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By Herbert H. Denron 

■■'■■■ /*«f SfrWnr 

WASHINGTON— A dissident 

segment of {be Libyan military 
launched two assassination at- 
taints recently against Cdonel 
Moflirwr Qadhafi, who responded 
by executing downs of officers, ac- 
cording . to intelligence reports 
-^reaching die UJS. government. 

A coup anempi by conservative 
officers is said to haw occurred 
early last month at a presidential 
villa, outside Tripoli, the Libyan 
capital. The reports indicated that 
as many as 15 officers may have 
been executed in retaliation. 

The second attempt, reportedly 


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By David Hoffman 

Wushlngion Pott Srrrtct 

SANTA BARBARA, California 
— President Ronald Reagan, who 
declined to visit the site of a Nazi 
ctmceotraiion camp during his visit 
to West Ger ma ny in May, has de- 
cided to lay a wreath at a German 
war cemetery where many Nazi sol- 
diers . were, buried following the 
Battle at the Bulge, the white 
'Reuse has announced. 

’ Outlining the itinerary for Mr. 
Reagan’s.European trip April 30.10 
May 10, the White House said 
Thursday that the president wffi 
visit die German Military Ceme- 
tery at Bitburg, West Germany, on 
May 5 as pan of a West-German 
official visit. 

The ceremony at the cemetery is 
scheduled after Mr. Reagan at- 
tends the seven-nation economic 
summit in Bonn on May 3 and 4. 
He win later visit Spain and Portu- 
gal and address the European Par- 
liament in Strasbourg, France. 

The White; Haase s po k e sman, 
Larry Speakcs L said the visii aimed 
to stress the economic cooperation 
between former enemies in World 
*Var II “in a spmtof reconriliatioii, 
v» a spirit of 40 yeanof peace, ina 
spirit of ^eeoneoHC' Ti 
compatibility of the Emopiah 
community together with its specif- 
ic allies.’* . • ' . 

Reaction from fte Jewish com- 
munity was tempered tat angry. 
Nathan Perlxnutter, national direc- 


an assault on a convoy in which the 
plotters thought Cotone! Qadhafi 
was traveling, is said to have taken 
place within the last two weeks and 
tohavetesnlted in the execution of 
at least 60 more officers accused of 
c on spi ri ng in the plot 

Unlike an attempted coup last 
- May, which was lea by exiled Qa- 
dhafi opponents who had infiltrat- 
ed into Libya, the two reported 
efforts appear to bare been carried 
out by conservative officers in the 
73.000-member Libyan armed 
forces. It was not dear whether the 
apparent dissatisfaction with Colo- 
nel Qadhafi is widespread. 

According to these repents, the 
attacks and executions have been 
kept secret inside Libya. The public 
banging of two Tripoli University 
students Last year stirred open dis- 
sent among the thousands of stu- 
dents forced to watch the execu- 
tions. Two persons who 
participated in the hang ings were 
later found slain. 

Opposition from a segment of 
the Libyan military is believed to 
be the outcome of a power struggle 
pitting comparatively moderate 
military' officers and career civil 
servants a ff»n« tire extremist Rev- 
olutionary Committees, on which 
fTdnrwi Qadhafi has increasingly 
relied since the failed coup last 
May. 

According to the intelligence rc- 



T1«<«MeMP-s> 


Lebanese Troops Move Back Into Market Town 

Soldiers entering Nabatiyeh, in southern Lebanon, to tell residents they will be protected after the 
pullout of the Israeli Army, which is in the midst of the second phase of its Lebanon withdrawal. 


U.S. Agrees to Meeting 


On Monetary Reform 


White House Staff Is Reorganized; 
Regan’s Role in Policy Is Affirmed 


parts, responsibility for patrolling 
iisia has been 


the Border with Tunisia 
taken over by members of the Rev- 
olutionary Committees through 
vduta&dond Qadhafi rules. 

The belief in Washington is that 
the military officers involved may 
have fdr that this was their last 
chance. before being totally 
the radical committees, 
lone! Qadhafi has sought to 
build a military force made up of 
the radicals as a counter to the 
professional armed forces, saying 
the regular army should be dis- 
banded event Daily. The armed 
forces are widely believed to repre- 
sent the only serious threat to Colo- 
nel Qadhafrs role. 

UjS. and’ foreign analysts in 
Washington say that Colonel Qa- 
dhafi has been suspicious of the 
professional military since an ai- 
lempt cm his life by officers several 
years ago- He then turned to the 
E ait Gomans to create his person- 
al security force; 

These guards are believed to 


By Gerald M. Boyd - 

New York Times Service 

SANTA BARBARA — Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan has an- 
nounced a major reorganization of 
the White House that, while affirm- 


ing Donald T. Regan’s primacy as 
White House chief erf staff, also 


tota retatetfregotafy. The Libyan 
(ContHKiedon Page 2, CoL3) 


grants powerful roles to two key- 
advisers from Mr. Reagan’s first 
term. 

Under the arrangement, an- 
nounced Thursday, Mr. Regan, 
James A. Baker 3d and Edwin 
Meese 3d will supervise virtually all 
aspects of domestic and economic 
policy through two new councils. 

The res true luring sharpens the 
system of policy-making that Mr. 
Reagan has long relied on, both as 
president and as governor of Cali- 
fornia from 1966 to 1974. In each 
instance, he has favored having po- 
licy recommendations formulated 
at tire staff level and then presented 
to him. 

The move will eliminate seven 
current cabinet councils, each 
headed by a different secretary. In 
its ptare, policy ;*nauers involving 
N$tl»sr WJuif 
Hofusaaides rifl-ffiwitorouirft tile 
new councils to lUuf. Regan. 

The cabinet councils to be 


dropped deal with commerce and 
trade, economic affairs, food and 
agriculture, human resources, legal 
policy, management and adminis- 
tration and natural resources and 
the environment. 

in addition, the Senior Inter- 
agency Group on International 
Economic Policy will be abolished. 

Mr. Regan will be first among 
equals, but Mr. Meese, (he altomcy 
general. and Mr. Baker, the Trea- 
sury secretary, will coordinate the 
development of domestic and eco- 
nomic policy by other cabinet de- 
partments. 

Mr. Meese and Mr. Baker, with 
Michael K. Denver, were the origi- 
nal iSuiing advisers who came to 
the White House with Mr. Reagan 
in 1981. 

Mr. Baker will oversee a new 
cabinet-level group on national and 
international economic policy. The 
group will advise tire president and 
coordinate policy. 

Mr. Mefcse will head a similar 
council to advise Mr. Reagan on 
domestic and social policy and de- 
velop ?uch policies fop more “com- 
^ Jjntegrated” way. 



leuWHffl 

Donald T. Regan 


The two new councils are to be 
composed of other cabinet mem- 
bers and administration officials. 


Policy issues developed by the 
councils would go to Mr. Regan 
and then to the president. 

With this move, the president 
seems to be returning to a team 
appptaeb among key adviser*. At. 
the start of his second term, the 
new chief of staff appeared to be 

(Continued on Page 3, Col. 6) 


By Axel Krause 

Interttiwcnal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The United States, 
seeking to resolve a conflict with 
ihe European Community on lire 
linkage of trade and monetary is- 
sues, said Friday that it would be 
willing to organize a conference of 
industrialized countries later this 
year to consider reforming the in- 
ternational monetary system. 

The United States won agree- 
ment Friday for the organizing of a 
preparatory meeting mi made liber- 
alization before the end of the sum- 
mer. The Reagan administration 
has been seeking a conference on 
trade to begin next year. Friday's 
accord, however, omitted any 
agreement on a date for the confer- 
ence and any mention of linkage 
between trade reform and mone- 
tary reform, as sought by the EC. 

The accord represents "a compro- 
mise by France and other Europe- 
an countries with regard to 1)5. 
insistence that trade liberalization 
negotiations begin as soon as possi- 
ble. 

The U.S. Treasury secretary, 
James .A Baker 3d. told a confer- 
ence of finance and trade ministers 
of the Organization for Economic 
Cooperation and Development 
that “the United States is prepared 
to consider the possible value of 
hosting a high-level meeting of the 
major industrial countries” with a 
view to taking "appr op riate ac- 
tion” on international monetary re- 
form. 

But Mr. Baker ruled out major 
reform, and he did not specify un- 
der whose auspices tire meeting 
should be hdii 

The announcement, made at the 
end of a two-day conference of the 
OECD, including 24 countries in 
North America, Western Europe 
and the Pacific area, was immedi- 
ately termed positive by Finance 
Minister Pierre Beregovoy of 
France and other European offi- 
cials. France has been the leader in 
the ECs insistence that monetary 
reform accompany the negotiations 
on trade liberalization sought by 
the United States. 

“The U.S. delegation is pleased 
with the results of the meeting," 
Mr. Baker said. 

William E. Brock, the U.S. trade 
rqwpsentative, added. 





The U.S. Treasury secretary, James A. Baker 3d, on Friday. 


Shultz Proposes Measures 
To Heip World Recovery 


tor of theAnti-Defamarion League 
ink his 


.*■ a.i I 


*N; 


of B’nai B’rith, said: “I think 
visit to the cemetery of German 
soldiers is an act of gnce'becaaseit 
is good to express friendship to a 
former enemy. But the asymmetry 
of doing that while choosing not to 
visit the graves oT that enemy’s vk- 
tirns is insensitive and k is not a 
healing act." ' 

Phil Baum, associate executive 
director of the American Jewish 
Congress, said: ‘‘We are saddened 
the president of the United 
lies should decide against com- 
memorating those European Jew- 
ish communities destroyed in con- 
centration camps and decide 
instead to pay homage to the very 
soldiers who fought a war in de- 
fense of a regime that engineered 
their destruction and, indeed, who 
killed thousands of American 
young men." 

[The American Legion, which 
represents 2J million veterans, 
said Friday it was "terribly ^ disap- 
pointed" bv the decision, The As- 
sociated Press reported from 
Washington. 

[The organization said in a state- 
ment that it supported solidarity 
'■nth members or the North AtEan- 
Treaty Organization, inducting 
West Germany. Bui "honoring 
German war dead, while igntning 


Retraction on Rape Won’t Free Man Firebomb Attack 

J "r% * n fn 


By Karhy Sawyer. 

Washington Post Service 

; -MARKHAM, Illinois — A 
judge has sent a 2B-year-dd man 


convicted of rape back krprison, 


saying he did not believe me new 
testimony of the manfs alleged vic- 
tim thai she had tad six years ago 
about bemg raped.' 

Judge Richard L. Samuels of 
Cook County drcoii Coun, who 
bad also presided over the trial of 
the man, Gary Dotson, in 1979, 
said Thursday that the reversal of 
testimony by Cathken Crowell 
Webb lacked “sufficient corrobo- 
ration. ” 

. Mrs. Webb, who identified Mr. 
Dotson as hex assailant in the earli- 
er trial, cried, ‘Tie’s innocent!” as 
she left toe courtroom at the end of 
the second day of testimony sur- 
rounding Mr. Dotson’s petition to 
be set free. 


% 


I tad in 1979." she said, wcep- 
“He is innocent.” 


{Continued on Page 2, Cot. 4) 


PAG** 

.A55IF |ED L 


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i $ 


‘I;*®# 

i 


INSIDE 


■ The Soviet Union is nostalgic 

for the time when Franklin D. 
Roosevelt was president of the 
United Stales. Page 2. 

■ In panama, the Coniadora 
group offered onlv limited sup- 
port to President Reagan's plan 
for Central America. Phge 3. 

■ In Pteru, an alliance of leftist 

parlies is favored in general 
elections Sunday. Page 3. 

/ante death of Enver Hoxha 


tai 



leaves opm the question of 
whether Albania’s isolationism 


policy will continue. 

■ Sudan’s new refers reportedly 

have agreed to return the coun- 
try to civilian rule after a one- 
year tranritkm period Page 5. 


akts/leisuke 

■ Flash at the Whitney Biennial 
in New York and a constituen- 
cy for Los Angeles’s “Tempo- 
rary Cbniemporaiy." Page ft. 

yfuMVESS/FlNANCE 


■ Wholesale prices edged up 
02 percent in. March, in the 
United States, ibc‘ government 
reported. Page 9. 


It. Dotson has served six years 
of a 25- to 50-year sentence. . 

Judge Samuels said be based his 
derision on his perception at the 
1979 trial that "per testimony was 
clear and convincing" and that, her 
"demeanor was consistent with a 
person malting a sincere charge of 
rape" 

By contrast, he said, ha 1 demean- 
or last week when she look the 
stand and testified that the rape 
had never happened "did include 
what might be called a selective 
recollection.” 

-The bottom Ene,” he said, was 
the 1 979 jury finding, after 96 min- 
utes of dtoiberation, that Mr. Dot- 
son was guilty. ■ 

. The judge criticized Thursday’s 
testimony by a friend of Mr. Dot- 
son who sought to provide Urn an 
alibi for the night of tire alleged 
attack in July 1977, saying the wit- 
ness “wrought havoc with the claim 
of an alibi. . 

He was referring to inconsisten- 
cies in. the sway told by William 
Julian, who said that he, Mr. Dot- 
son and several friends were to- 
gether that night- 

Mrs. Webb attributed her recan- 
tation to her religious faith and a 
desire to make things right. 

She testified that she had in vent- 
ed the rapestory in 1977, when she 
was 16, because she feared she was 
pregnant after a sexual encounter 
with her boyfriend and did not 
want her foster parents to know. 

Tte hospital emergency room 
physician ^ woo examined tat cm the 



Briefly Closes 
Japan’s Airport 


The Associated Press 


Gary Dotson and mother enter court before ruling. Below, 
Cathken Webb cries after verdict returned him to prison. 



er alibi witnesses testified Thurs- 
day that Mr. Dotson’s clothing was 
nothing like that worn by the man 
whom Mrs. Webb described and 
that the picture she had a police 
artist draw of her attacker showed 
no mustache, while. Mr. Dotson 
had one. 

He also said the scratches Mrs. 
Webb said she inflicted on her at- 
tacker were not present on Mr. 
Dotson when he was arrested. 


TOKYO — Firebombs carried 
by home-made rockets exploded at 
Tokyo's two airports Friday night, 
causing minor damage and Forcing 
the main international airport to 
close for an hour, police said. 

The closure of New 1 Tokyo Inter- 
national Airport at Narita. 40 miles 
(64 kilometers) northeast of the 
capital, caused 15 flights to be di- 
verted to Haneda airport in south- 
ern Tokyo, police said. 

The airport at Haneda remained 
open. Six gasoiine-f tiled bottles 
were fired at that airport, and one 
badly damaged a car parked in 
front of the Haneda terminal. 
There were no injuries. 

At Narita, the only serious dam- 
age was to two cars that caught fire, 
police said. 

Leftists opposed to the construc- 
tion and expansion of the airport at 
Narita have battled police and air- 
port authorities for seven years, 
and police said they probably were 
responsible for Friday’s attack. 

Some farmers, whose land has 
been designated for use by the air- 
port, have refused to leave. 


clear commitment to move on trade 
liberalization as soon as possible, 
and that is important" 

However, sharp differences of 
interpretation immediately sur- 
faced between the United States 
and France about how far the Rea- 
gan administration should be will- 
ing to move on monetary reform, 
and under whose auspices the 
meeting would be held. 

Mr. Beregovoy told the meeting 
that France regarded the proposed 
conference as a first step toward "a 
new Brctton Woods" conference as 
outlined by President Francois 
Mitterrand "at the Versailles eco- 
nomic summit in 1982. Mr. Berego- 
voy said that reform should focus 
on" developing "the greatest stabil- 
ity" in world cuirencymarkets. The 
1944 Bretlon Woods Conference 
worked out details for the post- 
Worid War II international mone- 
tary’ system, including the creation 
of the International Monetary 
Fund and the World Bank. 

President Mitterrand has said 
that the proposed conference 
should seek to effect a major re- 


By John M. Berry 

Washington Past Service 
PRINCETON, New Jersey — 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
has proposed a "program of inter- 
national action" to protect the 
world economic recovery, with the 
major U.S. contribution to be a 
reduction in its budget deficit. 

In a speech that was less optimis- 
tic than past administration pro- 
nouncements, Mr. Shultz said 
Thursday that there were impor- 
tant links between U.S. economic 
problems — specifically, that the 
federal budget deficit is a reason 
for the nation’s record trade deficit, 
the high value erf the dollar and a 
large inflow of foreign capital 
Warning that the United States 
could have a net debt to other na- 
tions of $100 billion by the end of 
the year, Mr. Shultz said, “These 
We taro- a " iB ft i d a noc s are interrelated, and ' 



George- IVShuitz 


they must be corrected if we are to 
maintain the momentum of our 
economic success.” He called for 
spending cuts to reduce budget def- 
icits but ruled out tax increases. 

“The main objective, and the key 
to success, is to accelerate growth 
in the world economy," he said. 

His remarks suggested positions 
the United States seems likely to 
lake next month in Brain at the 
summit of seven major industrial- 
ized nations. 

West European countries, Mr. 
Shultz said, should adopt policies 
to stimulate investment and eco- 
nomic growth rather than relying 
on a growing level of exports to the 
United Slates. 

At the same time, he said, the 
Japanese should not only open 
their markets to foreign goods but, 
like the Europeans, should seek to 
boost investment and domestic 
consumption. 

That would allow Japan to con- 
tinue to have full employment 
without the need to maintain a 
large trade surplus to offset the 
restraining effects of its unusually 
high savings rate, he said. 

Developing nations “should con- 


form of the world's monetary sys- 
tem, including stab ilizing exchange tinue to make the s true rural adjust- 
rates, and to develop trade cooper- menu needed to stabilize their 
alien with developing countries, economies, reduce the economic 


similar to the Bretion woods con- 
ference. 

In a reference to the fluctuating 
value of the U.S. dollar, the final 
communique said that the agree- 
ments reached at the meeting are 
“expected to strengthen the basis 

(Continued mi Page 2, CoL 6) 


burden of government, expand 
their trade and stimulate growth," 
Mr. Shultz said. 

These countries should encour- 
age domestic savings and private 
foreign investment, he said, adding 
that “austerity is not an end In 
itself.” 

In his speech, made at Princeton 


University. Mr. Shultz did not say 
why he believes a smaller federal 
budget deficit would reduce the 
other imbalances. 

Under Donald T. Regan, who is 
now White House chief of staff, the 
Treasury Department argued that 
budget deficits had little effect on 
interest rates. Treasury economists, 
Mr. Regan and President Ronald 
Reagan all have asserted that the 
strong U.S. dollar is a sign of eco- 
nomic strength, not a problem. 

Mr. Shultz acknowledged Thurs- 
day that the high value of the dollar 
against other currencies has helped 
hold down inflation by reducing 
the cost of imports and pressuring 
U.S. producers to compete. 

But he added: “The dollar's 
strength is causing painful structur- 
al adjustments in many of our ex- 
port-related industries: it is alter- 
ing the character of the American 
economy in a basic and, in my 
view, undesirable nay. 

“Lower costs in other countries, 
due to exchange rates, are leading 
many American firms to locale 
abroad production facilities that 
would otherwise be competitive in 
the United States." 

The growth of imports also “is 
spurring protectionist demands for 
tariffs, nomariff barriers and ex- 
port subsidies.” Mr. Shultz said. 
“Whatever short-term relief for 
specific industries such measures 
might provide, the overall long- 
term cost to the mettle of the Amer- 
ican economy, to the American 
consumer and to the world econo- 
my would be devastating." 


Thursday that her injuries were su- 
perficial. 

The physician, who testified for 
the prosecution at the trial, said 
Thursday that a vaginal smear tak- 
en the night of the reported attack, 


plus two other tests, showed “no 
evidence of sperm cells” and no 
evidence of semen anywhere on 
.Mrs. Webb. That testimony was 
not included in the 1979 trial. 

He said this could mean, among 
other tilings, that “no set act was 
committed,” that the act was not 
cbnsutranaied, or thank attacker 
was sterile or had had a vasectomy; 

In dosing arguments, Mr. Dot* 
son’s attorney noted that at the 
1979 trial four persons testified 
that they knew of Mr. Dotson’s 
whereabouts when the ape was 
said to have occurred, that two oth- 


■' Dotson Called Distraught 

Mrs. Webb said Friday that the 
court “did a great injustice" and 
challenged prosecutors Friday to 
uy her for pojiny. The Associated 
Press reported from Chicago. 

A state Corrections Department 
spokesman said Mr. Dotson was 
“distraught.” 

The spokesman, Nic Howell, 
said: “We are going to take tan 
over to the institutional hospital to 
talk to a psychologist and/or psy- 
chiatrist to see if they can hdp." 

Mr. Howell said Mr. Dotson 
would be sequestered there, proba- 
bly in a room alone. He wQl not be 
eligible for parole until 1988. 

Mrs. Webb, now a mother of two 
living in Jaffrey, New Hampshire, 
made her comments in an interview 
with her husband, David, by her 
side.. 

“I’d like to see the court uy me 
now,” she said, “and the other six 
witnesses. And Td like to see a jury 
of my peers hear the truth,” 

Mr. Dotson still has several avo 


(Con turned on Page 2, Col. 7) 


In Japan, 'Made in U.S. ’Just Doesn’t Sell 


Many Shoppers Say American Goods, When Available, Are p a Bit Rough’ 


By Susan Chira 

.V»n York Times Service 

TOKYO — Chieko Kunimitsu, examining 
Tiffany rings at a department store, was 
asked to describe her image of U.S. products. 

“I’m sorry w say this,” Mrs. Kunimitsu 
replied, “but 1 think they are a bit rough. 
When I choose clothes, I look for details such 
as how the hems are sewn, and Japanese 
mtaufacuircrs seem to pay more attention.” 

This perception of questionable U.S. quali- 
ty, which is a perception confirmed in market 
studies here, is dismissed as unfair by U.S. 
manufacturers. They insist that there are 
many cases jn which the quality of U.S. goods 
is higher than the Japanese version, but that 
entry to the Japanese market is barred. 

Therein lies the challenge for U.S. compa- 
nies that want to persuade the Japanese to 
spend more on U.S. merchandise than the 
$27 billion they spent last year. If the compa- 
nies can get their goods to market in Japan, 
they still have to overcome the widespread 
impression that Americans just do not make 
products as well as the Japanese do. 

The Japanese government, responding to 
U.S. accusations of protectionism, intro- 
duced a package or measures this- week to 
make the Japanese market iruwv Hcccssible to 


imports. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone 
added a personal push with a television ap- 
peal to the Japanese people to buy more 
foreign products. 

He also called on department stores and 
corporations to purchase more imported 
goals. 

At the Takashimaya department store in 
Tokyo. Ichifco Ishihara. a managing director 


Prime Minister Nakasone says be erred 
In increasing auto-export quotas. Page 9. 


of the store, said it had decided to hold a 
“S100 import fair,” promoting foreign-made 
article* that cost about 5100. This is in re- 
sponse, she said, to Mr. Nakasone’s calcula- 
tion that if each of Japan's 120 million citi- 
zens bought $100 of goods made abroad, 
Japanese imports would increase by $12 bil- 
lion. It would hdp narrow the United States 
. deficit in trade with Japan, a record $37 
billion last year. 

Reducing the deficit does not seem easy. 
For example, when the Japanese buy con- 
sumer goods, which account for only 6 per- 
cent of American experts to Japan, they trad 
to prefer domestic brands. 

“I mostly buy Japanese products," said 


Noriko Onishi. a shopper. “For example, 1 
lend to be conservative about cosmetics be- 
cause I worn.' they will make me sick, and 1 
feel that foreign cosmetic products have a 
scent that is too strong for the Japanese/’ 

“And what I hope is that Del Monte comes 
up with smaller bottles of orange or grape- 
fruit juice. The bottles are too large for my 
family. I guess we don’t drink os much as 
Americans," she said. 

Tokio Inoue, a 44-year-old sushi chef from 
Yokohama, said that although he is happy to 
buy foreign golf clubs and whiskey, he sticks 
to Japanese cars or European cars if the price 
is right. Big American cars, he said, have an 
unsavory image associated with Japan’s 
gangsters. 

And in many categories where U.S. goods 
are recognized as having an edge, the Japa- 
nese have bought them. Last year UJS. pro- 
ducers sold $14 billion of feed grains in 
Japan, along with SI. 7 billion of logs, pulp 
and paper. S575 million of medicine. S365 
million of telephone equipment and 5127 
million of utensils, glassware and cookware, 
according to statistics from the U.S. Gun- 
merce DepartraenL 

Japan's aging population has created an 
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 6) 





Roosevelt Remembered: Soviet Nostalgia 


By Seth Mydans 

,Vm York Times Service 
MOSCOW — In Yalta, where 
the wartime allies met to map the 
future, there is no street named for 
Stalin or for Churchill. But tree- 
lined Roosevelt Street, which runs 
into Lenin Square, is a favorite for 
strollers near the harbor. 

F ranklin D. Roosevelt has al- 
ways held a special place for Rus- 
sians among U.S. presidents, and 
just ahead of the 4uth anniversary 
of his death Friday, commentaries 
in the Soviet press asked the ques- 
tion, “What it he had lived longer?" 

Through the prism of time, the 
Russians see a man who embodied 
some of their ideals for Soviet- 
American relations, a statesman 
portrayed as approaching the 
world in much the same way as the 
current Soviet leader, Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev. 

For many Russians, the name of 
Roosevelt evokes nostalgia for a 
wartime allian ce in which they feel 
they were treated as equal partners. 

Weighing into the American de- 
bate on whether be was too soft on 
the Russians and gave away too 
much to S talin in postwar agree- 
ments, Soviet commentators have 
only praise for his “realism" and 
“historic vision," 

“Roosevelt, undoubtedly, was a 
politician of world caliber, a true 
patriot of America and a convinced 


New Swiss Highway Toll 
Is Taxing Liechtenstein 

The Associated Press 

VADUZ, Liechtenstein — Traf- 
fic through this tiny principality, 
already dense, has risen as many 
foreign motorists seek to avoid 
paying a new toll on superhighways 
in Switzerland, police say. 

The traffic was especially heavy 
to and from southern Switzerland 
or Italy last weekend and has 
touched off protests from resi- 
dents, said Friaolin Meier, chief of 
the Liechtenstein traffic police, on 
Wednesday. Switzerland imposed a 
30-franc (SI 1.301 levy on an users 
of its four-lane superhighways on 
Jan. 1. 


champion of cooperation with the 
Soviet Union,” wrote Valentin Ber- 
ezhkov, editor of the journal 
U.S. A., on Thursday. 

“Many people believe that if he 
had lived longer, the military situa- 
tion in Europe would have shaped 
up differently" and that U.S.-Sovi- 
et relations would have been less 
confrontational, he said. 

Articles by Mr. Berezhkov, who 
was an interpreter at meetings be- 
tween S talin and Roosevelt, and by 
a Tass press agency analyst, Igor 
Orlov, portrayed Roosevelt as a 
man wbo sounded uncannily like 
Mr. Gorbachev. 

According to them, Roosevelt 
was a champion of peaceful coexis- 
tence, a course that Mr. Gorbachev 
told a group of U.S. congressmen 
this week is “the sole sensible alter- 
native in this nuclear age." 

He is portrayed as understand- 
ing that confrontation is not “a 
natural state of relations between 
the two great powers," a key idea 
that Mr. Gorbachev has been re- 
peating. 

Roosevelt is also said to have 
championed the notions, often 
heard in the Soviet Union these 
days, that relations must be con- 
ducted on a basis of equality, that 
political will is a key ingredient for 
progress and that “frank and 
friendly talks” can be fruitful. 

The praise for Roosevelt con- 
trasts with the tone taken in com- 
mentaries about the current U.S. 
president, wbo is chided for seeking 
to gain superiority over the Soviet 
Union and to operate from a posi- 
tion-of-strength policy. 

A separate Tass commentary on 
Thursday said President 
was “unwilling to do anything 
would really contribute to improv- 
ing the international situation." 

It added: “Throughout the post- 
war years, the United States has 
failed to undertake a single action 
that could be assessed as practical 
confirmation" that it wants to re- 
duce nuclear weapons. 

When Roosevelt first met Stalin 
at the Tehran conference in 1943, 
Mr. Berezhkov said, they came to- 
gether as old Friends on the basis of 
an almost-daily correspondence for 
which he had acted as translator. 


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Roosevelt stated his belief that 
maintenance of peace after the war 
depended on friendly relations 
with the Russians, and he and the 
British prime minister. Sir Winstoo 
Churchill, worked then to win the 
confidence of the Soviet leader. 

By the time the big three met at 
Yalta in February 1945, victory 
over the Germans seemed assured, 
and Roosevelt was concerned with 
obtaining a Soviet pledge to enter 
the Pacific war with Japan. 

The optimistic Tehran agree- 
ments were for the most part rati- 
fied, and in their final form they 
left roan for Soviet domination of 
Eastern Europe and led to accusa- 
tions that the Western governments 
bad betrayed Poland. 

In fact, Mr. Orlov argued, “The 
U.S. president displayed much wis- 
dom and turned out to be far more 
far-sighted than those ‘experts on 
Russia' and ‘Kremlinologists' who 
even at that time tried to sell Roo- 
sevelL various concepts of confron- 
tation." 

With Roosevelt’s death on April 
12, 1945, Mr. Berezhkov said, the 
United States turned from its po- 


licy of cooperation to one of at- 
tempted domination that it has 
pursued ever since. Under Harry S. 
Truman, and with the atom bomb 
in hand, he said, “It was Washing- 
ton that assumed a course of hostil- 
ity toward the Soviet Union after 
Roosevelt's death.” 

At Livadia Palace, where the 
Yalta conference was held, two 
rooms are kept as what amount to 
shrines to the agreement 

One is a bigh-ceilinged hall with 
a large, round table in the center, 
where the three delegations met to 
work out their agreements. 

The other is a smaller, darker, 
wood-paneled sitting room. Roose- 
velt's room, where he and Stalin 
met for t£te-&-tete discussions that 
symbolized the emergence of the 
two nations into postwar domina- 
tion of world affairs. 

“Naturally,” wrote Mr. Berezh- 
kov, “Roosevelt was a loyal son of 
his class. He defended the interests 
of capitalist America. But at the 
same time, he believed that good 
relations with the Soviet Union 
were not at all contrary to those 
interests." 



Ulster Reservist Is Charged in Killing^ 

BELFAST (AP) — A Protestant police reservist was charged Frida) 
with the unlawful killingof a Roman Catholic man dunngan WfemptlagJ 
summer to arrest an American sympathizer of the Insh RepubBcanJ 1 

A tS reservist.- Nigel Hegarty, was charged with tilling Sean Downes.-^ 
who was hit in the chest by a plastic bullet as police charged a crowd at an 



?bb was hit in the chest bv a plasuc ouuei as w an - . 

anti-British rally Aug. I2.'UnlaWful tilling is a lesser charge than murder..* ' ■ v ‘ 
Mr. Hegarry. 27, was not asked to enter a plea dunng a court hearing * 
here and was ordered held by police until April 19. Mr. 


22, was-?* V 

shot as police tried to arrest Martin Galvin, an official of mcNew Yort * " 

based Irish Northern Aid Committee, or NorauL who attended the rally <r-* - 
in defiance of a British ban. He escaped and fled the country. - - ; 

. r_. 

Pope’s Speech Seen as Political Farajg 



regional 
united ~ 


pontiffs ... - . - . ; — . - 

convention here, were widely interpreted as support forme dominant -rf'* 
Christian Democratic Party, "which shares power m a centrist coalition. >7- _ - 

John Paul did not mention any party by name and lie urged 
audience not “to confuse in any way the church with the poKtkaf. o •‘T-.S. 
community.” But. Reporter, a Iialian-language daily, summarized tJar. V- _ ~ 
pope's comments in a headline Friday: “And the pope says, ‘Vote 
referenceTo the Christian Democrats' acronym. C:- 


Untad FVen hUemahood 

Franklin D. Roosevelt with Josef Stalin in Yalta in 1945. 


Neves’ Chance of Survival Called Poor 


A Death in Lebanon: 'Do Not Be Sad 9 

Family Gets Note From 16 -Year-CHd After Suicide Bombing 


The Associated Press 

BEIRUT — “I wish she had told 
me,” the mother sobbed “I wish 
she kissed me goodbye." 

Fatima Mheidleh's 1 6-year-old 
daughter, Sana, had left home three 
weeks earlier, saying she was going 
to buy nail polish. “Before she left, 
she put makeup on my face and 
dressed me up. She didn't know 
how to drive a car before she left," 

But on Tuesday, the girl drove a 
car loaded with 440 pounds (200 
kilograms) of explosives into an Is- 
raeli convoy in occupied southern 
Lebanon. She and two Israeli sol- 
diers died in the suicide attack, 
near the village of Jezzine. south- 
east of Beirut. 

On Thursday, Mrs. Mheidleh re- 
ceived a present from her daughter. 
It contained perfume and a blue 
necklace. 

A letter with it said: “Do not be 
sad for me. The South must be 
liberated." 

Beirut newspapers called her the 
“Bride of the South," following 
Moslem practice of calling unmar- 
ried women who die “brides," but 


her mother said she was dressed 
simply when she left the family’s 
Beirut home. She was wearing jeans 
and a black T-shirt. 

Fatima Mheidleh spoke to a re- 
porter at her home as the family 
received condolences. 

A day after her daughter left, 
Mrs. Mheidleh said, “the phone 
rang and the person on the other 
end of the line did not talk. I knew 
it was Sana. The same thing hap- 
pened a week later. She probably 
wanted to hear our voice." 

“For the rest of my life, this 
present is going to remain as it is 
now,” Mrs. Mheidleh said. “I wish 
she had given me a kiss, embraced 
me instead.” 

The family is originally from the 
southern village of Ankoun, out- 
side the Israeli occupation zone. 

Sana Mheidleh's handwritten 
letter said: “All my life I have been 
thinking of a revolutionary action. 
I have decided to fulfill my duty 
toward the South." 

The note also said: “Raise your 

head high. Mother Father, had 

I told you what 1 was planning to 


do, you wouldn't have let me go 
through fwithj it." 

She addressed the letter “to the 
dearest parents in the world." 

She bad been a member of the 
Syrian Social Nationalist Party 
since last year, and a party official 
who brought the present to the 
home said the car-bomb attack was 
her idea. 

“Some of our men tried to per- 
suade her to change her mind," said 
the official who refused to give his 
name. “She got the idea from wit- 
nessing what is happening in the 
country. It was her own feelings." 

“Sana realized that the party 
could help in this respect," the offi- 
cial added. “The car was provided 
by the party, of course." 

Relatives said she worked at a 
video shop where she recorded a 
statement before the attack that 
was later broadcast on Lebanese 
television. In it, she said she was 
going to join “other martyrs." 

A cousin, Hoda Mheidleh, said 
Sana Mheidleh recently asked her. 
“Those who carry out suicide at- 
tacks, do they suffer pain?” 



SAO PAULO (UPI) — President-elect Tancredo Neves of Brad/- V". ■ • . . 
under intensive care since the eve of his inauguration a month ago, : • 

survived his seventh operation on Friday but a doctor said he has only a 
40 percent chance of recovery. ; 2- _ . si .; 

Mr. Neves. 75, who was scheduled to take office March 15 as Brazil's g+f- r - 
first civilian president in two decades, was in critical condition Friday. "~ - 

after undergoing suj * * L ~ ” — : ‘“ 1 1 * J J ^ - " 

infection spreading 
Dr. 


department, warned that the operation would further weaken the prajr 
dent-elect’s partially functioning lungs. “Bang realistic rather 1 

• - 1 « ma j in - r * 


optimistic, he has a 30 percent or maybe a 40 percent chance erf survival," ‘S r 
said Dr. Veronese wbo was nor directly involved in Mr. Neves’s treat- 'fU 


menL 


U.S. Crackdown on Nazis Is Reported^ - 

NEW YORK (NYT) —The Justice Department has approved federal : ~_T- .L t 
prosecution, of a neo-Nazi group under a federal racketeering statute, 2 “ c - “ * , r 

according to department officials in Washington. . • .- •-*.? 

a racketeering indictment against as many as two dozen whitesupiem- cv-~- ' r : 


Sana Mheidleh 



'MadeinU.S.’ 
Doesn’t Sell 


the Bruder Schwdgen, ■ 
on the U.S. government. Federal officials say. they believe its members ^ r- -.-=r. ■ — < ’* 
have been responsible for at least three robberies .of banks and armored 
cars involving more than $4 milDon, extensive counterfeiting, arme^-tr-:-- - 
assaults on feda^l authorities, and the killing of Alan Berg, a Denver - r rr- 
radio talk show host, with a machine gun. 


U.S. Congressmen Meet With Arafat 


United Press International 

AMMAN. Jordan - Five UJS. 
congressmen have met privately 
with Yasser Arafat, the Palestine 
Liberation Organization leader, re- 
garding talks on reviving the Mid- 
dle East peace process. 

Thursday’s meeting was the first 
between Mr. Arafat and a U.S. 
congressional delegation since July 
1982. It is standing U.S. policy that 
government representatives have 
no contact with the PLO. 

The members of the delegation, 
which left Amman for Damascus 
on Friday, shielded their faces from 
photographers and refused to an- 
swer questions or disclose the 
names of those who an ended the 
meeting with Mr. Arafat. 

With the exception of Represen- 
tative David R. Obey, a Wisconsin 
Democrat and the leader of the 
U.S. delegation, the congressmen 
and three of their aides refused 10 
identify themselves as they drove to 
meet Mr. Arafat on Thursday eve- 
ning. 

Two other congressmen from the 
delegation did not attend the talks. 

All seven legislators met earlier 
with King Hussein of Jordan, wbo 
told them it was important that the 
PLO and the Soviet Union be en- 
couraged to join Middle East peace 
negotiations. 

Following a two-hour meeting 


(Continued from Page 1) 
expanding market for geriatric 
products, and its newly affluent 
younger people have more money 
than ever to spend on jeans, re- 
cords, cars, sporting goods and in- 
terior decorating, said George 
Fields, chairman of ASI Market 
Research. 

Mrs. Ishihara of the Takashi- 
maya retail chain returned from the 
United States last year with a list of 
more than 200 U.S. products to 




Chinese Leader Begins Asian Tour 

BEUING (Reuters) — Hu Yaobang, general secretary of the Chinese 
Communist Party, left Beijing- on Friday to begin a 12-day tour of five T,7^.TJT^ ...... ^ 

South Pacific nations. ••• — 

HecanceledascheduJed news conference, however. Officials amMient- "" 

ly wanted to avoid more controversy after Mr. Hu said Wednesday that *■; 

the United States had given China a commitment to send only non-nude- 
ar warships when units erf the 7th Reel make their first port call in tl'-'lL! S' 

Shanghai since 1949. Tsatr- j 


with Mr. Arafat at the state guest . . . and what do the Palestinians 
palace where he was staying, one expect,” Mr. Milhem said.] 

UJS. congressmen said that the Besides Mr. Obey, head of the 

“ ^1 S* . b “fc£ c l ffif Students and Workers Riot in Seoul 


MiHSus statement caught US. diplomats b/ surprise. The U.S. Ssf/"Z\ r ' ' J? 
verament Jater disputed his remarks, saying it had given no such ~SS? : '7' : .■ 

ummvt - * - •' • hf 


government 

assurances. 


-£ s iTV.“ .7 rv:".'!". 


comment 

[A PLO executive committee 
member, Mohammed Milhem, said 
that the discussions were “explor- 
atory" and did not involve any of- 
fers in the peace process. The Asso- 
ciated Press reported. 

[“They wanted to know what was 
going on . . . What's the next move 


egation visiting Jordan consisted of 
Representatives Matthew F. Mc- 
Hugh and Robert J. Mrazek. both 
Democrats of .New. York; Thomas 


camping equipment 
tional toys. 


and educa- 


SEOUL (AP) — About 1,500 students and workers, throwing fire 
bombs and stones, burned a police patrol car and raided a police statist ' 


cru.- •••■'::• 


E Petri, Republican of Wisconsin; 
Robert W.Kas 


station were 


oT'wiscon sin- ^fartfo’ cT^Sabo advantage. Sony Cotp. has report- car was destroyed by a fire bomb and windows at the police 
Democrat of Minnesota, and Steny importiiig U.S. cemput- smashed. _ ■ ■■ ^ . • . 

H. Hover Democrat of Maryland. er_assKted de ?S n an<J manufactur- The witnesses said the 50-tnmute demonstration turned to vrolence 

ing systems, video tdeconferendng when the protesters were stopped by the police from attending a rally 


Reagan to Visit Nazi Tombs 


(Continued from Page 1) 

the thousands of Allied war dead 
who fought there and the millions 
of European Jews who were the 
victims of the Third Reich, has 
nothing to do with reconciliation.” 

[It added: “The Mies of World 
War II did not fight for world con- 
quest; the Germans of that era 
did.” 


raony, but said Mr. Reagan would 
be accompanied by Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl of West Germany. 


equipment and a video switcher. 

Japanese companies have joined 
forces with U.S. makers of commu- 
nications satellites to seek custom- 
ers in Japan. 

A lack of access may keep some 
Japanese from buying U.5. goods. 
Miyoko Kawashima, shopping for 
supper at a counter of canned 


near the Pyongwha market in the vicinity. The Yonhap News Agency 
reported that more'lhan 40 protesters were detained for questioning. 


For the Record 


The Ubjan freighter Ghat, which Iasi year was suspected of laying 
mines in the Red Sea, was allowed to sail for h ome Thursday after being 
held in Marseille for nine months. . . £*/») 

An IS-montit-old boy has become the first child in Britain 10 tfic of 


[Meanwhile, administration offi- 
cials said the decision could be re- 
viewed. "There is no active recon- 
sideration of it at present. But 
that's not to say there won’t be," 
said a White House official.] 

The White House did not release 
further details of the Bitburg cere- 


Tbere was criticism last year in .. f ... - , 

ihcWesl German press of the ded- g°°ds where every label bore a Jap- AI DS. the acquired immune deficiency syndrome, a London hospital said 
si cm to leave Germany out of the anese company name, said she Thursday. The health department said it was believed that the. baby 
celebration at Normandy, France; ^tdd not think of even one U.S. contracted the disease from a blood transfusion in New York soon after 
■ ~ ----- product she owns. "There's reafly he was born. Y(UP1) 

not that many here” she said. Kenya’s Education Ministry said Friday that Nairobi Univeraity'smam 

A poll taken by a Japanese ad- campus, closed Feb. 1 1 following student unrest, would reopen Mob 
vertismg agency, Haknhodo, sup- However, the ministry said that students would be allowed back- 
ports the findings of Mr. Fields. meeting certain conditions laid down by the authorities. (/ 
When asked to list prestigious im- Sl ^h political leaders in India postponed a protest campaign after 
ports, consumers noted wrist- at .° 1 r y moves by Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi The Press TiUsi of 

watches, handbags and dothes. tadia main Sikh party, the Akali Dal dedded to put off the 

When asked where such things campaign which was due to begin bn Saturday. (Re et t n ) 

were made, they listed France first. Sir Geoffrey Howe, the British foreign secretary, laid a wreath Friday 
Italy second and the United States at the Warsaw grave of the Reverend Jerzy Popiduszko, the murdered 
; pro-Sohdarity priest. 3 ^ 


the Reagan visit to West Germany, 
marking 40 years since the end of 
World War II, is partially designed 
in response to that. 


Bitburg was a Nazi staging area 
for the Battle of the Bulge in De- 
cember 1944, at Baslogne, Belgium. 
On Christmas Day. U.S. forces bat- 
tling the German offensive wiped 
out the town with a heavy bombing 
attack. 


third. 


Anta-Qadhafi Plots Reported 


(Continued from Page I) 
leader appears to vary his routine 
and to withhold information about 
bis planned movements. 

U.S. intelligence assessments in 
recent weeks are said to indicate 
social turmoil in Libya is greater 
now than in the past two years. 

A reporter for United Press In- 
ternational one of several Ameri- 
can and European news organiza- 
tions invited to Libya this week. 


quoted unnamed Western and non- 
aligned diplomats in Tripoli as say- 
ing that Libya was feeling the pinch 
of a U.S. economic embargo. 

Declining oil revenues have 
prompted shortages and cutbacks 
of social welfare programs, but 
Colonel Qadhafi is reported to 
have m ai n tained expenditures for. 
weaponry and aid to armed groups 
he has supported outside the coun- 
try- 


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U.S. Agrees to Meeting on Monetary Ref oiSii 




(Continued from Page I) 

for greater exchange-market stabil- 
ity." 

Addressing OECD ministers, 
Mr. Baker linked the proposed 
monetary conference to reform 
studies currently nearing comple- 
tion under the so-called Group of 
10, The Group of 10 is made up of 
Britain, Belgium, Canada, France, 
Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Swe- 
den, the United Slates and 'West 
Germany. Switzerland, while not a 
full member, is associated with it. 

“We understand the ‘G-10’ stud- 
ies will conclude that a major re- 
form is not necessary, but that a 
number of concrete, pragmatic 
steps should be taken to strengthen 
the current system," Mr. Baker 
said. 

Finance ministers awt . central 


bank governors from the Group of 
e to review the studies in To- 


start of trade liberalization negotia- 
tions early in 1986. The United 
States has been pressing for such 
trade talks. However, several other 
EC members, including West Ger- 
many. clearly moved away Friday 
from specifically linking trade and. 
monetary issues. Such linkage was 
backed Thursday by WiUy de 
Clercq, the EC commissioner in 
charge of external relations. 

After the meeting, Michael Wil- 
son, Canada's minister of finance, 
who presided at the OECD - meet- 
ing, said there was “no direct link- 
age but recognition of the overlap" 
between monetary reform and 
trade reform. 

Throughout most of Friday, del- 
egates from die United States and 
the community tried to satisfy the 
U*S. insistence that a date, or some 
other strong commitment, be made 


to start trade liberalization talks in 
1986. 




The final commii 
the negotiating 


aiifc said dial 
under thf 


of Tariffs and Trade, the Gent 
based trade agency, “should begin 
as soon as possible,” but added that 
“some felt this should be in early 
1986." 




“The two questions are linked 
and we can now proceed to discuss 
them," Mr. Birtgovoy and. French 
and other "OECD d d f gpt** hinted 


dd< 

that a 'commitment to tEe^ 1986 date 
would probably be made : during 
the summit to be held in Bonn May 
2-4, which is to be atlnided by the 
leaders of the United Straps west 
Germany, Japan, France;, Britain, 
Canada. Italy andiheEC Commis- 
sion. ..... . : ' i' ' 


Please send your name and address with your subscription iq; 

ir. A International Classified Advertising. Inc. 

6ft MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK. N.Y. 10022 -U S A 
(free specimen upon ttQueu PEP. HTj 


NEW YORK 


PARIS 


BLAST OFF — The space 
shuttle Discovery was 
launched Friday at Cape 
Canaveral, Florida, includ- 
ing among its seven crew, 
members Senator Jahe 
Gam, a Utah Republican. 


10 are 

kyo in June, and they could move 
to organize the proposed mono-, 
tary- reform conference, probably 
in. the autumn. U.S. officials said. 

In another difference with the 
French app roach. Mr. Baker said' 
that the proposed conference 
should concentrate mainly on bow 
industrialized democracies can 
“promote, convergence toward 
noninfiationaiy growth." - 

He. said that the agenda could 
focus on strengthening the IMFs 
role in the surveillance of the eco- 
nomic policies of member govern- 
ments and on increasing interna- 
tional liquidity. He also said the 
conference should take up “certain 
aspects" of the international debt 
problem, mainly that of developing 
countries. 

The EC, led by France; has re-, 
peaiedfy insisted that an agreement 
to reform the monetary system 
must accompany the. proposed . 


Man Rejailed <n Rape Cise 


(Continued from Page 1) 


nues open to him in seeking free- 
dom. 


tiu-_n Mr. Dotson's.- 


His lawyer could ask the Illinois 
Appellate Court to overturn the 
decision of Judge Samuels, and, if 
be loses, he could- appeal to the 
Illinois Supreme Court: 

He could petition the Circuit 
Court or the state Supreme Court 
for a different judge to rale on a 
writ of habeas corpus, contending 

that he was bein: * ■ - 

oned based on 


which was affirmed in 1981 by aB 
_ — :Jgork 


court. The; New 
limes reported. 

to meet a heavy bur^a*0^ir(rfif W 

prove recantations, the judE&Said. 
and “there- is a suffiden‘t3aEfc 
corroboration of this 'recantation. 7 ' 

r- lcnow ’ for whaf reason 

Cathy Webb got up on the stand 
w told what she did," he said, 
ing wrongly impris- "That's only known toher." 
false testimony. a mftns fka — - - • w j 2 


He could also ask Gorcrnor 
James R. Thompson to pardon him 
or graqi- executive clemency. 

■ Judge Gt£ Precedent 
; Judge Sarouds cited fifinois case 
law in denjuag the motion to over- 


• ^ precedents thejuc& 

awa Thursday or previously w&fm 
1982 ruling of an Ulinois appellS' 

court that held that therecantod® 
of tes timony by a convicted cuff- 
dc rp T ?s stepson was untrustworthy 
md did. not warrant overiurtnag. 
die conviction. 






n ^ a< -* s tina 


11 A 




Pages 


i-fisSsS 

SH^V; 

EMS^ 

ISSRs’&'fii ■ 

eaS^ 

ivdCaU^p 

I 

'“P'laltol^^Fnt 



>SiS»S 
40 percent chanaS^ 1 ’’-;' 

“wived m Mr. nSJJJJ 

az * s Is Report^ 

PffiSiSgp" 

bington. n ° E 
*?>' 35 two dozen whii* , 

?5 n tt b ' l, - s -^. 

wvsa.’sfe*- 

SEfiaSS 

Jbbtnes of banks aod^Z 

t -u^ S1Ve r C0Unlerfeilin 8. aife. 

^mgofAlanBe^TC . 

is Asian Tour 

eneralsecreiaiyofthcCba ! 

to begin a 12-day lour^fc 

w. however. OTfidalsaniiaie 

r Mr. Hu said Wednesday^ 
litraent to send only noo-oc 
t make their first pon caE : 

iomats by surprise. The f: 
saying it had given no k 

s Riot in Seoul 

ts and workers, throwing & . 
car and raided a police suc- 
tion. witnesses reported - 
*es said that hundreds of s’ 
lustration. They’ said ibepoi 
idows at the police station w ■ 

nonsiration turned to rife 
: police from attending ad 
ty. The Yonhap News Apr 
:re detained for questioning 


was suspected of toe 
>me Thursday after !«; 

M? 

hild in Briiain to dec 
e. i London hospitals 
, believed that the te' 
i in New York soon £ 
(W 

Nairobi University's & 

1 . would reopen M#» , 
Id be allowed bsd^; 
iie authorities. _ (»• . 

protest campaign « 
indhi. The Press Tf- 
i decided u> pul® E 


On Job Parity 

'r -^% Robert Pear ■” 
.-•'v'". MkTtma Server 
TIMSBMGTON — The US. 
'Gnapnoa ao Cm( Rights has 
Co ng res s ad government 
f03BOKS to njoct the doctrine that 
inenfraiwomtt should be paid the 
rainy tor different jobs of 
sWe worth. 

cominfww p adopted iu 
•' ■ tf»ceTfnjntday in a 5-2 vote that 
'immediately was criticized by the 
National Organization foe Women 
cad by the American Federation of 
1 -Stale, County ^ Municipal Em- 
ployees. One member of tnc com- 
msHOO abstained. 

Y ;~Vonagwith the m af o ril y, Morris 

B. Ahum, vice dnttrmat of the 

- - ywi H Qim , said: “There is sex- 
baaed d*scrinanaiion in America, 
bot h is deefinmj’.** 

“The reperinotss charge that 
- w omen earn only 60 percent of 
what men earn in this country ob- 
lag t s tbe n pii fi g un fact dot 
women wort less hours, have Jess 
seniority and work more mtermu- 
lealty, i he said. 

• . Thc contmarioo nqcrity sod 
. shat federal civil rights enforce- 
: meat agenda should xety instead 
■ oa “the principle of equal pay for 
t ;.«{DaI work.” 

o' Jody Goldsmith, NOW _nrca- 
deat, said the commission failed to 
tecognize that “sex-based wage dis- 
crimination pervades oar econo- 
my" 

Under a policy of comparable 
worth, employers try to assess the 

- intrinsic value of different jobs by 
measuring the knowledge, skills 
and effort required of employees, 

■'their responsibilities and their 
woriring conditions. 

If such evaluations wens toed in 
setting pay levels, proponents say, 
it would reduce me disparity be- 
tween salaries for those m occupa- 
tions dominated by women, sum as 
: ' m a ting and secretarial work, and 
.- the** m better-paid occupations 
• dominaied by men, such as trade 
driving. 

In its vote the commission 
the recommendations of a 
that said employers could 
vohmiarOy agree to pay weaken on 
the baas of comparable worth, but 
that the government must not im- 
pose such a standard. 

The two commissioa members 
" who voted in favor (tithe doctrine, 
Mary Frances Beny and BUmfina 

C. Ramirez, countered m a joint 
statement that die forces of supply 
and demand could not always be 
trusted to set wages in an environ- 
ment in which a “history of segre- 
gation” had dosed certain jobs to 

. women and blacks. 



Ml ltd 

adopted) 
study tin 


WHERE THERETS SMOKE... — In Yale, Oklahoma, the Yotratteerfire department 
taking a break from a braining session to pose fora grasp photograph. Tbe group spent 
an afternoon extinguishing inferior and exterior fires that bad been intentionally set 

AMERICAN TOPICS 


Some Worthy Causes 
For Tax Check-Offs 

In 1967 the federal govern- 
meat gave taxpayers (he option 
of designating one rax dollar on 
their income tax forms to fund 
presidential election campaigns. 
Now 34 stateshave followed suit, 
and by checking off bones on 
their state income tax forms, tax- 
payers can donate money to a 
good canss, either to be deducted 
from refunds or added to tax 
.liability. 

WSdfife conservation is tbe 
most common chedcdT, used by 
31 out of 34 states, the Los Ange- 
les Tunes reports. Eight states 
hive checkoffs Tor child abase 
prevention foods and live for the 
UJSL Olympic Committee. Other 


Olympic C 
cs tnaude 


causes include arts subsidies or 
veterans’ homes. 

“You’d dunk people would 
really be surly by the time they 
get to the end of their lax forms,” 
said Helen Adorjzm, spokesman 
for die HfiooB Department of 
Revenue, “but we get a lot of 
money.” iu the case of Illinois, 
(hat included $498337 last year 
for child abuse prevention and 
S259572 for wildlife conserva- 


tion. 


Why the Very Rich 
Rule the TV Roost 

Television’s “Dallas” and 
“Dynasty” already are legends in 
the United States and are among 


the best-known American ex- 
ports. Why? The New York 
Tunes has asked experts in vari- 
ous fidds. Esther Shapmj, who 
produces “Dynasty” with her 
husband Richard, rays it’s part 
of the social evolution. “1 wore 
granny dresses in the 1960s,” she 
adds. “I felt like dressing up 
again.” 

Malcolm Forbes, publisher of 
Forbes magazine, ascribes it to 
the changed economic dunaLc of 
the Reagan era: “There is an 
awareness of business, or the 
consequence of corporate raids” 
featured in both programs. 
“More people are more interest- 
ed in the rich,” be says. “There 
are so many more of us now.” 

“A kind of vulgar Marxism,” 
offers Herbert J. Gans, a profes- 
sor of sociology at Columbia 
University in New York. The 
programs “are about new money 
behaving grossly,” he said, and 
feed “what a lot of people do 
believe, the notion that this 
country is run for the benefit of a 
email number.” 

Consumerism, says Robin 
Leadi. a television producer: 
People use such programs “to see 
what the rich are buying and 
order it themselves.” 


Short Takes 

CoOege professors are earning 
an average of $39370 a year with 
a pay increase; after allowing for 
inflation, of 25 percent The 
American Association of Uni- 


versity Professors calls this “en- 
couraging,” but says that after 
adjusting for inflation, college 
faculty are oily making 84 per- 
cent of what their salaries were 
worth in 1970-71. The highest- 
paid professors are (hose at pri- 
vate institutio ns grant doc- 
toral degrees. They average 
549,880. 

Technical problems still haunt 
San Francisco's refurbished ca- 
ble cars, back in service after a 
21-momh hiatus for reconstruc- 
tion. The cost, originally set at 
5582 million, already ts more 
than S63.7 mdGoa, according to 
the repairs supervisor, Lynn Pio. 
He says a chief problem is with 
the system that keeps the cables 
properly aligned. Toe end is not 
in sight, be says, and “it’s not 
going to be cheap.” 

Mild winters and hunting bans 
have made tbe mule deer so com- 
mon in Boulder, Colorado, in the 
foothills of the Rockv Moun- 
tains, that the animaf has be- 
come a menace to traffic, gar- 
dens, lawns and fences. To 
discourage deer from getting 
overly familiar, the city has made 
it illegal for people to feed them 
or otherwise entice them onto 
property. City council members 
said some people had put salt 
licks in their yarns “so they could 
wake up each morning and see a 
reaHife Bambi,” The New York 
Times reports. 

— Compiled by 


— {.ompuea by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Managua Lobbies Visiting Congressmen 


id a wreath ft® 
zko. the 


Case 


con’ 





Rape 

„ Mr. 

.... 

rhe U-K. And on April 1, 1985 Lyon in France and Dubrovnic in Yugoslavia. 


's network totals 38U,UUU kilometres -one of the longest flown by any airline - 

- and serves 124 destinations in 77 countries worldwide. Yer new destinations are still being added. 
In November 1984 Seoul in the Republic of Korea, Lamaca on Cyprus and Newcastle 


iai 


* lV or p*. art*- 




The Reliable Airline KLIVI 


Royal Dutch Airttnes 


Ely Stephen Kinzer 

New Yuri. Turns Serwt 

A^TURLAS, Nkarana — Two 
U5. coflgressmeo trailing an en- 
tourage of aides, reporters, televi- 
sion cameramen and Sandinist 
guides descended this week oa a 
liny refugee camp outside this re- 
mote village. 

They were a the vangnard of 
more than adozxn U5. lawmakers 
who will virit here during tbe con- 
gressional Easier recess. 

As the Reagan administration 
presses hs request for continued 
aid to aztii-Sandimst matrgeals, 
the Managua government is coun- 
tering with a lobbying campaign of 

its own. 

The camp at Asturias is borne to 
about 200 subsistence farmers 
evacuated from their homes by 
Sandioisi troops six weeks ago. Af- 
ter a three-hour ride from Mana- 
gua. the Americans arrived to chat 
with residents. 

The administr ator of the 
Maria Texera BlandAn, 23, uld 
visitors that although the reft 
bad been unhappy to leave 
homes, they realized that the exo- 
dus was for their own protection. 

Representatives Edward J. Mar- 
key of Massachusetts and Freder- 
ick C. Boucher of Vixginia. both 
Democrats, asked several refugees 
their opinions of the Nicaraguan 
government and of the VS. policy 
of supporting [he rebels. 

One woman said that several of 
her children had been kidnapped 
and forced to fight for the rebels, 
and that one had not returned. A 
youth said he had escaped from the 
“contras,” as the rebels call them- 
selves. 


Reagan Plan 
Considered 
In Panama 

By Richard J. Mcislin 

Xbt Krt Tunes Smite 

PANAMA CITY — President 
Ronald Reagan's recently an- 
nounced proposal to deal with Nic- 
aragua has received only limited 
support from the four-nation re- 
gional negotiating group, accord- 
ing to officials of the group and 
Central American governments. 

As Mexico, Panama, Venezuela 
and Colombia, known as tbe Con- 
tadora group, resumed talks Thurs- 
day with five Central American 
governments, it became dear that 
officials saw some improvement in 
the U.S. position in Mr. Reagan’s 
talk of dialogue with the Sandmists 
and. to some extent, in his call for a 
cease-fire between the Sandinists 
and U.S.-backed guerrillas. 

But much of the rest of his plan 
was seen as unacceptable. 

A statement from the Panamani- 
an Foreign Ministry said that Pres- 
ident Nicolas Ardilo Barletta had 
met with Mr. Reagan’s spedal en- 
voy to Central America, Harry W. 
Shiaudeman, on Thursday and had 
told him that there were “positive 
dements” in the plan, including a 
call for cessation of hostilities and 
the use of “dialogue instead of con- 
frontation” with the Sandinists. 

But he said the negotiating group 
hdd to “the principles of . interna- 
tional law, 'among which that of 
nonintervention in the internal af- 
fairs of each country is basic.” 

The president of Colombia, Bdi- 
sario JBelancur. who initially said 
he supported the plan, has said 
publicly in Bogota that it “contains 
dements that would be difficult to 
implement, whose acceptance be- 
longs to the Sandinists them- 
selves” 

The deputy foreign minister of 
Nicaragua, Victor Hugo Ttnoco, 
said Thursday that Mr. Betancur's 
initial reaction had been “badly in- 
terpreted” and that none of the 
four Contadora countries had ac- 
cepted Mr. Reagan’s calls for new 
elections in Nicaragua with inter- 
national observers, or his demand 
for negotiations between the San- 
dinisis and the guerrilla leaders 
through the mediation of tbe Ro- 
man Catholic Church. 

A high- level official of one of the 
four countries in the ne go t i at i ng 
group, who asked not to be named, 
supported Mr. Tinoco’s assertion. 

An earlier Contadora proposal 
was scuttled by objections from 
Honduras. El Salvador and Costa 
Rica, stalling negotiations. 

The talks on Thursday centered 
on a plan for what is termed “verifi- 
cation and comrol” of reductions 
in arms that would be included in 
the treaty sought by the negotiating 
group. The concept was at tbe heart 
of the objections of the three Cen- 
tral American countries, as well as 
of the Reagan administration. 

The details of the revived plan 
were not made public, although of- 
ficials involved in the negotiations 
said they included some sugges- 
tions made by the three objecting 
countries last fall. 

But Costa Rica, Honduras and 
El Salvador were apparently still 
seeking an even more stringent 
plan that would provide for an in- 
ternational monitoring force. 

Mr. Tinoco said in an interview' 
that Nicaragua rejected the new 
proposal by the three countries, 
which he said tried to make a bal- 
anced document “closer to the con- 
ditions of the three other coun- 
tries." 

He said his country was ready lo 
accept the revised plan as proposed 
by the negotiating group. 


Ecuador Ships Collide 

VruttJ Press Imemmonal 

NORFOLK, Virginia — The 
U.S. aircraft carrier Coral Sea col- 
lided Thursday with an Ecuador- 
ean tanker near Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba, and sustained significant 
damage, the navy said Friday. No 
injuries were reported. 


“Apparently, most of the contra 
force is based on kidnapping,” Mr. 
Boucher declared after 40 minutes 
in the camp. “What it says is that 
they really don’t have any base.” 

An official of the Commission 
on U.S.-Central American Rela- 
tions, a private group that opposes 
Ragan adnrinirtration policy and 
which arranged tbe trip, urged re- 
porters to remain with the con- 
gressmen and not to wander about 
tbe camp. 

But a few fee: away from the 
crowd, refugees said their village, 


Los Cedros. had been hit by San- 
dini:i artillery as a rebel patrol 
moved nearby. Young men said 
they remain in the camp partly be- 
cause they have been promised 
they will not be drafted. 

“A gringo stranger doesn’t get 
straight answers in a place like 
this.” said John Howard Buchan- 
an. a retired U.S. Marine lieutenant 
colonel affiliated with the liberal 
Center for Development Policy in 
Washington, who accompanied the 

legislators. 

“These refugees were very care- 


Rebels Wound U.S. Bishop 

1,/iireJ Press Iiuenwttoaal 

MANAGUA — An American Roman Catholic bishop working in 
eastern Nicaragua was wounded Thursday m an ambush by Un- 
backed rebels who apologized and fled immediately, the bishop 


isbop Salvador Scfalarffcr, 65, w ho has served 35 years on Nicara- 
gua's Caribbean coast, was traveling from Zelaya province to Mata- 
galpa wben rebels ambushed his car near Las Brisas. 100 antes (160 
kilometers) north of Managua in Matagalpa province, arm}- officials 
said. 

Troops arrived after rebels fled and took Bishop Schlaeffer, 65, of 
CampbeUsport, Wisconsin, to a hospital in the town of Matagalpa, a 
government spokesman said. 

“I have wounds all over my body and grenade shrapnel in my left 
hand, but I am still living, thank God,” Bishop Schlaeffer said. “The 
rebels were waiting alongside the highway and began to shoot with no 
warning. My driver turned the vehicle toward the cliff and the men 
kept firing. 

Bishop Schlaeffer said in Manag ua that he had identified himself 
and that the rebels had apologized but refused to help him push his 
van back onto the rood before fleeing. His van showed several bullet 
holes and its tires and radiator were punctured. 

In December 14&3, Bishop Schlaeffer joined 2,000 Miskito Indians 
crossing from the northern Zelaya province over the border into 
Honduras. The Miskitos were fleeing combat between the Nicarag u an 
Army and Indian rebels of the Misura rebel group. 


ful lo avoid direcL answers,” he 
said. “When you ask who kidnaps 
people, they say it’s armed men m 
the mountains. When you ask who 
is responsible for their situation, 
they say it’s the war.” 

On its two-day visit, the delega- 
tion met with several opposition 
figures and with President Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra. Mr. Markey said 
that Mr. Ortega bad indicated he 
would make gesnires to ease inter- 
nal tensions in Nicaragua if Con- 
gress defeated the administration's 
proposal to provide S14 million in 
aid for the rebels. 

“He said that if the contra aid is 
cut off within a short time, condi- 
tions will exist to make it possible 
to move toward normalization of 
conditions in the country," Mr. 
Marirey said. “He said that if tbe 
aid is cut off, the Nicaraguan gov- 
ernment would feel a moral obliga- 
tion to make a gesture towards 
Congress.” 

The plane carrying Mr. Markey 
and Mr. Boucher had not departed 
from Managua’s airport when two 
other Democratic legislators. Ted 
Weiss of New York and Bob Edgar 
of Pennsylvania, arrived. 

“I tend to doubt that anyone is 
really coming down here with an 
open mind about the contra aid.” 
said Mr. Weiss, who has voted 
against such aid in the past. “My 
sense is that the Sandinists are fun- 
damentally popular, if what I was 
told about the extent to which they 
have distributed arms in the coun- 
tryside is uue, they must have an 
awful lot of confidence in iheir 
popularity." 


. . -v- 





Peruvian Indians check lists of polling places In the dty of Huanta, in Ayacucbo province. 
Leftist guerrillas have threatened to Idll voters who do not boycott Sunday’s elections. 

Leftists Favored in Peruvian Election 


Reuters 

LIMA — An alliance of two left- 
ist parties is favored to win general 
elections Sunday in Peru amid 
threats by anti -govern mem guerril- 
las to attack voters. 

The elections will mark the first 
time since 1912 that an elected Pe- 
ruvian government has handed 
over power to an elected successor. 

Poll results show the coalition of 
the American Popular Revolution- 
ary Alliance, which is moderately 
leftist, and the United Left, which 
embraces several Marxist factions; 
is likely to win a majority of seats in 
the bicameral Congress' 

The polls sberw the two parties’ 
leaders. AFRA’s Alan Garcia and 
Alfonso Barrames of the United 
Left, to be leading the seven other 
presidential candidates. 

Peru's 8_3 million voters, faced 
by severely declining living stan- 
dards and high unemployment, are 
expected to turn away from Popu- 
lar Action, the center-right ruhng 
party of President Fernando Be- 
launde Terry. 

Mr. Belaiinde, 71, who was elect- 
ed in 1980 when democracy was 
restored after 12 years of military 
Yule, is due to leave office in July. 

He has been plagued by an eco- 
nomic decline that has been aggra- 
vated by rebel sabotage, floods and 
a foreign credit squeeze. 

The guerrillas of the Maoist-in- 
spired Shining Path movement 


have threatened (o attack voters 
and to sabotage balloting. 

The government is mobilizing 
70.000 paramilitary police (o help 
protect voters. 

Nearly half the countiy's elector- 
al workers are on strike for higher 
pay, and the government has hired 
contract workers to help at many of 
the 42.000 polling stations. 

The dominant campaign issue 
has been the sagging economy. 

The two coalition parties want lo 
reduce repayments on Peru’s $ 13.5- 
billion foreign debt, increase taxes 
on foreign oil companies and raise 
tariff barriers to protect industry. 

Opinion polls put APRA ahead. 


but its leader, Mr. Garcia, 35. is not 
expected to win an outright victory 
over the United Left’s Mr. Bar- 
run les, 57, who is Lima’s mayor. A 
mnoff would be held in June. 

■ Man Killed in Clash 

Rival political groups clashed 
Friday in .Lima, killing one man 
and wounding several others, The 
Associated Press quoted Lima po- 
lice as saying. 

Police said the clash was between 
supporters of Mr. Garcia and of 
Mr. Barrames. The dead man was 
identified by the government news 
agency Andina as a district secre- 
tary of Mr. Garda's party. 


Reagan’s Staff 
Is Reshuffled 

(Continued from Page 1) 
exercising sole leadership within 
the president's inner circle. 

The more collegial alignm ent 
l alone at 


leaves Mr. Regan 
tile Hoi 


tbe top 

of rhe White House management 
ladder, but appears to pull Mr. 
Baker and Mr. Meese more directly 
into managing the government 
than is customary for cabinet mem- 
bers. 

It also assured that at least one of 
tbe Californians who have been 
with Mr. Reagan since he was gov- 
ernor of California would be close- 
ly involved with him: Mr. Meese 
was Mr. Reagan’s chief aide in Sac- 
ramento, and is taking leadership 
of tbe new cabinet council just as 
Mr. Deaver leaves the White House 
to start a public relations business. 

“The new entities will streamline 
policy development and decision 
making," the president’s statement 
said. Mr. Reagan is vacationing at 
his nearby ranch. “Together with 
the National Security Council, they 
will serve the primary channels for 
advising me on policy matters .” 

The statement, which was read 
here by Larry Speakes, the chief 
White House spokesman, said that 
the system would allow aided “ac- 
countability and efficiency." 

The new structure would give 
comrol over that procedure to a 
small group of three officials — 
Mr. Baker. Mr. Meese and Robert 
C. McFarhne, the president's na- 
tional security adviser. 

They would, in effect, then re- 
port to Mr. Regan, who would 
serve as an ex officio member of the 
councils along with Vice President 
George Bush. 





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<a 





2 ."■ .;•=' a*.a : 




Page/ 4- 


Her 



(tribune. 


Pnbliibcd 'Witli The New Yotk Tfcaea »nd Tbe Wtrfdngton Port 


Shultz Speaks His Mind 


American secretaries of state are not nor- 
mally noted for understanding economic 
problems. It just so happens today that 
George Shultz is the best economist in offi- 
cial Washington. At a time when most of 
America’s economic top brass were in Eu- 
rope, embroiled in complex negotiations 
l eadin g up to the May summit in Bonn, Mr. 
Shultz spoke his min d in a reasonable tone 
at Princeton University. One recalls George 
Marshall’s speech, at Harvard in 1947. Uni- 
versity gatherings can be occasions for ma- 


jor constructive suggestions. 

Observers outride the United States will 


doubtless be tempted to concentrate on the 
Shultz analysis of the imbalances that cur- 
rently hang over the American economy. 
Cer tainl y his words give the lie to some of 
the less prudent remarks that have come out 
of Washington disclaiming any link between 
the monumental federal budget deficit on 
the one hand and the high real interest 
rate and the uncomfortable strength of the 
dollar on the other. But there are more 
important messages for the rest of the world 
in the Shultz statement 
First his speech chimes well with the 
thoughtful analysis that the OECD staff 
presented to governments in Paris this week: 
Protectionist barriers to trade seldom — 
hardly ever — give any country the boost to 
its economy and jobs that their proponents 
say they wilL They usually lead to self- 
inflicted wounds that damag e labor and 
business in general without conferring any 
lasting benefit on particular sectors thought 
to be threatened by imports. Protection, says 
the OECD, is a blunt instrument Its effects 
on America and the whole world, says Mr. 
Shultz, would be devastating. 

' Second, Mr. Shultz rejects the thesis that 
the dollar can be cheapened and stabilized 
by official intervention in the world curren- 
cy markets. We have already expressed skep- 


Death Squads in Chile 


Is Chile going back to the death squads? 
Seven political opponents of the Pinochet re- 
gime were seized on the streets in broad day- 
fight the other day. Three were found dead the 
next morning, their throats cut, and four were 
released after torture. The government says it 
will use the police and courts to establish 
accountability. Let us see iL The sequence 
represented the most extreme case of evident 
official violence since President Angusto Pino- 
chet, citing a resumption of guemHa terror, 
broke off Ms tepid and unconvincing steps 
toward a transition to democratic rule and 
reintroduced a state of siege last November. 

Nearly 15 years after General Pinochet 
seized power. Chile is foundering. Even before 
last month’s cruel earthquake, the Chilean 


'’economic miracle," which was just the oppo- 
site of a miracle to the classes that paid for it, 
had long since yielded to pervasive hardship, 
depression, inflation and indebtedness. The 
official claim to build stability is best set 
against the 735 bombings reported Iastyear, 
and the 84 complaints of torture. 

General Pinochet has resisted legalizing die 
political parties, a key step in any transition Ao 
the elections he has promised for 19189. The 
suspicion persists that he is more interested in 
consolidating his and the military’s position. 


perhaps to become an elected president him- 
self, than in farih rating a credible transition. 

Until last year the Reagan administration 
felt that President Pinochet had got up enough 
economic and political momentum to warrant 
a certain optimism about Chile’s likely passage 
from authoritarian to democratic ways. A UJS. 
policy akin to the constructive engagement 
practiced in Sooth Africa was still in favor. But 
Chilean haclrriirftng produced in W ashing ton 
an indinatinn to help move the transition 
along by a greater display of impatience and 
resolve at the Pentagon and the State Depart- 
ment The minimal purpose was to stave off 
further polarization and decay. The change in 
emphasis is being si gnaled by a change in 
ambassadors, from a conservative political ap- 
pointee to a Foreign Service pro. 

President Pinochet an imlimbcr 68, says: 
Security first, democracy second. His critics 
and many of Chile’s U-S. friends say: Security 
and democracy at the same tune. To proceed 
as he is, denying free expression, rep r es sin g 
and sometimes torturing Ms political foes, and 
catting the lines between government and gov- 
erned, is a “dangerous amhvolaiile mixture” of 
policies. So says — yes —the Reagan adminis- 
tration. Is President Pinochet listening? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Anxious Vigil in Brazil 


The serious disability of President-elect 
Tancredo Neves puts Brazils political transi- 
tion to a most difficult test :l 

The importance of a personality in politics 
usually varies inversely with the strength of a 
country’s institutions. Brazil's paradox is that 
its institutions are simultaneously sturdy and 
weak. Brazil is sturdy thanks to ’a long tradi- 
tion of effective political brokerage, producing 
much harmony and compromise: sturdy also 
t hank s to an experienced cadre of civil ser- 
vants, technologically skilled and administra- 
tively competent But it is weak because of the 
recent disintegration of a bankrupt and de- 
moralized military government; and weak, be- 
cause the democracy that most Brazilians want 
has yet to be constructed. 

Tancredo Neves was chosen by the old sys- 
tem to usher in the new. In a 50-year career, he 
established himself as a liberal whose modera- 
tion comforts conservatives and generals and 
as a democrat whose principles appeal to pop- 
ulists and radicals. He was to be inaugurated 


under the old constitution, but he promised to 
summon an assembly to write a democratic 
one. And then he promised to yield to a succes- 
sor chosen directly by the Brazilian people. 

Hours before his scheduled inauguration on 
March 15, illness struck. The 75-year-old pres- 
ident-elect has undergone six operations in 
four weeks and at times has seemed near 
death. At best, Mr. Neves is uriEkdy to assume 
his full duties for months. 

Thus authority rests nominally with Vice 
President Jose Sarney, a man dosdy associat- 
ed with the old military regime who had been 
placed on the Neves ticket as a symbol of 
continuity and compromise. He has shown 
dignity and modesty in an unexpected role, 
but he lacks the stature and credentials to 
become the architect of a political transition, 
or to lead the country in faring up to p r esa n g 
problems like the huge external debt. For now, 
these issues must await Mr. Neves's recovery. 
We add our hopes to those of all Brazilians. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR APRIL 13 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


19X0: Governor Demands an Inquiry 
ALBANY — In view of the recent disclosures 
of legislative dishonor and graft, Governor 
Hughes urges the New York State Legislature 
to mnlte an immediate, thorough and unspar- 
ing investigation into legislative practices and 
the use of corrupt or improper means for the 
promotion or defeat of legislation. The mes- 
sage is a sequel to the aimring disclosures 


showing how the representatives of the people 
systematically levied tribute cm the “Bridge 
Trust" for the suppression of certain legisla- 
tion, and how the insurance companies distrib- 
uted in five years at least SI 50,000 among the 
Albany legislators. The legislature has repeat- 
edly balked all efforts to secure a thorough and 
impartial investigation of the extent to which 
Assemblymen and Senators sold their votes to 
the agents of industrial and other enterprises. 


1935: Dost Spreads Across America 
KANSAS CITY — Diminishe d in intensity, 
the devastating dust storm which blew out of 
the Southwest readied its maximum spread 
[on April 12}, covering half of the nation and 
including for the first time Louisiana, Arkan- 
sas, Mississippi and Alabama. At Garden 
Gty, Kansas, the sky was visible for the first 
time since the storm started [on April 8}. The 
dealing atmosphere gave die worst afflicted 
areas opportunity to survey tire storm’s havoc. 
At Boise Gty, Oklahoma, dozens shoveled 
huge drifts of dust which blocked the railway - 
and highway and had marooned the town for 
24 horns. Galveston, Texas, reported that the 
dust paD for the first time extended over the 
Gulf of Mexico. The Socono-Vacuum tanker 


Royal Arrow, off the Texas coast, reported 
that the ship was covered with dost and dirt 


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JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


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0 1985, International Herald Tnbme. AO rights reserved 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 13-14, 1985 


tidsm (IHT, April 9) concerning the claim, 
which the European Community has fdt 
obliged to put forward, that trade barriers 
cannot be broken down in the absence of 
parallel n egotiati ons for international mone- 
tary reform. The sad probability is that if 
new trade negotiations have to proceed 
hand-in-hand with monetary talks, we shall 
never get anywhere cm trade. Experience 
suggests that parallel talks, involving differ- 
ent sets of government experts, move at the 
pace of the slowest, wMch in the case of the 
present proposal would be veiy slow. We do 
not want a two-ring circus. 

But where Secretary Shultz really semes is 
in explaining the need for joint international 
action to sustain economic growth — the 
mam objective and the key to success. He 
pleads, as the essential counterpart to a U.S. 
effort to dispel the clouds approaching the 
American economy, for more convergent 
policies on the part of Europe and Japan to 
sustain world recovery, without which it will 
surely prove impossible to keep trade barri- 
ers and the resulting depression at bay. 

This approach seems to be reflected in this 
week’s OECD compromise solution: a mon- 
etary conference that would, in American 
eyes, look at convergence of policies more 
than at technical reform. 

It malces dear sense to argue that the time 
is past when Europe and Japan should rely 
on exports to the United States to keep their 
economies moving. They have, in varying 
degrees, scope to encourage spending inside 
their own economies now. If America is to 
temper the stimulus that its defidts have 
imparted to the rest of the world in recent 
years — an essential action if America itself 
is not to overreach — other countries need to 
step in to keep world demand moving. The 
forthcoming summit wifl prove a disaster if 
Europe and Japan reject the Shultz thesis. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 



Kissinger r ‘ 


Has Missed/# 111 ’ 

The Point i 


By Philip Geyelin 


W ASHINGTON — Henry Kis= 
ringer's contribution (IHT: 


View down the gunbarreL 


As Reagan’s Men Huddled, Gorbachev Scored First 


W ASHINGTON — Does it mat- 
ter that President Reagan does 


YY ter that President Reagan does 
not know very much about arms con- 
trol? The populist view says: “No. As 
long as he s in touch with Sasic Amer- 
ican values, he can make the big deri- 
sions and delegate the rest" 

But the latest Big Two exchanges 
teach a different lesson. The Reagan 
administration overreacted in a nega- 
tive way to a Soviet move on disarma- 
ment because Mr. Reagan has been 
unable to wring a coherent position 
from his advisers. For the same rea- 
son, he has now put in for two rounds 
of summitry with the new Soviet 
leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. 

Mr. Gorbachev made Ms move in a 
Tass interview broadcast over Soviet 
television on Easter Snnday. He an- 
nounced a freeze until November on 


By Joseph Kraft 


deployment of Soviet SS-20s aimed 
at Western Europe. He called on the 


range U.S. missil es in Western Eu- 
rope. That is a long way from the 
refusal to accept any, which prompt- 
ed both the Brezhnev “ f ree z e” and 
the walkout from Geneva taltrs under 
Yuri Andropov in November 1983. 

Haring made that baric conces- 
sion, moreover, Mr. Gorbachev can 
go on to sweeten the pot in ways that 
are increasingly appealing to West 
Europeans. He can revive the “walk 
in the woods” accord proposed by 
Paul Nitre, then a U.S. negotiator 
and now chief adviser in tire State 
Department, whereby die United 
States would scrap all Pershing-2 
missiles and both rides would cut 
bade to 73 launchers. That proposal 
— rejected by the United States — 


at Western Europe. He called on the 
United States to stop deploying ana- 
logous weapons — the Tomahawk 
cruise and Pershing-2 ballistic mis- 
siles — in Western Europe. He sug- 
gested a moratorium on research into 
ballistic missil e defense — the so- 
called “star wars” project He hinted 
that a summit, while agreed upon in 
principle, would depend on aperitive 
response from the United States. 

The Reagan administration gave 
him the back of its hand, over and 
over and over again. The freeze pro- 
posal was denounced in a formal 
White House statement in a formal 
State Department comment 'and in 
separate televirion interviews by 
National Security Adviser Robert 
McFarlane (twice), Defense Secre- 
tary Caspar Weinberger and Deputy 
Secretary of State Kenneth Dam. 

The White House statements lik- 
ened the freeze announcement to a 
move by Leonid Brezhnev and called 
it a “discredited proposal.” Every- 
body said it was “disappointing” to 
have Moscow making propaganda 
instead of addressing itself to serious 
business at the Geneva talks or in 
preparations for the surnmiL The 
freeze, it was said, would only perpet- 
uate a lopsided Soviet advantage in 
medium-range missiles in Europe. 

There is indeed a lot wrong with 
the Gorbachev gambit It does per- 
petuate a large Soviet advantage in 
Europe. It was timed to boost Easter 
peace demonstrations in West Ger- 
many. The freeze expires at just the 
time the Netherlands wQl tie going 
through the tricky politics erf voting 
on deployment of U.S. missiles. 

But the allusion to the Brezhnev 
proposal rings hollow. In 1982, when 
Mr. Brezhnev spoke of a “freeze.” no 
new U.S. medium-range had been 
deployed in Europe. The United 
States has now deployed 54 (out of a 
projected 108) Persfnng-2s and 48 
(out of a projected 464) Tomahawks. 

So the true meaning of the “freeze” 
gambit is that the Soviet Union ac- 
cepts the positioning of new medium- 


appealed to almost all Europeans. 
He can also continue to rnnhiliTa 


opinion against the “star wars” re- 
search project Because Mr. Reagan 
and Mr. Weinberger have sold “star 


wars” as a way to make nod ear weap- 
ons obsolete, the project has seriously 
worried Europe, where the fear is that 
America is abandoning deterrence to 
leave the allies on their own. 

And Mr. Gorbachev can continue 
to dangle prospects for a summit. He 
.apparently did that on Wednesday in ' 
the nearly four-hour meeting he had 
with House Speaker Tip CTNriD and 
a congressional delegation. Mr. 
O’Neill dehvexed on behalf erf Mr. 
Reagan a letter reiterating interest in 
a summit Even though Mr. O'Neill 
raised the question of human rights, 
citing various prisoners, the “vibes'’ 
of the session were said to be “good.” 

Compared to the easy track that 
stretches out before Mr. Gorbachev, 
Mr. Reagan’s looks rocky. His advis- 
ers are at sins and sevens. Mr. Rea- 
gan and most of his White House 
advisers want to emphasize the sum- 
mit The Defense Department har- 


W ringer's contribution (IHT,' 

April 81 to the current flood tide of ' 7 
remembrance of the Vietnam War- " V S 
would be noteworthy simply because! : ‘ 

no other policymaker, presidents in- <•' * 
duded, had more influence on the ; 
outcome over a longer span. Bin it is > 
all the more noteworthy because Mig 
Kissinger still does not grasp a dear fr 
lesson of the Vietnam experience. y" 

That lesson has to do with free . 
expression, public trust and the im- ... ; 
perative for mobilizing' a degree o£ ' V ■*' 
effective coneressonal support. . ■> ; 

Leave aside Mr. Kssiogefs ana- 
lysis of how the war weal wrong: a v T -..v 
flawed strategy of attrition and grad-#..7I ■: " 
ual escalation unsuited to guerrilla' 
warfare; a traditional A merican m- 1 
ability to understand why you cannot _■ 
bomb and talk ax the same tune; d - : V." 
collapse of public. support starring 
with ^fringe” groups sedting “radicaf < ■/_. 
transformations of society?; a dm-’ 
sive Congress carrying dissait to ex- - 1 
cess; the ravages of Watergate; and, J i 
of course, the media. f “ 

Leave aside, as well, no more than ? „ 

yon would expect expect in the wajjj 
of scapegoating, setf-serving and se? - ^ 

' lective recall. The tuIc holds for ' r - 

statesmen defending their failed ven- 1 
tures: Being involved means not ha\4r - 

Scored First tsSSM* .=7 - - 

on in his latest book ("No More Viet- V: 

George Shultz, while hopeful for Ge- 
neva, believes that, for bargaining 

purposes, the While House has over- ™ 

committed itself on the summit ' 

' Settling these differences requires - 1 

choices difficult even, for a leader ^ 

deep into detail- Since Mr. Reagan is ““US, "• - 


bors doubts about the summit and is 
even more wary of the Geneva arms 
control talks. Secretary of State 
George Shultz, while hopeful for Ge- 
neva, believes that, for bargaining 
purposes, the White House has over- 
committed itself on the summit 


not versed in arms control, he avoids 
making the choices. So, in response to 
the Gorbachev gambit the adminis- 
tration holed up in negative positions 
that lead nowhere. As to the summit, 
the White House tried to many the 
views of different advisers by plug- 
ging for a “get acquainted” meeting, 
as well as a well-prepared, substan- 
tive session later on. 

Thus, failure to go deeply into 
aims control carries costs that are 
now becoming apparent The United 
States looks inflexible on substance 
and confused on atmospherics. 

Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


resumption of U.S. nnQtaiy action 
“in. over or neat” Indochina and 
slashed aid to South Vietnam. . j 
M r. Kissinger fails to remind us 


er on a secret “side tetter” from Mr: « 
Nixon to Souih Vietnamese Pres* r 
dent Nguyen Van Thieu promising 
swift US. re-entry into the fray if the 
North Vietnamese brake the truce> 
That was a promise Mr. Nixon could 


not have hoped to deliver on. given 
die state of the congressional xevolL - 


To Fuel Summitry, Try Fusion Energy 


United States owed die peoples of 
Indochina a decent opportunity for 
survival {bid] its domestic divisions 
made it impossible for the United 
States to pay this debt.” 

Now that may have been thexasq 
by the time Mr. Nixon and Mr. Kis- 




By Flora Lewis 


ginger took charge — depending on 
how yon. define ^decent” But what; 
are toe lessons? Me. Kissinger starts 


A TLANTA — They will, they won’t, they will, they 
won’t ... Soviet and American leaden have been 


won’t ... Soviet and American leaden have been 
backing around each other for years on- the matter of 
whether or not to meet, and <a what terms. 

^Despite the latest flurry of “dariffcatifias” from Presi- 
dent Reagan’s entoorage on when a su mmit conference is 
not a summit conference, there is little doubt that he will 
meet Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev this year. 

The Russians have not ruled out a session at the United 
Nations this fall. The signs are that Mr. Gorbachev’s 
missile freeze proposal is not a condition but a message 
that Moscow wants to raise important issues and will not 
be saddled with a mere protocol encounter. 

Soviet officials attending the Carter Center’s Consulta- 
tion on International Security and Arms Control indicate 
in Atlanta that Moscow’s main co n cern is to thaw what 
Mr. Gorbachev has called the recent *106 age" in Soviet- 
American relations. Washington is worried about the 
propaganda effects if expectations for a new East-West 
spnng in September are raised by too much fanfare. 

Both sides are maneuvering, testing the atmosphere 
and looking for something they could take home as an 
achievement without paying important concessions. Tins 
is natural and should not be written off with cynicism. 

The Geneva arms talks only opened last month. They 
cannot be expected to produce anything substantive untu 
there has been a lot more probing. Even the notion of a 
freeze is much more complicated man it sounds, involving 
intricate definitions as well as questions of principle. 

But a howdy-doody summit meeting, adorned perhaps 
with minor accords on fishing and ballet,. would scarcely 
slake the yearning for evidence that the superpowers are 
veering off collision course. Like supertankers, it takes 
them a long time to complete a turn. 

What matters is a clear direction. Simply talking “man 
to man” does not necessarily provide iL or assure.better 
understanding The important thing is to bring s sense of 
engagement in a search for ways to make the world safer 
and better off, a signal that something worthwhile has 
been started. As it happens, there is a good possibility 
that would serve everyone’s interest but has been over- 
looked in the focus chi difficult mili tary issues. 


An excellent candidate for an exerting constructive 
accord would be a program for fusion energy. 

Although fusion is the principle of the hydrogen bomb, 
it has oo other military applications. Unlike existing 
nuclear- fission reactors, fusion plants would present al- 
most&o risk -of accident and dangerous waste products. 
The rad is hydrogen, abundant in the sea. If it can be 
brought to economic viability, fusion energy would pro- 
vide unlimited prospects of development to all, and relief 
from atmospheric pollution by heavy use of coal and cdL 
Fusion research has been plodding alangformore than 
30 years, but there has been progress, lays Marshall 
Rosenbluth, apionecx who heads the Institute for Fusion 
Studies at the Umversity of Texas, “We can now fed very 
confident about the prospects.” Bid, as be puts h, to solve 
remaining problems “will require a large-scale effort, 
perhaps too difficult and expensive for any one nation,” 
America is spending only $400 million a year on this 
immensely proansmg new resource ^ -r- the cost of less than 
half a dozen missiles in the MX program. The Soviet 
Union, the European Community ana Japan have ad- 
vanced research efforts. All have been ergfemging infor- 
mation fredy, even m the worat of times, because nobody 
can be hurt by progress toward this scientific miracle. . 

So fusion energy offers a long-term, highly rewarding 
peaceful enterprise for Soviet-Amexican cooperation, to- 
gether with Europe and Japan. It would be as thematic a 
token of intentions as the defunct Soviet-American space 
program, and a lot more useful and enduring. 

. Evgenii Velikhov, who heads fusion research at Mos- 
cow's Kurchatov Institute, says a demonstration plant 
could be built within a decade to test engineering ideas, at 
a cost of about $2 billion. Mr. Velikhov, a participant in 
the Atlanta consultation, believes that the Russians 
would be glad to join an international effort. 

Secretary of Slate George Shnltz and Foreign Minister 
Andrei Gromyko win meet In Vienna next month to 
discuss a summit conference. Putting a fusion program on 
the agenda would not avert die abrasive issues but it 


5 T „ 






out sensibly. Prevention is the best r' ’ * ' 

cure for gua-rifla war, meaning gener- ^ . .. 

ons programs of aid and reform. J =” - r 

ing pre-emption, Ui combat troops • — 

should not be committed without a 

the thnSf^^S^istic objectives^ (^oVklYl 

— aTter which there can be no alter- V4&AJIA1 

native to achieving those objectives. 

Fmally, Mr. Kissinger insists that ".v;, _ 

“a democracy cannot conduct a sen- _ t - . 

cm policy if the contending factions s zj-.-. *T‘ ^ 
do not exercise some restraint in their 
debate.” That is where the reach ex- 7*17 : 

needs the grasp; Where do you draw v 

the restraining line and who draws h; . 7 ' ;: - ~ 

Congress or toe executive? l : ' v.tLa 

The only answer I can see is that 
both, by their own behavior, must 
practice and thus encourage iestramt. 

Mr. Kissinger gives no answer. But "• ’ a: 

a him as to wherein thinks blame lies v ’ j 

. appears when he says the “vaunted « “j;; • - ? r 7 ( 

credibility gap" was a media creation, ’.-i-.,- . . ' -7" 

fabricated by harping on the “differ^ , r 

races between governmental states -- 71 7 

meats and what in fact happened.” 

He goes on: “A fairer analysis would ^ 

have sought to determine what was 7. -7 ”7 

due to genuine confusion and what ^ 7 

was actual misrepresentation.” .• ^ -V. ^ 

HebasitaD backward. The cqnfu- — r 

son was not the' govemmeofs but ^sb'-TT'^' J*— - icu 

that of the public and Congress — ^ ~rc 

bom of thegovemment’s imsrcpr# *c,4’ « r. 
sen ratio ns. They are too plentiful to ~ 

bear recital — misrepresentations aD , ", 




■S i; v.-T?- 

v 


l 


^ sT”- • C- cvt. 

"r’.ff’- '• AST ' 






: J.- 


,CS3s : 

••■ul • 

: •• • 3T17 . 1 ' l 


uld promise at least one important success and bright- 
tiie horizon for the tougher talks 


The New York Times. 


Acid Rain: Better Call In the Shrinks 


W ASHINGTON — Look at 
the rosters of snerialists 


VV the rosters of specialists 
studying the arid rain problem and 
you wm find what you might ex- 
pect: biochemists, forestry scien- 
tists, meteorologists and the Cke. 
But recent political events demon- 
strate that they are the wrong spe- 
cialists. Add rain needs psychia- 
trists, especially those who treat 
reality denial and hallucinations. 

The reality, after nearly a decade 
of scientific study, is that arid rain 
is killing vast tracts of forest and 
poisoning thousands of laifg* in 
North America and Europe. 

The hallucination, endemic 
among politicians, is that further 
scientific study will tell us some- 
thing of value that we do not know. 
That new knowledge, they wistfully 


By Daniel S. Greenberg (bough urged to action by scientists 

— * ™ ft tn ctnfbi 


LETTERS 

A Moral Role at Dachau 

In response to "Why Reagan Truly 


ecoiogicai disaster that is rousing 
great concern on both continents. 

There is no doubt that more re- 
search needs to be done. On that 
basis there is some justification for 
the agreement recently struck be- 
tween President Ronald Reagan 
and Prime Minister Brian Mul- 
ropey for joint research on add 
rain. StiD, the Canadian leader and 
his people got taken by that rid 


are devastating big chunks of land. 

Scientists in all the afflicted 
countries do not claim that all the 
needed knowledge is in. BuL just as 
cancer is often successfully treated 
in the absence of full scientific un- 
derstanding, so, they justifiably in- 
sist, enough is understood at this 
point to apply effective remedies. 

What they see, after years of 
careful research, is that much of the 
acid rain problem comes from the 
tailpipes of cars and the smoke- 
stacks of coal-burning industries. 
Both sources can be reduced or 
even eliminated by emission con- 
trols. That calls for political will, 
which is in short supply in conn tries 
where it is needed most 

West Germany’s neighbors in the 
European Community are sympa- 
thetic about the spreading demo- 
tion of trees in the ancient Black 
Forest, but not so sympathetic as to 
be willing tospeed up requirements 
for automotive emission controls. 

Bonn wants to mandate controls 


it appointed to study the problem, 
prefers more research rather than 
widely recommended emission con- 
trols on coal-burning plants in the 
Midwest Research costs a few mil- 
lions; emission controls cost bil- 
lions. The choice is dear — except 
that arid rain also costs billions, 
and the end of those costs cannot be 
forecast if the problem continues. 

Given the huge costs of a clean- 
up, would it not be prudent to wait 
for research that might eliminate 
some of the unknowns about the 
biochemical p roces se s of arid rain? 
The Congressional Office of Tech- 
nology Assessment examined that 
issue and emphatically concluded 
that delay may be disastrous. 

Enough is known, it declared, to 
get started on what may well be a 
decade-long cleanup effort It 
pointed out that the four-to-six- 
year rese ar c h effort that scientists 

advise would be completed before 
the cleanup program, readies the 
stage of major expenditures. The 
two-pronged approach would as- 
sure a fast start and would mini- 


fa response to "Win Reagan Truly 
Should Visit Dachau" (Aprri6); 

Charles Williams Maynes's point 
about the American presidency^ bong 
“pre-eminently a place of moral lead- 
ership" is cmmenily right, even if that 
sound maxim came from a president 
Co-responsible for Yalta. Poles — 
who were the first to oppose Hitler 
and who became, next to the Jews 
and the Russians, the main victims erf 
Nazi fury — would be grateful for an 
act of presidential moral leadership 
that the worid much needs. 

S.GROCHOLSKL 
Hamme-MQle, B elgium 


of the first combat troops in^ Vietnam; 
about the numbers that would sobsc-; 
quently be needed, about the objec- 
trve. I do not mean miscalculations; 

I mean conscious deception. TM 
Pentagon Papers include documents 
establishing artful dissembling as 
matter of executive policy. r ‘ 

As for the differences between 
statements and what happened, why 
should promises unmatched by per- 
formance not lead legitimately to a 
loss of credibility? How many lights; 
after all, were we shown at the end of 
bow many tunnels? However honest 
the nrisj udgments, repeated progress 
reports that turnout to be empty ate 
th e na tural breeding groundTor the 
distrust and domestic division that 


ii-LV-r 

v • -il ••-- Ji.VC 
c: r:“V\ 


■ — — = C2 r . 


SERVICE!? 


NS?” 




Mh Kissinger so deeply deplores. ... . ^ „ 

G^enthe problem of conducting * . '* 

vrar mmd such passions by fcbnselL* 

Mr. Kissinger axgues, Mr. Nixon 
should have gone to Congress' early 
m his term, ootfined his straw and 

o ema nded an endorsement raffing ^ i 

that he should have liquidated the 

But Mir. Nixon needed thai SkC 557 ■ 
adwee, fearing that history worid 5? ,r 

mver forgive the appaDSng cense - 60 t 

qwaces” of such an/Sration of^ ^ 

ocecuhve responsftaEtv" - **■-*£?£"* 

^M r. Ki ssinger still seems to .thitic V ^ * 

that Presidtait Nixon made the wrong 

<*«arion. Mr. Kissinger is right on . 

one poinL “America owes it to itself 

to malte a fair assessment of ffie' Us- t 




by 1988 to reduce the automotive ' mize the chance of costly misdirec- 
nitrous oxides, from near and far, lion. It makes sense, but the Reagan 


his people got taken by that old 
snake oil — “more research." 

Few problems would not benefit 
from more research. What is need- 
ed is decisive action against the 
well-known add ram sources that 


that are the source of the nitric add 
that is wilting its forests. Although 
the other countries are also victims 
of arid rain destruction, they prefer 
less stringent controls and a 1994 
deadline for all cars. 

The Reagan administration, aJ- 


administration is not listening. 

Arid rain is beyond science add 
politics. Call is the shrinks. 


A Noble Freeze Spumed ; 

. . I ws so impressed with the Soviet queues' 
Union's decision unilaterally to sus- executi v 
pend deployment of their missiles Mr F 
that I decided to make a similar noble tbatPre 
gesture. I wrote to the tax authorities decision 
in my country to announce that Ihad one poir 
decided unilateral^ to renounce my- to make 
right to any aid all monies they owed sons of 
.me and to say that I hoped they “thatha 
would, in the same spirit, no longer Wash 
demand any money from me. 

Imagine my disappointment when 

the tax authorities accused me of try- . , 

ing to freeze an advantageous posi- „ 


*. 1 ■fr-as.i 






wns ^ that tragedy.” he says, but 

That has not yet occurred.” 




Washington Post Writers Group. 


don, since they owed, me no 
They continued to insist that 


0 insist that I pay 


The miter is editor and publisher 
of Science A Government Report, an 
ihdcpatdcrU newsletter. ' 


my taxes. Such cynirisinl I know how 
Mikhail Gorbachev must fed. Noble 


Mikhail Gorbachev must fed. Not 
gestures just don’t pay these days. 

.' X, JOHN HIGGS. 
• .ParisL. 


Ldttor" and mast contain themU- 
^ signature, name andfidt adr 
Lenars should be brief and 
™ xdvea to eOting. We cannot 
1* raponablc for the mum 4. 
UH 8oBcited mamtsaiptz - 










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u*Sl, £ 

Po int 

25 >. 



ife--- 




INTERNATIONAL HEBALP TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 13-14, 1985 .. 


Isolation 


re Mill 

is : it& 


s Jiu- «dM>. : 


■ 

Singapore Adjusts to 'Multiparty* Rule 

Televised Parliamentary Debate May Be an Eye-Opener 


\J!L£ 




for mobiiSS ** 4eS 

Uk ^ 

”?£'S?is 

m Se. groups sSf 1 ^ 
nations oTsS^rrafi 

S2«riyiS 2Li.*S 


e ^ages ^ #2"»r«»a 
media, 

:Mde,asweIL„{ Jnta 

JJapeattS^^ihj! 

selAeni^^ 
recall. The 72“??** 
pending 

sss&fiasfc 

Mr. KirtfJ 0 ^** 
ta “> V*r cSd taS fe 

.off with success SJ* 
wdeed that 

Is and penalties ^ * 
«t” to enforce 
of January 1973 
ally dismantled" JE? f 
and irresolute Cnn? a& 

■.flat same JL „Sl! 

tton of U-S/miiit^ 
er or near" Indr^L 30 * 6 
aid .to South 
“^Ser fails tolLd, 

m peace acoordshiSSf 
secret -side letter" 

& reentry- into the/ rayif4 ; 
Vietnamese broke fl* £1 

B a Promise Mr. NimnaS 
■ehimed to deliver o„,S 

e of the congressional && 
^singer says simph- that “i 
States owed the peoples <j 
na a decent opportunity fc 
l [but} its domestic divis® 
t impossible for the 
o pay this debL" 
that may have been the ost 
lime Mr. Nixon and Mr. fo 
.ook charge — depending na 
-o define “decent," But vfc 
lessons? Mr. Kissinger sum 
tably. Prevention is the Ira 
• guerrilla war, meaning gea- 
grams of aid and reform. Fak«- 
-emption, UJS. comhai troops’ 
not be committed sithou i 
inderstanding of .the named 
tat and of realistic objectives' 
r which there can benoatar- 
:o achieving those otgecthrs. 
By, Mr. Kissinger insists da 
ocracy cannot conduct a xn 
icy if ’the contending faction 
ixercise some restraint intis 
" That is where the reach e- 
be grasp: Where do you do* 
r ainin g line and who drawn 
ss or lie executive? 
only answer I can see is tbs 
jv their own behavior, ns 
“'and thus encourage restraaf 
Kissinger gives no answer. * 
s to where" he thinks Warn he 
s when he says the "vnmft 
lilv gap” was a media crea«* 
ted bv harping cm the “cfifo-. 
between governments^ 
and wbat in fan happen 
son: “A fairer analjMsw® 
Might to detenmae wM « 
genuine confusion and «* 
:ual misrepresentation* 

rajfg* «*TM g* 

as not the govenuu^® 
the public and C«g* 
f the goveraments tm^ 
Jns.llevaietooptoJ Jj 

Sal^nusrcprt^^ 
®*e record 

irst combat ^ 

be neededa^w 

tszsjfe 

of cxecutnjpjjj y*# 

for the ddferg^d 
rats sad whatbjW^pf 

tee “Jv^fSinaiiy^ 

CTedibiho* . H git 

ianv ra^^'—naiedp 11 ^ 

^laments. 


- •.iflpe.i* -. - ■■■ '; ■ ■ ■ " ) 

- ' By Henry. Kamra 

' ' • ' r Nm Yark'ima Service 

. ATHJ^Sr-Tbe death of Etwer 
Haxha reses to a new dimension 
(ben#s|ay mdwjmes that Alba- 
nia im posed to its neighbors, as 
weH&ji the Western and Commu- 
sh&camp* in general. since the end 
df WdddWar lL • 

. Hbwerer bristling hostile has 
4 been Albania*s positron toward the 
outside world since Me Hoxha be- 
came its leader, it was a consistent 

, r NEWS ANALYSIS , ; 

stance. Greece and Yugoslavia, 
winch bonier Albania, and Italy, 
whose boot's bed faces it across the 
Adriatic Sea, had a fair idea of 
, what they were facing, Their poli- 
- dtt toward this most uncomfort- 
able neighbor rested an one consol- 
ing factor: Albania's hostility to 
the Soviet Union. 

Tire small and moumamous Bal- 
kan nation of about three million 
people is aggressively isolationist, 
not hesitating to Gicaaoss its land 
or sc a borders at any real or imag- 
ined intruder. 

U is an unsatisfactory trading 
partner, paranoically suspicions of 
fora goers to the extern of refusing 
foreign credits under a provision in 
iu constitution. It represses its eth- 
' t ac minorities, particularly the 
Crreeks, and has carried hostility to 
religion to the point oT outlawing it 
But under Mr. Hoxha, who wed 
Thursday aged 76, Attautirt nei^t- 
bors have enjoyed the certainly of 
having to face an urmTUwt »nH 
friendless country as weak and 
atone as it is fierce. Mr. Hoxha 
made his a nation as hostile to the 
Soviet Union as it is to the West, 
and, since the mid-1970s, he made 
h an enemy also to its last remam- 
ing friend. China. 

Under his brutally dictatorial 
rate, there was certainty that Mos- 
cow could not establish a foothold 
on tire Adriatic, a fear that haunted 
Yugoslavia and gave concern to the 
■ North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
* lion, of which Greece and Italy are 
members. ' 

Mr. Hoxha's regime gradually 
reduced this fear as he elimina ted, 
usually by execution, anyone sus- 
pected of being a real or potential 
agent of any foreign power or a 
potential rival to the leader. The 
latest and most important victim 
was Mehmet Shehu, the prime min- 
ister and No. 2 in power until- be 
was killed in December 1981. 

The best hopes in this region and 
in the West lie in the fact that the 
Hoxha purges, a permanent feature 
of his rule, may have been thorough 
enough to have removed any threat 
ro the contimrify of his foreign poli- 
cies. 

„ The limited international group 


of “Albania watchers," analysts 
who rdy largely on the reporting of 
the few embassies in Tirana..— 
none of which have good govern- 
ment contacts — and close exegesis 
of the Albanian press and broad- 
casts, have come to believe that 
continuity under collegial rule is 
most likely. 

Ramiz Afia, who as president erf 1 
the Presidium of the People's As- 
sembly is head of slate, is expocted 

lO a r uling group distin- 

guished above all for its loyally to 
the late leader and his pewaies. 

. . In the. last years of his rale, Mr. 
Hoxha bad began what appeared 
lobe a slow but discernible process 






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'A he i 


CHURCH SERVICES 


Mats 

AMERICAN CATHEDRAL M PARS, 23 Aya. 
GMrg*-V, 75008 Pori*. Tho Vory Rov. 
am R. Uo, Own M*m» Omorgm-V or 
Al m a Mo r ctou. Sundoyi 9 ojm.. U cun. 
Church school and nunwy T1 tuo. Woaic 
days: 12 noon. TdL: 720.I7JZ 

CB4TRAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 13 few du 
VhwcCalMiibiMr, 75006 Pods. AMra SL- 
Safaiet. Sunday worship In EngBsh 9M 
ojm., tor. A. SomtnarvBn. Td.: 607.67.02. 

MBS SUBURBS 

EMMANUEL BAPRST CHURCH. RoufUtal- 
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tiem, BUo study; 9^5, worship. 10^5. 56 
Run Bons-Rahins. T*Lt 70.1&2P. 

G0CVA 

OftJRCH OF OfiHST - MnnHngs in En^bh 
Sunday nvanings o> 6 pjn., 26 run do lo 
Tnrrtmiarn, 1207GnrMva. TnUDoyln Knn, 
022/937537. Frnn BMn oomspondaneo 
counn in Eng&sh and French. Wri* to Jhn 
obovn. 

MONTE r*nn<ii 

MONTE CARLO, toT. Mowd%>. FwL 
htewri. Sunday B 2 *t hr. ( 6 fl o 0 es] 9 »A 5 am. 
Wdrdhv 11 & 6 pjilToL: 255151. . 

Ewore 

UNn^AJOAN-UhaVERSAUST. worship ond 
bcHvtfins 'm Europe Cortod HJU, Store 
Dick, S«nno*W«l 20, 1271 NCHuJimlUm 
htoihnrianck TnU 1+31) (0) 2152 55073. 

STOCKHOLM 

IMMANUEL CHURCH noar dty onntor. 
frimxBy dtrkSan Wktw»N|xS«td&y lliOO. 
■ToLi [08) 316051, 151225. 


To place <m adrorthement 
in thic section 


mm 


■ Me EUmbetir HETtWGOD . 
181 Ave-<i-^C«dle, 

92S2, ^7 C SSs r “^ 


cm econonac cooperathm with Chi- 
na-wiih expanded dealings with the 
WesL These increaring contacts 
were almost exclusively economic, 
however, *Tid mwwwpnninri by tm- 
dhmmshed fervor in anti-Western 
prono uncemen ts 

Such gains were quietly encour- 
aged by Yugoslavia, Greece, Italy, 
West Germany and France, for po- 
litical as well as economic reasons. 
The United States, however, has 
never succeed e d in obtaining even 
on indirect hearing for iis occaaon- 
al bids to improve relations. 

Greece has opened two road bor- 
der crossings ZO its neighbor, but 
their value remains symbolic be- 
cause Albania welcomes almost no 
visitors and rarely aBows its own 
people to travel. Albania has com- 
pleted a rail link to the Yugoslav 
bmder, white Yugoslavia is work- 
ing on its stretch of trade, to be 
ready by the end of this year. 

Italy has signed an expanded 
trade agreement and opened a ferry 
link, web remains a losing opera- 
tion for lack of traffic. 

West German diplomats and 
politicians have hdd conversations 
with Albanian emissaries in con- 
tinuing efforts to improve rela- 
tions. And white Bonn rejects Al- 
banian demands for wartime 
reparations, it is ready to offer eco- 
nomic projects to be financed by 
credits. 

In the months in which Mr. Hox- 
ha's beahh was dearly declining 
and his expected death became a 
factor in poficy p lanning , Western 
analysts had hoped that these pos- 
sihmties of beneficial links with the 
West xmght tempt the future lead- 
ers of Europe's most underdevel- 
oped and poorest nation. 

What the analysis feared in the 
outlook for post-Hoxha Albania 
was a possibility that rivalries 
might develop within the ruling 
group under Mr. Alia and that such 
contests might reopen a crack that 
the Soviet Union could explaiL Al- 
bania's long history of vicious in- 
ternal power struggles, always set- 
tled by force, make this a realistic 
fear. 


Tha Nm fort. Tm 


Singapore's government bps decreed that special areas be 
set aside for food vendors who sell lunch to office workers. 

2 Die in Racial Gashes 
On South African Coast 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Two 
men were killed in police dashes 
with black demonstrators around 
Port Elizabeth as widespread vio- 
lence continued in South Africa, 
the authorities said Friday. 

A spokesman for the national 
police force in Pretoria said that 
one of the men was found dead 
after a black policeman fired on a 
mob attacking his home. The other 
died when police opened fire with 
shotguns on a group throwing 
stones and bottles, he said. 

An economic recession has 
caused thousands of layoffs around 
Port Elizabeth, an auto manufac- 
turing dty in the eastern region of 
Cape Province. 

Police said that additional police 
and the army have been mobilized 
into the region around Uhenhagc, 
10 miles (16 kilometers) inland 
from Port Elizabeth, where a funer- 
al will beheld Saturday in at least 
19 black marchers who were shot to 
death by policemen on March 21. 

The funeral in the black town- 
ship of Kwanobuhle is expected to 
be the largest in recent years for 
victims of the struggle a go»n«sf 
white-minority rule. 

After the shootings provoked an 
international outcry and local un- 
rest, the South African government 
ordered a judicial inquiry into why 
police opened fire on the marchers. 

Survivors said the police fired no 1 
warning shots before shooting into ! 
the crowd of more than 3,000 I 
blades marching toward Uiten- 


Compikd iy Our Staff Ftvm Dtspacha 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Su- 
dan’s new mflitaiy raters have 
agreed to return the country to ci- 
vilian rule after a one-year transi- 
tion period, according to represen- 
tatives of unions and political 
parties. 

■ The representatives met Friday 
with the military , council arid ■Mid 
they proposed formation of an 
apolitical caretaker cabinet to ad- 
minister the country white the mili- 
tary rules during the transition. 

Sudan, Africa’s largest country 
in area, has not been rated bydvil- 
■ ans since 1969 when Major Gener- 
al Gaafar Nimdri, who was over- 
thrown last weekend, seized power. 

The 15-member military council 
now running the country is led by 
General Abdul Rahman Swaredda- 
hab, who ted the coup. Tbe council 
is to retain its hold on ultimate 
power during the transition period 
with the cabinet administering its 
policies. 

The Sudanese authorities also 
said Friday that they had arrested 
or deiained a total of 36 officials 
from the Nlmeui regime, the Egyp- 





Abdul Rahman Smreddahab 

tian Middle East News Agency re- 
ported from Khartoum. 

The agency quoted the Sudanese 
prison director. General Ahmed 
Hassan, assaying that 4,443 people 
had been released Irom prisons in 
Khartoum, inducting 371 described 
as political detainees, since the 
coup. 

Earlier reports said those arrest- 
ed included General NimeuTs two 
vice presidents, General Omar 
Tayib and General Joseph Lagu, as 
well as the former president's 
brother, Mnstapba Ntmeiri, and 
his sister-in-law. Fauna KhahL 

Sudan continued its gradual re- 
turn to normal Friday, with the re- 
opening of Khartoum's airport to 
all scheduled flights. AD interna- 
tional Sights to Sudan h»d been 
stopped last week by a general 
suite that ted to General Nimeiri’s 
overthrow. 

A spokesman for the grouping of 

unions and parties said their repre- 
sentatives presented a suggested 
i cabinet list at a meeting wiinmem- 
bers of the military council Friday. 
He refused to name the proposed 
cabinet members. 

The civilian negotiators dis- 
closed Thursday night that the 


council had accepted their demand 
that the transition be limited to a 
year and th3t the caretaker cabinet 
during this period consist of civil- 
ians with only one military mem- 
ber, who would be the ddairerniih 
ister. 

Unions and parties “are propos- 
ing to the mDitarycouncfl a calanct 
composed of civilians with no po- 
litical affiliations,” said the spokes- 
man, who requested anonynny. 

‘This was agreed by toe unions 
and the parties because we all real- 
ize that the carqtaker government 
has very serious problems to tackle, 
and the absence of any differences , 
on political ideology wDl make 
their job slightly eaaer during the 
transitional period,” the spokes- 
man said. 

After the transition, he said, the 
unions and parties expect demo- 
cratic elections leading to full civil- 
ian rule. 

General Nimciri named General 
Swareddahab commander-in-chief 
and defense minister on March 18, 
a few days before 1 m left on his last 
trip as president. The coup oc- 
curred while the president, who 
had ruled Sudan for 16 years, was 
returning from a UJ5. visit. General 
Nimeiri Has been in Egypt since the 
coup. (AP. UN, AFP) 


Portuguese Economist 
Dies in Car Bomb Blast 

77 « Associated Press 

OPORTO, Portugal — A Portu- 
guese economist, Jos£ Gomes Mar- 
tins, was kilted Friday when a 
bomb exploded as he got into his 
car in this northern Portuguese 
dty, police said. Investigators said 
they suspected that the car had 
been booby-trapped, but no further 
details were immediately available. 

A bomb blast Wednesday ripped 
through a government bousing of- 
fice here, causing extensive damage 
but no injuries. A little-known 
movement called the Autonomous 
Revolutionary Groups said it car- 
ried out the attack to protest gov- 
ernment plans to lift a 50-year rent 
freeze. 


CHANNEL 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMMNIES 
IN EUROPE &THC UK VIA SATELLITE 

“Europe^ Best View" 


PROGRAM. SATURDAY 13th APRIL UK TIMES 


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huge. Police witnesses have given 
conflicting Testimony. 

Eric Tembani testified Friday 
that the first person to fall during 
the gunfire was a bicyclist who was 
riding near two armored police ve- 
hides when an officer ordered him 
to move away. 

Mr. Tembani, 48. said the cyclist 
was turning to ride awav when an- 
other policeman shot him in the 
back of the head. Then police 
opened fire on the crowd, he said. 


By Barbara Crossctrc 

iViw York Times Service 

SINGAPORE — Prime Minister 
Lee Kuan Yew has made politics 
interesting again in Singapore, al- 
though probably not in a way he 
intended. 

Mr. Lee, who called an election 
in December after staging a series 
of events celebrating the accom- 
plishments of his People’s Action 
Party in its 25 years in power, dis- 
covered when the ballots were 
counted that many voters look a 

different view of a quarter-century 

of one-party dominance. Two op- 
position candidates won seats and 
the ruling party’s majorities were 
cut in many other constituencies. 

In any other country with a par- 
liamentary system, a sweep of all 
bat two seats of the 79 in the legis- 
lature might have been thought a 
resounding victory, but not in Sin- 
gapore. 

“Mr. Lee Kuan Yew's reaction 
was that it was a complete defeat 
for the PAP,” said J.B. Jeyaretnam, 
one of the two opposition members 
elected. 

In his initial response, Mr. Lee, 
61, shocked Singaporeans by pub- 
lidy suggesting that multiparty de- 
mocracy might not be the best sys- 
tem for this nation. He already had 
indicated that this would be his last 
term as prime minister, an office he 
has held since 1959, when Singa- 
pore was still a British colony with 
limited self-rule. 

The people responded with their 
own views of what lessons needed 
to be drawn from the election, 
prime among them that the ruling 
party had lost touch with the grass 
roots. 

The People's Action Party, with 


younger men now in leadership po- 
sitions, began to make some 
changes at the local level Mr, 
Jeyaremam calls them "lip ser- 
vice." 

"The old boy is suQ veiy much in 
charge." he said. "New revenue 
measures they have proposed were 
ideal measures for discussion. Was 
there any discussion? Not at all.” 

Mr. Lee recently added fud to 
the debate on Singapore's future 
with a sustained attadt in Parlia- 
ment on “Western" values, under 
whose umbrella he lumped birth- 
control pills, US. libel suits and 
Indian political practices. 

The prime minister, a British- 
educated banister who on ce called 
himself Harry Lee. has drawn clos- 
er in recent public statements to a 
strong belief in traditional Chinese 
values. In March, he told Pariia- 
mem that Singapore's political sys- 
tem had been a success because its 
people were overwhelmingly ethnic 
Chinese. 

“Had the mix in Singapore been 
differenti” he said, “had it been 75 
percent Indians. 15 percent Malays 
and the rest Chinese, it would not 
hove worked.” 

Singaporeans can now watch 
outbursts from their prime minister 
and his equally scrappy colleagues 
oo television. Live broadcasts from 
Parliament began a few weeks ago. 

“This has been a traumatic eye- 
opener to all Singaporeans," said 
Chi am See Tong, the other opposi- 
tion member of Parliament. 
“Hawkers, taxi drivers, factory 
workers hadn’t got a clue what Par- 
liament is. They think it is like a 
court where everything is solemn, 
the debate serious.” 


Now, Singaporeans will get a 
chance to see how “the government 
goes out of its way to ridicule us, 
using half-truths, untruths and 
lies." he said. “They will see who is 
right and who is wrong." 

One of Parliament's more hotly 
debated issues this year has been 
the government’s entry into the ro- 
mance business. 

Alarmed that, graduate women 
were not getting married, the gov- 
ernment set up a “social develop- 
ment" unit to help foster romance. 
The government suggested that 
men with university degrees were 
rgecting intelligent women in favor 
of more docile and physically at- 
tractive uneducated women, a 
frame of mind that Mr. Lee called 
appropriate only for “agricultural" 

societies. 

The government has strenuously 
defended its matchmaking office 
against those who suggest that it is 
still another case of social engineer- 
ing intended to reshape society. A 
previous measure, which would 
have given preference in getting 
into the better schools to children 
of women with degrees, came un- ' 
der fire and was scrapped. 

Many educated Singaporean 
women say they have no intention 
of marrying in a hurry, if at all, 
because the society is still far from 
enlightened in its treatment of 
them. 

A young man, a successful pro- 
fessional who lives in Singapore’s 
widening jet-set circles. s?id about 
relationships between the sexes 
here: “Men are much more liberal 
now. Most of my friends allow their 
wives logo out and take tea alone 
with their friends.’’ 



J.B. Jeyaretnam 

In a place where in one genera- 
tion a whole nation has moved 
from Third World poverty to high- 
rise affluence, there are bound to 
be a few comers unswept by the 
whirlwinds of progress. Sooner or 
later, the government finds those. 

There have been ami-spitting 
and pro-civility campaigns. Street 
vendors have been horded into 
malls. 

Now the push is on to make 
Singapore a “cashless" society, 
where wages will no longer be paid 
in currency and most family finan- 
cial transactions will be computer- 
ized. with people relying on bank 
cards. 



Take Off With Discovery 

By dialing outer space . . . direct! You'll be lifting off with Discovery, 
actually hearing the crew talk to NASA Mission Control. Then you'll listen 
to them deploy a communications satellite. 

You’ll be privy to an in-orbit press conference. And hear first time 
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ARTS /LEISURE 


At the Whitney: Zap, Flash and Strange Sweetness 


By Paul Richard 

Washington Post Service 

N EW YORK — The Whitney 
Biennial Exhibition is the 
Bloo min gd ale's of the art world 
Manhattanesque-fashionable. fast 
and sometimes naughty-naughty, it 
is just the right exhibit for the out- 
of-town consumer. 

The show won’t be a hit The 
Biennials never are. In the higher 
reaches of the New York art world, 
everybody gripes about these com- 
mittee-chosen shows — everyone 
gripes, but everyone goes. This 
year's show will be condemned for 
being too much fun. 

It has puns by Jasper Johns. It 
has lots of shiny Cibachromes. It 

Jamb 1 * Lmiia Jt wnalr Vtt! L" dntk 



Julian Schnabel. But it has Sherrie 
Levine's intentional and shameless 
plagiarisms: This year she is rip- 
ping off the post-revolutionary 
Russians. It has black light in the 
toilets, and neal-o toys with mo- 
tors. Out on Madison Avenue it has 
a wind-activated sound piece that 
moans and bleeps and twangs. 


This year’s Biennial pretends to 
be “a qualitative overview of cur- 
rent art activity in America.** But it 
isn’t really. It’s a local art show. 
Two- thirds of its 84 artists live in 
the neighboibood. 

Many of its fastest works — say, 
Cindy Sherman's big photos of her- 
self — zap you ai fust glance. That 
high speed is intentional. Barbara 
Kruger's oddly juxtaposed photo- 
graphs- with- texts (“When I hear 
the word culture I take out my 
checkbook 1 are meant to be as fast 
as ads. So are Jenny Holzer's max- 
ims — “Lack of charisma can be 
fatal" — which Hash by in moving 
lights just like the headlines that 
one has read high above Times 
Square. 

The one thing wrong with flash is 
that it ends in burnout. You've got 
to feel compassion for Cindy Sher- 
man's fans, for her explicate rs. imi- 


again to make room for Sherman's 
photographs. 

New New York art, for 40 years, 
has zapped us at first glance. The 
huge, wall-eating paintings of the 
Abstract Expressionists zapped us. 
Claes Oldenburg’s floorburgers 
zapped us. New Yorkers get 
zapped daily by the scribbles on 
their subway cars. The Whitney 
show is full of zappismip. as you 
might expect. But its zaps are 
strangely sweet. 

This show is fall of the happy 
colors you might put in the chfl- 
dren’s room. It’s got a little impo- 
liteness. true, but that's to be ex- 
pected — in punked-up and 
graffiti-sprayed fashionable Man- 
hattan. 


tutors, and especially for her buy- 


ers. Victims of chic an are 
victims of chic clothing. Think of 
all those art fashion victims who 
after buying Op Art and Photo- 
Realist images of motorcycle gas 
tanks have had to clear their walls 


Kenny Scharfs black-light deco- 
rations, all over the bathrooms, are 
like the decorations at the senior 
prom. (The Whitney did not have 
the guts to let him spray-paint the 
toilet stalls: they pasted paper to 
the walls.) John Kessler’s “Visions 
of China,” with its motors and its 
light tricks, its fake bonsais and 
bamboo leaves and miniature pa- 
godas, is as much fun os one’s first 


childhood visit to a Chinese restau- 
rant. 

Consider Jasper Johns. Remem- 
ber how he boggled the best minds 
in the art world with the unexpect- 
ed blankness of his targets, num- 
bers, flags? That was 30 years ago. 
Look what he’s got here. 

Paintings foil of jokes, self-paro- 
dies, double entendres, puns and 
easy- to- read clues. Who has the 
best-known smile in the history of 
p ainting ? The Mona Lisa. Who is 
the best-known dealer, in Manhat- 
tan? Leo Castdli. Both their faces 
show up in Johns's “Racing 
Thoughts” (1983). 

Puns, juxtapositions and various 
mind-stretching conjunctions are 
used by many of the painters in the 
show. 

This, is David Salle's major gim- 
mick. In the handsome picture that 
he calls “The Disappearance of the 



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group of ( 
has painted green. Had they been 
separated, they would not have 
made this show, but together they 
look chic. 

At the center of a happy-go- 


lucky, rather toylike assemblage by 
Rodney Alan Greenblat is a kind of 
twirling pedestal that bears Walt 
Disney’s name. And not only Dis- 
ney’s. It also mentions Gertrude 
Stein, Mary Tyler Moore. Babe 
Ruth, Copernicus and Picasso. The 
reference to Picasso is immediately 
caught, like a perfectly thrown for- 
ward pass, by the Jo Anne Carson 
paintings displayed across the 
room. Carson, a Ch ica g oan, makes 
witty, three-dimensional, tightly 
worked-out pictures that pay hom- 
age to the early 20th-century paint- 
ings of Braque. de'Chirico, Picasso. 
The screaming horse from Guerni- 
ca, a Paris care table, a wineglass 
and a zebra appear in her “Tom- 
foolery." Picasso, as the Minotaur, 
and the towers of de Chirico, and a 
cubist mandolin have cameo roles 
to play in her “The Amazed Man.” 

The 1985 exhibit, despite its easy 
entertainments, does include some 
works of substance. Its sculptures 
— by Jill Giegerich, Mel Kendrick, 
John Newman, Ned Smyth, Robert 
Therrien and especially James 
Suris — are particularly fine. It is 
perhaps worth noting that there is 
Utile new about them. 

Only a small number of the 
painters represented can withstand 
the competition. Eric Fischl is one 
of them. His “Portrait of the Artist 
os an Old Man,” with its evocations 
of Vincent van Gogh and Francis 
Bacon, and his “The Power of Rock 
and Roll,” with its naked dancing 
child happily ignoring the Rietveld 
chair before him and the Warhol on 
the waR are sexy, searing paintings 
not easy to forget Doug Anderson 
of Boston, Ed Paschke of Chicago 
and Elizabeth Murray of New 
York, are also serious painters who 
lend needed weight to this often 
giddy show. 



Sq*to ood Mm 

An array of Claes CMdenburgs at the Los Angeles “Temporary Contemporary.” 


'Temporary Contemporary 9 Offers 
A Sample of Museum’s Grand Design 


By John Russell 

.Yew Voj* Tones Service ' 


~|~ OS ANGELES — That a muse- 


rh.i i was intended to take up the 
slack in its coverage of contempo- 
rary art It was one thing to open 
um ^7o7tempor l ^“rn the Temp<^ Contemporary, and 
should open in a foVmer police quite another ^ tokeepnp Ae requi- 
maintenance garage in the section s:* 6 'level oF energy, let alone the 
of Los Angeles known as Little account. 

Tokyo was matter for amazemem. , Bnt, not ranch more than a year 
That the temporary quartets of the * e ** Museum of 

Museum of Contemporary Art Contemporary Art kwfc to be m 
should open on time - in Novem- good shapt The Temporary 
ber 1983 - and without apparent Cpritei^orary. has brought new 
effort was more remarkable still. We 10 “ mUrc neighborhood and 


m 


It was chosen, collectively, by six 
Arm- 


As designed by Frank Gehiy, the there are plans for it to stay open as 
Contemporary” ~ ~ 


Whitney curators — Richard . 
strong, John G. Hanhaidt, Barbara 
Haskell, Richard Marshall, lisa 
Phillips and Patterson Sims. They 
suggest that Minimalism may be 
due for a revival but the Minimal- 
ist objects they have chosen — box- 
es by Donald Judd and eggs by 
Robert Mangold — leave one fuu 
of doubts. 

The Biennial runs' through June 


“Temporary Contemporary" was 
no mere ad hoc hangar but a prince 
among spaces, all set to embrace 
whatever princess came round the 
comer. 

Yet not everyone forecast a long 
and happy life for the Temporary 
Contemporary. There was no per- 
manent collection. little Tokyo 
was not exactly on the main drag. 
The Los Angeles County Museum 
had commissioned a new wing 
from Hardy. Holtzmann & Pfeiffer 


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BRUNO MEISSNER 


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Wa nt in g to buy 
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imExUMttew 

ftAncdda Sake 

appears every Saturday 


an exhibition space after comple- 
tion of the permanent museum. : 

That budding, designed by the 
Japanese architect Anita Isozaki 
who was one of the people consid- 
ered to derign the new Getty com- 
plex, is going up on schedule on 
Bunker Hill. MOCA as it is cus- 
tomarily called, has begun to build 
its permanent collection in 
strength. 

Above all MOCA has a constit- 
uency. More than 250,000 people 
have visited the Temporary Con- 
temporary. There are 16,000 people 
who pay S35 a head for annnal 
membership. The endowment is 
pus hing the SI 5-million, marie. 

William FrKieschnick, president 
of Atlantic Richfield Co. and chair- 
man of MOCA, has in more senses 
than one the touch of gold when it 
comes to the museum’s affairs. Nor 
did -it hurt that the J. Paid Getty 
Trust not long ago gave MOCA a 
grant of $3 million. 

The current situation of MOCA, 
whose director is Richard Kosha- 
lek, is summed up in an exhibition 
that opened Feb. 13. The immedtr 
ate attraction of the show is . the 
group of 80 major works from the 
collection of Count and Countess 
Giuseppe Panza di Birano, ac- 
quired by the museum in 1984 for 
$9 million, payable over 11 years. 
Impresave in itself, tire purchase is 
indicative of the general policy 
MOCA intends to follow. Where 
other museums get a bit of this and 
a bit of that, as best they can, it is 
the grand design of MOCA that, 
like the Steddijk Museum in Am- 
sterdam and the Saatchi collection 
in London, it should concentrate 
on a relatively small number of 
artists and collect them in depth. 

What we can see of the Fanzas* 
collection, at MOCA through SepL 
29, speaks well for their judgment, 
which was 
hallowed 

tween 19oo ana ivoj, me group 
indudes work by Mark Rothko, 
Franz Kline, Robert Rauschen- 
-berg, Roy Lichtenstein, Gaes Ol- 
denburg, James Rosenqirist and 
George Segal, among Americans, 
and by Jean Fau trier and Antoni 


lar from recent , exhibitions, but 
here again the concentration 
.time (1961-1962) and in nom 
(16 in all) provides a total and i 
mediate immersion. 

.Dated 1953 to 1960, the seven 
large paintings by Rothko are the 
earliest American works in the 
show. They speak for a period 
when terminal melancholy had not 
yet begun to eat away at the artist, 
and -in the finely adjusted light of 
toe Temporary Contemporary they 
come across with an almost seraph- 
ic radiance. The Lichtensteins — a 
smaller, tauter group — aD come 
from 1962, and they include such 
key works as “Cezanne,” “Desk 
Calendar” and “Meat.” After al- 
most 25 years, these paintings have 
a spare, blunt, im compromising 
quality that has' lost none of its 

it. 

is represented by 

1%Q ^ukL ^i9M?^The landscape 
called “Capillary Action” and the 
phantomatic sky-piece call ed| 
"Noon” should revise the opinions 
even of those who have long looked 
hard at Rosenqptist. Finally, there 
are two sculp tores from the period 
when Segal was pioneering the Ed- 
ward Hopper look and the Edward 
Hopper subject matter in a medium 
peculiar to himself. His “Sunbath- 
era on Rooftop” is so much a New 
York scene that it ranks as an eth-, 
nic curiosity in a state , where sun-! 
bathing isa fact of life rather than a 
pleasure to be snatched in condi- 
tions of no matter what discomfort! 
But 
trait . 

toe group as "a whole gives a firmer,' 
more concentrated grounding in its 
moment of time than can be found 
on permanent exhibition in any 
other American museum. ~ 

Of the two European painters 
included. Fan trier will be unfamil- 
iar to most visitors under 60. Short- 
ly after World War n he had a 
great name in Paris for paintings 
(two of them represented at 
MOCA) that were supposedly in- 
spired by the plight ot toe French 
men and women who were taken aj 
hostages by toe Nazis and in many 
cases were brutalized and killed. To 
me, Fau trier's use of the title “Hos- 
tages” always seemed exploitative 
It called above all for a greater 
weight and poignancy of statement 

th» fc-rf- jjj jus ami > 1 ' 




luarenc 




■i 



it- z r.i ' 


.r-d 


r-.-.i 






ms of no matter what discomfort- . 
it Segal ha s his place in any p or^* I A " ‘ ' ; *- 

tit of that, particular decade, and l/ 7- *---* - 
eerbiro as a whole eives a firmer.' 


^ hasten- Re 
toa of Tibet 

Hit ri.-'i 

j H^K- 

I la ’J!/'" ~~t'. S 




- c a 





on paper 
agree; Fau- 
irier was the first artist he ever 


collected, and he sees “Hostages^ i 


• K 


as valid images of “life broken by J 


by | 13^ Mi.-;- . r „7 

toe violence of the war.” • • j atr u ^ ^ 


cr 


TSpies, among Europeans. 


e sight of 12 

made by Kline from 1953 to 1961 
might cause certain ideas to be re- 
adjusted. The sight of 12 paintings 
by Rauschenberg, from 1955 to 

1961. wiD also come as a revelation 

to visitors who know these works 

only from reproduction, if at nil 
(Even toe owners had not seen 

them for 10 years, and they have 

never been exhibited together.) 

The many little works made by 
Oldenburg at the time of his cele- 
brated store-show are more famfl - 


__ — '-“1C 

The policy of representation iri | r Cs 

depth pays off well in toe group of j - ' v '^ *■ r "- 
14 Hg works by the Spanito! painter ! 

Antoni TApies. Dated between i 
1955 and 1959, these speak for the 
years in which Tkpies looked like ! 



but this grou 
just enough 
on walk 

enough 

make us 

embody both an idea of 

dignity and a discreet loathing 
the Franco re gime. 


DOONESBURY 


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Page 7 



’•t-.'-. <• V--J. 


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' ■** '*- ’ •i'.’TV. - . . 


\ APRIL 13-14, 1985 




/LEISURE 


Subway Surrealism and Canine Fortitude 



’ ora,y 

r> Offers 

md Desim 

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j% -Thomas Quinn Curtiss 

International Herald Tribune 

j:T> ARf$ — All that glitters in Luc 
latest long-distance 
•„ w b the ofiffiant de-. 
Alexander Traaaer that 
trpMfomm the world of onder- 
traffic into a " haunting 
itssmagoria. 

s scenic design has oma- 
- fafeaied such monoritolc morion 

y MOVIE MARQUEE^ 

■ ■ ■ ■■■■ 

^ftCture classics as "Les Enf ants du 
Hparadis" with, its picturesque repro- 
duction of the Boulevard du Crime 
ail 'the' L -T84fe'apd Joseph Loscy’s 
«rMr:. Klein" with irs stark portrait 
>of Paris under Nazi occupation. 

£ When the- New Wave ra ny jn. 
•Xnnincr, scorning its btaqt docu- 
mentary insistence. left for HoDy- 
^rood to create the lettiags for the 
films of Billy Wilder, Orson Welles, 
Fred Zinneraann and John Hasten. 
On the retreat or the New Wave be 
returned to France and has been a 
cinematic asset here ever since. 

“Subway" is ns bold as brass in 
its defiance of plausibility, but mice 
on its breathless way. who cares? 
Its preposterous rigmarole springs 
from a poor little rich heroine invit- 
bleached-blond burglar, 


for an expresstonislic drama. The 
awesome settings are peopled with 
an assortment of creeps given to 
s i nis te r grimacing The only mem- 

coastrain t^Jw^tcro as locomo- 
tor engineer smiling blandly from 
his cabin at the continuous uproar, 
Even Isabelle Adjani as the leading 
lady, once below street level, suc- 
cumbs to the face-making fever and 
distorts her features in ‘'register- 
ing” surprise, fear, disgust and af- 
fection. 

□ 

A film of extraordinary quality 
from Japan, “Antarctica/ has en- 
joyed a popularity that has sur- 
passed all at i r ix i a n cc records there. 

It is based mi reports of a scien- 
tific expedition to the antarctic 
wastelands a few years ago. An 
outpost was set up in the snowy no 
man Viand as a permanent bead- 
quarters, and when the initial ex- 
plorers were recalled a second team 
was scheduled to replace them. Se- 
vere weather made water and air 
transport impossible; the replace- 
ment group tamed back and the 
project was temporarily aban- 
doned. The sled dogs, trained and 
brought to the outpost by the initial 
team, were left behind, and it is 


battle with the seals — their me- recounted with a minimum of dia- 
anderings in the region and their logue, quickly, neatly and with an- 
returns to the camp in hope of ematic flair with a catch theme 
finding their quondam masters song, It was immediately an ioter- 
compose a moving saga. The mood national success. 


mg a 

flayed by Christoph? Lambert, to. their fate that the film treats. 


ler flat. He robs her safe and 
r ^ makes off with the loot to scamper 
and battle in underground stations 
for the ensuing hour and a half. 

The M&ro stops have been con- 
structed by Tra uner as foreboding 
surrealistic visions, the background 


Most of the animals died of ex- 
posure, starvation and mishaps 
during the iongwait; only a sturdy 
two survived The fortitude of the 
part- faced with extermination in 
the hostile wilds, their search for 
food — a graphic episode is their 


is that of an tale bylack London, 
and Koreyoshi Kurabara’s direc- 
tion communicates the cruelty and 
pathos of the story lo powerful dra- 
matic effect against the savage 
scene captured by photography of 
rare beauty. There is an excellent 
commentary in French by Robert 
Hossein. 

□ 

In "Les Sp&attstes.” Patrice Le- 
conte boisterous composition, we 
encounter a yegg who — with a 
disguised police detective as his 
companion — evades the law by a 
series of gymnastic feats. The ab- 
sconding pair scale mountains, 
cling from perilous cliffs and 
plunge into waterfalls. As a spec- 
tacular climax the detective dnves 
a gigantic tractor- trailer, smashing 
to smithereens a whole garage of 
autos. 

The robbery of a gambling estab- 
lishment with explanations of all its 
intricate details is claptrap and silly 
artificiality that has been through 
the movie mills too often. 

Bernard Giraudeux and Girard 
Lanvin are the acrobats of Le- 
conte's daredevil exhibition. 

□ 

Claude Lelouch founded his rep- 
utation with his early, sprightly ex- 
periment, M Un Homme et une 
femme" (“A Man and a Woman"), 
a slender but engaging love story 


Instead of following his tri 
with something equally simple, he 
soon decided to mm exceedingly 
solemn and “literary." It may have 
beat the auteur theory — the no- 
tion that every director must write 
his own material and dialogue. Be- 
fore long he was turning out swol- 
len films crowded with characters 
that had the air of television soap 
operas transferred to the large 
screen. 

His latest uy in this genre is 
“Partir, Revemr." and it is by no 
means the most boring of the lot 
nor does it match in extended run- 
ning time the one about the for- 
tunes of a family for three genera- 
tions, although it moves from the 
present to the Nazi occupation era. 
As is his recent wont, it contains 
many stars — among them Annie 
Girardot, Jean- Lou is Trintignant, 
Michel Piccoli and Franchise Fabi- 
an — and Rachmaninoff is plugged 
in to lend it tonal grandeur. 

But these elephantine exploits 
fail to reveal Lelouch’s genuine tal- 
ent as a cin&ste. The smaller form 
is his metier and he should engage 
an experienced dramatist to collab- 
orate on his scripts. Tor the auteur 
theory succeeds only if the author 
is a seasoned playwright 
□ 

“Le Th£ A la mentbe" of Abdel- 
krim Bahloul has novel charm and 



Exhibition Explores Disturbing Visions 
In Art Works Done by Mental Patients 


Adjani in the Mfctro. 

humor that are bringing it consid- 
erable success. It is a milieu sketch, 
but sufficiently diverting to hold 
the attention for 90 minutes. Set in 
the Algerian ghetto of Paris, the 
Barb&s district, it tells of a young 
man, come from Algeria in search 
of fortune and become a petty 
thief. He writes to his mother of the 
great things be is accomplishing in 
the French capital. Sic comes to 
Paris to discover the emptiness of 
his boasting and gets him on a 
homeward-bound plane. Its direc- 


By Sharon Cohen 

The Associaied Pros 

C HICAGO — The hand is 
open and upright. It looks re- 
alistic except for one thing: the 
human eye staring out from atop 
the middle finger. 

The drawing is more than 50 
years old. Only one fact is known 
about the artist: He was insane 
The untitled work by Berthold L. 
— or L. Berthold, not even his 
name is certain — is one of about 
370 pieces of art created from 1890 
to 1920 by patients in European 
asylums and being shown for the 
first time in the United States. 

They are creations of fantasy 
and fear, magical visions of mon- 
sters and imaginary kingdoms and 
more mundane drawings of sol- 
diers and saints. 

The people behind the works, 
gathered around 1920 primarily by 
Dr. Hans Prinzhorn of the Univer- 
sity’ of Heidelberg Psychiauic Clin- 
ic, had a common bond. 

"They tend to perceive them- 
selves as . . . bring acted upon by 
outside forces they can't control” 
said Reinhold Heller, acting direc- 
tor of the University of Chicago’s 
Smart Gallery, where the art is dis- 
played. 

The prisoner motif is ever-pre- 
sem: drawings of barred windows, 
people in hospital beds and stem 


tion and acting have an appealing guards. One untitled picture shows 
sincerity that is winning it audi- thousands of tiny crosses over an 
races. outline of plates and a spoon, a 


Awareness of Art Is Spreading to New Areas and Unusual Publications 


International HeraU Tribune 

F i AR1S — Art awareness has 
been spreading fast in the past 
decade. It has extended to large 
sectors of Western society previ- 
ously unconcerned with it and 
reached new geographical areas. It 

SOUREN MELDOAN 

now encompasses the most rarefied 
aspects of art, previously of interest 
only to a handful of specialists. 

The new .interest is increasingly 
making ilsdf fdt in the media 
where an is becoming news and has 
left a deep imprint on publishing, 
A new generation of art hooks 
has sprung up. The ’60s were given 
to broad generalities — such as 
“Flemish Painting" or “Islamic 
Art.” The ‘80s arctiic age of narrow 
focusing. The auction nooses have 
been the spearhead of the new 
trend, with Sotheby's taking the 
lead and spawning a new publish- , 
j ing bouse, Fhihp W3saa Publish- 
■i era. It is bringing out titles that 
would have been, unthinkable m . 


commercial publishing before 
1980. 

A typical instance is “Deccani 
Painting" by Marie ZebrowskL The 
lamhty Shuicued book covers the 
school of miniature painting on pa- 
per that developed in the Islamic 
and Hindu circles of the central 
Indian region under the impact of 
Tr an ran cultural influence. The 
book is a rewrite of a doctoral dis- 
sertation, hence the joint participa- 
tion of Philip Wilson Publishers 
and the University of California. 

Last year, Philip Wilson, the son 
of the late Peter Wilson, the man 
who built Sotheby’s into a world 
giant, went one step farther in the 
way of ratified scholarly publish- 
ing. He published the catalogue rai- 
sonnfi of Baron Hans Heinrich 
Thyssen-Bo memisza’s collection of 
Renaissance and Baroque objets 
(Tart. The authors are Anna Somers 
Cocks, an assistant keeper at the 
Victoria and Albert Museum, and 
. Charles Truman, formerly attached 
to the museum and now an expert 
for Sotheby's competitor;- Chris- 
tie’s. 


al monastic mediation cells. 

The museum’s centerpiece is its 
replica of a Buddhist temple, or 

ported \ry four interior IxJ&mns 
that symbolize the four directions. 

T ppiflg, light streams down from 
a cupola. One wall forms a four- 
tiered altar for displaying numer- 
ous sacred objects, such as prayer 
wheels and gilded statues of multi- 
limbed religious figures. 





Monastery RepUca Provides 
Aum of Tibet on Stodxn Island 

By Rick Hampson 

The Associated Press 

N EW YORK — Jacqueline 
Klauber, who had never been 
to Asia, decided to build a replica 
of a Tibetan Buddhist monastery to 
house her Tibetan art collection. 

She knew the kind of site she want- 
ed: hDly, isolated, tranqufl. 

- She found it on Staten Island. 

“She wanted to create a totally 
. self-contained Tibetan environ- 
ment here on Lighthouse Hill," 
said Rod Prciss, assistant director 
of the museum Klauber founded. 

The Jacques Marchais Center for 
Tibetan An is believed to be the 
only museum in the Western Hemi 
sphere devoted to Tibetan art. 

Klauber, who used the name Jao* 
ques Marchais, “was planning to go 
to Tibet herself, but she wanted to 
establish this museum first," Prciss 
said. However, she died in 1948 at 
56, six mouths after her mu se um 
was finished. 

The center’s buildings, terrace 
and garden sit on the side of a steep 
hM, isolated from the rest of its 
residential neighborhood by stone 
r walls and thick foliage. The com- 
plex offers a view, framed by pines, 
of lower New York Harbor. 

Klauber endowed her mon astery 
with everything Tibetan — - from 
orange trees to dogs, including 
a huge mastiff and a tiny. L has a 
Apso. The grounds contain statues 
of Buddha, as well as figures 
of elephants, carp and baboons. 

There is a lotus pond and sever- 


Nexi year, Wilson will be taking 
an even bigger plunge — the inte- 

odam collections in the Topltapi 
palace in Istanbul. These are major 
collections. In some areas such as 
Ming blue and white, they provide, 
together with the collections in (he 
Tehran museum, much of the dat- 
ing evidence that has allowed mod- 
ern scholars to build up chronolog- 
ical charts. Many pieces are of 
stunning beauty. But no publisher 
would have dreamed of giving the 
collections of one museum three 
volumes, with 4,500 plates, to be 
priced as a set al $695. 

The movement toward highly so- 
phisticated art publishing is now 
spreading to the Middle East In 
Kuwait, two young businessmen, 
Harvard-trained Samir al Khanna- 
diet and Usama al Kaukji, inspired 
by the hobby of a collector friend, 
Jasem al Humayzi, set up a pub- 
lishing company called TRL Its 
purpose is to produce the most rati- 
fied class of art books — facsimiles 
in an area of the world where the 
idea is totally new. 

Their first experiment was with a 
printed volume of the early 19th- 
century “Antiquities of Spain," 
which is an illustrated account of 
Arab monuments in Spain as they 
stood 150 years ago. for their sec- 
ond attempt, they will publish in 
May a facsimile of a Uth-century 
Arab manuscript from Syria illus- 
trated with 30 miniatures, a reprint 
of the unobtainable English trans- 
lation and commentary by a 19th- 
century scholar printed in London 
in 1851. It will be accompanied by 
an essay by a contemporary scholar 
on the nature and development of 
Arab painting, with a tentative ex- 
planation of its mysterious demise 
around 1400. 

They say that interest in art — 
not just Arab art — is wakening 


fast in the region, adding that their 
potential readership is as large in 
the Arab world as m Western cir- 
cles interested in Arab literature 
and art The text called the Sul wan 
al Muta fi Udwan al Alba, is a 
literary masterpiece much admired 
in past centuries. 

The spreading of highly sophis- 
ticated art pubnshnig is not the 
only indication of the internation- 
alization of the new art awareness. 

Evidence of the trend is provided 
by the spectacular transformation 
of the monthly color magazine pro- 
duced for one of the leading inter- 
national airlines, the Swissair Ga- 
zette. In September 1983, the 
magazine abruptly shifted focus 
from travel topics in a light fashion 
to a more serious tone. That month, 
the entire issue was devoted to met- 
allurgy and printing techniques in 
and ent China. The articles carried 
the signatures of respected schol- 
ars, Professor Gerhard Bayer of 
Zurich, a specialist in ceramic tech- 
niques, ana of various sinologists. 
The emphasis was on artistic illus- 
trations; a Tmg-yao porcelain howl 
with exquisite rvory glaze in the 
Perdval David Foundation in Lon- 
don, Buddhist paintings recovered 
from the Tun-huang caves now in 
the British Museum, and so on. 

The November issue dealt with 
African textiles, December covered 
the early stages of Italian ope 
Throughout 1984, the empfo 
was definitely on the arts, with 
some spectacularly fine issues such 
as the one covering Sicily, from 
architecture in ancient Greek times 
to the Sicilian school of poetry, 
including an excursus into Arab 
culture at the Norman court. 

In 1985, a brilliant issue on Pre- 
Columbian America with texts and 
photographs by the Swiss author 
Henri Stieriin inaugurated the year. 
In May, Swissair Gazette will nave 


a double first: The subject is the 
exhibition of Islamic art to open in 
Geneva on June 25, and tul the 
contributions, written by well- 
known scholars, deal with works of 
art only, excl uding monuments. 


editors seem to believe." She said 
people are wdl- traveled nowadays: 
“You can't just tell them about 
some place to go shopping in Par- 
is." They might know better ones. 

She therefore opted for culture 


The driving force behind the and history. “There is a dangeT that 
transformation of Swissair Gazette we may forget what was before us," 


manic repetition that “reflects the 
monotony of their life," Heller 
said. 

la other works, however, he said 
it would be difficult to determine 
that the artists were mentally dis- 
turbed. Most were diagnosed as 
schizophrenic. 

“In terras of technique and qual- 
ity, there's nothing to keep it from 
becoming classified as an," HeDer 
said, noting that Pablo Picasso and 
Max Ernst, among others, were im- 
pressed and influenced by some of 
these works. 

The exhibit will move to the Cor- 
nell University An Museum in 
New York after it closes here April 
21. It includes drawings, paintings, 
sculptures and textiles from Swit- 
zerland, West Germany, Austria 
and the Netherlands. 

Some were done on paper bags, 
orange wrappers, tissue paper, 
scraps of wooa. bread or whatever 
the patients could scrounge. 

“The Art of the Insane: Selected 
Works from the Prinzhorn Collec- 
tion" is pan of 5,000 objects col- 
lected by Prinzhorn, an an histori- 
an and physician in the 1920s. 
Utile is known about many of the 
patients. Few had any artistic train- 
ing. 

Though most were labeled 
schizophrenics, “you can’t diag- 
nose illness from looking at the 
art,” said Hairy Trosman, profes- 
sor of psychiatry at the university. 

Because schizophrenics Jose the 
ability to differentiate between 
themselves and the outside world, 
Trosman said, some works depict 
“a lot of bodily distortion" or naif- 
human, half- animal beasts that 
could be “representations of forces 
within one’s self." 

One painting by Franz Karl 
Buhler, a metals mi th known as 
Pohi, shows a Minotaur-like crea- 
ture with a human face, big eyes 
and horns on the top of his head 


entering a parlor with three butter- 
flies and a dog. 

Sexual images, pictures of saints 
and imaginary kingdoms — be- 
lieved to be an attempt by patients 
to create order in their lives — are 
other common themes. 

“Some schizophrenics believe 
they are saviors or have religious 
missions to perform," Trosman 
said. 

Images that reflect sexual long- 
ing or obsessions are not unusual in 
a life of confinement. Heller said. 

“in the an of the insane, one 
finds the capacity to release oneself 
from social constraints," said Hell- 
er. chairman of the university’s an 
department. 

Still. Heller said, most of these 
patients, who probably would be 
on a light medication today, bad a 
sense of what was going' in the 
world. 

“Much of the motifs of mentally 
ill people reflected popular 
thought,” he said, “but they traded 
to take them to extremes." 

Kool Festival to Feature 
Traditional Jazz; Blues 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Traditional and 
modem jazz, along with a dose of 
blues and special tributes, will be 
featured at this year's Kool Jazz 
Festival in New York. June 21-30. 

Avant-garde, modem and fusion 
jazz stars such as Chick Corea, 
Stanley Garke, Jeff Lorber. Bob 
James,’ Steps Ahead. Free Flight 
and David Murray will appear. 
There will be a Young New Orleans 
program, starring Wynton Marsa- 
lis, the Terence Blanchard -Donald 
Harrison Quintet and the Dirty 
Dozen Brass Band. Rhythm and 
blues fans can hear Ray Charles, 
Johnny Otis, Etta James' and John 
Mayali. 


she said. 

And why an, particularly objets 
d’art? “A 'magazine must attract 
readers first and foremost. I want 
the visual effect." 

There is, indeed, no better way erf 


into a cultural, highly art-oriented 
ma gazin e is Lydia I riimann , who 
has been editing it since the sum- 
mer 1983. 

The Gazette is an independent 
company commissioned by the air- 
line to produce the magazine. The getting it, while offering at the 
general lines of the editorial policy, same time unpublished material, 
such as the geographical areas on Great monuments may be well 
which the issues will concentrate, known to many, but the greatest 
are the object of an agreement be- objects are still barely known to 
tween the airline and the company mosL 
concluded at an annual meeting. That awareness of the fact 
But all the details, from the subject should have readied an airline 
matter to the selection of authors magazine that prints 350,000 
and the iconography, are deter- copies — freely distributed to 
mined by the editor. Marketing Swissair passengers but now also 
studies snow that Swissair reader- available to subscribers — is a tdl- 
ship is enthusiastic. ing sign of the biggest cultural 

Lehmann said, “I felt very change that has affected our sodet- 
strongJy that the readers are usual- ies on an international scale in re- 
ly much more intelligent than many cent years. 



15th BASTILLE 

JUNK FAIR 

April 18 - 28, 1985 

PLACE D’lTALIE 

Square de Choisy 
PARIS 

Dealers days April 1 6 and 1 7 
250 exhibitors 



250 ' 




BUCCELLATI 


! 4 Place VendSme ■ 

Paris I cr Tfl. 260.12.12 



Highly Important Paintings by Old Masters 
From an American Private Collection 


Auction to be held on Thursday, May 9 at 7 p.m. 
in our galleries at 
502 Park Avenue in New York. 

A Special Viewing of a selection of the paintings 
will be held at Christie’s in London, 

8 King Street, St. James’s 
from April '12,through April 16. 

The entire collection will be on view 
at Christie’s in New York 
from April 20 through April 24 
and also May 3 until noon on May 9, 1985. 

Fbr further information, please contact Ian Kennedy 
in New York at 212/546-1 177 
or Simon Dickinson in London at 01/839-9060. 



CHRISTIE’S 


How to participate: 

• Fill in the coupon below with the number 
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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 13-14, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 



Onm HR* Law Lott dig. 


India 1»3A9 1Z70A3 1357 29 126S48 + 1.99 

Trans 598-54 40ZJS 59078 59871 ~ X44 

UHI 15688 15470 15581 15SL8B + 0,16 

Coma 514-83 5TTJ0 511-67 515.11 + 044 


Previous Today 

High Law Close ]PJL 


Composite 10474 IMJ5 10443 10448 

industrial! 12079 m.55 119A5 11970 

Tronsp. 97-54 9771 9744 9772 

Utilities 5545 5539 5579 5544 

Finance 109.17 108.77 10874 10875 


Fridays 

NiSE 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Most Actives - ! 

VOL HWi LOW LO*»:088L 


Closing: 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


ZW 295 

292 243 

2S4 244 

786 782 

'22 24 

8 3 


171-69 24A87 
32572 25372 
248.49 207414 
255J3 20*44 
S444 21734 


NYSE Diaries 



Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

UNIIIMS 

industrials 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unc h ang e d 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


813 937 

494 433 

495 445 

2004 2035 

84 84 

9 10 


-Included In the sates figures 


Bay Soles -Shirt 

232439 441789 2387 

239.047 472.494 2.171 

242.176 486.1*7 5745 

2143*8 55*389 5388 

181771 439338 2775 


V0I.M4 PJft... — ttmwo- 

Prey.4PJH.voL 188760706 

Prev consolidated dose I1&645,1M 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 


Jn? 


Previous Today 

High Low Close JPJL 


Tables include me nationwide prices 
uptottM dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades else where. 

Via The Associated Press 


Industrials 20137 199.95 200J2 20070 

Tramp 15393 15260 15370 152-80 

Utilities fi-W *U9 ®3|3 01J2 

Finance 20.94 2038 3034 Ml 

Comooslle 19031 17932 180.19 10072 


4 PJW. volume 
prav.4PJVL volume 
Prev. cons, volume 


>£39-25! 

772O0M 

7320300 


AMEX Stock index 


jeDini (> 


Prev tow „ Today 

Low Close 3 PJH. 


High LOW oose J P-M. 

230.73 22937 23072 23075 


17 Month 
High Low StOCt 


sis. a om_ 1 

Dh#. vid. pe iQOsHion LowOwLOvge 


23% lev* 
19* 9* 

istra 10 

19Vj ISM 

43 % 24 (a 

20 Ml in 
25 lb 22% 

21 19 

Uh 8 % 
47% 444* 
27 16 

54 3644 

25% 16*8 

22 12 % 

10% 814 

17*11 15 
21 11** 
19% 8*0 

4!Vh 25V. 
12*4 6* 

14ft 8* 
42** 37V. 
58*. 52** 
35 15*. 

4V6 2% 

51 381* 

341* 13 
2 1 
32 26*4 

7% 6 

489* 57 
ea 56 
13** 11 
21 >4 9V. 

16*i RJto 

31 A* 2399 
32% 23V* 
361* 27V* 

32 17 
2614 20** 
89 V* 65U 
26*4 23 
28*i 10*4 
224* 15*4 
94*k 81 
31** 344* 
31*4 15*4 
4214 38V. 
62% 53V* 

109% 99 
1071ft 100*. 
231ft 114* 
591ft 38 
12% 5% 

344* 24 
27 30 

34*4 27 
39% 30*4 
271* 15lft 
a<u 32% 
331ft 22*. 
144 98V* 

2*4 IV. 
199* 151* 
70 53 

27*4 244* 
704* 53 
115 55*4 

26’A 19V9 
27V* 19Vi 
55*4 40V* 
244* 711ft 
48 36 

19** 16*4 
33*4 251* 
111* lift 
54 V. 43** 
29*4 18*4 
21*4 15V* 

44 W 25 

30 14 

305* 19** 
121ft 6 
St 51*t 
83% 5B* 

a* us 

621ft 46*4 
38 2614 

841* 67** 
78 52 

-130 1121ft 
381* 181ft 
5*4 3V* 


AAR .48 Li 14 
ASS 9 

AMCA 

AMF JO 24 44 
AMR 9 

AMRpf 2.18 106 
ANRpf 2A7 11.0 
ANRpf 2.13 10.9 
APL 39 

ASA 280 3J 
AVX J2 1J 11 
AbtLeft 1-40 ZB IS 
Accowd S At 28 10 
AcmeC AO 28 
AcmeE 33b 3J 10 
A do Ex 3-11012.7 
AdmMI 32 IS 7 
AdvSvs 531 5.1 17 
AMD 13 

Advest .12 IJ 

Aerflex 12 

ArtnLf 2J4 45 39 
AetLof 553el04 
Ahmni 120 35 20 
Alleen 31 

Alrprd 1 JO 25 11 
AlrbFrt AO XI 10 
AIMoos 23 

AloPpfA3J2 1X7 
AloPdof 57 115 
AloPpf 8.16 124 
AloPoi 828 135 
A lagSC 5 91 7J 11 
AlskAlr .14 3 9 

AlbrtOS 58 14 20 
Albtnns 25 13 

Alcan 12b 4.9 9 

AlcoStd 120 32 11 
AlrxAlx 150 14 
Atexdr 19 

AlloCo 2061 22 30 
AlgCPPf 256 11.1 
Alglnt 150 52 
AlginPt 219 115 
Algl pfClIJS 122 
AllgPw 270 85 9 
AllenG 50b XI 13 
AIIOC03 150 42 8 
AldCpof 424 105 
AldCp pfl200 11.1 
AldCpf 1329c 120 
AlldPd 

AtldStr 212 35 8 

AIII1O1 

AllsCpf 

ALLTL 154 6.9 9 
ALLTpf 254 5.1 
Alcoa 120 X5 11 
Amac 20 1.1 
AlMUCPf X0D 82 
AfflHK 1.10 35 15 
AHeSPf 350 27 
AmAgr 

ABoKr 8 

A Brand 190 52 10 
ABrd of 175 102 
ABrdPf 247 19 
ABdcst 150 15 14 
ABkfM 54 34 12 
ABusPr 54 24 15 
Am Can 190 55 11 
ACanot 200 112 

ACanpf xoo 65 

ACapBd 22Q 112 
ACapCv 1060 42 
A CertIC » 

ACvon 120 35 12 
ADT .92 32 27 
AE1PW 2340104 0 
AmExn 120 35 15 
AFamJI 44b 14 12 
AGnCp 150 32 9 
AGnlwt 

ACnl pfA628ell4 


341 18*4 

30 121ft 
16 111* 

18248 21 
1754 41** 
22 SSfe 
514 2414 

2 191ft 

77 9 

720 54V* 
147 171ft 
1443 50** 
277 23V* 
50 14** 
117 Blft 
29 14** 

3 17*4 

42 101ft 
4095 319* 

31 914 
14 I3V4 

8095 40ift 
34 SSV4 
198 34*4 

43 2*6 

221 481ft 
4W 194* 
124 1*4 

12 31 
34 71ft 
40z 64 

340z 644* 
8 12*4 
75 1914 
29 15*4 

253 JWSa 
5068 254* 

58 33V* 
154 294* 
130 22*h 
10 741ft 
509 24 
184 27 

254 m* 
14 917* 

2106 31*4 
34 19** 
3456 428* 
139 42*4 
14 109*4 
1 1031* 
20 22 ** 
484 SS14 
89 49* 

8 29 
72 26*4 
1 34*4 
1805 341ft 
497 18 

4 34-ft 
2697 30** 

1 1301ft 
115 2 

114 18 
430 48*4 

5 24*4 

6 49V* 
642 105 

13 2514 
1 26*4 

143 52** 
3 23*b 
1 46 
89 189* 
38 30 
16 814 

349 S4V* 
235 25 
1449 211ft 
2692 421ft 
357 27V* 
1724 301* 


ACnl pfB 5.90e 72 
AGn PfD ZM A3 
AHolst 

A Ho me 2.90 45 13 
AHoso 1.12 35 10 
Amrtch 450 75 8 
AlnGra M 4 II 
A I Go of 585 47 
AMI 72 19 12 
AmMflt 88 

ANtRss 222 35 12 
APresJd 70 U 4 
ASLFIa 4 

A5LFIpfX19 145 
ASMo JD 45 11 
Am Sid 150 55 11 
AmSIor 54 12 9 
AStr ptA 428 75 
AStrolB 480 124 
AT&T 120 57 17 
AT&T pf 354 95 
AT&T of 374 92 
AWatrs 9 

A Wot of 153 2.1 
AWat of 125 115 
AmHatl 258 11.1 9 

AT rPr SM 85 
ATrSc 

ATrUn 554 72 
Ameron 150 52 7 
Am esO s 20 5 18 

Amescl SM 57 
Ametek 5a ID 14 
Am toe 

Amfesc 4 

AMP* 72 22 17 
Am pec 20 22 10 
Amraps 8 

AmSth 150 55 8 
Amsted 150 45 12 
Anacmp 

Mates 18 


539 11*4 
57 55V* 
844 02** 
1444 60*4 


22V* 149* 
37** 30% 


27*1 13*4. 
67V. 351* 

3*2* 

48 53*4 

111* 4% 
79VS SOM 
33 241ft 

36V4 17 
961ft 40 
2J1ft 21Vs 
28V* 18V* 
16 8*4 

381ft 24 V» 
24 13V* 

21 ** 12 ** 
2BVft 19 
39** 259* 
4*k 1** 

SOW 199* 
30*4 1*14 
42** 24% 
12V. 99* 

231ft 16(6 
81*4 57*4 
581ft 45*4 
20 V. 13*4 
14*4 89* 

14** 9(4 
2*4 1ft 
19** 151* 
401* 50 
25** 21 
321ft 27* 
30 24 

39% 17* 

71 w a 

91*4 15** 
239* 14W 
91ft 23 
1011ft 79 
2J** 13% 

“ft 14 * 

I3V4 101* 
19*4 4*4 

2914 141* 
24 V* IS 1 * 
38 229* 

36 29lft 
34V* 19 
24% 1314 
24** 16 
23** 14 
329* m* 
31*. 20* 
421ft 339* 
39** 311* 
61V: 451* 
98 73 

251* 181* 
24 19*k 

S3Vft 40** 
38 321* 

125 97 

20 Tilt 
33*4 18*4 
4611 29Vft 
271ft 159* 
39** 73 
15** 10 
41 27 

25** 19’4 
30ft 18 


57 10 
2438 40** 
2228 32 

479 8414 
2465 718* 
1 123W 
1856 2494 
537 39* 

58 441* 

306 3214 
154 59* 

82 1314 
24 129* 
318 30 


181ft— 14 
12 — W 
111* + W 
201ft +19* 
411* +1 
201ft + 1* 

24 W— 9* 

191ft 

89* — V* 
54 —11* 
179* 

SO** + 1* 
22W + 9* 
141*— W 
B9h— 14 
16** + 1* 
1794 

10**— 1* 
3014— 114 
91*— 1* 
121*— 1* 
401ft 

5514 + S4 
34V*— ** 
2*4 
48*4 

19W— ** 
19*— 1* I 
3094 + 1* 
79* 

64 + V* 

449* + 1* 
12*4 + W 
191*— 1* 
159* + V* 
3094 + 1* 
241ft— 9* 
329*— % 
299* 

229* + 1* 
76V4- 1* 
25*4 

27 +1* 

19% + V* 
91ft + 9* 
314* + Vft 
191* 

42—14 
42 429* + 1ft 

081ft 1081* + % 
03% 1031ft 
22 22 
549* 55% — 1b 
4*4 6*4 

29 29 + 1* 

261ft 241ft—** 
34*4 3494 
34 341*— 4* 

179* 18 
34 341ft + 1* 

301ft M'A 
301ft 1301ft — 1ft 
2 

172*— 1* 
681* + Vft 
2494 

491* + V* 
IDS 

25—14 
2694 + 14 
5214 

239* + V* 
44 — V* 
189* + V* 
299k— W 
Blft— V* 
53V*— 1 

25 + 1ft 
21 **— 1 * 
4214 

249* + V* 
301ft + 14 
11*4 + 14 

82% +1% 
60*4 + 94 

8414 + *4 
719* + % 
12316— 14 


’ESS 

42 3714 
8 37% 
47 249* 


22 22 17 
28 22 18 
8 


18 

IAS 44 
122 32 20 
20 12 16 
24 2.7 12 
XOO 25 17 
1 340 42 
28 12 17 
24 J 14 
28 22 11 
rf 

tO.10 11.1 
’ 7A0 1X3 
245 104 
1 4.18 1X3 
320 132 
9-128 32 16 
255 

■140 2 IS 
X40 104 7 

3.58 1» 
10J0 102 

« u 1 

148 4.9 17 


Armen 
Acme of 2.10 
ArmsRS 48 
ArmWIn 120 
ArmW p! X75 
AroCo 12o 
ArowE 20 
Artra 22 
Arvlns 40 
Aiarco 
AshJOII 140 
AshlOpf 4J50 
Ash.O Pf X96 
AsdDG X40 
AsdD pf 423 
Amiane 140 
AICVEI 248 
AH Rich XOO 
AlIRcpf 329 
AHRenf 24Q 
AttOSCp 
Auoot AO 
AuroDt 

AVEMC 40 
A very 40 
Avlail n 
Avnoi 20 
Avon 240 
Avdkn 


120 10% 
3773 33*6 
407 14 
42 17 
34 28% 
828 35% 
4141 3% 

438 25*6 
344 22** 
35a 399* 

11 lie* 

25 20*6 

799 8194 
562 58*6 
240 14*6 
132 13** 
253 II** 
457 1*6 

429 199* 

1420Z 60 
2 25 
2 31*6 

10 29% 
84 29 
34 12% 

1589 20*6 
1747 24% 
34 2996 
270ZJ02 
113 209* 
2313 229* 
54 

9 11% 
1384 79* 

26 179* 
60 19% 

622 34*6 
2501 35% 
4 29*6 
96 14% 

12 24% 
400 20% 
304 25*6 
427 3016 

2 42*6 
14 3916 
506 5814 
2 93% 
4 19% 
448 24% 
3333 49 

11 Ox 34*6 
1 116 

If 14% 
919 21% 
242 44Y, 
1 2516 
438 33% 
38 14% 
1532 3QAt 
1144 21W 
67 21% 


10 BMC AS 4.1 31 
18% Balrncs JO 12 12 
TS BKrlntt .92 5J It 
18% Baidar Jt 1A 15 
% vl Baiau 

28% BallCo 128 2J 11 
11% BallvMf 20 12 
7% BollvPk 12 

mt BoHGE 320 7 A B 
34% Bolt DfB 4J0 107 
21 BncOne 1.10 18 10 
3 'A BanTex 

39% Bandog 120 22 11 
29 BXBo* u 5L2 5 
43 BkBMOfS.1%100 
24% BkNY 2JM 5.1 6 

15% Bnkvas 1J0 3.9 9 
14’A BnkAm 1J2 7.9 11 
40 BkAmpf S.lVellJ 


11 W BKAm Pf 288 

23% BkARtv 2AQ 7.9 11 

37** BankTr XJO 4.1 7 

1916 BkTrpf XS0 105 

7% Banner Me J 17 

19 Bard At 12 13 

18 Barn Go 40 U V 

33% Barnet 124 17 9 

19% Borvvtfr .60 XT 13 

.4*6 BAS I X ,la> 1J1 12 
17% Bouscfl .18 19 16 
11*6 BaxITr 27 2J 74 
17% Bov Fin 20 1 JO 39 
19% BarStG 140 82 9 
24% Beatec MO U t 
30% BecfnD 120 2J 16 
4% Better 

9% Baker Pt 1.70 142 
12% BeldnH AO 18 7 

22 BelHwl J4 1.9 9 
.22 BelMwpf 47 2A 

44 BellAII 4JU 80 9 
22% BCE g 228 
19% Beitind 22 U II 
37U, Be 1 1 So 5 240 7A 9 
3536 BefoAH 40 1J 22 
20% Bemls 140 16 11 

23 BentCc 220 5A 9 
30V- Benelol 420 1X4 

32 Benefpf 4J0 122 
17 Benefpr 2Jo 122 
3W BenglB Me 32 25 


7% BergEti 
31* Beni ey 
HP* BeUPd 
li'A BefhSn 


14 

30 

24 18 24 
A0 U 


3T* BelAStDfXM 118 


IK* BelhStpfS 
21 Sever! r 
19?* BlgTitr 
u% Bioctm 
17W Block D 


»V. Dirt HP 1.92 68 


37 01 ck HR 2A0 4J 14 

37 Boeing 1.40 22 0 

32 'ft Bailee 1.90 4.9 18 

4& BdtKC 01580 92 

15*6 BoltBer .10 A 29 


52 Borden 104 4.4 ig 


172 11% 
15 2916 

1380 16% 
■0 22 % 
220 1 % 
38 44*6 
1114 15% 
204 1116 
834 42% 
IMh *2 
208 29W 
251 3% 

27 SB- 
410 451* 

2 51% 
260 27% 
143 24 
1983 1916 
I 45*6 
10 72V, 
80 16% 
22 30*6 
437 64% 

4 23*6 
7 11 

455 29% 

5 21% 
218 49% 

173 21% 
141 12% 
491 24% 

3444 15% 
215 21 
24 31*6 
2315 30 
178 48% 
22B 5% 

H 10% 
14 13% 
272 28*6 
ID 2SW 
809 8516 
289 38% 

B 31 

1439 344* 
38 54% 

10 27% 
118 37% 

11 34% 
20Z 35% : 
I30z 20% 
243 6 

36 23*6 
77 5% 

384 1316 
594 T7% 

5 47% 
95 21% 

236 33*6 

406 23*6 
127 IS 
500 31W 
53 3216 
20 22 
197 53% 
2213 61 
2148 3716 
378 54 

12 24% 
150 69% 1 


30%— % 
64%— % 
23*6 
10% 

39% 

21% 

49% — U 
31% + *t 
12 + % 
24% + % 
15% 

21 + % 
31% + ** 
30 + % 

40% + % 
S%— % 
10 % — % 
13% 

28*6 + W 
3816 

15 + % 

38% + 1ft 
30% 

34% + *t 

5416 

37% + *4 
37% + % 
3416 + V* 
35% 

20% + *6 
6 +1* 
23% 

SH- % 
13 — W 
17% 

42%— % 
21 % — % 
33% — V* 
23% — % 
IB +\6 
21% — % 
3216+1* 
22 

53% +216 
40% 

39% ft % 
54 + % 

34% 

49H 


NYSE Up in Active Trading 


Untied Press Inrcrnatitmul 

NEW YORK. — Prices were slightly higher at 
ihe close of the New Yorfc Stock Exchange on 
Thursday in active trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which rose 
3.75 Thursday, was up 1.99 to 1,265.68 at the 
close. Advances led declines by an 8-7 margin. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. 

Stocks have had a strong bond market work- 
ing in their favor for most of the week. Open- 
market interest rates have fallen sharply in the 
past few days. 

But the reasons for those interest-rate de- 


clines — in particular, signs of a slowing U.S. 
economy — nave produced some mixed feelings 


economy — nave produced some mixed feelings 
among market participants. 

The government’s report Thursday of a sur- 
prise 1. 9-percent drop in retail sales during 
March, for example, got a rousing welcome 
from bond traders. 

While it helped send interest rates lower, 
however, the news also raised questions in many 
Wall Streeters' minds about the outlook for 
corporate profits and dividends. 

In Friday's economic news, the Labor De- 
partment said the producer price index of fin- 
ished goods rose 0-2 percent last month, main- 
taining a low level of upward pressure on 
consumer prices. 

The Amex said it set a new all-time volume 
record for the second hour of trading with 
1 1,888,620 shares, fueled by heavy block trans- 
actions in BAT Industries. 

The market was schizophrenic, said Trade 
Latimer, of Evans & Co.-On one hand, negative 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Sis. Ctase 

Dlv. YKL PE ICBsHlptl Low Qurt. Chita 


31*6 


21%- 16 


77 43 

KP* 1 
12*6 10% 
23% 14% 
31% 25% 
58% 43 
123 91 

4% 314 
30 21** 

17% 9% 
6 2% 
2016 14% 
39 38 

23*6 19% 
33% 29 
34*6 13 
30 22*6 

45% 26% 
40*6 23*6 
4M* 25% 
16 12 
19% 13% 
17% 15% 
21% 1416 
29% 23 
58*6 35 
7% 6% 
51% 44V* 
18% 12*6 
45% 47% 
20% 12% 
11% 3% 
15 10% 


888 11J 

1.17 11J 
1A4 112 
72 U 8 
120 52 8 
188 X3 16 
XOO 12 

38 

183*81 8 


122 72 24 
3.12 82 8 
247 10.9 
325 122 
20 12 9 
124 5.1 15 
128 25 16 
120 27 8 
AS L4 IS 
44 3.1 35 

j» 4A a 
2.16 122 

12 

144 45 19 
140 27 7 
JS 81 
5806112 
84 42 13 
280 4A 11 
52 28408 


2001 75 
21 10'4 
19 12*6 
211 21 % 
49 29 
1487 54% 
2 119 
2 4% 

97 27% 
44 1716 

S 2% 
19 

8 37% 
23 

15 32% 
539 20*6 
73 24% 
05 44 
629 36% 
158 34 
54$ 14% 
19 18% 
19 17% 
147 18 
27$ 25*6 
137$ 52% 
21 4*6 

1 51 
329 15 
841 59% 
87 18% 
88 4% 

4 11% 


75 75 +1 

10 10 — % 
12% 12*6 + 16 
2116 7116— % 
28% 29 + % 

54% 54%—% 
119 119 —4 

4% 4% 

24% 24% — V* 
17% 17% 

2*4 2*6 
18*6 18*6— 16 
37% 37% 

22 % 22 % — % 
31*6 3216 + % 
20% 20*6 
2416 24% + % 
43% 43%— 16 
34% 34% — % 
34 34 

1416 14%—% 
1816 18% + % 
17V. 17% + % 
17% 18 +% 

2516 25%—% 
51% 51*6— % 
4*6 4*6—% 

51 51 

13% 13% —1% 
58% 59% 

18 1816 
A 4—16 
11 % 11 %— % 


48 +1% 

11 

2316 


»=# 
31 — % 
35% — % 
93% — 1% 
24% — 16 
24*4— % 
10 % — % 
32% + 16 
13% + 16 
17 

28% 

35% 

3% + % 
2516— 16 
22 % 

39%— % 
11% 

20*6 

81% — % 
58M — 16 
14%- % 
13% — % 
1116— % 
1% 

.19 — % 

■48 

25 + % 

31%—% 
28*6— 16 
28% 

12*6 + % 
20% 

24 + % 

29*6 + V. 
102 + % 
20% — % 
21 % — % 


33% 24% CBI In !A0c 52 13 
11416 <8% CB3 320 25 18 4 
77% 48 CBS Of MO 1A 
8% 4% CCX 13 

5K* 27 CIGNA 3J0 52 49 

31 23% CIGpt 225 9A 

7% 4*6 CLC . 

48% 21% CNA Fh 15 

10% 8% CNAt MOollA 
4416 341ft CPC lilt 220 52 11 1 
2316 14% CPNH 140 67 9 
27% UM CSX 

4016 22 CTS 

12% 7% C 3 Inc 

33*6 22% Cabot 
1416 816 Caesar 
20% 11% Cal Fed JJ 17 7 
47% 32*6 CalFdpf 4J5 104 
23% 13% Call tin 29b 12478 

18*4 11% Camrnr .12 5 i 

3816 15% CRLkg A0 

9% 3% CmoRg .141 

14% 10*6 CDRpfB 250 
73% 5416 CamSp 250 3L5 11 
45% •28% CdPacg 1A0 
21% 14>6 CanPEa JO 
222 UQ Capa Is 20 20 


M0O 52 13 15$ 24% 24U. 24%—% 
100 25 18 4974 107 100% 103*6 +316 
M0 M 4 71 70 71 +116 

13 81 4% 6% 4*6 

250 52 49 841 49 48% 48*6— V* 


13 81 4*6 6% 4*6 

240 53 49 861 49 48% 48*6— V* 

225 94 34 2916 29 2916 

3 5% 5% 5% 

15 1$ 341ft 35% 3416 

MOollA 35 Wft 10% TOVft + 16 

220 52 11 1389 42% 42% 42% + % 

1A0 4J9 B3 20*6 20% 20*6 + % 

M4 4A 8 1184 24 23% 23% + % 

1-00 X9 48 34% 33*6 34%—% 
32 28 9% 9% 916— 16 

■92 13 9 98 27*6 27% 27% — % 

14 347 14 13*6 13*6— % 

J! 17 7 301 19% 19 19 — % 

4.75 I0A 103 44 45*6 45*4 — % 

25b 12478 80 19% 19% 19V* — % 

.12 S 884 14% 137* 13% 

A0 477 22% 2216 22% — <6 

.141 19 4% 4% 4% 

XSJ 1 11% 11% 11% + % 

23 u 11 44 49% 48% 59 + % 

1A0 242 44% 43% 43% + Ift 

JO 116 20% 20% 20% 

■20 20 385 203*6201 203*4 *216 


48% 30% CapHJd 1-54 X3 11 191 47% 47% 47% — 1ft 


14% TO Carinas AS 


154 10% 10*6 10% 


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economic reports bode well for interest rates. 
Yet investors are also worried about the earn- 
ings of individual high-profile companies. 

“They want it both ways,” she said. The 
market continued to be highly speculative, with 
Lrading focused on takeover and rumor stocks, 
especially in the oil sector. 

“The market is indecisive and lacks leader- 
ship,” said Alan Ackerman, of Herzfeld & 
Stern. 

“We're in a changing economy, with conflict- 
ing attitudes about whether or not we’re headed 
for a recession, and whether or not the Fed will 
tighten credit," Mr. Ackerman said. 

Also, the market is still facing its dollar di- 
lemma, he said. 

“We are still base- budding." be said Mr. 
Ackerman said he believes the long-term trend 
is up and that interest rates will remain near or 
below current levels. 

“A recession does noL appear in sight;” be 
said “There are selective buying opportunities 
that later this year may prove to have been 
attractive for investors with patience.” 

“The market is just in a stagnant period” 
said David Polen, of David M. Poles & Co. , 
“Traders are looting for some direction.” 

IBM's earnings announcement “created a 
question mark in people's minds as to the direc- 
tion of corporate earnings for the next six or i 
nine months," he said ^ 

“People are not clear on what lies down the 
road There doesn't seem to be a tremendous 
number of reasons to selL but then again, where 1 
are the reasons to buy,” Mr. Polen said 


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35% — *6 42% 30*4 IdahoP 328 73 8 78 <2% 42% 42% + % 33% 21 MAPCO 180 XI 8 1001 32% 33% »6— 16 ^ U- 

15*6 22% 13% IdaalB 57 15% 15% 15% +.V6 4% 3 Marntx 

10 — % 25% 17% IIIPDWT X44 I0J 4 129* 24% 23*6 24*6 + % 2% Mara* . -6T „ „ . 

20*6—% 18 13% UPow pf 2JM 12A 22ftt 14% 16% 14%— % 35(4 . 19*6 MarMJd 1A0 *3 8 :445 34% «% M +16 

1£% + % 19 14% llPowpf 2.13 11J 300x 18 18. 10 +1 51% 40*6 MarM pf 528*108 SOW » 

57(6 + % 40 .m* Marian 32 J 39 su 3ȣK .... 

27% + % . 28% 27V. Marin wl 3 29% »% 39% +1 

26?*— % ■ 12% 9% MaricC 22 X3 - 41 -9*6. W4 9% + M -“.A .. 

To Our Readers -i 

1S% + % Because of the seven-hour time difference iS* 3 S* mSttk .« um xn 11% ia% in*— % -j.~- - 

between New York and Paris until April 27, 

^ some items in the Market Summary above are ^ ^ « «. 14 ^ ^ 4 rz.-~ 

from 3 P.M. New York time instead of the usual a? + S : ' r 

aw— u, 4 p^i. Also because (rf the time difference, ao% st% m^,e 23r a n sst sr* 57% sm-a : 

19** + % some other items dsewhere in the Business 5S Steffi 4 ^ n *2 ’St T St ''St u. — - 
StZ it Section are from the previous day’s trading. We 32% i«* Jr 23a xi 131 3i aP“ •_ _ 

t a regret the inconvenience, much is necessary to 49% w* moyos mb 19 w ww u %% m +1% 

jr , + £ JlL Aicfrthiifvm rMtinrpmmtC 49% 36%-Moyta 2A0 d5A 10 34 48% 48(6 48V. -— 

« — « meet aistnuunon requirements. 37% 25% Mcorpt 220 79 : 1 77* 27*4 37*4— % - -. " ■ . 

™ „ — : ; — 23 20% McOr pf 240 1TJ ~ 24 71% 2T% 21% + % 

55* T S 31% 23% McDftrt 180 47 T7 227 27% 24% 24% — 16 

32% 25(6 llPowpf 378 122 1300x31 31 31 +1 10% 6V. McDW 20 22 If 15 9V. 9% 9%.+ % , , , 

33% 25% llPowpf 4JM 125 1 32 32 32 + J* 42% <•' % McDtR I 82 . 1A U 8011 40% 59*6 59% 

34(6 21(6 mWl M 15 M 240 34(6 34 34 84% 47% McDnO 1J4 2A 9 717 74 75% 75% + V* I.... 

3W. 27*4 Impawn wig XI 9 857 37% 37 37% + % 44% 31% McGEfl 280 XI 100 517 44% 44*6 44*6 .. - ■ 

9% 5*fc ImsICp 13 99 9% 8*6 8%— (6 48*6 34 McGrH 1A0 38 14 034 44% 44 44% + % 

14% 8% INCO 20 1A 5485 1416 U 14 — % 38% 19*6 Me Into 56 38% 37% 38% + % 

17*6 14 InalMPf X15 125 13 17% 1716 1716 + V* 451ft 32*6 Me Km 2A0 58 12 111 43*6 43 43% + % 

15(6 W% IndLMpf 225 128 ’ ’3 17% 17% 17% + % 15% 1® McLaan 8 47 12% 12*6 12** — ■ - - 

25** 20% IndfMpf 275 105 395 25V6 25% 25% 6% 3*6 Mcl/a wT 311 4(6 4(6 4(6— H ' - 

38% 17% IIK0GS8 151 72 4 93 34(6 24 MV. + (ft 27% 19*6 McNgO 20 32 7 14 27 2SB. 27 - VI ” 

15 5% Inncea .14 28 235 4% 6% 6%— 16 41(6 27% Mgad 120 XT I 3448 38% 37% 38% + % • - 

24V, 13V, infmte , 24 1215 2114 2B(ft 21% + % 24% 13% Atasrux 3A 1A 10 M44 1716 14% 17 . ' “ ' 

50 35% InoerR XiO 5J IT 232 45% 45% 45*6 34*6 24% Medtm .74 23 9 1471 30% 29% 30% +116 77 

37% 27*6 InoRPf ZX 73 9 31% 31% 31%—% 51% 33% Malian ■ 158 55' 9 102 48*6 48% 48*6 + 16 . - 

15% 11% IngrTae 84 4A 20 7 12(6 1? 1216-+% 27 22% Mallon pf250 10A 51 26% 24(6 24% + (ft i.Z :~ i - 


35*6 21% fCIndS 130 18 12 

19*6 14% ICMn 

1181 5*6 ICN 

30 22% ICN pf 270 98 

1716 14 INAUl M2 1X9 

25% 23 IPTMin 

20V, 14% IRT Prs 1A0 82 7 


33% 33% 33% + % 53% 38% MocY 1.14 ,2A 11 

17*6 17% 17%— (A 42 34 Mocvpf 425 18 A 

30$ 11 TO*4 10*6—% 19% 11%. MadRa* , 

12*27% 27V. 27% + (6 39*6 24 Mcoiq 180 28 4 
4 16(6 16% 16% — (6 29% 3 MatAftt 1880c 

143 24% 24*6 24*6 23% 12% Manilla J0b. 28 70 

41 19% 19** 19% + % 21% 13% MontlNt 25 1A 19 


l.TA X8 11 2242 44*6 44 <4(6- Ml 

425 18A 401 41 41 41 + W 

Um 12(6-12% + % 

180 22 4 2» 35V. 34% * 

B80c 4 -3(6 3% 3% 

20b 28 70 37 H% 14% 15% + % 

to 14 19 47 20(6 20 » 


40% 20% ITT Cp LOO 22 12 3844 34% 34 34** + % 24% 11 . MaHTCl .16 A 24 235 ^ 24% » f % 
44 40 ITTPtK 480 65 ' 7S 51*6 61 41*6 + *6 41% 22% MfrMan 320 BA .5 1515 37% 34*6 » + (6 


63% 44% ITTpfO 580 8A 

49% 28 ITTpfN 225 48 

67% 42% ITTpfl 4JD 7.1 

21*6 15(6 IU inf 120 78 44 

42% 30*6 IdahoP 328 77 ft 

22% 13% IdaalB 


17 59*6 59 59*6 + % 

S 44% 44% 44% 

23 43 42 43 +1 


120 53 53 33 +1 

89 50V* 50% SBVft— (6 

237 7% T 7 
43 22(6 21% 22% + % 

R»1 32% 32(6 32(6— (6 


25% 17% IlIPWWr X44 10J 6 1294 24% 23*6 24% + % 

18 13% llPowpf 2JM 12A 220x14% 16% 14%— % 

19 14% llPowpf XU 1TJ 30Qx 18 18. 10 +1 


•*.*■■* *VI 

.445 34% 33% 34 +16 - 


50 +% 

5*6 +1(6 


To Our Readers 


33% 22% Masco M M 15. 
13V. 7(6 ManNr 20 1A .15 
20 15% MosM 180 9J 12 

3% 2 MasayF 
27% 20% MosCp 288 107 
11*6 9% Maslnc 122 11A 


84 22 10 157 10*6 
183 37 14% 


485 <8% 
224 TO 


2A2 9.1 


106 

1.92 42 

15 

53 

84 X7 

9 

967 

120 4J 

8 

13 

425 1X3 


1007 

180 X8 

35 

20 

85e J 


M 

122 XS 

9 

25 

24 18 

8 

2325 

88 23 

V4 

20 

80 X4 

14 

101 

1A1 1X9 


29 

JO A 

17 

154 


15 

B4 

.16a A 

12 

1 


X16 82 10 710 
A0 2A 13 25 


Because of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris until April 27, 

■ some i tems m the Market Summary above are 
from 3 P.M. New York time instead of the usual 
4 P.M. Also because (rf the time difference, 
some other items elsewhere in the Business j 


A2 22 18 
A0 XI 
220 61 11 


ZAO 52 3 6348 


124 112 27 

1A4 25 14 103 
A* 28 15 3402 


48—16 

7% 

28*6— V6 
30% + % 
22*6 + % 
25%— % 
51 +1 

34 + *6 

35 — (6 
20V» — Vft 
37% 

30% 

12 % + (6 
30% 

27 — % 
38% 

25%—% 

17 

5% + % 
18(6 + Vft 
19 
St 

44 + (6 

12 


32% 25V6 llPowpf X78 1221 1300x 31 31 

33% 25% llPowpf 480 1X5 1 32 32 

34(6 21(6 ITWs A4 15 14 240 3416 34 

39(6 27*6 UnpChm 151a XI 9 857 37% 37 

9% 5% ImnICp 13 99 9% ff 

14% 8% INCO 20 1A 5485 14(6 14 
17*6 14 InalMPf X15 1X5 13 17% IT 

1SV6 K% InalMPf X2S 1X8 - -3 17% 17! 

75% 20% IndfMpf 225 107 395 25(6 251 

28% 17% iMflGaa 188 72 4 93 24(6 26 

15 5% Imnteo .14 28 235 4% 4= 

34*6 >3(6 infmte 


t300x 31 31 31 +1 

1 32 32 32 +36 

240 34(6 34 34 

857 37% 37 37% + % 

99 9% 8*6 85ft — (6 

5485 14(6 14 14 — % 

13 17% 1714 1716 + 1* 
- 3 17% 17% 17% + % 
395 25(4 25% 25% • 

93 34V. 24 241ft + (6 


75% 7$% + Vft 


58 38% 37% 38% + % + 


Al- 


235 4% 4% 65ft— 16 

24 1215 2114 30 (ft 21% + % 


35% IngorR 2A0 5J IT 232 45% 45% 45*4 


37% 27*6 InoRPf 225 73 

15% 11V* Ingi-Toc J4 4A 20 

27% 19% InldSIl 30 XI 


AS 72 11 
184 3A 83 


15% + *6 
9% + % 
28% + % 


t’2 ^ 

— vr 


f:: 


27% ' 19% InldSIl JO XI 107 23*6 

<816 38% InldStpf 42$ 108 7 44% 

21*6 14 InsllCO 180b 52 10 309 19% 

11(6 3% InspRs 1119 5*6 

24% 11% infgRsc 9 1743 24% 

30(6 19 IntaRpf 383 11A 240 28 

5416 42 IntaRpf &58oI4J 25 45(6 

37% 25Vft IntaRuf 425 124 214 35% 

13(6 7V. llltRFn 117 34 12% 

19 15% HcpSa XIOallA 41 18% 

. 45(6 55 Intarca 388 48 11 232 43% 

140 120 Intarpf 7.75 S3 _ 111134% 

I 14% 9% intrfit 


9 31% 31% 3!%— % 

20 7 13(6 13 1216-+% 

107 ZM 23% 23% 

7 44V* 43% 44% + (6 

10 309 19% 19% 19% 

1119 5*6 5% 5*t + % 

9 1743 24V* 23% 23% — % 

^ 5%Sf5S=-tt 
87 2 £ St 3% 

41 18% 18% 18%— Vk 

11 232 43% 43% 43% + V* 
_ 111 134% 134% 134% + % 


rt 311 4(6 4(6 4(6— H 

JO 22 7 14 27 24% 27 — VI 

120 XI ■ 3448 38% 37% 38% + V* 

3* 1A Iff M44 1716 14% 17 

J74 X5 9 1471 30% 29% mi +1(6 

XA0 SL5 * 9 102 48*6 48% 48*6 + (6 

1280 10A 51 24% 24*6 24% + U. 


45% 30*6 Matvtll 1A4 3A 12 1047 4216 42 42V6 + % 

44*6 4016 MarcSt 120 22 TO 87 54% 53% 15*6—% 

109% 7816 Marck 320 XI 15 1074 102*6 101% 101%— 1ft 
48*6 40*6 Mcnffli 180 1A 15 34 44 43% 43% — *6 

34% 22 Mart-yn 80 27 29 2S7T 30*6 29% 30% + 16 

3% 2 ManOf 450 2% 2% 2% 


rw 

* -! '\c t 


ss sr 


MwaO# 

Mesa Pi 

MasaR 133M33 
M«ab JSall.l 


5 1743 19V* 18% 19V* Hh% 
15 3816 38 38 


AO SJ 5 '1253 TOW, l. 

•41 ' Intiik zm XI 8 144 51 50% 50*6— 

> wiiitmtar-f?: 122 9% » - 9*6— 

24% 14% IfflAtu 72 XT 9 11 m TOHf 11% r 
11816. 99 IBM 4A0 3A 12 9S10Q8 124% 128 +1 


2B%— % 
32 + % 


57% 45% MtEpfl XO 14.1 

fSH&ES CKUi 


152 7% 


k r{j w V-- '- v 

IS £*=- Tixiu 

t— % \; r <: n - 


mmm* m 


24% 15% InfCM 80 TA 10 34 21(6 
29% -22* I rtf F lav 1.12 41 15 tot 27* 


GAF -15e J 12 277 
GAP pf 120 XI 19 
GATX 120 3J 13 80 

GCA 12 Ml 


31% + (6 
3*Vi— (6 


UVft .5% InfHarv 
TO -2* IntHrwt 
50 23% intHpfC 

43 20*6 IntMpfA 

34*6 17% IntHpfD 


GEICO 180 1A 11 

GEO 

GFCP 


XM 77 7 2684 


GTEpf 2J0 78 
GTEpf X48 112 



Ganett 1A8 X5 Zl 537 


30%—% 
25% — % 
73*6 
5% 

7 + % 

40(6 + % 

35% — % 
22 + (6 


34 21(6 20* 2XV6 + (ft 
904 27* 27% 27%—% 
5504 9(6 8*4 9 — (ft 

450 *% 5*6 S%- (6 

31 47% 44% 44*—'% 
5 35V. 35 35(6 + (6 

75 28*6 27(6 2516—% 
239 40% 40(6 40% +% 


52* 30(6 MWcon 224 47 10 1279 50% 49% 
14% 9(6 MfOSUI 178 1X8 S 4440 14(6 1 13* 


43*ft 32% InNVUn 2A0 4A 12 239 40% 40(6 

29% 23 IntMutt 174 42 9 ■ 5 28% 28% 

57*6 44 InfPapr 240 48 34 1509 50(6 49% 


17% 9(6 Inf Res 


79 13% 12% 12%—% 


54% 32*6 IntNrth 2A8 52 0 3149 49% 44% 47 —2% 


WVi 82(6 intNtpf BAB 9A 


GooSIr M 2.1 14 18 

Gearilf AO 3A 17 245 

Gelco JA X9 15 59 

GamllC 149 

Gem II I 271 

GnCorp 1 JOb 32 MS 1845 

GAJnv IA3§m 50 

GnBcsh L00 24 8 1 

GCfnms A0 12 10 289 

GnOatS 1ft 295 

GnDvn 180 1J I ® 

GanEI 220 37 12 3058 

GnFfls 2J0 4.1 10 400 

GGtil n AOa 9A 7 . 

GnHma 10 25 

G Hosts JO 22 3 347 

GnHous 24 X3 31 29 

GnllMf JO 28 17 387 

Ga Mills 224 48 34 -757 

GMot 580T 48 5 3577 

GMEn ,10a J 818 

GMofpf 5SB 9.9 4 

GNC .14 22 22 71 

GPU 4 1736 

GanRe 7J4 28 22 1583 


58V6 + %1 ,k 126 InmtpfJDJO 

rf™ * I JAU, Tf\t. InhMln 1 M 




GnSkml 180 42 II 544 


GTFIPf 12S 108 200X 

GTFlpf IJOll.l 42te 

Gansco 12 48 

GnRad .10 ■ A 25 483 
Genii a 180 241 

GtnuPf 1.18 32 15 747 

GaPoc 80 X4 23 995 


Gap ofB 12< 42 
QaPCpfC224 tA 13 

GaPwnf 3A4 1X1 33 

GaPwpl X76 12J 4 

GaPv.pl X54 12A 3 

GaPwpf 2J2 124 1 

GaPwpf X75 11.1 3 

GaPWPf 780 130 - 2301 

GertlPl 1.14 39 11 335 

GarbSS .12 A 14 251 
Giant P 59 

GBwFn 5 1540 

GlffHIII 32 2J0 20 OOi 

Gillette X4Q A3 12 1174 

GfnsC 84 

GlotHM 24 SA 450 
GIObM PfSJO 17J 100 

GMNus 53 1055 

GMNwt 04 

GWWF 20 3 8 14*1 

Gdrfcti 186 52 12 432 

Gaodyr 140 U I 2484 

GordnJ J2 X3 II 24 

Gould AS ZB 61 3075 

Grace 280 48 10 243 

Grolngr 12* 28 13 34 

GtAFst A0 24 9 294 

G1AIPC 0 422 

GHJcin 180 22 11 294 

GNIm 1 Ale 102 7 3 

GtNNk 182 62 I 4QJ 

GIWFIn 88 12 11 2573 

GftVHSP 45 143 

GMP 172 1X9 ■ 40 

Greyfi 120 aa 10 4o4 

Gravbpf 42S 107 UOz 



23* 

11% + % 

•19 + % 

10%— % 

11% 

45 + *6 

14%— H 
41% + % 
29*4 + % 
13% — % 
48% + % 
59% + % 
4116 + % 
4%— % 
7% 

13% — 16 
10%— (A 
17*6— (ft 
54%— (ft 
73% 

43% + % 
50*6 

7%— % 
12 % + (6 
74*6 + *6 
12% + % 
43% + % 
11% 

11*4 

5%— (ft 
14*6— % 
20% — % 
32 — % 
22V.— % 

34 — % 

35 

24 V. — % 
29% + % 
20(6 — % 
20% 

24% 

40 — % 
29% + % 
18*4— (ft 
11% + Vft 
10% + 16 
24 +1% 

40 + % 

«* + % 
4(6— % 
20(6 
12% 

3 

30*4 — % 
30(6— % 
27 


40% 27% IntpbGp 180 23 13 

17% 10 Irtfflafcr 

20 15* intsfPw 1J0 *J 8 

19% 14(6 lawaEI 1.90 108 • 

30 21% lewllG 274 92 7 

30% 17 lawlllpf 221 118 

32(6 25 lOMVRf 100 97 B 

34* 24 Ipalco XM 82 0 

13% 9*6 IpCoCp 24 38 II 
35% 23% IrvBki Ml 14 7 
34 42*6 IrvBkpf XMalXl 


1701 V0 90 90 

7 145% 144 144 —4. 
35 40% 40 40 

111 14% IS* 14% + % 

17 19% 19* 19*— 1ft 

241 19 10% 19 

94 30% 29% 29% 

100X 19% 19% W%— *6 
» 32 31% 31% 

453 35 34*6 34* + % 

80 11% 11% 11% +.16 

3S4 34(6 35% 34 + *6 

150 50* 50*6 50* + % 


+ £ 14% • 916 MtoSUt 128 1X8 

“ S 2?* IZ 1 * «WR« 180‘ 58 

— «• 28% 22 MWE X48 92 

- V6 17% 11l6.MIHnR A4 32 

-Jf 84 70% MMM X50 4A 

+ % 33% 23*6 MlnPL 226 BA 

— ft 19% 4% MtmllH 

+ % 30% 15 MOPSv IJSbtfJ 

- 21 17*4 MBPS pf 2A4 118 

+ % 2216 18*6 MoPSpr 2A1 I1J 

- % 34% 28*6 MOPS pf 4.12 12A 

-2%. 8 4 Mltal 


180' 58 25 17% im 1 

248 92 10 91 38 27% ? 

At 33 TA 14 13*6 13% 1 

X50 4A 13 3089 80% 78* 7 

226 BA 8 28 33 32*6 3 


31* 23% Mobil 228 7 A 10 3494 


SSS5 3 sr* 

80 4% 6% Wx- Vft 


-V6 — — -.-TC4 

-3 ■-■■•! ’--t-DsI 

-% -. Mr. K 

^ -6 _ ,• . 

+ vk — ‘ *.V! r 


: C':,-!t3JDPd OB 


» V^WAMblHT ' -41 ^ 

AO U» 4W 2Hft 27* 4%7% 

u 4% MOltkDt » 4* 4*6— (6 

2* 1*% Monreh 80 58 25 3 U% 14 14. + % 

S S* 5JSH7.* ** > 4044 43% 42% 42%—* 

32 24 MntOU 2J4 88 9 75 32 31% 32 

MonPw 200 93 10 265 71% 2T% 21V, 

’S? 1JOo,n - 2 24 17% 17% 17% + (6 

MO NY 88 98 8 5? 9 8%9+H 

2S 3£S'!5SS™f 48 12 Isa 5m* so so*- % 

2£t JSS 18i 41 M 230 »* 25% 23%— * 

ZP4 23Vr McrM pf 230 92 1 27 77 Z7 — * 


195 4* 6% Mi— % 


IfiS “otiose AO IA II 484 28% 27% 21% + (6 
4* MOPkDt _ __ 2040 4* 4% 4*4- (6 


Curren 


3 14% 14 T« + % 
4044 43% 42% 42%—% 
75 32 31% 32 


,=. w > :rt 'flu. 

'r-t-rrzr- L .-.trii 


fEi K? r9n 3 ^ 45 a 17B9 48% 48% 48% + % 


30* 20 JWT J 1.12 3J 13 152 2916 28% 29 + % 


34% 23% J River J4 X) 1 
24% 13% Jamswy .12 A 18 
13% 10* JapnF 1A4S128 _ 


2054 24* 24V. 3*%—% 
39 22V. Zl* 21*6— % 
193 17% 12 13 , 


5S? 9S 20 81*6 81* 81* + % 

SS S nrK, I! J X7 10 109 39% 38% 39% + * 

W6 18% Moms 80X8 13 45 711ft 71 21 — * 


26* JOffPI* 1J2 3A ft 1347 39% MV& W*— % 


12, MtBRtY 121a 8J 11 135 20% 19% 20% . V; ■ 

212 §2 saw.* 4!«BeSSasSK»ifi ; s 


29% 24% Jorc pf 480 1X8 
» 47 JerCpf .880 142 

57 ASh JerCpf 788 143 
16% 12* JerCpf X1B 1X8 
9% 5% Jowtcr *' _ 


150x 29 27* 29 +1% 

1010X54 $4 54 —1 

40Z 55% 55% 55% +1* 
28 15* 15* 15% 

137 9% 9% 9% 


42% 28 JotmJn 120 2.9 15 4TVJ 41 

46V. 37% JtdinCn 1840 J2 ,5 ^SO 39% 39* 3TO 

29% 2J* Joraon M» X7 19 11 TTA 27(4 27g— % 

24% 15% JOStans 80 XS 13 191 21* 27% 22*— % 

27% 21* JoVMfp 1A0 .52 M 330 24% 24% 34% + % 


^ A4 18 10 2414 33% 32* 33% + % 

24% 15* Munfrd J4b X2 13 30 25 24* 25 

23% IS Monsng 420 22 21 20% Zl + (6 

Su. 2L JJy rp 5 C If 34 f 121 41% 41% 41% + * 

i5 utp ^ I-S2 U 11 49 30(4 30 30%- V6 

OT6 18% MujryO 120 48 10 32 20(6 19% 19*-% 

1?5 ’su, {S2ST 1 ,/4 * 18J 40 13% 13% 13(6 + % 

11% 2% MvorLn 112 2* -2* 2* + % 


25 V _ 

21 +»fl, :d .. 

4i% + *' ri IL 1 an 


KDl 20 2A 9 112 B% 

KLMs 12 1055 17* 

KMI pf 4JQ 118 4 37* 

Kmart 12< X7 9 3304 33ft 
KN Ena 1AB XI IS 1111 40 


KotarAI JO 4.1 
KntaCo 20 1J 
KalCPf 127 BJ 
Kaneb A0 4A 
Kanato pfl2J4alX4 
KCfyPL 224 1X4 5 
KCPLpf XM 1X3 
KCPLpf 425 1X4 
KCPLpf 430 1X9 . 

KCPLpf 230 TX6 
KCPLpf X33 1X4 
KCStM 180 XI IS 


402 15 
22 15* 
3 16 
523 9% 

10x92 
313 22* 
l«b 31 
T0feW% 
100x35 
5 17% 
5 18% 
45 <8(ft 


21% 16 NAFCC 

1 40% 40 NBD 
24 12* NBI 

22% 17% NCH 
816— % £* 23V. NCNB 

17% + % 20% NCR* 

37* + % 17 10% NL tad 

331ft— % 25Jft NUI 

39% +1 1J* “JS NVF 

14*— (6 33% NWA 


Hollar 


NAFCO 180 4J18 15 30% 20 30% + (6 

HBD X40 4.1 7 286 5B% 58(6 58* + % 

_ . 9 174 14% 14 14 

J2 3A 13 32 21% 21 21 — % 

122 X6 * 2541 37 34tft34* + % 

« U I 1344 W. 27* 27*—% 

20 18 1249 11% 11% n%— % 

232 63 9 4 35 34* 34* + (J 

1198 V* * ft + R 
JO 22 17 20B1 40* 40(6 48* — % 


KonGE 224 1X4 6 1393 19% 


14 — (6 x0 
24% + % JBJ5 
41(6 

41% + % M* 
14*— % 3J* 

17*— % W* 
43 +3% =6% 

18% + % ’j* 
34% + % 
27%—* Wft 
14% — ft * 
IS*— % 

24V.— % 

44% + % 5]ft 


OimOl 20 13 17 93 

GrubEI .08 2 IS 138 

Grumn 1J» U 7 S3 

Gram pf 280 102 3 

Gnmrai .16 xo 10 

GuHfrtf AS 28 8 7 

GlfWst JD 24 12 2K7 

GulIRs 23 13 41 

GulfRpf 120 44 2 

GllSIUt 144 1X9 7 3328 
GII5U pr xas 1X9 B9 
GlfSU PI* 4A0 132 22 

GNSUPl 880 1X1 902 

GAsro AfeXT 17 31 

Gallon 40 X7 13 IB 


12* +* 
11* 

2S%— % 
24% — % 
5% 

2* 

35 + % 

15* + % 



IS + % 
29* + (ft 
33(6 
72% 

12% — % 
14(6— % 


KanPLl XM -8A 7 331 35V. 

KaPLPf 232 112 ITS 21 

KaPLpf 233 108 44 20* 

Katvln 49 3S* 

Kaufflr 40 2A 5 20 1*% 

KdufRf TJ0 98 1 14* 

Kallaga 126 17 M HI 47% 

Kallwd 120 IB 7 22 31* 

Kanal 389 1% 

Karant 80 X8 14 33 31% 

KyUtll 344 92 9 13B 24* 

KarrGi At 23 . 51 li% 

KarrMe 1.10 34 25 945 30* 

KeyBfc 120 58 I 177 24% 

Key Con 7 2* 

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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


SATURDAY-SUflpAY, AFRIL 13~14o 1985 


3|c 3)e 


Page 9 


*We are of one mind 
about f undamental 
dangers posed by 
massive spending’ 


KOMOMiCSCHg 

7 Leading U.S. Economists 
Take Dim View of Deficits 

By LEONARD SOK. 

Nnv York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK — One of the public's main complaints 
about economists is.pver the dissenskm among them. 
Periodically, individual economists seek to refute the 
charge, saying that agreements within the profession 
. are vastly greater and more important than ihe disagreements. 

Seven former chairmen of the Council of Economic Advisers, 
who have served both Republican and Democratic presidents, 
'. have just issued a joint statement expressing their deep concern 
about the size of the projected defiats in the federal budget for 
the next several years. 

The- seven — Walter W. Heller, Gardner Ackley, Paul W. 
McCracken, Alan Greenspan, Charles L, Schulue, Murray 
L Weidenbaum and Martin S. 

Feldstein — declared; “De- 
• Spite our different views on 
- some matters, as professional 
economists we are of one 
min d about the fundamental 
dangers which the continued 
. existence of such deficits 
poses for the nation. Most se- 
- riously, continued federal def- 
; iriis of the amounts now projected would erode the long-term 
vitality and stability of the nation's economy. Even in the nearer 
term, however, the persistence of massive federal borrowing 
during a period of economic expansion can bring in its train 
mounting risks to the maintenance of economic stability at home 
and in the world economy.** 

The group said that, “as a practical matter,*’ it would be 
difficult to restore budgetary balance without some contribution 
from each of four elements: reductions in the rate of growth of 
‘‘mandatory*’ entitlement programs such. as Social Security and 
Medicare; reductions in other domestic spending; scaling back 
the increase in mflitary spending, and a tax increase. 

Various combinations of these four demeats could do the job, 
they said, adding that they did not agree among themselves “on 
the best mix." Tne choice wtmld involve many values, a number 
- outside the domain of economics, ami “like any group or citizens 
our value structures differ," they added. 

But Herbert Stein, chairman of the Council of Economic 
Advisers under President Richard M. Nixon, refused to sign the 
statement, because he did not think military spending should be 
cut. In an article in The A El Economist, published by the 
American Enterprise Institute, Mr. Stein contended that any 
imlitaiy cutbacks would weaken national security and he would 
not risk that “in order to increase private consumption in Ameri- 
; ca in 1990 by another 2 or 3 percent." 

R ECOGNIZING that virtually no one who ra>!U for mili- 
tary cutbacks says he or she wants weaker forces, Mr. 
Stein said that almost all insist they want to get the same 
forces cheaper. But, he argued, stretching out military urograms 
would provide less security in the years immediately ahead and 
waste could not be dimfnaTed without reducing military strength. 

“The most prudent assumption," he said, "is that if the defense 
budget is cut from $300 trillion to S270 billion, to be allocated by 
. the same organizations and people as at present, with the same 
incentives, we will gel about the same proportions of strength and 
waste from the $270 billion as we would have got from the $300 
billion” — that is. less waste and also less strength. 

However, William W. Kaufman, a military expert at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, disputes the proposition, 
apparently accepted by Mr. Stein, that increased mili tary spend- 
ing automatically leads to increased military strength. 

' In an analysis. “The 1986 Defense Budget," just published by 
the Brookings Institution, Mr. Kaufman concludes: “Too many 
programs are being funded too rapidly. Duplication is excessive, 
and the misallocation of funds is such that carrier battle groups 
(Continued on Page 11, GoL 4) 


Currency Rates 


Late interbank rates an April 12, cxdudmg teas. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brutub, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 
4 P.M. 



S 

E 

DM. 

fJP. 

ILL. 

OMr. 

■J. U=. YM 

Amsterdam 

347 

AMI 

ro.15* 

37.045“ 

0.1771" 

— 

5412* IMJ7* 138.17* 

BruuiilQ) 

41 Jl 

77 JO 

20.143. 

UM 

3LWf 

1741*1 

21985 24.40 • 

Proakfart 

UM 

1M 

— — 

3274S* 

1J6SB 

1*37* 

4J42- 119X4 "12193 * 

London (b) 

12SB3 

— 

1B3K 

TIJ7195 

245S4M 

4J44S 

77295 1225 3UX75 

Milan 

1.MO50 

245540 

639 JO 

20*29 

■ 

56547 

31-70 74040 7X01 

HtwYorktc] 

- 

1J5S 

1054 

*335 

U54X0 

xjet 

4145 2347 251X5 

Parts 

W67 

11.735 

un 

_ 

4JIIX 

17002 

1537" 343117225* 

Tokyo 

23145 

31647 

82.14 

24J0 

1192" 

7144 

40*50 " 9741 

ZBrh* 

15785 

12231 

84X1 * 

37.54 ■ 

0.1317" 

74-2*5 * 

AITS* 1X254" 

1 ECU 

D.72B6 

04631 

22356 

4 fTft 

1429J0 

23294 

45X468 1X779 183.197 

1 SDR 

0993533 

OJ9241 

HQ. 

9J0642 

1X4742 

34474 

413805 Z5S98 249J77 


Dollar Values 


• _ Cnrrancv 
EWW. 

0466 AMlrallWl S 
00464 AiHtrfon kMUh 
ontl Belflkm Bo. Imnc 
07324 Canadians 
UI91 Danish tan 
0,1337 rtaaiifi markka 
00075 Grade drachma 
012S3 HaatKOMS 


U44 

15015 

mss 

4240 

1J054 

HL90 

45033 

13U0 

7JSJ 


1J#4 irbOi 
00911 Isrart Stete) 
132*7 Kawnttl dinar 
04034 Mowr. rfMdB 
um 


OfiOSO Part-Mcado 
02772 Saadi (tval 


044 Ewriv. UAJ 

0994 04510 Staaasanf 22135 

♦0170 ua S. African rand 14939 
03004 tom S.KHWMH 01030 
1477 00055 Smm.S0Mte 17100 

Utf OUT* SMOkTIM OM 
103725 O02D TUMI 3957 
17250 00344 TMiboM 27325 

1400 02723 UAJLdlrtM 14728 


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UnlK of WO tal Wrtfj ol 1400 iV) UMts of 10500 

N.O.: not quoted: NA.: iiol ovoUotJ*. 

Sources: aomtue du ffeneku I Brussels); Banco CammarckUa HaUona IMUon); Bomu* 
NttUonale de Paris ! Parts); IMP (SDR); BanoutAraOeal irOmmatlenala tTlnvemuunanl 
temor ■, that. cOmam). Otnardata tmm Rooters and AT. 


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Eurocurrency Deposits 


Aprfl 12 


StartbM 


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Pra n e 


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SDR 


- 113 

4JB021-3 
130 *■ 


a ^ » ,i 

4 


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Dollar D«mh Franc 

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1Y. 9tu - 4 ft - 4ft - 5W 

Rotes aponcobJe to Utteroonk deposits at SI admen ntUdmum toreoutmteni). 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty (donor. DM, SP. Pound. FF): Uartts Bonk ( ECU J: Reuters 
(SOP). 


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n 'SI t i 




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Asian Dollar Rates 


April 12 


1 mo. 

IK -O’*. 
Source: Reuters. 


2 mat. 
no -8ft 


IBM. 
Aft -1ft 


5 mot. 

■ ft-f ft 


Key Money Rates 

United States 


Clout Pnv. 



assliifc 







Dlscootil Fate 

• Fedtrai Ftmos 

• Prime Rote 

. Braktr LOCH1 Rate 

• Comm. Poser. 30-179 tfovs 

3- monrti Traasurv Bill* 
o-mostti T«<atirv BiUs 
ccrs 30-59 davs 

- CD’s 40-09 days 

Wed Pmmwv 

■ Lombard Rote 
1 Ovemlonr Row 
' One Montt Intorbonk 
3>monih tfilerbonfc 

4- nwnm inrtrDank 

. France 

intervention row 
C all Monty 
Orw- month imirtwnk 
t J-montti intertesk 
6- month intorbonk 


on 

urn 

9ft 

Ul 

8JM 

832 

LIS 

120 


10ft 

9ft 

240 

201 

131 

U0 

130 


Britain 

Bonk Bom Rote 
Call Moarv 
mtoy Troosory BH1 
3-maalti Interbank 

Japan 

DiscBtml Rate 
Coil Momv 
Mkbv intarbonk 


Obh Prav. 

12ft 12-IJft 
-UU> 13 

n 12 s/io 

1212 12/14 


S I 5 
6 3/10 Oft 
Oft 6 5714 


400 LOO 
ISO US 
535 SJKJ 
4.10 LIS 

as as 


lift iow 

tow «w 
10ft iow 
■ Mft 19ft 
10 5714 10 5/16 


Gold Prices 


] 


d 
* 

£r & «•* 

J flS n> 
S ?2C !*■* 
Jj rs 1W 
«*= 


lift 

1<JI 


Sources: Retried. C tmtmemoank. Cr*tU Lv- 
gemots. Ltowfl Book, 1W at Tokyo. 


AM. PAL CUt 
HohoKhm 33155 33235 + «0 

LunmOovrn 3 37.25 — +175 

Paris (I2J Hto) 33109 33171 + £59 

ZuriOl 33225 32M3 —130 

London 33135 329.10 —235 

NOW York — 32U0 —470 

OfHcM IIxIms ter London, Puds and Loxtm- 
bomuoncnliwmdctoSlM Printer Mow Kaw 
and Zurica, New York Comix eorrml OOnteocL 

AJJ arm* In U3i mt ounce. 

Source: Reuters. 


] 


Wholesale 
Prices Up 

InU.S. 

Consumer Debt 
Rises to Record 


Complied by Our Staff Frm DJpaiches 

NEW YORK — Prices at the 
wholesale level edged up 0.2 per- 
cent in March and dim bed at an 
annual rate of only 03 percent 
through the fust quarter, the Labor 
Department said Friday. 

Separately, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported that U.S. consum- 
ers added a record $10.4 billion to 
their installment loans outstanding 
in February. The increase meant 
that credit expanded at an annual 
rate of 27.1 percent in February, 
just slightly less than the record 
high rate in May 1984, when Ihe 
economy was expanding at a blis- 
tering pace. 

And in another report, the Com- 
merce Department said sales of 
manufactured goods rose 02 per- 
cent in February following a 0.6- 
percent decline the previous 
mouth. However, inventories rose 
twice as fast as sales in February, 
expanding 0.4 percent. 

On prices, the Labor Depart- 
ment said that wholesale inflation 
as measured by the Producer Price 
Index climbed 0.3 percent over the 
past year, the smallest 12-month 
mflauoQ rate in 20 years. The 
March rise followed a 0.1- percent 
decline in February; prices were 
unchanged in January. 

Last month's increase came de- 
spite declines in prices for gasoline 
and food, and food costs slipped 
0.2 percent despite a 16.7-percent 
gain in vegetable prices. 

For the first three months of the 
year, prices were up just 03 per- 
cent, at an annual rate. Indeed, that 
rate held true for the last year as a 
whole and was the lowest since a 
0.1-percent rate for the 12 months 
ending in January 1963. 

A 0.8-percent gasoline price de- 
cline was the product of the Labor 
Department's seasonal adjustment 
process, designed to remove pre- 
dictable, periodic influences from 
price activity. Without the adjust- 
ment, prices at (he pump actually 
rose 1.7 percent. 

Analysts, however, expect pump 
prices to begin falling before long 
as pressure builds from the world- 
wide oil glut. 

In fact, many analysts predict 
inflation, for all of 1983 could be as 
low as 2 percent, only a slight dete- 
rioration from the 1.8-percenl gain 
recorded in 1984. 

That performance, combined 
with a minuscule 0.6-perccnt in- 
crease in 1983, gave the United 
States its best back-to-back infla- 
tion record in two decades. 

Meanwhile, the Fed said 37 per- 
cent of the $10.4 billion increase in 
credit went to buy automobiles. 
The average new-car loan cost less 
in January, averaging an interest 
rate of 13.78 percent at auto dealer- 
ships compared to January’s 1S.I 
percent. 

• The skyrocketing pace of bor- 
rowing can be both a sign of con- 
sumer optimism and a cause for 
concern among some economists, 
who see the possibility growing of a 
sudden cutback in borrowing and 


Nixdorf Shines in European Market 

But Its Moves 


IntheU.S. Are 
Less Fruitful 

By Warren Gedcr 

International Herald Tribune 

PADERBORN. West Germa- 
ny —Nixdorf Computer AG has 
become a model for West Ger- 
man companies trying to keep 
pace with technology. It has 
achieved this status although its 
profit increases have trailed its 
sales gains and it has had prob- 
lems breaking into the U.S. mar- 
ket. 

But profits remain strong. 
Group profit figures for 1984 
have yet to be released, but the 
company has said that net profit 
was considerably above the 93.65 
million Deutsche marks ($302 
million) of 1983. Parent compa- 
ny 1984 profit, Nixdorf said Fri- 
day, jumped 63 percent, to 1 14.1 
million DM from 70 million DM 
a year earlier. Nixdorf also said it 
would leave its 9-DM dividend 
unchanged. 

While other West German 
companies have lost ground be- 
cause of slowness m moving 
products to the market, Nixdorf 
has shown the gains to be had by 
moving fast in generating new 
technology and adapting it to 
customer needs. 

Evidence of the growing re- 
spect for the West German da la- 
processing group in Europe was 
the presence of Heinz Nixdorf, 
the company's 60-year-old 
founder and chairman, on a re- 
cent UK-West German panel in 
Frankfurt discussing trade rela- 
tions between the two countries. 

Mr. Nixdorf asserted to his 
American counterparts, includ- 
ing several congressmen, that the 
notion of West Germany suffer- 
ing from a “technology gap" was 
a gross generalization. He sug- 
gested that the huge U.S. trade 
deficit may reflect a lock of tech- 
nological competitiveness 
amgng American companies 
themselves. 

But it is obvious that Nixdorf 
has a long haul ahead before it 
can establish itself as a widely 


t «. v 

#o* 5 



11m N«w loti Tam 


Heinz Nixdorf in a company plant. 


recognized company in the 
crowded U.S. daia-processing 
market. 

Several computer-industry an- 
alysts at major brokerages in 
New York admitted to being un- 
familiar with Nixdorf when 
asked to comment about the 
company’s U5. presence. “Nix- 
dorf has not been tremendously 
successful in the U^" said Don 
Haback who follows Nixdorf 
and other European computer 
companies for tne U.S. invest- 
ment bouse, Smith Barney. 

“But then none of the Europe- 
an computer companies have 
had nuum success here. Despite 
good servicing networks, Nix- 
dorf has not been able offer any 
real uniqueness hoe in its prod- 
uct line or pricing that has been 
particularly competitive.'’ Nix- 
dorf s share of ihe small business 
computer market in the United 
States has been about 1 percent 
in recent years, analysts say. 

However, outside of the giant 
electronics group Siemens AG, 
few major West German compa- 
nies engaged in computers and 
data processing have displayed 
the innovation and staying pow- 
er of Nixdorf in international 
competition. 

Nixdorf — with a work force 
that has grown lo 20,200 from 


10,000 in the past six years — has 
been able to maintain the Largest 
share of the home market in 
desktop business computers. Ac- 
cording to statistics provided by 
Quantum Science Corp- a U.S. 
consulting group. Nixdorf had 
15 percent of the West German 
market in 1983 shipments of 
business computers in the 

525.000- io-SI00.000 price cate- 
gory, followed by International 
Business Machines Corp., with a 
13-percent share. In the 

5100.000- to-S200.000 range, 
Nixdorf widened its dominance 
to a 23 -percent market share in 
1983, from 9 percent for IBM. 

Figures for 1984 have yet to be 
released, but analysis’ believe 
that Nixdorf was able to main- 
tain its share of the domestic 
market and, in some areas, may 
have expanded its ed°p. 

In Europe: Nixdoif s share of 
the market for small business 
computers is put by market re- 
searchers at about '6 percent in 
1983, reflecting, analysis say, the 
fact that a growing sector df Eu- 
ropean industry and government 
prefers to buy from “indige- 
nous" makers. 

With the growing presence in 
Europe fueling his optimism, 
Mr. Nixdorf projected last year 
(Continued on Page 13, Col 2) 


Nakasone Says 
Quota Decision 
Was an 'Error’ 


Compiled b\ Our Staff Front Dispatches 

TOKYO — Prime Minister Ya- 
suhiro Nakasone said Friday that 
his decision to raise the quota of 
Japanese auto exports to the Unit- 
ed States was an “error of judg- 
ment" that resulted from a mis- 
reading of potential American 
reaction. 

Also on Friday. Japan's Ministry 
of International Trade and Indus- 
try announced a five-point plan to 
increase foreign imports of manu- 
factured products, and Minister 
Keijiro Murata appealed to Japa- 
nese consumers to buy more for- 
eign goods. 

A news release from the ministry 
said it would call on 60 leading 
Japanese companies, including 
automobile, electronic and machin- 
ery manufacturers, trading houses, 
department stores and supermar- 
kets, to make special efforts to pro- 
mote imports. Among the 60 com- 
panies are Toyota Motor Corp.. 
Nippon Steel Corp., Matsushita 
Electric Industrail Co., Sony Corp. 
Mitsubishi Co. and Mitsui and Co„ 
ministry officials said. 

The five-point plan also provides 
for import fairs, conferences for 
foreigners doing business in Japan, 
the expansion of trade in certain 
products, upgrading financial aid 
to importers and a publicity cam- 
paign on buying foreign goods. 

The government announced on 
March 28 that auto shipments for 
the fiscal year be ginning April 1 
would be 23 million, a 24.3-per- 
cent increase from the l.SS minion 
sent in fiscal 1984, when Japanese 
automakers were still under volun- 
tary restraint on exports to the 
United States. 

Mr. Nakasone, speaking at a lun- 
cheon. told foreign journalists, 
“With the benefit of hindsight, 
maybe we should have studied the 
situation more in advance. But we 
hope it is understood that we acted 
in sincerity and good faith." 


He coiled the decision to boost 
exports to the United States an 
“error in judgment about ihe alti- 
tude in the United States." 

The U.S. Congress, angered by- 
Japan's S36.S-billion trade surplus 
last year and what ii perceived as 
Japanese cars flooding the U.S. 
market, subsequently passed a non- 
binding resolution to retaliate if 
Japan refused to open its markets 
to more American competition. 

preliminary figures released Fri- 
day by Japan's Finance Ministry 
said the country's customs-cleared 
trade surplus widened to S3. 17 bil- 
lion in March, a 34- percent in- 
crease from the S2.36 billion in 
February and a slight decrease 
from S3.19 billion a year earlier. 

The customs-cleared trade sur- 
plus in the year ended March 31. 
1985. rose 50 percent to a record 
S35.07 billion from the previous 
record of $23.33 billion a year earli- 
er. 

Japan's exports to the United 
States rose 30.1 percent in 19S4-S5 
to S60.78 billion, while imports 
from the U.S. rose 4.9 percent to 
S26.95 billion, giving Japan a sur- 
plus of $33.83 billion. 

Mr. Nakasone’s remarks were 
made three days after the govern- 
ment's announcement of a new 
package of measures designed to 
liberalize Japanese markets for for- 
eign products in telecommunica- 
tions, electronics, pharmaceuticals 
and medical equipment, and wood 
products. 

The auto export issue, which has 
been dealt with separately in the 
past five years, was not a’ part of 
that program. 

Mr. Nakasone said Japan should 
not have specified a new quota, but 
rather should have “observed the 
situation” to make sure that the 
lifting of the voluntary restraints 
did not allow auto exports to go out 
of control. (AP, Reuters) 


Claude Dormer’s Testament: Takeover Shield or Gordian Knot? 


By Warren Gedcr 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Daimler- 
Benz AG’s bid for control of Dor- 
mer GmbH, West Germany’s sec- 
ond largest aviation group, faces 
stiff opposition from within the 
ranks of the Dornicr family. 

The bid by Stuttgart-based 
Daimler threatens to drive a deci- 
sive wedge between the already 
split family members, who own 100 
percent or Dornicr. But it is the 
threat of a complete family break- 
up that may stymie Daimler’s 
chances of acquiring Dormer, a 
company expected to report 1984 
sales of 1.6 billion Deutsche marks 
(about $513 million.) 

Claudius Domier, 70, the eldest 
of six family shareholders, said Fri- 
day that he is not prepared to ac- 
cept any outside group’s acquisi- 


tion of a controlling stake in 
Domier. 

Mr. Dornicr said that although 
he and other family members had 
been approached by Daimler-Benz 
about acquiring a majority stake, 
he Feels responsible for carrying out 
the testament of his father and 
company founder, Gaude Domier, 
to “keep Domier a family-owned 
enterprise" 

“I will do everything I can to 
prevent any big company from tak- 
ing over majority control of Dor- 
uier," Mr. Domier said. 

Before any family shareholder 
can sell Domier stock to outsiders, 
he pointed out, they must first, un- 
der terras of their father's win, offer 
those shares to the other five share- 
holders. 

The six family members together 
control 122 percent of the compa- 


ny’s shares outstanding Another 
27.8-percem block is in the estate 
of Anna Domier, deceased widow 
of the company's founder. It is un- 
dear how those shares will be dis- 
tributed among family members. 

“So far, no offers from family 
members lie before me, but I would 
certainly buy them up if I knew 
they were going to be sold to Daim- 
ler or any other trig company seek- 
ing control of Domier," Mr. Dor- 
nier said. 

Mr. Dornier’s step-brother, 
Christoph Domier, 46, an artist, 
and Ellen Domier, the widow of 
another step-brother, arc believed 
to be interested in selling their re- 
spective 12.8-percent stakes and 
are understood to have had discus- 
sions with Daimler. 

Claudius Domier emphasized 
that his previously expressed inter- 


est to sell his own 118-percent 
stake derived from a frustration 
over the way the company was be- 
ing run. But “this was all before 1 
knew' Daimler was trying to gain 
majority control,” he said. 

He denied speculation that fi- 
nancing of his own company’s 
“Seastar" amphibious-plane pro- 
ject had something to ao with his 
earlier expressed wish to sell his 
stake in the company. 

The elder Domier is believed to 
have become particulariy upset 
over recent changes in Dormer's 
management board that appear to 
have come at the behest of a group 
that includes another step-brother, 
Justus Domier, 48, who lives in 
Zurich. The half-brothers are 
known to favor divergent direc- 
tions for Domier. 

“There is no way over the long 


term to prevent shareholders from 
selling their shares outside the fam- 
ily — that is, if no other family 
members agree to buy them Fust," 
Justus said. 

"Currently, there are indications 
that some family members, not in- 
cluding myself, would like to pan 
from their shares and, should these 
shares not be bought up by other 
shareholders, they may well be of- 
fered to the strongest of those inter- 
ested outside parties,” he added. 

On Monday, the Domier family 
shareholders will meet with the 
head of the Baden-W uerttemberg 
state government, Lothar Spaeth. 
The government of Baden-Wuen- 
temberg, the state in which Domier 
and Daimler are based, has said it 
seeks a "Baden-Wuentemberg so- 
lution" to any new configuration in 
Domier' s ownership. 


spending farther down the road. 

The Commerce Department, 
meanwhile, said the February gain 
in sales of manufactured goods was 
led by a 1.6-percenl rise in retail 
sales. Retail inventories, 27.6 per- 
cent of the total, grew 0J percent 
despite the February sales gain. 

The trend suggested that retail 
inventories may have backed up 
even faster in March when sales 
dropped 1.9 percent, the steepest 
plunge in more than seven years. 

Tne dosdy watched inventoiy- 
to-sales. ratio inched up . to show 
1 38 months of supply on hand in 
warehouses, on shaves and in fac- 
tories, up from 1.32 a year earlier. . 

In an earlier report, the Fed re- 
ported Thursday that the nation's 
basic money supply rose $1.9 bil- 
lion in' late March. (AP. UPJ). 


More Failures of Small Securities Firms Predicted 


Dollar, Cold 
Both Lower in 
U.S. Trading 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
fell again Friday but hdd above 
key support levels as dealers 
awaited a economic reports due 
next week. Gold eased lower. 

The dollar has lost more than 
13 percent of its lale-February 
earfy-March highs of roughly 
3.47 German marks, dropping 
more than 3 percent this week 
to its Friday level of 3.0560 
DM, down from 3.0590 Thurs- 
day. 

The British pound, which at 
around S1.04 was nearing pari- 
ty with the dollar just a month 
ago, closed at $12550, down 
from Thursday’s SI 2570. 

Other late dollar rates in.New 
York, compared with Thurs- 
day, were: 9.3350 French 
francs, down from 9.3450; 
2J670 Swiss francs, down from 
2.5730, and 1,954.00 lire, un- 
changed. 

In late trading in New York, 
gold dosed at $328 an ounce, 
down from $33225 Thursday. 


By James L Rowe Jr. 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Govern- 
ment regulators and financial exec- 
utives in the United States say they 
fear that more small government- 
securities firms wfl] fail as investors 
begin to demand delivery of collat- 
eral left on deposit. 

The recent failures of two gov- 
ernment securities dealers — ESM 
Government Securities Inc. of Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida, and Bevill, 
BreskrJk Schulman Asset Manage- 
ment Corp. of Livingston, New Jer- 
sey — caused hundreds of millions 
of dollars at losses, mainly at mu- 
nicipalities and savings and loan 
associations. 

Both companies allegedly used 
government securities they were 
holding for customers for their own 
purposes, the Securities and Ex- 
change Commissi on has charged. 

The lawyer representing the 
trustee for BB&S Asset Manage- 
ment Corp., which was dosed 
Monday, said Thursday that the 
firm's collapse was precipitated by 
BB&S customers demanding secu- 
rities the firm didn't have. 

Nathan Ravin, lawyer for trustee 
Saul S. Cohen, said customers be- 
ep contacting Asset Management 
Corp. and seeking possession of 
their collateral after the failure of 
ESM, which triggered losses of 
more than $300 million after it 
failed March 4. 

“Any other government-securi- 
ties firms that fail will have had io 
have engaged in practices similar 
to" the ones the SEC alleges that 
ESM and Bevill, Breslcr engaged 
in, said the chief financial officer of 


a major regional bank. But in a 
business that is so easy to enter, 
and in which a money-losing firm 
can keep gang as long as investors 
are willing to lend it money, there 
are bound to be other cases of 
fraud, the banker said. 

Unlike brokers that deal with the- 
public, government-securities firms 
do not have to register with the 
Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion or any other government agen- 
cy. That makes it difficult for regu- 
lators to find out who they are, lei 
alone verify their soundness. 

The 36 biggest and most influen- 
tial dealers report daily to the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank of New York. 
Another 35 to 40 file voluntary and 
cursory monthly reports to the 
New York Fed, but those reports 
are of little regulatoiy value. Both 
ESM and BB&S reported monthly. 

Government and financial offi- 
cials say there probably are several 
hundred dealers around the coun- 


try. “That's a guess," said a banker. 

Regulators and officials said 
most of the government-securities 
firms are honest and have the secu- 
rities they claim to be holding on 
their clients’ behalf. But the offi- 
cials said they fear there are bound 
to be other dealers that have hidden 
losses by selling securities they sup- 
posedly were holding. 

Securities dealers and their cli- 
ents often engage m investment 
transactions using government se- 
curities as collateral, called repur- 
chase agreements and reverse re- 
purchase agreements. The 
transactions are referred to as re- 
purchases but for most purposes 
amount to a secured loan. 

In a repurchase agreement, an 
investor in need of a loan sells secu- 
rities, which are held as collateral, 
and promises to buy them back — 
to repay the loan — at some future 
date. In a reverse repurchase agree- 
ment, an investor loans cash by 


temporarily buying the securities to 
hold as collateral 

About $200 billion in govern- 
ment securities are traded back and 
forth every day, many of them in 
repurchase agreements. Dealers 
usually do both types of transac- 
tions. 

Lenders of cash make Lheir mon- 
ey like all other lenders, from the 
interest they charge the borrower. 
The borrower often makes money 
too. by paying the lender a lower 
interest rate for the cash than inter- 
est being paid on the underlying 
security. 

According to one banker, who 
enters into repurchase agreements 
as one method of raising funds for 
the bank, the going rate on a loan is 
about 8 5 percent, while the securi- 
ties he gives as collateral oftui earn 
1 lii percent. “That three percent- 
age points is my margin of profit," 
he said. 


2 U.K. Banks 
Cut Base Rates 

United Press International 

LONDON — Barclays Bank 
and Midland Bank cut their 
base [ending rates from 13W 
percent to 12 3 4 percent Friday. 

British banks use the base 
rate to establish all other lend- 
ing rates. Usually, prime corpo- 
rate borrowers pay a percentage 
point or two above the base. 

The Bank of England re- 
frained from dealing in the 
money market and traders said 
this indicated a reluctance to 
endorse the move, which it nor- 
mally does by cutting the rates 
at which it will deal. 


Gold Options (prim fas/ ox.). 


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U Qaai 'rii Mnfa Minr 
1211 Cmm I. Stefaw W 
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on 


PJJ* 






Fridays 

MSE 

Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere, 


Season Season 

HW Low 



U.S.'Futures a^u 


Open High Low Close Chg. 




season season 

Mgh Low Open HWi u»w 

2110 19*0 Jut _ 

m Sales p rev. Sales MM 

^Dav Open int. 27,171 offWi 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

as jgs as 

i«4ju m rn jui i«uw wto jSs 

1B260 twS Sets TS9.10 1*000 19075 

uioo isuo Nov 1 sun 15050 uuo 

18000 moo Jan 15745 

177 JO 15SJD0 Mar 15775 I57J5 137JS 

1*250 1*000 MOV 

15750 157 JO Jul ■ 

18050 . 17975 Sep 

Eat. Sales 500 Prev. Sales 78* 

Prev.Dav Open Int *574 up 99 


euiM»WHXA»nMMi - 

51 mill Ioimd » of «» Prt ea >5 9073 9076 — « 

SS K £ 3 S Bit BS' 

8957 8450 DOC 0978 89-80 » +52 

5£ r 53 It si H ^ 




15955 +48 

1*050 +5) 

15M5 +JB 
150*0 +75 

15755 — >18 

15755 —'1C 

15770 
15770 
15770 



□04150 503870 Sep 

004350 603905 Dec JW407O 

004100 JHMOtO Mar 

Est. Salas 0542 Pnv.SaM 7,992 
Prev.Dav Oaenint. 2271 * up 1 , 18 » 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Spar franc- 1 prtnteauatasag»i 
5900 JC9 Jun 7913 -2«4 -SH -22S 

j4830 5*80 Sep 7949 3M1 - 390S - 39 52 

83M 5531 Dec 5995 -4015 5958 5998 

5080 5835 MOT ■*“ 

Eat. Soles 24524 -Prev. Sgtea ZW71 
Prev. DOY Open Int 20002 off 137 


CATTLE (CME1 

40500 IbSL- cents per lb. „ 

4950 &1J5 Apr *270 43.J7 

4950 64*0 Jun *552 *550 

4757 *3.15 Auo 6550 6157 

6550 6UM oa 6X40 6377 

6755 6X60 Dec 6*55 *450 

6755 4455 Fob 6557 6558 

*757 *650 Apr *655 .*455 

EsI- Sales 13,791 Prev. Sate* 1X116 
Prev.Dav Open int *1573 up 193 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME] 

44JJB0 lbs.- cents per ItL 
7450 46*0 APT 6680 *690 

7275 6493 May 6755 M6S- 

7370 6660 Allfl 69J5 6955 

7350 6740 S*P 6955 6975 

7132 67.10 Oct 6845 6950 

7350 6955 Nov 6945 6945 

7940 7045 Jan _ 

Eat. Sales 1J33 Prev. Sales 983 
prev. Day Oaenint. 9,472 up 61 ■ 

HOOS (CME) 

30500 lbs.- cents per lb. 

5445 4160 Apr 4150 4175 

5UO 4745 Jun 46« 4872 

5577 4875 Jui 5055 5075 

5447 4750 Aua 5070 SttJffl 

5175 4600 Oct 47.10 47.47 

5045 4670 Dec 4840 4855 

5050 4625 Feb 4975 4975 

4775 4SL50 APT 4600 4650 

4955 4750 Jim 4850 4860 

Est. Sales 7.191 Prev. Sales 7739 
Prev. Day Open Int. 25,13* up *8 
PORK BELLIES (CME). 

33500 Ibsrcents per lb. 

8250 *1.15 MOV 1*75 *645 

8147 *115 Jul 67 JO 6755 

8045 (070 AIM *630 1630 

7620 6115 FW» 7175 7175 

7540 (450 Mar 7170 7175 

7540 7040 May 

7600 71)70 Jui 

EaL Sales 7419 Prev. Sc Ira 9728 
Prev. Dav Open Hit. 12793 up 35 a 


COFFEE C (NY CSCE) 

37J00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

15250 12251 May 14150 14150 

14970 12150 Jul 14055 141.10 

147 JO 12750 SOP 14645 14075 

14445 12975 Dec 139J0 14070 

14150 12650 MOT 13*50 13950 

14275 13150 May 13850 13850 

14050 13550 Jul _ 

13475 13273 Sep 13750 13750 

Eat. Sales 4550 Prev. Sales 5798 - 
Prev.Dav Ooea im. 12432 off. 170 
SU6ARWORLD II INYCSCE) 

112500 IbL- cents p er lb. 

1050 169 MOV 179 354 

975 355 Jul 3.99 605 

975 450 Sep 4-12 4.19 

955 4-12 OCt 475 431 

775 4J0 Jan 4.70 470 

933 550 Mar 5-15 5.17 

7.15 5.19 May 577 57* 

6*9 530 Jui 658 559 

Est. Sales 5755 Prev. Sales 8769 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. 86161 UP 744 
cocoa Orr csce) 

10 metric tons- 5 Per tan 

2570 1998 MOV 2385 2443 

2400 1998 JUI 2»B 2235 

2415 1957 Sea 2177 2191 

2337 1845 Dec 2140 2150 

2190 1955 Mar 2140 2145 

2130 19*0 MOV 


*277 -JO 
6477 —75 

6462 —33 

*105 .—-40 
6427 —75 

6475 — 7S 

6600 —JO 


*575 —770 
(6*2 —1-13 
(865 —75 

(642 —78 

6870 —75 

69J00 -6» 

. 7X10 —60 . 


4X15 —75 
48.17 —78 

5X02 —78 

4970 —JO 
4677 —63 

48.12 -JB 
4865 . —70 
4565 . — 65 
48.05 —30 


*460 — 200 
6655 —100 
*415 —177 
7047 —165 
7050 —MO 
7065 —160 
7065 —160 



Financial 


13975 1407} 
1397* 13979 
13870 13X93 
13875 13850 
13875 13878 
13870 13762 
13651 
13760 13560 


177 153 
358 4JM 

412 419 
474 470 
470 471 
5.14 5.17 
53* 537 
568 569 


2385 2418 

2200 2225 

21*7 2180 

2125 2135 

2138 2135 

2135 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 










9156 

87.14 Jun 9154 

9179 

9179 

9170 


9178 

8X94 Sap 9175 

9173 

9171 

9173 


9050 

8577 DOC 9X94 

9X96 

9X17 

9088 

—m 

9057 


9040 

9054 

9X54 

— jDQ 

9079 


9072 

9072 

9078 

— jji 

9060 

■860 Sap 



9X05 


8952 

■965 Doc 



■951 



Mar 8951 

B9JB 

8978 

8978 

—61 

Est Solos 

9731 Prav. Sales 1(523 




Prsv.DoyOpen lot. 38658 0(11,191 




10 YR. TREASURY CCBT) 





SI 00600 prln- PtsB 32nd* of 100 od 




82-3 

7M Jun 8X2* 

80-27 

BO-15 

80-18 

— S 

81-13 

75-18 SOP 79-29 

79-29 

7920 

7922 

—3 

80-22 

75-13 Dec 



7829 

—a 

808 

75-14 Mar 



78-7 

—5 

79-26 

74-30 Jun 



77-20 

-2 

Est.Salm 

Prov. 5otes 11723 




Prsv. Day Open Inf. 40599 off 1,142 




US TREASURY BONDS (CBT1 





(8 acMl(l060(H>ts A 32nds of 100 pet) 




77-15 

57-20 Jun 71-4 

71-4 

70-21 

70-34 


76-2 

57-10 Sap 70-2 

702 

6922 

6924 

-2 

7*-5 

57-8 Dec 69-5 

*94 

(8-26 

48-29 

—2 

72-30 

57-2 Mar 68-11 

*8-11 

682 

«W 

—2 


5X29 Jun *7-24 

*7-24 

*7-14 

67-14 


7M 

56-29 S«P 



66-26 

-2 

49-2* 

54-25 DOC 



46-8 

—a 

69-12 

54-27 Mar 65-28 

65-28 

65-24 

*5-24 

—2 

69-2 




65-10 

—2 

MJZt 

*M See ‘ 44-28 

*4-29 

*4-2* 

*429 

■ —a 





64-17 


Est. Sates 

Prev. Sates! 91 743 




Prsv.DavOpailnUl5.U7 aff39T _ 




GNMA4CBD ' • - 





SU0600 prln- PIS E32nas of m pet 




*9-29-: 

57-17 Jun 49-27 

69-Z7 

69-19 

69-20 


69-4 

59-13 S«P -69-2 

69-2 

6828 

68-28 

—4 

68-13 - 

59-4 DOC - 



684 


(8 

58-20 Mw 



67-22 

—s 

67-8 

5825 Jun 



67-* 

—6 

67-3 

55 SOP a 

67 

66-24 

66-24 

—a 

Est Saits 

Prev. Sales 

270 




Prav.DavOPMiint. 3721 ua28 





CE RT, DEPOSIT (IMM) 










9170 

8570 Jun 9174 

9174 

91.13 

91.15 

-jn 

90 JO 

8X00 Sep 9X64 

9X67 

9X58 

9051 

+52 

90.17 

8574 DOC 9X19 

9X19 

9X19 

9069 

+61 

8978 ' 

8X5* Mar 8979 

8979 

99 JV 

8970 

+61 

WM 

8X43 Jun 



8979 

+63- 

BUS 

877* Sep 89.17 

89.17 

89.17 

89.11 

+JU 

1876 

8874 DOC 



8856 

+64 

Est. Sates 


669 




Prtv.DayOpanliit. X635 up129 





Stock indexes 


(Indexes compiled shortly beta 

SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
pnlnh tmdHmk 

189.10 15410 Jun 18145 18260 

19270 1*070 S*P 18575 18600 

19640 17570 Dec 18975 10975 

19470 19X10 Mar 192.10 19X10 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 95.WS 

Prev.Dav Open Int 54739 up 356 . 

VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
point* and cents ' 

21960 17100 Jun t9768 197.90 

21270 18575 Sap 70160 20270 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 4335 

Prev; Day Open Int. 5439 off 72 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) ' 
points and cents - 

11070 9070 Jun 10560 USJO 

11160 - 9175 Sep 10779 10765 

11375 10170 Dec 10965 10965 

Est. Sates Prev.Satos 117H 

Prev. Day Open InL 87*9 0*127 


market dace) 


18US 18270 —70 

18545 18560 —75 

18975 188.90 -05 
19X10 19X10 -OS 


?Md5 1977 5 —SO 
20160 20X00 —40 


10560 10575 —.10 

30745 10765. —70 
10969 10965 -05 


Commodity indexes 



■ IS 27*. 2735 271k — 9k 
18 1073 15V* 14M 15V. +4*, 

14 120 551* 55Vk 55»— *fc 

7 404 211* 21 21 VS + V* Illttitltll 

17 34 18V4 IBM 15VS + U ALUMINUM 


London Metals 
April 12 


Prev tons 
■Id As 


W 9<P,v QuoO pf 964 10.1 1001 95 95 95 

2Zk> 15 QuakSO 40 37 2* 23* 21 U. 21 Vj 21V5 

111* AH Quanev 37 43* 9V* 9 91* 

3*4. 23 Ouestar 140 49 9 281 J2VS 3214 331* 

25*. 14 QkReU 74a 1.1 17 15 22H 22ta 22Vb 



» . UAL 75a 17 7 

34V* UAL Of 240 7.7 
7** UCCEL 18 

UGI 2JM 94 ID 
19W UGI Pf 275 11.7 
3 UMCRh 

10 URS 40b 37 17 

17te USFC 3 130 47397 
22V* USGs 148 M * 
13V* UnIFrst 70 14 II 


45ie * rn 447* 

31% 30*4 31 — to 
IS* 13V. 13% — lu 
22% 21% 3144— 4k 
: 23V* 231-3 23 Vs — 4h 
**k 9*k 944 

1210 12 12 
32 3J4k 3144 
33** 33% 33V*— 4* 
14"* 14 141* — Vk 


Sales figures or* unof Iictal. Yearly nions ana lows reiiect 
the previous 52 weeks Piui ine cnrreni week, but not the latest 
trading dav. Where o spilt or slock dividend amounting to 25 
percent or more has been paid, ihe year's hlon-iow range and 

dividend are shown lor me new slock only. Unless otherwise 

noted, rates <s4 dividends are annual disbursements based on 
The latest declaration. 

a — dividend aha extraW). b— annual rate of dividend plus 
slock dividend, c — liquidating dividend. Cld — called, a — 
new yeartv law. *— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 
mourns, a —dividend In Canadian tunas, sublect to 15% 
non-residence fax. (—dividend declared olter solit-uo or 
stock dividend, j —dividend paid this year, omjHed. deferred, 
or no action loken at Idlest dividend mealing, k— dividend 
declared or paid this war, an accumuiallve issue with dlvL 
(lends In arrears, n—. new Issue In the oast 52 week*. Tne Man- 
tes' range begins wim me stun of trading nd — next day 
delivery. P/E — arlee-earnlnos ratio, r — dividend declared 
or .?f >1 2, ln ,? r,c * lir, » nnxmths.BiuaMoO'dlvKteod.s— slock 
ipilL Dividend begins wtm date of split, sis — sates, t — di«+ 
12 mo nths, estimated casn 
u— new yearly 

-^^Htotcvor recdvershlD 

^^Bncy Act, or securities 

r . A ^Bten distributed, wi — 

N - l . 1 J\ ■— e.-oiviitend or w 

/ . , jo I . / yj Bllkoui warrants, v — 

K l Mia. i — soles in tuiL 


Union Oil Group 
Sues Mesa Head 

United Pre r» Tnientauonal 

LOS ANGELES — Union Oil Co.’s Retire- 
ment Plan Committee filed suit Friday in feder- 
al court in New York, charging that T. Boone 
Pickens Jr_ chairman of Mesa Petroleum Co., 
was running his oil company as an unlicensed 
investment firm in violation of federal laws. 

Earlier this week, Mr. Pickens launched a 
hostile S54-a-share cash; tender offer for 64 
million Unocal shares, which would give his 
investment group a controlling Slake in the Los 
Angeles oil company. His partnership already 
owns 13.4 percent of UnocaTs stock. 

Unocal, the parent or Union OiL sued Mr. 
Pickens on Thursday in federal court in Shreve- 
port. Louisiana, on the grounds that his take- 
over attempts breach antitrust law. 

The New York and Louisiana suits both seek 
to have the courts slop Mr. Pickens from pursu- 
ing his bid to seize control of Unocal - 

Several Mesa shareholders, including the Un- 
ocal chairman. Fred Hartley, and other mem- 
bers of Unocal's Retirerdent Plan Committee, 
allege in the suit filed in -U-S. district court in 
Manhattan that Mesa is Operating as an unreg- 
istered investment company in violation of the 
Investment Company Act of 1940. The suit also 
charges that Mesa Petroleum, founded by Mr. 
Pickens and based in Amarillo, Texas, is en- 
gaged in unlawful transactions with its affili- 
ates, including the tender offer for Unocal 
shares •• 


Sterling per metric ten 
spot m.®a 685.00 moo 90460 

forward 907.00 90X00 93160 93160 

COPPER CATHODES (High Orwte) 

Sterling per metric Ion 
wot 1,19960 170070 172360 172600 

forward 171200 171360 173260 173X50 

COPPER CATHODES (Standardl 
Sterling Per metric fan 
soot 1,19260 1,19*60 171560 171960 

forward 1.19760 170160 173260 173460 

LEAD 

Sterling p*r metric ton 
pot 309J0 31060 33360 33560 

forward 30960 30960 32360 32360 

NICKEL 

Starling pgr metric Ion 
spot 473560 47J060 445060 447060 

forward 473060 473560 442060 443060 

SILVER 

Peac* p*r rrov ounce 

smt 53060 53160 54560 54*60 

forward 54760 54860 5*460 5*560 

TIN (Staadord) 

Sterling pm- metric fan 
soot 960560 961060 963560 964060 

forward 97BS60 978(60 964560 965060 

ZINC 

Sterling Per metric fen 
spot 72X00 724.00 72960 72960 

forward 71460 71560 73160 73460 

Source; A p. 


London Commodities 

April 12 


Class Previous 
KigR low Bid Ask Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Starling Mr metric tea 
May 11240 11160 11260 11240 11160 11X00 
Aug 11*60 11*60 11*70 11*40 11*6011660 
OCt 12040 11960 11960 12070 12000 170.20 
Dec 12(60 12*60 12560 12*40 12(60 12770 
Mar 13X60 13760 13760 13860 13860 13870 
May 14X00 14260 14240 14370 14X40 14360 
Aag 1*760 14760 14*60 14970 14760 14970 
Volume: 1750 late of 50 Ion*. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric Inn 
May 1,9** 1630 1.947 1.954 1.938 1,939 

Jly 1643 1,917 1,935 1.93* 1621 1,922 

SiP 1,909 1692 1600 1.901 1680 1692 

DM 1655 1639 16« 1641 T6M 1639 

Mar 1651 1640 1638 16C 163* 1638 

MOV 1650 1650 1642 1645 1637 1645 

Jlr ftT. NT. 16« 1655 1645 1680 

Volume: 4756 lots of 10 lens. 

COFFEE 

Sleriteg per metric Ion 
May " 2,105 2683 2683 2687 2.108 Z110 

Jly £149 1128 XI 33 2.134 X15I X158 

540 2,182 X140 XU6 Xl*8 X18* XI 58 

NOV 2716 Z1M XI 90 XTM 2795 2710 

Jan 2711 X194 X19S 1194 2705 27 U) 

Mar 2.193 XI 70 1170 2,175 2,180 X200 

MOV N.T. N.T. X100 XI 40 XI 49 XI B0 

. Vonnne; L512 lots of 5 ions. 

GASOIL 

U6. dollars Mr metric tee 
API 229.75 22860 22960 229.75 33050 33075 
Mar 22X75 22450 22X91 22875 2Z7 JO S7J5 
Jan 92350 2237S 22350 22475 22560 

Jlr 32375 22250 22375 22350 224XS 32475 

AM 22X00 223JH 23450 22*75 23560 22775 

SOP 22760 22760 3251® 32875 22760 23950 

OCt N.T. N,T, 225JJE SJI7S 22760 233J0 

Nov N.T. N.T. 22X00 23460 22060 23x50 

Dec N.T. N.T. 22100 23460 22960 23960 

Volume: 71* lots of 100 Ians. 

Sources: Reuters and London Pofrofovm B*- 
cflfcw ipasaUt. 


BanJtruptcies Rise m Japan j 

Reuters 

TOKYO - — Corporate bank- 
ruptcies in Japan rose to a record 
20-363 in ihe fiscal year ended 
March 31. 1985. from ihe previous 
record of 19,959 a year earlier, ihe 
Tokyo Commerce and Industry 
Research Co. reported Friday. 


Asian Commodities 

April 12 


HONG-KONG SOLD FUTURES 
U66 pgr ounce 

Dos* Previous 
Hlgti Low Bid Ask Bid Ask 
Apt — N.T. N.T. 33j;!® 333JKI 328JHJ 33060 
MOV - NX N.T. 333.00 33560 33060 33260 
Jun _ 33X00 33X00 33560 33760 33260 33460 
AUB - N.T. N.T. 339.00 34160 13*60 33801- 
Oct _ 34560 34560 34460 34X00 34160 34360 
Dec - NT. N.T. 34960 35160 34760 34960 
Feb- N.T N.T. 35X00 35860 35260 35460 
. Volume: 25 lots of 100 ox. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
ILSJ por ounce 


Paris Commodities 
April 12 


Market Guide 


Oilcnuo Board of Troop 
aitcnoo Mervmfna ExcOange 
I n tematloncl Monetary Market 
Ot Chlcana Mercantile Enchanae 
New York Cocoa, Sugar, Coffee Exchange 
New York Caftan E xch ange 
Commodity Exctxvm, New York 
New York Mercantile Exchange 
Kansas City Board at Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


Cash Prices April 12 


High Low 

Aul N.T. N.T, 

Jun 33760 33570 

Aug _ — _ N.T. N.T. 

volume: 271 lot* of 100 ox 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents par kilo 
Close 

Bid Ask 

May 19760 17775 

Jun 20075 201.00 

JIV 20375 20475 

AW 207 JO 208-50 

Sen 20860 20960 

volume: 71 lots. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents par Wig 
Cleso 

BM Aik 

RSSIMay. 17460 174JO 

RSS 1 Jun— 1777S 17775 

RS52MOV. 171 JO 172JU 
RSS3MOV. 16X40 170JO 

RSS 4 May- 16430 14X50 

RSS S MOV. 16370 1*550 
KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian ringgits per 25 tans 
Close 

■Id Ask 

Apl 1A4B 1JOO 

May 1/00 1770 

Jun 17*5 1715 

Jly 1^5 IJ85 

Aug IJM 174 0 

Sen 1 JOB ijjo 

NOW 1 J90 1J30 

Jon— 1770 17U 

Mar — . — _ 1740 1700 

Volume: o lots of 25 teas. 
Source; Routers. 


Settle Settle 
33160 32960 

33570 332x0 

34070 31760 


Provisos 
■Id Ask 
20160 28175 

204JD moo 

10750 20W3J 

21050 311J0 
21X00 21360 


Prsvlous 
BM. Al« 
17X50 17760 

17975 18000 

17U0 174J0 

17150 17X50 

14X50 1*850 

14150 1*350 


Prsvlon 
BM Aik 
L410 1770 

1/4M 1740 

1740 1790 

1710 17*0 

1700 17W 

1713 1713 

17*5 1705 

17*5 1795 

17*0 1790 


" High Law BM Aik aim 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric w« 

May ]J52 1740 1740 1745 + 1 

Swi 1707 1795 1700 1703 +2 

Oct 1762 1745 1730 1754 +7 

Dec 710 17W 1700 1720 +8 

Mr 1JC9 UOD 1A93 1763 +3 

May nIx N.T. 13*0 TJ*0 +3 

Est. val.; 2703 Jots of 30 tana. Prw. octuol 

soles: 3705 lot*. Open interest: 22720 

COCOA 

French francs per 190 kg 

May 2740 2734 2755 27*0 +24 

■f& B:?: K:?: ™ 

Dec N.T. 14-T. XI 10 - +15 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2.1W — —S 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2.J05 — -5 

Jly N.T. N.T. X10S . — —5 

. Est. woL: 102 lot* .at 10 ten* Prev. actual 

sates: 9* Mis. Open Msrtst: 792 

COFFEE 

French francs per TO* to _ 

. MOV X4M '2730 2740 2 AS0 Unch. 

Jly 2780 2780 ZOO Z4W —73 

Sea 2510 2500 2510 2525 — 9 

NT. N.T. WJJJ 25 « -72 

Jan N.T. N.T. X5» 25« —21 

Mur N.T. N-T. XM? 2535 — 20 

MOV N.T. N.T. X498 — — 25 

Est. val.: 21 lots ot 5 tons. Prev. octuai safes: 
3 tote. Open Interest: 192 
Source: Bourse Ju Commerce. 


Commodi t y imd Unit 

Coffee 4 Santas, lb 

Print cloth *4/30 28 9«, yd - 
Steel billets (PHt.),ton_ 

iron 2 Fdrv. Phi la. ton 

Steel scrap No 1 Iwy pin. . 
Lead Soot, (b - 
Conner elect* lb - 

Tin (Strolls), lb 

Zinc. E. 51. L_ Basis, lb 

Palladium, os — _____ 

Sliver N.Y- az -- 
Source: AP. 


Fri ABO.. | 
178 ITS 

tt.€« 064 

473X0 45360 jm '■ 

I13.cs 21368 ; 

75-80 100-101 1 

38-Z1 26-28 

70-74 TMk-79 

tsm (7*27 : 

(U5-X7 053 

117-119 157» 1 

668 970 | 


DM Fa tares Options 
April 12 

W. German Mart 125.000 mortal CBrirper mart 


strike 

MH-IetJU 


Price Jun 

StP 

Dec 



Dec 


139 

189 


03* 

0J5 


247 

XII 


040 

082 


265 

L5C 



1.17 

33 08! 

UO 

267 


177 


34 OSS 

16f 

1.57 

143 

r.91 


35 027 

076 

1.15 

234 

2J* 

— 

Estimated total vaL 16(7 




ML *oL 5710 Opts lot. 34770 

Itete : Frl. vak 14*3 ootn bit. 21.1 74 


Source: CME. 






S&P 100 Index Options 
April 11 




Wheeling Filing 
Reportedly Near 

The Associated Press 

WHEELING, West Virginia — 
Wheeling-Pitisburgh Steel Corp. 
mil file Tor protection from credi- 
tors under federal bankruptcy laws 
early next week if creditors do not 
approve a concessions package by 
midnkhi Sunday, a union official 
said Friday. 

A meeting between the steel- 
maker and iis largest creditor, 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co., 

was scheduled in New York on 
Friday to discuss, the company's 
S5 14-million debt, Paul Rusen, di- 
rector of United S led workers Dis- 
trict 23, said. 

Mr. Rusen confirmed that Den- 
nis J. Camey. c hairman of Wheel- 
ing- Pittsburgh, had scheduled a 
Monday board, meeting to consider 
the “serious financial condition of 
the company." WheetingrPiiu- 
burgh has threatened to file for 
protection if it rannot refinance its 
'loans and obtain additional con- 
cessions from the union. 


— 1/1* 14 — 

UK 1/li W H 
1/14 <» 13/Kia 
1 2 2% 3% 

m svi w a 

W 91! - ■ 

- m - _ 


TON CM nohow I747B 
TpMoHlopcfl kf.OCU 
TON PBt vNuM WLK7 
TIMM sotoM. 44338? 

NM IH/3 Lev 12461 DoteI7iU + 0J3 


Source: CBOS. 


Dividends April 12 


Compomr For Amt Pew r»c 

INCREASED 

FsiConn Boncora O 73 4 -tj 4 

indoood nf Insvr Ore O 75 6.3 tS 

Starling Droo Q JO m jS 

StaoB Shop Cos 0 7 7\i 7-1 « 

LIQUIDATION 

ANTACora .51060 4-25 4-la 


Eastman Kodak -SO PC 5-17 4-24 

US. Hgaltfi Cora Svs .50 PC *.} 5-15 


Alcoa 

Davtah Pwr & Lot 
Dei Labs Inc 
General Ottawa 
JomwRWorCflra 
Kaufman a Brood- . 
LHIvIrMus.CooftaO*. 
NERCo inc. ■ 
Ntyrgort EtecteiA 
Praeter BGombte 
RPMInc ■ 
Unlvyrgol Foods 
UppPro uta P o ww 
wik Pubflesse 


3 0 70 5-23 5-2 

SB M m 
.12 *-Jl 5.” 
Q 72 5-J1 s-7 

Q .14 670 472 

0 .10 S-IO 4-25 

a 69V1 7.] (-10 

G _.14 5-14 J.* 

0 3)15 6-1 t] 

Q AS 5*15 4?19 

a .u uo uj 

a 7* 5*10 *2* 

Q JO M 4.19 

S -M 4-20 Ml 


O -M *-20 Ml 
A-Jumaai; swuootirtri 0-G»ort*rtv; S-innr- 
AamML ‘ ■ 

Source' URt. 


— 1 1 - iu-*" *1 ktf s ‘it ± h-mw 


New Digital Network 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan will, invest. 

S 11 .23 billion in the next 1 5 years 
for a new telecommunications net- . 
work, the government stud Friday."" 

A spokesman said the money 
would be used to set up an integrat- 
ed digital network to replace the 
current system by the year 2000.. 
About SO percent of the investment 
be used to buy ‘digital’ tele- 1 " 
phone equipment and the rest to‘ 
purchase telegram and data net-1 
works, he said. - - ; • > 

New Oil Strike Reported; 
In Chinese Delta Area • j 

Reuters ■ - 

1 ?55 NG “ Tte China Natick. . 
al Offshore Oil Corp, announced 
Friday an oil strike in the Peari 
River Della, the fifth since drillmBj 
started last year. - ■ 

A spokesman said an escploti' . 
«ory well by Phillips Petrofe 
Inieraauonal Corp. Asia,a 
» 2 .of PMlipg Petideian Col*- 
gelded 6.840 barrels * .toSgj: 


: -4s 

!ft 


'.Sf 

Ik 


liiiWHHrifiM-rHif/ii 1 ' , 



























































Mil .. 

"» 5^9 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 13-14, 1985 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Mi 


B 


KM) 

WhauM, 

* **» J3l8 ■*»» 

**a|| 

affiif 3i 

MM) 

K -tog 

v- Soles 1IH ■%« 

Wm® w -'58 

AM) 

Mhseuiaai 

* ^ ^ -Sjo ^ 

£■ SS S 3S Sj 

fr|S{«3iaw^ -®4 ife 

MW upijjfi -flTl 

AM) 

tomogwo, 


In Crown Zellerbach 

LmAnpln Tima Semte The S60-a-share price is “deariy 

SAN FRANCISCO — Ivan F. stratospheric.” a source close to die 


Crown Zeuerbach Corp. common 
stock* or 7.4 percent of tilt compa- 
ny’s sbaro outstanding. 

In a statement filed Thursday 
with the US. Securities and Ex- 


change Commission, Mr. Boesky trading at 3 p.m. Fri 
said be had paid nearly $83 mitlin p bach shares rose H to c 
or an average of $40.93 a share. For •<nu.. n: .1 j 


aung purposes. 

Analysts estimate (he company's 
value at abort 550 a share. 

In New York Stock Exchange 
trading at 3 p.m. Friday, Zefler- 
bach shares rose H to dose at 435L 


or m sjwageof share, for uy^re lcHiag ^ 

,, „ if we can't find a ‘white knight,* 

liquidate the company.’^ 
source aose 10 the bSd iid. A 


Mr. Boesky frequently buys 


- 

7J ^> UO 1.184 ^*5 

J ^ 

wissopom 

£ fs s» ® *» 

£ ■»» -«T5 jjjg g H 

UAMW S3 3 

J ggustrioTT^ — w 
f' M igg in. ^ 

• 1S4J0 ISSJn IE'S# lMjS *ii 
•v iSioo 15 aS ]&» lM 

s- as sS Ss IS 

» i«3o Itom ss *s 

JrSfiJ** Mm 14400 l«a£ ♦«! 

SW7 op 150 

r ^ n n £2 s* .*=• 

10 tsjs ?*A5 2JI -a 

«■ Sw jgj «* S§ -S 

jy Dtva 64.70 -3 

s * 3 

L i IlSJ 


to sdl the shares at a higher price. 
Crown ZcQerbach's directors an- 


„ oSSmSSSSSS 

m '** ^ for 51.63 bUQon, or 560 a share J ratCreHl4f - 

®*§°w 1 At the same time, the board said “By spinning off the timber, 

jm* -wtj ^ it planned to spin off interests in its well begin the process of liquidat- 

J * fs -«ts j3t |g ♦* rimberiand to shareholders and ing the company for the benefit of 

-Qgn 4o!g 3 urged than to rejea financier Sir the shareholder,” the source con- 

__ James Goldsmith's 54150-a-sharc linued. “Goldsmith would liqui- 

^ lender offer far a maiwitv of the date the company for Ms awn bene- 

Q5y ™5!s/^\ company’s shares. ' fit." 


in takeover parlance. 


for 51.63 bilBon, or 560 a share. 

;< At the same time, the board said 
it planned to spin off interests in its 
dmberiand to shareholders and 
urged them to rejea financier Sir 
James Gddsmhh's 54150-a-sbare 
tender offer far a majority of the 
company’s shares. 


GE Reports Earnings Up 5% 


United Pmj intenodonaj share, were up from income of $485 

FAIRFIELD, Connecticut — million, or 51.07 per share, in the 
General Electric Co. said Thursday same Quarter last year. Sales were 
its first-quarter earnings rose 5 per- down 6 percent to 56.2 billion from 


its first-quarter earnings rose 5 per- 
mit to 5511 million despite a de- 
cline in sales. 


down 6 percent to S< 
S6.6 billion. 

Sales for the first 1 


7140 TWO fifi 71 44 3£ 

33 as 

an J3 


Sales BiOO ? US Ljt 

U7S Offico ^ 

«. 

>V 3&M 29JJ1 Mu _ 

P 2123 Tflg 2^ 5« 

• 27.95 JRM Z/% V. 1 * -S 

• 27 J7 27^ ££ -J 

P Z7« 2J.7S S'" 

l w» ®j§ §2 gs 'i 

C 27 JO 27 jo -v 

#.Sata* 17.928 3741 n *0 -S 

MIA 002513 

lock Indexes " — 1 


I«1 shortly DviarB nia nut «oai 
ME) 

“ l 8250 »«1-7S IE» . 

o 1BS45 1B4U0 ISitJ 1*2 

C 1B9J5 1B9J5 189W 1MM 

»T 1*2.10 192.10 lSS w5 

/.Sales 55,145 
W» Up 354 


n 197J8 197.93 19 vlAS 197* , 
P 201 JO 202J0 201.90 
/.Sales 4J35 1 

U39 off 72 


n 1 05X0 105.90 10450 1017s „> 
o 107X5 107.95 107X5 j 

, c ^,r 

MM Oft 27 


lUKmaiuo. Sales lor the first quarter of 1984 

The earnings, equal to 51.12 per were the last to include GE’s for- 

- » mer Utah International unit 

. housewares operations. Sales from 

«ug nnpJ Stirinvnm continuing operations would have 

Tx^ j vJ been even with this year’s first- 

Reports '84 Loss 

Chairman John F. Welch Jr. 
said, “all the company's major 
SINGAPORE — Keppel business segments contributed to 
Shipyard LttL, Singapore’s gov- the increase in earnings." 

SfflLSWJftSS 

1 - WnnnmiM I ,ii t .. /ffin 1 UtCuDCHt OQ CuRTgCS Utft Hi 

& group net profUontOM mil- 

lira dofian ra 1983 wrald wit tayeafinanaal unpacL 

fcwi. ,U . ln ,„ L . GEs ehgibilviy for new govern- 
T ,,a > nU S shaS b^'foP^- 

ing costs d debt to finance the indictment, 

takeover of Straits Steamship “General Electric has made sub- 
Cain late 1983. The company missions to the secretary of the Air 
is now in the process of trim- Force which we believe will provide 

ming its operations and seeking the basis for prompt resolution of 
profitable ventures outsideSm- die issues and a decision to remove 
gapore, he said. the suspension. On that basis, there 

“We shall return to profit- should be no significant impact on 

ability in two years.” he «k i , our fin a n c i al results,” Mr. Welch 
: said. 


Malaysia 
Widens Scope 
OfPetronas 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia 
— The Malaysian Parliament has 
approved legislation allowing the 
national oil company, Petrosas, to 
participate in businesses outside of 
its original charter, which covered 
only oil exploration and develop- 
ment 

A bill to amend the Petroleum 
Development Act was approved 
despite strong opposition. 

A government official, KhaHl 
Yaalcob, told parliament the 
amendments, were aimed at ending 
doubts about the scope of Pc- 
tronas* activities. But an opposition 
leader, Lim Kit Siang, said they 
were designed to scuttle a pending 
strit challenging the legality of Po- 
tronas's takeover of the state- 
owned Bank Bumiputra. 

Petronas acquired a 90- percent 
stake in the bank in September for 
$130 million and rook over its 
debts, which totaled nearly $1 bil- 
lion. 

Bank Bumiputra’s bad debts 
were incurred by its subsidiary Bu- 
miputra Malaysia Finance through 
loans to now-failed Hong Koor 
property developers between 1979 

A suit filed against Petronas by a 
lawyer in December contends that 
Petronas violated the Petroleum 
Development Act by buying a com- 
pany undated to its purpose of 
exploration and development of Ml 
resources. 

The suit is scheduled to be heard 
July 21 

Malaysia's Bar Council, which 
represents attorneys, also criticized 
the government for pissing the 
amendments before the court had 
heard the suit. 

The Bar Council vice president. 

Pa ram r’ nmwrncamy mid that par- 
liamentary action could nullify is- 
sues in the suit 


Porsche Reports First-Half Profit 

Rcuttn 

STUTTGART — Porsche, the West German automaker, said 
Friday that it made a profit in the first half of the ament year coding 
July 31, but that sales fefl S3 percent from the year-earlier period. 

The company gave no profit figure for the fust half or forecast for 
the full year. But it said it expects to meet its 1984/85 targets of selling 

50.000 cars and raising turnover }o 3 billion Deutsche marks (about 
5952.5 million). The target compares with 1983/84 saks of just under 

44.000 cars and volume of 25 Billion. 

The positive first-half result was the result of high capacity use. 
good sales in the United States and a favorable doOar-mark exchange 
rate, the company said 


Company Earnings 

Revenua a net profits. In millions; are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


United States 

tedorai PbfMffad. 

IE Oner, im )*•« 

Arane ISU 138.9 

Net Inc. 12* 4J1 

Per Star*—. a IS <JJ9 

F*t Atlanta 
1*4 tutor. IMS HU 

Net Inc. Ui 143) 

Per Share 08* 048 

IWM InctudrM gain of St 
mtHton from sale, ins net In- 
d utU o loan A«* provision at 
>12 mUHott n IS million to 
voaroorlbr. 


Indiana Nafl 

1*1 Qaar. IMS Iftt 

Me Inc. 7J3 042 

Per Share 1J3 in 

Not htehnUo hot toss pro. 
vHum of 3J.lt million vs 
17.03 million, mi nol fa- 
CMOS pain of 30077X30 far 
etianoo In ropartlng trust 
fort. 


Fst Union 

i«r Qaar. ms nw 

Net Inc 23* U.I 

Per Share — 1.1* 140 

HBtonHotak 

1st Oust. IMS MM 

Revenue M&2 1448 

Mel Inc 235 79.) 

Par Share ui 071 


1st Over. IMS IMt 

Rev en ue __ 3755 37ip 

Net Inc 10* 503 

Par Shore— ftfl* 073 

N. Amor. Phiips 

1st Over. IMS 1W 

Ravenue 133 HI T7SJ 

Net Inc 27.7 2U 

Per Snare LM eja 

Owns K nots 
1st Qwar. I9SS MW 

Revenue— eu id 

Ner Inc 211 )u 

Per Snare 371 (U7 


SI 0 J minion. IMS net In- 
cktoot goto of 3*J mutton 
from tost. 

Rubbwmmd 

tatQeer. IKS nh 

Revenue Ul.« 137.7 

Net Inc 11 J 10.9 

Per Share 049 OM 

Sunbanks 

lit Qaar. IMS HM 

Net Inc ITS M3 

Per Share 079 0JB 

TaxatOBIGas 

M Osar. IMS 1M4 

Revenue 434 5737 

Kit Inc MSB 87 .94" 

Per Share 0 J 8 042 

HtHsH MIS 1M4 

Revenue 9432 13MO 

Net Inc 14179 14744 

Par Shore 071 0 JB 

VaHay NaH 

mover. MRS in* 

Hot Inc 17J 112 

Per Share — \M 0 » 


Aerospatiale Had 
Profit for 1984 
After 1983 Loss 


French state-owned aerospace 
manufacturer, returned to profit- 
ability in 1984 after registering a 
loss the year before, the group's 
president said. 

Henri Martrc told reporters 
Thursday that the company, one of 
the four main partners in ihc Air- 
bus Industrie consortium, earned 
330 million francs (about 535 mil- 
lion at ament rates) in 1984. In 
1983 the group, which is also a 
major military-equipment manu- 
facturer, postal a loss of 357 mil- 
lion francs. 

Mr. Manre said turnover in- 
creased 10 percent last year, to 
25.14 billion francs, from 22.87 bil- 
lion the year before. 

He said 61 percent of Aerospa- 
tiale's production of aircraft, rock- 
ets, satellites and missiles had been 
for export. “For 1985 we see an 
increase in the aircraft and helicop- 
ter sector, stagnation in missiles, 
and a reduction in the space area," 
he added. 

Aerospatiale has drawn up plans 
for a small reusable space shuttle 
called the Hermes, which France is 
pressing its partners in the Europe- 
an Space Agency to accept. 


American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. has asked the Federal 
Communications Commission for 
permission to raise rates in (be 
United States by up to 26.7 percent 
for long-distance interstate calls 
between parties less than 55 mile 
(88 kilometers) apart. 

Caterpillar Tractor Co. said it ex- 
pected to meet its goal of reducing 
costs by 22 percent in 1985, a year 
ahead of the target date it estab- 
lished in 1982. 

Continental Airlines Corp. said it 
will lower its full-sendee coach 
fares to Houston and Denver from 
Newark, New Jersey, to S65 for 
advance bookings and off-peak 
travel and $89 for peak travel, ef- 
fective April 15. 

Daewoo Corp. of South Korea 
said it has been awarded a $337- 
miUion contract by Libya to build 
sewer and water facilities, roads, 
pumping stations and a telephone 
system in Benghazi. 

Epson Ltd- said in London that 
it had introduced a new software 
package called Taxi — a new 
means of communicating with the 
computer — and a new 16-bit per- 
sonal computer, the QX-I6. 

European Banking Co. said it 
would offer institutions and profes- 
sional clients an independent 
equity-dealing service in 30 select- 
ed European stocks beginning 
April 15. 

General Dynamics Corp. denied 
a report that David Lewis, the com- 
pany chairman, would resign at 
next month’s annual shareholders 



meeting and that a successor has 
been picked. 

Hitachi Ltd. of Japan said its 
Hitachi America Ltd. subsidiary is 
introducing two single-chip micro: 
computers that use technology in- 
volving complementary metal ox-> 
idc semiconductors, or CMOS. 

Kaiser Sled Corp_ which earlier 
this week merged into Per tea 
Group, said it and California Steel 
Industries have received a S 150- 
million contract from Pacific Texas 
Pipeline to proride 500 miles of 
pipe for a proposed crude-oil pipe- 
line running from California to 
Texas. 

Matsushita Electric Industrial 
Co. said it will soon start exporting 
its VHS-format video camera-re- 
corder. shipping at least 10.000 a 
month to the United States next 
summer and a maximum 10.000 n 
month to Europe starting in June. 

Muriel Siebm & Col, a discount 
brokerage, bas expressed interest in 
purchasing the discount brokerage 
business of BerilL Bresler & Schuj- 
man Jnc. 

Transcontinental Services Group 
NV, a Netherlands Antilles invest- 
ment company, said it is forming 
an investment group to acquire Se- 
ll grrun & Laiz lnc„ a beauty salon 

and jewelry company. 

United Press International told a 
meeting of the .American Society of 
Newspaper Editors that it had 
turned its fifth straight monthly 
profit in February, that it was 
meeting with potential outside in- 
vestors and that it “will survive" its 
financial problems. 


A Dim View of Deficits 


(Continued from Page 9) 

and penetrating bombers receive 
the lion’s share of the appropria- 
tions, while the more essential 
ground forces, close air-support 
aircraft, and fast sea lift do sub- 
stantially less well" 

Mr. Kaufman does not accept 
Mr. Stem's implicit assumption 
that the military decision- making 


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process and incentives need remain 
the same and hence that the pro- 
portions of waste and strength at 
any given spending lewd will re- 
main the same, inqwwt he con- 
tends that "at the root of the cur- 
rent failure is a decision-miking 
system that has became a parody of 
modern defense management.” He 
says that at the Pentagon “since the 
advent of the Reagan Administra- 
tion, not only has decontrol come 
back into vogue, there has also 
been a full-scale retreat to the feu- 
dal reign of the 1950s that Presi- 
dent Eisenhower worked so hard to 
end.” 

Economists often substitute 
ideologies or political loyalties for 
detailed knowledge of the issues 
they touch, and that is a root cause 
of the dissension among them and 
their loss of credibility and influ- 
ence. 

Thp disrensio n onwng ihp wwin. 
mists is no myth, as an artide in the 
December 1084 issue of the Ameri- 
can Economic Review by four Eu- 
ropean economists, based on a sur- 
vey of nearly 1,000 economists in 
five countries, demonstrates. We 
shall consider that study in a future 
column. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


CWCI HUB BUREAU CHIEF 

CW Gxnmumcalion/inc^ publish** of over 50 computer-related newspapers and magazines 
in more than 20 countries, has an immediate opening in Hs fast-growing internatio na l 
Dep a rtment to head Hs newfy created hub bureau, located in Fans, France. 

Primary responsibilities of the hub bureau chief will include reporting and editing news on 
co mpn ter-related events and developments in Europe for inclusion in the CW International 
News Network, which serves the extensive family of CWCI publications. The hub person will 
also be responsible for retaining foreign stringers in other European countries coordinating 
news assignments between CW head quarters and European stringers; editing in-coming copy 
from stringers; and transmitting all copy to CWCI headquarters in Framingham, Mass. 

The hub bureau chief will report to and work closely with, CWCTs Director of International 
News in Framingham- Ideal candidate will possess a strong journalism background, excellent 
editing skills, and knowledge of the computer industry: experience in overseas reporting and 
foreign languages preferred Ability to work independently and organize many tasks is 
inderirable. 

inrmrmvwa pantws conrocrz 

Susan Blackeney/ 

CWa P.O. Bax 880, Fnxmngham, MA., 

(617) 879-0700. 

In Europe co nt act : Axd La Blob, 

Computofworid Communications S.A., 

185 Ava. Charlas-cto-GauBe, 

92200 NouOIy-stfr-Sairm, Penis, Frcmce. 


CW COMMUNICATIONS/INC 


3leralb«afe®ributt^. 

C . pauHnaiirv.MitaniNiwiafa^Miw 

INFERENCE 

Schedule 

1985 

THE INVESTMENT CLIMATE AND INCENTIVES IN EUROPE 

Cosponsored with Plant Location International 

April 25-26, Brussels 

TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN HUNGARY 

June 13-14, Budapest 

THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OUTLOOK 

Cosponsored with Oxford Analytica 

September 19-21 , Oxford 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY 
Presented by International Televent, Inc. 

September 22-24, Cannes 

OIL AND MONEY IN THE EIGHTIES 

. Cosponsored with The Oil Daily 

October 24-25 \ London 


For details on any of these conferences^ please complete the form below and mail it to Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune Conference Office, 181 Avenue Charles-de-GaulIe, 92521 Neuflly Cedex, 
France; or call Susan Lubomirski, our Conference Manager, in Paris on 747 12 65. 


Please tick a p prop ri ate bax(es) 

| | Investment 

1 — 1 Incentives in Europe 

□ Trade and 

Investment in Hungary 

□ In ternational 
Business Outlook 

□ 

□ Oil and Money 


Surname 

first Name 

Position 

Company 

Address 

Gty/countiy 

Telephone 

Company aaivity 


13-4-85 


























Uft 

■ft FPA 



17 

21 

lift 

lift 

lift— ft 

22ft 

14ft Fablnd 

JO 

2.1 

■ 

15 

19ft 

19 

m* + ft 

lift 

Sft FMata 




127 

Aft 

Sft 

5ft— ft 

11 

7ft FtConn 

1.00a 93 

7 

7 

10ft 

w 

10 ft 

30ft 

18ft FtFSLn 

Mb 2.1 

7 

Ax 29ft 

28ft 

28ft— ft 

13ft 

11 FWrmB 

m 

AJ 

10 

17 

lift 

lift 

lift + ft 

17ft 

lift FlKhP 

AST 53 

11 

7 

12ft 

12ft 

12ft 

U 

7ft FttcGE 



4 

40 

8ft 

Oft 

8ft— ft 

27ft 

22ft FKGEpfAJU 154 


4 

25ft 

25ft 

25ft + ft 

lift 

■ft FlanEn 




8 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft + ft 

43ft 

25ft RaRck 

JO 

14 

11 

22 

43ft 

43ft 

43ft + ft 

30ft 

22ft Flak* 

1481 54 

W 

242 

25ft 

24ft 

24ft— ft 

13ft 

Aft Food mi 



10 

22 

10ft 

10 

10 — ft 

10 

7ft PaotaM 




23 

9ft 

9ft 

Oft 

34ft 

28ft Footapf 




2 

33 

33 

33 + ft 

9ft 

Aft FltilDG 



Z1 

57 

9 

■ft 

9 

112 

48ft FordCn dAJH* 



A1QZ 94ft 

94 

94 —1ft 

22ft 

15 Fame A 

.15 

J128 

1 

20ft 

20ft 

20ft 

22ft 

15 Panics 

49 

4129 

1 

20ft 

20ft 

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The Associated Am . "-'-6 

LONG BEACH, California — Douglas An* 
craft Co. said Friday that China has .agreed^? 
bny 26 MD-80 series.anfinera and has an opti&f 
to purchase another 15 in: a transaction taf 
could exceed $1 billion. . . 

The licensed production' arrangement is tfeg> 
first between 8 U.S. aircraft mannfactorer and* 
China, said Donbas, a unit of St Louis-based 
McDonnell Douglas Corp. It also calls for Go- 
nese workers to be trained in the Uni ted States^ 

, All but one erf. the twin-engine planes wonkt 
be delivered partially assembled to Chinn 
final assembly there. 

The value of the agreement was not an| 
nounced, but Dave Emum^ a Douglas spokes-, 
man, said “the substantial majority" of th& 
work would be performed by Douglas and it$ 
.subcontractors. . . 

Completed MD-80 series airliners cost abo«:" 
S25 million each. At full price,; the 41 planes” 
would cost $1.02 billion. •, . Z 

: - The agreement follows six years of negotia^ 
tibns between Douglas, Siaqp i’ai Aviation In- 
dustrial Corp. . and. Chm* Aviation Supply' 
Carp., the procurement subsidiary of ChmaV ‘ 
Civil Aviation General Administration. - t'.j 


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WbRIS-^Ffaax’s gross do- 
o^prodtwpwalaninlla* 
j^^asttaamiaaliaicof!^ 
1 ^peroulwt ywr compared with 
x Q^-pcrecm rise in 1983. the 
Natioaaf Satisfies Insrimtere* 
ported Fiktay,. 

Tfe H?venmj«it had estinai- 
-e& to.TOnny that die GDP. 

measures x cocmr/s io- 
' lal output of goods and jer- 
ww, mi nus in coroe fags oper- 
ations abroad, expanded at a 
2-percent rale bat year. !t said 
.the reason for the downward 
revision in the latest figures was 
. dial the February estimate was 
bawd on incomplete founts 

quarter data. 

The agency said household 

consumption rose Oi percent 

tain year, unchanged from 1983. 
■The weak rise was attributed to 

t an erosion of consumer pur* 
chasing power following cca- 


i oouBC-austerity measures. 


Nixdorf Shines In European Market 


( Continu e d frora Page 9) 
that Accompany wotdd double its 
J983 sale* of 2.7 tfBkn DM by 
1987. After seeing sales jump 21 


IBM, Bull or Olivetti come in and Mr, Heslop pointed out, howev- 
try to take over those markets, Mr. er. that many of Nixdorf S origin^ 
Lufl said. desktop computer syspns are be* 

.No less important, he said, has coming obsoetft, wit, he added, 
perona in W84 ro 3.27 tnllion DM, been the oompaa/s strategy of Nixdorf been mcwiiig to rodstc 
the- company’s deputy chairman, providing customers wiib a com- these with microprocessor-based 
KSws Loft, said Nixdorf was wdl j^etc of rice-automation package oT systems, providing for greater pn> 
ogia way toward achieving the computer hardware and Nixdorf s cessing power at lower prices, 

W target. Ccunmany sales haw own software tailored to the user’s the snaagy at Nixdorf is oot 
risen an average 20 percent a year needs, one ttf focusing entirely on devd- 

for theMst 10 yars. Mr. Loft said Nixdorf currently qptnent of new products but rather 

.In 1984, about 89 percent of holds a 30-percem market share in ' combining existing computer and 
sues were in Europe and about 10 Europe for coorpmerized-bankinig software systems with the compa- 
pcrceai in the United Steles, _ equipment That puis it about even, ny-s djgiu), , computer-coniroDed 

■ With fierce jxice compeution he said, with its mtg’or competitor, 
ami heavy investment costs, tndud- IBM. 

mganomlayof400iniIlk»DMfor “Nixdorfs slogan of ‘We sell so- 
ptam and equipment test year, Nix- Imioca’ hxs been very efreclivc," 

' dorfsproft margin continues to be said Chris Heslop, on analyst at 
squeewd. But the fact that earnings 1DC Europa Ltd, a computer con- 
have trailed the rapid surge in sales sultancy groq> in London. 

^ * ‘ * u - J: Nixdorf oopects a huge maiket 

opening up for its switching sys- 
tems as various governments, in- 
cluding 'West Germany’s, prepare 
to digitalize their telephone ncl- 

. . , , . „ works. The company currently sells 

am-sized companies, before raulu- market, which is not fully devet- idecommunicabons equipment in 
wutonal heavyweights such as oped,” Mr. Heslop said. ' 13 countries. 


does ihile to temper, the optimism ■ “Rath^ than providing parts, 
at Nixdorf. Nixdorf is able to sell a whale padc- 

Theltey to Nixdorfs success has age; that has given them a good 
been finding prof liable nicbes, no- customer base in German retail 
isbfy in office automation for and banking and will make it easier 
banking, retail and small 10 medi- for them to enter tbeUJC. banking 


telephone switching systems. 

"'Right now, PABX can only 
transmit voice signals, but in the 
future we’re going to be able 10 
transmit voice, data, graphics and 

word-processing functions through 

PABX," Mr. Luft said 


[ 


Over-the-Counter 


April L2 


NASDAQ Notional Mofkol Prices 


MH HM CM* IPJULOrM 

(Cdadnwd from Page.12) 


iMJUri 

Wff fll 
; ’larmi 

iaSo 

MlcrMk. 

Mtcnfv 

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bs, China 
on Airline^ 

Associated P tBs 

B ***201 

^^ D f, arran8c ® al «lfe 
U.s. aircraft manu/acmur®-. 

-glas Corp. It also calls fer rv 

be trained in the United s£ 

r the twin-engine piawsl^ 

assemBied to oWfe 

' the agreemem u-as w 
ive Eastman, a Douglas nk 
substantial m^oritv” of ^ 
performed by Dou^s aids 

r>>80 series airliners cost ah» 
h. At full price, the 41 pbnc 
1 billion. 

it follows six years of Mate 
•ouglas, Shanghai Avuiionh. 
and China Aviation Sqxft 
areraent subsidiary of Chmi 
rcneral Admimstranaii 
■nize China's air iranswunnr 
he market potential far Doug- 
'orsham, president of Douglas, 
meficial partnership wuhsuper 
the future." 

to know the people [m rit 
y] as expert techmrians aX 
n,” he said. 

erated two MD-80s since ft- 
3C partially assembled MD-S 
lelivered to Shanghai bewn 
with the first of the airlmea 
no service in 1987. 


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y The .isudated Peas 1_. 

CHICAGO — First Chicago 
Corp., the 10th largest UJS. bank 
holding company, said Friday that 
first-quarter earnings fell 23 per- 
cent, principally because it took a 
SI 5. 8- million writedown on an in- 
vestment in a Brazilian bank. 

* It was the first major banking 
company to report a decline in 
frrsNquarter earnings. Three others 
— J.P. Morgan & Co. Int, Cbeon- 
- w k» New York Corp. and Marine 

13122 a; ‘TOfidland Banks Inc. —posted prof- 
, me **2 m gains earlier this week- . 

First Chicago;the parent of First 
National Bank of Chicago, said it 
earned S383 railliofl, or 65 cents a 
share, in the three months ended 
March 31, compared with a profit 
df $49.8 million, or 91 cents a share, 
a year earlier. 

The company wrote down by. 
$15.8 million, or 33 cents a share, 
iis investment in a Brazilian affile 
ate. Banco Denasa de Investimehto 
M- Fust Chicago owns 44.5 per- 
£ *'J ^. frnt of the. Braalian ' investment 


re? 1 


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lank, ‘which has assets of about 
5200 million. Banry Sullivan, chair- 
ipnn of First Chicago, aid. theft* 
zilian affiliate was hurt by‘austtnty ; 
measures by the Brazilian govenw 


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Illinois to Consider 
Midwest Bank Region 

' Reuters 

CHICAGO — LegisteSon to es- 
tablish a. seven-state . Midwest 
banking region has been intro- 
duced in the Illinois Senate; the 
Illinois Banking Association said 
Friday. 

. Tire bill would allow bank hold* 
mg companies to buy other bank 
holding companies or banks under 
reciprocal agreements among the 
states of. Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, 
K entirety; Michigan. Missouri and 
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Brokerage-House Executives 
Took Big Pay Cuts in 1984 

By Kenneth N. Gilpin cent reduction in total' pretax cotn- 
t/ew York Times Senice pensadon from 1983 levels, to 

NEW YORK — Executives at S»00.000. Donald E, Nkkdson, 
most of the major publicly traded P^dem^COTsamer markets, re- 
Walt Street brwerage bouses took «n/ed ,S485.000^ last .year, corn- 
substantial cuts in compensation P ared wilh . mnhon m total 
last year, according to proxy stale- compensation in 1983. 
meats (Bed with the Securities and - Pretax profits at EF. Hutton & 
Exchange Commission. * Company dropped by roughly 86 

■ “The retail business was horrible percent from . L983 levels last year, 
last year, and that had a very nega- Robert Fompo, Hutton’s chair- 
live impact oa overall profitabtli- man,' drew. the same $375,000 sala- 
ty,“ said Perrin H. Long, an indus- ry in both years! But two years ago 
try analyst at Upper Analytical he received abends of $1,125 mil- 
Senrices Inc. “Since a major por- lion, and last year that figure 
turn of a WaD Street executive's dropped to $600,000. . 
salary is im*mive- r d a i«4 if rf« AlMmfl iLyn*,Pf n «,Foma 
firms m not profiiabte they wai t ^ Smi ^, ^ Ro?w - £ B irl, 
gwnglo TOke as much money. chlifBiBt lnd William A. 

Schreyer.'diiet executive, look hef- 
nyew was most scvere.il hine cuU in pay Iasi year aslhe firm's 

SJfelSS- E?“ “ P * m f P>«w «Sngs fell try more than 

Webber fdi by nearly 95 percent, £5 oerccnL^ 

Ip $9.4 million, • 

For Donald B. MarronV the .M 1- - Bjrk* who received $1^56 
firm’s ehairtnan; chief .executive million in total compensation in 
and president,' this meaot a 60-per- 1 983, brought in $625:000 last year. 


international classified 


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Ml RAH WANTED (erAmncoB fan- 
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preferred, tnjrfh speakna S«nd 
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vwtahtngton DC Enflfah, no Brake. 
Send referenoes. tram*, photo 1754 
Wexford. V+kx VA 22190. 


AD FAIR Aug. NY area Beyl 6 4 3- 
ftiem Enauh. CaV/»m*B S father, 
380 Hentoge Dr. New Gry. NY 

"“LVliSr" 


10956. ! 


1.215a 


AU PAHU Start mimdaely. Suburb 
NY. Nornmokef. Tel our puerNdhrf 
31-8851 11594 or umie 43 StocAoH. 
New Hyde Fort. NY 11040. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITKWS WANTED 


YOUNG ITALIAN COL 29. bed rdtr- 

ences *nih prafassanal worbng egm- 
nence ei rternabond oo m po n i ei. 
very fond of cMdren. <1 ww of 
enpramng her Engksh. wuhes r> ake 
cor* of cMdren ei EnaUi foody, bra- 
in, for 3 to 3 months On sunn ier. 
London and Bnahion areas or Scot- 
land. Reply so Llamela Coma. V« 
T*wi™ fem. 16. 00131 
(Home) Tel- 0774/39001 9, 


ALWAYS AVAOAHE - AU PASS. 
diUren '» noniy, nun's helper* A ofl 
brandies cl Id doe* Hein doraeshc 
help woridynde. Csd Sfaane Bueou, 
London 730 8122^142 (24 hart U- 
CEWAGY.TK: B95067&.OANCG. 


HONG KONG Sepmnber. New Zd> 
lend prl 27. seeks namWhced poo- 
ban, leadwig EngUi for 3 . 6 mem. 
•xperiaKMf Keimncn. Driver. 
iMimr. R Era, 35 Bm Grave Rood. 
London SWllTet 01 ^6 2782 


ABOVE AVBAJQE POSmONS for 
above average soff . Cal An Par and 
DomesBe Appoemm m UK 01-579 
2040 INTRDc G pal 

faermtmere Coraubonal 


EDUCATB7 TRAVBH) rrtiAngual 
Dtmli lady Lvwgci holy wants Sum. 
met portion Europe. USA. as forty 
assataS. Box 208^rforaU Tribune, $3 
Via dela Mereede. 00187 brae. 


ALWAYS AVAHAME LONDON only 
babymmden & Id dan duly leads. 
Some foM>. London 730 8122 / 
5142. Oceneed employment apeney 


LADY S3, Aandi. seeks babysHMM in 
Amencan forty. Free ro traral Uene 
Defend. 32 rue L Beton. 75002 IW 
T*TSS 82 48. 


ENGLISH tMMMES & Mother's Helpi 
free now. Nadi Agency, 53 Owdt 
Hood. Ham. UX TAfmZj 290*4/5 


SBHOUS A RESPONSIBLE PERSON 
wG do hautealting for reaumable 
rale. Tel Parts 500 35 00/ 775 2? 79. 


AUTOMOBILES 


IHV CARS for Impart to the UJL 

v DOT-CONVOTH) 

2S0 St/GS, redTpdomnxj toother, 
Sepeed, OMBAJOOtL 
500 Sty 85 iMfo oc n c/potomno 
leather, DM115,000. 

500 S*C btoot. p u lonwio leather, 
loaded. DMlMXCa 
500 SB. angiroase, block toadwr, 
loaded; DM120D00- 
IQES AUTOMOBUE. Sluttwi 70, 
tek {Of 711/760966, k 725961 


J^BtCBlES tram EUROPE 
WE fHJHAUZE CARS TO MEET US. 
SAFETY STAMJARDS 

JD.O.T. A EJP-A. 

5 YEARS BCPBHBUCE 
„ X HUNK t SC- 
(nda^pofis. Indfoea 317-291-0106 


MERCEDES 500 SL 
7915 MODS. 

Only 700 km. Star grey metak, 
blade leather, ABS, air coadhonRL 
Becker radio, dc. AvalaUe NOW 
Arts sate or part eadttmge 
for new Mercedes 500 5U 
Tel: Mode Crate (93) 25 12 60 


FERRARI 400 

Brand new double (dr ccns W oning 
ei4* a> lr r ot o r beige In* 
drid (Spain) 4567564 


BMW, MERCEDES, SAAB, PORSCHE 

New complete can bed pnees. totro- 

cor Hafcnd Ud, P.O. Bae 1250, 5602 
BG. Endtoven (0)40425106. T b 
51497 MALE 1^8. 


1VM PORSCHE 911 CARRERA, 

13X00 knu, tanas, for sale bam. 
Porsche enpoyee. Cafl W. Germany 
(0) 7150-33094 after 7 pm. 


GREMLIN X US plates, a x corKEftm-' 
cd, driven only 9. 400 miles by oriaetd 
owner. 53X00 or nearest oner. Fans 
551 BO 80 leave memage. 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOMOBILES 


nw 308 GUI Brand M* March 
85J red. or oon dk oned. Tel London 
day 438 1795. Era 581 0921 


AUTO RENTALS 


QtAHC HW A CAS. Reap can 

w*h phone: bh Sent, Mrawte* 
Jogior, BMW, Iwouunes, can. 
46 r fterra Ownory 75008 PmU. Tel; 
72030.«. Tele* 63CW P CHAHjOC 


AUSTRIA t EAST EUROPE USS15J00 
per day. Asohmg, fra menbr u edf 
emtr. 8, A-1Q20 Vienna. let 2<l69t 


CHAUFFEUR 

SERVICES 


ENGLAND: Be rare of a cfcw 
oaraier ar leraee on yoer nrt me. 
flea 60742. BIT. 63 Long Acra. London 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR WTO THE UiA. 

The doemneet raqatoins ruRy vrhoianL 
mat do to bring a car wo the US. 
teUy and legaey. b nduda new & 

P r,e 3i3!^ ,, '*^ "P*. 
DOT X ErA oonvonMi oddraMl, ess- 
tom deo ran ce & shppng ppoedures 
« ml oi legal pans. Becarae at the 
tfrau dote, you can save op to 
USSIBJXIO when baying a Mracedra, or 
BMW in Europe & nparhag a to the 
Sums To recent* ms manual, send 
USSIBJOtedd LIS51 JOforpoacart to 
PJL xhmf, Putwiif in 313i 
7000 Stungart 1, West Germany 


MATD4A S UP P IN G 
Sbfopfog ko/friun U5JL 

MA1MA: Antetp (3) 234 36 61 
234 35 72 


Mra* taw WortwkU Cor SHnpi** 

Dnrty «i fte seaports ■ fosr&reMoe 
vwe - Ml documentation 
TRANSSHIP GMBH 
Bun germetaer -Srmdi- Ssr. S8«0 
D-280D Bremen I, W. Geraaoy 
Teh 0421/14264, The 246584 


SUP YOLK CAR TO A FROM USA 

HA ANTWERP AND SAVE, Free ha- 

Set. Regular urimp- Airport deiwny. 
AMESCCT Krtbesftaat 7 Arauerp. 
Mann, tefe 231 42 39. tit 71469. 


fRANKFURT/MAM-W. Gemow. H 

toeratarn GmbH. Teh 069448071. 
ftek-ap «d Over Europe -ip/ra-thips- 


WORUWBE Car shnwHl & reaiov 

ok ATK, NV, Anterw2Z 2000 Am- 
>. Belgium. 03/231 1^3T»3153S 


TRANSCAR 20 rue U Sueor. 75116 
Para. Tet 500 0304. Me*; B39S31 
Antwerp: 233 99 85. Cbra« 39 4344 


AUTO CONVERSION 


HAVE YOUR MERCEDES, BMW, 
POttSCHE.JAGUAXaaiMnBdforint. 
parr » the US Appravai aMraateed. 
we orronged paperMvi, bandma, 
sheppmg. name cal for a-ice quote. 
KJSAatOMOeXE Gmfcfi . P.tito 
700344. D-7000 Surttoort-ro. Teh 
(M711-fel013 or 767BlSTrtx 7255968. 


DOT/BPA CONVERSIONS 10 US. 

S 3. Amgance gut00VBi.d VIA 
6300 Freeport Centre. Bate- 
more. MO 21220^ 3016338611, 
Tbu- 4995689 VIA US. Autn* avaflotie 
to Belgium. Teh 32-50-715071. Tlx: 
82209^ 


DOT/EPA CONVERSIONS to 

US specs. Steppng, bondng. HMraxa 
Enopean Autaroctn* Comphances toe 
wTzoetent, 2586 JE The Hogue. 
Phone Hated (0) 70-5441 «T 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EXCAUBUR 

AUrOMORttES 

ora completely handbuflt in America- 
Only 44 of the 250 unil production for 
1983 ore being alocateate die Emope- 
an and Middle East market 

New for 1985 (for Europe ante) a a 
special General Motors £7 tore vo «*■ 
one producing 300 HP. nt ds natoa 
term or 425 rtP. when superchotged. 

Woes start at USS64jaOO + optionai 
«W«nen» (FOB factory). 

U» winner of the ISfli 
Concourse In ternaliewrd 
Bea uli eu car Mer, April 1 

itary qpprarimataly 8 weeks from 
order, white akcahoa lasss. For more 
infwtwjhan contact the sole andcucfo- 
bvb dntribuSors; 

EXCAUBUR MOTOR CAR 

DtSnraUTOlS 

Pork Mace. Ave tie la Ceeh* 
Maul* Carte, Monaco 

Tefr 33 - 93 - 25 63 91 
Talma 469*70 MC5 

* 

We wfll shortly be opening showrooms 
in Canoes and Geneva 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

for [AtMBMATC delivery 
REST SERVICE 

Far dimping, ine wmn e e , bond. 

1 iraUJLA. 


RUTE INC 

Tomsstt. 52. 6000 Frankfurt, 

W Gertn, Ml (OS 69232351, fa 411S9 
InformoOon only by phone or telex. 


MERCHJES 3*0 SR NEW 
Bkxk-Uuo meicftc. bmge leather uphal- 
stery, or condWanng. 4 power win- 
daws. Mesnorq seals, tetnpomcR. 

Car an mdkbd. (other usea moduli afro 
on hand) ar Heidefoerg. Contort tA 
06203/15279. Telex 465066 MORN - 0 


ALTOS TAX FREE 

10 YEARS 

We Deftrar Cm to ft* Worid 

TRANSCO 

Reaping a constant aodt of more ton 
300 brand new an 

Trgnsoo &*y 95 Nootdetoan. 

Tel 323i« «3a/£ mBTMNS B 

FROM STOCK 

Mercedes 500 SLjwv bfod 
Mercedes 300 SL/Sa/SEC. n*w 
aid kam others an 

CatMac Ferrari, Aww, ftmge 8«w, 
lad flow, Farid*, Meraedci rad 

| -7 — 

WlW ■* 1 P ly UAMCV 

Same -day regeeuttui pcsAto. 

ICZKOV1TS 

Oundersttaae 36, CH8027 Zurich 
Tefe 05/302 76 1ft Telex: 819915. 

NEW IMSWCUM 

MOn Modi Feari/Cream Leteher 
MO 5E TSrwraid teteMu. Leefter 
200 SS/Sa Mm/ G ray tortrar 
BMW 745 / 63S / 53S 

Afl an ft*r equipped. 

For more rtamakon oos 

Munch. W4C Germori^B9 - 465Q41 

Hoots |0 am. • 10 pa. 

DAWAJI TRADE 

MTLDBJVBtY 

We keep a lorae stock of 
moot ear brands 

Tet CGJ6a 55 13 

Telex 65658 

03 sue Lena, 

1060 Brveseb. 

GERMAN CARS 
FROM GERMANY 

Eicpenenced car trader far Mercedes. 
Porsche or BMW. tanedtote dtirary. 
Fui service eoport/expart US. DOT & 
EPA for tons and dealer. OCM. Teer- 
stegenstr. 8, A Duenddorf. W. Gomo- 
vyTT * t (0J 211-4346*6. telex 8587374. 

MERCEDES 

380 SEC 

Surf blue, velours gray/btoe 
ESrait DM2C00 o«* 
the fat prise 

Cal tor more edomebon 
O-HNANZMG CORPORATION 

Tefe 8141 > 26622 

Tk 527697 CG5 0. 

BMOPE I USA SPECS. 

AM roafeei for woridwwfe detary from 
stock. 5end for a TAX-FREE caolog. 

■MW - MBtCEDB - PORSCM 
VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

EUROPE AUTO BROOKS 

POB 214. 3430 AEttanregein Holland 
Tet p! 348241346. Tbu ZWM EA8 Nl 

RG TEAM 

Offers tax free an at law prices. Afl 
makes & types; new & used. Fair deliv- 
ery. PO Bra. 2050. 4800 C8. BREDA / 
Hafcnd. Td n 7665155a Tk 74281 

CAR TRADBtS: New A Second Hand 

Ful service: .sbppetg, 
awamoa, msuroncc 
■MSDeGaudwnk.2232Sdilde.AiO. 
werp. Bdghim 323/6581260. Th 2J127. 

MBKEDCS/ PORSCHE 
New/iud. bnaMcfoite detary, FaAVL 
Tet Germany |D| 6234-4092, 464986 

tmema 19*5- LARGE stock. 
TEASCO. G8. am CH. Gdf Jolw « 
London. Set 44-1-208 0007, Acs 
8956022 TEAS G 

NEW PEUGEOT, lend Borer. Range 
Rarer, Toyoto, 4*4. tropica specs. 
Bntox Zoonebaan 18, Maoiiev 
brad* Haloed JOP0445492. b 47082 

NEW MEKB3ES. BMW. RHD tax 
free amort mmwtac oetaty. UK 
(093376099. He 312242 AriDTlX. G. 

NEW BMW'S. M635. CSI + 745L 
dianond dadc/baffolo raNhroata. W 
Germany (01211 -S/3503, tic 85881 16 

TAX fra* cars, afl makes & madefr. 
ADC.NY. Anberni 22, 2000 Antwerp, 
Bdgmn. Td 03/231 16 53 T* 31535 

TRUCKS 

WANTH3- American mode heavy duly 
■reds, 1972 & newer, loanron not 
w^ortra* AgdV neetfctf far dtsfer 

Sj3s2l^S’^^lrifay 5/5 ' 

LEGAL SERVICES 

US U4AUGKATK3N visas. ATyiSpioi 
& Rodney. 1925 Bridtdl Ay, Mian FL 
33129. Tet (3051 6(39600. tx 441469. 

DOMMCAN DIVORCB. B« 20802. 

Santo Domingo, Dotaicen Repdftc. 

LOW COST FUGHTS 


te-9- rP» 

HOUDAYS & TRAVEL ) 



HB1A5 YACHTING. Yachr Charters. 

Aoademias 28, Alhera 10671, Greece. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


THE MAGISBRCENT 
STELA 
SOLARIS 

7 AM) 14 DAY CRUISES 

To die Greek Uamfe, Turkey, 
Egypr&hroeL 

1 Scrimp Every Monday from from 
and 

THE YACHT-LUCE 
STELLA 
OCEAhHS 

3 AND 4 DAY CRUSES 

To Ae Greek MartA & Turkey. Saitng 
every Monday & Friday from From 

Fleam apply to^weTrart Agent on 

2. Km. Sentes Sl, Alhem 10562 
leta- 215621, Phone 3228883 

Fans tet *345 80 36 
Munich tah 395 613 
Geneva lei 327 110 
Zurich tet 391 36 55 


Cnme in Elegance 

to the GREEK ISLANDS 
EGYPT, ISRAEL A TURKEY 

CHOKE OF 7-4-3-2-1 DAY 
CRUISES awl of Athene (Ffraeee) 


HC MODBM LUXURY SHOPS 
JUFfTBL JASOfL 
ASUS, OCEANU5, HOMES, 
W. RBWS5ANCZ ARGONAUT. 
OHWS NEPTUNE, PEGASUS 

HIROTHa CRUSES 


Lenda 


.2660324 

1-443032 


Ate 


New Yost. 


73408 05 

4757806 

-4526641 A 9 


12121 5991750 
WM 85517361 


HOTELS 


SWITZERLAND 


GB4EVA 

RBBOKZ DC FRANCE 

4 Ava. de Fnxa, CH-1202 Geneva 
Tel 0041 22731 14 79 
Beautiful lint dan, on-condtioned. 
residential famished apartments and 
stodns. Fuly eqapped lMttf* 
do3y maid service. 

WOoUy and monthly rates. 
EmraleM loamn 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


VIDEO 


VBEO SHOPS ATTENTION! 
VEtO Cassette] offered 
For sale meet pnoas UNDBt USS1& 
NTSC and PAL 
Thowcndiaf tides 
Amenem films. For bu coreoch 
ISLAND ELECTKOMCS 
PO Bax 3299 
Unrated / CYPRUS 
Teton — 3392 PRC CY 


ARTS 


THE MAN WHO lOOifl) 

THE AST WOmU FOR 
MOUONS OF DOUARS 

BLMYR DE HORY 

THE MASTH FORGER 
OF THE 20ft CENTURY 

Own a magnificant Monet, Renoir, Vbn 
Gogb, Moogfani. 

Enpfch. cafledor hoe for sde these 
umqge signed oi pointings by the tote 
Bmyr de Hay. oax 40 T£, LFLT, 63 
Long Acre, London, WC2E 9JH. 


BOOKS 


BRITISH BOOK5HQP fc JRAMffURT 
offers a wide seleaian of Britnh / 
Amencm books {d» dddrefl'^, Bril- 
idi tourist pubfacaiora. Med order ». 
wtteGermany only. Tel (W9-280492, 
Bacnernr 17. 6000 Frankfurt/Ml 


EDUCATION 


SUCCESS WITH GERMAN ■' 

German inSencve courses in iMQnderful - 
Tyrol AS levels. Accommodation r 
indoebd Write or ph ene: * 

5nAOBOUlEWBI»DO«F * 
6363 Wenwatof/Tyrol Auprie. 

Tel 05334/677113. 


PENPALS 


OHS AW GUY5 o9 eoABaens vsntw 
pen pdb. Detofc free Htretej V«rfoa' 
Bote MO6607N, D-1000 Bertoi IT, , 
West Germany. 


SERVICES 


YOUNG IADY 

PAAnterprato & Tourism Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 


** PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

FOR A REAL VI*. YOUNG LADY 
Detinpuished, Began, Mutrifopud. 


YOUNG BEGANT LADY 

MuNngute PA. Paris: 52S Sl OI 


* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG IADY TROJNGUAL VBAPA 


PARIS VH* SOFMSTICATED YOUNG 
lady companion. Why don't you 
phone 277-01-6? far your days, eve> 
ranas & weeteds? An etogent SsEn- 
goal guide, even for your ; 


PARS 704 80 27 
VP PA YOUNG LADY 
MuUErguaL 


TOKYO: 442 39 79 

European young lady eompomon. 


PARIS LADY GUfflES 224 01 32. 
Youna. etogert, educated, inti for 
days S, tknricn & travels parable m 
Prris & Anports. 


MTSMATIONAL BEAUTVU. People 
IMTD. USA & IMCIHDWIDETet 
212-7657793 l 7657794 


HMMGURT. Young lady companion. 
English. French, German spoken. Free - 
to ifaraL 069/44 77 75. 


SOGETE DUNE PARIS 260 *7 43 
Mcn&women guides, socuriiy & rent- 
ing ora services, 8 ora ■ 12 pm. 


DO YOU NBD A RS4CH«4GUSH- 


LOMJON. Young Gannon/Prenchefi- 
once to meet you on your vtrt to 
London. Teh UK0U381 6852. 


SMOAPORE B4T1 GUIDES. Calk Sin- 
gopore 734 96 28. 


TOKYO LADY COMPAMON, PA 
Personal Assatort 03456-5539 


TOKYO 645 2741. Toumg & shop- 
ping gaides, intetpreters. elc 


YOUNG LADY AS GUIDE & aoatratr 
in NYC 212-517-2097. 


HONG KONG (K-3) 723 12 37 
Yomg soqhigigaed eompomon. 


PARIS YOUNG UDY 341 21 71. 
W PA & btngud mterpreter. 


NEW YORK V JJ* Young lady cam- 
parson. (2121 386642. 


HONG KONG 3-671 267 young lady 
(Orientol/Eunapeorj cetnpomon. 


HONG KONG 3-661525 VS* tody. 
tAsian/Westeni| oompotion. 


FRANKFURT YOUNG LADY coaman- 
lon + travel guide. Tet 069/^52 


HONG KONG 3-697006l Ototring 
femde/meie conmanion 


MUMCH -GBIMAN LADY cwnpMi- - 
icn and atyguide. Tel: 311 11 OaT 


747 59 54 TOURIST GUIDE. Pais, 
otrporte. 7 am/miehiflht. Iwtl rrarat 


PARIS LADY MBIWEIB. Travel 
companion. Paris 633 68 09. 


PAMS, YOUNG MH4CHJPUCATH> 
Lady eompomon, gaide. 57471 4T. 


RAMS YOUNG SOPHKTTCATH) VIP 
lady, iribioual PA 500 89 72. 


LONDON WELL ‘EDUCATED Young 
tody compaiion. Telt 622 6615 


WEST INDIAN LADY Camparaan Teh 
London 381 9847. 


ATHENS- lady corapaiion and person- 
d anatait. Teh 8086194, 



of International Herald 
Tribune readers own 
Stocks, Shares, Bonds 
and Commodities. 

Trib ads work. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

savicE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C. 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 
2T 2-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 
OCCKS ACCBTED 
Private Metnherriupr AvdUl* 

Thto uwrad* 


inning serric* hoc 
*1 ft# top A most 


•tedacive Escort Senate by 
USA A mte nrttonal news metSa 
■ndwEng rmfia and TV. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 


Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

P ort m qn Escort Agency 

67 OiMem Straef, 

Im^ot wi 

Tel: 486 3724 or 486 1158 

AR major owR cards occe p ted 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SBV1CE. 
EVERYWHERE YOU ARE OR GO!_ 

1-813-921-7946 

Cal free From Ui: 1^00-237-0692 
Cafl free From Rarida: 1-8® 282-0892. 
LosmiS Eastern wetoomes you bad! 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT 5EKVICE 

IN NEW YORK 

THj 212-737 3291. 


LONDON CLASS 

ESCORT 5SIV1CE 


LONDON, HEATHROW A GAYWlCK 
Tet 01 890 0373 


LONDON 

BBT ESCORT SaVKX 
TSL- 200 8585 


LONDON 
KENS&4GTON 

ESCORT MMCf 
10 KENSINGTON CHURCH ST, W8 
THj 9379136 OI 9379133 

AR roofer crudtt trade accepted. 


AR15TOCATS 

London Eieert Sentke 
128 Wigmor# Sf., London W.l. 
AS mc^^Credil Cant Arrrpted 


12 i 


: 437 47 4W 4742 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK E5C0KT SERVICE 
212-888-1666 


MADRID INTI 

escort sanncE 

TH.- 2456548. CREDIT CARDS 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ZURICH 

Semanllio’t Escort A Guide Sendee 
Male * female. Td; 01/56 96 92 

* MADRID * 

TASK ESCORT SERVICE 

TEL 411 72 57-259 61 96 

ZURICH-GB4EVA 

ALEXIS BCORT SERVICE 

TEL 01/36301 64-022/3441 86 

* AMSTERDAM * 

SHE Escort Service. 227837 

ROME OUB EUROPE ESCORT 

4 Guide Serwce-Tet 06/589 2604. 589 
1146 prran 4 pet to 10 pm) 

CHBSEA BCORT SHVKE 

51 Beaudwmp Pface, landon SW3. 
Tel: 01 584 C5I3/2/49 (4-12 pri^ 

GB4EVA • BEAUTY* 

BCQRT ssnncE. 

TEL 29 51 30 

G0CVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tot 46 11 58 

GBCVA- BEST 

BCORT SBtVICE 

TEL 022/86 IS 95 

AMSTERDAM JASMINE 

ESCORT SERVICE 02046665S 

GENEVA REST ESCORT SBtVICE 
Beeervtefawo W1EKBO + TRAVa 

TB; 31 49 87 

AMSTERDAM MCOLE 

ESCORT SERVICE 026-999244 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SaVKX 020-954344 





DUESSBDORF - COLOGNE - BONN 
BS04. Gorinas Ewart Agency. 
Credd cards accepted 021 1/3003 9 

DUSSBDORF - RERUN - BORN - 

CoJojyt# . Esse* 021 1-3950S5 Pamela 
Escort Agency. Afl crerft cards. 

AMSTERDAM, Sruaeb, Antwerp, The 
Hague, Rotterdoit. Grfsge Escort 
Servo. Amstardane 1003120)- 906266 

VBttU CLEOPATRA Escort Setvfae. 
Tefe 52 73 88 + 47 7035. 

NEW YORK Renee & Gabriefle Escort 
Service. 212-223067D. 

ntANKMET + SURROUNDINGS 

ChrAina's Escort Service. 069/364656 

NEW YORK BENS’! Eton Service. 
Td: 212681-1948. 

AMSTBtOAM BETnTS CITY Escort 
Servfoe. Tel: 020} 3«05C7. 

V»MA - DBBB ESCORT Service. 
Tefe 52-33-355. 

LONDON JAPANESE ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 01 821 0627. 

LONDON 1UCY ESCORT & Guile 
Service, Td: 01-373 021 1 

MONTREAL RENDEZ-VOUS Ejcwt 
Service. 514-931-2441. 

HAMBURG ESCORT + GUHJE S*r- 

vieo. TeL 54 17 42. 

WASWKT0H D.C: Sandy Escort 
Service. (703} 549-1255. 

RANKHAT - YVONNE'S ESCORT 

and Trewd Setviee. TeL 069/44 77 75 

LONDON: JUUAN 6 ALAN Mato Es- 
cort Services. TeL 328 5300/341 9531 


COLOGNE- BONN - Dueaektori firtf 
Ooa Etcon Seraae. 0221/54 3304. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


FRANKFURT AREA - Female + Mate 
erorf + travel rarvice. Tel: 6284 3Z 


AMSTERDAM SYLVIA ESCORT Ser- 
jW 20-255191 


CARIBBEAN ESCORT SBtVICE. TriSn- 
guoL Botel Tet Qjl/54 34 41 


MUMCH tCLBTS Escort + Guide 
Service. Telt (W/44BM38 


BRUSSELS. CHANT AL BCORT Ser- 
vice; TeL M/530 23 65 L 


FRANKFURT “TOP 1ST Escort Ser- 
vice. 069/59-60-52 


FRANKFURT/ MUNCH Atafe Escort 
Service. 069/386141 S 089/3518226. 


MUNICH - PRIVATE ESCORT 
Gwto Service. TeL- 91 23 U 


DUS58DORF-COLOGFS^ssen-Bonn. 
Engfah Escort Service 0211/3831 41 


MUMCH - BIONDY 1TANJA Escort 
Service. Tefe 311 79 00 or 311 79 36- 


VWttl FIRST BCORT service. Tel' 
02244-4191 or ^2-02, titt mdnitfr. 


AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Service 
Tel: |020| 326*20 or 3401 10, 


FRANKFURT SONJA BCORT Ser- 
TeL 069-68 34 42. 


FRAMORNT JEMIY BCORT + ttov- 
el service. Tefe 069/5572-10 


HAMBURG - CAROLINE Escact Ser-' 
Tet 040 / 652 91 30 


MONTREAL. CANADA, CLAIIIE Es- 
oort & Geide Service. 5147<W09K 


Service (0| 20-964376 


. TeL 01 Z29 Q77A. 


VK*. Tel 4Q115IF. Cradt Conb. 


HAMBURG - SA8RMA EtCwl Ser- 
vwe. Tel 040/58 <5 35, 


MUMCH WBCOME EKOrt Service. 
Tel: 91 81 32 


AMSTBIDAM, Bnoeyfoeue, N. Eb- 
wpeEMBrtServict. 10201 906472 ' 


Hemhrow/Gqtwicfe. Tefe 834 7945: 


Guide Service. Tet 91 2314 


Service. MunaiifluoL 261 41 42. 


LOFBON TRUDtE ESCORT Service. 
Tet 01-373 8849. 






Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HEBATJ) TRIBUNE, SATURDAT-SUNDAY, APRIL 13-14, 1985 


ACROSS 

1 A Cabinet post 
6 Steak order 

12 Poor forth 
16 Ebb 
21 Stan’s pal 
22” FideJes” 

23 "Winnie 

Pu" 

24 Wanderer 

25 Massey role 
27 Popular card 

game 
29 Kennel 
complaints 
39 Loggers’ 
contest 
31 Designer 
Oscardela 


33Newsman, 

often 

34 More 
honorable 

35 Digs 

36 Hearts, e.g. 

37 Move quickly 

46 Danish fjord 

41 Common 
affliction 

42 Grave words 

45 Skiers' trestles 

47 Grain or 
whisky 

59 Paul of the 

Boers 

52 Like the 
Cheshire-Cat 

53 Melville 
captain 


ACROSS 

54 Land and 
buildings 

55 Hindu deity 

56 Author Grey et 
aL 

57 Rugged 

59 Mindanao 

group 

69 Tailor's 
lapboard 

61 Rainbows 

62 Homs is here 

63 Mubarak's 
predecessor 

65 Spot 

66 Golly! 

67 Shakespearean 
lover 

69 Water blooms. 

79 Big cat 

72 Louis XVI, e.g. 

73“Ruggfesof 
Red Gap” 
actress 

74 Fearful 

75 Gold coin 

79 Sprout 

82 Drives . 

83 Dilemma 
items 

84 Empire State 
city 

85 Part of N.B. 

86 Gams 

87 Hara 

88 Erodes 

99 Kind of horse 

91 Dies- 


ACROSS 


92 Give 
94 Transfer 

95 S-D.'s capital 

96 Fox's relative 
97N.Y. 

baseballers 
99 Dodges 
109 Organic 
compounds 

162 Bro. anddau. 

103 Irish love 

104 Prescribe 

105 Viktor . 

ballet master 


Stand-Ins by bert h, kruse. 


PEANUTS 


Il ia D M Is 


16 |7 IB IS 


Ii2 113 MS 


116 lit its 1 19 120 


r HEY, MANAGER, PIP 
W UJE L05E AGAIN?. 




WE L05T AGAIN, GHU. f 
AS USUAL, ONCE MORE, ( ‘ NOVO i 

AMGTMEKTIME_ ^ 


UJE EV&* LOST )- | 

. IN LATIN Vi 



nAm W 
,#>• , 
il-lan« 






198 S -A. serpent 
108 Relationship 
110 Kay Thompson 
girl 

113 Trap 

114 Transports 

115 Heaterfor 
hops 

115 Great Lake 
121 "Gem of the 


BLOND1E 


fee SUftE WE SE T.THE j W * "SUBS?- 

SE»>W«CTrra«y — S WgE SBHCgCIT^S; I VVE 


124 Komelia , 

E. German 
swimming star 

125 Force 

126 Big Ten team 

127 He commits 
grave crimes 


liool fioi 





no 


BEETLE BAILEY 


128 Takes five 
129Sweetsop 

130 Ease 

131 Billiards 
immortal 


|110 lift 1112! 


im|l1ft|l17|iul 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


120 





121 

122 





J 

123 

iS" 





126 






| 

12T" 

15" 





190 






H 

TiT - 


X WHAMT 

TO BE A 
BETTER 
PERSON, 
CHAPLAIN 


YOU CAM 
BE/ 

BEETLE . 


ALL VOU H/AVE TO 
QO IS WORK AT IT 


( THERE'S 
ALWAYS A 
CATCH, fcSNY 
k THERE? 


1 A swimming 
companion of 
Alice 

2 Jai 

3 Radar image 

4 Robert 
Motherwell's 
medium 

5 Legal point 

6” Dies,” 

Beckett novel 


12 Actress Hasso 

13 Story lines 

14 Citron 
attachment 

15 Join 

16 Yearly income 

17 Colombia’s 
capital 

18 A.A.U. 
member 


7 Circus 
Maximus 
official 

8 Hold back 

9 "It 

laugh”: Pinero 


19 All-purpose 
trk. 

11 How to roll 
along 


19 Poet laureate: 
1692-1715 

20 German river 
26 Very prim and 

precise 

28 Fairness 
32 Witch's home 

34 Natives or 
Oulu 

35 Timothy 
shaver 


36 Barbecue gear 

37 Do slaloms 

38 form (at 

one’s best) 

39 Famous 
oratorio 

41 Food named 
for a goddess 

42 Brilliance 

43 Famed 
Flemish 
portraits 

44 Huts 

46 French indef- 
inite pronoun 

47 Hamilton's 
birthplace 

48 Griffith 
Gaunt's 
creator 

49 Its capita] is 
Doha 


DOWN 


DOWN 


51 Drake or cob 
53 Russian length 
55Duchesse,e.g. 

57 Church council 

58 Support 
60 Pivotal 

62 Cum grano 


71 Lait topper 

73 Modern moola 

74 Railroad name 

75 Pentateuch 

76 Emulate Bel- 
low 

77 Grandparents, 
attunes 


® New York Times, 

DOWN 

87 Divided coun- 
try 

89 Author SL 
Johns 

90 Parlor piece 


64 “You could 
hear— 
drop" 

65 Wide-brimmed 
straw hat 

67 Items "on 
wheels” 

68 Kind of fist 

69 Steady Eddie 
of pitching 
fame 


78 Red ,S Af- 

rican shrubs 

80 Shackled 

81 Loathe 

82 Goddess wor- 
shiped by Ra- 
daraes 


83 Insinuations 
85 La .Trini- 

dadian port 


92 A reindeer In a 
Moore poem 

93 "Oops!” cause 

95- the 

thought!” 

97 Rodeo stars 

98 Retribution 
191 Hot-dish stand 
163 Arrives 

106 Regarding 
197 "Enough!" in 
Roma 

168 Unspoken 


DOWN 
199 One of the 
Horae 

110 Jug 

111 Like an ancho- 
ret 

112 Car pioneer 

113 Tizzy 

114 Young whale 

115 Galba’s suc- 
cessor 


Jeboari 

;■ y>eib-i 


ANDY CAPP 


116 Surmounting 

117 Drink noisily 

118 Kind of mark 
or cast 

126 G.&S. prin- 
cess 

122 Mideast org. 

123 Yeeuckl 


/iC qm& PERStWD 
XT’ 1 IT/AFTER ALL I'VE e-H 
. AMPY 77KEAUYDO 1 TAUS-fTNOUCVER } 

s «w_ r >' > — -'I V_T>tE YEARS-/, J 

_ BlLUM&S \ D T • Al . _ 







I HATl A 
^-SORE-i 
, WINNER 




MONEY: A Suicide Note 

By Martin Amis. 363 pp. $16.95. 
Viking, 40 West 23d Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10010. 


BOOKS 


Reviewed by Richard Eder 

A J’ARTIN AMIS intrudes amiably into his novel 
1VJL as a sardonic dens ex machina to its hapless 


protagonist and narrator. At one point, he even 
refers to being a novelist who is a novelist’s son. So 
it doesn't seem unfair to point out a mark or two of 


kinship between “Money" and Kingsley Amis' 
“One rat Englishman." 


“One Fat E 
Both are 


Both are about a foolish and infir m America. 
Both focus tin infirmity by means of a fat English 
slob who tries to get bis nodes into the infirmity and 
ends up steamrollered. Both find a stiver of moral 
superiority — as does the narrator of Graham 
Greene's “The Quiet American” — in the humane 
amateurishness of their own skulduggery as op- 
posed to the sleek American juggernaut In the teeth 
of the Roman soldiery, their English anti-heroes 
model themselves not on Christ but on the thieves; 
alternately, the one on the left and the one on the 
right 

Martin Amis, his book and his anti-hero, whom 


he names John Self, come a generation later, of 
course, and so does his America. The latter is 
fragmented and post-cverything: modem, electron- 
ic, punk. As for Sdf, he lags badly, cangbl between 
pillar and post He is a slick advertising man, a 
maker of television commercials. The America he 
hopes to take on, and take; is a screaming media 
madhouse of hype, baroque film deals, shady inter- 
national investors and. above aQ, a torrent of the 
money that serves as title and theme. 

It is chameleon money: Its origins are murky, and 
its presence can never really be determined. Now 
you see it now you don't. A platinum credit card 
summons up stretch limos, palatial hotel suites and 
sumptuous meals one day. The next day, h is 
brought back by a threatening bead waiter, neatly 
clipped into four pieces. 

The story is fairly slim, although various bits of 
deliberate mystification and possibly non-ddiber- 
ate fuzziness tend to make it seem bigger, or at least 
longer. Selfs drill at making short films has caught 
the eye of Fielding, an American promoter. He quits 
his partnership in his London agency and is whizzed 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 



□Euan □□nn unaan □□□□ 
□□□□□ □□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ 
iLHIlLJaLlOHUGni □□□□□DOUUD 
□□□□□ □□□Da □□□□□□ 
□□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□□□ 
youuuo □□□□□ □□□□□ 
□□□□□ □□□□aauLiLi □□□ 
uaaau □□□ □□□ aaauu 

□□a fiaauQnaaa uicjuaou 

□□□□□□ □□□□!! □□□□DO 

□□□□□□a □□□□□ □□□□□□□ 
□□□□uu anuuii □□□□□□ 
LJEJULJQU □□□aamjuu uuu 
□nnaa □□□ □□□ uuuuu 

□□a DUU11HHJDUH DDUUU 
□ UUHU □□□□□ DDOBBC 
□□□□QBQ □□□□□ HDOQHD 
□□□□□□ nation □□□□□ 

□□□□□□□□□□ □□□□□□□□□□] 
□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□ □□□□a 
□□uu □□□□□ auau uuuuul 


over to New York where big deals, high living, 
endless credit and a battery of meetings with glam- 
orous stars are lavished upon him. Eventually. it all 
vanishes and be is left broke and abandoned bade in 
London, with only Martin Amis to talk to and play 
chess with. 

Self is a creature of fitful energy, occasional 
violence and large but futile appetites. He will talk 
back to a racist New York cabbie— and get thrown 
out on the street for his pains — and spend days in 
bed nursing a collection of ailments. He consumes 
vast amounts of junk food and drinks endlessly. 
Then he throws up, almost as endlessly. At times, 
“Money” seems to be a novel about hydrostatics. 
He is obsessed with sex. much of it in the form of 
pornography and auto-eroticism. 

The transatlantic pillaging of what remains of 
human values by the contemporary big-deal is the 
serious theme of this book, verging on the petulant 
at times, and cast in the mold erf blade comedy. 
Selfs London neighborhood is becoming a wilder- 
ness of fast-food joints. As a maker erf commercials. 
Self recognizes his part in it. “My way is coming up 
in the world," he says. He is not the innocent 
corrupted, but a small-boat sleaze navigator caught 
in a tidal wave. 

Amis puis enormous energy into paradying al- 
most everything in sight Fielding, the American 
promoter, is both laid-back and fanatically fit, an 
expansive corsair who turns out to be a shriveled 
and half-mad fraud. A gorgeous film star practices 
sex as a mind-expanding experience with each lover 
getting one night and (he whole thing videotaped far 
her library. The small-time crookedness of Selfs 
London film partners is delightfully done: Every- 
thing goes on the expense account, including a 
poodle that is listed as “Security — guard dogr 

But Anris’s strength is wit rather than comedy. 
There is a good deal of genuinely successful satire m 
the bode, particularly in the portrayal of New York 
obsessions, but it is displaced by the excessive space 
and energy spent on its narrator. Self is a mess. 
Sometimes he is a funny mess, and occasionally be is 
an interesting mess, but he dilutes himself in a flood 
of drinking, spewing and endless high-pressure lan- 
guage. He is larger than life but emptier, as wdl, and 
his em ptiness crowds his wit and our interest. 

Richard Eder is on the staff of the Los Angeles 
Times. 


WIZARD of ID 


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BIT ANNOYED / | HE CAN -SEE YOU, MS. BISHOP' J j BACK TO /*\Y 

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PONT YOU z - 
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•v.- " ; ■ 

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leRACT-eyl 

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HESVGARFlELR H£V,ODfE.I HAVE 
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\Wd Stock Markers 


Via Agence France-Presse April 12 

doling prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


* HOW CAN X TELL fF SOMETHING'S WRONG 
UNnu/70iT2' 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 


Ataorve 

24 

75 

15 

59 

tr 

Baaakak 

36 

97 

27 

SI 

fr 

Amsterdam 

8 

46 

3 

37 

r 

Belllav 

19 

66 

4 

39 

0 

Athens 

23 

73 

16 

61 

fr 

Hone Koae 

20 

68 

16 

41 

r 

Bares tana 

18 

64 

11 

52 

d 

MmHo 

34 

93 

26 

77 

fr 

Betarade 

19 

66 

7 

45 

cl 

New Delhi 

35 

95 

17 

63 

tr 

Benin 

11 

52 

6 

43 

a 

Seoul 

18 

64 

5 

41 

fr 

Brussels 

6 

43 

5 

41 

r 

Shanshal 

16 

61 

B 

46 

fr 

Bucharest 

19 

66 

6 

43 

d 

Singapore 

26 

79 

23 

73 

it 

Budapest 

11 

52 

6 

43 

Stl 

Taloel 

21 

70 

17 

63 

d 

Capenhaaea 

6 

43 

1 

34 

r 

Tokyo 

10 

SO 

7 

45 

Stl 

Costa Del Sal 
Dublin 

22 

8 

72 

46 

6 

2 

43 

36 

d 

a 

AFRICA 






Edtaboryh 

ID 

50 

1 

34 

a 

Algiers 

23 

73 

7 

45 

d 

Ftarenee 

12 

54 

10 

50 

St 

Cairo 

30 

86 

IS 

59 

fr 

Frankfort 

9 

48 

5 

41 

Stl 

Com Town 

21 

7D 

14 

57 

tr 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

* 

3 

43 

37 

a 

■9 

32 

16 

r 

0 

Casabtaaca 

Harare 

23 

73 

16 

41 

tr 

IM 

Istaabul 

16 

Cl 

10 

SO 

fr 

La gat 

__ 


__ 


no 

Lot Palmas 

21 

70 

16 

61 

d 

Nairobi 

24 

75 

14 

57 

cl 

Lisbon 

19 

66 

12 

54 

d 

Teals 

23 

73 

8 

46 

ir 

London 

11 

52 

S 

41 

cl 





Madrid 

18 

64 

5 

41 

o 

LATIN AMERICA 



Mnaa 

14 

57 

s 

41 

d 







Moscow 

1 

34 

-4 

25 

SVy 

Buenos AJrai 

24 

75 

9 

<8 

fr 

Munich 

6 

43 

3 

37 

sh 

Lima 

2« 

75 

14 

57 

Cl 

Nice 

17 

61 

11 

52 

fr 

Mexico City 

23 

73 

10 

50 

cl 

Oslo 

5 

41 

-2 

38 

el 

Riodo Janeiro 

26 

79 

19 

66 

r 

Paris 

11 

52 

5 

41 

d 

Boo Paula 

— 

— 

— 

— 

no 

Propue 

Rerktavik 

10 

6 

50 

42 

3 

2 

37 

36 

a 

a 

NORTH AMERICA 



Room 

Stockholm 

Strasbaera 

15 

5 

11 

59 

41 

52 

13 

-6 

5 

55 

21 

41 

d 

fr 

d 

Ancboraeo 

Atlanta 

Boston 

-3 

22 

13 

27 ‘ 

72 

55 

■12 

10 

3 

ID 

SO 

37 

d 

St 

fr 

Venice 

10 

50 

9 

48 

r 

Ottawa 

19 

66 

5 

41 

PC 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

11 

14 

52 

57 

5 

4 

41 

39 

o 

a 

Denver 

Detroit 

20 

16 

68 

61 

5 

s 

41 

41 

PC 

fr 

Zurich 

9 

48 

3 

» 

r 

Henetaita 

27 

11 

17 

63 

fr 

MIDDLE EAST 




Houston 

24 

75 

16 

41 

St 

Ankara 






LMAMOtat 

25 

77 

.11 

52 

fr 

21 

m 

11 

a 

a 

Miami 

2S 

77 

21 

70 

it 

BetraT 

22 

72 

14 

57 

tr 

MieneaeaUi 

28 

68 

6 

43 

d 

Damascus 

22 

72 

6 

43 

fr 

Montreal 

3 

37 

■1 

30 

r 

Jerusalem 

26 

79 

U 

57 

fr 

Nassau 

24 

7S 

20 

48 

d 

Tet Aviv 

27 

■l 

11 

52 

fr 

New York 

14 

57 

5 

41 

Ir 

OCEANIA 






sen Francises 
Seattle 

25 

15 

77 

59 

10 

8 

50 

46 

Ir 

d 

Auckland 

22 

72 

12 

54 

a 

Toronto 

6 

4) 

2 

36 

ir 

Sydney 

84 

75 

17 

63 

fr 

WnsniAetaa 

21 

70 

7 

45 

fr 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Anon 

AKZO 

AfMW 

AMCV 

A’Doffl RutdMf 
Amro Bank 
BVG 

BtMftrmannT 

CatDndHIdB 

ElMvtor-NDV 

Fokkfrr 

GU Bracadn 

Hairwken 

Hoosovmi 

KLM 

Naortfen 

Nat Nwtdnr 

NMIIard 

Oc« Vandar G 

PofcnoN 

PMflps 

Rotwco 

Rodomco 

Roimco 

Roranta 

Ravel Dufcti 

UnUever 

vonOnmwm 

VMF Stork 

VNU 


CM( hw 

Morten IJD lin 

Kafl + SaU 251 251 M 

korstodt 21-450 214 

Kaufbaf 22 B 228 

ntfdmrH-D 247 246 

•tloecJcnw Work* 70JD 71 

Knmi staM 10 * in 

’H2J? 417JT1 42250 

Lirftttaraa 193 )Kcn 

MAN ]g uS 

Monneimann 16250 16150 

MalallaaMKscliaH 242 2*150 

1200 1160 

PreoMag 27* 275 

AMtaar^Wwka 33S xa 

gWE ISitSO 156 

Schertna 456 65220 

54»™n» SBAOSWAO 

ThyjMn 9450 fkm 

vorta 1 SX 20 iR4*a 

XS2 lfl0J0 

VEW 127 12*50 


Volknoosanwark 20850 20950 




ANPXBS OeatnK Index ; 

Pnrvkm : 2055* 


Bk East Asia 
CBauno Kona 
China Uatil 
Cross Harbor 
Mono Sana Bank 
hk Eicdrie 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 


HK Sdananal ‘ 
Ihk Ta is ahons 


Arbed 

Bekorr! 

Cockorlll 

Coboua 

EBES 

SB-mno-EMI 

cTvoert 

Hoboksn 

Intercom 

Kredkrtbank 

P*troflnc 

5oc General* 

Soflna 

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Unsrv 

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HK Wharf 
Hulch Wflomooo 
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Now World 
Show Brother* 
SHK Proas 
Slme Oarin' 
IMm 

Swire Pad He A 
Wheewcit a 
W heel ock Mar 
Wtnsor 
world inn 


2320 23 

1S50 H40 
1520 1520 
IX MS 
4425 44 

755 720 

34 3250 
520 520 

955 E» 

73 72 

4.15 625 

2260 2X40 
11 IT 
1120 1120 
455 650 

3.45 3-42S ' 
955 955 
HAS US : 
147. 154 

74 2440 
735 725 

Susa. — 
455 4475 
255 220 


Angla Am uew 593 593 

Babcock 153 152 

Barclay) 339 337 

Bail 537 539 

SAT. 330 333 

Bee Ch a m 360 333 

B1CC 253 2» 

BL 37 37 

Blue Circle 495 « 

HOC Group 275 Z75 

Bee)* 17* 172 

Bawater Indus 24* 246 

BP 538 538 

Brit Home sr at 270 

Bfir Telecom TIB 13*- 

BrW Aemeoce 433 430 

BTR 449 647 

Burmah 733 221 

Cooie Wireless 535 535 

CaiAurySchw 1J2 153. 

Charier Com 19S 198 

Coals Pa torn 144 144 

Commercial U 214 217 

Con* Gold 562 557 

Counauids 145 xa 

Dalaety 473 473 

Do Beers < 548 M3 

nisi I liars 277 27 7 

DrletonMn 328% S28U. 

Fheos 308 306 

Free St Ced swvj SSOVj 

GEC 18* 184 

GKN 232 231 , 

GIOMC 1051/641025/32 

Grand Met 293 291 

Guinness 241 244 

GUS 795 7*5 

Hanson 205 204 

Hawk or 437 4U 

ICI 747 747 

Imps 1*7 1S4 

Jaguar 303 303 

Uevds Bank 532 532 

Uanrtn ISO 177 

Luca 269 268 

Mark* and Sa 145 U? 

Midland Bank 329 324 

Nat West Bank 572 574 

P and O 343 340 

Pllkmstan 280 2*3 

Pteeaev 200 19# 

Racot Elect 202 196 

EowManteln nilw nil 


Fkil 

Fkislder 

OeneraU 

IFI 

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itoltnoblUari 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

HAS 

Hinosoenie 

SIP 

Snkt 

Smnda 

SWt 


Cieie Pre*. 

I Handel Bbanken 165 162 

Ptwr muclu 205 nxl 

ScaO-Scunkl 460 NjQ. 

Samhrtk 400 395 

Skmska 91J0 90 

SKF 217 213 

SwMMiMatdl 219 220 

Votwo 250 250 


AWny woerMew Index : 3T7M 
Prevteas :SHJ0 


Syd e mj 


MIB Current lot 
Pi evle u * ; 1199 


Air Liquids 
AWtum AH. 

A v Dassault 
Baa coir* 

BIC 

Banana In 
Bouvuues 

DSN-GO 

Camefour 

Charoovr* 

aubMed 

Darty 

□umez 

Elf-Aaultolne 

Eurece 1 

Gen Eaue 

Haehetfe 

LafaraeCea 

Lcaramd 

Lesleur 

roreal 

MatlM 

Motto 

Merlin 

Michel In 

Met Hwep r 

Moulinex 

OccWentate 

Pernod RJ& 

Pet roles Km) 
IPeoaeot 
Print ernes 
Rad lot earn 
Redout* 
ReuMt Uctat 
5anofl 


ACI 

ANI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Boral 

Bauoalnvtlle 

Brambles 

Coles 

Cotnatca 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixl 


Moot ion 

MIM 

Mver 

OakbrMae 

P*ks 

Poseidon 

RGC 

Santas 

SleWi 

South land 

Woods! oe 

WOrmald 


210 205 
285 290 
463 460 
654 456 
320 320 
250 249 
367 388 
370 372 
387 292 
636 632 
312 318 
226 228 
325 330 
TOO- TOO 
220 260 
333 33* 
184 110 
92 *0 
438 430 
449 418 
530 540 


Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Own 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Corp 
Mitsui and ea 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nfkfco Sec 
Nlpaan Steel 
Nlnaon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 


fitcoh 

Sharp 

Sony 

Sum homo Bank 
Sumitomo Cham 
Sumitomo Metal 
TalMl Carp 
Talsho Marine 
Takeda Own 
Tdk 
Teilin 


Tottvo Elec, Power 
Tokyo Marine 
Taray ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YamalcM Sac 
NBUM/DJ. Index : 
Preview : IJSTXkJ 
New Index : 9*1 J2 
Pravkms : 9BU0 


175 17S 
27 27 
15* 157 
355 353 


1530 1550 
500 4*0 

398 402 

202 2SS 
523 552 

338 345 

484 417 

1000 1020 
1060 1040 
925 931 

749. 700 
ISO 151 
242 211 

659 0S8 

1130 1150 
1110 1130 
2360 2460 
891 891 

'988 992 

4350 4330 
1700 1710 
222 217 

150 151 

211 712 

436 441 

948 886 

5540 5480 
464 MS 
1710 1670 
841 847 

482 488 

396 480 

1250 1260 

eu> 520 

12 S 88 JH 


Canadian stodn via AP 


All Ordinarie s I 


Source: Re u ters. 


Skis RessJanol 
SourJPerrler 


Sours* wrier 
Telemecan 
Thomson C5F 


Hong Sew Index : W92.1I 
Previous : 148339 


Rank 355 350 

Reed mil 552 554 

Reuters 360 361 

Revat Dutch t 46 u, 4*>w. 


Aoen index : «txie 
Preview: 21231 
CAC Index 1 22030 
Previews : 218L2B 


Cunren) Stock index : 

Previous : 22(282 


■Frankfort 


el-cloudy; to-fowr; fr-Wr; tvhall; oovtraai; oc-samy aaudv; r-rom; 
sh-stiowers; sn-snow; iJ-ftormv. 


SATURDAYS FORECAST — CHANNEL: Raweb. FRANKFURT: RslaTimo. 
10—0 ISO— 431. LONDON; Snawers. Torn*. 9—* (41 — 43). MADRID: Ovw- 
cast.Tema. 17—6 163-C-4SS. NEW YdRKI Portlvcioudy.Terrtn.16— 7161— 45). 


PARIS: Rail 
TEL AV1YP 
(48— 39). ■ 
Tem«.22-4 
ov. Terns# 
(90— 7J)1 


« Portly dowdy. Temp. 16 — 7 (61 —45). 

WM. 32—24 




AEG-TeWunkeo 
AlHons Vcn 
Bail 
Boyer 

BdyWJKypo. 

Borer.Ver.Bonk 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
ConHoumml 
Daimler Benz 
Dsguno 

Deutsche BabCOCk 

Deutsche Bank 

Dresdner Bank 

DUB-Schull 

GHH 

Hocfillet 


111.90 11250 
1115 107* 
30L38 207.10 
213 31150 
349 343 
HMD 334 
374J0375J0 


nttM 

60U0 66TJB 
3SV.W 3S93D 
WJO 165 
4*170 44250 
19140 T92J0 
217 21L50 
15850 1S7 

472 470 
213 31280 
910140 1H 
417 409 


I Haesch 
HoUmam 


AECI 

Ana la American 

Ant)l a Am Sold 

Barlows 

BhMor 

Buffets 

De Beers 

Drtetontebi 

EMndS 

OFSA 

Harmony 
HhrekJ Steel 
Kloof 

Nedbank 
PrwSMyn 
Rusatat 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sasd 

I WestHOWMa 


820 760 

2735 270) 
17900 17350 
1140 TWO 
1000 1675 
8630 8650 
1035 1051 
5475 5500 
1750 1770 
3429 3423 
3050 3180 
395 39S 

BM0 8275 
TOM) 1080 
0300 6300 
1775 1775 
Tie m 
3550 3(75 

*15 ns 

7000 6950 


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Soatctil 

Salnstwry 

sneu 

STC 

Sh) Chartered 
Tare and L vie 
Tesco* 

Thorn EMi 
T .l. ar gue 
Trateusai 1 Hsu 
TWF 

Ultramar 
Unllevarc 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
WUetP 

WXaWlnas 

war Loan 3Wt 


32* 324 

716 716 

194 1*4 

474 474 

420 418 

25* 254 

(04 397 

236 234 

335 335 

138 138 

243 24) 

11V71I 29/64 
100 178 

270 269 

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83*46 836*6 

36 35* 

784 777 


Bousiead 
Cold storm 
DBS 

Pras e r Noave 
How Par 
Inchcopt 


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453 

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I3B 

891 

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825 

■30 


528 

520 







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1DW 




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I960 

1550 

Full Photo 

1698 

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1000 

1100 

Hitachi 

no 

no 


Irak 

1320 




kdllma 

3S8 

292 

Kama! Power 


wo 




Kirin Brewery 

415 

617 

Komatsu ltd 

443 

444 

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338 

340 

MonuEtac inds 

1420 

1460 

Matsu Elec Works 

74) 

741 


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Bank Leu 
Brown Bawl 
CRw Go ler . 
Credit Suisse 

Electruwatt 
Geora Fischer 
interdlscaunt 
Jacob Sucbard 
JetmotT 
Landis Gvr 
Nestle 
Oartlkon-B 
RoctM Baev 


2730 2760 
3550 3540 
1630 1635 
3845 28*0 
2430 2430 


Schindler 

Sutzer 

SBC 

Swissair 

Swiss Reinsurance 

SwtSB VoOCSBOMl 

Untan Bank 
Winterthur 
Zurich Ins 
SBC Index : 4XLM 
'Previous : 42)38 


715 718 

1920 1910 
6360 6375 
1930 1970 
1675 1680 
6370 6380 
1445 147S 
M75 1700 
7*25 nos 
4025 4025 
374 373 

356 3*7* 

1075 1870 
10350 10350 
1420 1415 
3710 3720 
4520 4500 
22900 21500 


NA: net quoted: NA: net 
ava Rente; xd: ex-dividend. 


Kennel 9ila 
(Men BankHw 
OCBC 

OUB 

SemoSWpvard 
Sima Dorav 
s steamship 
5t Tradliw 
DOB 


.GM-Toyoia Suit Is Settled 


OUB Index : 487.80 
Pn vteus : 48M5 


F.T. 38 index :9S7S| 
Previous: K7A0 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — duysler Core, said Friday that an 
out-of-court settlement had been reached in its 
lawsuit objecting to a plan by General Motors 
Corp. and Toyota Motor Corp. to build Toyota- 
designed small ears in California. 

Chrysler had protested the 1983 agreement be- 
tween -General Motors, the wodd’s largest auto- 


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} f look. \ 

PERHAPS I'D 
/ BETTER GO 
7 BACK TO a\Y 

MOTEL ' WHY I , 
PONT VOU 
CALL ME WHEN 
YOU CAN BE 
MORE -SPECIFIC! 

I CAN BE HERE 
IN 20 MINUTES' 


xz*--. 





nfcSwn: 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATTJRDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 1S-14, 1983 



Page 15 

• •••"■ yjya wgtfj-r-?:*- " 


SPORTS 

WB 

ijfj 



nr* £ 

%1# # iwrwrEf TTmT nr i nnrii wirrnr „ ■ 

• A 


r 



a Push 


..Cm^tUptf Out Staff ham DopoHxs 

WASHINGTON — fi was a war 
ofatfritionand the Washington 
Capitals woo il hfStc Gartner 
came out from behind the New 
York Islanders’ net and shoved the 
poet pass, goalie KdJy Hrudey at 
1:23 of a second overtime period to 
me the Capitals a 2-1 victory 
Thursday ni ght 

Long after the Capitals had de- 
parted. the Islanders still were an 
the ice screaming at referee Don 
Koharski and insisting Gres Ad- 
ams had interfered with Hnwey. 

New York Coach Al Arbour 
poshed Koharski and was assessed 
a game misconduct penalty “far 
striking an official.” according to 
the supervisor of officials. Frank 
Udvan. 

The third game of the piavoff is 
set for Saturday at Nassau Colise- 
um with the Capitals hnl^mg s 2-0 - 
lead in the scries, both de- 
cided in overtime. 

Elsewhere, Minnesota, Philadel- 
phia, Edmonton, Winnipeg; Que- 


NHL ROUNDUP 


inni p eg. „ 
and Chicago look 2-0 leads. 


while Montreal tied its series with 

Boston. 

Thursday night's game at Capi- 
tal Centre was the longest ever 
played by either team. For more 
than 81 minutes, the only goals 
were produced by Washington's 
Lou Fraaceschetti. at 5:44 of the 
first period, and New York’s Bryan 
Troth er, at 7:41 of the third. 

The end came after Bob Carpen- 
ter gave the puck to Gartner, who 
rioted around the Islanders' net, 
came out front and shot between 
Hrudey and a post Hrudey was off 
balance after Adams had shoved 
him with some impetus from New 
York defender Kerin Kneed. 

Koharski dated to the penalty 
box to report the goal and was 
besieged by Arbour and most of the 
islanders, except for Kai Morrow, 
who was waving his stick at a fan 
near the Islanders’ bench. That was 
when Arbour pushed Koharski. 


SCOREBOARD 


1 Basketball 


Baseball 


NBA S tandings 


Major League Standings 


. CASTOR* COMPCRCNCC 
Atlantic OMstoa 

W L M. M 


AM ERIC A N LSAOUS 


r-Beston 

93 

17 

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Barton 

3 

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x-FURodotoMa 

57 

31 

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41 

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24 

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2 

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Now York 

24 

54 

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1 


Caamri Otetotoa 



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Atlanta 

33 

49 

MO 

25 

CMOOPO 

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Indiana . . . 

22 

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3 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


XaatuClty 


1 2 


Pet. GB 
MOP — 
MM — 
MOO to 
MT 1 
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mo a 

MO 3 

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x-OaUm 

41 37 

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xtoon Antonia 

49 40 

JM 

11 


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20 

Mnr York 

2 

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FacHtc Division 



Moatraal 

1 

1 

JM 

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y-LA Lafctni 

40 20 

JSD 

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0 

2 

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3 

K-Partfand 

40 40 

JOO 

30 

Pfftoburan 

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2 

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34 44 

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24 

51. LauM 

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Wort Dtvtaten 




LA. OtoPori 

30 50 

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2 

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. 

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32 58 

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31 

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2 

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ffnebtHfill • 

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1 

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fan Dtooo 

1 

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THURSDAY'S RESULTS 


San Frandm 

1 

1 

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1 

Dallas 

32 21 31 

24—134 

Houston 

1 2 


J33 

tfe 

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11 24 34 

12— 

■0 







Aguirre 14-22 2-5 30. Blackman I0-17M 30; 

Wood 10-1T 2J 3X Mdmai Mi MISLED TlllirwWs Tin A SfrirM 
□alias 44 (Psrklns 121; Sooffte 51 lUUrBtUJ » i-AUC JWICB 


{ Chamber 10). A*sfrt*: Dallas JS (Darts M); 
Scania 24 (Hsndsnan Si. 

Boston 32 V ' H S-Kl 

ClOVOtond - 30 27 31 17—115 

Bird 10-2B 4-15 3V. McHate *-l * 7-M 25; Fire 
11.25 1-2 24. Turebi 9-121-2 IV. RBtomdt: Bos- 
ton 47 iMcHate 111; CtowtondSKStwIton K». 
Assists: Boston 9 [Bird 331: Cte wrt ond 34 
- - 1 Boater 101. 

Houston . 37 ,3t 34 24—135 

City u n n 1WH 


AMBRICAN LOAOUE 
miw Yore n in hm ■ i 

an in w » i it i 
Bonfl (71. RtahoffJ It) and 
Wynagcir; Ctemens. Stonier (7) and Gadrnan. 
W— CJamans, 1-0. L — Hnsmutsaa 0-1. Sv- 
Stanter (II. HRs-Nsw York. WtoftaW (11. 
Boston. Evans 12). 

Ctavatasd MS ZH 2M 0-W I* 3 

Dof»H . S5S HI Oil 1—11 IS 1 

(10 lac teas) 

3omwonT4=2S W JLOttUHwrt lMfflW KT'^^StMiteaL JoftcaaS (4)7WadcMI (4), Eadsrty 


Lucca 4-1 M IS; Johnson 13-142426. Woodson 
7-14 10-1124. Ratadoads: Houston 54 (Ualuwon 
111: Kansas CHv 44 (mom 10). Assists: 
Houston » (Locos 7); Kamos City 3» (Them 
KB. 

Portland 30 33 21 4»-W7 

Waft BOB 40-MS 

DonHcr W-17 M 33. wnkMs JM6 2-1 22; 
Ksreev Ml 1-S IV. Pcocara 7-14 3C 10. Ra- 
bounds: Portland 65 (Draxter 9); Utah 43 tea- 
ton Assists: Portland 27 (Voteartna 71; 
Utah 44 ( Stockton 11). 
i-A. Lakors B » « 33-07 

Gckten Stats 33 34 24 27—130 

EJohnson 0-15 TO-13 20. Scott 10-14 3-2 22; ' 
Fjord 0-20 14-17 33. Short 11-24 7-V30.Ro- 
Maods: Los Angolas SO (Ramb<slS);GoMon 
State 44 (Smith. Wti U oftood H). Assists: La 
Annates SS<E Johnson 171; GoWsn Slats 25 
(Short I), 


Hockey 


NHL Playoffs 


1—2 


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DIVISION SEW FINALS 
Thursday^ 

Buffalo 1 • 

OmNc ■ * 1 1— * 

Goutei <21. Ashton (ll. Rochotert (i); Fa- 
llano (It, Houstev ID. Shots aa seed: Buffalo 
Ion Gonolla) W-S-4— 2t: immc (on Bar- 
rosso) 13-05-23. 

Boston S3 *— 3 

Montreal • I 3— S 

Robinson (IJ, BOfSVMT (I). ClWdOS (It. Nl- 
tanll).Cortionntou(l);Crowasr(2),lCnw*r 
(11. AAMdteren (2). Shots on goal: Batten (on 
Pamav) 4-15-5—24; Montreal (an Koans) M- 
13-00. 

NY Ranaors • 7 W 

pnlkutetaWa • I 3-3 

Bmwi 2 (3). SJntaoio (».* McPtwo (». 
Shots aa aval; NY (on (Jndboroh) 1S-14-1S— 
3 V; Philadelphia (on Homan) M3-14-34. 
Cotaanr * 1 * 

Winnipeg • I 3—5 

Howerchuk Rl.SmoU (D.ArnM (D.Basdt- 
roon m, Wilson (i); MocJonis <11. Bonk HL 
V Shots on goal: Colaary (on Hayward} 7-4-7— 
■ 22; v«limJp«fl (on Lomolln) 5-4-14—27. 
try uUdHn s • 1 s s— 1 

Washington 1 4 t fl l—I 

Frmic«etteHI (D. Gartnsr «». Trottter (1 1. 
Stetson aoal: Now York (an Joasen) T2-7-U- 
7-0 — 37; WasMnaton (on Hnidoy) MMVW- 
41. 

oatrait • • 3—1 

CMcasa * • * 

Suffer (1 ). Yoromchuk. (2). Sscorxt <17, Ffo- 
sor (2). Brown (1). D. Wilson <»; Koew <il. 
gion on goal; Ortroii (on B an ner / non) 13V- 
9 — 31; Chicago ion Staten) 7-4-10—25. 

Los Ansotes S 1 1— 3 

gH. wi n l M 1 S S 4 

Coffer (2). Hooter (D. KrushoUyAI pi. 
Karri (21 ; Toy tor (1), Smith (1). Shot* oa 
goal: Los Anastet Ion Fuhr) 144-15-37; Ed- 
monton ion Janocrk) 0-10-0-32. 

Miaaesota 0 * ?— 4 

SI. LOOM 1 1 

Acton 12). PNH 2 ui^don O); SUIWS 12). 
Gllmaur (11. Shots on aool: MteaosaM (on 
Warns lev) V-12-11-32; Sf.LnuM(tjaMelocfje) 
13-20-11—44. 


(4) , Camacho (7). Von Q()l on (10) an W1 Hard; 
Tarred. Scbarrar Ml. Bair (4). Loaoz (SLHor- 
nandez (7) and Parrish. W— Hotnandre. 1-0. 
L— Voa Obion. 0-1. HRs — Detroit. Trammell 
ni. GB»on m. 

okw SSSSMSIO— I s 2 

MOvoOkm 3M 122 Mx— 4 0 3 

LoUor, Sphbsor 15), Nelson (4). Janos 17), 
Aoosta m and HUI: Burris aad Schroedsr. 
W— BurrM. ML L— Lotlor, 0-1. 

DM SM 3M f-4 12 0 
City S1SSM 1M 0-3 I 0 

Loot. Mussalman (7). Lovoda ID. Caudill 

(5) . Acker (lO)and MarHnoz.Whdf (I); Loi- 
brand!. Bortnffth (7). QuMonberry (ff and 
Sandbaro. W— CaudlU.2-<L L— OutsantMcrv, 0- 
1. Sv — Acker 11). HR*— Kansas CltY. White 
(I). Toronto, Bad (1). 

Minnesota Ml ltl SOS 4—3 4 S 

CnUternla 401 4SS SO V-4 U 0 

But char, Wanho 171. LYtandor (71 and 
Loaanar;Steton.Corb#IT (7). Moore Poland 
Boom. W— Moore, l-l, L— Lrsooaer, 0-L 
HRs— Mlrwevota Brtmansky (2). Haicher 
( 21 . 

MO 344 MO— 4 11 ■ 
Sll Ml IBs— 14 U 1 
Ygwna. McCaffv (3), Kntesr <4I.Coaray (7) 
and Heoth, Tafftetal (7); MoreaiVCmseJ (4L 
Slonfoa (I) and PCeorn4y.W—Morgan,MLL— 
YaanaO-L HRt-Soaffta. Cowans (1 ). Prestey 
jO>. Bradley (1). Thomas 3 O).HBBd0r0Nl II). 
Oakland. Kinsman (2). Hill (1). 

" NATIONAL LEAOUB 
LM Anaetes DM Oil 00-4 4 1 

Houston IN 390 MO— 3 10 0 

HorNrtwr. COloz (SI. Hawaii (t) and 
Yoosor, Setada (7); Knopow. Dewier m. 
DiPtno (fl and Bofiev. n—CMn l-ft L— 
Dowter. 0-1. S v — Howell (ll.HR— Las Anoe- 
tes, Morttul) p>, 

PtMSbureh 404 Mt 014—1 3 1 

Chan 4M 4M Ms— I 4 I 

DeLeon, Oua ol a IB) and Pm; Trout and 
Davis. W— Trout ml L— DeLeon. 0-1. HR— 
Chicago. Cev 111. 

M. LauM MO Mi SM M— I 4 2 

Now York MININ SV- a 3 0 

pi fnmnss) 

Tudor, HossJw (Ui, Alton (17) and Porter) 
Dattno.Oroseo l», Stek (W).McOowoH PI) 
and Carter. W MeDawit ML L— HassterO-1. 

1M SM 443-4 H 4 
3M 444 904—3 7 1 
Perez. Smith (41. Sutter (IV and- Corona; 
Denny. Gross IS). Hudson (7) and Okn. W— 
Smith. ML L— Oonmr, 0-1. Sv— Sutter O). 
HR-Attsma, Murphy 111. 


Transition 


CALIFORNIA— Announced the restenoHen 
of AJ2. “Red" Potioraon, Acststonr to (he 
Qwlrman of too Board. 


Golf 


J 


WL MASTERS TOURNAMRNT 

J * ( Ftrst-rgunO scores of the AftS-rortLpor-72 

v- v AuoustoNotlonol GotfOuh COUfSOM AUW- 
M, oeereto ) 

Hoi there 3M3-4I 

Watson 3MV-4V 

Stewart 34G3-49 


Gary 

Tom 

Povn# 


Rov 

Lea 

Bon 

o-John 

o-Som 

Lorre 
Billy 
Scoff 
Gary 
Jock 
Sere 
Cary 
Bob 
;A«ty 
* Uutk 
- Lowly 
Bruce 
Bernhard 
1900 
Jack . 
Charles 
John 


Ftovd 

Trevino 

Crenshaw 

Inman 

Randolph' 

Mbs 

Casper 

Simmon 

Ployor 
Nick lout 
Badtasteres 
Koch 
GUdar ' 
Boon 
Lyt. 
W odh ln* 
Lfetzko 

Longer 

Aekl 


Coody . 
.Monoffty 
(adeootes umoteur) 


34- 34—70 

35- 35—70 
3545-70 
3W5-70 
3V37— 70 

3545-71 

34- 35— 71 

35- 34—71 
34*37—71 
36JS-71 

34-M-7Z 

37-35-72 

3434-72 

344B-72 

3MV-12 

3S3V-73 

30-34—72 

37-35-72 

3434-72 

3733—72 

34- 34—72 

35- 37—72 


CHICA G O Placid Gory Woods, autflaldor. 
an too 15-dav dteobied list. Recalled Brian 
Oavetr.outltekter.frDm lowool the American 
AssoctaOan. 

Pittsburgh — S toned Jtrrv DytstraU, 
ten elder, and John Henry Johnson, Pitcher, to 
cont r act s n f W i the ir Oosl AA A HowoU Wand- 
ore al the P o e 01c Coast League. 

BASKBTBALL 

Natlonei-Baikefban Assortettoa 

MILWAUKEE— Stoned OxH Enoler. cen- 
ter. 

SEATTLE — SJoned joe Cooper, center, to a 
th renname controa. 

HOCKEY 

woffon ol H other League 

N.V. RANGERS— Called yo Randy Heath 
and Chris Kpakn. wfnasj Andre Core, de- 
fenseman; Ran Scott. Boolto. and Larry Fa- 
toy. cantor, from Now Haven of too Amortcan 
Hachw League, Stored Keny MWer, ten 
wind. 

PITTSBURGH— Sto ned Jeff Cooper, sart- 
toader, to a imrittvpar con) rod. - 
COLLEM 

KENTUCKY— Homed James CHck*yo4Sl»- 
tont txaktnml coach. 

LOYOLA marYMOUNT— N amod Todd 
Carman women's basKethail ceoav - - 

ORAL ROBERTS— ffitmtd TedOwons (JOS- 
kttbatt eeodL 

PANHANDLE STATE— Named Earl Did- 
dle Mkeftiall COOrtL 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS— Announced the 
restoration of Alien Van winkle, baskiiball 
coach. 

UTAH— Named Jim Copekmd atofetlc dJ- 
rector effector# July 1- 

OLYMPIC skiing 

Cindy Nelson. American alpine raeer 
named to tour Whiter Olympic teams, has 
retired from toe US. Ski Team. 


North Stars 4, Bines 3 
Keith Acton and Willi Pleu each 
scored two goals and Gilles Me- 
lodic made 41 saves in Si. Louis as 
Minnesota look a 2-0 lead over the 
Blues, The best-of-five opening 
round series switches to Blooming- 
ton. Minnesota, on Saturday. 

“If we do well in the playoffs, 
nobody's gomg lo remember you 
played that had all season," said 
Acion. “We’ve got a chance io re- 
deem ourselves for a terribly em- 
barrassing season." 

The North Stars fdt behind, 2-0. 
on goals by Brian Sutter, ihen ral- 
lied Melodic protected the lead 
with some spectacular work. 

Flyos 3, Rangers 1 
In Philadelphia, rookie Todd 
Bergen scored twice and goal tender 
Pelle Lindbergh mode 38 saves 
against die suddenly tough Rang- 
ers, whom the Flyers beat seven 
straight times during die season en 
route to the NHL^ best record. 
Bergen got the winning goal at 5:23 
of the final period when Brad 
Marsh’s slapshot was deflected to 
him in the slot and he fired it past 
goalie Glen Hanlon. 

ltkka Sinisalo ensured victory 
with a 15-foot shot at 17:40. 

“It’s kind of surprising that the 
puck keeps going in the way it does 
for me," said Bergen. “The harder 1 
try to set up the other guys the 
more I score." 

Oilers 4, Kings 2 
In Edmonton, Alberta, Paul Cof- 
fey scored in the first period for the 
defending Stanley Cup champions, 
but the viators tied it on a second- 
period goal by Dave Taylor. 

The Oilers look charge with their 
rikuiR offe 

in the 


usual quick-striking offense early 
: final session, Mark Napier 


and Mike Krushdiryski scoring 42 
seconds apart. Napier pounced on 
slid it into the net 


apart Napier pounc 
a loose pud: and slid it into t 
and Krushelnysld made it 3-1, con- 
verting a pass in front from Wayne 
Gretzky after some fine comer 
work by Jari Kuni Kurri later 
scored into an empty net 
Jets 5, Flames 2 
In Winnipeg, Scou Amiel's 
at 9:21 began a three-goal ll 
period for the Jets, who carry their 
lead into the Calgary Saddledome 
where they have never won. 

The winning goal came after ex- 
cellent forechecking by the line of 
Thomas Steen, Perry Turnbull and 
Amid, who flipped a backhand 
shot over goal tender Reggie Lemc- 
lin. Laurie Bosch man scored 00 a 
breakaway with 1:22 left and Ron 
Wilson into an empty net at 19:13. 

Dale Hawerchuk and Doug 
Smail connected 16 seconds apart 
in (he second period for the Jets, 
who are unbeaten in 15 games, in- 
cluding (be regular season. They 
have not lost since March 6. 

*V NonHques 3, Sabres 2 
In Quebec Cty the Nordiques, 
who swept the Sabres last spring, 
won when Normand Rochefort’s 
routine wrist shot slipped past 
goalie Tom Barrasso with 4:51 re- 
maining. The Sabres had tied the 
game only 41 seconds earlier when 
Phil Houslcy beat rookie goalie 
Mario Gossdm. 

The other Quebec goals came on 
breakaways by Michel Goulet in 
the first period and Brent Ashton 
in the second period. Mike Foligno 
got a first-period goal for Buffalo. 

Cauadteos 5, Brains 3 
In Montreal, Chris Chdios sent a 
blistering slapshot past goalie 
Doug Keans 20 seconds into the 
third period, the power play giving 
the home team a 3-3 tie. Chns Ni- 
lan won it when he tipped Bob 
Gainey’s shot past the Boston goal- 
ie at 15:40, then Nflan assisted on 
an insurance goal by Guy Carbon- 
neau with 1:39 left 

Black Hawks 6, Red Wings 1 
In the only series with two wipe- 
outs so far, Chicago stormed to a 3- 
0 lead in the first period and coast- 
ed against visiting Detroit. The 
Blade Hawks, wbo won by 9-5 in 
the first game, tod: their lead on 
first-period goals by Darryl Sutter, 
Ken Yaremchuk and Al SeconL 
Curt Fraser, Keith Brown and 
Doug Wilson also scored Tor Chica- 
go, while Detroit's Joe Kocur 
scored on a breakaway. (WP, AP) 



Gives Way to Old Pros 


lead at two-under-par 


■MMn/UNad Pte* htoratonN 


Barefooted Lanny Wadkins dubbed his way out of the creek 
fronting 12th green and got a shower, but Mil ndled back to 
edge and he had to take a drop. He still shot 72 for the round. 

Third Hole Too Much 
Far Too Early for Most 


UmtcJ Press IntenhttionaJ 

AUGUSTA, Georgia — Quite 
often the turning point in a round 
can come early, and that was the 
case Tor several players Thursday at 
the third hole of live Augusta Na- 
tional Golf Cub course. 

For the opening round of the 
Masters, tournament officials 
placed the pin on the par-4 third 
hole at the extreme left of the green, 
'fust on top of 5 dope. Before the 
round began. Jack Nicklaus said 
the pin placement would be one of 
the most difficult on the course and 
he proved right. 

Of Thursday's 77 players, 34 
made bogey of worse; there were 
only five birdies on the 360-yard 
hole, and two were by the Haas 
brothers, professional Jay and am- 
ateur Jerry. 

“Three of the first six boles, in- 
cluding the third, had almost unfair 


pin placements,' 1 said Tom Wat- 
son, who got a par at the third. 

“They put you on the defensive." 

Among the hard-hick stories was 
that of Curtis Strange, who shot an 
80. He parted the first two holes 
and hit a good shot to within about 
15 feet of the bole al the third. 

From there he three-putted, then „ ...... 

shot 41 on the front side. Stewart are defending champion 

„ Crenshaw, Floyd, Trevino and the 

BiH Kratzert was even par gomg Randolph and Inman, 

to the third, but he put his second Nicklaus. Player and Casper are at 


By Randy Harvey 

Ldi i Angela Ttma Smite 

AUGUSTA. Georgia — It 
looked for a while Thursday as if 
the first round of (he Masters golf 
tournament was going to turn into 
Ted Mack’s Original Amateur 
Hour. 

But then a couple of lesser- 
known but highly visible pros re- 
captured center sQge for the guys 
who make a living at this game, and 
Tom Watson, Jack Nicklaus. Lee 
Trevino. Gary Player, Rav Floyd, 
Billy Casper and Ben Crenshaw 
took it from there. 

Payne Stewart was the first to 
break the early hold that unfabled 
amateurs Sam’ Randolph Jr. of the 
University of Southern California 
and John Inman of North Carolina 
put on this fabled tournament 
when they finished iheir rounds 
tied for 
70. 

If fashion were a prerequisite for 
winning on the Professional Golf- 
ers’ Association tour. Stewart 
would always be the leader in the 
clubhouse. 

His green tie was a particularly 
nice touch, considering that is the 
predominant color at Augusta Na- 
tional. Wearing that alone with his 
red knickers, a red Ben Hogan cap 
and acupuncture needles in his ears 
would nave assured him of being 
noticed even if be had not shot 69. 

Acupuncture needles? 

What would Bobby Jones say? 

Stewart's 69 was outdone only 
by Gary Hallberg, also easily iden- 
tifiable in his gray chapeau, which 
he called an “Indiana Jones hat." 

Asked if he had ever met Harri- 
son Ford, the actor wbo plays Indi- 
ana Jones, Hallberg said, “No, but 
I've hit the ball in a few places 
where I’ve looked for him.” 

Not Thursday. 

He shot an unadventurous 68, 
proving thar some of the players 
were wrong earlier this week when 
they said the course would play like 
The Temple of Doom. 

One of them was Watson, a two- 
time Masters champion who still 
was complaining Thursday about 
the difficult pin placements, even 
though he shot a 69 that tied him 
for second place with Stewan. 

Speaking about the particularly 
troublesome No. 6. where the pin 
was near the hack of the green, 
Watson huffed, *Td like to see Ben 
Hogan keep the ball below the hole 
there." 

Hogan was not here, but many of 
the game's other big names are. 
And in contention. 

One shot behind Watson and 



shot just over the green. His chip 
shoL scooted by the pin and raced 
along the fast green until it ran 
back into the fairway. From there 
be wound np with a double bogey. 

Mastering the third hole usually 
meant something good was going 
to happen. Ben Crenshaw ana Lee 
Trevino biidied it and they wound 
up shooting 70s. 

But to get his birdie. Trevino had 
to chip in from behind the green. 


71. Two-time champion Severiano 
Ballesteros is at 72. 

Who would have thought Nick- 
laus. who has won here five times, 
would ever be trailing one of his 
son's college teammates? Jack Jr., 
who was at home giving his father 
putting tips last weekend, played 
with Inman at North Carolina. 

Only Inman did not seem to be 
surprised. 

The brother of touring pro Joe 


(tMni'Un 

Fred Couples either kissed or 
bit his ball before teeing off. 
He shot 75 in the first round. 

Inman, John, 22, plans to turn pro- 
fessional himself after this tourna- 
ment. Although he is not quite 
cocky, the defen ding NCAA cham- 
pion is extremely sure of himself. 

Asked if he thought he could win 
here, he said, “I wouldn't rale that 
out." 

His confidence did not prevent 
him from being nervous as he ap- 
proached the fust tee. 

“I was so nervous, I couldn't 
breathe." he said. “I thought some- 
one had turned off the oxygen." 

Randolph, a USC junior whose 
father is the pro at La Cumbre 
Country Club in Santa Barbara, 
California, was runner-up last year 
in the U.S. Amateur. The only time 
he succumbed to the pressure 
Thursday was on the first tee. 
where he hit his drive far to the 
right. 

“When 1 stood over the ball, my 
knees were quivering,” said Ran- 
dolph, 20. “It was uncomfortable. I 
just wanted to get the ball out of 
there." 

But as Inman and Randolph 
probably will discover in later 
years, it is not only the amateurs 
who get jitters teeing off at the 
Masters. 


Crenshaw, who won here last 
year, said he has never been more 
nervous at the first tee than he was 
Thursday. 

“I’m always nervous before the 
first round of the Masters, but ! 
was especially anxious today." he 
said. 

That could have had something 
to do with his play this year. In nine 
previous tournaments, he had 
missed the cui five times and had 
been disqualified once for turning ■ 
in an incorrect score card. 

Entering the Amen Comer — 
holes 11, 12 and 13 — Crenshaw 
was one under par. After hitting his 
best drive of the day on 11. he 
discovered that his ball was caked 
in mud. Unable to control it, his 
□ext shot went into the water, lead- 
ing ro a double bogey. 

Earlier this year, Crenshaw 
would have erupted. 

This time, he turned to his caddie 
and said, “It’s a beautiful day. Why 
lei this spoil it?" 

He tnrdied three of the final sev- 
en holes and finished at 70. 

It was a beautiful day. With the 
sun shining and tempmtures in 
the high 60s. the course was firmer 
in the afternoon, resulting in longer 
drives, truer putts and lower scores. 

The action was on the back nine. 

Nicklaus was lagging al two over 
par until he made a birdie on 14 
and an eagle on the par-5 15th. 
Watson was fire under on the final 
eight holes. Hallberg and Stewart 
were three under on the back nine. 

Stewan has extra incentive this 
year. His father, a two-time state 
amateur champion in Missouri 
who put a golf club into Stewart’s 
hands when he was 4. died of bone 
cancer a month ago. 

The last time they visited. Stew- 
an said he was going to dedicate a. 
Masters championship to him 
someday. 

“He said, ‘Why not this year?* " 
Stewart said after Thursday’s 
round. 

Stewart has not always been easi- 
ly motivated, unlike his intense fa- 
ther. But Stewan said he has felt 1 
more competitive in recent weeks . 
than he has at any other time since' ‘ 
joining the tour in 1981. 

“Maybe he left some of his spirit 
behind for me,” Stewan said. 

He said he also was helped by his 
acupuncture treatments adminis- 
tered back home in Springfield, 
Missouri. Stewart has needles in his 
left ear to relieve stress and anxiety, 
and in his right ear to sharpen h& 
concentration and awareness. 

When he needs a lift, he simply 
touches the appropriate ear and 
Teds a sharp pain. 

“It makes it tough to use the 
telephone," he said. 

Hallberg cannot match ward- 
robes with Stewart, but he can ; 
match doctors. 

He said his game has improved - 
since he began consulting Dr. 
Ralph Mann, the former Olympic 
medalist in the hurdles wbo has a, 
biomechanics laboratory in Ocala, 
Florida. 

“He works with the physics of 
my swing," said Hallberg, a sixth- 
year pro from a suburb of Chicago. 

What would Bobby Jones say? 


Red Sox Win Again; Yankees’ Start Worst in Decade 


Compiled by Che Staff From Dispatches 

BOSTON — The New York 
Yankees are 0-3 for the first time in 
10 yeass, while the Boston Red Sox 
arc 3-0 for the first time since 1973. 

Dwight Evans drove in three 
runs with a sacrifice fly and his 
second home run of the season 
Thursday as Boston downed New 
York, 6-4, for its first series sweep 
of the Yankees since 1982. 

After striking out two of the 
three batters in the first inning, 
pitcher Roger Gernens came close 
to an early shower in the second 
when the Yankees took a 2-0 lead. 

Dave Winfield, who also bo- 
rdered. led off the inning with the 
first of his three singles and Don 
Baylor walked on a 3-2 pitch. Ken 


Griffey singled to score Winfield 
and Mike Pagliamlo walked on a 3- 
2 pitch to load the bases. One out 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


the expense of former teammate 
Neil Allen. 

After Keith Hernandez angled 


later, Gemens walked Bobby Mea- had a chance to tie the major- to open the 1 1th. Allen came on to 
dram on a 3-2 pitch to force in a league record of four homers m a face Gary Carter, who won Tues- 
run. Then the young right-hander game in his final at bat 

~ Thomas already had hit three 


struck out Omar Moreno and 
catcher Rich Gcdman’s snap throw 
picked Meacham off first to com- 
plete an unusual double play and 
the Yankees were en route to an- 
other defeat. 

Manager Yogi Berra, asked if he 
considered the 6-4 loss “crucial,” 
replied, “Not that 1 know of.” 

Mariners 14, A’s 6 
Seattle’s Gorman Thomas, a vet- 
eran slugger who hit just one home 
ran in 1984 while missing most of 
the season with a torn rotator cuff. 


day’s 1 0-inning affair by homering. 
This time, he singled off the glove 
of third baseman Art Howe and, 
when the ball skittered into foul 


three hits, pitching a complete 
game. 

Dodgers 4, Astros 3 
In Los Angdes, the Dodgers fell 
behind by 3-0, picked up a run in 
tbe sixth and scored three in the 
eighth against reliever Bill Dawley. 

Mariano Duncan walked with 
two outs that inning and scored 


territory, Hernandez reached third.' when Ken Landreaux doubled to 
Foster was walked mien- right. Then Mike Marshall, who 
had struck out five times in three 
games, hit his first homer this year. 
Braves 6, PhQties 3 
In Philadelphia, Dale Murphy 
angled in a run in the first, singled 
and scored in Atlanta's three-run 
'third and hit a two-run homer in 
the ninth. (AP. UP1) 


tionally to load the bases, then 
Danny Heep walked on a 3-1 pilch. 

Cubs 4, Pirates I 
In Chicago, Pittsburgh's Jose 
DeLeon wild-pitched in one run 
before Ron Cey hit a three-run 
homer in the fourth. 

Steve Trout held the Pirates to 



iho Auaboodfrati 

Bob Carpenter, who set op winning goal in overtime Thurs- 
day night to rive Capitals 2-1 lead in series, and teammate 
Darren Vdtch stole puck from the Islanders* Cord Dineen. 


Joss Score 
For New Boss 

United Press International 

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah — 
The Utah Jazz showed apprecia- 
tion to their newest owner m a very 
big way. 

Adrian Damley scared 23 pants 
and six teammates were in double 

NBAFOQJS 

figures as the Jazz beat the Port- 
land Trail Blazers, 145-107, Thurs- 
day night. 

The 38-point margin of victory 
broke the old club record of 30 
points set against San Antonio in 
December 1979. and came hours 
after the team's president, Sam 
Battistone, announced that a Utah 
car dealer, Larry Miller, had 
bought a 50-percent share of the 
financially troubled franchise for 
an estimated $8 million. 

“We got cm a roll tonight," said 
the coach, Frank Layden. 

Utah made 58 percent of its 
shots and took advantage of 26 
t unloves by tbe Trail Blazers. 

“This is oiir poorest performance 
of the season. I detest games like 
this," said Portland's coach, Jack 
Ramsey. 

Elsewhere it was Boston 121, 
Cleveland 115: Houston 125, Kan- 
sas Gty 123: the Los Angeles Lak- 
ers 137, Golden State 130 and Dal- 
las 124, Seattle 80. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


home runs, one a grand slam, when 
he came to bat in the seventh in- 
ning with the Mariners leading, 13- 
6. He walked on a 3-2 pitch 'and 
said later “there is no way I was 
going to swing at a 3-0 pitch or even 
a 3-1 pitch. Then you’re showing 
someone up.” 

Tigers IL Indians 10 
Detroit, which got off to a 35-5 
start last year and went on to win 
(he World Series, completed a sea- 
son-opening, three-game sweep of 
via ting Gevdand when reliever 
Dave Von Ohlen walked three bat- 
ters in the bottom of tbe 10th to 
force in a ran after shortstop Julio 

Franco’s error allowed the lead off * . 

man to reach base. 

Detroit’s Lany Herndon sent the Holmes Wants a Fight With Spinks 

RBI single in the ninth. LAS VEGAS (AP) — Larry Holmes, who now wants to top Rocky 

Bh»e Jays 4, Royals 3 Marciano’s heavyweight record of 49-0 rather than retire, said Thursday 

In K a n sas City, George Bell’s he has signed for between $2-5 million and S3 million to fight light- 

long home run off Royal reliever 1 — '- L - — ! — *' ,J - ' 

Dan Quisenbexry's first pitch of the 
10th gave Toronto its triumph. For 
the second straight night. Blue Jay 
reliever Bill Caudill got the victory, 
pitching one and two-thirds hitless 
innings before Em Acker took over 
in the 10th and got a save. 

Brewers 8. White Sox I 
In Milwaukee, Ray Burris made 
a successful debut for tbe Brewers, 
holding Chicago to five hits. The 
right-hander, acquired in a trade 
that sent Don Sutton to Oakland, 
was in command tbe entire way. 

The Brewers took control early, 
scoring three runs off Tim Lollar m 
the first inning. Paul Molitor and 

Robin Yount led off with angles , T cwm nrr 

and both Kprcd on Mark Brou- Boston Marathon Loses 2 l op Women 

hard s double. Paul Householder 12 


heavyweight champion Michael Spinks. But Spinks has not signed and 
the match already has run into problems. 

NBC wants to televise the fight in prime time Monday night. May 20, . 
at a site to be determined Promoter Butch Lewis, who has guided the 
unbeaten Spinks’ career, said Spinks needs more time and added, *Tm- 
going to teir Holmes, whose record is 47-0, that “I can deliver the money, - 
the site and Spinks for June or July.” 

Swedes Will Play Cup Match in Chile 

STOCKHOLM (UPI) — The defending-champion Swedish team, . 
which March 5 left earthquake-struck Santiago, decided Thursday to play. - 
its postponed Davis Cup match against Chile in Santiago on Apnl 39-21. ‘ 
despite a new tremor with aftershocks Monday night. 

In Dallas, Sweden’s Joakim Nystrom upset the world's top-ranked - 
men’s player, John McEnroe, by 6-4, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3 in the World Cop 
Tennis Tournament quarterfinals. McEnroe lost the second set tie break- 
er after losing an ace to a foot fault while leading, 4-3. 


hard’s double. Paul Householder 
then doubled home Brouhard. 

Angels 4, Twins 3 
In Anaheim. California, Dairell 
Miller scored the winning run from 
third base in the bottom of tbe 10th 
when slow Bob Boone beat the re- 
lay throw of a potential inning- 
ending double play. 

Mets 2, Cardinals 1 
In Sl Louis in the National 
League, the Mets were forced into 
extra innings for the second time in 
as many games but again won at 


BOSTON (Combined Dispatches) — Laura Albers and Jenni Peters, 
considered two of the leading women contenders in the 89th Boston.' 
Marathon, have withdrawn, a race official announced Thursday. 

Joe Catalano said he received a letter from Albers' husband Thursday, 
saying his wife felt that Lisa Larsen Weidenbach, the women's favorite, 
would be “too tough to beat" in Monday’s 26-mile, 385-yard race. Peters 
scratched because of an injury to her Achilles 4 tendon. Catalano said. 

Ron Tabb, the second-place finisher in 1980 and third in 1983. 
withdrew citing the lack of prize money. A black South African, consid- 
ered a top contender, was barred from the marathon because of an 
international ban on athletes from his country. “They could have told me 
a lot longer ago that I wouldn’t be able to compete,” said Mark Plaatjes, a 
medical student who came from Johannesburg to run. (AP, UPI) 











Page 16 


ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 13-14, 1985 



ART BUCHWALD 

Here Comes the Judge 



W ASHINGTON — I knew 
Rotary wanted to be a federal 
judge, but I didn't know how badly 
until I found him at his desk per- 
spiring as be filled out a question- 
naire. 

“What's that?" 

“It’s a series of ques tions I have 
to answer cor- 
rectly to satisfy 
the ultra-right 
wing that I'm 
worthy of hav- 
ing a seat on the 
bench." 

“Why are you 
trying to satisfy 
the ultra-right?" 

I asked him. 

llJid ■£« 

listens to them when he decides 
who gets the federal judgeships. A 
judicial candidate has to swear be 
buys the whole conservative ideolo- 
gy or he can’t get appointed deputy 
bail bondsman in a traffic court." 
□ 

“What kind of questions are they 
asking you?" 

“They want to know how I'll rule 
on abortion." 

“You're going to have to rule for 
it if you want to be a federal judge. 
It * the law of the land." 

“It may be the law of the land, 
but the ultras believe a federal 
judge has to ignore the law if a fetus 
is at stake." 

“So what are you putting 
down?" I asked him.’ 

"Here’s what I wrote. ‘As a fed- 
eral judge I have no choice but to 
let my conscience take precedence 
over any Supreme Court decision 
— ■ so help me God.' Do you think 
it’s strong enough?" 


TJeveiiy Hills Cop' No. 9 
On All-Time Monev List 

4 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Beverly 
Hills Cop," starring Eddie Mur- 
phy. has topped S200 million at the 
box office and entered the top 10 
list of all-time money makers. 

The movie, in its fourth month of 
release, vaulted-over “Grease” and 
bumped “Tootsie” to take the No. 
9 position. “Beverly Hills Cop" 
also became the first R-rated film 
to enter the top 10, according to 
Paramount Pictures Corp- the dis- 
tributer. 


“The devil only knows what will 
satisfy them. What else are they 
asking you?" 

“Would I have any hesitation 
frying a man in the electric chair?" 

“That's a good right-to-life ques- 
tion. Would you?" 

“Not if 1 could send him to the 
gas chamber first. You see, I don't 
warn them to think l*m partial to 
just one kind of death penalty.” 

“So far it sounds like you’re their 
kind of guy." 

□ 

"Those are the easy ones. They 
also want to know how I fed about 
prayers in school." 

“That shouldn't be hard. Say 
you're for them." 

“Of course I said I'm for them. 
But the second pan is multiple 
choice. Listen to this. 'If you an- 
swered yes, tell when: (A) in the 
morning. (B) at lunchtime, (Cj all 
day long."' 

“I'd put down C. just to play it 
safe." I told him. 

“There's no legal precedent for 
C," he said. 

“There’s no legal precedent for 
asking you all those other questions 
either." 

Rotary looked at the sheet. “Do I 
believe everyone in the United 
Stares should own a gun?" 

“I should hope so. How else 
would the good guys kill the bad 
guys in the subways?" 

“Where do I stand on the Equal 
Rights Amendment?" 

“Tell ’em, 'Right on top of Phyl- 
lis Schlafly.' " 

“They want a list of all the politi- 
cal groups I’ve donated money to 
in the last 10 years, the name of 
anyorie in the neighborhood who 
does not support covert aid to Nic- 
aragua, a list of members of my 
family who still believe in Darwin’s 
theory of evolution, and any bus 
drivers I know who are actively 
involved in school busing.” 

□ 

“You know something?" 1 said. 
“After listening to all this garbage 
I’ve decided you demean yourself 
by answering "a questionnaire from 
a bunch of right-wing kooks just to 
get a seat on the federal court." 

“Oh yeah?" he said. "They may 
be kooks. buL they also happen to 
be United States senators. As far as 
the White House is concerned, 
when it comes to selecting judges, 
the right-wing zealot's word is 
law." 


Sam Shem Novels: Medicine for the Funny Bone 


By Sandy Rovner 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON— “Fine” is 
his new book, a funny, sensi- 
tive, even adventurous account of 
the raetaraorpbosis of a resident 
in psychiatry, but Samuel Shem 
will always be known to U.S. 
medical students, interns and res- 
idents primarily as the author of 
“The House of God." 

A sort of “ Animal House” with 
substance, a less preachy 
this cult classic 
has been read as studiously as 
Gray’s Anatomy by virtually ev- 
ery student in any English-speak- 
ing medical school since it was 
published in 1978. It has sold well 
over a million copies, and even' 
now, seven years later, it sells 300 
copies a day. 

“It’s gotten so that you haven’t 
gone to med school if you haven't 
read ‘House of God,’" said a 
bioethics professor. 

Sam Shem — a pseudonym — 
is a physician and psychiatris who 
graduated from Harvard Medical 
School thinly disguised in “The 
House of God” as BMS, or Best 
Medical SchooL BMS is affiliated 
with the House of God, a hospital 
“founded in 1913 by the Ameri- 
can People of Israel when their 
medically qualified Sons and 
Daughters could Dot get good in- 
ternships in good hospitals be- 
cause of disc rimina tion." 

Shem interned at Beth Israel 
Hospital in Boston and describes 
it as “the worst year of my life." 
That he went to medical school at 
all is due at least in part to his 
freshman English composition in- 
structor at Harvard 
He really liked the idea of writ- 
ing, and he turned in his first 
composition with something of a 
sense of destiny. T worked on it 
like hell" he recalled. “After all it 
was my first grade 1 was going to 
get at Harvard. When I got it back 
from the woman there wasn't a 
mark on the paper, and down at 
the bottom in little letters in red 
ink was ‘See me.’ ” 

He went to her office. “I said, 
‘What is it?' and she said, *11115 is 
too terrible to grade. This is be- 
neath F,' " Shem recalled “I was 
heartbroken. She never could tell 
me what was wrong, but she kept 
on giving me D’s and D- minuses. 

I figured here she is a grad stu- 
dent in English and she must 
know what she was doing. So all 
through Harvard 1 never tried 



Douglas Owcior/Thfl Wusleiyluii Pan 

Author “Shem”: The House of God and St Elsewhere. 


to write again. I was crushed 

“Later on 1 found out that there 
were only two people in the class 
who got A’s. One of them was the 
son of a famous writer. The other 
was the captain of the freshman 
golf team. He was sleeping with 
her. I was on the golf team, too. 
and he told me.” 

He paused And sighed. “I'd 
love to find that woman today.” 

But that was around the time 
Sam Shem got into cockroaches. 

Cockroaches and golf got him a 
Rhodes scholarship, and when he 
returned from Batliol College at 
Oxford three years later he went 
to medical school 
□ 

The Thirteenth Law of the 
House of God fc The delivery of med- 
ical care is to do as much nothing as 
possible. 

□ 

After medical school Samuel 
Shem became an intern at Beth 
Israel where he came to the con- 
clusion that in many emergency- 


room cases in big-city teaching 
hospitals, the most humane treat- 
ment is to permit a patient to die. 
Not. as he was taught, to take 
every possible heroic step to keep 
the patient alive, quality of life 
notwithstanding. 

As he became immersed in the 
unexpected horror of decaying 
and diseased humanity, his life- 
line was his humor. “The House 
of God" was written, he says, “as 
catharsis. I just didn't want any- 
one else to have to go through that 
cruelly." 

Lisa Rubin, a 25-year-old se- 
nior medical student at George 
Washington University Medical 
Center, said she “read the book 
between my first and second year. 
When I came to med school I had 
a real idealistic, glorified idea of 
what it was about, and 'House of 
God' was my introduction to die 
fact that my view and the reality 
were somewhat different- “You 
get angry at that stage when you 
hear patients called ’goraers' [an 
acronym for 'get out of my emer- 


gency room'], but when you're 
called at 3 A.M. and rind a patient 
vomiting and incontinent and 
you’re trying to put in an IV line 
and they’re Sailing around and as 
soon as you get the line in they'll 
knock it’out and you Stan getting 
angry because you have nowhere 
else to put it. Fm not saying that’s 
right, but that's the only way to 
preserve your own sanity. 

“ ‘House of God* has the sort of 
humor that keeps you going. If 
you can’t laugh at it. You’ll cry. 
And if you cry, you won’t make 
it.'* 

At House of God. the chief resi- 
dent, known as the Fat Man, 
teaches the young intern the rules 
and the ways to “buff” and 
“turf." Buffing a chart is to make 
it look as though something has 
been done for a patient what, in 
fact, the Thirteenth Law has been 
followed to the letter. 

As for turfing: 

“My first very own patient was a 
LOL 'm NAD [little old lady in no 
apparent distress] in need of a 
checkup and a prescription for a 
new artificial breast and padded 
bra with finable pockets. Who 
knew haw to write a prescription? 
Not me. She wrote it, I signed 
it. . . . Next mus a Portuguese 
woman who wanted me to do some- 
thing about her corns. Who knew 
about corns? I toyed with the idea 
of writing her a prescription for an 
artificial foot and a padded shoe 
with fillable socks, bia then I re- 
membered the Fat Man and turfed 
her to podiatry 

Doing any “nothing" is anathe- 
ma to the nKdicopolitical hierar- 
chy that runs not only House of 
God but also BMS and the Mount 
Sl Elsewheres, the community 
hospitals in which patients are of- 
ten dumped. The term “Sl Else- 
where,” created by Shem, so 
quickly became part of the medi- 
cal vernacular that spokesmen for 
MTM Enterprises, which pro- 
duces the TV program “Sl Else- 
where," swear that the phrase was 
just plucked out of the air, that it 
had been a part of the medical 
argot forever. 

□ 

The Third Law: At a cardiac 
arrest , the first procedure is to take 
vour own pulse. 

□ 

At Oxford, Samuel Shem's 
Rhodes project was on the neuro- 
physiology of the cockroach. 


There was nothing whimsical 
about it, except perhaps its choice 
in the First place. “You can see 
learning in a single cell loop, 
Shem said, and Dr. Fine, the trou- 
bled psychiatrist hero of his new 
book, says much the same thing. 

Fine has trained grasshoppers 
to do ail sorts of intellectual exer- 
cises one wouldn't expect of an 
insecL As zanv as it sounds, prac- 
tically all of Fine’s science is 
based on fact, some on those Ox- 
ford roaches, some on newer dis- 
coveries about bow the bram 
works. 

On the other hand. Fme. who 
has a block about his first name, 
whit* only becomes understand- 
able on the last page, invents 
some, calcium rocks he sucks on 
throughout the book to enhance 
intelligence. 

When Shem wasn't trying to 
shock some sense into cockroach- 
es at Oxford, be was writing plays. 
Shem admits to a certain conflict 
about his use of a nom de plume. 
At first, he says, it was toprotect 
his psychiatric patients. Then, as 
his plays started winning; awards 
and being performed in New 
York — off-Broadway, where his 
latest, “Ground Zero,” is in pre- 
production — he realized that 
Samuel Shem was his writing per- 
sona. 

A few people, mostly close 
friends ana his editor, know both 
selves. Most of his theater and 
literary cohorts know only Shem. 
Most of his patients know only 
Dr. (let's call mm) Shrink- 

Dr. Gail Povar, who teaches 
bioethics at the George Washing- 
ton University Medical Center, 
said that what “The House of 
God” does “is provide all of the 
black humor all of us use with a 
black language. It pulled together 
all the jaigon arid created a lan- 
guage for a particular group. It 
created a universal experience 
people can use as a shorthand, 
between themselves, as a buffer 
between themselves and the situa- 
tion." 

One bioethics professor said 
she does not use tne book in her 
classes because “the older doctors 
would be apoplectic.” 

Kathryn Hunter, who teaches 
literature to medical students at 
the University of Rochester 
School of Medicine, does not use 
it in her classes, either, “because it 
should be kept as an underground 
classic." 


PEOPLE 


■t; t 






Damage at Stonehenge ; 

Causes Ban on Festival 

A pop festival that has been hekl :•** 
for 12 years at Stonehenge, Bril- 
ain’s richest prehistoric site, h as 
been banned because “destructive 
and violent elements'’ dag bread - 
ovens in ancient burial mounds and 
damaged the landmark last year. 

“The land aroun4 Ston ehenge , so 
rich In archaeological history, is be- 
ing ruined." said John .Crimea, '. 
area director of the National Trust 
The English Heritage Commission, 
which cares for the 4,000-year-old j 
monumenL and the -National' 

TrusL which owns the surrounding' 
land, announced that Stonehenge.) 
would be dosed on the night of tit ©; i 
summer solstice. June 21. which jj£ 
usually the climax of the pop-ejfr 
travaganza. Last year, 35,000 pe^ 
pie were camped illegally neaffo 
Stonehenge, and 270 people were?! 
arrested, many for drag offenses « 

The festival lasted for six weda;* 
and the commission estimated V 
damage at £20.000 (about 525,000), j 

There were no hard fedings.be- 
rween Loretta Young and (he pro- 
ducer Aaron Spelling after the ac- 
tress withdrew from her role in ar 
ABC movie and projected night 
time soap opera. “Dark Man 
sions." “Loretta Young will not bt 
rendering services because of ere 
ative differences over the story.’ 
her agenu Norman Brokaw. sak'; 

Thursday. Young, 72. had been dut 
to come out of retirement to begin 
work on the two-hour movie on 
April 22. She was to have played 
Margaret Drake, the matriarch of a 
Seattle shipping family. “It’s true 
that we had creative" differences 

over the way her character was de- - 

veloping," Spelling said. “She’s a'*’" 
great star and a great friend and I . - 
hope she always remains both. r j - - 

. . . Barbara Bel Geddes, who left 
the “Dallas” series two years agp * 

after a heart attack, will return for _ - | 
the show’s eighth season this fall a 'jju 1 T X - 
spokesman for Loriraar Produc- " 
lions said. Bel Geddes, 62, had • s 
quadruple bypass surgjery after a.-rfHp \ 1 \ 
heart attack in March 1983. 4 

□ 

Charles Aznavour was hospital- 
ized Thursday with acute pain .. 
caused by a kidney stone. Azna- - „ . 
vour, 60, was being driven from his - ' 
home in Geneva to a film festival at 
Vichy, France, where he was togive '• 
a performance when he collapsed. 

His chauffeur drove him to a hospi- 
tal at Bourg-en-Bresse. - • 






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AUSTRIA 

4 j .y ■ 1 « , i _ 1 , 1 ?. y j y/p n ir iVj 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

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GREAT BRITAIN 

ST. JOHN’S WCK». 300 yvds An*ri- 

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FOR SALE SAN SALVADOR [S Ven- 
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Pfans cvo4ab!e: OFHB! D 03-351360, 
Pubfcatat. 04-4010 Basel, Switzer- 
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MAJBEUA 


with terrace, ocean vww, 24 hour 
security, wedtang distance from 
Puerto Bonus. 
US$140,000 

Call (52) ■ 787300. Ext 1322 


LOVELY 4 BHMfOOM vfio far sale by 
owner m Jovea. Spam. 12m pool, 
trees, custom fireplace. Write VA-TS 
2S Javea. Aficam. Spain 


SWITZERLAND 


In the eho mxn g mountain resort of 

LEYSIN: 

RESIDENOE LES FRENE5 

Overlooking a splendid Alpine panora- 
ma 30 rmn. from Montreue and take 
Geneva by cor. 

you on own quetty residences - 
with indoor swenrmng pool and 
fitness focJrt-es m an ideal 
enwrarenent for tenure aid sports 

* fSrniciig\5^aw SF. rotes 
up to (n mortgu g e s . 

Raasa contact; 

Rasfcfanar tee Irene s. 1854 Leysin 
5WITZBUAND 

Tef. (OZS) 34 11 55 TU Moke 26629 CH 


Foremners 
MENT l I 


SWITZERLAND 
1 an buy STUDIO APART- 
/ CHALET. LAKE GENEVA . 
MONTREUX or in these world Famous 
naortfcCRANS-MONTANA.LESDIAB- 
LERETS. VERSUS. VHLARS, JURA, 
from SniOXXri. 

M ortgage s 6 09t or 6 M% interest. 
REVAC S.A. 

53 MordbriBant, Ot-1202 
GGMEVA. TeL 022/341544 
Mmc 22030 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely apartments with magnificent 
views of Lake Geneva and mountaets. 
Montreux. Viflart Verbter, Les Diabler- 
ets. Chateau tfOex near Gsfaad. Ley- 
on. fa c e fl es H QpportiMutites For 


Pn«s from SF123XJ00 
Liberal mortgages of interest. 
GLOMPIAN 5 -A. 

Av Mon Repos 24, 

CH-1005 Lousmme, Switzerland. 
TeL (21) 22 35 1Z IK- 251 85 M 8 JS 
Estabfalted Since 1970 


ST. MORITZ - MADULAIN 

Apartments 54 tq.ni. up to 90 iq.m., 
generoudy designed m the DigoCbt 
style, lop quafiiy + buit-in kitchen. 
Parking, saurw, indoor summing pool. 
Beautiful iurrou wings. ding, 15mm to 
Si. Moritz. Prices; SF210JXW up to 
SF420JQQ. Free for sale to foreigners. 
Mortgages at low Swiss hterett rates. 

EMERAJLD-HOME LTD. 

YOUR PAKTNBt IN HJROPE 
Dorfstr., CFF8872 WESEN 
TeL CH/ 58-431 778 
Tbc 876062 HOME CH. 


LAKE GENEVA A LUGANO, Mjru 
ireux, Gjtood Valley & many other 
famous maintain resorts. Foreigners 
can buy mografioBut APARTMENTS / 
VILLAS / CHALETS. Price from about 
15540,000. Mortgages at 6 !tr* inter- 
est. voit/phone: hL SEBOLD SA. 
Tour Grtse 6 , 0+1007 Lausanne. Tel 
21/25 26 11. Tt* 24298 5EBO CH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


BEST LOCATION IN S. CAUF. Centu- 

ry Gty Townhouse. Live m country 
dub luxury m the Heart of Los Ange- 
les’ most prestimoia enferranmenr & 
nnandeJ center. Fufl staff & seainty ct 
your service. ProfesBondly decorated 

3 bedrooms, 4 54 baths, sauna & spa, 

patros, roof garden and private ele- 
vator, coven 6j000 soft. Sl DOOjOOO. 
Coil owner (2ljfl5ST 2818- 


NYC UP!® EAST SIDE - Spacious 2 

bedroom, 2 both luxury builcfing coo- 
domimum. 28th floor. Spectacul ar 
views of Certrd Part the Reservoir, 
& the Upper West Side up to the 
George Washington Badge. 5800,000 
by owner. [212jV80-3465 Mon-Wed- 
Fri 10 am - 2 pm. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA'S HOUSING AGENCY. 
0222-527964, Hotter, Graben 31. 
Kentabr deluxe flats & houses. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


ADC B4 PROVENCE. South oF France. 
- Very Fine house, rent July and August. 
6 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, very big 
fang room, m the country. 5 mnutes 
From Aix. Coi eirwings (42| 23 57 37. 


THE RENCH RIVIERA offers tins sea- 
son summer residences in all price 
levels. Hem NBsen, Sous Bam 60 . 
06640 St Ceomtet. tot- (93) 24 B0 19. 


GERMANY 


BAD KOMBURG. New hiwry Rat. 2 
bedrooms, 2 bajhs, fivmg/dWrg 


ceea, fireplace. 

en, exceflenf locoticn. Please write to 
Bax 2132. 1 H.T„ Friedncfctr. 15, 6000 
Frankfurt/Moin 


■ equipped fetch- 
l Please vw 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON, QmcMI Hotel 


week. Minimum 3 


584 2501 


I weekly. 01-589 8223 


surf 2 . £ 1 20 /week 


TEAD, 5 

.01435 


7275 


GREECE 


MYKONOS, charming one bed 
house near town & beach. Me 
cent sea view. Urge terrace.' J 
monthly. Also one roam multi 
studio. 56a view From terrace. 2 
iwni mum for bath. By month only 
and August. A Skinner, Myfe 
(289) 2-3)29 


ITALY 


When in Rome-. 
PALAZZO AL VELABfiO 


Phone: 6794325. 679345a 
Wnto Via dal Vetobro 16, 
00186 Rome. 


ROME 

RESIDENTIAL AREA 
Lovely apartments by day, by we 
by month. Direct phone. Aufanc 
1 soring. Bar. Restaurant. Goto 
24 hour service. 

IDENCE CORTINA D'AMPE 

(39-6) 3387012 - 3387015 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

Publish your business mmaaaa 
in thm TnfrmatianeJ Herald Tri- 
bune, writer* more than a thad 
of a flriffien notion warfd- 
wnSde, mod of whom arm ht 
htnmmtt and industry, w riff 
rmpd H. Jut! latex ut (Pant 
&13S9SJ bmform 70 run!, en- 
turing that wm eon ietex you 
bods, aid your mmstogo wBt 
tgtpoa mftrfn 08 boon. Thu 
rote h US. $9.80 or faced 
•quhnMent pur lino. You most 
tndudm Compiotm and vmrify- 
obUbmrngaUtma. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES ? 


YES! bwesi m one of America's most 
voting rechnoiogicd brecftthrouglis in 
0 Ml on daUtx industry. We hove 
planted mere not trees in 1984 than 
any other developer in our Slate. 
t*gh annual earrings assured for many, 
many years. 

BROKERS’ ENQUIRIES INVITED. Me 
tend available in English, French, Ger- 
man. Arobt Box 19KUIetod Tribune, 
92521 NeuRy Cedes, France 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-SHIRT FOTOS 
NOW IN RJU COLOR 
an alcash business rhot can earn you 
58000 . 5 10.000/ month. New and used 
system from 59500 - 126500. 

Kemo, DepL A12, Ptarfoch 170340, 
6000 rranfcfurt/W. Germany, 

Tel- 069-747808 TIi; 412713 KBWK 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


THIS WEEK 

APRIL 22nd, 

in 

BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 

a Can Detroit Cepe? With Imports 
About To Soar H 10 U J. Aula 
Industry W3! Shrink 

• Fanning The fires: Tokyo's Offer 
on Trade Ms fiat. 

• China: Jcman Dominates The Ante 
MarfcetBot Europe Is In The 
Paeon® Lose. 

a Europe: Toady Is Counting On Hs 
Now Microcomputer To Stay hi 
The Game. 

NOW ON SALE 
AT ALL INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


MACHINES A B4GME5 for earth 
moving, material handing, forestry & 
ooftstrudmn. All makes & rypev 

T “-Hum, Gesebeomi 21, 

LjeL.3Z3.38i 

' B. 


HOTEL MANAGEMENT Profcuionds 
nek caplet a hufid 2 -sfor haW with 
entertomment & reJnranion apn- 
pninds in Porn. Forarai caprtol wqL 
come. Tel: Paris 670 35 90. evenma 
message, wfltnl yew bode. 


IW1S5 8US1NB5 WOMAN, m 6 n- 

S 9, with own ofwe/telex, dloofeng 
partnership or wB ad as yaur 
agtnt Pfoase cgntoct. Tetex 423070 
Geneva. 


ATHENS4NVESTMENT m Greece. 
Approved fnnt pKM padung mveit- 
ment $4 nvBion. Loohng For partner. 
FVeferably trader of soiwor troduds 
ri Middle Eat. Tlx 218597 ATEC GR, 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


BUSWESS SERVICES <n Uaembowg 
secretarid service > telepfione / Mex 
•• mea service / nwwong, lochnicoF, 
odmimilrahvB oed fmanoal guidance 
t custom agency f woroge space / 
advertising consultant f ffeedve 
workshop - domrakohon / cempony 
Fermonon. Please contact Luxcoro 
SA P.OJL 2436, Ll 024 Unmnbowg. 
Tet 495643 or 48 « 11/12/11 1 5 
2251 LUXCOLU. 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 
Report • 12 countries anrfwed. 
Detefc WMA, 4$ Lyndwrst ICE, 
Swte 504, Central. Hong Reng. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UM1MITED INC 
6 WORLDWIDE 

A complete social & busmen sen-„ 
prowling a uniaue cssBedton of 
toterted, versatile & mulhlcngud 
indrndutds for d occasions. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56lh St. N.Y.C 10019 

Serw* fepraser(ot>ves 
Needed Worldwide. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HAVE US DOLLARS to _ _ 
Swiss Francs or BcGon Lira 
6500 Zurich. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

ine dnmonds <ji any pnet rang 
at lowest wholesale prices 
direct from Antwerp 
center of the diamond world. 
FHjB guarantee. 

For Fimr price ter write 
Joachim GaMemtain 


EsFobWwd 1928 

'eUaaretraal 62. 8-2018 Antweri 
Belgium ■ TeL (32 M 234 07 51 
Tbu 71779 syl b. At the Diairorid Ol_ 
Heart of Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ZURKH-ZURICH-ZURfCH 

BAHWMF51KAS5E 52 
«X» OFFICE AWAY ROM F 

• Otfice/Atanagement Services 

• Company Fformatiotiss 

• Haw to do ftisinw vtJa! 

FROM 5WJT2fltLAhD 
Suifaen Services Consult Com. 
Bahnhafstraae S3. CH8022 Zun5. 
Tel 01/211 92 07. H» 813 062 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


EMPLOYMENT 


ITALY 

NORTH TUSCANY, 10 rams, from sea 
' Furnished country cottage to rent 3 
* double bedrooms. Iwma room, drimg 
„ room, gaden. Avaitawe May. June, 
July. September US$400 per week. 
_ Tel Italy (101 585812/541731 



m HOLLAND 1 

n 

«j Renthouse Internationoi 
v 020448751 (4 lines) 

^ Nederhoven 19-21, Amsterdam 

” DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 

_ Define rentals. Valcriusitr. 174, 

Amsterdam. 020621234 or 673222. 

d PHHt HtUM MAKHAASDU 

Inti Hmrmg Swvice-Rentats 
Amsterdam. Tel: 020-768022. 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

74 CHAMPS-ELY5EES 8th 

Sfadto, 2 or3-raoni oportmert. 

One morWi ar more. 
s LE CLAJHDCE- 359 67 97. 

SHORT IKM 5TAY. Advontages of o 
hotel without rieomwienaHi. Fed at 
home in rsce sfados or one bedroom 
opanmenls in Pmn. Contact! SORE- 
LB* 544 39 40. ■ 80 rue de 1 Univer- 
| rti. Pmts 7th. 

I5TH RUE FEUX FAURE. 2 bedrooms. 

I double firing, etp. sun. From May or 

1 loiterJ2. 14 montas). S550 net. Td 
5V. 09.99. 

16TH ETOHE 1 year. 1 -bedroom 

' raShT* 

61H near Luxembourg Gardens for 4 
months, beau* fully famished duplex, 

45 sqjn, F6000/moatK 5X8 63&T 

SHORT TERM in Larin Quarter. 
No agents. Tefi 329 38 83. 

TURKEY 

TURKEY - ISTANBUL Prestige 230 
sqm. residential flex in fFtoUgious 
center. Furnshed. utXties + exrrav 
frummuai lease 7 yuan, deposit re- | 
quMixd. AvatfoUe May BSf Write: 

AD.U.T.. P.O Box BF7, bttmbuL 

SWITZERLAND 

LOVB.Y CHALET, peaceful and nalu- 
;ol surroundings, sfe. fishmg, Wing C 
taotmos. Afi conveniences. 5fert/lona v 

term. Tel 33 31 31. o 

USA 

MOVING TO ATLANTA? Rent a pri- _ 
vote kingdom. Luxury cypress wood 
house on 4 acres, rnnutes from every, 
fiterg. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, (1 U 

sqm.|. Owner tofeng tsvenees prat ■ tn 
offers low rant to refioble tenant, d 
Please wnte to Box 2131. IJLT, Frie- tr 
drkhsfr. IS, 6000 Frankfart/Atam ar in 
latex John. Warsaw. Poltexl 817412. m 

NEW YORK CITY Greeirwfach VMoge ™ 
3-bedroom loti, tacuzzi 200 iq-m. ' 
$4,000/montfa Tel USA 914 677^67. “ 

on 

REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

AMBUCAN WOMAN itesi'cs to ex- HI 
change 1 bedroom Parts 7th, Sept or 

. 0a. 85 and Jm. '86 far t bedroom 
home - both, kitchen, auto. Polo A*o, 

CA USA. JM9 B Cnminq, State 288, 
Menlo Farit CA 9402S. 

WANTED GRES ISLAM1 RENTAL - 
Smdl house sought m or near pretty 
vrtksge or on bweh for 2 or 3 waefa 
storfingAug.3 PlaoEe send daerts ( 8 . 
gtatorf|&)foW , fl.30Wbl§: 

SANTA BARBARA, CAUF. Beeufiful 
house, swimmeig pool terns dub, 
rxdwge for smner in Franca ■ Au- 

■ i^snir 2 * 59 » ^ 


FOB MORE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS 
LOOK UNDH 

•WrKNATroNAL F>OSIT10N5" 
PAGE U 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


B4GINffil-MBXUE EAST 
Battery Manufacturing/ Dry CM 
5-6 years tn-planf produdnn superviso- 
ry eupwience required. 12-1B morih os- 
aenment in htdene Easr. Anroctwe sdo- 
rr. Send CV. » Bax 2012, Herald 
Tribune. 92521 NeuiFFy Gtdex, From 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


LONDON, MCUI5IYE B dgravra ml- 
tage, 3 bedwaa, ta Achcmgadurirn 
swnw sdtoal vocation Far strafe 
near Dtsney World. Write » 13 Wrt- 
ton Maws, London 5W1, England 


ADVERTH1NG/PJL 
German Executive with diversified inti 
marketing experience (inducing 9 years 
USA) in advertaing, P.R., Finanad plan-, 
dng, cmalysts, promotions, royalty & 6 - 
cenung agreemenls, new product der 
vdapment. Proven success m 
expanding market share. 5eeia new 
positions, WiCng to retocore. 

Box 2044 , Herald Tribune, 

92521 NeuHy Cedex, France 


ENTRBMBWUHAL LADY 41 
Fkieni Engfoh, Ftendi, German, Ehneh, 
Portuguese, wide experience as buyer 
industrul/consumer products, keen te- 
ster. hard worker, seeks new chd- 
e-ki import/export, mxmwnt. 
to relocate. Brussels let 829- 
or wnte to 6 Ave. de Bauieu. 
1160 Bruss^s. 


ATTRACTIVE CAPABLE e»cuii«| 
bdy wonts portion in Paris as assa-l 
tort to executive men/ woman. Curry. ‘ 
Tel 813-837-8266 USA 1 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


Place Your Classifiud Ad Quickly end Emily 

Inlb* 

HflHNATlONAL HBUOD TRIBUNE 

By Fhcnc CaB your local IHT representative with your text You 
wdl lie informed of the cost ii nme di ctaFy, end once p repayment a 
made your ad wifl appear within 48 hours. 

Cast: The boic rate k S9 JO per fine per day -fr local taxes. There are 
25 letters, signs andgrooes m the Fust fine end 36 in the fotawing bias. 
AAnkwn spoee is 2 fines. No obfaneviatioiis uge pte d 
Credit Cord*: American Express, Diner's Oub, Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access and Visa. 


HEADomq 

P«»l»: (par desaffod only): 
747-4600. 

HJROPE 


LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aires; 41 40 31 
(Dopf.312) 

Ouayaqurk 431 943/431 
Lima: 417 852 
Pammo: 64-4372 
Sot Jomk 22-1055 


Arastenlamr 26-36-15. 

Santiago: 69 61 555 

Athens: 361 -8397/360-2421 . 

Sao Paulo: 852 1893 

Breseote 343-1899. 

MIDDLE EAST 

Copenhagen (01) 329440. 

Bahrain: 246303. 

franfcfarfc (069) 72-67-55. 

Jordan: 25214. 

Leanomw; 79-58-94. 

Kuwaiti 5614485: 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44. 

Lebanon: 34 00 44. 

Qatar: 416535. 

London: (01) 8364800. 

Saudi Artdricc 

Madrid: 455-2891 /45S3306. 

Jeddah; 667-1500. 

Mikm: (02) 7531445. 

UJLE: Dubai 224161. 

Norway: (03) 845545 

FAS EAST 

Home; 679-3437. 

ftanjlfiofc 3W-06-57. 

Sweden: 08 7569229. 

Hong Kong: 5-213671. 

Tol Aviv: 03-455 559. 

MotBo: 817 07 49. 

Seaofc 725 87 73. 


Singapore: 222-2725. \ 

UWTED STATES 

Tarwan: 752 44 25/9. 

Tokyo: 504-1925 

New Yoric (212) 752-3890. 

Wert Coast: (415] 36241339. 

AUSTRALIA 

Sydney: 929 56 39 . 

Wrtbsume 6908233. 


•'ail* 




n 




^.ia 


doop iodst ixxvsmdong personable 
woman aver 28 for MadHent mg i 
raJng. Yugodom Italy, France, 
Span. Cmtatwan. 86 . Experience no! 
as vnpo rto nt as 0 positive outlook & 
desxe to become 0 competent safe, 
wwswsdive mtitude about tfe. opprea- 
ation of the all, knowing the Affor- 
enca between Mozart/MoHer. RSYP, 
photo, phase, interests. Bffl Fraetch. 
241 W. 13th Sr. NY. NT 1Q0n. 


employment 


_ GENERAL 
POSITIONS 'WANTED 


BEAUTIFUL HJUCATBJ weS-travefled 
womar^ 28webto asist. be penon- 
to filmmaker, designer, pMan- 

aropirt or rreatwe businessman. Able 

to For resume, references. 

Tribime ' 92521 
Nfa-JTy Cedcx. France 


type, ettractive tody 25- v ' aiic 5555 E — r 

35 Promote brand new product mUS 'rJnSr )™™ 1 seeks open- 
4 Europe. Lvs-tfi. Ground Hoar op-1 ^^5°*** mu ™ n S ua l- «*rwfrt & 
portunrfv for personttale outgoing 
type. AB expenses pad. Sotqrv cdui 


resume & 

Mr. Kell 
NJ 07747 USA. 


prefoned. 

to set up iraerview. 


toefobfo. representative. weO „ r 
fonwd and talented, broadminded. 


Wyckoff Sl, Matawon, I MARKETING TEAM.- Prestige mllbS 


WANTED 


Must be able to 
Send GV. and photo to 


nen expansion services, pubkeafons 
conferences. fforis—“ 
twentatwes spugh 
37 Quoi JAniou. ' 


44 rue N^, des 


75002 Pans 


Tribune. W521 hteudfeCedex. France 


1984 SWITZERLAND 


WOUgWAN 37.,BCPaBa^ 

**, tpepot forces, seeks 
gg^gost. Any location Tet uk 07« 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


YOUNG GERMAN ACTRESS, fatrty 
oduujt*dlooks far an uiereitmxSxf- 
Ban. Londai 2454X180. c ' c ” n SP»- 


GBUAAN - AMBUCAN 
xweri age 62, mole bocriotor. no 
hair fovnsK nna 


fluent Engteh- 
/rratich/Torfcah seeks position ri 
franen 6 in Turkey. Paris 224Sg7 


naaiy indepen- SPECIAL TROOPBL 35. Gorm^T 
staretorae/l ^»-^^Son. Trt: L® 


many. Am seeking portion . _ 

■'la/ mature manJfiriday 

nt reedenee preferably 


relocate , 
R<oort 6 iator of 
West Ger- 
of trim cal 
with] 
out- 


^c.S^^'HONAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


Bax 2104 

LM.T., Friedrichs*. 15, 
D- 6000 Honkfvrt/McMi 


fall- time private 


EMPLOYMENT 


EDUCATIONAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


NATIVE ENGLISH feather, expert- 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


QUAUFHJ ESL/ffL 
instructor seels serious WWme post- -Jt \ 

™n m Europe F^gimwip Autumn SSlUE ' . 

«» 2025, Herald Tn- ' 

_ bune, 92521 Nfettv Cede*. France. . 


^DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AU PAR/ NANNY. Amencan or for- 
?^«»uoated, energetic girl needed 
totafa full respcHWiblTiy at active 1 14 
ywwtemala. tong term, Kerin pb. 
Hctoy weak. Urn m Great Neck. W 
& Wm BeadL a in winler, Hamptons 
m y immer. lie of car on day off. 

P“Y commensurate with expert- 
have diectoWe reler- 
ejKOx- Send anrarn resume i picture: 

BOO ft.! 12 , Medford. NY 
11763 qttrh NeA Qr (5161 289-7800. 


ADPAIR.famwfa^, 
j P r 5 f «ssond Fam3y- y young enn- 
won. Tucson Arizona USA. Mubiwu 
S end photo, history, tel. 
tefeweas to P.O. Box 
PP7I. Tucson. AZ B5732. 


P ? IR Mo ntessorii School. C 


PAGE 13 
FOR MORE . 
CLASSIFIEDS 


onch 35, fluent Erjgfah, dotted 
m fimaioyan QA, seeks cho<- 


~ Merc « d « and Porsche 


Can 


a la Bhuan. smtonL N , . 

, Z awfcar, Pakutofl, China H- 
‘ ' ' \Oh- 


*. WH help ri wfoiog 


»P' - ... 
w*w trek*. Wenw v. I 
tar eorarftant rule£ trip, f 
■rata. *«■ charge Dad. Free- 
'. Tbc 642138 France. Ea0fl7. 


hi imiq) bh wwMiy m art, 

Strang pfychofagcol, busmna, (man- J 
oof badflrouncTwS oonfWer alter- 
native portion. Ptdip Levfoffkd, 5522 I 
Sana) Ave, Woadond H&, CA L 
91367 USA. - ^ 


tmprimi par Offprint, 71 rue de VEvangile, 7S01S Paris. 


w'°:'“ p o Rr/ export 

Warid Wid* Tax-Free* Cm. . 

r fam Europe 

firca « ^ 

Two RooShawraem 1 ^^dhrory. 

■ 280SE/1. Poncho 911 SC ^SOSE/L, 350SE/L 

P 930 Turbo, P 9<U, p 92d’ ntS*^ Por *S , to 928/S out. or not, 

, 

" 23.91 - 27-24.66- 27.28.32. -J