Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


□ 

^y Tw>n 

“<=d ha^g^jMhai, 

' Baffnai)^ bm 'l*'* ihe^' ' 
outcnm. n,*?''ClSiilJ?^: • 



W W BIP< ffl :AfffaaQWft>Oei6 


No.3x;r7o 


PuMished ''^th Hie New York Tinoes and Hie Washington Post 

** PARIS, FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 1985 


Reform 


Europeans Wahi 
TalhioVtarjIld^ 
Trade IKscussim 


om£^‘ii'>>'c,s». . By Axd Krause . 

■Uratrt /^' itUenMmalHereUTrtbvu 

SL S Ym^ paws - De^u dtfiier US. 

iMK. ? rgeciioa of such luJtue, the Euro- 

» hap r‘- Canmunity instsied Thurs^ 

iie Prt ‘* 1^1 IK. ■ ‘^y ^ “ agreement to refonn 

13 • ^-^een" die interaadooal mmetaiy systeoi 

• ^ ^ tnust accompany the proposed 

^"'Panv^^Tu Stan of uade^hovlizadoo onoti- 
*wo weeks of •‘dons eariy in 1W6. 

“ce&. alleging ih^*!f K Willy de Clereq, the EC CDmmis- 
'**“^«ncni she tSSl^ sioner in charge ot external ida- 
one nigh- (ions, said at the opqnng of a two 
d«e dircciion day • ministcsial meeting of the 

®ctor. .\n .Of^LnizaiionforEconmiucCoop- 

Twinit, mu “Wt “d Develcpmeai that 
ace. her ^ progress” 

«eswoman oniradeliberaUaauonaadonmoO' 

aylorhasnoihinoi eiaiy tefomuThis was one <rf three 
pute]. h's hetn.!^^. ooodftions he outlined for the ECs 

i MissTvson"'”'^^ ^ 3uppon of a U,S. for trade 

talks. 

Q The two Other coaduiccBs, Mr.de 

Bom. la c said, caQed for enfor^g 

Spasowskf, M ^ exisiingagreeraenlsoneasingirade . 

SMdor to UiiiiedSjJ';' for obtaining a strong 

defected in l^gj oommilment from Jqtan lo bem 

;onof martiaiia\ifi[|fijo the marltet^opening and trade ^ 
pi^ and oiafinnedTJ* eratizarion padfag that, was an- 
Jolic dunng a Masiai ,£ nounced Tuesday. Tina reform is to 
kroluiS'^ be conducted over the next three 
la. SpawwskL j years. 

dhisdeciiionioi.-S®' . He described the Jmnese pack- 
s the resulKrf a-anSL^'s. ^ ^ “tailor-made wr the Ui, 
and cilicd hLs'C’^ ^ ^ 

ppiesi mcimmi of wti • iai»«*od it provided fittfesiHaedi- 

ii I have joined. nSi ,l interest to the lOnaika EC, 

fch people." SpMiv. 

anda. » a ace^ to Japm« mariccts. _ 


';J^e ^'®*npanv^^Ts. 
two weeks or 

alieg,ng»K 

,'t*anag«n5n®32'^fi^ 

»r one mghi an.iTu'^ie. 
ector- .\n air],^^„‘l*a 

wttwoman said 
aylor nas nothing to!?" t 

i Miss Tyson.- 

□ 

*®“^SpasoiisliL M„ 
defected in 

^onofniartiidffA 
Md oiofinlJffj 

tbolic ounno j 


' Cilicd hLs 
ppiesi mommi of hisgt- 
ill have joined. reaDvjt 
lish people." Spasoviv.' 
“da, i» a Caiholii-. 
m sen.ed as ambass^^ 
5? VO 19fi! and fronil"? 
81. was Poland’s vnicf^ 
len he defecisd on Detiu 


Althmigh. EC fordffl ministes. 
first omlt^ their wish for paraDd 
lalks on March 19, ECoRicudsand 
OECD delegates said Mr. de 
Clercq's statement was the stxon- 
to date and was aimed at “de- 
jiberatdy pressuring Washiogus 
to talk and oethans act on mcne- 



Beijing 
Bars U.S. 
N-Arms 

Conventional 
Weapons Only 
In Pori Visit 


By Danid Southerland 

H'ltshut/itM Posl Senue 

BEUING — Hu Yaofaang, the 
leader c& China's Communist Par- 
ly. has said that China and the 
United States haw agreed that U.& 
Navy ships would not be carrying 
hucKar weapo^ when they make a 
.port call in China in a ferv weeks. 

II.S. offtcials immediately de- 
nied that there had been any formal 
change in the American polk^' of 
rduang to conTirm or deny with- 
er .U.S. ships making port calls car- 
ry nuclear weapons, wi one dfl- 
dal in Washington said that since 
the port call to Shanghai would be 
largely ceremonial it was "lo^cal” 
that the vessels would be conven- 
lionally armed. 

The U.S. refusal to provide ex- 
plicit assurances on this question to 
Australia, New Zealand and Japan 
in the past has provoked political 
controversies in those countries. In 
February, New Zealand banned 
U.S. warships from making pon 
calls in the absence of conTutnation 
that tliM' carried no nuclear weap- 
ons, which led the United States to 
cancel joint naval exercises with 
New Z^and and Ausiroha. 








,s- 




-Enver Hoxha 


Wc Aaoond Piai 


U.S* Aide Sedks to Lower 
Expectation on Siamnit 


By David Hof&nan 

ft rBiAifijRvi Post Sfrriet 

SANTA BARBARA, California 
— President^Roo:^ Reagan wants 
to hold a meeting with the Soviet 


Mr. Hu, widely considered to be 
the heir apparent to China's para- ^ 

mount leaiier, Drag Xiaoping, told .^i ^ beheves a fuU-sc^ 

summit conference would require 


mount leader, E}eng Xiaoping, told 
journalists from .Australia and New 


Zealand on Wednesday that China more lime and prqwraiion, accord- 
had insisted ihai the U.S. warships ‘^*8 president's naiio^ secu- 
tespeci China's .sovereignty and not ”*y l^ben C ^rarlane. 


Die AmoMri Witi 

A ertmd gistbe^ Tliursday around die gaDows of Kober Prison in Khartoum after 
thousands of prisoners vrme freed ftriknriog the miUtaiy takeover on Saturday in Sudm 


cany nuclear weapons in Chinese 
waters. His remarks strongly sug- 
gested that the United States had 
not contested the Chinese condi- 
tion for the visit. 


rity adviser, Robert C. McFarlane. 

Mr. McFarlane said Wednes^ 
that “there need not be a aMcific 
agenda" for a meeting, and that the 
climate in U.S.-Soviet reladons 
seems to justify a mawing But, he 


to talk and perhaps act on mcne- V/iQ 
aa M. • 1 . 1 . reform,** an ofhdal said. ^C. 

M Aa Quiekry end Sell France has been pcesoi:^ hardest fy r 
In **» for the linkage. wv M 

AL HERAU) TOBUIC .AU-S-c^^qie^inginivitto- " ^ 

jr,--..-. p.^ . ly,said,“We donc«iInaktnatvou 

iviU see-much of a iwtfw ^ B 
v^.7.ii5K:.-i i sponse, or any give** on the the EC 

•■latsu-rri -twsiM.tio:; 7 .'proposd from dm UJS^ Treesuiy TRW 
t!wfimHr»?ickf«vTift>i9e ' haaeran:,.|[anagsA Moudv 

p^SSTSTScen es - ^ ddega^ 

^ Baker IS expected.tocommem'on ; bec^ i 

the issue Friday. ; feies m ! 

LATtWAWm Mr. de Oereq suffiested dial die Tlcag 
^BnQiAir«.iit9i concurrent talks oc^ be hdd on- 


Qadhafi, Asserting ^Sudan Is Ours, ’ 
Warns Reagan Not to Interfere There 


He is to begin u trip to AuslraUa “You shouldn’t have high 


and New Zealand on Saturday. 

In his meeting with the joiunal- 


expectauons. 

Soviet actions in the months 


ISIS, Mr. Hu said, in answer to a ahead couid affect the limi^ of a 
auesiion. that the U.S. Naw's oort meeting, Mr. McFarlane said. 


question, that the U.S. Navy's port 
call would be **an informal visit” by 
a “conventional warship." 


meeting, Mr. McFarlane said. 

He said the adminisiradon be- 
lieved that extensive talks with the 


rtW fin! nr# -1# k f iiftifc,^is ' 

obwtvdnev 

peu. Sue's 0.9 k-een fts 

iMWuaxx 

Suenes Amk <1 til 

G*se j'2l 

Ovcror-^^^’CC' 

Uma: iirsn 

PcjOT'e pLgt 
Sot J03r m-IDS 

Sao?BUlo!B!llR 

MCOLEEASi 

Jereon' 

Kuwrdt 5:'-^ 
LeseissL 
Qotsr^'eSd 
Soioi AroSlB 
jaddAst'ia 

FAKHg I 
BOTgkotJW^;., 

Toifyo ^ 

AtgBAjW 


% Heruy Kamm Lebanon to Hitler’s massacres. Ac- 
VtvT^Titm. Serna laising Israel iro^s of killing civil- 

TRlPOLfUbya — Colonel ^ safiS; “This calls; for an 
~ hafisiq's that Frasi- 

Romaics “nose vrill can you alkm . the lulling 
Unned ^tes mle^ families whOc rejecung such, ao- 
L tiona a^nsi Jews?" 

is oothii^ to do with In apparent reference to Presi- 


be cdT' if die United States mle^ 
feres in Sudan. 

“Reagan has oothii^ to do with 


der the auspices of. die Genend: PngKdi to ^ American reporter 
Agreement on Tarifb and Trade, after a news coherence here. 


ivcagan aas puuiu^ w uo wiin m smparent rcterencc to rresi- 
the Ubyan leader said in dent H^ib Bouiguiba of Tunisia, 
EngBrii to an American reporta he said, “Anybody who protests 


nose ^ be cuL** .«■ 


agmnsi sudi a radio station, is igno- 
lanu" 

Oiplomais said that Mr. Bout- . 
guiba bad summoned Foreign 
ista Ali Abdd-Salem Treiki of 
Libya, while the minista was visit- 


ihc Geneva-bas^ agency comz^ dan is ours, not an American mat- ranu" 
ing al^i 90 naoons ihat establish- ter. Reagan nmst take care of Ws Oiplomais said that Mr. Bout- 
a and enforces trade Tutes-amt^ country, and be has big proUetns gtiiba ba d !tutn mnn«<rf For eig n Mi»* * 
its members, and the imeriro ccuD- there. Hedoa'liDt^ereh^ or his ista Ali Abdd-Salem Treiki of 
mitiM 'the toteniauonal Mp^ nosemj] becuL*’''.'k • Lil^a,whiletheministawasvisit- 

ury Fund, which advises ue IMF De^te mountiiig evidence that ing Tunis last week, and critidz^ 
boa^ ' ' the hew Sudanese government of Li^a severdy for the broadcasts. 

^ go^ of moneia^ refoon GeneraJ-Abdu} Rahman Swaredda- They said the Tiinisiaa president 
talk^ toe EC ofTicia] a yd, s hould hah has no Libyan links, Orionel eimeUed Mr. Treiki from his office 
be auned at easi n g the "eirattc be- - Qadhafi ooorinuM what diplomats wiibout allow ing him to reply. 
havior”or tbeU.S. doBarraiiddie eonrida to be an aiteomt to take Asked Wednesday when be 
cfreclsorhighU.S.mteresiratesoa credit for the dowxif all of PresideDt would viai Tunisia, Co lonel Qa- 
industrialixed and developing GaafarNimdri. dhafi said. “After the liberation.’' 


.. Deyhte mounting evidence that ing Tunis last week, and criticized 
' the hew Sudanese government of Li^a severdy for the broadcasts. 
GeneraJ-Abdu} Rahman Swaredda- They said the 'ninisiao president 
hah has no Libyan links, Cdonel ensdled Mr. Treiki from his office 
' Qadhafi ooorinuM what diplomats without aUowing bim to reply, 
eondda to be an aiteomt to take Asked Wednesday when be 


mnusinaiizea ana aeveioping Oaaar Nimem. dhafi said, “After ihe liberation.’' 

j;:jounm» He saidhe was “disgusted’’ by 

official said. them." he said. “I ^bi the credibility of Mrs. 

Fordgn Miiizsta Siintaro Abe Jahis news conferen^ which P*”*?**^ Md am skqitical abwi 
of Japan told the 24 OE£^ mem- was attended by about 30 Western "O' „ cwraiity in _^aaal, be 
bers that Japan would carq out its rqiorters invited to this usually ^ *P®cify why. 

package "wd activdy partk^te dosed country, C^ond.Qadhan Asked whether Libyan troops 


Mr. Nimeiri was overturned m a 
.UoodJess coup Saturday as he was 
returning hmne Ir^ an ctfEcial 
viat to Washington^ 

Cdonel Qadnafi described the 
Sudanese people as brothas 
Libya, “We love them and suppon 
tbe^” lie said 

In. his news conferen^ which 




.Asked if this meant the United Russians would be required in ad- 
Stmes had assured Ghna that the vance of a summit conference, but 
sbipsi would not carrv nuclear would not be needed foraget* *' 

we^ns. Mr. Hu said: “That is tioquamted meeting (or the two Robert C McFarlane 
^wqdv^adccsioodivawefnChifla ie3deri.H?aoi?dthalpasi summit , 

and ihc United Siaia. There is meetings lud nusetfexp^^ anns-conirol agr^ent,” said a se- 

agreemeni. As they will enter Chi- improved U.S.-Soxiet rdiaticsu that official 

nese territorial waters, thal is our uere not fulfilled. •. .. 

sovaeigniv, so they hsve to give Administraiioa sources said that Officials said Mr. Goitiachev s 
their coosml.'’ Mr. McFarlane's comments were ^n^wmeement Sunday of a freeze 

As a result of navy-io-navy nego- intended lo signal that a putting at roedium-ran» nuclw 

tiatitms that were agreed upon the United Ni^ns tins fall was m Europe, which de- 

August during the visit here of likelv. bin to discourage specula- ?<? propagan^ ploy by 

Navy Secretary John F. Lehman tion’that it would produce substan- i“® united Siat^ would not blt^ 
Jr,, three UiL desiroyas are cx- live results. ® 

peeled to make a port call next “There probably will be one. but' ™fi*^*l “at a repeal of such 


August during the visit here of likely, bin to discourage specula- 
Navy Secretary John F. Lehman don that it would produce substan- 
Jr,, throe UiL destroyas are ex- live results, 
peeled to make a port call next “Thm probably will be one. but' 
mcMiih at Shanghai, the firsi such don’t get your bc^es np for an 
U5. Navy visit to China in nearly - 
four decades. A U.S. admiral is 
gypec M to be aboard. 1 -gpi 

Mr.Hu’s remarks came at a sen- |G1*€|^| 
siiive lime. China hasjusi reopened W-V'i 

a new round of n^tiauons in 
Moscew ovCT possible normal- i?««erf 

lion cf relations with the Soviet NABATIYEH, Lebanon — The 


(Qmthuied oa Page 2, CoL 6) 


ssnr «i»r. s-»d«,-.7as*. 

Finland ..- 7 UFM SiirtWte*!> 22 »S* 

Fm» AOOf. Tma afOBCVi 

Onmy-ZSOOM ** "” '■ . a Cn Twkay 7X49000 

&M 8 raOT_.SDP. M nmrn , S , H> eX uaX ftSOCtdi 

OtM nn N*h rt BiiA-2J5ft us.fM rb^soss 

lion nSbk Mom, I 7 DX TagMtow XOD 


ESTABUSHED 1887 

Hoxha 
Dies in 
Albania 

Stalinist Ruler 
Had Rifts With 
Soviet, China 

Rouen 

VIENNA — EnvCT Hoxha, who 
led Albania through four decades 
of strict Stalinism and ideological 
breaches with both Moscow and 
Bdjing, died in Tirana on Thurs- 
day. He was 76. 

Mr. Hoxha was the longest sen- 
ing leader of any communist coun- 

The man who is most likdy to 
succeed Enver Hoxha is a q[iuet, 
ideolo^cal pwist Page 2. 

try. His death was reported by .Ai- 
bga’s irfficial ATA press agency 
and broadcast by Radio Tirana. 
The funeral was set for Monday. 

ATA said that President Rainiz 
Alia, 59, the head of state, wxiuld 
lead the funeial commission, a sign 
that be couid be expected to as- 
sume the mantle of party power. 

The official announcment said 
Mr. Hoxha's heart stepped beating 
at 2:15 A.M. Thursday. He had 
suffered from heart disorders since 
1973 as a result of diabetes, which 
be had fought since 194S, AT.A 
said. 

■ Defiant Leadefslnp 

Wolfgang Saxon ef The Sew 
York Times reported from Sew 
York: 

Albania maintained its mdepen- 
dence under Mr. Hoxha's defiantly 
Stalinist leadership for the longest 
period in well over four centuries. 
But his unrelenting Stalinism and 
Maoism left .Albania with few 
friends abroad as it broke with a 
succession oS more powerful for- 
eign benefactors. 

Albania was one of the first com- 
munist states to denounce the re\i- 
aonism of Marshal Tito in Yugo- 
slavia, siding with Stalin. Then, Mr. 
Hoxha cut ms ties with Moscow 
when it, too. turned revisionist un- 
der Stalin's successors. 

As economic and militaiy bonds 
with the communist countries of 
Eastern Europe atrophi^ by the 
late 1960s. Mr. Haxha relied I^vi- 
W on China for material suppon. 
He became a voc^d supponer of , 
Mao when he found hunselT lek^ 
tive^ isolated in his rivalry with the 
Kremlin. 

But the thaw in Cfainese-Anieri- 
can relations in the 1970s chilled 
Albaiua’s friendship with Beijing, 
and, over the last two years, tbeir 
cordiahiy turned into a rift that 
stopped just short of a break in 
diploniatic relations. 

Through it all. Mr. Hoxha main- 
(Contmued oo l^ge 2, Cid. 3) 


Israel Expands Pullout in Lebanon 


The harassment of Isiueli forces Inhabitants of Nabatiyeh greet- 
mdnued until the last minute, ed the sudden departure' of Israeli 
nly hours before the troops left troops with mingira relief and fear, 
abatiyeb, a major Palestinian Crowds gathered after the last 
lerrilla base before the 1982 Is- troop carriers rumbled south, some 
eli invasion of Lebanon, two happilv waving red-and-whitelteb-. 

ing Hussein and Yasser Arafat , . v, v ■ i. 

eetfornewtalksontbeirMid- ®;“ “ Na^uyeh 

e East peace plan. Phse 2. about tlte mam street, ap- 

******* patently dazed and uncertain 

ckets exploded near an Israeli ubout the i mm ediate future, 
itpost but «»<wt no raqiaiiii«« _ uonc of the frenzied 

'ne pullback —the second since jubilation that greeted Israel’s de- 
rad announced in January that it puriure from the souihern city of 
IS vrithdrawing from Lebanon — Stdon in February in the first stage 
ans that some Israeli border set- ^ withdrawal 
ments once again will be withfo This lime, no Lebanese .Armv 


Moamer QaiDttfi 


involved and will totally disregard uying to impiuve general relations. 


any parallel. 


lion cl relations with the Soviet NABATIYEH, Lebanon — The continued until the last minute. 
Union, Mr. Hu’s reinails could de- Israeli Army carried out a m^or Only hours before the troops left 
fieci potential Siniel criiidsm of pan d* the second phase of its with- Nabatiyeh. a major Palestinian 
China's militarv cooperation with drawal from Lebmon on Tburs- guerri^ base before the 1982 Is- 
the United Sutes at a time when day, pulling out its forces from hos- raeli invasion of Lebanon, two 

Beijing and Moscow mpear to be tile Shiite Moslem terrain in ic.»„„ iinc m -n — j 

iryingioimpiuvegcnS^tions. Nabatiyeh and the surrounding ^ 


Other observers noted, however, 


D^pite strains with Fcanoe, Col- J 4 r. Ho has a reputation for 
qnd Qadhafi described the rda- “shooting from the bq}” by speak- desened Nabatiyfr heli- exploded near an Israeli 

lions as good. ing bluntly or prematurdy about rowers flew ov^ead, moppmg impost but «»<wt no raqiaiiii«« 

Colonel Qadhafi offered no rea- the nuances of mplomatic and po- warning the population of jjjg p^^^ack — the second since 

son for the excepiumal news con- Uucal fxrh a^gp^ Israeli retalmtion if gnenilla announced in January that it 


As the last tanks rumbled out of ^ pence plan. Page 2. 
nearly d^ed Nabaliyd^U- exploded near an IsraeU 


— package “tmd activdy partk^te dosed country, Qdond. Qadhafi Ai 

in the work related to the hmosg taA»t out in many directimis. migt 

it T OST.^^ and reversiim of -protecuoaism. His taiwTs. b fri d ff die United pan 

— -I—--- within the OECD au dsewfade.” stat es, 7 tftniq&!w»t Prime uoo] 

But be empharized that “nuuket- Minister Margaret Thatcher of Cole 
(qiening can do no moie than pro- Britain. don* 

^ vide opponimiliesftw free ana fair He. defenddl radio programs l^di 

-..f « comp^tion.” ^ _ that have bees broadcast to Tuiti- 

,T. The OECD’s main, function is 10 ida and Motx}cco in' recent wedis 

■: guide mtffibers in formulating eco- taging people there to kfil tiidi 
*• - Domic poliq^. JeMsb xninoriues. The broadcasts 

In other devdopments, seve^ aie believed by Western official 


Asked whether Libyan troops son for the exc^ticnal news con- Utical fftrha"Er< 
might advance south of the 16th ference. His piineipal.interesi ap- china readiusted its for- 

paralld in Chad, nhere Libyan pea^ to be to deuounce U.S. ^ a-o anj luc mapaiiycn ir 

troops support a rebd movement, condemnation of a strongly anti- r«ofn>^ its indmmdait ^tura sparsely populated pocl 
Colonel Qadhafi replied: “Wc American dedaration here .o thfu WStSS rouniry of about llSsq 

doq’ichinkthtnksucEaihingasa last month after the formation of a ^ 


The Nabatiyeh Triangle, a means that some Israeli b^erset- 
arsely populated pocket of m dements once again will be within 


He. Aef/m^e4 radio programs foth paraUd. Who drew this line? poorly defined group called the 
that have bees broadcast to Turn- Who has the right to draw itT' National Ctmunand (rf the Revolu- 


.r:V' 


la a meeting with leportefs, 
^ Osno Ruding, fuumce mimscer of 

J: ; ' ^ Netheriasds and duttnnan of 

7 interim eomminiig, ^ 

‘ thaitliBiacreasemuaemploymettt 

was still Europds tnqor pnMenL 
“The I^fluesticm facing OUT econ- 
omies u wlieihff to puisue [siimu- 
^ * Jaiive] action on ihe -suimly w the 

side."^ he said Bin Mr. 
i Ruding stop^ short df noom- 
■ £.'•» mending nety moves, particulariy 

for West Gennany. “G!ennai^f.tt 
, : ' , ]$ ro the ri^i directitm,!' be 

i ^ 


T delegates, indudhig Mr. Baker, 
^ 1 - suggested that European obantries 
and Japan should stimulate growth 
in their economies to offset a dow- 
^ down in the overall rate of ffowih 
m in the OECD area, indudm^orth 
America, Europe and the racific. 
“OECD growth is IDcdy to be stow- 
[ )d er this year, as the U.S. moves to a 
somewhat lower but oxire susiun- 
able gro^ rate,” he said. 

Mr. Bdcer told deices that 
<4^^ OECD members diould take “nec- 
essary action to implieinent domes- 

tic policies that address otgtespec- 

y rive barriers to stronger ecosranic 
performance,”, whidi rtferwd to a 
* :: j renewed call for earing lestrictioos 

- J to trade and subsidies Mn the main 

'•J U5. trafing paitneis. .& empb- 

Tf ; ^can '-sized that it was “paitictilarly im- 

poftant” that Eiv^ arid Japan 
^F Stimulate their eoernmnira “as the 
” . U.S. economic eiqiaiisioio moder- 
ales in 1985.'* 


MW 

..t • AFOB-'"' 


JeMsb xninoriues. The broadcasts 
aie believed ^ Western official 
sources to origiDate from a sea- 
boriie “pirate" station oraani^ by 
li^ia. Cdond Qadhau said tbie 
bTMdcasts came from southern 
Ld»non, and be did not discuss 
who organized them. 

. He -compaied Israeli actions in 


INSIDE 


■Pkesriu trade issues are re- 
. rit^ing the political Uneup of 
R^bueans and Democrats in 
the United States. Page 3. 


Under an agreement not respect- uonary Forces of the Arab World, 
ed by Libya, the 16th parallel In comment on last montit's dec- 
serves u the dividing line between ' laraiioo, a State Department 
govermnentand rebd forces. While sp^cesman said April 2 that the 
French troops have withdrawn United States would react against 
from Ch^ U.S. and French sur- teirorist attacks against U.S. mter- 
vdllance riiows a continued Libyan csts. This caused Colonel Qadhafi 
presence, to ^uest a special session of the 

“Libya has no forees in Chad," United Nations Security Council 


and the Soviet Union, it shifted to a - 

more open sympathy for peace .. r j -i r • — 

movemenis around the worid. scene of daily ]iak Rabin, who flew here to watch 

mm %.T rw f jt n ^ attacks on Israeli forces. the q}eration,deni^ that foe witb- 

■ New Zemana^s Reactioa Israel, which at one point occu- draw^ posed an immediate securi- 
New Zealand, whose relatkKis pied a third of Lebanon, now hoi^ ty danger for Israel 
with the Uiuted States are strained about 19 percent, according to Mr. Rabin said that Israel in- 
because of a ban on visits by nude- aro^ fibres, Milit^' sources said tended to guarantee its security by 
or ships. Thursday icaciM cau- the red^loymeot Tnur^ay along establishing a buffer zone along its 
tiousiy to Chinese suggestions that the Litani River placed the front northern frontier manned m^y 
Washington had relaxed its policy line about nine times (15 I^ome- 1^ Israeli-supported Lebanese nu- 
of not saving which warships car- lers) north of the border. In some litia. He said there would be no 
riednudwarms, Reutersr^ned places, the line is within force permanent Israeli Array presence 
from Wellington. miles. in foe proposed security zone. 


country of about 115 square miles range ot guerrillas* rockets, mili- 
(300 square kilometers), makes up taiy sources said. 


was mthdrawing from Lebanon — 


t of Lebanese Israel’s minister, Yitz- 


aiiauks on IsraeU forces. 


presence, 

“Libya has no forces in Chad," 
Coload Qadhafi said “If foreign 
forces ini^eie^ we will have to be 


Questioned about supposed 
(Coatfaiued oo Pi^ 2, 5) 


from Wellington. 


in foe proposed securiQr zone. 


By Crisrine Russell 

UrasbtugioH Post Service 






■ neridem Ream's budget- 
compromise woufo put 650,000 
Americaos bdow me govern 
level, a Study says. i^l 

■ Son Sun, a leader of the 

non-Communist Cambodian 
tesisiance. said be was “mii- 
mistic" he would get U.& 
arms aid, • PageS 

WEEKEND 

■ Em^^ pd^ parks and 

gardens, refiect the ir^tiMis 
and life series of foe difierent 
countries Page 8. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ UtS. Rtitil sale; fdl 1.9 pe> 
edit in March, foe bi^t de- 
cline in seven years, nge II. 


n aeciaraium issura respect to the United States bwws range ot guerrillas’ rockets, mill- trocro entered behind the depart- 

w aftCT the fonnanoD of a and the Soviei Unkm, it shifted to a (300 square kilontetOT), makes up taiy sources said. ing Israelis to ensure order and no 

d^ed group call^ the sympathy for peace ^ ^ Lebanese Israel’s defense minister, Yitz- word that the govenuneni had or- 

IComtnudoffocR^u- movements around foe worid; *y be® scene of daily hak Rabin, who flew here to watch dered troops into foe area. The 

Forces of the Arab World. t i " attacks on Israeli forces. iheqjeration, denied that foe with- army is pinned down in Sidon, 15 

nmeot on last montii's dec- ■ New Zeaianf s Keacaoa Israel, which at one point occu- drawal posed an immediate securi- mite oonhwesi, wlwre Christian 

I, a State Department New Zealand, whose lelatkKis pied a third of Lebanon, now hoi^ ty danger for Israel. and Moriem fitting has rag^ for 

lU said April 2 that the with the Uiuied Slates are strained about 19 percent, according to Mr. Rabin said that Israel in- foe pasr three weeks. 

States would react against because of a ban on visits by nude- aro^ fibres, Milit^' sources said tended to guarantee its security by “We fear that the roaik in Sidon 

attacks against U.S. uter- ax ships. Thursday leacira cau- the red^loymeot Tnur^ay along establishing a buffer zone along its may spread and cnifo ail peace in 

s caused Colonel Qadhafi tiously to Chinese suggestions that the Litani River pla^ ilie front northern frontier manned mmnly Lebanon." said Nabatiyeh s Shiite 

St a spedal s^on of the Washington had relaxed its policy line about nine tmes (15 I^ome- Israeli-s^ported Lebanese nu- Moslem leader, .Abdd'al-Hussein 

'lauoas Security Coundl of not saving which warships car- lers) north of the border. In some litia. He said there would be no al-Sadek. 

ioned about supposed riednudwarms, Reutersr^ned places, the line is wit^ three permanent Israeli Array presence He said that half the 40,000 in- 

mied oo Pi^ 2, 5) from Wellington. miles. in foe proposed securiQr zone. habitants had fled Nabatiyeh in 

• recent weeks because of increasing- 

ly toi^ securi^ measures t& 

7 'V'v Wk T *1 • Isra^ and foeir Lebanese militia 

ows ILDs to Be a Lame of Infertility Nabatiyeh and 30 villages in the 

V V «/ area foe Israelis evacuated ap- 

peared to have been left in a vacu- 

matoiy disease because the device’s “tail,” are using them now. Of foe l.I million child- whilefoecopper-wrappedlUDsnowinwide urn. with no central authority to 
which leads out of the uterus into the vagina less women have used an lUD. foe center use were the safest, with only a modest eleva- j^eep order, 
for removal, may provide a means for bacte- estimates, 275,000 are current users. lion in risL Tlie w}fo'<iraw.il leaves the IsraeU 

ria to move into’ foe rqiroductive organs. The new studies found that womm who An editorial in Thursday’s New Fngiand occupring a Meditena- 

The fiodit^ were not all native. They have not yet given birth are twice as likdy to Journal of Medicine, in wt^h the new stud- neancoasutistrm around Tyre and 
also indicated that the risk of infertiUQr fiom become infertile if they have used lUDs as ies appeared, added that lUDs generally are n^n of east Lebanon's Vai- 
lUDs varies widely from oue type of device women who have never used them. “particulariy useful for women over the a^ lev where it faces Syrian forces 

lo another and that coppcr-wrappied lUDs Dr.JaBeiRDalmg.aUniversityofWash- of 30 years. In this age group, foe risk assod- -Askedabouiihefuiurew4’th- 

may present no increased risk ofinfertilitj- ingtoorescaicherwhoheadedasiudyofSlS at«d w>fo uswg oral contracqjiivcs and foe drawal timetable. Mr. Rabin said it 
for women who have had a chi^ who are women in foe Seattle area, said that women effectivenessoftbelUDarebofoincreased.” would be “not too long until we sec 
over age 25 when they first begin using the ^vbo wished to have children “should use 8ufoor, Dr. Daniel R Mishell Jr., noted another major step a nd not so long 
device or who have had only one sex partner, some other method.” chat lUDs are among foe most effective, before foe redeDlovirwm will 


l/.S. Study Shows lUDs to Be a Cause ofinfertility 


By Crisrine Rnga»1l matoiy disease because the device’s “tail,” are using them oow. Of foe l.I mtllifl 

mu&ir^ibn ;*<»/ Service which leads out of the uterus into the vagina less women have used an lUD. tin 

WASHINGTON The first direct evi- removal, may provide a means for bacte- estimates, 275,000 are current users. 

dence linking intrauterine devices to infertil- "a to move into foe rqiroductive organs. The new studies found that wom 
jty hac iwn ^ 1 ^ The fiodiM were not all native. They have not yet given birth are twice as I 


T^ fiodinffi were not all native. They 


are using them now. Of foe l.I million child- whilefoecopper-wrappedlUOsnowinwide 
less women have used an lUD. foe center use were the safest, with only a mo^celeva- 
estimates, 275,000 are current users. lion in risL 

The new studies found that womm who An editorial in Thursday’s New Fngian^i 
have not yet given birth are twice as l^y to Journal of Medicine, in wt^h the new suid- 


cal yifn tisis to wain t^t young Adless ^ indicated that the risk of infertiliQr fiom become infertile if they have used lUDs as ies appeared, added that lUDs generally are 
women generally should avom using lUDs if lUDs varies widely from oue type of device women who have never used them. “particulariy usdul for women ovtf foe a^ 


they wish to haw chDdren to foe future. ^ mother and that coppcr;wrapi)ed lu w 
Two major federally sponsored studies of may present no mrea^ nsk of mf^tj- 
American wm&en, released Wednesday, sug- tor women who have bad a child, who are 
g 4 sud that at least 88,000 ma>' be unable to over age 25 when they first begin using the 
^ children because of reproductive dam- device or vfoo have had only one sex partner. 

following foe use of an lUD, a. small ~ While there is agreement that one lUD — 
pJastic or onper-wr^ped plastic device im- foe discontinued Daikon Shidd —should be 
planted in me uterus 10 i»event pregnancy, removed from wnnen who have them, the 
Cbildkss-users of foe lUDs are pvice as. scientists said Wednesdajr that women 
likely to b^me infertile as wmnra who do should consult their physidaos about the 


for women who have bad a 


Dr.JanetRDaImg,aUiiiversityofWash- ofMyeM, 


“particulariy useful for women over the a^ 
of 30 years. In this age group, foe risk assod- 


srane other method. 


foediscontinned^SaRonShidd— shouldbe Women's Hospiid in Boston, headed a nanqrrat«of 1 io5fwoentmfoerirsiyear 
removed from wmnen who have them, the national study involving 4,185 women, said of use and deduiing thereafter. 

^dentists said Wednesday that women lUDuseshouldnotbeabirth-controlmefo- While the Boston study found that women 


[ that one lUD — 
hidd— should be 


Dr. Daniel W. Cramer of Brigham and reversible forms of coniracqiiion, with preg- rompteed. 


before foe redeployment will be 


Israeli generals have said the 
army hopes to be home b>’ June. 
Originally the withdrawal was 


should consult thdr physidaos about the od cf “first choice” for women who have not who used coppo* lUDs after the birth of schuuied to be completed bv 


not use jbe Itirth ctnird derices, foe re- advisability of removing other types of had children. 


searchers said. 


lUOs.. 


While the Boston study found that women Originally the withdrawal was 
10 used coppo' lUDs after the birth of schuuled to be completed by 
dr first child did not suffer subsequoit end of the summer out mounting 


The studies found foal fertili^ proUems The J(UD is foe fourth most common t^ 

linked with lUDs involve “tubd mfertility," conirkeption in foe Uiuied States, behmd 


in which tbe fallofrian tubes ore dama^d,- .volitn 
preventihg (he egg from traveling from foe . and o 
ovary 16 foe litous. - .The 


id children. thdr first child did not suffer subsequoit end of foe summer but fflouniin< 

But tbe researchers, and officials with the infertility, it also found that use of other attacks on foe amw by Shiite guer' 
National Institute of Child Health and Ha- types^IUDs^womeninthisgroupnearly rillas have speeded process, 
ao Development, which funded the new tripled thdr risk. Unlike foe first phase of the puli- 


mao Development, which funded the new tripled thdr risk. 


; Reseaichos have long believed foal lUD .estitxutes that of the 8.6 millimi American 
use increases llte.indde^ of pelvic inflam- womtt who have used.ao lUD, 22 million 


ilitntaiy sterilization, birth-control pills studies, also said foe increased ride of infer- Both studies also found that women with back, Israel made no attempt to 
id condoms. tility varied widdy,dq»nding on the type of tubal infertility were more likely to have had coordinate its latest withdrawal. 

The-Naliood Center for Health Statistics lUDused. numerous sexual partners and to smoke, but with foe Lebanese Anny or any ctf 


Plastic lUDs, partici^y the discontin- foesefactois were etcluded in calculating foe Lebanon's factions, Nil. Rabin 
ued Daikon Shield, carried tbe hi^iest risk, lUD risk said. 





Decentralization Changes French Politics 


By Richaid Bernstein 

filev YoHl Times Semce 

CHAMBERY, France — When the French 
Socialist Party came to power in 1981. oneof its 
maj or gools was to transrocm politics in this 
country by gjtnng local areas nxire control over 
their own affairs. 

The word of the day was “decentralization,'’ 
an idea, not exactly a new one. now embodied in 
S3S pages of l^islation intended to take power 
away from the national bureaucracy, with its 
histtxic center of Paris, and give it to the towns 
and Ae departments of provincial France. 

Many aspects of the Sodalists’ program, par- 
ticularly its economic aspects, have been side- 
tracked in the four yew since the Socialist 
victory. But “decentralization.'' according both 
to natioaal and local ofHdals, has slowly taken 
root, changing habits and modifying the way 
this counny functions. 

As the months have gone by, the local offi- 


tion said. “Before, be wore his sash and presided 


at weddii^ Now. decentralization pe^ts an 
electedom^ 


ndal to reaQy be an elected offldaL to 
do more t^ i^e speeches." 

In technical terms, a basic law of 1982 passed 
by the Sodalist majority in the National Assem- 


“The prefea tydn't want to let the rooms go," 
die cou^ presidoit, Michel Bamier, said, re- 
counting an qnsode con^iarable with others 
throughout ■ the country. “But I fought for 
them." 


Uy took power amv from prefects, representa- 
tives of (TO state who ' ' 


have been ai^iointed by 


Local officiab have begun, in 
the view of some people, to 
form a new political class. 


rials have become aware of thw authoriw, and 

ve fc 


thQ* have tried to gain more. Th^ have fought 
for buil^gs. cars and money with the pnfets, 
or prefects, the beads of dqjartments in Fiance, 
some of whom resented th^ loss. 

Local officials have b^un. in the view of 
some here, to form a new political class, one 
which, for the first time in recent Frendi histo- 
ry, will contemplate the prospect of political 
careeis not only in Paris but in local towns and 
counties. 

“Take a mayor of a small town,*' an official at 
ibe Ministry of the Interior and Deceatraliza- 


the narinnai government rince the days of Louis 
XTV. The auth^ty to run sdiools, roads, 
raise money and devise social ^ programs, 
among other thing s, was turned over to dected 
offiri^ whose previous power, officials say, 
was modly syml^c. 

In ChamMiy, tbe ca pit al of the Alpine de- 
partment of Savoie, near the border with Italy, 
people tattf of decentralization in near folklonc 
terms as ushering in a new era. 

Perh^s its most visible manifestation was the 
partitioning of the isqxmng medieval castle 
that has long been the seat of the local govern- 
men t. An ^air oi towers and cranellalions. it 
was until recently in the hands of dm prefect^ 
now, the fashionwly remodeled portion of the 
castle b^ngs to tte d^artmental assembly, 
known as the General CoundL 


“Before." said Mr. Bamier. a right-of-eenter 
political figure who at age 31 has alre^y gained 
a reputation nationally, “all the projects were 
drafted the prdecL AD the decisions were 
taken by him. AQ of dtt work was done by the 
prefect Now, aU rf the nwk is done by me." 

The overaU program has been criticized in the 
French national press for several shortcomiiigs. 
It has spawned a new bureaucrat in local areas, 
whfle the national bureaucracy has not been 
reduced. Some critics have chaiged that its most 
visible efiect in the three years since the basic 
illation was passed has been the efforts by 
assemblies to take over the properiy of the 
prefect 

But many say they believe the inmortant 
long-term ofect of decentralization i^bc the 
elevation of local office hold^ into som^img 
more than a largely ceremonial function. 

Mr. Bamier has his preferred prefects. One is 
to convert a nearby air force base sdieduled to 
be closed by the French military into an hidus- 
irial park udie^ he hopes, the regjon will be 
able to attract investments in high tedudt^. 

Another, promoted by dos^ brochures and a 
good deal of internatio^tra^ by Mr. Bamier 
and his team, is to have the 1992 v^ter Olym- 
pic Games awarded to Savde. 



'Ih* AMdateri n«i 

U.S. DELEGATION IN LENINGRAD — The speak- 
er of the Hoi^ of Representatives, Tbrnnas P. O^efll 
Jr,, rig^t, and Rqpresoitative Robert H. Midid, a 
Repiddican of Illinois, Naring a wreadroD a war memo- 
rial at die Pidcavyor Memorial Cemeteiy <hi Thursday. 


WORLD BRIEFS 




Contadora Bloc Resumes Peace Talks : ' 

PANAMA CITY fAP) — After a two-month hia^ the Contadora . 

GulSi and^nduras and the four nations wo^ to^ ^ ^ ' 

Sntadora group — Mexico, Venezuela, PaMma and CbMaa -“b^. ; : 

two days of talte that were to center on venficauon of tr^ provwons. . , 
nat^ue siaDed the Contadora tails 1^ fall Anotteattempi at , ^ 

offiotiations broke down in a diplomatic ^puie in nud-FOTu^. 

Panama's dqiuty foreign minister, Josfe Mama Cabrer^ said tben^oh- v. 

aiors would consider “some very interesting sugge^ons fttm the Canah- , 

an govemmenL” He would not dabwate. But diplomatic souroes not 
dii^y involved in the talks said that the Canadians had; offered an ; 
inspection force to oversee treaty oo mplian ce. 


U.S. T.inka Aid to Philippme Reforms 


MANILA (UP!) — U.S. officials said Thursday th at Am erican aid to 
the Philippines would depend Imgely on how the goveniment of Presi- ; : 
dent FerdmandE Marcos respond to demands for danoaaticiaorms. ■ 
In private meetings with Americans this wedc, both Mr. Maioos and 
his wue. Tmaidfl. gave assurances that they were undertakmgpcriitical andj'. . 
economic reforms. Mr. Marcos has been in power for 20_yeai5. 


“We’re going to watch very carefiilly to see if thore things he did SOT ; 

would be addressed are in fact bring addressed," said Senator John^ r. * . 


Kerry, Democrat of Massachusetts, a member of the Senate Forrign 
Relations Committee. “If we don't see the kind of response that we think 


we ought to," he Mtid, “1 think you’re going to see a^Con^^ of tte 


Unit^ States that is going to become more restive and.less wfllmg to >‘1'. '^ 
patieui." 


pt 


Ramiz Alia: A Guardian 
Of Albania’s Ideology 


By David Binder 

jVm' York Times Serrice 

WASHINGTON — Ramiz Alia, 
who is expec^ to assume the for- 
miri leadership of Albania's ruling 
Conununist Party, has for nearly 
two years been doiog the job of his 
predecessor as weD as his own as 
president of the Presidhnii of the 
File’s Assembly. 

Enver Hoxba. who died Ihurs- 
day after beading the party from 
November 1941. had become so iU 
since the summer of 1983 that he 
was unable to do more than q^ear 
at officiri functions, and then only 
infrequently. 

Mr. Alia, nearly 16 years his ju* 


sinmg presence in Albania, build- 
ina airfiel 


nior, began a series of visits to pro- 
* 1984, 


vincial cainials in Aii^t of 1 
making speeches along the way. In 
this sense the succesrion was or- 
dained Genera] Hoxha. 

In commemorating Mr. Hoxha's 
7Stb birthday in October 1983, Mr. 
Alia dedari^ in a qieech: “Our 
pa^ has had the great ludt to have 
at its h^d such a leader as Com- 
rade ^ver Hoxha, loyal disciple 
and foUower of the de^ of Marx. 
£ag;eK Lenin and Stalin, a leader 
who is characterized by the poeti- 
cal wisdom, the ability to be orien- 
tated in every situation, the fa^ 
si^iedness and courage to adopt 
correct decisioDs and at the prop^ 
tune." 

Prior to bis devation to the inner 
rircle of the Tirana leadership, Mr. 
.Mia, 59, had held a ke^ pwition in 
the party’s central committee, as- 
signs to oversee ideological ques- 
tions from 1958. It was a cntical 
time, becaose Albania had b^un 
to extricate itself from 10 years of 
dependence on the Soviet Uoiou 
and to seek closer ties with China. 

The Rusaans had established a 


Controllers’ Complaints 
Are Rejected by Spain 


Reutea 


Madrid — The Spanish avia- 
tion authorities have rgected com- 
plaints by air traffic controDers 
that faulty equipment and work 
conditions were endangering safe- 
ty- 

A statement released Wednesday 
by the Civil Aviation Droartment 
said (hat air iralTic ermoitioos in 
Spain were as reliable as in other 
European countries. 


ing aiifields and a submarine base 
at the heavify- fortified island of 
Rayan jn addition to such nnnmili - 

taiy prcgects as the palace of cul- 
mrem'nrana. 

Mr. Alia’s task then was to hrip 
prepare party meicAien for 
swing away from allegiance to 
Moscow and toward support (rf 
China's policies, including Mao Ze- 
dong’s ‘Cultural Revolution." 

Ramiz Alia was brm Oct IS, 
1 925. in the northern Albanian dty 
of Scutari. According to uncon- 
fiimed reports, his Moslem parents 
had migrated from Koso^ the 
predommantly Albanian region 
that was accorded to the Kingdom 
of Serbia in the settlements that 
ended Torldsh rule in the western 
Balkan territories in 1911 

As a northern Albanian of Mos- 
lem origio, Mr. Alia is considered a 
Gh^ toe designation aS the dialect 
used by toe dans of toe norto. By 
contrast Enver Hoxha was a Tosk 
from southern Albania where the 
majwify of the people are of Ro- 
man Catholic or Onhodox nri gn. 
With toe exception of Mr. 
nearly aD of toe Hoxha leadership 
also are of Toric origins. 

Mr. Alia attended a French 
school in Tirana during the late 
1930s and was poUticaDy active as a 
student He joined toe Communist- 
led National Liberation Army at 
19. traveling to toe biO town of 
Ylush to vduntecr for the newly 
formed 7to Shock Brigade in »riy 
1944, and fighting in what were 
essentiaUy guerrilla actions against 
toe retreating Gennan Army. 

After toe war, Mr. Alia was ap- 
pointed seciet^-general of toe 
Union of Woildng Youth of Alba- 
nia organization in 19^ and served 
in that post feu* nine years, exc^t 
for a brief stint in toe party’s a^ta- 
tion-propaganda apparatus in 
1948. He was named minister of 
education in 1955 and left that post 
three years later to become a fiiU- 
timejaar^ offidal. 

When toe Communist Party 
changed its name to the AfT wnian 
Labor Party in 1 948, the year of toe 
Soviet Bloc's break with Yugosla- 
via, Mr. Alia was elected to the 
ruling Central Committee. While 
stiU in his early thirties, he was 
made a candidate member of toe 
governing PoDtburo and a fuO 
member of that body in 1961. 



Hussein, Arafat Discuss Peace Effort 


India to Investigate Anti-Sikh Rioting ' 


:iL.: 




Ramiz Alia 


CompUedbyOyrSuffFromDI^aidm 

AMMAN, Jordan — Ki^ Hus- 
sein of Jordan and Yasser Arafat 
have hdd talks here on their joint 
Kfiddle East pe^ effort, an aide to 
toe Palestine Liberation Oiganiza- 
tion leader sai(L 

Hie meeting Wednesday night 
was the first between Hussein and 
Mr. Arafat rince th^ rigned an 
accord Fri). 11 comnattingthemto 
work together for a MitoUe East 
peace settlement with Israri. 

The Arafat aide, ^>ea]^ on toe 
oontotion henot be ideutifi^ said 
toe two leaders “thread to continue 
discussing" the peace Initiative. 

He said to^ also discussed toe 
attacks 1^ Israel on Palestinian ref- 
ugee camps in southern Lriianon, 
and Jevdan’s proposal for a United 
Nations discussiai of toe attacks. 

Mr. Arafat conferred for three 


hours Thursday with Prime Minis- 
ler Zaid Rifu of JordaiL 

The two agreed on “several joint 
steps to be taken at the Arab and 
international levels" to strengthen 
the joint initiative betwra Jordan 
and el-Fatah. toe mainstream 
factirai that is led 1^ Mr. Arafat,, 
stato-run Radio Jordan said. No 
details of the steps were pveiL 

The Feb. 1 1 agreement has 
prompted a mixed reffloose from 
the parties involved. Israri, S> 
and toe United Slati^ aD of wt 
toe agreemat envisions ^ partici- 
pant^ have criticized toe accord to 
vaiying d^rett. 

The Hussein-Arafat plan has 
been hobbled by the U.S. rriusal to 
meet with reo^nized PLO mem- 
bers and the PLO's insistence that 
its leaders be included in any dele- 


iriiich were, not 'disriosed, came 
amid prqiarations for a visit to 
Cairo next wedc by Ezer Wdzman, 
an Israeli minister without portfo- 


lia The trip, is offidalfy termed 
aid Mr. 


gation leading to peace talks, 
'iieoi' 


In a rdaied devek^menL Rich- 


Enver Hoxha Dies, Led 
Albania for 40 Years 


ard W. Murphy, usistant secretary 
and South 


private but sources said Mr. Weiz- 
man would meet with Mr. Mu- 
barak and other officials. 

■ Palestinian Ririe Backed 

Mr. Shultz was quoted as saying 
in an inier\icw pubiitoedThur^^ 
that Palestinians shniilri be in- 
volved “in every stage" ^ negotia- 
tions for pe^ m toe Middle East,' 
The Assodaied Press rqiorted 
from Jerusalem. 

The newspaper Davar said that 
Mr. Shultz also reaffirmed toe U.S. 
commitment to toe 1982 plan put 
feeth ly Preadent Ronald Rea^ 
that caUed for Palestinian self-g^- 
ernment in toe Israrii-occupied 
West Bank and Gaza Strip in asso- 
daiitm with Jordan. 


NEW DELHI (AP) —The Indian goyeramenti m a m^or move to 
hffld off a new confrontation with Sikh rnilitanls in toe state ^Punfal^ 
Thursday toat an independeatjudidalcommission wQuldinvesrigate 
the anti-Skh rioting that foUowed the assassination erf Prime Mmster V. 
Indira Gandhi in October. 

In a statement in PariiamenL the administration also lifted die bsn one' . 
militant S«kh student oiganization accused of instigatizig a virient cam- 
paign for a sqiaiaie SikS state. : : 

Thft flnnfwinoeingnt egmennN two daysbefrae the start of a threatened 
new amtatiem by the AkaD Dal, the Skhs* mrin political party. Officials ;j ' 
fear the Station c^d ^wn a new wave of demoKtratiaos and - ' ' 
virience in Punjab, the only state iriiere Skhs constitute a mrgorify. 


Pakistani President Appoints Cabin^ 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — fteadent Mohammed Zta uI-H^ • 
has named and sworn in Pakistan’s first dviliancalxnetmoe martial law : 
b^an ei^t years ago. 

Mohanuned Khan Jongo, a Britishrtrained agronomist, Uxrfc officers 
prune minister March 23. The appodatments Wednesday of 13 cabinet 
ministers and seven miiiistecs of state were another stqs in General 2a*8 .r.;. 
I>rogram to move toward dvilian rule He has said martial law wQl he -j-.* 
liftM when toe civilian government ^>pe^ stable. ' ^ ■ 

The president left afterward on a irilgrimage to Sauto Arabia, a’’: ^ . 
governmentspokesmansai(LTbespokesmanggveo.ouidicationMietoer : 
General Zia wUl meet with Saudi autooritia. . 


& 


□ 




CARAVEL 

Hora 


If you come to Athens (Greece) 
and you like a Hotel 

1 00% fireproof and 1 CX)% earthquake proof 

all 420 rooms and 72 suites with facilities, such as 

Mini Bar, color T.V., 

free indoor-outdoor swimming pool, 

free dry cleaning of your ties, 

the best food in Athens, 

24-hour Room Service and 
also o beautiful Mosque on the 
roof garden, then come to 


CARAVEL HOTEL 


the only Hotel in Athens 
with these privileges 
for its clients. 


If you like enjoying your life 

there is also CARAVEL No. 2 

on the island of ZANTE in the Ionian Sea, 

for the most exciting vocation. 

Reservations: Tel.: 0695/25261-2-3 


Head Office; CARAVEL HOra - Athens - Greece 
P.O. Box: 18106 Oft 
Tel.;^lT^ 7290721 (601mes) 


214401 CHGR 


(Gmtifiaed fnm 1) 
taini^ his grip on the hdm, foUiug 
plots, presiding over bloody purges 
and mass imprisonments of oppo- 
nents or those not quick enou^ to 
heed official course changes. 

Mr. Hoxha repressed reli^OT, 
true to his dictum that Albania had 
been made into “toe world's first 
atheist siat^ whose only religion is 
Albanianism." Mosques and 
churches were closed, and even a 
simple prayer became a transgreS' 
skm. 

Ethnic minorities among toe 2.8 
million people of Albania were ha- 
ra^ed to toe extent, for instance, 
that thousands were forced to 
change Greek-sounding names, 
were forbidden to possess Gredt 
books or sing Greek songs. 

^ver Hoxha was bom on Ocl 
16, 1908, in Cjirokaster, an old 
m^et center in southern Albania. 
His father was a Moslem cloth mer- 
chant. He was educated at the 
French secondary school in Korce 
and, at 22, he left his homdand to 
study natural science in France at 
Montpellier University. 

In France, he met the chief editor 
of the Communist newspaper 
L’Huxnamte, for which he wrote a 
series of articles. In 1934, he was 
appointed secretary to toe Albani- 
an consulate in Brussels, where he 
took a law course and continued 
writing for the Frendi paper. 

Because his articles were critical 
of the Albanian government, then a 
monarchy, his consular appoint- 
ment was caneded after two years, 
but he managed to return home to 
teach FrencE. His continuing at- 
ta^ on the government resulted in 
a biief jaD term in 1939. 

When Mussolini's Italy con- 


Albanian Labor, or Communist, 
P^in 1941. 

TV fonner teacher built up a 
guerriUa force of 70,000 men Uiat 


of state for Near Eastern and Sout 
Asian affairs, left Washington on 
Thursday for a MidcUe East visit 
that is to indude Amman, and U.S. 
officials indicried that if there was 
progress in his talks there. Secre- 
ta^ of State George P. Shultz 
might visit toe area in May. (AP. 
UPH 

■ (sadi-I^yptian 0>ntads 
Prime Mimster Shimon Peres of 
Israel received a message from 


En^isli-l Afigiiagft Darily 

To Publish in Rome 


Spanish Court Rejects Abortion BiU = 

ain's Co^tutipnal Conrt rgected a l^i^th'e “ 

: have legalized abortion um£er Bmi^ dreum- " 


The Associated Pros 

ROME — The International 
Courier, an English- 
newspaper funded 
American investors. Is toheduled to 


MADRID (AP) — S^'; 
bill Thursday that woula ha' 
stances 

116 bfll was drafted 18 months ago in the Cortes with toe Socialiri ', 1 ' 


battled the Italians, who seoteaced President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt 
him to death in absentia, and later on Thursday as part of ongoing 
toe Germans. contacts aimed u ji^provi^ rela- 

A provisional goveounent was-tions between toe countries, ac- 
proclaimed in October 1944, with' cording to sources quoted by Unit- 
Mr. Hoxha, now bolc^' toe rank ed Press International in 
of fuU general as prime minister Jerusalem. 


bc^ publication here Friday. 

-wiubave 


malformed or the pregnancy resulted from r^. 

The court dedared toe biD unconstitutionaL saying it ran counter to '* ■' 
toe I97ScoastiniiioaguaranteeingSpantriidtizenstoerightto1ifeaDd-to 
moral uate^ty. Abortion is iQq^ in Spam and carri« paialti» tott , - - 
indude fines and imprisonment for abortionists and women who tmdei]^ • 

abortions. . 


and conunander-in-duef. The gov- 
ernment was recognized by the 
Western Allies later in 1945 with 
the understanding that free elec- 
tions would be held. 

When the baUotiiig took place a 
few weeks later, tom was only a 
single list of candidates. qiODSored 
by toe Coomnmists. Albania ab(rf- 
ished toe short-lived mcmarchy of 
King Zog and proclaimed Alb^a 
a Peoples RaubUc. 

The Yugoslavs had a monetary 
and customs union with the new 
Albania. But Mr. Hoxha, fearful of 


The message, the contents of 


The 24-^page new^>^}er 
an initial press run of l2jQQQ and 
eventually wiD print editions m Mi- 
lan. Florence and Venice, said Ro- 
berto Scio,- an ItaUan businessraaa 
and toe paper’s publisher. The 
city's most recent Ehglisb-language tw n • t t • 

newspaper, toe Rome Daily Ai^- LllTOpean UeRlt F Rtient IS ImprOYlIIR 

cari,wentoutof business in 1983. CTYV-Airn w = -r-iv > ■ - • 

STOCKHOLM — Eun^s first artifiaal heart patient is ccntmuing ra... 


Belgrade's siqiremacy, cut aU ties 
with it at the time of toe 


quered Albania later that year, Mr. 
noxbai 


went underground to be- 
come the founder and leader of the 


Stalin-TIto 

break in 1948. 

Mr. Hoxha turned over toe pre- 
miership in 1954 but remained toe 
country’s overlord in his (^adty 
as party chief. He prevailed is pow- 
er strokes such as one in 196i that 
trigger^ a purge and numerous 
executions, ara an attempt^ mili- 
taiy coup in 1974. involvi^ his 
own defense minister. The minis ter 
and several army officers were exe- 
cuted. 

In facL nearly half of the original 
3 1 members of the park's Central 
Committee of 1948 were put to 
death in the decade that foflowed. 
In more recent years, economic dif- 
ficulties led to renewed political 
strife and hundreds of officials 
were repc^edly thrown into prison 
for resisting such policy moves as 
the break with toe Chiiwse. 


UnwnCarbide, GtingbidumSancey 
Saysit WonhReopmBhopalPlant 


CompM fy Oh- Siaft Fnm Dapatihes 

NEW DELHI — The Union 
Carbide Corp. said Thursday it 
was closing its chemical plan t in 
BhopaL Inma, because toe gov- 
enunent had refused to let it 
reopen the factory, toe sice of a 
gas leak in December that kiUed 
more than 2,000 people. 

A company statement, issued 
in Bombay, smd gcwemmenl 
officials had made it “abun- 
dantiy dear that pennission to 
restart toe factory wiU not be 
pven." 


A Union Carbide official 
said in Bombay that although 
toe plant was not functirming. 


toe company had continued to 
pay full wages to its 632 em- 
ployees. 

Another company offidal 
said toe factory's hcense ex- 
pired Dec. 31 and had not been 
renewed. The workers at tte 
Bfat^al plant have been g'ven 
notice, he said. 

The govenunent of Madhya 
Pradesh state, which had said 
previously that toe plant would 
not be allowed to reopen, sdd 
Thursday the factory would be 
closed officially on July 1 1. 

The factory h^ beim under 
govenunent control since toe 


leak of toe gas. methyl isocya- 
(AP,r 


nate. 


Reuters) 


se 


to do well arid has begun eatirig normal boq>italfoo^ a :^pdce^iiian at 
Kaririinslra Hoqntal ui Stockb^ said Thursday. c.^ y 

A hospital spokeswoman said toe patient, identified by his lawyer as a'sc srcuL.se 
T .jr 52, hod a quiet night and was feeling weJL On Wednes^y. :.vc 

his first solid m^ of meat and potatoes ance receiving & >. 
siened elastic and metal heart nn SiiTMtav ■"SC'i 



ad engine 

Roy. lUinois. who suffered a near-fatal heart attack, is to reedve an 
artificial hean Sunday at Humana Hospital Audubon, in Louisville, 
Kentucky, a spokeswoman announced Thursday. (Reuters, AP) 




car a- 


'rte 


For the Record 


Presideiit-eiect Tancre^ Neves of Brazil, 75. weakened by six oper^ 
... 


Qadhafi Calls Sudan ’Ours,’ 
Warns U.S. Not to Interfere 


Shuttle Is Geared for Launch 
After Repair of Drug Device 


(Continued from P!^ 1) 

threats of terrorism in the United 
States. Cdonel Qadhafi at first re- 
fused to repraled ques- 


General Swareddahab said 
Wednesday, The Associated Press 


tionsjn 25 days and vztdent reactions to drugs, showed “clear improve- 
ment" Thursd^ with hean and breatoing dose to nonnaL a pieadeotial 
spokesman said. 

(Sovernor W^mn J, Jaridow <rf SonA Dakota wll have, an^thfr rhanc e 
to press his c la i m that he was defamed ^ a Newswedt magayim* article 
reporting a vendeaa against toe Indian activist Domis Ttanl-c a federal 
appeals court Wednesday reversed a lon^r court's granting of a summaiy 
judgment m favor of the magarin# (VPt) 

F^men were aoaised in a federal indictment in Brooklyn. New Vo*. 
OQ Wednesday of conspiring to ship guns or other military eompmeDt 
lUegaUy to the Soviet Um’on, Poland. Iraq and Argentina. fl^YT) 
Poland's Stqmne Court wiH consider next week toe impeals of four 
^niy police officers (^vicied in toe killing of Father Jeizy Popie- 
lusko, a Roman Catbobc priest murdered in October a eovenimeni 
spokesman said. (jipj 

that its jet raided four Iranian bolder cities 


weancstoy. ihe /^ated Press i™ comcnaw wcdn^ay that Iraq used cfaemicar wewoiis in an*? 
reptirled. that his government *''f™ghi attack in toe Huzweizah marshes in the southernrectw- of toe*^^ 
would focus on solvins eccmomic battle front 


Vnued Press intemaionat 

CAPE C.ANAVERAL Rorida 
— Tedmidans repaired a leak in a 
drug-relmiog machine aboard toe 
shuttle Discovery on Tbiusday, 
deariog the way for a sdieduira 
'launching on Friday morn ing . 

The leak, discovered earlier 
Thursday, threatened to prevent 
Charles D. Walker, an. en^eer, 
from partidpaiing in toe fli^t 

Mr. Walto. who is to operate 
the machine. wiD join Senator Jake 
Garn, a Utah Republican, and five 
astrcHiauts for the sdieduled 8:04 
AAL start of toe shuttle mission. 
Mr. Garn is going aloft as a con- 
gressional obrerver. 

The astronauts on the crew of 
Friday’s flight — Karol Bobko, the 
commander, Donald WDIiams, the 
co-pilot; and Dr. Margaret Rhea 
SeddoQ. David Griggs and Jeffrey 


Hoffman — originally were to have 
flown last suiiuner on the shuttle 
Challenger. That mission was can- 
celed b^use of engine failure. 

The current mission is part of an 
ambitious effort to get toe shuttle 
program back on track. The fourth 
and last planned shuttle. Atlantis, 
is scheduied to arrive here Friday. 
And the shuttle Challenger moves 
to toe launching pad Monday for a 
mission to b^ April 29. 

The primaiy job of Friday's 
flight is to carry two communica- 
tions satellites uito ortnl, me for 
Telesai Canada and one iea^ to 
toe U.S. Navy by Hughes AircrafL 

The medi^ refinery aboard 
Discovery is a refrigmtor-rir^ 
machine that NASA is using to 
demonstrate the feasibility of pro- 
dud^ unusual commercial pr^- 
uctsin qrace. 


' tions, he offered ambiguous an- 
swers 
command 
Arab worid but would retaliate 
dsewhere if attacked. 

■ Ags'eanait on Civilian Rule 
Political and union leaders said 
Thursday night that Sudan’s new 
militaiy rulers had agreed to the 
formation of a civiliu caretaker 
government, Reuters reported 
from Khartoum, Sudan. 

The statement was issued by a 
group of prafessioaal unions and 
political parties that have been ne- 
gotiating with the militaty leaders 
who overthrew President Gaafar 
Nimeiri on Saturday. 

The agreement specified that the 
12 months following the naming of 
a caretaker government would be a 
period of transitional miDtozy rule, 
toe statement said. 


solving ecMomic 
problems, preserving national uni- 


ifs uiicrcu umoigiuws an- j ^ rir ji in -ill iT A’ -^^usiad wh sa id toat poPcc in Dhaka arrested 

sueeesiine that^irnew eventually banding power ^ leaders of toe Awami League oppoation naitv Tcrfad Ahowd and 

SiSild®ai only in X' overioadviliangovemnSir Sudhangsu Sekhar Halder.^^ T^' 



IJ.S. Seeks to Temper Summit Hopes 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGRS 

eawHkCi 

iisuimitr 

IStrsORi 


fbrUta. 

«uniav 

BACXtOAS MASTStrSORpOCTOfUre 
Sand MiBilae letuinA - 
feratipeevatesiwn 
mcme WESTERN UMVERSmr 
wao Bd CUSUM US/^ 


retSONAUTIES PLUS 

MARYBLUME 

M THE SECTION 

- OF nODAYS HT 


(CdntiBued from Page 1) 
tactics could jeopardize any meet- 
ing between toe leaders. 

Mr. McFariane mentioned two 
events at vdndi toe leaders could 
meet: the opening of tire UN Gen- 
eral Assembly in S^tember and 
the celebration in Octobv of toe 
40to anniversary of toe UN's 
founding. The Rusaans have not 
indicated whether Mr. Gorbadxv 
will attend either. 

It was the first time recently that 
the administration had tried to dis- 
tinguish between a relatively infor- 
mal meeting between toe leaders 
and a fully prepared summit. 

. Mr. McFariane said, “It is 
worthwhile for the two leadcis to 
meet for toe purpose of getting to 
know eadi oilier, to hear toe otoer 
person's priorities, and, as long as 
no one deludes then^ves that 
such meetings have altered funda- 
mental differences or the depth of . 
disagreement, no harm is dotie." 

He said the meeting between tire 
leaders could parallel^ Reagan's 
meeting last year with' tbe'Soviei 
formgn imnisteE. And^: A.' Gro- 
myko, at toe WUte Hou^ vtoidi' 
followed speeches by bothmiev at 
the United Nations. 


*TTie pre^dem believes toat the and Mr. Gmbaefaev could meet 
climate of the relationship is such without such preparations. Tbey 
utojusufy a meeting now and for said there bad bm talk recently of 
toe foreseeable future, absent anv the possiM^ of both a meeting of 


atu- 


dramatic changes in Soviet 
tudes." Mr. McFariane said. 

“There need not be a specific 
agenda f<K such a meeting which is 
oriented in the short term toward 
the new leaders . . .getting to know 
each other, surveymg toe current 
faixuly of disagreements and assess- 
ing each ocher’s commitment to the 
resolution erf problems." he said. 

Mr. McFariane said such a meet- 
ing was implicit in Mr. Reagan's 
inviialion to Mr. Gorbachev, 
was delivered to Moscow by ^ce 
Presideot George Bush when he 
attended toe funeral of Mr, G(^- 
cbev's predecessor. Konsiaatin U 
Chetnmiko. . 

White House officials acknowl- 
edged there had bra confusion 


toe two leaders to get ... 
this and a more motional 
aumnut meeting latex. 

Reagan has not always been 
willing to have mggringg just to a 
acquaint himself with another lead- 
er. ‘To Imve a nieetu]g.ju5t to have 
a meeting, doesn't make any 
sense, he said Jan. 9 at a pre^ 
conference. 




about Mr. 
session with 
caused in 
senior officials that 
tioD was fflsistizig 
itions. 


proarai 
• 'They 
full-scale 


$ plans for a 
Gorbachev, 
lions from 
admiiustra- 
oii extensive 


■ PoBcy Review 

Rfrt^ Gwertmum of The Ven 
York Times reported from Washing 
ton: 

The Reagan has 

deckled to bold a sweating liolKy 
review of |t$ relations tvito the Sovi- 
ei Umon in prqi^tioa for a high- 
lovel Soviet-Ameiican nruv^ing next 
month, administratioa oCfid^ 
Wednesday. 


The cffidals said that Sectetar;#- 
iiada*ed^ 


^ George P. Shultz had 

Ambassador Arthur A. Harman w 

e suimmt ^ ^ mted adxnmisinuion will d^de on aW 
lo make it clev thm _Mr. Reagan frcw prc^osalg -- 









IIVTEJ^ATIONAL HERUJD TIUBUIW, FIUDAY, APim. 


‘■‘I J W f ^ ' l irs-t -■ ir -w-r ^ 




Page 3 





‘ lofexior to Earlier One 


“ !psi fafr 

SlS^s 

t ihei 

f^Ppineiy, 


how Ui' 

® *n power 


Ptlr 

.^^*^dofrLSlCfc 


'SOmg to see . r 
“« relive a«J,^- 


- .l^ BtUKcUer 

*.. i Afnr IM Tma teirfav . 
y ' ' WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
-‘'adonnUiEtton’s senior ams ooih 
'ml has disiinasod a Soviet 
^(Doratodiini oa'dqdoyiajg medhnp- 
'iso^iiwdettr nussSes is Eora 
ssju^it was Lziferior loan o^er 
"Rossumsttude to him XQ 1983. 

*nte adviser. Paul H Nltae. Said 
iWedflesday the adiuoatniioDwaa 
s 'ridt 10 rdnilf ite newest aisale 
** wtf because it spediied faly ads* 
'sSes in. Birape, wtdwut freezieg 
misMlta simerf U' Japan Of fTwiw 

from 

; • *Tliis Is scmettiing we ooekl not 
poiAly Uve with.** w. Nha said. 
■To react to Ae inhiaiive of the 
•Sovki leader. Mikhail S. Gorl»- 
diev, halting U.S. missik d^ 
"irfc y gaPBi be md. would be “an 
'-•iasittineway to oqckiate.'* 

Mr. Niize, who was the U.S. ne- 
' gpdabrin talks on nediuis-range 
nussileB from 19S1 until 1983, 
spoke at 3 meeting in Wadiingion 



govmmeni. ^ , 

^alconiinission^^J«P^ 


W wave of fi&Otc 

«SithscomS5j^; 


Ex-Defense Chief 
Assails U.S. P lans 
For Space Defense 

7^ AssoaauJ fina 

QUEENSTOWN. Maryland — 

^ of iiu^Hn . ^an«R.Schlesinger,a fonnerU5. 

incase secreian, in an attack on 
President Ronald Rea^’.s stniC' 
gy in negotiations with Ae Sovki 
JUnion. says the Sint^ Defense 
Initiative could divide the NATO 
.allies and doom anns contio! tatfcg 
inCeoeva. . 

A-»v«v • .rs **He*s fallen in love wiA his own 

appoints CakL system.*' Mr. Schiesinger said of 
resident ’‘be president's support for raace- 

tcivilki«w®™?®^2fii, -based missile defense icchnfe 
^cabincisuttBs? --Mr. Re^. he said,' refuses to 
•^ihrow it on the Abk** foe vAai 
imMYc vr<^~ ''^^uit«- could be a successful trade-off for 
■PT* of -cutbacks in So^ oflensive mu* 

”JL . nani^lj, . “The American poalion at. Ge- 
stable. .{leva is inhe^tly isconastenl,** 

pugnoage lo Sandi Ad^ Mr. SchteSingff in a speech 
.‘sraan saw n/. «.*_• ^ . .-Wednesti^ to a oatf er ea ce of ad- 
•minislratimt t^idals and other 
weapons spedalisis ai tlu Aqien 
Insutute. 

SpedncaOy, he said, the United 
States is uigiog the Russiins hl ihr 
Goieva talks to reduce the <^en- 
-'sive iand-basedmissiks tiiat wooid 
' lie essentia] to thdr arms strategy if 
Mr. Reagan were to go ahead with 
- a space-based missik defense. 

' Mr.SdtlesbgiersaidAedTerby 
'the Soviet kada. Mikhail S. Gor- 
hadtev, to stop building SS-20 mis- 
siles aimed at Western ^ope ap- 
peals to the EuK^ieaa members of 
'the North Atlantic Treaty Oigani- 
itauon, who already are of 

-plans for the ^lace defense ^tcm. 


[rained 


rsraan gave no 
oriiies. 


its Aborfio: 

itioiulCoun rqcctediW 
id aboruoQ under lunaei^ 

0 in the Cones uiihihtfc 
aled imiTiediaiclj 
perrmiied abortion in obI 
red b> childbinh. iIk 
frem rape. 

ilutiond. saying ii ran CUE 
Riih ettusns the nghi 
Spain and carnes pco^ 
'ruonisb artd woroesvins; 


of the Aakikan Socie^ d New»> 
pwtfEdiiois. 

Gotbadwv add Sunday the 
SovM Union would isqiose “a 
BKHuioriizm on the deploynnent of 
its iiUcmodkie-range nw^iwf and 
subtend the impleaentatKm of 
otho' r^dy laecui c s in Eiuop^ 
nmii Novsirtwr. 

Afia that, he said, Soviet action 
wifi depend 00 whether the United 
States agreed to halt its dqtloy- 
mcQts of new Pershmg-2 and 
ground-Jannebed cruise nSssiks in 
Wesiern Eun^. 

The Pentag^ estimates (hat the 
Soviet Union has d^oyed 414 of 
its three-wBfbead SS-^ missiles, of 
vrtiidi 276 are within range of 
Wesiem Eun^ The United Slates 
has deployed 54 PeishiiK-2 and 4& 
cruise nmsQes, ah with a single 
warhead. 

Previous Soviet leaders have of- 
fered a missile freeze in Europe, but 
Ih^ have have alwa^ been accom- 
paoed by a demand that the Unit- 
ed Sutes withdraw its new misales 
eniirdy. The sew otfa made no 
siich demand. 

But Mr. Nitze said Mr. Goita- 
chev's move **wa]ks back" fnxn an 
October 1983 proposal and offers 
not **oiie iota a a cofsession." 

At that oae, Moscow agreed to 
cut SS-20 depkiyinent^ lAich then 
stood a! 300, to 140 missiles and to 
freeze the number of mssiles aimed 
at Asia. 

■ Craxi Cmnsefa OD Anns 

EJ. Dionne Jr. qfTheSw York 
Times reported from Rome: 

Priioe Mi^er Bettino Craxi of 
Italy said Wednesday in' Venice 
that the moratorium on Ae dqilc^ 
meat of. intennediate-nmge mis- 
siles announced by Ae Soviet 
Uition is a gesture that "deserves 
more than a siinple nyet," 

"It deserves at lea^ a counter- 
proposal," Mr. Craxi said "which 
all(^ Ae useftd confnmtaiioa of 
podtiOQS, to Ae gp^ of making 
pro gr e s s in the a^tiations.** 

Craxi, spemcing at a news 
conferoice in Venice, said be did 
not bdieve that Ae lUorattHium 
was an effort to p r e s e r ve Soriet 
nuclear superiority and divide the 
Atlantic as U.S. officials 

have said. 

. "I do D(H inieipfet tins midative 
as a maneuver aimed at Aviding 
the allies, but rather as a sign of a 
desire for diakwe wd move? 
ment," he said. "T hope I am not 

WKM^**' 

But Mr. Craxi, m reqxmse A 
questions abonl sunilar stetemoits 
he made Tuesday at a meming of 
Western Europ^ Sodalists m 
Madrid, said jpositioa Ad not 
differ sabsiantialTy from that of 
otber Western alfi^ 

"Hwre is a substantial iAmiiiy 
of view' between Italy and her allies 
on the problem,"' he smd. 



BODY BUNKER — A Boston patFolnuuidemoastrates 
(be Body Bunker, a recent innovatioa in the police 
department's war against crime. The hand-held shield is 
designed to deflect fire from a variety' of weapons. 


Trade Issues Change 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

V(H' YuHi Ttnui Senwe 

W.ASHINGTON — Pressing 
trade issues are reshaping the potit- 
icai lineup in the Umted Stetes as 
Oemocrais and Republicans ma- 
neuver for advantaju vAile trying 
to deal with an innux of imports 
from Japan and other countries. 

The Detnoents, who unA last 
year champimied legislation a re- 
strict imports, have shifted to 
blaming the Reagan administra- 
tion's fiscd polity- and tlK bloated 
dollar for the nation's rectfdS123- 
billion trade deficit last year. 

One reason, an:il>*sts say, is that 
the Democrats smell blood. Twen- 
ty-two Senate Republicans face re- 
election next )’ear, and Aey could 
be vulnerable A Ae adnuoisira- 
tion’s enAtisiosm for free-markei 
solutions to resolve the severe 
prahlems of the ditilai^s value, 

"Trade is Ais administration's 
Achillft* heel" said Kevin ntiliips, 
a political analyst and president of 
.American Poliiicai Research Corn., 
"becau.se it does not respond A ue 
administration's free-market argu- 
ments." 

Republicans, historically the 
party of high tariffs but more re- 
cently of free traders, appear to be 
reacimg by sunning back toward 
Ae protectionism they caused 
years aga 

"Republicans are caught on Ae 
cleft Slick of policies of their own 
adminisAiiion. which have caused 
the crucification of industries, and 
triggered pressures for a remedy 


from these AiAikkuiI Republican 
oonstituents," said Gary C HA- 
bauer, senior fellow at (be Insii Ate 
fm International Economics. 

The emer^g Republican pro- 
lectionism seems a reflect a move- 
ment by industry toward the posi- 
lioa that labor has espoused. For 
more than a decade, organized la- 
bor has vociferously advocated 
protection, most notably a domes- 
tic-content tnll fw automobiles 
that Ae Democrats supported until 
last year. That bill would discour- 
age ^es of cars with a low perceni- 
age of American-nude pans. 

The 13,00U-member Nation A 
.Association of Manufacturers. 
w4uch has traAtionaily opposed 
government intervemiem in mar- 
kets, (Ki Wednesday called for ac- 
tion to "cap" the dollar and pre- 
vent any further rise in its 
mieinaiiobal value, an increase 
that would make imports cheaper 
and exports more aistly. 

Overvaluation of the dollar has 
been an "agony" for American 
buriness and is behind "at least 
half ot Ae trade deficit, said Ae 
association’s pretident, .Alexander 
B. Trowbridge. 

BoA Ae Senate, wiA a Republi- 
can majority, and the Demomtic- 
dominaied House of Representa- 
tives voted overwheimingly within 
the last two we^ a censure Japan 
for not opening its market mere. 
But there were significant differ- 
ences m the two nonbindi^ resolu- 
tions. 


The House resolution cited the 
strong dollar and Ae huge federal 
budget deficit as the prindpai 
causes of the nation's trade prob- 
lems. It Ad not mention Japan un- 
A the fourA paragraph. 

The Senate resolution called on 
Ae prudent A adcqii an import- 
reduciion program w'iti^ 90 days 
if the Japanese did not dra- 
matic action to loosen ti^e regula- 
tions. 

"As far as Democrats are ooor 
cemed," said Charles L. Sdiultze, 
who was chairman of the Council 
of Eamomic .Advisers under Pied- 
deni Jinuny Carter, "Ae radical 
nature of the trade (^idi problem 
has given Aem an issue on which A 
attack this administratimi and has 
also allowed Aem a come back a 
a freer-trade podtAn. You might 
say Ae Democrats are returmng 
borne." 

OemoCTats already have moved 
A raise Ae profQe of trade as a 
political issue. The House majority 
leader. Representative Jim Wright 
of Texas, announced the appedm- 
meot of a Democratic task force 
that is expected to attack boA the 
administration and Ae Senate Re- 
publicans on Ae issue. 

"We have the stigma of protec- 
tionism, which comes by way of our 
closeness u> labor and speosorship 
of Ae domestic^conient bill," said 
Rtipreseniaiive Don Bonker, Dem- 
ocrat of Washington, who is chair- 
man of Ae task force. 

Senate Republicans strongly 


650,000 Would Become Poor Under Budget Plan, Study Says 


By Spencer Rich 

IfetAiVfigAiA Piai Serricf 

WASHINGTON — Ihe Umiis 
on cost-of-living ndiwtments pur- 
posed last wedc by ne^ent Ron- 
old Rea^ and Senate Republican 
leaders for Social Security and oth- 
ts pTograms would cause 650,000 
pe<»le to fall tteiow the pimeny 
level over three years, aecorAng A 
Ae Congressional Budget Office. 

Twn-ihirds of these people 
would be elderly, according to the 
analysis, released Wednesday. 

It was the firai attempt to ana- 
lyze the iim^t of premosed cosi- 
(^-living amusunent changes for 
the Social Security. The program 
proves reiirement and survivor 
benefits and disability benefits, 
and railroad, military and dvil ser- 
vice retirement benefits. 

'Hiti budget office analysis was 
impartial and Ad not oppose or 
course Ae proposal. 

The limits are the emnerstoue of 
a package of budget cuts designed 
A reduce the annual deficii by half 
over the next three fiscal years. 

Under the plan, recipients would 
receive a cosi-^rf'-living increase for 


tite first 2 percent of inflation and 
for any inflation rate greater Aan 4 
percent, but nothing for Ac two 
percentage poinLt.m between. 

The budget office's figures inA- 
caie that ihe dencit-reduction 
pacLi^ would face a tough fight 
nhen it reaches the Senate floor. 
The plan is scheduled for debate 
Ac week of April 22. 

In an infonnal count earlier this 
week, no more than 32 of the Sen- 
ate's 53 Republicans would commit 
themsdves A support the package, 
and many Democrats were vowing 
to oji^kose it and seek major revi- 
sions. 

Opposition to the plan mi^i be 
even stronger in the House, which 
is coDtroll^ by Democrats. 

Usii^ the adminisiraiion's as- 
sumption that annual inflation 
would be about 4 percent or slight- 
ly higher for Ae next three years, 
Ae report piojeaed that the pro- 
posal.*: would put 650.000 more 
people below the poverty line by 
the end of the Aree years. 

The budget office said that about 
two-Alrds of them would be ride^ 


ly. The official poverty line m 1984 
was SI0,6I0 a year of income for a 
family d four and S6280 for an 
elderly coupk. The budget office 
said the loss per family would be 
about ^10 a year — measured m 
1^3 dollars — by the end of Ae 
period. 

About 36.6 million people re- 
ceive Social Security benefits, 
about 1 million get railroad retire- 
ment benefits, more than 4 milUou 
receive Supplemental Security In- 
come, about 1.9 million get federal 
retirement benefits and about 1.4 
million get mAtary retirement 
benefits. 

■ Stockman Issues Waming 

David A. Stockman, director of 
Ae Office of Management and 
Budget, said Wednes&y that Ae 
bud^t compromise would unravel 
if Ae proposal was changed signifi- 
cantiy on the Senate floor. The 
New York Times repmied. 

Mr. Stockman, in a Washington 
speech, also said that the compro- 
mise must be approved by a signifi- 
cant margin in Ae Senate a create 
the momentum needed to get a def- 


icit-reducing plan through the 
House. 

"We have achieved the optimum 
balance," he said of the compro- 
mise, whidi wxnild reduce prqjeci- 
ed spending by SS2 billion m the 
fiscal year 19S6 and by nearly S300 
bilUon over three y ears. 

"It is a fragile pack^e," he said. 
"It win hang together in its entirety 
or it will disimegraie con^letely if 
we begin to pick and choose and 
have reservations about Ais de- 
ment or Aat." 

Mr. Stockman was Ae adminis- 
tration’s chief representative m the 
negotiations over Ae budget plan, 
which mcludes significant compro- 
mises by the president as well as by 
the Senate Republican leaders. 

President Reagan agreed to 
halve Ins proposed mcrease for mil- 
itaiy spe^mg, accepting a 3 per- 
cent rise on top of a rise to make up 
for inflation. And, despite his cam- 
paign promises, Ae president ac- 
cepted the reduixd increase b the 
oost-oC-ltvii^ adjusunent for Social 
Security reorients. 

The Senate Republican leaders 
agreed A eliminate 17 federal pro- 


grams. mcIuAog Ae Anurak na- 
tional passenger train nehvork, Ae 
Job Corps, the Small 'Busmess Ad- 
ministration and revenue sharing. 
They also a^^ to proposals cas- 
ing for a m^or restructuring or 
sh^ reductions b oAer pn>- 
grarns, eqxciaUy farm price stq>- 
ports and Medicare. Ae health care 
program for the elderly. 


deny that they have become protec- 
lionisL But last week, an anu- Japa- 
nese trade reprisal biU was ap- 
proved 12-4 by the Senate Finance 
Cotnmitiee. 

"The pobt of this legislation is 
not protection but enforcement of 
our trade laws," said Senator John 
C DaitiorA, Republican d Mis- 
souri, w'fao ffitroduced the measure. 
"It is designed not for retaliation 
but to open up markets." 


LERcnr 


i. -*k- 



.aUy WJtCll, 
iHirathin. 

quart?, waioriifliitant 
Mat block Treaied ^iccl 
and gold plated. 


The Jeweler 
you should not miss'. 

EDWARD 

JEWELS 

Via V. Veneto 187 
Tel. 49 38 09 
Roma 








Beverly Wilshire Hotel 

IN THE HEART OF LOS ANGELES 
l^filshire Boulevard at Rodeo Drive 
Beverly Hills. Calif. 90212 
(213)275-4282 1^16x698-220 


London (01) S83-3OS0 
Frankfun (069)29 04 71 
Hong Kong (5)221142 



\KmAwoi .* 

London (01)4094)814 
Frankrun(069)28 7524 
Hong Kong (3) 68 25 35 


I 

• * 


'■ .V T 


iai heanpjDaiiEciB: - 
iSpiiai foc^aspetesm; 
aiirsdav. 

nt. ideDUftedbyhiilir . 
b feebng«el] boVeic . 
potaiMS «ii!oe maic • 
Simdjv. 

'vasiori charges railiis' * 
i hren inittupnqw ' 
nuch as sivveasBipE 
icerr. Jack C. Bud*; 
hear. atiacL u lo jb®: ' 
ciul Auduhofl. a '• 
[ursdav. f** ' 


Americans use planes Ifke Europeanis use 
taxis. Not onl/ because their country Is so 
vast, but also because their climate is so 
hotly competitive. 

They dare not miss out on any business 
opportunity.. 

Of course getting them to the right place at 
the right time presents problems. Planes are 
not taxis.' ' 

So how can an airline effectively connect 


all the major cities? 

We got around the problem by re-inventIng 
the wheel. 

We have created two central hubs whose 
spokes radiate out to directly link over 55 
dties in the US. These hubs are at Dallas/Foit 
Worth and Chicago. 


nAirlines 


And now we are adding three more 
spokes to our wheel. From London and Paris 
you can fly non-stop to Dalfas/Fort Worth. 
And from Frankfurt you can fly non-stop to 
both Dalias/Fort Worth and Chicago. 

Which means you can get to almost any- 
where your business takes you in America on 
one ticket, with one airline, with Just one stop. 

Doesn't that sound better than flying 
around in circles? 










Heralh 


I1STERNA3I0NAL 



tribune 


FUdkM Vldi Hw New Yock Tina md The WnUBglai PoM 


Lurking Khmer Rouge 


Cambodia remains perhaps the most pitiful 
victim of the Indochina wars, and it is again 
contending for a modest American involve- 
meoL The House Foreign Affairs Committee, 
hardly a nest of hawks, has Ntited 24 to 9 for a 
SS-mUlioQ militaiy aid program to two small 
non-Coaummist armies resisting Vietnam's 
rix-year-old occupation. If Aat is a po^ 
wonh adi^ting (the Reagan administration 
has changed its mind and thm1« it may be), 
that meager sum ought to be an embmrass- 
menL Surely the sponsors either mean mly to 
chum a few headlines or mean to clear the way 
for a much larger new commitmenL If it is a 
down payment, then Americans had better 
decide what th^ really seek to achieve and 
what the total bUl might be. 

Hie conflict in Cambodia has been mainly 
a war between two distasteful Communist 
forces, Uie Cambodian Khmer Rouge and the 
Vietnamese. A decade ago this mcmth, Phnom 
Penh was '*h1)erated*' by indigenous Commu- 
nists led by Pol Th^ murdered miUions in 

a borreudous attempt to lobotomize a whole 
sodety. They also attacked Vietnamese vil- 
lages along the diluted border, ^ving Hanoi 
a long-soi^t pretext to invade. The Russians 
back^ Vietnam, China the Khmer Rouge. 

While recoiling from direct involvemeat, 
America has re&ed to recognize Hanoi's 
Cambodian puppet r egi™ . That has required 
awar^g a Umted Nations seat to an in5u> 
gent coition dominated by the detestable 
Khmer Rouge. But Washington has rejected 


China's imporcunings to supply the resistance. 

In recent months, ThailaDd and its ASEAN 
allies have urged American hdp for two non- 
Communist armies vdxse camps on the Thai 
border have been under fierce Vietnamese 
attacL One is led by former Prime Minister 
Son Sann: a still smaller anny is l<^ to Prince 
Norodom Sihanouk, the former dtief of statCL 
Prominent House Democrats have up 
the idea, contending that strengthening the 
non-Communist forces might induce Vietnam 
to pull out its 160,000 troops. They aigue 
t^t even SS million means a lot to insurgent 
forces totaling 25,000, and tiiat in any case 
helping them is a principled act, conqnrable 
to helping insurgmts in Afghmustan. 

However principled, that pittance wiH not 
make the non-Communists a match for Pol 
Pot's Kluner Rouge ar^ of 30,000 inside 
Cambo^ And it is thdr zealotiy that gives 
the Vietnamese the pretext for remaining in 
Cambodia. No diplomatic deal seems fea^le 
as long as Pol Pot lurks in the vrin^ And no 
modest American ud win undermine Pol Pot 
until China rgects him and helps to create a 
broader, more palatable resistance coalition. 

Even a large aid program is likely to be 
matched imam’s &)viet allies. Pe ' 
there are inducements that would 
Vietnam to withdraw — notably, guarantees 
against a return to power by the Khmer 
Rouge. But that is not now a guarantee the 
United States can credibly give. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


In Two or Three Years 


For a Japanese prime minister to urge his 
country publidy. on television, to buy foreign 
goods is an extraordinary departure from tra- 
dition. Most J^anese have mways felt that it 
is not only safer to buy J^anese but a kind of 
patriotic obligation. That is the presun^on 
Yasuhiro Nakasone is tr^ng to change. He is 
quite to warn his people that their en- 
grained habit of spending thdr mon^ at home 
has become dang^us to them. FGs courage is 
b^nd doobL The question is whether he and 
his government can move fast enough to de- 
flect the sense of grievance and the impulse to 
retaliate that has seized the U.S. Congress. 

U.S. and Japmiese negotiators have woriced 
through the latest list of disputes, and in re- 
sponse Mr. Nakasone announced a series of 
measures to open Japan's maikels a little wid- 
er. These measures wQl surely be helpful but 
th^ seem unlikely to make any dramatic dif- 
ference. The Japanese government will for 
example, increase its financial aid to its wood 
products industry with the thought of lowering 
the tariff on foreign competition in two or 
three years. Whv not soonei^ Well the Japa- 
nese say, you ^ve to understand that the 
wood fi^ucts industry is in bad sb^ in 
Japan and politically the suigect is sensitive. 

That is the land' of answer that enrages 
senators «4io take incessant pounding from 


American industries under pressure from Jap- 
anese imports. Why should Japan's inefEcieat 
plywood manufactutos be sacrosanct, when 
American automolnte producers face firing 
imports? The Jqianese govenunent has been 
ve^ slow to admowledge that these cases of 
outright protectionism — plywood and base- 
ball bats, oranges and beef, so forth and so on 
— have an inflammatoiy eflect out of all 
proportion to their economic iinponanoe. 

But the reali^ is that total Amoican sales to 
Japan will dep^ main^ on the doUar-yea 
exdange rate. The Rea^ admisdstratian's 
mismanagement of the economy and the re- 
sulting American interest rates ^ve lift^ the 
dollar so high that no Japanese cmcessions 
can m»)ef much di fference u ntil it comes 
down. A division of re^xmribflity suggests 
itself here. Washington be^ the main respc^ 
sibility for the exchange rate and the scale of 
the U.S. trade de&dt Tolgro bears the 
ribOity for resolving the potectiomst xnita- 
tions — plywood all toe resL 

On the Japanese side, Mr. Nakasone has 
made a brave beginning. In the interest of both 
rides, let us hope he has the s tamina to keqp 
gmng It is dou% important hecsast, unfortu- 
nately, on the Amokan ride there is little 
prospect for action on econontic policy sooil 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Qiildren’s Children 


Babies bom in the American South are sta- 
tistically less likely to survive their fust year 
than th^ in other regions. Ten of the 1 1 U.S. 
states with tiie highest infant mortality rates 
are Southern, and in more than half of them 
the statistics have been getting worse. South- 
ern governors want to do ttimgThing about it 
and have set up a task force under Governor 
Richard Riley of South Carolina. 

In a recent interim report the governors 
came up with some disturbing data. Almost 20 
percent of births in their states are to teen-age 
mothers; a sbockingly high number of those 
mothers are under 14. Two out of flve preg- 
nant women in the area receive inadequate 
prenatal care, and a high pn^rtion of bat^ 
are bom too soon or too sm^ The ixuadence 
of low-birih-weigbi babies is twice as high for 


black women in the South as for white wMneo. 

Money, as usual would he4>. Adequate 
funding much of it from the federal govern- 
meat — for prenatal and earlychildh^ 
health care is essential Sndi ^pen^g is more 
than compassionate: It is senrible, for the cost 
erf caring for critically ill oewbow and educat- 
ing and institutionalizug those handicap^ 
pr^turity far exce^ a pn^iosed S700- 
per-cfaild expenditure for prevative care dur- 
ing pr^iancy and the Rest year of life. More 
important than money, however, is education. 
Pr^nant women must be tanght the dangers 
of dgarettes, alcohol and drugs; adolescents 
must leam the dangers d teen-age prKnancy, 
not only in terms d thdr own yotmg Iwebui 
for their high-risk babies as w^ 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Recall die Bretton Woods Spirit 

As in the 1930s. it is the breakdown of 
eooQomic and mone^ order whid is under- 
mining the trade regime. To tadde these trou- 
bles means nothing less than an effort to revive 
the baric understanding— not the institutions, 
but the analysis — which undopinned the 
Bretton Woods current' system and founda- 
tion of the GATT and the IMF. Ibis was 
simply the acknowledgment that stabiliiy 
could only be achieved if all countries foUov^ 
internationally responsible economic polides, 
tested by the progi^ of thier “basic" balance 


of payments — current and investment cq>ital 
taken together. A return to such polides — 
aiming, notably, to eliminate the huge struc- 
tural imbalani^ in the Umted States and 
Japan — would tend to produce stable and 
manageable exchange rates in its train, j^tec- 
tionism is rimply an effort to get the lesdts 
without the ai^ustmeut, and h will not wtxk. 

Tins is a sunple proposition, but it 
not be ea^ to win su^rt for IL But the 
effort must be made. If lespooribiliQr and 
ndghborliness are not now put at the of 
the agenda, it may be too late. 

— ITte Faumdal Times (Limtbn). 


FROM OUR APRIL 12 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Factioiisli^tinGuadeloape 
POINT-A-PITRE — A bloody encounter at 
Vieux-Habiiants bas resulted from the arrests 
of the mayor, M. Be^e, who is a cand^te 
for the elections for the Chamber of Deputies 
in opposition to M. Girault-Richard. of 
M. Sineus, Conseiller-Gdieral and M. Maiie- 
claire, a journalist, for indtiu to revolt The 
partisans of the two caudi&tes fought a 
pitched battle in which there were numerous 
wounded. The secretary of the Munidpal 
Couad] is among the wounded. The present 
disnirbanoes are the usual concomitants of 
political agitation in the island. M. Beville, the 
recently-dected mayor of Point-i-Pitre, has 
evidentiy allowed his partisans to express their 
political opinions in a violent manner in ke^ 
ing with French West Indian customs. 


1935: Bear Mauls BaqmtinDaii^iter 

PERU, Indiana — MuMl Maiie G rigori evna 
Sdovieff. dai^ter of the Russian monk Ras- 
puin, who started earning her Sving as an 
animal trainer in Paris three years ago because 
she said she had seen “too much of politics." 
may reverse her opinkm as the result of a 
severe "lanimg a dreus bear, Tte aeddffl t 
occurred in an outdoor cage of Hageube^- 
Wallace show, where ^ was oadcmg her 
whip over the beads d 12 b^ts. A bear of 
the black Himalayan spedes attacked her un- 
expectedly, and for five Mme. Solo- 

vieff strayed with the beast Viliea the atten- 
dants were finally able to beat off the bear and 
drag the trainer to safely rile had been severdy 
clawed and bitten in the 1^ and 
She was immedxatdy taken to a 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Ooinmn I9S8-I982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. RALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

CO’Oub iitLn 


PHIUPM.F01SIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER, MUcr 

ExnmiTr £fitar RENEBONDY Dmet PuNMib' 

Ediur ALAIN LECOUR AaSSefS^ 

D^tayE^ RICH ARD H. MORGAN 

Depay saw STEPI^ W. CONAWAY Dmtor d OpaSam 

AsseeauEiar FRANKS DESMAISONS Dtreear^QrS^K 

ROLF D KRANEPURL iXTeoertf AdierimtSekt 
Interaatioari Herald Tribune. ISl Aveaue Chark^de^jiuDa 92200 NeaObw-S^ 

Fraooe. Tdqduine: 747-1265. Tdei: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald FmT 
PineteuriklaBvUkadim: WafttrK Tkmr. 

Ape Heedauiffm. 24‘34 Hapesiy Ri. Hmg Kong. TA J-2A5d/& Telex 61 170. 

Mataffng Dir. U.K: Rabat MacKdm 63 UmAae. Londga WCl Tet TAa262009 
^ aua^el de 1.200.000 F. RCS Noam S 732a2//’6. CmmEiWM Paritm No. 61337. 

U.S. subscr^ioK USA vearfy. Seand-daa pestm paid at lent Idmd City. H.Y. IIIOI. 

O JfiSS, I/imiaiiaiud Hatud Tnnaie. AO rig/its reened. 



Is Israel Up for Sale to the United States? 


SCUMCA, 

isieuJS? 



VouMotid/ 

OWTiL 

ASStHWi 
^CbfOOMIC 
FtAM> 

\ 



W ASHINGTON — Some 
Arabists who usually re- 
sist aid to l^ael are curiously 
muted or mechanical in thor 
oppbritimi this rime. And some 
d Israd’s staunchest stnport- 
ers in and out of the U.S. gov- 
ernment are speaking out force- 
fully against providing the 
requests emergency iniurion 
of medley until certain condi- 
lioos are met in Israd. 

Tbe reason for the rote rever- 
sal has to do with the creation 
of national dependency, which 
is a dangerous misiake for any 
aTiiawee Thc United Stales ts 
not “sdling out" Israel; rather, 
it seems to be buying Israd. 

The ooce-prqud Isradi ^ov^ 
ernment is selling its political 
indqiendence for a permanent 
Une of economic crediL “Amer- 
icans must understand." writes 
the fonner Labor Par^ press 
secretary m The New York 
Tunes, “that thdr aid is an in- 
vestment in funue of Isra- 
d's moderate political leaders, 
[ aifnvin Peres] and his Labor 
Party coUeagua are also eager 
for Washington to play an ac- 
tive role in the peace process." 

In other words, if America 
continues to finan ce the welfare 
state in Israel satefftl “moder- 
ates" there will ptu into effect 
WariiingtoD's evenhanded im- 
porition ^ a settlement whh the 
Arab worid. That is why sup- 
poners of the Arab cause m 
Wariiinglon want to see Israel 
get its quick financial fix; that is 
why many of Israel’s unial de- 
fenden resist the temporary re- 
lief of a d^Oitating bandouL 
Secreiaiy d State George 


By William Sa&re 

Shultz chose two economists 
known to be firm friends of 
Israd for advice on a nraponse 
to israd’s financial crisis. Stan- 
Iqf Rscher of Massachu- 
setts Institnte of Technolc^ 
told Congress last week that & 
rad must first come up with an 
unambiguous plan to oit the 
government spending that is 
ruining the country. If not, *^tiie 
is strong that two 
years from now she will still be 
growing riowly, still fighting 
hig h inflatioo and mofc than, 
ever reliant on outside aid." 

Dr. Herben Stem, a strong 
voice for Israd in the Nixon- 
Feed administiatioas. said that 
the such a 

plan would not be enough: 
“Steps for assuring execution of 
the program should be taken. 
and nwlecrnncs for 

measuring pedormance." 

The are right: Is- 

ra^ budgets have long been 
made to Ire bust^ and now — 
to bring discipline to Knesset 
chac« — the flow of economic 
aid should be tied strictly to a 
demonstration of results. 

Is that reqnirement denrean- 
iog for a soverei^ nation, a 
proven demoenue ally? You 
bet it is — but not as demeaning 
as the failure of the “govern- 
ment of national uni^ tO fife 
bureaucrats, abolish indexa- 
tion. cut out suteidies and peg 
currency to something more 
stable than a printing press. 

To postpone the day of reck- 
oning. a craven coition of 


right-wingers who caused the 
crisis and left-wingers fearful of 
dealing with it prefers the least 
painfiu and most damaging 
tadc: more statism in the fonn 
of w^ and price ccrntrols. 

Prime N^ster Peres- knows 
what has to be done — the solu- 
tion is no secret —but does not 
want io be blamed for unem- 
ployment and real ausieriQr. He 
likes tite rising popularity that 
iirerooosibility h^ brought, 
and his Dartisans pass the word 



that his'seeming lassitude is to 
avert a rdrellion in labor union 
elections next month. That is a 
fed>le excuse for paralysis in 
the face d crisis. Isradis nuisi 
face the realities to which their 
present leaders seem blind: 

• friiernaUy, political fiee- 
dom is insqrerable from eco- 
nomic freedom. The welfare 
state ultimately ctij^les a na- 
tion’s ability to compete and to 
^ow. and that outmoded so- 
cialist philosophy — now wors- 
en by wage and price controls 
— is the tnidr bomb parked 
outride the nation's treastuy. 

• Extern^, diplomatic in- 
dependotce is msq>arable frtMD 
economic independence. Isra- 
el's enemies sense that weak- 
ness in one b^ets weakness in 
the other When P^a pays the 
piper, Psqsa g*ns the tune. 

Isr^s independence should 
never be for saie. Until some 
economic l^ah magnifies the 
small v(^ demanding sac- 
rifice, this message must come 
from her friends abroad: No 
transfusion should begin until 
the hemorrhage is stopped. 

The New York Times. 


R€AUM? 

T^PU^S! 



lR3RM0MV.1 



Klractm, Jarunlm Post, 
caw SyiWlcott. 


Human Bights: The Battle for Infonuation 


L ondon —S ome years ago Am- 
/ oesty International reported 
that there were about 12JX)0 prisoo- 
en in KaboTs Pul-e-Qiaicla prison. 
The then presi^t of Afgfamistan, 
Hafizullah Amin, responds by teD- 
ing journalists that the organization 

haH a “fertile imaginatirtn and is 
Spoon-fed by the propa^da centers 
erf Radio Beijing, the BBC the Voice 
of America, Iglanmbad and T ehran. ** 
The reaction is not unique. There 
are other governments which seem to 
believe th^ are tiugets of some inler- 
national conspiracy when their hu- 
man rights records are exp<Med. One 
reason for this may be the oonrider- 
able imp^ that repeats about tor- 
ture, “disappearances” and otba* 
abuses can sometimes have. Th^ can 
affect a gavernment's staneht^ mter- 
nationally and at home, nosing ques- 
tions in Its political, eco n o mi c and 
(fiplomatic relations. 

The strug^ over human rights 
is to a large extent a battle about 
infonnatioa. -Some govenuDcnts have 
made it a ciinunal refeose to publish 
mfonnaiicm about human rights vio- 
latioos m their own countries or to 
send such accounts abroad. 

Human rights activists have be- 
come prisooets of oonsdenoe in the 
GeimaD Democratic Republic and in 
Ottoa. In the Soviet Union, members 
of UDcrfCcial groups monitorii:^ the 
state's adherrace to the final act of 
the Helsinid Confeicnoe on Security 
and OMpmtion in Emne have 
been in^iisooed. In El Evador, 
people trying to publidze human 
fights violations have tfaemsdves be- 
come victims of "disappearancm." 

Some governments refuse to co- 
opmte with mves^tioDS by inter- 
natiooal organizations. They fail to 
ratify treaoa sneb as international 
human ri^^ covenants. They wifi 
not a^t international obser^ to 
their political trials or their prisons. 
They do not respond to comirfaints 
rais^ in the United Nations, tnereby 
vierfating the important pnndple that 
•human ri^ts are a Imtimate inter- 
oational concern ana that govern- 
ments, in this field, are accountable 
not only to thdr own people but also 
to ibe rnternational oommuni^. 

Govenuneais have resorted to dis- 
tortion, deception and disurfonna- 
tioo about human n ghr-< issues. In 


By 111011186 Hammarberg 

The Hvirer ts seeretary-general cf Amnesty InterrutdonaL 


t%2 the Turkish authorities. Hying 
to counteract reports that ptisonets 
bod died as a rnuit d torWa^ pre- 
sented five prisoners to Toridsh jour- 
nalists. dauning that AmnesQr harf 
said they were dead. The attempt 
backfired when it was shown that 
five had not been named as dead and 
when two of the exhibited prisoners 
gave on- tire-spot testimony to the re- 
porters about their torture. 

It is cruda! for human rights work 
that attempts to disrupt and nnder- 
mine reporting of ri^ts issues be 


tant that there be critical discussiOD. 
about the techniques used by human 
lights reporters themselves — wheth- 
er ih^ are media. UN rapporteurs 
or nongovernmental organizations. 
That dicraitciftn should take into ac- 
count the methods of fact-finding, 
evaluation and presentation. 

□ 

First, fact-finding. There are sd- 
dc«n independent witnesses in the 
torture center. SdU, it is sometimes 
possible to put together a case show- 
ing piima fade eridence that tornire 


hbhnpaiiantthatthmbecnticaldiscussimi 
about the techniques usedhyhunumri^Us 
reporters ^wh^her the medioj VN ra^orteurs 
or nongoternmental organizations. 


countered. The United Nations 
should challenge, much more force- 
fully than it yet has, govenunents 
that refuse to cooperate wiUi agreed 
investigative procedures. Media and 
volunl^ organizations should insist 
on their own ri^t to opmte. 

In particular, more efforts must be 
nude to obtain infonnatioa from 
those countries where the authorities 
try to dose their frontiers and pre- 
vent a flow of human rights oata. 
People who have been is^risooed 
because erf (heir attempts to obtain, 
transmit or disseminaie facts about 
bumau i^ts violations should be the 
suligects d intense campaigning. 

The fact that some governments 
rabotage the fact-finding does not 
give reporters license to be less re- 
^xosible in dealing with infonna- 
tioo. Allegations of torture and other 
violations are often used as political 
weapons — fty opposition groups as 
vreli as governments. That m it^ is 
ground lor caution and care. 

It is also self-defeating to publish 
rqiorts which are badly resrarefaed. 
Even minor mlBMkes can undermine 
the most serious message. Reports 
^di do not stand up to scnitioy 
can, in facL tarnish the credibiEw of 
human ri^ts reporting io generA 

Tlas nukes it all the more impor- 


did take place. A medical euunina- 
tioD can sometimes corroboraie the 
prisoner's testimony. Reports fiomi 
other prisonen can addessential ia- 
formatioo. Forensic expertise can oc- 
casional add to the picture. So fact- 
finding is often a pamstaking process 
of obtaining as many pieces of infor- 
mation as possible from as many 
sources as one can find. 

It is crucial that official sources 
be t^ped. However wdl-based the 
allegations a^uiut the government 
may appear, it is e«er>™»l that its 
own versioa be soughL 

Likewise, it is important that the 
fact-finder be indqiendent of the au- 
thorities — and appear to be so. The 
UN rapporteur wDo came with a mil- 
itary escevt to vUJagns in Guatemala 
may not have goi a full answer to his 
question on whether there bad been a 
massacre in that village. 

A worrying new practice seems to 
have develop or grving govem- 
meots a right to veto who should be 
appointed to investigate the human 
nuts rituatioDS in tl^ countries on 
boudf of the United Nations. 

□ 

Second, the evaluation of informa- 
tion bas to be tborou^ and profes- 
stood. The r^rts sbonld ideally be 
based on several ind^endenlsources 


allowing for cioss<faecIdng. This 
may not always be possible and a 
constant dilemma is what to do with 
infonnatioD which appears rdiable 
but cannot be corroborated. 

In some cases one conld make a 
case for governmeait investigation on 
the grounds Ibar the al- 

though not fu^ conclusive, are sub- 
stantiated sufficient to for an 
inquiry — and thetdiy, in a 
loove the burden of proof onto the 
government The government's ofwn 
reaction m^ be a &nor in this evalu- 
ation process. Has it provided any 
information? If ibae was a trial was 
it open? Were the dmigcs published? 
How have the authorities act^ in 
amilar cases befoid? 

There are traps to be avrnded. One 
relates to ret^c^ infonnatioa which 
may appear as indepei^ent and cor- 
roborative. Often a wimess ^pirads 
allegations in various directions 
whi^ later snrface in different jp-. 
ports W diffeicait gioiq». StiH the 
- origLuar n^xxt may be one andibe 
same — and not necessarily reliable. 

It can happen ibat tbe most boii> . 
fying repoils are snUect to the least'' 
thorough checking before tb^ are 
dissenunared. This is human; it may 
not be ea^ to qnestion the method- 
ology behind a report if its message is 
emotionally overwhelming. tbe 
more mgidhanl then that those bod- 
ies and institutions which vet the re- 
port devde^ an atmo^bere of ctiti- 
cai inteQectual soutiny. 

□ 

ThinL the presentation is not only 
a question or headlines. In 

tbe long run it is not convincing, 
to pret^ to say more tbm can be 
said. It is better to point op^y to 
gaps in the informatjon. 

In addition, readers have a right to 
know bow tbe rvpon was produce^ 
what methods were used, what period 
it covers, bow many people were in- 
lerviewed, if there was an on-the-^t 
investigatioD and so on. New^iapers 
are often not tbe least at fault wbeu it 
comes to providing such data. 

The gitttest dilemma here is that 
sources must often be protected and 
cannot be named. Thm is no way 
around that; but axid reason 
must not be misused by w reporters 
themselves to disguise sloi^ wo^ 

Iniematknal Herald Tribune. 


Good N^ 


Is Required ' 
From Bonn 


By Henry Owen 

W ASHINGTON *— If the Bonn 

econmnic summit conference ' ' 
in May is to have durable value, the .. 
sev’en main indnstrial democracies ' 
will have to take comrete aciim to 
resoli’e growing trade and economic ' 
problems. The Europeans have sug: 
some steps. What is needed ' 

is American leadershm. 

France wants parallel talks to cor- ' ' ' 
rect foreign exdi^ge misalignments, 

An important West German state? ' 
meat says that “parallel io the tradd 
round, we sbouro discuss finahdal 
problems . ■ . capital flows and ex- • - 
diange rates." This reflects tbe Eo^ .. ^ ' 
peons' grow'iiig desire that Amoica -.c - 
cackle us huge budgetary' defidtsi :% 
which they believe distoii capital 
flows and exchange rates. ' 

If America agreed, the Europeans % 
should pledK to seek deep cuts in 
barriers in me new round irf* trade ^ 
talks. Most Eun^iean countries have ' 
long felt that weaknesses in their 'l l . 
economies precluded such cuts, but - " 
in recent years they have introdured T ' 
polides to correct the weaknesses -r 
anumg others, encouraging invest- 
mentahdreduciiiginternBliii^ties 
that ixnpede.grovHh. The rating 
change m economic pTO^wcissIu^ '^1 
□lake it easier for Eun^ieans to coo- 
tenqilate deep cuts in trade bahienL.^'^ 
as well as selective,' moderate expu-jw;:. 
sionist pblk^ if these should pi^ : 
necessaiy to offset ^obal deflatioit: 
aiy effects of U.S. budgn cuts. 

Thi* rhflng e in Fuivyean’ rftinifing - ‘ 

offers the components, (rf a possiUe 
sumimt baigam — a barcun en^. r" '■ 
hanced ^ developments inJapan. 

American thfailong about J^ian is ■ 
dmninated by the trade issue, rf 
thou^itisQOtclearwhyihederiieto 
reduce barriers focDsesc^ on Japan -j.' 
rather than also on Eiir^ie, where 
barriers are equally' noxious. . 

Tokyo’s lowering of barriers, air 
ready undtf way, nm be along 
cess and will involve changes m cnl- 
tural and business, attitudes. Even 
after this has taken place, Japu wiQ ' 
run a large export siuplus ns-k-ris p 
America, not only broause of the 
overvalued doDar but also because 
consumption is lower and savings are ' ~ 
higher in Japan than in America. 

Tbe issue in Japan's ecomnnic •' 
relatioaswiththerestoftheindustri- ■ii 
al world is thus not whether its eiqxnt .z-z 
surplus wfil go away-(it.will not) but z: 
wfaetber the sur^rfus be offset by 1 - 
useful long-term J^anese invest- 
meat abroad. Der^ulation of Jar 
pan's financial market, for which the 
Reagan adminisiniuott is pressing 
Tolm haid, will hdp alleviate the 
woridwide shortage 01 capital. . v. 7 
Here then is the outline of a bar- 
gain that mi^t be forged in Botm: 

• The Europeans would agree that ' 
new trade talks should seek the deep, 
cuts in trade bairieis that they are' J 

nnwikUiMiu eiuMiuli -fiTaeBent- - Y. 


Q. i'_j. 


'now strong enou^ tO'accepL 

9 America would agree to con- 
jinuing consultation among the sum- 
Init partners abouit Jbeic fiscal and 
moneti^ ' perfides. ' this implid^ 
cecopuzxDg that something innst bi 
done to cut the U.S. budget deSdt. 

• The Europeans and Japanese 
would pledge that if Amei^ fr^ 
lowed a more restrictive fiscal policy^ 

eepansion — if ihis^were need^^ 
ensure that the U:S. eban^ of couise 
(fid not cause a world recession. 

• J^an would commit itsdf to 
cootinnmg deregulation of its finao; 
dal mvkel, and to other poliries-rhai. 
recognized tbe ^wing impo rtance' 
of Jqian’s financial market as asup; 
plier of capital to tbe worid. » 

Such arrangements would do at 
least as much to inqirove wxirld eo> 
nomic prospects as the 1978 summit^, 
outcome — which- tnclu^ AmerK^ 
can oif^rke decontrol. West 
man and Japanese economic expah* 
sion and a commitment to conqilete 
trade n^tiations that year. : 

Whether such a bargain at' 

Bonn will dqiend on Amerira. 


The KTzte; a financed consubani, 
h^ed amtnse U.^ par&sptdon in jive 
economic smwuts. He conodnded tUs 
comment to The New York Tones. 





^ting Around the Democratic Bush 


C To judw By Cliampion Ward 

bv the dauv SDeeco and wnt- * 


' by the d^y qieech and writ- 
ing of Americans, usage 

haodbo^andtfaelabonof leacE- 
en are not havii^ the desired effect 
•Clarity and lo^ appear to be on 
the wane, even among people wlm 
know very well what the oandboerfes 
preadi and v4io once as students 
may have produced p^es of dear, 
dirm and logical prose. 

This flight from darity sug^sU: 
that it is not grammar that has de- 
dined so miuxi as candor. If so. the 
disorder may tnm out to have 
sources other than those that gram- 
marians are prone to look for, and 
its arrest may oot be bi^^t about 
by seeking consensus among gran> 

mariana qq Pnglish ii s p g e. 

Rather, we should lodt to such 
analysts <rf the sodal «ndCT as Alex- 
is de TogueviUe and tbe sodol^st 
David Riesman. who hove ms- 
dosed what may be the tMwie fail- 
ing: In a democratic sodety, it is 
rarely advantageous to be clear and 
dire^ even if you knowhow to be. 

Richard Hmiy Tawney, an Eng- 
lish ecoDonuc hisuman and sodal 
critic, wrote that when aristocrats 
fan, they fall on pillows. Toquevillc 
and Mr. Riesman ha\« observed 
that in a donocratic sodety most 
people are whiried about with their 
fellw dtizens in a Idnd of Brosvo- 
ian movement and m^ fall forever 
if their momentaiy status is lost. 

Aware of this instaHIity, people 
in a democrat find that in most 
settings it is best to be un- 
r, irufirea and not toolo^'cal — 
at least anti! a majori^ begins to 
form, whidi may then \k safely 


joined. Better to keep erne's options 
open which amoiuxts, linguisti- 
cuy. u> being habitually vague. 

Increasingly we encounter not 
only such evasive locutions as "in 
terms oT fThere will be a cessa- 
tioD, in terms erf bombing”) but 
even admissions of doubt by a 
speaker who (questions bis own view 
of the subject at hand, as in. “I 
guess vital !’m saying is " 

In public discourse, al^ candor 
is discouraged, and puUic oflidals 
are often congratulated by thdr as- 
sociates (“they didn't lay a glove on 
you") for successfully boT^giog 
awkward issues raised by reporters 
at news confemices. leaving the 
public none the wiser. 

My sense ihat impredsion in lan- 
guage and lack of candor are not 
only linked but getting worse grew 
upon me over a slretra of some 30 
years during which I often served as 
moderator of the Aroa Instimte 
executive seminars. The business 
leaders who were enroDed in tbe 
193{^ often lacked “good" universi- 
ty degrees or any d^rees at afi, but 
tftey were quite sure of their opin- 
ions and preferences. They were 
fully prqiared to express and 
fend them, fashionable or noL 
In the late 1970s the mentaiity 
displayed by tbe executives was 
very doffereni. Many bad attended 
the “best" uoiverribes. Kcmetessly 
up-to-date, they were afraia of foif- 
ing to display readiness to entenam . 
the most varied and even extreme 
ideas. Like many Democrats in 


Congress after Ronald Reagan’s 
decioral victory in 1980, the busi- 
nessmen were like surfers, afraid d 
not catching the next socU wave as 
it fonn^ and tberdw — the ulti- 
mate m'gbtmare for Americans — 
being left out of “tbe action," 

But I need not have discovered 
this change ai Aspen. I see now that 
1 had bea prepared for it My fa- 
ther was a forthright man who nev^ 
er waited until it was s^e before 
sajlng what be tbou^L Nw was he 
tfoubUNl or easily won over when he 
found himself outnumbered by 
those who thought otherMse. ft 
now seems more than a coinddence 
that my father’s age was the same, 
as Harry S. Truman's. 

I once heard S.K. PaoL an Indian 
Member of Parliament, oppose a 
legislative proposal on the grounds 
that its adopDon “must await an 
improvemeni in the natirmat char- 
acter." Is this our premt atuation? 

If so I have no antidote unless it 
be to compensate sufficiently any 
offida! <x executive who rerigns 
over an issue of principle and states 
the reason pubbdy. 

Somebow, democratic societies 
must find surrogates for tbe outspo- 
kenness that in aristocracies is sup- 
plied 1^ tbe few who enj ^ 

nerediiaiy sianding ^^ If 
such surrogates are oevis 


and when 
such surrogates are^evised, we may 
expect the decline of graiju^ to 
reverse itself as citizens ffnd'it atfe 
and- even useful to come night out 
and say what they mean. 

. .The .Hncm, a Jomer mierffadude 
demdAeUdm^tfOSoMCah 
trdxdedddstolheNew YaH: Tines 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Hie BBC Is Independent 

In response to "Wfule Briidn Mtd- 
fks a Trusty Voice" {Mardi 25): 

Jonathan Power has written per- 
ceptively about tbe BBC External 
Semces. He knows the impact of 
international radio, particularly in 
tbe Third Worl± But his mgggwtff n 
that Bush House is b^g finaociallv 
^strained by Mis. Thatcher for p<^ 
litical reasons, and his inteipretaaon 
of a recent review of External Ser- 
vices are, I bdieve; misreadmgs. 

We wdcxnned this review because, 
inter alia, it recommended a way 
around our annual cash' crises 
brou^i about by successive govern- 
meuts trying to contain public expen- 
diture. We certainly do oot beUeve 
that our indqiendence was compro- 
mised by the rq>orL An acconmany- 
ing letter from the secretary d state 
to the BBC chairman confirm^ un- 
equivocally that nothing in the report 
involved “ai^ dilution ... of the 
oatfitional editorial independence of 
the External Services." 

In terms of hours on the air, as 
Mr. Prm rightly says, America and 
the Soviet Union faa%'e Icmg since left 
the voice of Britain trailing. Nonethe- 
less m retaio our impact We are 
brin^i:^ into use more powerful 
transmitters and feeding i^y sta- 
tidns by satellite. New stations will 
open in Hong Kong and the Sey- 
.endksby the end of ibe decade. 

Tile etulorial independence that we 
and Mr. . 'Power prize continnes to 
eonfirra tbe BBC as a bolder of the 
largest worldwide audieture for any 
international broadcaster. Of course, 
we mw oot be fnst in emy country. 
iat wm we are beatea into second 
placeJof listeners, it Is usually by a 
powerhxl rq^onal ratiier than a ^ob- 


al ocrmpetitor.— All. India Radio.as tf ^ 
heard in Pakistan, for wi^tawn* Dm 
pTteent listraeiriiip erf at least 120^I(|T| 


premt listeneiriiip of at least 120 
miIU(m pet^le worldwide is eariiy tbe 
hipest figure ever retx^ed in tbe 
history of the External Sovices. ' > 
AUSTEN KARK. 

Exuniaal 






Managugl^rector. . 
teinal Broadcasting. ' . *^Srnia.-i.’ 

BBC London. *30 m ^ 

‘ Ji. ' JHstaiu 


American Maricet Musde 

E(X>noinicalIy, America remains 
the success stny. Tbe stilJ abundai^ 
resources, the imtiative and creadrity 
of the constantly rfurnginj an«t mov-* 
mg beterogeneous populatkxi aodi 
the still ^relatively lightly regulated 
“can do" envirexunent make it 'ihif 
loMunotive of the world economy. 

But dl of this is under pressure 
from new and old rivals. Itisgood'tq 
see America on top a gain in tarms 


^ si 

It 


™»n»«muscofitsgrealesUssetitS’ ‘''da 

consumer markcL WhUe Japan an4 ?lh '''9 a 

proiSisJ iJi'llilL: 

Ame:^ shows appalling laxitjC If 
has the musde to use toe. greatest 
consumer market in the w o r l'r nm the 
Saui of those who play fair. 

O. MARKMARCUSSEN. f 
London. 


lates mtetukdfi^ 006^8^ 
be addressed -Letters to the 
Emtor" andmuxi coattda rtewffr- 
^s stgnasure, none and Ml ad- 
dress Litters shotM be briti and 
^ mbjea to edting: We ctamot 
be /mrufhfe jhr Oe retvn of 
atisdieued manus^tyts' ' 


1. 


Srovv, 

^ior 














. , Irt ^. Press 

Itetirificized 
SHiN^; At ^minar 


^TTSi^^.-'-Xj 
’■av-'-'T” ■ ■- 




iNTERNATIONAL H^Al^ TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 1985 


Pages 


Top Mexican Drug Suspect Is Jailed 

HeIsSaidtoFwTushETiidmcemDea^ofU.S.Agent 


wnoinic 

«to have^tcSf*^^ 
'® to deS,^* 

"SnewhSJ'' will, 

■ ■ caoitai'* ^ riBv!" 


if ag. 

5^’ Glie\!e ^ dg- 
exchange <J? bin 

^Nge 10 sue 

“ihene^^d«pS spo 

ost Eurtij^ ^und ^ • ™|. 

* st“‘ 

es precluded S ^ 

t years ihev ht^ «^T 
«» wrreci ihe^' sbe 

^^utnng inip^ Hit wri 

^e Sron-jh ^"?K1% ebfc 

"economic nr «. 

=^‘=TorEP;^si, iher 

deep cuLs irtu 

V «o offse, “ 


•y developments^ f 
on also on Eurmt 

f no^ioT ^ 

sjowenng of hamec 
aer wa>. w-m he^^- 
^illmvoheclung^^ 
i bustness ai3r^ t. 
basialen pbetjapa,- 
ge export suipim t^- 
noi onu beJrused^^ 

•d dollar but also bt® 
non IS low-eraadsaiW, 
Japan than m .Anjfrb.’ 

in Japan’s ecac 
MlhihercsioriheindBr 
s mus not whether iliac 

Til go away lit win doiiV 
neiurpluswilllxofe-' 
•ng-ierm Japanese iihc 
road. Dereguladm ofi 
incial market. hM^ 
aaminUuauon a ptE 
tni. will help alletiattii 
e .shortage ol capital, 
ten is the otiiiuieofgj: 
raight be fo^ in iia 

Europeans would a^t 

- talks should seHtbe^ 

■ade bamers ihai tteji _ 
ig enough to accept ^ 
nca would agree :o tee- 
iRsuluuon iiribor iks» 
ers about their risolal 

policies, thus io^ 
ig that soaiethingiiHini! 
n the I'.S. budgfl deb 
Europeans and isfos 
.■dge that if Amoiak 
lOre restrictive risalpofe: . 
em would piusietDOte j 
— if this were ntfdtdi 
.1 the U.Sl change ^coc 
use a world recaaon. 

\ would commii iudf^ 

!, deregulation of iisl* i 

1. and to otherpohdest , 

1 the gruwing irapofts 
financial 
pitai '.0 die worid. 
Tar.aements would®- 

uch 'to impnwewwids? 

speci.'a.sihei'jTSwiJ » j. 

— which included A® i 

ice decontrol. 'Aes* ^ 
fapaae.se econora^ 

JommtiDi't" to . 

lialionsihiiv'ear. I 

-suchat'-araaineiKi?- 

depend on .Amen* 

.yr J finJKhjI 

iim;!- Hi fff 

Tr- • .V{H' li^' 


.. ^. Lloyd Grove . 

ItMugran Poi S«rrtfe 

WASHINGTON ^ Hov do 
Amencan newspapers cover the 
arcs? Very badly was ibe'oaisenw 
^ a paiy disewsion ii ibe Anacri* 
' can Soc^ of Newspaper Edtun 
J eoDvefluen. 

In a prognm Wednesdfty billed 
as **The Cnds va. ihe Cnudzed," 
Judith Marcia and HHioa Kramer, 
both culturd wciiers, blamed uninr 
fOTmed editocs, and the s(q)n8no 
Beverly SUl&ttiieral director <tf t^ 
New YOii Uiy Opera. invei^Kd 
against iocm^Mtent emks. . 

“If as little care were ^ven to 
hiring the sp^ ediUR' as goes to 
.V hinng the music editor," H&s SUs 
said, “you'd have a funny 
quvts page. Tve been reviewed by a 
youn| woman who spent two years 
studjiog the flute at a small sebotri 
m CaEftaiua." 

- “if I were a young sk^ today," 
she said, "I think 1 wouU dad n^* 
wrists. I have never seen music 
wiii^ in this country at sidi a low 
ebb. '»ere are some 'dreadful writ- 
ers on riewsp^iers today. Howrdare 
ih^ get a job on a new^u^, 
iriiens th^'m »ipposed to enlight- 
en me and interest mC? How 
.^fhey bore me and waste ipy time?" 

' “MyGo^”sbccontinu^"wdio 
is auditioning these people?" 

Her audience of about 500 news- 
pqier editors and imblishers re- 
sponded with sbeepiA latighter 
and scattered uplause. The bn- 
niorisl Calvin Tnllin later dead- 
panned, “L just want to sw, Beve^ 
ly, that I thought that the flute lady 
gave you a fair review." 

Mr. .Trillin, who writes for The 
New Yorker and The Nattoo, said 
there should be more hard n^ioit- 
ing OD the arts beat, *^051 IQce any 
other news sioiy." 

Miss Martin, a former drama 
and fihn reviewer for The Washing- 
w too Post who writes the satmeal 
* “Miss Manners" edqiMie column, 
blamed editors who mistakenly be- 
lieve ‘*that *ital people' Hke jmde 
culture that honest peofde prefer 
the bad to the ^xmL" 

Miss Sills said that newqiapas 
shotdd infoon their readers w^ 
the people writing about. cultorBl 
events had no eiqienise. The Qeve- 
laTwt Plain Dealer, ^ .wid, should 
have done that smial years 1^ 
when “soffleone-from -the copy- 
desk" was sent to appraise Geo^ie 
STselFs conduedng in a petfonnance 
of the Qevriai^ OtclKstn. 

"J wrote a letter to the editor— 
vriio. unfortunate, was my hus- 
band," Miss Sills said. 




. .im tatamvaa ^»rt 

llte U.S. secret^ <tf st^ G«<m« P. Shuhz, center, 0«ets Son Sann, left, and Prince 
Ntnwkkq XCnnariddhdiirii^ tbdrTiirit to Washington to disenss U.S. mifitaiy aid. The two 
are leaders of the non-OMwmmlst Cambodian resistance to occupying Vietnamese fmices. 

Son Sann, After Talks With Shultz, 
Is 'Optunistic’ on U.S. Military Aid 


By Don ^>efdocfer 

tVashuigroa Pat Svmcr 
WASHINGTON — A .senior 
leader of the Cambodian non- 
Cwnmunist resistance said after a 
t^levd tneeiing at the U.S. State 
Department that he was "very (^ti- 
mistic" that the United States 
would supply miUtaTy aid to his 
Cgbtens, bui that no definite prom- 
ises bait been maiU* 

Sou Sann, a fonDs CaidiolUan 
prime ittinlsut, who is mesident of 
the ooD-Communist Khmer Peo- 
ple’s Narional UbendoD Froni, 
made the statement after a meeting 
Wednesd^ wiA Secretary of State 
George P. Shuhz. 

He s^ that "you can’t haw 100 
percent irfutatyou want," adding: 
"If you have 60 or 'n percent a 
what you wish, that's a good 
thing.” 

The House Foreign Affairs 
Committee authorized $S miliirm 


in miljlaiy aid last wedc to the non- 
Commumst forces righiing Viet- 
oamese troops in Cambodia, 
spite the Reagan administration's 
(^position to direct U.S. mililaiy 

aid. 

State Deparuneot sources said 
after the meeuag that Mr. Son 
Sann was told tlw administration 
would be willing to use the $5 mil- 
lion to suf^ly such nonlethal sup- 
port as foM and econoouc as^ 
lance. However, the official said 
that the administration’s view re- 
mains that the noD-Communist re- 
sUiance has sufRdent weapt^ 
from other sources to arm its 
25,000 nghlers. 

Since the House actioa, offldal 
suiemeots have left open tlw possi- 
bility that (be administration might 
change its porition if the military 
aid is approved by both bouses of 
Conpess. 


Mr. Son Sann was accompanied 
to the State Depanment meeting 
by Prince Norodom Ranariddh, 
son of Prince Norodom Sihanouk, 
the former Cambodian head 
state. Ibe younger prince is com- 
mander of the Sihanouk-spon&or^ 
element of the Cambodian resis- 
tance. 

The Communist likhmcr Rouge 
overthrew the pro-U.S. gp\‘ern- 
ment in Cambodia 10 years ago 
next week, shonly before Saigon 
fell to the Vietnamese Commu- 
nists. The Khmer Rouge regime 
was responrible for the death ^ as 
many as two million Cambodians 
before being overthiwn by a Viet- 
namese invasion late in 1978. 

The Khmer Rouge, headed by 
Pot Pot, is the most militarily im- 
portant element of the current 
Cambodian resistance and is 
strongly backed by China. 


By Richard J. Mcislin 
Xe*' V«i Ttpm Swvhv 
MEXICO CITY —The man be- 
lieved by the Mexican auifaoriiies 
to be the country's No. I drug iraf- 
fleker has bfxa arrested in the Pa- 
eifle resort of Putfto VaDaria, the 
attorney general's office an- 
nounced. 

The arrest Monday of the sus- 
pect, Ernesto Fonseca Carillo, was 
the second nujor blow (0 Mexico's 
narcoiicii trade in less than a wedL 
On April 4, the police seized Ra- 
fael Caiu Quintero, who also was 
described by U.S. and Mexican of- 
ficials as one Oi the top fibres in 
the Mexican drug trade, in San 
Jose, Costa Rica. He was returned 
to Mexico on Friday and is facing 
charges before a Mexican court. 

The attorney general's office .said 
Mr. Fonseca, 60, had blamed N^. 
Caro Quintero for the killing of an 
agent of the U.S. Drug EoTorce- 
meni Administration and a Mexi- 
can pilot who sometimes flew for 
him. The beaten bodies ai the two 
men were found on a fann near | 
Guadalajara last month. 

U.S. officials have called Mr. 
Caro Quintero and Mr. Fonseca 
the "inielleciual authors" of the 
kidnapping and later killing of the 
two men, and hud sticn^y pres- 
sured Mexican officials to 'appre- 
hend them. 

.Arrested with Mr. Fonseca were 
23 accomplices, the aiioniQ' gener- 
aPs office announced. Among 
them, according to the govenunent 
newspaper El Nacional, were sev’er- 
al agmts and former agents of the 
judidal pobce and the Federal Se- 
curity Directorate, a police force 
operated by the Interior Minisio'- 
The attorney general’s office said 
that Mr. Fonseca told the police he 
first saw the kidnapped narcotics 
agent Enrique Camarena Salazar, 
at the home of Mr. Coro Quinteio 
on Feb. 8, the day after the abduc- 
tion. Mr. Fonseca smd he had sug- 
gested tkm not question the agent 
until the /ollouing day because he 
had had loo much to drink. 

But when Mr, Fonseca returned 


the next day intentflng to qiiestion 
them, tite aaome^ goMral^s office 
quot^ him as having said, the drug 
enforcement agent and the ^01 
already had bees serkMUy beuen. 
Mr. Fonseca said be was told by 
Mr. Caro Quintero, "Let's see if 
you can, l^use 1 don't ihioV 
they're talking." 

Mr. Fonseca said he became an- 
gry wi^ Mr. Caro Ouiniero and 
slapped him across the face. Mr. 
Caro Quiniero's bodyguards raised 
their weapons, he was quoted as 
haviag said, and be withdrew. He 
said he knew nothing d* the agent 
or his pilot after thaL 

U.S. officials had expressed frus- 
tration over the peifixinaoce ol 
Mexican officiab in the kidnapping 
and killing of Mr. Camarena Sala- 
zar. but t& arrests appear to have 
softened their view. 

“He's obviously a big nsh," one 


U.S. ofliciai said of Mr. Fonseca, i 
“It's a conlinu^ sign that the ' 
Mexicans are doing what they said 
they were going to be dtwg." 

Mr. Caro Q|iinten> is facing a | 
federal court in a Mexico Ci^: 
court OB charges of crimes against 
health, the standard Mexican nar- 
cotics accusation, as well as crimi- 
nal assodation, illegal arms pcsses- 
sioo and other crimes. 


Greek Shpll Kills 3 OiiMiwn 

ra? Assuaateti Preu 

THEBES, Greece —An artillety 
shell from an army firing range 
near this town in central Greece 
landed in j gypsy can^ and ex- 
ploded Wednesday, killing five 
children, the police said. .An un- 
known number of children were 
injured. 


30 bis. Rue de Paradis 
75010 PARIS 

(thru ihe archway) 

Tel.: 770 64 30 
When in Paris... 
visit our Museum 
and showrooms 

Open Monday - Friday 
9 a.ni. to 6 p-*n- 

Saturday 10- 12ajn. - 2-5 pja 
Also in selected sions 
near your home. 
Caldogiw on request 


In London 

there's a friendly hotel. 

You'll call it your club. 

THEPOKTMAN 
INTER • CONTINENTAL 





MBk Transmits Salmonella to Nearly 3,000 in U,S. 


Nnc Yerk TIiaef Sentet 

. CHICAGO — An outbreak of 
safananrila pwmntng Iq the mid'! 
western United Stales has been 
linked to two deaths and has 
caused Oliiess among nearly 3JOOO 
pecqple in five states, most of them 
in nfinois. 

MOk sdd by die Jewel Food 
Stores has been linked to the infec- 
tion. whidi is caused by eatiire 
foods CDolammated with the saf 
niondla bacteria or by coming in 
dose contact with an Reeled per- 
son. 


The Jewel company has suspffid- 
ed operations at its Hfllfarm Dairy 
in Mdrose Fait. llUoois and has 
withdrawn the suspect milk, cream 
and cottage cheese from its 217 
affiliated stores in the five states. 

Chet June, a spokesman for the 
Illinois Department of Public 
Health, said the outbreak was one 
of the worst ever in the United 
States. 

Of the 2,827 cases reported since 
Match 29, 2J114 have been cen- 
firmed. All but 268 of the cases 
from nUnois and the others 


were reported in Indiana. Iowa, 
Michigan and Wi^insin. 

Federal and state investigators 
have been unsuccessful in deter- 
mining how' the milk became con- 
taminated. Salmonella bacteria 
normally are killed in pasteuriza- 
tion. 

[Patrida Larsen, a spokeswoman 
for the health department said the 
number of cases could rise to 
10,000 if people infected by the 
contaminated milk spread the bac- 
teria, which can Itrtgar in a person’s 


system up to five weeks. The .Asso- 
ciated Press reporied.1 
Symptoms of the illness, whidi 
usually last a few days, include 
cnimps, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting 
and fever. It is rarely fatal. 

An au tops}' in Kane County, Illi- 
nois, confirmed Wednesday that 
sstimoaella poiscKui^ hod oontrib- 
uied to the nean failure Monday of 
a S3-year-old man. 

Tests showed that a 61-year-dd 
Chicago woman who died Monday 
also had been infected by the bact^ 


THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 

INTER-CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

22 F\fftman Square. (441) 4S6-3M4. Telex: 261520 
For reservations calk Paris: (01} 742-07-92, 

Frankfurt (069)230561. Amsterdam: (020) 262021 


Brown Boveri play a mi^or role 
at Karakaya and Atatiirk hydroelectric power plants 
1lirkey|s largest- 
supplying and 











entire electrical 
equipment. 


iDlTOR 


Water and power 


When completed, the AtatDrk 
hydro power plant in Turkey will 
have an installed capacity of 
2400000 kilowatts. Equipped 
with Brown Boveri generators 
together with BBC transform- 
ers. switchgear and the entire 
control system, it win be the 
country's largest power-gen- 
erating f^'lity 

Harnessing the River Euphra- 
tes, the AiatOrk dam will create a 
;Slake having a total volume of 
48700 million cubic meters of 
water Notonly to generate elec- 
tricity butaisotolrrigateafertile, 
but still arid, region of Anatolia^ 

Yet a^n. Brown Boveri are 
playing a major role in Asia 
Minor 


For back in 1977 BBC were 
entrusted wjth supplying all the 
electric^ equipment for the 
Karakaya hydro plant of 
1 800 000 iqAf. This is a second- 
stage dam on the Euphrates, 
some 180 km upstream from 
AtatGrk. 

The new project illustrates one 
of Brown Boveri's strengths: the 
ability to manufacture in drffer- 
ent countries to the same high 
quality standards. Components 
will be made at BBC factories in 
Switzerland, Germany and Italy. 

BBC play a major role in provid- 
ing the world with f^lities for 
generating, distributing and uti- 
lizing electricityi And often with 
such success as to invite a 
repeat peHbrmance. 






Atatiirk -M 



Competent ■ Dependable - Woridwide 


BBC 

BROWN BOVERI 




For hrthcrinfomatlon plnw consult yourloesi BBC agency or write to: SwIUm lend: BBC Brown, BovertA Company: Ltd., P.O. Box 58, CH-S401 Baden; Federal RapubUeofGennsiiyi Brown, Boveri 
& Cie. AMiengeselischafL Postfach 351, D4600 Mannheim 1: Auetrie: Oestanelchlsche Brown BoverMVerlce AB, Postfach 184, A-llpl Vienna; BraaBt BBC Brown Boveri S.A, Calxa postal 975 
06000 Osasco (SP); Canada; WK Brown Boveri Canada ine.. 2260 Place du Canada. Montreal, Qua., H382N2: FVenees BBC Brown Borerl Fiance S. A, 21. rue dssTrois-FonlanoL Pare de la Defense, 
F-92024 Nanterre Cedex; QrutSritaIn: British Brown-Boveri Ltd., Darby House, Lawn Central, CB-Telford, Shropshire TF3 4JB; HalyiTeenomaslo Italrano Brown Boveri 8.p.A, Casella postale 10225 
1-20110 Milano; Nerefay; A/S Norsk Bektriak & Brown Boveri. Postboks 263-Skeyen. N-0212 Oslo 2; Spain: Brown Boveri de EspaAa SA. Apartado 36127. E-Madrid 16; USA: BBC Brown Boveri. inc., 
2, Gannett Drive. White Plains N.Y 10604; other eauniriee: BBC Brown, Boveri & Company, Ltd., Brovm Boveri Intematloral Group, RO. Box 56. CH-5401 Baden, Switzerland. 







INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


RE4L ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


lOMMN W4. AtoQnrficent Vidmoi 
■K o roga in iis own ground. 10 bed- 
roons. Ewelenf ena^ feeAra. 
E3<0m Tal; 581 


GREECE 


A MASTERPIECE of Archiiadiire. In 
most mogndieeM Porto4afh reurt, 

buih on o w-tep wHh pmocone vMw 

on sea & mountan. Independent. 
280ni from sea, ei 3500 spjn, land, 2 
floors of 6 Mies (SS sqjn. eocU 3 
flab. 250 S4Jn. rcoplion ore o, 17 0 
sqjn. venandos, heipDrt, swinmng 
pool, porbia area rare art <Mr£ 
Aho lAeUewr towisiie exploilattea 
FiiA-photo mformolion ovaunle, br» 
kers occe p led. One. 100 nSon. P. 
btdvnbn, G. Zogndou 23k Zogro- 
fou-Alhent. 


VULA IN COSTA IU05. M/conoL 55 
sq. m., 3 rooms Kimshed, slew a 
Limrious condoevHnvniig pool, ten- 
na courL 7M dmdwia CaD Adteni 
6832321 or 6B20O6. 


SKIATHOS - Howe on pnvole Ivd 
widi 4 bedrooms. 3 bothi. 4 terrocea. 
BreotNokina views. Bex 2035, Herdd 
Tfibime. 92521 NeuBy Cedes. France 


CORFU, GfSECE. 2S0 room hold on 
eoott. $4 ffliBaa Ineome SI nelnn- 
/yeor. US pi 3)^56527. 


IRELAND 

IRBAND OAREMORRIS Moya 


7-noin bunoolow m K on. 9 nlH 

wport, ui^jboa.Re 


Replies: 8 Brae- 

mer House, Moifa Vole, London W9 


ISRAEL 


JOUSAIBIA Belh Hanna, For sde: 2 
■ ■ ■ ■ ■ S. Plot Is iqjn. 


■nMdud pto. 

t2;15jiOOsq 


Plot Z 15J$00 s^in. Conrtrudmn per- 
int on bond. Comod Mr T STBMAK 
^onlefurt, Wbst Germany, id; |0) 
69/63 40 66. 


lUXURY RATS, homes, wBos, cM- 
le^ for sole or rate. Hare- Isroel s 
most beouiifiil gorden dly end sea- 
side resort. Aiw Sven Red Estate 
Agency, 129 A Honoes A«e. Haifa, 
k^Te(>4«12967. 


rTALY 


PORTORNO 

Irekmi RivKnL Mo^iifieent 6.000 sqjiL 
rendenee vrilh spwfldd view on harbor 
-t- Pi oaa Q. 3 sdons, 6 bedrooms, seme 
in separate studes, central hedija d 
modw arnifort. Broctwe oueslae. 

DE HAAS Red Estate 
Sdioiiwweg 32. Wo ssetioo r, Hellend 
Td. 31 n v 


MCMHACO 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


MARBELLA HULCUIB 

•nAS ESMBIAIDAS” 
mi axeeptiond de vd egmenl d five 
iwordi styte viBos of 2/4 bedoom 
with brntroem en/surie. locaied in rim 
most deseoble oreo bctvreen Msbdia 

mid Puerto Bolus. 

FROM UKC1 50000 
Each property is bdvidudly designed, 
hos mogiiificBnt saowiew and pmote 


A fufly dekded btodan of OmH ^ 

other presK^evs propertire IS ovdoble 

Avenida IlieadD Sonm 22 
Morlidio, Spon. TeU 34 (52) 776350 


PROM01BB 
COSTA oa SOL,^ 

We me in rim ptocbb or bwong ever 
140 flab end in the bed lecdien 
of Fuengi^ We ore loeinng for es- 
tme agms in the Seandnavm ooun- 
tries, Gwiimy and Bcrmhei. 

Please corrae t 
MR JUUAN BAGUETTO 
SAIBDRECTOR 
EASTADASJk. 

PIqyg Cadilo 
P we i ara lgJMdqgd 
Tdi U 621 476(112 


MALLORCA - FORMBriTOR 
POI1B6A 

linunois eonverted farriioiBe, bcouti- 
fd salting on 11 ho land, 2 recepben 
rooms, aiMW room, 4 double sw 
roona, 3 bdnraoms, swimm i ng pod, 2 
gmoees. 1 nde from soodiere. 
fPSUlKt 

C Poeiiler, Lmidfalresse 84 
3047 ft| wig ar^ Bern 

Td; 31/23 09 75 or 61 35 38 


MB40RCA 

Beoddrort didels & opertnents in 


Pored, the last pvodse of the 
Me di terroneai. 50 nt rrem beo 


AmfoiSb 108 sqjii. 


fuciities in rim 


Didex 74 sam, 
NOVIMENOR SJL PO Boec 6107« 


usmooo. 


MAIMDIal: 
Tb 


2709004/5, 
’8 AROAE 


MONTE CARLO 
PARKPALAa 


Ariogreficary I 
pmw Furnisf 
gtetimaadni 


apartment. 1 16 sq. meters 
' Furnished ol PatkPdaee,oppe- 
gle rim oadne Old Hold de Paris, in rim 
Golden Trimnle of Mode Gmlo, new 
(suiUng, Sih floor with frmtl end 
terraces, ceBor & pvtong. 


For IdormaUMV Fleose gqU: 
Miss K Sdriediier, at Rheinberg 
Wesi Gernnny Td: |0284:q 182 


MONTE CARLO 
Prindpafity of Monaco 

Per sole m hixunw modern r es id en ee, 


plm m onl 2 room. baao. see 

• • • bSTwe 


egdppad bichen. 


Dvlaia PliOOiDO 

€(a&rvfA^ 


edkr. 


AGSKE INTBMHM 
R,P. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO CB)BC 


Tek^ll^SO 66 84 


: 469477 


MONACa PMhome 300 sun. Yaitf 
23 m. -f Rolls. (93)895395. 


MOROCCO 


MARRAKKM. Podid tmuse in fwt 
of mmtno with pod n ogurtyvd, 
pamramK vmw, staggered flam lew 
di etc. A piece of art. Gartfid tAxiidi 
Td: 151036 (dorl - 15/5266 bnmMig) 
m writs tec M. tfKn, Trwo mr. IS B. 
8000 fctaikh 19. W. Grnimwy. 


TAHGIBS. Cosy wdl kmx vifa «i dU 
mouioain with 4 bedrooRB, 3 bc^ 
roona, diamng lerroca & gonlen. 
Pm more iriforninon eontad owner's 


repr esen tative. Mn Erdni 7 Jama d 
• ■ ■* 19)38380 


Arara. TarQen. Td; I 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


EXOmONAL PANORAMA 
ON THE SBIE VAUEY 
78-Y«dines on N13l 60 ton. Pars 
LARGE BilGUSH R Bf DBK l 
vdfli CHARACTER, 1200 SQm. on 3 
Immb, 20 rooms of wfsdi 4 
RBCVnONS, louB XIB wood wdl 
poneBm^ on 7 ho. erdosed i m dvided 


poddedt. stables, weed 
lltoCAIlRl 


CARRIBE 266 9Q 75 
91 SM da no. ST-HONORE 
75008 PARIS TBEX 642.066 P 


BELL 

GROUP INTONATIONAI 
FOCH. High doss, i^iper floor, en- 
trance, AMig. oLgm, mortrie both. 


equipped toidisn. Superb 55 sqjn. 
700(612906 ia 727 34 tf. 


35 MINS. WEST PARIS 

NEM MONFORT L'AMAULLY 
Beoutmil pvf^ residenee, 300 sqjn. 
on 7,000 SUL PARK. 
EuL iia v it y ; 

SANTANDREA 11] 561 90 91. 


PALUS 17TH, near Metro la Fouid^ 
for sola, renovated stone heuw, SO 
sqm., Hnal _ pnvgie gord en, . wdl 
I bottvoofik 


eqmyeJ Utehoi & : 


, Bving 


room, bedomn wM gdtory! 

^ OSmOL 


FBSOJXiaTd; Peris 387 81 

Berne (31)50 14 94. Alfred Gm. Bolii- 
aenstr. 36rOi3020 8efim. 


BOULOGNE 

16th floor, mg nn ificent 
about 60 sqjn., 2/3 room 


penthouse, 
roa n s -I- terrace. 


Superb ur^ioble view. 


Td. 


OLSE 60 KM PARIS Sraoffl house with 

dioraeter. Uidmn, 2 bdhs, cerlrd 

hearing, hreplace in eodi room, on 
2J00 sq.m, land surrounded whh ncri- 
to hedge. Pn0,000. WMa Mnm. 
SoBm Cm londeL 602M le MesnB 
1hetibu8/Td;W484 40 36. 


ARCHITEa SELLS 
SUPBI8 HOUSBOAT 
bidl in 1960, 120 sqm, firepLoei, oin- 
deefc, Fbdng Bos de Bounam, 

n,20o!8oa Td 602 38 90 


25 MINS. EAST OF nUBS, vwy rmi- 

denrid. Beounfdv^ 350 sqm., 4 
bedrooms, 4 lutfuuunv, 
eooL 3,000 sqm. gordark 
TS(1)a76a04. 


69 KMS SOUTH PARIS, dmnnng dd 

country haute. 200 sqm. 2 baths, 
1,850 sqmwoled-n madm 
pnvDcy. P900 JOO. 137124 67 


PARLY El Owner sdb kmunous 152 

sqjiL aportnmnt, foong seurimor, 5 
roofliL 2 logaas, 2 bedraoim, mmole 
florni. n jaOffl). Td: 955 48 33 


I6lh TROCADBO. owner, Iimmous 

3rooni, 1 00 sqm. ground-nem, quiet. 
Td;P1461C10. 


ITTHETOORolmef _ 
55 sqm PSSOJXXX Td 328 

wdor 10 an to 7 cm. 


79 Paris 


PORTUGAL 


1 ALGARVE PORTUGAL 
. residence. 5,0 


COAST 

Imunous residence. 5|000 iqm pmk. 
pod, tencib court, 6 (oonb, 2 bdhs, 
mmUe ilem, ilom hearing, Replace 
monthly rentirg'S613 Pn^ SIoESv 
eidusivo sob. 

PAULA BUOHOlZ 

IMMCKRJBri GMBH RDM, flABQ 

y. 21. 5000 Kedn 41. 

V. (0)231-405071 


COIARE^ 2 smdl londmortc houses, 

gaden, very pmote, mogic of Sntra, 

coirleL nem bcodi, oivrtook. Just 
renowded. Tri^errtd SIISK. 312- 

965-3698 USA, Rx 4990821 MANSY 


SPAIN 


JOBSON REAL BH'ATE Cosio dd Sd 
Towirimute aO|ea fronting one of 


ihe^two 184m golf comes 


hdf'woy Mabgo Airport and 
beSe. Pnvocy swmunng. pa ‘ 
cames, dub houiAsup^ hiimimmii 
viewq. From C33.fD2 uq JC6S0N, 
EdiAao PraA 5, Puengirelo/Mda^ 
Teh 53-479466. 


20 MR4UTES MARBBiA. Ettalo of 
100 houses under conrirwlnn in 
l17Secres.3lmifremlheMadheiTO- 
neon sea X bn Mdogo InternaiiaKi 
Anport. Pm sole fradmid deed man 
owner. The remoinina 73 unsold ales 
dtaoriiouK. OffleaL swkiHwa pod, 
worldin r "Tr— Access roda Ser- 
vices & M dl wiri) current buHding 



MeiiftPfb 32/100 SOM. prne 


land in eMdueive Comp de Mm vnlh 
magwBoent sea mews. Apprw a d for 
con si rudion of 2 houm 350 fnit 
traeL OEve move. Abundant water 


Juan 

Spoia 


pfOig^.TItftPOO. Ab. Smnper, 


i«ral1S,Pc 
Td: 2^. 


Pdhn de Malorea 


COSTA BRAVA: 5694 iqjn. moQufi- 
mnl wflq old stene, surrounded by 
big pine trea^ saoiide; 15(0 sqm 
hmiie. 250 sepn. cowered perj ‘ 
tennis, sdt wder pod. 20 bn ta 


eemsa, 50 bn to Gerano Airpal. 

- »177, 


Marti de TerrcL Mtanud 
Boredaw 3i TeL P*3> 


2038321. 


TORBMOUNOS . COSTA 88. SOL 
Origifid Anddudan Vila wHh ariique 
funviure and fiteptacM, 702 sqm., 
wn re m i ded by beauti ful 2^ 1^^ 

condMerk Tok^!^3£u^ 


COSTA DB. SOL «JA Sbedoan 
fid USS40JX)0. Td 52/520771 Write 
Haaimi. Apta 34, Nmio (MA). SP. 


SWITZERLAND 


MINNY SOUTHERN SWnZBIIAND 

LAKE LUGANO 

In o knge 
P7/IQ0 sqm) with 


Ring pook snivde maims oid pfivote 
8Dsqjn. 


becdk 1st qucAy. Apmtmmns 
up to 190 sqm. + tartoces 34 - 47 
sqm. Prices; SF44jD0a - SR, 123,600 
on The Rndmoa intheS^ 

mea of the Ldue offers cpartrnenti 
fiom 7 sqm lo 1 X sqm, (Mdodong 
the tabe and riie iimiiAxib, Aiois: 
SF210/50 - SF 485.45a Free for ide to 
fbreig ra rv M w l niqi e e low Swbe 


EMOALD - HOME LTD. 

YOUR PARINBl M BJROPE 


Via G. CMIeri 1^ Loom 


Td; QL9T-548913 - 
Tito 73612 HOME Of 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


DOYOUWKH- 
' TO BUY AN APARIMBor 
OR AHO US8 

■ TO RETIffi IN S WriZBU APP? 

■ TO INVESTIN SWnZBOAND? 


OONTAa US: 25 I^ARS OF BIPBa- 
DriS IN BUILDING AM) SBlffriG 
HTC SWISS iSAL BTATE 


SOOIMSA. 

PA Bex 62, 

1864 Vilais. Switrerfond 
The 456213 (7BE CH 


GST A AD 

A once n a Gfdbne opportunity 

SCHONRIB) 


only o few nmitei fieni tayely Gstood. 
^Apartments et pricH 


tigni r ie a i ri y lower rim Gstood. 
MOTTGAGESi 


iTOTL-INTBteSTSWL 


AVAILABLE FOR FORBGNERS. 
GLOBE FLAN SJL 

Ave Men Repos 24 
ALIOOS Loumre, Swiavlaid. 
TeL (21^X12^.25165 MBJS Ol 
EM^DBIDGfl 


1970 


ATTRITION FORBGNBS 

gnamnail lOgiiWtofi 


. M boy 
upwliiMiils in Monlfoinq enepi fa 

tnose J ev efap m aai opp 

yem.Apprevd has been panted fcr 
lowdy rea dencB. direeriy on Ida Ge- 
neva, with sewerd medniti e ent oporl- 
menn owolable. lAaim r w rndim . 

Fm mferraobax 

GLOK PLAN SJL 
Aw Men Repm 24, 


Ledw Geneva A Lugano. 

hi these axeeptiond regions of Switzer- 
land inducing Menoeux, GOoed-Vd- 
lay & many dher famesB mex x ta n re- 
scrti, we hove e venr big dioKe of 
mo gnifie e n t APARTMENTS / VUAS / 
CHALETS. Very reaonobly priced but 
dso rim best « mosr exdiMve. Price 


fron^ about US^OOa Mwh j^^ q 
‘ lil m pnene: 


6tKL intrat. Hem viril i 

H. SBOLD SA. 


TOUR GBSE 6. CH-IOOP Imismme. 
Td 2l/aS 26 >1. Tk 24298 SBO Of 


VALAIS / SWITZERLAND 

OLANS MONTANA 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


GRSriWKH COMCCnCUT 

SERENE SETTING 


kufilaiipaay whh 

& woodond. fedme 
fireploces in 6ving roan & fceidy roaq 
master suite with Joaizzi & steam show- 
er, b e Jio an/study wHh batik 2 n 
bedrooms & more. 2-1- ooe era 
whh poobrie. fticed et $T,XI)H0a 

(LUXf^ 


Pa Mamaliai on tfis & other bxiiry 
N.Y, NJ. & a cell 
our Spead mpertei Comritad ol 
I-X) 


SCHLOn 

REALTORS 

GR»IWICHa 

1-203-661-9030 


New York Gty 
5tfi Avo Condombiiuni 

Luxurious 1 0 Roanis/300 Sgumc AAeters 
B'fTIRE HIGH FU)OR OF 
TOP 192(75 BUILDING 
vyith priwta eb val or entrance- Best 
vmws of porik museum and West Side. 

3 large raoepoon rooms, 3-4 beeboems, 

4 bdhs, 2 mad's ream, 3 fireplaces. 
North, West aid South etqxsTO. No 
boma of cSredetA imrestrsBad owner- 


ship, for^m wdeanecL 


.. pem DUbHAM 
Office pl£8325875 

Raddenca tfra SOSTOn 
Deugbs Sfanon Gfefaens & Ives 


LUXURY AFARnMB«r FOR SALE in 
M ui i y4 t on ‘s tefc Avenue mod 
sought after exchdve rasiriendd area 
yetWimen Regency & Moyldr Ho- 
teb. A truly s ophifteeiad cqimlinetri 

fill of sundaa m at dd binding whh 
oil modern convenienoK mode ready 
to move in by htarnoliond deerndm. 
Mng Porh Avenue, 2 sun mqtewri 
mmfale foyer, al; wdh, snmiess 
nwrar bd nreom. 3 bemoons -f- 
roam ft both ided for home 
Price lowered to 
for fast 

. rtriso 

pmfeet lima to buy. GHN Manage- 
merit ft SefdeesLrepri an ting axmer. 
212.88B-7840 i«£ard. Abo weper- 
frant sady beadi hooie in Horicb for 
sde. 


office or rwrsary. rnee lowert 
$1J90/X)0whh50KfinmKingfe 
sde. Lower mlerest rotes iiKM I 


NTC 43-Stary C0M)O 

Dog Honmardqdd Tower 

240 EAST 471h ST. 

1 Btodc To United NalierB 
-SPEQACULAR- 

I, 2. % ft 4 Bedeom Apertraanli 


New RiO SaVioe Bunding Whh 
Swimming Pool Hedlh Qub m) 
Hou s dieea ' ng Svvices Avidabb 

SwftL APAimwnTS 

ME ALSO AVAILABIE 
For Ida Cd 2127S988U 
5d, Sun 11-4; Mon to Fri 95 


MANHATTAN. NYC 

THEblilMATEM 
aXOOMMRIM LMNG 
TRU^ TOIA^ - on Hfth Avenue 
MANHATTAN PLACE - Isl Av ft X St 
New, dagari, presSgious units feature 
ddridwe, leoire aid afvaie 2, 4, & 
be(haaim.J1SOO to 3000 sq ft.) Avc£ 
obis dredly frem owners, 

CaiWd: Mr. M. Panoa 

Monocamail Cap, 
11835 OuMBlvd. 

NxewHBL NY 11375 USA 
Td: 718^^-4848 


PLYCEXOilSIVE 
5ih Ave, 2 bechnam ft 5 bedroom 


CREME DE U CR»AE 


THYON, IB COUONS 
fC VALD'AfMMBIS 


ST. lUC 

nalsand<hdets2Sto1S0sqni.,1 to 5 
rooms. Cradi 60%. bmretf rota &7SX, 
Durorion 15 yeors. Ownen buildn 
Dlr^ sd^ 

VAL PROMOTION SA 

10 Ave. du Mkl,^l95D Sion, 

Teh 41-27-^ 34 95 


USARESmENTIAL 


CBITRAL PARK SOUTH. NYC Siral 

2 badoom opatr^, Urabstnidal, 
t pedanda pah views, One of NY's 
mart secure addngk RA had ler- 
vicas. Buildira fa there who saefc 
privacy m NtT Smol, toirfy oamteta 
modem Uldm, 2 mabte Mbs with 
joaisi ft steam shower. Mtf esnii- 
lion Asking SSOQiXiD. ftiixiju h only, 
Tel: 3I2-2%-2635a Bw 2S1 Her- 
ddTrbunq 92521 NewSTC^ 


6taua it n oaidomirexns whh 
breath i dang views. Mma bcoliare. 

adusively CMs ..—A 

Mrs. Shtaun 213-4 
UL KAYE ASSOOA* 


BEST LOCATION M S. CAUF. Ceiriu^ 
ry Gty Townhouse. Live m camtry 
lurury in te Heat of Loi Ange- 


lei most presligiais enhsHuimerri ft 
cemerTM staff ft security ot 


finaiedaerew. 
yoa service. ProlesBomdy dscoRtted 
3 bedroara, 4K baths som ft qn 
paice, roof gaden aid private ai^ 
ria. oo*tn 6M t^ll,000XKI0. 
(21381^18. 


votar, 

Cdl 


rCYCUm EAST SK - Smus 
bedoan, 2 bo^ kixay buidng cav 


demiriwn. 2&h Hoa. Spedocubr 
views of Gentrd PeriL riie Reserveir, 
WM Sde up to rite 
M.tt00j]00 
iMai-Wrid- 


ft the 
Georgel 
by owna. pI2)^ 
Fn lOan-Bpes, 


GRPIWK H CDPyjECnCUT 
2 a 4 acre wooded homcertes 
Aiwriq oounhyselhng 
ftestigieiis aaa, caiyentonl to NTC 


FrindpA eorPotf owna XI 2652322 
Bor IIS' " “ 


T1207 (freenwidk CT 06830 USA 


BRONXVUENY . 

sa itile. X min. Iran NTC . . . 
soiod K-11 Gradous homes ft caop 
cpafmanlLlMitaibr brodwre. Dead 
Rad 1 20 Kf^ Are. BraunBe, 
NY WjTOB. (Pfft33 7.0900L We 
refocGrion speooBt^ 


BY cw m SIES TA KEY, Sorasciq 
Honda Almost on ooe aSafeoel; 




baodk - - 
bah hoiM. 
S2B5j01l0. T^ Bia 


USA. 


NYC TTUJMP PLAZA 61 St. ft TMd 
Me. 2 bedroom, 2K bah cD4a ter^ 
rooB, 7rii flea, dodoim badre 
c of pet in g, moRK Boot^, nitron, 
leaving maiy ereofc $636J00. Mdfr 
I $13)6416. Td 212OT-5)81 


DARHi 8 MW CANAAN Cameeti- 
cut Gcacuiive type homes fur red ft 
sde. Pleosait N.Y, Qly suburb. 
Frendi spdwk Nsrienwide eamee- 
liais. CdTlUaiis R£. 2036587724. 


USA 

COMME9LCIAL 

JilNDUSnUAL 


WEST HAMPTON BEACH- 

resto u ronl for sde. Cd Fa 
212-752-8343. 


WEST HAMPTON B6ACH- Cbmner. 

od Land. BJOO sq ft. Mne le ck rta*. 
Padeta4sedl7l2-752-6343 


realestah: 

TO RENT/SHARE 


FSENOl PBOVINaS 


COTE D'AZUR. ThedsL Bet^ texo- 

ry viria M ognd'K a h 1 

wow, CaiiTatubly funidie^ 5 bed- 
rooms, eenlrd heding. Sepaae siii- 
do with conoerge. Woemriy read 
SI JOO, Augurt SSgOO, rediiere satire 
Jer_bfswtaa/M 49 87 03. 


UDCURT PROVBICALE fanrimwe 

near Mea. 3 doufala «. Iwa- 


ed pod, June, July. August. S epta n - 
from E875 to E1,37s c 


ber 


London Bl 7550 from 10 


week. 


AUTHOrS SPAOOIS 8EAMB) vil- 

tageheuM, Ida, Preaire. 


naa sea na, Preaire. 

j2^^re90jQ|aTin^ 


EZSMANY 


BAD HOM8URG: New luxury Ra, 2 
bedroone, 2 bate, Bwo^diSM 
aoe. firaploeq fu8y a nqqj e J faten- 
en. awaBea leemiork PboM wire la 
Box 21 32, LH.T. Fnedietar. 1 5, 6000 
Fraiidurt/Main 


great BRTTAIN 


SUSSB. EASnoURNE PBOOO coun- 

efa o to ) £6SD pa week. Lovdy rae- 
lory (1 b haxi Londoid wnh views to 
riwseadfectariionsfteBwerveieiy 

ft jocua, 6 bed rea re , 3 beds, 1 
of malm 


Apply 

Kmos 


y motm gaden ft paddeda 
^ Mdml Aylasfard, 440 
Reu^ tadai SW10. Td: 01- 


Xn3B3.liu 916048 


LUXURY EXECUTIVE AnWTMBiTS. 

Kadrisfaridge/Oal f itt Ova IX 
fdlysavieid state, I ftJbedreem 


u p ij |i i iai ib .ABinodmcenve i iie uu s. 
Mninun stay 22tes. Pnns frem 
£145 oa week. Pteese eonna l» 
roung, NGH Apatoiems. Ndl 




7G. 


BB« A BUTOfOFF. A lage sebdiai 
of prctoerties m Si. John's Wbedt 


Regm Fork. Sws Cottoge , Hem 

moflwt Td 


rtm ft ecMore. 6 . . 

D1-5B6 ^1. Th 883168 ACO 6 


REAL ESTATE 
TORBST/SHARE 


GREAT BHTTAIN 


CB4TRAL LONDON - 6aairive ser- 
vice . u p u i . l me nt s in new bwUnn 
eomformly finidied and fmy 
equmped. Daly mdd service (Mak 
rtraiuc^JCda TV. Phene fa bra- 
dimioi] m ISCa write hesden- 


lid Eflotas ^ Unvershy 


St, London ’ 


tOMION KMSMGTON spoenus. 
novfy decorated. , jMQuHlwy . ^ 
lidied cfialmsrt. Living room, deung 
teeni. Zdeiible be dr ooms, i b^ 


rooms, one en swie wirii shower. 
Modern well eqwpped tetdi en. ft dw. 
Available 1 yea a tanga. 075 pa 
week. Perrin: 01-603 


for 


MURY POTTHL aid . 
good quiAiy fumidad ncis ft 
to rentmoMid London aa re^^pe- 


doErts in leninq monogemait ft 

01-493 2021 m ALD267te 


JOfM BIRCH ha X yeas experiena 
in Rentds. Long or short Se no ndes, 
Genbd ft suburban London ft Absr- 
deen. Birch ft Co, 01-4996801 


LQNDOR Fa the bed furnriad fkns 

ad housre. Consdt ria SpKii 
PMfps, Kay and lewis. Tefe London 
352 81 1 1 . Tdex 27846 RESDE G. 


QITRAL Londen, Luxur y fur nished 
flo^ Ainerieai kMais. CBO/ weeh 


staere 4 a £175/weelr - de» 1 Tel: 
oiSm 2204 a01-4a6 3415(180 


FOR RIRMSHED LETTINGS M S.W. 

Landoq Surrey ft Berksfure. Cortod 

MAYS, Oxdiolt (037 28^ Xn UK. 

Tdaxs 8955111 


( If nr I rn n tiIs 

Houses ft Rds fa reirid in Nath, 
hbrthwest ft Cartrd London, Tefc 01 
625 8611. 


ANSCOMRE ft RMGLAND whh of- 

fices in St Johns Wood ft Kendiigton 
ofler ria bed service in residma 
leak^Tdkmmf (Oil UK. 


CHHSEA HOUDAY APARTMBIT. 2 


rooms -i- falefan, bothrean ft ndie. 

. ... . 


£200 pa week. Td London 1 


NEW LONDON HCXiSL 2 bed 

mdre dly dose lube. SSDO/marih. 
Write Vbrdy. BOO 3QJ, England 


LONDON HAMSIEAD, 5/6 mashs, 

Hih 1 £120/wedk 01 435 72^ 


GUZCE 


MYIUNOS, . . 
house naa town ft 


one bedean 


cam sea view. Large tenooe. $L600 
monthly. Abo one room nwlli-lmel 
stacBa Sea wew from terrace. 2 wedc 
laninum for both. By month ante, July 
A^juL A Shinrar, Mykaws : 


end 


HOLLAND 


DLITCH HOUSMG (Bins B.V. 
£telua ra 
Amstardan. 


£telua raiilaii. Vclerkisir. 17A 
020621234 a 62m 


PETR BRUM MAKBAARDU 
tan lleeeei g Smvhe tenlris 


Amstmdam. Td: 03»^*B021 


ITALY 


ROME OIGIATA In a 
vGovrtIh 


.. Rofflcm 
there ae3 


squa opperiunibes o/ lenfing su- 
perbly funSiKlftdt. Hot A- — 
114 6,000 sq^$35IXL 
mrarenolcly 2^ sq,fL $1501 
Fn C - cBpreunotete i5DD sqft,, 
S1001 Boch'Rat has 3 bedrom with 
atadted bui li uu ii B . iying/dinmg 
room & Uldan. Rkm write to Hong 
Kena GP.O. Box 5073 FK a Tdex 
74^ a phone 5-3302S frem AprI 
111985. 


PARIS AREA IVRNISHED 


FACING KOm 
CONCORDE LAFAYmi 


Luxurious dntax siudiei> phone. 
Noogeneyfm 


FdlOO lat by month. 
^ Visit tocf 
Gouvmn St Cyr, Pais I7rik 


Shat term bree. Visit today: 9S Bd 
Ih; 574' 82 57. 


MW ISIh Pac ds OgMshions. Sta- 
te- ^ mxf 3 lo m re, fifty ia«| 


Uiiian, or* dov^ ene^weSt^m 
fflondi a mere. Cnrioeh FLATr 


55 rue d'Oraifcur s/Ghinq 

Td; 554 97 56. The XOW F. 


Reis. . . 
Remotiend pthas. 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSSS 8th 


&u(iq 2 a 3raan apartment 
One I 


: inaifi or maq 
LE OARIDGC 359 67 97. 


MONTUGLONEesycuea Beie.ga- 
geovi funuhed wloi mdoa pea, 5 
bodreems, 4 boriis. Rned exec Ivinq 
1-2 yr. leoM; refaemre ft seoxily 
raguM SSSOO/mailh. Tek 3418 
61X or awDae 312441J92(I9. 


SHORT TERM STAY. Advortegre of 
on hetd without neaiventenaq fed 
a home in irin dixfios a one bed 
room mortmenl s in Fab. Contaet! 
SOnyi«r 544 39 41 X rue de runi- 
veisbS, FkeisTih. 


SHORT RSITAL M FABSr State 
end 2 reare baairifiAy deooraled 
Contacb Sofir6giq 6 ove. Ddeeise, 
75008 PARS tZII I 399 99 51 


SHOR T TSIM, IS DAYS -3 maeh, 
fine eporimais. 3 & 4 rooms whh 
phone, cola TV.IinakTd: 306X31 


P fWY B . Double Svii^ 3 badvant 
b^fqIg qqcqml Awny. DonG 
&.500 naCCettn Ptatori OSn 


SHORT RENTAL AVL GBEIGEV. 1 
Ml 


bedroaq hnoinf oporfnreri. 
ogentaTelSO^. 


SHORT THLM h Lain Quata. 
No ogare 329 X 83. 


RUTTE IHONTMAKTBE. Sumy. 
roaM.lTea.$400b257 82 67 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


REST LOUB 

TO RPiT FOR a T EARS 
Ohxcixib oportment cdm. 

6 + 2 Dcaoenq en cadbrts. 
ueuulifd eq ui pped khdrei 
FIQjOtlnei. 

IGE KAYSR (1) 329 60 60 


I6TH MCXCART. Very tatWy stute 
drekweteg 
dbhwedMr, bafk of cenv 


fats. PSTX net. Smdi key money. 

Tek 806 23 II 


FOURQUEX. MAR GOLF ft RSL 

iov^ modan 5 bedroom vBq 

equipped feMiBik 2500 sqm garden. 
^4,^ Fostari 052 92 X. 


SARCHIES. 3 bedroaik uddes indud- 


ed. F55D0 wriuinshed; F75DD liir- 
lidmdftris 9902478 US 4Q4U324434 


BGLHOGM SL1R SBNE. SO sqm. Bek 

Long rem. Tefc 603 67 03. 


SPAIN 


SIZA 

HUTOF fMCA. tantortb sea view. 


sedydad logw^iwa IQ 


GoV Reea Lissa 5 nna PVerto teizq 5 

bedrooms, 4 beths, big pod, daasng 
women, for r«m May T > Od 15 S7w 
im vmddy nwimum 3 waeta. Col 
AustnoSSSe) 3148 a Pte 256 0255 a 
Box 1983L Herald Tnbune, 92521 NeuiL 
ty Cadm^ France. Evanfuedy (or sde. 


COSTA oa SOL, Jul 

bedroom flat naa 

LIS$600/fnonlh.Col52/; 

beta: Gorgeeuc 5-bedroom base. 


■EAUTIRJL 


IWUA VRIA. View, 

Sports roam, TV-Vid- 

' Septanbei. 

a wnie: M. 

Crtao^NajqMdpjft 


SWnSRLAND 


TO REM IN OaiEVA. knruriM fix- 
nehed ^atmam, residaniid aaa. 4 
bedroemi. Iprat Svmg, mdan MIy 
•quipped bttek Pa fuilha nfa- 
mann, Idfc 22/21 SO 61 


USA 


MOVR46 TO ATLANTA? Item a pn- 

vtaa tongdom. Lurety cyaem wead 

house on 4 goes, names 


nouse on 4 goes, names irem evay- 
theig. 4 beterm, 3 bte, (1 -U 
sq^ Owna taing euerseos pat - 
offers low ml to rdoble temri. 
Please vwite to Box 2131, UiT, Pne- 
tkkJa i. 15. 6000 Frorridurt/Man a 
tehx Jdw. Wbnow. Felaxf 817411 


YONKOS, NY 3 bedieem vKo nea 
riva,.Br oaitened 2 ca 

any ate Vasport to M 

fwta^ Ally ft Aw. $7»/i 

+ iilSbes.Ruteav,nFTaiiUAAve, 
YonkeR, NY 10X5; 7149656531 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


Sao Tome Seen as Biasing Out of Soviet Sphere 


U-SjL. 





REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

AMERKAN WOMAN derirei to eu- 
dwnge 1 bedroom Fore 7th, Smit, or 
Od. w end Jon. *86 far 1 bedraem 
hoiM - birth, mdoa ode. Pdo ABo, 
CA USA. 1259 S Corano, Suite 288. 
Menlo Pdk.CA94Q2S 

TORONTO BOUND? Fmte of 4 seds 
swop or Londan hom far 1 year 
itorkng Sept. 1985. Wb offar S bed- 
room. My eguippad, central houM. 
K. Gower, 54 ranran Ave., Toronto, 
Civmcfa M4V 1H4 4769614764. 

WM4TB Gnat IBMO RBiTAL- 
Smdl house sought in or near prdty 
v9oge or on beodi far 2 or 3 weds 
startmg Aug. 3. Please Mnd detdb (ft 
phDtaeifcSiiblit to9lh FL30 Wdl 
W.NYlOOBr 

AMBSCAN EKEOinVE needi a 2 
bedraem apartment in the SAi or 6lh 
leniietinimit far 28 June^ My. 

to Bee 2D3fi Hwdd Tribune, 
KkI Neufliv Cedec. frenee 

CAUFORMA tADY needi dudo far 1 
year or more. Reidrie tenant P200C 
madmunL Parim 281 47 B& 

EMPLOYlkOm 

GCNEBAL POSnONS 
AVAILABLE 

WANTS) 

American nolfanal writ vrarkine papers 
far codver fab at Hdlywooif Savoy. 
Must be able to site 

Send CV, and dtoto to Beonore, 
44 rue NJX dss TOans. 75(X)2 Fin 

GENQtAL 

POSmONS WANTED 

^^9 






SECKETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABUE 

-MIKSWC far AMBOCAN 

MINWVB firms in PARS: 

EitafaK Bdgfan, Dutch cr German 
seoeicrtietk knowledge ol Prendi re- 
qiired, EngEdi diorriiand. BKrgM 
telexBts. Vniie or dem 138 Avenue 
Victor Hugo, 751)6 Paa, Frofae. Tefc 
727 61 5r 

Deni mere 
INIEINAnONAL 
SEOBErAlUAL POSmONS 

TUESDAYS 

in Rre iff aceuffied Swtek 

SECRETARIES AVAILABUE 

GR-THECREMEDElAaiEMEtein- 
porary hufa people recruit bSingud or 
mte nxmier tongue wuetwias. 
Ri!ir75B 823a 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

lANGUAGE SCHOOL srefa pvtdine 
red fafl lena moriwr tongue EnRUi 
taodiers. Mist how EEC,Mipert or 
void "carte de timcff*. rerii /47 12 
80 So Far Longues 

DOMESne 
POSITIONS WANTED 





AUTOMOBILJES 

INRODEISOOSL 

1985 MOOa 

Olita TOO fan. SSwr grey mehriSc; 
bfad: horiier. ABS, or oandfaenng, 
Bedmr rate SBC. AMoadile NOW 
Privde sde or pot exchange 
far nnir Mmredcs 500 SB 

Td: Mreta Me (93) 25 12 60 


FBUUUU400 

Madrid (Spte) 454^ 

AUTO RENTALS 


AUTO SHIPPING 

HOW TO WPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR INFO THE U3JL 

Trw document eigfams fuUy wher ora 
muM gg to bring g ev into the n x 
scridr and legaly. It indudes new ft 

tom dsoxea ft draping frtocedwel 
os wmfl os legd peerts. Benre of the 

SMW m Bropt ft eiteting it to riw 
Stoles. To reedw Iho inemaL send 

7000 Stuttgart X Vita Germrey 



AUTO CONVERSION 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TAX RS CARS: 

V; .. 

^ dM of hm new 

gnd oeod wed cai. We do riie 
D.O.t. atd tPA on our am ora 
take cat of riie ^ 
m te bonSng n U5A ContoS us 

MOyiSOTl. Id. 

Sk??SS6gS,l!^^ 

Aiiiidaai 


to'sjMarnaienoL 

47, 9990 ■ ■ " 


recently visited Sao Tomfe and met small mOilAfy aid pact with the 
with the preadent United Stat^- 


Angola, where the Marxist gov- 
ernment has been hard-pressed 


^ Rcrf^erc Weller 

77k AsstKiated frea 

LIBREVILLE Gabon —The is- IW added that the changes 
land repubUc of SSo Tom6 and were not a surDiise, but came faster — t** •: — r 

Prfncrpe has sent home the bulk of than expeiS^from the SSo Tom6 
Ang^ soldiers stationed there -ovemmSTwhich President Omar 

and joined the shift of former Por- Bongo of Gabon once called “ihe pon for South Afnca. But its mpl^ 
inguese African colonies away mouth of a Soviet gun pointed at nnvatelv that they are 

from Moscow and toward the Gabon.” 


West, diplomatic sources say. 
And in the past two ^ks. 


the llie diniomats said that Mr. da 

r-taftJM AU taftftW tPUh UK •••Art t w re— 

govemmeni of Presideiit Manud Costa’S govemmmt had been dis- 
Pinto da Costa has signed an agree- Marxistiei^si eci> 

pii-nT tft cenri o email ar.tBrhm»n t rrf noDiK contTols that bad made 


mats say private^ that th^ 
pleased with talks during the past 
several years irith their U.S. coun- 
terparts. • 

The diplomais in Gabon said 
that Sao Tomfe's economic tura- 

^ a ■i.i.m.. -- — _ . . , ,, giound faffiao about tight months 

soldiers to the United States for precis unworai^ goygnuneni b^ame 

training, said the (^lomats, who ■ThediplOTU& wiodeamea w be with the levd and qual- 

further identified, to attached to soviet economic aid. 

two embassies. country lacked money to 

The two islands of Sao Toin£ end nay fw food imports. — 90perceDt 
Frindpe, ^di lie off the coast ^ js imported — and cocoa pcoduc- 
Gabon, became independent in ^ ^ declined from 10,000 tons 
1975 during the radicalFortuguese metric tons) at indepen- 

revoluiioa. Of five fesmer Poitu- ^euM to 4.4S0 tons last year. Coroa 
guese colonies in Africa, only C^ for 90 percent of fordgn 

Verdehas remained outride the So- yw-hawgp yaming s. 
viet sphere influence. The diplomats in Gabon also re- 

But in the past two years, Marx- ported the following chaises in SSo 

ist-niled Mozamlnque has turned Tom^: 

to the West for aia and signed a • Angolan soldiers, once esu- 


WOB IJ>WlDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 


IZ.QV.gjotgoV t!l.7Z3 .32. 32 

PARIS -FRANCE 



mi HORSE 


far and away 
thQ best nude revue 
in the world 

.. iQji ;h« prejj 


at lha bar only Z^iOfri 
♦15'i service charge 



snr 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMMNIES 
IN EUROPE ft THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


CHANNEL 


~Europei5 Best View' 


PROGRAM. FRIDAY 12ta APRIL UK TIMES 


laas FAMILY 
I4a0 STAR FLEET 
15.00 SKY TRAX 1 
15.45 SKY TRAX 2 
leao SKY TRAX 3 
17.30 MR ED 


lano THE LUCY SHOW 

18.30 MORK a MINDY 

19.20 STARSKY ft HUTCH 

X.10 THE NEW GANOID CAMERA 

20a5 7 FROM HEAVEN 

22n0 US AUGUSTA MASTERS GOLF 


9CY CHANNEL TV AIXIBmSMG SaiS PRCXXJCTS lifiST- FOR MORE NPORMATION. 
RATES. MAMCING a AUOSria CMA CONIXCT THE SALES DEmflTMENT. 
SKYCHANNEL,SArElLITETB£VISiaN PIC TB.: LONDON (01) 6964077 TELEX 266943 


mated to total 1500. have been 
reduced to about 400. Tb^ ma^ 
up the bulk of the arefai^ago’s 
security force and had bera nan- 
forced during attempted coups in 
1977 and 1980. 

• The radical, pro-Soviet foreign 
nunisto', de Nasdmento da 
Gra^a Amorim, has been dismissed 
and has left the island. The pro- 
So\iet minister of planning has 
been demoted. 

• Cuban, Soviet and East Ger- 
man advisers who work in govern- 
ment ministries have been told to 
make no major decirions without 
consulting the office of the piesi- 
denL 

Asked about the diplomats' as- 
sertions, the first secKAaiy of the 
SSo TomS Embassy in Libreville,. 
Homero Salvaterra, said; Tor 
personally, it is no change. Ihere 
cenainly are some adjustments in 
line wiu our expeiieuce.” 

Mr. Salvaterra said that his gov^ 
emment sought a quidt rapproche- 
ment uith the Um'ted States and 
hoped for a rapid inflow 6S foreign 
iiivestment and aid. 


AUFOS TAX FREE 


BUY YOW NEXT CAR 
TAX RS AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 


WRITE FOR RB CATALOG OR 
REE BUY-BACX FOLHa TO: 


MPSlOE B.V., PA Bex 756B, 1 1 1 8 ZH 
I NWnariontk 


Antaredo ni 
PhoM |020fl 


The 

Tetax: 12S68 


SHPSIDE tab, 576 HM) Arewq 

^NcwYo^N.Y. 

|h2| 669^ TelBrt&^ 


Phere 


SHIFSIDE SA. Onrere de Wdvre 
465, KWBnKBkBataiuak 
Phoire |D:q64m^dar«Q90 


TRASCO 

n« MBICHXS SPEOAUSTS 


TcKfrre IHD. Afl nxteb inck^ 10CO 
SEL ft rtrgfdi tmoBBnre far ■iiwe Jfal e 
shipnreri {rocn stock. 


E’A/DOT c ert i ficotion & sl ipp i n g by 
trie expertt. 


DIREa FROM SOURCE 


Troseo Lexte: Ud. 

II Howorden H«, London NW3 TBL 
Tefc 01408 OOlff. 

Telex B9S6022 IRAS G. 


C4Je5 0F 
COfWMGEV 

TAX FRK 


* Int ewB li on ol Sdee 

* WbrfcMde pefivery 

* Eurapeon Price Uodn 

* Tefc irri« I 37 78 00 

* Telex 19932 DK 


SS Vodreftare DK-1900 
CPHV.09«^ 


NEWMERCB)^ 

FORSOC. BMW, EXOnC CARS 

FROM STOCK 


far 4MMBXMIEdeiwery 
RESTSBIVICE 

For ihfaptag, hmonco, bond, 
ceweeiefaw ta U.SA 

RUTEINC. 

TounuMir. 52, 6000 Ftankhirt. 
WGwm., Ml 1069-232351, rix 4ll559 
tefbnnedGn only by phom or tte. 


RANSMUNDI BBGRIM, 21 Gertel- 
rebookB^I Z oersd , Antwerp: Tel; 

(SmlO.54 Tbc 3330i Troram ft bi 
rtodu fttoredre, BMW,ASO^^ 


pcw Mnrrnri. bmw, i 

free e xp ort inmdiata drevvy. i 
2MS^ 


(0933)76099. Tbc 312242 1 


RHD tax 
UK 
6. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


AUFOS TAX FREE 


lAULSA 

OmOAL ROUS RQYCE 
DMB FOR BEGIUM 

TAX FRS CARS 


ROUS ROYCE BMLEY 
RANGE and LANDROVai 


r. ds MBTDBBOURG 74ft2 
1170 Brute 
TH: 2-673 33 92 
TlX: 20377 


10 YEARS 

We DeReer Cm to Nw Werid 


TRANSCO 


Keeping o contoni stock of imie then 
30D brand now cars, 
rtnUng 5000 happy dmnb rewy year. 
Send far fase muhicolarcDtaKg. 
Trmco SA, K hfaordelaan. 


2030 AniMip. Befawn 

S2 4a TRANS B 


Tel 323/50 62 4a 


GERMANCAXS 

mOMmAMMT 


Bmerienced oar trader far Mercedes, 
Ponehe or BMW. bnoietee detey. 
PuO reviee jmpcci/expcrt US. DOT & 
B'A Fw louret arid deoer. OOUTeer- 


siegensir. 8,.^4 Dueneldorf, W. Genno- 
ny: Tefc (1321 1-434646, tte 8S87374. 


TAX HM AUTO SAIB 
Order your Biropeori - US - and UK 
outamofaHre. 

Car rentd, unEnritad mtooge. 


LeoMig newr cor 1 to 6 monhi. 
Tetax 200^2. 


Teb651 4342. 
Freicreq 2 Ave de Ste Oowd 

PteTSOIdu 


TAX FRE CARS 
P.CT. 

Al fixte, ql iB odelq brand new 
I te oai 1. 2008 Antvrein Betokm 
t£ 3/231 ^ 00, Tlx 35S4rPHOGT I 
Send lSl5 tar cohdog 


NEW IMMTS. M63& C5I -h 7451 

.te- . ii.e-.e.re -.i ^ 

UH U MiJ HOOC/DUirOO UllllCXM. VV 

GeniwwrBa21l3a503.ttc8Safl116 


BtCAUBUR. Sre ow ad ki Monday 

edrien. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


U UWYR . ereculive IMMKSRAp 

T10N. FRARC T. HOLIAN3, 2925 

Bi m p u i L Swle ^a Houston, Trere 

7894)904. (Not 


SERVICES 


***** 

YOUNG HEGANT lADY FA 

ZURICH 830.58.88. 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/tntarpretar ft Towtaii Guide 

PAHS 562 0587 


** PAHS 553 62 62** 
FOR A REAL VXP. YOUNG lAOY 
Dtafaguxfaed, Beg^. Mubingud. 

pJl YOUNG LADY 
PARIS 565 03 80 

YOUNG HEGANT LADY 

MuffiRogodl M. Ftoise 525 11 01 

* PAHS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY TRUNGUAl vim 

PMtS W SOPMSTICATS YOUNG 

fady uampgnion. Why don't you 
phone 27/-0)-6? far your day*, eve- 
lanm ft weekend^ An etegcnt bSn- 
oud fMtle. even far your mppinp. 

PARIS 704 80 27 
VWPAYOUNOiAOY.,.. 

, ; , MukingitoL „ . . , 

TOKYO: 442 39^ 

Eiropere yoing fady companion. 

nUHS LADY GUUXS 214 01 SX 
Youciq degorri, eduoded, kril far 
days ft dmnsR ft trovds pesdbie in 
Paris ft AiRMrtl. 

ROBWATIONAL BEAUimjL Pdqole 
UN.TD. USA ft WOB0WID6. M 
2127657793 / 7657794 

FRANKFURT. Yeung' fady companion. 
Engfah, Frendk Gwmre raokmk Free 
to mvet 069/44 77 75. 

SOOEIE DIANE PARIS 260 87 43 
Men ft wamre guidn, SKuniy ft ler* 
ine ev sarviem. 8 rei - 12 om. 

DO YOU NBD A FRBfOfa4GllSK- 

PARIS NOTE TMS PHOIC AT ONCE 

7S7 aia. TrudM VXP. fady. Iravd 
nonoonien. 

LOmON. Yomta Garmen/Frendi dS- 
OHS to meet you on your visit to 
LoKfaikTdi UK 01-381 6852 

StNGAFORE INTL GUOeS. Cdl: te- 
aoDgre734 96 2BL 

TOKYO lADY COMFAIGOK FA 
Prnrand Aiiidont (0456-5589 

TOKYO 645 2741. Teurire ft shop- 
pinq guides, interpreters, etc. 

YOUNG LADY AS OUR)E ft OBStant 
in NYC 212617-2097. 

HONG KOIriG (K-S) 723 12 37 
Younp sophistmted camoanfan. 


I SERVICES 



HONG KONG »ft61525 VIP fady 
. lArian/Weitern) eomoreioR. 










nafOfWtoK 

companion 


DBU. k ito r a elBi 
193161 TBti 


Travefl 


SERVICES 


LONDON WSi BMICATB) Yowg 
lody comparion. Tefc 622 66)5 


ATHB45. 

(ri 00810*. Tefc 


i194. 


and person- 


ARTS 


THE MAN WHO FOOta 
THE ART WORLD FOR 
MIUIONS OF DOUARS 

HMYRDEHORY 

TM MASTBL FORGat 
OF THE 20lfa CBmjRY 


Owna madtiBieenrMQnM'. Renou', Ven 
.JMoSglaM. 


Gori*. 

fiigfah eofledor hqi far sole these 


inque agn^ eil^^Mm^b^^ 1^ 


Buiyr de Hory. 

ietig Acre,.lflndon, WC2E 9J)i 


PENPALS 


FOUSH UONB WISH TO ovnKml 
Write ROB 5156b 2701 GO 
meer, Holand 


Plocn Yoor OosBifiGd Ad CMckly and Easily 

Itate 

INIflUiATKMAL HERAU) TRHIUW 


■Y BlMMa Gff your facet IHT represantotire wflh your text Vrni 
WM be iidoonei f -^ Ifie cost im iredfat el y, and once pr^Mymanl ii 
mode yaw ad within 48 houre 

Caek The basic rata per Gne per day 4- faeol taxes. There ore 

25 fatte aiW 36 fa ■(« falowing 

Memmn space B 2 r 


Credff Cmr . 

Cord, Accee and Vin. 

HMDOFRCE 


lATINAMBUCA 


Prefa; ^ e fa gifi ed only);' 
7^-4601 


EUROPE 


12636-15. 
AlbeM:361.83^/360-2421. 
Bnireelei 343-1899. 
Ctenhagens 101} 33944a 
Fraifcfint:|069)72-67-SS. 
lMnrereet29-S»94. 
liten: d7.27.93/662&44. 
Leo dote (Ql) 8364802. 
MoM; 455-2891/4553306 
MBrev (1^7531445. 
Norway: 09 845545. 
Itomas 6793437. 

Sweden: 08 7S69229. - 
TnlAvho 03455 559. 
Vienne; Centoet FronkforL 


lAboredl 4031 

(DW>*-312) 

GuoyaquR 431 943/431 
ltaMs417852 
F taHeire. 64-4372 
San Joere 22-1QS 
Sreiftoge: 69 61 SSS 
Sao taulo; 852 1893 


tWIDDlEEAST 


I 

Jreteu 25214. 
Kowte 5614485. 
Ubonons340Q44. 
OotaR 416535. 

Saudi Arobire 
JeddBiit667.TSDa 
UJLE.;DubM 224161. 


EAR EAST 


UNiTB STATES 


: 3900637. 
j Konre 5313671. 
Mreila:817Q7 49. 
Sood;7358773. 

' gngrejoio. 222-725. 
TaiwreK7S244 2S/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


Now York: (212) 7523890. 
Wdet Coaoh (415)362-8339. 


AUSIRAUA 


Sydney: 929 56 39. 
Me ft ioume; 690 8233. 


¥ 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 


ESCORT 

same 

USA A WORiOWIDE 


Heed offieB fa New York 
330 W. 56lh Si. N.Y.C 10019 USA 


212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 


major OBMT CARDS AND 
CMOCSACCfflB 
Mvole Meretanlte AvMl^e 


Tblf reered w l i eita g eervia hoe 
been tooh u od oi Hw tap ft moW 
ond u ave Eseort Sorviee by 
USA 8 tatonreliend nowi loMla 
Inde dta g reffie red TV. 


USA & TRANSWORiD 

A-AMBtICAN 


ESOOKT SHMCE. 
EVBryu^MVTXIAREm GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

CoH. free Irani U5 j 13002374)692 


Low^ EosIot waleoiM you bodd 


LONDON CLASS 

ESCORT SBlViCE 


^ HEATHROW A GATWKX 
MOT 890 0373 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

EmotI Servko. 

Tek 736 5877. 


LONDON 
P orl m cRi Eseort Agency 


67 OBfam SbeoL 
UndreW 
Tel! 436 3724 or 436 1151 


ESCORTS A GUH>ES 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SBtVICE 


IN NEW YORK 


m: 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SRVKE 
TB: 200 8585 


LONDON 

ICB45INGTON 


eCORTSBMCE 
TO KWISMGFON 08IRCH ST, W8 
TBj 9379136 OR 9379133 


ARIS10CATS 


londen Eeeert S ervice 
128 Wivnore SL. laiden W.1. 
Al mcfor Credit Cerdi Accepted 
^437 47 41 / 4742 
12 non 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUDE SBMCE frem Spin 
lOriBBAM (0) lO-miSS 
n« HAGUE (< 


ROriBBAM (0)1048 

:d|70^ 79 96 


MADRID INTI 


BCORT gtVICE 
TSL£ 3456548. OlEDn' CAIDS 


ZURICH 


Sunrenthote Ereert A Guide Srevfao 
Mato* Frete Tel: 01/56 96 92 


* MADRID ★ 


TASTE eSCOETSBWia' 
6t 96 



ESCORTS & GUIDES 


ZURICH-GMEVA 

ALEXIS ESCOET SBIVia 


MADRID APPLE 


BCORT SBnnCE 
TB: 3504396. CRBXT CARDS. 


ROME CUB BMOFE ESCORT 
Guide Se«viee.TA 06/589 2604. S 
1146 |lm 4 pm to 10 pn4 


CHB5EA ESCORT SBIVICE. 
Beoudnep Ph 
TeU 01 58< 6S1S 


51 Beoudnep Pfaei, lendon SW3. 
" ' tiaWW (4.12 pn4 


GBCYA eBEALirTe 
ESCORT SBmCB. 
TB« 39 SI 30 


GBCVA ESCORT 

SBtVICB. Tib 46 T1 S3 


OMYA-ISr 

EsooRT sanncE 

TB: 023/86 15 9S 


AMSTBIDAM JASMINE 

ESCORT SBIVICE. 020466655 


GBCVA REST ESCORT sama 

Rerevtatare WBBB) + TRAVB 

TB: 31 49 17* 


AMSTERDAM MCOiE 

ESCORT SMCE n09»9344 


AMSTBIDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SaWlOE. 020-9S4344 


MOAN ESCORT 

SennCE 02 - 69 762 401 


flUMOVET + SURROUIBXNOS. 
CereSne'f Been ft travel renree. Ov 

tek^ret^Gennan took**- Tefc 


OmeVA -HBBC ESOORT SatVKE 
Teb36 29n 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


lit -..'. ± 

DUSSBDORF . COLOGNE - BONN 
* ^SKi Service. 

Tdfc 02114799863. 














r-'V'iM-rreiii",viitnr" 








vice. Td; 01.229 6541. 


lOPBON ZARA rertfW T SanTT 
ifaedrow/OotvricCiSmIg*?*' 


LONDON: JUtlANGAlANMcfaT 

carl Serwcei. Tefc 328 Saoo/an^ 


OOLO^m.DuBHkfarffre; 

aotaaeort Sarvica, 022I/S4 33 047 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


ntAMOVRT AREA - Fnide + Mde 
ereart -t- tnte service. Td: 62 ftIK 


LOMDONZOE WEST facort Agency 
Tefc 01479 7556. 


AMSTEROAM.SYLVIA ESCOR Ser- 

vtoe(D)2aa5riw • 

CARB8EAN ESOORT SBtVKE.Tiiin- N 


avot Bred. Tek 061/54 34 41 


MUMOt leers Been 
Service. Tefc 099/4484038 


-I-' Gwde 


LOMiON YASMM ESCORT od 

trovdierviee. Tek 328 8459. 


BBISSBS. CKANTAL ESCORT 

vioe:Td;Q2/S20 23 65:- ' i? 









J 


i 


// 



TRANKRJRT **109 TBT' facort Sre 
wee. 0fl9/5P.6O62. 


FRANKFURT/MUMCH Mote haatix 

Service. 069/386441 ft 069/3S1822&^ 


MUNKH ■ PRIVATE ESCORT 
Guide Service. Td;9T 23 14, ^ 

DOMM (BNEVA Enen Srt^ 


wee. Tefc 022/ 31 ^73. 


OUSgLPptf^OOIOGNE 6win fli^-d 
fttafidiEeewt Service 021 1/38 31 40 


MIMCH . BLONOY 8 TANJA Enct . 
Serviee. Tefc 311 79.00 or 311 7936/9 


vmM^S PUBrscORr semee. Td! 

073<4U1P1 or 723432. taidddate. 


JEANET facort SevKifd 

Td: (02a 326420 or 3d0lia. 



PsnoJ^'T'^clUke 
^ ^anda:ther 


FRANnUtT SOMIA SCORT Ser 
wee. Tefc 069-68 3442. d? 


TRAMGURTJWtlifrESCORr + tin^ 

d eerwee. Tefc Oy9/5S72-TO " * 


riee. Tefc 040/ 652 9130 


ServicB Tdi 68 34 68. 


Service M 26964376' 


donOUSI 6378 


vine. Td. 01 229 0776 


lM^ 507. Crte Cte. 


Tefc 040/58 65 K 


ffWORIDWIPlACr ESCORT 4 ■SS0 

SteCe.M;iMnautri.261 41 42. 


ICIWKIN TRUE' ESCORT 

TdrOI^TsSw: 


GBOE ESCORT 

Td: 370 7151. 





.t 



















































line 

on 

:look 



April n, ms 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 


Sacha Guitiy at 100: 
From life With Father 
To Playing Louis XIV 


“/ have, been reqt^ed to summarize the 
hisury of the drama bi a few words. I ^uUl do 
soinasauaee.SIuA^eareadeadMidiire 
isdead, avirm not feeling very welL** 

~S 8 di 8 Gmtiy 


by Thomas Qouin Ontiss 

P AIUS— Sacha Guiny, 29yeais after 
his death, is otbrepopiilar than ever. 
-Thisyearma^ oeceatenaiy of Ms- 
hiith, aod lo booor the eveat three 
new biograjs&es have appeared, his com- 
plete drastic vorks have oeeo puirfished in 
a deluxe ll-vdozne edidon, several of his 
comedies are bemg revived (tbou^ it was 
predicted that Guiny without Sadn, like 
coward without NoEL would never do) and 
his nims are cozistanlly in the nume houses, 
on tdevision and in dnema dubs. 

. TUs most Paridan of Paxiaans was bom 
in St. Petersburg, wfam his father, Ludcn 
Otdt^, a leadingFrench actor <tf his genea- 
lion, had engaged a theater for his xeperto^ 
of plays in French. Sacha, at S. tissl wait 
bdore the footlights as Ketrot Jr. m a panto- 
nrime in the imporiitt BiKrinn oarrf tMt 
*‘I came into the wmld with aiaxnous last 
name and so ! was oUiged to make ghfien 

name famous,'' he once Mandlyjgrplamarf 

When the family returned to Paris in 1 890, 
Sacha's parents divorced and bis mother was 
granted cusUx^ of her two sons. Ctritry 
took Sacha to Qve mth faimi anyway, and the 
boy attended a succession of sduxns. But, as 
he said, be finished his fonnal dhicadoR 
‘'without having ever b^un iL” 

Hb true schooling was life with fadier. 
Ludeo Guitry Imi^ everyone from Rusr 
dan czars and Queen Victoria to Gemea- 
* eeau and Zola. Among 1^ indmaies were 
Sarah Bernhardt, trften his aciii^ partner, 
Rodm, Manet, Vjoda, Anaidk rrance, 
Jules Renard and Ali^mise Daudet, along 
with the foremost dramuists of beOe qKX^ue 
France — Georgies de Porco-Ridie, \manoe 
Donnay, Henry Bataille, Gemges Cooite- 
line, a^ others in whose works he played. 
All these were frequent guests and to be a 
member of such a housdiold was an educa- 
tion in the arts and Uteratuie. 

Sacha's first st^ as an actor on the 
French stage were stumbling, He got a job in 
a louring stock company and was called 
upon to oe an aloof SecoM Empire dan^. 
During the first p^oonance, m ill-filtii^ 
dolhes, he mnffea his lines, bundled into the 
fumilure, upset a tea tray and^ false mus- 
tache came oft He caused more laughter 
- *han the jokes is the comedy he rfnK-v**i 
^tbeengagemenL 

The eider Guitry was infuriated sAen he 
heard the avriul news and feared that the 
dispaceful exhibition would tatnisb. the 
family name. He took his son in hand and 
tutor^ him strenuoi^. seong possibifiries 
in his offering. Ibis child a ms had an 
actor’s mobile mask, a clean-shaven face 
with a large nose, oval dun and, in Ins own 
words, “a lodk of dighcly aoest^ devdegH 


• 1 



K:"' 

prath ovet^^® 
;5Cfrice^i 
i -Palics 



inenL” He was not handsome and even in 
youth be tended to stoutness. Yet he 
wdi and moved well on stage and he had that 
rare quali^ of keying thoeyes of the audi- 
oices on him vriiatever he 'dl^ 

After months of iraioing, his father gave 
Sacha a small role in a in whiehhe 
was starring at the Ibiatre de la Renais- 
sance. Sacha's dd>ut there passed muster, 
but one ewei^ he missed a cue and came on 
late and minus his wig. The father, in a 
towering rage, denounced him after the last 
curtain, dimraed him completely and re- 
fused to aid him further or even sp^ to him 
for the next 13 years. 

Sacha left tte paternal mansioa to experi- 
ence bohemian poverty in the Latin Quarter, 
supporting him^etf by contributing ^tcbcs 
ana cartoons to newroapers. At Is his first 
pl^ was produced and he was on his way. )n 
the next tew years he tossed off a series of 
<leli^tful l^ht CMiedies in which he acted 
with lus fint wife, Charloite Lysis. All were 
enoimoos box-office successes and three of 
them are masiopieces. 

Capa^ of turning out a polished act in a 
week, his industry was enria and his grow* 
ing rqHitation annoyed his rivals. He was to 
write 120 plays- in & lifetime, the majority 
of them hm^g him profitable reuirns. He 
entitled his hundxedm play “Le Mot de 
CambfXMuie,'’ a rather le«ra jest. (The expres- 
riou is a euphemism for merde, an ejqsletive 
supposedly uttered by Cambranne, one of 
'Napoleon's generals, at Waterioo.) 

The younger Guitry married five times 
and mLu actresses cd all of his wives. 
Yvouk Pimtemps, his sectmd, he discov- 
ered in a FoUes-Bogire revue. He guarded 
her jealously, never allowing her to be on- 
stage when be was on. Once he forgot to 
apply this security measure and surprised 
her m the arms cm the second lead, Pi^e 
Fiesnay. At the divoroe proceedings Sacha 
was not his customary nonchalant s^. 
“Why,” someone asked. “He knows she is 
irrnoceafal^” was the prophetic answer. 

Over the years a coterie of critics tried to 
Um as a lightweight, a boulevard 
butterfly incapable serious thinking and 
indifferent to the irnpmlaot htmpeoings of 
the times During World War I he was as- 
sailed for entertaming public instead of 
dqnessing it further. His farce ‘'Spelling 
Partners” ran siiiuiltaneously in Pa^ New 
York and London, while one editorialist 
inquired, "Who in these troubled days cares 
if me oiptagonist of M. Guitry's ocmicdy is 
Qidcofaed or not?” 

At the wax's end he refuted the charge that 
he had but one string to his bow ~ sex farce 
•— wrhing^two plays to woo his father’s 
foigiveoess. first, “Ddnirau,” the story 
o[ the 19di-centuiy nnme, is a trage^, and 
the second, “Pasteur,” is a lin^g tribute to 
(he great sdendst. lather read, forgave, 
aod acted in both of than. 


G UTIRY'S comedies are unique in 
that th (7 alinost always spring from a 
novel omtoeit and are so smooth Md 
qptmtaneous in developing their premises 
that they scan to be made up as they go 
along. 

In his '*Tbe Illuaoaist.” a muac-hall hyp- 
notisi, sediu a desirable woman in a 
mesmerizes her to get her to his ^artment 
Sie does so^ but after her suneoder the 
hypnotist has difficulty in breaking the ^dl 
to get rid of her. 

“The Hhisiwust" was adapted for the 
Amaican su^ Avery Hopymod, but its 
produeen feared it was too daring to get 
the censors. A play_^ Guitry's conmatriot 
Edouard Boordet, *n[M Oqiaye,” hu been 
raided Iw the New Yoric police because it 
made obuqtm refecenoes to a lesbian ludsoiL 
Its impresario, Gilbert Mller, was in danger 
of bemg sent to the workhouse with hue 
West, had been arested and sentenced 
to a tenn in jail f or wpeaiing in her own pl^ 
“Sex.” Guitry was m New York when tUs 
occurred, tnaMi^ his on^ American tour. 
“Ihe IDuabmst'^was an item of his reper- 
tory, but his play was in French and so die 
ceiums <hd not prosecute. 

Guitry wrote a gpier^ part — usually 
the principal part — in his plays for himself, 
but he bad many sdves. He was not always, 
as Ittend has it, the suave man of the world 
in sdken dresang gown prowlmg his parior 

, _j--. 

atri' 


Sacha Guitry as Lotas XTV. 


i spouting e pig r a ms while awaiting the 
ival'of some fair damsel In his “Mozart” 
he took the rde of Grimm and in other his 
productions he mii»qii^ryH^ Frans Hals, 
as Tall^xand and as N^leon III 
“Yes, I am an ^dsi as everyone is —but 
Continued on page 9 


From Planet Krypton to Boston 


P ARIS — It is hard, if not impossible, 
to inu^e a Henry Janies hero with 
a 17-mch neck, but Christopher 
Recto has brought it off in “The 
Bostonians,*’ shot in New York and Massa- 
chusetts by the fertile ioientadooal team 
James Ivoiy (director), Ismail Merchant 
(producer) and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala 
(screenwriter). 

Reeve plays Baal Ransom, the impovez^ 
ished Southerner who comes north after the 
Civil War to gray and high-minded Boston, 

Mary Blume 

where he finds himself locked in batite with 
his spinster cousin, Olive Chancellor 
eVanessa Redgrave), over the affection tit a 
young girl. Verena Tarrant (Muleleine Ifot- 
ler). 

James’s Basil has a fine, noble head, Row- 
ing eyes, a rivadous mind and the qraidsm 
bom of p^'erty and humiliadon. He ia also 
sallow, with “sedentary shoulder.” details 
that Rreve sensibly oimts. 

Set in 1873 and published in 1886, ‘*T]ie 
Basloniaas“ was ill-recdved and James was 
pereuaded to exclude it from the New Y<»k 
edition of his works. In choosi^ to confront 
defeated Southern conservatism with Bos- 
ton’s ironcl^ progressiveness, he cenierttl 
on the conflict over female emandpadon. “I 
wished to write a v^ Americas tale,” James 
arid. “I asked myself what was the most 
salient and pecuUtf ])oiot of mir social life^ 
llie answer was the situation of women, the 
decline of the sentiment of sex.” 

The Boston feminists are barely female. 
They are theorists. Basil is a tealisL Both are 
right, and wron& and at the end when Ver- 
ena gpes off with BasU in tears, aae senses 
James’s own ambi^ty, e^wdally in view of 
his last sentence: *^1 is to be fear^ that with 
the union, so far from brilhant, into which 
she was about to enter, these were not the 
last she was destined to shed.” 

A -furious woman journalist, at a Paris 
screening of the filn^ cried out that this line 
states tt^ Verena is being dragged off by 
force and that the film f^wd to emphasize 
this. Reeve agrees that Baril is a kidnapper, 
as the name Ransom suggests. But to him the 
last line means that Verena leaves clmsiered, 
ironclad Boston “for a world where laughter 
and tears nux.” 

“Jim Ivmy and I had long talks about does 
Basil love Verena or is he acting in reve^ 
for lus poverty and for the Gvil War. we 
decided that it is sexual longing, rather than 
a political idea. You can't act an idea. He's 
up nor^ he’s lonely, and be sees a vexy 
pretty ^ who is unai^able. Because she is 
unsvailrole, he persists. And it takes so long 
it becomes a pasrion.” 

H e plays the role very ^acefulJy ia- 
de^ *T was as ^pe^og as i 
be. and asli^tbarted— a man with 
an iron fist and velvet ^oves.** He was the 
first actor to be cast: Vaimssa Redgrave, who 
is brilliant, came in as a i^lacement for 
Glenn Qose. 

Reeve is charming but has no sympathy 
for the complacent maleness of a BasU. A 
h^issippi lawyer coached hun in his accent 
for the rale, and Reeve got to know tlu aum 
well, and to dislike lum quite a loL “He's 
Basil 100 years later, a real schmuck of the 
first magnitude, smug and self-righteous,” 
Reeve says. 

In person Reeve is no hulking mosdith; 
he uses his 6 feet, 4 inches well, wears cordu- 
roys, a sa^e-sfaioolder pullover and loafers 
that look as if thqr come from a New Yorker 
ad (he must, bless his heart, be the only 
person in films who doesn't wear running 
shoes), and he is an eager talker. His idea of 
hdl would be to relax on a beach and be 
descrites Hiimrif as a very optimistic and 
trusung person. WUle Robert Redfoid has 
remarked that his good looks hare limited 
tbs roles he can play, Reeve, 32, says sudi 
Undts are self-imposed and that he has no 
patience with the^ althou^ ht does apee it 
is hard for a good-looking mao, or woman, 
to be taken seriously. 

’*1 bare a very bland face. It’s a big face. 
It's not shopworn, lived in. We hare this 
itung in my family that no one seems to age. 
My rether at SS looks like my brother. As 1 
older, the parts wtO proMbly be better. 
That's happened to Michael Came aod he's 
become more rumpled.” Reeve and Caii» 
played homosexuals in Sidney Lamet's 
“Dathir^” 

“It’s hard ftn* me to get parts as an ordi- 


nary ^ in the street,” be adds. “I do a lot of 
period work; the dashing romantic hero.” He 
has just been seen on American television 


as 



Christopher Reeve and Vanessa Redgrave in “The Bostonians.** 



Preparing for takeoff in an earlier role. 


Vronsky in “Anna Karenina.' 

Reeve's career todc off when Ire played 
Stqwrman, but he b^an acti^ as a lad and 
became a member of Equity, the actor’s 
union, at 16 (the fee was lower for young 
actors and he knew that was bow he wanted 


to roend his life). His flrsi Broadway role, in 
1975, was as Katharine Hepburn's grandson 
in “A Matter of Gtavi^.” 

If be was never a 97-pound weakling, he 
suffered from asthma as a child and from 
being pull«l between divorced parents (his 
mother writes for a weekly in Princeton, his 
father is a college professor who lectured on 
Proust this winter in Paris). After piq) 
school be went to Cornell because it bad 


high academic standards anH was far from 
the temptations of Broadway. 

During his junior year he proposed to 
write a J>^per on regional and institutional 
theater m England and France and bought a 
BritRail pass, hitting every provindal reper- 
tory theater from Glasgow to the channel. In 
London be helped actors in the National 
True's production of “The Front Page” 
perfect thw American accents. He then 


went to Paris and was a runner for Terry 
Hands when he directed “Richard 111” at the 
Com^e Franqrise. 

Back in New Yori:, he took acting classes 
at JuilUard under Jo^ Houseman, willi^ 
Hurt, Kevin Kline and Richard Gere were 
there at the same lime. School ended for 
Reeve when his role as Ben Harper, the 
heartless bigamist in a TV soap called “Love 
of Life.” was expanded and there was no 
time for classes. 

Looking back. Reeve says that “Super- 
man” was a mixed blessing “I think it is 
understood that in ’Supermw I' and ‘IT — 
not in 111 .' which was terrible — there’s a 
real perfonsance, although there are people 
who say he's ^yed Sup^an and now he 
wants lo acL Discounting the material sid^ 
could I hare done without it? Kevin. BUI the 
others — th» aH il” 

Reeve feds confident gnmigh to believe 
that talent has paid off. “1 think Superman 
will take its place among a series of varied 
p^ormanees.'' Reeve h^ lived for the last 
8 ld years with an English actress W whom he 
has two children. After filming ^^e Bosto- 
nians” belayed on the London stage in 
James's “The A^pem Papers,” with Vanessa 
Redmve and Dame Wendy Hiller. 

“ilike ensemble work, I get lonely vritb it’s 
Guistopher Reeve in — . 1 was happy as a 
clam out there «itb those two legends.” 

Reeve has had his share of flops. He thinks 
there are two choices for an actor. “Oneis to 
find a comer of the market that isn’t occu- 
pied and try to be distmedve in it The other 
is to be reckless and take anything. This 
leads to mistakes but the other way makes 
you self-consdous. 1 never bare to wake up 
and ssy, ’How's the old image today? ” 

Like other actors of his generation. Reeve 
turns mcreasing^ to the si^: “The elabo- 
ration is about artistic choices while in film 
it’s about power.” 

This month in New York he will open in 
an experimental partly modern-dress ver- 
sion CM “The Maimage of Figaro" by Beau- 
marchais, directed by Andrei Serban. Reeve 
plays the Count. “He’s often portly aod 
middle-aged. In fact, he's the same age as 
Bgaro. ngaro just the brains. My char- 
acter is both vain and stupid.” His chief 
preparatimi has been to r^ up on the 
Spuish nobility exF the late 18th centuiy. 

“1 may want to rely on specific ihiog s — 
the master and servant relations, what did 
being a count involve, a sort of job descrip- 
tion. When I go into a room, do people bow 
and scrape? How do 1 make it sp^ic? 
Comedy depends on misunderstanding — 
you know h^ in comedy people never seem 
to understand what’s going on? This count 
never seems to catch on to Miat’s going on 
and yet he’s in authority. 

“How does he handle that? And if I'm a 
fool how do they know I’m a fool” 

Then, this summer he will do a film, a 
contemporary coowdy about “the anxieties 
of being in your thirties and bring still single 
in New Yon: and the desperation that pro- 
duces on both sides. It's thie consequences of 
the me generation — the people who spent 
the ’70s getting MBAs and jobs with top' 
New York law firms now looking down the 
road and wondering if anyone will walk 
down it with them. 

“Do you know there's a itiagnying called 
Self,” Reeve says. It’s about how to cook for 
yourself — how to brace yourself for being 
alone.” ■ 






iC, 






Troubleshooting in the Hoarse Latitudes 


1^ Henry Pleasants 


L ondon — one oi the most familiar 
— and succiact — pronoupce- 
ments of opera lore is RossutTs 
^ response triien ariced vibai one 
.. needs to beco^ a great anger. 

^ “Just three thia&” he is quoted as saying: 

“Voce, voce, vocer Or voice, voice, voice. 

It may be that a tape recording of (hat 
pronouncement would have suggests that it 
was sardonic, a wzy cmnmeat on the fact 
that 50 many singers seem to have thou^t of 
anything rise. 

But to Menbeth A. Bunch, a voice coQSuI- 
iflnt, it suggests a-paradox. Everyone has a 
vri^and usesit every d^in onfeommuni- 
- caUoiL from anger^ actors, news 

readers on tdevirion and radio and, in ex- 
ceptional cases, polidrisnsj hardly anyone 
.v'diinks of it at all. . . 

-vldR-, $he has beoi thmVing about her own 
vrioe, both in speech aw song, and the 
vtnoes of others ever since her studoit d83|s 
at Salem College in her native North Caroli- 
D 3 . where she earned a bacfaelar oi music 

degree in voice. After Sriem caime a master’s 


degree at Union Theological Soninary in 
New York, a doctorate in vocal sdenee at the 
Univeraty of ^ihero Califomia and a year 
as a posi-docfamd research fdlow at ibe 
Royal Crilege of Sui^ns (anatomy) in 
Lomoo. She is the author of “Dynamics of 
the S 11911 S Voice” {Spsin^ Verlag, 1982) 
and has another book, “Vibes — the Voice 
Book,” in prq)aratioiL 

After 20 y^ of sin^g, teaching and 
lecenring in the United Stales, she setUed in 
London a couple of years ago, and is now 
thinking about her own and others’ votc^ as 
a consultnni at Cantica Vrice Studio, at 
the Cem^ Sriiool of Speech and Drama, at 
tire Royal Academy cm Dandng (anatomy) 
and — as she puts n — as ‘in-house trouble 
shooter” in West End theaters. 

“It is odd,” she says, “that most people 
^lend so time , and money on 
clothes, cosmetics, hairdressing, jewelry and 
so on, and so little, or none- at all on a 
potential^ invaluable plwrical asset that na- 
ture has given them for free. 

“Singers, of course^ tb ihinic of their, 
vrices, and spend a lot of time and mo^ 
culUvati^ them. But too numy singers tiunk* 
of the sin^ng voice as distinct from the 


speal^ voice. Many of tiiem speak badly, 
and inhibit or iiyure the tin g in g voice ac- 
cordii^y. 

“Others who use their voices professional- 
ly, induding actors and politicians, too often 
begjn to dunk about th^ voices only t^en 
they are already in vocal trouble. Among 
politirians, Nril Kiimock, the new leader of 
the British Labor Party, forever on the brink 
of voicelessness, is a localW familiar and 
distressing example. Recent^, especially in 
America, business executives, both male and 
female, are boxnaung aware of voice and 
speech as prriessional assets, and are bo- 
oing to give due attention to eKb. 

"Just about everyone rise takm his or her 
voice for granted, and is careiess or indifrer- 
ent in the use m^e of it in the shaping and 
projection of spe^. And sp we bear all 
around us slovenly spe^ the sound unsup- 
ported by proper and properly controDed 
respiration. All too often we hear is 
alr^y evidence of vocal injury. 

“Much of the trouble is sheer indifference 
and physical laziness. But anoifaer contribut- 
ing factor is, 1 suspeci sdf-coQciousness, 
even fear. T mean fear'Of brii^ consricuous, 
fear of being thou^t affeded, elitisi of 


putting on airs in expending the effort, men- 
tal and physical it trices to project the voice 
properly and pay due aiieniion to the sb^ 
mg of vowels aM the riw eminciation of 
consonants, not to mention the mriodic and 
rhythmic eloquence of spee± artfully sus- 
taioed, 

“The result, as wnih the negligent profes- 
sional can be vocal injury and incapadta- 
tion, most familiar in the hoarseness that 
comes with trying to make oneself heard in 
noisy en\'ironments such as crowded bars 
and codktail parties, or with continuing to 
talk against the occasional attack of laiyngj- 
lis, itself often the price of bad speaking 
habits. 

”A contributing factor for professionris, 
has been the microphone and riectrooic am- 
piificaiion. In pre-mike days those udio had 
to make themselves heard over wide spaces 
— actors, orators, preachers — learned how 
to do iL Th^ bad to. Nowadays electronic 
ampUfication does il for them. Hre coose- 
queoce i$ likely to be the same kind of 
unsuf^ned ^>eecb we hear from non- 
professionals, with the mike amplifying the 
defideodes! 

“Most people are unaware that tire sound 


of their own ^tnee as th^ hear it is not the 
sound their listeners hear. They are deodved 
by their own head resonance. If they spe^ 
into a tape recorder, their reqrense to the 
playback will be: 'But that’s not me!' It is. 

“And it’s a good starting point for there 
Mio would like to do someUiing al^t the 
way they sound. Learn to hear yourself as 
others you — and as the mike he^ you. 
If you don’t like what you hear, do some- 
th^ about it. Think of the tape recorder as 
a vci^ mirror. 

“You are, after an, dealing with a musical 
instnunenL Indeed, your whole body is a 
musical insinimem, ctf which tb(^ two little 
vocal cords are the reet^ or the sounding 
element. Can you imagine playing with a 
bent oboe or a warped cello? * 

“It’s a matter of technique, of course, aod 
technique can be acquir^ and cultivaietl 
Bad lechnique. or no technique at all in any 
field iovoivmg muscular eon^matiftn, is like 
a time bomb. You can get away with il 
without iiyuiy for just so long. But it will go 
off in the end." ■ 



Heruy Pleasants is the auihw of revenz/ 
botdes on singas and vocal art. 


Maribeth A. Bunch. 


rovCeek 






r 


Pages 


INTERKATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 1985_ 


WEEKEND 


AUCTIONEERS 



CHRISnFS 

INTERNAnONAL 


Are pleased to announce 
the openii^ of 
their new premises 
in Monte Carlo 


under the direction of 
Hans Nadelhofier and Christine de Massy 


EncjuirieSy Catalogues and Valuations 

Christie's Monaco SAJil 
Park Palace 
Monte Carlo 

98000 Principaute de Monaco 
TeL(93)25 19 33 


CLINICS 


VAUMOliT 

WORLD RENOWNED MEDICAL CLINIC 

Glion-sur-Moiitraux, Lake Geneva, Svritzerland 


Located at 2,000 feet altitude ‘m o moderate and prate c ted dimate, the 
dinie hoi the-finest oceew ii nodotions ovaflaUe for your c omfort. In a 
beautiful and calm setting everioaking the Lake of Geneva and the Moni- 
chain the CUNIC VAIMONT provides co mple te medical chedHips, 
outstanding medical core os well os rest, individud diet aM rejuvenation. 
Centers are pre«Med for eordielogy, p li ys iethera p y , electrotherapy, 
hydrotherapy, eleetreeerdiegrom, X-rey and lobo ra tory onelyiis. 
Rooms with air eendtiening. 

Pteaie ask for our brodture and prieot, 

Writo to Mr. H. Tisor - Dteocfor 
CLINK VALMONT, 1823 OHoftesur-Monlrowx, Sw U —rfid 
Tofophena: 021/63 43 SI (10BnM| -T«lwe453 ISTvolmNcIi 


HOTELS 


GERMANY 



OfMMD HOTEL 
SONHET^BICHL 


Gonniwlt-fartenkirchen 1 
Gerniony 

The only Grand Hotel- 
in Uppar-Bovaria 
Toidly renovated in ]99i 

Tol,: 10)8821-7020 
CaG« 08-9632 


Resi Ulel Inlemoliend Stdgsnberger 
bi. Strviee 


SPAIN 



GRANHOIH.SARR1A 

awCBJONA 

SMlDOOB 

Business tedBSes 
Rikdass 


Avda. Sairid. 50 l 0aCQ9 Barcelona 
Id. 193) 239 n 09 
Tdex: 51033 V 51638 GHSB E 
OUeiGRANHOra 



HOIELCHAMAIOIN 
MAE3R1D 
378 rooms. 

PMiiim feJties. 

Ad dess. 


Esabdn Ournartln. 28016 Madrid 
'tek.OD 733 71 n . 733 90 IT 
lielex:492DI H01ME 
CaUeEhfTURSA 


] HOLIDAY TRAVEL 


VILLA HOLIDAYS 

WITH A POOL & CAR 

Luxinr rating 14 nights from p.p. 


Costa del Sol 
Ibiza 
Menorca 
Costa Blanca 
Majorca 


4 star 
4 star 
4star 
4 star 
4 star 


£268 

£262 

£267 

£248 

£250 


All prices mdiuk villa. Digbl (ex. Gatwkk and Headmw. Lanloii}. pool, cu; wdeome 
food pack, airport taxes, eanoellatian iasuiance. maid service. 

Qndt, aB April deperliires arc guuanleed opioet mneuL i & fuel Mwolmp.*- 
Speeiel prices for emummodetion oa^ avsQable on requcsb 
To get our ihreesn^K bradnixe pleaM call our haiir boiUae or aei 


■aee vesr travel 


agent. 

PderdiddlC^) 66561 
or01UP9l9tIerlPI2 
AAEON VILLA HOUDAYS 
Mean Heuae, P eter i Beld, 
Henta GU32 3JN, England 


MEON 


ABTA ATOL 016 lATA ATTO 


SOME CHILDREN WILL MAKE 
MORE FRIENDS THAN OTHERS 
THIS SUMMER 


Choose frofli 30 AciMtyneflday centres 
and from just £S2 you won't Tod a better 
way for your chUdren to enjoy edvenhire 
end challenge in a fRniawerk ol aaleiy 
and tuni Introduce Itwn to aaiung, 
noing, canoeing artfiery, trial bikes ana 
much. Riueh more. 

Write or phone tore brochureend details 
ot all our holidays f or boysand girta 7-17 
years Free vldse available showing the 
P 3 L. Magic in BCBonl 

PGL Vewng Adventure 
iR (O SteHon Street, 

ReM-en-Wye,HR97AH 


Tel. UK: (Ross-on-Wye) 63311 
Tel. PARIS: (1) 742 4969 


RESTAURANTS 





FRA^KFUKTs /2NW TlUE 
RESTAVRAlFri 

rriur 




fetfj ig4XM/igsest 


ROME 


RESIDBdTIALARCA 

Lovely imartmenb fay day, by week or 
by inontn. Direet phone, autormnioua 
h^ing, bar, restaurant, garage, 
24 hour iwvica. 


RESIDBICE 

CORUNA D'AMPEZZO 
I- (39-6) 3387012 - 3387015. _l 


"BEAUTIFUL VILLAS" 
APARTMENTS 

oa The lUvICTB for at. 
Wedcly lentaL Fm caiatog. 

Fxance-Sejonr S.A.RJL. 

Centre Calaxie. 

2193 de SLOande 

06600 Andbea (Fmnee). 
^mTcL (931 33.07.29 


— COSTA DEL SOL — 
SPAIN 

Right on the beach at San Pedro 
de Alcantara boBdaj rentals. 
Group of 14 eparUDenta in own 
cai|dena. Sleep 2/4. 1 bedroau, 
uvingi/diDlBg^ooiii. batbroom, 
kitchen, folly equiraed. 

Sited 3 km*. 6rc*n Pueita Banns; 
Meal tor corapanlea proy a m- 
oubg holidays for enqtloyeea. 

fTriie: Bmuaiows linda 
YbuPlaja 

San Pedro de Alcmbtrs 
Maritellni Spain 
orealh <52) 78.14.92 


TRAVEL 


On Making Chinese Cooking Scrutable 


by Nancy Jenkms 


N ew YORK — ''A lot of pef^le nnsunderstand Chinese 
coolung,** said Lily Lee Levin dui^ a viut here. 


Levin, who was born and raised in Qima, is the ittfe of 

U. S. consul general in Kong, Burton Levin. She is 
aien an enthusiastic eiqioaent of the art of Chinese cooking, whidu 
she insists vuth disa rming conviction, is not as difficult as Westerners 
mflifff ouL If millinnc Chinese women can turn out three meals a 
day, she says, there is no reason why the rest of us should find it 

riaiinring - 

“People say about Chinese cookmg: One, you use ^ot of in^^- 
ents Tve never seen before, and two, there's a lot of ^ppmg, irs a 
lot of WOTk — but that's not true," she said as she quickly assemble 
the ingredients for a demonstration one Saturday morning jb® 
sunlit Hors d'Oeuverie at the top of the World Trade Cmter. *^011 
don’t n eed a wok, you don’t nwd a deaver and you don t need 
qtedal ingredients." 11 . 

She went on to describe her formula: T-O-S-S, j^t 

anri sugar, that's the basis," she said. “Add G-S-G — gariic, scallira 
and gin wr , but never add MSG (monosottiim glutamate). That’s the 
tignoTb^fo^orabadcoedt — or both." 

The daughter of a Chinese army officer, wvm was oom m 


dbm to explore a range of combinations. “As far as mgre<haits are 
concerned?’ she said, “you have to think, to 
tion. I have a rough idea of what Tm gomg to cook, but after ihM I 
play a little, I raange A lot depends on whars m the 

RroidS*siir-fmng sliced cucumbers and onions, ^e said. “You 
can do this with carrots or greoi peppers, oryou «uld use a can of 
water rhestn ur*. you could add bew sprouts." Tlie Isxsy to it ^is 
spontandw. “Use minced pork or chicken or beef, whatCTcr you like. 
At the end you can add sesame oil to m a k e it OnentaL 


S HE does not believe in teadung ^pes. she smd on 

occasion, pr^aring a meal in a uieud’s kitchen in New York. 


Sha^oDg province, in northon ChiM. In the diffit^t ye^ bdw^ 
durine and a 


during arid after World War IL her family moved from city to city 
throughout China. ...... * u 

She learned to cook, she said, by foDowmg m the steps of her 
amah Qi nlirwnwiH ^Thc family cook traveled with us,'’ ^ said, 
“and we always had a bouse full of people, family and soldiers. In the 


“What is mqioitant is to get a sense of how the whole thing 
works,** she said. ^ ^ t 

As an exanmle of the method ^roach from “Lay’s Way, here is 
her “one-for-^ redpe for stir-ffied fish or sfatiir^ di^: 

“For rish or shrimp and v^etables, the proportioa is 2 cups to I 
cup — Le., twice as much fish or shrimp as v^etables. 

“METHOD 

“Clean the tish (whidi should be ffileted and cut into bite-sized 
pieces) or the shri^ (which should be devdsed) and use paper 
toweling to bloc dry. 

“Salt and pepptt the Csh (dusted with a little comstaidi u a 
binder to prevent it from falli^ apart while coddr^ or the shrin^ 
and separatdy dic^ shred or shce the vegetables. 

“Proceed as you would with a meat diw — stir^the ve^bles 
for abwt 10 to 15 seconds in IVi tbro. of heated oH, salt very lightly 
and then scoc^ the vegetables out of the pan. Add another 2V& tbsp. 
of ml and w4ien it is hot, saute a few slices of gLoger or, if you prefer, a 


Lily Lee Levin compares her cook- 
ing style to her marriage. ‘Now I like 
to intermarry Chinese and Ameri- 
can things. These days no place is 
isolated. We mix cultures and 


little chopped scallion or garlic, 
kddmefii' 


we 


mix cuisines.' 


kitchen they would give me a few v^tables to diop or a piece of 
do^ to roll out just to keq) me quiet” When the family moved to 
Taiwan in 1 949. she took over much of the meal prqiaration herself. 

But it was not until she became a U. S. Fore^ Service officer’s 
wife that she discovered her cookmg was something spedaL She met 
her Brooklyn-bom husband while attending Warren wOson Co^e 
in North CWoUna. “Now I like to intennany Chinese and American 
things," she said, con^aring her cookmg style to her marria^. 
“These days no place is ismated. We mix ^tures and we mix 
cuisines.” V^th to husband and two chiLdren, she has lived in 
Indonesia, Thailand. Taiwan and several times in Hong Kong, as 
well as in Washington, D. C, and Cambridge Massachusetts. 

Althou^ she h^ always a dedicated it is <mly in recent 

years, iritfi her children away at school that Levin has found the tune 
to demonstrate her enthusiasm to others. Now she has translated 
that enthusiasm into a book, “Lily's Way,” subtitled “S^table 
Chinese Cookmg,” vriiich she published privately in Hong Kong last 
year. In New York, the book is available for SIO in Bloomingdale’s, 
and I 9 mail for the same price plus postage from the World Trade 
Center Qub, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong. 


Add tiie fish or shrinm, stir-fry to about 20 to 30 seconds until 
almost done, a^ put ba^ the ve^tables. Stir fry for another 5 to 10 
second. Taste, add salt if necessary and a |mum of sugar, and it is 
ready to serve. 

“HINT 

“Ginger complements sea food. Use a lot of it when available. 
Sautfid gin ger gives off a fragrant aroma and imparts a ddicateflavor 
to the seafood. If you don't like ginger, snbstimte soDions. 

“NOTE 

“Fish and shrimp are often cooked with only a few slices of ^r^ 
and a couple of stolkm siaJks cut into about 1 -inch lengths, mth 
fish, soy sauce can be used instead of salt but it is general^ not used 
with shrimp since it would ovenriielm the ddicate flavoi. if you use 
soysauce, the groeial is 1 tsp. for every cup of meat or fish.” 

^ei 


on the size of 


le cookmg tunes are oiily tqiproxhnate and « 
the pieces of fish, shrimp and vegetable. Levin rKommeuds several 
v^tables to go with shrin^ or fi^ among them asparagus, bamboo 
shoots, bew sprouts, mushrooms, both fresh aM £ied, edery, 
cucumber and snow peas. ■ 



9 1985 The Net» York Times 


Lify Lee Levin shows how. 


My 11« Nre YvL Ta 


“Americans have such a misconception of Chinese cooking,” 
Lerin told a group of American women assembled to her demon- 
stration here. “They ask me, do you cook Peking st^e, Sichuan, 
Cantonese?” Her refuse, she said is to insist: “I code Chinesei It's 
the same way of cooKng all over China. Only the spice, the flavoring, 
makes the difference from one r^on to tiie next." 

As she demonstrated how to prepare stir-fried shrimp with sliced 
cucumbers, beef with onions, and stewed chicken with chestnuts, 
Levin explained what ^ calls the method aijproach to Chinese 
cooking, by which the mastery of a few techmques, sudi as stir- 
frjnng, steaming and stewing or braising, allows the 000 k the free- 


DOONESBURY 


tMSjSU 

BoSFt 

omA 

mm, 

rnsutir, 

MM* 
»/ 


'mi.Ftfisr 

OFTHByOUBf- 
BAlLPtAHm, 
ANPNDwne 
AlR.Sm>.. 



mHAPABOUTASMUCM 

tjtesstmmsEMeBm 

ASICANSmRITfmc 

IM60IN6T0TAKB0FF 

fOASmiSBRSAK. 




: ’7.‘« 
"■ •' '.'i 
;■ ■•■'it 

I'fc 


r -*n* 


- • .“n 

: 't 


• 'bS 
•“.evi 
J irr 


■ .* .t s 

' •'‘: 1 V 




INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


FW/LKoozenb«us(iel: 71111 1). 
JC^TS— April I3aad 14: Vien- 


VIENN/ 

CONC 

na Fhilbarmoniker, Andie Pterin con- 
liductor. Arturo BenedettirMIebdan- 
geli piano (Mozart, Haydn). 

Apnl 18: Vienna Symraoniker, Peter 
Sdmeider conductor. Itonas Zdiet- 
mair riolin. Trisea Zimmennann viola 
(Mozart, Schuben). 

RECITAL — Apm 17: Haydn Trio. 
Thomas Riebl viola (Beethoven, M^ 
zart). 

•Musikveran(td: 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS — l4: Vienna 

“ faoniker, Stauslaw Skrowac- 

i conducior. Grant JohanneseD 
piano (Ravd. Scfaostakowitsch). 


April IS: Warsaw Bomus Conson, 
MaidnSiB 


Szc^dnski conductor (Polish 
Renaissance music). 

19: ORF Symphony Orchestra, 
iri Gklen oocKiiictor. Gabrida 
Benackova-Cap soprano ^eethoven). 
RECITAL April 15: Qemeos Ha- 
ceDo, Elisaoeih Leonskafa piano 
Sduimann). 


April IS: Royal PhUharmoak: Orches- 
tra, Peter Gfi^ora condnetm. Marga- 
ret Bruce mano (Brahms. Mozart). 
April 1 6: EngUsb Chamber Orcbmtra, 
Yehudi Meauhm conductor/riolin 

April 19: Fraser GouldingcooductM, 
Malcolm Binns piano (Offenbach, 
Tchaikov^). 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shak^ 
roeare CompaDy — April 11-20: 
“Hamlet'’ (Sbak^ieare). 

•Haywi^ Galleiy (td: 928.57.08). 
EXHIBmONS —To A^ 21 : “Re- 
noir,” “John Walken Printings from 
the Alba and Oceania Series." 
»LoadoaColiseQm(td: 836J)1.11). 

-Ap^IS,!?,' “ " 

lered Bride" (Smetana). 


To April 20: “Li 


•Galerle James Mayor (lel: 
326.60J4). 

EXHiBlTlON — 

Shuang.” 

•Ubnurie-erierie du Joor <td: 233. 
43A0). 

EXHIBITION —To April 20: “Jean- 
Miehel Prudbofniiie.” 

•Maison de Victor Hugo (tel: 


ballet — April 13; “Hortunage i 
George Balanchine” (Balanchine, 
Neumder). 

OPERA— IS: “Tsar und Zini- 
merman” (Lor^g). 

MUNICH Gartnerelalz State The- 
ater(tel; 201.67.67). 

OPERETTA— Ara 14: “TbeBqgar 

0a.. /> 


272.16.65). 
IBJTION 


EXHlBTnON — To June 29: “Le 
Voyage duRliio.” 

■sMuseed’Art et Essri (tel: 260J926). 
EXHIBITION —To April 22: “Odi- 
I<m Redon.” 

•Muste de la Publidii (lel: 246. 
13:09). 

EXHIBITION — To April IS: 
“French Film Posters." 

•Mus 6 e du Grand Palais (tel: 


Student" (Milldckei). 

tional71ieater(iel: 22.13.16). 


•National Theater (ii 
BALLET— April 13 and 15: “Swan 
Lake'’ (Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — April 14 and 18:-“Ma> 
beib" (Verdi). 

April i 6 :“LaBohiiiie"(Puccnix). 
April 19: “Le Nozze di Hgaro” (Mo 
zart). 


Lndadi 


OPERA— Apti 
Lammennoor (Donizetti). 

^ril IS a^ 17: “Don (VerdO. 


261A4.101 

3ITION — To April 22: “Im- 


HONGKGNG 


EXHIBI 

pressionism and the Frehdi Conntry^ 
side.*' 


#Staateoper(td: 53240). 

BALLET — April 13: TheSleqring 
Beauty” (Nureyev, Tdiaikovsky). 
Aprill6andI9:“DonQaixoie (Nn- 
rnev. Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — April IS: “La 'Haviata" 


ateGalleiyttd: 821.13J3). 
BmON— To Janc2: “ThePo- 


(Vcfdi). 

April IS: “Aida" (Verdi). 


EXHIBmOI 
Ittical PaintinB oT Meriyn Evans 
(1910-1973). 

•Viooiia and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITION — To Jnne 9: “The 

lie: 


M uste du Louvre ^tel; 260J^6). 


EXHIBmONS— toMay 6 : “French 


ToMay6;“. 

Engraven: from theXVIIt Centuiy. 
•Musi* 


•VoOute^ftel: 53^. 


watetcokmis by Amadeo, Count 

m). 


BALLET — April IS: “Giselle" 
(Akmso, Adani). 

OPERA — Aptfl 17: “H BarUere di 
Sivi^” (Ros^). 

Apnl 18: “The Esc^ from the Sera- 
*jo”( M<ga rt). 

'PERETTA — April 16: “The Land 
of Smiles” (Lehte). 


BELGiUM 


ANTWERP, Royal Flemish Opera 
'td: 233.66.85). 

DPERA— April 14; “Paisifal” (Wag- 
ner). 

BRUSSELS, Optea National (tel: 
217.22.11). 


OPERA— April 13 and 19: ‘Tristan 
(Wagner). 


ondl^de" 


aM^drsB eaiut Anstid: SI 1.29.95j. 


CONCERT — AprO 18:NauonaIL.. 
gian Orchestra, Mendi Rodan ccnduc- 

tor, Emil Goildes piano (Slravinsl^, 


ziosi(1816-181 

•Wigmoie HaB (id: 933.31 Al). 
CONCERTS— te>rill3:NewCh8n^ 
ber Orefaesna of Stockholm, Iona 
Brown oondncior (Badi, Tdiaikov- 
sl^ 

April 17: Oromoote Kano 
Christopher Lawrence bass 
vea. Steuben). 

RECTTALS — April 14: Sylvia Un- 
denstrand S(»iana Geofih^ Paisons 
piano (Liszt, Sbdins). . 

April 15: Kkroly Moesri piano (Bee- 
thoven. Ratemamnovi. 

April 16: Julian Uoyd Wteber cdlo, 
Peter Petthmer piano (Bretten). 

April IS: Victoria de los Aqgeles sth 
p^o. Geoffr^ Parsons iriano (Spm- 
ishprcoam). 

April 19: Bernard Roberts, Yolande 
Wrigley piano (Debusqr, Radunan- 
inov). 

NOTTINGHAM, Royal Coocen Hall 


fustedu Petit Pal ais(tel:742J)3 AT). 
EXHIBITION— To June 30: “James 
Tissoi: 1836-1902." 
•O^(tel:7CLS7J0). 

0»RA — April 17: *‘AIceste” 
(Chite). 

Ap^ 18: “Wozzeck" (Be^ 

•S^ Gaveau (td; S&.2(D0). 
RECITAL— April 18: AnneQueff^ 
leepiano (Bach, Mozart). 
•S^Pleyd(563J)7.96). 
CONCEIT — Apiti 17-19: Or^ 
cbmtre de Paris. Daniel Barenboim 
conductor, I^afc Perlman violin 
(Bach. Beethoven). 

RECITAL— April IS: IsaacStemvio 
lin. 

•Ihteire des Cbanuu Bystes (cel: 
723A7.77). 

CONCERTS — April 17: Orcbestte 
National de France, Marinaaoo Val- 
des conductor (Offenbatel 
•'Tbiktre Musical de Paris (tel: 
261.19.83). 

BALLET — Maurice Bgart 20th Cen- 
tiny Ballet -April 13 and 14: “Notre 
Faust”(Bate). 
ri! 17-21; “L 


HONG KONG, Tsuen Wan Town 
HaU(tel; 790.75.21). 

CONCERT— April 19: Hong Kong 
Ffailfaarnxmic Orchestra, Christo(dier 
Seaman conductor, GflUan Lin pmi? 
(Steumaim, Wteer). 


EXHIBITldNS— To April28: ”Afra 
aoid Tteia Scarpa: aidntects and rie- 
sigoers,” "The Inuginajy and the 
Rj^: Paolo De Polt, CancUdi Fioc. 
ToniZnoeberi." 

TURIN, Royal Palacedd: 839.88.02). 
EXIOBrnON— To May 22: “Court- 
ly Life in ^astban Seen Through In- 
man Miniature Paintinga from the 
XVIItoXIXCeoniries.” 

•Teatra Regio(td: S4J80.00). 

OP^A — ApeO 14, 16, 18: “Tan- 

April 1^9: The bartend Bride'* (Sme- 
tana). 

VENICE, Ca’ Vendramip Caleigi (td 
70.99.09). 

EXHIBITION —To May 19: “Fign- 
rativeJapaneseAit; 1873-1964.’* 
•Palazzo Fortuny (id: 7D.99J)9). 
EXHIBinON —To April 28: “Hite 
Fashion: laSCsand 19^8.” 


•■CONGHUS— =~Aprilii 6 ^ Lansarme 
Qu 3 rt«t(M(mni;Veidi)i - 
^nl 18 and 19: 'Gulbeokiaa Ottees- 
tea. Lev Marktz ccnductor. Sequdra 
piano (Beethoveo. Mozart). 
RBOTAL — 17: Roswitha 

Tredermezzo s opr a no. JoaoPaoiodos 


■“'.'•a 




\ 


•Sl duto 

36.84:08). 

OPERA — 13: “Cosi fan tutte” 
(Mozart).. . 

^ril 17-19: “Madama Butterfly" 
(Pbcciiii). 




SCeTLANb 


EMNBURGH, National Gdleiy (td: 


• 




556.8941). 

arnON —To Apnl 28: “The 


EXHIBI 

Face of Nature: Landscape drawings 
from the permaneu t eoUectioiL” 
•Usberildlfid: 228.1 ).55)i 


CONC^T— April 19: ScotlishNa^ ^ 


JAPAN 


TOKYO, Azabn Museum (tel: 


GRBCE 


582.14.10). 

EXHIBITION— 


ATHENS, Athens Art Galleiy (id: 
721J938). 

EXHIBITON —To April 21 : “Infin- 
ities.” 

•Center for Folk Art and Tradition 


To April 28: “Mas- 
terpieces of Ifidyry E Pamting.” 
•Idenutso Art Gai]ery(tel: 213 J 1 . 1 1 ). 
EXHIBmON— ToJune 2 : “Loxidof 


tional ^dieslia, Neeme Jarvi cond _ 
tor, Mstislav Rostropovich cello 
(Haydn. Shostakovich). . 
GLASGOW, City HaU (tel: 
SSL59.61). 

CONCERT — April 14: Scottish 
Chamber OFcbestia, James Coolon 
conductor, Benita Valente aopiano, 
Ann Murray meizo-tepcano (Mb- 
zan). 


i.'ji 




Gvilizations. Thdew." 
•Japan Fdk Qmt 
4^527 


(td: 32439.87). 

ON— 1 


EXHIBITION —To Mmr. “Folk Art 
and Tradition of Thrace.'^ 

•Nees Morpbes Gallery (tel: 


361.61.65), 

;rnON —To April 20: “Pan- 


exhib: 
ayioiisTetsis.' 

•OraGaOenrltd: 323.06.98). 
EXHIBITION — To April 16: 
“Chissa Voudooroglou.” 


Museum (td: 

EXmi^ON— ToJuiie23: “Czafrs 
of North Eastern Disoicts.” 
•National Mnsum of Modem Art(td: 
214JSA1). 

EXHIBITION — To May 6 : “ShDco 
Mimakata.” 

tOkora Shukok&n Museum (tel: 


SPAIN 




583J)7.81), 

IBITION — 
maTaik 
S^ePainier. 


EXHl 

koyama Taikan: A Mi 


To^iiil 21; "Yo- 
[oman J^nnese 


Madrid, FundadOn Juan Maite 
(td:43SA2A0). 

EXHIBmON —To April 30: “Rus- 
sian Vanguawh’sin; I9I$t930.” 
•Museo oe Arte Conleomorineo (id: 
449 , 71 , 5 m - • 

EXHIBTnON — Thcongb 
“Jean Arp.” Tinnish Desgn.' 
•Palacios de Vdkzquez v ’ 

(Id: 27477.75). 


mSlAND 


April : 


"LeConcoun." 


(id; 42328). 

It— A pril13: London Sym- 


TchaikovsInFl, 

rnON —To April 28: “Fdi- 


EXHIBin.. .. 
den Rops.” draviings. 

GHENT, Royal Opera (td: 252425). 

OPERA — April 13; “11 Barbiere m 
SivigUa” (Rossitti}. 

lUEGRThtetre Royal (Id: 23J9.10). 
I OPERA— April 14aiid 18: "LeNooe 
di Figaro" (Mozart). 


CONCERT 
phony Orteestra. Claudio Ablndo 
condnetor. Maurice Boorgne obde, 
Axme Murray soprano (huhler, We- 
bern). 


GHUAANY 


miLAND 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
34L44^49) 

OPERA — April 14 : “Siegfried” 


OBUWARK 


COPENHAGEN, Radio House Cou- 
cert HaU (Id: 35.06.47). 


CONCERTS— April 13: Radio Light 


kpnl 

Orchestra, Teddy Pcieisen condudbr. 


HELSINKI. Finlandia HaU (lel: 
40241). 

CONCERTS— April ]7and 18: Hel- 
sinki Philbaimonie Orctotra. Um- 
berto Benedetti Micfaelangeli conduc- 
tor, Pascal Devoyon piano 
(Beethoven. Schu'ben). 

RECITAL— April 16: Andrd Gavri- 
lov piano (Cbopm). 


(Wagner). 

April 15: “Fidelio”(Beetiioven). 

t.Flying Duteb- 


3 y 

^lil 19: Ensemble Inter Contempoi^ 
■in, Alain Damiais conducior. 




ENGLAND 


BIRMINGHAM, fiinniiighain Hip- 
podrome (td : 622.74.86). 


BAL^^ — AprilJ ^Ihe Rc^ Bal- 
■ ine. Sira 


let, “The Fadnrd” (Fokiiie, Slravio- 
slQ‘), 'X)(msort Lessons" (Blndey- 

Stravindey), “A Month in the Coun- 
try” (Ashton, Chopin). 


NICE, Calesie ifArt Conlemporain 
(tel: 6227 11 ). 

MGXI VlGljira. 

•Galerie des Pooebettes (tel: ^^^LOGNE, 
62.31.24). 

KCHIBITTON— ToApril28: "Niuis: 

Gerard Titus Carmd.” 

PARIS, Centre '(Seoiges Pompidou 


Apru 15: "Fideoo^Ber 
April 16 arid 19: “The.! 
man" (Wagner). ' 
i^ril IS: “Ariadne auf Naxos” 
(^ranss). 

•Pbilhannonie((d: 54880). 
CONCERTS— At^ 12 and 13: Bei^ 
lin PhUhaimonic Orteestra, 

Pesdo conductor (Bate. Mozart). 
April 14: Berlin Sympfaooy Oicbestia. 
Lutz Herbig conuuetbr. Rudolf 
G 8 hlereon(hutor(Bach, Stravinsky). 
April 16 and 17: Berlin Bnlhannonic 
Oiteesira, Miteael Tibon Thomas 
cc^uctorCBeriicz, Schomaim), 
•Stel05sCharlouenbuig(tfl: 3201-1). 
EXHIBITION — To M» 25: ”Aii- 


LONDON, BarUcan Hall— April 13; 

Tteudi 


English Chamber Orchestra. 
Menuhin conducior. Jose-Luis Garda 
viotia(Baeb). 



Oper der Stadt (Id: 21 2521). 
OPERA— Apm 13and 19: ’‘Madama 
!tatteri^ ' - 

April 18: “Cannea^OizA). 
UtANKFUBT, Cafe Theater (td: 

77.74.^- - 

,TER — tThWiigh A^: “The 
(Quistie}. 

Frankfort (td: 256^335). ' 
BURG, Staatsoper (tel: 

5). 


DUBUN. Alliance Francaise (td: 
7621.97). 

EXHIBITION —To April 30: “Fer- 
nand Vivien.” 

•Gvie Museum (td: 77.16A2). 
EXHIBITION — Thioute April; 
“Wood Quay." 

•David Hendrik’s Gallery (tel: 
75.6ft62). 

EXHIBITION — To May 4: “Roy 
JohnsUm.” 

•National Concert Hall (tel: 
71.1828). 

RECITAL— April 13: John O'Conor 
piano (Beethoven). 

•Oliver Dowling Gallery (tel: 
76.65.731. 

EXHIBITION — To April 30: “Gil- 
benSwimberge.” 

•Oriel GaD» (id: 76.34. 10). 
EXHIBITION — Through i<^)cU: 
“The DubUners. Watercolours by 8 G- 
teadHealy.” 

•Peac ote'I Tieatredd: 74.45.05). 
THEATER— Threugh^nil: “Gleor 
geny Glen Ross" (David Mame^ 
•Prqects Art Centre ( td: 7 L3327). 
EXHIBITION — To May 3: “Lys 
Hansen." 

THEATER — To May 9: “Victory” 
(HowaidBadcer). 
• Tkylor GaUgy(td;77JS0.89). 
EXHIBITION — Huough April: 

“Louis leBrocquy" 


- iccar Art Museum (id: 5712234). 
EXHIBITION — ^ToA^29: “Scenic 
Spots in Edo- Ando fwoshto” 
•tebu Museum (tel: 981 J)l.l]). 
EXHIBITION —To May 12; “Leo- 
nardo da Ifind Nature Suidi^’' 


BOnBrnON-^To^ril 30 : "Span- 



lYamatane Museum (tei: 669.4036). 
— Tol^yl0^“Con- 


EXHIBmON ... 

temporary Jr^ianese P^tug.' 


MONACO 


isfaSculptore 1900-l!,^..«. 
•S8ladeExpCKtiidoaesdelaGaixa(td: 
419X14.40). ■ . 

EXHIBITION— April 15-30: “Rich- 
ard HemQtoiL” 

•TeatrodelaZaizuela(td: tt9.1Z86). 
OPERA — itoiil lOaod 19: “Atmid^ 
(Gluck). 

•Teatro Real (tel: 24828.75). 
CONCERTS — April 13 and 14: Oi^ 








MONTE-CARlA.CentredeCooares 

(lel: 50.7634). ^ 

CONCERT— Monte-Carlo Philhar- 
monic Orchestra — Aptil 14; Law- 
rence Foster conductor. Danid Bar^ 
boim piano (TdiailcovsM. 

Apnl 17: Jean-Pieire Wteezoondu^ 
tor. Herv6 BiIlautpiano(Biah'i)s, Mo- 
zanV 

•Salle Garnier (td: 50 l 7634}. 
CONCERT ^Apiil 13: Mdu Quar- 
tet (Beetiiovec, Dvorak). 


9toteyCorosNadonalesde&pana. V ’ 

Jes6sL6pezCoboscoiiductOT(Ci^- "-C— ~ 


^>ril 15 and 16: Sl Louis > 
Orchestra, Leonard SlatloD 
(Berlioz, Mozart). 


, 'y 

iuctor 






REdTAJL— April 16:RadoLupupi- “'*• ' ic* • 

“o- ■. 

SWBEN v-'''.:'* 



. • - " 

STOCKHOLM, Concert Hall (idr<^V. 


RECITAXS April I5: Aldo CScco- 
idJszLlUvd). 


linlpianol 

Apnl 16: Rea^ Bruson baritone, 
Sheppard piano (Moeaiu Rav^ 
d). 

April 19; Teresa IBerganza niezzo-so- 
pcano, JA. Alvarez Pareio niawrt 
(Biaih^ Vivaldi). 

•Tbiaire Princesse Grace (tel; 
50.7634). ^ 

RECITAL— April 13: JaouszMonar- 
chabasSpKCaTeteeDiedieu-Yidal piano 
(QKq}in,Scbaben). 



ITALY 


New Y0(RK, GuBgBDhdm Miisg™ 
Oel: 36025,00). 
bXHIBniON— 
kenthalerm 
1950-84. 


-c- ■■‘Cndi 
N— ToApa21:Ttan- alr-a 

PapenASeto^’^ 


PORTUGAL 


^Metropolitan Museum of- Art (tri: 
5.77.10). 






GENOA, Teairo Margherita (rd: 
58.9329). : 

.OPERA —April 14: “Akb” (Verdi). 
MUAN. Far^one dTAne Cootem- 
. poranea (td: ^;4628). 


LISBON, Calouste Gulbenkian 
FbuadaaoD (733121). 

BALLET — April 13: (julbenldan 
Ballet (“Five Tangos,” “Ghost 
Dances”). 




33S.77.r0V 

EXHIBITTON To SepL 
udiheHorse^” • 

•Museum of Modem Art 
(td:70824i)0). • 

gemrrONS— ToMay 14: *Tittri 

•k‘42. . • * - 

^ n. . 









international herald tribune, FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 1985 


Page 9 


Ttm FUN AND PROFIT 





Gidy a Few Can Afford 


fay Roger Colfis 







W,yW*h«gior.Tl,N«:;r" 


ytx^tsAm 

i&Tip 

veo-^Fm sm 





[CERTS April l<j; Unsmoi 
let (Mozan. Verdi), 
i IS and 19: GulbsnhanOidB 
jst Mariu conductor. Seqic; 
i piano I Seeihot'en. Mooni. 
ITAL — April 17; Riewi 
lernKSSosorranaJowPaM 
»»iano ( Scnonbers). 
C^os National Tbeaur (d 
1.08). 

_ April l5;"CoafjBnie 

„ ..L. 

I 17-lQ; “Madaou BunolK 
Hiu). 

SCOTLAND 


0 .April 28' "ft 

Qdi^di^ 

cc^ectioiL* 

S.M.551 

llQiSwmshw, 

- f^^l! 


V ’ Hall ni 

jamei Cab 
alentesopi* 
^soprano i» 


SPAIN 


iHE vesy rich 3r« fiffereat fmnev- 
oyone ebe; DK ooty do th^ hive 
more nK»w, as Haningway 
observed, faot thqr seem! to get 
jipore freebies diao other people, from invita- 
-Dons to ioaugoi^ MeSierraoeaa cruises to 
trips 10 Las Vqas whh all expenses paid. 
'I bank managers with nobody of- 
you aoyihbig wba yw realty need h. 
006 way.to get a irw Isnu b to offer to pay 
wih the proverbial auQio&-d(41ar bill. . 

So h is. for raemben of Premier Services, a 
Eop-of'tbe-Soe travel assisiBnceplan that the 
Anrer icar i: Express Bank opereies for 
ibet wadL** aeats: It dai^ to protdde an 
atouodfthe-clocfc condeige service — .from 
iedk^aid to help with travel arrangements 
’pm^cally aaywhm in the.'wofid. To be 
, nrabm are eureied to qnead some 
r around with tb^ American Exjffess 
['cards, but the service itsdf is free. 
Imagine that you're just about to return 
tan New Yorii; to your home Imse in Zuiidt 
ytNi ^ a messi^ that an unMriant . 

: IS flying in btan the^Middle East to 
a^ wants to meet you there the 
lowing day. You wonder now on eanh 
can unsoambk your Itinerary half an 
befree you're w to leave for JFK. 

ly. a tight bulb flashes above your . 
. anid you dtal the unlisted New Y«k 
^ ^hmnbercHitbebadcofyoarPteaiierServiees 
.^a^ On your arziyal at the aiiixvt, every- 
ttbh^ has been taken care of. Tlaett ate new 
faid^waidi^aitfaedieck-mdeskforLon- 
|doflL where acarwillmea you. accom- 

hnodatioa has been arranged, an interpreter 
(laid on for -the aftexno^ ' ndma for a 
^Moked-out show have miraculously ap* 
hjeared and your Cavoiiie restanruit has been 
fieserved for a late dmner. Whafs more, 
nnegages are on ihor way to yw office in 
' Zurich as w^ as to your raent deu^ of 

tyour new sdiedule. 

According to Rtriiort Smith, rftairmati atwt 
^chieC execuSve of American Bank, 

rpremier Senrices was sei op lost over ayear 
to meet the travd new oi iB private 
hoHiring clients, maiw whom arc indq>eo- 
dent entr^Hvoeun woo lade the resreuoes of 
. a large corporate neiworiL "These people are 
. ; frequent international trevekxs whh heede 
tpersonal and badness sdwdnles. Our aim is 
|to provide them with a badcap service that 
4 can't othemnse get, at no cost Obvious- 
<ly we hope to 'ffX ihdr private banking and 
* travd .business and that they use their 
•American Express cards." 

I In Older to quality- for membershm m 
I Premier Services, you must have not anfy an 
•American Express gdd card.issned by 
|American Express Bank or by ^ Trade' 
iDevdqnnent Bank (a la^ Geaevai>based 
•private bank that American Express ac-. 
Iquxred a coui^e of years ago) but have at 
fleast half a million dedbrs on di^msit with 
I oim of them. Okam who meet there reqmie- 
jments are lik^ to be {ull*fle^^ millioa- 
«eire$..So it is hardly surpdszQg that our of 
|30,000 bmUdng diems there are only about . 
. 'Pr emier Service membos scattered 

‘'ntm>aghouttfaewoiid;-^taw,n(Kie<tf 
^ cap be. U. gs :1mth; die American 

Express banks-t^iaate hnder al^al charter 
*>t^tpieciudesdj^fi]omcanddctmgdoineS' . 
’'tic budness in the United Stales. Acanding 
to Smith, members r^vesent a vride range of 
nationalities; the nanonals of no one coun- 
try account for more than 8 percent cS total 
■bank deposits. 

Froviaing ipedal services is a tnuUtional 
way for private banks to attract a wealthy 
..clientele. But America Express has been 
able to upst^ its cosqxhiitus 1^ eaploiting 
the faorizontu intention of its banking 
travd and credit card cfivisknis. 

"Premier Sendees costs us vutually noth* 
~ing in terms of oot-<rf-podcet expeiue^ h's 
. incremenui We are sizi^y pignbacldng on 
the already existing services ofiSe travd and 
^card boaiMSSses. Bmthe cost of this to anotb* 

'' er institatitm would be prohibitxve,*' Sonth 
says. 

. The Premier Sendees card, wiiicfa comes in 
'.'black and ^dd liv^ with the name of the 
■ member in gold cm the.fnmt, looks 

like any other strip of corporate plastic. In 
fact, only a courte^’ card and cannot be 

used for potdiases. eat. on the bac£ are 
' printed 24-hour hot-line numbers in New 
Yoric, Mia^ Paris and London vdiidi. 
Smith says, can be answered, in any of 16 
Tati g iia ges. Xn Juoe, hot lines will be opened 
in Sogapoie, Hong Ktmg, To)^ and other . 
cades in Aria. A ^ to the nearest center 
brings help anywhere in the worid, ritbough 
medial aid is coordinated Uuoi^ Paris by 
' anaogenient with Eunop AsristanceL 


Once a member's identiflcaiion has been 
established by name and personal code, the 
operator calls iro the relevant "travd pro- 
file, ** which inoKates preferences for air- 
Imes, holds, restaurants and tte like, medi- 
cal requirements and dietary and other 
predilections. This prKumably saves time in 
planning a schedule. 

For example, some hig h fliers might rou- 
tindy hire a Leaget between Zurich and 
Milan, while others mi^t scrape along with 
first class on Swissair. Oire may spMty a 
particular bodyguard, another a co^tail 
cabinet in the bulletproof limousine. Once 
the request has been soned out, Pimnier 
.Services gets to work and normally g«iu the 
member back in an hour or less. Out-of- 
pocket transactiems with vendors of services 
and goods are charged to the member’s 
American Express gdd card. This may prove 
to be a limitatimi in sortie parts irf the wxid 
because American Euress rdativdy few 
acceptance points —w0,000 compared with 
four milium for Visa, although they pcuht 


Amex bankers 
find a way to 
entice the rich 


out that most of the up-market vendors ac- 
oq>t American Express. Presumably, cost is 
no^'ectfor Premium SServiees.Says Robert 
SxmtlL. "Once you’ve got a client, and he uses 
tins card, he isn’t goii^ to be price senritive." 

In ^te of the exotic possibilities, tiie most 
frequently used services are for remtine air- 
line and hotel reservations. But there are 
itienty of anecdotes of out-of-thoK)rdinaiy 
requests. For example, a Premier Services 
member wanted to buy and move into a 
bouse in London within 24 hours so t^i his 
wife could leave the ho^tal and convalesce 
at home. He called the hot line. Premier 
Services arranged everything, from negotiat- 
ing with the r& estate agent to arranging a 
credit for £S0JX)0 because the member's ac- 
count officer at his ba^ in the south of 
France was unavailable ati in three hours 
one afternoon. 

Another member was taken QI at home in 
Lorulon. His regular physician was not avail- 
able. He felt so bad that he called 'Premier 
Services in Paris, vriiirii arranged for a doc- 
tor living next door to visit in hu an hour. A 
few weoes later, the same parson flew to 
fWis at riurt notice for a business meeting. 
He went to the hold where he normally 
stay^ bin it was full He called PFemier 
Services from a nearby public phone, walked 
back to the hotel and had a room. 

American Express has plenty of such ex- 
anqties to show the prowess of Premier Ser- 
vices •— from the Paruuayan ambassador 
«dio got a seal cm a fully l^ked plane after a 
ski weekend in Colora^ to same-d^ lunch 
reservati(»5^ai TafUevem-reatauFmcin-Paria 
— - but th^ are ft^tbeomu^ witii .tivs 

nanva of r^-lifc'^ICTBi^ ^ 

So I decided to call the Prenud’ Services 
hot line in Paris with a anmlatcd siuaticm. It 
was 1 1 A.M. on a Thursday. According to 
the scenario. I was in Monte Carlo and my 
wife was sl^ng at Saint Moritz. She would 
have to join me at a business dinner in 
Geneva that evenmg and we would fly on 
togetherto New Yore ou Sunday. There was 
one aMopticatioo, the U. S. visa in old 
Bntirii passport bad to be transferred to the 
newon& 

I^emier Services called back atlL45 AAL 
A private helicopter would take me to Nice 
aiiport ($160) unere a Cessna 18S turbopn^ 
had been chmiered (Sl,3()0) for Geneva (fly- 
ing time 65 minutes) which was timed to 
meet my irife, arriring at 17:05 on Swissair 
flight 327 from Zurich ($85 first class), vriiere 
she had been taken 1^ taxi tom Sainf Moritz 
($230). At the airport a limo (SUO) would 
take us to the Bemx Rivage botet ($120 dou- 
ble room) and a plurii restaurant, Le Biain, 
bad ben reservn for diimer at 8.30 P.M. 
($100 a perstm without wine). On Sunday we 
were bomced on Swissair fli^t 110 (first class 
$1,200 each) arriving in New York at 4:25 
P.M. where a Premier Services rnresenta- 
tive' would hdp u$ into a limo (5120) for 
Manhattan. We were booked into tbe Pierre 
($120 dobl^ roomL MreniAile, arrange- 
moiis had been made with the U. S. Consul- 
ate in Nice for the visa. 

It.was in^E»esrive. It. seemed a pity not to 
make the tnp. ■ 


SWE®^ 


Uioio 






. vnRfc 


77.101 


TP 




.Mtf 






Sacha Guitry 

‘•not more so," be once allowed when cau- 
tioned about his vanity. 

The inteiieried him, but while it* 

was mute he felt it h^ no place for him, as 
'he wrote his diriogue to faie heard and not 

• seen. He did make one sOent film in 191S,a 
documentary about Friisian artists anid au- 
thors, photogr^ilung Rodin and Renoir in 
their atdiers, Anatoie France and Octave 
Mirbeau in their studies and Sarah Bem- 

. hardt in her ornate drawing room. - 

When the talkies came ini be acted in film 
vetrions of his ptqntiar plays and, eseour- 
by the reqionse, he b^n. to write 
. icenarios. The first of these, "Hie Stoiy of a 
Cheat," tbe saga of an unscrupulous yo«mg 
man's to fortune, he tranrionned into 
a sparkling film of international renown. He 
foUowedmth three more of tbe genre: "Nine 
Bachelors," "Pearis of tbe Crown" and **A 
Ride Up the Qiamps-Elys^" 

- During the Nazi oociqiationfaisplays were 
'performed — as were those Of Giraidoux, 

' Sartre, Cocteau, daudd and other pitmii- 
nent Frendi authors ~ and the nunor was 
5 p p^/t that he was fratenmjng with the 
German autboriiie& His visits to the Nazi 
Jje^quartets were to protect bieods tom 
arrest and to intercede (or those already in 
concentration Hs intervention was 
'credited with protecting Tristan Bernard 
.and lus wife from beui| mttiested. At the 
Mffw» lime a eoliaborationist propaganda 
sheet attacked hibs for being Jewish, though 
he was noL In 1 942 Life magazine published 
an article announcing that he — together 
Vwith'Mauiice Chevalier, Mistingnett and tbe 
■boxer Georges Copentier — had been 
placed on an alleged Resistance list for exe- 
cution when the war was ewer. The article 
was showttjtp Guitty. 

• - ‘'The' magazine «»ll* itsdf life and'd^' - 
wifltids death." he said. . - 


Continued from page 7 

In August 1944, after tbe Naris had fled 
Paris, aband of Resistance iii^ulats en- 
tered his house and dragged him to the local 
town haZL They had no warrant forhis arrest 
nor evidence to present, but he ins inquis- 
oned to await trial 

"1 knew Paris had been liberated because 1 
was arrested," he later wrote. He 9 ent three 
months in crowded cells while th^ -^ican 
be had aided during the Nari occupation 
offered testimmiy in his bdialf, Whra the 
case watng to court the judge was perplexed. 
There was no charge agamst tbe prisoner. 
Why had he been arrested? . 

"1 know why," Ouitiy said. "Forty years 
of success in the theater." 

He returned to writing plays and filming, 
buthis b^th was broken. He acted in reviv- 
als of his bid pltys and v/rote some new ones, 
but It was the dmema that occupied lus time. 
He wrote, directed and produced three mam- 
moth movies — "S VeisaiDes m'etait eont^" 
"Napoleon" and "Si Paris m'6tait conte" — 
m vrindi he retold the history of Ftance in 

his tmiwhabfa mannwr of ••nfurtairring thcat- 
ricalization. 

Sacha’s reddeooe was as impiesave as he 
himsdf, a town house in Avenue EIis6^ 
Reclus, in the Seventh Arrondissemoit. that 
he had inherited tom -his father. It was a 
mittiture palace with a gaOeiy of printings 
and statuary, the wmks df mastera, a vast 
library of rare boriB and manuscnptSL 

Clad in fkwmg robe% waDtin^ its marble 
corridors and slminng guicsts l£ tRUDies, 
the host resemNed the Louis XIV he ioop^ 
sona ted in his Veisaines film. He hoped that 
after his death it would be preserw as a 
state museum, but vriieu he died in 1957 his 
estate was devoured by debts and the house 
tom down — a garage now stands in ttsplace 
— and the mansra's contents m attered at • 
auctions. 


TRAVEL 



Europe, Reflected in Its Public Parks 


by Paid Lewis 


G od almighty first planted a 
.garden, Francis Bacon reminded 
us over 400 years But since 
that first Gafdoz or Eden, man- 
kind has been bu^y planting and ritapingits 
own parks and gardens to its own image. 
And today Eurc^'s plentifu! public parks 
— and the way p^le use them — offer the 
perspicacious visitor a fasdnatiog j^ijiipse 
mto a country’s tr^tions and life style, just 
as a promen^ past the pioiickeis. j< 
and well turned out strollers of Centra 
sums up the mixture of chic and infonnality 
that is New York. 

In Europe puUic parks are still generally 
safer than them in the United States, but not 
always. Th^ are generally cleaner, too, but 
not everywhere. And while promenaders 
usually behave soberly, sometimes they are 
just as easygoing as any of tbe softball play- 
ers, roller skaim and picnicking families 
found in an .‘\merican recreationri area. 

Most revealing to visitors, however, are 
the national differences among Eure's 
parks and the distinctive ways their citizens 
use and enjcty them. 

In Britain, for example, that generous ex- 
panse of green around London^s heart that 
makes iro Hyde Park and its smaller neigh- 
bor, Sl James's Park, is a continual reminder 
of the strength of the naturalist traifltion in 


everyone from cranks to unemployed politi- 
cians can happily let off steam from atop 
iqnuined so^bojm before a poliidy sk^ti- 
cri audience. 

The Froich conception of a puUic park 
could scarcely be more different from the 
British. Freedom and nature may be tolerat- 
ed to an extent outside tbe c^tal diy, but 
only formalism and restraint will do within 
iL 

Luxembourg Garden and Parc Monceau, 
two of the most famous public paries in 
central Paris, are splendid monuments to the 
French mania to bureaucracy and re^men- 
tation. They are like pictures at an extaraoQ 
or cakes in bakeiy window — there to be 
admired but not toadied. 

Notices warn only ghiidr en under the 

age of 6 are allowed m the immaculate 
lawns, adding that age will be determined by 
the date of birth recorded on the duld'S 
national identity card. Dc^ are banned, 
even if on a leash. And p<dice officers of a 
special breed stalk about, blowing whiles at 
the slightest him that any of the ntyriad 
regulations is about to be brdeen. 

That tbe liberty<4ovmg Frendi accept aD 
this m Parc Monceau is pahaps not so 



Enriish landscape gardening and art. 

trees, shrubs and bushes are skillft^ 
arranged along the banks of the meandering 
Seipentine to create the impresaon that the 
countryside has invaded the town. Two of 
London’s most famous pa^ thus reflect tbe 
desire to re-create nature in idealized form 
that insinred the woric such famous British 
gardeners as Capability Brown and Hum- 
phrey Reptoo and drew its io^nration di- 
rectly tom the artistic traditiou of painters 
tike Constable and Turner. 

But the way Lraidoners use their parks, 
though more restrained than thdr American 
cousins, is also a tribute to shared 19th- 
centuiy traditions of democrat and belief 
in public welfare. 

The sight of thousands d Londoners 
peacefully doring away a warm afternoon in 
deck chairs on the ^ass, playing soccer or 
lying in loving embrace w<wd be inconcav- 
ule in the well rq^ted public parks of 
Paris. And none of the more ^tly regulat- 
ed countries of continental Eurc^ could 
tolerate the idea of a national safety valve 
tike Hyde Park's Spericers’ Comer, vdiere 


But Luxembourg Garden is in the heart of 
the capital's famed student quarter, .^d on 
a warm spring day, the bars to the student 
upriring of K&y 19M sit obediently eta little 
green chairs around the of the lawn, 
aamnuDg to exams and nfleadrtnany bold- 
ing hands. Old men play endless gamm of 
chess on stone tables that have been specially 
erected in tbe western end of the pa^ 

AT the edge of the city. Paris’s parks 

i\ become more inform^ During the 
-L^-wedtend, middle-claas French fam- 
ilies. usually with small children, trudge 
thrraigh the huge Bois de Boulogne, one of 
several former royal hunting grounds that 
ring the eapitai. the scene is reminisceai of 
Central Park, though with lerional differ- 
ences. Underwity on the edge of the woods 
are innumerable gr***"^ « football and 

boules, a gamw iidng «na11 metal kalk tha t 

can be played on any levd piece of ground. 
Deq>er in the woo(B are ukes, with row- 
boats to rent, riding stables for the more 
affluent, raoetradu and a few exceedingly 
expensive restanrants for those even more 
weU beded. 

But as daylight ebbs, the woods lose their 





Awaiting an audience at Speakers* Comer. 


MurdKehw.MogMn 



Copenhagen's Tivoli. 

relaxed family atmosphere. More rinister 
creatures zati^ along the edges. After daik, 
the Bois de Boulogne becomes the haunt of 
those who practice the world's oldest profes- 
sion. 

West Germany’s approach to public parks 
seems to minor a divid^ soul half in love 
with order, half in love with undisdplined 
nature. 

In Munich, capital Bavaria, nature won, 
thanifQ to Benjamin Thanpson Runfotd, an 
American who in 1789 began to design a 
stretch d royal hunting grounds into Ger- 
many’s first public paiiL Munich's famous 
Fn gifspher Gancn, completed in 1795, is laid 
out in the naiurriist style with carefully 
planned hillock^ woods, babbling brooks 
and even a Chinese pagoda copied from 
London’s Kew Gardens. Originally, Rnn- 
fmd installed pigs and cows to his 
idealized land^pe more convincing. But 
the Bavarians have «nga r^laced them with 
their owu incomparable ]xet gardens and 
pretzel shqis. 

On weekends, Munichers go to the Eag- 
Uscher Ganen to pretend th^ are tnkmg in 
the wfld Ovarian mountrins when mey 
haven't even left town. Wearing stout boots, 
green hunting coats and little fell hais vrith 
shaving-brumes in the brim, thty stride 
throu^ the park clawing thick wrildng 
sticks and pausing occasion^y for beer and 
pretzels. Birds sing the wind si^ in the 
trees, but the roar of Munidi's traffic is 
neiter ccunpleteiv out of earriioL As nif^t 
falls, the Engtismer Garten becomes a place 
to be avoided by all but the most resolute or 
foedhardy. 

A UffTRlANS treat public paiks less sen- 

nk ously than do their German cousins. 
yienna's Stadtpark, the capital’s 1^ 
gest, boasts a summer dancing pavflion 
vriiere strollers can waltz the afternoon away. 
The Prater frirground. with the whed 
immortalized m the film of Graham 
Greene’s "The Third Man," remains a riight- 
ly sinister place to this day. still jhe reputed 
meet 
rqie. 

that all tbe Ians 
iro-Hungarian 
there. 

Scune countries manage to proride the 
finest d weU-<mlered parks without recourse 
to entrance fees or stultifying regulations, 
relying instead on a nami^ orderliness of 
thdr dtizens that seems to impose itself 
automatically on -visitors. One such country 
is Switzerland. Few public paries in Europe 
are more perfect, more inunaculate, than 
those of Geneva, where the shores of Lake 
(jeneva dose in to form the Rhone River. 
But it does not require wtustle-blowing 
guards to keep the puks in such pristine 
condition. Tbe dis^lined bourgeois of Ge- 
neva would no more pick a flower or put the 
toe of a shoe on the grass than rob a bank. 

On 'the lake's northern shore, three sqia- 
rate parks, all laid out in the Fnglish natural- 
ist Style, run together to make up a huge 


inisier place to this day. still the repnt^ 
sriM pl^ for risitofs from Eastern Eu- 
e/Hie Viennese take it in stride, joking 


of the vanished Aus- 
pire can still be heard 



Waiting for business in Luxembourg Garden. 


Wierd Kolvai. MegiwB 


EBcn ErvnR, Ma^vn 


green expanse of leafy chestnut trees, formal 
flower and winc^ lakeside paths. The 
gardens have evocatire names: Parc Mon 
Rq>os leads into a ^rden called La Perle du 
Lac, beyond which is the Parc vnia Banon. 
An unuraal feature d these forestlike parks 
is that are dotted with private villas, 
some of which have been turned into restau- 
rants or offices. \Tsicors can walk fredy 
among these buildings to about a mile. 

TTie Parc de la Grange and the Parc des 
Vives on the southern side of the lake, 
bdiind Geneva’s famous waterspout, are 
smaller and more formal But they boast one 
of Hunt's finest rose gardens, seen at its 
best in June. 

Sometimes a nation’s public parks seem to 
reflect its private fantasies, or some lost 
gl^. The heroic statuary tiiat crowds the 
formal gardens of Brussels — great ^hes, 
win^ chariots, triimyhant warriors and 
pertotly fnoportioned maidens — all hint at 
a destiny tiny Belgium may have longed for 
but never r^y adueved. 

Similariy, it is iromc that minuscule, un- 
warlike Luxembourg should boast what may 
be Buna's most militaristic public park, 
laid out along the bottom d the gorge that 
forms a natural moat at the base of ibed 
fortifications. Called tbe Vall^ de la 
tnisse after the stream that runs through it, 
this sinewy, uncrowded park reflects the Id- 
surely pace of life in Europe's last grand 
duchy. Here in the shadow of their dtadd’s 
impresrive defenses, Luxembourg's citizens 
Eke to stroD during lunch or on weekends. 

Copenhagoi’s famed TlvoU has a touch of 
fantasy of a different kind. This park, whidi 
diaiges an admissioa fee, is another example 
of slightly old-fashioned quaintness still 
found in S^dinavia, de^te its rqmtation 
to modernity. With thdr s talls , amusements 
and restaurants, the Tivoli gardens are prob- 
ably the dosest thine left to the edebrated 
Vauxhall Gardens of 18di-century London, 
also essentially a cranmerdal venture where 
people paid to walk and be entertained. 

But to a taste of one of Scandinavia's 
truly public parits, there is Orio's Frogner 
Pai^ at the dt/s western end, which has 
been set aside for the sculptures of Gustav 
Vigda^ Here, in a setting of lawns, gai^ 
dens and fountains, one can wander among 
hundreds of figures in stone, bronze and 
wrought iron that depict the various stages in 
the life of 


M 


OVING south in Eurc^ the tradi- 
tion of bidding public parks and 
gardens wanes. Those that exist 
were constructed mainly as private gardens 
by the ridi and pow^ul and have only 
recenUy been opened to tbe public. This is 
true of some of me most famous public parks 
in Rome. 

The villas and palaces of Italy are tbe 
original ho^ of the formal Renaissance 
tradition in Eur^iean gardening. With a 
skilled tye, tbe visitor can still reconstruct 
the gaid^ of the ^Ua Borgbese as they 
must have looked in Renaissance days. But 
today the statues are chipped and broken, 
the paths worn and tbe lawns turned into 
public recreation areas. 

The Borgbese Gardens constitute the ordy 
large public park in central Rome, and its 
monuments, ue so many in the city, are 
sadly dilapidated, suffer^ from overuse 
anri lack O? maintenan ce. The Villa Borgb^ 
se, with its famous pictures and statuary, is 
closed to repairs. But tbe gardens remain 
open, co»Hniimg to play their multiple rde 
as the city’s premier playground, strolling 
area and viewing statiorL 

On any given day, at least half of Rome’s 
school-age youth seems to be playing foot- 
ball tbere^ chasing one another ^ and down 
the broad allies or just strolling past the 
rows of battered statues and occaaooal ru- 
ins. Older Romans and a few knowledgeable 
tourists gather at the southern end of tbe 
gardens, near the Spanish Stqss, to enjoy one 
of the views across the city. 

A visit to the dten qye-looked gardens of 
the Villa Dona Pamphili, on the mil behinri 
the Vatican, offers a similar eiqierieDce. 
These once splendid private gardens, which 
offer views out across the city, have deterio- 
rated into a huge, wild park in the best 
traditions of Rqpton and Capability Brown. 

Like the Borghese Gardens, Madrid's Re- 
dro (jardens were once the grounds of a 
palace, in this case one built in the 17th 
century for Philip IV, and subsequent de- 
stroyed. The park is wdl kq)t, mth flower 
b^ iree-lin^ avenues, grottoes and monu- 
ments, and lidi in diversions, from caf6s and 
boat rentals on the large a^cial lake. £1 
Enanque, to tbe b^ concerts and puppet 
shows that are given on spring and s umm er 
wedteods. ■ 

9I9SiTlKStwYoriiTtm<s 


tisse. 
lims'*- 





Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


VBL HWl Low Last CBOb 


3a5» iPH 
30296 ZDA 

wa 

13232 ^ 
12H* 12746 
10931 SB* 

loan 33*k 

9934 31 
9354 5516 
5516 15Vk 
9017 33 
7967 33V3 
7941 3016 
7765 3406 
7S5D 3966 


1916+36 
2106 +06 
im + 06 
4706 + 1b 
1360b +1 
S06 — 16 
3306 +0b 
3006+16 
S +116 
1506 ^ 

32 —06 

33(6 —204 
30 +16 

3406 + 16 

38'6 — H 


Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 136S34 137435 1357.10 nUg + ^ 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonos 

Utilities 

industrials 


Advanced 
Oecnned 
UiKtionesd 
Total issues 
New Htahs 
New Lows 


934 1068 

630 503 

453 453 

ww siwi 

54 72 

10 5 


PrevloBS Today 

High Lew Close 3PJW. 
CORIPOSHe 104.'>l 10336 10199 10435 

Industrials 119.0 119.13 11932 119JS 

Transp. 97.12 96J1 96.71 97J1 

UtlHIles 55.13 54.99 S5D7 5535 

Finance 108.15 107.62 108.15 10953 




Buy Sales *Sb'rt 

April 10 239547 472.496 1171 

April 9 242,176 486.147 5545 

216540 554589 5,688 

April 4 IBI571 439538 2.075 

flai-JJ J 189308 437,721 4545 

‘included in Itie wles lleures 


Thwsday s 

MSE 

Qoidh^ 


»i4PM 10S360M 

Prev.4PJM.VDL la&ISWM 

Prov consolidated close 132,100538 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Woll Street and 
do not reflect fate trades efsewtiere. 

The jlssociaied Press 


AMEX PlorSes 


NASDAQ Index 


Advanced ' 
Declined 
un uwngod 
Total iseiMs 
New HiOtH 
New Lews 


Close Prev. 

394 302 

243 324 

^ S9 

782 786 

34 30 

3 0 


Composite 

indusrrlalB 

Pliwnce 

Insurance 

UlUlties 

Banks 

Tronsp. 


Yeor 

Moon Avo Aoe 
38050 27756 27851 
p&S 29454 29654 

SrS a051 

— 32L36 32050 

— 27075 26057 

_ 255.17 24954 

— 3SS59 55452 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Preytous 

High LOW Close 3PJH. 
industrials 3U.54 1^ 30051 

Tramp. 15183 151.90 1040 Ik96 

Utilities 8057 8058 8949 n59 

FJnwiee JBM 2040 ntf ,3W 

Composlts in.90 17851 17952 18902 


AMEX Sales 



19(6 

^ Hf 

396 

1346 


4(6 


1246 

+ ?? 

1416 

+ (6 

416 

+ (6 

2546 

^1 

10 

^ (6 

M46 

— (6 

316 

— 46 

11(6 

+ ta 

1(6 

— (6 

1516 


616 



4P5LVDiU1tlC 

Prev. 4 PAL vahime 
praw. cons, volume 



AMEX Stock Index 

J 

Provtoos 

Htah LOW aoM 

22951 22829 ' 23M7 

Todov 

3P5A. 

23842 




4 ^ 


i 


2116 
'S2 

ai6 36«6 

ItiR 

s:h 

1216 9H 
221b 1616 
NH 5746 
SB 45(6 
3D<6 13V 
28(6 13Vb 
I4« 096 

1S<.. 10K6 
1446 9>6 
2 V Va 
19U ISVb 

a 

3716 

36 
17V 

I 

1546 
14(3 Arl 
33 Arl 
79 Ar 
1316 Arl 
16 Ar 
V Ar 
1046 Ar 
643 Ar 
16(6 Ar 
15Vb 
2246 
19 
1316 
16 
14 

17H 
3046 
3346 
311b 
451b 
73 
1BH 
1996 
4046 
aib A 
97 A 
11«6 A 
1846 Ai 
29(6 A 
1546 A 
33 A 
10 A 

37 A 
19<A A 
IB A 

0 


* 




M 


12 

350 75 7 
450 105 
1.10 35 18 

150 U 13 
140 55 5 
s.i3e1U 
2 j 04 55 4 
1J» U 9 
153 75 II 
S.I9el15 
pf9386lU 
prisa 

Riy 140 75 II 


53# 5 17 
44 15 13 
50 35 9 
156 17 9 
50 10 13 
.12b 15 II 
58 35 16 
57 U 7S 


BOVSIC 160 05 9 
Beoiine 150 29 11 
BeelCp 150 65 9 
BeolPt 138 60 
BednD 150 15 15 


' 57 14 
650 91 8 


180 75 8 
50 15 S 
150 35 10 

100 54 f 
450 124 
450 127 
ISO 117 
52e 17 24 


tT' 






New York Stocks Qose Higher 


Con^led by Our St^ From Dt^ldies 

NEW YORK — Prices rose sligbil:/ Thurs- 
day on the New York Stock Exchange in acttb-e 
tr^ns. 

The Dow Jones industriai average, which rose 
6.0s Wednesday, was up 3.75 to i.263.69 at the 
close: Advances led declines by a 3-2 margin. 
Volume totaled 108.36 millioa shares, i^ainst 
108.15 millioa in the previous session. 

Prices were hi^er in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

Before the market opened, the government 
report^ that U.S. retail sales took an unexpect- 
ed 1.9 percent drop in March, for their largest 
decline in more than seven years. 

Though the figure seemed to be anything but 
5 bullish signal on the U.S. economy, it served 
to reinforce recent hopes for a rdauvely stimu- 
lative Federal Reserve credit policy and lower 
interest rales. 

In the credit markets Thursday, interest rates 
on short-term Treasury bills dropped 10 to 20 
basis points, or hundredths of a percentage 
point Kces of long-term goveroment bonds, 
which move in the opposite direction from in- 
terest rates, climbed about SIO for every S1,000 
in face i^iie. 

'i think we're starting to see the spring rally 
develop here." said Eugene Perroni. of Bateman 
Bchier, Hill Richards, Los Angeles. 

IBM announced first-quarter earnings of 
S1.6I a shar e compared toSl.97 a share m the 
year-ago quarter, also contributing to the mar- 
ket's sains. Worries about Big Blue's profits had 
been a cloud over the market for sev^ weeks. 

‘The earnings are on the lable,* Mr. Peioni 
said, and now the maricet may be able to adt^t 
“a longer-term focal pdnL" 


“It looks very encouiapng." he said. "Il’s a 
well'based recovery." 

'There's been no follow-through in the last 
couple of months," he said. The possibility of 
more accommcKlating interest rates “should set 
the stage for a more sustainable recovery." he 
said. 

“The dimeasion of the rally will depend oa 
real action on Capital hill." be said. 

News Frcim the Fed was still in the back- 
ground. after Federal Reserve Chaiiman Paul 
A. Voicker expressed concern about the health 
of the U.S recovery. His ^eecb reassured some 
analysts that the Fed is unlilrely to tighten 
credit, which could drive up interest rates. 

The combination of the retail sales decline 
and Mr. Volck^s comments “bodes well fOT 
interest mtes." said Cbarles Jensen, of MKl 
^uriries. The IBM earnings bad been a cloud 
over the market and it is now ejqreriencuig s 
little relief, he said. 

On the trading floor shortly before the close. 
Bankamerica Corp, AT&T and Unircwal were 
among the most active issues, all moving higher 
in late afternoon trading. 

AT&T announced it was filing with the Fed- 
eral Communications Commission for a r^ 
structuring of long-distance rates. Uniroyal's 
stock rose after the company rgected an S18-a- 
share tender offer from Carl Icahn for control 
of the coimany. 

Crown ^Uerbach, another takeover target, 
moved higher on the news its board of director 
had rgeciAj a S^tlSO-per-share bid from Sir 
James Goldsmith, and speculation the forest 
products company could get higher offers. 

(AP. UPIl. 




64 

3106 + 44 

Sl6 

SM + « 


930 
£50 
1.40 
JO 
50 
154 
969# 

48 
152 
40 
960 

257 114 

a? 9 

7 » 
35 7 
44 10 
U 12 
75 8 


55 « 

10 
85 7 
14 6 

95 a 

95 7 
75 7 
25 

44 S 
35 II 479 
99 S 68 


33V6 23(6 
17 17 

26(6 35(6 
1346 ]» 
32W 3ZI6 
98 198 
40W 4056 
43(6 43(6 
2944 30(6 
4456 4444 
6(6 6(4 
2S(4 85(4 
42 42 

42 4344 

42(6 42(6 
24(6 34ta 
1916 1946 


3556 
42(6 
78 
9W 
3446 
6846 
2556 


88 
468 
an 4746 
92 29 
453 1044 
73 
913 

to 

957 
245 
53 
407 


2 
38 
31 
1246 
441 31 
•4 27(6 
73 39 
440 36 

17 
556 

18 
19(6 
54 
43(6 


.98 25 17 
150 55 II 
150 45 9 

151 191 a 

952 135 
750 1U 

755 135 

756 135 
855 115 
X13 125 
913 191 
275 115 
940 191 
ae 190 
450 194 
4.12 195 
972 105 
228 198 

50 97 II 
54 45 
925 85 
176 85 11 3354 
450 105 
150 15 12 
13 

150 15 60 
250 65 6 

4 




50 91 16 
50 25 IS 
I 50 25 6 
of 250 65 
50 15 9 
.156 5 12 
150 10 
150 35 13 
19 

150 15 11 


350 77 7 
950 65 


CHORUS GIRL 


Most analysts are trapped in the jargon of their profession, having ^ buy. sell 
or hold, although sophists have refined the art of Indirection, of “hedging" opinions. 
What is the difference between an "aggressive investor" and an “investor"? Does an 
equity categorized as a "businessman's commitment” also embrace the hopes of a 
chorus girl? What is a "speculation" contr^ed to an "investment"? When SEARS 
was incubating under $2 a share, AMERICAN IGE was "hot", ranked as a “classic 
investment*. 

In time, rt melted into the dossiers of thedisenchanted. Research departmentson 
the “Street" miner the observations of C. Northcote Parkinson. 'YVorkexparids » as 
to fiil the time available for its completion". In honoring monumental triviaiities, 
analysts are addicted to non-imaginative yardsticks, hemmed in by the S.E.C.’s ban 
on “inside information". An eagerresearcher intrudes upon ''CHRYSLER",seeidng to 
cull out a “fact”*that will titillate his firm, securing him a niche in a fiscal Valhalla. 

What can he be told that isn't relayed to other prying researchers? Wall Street 
"houses" retain scores of analysts as a tool to solicit-cuslomers, trying to dazde 
institutional investors with thedepth oftheirresearch, while in secret, "prime moors’ 
look upon equity sleuths with disdain, preferring to hone in on "Sponsors”, the 
“Bitists" who orchestrate stock prices. 

The pirouettes of “Elitists" can’t be programmed on a computer for “Sponsors" 
act with the stealth of a cat burglar in Cannes, accumulating during comatose 
markets, selling when ttie “Crowd” becomes euphoric, though C.G.R. peruses 
reports as avidly as a schooftray reading Penthouse, our seers, try to decipher the 
footprints of "Brtists", mocking prevailing opinion. 

When oracles were rhaps^izing oyer APPLE COLECO, COMMODORE and 
TANDY, we sounded asour note, urging riders to go "short”. The“Quartet* plunged 
600%: once again the contrarian triumphed. Our current letter predicts that the DJi 
will catapult over 1500. .... 

In addition, C.G.R. selectsa "puppy" that could emulate the success of a recently 
recommended "special situation" that levitated from $2 to $16. 

Foryourcomplimentarycopy.pleasewriteto.ortelephone: . • 




CAPITAL 
B GAINS 
RESEARCH 


C.VC. Capital Vanhire Consultants 
Amsferdam B.V. 

Kaiverstr8at112 

1012PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Telex:18S36 


Name: 


j Address: ^ 

I Phone: 

^st performance does not guerantee iuiure results 


■ tHTig/d I 


To Out Readers 

Because of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris «ntil April 27, 
some items in the Maricet Sommaiy above are 
fnxn 3 P.M. New York dme instead of the usual 
4 PJ(L Also because <£ the time difference, 
some other items elsewhere in the Buriness 
Section are from the previous da:^s trading. We 
r^ret the inoemveoienoe, ivhich is necessary to 
meet distribution requirements. 


Ota iita 

tn* 

15(6 
I9H 
16(6 
2SV6 
5'A 
11>6 
1846 
ta 
8(6 
716 










4# 






:s «« 

fc -•»e 
«55 


































































Itmlbcji^Snbune. 


AMEX pfkM PM E«n«(M r«nrfs P43 
f Itag nrt« ««t« P.i) 
Avse M*im "PM ■ OaM awrlM^ >,?( 

Evsc i> h i w fi» i p,i 2 tintMi mn p.)i 
Cong a w wacto P.U MwUtlMMnory P.W 
Cvmficv ralM F.IT ObOdm P 13 

ConMWttin Pl7 OTCsadi mm 
■ P.W oawriHBftn P.U 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stodfs 
Rqiort, Page 10 


iPRlDAY, APRIL 12, 1985 




Page 11 


mu 





eli 

>s. 

an 

fa 

»c 

in 

as 

a. 

an 

to 

et 

Je. 

s" 

le 

s" 

se 

»s 

le 

Ki' 

!d 

Jf- 

ly 


’Wherever there 
is money to be 
made, people 
win go after h.’ 




1 . 

1 . 

j It# 


\ ! 

t\ 


V — ti. 

I0« + U 
Mb •*> U 
2% 

U 

««« 4> U 

« U 

9^r~y» 
i —Tm 
iS 

M— U 

2* + '^ 

Isisfi' 

Ak— U| * 

Tag— u 
«•— u 
nk— I* 

M -f to 
M 4- to 
m— to 


TKHHOLOGY 

jn Quest of a Moneymaker, 
|U.S. Firms Offer PCB Tests 

BySrUARTDUJWOND 

iVm Y»A Tima Strrice 

EW YORK. — To a grotoiog number of CCTpanies, 
PCBs are noi a toxic wasic probioa, but a source of 
new bu^ess. As the federal government tightens di^ 
posal rules, a growing indusu>‘ of PCB detectors, 
disposeis and subslimters U emer^g. 
i At least 30 companies m^e 'equipmcni to fii^ destroy or 
replace PCBs, or polycUoribated biphenyls. Tbey indude giants 
such as General Hectric Co. and Wesdngbouse Beciric Corp. 
'j and smaller enterptises, sudt as PPM Inc. in Tudter, Geor^a, a 
company that takes ii name 
from the phrase pans per mil- 
litm. Nearly all of them sell 
new technology. 

. Millions of electric trans- 
formers, capacitors, a(^li- 
ances and yards of soil con- 
taining PCBs must be found 
and smely discarded over the 
next 10 to 20 years. Estimates 
of total potential revenues range into the billions of ddlars. said 
Narain Hingoyaiu, PCB programs director at the Electric Power 
Research Institute, which is Funded by the electric utility indus- 
try. The institute has spurred curious new PCB technologies and 
. yccnsed one of its own jMXKiucts to detect PCBs cheaply. 

- PCBs are extremely widespread. They have been found in the 
Arctic snows, in human breast mift, in many coastal fish and in 
the flesh of living creatures throughout the world. 

First sold in 1929. PC^ cousins to the msectidde DDT, have 
been used as stabilizers in printing inks, paints, plastics, adhe- 
sives; as lubricants; as insuluts arm coolants in electrical equip- 
ment, and as fire retardants. About. SOO millioa pounds (227 
million kilograms) of PCBs have been discarded; another 730 
million pounds sdll exist in electrical equipment such as ballasts 
contained in fluorescent light flxmres. 

PCB manufacture was bwed in the United States in 1976, 
after it was found that die chemical can cause cancer in experi- 
mental aniTTiaic and liver and problems in humfln< 

B y Ocl 1 of this year, PCB-laden dectrical equipment must 
be removed from food areas and by Oct. 1. 1988, 1.3 
million electrical capacitors must be rqrlaced. Many utiU- 
ties, such as Consolidated Pftt wn Co. of New York, are voluntary 
r^ladng most or all of their PCB-laden equipmenu PCB leaks 
and £res cost millions (rf dollars a year to deh) up. 

About 1S0,0(X} transformers are known to contain large 
amounts of PCBs. In addition, about 10 percai of the 33 million 
sizable transformers and a third of the 8 million nonappliance 
capacitors are believed to contain lesser but agnifimmt amounts 
of PCBs in mineral dl. 

Finding them by dme^onsuming lab san^ling tests costs up to 
SlOO each. The electric research institute last year devdoped a 
disp^ble$4 pocket-size test kit, Gor-N-OU, that can provide an 
on-site answer in flve minuies by testing for chlorine. It was 
licensed to Dexsil Coip. of Hamden, CoonecticuL 
Horiba Instruments Inc. in Irvine, Calif., sells a S2S,(X)0 X-ray 
fluorescent machine that gjves results in less than five minnies. S- 
Cubed of San Diego, Califon^ has a S20.000 portable tester 
that ^ves quick readiogs of soil contamination after a leak. 

The traditional di^i^al method is landfill, but there are only 
nine federally-approi^ PCB dumps. 

Union Carbide Coip. of Danbury. Conne^cut, and McGraw- 
Edison Co. of Rolling Meadows, lUmds, have jointly develops a 
^ proprietory chcnucal method that flushes PCBs out of iheinades 
.of iransfcffxp^jflUed largdy or..toially mtb pCBs, . .. 

Last week, four iransfonners in a ^ot prograni met Federal 
Standards f^PCB-free equipment, said Darid M. KdBy, general 
imanager of the jdnt venture; called Unison, of Columl^ Oluo. 

' For mineral-^ transformers laced mth. sinaller amounts of 
(Contimied on Page 13; Cd. S) 


—Si 


r i 

4to ' 




Currency Rates 


late intorbsdi rates on AprU 11 . exdudingfeeL 


w 


Offidd fwings for Airalerdara, Sruaaefh. FronUiirt, Para. Now York ram at 


'fi:. 

4 P.M. 








•to i- w 

RSiiS 

ni-^ M 



2 

s 

OJA. 

F.F. II.U 

CUr. 

O.F. 

S.F. Van 


AaKterOao) 

uo* 

A3M 

11204- 

37^2' OLITW- 


5414* 

13392*130427 



eniSMlt(a) 

044 

34.9Z7S 

20130 

ASMS 2.14SS’ 

174143 

rai^ 

Z3I129 34707* 

Ito 


Frankfurt 

aio 

3J2S 


317U* 7J<ln 

6047S* 

*70* 

110*I«1724S* 



LOBOM (b) 

laa 


3Ll3f 

11725 2.45209 

47345 

7775 

37455 3U40 

Ito + to, 


Mian 

1.9l3il0 

2447 J> 

43945 

30fJ7 

54474 

Sian 

79974 7JS4 

nk*iS 

•• ’ffc' i 

NtirYariiCG) 


L2S7 

33159 

9745 1JS9J0 

3.444 

4UI 

2573 25090 

Rb— ir 


Paris 

9.I44SS 

lIATtS 

Xfi5» 

— 4745V 

22077 

101*5’ 

3JI75 3739* 


*1 *•?•/*.* ' 

.'Tjsiira 
, urieii 

I ECU 

2SL90 

31005 

I1.U 

2U3 1375* 

rui 

40344* 

9405 _ 

»to— to\ 


2*025 

30311 

0400* 

27J4* OUU* 

7*23- 

4201* 

— 17313* 


• * • • 

eJ2l3 

OSH 

22359 

AS243 1J204| 

YAM 

*47911 

1J079 110405 


1SDR 

aMiMi 

080125 

3J044a5 

97552 1.94051 

14443 

41.733 

Z59M 251747 

M 4-to 

1 +■ to 




Dollar Values 




M « to 




Ptr 





M— to 



Cniriv. 





Equl«. 






.to— to 
t *\ 

to— to 

; — to 

4k 4> to 
to— to 
ito 

■ — to 
, to -I- to 
' 4eik 
to + to 
to 4' to 

— to 

to4>to 
to— to 

to 

to— 

to Stg 

to + 
to— W 
to + to 


a- ■ -VV 

ior' 
to ■. 
^ace- 

ce' V- 


lUCTk AiisiraUMt 
Oiua Aestrim sdiUlIn 
UIM MMon Dr. Iranc 
0.7311 Catpadtant 
OiOnp DoNMItfMk 

0.ISM FbwtakiBSildui 

00074 GrckkeracMM 
aim HooeXoMS 


1^ 

ru3 

OID 

laus 

luas 

kik 

13541 

7jns 


OMU Ifisbs 

fliKni ivwUsMtl 
U1» KimoHiitaor 
Otou Matoy.iiaeoR 
01134 NecWLklVM 
00544 PbiLkkW 
00057 PwlcsCMdi 
0277 SODdlrlral 


iaM7 

mjQ 

0302 

l«l 

OM 

103M 

IMOi 

mn 


0451 StoHpmS U173 
05051 OAMCMrine 120 
0JII13 OKtoMiWW IBOO 
011057 fM-NMN 17000 
0171* SwpOtoM ONS 
ODISI TotoolO 3fJ4 
OJOa TMboU 37J4S 
02723 UJLE.<Man 31725 


CStor<ln0il22MIrlih£ 

(a)CwnnwreWtraneA)4uneumnK4gdweiivofNpouiid(c)Anwuiiii«nM«»0WDuveitoeBll«m 
Unltsof 100 (xi Uniaof IMO (y} UnttSM UL0OO 
NJl: noi wotod; KA: ml enOoeto. 

Scuras; Banouw au Bttit/ioe fanamMi Baaca Carmieffiteto tMtaoa iMOani! OBmw 
Hationem de Partt (PorHit IMP ISOKH Batmt Anot «> lidtroatlenatt dImiatHumnt 
(dinar, rlyal. dlrhata}. OOttr data fnm ARdM oadAP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


April II 


OrtM Fraach 

Dollar D-Moiic Fraoc Starfliig Franc BCD SDR 
IJVL I'V.-dw. Sto>5to-5to.Sh 13 -Uto l0to-10H««.*f% Oh 
2M. oto - Oto S*> • 5kh 5to • 5to 13to - 13 IDto - lOto 9to - 10 Ito 

3M. a*k - f s*. - 6to Sto - Sto m • 13 . lOto • lOto Vto - lOto on, 

4M. 9to>9to Ito'lto Sto-5>to 12 to* 13 to 17 .UtolOto-lOU tto 

lY. 9kw - nw. IM. ■ Sto - 5to 13to> 13to llto • llto Wto- into 9to 

Rafts etvHeebh la Marbank dtaosHs etsi niMMon mimmm tor taolv^tni). 

Seurets: Moraan Guaranry (dollar. AH, SF. FeaeA FFIt Llards Bank tecuu RtiOers 
(SORi. 








Asian Dollar Rates 


Aprs n 


1 mo. 

jOY. -Bkk 

Seurem; Rtattrs. 


2 inat. 

Oil- -01k 


SfllOt. 
Ilk -O 


Imoc, 

tto-Olw. 


Key Money Rates 

United States 


Clou .Frev. -BritaiD 


+ to 

+ to 
* to 


—ito 


— to 
+ to 
-to 

♦ to 


''Ofseouni Rom 
Federal Funds 
Prime Rale 
Bnil«r Lam Rata 
Comm. Popor, 30-17V dovs 
34iianni Treosurr Bills 
«.menm Treakurv Bills 
CD's 30-50 <MVS 
CD's kMO days 

West Gennanv 

LomMrd Rdle 
OverniBM Rate 
One Alontii interbank 
S-tiunM Interba nk . 
5-tiienth Interbank 

i A- ' ■rancji 

f 'intarvemion ROM 
Coll Meniv 
Omimanni interbank 
SpawiNi inteibank 
a-manth interbank 


0 I 

0 isni 9 

lOto IDto 
m 9to 
OM ' 012 
005 
US 
030 
040 


Ott 

OIS 

020 


Bonk Bom Role 
Call Manev 
91-aav Treasury Bill 
Xnantti intorbanfc 

Japan 

Dbcoiinl Rote 
Coll Money 
HMov inicrbenk 


Clew Prev, 

I3.l3to 13-UW 
U 13 
» lato 
I2ia 13 vu 


5 3 

kto M 

4 5/U *5/16 


mMOtes 

18 % FaU 
In Profit 

Quarterly Drop 
First Since ^81 

The AssoeHued Press 

NEW YORK * Internadoasl 
Business Machines Corp. said 
Thursday that its first-quarter pix^- 
it fell 18 percent from a year earlier. 
It was IBM's first quarterly eara- 
ings decline since the fourth qutu^ 
ter of 1981. 

IBM's net income dropped to 
5986 million, or SI. 61 a^re,from 
$1,202 billion, or Sl.97 a staari^ a 
year earlier. Revenue edg^ tm 2 
percent to $9.76 btllioo from ^,38 
billion. 

In the (our previous quarters, 
IfiM bad shown average year-U^ 
year earnings growth of 20.6 per- 
cent. 

But the lower profit in the latest 
quarter had been expected. Earlier 
this year, IBM had predicted flat 
results for the fint quarter, but on 
March 22 it revised its f^orecast and 
said profli would decUne. 

IBM said in March and again 
Thursday that the first-quarter 
praflt dedine reflected two factors: 
the strong dollar and a hiatus in 
shipments caused by its Feb. 12 
introduedou of a new laig^scale 
oofflputer system, the 3090, and re- 
lated data-siorage products. 

IBM also said that it expected 
business to pick up in the second 
half of 1983. Full-year results, it 
said, would show strong growth. 

A number erf indusuy analysts 
agreed with that prediction. 

Jonathan Fram of Paine Webber 
Inc. said IBM would benefit, begin* 
niiig in the current quarter, from a 
combination of orders for the new 
3090 Laiige^ie coo^tets and 
continued demand {<x IBM's older 
top-line family of mmnframe com- 
puters, the 308X series. 

“We're looldog for 21-percent 
growth bttiniun| m the durd quar- 
to- that should last for about six 
quarters," Mr. Fram said. 

Other IBM analysts who follow 
IBM have caulitme^ however, that 
IBM's medium-scale computers 
could face sluggish order growth. 

Traders on the New York Stocks 
Exchange appeared to be glad to 
have IBM's r^ls behind tnmi. At 
3 P.M. IBM's stock was trading at 
$126,75, up 87!^ cents. 


Forceful Leader for a Rchel Union 


By William Semn 

"York Tuna Strvtte 

TORONTO — When Robert White led a strike 
against Genenl Motors of Canada last October, 
tns American leaders the United AutotnobOe 
Workers were as annoyed as the company execu- 
tives. 

U was bad enough, they fdt,‘ that the articulate 
and independent head of Canada's UAW had 
disie^rded the pact already negotiated across the 
border. Worse, his strike siOfi^ the imponani 
fW of parts fran CtmadiaTi plants to the United 
States, foidng GM to lay off almost IS percent of 
its U.S wmk force. 

Bui for the American labor leaders, there was an 
even greater irritant. Mr. White's strike was a clear 
violation of a long-treasured rule: In the UAW. 
there is alwa^ reamwork is the leadership and 
sohdariqr in me ranks. 

The 13-day October suike challenged that unity 
head on. And now, in a sharper blow, Mr. White’s 
123.000-niefflber union isseoxlmgeodrdy from its 
U.R parent, stepping out itf a S6-year reladonsbip 
long dominated oy me Americans. 

“It has n/uhinfl to do with antt-Americaniam,** 
said Mr. White. “It has to do with the stiueture of 
our union. We will be aceoun table for what we put 
on the baigacqng table and what we take off. 
There wUl be no more blazn^ anybody rise." And 
that, he said, is enough to jusufy seoessios. 

For Mr. White, who will turn 50 on April 28, the 
ilit means that he can try to expand his tmion 

itma 



mergers with other rawriian unions and 
that £s alr^y-extensive pow will grow. His 
membefriiip is solidly behind him and many of his 
rMfuMan colleames pushed hha to break with the 
Americans, And he is extremely popolar across 
Canada. 

“White may i^e sent the dosest thing to a 
bonafide supmiar Canadian labor has ever had." 
said an Ontario newspaper. The Windsor Star. In 
its view, “the North American auto industry has 
product oiUy two personalities in tbe I9SQs — 
Lee lacocca and Boo White." 

Mr. White'sreeent stands against concessions — 
and his willii^aess to strike whoi his eounterpans 
in the United States were not — infuriattti many 
UAW leados in DetioiL Thev appear pleased to 
bend of lifr. White, although dt^arenot happy to 
lose the diviaon. whidi will reduce tbe 

UAW to just over 1 miHioD members — from U 
fiiiUuM) as recently as 1979. 

On Mardi 30. the 350-fflember ganadian bbor 
council of tbe UAW onanimously approved the 
separation, had been porolatmg in Mr. 
White’s mind for several yea^ A convention is 
for September to draft a eonsticution for 
the union, whi^ will be called the Canadian Auto 
Workers. The plan tl^ comes before the UAW 
convention tn June 1986, but that is a formality: 
With the March 30 vote, the ranadlan unio n, for 
dl practical purposes, achieved IndqieDdeDce. 

‘^e are goiog to determine our own destiny," 
said hfr. White. “The accountability will be where 
it bdoiMs; on our shoulders." 

Mr. White is likely to jxess the suio companies 
for inqiroved wages and benefits. He said that 
because the Canadian dollar had lost so much 
ground against tbe U.S. curreoQr, ranLlian work- 


Robert White 

ers had earned as much as 57.50 an hour less than 
their southern counterparts. 

The new union, according to Mr. Whit^ will be 
independent, strong arid open to new ideas — and 
new members. “Once we get the structure in 
place," he said. “We'D b^in to mergers 
with other unions." The fanadinn Air Line Em- 
ployees Association, which has 4^00 members, has 
tentatively agreed to meitt with the auto workers. 
He a1<ft Mll'k of C!^T-ih1iu>ing a f^n.idian metal 
workers’ federation to strengthen the power of 
ran.'tdtan industrial workers. 

For White, concenis about unionism dale 
from his late teens. Bom in BaDymoney. Nonhent 
Ireland, he moved to C^ada with his fannly. 
which was seeking a new life in North America. 
They settled on a farm near Woodstock. Ontario, 
and to help out, the young teenager worked in 
nearby farm fields for SI a day. 

It took a truant officer to get hira to sdiool, but 
he soon fdi out of place Ihiae and did poorly. At 
IS, he obtained a permit to leave school and go to 
worL His father, by then, was eiqiloyed al a local 
woodworkiog conmany, whose workers bad been 
oiganized by the Unii^ AutomoUIe Workers, like 
those at Oltitf .gnaU rfwwpant^t 
Mr. >^ie was advised his father not to 
become involved with the muon. But a little more 
than a year later, he dropped by a union meeting 
and was elected a shop steward. He later became 
chairman of the plant bargaining committee, then 
ehairman of the Union’s plant committee. tbe 
time he was 21. he had his first strike, over 
pensions, which laried 1 3 weeks. 

h^. White read voraciously and attended union 
educadoQ classes. When he was in his niid-20s, in 
what be came to view as a turning point in his life, 
be attended his first UAW convennon and became 
enamored of Walter P. Reuther, then UAW presi- 
(riwIinneJ <» Page U, CoL 5) 


U.S. Retail Sales 
Declined 1.9% 
During March 


The AssedaieJ Press 

WASHINGTON — U.S. relafl 
sales, held back by lower demand 
for autos, fell 1.9 fxrcent in Mardi. 
the bigg^ decline in more than 
seven years, the government re- 
ported *rhursday. The Commerce 
Department said sales fell to SI 10.5 
bOlion last month from a record 
$1 12.7 billion in February. 

February sales had risen a strong 
1.6 percent over the January level 

But many analysts cautioned 
Thursday against rrading too much 
into the Ng March decline, saying 
it refiecied an overstatement of the 
strength of sales in February. 

Mike Evans, head of Evans Eco- 
nomics, 3 Washmgtmi forecasting 
firm, said the weak sales in March 
stcEnio^ from a variety of factors 
ifuri have held the economy back 
since last summer. 

“The dedine in retd! sales re- 
flected the coatinuing effects of the 
economic slowdown and slug^sh 
growth in wages that we have had 
for several months," he said. “But I 
think we are about to snap out of 
this. This is the end (rf the bad 
numbers — not the be^oning." 

Meanwhile, in contrast to tbe 
Commerce Department report, 
many of tbe major U.S. retaDers 
reported sharp sales gains for 
March over Ma^ 1984. 

K man Corp. said sales rose 19.8 
percent; Zayre Coip. rose 31.4 per- 
ceot; R.H. Macy & Co. rose 8.1 
percem; J.C. Pennmr Co. said sales 
increased 7.2 percent; Dayton 
Hudson Corp. said sales inerrased 
19.7 percent, and Sears Roebuck & 
Co. said sales rose 17 percenL 

The March sales drop was the 
biggest decline since a 2-perceni 
fall in January 1978; the Commerce 
Department said. It had originally 
reported that the dedine was the 
lar^t rince June 1982, but later 
corrected this based on revisions to 
the earher numbers. 

According to the repon. auto 
sales dropp^ 4 percent in March 
00 a seasonally adjusted basis over 
tbe level of sales in February. Many 
auto industry analysts disputed the 
rize of the drop, however, pointing 
out that sales before adjusting for 


seasonal faeiors actually rose 15.4 
percent in March over February. 

Hou’ever, auto sales nonnally 
rise by 19A p e rcent from February 
to Mmch everj'year. Therefore, the 
Commerce Department figures 
showed a 4-permt decline in auto 
sales on a seascnally adjusted baris. 

Even with tbe March seasonally 
adjusted dedine, auto sales were 
sdll a strong 10.4 percent above tbe 
level in March a year ago and U.S. 
automakers are prediciiDg strong 
sales through coming months. 

Excluding autos, retail sales 
would have fallen 1.4 percent last 
month as most of the major cat^o- 
lies suffered a slump in demand. 

Sales of durable goods, items ex- 
pected to last three or more years, 
dropped 2.4 percent while sales of 
nondurable goods were down 1.7 
percent from the preiious month. 


DoUarDedine 
Continues in US, 

Liniied Press iiuemuional 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
feU sharply Thursday after the 
government's report shoMng a 
substantial decline iu retail 
sales reinforced ibe view that 
the U.& economy is weakening. 
Gold and silver rose. 

“The doUar already was on a 
downtrend when Europe 
i^reoed. breaking through some 
key support kve^ then it broke 
further after the very substan- 
tial retaU-sales declme," said 
James McGroarty. vice presi- 
dent at Discount Corp. 

Tbe dollar dropped more 
than 6 pfennigs a geing the 
Deutsche mark, to 3.0390 DM 
from 3.122 on Wednesday. The 
British pound rose more than 
three cents, to S1.2S70 from 
S1.22S. Other late New York 
prices compared with W'ednes- 
day were: 2.S730 Swiss francs, 
down from 2.6450; 9.3450 
French francs, down from- 
9.5200. and 1,959.00 Italian 
Dra, down from 1,990.00. 


Bundesbank Rilling Set 
On DM-Eurobond Issu^ 


] 


By Warren Gecler 

Jnternarhnat HensU Tnbmie 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank will announce next wedt that 
West Gennan subsidiaries of for- 
eign ba^ wiU be aUowed to lead 
™n.iy Deutsche marit-denomi- 
naied Eurobonds, banning May 
I, banking sources said HiinMtQr. 

Builhenihng — wludiwiU spec- 
ify that the foreign units must be 
fully incorporated Geiman banks 
and not mere branch operations — 
wiU not imme^atdy a|^W to Jjma- 
nese banks operating m West Ger- 
many, tbe sources said. 

According to the sources, Japa- 
nese banks be barred from par- 
tidpating in the lucrative Euro- 
bond underwriting business until 
Bonn and Tokyo readi agreement 
assuring redpfocal oeatment for 
German banks in J^an. 

Bundesbank offk^ on Tues- 
day met sqiarate^ with re^reseaia- 
tives of the leadi^ American and 
Japanese banks to discuss pro- 
pel rdorms in Wesi Germany’s 
capital maricets. Tbe U.S. banks 
were given the wannest recqitioa, 
sources indicated. 

“There were no m^o- i^blenis 
voiced concerning leaprodiy from 
the U.S. ade." said an official of a 
U.S. bank in Frankfurt 

“IT these refonns go through as 
proposed by the Bundesbank, we 


will be very satisfied," said WHfried 
Sdieele, a senkir onkial of Gti- 
bank AG. the Frankfurt-based 
subsidiary oX the UJS. bank. 

A Bundediank o^icial said tbe 
West Gennan central bank wfll not 
assume the diief n^tiator's role 
with Japanese officials, but rather 
wUI support efforts by the econom- 
ics minister, Martin Bangemaxm, to 
win greater deregulation irf the Jap- 
anese cuitaj marirets. 

Ibe Bundesbank official said 
Mr. Bax^emaan's recent trip toTo- 
kyo has yet to ^eld concrete re- 
suits, but appean to have conveyed 
the significance of West 0611X110/3 
interest in seong further c^tm- 
niarket liberaluation in Tol^ be- 
fore Japanese banks can partid- 
pate in new opmortunides here. 

The Bund^ank is ejqjccted to 
infonn readent foragn banks next 
w^ of details enne wnmg deregu- 
lation of its capital markets, indud- 
tng changes that wiU allow the issu- 
ing of floating-rate notes, 
zero^oupOD bon^ bonds witii 
oiulti-cunency options, as well as 
cunenqr swaps. 

Aoco^n| to the sources, foreign 
bank subsidivies will be aUowed to 
issue DM Eurobonds more chan 
iOaiiUioD DM(S6.4miUiox]) on the 
con<htion thqr rqjsla with tbe 
Buntobank three days in advance 
of the issue. 


BeiMlMlapse linked to (mUs 
F rom (Mentsfor CoUatend 


MO MO 
5JS SBO 
S.M SfO 
6.1S 6.15 

*35 «as 


ion lOto 

lOto into 
W4 m 
Uto IM 
10 5/1* IDto 


Gold Pnees 


] 



AM 

PJN. 

Cbm 

Mono Kora 

32&4S 

32025 

+ 030 

Uiwombpura 

32870 

— 

+ 570 

Paris (125 Mio} 

33974 

33973 

+ 4.77 

ZWKtl 

33000 

331.75 

+ 475 


Saamf: Bnteft, CammerOatA. ereoB Lr- 
OMiah, LtoMi Book. Balth at Toleva 


329X0 33US * SJIO 
Nrw vork - 33t.70 + 5J0 

OIIKIol RkMOi fer Londsto Porll oM Luvm- 
boars. oMRlnB ond closins orlees tar Hera Kora 
odd ZurldL Now York C«nn oirrvl eantrocL 
All pHCM m U.SS oer aunco. 

Satira: RouMn. 


By Nachanicl C Nash 

Nett York Tima SerrRe 

WASHINGTON — A small 
New Jersey government secuiities 
firm collapsed this week because 
too many of its diems had de- 
manded deliv^ of promised col- 
lateral for their loans to the firm, 
according to a federal official vbo 
supervises banks. 

Tbe offidal, who works for the 
Office of the Comptroller of the 
Currenqr and asked not to be 
identifiecL also smd Wednesday 
that there was not much hc^ for 
those clients. 

Ibe msiiuiiions were urid by the 
firm, Bevill, Bresler & Schuuaan, 
that their eoUateral was beinebeld 
for them by Securiw Padfic uear- 
ing & Services Coro, in New York, 
a subsidiary of security Pacific 
Corp. in Los Angdes, 

The official said that the stream 
of demands for coHateral from the 
BevilL, Bresler & Sebuhnan group 
came after the coUapse last mooin 
of ESM Government Securities 
Inc. of Fori Lauderdfde, IHorida. 

He said that, once E$M*$ prob- 
lems became known, cDents or Bev^ 


ill Bresler & Scfaulman began ask- 
ing tbe firm for amounts of 
crateral that far exceeded what 
the firm, in fact, had. Early this 
week, Bevill, Br^er & Schulman 
Asset Managea^t Coipn one of 
five companies in the group, filed 
for vduntaiy bankrutp^. 

The official »d thm six nation- 
ally chartered Inmks ~ regulated 
by the conptioUer's office — had 
bm involv^ 

Three should not sufier losses 
because they were in poss^oo of 
thdr coDateraj, the officia] said 
Tl^ are Security Pacific, the clear- 
ing agent, which had a $30-milljoD 
loan to the firm; Fust National 
Bank of Tmns River, New Jersey, 
which had a S19-miIlioa coUiteru- 
ized loan, and Brst National Bank 
of EDmrt, Indian^ also with a $ IB- 
million c^aterahzed loan. 

Tbe banks mth potential losses 
are Worthen Bank & Trust Ox, 
Little Rock, ^kansas, with $12,5 
million in unsecured loans; New- 
.poct National Bank, Providence, 
Rhode Island, with $4 miDloii in 
loans, and Brst National Bank of 
Skdeie, lUiimis, with S\ minion in 
unsecured loans. 



Forthe man with excepdonalgoals, 
a new dimension in banking services. 


W 'hat makes Trade Develop- 
ment Bank exceptional? 
To start with, there is our 
policy of concentrating on 
things we do unusually well. 
I^or example, trade and export 
Bnancing, foreign exchange 
and banknotes, money market 
transactions and precious 
metals. 

Equally imporrant, we are 
now even better placed to 
serve your needs, wherever 
you do business. Reason : 

We have recently joined 
American Express International 


Banking Corporation, with its 
89 offices in 39 countries, to 
bring you a whole new dimen- 
sion in banking services. 

While we move fast in 
serving our clients, we’re dis- 
tinctly traditionalist in our 
basic policies. At the heart of 
our business is the maintenance 
of a strong and diversified 
deposit b,'ise. Our portfolio of 
assets is also well-diversified, 
and it is a point of principle 
with us to keep a ranservative 
ratio of capital to deposits and 
a high degree of liquidity- 


sensible strategies in these un- 
certain rimes. 

If TDB sounds like the 
sort of bank you w'ould 
entrust with your business, 
get in touch with us. 

TDB banks iu Geurva. Loudon, 
Pans. Luxembourg. Chia^o. Mrtute 
Carlo, Nassau, Zurich. 


TDB is a member of American 
Express Company which hiU 
asscis of US$ 6^.5 btUiou and 
sbareljolders' equity of 
US$4.4hillm. 



liade Development Bank 


Shown ac left, the head oAicc 
of TruIc Development BanL Geneva. 


.An American Express Company 









Thursda ys 

Gosbig 

Tables incliMie the nationwide prices 
up te the cioshifl on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 



(Continued from Pi^ 10) 


laAflonth So. Ctow 

HWhLow Stock DIv. YM. PE lOOsHtahLowOuatarga 







*HlSh" *u5S^ Onwi Hloh Low Clooo Ow. 





Metals 






; 170 

17 

1S5 

77 

172 

87 

178 

57 

70 

J 

70 

37 

tJH 

47 

UO 

U 

170 

15 

10 

3L2 

1JU 

15 

174a 
132 
10 ' 

107 

X9 

117 


CATTLE (CME) 
iOMO lbs.- cents POT lb. 

SVJM 61A Apr 095 S120 

ojo sue Jim ssjo S&90 

6747 atS AM 4550 4557 

4S90 5IJ0 Oct 5X30 5X90 

57J5 5X40 Dec 44J7 UfS 

57AS 4425 Feb 4525 4525 

5757 4420 Apr 

Es).Sales MOO Prev.Soles 13237 
Prev.DayOpBnlnt. 51500 oHS/f 
FBEDEE CATT1.E (CMS) 

44000 Ibkr cants PW lb. 

7420 4470 Apr 44J0 4720 

727$ 4495 Moy 5720 4X17 

7170 4X40 Alio 4025 4X45 

7U0 5720 Sep 4X90 5020 

7322 47.10 Oct 4X7$ 4025 

7320 4925 Nov 4020 402$ 

7020 7025 Jon 

'Est.Salos 07$ Prev.Soles I2n 
Prsv.DovOPsnlnt 0211 off 344 
HOOSfCME) 

30200 lbs.p cwits psr IX 
5425 4240 Apr 4420 44JS 

5520 47m Jun 40JD 4027 

SJ7 4X95 Jul 5120 5125 

5427 4720 AlW 5120 5125 

5125 4X00 Oct 4725 4725 

5X15 4X30 Dee 4020 4020 

5020 4X25 . Feb 4025 4020 

4725 4XSD Apr 4X02 4X30 

4025 4720 Jim 4725 4X10 

Est.S0le9 7214 Prav.Soles 4431 
Prw.DovOpenlnt. 2X040 vp 4I4 
PORK BELLIES fCMEI 
3X000 Ibsrcanlspsrlli. 

■XOO 51.TS May 4X10 4020 

0227 4115 Jul 4020 1X07 

EU5 4020 Auo 5720 5X3S 

7X30 4115 Peb 7140 7110 

7X40 4420 Mor 

7X40 7020 Mnr 

7X00 7X90 Jill 7240 7140 

EPl.Satss 0205 Prav.SalM X177 
Prev.OoyOpaniKL 11237 efl127 


mit 4227 
4527 4523 
4520 4X35 
027 4325 
4420 44m 
4520 4X20 


5725 5725 
5025 4920 
4120 0020 
4145 4X9S 
4920 4920 
7X40 


4325 4390 
4927 4X15 
SOX 5X10 
5025 5X10 
4720 4720 
4X40 4170 
4025 4025 
4X02 4X10 
4725 4125 


4X30 4420 
5725 4725 
4427 4X13 
TU5 7222 
7110 
7115 
7340 71U 


COFFEE C (NYCSCEI 
372D0 Ibs^ cents par lb. 

15100 12101 May 14190 14190 

14920 I2I2D Jul 14100 14220 

14720 12720 Sop T42J5 14225 

14425 12025 OSC 14120 1412S 

14320 T3X5D Mor 14020 14025 

U2JS 13120 MOV 13020 13020 

14020 13X50 Jul 130JD 13020 

13425 13235 SOP 

EstSales 4200 Prev.Soles IJfO 
Prw.OoyOPonlnt. Uon oniOl 
SlfOARWORLD II CNYCSCE) 

111000 ibxr cents Per Ibk 
1020 340 Mpy, 174 105 

•25 325 Jul IM 405 

92$ 420 Sea 4J2 419 

925 413 Oct 434 421 

72S 440 Jon 470 470 

923 XOO Mur X13 X10 

7.15 X19 May 523 520 

449 &40 Jul XS5 527 

Est.SBlas Prev.3aies MP5 

Prev.DoyOpsnlnL 1X417 upS37 
COCOA (NYC5CE) 

10 meMe tam> s per ten 

2570 1990 May 3390 2390 

3400 1990 Jul 2190 2193 

3415 1957 Sep 2143 2141 

3337 1945 Dee 2130 2130 

2190 I9S Mar 3120 3124 

2130 IftO May 

2110 1940 JQI 

EstSoies Prev.Soles isn 

Prav.OaoOeaninl. 27272 up 72 
ORANGE JUICE mVCB) 

1X000 Ibsi* cants par IX 
11X20 15120 4tay 15150 14020 


14025 141.19 
14125 141.10 
14X50 14X43 
14X15 14X32 
13920 13920 
13920 13X00 
13X50 13X50 
13520 


375 113 
394 403 
410 417 
423 429 
449 471 
X09 X10 
523 X30 
X53 XS7 


3340 3372 

2144 3177 

2131 2152 
2100 2120 
2120 2120 
2130 
2130 


Financial 


us T. MUG OMMl 
21 mllilon>plieflDDpcL 
9121 S7.14 Jun 9125 9124 

9123 1X94 SOP 9120 9121 

9X90 0527 Doe 9X57 9X09 

' 90m 0X40 Mar 9023 9X57 

9X27 l7Jn Jun 9X12 9X29 

9020 8X00 8ap> 0921 0922 

8922 1925 DOC 

Mar 

Est.Salts Prov.Seiss 11599 

Prev.DoyOponlnl. 40249 up29f 
10 YR. TREASURY CCBTl 
S10ao08prln-PisX3biAaf100pct 
OM 7X4 Jim i0>12 1X41 

n-13 7S>» Sop 7941 50-1 

1X42 7S-13 Doc 

8X4 75-M MOr 

7944 7440 Jen 

BstSalso Pnv.Solos 10293 

Prsv.DnvOponinl. 41241 eftSSl 
US TREASURY BONDS (CPT) 
(Opct>«IOQLOIMH4sA33aKlSonOOpCt) 
77-15 5^20 Jun 7X-S0 71-5 

744 57-10 SOP 4940 70-4 

745 574 Dec 40-27 . 094 

7M0 57-2 Mor 41 40-14 

70-14 5429 Jun 57-13 57-S 

704 5449 Sep 44-25 57-5 

aM6 5445 Dec 44-7 44-1S 

49-12 5447 Mar 46 44-1 

5F2 43-13 Jun 

4X44 a-4 Sop 4447 45-11 

4X4 42-24 Dec 4444 4444 

Est. Seles Prov.SelesIfims 

Prev.Day0pmlnr21X7DX iip940 

GHSUKXT) „ 

XIOXOOOprln-pIsXSbiilsDflOOpct 
49-27 57-n Jun 4944 4949 

49-4 59-13 Sop 4041 494 

4X-I3. .5M ^ Dec . 

40;, .5X20:-aA ■ 

ST-* . 5X45 Jun ' 

574 45 Sap 57 57 

E3t.Sales Prev-Saloa 354 

Piw.DpvOpenlnt. 3293 efl3 
CERT. DEPOSIT CIMMl 
SI million- Pis enoo pet 
9120 0520 Jun 9120 91.19 

9X00 0520 Sep 9X0 9021 

9X17 1524 Doc 0929 9X00 

8921 0X54 Mor 8920 0928 

8925 1X43 Jim 0921 0921 

1155 I7jt SOF 

1126 0124 Dee 

Bot.Solas Prav.Selaa 733 

Prev. Day Open Inl. X50« effSia 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
Slmilltan-pNeflOOpei. 

9111 1149 Jim 902B 9021 

9023 1453 Sap 09J7 9024 

0927 0420 Dae ■ 89M 0923 

0921 1X10 Mar ilSi 0920 


9125 9120 4^.19 

9120 9123 424 

9027 9X90 4m 
9X33 9025 424 

9X12 9029 424 

0921 -902$ 425 

0921 424 

1929 423 


00-12 HHD 423 

79-19 7944 433 

7041 431 

7X4 440 

7743 419 


7X-17 7X45 
51^17 4945 
4X41 4X41 
4X 4X4 
4M0 47-M 
1X33 55-a 
544 44-10 

45-25 4S45 
45-12 
4439 4431 
4419 4419 


4941 4945 -tO 

4X41 ' 49-1 *7 

4413 47 

.. 5M7 »• •■H’ 

47-n 47 

5X39 4549 - 47 


Stock Indexes 


(inOexes compiled oltorlly befei 
SP COMP. INDEX tCMEI 
peintomtdcen i s „ 

Iff.M 15X10 Jun 11150 I13L40 

1917X UIUM. Sep 11430 10X10 
19X40 17X70 Dee 11925 1902$ 

Est.S<iles Prav.Soles 57J44 

Prev.DoyOponinL 5U03 eni297 
VALUE UNR CKCGD 
peint s anil cento 

21920 17100 Jun 19X00 19X90 

31130 18S75 Snp 30240 20320 

Est.Salos Prev.Soles 4237 

Prev.DoyOponint. 5.511 off46 
NYSE COMP. INDEX nirPE) 
poMsond cents 

31X00 9020 Jun 10520 10x45 

11120 9125 SCP 10X05 10X05 

TUTS 10120 Dec 11020 11020 

Est.Sales Prev.Soles 13237 

Prsv.DoyOpsnlnt X4M effSO 


market etOM) 


1S1.90 I822D 420 

10525 1«U» 421 

10725 10970 -445 


19720 19720 —JB 
201JD 30140 425 


10520 lOSJO 420 

10770 10X00 420 

10925 109.95 -KB 


0927 fUD Dae ■ 89m 0973 

0921 1X10 Mor hSo 0920 

0X15 0X73 Jim M75 1138 

■124 5720 Sep 1529 1129 

027 S72i Dae eu3 SX33 

1729 1724 Mor 

Esl.Sales Prev.Solos 4177S 

Prev.OayOpanlnL103293 up 1221 


9120 9U4 
9042 9029 
0929 9020 
•921 0929 
•921 0925 
•920 
•123 


9020 9079 
1927 9021 
•M5 0971 
OXN 0921 


CMnmodity Indexes 


M1.90 

Reuters I 1.92&00 

DJ. Futurpg NJL 

Com. Research Bureau. N2X. 

Moody^ : base 100 : Dec 31,1931. 
p • preliminary; f • final 
Reufxrs : base 100 ; Sep. IS, 1931. 
Daw Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Morket Guide 


3 




33W 31M 
ISW S9k 
33H 14 
5W 2U 
3SW ISVh 
5W 214 
TDb S9k 
44W 29W 
13« .9M 
35*k 17M 
4n 3H 
WH OM 
43*h SSVk 

43 3iW 

44 $4 

759k 50W 
74 47M 

01 47M 

•3H 4SW 
44W 5210 
41% 49% 
43% 51% 
30% 11% 
41% 37 
70 so 


vwxto 

VestSe 
Vlocam 
voSPpfi 
voEPpf : 
vaEPpf I 
voEppr I 
VaElpf I 
VoEPPl ! 
vaEpfj : 
voEPpf : 
vbEPpf ; 
vtsboys 
vomod 
VulenM I 


• OS 31% 
1275 Ills 
40 33% 

4 3% 

4 33 33% 

5 3% 

1 1 % 

11 1540 31%' 
15 4 11% 

13 373 19% 
10 4% 

39 10% 
19 1933 43% 
00X 43% 
1500 44% 
39lb7S% 
12 73 
T40zf0 
19502 11% 
1002 44 
402 41% 
3002 43 
13 38 10 

15 7 39% 

11 21 75 


30%—% 
11% X % 
33% + % 
2% 

22% 

3% + % 

1% 

31% -4 % 
11% -I- % 
19% + % 
4 

10 %— % 
43%— % 
43% + % 
44% —1% 
74 —I ' 
73 

n + % 

•1% X % 

44 

41% * % 
42 -4% 

II 

39% -4 K 
7S%— % 



57% 35% TDK 27* 2 19 172 43% 43% 
^ U > a9 31% 31% 
13% 7% TGIF 15 75 11% 11 % 

15% 11% TNP 125 72 8 12 15 

25% 17 TRB 120 47 14 320 31% M 

•1% 30% TRW 100 XI 10 532 73% 72% 

10% 3%- TOCBOOt 40 4% 4% 

70% 52% TonOnl T.13 12 14 321 40% 40% 
17% 11% Tellsy 25e J 13 859 17% U 


43% -4% 
31% X % 
11% -4 % 
14 X % 
31 % — % 
73%—% 
4%— % 
59% X1% 
17% X % 



Class 

Kifb Low XM AOK arte 

SUGAR 

Frwicb Orones per metric tea 
MOV 1250 1235 1240 1245 —4 

Aue 1210 1295 1200 1203 —5 

Oet 1245 1240 1240 1250 —3 

Dec N.T. N?r 1295 1210 X2 

Mor 1205 1295 1295 1200 —13 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1240 1255 — 13 

Est. voL: 3273 lots of SO tons. Prev. omual 
soles; 1210 led Opon mtaroot: 22245 
COCOA 

Froncb Iranco par ISO ke 
MOV 1240 2225 2230 3233 —39 

Jly N.T. N.T. aS — —5 

Sep 1300 1190 1104 — —13 

Ok 1110 ajOH 1110 1150 —22 

Mor M.T. N.f. 1100 1140 —5 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1105 IMS UnclL 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1115 1130 —5 

Bat. vel.: 90 lets oi 10 tons. Prov. actual 
sales: 31 led Open Interest: 749 
COPPER 

nrandi rrencs par 104 ke 
MPV 1475 1475 1440 1450 — 45 

Jly M.T. N.T. — 1515 —90 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2215 2240 —31 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2230 15M —30 

Jon N.T. N.T. — 2255 —35 

Mar M.T. N.T. ISID 2250 —30 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1510 1550 — 35 

Est.vei.:2lotsofSlanxPrew.ariiiel wles:0 
lodOeen Interest: 191 
Sourer: Bouroo Ou Caauaofcet 


London Metals 
April 11 


dew Provtoos 

BM Ask . BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 
siarMne par motile ten 
spot 80420 B8S50 90320 90420 

forward 91120 9IU0 93120 93120 

COPPER CATHODES (HItirOrade) 

Starnne per tu ai r le toe 
Spot 120420 I2D520 122320 122420 

forward 121100 121320 123100 lAUQ 

COPPER CATHODES (StnndnrA 
Slerlino par metric ten 
Opel 1201J» 120320 imUO 1219J» 

la-werd 121100 121424 123100 10420 

LEAD 

SMIIbo par metric tea 
spot 31820 31320 33320 33320 

forward 31150 31X50 32320 32320 

NICKEL 

Sioriiiia per mairic Ion 
spot X33520 X34D20 X4SX00 427020 

forw er o X34a0D 424520 4220.00 X43an 

SILVER 

Pence par trav ooMa 

apei 53720 53X00 54520 S4420 

forward 55X50 SSS20 54420 54520 

TIN (SiaiMoro) 

SMrtbie par metric tM 

spot 979020 920X00 923520 924020 

forward 978020 979020 924520 925020 . 

aNC 

Sterlhte per metric ton ^ 

SDCl 71720 71920 73920 7392D 

Nrword 72220 73100 73320 73420 

SavnsiAp. 


DM Futures Options 

April 11 

KGoimMiibQSiaiinl&caaseriiM 


London G>inmodities 

April 11 


Cleoe Prwalen 
Hlfh Lew Bid Ask BM Ask 

SUGAR 

Sterdna por metric ton 
Mny 11100 10920 11120 11320 11020 11020 
AM 11520 11520 11420 11X00 11570 11520 
Oet 13X20 11X20 12020 12X30 11X60 11920 
DK 12X00 I3S20 12420 12770 13420 12520 
Mor 13170 13420 13120 13870 13420 13720 
May 14320 M120 14320 14320 1410 14100 
AM 14420 14420 1470 1490 14X00 1470 
Volume: 3245 lets of 0 tenx 
COCOA 

Stemns per metric lea 
May 1747 1733 1,938 1739 1742 1.944 

Jly 1735 1710 1721 1722 1754 170 

Sw 1.915 1792 ITM 1792 1,928 1,930 

Dk 1254 1231 1234 1239 TJa4 1241 

Mm- 1255 1237 1234 1238 1243 1267 

May 1255 1250 1237 1245 1245 1245 

JIv N.T. N.T. 1245 12n 1250 1JU 

Votumo: 3207 lots of 10 lorn. 

COPPER 

Storfipf par metrletea 
May 1140 1104 1105 1110 1164 1149 

Jly 1154 US 110 110 200 1310 

Sop 130 1104 1114 11M 1343 1344 

Nov 1345 1310 120 1310 270 22M 

Joe 120 205 130 1310 303 1357 

MOT 1229 130 110 270 2745 120 

May N.T. N.T. 110 110 120 2770 

Votumo; 3284 lols of 5 tonx 
GASOIL ' 

U2. oellaro par metric ton 
API ai0 3290 33X0 33X7S 33X0 3300 
Mar 3290 3270 2370 227.7$ 200 23X0 
Jen 22X0 2240 23X75 3250 3250 3250 
Jly 3350 2340 2240 2240 23X75 2230 
AHf 22X0 2240 22£0 227.0 2250 2890 
Sep N.T. N.T. 2270 2300 2250 3320 
Oet N.T. N.T. 2270 2330 3340 3370 
NOV N.T. N.T. 32X0 3340 3270 3400 
On IXT. N.T. 3390 3390 2270 2«0 
Volume: 1725 Ids of 10 fora. 

S cu reo » ; RouloraondLoneton Petn^ium &»■ 

efKwpo fipesaiu. 


Asian Commodities 

April 11 


HOH^KOffG GOLD FUTURES 
UTAperoeneo / 

Closa Previoiis 
Hlpil Low BM Ask BM Ask 
Apl~ N.T. N.T. 32X0 3300 3210 32X0 
MOV . N.T. N.T. 33X0 3320 3240 3240 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 3320 3340 32X0 32X0 
Aon .. 3340 33X0 3360 3300 3300 3320 
Oct — N.T. N.T. 3410 3430 3350 3370 
OK . N.T. N.T. 3470 3490 3410 3S0 
Feb _ 3S10 3530 3530 3540 3440 3480 
Volume: 34 lets Of 10 ea. 

SINOAPORS GOLD FUTURES 
UTApereinwe 

Mali *Law Settle Settle 

API fl.T. N.T. 3290 3230 

Jun . 33140 3290 3310 32X0 

Am — N.T. N.T. 3370 3310 

Volume: lltlotsef 1001 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
MoMrslna ewits per kHo 

Ciofa PreviOM . 

BM ASk BM ASk I 

May 010 3010 3040 wwwi , 

Jun . 2040 2050 2070 3070 

Jly — — 3070 30X0 MM 309 ^ 

Aug .. 1100 3110 2100 3110 

SOP 31^ 2110 2120 2130 


CoarmedUv and Unit 
CoNm 4 Santos, in 
Frinteloth 64/0 0 %. yd _ 
Steel blNats iPllt.). Ion..... 
iron2Fdry.Pblta,tan — . 
Siwl senm No 1 iiw Pill. , 
Load Spot, lb -- 
Capper eleel. lb 
Tin (Straltsl. lb 
Unc, S. St. I_ Bools, lb — . 
PoHadlum, 03 - 
Sltwor N.Y.ea - - 
50w«p; AP. 


Dividends April 11 





S. KoireaBiifldiiig Finns 
Cite McHie Fordgn Pacts 

Roam 

SEOUL — Orerseas construC’ 
tioR coatiacts won South Kraea 
amounted to S1.0S billion in die 
fiist thiee months of this yw, 

31.7 percent from the period in' 
1984, the Overseas Consimction 
Association of Kmea said Tliurs- 
day. 

South Korea secured S6.5 billion 
in overseas construction contracts 
last year, down from S10.4 bilUoo 
in I9S3, the Mganization said. 


AMCyUAWtoBegmTalks 

United Press fmonMdMof 

DETROIT -^Ameiidui Motors. 

Core, and the United Auto Woric- 
ers fiavt agreed to begin tafe witlh ; 
in a znauer of days on a new con- 
tra^ a company spokesman said 
Thursday. The current contract ex- 
pires SepL IS. The UAW eariio- 
this wedt agreed to Id the anto- 
maktf pay only SS.4 million on die 
more than S141 million it owes em- 
ployees because of concessions 
— de by the workers l^ween omvw 
] 982 and Januaiy iwS. jnnp; s 


May 010 2010 3040 wwwi 

Jun . 2040 3050 2070 2070 

Z,-= ggs M 

SINGAPORE RUBBGR 
SMffoPOrs cools per kite 

.S** ^ FlWlOIIS 

BM ASiC Bin 

RSSIMPv. 1760 1770 1780- 17^ 

RSS1Jun_ 179JS 100 1010 1310 

RSS2Mav- 1730 1740 17X0 17S0 

RSSSMav. 1710 1720 1720 1 ^ 

RSS4Mey. 14X0 16X0 

RSSSMoV. 1410 1430 14^ 1440 

KUALA LUMPURPALMOIL 
MMoysion rtoaolit per 0 teas 

-S*** Piwlops 

BM Ask BM Ask 

M 1.^ 1770 170 ^ 

MOV 170 1740 170 170 

Jun 1740 1790 170 170 

Jly 1710 1740 1 ^ TM 

Aim 170 170 llm 

Sop , , , 170 1715 1710 IM 

Nov 1745 170 170 IM 

Jon 170 105 im IM 

Mer 170 1790 170 17 S 

Volume: olDlsalKtera 

Seuree: Reuters. 


1 




Pot Amt Pay Rm: 
USUAL . . ■ 

Q. 12 % 540 A 22 ' 

Q 75 5-31 5-7 

.0.18% 4-10 $0 
k Q 0 7-24 4-23, 
O 0 0-0 6-7': 

. O .14 SIS 4-U . 
O 75 4-1 

Q 77 7-1 4-14 

' - Q 0 7-15 6-14 
Q 0 4-0 4.6 

Q M X0 M 
a. Q 74 5-15 S-l . 
O 0 4-10 5-24 



NYSE Hi^u-Lows April 11 


S&P 100 Index Options 

^trfl 10 



Prev 

■M vtsM vtoM 

M XM 
XO 80 8% 

ISS. .90 90 


dovrer; 5HbniM BivffMrv ' 


Honeywell I^aiisLavo& 

The Mssoaateii Press - 

BILLERICA, Massachusetts -rt ■ 

nraey^I] inc^ jg u^jnsuy-f 
Wide slump in sales of sman and» 
^um-sized computer systemil - 
«ys It plans to layoff 120 people all 

us computer pUnt at BillCTraT ^ 














































INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 12 , 19$5 



ROUMIW 




. 'W? IS 

J«2 jaSa ^ 

• •>So >1^ 
mSS ■’sS ^ ^ 

ecilMM} ^ 

^.s«« 


is ^ ^ 

d!^ % ^ 

Mar SS ^ 

tOMM) 

*^) ^ 

^ ^ ^ ilS I 

J^p ■®*’S « ‘if 


nSuggir 


'i^ba.rt. 
jgl 1«ijo }5;>8 IJ4J, 

I) 

•rib. , 

^ Sil PS ' 

S2: S3 si 5S § s 

as “ S3 g a ;; 

Jul 5*l .j' 

:5 


^ kSi ^ >11 . 

ss ^ 1 

. 0 #C TtS 77« 5 ^ 

!>• lM77 upA)7 • 

ME) 

wbM. 

May ».i5 3tM ... 

•lun aaM a.» l?i »i .• 

Jul w m > Stli s<) Es 7 

*M ^ 1m »2 P U 

Sw 2115 Sis »• SJ* -A 

Nov 282S Sw S-5 Sit Ji- 

^ 5S gs aS ;-? 

Prav.Sales 9 ^ 174 “ *■• .. 

E. 44.«aS U»4I0 


■Stock lndi>xer^ 

mpiied *»rti,be(m,„„u, 

X (CME) ^ 

,'55 !?HI «f!n uu. 


11 BidbRgecied :| 
ByZdlesthach 

'■■ t^mttd-Prta /fU^NdhoHu/ 

.' SAN FRANCISCO — 

. Crown Zellerbach Co’'p.’s 
' botfd of direcim ha& reje^ 
an $807J-nullbn taLeover ixd 
from Sir James Gc^dsmith, 
oompany aaoounced Thurvday. 

The board recommended 
that diarebiMders decline Sir 
James’s S4150'per’‘^are offer 
for common stock, saying that 
ifae long-term value of the 
shares is about S60. At 3 P.hf, 
Thursday, ifae stock listed at 
S4150, up STV: cents, on the. 
New York Stock Exdiange. 

Analysts said that Crown 
. Zdterb^ might be seddng a 
fai^ur bidder aiho might be 
more accepiabte to manage-, j 
ffloiL'Sr James is belieived to ! 
^ want Croun Zellerbach so. he ! 
' eassellofTsomeofttaiapront. | 

Chemical Reports 
10.3% Profit Gain 


Bunnah Says ’84 Profit Rose 

Died a p^t of £2,5 million, level 
LONDON — Bunnah OD PLC with 1^. laiereH ebarg« rose to 
rqxmed Thursday a 7,S-percent £36.3 millioD from £2377 miUiM, 


increase io pimx profit for 1984, 
to £70 million ($84 million) from 


the company reported. 

A Bunnah suttement said the 


*«»«« French aircraft builder, 

NEW YORK — Cbemical New tcalia’s Air Queensland b 
-Yoric Gm.. parent of Chemical four of its ATR>42 con 
Bank', said 'Thursday that first- iinm aruf hu udeen o 
quarter net income rose 10.3 per- three others in a 360-mi 
cent, to S89.7 million, or S1.68 per (S37.8-mil!ion) coniracL 
’share, from S8 1.3 inilljoii, or SI J8 Aetb Asian Bank EC i 
per share u year eariier. said Luxemboujg's Midd 


£64.9 millioa in 1983. Vriume rose coqq)any plans an active explora- 
abOUl 8 percent, Ib £1,72 billion rinn prog ram ihic yM y rffll Cfg trBt- 
from £1«S8 billion. ing on tne North sea. 

Coniributofs to the profit in- Burmahiapanoftbeconsortium 
duded lubricants and fu^ at £68.8 recently avraided a North Sea auc* 
million before interest and tax, up don block. It has al» applied for 
31 pocent from £49.2 nnDion in interests in a number of mscreiion- 
1983. and specialty chcnacals at aiy blocks under the British ninth 
£7.4 nunimt. w 34 percent from luring round. 

^ However sWpping’s BurmahalsosaidUisinvcstigat- 
proftlfeU8peremt.io«Jimmon ing expansion possihaiiics atiis 
^ttoyear.e:irJier £6.9nwU)oo. CastroTmd spedalty-chemicals 
^it from eiplofatwn and pro- operations. Diwtitures in 1984 
**®*’f^ pcirolenm-wenue efiminaied some losers, the compa- 
fdl 31 peroeot. to £13.4 mil- oysakL 
lion, fron £19.3 million. Bunnah said a restructuring pro- 

con^any said a subsidiaiy, gram would continue, althou^ the 
Quinttm Hszdi Ltd., had a £3.1- groi^ was in a better stratne, fi- 
milfim) loss, compared with a profit nannal and operating posiuon at 
in 1983 of £2.6 million. Investment the start of 19SS than at any time 
and disuibution actirities Gonlrib- ance the early 1970s. 

COMPANY MOTES 

Aero^tttfale, the state-owned side Petroleum Ltd., lifting their 
French aircraft builder, said Aus- joint share to 4S.6 percenL 


Profit frtHn expltvation and pro- 
duction, after petroleum-revenue 
tax. fdl 31 peroeot. to £13.4 mil- 
lion. frmn £19.3 million. 


Jdpim Unveik 
NewAtriiner 

Rtiam 

GTFU, Japan Japan un- 
veiled Thursday an ex^men- 
tal airtiner capwle of using air- 
ports with runways, too short 
for normal commercial planes. 

A spr^esman for Ure 578.4- 
million project said the plane, 
named Asuka, would begin test 
flights later this year. He said 
the plane needed only 7Q0 me- 
ters (2,300 feet) for takettff. 
compared with about twice that 
for other airliners. It is to carry 
moK than 100 people and be 
ouieter than otlw jets its size, 
the spokesman said. 

The spokesman said the fuse- 
lage was modeled after Japan's 
C-I military transport ana that 
its four FJR-710 en^nes were 
developed by the Industrial Sci- 
ence and Technology agency. 


Forceful 

Leader 




Page 13 



(Coaiioued from Page 11) Bv Brenda Haecrry rate computer-aided engineering 

denL ’’Walter really toed: my mind hfemaionai fferaU Tnbune and maotuacturing. 

out ctf the union as I had known it LONDON — Didtal Equip- Texaco Lae: said M. Kendall 

in the shop and put it oc a much Corp., the L'!s. computer Lancaster has been named preu- 
broader .social plane: citi’i! rights, maker said it is fonnine a Europe- dent and resident director of Tex- 
political and international affairs," an board of directors. a<» Saudia Inc. Mr. Lancaster 

Mr. White said- “With Europe plating a larger ^ Riyadh from Harrison, 

Within a year, Mr. )^'hitc, now operations it is Nw York, where he was eastern 

25, became a full-ume organizer for panieularly important that Digital regional sales manager for Texaco 
the union’s Canadian committee in ^ whole more aware Chemical Co. He succeeds Ken- 

Toronto, sensitrve of the issues and con- neih T. Hern, who was transferred 

in 1978, he became the U.^Ws cerns that are unique to individual Lagos as mana^g director of 
Canadian director and sooQ began European countries," said Kenneth Texaco Nigeria Ltd 
w shw agns of independence h. Olsen, Dipt^'s presideni and Finandiro Credit Sidsse-riist 
frem the U.S. union. founder. Boston said Robert Sirebel has re- 

Lasi Decemba, with the uoiM s The board, appi^ted fcH* a two- signed os a member of the group 


DEC Forms European Board 


political and international affairs,” 
Mr. White said 


rate computer-aided engineering 
and maotuacturing. 

Texaco Lae: said M. Kendall 
Lancaster has been named preu- 
dent and resident director ofTex- 
aoo Saudia Inc. Mr. Lancaster 


10 show signs of independo^ H, Olsen. Difl 
from the U.S. union. fcwndcr. 

Last December, with the union's The troard : 
Canadian and American branches ^rji] 


I's president and Finandifie Credit Sidsse-riist 
Boston said Robert Siiebel has re- 
nted fcH* a two- signed os a member of the group 
made up of eight executive board and as ehaimMn ot 


rtuicjiwu uiiiiwira yeoT tcrm, Will DC made Up 01 eight executive Doara and as Chairman of 
imtaied with ^h other, Mr. dec vice presidents and will be twouniis,^FBSecuritiesaadVa- 
Whitepresnted the unioQ with de- chaired bj- Jean-Oaude Peiersch- leurs While Weld SA. The bank, 

iVIflll^e HA VvtM* If umiM •Xi*. ^ l.. j i... ^ • a 


oiands he knew it would not ac- 
cept: independent control over Ca- 


iti. jointly owned by Credit Suisse and 

Other members are Pier-Cario First Boston Coip., said Mr. Stre- 


s oadian ba^aimng and st^es, plus Palotii, preadeni for Europe: Don bel would pursue a career in private 
guaran^ ara to *e OTke K. Busiek, corporate software ser- banking. Osw-ald Giubel, currently 


fuod.^e UAW aewtive boa^ vices; William C. Hanson, corpo- chief e>fecuti\*e of CS^ Sec^ties, 
n^cd the demand^ 24 to 1. Mr. rate systems manufacturing: Win- was named chairman of units 
White cast the negauve vote. ston R. Hindle Jr., corporate andisiobenonrinaiedtoihegroup 

operations; Jeffrey C Kalb, corpo- executive board. 

rate low-end ^sterns and tedmd- Spencer Stuart & Associates Ud. 
Pgmg^’fmfQ og>'; Jafflcs M. Ostcrhoff, corpofaic has appointed Eric K.H. Sim as 
J. M %JJ U/O rmance. and Peter J. Smith, corpo- vice preadent in its Singapore of- 


tcalia’s Air QueeosUsd has ordered Hilton Hotels Coqi. said it has 
four of its ATR-42 commuter air- raised its bank credit to $600 mQ- 
linen and has taken opdmis on lion in what observers saw as a 
three others in a 360-million franc move to build a war diesl to fight 
(S37.8-miUion) coniracL takeover attempts foiling a re- 

Acab Asian Bank EC of Bahrain cent bid by Golden Nugget Enc. 
said Luxemboujg's Middle East F3- Hitachi Zosen Coip. said it and 


New Profits 

Coip. said it hoped to have one full IfwvkVM 

potlmc operating at its Volta Alu- A iXfMMMt X vaOd 

mimim Co. plant in Ghana by the 

end of April but that further pro- (Continued from 11) 
doction would dqiend on potver PCBs, various companies sell a 
availability. process to dean the oQ. destroying 

Millieom toe. said in New York the toxic chemical by stripping off 
Giy that its Hong Kong joint ven- the chiorine. Among ihoK compa- 
lure conqjany, China Telecom Sys- nies ore PPM; SunOhio of Cuton, 


per share u year eariier. said Luxembourg's Middle East Pi- Hitachi Zosen Coip. said it and 

, Tte rise was kugdy attributable nancial Group SA has made a take- Nichimen Coip- have won a $260- 
(0 tn^er net-interest income, ser- over bid fm* ail of its issued-share million onto from Indonesia's 


Company Earnings 

Revenue end eraflts. in mitllans. ere in lecel currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


m« ms 
1.730. 1JB). 


rice fees and foreign-exchange 
trading profits, the bonk said. Nei- 
interest income rose 14.3percem. 
io $457.2 million, from S400.1 mil- 
lioD a year eariier. the bank said. . 


capital. 

Branifi lor. said Hs March load 


state-run p 
Kraft Acen 


company, Kerlas 
build a diemieal 


factor increased to 79.4 percent pulp plant in Aceh by mid-1988. 
from 23.4 peieent last Mai^ and In^erial Group PLC^ proposed 


that its revenue passenger miles in- merger with Permaflex Ltd. had million chips per month bv the end vania. 


Millieom bic. said in New York the toxic chemical by stripping off Britain 
Giy that its Hong Kong joint ven- the chiorine. Among ihoK compa- ^ <-ui 

lure conqiany, China Telecom Sys- nies are PPM; SunOhIo of Cuton, BorrnmiOo 

terns Ltd., has stalled providing Ohio.;mdAcurex Inc. of Mountain i.^ 

radio telephone service in Hong View, California. Other federally- nTsiwIL: ei^ 
Kong. licensed chemical processes are by Cmiciclci 

NEC Corp. said it would increase PCB Destruaion of Kansas Gty, 
its output m 2S6-kiloN! dynamic Missouri, and Franklin Research ^*1 Thomson Org. 
random access memoiy to seven Institute of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 


Net fnefudrs loan Jou era- Buri 
tistons ot SS.3S million vs 
SiSS nullien and lean ctar- 
aoaltfofSlJtmiUimvsnSi 
ms 


Buriington hfalhn. 
ittQuer. ins IfM 

RevHiiw 2a«a sata 

N*t tnc. _ ISS2I I6a»3 

Per Shore 135 1.W 


Koi^ 

NEC Corp. said it would increase 
its output m 2S6-kiloN! dynamic 
random access memoiy to seven 


Canada 


These gains were partly offset by. creased to 181.2 miDion from 1 14.8 been referred to the British Mo- 


losses from trading-account activi- miiltoi for the same monih. 


oopdies Commissioii, whidi has 


.ties and sales of investment securi- Brdtes 101 Piy. and Shell Aus- bem given six months to conqilete 
•ties and by higher noninterest a- tralia Ltd. said they have acquired its report, 
prases, it said. another ^percent stake in Wood- Kato Ahmunun and Hifwiiffrf northeastern Llanos area. 


of 1985 from three miflion last 
march, a coixqiany spokesman said. 
Occidental Peoolram Corp. said 


Georgia Power COn after ‘re- 
search by the electric power insti- 
tute. is buOding a plant that uses a 


IntT Thomson Org. 

Year 1*54 im 

Rawenue U3S. I JOC 

Op«f N*l V7.f 7SJ 

Ootf snare— 034 027 


Amsouth Bnq>. 

ItlOMr. IMS IfM 

Net Inc. *.M 0.93 

Per Shore Q.M 001 


»• ColeifHlto Tractor 

1st Qeer. INS 1N4 
S-n Revenue 1370 IJN. 
Ml Net Lon 700 I0f3 


France 


BondexcM Group 
inOuor. INS IN 

0^ Mel Ine. 130 1.71 

Per Share 005 OA 


Centerre Bnq>. 

up 1st QMT. IMS 1N4 

im NHIcie. 030 £30 

1.7S PerShore.^ 033 070 


it has struck oil in Colombia’s solvent lo selectively concentrate 


PCBs out of mineral oil 


Crodit Lyomos 

Year ItW 191 

Net Inc — . Mfl 391 


7905 tier Mc/iidef Min et 
Slja million on sale. 7«r ner 
tnaudes seatfiMs gem of 


Chem. New York 
IstQimr.* INS im 


SwHxeriond 


”, meiuOes seevtiMs gem el IstQimr.* WB IM4 

IW W"riT ana nor benelit ot Net inc I9J9 IIJS 

S45M10; alsa metaoes loan Per snore 1 a4 I£3 

lass pfovisten ot 02 million ^ 

ve S3 miiiien and ehor peeWs Gtiz. & S. Georo. 
of Ul million vs aimIHion. .l^ ’rT 


ENTERIVAIIONAI. REAL. ESTATE 



i\.' 




United States 
ABiod Bnsdirs. 

M Qoar. ms 19H 

Net Inc 31.4 37.9 

Persnore-^ 07* qaI 

ResuUs restated tor aoolod 
oemiisHiens. 


Bk of New York 
IrtOwr. ms IN 
MetiiK.__ 332 as 
Per Shore U7 1 J 


Gtiz. & S. Georg. 
^ IClQiier. 1915 im 

Nel Inc 303 ISO 

^ PerStare 053 047 

^ Nel mdudes hen loss ore- 
im visions olSSJmlKlea vs S*SS 
3S9 minion. 


Bui iie l t Bkt Horidq 


GlyNotT 


Donun riuriira ,s,Qll0r. IfM 19M 

IRQaar. mS im Revenue 63.9 SOO 

el Inc _ 393 340 Hel Inc S£3 4.94 

er Shore— 134 1.16 Per Shore— OeS 059 


Amerifrust 


IstOuer, 
net Inc _ 
Per Shore— 


im istQuor. 

14.1 Net Inc 

153 PerStare. 


Boybonks 
ir. ms 

957 

e— 15? 


CPC IntT 


laoeor. ms ITM 

im Revenue 1520 1060 

739 Net Inc — 311S 34.96 

1.17 Per Stare 068 073 


flee. He joins fencer Stuan, an 
executive search firm, from the 
post of general manager and chief 
executive of United Merchant 
Bank Lid., a Singapore-based unit 
of United Oi'erseas Rmlc 

General Foods Ct^ has ap- 
pointed Sylvester T. Hinkes, gener- 
al manager of t^g GF .AG. a West 
German subsidiary, as a corporate 
vice preadenL Ctoeral Foods is 
baseu in White Plains, Neu’ YorL 

American Express Co. has 
named Hugh Freuberg lice presi- 
dent and graeral manag er of travel- 
rdated services for iis Southeast 
Asia re^oo. He mo\'es to Singa- 
pore from his post as rice pr^ideni 
and general managn for consumer 
finanaal services in the United 
Kingdom and Ireland. 

Nippon Ctedt Bank Ltd. has ap- 
point^ Yasushi Sakashiu to head 
its London branch, succeeding Toi- 
chi Danno, who is returning to To- 
kyo. Mr. Sakashita preiioudy vas 
general manager of the bank’s in- 
ternational finance div'ision, based 
in Tokya 

Canadian Imperial Bank of Com- 
mence of Toronto has opened a nen* 
trust subsidiary in Guem^'. The 
new unit, Canadian Imperial Bank 
of Commerce Trust Co. (Channel 
Islands) Ltd., is headed by Keith 
Betts, who previously was with 
Guinness Mahon Guernsey Ltd. • 

MerriD Lyndi International io 
London said Tony Church has 
joined its research depanmeni as a 
senior chemical analyst, responsi- 
ble for coverage of the major U.IC 
and EuFOfTean chemical companies 
as wdl as the European operations 
of major U.S. chemical companies. 
For the past six years, be has fol- 
lowed the European chemical in- 
dustry from London for Kidder 
Peabody. 


VW Board Proposes 
To jResfOre Diridend 

RaKts 

WOLFSBURG, West Ger- 
many — Volkswag^werk .AG 
said Thursday that its supervi- 
sory board has proposed restor- 
ing a 5-Deutsche-maik (SI. 60) 
diridend on 19S4 results after 
omitting dividend pavments for 
1982 and 1981 
VW’s last payment, on 1981 
results, was also 5 DM per 
share. 


Jun 111199 :Ct.4S lu,] Hm 
Sm lOlOS 10856 IPA lug H 
Ota 11050 11060 INJS iw 3 
Rrtv.Sotn 1333: * 

W. tM»6 06130 


lommodity Indexes 


100 . D«c. oV I«11 
; i • final 
100 . Se». It. 14:1 
sc 109 . Oe; 31 1>::. 


Market Guide j 

COM Soars o< 

BOM MorconMw E'OOta 
irnoiionoi Menfwrv "WM* 
9riea»3 .WercsrtP!» gigtat 
t Yorii CocM. Siieof. 3** 

« York Conrr. Etosoe 
nitaCirk Siaww >»* 

V Yoni Merwall** B»Oww 
itoi cit, BMn 6< '>96t 
t York Fwiarts S*eanx 


OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Yew own uAcaoon l^nd on ihu Cabulous Lake of (he Oarks m Cmtia] 
Missourt. fCgfn in the heartland of Amenca. Auoy from clues, ncose, 
polhioon and the rai-race of the wotkadey world. 

Forties Inc.. pubOshets of Foibes Magadne. through its subsidiaiv. 
Sangre de Cnsto Ranches Ine . is offering die opportunity of a lifetime lor 
you Io acqi^ one or mere oaei of our choke MiSsoun lakeland 
- .Thenls no better tune than nghl now In find out If Fotbes Lake of the 
'Ozarks Is the glace for you. AS qut homcsiK^ irtclucfinslakEi front and lake 
view. itnS .-be S’ minimum d2e M-one acre— rangtog le over three aoes. 
Cadi prices Mart at $6,000. Oriaior more actes of this mcrediUv beautiful 
lakebmd can be youn for the modesi payment of SbO per month, unlh 
easy credit lemis available 

For compkie Inlormation. including pictures, maps and full detaib 
cm our Ubetal money-back and exchange privileges, please write to. 
Forbes Europe Inc.. H. P.O. Box 86. London SW 1 1 SUT England 
Obiam me Propeilv Report lequired by Fedcval uw jna read rf be^?e 
EMSnpg anyitwig No Federal apency nac ludgeo me menis v value d an 
o( ipis pcooeitv sOuai CreOil and Hou&ng Cippenufulv 


Floating Rate Notes 


April 11 


Dollar 


Cash Prices 


Hawk offers distinguished servicesfen- the ottmers and guests of our . . 
bLTurioiis homes nesiled in the Green Mountains ofVemumLBlissJuliy 
sednded, yet only mimaesJnjmKiSmepc^ New En^md^ premiere ski resort 
Cathedral ceUbrgs.JuAdsJxmeJhejdaces and sky-Utioorraduxnuten^diese 
splendid retreats. AndeueryeJ^UniadetospoUyou,Jnmaioine- 
and-cheese wdeome basket to an oldfiaskioned hayride through the peacejul 
countryside. Understandably, we are a Mobil Four-Star, AAA Four-Diamond 
resort. Eiquisite Haiok homes fiom SI50.000-S4SO,000. For ownership 
infjrmation caB useoBeet in the US. at S02-672-38I1 or write Hawk l^miorri 
Mountedn FesorU Sth Floor, 87 Jermyn St., London SWI Y6JD, 

K ^ TWX 710-227-0652 


194 Queenls Gate London SW7 

I— Nw ' Superb apartoents in 

h a ^lendid Victorian 

^ GsSBJHBBBhL house close to 

Ajft 1 ^TnTMinMiuirfy^ | * I *iri iiiinillmiP mlini 


Mbunti 


iTHAWK u&mater iuecu/uf. 

VERMONT MOUNTAIN RESORTS RO. Box 64-H4M, Plyrnoum, UBmioilt 05056 

Mtt^pkmrmddesiyn^H/y^hmtesandoanrmaxnitieshy 
Robert Carl Williams, Architect and Associates. 

Miid nvnei* fliphiMsd oy law 


Dividend! 




NIONTE 

are sow through 

* G E D I 


Global Vision 

As the laroest full service 
real estate firm in Texas 
and the southwestern US., 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
msnagement. 


Rease' note specific interest 
• In request to 


SOleAffenis: 

wai:llis 

B4 Bromplen Reed 
LoodeeSWS IHP 01-581 7654 
Idex 23661 WAC 


Kensington Gardens 

’^k^^^fvlhedes^retamsotneof 
j^ \^thetntfymagnkkent 
'^^T-jj^^origutiUroomsanddteir 

Vtdorkmperiodreaapes— 
now combined a 

.'very high standard of 
^**?y^e »»ffioiag7» amenity throughout 
fbicluiBi^ passenger m. 

S IWTIirT'- resident earetaher.O^ 

I quality kitehensS 

bathrooms, all new 
plumbing and ekcirics,ac.K 

FlMs and Duplex 
' ^ Apartments including a 

■* — «»fica*wifixl p>wtlwMt<6) mteh 

— — =^7’ — 3W bedrooms. 2 reception, 
2 U bathrooms. 6rom 
. £295,000 to £500,000. 

J.K Stui&o Flat @£60.000 


LEASES 67 YEARS 
FOR SALE 


SHOW FLAT OPEN DAILY 11AM TO 6PM 


_C' CU 


P.'g^’S.eP 

Trav'-ic' 

fc6l 

dori^ 

IP 






eiTEBNATIONAL 
WEAL ESTATE BROSmS 

EABNESCEumr ceiumssnNs 

ON FLORIDA PROimtmS 

One of the lai)g;e&t developed in Florida seeks 
qualified Brokers to sell homes & homesiies from 
to 11^ acres at subdivisions in northwest Florida 
near '“the world's most beautiful beaches". 

JEL4NK FISCHER, 

IVlarketuig Consultant Overset 

pECS'EKrmsvttsc. U&to& free 1-800-327-9100 
Fk»idatofl&eel-80043M89I 


HENRY S. MILLER Ca, 
REALTORS* 

Deyld Donosky, CEO 
Corporate Headquarters:' 
2001 Bryan Tower 
EMea.l^TSan 
214/7(8-9171 Telex 7324^ 

The OrMv Awe n Itas fleer £iMa 
Pannm In Service nwlih Qnibb a EWs. 


SILVAPLANA 

(3 milei from Sr. MerRx) 

1 and 2 bednooMpirtmenis ' (66 
oi(.aL up to 89 Bq. 111 ,) top qrafiiy, 
pmge. auna. lovdy view of the 
ttounuuis end the lake of Shm- 
pfaiM- Free for nie to aoibSwiN 
randeal. 

Up to 70%, at 6\4% intexesL 
Prices nmaxu from . 

Sir. $83,000.- in Sfe 558,000-. 

Uforing AG 
P s s lli ti vi iul r qin 24 
T*LCH/1 2024310 
Hx 822518 HCH 


LONDON = 

KENSINGTON COURT 

£95,000 neg. 

Luxurious unique Kensington 
oparhnant. 1 ,000 sq. ft. firing 
area. Huge master-bedroom, 
2nd bedroom (fitted double 
bed), enormous lounge, luxi^ 
ry bothroom with jocuizi both 
ond real shower. Fitted kitch- 
en with oppfiances. Large 
souno, compact study. Mony 
features. Lower ground floor.. 

Tel.; 01^37 5633 bb 


ExceHent opportunity 

purchase 4.2 ooes zoned for 

tawnhouscs In fast growing swibelf 
dly witii significant and rapid op 
predolion pelentioi, leverage in- 
vestment 

Hgqairot 9650,000 eaih mitk 
OSiSfOOO ohiumUb. Ameisod 
$1.4 million. 

For Infomation contact: 
TAKBQliic 
4742 N. Grade ftood 
Suite 213 

‘fimnn. Arfzana 8S705 
Telex 165541 EXTUC 


SWITZERLAND 

Montreuso-Geneva Lake 
APARIHOra BONIVARD 

For sole luxurious apartments, 
from 1 to 5 rooms, overlooking ihe 
prettiest port of Geneva Loke. 
Prices; S.fr, 1 23,000 ind. eqw^ 
mertt and fumitura. 

60% mortgage available at 
6VA interest. 

Haase cantoet the ovmer: 

RieiC DE LA RIYIERA &A. 

33 avsew* du Cosine 
1320 Maittreux-Swii li eilrad 
Td.t 021/635251 

Taltas 25373 art di 


INTERNATlOlllAL 
REAL ESTATE 
spears every 
FRIDAY 


To place on odvertisefnent 
• contact eirr office in your eeunhy 
(listed in Gossified Section) or; 

Max Ferrero, 

181 Ave. Qi8ri»de-(7inlle» 
NemDr Cedex, France. 
TeL 747.12,^. Teto: 618595. 


Isiser/iwat. 

ARM irtthTS 

AdMIrisnitni 

Allhn Irtao 

Atihd irhnPcml 

ArebBksCatvl9HI 

Aiwincnn inltfui 

8coC6iniB.inL9t 

Son Nca Lovorotl 

eoacDOiRomotl 

BcoDISonloSoLtl 

Benco Pinto SS 

Bonk 0( Amor ica 97 

BhO«CrMCe91'94 

BKOtCrc«t97 

Bk (HtrctMS* 

SkOllrokMtS 

SIM6nlnM0t<l 

Shot Montreal 96 

akOIMimreoi9i 

BkOiNewVorfcte 

Bk Of Nova Scotia nra 

SkOINoKiScallaW 

BkOfTakvalS 

BkOt Tokyo 16 

efcOtTokvaO 

Bk Of Tokyo fcMim 

Bk 01 Tokyo tfKSlin 

BkAiDErlatTo 

Bankers Trud 03 

SenktnTruil94 

SonktrsTml96 

Ba Ard» El Imcs 17/91 

HSL9S 

8BL99 

BaindoMiesM 

BqiiiaosuK99 

8UEI9 

BFCEI7 

BFCEedM 

BPCEtanH 

BPCE99 

BNP IS 

BNPH 

BNP 15/81 

BNPSOflk 

BNP 99 

BNP It 

BNPSa/*! 

BNP 96 
BNPOS 

BoPorltaipete 

Bo WBrim 89/94 

BorctavsOHOSIS 

SarooMOMesio 

BardevsOwosetrp 

BoramOONSlu 

Kins Bdg pen 

KlneB«le 99/04 

KInaBeleeO 

BorponBonkM 

BwaenBankOdltm 

KiwBelglSAK 

Kbie Beta 99/84 

CccelS 

Coot 85 

CNCA 98/95 

CNTfO 

CHT91 

CtaeOS 

CibelWkivilo 

CtacM 

Carteret S6L 94 

CMM Mortnttanii 

cneseot 

Owmleai Bku 

CntmlCDlfWUy>96 

OrWtanioBkll 

cliiltriaaMi94 

CUieDc«tWklvleM.im 

CincorpSwtfO 

OH 0096 94 

Clllarpli 

Otieoiv^lndeM n«P 

Cineeret? 

CentmenBonklt 

CemmersBonk N6vl9 

Canm Urb WoatrccA 9) 

CCFStni 

ccFions 

CCFtoBti 

CCF97 

CEPME 17/92 

CEPMEN 

OMIt Du NorC 19/92 

CredH Fend vara 

Credit For E». 92 

CrLven9S.<94 

Credit Lvennaltl7_ 

Credit Lvennoisiam 

Credit Lyemeara 

Crcdli Lvierals 91/95 

Cridii Lyonnoadeell 

Oidit Lyennoie lanlino 

Credit UvcHNials Iui92/N 

Credit NoUoodl a 

Credit NodionollD/M 

Credit Natteoaia 

OcdIMnrioliit 

CrednanNoBN 

Dol lOri Konevols 

DoisksOBeW 

DanNenkenaelO 

OcnNerskedcas 

Dennnrk ionH/lD 

DetMiarkecai/iD 

DaninarKH 

Oernnoritpei* 

DieEniOe5i92m 

a.93 

OresdaerBonkls 

DresoeerBonka 

OreianerBtakn 

Etdorode Nedeora 

EOF a 

EOF 95 

EOF a 

ENELM 

EAsn 

EAB9B 

EEC as/ID 

BdcrlerlniiN 

Ferreirtea 

Fbeitti PuoerlS 

First BmImIikIUW 

First Bank SystamsH 

RrstCMoosen 

nrstCMceeeie 

FlrflOtyTiMMls 

First loterstoMM 

FulltSfK 

GcftlM6M6aM2 

GenfUnncsIS/M 

Gzaa 

Gua 

eZBPsrp 

Gte«6 

cma 

CrbMlaysR 

CrMknrsW 

CrMWcsttmFlaH 

OrealWcflimis 

HlilSamusIM 

HinSdRWslPirBij/s 

Hboam AmenoM 95 

Hydro OuNkM 

Hydra Quetseg 

Ic IneustrlasV] 

Indentsinara 

tBJB 

iBJitna 


CoumNnI Bid Askd 
tab IM aj4 a.94 

m 17-4 noaipBjB 
9<u, S7 180.1711)037 
OV. 284 tSBSMa 
Oh IS9 lUiaiB 
Oh :t-5 10828ID03S 
rm M iDU7ioai7 
ISh 264 100.1310023 
911/474 69Aia.n 
9V 29-5 a.Ua3S 
I0»| 2M a2S 10D3S 
Vi 9-5 HASaJ? 
n* 114 98ja9S60 
«i. IM 91«9t5S 
9% SI'S uo-isniLse 
6 B-7 99^ I0(L2S 

«w 2M 10I1J7HOS2 
OVy 294 1003210042 
ID’S 384 looiTatoaa 
«* B-7 WAiajI 
wm 304 1006410034 
9-k 11-7 10a741II0S< 

II 264 8)851101173 
Sh 264 100.1510035 
Bk. 267 lOaiDina 
lyy M loouaina 
9% IM IIIUtiaOA 

nt 3S4 looosiau 
n, IM nu aA 
9V: 2H 1085810860 
9h 134 IOII3noa33 
ISh 304 9U0 10080 
r* 174 1005110861 
9ta IWIO 008410814 
9h 1S7 UOOOBId 

lOh 21-9 uomna 
9ta 2M 1088710817 
IW 29.7 1808318813 
IIFe 384 1082naU8 
fh 22-7 iai3I802 
IDh 134 8)83718847 
91: 65 i089410I« 
lIVi 2S0 nn bid 
8*1. 284 108R10023 
96V 134 1005510845 
9eb 54 a93 10082 
1080 9-5 1081310832 
»h 44 iai87in.lT 
9% 2^7 IOe8gifl8N 
ajo W.90 

lOOO 114 10874I0OM 
ns 44 1088510815 
9h 30-7 100J4MaN 
9% 174 1087310083 
lOh F5 1005B18840 
IDIk Af 1003710831 
nt 13-1 1DQ31100J1 
9ta 1S5 U037M847 
94k 384 IDaaiB8l9 
9% 31-5 1KL12ia37 
Ka 104 1081010030 
9'6 94 U8I3I08& 
9\. IM8 1083010030 
9Vy 134 10828HOJD 
Vj 154 aj6 a.96 
9Tb 74 I08S710067 
lltv 364 1003710837 
URb 85 1008010180 
Fh 384 aJOIDOta 
9V. 1B4 9897 a.l3 
Fh U-7 1081410834 
9V. 385 aJ5 10005 
nv 31-7 a» 10895 
9b M a.M 10884 
fta a-nm55iooAS 
9 284 MW 99.12 

9’:, 134 ie8inDa3S 
lOta 44 I0055KI070 
9 - 224 NNaOS 
961. 194 aJO 9980 
fh 384 9MS9945 
IV. IM 1013410131 
n, is-7 aji 10058 
itk 284 a5sa.ts 
31-5 nn 10807 
lOh 305 toaisnas 
lOh 114 loomoou 
9H M niAOTIIOSB 

III 9-10 10057)0077 
96b S4 1081410036 
9«h 284 a.73a83 
)0h IM lOUOIOOii 
IS 64 1003410064 
9<4 274 1008210813 
r6 9-10 loouuoa 

m 1-7 wjoan 
9Vb n-W 1004710057 
O’.. 334 Moutooa 

9!a 9-10 1006510835 
PH. 9-7 1085110061 
9K, 294 1008310093 
9h 774 lOOMUOa 
9 tS-7 1081310032 
91b 144 I0863M873 

9 U-? 1083410044 

lOta 114 10850)0038 
9.S 384 aj3 9U2 
9. 11-7 10829)0039 

^ 274 1003710037 
tOh 134 18813)0033 
9h 9$ 1003410055 

IV, 185 aNU05D 
194 ass 10050 

9h 9-7 108351080 
9ta I5-10 1H145I0055 
9b 194 lOiaMOAS 
lit 84 1081010(130 
81b 28) 29-7 a83 

1)13 194 lOOiOUOn 
9ta 385 a.951IIIUB 

10 374 1083710037 

99k 384 10015111830 
1800 374 1086710077 
9V, rS* 1081110031 
9h 185 a« aw 
logo 89 1000710817 
9Hh 174 9991 10033 
W 344 1081114039 
Pb 87 namau 
M. 214 a.9S lOUE 
lOlk 3M IN3aiO80 

nanji 
n S-S TMlWiS 
9h 185 9055 am 
P4 85 aj2 a.9! 

9«, 31-5 188ine035 
M r4 9450 9650 
tab 84 amajo 

V, 187 99M nsa 

9h m U0JT10847 
fh 287 mman 
9h lU 100390035 
916 )M lOOJtlMLta 
lOh 144 Nta 99ta 
9b. a-5 1006310033 
tab 974 U8fS»IBS 
Wh JM 1084510055 
Ita M 1085910019 
lOta 334 9150 9B» 
fib 64 n.i3ar525 
IBh 94 1003510060 
3 385 9450 946)0 

iih 364 a54 aji 

n. a-7 nauious 

IOOD7M8t7 
9lb 15-7 aJS 10025 
Rb 9-» MULBROOr; 

n 56 10800 BU 
10ta 285 108010050 


LmoAia 

Uoydera 

LiDVdsn 

LlovaslM 

LTCBluia 

LTCB8S 

LTCBIima 

LTCBta 

LTCBK 

Maiviisia96/a 

/VWOVSKI 15 

Uaiaviloapra/92 

Moloysladaca/92 

MoiaysioavfS 

IMBnHpnO0tOS94 

ManHan(Wklv>94 

MinrloeMliMnaM 

lUartM! OOklignda 

MorlneMldtand96 

MmonBkN 

Mdhmdii 

MMIanda 

DMheidn 

AUdiendl) 

Mldlanda 

Ml) ad nn 94 

MnreanCr6(rieiia 

MertaOM Den 90/93 

JMrtaoKDenn 

Not Bk Deiron 94 

N0 Com Sdi Arabia 94 

NallWestmlnn 

tMlWestmlnlo 

NoHweslmioH 

NaMWeffmln92 

Natl weslmineerp 

NesteOvW 

New Zealand 07 

NewZeotandSieein 

Nipoon Credit Bk 90 

Niano Credit Bk a 

Nlopen Credit Bk 14 

NordtelntFlnll 

OkBOo 

OI.B94 

OLBisne 

OttaiwreOiUidBaa 

DtfihoreMlnlnBl4 

Pirelli 91/M 

Pkeankena/91 

QiMnfiandf4 

Benia a 



Non Dollar 


issuor/Met. 

Coupon Next 

Am 97 

14Vi 144 ' 

BkMenirial94 

llta 276 

BkTokW 80/98 

31-S ! 

BqlnaQSIi«9l 

I6tb 2VS 

Oilcvp 19/91 

13% 154 < 

ConMliaawagoid 

lAb M ! 

CEPME 96 

131b 214 

Cridli Foneiar99 

lOh 94 ' 

Credll NaNenol 91/95 

\y* 184 

OeninarkfSra 

Uta 324 

1.1.1.96 

13ta 154 1 

KhMdam Bftaiuni 96 

13'., 187 

Uoydi96 

I4ta 364 ' 

MlnitaeiD 

IIS 7-S 

SNCF90ra 

US 344 ' 

YerksMre91/96 

13ta 274 ' 



Sowree : CnOlt Suisse-First Bestgn LU. 
LenOen 


CORUM 



The famous Corum Coin Watch. A precious ultra- 
thin quartz movement inserted between die two 
halves of a genuine ^0 gold coin. Water-resistant. 
In ladles' versons too. A subtle touch: each Corum (2oin 
Watch has a pure diamond set in the crown. 

"TjZ"! Conim wdiches ure an v-iew at the finnt jcwellL-rk. For the 
gS address of the one nearest you or for a hrochurc. write 
or phone to: France, 5.A. Michel Nurqum, IT7. Bd de 
VV CrnciL 94100 Saini-Maur, tel. 1/884 - Gcraun). 

— — — i Adstria, Holland, Helmut Tenet GmbH. HcinrKh-Hcine- 

Allee 4. 0-4000 DQsseldorf. tel. 031 1..i20.44ti - Gtcsi Britain, Saunderi 
A Shepherd Lld„ I, Bleeding Hean Yard. Grcville Street. London 
ECIN tcl. 01-405.2666 - Italy, Corum luilia di Amedw Meda- 
Folz, Via Tito Vignuli 44. 20146 Milun. tel. 243.77.V3 - Other eomiries, 
CORUM. 2300 La Chaux-de-FoDds. Switzerland, tel. 39.'2S.66.6b. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBtfNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 1985 



Th ursday^ 

AMEX 


Goshig 


Tables inetiide the nationwide prices 
up to tbe dosiop on Woll Street 
and do not reflect kite trades dsewhere. 
yUi The Associated Press 




2Vb 
27 27H 
«2 lask 
37 Tie 
M 42lh 
41 SV» 

173 lU 
348 iim 
436 2M 
3« MU 77 
716 7U 
3H 34* 
6U 6V* 
169 1IM ion 
65 in m 
15 n n 
3M 359* a*3fc 
491 isn 14V* 
86 7 M TV* 
TV* 74* 
7 
<1 

314* 3eH 
71* 63* 
64* 63* 
10 746 

646 6H 
ISt* 15U 
I4n 14n 
iK in 
34* 33* 
574* 57V6 
46 46 

IS 141* 
6M 64* 
217 151* 144* 
M 346 3J6 

36 3 24* 

371 54* 5V* 

37 3V6 
1246 

6V* 

4k 
14* 

54* 

6«k 
646 
»16 
81* 

114* 




64 134* 13V* 13V*— V6 

19 142 17 184* 184*— V* 




48* 

38* 

298i 

23V* 

31* 

146 

53* 

31* 

131* 

716 

171* 

71* 

986 

71* 

61* 

216 

36 

21 

71* 

44* 

916 

51* 

48* 

31* 

416 

21* 

63* 

4 

MU 

lOU 

9I« 

446 

41« 

186 

221* 

111* 

544 

21a 

50 

3SH 

SOU 

3616 

281* 

19 

53* 

316 

3844 

19 

44* 

41* 

2« 

191* 

174* 

14 

17V* 

141* 

3416 

174* 

21% 

46 

19M 

111* 

401* 

221* 

IfU 

111* 

43* 

21* 

19 

121* 

39M 

2146 

1st* 

1116 

3216 

2286 

341* 

2116 

4 

5 

a 

916 

31* 

34H 

1946 






— 


1 

74* 

78* 

-78* 

Ml* 

TV* LMFPh 

JO 

L9 


40 

151* 

151* 

158* + 86 







24* 

3H 








21* 

21* 

aih— 1* 

3981 

2316 Lorlinr 



10 

1710 

3536 

38 

3516—1 

161* 

84* Lumwt 

m 

J 

34 

n 

14» 

148* 


1311 

61* LunOvB 



19 

16 

1246 

13V9 


M 

103* Uiria 



9 

37- 

113* 

1186 

III* + 1* 

1486 

18 Uvdolt 



4 

8 

141* 

14 

14 -El* 

3916 


M 

IJ 

17 

197 

301* 

301* 


108* 

JO 

2.1 

9 

10 

93* 

94* 

94* 





a a-* 

l&i 


4 




S4* Ultinio 3 

Vk uideon* ' • •* 

11V* Unlapf X &6 
S46 Unlmrn 

141* UAirFd J4b U 10 
14* UFoodA .10 53 » 
nib UPoedB 22 

im UhST .657 47 15 
10V* USAGwr 
61* UnIMV .7M1U U 

161 * IMKIi n 40e 3.1 
94* UnttyB lOJHe 
74* unvOn ^ 

54* UnNRs _ » 

154* UnfvRu J0»4J 7 
98* UnvPot 


Sn 114* 
292 8* 

28 13V* 
141 lot* 
7 im 
64 13* 

14 186 
40 1346 

4 m 

7 546 

16 19t* 
f 108* 

5 134*- 
7 8 

1 153* 
21 1416 


"ft 

1736 174* + Jk 

68* 686— te 

jgisa^S 



as 

58* 

8V* 

OH + • 

0 3 

151* 

1516 

141* 

S 13 

61* 

4 

6 

6 94 

28* 

2V* 

31* 

2152 

1»* 

131* 

133* + 1 

17 

11* 

11* 

11* 

5 7 

21 

2T 

21 — 1 

111 

416 

4Vk 

4*6 

a 131 

736 

74* 

74*— 1 

a 

7 


12U 

8* 


13 

4k 

4* 

4k— 1 

9 5 

13» 

131* 

131* 4- 1 

11 

33* 

316 

316— 1 

9 7 

1816 

101* 

101* 

7 36 

214* 

2116 

214* 4 8 

23 

11* 

186 

11* 

1 as 

JIU 

31 

31 * 1 

6 41 

■3* 

51* 

84fe— 1 

7 47 

4t* 

OK 

81* 

1 18 

9V* 

9 

9 — > 

4 1 

5 

S 

5 


1746 

12 Joelyn 

JOblS 

9 

6 

14*6 

141* 

1416 

9 

5Vk Joeeba 



02 

511 

41* 

436 

SU 

31* 

M j«tAm 

4* JufAwl 


* 

85 

3 

^ *ft *ft9.ih 

81* 

51* JWrwi 

jM A1 

16 

28 

8 

71* 

t +1* 

41* 

21* JormPd 



18 

4 

31* 

4 

113* 

716 JehnAm 

JO 3.1 

14 

431 

946 

916 

93*43* < 

118* 

31* JetniM 


4 

196 

81* 

731 

1 9- 1* i 

7U 

4 JmaJkn 


5 

29 

4V* 

486 

41* + 1h 


3416 

1616 OEA 


13 

187 

22 

22 

22 

22*k 

14Vl Ortewd 

iOb 

A 13 

71 

201* 

193* 

2DI*-*** 

12 

4 OdtiAn 


41 

34 

08* 

016 

816 16 

16V* 

48* OdMB* 


56 

18 

118* 

10V* 

111* + 4* 

lOH 

93* OhAri 

J< 

U 34 

1 

141* 

14V* 

141*— 1* 

2D3k 

153* Ollolnd 

50 

10 15 

3 

198* 

194* 

194* 

191* 

10 0MUR8 

J* 

1J IT 

284 

198* 

1046 

19 -* H 

71* 

31* OOU* 



28 

It* 

4V* 

51*— M 

8 

516 OrtetHA 

.18 

12 16 

12 

7 

63* 

63* 

73* 

58* OrlDiHB 

JD 

35 14 

10 

586 

546 

58* 

38* 

1 OfTiwnd 



10 

136 

186 

1*6 

1086 

41* OOrdF 

J2I 4J 9 

9 

9 

046 

9 -f V* 

11 

7H OvrKH 

JO 

12 a 

141 

9Vh 

9 

9Vh -t-Vk 




358* 

aOVb KnGfpf 

450 134 


1281 331* 

331* 

33V* + V6 


IV* Iteokc 



7 

229 

23* 

23* 

236 + Vb 

15V* 

10 KoyCp 

Jd 

14 

22 

3 

I486 

144* 

1416 + 1* 

148* 

946 KoorNn 

48 

11 

13 

14 

131* 

12V 

1246- 16 

am* 

14*1 Kmwin 

500 43 

9 

1 

153* 

104* 

188*— t* 

91* 

536 KuyCo 

JO 

13 


7 

7V6 

786 

716+1* 

17Vh 

0 KBVPh 

JO 

11 

16 

SB 

93* 

946 

986 

158* 

5 K5yCe 



9 

M 

516 

43* 

516 + tb , 

2V* 

IV6 ICiyCawf 




9 

136 

14* 

18*— Ik 

91* 

71* KovCeun 




S 

OVh 

OV* 

83* + t* 1 

41* 

216 KMdawr 




14 

3h 

33* 

33k + tk 

41* 

av* KlMfn 



33 

2 

4 

4 

4 

5H 

38* KMerk 



21 

31 

53* 

44* 

51* 

41* 

a Klrbv 




84 

3ta 

31* 

3H 

586 

3V* KKAMb 



13 

S 

5 

4U 

S 

38* 

21* KlMTVa 

jar 

J 


IS 

21* 

2tt 

21* + 1h 

153* 

916 Kmn 



18 

■34 

ISIh 

14th 

1516— 1* 

151* 

ft* Knoll 



14 

348 

1286 

1»* 

12H— 3* 

27V* 

21 KoMrC 122 

S3 IS 

31 

358* 

atu 

243* + !* 


21* 

n* LSB 



4 

IV* 

11* 

11* 

3>h 

2V* LoBoru 



7 

24* 

21* 

31*— th 

74* 

336 LaPnl 


4 

1 

416 

486 

486 

381* 

22Vh LoMSo 

.150 


01 

3716 

364* 

aS + Vk 

148* 

ill* LndBnn 

36 

as 9 

111 

141* 

14 

151* * 1* 

171* 

11 LdrokO 

J3 

10 11 

T 

148* 

144* 

1«H— 16 : 

14U 

91* Loitr 


40 

9 

12 

13 

12 1 

U 

086 Lournn 


14 

1 

m 

itn* 

101*— 1* ! 

2736 

25 LBorWP 



7 

24 

at 

24 + I* 1 

93* 

21* LmPH 


14 

32 

4V6 

6V* 

4V*— 1* 

a 

129* LWllohl 


12 

33 

3516 

a 

aM* + th 


Over-the-Couiiter 

April 11 

NASDAQ National AAorket Prlcos 






191 
U 316 
27 116 
5 63* 
7 516 

3 33* 

3 1166 
23 94* 

12 016 
7 1716 

oS ^"ft 

U 1386 
131* 
101 * 
lot* 

64* 

31* 

34* 
154* 
1546 
15Vk 


14* 

134* 

SV* 316 
m IV6 
58* 53* 
486 446 
33* 33* 
11V* 1116 
916 94* 
OM OW 
1716- 1716 
1246 121* 
86 46 

1336 1346 
128* 131* 
10V* lOV* 
1336 1346 
5V* 5A 
3t* 31* 
33* 31* 
151* 
15 > 
144* 144* 

'ft 'ft 
1116 
91* 

98* 


103* 

94* VSTn 

JOoll 


120 

936 

93* 

94*— 1* 



J4 

13 

14 

IS 

351* 

29- 

SS 


446 VorMm 




2S 

TV* 

731 

736— M 



JObll 

9 

2 

m* 

193* 

191*. " 






5 


36 


im 

946 vomit 

20 

10 

10 

V 

1016 

Wk 

15)6 

01* 

33* VOrtpl* 

.10 

11 


5 

Jib 

48* 







2 


9 

9 • 

916 

SV* Vteon 



13 

39 

73* 

736 

731 + 16 

5Vi 

28* vmto* 




0 

386 

3V6 


133* 

114* VmOB 

JMr 

J 

9 


M4h 

143* 

Ml* 

>31* 

59*6 Valntl 




9 

32 

51V* 

« • ' 

036 

41* VIOIMIC 

M 

.15 

13 

53 

136 

53* 


1236 

0 lAolox 

J4 

3.3 

13 

4 

1036 

MV* 

1036 + 1* 

193* 

131* VoteCto 

JO 

54 

11 


liU 

Ml* 

1016 ?- 









!£. 


046 
2786 
1586 
313* 

246 
91* 

115 
26 
01* 

254* 

446 
5H 
173* 

61* 

133* 

U 686 
103* 43* 
436 216 
29<6 153* 
44* 86 

1016 786 
13V* 016 
14 5th 
103* 716 
191* 143* 

ai 

29 


”1 "i 

9* »* »* 
131* 


11V* 

61* T Bor 


63 

21 

41 

04* OH ' OHr 

V (6 

12 

TV* TEC . . 

3 

25 

S3 

QH MH 13H A 

k 8*^ 

3M 

51* TIE 



14 

-902 

5H -5H. -648’ - 



54* Til . 



c 

m 

946 9 9H . 


1186 

13 TobPrO 

JD 

1.1 

u 

5 

18 10 10 




lono HI0HS M 


BohiiPliuiiii 

Spoctros 

CM REIT 
CBndadSv 
avunir* 
Mmlua 
' SMUflnOw - 
■MSMWM 

CwncD 

CfwwtorMII 

HolalPrapwt 

Otatano 

yzEompiA 

Tccine- 

CbPOtBo ' 
DIaia ii 

LahWiPro 
PVSPLpID ' 
SCEifapr *ij: 
wiwrfiMEnHSi 

. • V • I 

"•'Mmf-cows' '-s 


AtamcB 

SUSIDdlaO 


j 


Sales Is Mat 

188* Hie* Lew OPJVLOreo 


Solwbi t6el 

108* Hloe Lew 3PJW.cir9e 


‘iin 


'ill. 



Back of the famous Corum coin watch. On a genuine 
$20 gold coin the effigy is upade down when compoo^ 
to the other ^de. It is naturaiiy the same with Corum's 
coin uQtch, made of an ultra-thin movement ins^^ 
between the two halves of this genuine gold coin. You’ll 
see when you turn the page 


CORUM 





TU 
22 
71* 
1716 
V4b 
31* 
1786 
111 * 

a a 
108* 118* 
1 W6 1816 
ai* 221* 
33 374* 

13 121* 

45 45 

21 20 
38 304* 

Sa* 361* 
18* 186 
131* M 
1146 111* 
51* 586 
34* 31* 

in* 118* 
51* 51* 
51* 516 
51* 51* 
1346 1246 
M3k 151* 
181* 101* 
Ml* Mia 
S 
1716 
1746 
546 


e; 


FmfcRo 



100201 * 

OT* 

301* +1 

h 

Fromnr 

50 

u 

517271* 

V 

27 

1 

PiKirtF 



108 m 

T16 

Mt— H 

li 

PhIHBs 

JO 

10 

232 1SH 

15 

» — W 

11 

12 


E ^ 

I 


71* 
3n6 3386 
3616 261* 
98* 98* 
86 86 
586 54* 

186 186 
446 486 
144* W* 

2n* 
151* 
2316 
1886 

1%* 
& 


716 

sm* 

71 * 71 * 

a a 

31 * 33 * 
138 * ~ 
1516 
01* 

2216 
178 * 





MoekTr 

i!«*Gg 238 fA 


3 1 


Is j.« i® 

-111. 2a 































































































-aiT, 

a.B!3 

SB 

r 

■ '39 
. -m 43 


as % £s' 

ife 

s,S§i 





immriXTimkh herj^ tribune, FRTOAY, APRIL 12 , IQBS 


^r«<i^e-Couiiter 

HA50A0 Ncrttonail Molut pncK 


Apxil 11 




^ B 1-- • • wiT 

" Si »1‘' jr ■- i' ^ x^M.aPm 

^ ^ tiwn Page M) 


«i£ % 


■f 4as U.4 

isS wl 

4 73t IIJ 


S SS*'i 

TB 





MM HIM L*W SPJ^CVM 


RfMCPS i3 
PrwfH 
nv^ IM 
PiwWK 


PMNC 


MtfniS- 


I < 



•iicParl. 


iiv> tiH + u 
JB- U B32W 33V> 3St» 

. . nft wb *n 

3M 1 * mnv SMb SM 4MS 
Jb M MM IM TM 

a< n»' 71k 7«t 4 lb 
A l7l3Vk n 1ft •‘Ik 
iu» 11% n 
u riTiM mb iTib 

- walk a 4Sib4iw 
TSM M 4K ftk <4 te 
*914% IM, U — 

•W A I mk ftTVk 3»k 41 

ft9a4M«. ftn% aMk 41ta 
■ IMD T3% n 4 4b 
^ 42 Stt ^ 5 

,tflD A «717bi I«U Ifth 4 Vk 
1 W 3411 34b— lb . 

31M IBVl 10lk4M SmSm 
U M3SW SM 3M 4 4b gulMite 
awfm 


.u 4 


tM 

i.n 


u 


iPlirttn M U 


MA 4t% 41 4 

JB SIk 5H 51k 
ftnutb lllb 13% 
KVMk Mk 24% — 
S814M IZIh 14\k 
n/M f3 *3 — 1 
451BK «3li 1«lb4 4b 
SB* lK m 14b 
1521% 2l4k 21% 

3130 aru, 30 

44B Mb 4% Wfc 

ftoaowi a a — % 



JB aa 


-M4II% 11% fibb 
»13*b U ia — 1b 
am* f%— % 
)1> m 94* 74b 
1114% J4% 14V> 4 % 
MS 44h S 4 lb. 

na«b a* m 


35413 Iftib mb 4 U 
as SIk 5% 
3114b 11% 1141— 1b 
17 M M 9% 4 % 
autb U 141b 4 % 

saznb a4b 21 %—% 
11 3H 3«b 3H— « 

14 Bbk Sit Bbb 4 % 

mo m m— % 

340113% n 11% -+ % 


IS 


4Mmft 141 34 
SrSCa 

MifSPa UO 4.1 
MetNy ijsnis 




IRamm 


Raven 

RMOnB 


400 43 


RKvei 

^Smi 

Wallab 


MCCO 
WMTMk 
«AKrtV 

MDerrc 
MKnp 
(Merara 
MioSn 
MBPCA 
MdSIPB 
MWBkl IJft 
MO*Mf 
MUTtA 
AMHHr M 
MHar 


Rniour 

nwiPe 


M 1.1 


At 1 .* 


RMhinc 

Mrsy 


..5 1 S? 


yaua iM 


JOa 2 
.12 u 

Jifti 


If'Ci 
itii; 


M Z2 I 


JO 


1J2 


13 

U 15 
1J 23 
» 


’*! 'h 

Jt ft* 

4 lib lu 

SO 1S%1L«. 

« ^ If- 

ISi **» 2 i2 «[*• 



t.» 43 
uasp 
ji 

.Ua 141 


gOblnw J4bU 
itotab a 14 
MMllH- 130 73 
MuHUlO .44 2.1 


RAX 

maib im im 4 % ;ru<£ 
ma 34% 3M t % RPMi 
14731% 2f% a 4 % Inotfivi 

asm 4m a 4 % iMinT 

47 7 7 4 lb RaMI 

a34% a» 3Mb IroEs 

17b% 74% 1Mb— 4b - 
IM If 10 *V» 

414*% 40% 4*% 4 Vb 
307%% a% 44% 4 % 

»31% 30% 31% -H 
MISVk 15% 1S%— % 

713% » M 
30014 U 14 •*% 

a 3% 3% 9% 

217% MH mb— la 

4413% 13% 13% 

451 14% 13% 14Vb + % 

11 IMh 1f% im + % 

39n35% 34% ftl% 

47 4 31h 3% 

31 ■% ■% B% ■V % 

a 5% 5% 5% 

17a 13% 11% 11% 4% 

M Mb 4% 4H— % 

348 1% 3% 9%— % 

10 9% 5% S%— % 

Mi 4% 4 4% 

4131% 3i% »%— % 

3* 11453*% 3*% 3>tb •* % 

11 a 4% i% 4% 4- % 

n % % %— h 

17 23*35% 34% 34% , 

1.1 2a40to 3*% 40% 4 lb 
311* S% 3% Mb ^ % 

340 7% 7 7 — % 

20S9Mb an 34%— lb 

3113% tm n% 

1 * 0% ■% f% 4 1b 
ia Ob ■% Mb 
SI 5% S% 5tb 
14547% 44% 47 — 1b 
a 0% 7% 7% 

U3S 32% 32Vb— K 
sn43% OVh 43% •* % 

144 3% 3% 3% 

1311% 17% 13% * % 

' 140 » *% •« 

I3ai3?b 13% 13%— % 
aai 30% »%— % 

17134% 31% 3«M— % 

417% 17% 17% 

113% 13% U%— U 
1111 1B% 11 +% 

48111% mb mb— ta 
111* 4% 5% * •«■ % 

ai3% U% 13%— w 

4515% 14% 14% 4 % 

131% »% a% 

nsftib a a — % 

M la 17*354% 54% 84% + % 

IJM 37 145 45 45 41 

1S8B% B% 33% 


70 

at 


R*autu At 3J 


RawirH 
RawA 
Raxon 
RtrRav la 
RMa44 at 
RWlm 
RIOiet 

R%a4N 350 
nizvB 
Rlwai 
RaoifS* IM 
RobHivr 


MM *% f%— % 

A 7 •% * * 

37 aHb, 18% 11 4 U, 

33 SI7H% M% 14%— % 
4B»% 13% Oil 
4713% 11% 13% 4 % 
84 4% 4% 4%— % 
lo M4ia% 35% 34% 4 % 
ia 4% 4% 4%— % 
28 aM% a% 34% 4 % 
U M17% 17 17 — % 

SMla 1S% 18% 

» 8% 8% 5% 4 % 
733% 31% 31%— % 

ia 1 8% 8%— % 

»14% 13% 1314 — % 
Sa 4% 4% 4% 4 % 
32412% 13 n% 

17 4 8% 4 4 % 

17% 7% 7%4 % 

a 8% 5 S%4% 

15717% 17% inb.4 M 
At 43 a 8% f% 8% 

_ 33*14% 14% 14% + % 

J3e iA ai9% 11% 13% 4 % 
4314% 13% n% 4-1% 
.la 17 4012% 11% 1Sb-+ % 

7% J 3539 3f% a 4 % 

L44 121 4412 n% in* * % 

9 4% 4% 4% 4 % 

a37 34% a%— % 


t 

70 23 

71 7 


RebMis 

ROBVM 

Rockor 

RebMH 

RMUnd 

Rkaams 


naaottfi 

Raim 

RMMPr 

RavPim 

R0VtR8 

RavUUr 

RwMnd 

RutfPM 

RvoftPa 


24 

21 

41410% 

sa a 27 

47 1941% 43% 44%'43% 
41 3 3% 3 4 M 

70 37 14411% 15 18% + % 

~ 3J 3M3f% 34% 34%— 3% 
4013% mb 18% + % 
t 21 7% 7% 7% 4 % 

At J 73 13% U . IS% 4 % 

am* mb m«4% 

10 * 1 *% mb m* 

■atm 11 Mil 10% 11 4 % 

144 1% 8 t 
70 SJ 1311% 11% TWh 

.ao 17 39 9 9 

JOa t.l 935% 9 . 9 

70 2* M*3I% 30% 30% 

IJI 27 4*40% 40 40 4 % 

.19 la 1SW *% 10 4 % 

a OH 0% *%4% 
44 * 5% S%— % 

19 *% *% *% 

9 4% 4% 4% 4 % 

914% 15% U 4 % 
914% 15% M%— % 


2340107 
t 470 IIJ 
!* 72 37 7 

Of 170 1U 

I 72 

8 TSo 23 


31 21 NWCil 

‘-ioaeas 
vORiFb 


10z« 


a 

m • 


ISi' 


ia 71 

13 Mi 


HdvBn 

€»V 


EmNJ 

Ntarri 

NDofe 


1 *1 

17 13 20 


Ht thi, 
SW Sk 


jac 
iLumo 
MMim 
Rlipxn 
MPraa 
Tadt' 


70 37 

JM 40 
74- 44 
7M17 
1 

29 47 
70 27 
29 47 
78 17 
74 41 

77a 17 


.10 17 


I’* *'k a.i 


hs-Lows 


April II 


K6W KIOHS 3t 


IRKIT CamcB Otfak 
mfadS* CroMtf Ml DUa 
Xtllrt HoMPrsbwt LMtfii 
■ariiM OutMii PgSPlA 
MftiCaa SCEorgaU SCEOM i 
> Sim TEC IK Whnil^ 

Mew LOWS I 

■I DotoCp WorttanBb 


KlrSunt 

HpHia 

NMtM 

NMkSoe 


NBninS 

NEBu* 73 -U 
NHinpB 70 23 
NJMalE V.19 47 
NYAIrl 
NVA«M.- 
' " 1.W 47 


Nwary- 

NiaMU 

«• 

‘Cat a 
'bickOO 
NIMB 
HataM 


74 7 


74b 


.14 1.1 


KD 
ion 
>Ow 
aoan 
CO 
aoFn 

Sv 

rTai 
nW 
Pvnh 
rtPir 
rloc 
arm 
nnvn 
m«c 
nntt 
cWbA 

Mac 

atn 

JRM 
HW 
Kina 
L3* 

MbK 
S 

Carp 
TMal 
irm 
■er* 
mtSL 
MOO 
iSoU 

RlAt 

Ipl 
R>rs 
Apor 

»*-*• .a 

ttsn •40 

mWir 

170 41 

ISRUi 

IMOrt 

nea 

»• = 

«ne 

nlcW 
Ml A 
sanon 


r % 4b 4 nfi 
43D tH % n-l 
miobi iih n 

43 Pi M M 

ism. R s 

m M. M M-I 
4MiaW IT. EfI 
lOM •% ita M-I 
P Pi Pi »- 
St IM t2b Qg-I 
IkblPlk fb W 
7:i4Vs Uli IM- 
IS Th 7<* R-i 

3mi0 St M'S 
1U TV. lb" 
ISini W. IM- 
4110 % R 

1110 % «-■ 

44 4 » A 

4KM l» U fl 

nii» IMH" 

45 r* iw JSv 

b522b, M' 

IP ITU i» ia*; 
•n ?R Tb A-i 
n I'k ij w 

TTIIft 11 '■ V 

isun Mj >*;; 

»2»»iS £ it- 

|443Pb g" Sr 


Nil . 

asss^ 

Norwe 

Nertloft 

NoANot 

NAttIn 

NCW^ 

MaPrM 


70 47 

Mr 35 

74* 


7M 3 
ate 17 


370 &* 


OBlIVL. .. 

MK9V 

NBAlr 

MMivWi 

nwNG 

RTalao 

NkMFns 

NwHLi 

MwIPS 

NorwsB 

MOVRrtx 

Hovar 

NawCp 

rtonH 

NOCMtt 

NudPA 

NudSpt 

Niitarax 

Numarle 

NiitriF 

NvMad 


J9 a 

5lr J 


174 77 
1704 37 


174 57 


174 21 
.141 20 
71 25 


210 

.14 


9 24 


14% 5% 4% + % 
m 4% 5% 44t + « 
10315 14% IS 

*113% 13% 13% 
tf3« 9% 24 
401*% If tr ■ 

. 11 5% 5% S% 
551SH 15% 15% + % 
51148% 48% 48% + % 
39 9 9 + % 

4Sa 9 9+3 

'17315% 15% 15% 
4910% 10% mb— % 
13 4 8% ' S% 

39% 9% 34% 

9 5% 5% 5% 

410 Mb 4 4% 

21 1% 1% 1 + % 

413 13 U 

1 3% 3% 3%— % 
3 4% 4 4 — % 

41 5% 5 5 — % 

74 5% 5% 5% 

IM 7% m 7% + % 
344 S% 7% 7%— % 
71 1% 8% 8% *• % 
15M3SW 24% 25% + % 
3 S S S — % 
5437% a a —I 
9 8% ■% Mb 
932% 33% 33% 
4*35% 35% 35% + % 
.925% 3(% 35% + % 

sns « 

4110% 11% 11% 
910% 10% M%— Ob 

-ft 

49 1 8K 1 y % 
451 WbrOi Wrj p R — 8b 

-^^.+ 9. 

ma 

1941% 48% 9%— % 
0 7 8% Mb 

IS Mb 1% 1% + 1b 
ns Mb 5% 4% 

135% 3S% 3S%— % 
9n% 30% 31% 

' 14 4 3% 4 — % 

19 9 9 +% 

19 f% S 1% + lb 
1 Mb 4% Mb 
1115% M% 1S%— 1 
4418 17% I7%— Vb 

9 Mb 5% 5% 
927% a 37%-+% 
41334% 33% M + % 
99 33% 33% + % 

77 4% 4% 4%— % 
0 S% 5% SIb + lb 
1317% 14% 1Mb— % 
19 3 0 3% 

4744 45% 45%—% 

4nim 13 13%.+ '% 

0 5% 5% 5% 

18 14% 14% 14% + % 
ia 7% 7% 7% + % 
1031% 31% 34% + % 
83 7% Mb 7%— % 
7514% 74 74% 


SA8HBS 

SAVtnS 

SCISv 

SEI 

SFE 

SPSraa 

SRI 

SaeleM 

SaiKrd 


SUuda 

srpaet 


29 45 


SonSar 5Sr j 


.12 1 * 
179 4J 
54 20 


SaMcs 

SoWSv 

SBMIF 

SVSkPS 


ScanTT 


BealmA 

SdnM 

SdOvB 

SdCav 

Scilws 

sciMie 

SMSVSV 

SdlBK 

Saoeal 


.13 X* 43 SM 8% 0— Vb 
2114 13% 13%—% 

44113H 13% 13% + % 
918% 18% 1l%— % 
JOr 15 13*1 1% Mb 9%— % 
I 914% 13% 14% + % 

70 U 1*377% 17% 17% + % 
.39 J MSI% 33% 33% + lb 
1031% 31% 31% + % 
171 <1 314535% 34% 34% 

015% 13% 13% + % 
09% 9% 9 + % 

78 3% m 3% 

18% 1% -8% +% 
13 7% 7% 7%— % 
27 1 % %— U 

4 7% 7 7% + % 

337% 37% 37%—% 
930% 9 38% + % 

a fib 8% 1%— % 
ail mb 11 + % 

910% 10% mb+ % 

1917% 17% 17%— % 
9 8% 7% t — % 


35 

35 


47 


27 .-Sim ‘3 


Seallne 

SoawPO 70 4.1 
SCNTSW 1.M 75 
StcNII 470 3J 
SacAFa. .Mb j 

tn s* 

SacTaa 

seso 

SaM 50 2* 

SMiCt 

samiea 

-- 55 7 

SrvowX 

SvcbSar 9 4 
5bm0 US 21 
SvePrcJ 

34 1.1 

SWMatf 70 17 

V.jf. Jt- 

* .Ml 15 

W."* 

SS&r 

Mmatn <9 57 


.18 0 

0 

8% 

48 4 

4 


5 0 

0 

0- U 

9 0 

4% 

04% 

m 4% 

4% 

4% 

22118 

10 

U 

Ml 0 

0 

0— % 

1884 7 

0 

tOk— % 

* 0 

Stk 

0— % 


I.* 


49 11 
1= 7 


1.4 


Jba 
AWSV 
‘ran 
rptir 

yuan *4 

irmr 3j 

at*r -SW " 

ikdon 

rtVJ!'- 17 

t: 

19 


I4B4*’* SZ ia. 

I320R ?■. 

*ini X jL, 
5180 IgK. 
Jpl« S w- 
3371* ij; 

13 P* ^ bb*' 

• tjOli !P> ^1 

JrAi ’’T 


37411^ IS 

f„Ok. 

3T S^ Tk p 

io« i!f .k; s*" 

, 0*' 


19 

29 


sr®- 


. OTc 
cMHin 
OMRK 
Ocaanar 

Ocinoa 
OfMLoQ 
OMIMl 

otiioCa 

(NiDiii 
OWPih 
OMKntS 19 27 
OMNSs 29 45 
OI8RB0 9 23 
OUStn* 29 7.1 
mdSafB 29 115 
QjdSafC 29 123 
oSmF 7Sa21 
OiwBca atm 14 
OnLlna 
Onyx 
OptIcC 
OpIlcR 
OMrte* 

Oiaone 

Oran 

OraoNtt 25DB 
OrtoC* 

OrtanR 

Olh-TP 29 15 
OyrCw 

OwanM 70 24 
Omco 


19 1% 1% 1%— % 

TM 3% 3% 3% + H 
lU 0 2%. 0 
44 3 0 3 

78410 14% !«% + % 

0 0 M 0 + % 

7140 40% 40 
951% 51 51% + Vb 

320 30 30' 

13 5 4% 5 + % 

33337 9 30 + % 

3158% 40 50% +3% 

2930 30 30— % 

331% 30 20 
. 1320 9% 30 
1331% 30 31% 

111% 11% 11%— % 

51415% 10 10 . + % 

109 0 4% 0— % 

79 3 0 ft* + % 

1014% 14% 1M-V%-tSlrVl9r 
11741 9% 9% + % ] SmortH 

*10 12 10 
910 10 10 
29 4% M 0— % 

3*10% 18 10 + % 

37 sn Sti 0 + % 

1310 10 10 + % 



4M% M% U% 4-1 
479 9 10 

19% 38% ' 30 + % 
11 10 17 10 +1 

930% 1«% 9 - — % 
41 0 3 0 

412 0 0 0 + % 
933% 31% 20 + % 
I 0 0 0— % 

-ill k 1^*“ 

M413H 13 10— % 

038% 34% 34% + % 

9 0 4 4 

4804% j|8{lh*0 + % 

4;^* a 
SiSh m iSb + % 

09 1*% 10 + % 

^i»iSia8-% 

8 10 15% 10 
10 10 10— % 

4 isair+% 

iS'l 

L4 

5 09 10 » + % 

1310 n 10 + % 
23020 20 30 + % 
383 J% 0 0— % 
754M :SS 30 +1% 
320 20 20—% 
ns 0 Mb 0 + % 

041% 40% 40 +1 
IW 0 1% 1% 

9 0 0 0 — lb 


ISSS 

Smk* 

StarSri 

swew at 
amort 19 
SMMIe 
MRao 1.9 
Standua 
aianur 

Staiwei 19 40 
Slosxe 19. 21 

90t*6 .19 28 

SttkrSlv 

SlbriRf 72 21 

SiBwSn .U 4* 

SHM 

StodcSy 

sirafM 

StrwCi 1.9 - 2) 



8814 

15% 

10 — 

% 


4410 

U% 

10 4% 

5 

4* 0 

0 

0 — 

% 


13 0 

3 

0 — 

% 


ISU 

10 

10 



9911% 

0 

10— 

% 

35 

134 4 

0 

0 — 

% 

24 

7430 

11% 

20 



mi0 

10 

10 4% 

87 

8350 51% 

5I% — 



8138% 30 30 + H 
MU% 11% 10— 


303)7 14% 17 

IM 0 0 


% 

+ % 


8>f. 


dhrSA 

iDVSB 

MW 


la 

.14 

5C 

9 

'■2 


<nU 
rva» 
m(iS4 

•*1^9 td 
moot M 
mbrb 
**e®“ a& 
KWrs M 
■Ok -S 

•dart ■® 
iieki '* 

jslO 
aBrnb. 

IN 

s-B*;’ 

icWS* 

ivm 
jidijv 
imR* 

iriaT 

mess' 

jCnli. 

i8BF 

siwCo 

ma'r 

jnen 

pFgL* 

wDto 
jWwr 

BKlfon 
lkid» 
»UBC 
loan 
linV* 
leCom 
likAS 
:nrTu- 

«eT«* 
ifiAfP 
rfw* 

nor 

iBittP 
ftOiP 
,pno* 


4S*iS 

^ ' 

.44 ^ jjJ * £ SS- 

531’' 

74 17 22 4^ 

S 2 H 

. TOs’S^Ib 
7}i.L. If* 


f S'- 

^■5' 

% 

A* 


PLM 

FPC 

^PB 

Paccar 

PacF s t 

PeCoR 

PocTbI 

PDcoPn 

PoniGh 

PancMx 

Ponspn 

0rPhs 

Porlian 

ParkOn 


J tm ^ ]ja £ ParkOr 

• 0 S4T g* nb <P, PorkOh 

7 iPt'S » PotntM 

' ” « I Poflax 


ITOa 17 


190 57 
9 *5 


.13 17 


*8 37 


n*S- 


®SJiSI . 
’iSi*a IP 

" it fi- 

44 JWl 


19 

23B 


37 

47 


24 


J* 

; S I!!. 


.« fS 

-to 3.> 

tTi-* 
9 ’■* 


JSS 


ii5 

TOSL >5, 
|0»s^ rf*® ' 
3*’S5 m 


S!2 


M as 
1H £<■ 


. 1 * 


31 * 2 e 5*: Perrmn 
PMna 

■.1 x^s-'F’M' Pnni** 

!J0 H SlSlSSiX**' Phrmm 
JT t 1^ b tfi' psra 
> ■* stiS'^ier 2J"®i 

w'vumE. PhrncAm 

JO . lOTOl^d S* PhotoCi 

^ iJ ilk S Plesov 

- *i:S« S £ PleCoM 

?>*£ SS»c 

^ •’•JUS?: 

•1 »>E 
■* I IT !!*■ Sb 

<8 *•£ t/t 0 

3 ^- 



.12 17 10 4% 4% M 

29 45 91153 51% a + % . 

3 f 1 f — % I 

4440 9 9 — % 

37310 10% 10 
920 34% 30— % i 
1110 10 10 + % 
ai0 10 10 + % 
143 0 0 0— % I 
113 0 7 7 

38110% n% 10 + % 
SSS9% 10 9% 

1 11% 11% 11% 

330 30 30 
215% 10 10 
19 0 0 0 

4 0 4H 0 

a 0 0 0— % 
99 a 30—% 

219% a 30 +1% 
215 10 10 10 + % 
1310 «% 10 + % 

79% 10 10— % 
920 30 20 
12)1% 11% 11% — '% 
410 10 9% -f) 
1810 10 12% ' 
930 9 Sl%— Vb 
573 0 0 0+ % 
240 40 44%— lb 
|4f% 9 4*% + W 

1059 30 30 

15534% 3» 30 
3113 im IS 

SS'g ^ 

sSiSi iSS iS+i'^' 

45 0 1% 0—1 
9 0 0 0 
3«30 30 30 
177% VA 0— Vb 
18112% tttt 13% 

19 0 0 0— % 
5* 0 4*k 0— % 

ton 0 f 0 + % 
9r 2f 90*10 9% 1Mb + % 
9 0 0.0 
221 7 0 0 + % 

374S20 30 9Vb + lb 
9 37 8431% 21 3) 

9 27 434% 20 a%-f-« 

JO 15 110 10 10 .. 

37 ZJS 12931% 9% »%— % 

^15 1' 0 m '0% 

74 21 59 

aww 
137335% 

7Sr24 

933% 

1 0 
189 
.13 7" 459 


Suborv 

SabAld 

SuOrB 

SiMbrv 

SaRSB' 

Sufima 

SuntfBi 

SumBA 

SumtHI 

SwnCP 

SuBOir 

SanMad 

SunSt. 

Suawit 

SupR% 

SuaSkv 

SuporBi 


55 


55 

173 


.19 a 

74 47 
29 47 
.18 15 


.9 


SuorEa 

SurvTe 

SVICM 

Svmbln 

SyaWT 


in 4% 4 4 — % 

9113% 10 10—% 

09 20 a + % 

950% 48% Sm— % 
33* 0 M 5% + % 
307 0 0 0 
214% 10 10 +% 
7130 9 9%— % 

5 0 0 0— % 
9 7 0 7+% 

14 0 0 0— % 

7910 9 9% + % 

asm 53% 53%— I 
1930 30 30-+1 
13 0 0 0— % 
840140140—1 
13 0 0 0— % 

909 43 9 —I 

9 0 * 1 — % 

3W10 10 10 + % 
19 3% 0 0 
330 30 30 
140 40 40 

3 4 4 4 + % 

8 0 0 0 
0 0 0 1 
19 V 31 
1110 17 17 

S 0 0. 0 
409% 10 10 + % 
19 0 - 0 0 + % 

15 0% 0% 0— % 

911% 10 10— % 

MS7 4b % %— % 

475 0 0 0 + % 

910 10 10 + % 


+1 


Potlax 
Petrfcl 
Pdlrlet 
Patnef 
PouiHr 
PoiiPt 
PaxiM 
PavN 
Paydui 
Payees 
PookVK 
PieiiH 

PtOGW 5M 7 

pemvo uoo 35 

PbfttCP 29 41 

Panoen 39 74 

Ptniars 58 35 

POwa i X 

PaopEx 

PbepRt 

Psreaot 

?•!»* 

^ *PsCPf 
^ vMInd 
•WIta 


Gold Options ISrienbiS/ac.). 


frea 

10 

4p» 

' r<bi 

770 

18(038(0 



w 

13(009 

SttSUO 


3« 

810*59 

175M12S 

289379 

3W 

iSO 7a 

1391808 

■nqinw 

ya 

30» 458 

189119 

I47SIBS) 

so 

20)35} 

79. 9Z 

UflBIUD 

so 

— .... 

878 79 

1150.1280 


Cduspio-mo 

YUnRUtelVUiSuA. 

L Qari fa Ma94%ae 

mi Ccami 1, Swtiwil9< 

TA siezsi • Tdn 2S3B5 


1.13 35 


STOCK 

DeVot-Holbein 
Intenotioiial bv 
ChyQock 
iMenttUonal mr 


BID 

uss 

5H 

2 H 


ASK 

USS 

6 %' 


SA4 


Quotes » 0 & April II. 196S 



PlonG* 

PlenHI 

PfenSI« 

PiCKHn 

ftPolk 

PicvMa 

PbocsP 

Ponx 

Poivaii 

Powrlc 

P^cCst 

y^RLa 

'■M.WLf 3 
py0CR 
PTfimv 


aSlf SES.. 

iMk 

BSSS .» 

RSIS' 


50 37 


37 


50 U 


31 31 —1 , 

0 10 + Vb 

a 9 +1 , 

0 0 +91 
32% 2ZVb 
0 3Vb + % 

10 9 +XV* 
30 a + % 
337 * 0 0— Vb 

420 34% 30— % 
ai0 15% 10— % 
443 0 3% 0 

4011 0 4% 0 + % , 

14710 11% 13 — % I 
2950 55%.54% + %l 
40 4 0 4 +'% , 

1449% mu 10 + % 
4*2 0 0 
34 0 ' 0 -0— % 
413% 10. U%t9, 
32 0 0 0 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in ^bal scock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsteaer 
will be senr free and without 
obligation. 

First Comnierce Securities bv 
Herengrachc^S} 

1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)3120 260901 
: Telex; 14507 firco nl 


Snon 
0 vA 9« 
omiii 
OyifnM 
SyitOn . 
Svamr 7« 


Ji 17 


2* 0 0 0 + % 
011% 11% 11% + Vb 
fl4'4 0 0— % 

Jf14 9% 9 + % 
3319 mb 10— % 

4 0 0 0— % 
Ml 0 0 0 + % 
43 7 M 7 +% 

911 10 10 


.12 4 


1.) 


TBC 

TSI 
TlRl 
TBcVIvO 
Tdndm i 
ToadM 
TctaiW 
TeCam 
TOilfiCB 53 J 
T«l« 

TIcniA r 

TMPha 

TMcnt 

Tatocrd 73 U 
TaMba 


M 0 

I 0 


15 


Teuton 

fRXi 

TfldrLv 


Tarmol 

TkbdeiB 

TaMn 

Tixlne 


518 


73 47 
1 


' 1310 11% 10 % 

. - ?B 512“** 

09% 15 15 — % 

38 0 0 0 + % 
3l1*a% 37% 3I%-1 
40 0 0 0— % 

ai0 13% 10- % 

9 0* 1 — % 

2 4% 0 0 
1010 )» 9% 
3934% 34 34% + U 

177)0 0 9%— % 
10410 10 10— % 
4411 10 10 + % 

9430 33% 9% + % 
134 » 0 1h— % 
3149% 10 1« 

amb 9% 10 + % 


15 


k— % 
0 +Vk 
4 +1 
21% 

4Vb 

1%— % 


170 X4 99 


I.W 47 


Tiimids 
TtatM 
ThdHB 
Tiwrin 
Tnartae 
TROUT 1 
ecom 

TimB 
TMiand 
Timtii 
TawPlB 
Ttarary 
Toftli 
TaiadTr 
Tansvi 
TrahAa 
Tronlnd t 
Tmait 
Triodty 
TriMte 
TrlBCm' 

Tiien 5* 15 

TrwJe 50 15 

TBbSa 150 35 

TuckDr • 
Twmcry 
Tvian 

TvwnP 58 7 

USUCi 

uspRi aaiesio 

UTL 

UHTBCB 19 47 
UMivy ate a 

Unama 

UabMP 

UalDepl 173 105 

Uiun 

UiMrei 


2 * 


UAOni 54 5 

UBArtc 9 24 
unAiik .ISr 17 
UBkSP ' 

UBkOB 

UBCol 19 45 

UOlM 

UCIvOl 158 7.* 
UoDoin 33 45 
UnBdS 
UPnOrv 
UPWPd 

uOrdn 1541147 
UflRM 78* 35 
US Ant 

USB9 19 21 
US Cm 
USD9R 
US ear 
USHto 
USHItl 

USSWt ,13i 21 
Uf Our .0 7 
USTrk 19 17 
UOTri- 19 45 


UaPIntr 
UnTrec 250 


9 0 4% 

IS 2% 3 
3 4 4 

1731% 31 
ia 7 m 

31 1% Ikb 
Ml % 

159% m 10 
5311% 11% 11% 
73W 14 14%— tt 

99 ' 37% 37%— Vb 
Mil 10 10— % 

*914% 10 10- % 
3C. 0 7% + % 

0*111% 10 11^ + % 

"ft ^“la 

77 10 9 10 + % 

1*9 9*k 9 + % 

8310 17 10 + % 

1910 10 10 +1% 
3 0 0 0 + % 
41 3 0 0 

i3n «% 0 « — % 
345 * 0 4 

S 3% 0 0 

9 1% 1 0 + % 

137% 30 30 + % 

17433% 30 30 + % 
90 0 4% 

1 17 17 17 

4343% 43 43 

3431% n% 30 
410 m* 9% 

421% 31% 31% + % 
79% 9 30 + % 

0 0 0 0 + % 

4343)0 11% 13 — % 

1 10 13 n + % 

1014% 13% 10 + % 
49M 0 0— % 

8313% 11%‘1l%— % 
M 0 M -0— % 
910 m* 10— % 
941% 40Vk 41% + % 
9 0 0 0 

1329% 10 10 
e34% 34 34 — % 

910 0 0— % 

10 0 0 
110 10 nvb— % 

148 34% 34 34 

9 3 0 0 — % 

11 10 10 10 + % 
1113% 10 13%— % 
44 3 0 3 +% 

10 0 0— % 
1330% 9 9+% 

3211% n 11 

31 9% *94 0 
0 4% 5% 4 

31% 31« + % 

3% 0 + % 
0 0— % 
0 7% + % 
30 30 *8% 

0 m 

..... M 0 + % 

409% 31% 31%— % 
110 10 10— % 
037% 30 30— % 


899 
43 0 
la 0 
19 0 
19433% 
743 f% 
9 0 


UOIalni J8 7 
UnTMfw ' 

UaTiie 

UVbBk 154 45 
UnvDav .18a 7 
Um Pm 
UAvHil 
UilwHW 
UFSah 

UaRtM 1.1 

UPmP 250 105 

Uraae* 

uteola .0 27 

VI.I 

VUl 

VMX 

VSE .14* 17 

vaudLo 

VMPSt 


VWMtl 

WliriBl 

Valfak 

VWLn 

VbbOu 

Vtan9(t 

VarlCr 

veriH 

VMtrG 

ValeBd 

VMtm 

VmaT 

VMa 

lOeonP 

VIegra 

VIetBn 

vionis 


54*20 23% 23%—% 
930 30 30—% 
515% W% mb— W < 
0140 48% 40 + % 
a3i% am 3i%— % : 

39 9 - 9 + % I 

1419% 9% 9% + w: 

3* 0 5 0 4 % 

13 0 >% 0— Vb 
41 0 0 0 
59% mb 10 
19 0 0 5 
311 0 4% 5% 

a • 0 8+% 

3011% 11 11% 

ia 7% 7 7 

110 W% 10%— Vb 
0113% 13% 10 + % 

a u% 10 10 

170 37 1030 14% 37 + % 


.ai 


PAge 15 


NgwImiw 


This advertissment appwus as a mattar of record only 


April 11,1985 


... 21 

ate 15 
50 15 
50 37 


70 U 


19 47 


410 Mb 10 + % 
31 4% 4 4% 

324% 9% 24% 
4010 10 10+ % 
linVb IT 11% + V» 
41 1% 1 1 — » 

■■ MM 

% Mil 

10 IV 
0 0 


39 

in % 

51 1* 
att 3% 


*1^ 


447 
4 0 

28134 


10 10— |Aj 


% %- 
JS* *** 

... 30 20 

JD9% 1^ 30 4% 

0 4 0 4 — % 



aom l.f 

*810 

11% 

11%— % 




Mll% 

10 

10 

MrateR 












VbTeei) 



9 1% 


)» 

Vlrraffl 

t 


2 4 

4 


Vadsut 



1011% 

11 

)1% + % 

VertCp 



4 4 









VWvn 



38131 

18% 


VartM 

.13r 

15 

4 0 



VVOMI 



3 0 

7% 

0 

WO 40 

JS 

47 

3710 

19% 

10 4 % 

WBtafC 

At 

.1 

Rsa 

It 

32% + n 

WikrTel 



37* 8% 

0 

0— % 

WdiE 

173 

17 

3538% 

10 

30 4 % 

WFBLe 

jenz* 

17130% 

30 

31% 4 % 







WeMce 

.13 

.1 

3330 

23 

33% 

woirtat 

.11 

15 




WouaPn 

50 

35 

4813 

11% 


Wovelk 



9 0 

0 

0 4 % 

Wexnia 

58 

J 

3a m 

0 

0 

WMbi 

J* 

27 

2310 

13% 

10 4 % 


ESCOM 

Electricity Supply Commission 


Sanefton (Itansiraal) 


DM200000000 

8''A% Bearer Bonds of 1985/1993 

irrevocably and unconditionaliy guaranteed by the 

Republic of South Africa 


WidBtR 170*97 
Wllfldl 50 47 
WMMtl 

159105 
WMK2 50 W7 

WAmac 70 II 

WnIPn 

VAiCeas 254 42 
WMPSL 
WMICTc 
WOMcr 

WS*L% 74 25 
WS9ar 70 21 


9 0 0 0 
811% 11% 11% 4% 
424% 24% 2«% 

74 0 «% 0 4%, 

4 0 0 0— % 

3U% 10 10 
4i10 10% 10 4 % . 
1047 17 47 — % 

15*11% 11% 11% + % 
no 5 f 

5 0 0 0 4 % I 

1 14 14 14 4 % 

3 0 0' 


- Stock Index No. 475436 - 

Offering price: 99 Vi 


Dresdner Barrie 

AkiMnedsoSscimrt 


Commerabenk 

Aktiacigmallscliaft 


WiTIAn 



1830 

73 

33 

WmorC 

50 

13 

*310 

17% 

17Vh— % 





30 



78 

35 

2924% 

9% 

3U8— % 


25 

188 

M 

58 

IWcai 



IDT 0 

0 

0 

Mdcem 



588 0 

0 

0 4% 

MMnd 



4* 0 

7 

7 

Mitait 

I5S 

+1 

7B<7A 

34% 

a -a 





«% 


Milmi 

1 


14 0 

0 

0 

NmcSn 



3*14% 

10 

10— % 

mmeTr 

200 

37 

M80 

n% 

SM +0 

MimP 



278 0 

8 

a%— % 

MtnH 

78 

15 

433810 

10 

10— % 

Mltan 



3 0 

0 

0— % 

Mndmr 

57 

1.1 

*1 0 

0 

0 

WhmBn 



98 sot 

0 

0 4 % 


Befcisys Mendvent Bank 

UniitBU 


B a yeri ach e Hypothakan und Wech a a l Ban k 

AkmngtfsllBChali 


Beribiar Handels- und Rankfurtar Bank Crddlt Conmiarcial da Ranca 

Kradfetbank International Group Nedbank International 

Westdautseha Landaabank Gbozentrale 


Bayarfacha Varakisbank 

Akttenseaollfctisft 

Dautscha Bank 

AkttenBdsellschaft 


Swfaa Bank Corporation International 

Uiniteci 


WlwrO 
WMgnn ,l* 
WMdM 50 
Worltw 54 
wimim JO 
XiMC 
XlCM- 
XOdtX 

VtowPt 150 
VorkN 50 
ZalMtil 
Zmcbi 
ZmWe 
ZlanUt 174 
SM 
ZIrad 

Zondvn 74 
ZymM 


37 


399 10 10— % 

25 47 0 4% 4% — % 

37 1* 10 W% 14% — % 

25 43030 9 35% 4 % 

14 *19% 9% avb 

148 S 0 5 4 % 

SOS 0 0 8 — % 

14911 10 10—% 

21 104334 31% 31%— 3 

24 U10 13 10 + % 

7 0 0 0 4 % 
33*37% M% 3*%—% 
134 3 0 3 4 % 

930 3i% 30 4 % 

21 4% 0 4% 4 % ' 


•ADVERIlSEMEIVr 


INTERNATIONAL FUNM 

Quototloin Supplied by Funds Listed 
11 April 1985 

Tbt not oMtf valM quotallani shMffi below ore svpalled bv the Pimdt IliM urttn Hw 
•xcooHoh of lona hiiids kwhoio qootos ora based on IssM ortcis. Tlw inlloMring 
m w alnoi lymboli Mdleal* bvqvtqev of oMtaltoH nipplM ter ibt IHT: 
(dl-ddlly; (w) > kvtvliiv; (bi-btHnonthly; (n-refuterty; tl)>lmoviQrhr. 


AL MAL MAftAGEMENT 
(w) M-mi Tniil.&A— _ 


OBLIFLEX LIMITED 
S 18354 — (wl MuiNcvrrcncv. 


* go- -tU oS!IS 

-tdlBoefbond..... . . .. ■ -Iw) awomm Ywi. 


.s lau 
_Sf7B 


^d I Equlbotf Poelftc— SF lUMO 

— td 1 Grohor SF 103950 **•*• P™"'— 

-<d I stockbor SP 93750« ORANGE MASSbU CROUP 


.DM1051 

.FL1057 

^SF9.«2 


— tdicsP B— < 

— (d i CroMbow Fund. 


^d) iTPFund N.V- 

banoue indoousz 

—(d 1 AMon Growth Fund, 
iw) Dtwqrhond. 


— 4wl PIP— Afnerica. 


I PiP-PeeU 


^oi. IMDSMS MWNbond* A. 
—Id > imkMun muIUmthU B. 


CBOC^ PBOanLTMHgoiwHTniCVPS 

1^^ -(d1B4WBllb08llM++4 

. 8'!^ PARISBAS-GROUP 

—Id > CorliM intemoliwiol 
..n-.. — (w)OBLI-OM...— 

’el>^ •HwlOBLiGESTION. 

^ « to IS *- OBLIOOLLAR. 

* *lnn '-I'* 

‘ IJS-S -IwioSLHSULDEN 
S155S ..(d i PAROIL-FUND. 


S31<I0 


-if • parinter fund..^ 

814S57 .^dfpAAUST/MwryBMd. 
BRlTANNlA.POa 771. St. HMItr, Jersey 



BRITAWW l5.FpB^,» . HMWT. Jeiw AOYAL 6.0P CanA0AJ>08MJSUERNSEY 

— {Wl grH. Dgl|cr in cOTik.— , — ».2W -h*j R8CCiiiiadlcinF.indi.ii._— sn.l* 

.-i £ !'iS5f?Si^i35‘T — ' »*^+IwiRBCForEOfl*PocmcFd StOiM* 

“52lS"‘12^?i!2S2SSIIl'^-^ «-5^;-Mwk«ac*iricw<iMBd.w__ saus 

“J3 ; 51} •.tPJdi'SS£22’~~ i 1-lK +lw» R8C lull Income Ft 


4w> arliJjnlvwsdi Growtn, 
4w) BriiXMd FwM. 


1105* 


. J BrltJWonaDjCarfaqcy:;.;— 
—Id V BrR. JopooDCr P«rf. Pd. 
— twi Brttj<kn*r CM Fuiid_ 
— <d 1 Bril. WorW 15%. Fund— 
-Md) Brit. Vtorld TkIxl Fund. 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
~ IIOllnnFMid_— _ 


12133 

1*53 


—twi CMlIOl 

— IW) 


CoBliai Iloilo 


Iff--— ^ 


ln% "ViaiRBCManCtimnerPii 

41W r+IP'.ROCpBthAwr.Rl- 

, SIL>f7 BKANDlPONO INTL FUND (4+S736270I 

10221 — (Wllnc.:aia seji-oifor 15.:^ 

11542 — (wiAee,: bm. maoiter- — is7* 

10772 SVENSKA international LTD. 

X7 OvnmiMfb Sa75>¥n»4n.3775IMQ 

S3S40 — (b I SHB Bond Fund— i.— 52154 

8 1254 — IW) SHB inri Gmrin Fund 1 1*70 


CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) . . 

P34Z2S' — (dIAnwrtco-Volar. 


—id > Adlotw Suhm 
—(dt Bond Valor Skri. 


SWfS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 
SPSOOTS 


— SP 1IW5D —id I D+Aork Bond Soicctlon 
— ldlBondVBlor0.4n<irK— OM1045S—ia)DoilarBondStltcliap— 
— 4diBondVoloruS-DOLLAR— . s 111.00 —Id > Florin BondSolocllen.. 
— (0) Bond Vblor Von— _ Von 1049*50 —Id) IMamolor. 

—(d) Convori Voter SwI , .. SF lOMO —Id 
—Id) Convori Voler US^IOLLAR. 1 HOT* —Id 
— (0 ) Coiwior,,. , SFAt050 "4d 

—Id I CS Fand» Bonds SF 787S — (d 

— M I CS Pond*-1nt1„,.,.,. ■■ SP 10*50 ."^d 
— (dies MenovMwkot Fund— . SlOSUO^d 


Japan Portfolle. 

Steriliw Bend Solodlon. 

Swlai Perelon Bend SoU 



— M ) C5 Money Mrkol Fund 
—Id ) Encrelo— Valor— — 
4d)U« 


=IS I BwinoB V oler M. 
— (d)Pocine— MIor. 


DIT INVESTMENT PFM 
— 4(d ) CowcoMro.. ... 

— Hd ) toCi Ronlonteod — 


Ounn A HorWtt 4 Uevd Gooroc, BmuoM 
— Im) DAHCommodltvPoel. S3 
—(mi Corroney A Gold Pool— .s 1 
—(m)wineib Lite FiiL Peel— s 
— (nDTroniWortdFul.PeeU 1 

FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Lduronco PoMity HIIL ECA 0I5335UI 

-riw) FACAUoMlC... 

— (vrl PAC *•— — 

— Iw) FACOriOilMI— — 


SwRowdler Now Series.. .. . .. 
UnlwMlBemi Select.— SPOOTS 

. ...UrdvornlFuiHL— — SF1IU1 

DM 103050 — (dlYonBendSfloalan— .Yia50450 
|p0M UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

» — td ) Amca U5. SA. SPdOiS 

Ip i4t.K — <d ) Beod-lnwool— — . SF *775 

^'""-(dlPOMOSwftoSIl. SP13450 

SPfSSTO 
SPS6150 
SF 11750 

UNION INVESTMENT Fronkhirt 
— (dlUniranta— — DM4U0 
•74*** — (dlUnHondo— — DM22M 
— (d| Uninik— — — DM7750 


—Id 1 Japon<iny*ol. 
PM3478 — (disafltSeuni.A<r.SK. 
5 mP 72— Id) 


tsinwioteekprie*). 


Odier Funds 

(wl Aaibendi inwto U ntnt i Fund. 

M iw) ArilvoM Inll 

StOM ImlAIIMLia. 


Sluja (wl Aouita Initmetlenel Fund— 
(r)AraBPInonc*I.P— — . 


FIDELITY POB <72 HemlHonBtrMudD (tDArtan*. 

— (mlAmtrleonVMimiCORinion. SI470 (w) TnicMor mri Fd.(AElF). 
— (miAmtrVetateCumprtl— s 10174 (w) BNP Intorbend Fund — 
—(d) FIdelltv Amor, Amis— 8*451 (wl BondMlte-isMePr.. 


— IdiPWontvAusiroiioFuiid— 8054 
— IdlPideliryDliOwervFund— siaio 
— (d)PldoUlvDV.Sva4.Tr— — . 112253 
->4d 1 FhMKv For EO0 Fund.— 8 2074 (0 
— (d > PkMHy mn. Fund— .— S5573 Id. 
— Id) PldemvOriontFund— . SSaM (m 
— idlFWtlltyFfonrlirFtHid— S1211 (w 
— IdIPideittyPacifieFvnd— ^ 8132,47 (b 
— (d)Pid4illvSpeLerawtt)F2— $1474 iw: 
—(d ) FidelHy Wend Fund— . 83214 (kv 


FORBES PO BliTCRANO CAYMAN 
London Asen) 0)597013 


— (w) Gold ineenM- 
— Iw) GoMApartelettan. 
— 4w) Ooltor ineenw. 


— (ml 8 l 0 iei c Trodlno^ 
GEPINOR FUNDS. 

— (w) Ee4l (nei M monl Fun 
— (w) ScelHWi World Fund. 
— )w> SWt* 5L AbwHcob. 


8756* 

. 8453 
S2M 
. 81.14 


S3S353 

(11+14 

815474 


832*4 
81274 
. S350 
SHOT* 

S8429 

. 810171 
SP 135.10 

tVJD 


:ml Conoao Gid Mormoae Pd^— , 8* 
d ) CapM Prooerv. P<L intL— 111. 

:w> citodol Fund SV^ 

CJ.R.AusirBltaFiiod— 8*73 

CJ.R.JePon Fund 81.*! 

CtovotondOmheroPd— 8 20079 
Colum&ta SieurtttaB— FL 1129 

COMETE SIBMI 

Convori. Pd. Ion A Corte——. $954 
Convori. Pd. mn B Cons— S265S 

nr.r . S7S.M 

D.WIttorWldWMOIVTTM— 81079 
Orahkar InvoiLPund N.V.. 8M10.N 
Dccyfuo Fund InTL— 1349 
Drorteo IntareonUiwnt— 83153 
TM EetaWtahnianl TruU— . $ I5B 
Europe ObItaettant— — — . .4243 


Firs) EmI* Fond. 
Fmv Stars LM.. 


... Fmsburv Group LM_ 
.w) Riwd incetno Trans, 
w) Pensotax Issue Pr— _ 
w) Poroxiund. 


(w) Fermulo Soloetlon F2. 
Id ) Fonditdita . 


810173 Iw) Hosiia Pundk. 
8 U.14 (wl Horizon Fund. 


CaprLGuidXldl5AA8tnt5I-4n4230 
GLOML ASSET MANAGEMENT CORF. 

FB n*. SI Ptier Port, Cuomiov. MiGOTIS 

(m) FirtwGAMSA— — S1J.M (d i Gevtnim. Sec. Fund*— 
ImiCAMArmroeo me...-. ■■ 512371 lo > FronKhTruot imerxin*. 
(wl CAMorlM Inc— S132V (w{HeussmamHtd09.N.V. 

(w) GAMBoctan Inc— — **■■— - 

(w) GAM w»— I*— 

(w> GAM Pmncwnl— — 

Id 1 GAM IntomoliDnai me— 

|w) (SAM Nortti Aimrlca me,— 

Iw) GAM N. Amorico Unit Trusi. 

(wl GAM Podfle me — — — 

(w) GAM Slorl. A mtl Unit Trust 
Im) (SAMSvstams Inc 


S 1+10171 

- 80711* 

- S1I474 

- 81053 
SP3tb5S 

— . $771 
. SF 71.91 

- S22« 

- $$340 
DM4150 

- $111.13 

- $10477 
$1.1029 

81.72 

81278 


833050 


SPf7.«1 (b) iLAinH Gold Bend— 

81029 (d) intorfundSA— 

S1QS5* (w) Intormarkffl Fund— 

ll&IttP <d 1 intarmbita MuL FdL CL'B'— $3*29 
on+y jr) innSoeurlttaeFund ■■ S*71 

199* P (d ) inveota DW5 DM 449 

$10071 Iff mvostAtionilouoi. $777 


ImXSAMSvstamsInc—— $10071 (riinvosfAtlonitauob— 
wICAMWerkhMiiie— — — $J345r Ir) llaliertwne mnPund 
(mlGAMTvchoSACloicA— $1115* (w) jeMnSetaeilonPunO 


G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK> LM. 
— (wl Bonv teic F2 LW.., . 
—Id 1 G.T. Appliod Setanee. 


S*50 

81+95 

— ld10.T,AsoanH.IC,Gwth.Pd— SI23V* 
1 C.T, Mb Fund— — 83,90* 


— (wl I 
— (d ) G.T. AutmUta Fund. 
—Id I G.T, Europ* Fund. 


— Iw) G.T, Eura. Small Co+ Fund. 
— (d 1 6.T. Doltaf Fund— 
— (d I G.T. Bond FuML 


— <d ) &T. GiebW Toefmioy Fd . 
— (d I C.T. HentM FottiRndor . 
— (d ) G.T, invoslRHnt Fund. 


S32S3* 
, 8*73 
..SI0J7 
81+41 
, S*.*9 
81270 
$2+79 

. . .... $1772 

— Id) G.T.Jeaap Small CCPUM_ S42J8* 
— io)C.T.TpeiMricmFund— $2*75 
—Id ) (LT. South CMM Fund .. 8 1353 

SBC TRUST CaiJERSEVI 1^ 

17 Ssole SLSt. Hollsr:Q53+3b33l 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

S idiinc: Bid— siTSOttcr— .S17M* 
(OICap.1 BM— 81074 QMsr— ..$10547 
INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
— (OlShortTorm'A'iAcewn)— SI5A« 

— (d)SnortTerm'A'(Oirir).., SI513S 

—Id > Short Tsfm'%‘ (Acaim 

”'lo5trj- 


Betarilow Fund 
iwt JMon PochIc Fund. 

(m) Joffer Phu. liitL Ltd. . 

.d ) KMnwort Bonien inFl i 
(wl Kitinworl Bent, JdP. F( 
a I LMcwn Fund—.— 

:w) Livorooo Cap Hold 
:d > Ltanlbeor— 
w> Llevdb InH, Smollei 
wl umtund— 

m) Moonotund N.v 

dlModtohnumSdLF 
biMoMoro. 

wl NAAT— - _ 

dlNUeuGrowltiPaekano Fd $971751 
iw) Nippon Fund... I. . I m. $2*53* 
w) Woeptoe inwe s lfwOHl Fund—. $ *3.08 
Iw) »»-**■ S 14+17 

m) NSF S 15571 

PANCURRMne^— S1&f7 


— (d)SheilTonna' 
— (w) Lena Tprin. 


SSI59 


JARDINE FLEMING. FOB 70 6PO Ho Ko 
— (b 1 J.P JqpBO TniSl , . , , „ Y.an 


— lb 1J.F South Eofl Asia.. . . .. . 

I j’f pSSRcYSliAecP" '' *** 6wiiy H008MV .$.*.w 

— (b 1 jiFAustrollG 



'riPerta»0.REjt(tai)svp SF)797JID 
rl Ponn«VnluoFiindN.V— $174544 


btPlotedao. 


d I Putnam mn Fund. 

81.1124 (b)Prt— T«eh. 


$10)474 
$13177 
8 


8 0548* (w) (andum Fund N.V,. 


Renio Fund. 

RonttovdS. 


. $S7.92 
. $1*357 
.. S35S974 
LFTJSAOQ 

LF ITSSTI 


id ) Reserve Insured Dtposin.. $1072 
^ to-M • w) Somurol Pertfetta— — SF I0B55 
$-389 talSCI/TeA.SALuxembourn— . $«J3 


3^ IW) srrowdy imotmont Fund— $1971 
ldlSvin8xLid.’(Clos8A)' ._S.77! 


LL0YO5BAHKINTUPOB432Osneva1I jw> Iechne_Grow|h Fund — 
— +(w) Ltavds mn Dnltar— s loue (w) Tokyo Poe HoU (Ml. 
— Mw) Uokds mil Euront— SP ] 


„jl^-(witoiivoPae.Hbld.N.v. 

-flw) Ltayds inn Grawtti— SF 1B200 |yj ImnwocWlc Fund— 
biw) Ltavds mn ineemo— SR 31450 (d ) Turgiwis o Fund 


SP 07.70 
SldlJM 
$13154 
. S1477 

KSJtKSinnftaoier sfVbw isiSsKlJSSSSSfi 

NIMaRBEN Id 1 UNICO Fund.— DM77JD 

— (d)CtessA, .$*251 (dlUNIBnndFund— — S14241 

— lw)CtaS*B«U7.— — ..1954 (b ) UNI OPital Fund— .5104153 

— (w) Ona»C-JoeBn .STSJB (wl VnndortiiltABih S1171 

tm) WIneheotsr Finonelol Ltd— . SXLIS 
imlWInchostarDIvsriMtadM^ $222^ 
(dlWoridPundSA , . . , S1054 

Iwi Worldwid* SoeurlEos S/S 0. $4214 
l4^woriawMsSp*elais/S0. 81779.9 

OM — OMtiehs Mark) BF ~ Belfliun) Francs; FL — -Outdi Florin: LF — 
Luxombouro Frona: SF — Swiu Francs; a — asked; + — Offer Prlcesib — bid 
durw p/v $10 to 81 nr unit; N JL— Noi Available; N.C— NetCominunicDtedio — 
Now: s — fusponded) S/S - Stock Split: ' — Ed-OIuidontf: ■■ - Ex-Ris: — 
Gross Ferfermonco Indtx March; +— RodctfiM-Prioo- Ej+Coupeni •■— Pormeriv 
WorMwWp Fund Ltd: ■# — OHor priet (ML 3% praUm. oiarw: ++.— dollv staCK 
' prien os on Ainsi.erdam Slock Exoiana* ' 


ABB S*e i » l tl0 CotporitlBn 
BankhBiia K AuftiiusBr 
BBdMHWOrttembBigiscliB Bank 
AklianaaBaaaehaft 
JuNiia Bbbt IntGraatfonBi Uniflad 
Banes CemirMiclBlGltallaiiB 
Banes dal Oettardo 
Bancs Naxionaia dal Laatofo 
Banco dl Roma 

Bank Gutzwfliar, Kurz, Bungsnsr 
(Ovanaaa) Undtad 
Bank Lau Intamatlonal Ltd. 

Bank J. Vsntebal 6 Co. AG 
BWiBtfa rn M fB i d adkfCiOBMBefca 
Extdrlsur 

Banqw Q6n*eala du LuxembwaB 
Bamius Indoaasz 

Duqua Intamatlonala h LuxamboufB SJL 
Bmiiia NatioiMla da Paris 
Banqua Paribas Capital Uaikats 
Ban^ Popmalra guiaa i SJL Upcaniboiieq 
Banqua da runion Eurapdaone 
D 0 i|u 8 Wonna 

Baya rtach a Landaaba nk Gkoxa n ti al a 
Baar Steams Inlainatlonal Ltd. 

JdIl Baranbarg, Geastar A Co. 

BarikMT B«ik AktIsnBsaaasGitaft 
BinkhauB Gebffidar Batfamaon 
Brimsr Landaabank 

• KiadttanataltOldanburg-GiiDSNNitrala- 
CazanovaACe. 

CrMIt Induatrlai (TAlBaea at da Loimlna 


CrMHlvonnaiB 

Ctadtt Sulssa Hrat Boston Umttad 
Ctadtt a n a taH-BanIcvewin 
OalbfaekACe 
Dautaeha GbDzantFria 
- Dautacha Koimnunalbank - 
DSL Bank Oaiitaefia SMkBiga- und 
I anrtMrantanbwik 

DO Bank Da u t ach a O ano sa an iUiaUab ank 
anwianliank Wariwag AkUanBaiallachaft 
EuremebMara SbpJL 
Eunpartnaia Saeuridaa Ceipomtfen 
Bir^aan Banidng Company Undtad 
fi a fl walnta ma tlpi iam rf 

VtaraiB 

GkoiMtiala und Bank 
derectanolchiBehon Sparkaason 
Akdangosalsehaft 
Goktoan Sac ha Intamatloi iB l Cotp. 
Hambfoa BankUnKad 
HambuiBiBelia Landaabank 
-Gbozenbaie- 
GaeiB Hauck A Sehn BonUora 
KoiiiBiiBndWgaaagachaftouf AkUan 
Hoasiaehe Landaabank 
-Okoaantmla- 
HHI Samuai A Co. Umltad 
isStutn Baneario San Panin (E Torino 
Nddar, Peabody faitamatlenal LMtod 
Ma in werL B anaen Umltad 
KiadlatfaankSJLLi ix ambo ui gBolaa 


Bankhaus HannsMin Lamps 
KemmandRsaoalieehaft 
Landesbank RhaMand-PfBlz 
- OUroxantmlo - 
LazMd Mias at Cla. 

Mai ck , Hnck A Cn. 

B. MeUar sooL Sohn A Co. 

Moigan Btanlay IntanwtteiMl 
Nerddautadw Landaabank Ghoaantmla 
Oatanal chlacf ia Undaibanfc 
AkManflMaMtehaft 
SbL Opporttetan Jr. A Cla. 

Rauschai A Cd 

N. M. RolfiacMM A tens LMtod 
J. Hanry Sehfodar Wagg A Co. UmRad 

SCnilvBMHGIM nypOQIteltVIr 

und HandalibBnk 
Smith Bamay. HbrIb Upham A Co. 

Incerporatod 
Straun, Tumbidl A Co. 
TrinkauaABuriAMdt 
The Trust Bank of Aftien LMtod 
Union Bank of S iri U ai lBnd ( Sh cu i l tlM ) 
Umltod 

VacbandSchwrtEariachiM'IC Ba ten al banka n 
Varahia- und WaiHiniik AkBwgBBaBBetiBft 
illLM.Wwinag llrii>Liuii9iii,WlftzACo. 
WsBldButBcha OanoBaonBchatt^ 
Zantralbaidca.G. 

WBifManhanlf ftliliBnoBBBnBrrMrfI 

WURWnHISWCnV MMIHIIIIIWP 
I teirlabhBnir nkoTwIialn 


|i. ,11 1*..' > 

T;'. ■ 

I '.I'l' 


■' 1 , '' 

' i" ^i'' I ','i 

', ' i' 'll 


'i; 'I !' ', 

. , v/V' 

' T !'i ' ' . 

i: 'V ,'l| 


,i 'I,,;:' •' 




' .|l 

:■} ;'i,v 





. South Africa has a great destiny 
on the African continent . 


The companies of the Anglo American 
Corporation group continue to press 
spedfically for the elimination of discrimina- 
tory labour practices and to strive for the 
improvement in the quality of life for all 
South Africans, irrespective of race and 
colour. The policy of Anglo American 
Corporation is unambiguous: we believe that 
3 healthy society depends as much on healthy 
labour relations and equality in the 
workplace as on (he reco^ition of the rights, 
responsibilities and social obligations of 
employed and employer alike. 

All responsible South Africans are 
united in the pressure for peaceful and 
meaningful political change and an end to 
discriminatory race laws. The call for 
sanctions and disinvestment to bring this 
about should not be heeded without very 
careful consideration of their likely long term 
practical efrects. To encourage a course of 
action which must inevitably provoke 
violence is dangerous and irre^nsible in 

however well-intentioned, would have 


disastrous consequences for all who live in 
southern Africa. 

We believe Soudi Africa has a great 
destiny on the African continent, and that 
once the dynamic of our country has been 
released by eliminating the injustices which 
still prevail, South Africa wul be able to 
make its significant contribution towards 
leading the continent away from poverty, 
cU^ase and miserv. 

G.W.H.RELLY 

Chairman 


Anglo Americran Cofpwation 
of South Africa Lindted 













il 

B 

a 

fl 

a 

a 

a 


a 


a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

li 




■ 

■ 

■ 

a 


a 

a 

a 



m 




■ 

■ 

■ 

a 


a 

a 

a 







a 

■ 

■ 

■ 

a 


a 

a 

a 



m 





i 

■ 

■ 

a 



a 



ii 




B 


a 

■ 

a 

a 

a 

a 



u 




a 

a 

a 

a 


a 

a 

a 

a 





a 

a 

a 


a 

a 

a 

a 


a 

■ 

m 


a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 


a 




a 

a 

a 


a 

a 

a 



m 





a 

a 

a 

a 

a 


a 

a 



m 




a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 


a 



m 




a 

a 

a 


a 

a 

a 

a 

a 



m 




a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 



m 




a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 


frr^ 


ACROSS 


1 Tea lira 
8 Front foot of a 
dog 

tS Characterized 
by strong 
feeUngs 

16Mother-of> 
pearl source 

17 Moves quickly 
to and fro 

18 Some 
compositions 

19 Engage In: 


47 Mangle 

49 Some ships: 
Abbr. 

50 S.A. nation 

51 Embellishes 
SSGelderland 

city 

54 “Fifty 

Frenchmen 


20 Built 
22^— up 
(aviated) 

23 Graceful 
movement 
25 Some accounts 

20“ In,” 

Frost poem 
27Ria 
29 Salt 
SOBob^iite 
31 Straggled 

33 Interweave 

34 Rosebud, e.g. 

35 Chirp 
SOGlo^doth 
38 Coining fee 
431mpro^ 
44FootbaU 

gadget 

45 Lai;^ baskets, 
in Bilbao 
48 Christian 
equivalent^ 
Ramadan 


50 Adjective for a 
Martian 

58 Former 
Danish colony 

59 Rut 

00 Imposes, as a 
burden 

01 Hemingway et 

al. 


DOWN 


1 South-side 
pews 

2“ Grace," 

Anita Bryant 
book 

3 Type of cherry 

4 Mel of the HaU 
of Fame 

5 Depraved 

0 Prevent 

7 Played 
musical chairs 

8Jet setter's 
ciy? 

0 Khi of English 
horns 

10 South African 
coin 


11 Note of note in 
crosswords 

12 Pit 

13 Lifelessness 

14 Section of 
Londtm 

21 Attired 

24 Most up-cigfit 

20 Four sights as 
“Hamlet" 
ends 

28Mab-joiigg 

counters 

30 Board game 

32Budd]£^ 

83 Oolong, e.g. 

35 Urgency 
SODeupurahases 

37 “Beautiful" 
place 

38 Felt 
ezcitement 

38 Honey bunch 

40 Moon goddess 

41 Like some 
heraldic 
animals 


42Ancfent 

ascetics 

44 Current styles 

47 Having a 
natoFubent 

48 Mister in JaOtt 
51 RatUo tuner 
S2Avtdd 
SSD^tiyento 

Bet^ord 
57 Ouray was one 


<0 iView ybrtc Tima, e£ted by Eugene MzZesfaa. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



^Sounds like tou had a LDTof fun when >ou 

A LITTLE 6CY. 1 WISH 1 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


UnscrenAie these four Jumbles, 
one letterto each square, to form 
lour ordniaiy Mtords. 


VILEN 





BRILO 





GLEINT 





V\4^RMOR 


■■■■ 

mm 



Now anange the dreled letters to 
form the surpriae answer, ee au^ 
gested by the abow onoon. 


ONE RN6ER Ulia MEAN 
JUST TRV TO SET IT 
Oy/ERTHE plate... 



111)0 PIN6ER5 U)ILL MEAN 
TRV NOT TO THROW rr 
OVER THE BACKSTOP.. 

rr 



ANP THREE RNSERS 
U»LL MEAN WE'LL ALL 
BE 6LAP WHEN THE 
SEASON'S OVER. 




THE WAR DIARIES OF 
JEAN-PAliL SARTRE; 
Naveiid>er 1939-March 1944) 


ByJem-PmdSartre. TranslaedfyQidMin 

Book. 366pp. $17.95. 

Panlh&mf 201 East 50th Street, 

Bew York, N. Y. 10022. 


BLONDIE 



BEETLE BAILEY 


KEEP COMING TILL 

XSAVeTGP 



ANDY CAPP 



Reviewed by Herbert R. Loctman 

T here are diaries and diaries. Andr6 
Gid^s is a collection of pieces, and 
tfgnwitg of these private reft^ons (cont^- 
tng precious little of his private me) were 
delivered regularly to the presses in the last 
years of Ins life. Jean-Faul Sartre’s dia^ 
was for Sartre first ^ aR thus closer to his 
deeper c ^u inerns — lus career, what p^opi^ 
thnnght of him, tfac woown in lus life, ne 
confesses that he used to hate diaries. But now, 

“when one is in the process of changing one's 
life like a snake slou^dng i IS sldn, one can look 
at that dead skin . . . Betake one's bearings. 
After the war I shall no loo^ kera this I " 
or if I do I shall no longer speak about mj 

*”Awo*d about that title, “War Diaries”. 
Fteudi orional translates as “Phmiy War jDia- 
ries;” refem^ to the period between the declg' 
riuion of b^4^rency in Septemb^ 1939 pd 
the laundiing of uermany’s blitz against 
France's northeast border in May of i& fol- 
lowing year. It was a rime of considerable 
tranqnihw. Hve miles behind (he fitmt, Sartre 
-has ue leisne to produce considerable quanti- 
ties of prose. He is woriring on a noveL plan- 
ning a mqor work of phflosojriiy. tmd also 
turning out reams of this phony-war diary, for 
the 3Sl pages which have bera found repro- 
duce only five out of 14 (or toon) numbered 
notri>o6ks, the others having been lost on a 
train. Sartre is ^so reading a lot: In the first 
two i^ths of war he has read or reread 19 
books. He gives us the list, and we find that it 
Kafka's '*rheCastle”and “TheTriaL’' 
Gide's hrfiy “Tn nmal, " and half the pllQIS of 


The Sartre we meet in these p^es is already 
a 1 ^ 34. He has published a niov^ “Nausea,” 

a tu— L nP Wall ’’ a phrl rtm 


a snidl book of stories, “The WaU,' ^ 
sophica] essay whose ririe could be translated 
as “Outline or a Theory of Emoric^”; mainly 


he’s a teadier of phiksophy. He is not yet a 
‘ t before uie war is over he 


famous writer, but 

win create the works that made his i^tarion, 
“Being and Nothi^ess,” his mqor 
scphicai statemenL and his first pre 


plays. The Flies" and "TJo Eat" (which Go- 
man soldiers in Paris, and Gern^m^were 
10 have the opportunity to applaud before we 

beencalled attbebtmmimgof 
S«)tember 1939, He is inlUsace whm wb &d ’ 
him wi mid-November in the TOiing pages d 
thit hnolc. When he im't reading oc wiitmg he .. 
is a soldier in the meteorolopcal service. After ?■' 
we leave him — when the iwtdxxdc breaks rif 
inMardi — bell go to Paris, wiim Jus pbOo- 
sophical essay “LTmqpnaire” is bong v 
lished, to receive a literary prize tar *Ihe ;• 'f 
Wall” Shortly after that the Germans wiQ / 
sweep down from the Ardennes and Paris wiQi^*.' 
falL ii-'- 

These “War I^aries”, wfai^ iq^wared in - 
Frenchinl983,threeyearsafterSartre'sdeadL 
breach his intimacy for the first time. (IBs ' 
autolROgr3^ucal‘*Tbe Words'^ was rcvd^oiy 

but writtm for publtotion.) He discuses '' 

his tdarionship wim fiiends^ with .lover and 
frie^ Simone ^Beauvoir, with his am^ com- .> ' 
^es. There are some paii^ passages in tie 
tradition of omfessioari literature — on bis 
iigiini»gs- and how he son^ to deal wifhit 
associating whb beauty ^eantiful pils as wefr V ; 
as beau^ in an). Funny mmnents.too, as wim 
he tries to cope with the dilemma of becauii^ 
a great man who must stay aloof, even bosn 
women, while realmng that “wranen certrinly 
weren't running after me, indeed it was I wiio ■ : 
was running mter thenL” He would tdl a 
young lady whose conquest be had just made 
not to inmnge on his freedom. “But within a 
sh(«l spared time . . . rdmakehera^tof 
that precious freedom." Ifis weiglri prolNem: 

“Every four or five months, I look , at 
Qtftmaeh in a mirTOTand get unhappy.” And so 
we are given vdiat might be called tne earisten- 
. rial diet: “If I crack down on myself a Ui 
roughly I have the inqiression of bemg my oi{^ 
master, hence fiee." - 
Whai we do not find in these notdiooks, not 
even in embryo, is tie pdlirical Sartre' of tb 
postwar decade. For, as astomsfaiog as this 
may seem to readers who recall Sartre'rpublic 
presence in the 19S0s and '60s, ndther the 
oiubteak d war nor the troobled years vriridi 
had prece^ it — years wfaidi saw the rise d 
Ifitler, die Spanish Civfi War, .the anti-Fasdst 
commitment of Sartres fiiendsin Paris —had 
moved Sartre much. We know from Smmie de 
Brauvdr's memoirs ^ how j^ve the S8^ 
tre-Beauvoir couple nad been in the Popi^ 

Front years. Now in this diary he dfera an 
imaginaiy reply to a critic who suesests that he 
ht diandon literature for 


^ . 




{fpool. 

^ til 


vn’oer 


SolotioD to PKvioiis Pnzdie 


SDiiQaa 
□OQDSSS SDSCiQtlQ 
caas BoaQO] ncis 
QDQQ DQQSQ OE3lj3D 

nos oiaasQ □□□□ 

□ 


V i ^ 
IsMiii oteI 
IrIaItIsii^iItTe 


with mysrif But ifhe has no sodaIpassioa..iU . 

he lives out side his class and tiin^ ne 6oesa!V‘'^. . 

necessarily admire this side d iris character; r.'-.T'* 
he'd tike to change. We now know that Sartre *' .1. 
did get out d bis armchair during the Gennao .... 
occiqiatiQn; he tried to get an mteOectual resis- 
lance movement gdi^ but in the face of .','77 
mdifierence he gave It tq>. He ended the war 7."'^;. 
contriburing articles to dwundetgnxmdi^^ 3.‘-.77 '' ' 


lElSiTlOlRlE 


while "Miring a rto^tion and 

lari Paris. True political CQgag^ 


□Bonas QQaaiDaas 


□ 

D 

d 

□ 


0 

\2mu\ 



Q 

□ 

□ 

Q 

n 

E 

0 




aQCi 



Q 

a 

□ 


E3 

D 

a 

D 

a 

□ 

a □ 

m 

□ 

□ 

El 

□ 

m 

□ 

Q 

s 

m 

a 

m 

[u m 

Q 

□ 

m 

Q] 

□ 

Si 

m 

D 

s 

D 

m 

□ 

O Q 

Q 

a 

0 

Q 

S 

1 


money in.Gennan 

ment would come later, often courageous, 
sometimes terribly wrongheaded, as when Be 
moved toward the Stalnusts at the very mo- 
ment the^ were becomiog aritamed d Stalin- 
ism. . 


.4/12/85 


Herbert A Lottman. atthor of "Albert Ca- 
mus: A Biograpfy, ” "The Lefi Brnik” and “fe- 
tain: Hero or Tfintor," wrote this review for Tfa 
Wa^nngfon Post 


KKIDGE 




By Alan Tniscoct 

AVORABLE vulnerabili- 


w provokes eccentric bids, 
and nak's weak 1 


*5 weak two-bid on the 
diagramed deal certainly 
comes under that heading. 
North had to consider slam 
possiblilities when his take-out 
double produced a qiade bid 

om S<mth. The South hand 
was cieariy weak, but tome dis- 
tribution stren^ was possi- 
bk 

Against five spades. West 
led the sin^eton heart ten. 
South now kaew that East had 
oiMned a weak two-bid with a 
suit tlmt was both weaker and 
shorter than the textbooks 
would recommend. It was iin- 


likd^ that this gambit would 
be attenmted with a balanced 
ban^ so he drew the right con- 
clusion in the trump suiL After 
winning wtto the heasi ten and 
leading to the spade long, he 
led a riow spade to his jack. 

. This could wdi have been 


vious heart finesse. He now 
had 1 1 tridcs, and surreoderod • 

a diamond at the CnifiL 


NORTB 

♦ AK73 
OA983 
V A 10 

♦ AS9 


vir.--- 


wrong; East might have pro- 
duced 


the tniD^ oueen and 
^ven his partner a heart ruff. 
But the inference proved valid. 
West won with the spade 
queen and shifted Co dia- 
monds. 

. South won with the ace. led 
to his .dub gueen and 
the trunp oghL The i 
finesse against tiie nine al- 
lowed h™ to draw tiuaqis, 
and he could then take the ob- 


wEsr 
♦ Q9«5 
o to 

4Q J754 

«7s2 


east(0) 

♦ M 

V Q « S 4i3 
0 Koa . 
4 10 84 9 

soirra ' 

4 J 842 
CKJ? 

4832 ■* 

«Q7a 

Nona and SonUi were vataeraMe. 
The . - 

Eaat Soodi . INfi 

27 PaM Pass VbB 

PUB 2A Fan -54 

Pue Pan Pan ■ 

' Wm led Ok twantea 








Answ^hara-wrTHH^ rmi:!!!^ 


Yesterday's 


(Anewers lemonow) 

Jumblas MINUS EAGLE UNCOIL JOBBER 


Answen Hew the cotton tycoon tound his work— 
IING 


VERY ABSORBI7 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


aiaqr ve 

Amie^dain 

Atiieni 

BorcetoiM 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brnnels 

Bwawreet 

BudepMl 

CenentMoen 

CMtoDelSol 

DuMln 

Edinbwvli 

Plorena 

Prenfefnrt 

Oenevo 

HelslaKl 

Istanbel 

Let Palmas 

UsbM 

London 

Madrid 

Mian 

Mdicdw 

Munm 

Nice 

Oslo 

Paris 

Prague 

RevKiovia 

Rome 

Sieddwlm 

girosboutg 

Venice 

VIlaiM 

W oi - n w 

zurfea 


HIGH 
C P 
» 6B 

10 so 


27 n 

17 43 


14 41 

a 44 


10 91 

21 70 


sv 

1 34 
17 46 


Cl 


17 43 

11 SS 


12 


54 
39 
34 7S 
30 48 


14 41 

10 9 > 


if 44 
15 59 


34 
II S3 
30 4e 


17 43 
7 44 


12 44 

14 57 


14 Si 

S 41 


10 SO 

MIDDLE EAST 


LOW 
C P 

10 so 

3 37 
13 55 

4 41 
9 48 

4 43 

5 41 
13 45 
9 48 

-2 3B sw 

13 SS 

3 37 

4 39 

11 S2 

7 45 
4 43 

-4 35 

14 57 
14 41 

TO 9 

4 4) 

•1 30 

8 *» 

-2 a 

2 34 
8 44 

-7 19 

5 41 
4 39 

3 37 

4 43 
• 4 21 

6 43 

7 45 

8 44 
0 32 
3 37 


Ankora 

Bemt 

DOOIOSCUB 

Jervuien 

TtlAulv 


31 70 
22 72 


34 75 II S3 

2S 77 10 SI 


OCEANIA 


2D 40 12 44 Cl 

S 72 IS 44 fr 

cKloudv: fo-lopsri Ir-lolr: Ivhall; 

cleiidvi r-reln,- sl)-siiewera; Sfr«iew; 


Aockland 

Svdeev 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

c 

P 


Bangkok 

34 

97 

36 

79 

fr 

Belling 

19 

44 

4 

39 

tr 

Hong Kong 

24 

75 

21 

70 

0 

Manila 

31 

IB 

37 

fl 

0 

NiwPetM 

.'ll 

91 

If 

44 

h- 

Seoul 

15 

49 

13 

.45 

cl 

Shanghai 

17 

*3 

11 

52 

fr 

Singapore 

31 

88 

25 

77 

« 

Tolpel 

33 

73 

» 

48 

0 

Tokyo 

15 

44 

IS 

59 

r 

AFRICA 






Aigiere 

7T 

70 

7 

44 

IT 

Cairo 

32 

90 

16 

41 

Ir 

1 1 M 

19 

44 

17 

44 

fr 

M 

18 

44 

13 

45 

d 

iwrore 

35 

72 

10 

50 

fr 

Lorn 





no 

Nolrabi 

34 

75 

15 

49 

fr 

Tmds 

20 

48 

U 

55 

d 

LATIN AMERICA 



BuoneoAirof 

18 

*4 

0 

44 

fr 

Umo 

« 

77 

w 

47 

fr 


M 

61 

1 

32 

r 


M 

06 

30 

48 

fr 

Soo Paulo 

— 

— 


non 

no 

NORTH AMERICA 



ABChcragt 

• 5 

33 

17 

M 

sw 

AllMfg 

?T 

70 

5 

41 

Pd 

Beeton 

11 

47 

7 

36 

ew 


13 

44 

1 

M 

fr 

Penver 

34 

77 

3 

39 

fr 

Betrait 

9 

48 

3 

39 

fr 

Hanaluhi 

77 

81 

14 

61 

ir 

HDUshm 

22 

71 

14 

57 

r 

LOf Angeles 

fil 

n 

ri 

57 

PC 

Miami 


m 


70 

d 

MlnnenpeHs 

14 

41 

3 

57 

PC 

MsDtraoi 

■ 1 

m 

.9 

1* 

fr 

NewBB 

U 

7S 

38 

<8 

Cl 

Hew York 

1.1 

SS 

j 

3* 

r 

SoAFranctseg 

17 

43 

9 

48 

Cl 

seottli 

13 

55 

» 

46 

r 

Teronlo 

0 

32 

■7 

19 

oe 


Wtaihlnglea 
no-nol avnllDbli 
St4tormv. 


M 44 4 39 cr 
»«vercast: oe-aeftly 


PRIOA1-S FORECAST — CHAMNCL: ROUOll. FRANKFURT: Showon. Tenw. 
9—7 — 45l. reHDQ^ Rain, Temp. 9-S <48—41). MADRID: ClOwdy, 
Temp. ia— 3 i44M*tejMtiii..vnnif. Roln. Temp. 13—4 <55 — 391. PARIS! 
Rain. Temp, .Ifl | T im Tt TEL 

AVIV: 41). 

BANGKOK: "^Wno. 

Temp. 14— d -1*1 — 34 

(9o-75i.Teir j I - « 



\^bi4d Stod& Markers 


Via Agence France-Presse April 1 1 

dosing ptieet in local caimcus aaless orAermn miietued. 



1 

1 



Oeea 

^rtVe 

ABN 

405 

400 

ACF HoMlnB 

900 

200 


liUO 


AKZO 

1)140 


AImM 

»&58 


AMEV 

n&jo 

2I» 

A'Doffl Rubber 

US 

0.10 

Amro Bank 

7340 

73.10 

BVG 



BuohrmannT 

9040 

90 







Fekker 

9940 

9040 


HU 

US 

Hcineken 

15740 

15740 

Hoogavens 

4140 

4240 

KLM 

4U0 

5840 

Naeroen 

4740 

47J0 

NotNeodar 

70.10 

<9.90 

Nodllovd 



OeaVandarG 

31* 

316 



6740 

Phlllpn 

5740 

5740 


72 


Rodamea 

U8JD 

13870 

Rellnee 

<740 

4740 

Raremo 

4440 

4440 

Royal Dutch 



Unilever 

34440 





VMP Skarl, 

15140 

150 

VMU 

211 

20140 


AHP.CGS General Indca : 383148 








W.'w • < 





' Vi 1 


•lit i< 

Ijl ' 








f ► « • 









la... 







1. - 



Le • 


L^. y, 



L'l • 

.--I , 








1 

1 


cm* Prow. 

Kersladr 314 m 

Koufinl 238 238 

KIOMWH.D 244 35840 

Kieockner Werke 71 7220 

Knippstohl 108 109 

Unde 42240 421 

LwilhenM 19&S0 194 

154 I54JO 

Mwineeinaiin 16340 14&3D 
McialiaeHRselwft 26150 232 

Muencii.Rueck 1140 USD 

Prevseog — ~ 

RwetaereWerke 

Mierine 
Siemens 
Titvnen 
Vorta 
vebo 
VEW 


274 274 

338 30 ) 

154 144 

45240 452 

539 JO 541 4D 
9«J0 9940 
ISAM 18A80 
1B0J0 179J0 
1284012450 


VaUOwagaowierk 20940 208 


Anmnerebanlc ledax : 120230 
Previous : i2»C7i 


HomMKioM I 


AB<i-Tililuii1ieii 

Allianz Vera 

BOSf 

Bovor 

BoperHvpa, 

Bovor.VerJOBOk 

Commerzbank 
Con W guw im l 
Palmier B era 
Deguna 

Deumae Botadc 

OautfMBBilk 

Drasdner Bonk 

eUB-Sdaill 

GHH 

Hodinci 


1115011140 

1070 1058 
287.10 20740 
3115031540 
343 343 

3M 330 
37S4D 373 

1A34Dt44jO 

uejotWJD 

467.tD 444 

35940 340 

148 1M30 
4425044740 
1923011040 
2I44D 228 
157 15440 
4» 473 

2128021250 
110 11150 
409 294 

17B 170 

25140 25148 


BkEOSt Asia 

OMOtio Kong 

Light 

Cran Harbor 
Hong Seng Bonk 
HK Electric 
HKHMelS 
HKLund 

HKWtion 
HuiA wiionipaa 
JorWneMatn 
JordlneSec 
Mew World 

§firp“rS!r’ 

SinwDarbv 

Sleluk 

Swim pncinc A 
VW^IOCltA ' 
Wtiie kA k war 
Wlosar 

WtorMtnn 


23 

1540 

1540 

9JS 

44 

7JD 

3240 

440 

845 

73 

445 

2140 


23 

15.10 

1540 

9JS 


II 


740 

33 

540 

8.95 

7040 

445 

3340 


1140 

440 

liOS 

945 

445 

144 

2440 

745 

Susu. 

4475 

2.30 


11 


1210 

440 

345 

945 

lifi 

149 

3340 

745 


Hong Sing Index : I4B3J9 
PmrtOH : 147041 




ASCI 

Angle American 

AngtaAmGeld 

Bartows 

Blyvoor 

Bimels 

DeBoers 

Drl e twnetii 

Bune* 

GF4A 

Hernienv 

Steel 


PrnSiBvn 
RVOPlg l 
SABrewi 
St Helena 
Sosel 

WOslHoieiiiB 


740 7M 
2700 2635 
17350 17358 
1090 1047 
1875 1450 
8410 8450 
1058 1037 
Sm 5375 
1770 ITOO 
3435 3400 
3100 3015 
395 390 

827S 8075 
1088 998 

4300 4100 
1775 1710 
490 480 

3475 3300 
595 SBS 
6950 4100 


Cemge iO eBr yiJk Index : lOTija 
Pr e e fca i e ! 188748 




AACerp 
AUiee-Lveng 
A^AmGeld 993 S8II/2 

Bobcack 153 153 

Boretovs 337 339 


Ban 

BA.T. 

fleictwm 

BICC 

BL 

sm circle 
BOCCrauP 
Beeis 

Bewetcr Indue 
BP 

Brit Home Si 
BrW Telecom 
Brn Ae r o in ac i 
BTR 
Burmon 
Coble Wlreien 

Cadbury Sdiw 

Ot nr ier Cons 

Coots Potons 

Cemmerelai u 

Cent Geld 

CeurlauMs 

DolMv 

Be B eers* 

Distlllars 

Orlefentein 

FIsens 

PreeSiGed 

GEC 

GKN 

Gloeoc 

Grand Mel 

Guinness 

OUS 


CISM Prev 

539 539 

333 333 

358 343 

250 253 

37 37 

485 4BI 

275 2» 

173 178 

366 247 

538 541 

270 267 

138 13915 

430 430 

467 674 

221 206 

535 542 

153 153 

198 195 

144 147 

217 215 

557 547 

U3 140 

473 478 

50 530 

277 278 

82814 S27M 

308 308 

S30W S39W 

186 184 

231 232 

1025^310 59/64 
291 293 


IPI 


itoMementl 

Italmoblilorl 

Aiiedlobofica 

Montetflnn 

OllveitI 

Pirelli 

RA5 

Rlnosccnte 

SIP 

Snia 

Siende 

Stel 


HUB Corrgnt Index : 1199 
Prevleiie : 1195 


FMris 


Air UauMe 

AisilwniAtL 

AvDociawli 

Bonaire 

BIC 


445 

318.10 


ISO 


Hawker 

iCi 

imps 

Joguor 

Llevds Bonk 

LenrbD 

LUCDS 

Marks and Sp 

Midland Bonk 

Nal West Bonk 
PontfO 
PIMrvien 
Pfeesev' 

Real Elect 

Ronsiontein 

Rank 

Reed Mi 

Reutnrs 

Rovoi Dmek e 

RTZ 

Sooteni 

Sobisbury 

Shell 

STC 

SWCtw r lerad 

Tote and Lvie 

TCftCQ 

Them EMI 

T.i.greup 

TrofcilgarHM 

TMF 

Ultramar 

Unilever c 

United BIseuHs 

Viekers 

w.Pecp 

wjioldliigs 

War Leon 3WC 

WDOlmrm 


244 

795 

204 

411 

747 

186 

303 

532 

177 

360 

143 

324 

574 

340 

283 

196 

196 


944 

795 

306 

413 

759 

185 

305 

S77 

179 

370 

Ml 

334 

587 

341 

m 

194 

196 


5118 S114W 

350 353 

554 550 

361 359 

44nb44 47/64 
*47 


BBS 

324 

714 

194 

474 

415 

354 

397 

334 

335 
138 
340 

1199/64 

in 

369 

54844 


890 

324 

715 

194 

474 

430 

2S3 

401 

236 

334 

139 

241 

ir<e 

177 

264 

S47Kr 


SM%* 535VI: 
38*1 3S4k 


F,T.lilndeK:9S7At 


Mama 




BSN.GD 

Correfoiir 

Chib Med 

CoDmeo 

Dumez 

Ell-Aoulielne 

Europe 1 

GenEwv 

HoOane 

imelei 

Lofera Cep 

Legrend 

l-Oreel 

Motra 

Miehelin 

WMPennar 

Meet He nn etiv 

Moulinex 

Nerd-Est 

OceWentale 

Pemod Ric. 

Peireiee ifset 

Peugeot 

PwMn 

Prbiiemps 

RadMeerm 

Redeute 
Rousiei Uelpr 
Skis Roes lg ne l 
Seur.Perrler 

Teiemeean 
T hu i i i nn eSP 
Valeo 


47S 

2485 

2170 

ltS4 

255 


891 

437 


49110 

2144 

3570 


9948 


11140 IT 
89.95 8 
707 
718 709 

34240 36440 
317 JM 


. 1 Ciets Prw. 

a SkansKa 



0- SKF 

213 


0 SwudlshMoleh 

320 

7)9 

N vaiva 

250 

345 

lo* AffdorsvacrldM Index : 39440 

2 * Freviaas : 391 41 
>0 



g|| 1 

0 




905 

919 

ANI 

290 

2U 

ANZ 

4M 

450 

BHP 

4« 

440 


370 

Firai 


249 

944 





377 

370 

< Comolco 

297 

385 

1 CRA 

432 

418 

t CSR 

310 


1 Dunien 

738 

1^ 

) Elders ixl 

320 



leO 

159 

7 Maaelian 

260 

360 

1 MIM 

336 

334 



BLiB 

i Ookbrldge 

90 

as 

i Peko 

430 

434 

s Pasetdan 

410 

404 

5 RGC 

SS 



444 


n Sialgn 

1716 

m 



94 

* WoodsMe 

tS7 

155 

[ warmow 

353 

353 

5 All Ordhiui Ml index U43J0 

$ Pnvloui :IS840 

1 



jii Tofcyw Ji 


5440 
240 
300 
1499 1430 


505 SU 
9410 2650 


STS 

230 


Agefl Index ;3I346 
Provieut : 31071 
CAC index : 31840- 
Previous : 2l6Je 




Baueiead 

1.7» 

Cow Storage 

ZJ4 

DBS 


FrasurNoavo 

41.4 

How Pgr 

Z23 

inchCoM 

345 

ual Banking 

5.90 

QCBC 

. 14 

OUB 

344 

Semb Shinyard 

)J1 

SIme Darby 

191 

5 SMaaishto 

103 

SI Trading 

ATS 

uoe 

4.4* 

OUB Indev ! 40945 
Frsvfous rmns 







NtoefchslM \ 


AGA 

Alfa Lovol 


Astra 

AilnCeoa 

Boiiden 

Clectrolin 

Eriesenn 

Ewue 

HeMelibaM>en 
Phormocio 
O obh S BO ni d - 
sondvix 


390 NA. 
199 192 

359 359 

413 385 

114 no 
NA 210 
311 lu 

989 399 

=5 

395 ' 285 


Akol • 
Aeonioieni 
AsaMGlaM 
Bonk el Tokyo 
Erfdoastofw 

Conon 

Ciioh 

Pal Nippen Print 
Poiwa House 

Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
Fulllw 
HNoal 
Hondo 

Japan Air Linn 
Rollina 
Konnl Powor 
Kawaaofci Steel 
Kirin Brewnry- 
KometsulM 

Kubota 

Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mlleubishi Bonk 
MltsuMsMOism 


Mitsubishi EMC 
SMtMbMil Hsavy 
MlisubIshICorp 
Mitsui and m 
Mltsufcnhl 
Miliuinl 
NEC 

nOK InsoMers 
Nihkasec 
Nippon Steel 
NlpnonVueen 
Ninon 
Nomura See 
OlvnuMs 
Ptanuer' 

Rleei) 

Sharp 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bonk 
Sumitomo Chem 
ISumltomD Metal 
ToleelCerp 
Taistn Marine 
iTakedoChem - 
iTdk 

Tellln _ 

TekvoEMc. Power 1470 1460 
rukvu ASerIne 847 855 


CMie Prev, 

403 400 

365- 268 
SS2 525 
345 341 

487 487 

1II» 990 
1840 1870 
m 925 
760 755 

151 15T 

241 2a 

658 464 

1150 1178 
1130 1130 
2440 3530 
891 m 
992 997 

ixio 

im 

317 230 

151 153 

313 314 

441 447 

884 896 

6480 5450 
463 464 


ad 
Tovoia 

vamaielil Sec 


JOB JOB 
iSo 1350 
820 820 


Sow Index: 98136 


ZvMh 


Adlu 

Bank Leu 
Brown Boveri 
ObeCeloy 


3760 3770 
3540 3565 
1638 1635 


Croat Suisse 

B l eclrawott 

Georg Ptseher 

■aterdlseouni 

JoeebSuchord 

JuHnoil 

LondliGvr 

Neehe 

Perilken-B 

RadMBoDv 

Sunuos 

Schlndlor 

Sutter. 

sac 

Swlnoir 


461 465 

930 945 

891 891 

830 814 

520 524 

1330 1350 
355 m 
tow im 

5*6 564 

1550 1560 
14190 1690 
1100 1120 
5)0 519 

1330 USB 

4360 6270 

292 393 

1390 1380 
147 147 

617 es 
444 447 

3t0 313 

1460 1480 

im im I NA: not ouotod: na: net 


300 ' 3425 
3880 3875 
718 730 

1910 1930 
4175 4390 
1970 1950 
1450 isn 

**— . Ama, 

1475 M70 
•TOO 8735 
7825 7850 
4025 4025 
373 370 

367 365 

1870 1068 


IWOBIW MIO 


SwlnRelnourona 10250 loiso 
1415 1410 


Swlie Volksbonk 
UniOftBank 3730 3700 

Wlnierthur 4500 4*50 

Zuriai Ins 21600 2i3n 


gBCIMex: 43140 

PraviBOt : 43241 


laJV I nn W9 i«Qp_ <11 

48S I mitoM/ )(d: •ff-tflvWtntf: 


Fox Says Losses Widened 


Chiia/ Frea rniernaaoKOl 

LOS ANGELES— Twentieth Ceatuiy Fox Film 
Corp« ciliog decreased featiire nim and tdemtm 
revenue, reported a 72-pefcent widreing of its net 
los in (he second quarter, ended Feb. 2. to $I 1.9 
million from $d.9 mlUioo a year eariier. 

The movie studio said Wixlnesdav that the l o ssf ? 
had been expected, and that since dcL I it has been 
undergoing a. reorganization in its rilni and Revi- 
sion divisions. 

'*lt is anticipated these changes wiilposition Rut 
for improved future performance,” Fm said in a 
siatemeot Wednesday.- 


987 AMI Pre» 
46200 AeklondS 
11300 AgnlaE 
4900 Agra I nd A 
48436 Alt Erwrgv 
BOD Alla Nal 
SOOAIooCmi 

WBSAigeinasr 
BBHAraeen 
239ArgusCpr 
ITUAtali 
36540 BP Canada 
354316 Bank BC 
140176 Bank N 5 
21300 Barrteko 
27D0SalenAI 
68287 BononnR 
STOOBralanie 
1600 Bromalea 
4e0BrendaM 
6955 BCFP 
50004 BC Res 
9854BCPbOM 
liOOBrwnswh 
SOOBuddCan 
16950 CAE 
2DDCCLA 
57100 CDIStbBf 
35500 Cad Fru 
smocNorwesi 
esoCPaor* 
60050 Can Timt 
360 CGE 
60914 Cl Bk Com 
SHU can Not Res 
182122 CTIreAl 

3D63CUtll8 

SDOCara 
3l4SCManess 
60800 c pisib A 
57100 COIstb B r 
2390 CTL Bonk 

lODConventrs 

2DCOow«stA 
35050 CoenkaR 
2)0OCanran4 
66l9Crewnx 

31460CMrRns 
30374 Dnenpw 
SeOPowiA 
I3MI PentsgnAp 

7810 Ponlsen B t 

33000«vgteM 
23436 CNcknsn A I 
OISDiekMna 
ISMDofnanA 
1466*PufoeaA 
36310 p« Pent A 


CaMffiflB xweb ijg .<P 

High Low Ciooe Cbge 
55398 SI 51 — lia 
51614 16 


U> 


SKib 17U 


87 


1300 1 

4eoenwe 
22153 Eoully Svr 
ISO FCA mil 
lOBOOCFoiewiC 

34700 PloibrdBe 

347FurtfyRe9 
25125 Fid IndA 
UOOPed Plan 
2000 F City Fin 
200 Prosor 
. SOOGondtaA 
11530 GoocConw 
14492 GMcnido 

STOaOHiniltar 

SSB9SGeMcBrp( 

MOOGrendma 

nooonmdne 
^OLFnrosl 
4150 ol Pacific 
ODGroyOAIi 
2HCraupA 
SOHrtflnaAf 
llOHgwkK 


82089 Horatg^ 


.•4638 Maavl- 
68810 imoea 
usaipdai - 
2lB9BliileMGa 
WSUliWThom 
-6360 iMsr Pipe . 
30610 JOpnock- 
8OllO.KamKafl0 

■ffifcST' 


4*.'8 

521W 2098 2118+18 

515 15 IS + ■* 

532 22 22 

5331* 231* 338,+ W 
5lf« 191* 19M + 'ft 
511 11 11 

5914 918 9IA 

53418 33(8 3418+118 
5518 5Vi 548+ 18 

51368 131k 131*+ 18 
135 132 133 —2 

51S68 15 1518+18 

415 410 410 

55 S 5 +5 
51466 1466 146k + U 
598, 966 966— 1* 

59 86* 866— «* 

^ 246 250 + 5 

523 318i 218. 

5169 k 161* 16(6— •* 
53318 2316 23(H— 66 
5169 * 1668 1666 
53516 251* 281*— 18 

5598 566 578 

S1^S<* 15(8 1S\. 

534 . 2366 34 + Is 

52918 »66 3966 

WV» ^ W18 + ? 

58(8 5(6 lU— 1* 

S17V8 1768 1718 
Sill* im 11W+18 
5718 6^ 718 + (6 

» 568 56^64 

5568 S66 568 

510 9«k 10 + V8 

5SV8 5V8 5V8 

55(6 O'* S'* + •* 

315 305 3)5 +10 

51368 128. 1236— V8 
S17*« 17*8 1768+ 1* 
185 180 185 

469 455 455 — s 

435 435 435 +10 
51266 1218 1266+ 4k 
51)68 1168 im+w 
57 66k 7 + M 

nu 6A 71* + 68 

-5718 ._*<8 718+6* 

315 215 215 —5 

SM ^ 3668 

516 IS8i 16 + '.8 

541«8 418. 4r.g.hkk 

55 ■ 8—1* 

*iL. + S 

*76* .768 76*+ 6k 
SO 1968 20 — •* 
518(8 ||,a 18H+ *8 
10* no 104 + 4 
2^ 285 295 +10 

5301* 1966 20 _ u 

533 216* 23 

01318 13 111* + V8 

S12? h3+ 2 

*2766 27(8 2766 
*»«•»« 11*8+1 
284 377 3S4 .k 9 

SlOH 10(8 1DW ’ 

SB 76h 8 + >* 

AS 2 2? 

53566 3588 356^ b 

;2s 

S61V6 -im irib.-'w 
m 19 128+5 
516 3566 3566+ u, 

'SM(6 U . . lAH, ' 

s... 

534 33(8 331k +Iki 


767 LL Lac 
11787 LoMow Co 
300MOSHA 
16057 MclenHX 
BgMeGrowH 
2192 MerlondE 
26iaMolsnAf 
2IOOMoisenB 

450 Murphy 
-...M NotHKO L 
122S04 NorcRida 
8831 Norean 
TUMNvaAIIAI 

13700 Nowaaw 

68832 NlMIM 99 A 
lSD90aiewea 
23100 OshowoAf 

4950 Pumour 
2^PonCanp 
raspembing 
ITOOPhonlx OH 
..475 Pine Pant 

g!s:iSr«"> 

nBOGueSfuree 

8900 Rom Pet 
1 5300 Royrpck r 

331 RodPOth 

47800RtfStanhsA 
10700 Res Serv { 
1450 Revn Prp a 

liSgSSS* 

222SSsr 

32nSCDtl9l 
9062 S e e r s Con 
ijgn Shell <S." 
3N7BSherrll1 
500 Sigma 
100 staler Bf 
15490 southm 
422SStBradai 
31748 StelaA 

ismsuiptro 

36M Steep R 
35500 Sydney 0 
6WB Talcorp 
19223 Tara 
ll90T«cfcCorA 
L39«0TeekBi 
_40DTeladvno 
3MM To- Coo 
10196 ThemNA 
SOTWTorOm Bk 

’OgUTorwwBI 
lISSIrodersAf 
9M5 TmsAU 
3200 TrlnKv Res 
38138 Tl^lta Ua 


25726 Trjmoe 
...MO Trizee a f 
3^69 Turbo I 
,9200 Un Carbid 

^val^ 

19900 VerstiAl 
2M0Veitgrsn 
mwriowDd 
AMSVtfsslmln 
HMWosian 
*355WooandA 
auoovkSS?'' 

Total Sales; 13370539 wSms 


HIgb Lost gill Cbes 

$37 30(8 37 +*2 

$18(8 It 18 
SIS 18 18 — V 

S2S(k 25 25 —U, 

52218 2268 2268-4 
435 42S 435 +5 

574 75V 74 

S14 15*8 16 +18 

$2366 2346 3516+ M 
52568 25(8 2548+ >8 
$l8(Ei 1768 l8V8+6( 
51468 1618 14{8 + M 
54(6 618 6(6 

SSVs 25(8 25(8 
51 a 51 
trvk 7 7 

5246* 34(8 2466+U 
S76k 718 7H+M 
$331* 3266 326^ U 
SIB 1718 18 + U 
$7(8 738 71^ P 

528(6 28 28(6 + .(t 

120 117 120 

2SH 28(8 +<l% 

455 445 455 +£' 

54(8 4(8 4(8+ M 

5868 aw BVk— }8 
51068 106* lOk— H 
52168 21 21 

272 270 270 —2 

145-. 140 145 +W. 

*«8 »8 7>8 - 

Sim 1018 11W+48 

541 4! 41 — (6 

S46j 41* 4W+J9 

5221k 22H 22«k+ « 
5718 768 T6k 

$3r% 25 2 S( 8 +M 

57 61b 7 + » 

SSiB 19k 5*8 + 16 
51068 1018 1068-% 
556(8 56 S6Vt*Vi 
512Hi 12(8 • 12(8. ^ 
930(8 9068- 20(8— >8 
330 330 330 +5 

265 360 310. —70 

25 K K — 2 
101 101 WI + L 

523*8 '221* a*8t& 
$13(8 1266 1318+% 
S136k 13(* 13V8+U 
51118 in8 1168 + 69 
53568 3$(b 3S68+.M 
557(8 5*66 S W % 
51968 If I* . 1918 + i* 
519(8 19 1918 + M 

5231* 33 231* +<^- 

$718 Tit 718 
485 375 375 ' 

52566 ' 25(8 3518 
93468 SI68 346fc-M( 
430 . 435 430 

5276* 2766 3766 + 

75 62 68 ' 

$12 13 12 

S11V8 111* 1I68 + >P 
$1168' 111* 11V6— J6' ' 
708 108 108 , . ' 

308 2N 3M 4-5 
541* 4 418^ - 

Sim .im im ^ 

5141* 14 14 — ta ' 

51568 15 15«b— H> 

S746h 74(8 7466 + * 

m im n6fc+% • 
$1368 13% UI^V 





('-2 — 


-• _ 


k. 





TSEsooiBdax; 




asm Bank Mont 

9199 Pofi) Txt A 
JMSgMfWTfW 
40WB MfltBk gaa 
yggW"wC8ra 


MlBb-LofrCNHoC^*^ 

S2468 36 241*-i-: 

SI4I8 .1468 1668-" 
512(8 13 12 

SI4Vk 148. )4(h- 
51768 I7to 1768+1 
53168 3168 ai68+v 
518)0 . 17« 1868-': 
519 ' ink 19 . 

538% aF8 38% +' 




%$• 


S Sr*** 


51868- IBM 


34 .’-f 




































“ffleieorob 


®“>«ArdoS!.9attj„Ti. 


Jciaiei 


and! 


Diaries” n4,' 

te Beau\'oir, ^ith t- 

e some n,;>e-'r’'UJanftr ®l 


i 



TO fflusi Slav 
■eaSzittgihai ‘W®^ 

g after me, iBdeS?’'^®^ 

ifter them.” ' 


“ »ij|u 
«ouid 


“« conquesi he haT™ ^ 


ime 
reedom. 
five 


“akchal' 


His 


r moaihs'^Wif'^ 

irroraadoeiMnu 

• crack dovin ^oui* 

•ree” ' 

not find in these nojriwwi. 

vnortbeiroub^Sj 

lush Civil War. t£ anTt^ 
friends in Pan, *f 
nuch.Webiow[roil£:^ 
iwirs just ho\^ i3ffi= 

ihis diOTht^g 

a bieraiure lor 

ing . mere s no daaatfllit 

diip,’ 'Aiih an^ihint mb 

ie his dais and tim. 


,, CaiiflUlypirSkifPftnafadm 

: ^^:Dlk30 ^Eric Shbw^ die 
•rightbanded aoe d the National 
■Tdipie chas^ioD San Di^ Pa* 
.dns^ ttnek out a eaiea-hxg^ 11 
■bam and scattered four hits 
'Wedsesd^ in a 34 neuxy over 
die San FiaodscoOiants. 

• Slow, vriMse prevkn ^xikeoat 
lugb was eight, did DO! aOow a waBc 
or a ruxiner pw second base and 
.retired 13 consecodve banets be* 
tween the flm and fifth imutt^ 

• San Dkgo's raanager, Didt 
'liants, was amazed. - 

.**No one cwld eqw et nine in-, 
.-ninp from him this Milyjet alone 
j diiuoDt and 11 strikeoms,” 
^'liaiss 

- San Di^ got the oi^ run it 
'needed in the first innmg when 
ler^ DavUriii^ed, reacfaedsecond 
■on an enor and scosed on Kevin 
‘McRejmdds* single. The Padres 
got insurance in the ninth oa Jeny 
Royster's two-nm douUe. 

Dodgers 2^ Astras 4 
' InLosAngdes.SieveHoweam- 
ply *'5aid a little prayer and went 10 


war he said after gei^ a save in 
his fint qi ip e ara noe in the ma^ 
leames in more than a year. 

Howe, sdio vas sounded 
cause ct cocaine had not 
pitdied in the ffl^ors stneeSq>tein- 
ber 1983. b addititailo the suspen- 
sion, he had undergone dhow sor* 
gery last wtoier. 

Howe came in in the bottom of 
the ninth after Houston had sooted 
once and had a runner on first with 
two ous. On Howe's first pildi, 
Jose Cruz lined out to center field 
to end the game. 

Jeny Rosss, who owns a 20-10 
record against Houston, had 
bdped with a two-nm so* 
gle in the sixth iimiiK a^ took a 
five*hitter and a 5-0 lead into die 
eightL But he left after giring iqi 
two more Mis that inning andKen 
HowdI threw'a wild jntdi, aHowing 
one run to score. Alan Ashby's two- 
nm singje made it 5-i 

b the nioih, Ke^ Bass drew a 
kadirff wa&, then scosed on a sac- 
rifice fly by Phil Gamer before 
Howe came in and redied Cruz, 
Housum's deanup bhter. 

Expos 4, Reds 1 

b Cincmnafi ; BM CollickSOD, 
who had lost five saaiK)u April 
dedskms gnee 1983. plumed seven 


Oirerpool, 

. wvf str o ng znnmgs, aDoiring four bits, 

Juventiis Wm 
In Soccer 


VnM PrtB IrntnaOtmet 

LONDON —Title4older Liver- 
'poM and pownfiil Juventus soared 
ooanfortable first-leg home vic- 
;tix!es in the European Chan^sions* 
'SoocerCup cm Wednesd^ i^t to 
pave the way for a probaMe second 
'cooseentive Enrinn-Iialiaa finsi. 

Ltveipoal, imidi edged Roma 
. on penrities to enn ^ yeafs 
.‘IcrowD fix' the fourth tune in ^it 
years, defeated Panathinaikos of 


HntdeBrodcs, acquired from the 
New York Meu m the big trade for 
Gary Carter, drove in miee runs 
with two Mngfe* and a sacrifice fly 
Mui teammate Tim Rants oonttfly 
nied two singles a^ a tiqde .aiid 
sude iwobas^ 

-The Reds' i^yer^nanager, Pete 
Rost; «in gi*d *firi ha<t a fun-scor- 
ing gFoond oat in four at bats. Tbe 
Mt raised his career total to 4,100. 

Bine Jays 1« Royals 0 
In Torhuo, m the American 
League, Bill CaudilU the rdief 
pitcher acquired m a trade and 
signed, for S9 nnOion over five 


claiSMd ‘'CiBeoe. 4-0, while Inventus beat yc«s, piii^ out of ;ams m the 


nnreiMs side of his ch^J 
mse.We Qowfcnwihafe 
Qis armchair during ibe Gat 
r tried lo get an inteUecnSIt 
sat going, but in ihe {ft. 
r gave it up. He ended dev 
nicies to the underground k 
a repuiaiJOQ and possihhsa 
nan Paris. True polnkal fl»> 
come later, often cour^ 
ribly WTOiigheadci as ftSsj 
! the Siamsu at the ttiTe 
re becoming ashamed gfSiit 


' ^Qideanx of Fnnce; 3-0, in tbdr 
semifinal in Turin. 

- Everton, Liveipoors Mersn^ 
'neigbba*. did well m tb Cup-vl^ 
! nets Cop, holding Bayern Munidi 


seventh, eighth «nd mntb tnitnwK 
for the vktoiy and Gary Lswd^ 
acquired m another deal, worired a 
perfect lOlh. 

Both Toronto starter Doyle Al- 



Favorites Get Workouts 
In Stanley Cnp Openers 


Thi Assoeuaed fna 

EDMONTON. Alberta — 
Hometown fans heaved a great sigh 
of rdief aroond the Nalicwd Ho^- 
ey League on Wednesd^' mgbt af- 
ter th& got started erff cm 
the right foot in the Stanley C^p 
pbyws. Even if those teanisflad to 
work ovenime to do sa 

The Hgfi^Hing champdM) Oilers 
edged Los Angeles, 3-2, on Lee 
Fogolin’s shaipAOgled 3:01 
into overtime. The PhOadelpfaia 
Flyers, who had the most pdnts 
during tbe regular season, defeated 
the Not Yen Rangers on Mark 
Howe’s shot 8:01 mto the extn 


session. 

The Washii^oa Cqiitals beat 
tbe Not Yo^Hlaoders, 4-3, when 
Alan Hawc^ scored at 2:28 of 


ler outworked two Rangers behind 
the Not Ycok net to gel the puek 
and it out front 
“Z didn’t know tbe puck was in 
until I heard the crowd,” Howe 
said, “Tonight is history. We have 
to concentrate on tomorrow night” 
As for letting the Rangers rally, 
he said, “I don't thiat we let up. 1 
rhinif things just clickcd for them.” 

Captds 4, blandm 3 
In Washington, both teams 
scored three times in tbe second 
period. Mike Bos^ had two goals 
for New York and Lany Murphy 

NHL FOCUS 


Steve Penn^ at 9:21 and Rick 
Middleton added an insurance goal 
for Boston at 14:05. 

“Wewanted to see if we couldn’t 
put toother a real ajod fust peri- 
od'' said tbe Brain? coach, Harry 
Smden. “We fell that would do us a 
lot of good. We didn't fed we ctmld 
afford to fall bdiind at alL" 

Bbdt Hawks 9. Red Wings 5 
b CMcago, the Black Haw'ks set 
a team record for playoff goals in 
one game. Rookie Eddie Olezyk 
scotM twice and got an asrist for 
the Hawks, wto held a 4-0 lead 
after one period and tvere up. 8-3, 
after 40 minutes. 

“1 remember siitiog in the stands 
last year during the playoffs, 
waidung tbe Hawks lose to Minne- 
sota.” said Olezyk, a Chicago na- 
tive. “I made up my mind that if the 
Hawks drafted me, tbe greatest 
thrill of nw life would be to usten to 
the crowd in my hometown cheer- 
ing for me in a Stanley Cup playoff 
game." 

NorA Stars X Bines 2 
In St Louis, the North Stars sur- 
prised the Blues, who held a 6-1-1 
marpn over Minnesota in games 


buMi/Uhtl^ Fresi kwniabood 

Yankee ribortstop Bobby Meacham jumped high to avoid Rich Gedman of the Red Sox, 


two on power plays for the Ca|u- 
lals. b oveninie, Haworth skated 
in virtually untouched from the left 
overtime, triiOe the Winnip^ lets' comer to beat the Isl^ers’ goalie, 

Brian Mullen deflected in a shot Billy 

7:56 mto overtime to beat the Cal- ffag vicioty was Washington's 
gary Flames, S-4. first at home against the Islanders 

Elsewhere; Boston upset Mon- jg playoff The Island- 

treal, 5-3; Chicago maulm Detrdt, os, who mgniig wt only 17 shots 
9-5; Minnesota surprised Sl Louis, Wednesday, rttiriTtiat^ the Capi- 
3-2. and (^ebec bttt Buffalo, 5-2. uQs from the playoffs the last two 
All series continued Thursd^ years and had won their last six 
night at the same aies. postywtfon overtime tna^n over ivunnesou m gamu 

COefs 3, Sfflgs 2 was very surprised,” Haworth during the regular season. Goalie 

Fogplin was an unlik^’ hero on saii£ '‘in the pl^offs, in overtime, Gilles Meloche made 39 saves and 
a team led by super scorers Wayne thmpg dem’t usually open up like ^^8 Hartsburg ended a 1-1 tie 
Grecdty, Faul Coff^ and Jari Thaf^ with a deflected slapAot in tbe 

Kutri. CofT^ and Karri spi tbe ftitins 5, 3 

Oilers' other two ^als. while Craig is Montreal, Ken Lmseman 

Redmond and Demie Nicholls scored a gori pnd set up two, in- 
scored for Los ^gries, Nicbt^ eluding tbe winner bv Keith 
making it 2-2 with 4:37 to go in Crowder, for the Bruins. lAuy were 
regDlanon. hd p by the g oaitgnd ia g of Doug 

Then FMolin produced the ric- Keans, who made 19 saves and held 
lory on what be called “a lucky off tbe Chnadieos — who finished 
go^” wfaidi came on the only shot fij^t m the Adams Division, 12 
of the overtime. peunts ahead c/f the fourth'place 

"I was rixMit at the gic^ line Bruins — after they surged oack 
when I let it go," said FogMin, who from a 3-0 ddiciL 
h^ only four g(»!s aD season. **! CbarheSmmer.MikeO’Coimd] 
didn’t look at all but I knew 1 had a pp d t inc^man put Boston on top, 
little room oo the outside.” then it was tied by goals from Petr 

Svoboda, Mario Tremblay and 
Bobby S^th, who scored 42 sec- 
onds apart in the third period. 

Crowds snapped a pass from Lin- 
seman past Montreal goaltender 


to a g^ess draw b West Germa- «ander utf Kansas ^ starts sUding into second on a wild Ifarow. Yankees lawibHl vriA a tbnd, losing by tis Wednesday, 
ny and Rapid ^ennadefoied vis* wMi » J J 


LotmhU, turiiiir of 'A&n C- 
jfty." ■TwLviSarJffflrf'^ 

rrd?/e>r. " HTiJftf f/iu 
CSt 


. itii% Moscow Dynamo, 3-1. 

' The UEFA saw Videoton of 
Bungaiy sccoe a 3-1 rictoiy at 
. home over Ze^'eznicar Sangevo at 
.Yugoslavia and bter-Milan ddfeat 
Real Madrid, 2-0. 

The second mardies in all 
three cffliqietitions win be played b 
two weeks. 

Ian Rhsh. the leading scorer b 
Eurqpe last seasoo, ffleaiheaded 
. UveiTKxd’s success with two goals 
*b 60 seconds. 

t The WdA- KHOBatiooal, wb> 


Danny Jackson pitched well 
enough to win. Jackson went nine 

binngs and gtm up five Mts with- kb during an attempted .pickoff 
out walkbg a batter, Mexanto and may mss Friday nights 000- 


allowed five hits before Caodill re- 
lieved b the seveaith with runners 
on first and thinl and two outs and 
. got Oxdx Ctmcqxaon (m a fiy ball. 

b the 10ib.Torooto’sWinie Up- 
shaw led off wib a single and was 
ncrificed to ihitd. One out later, 
Tony Fernandez hit a sharp 
gFOimder to deq) shon that Cem- 
cqx^ fidded. Fonandez baie^ 
.beaL Gcmcqx7<ca^..throw to first 


vio'Jk bean [ino>». He v 
hod ! ! mcLs. and .qirreiidx 
a liiomcind 31 the rui<iL 

NORTH 
AAKil 
: A ! » 2 
< !V 
A A KS 


WET 
• C! 9 

: 10 

: Q J * 5 ^ 
» J 5: 


I I'l 


4U 

:«(»( 

:tJf 

Syiti) 


SOITH 

*jh: 

• KJ' 

A >: 

TB SiSdirs • 

fr S' S !f 

pass ■ * P.JS 

pass ^ 


scored a second-round hanricfc home just 

H gringt Bwifi ra PonugaL siiiidt ' s*heauiot;tae dm^Aere. 
S^48A and 49th nSis after Earlier, the Royals said rdief 
Scotsman John Walk had opened 

T 1 rtfmg Ifl nwoTiti^c flCIOCr WlUlC WllSOO MVC 

signed contracts that sbotdd bind 
thra to the team for the rest of 
their careers. 

OriolasT, Raiqeis 1 
b Baltimc^ Fred Lynn, the 
gdR-fflOlion free agent, got his first 
two tuts for tbe Qnoles while Mike 
Boddicker, the American League's 
only 20-ganie winoer last season, 
went six innings fcff the victory. 

Lynn angled twice during a six- 
nm fourth umh^ Ms scc^ Mt 
driving b two nms. Rick Dempsey 
hit a two-nm angle b tbe fmirth. 

Baltimme shortstoj) Cal Ripken, 
ubo has played eve^ inning m 444 
straight games, qiiamed his left aor 


LiveqioM's scorbg 10 mbutes be- 
fore the bteml with Ms 23id goal 
b 32 Eiirapean tries. 

Jbi Begtb, debuting m Europe- 
an competitioa, then beaded hetne 
Liverpool's fourth goal b the 8Dth 
fflbute to give the duunfMons an 
almost insurmountaUe le^ 
Juventus provided a pefisbed 
diq>Iay of attaddiQ soccer to over- 
power Bordeaux, which, never 
looked like testi^ the Italians: ' 
Mkhel Platini was the oeative 
genius driri^ Juventus and the 
French national team captab 
capped a brilliant dxqil^ by oom- 
.^leuug the scoring 1 7 mbntes from 
s.'it end. 


test agabst Toronto. 

l^eis R tMEtns 1 
In Detroit, Lou WMtaker drove 
b Ms team's first four mns wib 
two homers and Kiri: Gibson ac- 
counted for the Rnal thru runs 
wib a home run. 

Dan Peuy, 18-8 last season, scat- 
tered four hits over six bnbgs be- 
fore Aurdio Lopa pitebod three 
pafeft;bhui£S for; a save. "tvi • 
Red Sox 14, Yankee^" 
b Boston. Tony Ani]a5<-*and 
Wade Bo^ each drove b tiiree 
runs and Bill Buckner Mt a two-nm 
henna as New York was routed. 


The Red Schc bndte open be 
game with a seven-run second b- 
nbg against Ed WMtson, the big- 
money free agent signed by toe 
Yankees. Whitson lasted only one 
and two-Unrds iiunngs and gave up 
nine runs — just inree of them 
earned CO six hits. 

Errors by Whitson and catcha 
Butch Wynegar. both on bums, fu- 
eled the big mnbg. Rich Gedman, 
who went four for four, doubled 
aQd.ijn^ed b tbe second bnbg 


loaded sb^ to tie the score and 
Gary Gaetti fdbwed with a sing^ 
off losa Donnie Moore to put the 
Twins ahead, 3*2. 

The Angels’ R(^e Jackson hit 
tile S04th hoQKx ofms career, driv- 
ing b two runs b the first. 

Marinecs 5, A^ 4 
b Seattle. Marie Langston, the 
AL's nxAie pitdKr of the year b 
1 9S4, made a successful 1983 debut 
vnib the hdp of Ton Presley’s ihree- 
ruri boma. 


mithBiioIma cappedAe uprisbgiiiiiH j6i^n,-who last year led the 
Tirins 6. Angds 3 ^ -v.tesgiteb strikeouts, struck out just 
b Anabc^ Califoniia, Minna- 01^ and left the game afta Dave 
satawastraifi]%2-l,btheeighA KbgmanMtatwo-rnnhomawith 
Mien Tom Bnmansky Mt a ba^ one out b the eighth. (AP, UPI) 


YcaJoees^ ^einbretmerkQuidi to Throw His first Qirve 


The i4«aeAtr«4 Prea 

NEW YORK — It does not take long for the 
New York Yankees* owna, George Stembrenna, 
to soiind off when thbgs are not going well for his 
team. . 

“(Kf the first two days,” Stembrenna told the 
Not Yoric Times after Boston routed the Yankees, 
14-5, Wednesday, "I'd have to say our pitchbg 
stinks. They Imow they stink." 

Tbe Red Sox beat New Yak by 9-2 on Monday. 


Yankee pitchbg has given up 24 Mis and 14 walks 
b addiiioi to 23 runs m two games. 

"I'm not gpbg to at back and let this stuff 
continue," Stdnbrenna said. "It's only two 
games; Pm not gong to panic. But I'm not going to 
be as patient as I was 1^ year." 

Doa this mean some cb^es can be expected? 

“This is a tremendously tough divisiai," he said. 
"I'm not gobg to let them get too far behbd bdore 
I make moves. I'm not saymg what moves, just 
moves.” 


"I thought I coild btercept it,” 
said the Kings* goalie. Bob Jane- 
mk, "but itidt my sli^ and de- 
fatted in." 

Jets S, Fbmes 4 
In Winnipeg Mullen's goal 
capped a Winnipee comeback nom 
a 4-1 deficiL Mulleo, skating 
through the slot, defleoed Dave 
EDett's pant drire past goaltenda 
RM^Lemdin. 

E»ve Babych scored b the first 
period fa Wnrupe& but Calgary 
got four straight goals, by Ed Beos. 
Hakan Loo^ Paul Rdnbart and 
Steve Konn^ in the secoid peri- 
od. The Jets rallied when Paul Mac- 
Lean connected late b the second 
period, then Dale Hawerchuk and 
Ellett scored in the third. 

"Anytime you get a denection 
that goes b hke that,'^ said Winni- 
p^’s coach, Bany Long, “It's kind 
of a lucl^ goal Nonetbdess, if tbe 
puck is shot on tbe ice and the 
players get their sticks on the ice. 
anything can happen." 

Fjyers S, Rm^os 4 
Philadelphia, nliidi swept seven 
games from the Raiders during the 
season and finished SI points 
ahead of New York b the Patrick 
Division, ended a nbe-game post- 
season losing string. The Flyers led, 
3-0, but the Rangers ralHed as Don 


m 

middle pmod, then Xdth Acton 
got the winna with 9:15 left. 

Neal Broten also scored for tbe 
North Stars, while Joigeo Petters- 
son and Rob Ramage, with a short- 
handed goal, replied for the Blues. 

Norfques 5, Sabres 2 
b Quebec Gty, Wilf Paiement 
scored twice b tbe third period to 
ensure victory in a game mierrupt- 
ed fa 20 mmuies ^ a powa fail- 
ure. Micbd Goulet, Alam Lemieux 
and Anton Stastny scor^ QiKbec’s 
otha goals. Paul CVr and Seil- 

ing scored fa Buffido. 

QuAec's Peta Stastny bad to 
leave the game afta takbg a shot 
ova tbe eye that required 25 stitdi- 
es. He is not expected to miss 
Thursday night’s second game. 


Nets Prepare for Playoffs 
By Setding an Old Score 


The Assodaied Pms 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New 
Jersey — Tlie New Jos^ Nets 
want to play tbe Detrmt Pistons 
raiha thw the Philadelphia 76as 
b the first round of tbe National 
Basketball Association playoffs. 
But first they had a score to sotle. 


If the Nets finish ftith b the 
Eastern Conference, thqr will face 
the Pisioos. whom they have beaten 
b five of six meetings tMs season. 
If Not Jersmr is rixth. the 76as win 
be the first-round opponent. 

b otha games it was Detroit 
116, bdiana 114; Atlanta 98. New 


b be back of my pwd .was the^. Yak 94; Milwaukee 106. Washbg- 
J^t game when they pushed iis the ton 97 and tbe Los An^es Qip- 


NBA FOCUS 


triiole game and seemed to try to 
embarrass os,” Micbeal Ray IQdi- 
ardson said afta the Nets beat the 
76ers. I2.S-100, Wednesday night 
“We wanted to show them what it 
felt like." 

Richardson, who had 27 ptwts, 
14 asrists, seven steals and eight 
rebounds agabst the 76ers, was re- 
Maloney scored twice. A mistake ferring to a 127-107 rout the 76ers 
by goalie Glen Hanlon allowed the pinned on the Nets oi March 16. 
Eyas' Hm Kor to score bto an Despite New Josh's victory, 
unguarded cage for a 4-3 lead, but which lifted h out of a fifth-plaa 
Anders Hedb^ forced overtime tie with Wasbbgtou* the Nets are 
when he beat goahe Pdle Lind- hoping to avoid tbe 76ers b the 
bogh with 26 seconds left b the first round of the playoffs, havbg 
third period. now won oily two of the six games 

Howe's goal came afta Ron Snt- between the teams this 


pets 129, Denva 127. 

■ Bol Wn Turn Pro 
Mannte BoL the tallest playa b 
U.S. college basketball, took the 
first st^ to becoming tbe tallest 
playa b the Nationd Baskaball 
Association on Wednesday, The 
Associated Press reported 
Bol, a 7-foot-6 (2.28-meter) 
freshaiao from Sudan, told Bruce 
Websta, his coadi at the UmN'ersi- 
ty (rf Bridgeport b Connecticut, of 
Ms decisioD and sent a letta to the 
NBA requesting to be included m 
June’s early di^ility draft. Ac- 
cordmg to Websta, the 190-pound 
(86<kilogram) Bol also said be 
needed to return home to assure the 
safety of his sista, whom he bad 
not beard fron sbee May 1984. 


SCOREBOARD 


iTE7LS^L3v.JO 

ZK ^ 

4057 Mci'2'’ " 

•••»; v,r-. e 

Wise.- - ' 

8M N05'«;;- 
tS2'. 

■;io5C'«53*^ ■ 

33^ Per»r'-« 

1-W Pt.'-’'.* ' 

P ftc ^ S'i' 

-.^0 Oi.ff _' • 

S»X ?3iT . 

5i:r 


Hiv. uri"! • 

sii-j 5. 

S15 H '• 

s-” ' 


Basketball 


Hockey 


Transition 


INBA Standings 


NatHHial Hodk^ League FkyofiEs 


sis 

>Ie 

sy* 

KJ®* 

s<r- 

<1.1 

SI"; 

S' 

iU 

S7»! 
s::* 
SJ! . 

'7i' 

■ • 
St s 
»?» 


ts- , 


SIS- 

1?: f: 


T* 7 

iF 


BASTERN COMPBRENCE 
ANontte mvliion 

W L PCL 6B 

y-BosiM *3 IT JI5 — 

K.PMM*lphlg ' 57 33 JU 5IA 

x-Nwr Jensr 40 40 221^ 

s^WnMnstMi 3t 41 'AH 33M 

iWwYorK 34 M JOD son 

CMrtrri DIvIllM 

y.MawaulM« 57 S 713 — 

x«tlroil 44 3i S5D 13 

■ t-Oilcago 31 41 ATS 19 

^•Cltwland 35 44 - A43 8in 

- Aims 32 41 AOO a 

Indlam ' 3Z S3 J7S 3S 

WfiSTRRN CONnRRMCR ' 
MidwMt DMdM 


. . .[T p-—^r- 

'~K n 

wt: ,• 

fTif r s-if ' - • 
j^i-S 

Im Sia'*--' - 

'’.n" 

57^ Sw ":. 5 
3653 6'^' j 




S;i'* 

ii* 

Sli-> 

5St ; 

.■>1 -j 

•S ‘ft 


r‘ 

if M 

" 

f.. 


V.DMIW 
» llBuiton 
x>Datlia 
seSon Aflienie 
x-Utah ' 
Kamos aty 

y-bJk, LoMrs 
^PorHond 
x-Phetnlx 
Saottia 
LA CRomrs 

GoMM sroi* 


51 a 

44 a 

43 a 
40 40 
a 40 
31 48 
Pacllle DMsIu 

a a 

40 a 
3* u 
31 48 
a 90 
a 57 


soo 

AM 

an 


4M 

■10 

II 

nw 

mb 


a47 — 
AM 19 
Aa 35lh 

an a 
an 3fw 
aa a 




i'l?? ”, 




I 

111 : 

s' j' 

s’i' 

s't* 


i.** ^ Si 

t-' 

» 'S'* Xr 

*'l.- ,1 » 
S':' i®* u- 

sT' '« ft' 

4 . 

'A ^ iC 

fc* 11* «• 
i'l * li jf 
S'l* iJ 
s's’ tr. ivv 

S!i“ '£ r 

Sil^ ITS 


Cx<llnetMd plaveR Mnh) 

(y-ennelMd OMslen MMo) 

WIDNa^Va RRSVITS 
pwtomiphio 17 a a so — too 

RMriormr a a M 3*-US 

JULRItfiordSon 1340 1-39. Kim 11-19 14BS 

wood 4-11 M 14. awKIW M M 14. 

son 4-U M 14. RobMOdss PUMilaniB S 
IMotam 8>: Now Joraor 54 (WDiinm W>. 

PhiiadolpMa 14 (Wfloo 3): Now Jof* 
MV 34 (RICtlO fUS OO V*). 

a a a as-^m 


MinSKUl SRMIPIHALS 

WMMrtoyv Rtnn 

3 1 '3-8 

Mo wlr ool 0 1 8-3 

Slnuncr (1). OXennoH 111, Uraoinan (1), 
Cfowritr (II. MMItlon (1): ftwOnOo <11. 
Trombtoy (1). Smllfi ID. Sbols oo tool: B» 
ton (on PonMvl 75 5 TT; Montrool (on 
Koons) 44-10-21 

■oHolo 1 1 8-4 

Rwefeoc 1 3 t-4 

Lontoux (1). Coutol (1). A. Statny (II. 
Potomorri 3 (3) : Cyr ID. SoWfio m. Shata oo 
■oM: Bullalo (on GmHlInl 9A.13-48: Quo- 
boe (on BvraoMl 12-17.13-39. 

Il'f inillllfl 8 3 t o-s 

WfMKltllMnn 8 3 0 1—4 

Morpitv 3 HI. Cortnw- (1) Howerto (D; 
BoMv 3 (2). POtvfn (1). Ohois 00 tool: N.Y. 
iNoaaonton Rlotlo) 3«44-l7; WoRilnaten 
(on SmlRi) 0-13.a 3 A 
K.V. irnnoifi 
PMioaiiniio 
RanSiitior(1).Bofton(D.MeCr(inmett<D, 
Korr (D, Hmm (ID RuoMOlQlnoii (D. Mo- 
loMv 3 (U. HidPoro (1). SMs 00 tool: N.Y. 
Ramon (on Undbwth) WT.i^i— 31; PWlo* 
OOtmlo ion Haf|kM).11-l04A^-3L 
MlUMSOtO 1 1 1—3 

M LoMit 1 0 1—3 

Broicn (1). Homburo (i). Acton (1): R» 
mom (D. PoRornon (iLSbotsoo pool: Min* 
noMla (on OVonuloy) M-IO-Si; St. Lmb (on 
Moieehol 14.13.11-4I. 

Dotmit 1 3 3-4 

Oilcmo 4 4 1—9 


18—51; Chicooo (on Stotan. Mtcoion 1M<7- 

a 

colmry 8 4 8 8-^ 

Wflnnl m i 112 1—5 

Bobven ni. MocLoon <D. HevwrchvK (1). 
Eliott (1>, MoUoo III; Boon (i), Loob (1). 
RolnMri(1).Konrovd ID.SMtoonoool: Col- 
oorv (on HoyworO) ^1 3 4 4 81; WInnipoa 
fen LonMiln) I0.7■^7— 31. 

LOS Anootos 1 0 1 0-< 

firfmonton I 1 • 1—3 

Kuril (n.Cot<ov(D.PoeoHA(l); Rodmond 
ID. NiHwito (D. siMlB OR tool: Loi Amoloi 
(on Fuhr) 154.I34-33: Sdmonlon (on Jono- 
evk) I5-7-1VI— 34. 


BASKRTBALL 

Motlwioi Bnkoiban AtaeciBHen 
LJL CLIPPERS— Slemd Fitnutn Ed- 
wontb ouord. througli ttw ramaindor el the 


SAN ANTONIO— Slanod DovM Thkrdklll. 
o«iei-d.lormrd. 

FOOTBALL 

united Slaloi Pootben Lseowo 
NEW JERSEY— Anneuncid mt roNroRiml 
of Jim LoOolr. imnoekcr. 

PORTLAND— woivod Wllllo Rotborough. 
noBO lecklo. 

HOCKEY 

HnllBnel Hockey LeoBue 
HARTFORD— Colled UP Doan BvaoQO. con- 
tor. (ram BInghofflIon of Ifw American Hock- 
ey LeoBue. 


Masters: TheRiseand FaUofBen Crenshaw 

lliirt, FnisUation^ 

One Year Later 


BasebaU 


xyk 3 121. Lormor (1) : Monm (1). LarMPi (D. 
OBrodoiek (11. LodoueourCD.Yconnon (D« 
SBotsoRBOal: DolroH (on Bonntnnen) IWIS- 



..,-0 

S* m mTi 

♦•••2 fi 


I?]?®' 

Sir” j-i'*!?-' 
jj'.* i"’’ S 


iaotroit a a.a 17-114 

, • Trlpueko 4*14 11*U 33. Tyler 10-18 BO 3B 
LalnibOor-9-U 30 a: KoEago 10-17 II-U 31. 
Flatninp W» 4-4 34. RoBooiids: fiafloao 55 
(KoUoH 1B>; Detroit S3 (LotmRoor UL At* 
bWb: titdloBa 34 (Plonlno M: Ootrwt 33 
(TtwfneB 14). 

mmiiiiton 38 a S3 2^97 

MnwMRM II u n a«-iM 

Nk»erior9.17B*l0a.eummlms1B43MSl; 
BollerO 12*M so 34. Meieno Wio 10 17. Ro> 
bo—Es; WMhbMioa S4 Uom* 11)1 iiWwou- 
kooS4(PnB8ev tO).il8ll5l8LWWMiiBloflS 
((His Williams 8) i MUweukoe a (PiMsiy fl),. 

"nowyohi a a m w:-w 

AtiMiB a a 17 2»- H 

DJNUUni wa 3A V. Jemson B-U 0-1 u; 
Orr 5-11 12-12 » Wotter 7-15 5*W 19. R*. 
booods: NowV«rk54(E.WRUn1U; Allows 
(DJMiklitt 10). Aaislu Nbw York 17 
(micmD; Atlanta a (JdhMoa Rlvenlll. 

DfRw a 31 a sp-or 

LjL nriMiwi ' 41 a a it— ta 

Nixon 11 -a 4*7 a. Johnson 1 M 4 B 4 S 8 ;En* 
oUNl1M^^23^.Ltver10«K2i.R^b■Wl0li; 
Denver S (Sctnva-J 3 ); (.A aienon M 
(Woitan 13). JUsWi: Oenwtr St (Lover 1 I); 
CA. aipeori a (Nixon 3M. ■ 


Soccer 


I o j td Wednesday’s line Scores 

AMBRICAH LHAISUB 
CMvOlsnd too TBS SOI 1 4 I 

Dohvit 001 010 40X-0 10 1 ' 

RuMo. Joffesol (4). Romors {7), VoirOhlen 
(Tl.Hoetai (Djond BondOk Bsntsn (71; Palry. 
Lopoi (7) and Poinsn, Castillo (BL W— Potrv. 
X). L— RuhMb i'l. S-^ LOPOI (1). HRs— Oo- 
troit, WhUaksr 2 (3). Gibson (D. 

NOW York 181 111 BIS— 5 0 3 

BecMH 310 on 3011-14 14 I 

WMIsen.Cewliv (2), Bonn 15), Murray (7), 
RWliettl III and WyiwBor; Hurst. Osar (8). 
OleOB (9) end OoWnan. W— Hurst. l-O. Lp- 
DLWIben(l).Fre«or(1}.Savard(l).Var. whUsers o-l. HR— Besren. Buduwf ID. 
cRiehuk(lU(rCo»ohana).BJlvllMn(l).Of& -ropos ONOaiaM— 1 4 2 

Boltlmers 010 401 OOx-^ 8 0 

AMson. Neios (4). Schmidt (41. D4tewart 
(7) andsmshl: Boddldier.&Sttwerl (7) and 
Oomosoy. w ’ Dsddleksr, 14. L- Jw as on. mi. 
s anwurt fl). HR— Toxei. Porrlan (D. 
Tonots OM OM aw 1— I 7 8 

Kenns city . 080 sso ON s-e 4 3 
Alexondsr, Caudill 171, LovoHt 110) and 
Mortlnoz. whNi (W) ; Jaekfon. Bodcwllh 1 10) 
am Sundbn. Wotttan (10). W-Cau«1l. 14. 
L— Boefcwiin, 0-1. s— Lavolio (l). 

Odklond oaaoSOSB-A 7 I 

ssotne 010 004 tOx-5 7 • 

KruoBtr. JMcCatty (4). Howsll (0) and 
Hontb; L u f iwl on, Nunoi |8) and Kearney. 
VIM-ongstan, 1*0. L— KrwBor, D>1. ^4 iumz 
iD.HRs— Scoftle.PrBsievdl.OeWona.KlnB- 
inan (D. 

Ml i u i sat o OMOHOa-dlS 3 

CWlfOrnta 2N OM MI-0 5 1 

smittitea werdto (01. Dovk (9) and 
Loudnor, Solos (8); Ztfim. Moart (7), 
monts (9),Cerbetl (9) and Boan8,w-Smlth- 
bm;. 1-0. L-AMsrs. 0-1. S-Dsvfs (3). HRs- 
Colllernls. Joduon (1). Mlnnssom. Loudner 
(D. 

. NATIONAL LIAOUB 
Msnirooi 1)0 HI 0)0-^ 11 e 

andmntt 000 000 001— I S I 

(TDlHCkseaSebotzedor (8),Rsordon (9) ona 
Plhstratd: Tibbs. Hume (7). Power ond Bi- 
lordolla Wr^lldcson. 141 L-rtMs. D-L . 


Son DU«e 110 SM 008-3 II 0 

Son ProPdiee 880 lOO 880-8 4 1 

Show and Ksnnody; LaPobit Gerreits (9). 
Dovls (9) and Bronlv. W— Show. 14). L— Lo. 
Point. 0*1. 

Los Aneews in on 3Bb — 5 10 o 

Heustea DMIHNI— « 9 0 

Rouse. Hewolt (B). Hledanfutr (9), Howe (9) 
am Selosela: NIokn. Selene (7), Calhoun (7). 
Smith (9) am Asnbv. w nsuss. 1-4. L— 
NMcm. 0-1. S Howe (D. HBs lbs AnpolOA 
Lendrooux (1). Cuerroro (1). 


Major League Standings 


AMBRICAH LEAGUE 
East DtvMon 
W L 


Pet. GB 


UEFA CUP 
(SooiinfioL First Lee) 
VMeelDn 3, Zslloznlear Sonrlsuo 1 - 
Ipior Mlkm Z Jteal Madrid 0 

' EUROPBAN CKAMPIOHS' CUP 
(Semifinal, FIrsI Loo) 
jjvenool 4. PensthlnaiKN 0 
Jwontus 3, SontoouK 0 

CUP WINNERT CUP 
(SomEkioL Pint lw) 
Bverlofl 0. Boyom Munich 0 
Ropid VIOhM X Dynamo Mai ca w 1 


ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Nottlnshom Porott 2. Owlioa 0 
Polnis standiHU! Evorton N; Mondiostor 
UPlied 44; Totionhom 41; L i vorpoob Seutiw 
awMaa: SheWold Woonet do y, Afsonol M; 
Noltinobom PoraR S3: OwUn, Atton VIlio 
. a; west BramwlehCS.- Quotns Pork Ronwrs 
44; Lofentv, Horwtd). Ntwconla 42; Wen* 
ford a; Wisf Horn a: I switch a; Lvtoa 
SundMiand 35; Covontrv a; Sloko 17. 


Bolllmero 

2 

0 

1M0 

_ 

Boston 

3 

0 

lino 

_ 

Dolroll 

3 

0 

UMO 

_ 

Toronlo 

1 

1 

M 

1 

MUtMOVkoO 

0 

1 

MO 

ita 

Ctevekind 

0 

3 

MO 

3 

New York 

o' 

a 

MO 

2 


West Division 



MlnnoBofo 

3 

0 

UMM 

_ 

Sooltlo 

3 

0 

IJM 


CMcnso 

1 

0 

line 

Vi 

Korns Otv 

1 

1 

seo 

1 

CoUfernla 

0 

3 

MO 

2 

Oaktand 

0 

3 

MO 

2 

Tema 

0 

3 

MO 

3 

NATIONAL LEAGUE - 



HMt (NvWBn 




w 

L 

Pet 

QB 

CMcaBo 

1 

0 

1M0 

— 

New York 

1 

0 

IMO 

— 

Momreal 

r 

1 

MO 

V7 

Pniiodelpitki 

0 

1 

MO 

1 

Plttsburoh 

0 

1 

MO 

1 

Si. Leulo 

0 

1 

MO 

1 


west iNvisiHi 



AHonls ' 

) 

0 

IMO 

— 

Houston 

1 

1 

MO 

to 

CMnnotl 

I 

1 

MO 

to 

Los Anoolos 

1 

1 

soa 

to 

Son Dlioo 


1 

MO 

to 

Son FfoneiseB 


1 

MO 

to 


Thomas Boswell 

WahUigtoa Peat Service 

AUGUSTA, Geor^ — When 
Ben Crenshaw won his ^bsleIs ti- 
tle last year the most pimalar, 
sweei-tei^pered, honest ana star- 
crossed gglfa at his generation bad 
eias^ a dozeB years of disapptwt- 
ments b a day. 

Tbe trouble nith ha|^y endings 
is that life goes on. 

Just when Crenshaw tbought he 
had gotten the monkQr cSf Ms 
back. It was replaced by a gorilla. 

Sim that gnren coat was draped 
around hh snouldeis, he said, golf 
has brought Mm "embarrassment, 
hurt, anga and ftustration." 

A month afta his 1984 Masters 
victory, "It was tike the life was just 
drawn ri^t out of me." And. with 
the 49iii Masters starzbg 'liiors- 
day, tbe life is not back yet . . . . „ 

Gdfeis have slumps, but what Ms Masters victory, 

Crenshaw has been b for the last Crenshaw has gotten adivoroe, but, 
n monihs is a black hck. b nme ^ masts, "Its bCOT a long time 
starts ;big yea, he has nriewt five sMce the divorce” b Oeioba. “If 



(xits, been disqualified and won 
only $11,810. He ranks 160th on 
the Professioiial Golfers Associa- 
tion tour b scoring (74,0). I50th b 
greets b rq^iladon. 160ih m driv- 
bg distance and 134th b putting. 

Crensbaw has worried so mum 
that he has lost 10 pounds and, no 
matter how much he eats cannot 
gam an ounce on what was always a 
slim frame. 

Even his l^end^ putting and 
boyish looks seem b jeopardy. 

"The wits just aren’t fallmg,” be 
said, "when you struggle with the 


nwAwedmdPrm 

Ben Crenshaw, now nured in deepest of slumps, was helped 
on widicfaanqrioD*s green jacket in 1984 by Seve Ballesteros, 
anodier one proMems. llie Masters b^an Thorsday. 


Jusr a few weeks laia, at Jack 
Nicklaus’s Memorial Tournament, 
Crenshaw still was on his high, sun 
seebg his name 00 tbe leader board 
every time out. “l can even remem- 
ba the shot when it changed,” be 
said Wednesday. "I tried to Mt a 
wood out ^ a trap. Hit it sidewaw, 
made 8 on a pai-4 and it was luce 
somebody turned out the tights.” 

Crenshaw shot 79 that uy, 79 
the next. Golf has been a mystery 


anythbg that was a relief.” 

As though Crenshaw needed any 
more bad luck, be forgot to strap 
bis bag lo his golf can a few days 
ago. When the bag toppled off, the 
guy behbd him drove over it and 
snapped the head off Crenshaw's 
favonte driver. 

Three clubs are personal to 
gibers: the sand wcf^ putta and 


Foreign Golfers 
Having Problems 

The Ajnxureif Pros 

AUGUSTA Georgia— Tbe dif- 
ficulties encountered by Gary Play- 
a, Seve Ballesteros and Gr^ Nor- 
man has taken some of the stbg out 
of the once-formidable foreign 
challenge b the 49th Masters that 
was to b^b Thursd^ at the Au- 
gusta National CoU (Hub. 

“My doctor said it's the 
Kong viiu^” Norman said afta his 
final practice sessioa Wednesday. 

"I’m qmte iU,” said the lo^- 
hitting Australian who won two ti- 
tles on tbe U.S. tour last season and 
lost tbe U.& Open m a playoff. He 
said be has reedved medi^ atten- 
tion this week, bcludbg an bjec- 
tion that blurred bis viaon; "Just 
what 1 need right now,” he said. 

"Fve bad the virus for about six 
weeks. It kbd of comes and goes. 1 
just can’t shake it.” 

Ballesteros, tbe Spaniard who 
has won two Masters and a British 
Open, said he has a painful skb 
problem, like a rash, on bis palms. 

Tm tiym| sometfaiog differeni 
iMs year, uybg to come b more 
rested and rdaxed,” said Bailes- 
taos, who often plays b tourna- 
ment coiiq)etition the week before 
tbe Masters. 

lius year, be qieot tbe week on 
the beach. “No wlf, just rdaxing.” 

Playa, 49, a thre^time Mas^ 

ffhnmpinn b 410 IS malfing hiS fitSt 


and a misery ever sbee. 

^ ^ Pahaps Tom Watson, the favoi^ 

driver,” be said. *^^60 one of ite to wb this Masters, put his stanm more three months, said, “I 
th^ three gets you feel finger as close to Crenshaurs prob- haven’t played sbee January, and 

like you lost your arm.” lem as anyone when he said, "b all that's probably a mistake.” 

sports, you see athletes who attab 
a certam goal and it stops them. 

Tbae's alwaw a ^ belter than 
that gpal anil you have to find it If 
you don't think that way, you’re b 
trouble.” 

Watson's goal? 

To Ml the perfect shot eveiy 

excuse. My health has been pe^ Palmer's. "1 don't thihir thereH time I swbg at iL” 
feet” Some would tike to pomt out ever be a sweeia momenL** So much Tor aiiamable goals. 


Lui Apnl 15, Crenshaw shot 68 
and wrote Ms name la^ m the big, 
leaiha-tKNmd mif history books 


putter. It gets mto the ^ of your helovcssomofttorcadandcol- 
g^ Its an extra slramM your- lect TMs is a sweet, sweet win," he 
self to try to squeeze that ban m the jou ^ that ^ 

proved his victoty more than any 
Crenshaw “doesn't even have an Masters triumph since Arnold 


StHC tb6 foreign contingent is 
among the stroi^est this event has 
had. It bdudes &vid Graham, the 
Australian who has won both the 
U.S. Open and PGA; Japanee vet- 
eran IsM A(^ winner of 44 iiua- 
natiooal titl^ and Bernhard Lang- 
er of West Germany, the 
CT ’tstF ff d'Ti g playa b Eur^ last 
season. 














.• * r . o.' I-* *. ^ !W : 





OBSERVER 


Taxing Conversation 


By Russell Baker 

N ew YORK — I can’t stand 
pei^Ie who say the^re paying 
too much tax. People luce IKpple- 
burg. **You wouldn’t believe the 
taxes i paid last year," Pippleburg 
said, starting a conversation he ex- 
peaed to earn him some damp- 


eyed s^mpa^y. 

ne."Isaid. 


•Try me.’' 

He mentioned a figure that infu- 
riated me. It was almost os much as 
my entire income for last year. 

For the Tiist rime, it occurred to 
me that 1 had overrated Kppleburg 
as a human being. 

"^So you think you’re being taxed 
pretty heavily?" I asked, and wiib- 
out giving him a chance to whine a 
reply, said, "A lot of guys buried on 
Om^ B^h might say some peo- 
ple have paid a lot more to their 
country than you have. Pipple- 
buig." 

Sure it was a cheap shot, but 
Pippleburg had it commg for mak- 
ing so much more money than I 
did, then conung to me for sympa- 
thy about the tax gouge. 

I can't stand people who boast 
about bow litde they're payiu in 
taxes, either. People hke C^- 
decker. CuUdecker never comes 
ri^t out and says, “You wouldn't 
believe how infinitesimally tiny my 
ta.Y bill is this year." 

That's not his way. He wants to 
be prated, but he wants you to lay 
the praise on him voluntarily. So be 
starts with a question: 


ment and cry, “Wow'! Talk about 
tax smarts!" 

SDently I shriek to Heaven: 

“Justice is a mockery when 1 
have to pay out every last cent in 
taxes so El Cheapo here can swag- 
ger across life's stage crowing of ms 
triumphs at the ^agler’s art" 

I don’t dare spe^ this way to 
CuUdecker. tbou^. Instead. 1 have 
to be satisfied ^ poisoning him 
with envy. 

So slyly 1 say: 

“When you and I. CuUdecker, 
are hauling down a fabulmis in- 
come Uke Hpplebuig’s. we wiU not 
have to waste our lives mastering 
the lax-cbiseler’s sterile skill. *rhea. 
like Hppleburg. we wiU teU the tax 
collector to go ahead and take 60, 
70, W percent for there will still be 
plenty left over to wallow in." 

Sure this is a rotten thing to do. 
Now CuUdecker wiU despise Pip- 
pl^urg for maldog so much money 
that he doesn't bother with tax 
shelters. But Pippleburg deserves it 
for making so much more money 
than I do. 


Then there are people like Higg- 
leby. He's always hying to worm it 
out of you how much you pay in 
taxes. He says ihii^ like, “It hmd- 
ly pays to go on livug, does it, what 
with these awful taxes.” 


Higgleby is tr^ring to g^ you to 
teU him wiiat your tax bite is he will 


oatyc 

be able to judge your character. 

If you are paying a lot more than 
be is. will conclude either (a) 


“IXt^ou get all your income 


shell 

yeaiT 


from those sharks this 


that you are stupid because vou 
of unshel- 


CuUdecker knows veiy well I 
didn't get any of my income shd- 
tered. beikuse he knows the kind of 
income I have. 

Even though I know CuUdecker 
knows this, I am ashamed to admit 
it aloud. Having income that can't 
be sheltered makes you look so stu- 
pid nowadays. 

Instead of admitting to this 
dumbness, which 1 know CuU- 
decker has detected in me, I diange 
the subject with a question: 

“How’s your own sheltering op- 
eration working out this year, pal?” 

“Best ever,” he says. “My entire 
tax bUl — federal, stme, county, 
dty. prednct and block— comes to 
only 43 cents." 

Now he expects me to praise 
him. to slap my forehead in maze- 


have a hopeless amount 
teied income, or (b) that you are 
making a lot more income than he 
is and. therefore, can only be blade- 
mailing your boss. 

If you are pa^i^ less than he is, 
he wQl conclude either (aj that you 
are an unpatriotic cheapskate loo 


selEsh to gay a fair share of your 


county’s bills, or (b) that you are 
earning a lot less than he is and. 
therefore, must be an incon^tent 
not worth his time or attention. 

If you want to keep Higglel^ fw 
a friend — and after your experi- 
ence with Pippleburg and Cull- 
decker you probably i 
friends you can 
about your taxes. Remember, as 
your government neither weeps nor 


need aU the 
stay mom 


applauds, but only judges ciudly, 
tno 


so will it be with those you thought 
might love you. 

//ew York Tunes Semce 


Liberace; Still the Hi gh Poobah of Glitz 


By William & Gcisc 

New York Times Semce 
EW YORK — Sure, Liberace could i 


N ew YORK — Sure, uberace could get 
by with using chint^ rhinestones. But he 
doesn't Liberace uses the finest ifainestones 


available in the world today, multifaceted, 
hand-cut Austrian rhinestones. “I only use 
the best of everything,” Liberace explained. 
“People know a phony." 

There were those who suggested that New 
Yorkers might just be a little too sc^histicat- 
ed for Liberace. and a couple of them may 
very well be, but more than 103,000 people 
purchased tickets in advance to see the Lord 
High Poobah of Glitz at Radio City Music 
Hall during a 17-day engagement, which be- 
April 4. It is a ticket sales record for 


adio City. Some pecmle ate attending as 
li that includes dinner at 


part of a package i 
Mama Leone's, but probably not Walter 
Cronkite, Christopher Walken, the cast of 
the TV comedy show, “Saturday Night live," 
and other lu minar ies who attended the open- 
ing. 

“The older people like the warm, sentimen- 
laL personal toui^" said Liberace, between 
rehevsal kicks with the Rockettes, **and the 
you^ audiences love the aaa clothes. It 
reminds them of rock stars. Ki^ like glitz." 

To watch preparations for Liberace’s show 
was to worry about Austria's economy — an 
entire nation so dependent on one man. One 
of the four cars used in his show is covered 
with perhaps hundreds of thousands of Aus- 
trian rhinestones, as is one of the pianos. As 
for his wardrobe; ticket holders mi^t want to 
learn the early warning signs of retina dam- 
age. 

Liberace opens in a cape of silvery plum 
lame festooned with waves of shimmering 
multicolored sequins. That's the Uning. The 
outside? Don’t ask, but it includes an dght- 



Tht ftat 

Liboace agjow: To shake hb hand is to flirt mdi lacoation. 


foot train of pink feathers. Under the ca{» b 
a suit that makes r " 


; Liberace appear as if he had 
sued through the 


been dipped in glue and roL 
precious stones department at a K mart dis- 
count store. The baubles, bangles and bright 
shiny beads are literally set on top of eSiAx 
other. 

Advances in technology since Liberace be- 
gan back in the 1940s have ^wn him even 
greater flamboyance cap^ili^r, with “Danc- 
ing Waters" bong the primary example. The 
device appears to be a Palm Springs-size lawn 
^rinkler.40feet by 15feet(l2by4.6 meters), 
with 1,100 jets spurting coloral waters that 
dance to Strauss waltze^la^ on a revolv- 
ing piano by Uberace. Don t worry, he can 
play Tchaikoisky's Piano Concerto No. I in 
four minutes, “by cutting out the dull parts." 

It takes some dmng to create a splash in 
New Yoik, but Uberace has. Aides working 
for him in New Yorit sometimes wi^ the 
frenetic 6S-year-old would get out of town so 
they could some rest. 

^ce arriving, Uberace has been seen here, 
there and everywhere appearing on almost 
every known show, mowing up on “Sat- 


urday Night Uve" dandng with some Rock- 
ettes at a professional wrestling match, stop- 
ping in at the Rolls-Royce dealer to talk valve 
jobs and mink carpetir^ bujnng a gold-plat- 
ed shovel at 'Ilffan/s ^or ground-breaking 
ceremonies at a bigger and better Liberace 
Museum in Las V^as), shopiung for grocer- 
ies and plastic food containers at the Path- 
mark. “liberace,’' expired a press aide, “is 
just like you arid me." 

Explaining his participation in the wres- 
ts match, Uberace, who was named Wlad- 
zau Valentino Liberace after bis tnrth in 
ooosin. saU; “My mother loved wrestling. 
She would be very proud of me today." He 
told of appearing at professional wrestling 
matches m Indlanapo^ to promote his con- 
certs, “because the fans were found to be one 
and the same." He said his motiier was 
thrilled vbm he met Gorgeous George: “She 
said they used the same lavender nnse on 
their hair." 


A near disaster occurred when Uberace 
was dining at the Rainbow GiiD and the 
comedian Billy Ciystal stopped by the table, 
embraced Liberace. and the two of them 
stuck together — no joke. Crystal had be- 
come entangled in the real gold-and-<Uani 0 nd 
jewelry that encrusts Liberace: pendants, me- 
dallions, bracelets, and his big diamoad 
g^d-piano watch. To shake his hand is to 
flirt with laceration. Let’s see, left to ri^t, we 
have the enormous topaz and gold ri^ the 
grand piano of diamonds and gold wim the 


top that opens, the simple hunk of amethyst 
ring, and then we move to the right hand, 
where we have the diamond candelabrum 
ring, the gpld record-player ring with moving 
turntable, and a large gold structure of a 
that looks as if it were designed by Buckmin- 
ster Fuller.- possibly for human haUtation. 
liberace snoxtly leaves one Anger on each 
hand opeo to av^ ringlocL 

Uberace is staying in the model apartnient 
at Tiunm Tower, even tboii^ the place is a 
tad subtmed for his tastes — certainly com- 
pared with his b^e in Las Ve^s, with the 
Sstine Chapd celling rroroduction that in- 
cludes the likeness of uDerace. Uberace is 
g^g to buy a condominium from Donald 
Trump, whom he describes as “a smart man 
who h^ a feel for what is uring on." 

Liberace is more than ever, and 

hazards a guess wl^. “ihis is an age of glitter 
and flambqya^. People like Cyndi Lauper 
realize this. She is smart She knows the 
fleshier looting you are the better. Priiice is 
smart” 


spectacnilar. which featured appearances by 
U’berace. Mubammed Ali, BiUy Martin and 
Mr. T. spoke reverently of Uberace as the 
“sage of the ^tter a^" 

Liberace recafled wien he first realized 
that more attentiem was bein| p^ to his 
tuxedo and candelabrum than his piano play^ 
ing. “I was not too thrilled about it” he .said. 


ing. “1 was not too t&nued about it” he .said, 
“but then someone said: ‘Hey, you've got 
something going there.’ " 


PEOPLE 

Shaggy Unicom Story 


i 


Suspiciously shaggy and a hide 
on the short ade, those new 
gnimai-is advertised in New York iv 
the RingUng Bros, and Baraum * 
Bailey dicus may look like um- 
coms but they smell like goats 
which is what unwhimsical 
ment sdentists say they are. The 


bad ballooned to -250. much of 
«4iicb he gained vdiile campaigning 
for the Democratic lidc^ last year. 

“I've been exerciailg. doing, some 
walking, swimming, playing tennis. ^ .... 

chasing after my nieces and nept . fl* 

ews.”Kennedysaidhcwasnoiona .;/7i * * 

:..l .JSa* VMit iira« iinirr4imB hie ll'” 




iinimals appear in an act kno^ as 
the “Spectacular.’’ Dr. Geraio 


the “Spectacular.’’ Dr. ueraio 
Toms, cfcef of the U. S. Agnculture 
Department’s New Yoii veteri- 
nary office, said Wedn^ay tfmt 
an insp«tion of the 

animaU at the OTCUS Tucsday night 
determined are indeed goats. 
“Gerikically ilib^re goats,” Tom 
said. “But if you want to siuremiCT 
to whimsv. then they're urucoms. 
Surgeons'probably had moved the 
goats' horns from the sides of their 
to the middle of the fore- 
heads when they were kids, pie 
boms fused and grew to full size. 
mairinp the aniitiak lesemble the 
cingig .hnmed horse-Uke creatures 
ctf legend. TTie circus, however, 
reuses to call the creatures goats 
ud asked the public to believe in 
the unbelievable, running a full- 
page advertisement in The New 
York Tunes to defend its star at- 
traction. In the style of the l^eud- 
aiy P. T. the ad quoted 

from Levris CarrolTs “Through the 
Looking Glass:" “WeU, now we 
have seen each other.” said the um- 
com. “IT you believe in me. I'll 
believe in you. Is that a bargain?" 
The ad didn’t mention that Bar- 
num also is credited with the 
phrase, “There’s a sucker bom ev- 
ery minute." 


spedal diet but was watchi^ his 
food intake more carefully: 

□ 


Prince Charles suffered a toudi 
of vertigo Wednesday as he lih 


jhafi 


spected the decaying ^tire of Sahs- ' 
cathedral to munch a £6J- 


mSiion" ^S7.8-Illiiiio^^ appeei to ■ 
restore the 650;year-old steeple. “1 .. 
don't mind beUcOTters but I'm. not 
too keen on this; smd the bdr to 
the British throne as he stood.on a V 
winds^i ledge 220 feet (67 
lers) above the ground. Charies ar-' 
rived at Salisbury. 80 nules (128t 
kilometers) west of Ldudoo, by he^ 
licopter and then trudged . up 3S0^' 
steps to readi the base of the fam- 
ous spire. Britain's high^ at 404 ... 
feel fl23 meters). The spire’s 
stonework has been eaten away by • : . 
acid rain, frost and polhition. 


GObert Becaud, the French sirs-' 
er and conqxiser (“What Now My 


Love,” “Let it Be Me"), 'finds it t 
annoying to perform on st^ be- . I 
hind a piano because.iLi&dimddt^ , 


to see and be seen by the audience: 



structed to r^ve that probM^j'^rTTlfin 
>iano that he has broi^'jLi * 


Ptcsideiit Roodd Reagan has ao- 
ceptol an invitation to attend a 
recqnion at Senatu' Edward Ken- 
nedy’s home in McLean, Virgmia, 
on June 24 for the benefit the 
Jotai F. Kenneify Library Founda- 
liotL John J. chairman 

of the fonodatitNi, sud CaroGne 
Kennedy, chfldren of ^ 
slain president for w^iom the li- 
brary IS named, invited Reagan to 
Ae reception, riillinane smd other 
members of the Kermedy family 
would also attend, including 
JacquefiM Keimedy Onassis. . . . 
Meanwhile the senator says he has 
less weight to throw around the 
Senate. Kennedy, whose pud^ness 
made him the otgect of stin^g 
commentaries and cartoons, says 
he has dropped 20 pounds — ob- 
servers estimated laA year that he. 


The new piano i 

from France is made of clear plexi- 
glass. with ^arkling ^d fittings.^’ 

D 


Larry Colliiis’s latest novel. . 
“Fortitude," is now the best-seUing' 
novd in France on. lists. in I'Ex-. 
press, Elle and Fiance-Soir. 
cordi^ 10 Editions Robert ' 
font, the book's publisber.it is only - 
the second time m the' 16 ye^ that-- - . 
I'&press m^aane has brezt com-- - 
piling its list thm an American aor'''- 
thor has h^ France's Na 1 sdlei;*: ' 


. '■ j 
.'.TtXl! 
■ .-.-..I 

Min 

^*441 


the previons one bmns Alex Haky^-- 
with “Rixns.”' “Fortitude,” about 


espionage in Woiid War U, is to be.~-- • 
publish under the title “A Fall.’ : 
From Grace" in the United States •' ' 
in June ) and in Elriiain In S^nero; ~ 
ber^ The former writing team of : i r: 
Collins and Dooud^ Lapiern' .. 
had success with a senes of histoiv:'- 
cal bocdcs. including “Is Paris Buni-^ .-r 

iugr 


Sal 

•,» JTH o 

■ 

•V 

..V. .-Uil 


MOVING 


ALLIED 


kifl Momma 

uiu: 


VAN UNES INTL 

ova 1,000 A6a«n 

in U.S>. ' CAMADA 
350 womo-wiDE 
ftSBimATB 

PARIS DodMircUs I n tm n alional 
(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT s«5c.^ 

(069) 250066 

MUNICH IMS. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON ..ftrsss; 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSBS: 

(02) 425 66 14 

GB«VA 

(022) 32 64 40 

CAIRO Affied Van tiiMf Int'i 

(20-2) 712901 

USA AIBod Vim Unas Inn Corp 
(0101) 312-681-6100 


MOVING 


RELOCATING 
IN EUROPE 


HOMEQUmr 
RaOCATION 
THE ONLY CHOICE 

Homeguilv RehKotion, Ihs worlcfs 
enipfo^ 


mst eni|i7y«e rakurtm 
fan a ant sfliKtive & solu- 

tion throughout Europn to of your 
reloeotion prcMam. 

Our interrohond Home Saerdi pro- 
ffttn is deggned to everoocne the oil 
lurol and prooied cfifficuHiB enesun- 
larad by tha axecutm ond fendy when 
oonfrontad Ejy the prospect of 0 Foreign 


(or 


. . . detoh, please contact: 
Homeqiiity Bebc o hon Uimted 
Ewopeon Seivnes Head Office 


[Annemene Htrtdinson or Poid KeBnd 
London 01-9S ISI9 (irnier charge). 


OONTIIEX Cosibusiers to 300 ciMs 

wor^fwide • Air/Sea Cdf Onrie 
28i 1881 Pons beer Operol Cars too 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO aa FOR YOUR 
NEXT IN1BINATIONAL MOVE 


FOR A HSE ESTIMATE CAU. 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHBIS: 

BARCBONA: 

BONNb 

8REMB4: 

BRUSSELS: 

CADIZ: 

FRANKFURT: 

GENEVA: 

LONDON: 

MADRID: 

MANOCSTBI: 

MUNICH: 

NAPIB: 

PARS: 

ROME: 

VIBUNA: 

ZURICH: 


071J 89.93.24 
961.1X12 


01 

0316523111 
1166062 
0421)170591 
720. 


MK 

956)863144 


95.63 


ia< 

;o6i{^tooi 


85.30 


022)4 
01)961.41.41 
01)671.2430 
'061)7072016 
039)1415036 
081)7801622 
3)0249000 


i526f9342 


101)3 


1)955520 

:633a00 


BUY A DREAM AND WIN A FORTUNE! 


Now try the Lottery with only 
80,000 Tickets 

JpTjK 44,900 winners aEfm 

IPF WINNING CHANCES: 1 :2 


s 

> 


44,9(X) winners 

WINNING CHANCES: 1 :2 

Yes, only 80, OCX) tickets participate in the 120** Austrian Lottery, 
bringing YOU closer to BIG WINS like these: 

1st Prize: US $ 540,000.00 
2nd Prize: US $ 270,000.00 

3rd Prize: $ 225,000.00 2 Prizes of $ 180,000.00 

2 Prizes of $ 135,000.00 2 Prizes of $ 90,000.00 

31 Prizes of $ 45,000.00 35 Prizes of $ 22,500.00 

PLUS 44,825 Other Cash Prizes up to $ 13,500.000 

Total Prize Money: $ 19,080,000.00 

• Your winning chances are the best worldwide, since one out of 
every two tickets wins at least the cost of the ticket. 

• All winnings paid out tax-free in any currency, anywhere. 

• For your protection, the Austrian Lottery is under strict govern- 
ment control. 

Make a date with lucki Order now, using coupon below, your 
ticket(s) for the 120* Austrian National Lottery 

to 

PRQKOPP INTERNATIONAL 

the official disbibutor for the Austrian National Lottery. 


O 

o 

5 


29 MariahiHer Str. 




0 

31 

1 








19^ A-1061 Vienna, Austria. 

□ Please send 

Full ticketfs) at US $ 378.00 each 

Half tickets) at US $189.00 each 

Quarter ticket(s) at US $ 94.50 each 

valid for ail 22 Weekly Drawings of the 120'” Austrian National 
Lottery beginning May IS”, 1985. For the mailing of all winning 


I 

cr 

oc 

O 


lists, I add US $ 12 for Overseas Airmail Postage (or US$8 within 

Europe). wad n wi,iu«i n ima.«ia 

I enclose total payment of US $ 

with check pa^le to J. Prokopp. 


< 

S 




Please send further information. 


Name 


Address 
City/Country 



OmoRROW • MAIL TODAY • WIN TOMORROW e MAIL TOOP^ 


LEGAL NOTICE 


INTBEST OF 

jmOME L DOiTaid 
R4IBtNATK)NAL POWER 
MDUSTRSS N.V.. 


OTHai MATTHS. 

Dm nohoi offoeb yaw nghh. If yn 
tp r«id or con^ whh ifio nOKe. 
debts m may be owmd by eilhar ( 
or «v4l be fbnwer barred irom sh( 
inony oueis cf the deblon^ 


li<vid Fotm Indufliin. N.V.. 


San Die«. CoEfomia 92){e, of 
dooniMilM 


be forever ban^ frora i 
mg in any oBeh of either debtor 
rome L Doff and koeniahonQl P< 


ors m 
Pli pending 


boidauen a 
indina berare 


Ihot eourt. 


oddre 


debar w. Ip tgfca or recover pwperty t 
of rile debtors 


OMtt of the estate 
4. Con^ 
00B23-PII mthe 


on the extent of the ooorf's orders of- 
feong your n^tts. TWs notice 
ishedpnuont to an order of tf 
fo oupiofa m g. 


ANNOUNCEMEIYTS 


SlASCRiBE 
to the 

INTERNATIONAL 


HERALD 

TRIBUNE 


AnOSAVE 

Aa a new nfaniber to the 
h it wiMrion ol Hoold Treone, 
you con tme up to hdf 
the newBtond price, depen di ng 
on yev couftiry or resdence. 


1 ANNOUNCEMEr<rrS 


HAVE A MCE DAYI Bokei. Hove o 
nice day! Bokel 

REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 

MTONATICtelAL AftCHnECTURAL 

Coinvitonis provide fuR roige proioi' 
sional services Eurepe/USA. indudru 
oiqeclive exonnutian of business 7 
penondorop^ ft use/design op- 
tiem. AfOiOVB ASSOCIATES Par& 
01 551 4232, NYC ^I^989•S^78. 

GREAT BRn'AIN 



1 USA 1 

bw 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FOR MORE REAL ESTATE 
OffORTUMTIES SS 

PAGE 13 

CANADA 

CANMkA. FOR MVE5TMENTS m ho- 

let, shopping molb, ofiia buUngL 
itefiedfa, conMentioL profealonol 
root estate semces in Conoda Write 
Bee 2016, Herald Tribine, 92521 
Neuly Ctetas, France. 


For daW h 

on ttw ipeod iiereductocy cHer. 
write »! 


BfT SabecHptiem Departmenl, 
131. AwnitaChialaideGna B e. 
92200 Ne iri iyw^ S eln» France. 
Or lei: Paris 747.^-29 


m ASA AND PAOHC 

eonlaa our lead dstrfeuior or. 


I nloniarianal HenM Treuna 
1005 TaISm CenoiMNial Buidno 
24-34 Hwnw Read 
HONGKONG 
TM: MC 5-286726 


LORDSHP FOR SAIE 

The most HuportORt Monor; Ke a nrA 
dt, NerfoA, End;^- trodMnoOy^ 
CD'portfng the uconnon Honour 

CMS BUTIER OF ENGLAie 

SAVIU5. B & 10 Upoer King Street, 
Nor - 

Tet. |0«03| 


Norm^ NorfeRL 
WOS) 61211. TLu 9755<1. 


REQUBn UNOON viators, 
T iovelett e r providM pq^ of updat- 
ed onOcai monriRy nfermulien, ngt 
adve'tKte. w London & Bntnh ritop- 

p^(esiau;onls,irovdnews, + Ae- 

oter gwde. By Aneraun & other UK 
lesid ints . 1 1 imim US53S er UiUE33 
tC2S wnhm UKL Amex Ao oeeepie^ 
aEWBT UeeotiQfB Ltd. Bex 662. 
Loe^ WIO 6EW, free detail 


WHO SAYS netEf NOTHING 

FUN HAPPBOIG SUMMY5? 

BRUNOI AND DINNER AT 

HOUYWOOD SAVOY 
Spoool don & mens BACK 
by popular demand. 44 lue N. D. des 

Wckm 75002 Fora. Tri; 236 16 73 


W^ STEVEN spunsrs ««y Stm 


ctd with deeouns up . _ . . _ 

ed to Apr 30 Came 265 92 40 
for fuH dNodi Cm de b MatMeine^ 
25 f . Boytde (Gte Serryer) Pgrit B 


AlCOHOUCS anonymous in 
^^^POrb. 634 9 & Borne 


real ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


AUsnuA 


KITZBUBBa. 40 sqjn. oportment, fur- 

mshed. USS78.DOO. Telephone Munid> 
(89) 36 II 365. TW 531 


IBAHAMAS 


BAHAMAS 
(ELfiOHERA) 

A in'm 1200 ft o atwhu iil ejlate. a 
beounfviy fumehed. fully eqwpped viU 


la with pool, overfodidng serira w(d!^ 
Excellenl for mdoor / 


wws. txcellenl for mdoor / outdoor 
entertoinng, dote to the prestnnMt 
Canon Boy Oub. 

For further detab please contact: 

AGED! 

36 be Bd PiMcaste Charlotte 
Menfe CcrixMC 98000 Monoee 
Tet (V 

Telex 


IIJ0 66 00 
^17 MC 


CABLE flEAOt THE 8AHAMAS- 

New 3 oodroMT, % both Aegean 
style hooM. Oceonfrocti pool & potto, 
seneKte TV, mod seraoe, car. IM 
for foray or 23 coupl^ 
S2S0(Vmenrh. Summer & Sefrieniber. 
exdudng utihbes. Inquiries. Copnee 
V9lc^ P.0, Box NS?4, ffossotTwho- 
mn. After S pm BT; 809.327-7661. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


RANCE COTE D’AZUR 

AitenKcn oO bv4d«uooatractors. Btou- 
trfi4 property, ISjAO scuiL, soutiMm 
skipinn »ie, view on the bohn & 
FrerKhIfivierooonnce be btodeed. Bidd- 
•ag fiermesnn for 73 viOos m Provence 
style. FuDy developed, 5 km to Monte 
Gorki. Fqi Ktie. (^^,000. VZJimno- 
Uben GmbH, P.O. Bew 1747. 0.8990 
Undou / fi., W. Germony. Phone: 
{Q)S3S2-79)33. Telex: 541 163VZU^ D. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

FEARMOUGDIS 

In high eiess residartbol area, beautiful 
Vila, J reeepiiorB, 4 bedrooms. 4 baths, 
pool. Oneha land, Pnee P5.000,000. 
Ref: 1558. ^v: 

JOHN TAYUW SJL 
55 Lo Crsisetie 
06400 Cannes 

Teb (9^ 3S 00 66. The 470921. 


FltENCH PROVINCES 


NEAR MONACO: 
CAP MARTIN 

For Sote 

m 0 real pqrodse (ireci(y,on the Medi- 


terr qn eon, m a ktw residenlnl build- 
ii ond 


vnth garden and swim mi ng pool 
Ld 5 room apartment. 
iJtOO. For funhei det& 


AGHR 

36 b Bd Ptine M e Ovlotte 


C^MC 98000 MfSNACO 


(931 SO 66 00 
Th. 479A17 MC Of! 
INTBINAnOFIAL AGBtiCY 
4 Bd de lo Come d'Or 
06230 cot OS VUIBRANCHE 
FRANCE. Teii (93) 56 <9 36 


BEU. 

group IN1BDtiATK3NAt 


CANNES. 5ea view, supedi oaortmeni, 
erroee, double Ev' 


6rii floor, 20 srpn. tetToee. 
mg, study. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, en- 


dosed gcrage, oelar.. Good prioe - 
SUPbToWNB lo CoMonw -1- 


other oporlmenfs 
TBEX 612906 TB. 727 34 65. 


20 KM BEAUNE 

SIMERB RESUBtiO, 1900 STYLE 
1 1 roomi oi> 6,100 sqjn. fenced. 
Dnendendes. 

SANTANDrIa (1) 561 90 91. 


HOULGATE HOURS PARIS Okl 

house with lots of dwrm, eNrance, 


blehen, liwng wUh ponellina, old Ira 
place.7bedrooms,7baihsriwC + 


Jbisths,TW( 

J with 3 rooms, norse-box. 
Ivge garden, wel decoreled. 200 m. 
beach. FI .500.000 (1631] 24 62 00 


COTE D'AZUR - MCE - REAL. ESTATE 


toeney - Buymg on e p ur tree m or e 
wloT SolvB a l(r.' 


Mrimis problem wAh' o 
senoio eemporw — PROMOTION 
MOZART. Ask ^ our bodim 19 
Ave Auber or Hotat MerUm Nin 
06000 - Toh (9^ B7 08 20 - 81 48 80. 


COIE D’AZUR, CANNES. Sumptuous 

oportinent-vtiki, 4 roonu. modem. 

ViayKgh doss residence. Mogrdicent 
centurvold perk. pcxiL Direct proreot- 
et.'FiJSOfiOO, expanses reduced- 
FSANa reO^nOt-l. Cannes, tek 
(93)38 62 62. • -• 


SOUTH OF .FRANCE, ffct for side 

newly modernized, flited com 
rooms, bldmi & btfhreoai £225lm. 
rooms, kitchan 6 bolhnsom iSttfUi. 

OaervUoae IS mDessea Td; London 

935 33^063528658 


EXCEPnONAL, ovsteokbig Utedter. 


riBiw & Pgrquerollet, in rragoiri 


Imidsoaw, viBa 5 bedroom^ 3 
2 letdwii, artist studo, bm 

roundnd with exouc trees. ftSO 

Teh 1901 75 is CQ/ Pons 2^ 


S.W. FRANCE 2 

uig, dining, etf in Ididan, 
bmhs, 2 cor garage. eentrG heal -f- 
42 sqjn. fled. M fumbhid, ^pE- 
ognees, many vdros. 2360 sqjn. 
sas.00a Tel: ^663)64 97 23 


meat uvau near H/er«, k 

gnwnd-floor apartment in private 
mein, with oecac le beach 
ihmi^ private gordea F1O00J000 
mctudiig own gangge & prhirit boat 
berth. &ials^ 9 49 60. 


YOUR CONTACT M PROVBia. 
Houses with character. 


Omnnng 

properties. Edpte s. 6 wIb GABON. 


VB4CE 


5& 13532 5T.REMY4)E-PfiOi 
ICedex. Tdb (90) 9201 JB +. 


1 8 KMS. CANFCS (Grasse), vilta. 200 
sqm.. S Toomfcdcrage. beoulifufa 
landscaped, 4,209 sqjn. gonjen & 
pool area rnnora ni e views throunh. 
out.F260Qji5K^Trt|93136 48 9g 


DOWNTOWN sr. TROPEZ, eabn, 80 
sqm. restdenoB, 300 sqjn. waled gor- 
den oiwres oma^ 2 bedoons, 
douUe tiving, niy eqcnpg^ Bt c h en, 
befeony & wrroce. Paris 


ratiCE Pronneol stone vGo, very 


■ Owner 1^00 


INCRSALE BARGAM. Pyrertees 
Arentolas, IS ho land, tremen- 
dous wew, 18 bn Fbrpignaii 25 bn 
beach. Price FPZOO/sqjn. Owners 
Tak (3368) 3491S1. ThloSTTSF. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTBatON BXECUnveS 


ai Mo bt i m i t cS o md Herald^ 
butmr where mere Mon a third 
^ a imBien neadire warid- 
widf^ omM of whom en Ui 
buwooee and mMm6k wOI 
toad d. Juet tefra ve f Avte 


6J3S9^ 6efaw JOrnm. oa- 

0|0r 


eurtiqp i 


MW eon Mex raw 
swdf 


6acE ond your tnwrnne 

winriii dShoun. Ihm 


US.S9.80 or had 
eqwii M ew t par fine: You mutt 
iitdude eonadoh and rarfl^ 
^h UBng addmot. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


WRHM 30 DAYS - OR ISS 
You con bora your nwa 


...and pwcfcn t men money in 


rhon mo s t people earn mow^. . 
Eew. Its not hord ot oB vvhen you own 
a Ktrra Computer Portrort Sjatein. 

A sure winner thtf eombeies 3 of to- 


S 's hoHesf video, eomcwlBn 

■leiani pciums... phis the mow. 


how aid giMTontees v Texas Instru- 
menb. Pmseiue and Kemo. An oH oenh 
busirwte. Customers eome to you. No 
scAng. No stress. b'snetB f i uiiu i ae. AB 


the money and fhejirofils ore lOOX 
foniMS, wtiwiduali Or 


yours. Idea for . 

ewneri Part-time. fiA-teoe or 
s. There's m iwra le leave 
your preuiti jMt. With the Km syston 
you taka sonwone's petwc withe T.V 
amm imd nstoniry pnnr it with o 
wier. It's so putfhortten sinpte: a 
_ _ con run iL But the prafiis aren't bd 
stuff. The Kemo cyiim is ovoilcile in 
black Old wtete or fuB cetari a pone- 
ble, sets up in 30 irw u te s er less, gny- 
ten^ onywh em . The nworld a yew terri- 
tory. Than ore thousands or leertm 
waiting le be liBed... plus treaw w doia 
mol order npp fce Btien. System Briess 
stBT et u5S9[joo to ussajoa 
bns. M3% 

Frankfurt / W. Gernmiy. 

Tel, 069 / 747808 lb: 4)2713 KEMA 


SWISS COMPANY - impori/E^, 
wfl act Bs your ogeM - hendb yeur 
mraaoiaiB. Pleoie oontao. Telex 
4Z30n Geneva 


BUSINESS 

opPORTUPnriES 


MVESTMBff PAR1NBU. 
NEH)&> 

'• Selad land swoincaly tacoied near 
Dwieyworld / Orlonda 


• Option to purchase at weB below 
eurreiU morkel vdue 

• Adtfhonal flnarMOl partners required 


to eomalete ourehesc and take Me 
ta fagK vqImM tor 


• Short 
profitable 


land 
)d bi . 
(protected 
. srs mteresl 
mternationd lounsl 


before vmy 
d >00% 


gli^ta developers ^retfM in 


nnreaon, hotels, shqppnM center. 

uSloW u 


• Investm en t ronge 
IB$1^4300. 
rum Amnni i ■ 


bi rai 


100 N. Beceyne Bhrd 
Suite 1209. Mm. N. 33132 
Tel: ^ 3588097 
Telex, 8^(7 ELRO MIA. 


Cerp. 


NOW tS TW TIME for tvoieci devel 
epmeni. red estate investnient m bro 
the best opaanuixtlei 6 nd- 


For the best opaanuixtiei » nd- 
vme, codocii Mr. H Burns, Anole 
SaugBed End* Agmy, Mod, nl: 
4-81296/7. Tb. 


fNVESTMBtiT CTPORTUNnY in ex- 
port doeesMig nne Korodv. I^le^ 
es»apartietmeyeonlD0SMA5hir- 
oo. Tb: 46S7B2 free SJ or P.a Bcb 
5752 Jnddoh. Saudi Arobn 


BUYING SWATCH WATOB, 

Mg eosh, sM, mmiRnlin 500 
pmees. Banger, Cdmas Mooe 


teLFronee. 


jHo- 

i4 4S.lbc47D04S. 


COMFUTBIS for bufirted imdpersafr 
ol usa AwlherBod deeter ter SM 
Apple, dhws. Bed gnees. Cdl Mr. 
Lowrenoe. Pons 563 348-3(100 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


WEEKS m Belier Haefch. 
Mr Cordiee M ftevertifon & 
He ow h Baeenrttietimg Proem new. 
Elegeni iiionpon, paeeehil Surrey 
csimirjfMH, )mh|y quolrfled nedieai 
supeiwoi. Veil Bern MeGed Cm- 

104818792233, 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTL 

BEAUTffUL PEOPIf 


UNUMriEDINC 
U-SJk. A WORLDWBB 


A cempieta social & busnasi service 


prowdmg e mqua eoUeebon of 
sotw & muNmgool 


nfenied. verso 
nfs tor ell 


jndrviduofs tor off oeecBians. 
2124'65-7793 
212-765-7794 
300 W. S6ih St., N.Y.C I0Q19 


SanriM Bav'esentelives 
•dWoHd 


Needed 


ridwnda 


PANAMAMAN corpordions prowde 
the odrarnoaes of complete odtiiderv 
lieOly, aroldc GoMly ft Lfi dedv 
enency envroimni We offer com- 
pany rarmehon larvKes on e test, 
rekoble aid eoiepelibn basis. We 
ne patiedorly uileresied m Mnng 
up vnth effstior* fauBnes eensultanls 
«i other (Dunmes, Conloa H, I. Dor- 


COMMERdAL 

PREMISES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR. CANNES Certter. 


1^38, 


RIVnArS bns, 

houM, iovel^j 
vaioge. Pricer 


rched 

'^ooa 


tmy hoRday 

rebnxie - 
35 1832 


GRB40B1E RESRimiAL 3 room^ 

bdeony. lOthAwr. (74^6617. eves. 


mi 


GERMANY. 


LUXURY PBllHOUSE terroce ^Krt- 

iramis & stufiosia Wiesbodtn. Ger- 


inony. For setie by US. ordMea/d^ 
taper. New buUag in dty oentar 


Fdnous os SPA with gotnbfir^ cosna 
Oily 15 mns. from mtentatmnd air- 
port - ^onUurt Bret prios d present 
USS exchange reir sorting or about 
155,000. LooJ fraidng d about 7% 
posBblit. WriterGabau, Nordensti-, 2, 
. b-60S2 WoOdorf W. Ger mony . or 
cd M 61Q56I±. Tb 4185723 fo- 
^ddtane^Bicib^hotafc 


GREAT BRITAIN 


GRACIOUS OFFICE 
BUILDING POR 
YOUR COMPANY IN 


WEST BID OF 
LONDON 
FREHOID 


22,000 sq.ft. w con be eitid’gad 
Own Cv Pvk 


A histortc borgoia Tins elegant 19th 
% name of 


Century buiUng, once the .. 

Cadnal MawHig, is in Censerration 
Area dose to Vidono Station & Airport 
cennediene. 

It lends itself, to eeorainieal refurbish- 
oent & modemizottan to crovide e 
presligiaus European Headquarters, 


Plaore eontod: 

HRUHL MRXB MAY ft ROWDBI 
77 Grosvenas Street 
London W1A 2BT. 
Telepfione 01629 7666. 

Telex 267683. 


BUYING A PROPERTY 
MTHE UK? 


We'eon find you onyriting from 
0 siudo to a cosHe. 


Complete service provided 
Letting & Management 


Pre of coaeneidal prennes and 
•nvesbnertis, please coffloa: 

A6BM 

% bis BU Prmeessa Otarli 


MC 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Lngi^ P06 1327. PanmnoPA^ra 


nMTIx.- 3121 K^^ PG 
0834 or 28^19 (eves 2367791, 


BIHMESS SamOS m Uddtiiourg 
leereti^ rervici i telaplietie / tetex 
/ mml san^ f mvoieng, lechneel, 

/ cuddle ogeney / ODcage ipoee / 
adv er ti an g eoiMultanl 7 creanvt 
wortehep/ denidkfnn / coRpony 
IbnnaiHin. Pteoa cortiad Luxeerp 
SA P.O.B. 2436. L1Q24 Uivembourg 
Tet 495643 oc 48 40 11/12/13. 1% 
2251 LUXCOLU. 


IS YOUR TYPEWiOTER BUGOB? De- 
ad & neubofae'bira telwritene tops 
ft kfte ,cacardtes. Hundreds of securh 


88I4Wi te 


297 S60DI 


TAX SERVICES . 


TAX tetuRB'ond oiide 
' Pn 56391-23. 


Your ban buy. 

nna docimds m oity price raae 
ol lovresi wholesae pms 
dred from Aiiiwerp 
center of iha dmmeite vredd 
fuK g u er itee. 

For free pnea tin wrue 


tetMMted 1928 
Mbtanstroot 6Z fl-2018 Antwerp 
Betaum - Tat P2 ^234 O SI 
Tlx, 71779 syl b. At the womond Cbb. 
Heort of Antwerp Dioniend lediinry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR OFFICE *i Gentiony. high stan- 
dard oFflos, tee nuHfiiwCi pmemi, 
<41 fae&nes. Satnwr, Bom 


Servm P7. 2621. D6800 Mwintwun: 

n 671-22f34i' tb 463740 BS D 


RJRO BUSRHSS GBirR 

99 Kanwacht. 1015 CH Amitefd oi ii 
TM 31.20% 57 49 Tain 16181 
. Wedd-Wde SuneSs Centers 


BUSINEn SERVI^ in LuKMrixaH^ 

Ati c euintnig / Cumpuuy rumtutiens 


*h Monci^mapt / jeoatand Ttel^ 


phone / teiw / roS Fnear, 12-14 
efA wcwJ tet. 1160 luteotbowg. 
Phgne{-l-35i21 49.7153, Tbn 1433. 


PARIS AOOR^ 

Since 1957 \Sf. ftardm nt aiL- . .. 
iteetteg leeniL S ate d^Arfeb, 
TebS94704;Tbe-6423IM.-' 


YOUR OFRCE M PARISt TBfiL 
ANSWaiNG 


TeL 


SrS,^:'SaS: 


TOWN ft AROUFO LTD. 

108 Behize lone. 

London NWS 

Tet 01.435^^ ft 352 0816 bnri 
Tb- 29S441 BUSY30. ^ 


LOMtON. igvaY tUUSE en Rivff 
ThoiM by Putney Bridga. Fully reiio. 
.''Oteri, 5 bedroom, 3 reeephde,. 2 
bdhs, large htehsn, loiindry. eemrol 

hea^ eniophene. peris 4 cars, 1 1 S 


MAGNIFi»IT BRAND NEW rest. 
dance otBigents P arte, 4 bedroom, A 
itmrbte boriwoons with n ro e w ive L- 
ng Old diwig rooms. nOO sq. ft. reef 
6?^ devetar. UMQOO 
freehold 01 -586 0449, Prmcipeb only 


REAL ESTATE 
FORSAIE 


■ •■’I 4 

r 

V -rcti' 

'Yj 

■ 


GREAT BBiTAIN 


KMOHTSBRIDGE PENIHOUSL Op^ 


KniteHcicndsuAlhmagiidicere views — 
from 4D-Foat terrace, rmwty ret 


- 5 
'>V 


terrace, rmwty refir- 
bishad,fa(Piini:g2dodriebedc»ea. 

1 with dreiBiiig area & luxury bollv 
room ensuite, snendshower room, '** -- 
douUe aspect Icwnge/dniii^roaai, .'7 . 
Superb IlK^ lotiJten fitted writ . 
top' qudiiy equipmenr. Lease Hrj*--'- -‘ 




OffinanKlnd£i6SJX)0. Teto'^ 


'4 38 UK. 


HAMPSTEAD PBti lHQUSE . A irogrtif. 
taeni.7lh Boor modem penthouse 
beaulifulylocoled m o privae wood 
ed eshPein Hie best of Homp^ 


stead Stumwn views from private' 
s, double garage, excellem set 


‘.“iri ' 
■.'..,■•■,11 

■ flas 
'T?«J 

•• -ICO 


terraces, double gorqge. 

curity, porteroge. etc. 4 receptieir 

rooms, 4 beds, 3 baths (2 en witi^ 


I Cm 


Luxury Udwi), ut^ mom, gotsts. 

{.Omnini 


dool&POO 


ESTSJXXL 


U years. Olti 

lASSMANS 


lenMsof 


4092020 


STRATFORD UPON AVON, Wdr^ 

undsttee- ouertooting -rite nver Avon 
and Royal Shoteqaare Theatre. A 
sineA ordRact designed residenee. 
Inavidiiaf ft iniqufr aeooinnodalian - . 
foyer, reception hdl, ktldcn, 3 duv- 
fate bedmoms, 4th bedioam / audb 
goroginga 


R, 


. 


gerrte 
Oreon Street, Stratford 
TeL (078^ 66191 


dens. $115000, 


GROSVmOR SQUARE W1 . A 

lencent duplex aportment in nmnier 
faulcSi^ on the north side of I 


exdushte garden squve. 5 beds, 4 
:, 2/irreeepiia 


reeepliocte, kmry litdten\ 
/breateote roonr odcfitiona) i 
SWSlftoavaddMl 



LOMXM 


„ , , SOUTH KBONGTON. 

Biigte 4lh Boor pertihouse dupin in 
wiOB tree Ened street. 2 becnoaq, 2 
bottveeiM, 2 receptions, My (itM 
luldten / breddast room, roof ten 


race. 
£I3Si 
581 £ 


.. Tfooin, 

Bewreor, 44 ' year (ease. . 
' OT naorraafter. Td: London 

or 228 0992 


ST. JOHN^ WOOD NWB. A rvely 

ovoiloble detixfied double fronted 
neOTGeoig^ house in axdusve loco- 
lion. S b^ 3 baths (2 ensatej. 3 
reoeerions, matted noft gu^' 
doofa, fitted Uidiafi, uifity, sriol IC- 
dudad gordea privote pvters. free- 
hotd.CSBi)Q0.CsS5MANS4P2(«L 


MS 

'T-g 

i'-un 

ih 

.^‘U1 

■ -i-i A 

rs 

•Ajb*, 

Mr 

:r;i 


DARTMOUTH, DEVON. De&^ 2 
Mdroom town cottage. Very aea 
restouronte shopA mOTim. Wau 
mam u iie J holiday home of army 
o^. E3IJI00 w offer. TeL If 
06D42S 507 Of Ger^ 02436 2299 


■-f ^ 

U 


STf, 


LONDON NWS PBUTHOUSE FU^ 

Moaufioeet views overioofangHarapI 
Stead Hemh. 3 beds. 2 bml^ 



PAGE 6 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


new YORK 


FI 990 ONE WAY 


+ Anatardow to; NYC 


KBTOUR - Td: 260 4D 




TO 15* raoM ei9o ^ 
NATC London 01.734 BIQQ. 


OFH WAY SISOL fireryd oy NY • 
Wed Cead $145. Pvis 23^ 90 


holidays A TRAVPJ 


WAR^AYACHrtNGREECLDL 

r ed fran owner of Ivgeit Beet 
mcnegemeni. 

bier. Pa 190CMS^15 64lfer’' 


] 


• '4-l 




HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


tSLAS YAOfTMG. Yodri Owten. 

A fndi ii Mut a8.Aihew10671. Greece. 




TUSCANY, wute term fkes, lerUtHw 
. ente.poot/tenrtis.Muitidt43Wt>» 






Horas 

FRANCE ^ -1% **^2. 
'■'••NN.TPraemwehbailvertra . ■•V. . 


renouuled. bi hacA of Pons, deie- 
Tuaiiies.cSilftamft't- 
f«nR«fi.3roeMoiriThobor,Pb* •.V - 

_lMTef! 260 32 80. Tla! 213492 F. i, 

E Zefoi l.M roo m flats, bofc' .*•*.? ' -S 
JttidiaH. frda,. Td- 677 72 00. ^ 


great BKTTAIN 




' *^ 5 


-‘■esc* 
- 0 

rw: 

•c-tilBC 
afft 
jIl'ij tc 

-.X Arl. '. 

r:ev.s~» 

. « 
itt 

a| 
, Ma. 


MM waaeS^SECiBN 


™.nAZA NOTH, UNDCN 
KmBmea bast steSon fo bteteed 
Md deom.AB-fOMe faeih / « 
y * TV /.telephone / rede / 


% 




Inprime par O^rim, 73 rue de PEvmffJ^ 750JS Boris, 


T.L017«417. 


*10!