0 

(w) GAM North America Inc. 11IBJ9 iwl tntarmarfcat Fund *32040 

Iw) gam N. America unit Trust, moo? id ) Inrerminlno Mur. Fit CL*B*— *389.17 


5 14.10728 
. * 87RB9 
. * 11424 
- * 10X2 
SF 214-45 

5721 


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Mohawk Data? 
Datapoint Corp . 
ToMergeUnits 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Datapoint 
Corp. and Mohawk Data Sci- 
ences Corp- said they would 
combine their computer-ser- 
vices businesses in a two-step 
transaction. ‘They declined to 
put a value on the accord. 

Tbe two companies said Da- 
lapoint would spin off its ser- 
vice business to shareholders on 
a tax-free basis, creating a new, 
publicly traded subsidiary. Tbe 
subsidiary would then buy Mo- 
hawk’s customer-service divi- 
sion for an undisclosed price. 

The transaction would bring 

together two companies con- 
trolled by Asher B. Eddman, 
the New York financier. Both 
companies have encountered fi- 
nancial difficulties recently. 

If approved by both boards, 
the transaction would create the 
largest third-party service con- 
cern in die computer industry, 
with revenues of more than 
S200 million, according to Ed- 
ward P. Gistaro, Datapoinfs 
president and chief executive. 

It would also allow the cash- 
hungry Mohawk to pay a sub- 
stantial portion of its SI40-mil- 
lion bank debt, according to 
Francis P. Luder, Mohawk's 
chairman. 


Unocal Shares Tumble 
On Takeover Rumors 


By Robert J. Cole 

.Vw York Timet Serrice 

NEW YORK -Shares of Uno- 
cal Corp. slid 51.73 Tuesday, to 
$48. in heavy trading amid Wall 
Street rumors that tne company 
might try to buy another major oil 
producer to frustrate a takeover at- 
tempt by a group led by T. Boone 
Pickens, the chairman of Mesa Pe- 
troleum Corp. 

The company most widely men- 
tioned as Unocal’s possible target 
is Diamond Shamrock Corp- of 
Dallas. Diamond Shamrock's stock 
climbed $1.25 on tbe rumor, to 
$20.50, also in heavy trading. 

Only three months ago, Dia- 
mond Shamrock broke off a $33- 
billion merger transaction with Oc- 
cidental Pctroledm Corp., bat left 
little doubt that it was still open to 
other merger talks. Based on the 
Occidental talks, Diamond Sham- 
rock appeared io be on the block 
for about $23 a share. 

Neither Unocal nor Diamond 
Shamrock would comment on 
Tuesday's market rumors, but ana- 
lysts said that nothing should be 
read into the silence. Such rumors 
are commonplace on Wall Street, 
and companies rarely comment on 
them. 

Mr. Pickens, who heads a group 
that owns 13.6 percent of Unocal 
stock, said Sunday that he would 
pay $54 a share, or $3.46 billion, for 
enough stock to give him 51 -per- 
cent control of the company — if 
he could raise the money. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Armco Inc, a financially trou- 
bled steelmaker, said it has reached 
an agreement with its principal 
bank lenders that extends its debt 
obligations and provides it with 
$300 million of new credit. The 
agreement covers $485 million of 
Armco’s outstanding debt, the 
company said. 

CBS Inc^ in a federal court suit, 
accused Ivan F. Boesky of making 
false and misleading statements to 
the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission when he acquired an 8.7- 
percent stake in the company. The 
suit asks the court to order the 
financier to divest his CBS slock. 

Chase Manhattan Corpus Span- 
ish unit has an agreement in princi- 
ple to buy Spain’s Banco de Finan- 
zas, banking sources said. 

Compatervision Corp. said it had 
laid off 950 employees, or 14 per- 
cent of its work force, because of a 
slowdown in sales. The Massacfaus- 
setii- based company also said that 
50 top officers would take “signifi- 
cant” pay cuts. 

Essflor International SA, the op- 
tical-glass maker, said final results 
for 1984 were unchanged from tbe 
preliminary report Tne company 
bad reported that consolidated rev- 
enue rose 16.8 percent from a year 
earlier, to 2.87 billion francs (about 
$287 million). 

General Motors Corp. said it 
would dose its enginerblock found- 
ry in Pontiac, Michigan in a move 
that will displace about 2,000 work- 
ers. Last year, GM closed a found- 
ry in Tonawanda, New York. 

Guilford Mills said it has ac- 
quired TRT Corp. from Toyobo 


CO. of Japan for undisclosed terms. 
TRT converts woven goods and 
dyes, finishes and prints fabrics. 

Kowloon Motor Bos Co. plans a 
one-for-dght rights issue at 5 Hong 
Kong dollars (64 cents) apiece to 
raise about 1 16 5 million dollars, a 
company spokeswoman said. 

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries said 
it, Mitsubishi Corp. and Cerrey 
S.A. de CV, a Mexican boiler mak- 
er, have joindy won a 22-billion- 
yen (S86.6-million) order for two 
boilers from Comisidn Federal de 
Ekciricidad of Mexico. 

Sharp Corp. said it and RCA 
Corp. have signed an agreement to 
set up a joint company to develop, 
design, produce and market com- 
plementary metal-oxide very large 
integration-type semiconductors m 
the United States. 

Sperry Corp. said it has conclud- 
ed an agreement with the Queens- 
land, Australia department of in- 
dustrial development under which 
Sperry will make personal comput- 
ers at a new plant in Brisbane. The 
company said the plant is expected 
to be in operation by early 1986. ' 

Toshiba Com. said it and United 
Technologies Corp. have set up a 
joint company to develop, produce 
and market fuel-cell power plants. 
Fuel-cell power plants convert the 
chemical energy of a fuel directly 
into electrical energy. 

United Press international said it 
has notified a New York brokerage 
firm to cease distribution of an un- 
authorized solicitation for equity 
purchase in the news service. UPI 
said the brokerage company bad 
acted without its consent. 


“PRI /TECH” 

PRIVATE AMERICAN TECHNOLOGY SJt 

SodM A n onym* d'bivmfiSMmant 
Rogbterad Office: Luxembourg - 20 Bd. Emmanuef-Senrais 
B.C. Lnxamboarg B 20.566 

Notice ia hereby given that tbe 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 
of die shareholders of pri/iecb will be held at the registered office at 2.30 
p.tn. on April 29. 1985 with die following 

AGENDA 

1. Approval of the reporta of tbe board of directors and of the statutory 


2. Approval of the balance sheet and profit and lossaccotmtior tbe fiscal 
year ended December 31, 1984. 

3. Allocation of the net result. 

A Discharge to the stannary auditor for the proper performance of its 
duties during tbe fiscal year ended December 31,1984. 

5. Re-election of tbe statutory auditor and ejection of two new directors. 

6. Miscellaneous. 

Resolutions of tbe shareholder* will be passed at a simple majority of 
those present and voting. Each share is entitled to one vote provided 
no penwQ as shareholder and/or proxyholder may vote for more than 
20% of (be shares issued nor for more (ban 40% of tbe shares present 
at the meeting, 
and tbu an 

. ENTRAOB1MNARY GENERAL MEETING 

Of tbe company will be held immediately thereafter with the following 

agenda: 

1. Amendment of the last pax. of article 3 and of article 30 of the articles 
of incorporation by substituting a reference to tbe law of 2Sth August 
1963 on collective investment undertakings to that of tbe 31st July, 
1989 on bolding companies. 

2. Amendment of me fourth sentence of tiic second par, of article 21 of 
the articles of incorporation, which shall read as follows tbe redemp- 
tion price, which snail be determined at least once a month shall be 
tbe net asset value per share calculated in conformity with article 23 
hereafter ai the valuation date on which tbe redemption request is 
received, provided ibe company receives such a request before noon, 
Luxembourg; time, or at tbe next valuation dale, if receipt takes place 
after such tune at a valuation date. 

3. Insertion of the following a* the end of the first par of article 21 of tbe 
articles of incorporation; 

"Tbe redemption price shall normally be paid within 10 days 
following the valuation dale on which it has been determined”. 

4. Insertion in article -5, a) the third paragraph, of the articles of 
incorporation of a new sentence to read aa follows; 

"The ireue or sales price shall Im paid by the subscriber within seven 
dm following the dale of determination". 

5. Addition of a second j£nenct in art. 24 of the articles of incorporation 
to read as follows: 

"There shall be at least one net asset valuation every month, in 
accordance with an. 23 bereabove” 

6. To replace the word "eommereial” by tbe word "abnormal" in art23 
of anuses of incorporation in par. 1 o( tbe rules of determination of 
the net asset value. 

Resolutions of the shareholder to be passed at the extraordinary general . 
meeting require a quorum of 50% of tne share* outstanding to be present 
or represented and will be passed ai a majority of % of those present and 
voting. 

At the extraordinary gcoeral meeting, each share is entitled to one vote. 
A shareholder may act at any meeting by proxy. 

In order io par ti cipate in tbe above meetings tbe owners of bearer shares 
shall have to deposit their shares Gve business days before die meeting at 
tbe ngtsued office of pri/tech or with a bank acceptable to pri/teeb. 

On behalf of tbe company, 

BANQUE PRIVEE SA- Luxembourg Branch 
. . 20 Bd. £.• Senmia • Luxembourg 


Tuesday, however. Wall Street 
traders began lightening their 
stakes in Unocal over fears (hat 
Mr. Pickens might have difficulty 
raising money for the takeover or 
might even resort to “greenmaiT — 
that is, sell his huge stake in the 
company back to Unocal. 

A key ingredient in Wall Street 
fears, traders said, is the possibility 
that Unocal might slow Mr. Pick- 
ens by buying another company. 

As analyzed by traders with mil- 
lions of dollars at stake, if Unocal 
were to issue, say, 75 million shares 
to buy Diamond Shamrock, Mr. 
Pickens's cost to buy Unocal would 
jump at least $4 billion. Such an 
increase in Unocal's price would 
probably put the company beyond 
Mr. Pickens’s reach, analysts say. 

Wall Street analysis estimated 
that Unocal's stock price would 
drop to $38 or S40 if Mr. Pickens 
withdrew or were defeated. 

Mr. Pickens could not be 
readied for comment but a dose 
assodate. David H. Baichdder, 
voiced confidence that the funds 
would be raised. He said investors 
would comma the first half of the 
$3 billion being sought by the Wall 
Street house of Drexel Burnham 
Lambert Inc. by Friday, collecting 
$11.25 million in commitment fees 
for the money. 

In a separate development. Uno- 
cal said in response to questions 
that Goldman. Sachs & Co. and 
Dillon, Read & Co., had been re- 
tained as financial advisers. 

FCA Rejects Offer 
By Former Chief 

United Press Iniermitotud 

LOS ANGELES — Financial 
Corp. of America has rejected an 
offer by its former chairman. 
Charles W. Knapp, to buy more 
than $1 billion in problem loans 
written while he headed the firm. 

In a letter Tuesday, tbe FCA 
board made it clear that its current 
management was not interested in 
doing further business with Mr. 
Knapp. The board removed Mr. 
Knapp from his job with tbe com- 
pany last summer during a $6.8- 
billion run on its subsidiary, Amer- 
ican Savings & Loan Association. 

Mr. Knapp's group, Trafalgar 
Holdings Ltd., said it was “disap- 
pointed that the company consid- 
ers us adversaries and has sum- 
marily rejected the offer, 
particularly since there appears to 
be no alternative plan of disposi- 
tion." 


J.P. Morgan Net 
Increased 12.7% 
In First Quarter 

United Press Intenutumd 

NEW YORK — J.P. Morgan 
& Co., parent of Morgan Guar- 
anty Trust Co., the fifth-largesi 
bank in the United States, said 
Wednesday that first-quarter 
earnings rose 1X7 percent from 
a year earlier, to $164.6 million, 
or $1.85 a share, from 5146 mil- 
lion, or $1.66 a share. 

Lewis T. Preston, chairman, 
told shareholders at the corpo- 
ration's annual meeting that 
Morgan increased its primary 
capita] by $500 million in the 
past 12 months, to S4.7 billion. 

Much of Morgan's earnings 
increase came from higher net 
interest earnings and from a 
lower provision for credit losses 
that were offset by lower earn- 
ings in most non-interest sec- 
tors, he said- Net interest in- 
come rose to S428.3 minion 
from $372 million in the 19S4 
first quarter. 

Provision for possible credit 
losses was reduced to S30 mil- 
lion from S4S million a year 
ago. The total allowance for 
possible credit losses stood at 
$598 million on March3], com- 
pared with $509 million a year 
earlier. 

Non-accrual loans, those on 
which little or no interest is be- 
ing paid, rose to 5870 million 
from $604 milli on a year ago. 


Chase Manhattan to Buy 
2 Ohio Savings Banks 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Chase 
Manhattan Corp. announced 
Wednesday that it will acquire the 
Mentor Savings Bank of Mentor, 
Ohio and the Federated Savings 
Saak of Cincinnati for a combined 
price of S7.4 million. 

Arthur F. Ryan, an executive 
vice president of Chase, said his 
institution will pav S6.8 million for 
the Mentor thrift and S600.000 for 
the Cincinnati savings and loan. He 
said Chase has received state ap- 
proval to acquire the two institu- 
tions and has filed applications 
with the Federal Reserve Board 
and the Federal Savings and Loan 
Insurance Corp. for final approval 

Mentor Savings Bank has assets 
of SI 14 million and 25,000 ac- 
counts. Federated reported assets 
of S53 million and 7,300 accounts. 

Mr. Ryan said Chase will seek 
state legislation to permit it to op- 
erate as a commercial bank in 
Ohio. In that case, he said, the two 
thrift units would be merged under 
the Chase umbrella. 

“We see these acquisitions as a 
first step in helping resolve the sav- 
ings- and-ioan problem in Ohio,” 
Mr. Ryan said. “We believe we can 
offer competitive rates." 

In other developments, the presi- 
dent of the collapsed Home State 
Savings Bank ana three other top 
officers have been dismissed by the 
state-appointed conservator who 
has taken over operation of the 
closed savings and loan. 


John Hartnmfi, one of the state- 
hired attorney's representing con- 
servator Arlo Smith. said Tuesday 
that the executives were dismissed^ 
before Mr. Smith filed a lawsuit 
against Home State’s owners and. 
executives. He said the firing was 
because of the conservator's allega- 
tions against them. 

”1 think when you're going to 
allege that they've done things 

wrong and cost the institution S140 
million, it's inconsistent to keep 
them on the payroll” Mr. Har- 
tranft said. 

The conservator has charged that 
negligence or improper acuons by 
management led to the March S 
collapse of Home State, a Cincin- 
nati-based thrift with 33 offices in 
southern and central Ohio. 

Chemical New York Corp., par- 
ent of Chemical Bank, has signed a 
letter of intent to acquire Home 
State for undisclosed terms. State 
officials have said the sale could be 
completed this week. 

At its meeting Tuesday, the 
board also authorized the Ohio De- 
partment of Commerce to hire the 
investment banking firm of Kid- 
der. Peabody & Co. for S200.000, 
plus up to $50,000 in expenses, to 
advise on terms of the sale of Home 
Slate, perhaps later this week, to 
Chemical New York Corp. 

Thirty-nine state-chartered sav- 
ings and loans have reopened since 
Governor Richard F. Celeste 
closed 70 on March 15. (UPI. AP) 


Goldsmith Bids for 70% of Zellerbach 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Sir James Gold- 
smith, the British industrialist, mi 
Wednesday made a formal offer for 
as much as 70 percent of Crown 
Zellerbach Corp. at S4250 a share, 
if the company withdraws a com- 
plex anti-takeover provision. 

The offer caps a four-month- 
long campaign by Sir James and 
came as Zeller bach’s board of di- 
rectors was scheduled to meet. 

The proposal states that if the 
anti -takeover provisions were not 
revoked. Sir James still would seek 
to amass stock in tbe paper and 
forest products company, but only 
if a minimum of 51 percent of the 
stock is tendered. 

Under that circumstance, the of- 
fer said. Sir James would not be 
bound by the S42J0-a-share price 
or other terms of the offer and he 
would not commit himself to fur- 
ther purchases. 


Crown Zellerbach’s stock, which 
was 529 in mid-December when Sir 
James fust made his interest in the 
company known, dosed Tuesday 
on the New York Stock Exchange 
at $41 .625, up 50 cents. 

Sir James, who owns an 8.6-per- 
cem interest in the company, last 
week offered at least S41.625 a 
share for the rest. 


Gold Options (pdcegtaVu.). ” 


fVxat 

Mar 

*** 

taw. 

xo 

145)165) ; 


■ 

xn 

wo-nra 

195021 .3) 

_ 

MO 

575- 7.25 

1500165] 

2250X51 

350 

400- 550 

1125-1273 

1775-1975 

3 M 

25D- 400 

825 925 

15001650 

370 

125- 275 

625- 775 

1225075 

a 

— — 

42* 575 

9751125 - 


Gott 32200 32150 

Valero White WeU SwA. 

I. Oai do Mow-Bteac 
1211 Georra I. SrtOotead 
T«L 310251 - Telex 2*305 


r i 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on April 8, 1 985: U.S. $1 38.46. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pierson, Helcfting & Pierson N.V„ 

liar e ngra ch t 214,1016 BS Amsterdam. 


This announcement is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy these securities. 

The offer is made only by the Prospectus. 


$65,000,000 

Telepictuves 

r CORPORATION 

8 3 A% Convertible Subordinated Debentures Due April 1, 2005 

(Interest Payable April 1 and October 1) ^ 

The Debentures are convertible at any time prior to maturity, unless previously 
redeemed, into shares of Common Stock of the Company at a conversion price 
of $27.75 a share, subject to adjustment in certain circumstances. 


Price 100% 


Copies of the Prospectus may be obtained in any State only from such of the several 
Underwriters , including the undersigned, as may lawfully offer the securities in such State. 


Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. 

Allen & Company Incorporated 

Furman Selz Mager Dietz & Bimey 

Incorporated 

Bear, Stearns & Co. The First Boston Corporation Donaldson, Lufkin 8b Jenrette 

Securities Corporation 

Drexel Burnham Lambert Goldman, Sachs 8b Co. E. F. Hutton 8b Company Inc. 

Incorporated 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets Morgan Stanley 8b Co. 

Incorporated 


Lazard Freres 8b Co. 
Prudential-Bache 

Securities 


L. F. Rothschild, Unterberg, Towbin 
Smith Barney, Harris Upham 8b Co. 

Incorporated 

Thomson McKinnon Securities Inc. 
Gruntal 8b Co. , Incorporated Herzfeld 8b Stem Inc. 

Ladenburg, Thalmann 8 b Co. Inc. 
Moseley, Hallgarten, Estabrook 8b Weeden Inc. 

Prescott, Ball 8b lbrben,.Inc, 
The Robinson-Humphrey Company, Inc. Wheat, First Securities, Inc. 

April 3, ms 


Salomon Brothers Inc 
A. G. Edwards 8b Sons, Inc. 
Advest, Inc. Dain Bosworth 

Incorporate^ 

Janney Montgomery Scott Inc. 
McDonald 8b Company 

Sec untie*. Inc. 

Piper, Jaffray 8b Hopwood 

Incorporated 






Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL 


j»!mMm»;«ianeiaii«u.ii< 


Over-the-Counter 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 



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INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


HUMAN RESOURCES 
CO-ORDINATOR 


Arabian Gulf 


Attractive Tax-Free Salary 


We are the Offshore Operations Division of Qatar General Petroleum 
Corporation located in one of the more pleasant parts of the Arabian Gulf, 
where expatriates and their families can combine challenging work 
opportunities with a family lifestyle and first-class benefits. 

We are currently looking for a Senior Personnel professional to be 
Human Resources Co-ordinator and to manage the Personnel Division 
responsible for recruitment, manpower planning, salary administration 
and staff development, with special emphasis on Qatari employees. 
Reporting to the Personnel Manager the selected candidate, aged 35 to 
45, must have a proven track record in the activities listed above and be 
able to demonstrate the relevancy of his experience in manpower 
planning and development systems including the determination of 
training needs. In particular he will need to have an enterprising approach 
to the development of Qatari staff in line with the objectives of the 
Corporation. In addition to managing these activities he wiii also be 
responsible for job classification, recruitment and salary administration. 

The successful applicant will be a University Graduate with not less 
than 12 years'experience in the Personnel function, several years ol 
which will have been in the Middle East. A knowledge of Arabic is , 
desirable. 

This js a married status position with an excellent benefits package, 
including free accommodation, 37 working days leave per annum, 
subsidised local or boarding school fees, free medical cover and 
outstanding recreational facilities. 

Interested candidates should send full career details with a contact 
telephone number quoting reference number L2528 to Anne Weisflog. 
Lansdowne International Services Limited. 37 Golden Square, 

London W1R4AL 


Qatar General Petroleum Corporation 



ansdowne 


INTERNATIONAL RECRUfTMENT CONSULTANTS 


Medizintechnik 

Ais Untemehmen, das auf verschiedensten Geb'eten der neuen Tedindogien, der Raumfahrt, Bekfronik und 
Date nveror be itu ng akfiv ist, arbeiten wir seif mehreren Jahren erfolgradh im Sektor der Mediziiitechnoiogie. 
Dabei wurde u. a. ein Verfahren zur beri)hrungsfreien Zerldeinerung von Nierensteinen durdi Extra-Corporal 
erzeugte Stosswellen entwickelt, das in der internationden Fachwdt eine sehr Starke Nadifrage ausldste und die 
Basis fOr eine Familie medcrintechnischer Gerate bildet. Fur die systematische Erweiterung der internationden 
Vertriebsaktivitate n sudien wir den 

Vertriebsbeauftragten Fernost 

mrt voraussiditlichem Stand ortschwerpunkt in Japan und Akfivitaten in SDdkorea, Tcnwon; ggf. Australien und 
Aseon-Staaten 

Vertriebsbeauftragten Nahost 

mit Sitz in Kuweit oder den U .A.E. 

Die Aufgabenstellung umfasst [eweils die Erarbeitung und Umsetzung spezifischer Strategien zur Realisienjng der 
Umsatzziefe, dabei insbesondere Aufbau und Pflege von Kontdcfen zu medizinachen, politischen und administrati- 
ven Entscheidungstrdgern sowie den Dfrektvertrieb von Gerafen und Serviceleistungen bis zum Vertragsabschluss 
einschliesslich erforderlicher RnanzierungsmodeHe. 

Wichtig fcr die erfdgreiche Wahmehmung einer derartigen Funktion ist die tdndergruppenspezifische Vertriebser- 
fahrung, mdglichst erworben im Klinikmarkt fiir Grossgerate, in Verbindung mit den entsprechender verhandlungs- 
sicheren Sprachkenntnissen. 

Eine solids Basisausbildung ais Wirtschafts- oder NaturwissensdiafHer bzw. Ingenieur ist in jedem Fa He vorteilhaft. 
Wenn Sie eine cfieser Aufgabenstellungen reizt und Sie ab e rfo Igsorientte rter Vertriebsmann die sellene Chance 
wohrnehmen mdchten, in einer friihen Phase zum Erfdg einer zifanffeorientierten medizintechnischen Ger6tefo- 
mi\ie beizutrogen, senden Sie uns bitte Ihre aussagefdhige Bewerbung, oder fordem Sie vorab u riser en 
Personalfragebogen an. 


□ORIMIER 


Domlar System GmbH 
- Penonafabtsilung - 

Postfo ch 1360 

7990 Friedrich itiafen 1 r W. Germany 
Tslefon: 07545/8-4256 



unibef 


The United Nations Children’s Fond (UNICEF) 

With Headquarters in New York and offices throughout the 
world, working with developing country governments to 
provide disadvantaged children and their mothers with the 
basic sendees they need to survive and develop seeks 

SENIOR POLICY SPECIALIST-CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

New York (USA) - (Ref.: VN 470) 

Responsibility' to provide professional support to Field Offi- 
cer* in early childhood development activities within the 
framework of comprehensive approach to survival and devel- 
opment of the child: to contribute to the development of 
policies and programming strategies for Unicef activities. 

Qualifications: Post graduate university degree in behavor- 
ial sciences or related specialized subjects; additional training 
in subjects related to early childhood development leading to 
a broad under stanefing of child development issues. 1 2 years 
of work experience, partly in policy and program dewslop- 
merit, with substantial experience in developing countries. 
Proven ability to work effectively in an advisory capacity 
required. Familiarity with other international organizations 
particularly with their programs affecting early childhood 
development will be an advantage. Fluency in English and 
preferably in one other UN language; ability to write reports 
and position papers in dear and readable language. 

Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. 
Excellent benefits package. 

Send detailed resume with an example of published profes- 
sional writing to: 

MICHAEL K. CORBETT 

***»>■* e* M"i» i | nnd Ptnrninnnl 

CNUXF,88«(INnaa,Newy«rfc,inr 10017. USA. 


HI-TECH SALES PROMOTION EXECUTIVE 

JAPAN 

This position will be headquartered in Tokyo, Japan. The successful candidate wifi have lived In this 
part of the world. He should have intimate knowledge of the economic and political environment 
and above all have a good understanding of the motivational and related aspects in dealing with 
business executives and customs in the area. A working knowledge of the Japanese language, as 
well as English, is essential. With regard to his educational background, we are looking for a 
graduate engineer with solid business and marketing experience, or conversely a business graduate 
with extensive technical activity exposure. 

Our company has enjoyed spectacular growth and excellent profits for over 50 years. Today, we are 
the recognised world leader in our field of metallurgical specialties, both technologically, thanks to a 
number of important breakthroughs, as well as in terms of products and marketing innovation. We 
have a diverse customer base covering ail industry sectors, have our own manufacturing facilities and 
are very research-oriented. 

We are seeking a young, dynamic executive with a strong business orientation and successful 
management experience in a technical field. Someone who combines a high degree of intelligence 
with a pragmatic approach to complex marketing and business problems. 

Above-average compensation will be offered to the right candidate. 

Please reply in confidence, giving business experience, 
personal data and salary history to: 

Box No. D2145, Herald Tribune. 92521 Neuiilv Cedex. France. 



ALSTHOM 

sgsjis acb 

offshore ■■ 

acb A SUBSIDIARY OF ALSTHOM ATLANTIQUE GROUP 

International 
sales engineer 

Nt, r rSlS J ( , fer Sy * Cm5 “ d Biuipment Department - located m 
■Frequent mps abroad - Responsibilities will include: 

Our ream would welcome : 

Engineer or Business graduate 

S to 10 vars in Technical ale, (preferably ofehore). 

Fluent English required : French appreciated ; Other languages a+. 

! a , CH 1 Ue ^ ne , and P-ti™ 

Scr + txinift. photo, handwritten lerum to our adviser: 



REFINERY 
' MAINTENANCE n 
MANAGER 

Overseas Assignment 

An internationally respected E&C firm has an imme- 
diate opening for an engineer who has a strong back- 
ground in petrochemical refinery maintenance man- 
agement. The first months of this a s signment w9 be 
spent in our Southern CaEfbmia headquarters where 
you will be involved in developing a comprehensive 
maintenance plan. 

After completion of the planning stage, you w3 be 
relocated to an overseas location and assume overall 
responsibility for the management of aJl refinery main- 
tenance operations. You must have a degree in petro- 
leum engineering along with a thorough knowledge of 
refinery operations, including start-up, shut-down, 
parts, toots and equipment needed tor an efficient 
maintenance progra m. 

In addition to modern Suing accomodations, we wifi 
provide ftdl travel and moving expenses, generous 
overseas salary, frequent post leaves, and excellent 
potential tor advancement, interested applicants should 
^forward their resume in strict confidence to: jr 

BOXB-2143 /A 

International Herald Tribune. 

V 92521 Neuilly Cedes. France. 


— ■ languages a t. 

Should you be inrerened in such a challerwina 

olease send CV + “ ™uenpng and amaenve position. 

Ptetrerend CV +.tunn*, ph«c* haulwncren Iran; to our advteer: 







"INTERNATIONAL 

POSITIONS” 

appears every Thursday A Saturday 

n “ r “* 



































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rf.: VN 470) 

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(Continued on Plage 14) 



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Competitors Cite 
Japan Cargo Line 

Lea Angela Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The enuy of a new Japa- 
nese cargo airline will seriously erode the ability 
of VS. airlines to compete on the busy trans- 
pacific route, according to industry officials. 

Representatives of Los Angeles-based Flying 
Tiger Line complained Tuesday to the Interna- 
tional Trade Commission that the structure of 
the new Nippon Cargo Airlines, owned primari- 
ly by Japanese shippers and freight forwarders, 
will unfairly increase Japan's dominance of the 
huge ILS.-East Asian cargo market. 

The officials of Eying Tiger, the largest 
American cargo carrier flying between the Unit- 
ed States and Japan, added that the Japanese 
already have a complex web of restrictions on 
U.S. air-cargo carriers doing business in Japan. 

M We are willing to do whatever is necessary to 
be able to compete with any other carrier, U.S. 
or foreign, provided the competition is fair,” 
Peter Hubbard, Eying Tiger's senior vice presi- 
dent for sales and service, said. 

Mr. Hubbard and officials from other air- 
cargo, ocean-shipping and air-charter compa- 
nies testified at the commission hearing on now 
the cargo-transportation industry affects trade 
between the United States and Japan. 

Nippon Cargo sought U.S. approval Iasi year 
to operate regular flights between Tokyo. San 
Francisco and New York. The Reagan adminis- 
tration has not yet decided the matter. 

Eying Tiger, winch operates 19 Boeing 747 
jets, told the commission that because Nippon 
Cargo is owned by major Japanese shippers and 
freight forwarders that control virtually all of 
the air cargo originating in Japan, it would 
likely be assigned an unfair proportion of new 
air shipments. 

Eying Tiger officials also contend that Japa- 
nese government guidelines that require Nip- 
pon Cargo to cooperate with Japan Airlines 
could further affect the amount of cargo avail- 
able to U.S. companies. 

Japan Airlines controls nearly 50 percent of 
the trans- Pacific air-cargo market. U.S. carriers 
have a 39-percent market share, of which Flying 
Tiger has 27 percent. 

Cyril D. Murphy, vice president of interna- 
tional and governmental affairs for Flying Ti- 
ger, said in an interview that, without neater 
flexibility for his company to operate in Japan, 
“Ten years from now, well be an insignificant 
part of the marketplace.’' 


(j International S A 


i 


ASSETS 

in millions of DM 

previous year 

L#OnQ6nSGu 

Balance Sheet 

Amounts due from banks 

3,638.8 

3.581 .5 

Loans and advances to customers 

6,464.2 

6,611.1 1 

as per 

Securities 

464.9 

391.7 

December 31, 

Other assets 

418.7 

337.9 

1984 


10.986.6 

10,922.2 


LIABILITIES 

in millions Of DM 

previous year 


Amounts due to banks 

9,228.2 

9,436.1 

WestLB International S.A. 

Current deposits and other accounts 723.3 

563.6 

. 32-34. boulevard 

Grande-Duchesse Charlotte 

Other liabilities 

277.6 

275.6 

. P.O. Box 420 

Share capital 

125.5 

125.5 

L-2014 Luxembourg 

Reserves 

214.3 

199.0 

Telephone: 447411 

Provisions 

405.1 

309.7 

Subsidiary of 

Wp*triPiiT<;rhp J andesbank 

Profit 

12.6 

12.7 

. Girozentrale. 

Diisseldorf /Munster 


10,986.6 

10.922.2 ] 


The unabridged annual statement as well as the profit and loss accounts will be published in the 
'MEMORIAL. Amtsbtett des Grosshenrogtums Luxemburg. Ausgabe C” (Official Ga/ai of the 

rv 

Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, edition Cl 


n i 



:**&*, TV"" 



A Conference on 
Trade and Investment 
Opportunities 

Budapest, June 1304 1985. 


. The international Herdd Tri- 
bune conference on "Trade and Invest- 
ment Opportunities hi Hungary” will be 
of keen interest to any executive con- 
cerned about future economic relations, 
between East and West. 

Speakers at this landmark 
conference wiH include Hungarian 


government ministers, business leaders, 
bankers and economists. 

For further information, 
please contact the international Herald 
Tribune conference office, 181, avenue 
Charles deGaufie, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, 
France. TeL- 747 1265. Telex: 613 595f. 












































i’.v r.^r-.; 




:^X ; ; 




and programs 
To set your 

■■*-■-•• *, ;';.x s r /' *■'■•*■ ■-. • '■ j'i : ‘ ■ .# 5 r i^- 1 -. 1 ?!!,” ■ T-vSi "MBSw 

for tomorrow. -~ : .-^y. •.:. • • . ’• -^’i-v-.' J’?- 

. OiQital Eqii{»mn6teoh»r8nbn 

12 averwdes MprB^fS^O PerSi-^Bgcy 3 ;€^j^(a^^S 3 :?gg«^^ 


Digital EggapgBent Corporation (DE0). 


Wednesday^ 

MEX 

3pm. 

Tables lnctode the notlonwide prices 
ap to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect tote trades elsewhere. 


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201* JV4 TIE 15 

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Floating Rate Notes April io 


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141* 44b Odfltn a 53 23 1014 9ft 1014 +1 

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814 

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29 

15 

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5ft 

51b 

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15 

20 

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124b 

12ft 



IXfS 

33 

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33ft 

33ft 

_ 

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Jit 

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15 

526 

11 

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11 

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14 

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150 

105 

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73 

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171b 

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w 

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40 

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388 

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10 

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156 

35 

12 

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38ft 

384b 

38ft 

+ 

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35 

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394b 

391* 

391b 



M 

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15 

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194b 

194* 

194b 

+ 

ft 

.15 



92 

814 

8 

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1024b -fin 
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1244— ft 
514 
2Vb 
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394b 4- 44 
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211b 
214 
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■83*— 1* 
121* 4- 1* 
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IV* 

8 4-1* 

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614— lb 
10N 4- 4b 
10ft 4- 4b 
144 

2*4*— 1* 
331b 
314 


10 291 

6 


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2A 31 


1014 PGEPfA 1-50 
814 PGEofC 1JS 
84* PGEPfD 175 
Bib PGEpfE 1J5 
8 PGEpfG 1 JO 
28V* PGEpfF 4J4 
264b PGEPfZ 404 
21V* PGEplY 3J0 1 
17V* PGEpfW 257 
1544 POEJrfV 132 
17 PGSpIT 254 1 
174b PGEpfS 252 ‘ 
74b PGEpfH 1.12 
1514 PGEpfR 2J7 
139* PGEpfP 205 
131b PGEpfO 280 
131b PGEMM 1J6 
134b PGEpflC 104 
15 PGEptl 2J2 
74b PGEjrfl U» 
1414 PGTm 1 J4 
30 POCLtPf 440 


124b TZK 
111* 1114 4-llb 
101b ION 
10V* 1®N 
Wfa 3® - N 
324* 33N 4- V4 
31 311* + lb 

25N 26 
203* 2034 
1BN lift — 14 
2044 2044— ft 
2114 2114 
9 9ft— »4 
1914 1914 + ft 
16V4 1614— ft 
1614 Ml* + 14 
153b 15ft 
1644 164* 

UN 184* 

9 9 — *4 

214* 214* 

354* 354*— 1 


36ft 

28 N KnGapt 

450 137 


450z 35ft 

34 

34 —1 

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1ft KapofcC 



7 

148 

2ft 

24b 

2ft + ft 

1514 

10 KnvCp 

70 

15 

22 

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UN 

14ft 

UN— N 

16ft 


-40 

11 

14 

100 

>3 

13 

13 

TON 

T4N Kenwln 

50a 43 

9 

1 

184* 

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lift— N 
15ft + ft 

17ft 

1014 Ketctim 

50t 37 


15 

15ft 

154* 

914 

54* KcyCo 

70 

25 


7 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft— N 

17ft 

1 K*vPh 

70 

11 

16 

368 

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94* 

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2ft 

IN KwvCawl 




3 

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1ft 






2 

m* 

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8ft 

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2N KMdowt 




16 

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33 


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21 

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110 

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12 

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19 

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^ SDecial i 


Ktfai mti 


^^ncei vou 

Hi? . 




feld TrisS? 


1 













































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I !NTKR NATIONAL 11KKALD TRIBI NE, THURSDAY. APRIL 1 1, 1985 


*i)~ 


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Page 1$ 


Irish Distillers: Hanging On to Niche 




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By Bamaby J. Fcdcr 

■Vow Voric Tumj Sfmec 

MIDLETON, Ireland — Al- 
ibougb some Irish drink ere give up 
whiskey for Lent, Irish Distillers 
Group PLC does not normally stem 
producing and distributing tL Thu 
year, though, a labor dispute shat 
down the giant distilling complex 
on the roUing outskirts of this town 
just cast of Cork from the begin- 
ning of the proEaster religious ob- 
servance in February until last 
Wednesday. 

The confrontation began when 
Distillers, which produces ail Irish 
whiskey ip the Republic and the six 
British-controlled counties of 
Northern Ireland, tried to cut down 
trucking costs by laying off drivers 
and reorganizing deliveries. The 
drivers could not accept that a 
company enjoying record sales and 
profits needed to resort to such 
stringent cost cutting. 

Distillers was willing to take the 
si* -week strike — before accepting 
a compromise that met at least 
some of its demands — because 
company officials have an entirely 
different perspective. 

To be sure. Distillers — the 
country's fifih-largesi conmany — 
is relatively prosperous. However, 
company executives regard the 
concern as a minnow marshaling 
all of its resources to defend a 
strong — but tiny — home market 
while expanding its barely measur- 
able niche in a competitive world 
dominated by other spirits. 

“I had an image of a very settled 
industry because it's been going on 
for hundreds of years,'' said James 
Twomey. the executive Distillers 
plucked from a nearby Mitsui 
Chemicals plant to manage the 
complex here in 1981 “Actually, 
there’s much more change going on 
here than at Mitsui." 


All of the change — marketing 
initiatives, new product develop- 
ment and restructuring of distribu- 
tion — is aimed at recapturing nasi 


takd S17I million last year, but 
Irish whiskey claims just 2 percent 
of the world whiskey market 

And in the United States, which 
hy far is the worlds largest whiskey 
market, Irish whiskey last year sold 
the equivalent of 350.000 cases — 
just five-tenths of l percent q[ the 
whiskey CotaL 

Ireland dominated the whiskey 
trade in the 19th century, but a 
number of factors have eroded that 
preeminence, including the de- 
structive effect of years erf domestic 
strife sis Ireland fought for its inde- 
pendence from Britain. 

Prohibition in the United States 
dealt another blow. Sales of the 
spirit plummeted and its image was 
tarnished as bootleggers began sell- 
ing concoctions that they adver- 
tised as Irish whiskey but which 
bore little resemblance to the real 
product. 

To make matters worse Irish 
distillers did not foresee the end of 
Prohibition. Unlike the Scots, they 
had little set aside 10 offer the huge 
American market when the ban 
was lifted. With a product that 
takes 7 to IS years to age before it 
can be sold, a quick recovery was 
impossible. 

The important turning point 
came in 1966 when the surviving 
distillers in the Republic merged to 
form the current company. By 
then, they had not only lost most of 
their export market but laced a new 
import threat from European dis- 
tillers and brewers as Ireland pre- 
pared to join the European Com- 
munity and pull down protective 
trade barriers. 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


New Zealand 

Wattie Ind. 

tod HaM IMS 1*W 

Revenue SWJ 310.9 

Pretax Ner_ Mil 17J 

United States 

Amor. Security 

Id Ovsr. IMS ITU 

Nel Inc. S.77 7.17 

Per Star*— . 040 043 

AmorHad) 

!«t Quor. IMS IMt 

Revenue 7-210- 1030. 

Net Inc. 270 2574 

Per Shore IBS 244 


Cameron Iron Wks 

3rd Quor. IMS im 

Revenue 133 J 223.9 

Net Inc. 3-M loJlBJ 

Per Shore 0.12 — 

9 Months IMS 1914 

Revenue 3W.0 mo 

Net Inc 427 (o}4(.l 

Per Share 0-14 , — 


Celanece 

Id doer. IMS 19*4 
Revenue — _ 7410 837-0 

Net lilt 3MJ 440 

Per Share—. 140 224 

Colt ind. 

1*1 Over. IM5 1M4 
Revenue 4UJ 4 

Net inc — 3io ns 

Per Shore — _ lit IJ5 

Consol. Papers 

IslOuor. IMS IM4 

Revenue U42 m2 

Met Inc 27.37 1147 

Per Shore 124 Ofl9 

nr iw* mum rntana 
Hr l-tor- 1 dec* spur poM 
Dec. JAM. 

Continental Bmp 
IdOoar. IMS 1914 

Mei Inc 112 S3 

Per Shore— 1.19 OM 
mr net OKlu&n fox creett 
ofSUUta 

Cit&en/ ftesf Bkn 

Id Over. IMS 19*4 

mrinc sis 15 a 

Per snare — 039 Dl4S 


NoTHtck/dos toon lea pro- 
v/dans of UJS million vs 
SZ34 million, net choropottt 
of SUV million vs ISM mil- 
lion. and narmertomung as- 
sets of SSSjf million et iit.i 
million. IMS not 1/tctucrt 
choree ot SI million from 
aborted merger, ana gout of 
Sl.l million on teeurtUn 


F*t Nafl Cincinnati 

Id Osar. IMS 19S4 

Nat Inc 731 US 

Per Share 075 049 

Per snore oalusled for 3- 
tor-i stock sour parade April 
IS 


Hnt Fin, Group 

Id QUO'. IMS 19*4 

Net I sc lfiJ M7 

Per Share 1-03 039 


Food lion 

ldQuar. lftS 19*4 

RevenUel. . 40U 3073 

NO Inc 9-54 730 

Per Shore MS 6.14 


(Other Earnings on Page 10) 


; “They decided to pool their re- 
■ . sources and have a go," said Rich' 
ard Burrows, the 38-year-old man- 
aging director who runs the 
company from Dublin. 

Another major piece fell into 
place between 1972 and 1974. It 
was then that Distillers acquired 
Old Bushmills, the last surviving 
distiller in Northern Ireland, from 
Chaningion, the British brewer, in 
an accord in which Seagrams of 
Canada acted as intermediary and 
ended up with a 14-percent stake in 
Distillers. 

Seagrams today acts as importer 
in North America for Jameson 
whiskeys. Distillers' leading brand 
in the American market, and is a 
frequent partner in the exchange of 
technical information, according to 
Mr. Burrows. 

Industry analysts believe Distill- 
ers is fioolly on the right track. 
While Scotch whiskey sales have 
stumped in the United States and 
other world markets, the sales of 
the Irish spirit have managed to 
expand. And while 18 percent of 
Irish whiskey is still sold around St. 
Patricks Day (this year's supplies 
were shipped before the stake). 
Distillers maintains that year- 
round consumption is expanding. 

It has not beat easy. Distillers 
has endured a one- third decline in 
its home market since 1979 largely 
due to the imposition of high liquor 
taxes. Some Irish drinkers cut back 
while others turned to Scotch and 
other spirits they could smuggle 
across the border with Northern 
Ireland. 

“Our competition is the whole 
premium end of tire drinks market, 
and that includes not just premium 
Scotch but high quality gin. vodka, 
and Cognac,'* said Mr. Burrows. 

Recession May Be 
Bullish For Stocks 

(Continued From Page 9) 

said the key to an advance by 
stocks will be “superior perfor- 
mance" in the bond market. 

“Until then, we could well be 
buffeted by the crosscurrents of 
disappointing earnings and sagging 
confidence about the 1986 out- 
look," he said. “The long-term case 
for equities remains impressive, but 
it is ovcrwhelminely a valuation 
case dependent on both lower rales 
and an extended cycle." 

Michael Ponsbach, partner in 
charge of Stockholm’s Jacobson & 
Ponsbach brokerage firm, also sees 
a period ahead of rest and recuper- 
ation for investors worldwide. 
“There’s just a general lack of inter- 
est now about stock markets, from 
Wall Street through Europe and 
including Japan," he said. 


Japan Said to Set 
Export Levekfor 
3 Automakers 

Rruim 

TOKYO — Ministry of In- 
ternational Trade and Industry 
officials have described as spec- 
ulation a report that it has pro- 
posed limiting car-export in- 
creases to the United States to 
13 percent or less for three large 
Japanese automakers. 

The newspaper Nihon Kegai 
Shimbun, citing informed 
sources, said Mill proposed 
raising the limits by 1 1 percent 
to 13 percent for Toyota Motor 
Corp.. Nissan Motor Co. and 
Honda Motor Co. in ihe year 
that began April 1. 

The newspaper said that 
meant MITT would give larger 
increases to smaller automakers 
that have contracts to sdl cars 
to U.S. auto companies. It said, 
MITT was expected to make its’ 
quota proposal to five smaller 
automakers later. 

Company spokesmen said 
they knew nothing of any pro- 
posal. M1T1 officials said they 
had not decided an new alloca- 
tions for the eight automakers. 

The Japanese government 
has increased the ceiling on car 
shipments to the United States 
by 24.3 percent to 2.3 million in 
the year that began April 1. 


Astra Doesn’t Plan New-Share Issue for London 


By Juris Rasa 

Imentiuiunul Herald Tntme 

SODERTAUE. Sweden — As- 
tra AB, Sweden’s largest pharma- 
ceutical company , plans its already 
announced listing on the London 
Stock Exchange, set for May. solely 
: for its existing shareholders in Brit- 
! ain and not to raise new capital 
i said Ulf Widengren, president and 
chief executive. 

“For normal business develop- 
ment, we don’t need any [morel 
money," said Mr. Widengren in an 
interview. He indicated that the 
purpose was to raise tire pharma- 
ceutical company’s visibility by 
listing it on the London exchange. 

As previously reported. Astra’s 
I *184 pretax earnings rose 27 per- 
cent, to 822 million kronor (about 
million) from 1983’s 631 mil- 
lion kronor, while sales rose 10 per- 
cent, to 3,9! billion kronor from 
3.56 billion kronor. Group profit os 
a percentage of sales grew to 21 
percent from 17 percent while re- 
search spending increased 22 per- 
cent, to 7]7 million kronor. 

For 1985, earnings and sales 
were expected to grow about 12 
percent each, Astra said at the end 
of February. 

Some market observers said that 
it would be a waste for Astra to get 
listed in London without a simulta- 
neous new -share issue for that mar- 
ket About 20 percent of Astra cap- 
ita! stock consists of “free" shares 
that can be owned and traded by 


non-Swedes. Observers have said 
that, based on earnings potential 
and a relatively low pricc-eaznisgs 
ratio, Astra could attract a consid- 
erable number of new foreign in- 
vestors if it issued such new shares. 

"They have a very interesting 
and varied research program.” said 
Linda Tremaine, a pharmaceuticals 
analyst at London’s E.B. Savory 
Miiln. “Oxer the next few years, 
that should produce a stream of 
clinically interesting products in 
commercially interesting areas.” 

“We have about 2 billion kronor 
in cash." Mr. Widengren, Astra's 
president, said. “The only justifica- 
tion to raise capita] would be an 
acquisition abroad of such a size 
and price that the issue would be 
justified. We don't sec any compa- 
ny that we are interested' in now, 
but with a listing in the U.1C, if the 
opportunity should come up, we 
can take quicker action.” 

Despite the company’s record, 
Astra shares have been volatile in 
response to what were perceived by 
the market as setbacks for some of 
Astra’s most promising products. 
Astra stock closed Wednesday at 
385 kronor a share on the Stock- 
holm Stock Exchange. But. as a 
sign of the stock’s recent volatility, 
Astra was trading around 420 in 
early February. 

In 1983, Astra had withdrawn its 
antidepressant drug zimeldine, 
marketed as Zelmid, after unex- 
pected neurological side effects 


showed up, and in 1984, clinical 
trials of omeprazole, an ulcer drug, 
were suspended temporarily. Re- 


“good news” could also contribute 
to share-price volatility, b 

He said that as part of its re-^ 


cently, Swedish authorities permit- search into antiviral drugs, Asira> 
ted resumpticn of omeprazole tn- was investigating possible cure? 


als in what was seen as a major 
advance for bringing Astra’s ulcer 
remedy to the market. 

"Omeprazole was well known.” 
he said. “Its healing properties 
were so spectacular compared to 
major drugs on the market We saw 
healing (of ulcers) in half the time, 
and we coold also heal people who 
were non-responders to Tagamet" 
Tagamet is a widely used ulcer 
treatment. 

The drug was withdrawn from 
clinical trials for further investiga- 
tion of certain toxicological find- 
ings, but Mr. Widengren stressed 
that “what happened to omepra- 
zole, there has been so much pub- 
licity. We also thought that we 
should tell the public that it's just 
not that easy, tnat new drugs sim- 
ply don't come along." 

Ms. Tremaine at Savory Miiln 
remarked that delays in the devel- 
opment of promising drugs “are 
one of the cycles that a company 
goes through. For Astra, it’s just 


and remedies for herpes infections, 
and for acquired immune deficits!- 
cy syndrome, or AIDS, both caused 
by viruses. In new of the publicity 
associated with certain illnessesT 
the Astra president asserted that it 
was important to be low-key in 
discussing research and discoveries 
that could take many years to turn 
into a product. 

Mr. Widengren explained that 
besides antiviral drugs, the other 
main areas of Astra’s research were 
gastrointestinal and cardiovascular 
agents. “In the short term, we have 
a calcium blocker coming, an ami- 
hypertensive drug that is a comple- 
ment to the beta blocker.” be said T 
“Calcium blockers have been on 
the market for some time, but this 
will have some unique properties in 
controlling hypertension." 

He also predicted that omepra- 
zole. the ulcer-healing agent, will 
“quickly be on the market, in late 
’86 or ’87. once we resume clinical 
trials." 

While; he said, other Swedish 


r j i * f »» iuiv, lift, ooiu, i/uiti kjivtutaJJ 

bad luck that a couple _of events companies searched for biological 
came so close lo & ; ri>er- Th"* * no substances with therapeutic appli- 
way you can say they have bad a*** apP rM C h “is that 

management or poor climca] tnajs, we go from the diSse to the drug 


they were just very unfortunate." 

As for market reaction, Mr. Wi- 
dengren said that oversimplified 


Budd Uncouples Rail-Car Unit in Pursuit of Profits 


(Continued from Page 9) In its fiscal year that ended last 

ever-changing political body is a September, Thyssen itself returned 
treadmill to oblivion," said James 10 profitability with earnings of 
H. McNeal Jr., Budd’* president S57.2 million. In the period a year 
and chief executive. earlier, Thyssen had a loss of 

Mr. McNeal, who has been with 5173.7 million. 

Budd since 195 1, obviously is much TTiyssen said that a turnaround 
happier selling auto and truck in its steel business and reduced 
products to the Big Three automok- losses at Budd were responsible for 


Mr. McNeal, who is a Transit 
America director, as is Mr. Busch- 
raann. said Transit America would 
continue to go after the rail-car 
market under Mr. Wolf. 

The United Slates, Transit 
America said, will be the largest 


Workers covering 6.000 workers at 
a total of six plants in Detroit and 
Philadelphia. 

The company, with $1.5 billion 
in sales, is one of the major auto- 
motive suppliers, ranking with 
Borg-Wamer Corp., Dana Corp, 


single market through the end of Rockwell International Corp. and 
the century, with a potential for Eaton Corp. 


He said that Transit America 


: automotive side of Budd ac- 


represented only 20 percent of tually returned to the black in the 
Budd’s business even in its years of fiscal year 1 984, Mr. McNeal said, 
highest deliveries and that breaking and expects to be profitable in 
it ofl would allow “the problems 1985. 

peculiar to it to be addressed." Earnings figures were not given. 

The creation of Transit America, But Siegfried Busdimjnn, Budd’s 
Mr. McNeal said, does not “get rid chief financial officer, said that 
of the problem" of the ailing rail 5100 million flowed to Budd’s bot- 


400 to 600 rail cars a year for re- 
placements and for new systems. 


Among its major products are 
body components of steel and plas- 


The question is whether Transit ^ wheek ^ brakes heavy-duty 
America can be a senous competi- tn,ck and trailer equipment, cast- 
tor with the foreign manufacturers. ^ siamp i ngs the like. 


Budd is smaller than the compa- 
ny that Thyssen bought. 


The company also is set up to 


force .o- f < "? Sn S T 

taJed 21.500. It is now at 14.500. A ' hn, “8 |1 t0 lhe final 


car operation for Thyssen. 


tom line in the fiscal year 1984 


Mr. Spethmann, during his New although that was not enough to 
York visit, reiterated that Thyssen offset rail-car losses and return the 
might seek partners to invest in the entire Budd company to profitabil- 
unit. ity- 

Transit America, he said, has on Budd posted a loss of $44 million 

order backlog large enough to carry * n fiscal year 1984, compared 
on current activity for 18 to 24 with a loss of S142J1 million the 
months. “We have always fulfilled year before, 
our orders," he said. moammmammamntmma^—^m—nem 

Thyssen began its diversification . AUTOS TAX FI 

drive in 1974, when demand for 

steel began to slacken. 

Four years later, it paid $295 reaMffitMANr 

million for Budd. only to absorb its bp*n»)ad ca note for Mmcfa. 
problems as the American aulo in- JE&SjSSal&Fi 

dustry slumped. EPA for found aid doofar OCX Tmt. 


i stamping plant and other 
-cost operations were dosed. 


hardware. 

And Budd has prepared for 


“In the downturn we did not sit auiomakers’ renewed demands of 
back.” Mr. Buschmann said. “We on-time deliveries of inventory, 
did a lot of preparation for the next * ^ e . a f e converted,” Mr. 

recession. Thyssen gave us the fi- McNeal said. 


nancial support to restructure.’' 


But be remembered that in the 


Budd recently has announced a old days, so-called just-in-time in- 
tentative agreement on a new con- ventory delivery was a Detroit 
tract with the United Automobile practice. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page) 
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We understand a disease in depth 
and then we try to make or find a 
molecule that will cure it." 

Shell Australia, 
BHP Mount Bid 
ForWoodside 

Reuters 

MELBOURNE — Broken 
Hill Pty. Co. and Shell Austra- 
lia Ltd. offered Wednesday on 
indicated 459 million Austra- 
lian dollars (S300.1 million), or 
1 .60 dollars a share, for the 57.4 
percent of Woodside Petroleum 
Ltd. they do not already hold. 

The offer, announced in a 
joint statement, compares with 
Tuesday’s closing price of 1.16 
dollars a share. Woodside ! 
shares rose to 1.55 dollars on 
the announcement. 

BHP and Shell each now hold 
21.3 percent of Woodside's 500 
million shares outstanding. The 
offer is unconditional and pay- 
able immediately, BHP and 
Shell said. 

Woodside has advised share- 
holders not to sell their shares. 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 1985 



PEANUTS 

(l FEEL GOOD 
V TODAY' ^ 


V (/A Isj \ 


BLOND IE 

1 [ HOW WAS THE S 

> PB’PB? STEAK? 


fl FEEL I CAN A 
CATCH ANYDUNfi THAT 
v. COMES MY WAY' ) 


1+-/I euHIMMF 


HEY SWEETIE, YOU 
COMING MY WAY? 


| '4**1 | I'F'W. 





HERE'S VOUH LEMON 
> AABJINSUE RJE 


.ah-C) 

-*/ 


04 


08 ll 


JSfc6e 


/Y^IT -you SOI MG TO 

SW GESUNDMErr ? r- 


I 


ACROSS 

1 Counterpart of 
fraternal 
8 Idle chatter 

15 Run-of-the-mill 

16 Raise 

17 Threatens 

18 Guided 

If Blab 

20 Purvey 

22 Anger 

23 Kind of dock 

24 Candle 

25 More than 
some 

28 Opposite of 
hiver 

27 Hen 

28 Curriculum 

29 Renovates 

31 Highway 
havens 

32 Exclamation 
of disgust 

S3 Quote 

34 Treats a violin 
bow 

37 Live with 

41 A constellation 

42 Fathered 

43 Word with 
power or 
handle 

44 Tend 

45 Certain sports 
events 


48 Ste. Jeanne 

47 Kind of salad 

48 Bjorn Borg, for 
me 

49 voce 

56 Cracker 

52 Tire type 

54 Edited 
critically 

55 Mistake 
Indication 

56 Antigone and 
Ismene 

57 Wishes 


1 Wall ornament 

2 Yielded to 
esurience 

3 Appoints anew 

4 Speak 
pompously 

5 Dash 

6 Mature 

7 Haitian 

seaport 

8 Badger 

9 Tailor 

19 Salacious look 

11 Map abbr. 

12 Statistics term 

13 “Love Is—," 

I. Stone book 

14 Rock bass and 
rudd 


21 Imitates 

24 Bakery items 

25 Liturgical 
headdress 

27 Advances 
made by 
bankers 

28 Performed a 
civic duty 

39 True's partner 

31 What an 
odometer 
measures 

33 At bay 

34 AbuSimbei 
figure 

35 Oriental art 

38 Kind of bar 

37 What some are 
fit to be 

38 Olympics 
competitor 

39 Steak order 

40 Does a cryp- 
tographer's job 

42 Exceeds 55 

45 One of the 
English gentry 

46 Back: Comb, 
form 

48 Kind of walk or 
wall 

49 Stops onaRR 

51 Trinitrotol- 
uene, for short 

53 Poetic 
palindrome 



BEETLE BAILEY 


X SUPPOSE 

x Have to 
DO THIS... 


YET, X ASK i SARSE'S 
MYSELF -IS IT i VERSION OF 


REALLY WORTH 
N IT? 


TRIVIAL 

PURSUIT 



OH, WELL 


co^^O 



30 


& 


ANDY CAPP 


flMltUJbGMXJ-/ 
32 NEVER--0\f~ 


M-ll It 


It 19*3 mtnat 
|MlD|N9w»«(ivei5yfi«eili 


I'LL PROVE IT-.' 


[ HANGCNTOTHISFORA1E , \ 
>■ RUBE. HE*3 A LAD WHO'S A 
AUrtWvSREACVTD RJTSOLR 
MONEY WHSEHtS MOUTH IS . 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



VIZARD of ID 

THK5 IS UAMlVAU, 

emm- mo -root his; 
t cm 2 thml^! 


WHY IN -THE 
U0PW7PIPY 00 
VOS&WA 
THIN^P 


PJPYOJ^R 
MY A T0LLFCPAII 



REX MORGAN 

H L1KE they -say, CLAUDIA — 
WHAT YOU PAY FOR' WITH 
NCW YOU'RE GETTING THE ^ 
BALERS CUT THE STUFF TO ) 

E YOU'D HAVE TO BE 
IV TEN 


LOOK, I'D BETTER RUN { W 
1 HAVE AN IMPORTANT M 
APPOINTMENT AT EIGHT- ^ 
THIRTY i IF 1 MAKE THIS SALE A 
ITLL BE THE BIGGEST I'VE A 
EVER MADE/ 


W THE WAY 1 
I YOU LOOK 
K you COULD 
\ SELL ME J 
> THE 
CORONADO 
BRID6E l ■ 
ISOOD LUCK' ; 


'Look! Ther^sv^nus and *W/£re only innerested 
the tapper... and...* 


GARFIELD 


*5>Yf in that scrambled word game 

by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


ITS FUN TO FIND 
FAMILIAR SHAPES 
IN THE CLOUDS s 


IBwote* 

EKm6Z*J 

KfHLr- 1 


*■ THERE'S AN < 
OLD STANDARD. 


► A DOG CLOUD A 
CHASING A CAT CLOUD . 
^ UP A TREE CLOUD 1 


Uiwcrambte these tour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
tow ordinary words. 


SMUNI 


LEAGE 




<J2M PAVfe 



BOOKS 


~ Boh is no exception. Never haying reafly 

CONTINENTAL DRIFT gob rmds it hard to know rigid from 

Srona- instead, '“he relies on taboos and ar- 
tsell Banks. 366 pp. £ 17.95. . cuSices to control his behavior, to make 

• & Row, 10 Ea « Sid Stroou 

ark, N. Y. 10022. ^ humdrum life, feds trapped and an- 

vcd by Michiko Kakurani that none of the dreams he grew up withare 

likdy to come true. He feels there are two Blob 
US is an American story of the late 20th Tjuboises: the version he’s invented for the real 
century” writes Russell Banks in the wodd _ a ^ “who’s dutiful prudent, custo- 
jrian invocation that opens “Conlinen- ^ and even-tempered;” and anoth- 

if and this remarkable novel goes on 10 a ^ _ a man who’s “feckless, reek- 

hat ambitious introduction — m the ]e ^ irresponsible, faithless and urarionaL" 
sense. Swearing in narrative and vivid ^ ^ jhere’s not much to distinguish Bob 
lepiction of fragmented, fragmenting Dubois from the host of disaffected characters 

Continental Drift" accelerates like a wfao the fiction of Raymond Carver, 

ek railroad train to its swift conclusion, g^bie Ann Mason and: Mary Robison: not- 
1 ley’s sure command of plot proves to be jQ.young survivors of the dislocations of the 
e of many novdistic tools employed m ’60s, afflicted with vague existential doubts 
ice of a larger vision. and given to drifting absencmindedly, from 

Graham Greene and Robert Stone, ^ fay m gob, however, determines to. try to 
; concerned with moral ambiguities and a new fife for himself — to start again; 

nsequences on ordinary lives, and his ^ one fine day. he abruptly picks up his 
tow one man named Bob Dubois went family and moves to Florida, whan he’s soon 
fa of a better life and got in over his drawn into partnership with his fast-talking 

comes, at race, a visionary one about brother, Edctie, and with Ave, a childhood pal 

ce and evil and a shattering dissection who's pairing a bundle running drugs, 
anporary American life. for panlrs, Florida is what California used 

, Bob Dubois has a wife whom he loves, to be for Raymond Chandler and Nathanael 
ighters and another child on the way. we* — a seedy, dangerous place, a magnet for 
life, he’s lived in Catamount New dreamas, entrepreneurs and people with no 
lire, and sincehigh school he’s worked place else to gait's the final frontier, where all 
•airman for the Abenaki Oil Co. Tie jgft of the old pioneer spirit is a scat of 

nest, he doesn’t sneak copper tubing or lawlessness and “me- first” individualism, 
10 his car at night, he doesn't put in for those willing to play fast and dirty can 

didn't work, be doesn't drink on the get ^ch quick but where other, more tentative 
t owns a run-down duplex in a work- folk, like Bob Dubois, sec their dreams disnte- 

s neighborhood, a 13-foot Boston g rating in damp, pastel-colored trailer parks, 
be bunt from a kit, and a battered discovers that his life has sfadded 

et station wagon, and he owes the local out of control in Florida. By moving there, he 
and loan— for the house, the boat and lassoed the bright future he fantasized 

— a little over $22,000. “W e have a about; he’s only succeeded in losing his past — 

fe. We do,” his wife, Elaine, keeps ^ house, everything that once gave 

kn. his life a modicum of coherence and meaning, 

ugh Catamount may, at first recall To refugees from the Caribbean, however, 
Falls, the setting of It’s a Wonderful Florida stiflrepresents the promised land, the 
lat surface image soon absolves into ^ Amer ican d ream, its palm trees 

— an image more reminiscent of an wfai^ering “luxury and power.” And in a se- 

Hopper painting. There s something ^ ^ alternating takes that counterpoint the 
depressed and even vaguely menacing of gob Dubois, Banks tells the tale of a 
us co mmuni ty “dosed in by weatter young Haitian woman named Vanise, who 
gr^ihy, where the men work at jobs Utamly risks everything to gel to Miami. Be- 
women work at home and raise chil- rans e Vanise’ s inner life is never delineated 
3 there's never enough money, where ^ lavished on Bob’s, the reader 
n and the women ten d to feel angry sometimes feels the author straining to use her 
me another much of the time, especial- asametar*OTfortheyet unspofl^immigraut 
1 evenings when the work is done and dream. Allihe same, the t^Konbetween her 
ken are sleeping^and nothing scans md Sob's is so powerfully orchestrated 
d over yesterday. that it takes on the terrible inevitablity of real 

life, and it lingers in cur mind long after we 

Solution to Previous Puzzle fi ^^lhe reasons “Continental Drift" pos- 

sesses such emotional resonance is that Banks 
makes the tenuousness of contemporary life — 
our fears of not being able to hold onto our 
* dreams and protect the people we love — seem 
entirely palpable, a byproduct of oar individ- 
ual fadings and our susceptibility to all the 
changes wrought by recent history’s manic 
metabolic rate. While the scope of “Continen- 
tal Drift” is huge — the author wants to do 
nothing less than capture American life as it 
exists today — it remains, somehow, acutely 
personal; in the story of Bob Dubois’s sad, 
brief life, we catch a frightening glimpse of cun- 
own mortality. 


By Russell Banks. 366 pp. £17.95. 

Harper & Row, 10 East 53d Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakurani 

'«T*HIS is an American story of the late 20th 
I century.” writes Russell Banks in the 
Faulknerian invocation that opens “Continen- 
tal Drift,” and tins remarkable novel goes onto 
fulfill that ambitious introduction — m the 
largest sense. Sweeping in narrative and vivid 
in its depiction or fragmented, fragmenting 
lives, “Continental Drift" accelerates like a 
fast sled; railroad train to Us swift conclusion, 
but Banks's sure command of plot proves to be 
only one of many novdistic tools employed in 
the service of a larger vision. 

r.ifr* Graham Greene and Robert Stozte, 
RatilcQ is concerned with moral ambiguities and 
their consequences on ordinary lives, and his 
tali* of how one man named Bob Dubois went 
in sew re fa of a better life and got in over his 
head becomes, at race, a visionary one about 
innocence and evil and a shattering dissection 
of contemporary American life. 

At 30, Bob Dnboishas a wife whom he loves, 
two daughters and another child on the way. 
All his life, he’s lived in Catamount, New 
Hamp shire, and since high school he’s worked 
as a repairman for the Abenaki OQ Co. “He 
stays honest, he doesn’t sneak copper tubing or 
tods into Ms car at night, he doesn't put in for 
time be didn't work, be doesn't drink on the 
job.” He owns a run-down duplex in a work- 
ing-class neighborhood, a 13-foot Boston 
whaler he befit from a kit, and a battered 
Chevrolet station wagon, and he owes the local 
savings and loan — for the house, the boat and 
the car — a little over $22,000. “We have a 
good life. We do,” his wife, Elaine, keeps 

idling him 

Although Catamo unt may, at first, recall 
Bedford foils, the setting of “It’s a Wonderful 
Life,” that surface image soon dissolves into 
another — an image more reminiscent of an 
Edward Hopper painting. There’s something 
somber, depressed and even vaguely menacing 
about this community “dosed in by weather 
and geography, where the men wont at j'obs 
and the women weak at home and raise chil- 
dren and there's never enough money,” where 
“the men and the women tend to reel angry 
toward one another much of the time, especial- 
ly in the evenings when the work is done and 
the children are sleeping and nothing seems 
improved over yesterday?’ 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


□□□□□ naan □□□□ 

□BQDB □□□□ 

Boana aana anna 

oaaa Bnaaaa 
□□□□be] aaBaa 
□b □□ □□□□ aaaa 
□BQQnna aonaoaa 
dhh □ □□□□ aaaa 
□aaaa □□□□□□ 
□□□Baa □□□□ 

□□□□ □anaaaannai 
□nan □□□□ □□□□□ 
□bob aaaa aaaaa 
mmm anna asasci 


Michiko Kakutani is on the staff of The New 
4/ii/85 York Times. 


By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal 
South was astonished to 
bear an opening bid of six 
dubs on his right. Even his 
long experience in the game 
had not given him much prac- 
tice in this situation, and he 
had to think a little when his 
partner reopened with a dou- 
ble. 

Doubles at the six-level are 
not for take-out. but this one is 
not defined in any textbook. 
East was looking quietly confi- 
dent, but was deflated when 
South ventured to bid his 
hearts. He has decided correct- 
ly that East knew what he was 
doing and had a completely 
freak distribution. 


BRIDGE 


It would scan that six hearts 
doubled was due to fad by five 
tricks, which would be 900 
against the 920 available to 
East-West pairs at other tables 
for malting ax dubs undou- 
bled. In practice, however. 
West misdefended and permit- 
ted South to escape for 700. 

Six spades would have been 
better, and North should no 
doubt have corrected, but even 
so South collected 11 match 
points out of a possible II He 
tactfully refrained from point- 
ing out to East a strategy that 
is usually better with such 
hands: Bid slowly and hope to 
be pushed to six clubs. 

He knew that East bad ex- 
pected that his brash opening 


would silence an L O.L But 
be had chosen the wrong 
LO.L. 


NORTH 
4 K J 87 832 
O A U4 
*IS 

* A 

WEST EAST 

♦ A< u~ 

VKJS32 <? _ 

.OAKQ72 

•«32 *KQJ109S43 

SOUTH 
*Q 1085 
O Q3875 
4 7104 
*7 

^NOjbu aide **b rafeKcahle. The 


fftes 

& lt 


•• Pw Pins 

Pw dm. 

Para pw 

Wrat lad the dab six. 


Win, 


UNCOU 


BORBEJ 


Answer here: VERY 


HOW THE 
COTTON TYCOON 
FOUND HIS WORK. 

• -4 

Now arranga the ctrcfad letters to 
term tin uprise answer, as sug- 
gested by me above cartoon 


V^brid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse April 10 

■ Closing price j in local carrendes unless otherwise i n di c at e d. 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jurnbies: FAULT BLESS ATTACH EVOLVE 
A n swer VWi^youmjgMconsun a plastic surgeon— 


WEATHER 


Ateorva 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Barcelona 

Serenade 

Berlin 

Brawls 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Casta Del Sal 

Duwm 

dflaburaa 

Florence 

Frankfort 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Pal met 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

17 63 76 4S St 

IT 52 0 33 fr 

24 73 11 S2 IT 

IB 64 7D 43 fr 

23 73 14 37 d 

11 53 6 43 Hi 

10 50 6 43 a 

31 81 10 30 fr 

15 51 B 48 tb 

3 37 ■ 1 30 d 

20 61 6 43 d 

12 St 4 39 0 

7 45 S 41 a 

31 70 13 SS d 

12 54 4 3* o 

11 52 7 45 th 

2 36 -8 18 fr 

15 66 13 SB d 

21 70 15 5* d 

16 61 9 41 d 

15 39 4 3* cl 

14 57 4 39 O 

IB 64 10 50 r 

9 48 5 41 o 

■ 46 6 43 r 

21 70 11 52 fr 

3 37 -B 18 lr 

13 55 8 46 d 

13 55 5 41 lb 


Bonshofc 
Bell lap 

Hone Kane 


Cabs 
Caps Taws 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

36 97 74 75 Ir 

16 61 4 39 fr 

24 75 19 66 o 

33 91 25 77 d 

29 B4 15 59 fr 

21 70 11 52 D 

21 70 13 55 r 

33 91 25 77 O 

24 75 20 68 d 

20 68 9 48 o 


21 70 13 S5 fr 

27 11 13 55 fr 

20 68 • 40 fr 

IB 64 7 45 d 

22 72 14 57 d 

— — — — no 

26 79 16 61 a 

24 73 12 54 cl 


ABN 

ACF HoMlflB 

Aeoon 

AK20 

■AhoW 

■AMEV 

Alton Rubber 

AmroBonk 

BVG 

Buehrmvn T 
Cotand Hide 

ElsevHer-NDU 

Fokker 

GW Brocades 

Helnok m 

I Miopovens 

KLM 

Naarden 

Nat Nedder 

NedUovd 

Oce Vender G 

Pokhoed 

Philip* 

Robeco 
Rodamco 
Rollncp 
Rorento 
naval Dutch 
Unilever 
Von Ommeren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


AHP.C BS General bite 
| Previo u s : ram 


LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aires 25 77 10 64 o 

Lima 36 79 19 66 d 

Mexico ary 21 7D 3 39 r 

Rio da Janeiro 27 81 20 <8 o 

Saa Panto — — — no 


Artec 
Bckaeri 
Cocker) II 
Cobeea 
EBES 

GB-lnno-BM 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Hoboken 

rntorcom 

Kredtottank 

Petro n n u 

Soe General* 

Soflna 

SoIvQV 

Traction Elec 

UCS 

Unere 

VMUsJWonio Bn a 



Close Pre* 

KaU-fSalZ 251 JO 252 

Ktasttxtl 212 21120 

SUauSto 22B 223 

KJoedaieTH-O 23050 249 JO 

Ktoedaier Wsrkn 7220 73 

Kruap Stahl 109 112 

Unde 431 41150 

Uitthcnso 196 19650 

MAN 13450 15450 

Ma nn tsiwo wn 165J0 16450 

Metal laeseflsdnft 2S2 249 

MuenavRuecfc 1150 1195 

Preusspa 274 373 

Ruetswrs-Werke 340 345 

RWE 154 153 

SdMdns 43244950 

Stonwa* 54150 53850 

Thrsien 9950 100.90 

Varta 1MJ0 183 

Vefia 17920 17B 

VEW 1365D 12650 

Volkswaaenwark 208 203 

Cain met shook Index : 12MJB 
Previo u s : 119M8 


23 3.10 
15-10 15-40 
15-40 13-40 
«5 9J3 
44 4873 
7M 755 
33 33 

SJ0 525 
era 9 
7020 71-50 
625 620 

2320 2340 
11 1120 
ia«i mo 

650 650 

X4S 140 
953 923 

MS MS 
159 140 

23.90 2320 
725 725 

limi 

A40 4273 
2.175 2275 


760 760 

2635 2613 
17350 17230 
1067 1055 
1650 1680 
■450 8400 
1037 1B23 
5373 S375 
1700 1700 
3400 JW 
3025 3008 
390 390 

8075 IVB 
990 no 
6100 4100 
1760 17*0 
400 470 

3300 3300 
MS StS 



Haua Sane to 
P rev i o u s : 14 


AECI 

Anglo Amarl c on 
Angle Am Gold 
Bartow* 

BIWoor 

BofteH 

DeBoers 

prie ta t rt eto 

Elands 

GFSA 

Harm any 

HIvaM Stoat 

Kloof 

NadBank 

Pres Stem 

RiHPtat 

5A Brain 

st Helena 

Sasd 

west Hawn* 


FrnsJder 

Generali 

IFI 

ItataemetiM 

Itolmobmon 

Medtobanco 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RA5 

Rlnascento 

SIP 

Snki 

Standa 

Slat 


Air Uaulde 
Aismem ail 
A v Dasecajil 
Boncolre 
B1C 

Correfour 
auc Mod 
Coflmeo 
Du met 
EIFAaultntne 

Europe 1 

Gen Ewx 

Kachette 

Imetal 

LatareeCop 

Legrond 

roreol 

Metro 

MJcftoln 


Moulinex 
Nord-E*t 
OccJdenlota 
Pernod Rlc. 

Petrol as Use) 
P e upeot 
Poelaln 
prtntemp* 

R p dto ted in 

Redouts 

RoosstoUdaf 

sail npislensl 
SourJtorrtar 
Telemeco r 
Tnoimoa CSP 
Valeo 

Aeefl late : nan 
PrevtoM : 20950 
CAC Index : 21629 
prevlom : 316M 


. “ 52 
41650 41900 
7750 7670 
B2D00 El 400 
68000 47010 
82000 60000 
1510 1500 
6300 6233 
2212 31B* 
63700 &3200 
667 659 

1995 1993 
Z7W 2749 
12340 12030 
2560 2570 


Ctose Free, 
fondvlk 285 NO. 

Skonska W 9QJ0 

5KF 2 09 208 

SewdtohMotdi zi9 220 

Vdlvo 245 250 

AHMnvowtdm tote : 3914B 

Previous : 3905a 




ACI 

212 

ANI 

285 

ANZ 


BHP 


Bora! 

316 


246 

Brambles 

393 

Coin 

370 



CRA 

tin 

CSR 

298 


224 



Hooker 

159 

Moeellan 

260 

MIM 

334 

MW 

10 

OafcbrldM 

■5 

Peko 

424 

Pose Wan 

406 

RGC 




Stetah 

ns 

Southland 

25 

wofxtskto 

155 

Wormold 

353 

All Ordlaartos Index 

:ISL38 

Prey tons : 5*170 


Source: Reuters. 



Akal 

Atahl Cham 
Asahl dose 
Bank ol Tokyo 
BrMaestone 
Canon 
C-iron 

Dal Nippon Print 
Dalwa House 
Full Bank 
Full Pnola 
Fulllsu 

Hltocnl 

Hondo 

Japan Air Lines 
Kollmo 
Kamo 1 P ow er 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatw IM 
Kubota 

Matou dec lnd> 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
MllsubltM Elec 


465 467 

945 TOO 
891 IM 
SU eo 
534 !2» 

1250 1279 

2S9 357 

W20 1010 
554 354 

1540 1560 
1690 1690 

1120 tin 

819 824 

1330 1330 
6270 6160 
2*9 300 

1380 1390 
147 147 

425 617 

447 448, 

>43 350 

I486 MW 
745 744 

1530 1530 
488 461 , 

400 403 


Mitsubishi Heavy 268 

Mitsubishi Carp 525 

MHMlbndCQ 348 

MlUukOStll 487 

Mitsumi 990 

NEC 1070 

NCK insulators 925 

NlkkoSOC 755 

Nippon Steal 151 

Nippon Yuseti 242 

Nbuon 656 

Nomura Sec 1170 

Olympus 1130 

Pioneer 2530 

Ricoh 895 

Sharp 999 

Sony 43*0 

Sumitomo Bank 1700 

Sumitomo Chem ■ 220 
Sumitomo Metal 152 

Tolsef Carp 216 

Taisno Marine 447 

Takeda Chem 896 

Tdk 5450 

Tellln 446 

Tokyo Elec. Power 1660 
Tokyo Marino 855 

Toroy Ind 408 

Toshiba 410 

Tovola 1250 

Y onto CM Sec B20 

Nikkei/ CM. index : 12401 ; 
previous : 1363043 
New ladex : NUI 


Zaricfa 


Adto 
Bank Leu 
Brown Bovarl 
aba Gelpy 
Credh Suisse 
ElecrrowatT 
Gears Fischer 
inreniacaunt 
Jacob Sucbord 
Jerman 

Lonao Crr 

Nestle 

Oartikon-B 

Roche Baby 

sandaz 

Schlnaler 

Sulxar 

SBC 

-Swlsaolr 

Swiss Reinsurance 

Swiss wMoa 
Union Bonk 
Wlntarthur 
Zurich Ins 

JBC index : IBM 
Prsvtous : cnjo 


2770 2740 
3565 3575 
1635 1635 
2S2S J*40 
2425 2405 
2875 2870 
730 730 

1930 W30 
6390 43S0 
1950 1960 
1480 1475 
4340 4340 
1470 1490 
8725 8725 
7850 7925 
4025 4025 
370 3S0 

345 366’ 

1D6B 1075 
10150 TOOK) 
1410 140 

370 3665 
4450 447S 
21375 2140 


fta.: nor quoted; na: not 
ovaiwii; xd: ex -dividend. 


Sid Chartered 
Tata and Lyle 


Thom EM) 
TJ.aravP 


West German Car Taxes 


Banco Comm 

Ce n t r a l # 

awwnt 

Creo lied 

FarailtoHa 

Flat 


17W0 16810 

P 7^ 
w iSa. 
2949 sna 


Reuters 

BONN — The West German government ap- 
proved Wednesday a package of changes in taxes 
on -cars to encourage a switch to low-pollution 
vehicles fitted with catalytic converters, the Fi- 
nance Ministry said. 

Beginning July 1. low-pollution cars with-eugine 
capacity of 1.4 titers or more will receive a tax 
reduction of up to 2^200 Deutsche marks (about 


than 1.4 tilers will 
cut, over 3W years, 
on "dirty” cars wflj 
of next year. 



_J ion Nabisco L 
32967 Noronda 
5488 Nor c o n 
t 9744S Nvo AHA f 
900 Noma W 

i 715035 Oakwood 
3 17D0OshawaA1 
74C0 Pamour 
452DO PanCon P 
, KOPtmSIitfl 
4550 Phonlx ON 
, M51 Pins Point 

1250 Place GOo 
, 54239 Placer 

, 663 Provloo 

, ^nouesiuraa 
3350 Rom Pet 
3770 Ravrockl 
BB20 Redoatn 
SWlBRdSltnhsA 
, 77100 Res Serw f 

4244 Revn PrpA 

, 16420 Roman 

. too Rothman 

i 6323 Sceptre 

j 400SCPTTH 
l 44700 Sears Can 
I 105762 Shell Can 
I 328932 Sherrill 
1S5JBTTW 

■ * 

I 700 South m 

i 70 SI Brodcyt 

I^64SMCUA 
71 0Q Sulptro 

1 two Sydney a 
, 8800 Tara 

250 Ted, Cor A 
, 76225 Teck B f 

123130 Tex Can 
_4675 Thorn HA 
mis Tor Dm Bk 
, 39000 Tor star B r 

i 773TrodersAf 
1825 Tim Ml 
IKS Trimly Res 
KfS TrnAlta UA 
I “gJTirConPL 

i 13 ^Trtrooc 
^ *gTrt**cAF 
4S«OTurbol 
_201 Un Carbld 
Entarfa* 
$30011 Keno 
2000 Van Der 
28410 Verxll a I 

fiss* 

Total Salas: 10.951J1J 


Itsc 30 Index: 


Weh Lew Cto— Ches 

S25H 251b 2SVk — U, 
*1726 17V*j 1706+ U 
8164b 14Vj 1648+ Hi 
S64b 61b 6*6+ Vb 

*25)4 25% 25W 
51 50 51 

871b 7 7 — lb 

5241b 2416 2416 
J7to 716 716+16 

S33V6 32*. 33 
517V? 17V) I7VJ+ V» 
S7H TVt T*l+ Vb 
28 28 28 — '6 

12J 116 122 + S 

5254b 2 54b 25 V) + 16 
8191k 1946 1964— Vh 
460 445 450 —10 

561b » 6Vb + Vn 

sm> 8H BM 
510ft 1016 10*6 
S214b jlVk 2116 — >4 
272 STD 272 +2 

135 10 13S + 5 

S9VS 9V, 91b 

SlOto 10W lMb+ Ik 
5*116 4U6 4116+ 16 
564b 6Vb 646+ 16 
5221b 22Vi 221b— «. 
*776 7*i 776+ 16 

5281b 27V7 28 + ft 
*6Jk 6Vb 64k + W 

*876 876 876 

S10W low low 

556 56 56 — W 

S12W 12W 121k 

S?" 

*75 320 325 

270 250 270 +2D 

27 27 27 +3 

S23W 23'6 2216— 16 
5127k 127k 121k 
51376 137b 137k— W 
Sg£ 34*. 35W+ *k 
SS77i 5716 5716+ Vk 
JJJJk 19 1916 

1197k 1916 1916+ W 
123 23 23 

S7V. 7U 7W+76 
375 373 373 +3, 

525b. 2576 257%+ 16 
5247k 247b 2476— 16 
<30 425 430 

5271., 2764 271b— 16 

61 57 61 +3 

5TTW 113k 11» 

*11}b 1116 1116 
51176 1116 11W+16 
295 285 29S +20 

*616 6 67k + Ik 

*1116 1116 1116 
SI 41b 14 141b + 76 

*1516 157k 1516+16 
*74 731b 74 +46 

*12 119k 119k— 9k 

5137m 131b 1396 
shares 


Ohm Previous 
2+0120 259940 


tamtam! 


Htab Law c 
*26 Vk 2 Sb 

Hi?" 25* 

SI 21k 12 
*14 14 

*1736 17fc 
*31 Vb 31 

*m ibk> 
525 w 

52876 2876 
«8Jk 1846 
S33W 33W 


ITKi 

31W+ W 
19 —296 
19 —4 
2S*fc 

1846 — 16 
33W— lb 


DA1LVWTHEWT ’ ' 


W in Ph 
'^t Ti„ u 


. ^iii. 

vV-”:- 


A,-... 


r V . L 


S«bw'." J 

'a- 

Jji -c r - -i ? f - 4 

I r-.. nr- Ti . 2 i-in’.e- 

7S5J- r~ 


• »h vV ! , 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, APRIL II, 1985 


380 —and 


SPORTS 



Page 17 


•"■sfcSr 


Flyers Biggest Threat to Oiler Supremacy 


s^atSsS 


By Sam McManis 

An t Angela Timet Service 

EDMONTON, Alberta —More 
than just the Stanley Cup seemed 
ro have changed hands last spring 
when the Edmonton Oden de- 
throned the four-time defending 
champion New York Islanders in 
the National Hockey League cham- 
pionship series. 

It seemed hockey itself would 
undergo a drastic change in style, 
as one dynasty gave way to one well 


Division, finishing with a league* 
leading 113 points. It doesn't seem 


“^ho'sduSu? 

§Blt 

^ ason and 

wore of Oieg Robbie 

^th vague « on its way. Edmonton's convincir 

abseotnS* 1 five-same victory was a triumph of 
' P ' however, det^^h |' speed and finesse over the bump- 

game that had made ^e 20-7 record that surprise even 
M y* he abrunih. hjj, . islanders and others so successful ,h«rwiwK 
<*« 

i Hie sleek, it appeared, were 

about to inherit the ice. 

Yet . here it is the start of the 


It seems remote, but there’s a 
chance the Oilers won't make it out 
, . iawill continue of the Campbell Conference. Every 

its playoff drought — they are 0- Smythe Division playoff team, cx- 
for-9 going into Wednesday’s first cept Los Angeles, had more points 
round. than any Norris Division team. 

In ibe past, the Flyers won by Gretzky has said the first two play- 
outmusdmg, outworking and out- off rounds against Smythe teams 
punching opponents. This season, could be the Oilers’ toughest, 
under rookie Coach Mike Keenan, 


they have added youth and speed 
without wholly abandoning their 
grinding style. Hie result was a 53- 

NHL PLAYOFF PREVIEW 


PATRICK DIVISION 
Two seasons ago, Philadelphia 
played the New York Rangers in a 
first-round series that didn’t figure 
to be close. It wasn’t: The under- 
dog Rangers won in a sweep. It's 
doubtful that Ute Rangers, who had 
their worst season in 10 years, will 


uinershjr 


give the Flyers a problem this lime. 

Ijrui 


themselves. 

With an average age of 24.5, Philadelphia figures to be in- 
Philadelphia has the youngest team volved in a much tougher dash 
in the league. Center Tim Kerr. 25, against the winner of the Wasiung- 
has become the star and leader the ton-New York Islander series. 
1954-85 playoffs, and that hasn't Flyers needed after Bobby Qarke Based on the standings, the Capi- 
happenecL The Oilers may not be retired to become general manager, tals have to rate as the favorite, 
the dynastic force they seemed af- Kerr scored more than 50 goals for since they finished 15 points ahead 
ter last season, and most of their the second straight season. Brian of the Islanders. But after playing 
challengers have not really changed Propp. with 43 goals, and Captain most of the regular season without 
to Edmonton’s streamlined style of Dave Poulin, with 30, also supplied 2 set lineup because of injuries. 

offensive strength. New York is close to full strength. 

Goaltender Pelle Lindbergh, Forwards Clark Gillies. Bob 
who won 40 games and had a 3.02 Bourne, Brent Sutter and Bat La- 
goals-against average, has headed a Fontaine are back and producing 
defense that gave up the third-few- 
est goals in the league. 

Edmonton is probably hoping 

uc u ngn [ [ UUu . . \ iwguwi’jujuu irauiui can mean the Flyers don't make it to the 
y succeeded j/, 6 * jan^v little once the plavofTs begin. Ask championship series. In die last 
mse, everythina ,be Philaddphia Flyers, the team eight games between Lhe teams, the 

Byers have an 7-0-1 record. 

But if the Flyers fail again, oth- 
ers are capable of challenging Ed- 


*ujcr$rup with v 
arond Chandielr?^^ 


hockey. 

Since it holds the cup and still 
has the prolific Wayne Gretzky, 
Edmonton is the logical choice to 
repeat. But unlike recent seasons, 
there are several teams that could 


ip. Panel^iored S* 

^covers that his tin? 1 Si 

m Florida. R v Jr c .* las &. win the championship, 
the bright futureh^^'- * Regular-season results 


from ^ The Flyers have compiled the 

Jresents Lhe «U NHL's fourth-best record over the 


nan oi coherenctTn^P manyjriew as the top comasder. 


swept in the fust round of the play- 
offs each year. 

This season, the Flyers were the 
surprise champions of the Patrick 


Any of three Adams Division 


after having gone through assorted 
injuries and ailments. 

Washington has lost to the Is- 
landers the last two seasons’ play- 
offs, hut it was thought the Capitals 
had matured to the point where 
they might be ready to overtake 
New York. In recent weeks, 
though, their weaknesses have been 
exposed. The Caps rely almost 
strictly on Mike Gartner (102 


teams — Montreal, Quebec and points) and Bobby Carpenter (95) 
Buffalo —could challenge Edmon- for scoring. Rod Langway, last sea- 
ton. son’s Norris Trophy winner as best 


defenseman, has been sub-par, and 
Coach Bryan Murray still hasn't 
decided whether to go with Pat 
Riggin or AI Jensen in goal. 

ADAMS DIVISION 
This group produced the most 
suspense during the regular season, 
and lhe first two rounds of lhe 
playoffs also should be dose. 

Montreal swept Boston in the 
first round Last year, when the roles 
were reversed — the Bruins had 
finished first and the Can adieus 
fourth. The Canadiens seem to 
have enough offensive firepower to 
win, but their young defense may 
break down in later rounds. 

Quebec has a goaltending prob- 
lem: Richard Sevigny was bombed 
in a 7-2 loss to Montreal lost week, 
Don Bouchard has been a disap- 
pointment all year and Mario Gas- 
selin is a rookie. The Nordiques 
have an explosive offense, however, 
led by the line of Peter Stastny, 
Anton Stastny and Michel Goulet. 
But Buffalo nos the division's best 
defense and goaltender, Tom Bor- 
rasso. If the Sabres can muster 
enough offense, they can beat the 
Nordiques and the Canadiens. 

SMYTHE DIVISION 
Although Edmonton breezed 
through the regular season, their 
task won't be that easy in the play- 
offs. Last spring, Calgary took the 
Oilers to seven games in ute second 
round before the Oilers overcame a 
third-period deficit and won a sries 
that was dubbed The Battle of Al- 
berta. There will be a sequel if the 
Oilers beat Los Angeles, as exected, 
and the Flames get past Winnipeg 
in the first round 
The Cdgary-WIonipeg matchup 
should be dose. Although Winni- 



The Allocated Pmi Thu New Yvk Tana 

Pelle Lindbergh’s standout goaltending has been a major reason for the Flyers' success under rookie Coach Mike Keenan. 


mvowxu LHC niYim - - - — - — — wr - — — — — 

lerican Hr*-,— last three seasons, but have been monton. 

Wrt w' 0 ^ — 

hibois. Bank tells ft?'- 



Seaver Wins Record 15th Opening-Day Start, 4-2 

same, 

IS SO DOWerfnlK 


peg finished two points ahead of 
Calgary for second place, the 
Flames this year were an impres- 
sive 1-5-2 against the Jets (and are 
18-4 over the last three seasons). 

Except against Calgary, howev- 
er, Winnipeg has been all but un- 
beatable during the last two 
months. The Jets went undefeated 
in their last 13 games and finished 
with the league's fourth-best re- 
cord. 

Calgary goaltender Reggie Le- 


melin has a clear edge over his 
Winnipeg counterpart, Brian Hay- 
ward. Lemelin has been steady all 
season and is supported by an ex- 
perienced defense that allowed 30 
fewer goals than Winnipeg's. 

NORRIS DIVISION 
In the final two months of the 
season. Chicago played as well as 
any team in the Campbell Confer- 
ence. If the Black Hawks can con- 
trol Detroit’s high-scoring line of 
Sieve Yzerman, John Ogrodnick 


and Ron Duguay, they will stop the 
Red Wings. 

Chicago's line of Denis Savarri, 
Steve Larmer and Al Secord is as 
good and intimidating as any in 
hockey. Doug Wilson, perhaps the 
NHL’s best two-way defenseman, 
stabilizes a defense that has been 
shaky because of goaltender Mur- 
ray Bannerman's unusually incon- 
sistent play. The Red Wing defense 
is weak, but Greg Stefan has been 
the division's best goalie. 


St- Louis is favored to get past 
struggling Minnesota even though 
the North Stars have two players — 
Paul Holmgren and Craig Ham- 
burg — back from injuries. If the 
Blues do advance, however, their 
lack of depth would bun them 
against Chicago. Because of inju- 
ries to Doug Wickenheiser, Kevin- 
La Valle and others, St. Louis has 
been forced to play nine left wings 
on its top line of Bemie Federko 
and Joe Mullen. 


SCOREBOARD 


Cumpiled by Our Stuff From Daptttdie 

IS so powerfully MILWAUKEE — Tom Seaver 

the terrible meviubfoT? doesn't chug along as fast as he 
;ers in our mind lone once ^ but he still had enough 

! 5 steam to pass the Big Train. 

The three- time Cy Young Award 
winner made a major league-record 
15th opening-day start here Tues- 
day, and it was vintage Seaver. 
Starting his 19th season, the 40- 
y ear-old right-hander gave up two 


asons "Continental Drift’- 
JUona] resonance Mlafe 
3usness of contemporary^ 
« being able to hold mi 
■tea me people weloit- fr 
3 byproduct of an 
- our susceptibility to g l 
hi by recent hisonv & 
Wfeik the scope of “Cs^ 
ige — the author w«ms 
an capture American Sfes* 

• it remains, somehow, 

e story of Bob Dubots'ss 
ich a l'righiesina gfimpsedc 


'Man: is on the siaJjoiTm >■-, 


would susoes an L0.lt 
he bud cho«n the rt 
LO. L 


NORTH 
ft K JJT 6 J! 
: a i»< 

:• 5 5 

ft A 

EAST 

4- 


WEST 

• A4 

Ttus:: 

C' 683 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

runs on five hits, two walks and 
struck out three over 6% innings in 
pitching Chicago to a 4-2 victory 
over Milwaukee in both teams' sea- 
son opener. 

The opening-day start broke the 
mark held by Hall of Famer Walter 
Johnson and produced Saver's 
289th career victory.. 

“Sure it’s nice,” he said of sur- 
passing Johnson’s record, “but now 
that we’ve won it’s much more sig- 
nificant. The thing about being the 
starting pitcher in the opener is to 
get the club off on the right foot." 
said Seaver, who has a 7-1 record in 
season openers. “That’s the way 
I’ve always fell." 

With the White Sox leading. 3-0, 
in Lhe seventh inning. Seaver un- 
corked two wild pitches, leading to 
two Brewer runs. That was a signal 
he had run out of gas. “I was a little 
fatigued.” said Seaver after giving 
way to Bob James, who finished up 
for the save. “I was trying to get 
one more inning out of myself. 
When I have two wild pitches, Fm 
tired.” 

“Seven to 10 years ago, he was 
completely overpowering— a nun- 
. it-in-your-face pitcher." said Ted 



Keltbe; sUSeVM 

twMfcg: 

Ea« SOBS ** 

Pas S • w - 

pass 

Vest Hri U» 4 a 6 » 


.-NC .'^ 5 

jNarcer 

; Nk 3 AlSA» 

; 

JN-j/.'SIM- 

: PsOlOM - _ 

1 panCc" r 

iPtltiS*”,, 

■pwW 

: Piacer 
l PrC-jE 3 . 

rawSL-;,'-'- 
:H err -e' 
>ac »•-==;’ 

: . 

»5tdS f- n! ; 

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1 Hc:K n, f ; ’ 

: *.-**'"* 

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PR* 

MSl. 

* t'-Vl-W 


ftsqjBK 
SOUTH 
ft 0 19 9 J 
r qiits 

;j»i a 

* ' OT-aeaftS ?Simmons, Milwaukee's designated 
hitter. “But he made the transition 
from power to finesse pitcher. He 
used to throw a straight fastball 


and slider. Now- he has six pitches. 
How do you know what you're go- 
ing to get?" 

Rookie Darryl Boston drove in 
one run and scored another for the 
winners. The Brewers committed 
five errors; three of Chicago’s runs 
were unearned. 

Twins 6, Angels 2 
In Anaheim, California. Tom 
Brunansky hit a three-run home 
run and Mickey Hatcher added a 
two- run homer to lift Minnesota 
over Calif ornia, 6-2. Starter Frank 
Viola allowed four hits over 7 -ft 
innings to gain the victojy. while 
Ron Davis went the rest of the way 
. for the save. Bnmansky’a shot came 
in the eighth inning off Mike Witt, 
who had pitched a perfect game in 
his final start of 1984. 

Mariners 6, A’s 3 
Jn Seattle, Al Cowcns drove in 
two runs with a triple and two sin- 
gles to lift the Mariners to their 
fourth straight season-opening vic- 
tory, a 6-3 derision over Oakland. 
Winner Mike Moore pitched seven 
innings. 

Mets 6, Cardinals 5 
In the National League, in New 
York, Gary Carter made his debut 
in a New York uniform a memora- 
ble one by hitting a one-out home 
run off Neil Alien in lhe 10th to 
give ihe Mets a 6-5 victory over Sl 
L ouis. Carter, an All-Star acquired 
from Montreal in the off-season, 
went 2-for-4 and twice was hit by 
pitches. It was New York’s 10th 
opening-day triumph in 1 1 years. 

Jack Gaik, an off-season acqui- 
sition of the Cardinals, homered 
and also drove in The tying run in 
the ninth, when he drew a bases- 
loaded walk from reliever Doug 
Sisk. Dwight Gooden, the league’s 
rookie of the year last season, start- 
ed for the Mets and went six in- 


nings, allowing six hits, three runs 
and striking out six. 

Cub* 2, Pirates I 
In Chicago, Rick Sutcliffe and 
Lee Smith combined on a six-hitter 
and Keith Moreland drove in two 
tuns to lift the Cubs over Pitts- 
burgh. 2-1. Sutcliffe, last year’s Cy 


Hockey 


Young Award winner, set a fran- 
chise record by winning his 15th Final National Hockev League Leaders 

tfmiohr uflmp dvpt ftun vwpc Fn • 


Football 


Reulbach won 14 straight for the 
Cubs in 1 909. Moreland had a run- 


straight game over two years; Ed 

FUMl rMalor-Maaon NHL Uodert: 
OVERALL OFFENSE 

scoring single in the first and ho- Grvukv. Eanomon 
mered off Rick Rhoden to lead off kurrL 
the fourth. 



Gtanis 4, Padres 3 
In San Francisco. Chris Brown 
delivered a one-out RBI single in 
the ninth ro give the Giants a 4-3 
verdict over San Diego. Brown's hit 
made a winner of veteran Vida 
Blue for lhe first time since 1982, 
Blue, out of baseball for over a year 


Propp. PhiiodMohia 
Gould. Oucbec 
Carpenter. Waiblogton 


37 
St 
ss 

38 
30 
SO 

43 
41 

44 
43 
43 
32 
37 
54 
43 

SS 

S3 


Plm 
13S 206 52 

64 13S 
77 1» 

■0 124 
64 121 
St 117 
50 105 
67 1B5 
73 103 

53 102 
40 102 
40 101 

54 100 
S7 100 
SB 100 
46 100 

43 V* 

44 f8 
S3 94 

40 *S 
42 95 


SHOOTING PERCENTAGE 
GP C S 
Young, PltfsOurgh M 40 130 

Kurrl, Edmonton 73 71 241 

Simmer. L>.-Bm. 46 34 134 

Tovtor. Lo» Angelas 79 41 172 

NastumL Montreal 60 42 179 

KrtfNielnrskl, Edmonton 80 43 187 

Larmer. Chicago 80 44 206 


pa. 
308 
27.2 
25 A 
23J8 
2X5 
230 
223 


GOALTENDING 

lEmptv-net goals In oarcntM«esl 

44P GASOAvg 


, POWER- PLAY GOALS 

CP 

Karr, Philadelphia 74 

partner, Washington H 

GouieL Quebec 69 

Hawgfcftiik. winnfoeg BO 

SHORT-HANDED GOALS 
GP 

Gretzky. Edmonton SO 

Propp. Philadelphia 74 

□erloga, Taranto 42 

77 
SS 
66 

L 
GP 


PJfostnv. Quebec 


SHOT5 


Gretzky. Edmonton 
Bourauft. Boston 
Gartner. Washington 
Nlcholis. Los Angeles 


73 

80 

74 

75 

GP 

M 

73 

80 

80 


PP 

21 

17 

17 

17 


SH 

11 

7 

5 

S 

5 

S 

GW 

13 

11 

9 

9 

S 

3S6 

333 

331 

32a 


Barr 
Souve 
Cloutier 
Buffalo IS) 
Jensen 
Mason 
Riggin 

Washington a) 
Froese 
Lindbergh 
Jensen 

Philadelphia (3) 
Roy 
Penney 
Soetoen 
Montreal CO 
Sevigny 
Gossedn 
Boucha rd 
Quebec (U 
Keans 
Peelers 
Svtveitri 
Daskolakis 
Boston C3) 

Heinz 
Milieu 
Warn siev 
Llut 

SL LOUIS IS) 
Mdoq 
B aron 
Four 
Zanier 
Reougti 


3348 144 
1.564 64 
45 4 

077 337 
803 34 
Ml 31 
X388 146 
4452 VO 
923 37 
3X58 194 
40 7 

4441 241 
20 0 

X2S2 147 
1406 91 
4478 342 
1.104 42 
1,960 UN 
L798 HQ 0X44 

4442 275 1X19 
1497 S2 1329 
2475 173 1347 

102 6 0X53 
289 24 04.98 
4463 3S7 2X54 
70 3 0 X57 

405 35 0 X47 
2J19 124 0326 
1460 119 1182 
4463288 1355 
24» 111 1 X30 
33 2 0 X64 

2459 165 1347 
185 12 0X89 
60 5 0540 


5246 
0322 
0349 
5242 
1254 
1281 
2X98 
4X97 
1X41 
2X02 
0740 
3X99 
0 040 
1348 
0X48 
13X2 
1X37 
13X4 


bpriun 

Gary Carter 

After his game-winning homer. 


Kmterchuh. Wmnioeg 
Dionne. Los Angeles 
Collev, Edmonton 
Bossv. N.VJ. 

Ooradnick. Detroit 
Savor (J, Chicago 
Federko. SL Louis 
Gartner. Washington 
B. Sutler. N.Y.t. 

Moctean. Wlnrloeo 
Nlcholis, Los Angelas 
Lemieux. Pittsburgh 
Toneili. N.V.I, 

... . . , . P. 5tostny. Quebec 

after a drug conviction, entered the N nuon. cm gory 
game in the ninth and squelched an non. pniiaaeipmo 
uprising after the Padres had lied, 
it 3-3. Jeff Leonard started the San 
Francisco ninth with a single off 
reliever Luis DeLeon and moved to 
second on a sacrifice by Bob Brenly 
before Brown laced his game-win- 
ner hit to left. 

Braves 6, PtoIEes 0 
In Philadelphia, starter Rick 

Mahler pitched seven innings and 

Dale Murphy drove in two runs Kasper. Boston 
with two singles to spark Atlanta’s Edmomoo 

6-0 triumph over the Phillies. Mah- 
ler allowed three hits in helping game-*».nn,ng goalx 

Eddie Haas, the Braves’ new man- Karri Edmonton 
ager, notch his first major-league comm. Washington 
victory. K * rr ' ^ lkx),lcftk ‘ 

Astros 2, Dodgers 1 
In Houston, Nolan Ryan and 
Frank DiPino combined on a four- 
hitter to lead the Astros past Los 
Angeles, 2-1. Ryan retired 16 of 17 
batters from the second inning 
through the seventh, after which 
DiPino came on. Ryan struck out 

four batters to increase his all-time _ _ 

leading total to 3,878, three ahead Maior League S tandings National Basketball Association Standings 
of Philadelphia’s Steve Carlton. J ° 

The victory was Houston's first on 0 

opening day since 1980. (UP I, AP) 


Bonner m an 
Pong 

Chicago (5) 
Lemelin 
Edwards 
Calgary (41 
Hmdev 
Smith 
Mekinson 
N.Y. I ski odors a) 
Staniawski 

L>ut 

Weeks 
MU Ian 
Hartford (1) 

Beau ore 
MeiocAe 
Melansan 
Sands 

Minnesota (5) 
Janecvk 
Eilat 

Los Angeles [63 
Hayward 
Holden 
Benrena 
wtontoeg (61 
Hanlon 

vonbiesbrouck 
M.Y. Rangers (4) 
Low 
Retch 
Kammpurl 
New Jersey t7) 
MIO 
Stefan 
Micnlef 
Detroit <«) 
Bemnordt 
Hester 
wronger 
St. Croix 
Toronto (■} 
Romano 


IFiihr and Mono shared shiloul Jan. 81 
Edmonton 13) 4456 398 3X41 

Clifford 20 0 0040 

Sfcorodensfti 1J96 75 2X22 


DIM 

Ford 

Pittsburgh (4) 
Broaeur 
Caortce 
Garrett 
Vancouver (71 


3571 215 0343 
60 4 0440 

4447 299 2X70 
1176 183 1 146 
1491 115 >448 
4467 302 2X72 
X335 141 2 X62 
2490 133 0342 
425 35 0484 

4459 312 2X81 

20 1 0340 

731 37 1X04 
1457 92 2X79 
2459 187 1442 
4467 318 
1470 109 

1417 115 
1.142 78 

139 14 
4461 321 
0002 183 
1482 137 
4484 326 
3436 220 0344 
213 IS 0443 

1418 91 1448 
4467 332 1449 
2510 175 04.11 
1358 166 14X2 
4461 345 
1526 85 
2484 200 

645 54 
4455 346 
376 27 
2433 190 0433 
1456 136 0440 
4465 3S7 0440 
X1B2 136 0 X74 
767 54 1X22 
1478 103 0444 
628 54 0 5.H 
4458 356 1448 
1429 12D 1 642 
X193 170 1 X65 
553 43 0 Ae7 
457 48 0 A36 
4432 385 2X78 
2.930 228 0 X67 
1523 122 0441 
407 44 0*49 

4460 461 0 X95 


USFL Leaders 


WESTERN conference 
T eam Offense 


an 

1X69 
1340 
0X10 
0644 
1 346 
2X66 
0*37 
2440 


1435 
T 345 
0X16 
0542 
1438 
0431 


Houston 

Oakland 

Denver 

Portland 

Arizona 

Los Angeles 

San Antonio 

San Antonia 

Denver 

Arizona 

Portland 

Oakland 

los Angeles 

Houston 


Kelly. HOU 
Heeert, OAK 
Williams. AR12 
Young. LA 
Evans. DEN 
Robinson. PORT 
Woodxvord. PORT 99 
Neuhebel. SA 
Sourer. LA 


Yards Rusn Pass 
2846 283 2563 

2550 948 1602 

2484 932 1552 

2190 1007 1183 

2053 822 1231 

1827 785 1042 

1443 619 824 

ream Delease 

1966 821 1163 

2048 787 12bt 

2116 881 1228 

2153 792 1361 

2241 683 1558 

2249 830 1419 

2626 997 1629 

Quarterbacks 
ATT COM YDS TD I NT 
315 194 2652 23 11 

193 101 1626 16 8 

113 1300 7 7 

61 888 3 5 

12S 1671 8 12 

49 652 5 9 

44 600 2 5 

118 9 n» 3 I 

76 33 408 1 8 


19S 

117 

233 

90 


Rashers 
ATT YDS 


AVG LG TD 


Johnson. DEN 

73 

518 

7.1 

29 

S 

Bemiev. OAK 

77 

471 

XI 

57 

1 

Jordan. PORT 

eo 

402 

67 

25t 

3 

Brown. ARlZ 

69 

396 

57 

441 

6 

Williams. OAK 

66 

257 

37 

17 

1 

Gray. LA 

61 

239 

19 

251 

1 

Long. ARIZ 

75 

231 

11 

17 

4 

Beverlv. PORT 

50 

222 

4 A 

17 

1 

WortaV, SA 

54 

194 

16 

21 

0 


Verdin. HOU 
Johnson. HOU 
Lewis. DEN 
Harris, DEN 
Carter, OAK 
McNeil. HOU 
Banks, OAK 
Hudson. LA 


Receivers 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 
47 620 133 74 6 


Baseball 


Basketball 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Cans Win Playoff Berth SPORTS BRIEFS 


For First Time Since ’78 2 Students Head Guilty in Tulane Case 


Compiled by Oir Staff From Dispatches 

RJCHF/ELD, Ohio — When 
George Karl began his first season 
as coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers 
by going 2-19, he had sunk about as 
f ^ low as one could get. But when the 
sounded here Tuesday 


las IG5; Houston 1 24, San Antonio 
103; Detroit 107, New York 97; 
Utah 123, Los Angeles Clippers 
104; Los Angeles Lakers 148, Den- 
ver 1 19. and Portland 116, Phoenix 
100 . 

4i K ^ final buzrer sounded here Tuesday The Cavs led by as many as six 
S’rt night. Karl was lifted high upon the points in the second quarter, but 
shoulders of his players and carried fell behind, 62-52, at halftime as 
off the court in triumph. Micbeal Ray Richardson scored 20 

Cleveland’s 1 14-100 victory over points in the first two periods. 

New Jersey sent the Cavaliers into 



NBA FOCUS 


Its- r£ & 


tip 

e = 4 ; 

^ Sr' 


the National Basketball Associa- 
tion playoffs for the fust time since 
1978. 

“I just hope everybody under- 
stands what a tremendous, great 
effort this was," said KarL riding 


The Nets expanded the lead to 
72-58 early in the third quarter be- 
fore Free scared 13 third-quarter 
points to pull (he Cavaliers within 
85-83 entering the final period. 

Phil Hubbard had 8 points in a 
decisive 10-0 fourth njuarter burst 
that enabled Cleveland to secure 
the eighth and final playoff berth in 
lhe Eastern Conference (Clevdand 


cs iiif; 


Roy Hinson s shoulders and bask- probably meet defending NBA 
ing m the cheers from a crowd of champion Boston in a best-of-five 

* ... . , , .. _ . first round plavoff). 

h s . a s P eaal fccb ° 8 - Bunt was Wilh New abcad> 95 . 91 , 

/-ups to 

. , „ wilh 6:08 left. After 

miracle. 


luck this year next year we’Ii really Hubbard hit two i 
s-7’ ^ fn earn it. Making the playoffs was a y e ^ score will 


NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Two Tulane students have pleaded guilty to 
conspiring to bribe players to shave points in a Feb. 20 basketball game 
with Memphis Stale. 

Bobby Thompson, 21. of New Orleans, a member of the T ulane team, 
and David Rothenberg. 22, of Wilton, Connecticut, entered the pleas 
Tuesday as part of an agreement to cooperate with the district attorney. 
Thompson pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit sports 
bribery, Rothenbttyg to two counts of conspiracy and one count of 
possession of cocaine. Criminal District Judge Alvin Oser set July 9 for 
sentencing. _ 

Rothenberg and Thompson are two of the right men — three basket- 
ball players, three students and two nonstudenis — accused of a score- 
fixing scheme. The investigation has led to the discovery of reemiting 
violations at Tulane, the resignations of Coach Ned Fowler and two 
assistants and to the school’s announcing it intends to drop its basketball 
program. 

His attorney said Rotbenberg would Testify to the truth" if called as a 
witness against others in the case. 

Flamingo Disqualification Overturned 

HIALEAH, Florida (AP) — Chiefs Crown, stripped of first place in 
the March 30 Flamingo Stakes, was reinstated Tuesday by a select panel 
that ruled unanimously that the colt did not interfere with second-place 
finisher Proud Truth. 

Chiefs Crown, the early favorite for the Kentucky Derby on May 4. 
won the Flamingo by a length, but track stewards dropped him to second 
for moving into the path ofProud Truth during the stretch run. Florida's 
Division of Pari-Mutuel Wagering ordered a hearing after Chiefs 



East Division 




Atlantic Division 




W | 

. 

Pci. 

GB 


W L 

PCt. 

GB 

Baltimore 

1 


1800 



V - Bos ton 

62 17 

TBS 

— 

Boston 

1 


1800 



A-Phltadeiphlc 

1 57 22 

722 

5 

Detroit 

1 


1-000 



x-New Jersey 

39 40 

■494 

23 

Cleveland 

0 


.000 

1 

x-washmgton 

39 40 

A94 

23 

Milwaukee 

0 


jno 

1 

New York 

24 55 

304 

38 

New York 

0 


-000 

1 


Central Division 



Taranto 

0 


JUO 

1 

y- Milwaukee 

56 23 

.709 

_ 


West Division 



x-Detrolt 

43 36 

.544 

13 

Ctilcopo 

1 

0 

1.000 

— 

x -Chicago 

38 42 

773 

18 to 

Kansas Cllv 

1 

0 

UMO 

— 

x -Clove land 

35 44 

A43 

21 

Minnesota 

1 

0 

UMO 

— 

Atlanta 

31 48 

792 

25 

Seattle 

1 

0 

uno 

— 

Indiana 

22 57 

778 

34 

California 

0 

1 

JM0 

1 





Oakland 

0 

1 

AOO 

1 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Texas 

0 

I 

00c 

1 


Mkfwasf Dirt sloa 




Doover 28 28 38 41—119 

i * Lahore 41 33 37 37—148 

McGoglO-12 2 226. Scoct 11-ISM 22; English 
12-19 4-4 2R whlto 9-13 3-3 21. ReOoands: Den- 
ver 56 1 Kaplcfcl 9) ; LA. Lakers 51 (Johnson 8). 
Assists: Denver 35 (Evans 9); LA. Lak*rs43 
(Johnson 111. 

Phoenix 16 81 24 1ft— 180 

Portland 33 30 26 27—116 

Vondawegne 11-16 5-5 27, Valentine 7ft 1-1 
15; Sorwiere 6-14 l-io 19. Mocv 3-7 4-» lx Re- 
bounds: Phoenix 40 [Jones jOJ; Portland 57 
(Bowlft 14J. Assists: Phoenix 27 (Humwirles. 
Ataev 5); Portland 34 (Valentine. Bowie 61. 


38 467 1X3 53f 4 

33 463 1X0 28 2 

29 304 1115 39t 2 

27 580 21-5 501 6 

27 513 19 j 0 58t 3 

25 466 186 43 4 

22 319 ISO 46 ft 

pu atan 

NO YDS AVG TB 120 LG 

Tallev. OAK 30 1263 411 3 11 58 

deBrulln. ARJZ Zb 1094 411 2 10 72 

Partrldae, LA 33 1342 40.7 1 7 53 

waiters. HOU 24 950 396 3 3 5* 

G assert. PORT 26 1027 39.5 3 5 56 

SaeeHnan. DEN 27 1014 37 a 0 2 58 

Puat Returners 
NO YDS AVG FC LG TD 
McNeil. HOU 15 170 1U 1 791 1 

Gunn. LA 18 110 114) 4 451 1 

Martin, DEN 9 94 1 04 2 33 0 

Harris, ARIZ 21 204 9.7 2 23 0 

Banner, SA 7 63 9J) 2 27 0 

Hall, PORT 10 Be 8ft 3 32 0 

Kickoff Returners 


Chlcooo 
New York 
uonireaJ 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburgh 
Si. Louis 

Atlanta 
Cincinnati 
Houston 
Son Francisco 
Las Angeles 
San Dieoo 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Eest Division 

W L PCI. 

1 0 13)00 

i a umo 

a i j»o 

a l .ooa 

o i jooa 

0 i jwo 

West Division 

1 0 

1 0 

i a 

i o 


1.000 

1.000 

1.000 

1000 

.008 

ftOO 



v -Denver 

51 

28 

A46 

— 


s-Hautton 

46 

33 

SS2 

5 

GB 

x -Dallas 

42 

37 

sa 

9 


>-Sm> Antonio 

40 

40 

sat 

11W 


x-UIGtl 

39 

40 

494 

12 

1 

Kansas City 

31 

48 

792 

20 

1 

Pacific Division 



1 

I 

y-LA. Lakers 

3* 

20 

747 

— 

*• Portland 

40 

39 

506 

to 


x -Phoenix 

34 

46 

43$ 

25VS 

— 

Seattle 

31 

48 

792 

28 


LA. Clippers 

29 

50 

767 

30 

— 

Golden State 

22 

57 

778 

37 

— 

(x-dlnched MavoH 

berth) 




1 

1 

<v -clinched division title) 





Transition 


iracte. the Nets’ Buck Williams fouled oul «««« « njinuuio a-gmux raw™ d uwimg «« uih» 

World B. Free agreed. “We had ^. h c.« , rfL Free a p_ foo . ' Crown s ownership protested the deaaon, and the pand of retired 
r — « ,L(L . 3 « le ! 1 ’ r i“ ““ a - u : - Stewards ruled Tuesday that nothing that happened during the race 



NtfiU; -'re 

W— ,‘a-til 
23»3 _’i-S 

ItyV 


speechless, 
last time ibaL happened." 

“We’re not used to seeing a 
crowd like this here," said Net for- 
ward Albert King of the often near- 
empty Richfield Coliseum. 

Tuesday’s victory was a micro- 
cosm of devdand’s season. The 
Cavaliers rallied from far behind in 
lhe second half, outscoring the 
Nets by 56-28 after trailing, 72-58, 


out a 10-day suspension given to jockey Don 
_r .. w , tKru.aki MacBeth Tor lus handling of Chiefs Crown in the race. 

Shad U k Twi f^" 11 shows Chiers Crown ^ T ™ lh ^ 

ISrl STof bJSte S Stephan's Odyssey third. The first-place purse of 1150,000, wthheld 
JtarLJMl sort ot or«e inetr p^,,^ wju b, awarded to Chiefs Crown. Under Florida 

racing laws, purses may be redistributed, but bettors have no recourse 
because the payoff already has been awarded. 


h«* u jiL i 
$ 

SjsJ jj 9 

fft' ki the third period. 

i< « , 7 

k 

_ ... 

fil / still make a run at a J00 team, that 


backs. 

“We just regrouped our offense." 
said Hubbard, who finished with 
22 points. “George got us together 
and told us to stop playing like 
patsies. He got us mad, and we took 
it out on the Nets." 

New jersey, paced by Richard 


pUySffih Ueberroth Sees No Apt Expansion City 

aQD We tOOk riWriMVATl 7 A PI Ru«>K3ll r^nrnmiceinTi^r I IfliZiTihllt c-iisc 


CINCINNATI (AP) — Baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth says 
he does not consider any U.S. city currently suitable as a site for an 
expansion baseball franchise. 

you the character of son’s 33 prank, ieli 10 39-40. U I had Ueberroth said Monday that he has three criteria for expansion. 
■ we have." said Free. “If to sweat a full 48 minutes for those “No. 1, that ownership has roots in the community: No. 2, that the 
voucanoAf down hv 14 noinf<snd points.’’ said Richardson. “This community has greai fans, and No. 3, that the team has the support of the 
you can get down by w pomts ana 4 -^ h.,t uo., ^-d stare -in other woids, the polilirians" 


£&***’ 0% * shows the character of your team. 

Elsewhere it was Washington 
130, Atlanta 1 10; Philadelphia 1 13, 
Boston 104; Kansas City 117. Dai- 



said Richardson. "This 
Isn’t a prediction, but you watch — 
the Cavs will give Boston a tough 
time. 

“Free and Hubbard just de- 
stroved us.” (CPI. API 


city, county ant 

Officials in several cities, notably Denver, have made efforts to try to 
bring major league baseball teams to their cities. Bui Ueberroth said 
Tuesday that Denver would be in liie running, "along wilh other 
interested cities." when expansion sites jre considered. 


Tuesday's Line Scores 

* 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Chicago 20* 188 81ft— 4 > e 

Milwaukee 000 008 260-2 4 3 

Seaver. Jamn (7] and HUI; Ham. Swraoe 
191 and Schroeder. W— Saovftr, jft. l— H aas. 
0-1. 

MmtosatO 108 800 832—6 12 8 

CftHtomla 808 001 0 In— 2 4 ft 

Viola, Davis (II and Loudner; w I rt. Sc rrehsz 
(81, Oerrwms 19) and Baona. W— Viola 1ft. 
L— Wlir. 0-1. S— Davis dl. HR— Minnesota 
Brunoiuky 111. 

Oakland 003 000 000-3 9 1 

Seattle 302 820 Ml I 1) 0 

Cod I roll. Atnerton (5) and HMlti; Moore. 
Nunez Hi ana Keamev. w— Moore, ift. L— 
Codlrcril, 0-1. S— Nunez (11. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

FlRaburah ote mo D1H-1 « 2 

Chicago 100 IN 00*— 2 I I 

Rtmien. TekuhM (7), RoMnsai (81 and 
Pm; SulellHe, Smith (8) ana Davis. W— 
SirtcRfte. Ift. L-Rhodea 0-1. 5— Smith (11. 
HR— Qilcooc. Moreland (II. 

St. Lout* 011 108 at 8-5 11 2 

New York 201 110 000 1—6 13 0 

Andulcr, Darter (61. Com owl I (7). Hauler 
101 1 Align »l and Porter. Nieto 19); Gooden. 
Sisk (7}.Omco (9), Gorman (I0f end Cartor. 
W — Goftnon, 1ft. L-Allon, d-1. HRs-SI. 
Lduii, Clark (11. New York. Foster (1 1. Carter 
( 1 ). 

San (Megs tOO M0 201—3 B 1 

San Fraud see ON 101 181—4 8 3 

Havi, DeLeon <B> and K*v*dv; Hem- 
maker, Williams 17). ALOavIs (7), Garretts 
(9), Bhie (9| and Bren I v. W— Blue, Ift. L— 
DaLeon. 9-1. 

Atlanta 001 002 111—6 I 0 

PlMddeipnki ON MO BOO 0 3 i 

Mahler. Suffer, (8) and Cerone: Cnrtfoa 
zoenry (71. Carman |7). Hudson (81 ond Vlr- 
aii. W— Mahler. 1ft. L-Corllan. 0-1. 

Lot Angeles oio w loo-i 4 3 

Houston 0DI 100 00*— 2 10 0 

valontuehi. Niedrntuer (8] and Sooscio. 
Fran. DiPino ‘ B ' ana Ashb* Y.‘— R r an. 10 
L—Va lemur la. >1 1 5— DiPino ill 


TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
New Jersey 36 36 23 IS— 180 

Cleveland 29 23 31 31—114 

Free 1X24 8-10 35, Hubbard 8-10 6ft 22; Rich- 
ora ion 15-24 2-2 3X Turner 6-10 2-2 IX Brewer 7- 
13 Oft lx Rebounds: New Jersey 42 (Gmfoski 
7)j Cleveland el (Hlneon 81. Assign: New 
Jersey 22 (Richardson 111: Cleveland 37 
(Bagiev 91. 

Boston 38 22 23 29-184 

Philadelphia 22 35 30 16—113 

Malone 8-19 6ft 22. Erving 8-15 3-2 18; 
MeHaie 9-1 7 S-* 23. Bird 7.15 4-5 18. Parish 7-12 
4-4 ix Reboa ads: Boston 48 (McHale I0J; 
PtHiodaJphlo 64 (Malone 19). Assists: Boston 
28 (Bird 91; Phltodetohla 30 (Cheeks 71. 
Dallas 19 28 28 1ft— IDS 

Kamos City 28 34 26 38-117 

Woodson 9-19 9-10 27. Johnson 9-19 7-9 25; 
A«uirrel2-204-72XEIIIsB-131.1 2a Rebounds: 
Dallas 4* (Aguirre 81; Kansas Cllv 57 
(Thompson 121. Assists: Dallas 24 ( Harper B); 
Kama CWv 27 (Theus 9). 

Detroit 19 2ft 39 29—107 

New Yam 20 2* 21 3G- 97 

Tri cucka 9-19 54 21 Lolmbeer 8-16 7-» 2X 
Long 9-17 M 18; Bonni«er8-l72Olxorr7.l0 
3-4 16. Rvbovndt: Del roil 62 (Lolmbeer 11); 
New York 43 (Orr 01. Assists: Detroit 34 
iTnomas to): New York 23 (Grunfeto 7). 
Soo Antonio 32 19 35 17-101 

Houston 36 33 38 28-lM 

McCray 8-16 2-3 10, OWm** 7-18 2-3 16, 
WtO0im7ft3-216; Gilmore 10-159-10 29, Milch- 
ell 12-202-226. Rebaands: San Antonk>45 (Gil- 
more 13 ): Houston 49 (Olaluwon is). Assists: 
Son Anlonta 35 (Moore la): Houston 28 (Hol- 
lins 8). 

LA. CCPeers » 27 23 25-lft* 

Utah 33 23 27 40-123 

Oonllev 11-22 12-14 3X Bailey 9-17 4-4 22. 
Wilkins 11-MG1 22: Smith 10-19 5-525. Nixon 7- 
IT 3ft IX Rebounas: LA. CItooers 48 iCoge 
10) : Uinn 48 (Bailey, Eaton lot. AssMs: la 
C ilpaers 22 (Nixon 10); Utah 36 (Greet! 10). 
Atlanta 28 21 27 36-110 

Washington 34 36 26 34-130 

Robinson 14-19 2-2 31. Malone 9-15 4-4 22: 
Wilkins i>25 1-5 37. E Jonnson 6.12 3-S IS. Re- 
aounas; a Han to 49 < wvnkins 8): -.Vasiungi'in 
46 Jones 10] AsSiSff: AUonta 2J lEJoMscn 
11 1 - Washington 41 i Gus Y.iilioms 161 . 


BASEBALL 
AOtortcan League 

DETROIT— Placed Nelson Simmons, oul- 
Reider, an the 15-dov disabled list. Recoiled 
Doug Baker, shortstop, from Nashville af me 
American Association. 

Nortoaoi League 

CHICAGO— Optioned Brian Oayglt,lnflgM- 
er-owKielder. to Iowa of the American Associ- 
ation. 

LOS ANGELES— Placed RJ. Reynolds, 
outfielder, on ihe 15-dav disabled list. Re- 
coiled Mariana Duncan. Infielder Irom Albu- 
querque of toe Pacific Coast League. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

PHILADELPHIA— Extended lhe coniroct 
at Steve Hayes, larwnrd, through the end tf ' Fiutte. MJ 



NO YDS 

AVG LG TO 

Verdin, HOU 

14 379 

771 

94t 1 

Harris, ariz 

12 324 

Z77 

76 0 

Faulkner. OAK 

12 310 

257 

57 0 

Ricks. PORT 

to 253 

257 

61 0 

Beni ley. OAK 

7 177 

3S3 

33 0 

Jackson. PORT 1 1M 

2X7 

44 0 

Williams SA 

8 181 

22a 

36 0 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 



Team Offense 



Yuras 

Rush 

Pass 

Tampa Bay 

2854 

851 

2803 

Baltimore 

2498 

ST* 

1619 

New Jersey 

2439 

1429 

1010 

Birmingham 

2352 

991 

1371 

Memphis 

2281 

11B7 

1174 

Jacksonville 

2192 

805 

1387 

Orlando 

1622 

BM 

756 


Team Defense 


Baltimore 

1973 

675 

1298 

Birmingham 

2015 

828 

1187 

Tampa Bay 

2111 

76b 

1351 

Memphis 

2275 

921 

1354 

New Jersey 

2498 

B49 

1649 

Jacksonville 

2653 

1089 

1564 

Orlando 

2709 

1394 

1315 


Quarter Oodu 




ATT COM 

VOS TO INT 

Lewis. MEMP 

137 73 

1220 14 3 

Reaves. TB 

233 133 

1823 12 8 

Fuslna, BALT 

195 125 

1580 : 

5 6 

Stoudt, BIRM 

178 102 

1427 12 10 


110 73 1118 B 10 


ihe season. 

Goistevn. ORL 

101 

49 

483 

3 5 

Luther. JACK 

14) 

75 

920 

5 12 

FOOTBALL 

Confer. ORL 

85 

40 

452 

0 S 

Canadian Football League 


Rushers 



CALGARY— Reached agreement with Joe 


ATT 

YDS AVG LG TD 

Barites, quarterback, an a multi -year con- 

walker. NJ 

132 

733 

SA 

881 7 

tract. 

Anderson, TB 

127 

573 

4i 

681 10 

No Hanoi Football League 

Ruler, JACK 

130 

551 

42 

19 4 

DENVER— Signed Glenn Hyde, offensive 

Bledsoe, ORL 

112 

448 

4ft 

20 1 

lineman. 

Cribbs. BiRM 

100 

407 

4.1 

15 4 

MINNESOTA— Traded their 1985 Hrsi and 

Cannon, NJ 

83 

377 

X5 

551 3 

second-round draft Picks lo Houston tor Hous- 

Harvln. BALT 

84 

366 

44 

47 3 

ton* First-round draff choice. 

Lewis. MEMP 

41 

358 

X7 

43 3 

United Slates Football League 

Brvanl. BALT 

10 

318 

45 

35 2 

ARIZONA— Signed Oils Brown, running 


Receivers 



back, to 0 one-year contract. 


NO 

YDS 

AVG LG TD 

OAKLAND— Traded Larry Bethea defen- 

Alexis. JACK 

36 

448 

1X4 

51 2 

sive end, 10 the Houston Gamblers for on un- 

Fltzkee, BALT 

34 

444 

111 

37 0 

dbdosea draft choice. Signed Rich Dixon, 

Smith, BIRM 

31 

541 

17ft 

561 6 

linebacker. 

Truvillion. TB 

29 

452 

156 

641 5 

PORTLAND— Placed Lenny Willis, wide 

Anderson. TB 

28 

741 

86 

20 3 

receiver .on waivers. Acquired Mike Mcitmls. 

Keel JACK 

26 

251 

W 

35 2 

defensive end, from Baltimore lor on undis- 

Kemp, JACK 

24 

356 

14ft 

341 2 

closed draft choice. 

Maser, MEMP 

23 

474 

306 

59 4 

COLLEGE 


Punters 




ARK A N&AS— Named 
basketball coa ch . 


Nolan Rlchorasan 


NO YDS AVG TB >20 LG 


Soccer 


Cater, ORL 

38 

1623 

417 

6 

1 

M 

5 wider, JACK 

23 

977 

42ft 

3 

s 

57 

Miller. MEMP 

23 

963 

41.9 

4 

7 

S3 

Andrvsvshva TB 22 

915 

416 

1 

7 

59 

Partridge, NJ 

29 

1168 

40ft 

3 

7 

61 

Landeta. BALT 

23 

904 

3U 

a 

3 

49 


ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Sheffield Wednesday 1. Manchester United D 
Southampton X Leicester 1 
Points standings: Evgrion 69; Manchester 
United 65; Tottenham 41.- Liverpool, South- 
o melon 57; Sheffield Wednesday, Arsenal 55; 
Nottingham Fores! 50; Chelsea. Aslan Villa 
49; West Bromwich 65; Queens Park Ravers 
44; Leicester. Norwich. Newcastle 42; Wai- 
toro 38; West Ham 37. laswieh 36: Luton. 
Sunderland 35: Coventry 34; Stoke 17. 

WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Hamburv 3. Bochum I 

BprvY.ig Ogitmund *■ Sorer ue'dinpun 6 


Punt Returners 

NO YDS AVG FC LG TD 


McFaason. BIRM10 
Jackson, ORL 15 
Lone. BALT 19 
Williams. MEMP U 
Daniel. NJ 13 


160 

in 

196 

iflo 

71 


163 ) 

1 U 

1 QJ 

9.1 

Sft 


Parrlsn. ORL 
Harris, BALT 
Miller. ORL 
Peauev NJ 
►. rrr.p. JACK 
Carruih. pi DM 


Kickoff Returners 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 


22 

602 

274 

951 

2 

9 

199 

23.1 

48 

0 

7 

149 

21 J 

33 

0 

10 

310 

210 

38 

8 

11 

325 

20.5 

38 

0 

10 

199 

14 V 

26 

a 








Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL IIKRALD TRIBl’lNE. Till USD AY* APRIL 11, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


It Was His Day Off 





W ASHINGTON —The Amer- 
ican Society of Newspaper 
Editors is holding its annual con- 
vention in town this week and, as 
usual, everyone is overjoyed to see 
them. 

What, you 
may ask. do 
these high- 
powered news- 
paper editors do 
when they aren't 
stroking each 
other at an edi- 
tors' conven- 
tion? 

Everyone 

seems to have Bucnwald 
his or her own idea. 

Here are sortie varied impres- 
sions, which depend on where you 
are sitting. 

"The Editor fas he sees himself): A 
sli gh tly aging Robert Redford, 
maybe five pounds overweight It 
wasn't his choice, but someone has 
to be the "captain of the ship.” It’s 
lonely at the top. God. is it lonely 
on the top! You don’t know who 
your real friends are anymore. Be- 
cause you’re tough but fair, you’re 
always getting a bad rap. The edito- 
rial staff thinks you're constantly 
knuckling under to the business 
side of the paper. And the business 
side is always giving you a hard 
time for wasting the paper's valu- 
able space on editorial content. 
They can't pay you enough for the 
aggravation you take. You'd go 
back to the police beat tomorrow if 
you could just keep your present 
salary and still eat in the executive 
dining room. 

The Editor (as seen by his wife): 
She never sees him, except at 2 in 
the morning when she wakes to 
hand him the phone. 

The Editor fas seen by the report- 
er): Editors have two heads, no 
heart and eyes in the back of their 
pointy heads. For some reason, 
which the reporter can't fathom, 
the editor either ignores the report- 
er all the time or is constantly on 
his or her back. The editor has his 

Everest Permit to Cost More 

The Associated Press 

KATMANDU, Nepal — The 
Nepalese government is raising the 
cost of permits to climb Mount 
Everest and other Nepalese moun- 
tains starting July 15. A permit to 
climb Everest, the worm's tallest 
peak, will cost SZ573. 


favorites and assigns them the best 
stories. He wouldn't recognize real 
talent if it was staring him in the 
face. The best way to keep your job 
is to have as few dealings with him 
as you possibly can. Editors used to 
tear up your story with a black 
crayon in front of your eyes — now 
they do it on the computer in then- 
office. and there's nothing you can 
do but stare at the monitor and 
bash your head against the screen. 

The Editor (as seen by the reader): 
Wears shirtsleeves in the office and 
polyester suits with unmatched 
pants and jackets to dinner parties. 
Ether looks like Jason Robards or 
Ed Asner, depending on whether 
you saw “All the President's Men” 
or watched “Lou Grant" on televi- 
sion. He is responsible for all the 
bad news in the paper, especially 
the unfair and libelous articles 
about the reader's (a) political par- 
ty. (b) religious affiliation or (c) 
favorite sports team. The editor is 
held accountable not only for 
printing the news but also for the 
news itself. He has too much power 
and you can’t wait to see him cut 
down to size. 

7 he Editor (as seen by the publish- 
er): Newer is around when there is a 
crisis. Is responsible for 54 million 
in libel suits now pending in courts, 
not to mention the legal fees the 
paper will have to pay. win or lose. 
The editor’s entire operation is a 
drain on the paper's finances. All 
he wants to do is spend money that 
isn’t his and print news that no- 
body wants to read. Has no sense 
of how much flak the publisher has 
to take from his friends and busi- 
ness associates for some stupid sto- 
ry the editor let through. 

The Editor (as seal by the syndi- 
cated columnist who appears in his 
paper): Forthright, brave, intelli- 
gent and honorable, the editor is 
not only a credit to his profession 
and his race, but the one indispens- 
able person in a free and thriving 
democratic society. 

His main job is to make crucial 
decisions. For example, this article 
may have been submitted to him 
and be had to decide whether it 
should appear in a family newspa- 
per. 

If the editor said, “No way,” 
then you wouldn’t be reading it 
right now. But ance you’re reading 
it, you have to assume one of two 
things. Your paper has an editor 
with a sense or humor, or yesterday 
was his day off. 


Nefl Simon’s Youth: The Biloxi Scene Mermuri ’ s Piraeus Plan 


By Michiko Kakutani 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — In “Biloxi 
Blues,” Neil Simon's new hit 
on Broadway, it is 1943, and Eu- 
gene Morris Jerome, the young 
hero played by Matthew Broder- 
ick, is spending his stint in the 
wartime army, trying to grow up 
and become a writer. 

Eugene sees himself as an out- 
sider, an invisible witness to the 
hectic events of the world around 
him, and he is constantly scrib- 
bling down, his observations of 
his [dlow soldiers in a little mar- 
bled-cover composition book, 
feeling “a little ashamed for be- 
traying their secret and private 
thoughts.” Instead of serving on 
the battlefield, he will go on to 
work for a GI newspaper, but 
while this will cause him to “suf- 
fer pangs of guilt because my ca- 
reer was enhanced by World War 
LLT he will have found his voca- 
tion. He win indeed grow up and 
become a writer. He wffl grow up 
and become Neil Simon. 

Like Francois Truffaut’s An- 
toine DoineL like Tennessee Wil- 
liams's Tom Wingfield, Eugene is 
intended as a portrait of the au- 
thor as a young man. Yet if many 
of the events and emotions in 
“Biloxi Blues” and its companion 
piece, “Brighton Beach Mem- 
oirs,” were taken from Simon's 
life — the job on a service news- 
paper. a humiliating experience 
with prejudice in the army, a very 
funny encounter with a prostitute 
— they are also the efforts of a 
mature writer, in the playwright's 
words, to “force memory" and in 
doing so. recapture and reassess 
the past. 

“I think you discover dungs by 
writing — u can be therapeutic." 
Simon said, “and I wanted to 
know how this extremely shy, not 
enormously well-educated boy 
came to do what I consider a very 
bard tiling to do: write plays. I 
wanted to see how I became the 
person I am.” 

The acclaim that his 22 plays 
and more than a dozen movies 
have given him. Simon said, has 
done much to alleviate his shy- 
ness and diminish his sense of 
invisibility, but at 57, be contin- 
ues to have a lot in common with 
this younger self he calls Eugene 
— a name chosen for its ethnic 
resonance and its blandness, the 
sort of muted name that would 












Moffo Swop* 

Simon (right), Broderick and Gene Saks, the cfirector. 


mean “you’re never going to play 
on the Yankees." 

As a young boy. whose parents 
were constantly fighting, Simon 
used to sit alone in the dark in his 
room, listening to the radio, re- 
moving “reality and replacing it 
with my dreams": and to tins day. 
he still loves to retreat to the 
private world of his imagination. 
Like Eugene, he still chastises 
himself for bring a witness and 
not taking a more active part in 
the world; and like Eugene, he 
still loves the actual process of 
writing and the pleasures it af- 
fords. The lovely, tactile sense of 
filling up thinly , lined notebooks 
with prose; the cathartic release 
of ex p res s ing — or confessing — 
unconscious thoughts through 
surrogate spokesmen; the self- 
knowledge gained by reinventing 
the past through words. 

In a sense, Simon’s best work 
has always been acutely autobio- 
graphical — either translations of 
his experiences or wished-for sce- 
narios played out on the stage or 
screen. He will occasionally write 
something wholly diversionary 
like “Murder by Death” to take a 
holiday from himself, but as far 
as his serious work is concerned, 
he says he's gotten into the most 


trouble when he’s strayed into 
unfamiliar territory, as he did 
with “The Star-Spangled Girl” a 
comedy about two leftist politi- 
cos who fall in love with a reac- 
tionary gjrL 

Simon's first play, “Come 
Blow Your Horn," portrayed the 
efforts of hims elf and his brother 
to leave home. “Barefoot in the 
Park" commemorated his early 
years of marriage to his first wife. 
Joan; and “Chapter Two" dealt 
with the guilt he frit after her 
death in 1#73. “The Odd Couple” 
was based on the experiences of 
Simon’s brother, Danny, and a 
friend, and “The Sunshine Boys," 
on older comics he knew from his 
days as a gag writer. 

Curiously enough, Simon re- 
fers to all the fictionalized ver- 
sions of himself as “Eugene.” as 
though his oeuvre formed a sin- 
gle, continuous memoir — “when 
I started writing about Eugene he 
was 21 in ‘Come Blow Your 
Horn,' and in ‘Barefoot in the 
Park,’ Eugene was 26 or 27" — 
and be points out that these char- 
acters all share “my humor, my 
attitude in dealing with things." 
As he* s gotten older, though, he 
says his perspective has become 


dearer, and a change, too, has 
taken place in his treatment' of 
“Eugene”: Whereas the early 
plays treated the “lighter, farci- 
cal” sides of the hero and bis 
riilemmac, the last two works 
have used humor to explore 
somewhat darker regions. 

In “Brighton Beach," Simon 
says, he tried to deal with the fact 
that his mother was a wonderful 
woman who also happened to be 
a bigoL He is currently t h i nk i n g 
about writing a third play about 
Eugene's apprenticeship as a 
writer — a play that would be set 
during the years he worked for 
television with Carl Reiner. Sid 
Caesar and Phil Silvers. The role 
of Eugene, in all likelihood, 
would again be played by Mat- 
thew Broderick. 

In playing Eugene twice al- 
ready. Broderick has not only 
been re-enacting Simon’s coming 
of age as a writer, but has also 
been growing up in front of audi- 
ences himself: He was 21 when he 
got the part in “Brighton Beach”;, 
last month be turned 23. “Brigh- 
ton Beach,” of course, was the 
show that galvanized his career — 
since then, he’s made such movies 
as “WarGames” and “Max Du- 
gan Returns.” 

“I went through a long lime of 
dying to be an actor ” he said, 
recalling his days as a young teen- 
ager at the Walden SchooL “But I 
was afraid to get in front of peo- 
ple. Td picked a school that had a 
great theater, but it took two 
years for me to audition." 

As played by Broderick, Eu- 
gene seems the model image of a 
young writer or what an older 
writer would like to remember his 
younger self as — vulnerable but 
spirited, appealing in his good- 
natured idealism; and when Si- 
mon sees him on the stage, he 
can't help bat be reminded of the 
young man he used to be. 

“It’s not physical so much,” be 
says, “but mat Matthew says so 
many of the things exactly the 
way I would say than. I think 
also it’s the way he does the hu- 
mor — he never tries to be funny, 
he says the lines with great ear- 
nestness. Somehow 1 would not 
fed I'd quite accomplished my 
job fully if he were the only one 
who could play the role, but it’s 
hard to escape Matthew’s crafts- 
manship and charm. There’s an 
innocence about him that was a 
part of me." 


Mefina Mercouri, the culture 
minis ter of Greece, has announced 
plans for a 5700,000 permanent ex- 
hibit in Athens’s port city of Pirae- 
us illustrating Greece’s seafaring 
tradition. “Greece has always lived 
by the sea and from the sea. This 
exhibit will make Piraeus rate with 
Europe's richest cultural centers, 
she said. Mercouri, who is weu 
known for her portrayal of a Pirae- 
us waterfront prostitute in the film 
“Never on Sunday,” represents a 
Piraeus district in Parliament. The 
exhibit, to open June 21 at Pirae- 
us’s central passenger terminal, will 
include more than 1,600 items from 
the Stone Age to modem times. 

□ 

The man who played the part of 
Christ is the Oberammergau pas- 
sion play has been denied recogni- 
tion as a conscientious objector. A 
West German selective service 
board ruled Tuesday that RwB 
Zwink, 26, a dentistry student, 
must sen* 15 months in the -West 
German Army. Zwink said as both 
a Christian and as “Christ" in the 
play, staged in Oberammergau 
since 1634, he did not want to be- 
come a soldier. Zwink said be 
would appeal the decision. In 1984, 
23,929 men applied for exemption. 
Of these only 1248 were rgected. 

□ 

“We Are the World," the U. S. 
charity album to fight hunger in 
Africa and America, started at No. 
9 on Billboard magazine's pop al- 
bums chart. Tom Noonan, an editor 
at Billboard, said the last previous 
album to debut at No. 9 was Bruce 
Springsteen’s “Born in the USA,” 
in June 1984. That album quickly 
went to No. 1. and “hasn't been out 
of the top four for 44 weeks." 
Noonan said. . . . International 
stars such as Menudo, Julio Igiesias 
and Ricardo Monta&an donated 
their talents Tuesday to a Latin 
song similar to “We Are the 
World" to help the needy in Latin 
America and Africa. Tlie singer 
Vicki Carr, one of 48 artists who 
participated in the recording ses- 
sion at A&M Studios in Los Ange- 
les, said she was glad the record 
was being prodiKxd, “knowing that 
in Latin America especially so 
much help is needed." Ninety per- 
cent of the profits were to go to 
Latin American relief, with the rest 
targeted for Africa. Among the art- 
ists who sang at the session were 
Richard (Cheech) Main of the 


comedy team Cheech and Chong, 
ApoOonia, Jose Fetiriana. Sergio 

Mendez, the Mexican singer Jos* 
josE, the Venezuelan ringer Jost 
Luis Rodriquez and the Mexican 
comedian Cantujflas. Artists who 
sent tapes to be spliced in included 
the opera singer Plarido Domingo 
and the singer Irene Cara. . . . 
Austrian pop stars announced 
Wednesday they had written and 
recorded a song about the famine - 
in Ethiopia and said profits from 
sales would go toward helping hun- 
ger victims there. Called *WanmT 
(Why), the song features Wolfgang 
Ambras, IQH Baer, Maria Bffl, Pe- 
ter Cornelius, Georg Darner, An- 
dr€ HeHer and others. 


i# 


•• !N 


Cicely Tyson says that she re- 
gretted having to take action 
against a theater group created by 
Elizabeth Taylor and the producer >- 
Zev Bufraan, but she is pleased with 
the outcome. Richard G. Green, an 
arbitrator in New York, ordered 
tire Elizabeth Theatre Group to pay v - 
Tyson back wages of $607,078 
since her firing from the cast of ■ 
“The Com Is Green” on Sept 16, * 
1983, Tyson's manager said Tues- r . 
day. The company fired Tyson af- : 
ter two weeks of Broadway peifor- ^ . 
mances, alleging that she failed to ■; 
tell management she cook! not ap- ; ~ 


director. An airline flight delay 
causal Tyson to miss oneperfor- -V 
mance. her manager said. Taylor’s - 
spokeswoman said Tuesday that ’ •■ 
“Taylor has nothing to do with [the 
dispute]. It’s between Mr. Bufman 
and Miss Tyson.” 


Romuald Spasowski, 64, an am- 
bassador to the United States when 
he defected in 198 1 after the inqx>- 
sition of martial law in Poland, was 
baptized and confirmed a Roman 
Catholic during a Mass at the home 
of Cardinal Joan Krai in Philadel- 
phia. Spasowski, a lifelong atheist, 
said his derision to join the church 
was the result of a “growing inner 
life” and called his baptism “the 
happiest moment of his life. I feel 
that I have joined, really, also the 
Polish people." Spasowski's wife, 
Wanda, is a Catholic. Spasowski, 
who served as ambassador from 
1955 to 1961 and from 1978 to 
1981, was Poland’s senior diplomat 
when he defected on Dec. 21. 1981. 


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GBtMAN . AMERICAN 

U.S. erthen, age 62, male bachelor, no 
tie*, half Jevrsh, hoOToelly indepen- 
dent, trSngud, wfing to release / 
travel, just retred m nt-Coor rfm cVor of 
ineenxftond corporation. West Ger- 
many. Am seeking position of trust as 
responsible/ mteure marvFnday with 
pemwnert residence preferably out- 
side the Federal Eeitabfc W3 oho eon> 
uder pMonttwopc protect. RefioUe cw 
ovoilable. Write in aamlai«j 10 
Be 21 W 

(KIL Fhednehsrr. ?£ 

D. 6000 Fronltfurt/Mam 


A meto ed — 3636-15. 
Athene: 361 -8397/360-2421 . 
Bmieeta 343-1899 
Cn periioge n. (01) 329440. 
Frankfurt: (069) 7267-55. 
Im i ionn e - 29-S&94- 
liAom 67-27-93/6 6-T$M. 
London: (01) 836-4802. 
Madrid: 455-2891 /45S3306. 
Milan: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (03)845545. 
Rome: 67*3437. 

Sweden: 08 7569229. 

Tel Avhr 03-455 55P. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

UNITED STATES 

New York: (212) 752-3890. 
Wert Coart: (415] 362-8339. 


EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Bueno* Ahwc 41 40 31 
(Dept. 312) 

GoayoquI: 431 943/431 
lima: 417 852 
Prnnr 644372 
SOI Joe* 22.1055 
Santiago: 69 61 555 
Sao Paolo: 852 1B93 

MjPOUEAST 

temto 246303. 
Jordan: 25214. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
tebaoon; 34 0044. 
Qatar: 416535. 
Sw6An6to 
JmMah: 667-1500. 
UAEj Dubai 224161. 

PAR EAST 

Bmtokelc 3904667. 
Hong Kenm S213671. 
M*b 5* B170749. 
S*sob 7258773. 
Singapore: 222*2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Sy*tey: 929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 690 8233. 



Tele* 231496 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

640 


TROCADEROr URGENT 

MaaanetM, beautiful living + 2 bed- 
rooms. refined decoration, very cairn. 
Tel: 266 15 47. 


16lh new FOCH 

Luxurious a p artment. 280 stun. 
3 baths, 3 mad*' room*. F4300.0C 
Tel: 743 19 59. 


ESESEEJ 


VILLARS 

WINTER A SUMMER 
PARADISE, 20 MINUTE 
FROM LAKE GENEVA 

ftniw l ni en h , ranging from Uurio* 
to 4 room. AsndedM liar Scde To 


from SH95XC0 to SF635.G0D. Mori- 
gogesavaMjle or only d5fc interest, 
rof mTormawT; 

CLOU PLAN LA. 

Aw. Men- Repos 24, 

0*1005 LA USANNE7 Switzerland 
Tel: (211 22 35 1Z Th Sl85 M&S Oi 
EetoUihed Since 1970 


INVEST IN 
FUTURES 
TODAY! MONEY TREES ? 

The Trmmrid Fwtoree Pool YBI Inve rt ma ne o f Amenta 's most 
A dofor-based investment fund trod- 

in dl mawr futures inducting GOLD a Wfion donor nkist ry. We hawe 
■ f planted mom net freeem 1 984 man 
my other d ow el up er In our State. 
High annual eansngs awured for many, 

MOX^^e'WUJWBaWTHJ-Mo- 
tend ovtAabe n Enofish, Fmndi, Ger- 
mcrL Arabic Box 1995. Herald Tnbwie. 
92521 Newly Cede*. F ran ce 


OFFSHORE TAX SHELTERS 

From £75 , , 

UK, hie of Man, TwK Oanel Uaxh, 
Parana. Liberia & mortofWwre area*. 

Very stnaty connae*™*- 
Free aHauHabom 
Roger Griffin LLB, F.CA . , 
Brochure! Corpora* Monaganem Ud., 

Western House, Victoria Sheet, 
Dougin, Id * of M ot. 

Teh (0624) 23303/4. 

Telex 627389 CORMAN G. 


SS OUR AD ON 
PAGE 9 

TRANS CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 




We provxte confrntKfion by prune lwu 
bank* lor letter* of credrt opened by DWAli P.O. Bax 1515. DNATA 
most baries ei Nigeria. Please telex Axfne Centre Duto, UAE. 
u famce io n i mention Rne Export Teh 214565 Tetev- 48911 
telex 261426 ADFONE • G in London LONDON: 110 The Strand, 


U * M*i» private 


TAX SERVICES 




FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


London WOt QAA, 

Tel: pi) 836 8910, tlx, 24973 
MAPgD -, C/O eme N" 68-4, 

Modnd 29320. Tel 270 56 00 or 
270 66 04. Telex: 46642 
MILAN: Via Boccaccio 2. 

20123 Mian. Tel 86 75 89/00 59 279 
Trier: 320343 

NEW YORK 575 Motfim Avenue 
New York. NY 10022 Tet (212)605- 
inmmr 0200, Trier: 125864 / 237699 

PAJUS: 605, 1 5 Avenue Vprtor Hugo 
ATTBdlON 751 16 Pori Tet 502 18 00 

Trine 620893F 

Acmrspn axparafto n faatt to « Ca5- ROM6 Via Sown 71 00198 Bone. 
fMisseelcstarriujOTBnprfiag*- Tel: 85 32 41 ■ 844 80 70 . 
aboni and real property. AtoanmUs Trier: 613458 
y mafion 1 bang requested fc riqrpp - SNCAPOItE: 111 North Bridge Pd 
ertjr e oppraieJol aver L SS'SrnA or # 114 ) 4/05 Parxmuto Pte^Vpore 
gftgyy* 06!7. Td- 3366577. Tlx: 36&. 

^ 8001 “ 

S tStttSiMrW? ^ B12656/B12981. 

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(714) 677^451. Tlx: 294223 AffM UR 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


IMTt 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMfTH) WC 
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212-765-7794 
330 W. Sritfa St, N.Y.C. 10019 
• Service Sr 


EAM 133% , GENEVA 

Minimufli ptoBven litfar <*■ SW1TZBUAN0 

celerahon with lartwiwn >'00X00 in- - .n • 

vestment in Deed of Trust Horn i» FuD SerVlCC 

cured by real estate in U.5A. SearOy _ . 

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increase from 16% to 193% a* rates 

apasrtowesra. fa wfa, iwite atewnaeonri towOTdraws 

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OFFICE SERVICES • Formation, danvcSptian and _ 



COOPS ST JAMES 

OHKIAL AGENT 
OF BMW (G81 LTD 
*»® BMW NOftTH AMBttCA 


Whto you « in Europe, we cot off? 1- 
nraderable savings an Drand new LS 
spec BMW an vSi fut factory war- r.’ 
ranly and offidal US dealer bodrep- * 

We can aho supply right or toft hand ' 
ar we tan hoe BMW: cl lour ist price*. ‘-3 

We ako supply factory butt nriri- -iv 
proof BMwTand the Alpina BMW 
range toe free. r .-:i 

Call London (01) 639 6699. V 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 








(201) 779-4681. 



adminittrahan of Swiss and forrign EngksK . 
OopaiWS lecretori 

Fill canfrdwiek.and risenrien eesured a«ri, ! 


BUSMESS ADVISORY 
SaVKBSJk. 

7 Rue Munr. 12® GO«7A. 
Tel 36 OF 40 Teton 23342 


/C Sffla for AM8BCAN 
rB FBIMS >1 PASS: 
linn Dridi or Gwnsi 
tetowtedge of French re- 
|fash sh gfe nd Btoiguri 
raa phone- 13B Avenue 
3, 75116 Paris, France Tet 


SjBSlZSiEai 


WW IttGEOr. land Rover. JtaW i ^ 






TEMPORARY SKKTART nteJ-Jun* 
to fted-Oet. far US. lawyer. En^sh 

toodwr tongue, niitos FtwkK. , . 

Word processor stotodewobte. Write »»W 8MWTS. WOS. C9 + 745 
to Box 2027. Hwrid Tnbwie, 92521 riomond bfcA(hu&ps anttrocH,^ 
' ' G«rtenoy|3pn-673503, tb 8508116 


NeuiBy Cede*, Fronee 


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