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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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PARIS, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


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The AnodcMd Prnt 

Two astronauts worked in the .cam) bay of the U.S. space shuttle Tuesday to attach an 
improvised tool to the shuttle's robot arm In preparation for a satellite rescue attempt 

Astronauts Lash Handmade Tools 
To Shuttle in Bid to Rescue Satellite 


Cca^rthd if Our Staff Fnm Dapauhct 

*■ CAPE CANAVERAL. Florida 
— Two astronauts from the UJ5. 
space shuttle Discovery floated 
into the shuttle's open cargo bay 
Tuesday and attached to the shut- 
tle's robot arm two improvised 
tools designed to save a stranded 
satellite filled with volatile fad. 

“Job weB done." Mission Con- 
trol commended them. “You can 
take a bow." 

The unrehearsed space walk by 
Captain S. r David Griggs of the 
navy -and Dr. Jeffry A Hoffman 
was the fira step in a hastily ar- 
ranged but intensely scrutinized 
plan by NASA to try to rescue the 
Svncom conantmicatiohs satellite. 

Early Wednesday, Discovery's 
" jrew wall close die 40^nile {64-ldlo- 
Yneter) gap with ^Mpm. It iviH; 
■ then tiy fetsnag j ^ 

side of die rotating satellite with 
the wo tools —one described as a 
flyswatter, the other as a lacrosse 
slide —attached to the shuclle’s 50- 
foot ( 15-meter) mechanical arm. 

The lever is an cutoff switch for 


Republicans 
Urge Reagan 
Compromise 
On Nicaragua 

United Frets Imemanonat 

WASHINGTON — Key mem- 
bers of the Republican congressio- 
nal leadership told President Ron- 
old Reagan on Tuesday that be 
must compromise on the terras for 
his requested aid for Nicaraguan 
rebels or face a foreign policy de- 
feat on Capitol HilL 

Duriiig an houriong meeting at 
the White House, Mr. Reagan 
learned that his revamped request 
of April 4, which cast the proposal 
as a peace plan rather than just 
more euns far the rebels, has not' 
neutralized opposition in Congress. 

“1 told him he has to deal realisri- 
caliy with some people who share 
*>15 objectives but disagree with his 
methods,” said Darid Durenber- 
ger, a Republican of Minnesota 
who is chairman of the Senate In- 
telligence Committee. “He 
shouldn't go out of this losing.” 

Mr. Durenbergcr made clear to 
reporters that he remained opposed 
to a resumption of covert assis- 
tance to the rebels. The White 
House contends there are legal bar- 
riers to overt assistance. 

The admonition that Mr. Rea-:. 
gan must choose between compro- 
mise or defeat was echoed by Rob- 
thc 


«j M P Aw-i-zi-^ys" i rl Michd, leader of 
__ j ^ :»**7 Republican minority in the House 

ffc-'y j f* r of Representatives, who said he 

" l " 1 ' - wanted to be able to offer "another 

way out" to moderate Democrats 


decukal power. It was supposed to 
have tripped outward automatical- 
ly when die astronauts deployed 
Syncom cm Saturday. 

* Chi Tuesday, working in cumber- 
some S2.1 -million space suits. Cap- 
tain Griggs and Dr. Hoffman had 
trouble at first as their tods, straps 
and other gear kept floating away 
at die end Of tethers. Within 90 
minutes, however, they had com- 
pleted strapping the tools .to the 
. arm. Mission Control had estimat- 
ed the last would lake more than 
two hours. 

“Is that not beamifai. or is that 
not beautiful?” Captain Griggs 
asked as he stepped back and ad- 
mired the completed job. 

The tods were improvised from 
the plastic covers of their Aighf 
bOc^ a tpndfcftv jdiade, tubing and 


flaps. One version was attached to 
a cone nude of rolled plastic, an- 
other was affixed to the aluminum 
ribbing of the window shade. 

The plan is to position the shut- 
tle arm so that the perforated flops 
slide along the side of die spinning 
satellite and catch the lever. 

Flipping the switch will start a 
45-minute sequence that erects the 
satellite's antenna, puts Syncom 
into a faster spin and sends it off to 
a useful orbit high above Earth. 

The satellite is loaded with near- 
ly four tons of hydrazine fuel, 
enough to power it to an altitude of 
22,300 miles. The Discovery will 
have to rocket quickly from the 
vicinity once the fever is pulled. 

The astronauts have six and a 
half minutea and a dozen chances 


Concentration 
Camp Site Is 
To Be Included 

Riincn 

WASHINGTON - President 
Ronald Reagan said Tuesday that 
he would visit the site of a concen- 
tration camp to mark the 40ih an- 
niversary of the Nazi surrender 
while on a state visit to West Ger- 
many next month. 

He also said he still intended to 
participate May 5 with Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl at a wreath-laying 
ceremony at a military cemetery in 
Bitburg. southwest of Bonn, where 
German dead from two world wars 
are buried. The cemetery includes 
the bodies of SS troops, the Nazi 
elite guard. 

Mr. Reagan told the Conference 
on Religious Liberty, a group of 
U.S. religious leaders, that his orig- 
inal decision not to go to a concen- 
tration camp memorial was due to 
a misunderstanding on his part. 

He had ngected as inappropriate 
a visit to the Dachau concentration 
camp bur accepted the West Ger- 
man government's proposal to go 
to Bitburg. 

“The decision not to go to Da- 
chau, one of the sites of the great 
moral obscenity of that era, was 
taken because of my mistaken im- 
pression that such a visit was out- 
ride the official agenda." he said. 

Mr. Reagan's earlier plans con- 
nected with celebrations marking 
the allied victory in Europe caused 
an outcry among religious groups 
in the United States, West Germa- 
ny and Israel and among U.S. war 
veterans. 

“It was and it remains my pur- 
pose and Chancellor Kohl's to use 
this visit to Germany on the 40th 
anniversary of the war's end in Eu- 
rope to commemorate not simply 
the military victory but the libera- 
tion of Europe, the rebirth of Ger- 
man freedom and the reconcilia- 
tion of our two countries.** Mr. 
Reagan said. 

He said that his purpose in West 
Germany “was and remains not to 
reemphasize .the crimes of the 
Xlbwt'to celebrate the 



Ezer Weizman and President Hosni Mubarak during their meeting in Cairo. The Israeli 
envoy said Mr. Mubarak had reacted “very, very” favorably to the idea of a summit. 

Sudan Makes Overtures Abroad 

Improved Relations Sought With Soviet, Libya, Ethiopia 


to do 'the -jdfcrlf- 

from" Dis- ' compktcdSuring one-®- they .^wmoBniB tnc 

coyery’s cabin. Their shapes will wail for a second opportunity ircra ? n ^ ous accomplishments of 
prompted Dr. Hoffman to dub the 90 minutes taler in the next orbit. 

The timing is dictated by the way 
the satellite must be pointed when 
its engine fires. 

(AP.VPl) 


crew She Swat Team.** 

The astronauts were ins true led 
to cm rectangular holes in the plas- 
tic covers, which were made into 


the German people in 40 years of 
liberty, freedom, democracy and 
peace.” 

The wreath-laying ceremony was 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL I) 


By Christopher Dickey 

H as/ungizn Past Service 

KHARTOUM. Sudan — Sudan 
is seeking improved relations with 
the Soviet Union. Ethiopia and 
Libya, according to the country's 
new leader. 

The leader. General Abdul Rah- 
man Swareddahab, said Monday 
that “we ore receiving positive re- 
sponses” to letters sent to the lead- 
ers of those countries since Presi- 
dent Gaafar Nimeiri was 
overthrown April 6. 

General Nimciri’s government 
was resolutely pro-American and 
hostile to Ethiopia and Libya. 

But there appatrs to be little like- 
lihood that General Swareddahab's 
Transitional Military Council will 
turn its back on the United States. 
U.S. food aid is essential in this 
country, which is suffering from 
famine. 

Democracy, specifically parlia- 
mentary democracy, was the objec- 
tive about which General Swared- 
dahab talked the most. 

At a press conference, he was 
careful in. his assurances that he 
saw his government as an interim 
regime. He pointed to theevolution 
since the coup of consultations be- 
tween the trade unions and politi- 
cal parties whose agitation set the 
stage for General Nimeiri's over- 
throw and the military men who 
completed the coup. 



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Princess Michael Learns Father Served in the SS 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Princess MI- 
.chaeJ of Kent, who was raised to 
believe that her father was an 
anti-Nazi hero, has learned that 
be was a major in the elite Nazi 
SSguari 

Buckingham Palace said Mon- 
day night that the report first re- 
vealed by the Daily Mirror on 
Monday was a surprise to the 40- 
year-old wife of Queen Elizabeth 
ITs first cousin. 

The London tabloid said Tues- 
day that it was unbelievable that 
the princess bad never known the 
truth about her father until now. 
She was boro in Carlsbad, Bohe- 
mia, now part of Czechoslovakia, 
in the closing months of World 
War II. Her parents moved to 
Austria and later divorced. She 
was raised in Australia. 

The palace statement issued by 
Michael Shea, the queen's press 
secretary, said: “Princess Mi- 
chad confirmed tonight that it is 
true that her father was a member 
- of the SSL It came as a total sur- 
prise to her when she heard the 
news from James Whitaker. And 
ii came as a total shock. There 
will be no further comment or 
. statement from the princess.” 

Mr. Whitaker is a Daily Mirror 
reporter. The SS, or Sdudzstaffcl, 
was a Nazi unit created to serve 
as bodyguard to Hitler and later 
expanded TO take charge of intel- 





Hi® Aaooarad Pr®n 


Prince and Princess Michael of Kent 


ligence, central security, policing 
action and extermination of un- 
desirables. 

The princess, born Marie- 
Chrisline von Reibnitz, bears the 
name of her husband. Prince Mi- 
chael of Kent, because she is a 
princess only by marriage to him. 
At the time of her wedding in 
1978, British press reports said 
that her father, Baron Gunter 
von Reibnitz, a Silesian noble- 
man, had been thrown into a con- 
centration camp in 1944 for anti- 


Nazi sympathies. Baron von 
Reibnitz. died two years ago in 
West Germany. 

The Daily Mirror said that in a 
“persona] account of his life, 
hand-written in 1941” Baron von 
Rriboiiz boasted of being part of 
the invasion of Poland m 1939, 
which led to Britain's declaration 
of war. 

A historian, Philip HalL said 
Tuesday that accordmgto the re- 
cords of the Berlin Document 
Center the baron joined the Nazi 


Party in 1930, was inducted into 
the SS in 1933 and was promoted 
to the rank of major on the per- 
sonal recommendation of Gor- 
ing. 

The bason was expelled from 
the SS in 1944. Mr. Hall said, 
after he became a devout Catho- 
lic and the SS leadership accused 
him of having divided loyalties 
between the church and die par- 
ty. 

Mr. Hall said he has seen no 
evidence that Baron von Reibnitz 
participated in war crimes. 

After the war, Princess Mi- 
chael's parents divorced. The 
Press Association said the baron 
went to Mozambique and remar- 
ried. Her mother, Marianna, the 
daughter of an Austro-Hungar- 
ian count, took Marioduistine 
and an older brother, Fred, to 
Australia. The mother later mar- 
ried a Polish nobleman. 

Prince Michael who was I6th 
in the line of succession to the 
throne at the time he married, 
had to renounce his claim be- 
cause the princess is a Catholic. 

■ Wdsenthal Has Name 

Simon WeisemhaJ, the Nazi- 
-hunter, said in Vienna that Bar- 
on von Reibnitz appeared on his 
lists as an SS officer but was not 
wanted for war crimes and had 
no involvement with concentra- 
tion camps, Reuters reported. 


Bonn Seeks Soviet Ferry Link Despite Warnings 


" PAGE]?, 

fob 

CLASSI fl0> - 


Reuters 

BONN — The West German 


who supported the preataVriew government decided Tuesday to 
of the Nicaraguan government but feet ncgoijan, ■ ■ 








were reluctant to continue arming 
^.e rebels. _ 

* Mr. Michel said firm opposition 
to the Reagan plan by Thomas P 
O'Neill Jfr.. speaker of the House, 
would force him to consider any 
alternative proposed by the Demo- 
cratic majority. 

The meeting came as Mr. Rea- 
gan, who pledged Monday night to 
-fight on” to victory in his bailie 
with Congress, released an unclas- 
sified version of airport accusing 
the Sandinist government in Nica- 
ragua with imdermining^ecuriiy in 
J America. =He churned “a 
undeniable moral impera- 
the rebels.' 

Dedaring that the United States 


negotiations with Moscow on 
cons true lion of a Baltic Sea rail- 
ferry link, overruling objections by 
the zrdli tary that it could become a 
major security risk. . 

• The cabinet decided in favor of 
the link for economic reasons, be- 
lieving it would boost trade with 
the Soviet Union and prevent Mos- 
cow from expanding its ferry Jink 
with East Germany as an alterna- 
tive, government sources said. 

West German military leaders 
have opposed the project on the 
ground that Moscow could use the 
connection as an invasion route.. 

A spokesman for the. govern- 
ment, Peter Boenisch, confirmed 
the cabinet’s decision to soon begin 




cannot “walk away from one of the discussions on the project. He said 
greatest moral challenges in post- . the Interior and. Defense ministers 
war histoiy." Mr. Reagan Stepped ' of tfjeir reservations ai the 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL3) meeting but were assured that West 


Germany's security needs would be 
respected. 

■ Project Always Controversial 

John TagHabiie of the New York 
Times reported earner fnm Bonn: 

West Germany’s northernmost 
slate, Schleswig-Holstein, hopes to 
profit most from the project, which 
has a projected cost of between 
$200 million and $400 million. The 
decline of fishing and shipbuilding 
in the state has caused unemploy- 
ment to rise to 13 percent, well 
above the West German average. 

Soviet officials first approached 
West Germany in 19BQ about es- 
tablishing the ferry link across the 
400-mile (648-kflometer) stretch of 
sea from Klaipeda, in Soviet Lithu- 
ania, to a port in Schleswig-Hol- 
stein. Bonn deferral action partly 
because of the Soviet intervention 
in Afghanistan and Poland’s crack- 
down on the Solidarity trade union 
movement^ 

But in 1983;. Schleswig-Hol- 


stein's economics minister, Juergen 
WcstphaL and the Soviet minister 
for the merchant marine, Timofey 
B. Guzbenko, signed a memoran- 
dum urging their governments to 
examine the plan. 

West German officials said each 
country would pay half the invest- 
ment costs, which involve the in- 
stallation of terminals in both 
countries and the construction in 
West Germany of about six twin- 
deck vessels, each capable of carry- 
ing up to 73 rail cars. 

TTie Soviet Union has already 
established a rail-ferry link in the 
Black Sea between Ilytchevsk, near 
Odessa, and Varna, Bulgaria, It is 
developing one in the Baltic with 
East Germany, also using Klaipeda 
as the Soviet terminal. . 

Officials said Moscow initially 
expressed a desire to acquire har- 
bor-sidc property, at a northern 
port in West Germany for the con- 
struction of a Soviet railhead with 


the ability to adapt broad-gauge 
Soviet rail cars to the narrower- 
gauge Western track. 

Naval experts from the North 
Atlantic Treaty Oi^anization have 
opposed the ferry link, arguing that 
the Soviet Union would improve its 
ability to gather intelligence by sta- 
tioning Soviet officials in a West 
German port. The experts say the 
link would also heighten West Ger- 
man dependence on the Soviet 
Union for the transportation of 
critical cargo. 

The Bonn government has em- 
phasized that final approval of the 
ferry link would hinge on Soviet 
acceptance of West German condi- 
tions, including construction of the 
rail-ferry port at a site where there 
ore no military naval bases; a curb 
on the number of Russians based in 
the port: and construction of the 
gauge-transfer installation at the 
Soviet end of the line rather than in 
West Germany. 



lun 


Abdul Rahman Swareddahab 

General Swareddahab, who has 
promised to name a new cabinet, 
said that an announcement was im- 
minent. 

Mergani Nasri, a lawyers’ union 
leader who'is bdieved to be the 
probable choice for prime minister, 
said the list of names for the cabi- 
net was finished Sunday night. 

in an interview, Mr. Nasri said 
he expected civilian rule to be more 
effective now than 16 years ago 


because “we know the hardships of 
dictatorship, we have had enough 
experience with all its troubles and 
problems to convince us all that the 
only way is democracy.” 

The inability of the wunuy’s po- 
litical forces to find effective ways 
of governing led to General Ni- 
meiri's takeover in 1969. 

At his news conference. General 
Swareddahab outlined the steps his 
regime was taking to address a po- 
litical crisis mode disastrous by 
famine, refugees, corruption, a col- 
lapsing economy and erratic lead- 
ership under General Nimeiri. 

The government faces a power- 
ful renewal or a 17-year insurgency 
in the mostly Christian southern 
half of the country, which came 
largely because of General Ni- 
meiri's decision in 1983 to reduce 
the region’s autonomy and apply 
Islamic law, or sharia, throughout 
the country. 

The leader of the insurgency is a 
former colonel, John Garang, 
whose forces are able to operate out 
of Ethiopian sanctuaries with mon- 
ey and arras furnished by the Liby- 
an leader, Moamer Qadhafi. 

General Swareddahab did not 
specifically say whether improved 
relations with Ethiopia. Libya and 
the Soviet Union were intended to 
undermine their support for Mr. 
Garang, but that was the reading of 
his initiative by many members of 
the diplomatic community here. 


China Steps Back in Rift 
On Nuclear-Armed Ships 


By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Post Service 

CANBERRA, Australia — Chi- 
na appears to have stepped back 
from a confrontation with the 
United S Laics over nuclear-armed 
ships, saying that conventionally 
powered U.S. Navy ships may call 
at a Chinese port without mention- 
ing whether the vessels would carry 
nuclear arms. 

A two-sentence statement dated 
Sunday and released through the 
Chinese Embassy here Monday 
seemed aimed at giving the United 
Slates and China more room tc 
maneuver out of a potential con- 
frontation over whether US. war- 
ships would be curving nuclear 
weapons on a planned port call to 
Shanghai this spring. 

The Chinese statement said, in 
effect, that China is in control of 
the type of ship that emers Chinese 
waters. But it left open the possibil- 
ity of a port call by conventionally 
powered but nuc! ear-armed U.S. 
ships. 

This marked a step back from 
statements made in an interview 
Iasi week in Beijing by Hu Yao- 
bang, the head of China s Commu- 
nist Parly, and a high-ranking Chi- 
nese Foreign Ministry official that 
seemed to indicate China was rul- 
ing out the possibility of any nucle- 
ar-armed ships participating in the 
port call. The Chinese officials 
made the remarks before Mr. Hu 
left for a five-day visit here. 

The Chinese seemed to be trying 
to head ofT any confusion which 
might develop from questions pul 
to Mr. Hu at a press conference 
scheduled to be held here Tuesday. 
The American refusal to provide 
explicit assurances on this question 
to Australia. New Zealand and Ja- 
pan has provoked political contro- 
versies in those countries. New 
Zealand has banned U.5. warships 
from making pen calls unless the 
United States could confirm 
whether they are carrying nuclear 
arms. 

The Chinese statement Monday 
said. “U.S. conventionally powered 
naval vessels may call at a Chinese 
port on an informal ceremonial vis- 
it. This is a matter solely between 
China and the United States and 
there are questions remaining to be 
settled between the two sides.” 

■ Iceland Announces Ban 

Iceland said Tuesday that it 
would not allow warships armed 
with nuclear weapons into its ports 


or territorial waters, Reuters re- 
ported from Reykjavik. 

The foreign minister, Geir Hall- 
grimsson, told parliament, “As Ice- 
land excludes nuclear arms gener- 
ally from its sovereign area, it is a 
natural conclusion that nuclear- 
armed ships are barred from enter- 
ing pons or even sailing in the 
country’s territorial waters." 

Iceland is a member of NATO, 
and ships from the United Stales 
and other allies regularly visit its 
pons, but Iceland has never before 
inquired about weapomy on visit- 
ing vessels. 


Mubarak, 
Peres May 
Hold Talk 

Israeli Envoy 9 
Egyptians See 
Summit Hopes 

Remen 

CAIRO — President Hosni Mu- 
barak has reacted “very, very" pos- 
itively to the idea of a summit 
meeting with Prime Minister Shi- 
mon Peres oT Israel, the Israeli en- 
voy, Ezer Weizman. said Tuesday. 

Israeli sources later said that Mr. 
Peres would frvor a summit meet- 
ing in the first half of next month. 
President Mubarak’s senior politi- 
cal and foreign affairs adviser, 
Osama el-Baz, said Mr. Muburak 
“is willing to meet any Israeli per- 
sonality who may visit Egypt. Mu- 
barak is willing to meet anybody, 
including Israeli Prime Minister 
Shimon Peres." 

But other Egyptian sources said 
President Mubarak still had reser- 
vations about seeing Mr. Peres. 

Mr. Weizman. the Israeli minis- 
ter without portfolio sent to im- 
prove relations with Egypt, saw 
Mr. Mubarak for two hours Tues- 
day. His visit had provoked a rift in 
the Israeli cabinet with rightist 
members erf 1 the national unity gov- 
ernment narrowly failing Monday 
to stop him from coming to Cairo. 

After their meeting, Mr. Weiz- 
man was asked the Egyptian presi- 
dent's reaction to the idea of seeing 
the Israeli prime minister. Mr. 
Weizman said the response was 
“very, very positive;” but added “it 
will 'depend on certain prepara- 
tions.” 

According to Egyptian sources, 
Cairo also wonts to see signs of an 
Israeli and U.S. response to moder- 
ate Arab efforts to resume tails on 
settling the broader Arab-Israeli 
dispute and the Palestinian issue. 

Mr. Baz said a su mmi t depended 
on progress in the search for a com- 
prehensive Middle East peace and 
said it was important that the tim- 
ing be right. 

Mr. W eizman said that “a lot of 
work has to be done," adding that 
no one could deny there were prob- 
lems on both rides. 

But, he said,- he was sure that 
President Mubarak and Prime 
Minister Peres would meet after the 
necessary preparations, and find 
what he called a common language 
to “not only solve problems but 
develop new ideas." 

Political sources said Mr. Peres 
would like a meeting with Mr. Mu- 
barak before the prime minister's 
May 13 meeting with Israeli labor 
unions. Progress with Egypt would 
bolster his status after the coali- 
tion’s disagreement over Mr. Weiz- 
man’s mission. 

This involved Mr. Peres in a 
sharp dispute with the Israeli for- 
eign minister, Yitzhak Shamir, who 
said it usurped his position. 

Mr. Shamir, leader of the right- 
wing Likud bloc, opposes talking 
with the Arabs because Egypt and 
Jordan have proposed that Israel 
swap the occupied West Bank in 
exchange for peace. 

Mr. Baz said the Egyptian am- 
bassador to Israel would return "as 
soon as the situation is conducive 
to promoting more cooperation." 
He said Egypt wanted a full with- 
drawal of Israeli troops from Leba- 
non as one of the conditions for 
improving relations. 


INSIDE 



A 

The AuDemd fan 


CHAMPION OF THE WORLD — Marvin Hagler 
knocked out Thomas Hearns in the third round in Las 
Vegas to win the undisputed middleweight title. Page 23. 

■ Algeria has gained approval from the Reagan administration to 

buy its first U.S. arms. Page 1 

■ Peruvians, afflicted with an enduring economic crisis, made a 

historic move to the left in Sunday’s elections. Page 3. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ US. industrial production rose 03 percent and housing starts 

climbed 16.2 percent in March. Page 17. 

■ France will sell $271.4 million of telephone equipment and 

manufacturing ability to China. Page 17. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■Ad Ivorian who sings in French, English and his tribal tongue 
brings Jamaican-born reggae to West Africa. Page 5. 

SPECIAL REPORT 

■ West Germany's economic planners resist calls for reflation. 

Part 2 of a 2-paii special report. Page 9. 




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Hu Yaobang: Candid and unpredictable 


Truck Shortage Delays 
Food Aid to Ethiopians 


By Blaine Harden 

Washington Post Service 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — A 
severe shortage of trucks has creat- 
ed a backlog of famine relief at 
Ethiopia's ports and warehouses, 
has caused shortages at many food 
centers and has threatened to un- 
dermine an international effort 
that is now sending more than 
100,000 tons of food a month into 
the country. 

Fearing that food would spoil on 
Ethiopia's docks, Kurt Janssen, the 
UN assistant secretary-general for 
emergency operations in Ethiopia, 
threatened this month in a letter to 
the Ethiopian government to post- 
pone food shipments unless the 
truck shortage was resolved. 

The government responded 
Monday by promising to send 200 
trucks to the port of Assab, where, 
Mr. Jansson said, 65,800 tons of 
food are waiting on the docks and 
137,500 tons wfll arrive on ships 
due within the next month. 

Even with this move, “there are 
just not enough trucks in this coun- 
try" according to Roman Roos, 
chief transportation official for the 
UN emergency operations in Ethi- 
opia. 

, Mr. Roos plans to appeal to in- 
ternational donors next week for 
450 long-haul trucks worth $33.5 
million. 


they can return home.’ 
He added that the r 


He added that the rainy season 
in June would malce many famine- 
stricken regions impossible to 
reach. 

The management of the aid has 
deteriorated since large shipments 


began arriving here in January, ac- 
cording to UN and Western aid 


The shortage of trucks to haul 
food aid has been exacerbated, ac- 
cording to relief officials, by the 
need to use trades to cany seed and 
fertilizer to the three million Ethio- 
pians affected by the famine who 
have not abandoned their farms. 


In addition, relief officials said 
. that trucks have been diverted to 
assist in the government's resettle- 
ment plan. under which more than 
, 330,000 people have been moved in 
the past five months from the cen- 


cording to UN and Western aid 
officials. They said this was partly 
the result of a power straggle with- 
in the Marxist military regime. The 
straggle, they said, is between the 
governing Communist Party, the 
Workers Party of Ethiopia, and an 
agency called the Relief and Reha- 
bilitation Commission. 

According to senior Western aid 
officials, party leaders in rural ar- 
eas have overruled some commis- 
sion distribution decisions in re- 
cent months, in some cases 
diverting food and tracks from 
feeding centers in the north to re- 
settlement camps in the south. 


Reagan Visit 
Is Expanded 


(Continued from Page 1) 
intended to cement 40 years of 
friendship between a free West 
Germany and the United States, he 
said “That's why 1 accepted the 
invitation to Bitburg and that’s 
why I’m going to Bitburg.’’ 

■ Deaver Confers in Bonn 
A White House official met 
Tuesday with West German gov- 
ernment aid*s on adding a ceremo- 
ny at a Jewish Holocaust memorial 
to the May visit. United Press In- 
ternational reported from Bonn. 
Peter Boenisch. the West Ger- 




Michad K. Denver 


The home 
of Burberrys Paris, 
since 1909 

(Near the Madeleine) 


man government spokesman, said 
Tuesday at a news conference that 
Mr. Reagan’s deputy chief of staff. 
Mi chad K. Deaver, was discusring 
the visit agenda with Horst Tdis- 
chik, a close aide to Mr. KohL 
Mr. Boenisch read a letter sent 
recently from Mr. Kohl to Mr. Rea- 
gan acknowledging that Jewish ob- 
jections to the Bitburg ceremony 
were strong but “understandable.” 


He said that he was returning to 
s earlier suggestion to Mr. Rea- 


his earlier suggestion to Mr. Rea- 
gan that an additional visit to the 
Dachau concentration camp or an- 
other “Jewish memorial" should be 
included in Mr. Reagan’s schedule. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


Hu Yaobang: Out of Deng’s Shadow and in Spotlight of Scrutiny 

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By Daniel Southerland 

Washington Pan Service 

BEIJING — Twice last week, Hu Yao- 
bang, the bead of China’s Communist Par- 
ty, made headlines throughout Asia, caus- 
ing politicians and diplomats to study his 
every word. 

While he would be well known to most 
Chinese and to many educated Asians, Mr. 
Hu is not widely recognized beyond the 
region. This is because he has long been in 
the shadow of his better-known mentor, 
Deng Xiaoping, China’s foremost leader, 
and because until a few years ago much of 
what Mr. Hu did remained out of the 
public eye. 

Yet Mr. Hu has now assumed enormous 
impor tanc e on China’s political scene. Mr. 
Deng is 80, and Mr. Hu, at 69, is his chosen 
successor. What Mr. Hu decides over the 
next few years in conceit with his senior 
colleagues wiB determine whether the eco- 
nomic reforms, introduced by Mr. Deng in 
a move away from Soviet-style central 
planning, mil succeed or fail. 

{China said foreign-owned banks may 
open offices to provide a wide range of 
services in four special economic zones. 
Page 17.] 

Among Western diplomats, Mr. Hu’s 
image is one of a tively and refreshingly 
direct leader. But he also has been known 
to mate* the diplomats’ lives more difficult 
by being candid and unpredictable when 
he speaks publicly. Last week, Mr. Hu 
caused diplomats to scramble to determine 
the meaning of his remarks wfaeu he told 
journalists from Hong Kong and Macao 


that, in order to normalize relations with 
China, the Soviet Union had to remove the 
obstacles that threatened the security of 
China's northern and southern frontiers. 

By referring to China's southern border 
with Vietnam and its northern border with 
the Soviet Union, Mr. Hu seemed to de- 
emphasize the usual three obstacles that 
China dies as standing in the way of better 
relations with Moscow. According to a 
Hong Kong journalist who attended the 
meeting with Mr. Hu, the Chinese leader 


New Zealand on Saturday, with 26 Chinese 


journalists following him. 

{In Canberra, Mr. Hn assured foreign 
investors Tuesday that China would con- 
tinue to do business with the West, and 
might even open its door wider. The Asso- 
ciated Press reported. 

[He said that “in the first 50 years of the 
□ext century we will catch up or approach 
the level of the world’s advanced countries. 


try to rehabilitate purge victims and revi- 
talize a Communist Party that lost much of 


appeared to omit the Soviet intervention in 
Afghanistan. 


fghanistan. 

Then, a day later, in an interview with 


journalists from Australia and New Zea- 
land, Mr. Hu dropped a public bombshell 
by saying that the United States had agreed 


policy wifi change My answer is, no." 

Mr. Hu is a small, wiry man, who chain 
smokes. Parris Chang; a U.S. scholar from 
Pennsylvania State University who met 
Mr. Hu in mid- 1983, said Mr. Hu struck 
him as a personable individual, with an 
appealing directness and the same streak of 
ear thiness that has also ebar»r*«f«»d Mr. 


Deng and Mao. 
Within the Co 


a Communist Party that lost muen ot 
its prestige dining the Cultural Revolution 
and its aftermath. , . 

Mr. Hu was one of the first victims of the 

Cultural Revolution. In 1966, Mao criti- 
cized the Communist Youth League, which 
Mr. Hu then headed. Mr. Hu was accused 
of a “capitalist loader" along with 
Mr. Deng and others and was sent to be 
“re-educated” through labor. Mr. Hu later 
revealed that he had spent two and a half 
years living and working in a cattle barn. 
He was iW allowed to return to his home 
but was kept under virtual house arrest for 
five years. 

He re-emerged in the mid-1970s to work 
with Mr. Deng, particularly on science po- 
licy. He is repotted to have written aeon- 


tails of his family life. The {private live 
Chinese leaders are usually kept secret. ; 
at a press conference before his trip' 
Japan, Mr. Hu disclosed that be had f 
children and five grandchildren. He : 
that all his children -and their spou 
except one, had attended universities. * 
children include a historian, an econon 
a doctor, and a member of the Peop . 
Liberation Army. Mr. Hu’s wife is repoi 
to be retired textile factoiy manager. 

Details of Us early life are sketchy. . 
cording to Chinese publications, his j 
ents were poor peasants living in Hui 
province in an area of heavy Commui 
activity during the 1920s. Mb’. Hu's he 
was located 75 miles (about 120 kOot 


ters) from the birthplace of Mao. 

At the age of 14, Mr. Hu left home i 
jointed the Communists in mountain ba 
as a child soldier. Largely sdf-educatod, 
did propaganda and organizational wc 
later rising to become secretary-general 
the Communist Youth League. 


weapons. 

As part of a long-standing policy, the 
United Slates has never previously made 


United Slates has never previously made 
clear whether its warships carried nuclear 
weapons. But Mr. Hu seemed to say that 
the united States was making an exception 
for China. 


Mr. Hu placed the Americans in an 
embarrasang position with their allies, 
none of whom has been able to get this 
kind of assurance on port calls. Chrnflj 
which is not an ally, seemed to be getting 
more in the way of assurances. It now 
appears tha t if China insists on such assur- 
ances, it could mean the cancellation of the 
port visit 

Mr. Hu began a trip to Australia and 


within, the Co mmunis t context Mr. Hu 
has a reputation for bring more tolerant of 
a diversity of views than do most Chinese 
leaders. But he is no democrat in the West- 
ern sense and dearfy believes that Commu- 
nist Party rale must go unchallenged. 

Mr. Hu was judged to have been impetu- 
ous on one previous occasion. Daring his 
1983 visit to Japan, he warned that if the 
United States failed to respond satisfacto- 
rily to Chinese protests over Taiwan, China 
would have to reconsider plans for an ex- 
change of visits between President Ronald 
Reagan awH Prime Minister Zhap Ziyan g 
In the end, the Chin ese press toned down 
Mr. Hu’s warning, and the visits went 
ahead as planned. 

One of Mr. Hu’s main tasks has been to 


troversial paper for Mr. Deng that recom- 
mended that stieotists be freed from Mao’s 
demand that they do manual labor. 

Among educated Chinese, Mr. Hu has a 
reputation for encouraging artists and 
writers. He was reported to nave told dele- 
gates from a Chines e writers conference 
early dus year that it was up to them to 
elect their own leaders without having to 
receive guidance from the government. 

But Me. Hu is supposed to be fond of 

■ _ ■ _ a. « 


the famous Ixrng March, Mr. J 

was in charge of the youth league, brat 
of one of the red army units. Later a: 
political commissar, he must have n 
Deng Xiaoping, who was chief politi 
commissar of one of the red army's ft 
principal units. 

■ Another Disclosure 
C hines e officials traveling with Mr. 1 
have revealed to local journalists the sec! 
of the small round object he keeps on ! 
belt It is a pedometer that monitors t” 
amount of exercise he takes, Reuters } 
ported from Canberra. 


playing the “bourgeois game” of bridge. 
This was bri d against h»m and against Mr. 
Deng daring the Cultural Revolution, 
when the pair were accused of using entire 
railroad cars and special airplanes to ferry 
bridge partners around the country. 

At the end of 1983, Mr. Hu took the 
unusual step of revealing some of the do- 




tral highlands to lowlands in the 
southwest. 

Ethiopian officials have said the 
resettlements were aimed at mov- 
ing drought victims to more fertile 
land. But Western donors, particu- 
larly the United States, have op- 
posed the moves, charging that 
Ethiopia is Ell -prepared to feed, 
house and provide medical care for 
the 1.5 million people whom the 
government has said it would move 
by the end of this year. 

The famine, which has affected 
7.7 million people, has created a 
need this year for 1 J million tons 
of emergency food, according to 
government estimates. 

According to Mr. Jansson, the 
riming of deliveries of the food is as 
important as the equipment needed 
to deliver it “We have people who 
haven’t yet abandoned their farms, 
who each month walk or come by 
donkey to a distribution center to 
pick up a ration of food,” he said. 
“If there is food when they arrive, 


Algeria Told 
It Can Buy 
U.S. Weapons 


South Africa Gets a Mixed Reaction 


WORLD BRIEFS 




On Move to Alter Apartheid Laws 


By David B. Ottaway 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON— The Reagan 
administration has decided to al- 
low Algeria to purchase arms from 
the United States for the first time 
since that North African country’s 
independence 23 years ago. State 
Department and Algerian diplo- 
matic sources said Monday. 

The decision, consisting of a 


JOHANNESBURG — South 
Africa’s decision to repeal laws 
barring sex and marriage across ra- 
cial lines has been acclaimed inter- 
nationally but sharply criticized by 


opponents of the government in- 
side the country. 


presidential decision declaring Al- 
geria eligible, was made April 10, 
apparently in preparation for a 
four-day state visit by President 
Chadli Bendjedid of Algeria that 
began Tuesday. 

A State Department spokesman, 
confirming the report, said Algeri- 
an arms requests would be consid- 
ered by the administration “on a 
case-by-case basis” and in a man- 
ner “consistent with the U.S. inter- 
est in peace and regional stability.” 

This apparently was an allusion 
to the rivalry between Algeria and 
Morocco, a dose U.S. political and 
military ally in North Africa. This 
rivalry has been complicated by 
Morocco’s war with the Algerian- 
supported guerrillas seeking inde- 
pendence for the Western Sahara. 

The State Department on Mon- 
day told Ambassador Mohamed 
Sahnoun of Algeria of the U.S. de- 
cision. He said Algeria was inter- 
ested in purchasing weapons to re- 
duce its dependence on the Soviet 
Union, long its main arms supplier. 

Mr. Sahnoun said Colonel 
Qiadli was not coming to Wash- 
ington with a shopping list. But he 
indicated that Algeria was gmeral- 
ly interested in military aircraft, 
electronic equipment ana radar. 

“We don’t have a specific list of 
items we want to acquire right 
away " the ambassador said. 

The United States has sold Alge- 
ria C-130 transport planes and has 
approved a $50,000 military train- 
ing program for Algerian officers 
this fiscal year. 

Hus is the first tune that the 
government has declared Algeria 
eligible to obtain general defense 
equipment under the Foreign Mili- 
tary Sales Program, which provides 
foreign governments with credit 
and concess i onal interest rates, if 
needed, to help finance ibe pur- 
chases. 


side the country. 

The announcement Monday in 
Parliament by the internal affairs 
minister, F.W. de Klerk, had been 
forecast as a major step in the gov- 
ernment’s stated intention of re- 
forming its racial segregation poli- 
cies, known as apartheid. 

The U.S. government responded 
rapidly to the announcement A 
spokesman said that the Reagan 
administration was ‘heartened by 
such a move.” 

Britain also applauded the deci- 
sion. 


“We naturally welcome the dis- 
mantling of this offensive aspect of 
apartheid." a Foreign Office 
spokesman said. “This decision re- 
flects chang in g attitudes in Sooth 
Africa which are to be encour- 
aged.” 

Mr. de Klerk said that interna- 


tional pressure against apartheid 
played little part in the move. 


played little part in the move. 

Id a interview on U.S. television 
beamed from Cape Town, he de- 
scribed the derision as internal and 
part of a reform process; But, he 
said, if it helped “convince our 
friends abroad that we are not what 
we are made out to be, then we are 
very glad to have that as a bonus.” 

He told Parliament that laws seg- 
regating residential areas and fatal- 
ities for different races would re- 
main in force. 

Beyers Naude, general secretary 
of the South African Council of 
Churches and a leading opponent 
of apartheid, said: “It’s a case of 
too little, too late, from the view- 
point of blacks." 


A white woman, married to a 
South African Indian, also scorned 
the announcement as a cosmetic 
change, saying that legislation 
would not alter the attitudes of 
whites who reviled any member of 
their own race who dared to stray 
across racial lines. 

“The only thing that thi< does 
mean is now we will not have po- 
licemen smashing down ourdoor in 
the middle of the ni g ht , " she said. 

South Africa's justice minis ter, 
Hendrik J. Coetsee. said Tuesday 
that all prosecutions under laws 
banning sex and marriage between 
races had been baited. He said that 
charges pending against 27 persons 
under the laws would be dropped. 

Political analysts in South Africa 
said that the announcement of the 
repeal could herald a more rigorous 
attitude to apartheid rather than 
further reform. 

Professor Robert Schrire, direc- 
tor of Applied Political Studies at 
Cape Town University, said: “We 
shall probably see a concerted gov- 
ernment action to dampen expecta- 
tions on reform. There is no way 
South Africa can satisfy interna- 
tional demands." 



Soviet Policy Change in Major’s Death 

WASHINGTON (UPI) —The Soviet Union, responding to the kfflir 
of a U.S. Army major by a Soviet sentry in East Germany will not it . ' 
force in similar cases in the future, the State Department said Tuesdft 
Soviet military officials also have agreed to refer “to higher authority - 
a U.S. danand for an apology for the March 24 shooting and compen& . 
tion to the family of Major Arthur Nicholson, a department statanq 
said. 




Iranians Sent to European Hospitals 


Beyers Naude 


“We cannot escape the impres- 
sion that the United States refuses 
to judge South Africa within the 
framework of the African conti- 
nent,” Mr. Botha said. 


VIENNA (AP) — About 45 Iranian soldiers reportedly suffering frw 
chemical weapons poisoning arrived Monday at Vienna’s airport ah' ; -‘ 
were sent to hospitals around Europe, the Austria Presse-Agentur repor ' - 
ed Tuesday. 

The agency quoted Dr. Gemot Pauser, a doctor at Vienna's Genen : - 
Hospital as saying the Iranians “have such severe injuries that mayt : 
only 10 to 20 percent of them will survive.” He said most of the trocf 
were victims of mustard gas, but that there were signs that anotiit^, 
chemical had been used. The soldiers were injured early last week, th 
agency said. . -- 

At the 40-nation Disarmament Conference in Geneva, Iran’s foreig. 
minister, Ali Akbar Velayati, accused Iraq of using a new competin' - 
containing cyanide, the nerve gas Tabun and mustard gas. Mr. Vdayc - 
accused Iraq of using chemical weapons in 33 attacks in the six week; : 
before April 9, inflicting 4,600 casualties. ’ ’ - 


23 U.S. White Supremacists Indicted 


■ Shultz Commends Move 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz on Tuesday commended 
steps by South Africa to dilute its 
racially discriminatory policies but 
said “these changes are not 
enough,” United Press Internation- 
al reported from Washington. 

“Serious inequities continue: re- 
pression. detentions without trial 
and the prospect of treason trials 
for some blade leaders,” Mr. Shultz 
said in remarks prepared for deliv- 
ery to the National Press Club. 

Earlier, in Johannesburg, South 
Africa's foreign minister, ILF. Bo- 
tha. criticized U5. remarks. 


■ Angola Move Described 

Mr. Botha said Tuesday that the 
political advantages of withdraw- 
ing South African troops from An- 
gola outweighed the security risks 
involved. Reuters reported from 
Cape Town.. 

Mr. Botha announced Monday 
that his country would withdraw its 
forces from Angola by the end of 
the week. He declined Tuesday to 
rule out a re-occupation of Ango- 
lan territory in the event of in- 
creased activity by guerrillas in 
South-West Africa, the territory 
also known as Namibia. 

Mr. Botha did not elaborate on 
his statement but official sources 
said that the South African govern- 
ment feared a move by Angola to 
call a Security Council meeting at 
the United Nations to demand a 
South African pullback. 


SEATTLE (NYT) — Announcing indictments against 23 members o; 
a white supremacist group under an anti-racketeering statute, the fedefa ~ 
government has warned that it will retaliate quickly against violent act*”" 
by racist sympathizers. 


The indictment Monday was brought against 23 members of a neo^ V * 1 

NasgTOup that calls itself the Order, or the Brfider Schweigen, GamarJ ! clPP] ] 1#* 
for Silent Brotherhood. Sixteen of those indicted are in custody. Separat- v 

llctments have been brought against the same defendants on charges o' t- > ,, ,. fj 

nk-and armored car robberies, counterfeiting and related activities tfaA j ^ § If rlJ 

vemment alleges were conducted to raise money for a “war'’ agains 4 *• * *_/ OAf 


indictments have been brought against the same defendants on charges o' 
bank-and armored car robberies, counterfeiting and related activities thA 
government alleges were conducted to raise money for a “war” agains- 
the federal government - : 


Police Find Explosives in Basque Villa 


BAYONNE, France (AP) — Police, tipped off by a phone cafl, fount- 
one and a half tons of explosives and a large stock of ammunition in i- 
villa in the French Basque country, sources said Tuesday. 

The police sources said the explosives were of the Goma-2 type, ofter- 
used by the banned military wing of the Basque separatist organization 
ETA. _ 

Police found the cache in a villa in St P6-sur-NiveDe in the Atlantic 
Pyrenees region. The sources said the owner of the villa called potter 
Monday saying that he intended to kQl himself and that he had the cache, 
in bis home. No other information was immediately available. 


New Zealand Base Sinks Into Desert 


_ WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Officers have sent a distress s 
signal to the Ministry of Works because a navy communications hase-ft 
sinking into the ground in New Zealand's volcanic desert region. 

The Irirangi naval base, 124 miles (200 kilometers) north of w i lin g , 
ton, has the same designation as a ship and has 85 sailors aboard. The . 
main transmitting station of the landlocked base began sinking into the 
ground when a heavy air conditioning unit was installed on the roof to 
control the temperature of electronic equipment. 

A oavy spokesman said doors began to jam and several windows broke . 
or fell out as the building sank about four incites (10 centimeters). 


- >: 


Reagan Urged 
To Ease Stand 


(Continued from Page 1) 


up his campaign Monday with a 
declaration that defeat of his aid 
request would be “literally a vote 
aga inst peace" in Central America. 

White House officials acknowl- 
edged that Mr. Reagan has failed to 
marshal the votes he needs in either 
chamber. Bui the president re- 
mained determined despite a deci- 
sion that be not invest all his politi- 
cal capital in a fight be might lose. 

With the first vote expected a 
week from Tuesday in the Senate, 
Mr. Reagan hammered away at the 
“brutality” and “scorched-earth 
policy” of the Marxist-led Sandin- 
isl regime in Managua and de- 
fended his support for the rebels. 

The message, reinforced by two 
Nicaraguan refugees — a 29-year- 
old who clung to Mr. Reagan as the 
audience cheered him and an 8- 
y ear-old girl who presented him 
with a picture of refugee children 
— was the argument Mr. Reagan 
was expected to use in public and 
private over the days to come. 

But outside the hotel about 100 
people protested the president's 
speech. 

Mr. Reagan said rejection of his 
recast aid package, which would 
proride the rebels with only hu- 
manitarian assistance if the San- 
dinisu agreed to a cease-fire and 
peace talks, would be “a rejection 
of ail the forces of moderation” in 
Nicaragua. 

“To do nothing in Central Amer- 
ica is to give the first Communist 
stronghold on the North American 
continent a green light to spread its 
poison throughout this free and in- 
creasingly democratic hemi- 
sphere," Mr. Reagan said, in an 
evident reference to Cuba. 


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UNESCO Deputy Chief Resigns Post 

PARIS (AFP) — The UNESCO spokesman and dqruty director- 
general Gerard BoDa, announced Tuesday his resignation from both • - • -- 

fiiiV'fTAne ° 


7 . * — ’ '■"J uuui 

funcuons. 

Mr.Bolla, a Swiss citizen who joined the United Nations Educational • “ 
Scientific and Cultural Organization in 1955, assumed the posts last year. •' • " 

Hegave no. reasons for his decision, and there was no immediate -V 
indication as to who would succeed him 
UNESCO is trying to cope with a budget deficit caused by - 
withdrawal of the United States at the end of last year. The oraamration^.- > 7 - 
has been accused of becoming too political and of squandering its v 
resources. b ~ 


Supreme Court Protects CIA Sources 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The CIA and other U-S- intelligence agencies 
are free to conceal from the public the identities of all their sources, the 


Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. 
The court, bv a 7-2 vote. 2 


The court, by a 7-2 vote, gave the director of Central fritefligeaM 
unlimited power to protect not only secret agents but all other sources of 
information, classified and unclassified. That indudes the names Of 
private scientists and researchers and even academic journals. 

The decision overturned a lower court ruling that could have forced the 
CIA to disclose the names of college researchers and others who contrib- 
uted to a pro ject in the 1950s and 1960s that involved brainwashing and 
such experi m en t al drugs as LSD being administered to unsuspecting 
individuals. At least two persons died because of the experiments. 


FLYING TRAPEZE — President Ronald Reagan takes time off from lobbying 
Congress to see a three-ring circus witb children from a Washington elementary scbooL 


Murphy Given Petition Backing PLO 

TFRTISAt PM a , «... . . P 


Toy Time in Space Defies Expectations 


ttw York Times Service 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida 
— When they wot not working 
with their high-technology gear on 
Monday, the Discovery astronauts 
took time out to play with their 


was chasing the ball that would not 
come back to her. 


toys. They found that their yo-yo, 
jacks. Slinky, and mechanical 
mouse did some peculiar things in 
the weightlessness of space flight 

One astronaut tried to juggle 
some oranges and apples. But fey 
just hung there suspended in mid- 
air. He had to move them about 
like cbess pieces. 

Dr. M. Rhea Seddon had trouble 
with herbaH and jacks. The jacks 
floated all over the cabin, while she 


She also found that the Slinky 
toy did not behave the way it does 
on Earth, slinking down steps once 
it is set in motion. “It won't slink at 
all” Dr. Seddon said in a telecast 
“It sort of droops.” 


The mechanical mouse, however. 


showed unearthly energy in orbiL 
It flipped up and over, rapidly and 
often, in the virtual absence of 
gravity. The astronauts nicknamed 
it the “Rat Stuff” . 


get dizzy — otherwise he'd have a 
tough lime in space." 

Senator Jake Gam, the Utah Re- 
publican who is aboard as a con- 
gressional observer, made a paper 
plane and sailed it smoothly 
through (be cabin. 

The toy demonstration was not 
so much for the pleasure and relax- 
ation of the crew as for the edifica- 
tion of school children. As planoed 


, JERUSALEM (.Reuters) — A group of Palestinian leaders gave the 
LLS. aslant secretary of state for Near Eastern and Sooth Asian affair* 
Richard w. Murphy, a petition Tuesday saying they viewed the PLO a*S 
the sole representative of the Palestinian people. 

The petition, copies of which were made available to reporters, called 
for the establishment of a Palestinian state. It was signed by 22 Palestifl- 
{ T m to* occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. * 
vlfc.J'W 3 ' a !”, had .“““Tuesday with the Israeli defense minister. 
Yitzhak Rabin, and senior officials of the Foreign Ministry. 


For the Record 


by the Johnson Space Center and 
the Houston Museum of Natural 


Observing the mouse's gyrations. 
Captain Donald E Williams said: 
“It s a good thing Rat Stuff doesn’t 


the Houston Museum of Natural 
Science, the video of the toys in 
space will be shown to students to 
pique their interest in some baric 
principles of physics and the phe- 
nomenon of weightlessness. 


US. and Soviet arms contra! negotiators held separate sessions Tires- / 1' * r ~ 

s^^ llUfrran ^ e nuciear rmssdeslmd^pace 

inShJg SS ^ddS^timtiSSt ! V 'fe 't' 

ity of voluntary affirmative-action plans for public enrolpyees. f Wff . l\\ 

A CyprioHrmied si^ertnter, the 122,841-ton Kypros was fait by* 

“ wcre ^Ported, (finders) 

OT^inro> bill, in southern ThailandM^^, SihiSfficr^a S. ** 


r~-t? 








s 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


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An Expert Definition 
(XiRealEtkation 


WDUtua J. Bennett, US see- 
reiary of education and former 
dutoman of the National En- 
dowment.-, for the Humanities, 
defines an educated person as 
one who knows “haw tooun- 
. »*tns are made and that for 
every action there is an equal 
and opposite reaction,” and 
“who said i am the state 1 and 
; who said 'I have a dream’ " 


Such people “should know 
about subjects and predicate, 
about isosiries triangles and el- 
lipses, They should know where 
the Amazon Rows, what the 
First Amendment means. They 
should know about the Donner 
party and slavery,” he said, and 
"where Ethiopia is, and why 
there is a Berlin WaH N 


They should have an idea of 
ow plants and poems work, of 


bow 

the Milky Way' and DNA. of 
“die Convention of 1787 and 
the conventions of good behav- 
ior,” and, he added, “what the 
Sistinc Chapel looks fike and 
what great music sounds like." 


A Couple of Blocks 
For the Gipper 


The U.S. Secret Service, con- 
cealed about car bombs, has 
proposed barring automobile 
traffic from the two-block 
stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue 
fronting the White Home. Da- 
vid A. Clark, chairman of the 
Washington City Council, pre- 
dicts traffic chaos. He says the 
Secret Service wants to make a 
•'palace” out of the place. 

Much editorial reaction has 
been negative, but Mary H. 
Uulemeyer of Washington, in a 
letter to The Washington Post, 
wrote, “Cities dose off their 
streets for far less —for 
ping malls, for example. 1 
added: “Let’s do tins for the 
Gipper and for the men and 
women who will succeed him." 


Short Takes 


After fifllng their quotas for 
four yeas with relative ease, the 
armed forces say preliminary 
reports show that enlistments 
were off slightly for the first 
luarter of 1983. They ascribe 

rinriine to a d emo graphic 

decrease, a lag in militar y com- 
pared with civilian pay and the 


E 


drop in unemployment Law- 
rence J.Korb, assistant secre- 
tary of defense for manpower, 
says, "We anticipate that re* 
enmifig wiE continue to be- 
come increasingly difficult." 

Mario M. Cuomo, the Demo- 
cratic governor of New York, 
and Howard H. Baker Jr., the 
former Republican senator 
from Tennessee, trill give 75- 
seoond radio commentaries on 



Cuomo and Baker 


alternate weekdays for the Mu- 
tual Radio Network. The com- 
mentaries are to be broadcast 
coasi-tp-coast starting July 15; 
both men are possible candi- 
dates for president in 1988. 

More man three-quarters of 
Americans who retire start 
drawing benefits before the tra- 
ditional age of 6S. More than 
half begin receiving Social Se- 
curity benefits at the minimum 
age of 62, according to the So- 
cial Security Bulletin. 


What It’s like 
Being a Look-Alike 


ar- 


Whena 

tor named AS. fChaflric) 
moved to New York from 
Washington last month he got a 
new haircut and found to his 
surprise that he had become a 
ringer for Bernhard H. Goetz, 
the so-called “subway vigflan- 
te." He described stopping at a 
coffee shop after the haircut: 
"AH these people were pointing 
at me. I was proud. I thought 
maybe they noticed me from 
‘Protocd,’ a fihn in which Mr. 
Gsaky had a bit pan. 

Mr. Csaky says that one 
woman told him, “When they 
do the Benue Goetz story, 
that’s going to be your break m 
show buriness." 

But for now, has being a 
Goetz look-alike changed his 
life? 

Not really, Mr. Oaky says, 
except that “I get a seal cm the 
subway real quick." 


ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Center-Left Victory in Peru: Economic Woes Came a Basic Shift 


By Alan Riding 


Nev York Timet Service 

LIMA — With more than 70 
percent of Peruvians giving their 
support to either social democratic 
or Marxist candidates, the general 
elections Sunday marked a tumin, 
point in this courtly's convul: 
political history. 

The conservative parties that 
have traditionally ruled Peru were 
rebuffed, and a majority of the 8 2 


vote and is expected to succeed 
President Fernando Bdattade Ter- 
ry for a five-year term be ginning 
July 28. 

Because Mr. Garcia fell short of 
the required absolute majority, 
however, he most participate in a 
runoff election June 16 against the 
second-place candidate, Alfonso 
Barratries Lin g An . an independent 
Marxist now serving us mayor of 
Lima. He won 13 percent of the 
vote on the United Left ticket. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


million voters endorsed populist 
and even radical measures to deal 
with the economic and social crisis. 

No less crucial, the Maoist guer- 
rilla group known as the Shining 
Path, which called for an election 


But while Mr. Garda outpdled 
Mr. Barren tes on Sunday by a 2-to- 
1 margin, they both symbolized Pe- 
ru’s changing political profile by 
successfully mobilizing workers, 
slam dwellers, peasants and Indi- 
ans to support the idea of social 
reform. 


boycott, was largely ignored. And, 
ed forces 


with the armed forces pledging to 
respect the results, the country’s 
besieged democracy received an in- 
ject ion of faith. 

The best showing was for AJan 
Garcia Ffcrez of the American Pop- 
ular Revolutionary Alliance, or 
APRA, a 61-year-old party with 
strong populist roots and a new 
social democratic image. It has nev- 
er led a national government. 

Mr. Garcia won 48 percent of the 


“The right in Peru has been 
eradicated,'’ Mr. Barnrates said 
Sunday night after congratulating 
Mr. Garcia on his first-rouna 
showing. 

According to unofficial returns, 
the main conservative candidate, 
Luis Bedoya Reyes of the Demo- 
cratic Convergence Party, won 1 1 
percent of the vote, and Javier Alva 
Orlandini, nominated by the Popu- 
lar Action Party, which heads the 
outgoing government, received 6 



Alan Garcia Perez Alfonso Ban-antes Lin gin 


rang 

to the five other candidates or were bloc in 
nullified. 

The conservative presence in 
Congress will also be minim al. Mr. 

Garcia's party appears to have won 
control of both the 180-seat Cham- 
ber of Deputies and the 60-seat 
Senate, with the six Marxist parties 
that comprise the United Left ac- 


igfor 

both 


houses. 


In part, the results reflected deep 
disenchantment with the misman- 


agement and lack of leadership of 
tt. Over 


the Belaunde administration, 
the past five years unemployment 
has soared, the living standard has 
slumped to 1965 levels, a surge of 
leftist guerrilla activities has led to 


human rights abuses by security 
forces, and the country as a whole 
has seemed to drift in a fog of 
uncertainty and insecurity. 

Both the Popular Revolutionary 
Alliance and the United Left 
picked charismatic presidential 
candidates who were able to revive 
some feeling of hope and optimism 
among the dejected electorate. 

Mr. Garcia presented himself as 
the chosen heir of the party's 
founder and longtime leader, Vic- 
tor Raul Haya de la Tone, who 
died in 1979. unabashedly copying 
bis mentor’s gestures and speaking 
style. But Mr. Garcia, a tall strik- 
ing figure who is only 35 years old, 
also projected a more modern so- 
cial democratic image that ap- 
pealed to many younger voters. 

Significantly, while Mr. Garcia 
apparently won the votes of many 
middle-class Peruvians who feared 
a leftist victory, during the cam- 
paign be criticized the Belaunde 
administration and the conserva- 
tive Bedoya candidacy much more 
harshly than the United Left. 

Some politicians believe that he 
in fact preferred to face Mr. Bar- 
ram cs in the runoff election in or- 
der to present himself as a centrist. 
And for this reason, they said, Mr. 
Garcia has avoided specifying how 
be will fulfill his promise to deal 


with unemployment, inflation, 
slumps in industrial and agricultur- 
al production and the country's 
foreign debt problem. 

While committed to a program 
of nationalization, in contrast, the 
left’s flag bearer cuts anything but 
a radical fis 


figure. 

Tmj^soft-spoken, and bespecta- 


cled, the 56-year-old Mr. Barraults 
demonstrated his political skills by 
fusing numerous squabbling leftist 
factions into an alliance that won 
him the mayoralty of Lima in 1983 
and sponsored his presidential bid 
this year. But tensions within the 
alliance surfaced on several occa- 
sions during the recent campaign. 

Beyond his personal appeal, Mr. 
Bamntes's performance also re- 
flected the growing influence of 
leftist parties among peasants as 
well os the large number of mi- 
grants who crowd Lima's slums. 

The one victory that Mr. Be- 
taunde can claim, though, is that 
Peru’s democracy has survived a 
period of great stress. In 1980. after 
12 years of military rule, Peru be- 
came the first of numerous army- 
ruled countries in the hemisphere 
to return to democracy. 

If Mr. Belaunde hands over pow- 
er to his constitutional successor, 
he will become the first elected 
leader of Peru to do so since 1945. 


Confessions U.S., Soviet Easing Dispute Over Siberian Radar 
To Murders in 
U.S. Doubted 


ght against 23 memhenofaz 
or the Bruder Sehweigen.fe. 
sc indicted are in custody. 
t the same defendants mdtp? 
rierfeiting and related aamosit 
o raise money for a “wafagzi 


Only a Vaccine May Halt 
AIDS, Unofficial Says 


sin Basque \1 


ipped off by a phone calk 
i large stock of amnumiiks: 
roes said Tuesday. 

; were of the Goma-2 t)TK.e 
e Basque separatist orgaBE 


’e-sur-Nivelle in the Alt 
ner of the villa caUedpr. 
self and that he had d*®- 
mediately available. 


on 


Jinks Into Desert 


s have sent a iff 
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g&stlfrii 

« BoefflT' 


The AssocHUcd Pros 

ATLANTA — Everyone in the 
United Slates probably will nedl to 
'be vaccinated against acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome, or 
AIDS, to halt the spread of the 
disease, according to a US. govern- 
ment expert. 

But researchers still are far from 
developing such a vaccine, accord- 
ing to reports presented Monday at 
an international conference on 
AIDS that is 
the World Heal 
and three US. agencies. 

When a vaccine is developed 
possibly by 1990, said Dr. James 
Cumm, chief of AIDS research at 
- the federal Centers for Disease 
Control, “it will probably be desir- 
able to vaccinate all Americans.’' 

[The virus thought to cause 
.AIDS can change its makeup, a 
factor that would comphcate the 
formulation of an effective vaccine. 
United Press International report- 
ed Dr. Robert C. Gallo of the Na- 
tional Cancer Institute as saying. 

fit was reported at the confer- 
ence that scientists have seen more 
than 100 variations of the AIDS 
vims. Medical experts said formu- 
lation of a new vaccine would be 
necessary every time a change oc- 
curs.] 

Scientists predict that as many 
. Americans may contact AIDS in 
Tythe nexL year os did in the six years 
following 1978. The illness has 
struck more than 9,000 people in 
the United States since 1978, and 
within the next year wfll strike an- 
other 9,000, many of them homo- 
sexual men, Dr. Curran said. 

. AIDS is marked by a failure of 
the body's immune system to ward 
off infection. The virus attacks cer- 
tain white blood cells, called T lym- 
phocytes, that play a central role in 
the immune system. 

_ . Dr. Curran underscored the be- 
lief of many researchers that AIDS 
cann ot be spread through casual 
'contact. 

Concern over the casual spread 
of AIDS diverts attention from 
solving the important problems. 
Dr. Curran said, adding, "It's our 
way of denying the reality." He 
said current efforts to prevent the 
i 'Spread of AIDS are limited mostly 
to counseling and educating the 
public. 

- Preventing its spread in homo- 
sexuals is becoming nearly impossi- 
ble, Dr. Quran said. There is evi- 
dence, he said that homosexuals 
have reduced sharply the number 
of their sexual partners “in what is 
perhaps the most important sexual 
revolution since the 1960s." 

However, that may not mean, 
much to the individual who does 
niter his sexual behavior, 
f “His own risk of exposure has 
diminished only slightly despite a 
dramatic change in sexual behav- 
ior," Dr. Curran said. Even though 
a person may have fewer sexual 
partners, be said, a higher percent- 
age of those partners already will 


have been exposed to the virus re- 
sponsible for AIDS. 

As the group of people exposed 
to the virus ages, the number of 

AIDS-related cancers and brain killed only tnree persons. Mr. 
diseases wall increase, he said. The Walsh had prosecuted Mr. Lucas 
AIDS virus recently has been for the strangulation of an uniden- 


Thc Associated Press 

AUSTIN, Texas — Henry Lee 
Lucas has confessed to hundreds of 
slayings across the United States, 
leading law enforcement officials 
to close the books on more than 
200 of them. But Texas officials 
now say they no longer believe his 
confessions. 

The state attorney general, Jim 
Mattox, noted Monday that news 
reports now indicate that, in some 
cases, the drifter was thousands of 
miles from tire scene, or would have 
had to travel constantly to commit 
all the crimes. 

In an interview with the Dallas 
Times Herald newspaper, Mr. Lu- 
cas, 48, claimed that all but three of 
his confessions were false. He said 
he staged the hoax "to show law 
enforcement doesn't do its job,' 1 
the Times Herald reported Sunday. 
He also told the newspaper he 
keeps confessing because authori- 
ties told him that once he stops 
tanring he will go to death row to 
await execution. 

At various times, Mr. Lucas has 
confessed to slaying 100 to 600 
people. Nationwide, police have 
ended their investigations on 210 

killings based on those confessions. 

A grand jury in Waco, Texas, is 
investigating two slayings in which 
Mr. Lucas's confessions now are . 
doubted by authorities, Mr. Mat- 
tox said. 

Ed Walsh, the district attorney in 
Williamson County, Texas, rejects 
Mr. Lucas’s claim now that he 
killed only three persons. Mr. 


By Walter Pincus 

Washington Past Service 

' WASHINGTON — The United 
States and the Soviet Union appear 
to be easing their stands on one of 
their sharpest disputes, the one 
over the Large radar under con- 
struction near Krasnoyarsk in Si- 
beria, according to sources both in 
and outside the U.S. government. 

The United States has called the 
facility a major violation of the 
1972 Ami-Ballistic Missile Treaty 
between the countries. That part 
distinguishes between early-warn- 
ing radar, which it allows, and ra- 
dar systems for use in so-called 
battle management. It allows the 
Russians to maintain only one of 
the latter, to direct the ABM sys- 
tem around Moscow. 

The treaty requires that early- 
warning radars be installed at the 
edge of each country, faring out- 
ward rather than closer to the inte- 
rior, where battle-management ra- 
dars would have to be. 

The new U.S. position appears to 
be that, while the Krasnoyarsk ra- 
dar is in a pan of the country for- 
bidden under the treaty, it is, in 
fact, fra- early-warning purposes. 


That still is a treaty violation, given 
its location, but not such a threat- 


ening one. 

Paul H. Nice, the senior arms 
control adviser to President Ron- 
ald Reagan and Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz, said un'equivoca- 
bly last week that the facility is “an 
early warning radar." 

Soviets officials appear to be 
backing off their contention that 
the radar's only purpose is to track 
satellites. During recent private 
conversations in Washington and 
in Moscow, some officials have ac- 
knowledged to Americans that the 
radar may have been buQi “for mil- 
itary purposes" rather than civil- 
ian. as one source put it. The Rus- 
sians “know they have a problem'’ 
with the treaty, this source said. 

The two sides are supposed to 
discuss the Krasnoyarsk radar at a 
meeting this week in Geneva of the 
Standing Consultative Commis- 
sion set up in 1972 to settle dis- 
agreements over treaty terms. 

The Soviet Union’s change in at- 
titude stems, sources said, from the 
realization that even arms control 
experts who do not support Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan support his 


contention that the radar is a treaty 
violation. Bipartisan congressional 
delegations and U.S. groups of law- 
yers and scientists who support 
arms control and who have visited 
officials in Moscow over the past 
few months, have stressed the need 
for the Kremlin's leaders to do 
something about the radar. 

Acce nting to a Reagan adminis- 
tration official, studies are under 
way in Washington to find a “pal- 
atable" solution to the radar other 
than the only publicly announced 
one of “tearing it down." Some 
experts say the Russians could nar- 
row the radar's angle of coverage. 
iHik limiting the area it wn< The 
United States took a gmilar step 
with two of its new phased-array 
radars in Georgia and Texas after 
Soviet complaints several years 
ago. 

The Soviet Union also could 
make it easy for U.S. electronic spy 
satellites to “read" the radar pulses 
when testing of the facility begins 
in Lhe next year or two. The fre- 
quencies of early-warning and bat- 
tle-management radars are sharply 
different, according to experts. 

These experts discount a r emar k 


. by Anatoli F. Dobrynin, the 
Soviet Union's ambassador to the 
United States, that U.S. scientists 
would be invited to examine the 
installation when it becomes opera- 
tional. “They would have to be able 
to examine the computers and the 
sensors,” an expen said, “and the 
Soviets would never allow knowl- 
edgeable government scientists to 
see such equipment." 

A nongovernment expert said 
Monday that in one meeting the 
Russians were told that if the Unit- 
ed States took “them off the hook" 
on the radar, Reagan officials 
would want “a quid pro quo." He 
said that might include a redefini- 
tion of “ABM treaty provisions to 
permit" some space defense “tests 
to go beyond the laboratory with- 
out complaints." 

Moscow's claim that the Krasno- 
yarsk facility is a space-tracking 
radar is discounted by U.S. ana- 
lysts. They say it resembles other 
early-warning facilities and is not 
located in an area where space- 



tra ckin g would best be done. The 
US. intelligence “consensus," an 
official said Mo 


Monday, is that the 


radar was built primarily to spot 
:-launched missiles 


U.S. submarine- 
coming from the northern Pacific. 
As such, it fills a gap in early- 
warning radar coverage provided 
by existing facilities. 


U.S. Judge Grants Extradition Colombian Leader 
Of Alleged SS Guard to Israel 


By Mary Thornton 

Washington Past Service • 

WASHINGTON — A federal 
judge in Ohio has granted Israel's 
request for the extradition of a re- 
tired auto worker accused of being 
responsible for the deaths of thou- 
sands of Jews at the Nazi death 


shown to affect lhe brain as well as 
the immune system. 

As an increasing number of chil- 
dren are bom who have contracted 
AIDS from their mothers, the dis- 
ease eventually could be spread in 
day-care centers, Dr. Curran said. 

In other presentations at the con- 
ference. researchers gave progress 
reports on two drugs that show 
souk ability to block the growth of 
the AIDS virus. 

Both the drug suramin, bring 
studied at the National Institutes 
of Health in Bohesda, Maryland, 
and HPA23, bring investigated at 
the Pasteur Institute in Paris, have 
shown some anti-AIDS activity in 
trials with several patients. 

But, researchers said, it is too 
soot to say whether rilher drug will 
lead to a practical, effective treat- 
ment. 


tified hitchhiker found Dear 
Georgetown on Oct. 31, 1979. 

On the basis of his confession in 
the Georgetown case, Mr. Lucas 
was given the death penalty. 

Mr. Walsh said that “there are 
just too many cases I am familiar 
with — by talking with officers I 
have the highest regard for — 
where he has provided details, 
scenes and things no one but the 
killer could have known." 

“I have no way of knowing 
whether he's killed 200 people," 
Mr. Walsh added, "but it's really 
lucfi crons to say he's killed only 
three." 

In the Georgetown slaying, Lu- 
cas first said he had raped and 
slabbed the victim, 
in fact the victim was stran- 
gled and had not been raped, the 
Tiroes Herald reported. 


camp in Trebliaka, Poland. 
Thei 


Fear of Filing: Computer Fouls Up 
At IRS Office for Overseas Returns 


Washington Post Service 

PHILADELPHIA — Computer failures and human errors have 
caused drastic slowdowns and mixups at the Internal Revenue Service 
cento- here, which processes income tax returns for the eastern United 
States and for many people filing from abroad. 

Weeks before the April 15 domestic filing deadline, congressional 
offices in Pennsylvania were besieged with complaints. 

Philadelphia is also the filing center for overseas taxpayers. [The 
IRS told the International Herald Tribune that the problems should 
be resolved by the overseas filinc; deadline of June 17.1 

The cono failed to record $297 million paid in withholding taxes 
by 27,000 mid-Atlantic companies, accountants and lawyers said, and 
five bank accounts had been seized and thousands of threat 


notices mailed before the error was acknowledged. Similarly, a 

10 times mu ' 


1 liens 


estate! 

were still placed on his bank account and house 
“We’re giving people refunds to which they're not entitled and 
assessing people for payments for which they're not liable," said a 
woman who has worked at the center for more than 20 years and 
asked that her name not be used. “We’re not current on anything." 

IRS officials in Washington and Philadelphia say some problems 
were inevitable because of the magnitude of replacing outdated data- 
prooessing systems with one computer in January. 


i case of John Demjanjuk. 65, 
marks Israel’s first successful effort 
to gain custody of an alleged war 
criminal since the Uni led States 
and Israel signed an extradition 
treaty in 1963. Under Israeli law, 
he could be executed if he is found 
guilty. 

Allan A Ryan Jr., Lhe former 
head of the Justice Department's 
Nazi-hunting Office of Special In- 
vestigations, said he believed that 
the Israelis were using Mr. Dem- 
janjuk as a test case. 

“They chose him because he was 
among the worst," he said. “Now 
that extradition has been granted, I 
believe we may see more requests 
from IsraeL" 

In his derision Monday in Gevc- 
land, U.S. District Court Judge 
Frank J. Battisti ordered Mr. Dcra- 
janjuk's immediate arrest but de- 
layed the extradition until May 1 to 
allow him an opportunity to ap- 
peal. 

Mr. Demjanjuk, of Seven Hills, 
Ohio, allegedly ran the gas cham- 
ber for the German SS as an armed 
camp guard at Treblinka, where 
900,000 Jews were killed in 1942 



John Dentjanjuk 


New York Tuna Service 

BOGOTA — President Belisario 
Be urn cur say s that he and other 
Latin American leaders axe op- 
posed to renewed U.S. military aid 
for rebels seeking the overthrow of 
the Nicaraguan government 

Mr. Belancur said in Washing- 
ton earlier this month that his reac- 
tion to President Ronald Reagan's 
plan on Nicaragua had beat "very 
positive." But Mr. Beiancor said 
Monday that his response had been 
based on the plan's can for a cease- 
fire and negotiations. 


□als from South America, but the 
requests have been denied on the 
ground that Israel was not a sover- 
eign nation at the time of the 
crimes and lacks jurisdiction. 

Mr. Demianjuk’s lawyers bad ar- 
gued that their diem, a Ukrainian 
who came to the United States in 
1952, could not be extradited be- 
cause he was charged with murder 
as a Nazi collaborator, which is not 
a specific crime in the United 
States. 

The Justice Department had al- 
leged that Mr. Demjanjuk became 
known to prisoners as "Ivan the 
Terrible" because of his sadistic 
behavior. 


He said that Mr. Reagan and 
Secretary of Stale George P- Shultz 
had not mentioned to him that it 
included renewal of aid to the in- 
surgents, and that be did not realize 
that this was part of the plan until 
his return to Bcgota. The plan also 
includes a cease-fire and talks be- 
tween the rebels and the Sandinist 
government that would lead to new 
elections. Nicaragua has rejected 
the plan. 

Mr. Betoncur, in an interview, 
said Mr. Reagan’s recent call for 
Congress to approve S14 millio n in 
aid to the rebels made that part of 
the president's plan “no longer a 
peace proposal but a preparation 
for war." 




Baume & Mercier 


GENEVE 

1830 



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Quartz. wMar-resistaM 


5661 


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and 1943. He has said he served in 
the Soviet Array until he was taken 
prisoner by the Germans during 
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The only other major Nazi war 
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and executed in the early 1960s. 

Israel has sought the extradition 
of other suspected Nazi war crimi- 


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Jteralb 


PnMhbed Whh TTw New Yo* Tnnw and The W«Mufloo Port 


Sribunc, 


Please, Take Our Subsidies 


The owners of big American-built oil tank- 
ers want to give back some $400 million in 
government subsidies. But they are having a 
hard time persuading Washington to accept 
the cash. The chronicle of their difficulties is a 


' dreary study of government at its worst. 

It costs far less to build a ship in a foreign 
shipyard rhnn in the United States. Yet some 
Americans are afraid that foreign competition 
will destroy the commercial shipbuilding in- 
dustry. They have gone far with the dubious 
■ theory that the industry is essential to national 
’ defense. That is how Congress came to spend 
- hundreds of millions in the 1 970s to subsidize 
fully half the cost of building 29 oil tankers for 
the international trade. But even with these 
subsidies, the tankers have not turned a profit. 

The only American tankers making money 
today are the ones carrying oil from Alaska to 
U.S. refineries in the lower slates. They are 
highly inefficient but man age a profit because 
they have a captive market Oil companies are 
barred by law from selling Alaskan crude 
abroad and must use American-built ships to 
cany it to American refineries. 

Not surprisingly, therefore, the owners of 
the subsidized international fleet would like to 
get into this lucrative .Alaska market. But when 
Congress decided to subsidize their ships, it 
insisted that they would have to stay out of 
domestic competition. So the internationals 


are begging to give back their subsidies. 

The Transportation Department tentatively 
agreed two years ago to take the deal with 
interest, and let the big tankers into the Alaska 
trade. But the owners of the rust buckets now 
serving Alaska protested bitterly. If they were 
driven out of business, they argued, the Navy 
would no longer have their ships to use in 
wartime. The Transportation Department 
properly dismissed that claim. If barely sea- 
worthy tankers are needed to fight the next 
war, it concluded, let the Pentagon buy them 
for scrap value and keep them in mothballs. 

The real question was whether the Alaska 
shippers deserved precedence over the taxpay- 
ers who subsidized the international tankers. 
And the answer to that, it concluded, was easy. 

But the story did not end there. The Alaska 
fleet steamed up to Capitol Hill and got Con- 
gress to prohibit the deal And it wants the 
prohibition renewed when it expires on May 
IS. Given the budget deficit. Congress, too, is 
likely to yield to common sense. But that still 
leaves the White House, where highl y placed 
friends of the Alaska tankers are trying to 
persuade the National Security Council to 
reweave the threadbare argument about na- 
tional defense. Is the administration serious 
about reducing waste and making the econo- 
my more competitive? 

— THE NEW YORE TIMES 


Genocide Treaty: Year 36 


It seems right that, in the mouth (he libera- 

■ lion of the German concentration camps is 
being commemorated, the U.S. Senate will 
again consider the Genocide Treaty. The pact, 
which is in part a response to the Holocaust, 
has been accepted by 96 countries, but not by 
the United States. For 36 years the Senate has 
refused to consent to ratification, first because 

- of fears that the United States would be ac- 
cused of genocide because of segregation, and 
later because of similar fears concerning 
its actions in Vietnam. 

Last year, supporters of the treaty were 

■ given a boost when President Reagan pressed 
.' for ratification. The treaty was approved on a 

17-0 vote by the Foreign Relations Committee, 
' but it never came to a vote on the floor because 
time ran out. Instead, the Senate adopted a 
resolution supporting the principles of the 
. agreement and urging prompt consideration 
this year. The Foreign Relations Committee is 
expected to vote April 23, which will leave 
plenty of time for a Soar debate, if needed. 

- Senator Jesse Helms, who did not oppose 
the treaty last year, has raised some questions 
about its provisions that may delay consider- 
ation. Mr. Helms asserts that the rights of 

' Americans might be jeopardized under the 
treaty because, by its terms, the World Court is 


authorized to hear cases concerning its inter- 
pretation. The World Court, of course, is not a 
c riminal tribunal, and no one can be tried and 
punished for acts in violation of the treaty in 
that forum. Moreover, it does not have the 
power to enforce its judgments and must rely 
on the Security Council of the United Nations, 
where the United States has a veto, to apply 
sanctions. Nevertheless, Mr. Helms has indi- 
cated his intention to offer a reservation that 
would take the World Court out of the treaty 
entirely. Even worse, he has persuaded the 
administration to accept his terms in the inter- 
est of speeding Senate consideration. 

The Heims reservation is an old ploy used 
time and again by those who want to sink the 
treaty by fright ening their countrymen. There 
is absolutely no threat to any American in this 
treaty, and it ii ridiculous to try to persuade 
citizens that they win he at the mercy of 
foreign judges if it is ratified. 

The United States can honestly and proudly 
affirm its abhorrence of genocide by agreeing 
to the treaty. Continued reluctance to consent 
to ratification simply gives others grounds to 
question the sincerity of the American com- 
mitment to human rights. The public has done 
nothing to deserve such a shir. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


In Illinois, Justice on Trial 


If Gaiy Dotson did not commit the rape for 
; which he is serving 25 to 50 years in an Illinois 

- prison, he has to be the most forgiving prisoner 
imaginable. He forgives Cathleen Crowell 
Webb, who now says she falsely accused him 
of raping her six years ago when she thought 

. she was pregnant at age 17. Though distraught 
that the trial judge has refused to set aside his 
conviction, he says he understands that he has 
an uphill battle because courts resist pleas 

- based on recantations. 

There is, however, more at stake here than 
this one man's anger, or lack of iL Confidence 
. in American justice cannot rest easily when he 
; is sent back to jail on the word of a woman 
who is, one way or the other, an. acknowledged 
liar. Judge Richard Samuels, who presided at 
the original trial, refused to credit Mrs. Webb’s 
recantation in part because the judiciary needs 
finality in its judgments. But merely incanting 
such truisms mil not resolve this case. 

Most state courts share Judge Samuels's 
wariness of repudiated testimony. They seem 
to fear that a witness might be turned around 
by bribery, coercion or belated sympathy for 


the defendant They must guard against fraud 
on the court But if Mrs. Webb is telling the 
truth now, the fraud lay in her 1977 testimony. 
Some of the judge’s remarks from the bench 
made him appear more interested in defending 
the 1977 verdict than in determining whether 
he and the juiy were victimized by Mis. Webb. 

Courts have rqected recantations in other 
cases, but usually for better reasons than Mr. 
Samuels gave. For example, an accomplice in a 
robbery case who later swears that his friend 
had nothing to do with the crime is routinely 
disbelieved. But none of the precedents cited 
by the judge involved the changed testimony 
of the complainant, the supposed victim. 

If the Illinois court system cannot convinc- 
ingly end this case soon. Governor James 
Thompson may have to contain the damage by 
commuting the sentence. Once convicted, a 
defendant may fairly be required to prove that 
the verdict rests on perjured testimony. But it 
is hard to imagine what more Mr. Dotson 
could do to cany his burden. IBs case contin- 
ues to burden the conscience of the state. 

— THE NEW YORE TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Thatcher: Boosting or B ashing ? 

- When British Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher embarked on her grueling 11-day 
tour of Southeast Asia she probably had little 
idea that her remarks 10,000 kilometers away 
would cause so much controversy back in 
Britain. But she returned home Sunday to find 
herself the center of a storm over whether her 
trip was designed to boost or bash Britain. 

What caused the row was Mis. Thatcher's 
strident style in- trying to reassure potential 
markets in Southeast Asia that the British 


economy is not the mess a lot of people believe 
it to be. She resorted to some harsh rhetoric 
about the trade unions in general and the coal 
strike in particular. This prompted bitter at- 
tacks from the socialist opposition who ac- 
cused her of engaging in domestic politics 
abroad and using the trip to gloat over the 
defeat of the coal miners. 

Mrs. Thatcher may well be “Batting for 
Britain.” Bnt she can expect more than her 
share of political bouncers in the coming 
weeks from an increasingly hostile opposition. 

— The Bangkok Post 


FROM OUR APRIL 17 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Indian Cites White Man’s Debt 
NEW YORK — Little Bison was the pictur- 
esque feature of the luncheon of the League for 
Political Education in the Hotel As tor. Mag- 
nificently attired in what has ceased to be the 
costume of his race, with head decorated in 
trailing feathers, he calmly informed the white 
man in substance: “You have taken everything 
from us that made life good — our buffalo, our 
deer and our lands and have given in exchange 
an education which is theoretical, but not 
practical. So you still owe us something." Lit- 
tle Bison is the son of Chief Big Foot, a Sioux 
killed at the battle of Little Big Horn. He 
studied in the University of Texas and for 20 
years Has worked for his people. He asserted 
there is nothing for them in the United States. 


19S5: 25,000 Exiled From Leningrad 
LENINGRAD — At least 25,000 persons 
have been exiled from Leningrad to Siberia or 
other remote regions of the U-S.SJL since the 
general clean-up in the old Czarist capital of 
the members of the former “ruling classes" 
which began early last mouth. The figures 
include members of the families of those desig- 
nated for exile. No mention of the Leningrad 
clean-up has been made in the Soviet press 
since the announcement March 19 that 1,074 
persons who played conspicuous nMes under 
the old regime, including members of the no- 
bility, had been arrested and were bong exiled 
“eastward." Tourists arriving from the Orient 
report having seen whole train-loads of exiles 
moving eastward under armed gnati-t* 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, hbSsfxr 

Extern* Edltcr RENE BOND Y Deputy PubBshtr 

WALTER WELLS Edaer . ALAIN LECOUR Atwciatc PMsher 

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SAMUBLABT Dqwy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Operations 

CARL GEWIRTZ Amatoe Editor FRANCOIS DESMABONS Direct* 2 Ctruktto 

ROLF D. KRANEFUHL Director of Advertising jW ff 
Imeroaliona! Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chariea-de-Gsulle, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Tetou 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

Direaeur de la oub/kation: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Hemesty Rd., Hong Kong. Tel S-28S6J& Telex 61170. 

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C /MO. International Hewd Tribune. All rights resermt 



i 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


Reagan’s Economic Revolution: Will It Come to Pass??$ ( 

. __ » r«9l\ that a., .m) I I' 


dv, 


W ASHINGTON — In his State 
of the Union Message, Presi- 
dent Reagan held out the prospect of 
a Second American Revolution. At 
the time, I thought the phrase was 
exceptional hyperbole, even for die 
occasion. Other presidents have of- 
fered various “Deals” (Square, New, 
Fur, the life span of a Deal is four or 
eight years) — but if Mr. R eag an 
truly intended another American 
Revolution, he would be offering 
something that comes around only 
eveiy 200 years or so. Thus, the more 
realistic question remains whether we 
are about to have the first Reagan 
Economic Revolution. 

In Ronald Reagan's first term, 
there had been expectations of such a 
revolution. There would be a shift of 
national priorities to defense and 
economic growth and away from 
consumption and redistribution of 
income. There would be a restoration 
of free markets and a radical reduc- 
tion of government regulation. Infla- 
tion would be ended and a predict- 
able, stable dollar restored. 

In all of these directions, steps 
were taken. An expanded defense 
program was launched. Some of the 
most growth-inhibiting features of 
the tax system were corrected. Eco- 
nomic regulations were relaxed or 
elimina ted, notably in the energy 
field. Inflation was slowed. Bui this 
did not add up to a revolution. 

Why? Because what was done was 
too limited and too vulnerable. The 
upward trend of nonmilitary spend- 
ing was slowed but not stopped. Do- 
mestic programs were cut, out pro- 
grams and agencies were not 
abolished: They remained alive, to 
grow again when the political atmo- 
sphere became more favorable. 
Alongside the deregulation of some 
economic sectors were major moves 
toward increased regulation of for- 
eign trade. Although the inflation 
rate was reduced, nothing was done 
to prevent a recurrence of the wave of 
inflation that had begun inconspicu- 
ously in the mid-1960s. There were 
no durable changes in rules, tech- 
niques or institutions that made mon- 


By Herbert Stein 


elary policy. And the big tax cut was 
largely wasted. Tax reduction had 
provided an opportunity for making 
tax reform painless by giving taxpay- 
ers a reduction in rates in exchange 
for giving up loopholes, but the op- 
portunity was not seized. 

The whole first-term economic po- 


f as ter than other expenditures could 
be reduced. Concern over the deficit 
strengthened pressures for restrain- 
ing me rise m defense outlays — 
pressures to which Mr. Reagan made 
some concessions. Worries about the 
deficit made the tax future uncertain 
because there was a common skepti- 
cism about the government's ability 
to deal with the deficit for long with- 
out a tax increase. The deficit con- 


tributed to fears of renewed inflation 
and, indirectly, to demands for pro- 
tectionism, because the deficit helped 
make the dollar's exchange rate nigh 
and thus encouraged imports. 

Had the' Reagan administration 
ended on Jan. 20, 1985, we could not 
be certain that it would leave a lasting 
mark on economic policy — or, at 
least, not the kind of mark that the 
Reagan »«»n would have liked. Since 
any Reagan Economic Revolution 
will have to be made in the second 
term, an examination of the pros- 
pects shows that the possibility of 
success has been raised by three de- 
velopments since the election. 

First, the Treasury’s tax reform 
lan (a modified version of which 
-. Reagan plans to introduce next 
month) constitutes the biggest move 
toward equity and efficiency in the 


plai 

Mr. 


federal income tax since that tax was 
introduced in 1913. Itisafree-market 
tax plan in that it would try to treat 
income from different sources equal- 
ly — or more equally than at present 
— so that taxes would not be so large 
a determinant of which industries 
thrive and which do not 
The Treasury's plan tries to reform 
the tax system under an extremely 
difficult constraint: It envisions no 
room for reducing revenue. Since tax 
reform inevitably shifts the burden of 
taxes among individuals, if there 
could be no net reduction in revenue, 
then some taxpayers would have to 
pav more. The Treasury nonetheless 
faced up to this difficulty, undoubt- 
edly emboldened by the various con- 
gressional proposals for a more or 
(ess flat tax. All of these plans had the 
advantage (too heretical to mention, 


but nevertheless real) that one. , 
adopted they would permit addition li 
al revenue to be raised with less eco ' 1 
aomic damage thp would resul 
from trying to raise more moor 
from the present tax system. 

Second, Mr. Reagan submitted ; 
budget that squarely recognized tin 
facts of life. By the beg innin g of hi 
second term, it was dear that rea 
progress on reducing the deficit coulc 
come only from two sources — slow 
jug the military program and taking 
something from middle-incomt 
Americans by cutting their govern- 
ment benefits or raising their taxes 
Everything else was too small, or, Eki 
the interest on the debt, too immov- 
able. The problem is that the presi- 
dent considers the -defense program 
essential, but the middle class consti- 
tutes the great majority of the voters. 


3H 





-.-**** 


- 1 ; 


,v4 i 


The president’s budget met ihh 
problem courageously. He stuck by: 



Yes , Mr, Weinberger , About Those Misconceptions 9 


W ASHINGTON — Making the most of a 
captive audience at the annual meeting of 
the American Society of Newspaper Editors, De- 


By Philip Geyelin 


fense 


pie who decide what is news to help dear up 
s'* about the Strategic Defense Im- 


budget request of $26 billion over five 


would 


misconceptions 

dative. Very well, let us begin with basics, 

The latest high technology is the name of the 
Pentagon game. The strategists, the field com- 
manders, the procurement officers all play it, all 
the time, with willin g collaborators: scientists 
whore zest for technological breakthroughs is more 
than matched by their appetite for the wherewithal 
to pay for it Private industry is one source of the 
wherewithal But nobody has more wherewithal 
than the government this makes for a happy 
marriage between the Pentagon, the scientists, and 
private industry looking for spinoffs from govern- 
ment-financed research. 

In Europe, there also exists what one French 
strategic planner (building on Eisenhower's wara- 
*ing) describes as a “nrilitary-indukrial-space com- 
plex" — a public and private collaboration whose 
elements flourish by feeding on each other in the 
name of national security and free enterprise. 

There was, then, a live constituency ready to 
welcome the president’s announcement of plans 
for a “comprehensive and intensive effort to define 
a long-term research and development program” 
to develop a nuclear-defense system based partly 
in space. All but lost in transmission was any sense 
that all the president was doing was giving a 
considerable boost to research and development 
efforts that had been under way for years. 

Now it is true that the president’s “star wars” 


Irani est 

be a doubling, according to experts, of the j 
ing rate previously contemplated. But even so, the 
president was careful two years ago to speak in 
speculative, futuristic, tum-of-the-centiny terms. 
That, too, has been lost in transmission. As the 
administration turns up its sales pitch, it also adds 


variety in a way that puts today’s case for SDI 
strangely at odds 


with the original virion. 

If the' nation’s editors are to help dear up mis- 
conceptions, then they are going to require help. 
Hist impressions do matter. And the first impres- 
sion conveyed to the American public. Congress 
and the European allies — not to mention the 
Russians — was that the United States was onto 
something genuinely new. The lines dividing re- 
search and development from testing and deploy- 
ment were thoroughly blurred. 

Within a week of his March 1983 speech, the 
president elaborated: If the United States cracked 
the case and came up with a workable, leak-proof 
defense against nuclear weapons, a future presi- 
dent could share the technological secrets with the 
Russians. Then everybody would be protected by a 
nudear “bubble" and, presto, ’ we would have a 
world free of the threat of nudear war. 

The first result was a raging debate among 
scientists, with enough weight on the ride of the 
skeptics to raise serious questions about whether 


the Russians so decisively that it could afford to 
pass the technology along 

So we do not hear any more about thaL Rather, 
we bear the opposite: that the Russians are stealing 
a march on the United States, that they are well 
ahead in research on lasers and particle beams and 
more conventional anti-missile defenses. That has 
now become the main argument for why the Unit- 
ed States must redouble its effort: to catch up. 

It is not a bad argument Not even the uneasy 
Europeans oppose research, the more so since they 
are being offered something in the way of hush 
money: a piece of the research action by competi- 
tive bidding Bnt the Europeans, led most vocally 
by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of Britain 
but also by the quieter and earlier efforts of the 
French, are more explicit about the Zincs between 


the defense program and tackled a 
long list of government activities that 
mainly benefit one or another sector 
of middle America. That list included 
the Small Business Administration, 
Am Irak, urban mass transit, loans to 
finance the college education of mid- 
dle-income students, aid to fanners, 
and so on. In many cases, he would 
entirely eliminate programs and 
abolish agencies, leaving no bureau- 
cracies to lobby for their restoration. 
By marking these programs for cull- 
ing from tiie budget, the president 
took a long step toward enforcing his 
priorities in a durable way. 

Third, in his State of the Union 1 
Message, President Reagan called, 
upon America's trading partners to 
join with the United Slates in a new 
round of negotiations to expand 
world trade and international compe- 
tition. This move gave some promise. 
of reversing protectionist tendencies 
and implementing the free-market 
philosophy that has been so much a 
part of the Reagan ideology. A few 
weeks later, this free-market line of 1 
thinking was given more immediate 
evidence in the decision not to ask 
Japan to renew its quotas on the 
export of automobiles to America. 

These steps were all politically cou- 
rageous because they antagonize 
powerful constituencies, important 
groups, that would have to pay more 
taxes, give up government benefits or 
face more competition. But no one 
ever said the Reagan Economic Rev- 
olution would be bloodless. In fact, 
the basic reason for the failure to 
achieve the revolution m the fist 
term was 


-K ■ 
. net 

... i i 

** ’ 


nf 1 

- 

?M5pr 


'‘it* 


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■ •. e 




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®p. tolorfi 


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research, testing and deployment. 
Ihe 


any foolproof system could be achieved in any 
ible ‘ 


foreseeable future, and never mind whether the 
United States could condurivdy steal a march on 


They know the momentum of these matters, the 
high cost of early development, and the disinclina- 
tion to raise questions about sending good money 
after bad. Rather, the argument usually goes that - 
those . early investments are argument enough for 
pressing on. So the Europeans, and a good many 
Americans, are not entirety reassured oy the ad- 
ministration's vision of a gradual safe transition 
from a strategy of deterrence by the threat of 
retaliation to a strategy of nudear defense. 

And not the least of the reasons for this disquiet 
has to do with “misconception" of the administra- 
tion's own making: a confusion between the poetiy 
of nudear disarmament and the prosaic business 
of research looking to a state of the art and of the 
world that nobody now foresees. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


ponents to accept the fact that 
would have to be pain and sacrifice. 

'The same opposition that makes 
the new policies courageous also 
makes the outcome doubtful There 
have been the predictable outcries 
about the tax reform proposals. On 
the expenditure side of the budget, 
the president already has ifdtit neces- 
sary to compromise with his own 
team — the Senate Republicans — by 
accepting cuts in the military pro- 
gram ana foregoing some reductions ; 
he wanted in the rest of the budget 
How far he may yet go in compromis- 
ing with the Democrats is unknown. . 
Finally, despite the president’s small . 
moves to liberalize trade, the country •, 
is bathed in protectionist talk of a 
virulence not heard in 50 years. 

The Reagan Economic Revolution 
may yet fizzle out But at least bold 
steps were taken, and the ball game 
is not over. 




k.?,' 


The writer, chairman of the Council 
.of Economic Advisers in the Nixon and 
Ford administrations, contributed this 
view to The New Yak Times. 


For a Universal Banning 
Of Chemical Weapons 


Bv Jonathan Power 


L ONDON — Reports last month 
/ that Iraq was using chemical 
weapons in its war with Iran came 
as a U.S. presidential commission 


was touring Europe to assess opin- 
ther the United States 


ion on whether 
should build a new generation of 
nerve gas weapons. 

The weapons in question are 
“binaries.'' shells with two uonle- 
thal chemicals that become deadly 
only when they combine. Perhaps 
the U.S. interest in these weapons 
in recent years partly explains why 
Western governments have muted 
their criticism of Iraq. 

This stands in contrast to the 
loud and persistent allegations 
against the Russians and North 
Vietnamese of using chemical 
weapons in Afghanistan and Indo- 
china, allegations that now are dis- 


credited by many authorities, 
e last 


Before last year it was thought 
that only the United States, the 
Soviet Union and France pos- 
sessed stocks of chemical weapons. 
But in May 1984 the U.S. Defense 
Department said that it estimated 
that as many as 16 countries had 
acquired chemical weapons in re- 
cent years. Later that year the CIA 
said it had evidence of chemical 
weapons in the arsenals of Syria, 
Libya, Israel Ethiopia, Burma, 
China. Taiwan, Cuba, Peru. Egypt, 
Iraq, Vietnam. North Korea and 
several East European countries. 
There were also reports of guerril- 
las of the Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization and the Sonth-West Af- 
rica People’s Organization 
receiving training in the use of 
chemical weapons. 

The only incontrovertible evi- 
dence of their recent use is by Iraq. 
But there are serious reasons for 
thinking that longstanding inhibi- 
tions about the use of chemical 
weapons are beginning to erode. 

Since World War I, chemical 
weapons have been used only when 
it was known the opposing side did 
not have the means to protect its 
troops. This was so when the Ital- 
ians used nerve gas against the 
Ethiopians in 1935. and today in 
the Iran- Iraq war. This is likely to 
be the pattern for the future: 


Chemical weapons will be used 
mainly by Third World nations, as 
the poor man's nuclear weapon. 

Is there any way to block tins 
trend? It is difficult enough to con- 
trol the trading in nudear materi- 
als, but policing constraints on the 
raw materials for chemical weap- 
ons is nearly impossible: the basic 
ingredients are similar to those 
used to make fertilizers. The only 
hope is an international treaty al- 
lowing on-site inspection. 

This is why negotiations under 
way at Geneva to draft a treaty to 
outlaw the production, possession 
and use of chemical arms are criti- 
cally important and why President 
Reagan's new attempt — his fourth 
— to win approval for “binaries” is 
to be regretted. 

In 1969, President Richard Nix- 
on announced a U.S. unilateral de- 
cision to destroy its stockpile of 
biological weapons — bombs filled 
with highly infectious fatal dis- 
eases. The reasons given included 
the unpredictability of biological 
weapons, their delay in causing an 
effect, the danger of causing large 
numbers of civilian casualties and, 
most important, the fact that these 
weapons “could not destroy the 
military arsenal — the tanks, 
planes and artillery — of an ene- 
my." His gesture led to successful 
negotiations with the Russians and 
the signing of the biological weap- 
ons convention. 

Although chemical weapons are 
not as frightening in their potential 
as biological weapons, they share 
many of the same problems. — in- 
discriminate and unpredictable ef- 
fects, high noncombaianl casual- 
ties and a blurring of the 
distinction between conventional 
and nudear warfare. 

For the superpowers, they add 
nothing eitber to the concept of 
deterrence or to the ability to fight 
a successful war. Yet they remove 
what tittle moral leverage the in- 
dustrialized countries have in per- 
suading Third World countries not 
to use them. This should be reason 
enough to seek a universal ban. 

International Herald Tribune. 

AO rights reserved 


Turkey: The Generals Are Still There 


W ASHINGTON — When you 
are visiting Washington looking 
for billions in aid to refurbish your 
military, other issues, such as which 
political prisoners are (anguishing in 
jail lend to get lost. 

Turkish Prime Minister Turgiit 
Ozal recently paid a state visit to the 
Reagan administration. He was well 
prepared to explain why he and the 
Pentagon believe that the Turkish 
government needs more weapons and 
military might to keep vigilant 
against the bordering Soviet union. 
But on the seemingly lesser matter of 
human beings who are suffering in 
prison for what they think, Mr. Ozal 
had a poor command of the facts. 

In a group interview, I asked him 
about the continued imprisonment of 
some members of the Turkish Peace 
Association. This is the nonviolent 
group of journalists, artists, former 
diplomats and peace activists that 
had 23 of its members imprisoned by 
a military court in the summer of 
1983 for sentences of up to eight 
years. Five of the group have been 
released but the others remain in jail 
Mr. Ozal insisted they were all oul 
Someone who knows otherwise is 
N urban Katirriogln, 27, a doctoral 
student al the University of Wiscon- 
sin. Her mother, Reha Isvan, a peace 
worker and the wife of a former may- 
or of Istanbul has been in a military 
prison for 18 months. Over the 
phone. Mrs. Isvan's daughter said it 
would be heartening news if . the 
Turkish prime minister were right 
and her mother were free of her un- 
just imprisonment. But she is not. 

Mr. Ozal was incorrect a second 


By Colman McCarthy 


tional news of themselves. Instead, 
the censorship became the news. 


■> “ *'■ 


pros, Armenian terrorism against 
Turkish diplomats, an economy in 
which per capita income remains at 
about SIJOQ a year. Mr. Ozal is a 
personally gracious man who de- 
serves large credit for trying to be a 
conciliator. He said that censoring 
Mr. Miller and Mr. Pinter was a mis- 
take, and he would not have ap- 
proved the decision had he beat in 
the country at the time. 

But here is the heart of the prob- 
lem. One human rights group after 
another — Amnesty International 
the U.S. Helsinki watch, the Com- 
mittee to Protect Journalists, PEN 
International — has recently sent del- 
egations to Turkey and reached the 
same conclusion: Despite the integri- 


the censorship became the news. s '. 

Mr. Ozal is said to be sympathetic^^ jgy \ 
to human rights victims. He is not 
dictatorial Turkish journalists say 
that under Mr. Ozal censorship has 
decreased. The best-selling book in 
Turkey, “The 12th of September" by 
the journalist M. Ali Birand, is criti- 
cal of the military. The newsmaga- 
zine Nokta has nut carried a cover 
story on torture. The editor of a news 





organization says that censorship or- 
aost daily 


Sj.- 


ty and democratic aspirations of pro- 
of the 


pie such as Mr. OzaL the power t 

military and its martial law remains. 

It says a lot that the martial law 
command could order the censo ring 
of the Miller-Pinter press conference. 
Mr. Ozal suggested that it was a stu- 
pid decision. He said that the find- 
ings would not have been big intema- 


ders, which in 1 980 came almost i „ 
from the martial law command, now 
come once or twice a week. 

Mr. Ozal wants to create a free- 
market economy. It cannot happen 
unless there is also a free press and 
freedom for groups such as the Peace 

Assoc i a t ion. Human rights violations _ ^ 

should be easily solvable. But withrf, / :JX - ; 
the generals still sharing power and .3 ft, , i 

often using it unthinkingly, what Ar- ^ j 

thnr MiQer said remains tme: “There W’fWT i 
is either democracy or none of iL" • 




The writer is on the board of da 
Committee to Protect Journalists. His 




columns are syndicated by the Wash- 
Writer. 


inpon Post Writers Group. 




LETrERS TO THE EDITOR 

Responsibility for Bhopal 




inBh 
C 


ility' 


“ Unanswered Questic 
Carbide's 


ay Be Crucial to 
(March 22): 


Thomas J. Lueck’s report errs in its 


time. He spoke of the visit of Arthur 
ana Harold Pinter, two au- 


Miller 

thors wbo went to Turkey in mid- 
March on behalf of PEN Internation- 
al, a group that defends the rights of 
artists ana writers. Mr. Pinter, in an 
Istanbul news conference after a five- 
day visit, said. “Our conclusion is 
that torture, despite the protestations 
and denials, is in fact widespread and 
systematic in military prisons and po- 
lice stations in Turkey." 

Mr. Ozal gave a baa review to the 
two playwrights. He said they spoke 
with only four or five “extreme left- 
ists.” In fact, Mr. Miller and Mr. 
Pinter met more than 100 Turkish 
citizens of left, right and center. Mar- 
tial law authorities thought even less 
of (he two men’s findings; the news 
was censored from the Turkish press. 

Mr. Ozal's two mistakes, may ap- 
pear small when compared- with the 
larger problems that he faces: Cy- 


. report e 

logical construction. While Union 
Carbide certainly has a large liability 
in the matter. Union Carbide UJS A. 
is correct to push the blame onto the 
Indian affiliate, for that affiliate had 
the accident. And, according to the 
normal principles of law, Indian law 
should be applied first. This. is rele- 
vant in that die Indian officers, direc- 
tors and owners must bear a share of 
the responsibility. Indeed, Indian 
regulators and inspectors must also 
face culpability. 

Having said thaL it is true that only 
Union Cmbide USA. has the re- 
sources to make a fair compensation 
for its affiliate’s gross negligence. 

Another pomL that developing na- 
tions should think twice abour ac- 
cepting continued multinational in- 
vestment, is a leap of logic. To do so 
would be foolish for a developing 
economy. One should argue that de- 
veloping nations must. mast upon 
stricter safety standards, and encour- 


age multinationals to build better 
quality staffs. Too many developing 
stales are lax with foreign Investors at 
the start: The planning ministries are 
more concerned with c reating jobs, 
building reserves or talcing fricV har ks 
than with worker safety. 

Nonetheless, the successful part- 


nerships of developing countries and 
restors have built Aroeri- 


fordgn investors 

ca’s railroads. Japan's auto industry 
and Asia’s Green Revolution. -• 

STEVEN T. THOMAS. 

Manama, Bahrain. 

Scargifl’s Version £ 

Regarding the report “Strike - Sue- ■* 

ceeded. If. JL Mine Leader Tells Rus- 
sians" (March 29); 1 

Arthur ScarplI was able to tefl the \ 
Russian miners his coal strike was . jj 
by redefining its aims after }. 
mefaei — a laughable trick in the^. 
-IS 1, ■ ^fair to news-starved 
workers in the Soviet Union. \ 

* J™ n <fe r if Mr, Searehl has ever * 
asked himself why the Russian 
unions don’t gqon strike? 

FRANK L. GROSSMAN. 

Hawaffi, KuwaiL 






P^Sr. 







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INTERNATIONAL HERAU) TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


Page 5 


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iddlc America s*' - ' ' 

Small Business AdJj* 1 ^- 

«*ihe college edS^^i 

"come students. S 00 ^*. 
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ely eliminate p^L^V 
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es to lobby for ihei?^, 1 ^ 
marking these nrr»« rcil0l \' 
from the bwfiiJ&'jq: 

? long step toward enV^ 

nues in a durable 
tird, m his Staip n,t'\ 

wge. President 

1 America's iradfe^- 
with the United sSi?® 5 ' ' * 

dtruA D ^ lia,i «»^ in e L fc 

Attadeaadmieinaii £,5 

“■ This move gave 

^wsmg protect, cnisSt 

implementing the (£** 
osophy that has been 
of the Reagan ideo|<£.^ 

{? later, this free-mag't 
kmg was given raore 
race m the decision 
m to renew its uu«T ^ 
jrt of automobiles to \ nfc * 

hese steps were all poliS : 

J °!“ h®* 0 * ■*» ■£ 

wful constituencies. ^ 

jps that would have toZh 
»,grire up government &*£ 

: more competition. Buuor .'■• 

r stud the Reagan Ecooomul. 
uon would be bloodless tot- 
basic reason for the radus- 
leve the revolution in feL 
n was the unwillingness 
lents to accept the fast that it 
ild have to be pain and sajjfc 
lie same opposition that ^ 
new policies courageoo * 
kes the outcome doubtful Te 
■e been the predictable oac 
jut the tax reform proposafct 
expenditure side of ik bat 
■ president already has felting 
y to compromise with h& p 
m — the Senate Republicans-- 
repting cuts in the miliuiTp 
un and foregoing some rate 
wanted in the rest of ifathfe . 
w far he may yet go in contra * 

: with the Democrats is rim 
tally, despite the presidoivas 
jves to liberalize trade, ihctsi 
bathed m proiectiomsi ol<f 
ulence not heard in 50 « 

The Reagan Economic Rod* 
ty yet fizrie out. Bui ai leas? 

.■ps were taken, and the ball j£ 
not ewer. 

The writer, chairmw of iht l« 
Economic Admen in ihe .Vna: 
j rd adminisiraiim. ownhas: 
m- to The See York. Tim 

Still There 

Mr.Ozalissaidiobesyg^ 

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ARTS /LEISURE 




Alpha Blondy, a Touch Messianic, 
Re-exports Reggae, Peace Message 


are 

IS. 


By Michael Zwerin 

' tmermnoaol fttrald Ttfbo* 

A bidjan, ivory C3«a.—Aj- 

pba Blonds’ regularly draw 
rarasof 30jQOO in wesenf Africa, 
where he is hailed as something of a 
m es aah , and he iamorc than a 
touch messianic. 

. “The rich arcoying, ihcpoor aj 
aying,'’ he says, eyes bonuni 
crouching, poised 
floor. "So I ay. ’Lct everybody dry 
their tears.’" 

- A generation of young Africans 
has apparently been waiting for an 
African Bob Mufqrio ddmr the 
Ras tafarian **»*«!* gf in African 
terms. Now. just when rcggflfr ap- 
peared dead as disco, along comes 
Alpha Blondy. 

The Rasta culture and iis music, 
reggae, have had a great influence 
on African youth, particularly on 
the west coast, which is closest to 
the music's birthplace. Jamaica. 
The roots of reggae and Rasta are 
African; now reggae is about to be 
re-exported by a mack man named 
Bloody who sings in French, En- 
glish and his tribal l ang ua ge (he 
was bom 32 years ago in die north- 
ern Ivorian town of Korfaogo). The 


worth singing about; ’Put down 
your guns? 

. “I tty to reach the intelligence 
behind the guns. Arabs and Jews 
ace cousins, Iraqis and Iranians arc 
cousins. Who put the worm in the 

appter 

He jumped tg? and raised his 
asm high in a mixed gesture of 
surrender and greeting: “This is 
bow I arrive on stage, to show the 

people, Ton see? I am unarmed.' “ 

Reluming to a crouch, titling on 
his haunches, shifting weight from 
foot to foot while talking nonstop 
amid a drmered array of musical 
instruments, he stared unblii 
with an intensity that transmil 
the next word before it was uttered: 

“Insane. Yes, they cal! me crazy 
and t am happy to be so. I believe 
thru every person is God. 7 believe 
in the God I can see. I see God in 
yon. And do you know where I 
came to accept my craziness? Un- 
der psychiatric care. Yeah, man — 
a mental hospital. I was in Belle- 
vue.** 

He was thrown out of school in 
Korhogo (which was just as wdl 
because “1 got hit once too often**) 
and went to Monrovia, Liberia. 
There he tauaht Fiwlidi- his one 



Jamaican colors on stage. He re- In the late 1970s be furived in 
sponds: “All music grows on the New York but was refused entry 
same tree. I sing reggae because lor lack of cash. Then came, he 
God is in that muse, { do not sing said, ‘‘a mirade**: A woman named 
about 7 love you’: that is prostim- Margaret wbo worked in the Ivor- 
tion. There is only one subject ian consulate baited him out of 

f Ladyhawke 9 : Dialogue Mars 
Romance, Colorful Images 


C APSULE reviews of movies 
recently released m the United 
States: 

“Ladyhawke,” set in the 13th 
century, features a wicked bishop, a 
handsome pair of lovers doomed 
by tire bishop’s curse, a fortress city 
and a sly young thief. "As pre m i ses 

MOVIE MARQUEE 


segments that compose ‘Oafs Eye’ 
matched 'Quitters Inc,’ tire film’s 
exuberantly wicked first segment, 
tins adaption of three Stephen 
King stones could have been some- 
thing of a classic of its genre, 
though I’m not sure exactly what 
that genre is," writes Vincent Can- 
by of The New York Times. Canby 
calls it “tire best screen adaptation 
of any King work since Brian Dc 
Palma's ‘Came,* and “pop movie- 
making of an extremely dever, styl- 
ish and satisfying order.” 

“Lewis Teague, who made *AHi- 


don't want to become, a piece of 
human waste. I am responsible for 
what 1 do on this Earth. 

“1 don't go to church or a 
mosque, but lhave a Bible and the 
Koran on stage when 1 ting: 'Su- 
perpowers get out of Africa / We 
don’t want no guns no bombs / We 
don't want your KGB / We don't 
want your Red Army.' ” The song 
is from his new Path* Marconi al- 
bum, “Cocody Rock." 

He continually skirts the edge of 
the banal, somehow finding wis- 
dom where there should be cocbbs. 
“People say Tm too romantic be- 
cause I want to make tire world 
happy. But it’s the only choice I 
have. The other choice, 1 know I 
don't want that They tried to put 
me in the army once. I told them 
no, 1 don't go. I'm crazy. 

“IT 1 say everything has been said 
and done already and so why try to 
do anything, then I am nothing. 
You got to repeat things to human 
bangs. Repeal repeat Maybe in 
ten years I convince two people not 
to pick up guns. That is a lot two 


for medieval romances go, this is a 
pretty good one,” writes Vincent 
Canby of The New York Times, 

“but * Ladyhawke’ is a film div ided — — »- — . -- — - , - . 

against itself. Shot bv the Oscar- «“<*.* one of my favorite beast- people. The speed or thought is 
warning cameraman Vittorio Stor- running-amok movies of all time, faster than the speed Id 'bghL Thai 
aro (‘Apocalypse Now.’ ‘Reds’), hasdirtcted*CaL’s Eye’ with agood the light. Wc can 

*i n ^..u n L4..> if f..n :r. deal of comic authority, but almost create ugnt. 

credit most go to Karl Miller, He began to sing in New York, 
was responsible for the cats.” with Jamaicans and with tire disco 


‘Ladyhawke’ is full of magnificent 
landscapes and castles in colors 
that seem bumishedby time, but it 
often talks as if it had just taken the 
subway from Brighton Beach to 
Broadway/ 

The cast includes Rutger Hauer 
and Vfichefle P feiffer as the lovers, 
John Wood as tire obsessed bjshop 
and, as PhflHpe. the thief, Matthew 
Broderick. 

□ 

“If the second two of the three 


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detention and a few hours lata 1 he 
found himself on the 16th floor of a 
modem apartment building in 
Greenwich Village watching snow 
fall for the first tunc. 

“Oh yeah, man. New York is a 
piece of heaven- It's the dty of the 
year 3000.” 

He worked as a messenger on 
Wall Street, where "big men said, 
'Hello, ar.’ to me. They know th« 
live in a danger spot. Everybody's 
hot. When Mister come along 
dean, with a nice woman, and he's 
taking her to the Waldorf Astoria 
for dinner, he's not going to step on 
roc, because I might just say, *Hcy, 
this is thecai 1 been looking for to 
pay back all the sins I suffered.’ 

“You get it? Everybody respect 
everybody in New York because 
evaybody afraid of everybody. 
When that happen everywhere in 
the world, nobody’s gonna pick up 
a gun any more.” 

One day, he said, somebody 
laced his beer with “angel dust,” an 
animal tranquilizer that was an 
“in” drug for a while. “I flipped 
oul Imagine coming from Kor- 
bogo all the way to me Big Apple 
and a black man, a brother, he give 
me angel dust without t ellin g me. 



West End’s [ Jumpers’ Still Without End 


% 

lael Sagem ‘0<ana 

Blondy: Reggae’s roots. 

star Sylvester. He began to write 
song? there. When he went back to 
Abidjan two years ago, be ap- 
peared on a television p rogr am that 
showcases untried talent. Suddenly 
evaybody was talking about Alpha 
Blondy. Last week an in-depth in- 
terview with him was the cover sto- 

S in “Le Guido,” Abidjan’s prind- 
e cultural and entertainment 
guide. 

Tm an African, but New York 
is my home. 1 want to make an 
African concert in Central Park. 1 
left New York with tears in my 
eyes. New York defeated me. Bull 
said, ‘New York, you and I are 
gonna meet again.’ 1 * 


By Sheridan M or Icy 

himuimi/ tl emid Tnbene 

L ONDON — Tom Stoppard's “Jumpers,” 
/ which has at last reached tire West End (at 
the Aldwycb), 13 years after the first National 
Theatre production with Michael Hordern and 
Diana Rigg and a year after the. Manchester 
production with Tom Court may and Julie Wal- 
ters. is literally a play upon words. 

Stoppard's first fulWcngth work after “Ro- 
sen crantz and Guildcnstem” is a son of drama- 
tized Scrabble game in which plot and charac- 

im LONDON STAGE 

tarnation take second place to a fowling, loony 
display of verbal pyrotechnics with which the 
playwright and bis leading character beat us 
into at least temporary submission. 

The play focuses on George, a lecturer in 
philosophy wbo appears to owe his job to a 
remarkable nominal similarity to the philoso- 
pher George Moore, though not of course the 
novelist George Moore. He is married to Dottie, 
a failed music-hall queen who has certain diffi- 
culties in recalling tire lyrics of well-known 
songs involving the moo*C now that the astro- 
nauts are there, and who is inextricably involved 
with the vice chancellor of her husband's seat of 
learning. Not that he is your ordinary kind of 
vice chancellor He is also the local coroner and 
the leader of a team of incredible liberal-radical 
“jumping men” who are available for such sinis- 
ter tasks as the polythene- wrapping and remov- 
al of an academic who has been mysteriously 
shot while forming the cents of a human pyra- 
mid at one of Dottie's parties. 

When not entertaining the vice chancellor in 
her bedroom or foreseeing a vast breakage of the 
universe, Dottie spends much of her time watch- 
ing television tapes of astronauts landing on the 
moon. The astronauts are British and named 
Scott and Oates, so it will come as no surprise to 
those versed in arctic history that Oates is the 
one with re-entry problems. Meanwhile, bade in 


Dottie's bedroom, there also seems to be a 
police inspector whose bother was an osteo- 
path called Bones the Bones until it drove him 
mad. The inspector now wants to know where 
tire missing body is. at least until tire vice chan- 
cellor suggests that he retire from the police and 
take up a position as professor of divinity and 
occasional jumper. 

These random happenings and individuals 
merely form a baroque framework for the cen- 
tral character. George, in Paul Eddington's en- 
dearingly bemused performance, is the greatest 
linguistic jumper of them all, a walking thesau- 
rus who starts his lectures with the word “sec- 
ondly" and gradually dismantles himself as he 
delves deeper and deeper into a semantic forest. 

The real trouble with “Jumpers” starts at 
intermission. A riotous hour spent in setting up 
various linguistic, moral, sexual and criminal 
confusions is followed by an hour of thunderous 
anticlimax as they all ge't more or less unscram- 
bled again. 

I have seen plays abandoned by their audi- 
ences before the end. I have even seen plays 
abandoned midway by l heir actors. “Jumpers." 
however, was the first play 1 ever saw aban- 
doned by its anther long before the final cur- 
tain. and in more than a decade not much has 
changed. True, we now get Felicity Kendal as a 
somewhat fey Dottie, and Simon Cadell as a 
wonderfully sinister vice chancellor, but we've 
still got 60 great speeches in search of a coherent 
author, ana Peter Wood, who directs (as he did 
at the National), has been unable io disguise the 
fact that at least some of the emperor's clothes 
have been misplaced. 

Perhaps because of their recent work on a 
much more structured romantic drama of Stop- 
pard's (“The Real Thing”), Kendal and Wood 
seem to think they have in “Jumpers" something 


an Existential French bedroom 
farce. But the last an still lurches into a coun- 
room scene reminiscent of “40 Years On" and a 
briskly acrobatic return of “Slaughter on Tenth 
Avenue.” 

it remains perfectly true that 1 have no idea 


how “Jumpers” should end: but it is mildly 
alarming to discover that, more than a decade 
after writing it, Stoppard seems to find himself 
in the same predicament. 

□ 

Recent comedy hits in the British theater have 
had much in common with spectator sports: 
“Trafford Tana" told us we could all become 
wrestlers, “Stepping Out” is about suburban 
wives becoming star tap dancers, and the award- 
winning John Godber comedy “Up V Under." 
newly arrived at the Fortune. 'is a celebration of 
training-room life in amateur rugby. 


a 


back through “Choms Line" to “42nd Street. 7, 
that an amateur or newcomer in sudden. tri- 
umph is more fun to watch than a seasoned 
professional Godber has latched onto this un- 
derdog theme to give us a team of no-faopers 
going, if not to victory, then at least to a near 
miss. 


The problem is that Godber, a or 

toi 


volific and 

successful young dramatist, goes for the mo- 
ment rather than the play. His writing is steeped 
in a kind of scrapbook nostalgia for old songs 
and movies, but be does very little to create 
individual character. In taking on this team of 
no-hopers and asking us to care about their 
private as well as their rugby lives, he is taking 
cm the best of David Storey in a play like “The 
Changing Room” or “Tire Contractor." and 
there is no real contest 

Godber is, however, an agile director, and 
whether singing action replays worrhy of Satur- 
day afternoon television or merely encouraging 
his cast of six to double as the opposing team, he 
has a kind of boundless energy that spreads 
from stage to stalls. He also offers in the first 
half some parodies of Shakespearean choruses 
that suggest as much time spent in front of the 
examiners as the rugby posts. He is clearly 
obsessed by “Rocky ; it remains to be seen 
whether he will end up a Sylvester Stallone or a 
Gifford Odets. 



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INSIGHTS 


10 Years Later, the Vietnam War Burns On in the American Mind 


- By Joseph Lelyveld 

* New York Times Service 

“A young btrbnze god of ■war.” John Demon 
first heard tharphrase in harangues and pep 
talksHuhea he L was going through officers 
gaining a? a. Marine. It resurfaced in his mind a 
generation later al a Fourth :Of July family 
picnic. What brought it back'Was-an encounter 
there with# young soldier who seemed as eager 

for action as Mr. Denton himself bad been _ 

when he took command of his first platoon in 
Bravo Company. 7th Engineer Battalion, at 
Danang. South Vietnam, in 1966. 

Mr. Denton, now an agent of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, had not realized that 
soldiers like that were still '"being turned out. 
Trying to express bow moved and transfixed he 
felt when he saw the young man. Mr. Denton 
described a vision: “He was 21, if that, and he 
took me right back to what I was. He was 
ready, and he was going to do it. almost to the 
point of saying. ‘1 sure hope they've got a war 
going someplace.' It made me fed good, but at 
the n'me I wanted to go over and put my 
arm around him and say. ‘Hey, have you got 
about five minutes? I want to tell you a few 
things.' " 

Mr. Demon never had that conversation. If 
he had spoken, he would have talked, he said, 
about the responsibilities rather than the glory 
of command, about the strength a leader 
derives from his men, about devotion to them 
as an element of valor. 

Instead, this FBI man was roiling late in the 
den over his garage in Knoxville. Tennessee, 
pouring it all into a novel — not about the 
country called Vietnam, or the questions 
represented by the war, or what happened to 
the veterans when they returned to an 
ungrateful, even hostile, nation. The country 
and questions and aftermath were all 
incidental. What he needed to explore was (he 
nature of the camaraderie of men at war. 
almost to the exclusion of these other matters. 

Almost, but not quite, for Mr. Denton now 
bas a 10-year-old son, and wben he thinks of 
his boy. he does not think of young gods of 
war. In that context, Vietnam — everything 
about it — returns in a rush, and his tone of _ 
voice changes. Instead of the gentleness that Is 
there when he speaks of the men with whom be 
served on Hitt 55 and Marble Mountain, there 
is urgency, even resentment. “Next time we’re 
going to need a contract,” he said. TTn not 
saying I won’t send my son — I probably 
would — but before we commit our sons, we 
better have full support, across the board, from 
every segment of society. Before I commit my 
son. I want these things addressed. I want a 
decision.” 

Nearly 10 years after the fall of Saigon — 
when the superpower of the Western world 
rescued its last representatives in Vietnam, 
helicopter by helicopter, from the roof of an 
embassy that had served as a vice-regal outpost 
— this kind of double exposure on issues of 
peace and war bas lodged itself in the 
consciousness of millions of Americans. 

There is that instant when disbelief can be 
suspended and the righteous use of power 
again seems possible; and there is that equally 
emotional moment that follows, wben disbelief 
returns in a clatter of old doubts and bitterness. 
Politicians and strategists still refer to the 
“Vietnam syndrome” as if it were a lingering 
ailment in search of a miracle cure. Others, 
continuing the old Vietnam debate on a higher 
level of abstraction, contend that die war itself 
was a costly and wrenching cure for imperial 
delusions. 

But it was not ancient arguments I 
discovered in nearly a month spent wandering 
around the United States, trying to assay the 
feelings Vietnam still aroused, it was the 
voltage those feelings are still capable of 
delivering. 

I began with the notion that I might have to 
explain why I wanted to talk about the war at 
this late date but — except when I was talking 
to members of the younger post- Vietnam 
generation, for whom the names of Vietnam 
battlegrounds like Hue and Khe Sanh carry no 
connotations at all — no preamble was 
necessary. The feelings required no excavation. 

"It seems like the American people can't get 
used to the past,” an auto worker in Detroit 
observed. “They have it on the brain.” 

T HE feelings are stiH there and unsettled, 
but now they tend to be focused on the 
future. We want to give ourselves 
{absolution, although we remain deeply divided 
|— as individuals and as a people — over what 
pi is we need to absolve (whether it is what we 
{did fighting the war in Indochina or what we 
jdid protesting it at home). 

b ’ Even more urgently, we want to know how it 
U be if there is a next time, whether the use 
p/. power in a Third World setting would 
automatically reopen the old divisions. 

In other words, when we talk about Vietnam 
{we are seldom talking about the country of that 
(name or the situation of the people who live 
{there. Usually we are talking about ourselves. 
{Probably we always were, which is one 
[conspicuous reason our leaders found it so 
{hard to shape a strategy that fit us and our 
{chosen terrain. 

t Obviously, the war is not over for Americans 
bike Scott Mott, who has had three operations 
on the last year at the Audie Murphy Veterans 
(Hospital in Son Antonio to have old fragments 
Jof shrapnel removed from his body; or Greg 
iNysirom. a waiter in Hollywood and aspiring 
{photographer, who has not been able to banish 
{the thought that a father shot down over North 
[Vietnam more than 19 years ago might still be 
{alive. 

I In less obvious ways, the war is not over for 
itens of millions of other Americans, especially 
[those whose sense of their country and the 
, world was shaped in the Vietnam era. If 
{anything — with the passage of time, the need 
{to reinterpret America's longest war to a 
(younger generation, and its usefulness as a 
[metaphor and touchstone for the debates on 
{Central America — the Vietnam experience is 
[reasserting itself. Suddenly with (he dedication 
uf the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the mall 
in Washington, where it now outdraws every 
other monument but the Lincoln Memorial 
Americans have settled on a new and more 
gratifying image of the Vietnam veteran. 

Instead of the incipient psychopath deserving 
pity, he is a patriotic symbol and something of 
a culture hero, often presented now as self- 
sufficient and irrever e nt, trusting only himself 
because his leaders and society let him down. 

In the intellectual sphere, the debate on the 
war still periodically Hares, with conservatives 
aunching sporadic raids to seize the moral high 
ground that those wbo opposed the war once 
confidently occupied. To the extent that it was 
Lhc left that introduced moral zeal into 
American politics while the war was being 
’ought, it is providing models for today’s right. 
Vietnam, exults the Committee for the Free 
World, is no longer an occasion for “America- 
bashing.” 

Meantime, bumper stickers that cry “No 
Vietnam War in Central America" are 
sprouting on California freeways. And across 


America, from lower Manhattan to Concord, 
California, Vietnam veterans go on 
constructing monuments to their dead. In all of 
this , Vietnam functions less and less as a real 
place »hnn as a mirror to America, the way the 
polished black granite slabs of the memorial in 
Washington reflect the faces of the thousands 
who go there in search of one or another kind 
of catharsis. 

A New York Times poll taken at the end of 
last month indicates that Americans are more 
ready to agree with the assertion that their 
country’s role in the war was "immoral” or at 
least “wrong” than with President Ronald 
Reagan's characterization of it as a “noble 
cause.” It indicates, too, that they mostly 
subscribe to the view that we learned in 
Vietnam not to intervene in civil wars. But 
many wbo took these stands were also prepared 
to send combat troops to El Salvador to 
prevent a Communist takeover there. For 
many, then, it might be said, immorality had 
something to do with failure: What was true for 
these individual Americans was especially true 
for the U.S. Army. 

Traumatized by its failure to subdue the 
peasant soldiers of a poor Asian country and 
grieved by its losses — of men. discipline and 
prestige — the array tried at first to treat 
Vietnam like a bad affair whose lessons were 
all for the politicians. In officers’ dubs and war 
colleges, the lieutenants who “humped” with 
their men through rice paddies and highland 
forests schooled themselves to talk of almost 
anything else as they ascended to field-grade 
ranks. 

But as the Vietnam lieu tenants became 


ard-rc 

BUR 


“The country was suffering from a post- 
traumatic stress disorder, not the Vietnam 
veteran,” contended Barry Levin, a successful 
c riminal lawyer whose combat decorations, 
including a Bronze Star Medal and three 
Purple Hearts, hang in a glass case in his 
penthouse office in Los Angeles. ‘T am not 
ashamed to say that the best years of my life 
were In the military. 1 loved the war. I'm very 
proud to have fought in combat for my 
country.” 

Does he think such people should now fed 
some responsibility for what happened in 
Indochina after the Americans left? “Sure, 
sure,” he replied in an offhand manner. In his 
mind, that conclusion is too self-evident to 
require spelling out. “It’s too easy in America,” 
he went on. “They’re consumers of freedom, 
not protectors of freedom.” 

The “they” conveys an alienation the lawyer 
readily acknowledged: He has little use for 
contemporaries who did not fight in the war, he 
said. Yet Vietnam veterans are divided like the 
rest of the population on questions of war and 
peace. 

In Santa Cruz, California, I visited VFW 
Post 5888, which has had its charter revoked by 
the national VFW for passing a resolution in 
favor of “self-dete rmin ation and 
nonintervention in Central America,” then 
conveying it to a Sandinist representative in 
Managua. Nicaragua. “It’s our duty to see 
Vie tnam doesn't happen again,” asserts Lee 
Bookout. an angry transplanted Texan and 
former marine who said he kept his feelings 
about the war so bottled up that “I was 


Both are prepared to “give witness” to what 
they regard as the moral failures and self- 
deception of the anti-war movement. 
“Everything we were told wouldn’t happen has 
happened,” Mr. Peacocke said. “We were xoW 
it wasn't North Vietnam’s war, but a ‘people’s 
war.’ Now we find out North Vietnam 
engineered the whole rhing We were told there 
would be no genocide and slaughter. There has 
been genocide and slaughter, what the people 
we dianot trust said was true.” He added, 
“The Third World Warstarted a long time ago, 
and we are losing.” 

It is only among ideological converts, 
however, that this kind of confession from 
1960s activists is aptto be heard. Probably 
because the war had been disowned by 
virtually every segment of American opinion 
by the time troop withdrawals began in 1969 
and the Nixon policy of “Vietnamization” was 
in place, the “who lost Vietnam?” witch hunt 
that stirred jittery premonitions in the Johnson 
White House never materialized. Periodically, 
however, intellectual disputes on the issue of 
intervention in the Third World are enlivened 
by a suggestion from the side that jousts under 
the neoconservative banner that a little 
confession might be good for liberal souls. 

In the 1960s, proponents of intervention 
used to argue somewhat wanly that we had to 
engage the realities of a complicated world; the 
opponents brandished moral principles and 
brushed aside complexi ty. In the 1980s, I was 
b eginning to conclude, it is just the opposite. 
But Daniel EUsbeig, a veteran of both sides, 
did not fit into my paradigm. He had known 
Vietnam too wefl to be simplistic then and he 


on their fingertips, which they then ran along 
the rough stone surface of the lobby walk 
forming a faintly visible web of powdery blade 
streaks, a symbol “of death and repentance.” 
i-itra many demonstrations of the 1960s, it was 
essentially a media event, affecting for those 
who took part but largely ignored oy passers- 
by. 

It was familiar except for one crucial factor: 
The participants were so much older, which is 
to say there were hardly any kids. (Later, back 
in New York, I asked the Reverend William 
Sloane Coffin, a leader in the sanctuary 
movement as well as a leader in the early days 
of the Vietnam protests, whether this was 
typicaL He acknowledged that it was. citing the 
absence of the draft as an explanation. 
“Americans are not ready to have good 
Americans die bravely in a bad cause,” the 
preacher commented caustically, “but they are 
ready to have almost anyone else die bravely in 
a bad cause."*) 

B EYOND the rejection of the Vietnam 
War itself, there is virtually no trace of 
the rebellious hostility to America — the 
“mother country” it was sardonically called — 
that ultimately cur off the protest movements 
of the Vietnam era from any chance of grass- 
roots support. At the last peace rally I can 
remember covering in those days, late in 1971, 
the government was denounced for “war 
crimes” and “genocide,” and debate centered 
on the question of whether American society as 
a whole should be resisted as “evil.” Essentially 
this was a question of tactics; that it war evil 
was taken as a given. ■ 

Conveying the mood of dmOQsion that 


(AS E 
HEN 
)E / 


|ci 

Rl 

if 






An American flag hangs in the dark granite of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. 


t»T 

HUG 


Un#ed Pm Hefnariand 


colonels, the military started to pick at the 
wound and assess its own failures: the divided 
command structure, short duty tours for field 
officers, lopsided imbalance of support troops 
to fighting troops, reliance on “body counts,” 
systematic self-deceit and failures of 
intelligence. Studies by some of the army’s best 
thinkers, notably General Bruce Palmer Jr. and 
Colonel Harry G. Summers Jr„ have erased the 
myth that the war was lost only because the 
politicians reined in the generals. 

Now commander of the 4th Airborne 
Training Battalion at Fort Benning, Georgia, 
Lieutenant Colonel Leonard B. Scott was a 22- 
year-old lieutenant leading a Ranger patrol in 
the first company that went into northern 
Cambodia in 1970. With a picture erf John 
Wayne as a cavalry officer on a shdf behind 
him, the colonel is the image of a tough 
airborne officer — trim, blond, suited up for 
the jump he will make before lunch. But when 
he gets on the subject of leadership and 
Vietnam, his eyes get wet and he has to look 
out the window to regain control- Only now 
does he find it possible to speak openly about 
the “hoQowr” and “sick ening" feeling be had 
when he rotated out of his unit, “leaving guys I 
did not want to leave.” 

“The army did not perform well in 
Vietnam,” this officer said, “but that guy, that 
individual soldier, on the whole be did an 
oulstandingjob.” 

C OLONEL Scott's feelings had nowhere 
to go in the post-Vietnam army so they 
flowed, like those of the FBI man in 
Knoxville, into a novel. Called “Charlie Mike” 
and scheduled for publication this year, it is a 
hymn on the theme of valor — that of the 
American soldier and that of the North 
Vietnamese enemy as wdl 
The experience of writing it has made the 
colonel feel, at 37, like a “dinosaur.” The 
younger of Been are sick, he thinks, of bearing 
about Vietnam. When the last battalion 
commanders with Vietnam experience are 
phased out, he said, “some people win say, 
'Great! We finally got rid of the Vietnam 
mentality, the jungle-warfare mentality.’ ” 

If Vietnam is remote to the younger officers, 
it is infinitely more remote to their troops, the 
newest of whom were getting ready for 
kindergarten when the American withdrawal 
began. If you are over 35 and want to fed like 
135, try talking about Vietnam with a recent 
high school graduate. 

Many veterans said it was years before they 
could sit calmly in a social situation. But the 
realization (hat there are well-adjusted, 
psychically whole combat veterans from 
Vietnam is only beginning to seep into the 
consciousness of many who opposed the war. 


married for years, and my wife didn’t know I 
wasaveL” 

“Yeah,” said Richard Anderson, the post's 
commander, who fought in Vietnam during the 
1968 Tet offensive as a member of a mortar 
platoon, “that’s bow it was with me and my 
first wife.” 

The vets wear their Veterans of Foreign 
Wars hats. The haD they occupy has glass cases 
with souvenirs retrieved from the Spanish- 
American War. Mr. Anderson and Mr. 
Bookout are both heavy-equipment operators. 
Drafting manifestoes is not their line of work. 


the organization's “unanimous” support of the 
president’s stand in Central America. A 
Harvard lawyer might have found it hard to 
improve on their draft, which said they had 
fought for the right to dissent 

The Santa Cruz vets have a vision of 
themselves as a “first wave" of former 
servicemen who will join together in the cause 
of peace. Near San Jose. I encountered 
veterans of another kind, former peace activists 
who had leaped across the ideological divide — 
with no sacrifice of radical zeal nor loss of 
belief thai they are m confrontation with a 
decadent society. They are taking their stand 
with conservative Christians seeking to “restore 
the strength of our nation.^ as a brochure I was 
handed puts it. by placing it on “a biblical 
base.” 

If you are disposed to do so, you can write 
off Bill Garaway and Dennis Peacocke as 
cultural mutants, but they are earnest, hard- 
working individuals who are more 
conspicuously, at this juncture in America, part 
of a “wave” than those who still identify with 
their former cause. U they are not typical at 
least these “Christian activists." as they are 
pleased to be known, show how the zealotry of 
the 1960s left has provided models for the 
1980s right 

Mr. Garaway, new a successful contractor, 
was a leader of the draft-resistance movement 
in the Vietnam period; following two federal 
prosecutions (and a featured role playing a 
character like himself in Antonioni’s 
“Zabriskie Point”), he went searching for a 
“new consciousness" on a commune, winding 
up by himself in a tree house is the woods 
above Palo Alto. 

Mr, Peacocke. whose passage included the 
Free Speech Movement at Berkeley and the 
Trotskyist Socialist Workers Party before he 
tripped off into LSD, black-belt karate and 
Zen, is now a pastor and leader of an 
evangelical movement in Northern California 
called the Covenant Outreach Ministries. 

Both men are heavily involved in the righl- 
to-life movement and building support fora 
resolute American stand in Central America. 


was not inclined to waffle now. Over herbal tea 
in his hillside study cm the outskirts of 
Berkeley, where he maintains a one-man think 
tank on Issues of war and peace, Mr. EUsberg 
read to me a passage from one of his official 
reports from Vietnam that he had published in 
1972 without apologies. The Communists, he 
bad predicted, would introduce “forced-draft 
industrialization under totalitarian controls, 
capitalized by exploitation of the peasants and 
preceded by a blood bath to destroy or 
terrorize potential opposition." 

“I did not take naivcpositions,” be said, 
marking the passage. *There is a tendency now 
to stereotype the entire anti-war movement as 
pro-Hanoi. A stab-in-the-badc legend is 
growing up” 

Mr. EHsberg argued that there is a peace 
movement in place now that is more broadly 
based, more knowledgeable about techniques 
of nonviolent protest and more disciplined 
than the movements of the 1960s. It has shown 
itself in the campaign for a nuclear freeze. It 
will show itself agam, he said, as the conflicts 
in Central America widen. The Central 
Intelligence Agency and the Pentagon are also 
better prepared, he contended. They have buDt 
airfields, made their logistical arrangements, 
sealed borders and eliminated the possibility of 
sanctuaries before running the risk of 
American casualties; they are also ready, he 
said, to limit television and press coverage. 

“But if you think all we need is censorship, 
more air power and tougher police.” Mr. 
EUsberg said, “look at Russia in Afghanistan 
or Vietnam in Cambodia.” 

T EN years later, we are talking about 

Vietnam again, but often as an analogy. 
What we really want to know is what we 
would do the next time. The question is pat 
two ways. Positively: Have we regained our 
national will and purpose? Negatively: Are we 
about to tear ourselves apart ah over again? 

The two concerns, it may be noted, are both 
self-regarding. They are also not mutually 
exclusive. 

Ash Wednesday, in Chicago’s Loop, I found 
myself on the fringes of the first peace 
demonstration I had happened to witness in 
more than 13 years, a religious service 
conducted at midday in the lobby of the 
Everett Dirkscn Federal Braiding by dergy and 
laity from Chicago churches that have pledged 
to serve as sanctuaries for political refugees 
from El Salvador and Guatemala. A 
“statement of confession and concern” was . 
read out. calling on the government “to repent 
of its death-causingdesiruction and seek the 
forgiveness of God and (he wounded children, 
women and men of Central America.” 

Then, stepping forward, one by one, the 60 
or so partitipwu had the ashen marie applied . 
to their foreheads and took a tittle extra carbon 


prevailed in that period to today’s 
undergraduates is not much easier than 
conveying the mood of 17tb-centuiy Salem. 
Massachusetts. James Matray, a 36-year-old 
historian, participated as a student in the 1960s 
protests. Today he teaches a course on the 
Vietnam period at New Mexico State 
University at Las Cruces to students he 
describes as being mostly Tabula rasa” on the 
subject Usually, he said, it is more difficult to 
explain to his students the position of those 
who, like himself, resisted than to explore (he 
position of those who supported the war. 
“What’s so disturbing about the college 
students today,” he commented, “is the 
absence of the moral yardstick that we 
applied.” 

What grips today’s students about Vie tnam 
is the experience of people wbo went through 
(be war, the persona] choices of soldiers, not 
presidents. “I have high respect for the people 
who went.” a sophomore named Diane Watts 
comments when I raise the subject of Vie tnam 
at Southwest Texas State University, Lyndon 
B. Johnson’s alma, mats'. “It may not have 
been the right thing to do, but at least they 
gave their lives up for the government." 

It's not the students who speak of the 
“lessons" of Vietnam. That's left to those who 
pursue the old debates. Was it that we limited 
our use of power, used it arrogantly or used it 
at all? Was the military kept from “winn i n g ” 
the war, or did it lack a strategy? What did we 
mean by “winning,” anyhow? It is a mark of 
how unresolved American feelings about the 
war remain that you get answers that are 
diametrically opposed when you raise such 
issues with the two members of the Senate 
whose political careers are most conspicuously 
rooted in the war. 

Jeremiah A. Denton Jr., an Alabama 
Republican, and John F. Kerry, a 
Massachusetts Democrat, were both highly 
decorated navy officers. Senator Denton, a 
career man shot down over North Vietnam on 
his 12th mission in 1965, survived more than 
seven years — including more than four years 
of solitary confinement punctuated by torture 
— as a prisoner of war. Senator Kerry, a 
lieutenant 19 years Senator Demon’s junior, 
became a spokesman for Vietnam Veterans 
Against the War. 

The essential emir on the American side, the 
Alabaman bdieves l was to fail to use decisive 
force early enottth. “If : we were bombing ... 
Hanoi in July 1965, the month I was shot 
down, at one-tenth the level that we bombed it 
in December 1972,” be contended, “the war. 
would have been over.” The United States 
confronts a similar test of will in Central-. 
America, where, he said, “unilateral war : 
shouldn’t W in the cardsbut maybe • 
necessary.** 1 

Senator Kerry, by contrast, described his 


stand on Vietnam as “a central part of my 
political existence” The “dear fessons” of 
k Vietnam are apparent to the voters, he 

contended. Senator Kerry had a landslide of 
s his own last November in the midst of the 
Reagan avalanche. “They have come to 
understand that we should not have been 
there,” be said. “When we commit our forces,. 

: the goal should be achievable. Wben we do it, 

let’s do it democratically ” With Central 
i America in min d, the freshman senator is 
looking for ways to strengthen the War Powers 
Act of 1 973. which was intended to dude a 
i president's ability to commit American power 
without congressional approval. 
ie Periodic attempts by the Reagan 

administration to repeal the act have foundered 
because the very suggestion provokes fears of 
“another Vietnam. ’Tn what proved to be one 
e of the most misguided assessments of the entire 
n war, then- Defense Secretary Robert S. 

McNamara wrote early on: 'The greatest 
contribution Vietnam is making. — right or 
wrong is beside the point — is that it is 
developing an ability in the United States to 
ie fight a limited war, to go to war without the 
— necessity of arousing public ire.” Now public 
ire is seen as a potential threat to any war 
effort. Hence the conclusion of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff and Caspar W. Weinberger, the 
p defense secretary, that we should only fight 
wars the public has endorsed, which makes the 
Joint Chiefs heirs to one of the main anti-war 
5 themes. 

y But then such paradoxes are part of the. _ 
general inheritance. 

Dan Moore, a veteran now employed 
making Cadillacs at the Fleetwood plant in j 
Detroit, readily acknowledged that he tried to 
avoid service in the war. He weal finally, but 
manag ed to stay offshore in the Gulf of Siam 
on a navy oiler. He does not think the war was 
justified, but he now dwells on “strength.” 

“I don’t think we can spend enough time 
thinking about being strong," Dan Moore said. 

“I wish oar president had acted when they 
bombed our embassy in Lebanon. He wasn’t 
strong enough. And when they shot down, that 
007 plane, we did nothing. It sometimes makes 
my mind go on the blink to thmlr if we’re 
really, really ready.” j 

Plainly, the revulsion from the Vie tnam War ; 
and thedtasm it opened in American "society l 
have made room for the prevailing mood of ; r 
. nationalism, but it can also work the other way. 
Paul Melhercik, the personnel director for an 1 
electronics company, also tried to avoid the 
war. He has a sports car in thegarageof his . 
home in a St. Loins suburb with the license 
plate OLDVET, but he says it stands for “old 1 
Corvette,” not “old veteran.” Mr. Mefiterrik J 

voted twice for Richard Nixon, twice for 
Ronald Reagan, and believes in “a strong 
military, a strong defense.” Yethe is dead set 
against intervention in Third World conflicts. 
“What we learned in Vietnam,” he said, “is we 
can’t fight other people’s warn. 1 don’t know \ 

why, whether we don’t understand their 
cultures or what; but we can’t be the world’s 
policeman. Another culture doesn’t play by the 
same rules.” At which point Charlene 
Melhercik, his wife, interjected, “You mean our 
rules.” 

I N the American mind there are, after all 
two, three, many Vietnams. There is also 
the real country, winch was always remote, 
even to many who saved there. 

• In a long afternoon’s conversation over beer 
at the VFW post in the Appalachian coal- ’ ; 
raining town of Cumberland, Kentucky, the 
talk turned to hatred. “We didn’t like 
ourselves, we didn’t like any people there,” said 
Sam Gilbert. “Wejnst built up a general 
hatred.” 

“Slant eyes,” another vet said, sounding 
nostalgic, as tf he had remembered the name of 
a song. 

“Just about every Vietnam vet hated the 
Vietnamese,” remarked Eddie Sturgill a union 
official speaking in a sad, ruminating voice. 

One of the vets remembered how his unit used 
to fire rounds over the heads of peasants 
working in the paddy fields, “just to see them 
hit the water.” 

“To see how big a splash they made,” 
another said. 

“You know, if we went to Central America, 
we’d hate those people, too,” Eddie said. 

"What concerns me," he continued, “is when 
people say, “You couldn't do it. You lost the 
war.'” 

“We didn’t lose no war when I was there,” 
exploded Roy Tippett. “We done our 
objective." 

I went back to Washington at the end of my 
trip and spent three hours at the Vietnam 
Memorial on an unseasonably balmy Sunday 
afternoon. Specifications in the design of the 
monument required that it be apolitical, but 
the feelings it inspires may have political 
m e aning for the American present No doubt 
these are diverse, but I did not get a sense that 
many viators find an explanation, let alone a 
justification, for the deaths. On the contrary, 
the effect seems to come from the nam« 
themselves: the remarkable particularization 
and specificity of the 58,022 names etched in 
granite and chronicled in directories the size of A 
phone books (83 more names than were there ■ 
when it was dedicated). From what I could 
surmise, most visitors come away with a sense 
of waste as well as sacrifice. 

“Sometimes,” said Bill Schorndorf, a former 
mraioe who visits the memorial at least twice a 
week. Truck a name and try to imagine what 
he was like.” He wasn’t the only one who 
seemed to be doing that. “Look," a man from 
Virginia said to his son, “there’s even a 
Yamashiia." l checked the directory. Five 
Americans named Yamashita died in Vietnam. 

Of there is a next lime, probably there will be 
Troungs and Nguyens: 700,000 refugees from 
Indochina have reached America since the fall 
of Saigon.) 

Nations don’t build monuments to their 
derated allies or victorious enemies, so there is 
nothing at the memorial to remind you of the 
Vietnamese. Of the people with whom I spoke 
wmen I visited the monument, only Bfll 
Scbomoon even mentioned them, and then 
only after I had brought up the subject 

^ asking whether he thought it had 
to a nqWe cause,” as President Reagan 

we weat m there was 

right, heraid, but I don’t think the people 

wanted to be saved, at times." 

tft historical judgment would have 

If why. if 

thaiwere tin case, they didn’t want to be 

Sdeva 3140 h ? VE , to ■* whether there 

“532*7*““, «al relationship between the 

^tHical judgment, it 
WeSmtit? 6 of ““S' Americans: 

v“ cl ^. tofor »verarseIvesfor . 

tnc hnpd aSo to say tha r if 
it is Still, I 

tboognt, a recognit ion oftot oty and of finals; 



V 


jt: 



~;- ; r ' .. INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 Pa S* 7 




BULL'S tree symbolizes BULL'S total commitmentto communication and 
information systems. 


BULL- Freedom to choose in Europe 

In order to improve its efficiency, European business must have the 
greatest possible choice in computer systems. 

European users must also be certain that computer technology, the 
applications of which are essential to European competitivrty, will 
always be deeply rooted in European soil, with no dependence on 
other countries. 

This is why it is essential that European computer companies like BULL 
exist and grow. 

BULL -A reliable alternative for Europe 

BULL is the number 1 manufacturer of data processing and office auto- 
mation systems in Europe. 

With: 

• Over 26,000 employees 

• q strong presence in Europe and in the world-75 countries 

• marketing products tailored to national requirements 

• a revenue in 1984 of 13.6 billion French francs 

• a 16.8% increase in revenue from 1983 to 1984 

• an investment of more than 18% of revenue in research, develop- 
ment, and in industrial and commercial resources. 

BULL offers integral, open solutions tailored for specific sectors: 

• Open solutions-. BULL’S produds,ronging from large and medium 
scale systems to micro computers, can be used in conjunction with 
other equipment. 



• integral solutions: hardware, software, applications and services. 

• Market segment oriented solutions: tailored to the needs of specific 
professions and activities. . 


BULL software and application services are developed in keeping 
with a policy of cooperation with software houses. 

BULL has developed an unmatched know how in designing commu- 
nication systems In order to improve interaction at all levels, In any 
situation. 

BULL quality program aims, above all, at satisfiying the customers’ 
need for reliability. In 1985, a total of 15,400 people will be trained, 
specifically for the quality program. 

BULL- Die Commitment to Europe 

BULL'S commitment to Europe is total. It is involved In 17 projects in the 
Esprit program, set up by the European Commission toaid internatio- 
nal cooperation in information technology, and is taking a leading 
role in two of them. 

One of these, the Esprit Information Exchange System, or E1ES, in con- 
junction with GEC, ICL, Olivetti and Siemens, is a communication net- 
work for participants of Esprit. The second project is for the joint deve- 
lopment of software engineering with the same group of companies 
as EIE5, plus Nixdorf. 

BULL is cooperating with other European companies to develop a uni- 
fied set of standards. At the instigation of the European Commission, 
the twelve leading European information technology firms, AEG, 
BULL, CGE, GEC, ICL, Nixdorf, Olivetti, Philips, Plessey, Siemens, STET, 
and Thomson have formed the Standards Promotion and Applica- 
tions Group, SPAG and have agreed on o common set of standards 
IOSI1 for interconnecting their system. Another agreement involving 
six majorfirms (BULL, ICL, Nixdorf, Olivetti, Philips and Siemens! resul- 
ted in the formation of the Open Group for Unix System, for develo- 
ping a common application software environment. 

BULL'S deep seated commitment to Europe doesn't end there. At the 
beginning of 1984 the European Computer Research Centre, ECRC, 
created jointly by BULL, ICL and Siemens, opened its doors in Munich. 
Its activities are intended to enhance the future competitive ability of 
the European information technology industry. The centre’s field of 
activity covers the technologies needed to improve the process of 
machine assisted decision making. 

At International level BULL has also built up a long-standing agree- 
ment^ with Honeywell, a deal with Ridge forthe development, produc- 
tion and marketing of a range of scientific super minis, a technical 
agreement with Convergent Technologies for distributed EDP and 
office automation, and an arrangement with NEC which will lead 
to the introduction of a very large data processing system in order to 
complete its DPS 8/88 range running under BULL GCOS 8 operating 
system. 

BULL -The European team spirit 

Cooperation with rts customers is, for BULL, the major element in obtai- 
ning the most effective solution. You and BUU, together, wilt find the 
answer to your particular problem. 

BULL computers: the European alternative. 


Meet BULL at the Hannover Fain CeBIT Centrum HALL El, Stand 

4902/5002 












Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


Om High Law Last chs. 

Indus 1248.11 127441 1S6J4 1249JS5 4- 277 

Trans SWTS 40332 59171 5HL21— 1.1 a 

Util 15678 15771 15571 135TB — 034 

Coma 514.15 51947 51130 51537 + 0.11 


NYSE Index 


PrtvHwi Today 

HM LOW Closa 3 PM. 
Composite 104.98 10444 10437 10449 

Industrials 12IL23 11932 120.19 11934 

Trortso. 9UI 9739 9731 9437 

U Mimes 5549 5530 S54I 5544 

Flnanaa 10934 109.12 10934 10939 


Tuesdays 

MSE 

Closing 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advancad 
DwOUnad 
Unchanged 
Total I mum 
H aw Hfgta 
Now Laws 


114 799 

't *7 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

utilities 

B onto 

Tien tsu. 


Moon AW» *®° 

»KSI 

~ m * a 255.19 
~ 208.18 
Z S5SJ3 204.72 
254-19 21738 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

Utilities 

industrials 


-Included In the sales figures 


Buy Sales -SIM 

255442 445320 4 342 

221,738 424314 1,795 

232439 441389 2387 

239347 471496 2.171 

242.176 48&I47 5345 


WolBtJPM 

9*484100 

Prev.4 PJH.T0I 

M44MM 

Prev coaxlidated don 

95431,968 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect Me trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


Standard & Poor's Index 


pravkws Today 

High Law Close 3 P.M. 
industrials 20137 20099 20132 20132 

Tronic. 15347 152.17 15235 U1J6 

UndHes ' 8134 8L17 8141 8131 

Finance 202W aiEfeS 2031 ,2186 

Composite 181.15 18043 11032 18054 


AMEX Sales 


AMEX Stock Index 


4 PM. volume 

Frev.4 PJVL valumg 

Prcv. cons, vqtume 


previous 

LOW 

23048 


New York Stocks Close Higher 


Compiled bv Oar Stuff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The stock market extended 
its week-old advance with another small gain 
Tuesday. The Dow Jones average of 30 indus- 
trials rose 2.77 to 1.269.55, bringing its gain for 
the past six sessions to 14.57 points. 

Advances slightly outnumbered declines on 
the New York Stock Exchange. Big Board vol- 
ume rose to 98.48 million shares from 80.66 
million in the previous session. 

The NYSE's composite index gained .15 to 
105.01 

At the American Stock Exchange, the market 
value index was down .46 at 230.93. 

Stock prices have been nudging ahead for the 
past five sessions, aided by falling interest rates 
in the credit markets. 

Prices of long-term government bonds, which 
move in the opposite direction of interest rates, 
rose S3 or more for every S 1,000 Tuesday. But 
analysts said confusion persisted on Wall Street 
over whether the economy was growing steadily 
or losing momentum. 

The government reported Tuesday that hous- 
ing starts registered a stronger-than-expected 
162-percent increase in March. Building per- 
mits. regarded as a good indicator of future 
construction activity, rose 10.9 percent. 

However, another key measure of the econo- 
my. industrial production, was less upbeat. It 
rose 0.3 percent last month, according to the 
Federal Reserve Beard. 

“We are seeing some buying pressure build- 
ing up," said Harry Laubscher, of Paine Web- 
ber. 

Mr. Laubscher said the end of the tax season, 
basic economic news and the belief that interest 
rates will ease would all help the market He 


To Our Readers 

Because of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris until April 27, 
some items in the Market Summary above are 
from 3 P.M. New York time instead of the usual 
4 P.M. Also because of the time difference, 


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said the market's meandering of the past six or 
seven weeks was helping to “drive stocks from 
weak hands to strong hands." 

In late trading, Unocal was near the top of 
the active list off fractionally. The company has 
been sparring with T. Boone Pickens, rejecting a 
$3.9-billion takeover bid. 

Phillips Petroleum was second, up a bit Un- 
iroyal followed, higher amid a takeover struggle 
with investor Carl C I calm. It announced first- 
quarter net of 57 cents a share, compared with 
55-cents-a-sbare net from continuing opera- 
tions in the year-ago quarter. 

“We may have a further period of backing 
and filling," said Ricky Harrington, of Inter- 
state Securities in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

He said the market's dip should be tempo- 
rary. “I don't look for any extended sell-off," he 
said. 

“It's not very long until we see the upside," he 
said, adding that a close above the 1,270-level 
would be significant. 

CBS shares soared following published re- 
ports that Ted Turner may make a takeover 
play for the network tins week. CBS denied that 
it planned to sell a large block to General 
Electric. 

Sir James Goldsmith, who has been seeking 
to acquire Crown ZeUerbach for $1.4 billion, 
said he had received financing. The paper and 
forest products company was lower after filing 
in a U.S. district court in Nevada to stop his bid, 
alleging violations of federal securities laws. 

ITT Corp. alerted the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission to possible improper accu- 
mulation of stock by investor Irwin C Jacobs. 
The stock was fractionally lower. (AP, UPI) 


some other items elsewhere in the Business 
Section are from the previous day's trading. We 
regret the inconvenience, which is necessary to 
meet distribution requirements. 




•A 


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“I haven’t had to paint this buggy in ten yean. 
Grow Group’s Awlgrip is out of this world V 


# Awl grip® is the world's finest yacht coating system 
for pleasure and racing crafts. For our 1984 Annual 
Report, write: Grow Chemical Europe N-V., 
Oudestraat 8 B-2630 Aartselaar, BeJgium.Dept. G 

Grow Group, 

Awtarip, Devoe, Ameritone, three of our well-known ■ brand names. 


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iwkMTu.Tvv.i^im.miVf^wpM 


WEST GERMANY 


A SPECIAL REPORT— PART Q 


Part I Appeared 
In Yesterday's Editions 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


Page 9 


For West Berlin, 
Recovery Is More 
Mood Than Miracle 




... — V* 

■ ' 




J T ^ 

f ' 


Economy’s Engineers Resist Calls 
To Give 'Locomotive’ More Steam 


.oed 01 * 


By Henry Tanner 

WEST BERLIN — Whal has 
been happening in West Berlin in 
the Last wo years is not quite an 
“economic miracle.” even though 
this is what local boosters and some 
West German newspapers have 
called it. 

It is “a relatively favorable devel- 
opment,'’ in the words of the latest 
report of the respected nonpartisan 
German Institute for Economic 
Research, which has its headquar- 
ters in West Berlin and does in- 
depth analytical and planning 
studies for government and indus- 
try. 

"West Berlin's economic recovery 
began by the middle of 1983 at the 
same time as the business cycle 
started moving up in the rest of 
West Germany; it continued 
through 1984 and can be expected 
to be maintained in the current 
year, according 10 the institute. 

Economists say that investments 
in machinery and equipment were 
up some 7 percent in 1984, a larger 
increase than in West Germany as 
a whole. Industrial production ex- 
panded handsomely during the 
year but the number of manufac- 
turing workers declined slightly, 
according to the institute. 

Modem industries, including 
manufacturers of communications 
equipment, dairo- technical con- 
sumer goods and data-processing 
hardware, did well as a result of 
upgraded new technology, while 
machine-building stagnated and 
the machine-tool industry “is still 
in a crisis,** the institute's econo- 
mist.- say. 

Last year's economic growth, 
measured in terms of the city’s 
gross product, was 19 percent — 
just three-tenths of a percentage 
point above the the West German 
national average. It was 17 percent 
in 1983 compared with 2 percent 
for West Germany as a whole. In 
19S2, West Berlin had had a nega- 
tive growth of 3.3 percent and West 
Germany one of \2 percent 

Unemployment, as in the rest of 
West Germany, remained substan- 


tially on the same level in 1984 
inspite of the general economic up- 
swing. But for the first time in 
many years the number erf jobs in- 
creased. 

Citing the similarity between the 
trends tor West Berlin and Lhe rest 
of the Federal Republic, West Ger- 
man and foreign economists point 
out that the upturn in Berim is in 
reality a reflection of the upturn in 
the rest of West Germany and that 
the two economies — that of the 
nation and that of the city island 
deep in East German territory — 
cannot be separated. Only about 1 
percent of West Berlin’s exports go 
to East Germany. 

What has changed in West Berlin 
is the mood in the business commu- 
nity more than the basic economic 
facts. 

B usinessmen and merchants are 
happy that the city government re- 
mained in the hands of lhe ruling 
coalition of Christian Democrats 
and Free Democrats after the 
March 10 ejection, and above all 
that the Alternatives — West Ber- 
lin’s equivalent of the Greens — 
did not make the phenomenal gains 
that some lad predicted 

Some of the pre-election polls 
gave 18 percent or more of the vote 
to the Alternatives. This would 
have turned this leftist party into a 
decisive third force between the 
ruling coalition, which fell short of 
an absolute majority, and the se- 
verely weakened Social Democratic 
opposition. 

The prospect frightened the 
business community, which feared 
that the city would become ungo- 
vernable, mat the squatters and the 
Turks, who have begun to leave, 
would be back in force. None of 
this has happened. The Alterna- 
tives received 10.6 percent of the 
vote, which is more than the 
Greens have in most areas of West 
Germany but not enough 10 be the 
arhiter of city affairs. 

Eberhard Diepgen, 47, the previ- 
ously almost unknown young 
Christian Democrat, was con- 
firmed as governing mayor. He had • 

(Continued on Next Page) 


.*vy 

’r>or*a 

WM 


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t 


I 


... f* 

V '** ¥ I 

' -*>' * * 




4 

f, i 


SYGMA 


Kreuzberg, one of West Berlin's oldest neighborhoods, 
where abandoned apartments are occupied by squatters as 
new apartment buildings are being constructed nearby. 


At f Silisium-Tal, 9 
A Bavarian Accent 
On High Technology 


INSIDE 

[ Investing: The dollar vs. the Deutsche mark. Page !L 

I Banking: The veterans make way for new faces Page 11. 

I Youth Unemployment. A call for practical education Page 12. 
I Labor: Flexibility of hours clouds unions’ gains. Page 12. 

I Privatization: Some resistance is arising. Page 13. 

I Automotive Technology: Automatic car seems nearer. Page 13. 
I Success Story: Audi steps up in price and class. Page 13. 

I Chemicals: Exports boost profits for the Big 3. Page 14. 

I Insurance: The industry is rising to the challenge. Page 15. 

I Finance: Venture capital is aiding hi-tech firms. Page 15. 


By^Vivian Lewis 

MUNICH — “Silizium-Tal” 
(German for Silicon Valley) is cen- 
tered here in the capital city of 
Bavaria, host to companies making 
everything from computers to elec- 
tronic speech devices, from word 
processors to machines that play 
chess. 

Most of these high-technology 
firms are still in the start-up stage, 
high-risk ventures by a new genera- 
tion of entrepreneurial engineers. 
Many come from, big companies 
like Siemens or the large U.S. elec- 
tronics firms. And, Califoraia- 
style, almost none of the owners is 
a native of the place where he set up 
his business. 

Pan of Bavaria’s appeal is that 
like attracts like. “You could see 
the trend in 1968, when Semens 
moved bom West Berlin to Mu- 
nich,” said Manfred Hegener of 
Hegener & Glaser, maker of the 


Mephisto chess-playing machine. 
Mr. Hegener helped form the com- 
pany that same year after graduat- 
ing from university in Munich. 

Werner Wolf, board member of 
Electronics 2000, a components 
and systems distributing company, 
which be founded withois brother 
in 1971, sited the firm's headquar- 
ters near Munich. The reason: “Ba- 
varia accounts for 26 percent of the 
German components market, and 
Baden-WOntemberg for another 29 
percent. If you include Frankfurt, 
60 percent of the German electron- 
ics market is in the south." 

The Wolf brothers started out 
with a U.S. firm, and that is often 
the case with electronics entrepre- 
neurs. A local venture capitalist 
and financial consultant, Alfred 
Promoter (formerly with Siemens), 
admits that he looks for potential 
company-founders among the Ger- 

(Contin u ed on Page 14) 


By Warren Gerler 

BONN — The center-right coali- 
tion government has answered calls 
for a more robust economy by 
stressing that West Germany's con- 
tribution to the world and domestic 
economic recovery is price s Labil- 
ity- 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl empha- 
sizes that a reflation of the econo- 
my could lead to the kind of large- 
scale deficits that marked the 
outgoing years of the Social Demo- 
cratic administration and shook 
business confidence at home. 

Seven years ago. at the 1978 
Bonn economic summit, the gov- 
ernment of Helmut Schmidt faced 
similar pressures to reflate its econ- 
omy, Europe’s largest. In return for 
certain concessions from the Unit- 
ed States, Bonn agreed to prop up 
domestic demand and play “loco- 
motive” to world economic recov- 
ery. 

To the misfortune of Mr. 
Schmidt's Soda! Democratic gov- 
ernment, the second cal crisis set in 
the following year. Surging oil 
prices combined with Bonn's ex- 
pansionary economic policy to 
cause relatively high inflation, at 
around 6 percent, through the early 
1980s. 

Adding to the troubles, the mark 
began a steady depreciation against 
the dollar, and the current-account 
balance, the broadest gauge of ex- 
ternal performance, swung into 
deficit from 1979 through 198L 

Today, as the West German cap- 
ital prepares for the world econom- 
ic summit in May, there are even 
louder calls for a more vibrant 
economy. But the hosts of this 
year’s summit harbor a rather dif- 
ferent view. 

Since assuming paiiiameniaiy 
control in late 1982, the Kohl gov- 
ernment has reduced the public- 
sector deficit to 48 billion Deutsche 
marks (SI 5.5 billion) last year from 
70 billion DM in 1982. 

Among its priorities this year, 
the government hopes to reduce the 
deficit further to around 38 billion 
DM. In so doing, Bonn expects to 
shrink the government’s share of 
gross- national product xo 48 per- 
cent, from 50 percent in 1982, 
opening up room for more private 
initiative. 

To be sure, the architects of 
Bonn's tight fiscal policy will not 
be easily moved by the calls for 
reflation. Finance Minister Ger- 
hard Sioltenberg, Economics Min- 
ister Martin Bangemann and the 
president or the central bank, Kari 
Otto Pa bl, have been singing the 
praises of their mix of fiscal and 
monetary policy. Last year, the mix 
brought West Germany a modest 
2.6-percent economic growth, in- 
flation at a mere 2.4 percent, the 
lowest interest rates in Europe out- 
side Switzerland, a renewed will- 
ingness by German companies to 
make major investments and re- 
cord surpluses in its current-ac- 
count and trade balances. 

Far frora experiencing a second 
postwar “economic miracle,” as 
some observers saw it at the outset 


Unemployment Goes Up . . 

Percent 
+10 



’so -at 


’8S 


*83 


■ 8 * 


NOTE: 1985, atMonally anadputod. 
Sourer. Federal Labor Office. Not antvf 


. . - But Inflation Falls 



of this year, the West German 
economy may be operating at con- 
siderably below its potential To a 
certain extent. West German in- 
dustry has been encouraged by the 
Kohl government's policies. But 
from industry’s standpoint, the re- 
sults after two and a half years in 
office are mixed. 

Hans Joachim Langmatm, presi- 
dent of the German Industry Asso- 
ciation, criticized the government 
for failing to make headway in cor- 
porate tax reform, in dismantling 
subsidies and in bringing greater 
flexibility to the labor market — in 
effect, Mr. Langmatm said, it has 
left intact much of the same rigidity 
that stifled growth under the previ- 
ous 13 years of Social Democratic 
rule. 


While urging more supply-side 
stimulus, Mr. Langmann warned 
Bonn to eschew calls from the op- 
position for a relaxation of the gov- 
emm cut’s tight rein on federal 
spending. 

At a recent conference spon- 
sored by the Association of Ger- 
man Bankers, Mr. Stohenberg de- 
livered a strong defense of his 
government’s policy of economic 
austerity, stating that Bonn is not 
sympathetic to foreign prodding 
aimed at getting West Germany to 
accelerate growth. 

“There have been isolated calls 
from abroad for West Germany to 
neglect its policy of economic sta- 
bility in order to provide short- 
term boosts to demand,” Mr. Stol- 
tenberg said. “After the bitter 


hobdCw*Mo«w IHT 

experience of the late 1970s, we will 
not succumb to approaches of that 
kind. 

“The longevity of the current 
growth phase will depend decisive- 
ly on how well we succeed in main- 
taining the current degree of price 
stability. We cannot give inflation a 
second chance.” 

U.S. officials, notably Federal 
Reserve Chairman Paul A. Volcker 
and Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baldrige, have stepped up calls for 
West Germany to consider boost- 
ing economic growth beyond the 
2.5-to-3-percem expansion project- 
ed by Bonn for 1985. 

Stronger German growth is nec- 
essary. according to Washington, 
to pull the world economic recov- 
(Continued on Next Page) 



Die Hannover Fair grounds. 


Hannover’s 'Fair of Fairs ’ Means Business 


By Wellington Long 

BONN — If the playwright Arthur Miller had 
been a European, his salesman protagonist, Willie 
Loman, probably would have spent much of his 
life displaying his samples at West German trade 
fairs. 

European businessmen long have agreed that 
the best place to buy and sell is at a trade fair, 
where the decision is made on the spot on the basis 
of samples displayed and demonstrated. An Amer- 
ican who discovered this a few years ago has said 
that a week at a European trade fair < 
a top salesman on the road for at least 
months. The Hannover “fair of fairs", which 
opened Wednesday, and runs for a week, actually 
is a collection of product-specialty fairs held simul- 


1. This year, there 


taneously at one hue 
will be a record 7,000 exhibitors. 

Altogether, 102 fairs were hdd in West Germa- 
ny in 1984, drawing more than 7 million visitors. 
Although most are annual affairs, some are held 
only every second or third year. This year, 90 fairs 
were scheduled. Most fairs will not open their 
doors to ordinary citizens except, in some cases, on 
certain days. An exhibitor may assume that most 
of the visitors approaching his stand are buyers, 
authorized to dose deals then and there. 

Hannover, although now one of Europe's lead- 
ing industrial fairs, is not one of the traditional 
locations for such events. 

It hdd its first fair in 1947, at the suggestion of 
(Con tinned on Next Page) 



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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL 



A SPECIAL REPORT ON WEST GERMANY 


For West Berlin , the Recovery Is More a Mood Than a Miracle 

f ^ nmnliac mMnf 4 a Ib«>» a 


i (Continued From Previous Page) 


inherited the job last year from 
Richard Wetzsdcker when the lat- 
ter became president of the repub- 
lic. (Governing Mayor is the offi- 
cial title of West Berlin’s chief 
Executive, and Senate is the name 
of the city government) 

! Mr. Diepgen's policy is emphati- 
cally friendly to business. 




; FI mar Pieroth. his senator for 
economics and transport and his 


Senator for science and research, 
[Wilhelm A. Kewening, both of Mr. 
Diepgen's generation, were the 
chief promoters behind the cre- 


phief promoters behind the cre- 
ation of a technology park called 
the Berlin Center for Innovation 
and New Enterprises, which has 
attracted much attention in the 
West German press. 

• A huge, majestically ornate but 
empty 19th-century factory build- 
ing a few hundred yards from the 
Berlin Wall has been partly refur- 
bished to accommodate the center. 
A part of the sprawling complex 
has now been put at the disposal of 
aspiring entrepreneurs, including 
science professors from Berlin’s 
noted Technical University. They 
have been given space — usually a 
single room — furniture and some 
other facilities. 

The building once housed AEG 
(Allgemrine Elektrizitats Gesdl- 
schaft), an electrical-engineering 
concern, which, with more than 
150.000 workers, is one of West 
Germany’s biggest industrial enter- 
prises. the company, which at its 
peak had employed some 18,000 

S ons in Beriin. cut the number 
tically over the past several 
years in the course of a nationwide 
retrenchment. Its local work force 
has now leveled off at just over 
7,000. and the leveling-oEf is re- 
garded as a success for the city. 

Walking down the long neon- 
lighted halls, one reads on each 
door inscriptions like Tech-Writ- 
ers, Cybertron and Datanet, and 
the second line on the name plate is 
Apt to describe the company's en- 
deavors as systems engineering, en- 
vironment-protection instruments. 



supplies meant to last for a year ar 
a time. 

Industry and businesses of all 
kinds get extraordinary incentives. 

When a Berlin manufacturer 
sells goods processed or produced 
in the city to a West German cus- 
tomer. he receives a “turnover bo- 
nus” ranging from 3 to 10 percent 
depending on the value added to 
the product in Berlin. The customer 
also gets a preferential bonus of 42 
percent of ms purchase price. 

A newcomer to Beriin can write 
off 75 percent of the value of his . 
machinery, buildings and land as 
depredation during the first year of 
acquisition. Nothing, one specialist 
said, prevents him from shipping 
the machinery and other assets to 
his West German branch a tittle 
later. 

Investments in machinery and, 
to an even greater extent, in re- 
search and development, are partly 
tax-free. Special financing is avail- 




West Berlin, city of parks: Scharfenberg Island in Lake Tegd. 


able for a variety of purposes under 
the dty Promotion Law. 


software microelectronics and in- The aim also is to create small a West German economist said, 
dus trial automation. and medium high-quality firms "‘Silicon Valley it isn't,” a West- 

About 30 new companies have that will increase the dty’s already era diplomat who wishes Berlin 
found space — as well as the stimu- large pool of highly qualified pro- well sard of the dty’s high-tech ven- 
iation of like-minded eotrepre- fessionals and that are thought to cures. 

neurs and scientists on the pre- be better suited for survival in the “Berlin," the same diplomat 
mises. Many of the firms are isolated dty than the big tradition- said, “is viable — with some bdp 
one-man or two-man outfits. al industries. from its friends.” He meant a lot of 

Mr. Pieroth and Mr. Kewening Mr. Pieroth is the sdon of a help. 


The aim also is to create small 
and medium high-quality firms 


About 30 new companies have that will increase the dty’s already 
found space — as well as the stimu- large pool of highly qualified pro- 


the dty Promotion Law. 

- j . Personal income taxes are 30 

cetved 4.9 billion in return in taxes. percent lower than elsewhere in 

r\r iL. .■ j i t» is ^ r - . _ 


, tije total paid by Bonn, HJ West Germany. Corporate income 
billion DM counts as outright bud- taxes are 223 percent lower. “An 



iation of like-minded eotrepre- fessionals and that are thought to 
neurs and sdentists on the pre- be better suited for survival in the 


get subsidies — 53 percent of the enterprise located in Beriin will 
city's budget. Bonn also pays the generate more than double the 


one-man or two-man outfits. 

Mr. Pieroth and Mr. Kewening 


from its friends.” He meant a lot of forces in the dty. 


1 J billion DM it takes to keep profit after taxes, with identical 
American, British and French cost and revenue factors,” says a 


are espedally proud of the budding wine-merchant family that has in- 
interaction between professors and traduced door-to-door wine se lling. 


brochure issued by the Berlin Eco- 


entrepreneurs, between academia with some 3,000 salesmen, to West 


and business — a tradition that is 
not strong in West Germany. West 
Beriin has some 180 institutes for 
sdence and research in addition to 
the Technical University, which is 
one of the leading institutions of its 
kind in West Germany. 

The goal is to bring high technol- 
ogy back to West Berlin and to 


West Beriin represents a budget 
burden of 133 billion Deutsche 
marks (S4.28 milli on) to the West 


Other items include more than oomic Development Corporation. 


Calls for More Steam 


72 million DM for high-technology 
development — serving the qnw 


Employees, too, are better off. 
ley get tax-free bonuses of 8 per- 


Gennaay and that is reported to German government in 19S5, the and other initiatives — and about ”w«r - Bferii^r'nnenro!ovment ^ tZSPFP 01 * oy^years end or 

have launched a similar venture in diplomat said. Bonn is paying 18.4 60 Million DM for a stockpile of rate of about K) 6 Derceot tins Feb- }° to no Jf* important for 

ihe United States. He is given high billion DM to Berlin andit re- food, coal, mw mntemSote toSSkr Sm “mnnond ™fidon« to be n. 

credit for imagination, initiative „ i .IT. m stored m Deutsche mark, as 

. Germany buti snti higher than the West German growth rates catch 

national West G e rm an average. .. . . . , . 


purpose as the Innovation Center cent <rf their wages. 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
ery along should the U.S. economy 


projected by the government 
yet to come in at that level ’ , 

The combination of these deva* 


the United States. He is given high bOlion DM to Berlin and it re- 
credit for imagination, initiative 


ni m inetr waves , , , , . - i uc m/ujl'iimuvu vt uwtw- 

W « t Bbriij s unemployment SlSfJ' 


create a local Silicon Valley. Highly 
skilled university graduates will be 


skilled university graduates will be 
induced to settle in Beriin instead 
of moving to West Germany and 
getting absorbed into the big indus- 
trial concerns there. Specialists in 
industrial and commercial plan- 
ning, business administration, mar- 
keting and communications are 
also favored. 


and a flair for promotion. 

Independent economists see the 
Innovation Center as an important 
long-range seed project but say that 
it has not yet bad an appreciable 
impact on the city’s economy. 

Manv West German cities have 


into I9S6. It is no less important for ^ February, bas led see 

international confidence to be re- ^ German economic research in 

sti lutes and banks to project a 03- 


national West German avcrage. 

^Ut^atoostwiceas high asm jj dtod S tates,l^guraot that 
Baden-WOrttembeig, the high-tech President Ronkld R^aTrecenlly 
region in the south. asserted was the basis for the dof- 


technology parks of their own. Mu- 
nich and Stuttgart, with their con- 


• - » — iJMiuvm iwuaiu lxcarnu it 

region inthesauth. asserted was the basis for ti 

Special benefits, financial sup- lar's strength from the start 
port from Bonn, an Mang of social “ 

tensions in the dty and relative In one of the rare hints that Bonn 


nich and Stuttgart with their con- 
centrations of advanced industries, 
including the nation’s leading car 
manufacturers, are the country’s 
two foremost high-technology ar- 
eas. Because of isolation. West Ber- 
lin will never be able to rival them. 


quiet on the dividing line with East may be prepared to shcrw some fis- 
Gonnany seem tohave had their cal flexMty, Otto Schlect undo- 


effect 

Some leading West German in- 


secretary and chief economist in 
the Economics Ministry, said in an 


dustries are quietly b uilding up interview last month that Bonn was 


thdr investments in the city. ' weighing contingency plans to 
Nixdorf. the compuiennanufa c- stimulate the economy next year in 
rarer, which has been investing in eveat thal Lf.S. economy 


percent decline in GNP in the first 
quarter from the previous three; 
months. With industrial produc- 
tion down 0.6 percent in February, 
after a l .8- percent decline in Janu- 
ary, a Bundesbank spokesman re- 
cently acknowledged that the first 
quarter could show zero growth, 
marking a considerable slowdown 
from the 13-percent growth in the 
fourth quarter of 1984 and the 23 
percent rise in the third quarter. 

Consequently, these economists 



Hannover’s 'Fair of Fairs 9 Means Business 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
an officer of the British Army of Occupation, 
mainly as a counter to the Leipzig Fair in East 
Germany. Hannover’s geography played a role, 
being situated on the same north German plain as 
is Leipzig. Also, half a dozen halls that once 
housed an aircraft factory were available for exhib- 
its. Its exhibition area now exceeds 500,000 square 
meters (596,000 square yards), and it has its own 
railroad station. 

Visitors from the United States who are used to 


fairs that are a hybrid of convention and vacation 
are warned: German fairs are not vacations and 


anyone showing his goods must be prepared to 
close a deal, not weeks later after an initial contact 
at the company stand, but immediately. 


In a booklet prepared by the U.S. government, 
ospective American exhibitors are cautioned 


prospective American exhibitors are cautioned 
never to address a visitor to the fair stand by his or 
her first name, and to dress conservatively — and, 
as Willie Loman would have added, keep those 
shoes shined. 



Beriin for several years, has started tarns down sharply. Consideration 
construction of a new factory that “ 9** “°ving forward a 


have begun posing some hard ques- 
tions about the nature of the West 


rOldS 


ol< 


a% 


will be its biggest plant outside the 20-bfflion-DM tax cut and to a siz- 
headquarters town of Paderbora in able increase in public-works in- 


West Germany. 

Siemens, which once had some 


vestment 

There is growing concern among 


45.000 workers in Berlin, is now the economic observers that the West 
biggest local employer, with 20,000 German economic recovery is not 


employees, and is moving into as self-supporting as the goverment 
modem glass-fiber technology. says it is. Private demand, expected 
AEG is coming back cautiously to rise a mere 13 percent re mains 


fgi Mp . 

»■ i 


with facilities to build modern dec- in the doldrums despite the tax cut 
ironic equipment in the place of the on the horizon; the construction 


Tegd Airport in West Berlin. 


old dectro- motors that it used to industry is sliding into its deepest 
build here and that are now manu- postwar trough with no renewal of 
factured more cheaply in Spain and government aid in sight, and the 6- 
South Korea. percent rise in business investment 


tions about the nature of the West 
German economic recovery, which 
now is in its third year How will; _ 
the econonty fare if it is suddenly 1 
denied the export boom it enjoyed ~1 
for ibe last two years, and, should “ 
the economy find the strength to .V. 
maintain a moderate 2.5-percent r 
growth, will that suffice to reduce 7 
unemployment? The jobless level . 
was at a near-record 2.47 million in 
March, or 10 percent of the labor ^ 
force, against 103 percent in Feb- 3 
ruary. 

Mr. Bangemann says that r ' 
growth of 23 percent or more this ~ 
year would ease unemployment by ; : 
■100,000 at year s end. ~ 


r-T! 

: * 


Why the experts chose the new Opel Kadett Car of the Year 1985. 


T*. 




These are just a few of the many 
reasons why 51 journalists voted 
overwhelmingly for Kadett: 

*- - . the new kadett has an aerody- 
namically efficient shape that contri- 
butes to good economy. Good value 
for money," 

Iva Maasing, Motor , ; Sweden. 


visual identity and plenty of room for 
passengers and luggage. Good 
balance, excellent roadholding easy 
to service and a wide model range are 
qualities that count" 

Hans Oravdal, Motor, Nomvay. 


smaller class, but also is a genuine 
example of craftsmanship . * 

William Leniger, Autokampioen, Holland. 


CAR OF the year “...the all new body has a strong 


“Forme the new Kadett is car number 
one this year because it does not only 
set the aerodynamic standards in the 


1 Remarkable composure on the 
road, excellent comfort in motion, 
exceptional - aerodynamics . for r a 
4-metre vehicle, good consumption, 
are the main quarries." 

. Jean Bemadet, Freelance, .France! 


But for us the most important 
expert is you. today's driver. Because 
rt s around you that we engineered : , 

the new Kadett & 

e ** ^ Year at any one j* • 

of the Opel dealers across Europe. " ’ 


PROVEN PROGRESS 






Page 11 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON WEST GERMANY 


Vl v 

• • % 'ttTr&SBS&i 


•rejected b> the M ._ 
et to come in 

The combination t f iu 

•pmems. plus ****** 

MMiyandFebniarv 
Ml German cconoi5c^ r 
unites and banks iSj?** 

wrcem decline m GNpJj! 1 

luaner from the 
nonihs. With indSni 
ion down 0.6 PCTl . tn ™ ni 
i/ler a I .S-perceni tier 
oy. a Bundesbank ,p& 
*nUy aaomledgedYh^ 
quarter could ™ V- 
parking a considerable 
romthe 1.5-per«m 
ounh quarter of 
percent rise in theil*^ 

Consequently, the* ~ • 
aavr begun J 

aons about the nature of £\ 
merman economic r« 0 \m 
low is in it* third vcar H* 
the economy fare if n L , , V 
denied the export boomiia.. 
for the last two tears. and^' 
the economy find the < 1 ^' 
maintain a m-;iderutc '’W. 
growth, will that suffice im 
unemployment? The tobies', fe 
was at a near-record 2 47 nnfc 
March, or 10 percent of ikb 

force, against 10.5 percent qF* 
niarv. 

Mr. Banaenunn saw it 
growth of :.? percent atm t; 
year would ease anempl-WTnar. 
100,000 at year > end 




Cop^onHoMk 


SYGMA 


Frankfurt: financial Crossroad 

Commerzbank, left, in the banking 
district of Frankfurt At right, 
headquarters for Deutsche Bank. 
Frankfurt, together with DOsseldorf 
and Hamburg, constitutes the core of 
the West German financial centers. 


The Old Soldiers of Banking 
Making Way for New Faces 


FRANKFURT — “We are in a 
time of change of generations, not 
just in banking, but in industry, 
too,” says Haims Christian Schroc- 
der-Hohenwarth, head of the Ger- 
man Private Banking Association. 

“The generation of old soldiers is 
stepping down for younger men, 
people who traveled abroad as 
youngsters as we could not do, who 
are more internationally educat- 
ed," he says. 

Mr. Schroeder-Hohenwarth 
himself last year siqjped down as 
speaker of the managing board of 
Berliner Handds- und Frankfurter 
Bank, one of the German Big Six, 
to head its supervisory board and 
the hankin g association. But other 
new faces are now being seen at the 
managing boards of outer banking 
offices in other skyscrapers around 
this dry. 

Earlier this year, a new speaker 
was named at Dresdner Bank, and 
next month a new co-speaker win 
be formally installed at Deutsche 

in GermsTlaoking, with a two- 
board system, the speaker of the 
managing board is tpe chief execu- 
tive. 

Because he is not formally on the 
job, Deutsche Bank’s next co- 
speaker, Alfred Herrhausen, 55, 
wfl] not talk to the press. He is 
replacing Wilf ried Girth, 65, who is 
moving to the supervisory board, a 
; move typical of a German ba nkin g 
career — and typical, too, of the 
smoothness of transitions at Deut- 
sche Bank. 

“The style and strength of Deut- 
sche Bank include its great continu- 
ity," said Heinz Sippd, speaker at 
Hessische Landcshank. “In two 
years, the co-speaker at Deutsche, 
Wilhelm Christians, win also be re- 
tiring. Since there is as yet no offi- 
cial crown orince, it is possible that 


Mr. Sippd feels that it is Deut- 
sche Bank's policy to “build up 
future heirs." He says, “They are 
made to prove themselves, and for 
every position there are several 
candidates." And, he adds, “at 
Dresdner things are otherwise." 

Dresdner’s new speaker, Wolf- 
gang Rj&lkr, said: “Today's bank- 
ing is no longer the bankmg of the 
1950s or 1960s. I fed that those 
who were in the top position in the 
banking industry m the past were 
challeng ed like we are, but within a 
different market environment and, 
therefore, with a different business 
philosophy." 

Dresdner's transition problem is 
not the first that has troubled West 
Germany's second largest bank 
Virtually since its speaker, JOrgen 
Ponto, was assassinated by the Red 
Army Faction in 1978, and an out- 
sider, Hans Friderichs, a politician, 
was brought in to assure the succes- 
sion, Dresdner has been forced to 
beef up its second-levd manage- 
ment because erf gaps at the top. 

Now, Mr. Friderichs has re- 
signed to fight charges that he ac- 
cepted bribes for hu Free Demo- 
cratic Party in the Flick case, in 
which the company was accused of 
tax evasion. The new speaker of the 
man a g in g board, Mr. Roller, 55, is 
a career banker with Dresdner. , 

His appointment has, nonethe- 
less, caused a few eyebrows to be 
raised in German bankmg circles. 
Mr. Roller, unlike his Big Six col- 
leagues, is a man from the dealing 
side, not a commercial banker. 
Rather than worrying about loan 
portfolios or the administration of 
the important industrial and finan- 

a muaef^^mkets side, having 
had jraponsibtiiiy since 1973 for 
bond trading, portfolio manage- 
ment and, later, for currency, bond 
and gold dealing. 

A Goman banker indicated it 



DfA 


Worker at an aviation factory in Ottobrtmn. 


Os, 


was not surprising that it was at 
Dresdner Bulk that the first man 
from the trading side reached the 
top. 

“Dresdner is more exposed to 
trading gains than other large 
banks," be said. “This is part of its 
history. It is also more involved in 
the stock market." 

But another banker thought the 
Dresdner appointment was pari of 
a trend. “Traders are moving into 
ever more powerful positions," he 
said. “Capital markets, bond is- 
sues, foreign-exchange experts are 
profit sources for German banks, 
more than pure credit business." 
But this man, himself a trader, 
warns that there is an obverse side 
to the coin.. . . 

“Traders also become the scape- 
goats for banks' misfortunes," he 
noted. “Board members can get 
their heads cut off. So they learn to 
make decisions and justify them. A 
misjudgmem on the trading side 
can cost ten times as much to the 
bank as the worst loan write-off, if 
you are wrong on refinancing or the 
rate of the dollar” 

Mr. Herrhausen, the new ap- 
pointee at Deutsche Bank, has oth- 
er qualities than sheer trader’s 
nerves. A nun with good political 
connections — he was rumored to 
be under consideration for the Eco- 
nomics Ministry — Mr. Herr hau- 
sen has been called "un terrible sim- 
plificateur " by one of his rivals. Mr. 
Herrhausen has a gift for summing 
up an argument, expressing a point 
of view, which he demonstrated in 
earlier meetings when he discussed 
the future of the German economy 
from his old base in DOsseldorf. 
But there was nothing simplistic 
about his views. 

He has a business background, 
having first came aboard Deutsche 
Bank from financial management 
at Verdnigicn Efcktriritfitswerke 
Westfalen. In the abortive attempt 
to restructure the German steel in- 
dustry, he served as one of the 
“three wise men" seeking to resolve 
the problems of tbe Krupp group. 
Earner, be bad advised on oank- 
reform legislation. 

“He has a reputation of not only 
bang a banker, but also being a 
tough and experienced industrial- 
ist," said Hans-Dieter von Mei- 
bom, manag in g director of a small 
private bank, Metzler. 

With his industrial background, 
Mr. Herrhausen also brought a bit 
trf politician’s savw to his ranking 
career. As he told die German busi- 
ness magazine Wirtschafts Wochc 
before his appointment: “I didn't 


follow tbe philosophy of trying to 
earn the last fraction. Thai is no 
way to build up a friendship. You 
don't win with might-” 

Mr. Herrhausen s political skills 
and Mr. Roller’s adeptness at ad- 
justing to markets will be tested 
this year as German banks seek 
again to reach record earnings. In 
recent years, being the leader had 
given Deutsche Bank a growing 
edge. But the skills of Deutsche’s 
top management are those of on 
orderly and conservative general 
staff, not those erf fleet-footed en- 
trepreneurs. “They are not innova- 
tors, but systematizers,” a former 
German banker said. 

Yet, given the challenges facing 
German banks, Deutsche, with its 
unmatchable portfolio of industrial 
and financial interests, looks likeli- 
est to win out, for example in the 
new competition over Euromark 
underwriting or the bid to offer 
financial services like insurance or 
the boom in new issues. 

Over at Hessische, meanwhile, 
Mr. Sippd, 62, is preparing his res- 
ignation. He is to be succeeded by 
Herbert Kazmierzak, 53, a Luxem- 
bourg-born industrial and real-es- 
tate banking specialist, 

-VIVIAN LEWIS 


The DM: Ways to Make the Most 
From Gains in Exchange Rate 


At the first sign of a break in the high dollar, investors 

from all over tbe world would rush their money to West Germany, adding 

more downward pressure on interest rates. 


Deutsche Mark vs. Dollar 



J M 
1984 

Source: Bundesbank. Fmnicfun 


FRANKFURT — If the dollar weakens further against 
the Deutsche mark, those who already transferred money 
into West Germany stand to make a currency-exchange gain. 
For those seeking conventional investments, there are ample 
opportunities in West German bonds or stocks. Moreover, 
apart from the usual return on interest or dividends, there is 
a chance to benefit from the rise in the value of the mark. 

After a moderate rise at the beginning of last year, the 
mark, partly reacting to the long mdalworkers' strike, start- 
ed on a slide that continued throughout the year and during 
the first seven weeks of 1985, ranging from a monthly 
average of 2.806 to the dollar in January 1984 to 32292 in 
February 1985. In the course of the past 20 months, the mark 
traded at a high of 2.5391 to the dollar on March 7, 1984, to a 
low of 3.469 on February 26, 1985. 

“Part of the world population expects a revaluation of the 
DM; that is why we can afford to nave a lower interest rate 
than the United States,” said Harms Christian Schroeder- 
Hohenwarth, chairman of the supervisory board of Berliner 
Handels- und Frankfurter Bank and head of the German 
Private Bankers’ Association. “I think in time we will have a 
development to improve the situation of the DM against the 
dollar. . .the question is when. But if you buy now with very 
favorable exchange rates, you can get German bonds with 
quite a apod interest yield.” 

Mr. Schroeder-Hohenwarth feds that DM-denominated 
issues, rather than those in higher yielding cunenries like the 
Danish krone, are what international investors should buy 
because of the devaluation risk in kroner or other currencies. 
“Stick to tbe DM.” he advises. 



the 

same thing. In addition, they say, if tbe dollar starts to 
weaken, the German authorities may push down interest 
raxes to stimulate tbe economy, thus enabling holders of 
bonds to make a capital gain. 

* Moreover, at the first sign of a break in the high dollar, 
investors from all over the world would rush their money to 
West Germany, adding more downward pressure on interest 
rates. 

Nigel Farmer, of the British brokers and bond specialists 
Phillips & Drew, agrees with this scenario. “Money will go to 
Germany, especially from the United States, and a lot of it 
will go into DM bonds," he said. “So far, only about 10 or 15 
percent of overall U.S. portfolio investment has gone inter- 
national, so the potential flow is considerable." 

Mr. Farmer said, however, that foreign investors should 
be wary of a market they do not know well and should stick 
to Bundesrepublik paper — “overall the safest" — since 
there no longer is any tax advantage for owning Euro-DM 
issues from less worthy borrowers, the withholding tax 
having been eliminated. 

Another British analyst, Timothy Plaut, of Savory Milln & 
Co„ favors stock-market play's in West Germany. He thinks 
that foreign investors should'buy stock in the so-called “holy 
trinity” of best-known West German stocks —Daimler, 
Siemens and Deutsche Bank — and he particularly favors 
Deutsche Bank, which be sees as “the purest play for the 
domestic recovery." 

If interest rates fall, Deutsche Bank, merely as a bond 
owner, will earn more and its yield income can jump 50 


IwW Cv.frJAjow’HT 

percent Mr. Plaut points out that buying Deutsche Bank 
shares is a way of buying into the West German economy 
since its industrial holdings indude 7 percent of .Allianz 
Versicherung, the insurance group; 20 percent of Horten, 
retailers; 25 percent of Knrstadt also a retail chain; 28 
percent of Daimler, the automobile manufacturer, and 33 
percent of Philipp Holzmann, the construction company. 

The Daimler holding alone is worth half the total market 
capitalization of the bank. While Siemens is up 170 percent 
since the August I9S2 bull market began and Daimler is up 
135 percent, Deutsche Bank is only up 70 percent. 

Analysts at Portfolio Management in Munich have re- 
duced their rating on all West German banks to a holding 
neutral 3, on a scale of 5. as a revaluation play, although they 
rank it as a safe-to-buy 2 as an in vestment. And Robeco, the 
largest mutual fund group on the Continent, has halved its 
holding of Deutsche Bank and put the money into other 
shares like Alldephi, the Philips subsidiary in West Germa- 
ny. and Preussag, and into 4-percent Deutsche Bank con- 
vertibles. Convertibles in normal markets give increased 
leverage, but Germans are reluctant to pay premiums on 
them. 

Another stock favored by Mr. Plaut is Beiersdorf, maker 
of Nivea creams and cosmetics, and Tesa adhesive tapes. It 
may scare off some investors because it is typical of smaller 
West German firms in not publishing a consolidated report 
As with bonds, German banks will handle trade for inves- 
tors. 

— VIVIAN LEWIS 




A fair without 
congress 
like a congress 

without a fair. 


Portex ’85 Hamburg 

2nd International Pori Exhibition 
featuring Harbour Construction, Harbour Technology, 
Harbour Organization, information 




in conjunction with: 

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International Association 
of Porte and Harbors 


MAY 7 - 10, 1985 

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(TO 







Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON WEST GERMANY 


As Jobs for Youth Decline, Reformers 
Want to Make Schools More Practical 


By Herb AltschuU 

BERLIN — Jobs for university graduates, 
especially in the humanities and social sciences, 
are growing more and more difficult to find in 
West Germany. The country seems to be full of 
Ph.D. graduates driving taxis and working as 
salesmen. 

The political Right blames the Left, and the 
Left blames the Right. 

Meanwhile, it is clear to everyone that West 
Germany, once the world leader in Nobel scien- 
tific prizes, has fallen close to the bottom among 
industrialized nations in this category. It is Ja- 
pan and the United States that dominate the 
field in electronics, computers, even cars. 

Morover. unemployment in West Germany 
reached double digits this year for the Erst time. 

Can new directions in education, it is asked, 
remedy the situation and ensure West Germany 
an enduring position of leadership among the 
industrial nations? 

To some, like Karl Deutsch, the political 
scientist who directs a think tank in Bolin, the 
answer is no. He says the system of higher 
education is muscle-bound by a rigid class sys- 
tem and dedication to a traditional past. 

To others, like Peter Glotz, business manager 
of the Social Democrats and an education spe- 
cialist, the problem does not lie with technical 
and engineering schools, which he says are turn- 
ing out top people in their Gelds, but with the 
academic studies in the “soft sciences” and 
humanities. 

In any case, while the prerogatives of the all- 
powerfuJ professors were weakened during the 
years of upheaval at Ger man universities in the 
1960s. changes in the hierarchical system were 
often merely cosmetic. Still today, assistant pro- 
fessors are without power and students remain 
mere vessels in which to pour accumulated wis- 
dom. 


Educational pioneering was never strong in' 
Germany, Mr. Deutsch says. To him, “the Ger- 
mans have always studied the wrong kind of 
history, always about rulers and dates. They 
have never studied discoveries." 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl blames previous So- 
cial Democratic governments for placing too 
much emphasis on sociology and setting back 
the progress of German research and industry. 
Those Socialist governments, Mr. Kohl told a 
meeting of his Christian Democratic faithful in 
February, “endangered our schools and univer- 
sities with their educational experiments." 

Socialists like Mr. Glotz do noL see it that 
way. Neither do independent analysts such as 
Mr. Deutsch or Shepard Stone, director of the 
Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies in Ber- 
lin. Mr. Stone says many modernizing improve- 
ments have been made over the past two de- 
cades, but problems persist. 

For example, there is the crowding of univer- 
sities. “There are." he says, "too many students 
— and not enough jobs for them, especially in 
the humanities." Moreover, be adds, loo many 
of the students are continuing to train in the 
humanities. “The prevailing level has always 
been the theoretical.” 

Students need to be alerted to the real world, 
Mr. Glotz says, and that means high school 
teachers must steer their students into the 20th 
century. “We need," he says, “more engineers 
and fewer students of classical literature.’' 

Mr. Glotz left little doubt that he thought the 
academic profession was filled with too many 
poorly trained and unqualified persons who had 
gained their positions during the 1960s and now 
hold lifetime civil service jobs. 

One area of special concern to Mr. Glotz are 
medical schools, which have fallen behind in 
research, partly as a result of their unwillingness 
to seek research funding from private industry. 


But. Mr. Glotz says, “our engineering schools 
are as good as any on earth." 

Students at universities from one end of the 
country to the other continue to grumble that 
what they get in the classroom is of little use in 
preparing them for the tight job market. It is 
true that the woods are full of graduates hunting 
for jobs. A recent study predicts that by the year 
2000, there w01 be one-third as many jobs avail- 
able for college graduates as there are today. 

The joint Federal-State Commission for Plan- 
ning in Education and Research predicts that if 
present trends continue, 2.7 million students 
will finish university and enter competition for 
900.000 jobs during the next IS years. 

The most worrisome area is the one that 
historically has attracted the greatest number of 
university students: teaching. The planning 
commission reports that a third of all unem- 
ployed college graduates did their training as 
teachers, and the problem is likely to worsen. 
The falling German birth rate means a decline 
in the school population between now and 1992 
of 21 J percent, and even fewer jobs for teach- 
ers. 

Educational policies in the 11 West G erman 
Landerfstatesj differ substantially. Those under 
the control of the Christian Democrats move in 
one direction, those under the Social Democrats 
in another. Joint panels such as the planning 
commission try to smooth over what may be an 
irreconcilable division. 

Mr. Deutsch speaks of a “two-culture syn- 
drome," in which learning has been divided into 
the aesthetic and speculative on the one hand 
and the natural sciences and mathematics on the 
other. 

In the traditional German university, Mr. 
Deutsch says, the natural sciences have never 
seemed to be very important. “It was all right to 



Jottfi Cbpewoft Hoiscft 

Youths in an unemployment office in Hamburg, left Right, in Frankfurt youths spend time in a games parlor. 


recognize a scientific genius, but that didn't 
mean an educated person really needed to know 
anything about science.” 

Mr. Stone agrees with this assessment “Tra- 
ditionally,'' be says, “professors haven't liked to 
‘dirty their hands' by turning to banks and 
private industry for research support." 

That pattern, he adds, seems to be changing, 
especially in engineering schools and among 
scientists, who. like their colleagues in the Unit- 
ed Slates and Japan, have been turning more 
and more to private sources for funding. 

The fact that a problem exists in education is 
dear enough to the Germans, and they are 
trying to do something about it. In fact, the 
Linder governments have been considering a 
variety of solutions. The Christian Democratic 
states see the answer in developing a new intel- 
lectual elite, the Socialist states in brin ging 
about greater democracy in education. 

“Both go too far,” Mr. Deutsch says. “What is 


really needed is what Jefferson wanted, an aris- 
tocracy of talent. The only kind of tradition in 
Germany is for an aristocracy of birth; that kind 
of elite. On the other hand, the Social Demo- 
crats want to go too far in leveling. It is difficult 
for anyone to rise to the top when everything is 
■level” 

Mr. Stone says, on the other hand, that nota- 
ble progress has been made. 

One of the solutions often proposed as a 
counter to the overcrowded, impersonal univer- 
sities are private colleges devoted to excellence 
in education, similar to the Ivy League schools 
in the United States: The idea is to create the 
kind of elite that Mr. Deutsch says is missing 
from the German scene. 

Among the more ambitious such schools is 
the University of Witten, established in the 
industrial Ruhr two years ago and designed 
frankly to develop captains of industry as weU 
as philosophers and artists. It is funded by 


officials of some of West Germany’s top bank; 
and industrial concems- 

Appointed as dean of the university, which s> 
far has been operating out of the second floor o 
a former grammar school was Ekkehan - 
Kappler, a professor of industrial managemen - 
at the University of Wuppertal and author o ^ 
some leading books in the field. J 

Professor Kappler is a man with a profoum " 
belief in the practical From the beginning ' 
students must become acquainted with the rea l 
world, he says. Part of the curriculum involve 
working in wbat he calls “the jungle of a ffee ; . 
market economy” and helping to solve rea - 
problems. 

Gasses are small and interdisciplinary. Stu- . 
dents interested in economics must learn phik» ‘. 
ophy and mathematics and music. Students whr 
want to become doctors must team computet , 
science and history. It is a matter of drive 
curiosity and enthusiasm. 



Flexibility in Hours, Saturday Shifts Becloud Labor Gains 


John Gop« u -«on Hanab 

Workers leaving the Volkswagen factory at Wolfsburg. 


BONN — On April I, about 42 mini on West 
German workers began to enjoy the rewards of a bitter 
seven-wed: strike staged last summer, reducing the 40- 
hour workweek to an average 38.5 hours with no cut in 
pay. 

The metal workers’ union, IG MetaU. heralded the 
development as opening the door to the 35-hour week, 
and some of its more optimistic officials even predict- 
ed a 30-hour week by the late 1990s. 

But the celebration was overshadowed by manage- 
ment and government suggestions that Saturday fac- 
tory shifts should be reintroduced so as to make 

maximum me of plant 

The 1984 strike ended with a compromise agree- 
ment that permits flexible scheduling of work and 
says, that in any given plant the average of all hours 
worked in a year must be 38-5 per employee. 

Union and management leaders in other countries 
— and potential foreign investors in West Germany — 
are watching closely to see how the new flexibility is 
applied. 

Dieter Kirchner, general director of the Federation 
of Metal Working Trades, says that there are three 
possibilities: 

• Fieri 1, whereby each worker in a plant is treated 


individually according to his task, some working only 
37 hours a week, others continuing to work 40 hours. 
The majority, however, will be working 38J hours so 
that the average for all at the end of the year is 38.5 
hours. 

• Fieri Z whereby shifts are scheduled according to 
the work available, so that everyone averages 38.5 
hoursper week over two months. 

• Fieri 3, whereby everyone continues to work 40 
hours per week, but receives an additional nine paid 
days off per year. 

Within the framework of Fieri 1 and Fieri 2, some 
companies have derided to simply cut each shift by IS 
minutes, others will let everyone leave 90 minutes 
earlier each Friday, some will let everyone leave three 
hours earlier every second Friday. 

In the main, the least skilled workers and those 57 
years of age or older will work 37 hours, while the most 
skilled and the foremen will continue to work 40 
hours. 

In all cases, machine running time remains 
unchanged. 

That is where the possibility of reintroducing Satur- 
day shifts comes in. Norbert Blum, the former Opel 
factory worker who is now minister for labor and 


social affairs, said that “in the long run it is going to be 
too expensive to permit modern robots and machines 
to sit idle through each entire weekend.” 

Predictably, union leaders initially reacted angrily 
to the suggestion. They remember the fight for the 
five-day week during the late 1960s, when union 
members walked picket lines with posters bearing 
pictures of small children crying “on Saturdays, daddy 
belongs to us.” 

But on consideration, some admitted — although 
not yet loudly — that reintroduction of Saturday shifts 
might be attractive if offered to workers as an option. 
A mao who is the only employed person in his famil y 
might prefer to work Saturdays so that he can take the 
family shopping on weekdays when the crowds are 
smaller or use his days off to deal with government 
offices that are dosed on Saturdays. Of course, Satur- 
day shifts would be less attractive to families in which 
both husband and wife work. — . 

When the metal workers’ union and the printing 
trades workers went on strike last summer, they ar- 
gued that by forcing a reduction of the work week, 
they were helping fight unemployment because man- 
agement would be forced to hue more workers to 
maintain production. 


So far, that has not happened. Mr. Kirchner ami- 
other management spokesmen insist that any compa-'-. 
ny that has beat bring recently has done so only 
because of increased orders. However, union leaders. 
remain convinced that by the end of this year, the 38Jx 
hour week will have triggered a delayed wave of new 
jobs. 

But for the moment, unemployment r emains high - 
It averaged 227 million, or 9.4 percent of the work j: 
force, in 1984, rising seasonally to peak at more than 
2 J million, or about 10 5 percent, last winter. At the 
end of March, the figures were 2.474 mfition, or 10^ 
percent Z- 

These are high figures for a country that during the' 
boom years of the 1960s and 1970s enjoyed an unem--~ 
ployment rate of 2 percent. 

But even more worrying is that so marry of those outi 
of work have been jobless for so long. O £ the 2.14~ 
million unemployed at the end of September last year, ~ 
397,000 had been without work for from one to twol 
years, and 303,000 were out of work for more than two ~ 
years. 

— WELLINGTON LONG 


Success in space 
for life on earth 



in 

Backed 

oeaD 


SSt-SS- 

«*•«*£* 30(1 space 




gineering - Made in West Germany 


DATE5 1985 

INTERBRAU 

Mforld Fair for Beverage 

Technology 

3-10 May 


COSMETICS" 

6fh International Trade Fair for 
Cosmetics, Health and Beauty 
Care with Accessories 
31 May -2 June 

LASER OPFO-ELEKTRONIK 
7th International Congress and 
International Trade Fair 
1-5 July 


MUNICH 

EXHIBITION 

CENTRE 


35 th MMT 

Munchner Mode-Tage* 
25-27 August 


1SPO -Autumn" 

23rd International Sports 
Equipment Fair 
12=32 September 

IGAFA" 

13th International Trade Fair of 
Hotel and Catering Trades 
21-25 September 

INTERMONTEC 
Alpine Installations and Equip- 
ment for the Sports, Leisure 
and Tourist Trades 
8fh International Trade Exhibi- 
tion with Conferences 
25-28 September 

52nd MWM MODE- 
woche-monchb^- 

Intemational Fashion Fair 
6-9 October 


CERAM ITEC 

3rd International Trade Fair of 
Machinery, Equipment, Plants 
and Raw Materials for the 
Ceramics Industry 
15-19 October 


SYSTEMS 

Computer and 

Communication 

9th International Trade Fair 

and international User 

Congress 

28 Oct.- 1 Nov. 


PRODUCTRONICA 
6th International Trade fair 
for Electronics Production 
2-16 November 


8th HBM 4- HANDWERK 
Handicrafts in the Domestic 
Sphere with Special Shows 
and Technical Dispfays by the 
Different Handicrafts Branches 
30Nov.-B Dec. 


DATES 1986 
'First Six Months) 

INHORGENTA MONCHEN" 
13th International Trade Fair 
for Watches, Clocks, Jewellery, 
Precious Stones and Silverware 
with their Manufacturing 
Equipment 

31 Januar y - 4 February 



MESSE MONCHEN 


/0 


INTERNATIONAL 


CB-RMpNCHEN . . 

. 17th Exh&ition Caravan-Boat- 
Intemational Travel Market 
1986 

1-9 February 
36th MMT 

Munchner Mode-Tage ’ 

9-1T February 

ISPO- Spring’ 

24th btfemahanof Sports 
Equipment Fair 
20-23 February 

IHM 

38th International Light 
Industries and Handicrafts Far 
The Fair for Small and 
Medium-sized Enterprises 
8-16 March 

53rd MWM MODE-WOCHE 
MONCHEN" 

International Fashion Fair 
23-26 March 

BAUMA 
21st International Trade Fair 
For Construction Equipment 
and Building Material 
Machines 

7-13 April - 

103rd Congress of the 
German Surgical Society with. •. 
Exhibition . - * 

23-26 Aori) 

BORO 5 

13th Trade Exhibition Office ’> 

Technology, Computer, Office 
Furniture, Organizational 
Methods, Drawing Techniques 
13-15 Mav 

COSMETICS" = r. 

7th International Trade Fair for 
Cosmetic, Health and Beauty _ \- 

Care with Accessories • :• 

23- 25 May * - 

ANALYT1CA 

10th htemofenal Exhibition 
wWi International Conference _• ; t 
3-6 June - 

transport 

International Trade Fair for 
Freight and ftossenger Trans- . ' ’ 
portotion 1 

10-14 June 

Wood Construction and ^ 

Home Improvement 86 - ^ 

including the 1986 German . - ^ 

Wood Construction Congress., v. 
19-22 June ^ 

ELTEC .. 

Exhibition for Electrical " . 

Engineering 1 \\ 

26-28 Jura i* i- 

■NTERFORST 2 

5th International Trade \ 

Exhibition Forestry and Round 
Timber Technology with Inter- 
national Congresses and 
Special Shows 

1~6 Jul y 

For trade visitors only 
Subject to changes! 

Information- 
Munchener Messe- 

SSiEST''""* 

S«tfoch 121009. 

D-8000 Munchen 12, 
jejephont* (089)5107-0, 

Telefax 51 07-506 • 


t 

i 

! 

I 









■J-'SUXTA . 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


Page 13 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON WEST GERMANY 


rivatization’ 

uns 



a 8»i* S p at l w 

«*s in the field. ** ^ 

KcS. a FSn Wl ^a^ 

IffSSSfijSSS 

at he calls “UieSf® m % 





■“"erollr 


rstory. It U a 
nthusiasra. 


Jains 

XSE&SSfe 

:nng recently has 

t T 36 ?' H j wever - “mon bi- 
ff by the end of this vear ifo* 

triggered a delayed waverf^ ■ ^ 

nt, unemployTOem remains t 
bon, or 9.4 percent of the 
srasonally to peak at mont 
: I0 -5 percent, last winter a,* 
lgures were 2.474 million. *, 

lip for a countrv that durin£» 
'60s and 1970s enjoved an ^ 
ercent 

Tying is that so many of tWf ■ 
jobless for so long. Of the’t 
at the end of September kui)-_r 
ithout work for from one to tv 
ere out of work for morcilam, 


— WEUJ1SCTON10M 

C-B-R MONCHBM 
17th Exhibition Corovafrfal 
International Travel Mote 

193o 

1-9 Februar y 
36th MMT 

Munchner Mode-Toge' 
9-11 Februar y 

1SPO- Spring" 

24th tnlemationd Sports 
Equipment Fw 

20-23 Februar y 
IHM 

38th tnterriOt»c«nal Liph! ^ _ 
Industries arid Hamkrcrac 
The Fair fc.r Small and 
Medium- sired Enterpn® 
fl- 16 March 

53rd MW fM MODF-W0® 
monchen- 

International Fasten w 

23-26 Mgjh 
BAUMA 

*?lsl International Ira*™ 
for Construe** 
and Building Mater® 
Mcchines 

7-13 A ed 

503rd Cong*>»'*V ( . 
Gentian surgical 5oae*y 
Exhibition 
23-2o±PL!l 

BORO _ u^ijjorQfe 
13th Trace ,j& 

Technology. Cc, ^L^ 

^.rure.Oraani^ 


•j By XJli Schmctzcr 
• BONN —The trend in West 

Germany toward *Mrivatiza- 
j uon” of stale-owned bcsiiwss 
"started is regional and urban 
sdOTmmraticns, where private 
: contraaon were caSed upon 
.for tubs traditionally per- 
: fonned hy local entities. 

- In this tray, the siatt-nm post 
60 ice handed oat its ftnmamg 
£vand xecabling contracts u> pn- 
vale entrepreneurs and the mu- 
garbage coHector was 
by local firms, 
t when West Germany's 
new Christian Democratic co- 
alition launched a program to 
offer private interests a large 
chunk of the wholly or partially 
owned stale- run companies, the 
plan ran into trouble. Now, the 
coalition's initial project to pri- 
vatize or reduce slate participa- 
tion in about 10Q companies 
has been reduced to 12. 

The pressure to dilute the 
plan came mainly from the 
ranks of the tilling parties. Ac- 
cording to Der Spiegel, the 
weekly news m agamic, politi- 
cians and party “mends” refuse 
to give up lucrative positions on 
the boards of state companies 
marked for privatization. Some 
of these advisory and consult- 
ing jobs bring in a secondary 
income amounting to as much 
as 580,000 a year. 

At the same time, trade 
iminnt fear that if the compa- 
nies change hands, the new 
owners might try to cat costs by 
rigorously reducing labor, a 
measure few governments 
could accept. Supporting the 
unions, the opposition Social 
Democrats (under whose 13- 
year a dminis tration tike 5UUe 
acquired participation in 271 
com panies ) denounced privati- 
zation as “a sellout of the 
state.” ‘ 

But Finance Minister Ger- 
hard Stoltenberg sees it as “a 
contribution to the rejuvena- 
tion or the economy.” Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl feels that : 
ting rid of the firms will 
the government to concentrate 
on whaL he calls “the core of its 
mission” — presumably, the 
job of governing. 

Yet both Mr. Stoltenberg and 
Mr. Kohl will have to push hard 
if they want to salvage anything 
from the original proposal. “In 
the end, some token companies 
will be offered to the public, a 
far cry from the initial pram-, 
ise an industrialist said. 

One such offer has already 
been made. In January 1984. 
the state sold 13-25 percent of 
its 43.75-percent. stake in the 
energy conglomerate Veba. The 
sale was to oe the starting signal 
for jettisoning other company 
responsibilities, linked to a 
promise that the government 
shares to come onto the market 


were to be made available first 
for “the little man." 

Nobody was surprised, how- 
ever, when “the tittle man” 
showed little interest in the 
Veba shares and the bulk was 
bought np by U5; and Far 
Eastern interests. 

“The patrimony of the state 
should not be used as a clinic 
for the foot diseases of the 
economy.” said Hans Tiet- 
tneyer, secretary of state in the 
Finance Ministry. 

Franz Josef Strauss, for ex- 



national airline. Lufthansa. Ba- 
varia’s rightist prime minister 
argues that Lufthansa is not 
only a profitable concern but, 
as the national carrier, should 
remain firmly in state hands. 
His critics, however, point out 
that since 1983, Mr. Strauss has 
been on the executive council of 
Lu f t h a n sa and, as chief execu- 
tive of German Airbus, he fears 
that a waning of state influence 
might cause Lufthansa to opt 
for CJ5.-made aircraft rather 
than European-made airbuses. 

At the end of March, the gov- 
ernment put through parlia- 
ment a privatization plan to sdi 
off pan of its holdings in three 
companies and two banks. The 
mcasore win reduce the govern- 
ment’s stake in Volkswagen 
from 20 percent to 14 percent. 
At the same time, 25 percent of 
government shares in the ener- 
gy and aluminum holding com- 
pany, V1AG, are to be placed 
on the market. 

The government, however, 
win retain a simple majority in 
two small banks: the Pfandren- 
. tenanstall and the Deutsche 
Siedlong und Rentenbank, 
while its share in the gas and oil 
exploration company, Prakla- 
Setsmos, is to be reduced to 
under 50 percent. 

The debate over Lufthansa is 
blamed for bolding up the 12- 
company privatization propos- 
al, which includes such con- 
cerns as the gas utility 
company, Thyssengas; the alu- 
minum producer. VAW (Ver- 
einigte Aluminium- Werke 
AG); one of the government’s 
seven finanrini institutions; the 
surveying firm Prakla Sdsmos; 
minor banks like thePfandbrie- 
fanstalt and the Deutsche Sicd- 
lung und Landesrentenbank as 
wdl as a share reduction in' 
Volkswagen from 20 to 14.1 
percent 

The 12-corapany sell-off, 
which would also include the 
gas utility company, Tyssengas, 
is expected to bring the state 
between 1.S billion and 2 billion 
Deutsche marks. The program 
still has the support of the Free 
Democrats, the coalition part- 
ners of the Christian Demo- 
crats. 



The Teves anti-lock braking system, above left; navigation 
computer system under research at Daimler-Benz, above 


right. At far right, the new Mercedes-Benz route calculator 
system, which rs designed to be easily within driver's vision. 


A Rush in Electronic Memory Advances 
Pushes Forward Automatic Car of Future 


By Pearl Marshall 

STUTTGART — Drivers who 
are tired of having to reposition 
seat, steering wheel and minors ev- 
ery time someone else uses the car 
soon will have only to press a but- 
ton for the changes to be made by 
an electronic memory device. 

West German automobile mak- 
ers such as Daimler-Benz and 
BMW already incorporate the seal 
memory in their vehicles. Now the 
race is on to add mirrors and steer- 
ing wheel to the elecironic-adjusl- 
mem process. 

Daimler-Benz is said to be plan- 
ning to launch its electronic steer- 
ing-wheel adjuster in a few months 
time, followed later by an electron- 
ic mirror positioner once its re- 
search engineers have perfected the 
technique. BMW says it is planning 
to introduce the equipment the oth- 
er way around, adding the electron- 
ic mirror first, with the steering- 
wheel adjuster coming later. 

The pace at which these and oth- 
er dec ironic systems are being add- 
ed to West German cars is boosting 
dramatically the share that elec- 
tronic equipment contributes to the 
overall value of the vehicle. 

Whereas, on average worldwide, 
electronic systems account for 
about 3 percent of total cor value — 
an average that is expected to in- 
crease to 9 percent by 1990 — some 
West German automobiles already 
offer a much heftier dectronic con- 
tribution, often as much as 20 per- 
cent or 30 percent 

“Take the basic price (44,000 
Deutsche marks), without value- 
added tax, of the 280 SE model, for 
instance," said a Daimler-Benz ’ 
spokesman, Hans KJoost “If you 
include all the standard electronics 
we offer in the S-ciass model such 
- a£ the anti leek braking system 
(£947 DM) and then you add the 
airbag (2,120 DM), the route calcu- 
lator and so on,” he said, reeling off 
a long list erf dectronic items, “you 
can easily reach a third of the price 
or more.” 

These statistics illustrate just 
how important an industry the area 
of automobile dectronics is becom- 
ing. West Germany has some of the 
leaders in the field. 

Robert Bosch of Stuttgart, which 
helped BMW develop its corap ut- 


Audi Enters a New Social Class 
On Its Way to Bigger Profits 


-whed drive bn the market. Daim- 
ler-Benz is working on an electron- 
ic system for its Mercedes cars, 
which switches the car to four- 
-wheel drive when it senses the 
need to improve d-action, at the 
s ame time info rming the driver of 


INGOLSTADT — In earlier 
years, Audi was known more as a 
solid, somewhat serious car, popu- 
lar with civQ servants. It was not 
inexpensive, but it was not a luxury 
item. 

But over the Iasi six or seven 
years, Audi has undergone a total 
personality change. It is now dash- 
tug — and more than just a little 
sporty — and is rapidly gaining in although Daimler-Benz 
status and desirability, particularly say “in the near future.” 
in the United States, where it is R,,t ,>lp A " H ' «*“ 
viewed as a classy buy. 

In fact, Audi now can boast that 


the change in operation. 

The Mercedes version could be 
on (he market as early as next year 
although Daimler-Benz will only 
y “in the near future.” 

But the new Audi image was not 
shaped by rallying successes nor 


market back home where its market 
share dropped one percentage 
point to 6.1 percent Mr. Habbel 
gives a lot of credit for Audi's new 
image — exemplified by the Audi 
100 — to his research and develop- 
ment chief, Ferdinand Pitch, who 
went out of his way to choose engi- 
neers who understood the kind of 
image and technical advances that 
Audi wanted in designing a more 
modern and prestigious car, some- 
thing that could easily be disiin- 
1 from the competition. 


n ra w,r«^ 4 it has broken into tbe same soda] 
Methods.- - M t h e Mercedes-Benz, 


13-15 Mcy 
COSMETICS’ Tf<jdefij( : 

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Irrationals 

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ELTcC n ;, r 0 ^ 

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g£2£jaES 

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BMW and Porsche. 

Its sales in the United States al- 
most doubled last year, from 
42,000 units to 72,000. placing it 
third in line behind . Volvo 
(100,000) and Mercedes (80,000) in 
the luxury European import cate- 
gory. BMW was fourth, with 
71,000. 

Just how much of Audi's extraor- 
dinary success recently was 
planned and how much was luck is 
hard to teH “It’s been a little bit of 
everything,” said Wolfgang Hab- 
bel, the chairman. 

The first indication of something 
new and special on the West Ger- 
man automobile scene c am e' in 
1981 when the Audi Qualtro, a 
four-wheel-drive racer finished 
right up front in some of 0 k 
^ world’s toughest rallies. The ’Quat- 
2 tro went on to win c on si sten tly in 
the following years, helped by such 
rally stars as Hamm Mikkola, Wal- 
ter Rdhri. and Michile Mornon. 

In 1983. Mikkola and Arne 
Hertz, driving the Audi Quauro, 
won the world drivers’ champion- 
ship title, and in 1984 the Quattro 
and its drivers performed the dou- 
ble feat of winning both the world 
drivers’ championship and the 
champion award For make of car. 

This extraordinary success made 
a big impact on the public, and 
?*when Audi started introducing its ■ 
concept of permanent four-wbed- 
drive t ransm ission into some of its 
passenger-car range, its competi- 
tors worldwide were quick to fol- 
low suiL • . 

Ford, for instance, has a. four- 


just how much of Audi’s «s±raordiiifliy 
success recently was planned and how 
much was luck is hard to tell. "It’s been a 
little bit of everything,” said Wolfgang 
Habbel, the chairman . 


innovation of the four-wheel drive 
for the normal passenger car alone. 
There also was the automobile 
product itself, specifically the Audi 
100, which hoped redefine (he 
Audi as a classier product 

Customer response to^ this mod- 
el known in the United States as 
the Audi 5000, was overwhelming. 
It could not have hit the market at a 
better time. Buyers in the luxury 
bracket were looking for something 
different, and here was ah automo- 
bile design so advanced in concept 
that it won the title “Car of the 
Year 1983 ” as well as numerous 
other awards. 

It was the Audi 100’a success in 
the United Slates that helped al- 
most double sales there last year. 
Mr. Habbel said that Audi's high 
U.S. sales in 1984 had nothing to 
do with the strong dollar making 
imports cheaper, but was due rath- 
er to a predilection by the U.S. 
customer for European quality 
cars. 

However, the dollar 
rate naturally provided some at 
tiooal profit and Audi was able to 
keepitsprices almost down toJ983 
levels. Audi's strong U.S. sales in 
1984 helped make up for a slacker 


The initial urge for a new direc- 
tion came as early as 1969, when 
the company adopted a new slogan, 
which amounted to “advancement 
through technology." By 1978, Mr. 
Piech’s team had ‘created the blue- 
print for the Audi 100. Its shape 
was developed in a wind tunnel so 
that aerodynamic efficiency could 
be bufit into the design right From 
the start. 

Alongside ibis development 
work. Audi was able to step up its 
output volume in order to bring in 
the kind of money that it needed to 
invest not only in new products but 
also in new plant. Its Ingplstadi 
and Neckarsulm production facili- 
ties are examples of the latest in 
manufacturing technology, with 
lots of automation and tnc latest 
robotics supplied by its parent 
company, Volkswagen. 

In the case of the Audi 100, Audi 
was able to start building a brand 
new car in a brand new plant The 
company invested- some 3 billion 
DM between about 1980 and 1983 
in its new plants, products, sport- 
ing activities and in other attempts 
to give itself a much stronger per- 
sonal identity. 

— PEARL MARSHALL 


iry, for ins 

biting deep into uie U.S. market, 
particularly with its electronic fuel- 
injection systems, us well os taking 
the largest share of the auto-dec- 
ironies business back home in West 
Germany. 

Auto-electronics plays a signifi- 
cant role in Bosch’s overall elec- 
tronic production, which also in- 
cludes communications electronics 
and accounts for roughly 24 per- 
cent of the company's annual turn- 
over of 15 billion DM. 

Bosch's Jctronic fuel-injecton 
system is one of the widest used in 
the world today. 

The Bosch ’group’s American, 
French and Spanish production fa- 
cilities, as well as its several fac- 
tories in West Germany, have pro- 
duced a total of 13 million 
fuel-injections units. It also has li- 


censing agreements with Japanese 
companies to produce this equip- 
ment. 

The first Bosch fuel-injection 
system was launched in a Volks- 
wagen in 1967 and exported to the 
United States. Last year Bosch pro- 
duced 21 million fuel- injection 
units and this year the target is 3.2 
million. 

Today, every third pasenger car 
in West Germany is fitted with a 
Bosch fuel injection system. 

U.S. demand is growing at a rap- 
id pace because U.S. automakers 
prefer the Bosch package, rather 
than invest enormous funds into 
research and development for their 
own fuel-injection systems. 

Another breakthrough in West 
German automobile electronics 
came in 1978 when Bosch, working 
separately with Daimler-Benz and 


system, or antilock braking system 
as it also is known. This takes over 
when the driver jams on his brakes 
too hard and reduces the braking 
force just enough to prevent the 
wheels from locking. 

In the last six years. Bosch has 
built half a million of these antiskid 
systems and has been the sole West 
German producer. 

This year Alfred Teves, with 
headquarters in Frankfurt, entered 
the field as a strong competitor to 
Bosch. Initially, it is producing an- 
tiskid systems for the Lincoln Con- 
tinental MK VII and is starting to 
equip the full range of Ford’s new 
Granada series. 

Another major West German 
auto-electronics producer is VDO, 
near Frankfurt, which supplies the 
main on-board computer in 



BMW’s 745i model. This provides 
such information as how many ki- 
lometers or miles the car can travel 
with the fuel remaining in the tank. 

VDO, with other West German 
firms, including Bosch, is supply- 
ing BMW cars with a check console 
that monitors functions such as de- 
fective rear lights. Any deviation 
from normal functioning is indicat- 
ed on a display. 

The visual preponderance of 
electronic equipment in some of 
BMW's models, including the on- 
board computer and the check con- 
sole. give the driver a sense of al- 
most being an airline piloL In fact, 
BMW advertises this “cockpit" as- 


pect widely as part of its sales ef- 
forts. 

This approach, compared with 
Daimler-Benz’s efforts to avoid 
glamorous electronic displays in 
case they overwhelm the driver 
with too many push-buttons and 
switches, underlines the wide dif- 
ference in personal philosophy be- 
tween West German automobile 
makers. 

It is a question of the individual 
customer’s preference. BMW said 
that in keeping with the results of 
market reasearch it replaced its 
original on-board computer with a 
VDO model for the 745i “to make 
it less confusing.” 


Nymphenburg Castle m Bavana 



This hardly looks 
like the hub of an international 
financial network. 



Bavaria’s historical sites and tra- 
ditional Bavarian friendliness are ap- 
preciated the world over. Yet, few are 
aware of the modem, international out- 
look of its institutions. 

Bayerische Landesbank, for instance, 
is not only one of Germany’s top banks, 
it’s also one of the country’s most out- 
ward-looking. Our global facilities 
include branches in London, Singapore 
and New York (with our 1BF and Grand 
Cayman Branch), a wholly-owned sub- 
sidiary in Luxembourg plus offices in 
Johannesburg, Toronto and Vienna as 
well as our correspondent network 
around the world. 

Through a growing international 
presence our capabilities range from 


buyers credits in the Far East to roll- 
over credits in Luxembourg, from inter- 
bank money dealing operations to 
Eurobond issues. 

With a balance sheet total of over 
DM 100 billion, our resources are sub- 
stantial. Also, we’re bankers to the State 
of Bavaria, and an integral part of Ger- 
many’s most powerful financial organ- 
ization, the Sparkassen network. 

Moreover, we are authorized to issue 
our own DM bonds (one rated AAA, 
Aaa), an attractive investment for insti- 
tutional investors wanting to spread 
their currency risk 

Our Commercial Paper traded in 
New York have received best possible 
ratings, too. 


Bayerische Landesbank 

International Banking with Bavarian Drive and Friendliness 

Central Office: BriennerSlrasse 20,8000 Munchen 2, TeL - (89) 21 71-Ol.Telex; 5 286270, Cables: Bayembank Munich. Brantf es^ondon,M:7^^ 

2 22 69 25. Subsidiary: Bayerische Laidesbank International S A, Luxembourg, lei.: 47 5911-1. Representative Offices: Toronto.Tti.:862-B840;Vlenna l Tel.: 66 31 41, JohannesburgJeL.B 38 1613. 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


Tonight could be 

the night 





Spielcasino 
Aachen LLe, 


Intriguing Internationa! atmcs 
Dhere. Avantgarde interiors 
with more than 100 works by. 
leading contemporary' artists. 
First class Gala Restaurant 
(Michelin star).' ^ Dancing in 
Club Zero. A 


A SPEa4L REPORT ON WEST GERMANY 


Exports Boost Profits for Big Chemical Companies 




■ I ■ , ■■ -IV ^ II; 


■ mb . ..I *^9 I- k 


FRANKFURT— West Genna- 
ny's three biggest chemical compa- 
nies — Baver, BASF and Hoechst 
— could not be happier. Last year 
proved to be a bumper year as 
exports soared along with the dol- 
lar and the general economic up- 
turn. 

“A record-breaking year for 
Bayer.' 1 said the chairman, Her- 
mann- Josef Stronger. His counter- 
part at BASF, Hans Albers, point- 
ed out that “the chemical industry 
has enjoyed a disproportionately 
large share of the recovery." 

West Germany now exports 
more chemicals than it sells at 
home. It exceeded SO percent for 
the first time last year as the dollar 
knocked out some of its U.S. com- 
petitors in foreign markets. 

Sales last year rose to 141 billion 
DM, an increase of II percent. The 
export share, however. leapt by al- 
most 17 percent, to 7L5 billion 
DM. 

The Bayer group’s North Ameri- 
can sales topped its West German 
sales by more than 10 percent last 
year, for instance. Only a minimal 
amount of chemicals was actually 
exported from Germany. The rest 
of the North American, business 
was done by Bayer's own subsidiar- 
ies located there. 


| CHEMICAL EXPORTS 

1 IN 1984 


| Country Percent rise 

from 1983 

France 

13.8 

Benelux 


Netherlands 


Italy — — 

19.9 

United Kingdom.... 

26 J! 

Switzerland 

13.9 

Austria 

9.5 

CJuj tod Slates 

30.6 

Source: Went German 

i 

1 

Industry Association 





. V. <. • • 1 ■ 






The Boehringer chemical plant in Hamburg. 


16.2 billion DM). Some 79 percent 
of the Bayer group’s world sales 
were abroad. 


cent more than the previous year. 

But the U.S. market is not as 
substantial as some of the other 


capacity at a time when market 
conditions were much more nega- 
. live. 

Now they see some European 
producers, in light of the economic 
upswing, wanting to add, for in- 
stance, more than 200.000 metric 
tons per year of linear polyethylene 
— a product that is expected to be 
supplied at less cost from the Mid- 
dle East. 

Where fertilizers are concerned, 
the European price war has caused 
tremendous problems to those 
companies intimately involved, 
particularly BASF. 

The initial swamping of the Ger- 
man nitrogenous fertilizer market a 
couple of years ago by the Norwe- 
gians and the Dutch. whose fertiliz- 
er production, was supported by 
subsidized natural-gas prices, has 
eased somewhat following a reduc- 
tion in these subsidies. 

At one point imports reached 60 
dpa percent of demand, but that figure 
.h.m. has since been reduced to slightly 

lDUrg ‘ above 50 percent 

BASF was so heavily engaged in 
sales (7923 million DM) are rela- fertilizers that its only recourse was 



CluiHei 


gjVT'Tt-t'- • ■ 

"-•uV T- f \ - • 

•t ' • - - 

ll. - • 

'V. * * • 




Phosphate production at Hoechst plant in North Rbine- 
Westphafia. 


’iirrsirt $ 
innir 

; i* 


Each of the three big chemical foreign markets. The United States 
groups has world sales of more places only sixth in West Germa- 


Lively modest, compared with the to face up to the flood of imports 
size of the country and its popula- and lower prices, as did other West 


Spielcasino 

Oeynhausen 


Germany's latest Tasteful, 
gaming salons ;n the midst of 
the lovely Kurpark. Sophisti- 
cated ambience created by 
innovative architecture, lighting, 
color and art. Gourmet dining. 

! Slot machines Roulette, Biack 
Jack daily from 3 p m. 


- Bayer now is launching a second 
expansion drive in the United 
States, aimed particularly at phar- 
maceuticals and other high-tech 
health products. Among its invest- 
ment plans is a new drug and bio- 
technology research laboratory in 
West Haven, Connecticut 


than 40 billion DM. Hoechst re- ny’s top 10 chemical customers, 
ported 41.3 billion DM in 1984, with the top five being in the Euro- 

_ t -i _ r% a ct?’- «. At\ a i_:i r 01 


ther expansion of business to Chi- led to substantial losses. products, such as' fungicides and wigshafen-based parent company . 

na. “We have been able to cut these pesticides, and other agricultural was able to boost its sales revenue 

As chemical demand in West losses decisively," Mr. Albers, the chemicals, and by doing wdl in in 1984 by 17 percent to 19.8 bG- 


The company made up for poor r unnin g at 100-percent capacity of ' 
profitability in this area by increas- more." 
ina its safes in plant-protection With these successes, the Lud-. 


lion. West Germany expects a fur- German fertilizer producers. This mg its safes in plant-protection With these successes, the Lud- 


while BASFs figure was 40.4 bil- pean community. 




lion DM. 

Between them, the three parent 


Exports to the United States in 
1984, for instance, did not even 


companies contributed about 50 reach 5 bQUon DM, less than to 
billion DM to West Germany's to- Italy (6.6 billion DM). 


tal turnover figure of 141 billion 
DM. 


Almost half of West Germany’s 
chemical exports go to the Europe- 


Foreign business was largely re- 
onsiblc for the growth in both 


►ponsible for the growth in both 
Bayer’s world sales (up 15 percent, 
to 43 billion DM) and its parent- 
company sales (tip 11 percent, to 


Chemical exports began to pick an Community, with France being 
up as soon as the dollar started to the biggest consumer (7.3 billion 


climb around May 1983. establish- 
ing an undeniable link between the 


DM). 

Some of the export spotlight was 


two. Exports to the United Stales on China in 1984, where sales in- 
by 1984, for instance, were 31 per- creased 25 percent. Although the 



Spielcasino 

Bremen 


Warm, inviting club atmosphere 
on celebrated Bottcherstrasse 
Choice dishes.in the Flett 
Restaurant; drinks in the 
Nautilus Bar. 


Roulette • Blackjack 

(Baccara in Aix-la-chape!le) 
daily from 3 p.m 


; Messieurs, Mesdames - 
Faitesvosjeux. 


Trade Profile: The Top 10 Partners 


EXPORT MARKETS 


IMPORT MARKETS 


Country by Rank 


Percent Country by Rank 


Percent 


being used more heavily, improv- to modernize, consol 
ing profitability. Capacity utiiiza- tionalize production, 
tion now is about 85 percent, com- 
pared with well under 75 percent in 
the down years of the early 1980s. 

Although 1983 was a good year A Kil VS11 
and 1984 a record year, no one 
wants to say much about 1985 at _ . 

the moment, especially with the (Cantun 

bouncing dollar. mane working for 

In one area of particularly poor can management 1 
profitability, plastics, German costs; they are flex 
chemical companies have slashed mer said. And th 
capacity by about one-thud in the rich.” 
past two to three years because of Mr Wolf ticks < 
the world glut Much of the reduc- that duster in the f 
tion was from the closing of old a goo d place for vt 
plants that were uneconomic. Ca- be: Texas Instrum 
paaty utilization now is about 85 National and Fain 
to 90 percent because of the loss of In the view of a ! 
these plants and the economic up- hani- Bayerische V 
swm 6- ninp to finance an 


“Plastics are booming 
BASF spokesman said. 


— PEARL MARSHALL 


A Bavarian Accent on High Technology 

(Continued From Page 9) move of West Germany's largest bome-gn 


mans working for U.S. firms in the area. “Ameri- 
can management knows how to plan and control 
costs; they are flexible and innovative," Mr. Prom- 
mer said. “And they believe it is important to get 
rich." 


move of West Germany's largest home-grown 
computer firm, Nixdorf, to Munich, from Pader- 
bom. east of the Ruhr industrial basin. 

The region around Munich brings together the 
life-style ingredients for high-tech industrial devel- 


1. France 

2. United States 

3. Netherlands 

4. Britain 

5. Italy 

6. Benelux 

7. Switzerland 
& Austria 

9. Sweden 

10. Soviet Union 


]. Netherlands 

2. France 

3. Italy 

4. Britain 

5. United States 

6. Benelux 

7. Japan 

8. Switzerland 

9. Soviet Union 
10. Austria 


With expected increases in plas- 
c production in the Middle East 


tic production in the Middle East 
and Canada, however. West Ger- 


man plastics producers still may 
have to dose down more capacity 


Note: 1984 exports fob 


Note: 1984 imports cif 


have to dose down more capacity 
in the next few years. The Arab 
countries are expected to take from 
5 to 7 percent of the German mar- 
ket by about 1987. 

The West Germans also are wor- 
ried about expansion of plastic ca- 
pacity in the European Communi- 
ty. laving seen France and Italy 
either not wanting to dose down 
capadty or wanting to add new 


Mr. Wolf ticks off the international companies 
that duster in the Munich region as proof that it is 
a good place for ventures like Electronics 2000 to 1 
be: Texas Instruments, Siemens, Motorola, Intel, 
National and Fairchild, among others. 

In the view of a specialist from the leading local 
bank, Bayerische Verdnsbank, which is just begin- 
ning to finance and assist some of these start-up 
firms, Bavaria is home to about 40 percent of West 
German software companies and distributors of 
components and software. Berlin, which has of- 
fered subsidies to draw high-tech firms, has been 
less successful and businessmen tend to avoid the 
high-unemployment smokestack regions like the 
Ruhr for electronics ventures. Only Baden-Wflrt- . 
temberg, Bavaria's neighbor to the west, is as 
important in the high-tech business. 

Siemens alone is believed to buy 1 billion Deut- 

each year, in a total German market of aSout 3.8 
billion. 

Recent proof of the appeal of Munich was the 


opment: a famous university and technological 
. institute, an intense cultural life, good schools, 
pleasant housing and great sports areas for. skiers, 
climbers and swimmers. Tne relaxed Bavarian 
manner is also part of the appeal. 

Still slow to appear in Munich, compared with 
the United States, is the support system for new 
high-tech start-up firms. Mr. Proaimer’s consul- 
tancy, a handful of venture-capital sources, the 
timid attitude of bankers — this is not on the scale 
of Silicon Valley. 

“What is happening is more a matter of adapt- 
ing than of research and development,” Her man- 
Wolf Richter,' an independent computer-market- 
ing consultant, said. a It is incorrect to- talk of 
Silicon Valley here, unless you use an enlar ger," 

To help develop Munich's “SQizunn-Tai," there 


are throe new projects for technology paries around 
the city, in Nenperladx, Western! and the Euroin- 
dustnepark. The latter pnts Finns of differing sizes, 
offering both hardware and software, under one 
root 

In this way, Munich seeks to add 20,000 elec- 
tronics jobs by 1989 to the current 10,000. 


Item Bremen... 







mm • • ■ have, for generations regarded 
Id I ■ ■ ■ ourselves as a bridge between world 
markets and the German market As a centre for 
the handling of coffee, tobacco, cotton, machinery 
and many other products, Bremen plays a part of 
major importance in international commerce. And 
as Bremen's longest established bank, our task is 
to make sure that business abroad has easy 
access to VWsst Germany’s internal markets, 
establishing contacts between potential business 
partners, financing projects of every size and 
description and handle all aspects of payments 
from one country to another. Our worldwide con- 
nections with around 3,000 banks in more than 
50 countries and the experience of our specialist 
staff together provide the basis for our inter- 
national services. Contact Sparkasse in Bremen 
and you will soon be convinced that you’ve chosen 
the right people to help you achieve business 
success here in Germany. # 

Die Sparkasse in Bremen 5 

Foreign Trade Bank since 1924 





Head Office of Die Sparkasse in Bremen 


S.W.I.F.T. Address: SBRE DE 22 • Telex: 174212010 • Tel. (421) 1792187 
P.O. Box 10 7880 • Am Brill 1- 3 ■ 2800 Bremen I, F.R of Germany 









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Bayer 


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At home in the markets of the world; 

Quality, safety and the know-how which- and automobile safety. With pharmaceuti- obliges us to wnrt , 

stems fi-om decades of research have cals for prophylaxis and therapy.: With the problems in ,K«2 remiUinsly 10 *° ,v £ 
Me ihf "w - r. EL. .uA _ *^ ‘ ns ln tnese areas. 




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The Roland 


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ASEAN event 


Quality, safety 1 and the know-how which 
stems from decades of research have 
made us the i.econd-1 a rgesl exporter in 
West Germany. 

With more than 10,000 products, Bayer is 
at home world-wide and involved in 
almost all spheres oflife. With dyestuffs for 
clothing. With pigments for house paints 
and furniture and machinery enamels. 
With textile fibres whose properties arc 
superior to. those of the natural fibres. 
With engineering plastics for leisure, sport 

KWJ 44 A A 


and automobile safety. With pharmaceuti- 
cals for prophylaxis and therapy.: With 
agricultural chemicals to protect the 
harvests of the world. With paint raw 
materials for the surface protection of air- 
craft railroads, industrial plants, domestic 
appliances and furniture, 
lite scale of this operation . imposes 
responsibilities. U commits us to a critical 
■ self-awareness with regard lo’issties iu^h . 
as raw material consewattonan«jktnviron- : 
mental protection, and at the.same^time : 


Bayer thinks of tomorrow - 
today. 


/T\ 

(BAYER) 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1983 


Page 15 




A SPECIAL REPORT ON WEST GERMANY 


Insurance Industry Is Rising 
To the Challenge of the Titans 



hst plant in Nonh ijj^ 

£*“ "**“«** 
With the* success , ' 

gshafen-based ^ U- 

UionDM m 
— PEARL 

echnology 

ihr industrial basm. ** 
d Munich brines uweiW^ 

•for high-tech indus^J 

universuy and teduiaffi 
e cultural We. good S 
■d great sports areas fcrSf 
*“■ 1116 relied 
of the appeal. e 

ar in Munich, compared «* 
is the support system torus 
irnns. Mr. Prommer's con*. 
>f venture-capita] secures, fc 
nkers — this is not on the sea!; 

mg is more a matter of ad» 
i and development." Herna* 
ndqpendeni compurff-nudg. 
d. “It is incorrect to ulk e 
unless you use an enlarger." 
Munich's “•Silizium-TaL" tW 
:ts for technologs parks uomf 
lach, Westend and the Eun&t 
:ter puts firms of differingsm 
ware and software, under « 

nich seeks to add 20.000 du 
9 to the current 10.000. 


MUNICH —TheVr’esi Gernaa 
finanaai services battle has subrid-. 
cd — but other challenges to the 
predominantly Munich- based Ger- 
man insurance industry remain a 
threat. . 

£ For a while, .two years ago, it 
looked as if the West German fi- 
nancial revolution would urn into 
a battle of the titans, pitting Deut- 
sche Bank against Europe’s largest 
instance company, Allianz. Ger- 
man banks abeaay have a wide 
range of senses; taking deposits 
and tending, brokering and under- 
writing, acting as portfolio manag- 
ers add s lode-mark rr specialists, 
22 gut-r usually through subsidiaries 
— writing mortgages. 

One distinction remains between 
hanks and insurance companies; 
each is closely supervised by sepa- 
rate government boards from west 
Berlin. But the regulators allowed 
Deutsche Bank to offer insurance 
plans under certain conditions 
[ now copied by rival banks), there- 
by opening the door to competition 
against the monopoly of the insur- 
ance companies. 

The result has been a compro- 
mise — perhaps not altogether sur- 
rAsingly so — given the nature of 
Jjnnan corporate ownership. An- 
other challenge to the monopoly, 
from foreign insurance companies, 
may be harder to brush off. 

Deutsche Bank's 2-year-old pro- 
ject links savings plans with a Life- 
insurance cover. The bank’s mo- 
tives, according zo a former 
employee, were “need for new fund 
sources cheaper than what could be 

raised on bond or share or financial 

markets.” German banks are 
hungry for funds to tend “because 
of demographics and the decline in 
the savings rate.” 

Because Allianz is the dominant 
insurer, Deutsche Bank's move, be 
said, “necessarily was perceived as 
a challenge to it." Yet, Deutsche 
'tank itself is (be largest sharehold- 
er in Allianz with. 7 percent, fol- 
lowed by the sister reinsurance 
group, Munich Re. Then,ioo, the 
largest hank and the leading insur- 
er each hold major Mocks in Beiers- 
dorf, manufacturers of adhesive 
tapes and cosmetics. Share-hold- 
ings and aos5-dfrectorship5 be- 
tween Deutsche Bank and Allianz 
or Munich Re include Thyssen and 
Hapag-Uoyd. Similar rinks bind 
other German insurance firms with 
other banks, and such de-ins are 
not only legal in West Germany, 
but also typical of the industrial 
structure. 

Deutsche Bank actually opted to 
call in an insurance company to 
;yve advice on how to handle the 


risk of its new savings vehicle. This 
was Berliner Ldxnsvcrskfaerungs- 
geseflsebaft. in which the leading 
shareholders turn out to be Allianz 
and Munich Re, with 47, 16 percent 
of its shares each. 

Deutsche Bank’s initiative has 
been taken up by others — Com- 
mazbank, Baycnschc Vcreinsbank 
and Hypo Bank, all savings banks, 
among others — which now are 
offering insurance-linked plans. 
But, nonetheless, a compromise has 
been readied, and not too surpris- 
ingly given the links between bank- 
ing and insurance in Germany. For 
example. Allianz owns a 7- percent 
stake in Hypo Bank and a shore of 


Perhaps a more serious 
threat to the 
insurers, in the 
long term, is the 
challenge of the 
competition* 


Privatbankicrs Hauch, while an- 
other partnership bank, Sal Op- 
penheun Jr. & Cre. owns control of 
Coloniaand Nord-Stero insurance 

According to one banker, the 
com pro mise stipulates that banks 
do not sefl “insurance plans too 
aggressively but to use it as a de- 
fense, if the customer hhmseff asks 
for an insurance-linked savings 
plan, only.” This enables all sides to 
avoid making too much of the ma- 
jor difference between a hank in- 
surance policy and one sold by an 
insurance company: taxes. The 
savings-linked plans do not offer 
the tax breaks (hat rich pohey- 
bolders gel through buying insur- 
ance to earn interest and defer in- 
come. But insurance companies are 
bring cautions about stressing this 
advantage of buying insurance, for 
Tear that Bonn tax-reformers will 
decide to take the privilege away. 

Ahhoug h Deutsche and Com- 
merzbank, as well as the Bavarian 
banks, have introduced insurance- 
linked plans, Dresdner Bank does 
not intend to do so. its speaker, 
Wolfgang Roller; said. “In contrast 
to several competitors, Dresdner 
Runic does not offer an insurance 
service," he said. “We are not con- 
vinced that there is lasting demand 
for insured saving* plan. r Wo have 
thoroughly considered the pros and 


rag,® plan, 
attered the 


cons, especially in view of our tra- 
ditionally close working relation- 
ship with almost all inmsurancc 
companies." He adds, "Our busi- 
ness policy is based not on confron- 
tation but on cooperation with in- 
surance companies, following the 
tried and true division of labor be- 
tween banking and insurance." 

Perhaps a pure serious threat to 
the insurers, in the long term, is the 
challenge of the competition. With- 
in West Germany, the cartel office 
is seeking to increase the transpar- 
ency and comparability of insur- 
ance plans, to enable policy-buyers 
to know to what they are subscrib- 
ing. Banks like Bayerische Vcrci os- 
bank arc stressing the simple, read- 
able policy that they are offering, in 
contrast to what an insurance com- 
pany ombudsman calls “policy 
Greek." Hie director of the cartel 
office, Siegfried KJauc, has called 
for better information and more 
innovative policies. 

Maui while, in the European 
Court of Justice, the EC Commis- 
sion has brought a case against in- 
surance regulators in West Germa- 
ny (as well as in France, Denmark 
and the Netherlands) who are 
keeping out foreign insurance 
firms, thereby violating the free- 
establishment rales of the Commu- 
nity. Georg Bflchncr, president of 
the Organization of Goman Insur- 
ers and head of the WUrltembetg 
Fire Insurance Co., said that Ger- 
man insurers favor liberalization 
‘as long as protection of the cus- 
tomers is not harmonized down- 
ward to a lower ‘Euro-leveL’ " Offi- 
cials at Allianz, meanwhile, stress 
that some foreign insurance firms, 
through German subsidiaries 
(above all the Swiss companies), 
have managed to penetrate the 
German market. 

The problem was brought to the 
European Commission’s attention 
by British insurance groups, frus- 
trated at bring kept oat of German 
and other markets by protecting 

isb'most was the Ajftuxz attempt, 
subsequently defeated, to take con- 
trol at Eagle Star, a British insur- 
ance company. Allianz's bid was 
defeated by a counterbid from Bril- 
ish-American Tobacco, which 
yielded the German insurance firm 
what its press officer called “a 500- 
million-DM consolation prize.” 
Part of it has been invested since 
then in Riunione Adriaticft di Si- 
curiift of Milan; but the Munich 
insurance group says that it still is 
seeking a major acquisition, possi- 
bly in the United States. 

-VIVIAN LEWIS 


. 1 Hi 




he* 


.m 




■ v - ■ • • << ■ . 





Where 

Productiyity is 
first priority. 



Venture Capitol Is Aiding High-Technology Firms 


MUNICH — “German inves- 
tors warn double security — not 
just suspenders, but also a belt," 
according to Manfred Hegener, an 
entrepreneur in high technology. 

Mr. Hegener is a partner in a 
Munich chess-computer firm, He- 
gener & Glaser, one of two elec- 
tronics companies brought to the 
“telephone” stock market in 1984 
by Portfolio Management, a new- 
issuc s specialist. The “telephone" 
market functions as a kind of un- 
regulated over-the-counter system, 
with no market maker, in the Ger- 
man share-trading establishment 

The other 1984 Portfolio Man- 
agement new issue, BCT, launched 
in January, was seeking protection 
from its creditors by October. Since 
several other new issues in con- 
struction and brewing have also 
run into problems, the effect has 
been to cast a shadow on sound 
firms that Portfolio Management 
brought to market. And, as a result, 
the new- issue path for small high- 
tech companies has all but closed. 

For a small firm to go public is 
somewhat unusual in West Germa- 
ny. Bemd Ertl, manager of Portfo- 
lio Management and a former 
Bache broker, is generally praised 
for his courage, but many of his 
supporters feel he went in over his 
hod, both in getting company 
books audited and in judging high 
technology. But Mr. Ertl plans to 
go on with new listings, which he 
feels is still the best way for young 
films to get funding, and he has 
two issues in preparation. 

“The last new-issue boom in 
Germany was in 1928." Mr. Ertl 
said. But “from 1 3,000 listed stocks 
in 1932, Germany today has only 
2 . 000 ." 

Having resisted the idea of new 
issues when Mr. ErtTs firm first 
launched them, the large West Ger- 
man banks now are imitating it — 
with a difference. In 1984, under 


ts 


$8$ 


he 


Baden4Mjrnemb^ 
vjoftd over w«h productivity and achieve- 
ments tfi scence. technology, and industry, 
wan pioneers such as Ferdinand Graf von 
Zeppefin. whose tost dmgibte, the agar- 
shaped LZ-l. proved m 1900 me practi- 
cability d ngid airships. 

Zeppelin tsatytucaJ example of foe 
deep- rooted commitment to inventiveness 
and producfonly that has made Baden- 
Wurtiemberg one of West German/ 8 
most dynamic and prosperous stales. 

Productivity is a!so foe cornerstone of 
our banking philosophy at Lanoesbank 
Stuttgart which ranks among southern 
German/3 leading banks w&h assets of 

some DM 29 b«ioa 

Landesbank Sluttgarf is a government- 
backed bank offering a comprehensive 
range of commercial and investment 
services including trade financing, foreign 


exchange sntfsaairity dealing, and under- 
writing operators. With a tufl-servtee branch 
fo London, we have foe capabiHtes and 
flexbftty to meed foe financial requirements, 
of a growing tntemeiional clientele. In Zurich 
we ere represented by our artftaie Bank tor 
KredHund Auesoihandef AG (BKA) and in 
Pans by Banque Franco-Allemande SA 
(BFA). For refinancing purposes we are 
authorized to issue our own bonds. 

For a banking partner whose firs prior^y 
is productivity, pteeae contact Landasbank 
Stuttgart 

SruH o art Head Office 
Zeppelinbau, Laiflenschlaflefstrasse 2 
D-7000 Stuttgart t 

Telephone: (7H) 2049-0, Telex: 72 519438 






ftoifl 


Where money is productive 


72 BasinghaH Street, London EC2V5AJ 
Telephone: 01-6068651 Tetac 8814275 


Landesbank 


Rtuttaart 


WfcrtWWtfflWJ'fl 
Kurntmiraio Inndesbarfr. 
ficrvofirDiD 


top banking auspices, new -share is- 
sues were offered for Nixdorf, 
Porsche, Bosch and Henkel. These 
are not traded on the “telephone” 
exchange but on the regular stock 
markets and, like the Portfolio 
Management new issues, they were 
vastly oversubscribed. 

Some experts feel that venture 
funding for new technology com- 
panies should only come from the 
stock market at the end of a long 
nurturing process that has to be 
undertaken by people better able to 
take risks. 

“Everybody always talks about 
venture capital, but few people un- 
derstand it," said Eberhard F&rber, 
a partner in on electronics firm, 
PCS. “The Porfolio Management 
business has done harm,” he said, 
noting that his own firm has sought 
other forms of funding from pri- 
vate investors. 

In fact, one adviser to stan-up 
firms, Count Albrecht Matuschka, 
who has a large venture-capital in- 
vestment pool of 116 million Deut- 
sche marks (S38.5 million }, specifi- 
cally rules out public shareholding 
at this stage. The TRV group 
(Treuband-vermogffns\’erwaltung) 
“does not allow any private indi- 
vidual accounts in German ven- 
ture-capital investments." Instead, 
wealthy individuals, banks, insur- 
ance companies and foreign indus- 
trial companies and West German 
multinationals like Siemens pro- 
vide the seed capital. 

Another Munich-based consul- 
tant. Alfred Prominer, set up a firm 
three years ago precisely to bring 
together financing and entrepre- 
neurs. Mr. FSrber’s firm, for exam- 
pte. got funding from Harald 
Quandt, who owns 25 percent of 
PCS and is heir to the BMW for- 
tune, arranged by Mr. Prommer. 
Another German high-tech inves- 
tor, also in Munidi, is Helmut 
Rausch, a former Nixdorf execu- 


tive, who has become a venture 
capitalist. 

With shrewd investors, institu- 
tional funds, the occasional grant 
from the state or federal govern- 
ments and the emerging technology 
mutual funds, it may no longer be 
true that entrepreneurs have prob- 
lems raising money in West Ger- 
many. (There is also the Economic 
Community's Esprit program, 
which provides funding for small 
or medium-sized high-tech firms.) 

Mr. Fiirber estimates that 700 
million Deutsche marks have been 
collected for investment, including 
50 million from Citibank, but that 
only 20 million to 30 million at 
most have been invested to date. 

The situation, in fact, has 
changed in the last two years. Wer- 
ner Wolf of Electronic 2000, a suc- 
cessful Portfolio Management new- 
issue, sought working capital in 
1981 and was turned down by the 
banks. “Bayerische Vereins'bank 
actually sent us to Ertl," Mr. Wolf 
said. 

The Munich-based bank subse- 
quently has beefed up its commer- 
cial lending for technology’, but Mr. 
Forber, who has received a loan 
from the bank, said: “There is still 
not much understanding of tech- 
nology or how technological com- 
panies work. Banks are belter with 


a big house, with big machines.” 

Getting money' from big compa- 
nies is not always the answer, ei- 
ther. Helmut Kirschncr. of the 
TRV group, described what hap- 
pens: “Semens will say, ‘If this is 
so good, how come we didn't invent 
it ourselves? 1 ” 

Government venture-capital 
funds are often small, giving com- 
panies a maximum of 800.000 
Deutsche marks to develop a new 
product or company. In Mr. 
Farber's view, ji takes three to five 
times that amount to get into pro- 
duction and marketing. 

So, despite the available funding, 
there is still no real comparison 
with high-tech financing on the 
California scale. Mr. F&rber cites 
the case of PCSV arahrivaL Sun of 
Polo Alto, California, to show the 
difference. Both firms had about 
S10 million in turnover in 1983 and 
they expea to double that this year. 
But Sun got $5 million in stan-up 
capital and secondary bank financ- 
ing of S5Q million. Then Kodak 
bought 7 percott of Sun for S20 
million, capitalizing the whole at 
four times this year's expected 
turnover. 

“There is no possibility of get- 
ting that kind of money in Germa- 
ny," Mr. Faiber said. 

Mr. Prommer attributed the dif- 


CONTRIBUTORS 


ficulty to the attitude of the Ger- 
man investor. “He is more interest- 
ed in tax write-offs, building 
houses or financing ships,” he said. 

Count Maiuschka agrees that tax 
laws and charges for social insur- 
ance hinder entrepreneurship. “If 
an investor subscribes to a life-in- 
surance annuity, he can get a 6- 
percem return, tax free, in 12 
years,” he said. “If you are silly 
enough to sun a firm and hire 
people, your margin may equal 2 
percent and your tax rate will be 70 
percent." 

Firms like his and Mr. Prora- 
mer's actually help in corporate tax 
planning to reduce the bite from 
the very high basic corporate rate. 
“Big companies cut taxes by creat- 
ing provisions, but small firms 
don’t know how and can't afford 
tax advice." Mr. Prommer said. 

Other consultancy services to 
start-up companies ' might cover 
foreign-exchange management, in- 
terest management and presenting 
the books. In addition, almost all 
stan-up firms need marketing ad- 
vice. Financing consultants, there- 
fore, take on a broader role than 
merely putting up money; they can 
address problems that the new-is- 
sue method of Portfolio Manage- 
ment could not handle. 

— VIVIAN LEWIS 


HERB ALTSCHULL is a journalist based in 
West Germany. He is the author of “Agents of 
Power” (Longman. 1984), which looks at the role 
of the press in politics and economics. 

WARREN GETLER is the International Herald 
Tribune’s business correspondent in Frankfurt. 

VIVIAN LEWIS is a financial journalist based 
in Paris. 


WELLINGTON LONG and PEARL 
- MARSHALL are journalists based in Bonn. 


ULi SCHMETZER is a journalist based in 
Bonn and Rome. 


HENRY TANNER is a staff correspondent for 
the International Herald Tribune. 


Not an imitation. An original. The LEICA, 




4* 



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just one look, and you notice the difference. Handle 
it. and you know it’s something extraordinary. 

The LEICA R4 .W the LEICA R4s can Ire switched 
mjtjntlt between spot and integrated exposure metering. 
The LEICA R 4. a multimode automatic with 5 programs: 
aperture priority with either spot or integrated 
exposure metering, shutter-speed priority, program 
mode and manual. 

The LEICA R 4s, an automatic camera with 3 programs: 
aperture priority with spot or integrated exposure 
metering plus manual. With the world famous LEI CA_R 
lenses, from 15 to 800 mm. 

Leitz means precision. Worldwide. 










Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON WEST GERMANY 


, wi* 


SIEMENS 






M fj • 

< 


r\ " 


JUJl 











Every 12 hours: 

A new 

mainframe computer, 
running under 
the Siemens operating 
system BS2000, 
goes into 
service in Europe. 


The more widely distributed an operating 
system is, the more advantages it offers. 

This is common knowledge among computer 
users, and the reason is obvious: it is more 
worthwhile to generate software for an 
operating system with many users. And by the 
same token, a wide range of software 
gains more users for the operating system. 


Freedom to grow 

The Siemens operating system BS2000, 
currently in use in many parts of Europe, not 
only encourages such a development, but 
also guarantees any investment made in soft- 
ware products. When an enhancement of 
computer facilities, or simply an increase in 
computer power, is made, software invest- 
ments are only safeguarded if the operating 
system remains the same. This is the point 
about BS2000; it covers the full performance 
range of our state-of-the art 7- 500 series 
of general-purpose computers, a total hard- 
ware program of 10 different models, from 
medium-sized machines for new installations 
to the very largest ever developed and 
produced in Europe. 


operating expenses than other comparable 
operating systems, whether staff, system 
maintenance or training costs. 

There are currently over 2,600 computer 
installations running under BS2000 today. 

A base of this size, with its daily increasing 
number of users, demonstrates quite clearly 
that for BS2000 the future is already here. 


For further information, contact: 
Siemens AG, ZVW13, 

Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-8000 Munchen 83. 


There’s a 

Siemens Computer 
for every business. 


Real efficiency 


BS2000 is also widespread because it is 
efficient Diebold, the American statistical 
research organization, has determined that 
BS2000 generates 40 percent lower 


U- ? remn |i 


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BUSINESS /FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL X7, 1985 


** 


Page 17 



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IHTEBMATIOHAI MANAGER 

Staff Working From Home 
Cats Costs for Companies 

: By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

Iniermtuumul FttruU TntatM 

P ARIS —Those days when you bate your boss and arc sick 
of working nine to five, working ai home seems like the 
ideal solution. Peopleless offices may never become a 
reality, but cheaper and increasingly sophisticated micro- 
computers have encouraged some innovative companies to send 
their managers home. 

Pioneering companies include Rank Xerox Lul, a British 
. subsidiary of Xerox Corp- of the United States. This has 48 
_Vneiworkcrs,“ as the workers at home an: called. F International 
Ltd., a British computer-services company, has 650 out of 850 
employees working from home, and International Computers 
Ltd, also of Britain, has 200 full staff members working from 
home. In a bid to follow suit, 


Loneliness lurks 
behind the new 
freedom of 
managers. 


Hewlett-Packard Corp. of the 
United States also is advertis- 
ing for workers to work from 

home. 

There are two formulas for 
managers working from 
home. F International and 
I CL managers are full-time 
employees. Rank Xerox 

networkers, on the other hand, are part-time free-lancers who do 
-Apt receive social security and other company benefits. They get a 
■a»he- to two-year .contract, a fully ctjmpmenzed office at home 
and are encouraged to develop other business in addition to the 
contract they haw with Rank Xerox. AU networkers set up their 
own companies. 

Whether adopting the net worker or full-time staffer formula, 
companies can reduce overhead costs by cutting office-bound 
staff. Rank Xerox has even closed one of its London offices. 

T HE net worker formula involves other savings for compa- 
nies. Rank Xerox estimates that a free-lance network er 
who costs the company £10,000 (about 512,700/would cost 
£17,000 as a staff member. Arguably, a nelworker who knows the 
company may be more efficient than an outside consultant It is 
also easier and probably cheaper to get rid of a networker than it 
is a staff member. 

Rank Xerox estimates the project which was started in 1981, 
has been a success and plans to increase the number of 
networkers to ISO. “We must expect there will be failures, but we 
ihave not had any so far,” says Phi! Judkins, manag w (Britain) of 
‘ management services at Rank Xerox. 

Rank Xerox judges the success of the project by the number of 
networkers that have managed to grow, in two to four years, from 
a one-man, free-lance operation with only a contract with Rank 
Xerox to a small business. Out of 48 networkers, five networkers 
now have small businesses with annual sales of £100,000 or more. 

However, not all Rank Xerox's networkers have struck h rich. 
Some estimate they are making die same or a little less money as 
rith Rank 


‘getting] 

ork wdi together. 


1 managers 


when they were on staff with Rank Xerox. 

What Rank Xerox has found most difficult is i 
who are still in the office and networkers to work 
Networkers were so well trained in negotiating skills that the 
company ended up paying more for their services. 

“It was Lions 10, Christians 0. They just walked all over our 
managers,” says Mr. Judkins of Rank. Xerox, referring to 
networkers. “The staff managers were seeing these guys going out 
with all this freedom and making lots of money and were saying, 
‘Why not me* !* 

There is no doubt that working from home means greater 
.freedom whether you area networker on a contract or a company 
staff member. But loneliness is not hiriringfar behind Recogniz- 
ing the problem, Raftk Xexo&fftis irietUO^jfcep its networkers 
within the corporate family. 

“I felt very isolated during the first few weeks until I realized I 
had an emotional and business foundation with Rank Xerox," 
says Roger Walker, president of Chamberlains (85) Ltd, a 
(Continued on Page 19, Col 3) 



Late interbank rates an April 16, excluding fen. 

Offictd fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Pans. New York roles at 
4 PM. 


France 
Signs Pact 
In China 

$ 271 -Mt 0 ion Job 
For Phones Is Set 


Reuters 

PARIS — France is to sell 2L5 
billion francs (S277.4 million) 
worth of telephone equipment and 
manufacturing ability to China, 
Edith Cresson, France's minister of 
industry and foreign trade, said 
Tuesday. 

The accord, signed in 
covers the provision of 
telephone lines, the construction of 
a plant to manufacture telephone 
exchanges and telecommunications 
equipment, Mrs. Cresson said in 
Beijing. 

France will also provide 1.7 bil- 
lion francs in mixed credits to hdp. 
China finance its purchases, the 
French government said. 

The accord for telephone equip- 
ment sales will boost Trance's aim 
lo more than double iu trade with 
China by 1990. 

Mrs, Cresson, who was flying 
home Tuesday night after a six-day 
visit to C hina, was speaking to re- 
porters after agoing a new fi- 
ve-year bilateral trade agreement 
with her Chinese counterpart, 
Zheng Tuobin. 

Mrs. Cresson said Frahce was set 
on a path of lasting cooperation 
with China and was committed lo 
transferring advanced technology 
to Beijing. 

Bilateral trade was worth $623 
million in 1984, with French ex- 
ports totaling $243 miffion and im- 
parts totaling $380 million, accord- 
ing to French government figures. 

“Our goal is to more than double 
our (1984 trade) exchanges by 
1990,” Mis. Cresson said. 

Referring to the telephone 
equipment contract, Mrs. Cresson 
said it followed a sale earlier this 
year of exchanges with a capacity 
of 100,000 lines for Beijing She did 
not name the French suppliers in- 
volved in the latest contract. 

The previous contract was made 
by the slate-controlled Cie. G4n£r- 
ale d’EJ6clridt£, which said in Feb- 
ruary it was negotiating to build an 
exchange manufacturing plant in 
C hina. 

Separately, Mrs. > Cresson and 
Airbus Industrie also announced 
the formal sigiting in Beijing- of a 
contract for China to buy three 
wide-body twin^ngmed A3 10-200 
aircraft from the European consor- 
tium. 

The contract, concluded in Feb- 
ruary, allows for ddivoy of two of 
the airbuses in June this year and 
the third in May 1986. The con tract 
was Airbus Industrie's first ever in 
China. 

Mrs. Cresson said she had also 
.discussed in Beijing the budding of 
two nuclear-power reactors in Chi- 
na’s Guangdong province. 



Former Texaco Inc. refinery acquired by Trinidad and Tobago for $189-2 milli on. 

Trinidad, Reluctantly, Blip Refinery 

By Josep! 

New York 1 


>h Trcastcr 

New York Tunes Service 

MIAMI — With world oil prices down and 
many refineries being closed, die government of 
Trinidad and Tobago has reluctantly bought the 
sprawling Texaco refinery on the east coast of 
Trinidad, 

The government agreed to buy the money-losing 
refinery, officials say, to save more than 3,000 jobs 
and to stave off shock waves that would have been 
sent through the economy by a closure. 

“We didn’t want to take over Texaco," said 
Ronald Jay Williams, Trinidad and Tobago's min- 
ister of state enterprises in a recent interview in 
Trinidad. “They told us they were leaving," he 
said. “We had no choice." 

As Prime Minister George M. Chambers and 
Texaco executives were signing the purchase agree- 
ment at the end of March, Exxon was formally 
doting its refinery in nearby Aruba and Royal/ 
Dutch Shell and Curasao were discussing the fu- 
ture of the SheQ refinery in Curasao. Royal/Dutch 
had announced earlier that because of continuing 
losses it would have to dose the refinery unless the 
government bought two-thirds of the operation. 

Refineries have been shutting down not only 
because of the oversupply of oil on international 


markets but because many companies say they 
find h more cost effective to refine crude either 
where it is produced or where it is sold. 

The Caribbean refineries were built mainly to 
produce Aid oil for utility companies and factories 
in the northeastern United States. But these cus- 
tomers have reduced their needs through conserva- 
tion and, in some cases, have shifted to cleaner 
burning and less expensive natural gas. The refin- 
eries, some built more than 50 years ago, also find 
it difficult to compete with more efficient modern 
plants. 

Government officials in Curasao say they are no 
more eager to buy a refinery than was the govern- 
ment in Trinidad. Bat, like the Trinidadians, they 
are worried about the social and political impart of 
thousands of jobs being lost. 

Officials in Aruba, which has a population of 
65,000 compared with 1 2 million in Trinidad, said 
they never seriously considered buying the Exxon 

refinery. 

“The question never came up because of the 
massive investment that would have been needed," 
said Henry Croes, one of Aruba's political leaders. 

Mr. Croes said in a telephone interview that 
Aruba was still hoping to find an operating compa- 
(Conthmed on Page 19, CoL 4) 


U.S. Output Up 
0.3%; Housing 
Starts Soar 16% 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Production 
at U.S. factories, mines and utilities 
rose 0.3 percent last month foil ow- 
ing a decline in February, the gov- 
ernment reported Tuesday. 

In a separate report, the Com- 
merce Depanmem said bousing 
construction surged 16.2 percent 
last month, the biggest gain in al- 
most two years, as an increase in 
apartment building reversed a big 
drop in construction in February. 

Applications for building per- 
mits. a barometer of future activity, 
climbed 10.9 percent in March fol- 
lowing a 2.4-percent decline in 
February, Commerce said. 

The report on production by the 
Federal Reserve Board said the in- 
crease in March erased a revised 
0.2-percent drop in February. That 
decline, which was originally re- 
ported as a steeper 0.5 -percent 
drop, had been blamed on weather- 
related plant shutdowns. 

The increase left industrial pro- 
duction at 165.4 percent of its 1967 
base. While production is 2.9 per- 
cent higher than a year ago, it is stfll 
slightly below its 1984 peak of 166 
percent, which was readied last 
August. 

The March gain represented a 
widespread pickup in activity, the 
Fed reported. 

Manufacturing plants increased 
production by 0.4 percent follow- 
ing a 0.2 -percent February decline. 
The March activity included a OS- 
percent gain in the manufacture of 
durable goods, items expected to 
last three or more years, and a 02- 
percem rise in production of non- 
durable goods. 

Production of autos and auto- 
motive products rose 0.4 percent in 
March as cars were assembled at an 


annual rate of 8.3 million units, up 
from a rate of 82 million units in 
February. 

Production of business equip- 
ment was the only major category 
showing a decline, the Fed said. 
The 02-pereenl drop, which fol- 
lowed a 0. 1 -percent decline in Feb- 
ruary, was blamed on further re- 
ductions in demand for oil- and 

gas-well drilling equipment. 

Mines increased production by 
02 percent following a 1.6-percent 
decline in February, the Fed said. 

Meanwhile, the Commerce De- 
partment said construction of new 
homes climbed to a seasonally ad- 
justed annual rate of 1.895 million 
units in March after an 11.8-per- 
cent decline in construction activi- 
ty in February. 

The swings in both months oc- 
curred in apartment activity. In 
March, construction of apartments 
with five or more units jumped 53 J 
percent following a February de- 
cline of 39.6 percent. 

Construction of apartments with 
two to four units rose 17.9 percent 
last month following a 9 J-percem 
decline in February. 

Constructioir of single-family 
homes was up 23 percent in March 
to a seasonally adjusted annual to- 
tal of 1.15 million units, following 
an even larger 5.9-percent increase 
in February. 

The 16.2-percent increase in 
overall construction was the largest 
since a 17.7-percem jump in Mav 
1983. 

Commenting on the two reports, 
Larry Speakes, the presidential 
spokesman, said they “show the 
economy to be healthy, still grow- 
ing and still producing new jobs at 
a record rate." 


Sweden May Cancel Euroyen Loan 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Sweden has said it 
may caned plans for the first Eur- 
oyen syndicated loan for 100 bil- 
lion yen {$398.4 million) iT 12 ma- 
jor Japanese banks do not make a 
commitment by Thursday to par- 
ticipate, Tokyo banking sources 
said Tuesday. 

Sumitomo Bank LtcLjvhich won 
the mandate to arrangethe 30-year 
revolving facility by underwriting 
the entire amount, is how seeking 
sub-underwriters among other Jap- 
anese banks. 

Sumitomo officials declined to 
comment on the negotiations with 
Sweden, 

But a loan officer at one major 
Japanese bank said the 12 banks 
are not prepared to participate. 

He said the 12 want to avoid 
accusations from abroad of 


“dumping operations" by Japanese 
institutions, which they are worried 
could result if the pricing for the 
initial syndicated loan on the Eur- 
oyen market is unrealistically low. 

The facility, scheduled to be 
signed next month, carries an inter- 
est rate at ^rpereem above the 
London interbank offered rate (Li- 

bor). X i - 

Peter Engestrocra. director of the 
Swedish National Debt Office, 
asked to meet with loan managers 
from the 12 bank* Tuesday, the 
sources said. 

Mr. Engesiroem is in Japan to 
sign an accord for a 50- billion-yen 
Samurai bond. 

The 12 banks have told Sumi- 
tomo that the loan’s Interest mar- 
gin is too narrow. 

However, one banker who de- 


clined to be named said Sumitomo 
does not regard the spread as low. 
given Sweden's good creditworthi- 
ness. 

Despite this, the 12 banks believe 
the spread should be at least Vi- 
percent over Libor, although they 
concede that it is difficult to give 
price comparisons as no syndicated 
.Euroyen loans have, yet beat is- 
sued. 

One banker quoted Mr. Enges- 
troern, who could not be reached 
for comment, as telling potential 
syndicate members that Sweden 
currently has no need for yen but 
offered to make a long-term Eur- 
oyen issue to help Japanese banks 
start the market 

Japan’s Finance Ministry has al- 
lowed syndications of Euroyen is- 
sues only since April 1. 


Citicorp Raised Profit 24% 
In theFirst Quarter of 1985 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — Citicorp, a U.S. 
bank-holding company, said Tues- 
day that its first-quarter net rose 24 
percent from a year ago, primarily 
because of increases in revenue 
from interest-earning investments 
and fees. 

Citicorp reported a net of $277 
million, or $2.02 a share, for the 
first three months of 1985, com- 
pared with S223 million, or $1.64 a 
share, a year earlier. 

Net interest revenue rose 25 per- 
cent to S123 billion while revenue 
from fees and commissions was up 
27 percent to $462 million, tire 
bank said. 

“The strong results reflect con- 
tinued improvement of the world’s 


economy and a somewhat lessening 
of interest rates here in the United 
States and in other important econ- 
omies around the world,” John 
Reed, chair man of Gticoip, told 
the company’s shareholders at their 
annual meeting. 

Citicorp isthe holding company 
for the second largest U.S. bank. 

Separately, Bankers Trust New 
York Corp. reported first-quarter 
net rose 25 percent to $923 million, 
or $2.74 a share, from $74.1 mil- 
lion, or $236 a share, a year ago. 
Security Pacific Corp.. Los An- 
Jes, said Tuesday that net for the 
three months was up 82 per- 
cent to $733 milli on, or $1 a share, 
from $67.9 million, or 92 cents a 
share, a year earlier. (AP, UPf) 



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Bid by Turner for CBS Inc. Is Expected This Week 

By Sally 

New Ya 


Currency 


* 

Enolv. 

1445 Australian X 
IIM71 Andrian KMHUW 
MTbJ Bntafaa So. franc 
0735* CokhUubS 
oora DafUffttHWW 
HUB Final* markka 
OJ0O75 Cmt drachma 
0.1285 Hang Komi 


uu 

1-5031 

21.23 

4L3S 

usn 

tones 

433 

13U0 

7711 


Currency 


Dollar Values 

i 

Cool*. 

UWI irtoc 
own Kro*n (Mm 
13347 KmmJtidtoar 
■MO* MBtoy.rtnmH 
01141 Mantftnwa 
MSU PUR. POM 

aoaw PMtMoma 

am Seotiriyrt 


Per 

U55 

_ *. Carrmev 
Iwrfv. 

Per 

U5J 

09434 

(USD Stammi 

2H4S 

moo 

OS S. African rand 15147 

03004 

aflOU OKananwM 

141.10 

1«1 

00059 1BM.NMII 

14040 

073 

01131 Sated, krona 

15 

10725 

0520 Taiwan 1 

3950 

17W0 

030 TMMI 

27275 

340*3 

82723 UjLE.dJrtKU» 

34725 


f Sterftef.-I223 frfcnr 

(ol Commercial franc lb) Amounts flooded to t»f on* ewndlcl Amounts n*«*d to feuvoiw donor (*) 
(/nils afl 00 (xl Units of 1400 frJ Unite at UUffl 
N.Q.: not quoted; N A.: DOT owoHaOte. 

Sources: Banov* tto Benda* tBrutsots): Banco C om mercial* itathsna (Milan); Banov* 
National e ao Parts t Paris); IMF ISDN). Banaoo Afobe at Internationale mnvesnssemerd 
minor, rival, oirtiami. Otnenfata tram Routers and AP. 

I 


Bedell Smith 

York Tima Service 
NEW YORK —Ted Turner, the 
Atlanta-based broadcast and cable 
television entrepreneur, is expected 
to announce a bid this weds to take 
over CBS Inn, broadcast mdi 
and Wall Street sources have 
The announcement, one source 
familiar with the plan said, would 
be timed to follow the CBS annual 
meeting in Chicago Wednesday, 
and it could occur either Wednes- 
day or Thursday morning. 

One source with knowledge of 
the negotiations between Mr. 
Turner and his investment bankers 
said Monday that Mr. Turner had 
hired a financial public relations 
firm, Doremus & Co, to hdp plan 
the announcement. 



Eurocurrency Deposits 


April ft 


FtvnCh 


Swtu . 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Sterllaa Franc ICU . SDR 
1M. SVj - ter* SH - 5*i 4-tfc -SR ITU. ■ 12*1 10»k- 10 k. 9IW • **. BU. 

2M. !*.-■«. SVy ■ 5M 5R.-SK Uto-IMi VOVi - 1BH »W - »*. ■ T. 

3M. 8*> - Si. » 5 V. ■ 5 h. UK- 12 K ]Hk - 10 W. Ifc - ftk IK 

6M- 8*k-9 54h-4M. 12 - 121k 10*.. H M. f W. - t «. ' BVl 

ly. 9V> - Hi 6 vu - (K OK - 5K Ilh-U-K 11K-NA. fK - TO K M 
Rates apotKotn* to intarOonk decodes at si million minimum (or aaulvahuttt. 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty ! donor. DM. SF. Pound. FFI; Uayrts Booh (ECU!; Routers 
MOW. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


April 16 


1 mo. 

8w> -mi 

Source: Reuter*. 


Isms, 
ik. -a<K 


imec. 
*b >atk 


W* 


Ota -?*. 


Key Money Rates 

gated Stales 


dose rrw. Britain 


Discount Role 
Federal Fundi 
Prime Rare 
Broker Loan Roto 
Comm. Pasv. 30-I7V days 

3- montti Treasury Bills 
u-motirti Treasury B<Hs 
CD1 30-S9 «tav» 

CP's 40-BK davs 

West Germany 

Lombard Role 
OuernlaM Rale 
One Month interbank 
Vmeflin Interbank 

4- month interbank 




Intervention Rale 
Can Manev 
One- month interbank 
1-manth Interbank 

j-awith Interbank 


B I 

III 8 7/14 

Ufe TOVj 

Fli-fll TVj 

U7 >41 

751 MS 

020 UI 

3.15 &1S 

020 020 


440 400 

540 13Q 

MS MS 
4,10 - 4.10 
»20 ' *2S 


t«n nwr 
UK into 
10*1 iow 

MW Wfe 
W 5/14 W S/M 


Bank Bom Rate 
Call Money 
91-dav Treasury BIU 
SynonHi interbank 

Japan 

discount Role 
Coll Mooev 

IMav Interbank 


Clow Prev. 

12*. l» 
1314 ISM 
12 12 1/14 
12 1/32 n */l» 


5 5 
4.1/1 4"< 1/M 
4 5/14 4 5/14 




Dollar Is Lower 
htJSeYe Trading 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — The dollar, 
helped somewhat by encourag- 
ing UJS. economic data, recov- 
ered Tuesday from early morn- 
ing lows m New York, but still 
dosed down from Monday’s 
closing levels. 

AHer opening at 3,0140 

3.0040, the .dollar recovered to 
dose at 3.0220, up from Mon- 
day's dose ol 3.021. The British 
pound dosed at 51.2830, up 
from $1.2760. In London, the 
pound dosed at $1.2740, down 
from Monday's close of 
SI 2765. In Frankfurt, the dol- 
lar dosed at 3.009 marks, down 
from 3.030 Monday. 

Other late doDar rates in New- 
York Tuesday compared with 
late rates Monday, were: 15170 
Swiss francs, down from 
15260; 9.1950 French francs, 
down from 9215, and 1,928 
Italian lira, down from 1,933. 


Alan Quinby, senior vice presi- 
dent of Doremus, decli n ed com- 
ment on the report. 

Mr. Turner’s secretary in Atlanta 
said he was unavailable Tor com- 
ment. 

CBS slock rose SS25 a share 
Monday, to $109, but remained be- 
low its recent high of $114 and far 
below what Mr. Turner is expected 
to offer. 

The sources said he would offer 
at least $175 a share but added that 
the market might value his securi- 
ties, presumably including so- 
called junk bonds, at only $130 to 
$150 a sharei 

The stock of the Turner Broad- 
casting System was bid at $24.50 
Monday, up 50 cents from Friday. 

There were also rumors in the 
investment community Monday 
that CBS was preparing a defensive 
maneuver, either a “friendly” 
merger or a plan to lake the compa- 
ny private. ' 

William LiUey 3d, a senior vice 
president of CBS, reiterated his 
previously stated position that the 
company “has no plans to sell the 
company, take the company pri- 
vate, merge the company or liqui- 
date the company." 

He added: “We intend to fulfill 
our ambitions as an independent 
company and we believe we have 
the resources to do it. We don’t 
know what Turner is intending oth- 
er than his long-stated desire to 
own a network company.” 

Last month, Thomas H. Wyman, 
chairman of CBS, attacked Mr. 


Tomer’s fitness as a broadcaster 
following a speech to securities an- 
alysts. 

Mr. Turner was unqualified to 
run CBS, Mr. Wyman said, “be- 
cause he doesn’t have the con- 
science." 

However, one member of the 
CBS board, Walter Cronldte, the 
former anchorman of “The CBS 
Evening News,” said recently that 
he could not prejudge what Mr. 
Turner might ao at CBS. 

“It might be very much like be- 
coming president of the United 
States,* Mr. Craniate said. “Maybe 
the office makes the man. He has 
proved flexible in the past. What he 
says be is going to do and what he 
does are not always the same.” 

Investment banking sources said 
that Mr. Turner began working 
with EF. Hutton & Co. after he 
and Shearson Lehman Brothers 
parted company in the middle of 
last week. 

Daniel Good, executive vice 
president, director and head of 
mergers and acquisitions for Hut- 


ton. declined comment except to 
say: “Mr. Turner is a client of ours. 
He is known to us and we have 
been working with him on a num- 
ber of matters." 

According to investment bank- 
ing sources familiar with last 
week's negotiations, Shearson Leh- 
man withdrew from pursuing a 
hostile takeover of CBS after Mr. 
Turner decided not to take on a 
corporate partner. 


CROSSRATE SYSTEMS 

Foreign Exchange Management 


Fmveu&A. 

2i Avenue da Mail 
1205 Geneva 

Telephone: 41-22-28?244 
Telex; 422 556 FINV CH 


Crossraw Systems, Inc 
P.O. Box 99402 
Sen Fnnrisco 94109 
Telephone: 415441-6224 
Telex: 595974 XXXX SFO 


Sources: R e u te r s. Comn mUMfM* C 
'snmhL Lloyds Bank. Bank, at Tokyo. 


AM. PM. WW 
Mono Kona m4S +m 

Uw wnhaura 33Z25 — + XJ0 

PorU (IIS JiUai m» 3J1J4 — 151 

2mm . 33145 MMO - 1JS 

umn 33140 331140 —ITS 

MW Yon — TOM —1311 

0mcwi Hxtan Hr London, *ort* owl U»» 
MurwooMno and ctotlna ork* tor Hano Kara 
ad ZurUn, Mw York Conte* curriflt contract. 
AH KteM m U44 Bar aura. 

Source: Beaten. 


p= CHARTER =ji 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE” 


125 ft 12 
Wc arc chc 


Islands. 


Mediterranean Cruises Ltd. 

3 Stadfcw Sl, Athens. 
TeLi 3236494. Tbu 222288. 


0 



MmHmmi Avow* 
JrtTSUl&tTMt 
Now Vdric 10021 
CaM* The Cartyl* Now Ybffe 
biiwiurtlenal TMax 020602 
UM*phOM212.M«-1«00 

A «ymb*r of the Slurp Group 
■Inoaiscr 


pIptapman 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDU 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yiekted the Mowing 


M 1980; +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

M 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: -24% 

IN 1984; -34% 

o*of 

APRIL 11 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $ 91 , 061.43 

Call or write Royal Frazier at 
UtPMAN. TiendAnatysis and 
- Rjrtfcfe Management, Inc., 
WM Street Plaza, Now Ybrk. 

New 'itric 10005 212-269-1041 
TekwBMI 667173 UW 



In Jakarta 

there's a superb hotel 
that is more like a 
luxurious country dub. 

HOTEL BOROBUDUR 
INTER- CONTINENTAL 




THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL® 



•XlNTER-CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

Jalan Lapangan Banteng Selatan, (P.O. Box 329k 370108. Telex: 44156 
R>r reservations call: Hong Kong: 5-8440311/3, 

Tokyo: 2150777, Singapore: 2202476, Osaka: 2640666, 
of call vour nearest Inter ’Continental sales office. 


/ 









Tiiesd^ 

NtSE 

Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


(Continued from Page 8) 


M 18 

10 

131 

88 8 

9 

743 

272 77 

9 

27 


11 

140 

186 37 

11 

M2 

18* *2 

6 

482 

.17r 8 

37 

165 

180 XI 

n 

308 

2.12 38 


1 



«7 

80 18 

11 

107 

.14b 28 

9 

107 


3 

12 

81*34 

12 

4 

80 3* 

35 

369 

i jn 37 

36 

1463 

80 8 

7 

253 

80 *2 


18 

40 25 

60 

171 

183 97 
1180 11.1 

7 

2530*1 

240 128 


1 ■ 

*48 1X1 


39 

*33 1X1 


41 

186 *6 

12 

TO . 

216 78 

9 

306 : 

480 107 


soar 

*04 1X9 


21701 . 

74- 18 

1* 

47 : 

280 58 

7 

148 : 


14 

708 

89 7 

280 *9 

26 

12 

2®r 

72 27 

19 

229 

180 38 

9 

5 • 

280 95 
XW 108 

8 

T, 

180 125 

8 

513 

350 1X1 


290z 

184 1*1 


28QBz 

180 142 


2000z 

7.15 1*2 
984 1*5 


Si 

852 168 


360z 

878 1*5 


44QZ ! 

IN 1*8 


110KI 


2 

542 



xmz; 


8 


tov. 

7* 

184 3ft 

.is u i a n% 

5 2 M 

IJ6 118 10 3ZI 14ft 

.12 8 24 9S 

is un 103 

7 *20 
134 U 12 710 

2 2ft IS OuakSO JO 17 24 2575 2128 

11% At Quanax 36 57 *14 

34ft 23 Quarfar lit O I 1« 3» 

25% M GkRrfl J4a 1.1 17 41 21% 

.14 23 
MM 25 13 
250 U 
*00 42 
272 7J 
245 M 
20 U I 


27 27V. 

28 28% 

12% 12% 

35 35 

42 42 

43 43 
17% 17% 

54 54 

19% 30% 

42 42 

44 44 

44 44 +1 

61 61 -H 

40% 60% — % 
78% 78% + % 

3% 1% — Vx 

11U— % 
4% 

14% + Mi 
% 
U 
% 

21% 21% 

9 9 — % 

32V. 32% + % 
21% 21% — % 
% 


15% 15% + 
13% 13% + 
X 30% + 


152 *3 
250 84 
250 120 
212 114 
2X 11J 
625 125 
1550 14.1 
1442 1X5 
1*00 121 
1-00 XB 

I JO u 
IJ0 127 
pi 190 133 
Pf 444 135 
Pf 454 1X2 
pf 724 117 
pf 736 114 
pf 220 IX? 
Pf 350 13J 
pr 292 128 
Pf 844 140 
1048 123 
40 XI 
B84 I2S 
127 12J 
121 
112 
125 
25 
107 


3190 

3*ft 

174 

27ft 

60 

54 

1022 

27 

■a 

34% 

4ft 

6/8 

82% 

137 

2% 

< 

35% 

1977 

29% 


as 


wj*r 




IOC 25 W 
40 


X 15 15 
40 43 34 
212 110 
130*143 
153*1X3 10 
12 

80 24 17 
20 

JO 21 10 
13 

X 20 9 
144 34 8 
212 105 
212 124 
144 50 7 
212 73 
32 U 24 
JO 34 12 

1J4 50 12 
70 27 13 
44 34 9 
340 41 a 

LOO 28 4 
450 50 
148 44 IS 
140 90 
50 17 10 
12 

1.12 27 7 
140 40 X 

220 184 6 
244 44 10 
100 20 10 
200 25 9 

30* 13 3-1 
85* 2 31 
46 42 17 


•-U-J 


45% +1% 
9%— M 
19% — % 
23 + % 

12% 

12 % + % 
B%— % 

"SSzR 

37% 4- % 

4% 

1% + n 

10 % 

45% +1% 
W% — Ml 
25% 

32% + % 
28% + % 
% 
% 


U.S. Futures April ie 


Spcnon season 

Hlotl Low 


Open Won Law Owe Cho. 


Grains 


B. 


Metals 




u! 






206 XI 
L LH 103 
Lpf 440 128 
PL Of 450 124 
PLdPfXe 125 
PLdPrt.90 120 
PL«r 840 129 
Ldpi£25 124 
LdPtSUS 124 
LPf 934 109 
L or 11 .00 121 
.or 1X00 128 
.pr 800 1X2 
pr 870 1X2 
220 SO 
250 44 
140 47 
220 45 
130 7.1 
40 1.1 
140 12 
54 24 
l-26cl41 
78 14 
140 24 
£72el*4 
147 97 
.... 100*204 


26% — % 
17% 

TO-' 4 

34 — % 


5% 

29%— % 
24 + % 

8ft — % 
10U— % 
37 + % 
22% + % 
25ft— % 
37ft + % 
12% 

18ft 

U 
% 
% 


Vfr 


SOYBEANS CCBT) 

5000 bu rntnl aura- dollars ppt bushel 
777 570% Mav 593 577 

77? 500% Jisl 579% 605 

756 502 Aue 602 607 

671 501 Sep 601 603% 

648 503% Nov 605 608% 

679 574% Jan *17% 61? 

742 606% Mar 637 639 

779 6.15 May 

64? 441 Jul 

Erf. Sales Prev.Sales 27500 

Prey. Day Open lot 6X07/ off 477 
SOTBBAN MKAL(CBT) 

100 (MOHdMiara per ten 
20500 12400 May 13050 I307U 

19640 13670 Jul 13670 13*08 

18000 13740 Alls 13970 13970 

17950 14000 Sep 14210 14220 

T80J0 14250 OCt 14500 14500 

18400 14750 Dec 1#40 14900 

16300 14900 Jan 15150 15150 

20650 15400 MOT 15650 15650 

16250 16000 May 16100 1<UM 

16700 16700 Jul _ 

Eat. Sales Prev.Sales 9387 

Prev. Day Open InL 46547 off 41 2 
SOYBEAN OIL CCBT) 

60000 lbs- dot tars per 1 nibs. 

HAS 2280 MOV 3150 3240 

3225 2270 Jul 3820 3078 

31.17 2250 Aug 2935 3XD0 

3030 2250 S«P 2X45 29.10 

29.15 2270 OCt 2750 2X10 

2830 2270 Dec 2670 2740 

2705 2X60 Jan 2675 27.17 

2770 2440 Mar 2630 2430 

2648 2440 May 

Erf. Sales PrevTsata* 19727 

Prev. Dav Open Hit. 5*012 off 1056 
OATS CCBT) 

5000 bu minimum- dollars perbushel 
1.91 146% May 147% 148 

178% 143 Jul 144%. 144% 

179 140 Sep 141% 141% 

102% 144 Dec 

144% 144% Mar 

Erf- Sates Prev. Sates 215 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 2465 up 18 


282 +J1U 
280% 

349% —40% 
244% -jh% 
222 — 01 % 
278 — v01% 

280 — 01% 


£92 574% —08% 

379% 403 +08% 

601% 605V. +jn% 
608 601% 

504% 6d06U —MV, 
4.17 4.17% 

434% 638% 

634% 

60 


Team 

13400 13430 
13700 13730 
TJPOO 13900 
14230 14230 
147.10 14750 
14930 14950 
15600 15518 
15900 15900 
16210 


3150 3208 
3002 3040 
2930 2940 

2837 2800 
2745 2770 

2658 2708 
2640 2645 

2430 2672 


147% 148 +80% 

144% 144% 

141% 141% +JS% 
144% + jfflft 
147V. +80V. 



Jiil 








Livestock 


CATTLE {CME1 
48)000 Ibs^ cents per Uh 

6900 6155 Apr 6175 6200 6005 4007 

6950 6357 Jun 6372 6305 6290 6330 

6747 6215 Aug 6430 6450 6375 6X97 

6570 6140 Oct 6270 6270 6245 6262 

4745 6160 Dec 6305 6370 6345 6X65 

6745 6435 Feb 6430 6645 6*10 6*10 

<757 6555 Apr 6£45 

Erf. Sales 1*863 Prev.Sales 17304 
Prev. Dav Open Int 59464 off 103* 

FEEDER CATTLE (CMB) 

4*000 Ibsr cents per fb. 

7*20 6505 Apr 65.15 6570 6455 *440 

7275 6475 May 6505 4*18 6502 6535 

73.79 6640 AW 6830 4845 £752 6772 

7300 6700 Sep MOO 6X10 6745 6755 

7232 <7.10 OCt 6702 6770 6730 6730 

7330 6&50 Nov 6850 6870 6805 6839 

794B 6900 Jan 6930 

Erf. Sales Prev.Sales 2490 

Prev. Day Open Int. 9374 off 153 
HOG5CCME) 

38000 IbL- eentt per Rl 

5445 4240 Apr 4305 4450 4375 4*27 

5540 4775 Jun 4X50 4075 4800 4857 

5577 4X95 Jul 5050 3075 4907 5040 

5*37 4750 Aug 50.10 5045 4945 5X10 

5175 4500 OCt 4700 4735 4*70 4700 

5005 4630 Dec 4X20 4830 4700 4775 

5000 4635 Feb 48JD 4800 4838 4&K1 

4735 4545 Apr 4540 4545 ' 4500 4555 

4905 47.QS Jun 4835 

Erf. Sales 7362 Prev.Sales *625 
Prev. Dav Open Int 243)7 off40S 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

3X000 Ibsr cents per R>. 

8200 41.15 May 6*80 6545 6X10 <530 

8247 6215 Jul 6*38 6*70 6430 6*15 

SX65 6030 AW 6*65 6535 6X10 6*65 

7630 6X15 Feb 7070 7070 4955 7076 

75.4® 6*68 Mar 7000 7830 69 JO 7010 

7340 7SU0 May 7130 

76JU 7X90 Jul 7130 7100 7X00 7140 

Erf. Sates 7445 Prev.Sales 6497 
Prev. Day Open Int. 12324 aft 307 


Industrials 


Financial 


COFFEE C(NYCSCR) 

37JW (bs-cents per lb. 

15200 12201 May 14825 14075 

14930 12130 Jul 13940 13? 75 

147J0 12738 S*P 13930 13950 

14*55 12935 Dec 13930 13935 

14350 12X50 Mar 13X25 13X40 

14275 13130 May 13X50 138J0 

14050 13570 Jul 13X00 13X00 

13770 13273 SOP 

Est Sales 1460 Prev. Sato 2463 
Prev. Day Open Int. 13300 up 243 
SUGARWORLD T1 1 NY CSCE) 

1 T2300 lb*- cents porlb. 

1070 341 May 342 265 

*75 375 Jul 303 305 

9.75 430 Sep *02 *83 

933 *05 OCt *» *14 

775 448 Jan 455 *55 

933 *96 Mar 533 '534 

7.15 £19 May 527 527 

649 540 Jul £47 547 

Erf. Sales 8441 Prev.Sales 12395 
Prev. Day Open InL 85400 off 680 
COCOA (MY CSCE) 

10 metric tans- S per ton 

2570 1998 May 2190 2400 

2400 1998 JUl 2235 2Sffl 

2415 1987 Sep 2191 2194 

2337 1945 Dec Zl« 2190 

2190 1955 Mar 


139JO 14037 
13930 13945 
138*5 139.15 
13X50 138*4 
m05 13X53 
13800 I3XS0 
13*00 13X00 
13530 


33} X61 

374 379 

332 197 

*04 437 

*40 *47 

435 439 

£17 £21 

£35 543 


2351 2301 

2185 2221 

2140 2180 

2115 2140 

2140 


US T. BILLS UMMI 
SI mlUton- pteofl 00 PCL 
9LB9 87.14 Jun 9106 9207 

9143 8*74 Sep 9X39 915B 

9036 85.77 Dec 9033 91.12 

9040 MJJS Mar 9844 9076 

9033 17 jn Jan mas tool 

9009 SUM Sep 90.14 91125 

8942 8905 Dec 

89.58 8938 MOT 

Erf. Sates 17.270 Prev. Sates £913 
Prev. Day Open InL 38781 up 258 
If YR. TREASURY CCBT) 

suxuno prln-ptta 32ndsof 180 Pd 
82-3 70-9 Jun 8030 81-1* 

81-13 75-18 Sop MS BO-19 

80-22 75-13 Dec 790 7726 

8M 75-14 Mar 70-22 77-3 

79-05. 74-30 Jun 

Erf. Sales Prev. Salmi £070 

Prev. Day Open InL 40364 oft 53 
US TREASURY BONDS CCBT) 
apct-tioaoo(H>tsX32naaofioopct) 
77-15 57-20 Jun 71-5 71-22 

76-2 57-10 Sep 70S 70-21 

76-5 57-8 Dec <74 49-36 

72-30 . 57-2 Mar «-21 6M1 

70-16 SMB Jtm <7-00 4M 

70-3 56-29 SCP <7-10 <7-19 

69-26 54-25 Dec 66-22 67 

69-12 56-27 Mar. 664 66-15 

<9-2 63-12 Jun 

68-26 63-4 Sep 65-11 60-18 

68- 8 62-24 DSC 

Erf.Sales Prev. SatetlOl J«9 

Prev. Day Open IM.2I1435 up 33 
GNMA CCBT) . - ■ 

SWUM prtn-pn&raidaol IN Pd 

69- 29 57-17 Jtm 69-26 SMS 

69-4 59-13 Sep 69-3 69-6 

68-13 59-6 Dec *8-18 <8-18 

68 5X50 Mar 

*7-8 58-25 Jun 

67-3 65 Sep 

Erf.Sales Prev.Sales 44 

Prev. DaV Open Int 1757 up 8 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMMJ 
81 mltlton-ptsoflOOpct 
913* 8530 Jun 91.12 9147 

9047 8S4» Sep raw 5087 

90-19 MJ4 Dec 9X23 9X34 

8979 B*56 MOT 

?V4« 8643 Jun 89-56 89J* 

89.17 8788 Sea 8925 8925 

8X36 8X34 0*C 8X99 8X99 

Erf.Sales <70 Prev. Sates 174 
Prev. Day Open lot. £590 off 102 


9182 9286 
9X36 9X57 
9083 9X14 
9059 9077 
9025 9049 

90.14 w:u 
93 J81 
8979 


8829 81-15 
80-1 88-18 
794 79-25 

78-92 799 
78-14 


71-3 71-22 

70-3 70-21 

494 4995 

48-15 4841 
<794 484 
OS <7-19 
66-19 <7 
684 66-15 

<6 

654 <5-18. 

454 


*9-21 6949 
6840 894 
66-18 68-11 
68 

<7-1* 

<79 


91.12 9144 
9089 9X90 

9X16 9039 

89.99 
>981 8987 

8924 8927 
8099 89.10 




n '.f -/'-■! '«vmI 

[1 

i I r l Mi/ 1 '•I/ 1 ' 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody's 96040 f 

Reuters 1,886-90 

P-l Futiirne _ NLA. 

Com. Research Bureau- NX 

Moody's : base 100 : Die 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Rmitars : base 100 : Sep. IB, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 7974. 


Previous 
957 JO f a 
1,901.90 
12165 ’ 

24X50 5 










272 41 10 
382 1X7 
240 104 
172 *4 
180 XI 9 
.12 J 19 
20 27 4 
.13 4 14 

14 

124 72 9 
680 77 S 
53 17 15 
128 U 9 
82 34 48 
27 

172 32 10 
182 *7 fl 
124 £8 10 
140 29 15 
20 48 1* 
84 27 11 
22 21 I 
178 34 I 
280 57 ■ 

10 

82 32 10 
76 34 11 
l no xi u 
1780117 
.12 36 
76 32 10 
76 47 10 
170 48 13 
120 72 U 
148 52 U 
140 37 9 
40 22 11 
1.18 28 10 
124 £7 15 


220 42 11 

225 22 
180 4.1 12 

26 

40 XI 11 
42 1.1 14 
JD 54 Ml 
188 14 11 
240 7.1 

19 

1.92 32 14 
26 XO 16 
27e 4 18 

226 72 9 

18 

12S 77 « 
180 44 M 




270 

£0 

450 118 

82 

28 

80 

33 

78 

8 

88 

17 

180 

85 

17 

180 

*1 

180 1I.T 

88 

£9 


Paris Commodities 

April 16 


him Lew Bid ASH Cliye 

SUGAR 

French fronts per metric too 
Aw 1280 1260 1275 1276 -Z7 

oa 1220 1210 1210 1215 —28 

Dec N.T. N.T. 12*0 1275 —28 

Mot N-T. N.T. 1455 1460 —32 

Mov 1460 1455 1800 1815 —32 

OCt N.T. N.T. 1845 1875 New 

Erf. voi.: 540 lots at 50 ions. Prev. actual 
uto: 1457 lots. open Interest: 1X960 
COCOA 

French francs per 100 ke 
MOV 2250 2210 2218 2220 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2205 — 

Sen 2200 1195 1171 1183 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2287 2290 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2280 — 

Mar N.T. N.T. — X129 

Jly N.T. N.T. — 1125 

Erf. vaL: 159 tots of 10 tons. Prev. 

Bales: 32 tots. Open Interest: 802 
COFFEE 

French tram per IK kg 


Dividends April 16 


20 % + % 
40% 

37% + % 
11% 

4ft — % 
1% 

18% + % 
19% 

7ft— % 
22 — 2 
9% + % 
27ft— % 
3ft— % 
7ft— % 
25% 

8 % 


% 

49% + % 
7*. —1ft 
44% + % 
26ft + % 
25% — ft 
23ft— % 
10ft— % 
9ft 

29ft + % 
4ft + ft 
7ft 

35 — % 
ft 


London Commodities 

April 16 


Close Previous 
Htoh Lew Bid Ask BW Ask 

SUGAR 

Sterling per metric too 
May 10X00 10680 10720 10720 10*80 10640 
Aw 11380 1 11 40 11240 11160 11120 11140 
Oct 11*40 11*40 11*00 11620 11440 11440 
Dec 12280 12280 12280 12280 12280 12X00 
Mar 13520 13340 13*00 13*40 13320 13380 
May N.T. N.T. 13980 13940 13X20 13980 
Aw N.T. N.T. 14*00 T4£D0 14340 14580 
Volume: 1237 tots of 50 Ions. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric tan 

May 1.934 1.920 1,920 1.921 1736 1737 
Jhr 1715 1885 1885 1890 1717 1,918 
Sep 1876 18*4 1844 1845 1877 1880 
Dec 1820 1795 X795 17*7 1822 1823 
Mar 1810 1797 1798 1799 1821 1822 
May 1823 1801 1801 1803 TJQB 1830 
Jly 1830 1830 1800 1810 1815 1840 
Volume: 48Z7 lots otlQtonv 
COFFEE 

Starting per metric ten 
May 2860 2822 2890 2853 2830 2832 
Jly 2.107 2861 28% 2898 2871 2872 
S*P 2,145 2.102 2736 2.140 2709 2712 
Nov 2771 1716 2,160 27*4 2,136 2.138 
Jan 2.166 X130 2.160 2,165 Z133 ZI38 
Mar £135 2711 2.133 2740 2710 ZI15 
May 2700 £100 2.110 2720 2700 2710 
Volume: 3293 lots of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

(IJ. dollars par metric toe 
Apl 23075 22980 22X00 22980 22X75 22980 
May 22780 225-50 22X50 22575 225.00 22575 
Jen 22475 22275 22275 22100 22175 22X00 
Jly 22*00 22280 22275 22380 22280 299 75 
Aug 22*80 22575 224 JO 224.38 23480 22475 
Sep 22X00 22X00 32380 229 JO 22675 23788 
OCI N.T. N.T. 22680 23200 229TS 229 JO 
Nov N.T. N.T. 22480 23400 22780 233J0 
Dec N.T. N-T. 22680 33100 22380 23X00 
Volume: 1810 tots of 100 ton* 

Sources: Routers and London Pmfrotmmt Ex- 
change fp aseffJL 


U.S. Treasury Bfll Rates 
April 15 


Asian Commodities 

April 16 


Cash Prices April 16! 


London Metals 

April 16 



Offer 

Bid 

YloM 

Pnw 

YMf 

3-monftt 

BJ0 

£05 

034 

132 

4-month 

X25 

833 

*72 

X76 

One voor 

844 

X42 

9.15 

».U 

Source: Salomon Brothers 





Volume: o tots of 35 tons. 

Source: Rwvtwrs. 


AMEX Highs-Lows April 16 


CoflnFdswts D uu le e Pn ds QtonfFood 
HoMPropwt Ionics LotitehPrs 

PGEiSTpfs PLMT64pf SwndrSrpf 
SCEoruofA TostvBk A Telon Rnch 
OlaHttr* SferroSmn TumerCp 
Lvdolli 


ActonCp 
Salem Corp 


Him Ext 
Sclent L» 


Hlndertlter 
McRae A 


46ft 33% Xerox 380 *5 18 4402 46ft 45ft 45ft 4- ft 

52 45% Xerox pf £45 HU 763 51% 51% 51% -I- % 

39 19 XTRA 84 24 TO 8 36ft 2<ft 26ft + % 


30 24 ZbleCp 172 58 8 272 27% 26% 26% - 1% 

23% 19% ZalepfA 80 38 3 21 31 21 — % 

24% 13ft Zapata 84 58 18 5» 15% 15% 15% — % 

58 3D zavra 80b J 14 438 57 55% 37 44 

31% 18% Zen I thC 7 230 21% 2Dft 31 — % 

21% 14ft Zeros 17 29 IM IBft ISft + % 


Producer Prices Rise in Italy 

Reuters 

ROME— Producer prices in Ita- 
ly nose 0.8 percent in February af- 
ter a 1.4-percem rise in January 
arid a 1.0-perceni increase in Fet>- 
niary, 1984, the government said 
Tuesday. 


A Securities Firm 
Closes in Arkansas 

The Associated Press 

LITTLE ROCK, Arkansas — 
Another small securities firm, Col- 
lins Securities Corp.. closed its 
doors Friday. 

Tlie office of the Arkansas Secu- 
rities Commissioner said Tuesday 
that Collins', closing relates to its 
transactions with Brokers Capital 
of Chicago. Brokers Capital is a 
securities dealer that halted opera- 
tions last week because of losses 
stemming from the collapse of yet 
another securities dealer, Bevill, 
Bresler.& Schulman Asset Manage- 
ment Corp. of New Jersey. 

Bevill Bresier last week filed for 
protection from its creditors under 
federal bankruptcy laws. The Secu- 
rities and Exchange Commission 
also, charged .Bevill Bresier with 
fraud for allegedly misrepresenting 
its financial condition. 


DM Futures Options 
April 16 

R. Gemxn Wort -nSIBB aakx cedi «r man 


5tflka CaUt-Srfflt! Prfl-Srftto 

fhiCB JM SB* Dk Jn sSdbc 

23 — — — 081 009 _ 

28 JTfl - — Q81fi.>2.— 

29 *» *54 — B1U XU — 

X X» 153 *16 XU ail — 

31 US 2.W 150 o.n uo 07* 

R 1*1 Z15 271 X3B 880 184 

B W W 215 07* 170 - 

31 XU 1.17 IJ0 U2 ljJ _ 

35 070 087 175 202 276 — 

Estimated total viL £304 
Mil : Man. vrf. Z7A mm Irf. 37841 
Prti : Mon. vat. 2407 Bam 1x1.22*29 
Source: C ME 


S&P 100 Index Options 
April 15 


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Prk» M Mtf JBlJIt 

iss n b - - - 

MB 1IM m - — 

US TT% JJ - - 

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IN l ft 3ft 5ft ift 

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MS -.--to'.- 




































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


^TTT[?^ 






Troubled Eastern Posted 
Record Net in First Quarter 


Ctmsptled by Oir Staff From thspaichn 

NEW YORK — Eastern Air 
Lines said Tuesday it earned S24.3 
million, or 33 cents a share, in the 
first quarter of 1983, against a 
S2B.1 -million loss a year earlier. 
Revenue rose 13.6 percent, to $1.22 
bQtion, from $1,07 billion. 

The results were Eastern's best 
evo- for any quarter and marked 
the third consecutive quarterly 
profit for the Miami-based airline, 
which lost S3 614 million from 
1981 through 1984. Eastern earned 
S3.6 million and 510.7 million in 
the third and fourth quarters of 
1984. 

Frank Borman, Eastern's chair- 
man, attributed the improved re- 


sults to stronger passenger traffic, 
cost controls and the March strike 
against Pan American World Air* 
ways, which helped divert passen- 
gers to Eastern. The results also 
included an extraordinary credit of 
51.68 million for Lax-loss carryfor- 
ward and a $28,9-raillk>D reserve 
for employee profit-sharing. 

Meanwhile, Eastern's machinists 
unexpectedly rejected Monday a 
three-year contract that union ne- 
gotiators had accepted. The ma- 
chinists joined Eastern's flight at- 
tendants in ng'ccting new contracts 
that were agreed to in principle 
earlier this year. Eastern's third 
major labor group, its pQots, rati- 
fied the pact (AP. Return). 


Wheeling Files 
ForChapterll 

The AaocuiinJ Press 

PITTSBURGH — Wheel- 
ing-Pitisburgh Steel Corp. said 
Tuesday that it would seek pro- 
tection from creditors under 
federal bankruptcy law after 
failing to win concessions from 
creditors. 

The company, in a statement 
given to reporters before a news 
conference, blamed die United 
Slcelworkcrs of America union 
for its financial plight. 

Under Chapter 1 1, a compa- 
ny voluntarily seeks a court’s 
protection from creditors while 
it tries to reorganize its fi- 
nances. 




Nippon Credit R ank Changes Key Managers 


Return). 


Rhone-Poulenc Net Soared 200-Fold in ’84 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Rhfine- Poulenc, the 
state-owned chemical company 
that is France's biggest, said Tues- 
day that net increased nearly 200- 
fold last year, to 1.98 billion francs 
(about 5198 millim)). from 98 mil- 
lion francs in 1983. 

Saks last year rose 18 percent, to 
a record 51.2 billion francs. 

The results continued the com- 
pany’s turnaround from a loss of 
844 minion francs in 1981 But 
Lriflc Le Floch-Prigent. the compa- 
ny’s chairman, said Tuesday that 
first-quarter sales showed a smaller 
rate of gain than year-carlier results 


Staff Work 
From Home 

(Continued from Page IT) 
management consulting company. 
When Mr. Walker famed his one- 
man limited company in 1981, he 
had set 1985 as the vear of reckon- 
ing which explains the name of the 
company. He now has 33 employ- 
ees and mutual sales of £250.000. 

“Comradeship is something one 
docs miss, you can’t go in in the 
morning have a coffee and com- 
plain. You need a specific tempera- 
ment to work on your own. A lot of 
people would be on the verge of a 
nervous breakdown,’' says John El- 
lis, director of J&J EDis Associates 
LuL, a one-man operation. Before 
leaving Rank Xerox, Mr. Ellis con- 
trolled all of Rank Xerox's interna- 
tional facilities. He is now project 
director for Rank Xerox's new 
headquarters near London. 

Working from borne can also 
make one fed that one is missing 
out on important changes in the 
company, “I like working at home 
but 1 miss the possibility of bounc- 
ing ideas off people and the intel- 
lectual chaflehge of pushing 
-through change in a large organiza- 
tion” says Roy Johnson, who is 
about to expand his one-man train- 
ing and management consulting 
company, Workways Ltd. When 
working for Rank Xerox, Mr. 
Johnson was international manag- 
er of service planning and develop- 
ment. 


and that the second quarter looks 
“more difficult." 

Mr. Le Floch told reporters and 


financial analysts that first-quarter 
sales rose 9.5 percent, to 14.56 bil- 
lion francs, compared with a 22- 
percent rise in the year-earlier peri- 
od. He did not provide a 
first-quarter earnings projection. 

A vigorous U.S. economic recov- 
ery ana the high dollar fueled ex- 
pansion “to the advantage of world 
chemical companies, Mr. Le 
Floch said. He noted that 14 per- 
cent of RhOne- Poulenc’s sales last 
year were in dollars, second to the 
French franc, which accounted for 
40 percent. 

Mr. Le Floch said he expected 


that a weaker dollar will nuke larg- 
er U.S. chemical companies “more 
aggressive" in world markets. But 
he emphasized that Rbdae- Poulenc 
was well positioned to compete fol- 
lowing last year’s corporate reorga- 
nization and cost-cutting program. 

He said the company's textile 
division, which accounted for 33 
perce n t of loud sales last year, had 
an operating profit of 369 million 
francs following an operating loss 
of 128 million francs in 1983. Profit 
of the chemical division, which ac- 
counted for 13 percent of sales, 
rose to 3.17 billion francs in 1984 
from 133 billion francs and 7 per- 
cent of sales the year before, Mr. Le 
Floch said. 


By Brenda Hagerry 

ImemaiKwu! Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Nippon Credit 
Bank Lid. has announced changes 
in the top management of its of- 
fices in Paris, Frankfurt and Lon- 
don. 

Hie Tokyo-based bank said Hi- 
toshi Ta kahas hi has been named 
chief representative of its Paris of- 
fice. succeeding Yoichiro Kawa- 
moto, who was transferred to To- 
kyo as deputy general manager of 
the international finance coordina- 
tion division. Mr. Takahashi was 
manager of the bank's securities 

division in Tokyo. 

In Frankfurt, Kenjiro Fushimi 
was promoted to chief representa- 
tive from representative. He takes 
over from Kozo Ogawara, who has 
become deputy general manager of 
the bank's business division No. 7 
in Tokyo. Toichi Danno, managing 
director and general manager of 
Nippon’s London brand) is relum- 
ing to the head office as managing 
director. He is succeeded by Yasu- 
shi Sakashita, who will hold the 
titles of director and general man- 
ager. Mr. Sakashita formerly was 
general manager of the internation- 
al finance division in Tokyo. 

Hirosuke Sakai, a deputy general 
manager of the London branch, is 
returning to Tokyo, where he take 
up the post left vacant by Mr. Saka- 
shita. 

H ongkong & *shnnghfli Ranking 

Corp. said David Jaques, chief ex- 
ecutive of its operations in Malay- 
sia. will mow to the Hong Kong 
bead office as an executive director 
to succeed Roy Munden, who is 
retiring at the end of November. 


Richard OrgilL currently an assis- 
tant general manager 'in Hong 
Kong, will become chief executive 
in Malaysia. In addition. Colin 
Selby, executive vice president and 
manager or Hongkong Bank in 
New York, will move to Bombay to 
take up the post of chief executive, 
India. He will succeed Alec Gilli- 
brand, who is retiring. 

Chevron Petroleum (U.K.) Ltd, 
has appointed Charles M. Smith 
managing director. He moves to 
London from Lagos, where he was 
managing director of Gulf Oil Co. 
(Nigeria) LtcL a post in which he is 
succeeded by C.B. Cov Mr. Cox 
formerly was general manager of 
Gulf Oil Zaire. Mr. Smith succeeds 


Len Porter, who has moved to San 
Francisco as general manager, pro- 
duction, for Chevron USA Inc.'s 
western region. 

lyo Bank Ltd. has opened a rep- 
resentative office in London which 
will cover Britain and continental 
Europe. The London office is head- 
ed by Futoshi Endo and Kazuo 
KikuchL chief representative and 
deputy representative, respectively. 
They both previously were in the 
bank's international division in To- 
kyo. 

Philips NV. the Dutch electron- 
ics group, said Constant Busch will 
become director of corporate fi- 
nance on May !. succeeding J.H. 
Goris. 


U.S. $100,000,000 
National Westminster BankPLC 
Floating Rate Capital Notes 1994 


In accordance with the provisions of the Notes notice 
is hereby given that for the six months interest period 
from 16th April. 1985 to 16th October, 1985 the Notes 
will carry' an Interest Rate of per annum. The 
interesi payable on the relevant interest payment date. 
16th October, 1985 against Coupon No. 13 will be 
U.S. $47-66. 

By Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York. London 
Agent Bank 


Trinidad, Reluctantly , Buys 
Money-Losing Oil Refinery 


(Continued from Page 17) 


Many in the government believe 


ny to revive the Exxon refinery, but that Trinidad can stem the refin- 
thm prospects seemed “dim/ cry’s losses at least break even by 

Unlike most other islands in the stepping up the amount of crude od 
Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago being processed and by making 
produce their own oiL They do not some technical improvements, 
produce enough crude to efficiently Some think that even making a 
run the Texaco refinery and the profit may not be out of the ques- 
refinery that the government has tion. 

been operating for some time. Still, Critics, however, say thev believe 
even limited production capability the government is in for huge 
makes the operation of a refinery losses, 
more feasible for Trinidad than for 
Aruba or Curasao, oil experts say. 

A tittle more than two years ago, mSSSSSSSSSSSSS^^m 
government officials say, Texaco Gold Options omn 
proposed to sell Trinidad and To- n " r~ Ti ~' — — rr — — nr — 

bago three-quarters of its refinery — — 

as a condition to keeping it nm- g III 

nine. m mmi«o xcmmo 2723293 

T*r rh* nMAIMtJnn, Ent *0 MB 150M4SJ 2223(25 

in rne negotiations that rol- ao 135 . 47 s namco 

lowed, the government agreed to *0 1 * 12 « 2 s. vs issmud 

lake full possession of the refinery. H ~ 
but insisted upon | getting some of ||v*k*n WUteWeM SJk 
Texaco s oil wells and mineral II 1 , cmHL mLTm— c 
rights — assets which the Trim da- II uiTccwn 1 , i 

dians hoped might offset the ex- ” T «t 3 nasi - Tdn axs 
peered losses of the refinery. 

In the final agreement, Trinidad - .... 

paid Texaco $1893 million — 198 
million in cash and the balance to 
be delivered in petroleum produce 
over 10 months. Texaco retained its 

most productive offshore oil fields . . . . . 

and two other undeveloped off- [ 

shore tracts. Mr. Chambers said AOc 

negotiations would continue for 
these properties, but there was no 
immediate comment from Texaco. 


SO JQ2SZ22S 

330 U»li» 2SSM775 

34 9511100 3U0-2U0 ?2SK5 

350 &SOM0 ISCOldS 2223(2 
360 125-42 115)1300 W2MB00 

370 J2. 12 I2S- *2 1SBM&9 

3BQ 1 400- 730 I lMMiaP 

mm . m«n 

Vatam WUteWeM SLA. 

UQuaiim Mm-Hmc 
1211 Coctb t, Switzerland 
Td 310251 - Telex 28306 


PUBLIC NOTICE 


Major 

DISPOSAL AUCTION 

of several hundred exceptionally 
fine and medium quality, handmade 

PERSIAN CARPETS 

rugs and runners... 

and others from the more important weaving centres of the East. 
Included are many antiques, silks, kelims, nomadics and other unusual items, 
not generally to be found on the home market. 

This merchandise is the property of a number of principal direct importers in 
the U.K.. which has been cleared from H.M. Customs & Excise bond, to be 
disposed of at nominal or no reserve for immediate cash realisation. 
Every item guaranteed authentic. Expert advice available at time of viewing. 
To be transferred from bonded warehouses and offered at the: 
Portman Hotel, Portman Square, London W1 
on SUNDAY 21st APRIL at 2.30pm 
Viewing from noon same day 
Payment: cash, cheque or all major credit cards. 

Auctioneers A Wellesley Bnscoe & Partners Ud.. 67/68 New Bond Srreet. London Wt. 


AD of these securities have been sold. This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


All of these securities having been sold r this announcement appears solely for purposes of information. 


NEW ISSUE 


April 2, 1985 


~ 

JO »■*•*- 
?it1 1 ion — 

■mis- "Wjr-" 

13 t n»> 0|n - 

.Id - t z 

ID [ftf 


London m 
April U> 



ECU 150 , 000,000 

Credit Fonder de France 

9%% Guaranteed Bonds Due 1995 

Payment of principal and 
interest unconditionally guaranteed by 

The Republic of France 


Morgan Stanley & Co. 

Incorporated 

Hie First Boston Corporation 


Goldman, Sachs & Co. 
Salomon Brothers Inc 


Bear, Steams & Co. 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 
Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. 
EuroPartners Securities Corporation 


Deutsche Bank Capital EuroPartners Securities corporation 

Corporation 

Sogen Securities Corporation Swiss Bank C orpora tion International 

UBS Securities Inc. 



£75,000,000 

PHILIP MORRIS CREDIT CORPORATION 


llVs% Bonds due 1995 


Lloyds Bank International Limited 


Algemene Bank Nederland N. V. 
Banqne Bruxelles Lambert S.A. 
Baring Brothers & Co., Limited 
Daiwa Europe Limited 
Goldman Sachs International Corp. 


Hambros Bank limited 


Lehman Brothers International 


Nomura International Limited 


J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. Limited 
Sotilte Generate de Banque S.A. 


Swiss Bank Corporation International 
Limited 


April 1985 


Amro International limited 


Barclays Bank Group 


Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 


Dresdner Bank AktiengeseDschaft 
Grindlay Brandts Limited 


Hill Samuel & Co. Limited 


Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited 

Orion Royal Bank limited 

Soctete Generate 

Sumitomo Finance International 

Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) 
Limited 

























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Over-the-Comiter 


April 16 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


tales In Net , BRCom 

100C HWi U» 3 PM. CIToe ggjg, yMoii 


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927* 27* 27* +1 Otter 
2967* 67% 6714 Oprlco 
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5212* 12% 12* OtSou 


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165 5* 514 5* + * 

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180 63 1 25* 25* 35% + * 

117110* 10* 10*— * 

7582 81* 81*— 14 

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130 38 13935 34* 35 + * 

36 38 85722* 21* 22 


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10 4% 4% 4% 

7312% 1314 12*+% E5»No» IMr S3 
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11 5* 4* 4* CoorFn 

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207613* 11 13% —1 GlfBdc 

GHNvc 

Air 53 6925* 34* 25* +1 Gull 


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Abk&c 30 6* 6* 6* 

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I . 513 13 13 

,30e 13 20 26 26 26 + * 

180 33 433 » 37* 37* 

T2621 20* 20* 

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80a 8 250 50 50 —1 

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AlldBn 84 33 205825* 24* 25* + % 

- AHdCaa 180a 47 12 21% 21 21% + % 

Allnet 29 2* 2H 2% 

AJIvGar 13712% 12 12 

181 7* 7* 7% — % 

137 7% 7* 7% 

15811 10% 10ft — * 

211% 11* 11% + % 

Amoral AC ’7 62315% M% 15 

AWAIfl 1377 7% 7% 7% + * 

AmAdv 225 10% 10 TO — % 

ABkCtI too 58 1217* 17* 17* + % 

ABnV.r 80 43 10412% 11% 11*—* 

Am Carr 69210* 10% 10* + % 

175 8 7* 8 

_ IS 4% 4% 4%— * 

AFdSL 80 Al 59814* 14 14* + * 

AFIItrn 132 4.9 3 26* 26* 26* + % 

AmFril t 18 7* 7* 7% — % 
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(Ondmied on Page 

































» SWShr -* 0 3j 


r Mwiftn 

V Wrutw ' 1J ° 1J 


H3 ' r 


Floating Rate Notes A pr u u 


? lOMBr ^ *•! T5 


«£ y »v* 

’life 

1 & VuWT 


« Tylrwia 


H BS IUjO Bid arid 
n> 2U ««MH 


ENTJERNATIOISAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17. 1985 


INTERNATIONAL 


(Continued From Back Page) 


JjU.. 


Page 21 


IED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 




REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


i.Ani»»wi:. l iii 




REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PRO VINCES 


AUTOMOBILES 


cm SI GGRMAW. Juki ft Aug. 4 ! ROO$ROYCE5Jver Sprit, I98i, 5800 
room, F5,200toMrK &4 7301 | lun, darn eifeuor with mognobct 

ppcd buqpmdy rttnar, Monaco 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


DAWAJI TRADE 

1NTL DELIVERY 

We keep a btoc nock or 
mow car Brands 
Tel-. K/6i8 55 13 
Tefau 55658 
42 rue Lam, 

1050 Bnmek 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


ICELANDAIR 

30 Years Anniversary 

Spaod one wy form 

votd May 7 ih - June 7ih 

•New YoA — F 1.790 

•Was hi n gto n. F 1,790 

•Odcaae- F 1,990 

aOebait F 1,990 

eOrfonde (Rondo) F %39Q 

•Lee Angeme F 7,990 

•Son F wdm f 2, WO 

Far bund oip. call.- 
KHANDADL PARS 
Tet (1/ 747 52 7b 


Non Dollar 


Over-the-Counter 


April 16 


f.-ixref w 


tm i» 
Wt 1M 1M 


M 3L0 

J* 21 

jaso U 
-M 14 S 

,fS ID 21*4 

.72 IJ 2» 

.** U 

.70e 20 
JM 3.1 


mb— a 

30 *Mk 
24 + Hr 

12VU + V* 
■to + Vb 

TU— 14 
144b + to 
to 

’SfJJ? 

to 


to 

m— m 

1M 

2Vi 

7to to 
4U. + to 
Mb 

MU.— K 
34 — to 
15to +lto 
IM 




FACING HOm. 
CONCORDE LAFAYETTE 

bmmous duplex Uudkx. boh. phonx 
No ogency feu. Ffi.100 nor by month. 
Short tarn lame. Ven today; 95 Bd 
Souvion StCyr, Font T7l§v 574 82 57. 


ON PARC MONCEAU 
AGENCE do ITTOfli 



Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


144m 
M 

n 

14 
914 
14V. 

S3 Hi Mi 

Mb 2*K 
16to 14V. 

4H 44 4H 
4»W IV 
4H 4tk M 
51V. SI* 
we «4 
UVb IS* 
ijv» m 
3* Mi 
30* 30* 
4Mb 4Mb 

'h w 

S2 

7V. 

' 41b 
17 


Britan 

Tosco 

toot 19M l W 

Revenue KKo. 2400. 

PrwfaX N#t_. *1.0 *7J 

Per snare _ CUV 0.117 

South Korea 

Daowoo 

Year ifM im 

Revenue MSS. 4250. 

Prom <3.7 44J 

Results in UJk dollars. 

United States 

Aimer. Home Pdts 


GTE Rodcwafl Infl 

lsi Qoor. ins mo 2nd Boar. ins 17M 

Revenue 145a km. Revenue 2JW0. 2220. 

Ooer not — 2732 0x6 Met Inc. 1544 1322 

Oom Shorn- 127 125 Per Shore-. 14B 0J4 

imfa&tmucludee ootn oiU5 let Matt IMS I7M 
million irom accounting Revenue— 5210. 4340. 

cheoo*. Net Inc. — . 375.1 3344 

„ „ Per Shore — 1.94 142 

Honeywell 

let Over. IMS 17M Rohm Jt Hrvtc 

Revenue L®. ijea "® nn ’ * naa * 

Nelinc 442 V* letQuar. 1W 1M4 

Per Share 120 024 Revenue 5522 548.1 

lf*4Mt fn cMee jaetetUA Kil3£,r“* 
million Irom discontinued op. Per Short — 1-44 It* 

wnjttont. 


AGB4CE DE LTTOUE 

REAL STATE AGB4T 

764 03 17 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 

Stw6x2 or krooni upte tme ut. 
Oi# mortti or more. 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


TOP CLASS P.R. GIRL 

1 need jyri of highest colter, preferaUv 
young to orgtrize meebny aB over 
□rape and Nanh America Need you 
to travel from me to lima, al expenses 
pod far you and your coSeapeb- 
Some lanwtedge of English essennoL 
Sarvioe it tor leocSng world mde imi» 
triaHst. You can see Eirope and the 
world if you are the best. Reply with 
photo {essential} to Box 2030, Harold 
Tribune, 92521 NeUBy Cade*. Franca 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


THE MAGNIFICENT 
STELA 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To the Greek blends, Turkey, 
Egypt & brae). 

Saing Every Monday bom Piraeus 

THE YAOfT-UKE 
STELA 
, OCEAN15 
h/FW MFffrfDFSl ® ^ DAY CRUISES 

Mycw iViCKL>CLfCD\ro *• Uardi & Turkey. Sail™, 
PORSCHE. BMW, EXOTIC CAES I every Monday & Friday from firaeul 


FROM STOCK 

for IMMBXATE defivery 
BEST 5BWICE 

For shipping- tonmnce, band, 
cenewM in USA. 

RUTEINC 

Taunusstr. 52, 4000 Frankfurt, 

W Germ., tel TO 49-232351 . ft- 411559 
norraaboa only by pban# or telex. 


SOOETE DIANE PARIS 240 87 43 
Men ft women BMdtt, security & rent- 
car services. 8 am - 12 pm. 


HtAMGRJRT. Young lady companon. 
EnaEsh. French, German spoken. Free 
to travel. 049/44 77 75. 


if-- -^aB 


SMGAPORE INTI GUIDES. Cc* So- 
734 96 2ft. 


HONG KONG (K-3) 723 12 37 


Please apply toyour Travel Agent or: 

Z Kar. Sarvas Sr., Athens 10562 
Telex: 215621. Phone 3228883. 

Pari* tot *365 80 36 
Munch h* 395 613 
Geneve tel: 327 110 
Ziridi tek 391 36 55 


Cruise in Elegance 
to the GREEK ISLANDS 

EGYPT, ISRAE & TURKEY I iowon whl mu«ra) Young 

I nay companion. Teh 622 6615 



IsrQuor. HM IfM 

Ravamie 1210. 1.140 

Ooer Net 11095 IM.75 

Oear Shore— 1.1B IXf 

JRW not excludes gain el 
0.1 million. 


„ let Qoor. 
KM Revenue — 

-V«, Net Inc. 

M.75 Per Short _ 


Hospital Cp Amor. 

«t Qoor. IMS 19*4 


1C Industrie 


SCM 

19M M *»■ t«S IM* 

riSn Revenue 535.9 5000 

MJ Nfll '"t 0*1 *J 

oS PwShore—. 0*4 0.94 

VMonttu IMS 19*4 

, Revenue iJ»o. 1^30. 

• Net Inc. 305 258 

19*4 Per snare — 1.90 122 

9054 im 9-monttt not Includes 


IstQoar. 19*5 19*4 Per snore — 1.9* 152 

Amstod Ind — uoa im 9-monm net Includes 

.. .... °u*r Wei — yy 201 cneree of lie* million and 

2nd Oaor. IMS 1M4 Oper Shore— 04* 047 gam of S4 million. 

■"*«» 1ft! ‘ft’ exaudr loxun atSIQS 

Ir!uS^»~' million vg si j million fmm - „ _ 

ir Shore— . 023 022 ddcontlmmdoomratbns. Scott Papar 


Revenue 

Mel Inc 

Per Short—. 

1st Hoff 
Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Share 


Int’l Multifoods 


4 * : 


Archer Daniels 

3rd attar. im It 

Net Inc 3U Z 

Per Shore — 033 0 

* Mount* im n 

Net Inc 1124 ft 

Par Snore — 1.17 0, 


019 4th Qvar. 

Revenue — . 
u Net inc . 

“ Per Share 

IfM Yaar 
22.7 tuvJnu. 

VU Mg* “ 

19*4 Per Share 


HM Per Share 
015 

1-00 See 

. 1M4 lit Qua, 


'S’* VRft Net me. _J_ 
Pw Share— 


Security Pacific 

lit Qoor. 19*5 19*4 

ethje. 7X5 47J 

IT Shore — IM 072 

Por snore mulls odlustod 


Auto. Data Pkr. 

2nd Ouar. 19*5 79*4 

Revenue— 27X5 234.7 

Net inc. 301 22.1 

Per Shore— 073 043 

9 Months H8S 19*4 

Revenue 74X7 4SS.7 

Net Mb 41 3 513 


Per shore 1J4 1J2 Net Inc. , 

Full name of campanr It _Y?? r 
Automatic Data Processing. Rffenue 
Nfi inc- . 


u charoo ol3J cent* Irom asset 

r. redeployment. IM* not otto 
79*4 tnctudn gam d43 cents Own 
234.9 Currency translation. 

32.1 

** Kaiser Steel 

JS r 4th Ouar. IMS 17*4 

Revenue 41.9 5X4 


ofOfJ million v* HU mU- 

non. 



ESCORTS & GUIDES 

Scott Pop4tr 

f f INTERNATIONAL LONDON CLASS 


ESCORT 

SBCVHX 

USA A WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 


tor 3- for - 1 SO lit m Jan. Mott 330 W. 56ft St, N.Y.C. 10019 USA 
Include proybLlon* far. lossot kia — *e teoc 


Baxter Travenol 

I Quor. IMS 19*4 


Net Inc. 4l5ta)4io9 M* 

Year 19*5 1914 f££ J 

Revenue 151 J 137J ««■ 

Net me 47.7(0X228 

a: fast. 1M4 result ( restat- 
ed. 


Smith (A.O.) 

let Ouar. 17tS 1914 

Revenue ZIO* 24 Ob 

IfM Ooer Net 7J1 ll.l 

5X< Ooer Share— 097 150 

4109 Nets exclude tax credit at 
im tz? million vs toss of XU mil- 


212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR OBlfT CAEOS AND 
CHECKS ACCHTHJ 
Private Me mb er «hlp« AvoBafaie 


lit Quor. 
Revenue — 

Net Inc. 

Per Share— 


MeUon Bank 


lit Quor, 
Netlnt — 


Central 4 Sfh West p,rShor "— 
IfLSST' iSf 221 Merck 


wooer, MW 

Revenue— *011 

Net Inc — 4X7 

Per Share— QA4 


Chicago Nth West. 


71 J lit Quor. 

048 Revenue 

Net Inc. - 
. Per Share 


Storage Tech. 

„ m Over. I9*s 1784 

Revenue 151.9 22X7 

Net Law— 4192 3X4 

n*4 Year 19*5 19*4 

3XD Revenue— 80X4 88X4 

120 Net Law 5055 4X9 

Ne ts Include wrltleaff ot 
sznj million In ootn periods 
vs town ot XZ74 minion In 
I9M quarter and at S3! J million In 



1*1 Qoor. 19*5 17M MkBa 

Revenue — , 22X4 23X6 , 

Net inc. (DllZ.9 IX* 

Per Share — — 0JW «« ‘I?- 

a: loss. Full name ot com- Per SBBr "-- 
pany is Chicago and Norm 
western Tra ns portation. N* 


MkBantk Banks IP Q uor. 

letQuar. IMS 17*4 SS'ESt 

— ] 7 ^ ita pJrStSrJi: 


Swndstrand 


Citicorp 

1st Qear. IMS 

Net inc 27741 

Per snare— .202 


lit Qear. 
Revenue — 
idu Net Int 
y?n Per Shore— 


Northr op 


C'l^rrT ilS 


844 an 

13V. nv> 

14 Vt 14 

m Wk 
M4 »Yjl 
Uto 144b 

infc 

34 33* 

224b 22M 
344b 34 

UU tna 

*4 63 


] it Ouar. IMS 1 

Revenue 35X5 X 

Net Inc. —w * 

per Share— BAB l 

Ensorch 

lit Otter. 170 1 

Revenue W.® V 

Net Inc 45,7* £ 

Per Share— X47 1 

. Fit Bk 5ystwn 

id Quor. IMS 1 

Net Inc 37-16 31 

Per Share— 1.27 1 


_ l*t Quor. 
IfM Revenue — 

«B Net Inc. 

3X17 P*r Share— 


PNC financkri 
hM 0 ”- Union Bank 

jg 8S « x a 

® PPG Ind. aWJSWafttfi 

lit Quor. 1*0 TM4 

n Revenue IML 1MX 

»« SSJ!fl£«r us iil Union Pacific 

^ Jgmmtmemmrn iSC iSSS 

Nettne. 1114 MU 

— Per Shore — DM 0JB 

Hie KCA 

unn _ in Qoor. IMS IM4 IlnUvwMl 


Toxas Comme r ce 

mi 1st Oner. IMS 1H4 

SM Net Inc. 29J 4X8 

ain Per Share— X» W1 

XA7 Nfi Includes prwtslcn for 
lasses of USJmlthon vs Slid 
mHHon. 

m ™ 

277 1*1 Ouar. IMS 1*M 

0.77 Revenue UDX l^4X 

Net Inc. SX6 6M 

Per Short— 1A8 li7 


PPG bid. 


Est Boston 


dS= V =1 4B .. J Jn ‘"ss l 

Per Shore— 1JS LM p^c 5^^ 55 (uo Reve nue— SOU 51X0 

Goldtm W*st Hn, LSWaSSJtf 8S&= » SS 

v Tj ^9Ssa£&ss& 

'*«=■ s ssmmjsss sr^ 


Galdon W«t Hn, 


Net IIK- - 
Per Shore 


REGENCY 

WORUWflDE MULT1LMQUAL 


MEW YORK OFFICE 

Tab 312-838-8027 
ft 212-753-1 B&4 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERiCAN 

ESCORT SERVICE. 
EVSYWH9E YOU ARE Ot GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

GJ free from Hi: l-8DMg4M« 
Coll free bom Florida: 1-800-2820892. 
LoweS EaBsm wekamei you badd 


CAPRICE 

BCORTSSVICE 

IN NEW YORK 

T& 212-737 3291. 


ARISTOCATS 

lecdon beat Service 

128 Wignore Si, London W.l. 
Al major Gram Gords Accepted 
Tab 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon • midngh 


ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON, HEATHtOW ft GATVROC 
Tab 01 890 0373 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

E*eort Service. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 

67 CMBm Street, 
London Wl 

Tab 486 3724 or 486 1158 
AB major mdt mnk ac ce p t ed 


GENEVA 


CeCne Escort Service 
Male * Female. Tel: 022/36 25 21 


ZURICH 

ALEXIS ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL- 01/363 08 64 


* AMSTERDAM* 

SW Escort Service. 227837 


BCOKT SStVlCL 385 3573. 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SERVICE 

TEL 200 8585 



ulUfp wWDu sum KV^nVU. 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUIDE SERVICE bom 5 pm 

ROnHDAM (0110-254155 
HE HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 96 


MADRID INTL 


TH: 2456548. CKSXT CARDS 


ZURICH 

’Sum riba 1 * Ewe* ft GeMe Servica 

Mcde ft Fem*x let 01/56 96 92 


MADRID 


IBi 411 72 57-259 61 96 


ROME CUA BHtOPE ESCORT 
ft Gude SemcxTet 06'589 3604- 589 
1146 (bom 4 pm to 10 pm) 


GENEVA •BEAUTY* 


TH: 29 51 30 


GB4EVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 11 58 


GENEYA FIRST ESCORT SERVICE 
Roiervehenx WEEKEND + TRAVEL 
TEL 31 49 87 


GENEVA - BEST 


TEL 022/86 15 95 



AMSTERDAM JASMINE 

ESCORT SERVICE. 020-366665 


AMSTERDAM NICOLE 

ESCORT SatVKE 020-999244 


AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

ESCORT SBVKX. 020-954344 


MILAN ESCORT 

SERVICE: 02/69762402 



MUNICH WELCOME Escort Sennce. 
Tel: 91 81 32 


LONDON ZARA ESCORT Setvke. 
Hoothrow/GOMck Tel: 834 7945. 


PRIVATE BCORT + 
Guide Service. TeL 91 23 14 


WASHINGTON, D C: Sandy Escort 
Service. (703) 549-1255. 


DOMINA, AMSTBH3AM BCORT 

Guide Service. Tet 1020] 762842 


FRANKFURT/ MUNCH Mate Escort 
Serwce. 069/386441 ft 089/3518226. 


FRANKFURT - ANNE'S Escort Service. 
Tet 069 i 28-81-03. 


LONDON GABSSHLA BCORT Ser- 
vice. Tek 01-229 6541. 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Service. 
Tet 0711 / 2S2 11 SO. 



FRANKFURT - YVONNE'S BCORT 

and Travel Service. Tet 069/44 77 75 


GENEVA CHARLEM: GUIDE Service. 
Tel: 283397. 


HANNOVER - Corinna Escort Service. 
TeL 0511/80 61 S9. 


LONDON ZOE WEST Escort Agency 
Tel: 01-579 7556. 


STOCKHOLM ESCORT AND GUIDE 
Service. Tet 68 34 68. 


VflMNA - DESIREE ESCORT Service. 
TeL 52-30-355. 


AMSTERDAM FOUR ROSES Escort 
Service fl) 20-964376 


AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Sena 
Tab 1020)326420 or 340110. 


BRU5SSS. CHANTAl ESCORT Set- 
viau Tab 02/520 23 65. 


HAMBURG ESCORT 4- GUIDE Ser> 
vicx Teli 54 17 <2. 


FRAF8CHJRT AIGEA - Fstnde + Mole MINCH -BLOWIY 1 TANJA Escort 
escort 4- travel service. Teb 62 84 32. Service. Tefc 311 79 Oder 311 7936 







































































































































-Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 



PEANUTS 


I STILL CAN'T ^ 
AND THE BALL!/ 



Wp BETTER 
k HELP MER 




+-rr 


BLONDDE 


ACROSS 
1 Watch ol a sort 

’ 5 Eastern cape 
8 Algerian port 
12 “How now! 

?": 

Hamlet 
.13 Satan 
' 15 Quote 
MLikeGodlva 

17 Ecole student 

18 Taj Mahal site 
It Lessee's lessee 

22 “Heaven was 

help. . 

Crabbe 

23 Malevolent 
looks 

. 24 Samples 
26 Canadian 
metropolis 

29 Salamanders 

30 Alaskan 
islander 

31 Shortly 

33 And others; 

LaLabbr. 

38 Bulgarian 
capital 

37 “All About ” 

38 Froth 

39 New Zealand 
river 

48 Performing 

wammiil 

41 Impish 

42 Forced into 
court 


44 Chianti 
containers 
48 Altruistic 
person 

48 Ox or sheep 

49 Poetic Lizzie 
58 Act that may 

wreck a watch 
55 — -mecom 
(handbook! 

57 Inventor Howe 

58 Hebrew month 

59 Level 

88 Of certain 
hones: Comb, 
form 

81 Cause dander 
to rise 
62 Jerk 
83 Sparks or 
Beatty 

64 Store event 

DOWN 

1 Freud’s 

'Totem und 

>* 

2 Ireland’s 

Islands 

3 Avon great 

4 Instrument for 
a rock star 

,5 A condiment 

6 Pizzeria needs 

7 Sutherland, for 
one 

8 Wood sorrel 


9 Wolfe book, 
with “The" 

19 Up 

(trapped) 

11 Comes close 

13 Sidetrack 

14 Pre-Easter 
adjective 

29 “Giant” ranch 
21 Marble 
25 Roofers’ gear 
29 Specie 

27 Baseball's 
Matty 

28 Southpaw 

29 “Private 
Lives" 
playwright 

32 Basis for 
Ovid’s omelet 

34 Friend of 
Jeanne 

35 Camera eye 
38 Canary’s kin 
40 Tends 

43 Zodiacal sign 

45 Warning, for 
Juan 

46 A natural at 
Reno 

47 Ho's partner 

48 Comedienne 
Fanny 

51 Vivacity 

52 Pelvic bones 

53 Invalid 

54 Kind of dub 
58 Terminus 


LET'S SET THE 
BOVS TO TAKE 
US TO 
LUNCH 




BEETLE BAILEY 


WIZARD of ID 


© New York Times, edited by Eugene Moksha. 

DENNIS THE MENACE “ 




JUST 
A UttM? 
PMY0N 



REX MORGAN 


AFTER RECEIVING 
A SPEEDING TICKET, CLAUDIA 
RETURNS TO HER HOTEL TO FIND 
A MESSAGE. 


THE WOMAN ASKED THAT YOU 
CALL IMMEDIATELY i IF YOU 
WISH YOU CAN USE THE PHONE 
HERE ON THE COUNTER i 



YES. MS. BISHOP, THIS IS 
MR- MARLOWS OFFICE. 1 HELL BE 
ABLE TO SEE YOU NOW IF YOU 
CAN GET HERE IN TWENTY 
MINUTES ! 



IM SURE 1 CAN ( I 

JUST HAVE TO RUN UP 

TO MY ROOM FOR A 

FEW Cfi-ownc f 



'Where oo you keep tor shares 4 


GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Las 


Unscramble these fou-Jixntotea, 
one totter to each square, to tarn 
tote ordinary words. 


PURUS 



. 

JL 


ERECK 


U L 

JQ 




BOOKS 





ENLARGING THE CHANGE: 

The Prince ion Seminars in literary 
Criticism -1949-1951 

By Robert Fitzgerald. 249 pp. $19.95. 
Northeastern University Press. 

17 Cushing Had 560 Huntington Avenue, 
Boston, Mass. 02115. 

Reviewed by D. J. R. Bruckner - 

W ILLIAM HAZLITT thought “the con- 
versation of authors is not so good as 
might be expected, but, such as it is (and with 
tare exceptions! it is better than any other.” He 
did not include critics; but he might now. 
Among those gathered for two yearn of conver- 
sations about literature in Princeton, from 
1949 to 1951 were Frauds Fergusson, John 
Benyman, Delmore Schwartz, R. P. Blackmur, 
Ernst Robert. Curtius, Erich Auerbach, Jac- 
ques Mari lain. Rent Wellek and Allen Tate! 
They were terrific talkers, discussing literature, 
and the record of their talk might well make 
one impatient of other people's conversation 
for a while. Here their talk is recounted by 
Robert Fitzgerald, the poet and . translator, 
who knows how to say what be wants to. 

From the excitement of his account one 
might guess Htzgerald tboneht the high point 
was Fergusson tanring about Dante but he says 
it came with Maritain cm the origins of poetry, 
presentations that eventually turned into the 
book “Creative Intuition in Art and Poetry.” 
Mari tain's eloquence may have been even 
more brilliant in his seminars than m that great 
book: “‘Poetry proceeds from the totality of 
man, sense, imagination, intellect, love, desire,, 
instinct, blood and spirit together. 1 In what 
sense, then could poetry be called a form of 
knowledge? 1 

“ The poet,’ he said, lenows himself only on 
the condition that thing s resound in him, and 
that in him, at a single awakening, they and he 
come forth together out of sleep. 

There are enough fertile ideas in this small 
volume to keep a clever mind occupied for a 
long time, but there is also rich entertainment, 
in lightning glimpses of the seminar partici- 
pants. One evening several people disputed 
Auerbach's interpretation of a Baudelaire 
poem and John Benyman exploded at all of 
them: “Either I do not understand this poem 
or there has been a series of violent misconcep- 
tions. . . . Here is my interpretation for what 
it is worth, though I do not see how it can be 
wrong.” 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


Even Fitzgerald can cul He refers to one 
. young philosopher who evidently annoyed him 
as “gadfly-in-chieT-arid later characterizes a. 
-talk by him as “modest points briskly made, 
and he calls a presentation byMaxkSelwrer “a 
loose end and a dead end." 

This extraordinary manuscript was .found in 
carbon copy in a me: Fitzgerald wrote it 33 
yearsago as a report for theseminais’ sponsors 
—die Institute for Advanced Study in Prince- 
ton, Princeton University and the Rockefeller 
Foundation (these sesaons were the Jorertin- 
□era of dteGaussseiniimrs whidistillgo onat 
Princeton}. It most be the most unusual, cer-a 
tainly the most eloquent, report sat to spon- 
sors in our time. One of Fitzgerald's friends 
resurrected it recently and Northeastern Uni- 
versity Press grabbed iL It is a great End. 

D.J.R. Bruckner is an theswff of The. New 
York Times., 

BESTSELLERS p 

The New Y«k Tines 

Hris fin is based on reports rum more: than iOOffbooksttucs 
throughout ibe United Sure*. Weeks cm fin are dm necessarily 
consecutive . 


TVs 

Week 


FICTION 


LF TOMORROW 
Sheldon 


by Dajridk- St 

Comes, by 


Sidney 


3 THINNER, by Richard Bachman 

4 THE LONELY SILVER RAIN, by John 

D. MacDonald 

5- INSIDE, OUTSIDE, by Homan Work — 
6 THE HUNT FOR RED 


Tool Clancy 
PROOF, by Dick Francis 
GLITZ, by Elmore Leonard . 
MINDBEnD, 1 


OCTOBER, by 


by Robin r«nl> . 
10 SEE YOU LATER 


W flliam F.BuCkl 


ALLTTGATOR. by 

iickleyir. — : : 

I! HOTEL DU LAC by Anita Brookner __ 

12 THE FINISHING SCHOOL by Gail 

Goodwin - 

13 MEXICO SET. 1 

14 THE SICILIAN, l 

15 VIRGIN AND MARTYR, by Andrew M. 

Greeley 

NONFICTION 

1 lACOCCAiAa Autobiography, by Lee Ia- 
cocca with WDUam Novak - 

BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 

' > N. Shevche nko .’ 

G EACH OTHER, by Leo Buscag- ' 


Ha 

CITIZEN HUGHES, by Michael Drotuin 
CHANC 


THE COURAGE TO 
nbWboley 


4GE.by Dcu- 


6 SMART WOMEN, FOOLISH CHOICES, 
by CotmeU Cowen and Mdvyn Kindn 

The bridge across for 

Richard Bach 


3REVER, by 



8 SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 

Evan Si Connell • 

9 AUGHT IN THE ATTIC by SbdSilver- 

SKU - a ■ - - 

10 “SURELY YOU’RE JOKING, MR 
FEYNMANN, " by Rfc tod P.-Fe ymam L 

11 MOSES THE KITTEN, by Janies Hemw 

12 THE UVTNG PLANET, by David Altne- 

borouah 

13 CRY OF THE KALAHARI by Mark and 

Ddla Owen 

14 DISTANT NEIGHBORS. by Alan Radios 

15 THE SEVEN MOUNTAINS OF THOM- 

AS MERTON, by Michael Mou 


8 5 


13 9 


□ 

G 

□ 

a 

□ 

□ 

a 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 


□ 

□ 

E3 


ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

NOTHING DOWN, fay Robert O. Alien 2 19 

.TCHER5< 


in 

□a 

□ 

□1 

□ 


□ 

□ 

□: 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

B 


□ 

a 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

a 

□ 



WEIGHT WA‘ 
PROGRAM COOKBOO’ 

ihtrh 


QUICK 

>K. by : 


CK "START 
Jean Ni. 


WHATTHEY DONT TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 
Marie H. McCormack . 


4/1T/85 


THE ONE MINUTE SALES PERSON, 

bv Soenccr Johnson and Lanv Wilson 

FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jeff 


Smith , 


I 13 


3 30 

4 21 

2 


8 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

O N the diagramed deal 
East found himself with 
an attractive hand. In the third 
seal he chose an opening of 
four hearts, concerned more 
with complicating life for 
South than with musing a 
good slam. 

As South also had a hand 
that was worth about 10 tricks 
in attack and hole in defense, 
it was not surprising that the 
bidding wandered on to the 
seven level. East was intending 
to bid seven diamonds over 
seven dubs, and would proba- 
bly have succeeded. The nor- 
mal lead for South is the spade 
ace rather than the club ace, 
and declarer can then cross to 


the diamond ace, pick up the 
heart king! and discard dobs 
ou hearts. . . 

Unfortunatley for East, 
North converted seven dubs to 
seven spades. Even more un- 
fortunately, West led the dia- 
mond ace against seven spades 
doubled, the only way to allow 
the contract to succeed by ruff- 
ing and drawing trumps. 

The lead of the heart nine 
would have beaten the con- 
tract three tricks, for the third 
round of the suit promotes a- 
trump trick for West And 
even a black suit lead Brin gs a 
one-trick defeat His partner's 
decision to lead a diamond 
rather than the heart nine cost 
East 3,270 points. 


WESTCD) 

*9114 

VM 

OA10742 

*JM - 


NORTH 

+QJ3J2 

OK78 

*•9 

*973 


EAST 


OAQJVSI 

OKQJ983 

*1 



SOUTH 
- AAK97 
«| 

O— 

AAKQS642 . . 

Both ekfae wn vMonMc. Tbe bM- 


«* 


North 

EM 

PM 

49 

PM 

-SO 

Pass 

. Pm 

?♦ 

DU. 

Pm 



5* 

94 


Pm 

Wen ledthedfeunood i 




CATBUD 


m 

1 

Wm 


SWORDY 





WHAT A PERSON 
WHO SPENDS 
TOO MUCH TIME 
| STU£7Y/NS CERAMICS | 
Ml&HT EKJC7 UPAS, 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the svprisa answer, as sug- 
gested by tnb above cartooa 




Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: BOOTH IRATE SWERVE KIMONO 
Answer. He liked the Job, but hated this— THE WORK 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 


Costa Dal Sol 
Dublin 

Edinburgh 


Kd*taH 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

at 79 13 S5 (r 

12 54 7 45 d 

21 70 13 55 O 

IB 64 7 45 fr 

I 46 B 46 r 

8 46 6 43 Sh 

13 55 7 45 o 

15 59 8 46 o 

11 52 5 41 o 

9 48 2 36 d 

X 68 8 46 fr 

M 57 10 50 O 

15 59 10 50 0 

16 61 11 52 d 

10 SO < 39 r 

11 52 -1 3B a 

3 37 1 34 r 


ASIA 


Bangkok 
BoUlM 
Hong Kang 


5gaal 


Ttff>o< 

rum 

AFRICA 

Algtare 
Cairo 
cm Taw 
caHMaocti 


litanbel 

21 

70 

12 

54 

Cl 

LOS Palmas 

32 

73 

15 

59 

Cl 

Lfabon 

21 

X 

12 

54 

fr 

(j«sidoa 

17 

63 

7 

45 

d 

Madrid 

21 

70 

5 

41 

fir 

Milan 

16 

64 

3 

37 

fr 

Mottow 

6 

43 

6 

43 


■dqtaek 

8 

46 

1 

34 

*h 

race 

17 

63 

9 

48 

fr 

0*10 

ra 

M 

0 

32 

It 

Parts 

18 

64 

11 

52 

It 

Praam 

8 

46 

2 

X 

ih 

Reykjavik 

5 

41 

1 

X 

r 

Rome 

1? 

66 

12 

54 

ei 

Stockholm 

7 

4ft 

1 

34 


Straebearo 

11 

52 

3 

37 

r 

Venice 

14 

57 

6 

43 

fr 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

— — — — no 

16 61 7 45 fr 

23 73 19 66 a 

34 93 24 75 fr 

36 97 20 68 fr 

19 66 12 54 Cf 

22 72 10 50 fr 

38 48 lfl SO "a 

30 68 10 50 a 


16 61 12 54 d 

32 H 13 55 fr 

X 68 13 55 fr 

22 72 8 66 fr 

21 70 14 57 d 

— — — — «g 

21 70 13 55 O 

12 54 9 48 sf 


Aifaata 


Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zorich 


11 52 5 41 
11 52 5 41 


ID 50 2 36 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 
Botrvf 
Da mason 
Jemalem 
Td Aviv 

OCEANIA 


18 

64 

0 

32 

0 

27 

81 

13 

85 

fr 

2? 

81 

8 

46 

fr 

27 

11 

11 

9 

fr 

27 

81 

9 

48 

Ir 

21 

70 

13 

55 

fr 

33 

73 

17 

63 

Cl 


Sydney 

d-doudv; Mmv; fr-tatr; iwwi 
sfHdwwrs; mnpw; st-stormv. 


Lagos 
Nairobi 
Tools 

LATIN AMERICA 

Booms Aires 24 75 13 SS a 

Lima 24 75 13 55 a 

Maxi co City 21 70 9 48 nc 

Rto dr .Janeiro 29 84 17 63 fr 

Sag Paolo — — — — na 

NORTH AMERICA 


Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

HanoMa 


Las Angelas 
Mi am i 

Mlwwopefl* 

Maafrgol 


New York 


Tbnnta 

MtasMngtga 


5 

41 

■2 

X 

23 

73 

10 

50 

X 

61 

10 

50 

15 

59 

5 

41 

27 

01 

9 

40 

W 

66 

8 

46 

29 

14 

21 

70 

29 

84 

W 

57 

21 

n 

14 

57 

X 

to 

X 

<8 

17 

63 

5 

41 

M 

44 

0 

a 

X 

77 

33 

73 

X 

<8 

10 

50 

16 

61 

10 

SB 

13 

55 

7 

45 

22 

72 

6 

43 

21 

70 

7 

45 


WEDNESDAY? FORECAST - CHANNEL: Smooth. FRANKFURT; CWv. 
. Temp. 17— 6(63 — 43). LONDON; Fair. Temp. 18— 7164— 451. MADRID: Fair. 
Tomo. ID -5 (72 -41) NEW YORK: Wr. Tenet. 17- 7 (63 -451. PARIS; 
Temft 19—7 (66— ROME: Rain. Temp. 17— 11 (63 — 52). TEL AVIV: 
apudv. Tima 36—12 (79— 54). ZURICH: OixxJy. Toma. 16—5 (41—41). 


W)rid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France- Presse April 16 

dosing prices in local amentia unless otherwise indicated 


ABN 

ACF Holding 

Aegon 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

ADom Rubber 
Amro Bonk 

BVC 

BuihrarwnnT 

Coiand Hldg 

Btsevigr-NDU 

Fokkar 

GHl Braaades 

m ine ken 

Hooeovens 

KLM 

Noarden 

Mat Nodder 

NecUayd 

OooVanderG 

Pokhood 

Ptiflkw 

ROtMOO 

Rodamco 

Rollrtcn 


92 


Unl lo vor 
Von Ommeran 
VMF Stork 

VNU 

ANPjCBS General 
Prcvtoai : 287A0 


418 

20 a 


am 

7660 

206J5B 

91 

34J0 


60JD 


4BJ0 

71.10 


5UD 
7160 
137 T382D 
6600 6730 

44.10 4430 
20130 20130 
34930 34930 
3030 31 JO 

156J0 15480 
21130 — 

Indnx : 3BCJ0 


Arbed 

Bokaert 

Cockerill 


221 


5930 

230 


EBES 
GB-Inno-BM 
GSL 
Gnvoort 
Hoboken 
Intercom 
Kradhgb cnk 
Petnrtlna 
Sec General* 
Safina 
5oJvav 

Trod fan Eloc 
UCB 


Unerg 

vwim 


Monlagne 


3135 3125 
3205 3185 

two 22 

3900 3920 
»« ** 
2230 2270 
8190 asm 
4850 6830 
1940 1940 
7350 7400 
4140 4190 

££ JSK 

5700 sm 

1700 1720 
6340 6350 


Carreot Sleek lotos : 22S3S7 
Fravtoas : 2BU* 


Frankfort 


AEG-T8l*fUTllMf1 

Allianz VCrs 

Bad 

Baver 

BayerHypa. 

Bayer.Vor.Bank 

BMW 

Commenbank 

Conhgumml 

Deimiar-Banz 

Degussa 

Ceutsdta Babcock 
Deutsche Dank 

Dresdner Bank 

DUB-Schoff 

GHH 
Hochtief 
Hoechsf 
Honch 
Hobmann 
Horton 

Kail + Sob 
KarstodT 


10950 110.10 
1108 1115 
20X40 206 
mao 21120 

354 355 

344 342 

37U0 374 

172J0 J72 
138139S0 
661 JO 64X50 
3618036220 
166 167 

47X70 471 

2063020X50 
22280 221 
U3L20 156 

476 475 

21X»21L40 
T10L50 110 
409 JO 412 
170 171' 

24520 250 

213 2U. 


T I dm 

P*tv. 

J I Koufliof 

228 

329 

KIOecknerH-Q 

2 « 



7244 

7X50 

lnimizialfea 

10584 

107 

undo 

411 

418 

1 Lufthansa 

193 


MAN 

151 


Mannesmann 



il » ii 

MV - , ■ 

ixa 


Praussaa 

27150 


RuctaefT-Werfce 

34333550 
157 JO 137 JO 

Setter Ina 

47X50 

472 



Thyisen 


IT* I 





1800 1B6J0 ] 




LJ-L— Ul 


| Previous: 1230J0 


1 

|| niMt Ifnm |[ 

Bk East Agfa 

2350 

2350 

Cheung Kang 

16J0 


China Light 

15J0 


Cross Harbor 

9.X 


Hans Seng Bank 
HK Electric 

45 

8J5 

4450 

750 

HK Hotels 

MTS 

3350 

HK Land 

SM 


HK Shanghai 

9JS 


1 HK Telephone 

73 

74 

HK Wharf 

&20 

M0 

Hutch Whampoa 

2190 

2190 

JardlneMath 

1140 

1158 

JanUneSec 

1150 

1150 

Now World 

6JD 


Shaw Brothers 

1325 

150 

SHK Props 

1050 


State Darby 

6.10 

655 

Stehix 



Swire Pacific A 

24JD 

24X 

wheetackA 

7 JO 

735 

Wh+sJocfc After 



Winsor 

475 

4JTJ 

world mn 

1075 

11X 

Hose Sene index : 
Previous: 151544 

issue 


■' ~T« 

AECI 

825 


Anglo American 

2760 

2X0 

Ana to Am Cota 


Barlows 

1155 

1160 

Blyvaor 

1550 

loaa 

Butte Is 

8775 

8850 ' 

De. Beers 

1050 

IMS ' 

Driefeiifeln 

5525 

5600 

Elan* 

1800 

1820 

GF3A 

3400 

3400 

Honnony 

3075 

31 a 

Hhrajd Steel 

395 

398 

Kloof 

8200 

8350 

Nedbmik 

1140 


PrasStayn 

6425 

6450 

RuSOtot 

1775 

1775 

SA Brows 



St Helena 

3600 

3625 1 




West Holding 

ion 

Tooo r 


| Previous : nilJB 


Is 

l Loadoa. | c 


AUlw^Lyans 
AgteAjnGokl 594W 

Bcs-ctaym 
Boss 


s ’^ s, $ 

154 M9 

342 333 

542 541 


BAT. 

Beechom 

BICC 

BL 

Blue arch* 
BOC Grow 
Boots 

Bomta Indus 

Brit Homo St 
Brit Telecom 
Brit Aerospace 
BTR 
Burmah 
Cable Wireless 
CodburvSchw 
Charier Cons 
Coats Pa tons 
Commercial U 
Coni Gold 
Court crnld, 
DM 
DeBeerat 
Distillers 
Drlefontein 
FI sons 
F^SIGto 

GKN 

Glaxo I 

Grand Met 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

imps 

Jaguar 

Llavds Bank 

Lonrho 

Lucas 

Marks and Sg 

Midland Bonk 

Nat west Bonk 

PondO 


Close Pm 
341 
368 
253 


39 

503 

276 

179 

247 


275 

IDO 


287 
137 
433 
477 
232 
528 
ISO 
196 
147 

227 
572 
145 
473 
557 
277 
S29fk S294* 
308 311 

531 S3M4 
192 194 

237 231 

123/6411 19/32 
298 


243 

BIS 

209 

4S5 

766 

180 

297 

5Z7 

153 

264 

147 

339 

572 

343 

278 

204 

204 


244 

815 

208 

451 

754 

180 

302 

524 

183 

265 

146 

33? 

567 

343 

280 

206 

204 


5120VI 512293 
368 363 

554 552 

363 363 

465/644563/64 
654 657 


ilgarHsn 


m 

336 

721 

197 

464 

443 

23D 

442 

238 

335 

I 4 ® 

243 

H<4 

184 

267 


893 
332 
713 
196 
454 
425 
2St 
427 
236 
335 
140 
245 
lltt 
114 

S4P& 54944 

*36W J37V» 


3614 

to? 


36H 

817 


MDn 


Formltaiia 

Fiat 

Flnslder 

Generali 

IFI 

DBicanwitl 


16900 17000 
3137 3210 
7360 7278 
2095 2070 
12170 12140 
2960 2935 
57 57 

43380 41610 
7720 7680 
83850 82900 


Italmobiliarl 

Medk*>anco 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascenle 

SIP 

Srda 

Standa 

Stel 


mnn <WKl>ShMOtdl 

82200 B1750 Vohra 
1514 1520 

6235 6215 AHaersvoerlden index : 
2210 22m Previous : 396J0 
62010 62360 
659 JO 658 
1928 1940 
2795 2776 , 

12410 12400 
753 5 HU I AN I 


Close Pm. 

220 219 

349 245 


S * jg 


MIB Currant index : 1191 
Previous : 1198 


?**» ! 


625 

635 

Aiittiom AM. 

302 

406 

Av Dassault 

1430 

1471 

Bancalre 

645 

644 

BIC 

534 

541 

Banoraln 

1902 

1930 

Bouygves 

646 

661 

BSN-GD 

200 

262* 

CarretsHir 

2155 

71 MC 

Charpeurs 

510 

516 

Club Med 

1158 

1170 

Darty 

1280 

IX! 

Durrnn 



EH-Aquttolres 

239 24620 

Europe 1 

905 

945 

Gen Eoux 

618 

643 

Hachetta 

IBE® 

iwo 

Latarpe Coo 

495 49X60 

LDarand 

2160 

2194 

Lnsleur 

805 

811 

rOreal 

2473 

2570 

Marten 

1730 

1/40 

Malm 

1751 

18X 

Merlin 

1803 

1075 

ftMchoiht 

939 

948 

Moel He, mossy 

1X0 

1880 

Moulinex 

110 11250 

Occldentale 

683 

693 

Pernod RJc 

704 

724 

Petrolas Use) 

257 X150 

Peupeol 

33X40 337 JO 

Prlntemps 

235 

240 

Radtotechn 

297 

XI 

Redoui’i 

1341 

1405 


1715 

1790 

Scmati 

671 

485 

Skis Rosslonol 

1850 

IVM1 

Sour. Perrier 

488.10 

awn 

Tetomocor 

2S50 

2595 

Thomson CSF 

569 

689 

Agefl index : 8U 



Pmrtoas : 2tzjl 



CAC 8w5sx : TOM 



Previous : 21879 



1 Shnurov* J 

Bausteod 

159 


Cold Storage 

258 

269 

DBS 

615 


FrtKwNeave 

SJrt 

5 

How Par 

218 

117 

snchcape 

N.T. 

753 

KM Ship 

154 


MaJ Banking 

6/6 

5.75 

OCBC 

9 


OUB 

182 

IM 

Sen* Shipyard 

U7 

U4 

Slme Darby 

M0 

1J9 

S SfeamsJsle 

M2 

un 

St Trading 

4X 

4J4 

UOB 

4J6 

4J4 

OUB Index: 48135 



Pwbw: 40U4 



Stoekholm || 


ANZ 

BHP 

Barol 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Cotes 

Comal ca 

CRA 

CSR 

Dun Ion 

Elders Ixl 

Hooker 

Mugeltan 

MIM 

Myer 

Ookbridse 

Peka 

Poseidon 

HGC 


All Oniie 

Previous :t57Jt 

Source.- Reuters. 


212 

27B 

460 

646 

318 

2« 

375 

380 

275 

634 

306 

219 

314 

158 

260 

328 

182 

93 

447 

473 

320 

630 

173 

27 

160 


210 

284 

440 

642 

320 

246 

380 

375 

280 

630 

305 

220 

312 

160 

275 

330 

181 

91 

435 

460 

516 

626 

175 

27 

158 

356 


Tofcyw 


450 458 

865 925 

kto m 
795 Efl 
518 518 

1200 T230 

350 359 

Dai Nippon Print 980 1010 

532 5® 

1500 15M 
1700 1700 
1068 1080 
799 812 

1300 1310 
S 5m 6148 


Fujitsu 

Hitachi 


3 


Close Prev. 
Mitsubishi Gorp 520 525 

Mitsui and co 3» 335 

MltsukasM m OS 

MJtJWtl) N.T. isno 

NEC 1040 N.T. 

NGK Insulators 923 925 

NUckoSec 701 

Nippon steel MV 

Nippon Yusen 238 242 

Nissan 66 S 657 

Nomura Sac 1060 1108 

Olympu s 1090 1120 

Ptonaer 2420 2» 

Ricoh 163 885 

Shorn 975 f« 

Sony <jjo 

Sumitomo Bank 1620 1638 

Sumitomo Chem 278 236 

Sumitomo Metal T45 130 

TotsH Cora 209 214 

Tabtio Marine 435 438 

Tokeda Chem M5 945 

Tto 5300 5420 

Tellln 437 468 

Tokyo Elec. Power l«8 tew 

Tokyo Marine 81? 842 

Toraylnd 460 481 

ToWilba 391 39! 

Toyota 1200 1230 

Yamakhl Sec 778 810 

NBdM t/P-l. judex 1 122B7JS 

Previe w : 1255232 

New Index : 9500 
Prev i o us : 977.M 


Aprd lS | 


CanatScnv stods tsa AP 


Adla 

Bonk Leu 
Brawn Bavert 
ClbaGelsv 
Credit Sulss* 
Electrowatt 
Goora Fischer 
Inierdbcouni 

Jacob Suchard 

Jelmoll 
Landis Gvr 
Nestle 
Oertlkon-B 


Kaibin 
Konsat Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu ltd 

Kubota 

Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 

Mitsubishi Chem 

Mllsubftjii Elec 

Mitsubishi Heavy 


145 

s? 

339 

14S50 

211 


145 

619 

441 

341 

1410 

741 


1520 1530 
474 ms 
395 396 
253 253 


2735 2730 
3540 3550 

1635 1630 

3845 2845 

2£° 2430 
2885 r 

S 712 
1920 
6300 6140 
1930 TO 
1640 1675 
6300 6370 
USD 1465 
1675 8725 
7873 7825 
4010 4025 
370 374 

357 356 

Swiss Reinsurance 10450 10350 

SwtMVolksbank 1425 1420 

JJJJonBank 3720 3710 

Winterthur 4528 

Zurich Im 22300 22900 

S BC IldlX 1 43220 - 
Pitokm : 43U0 

NA; not quoted; NAi not 
available; xd: ex-dlvkJend. 


Sctilndlor 


SBC 


China Granted 2 Loans 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —China has been i 


AGA 

Alla Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

Attas Copco 
B onder 
Electro hue 
Ericsson 
EsMite 

Hondo) sban ken 

Pharmacia 

Saab-Scanki 

Sandvlk 

SkOHka 

SKF 


— uunanasoeea granted two 
50-year, interest-free loans totaling $I20miIlioQ for 
developing village water systems and for setting up 
seed-production centers for major crops, the World 


m 

350 


197 

35S( 


nt 1 ™ for ^ million villagers in the outskirts « 
3 it SS and in the i provinces of liaoning; aaamd, 

*2 S Sichuan and Zhqiang, the announcement, issued 
IS* Monday, said. This prqject, costing a total of $210 
m 284 nmliion, will also utilize local and central govem- 
*& 9 ,™ meat funds, plus SI J million from West Germany, 
ns 2 is it added. 


69ttAM1PrM 
lOOAck lands 
37255 Ann leoE 
20300 Aero ind A 
34185 Alt Energy 

7T» Alta Nat 

300 Also Cent 
WAttoma 51 
200 Aegean 
1400 A Ico I f 
17870 BP Canada 
27589 Bank BC 
136766 Bank N S 
54950 Barricfco 
T700 Baton A t 
BUI Bonanza R 
24500 Brotome 

37100 Bramalea 
54029 BCFP 

4B791 BC Res 
<738 BC Phong 
11 BM Bruntwk 
WOBuddCon 
40500 CAE 
108CCLA 
5700 CDtSibB f 
24400 Cod Fry 
1124 C Nor West 
5812 can Trust 
200 CGE 

109620 C I Bk Cam 
COO Cdn Nat Res 

132871 cnraAf 
lIOOCUfllB 
14513 Ce l on ai e 
300 Colon 1 75 p 
1400 CDWbA 
sroocDbibBf 
is® cn, b«* 
lOOConwestA 
18911 CaMka ft 
. .‘3 Conran A 
17740 Crawnx 
521BD CmrRM 
35821 Doan Oev ' 
90a Doan A 
12577 Denison A g 
17172 DentoanBf 
2300 Deveicon 
12175 DtcknsnAf 
1075 DldCOMi B 
2376Dontan A 
' 37660 Dofasca A 
1200 Du Pont A . 
40tfDvlexA 
1100 eidhamX 
49300 Saul tv Svr 
400FCA1ml 
1300 C Falcon C 
1300 Fkaibntge 
20 Fore!y Res 
1180 Fad Ind A 
3480 FCIty Rn 
2093 Fraser 
100 Fruehouf 
MOGenaliA 
4501 Oeoc Comp 
8571 Geocrude 
2550Glbroliar 
3S551 GaWcurpf 
200 Goodyear 
700 Groff G 
MO Grandma 
100 GL Forest 
250 Gt Pacific 
SfODHrtflnoAf 
7M Hawker 
3763 Haves D 
723 H Bay Co 
38940 laxuca 
VOOffkM 
1444 In land Got 

134875 Inti Thom 
12359 Intpr Pipe 
22QIVOCOB 

<700Jcmnack 
9200 Kant Kona 

700 Kelsey H 
1200 Kerr Add 
7001 Lobatt 
47080 Lae Marts 
400 LOat Cent 
464*0 Laama 
1970 LL Lac 
38716 LotJtaw Co 
1125 MlCC 


snff 5 TK C ^i+t1! 
51616 16Vj ltVh 
818 1746 17U+ Ml 

S7W 7 79k+ 1% 

S2TK 214* 21M.+ K 
X14A MW 144fc— 1* 
*21 21 21 — M 

S23H, 23 23 —1* 

*194* tm 190* 
to 9« » 

*3516 3446 3SU + 16 
*5 Vt 516 516— ft 

*12*6 UI6 124*+ 16 
132 128 130 —3 

SIM 106 15ft— ft 
425 420 420 

» 495. 5 

ST7 16ft 17 + 1* 
9 89k to* 

253 246 346 —5 
S22ft 2216 2216+ V* 
S17W 17 17ft + U 
*Z3U> 33 23 — ft 

SUft 16 Uft 
1381* 211* 281*+ 1 * 
*59* 5ft 5ft— ft 
SUM . 149* 141*— Vi 
524ft 31 241*+ 9b 

*J3 32ft 32ft- ft 
gD 69 » + V* 

*29ft 29ft 29ft+U 
29 29 29 +6 

Hft 8ft 8ft + ft 
*179* 17ft 17ft 
1796 7ft 7ft 
ST 7ft 17ft 1716+ ft 
* 5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 
*5* 5ft 2*-ft 
510 9ft 9ft 
BR* Oft 8ft + ft 
345 330 340 +H) 

512ft 1216 12ft— 1* 
518 17ft 18 
190 IBS m +n 
m m <60 -is 

425 415 415 —30 

SUft 12ft 129* 

SUft lift lift + 9b 
S6tb 6ft 696— ft 
«ft Oft. 6ft +9% 
to 6* Oft- ft 
215 214 214 

SMk 26 26>*— ft 

TO H W + ft 
54199 41ft 41ft- ft 
• 81 7ft 7ft— ft 

*20 28 20 ■ 

51816 18 18ft 
106 104ft 10496+ ft 
205 2BS 285 +5 
toDft 20ft. 20ft- ft 
513ft 13 Uft— ft 
517ft 17 17 — ft 

522ft 22ft 22ft— ft 
*27ft 3716 27ft— ft 
5119* lift lift- ft 
290 TBS m +3 
510ft 10ft 10ft +99 
S8U 7ft 896+ ft 
5419 * 419* 41ft 
1321* 32 329*+ V* 

52 52 52 —8 

589 19 *9 —1 

5301* 30ft 309*+ ft 
1SS 150 • 155 +W 
520ft 209* 209*- ft 
gl Wft IT 
513ft 15ft 15ft + ft 
52536 25ft 25ft- 9* 
513ft 13ft Uft- 9k- 
IU lift 16 + ft 

sm 8ft 8ft 

5369* 35ft 36ft + ft 
522 21ft 21ft- ft 
511ft lift lift 
]3B US U5 +5 
536 X X — 96 
TOft IM 18 — ft 

|gk|SSftS 

IS & 

to 

230 215 230+15 


TOXMckinHX 
laoMcGrawH 
22375 Meriand B . 
9946 Maboa A f 
1300 Murphy 

maoNoMsaiL 
42819 Naranda 

6575 Korean 
61130 NvnAltAf 
69U0 Mowaco W 
69430 NuWst SPA 
176914 OokwtMXl 
raooshawoAf 
vaaopamour 
iTBOPonCan P 
300 Praiblna 
4*00 Phonht «l 
34400 Plnv Po6tl 
5413S Placer 
1400 Proviso 
7800 Quo Slurs o 
run Ram pat 
12000 Rovrackf 
4650 Redoatti 
162572 RdSfentH A 
384 RMctihoM 
23600 RBStrvI 
9569 Revn Pro A 
RWrtA 

700 Roman . 
Mooscaptre 
3300 Scotty I 
16 955 Sears Con 
100577 Shell Con 
71630 SIMITUI 
sen Shwna 
*oo stater B f 
iTOOSouttim 
MOStBrodcxt. 
373255 telco A 
3Z775ulpfra 
lOOSuncorpr 
eooosraaeyo . 

anTakwp 

1167 Tara 
ram Tm* Cor a 
26655TacfcBf 
225 Teledyne 
1*4S4 Tex Con. . 
rm Thom N A 
59173 Tar Dm U 
eeoOTantarBf 
4W Trader* A f 
Mas-mwMt 
370ftTrinlty Res 
27036 TmAHa UA 
3l4T9TrCanPL • 
1137D Trimac 
JWOTrtacAf 
38910Q Turtof 

i274Unlaon>Af 
127MU Enlprbe 

4230 U Kano 
2400 (J 5tacoe 
11500 VrntlAf 
gOOVejnrw 
370SWMdwod 
iW Weitmln • - 
MWhMH 
3300 Wiit oa ■ 
3443WOO(twd A 
18250 YkBeor 


Total Sale*: 1X084276 xhare* 


534ft 24ft 24ft— U 
*227* 22ft 32ft 
435 415 415 —5 

*159* 15ft 15ft— ft 
*349 6 2416 2416 + 46 
SBVi 251* 25ft— ft 
SUft TBft lift - 
117 164* 164b— ft 

Uft 6ft 6ft +1* 
SXft X X + ft 
54 50 52 —4 

57ft 7 7ft+ft 
*244* XU Uft— ft 
594* 9ft 9ft + ft 
Sto 32ft 3246+ ft 
517ft 17ft 17ft 
*74* 7ft 7ft- ft 
*3*4* 38 X — ft 
*274* 27U 27U+.4*. 
1194* 19ft 19ft 
*5 470 5 

to 69* 6U + 
*8ft Bft 8U— __ 
noft leu lou-ft 

*22 . 21ft 21ft + ft 

TO* M»+ft 

273 370 370 — 3 

168 UO 139 +TO 
*916 9ft. 9ft— ft 

sum i im nm 

*7 6ft 6ft - 
523 22ft '33 
toll* 7ft 7ft— 9* 
H9ft 28ft 291* + ft 
toft 7 7ft + ft 
SVft 9ft 9ft + ft 
SlOt* 9ft 9ft— ft 

g* 3 SM 

«4U MU XU+T6 

W 97 97 —3 

S2ZU 22U 22V>— M 
S» nu i3u 

514ft 12ft 13ft 

TOft-Jt 36U+ ft 

5191* 19U 19ft + ft 
“ft 33ft Sft— ft 
toft Bft «ft+ ft 
420 415 420 +20 

539ft 25H 2546 + ft 
5UU MU 24U— 4* 
428 415-433 +5 

5271* 27ft 274*+ ft 
to B 92+8 

gl£ lift lilt'* 

SAW 6 6 

nn* ii lift . .. 

SI4 Uft 13ft- ft 
515ft 15ft 15ft + ft 
UO 60 60 +2U 

577ft 764* 7716+ ft 
tolft IM* 114b- ft 
51416 MW 1496+ ft 




tse 300 index: 


00*8 
2429 JO 


X62X00 


ApriUS. 


11713 Bank Akmt 
1215 Can Soft . 
3821 Dam Txt A 
200 Mnt Tr*t 
21801 N«IBkCto 
13660 Power Carp 
SO&ftoUaixlA- 
12964 Ravel Beak 
lBORavTntca 


Total Salea: U2740Seharto 


IntotfrU il * Index: 


HM Law One Owe 

1 343* 26ft 2646 + 

516ft I6U lift— 

512 lift lift cry 
1WU 14ft MU+ff* 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. APRIL 17, 1985 


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Marvin Hagler, following through on a right hand in the second round of Monday’s fight 

Winnowing the Cup’s Hopefuls 


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International NeraU Tribune 

LONDON — Between now and 
Sunday night people whose gov- 
ernments have nothing to say to 
one another will both lest the no- 
tion that spon opens locked doors 
and demonstrate that soccer is as 
global as war. 

No fewer than 14 World Cup 
qualifying matches are scheduled 
for Europe, Africa, the Gulf and 
the Americas. They begin with 
Wednesday's visit by Greece to Al- 
bania — the shortest in distance 
but the most extraordinary across 
the ideological divide. 

The Greeks may tiptoe across 
;.the border, spend the night in some 
remote Tirana hideaway, fulfill the. 
90 minutes and leave. The match 
may have absolutely no bearing on 
wider issues, but 1 happen not to 
believe that room can be kicked 
into some irrelevant void. 

Acknowledged or not, those 
Greek players and their tiny band 
of permitted officials and journal- 
ists may wdl be the first foreigners 
bn Albanian soil since Enver Hox- 
ha's death last Thursday. 

By one coincidence*- a third of 
that isolationist Albanian leader’s 
40,000 political prisoners are ethnic 
Greeks. By another, Wednesday's 
match has been built up as the most 


es of £1.000 (SL275) per victory, 

£500 per draw and an added 
£16,500 a man to qualify —moves 
the Swiss toward their first finals in 
20 years. And the groping of the 
Russians (a 1-1 draw in Norway, a 
1-0 loss in Ireland) reveals the cri- hinge on creator 


Rob Hughes 


When these dubmates of FK Aus- 
tria opposed each other in Buda- 
pest last fall, Prohaska had the bet- 
ses of trying to replace the sprint ter of the first hour before Nyilari 
speed ana mush of Oleg Blokhin, prompted a turnaround, from a 
True, the Russians recently won go* 1 "wn to 3-1 Up. 

From there to the desert dud 


True, the Russians recently won 
the Nehru Cop in India, but what is 
that to World Cup failure? Khars 
of what was the most impressive 
Soviet team remain — the tall, elas- 
tic goalie Rinat Dassayev, the su- 
preme swe 

the crafty 

the powerful Sergei Baltacfca — yet 
apart from the decline of Blokhin's 
devastating edge, what has gone is 
the improvisation of Georgian tal- 
ent. 

David Kipiani broke a leg and 
retired early. Vitaly Darasdia -died 


in a car crash at 25. Ramaz Shenga- 
ave. Or- 


ba's prime nattered to deceive, 
ganization might carry the Rus- 
sians near, but the quality is 

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Relhi out into the world to study 
the Italian school among others 
and to test his under- 18 and under- 
21 sides in Europe. 

Then, astonishingly quickly, Al- 
banians began to dream tin; un- 
d reamable. A home victory over 
Belgium and a draw hi Poland sug- 
gested Albania might be ready for a 
World Cup final. 

A defeat m Athens in Fcbnuuy 
dimmed the euphoria, but bow 
sweet and how uplifting revenge 
would be at Qemal Stafa. Most 
uncharacteristic boasts had ema- 
nated from Tirana, warning Greeks 


m the shadow of the magical Mag- 
yars itself grew old; the next gener- 
ation became tainted with whole- 
sale bribety convictions; Gyoigy 
Mezey, Hungary’s seventh national 
coach in nine years, had to start 
afresh. 


romped past Sooth Yemen. 

Another sunkissed Brit, Mike 
Everilt, works in Egypt. Tempera- 
ment plus temperature, he suggests, 
mold a style technically impressive 
“ u *ly too casual If he’s 


but 


Mezey has redirected his squad. 


edge looks 
s match 


He stopped rdying on magic, |pt 


down to pragmatic lessens 
ness and head-on tackling and built 
a disciplined unit which, although 


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Maybe, even now, it wiQ happen. 
The celebration might now be mut- 
ed, but if Greece nils ihe way of . 
Belgium, a small cheerful ripple on 
a sea of mourning might be permis- 
sible. 

Across in Bern, meanwhile, rath-, 
er more fiscal personal stakes 
might induce Switzerland to pro- 
gress toward Mexico *86 at Riusian 
expense. Their group table, with 
, , , the Swiss on top, tiie Danes, Nor- 
<■, L. r werians and Irish in the sandwidi, 
fij2 C r and the Soviet Union at the bot- 

** T f 


sa 1 

& f r: - 
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f point in the qualifying, 
l&r-r- Yel their order and precision — 
gv ^ > and no doubt the individual bonus- 

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The AtsodPlfd Pmi 

’fe ii i ■ NEW ORLEANS — Basketball 
|ii ^ f stars David Dominique and John 



Tflxw Nyflasi 
A key man in Vienna. 


right, Egypt’s ono-i 
too frail to survive 
in Madagascar. 

African powers wane in soccer as 
in other things. The exodus of stars 
to France; Spain and Portugal 
doesn't help. Cameroon, which 
came devQishJy dose to knocking 
out Italy before ibe Italians won 
the last world Cup, will need heavy 
witchcraft to overturn Zambia's 
4-1 lead 

Tunisia, another African power, 
narrowly squeezed out Guinea; Al- 
geria starts again after a goalless 
draw in Angola; Ivory Coast, used 
to buying its neighbor’s better play- 
ers, is similarly deadlocked with 
Ghana. 

Still, Libya is on the march. My 
files do not reveal the inducements 
for success or the price of failure, 
but Libya at any rate got past Niger 
without kicking a ball (Niger with- 
drew) and put out Sudan in style, 
drawing 0-0 in Khartoum and 
whipping the Sudanese by four 
goals in Tripod 

Africa’s reduction from 42 to 2 
qualifiers is far from finalized, but 
should Libya reach Mexico in 1986 
—and should Albania be there too 
— remember, you read about them 
here first. 


l*Two Players Plead Not Guilty in Tulane Case 


21 —pleaded not guilty last week. 
Pretiding Judge Alvin Oser is- 

. sued a gag order on Monday for- 

t J Williams pleaded not guilty Moh- bidding anyone involved with the 
5^ £>- day to charges of briboy and con- case to make public, comments 
!'«v spiracy in connection with a point- about it. Die order came at the 



yers. 

Oser set a tentative calendar. 



pf shaving scandal at Tulane request of one of W3hams's law- 
■* University. 

Also pleading not guilty were 
Roland Ruiz. 48, a convicted gam- 
bler, and Craig Botngfois, 21, al- „ . 

legedly the courier for money used preliminary motions or pleadings 
, ‘jj buy players' in what prosecutors and prosecutors until June 7 to an- 
hh* describe as one of two separate but swer those filings. He set June 25 
rimultaneons fixes. for arguments on the preliminaries, 

s':. The Principals .in the. other al- Two_playets, senior forwards 


aiming at an August trial He gave 
defense lawyers until 15 to file 


guard Bobby Thompson, pleaded 
guilty to conspiracy in plea bar- 
gaining, last. week. Student David 
Roihenberg also struck a bargain 
and pleaded guilty to conspiracy in 
connection with the case as well as 
pleading guilty to an unrelated 
count of cocaine possession. 

Meanwhile, the university senate ' 
on Monday voted overwhelmingly 
to abolish Tulane’s basketball pro- 
gram. • 

The 42-5 vow supported Tulane 
President Eamon Kelly's call for 
the intercolfegiaie pro- 


8 s Si! lett^'scherntT^ 2 l-year-ok! stu- Qyde' Eads^and Jem Johnson, are grain. Afl that remains a an ap- 
;i- 'id. j — — >t -t vr_~. n« t~. *k« "jxjsccuticm under nnwin 


;-i 3 §aS*--JJ-Vaj $15?, dents Gary Kranz of New Ro- teaifymgfortbepro 
, r chelle, New York, and Mart grams of immumiy. 

K 0 ' 1 : M n ‘ s !ik u niMcIm of IToir r mm Nrw Imw Anoiher nlaver. 


- ! t Olensky of Fair Lawn, New Jersey 


Another player, senior point tors. 


scrapping 
gram. All 
proving vote, expected Thursday, 
by Tuuse’s board , of adrainistra- 


SPORTS 



Page 23 


Hagler TKO Victor in 3-Round Bloodbath 


Ctmpdnl iy Out Stt^f From Dtspathti 
LAS VEGAS — Until Thomas 
Hearns fdl, with the assistance of a 
smashing right to his face by Mar- 
velous Marvin Hagler, and was 
ruled tbe loser at 2:01 of the third 
round, hardly a second passed that 
one of the fighters wasn t landing a 
stunning blow. 

But the last punch was the one 
that allowed Hagler to retain the 
undisputed middleweight champi- 
onship of the world. And the last 


ended, at least temporarily, 
scorning the 


learns V dream of becoming 
first boxer ever to win four world 
tides. He was hoping to add the 
middleweight championship to his 
junior middleweight and welter- 
weight titles and then go on to tbe 
light .heavyweight class. 

He will have to bock up and try 
for No. 3 again, and he said later 
that be wouul 

The fight Monday night, held in 
ao outdoor arena beside Caesars 
Palace and before a sellout crowd 
of 16,034. was a tide bout that will 
have to go down in history as one of 
the fiercest ever, ranking with the 
great wars of Gnwiano-Zale, of 
Dempsey- Firpo, or whomever else 

the boxing historians want to re- 
call 

Earning a purse of at least $5.6 
million, Hagler improved his re- 
cord to 61-2-2, with 51 knockouts. 
Hearns, who has won 40 bouts (34 
by knockout), lost for only the sec- 
ond time. His other loss was to 
welterweight Sugar Ray Leonard in 
1981. 

From the opening bdl, the ac- 
tion was nonstop. Seconds into the 
first round, Hearns rocked Hagler 


with an overhand right. Hagler re- 
tina H« 


sponded by banging Hearns with a 
hard left in center ring. Hauler 
moved in. Hearns was punching 
furiously with his longer arms — 


Hearns bad a 78-inch (1. 98-meter) 
reach to Hagler's 75 — but the left- 
handed champion slammed Hearns 
with a right to the jaw. 

Although it was obvious that the 
compact Hagler was phvsicaUv 
stronger and although the challeng- 
er was backpedaling, Hearns was 
punching, not running. And he 
stunned Hagler with a left to the 
jaw. Hearns moved bade and hit 
Hagler again with another hard 

right to the bead and followed with 
another left Hagler kept penetnu- 
ing, catching Hearns on the ropes 
and flailing away. 

A cut suddenly opened above 
Hagler's right eye. 

Now Hearns tried to measure 
him for his powerful overhand 
right. But Hagler was able to move 
inside and throw lefts and rights to 
Hearos's head. Hagler’s blood was 
smeared on Heams's left shoulder 
as Hagler bulled him along the 
ropes. As the befl rang Hagler 
threw a vicious left that staggered 
Hearns. 

Hagler wasted no lime in the 
second, opening with a left hook 
that bounced off Hearos's head. 
Hearns popped a right that re- 
opened Hagler’s cut. Retreating, 
Hearns tripped. He righted himself 
just in time to catch a lunging right 
to the jaw. 

Hearns banged a couple of shots 
to Hagler’s cut — and opened an- 
other one. below the right eye. But 
Hagler, undaunted, kept throwing 
punches with both hands; a 
straight right and a left book stag- 
gered Hearns. They were bade on 
the ropes, and blood covered 
Hagler’s face. And that’s where 
they remained, returning punch for 
punch as the round gndjpd . 

At the bdl for the third round, 
Hagler moved out of his comer, bm 
referee Richard Steele halted his 


progress. The champion's face was 
still bleeding despite the doctoring 
by his comer men. Steele wanted 
an opinion by the ringside physi- 
cian. Hagler was deemed able to 
continue. 

Wild with a right, Hagler landed 
a left Hearns slammed a series ctf 
long jabs toward Hagler’s eye, but 
seemed to stagger at the energy loss 
from all his punching — com- 
pounded by the shots he had been 
absorbing.' 

Die challenger suddenly looked 
tired. 

The two clinched and Steele 
broke it up and checked Hagler’s 
cut. The fighters continued. They 
were in center ring, and Hagler 
threw a solid right that caught 
Hearns on the chin. Tbe challenger 


his side and then turned over on his 
back. 

He raised himself slowly, hold- 
ing onto the ropes, and was on his 
feet at the count of eight, Stede 
looked into Hearos's glassy eyes 
and waved that the fight was over. 

“They always say, ‘Even the 
greatest lose sometimes,"' said 
Hearns after the fight, ‘*1*11 just 
hold my head up. I know this is not 
the end for me. I'm a winner, I 
don’t take defeat easily. But I have 
to give Marvin proper respect for 
being a great champion. He has not 
held thetitie that Icing for nothing." 


staggered to the ropes, and 
dropped to the canvas. He fell on 


Hearns explained why he 
slugged it out with Hagler instead 
of trying to tie him up more. “I had 
to punch,” he said. “It was there. 
Marvin started running in and 1 
had to show him he haa to respect 


me. 1 wasn't going to have him 
make rae run." 

Said Hagler: **I have to admit it 
— Tommy gave me some good 
shots in the first round. He's a good 
fighter and a very courageous man. 
I can't take nothing away from the 
man — it takes two to tango and 
two to fight. But you can't come 
out and expect to take it away from 
the champ. Somebody had to fall, 
and I knew it wouldn't be me.“ 

. Unlike Beams, HagJer is content 
to keep one title, and his ambition 
is simply to successfully defend \\ 
at least four more times, thus bet- 
tering by one the most title de- 
fenses by a middleweight champi- 
on. Carlos Monzon defended his 
crown 14 times. 


“History." Hagler said shortly 
i defense. “1 was xo- 


afier his latest 
ing for history. 


f.VJT, IVPl 


Reds Hold On, Beat Braves, 9-8 


The Associated Press 

ATLANTA — Cincinnati's bats 
finally came out of hiding as the 
Reds pounded out 13 hits in a 9-8 
victory over the Braves here Mon- 


day. but they almost let it get away 
' ar defense collapsed in the 


when their 
ninth inning. 

Nick Esasky and Dave Van 
Gorder provided much of the of- 
fense for the Reds, who had scored 
only six runs in four straight losses 
after an opening-day victory. 
Esasky hit the team's first home 
run of the season, a two-run shot in 
the fourth, and Van Gordo's two 
singles drove in three runs in Cin- 
cinnati's most productive game 
thug far. 

The Braves rallied for three un- 
earned runs in the ninth off reliev- 
ers Carl Willis and Ted Power. 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Golf 


Basketball 


he will not have ii said, is a stride 
away from qualifying. 

The Austrians are again under 
new management, their 18th lead- 
ership change since World War II. 
Wednesday’s intriguing battle will 
lor Herbert 


Major League Standings 


Prohaska 


against Hungary's Tiber Nyilasi. 

of FK / 


Now York 

Cntaroo 

Pimtxjmh 

Moolrool 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia 


Atlanta 
Los Anaotos 
San Dioao 
San Francisco 
Houston 
Cincinnati 


NATIONAL LEAOUS 
■Ml Division 

W L Pet. GB 

1 1 
S 

3 

2 4 

3 4 

1 5 

Wnt O Milan 

4 3 

4 3 

3 3 

3 3 

3 4 

2 4 


an — 
t xa - 

3 -500 3 

JXS 3 
033 3 

-147 4 


-M7 — 
071 Vt 


-U0 1 

J00 1 

m 


J33 3 


between the United Arab Emirates 
and Saudi Arabia. Allah alone 
knows what astronomical rewards 

are dangled before the combatants 

AlotindrChivadze, (or what dark forces are afcxjt/giv^ 
and en constant Asian rumblings — not 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
East Division 

W L Pet. 


GB 


least an alleged $10,000 bribe to 
Thailand to Tie down against the 
UAE in the World Youth Cup a 
month ago). 

The Saudis' match against the 
UA.E. in Riyadh last Friday was 
scoreless; so much for Brazilian 
coaching influence in the Gulf. En- 
glish naming may be less sophisti- 
cated, but let no one say less fruit- 
ful Bahrain recompenses one-time 
Tottenham Manager Keith Burkin- 
shaw £60,000 tax free for his trans- 
lations into Arabic, and, after side- 
stepping Iran — which was 
excluded for failing to agree to play 


Detroit 

S 

0 

1-000 

_ 

Baltimore 

4 

1 

jog 

i 

Milwaukee 

4 

1 

400 

l 

Boston 

4 

2 

MT 

US 

Toronto -■ ■ 

- *■-*" 

sot 

2Vi 

Now York 

3 

3 

• 408 

3 

Cleveland 

0 1 

Wirt Division 

JOOO 

s 

Seattle 

6 

T 

437 

— 

CtUcoso 

3 

3 

400 

2 

California 

3 

4 

439 

3 

Oakland 

3 

4 

429 

3 

Minnesota 

2 

3 

486 

4 

Kansas City 

I 

4 

300 

4 

Texas 

0 

5 

jiao- 

5 


Monday's Line Scores 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 

cmcovo nwn 83— t ii a 

bmim on on iti si— s is a 

SMV«f, James ( 7). Aaosto 19), Jonas (*) and 
Pltk.- Hurtl. Starilty (8) and CMmon. Sulll. 
van (9). W— Junta. 1-0. 1 — 5|onMy,0-l. HR— 
Boston. Rico (2). 

California BIS IN 128 — 9 9 8 

MlnnaMta ON 8N 888—8 ( 8 

Zartn and No iron; Smithson. FUua {8J.Lv- 
sondw {BJ, Klowittor II) and Laudrwr. W— 
2nhn. 1-a L — Smithson. 1-1. HRv-Calltamta. 
RJoms (II. Narron (!). 

SMtlt 138 MO 818—4 8 1 

Oakland 3N 3N 13n-7 t 1 

Lanoflon. Stanton (7>.VMid8B«ro ID. and 
Kwtoiy; Kmmr. a morion (71, Conroy (I). 
JXowril (I) and Hoath. W— Kruwir. 1-1. L— 
Lonwton. 1-1. 5v— JJtowotl (2). KRd— S mi- 
fJa. Cowans (3). Oakland, Hiafti (1). NLDavts 
(31. 

NATIONAL LSAOUB 
PUhMMnbla BN 8N 188—1 4 1 

CM COSO Ml BN 81>— 1 9 3 

Dmnv.lLGross <7J, Carman (B). Hudson IS) 
and Vlrali; Trout Sawn («) ana Oavu. W— 
Trout, 2-0. L — IC Gross. 0-1. Sv— Smith (2). 
Ctadnnatl M2 2M 080-4 U 3 

AlHutfa IN IN MM U I 

ShiMT, Price (4), WIHN li>, Power (9) and 
von Gonfsr; P.Penu, McMurtrv (l). Smith 
(4), Forster f7), Goroer 19) and Corona. W— 
StuMf, 1-0. Lf-P.P eret. 0-1. Sv— Power (1). 
H Rs— dnckuwtt, Esasky (1 ). Atlanta. Carwie 
(1). 

New York 001 ON 008-1 t I 

PtmtMtrak 081 388 19*— 4 7 0 

Latham, SWc (4), Garmon (7). Lynch (8) 
and Carter; BleleckL Candelaria (7L and 
T-Pena. W— BMscfcL 14L Ui— LotnenuO-l .Sv— 
Candelaria 13). 

Mo nt real BN BM 808-1 I 8 

SL Leals OH 833 88s— 4 II 8 

Gullicksan. Schatzedw (4). Burke (U and 
Fttxoeraid; Pencil and Lavaillere. W— 
Farscn. 1-C. L—Gu Hickson. M. HR— St. Louis. 
CLSmhti (1). 

San Francisco 083 MO 818-3 S B 

Sen Dim BN 408 48K— 4 13 1 

Hommnker, Williams (4). Minton (7) and 
Brenlyj Shaw, Gossans (II. DeLson (9) and 
Kennedy, w — Show. ML b Ha m maker, o-l, 
HRs— Sen Dleaa Kennedy <3].Marttnez2(2>. 
Houston 873 MB 888-3 9 I 

Las Anoetes IN 181 11 k— 5 7 1 

Nlekro, Calhoun {7).Dowtev Cl) and Ballsy; 
HersMswvCDiaz (S). Howell IS), and Sclat- 
da. w — CDtoz. 3-0. L — Nlekra, 0-2. Sv— How- 
ell (3). HR— Las Anoetes. Duncon (1). 


Statistical leaden oaths ProteaJoeal Batt- 
ers AnodaNoe Tear threosti the Masters 
leam un ie n l : 

EARNINGS 

1. Curtis Siranae S3I944S; 2. Calvin Peete 
S379.93S; X Mark O'Meara 3314443; A Lannv 
WodkiitsCll&8S5;&Craio Siaaier 331 1444; A 
Bernhard Longer SI 44467; 7. Fuzzy Zeeller 
S142J77; X Tom Wateen S138J32; 9. Fred Cou- 
pfes S13144S; IX Srve Ballesieres 313X771. 

SCORING 

1. Don Pall«v. 7XBS- X Crola Stonier. 70i». X 
Loan/ WMklns. 7041.4, Lam> Mize, 7X3X &. 
Tom Watson and Ojrihj Strange, 7X3*. 7. Ed 
Fieri 70.40. X Calvin PNte, 7X41. 9, Corev Po 
vln. 7IL7X IX Gary Koch. 7X71 

AVBRAGB DRIVING DISTANCE 
I. Greg Norman and Bill Qonoa 277.1, X 
Fred Couplet, 277.0. 4, Andy Bean. 37A9.X Jim 
Dent. 274A. X Mac (TGrady.2719. 7. Dan Pahl. 
37XX X Fuzzy ZoeilW and Greg Twlgos. 371 S. 
M, Tam Watson. 3714. 

DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
1. Calvin Peete, JU. 1 Hole Irwin, J*9. 1 
□avia Edwards. 3U. 4. Wovne LevL44L L 
Mike RekL .75*. A Tom Kite, J5X 7, Bruce 
□eRATTSC- X jock Renoer, J54. 9, Larry' 
Nelson mad Tim Norris. .748. 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
- l. Jack Nfcklovs. .747. z Dan Pahl. .740. x 
uruea Uetzke. J3X A Doug Towel!, J27. X Al 
Geiberger, J2X X Corin' Puvbi ana John Ma- 
liottev. J1 XX MocO-Gnidy, J17.». Mike Reid. 
JU. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
l,KIKuaAraL37J4.XSeveBaHesl«ros.3X4X 
X Morris HataiskY. 2844. A Fuzzy Zoeller. 
2B4XXOanForsman. 2844.X Loren Roberts 
and BabbV OarwetL 2X72. X Rex CoJ dwell, 
3X7X 9, Frank Conner. 2X7X K. Don Polley. 
384X 

PERCRNTAOE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1, Grata Siadier. 447. x Lannv Wodklns and 
Tom Wtotsan. 43X ACurBsStrange.421 X Tze- 
Chung Clm 219. x CHI Morgan, 4IX 7, Philip 
Btockmar. :21X X Fred - Couples. 41X 9, Ed 
FiorL J1X 

BIRDIES 

I. Fred Couples. t8X X CurNs Strange, I77.X 
Craig Stader. 17X A Larry R Inker, 157. & 
Loren Roberts, 152. X Scott Simpson. 1 31. 7, 
Wilde Wood. 130. X Larry Mbce. 14X 9, Brad 
Faxon and Hal Sutton, I4A 


NBA Playoff Schedule 


FIRST ROUND 
EASTERN CONFERENCE 
April u: Cleveland at Boston 
April 20: Cleveland at Boston 
April 33: Boston al Cleveland 
x-aptii 23; Boston at Cleveland 
x-Anril 28: Cleveland al Boston 


April 1«: Chicago at Milwaukee 
April 31: Chicago al Milwaukee 
April 34: Milwaukee al Chicago 
X-April 36: Milwaukee at Chicago 
April 38; Chicago at Milwaukee 


April 17; Washington at Phlladalolila 
April 21: Washington al Philadelphia 
April 34: Philadelphia at Washington 
x-Aorll 26: Philadelphia at Washington 
x-Aprir 28: Wosnhwtan at Philadelphia 


April is: New jersey al Detroit 
April 21: New Jersey at Detroit 
April 24: Detroit at New Jersey 
x-Aprli 36: Detroit at New Jersey 
x-Aprll 28: New Jersey at Detroit 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
April 18: Phoenix at LA. Lakers 
April 20: Phoenix at LA. Lakers 
Anrll 33: LA. Lakers at Phoenix 
x-Aorll 23: LA. Lakers at Phoenix 
■•April 27: Phoenhc at LA. Lakers 


Aprn it: San Antonio al Oenver 
April 30: San Antonio at Denver 
April 33: Denver at San Antonio 
x-April 26: Denver at San Antonio 
■•April 28; San Antonio ol Denver 


April 19: utoh at Houston 
April 31: Utah at Houston 
April 34: Houston at Utah 
x-Aprll 26: Houston at Utah 
« -April 38: UkXi at Houston 


April 18: Portland al Dallas 
April 28; Portland or Dados 
April 23; Dallas ai Portland 
x -April 23: Dallas at Portland 
«■ April 27: Port kx >d at Dallas 


Transition 


Distance Running 


BASEBALL 
America* Lmhhni 

BOSTON— Placed Bruce Klsoa. Ditcher, on 
me 21-day disabled list and activated Al Nip- 
per. pitcher. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Assodattoa 
WASHINGTON— Activated Jeff Ruland, 
center, and Frank Johnson, Board. 

FOOTBALL 

United Stales Football Lsaaoe 
ARIZONA— Traded Paul Hanna. defensive 
tackle, to Son AnloMo tor Al HI1L wWe receiv- 
er. 


Tie finishers in Mondays 89tti Boston Mar- 


Football 


USFL Standings 


MSN 

1. Geoff Smith. Great Britain. 2 hours, 14 
minutes. 5 seconds. 

Z Gary R. TutMe, UJL 2:19.11. 

X Mark M. Holgoson, UJL 2:2115. 

A Lou 5uolno. UJL 2:21-9. 

S. Bobby Doyle. UJL 2:2141. 

A Toro Mlmura, Japan, 2:2X33. 

7. Charles Hewes- UA- 2:2X35. 

X Daniel A. Dillon. UA, 2:2X30. 

9. Christopor R. FleWier, 2rtA29. 

10. Normon W. Blair, Ui 3-J233B. 

IL Randall Dyson. US L 2;2SJA 
13. Mark A. amwov. UJL. 3:2422. 

13. Wovne A. Jacob, Ui. 2:3459. 

14. Michael U. Shwln. UJL 3:3649. 

15. Stephen G. GrYOtet, U4. 2:27114. 

16. Mork P. Lohmen. Ui, 3:37.11. 

17. Peter B. (Confer. US. 2:27.12. 

1A John E. Zuoanc. UJL 2:37.11 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Blr m lnaham 
Tampa Bay 
New Jersey 

Memphis 

Baltimore 

Jacksonville 

Orlando 


Fcl PF PA 
73D 193 130 
JM 233 170 
423 206 111 
500 1SJ 147 
-■OS 136 109 
STS 190 325 
350 144 211 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Denver S 3 a 423 178 166 

Houston 3 J 0 423 245 III 

Oakland * 3 1 -543 192 180 

Arizona 4 4 0 JOB tel 143 

Portland 3 3 0 J75 111 17* 

Son Antonio 3 5 0 .275 til 161 

Lee Angeles 2 6 0 350 148 181 

MONDAY'S RESULT 
Tampa Bov 33. Denver 17 


WOMEN 

t. Lisa Larsen wektonbadL UJ. 2:34:06. 
Z Lynne Huntington, US. 2:4213b 
3. Karan E. Dunn, U S. 3:4237. 

A Detwran l. Butterfleia, Bermuda. 2:4X47. 
5b Vickie C Smith. Ui. 2:4633. 

A Kathleen P. Northrop. UJ_ 3:4643. 

7. Kimberly A. Mpodv. US. 2:46J1. 

A Mary P. Hynes, UJL 2:4857. 

9. Elizabeth M. Butman. US. 2:50.16. 

10. Bern Dtiilnger. US. 2:5IU6. 

11. Patricia M. WoesJL UJL 2:5242 
12 Susan F. Laptop, UJL 3:5X32 
12 Caryl E. Andrew. UA, 2:5135. 

14. Sherry Lanstats. U S. 3:5534. 

15 Betty H. Nelson. Ui. 3-5538. 

U. Pauline F. Brown. UJL 2:5608. 

17. Sairv Zimmer. UJL 2:5653. 

Tfl. Nancy R. Munroe, UJL 2:38.19. 



BMMUsNd PM Memosenri 


Denver safety DarnrI HemphQI leveled quarterback John Reaves In Monday ’s ear ly going, 
ssedfoi 


but Reaves passed for 292 yards and one touchdown in Tampa Bay’s 33-17 USFL vtetoiy. 


With two outs. Brad Koraminsk 
reached on an error by third base- 
man Esasky. Dale Murphy fol- 
lowed with a run-scoring double, 
and Bob Horner then hit a ground- 
er that Dave Concepcion booted, 
allowing Murphy to score. A single 


BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


by Gerald Perry moved Homer to 
second and brought in Power. Rick 
Cerooe's single made ii 9-8, before 
Power struck out Glenn Hubbard. 

Cincinnati pounced Pascua] Pe- 
rez for five runs in the first. Consec- 
utive singles by Eric Davis, Pete 
Rose, Dave Parker and Cesar Ce- 
deno brought two runs home. An- 
other scored when Ron Oesier 
drew a bases-loaded walk before 
Van Gorder greeted reliever Craig 
McMurtry with a two-rim single. 

Pirates 4, Mets 1 
In Pittsburgh, Bill Almon drove 
in two runs and Mike Bielecki com- 
bined with John Candelaria on a 
nine-hitter to help the Pirates beat 
New York, 4-1, and end the Mets’ 
season-opening w inning streak at 
five games. 

Cobs 2, Phillies 1 
In Chicago, Chris Spder's pinch- 
hit sacrifice fly in the eighth broke 
a 1-1 tie and lifted the Cubs past 
Philadelphia, 2-1. 

Canfinab 6, Expos 1 
In Sl Louis, shortstop Ozzie 
Smith, who earlier in the day signed 
a four-year contract extension 
worth more than S2 million a sea- 
son, homered and singled to help 
the Cardinals win their home open- 
er. 6-1, over Montreal Bob Forsch 
scattered eight hits in his first com- 
plete game since no-hitting the Ex- 
pos on Sept. 26, 1983. Forsch 
missed half the 1984 season after 
undergoing back surgery. 

Padres 8, Giants 3 
In San Diego, Carmelo Martinez 
hit two homers — one of them a 
grand-slam — to power the Padres 



RBI leader Mike Davis 

. . 77uw homers in jour days. 


first major-league home run in the 
seventh, breaking a 3-3 tie and pro- 
pelling the Dodgers to a 5-3 veraici 
over Housion. 


A’s 7, Mariners 4 
In the American League, in Oak- 
land, California, Mike Davis and 
Mike Heath hit homers to lead the 
A's to a 7-4 triumph over Seattle — 
die Mariners’ first loss after slx 
straight victories. His third homer 
in four days ran Davis's league- 
leading RBI total to 13. Trailing, 3- 
2. Oakland touched Mark Lang- 
ston for two runs in the fourth. 
Heath led off by ripping a 3-2 pitch 
to right center; the ball rolled along 
the wall away from right fielder Al 
Cowens, and Heath had the first 
inside- tbe-park home ran of his ca- 
reer. Davis followed by putting a 2- 
2 pitch into the right-field stands. 


to an 8-3 home-opener triumph 
s first 


over San Francisco. Padre 
baseman Steve Garvey’s record 193 
consecutive errorless games ended 
in the ninth inning. Garvey charged 


in on a foul popup by Bob B roily 
to make a basket catch. 


and tried to make a basket catch, 
bm the ball popped out of Us 
glove. 

Dodgers 5, Astros 3 
In Los Angeles, rookie second 
baseman Mariano D uncan hit his 


WWte Sox 6. Red Sox 5 
In Boston. Julio Cruz’s two-out, 
two-run single in the 1 1th broke a 
4-4 tie and lifted Chicago past the 
Red Sox, 6-5. Ozzie Guillen led off 
the inning with a walk off Bob 
Stanley, and Greg Walker followed 
with a single off Stanley’s glove. 
After Daryl Boston struck out. 
Walker went to second as Rudy 
Law bounced oul Cruz then sin- 
gled to left. 

Angels 5L Twins 0 
In Minneapolis, Ruppen Jones 
and Jeny Natron each hit bases- 
empiy home runs to pace Califor- 
nia to a 5-0 victory that spoiled 
Minnesota’s home opener. 


Ad byApril 
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Page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1985 


* V 



OBSERVER 


No Beery Deeds , Please 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I’m the last 
person I know who doesn't 
have a VCR, but I get a lot of 


invitations from people who do. 
.and 


made about a lifetime ago. What 
followed was a movie experience of 
utter horror, as we witnessed the 
destruction of the greatest movie 
ever made. 


“Come on over and see ‘Mr. Deeds 
Goes to Town,' " they say, and 
sometimes I accept, though never 
when they offer “Mr. Deeds Goes 
to Town." 

This is a movie I saw when it was 
a first-run show, which was, oh. 
some time ago. 1 enjoyed it im- 
mensely. Since then I have not seen 
it again and will go to great lengths 
not to. 

I have had too much painful ex- 
perience revisiting movies that 
were wonderful years ago. If you 
want a wonderful movie of your 
childhood to be exposed as a colos- 
sal cultural disappointment, all you 
have to do is watch a VCR run it 
through a friend's television set. 

< □ 

- Pan of the trouble may be the 
television set's inescapable associa- 
tion with beer. The first television 
set I ever saw sat behind a bar in 
Baltimore while dazzled beer 
drinkers watched professional 
wrestlers toiling at their fraudulent 
'trade. For the longest time after 
that, television existed almost en- 
tirely as saloon furniture, so it was 
natural that when it moved into the 
parlor it should continue its tradi- 
tional role as a beer-huckstering 
tool. 

Another problem with VCR mo- 
yiegoing when it comes to the clas- 
sic flicks is the hostile ambiance of 
the parlor auditorium. Recently 
some young people very dear to me 
offered to show the greatest movie 
ever made if I would but name it. 

They are the son of people who, 
when asked to name the greatest 
movie ever made, automatically say 
“Citizen Kane." I always said “Cit- 
izen Kane" myself in bygone days 
when I hoped to show the world it 
was dealing with a man of intellect 
.cultivation, artistic sensibility and 
good taste. Now that triumphant 
Reaganism has made vulgarity 
fashionable, however, I can answer 
frankly when asked to name the 
greatest movie ever made. 

“Gunga Din." I said. "Get 


It began with us all sitting in 
comfortable chairs in an over light- 
ed room instead of on sprung the- 
ater seats in a darkened cavern 
reeking of bubble gum and pop- 
corn. for which all the truly great 
movies were designed. 

That was handicap enough, but 
what about the telephone that kept 
ringing at critical moments in the 
drama? And these people — my 
dear hosts! — kept answering the 
thing. 

The worst moment came in the 
great scene in which Eduardo Cian- 
elli, wearing nothing but a few tow- 
els and a gallon of walnut stain on 
his face, exhorts his murderous 
Thug cohorts to kill kill for the 
love of killing, kill for the love of 
Kali. Here is one of the great mo- 
ments in cinema and as I prepared 
to savor it — yes, that was a tele- 
phone rin ging , all right. 

I could scarcely believe it when 
my host — a lovely young man, a 
young man very dear to me — said, 
“No way you’re going to get me 
betting against Georgetown." 

Eduardo Clanelli was already 
launched into his great speech — 
"KiD! Kill!" — and drowning it out 
was this inane chatter about bas- 
ketball games. 

“Could you turn the sound down 
a little?" the young man asked. 

The two women present were de- 
lighted to do so. What with a phone 
conversation in progress and Cian- 
elli crying out for mass murder all 
over India, it hadn't been easy for 
them to enjoy their discussion of 
scandalous doings by a famous star 
of television and gossip sheets. 


‘Gunga Din’ from your movie sup- 
plier, and you shau share 


: with me 
one of the sublime moviegoing mo- 
ments of your life." 

I They got “Gunga Din," starring 
Victor McLaglen, Cary Grant and 
Douglas Fairbanks Jr„ which was 


I did not cry, though it seemed 
that I must once have been a silly 
child indeed, for what other kind 
could have admired such an awful 
show? People have since told me 
that the whole point of VCRs is 
that you can watch dirty movies at 
home without anybody knowing 
about your vile tastes. 

I don’t want “Mr. Deeds Goes to 
Town" to be run through that land 
of machine, thnnlc you. 


New York Tima Service 


Mercouri’s Athens: EC Culture Capital 


By Don A Schanche 

Los Angela Tima Service 

A THENS — Her tousled 
blond hair spills across her 
worry-lined brow, and. the large 
eyes that once captivated movie- 
goers are rimmed by deepening 
blue circles that suggest near ex- 
haustion. 

But Melina Mercouri, movie 
star turned politician and mem- 
ber of the inner circle of Greece’s 
Socialise government, is on tap of 
the world at age 59, fending off 
what she sees as the electronic 
homogenization of European cul- 
ture by American television. 

“We are very concerned about 
our identity, and we're very much 
afraid of what will happen to it 
when satellite and cable TV 
spread everywhere," she said in 
the husky voice that drew raves in 
“Never on Sunday." 

“We know the Americans mil 
take over and dominate the tele- 
vision," she said, “so it was obvi- 
ous that we Europeans had to do 
something.'' 

So, as minister of culture in the 
government of Prime Minister 
Andreas Papandreou, Mercouri 
is sprucing up Athens for a six- 
month stint as the culture capital 
of Europe. Beginning June 21. 
art, drama, music, films and as- 
sorted entertainments and exhi- 
bitions from other member coun- 
tries of the European Community 
will be appearing there. 

The Menxmri-inspired coun- 
terattack against homogenization 
of the arts so captivated other 
European culture minis ters and 
their governments that the idea of 
an annual movable culture feast 
has taken hold. 

Next year the culture capital 
will be Florence; the year after 
that, probably Amsterdam. 


culture that long ago spread to 
Europe and beyond. 

"We don’t want a closed-door 
cultural life," Mercouri said. 

She enthusiastically described 
some of the more than 100 major 
events that are expected to ele- 
vate Greek spirits — and Greek 
tourist revenues — by the end of 
this year. They include summer 
performances of a yet-unchosen 
play by Euripides in the beauti- 
fully preserved open-air theater 
at Delphi This would not be un- 
usual but the cast — a troupe of 
Canadian Eskimos — must repre- 
sent a milestone in die history of 
the theater. 

Another cultural Cist will be 
the debut of a Soviet rode opera 
— cast and theme still to be an- 
nounced — at the Veakio Theatre 
in Athens's port city, Piraeus, 
which Mercouri has represented 
in the Greek parliament since 
1977. Still another event of dis- 
tinctly non-European origin will 
be two nights of jazz with Miles 
Davis, at the Lycabeltus Theatre 
in early July. This is to be fol- 
lowed, a week later, by an all- 
Europe jazz festival 

Heavier contributions range 



Corwra Frew 

Melina Mercouri: Athens project is afl-consuming. 


from the Ibsen play “John Gabri- 
u" directed 1 


Marry other cities are lining up 


for their turn, according to Mer- 
couri's brother, Spiros, coordina- 
tor of the project in the Culture 
Ministry. 

“Every year a different Euro- 
pean capital to which we can send 
our writers and artists and per- 
formers,’' Melina Mercouri said 
with pride. 

Despite its primary aim, de- 
fending Europe against pop 
trends from across the Atlantic, 
tire program will not be entirely 
Continental not does it altogeth- 
er dismiss dements of American 


d Bjorkman," directed by Ingmar 
Bergman, to Shakespeare’s “Co- 
riolanus,” performed by Britain’s 
National Theatre. 

Medieval dancers, jugglers, 
sword-eaters and tumblers will 
stroll the Roman Agora, and doz- 
ens of orchestras and ensembles 
win play at theaters and concert 
halls in and around the city. 
These offerings will include 
Leonard Bernstein conducting 
his Third Symphony with the Eu- 
ropean Community Youth Or- 
chestra, and a performance by the 
WashingLon-based National 
Symphony, conducted by Msti- 
slav Rostropovich. 

“It has become almost a cultur- 
al Olympics, a competition to 
send the very best," said Michael 
Coutouzis, a foreign affairs advis- 
er who, like most employees of 
the Culture Ministry (including 
Mercouri's husband, the Sim di- 
rector Jules Dassin), is devoting 
almost full time to the program. 
“We needed an institution to 
draw together the multiplicity of 
European cultures and to snow 
their unity, and now we have it." 

A welcome side effect of the 


event, Coutouzis said, will be to 
draw European politicians to- 
gether to do something besides 
argue over EC agricultural policy. 
Most leaders, including President 
Francois Mitterrand of France, 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West 
Germany and Prime Minister 
Bettino Craxi of Italy, are expect- 
ed to join Papandreou for the 
opening ceremonies. 

Mercouri was raised in the 
household of her grandfather, 
who was mayor of Athens for 30 
years. The former Greek military 


government stripped her of heir 
tip in 1 967 bet 


citizenship in 1967 because of her 
opposition activities, and she 
lived in exile until the junta fell in 
1974. 

She and her colleagues in the 
ministry bought a theater com- 
plex in downtown Athens, ex- 
panded the city’s art museums, 
created a modd traditional Greek 
port near the airport, converted 
three old rock quarries into out- 
door theaters and turned factory 
warehouses into theaters and a 
huge old pier in Piraeus into a 
restaurant/ arts center. 

“It’s been a lot of work," 
Spiros Mercouri said. 

The cost to Greece so far has 


not been great, he said — about 
55 million, which the Greek Na- 
tional Toorist Organization con- 
siders a bargain in view of the 
number of visitors the project is 
expected to draw. 

“Demand for beds is already 
fantastic,’’ said Nikos V. Skoulas, 
secretary-general of the organiza- 
tion. “We will have at least a 12- 
percent gain this year over the 6 
milli on visitors we had last year. 
It’s perfect, because the essence 
of our tourism always has been 
cultural" 

But costs will rise as the sum- 
mer progresses: Greece has 
promised free hospitality to the 
thousands of artists, writers and 
performers who will be coming to 
Athens to take part 

Asked how many participants 
there would be and what arrange- 
ments had been made to house; 
feed and transport them, Spiros 
Mercouri seemed surprised. 

“To tell the truth, J don’t know, 
but I'm glad you mentioned 
that," he said, frowning. “It's 
something we haven’t thought 
about yet, and your question re- 
minds me that we’d better get 
busy." 


people 
Voyage for the Heart 


An adventure-seeking ^ rm 5 r 
heart patient, sailing around the 
world to raise money for heart re- 
search at Papworth Childrens 
Hospital in London, tied up Tues- 
day in Perth, Australia, after bat- 
tling adverse winds and a faded 
motor in a 61-day solo trip from 
South Africa. James Hatfield, 29, 
began his voyage in Penzance, 
Cornwall, in a toy-laden 24-foot 
(7.3-meter) yacht called British 
Heart. He said he had been seeking 
adventure ever since be walked out 
of a hospital 10 years ago after Jus 
eighth heart operation. He found it 
bn this voyage: “In the South At- 
lantic I hit a floating container 
which had been blown off a ship in 
a storm," - he said. “The impart 
cracked the deck, mast and bow- 
sprit, smashed the rodder . and 
upped a saucepan of boiling water 
over my legs. It took me two 
months to reach Brazil for repairs, 
steering the boat by the sails." He 

inPerth! then saillipeasiem Aus- 
tralia before heading across the 
Tasman Sea to New Ze a la n d. 


named the winner of the Vannevn..: 
Bush Award from the National Sci- - 
ence Board. The National Sdeuce>: 
Foundation said Bethe, profess® 
emeritus at Cornell Universig Iq 
I thaca, New York, would receive* 


medal and citation M^r l5. Bette» 


Warren Beatty has won a deci- 
sion that will require the ABC tele- 
vision network to run all 200 min- 
utes of Beatty's award-winning 
1981 film, “Reds,” later this 
month. To avoid conflicts with lo- 
cal news programs, ABC had con- 
tracted with Paramount Pictures to 
show a version of the film with 


about 12 minutes cut Beatty, who 
in “Reds.' 


directed and starred _ r . 

tried to persuade the network to 
run his original version, then took 
the battle to arbitration. The arbi- 
trator, Edward Mosk. an entertain- 
ment attorney, ruled that Beatty 
had the right to the final cot Beat- 
ty's attorney, Bart Fields, said: “He 
concedes they have the right to cut 
the picture for censorship reasons, 
but that is not the issue here. His 
position was you can't cut movies 
like sausages to fit preconceived 
time slots. Fields said Beatty in- 
sisted that the cuts ABC sought 
would have significantly altered the 
movie. “This was a battle for all 
directors," Fields said. Only a 
handful of movies have ever cut 
into news time, including another 
Beatty film, “Heaven Can WaiL" 


received the Nobel Prizein 19674cj|i»f 
work in the 1930s cm the origin pit i* 
stellar energy and was a key 
in developing the atomic bomb. 

□ . •• 

Ten men in tuxedos drained five’ 
bottles of French champagne by a 
little-known memorial along the 
Potomac River in Washington tc 
remember the passengers who went ■ 
down with the Titanic 73 years ago, 
“To those brave men!" the Men’s - 
Titanic Society toasted. Georg? 
Light, a member of the Men's Te - 
tanic Society, said: “Men. have giv- 
en their lives on ships before and . 
they will again, but'perhaps never . 
again will men give (heir lives with' 
such style and class as those brie- ' 
men." The monument, a warble 
statue of a man with arms- oat- - 
stretched, symbolizes the sacrifice;'' . 
of those who died when the ship : 
sank after striking an iceberg on its 1 *' 
maiden voyage in 1912. Because of 
the “women and children first" ira- 
dition. most of the more than 1,50th 
victims were men. ‘ 

□ .V _ 

A hoi-air balloon bearing the"~ 
colors of France and the United - 
States was launched Tuesday be- \. 
side the Eiffel Tower to signal the ” 
start of a campaign to raise S5 mil: - r 
lion in France for a new torch for 
the Statue of Liberty. The statue in • • ' 
New York Harbor, by the French - 
sculptor Frederic Auguste Barthol--: 

<§. is undergoing renovations ex-.- ' 




the target date for completion, h 
4, 1986; 

□ 


□ 


Hans A Bethe, a winner of the 
Nobel Prize in physics, has been 


Imelda Marcos has made her de- . 
but as a singer and songwriter, the " 
Bulletin Today newspaper reported "7 
in Manila. It said she sang a song.' 
called “Forever," and dedicated it 
to her husband. President Ferf- ; 
nandE. Marcos ofthePMippm/ 
at a state luncheon that Marcos' 
gave for the secretary-general of:, 
the Muslim World League, Abdul: - 
lab Omar Nasseef. Palace sources- 
said Mrs. Marcos, who studied mu- - 
sic in college, wrote the first draft / 
of the song last month on her way- 
to the funeral of the Soviet leader, 
Konstantin U. Chernenko. 


; -•*) 

t 


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DEMEXPOKT 

PARIS • LYON • MARSSUE 
ULLE • MCE 

Inti moving by spedpfist from major 
dtfes in Francs Id all cities in the world. 
Tdl free from France Id (051 24 10 82 
FUG ESTIMATES 


CONTWEX CdAuaers to 300 cities 

worldwide - Air/Sea. Gil Charlie 
281 1881 Pori* (near Opera) Gen too 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CANADA 


CANADA. FOR NVESTMB4T5 m ho- 

tek, shopping moll, office bwkfcigs. 
RefiaHe, confidaimd, prctinsnonal 
red estate services in Canada. Write 
Bov 2016, Herald Tribune, 72521 
NeuJty Codex, France. 


GREECE 


LUXURY HATS - ATHENS. 180-290- 

PhaEron. The 


400 (duplexj sqm. P. 

21&5WATK:GR. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

pjSpPi 

j GREAT BRITAIN 




| ITALY 


PARIS A SUBURBS 

EMBASSY SERVICE 
SBECTIONS 

FOCH EIORE 300 s cun. 5 bedrooms. 

5 berto + 2 maids rooms perfect 
ronrition. 

BORE VICTOR HUGO. Very luxuri- 
ous 400 sq-te- 3 bedrooms + 4 maids 
rooms. 

TROCADERQ. Townhouse 500 sqja, 
would sut Embassy. 

GEORGES MANDB. Very luxurious 
140 sq-nv. garage + nxtid'i room 

562 1 6 40 Ext. 367. 

16* SQUARE JOUVENET. Cdra, 
sunny, high doss, new large 3 rooms, 
tOTsa^interestag price. One of Ihe 


TAKE OFF WITH A BIG WIN! 


Now try the Lotteiy with only 
dNAo 80,000 Tickets ffNRa 

J 14111ft 44,900 winners ZMIflft 

fPF WINNING CHANCES: 1 :2 If 

Yes, only 80,000 tickets participate in the 120* Austrian Lottery, 
bringing YOU closer to BIG WINS like these: 

1st Prize: US $ 540,000.00 
2nd Prize: US $ 270,000.00 

3rd Prize: $ 225,000.00 2 Prizes of $ 180,000.00 

2 Prizes of $ 135,000.00 2 Prizes of $ 90,000.00 

31 Prizes of S 45,000.00 35 Prizes of S 22,500.00 

PLUS 44,825 Other Cash Prizes up to $ 13,500.000 

Total Prize Money: $ 19,080,000.00 


• Your winning chances are the best worldwide, since one out of 
every two tickets wins at least the cost of the ticket. 

• AH winnings paid out tax-free in any currency, surywhere. 

• For your protection, the Austrian Lottery is under strict govern- 
ment control. 

Make a date with luck! Write to day, using coupon.forbrochureand 
ticket application form 


£ 

r~ 

3 


to > 

PROKOPP INTERNATIONAL 


1 


official distributor for the Austrian National Lotteiy. 
29 MariahOferStr. 


2 

P 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS ft SUBURBS 


Embassy 

8 Av*. de 


Service 


75008 Peris 

Tele* 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562-1640 


BOIS LEROt: in 4300 tqjn. paA, lowly 
1925 vdla, 8 rooms, perfect condition. 
Caretaker's home. Garage. 
F1.90Q.OQa Tel: 272 40 19 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

PARIS ft SUBURBS 

PARIS ft SUBURBS 

SWITZERLAND 

8TH FBG. ST. HONORE 

Exceptiottd location near 

Bysees Poloce. 

Last Boor, apartment style 'oteier'. 103 
sqm duplex. 3/4 rooms. 1)6 baffo, liv- 
ing with high cofcia, very surety 34 
son. terrace. F3.1S/100. Write Box 
2®3. Herald Trfoone, 92521 Neufly 
Cedex. France 

7TH VANEAU 

VEWONGARDS45 

Ground floor 102 sqjt^ private garden 
120 Jqjn., living, 2 bedrooms, 
maid* room, garage. 
EXCLUSIVITY ViGO: 766.03.26 


METRO EXHMANS: Lowly 1930 
building, large 2 rooms, period condt- 
tian. Ground floor on courtyard fac- 
ni wrest. Tel: 272 40 19 

HE SAINT LOUIS 

XVBtti century bukSna, superb 160 
»q.m. High price. 227 60 1/ morning. 

BASTILLE. Superb 190 sqjn. duplex. 
Teh 272 40 19 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


GST A AD 

A anoe m a Heine opportunity 

SCHONRIH3 

only a few ni'nute from loyoty Gfltwi 
Apartments at pries 
si uufiui ntly lower t han G staod. 
MORTGAGES TO*- INTEREST 5V6* 


AVAILABLE FOR FOREIGNERS. 
GLOBE PLAN SJA 
Ave Mon Repot 24 
CH-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Teh [21122 35 1Z TT* 25185 MBJS CH 
fijtafirtied etnee 1970 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


VILLARS 

SUPERB APARTMENTS 


[Domain* de la Rtebna} 
with curfharaationi. 

Agence Lull MGNDE5 DE 1EON 
Tefc 025 - 79.17.77 
Tain: 456 263 0TCHA M0M35 


VH1ARS-SWITZBUAND 

K 

Aportme 
l&dtt o 


FORBGNBtS CAN BUY 

mnti for ide in 5 lowriy chefcu. 
on ski slopes, beautiful view, 
oa-ooe. ooaL sauna. 

Up to i merest. 


StMOTEG, 3 me SMavrent 

” it 36.60 J4. 


1207 


REAL ESTATE 

. FOR SALE 


?roacli of 


SWITZERLAND 


Lake Geneva & Lugano: 

In these exceptional rogiom of Switzer- * v IAV . 

■and, including Montreux, Gstaod-Vd- 
ley & many oaw famous mo^fsiain re- . 
sorts, we nave a very big dnia cf -1 \S „ . j |] 

mamtioeri APAKTMENI5 / VILAS / lie U A«LT 8 11 
CHALETS. Very rnasonaWy priced buU* 1 "" A V.JP1 

oho the best & mod exaueve. Pnom 

from about USWLQOO. Mortg ‘ 

interest. Hease visit or | 

H. SEBOLD S.A. 


a 


TOUR GRtSE 6, CH-1007 Lausanne. 
Tel 21/25 26 11. Tlx 24298 SE80 CH 


PAGE 21 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


r ' r. 
■' -J 
7.4 
r- 

V 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

ftflHWi your bvsne»s mesme 

in A# httomaffona/ HerM Tn- 


buo *, wkeeiMreftaiaAvri 

of 4 mSSori rmaders woM- 
¥ridm, most of whom arm in 
teeeiMs and mtkntry, wtt 
mad it Just Max as /Paris 

6J3S9SJ baton 70am. «t- 

nriw mat wm am Max yea 

back, and roar mmssa gm «Jf 


na your mm s sagm 

.. within 48 bouts. Ihm 
rate is US. $9 JO or had 
mydvtdant par Bnm. You mast 
indudm eoim dmtm and vmrifr- 
abh bitting oddness. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MANY CLAIMS 
ARE MADE 

REGARDMO 

CONTAINER INVESTMENT. 


FOR EXAMPLE 

EARN RXB) INCOME OF 
17% -20% 

PER ANNUM 


We ore not mafang such dam 
because we beSeve there ran be 


GREATER ADVANTAGES! 


We are a major conte tiner leasing com- 

pany (founded 1973} with an exceflenf 
record of return & service for our dL 

erts. We ore currenriy m on qg j ng aver 

17,000 containers for over 2$)0 Sertfs. 


you ore consider in g on investment in 
contcBHeri we suggest you ranted us 
before mafang you dee m on. 


SHfRLSTAR 


INTBINATIONAL SALES 
KHZBSGRACHT 534 
1017 BC AMSTBIOAM 
TEL: (020) 272822 


' with luhudacry 
once. Germany. 
Norway & Sweden. 


CONTAINBnWOUD SERVICES tID 
HIGH INCOME PLAN 
EARN 17% na ANNUM 
On in ve s tments of $5320 
from 5 In 15 yens 
Minimum Investment $2730 
Comainarworld Services Ltd ip on oge 
and operate a first dess worldwide 
container leasing service to the 
vtippng Matty and sp e dafa 


pronging imeston'wfah a 
HtGHHXEDI 


A-1 061 Vienna, Austria. ^ 

Please send me a brochure and ticket application form for the ~ 
120® Austrian National Lotterv. 

Name 


Address 


City/Counti 


^Qty 



MAIL TODAY* WIN TOMORROW • MAIL TODAY* 


INCOME 
WITH SECURITY 
fu8 detcis of this ffigh Income Hon 

NOW lhC»PC*AT1NG NEW 
*fTAL flB»AYMB>fr OPPORTUNITY) 
coronet! CONTAR«WDHD 
SERVICE LTD 
25 QUEEN'S TEtRACE, 
SOUTHAMPTON 
SOI 1BG, ENGLAND 
Teh 0703 335322. 

Tbc 47616CNTWLD G 
Perswts mteresied in becocnmgon inter- 
nwSory, please ranted Mike wrier at 
Container World 


MtaNATIONAL OFFSHORE 
COMPANY INCORPORATIONS 
ROM Clip. 

Comprehensive Adminidrafoiv 
Npmsue servos. Powers of Attorney. 
KegaNred office*. Telex, telephon e, 
mail foiwring. 
likmd Resources 
Bdbcunie House, 
Summerfd, 
fate of Man. 

TebjotiM m&mm&m 
Telex 628352 bland & 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


CARLSBERG 

One of Californio's most successful Real 
Estate compan i es has a selection of 
land parcels ava fable for. international 
investors. The properties, located 
thro u ghout the state nne in price 
fromSlOXCO to S600K. 3l ovJabte 
with terms. For information about the 
company, their trade record and the 
properties, contact: 


CARLSBERG (AND CQRf>. 

PO Box 412 
London NW3 4PP 
Teh 936 9119. Telex: 268048 aK3013 


OFFSHORE A UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

Inc o rporation and management in UK, 
Isle of Man. Turks, Anguilla, Channel 


Wands, Panama, Liberia and most other 
offshore creas. 

* Confidential pre fa wond 
advice 

+ h nm e di u l e avalabiKty 

* Nominee services 

* Boat RegsstraSions 

* Accounting X administration 

* Mas), letefXKXie & telex 
Free expKmatory booklet form: 

SELECT CORPORATE 
SBWICES LTD 
Head Office 


Mt PtocMant, Douglas, tele of Mm 
la([&624 


Tel: Dougta* [0624) 2371 8 
Tatar 628554 SELECT G 
London Rroesenlive 
2-5 Old Bond a., London W1 
Tel 01-4V3 4244, 71x28247 5CSDN G 


For Sale 

SURPLUS PLANTS 
OXYGBUOTROGEN- 
ARGON 


1 Ton Per Day BO Meter) 
•" “ fl» Meter) 


5 Tans Per Day L .. 

25 Tons Pkr Oaf 1750 Meter) 
75 Tons Per Day j225Q Meter) 
Modem bqud 
Ensefient Condition 


LOW PRICES 
FINANCING AVAILABLE 


Nicolai Jaffa Coro. 9171 WUn 
Beverly Hffis, CA «Q10 Tit 67-4638, 


UNIVERSAL CONTAINERS LTD. 
Hfch Interest income Ptai 


17%% P/A 
in US? 

UCL prsvidK matters writ a'figh 
fixed income with security by operating 
agtebal oortmner leasing and manage- 


l inquiries at 19% offer wil 
ceroinae >o be dealt \ 


with as received. 

Far tfokib or ths foflv guaranteed and 
rawed investment dan, contact: 
UNIVERSAL CONTAINERS LTD. 
P.OJOX 197 LONDON SW3 3ST 
Tel 350 0667, Tic 8M757 


ENTER 


EUROPEAN 

MARKETS 


UX marorfactwer of eJedricri c o nco - 
nert* ledo new ■products to fabricate 
or assemble m Britan 


palmer Hargreaves ltd, 

2® Corporations Street, 
Coventry, UX, CY1 idF 


Trieptanmjavenlry 28S8S 
Tetac 313444 T/P16 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SWITZERLAND 


Safety first for y ou rad your fanilyiVVe 
hefo set is business and residential 
property, obtcei permanent midancy 


. # , , nclu- 

rofoationj. Confidential information 
ontyby o personal rterview in Europe. 
Send us your telephone number 8> we 
i nf o rm you p 
mem around 

Please write Box 2126. I. 
dhcSstr. 15, 6Q0C Frankrurt/Man 


YOUR OWN COMPANY M 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH - ZUG - LUZERN 
From SF500 per annum - 


rrcra STOW per onnum - roj. 
Confidesa, Boorarstr. 36, OL630D Zug 
Teh 0041 42 21 32 88, Tltc 86 49 iS 

A Present for Your Son 


CALIFORNIA WINE VINEYARD with 
winery she. 500 ocra pretnum varietal 
wise grape. Vmeyad in best rotate! 
growing reoon of CaL We planed 16 
years ago. Total 2500 acres of Itmd. 
One m® of frontage on major Grid. 


teghwoy for vmery. Winery permits 
re at safe. Cur- 


obtmned. Joint venture 

rent iromogeinent ovoilabie. Owner 

H. Sdiwortz, 9056 Santa Moniea BJvd, 
Los Angetes, CA 90069. 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 
Attorney & Realtor obtain vises &] 
monent residence. Helps to set up I 


budrwsses fir locales ramniarcid, induv 
nial & residential rod estate. For 


fro* 


brochure whtei David Hrson, 1201 
Dove 5t„ Sta 600. Newport Beach. CA 
92 660 USA. (714) 752 0966. 


BUSINESS MIGRATION 
TO AUSTRALIA 

Economic arauftemh offer hiU services 
inducing evokjctiofl of aUgpfocBtye Bun- 

ness vrvestment ochnce; rosalarce with 

visa & irogrant oppfcahoni You may be 
eSgibte. For datais write Ameru fcco- 
none Cansultanls, Gj*.0. Bax 653, 
Brisbane, Oueendond. 4001 AusSratki. 


IN UJ. - FOR MULTINATIONALS 
CPA RUM 

Inti & US. tax planning, ac c ounting. 
Rnandd & bu s i nes s services - red ss- 

%s&E%a^Tssr 

225 W. 34 SL, New Y«fc NY 10121 
Teh 212.5943771. 


PANAMA COMPALQ£5 with normnm 
<Srectorae»toconGctentialSwiss/Pan- 

mna bank account formed in 48 noun 
P' rear -Offshore .bcnfai 
tannad far STOOD. Currenaei or funds 
moved into Eurocurrency time deposit 
accounts with lax free interest end 


_ . 10 Pdk'rtaca, 5L James’s, 
London SW1 A ILT.TeL 01-S06 2007. 


MAB. ORD« SERVICES 

• YOUR MAIUNG ADDRESS 

• MAIL-FOSWARDINO SBtVlCE 

• PAOCAGMG l RARUMBir 

. SHtVKB M BJROK. 
IVM AG, WMs&teoSr. 72 
•042 Zurich. Tefc 101&63 38 44 
Tbc 59140 TeWm (01)363 30 18 


lBX1(M»q,OOOu Unque opportwtity 
rented wdn (Mrairudion buniesL For 

strictly perianal rtoCMS tefej Us.- 
lory m rron<9. foJremely promabte. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

PpP 

FSAGRANCB 

U5. bated cosmetta froyreKB vrtioie* 
irier seeks export source* of prestige 
namebrand fragrances. Please forward 
detail*. Confidentiality assured- Telex 
353240 attro Mr. Charles, P.O. Bax 102, 
Li We Fob, NJ 07424 USA 

* SAFETY FIRST * 

When interested in 0 second travel 
document please get m touch with 
lAMECO/Apdo. 195, 

ALTEA / Afamte J 5prin. 


EXPORT ASSISTANCE 

Marketing in LLS. 
or assat with export, joint venture 
considered. AJM 878 27 28 Paris 










Hgh technofofly but light industiy. 
Inter notiywl eo m mwsja f netware. 


boh parfonnaice memogemenr. A1 

retaences. Write Box 1953. Hatdd 
Trfoune, 92521 Neuffly Codex France. 


Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de PEvaniplc, 75018 Paris. 


FOR SA1E VAIUAME UK auric viud 


patent. Prototypes ready for market- 

nee E?5,ra(L Tab ten April 18 


mg. Pnoe — 

cmrardi En^and 0704 261 « 
QUALITY T4WKB.AVAHAME or 
a^gve^price. Tek Brussels 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Swte 504. Central, Hong Kong. 


fiscal parodae, no 


OFFSHORE 
LIMITS) COMPANIES 
BANKS 


Worldwide 
From £75 

MoUmg - Telephone ■ Teter 
. . Secretarial 


Antflle*,. Ready mode^or ^ edd. , 


explanatory I 


Aston Company Formations 
pt Tl, B vie 


Dept 




26591 

Telex 627691 5PIVA G 


INTI 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC 
UJJL 8 WOODWDE 


A complete soda) & business service 
praviefing a unique coSedion of 
. talented, voroatite & mutiCngud 
indnnduds for cfl occasions. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56* St, MYjC. 10019 


Service Representotiva 
roTworldwide. 


Needed 1 


»hen/<fsmbuK3rs, survey for ax 
to US ftratfestowf). RUNNING ER- 
8ANDS. Offer free report to accant- 


IN THE US FOR YOU. Corrtoa Adv 
ard Fatter. Product Pubtc Rotor: 

359 West 20lh St., Naw York, 
10011. Teh 212741.1590. 


OFFSHORE SBtVICES 


U K. non reddanl eompanw with 
nominia cfinectan, bearer sham oad 


& support services. Panama & Liberian 
uump an i e s . frit rate confidential 
' profofoowl wvfow, 


eSSueliOl S7^?Tte^9391 , ?G 


LONDON - EXCLUSIVE 


1 office in the penthouse of 

^ bulking avaUtie 


foe finot Wes) End 

for shorl/tong term ocaoofioa rufty 
furnished witfi reception ft »«tanal. 
serwoes. Usee* <t> modem office fpeS- 

lias. Use, of torge 


COMflBfDfHVE SEKVKBv >*- 

MA oc c c tiri o ncy, 

*■ - .J - re- - tai4ue 

wXWBgqgEV 


addre&- tetat ac c c tiri a ncy, 

lls i sjutei'fooyieS, 


eol and ffwmdal j 


and. retinwroncte.^^^fe' 

72 r. de Lausanne, CFJ8U, I2fl 
Ganeva-2. Switnrkmd 


BUSINESS SERVICES 

BUSB4E5S Sbmce 
Assistance 

PARIS 

DONMVSINESsIn PAMS 

MR 

IWVATE DETECTIVE SCANDINAVIA 
ft Hrtond, colt Norway- 24 hairs 02. 
42 72 14. Tlx 18949 Agent. Monam 
G. Sfaklev, former paCoe/army offi- 
anr, contacts woridvnde. Past to Jenv 
baneteBel 4, N0154 Oslo 1 Norway 

S ® 1, TO USA. Safes .aid marketing 
conwhonl with nationd consumer 
B 00 ™ *** fproe wi represent you. 
Bo* 101 Brtxnard, N.Y. 12024. Tht 
HJ199 Swift IA Alt AhG Tel; 518 794 
9010 USA 

pjg8ii|j 


TOUR CWCE M NEW YORK. RFth 

OS your 

ISArfficejVWjjhan, cab received 
5',S 1 SS ,c !? d Yoric Med Service 

210 fifth Ave. NYC 10010. 



TAX SERVICES 

OS. INCOME TAX TSi- mas data 
Return completed 5 business dare. 
France. TehM3B 32^^ 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 

SAVE $ THOUSANDS. Buy 0 Boren- 
dorter ptanp « tendon, w* m, 

S^P^Borendorfor Ixwlon Pkmo 

298944 BOSKJMG 

DIAMONDS 

diamonds 

- , Y °w bast buy. 

Jli m TiP n “ twifl e 

. ««*• «rf Jta riamond SorfoL 
fid guarantee. 

y fr .*y py* y* ^ 

JooddmQofatoneHfo 

„ SSS5TS 

wmm,. 


] 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Your Office in Genwoiy 

we era “At Your Service” 

• Complete office services at two 
prestige oddresses. 

• nAy equipped offk»s for the short 

term or tiie long term. M 

• Intomationciy trained office and* 


professional staff at your rispasol ■ 
• Cm, be learilv used os your oaepo- 


r 


legally US r 

rate domjafe for Geroany/Ewapf. 
* Your buiines operation can start 
immeefiatefy. 


(airea B u s i n ew Service* GmbH 
Loarra-Hous am Hobhauswporlt 
JustinianieasH 22 
6000 fVanlrfur! am Main 1 
Germany 
Tek Odfl^ftOfil 
Tetoc 414561 


ZURJCH-ZUR1CH-ZURICH 


_ BAHNHOFSTRASSE 52 
YOUR OFFICE AWAY FROM 

• Office/ ManogeroerTt Services 

• Company Formations: 

• How lo do Business in/ or/ 

FROM SWnZBUAh® 
foti n w Services Coomb Crop- 
BahnhcAirosse 5ZOL8022 Zixvii 
Tel: 01/211 921S7.' Tbc 813062 u 


V 

^4 


LOS ANGBS 

Furnished effk» in Beverty K&. Con- 
wroent, prestigious address. Tbc m*. 
leeretoriol ft fcqd services. 

Broaitiv* Budnets Services 


9777 WHdtire Blvd^ Ste- tiO^Bewfiy 


Hfls, CXwflz'ia: nia 8*-167& 
“ S 472S457 


Telex: 


geneva 


r, i 

-'T 

•HE 
I I 


FuBy equipped offices to rert. 

(marf. fsiex S f^sone). Trade, v*6 
adrmrastrntian ft Sfcrotcnd services. 

I®5, 5 R» de Cher*. 1207 Geneva , 
Tel- {22} 86 17 33, 1k, 428388 KBS 




YOUR LONDON OFFICE 
p the 

CHE5HAM EXEQI11VE CBOK 


- r .. 


vnoniw cwuilinun"- . . 
Comprehensive nmge of servos * 

_ 150 Regent Street, London WI. • 

T aL (Ot) 439 6288 Tta 261426 


your OFRCE M CANADA ■ Mourn- . _ 

^Oonvcionon (moil ft phone}, trade, , 
sates, adnuntoronon ft seeretarotirajrf.. -. i 
$50 Crfo per morth. CrocrdT . 

fp. Box 602. Burecw CartienA, . 

Canada H4K 218. Tek 514- .> . J •- 


’Cv 

■*e 


8US»«S SBIV1CE5 ■» Uaambmra 

4«o«miing t Cdrt^ony Fcrrnoto^ 

+• memogement/ taaetanol • *2“ : 
ftfione / tetex / mdL * ?: >4 “ ‘ 
tfAvramW ■ H60 , V 

Phone (+K2) 495T SI Thu ^ ,' r 


hr. 




PARB , ADDRS5. 

S«* 1957 LSJ*. provides 

‘ ?*^ n Q_ rooRS - l rv *.S£J A 

Tot S9 47 04. TUi 64250A 






-1 A 


‘ .'-V 


ehorw, teten, secreted urtt 

Contact- tant Business CetWT-. '«,• 
317 92 11 (12 fines).- The 61344 


TfeS 

cn 

a 

i h 


soft 


_Acr*,Loodon.Wtf^m 


OFFICES TOR -RENT. 


Year 

ext 


mwi, 


l01-sain,'23«Pfl* 

r.F193S&. Tek 261 3550 


it 






Lo 

« 

IBS 


-,r> -- i ■ 

I- - ... 1 


vO- 


a.