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Publifliied With Ihe New Yoih Hmes and The Wi 


PARIS, SATURDAY-SUIVDAY, APRIL 2IK21, 1985 



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By John Burgess 

Wa^iun Po» Stmce 
TOKYO — Japan and the Uoii- 
edSutshaveagreedmncw-.iini- 
Isi.'piilled uchak»l standards for id^ 
<-;-a>nuuuflhSiunRS cqaqKoont Used 
V!' in homes and offices, a mo«e that 


w„..- ^*0 liabiir?'* T.-t»*dd«™avc important banfcw to 

Maitm Pascal" »> ^fordgn companies’ saksin Japan. 


Utmert 

WELUNGTON, New Zealand 
its armed fmees 
men. the general 
seoelaiy of its Commomst Party, 
Hb Ysmbb^ said Friday. 

Mr. Ho made his announcenieni, 
tala' repoefed by the 
Jw pii« 4tfBcy in Bering, afitf 
with mw Miiuster David 
Lange New Zealand. 

"I have Kdd my New 7^i«nd 
friend jet now that Qnna will con- 
tioiie 10 cm bade its convenuonal 
foroes," be said. ‘Thai is w siy, 
starling fran this year tS next year 
ibcre wH be r deoeaaeof one nnl- 
bon ccavemional fame in China.*' 


TIseR we no immediate inches 


.lata o agreed to SSraderirms. 

• ; • Godard's nu U5. requests coocenilng Thew »■**»! 

Virgin Marj JT for ^Icalted imereS *«* «» ' 
gas siauon cquipracni, a rdativeN small 

controvers> U B^’^ti^. icgmenl cl Joptm’s SSS-bnUon't’ 
rdm club and R.!^ leleconunuoicatiou'maiisec. 
fended by the withheld final 

eluding huas ^j^'.‘Vv^.;udgment until the new ndes are 
porters nj. ‘?P^%'pubhsheJandinqdimi«szed.fti(m 

dOft-ElOVl-n iheai; 

Salue Marie" contrasted markedly 

its delaved d ^hro-wiih iheaUcgatkmsof badl^l^ 
film deoTK M [Kniiic. Jap'an that have followed other re« 

«em Rchk«i I^>a!Riceni ncgoiiaiing sesskos. 

and shows - “What we have estibBstod is year to SoioL arid the man who 

Joseph. of^ket, access at a recently was offering the Uiecon- 


tioD vriiere cuu would be made in 
the Petrie's Liberation Army, 
which consists of (he army, navy 
god air force as wdi as corps re- 
enable for capita] construction, 
engneering and railroad projects. 

The London-based Imemational 
Institute of Strategic &udies esti- 
mates that armed forces were 
reduced by about 100,0% men in 
1983-84. 

The chief of the general staff, 
Yang Dezfai, said in January 
there would be a furibo' reduction 
to save money and free men to 
buUd the Gun esc economy, Mr. 
Hu said the cutbadt would not di- 
minisb Ouna’s ability to defend 
itself. 

Xinhua said in March that the 
army would retire 47,000 veteran 
officers in the next two years. 



ImMntAMtf Aw fcwxMBanal 


The'Discovery Comes Do^m to Earth With a Bang 

The space rituttle Discovery and its sev’cn-member crew gOded to a safe landing Friday at Cape 
Cunaveral, Fkxida. But a landiag-gear tire Uew during touchdown and an inspection revealed 
what officials called potentially **sigDificam”damage to a wing control flap on the crafL It was the 
end to a dramatic werklong space advennire that included an imfmvised satellite rescoeattanpt. 


Slowing of U.S. Economy Raises Policy Questions for Reagan 


lever for 

a Arch^gdQjj^-cquipmenl, said Jack i 

J / of the U.S. 
imi she ttil! git-e binli'A. team. “They are not 
people waiched ihe iocte ' *h“ we 
ens of members a lo^ . dilates," said Mr. 
ntarchsa ouiade ilje groim vice presidait of dtf'Bko*. 
uiS »>Sns reading: “Uap, ., trooie Industries Associatioa. 
come 10 sa\-e you fmi j!' Mr. McDonnel smd a press epa- 
sors." The nurefa^ ^'fereoce Friday that the agreement 
heated words «uh |]|;^was a *^;^ue achievemenL" 
Roman Ca'ihobcs. ^ Au offichd of the Japeuae For* 
dgn Ministry said Friday oi^ 
^that “everybody is aware of; the- 
R£.\L ESTATE s^liroent and movement 

for SaU growing on Capitol HilL" 

He said the dianges were in Ene 


fiy Pecer T. KUbom 

AW Ytti Tima Senice 

WASimiCmt — Just two 
wedes fiom now. Prerident Ronald 
Reagiu is to set off for the inn^ 
eceeoimie saomh eooference, this 


ATE 
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(Continued on Page Z, GoL I) 


omy as the raodd for the worid 
. new finds it bis taken an unocpeei* 
Od but .uodeoiibk turn for the 
wm. 

TheCbnmerc c Depanmeni’s ir- 
pon Ihtusday dm the U.S. econo* 
BQT pew at a ate of only 1 J per- 
ceoi ifaivMigii lhe first three "lontH* 
of (be year poses dirfioili policy 
for (be Reagan adminis- 
tatktt.' b(^ here'inS in its rda- 
tions abroad. 

Tbe IXS. eeonoiny that 
nmehof the Iasi two yean was ' 
indusiriai , wprid’s strongest now 
appears to be one of the weaker 
ones. The economy that provided 
aa isviting madiet for the rest of 


the world now becomes one that 
wiO be appealing to oihen for hdp. 

“It’s Ming to be haun^ to get a 
cbeerfuTnote across," said Murray 
L. Weidenbaum, the first chairman 
of Mr. Reagan's Coun^ of Eco- 
nomic Ad visas and now direcior 
of the Center for the Snidy of 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Amoican Business in Sl Louis, 
Missouri. 

Econoiziists attribute the slow- 
down m the tide of imported goods 
that has been uodennining U.S. 
manufacturing industries. The 
GNP report Inursday was a new 
measure of bow mu^strengdi im- 
ports are sjtiioning off from the 
U.S. econoiOT. It lends ^wcial sa- 
lience to the Bonn summit. 

For months, (he Reagan admin- 
istration has planned to appeal to 
the other m^or indiisti^ democ- 
rades, eqieoally Japan, (o open 


their markets to U.S. goods and to 
join in a new round of talks on 
woridwide trade liberalization. 

With (he recent Senate's vote 
caUiim Japan an twtf^ir trader ywH 
(be ^mmerce Department's new 
evidence cl the geonomic ^ect of 
imports, the Reagan administra- 
tion has hoped to strengthen its 
hand at Bonn by citing the posabil- 
ity that Congress mS>t pass pro 
lectionist l^slation. 

In addition. Secretary of State 
George P. Sbultz and die rfinirman 
of the Fed^ Resove Board, Paul 
A. Voldcer, have been ai^Kaling to 
Europe’s stronger nations to stimu- 
late their economies, with tax re- 
ductions or other derices. Sudi 
measures would result m greater 


economy at home, chiefly whether 
the Fednal Resem sb^d ease 
interest rates and bow Congress 
should deal with the budget. 

For a coujtie of years, econo- 


demand for American exports, mists have been calling the U.S. 
helping the U.S. economy (hat over ecixiomy “distorted," “It^doi" 
ihepast two years bdped and “unbalanced," with an uncom- 

The new GNP report also poses mooly strong dcdlar, unusually 
unexpected questiwis for the U.& bigh interest rales, a huge deficit in 
governmeiu’s mamgement of the feieign trade and — the cause 6l it 


r I 'Tffl M f Botha’s Namibia Plan Is Criticized 


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LONDOM 

F BPPq OID Camptleikf Oar Staff Front KspoKhei 

/PARIS TTihd Worid and 
"»‘'“li^e>l^BatitmsdBFrid^4|B^ 
.yn fjs ia oiiicizi^ South Africa's mow ip 
. s&ubiish linuted seU-sovemraeik 
U^yrofjn Souih-Wtt! Africa. 

la New Delhi, coimiries bdoug^ 
remm jng 10 the Nooaligned Movoseni 
* *S*i^K««dcmned the South African ded- 
w«Ks Ke^sion. caOing it an effort to insiaO. a 

"P“PP« S 

PASXB tuMEalso knoim as Narama, They 


- urged the United NaticMBS Security 

Council to take action to block the 


sinister sdieme," 

The United States, Britain and 

sconw France also attacked the dedsum, 
(REN EAuE which was announced Thnrsday by 



.‘om 


ton; -i,«. (nads^«^3pC 

South Africa's move to establish 
^ lited self-govemmeot excludes 


United NatinutHemaiirfc -fft^ indt- 
paulenoa for the lectiitty of one 

Fontign nooistm^of dte-SQ-na- 
lioa coordinating faureab of ite 
N<maiigacd Movemem, meeting in 
New D^ in a ^ledal sesrion on 

Soodi Africa wfll afiow some 
• Hadu to own property. Page 2. 

NaimlHa. issued a siatemeni < 
tbe mow- “fiu: most brazen 
anoe of the United Nations.” 

Prime Minister Ri^Ty Gandhi of 
India said South An^'s plant^ 
(ranritional govenunent was in- 
lended lo “iaiHieaie pdiKfltiUtiesr 
of a unitaierid dedantion OS inde- 
pendence “on the pan of this ptq>- 
petbody." 

Mr. Gandhi, flanked on the dias 
at tbe oOdference hail by Nu- 


NY 



saj-gcn'cruiuau cxauocs MiocuxucrBiGciuuiDyaBioriii' 

South-West Africa Pe^ JOBoo. the leader d the SWAPO 
“*” iff ^'ganizatini, the guerriila qrganm- guenrillas, and Yasser ArafaL the 

I »":;.^^*;‘.^e^tioarightlog the South Afri Palestiae bTnatioo Organization 

>ri.itary. and runs counter to a UN chairman, issued a thinly veiled at- 

ladt on Western naticais iriiidi, he 
said, . were tacitly enconri^ng 
South African intrantigeoee. 

“How has a fninoriQf r^ime de- 
fied tbe worid ccmimunity for so 




'itary. and runs counter to a UN 
*= *J^ ‘ ^ plan for South .Africa’s wtiidrawal 
\wt^ ^pHowed by dcctions and ind^n- 


long and with such impunity?" Mr. 
Gandhi said. “Because of open and. 
hidden ^betmeol -^rom others- 
Some c^tritti have swora by ra>^ 
dal cquaUty vrith their left hand, 
but with tbim ri^i hand supported 
the Preutfia F^une." 

in Washingtoa. State Dcpait- 
roeot and diplomatic souroes said 
that the United Slates had spnt 
mepiges to South Africa (hU.w^ 
saying that its interim government 
pUut is “nuD and void." 

A U.S. ^otunent statement 
said Tluusday that South Africa's 
plan for Namibia has “no stand- 
ing" and insisied that it will have 
“no effect" on the international n^ 
gpliati^ process abaed at brining 
Namilxa to indep^ence. 

An (rffidal said the U.S. doubted 
that the interim legime would last 
very long, noting that a riwiilar ar- 
rangement had been attempted in 
1978 but later collapsed. 

In P:^ tbe French government 
said Friday that it “cooridm tbe 
effects of any initiative tendng to- 
ward the creation of an interim 
government in Nanubia null and 
void." (1VP,Radten) 



Prime Muusto- Rajiv fiandhi of India, fiairised by Sam Nujoma, itft, head d tbe South- 
West Africa People’s OrganizatkMi, and Yasser Arafat, dudmian of the Palestine 
Libm'ation Organization, stand to htmor bufira Gandhi, dm assassinated Indian prime 
minister, at die b anning of a nonaHgned conference on Namibia hdd in New DelhL 


I7.S. Recovers From Disaster in Vietnam 

It Is as Strong as Ever in Padfic, Analysts Say, While G>nimunism Wanes 


SSI I---; 

•! 

EC 




BRONZE PRIZE — Tins 14th-centiiiy Iranian caricet 
in silver-inlaid brcfize, emuidered to be one of die finest 
in tbe world, was sold \ny Sodit^’s for £39JNNl jpi^ & 

HI A coorirted sjw told seoaion about lax secoriQ' at a Q^ornia 
company where he carried out Soviet eqtionage, 


.*t«avsA»! 

«NfO ! 

« 5K^_ i 

■ ^ »«ir 



■ East bloc kaders wiH hold anunimt to fcoew the Warsaw Pan, 

Erich Honecker, the East Goman chief, said. Page 1 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Chiyrin' Goip. and Samsung Co. have agreed to-form a conq»- 
n> to roanufanuFC auiomodve parts in Swih Korea. Page 9. 

■The Intemational Monetaiy Fu^ edied for nations to ^ 
greater curFCBCy stability. Pt^9. 

SPORTS 

in die first same of 
:S.' 


■ MbmeMta comeii back to defeat 
Naiuma] Hockiy Leaguc.dirisiotial pi 


By Leslie H. Gelb 

New York Timn Sem'n 

. WASHINGTON — Ten years after the de- 
feat of SouA Vietnam, wn is widespread 
^reement among analysts that the posi- 
tion of the Uoitea States in Asia is stronga now 
than at anytime since the cod of Worid War IL 
In April l^S, it was in gbamM#s- 

A decade a^ North Vietnam reveled in vic- 
tory. Now the economy of ite united Vietnam is 
siagnatiimand Hanoi is mired in its own “Viet- 
nam'' in Cambodia. 

In the man ol 10 years, poliqr angsts say, 
Vietnam, the Soriet Union and most Commu- 
nist movements in Asia nnnbied from victory or 
ascendancy to deciine, while the United Stales 
moved from defeat to a positioa of strength. 

The lurnaroond was aue largely to a <mange 
in the pt^tics of U.S. policy-making toward 
Asia. 

For 40 years, no foirignpolicy issue was more 
divisive t^ A^ from what to do about Qnna 
right after Wculd War II through the Korean 

ar to Vietnam. Bui in the last 10 years, after 
the i^rodiemdit with China and the end of 
tbe Vietnam War, few policy issues have gar^ 
nered mom bipartisan suppon. 

Yet tbe question of who lost Vietnam is stiU 
hotly disputed bv the people who once struggled 
over po^. and fought the war. Among the 
issues raisu are these: 

• V^y did the defeat pot lead Asian countries 
other than Cambodia and Laos to fall under 
CcKtununist control like "a row of doininoes,’’ as 
President Bsenbower and his successors piv- 
dieted? Did America's stand in Vietnam delay 
or make posrible America's cuneiit porition <m 
strength In Asia? 

• why have Hanot and Moscow been unable 
to capiidize on their victory? What parallels are 
to be drawn for Central America? 

The question$-and answers about tbe Viet- 
nam exjmcnce'slice deqjly into virtually every 
central foreign pt^ey issue in tbe Rea^n ad- 
ffloistration. ftem Cnti^ America to Grenada, 
Lebanon and tmorism. 


DefeiM Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger has 
argued for using any military intervention 
around the world only as “a laA resort," viifa 
full public bacldng, and “with the dear inten- 
tion of winning." 

Secretaiy of State George P. Shultz has main- 
tained that “there is no such thing as guaranteed 
public suppon in advance." and that a great 
power must be prepared to use doses of force to 
buttress diplomacy. 

The belief that the U.S. position in Asia has 
never been stronger in 40 wars is shared by 
Vietnam doves like Richard C. Holbroo^ as- 
sistant secretary of state for East Asia in the 


Did the U.S. stand in Vietnam 
delay or make possibk 
America’s current position of 
strength in Asia? 


Carter administration, and Viamam ba^ like 
Paul D. Wolfowiiz, who now holds that posi- 
tion, 

“It is clear that the whole condition of East 
Asia is t(^y far better than tbe most optimistic 
would have izr^icted 10 years a^,” Mr. 
Wolfowitz said. 

“Even compared to the end of Worid War IL 
it i$ far better b^use the countries Of Asia are 
far more self>rdianL don’t look to us as much os 
they did More; Imi when they do, we are 


sary, has become a strategic ally in many ways. 
It Ksirains North Korea, aw guerrillas in 
dia’king Vietnam in Cambodia, has called ofi 
suppon for Communist insurgents in Thailand 
and elsewhere and ties down a third of Mos- 
cow's armed forces, on its border. 

With the notable exception ol tbe Hiilipcanes, 
most Asian countries have poliiical si^Qity. 
The stability rests on a blend of authoritarian- 
ism, democracy and substantial economic 
growth. 

According to U.S. State Depanineni figures, 
tbe economies of the members of tbe Associa- 
tion of Southeast Asia Nations, or .^EAN, 
which is made up of Thailand. Indonesia, Ma- 
layaa, Singapore, (he Pbilippines and Bnmel, 
have grown on the average of 7 percent a year 
the last 10 years. 

This is about twnce the global average growth 
after discounting for inflation, U.S, trade with 
countries of the Pacific basin area now exceeds 
its trade with Europe. 

Soviet miliiaiy power in the region has grown 
considerably over the decade. This includes sub- 
stantial use of the former U.S. base at Cam 
Ranh Bay in Vietnam. 

Nonetheless, Pentagon exp^ ^neraliy sub- 
scribe to the assessment of Robert OT^eiU, an 
Asian scholar and director of the London-based 
Imemational Institute for Strategic Studies. 

Given U.S. military and naval power in the 
regicMi and deployments under way, he said in a 
recent ankle, “there is little prospect that the 
United States will be outclassed in power pro- 
jection and other sirate^c capabilities in tbe 
Pacific,'* provided there are no majm crises 
dsewhm 

Alone among those interviewed, tbe fanner 


Israelis Want 
Amal to Police 
South Lebanon 


Reagan to Visit BergenrBelsen Camp 

Tka .issocuifJ Preu 

BONN — President Ronald Reagan wiD visit the fwmer Naa oonoen- 
tratitm camp at Bergen-Bdsen during his state visit to West Gomany 
next month, the West Gennan sovemmeni said Friday. 

Mr. Reagan and Chancellor Hdmut Kohl wiQ visit the ate May S, the 
West German government announced. 

In Washington, cootrovers}' continued over .Mr. Reagan's pl«« to visit 
a Cerniao comeiery that includes Nazi war dead. Page 3. 


all, in the view of most economists 
—an enormous budget deficiL 
But federal finding helps keep 
the U.S. economy alive whro the 
profits of indusi^ and the wages of 
workers decline in a recesaon, so in 
tbe face of a possible recession and 
a rise in unempioymenL the new 
growth figures could inoease Cm- 
gress's reluctance to accept the 
cuts. 


By Thomas L Friedman 

V>M )'■;,( TllHti Smite 

JERUS.ALEM — Israel would 
be prepared to “trade" the security 
zone it plans lo establish in south- 
ern Leb^on for an informal 
meniwiih Lebanm's Shiite miTitia. 
Anul. to keep the area qoieL senior 
Israeli militaK sources said Friday. 

“We w ould be prepared to trade 
the security zone for a deal with the 
Sbiites," said a very senior military 
source directly involved in policy- 
making on Lebanon. “We would 
like them to know that we mean 
business. Though we know- that 
Amal could noL even if it wanted, 
fully gi^antee security in the area, 
we baieve they could do so to a 
large degree. We r^ard them as an 
address we can d^ with and we 
are not lookixig for any formal ar- 
rangements." 

The official's remarks, Israeli 
military analysts say. reflect a 
change taking place within Israeli 
military thinking in recent months. 

There is now an ever-increaring 
understanding that it is impossible 
to go back to the pre-invasion siiu- 
aiioD in southern Lebanon, when 
Israel relied for securiiv exclusively 
on a friendly force led by the late 
Major Saad Haddad, a Greek 
Catholic who died last year, and 
that new cemers of power have 
been created as a by-product of 
that invasion. 

Concurrently, there is the real- 
ization that Is^l now will have to 
deal with these forces on a new 
securin' doctrine. 

While M^or Haddad was a 
Christian, his militia was generally 
estimated to coi^rise two thirds 
Shhie and oue third Christian vol- 
unteers before Israd’s 1982 inva- 
sion of Lebanon. 

Israel has gone essentially from 
viewing southern Lebanon as an 
area that must be dominated by the 
pro-Israeli Ch^tian minority to 
sering it as an area that can be 
stable and secure only if tbe major- 
ity Shiite population has a migor 
role in fMljdog the re^on. 

Israeli officials ioasi that th^ 
still intend to maimain dose con- 
tacts with the Cluistians, but no 
longer at tbe expense of the Shiites. 
And vdien the Isradis refer to the 
Shiites today they are not refening 
to the traditional famili es with 
whom they used to deal, and who 


represemed no one. Now they are 
referring to the p^lar Amal mili- 
tia led by Nabih Bern. 

“We would do anything possible, 
within reason, to imi a deal with 
Bern over the souih." a senior Is- 
raeli military official said. “When 
we were still in Lebanon they said 
they could not talk to us. Fine. 
Now we are almost gone. There 
should be no more obsucles. We 
are not interested in the Linited 
Nations or the Lebanese Army be- 
ing there." 

The Israeli proposal is being 
communicated to the Amal offi- 
cials in Beirut through ail available 
means. Israeli ouiitary sources said. 
They added, however, that thus far 
they have not gotten any positive 
response. It would appear that the 
Amal offidals in general know that 
the Isradis are leaving anyway and 
hence see no reason to get involved 
now in making commitments to 
them. 

.At the same time, the position of 
Mr. Beni has been weakening and 
any cooperation with Israel on his 
part would only be exploited to 
undermine turn further. 

The ovenure to the Shiites comes 
as the Israeli cabinet is about to 
discuss the final phase of Israel's 
withdrawal frtHn Lebanon. 

.At its meeting Sunday the cabi- 
net is expected to approve the last 
two pha^ of the withdrawal. The 
first of these is to take place in the 
next week or 10 days and involve a 
pullback from the western and 
eastern fronts to a line running 
from about three to seven miles 
(five to 1 1 Ulotneters) north of the 
border. 

This is rou^y the aze of the 
“security zone^ Israd plans to es- 
tablish immediatdy north of the 
frontier. It is this zone Israeli offi- 
dals speak of tradii^ 

The final phase is to involvv a 
pullback of troops from this securi- 
ty strip to the international border, 
li^tary sources said that Defense 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin would like 
(his completed by June 6.' 

The Israeli-backed, predomi- 
nantly Chrisiian South Lebanon 
Army. led by Genera] Antoine 
Lahd. will not be able to move 
freely tbrougbout the security zone, 
according to Israeli military 
sources. That is, it will not be able 
to rule over Shiite areas. 


India Stops Talks 
On Bhopal Payment 


*7hcse two men and other Asiaa cxpeniL such secretaiy of state. Dean Rusk, sounded a note of 
as Robert A. Scalapino of ihe University of caution. 

California at Berkeky, Donald $. Za^ of Jon * we know yet tbe fuU conse- 
Hunier CoUeag and Winston Loid, piw^t of qnenccs of tbe war." he said. “North Vietnam 
the Coundl on Foreign Relations, produce al- still hM a lot ^ digsiing w do in South Vim- 
most a litany of examples to back up this opti- nam. Laos ^ Camoooia. 
mistic picture. Vietnam is now a coimiiy ch 60 nuUion people 

Ouna, iosl^ of being the principal ^ver- (CtmtimiedooPia^ZGoLZ) 


By Sanjoy Hazarika 

iVrt- t'ort nmes Semre 

NEW DELHI — India has' 
stopped negotiations for an out-of- 
court settlement with Union Car- 
bide Coip., saving that the U.S. 
compuy bad o^feiro an unaccept- 
able figure of ^00 million as com- 
pensaUMi for the ^ leak disaster 
at Bhopal an Indmn offidal sdd 
Friday 

The official, who declined to be 
identified, said that the proposed 
payments were to be ^ead over 30 
years and that the $2(X)-million fig- 
ure was to indude interest accrued 
in the period. The govvnunent re- 
jected the offer earlier this month, 
but never made the compensation 
prop^ public. 

About 2,000 people died in De- 
cember when douds of methyl iso- 
cyanate escaped from a faulty stor- 
age tank at a Union 
C^bide-owned pestidde plant in 
Bhopal in cemral India. The gov- 
ernment says at least 300,000 per- 
sons were injured, and it is suing 
Union Carl^ in a New York 
court for damage 

“My perception is that they 
seemed to have some interest in a 
settlement but somehow tb^ have 
never addressed the dimensions of 
tbe tragedy," said the offidal, who 
has been invd.ved in talks with 
Union Carbide representatives. 

The Union Carbide propi^ 
linked the amount ofcompaisaiion 
to the number d dead and injured, 
the loss of animals and the damage 
to Bhq)ar5 eaviiomneat and per- 
sonal property, he said. 

Indian officials and the Ameri- 
can businessmen discussed the is- 
sue at two mi-^tingg ^read over 
four days earlier ^ month but 
failed to agree. 

One suggestion by Union Car- 
Inde that the | 0 vemiDem had r^ 
jected involved tbe conversion of 
part of the plant into an orphanage. 
But thaL the source said, meant 
changing Indian property laws. 

Union Carbide had also offered 
to Fomburse government expenses 
for its handling of the disaster, cqv- 
molictr relief, fee^g the 
displaced and other steps. But 
a|^ this was largely to be done 
within tbe framework of the 5200- 
million liiniL the official said. 

Union Carlnde agr^ Thursday 
to provide S3 million in emeigenQ' 
aid to Bhopal survivors without 


wailing for the courts to determine 
whether the company was legally 
liaUe. 

Tbe lodian government, citing 
the “encMmity" of the disaster, said 
earlier this mmih that it was not 
yet able to specify a dollar amount 
on the damages. A number of 
.American bwj'ers, however, have 
filed separate suits seeking a total 
of $15 billion in damages for Bho- 
pal victims. 


Reagan Bows 
To Congress 
On Rebel Aid 


By Steven V. Roberts 

Se* York Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — Faced with 
almost certain defeat in Congress, 
President Ronald Reagan has 
agreed to postpone his fight for 
militan* aid to the rebels fighting 
the Nicaraguan govemmeni, a 
White House official said 

The official said Thursday night 
that the president would accept a 
compromise saying that U.S. aid to 
the rebels in the current fiscal year 
could.be used only for “nonleihal" 
purposes. That would include 
trucks and uiUforms, the official 
said, but not guns and ammunition. 

Details remained unclear, and it 
was not certain that the compro- 
mise could be fully woriced out be- 
fore Tuesday, when the House of 
Representatives is to vote on Mr. 
Reagan's origiaal requesL 


Democrats favor iraslation that 
ould proride only humanitarian 
aid, such as food anid clothing. This 


legislation would be more restric- 
tive than the conqiromise backed 
by the White House. 

On Thursday e\'eiimg, the Senate 
Democratic le^r. Robert C. Byrd 
of West Vir^nia, met with a group 
of his party's lawmakers, and tel^ 
phoned. Mr. Reagan with an offer 
to discuss compromises. The presi- 
dent replied that such a meeting 
would be a “good iddt," according 
to a spokesman for Mr. Byrd. 

All parties 'to (he eoniimimg ne- 
goiiaaoss, however, now seem to 
have accepted the prindple that no 
(CoDtiniMd on Page 2, Ctd. 7) 





*-.‘s 7ij 


r Page 2 


INTER^TIONAL 





.1- 

France Urges JEuropean Effort 


peaceful sden finoectt coontries with a detemnt. has reacted skqftkaDy to 

r PoUtical analysts view the pro- political Mr: Read’s calk for ihe<^^ 

: posal as aoattenroi to coontcr the » the UA rwj^ progm tion<^,anti-iinssae^ei^^ 

t^nlndeal rh3len«: bv prcgects are to be discussed tern. Officials have said pnvatdy 

:■ SSidayaiidlbesdvaiam^ that thc^feai;^ tire talk of d^ 

' tdc Defense Initiative^ of the Western Ennreean Union m aw^ with nodeardetenenls could 

^^e French proposals, which Bonn and next mmui at the annual ununmnepoldicanifideaceinthe 
were di y^ i sy*^ w jjj^ay at a seven-natiaQ 'economic stunimt idea of ‘^motually assnied destnio- 
: cabinet meeting, rmresent a renew- meeting, alsdk Bonn. tion” to keep tire peaa in Enrope. 

■ alofFrffid^iiadvestospurEu- In a televisibn interview Thi^ In common with othm West En- 

ropean cooperation in high tech- DefwlMmister Oia^ ropeans, Iwwot. the French m 
fuiinnr Hcniu sBid dt^othcT countnes be- also troubled by the prospect of a 


By Michael Dobbs devdcanngal^-Wlmology^anti- their own oot^eradon in sncfa areas 

WasUttgun Pm Seniee ballistic im^qrsteoL as lasers, pardcle beams and hi^- 

PARIS — Prance is ureins its Analysts atw the timmg the powered ammuters. 

European neij^ to b^Sro- Ff««h prap^ suae^ ^ Fiance, trii^aloog with Britain 

peanpiSraaKforpea^s^^ they w«e intent© provide pdrer has its om mdqmi^ ,m^ 

Europemi coontnes with a deterrent, has reac t ed skqrticaDy to 
...oiuete viM rii^ nm- potitical aslo orinomb altcniat^ Mr: Read’s calls for the constmo- 


TRIBUNE, SATURDAT-SUWDAT, AraiL2<K21, 1985 


Soviet Tjiiks Geneva 
To U.S. Space Plan 

Retaen United States cames out an _en- 

BONN— Two senior Soviet of- forced program for the nrilitari» 
Goals said Friday that Moscow turn ctfroaoe it could mean that the 
might r efuse to reduce its Soviet Union will not be able to 

arsenal if the United perrist- reduce its strat^jc wea pon s." 


wo; 



s PoUtical analysts view the pro- po?^. 

•: posal as an attesmt lo counter the » UA wseaft h progi^ Bom 
.. Ecological Senge posed hy projects are H^to be disra^ 


Hi^saidBi^othercountriesbfr 

were formally conv^ed to sides ^ abopowere riwuld be 
other West European govennneots allowed to Mqmre $pace-a^ teoh 
by hfinistex for Estemal Relations notogie s miEtaty observa- 

pnian/t ii iiinas earlier this wedL tion satmtei: .* 

Code-named Eur^ for the cry Noting Att France not be- 
made by Archimedes, the ancient long to die loffitaiy wi ^ erf die 
Creek yiffnti s t, when he discov- Nmui AtlanMc Oegudza^ 
er^ the prin^de of specific gravi- don, Mr. Httisu s^ tire United 
ty, they envisi^ European cooper- States dbonld rent be allowed **to 
ation in such areas as hid-powered place us iflt -a'kind of economic 


dm” to keq> die peace in Ennm 

In f'mrrmnn with Other WcSt El> 
ropeans, however, the Freodi are 
also troubied by the prospect of a 
widening technolcfflcal gap be- 
tween the United States and Eu- 
xc^ if d» Reagm admhnstxatiai 
gom ahead wiA its plans to invest 
vast sums in a space defense qfs- 
tem. 

Freadent Fransens MitteiTand's 
advisers are aware that other Eoro- 


ed wiA r e se ar c h into space-based *Tf tite UA declarm itself ready 
defenge systems. to bar the mDitaiization of ^mc^ 

Th^ also urged West Germain then we are ready to agree to shmp 
noCtojcandKpitgect,theStrat^ reductions in nuclear weapons," he 
Drfense Inhiatore. Cban^or Hd- said. , , 

iiiut i^dil said Thmsd^ that Bonn Ibe new Soviet teder, Mikhail 
sqiported -the UA program and S. Gorbachev, this monA an- 
wanted to- p«ird«p*te in the re- nouneedafreezeinthedeploymat 
sear^ So^SS^ medium-range mis- 


Spain Acqiiits 2 

MADRID (Reuters) — Two of thN ^ 

dited famiFrancclast SqrteB^haveto 

SpaniA court officials said Fr^y. They ■ 

CTA (Basque Xfomdand and UberQr) were 

Manuel Martinez Beiztegiii, who was 
an attack in which a passeriv was . 

Ramirez, who was accused ctf kunnga ovu 

prison because he faces sepaiare chTO in oom«^ 

four civa guaids. A rnKng on the tnafof fte tmrd 

r pjfliwhin Galdeanu, is eqiected befewe Mond^ 

^e extraditions m Sqrtonber broke wiu French 

saiaiatists Uving m Fnuwe as political CTiles and toucBW, 

oiii^ in the Basque region. 




nounoea8ireczcuiuicus|jxwjiiiM<» , . . wwv ■ 

of Soviet SS-20medi(^range mis- Kflrfmilj ASSaoLWgOTfifi 


MQdiafl V. Zunyazun and Leo- sOes m Europe unto Novraba xSaiurAW^isnifMteral.— PrinreMnisterRashid 

id M. Zamyatin, on a five-diQr The Umted States dismissed tire DAMA yUS (tote^ al-Assad of Syria 

«t M «»d at a »atu« as insimificant becausc. it conferred Friday wth Freotot iMez ai 


Rotand Damas 


nid M. Tamyafin^ OD a five-diQr The Umted States dismissed tire 
visit to West Germany, said at a gesture as insignificant becaus^ it 
news conference that Moscow said, the Soviet Unim ajready to 
would w»«*t on cmnectittg the is- a 10-tchl advantage in missue 
sues qiace weqrans and earth- strength in Europe, 
based nndear aiseoals at the Gen^ Mr. Zamyatin’s oemnrents 

va arms with the United peered to indicatims tto 

States. Moscow im^t refuse to accept any 


militias in 


conqnitos, lasm, ar^ram intdli- supa-NATO” on the pie^ **of 
g ffl i ry microprocessMS. chasing aftfef odr industries, our 

In public comments Thursday, t ec hniq ue^ ^ our knowledge our 
sevenu French ministeis contrasted tedmotogreauBd. our bndns." 
the initiative for peaceful high tedi- AsiinflcfUQO'was talrea^R^ 

nology research wiA Presidmt search and -Tbdmcfogjr Mmister 
R^gan ’c Strategic Defense Initia- Hobert Caijtieii,;i4x) said that the 
dve, popularly known as "star prospect of an American teduKh 
wars.*^The Reagan administration logu» "leap forward” becanse of 
has invited West Euiqiean coun- tbequcedaetoptowasencoDr- 


n„i^y b'te Bimd^ v*m rantuieiitia and medium-range lanes 

JlSi^ScSlliisImStorihe anns mdess the UA ^ to ne- -«eur.qr end nnnquilhty for .11 Ldmnesu 

¥>.«t«sri«1Vfmitsm 


Mr. Ttmygtim was present agreement on cutting bade mter- 
T TwireHay |q (he vAen Continental and medium-range 

Mr Ko M wwwri hk iwififttig for the arms uhless the UA uieed to BO- 
StratMic Initiative, popu- g^****^ a ban on the develt^mrent 


affairs, Abdd Halim Khaddan, discussed the ciisffv4jBi^|Eeg^ 
meeting, the official Syrian press *20rtef- . % 

Mr iGuami returned later to Bemit, miete he to:led^^cai«lef 
government since he resi^ Wednesday. 
to speak to reporters. The Syriu prem agency 
«a!Vc President Assad underlined his country’s inteiest AFSiiBSiBiic 

« . « .^11 ■ ^4 • • 



fers of iDoadve defense contracts, viewed Enidea man^ as an imda- 
'niepiqposedEnidcaprqjeeten- tive to start discosacas about En- 
visages Toeuth in many of the rppean tecfandcncal coopecation. . 
areas that vrouid be coveted the fHi^ not^ tto Fame bfimster 
UA qrece defease program. Laurent FaNn^ vAdi he ms m- 
France to sm{^ ont ax areas dost^ mmiwer , nwdtft «dmaiB' pro 
to possible cooperation. Tto in- posals last year and dud they were 
f^nfr- advancen optic laaer resistedinwestGennariyaiiidBrit- 


fTh^ noted tto Fame bfimster gmiation oouncty to rgect the 
Laurent FaNn^ vAdi be ms m- Reagan admimstcatiaa’s'mvitation 
dost^ minister, made amflar pro- to partieqate in tiie researc h . A 
Dosals last Year and that they woe Bovenunent statement issued in 


tries to take pan in joint reseaxdi in aging WestEnropians to rdnforce 

Renewalof Wars^Pact 

Is Foreseen brHmiecker 

•/ 

Reutas whether thm would be danges in 

BERLIN — Soviet bloc leaders the new tre^ but a^ed if mffer- 
mli meet Friday in the Polish cam- cnees wiA H^omahia over pact po- 
tai to renew the Warsaw Pact de- ficywerereflectedinthedocurnent 
fense treaqr for 20 years, Erich he rqilied: ^e are uiiammous." 


techndogy, new matoials, large ain. Mr. MSoecrarid made a amflar part 

conmutecs, artificial intelligence proposal to a Eu ro pean s nm aiit in Mr. ^wnyatin, the Kremlin’s 
and nq^-qaed nnerodeettomes. • hfordi 1983.] chief ayntc^an, said: "If the 


laciy known as "star wars.” of space weapons- 

■ Norway on Thorsday became ZSnqraniit who holds the 

UrefflfortiiAtlanticfreatyOr- 5?™^ 

■ ation country to rdect the Cotnmun^ Pirty Ont^ Coi^ 
aaadmimsSon’smvitation rmttee. toW Bonn thgt taking part 
utiemate in the researc h . A in the space weai^ res^hp^ 
■^S^tement issued in S«“ wwld inro^^ ^ect tela- 
said Norway would not take to between the Soviet Union and 
WestGennany. 


Soviet Protests Momand ShoWi^WjB! 


Chief said: "If the concern that the of^ 

’ . WestGermanyarereadytopartia- 

— I pate in woik^ out the so-called 

Stratogic Defense Initiative.”, Mr. 
Tttnyanfn said. 

"It is inconqirehensible that 


meriiil secreaiy In Ihe PAlUS(ReuleB).-r -jtt e ^U n ^ 

^mmiifrict Pasty Crotrm Com- tdewsKm program m wmefa Yves Montand, one of Fraycrs bat^i ym 
ittee. told Bonn thgt part eotertamers, examiiied the prospects of an at^ by toe Warsaw Psci 
the space weapons rcsearcE pro- nations on Europe. , _ufj .d. 

am mSd SeviSly affect rela- A spokesman at the h&istry ia Ix^nul ^to sad Enday to 
ms between the Sovfo Union and France had igected the protest Montand, once a.siqjporler ot to 
estGennany Ftondi Conmunisi was the host on tire mow on diaimd ^ 

"We heard wiA astonishment Thursday. The show contaned a montagie of Soviet tanks, troops ^ 
id concern that the leaders of the hdicoptem in action arto said that Wosaw Paa forces could ovafuf 


most <rf West Gennany in t itoter of davs. 

[In Moscow, Tass said Ridajr thk toe program ins "deagued to 


_ pn Moscow, Tass said fi 

Smtegic Drf^'Iiutiative.” Mr. pimlicim to aims race atojust^ American pito for xmHtaiizatioa of 
Tmiyanin said. outeT space,” United Press mtemational iqxirted. Tass said that Mr. 

"I t is incon^rehensible that Montand acted as namtorbecabse he sought *^Mpnlarity as a herald of 
these people do not realize that to human-hating ideas, id&hg Reagan’s ’star wars* and rabid anti-Soviet- 
mflitarization of space would have ism.’l 

a destabfli^ effect on to Euro- wi . • * a 

pean continent,” he said. Nu^ra gnB KftpOlia AttaCK Oil OllipS 

Mr. Zmyanin said - that Mr. ” o • • JT- • • ^ .j —A. j. . 

Kohl's argument that participation MANAGUA (AF) - Thf Nrearaguan govo^t sjd^da^ 

was vital m order tom access to Hoitouran warplanes strafed two btoaguan C(to guard boats TTmrs- 
new technology was ^taord.” (fay.smlmgoiKaftomaito kiHBgaaewiDember. 

■ Tass on Ddtente A Foreign Mmistiy statement said to atojuari boats 

Tass press agency said Friday ^^'pS:lihigma^m to keys. It said they then were attacked by three 
that Washington’s rqections of So- HbndmimStaryiets. 

viet calls for moratoriums on to Honduras said m a statement that two Honduranjets went to h^ to 

testing, devdqpment and deploy- fishing ve$sdTtoink,vd:^ was bemgluiassed by a Nicai^ 

meat of nuclear weapons were goancoiut guard bo^ The coimnurtiqQ6 said the planes "drove ofT the 

tratmg a retnrn to detente, Uiiited. ociast guard boat, severdy damaging it. 

Press International reported from . .. 

"UA official drdes are not Qtadfi Grecemed-Abont Saharan War 


Honedeer, to East Gtoian leader, -nw Sovi^ 

was quoted as saying Friday. announced n 
Mr. Honecker told to Italian ^vouid tako^ 
news agency ANSA in an interview 
' Ihurs&y that member countries of cnvietsow 

to pact had unanipusly 


tess agency, Tass, 
ter that to meeting 
ce in Warsaw late 
it gave no date, 
s here say to Cen- 
to Soviet Com- 



on a renewal of to treaty that ex- 

pii» oCDcially M»y 14 afla 30 tom«T«sdaym 


years. The interview text was re- ‘ 

Friday in East Berlin. 

The seven members will also re- 0<ybadi CTg^to Soviet toder, will 
opto maty £ 


a fimher 10 years, Mr. Honecko Pja ppli#Pe will ta 

said. In adiHlion to the Soviet .Gorsky’s rust su^t 
Union, members of the pact are meetny M^fte otiy Ea st Eim> 
Poland East Gemiany.cSoslo- Pf™ Jes^^ he sneo^ 
vakia,Himgaiy, Romania and Bill- Chenrenko, who 

garia. ^ 

"The situation now is not partio- Mr. Hon£^]^. vto is sdieduled 
ulaxly good,” AN^ quoted Mr. to bold talks Tuesday in Rchdc in 
Honecka as sayi^ "We are in his first insfl^to.a NATO country, 
favor of an extension.” said a meeto ^Ww eea Mr. Gorba- 


*TJA official drdes are not Qtadfi Greceriied About Saharan War 

looking for pointe of contact be- WAaiINGTON(NYT)--PresidentChadHBcndiedidofA]aeriahas 
twem the tw rot mk to vaic^crocernabomgro«ingtensrottfflN<MlhAfnca,acaisingMorocco 
rdndd to Cold War bama tot ^tfepiinimgdiancesfarap^cdsetdeo^toftolO-yearconfi^ 

wScmMiaia. 

He said King HassanH of Wforoccoinight be oottsidering a full-scale 


U-SAR.,”itsaid. 


gana. 

"The situation now is not partio- 
ulaxly good,” AN^ quoted Mr. 
Honccktt as sayi^ "We are in 
favor of an extension.” 


The Warsaw Paa was offidally <tov and Pierident Ranald Rragan 
v''ret tq> as a response to the creation could tadp reduce intematiroal 
of the North Atlantic Treaty Orga-. tensions. 

nization, the military alliance of the ■ 

United Stales, Canada and West 

European nations. ^■irfmatohn Risliolc 

"Of course, we are ready to dis- MatlUcK 

solve the Warsaw Pact if NATO m n ' nr ^ 
were dissolved as wdL” be said, lOH09Bl€ nCOjOre 
repeating Soviet bloc policy ^ ^ xtw * 

pressed in to existing treaty. Aprnh tM Knnr tfaMin. 

Mr. Honecker did not specify ^ : 


AN APPEAL HEAiUNG IN WARSAW — Mnymutt Popiehiszko, dto 
Rev^nd Jerity Popidnsdeo, n pro-Sofidmity priest idio was killed Ity Pofirii security 
trfficei^ appeared Fri^ at rito opei^ of an appeal heariog in Warsaw for foor police 
officers convicted in the case. She is flanked by her sons, Stnislaw; left, and Josef. 


^Tiey s^ to^prevent a reoir- mnitaty drive against to Algerian-backedSaharan insurgents. Cokmd 
moe of detente, Tasssaid. CbadlLito met with FrasidrotRoahU Reagan on We^e$roy,caitirized 

Hassan forengadro "in ddayiag tactics to tii^ and maybe it's in 

_ . .. his mind tot I niuitaiy, foreriul solution is fearible.” The long is a 

OOthd Attacks *°^J^^^i.idmromU»vicw tot King Hassan had “hai^^ 
^ his poritiod'stnee he concluded a treaty of union last snnuncr wi± 

1 yllTIOIlfi Ut S CotondNfoacierQadliafi of Libya. 

Oyer Unrest 


□ulitaxy "anotor form 

d to iq^me of dictator NimoiL” 
It rgeeteq as basdess reports 


iMaTUAXv ajwmill a 0Vtau«Maa 

TT G bds saM Friday that thCT were re- 

U«^* newingtiieirb^waranerabrief 

A ' truce witii to military rulers who 

"D "L 'Dn^vl- ovoihrew Ptesidait Gaafar Ni- Mikh^ 

It rvll*Ml A ild DMiri in a coj^ earlier this month. 

The rebd rattio called the new 
(Continued fitun P^e 1) nulitaxy "anotor form 

with Japan’s decision to let market to regime of dictator NimarL” 

forces prevail wherever possible. rgecteq as basdess rqiorts 

■nmagrmnmtamdudaitheoc. ff™ .laytonm jM Tlmnday jflal 

the rebd leader, Colond John Gar- 

^ihiro Nakasone had promised 

late last month loG^^, a iSS.^^^bdnl 

qieaal envoy of President Ronald sSSdiSS. 

Kfiusn* 

to one another over phone lines, officerrand to addressed several 
UA officials stressed that other giievances of to people in to 
aspects of to telecommunications cniitb which is r T*»^«***< mainly 
dispute remained unsettled. Fri- hy ^ 

HeraeindalGenerdNmHii-! 

ttMvtarv CToduccd by General Nimeiri to 

secretary, Malcolm Baldiige. samk-uMr.- 


Sud^RAds J 

ThReBu^WwfdK 

A 17X WASHINGTON — “If an evD 

MkiUIiW empist does exist, let it esdsL I’m 
^ ■ % , sure fwnalfing the Soviet Uniro is 

‘ itoerr not a goal ai the United Stales.” 

CAIRO -r Sudan’s sonthem re- Thatxemaik-— playingoffPresi- 

said Friday thty were dent Ronald Regan's Uunt de- 
gewing toff war aner a brief aeration of to Soviet Union as 

truce with to mflitaiy riders who evfl eiimire” — was made by 


Gorbachev Impressed U.S. Visitors 


Taiwan Adnural Gnmctied m 


■f|f|-rhy^QQr^fl I ^ VlfillYh*l*fi By Richand Bernstein bureau was conviaed and sentenced to life in pru 

XUBFA T R0AIA,rA O New York Tima s^'ce the moidcT of a Chinese-Amcrican Writer last yea 

'*- ■ CAPE TOWN — - President , Vice Adinind Wong Hsi-4ing, to foi^ intdligeiu« chief, was 

or Uganda,” Mr. Gorbachev said erwise to teams in Geneva will be Piem W. Botha said Fridity that rioted by a mifltaiy coim as a princjpal m kflfing to wrto, Hony 


TAIPEI (NYT) — Theionner head of Taiwan’s miJitaiy intdlige^ 
bureau was conviaed and sentenced to fife in prison Friday for plotiiog 
the murder of a Chinese-Amcrican writer last year. 


eating that way throi^ piles <rf South 


eariyinhis 


pointe^. eating thtf r way ihrougji piles of South Africa was "dominatis by a >rimwoto a criticriMography of Taiwan’s prerident,ChiaiigChing-kQa 

He said that if the United States gold rubles, drinidi^ cc^ee. tip- drastic esc^tion<rf the rev^tion- ^.Liuwastiiottodeauii]ithegarageofhisD^Qty,Calif<xma,hoiDe 
continues to de^op a space-bmed ping tea. i^e mountains of arms ary climate in to counojT ai^ in October last year. 

defense, the Soviet Union would continue to be built.” accused rdigious and pofidcal op- The verdict came little more than a wed: after two leaders (tf Taiwan’s 

push ahead on building additional When the Americans raised to position groups of sedong "to (to crimi^ gang, the Bamboo Unum, were ccmvic^ and sentenced to life 
offensive mistiles. Tbto "would subject of iwimaii ririits. Mr Got- struction of oar system m govern- in prison in a Ta^ distrkt court for planmng and canying ont the 
cost 20 times kss" than the UA baaev tiiowed to trwfiticoti So- and dvilized values.” nn^ec of Mr. liu. The court said Amniial Wong had airuiged the 

defensive system, and wrold posh viet aiMer aa to TO Wro r saving qieaking to Par^ slaying with to gang JeadeisL 

to United States further into debt, fh*t inr<^ liaoient a day after five persons 

he said. nwn> aH>>4»/r were killed bv police in liotine in 1?^«. 


accused rdigious and Dofidcal cm- The verdict came little more than a wed: after two leaders (tf Taiwan’s 

potition groups of sedong "to (to crimi^ gang, the B^lm Unum, were convicted and sentenced to life 
struction of our system (rf govern- in prison in a Ttipd district court for plamwng and (anying ont the 
mem and dvilized values.” nuroec of Mr. The court said Admiial Wons aTT an pBd the 


viet anger on to subject, saving Mr. Botha was speaking lo Par- slaying with to gan g l ea der s, 
that his (muntiy’s mteraal polidS Uainent a (jay ate five pM ^ 


Noting American econmnic (fif- 


that his country’s internal policies 
were being attacke(L 

"You have your laws,” he said, 


hers of Congress iBtweet American liw." Mr. Goiha^ 

^afewoccaaonsMr.C5ori»- from the law facnity of 

Repr^tanve '^ O. a Moscow Stale University. 

fl^iachwf*c tiou, leading (xic (ntolawmakcis • There were a few q>aiks(rfp(diti- 

that he was a newstrie. even Mr. Gorbadiev slammed his fist O’Neal, a Democrat of Massadiu- 
**WsteniizBl'’ lesdar'^ ^ ^ pcinied to an setts, temaiked that to zdadvdy 

XM ^ . . interpreter as he gave to tnn^ littl^known Mx. Gorbarbev hod 

Mr. Com^detaMnotmof the answer — to United come from out of nowhere to as- 

session, lasted neaity four ^ “resptmtiWtf’ — to a *“*» power, toe Soviet leader re- 

faooi^^o^ a vivid portrait of qgesti0Q aboat tto recent tixiotnig ^(»ded: "Tliete are lots of daces 

Mr. UOrOaCDeV. . n C -cl^ tn fuil* m thm Cmiia* rini’m, ** 


from Khartoum on Duusday that Representative Silvio O. Conte, a 
the id>d leader, Colond John Gar- R^Uican of Massachusetts, Mr. 
angj r yttg to the Srutane se Gorbachev’s confident, ontsjxdcen 
capital for peace talks with to new tn a nn e r convinced to Arogicans 
mflitary leader. General Abdnl that he was a new-styfe, even 
.... "Westernized” leader. 


Rahman Swaietolahab. 

The radio (tf Colond (jani^s 
Sudanese People's Liberation 


were killed by police in rioting in ||ia 

toe b}ack townships near Uiten- IkCCUrU 

hage in eastern Ca^ Proviiice. He Hw aanec u fie u of JauNS D. Bril^. 28, was carried out Thursday nigbt 
said that "the potential for exten- m to electric chair at Virginia ^tePedtentiaxy. He had been convicted 
tive counttywide violent distur- of three murders. (Af) 

banceshas increased markedly.” Tanoredo Neves, to pretident-dect of Brazil, was in "extre^ 
Mr. Botha’s statement Friday critical” condition Friday after to fatee of vital (Hgans, a governm^ 


On new weapons, for example, Germany. 


States was *tep(msild^ — to a vmne power, toe Soviet leader xo- 
question about recent tixiotiDg 9<md^ *”Ihere are lots of daces 
of a U A nulitaiy officer in to hide in to Soviet UnUn.’* 


Garang. a U.S.-educated distident he said flatly that to United Stares 
officer, and has addressed several "must ^ve iqi tins pnmam” for 


The Americans present, indod- 


^kvances of to people in to devdtqimg a missile (fefense in 
south, vbich is pr^ulated mainly roaoe. 
byChristiads andanimists. * He noted a conflict between the 

He nscuided General Nimeiri’s Reagan administration’s state- 
unpopular I9n divition the au- meats that it "can’t gjve up re- 
tonomous southern region into search” cm space defense while ti- 


As he argued for a moratozium ing to UA ambassador to Mos- 
OD coDStructiro of nudear we^ cow, AitbiirA.Ha[tDan,idiow85 
ons, he asked almost pltintiv^, the offidal note-taker, were im- 


"What do we do with 
(»s we have? Lm’s su 
"I get information 


stro. 
a from 


toweap- pressed Ity Mr. Gorbachev’s exten- 


seemed unusually harsh and a>- 
peared to be in response to toe 
increasing racial vidence in to 
country. 

In addition to the five HiagW 
killed Thursday evenio& a 19-year- 
old white man was pimed from a 
car near Ultenh^ doused with 
gasoline and set afire Ity a band of 
30 people, the police si^ The in- 
jurro man. «bo was tainm to Imffn- 
tal, was listed in stable cc^tion 
Fridity. 

In his speech, Mr. Botha made 


spokesman said. 
Search pfames 


Searehpbnies located to wreckage of a U.S. Air Force jet fighter that 
crashed Tonrsday off the nortbern coast (rf Honduras. Air force officials 
said Friday that there was little hope of to two American crewmeo bring 
found alive. (tjpi) 

Reagan Bows to Congress, 
Postpones Bid for Rebel Aid 


(Contimied from Page 1) 


Geneva 


vepraiarai 
Ms. Gori 


paration for the meeting. 
Gorbachev brought with 


every day," Mr. Gorbachev said, him sheets of paper on which were 

xt ^ « . a 


three provinces and p] 

vise the TriMwitr. Jsw, or Siaria, in- are "on die tab] 
iroduced by_ Gen^ Nimeiri to n^tiations. 
same year.' ; "Youarenott 


to le- multaneously sawng that all issues 
ia^ in- are “on the table” at the Geneva 
li to n^tiations. 

"You are not taUdng to Tanzania 


qieaidng of the enntiniiii 
control n^otiations, "and 


jtaitos rep(irting vtoat mem- 
congrestional ddegations 


green, others 


CHURCH SERVICES 


PARIS 

AMSOCAN CATHBMAL IN PAHS, 23 Aw. 
GMrgeAT, 7S008 Porte. Th« Vary Rav. 


Analysts Agree on U,S, Ascendancy in Asia, hutNoton Why 


(OMtotod from Page 1) 


Staira swmed deqily divided and 


the ^conomie dynantism, commit- 
ment to eqinty and leadersh^” 
and so their insurgeiKty has gotten 


But die record does not show daitects of the war, offered tins 
that many other offidais were. condusion; "Whea I say the war 


■*?”**..*■ ot 1.2 minion; to turning inward. otent to equity and leadersh^” that many other (tffidals were: condusion; "Whea I say the war 

SlSl^iSd 'oSriiSirJ arnty is toeTourth largest in the ^ Hov^, wito Lam and Can^ and so tiwir iosingencty has gotten In any event, Mr. Bundy main- bought time for Asia to become 

day*] i2noan.Td.:72ai7.92. World after'tiaose of Qim^ to So- bodUfelL as alironatt predict out of hand "mmro noticeable tamed that to Atian eouncries stronRer. Fm not savine in retro- « 


residents of South African cities, a 

move that would apparently ie^- ^ 

mize permanent SS* hSitSSi 

of areas where thty were once (stiy 

— clear that milhaiy aid is deadior an 

extended period of time:” 

M. ** RqwbBcans indicated 

% Oflr fT ^ admmistntion would te- 

J new its G^t for military aid wbro 

^ < I. . Congress allocates foreign assis- 

^t^.of to war. offei^ tins tance for to 1986 fiscal ywr, which 
c^i^; “When I say to war begins Oct. 1. "This fa nSto last 


viet Union-'^ to United States, to otte Asian doouii()asto^ external support.” 


CENTRAL BAPnsr CHURCH, 13 Hw du [ Fer cg»ta iacome is estimated by Mr. Lo^ «gued tfaatin (fats "the 


"were much 


vitwCc i o i Bbier, 75006 Poite. Metre Sb- the State Diteartment to be about most cnirial factor was the o 

an ngage of UA s^es m final debacle in Sareon. 
PAWS suMfns Vietaam t^ was. m one fonn or 

EMMANUB. BApnsT OMtOi. itouaMd anotiw, iwaSro an of ms succcs- 
mateen. bignah i p ed dno , dl denonilne- sors thioi^^Ridiaid M. Nixon. 

Sens, BUe 9i45, worthip; KM& 56 *4V«ii linifr^ m.,, if 

ihw Boni Reiiit>h TbL 74 ^iS 5 . *Tou hmu TOW rf dominocs Srt 

up.” msenabte said. "You knock 
BjRo ra over to fust one, and vtiiat will 

hq^Kmtotolartoncistoca- 

Dtek,S«ii«s£(rtS, 1271 NCHulzen, The tot-R wfll gp over VCty 

Netherlands. TeL-(+31) <0)2152 63073. qUlCkly. 


SrOOCHOtM 

IMMANUa CHURCH nev dty wnter. 


ToGseh 

fUinhndie, 


MendtycArteiivWi(Miiip.Sund^ penMiwln. Indonesia and. 


Tel.: (08) 310051,151225. 


7b piace on otfrerttemenr 
in thii lection 
pleeie conlact: 


peiii^ th^fstof Asia. 


Mr. Nix 
domino the 

w«9ul(i rediii 
"a pitiful, i 
•sxsoY U.S. ; 


<(n oeighbois. thePariscease-fireagreementend- 
...... ing U.S. invdvement in to Viet- 

odrot Bsrohowm oam War and four years before to 

6 of UA stakes m final ]4aT^y|]» Tn 

J^ofKs^Sc^ -ThfahdpedtopuiInd()^ 
bard M. Nixon. paspecttveandeTOtfae^ofour 
... __ ent, and restram HancaT he said, 

swtfdomin^srt Mr. Sodapino stressed that the 
^ loss of Vietnam "raised questiros 

and wfll ,bout American credibility, but it 
art one is to cci^ raised to quotient of A yiap 
vfll go over very sdf-rdiance.” 

T^ dei^t of sdf-tdianoe is 
r, this meant Laos, central to Mr. Zmmia’s analysis. 
Hand, Burma, the "Revcdutioiis,”to said, "though 
a, Indooesia and, influenced by external factors, are 
L of Asia. laigdy detennined by indigoous 

sepanded on this factors.” 

Unnghfapresidai- Thailand and Indonesia, be ar- 
be fo» ot Vietnam gued, were able to gfit thonsdves 
e Uiiited States to tpgetiier politicly, economically 
la ^tanf and de- and mflharily to b^t down Com- 
ibflity woridwide. munist insurgencies: 


But. and here is the nub of to ^ eadtd, and all <» tot had wise. The price was toi 
debate; did UA involveiiient in rdationsh^i to our be^ in for that. Taking all ti 
Vi etnam dday to fiowcDiiz of Vietnam.” Tbcji were "notas jittery into account the in 
U.S.-Chiiiese ties and Ariansdf- ^ ^ 1964.” In other sons, to human loss i 

rdiance rod growth, (>r did it inake wrods, to war gave them time to was a national tragedy.' 


of its allies on C^itol Hill to ac- 
cept a compromise. According' to 
Republican leaders, the adimnfa- 
tration backed off on to aid le- 
qnmt only wiies it realized it w^ 
faring a devastating * 

■ Em^eans LoUty for Aid 

Winston fitiirrhiii 2d, a member 
of Pariimneiit and to grandson of 
the British prime mmfaer dutins 
Worid War ff, visited to White 
House on IbursdOT as part of s 
delation of West Europeans urg- 
uig Coi^ress to rdease am to Nica- 
ragnan rebels. The Washington 
Post reported. 

The visit by Mr. r>tirriiill and a 
dozen other persons was part of a 
White House effort to gain the 
hackirtg (m to aid issue. Toe groi^t 


cywere“notasjitteiy mto account ~ to internal divi- SSw Coo^S^li2ilS?®A! 2?*^^ W to^dt^ is 

1 in 1964.” In other sons, to boman loss of life — it *?5 ^dispensable." 

ar gave them time to was a national tragedy.” ,%** “ After a White House sesrioa « 

wstDOtder. was a nauonamagwy. gpt be l ^eased u ntil to new ses- which Mr. Reagan made a brief 

ooke countered that With^SSS«^!f fPpearance, hfr. (cLrchfll said the 


those devel(qnnent$ posribl^ Set their houses in order. 

Did. for arwnpi^ to War blind Mr. Holbrooke countered that 
UA leaders to the hfatorical ten- "2,000 years of Cbinese-Vietiiam- TTnwonrSfln RtfunaiMw a 
sons and conflicts lytye e n (Tw*>* ese enroty and hundreds of years “ 
and to Sc^et Union, and (Tiina of Chinese and Russian mutnal Rgr ^ AhfitiPTIIIffn ™ VfttP- 
and Vietnam? su^iritxis were su^aded a^en 

BUDAi^*:!^a.«di,., 


and Vietnam? su^iritxis were st 

William P.Buwty, assistant see- 
retary of state for East Arian af- “* aod^ we 
fairs in to Kenn^ and J(toson pwe^tKmsvatl: 
a dminigtratinns said in an inter- icla t K Xi s wrth 
view; “No, 1 was aware of to “Vetus to ASEA 

^ ended our 


proposed a new ^roach r^st 
rmmtii, that the aid would be used 


SSSISLvSfovietiuS? 

*He added. "We could not im- BUDAPEST — Inararedi^by ureed to baunu^tJtinu^th 

p>wrd»donswj{liWdmlop 

our lelatiros with or give govemmeol, a member of Hunga- Mmit. wjtiun 60 dnv> ?r 
impetus to ASEAN stf-rdiSce r/si^mnent said Friday he had 


I expanded on this 
It (he loss 

: to United States to 


Wo, Manofi Toast Bdatiom 


until wc our invrivement in =»befainaH m a vote on a net 
Yirtnani.” tion law because he disagr 

TTiosc who made U.S. policy, he offidai education poMes. 
said, "pm American pies^ on to Istvan Kiraly told ib 




iiaaieaucauoapouaes. Republican hadets have been tril- 
Istvan Kiraly told to daily ing the White House for itob that 


"indispensable." 

a White House sesrioa rt 
which Mr. Reagan a briri 
appearance, 1^. Cburdiill said the 
United States should attei^t ^ 
the spread of communism 
Central Ameri ca now, "when the 
stakes are rdativety low.” 

If this effort fails, be said, 
may wake 19 S or 10 years from 
now to find that the aii»ee of jbe 
Soviet Union are on to Rio Gitf' 
de and you do. indeed, have to 
nonuxut.u.S. forces and that tbfa 
could be a Yietnam-type involve- 
loent, which we are so desperatriy 
anxious that you should avmd.” 



E^that creiSNlity was 
herimse of to loss of 
t-because the United 




, Itointiiatplaceintowo^whcre newspaper, Magyar to president's request faced virtu- ■ Soviet Installation AOeeed 

nbp» Of sucoea abstained because he felt pPBseia allyoertaudefeaLLawmakerawho' Soviet 
— Fmdgn Minister and, m to name of strengthening pdides prevented scho<^ from have talked recently with Mr. Rear settin* ™ ? 

Wu ?to(^ of met Fridqr America, they w^cened iL The meeting soriety’s need to train gaa be has rcri: emotional SnSn^tif ^™^nnicat](ys sy^ 
with IVesltotFa(linandE Ma^ Vietnam bofl had to be lan^ be- dite!L^%chool5 cannot cope prop- oomimtn)eartotbetebel{ause,a5 Nicaragua that can 

cmaadceMffate^ manexdti^ foietoiestwaspdssibla” eriy with the tasks providing RewesjanativeJttoS. McCain, an bonva^onS; 

(rf toa^ to csta hliriiifienr of ^ Was to U.S. effort m Vietnam rimritaneous progress to nfl,” he ArizooaJtewbBcaiLpittiL ' 

tomw ^atiom bc^ said. “Wesh^ be able to provide Asere^L to WfoVHobmhas rrocSS 

andtoPhilippinBslOyearsago. Mr. Bundy, oi» of to mam a^ more options to to takn& been.ski^;to:Rq)(mdtodM8dvto 


air traffic, The Asmeiated Press 
^yorted U.S. officials saying'io 




. s * 








Pa^3 





INratNAllONAL lBD 5 RAZ 2 »‘TIUdS)D 7 ^ SATURDAY^UNDAT, APRIL 26 - 21, 1985 


rr ™ thiM 








. 

Montand Shov«.. 



-'--*Dy4g^S 

s.|fr.^Sid^^siidf. 

natter of rf«« ^'«cesftJ:<.’, 


natter of dayi 

«*ay that tbe’proera^ 

nieina^ repSiS 

*«nse he sooghl-Si J*« ^ 


>rl8 Attack onSk 

. hlhne a crew «t 


i-„. ■— -e-«ui wjaa 0 

lolling a crew member^ 

nent said the coast euanl Im. 
waters when ihev iricdZ,^’-- 

*ys.iisaid^to“C,Sg:- 


at that two Hcwduian lets Bnui. 
pik, wiiich was bring harasscdbi' 

ommuniqirf said the planes-dS/ 
, severely damping JL 


ed About SahaniB? 


-President Chadli Bendjedidgiii. 
5 _tensioninNorih.Vrica,a«iJ 
heal settlement of the lO-yearofe 


Morocco might be conskbiBct 
gerian-backed Saharan inmT 

nt Ronald Reagan on Wednndn : . 

tying tactics to dme. auliBn- 
roefui solution is feasibie." Ibt 


Bternew that King Hassan had 
Bled a treaty of union last se; 
Libya. 


ICoBvietedinliii!' 


head of Taiwan's niiiiaij'L " 
»1 to life in prison FrvfaTlIr.' • 
n writer last ^ear. 
he former toieUigcncrdid’u 


rage of bis Daly diy, (Me. 


week after two leaden^ 
ere convicted and sott£ 
for planning and csiys' 
.Admiral Wong had *tr' 




rm ••r^vrrr 


;.r? cvr 



TOPICS 



Th» Aaoeote Wm i 

SHAKING UPTHE CA 5 T •Los Angeles anersency personnel made use of movie 
!>etK at Univefsai StuAie tq add leailsm during tests Ol die city's preparedness fm- a 
major earthquake. Sdentisis.hsve coadoded t£it die diances are ^U^** t^ Ae Los 
Alleles area win be stnadk by a qudie of v( 3 > great mt^tnde in the next several years. 


Procter & Gamble . 
Bedeviled .Anew 


Procter & Gamble, the U-5 
conglivmerdte that sdU Si3 biP- 
bon worth of Ivory So^> and 
other iMUbcbidd prtKhtcts a 
say-s it is being besieged ngafn 
rumors that it is in league 
the devil. These lunors, h says» 
stenu from its I00-year*old 
trademark: a man in ibemoon^a 
popular decorative theme in 
ISSOs, that is sumoendod ^ J3 
stars representing ^ 13 ori^nd 
U.S. stales. 

The nicnofs fir&t peaked, .tp. 
19S2, when the oQoqwty vna 
getting 15,000 phone cws a 
month about the nunois, most 
which arose from chain tetters 
circulated to fundameotoHst 
Etesian! sections of the SoBfb 
and Southwest Now the ramocs 
have mtuhroom^ agaio, to 
6.000 calls a month, momy com* 
ir.g from Roman Cadk^ neigh- 
borhoods m the NortheasL 
Procter & Gambie has pnbliciy 
denounced “false and maliddus 
rumors assoriadngthe con^iany 
with Sataoisffi." TTw conipany 
says it cannot esdmaie the 
on sales, but it has lined hvo 
detective agencies. Pink^on 
Inc. and WadLeobuc Corp,, to 
track down the chain-iettec writ- 
ers; ?vy?"»rfnt>- 


Short Tidees 


Ten years ago last Monday, 
Karen Aon Oumkn fell into an 
irreversible conRU apparently 
brought on by a nrixturt of alco- 
hol and a tranquilizer. .MdKH^ 
she was taken off an arrifiw 
respirator nine years ago. she lin- 


on m a narsing home in 
Plains, New Jaxy. Now 
31, she 65 pounds (30 

kifa^amt). The taxpayers pay 
the 532,500 annual cost of her 
treatment. She is fed ihrou^ a 
edinJan- 


lobe. Under a law passed 
. tl^ itdie qQiild be removed, 

barber parols, who visit her 
every day, rriuse thBL Her fa- 


ther. 3osm Quinlan, says, **lt is 
if s hands DOW,” 


in Gofs: 


- Om Amencan woman in five 
. a«i;s imtil marriage to 5CX- 
Qil activity, according to a just- 
pnUished study, conducted in 
..l9S2;by. the U.S. goverament’s 
NaDOOBl Center far Hmlih Sia- 
ttetiCB. *018 raport said, “The pro- 
portion' of women delm^ 
s^ual intrit^ourse until marriage 
'Secliiied frem 48 percent amoi^ 
.women maiTying during the peri- 
od 1960-64 to 21 percent.” 


The nmnes of more than 300 
Viemaqi War-dead will be added 
. to. the Vietnam Veterans Memo- 
rial in Washington. They had 
bem eadiuted l^use they were 
kilted outside the official war 
zone. Many were members of air 
opws ki^ '<riieo their bombers 
crashed iqio the PaciTic eo route 
toVietnmiL ' 


fn«n Mteourl, yiwVe.gpt 

^ .from uiot state have been 
saying: for lone^ than anyone 
ean remember. The state's auto- 
mobile Horiise plates cany the 
wxds “3 k)W-Mc State;” The 
Divisi^ of Tourism ranted that 
mto**Cet Mosoori Stow You the 
Best 'nine Evriy* whidt 

was cumbet^mw, eroaadlW 
licen&e plate. Now a nil is before 
the state Icpslature to put 


“Wake Up to Missouri” on the 
tags. Not everyone is for it. State 
Representative Mark Yioung- 
daU said it would mean ex- 
changing haitage for “the latest 
billb^ra slogan,” 


AO the President’s 
Slogans, Engraved 


During the more than four 
years that Ronald Reagan has 
occupied the White House, The 
New York Tunes reports, hU 
desk in the Oval OfHce has accu- 
mulated a^t plaques, asbtr^ 


muiaced agnt plaques, asbtr^ 
and paperweights from friends 
and pcdiUcal aTlies, bearing these 


and pcdiUcal allies, bearing these 
slogans: 

• Babe Ruth struck out 1,330 
limes. 

• It CAN be done. 

• The budearoo stops here. 

• Mdte 00 MXstake about it 
You real^ made my day. (Gxn- 
memnaiiag a House vote rdeas- 
ing funds for more MX missiles). 

• The most important goal in 
my life is to have some signin- 
cant haipact in extending and 
preservi^ the realm of personal 
freedom in the life of coun- 
try. 

• There is no limit to what a 

man gap do and be can go 

if nurid -dbo gets the 

credit. 

«A thought for today: You 
can be too big for Cod to use but 
you canT be too small. 

• lUegiimu non carborundum 
(“Erigineeis' Latin” for “Don’t 
let the bastards grind you 
down.”) 

— ■ Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 



Wm^S^arne^ 
U.^, Jewish 
LeaderSays 


By Fcancts-X'. Qincs 

Keu York Timn Stmtt 

WASHINGTON « Bic Wiesei, 
the ^airman of the United States, 
Hdocaust Memorial CcniodL has 
pleaded publicly with Secretary o(> 
State Geom P. Shultz to dissuade 
President Ronald Ragan from inr. 
nieting "pain and shame” on 
Americans by visiting a Gennsn.- 
cemeleiy that include Nazi war 
dead. 


“Mr. Secretory, please be our 
emissaiy,” Mr. Wie» said Thurs- 
day. turning to Mr. Shultz at a 
mournful ceremony at tbe Capitol 
honoring the Ammican liberation 
of the German death camps of 
Worid War II. “T^ those who 
need to know that our pain is genu- 
ine, our ouu^ deep and our pe^ 
ple.xity infinite.” 

Mr. Wiesel spoke before learning 
of tbe prraident's remarks Thurs- 
day in which Mr. Reagan contend- 
ed that both the Jews slain in^ the 
Htriocausi and some ctf the st^diers, 
many of them draftees, buried in 
the wmetery were rictims of Ns- . 
zism. 



U.S. Spy Says TRW 
Had Lax Security 


By Kachy Sawyer 

If'aiAiMfan Post Sema 

WASHINGTON — A convicted 
ChrisKqrher J. Boyce, has testi- 
ft^ before a Senate 'hearing that 
oiqiloyees at tbe California head- 
queers of TRW Systems Group 
treated security as ajoke. 

He told a Smte hearing Thurs- 
day that empitwees who worked in 
TRW*s “black vault” fiUed with 
sensitive government information 
used a “classified" satebd to smug- 
gle in pepper mi nt sdmapps and 
that tb^ used a machine for de- 
sirc^ing code cards to make ba- 
nana daiquiris, wli^h they drank 
on duty. 


In this atmosphere during night 
and weekend hours starting in 


1975, Mr. Boyce said, be was able, 
at age 2 1 , (0 remove or photograph 
secret documents concerning the 


opmtion of highly secret U.S. io- 
itelfliti. He was con- 


ITw ftiwimiiil FuM 

Qie Wieiid, diaimaD tbe U.S. Htriocaust Connimmoii, 
addresses a ceremoity in Wae^ngtMi ccKnmeinorating the 
libantion oH Jews from coocentradon canqs in Genmi^. 


Later, as the 65 presideuid a(^ 
poiniees to tbe Holocaust Memori- 
al Council debated mas resigna- 
tion.^ in protest, Mr. Wjesel 
counseled caution bui voiced shock 
at Mr. Reagan's latest comments. 

“To compare the vicums to Nazi 
soldiers may suggest that be 
doesn't know what it meant to be a 
Jewish vtciiro in those times. Does 
he really think that German sot- 


diers fell what we fell in Buchen- 
wald and Trablinka in the shadow 
of the flames? Have they seen what 
«e have seen — selections, execu- 
tions and mass murder?" 

Mr. Shultz, whose remails fol- 
lowed, said he shared tbe concern 
that, in tbe current iqnrii erf* recon- 
ciliation with West Germany, 
“ihere is no place for understand- 
ing for those who took pan in the 
perpeiraiimi of the Nazi horrev.” 

Because of the grouing contro- 
versy, Mr. Reagan has d^ded to 
add a slop to cmnmemorate the six 
million Jews killed in the German 


death comps, but Mr. Diesel issued 
a plea that, in addition, the visit to 
the cemetery should be dropped. 

IDespite his criticism of Mr. 
Reagan, Mr. WieseJ said Friday 
that he wxmld go to the White 
1-louse and accept a congresrional 
gold medal from the president. 
United Press Iniematimi^ repevt- 
ed from Washington. 

{“The question was not wiieiher 
to ucc<q)t,” he said in a telev-ision 
interview. “I couldn't but accept 
with gratitude.” Mr. Wiesd added: 
"The question was whether to ac- 
cept it at this lime.”] 


teUigence sat 
victM of selling the information to 
Soviet agents. 

Mr. Boyce, whose espionage was 
depicted in the book and movie 
“The Falcon and the Snownian,” 
said he is helping the govemmeot 
because, after a lifetime of tiying to 
tear things down, he wants to per- 
fonn “a coosmictive act,” 

Convicted in 19~“ on eight 
counts of espionage, he is serving a 
40-year sentence in an isolation cell 
in a federal prison in Marion, Illi- 
nois. His e^ionage partner, An- 
drew Daulion Lee. is serving a life 
sentence. 

The hearing was tbe last in a five- 
month invesugation by the perma- 
nent subcommittee on investiga- 
tions of the Senate Governmental 
Affairs Convninee. Tbe inquiry in- 


dicated that tbe sj'stem for protect- 
ing defense secret is collapsing be- 
cause of bureaucratic uiTighting, a 
swelling woiiload and lack of gov - 
ernment leadership. 

Officials of TRW. one of the 
Central Intelligence Agency's prin- 
cipal suppliers of itconnmssance 
satellites, mamiaised Thursday 
that securitv procedures were 
“sound” in the period since 1975 
and called Mr. Bov-ce's diarges “a- 
aggerated.” But they acknowledged 
that a government investigation 
had found “limited use of alcohol 
on the premises“ and “poor securi- 
ty supervision." 

“lliat makes me wonder how se- 
rious you've been about correcting 
these things.” Senator Sam Nunn, a 
Democrat Geo^a, said. 

Mr. Boyce tesii^ that a fellow 
employee used a photo of a mon- 
key on his security badge and 
gained access to secret informaiioD. 

Paul W. Schw egter, a TRW exec- 
utiv’e, said: “I've seen that badge. I 
And it extremely difficult to believe 
that badge was used.” He &aid that 
accountability for badges and other 
security measures have been 
sirengitiimed. 

No matter how security is im- 
proved, Mr. Boyce said, it w-ill not 
work without ddnmkiiig myths 
glorify-ing espionage as exciting, 
sexy and lucrative. Mr. Boyce 
blamed the entertainment induiiry 
and government security briefers 
for portraying treason in a w-ay that 
is “just w'^t all those bored, young 
secretaries” with secret clearances 
are “dying to hear.” 

Tbe truth about tbe spy business 
is-“sweatyr palms and sh^y hands 
. . . and gut-gripping fear,” be said. 


Reagan^s Misstatements Pose a Chronic Problem 


By Bernard Weinraub 

.Vn Wt Timtt Suvne 

WASHINCrrON — Despite his 
rqwiaiion as a dazzling pentwroer 
and persua^, Ronald Reagan has 
made a series of often inevplicable 
misstatements over the years that 
have apger^ many constiiuencies, 
mired him in political Irouble and 
dismayed even his dose associates 
and admirers. 

Standing^ his dedsiou to lay a 
wreath at a (^rman miliiaiy ceme- 
tery next moath. Mr. Rea^ said 
Thursday that most of tbe sddiers 
buried there were as much victims 
of the Nazis as the irunaies of the 
oonceniration camps. 

“1 think," Mr. Reagan said, “that 
there is noihifig wrong with visiting 
that cemetny where tbote young 
men are victims of Nazism, also, 
even tbcwgh ih^ were fighting iq.- 
.tbe Ger^.'unuonn. dr^ted.into . 
seivice to cany out the hateful 
wishes of the Naris. They were vic- 
tims, just as surely as the victims in 
the concentration camps.” . 

Mr. Ragan’s likening of dead 
Naa soldiers to Jewish victims of 
the Na^ is only tbe latest in a 
series of comments tw him that 
have offerided suffering or disad- 
vantaged groups. . 

In past years, some blacks, elder- 
ly redpiems of Social Security re- 


tirement and disability payments, 
farmers, women and w^are redpi- 
enis have questioned Mr. Reagan's 
sensitivniy to their conditions. 

These occastonal remarks are 
part of an enduring kitmotif in Mr. 
Reagim's political queer, and con- 
servative analysts nd some close 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


aides admowle^ they have creat- 
ed the i^RSsioD that he suffers 
from a historical blind spot 
Two conservative commenta- 
tors, who Ime spoken admiringly 


of Mr. Reagan m other regards, 
Kevin Phillips and ^ul M. Weyr- 


ich. attributed Mr. Reagan's trou- 
bles in to his years in the 
relatively insular worid of Holly- 

wDodj- 

Tf. think, 4bat ; his HoUywood 
backgtound lus..:s{mctiines pre- 
vent^ him from being sensitive 
enough to the realities ^i are out 
thei^ smd M^. Weyricb, the lead- 
er brseveral coiBen'iuh'e causes. 
“Because of his backpround in mo- 


his conunents Thimday about the 
Nazi years hardly refleq prqudice 
but a vision that is. esseoti^y, nar- 
row, unbiaer and with little mst<Mi- 
cal perspective. 

“People sense no meanness cm* 
vindictiveness there," said Thomas 
E Mann, executive director cf the 
American Political Science Associ- 
ation. “They attribute what he says 
to pditicai naivete." 

in terms at comments and poeti- 
cal style, some political eommenta- 
UMs say the impact of Mr. Reagan’s 
years in Hollywood cannot be un- 
derestimated. 

“He has a movie America view; 
he's always locating f^tw heroic end- 
ings,” said Mr. Phillips. Mio is 
president ct the .American Pdiiical 
R^earch Corp. 

Conocmieg Mr. Reagan's vist to ' 
the cemetery at Bitbuig, Mr. Phil- 
lips tied the dedsiem pactly..tg the 


president's political career has been 
lira mis 


studded with misstatements. 


On racial matters Mr. Reagan, 
like his administration, has often 
seemed suNect to contradictory 
iodises. He <q>posed the 1964 
Civil Rights Act as an uncoosiitu- 
lional infringement on property 
rights. Critics poini out that be has 
a& <q>posed the introduction and 
app'iication of virtually ev'cry sig- 
niftcant measure of law that the 
Supreme Court, Congress and state 
k^ators have sou^t to remedy 
discrimination. 


U.S. Air Force 
Removes Ban on 
G>ntracts for GE 



non jjicnires be relies on people 


who direct and write the scripts and 
when you don't have coiiqietent 
pqi^Ie writing tbe script you have 
serioiis problems.” 

Beyond this, pditical scientists 
and even critics of Mr. Reagan say 


as criiids, Mr. Ptuinps -oi 
that Mr. Reagan, as far bade as the 
1940s and 1950s, had been a strong 
supporter of Israel and Jewish > 
causes. 

Althou^ the Bitburg decisioDc 
and Mr. Reagan’s commeocs may 
prove “the most serious error he's 
ever made," Mr. Weyrich said, the 


Yet, he liked to aitswer those 
who accuse him of prgudice by 
recalling how he took a bladt col- 
teammate into his home as an 
(wemight guest rather than patron- 
ize a segregated hotel. 

Some a^ueihaL Mr.,. Reagan’s 
comments about Social Security 
also seem'ioTeilcct a lack of under- 
standing of tbe needs of ' the aged 
WtRcMdr. ThUen9«B. for 
example, he suggested th|t the pn> 
pam ought to be votam^.- 

More recently be hasmadocom- 
ments that have embarrassed 
White House aides about U.S. rela- 
tkmswith Taiwan, Darwin’s theory 
of evolution, air poDutiom ihe nu- 
dear freeze movement and Dr. 
Martin Luther King Jr. 


.Vn* >Vf*- 7V/Mf Senw 

W.ASHINGTON — The U.S. 
Air Force has announced that it is 
restoring most of the eligibility for 
the General Electric Co. to bid mi 
government contracts three we^ 
wer the company was suspended 
from such bidding. 

The company's Space S>'stems 
division, which has been cha^d 
with altering time cards in a way 
that defrauded tbe goverameDt, 
will remain barred from federal 
oontraciii^ while the air force re- 
views additional correctiv'e actions, 
the air force announced Thursday. 

The purported alterations result- 
ed in a fraeral indictment of the 
company March 26 and CFs tem- 
pon^ suspension from obtaining 
new Defense Depanraent con- 
tracts. 

The announcemem said that, be- 
caose of improvements m the com- 
ptooy's accounting procedures, all 
•other GE divisimis could again Ud 
for contracts. 

Despite the suspeorion. Space 
Systems, which accounts for less 
3 percMt of OB’S sales, re- 
cently received a 54.4-mil!ion 
award from the air force on mUi- 
laiy satdlite prcgects. 


.Bifley,:?. 

>a State Peniteouary. Hchiilbau 


In Guatemala^ a.Ri^ts Group Battles Fear, Murder and the Govemment 


By Srephen Kiiizcr ‘ tbe jmlitaiy: lemains in oon- 

.Vet* Yofk Tuius Sayke ad-' . . • ' 

GUATEMALA— Ten months In iiit^e^ ihc.r^^ 
sideni-elect of " .-ago. six people founded a human m.tbar2(^ appear^ 

ter the failure of wM]oisans,a? • rights organEation caSed the Mu- shakfinar*dcon&ised.AftetXDonth» 


tivist, dismpeared after bdim ab- 
ducted in Fdmiaiy 1984. “A lot of 
people have droppoi out Those of 
us are left have to decide what 

to do next” 


"We were iimoceni 


L. ' tual Suppon Group for the Ap- emotional agony in their search At tbe end of March, one leader 
ofaL;S. AirFwttjJJ; pearant* AUve of <3ur Rdativtt. ' 

isi of Honduras. ' Today, only two of the six remain. • - * - i— 

ite itooe of the two .ArnoicaBCK®. q-^.y Irilied, oneisin exile 


Garcia said, 
and naive.” 

After thar initial pleas for rela- 
tives fell on deaf ears, they quickly 
stq>ped iq> their protests. Members 
stagM a march to dramatize thdr 
pli^t, disrupted a sesaon of the 


U.S. Airriwr-r; pearance Alive of Our Relatives, tor meirjitttqanaa. wno nave nioap- oa me group, Hect6r G6mez Ca- 
of Honduras, -Today, only two of the SIX lemaisu peaied, they.now confreot a bai^ lixto, was abducted. When his body Consutueni Assembly and began 
frSSj^ihewoArnenoB*"® Twohavebcenkaicd,oneisinexite rage of death ihreais that,, diplo- appored, his tongue had been cut noisy demonslran^m front of 

mats say, are duUingly erediblo out. govenunenlrance biuldings. 

Alleast three nations him<]uietF. Soon afterward, Rosario Godov “I wouldn’t say we were politi- 
The two remaining diieeuws, |>‘ offered 44 'htm to tbe two women Alfaro de Qievas, 24, was fouoa cized,” Mrs. Garda said. *T)ur 
Nineth de Garcia and Isabd de diey d^ to leave<3u^^ 


and another has idt the poop out 
of fear. 


Bid for Rebels 


’friends from 


) 

cstbe 


■yiiiai 
.^Udt 

The Mutual Snppbil Group 
ygnsQOsd a pxptest,nuxch in Gua-. 
iBin^ Gty on Saturday, u which 
more than ' 


.—»acS r«iQ«n ae uoicia ana isaop «e .r r— ". 7; 

Casianon. said this week ihai they- . f« » But lor adw,.dtey wU 
Wo MJ ^^**5 _ hoped to keep thdr poop aSvl stay.venturmgmiothcTOls^^^ 

' , But the two young women clea^ 

-.are terrified. 

The deaths of their tivo col- 
(-Miiit. let^ueswerejustneindicaiioiior 

RepubJii^n.^ToiS pledged to ram power o«r to civil- tookjraa But more pub&denKm 
iration ^ ... dections this year. The strahonsare noimqiecied som 

quest oq 1> deaths also illustrated the extreme -;‘The group tfmtMnw, wd 

facing 3 difficultv of organized pro^i 

• ■■■■ . . •■■■ ■ — ^ 

^^ush p' U.S. Aides Resign Named 

the ngw" 


I now 
«Re- 
‘ Mis- 


Mrs. Garda, whose husband a lim- 
veroty student aqd trade unirai ac: 


Alfaro de Qievas, 24, was fouoa 
dead in an autonsobite with her 
brother and 3-year-old son. The 
police said the draths were aedden- 
lek but tins week many Guatema- 
lans and diplomats said they 
doubted that explanation. 

PoBtical vidence in Guatemala 
has taken many thousands of vic- 
tims over tbe last 30 years. Much of 
the violence has been attributed to 
factions in the miliiaiy or security 
forces. 

When the Mutual Support 
Groiq} was founded last year, Mrs. 


Idaho 
the is- 


jretiy 


tOT^ 


icated 
id re- 
whes 
as^ 

wluch 
)cUsi 
said- 
on re- 
ilitary 

xsdeu 
igcnce 
d the 
couh3 
w ses- 
ISO. 

jdrios 
leagafl 
1 last 
eused 
oses if 

.inists 

s v^ith 

9L the 
auto- 
ance-, 
is and 
m idl* 
ksihai 

ft who 
Rea- 
jdon*l 
OStaS 

ijo,*n 




House ,'?n- 


EmS'- 

s- 


D^ KS.Sc«reftiiy</Sl«ite 


luon 

faguifl re^ 
pjst 






dial 






hall trtf 




dc a , 

coinf!^. . 4 


‘ftek-Yofk' Tunes Service 

- 'WASHINGTON — A retired 
Washington — Eileen MaT''WaiI Scren'-fiivesunient baziker, 

rie Gardner, a speda! assisted m jcimCVlutdread. has been nomi- 

the D^anr^ of Edacwon,.4us • baled'ib be, non dspmy seen- 
resigow following a ^mic ^ aafr it crmfliinad Ity the 

over her runarks abrait bandt-'g^st^-Iie would rqdaee Kenneth 
capped people. ' ’ W-. D^ .Mio is resagmu to be- 

Ms. Gardner had -sud-tbal-' ccwK'aviceprmideairalBM. 

■ handicapped people bad “telTidily ' The aaaotmcqnenl was made 
drained resources from the normal 
‘ school pm^tion” and that efforts 
10 help the disabled were “mhipiid- 
ed.” reemed-mdvedby tbe'loss of Mr. 

Another new appoin^ Law^ ‘.Daii^ a lawyer .who has wodeed 
fence A. Usdl, also resignql un- with him stoce 1970. He recalled 
der fire Thursday for his rdnarks *• that ^aboui the firrt tbu^T 'did 
that every federal pn^ram for de- after asked by the piesideat 
mentaty and secotidaiy educatim.' to he seerditry cS sfate.WBS readi 
ioduding aid to the handicapped,"-for the j^iw ahd call friend, 
should be abolished. He-had been Koi'Dain^'ahdaskbimtOiomme." 
-named m lead tlM Reagan adnmus- ' !'Mr. VkMiehead, u4k>'IS 63, le- 
traiion’s niitton lax-oedii iniiia- id August a& oo-chainiu ttf 
live. . Goldmaa,' Sachs & Ox, a \yaQ 

Anne Graham, assistant seen- 'Bued iirvdsunent badting hoise. 
taiy for public affairs, annonncel ' He to serv^' as ivesideat of the 


who should rqslace Mr. Dam, be 
gave fecial aiteotion to tiiose in 
mvestmeat banking. 

“Having bad a little experience 
in that area,” he ^d, ''I noticed 
that investment bankm have all 
those dataeterisdes that we need 

•- ft 
MfCp 


awareness of reality was in- 
creased.” 

In the last few months, the gov- 
ernment has issued seve^ warn- 
ings to the Mutual Support Group. 
The interior minister, Gustavo 
Adolfo LOpo Sandov^ asserted 
that subversives had infiltrated the 
ip. The chief of state. General 
Mejia Victores, asserted last 
month that tbe group was “funded 
by extremist elabenis.” 

A commission of government of- 
ficials, appointed by General Mejia 
Victores, recently r^orted that it 
could find no evidence of dandes- 
tine detention centers in Guatema- 
la. But the general said tbe investi- 
gation would continue. 

Politicians have- pledged, to on 
tend to the question of nnssii^ peo- 
ple after a new governmem takes 
over in January, 

*niie first thinga civilian goyem- 
ment will do is open aD the prisons 
to see who is alive and who isn't,” 
said Jmge Can>k) Nicdle, a leadii^ 
prudential candidate. Mr. Carpio 
said that members of the Mutual 
Suppon Groim "have every right to 
But, he ac- 


ber, chiefly because of the seriously 
deteriorating ecooraxiy. But any 
elected president can expm to find 
the consolidation of nvilian rule 
difficulL 

Leaflets, recently distributed in 
tbe capital, carried a purported en- 
dorsement of the Mutual Suppon 
Croup by Marxist rebels. 

liie leaflets praised the human 
rights actirists as “comrade revolu- 
tionaries” and congratulated their 
U.S. supporters for “being con- 
scious of the criminality and deca- 
dence of imperiaUsm" and for sup- 
porting “tbe stride of oppre ss M 
people, which knows no national 
boundaries.” 


Mrs. Garda and Mrs. Castanon 
fear tiiat more activists will be 
killed if the Mutual Support Group 
continues its public canqaigiL Yet 
they want to do all ih^ can for 
ihw missing husbands. It is a di- 
lemma tire remaining members 
tbe group will begin usensang at a 
meeting this weekend. 

“Tb^ women are convinced 
that thdr husbands are alive,” said 
a newspaper editor who h^ fol- 
lowed the group's activities. “They 
can’t go to bra at night without 
thinking of thdr husbands rtiain»<t 
to the w^ of a dant edl some- 
where: How can ^ tdl them to 
lay back and be qitirn fra a rddC?” 


_ , . . , , , contmue protesting. 

1 ou ve rat to think ivetty fast knowledgcd, if they do so now 
sometimes, Mr. Shultz added, is a risk.” 

“and you've gra to keep cool and Most political leaders say they 

b^eve the military wiU cany out 
its pledge to hold elections in Octo- 


you;ve ^ to be able to bounce 


back a 


^ rssignatimis after (Ik two- lotenutibnaf Resrae Commi^ 


g Soli®* 
Sov-iri 






1 ^.. 'aides engaged m an etranomii'-'wunr assists political reiagees 
clash with Senator Lowell P..-afoondt&e'«^a. He brings to the 
‘ Wdeker Jr., a R^ublicra oTCon- .'.job' do iapp^t expertise ra in^- 
.necticui, at a hearmg of the iqjpn> 'fiatibnal^Ioihacy, but tbe No, 2 
priatirais subcprainiitee -tiiat over- 
sees the Educatirai DepartmeiH's 
budgcL Mr; Wdeker's Sba-'tto 
born with Down's syndroffic' ' ' 




State Departinei^^^ has 
ten ^ prnmnat fig- 

'lirei from law'of btShesL 
Mr. ShUllz stdd tiuLhi deddihg 


SK/ 


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t vrrs’’? 

Page 4 


SATUBDAT^UNDAY, APRIL 20-21, 1985 


.1-nV 




JCeralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


^rUiune 


PiAlirfKd WiUi Tbe Nw YotkTmea •ai Tbf Wa U n glo n Port 


Behind the Slipping GNP 


The sharp slowdown of the U.S. economy in 
this year's first quarter further erodes the cred- 
tbiiiiy of tbe R^gan administration's pia^ 
dons and polides for 198S. The remaining 
quarters wUI probably be stronger, but the 
risks of tight money are now enhanced and 
tbe need to reduce the federal defidt has 
become even more urgent 

The Commerce D^aitment estimates the 
gross national product’s real growth in the 
winter months, after allowing for inflation, 
was at the annual rate of U percent That is 
die slowest quarterly growth since the current 
recovery be^ The rate was three times as 
lar^ in the last quarter of 1984. There is no 
need yet to prepare for another recession. Such 
sios^xiowns do not necessarily snowball but 
unemployment exceeds 7 per^t Most 
forecasters still expect economic growth 
t^^ 1985. but not at the 4 percent rate the 
administration predcied in preparing policy 
recommendations two months a^. 

Slower grOAih is typical ndien an expanrion 
has run beyond two years. The slugg^di pace of 


federal tax refunds caused by computer trou- 
bles added But tbe huge t^e deftdt 

is the more profound, enduring problem. 

The Ugh value of the dollar lus sucked in 
imports and severely hobbled American ex- 
ports. And administration policies are dearly 
to blame for some of this Hamagw. The dollar's 
strength has been sustained ^ the govern- 
ment's huge borrowings at high, interest rates 
to finance tbe chronic^y 1^ budget defidts. 

UntQ recently, the admimstratioa rejected 
that connection. Now, evidently chastened by 
liang demands for protectionist curbs against 
isqXHis, Washingtoa offidals have b^un to 
point to the slowdown in gro^ as one more 
reason for action on the defidt 
There is no quick fix, because budget and 
export-import trends evolve only slowly. The 
Fe^al Reserve therefore has the immediate 
buiden of girding against exoesdvdy tight 
money. But its task w^d be more a^ort- 
able if tbe administration and Coogtess 
brought tbe budget defidts down. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


America’s Harvest of Shame 


Twenty-five years ago. Edward R. Murrow’s 
documeniaiy, "Harvest of Shame,*’ aroused 
the American pnblic’s consrience revealing 
the ghastly conditions in wbidi migrant fidd 
workers toiled to biii^ a fresh, varied diet to 
the tables c( the United States. Since then, 
when migrant wc^ers are found hdd in bond- 
age or a migrant child dies from dysentery, 
public concern again flares. Congress may 
even tighten slightly tbe poorly enforced stan- 
dards meant to curb abuses. But the qiheineral 
quality of this concern was highlights by last 
week's decision by the Occupational ^ety 
and Heal^ Administration to IdB a long- 
awaited rule requiring that fresh water and 
toilets be piovidal to field woriters. 

There is a sick-joke quality about the Labor 
Depanmem's justification of its dedsian. 
OSHA's director, Robert Rowland, says that 
even if a federal standard had set, it 
would have been laxiy enforced. Wdl he is 
certainly in a position to know how often his 
agency disregards its own rules. Mr. Roiriand 
notes, moreover, that migrants in 13 states are 
already covered by some sort of sanitation 
standa^. Perhaps he thinks those in other 
states can move across state lines wfam thqr 
feel the urge. After all th^ are migrants. 

We are not talking about unnecessary frills. 
Thousands of field woritets and their c&ldren 
are forced to toil for long hours in the hot sun 


with, at best a bucket of comaminated water 
from whidi to drink and no access to toilet 
facilities. Numerous studies, induding studies 
by Johns Hopkins Unzvetsiiy in Baliunore of 
workers on &e nearby Delmarva P eninsula, 
have shown that as a result of these primitive 
conditions, workers suffer high cates of infec- 
tious, pararitic and toxic disuses. 

One mq>ert recently hired OSHA to 
review the evidence, concluded that parasitic 
disease is more common among U.S. field 
workers than among Guatemalan diildFea. 
And because tbe U.S. woiicrs have nonliere to 
wash their hands and must rdieve themsdves 
in the fields, these (fiseases are passed on to 
nearby communities, and to consumers. 

The romprilfng nC fd . on both hinwanimrian 

and health grounds, is no longer seriously 
diluted. Even the farm organizations, whidh 
have traditionally oppo^ fedoal standards, 
have muted their <»|mtion. One official udd 
the Post last week that *1aaany of our members 
are prq»red to put this behind ns." Advocates 
for the farm workers are ptq>ared to ^peal 
OSHA's decision in court Labor Secretaiy- 
d^gnate Wiliam Brock should ensure that 
is not necessary. Mr. Roadand says his 
agen^ has *Tiigha pi^^ standards” to en- 
force. What priori^ can be higher than treat- 
ing aD people in America as human bangs? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Victiins of Experimentatioii 


In a recent case, the nine justices of the 
Supreme Court agr^ that Congress gave the 
Central Intdligence Agcnt^ broad powers to 
conceal information obtained from int^- 
gence sources. Justices Brennan and Marshall 
u) a concurring opiniotu would have defined 
"imelligeoce sources” more narrowly, but even 
they agreed with the result in tbe case at issue. 

It is reasonable that the ClAbegiveD spe^ 
exemptions from the Freedom of Information 
Act, and in principle the court's decision is 
understandable. But this is more than a case of 
dry statutory interpretation. It involves red 
human beings who were severely ityuied 

In the 1950s. tbe CIA embarked on a 
gr^ called MKULTRA to experiment with 
mind control In order to catch up with what 
was assumed to be dramatic Soviet and Chi- 
nese advaiuxs in tiiis field. institutions 
and 185 private researchers h^ contracts with 
tbe CIA to perform this work. N^y indvid- 
uals became, without their consent, the sub- 
jects of p^rcbiairic and drug mqKiiments. 

It is not known who most of thne people are 
or what became of them. The plaintiffs in the 
case the Supreme Court decided tried to force 
the CIA to turn over records of the experi- 
menis so the ^ctims could be traced 
informed. Thev were nnsuccessfol 


From the few known cases, the results ctf the 
experiments wens horrible. Some sutg ects. gw- 
en LSD, suffered permanent ment^ impap 
menL Some cooumtted suicide over drug-in- 
duced fears and depresrions. Some res^rch 
was carried out in Canada, iriiere a private 
p^hiatrist experimented on patients at the 
R^al Victoria Hospital in Montreal A group 
of surviving rictims, one the wife of a membCT 
of the Canaan Parliament, has sued the U.S. 
government for compeosaricHi; the CIA per- 
sists in denying liability, and the case 1]^ 
dragged on in court for more than four years. 
In another case, involving an American whose 
family discovered tbe CIA's role in his suidde 
years afterward, compensation was awarded. 
But most of those ?Ao were the sulyects of 
MKULTRA ejqreriments still do not know it 
These victims of government action must be 
found and cared for. Tbe courts will not order 
the CIA to reveal the required infonnation, 
but the agency, ading on its own. can trace 
many vicums throu^ its contractors. If this is 
iK>t done. Congress, whidi ultimately makes 
the rules governing CIA activity, can order a 
search and provide emnpe^tioa for the Ca- 
nadians as as the Americans involved. It is 

the onfy just and honorable thing to do. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 

Advke and for Reagan [Pradem r 


Here’s some advice for Presideat Reagan 
concerning his trip to West Ger^y; When in 
a hole, stop digging. 

He has already alienated everyone from the 
American Le^on to tbe Jewish community by 
his plans to lay a wreath at a German cemetety- 
that contains SS graves. His defense of the 
ceremony made matters worse; [it was] q>ec- 
lacularly tasteless. 

— The New York Posi. 


[President Reagan] deserves some sympa^ 
ifay. Two currents of feeling are generated by 
the war anniversary that are to some extent at 
odds. Both are generous in impulse. Tte one 
finds cause for celebration in the Uberation of 
Euiope and tbe transfoimation of tbe German 
polity. The other insists that the crimes of 
Nazi-dominated Germany shall never be for- 
gotten. The difference is sharp. It is no wonder 
if tbe preadent has failed to hit upon a sym- 
bolism that does justice to both. 

— The Times (London). 


FROM OUR APRIL 20 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 
HO: Police Qose Fifty in Antwezp 1935: N.Y. Senate Acts to Ban Nudhy 

•TTWEI^ — On charges of indecent behav- ALBANY — Wiihont a word in opposition. 


1910: Police Qose Fifty in Antwezp 

ANTWERP — On charges of indecent behav- 
ior in playing in a piece of a Br-atirfaioiie nature 
at the Thntre Modeme here, a Parisian actress 
has been jailed and all the other actors 
actresses, as well as the authors of the play and 
tbe manager of the theatre, are to be prosecut- 
ed. A spectator rose [on April 18] in t£s middle 
of the performance and ordered the play 
stopped. The audience thtNighl rbat the specta- 
tor was a private individual but a minute later 
a nuntber of policemen entered tbe theatre and 
climbed onto the stage. The actors ac- 
tresses, the latter being mostly in attire which 
at the best can be described as scanty, were 
arreted and removed to tbe police station, the 
police being obliged to make their wray with 
their prisoners through a hostile crow^ 


^ Slate S^te passed the McCall anti-nud- 
ism bill wdiich originated with the Legion of 
Decency and has quietly pushed by than 

behind the scenes at the O^itol It will meet 
more strenuous opposition in tbe Assembly. 
Senator T. McCall of New York, its 
sponsor, called the bfll up with remarks in 
which said that Conmuinists were wearing 
shorts in Dutchess County; that shorts were 
disgusting enou^ but there were other things 
worse that had to be stopped. Senator William 
T. Byrne, most voluble orator in this House, 
took the floor for the bQL "This particular tnil 
has tbe approval cd all dean-thinking, home- 
loving. moral people in our country," said 
Senator Byrne, after talking about a half-hour. 




\ • . HmeeoerjOaanopponMoneinustadmUheisamostengagmgpersonality 
anda€harmmgc(mveiMimudiSLlamg(mnamoidadabumjanyw€^r 

Qouds Over aDefidlrEiddm 


Gorbachev: Hardball ,r ; 
With a Softer Touch? 

By Dimitri K. Simes 

■¥T r ASHINGTON Mikhafl S- pushed them to withdraw from arms . 

one -timpani heightened len^ does nol new- 

Snerican SminiJirations Iwk good Suv^^ ^ ^ 

bv defaulL From now on. this is un- gic 

likelv to be true. There is, howevCT, 

Doihins 10 indicate that any superfi- m need of trade with ^ West —and 
cdal vSming of relations will m the it hopes that neater coo^ 

end lead to a genuine thaw. with the Umied Slates wodd 

True, (here was nothing particular- discoui^ America^ from prw^ 

Iv impresave in either the substance thefrall^todenytheSo^Union 
(5r the deUveiy of Mr. Gorbachev's high techimlogy and^ cie& 
recent arms control mitiativ& Tbe It is nowonto tlat Mr. Gwha- ^ i 
new ^riet leader coupled an acoq>- chev has nice to American gr , 
lanceiinprindple] of a summit meet- gressmm vwtmg htescow ot that he 
ina wth an appeal to freeze nuclear responded favorably to President 
and space weapons, including an in- Reagan’s invitanOT far a meeting 
herenUv unverifiable ban on re- Bat Amencans should have no Hhi- 
- - ' tioDs: The baric differences between 


search. He also declared a unilateral 


W ASHINGTON — As I was 
prqraiing to leave Washing- 
ton for a trip Co Spain, there was a 
strange ambivalence about the cap- 
ital and the country I was tempo- 
raifly abandoning. 

Washingtoa was as beautiful as 
ever in tbe spring and the nation 
seemed as proarerous and comfort- 
able as I could remember it in all 
the ye^ 1 have been traveling and 
reporting on its politics. But just 
beneath that plaad surface there 
were apprehenrions so de^ that 
the rnc^ seemed almost schizo- 
phrenic. Giasciously an<l I think, 
not foolishly, the question in my 
mind as 1 padeed was whether the 
euphoric s^ would be shattered 
the time I got back. 

I hope not But three conversa- 
tions, among many, \rill tell you 
u^y there were some dark clouds 
on the horizon of my unagmation. 

llie first was with Rqireseniative 
James J. Florio of New Jersey, an 
able and coosdentious Democratic 
l^Iator who had just dedd^ not 
to run for the governorship of his 
state. Part of il surely, was his rec- 
ognition of tbe strength of the in- 
cumbent governor. Thomas H. 
Kean, but part of it was his sense 
that things are headed for a criris 
that could make a race hazardous. 

"There is so much anger in the 
meeting Fve been to betwm local 
officials and dtizeos.” Mr. norio 
said, "that it's painful to watcL 
With the cutbacks in federal aid. 
the local offidals have to raise taxes 
or fees —• and the people say tiuw 
can't take any more. 1 find mvs^ 
trying to keep people I like from 
hitting each other. 


By David S. Broder 

"It's the same way up here" In 
Congress, he added. "Reagan ke^ 
pushing for more defense spenefing 
and blanung Congress for Uie defi- 
du And my colleagues are so frus- 
trate they lash out at each other. 
It’s really gotten mean.” 

Tbe second conversation was 
with Richard A. Celling, the esti- 
mable former governor of VennonL 
He is working full-time, through an 
organization he created called 
Prqwsitioa One. lobbying without 


in both militaiy and domestic pro- 
grams and an mcrease in taxes. 

Mr. Snelling. who bad a success- 
ful buriness career and four terms 
as governor b^ore retiring last 
yeUf said: Tm an incurable opti- 
mist, but for the first time in my 
life, Fm scared. This defidt could 
do my country in.” 

Although an ardent Republican, 
be often challenged Mr. Reagan’s 
fiscal polides when he was <mair- 
man of the NaliOEuti Governors As- 
sodation, and he is even more oui- 
qxiken now. 

"Ronald Reagan is a totally hon- 
est petsotC Mr. Sndling said, "and 
he believes we can grow our way 
out of tins defidL But last year the 
economy grew over 6 percent — 
and the defidt inoeased. Reagan 
says he's cut taxes, but he's n^y 
just put the country on a tax holi- 
day. We just haven't been sent the 
bill I thiiok we have six months^ 
ms^be a year, to start ^tting this 
under qontrol, or il can destroy us.” 


My third talk was viith Lee la- 
cocca. the Chrysler chairman whose 
autobiography has made him more 
of a foDc hero'than any other Ainer- 
ican businessman. He is a noounri 
Republican who is caustically criti- 
cal of the leadership of both parties. 

Mr. lacocca imked as much 
about the trade defidt as he did the 
budget d^idt. In blunt terms, he 
said he thinks the present national 
leaderstup lacks the guts to deal 
with either of them. Brause of that 
belief, be has put his corapanv on 
"idle ^>eed” for the next three 
years, postponing plans for expan- 
sion of its domestic production fa- 
tties. He sees upb^val ahead. 

"Unless ive dedde somehow to 
sit down and stop this flow of 
blood, there will be a radical 
c^ge” in national leadership in 
1988. he said. "The lOUs are out 
of control. Th^'re just piling up 
for our kids.” 

These were three separate con- 
versations ixith three differrat 
indviduals who have major dis- 
agreements on most politico issues. 
What was striking was the shared 
sense of deep apprehension — the 
belief that the bubble has to bursl 
and that the only question is when. 

Tbi^ all see the current economic 
prosperity and political euphoria as 
being a thin veneer covering tbe 
cracKs in tbe foundations of Ameri- 
can society. They all believe that 
delay in dealing with the deficits is 
putting the Financial and political 
systems under a strain that could 
earily crack the country wide open. 

1 hope they are wrong. But I can't 
convince myself thity are. 

The Washingion Past 


moratorium on the deployment of the superpowers remain. TTiere is no 
medium-range nuclear missiles in Eo- sign that a srabuizatibn of relations 


rope. The snag is that Moscow has, wiU devdop mto a genume accom- 
for all pradT<^ purposes, completed roodatioa beiwem the two giants, 
its planned deptoyment of new mis- The new ^iet leader's energies 


riles in Europe, and the moratorium and talentswill to a large decree; be 
will only last six mont^ unless the dir^iKl toward goals imnucal to 
United States agrees to follow suit. Americao interests. What is more, if 
Mr. Gorbachev was certainly he succeeds in making his nation's 
aware that this old trick, designed to economy -more effictent, the Soviet 
conserve a conriderabie Soviet supe- military machine will benefiL -I 
riority. was tried by Leonid I. Brezh- In arms control Mr. Gorbachev 
nev in 1982 and squarely rgected ^ seems to be pnrsuiiig a double-track 
the West. He could be under go illu- diploma^: Negotiate with the Rea- 
sions that the Western response gm administration while trying to 
would now be more enthusiastic as it prevail in a battle for Western public 
indeed was not opinion. It may prove iiiqiosrible for 

Still tiie outride world has learned the general secretary to outmaneuver 
to expect so little of Soviet leaders the Great Coomumcator on his ow-n 
that even a rather trivial move sudi as ' aound, but in a nuclear-anxious 
this has been widely acclaimed as a Western Eurpfie, not much skiQ is 
masteiiy. performance: Mr. Gorba- required to generate discontent ^ 
chev scored a point, and Wash- In the Third World, the Russians 


chev scored a dieap point, and Wash- 
ington got the si^ial that tbe Sovitf 
Union ma y finally have a man in 


feel overextended. But (hdr reluc- 
tance to make new costly commit- 


cbaige who knows, bow to play inter- meats does not amount to paddng 
national hardball with a soft tout^ th^ bags and abandoning places 
Mr. Gorbachev does, fortunaidy, where th^ have already invested 
intent on nnniinuing Konstan- sources and prestige. Moscow's atti- 
tin U. Oiemoikd's efforts to resume hide might be called “assertive 
the s up e rp ower dial/yie- His first retrendiment”: from I^caragia to 


concerns wOI be' to consolidate his Angola, from Syria to Af^ianistan. 
power and to get the totalitarian wd- the Kremlm shows xto willingness to 
fare state woddng The latter se^ a graceful exit On tbe contrary, 
effort is bound to face serious (^jposi- as Mr. Gorbachev warned Pddstan, 
non tioth from the elite, feaifw of Soviet patience with hostile guerrilla 


losing piivil^es, and lira the peo- 
ple, wfo are rduciant to accqit the 
haidsMps associated with reform. It 
would tous be illogical if he did not 
seek at least a su&lizatioa of rda- 
tioas with the United States. 

But Mr. Goibkhev has other rea- 
sons to seek a betus- rdationship. The 
Russians arc still smarting ftem the 
events of 1983. when the o^Ioyment 
of American missiles in Europe 


Reagan Can Learn From His Blunders on Germany 


W ASHINGTON — If you were 
planmng a series of events to 
commemorate the Holorausi and 
you were seeking some way, af^ter 40 
years, to revivity the ni ghtmam of 
Nazi tenor, what series of unlikdy 
events would you hope for? 

First you would have a team of 
White House advance men let it be 
known that the prerident of the Unit- 
ed States would decline to ririt a rite 


By William Satire 





of a concentration camp daring a 
virit to West Gernmy. 

Then you would have the president 
botch his answer at a news ctmfer- 
ence, ^ving as his reastm a derire not 
to "impose” a sense of guilt on Ger- 
mans lor the murder of six million. 

To top it off, to readi far beyond 
surriving Jews into the homes of tens 
of nuUions of American and German 
veterans, you would g^ the president 
to announce his inci^ble mtention 
of laying a wreath at a cemetery that 
includes the graves of Nazi Waffen 
SS officers who may have been 
among those responsible for the mur- 
der of U.S. prisoners during tbe Bat- 
tle of tbe Bulg^ 

In the ensuing outra^ onr West 
German allies would be reminded 
that any attempt to foi^t tbe unfor- 
^vable will always be mightily resisi- 
ra; Jews all over the world, including 
tbeforgetful would be forced to look 
j^ain into the abyss: and the genera- 
tion of Americans who fought the last 
uncontroversiai war would rise to in- 
strua its present leaders that state- 
sponsored evil is never a bygone. 

Hard though it may be to believe, 
all the attention-getting blunders 
look place and the pubtios fierce re- 
action has been all uat moralists and 
patriots could have hoped for. 

White' House advance men will re- 
memba. Um "Deaver debacle" for 
y^. and no agent will soon repeat 
this farrago of unseemly acts and 


insenritive judgments, but there is 
this to be said for all that has gone 
wrong: It has produced worthwhile 
results in severri areas. 

1. The post-landslide hubris of the 
Reagan inage-makeis has re- 
due^ The president’s men are not 
public-relations geniuses and Mr. 
Reagan, as communicator, has shown 

to be capable of miqud^ng 
opinion and bobbting symbe^. 

2. This prerident h^ demonstrated 
a willinmess to admit error pnbli^. 
rather than to "han|tou^'' to me 
biber end. After his ill-bnefed news 
conference, he went out of his way to 
tell interviewers; will say any time 
that anyone wants me to say it, as 
publicly as I can, that no, we must 


eteiy is the wrong place to visit 
4. What tbe presittont says is at 
least as impoitant as vriiat he visits. 


movements and their foreign rap- 
porters is w earing increaringly thin. 

Is there aity hope of a more far- 
reaching change in Soviet foreign po- 
lk^ Posribly. Ihe Politburo it^ 
seems to rea^ that its mimiatiooal 
sbat^ is based on obsdete and 
fiawou assumptions, inchidic^ the 
bdief that the globM corrdlabon of 
forces is constantly shifting in the 
Soviet Union's favor. If the Kremlin 
draws the ri^t conchisioos and ac- 
cepts tbe need to scale down its mes- 
sianic aspirations, eveiyooe, includ- 
ing tbe Russians, would beoefiL 

Ibe American policy toward the 
Soviet Union sbouldbe qpra-nimded 
and nc^rovocative. It is inmortam 
—particularly at this stage when Mr. 
Gorbachev is still devdoping lus for- 


HtyeisihcOTportonitytoccm^ dgn policy —for the ReSadmiu- 
aHUmce of foni^ eneim^ with an istration to rommiminaf^ an interest 
understanding of meaning, and a jn a more r^ulated relationship. At 
J^toass^ ttesur^ the very leasi the two couftries 

should kek to pursue their overlap, 
m .World War n th^ remonhraiKx ping interests — in environmenS 

issues and nuclear nonproliferaticn. 
fice; d the orient is to recoup, for fo|. exanmle — in. a more sustained 
himself and for aJS Americans, his and rSJe way 
mess^ ^ be tb^t through, utUe can be gained and a lot can 
Its rabtleutt eiqiressed memo^^ lost gjving Mr. Gorbachev 

the impresrion t£t nothing short of 
^andbai^^’tortbelegioas surrendering the fiindamoatal inter- 
of the offended to stop nH>mg into gsis of hisregime would allow rap- 
w ^ rooftig te proebement with the United Stales. 

^ “fiot acquainted” summit mwMrng 
bi^^. Itdnkipg riidl^y at fir^ coupled with an extension of the sec- 

does not conflict with the pmpos^ the 

their aWance; on the aSSwtiie program and dmliyi^ 

point feSigto^SS^l^ 

tnindets of the heU of the past binds ^ 1“ 

iis to protect freedom in 
The president’s stumble win have 
beenaHesringifheisgivenachance 

LO Straighten un and finish stiiifio ^ clearly add to tiie KremEn s 


messaea most be tboi^t throng 
its subtleties eiqiressed mempf ai^y 
Now is tbe mraneni after the blun- 
ders and backings-off , for the l^ixis 
ctf the offended to stop rij ymg in tn 
tte prerident ^ to start rooting to 
him as America's rnresentative to 
bistoiy. TfainkiDg riidl^y at fir^ 


publicly as I can, that no, we must and then rirapOy served, lifr. Rescan 
never forgeL’"niis wi^ he actually compounded ms error and earned the 
used the words "my mistaken impr^ angiy reaction; now, made aware of 
sion” in connection uith his e^er tbe unexploded minefidds oi memo- 
dedrion to fo^ a visit to a death ry, he faces the diallei^ of reraond- 
carap. Those forthright corrections ing^whh senritirity, grace arid clarity, 
are signs of stren^ and good sense. will he rise to the occasion? Pus 
3. He is now hkdy to strike tbe evident emeem and eagerness to cor- 
net balance in what be finally does, reel his mistakes ^ve ns reason to 
T& balance is not to say "what’s past hope so. The necessaiy remembrance 
is past” to Germans and “we must of evil by Germans and Americans 
□evo- fojget'’ to Jews, which is con- does not conflict with the purposes of 
tradictory. but to celebrate “40 years their alfiance; on the contrary, the 
of peace” without ever forgetting . p^t is waiting to be made tim re- 
what the war was about. wUdi is not mindecs of tbe bell of the past bin d s 
in the least contradictory. us to protect freedom in the future. 


in the least contradictory. 

This means a virit to a concentra- 
tion camp buitres^ not balanced, 
by a memorial to a German such as 
Konrad Adenauer. The Bitburg oem- 


The president’s stumble will have 
been a blessing if he is given a gh«n^ 
to straighten up and finish stnmg. 
The New York Times. 


Albania: The Mouse ThatRoared May Roar Again 


B oston — Albania is not ordinarily the 
subject of grave concern in the forei gn oi~ 
fices o( the West. This, today, may be a n^ake- 
Albania is an interesting country, and now that 
Enver Hoxha is dead, the last of his l-i n d. Alba- 
nia becomes much more mteresting. It mi ght 
even become dangerous. 

Albania has lived for 4Q years in aggressive 
isolation, a result of Mr. Hoxna's rule but .iT so of 
a peculiar history that has inclined Albanians to 
look upon outsiders with su^idon and find 
safety with family or dan. Its geographical isola- 
tion, arid the combativeness of lU people, are 
why British and American intelligence services 
laundied an toleration in 1949 to pry the country 
from tlM Soviet bloc, to vdikA it odonged. 

. Making use of the same people and 
that bad been used to support Al banian guenilla 
resistance to Axis occupation, several hundred 
men were infiltrated into the country over a 
period of four years to organize resistance to the 
Hoxha govemmenL Half, at least, were killed or 
arrestco. The operation failed because it was 
betray^ by Kim Fbiltty, the British double 
who iniliafiy oommanded the British side of the 
affair, and because it was badly carried out — • 
but also simply becaus e things that work in 
waitiine don’t mways work in peacedme. 

Resistance can be organized gainst an occu- 
pying army. This is not so easy when army and 
police are natives of the country, and wben the 
national iraditioa is xenophobic andal^uiist. 

Tbe niyiia of classical times, Albania was 
under noioinal Byzantine rule until the 14th. 
century, becoming an Ottoman conquest in the 
15th. As Ottoman power faded, Albanian rebd- 
lions in 1911-1912 compdled the Turks to con- 
cede autoiUMity', wfaidj was precariously main- 


By William Pfaff 

lained after the Hrst World War. when the great 
powers set out to divide the country among its 
neighbors (k is only 120 miles long and 40 nules 
wide). Woodrow Wilson's comrmtmeDt to na- 
tional self-determination tiiat. 

Ahmed Zogu, who had served in both Otto- 
man and Austrian armies, struggled to power in 
tbe 1920s, made himself president in 1925, and 
became King Zog in 1928. Eleven years later he 
was out, as Italy seized the country. The Partisan 
resistance that then developed droended upon 
the Yugoslav communists, and got its arms main- 
ly from the Western Allies. The Mviei Union bad 
no part in Albania's liberation. 

Mr. Hoxha imposed an absolute rule on the 
country that ow^ something to the national 
tradition, and much to the StaUnism that had 
prevailed in tbe Communist International during 
the years of his own political formation. He 
committed the country to Stalin, and broke with 
Yugoslavia when Yugoslavia broke with the ^ 
riel Union in 1948. He broke with Moscow, in 
turn, when the Russians broke with Stalinism 
and resumed ^ rdations with Yugoslavia. He 
broke wth Quna in 1978, when Giina resumed 
relations with the Soviet Union. 

It can safely be said that the key to Albanian 
poU^ was always the rdationship with Yugosla- 
via, and the seanrii for an excemal ally to guaran- 
tee Albania auinst what the Albanians have 
tmderstood to be the permanent threat of pani- 
doo and forogn domination. For more than a 
centuty. Yugoslavia (earlier Serbia) has con- 
trolled iheregion of Kosovo, where therenovare 
one miHion Albanians — between a third and a 


half as many as live today in Albania itsdf. 

Enver Horiia's successor, Rantiz Alia, is taTkii*^ 
about as a man who wQl open up the country, 
politically and cnlturally. There is no particular 
evidence to this; but isobtion and autarchy will 
not be to maintain Unlike Mr. W/vriha 
educated in France and briefly a diplomat befran 
the wax, Mr. Alia scanty knows the outri^ 
world. Since becoming a Partisan in his tiv-ny he 
has made his career whdly within the Albanian 
Commuiust apparatus. He has, however, ^ken 
of the need for economic refonn. 

The (so-called) Brezhnev doctrine; as an- 
nounced by the Soriet Union at the time of its 
invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968, holds that 
communism is an irreversible political 
and that this theoretical point will be assured by 
the Soviet Army — at leasi in those comnumist 
countries the Soviet Army can get aL In the 
Albanian case, there is a problem; Yugoslavia 
lies in the way. . 

This is why the Albanian ritnation is interest- 
ing. It has aiimly been shown in Eastern Eun^ 
that onljf the Si^t Army blodts the progress of 
nationalism, ideological deviation, revisionism, 
reform — and of danoontizadon. 

^banla is poor and .backward, bat has already 
amply demonstrated its naUonahsm. It recenlty 
has improved relatkmswiih italy(faisbmcally, its 
window to the 'West), Greece, aiu^ guardedly, 
Y ugoslavia. It will soon have a rul ommection to 
Western Europe by way oC Yt^oriayia. Its West- 
ern trade has slovriy b^ mcreasing. A few 
tourists come. loerit&ty.iiew'tiibughtvrinot^ 
.too. The Albanians have . the. meditt to decade 
thrir own future, and wiut t&^deci&'wfil have 
an echo in tbe rest thecmnmnnitfrwcBld:' 

© 1M5 J:- 


sense of ovoextension. WashingUffi-^ 
should continue an^ when appropri-. ~ 
at^ escpai^ its support of sira forces. 

Mamtaining presrare on du Soriel 
Union is not an obstade to a more 
constructive and sta b le- m |f tinnship - 
pn the contrary, it may be a contfi- 
lion for a thaw. 

President Rngu will -need both a 
lira h and and a fine touch, in dealing 
with the Kr emlin *.^ new man 

The ivrifer, a saiior assodateai the 
Carnegie Erulowment for Jiitamcdiai- 
^Peace, eatoibuted this eommeni tb 
The New York Times. • • ' . '.c; 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 20-21, 1985 


Pa|^5 



Hie new German Air-Line 
The Audi 200 Turbo. 


be superpowers In '• 

■nd taJenis wiU. 4- 

J«ci?d toward 

^«t«icaD tmeresis®^ “‘“Biw- 
w succeeds in 
«»omy m.ire3S>«i'-. 

ntjtary machine 

In arms iwniro! ir^" 

iiplotnacv. NeBoiiaf/,^*^- 

Jrmail inahnii.tL,?.''' 'nir.- 


iie general sccreian.! 

iK Great Corrmi^i''^' 

gound. buL ,n 

«juir^mge^;a>ediS;L^ 
in ihe Thtrd WorlH'® 
feel overextended. Bui iL, ' 
tance to make qcwcLk 
“ enis does not amou^o? 
iheir bags and abanJa^l^' 

where they- have alread^ L" 

»y«s.andprcsiige,0- 

ludemighi faestbecalW*; 
retrenchmenr; from \i 
Angola, from SvTtatc ^ -' 
the kremlin shows no sTlfito 
seek a graceful exiL On the 

^ Mr. Gorbachcx- warned iff 
Soviet pauence with hosukae' 
movemenis and their for® ,' 
porters is wearins incrcasuid' i 
Is there any hope of a i,.: 
rttching change in Soviei \ok^'. 
Ucy? Possibly. The PohibB^: 
seems to realize that iuuuerBK: 
strategy is based on obsolA - 
flawed assumptions. induJe' 
bdief that the global condar. 
forces is consiamJy shiJ^ c : 
Soviet Union's favcf. If da kc 
draws the right condusmssl. 
cepts the need to scale 
sianic aspiraucss. everyone. ' l... 


sionic ospirauuQs. everyone, t, 
ing the Russians, would bod 
The .Atnencan policy un'z: 
Soviet Union should be'cpnc: 


awKi c'UJ(.<u aiiuuiu uci’^cik.:. 

and nooprovocaiive. It is 
—particularly at ihissugeait:^ 
Gorbachev b'siUl devdc^k. 
eign policy — forihcRagaoir 
isirauon lo commumcauiSK 
in a more regulated rdabonst? 
the verv least, the two car; 
^ould ^k to purwiiJ»«- 
ping interests — in ennraiK- 
and nuclear naiprefife 
for example — in a more aic 
and reliable way . 

Little can be gained and aj- 
be lost from gi'nia Mr. 
the impression that noiiunt^ 
surrendering the 
esKoftoiairae*^*: 
procheaient with ^ Ij^k^ 
A “gel acquaintctT siu^J; 
coupled with an 
oed Strategic Arms UnDi^. 

IV and an ‘f^Tc 

s'lraieeic trade would Ik 

S wav to reach out toto 

Yet .Ainencans shoulder 

that the Pohtbimjso^jg 

moderauo.n fre. «<■ J 
product 

discipline the So'«» ^ 

not.Ant^c^^r_^S 

emsteaoii^irs^^^ijf. 
-star wars 

missiles m iIk :#■' 

the Russia-ns 1^5 if: 

Geneva., 

pUyinmcTh^^^^Ontf^ 

..^..«.|].t Mnunue^t''^^ jai*- 



Union is Jjsble tds*? 

On the 

Cirnfcv 

77:0 .S ^ 


Audi presents an interesting 
example of what amounts 
to an aerodynamic tour de 
force - using ultra-modern 
weight -saving techniques. 
For greater economy yet 
making no compromises as 
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of the advanced Audi con- 
cept And thus of a new gen- 
eration of automobiles. 

As typified by the Audi 200 
Turbo. An exclusive saloon 
with a list of advantages 
to its name which make it a 
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VvfSpnjng d'^rcR Tecnril. 



i 


Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATUIUIAY-SUTTOAT, APRIL 20-21, 1985 



Highly Important Paintings by Old Masters 
From an American Private Collection 


Auction to be held on Thursday, May 9 at 7 p.m. 
in our galleries at 
502 Park Avenue in New York. 

Hie entire collection will be on view 
at Christie^ in New York from 
April 20 through April 24 smd also May 3 
until noon on May 9, 19^. 

For further information, please contact Ian Kennedy 
in New York at 212/546-1177 
or Simon Dickinson in Lcmdon at 01/839-9060. 



CHRISTIES 


M* Christian DELORME 

Aucrioneer 

14, av. de Messine, 75008 PARIS 
Tel- {!) 562.31.19 
HOTEL DROUOT PARIS 

Frickxy, May 3lh - Room 4 



MumniiGS • PMnniKS 
SCUIPVURES 

Experts: 
M«nn- P odtfi 
a Jecnndle 


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Bronze 
H. 28xW.2S.Son 


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Anriqae emtclws - wrist wstches 
docks - boxes - jeweler, 

Sotvdiy 27^ AprR 1985 et 2.00 p A 
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West-Gcnnao} 

Vlewiiv M 26*^ Apri kw 2J0 pA 
(iMLSMtel 


te lOLMl 

FOR SALE: mre goU emKl niBicalaui^ 
mnon wairtcv idibuiI 17™ aod IR™ ce» 
iDiy wacdKs; complicaied pr wBio n thnr- 
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DM 30,- (iittern. benkdiequel 
AUKTKN«EN 

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DntiddMf - CokigRc - Masnictii 4^) 
BitellB) 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Sotheby Sales of Islamic Work 
Show Unparalleled Confusion 


doonesbury 


IntemaziomU HensU Tribune 

L ondon — The an marlMi of- 
* ten defies rational assessment, 
but in no area does it do so as 
blatantly as in what is coovendon- 
ally call^ Islamic art A round of 
sales at Sotheby's from Monday to 
Wednesday has pointed up the un* 


SOUREN MeLIKIAN 


paralleled degFM of confusioa that 
characteroes this area. 

The confusion is, first, one <rf 
perception. Tbe phrase ‘^Islamic 
art.** widely used as it may be, is 
about as meanrngful as tbe phrbe 
“Christian art" would be if it were 
used to describe anythiagprodiued 
in the Christian Aiorid iram the 
eariy Middle Ages throi^ the late 
I9th century. It covers the hu^ 
production of Iran, with its lon^ 
complex historv: of the Arab bdun- 
tries, and of 1*urkw: and of the 
highly diversified Islamic areas of 
India. No single spedalist could 
possibly handle it aU, and yet that 
is what the auction houses' experts 
must do. That they should occa- 
sioaally get h not quite right is only 
loo understandable. 

Goingdumigh the huge two-day 
sale of ’^ine Cmental Manuscripts 
and Miniatures" at Sotheby’s, one 
stumbled here and there upon un- 
tenable attribudons. Typify Ira- 
nian manuscripts of ite 15th and 
16th century were described as 
“Ottoman" — i.e.. from Tuiiccy — 
for no plausible reason. A Ktnan 
manuscript with its layout, callig- 
raphy and iiluminatlon nvuchfti by 
many other Iranian manuscript^ 
weut down as “Qur’an, Ar^ic 
manuscript on paper, coined by 
Abdullah Ibn Rajah Ibn Abdullah 
al-Khansari. Turkey, dated A.D. 
1484." Khansaii is a Persian name 
and. tn the absence of any indica- 
tion to the contrary, tb^ is no 
reason to believe that the very Per- 
siaa-looking manuscript was cop- 
ied anywhere hut in lim Anotfa^ 
Koran of the same school and peri- 
od was labeled “Central Asia," 
again for no perc^dble reason. 
There is some irony in the fact that 
both fai^ poorly. The first was 
bot^t in at £53W (about $7,150) 
and the second was sold for ^.5(X}. 

One would at least expect consis- 
tency in pri^ when it comes to 
pages belonging to the same manu- 
script wi^ a de^te location, a 
date and a dedicatioo to a well- 
known sultan, ^t this was not the 
case with successive auction ap- 
pearances of Turkish mimatures 
from a work called the “SiyaiH 
Nabi" or “life of the Prophet" 

The six-volume manuscript, 
“copied by Mustafa Ibn Vali for 
the hbrary of Sultan Murad UT* 
was completed in 1595. Its numer- 
ous miniatures illustrating 'episodes 
from the Propbei’s life were paint- 
ed in file workshop of Master Lutfi 
Abdullah. The work could not be 


mere glamorous; volumes L U and 
VI are preset in the museum 
attariied to the Topkapi Saiay. 
“the Palace of the Cannougate," in 
Istanbul Volume III found its way 
to the New York Public library 
and Volume IV. to the Chester 
Beatr/ Library in Dublin. Volume 
V is consider^ lost 

On March 23. 1984. four minia- 
tures on paett tl^t originally, came 
&om the .tester Beatty voluine 
turned up at a Drouot auedon in 
r^ris conducted by Bernard Oger 
and Etienne Dumont. A special 
catalog that the Drouot expert. 
Jean Sousnel had printed, was 
widely distributed and one of the 
miniatures skyrocketed to 550.000 
francs, not counting the s^es 
dtar^ — a world record ‘for any 
Turkish .miniature. Two others 
from tbe rnanuscript were knocked 
down at 250.000 francs apiece. A 
j^ar later, five more pagm from the 
manuscript tinned up at Drbuou 
The auciion^'was Enc Buffetaud. 
The expert was a^in Jean Souriiel 
who. as before, sent out the catalog 
to collectors and museum curators 
around the world. The response, 
was as weak this time as it had been 
oiihusiastic before. Foreign deal- 
ers such as ^ioJe of London who 
had played a promineiu role in 
1^ did not even bother to come. 
The miniatures were knocked 
down at prices ranging from 
120.000 to 145,000 francs — prices 
that, in dollars, were half what the 
dreapest lots sold for a year earlier, 
worried Soth^y's expert 
N^ui Saidl viho said that he found 
the Paris miniatures more attrac- 
tive than the seven that he was 
abmrtto self in London. 

On Monday at Sothel^s the 
first of the London miniatures rose 
to a steep £42,000. thitt times the 
prme the most otpenstve minia- 
ture in Paris fiv-e weeks earlier. The 
next pieces went for £25,000. 
£20,000, £24.000 and £22.000. The 
last two failed to reach the reserve 
pricK and werv bought In at 
£13,(X)0 and £5,000. They have just 
been sold priyaidy by Sothel^s at 
prices close to these. 

Such failures are suiprism^ ^v- 
es the importance of the nranu- 
script to the history of Turkish 
painting . Only a few more leaves 
are believed to remain In the hands 
of tbe Swiss owner from which the 
Paris and London miniatures 
came, so there is no question of a 
glut of the market, as some dealers 
suggested 

Ncm- can the London faflures be 
due to a sudden Lack of inieresi in 
Islamic painting. Very much tbe 
contrary was suggested Tuesday by 
the world rea>rd established for 
anv paintiog from Islamic India. 
£1354)00 for a from a manu- 
script called the ‘*Hanza-Nama."~ 
This Persian romance, desdiog with 
the feats of Amir Hanza. an uncle 
.of the Prophet, may have run to as 


many ‘as 12 volumes, now lost 
They were executed at the Persian- 
speaking court of Akbar, the Mo- 
ghul emperor of India, starting in 
about 1560, in an atelier set up by 
I ranian mastcTS at Akbar's request 
Of the l.4(X) paintings that art hisr 
torians 'believe must have been 
completed no more than ISO or so 
appear to hav'e survived. 

the pa^ sold at Sotheby's illus- 
trates the symbolic burning of tbe 
arms chest of Zoroastn', prtmhel of 
the ancient religion of Iran, it ranks 
among the ve^ finest such works 
on remrd foe its compositioo, but 
like most otiier miniatures seen at 
auctions in recent years, shows 
signs of rubbing a^ smearing, 
which makes, the price more re- 
markable'still. * 

There u«re sinularly wild varia- 
tions in prices, bearing little or no 
relarion^p to the quality of the 
pieces, when olgets d’art were strfd 
at Sotheby's on Tuesday evening 
and Wednesday. Here and there 
the catalog entries reflected the ten- 
dency to give Iranian objects a 
provenance more in tune with the 
expectations of. Arab buyera, who . 
are playing a leading in the 
market A typical eastern Iranian 
bronze pitcher was called “Egyp- 
tian,’' although the caption stated 
tha t it came from N^shabur. in 
Iran., where several such pieces 
have come to light A small bronze 
inkwell with figurative scenes in- 
laid in sQver and gold, which was 
bou^t in Im thr^ years ago and 
is ^ical of late-13th-century de- 
sign in that coun^, was described 
in a long, rambling entry leaving 
the reader in doubt as to whether it 
i^iTig from noitheastem Syria or 
western Iran. A similarly word^ 
entry graced an imppr^t incen^ 
burner, made of silver-inlaid 
bronze. 



meoTimsc^jm qiad 
earwBFooM. rwr^ tdm^ 
tKJ. ‘ 

% • it '. 1 1 a . 


J 



)WCW57E4£.7ZWC5/T«l*1Wg 

AM/C& cmair FRONT, help yOURr \ 

5&FT0imKS6,airUHAI&fERW 

.PO,lXmBRiN6lPTH£NCAAaiM’ 

TBRFtNfilO. THAT^ ABOUT IT.. 


v«i 0H,YSAH,7HB 
aUCKINTmUB 

^5^, miKBSH^A gfffi 

JnsRMmrTtfcox^ ' 
am US. / 




Whether this confusion actually 
made a difference to the price of 
either work is doubtful The- ink- 
well rose to £36.000, which is not 
terribly expensive for a piece in a 
exceptionally good state of preser- 
vation, and the incense burner went 
up to £39.000. A 14th-century cas- 
ket in ^ver-inlaid bronze from 
Irw, probably the finest, in die 
world after a piece in the British 
Museum, also sold for £39,000. A 
Turkish silver drinking jug of tbe 
early 16th century zoomed to 
£70,000. 

In such a contexL one would 
have expect^ everything to go sky 
high. That was far from tbe case. A 
pottery tile of the late 1 3th century. 


decorated with flying birds and -a 
beautiful inscription in low celiri, 
was knocked down at ;0OO. A high- _ 
ly imponant pottery tDe. the bes^* - 
preserved .trf only three recoidjfq’'^ 
tiles from this set, went for a Ion' 
£4.200. Several pieces sent in by 
dealers i^d not sdl. But a marque -. 
uy panel from 16-centuiy E^t. ' 
bou^t for le» than 204)00 francs 
by a London dealer at a Drouot ' 
sale two veais ago. was sold for ' - ‘ 
£26,000.' 

There could be no better iHustra- ' , 
non of tbe erratic natine of a mar- : 
ket where many buyds seem to ad ' ‘T 
at randonfL without -the faintest | ; 
idea why the>' are buying and how ; . 
much th^ stiould be paying. - ' 


Herzog^s of Busoni’s ^ Faust’ Is Hit 


By William Weaver 

B ologna r-The surprise bit of the spring opera 
season iri Italy is Ferruccio BusonTs 60-year-o)d 
“Doktor Fausu" playing to sold-out, enthusiastic 
houses in the Teatro Comunale of Bologna. Unfin- 
ished at the composer’s death in 1924, the work was 
completed by bis pupil Phi^ Jarnach and presented 
in Dresden a year later. Since then it has been 
much a festival opera, mounted occasioDally with 
grand artists and elaborate staging. As a rule there is 
critical acclaim and public indifference followed by a 
long silebce< 

This production may cbaii|e the pattern. First, it 
proves that the piece works without superstars. In the 
title role, James Johnson was so impressive that he 
mighi soon become a si^erstar (especially if he can 
bring the level of his actit^ up to that of his smgiog). 
In the fiendishly demanding pan of Mephistopbeles. 
the tenor. Wolfgwg Fassler.was less ixnpressive but 
still effective, and Sophia Larson as the Duchess of 
Parma sang with glesuning. dramatic power. The nu- 
merous smaller roles were strongly cast, and Zoltan 
Pesko and the Bologna orchestra coovindogly Qlus- 


'trated the beauty and subtlety of this deeply person^ 
and bauntii^ score. 1 

Malting his operatic dd>ut. the film direooF Weme 
HeizM followM the fashionable ignore-tiie4ibren| 
rule. Iraust's study became an alpine p^ which W 
doctor scaled during the first acL Lu^ Parma wasl 
polar floe. It would have been more useful if Heizd 
had devoted time to the acting of the principals, wq 
showed little si^ of having had individual guidmej 
Henning von Gierke's sets were striking (the o rigin] 
designs, displayed in tbe foyer, are even more ^ 
ing). • . - • ] 

A particular feature of jthis st^g was that it usd 
for the first time, a reconstruction of (he final aca 
devised the English Busoni scholar Antony Bea( 
mom. scmpulously based on sketches and notes foiq 
long after Jarnach ±ad done bis worL Beaumon; 
achievement sounds right, so this Bologna staging w > 
not only enjoyable but Butbemic. ’ 

fViUiam IVeaver is a writer and translator who lives 
Jlafy and writes about Uie arts. His latest hook is t 
bio^aphy *'Diae . " ^ . 


i- 


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URBINO! f 

URBINO! I 

ITALY* 
Paintinir: Michael Goldberg, 
Jacqueline Winsor, 
JackYoungerman 
I^otography: Len Jenshel, 
Stephen Shore. Joel Stemfeld 
Graphic Desifsnt 

Ed Benguiat, Jack Odette, Tony 
Palladino, George Tschemy 
Printmaking: Lucio Pozzi 

RRST SESSION. July 8-July 30, 
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SECOND SESSION; July 29-August 20. 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 20-21, 1985 



AETS/LEISUBE 




^ Irdiand’s Treasures 
On Show in London 


Eccentrics in ihe Mcdnstream Prodi^ 
New Albums of Contemporary Music 


.**■ 1^ Max ^yia»Jovcc aidnteo/hisioria& C>'ril £. Power 
ONDON — WhMe^ ‘my be ' ^ 


530SOT 


fr-.-m ,h, t 

£A2Qd. Se^c 

‘ry pane! from 16 

boughi<..r less ,L, 1- 

'’■'; ^ L.'nd'rA" J'Wt 

CnAHJii ’‘i'".* 

keiiAhere n)jnvbuve“^-‘ 
ai randnfn. ,^‘ 

idea wh'. ihcv an* k,.. * ■‘' 
much ili» 

Faust’IsBit , 

«raiicdeh^.ihf,-,|md,TO«. 

- ihc fdihi.'p.jWe isimMiitaj.' 

av became an alpine nei »v' 
Jnng rhe nr*' 3.^, Lush PanJ. 
>uld have rieen more asefulifii. 
ic lo ihe u.iinj|0f ihepnmfe 
^ Of hawMa had mdividualaai; 

lerke’s w:* v.cre Mnlunaife,^ 

ed ic ilie ii.'.ser. are e\enmc«- 

tfaiure oi ihi.* *ia|innixilii:s 
e. a recon>irueiion of ihefam" 
English Bu'..‘ini scholar MoM* 
tslv based on skeiihesandiwci. 
2ch had dc'ne hi« Mcirl. Beis: 
inds right. «;• ilus bol>,<gna^v > 
b!s but aiji.l'ier.ae. ' n 

■'tT fS if n .■c jnJ rriSfuiatif kfc' , 
tfbou; I'll ..o. H..'. iisies}hiA. 


^ Brii^ and Iretand in other re> 
(he cottotries’ natk)iud 
i«rieh have isoopeTated evM aiOBe 
titt foondation ot the Naliooal 
Gallery ot Irdand ui Dubhn in 
1854 bv aa act (he SritiA PariU- 
nent. iTic National GaBeiy.of !»- 
lam! now has marc duo 2^00 joa.- 
jof oil paintings m its critetkw *-* 
which must have made (be seke- 
bon ct 3S voAs for a kaa Show to 
Nitbe Nadonal GsUery in LoodDn a 
** diffioilt task for the British sdec- 
lOK, who were given carte blanche 
by (heir frish opposite muAicrs. 

.The.works were chosen to 8Ug- 
mcot the considerable London 
biddings of artists such as B Gtio- 
uo, Poussin and Titian, or to aOow 
the British to \iew waits by artists 
who ouw an poorjy r^resented or 
liot represent^ at all in the Bntiib 
ludonal collectkms. NotaHe in die 
latter case are Giovanni Benedetto 
Casti^one (!6I6-I670]i with bis 
**Shepherde&s Filing the laCant 
Cyrus”; the Venetian Bersardo 
,,^|eUouoLn20-nsb}, anephew and 
pupiJ of CaoaleiiD, tbe^ quite 
different in s^Ie, here iupreseofed 
by a pair of cityscapes trf Dreadeo; 
iiad the Dutch painter Frans Post 
(1612'Jd80}. who turned our **A 
Brazilian Landscape” as a tDcmbcr 
of the entourage of Count Maurits 
van Nassau>S(ttea, gDvemor^gett' 
etal of Brazil irom 1636 through 
1644. 

Other splendid loans is tha ex« 
odlent show are a dramatic ^David 
and Goliath'* by Orazio Geotiles- 
chi (1562'164?>, Ac Pists-bora 
p^ter who died in Loodoa in the 
service of Kang Charles I; a cobMfu! 
picnic **Pany Feutinff in a G»- 
den” by ibe Roman Giovanni Bat* 

I tista Fasseti (c. IdlO-ld*!^; and the 
portrait of a young mtateiaa. “A 
l^y Playing a Lutr* whose imp^ 
rious beauty was so wdl •caught in 
1648 by Jan Myiess (c. I6I4-1670) 
that the centuries fall away, and it 
is, at least for this beholder, still a 
case of love at /ifst lighL 


BENCH LANGUAGE— 

'vy.Vtwi’Wa 
« •*•••• • ryr s "U" J*** 

ANES* O-STUDES RUM;Affiv' 

■»., 

tens y ■■. s'wd ■■idrw*'' 

« eo* monih. 

•rt* 

D'^DES FRAbKAI» 
dl(Frcnce). . 

«: C£MED46J W2F->-^ 


Pre^ brochure 


”V *e v5® 


lOOl-Pt 


Color Linocou of (he 
and 1930s" ai the Redfern 
Galfe^. The show also indudea 
.*^Dull Evening,” an evocative print 
by FKght’s dw friead £dhb Law- 
rence (1 890- (973); and several 
works by ibe Swiss artist UU 
Tsdiudi (b- 1901), whose work 
iiujws the tnfluenoe of earlier stud* 
ies with Andri Lhoie and Gxno 
Severiiu. 

"foash Color Linocuu of the 
ITSOsand 1930s.” Redfern Gaflerv, 
26 Gorii Street, W 1 . ibrau^ May 
Q 

. Anthony PaUiser is an &glish 
paiiiier who, after graduating in 
. modern Iwgitagw and histon at 
Oxford, traim as a painier in Italy 
and now lives and works in Paris. 
The chief theme of his 1980 Lon- 
don show was stffl life, of vdiich 
there are one or two examples in lus 
exhibitioa of leoepi worit at Quid- 
ton Green Fine An. His ne«' work 
has taken fresh direciion — eon- 
ststing diM^y of ptftraits and 
nudes. pMnyed on a lai« scale; 
and manipulating vivid col^ The 
nudes are as muh poaadtitpe as 
the pDrtrait&» and aeiiher suffers 
from stesile acadomeiffiL 

**Aath«iy Palfiser,” Qufo(on 
Green Boe Art, 5/6 Code Street, 
Wl, (hiough May 4. 

a 

The Stoppenbaefa A Delestre 
show of ”Nmeteenih A Twentieth 
Ctnbuy French Drawum and Wa- 
teredois" indudes a ^ flower 
pieee, a specialty of punters in 
•Lyoii, hy Jean Pierre Lays (182^ 







Nmjw Ga»»~> erf hdand 

Nadona! Gallery show indudes Passari*s *‘Party Feasting in a GardM” (detail). 


JsS^; and a ddi^tful “View of 
(be Louvre and lire Institute from 
the Pont Neuf” by Augustus 
C^ea de Pugin (1762-1832) the 


Uule-koown emigre father nf 
A W. N. Pb^ (18(2- 1852) the ar- 
cbiteci famed in Vtctorian Endaad 


•1^2}thear- 


“Masterpieces from the National 
Galleiy of Ireland," National (3ti- 
lery, Trafalgar &uare; (hroi^ 
May 27. 


In the' 1920s and early 1930s, 
British printmaldaf todc a new, 
and exQting direcoon in the per- 
fecting of emred linoculs. Ilie U- 
nocui Movement was led by 
Claude Pli^l (1881-1953) and his 
associates and students from the 
Grosvenor Sdiool of Modem Art, 
Sybil Andreas (b. 1898) and the 


for his kadetship of the (jothie 
RevrvaL 'There are two social com- 
mentary waieieolofs by Jean- Louis 
Forain (18S1-193I), one of which, 
“Love in Pd^" portrays a ratle- 
man snonng wiiik his emu&le fe- 
male companion rummages 
thxou^ his pock^ Anotiser &- 
Ore <H the snow is a group of ink 
and wash drawiDgs by Auguste 
Louis Lep^ (li&I9I8). Giher 
mi^ dr awing s mdude the pencil 
“liusul of a Young Wmnan” by 
AadrtDeraia (2^1954). 

“Nineteenth and ‘Twentieth Cen- 
tuiy Fiendi Drawings and Wate^ 
col^'* Stoppenbacu A Delestre, 
25 Gc^ Str^ Wl, tiinwgh Mky 
il. 


In the late JKih century and the 
first half of the 19th, many British 
profesami^ people who had to 
travel abroad for their work seem 
to have been endowed with consid- 
erable artistic abiKty. Sudi a per- 
son was Dr. Thomas Boiwall Wat- 
son (1813-1860), who took bis 
M. D. at Edinbuigh, was a faadly 
doctor at Mdrose, and in 1843 
sailed for Macao to take over the 
medical iwUee of a fdlow Scot 
Among his patients was the artist 
Gcofgf Chiweiy, who beome the 
doctor’s friend and fiom whom 
Watson received "many valuable 
faints on the art of painiing’* The 
results may be seen at Mar^ 
Gregory in the fim exhibition of 
119 of Watson’s penoL ink and 
wash drawings of Macao, and of 
Ihuig Kong, where be li\^ from 
1856 to 1858. After Umdon, tiie 
exhibition travels to Hoag Kons 
and thence to Macao, it wiU 
have a museum showing horn May 
24 throt^ June 4. 

”Dr. Ihomas Boswall Watson.” 
Mariyn Gregory. 34 Bury Street, St 
James's, ^1, through Af^ 
Hold Furama Inter-Continental, 
Hong Kong May 15-18; Museum 
Luis de Camhes, Macao, May 24- 
June4, 

D 

It has long been the fashion 
among mayor artists to attempt 
book ulusinuioo at least once for a 
fine linuied edition. Under the title 
"From Manet to Hockn^' the 
Victoria A Albm Museum is show- 
ing 166 such books, Manet being 

resented by his 1875 illustra- 
tions for Mallumi’s tnmdatitHi of 


Poe's poem “The Raven," and 
Hockn^, ratiter excessively, by his 
etchings (I96di for "Fourteen Po- 
ems by C. V. Cavafy” as well as bis 
1970 eti^gs for **Six Fairy Tales 
from the Brothers Grimm” and the 
1977 etchiim inspired by Wallace 
Stevens’s ncasso-inspired poem 
"The Man triih the Blue Guitar,” 

Among the best books were 
those whose tUustradons were most 
directly felicitous to the icxis — the 
monotypes by Degas for Ludovic 
Half's novel "The Cardinal 
Family": Bonnard's liibographs 
for the Afflbroise Vdlard publica- 
tion (1902) of tbe "Pastoru Poems 
of Longus"; Picasso's etchings 
( 1942). supervised by tbe printroas- 
ter Roger Lacouriire, for Buffon’s 
"Naiuid History”; and Andrt De- 
rain's colored woodcuts (1943) for 
Rabdais's “Pantagruel,” for the 
printing of which he aim enlisted 
LaojunAre's aid and for the derigt- 
ing of whicb be made a profound 
study of playing cards popular in 
the ufetime of Mbdais (c. 1494<. 
1553). 

"From Manet to Hockney: 
Modern Artists' Illustrated 
Books," Heuiy Cole Wing, Victoria 
A Albert Museum, Exhibition 
Road, SW7, through May 19. 

□ 

A mie artist’s botA -~text com- 
piled and printed, images deagned 
and printed, and fimstied book 
bound, tbe artist -—is one of tbe 

main exhibits in "Edvirard Wright: 
Grapluc Work A Fating," an 
Arts Coundi traveling exhiinuon at 
Kettle's Yard Callety, Cambridge, 
later moving to Norwich, Oxfi^ 


GVrEBJVAtiaNAL ART EXBDDBITIONS 


PAum 


AiaOMAl 

centre cTbil plostique contemporoin 


DUMiTRESCO 

fWituivs-scidphimsL 7971-1984 



Oeuvf«s 796^1984 


S. Defauna^ DumBresce^ C^olL Le Por^ Moffo, 
Meurice, Pmalba, RtM^^mont, Sdioffer, Vahnier. 

Topis cforfislts 



MASSON 

A 


Estanipef 

A 


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db fflORf ou samcdl de 
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GAlBUEbmiSERENi — 

196 BM. St.-Germaa, 75007 PARIS - Tel.: 22277.57 

HEURTAUX 

Pioneer of geometric abstraction 

V!en«A>Me Apdl 54 ee 7 ejMi 


GALEKIE CLAl I>E BERN AHD 

9. "'OiH) PAKi'^ • :’,2f.-9:-i)‘ 

Alb^^rto 

Glx\rO>IETTl 

drawings 

Apri! 16 ■ Junr 16 


==s DENISE RENI == 

196 Blvd. St.*^Gerffuirn, 7lfi. X22J7S7 


PARIS 

APRIL - MAY - JUNE 1985 

JOAN MIRO 

EXCEPTIONAL SERIES 
OF IS GOUACHES 1953 

Cotoi^ue ovoilable 

GALERIE MARWAN HOSS 

12 Rue d' Alger Paris r 
Tel.; (1) 296 3796-296 39 45 

BB doted Soturdoy afternoon except by appointment bs3 


GALERIE KAIU- FLINKER 

25 Rue de Tournon Paris 6* • 325.18.73 

PAUL KLEE 


■April 'May 1985 w 


ALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

6. Rue JeorhWermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.8Z44 




NARAHA 

Seulpivres 

Rrst Exhibition in Franco 




— GALERIE ART YOMIURI 

5 Qua! de Conti, Paris 6 , Tel.: 326.1535 
Le8 Bonk, ftadng Pont Neuf 

KIMURA 

Recent pointings 

_ UnM Mkiy 4 - Tuesday through Sqturdoy - 1 0 a jn. to 1 2 - 2 to 7 p.m. ■ 


— MUS&g MIA MARINE 

PcMa de dirillot _ GALEflIE 

I Concartbyih^ ■ BRUNO MEISSNER 

ENSCAUUDEGHAMBRE ■ BAA 

STAMiTz 7V\ 

Tuesday April 22 et 8:30 pun. 

bhaMon I" - 

NOEMARTOE VUuitliipttlniy 

||•eriMr.^rl« lui dreetpaindngs 

■ — ■ .unWMeyta 1 Old Masters, 

^ impresslomsts 

< 

se ter instance 

— G.Ceurbet 

^ C.Pieearro 

UL 

O GaJerle Bruno Meiesner 
> , Bahnhelstresse 14 
S CH-8001 Zurich 
Telephone (01)211 90 (X) 


KING STREET OUXERY 

19thCentury Paining 
OitFree 

. 17 '^IIE Sl, Su Jame's 
Londoo, SWl. 01-930 3993 


W\ 


'and WrexhanL Wright, who is 
South American by descent and 
Briuih by education and domidle, 
was once described as "the only 
artist in Ei^and who has used 
communications as his theme.” Hu 
work, throughout his long career a.s 
architectural assistant, painter, 
graphic desi^r, typo^pner and 
influential design leachtf. has been 
ge^d to examining the meeting 
poim between image and meaniig. 

His book, the *^odex Atorran- 
d&” printed by hand on a single 
sheet of pi^er more than 6 meters 
(20 feet) long and folded into 24 
pages in the Clunese whiting 
style, incorporates film stills, pho- 
tographs, reproduced postage 
stamps, saeenprints and a wealth 
of wc^ in many languages but 
priodpally bmfardo, the under- 
world sla^ of tum-of-the-centuiy 
Buenos Aires. Hence the title, ^zzor- 
none bemg the timfordo word for "a 
vagrant.” 

The vagrant, "he of the wander- 
ing feet on any endless road," is an 
archetypal bang in Wright's emn- 
plex image^*, xnd one who recurs 
in tbejpaintings, collages and prints 
of which this show consists. 

“^ward Wrighi: Graphic Work 
and Painting,” Kettle’s Yard Gal- 
lery, Cambri^ through ^ril 21 ; 
Norwirii School of Art Galleiy, 
May 7 through June 1: Museum a 
Modem Art, Oxford, June 16 
through July 28: Library .4ns Cen- 
ter, Wrexham, Aug. 3 through S<^ 
6 . 

Max IVykeS'Joyce regularly 
writes In the JHT a£our Lemdon art 
exhilutions. 


By John Rockwell 

Vn Vor( Tiitiei Sennr 

' E9,' YORK — The typical European composer 
once fell pan of a cultural iradiiioA. Sunned b>' 
his teachers a^ peers, be was conscious of his place in 
a continuum of music, even if he itiiose someuroes to 
rebel against t^t tradition or (o red^ine it. 

Yet more and more, it seems, Europe, and Europe- 
anized Japan, bm ptodudng isolated muacai 
eccentrics, a^ they often count among the most 
important con^iosert of tbe day. Four of these men ~ 
Kariheinz Stockhausen, Iannis Xenakis. Toru Take- 
tniisu and Arvo Paert — have new records that attest 
not just to the interest their music arouses, but to its 
idiosyncra:9. 

This devdopment is unexpected, in pan because 
modem techn^ogs' and trarel were suppo^ to bind 
us alf more closely together, emdicating indniduai and 
regnal dinerences, A chief fear anumg the non- 
American pans of the world, in fact, is that thdr 
tudigetuMcs cultures will be .Amerh^nized. Vet the 
eccentric composer has long been the distinguishing 
feature of the best new American music. 

Peiliaps the reason for tiie rise of these iadiridual- 
is^ in toe United Slates and abroad, has more to do 
with the Uigeist, with our time's foi^ focus on the 
individual at the expense c4 the conununiiy. Or per- 
haps the eclecticism of modem musical styles — the 
failure of any one trend to assert itself as the moin- 
stream — means tbe mainstream is made up of un- 
countable iribuuries. 

Sbx^hausen is pnfaaps Europe’s best-known com- 
poser-eccentric these days; cmly Deutsche Grammo- 
phon's indefatigable winlngness^o document his every 
musical utterance saves him from tnar^nality. The 
latest is bis mostly choral “Atmen gibt das 
Ldren ..." 

Stockhausen stoned his career a quaner-cenniry 
ago as a far more conventional modoiust, nuningout 
serial scores and electronic peces with earnestly diro- 
matic seriousness. His turn to eccentricity, consonance 
and ritual may have begun with time spent during the 
mid-1960s in that command center of U. S. compoti- 
tional eccentricity, C^omia. Since then, his music 
has cODcestratrtI on commug;>| rituals, a theatricality 
reminiscent of George Crumb and all manner of 
medimtive sound experiments. 

This has been alued. however, with a Wagnerian 
ambition, most notably in his prqjected se\'en-evemng 
quasi-operaiic cycle, "Light,'* the First insiaUmeni of 
which, "Thursday,*'wasrdea^in 1983asafour-di^ 
album by DG. 

“Aimen ^bt das Leben ...” (Breathing Gri'es 
Life . . . > was ccu^eted in J 977 and is described as 
a "choal opera wiut orchestra (or tape)”; on this 
recording the fmees are the chonis and Qtnphony 
orchestra of the North German Radio; Hamburg. As 
with most of Stockhausen's recent music, real beau^ 
coexists unearily with profound siDiness. Stockhausen 
has proved, from his eariiest WOTks throud his occa- 
sioi^ later masterpieces (e.g., “Hymen’O, (hat he has a 
deep oosmosidonm gifL But he also a mile-wide 
sum d self-indulgence. In the United States, nams- 
sism is encouraged Iw isolation. In West Germany, it 
seems to be fostered by lemming-like institutional 
critical support. 

The prime French candidate for eccentric individ- 
ualiiy — Greek-Frcndi, acnially •>-is laimis Xenakis, 
who has been somewhat ecli'i^ in fame and govem- 
mental support by Pierre Bewez but who still uves in 
Paris compo^g muric that sounds like nob^y dse's. 


One strange a^t of Xenakis’s r^maiion, propa- 
gated in large measure bv himself, is that he is per- 
ceived as an ultrnraiiooalisi. almost a French Mihon 




charts, wherein he attempts to provide a physical or 
maihanaiical or psychoacoustical corrriauim (O the 
mere notes contain^ in his music. 

In fact however, Xenakis seems more like Edgard 
I'arese: or even Glam Branca, than Babbitt — a no- 
holds-barred Romantic whose sonic assaults can be 
best appreciated as ^ressiooisi passion, not ratio- 
nalist order. Heard in that sense, his music sounds 
wonderfully invigorating. Certainly it sounds that way 
on the Ardiui String Quiet's new XemtiLis collection 
(Engliiih RCA). The music sighs and screams and 
howls, and its e\‘efy inflection is admiraMy c^tured 
by the .Arditti players, who seem to be an ugUsh 
equivalent in their 'commiiniem locontemporjiy rep- 
ertory, to the American Kronos (Juanei. 

Toru Takemitsu is Japan's best-known composer, 
which might make him an unlikely eccentric. Vet to 
judge from recent reports, Japan lacks an e.\tenu\v 
new-mu&ic community, and in any case Takemitsu has 
always been a world-wanderer, as wdl as a mu.dcaJ 
auiodidacL who reristed ready absorption into anv 
compositional school. 

Often his music has sounded bland, a sincere but 
dcsiialized recycling of hannonies and moods better 
expressed by the likes of Debus^' and even Rachmani- 
noff. But his "In an .Autumn Garden” (Varese Sara- 
bande) is another matter altogether — about the most 
evocatire Takemitsu score 1 have ever encountered. 

He n«er broke entirely from his Japanese heritage; 
several of his pieces have made use of ancient Ja^ese 
instrumenis. “In an Autumn Garden” is part of a 
series of commissions from (he National Theater 
Japu to prominent composers to write works for the 
traditions Japanese gag^u orchestra (another recipi- 
eni of this program was Stockhausen). Takemitsu's 
commission came in 1973; sLx years later he added 
more material to make up the nearly hourlong score 
beard on (his compact disk. 

The worit does not use the old gagaku modes or 
confine itself to the iiattiiionally circumscribed ways 
of playing the old msttumeots. The effect is fascinat- 
in^y half-modern, half-ancient; dreamily atmo^her- 
ic. redolent of a mysterious natioi^ past yet 
contemporary. 

rinally, we have the least wdl-known composer of 
this quartet, tbe Estonian Arvo Paert, who lives in 
West Berlin. Paert's ^uiatioo is growing, partly 
because of the notable mtmreteis who champion his 
music. "Tabula Rasa” (an ECM compact disk) enlists 
(jidon Kremer, Krith Jarretl, Dennis Russdl Daries, 
the Twelve Cellists of the fieriin Philharmonic and the 
Rusrian avant-garde composer Alfred Schnittke, 
amoog others. 

Paen is a minimalist, but that does not mean he 
sounds motoric and trancdifcft His music unfolds with 
a quiet rapture, small units shifting and turning into a 
ritualistic mysticism. 

Tbe most overtly gorgeous piece here is tbe five- 
niinuie "Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Brinen,'* 
which could became as pc^ular as Padielbel’s Canon 


intense muac is beard for vidin and piano and for the 
12 cellists. "Tabula Rasa” itself, die longest piece on 
tbe disk, conjures up images of revolvmg heavenly 
^heres, or angds at play. 


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241 

100.000 DM 

1 1. Class 

Junr as Dr^Minrjs 

4 x soaooooN 

4X 

5MA00DM 

4* 

dD OOOOM 

Bi 

BO.OOODM 

I Uay/June B!: Dfjn 

4< 

asaoooDM 



4 * 

00.000 DM 





41 2SIMIOOOH 




40 0CODV 

4* 

40 OOC DM 

8 i 

40.000 DM 

3i 

40.C00OM 

4i JIOOOOM 

Ji 

OS.OOfj DM 

4 > 

2 u OJODM 

4 1 

J5 OOODM 

(3* 

25.(iOODM 

e* 

25.000 DM 

loaooDW 

4-4 1 

10 coo DM 


1 Cl coo DM 

68 * 

1C) OOODM 

34* 

10.000 DM 

lOOr 

10.000 DM 

43 1 

?2s 

S COO DU 

196' 

ii COO DU 

!.->C* 

0 000 DM 

163/ 

S 000 DM 

J32i 

5.000 DM 

J40i iSOODPit 

240, 

■ ! 000 DM 

040i 

? OOODM 

240* 

? iOO DM 

460* 

: 500 DM 

1 920* 

O.bOODM 

:‘<00» 'bOCDM 

J* 00 i 

7000W 

3 40Cti 

1 000 DM 

0400* 

1.250 DM 

?400i 

• SCO DM 

9600* 

I.500DM 

’TOOOi :40DM 

lOOOOi 

ObOOM 

'OOOOi 

400 DM 

12000 * 

600 O.M 

tsooo* 

700DM 

7200* 

1.000 DM 

moooi' . iioOM 

leoooi 

040 DM 

13000* 

360 DU 

laooo* 

480 DM. 

1000 Q* 

bOODW. 

■ 02000 * 

640DM 

s:7:a ■■ 

3J76B •• 


3?«oa ■ 


32848 -■ 


29:76 - 


121 322 !■ 


S KO 000 DM 

1 

1.600 OOODM 

1 ia bOO.OOOOM 1 

1 23.420.(000 DM 1 

[ 3S.360.0000M 1 

1 127.180 0000M 


Prize 

Schedule 

77. Lottery 

May 11, 1385 
to 

Nov. 2, 1985 


*^ 00.000 
i^et number 
in the game 


'^291.650 . 
ticket numbers 
are drawn 

Over 225 Million 
DM . 

in prize money 

Almost every 
2. number is 
a winner 



Start of next Lottery: November 1965 


These are the figures. Where else are the chances this good? 
They are almost 1 in 2. Bmng a state lottery, the Sueddeutsche 
Kiassenlotterie (South German State Lottery) can offerthese 
extraordinary odds vrith large prize money. Besides the 
Jackpots, as shown above, the middle-dass prizes range 
from DM 5.000 to DM 80.000. Of course not to mention the 
numerous amount of smalier prizes. 

Look at the facts: 

The lottery runs over a period of 26 weeks with each class 
covering 4 resp. 6 drawings. 

The drawings are publicly held in Munich, West Germany, and 
are supervised by state auditors. The German government 
guarantees all prizes and is responsible for the orderly 
conduct of the lottery. 

Anonymity is guaranteed, if you win, no one but you will ever 
find out about your winnings; that is. unless you teii them- it’s 
as though you’d have a numbered account at a Swiss bank! 

How to partietpate: 

• Fill in the coupon below with the number of tickets desired 
and your complete mailing address. 

• PLEASE INCLUDE PAYMENT WITH YOUR ORDER. Pay- 
ment may also be made upon receipt of our invoice. Personal 


I’ll join the lottery! 


For all desses of the 77. Sueddeutsche Kiassenlotterie, 
Starting May 11,1985 through Nov. 2, 1985 

Please fill in number of tickets you want to order 


checks, travellers checks, bank transfers or cash sent (at 
your own risk) via registered mail can be accepted. Payment 
must be made in DM, US $. £ Sterling, Swiss Francs or any 
other currency convertible in West Germany. 

• Within days you will receive ypur ticket, an invoice or 
statement of account, and the offidal drawing schedule with 
rules and regulations. 

• After each class, the official winning list together with 
your ticket for the next dass will be sent to you by airmail. 

• If your ticket Is dra%vn you will immediately be sent a 
winning notification, since it is our business and obligation 
to check all drawn numbers. 

• You may determine how your winnings are paid out. 
Transfer will be made anywhere in the world within one week 
either by check or according to your instructions. Of course, 
jackpot winners may personally collect their prize money in 
cash. 

• If you are already one of our customers, your ticket for 
the next tottery will be mailed to you aufomaiicalty. 

• You can be sure you’ll receive rapid, honest confidential 
service. If you like the odds, try your luck. Order today. 

Good luck! 


Boppstr. 20-24 
D-6500 Mainz, 
. 19161116 W-Germany 




Return coupon to E. Gehle 


Boppstr. 20-24 
D-6500 Mainz, W-Germany 




DM 

or 

uss* 

or 

E* 

1/1 ticket 

747.00 

• 

229.85 

• 

210.45 

1/2 ticket 

387.00 

• 

119.10 

a 

109.05 

1/4 ticket 

207.00 

• 

63.70 

• 

58.35 


Please write in German □ English □ 

' 77/85 1 

Mr.D lfrs.O WssO Pto»ft*prfnthi 

: First Name 

i bloek letters. 


Last Name 


* U5S prices and £ pnees are subject to rate of exchange 

Prices are (or all 6 daM«s Including air nail postage and winning list 
after edch elm. No additional elwrges, Rato olcacliangt; Feb. 1085 


VAUD ONLY WHERE -NOT AVAILABLE TO RESINENTS Of SMOAPORE* 



P.O.B 0 X 

City 

Country 






















Page 8 








INTERNATIONAL WF.BAl.n TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 20-21, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 



vw. 

HMl LOW 

Lost 

CbO. 

Unoal 

1924S 

47% 

46% 

47% 

+ % 

ATST 

13006 

31% 

73 

a% 

+ % 

CBS 

11822 ia 

10(0 

107% 

+1% 

IBM 

73M 138% 

lam 

127*6 

+ % 

PMEPn 

72B 

32% 

2l9t 

73 


GMol 

7814 

70*6 

7M 

70% 

— % 

Exxon 

6on 

54 

520 

SM 

+1 

Uniroyl 

(854 

20% 

30% 

20% 

— (6 

Moinos 

66(8 

a 

32% 

3M 

— 1% 

Gould 

(45* 

22% 


72 

— % 

TlXlflSl 

6290 

92% 

*00 

920 


GenEl 

6384 

59% 

50*6 

son 

— % 

PonIM 

5848 

4M 

4M 

43% 

— (( 

HhpCp 

5773 

410 

40% 

410 

+ 0 

Am Exp 

5725 

41% 

41 

41% 



Dow Jones Averoges 


Omh HM Low Lott Oio. 


Indus 126&U 1»HS 

Trans S8MB 591 « S81M J-gJ 

UNI 155.29 UA29 1BJ1 — 0J2 

^ mS sSS S0U7 511M- U4 


NYSE Index 



Htah 

Previon 

LOW 

Ctaso 

Today 

3PJM. 


185A6 

10454 

10456 

10499 


mm 

120.14 

ia.14 

1205* 


9654 


9606 

9592 


5551 

SSA4 

SSA6 

sa 

Finance 

110.16 

i09.n 

mj9 

10970 


IH^H 





T 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bends ‘ 
UtlKlles 
indtfsiriais 


Prev. 
CIOM 
7439 
7235 
77 J3 


Today 

Moen 

74,99 

72.15 

7733 


NYSE Diaries 


CloM Prav. 


Advanced 
Deeilned 
unettenoad 
Total Issues 
New Hlohs 
Now LoM 


799 

7«3 

459 

2030 

>7 

U 


B23 

491 

2012 

100 

II 


Odd- Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Aorll 10 . 
April 17. 
April is. 
April IS . 
April 12 . 


'Included in Nm Mies flmres 


Bev Solas •SbYl 
200315 458303 14392 
207350 450331 9.197 

— NJL — 
255.543 

221338 42MM 


4352 

1.795 


IriflaQ^ 

]MSE 



WlMift 


Prev consolidated ctoa 

I1U3M 


Tables Include the notioewMe prices 
up to the cloAng on well Street and 
do not refloct late trades efsewhere. 
yia The Associated Press 


l3Atenlti 
HIM Lew Siodt 


Ota. 

lOOsHbbLDw 


Odh 

OuataiOe 


21 

14U 


20 

19Vi 



At 

XT 

14 

73 

llta 

11 




9 

114 

13% 






65 

11 

100 


SB 

16 

43 

1073 

70 

19% 




9 

7754 

41% 

4»ta 


111 IDA 


50 

71 

a% 




a 

90 

10 

50 


700 

37 


633 

53% 

a% 


77 

75 

10 

169 

U% 

16 


1A0 

72 

15 

•70 

51% 


i(0AecaWdoA4 

25 

15 

72 

22% 



AO 

19 


55 

14 



lllattO 


135 

16% 



22 

25 

6 

.19 

16% 

150 


531 55 


9a 

50 

9% 




13 

4607 

30% 

29% 


.12 

1J 


163 

9% 

50 





a 




1(4 

65 

39 

1934 

400 

40% 


S5301D5 


15 

550 

55% 


1.70 

0 K 


1079 

M% 

a% 


1.70 

? * 

11 

466 

400 

450 


a 


11 

a 

190 

19% 




a 

41 

10 

1% 

3(0 AlaP0lA192 I2A 


a 

310 

31% 


57 115 


M 

7% 


61% AtaPpI 

9a 125 


10X 

72 



15 
51 lA 


— H 

— « 

— u 

— M 

— Vh 
+ 


1— U 
k— Vk 
i— H 
b + Vb 
+ Vi 
b— Vi 
k— n 
k— M 
k— V* 
1 +1U 
I— M 
k— ta 


30 U 
J6 Z5 
130 43 


103 05U AlaP pf 1130 103 

58 55 AlaPpf 838 127 

1M 11 Aloosce 134 ~ 
21(b 91& AlskAIr .14 
15U 101A Atartas 
310b 22ta AIMsns 
31bb 23Vi Alan 
35M 27VV AlCoSM 130 
32 17 AlexAlX 130 X4 

25kb 20*0 Alear 
89IA 5Bta AliBCP 2351 V 
23 AlpCPPf285 103 
2845 1S9b AlPlnt 130 53 
23«b 15U Alplnpl 2.19 113 
9494 81 AlglPfC1135 123 
3199 24ta AIIOPw 270 <3 
21*1 ISSk AllenG 30b £l 
431b 2815 AlldCpi 130 43 
63H 5Tb AMCepi 574 1Q3 
10955 99 AMCp PfIUO 103 
331b 12 AJUPd 
S9lb 30 AIMStr L12 33 
1214 5tb AlllfOl 
34*b 24 AlleCpf 
271b 20 ALLTL 134 53 
2514 2055 AlpIlPr 30c 33 
399b 30>15 AlCM 
at 1514 Afimc 30 
4215 3214 Amox Pf 330 


79b 

72 

102 


+ 9b 
— 14 
—I 


Oil 12 

3 9 
» 
13 


37 II 


SK65U 

65% 

65% 


13 

170 

13 +% 

75a 

310 

71% 

210 + 0 

79 

16% 

16V6 

16% — % 

54 

350 

a 

a% + % 

3095 

85% 

74% 

340—% 

54 

37% 

310 

33% + H 


35% 

79% 

290—1% 

110 

38% 

7? 

a — % 

10 

76% 

76 

76% 

7 

76% 

»% 

36% 

37 

77 

350 

V 

3 

190 

190 

190— % 

a 

93 

97 

92 

751 

310 

31% 

310 


19% 

19% 

190 + % 



470 

430 + % 

65 

63% 

a% 

63% + % 


19 11014110 110V4 4-1 
18 219fa 2195 2Ub— 1b 

8 5392 5B9b 54 5614 T2Vb 

99 595 59b 595 

14 29 29 29 — 15 

9 38 271b 25195 27M + 15 

_ 13 I 2295 2295 2295 

130 37 10 2507 331b 3294 Vk 

1.1 115 T71b 1795 179b + 1b 

17 3 3414 34 3414 + 14 


3314 2295 ArnHoi 1.10 33 15 1549 309b 30M .3015 


985b AHaspT XSO 
295 115 AmAor 

1945 1514 ABdkr 

» S3 ABrond X98 

2795 349b ABrd Pf 2JS t 

709b 53 ABrdPi 237 

115 5595 ABdcM 130 

3515 1914 ABMM 35 _ 

271b 20 ABUsPr 34 04 15 

5595 401b AmCan 250 S3 11 

249b 2114 AConpf 230 115 

40 35 AConpf 330 U 

199b 1594 ACoPBd 230 1|2 

3395 25Vb ACopCv 251# 93 

11 614 AOMIIC 

5515 4394 ACyen 

29U 1095 AOT 

2195 IM AElPw 

4415 S AmEXP 

1415 AFamll 
1994 AGnCp 
5 AGnIwt 

5194 AOnlPfA430pl13 


30 

31 

1314 

P 


ISO 33 
.92 33 

34b 23 
130 33 


11 


+ 14 

— 1h 

— 95 

— 9b 

— 1b 

— 14 
+ Vb 
+ 9b 

Vb 

5295 $19h 521b + H 

2314 2314 2314— W 

1«9b 1914 199b + 15 

28 2794 28 + V5 

89b SVi 814 


2 130 12915 130 
209 21b 2 2 

24 18 1796 1795 

191 579b 579b m 
4 2794 3794 2795 
2 599b 519b 519b 
439 10515 105 10514 
31 2S9b 2495 8S9b 

2 2514 359b 25% 
571 

3 
3 

74 
10 
18 


13 1021 S39b S29b 5315 + 94 

27 153 25 2415 2414— 95 

I 2521 219h 219b 2IH— % 

14 5725 4114 41 4194 


82« sa*i Aqmptasjoa 7j 
57 4495 A6ftlPf 335 30 


145 251b 25W 2594 + 14 

1084 3094 309b 3D9h + 15 

200 12 119b 119b 

9 Mb 8194 m 


230 47 
1.12 


52 4DI5 AGnpfD l54 4J 
JB9k 259b AHcrtt 138 33 9 
1315 TVs AHpM 
5214 45%k AHsme 
St 2515 AHPM 
0515 52fb AflirMl 530 
78 52 AlnOrp 34 

13114 11214 AlCppf 535 
314 1814 AMI 73 
596 315 AmMat 

45 2796 ANIRss 222 35 

4114 25 APnPU 74t 25 
13% 5*k ASLPta 
1814 13(5 ASLF1 pt 219 U3 
15 KM Alhta 30 63 
3M 2f9h AniSM 130 53 
5614 3SI4 ArnSlor 34 12 
S59i 4614 AStrpU OS 57 


5 a 82 0 

24 6514 5596 5M4 
524 6116 6096 51 

13 2127 61% 61 51% 

33 10 1304 319b 3096 3114 

73 8 314 8494 $iVb 84% 

3 19 *23 7514 75% 

43 11 130 12814130 

28 12 8M239ht3142l9b + 94 
01 ICni 3% 3% 3%— 14 
12 38 54% 55U 54% + 14 

3 238 3094 299b 3M— Ml 

4 87 $9b 896 1% + 1b 
61 13% 12% 13 — % 
59 129b 12% 1894 


— 14 

— 14 
+ 94 

— 15 
+ 14 

13S 

+ 94 

— V5 


87? ^ ^ 


W* ?1 AStrpW 630 IZI 
Sib 141b ATET 120 53 


1511 


534 83 


30% 3014 ATETPf 334 93 
39(4 31(4 At£Tpfa74 97 
3796 1F5 AWetre 130 33 

60 3614 AWalri 133 3.1 

13 10 AWOtPf 125 laO 

12(4 10 AWsSpr 125 103 

:|i4 im AinHpll 230 93 

S M ATrPr ~ 

119b 49b ATTOC 

r 8f15 ATrVn 534 
3614 Anwen 130 
1714 AmesOs 20 
50 Anwpl 522 
291a 21% Ameick 30 33 13 
3014 18% Amtae 
15 896 AmtCK 

3814 36% AMPe 
14 13*4 Ampa 

31% 139b Amrops 
38% 19 AdlSta 


333 S4Vk 81% 

» 45 64% 65 

• « 

3796 37% 
38% 31% 
S5% 27% 
1008 58% 68V5 61% 
5508 11% 11% 11% 
2308 11% 11% nil 
277 30% 20 3H 
10 50% 0 58% 


+ % 
+ 96 
— % 

— 15 
+ % 
+ V5 

— % 
— 96 
+ % 
+ V6 


12 10% 10% 10% 

U »% 78% 78%— % 
7 3X31 31 31 

18 1773 3596 ^ % 

5 92% 92% 92%— 1% 


351 37% 25% 35%— % 
434 25% 2896 2f%— 1 
4 79 109b 10% 10H-+ % 

Z2 17 3275 82% 38% 32%— % 

20 32 17 1057 139b 13 13 — % 

8 25 17% 17 17% + % 

1J0 S.1 a S 27% 27% 27%— 14 


72 


399b 28% Amptad 120 42 13 3039 0 37 0 +2% 


14% 

2% 


1% Anoono 




317 

4 

M 

M 


% 

*M Antooe 



10 

140 

31% 

70% 

20% 


0 

19% Andior 

la 

75 


411 

71% 

900 

71 



34% AnCtov 

la 

35 

19 

M 

37% 

360 

37% 

+ 

% 

90 AndrGr 

.a 

1.7 

16 

94 

110 

11% 

11% 


% 

16% Anoille 

.0 

7.7 

13 

330 

700 

20% 

200 

+ 

% 

51% Artwui 

3a 

35 

11 

414 

•1% 

11 

n 



45% Anbwpi 

160 

A7 


705 

a% 

a 

a% 

+ 

% 

13% AWxir 

a 

1.9 

17 

SB 

14% 

14% 

14% 



10 Anthom 

a 

5 

14 

170 

160 

14 

14% 



100 AnItinv 

A4I 

35 

7 

1 

130 

130 

180 

+ 

% 

9% Apocho 

06 

25 

11 

176 

110 

11% 

110 

+ 

% 




US 

2 

10 

10 

+ 

% 


33% 27% APPwpf A18 132 
0 25 ApPwpt 3J0 13.1 

39% 1796 ApIDta 1.121 34 13 
21% 3 APPiMe 
2196 1594 ArdiDn .Mb 7 14 
24% M% AiizPS 30 107 7 

29% 33 ArIPpf 328 122 

1C 79 ArIPpf 10.70 102 

239h 13% ArKBtt 0 20 0 

1JM 5.1 


914 199b 19 19%—% 

0 3196 31«b 3194 


24% 15 Arkta 
% % ArInRt 


13% 10% Armada 
1996 5% Arma 

29% 15(4 Armcpf 310 131 

24% 15% ArmsKb M 25 

St 22% AnrUVIn 120 35 

36 29% AnnWprSTS 107 

34% 19 AroCp 120 42 

26% 13% AroYVE 20 15 

259b 16 Arira 22 7 


1 39 0 29 

93 3296 38% 3214 
10 139b 13% 13% 
141 21% 20% 21% 
M84 24% 24 24% 

10 89% 29% 2995 
S500d01' 101 101 
W »% 0 20% 

17 250 21% 20% 0% 

% ni % 


0 


5 

280 


11% 11% 11% 
79b 5% 7% 


+ % 
+ % 
— % 
+ % 
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+ % 
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— % 


93% 

14 Arvin k 

a 

AI 


33% 




310 

200 AWllOil 




«% 

330 AShIO pf 4a 



39% 

31% AkfUOpf 196 

101 


61 (* 

45% AsdDG 

960 



90 

73 AldDPi 

4.75 

A9 


25% 

18% Alfltane 

IM 

• 1 

9 

96% 

190 AICVEI 

3a 



57% 

40% ANRIdl 

la 


72 

a 

33% AtlRcpf ITS 

103 

ia 

97 AtlRcpf la 

at 


90 

110 aimscp 



38% 

150 Aupot 

a 



0% 

a AutaDI 

a 

15 

IS 


40 Avatanr 


37% 

150 AVBMC 

60 



39% 

a Avorv 

a 



150 

10 Avloll n 




41 

27 AvntI 

50 





100 


300 

10 Aydin 



10 


S2 159b 1595 10b 
15 199b 19% 19% 
290 34% 34 34% 

90834% 34% 34% 

in 29% 0% 0% 
91 14% 149b 149b 
0 259b 25% 85% 
18M 19% 1994 19% 
05 34% 249b 2496 
7B 309b 0 SIM 
3 0% 09b 439b 
19 399, 38% 3996 
408 51 5996 0 

1 95% 9596 95% 
0 0 19% 19% 

10 869b 0% 25% 
72 310 499b 489b 09b 


M% 


52008 0% 3t 

4 115% 116 115% 

12 13% 13% 13% 
30 0% 21% 21% 
S63 43% 0% 42% 
U 5 496 4% 

17 25% 0 0 


+ % 
— % 
— % 
+ % 
— 1% 

— 9b 
+ 9b 

— % 
— % 
+ % 

— Vb 
+ % 
—I 

— % 
— % 
+ % 
+ % 


+ % 

— H 
— 1% 

— Vb 

— % 
— % 


>05 33% 0% 339k 

04 15% 14% 14%— % 

9S7 31 30% 30%— 14 

son 21 30% 21 + % 

0 20% 0% 30% 


a 

10 

BMC 

a 


31 

a 

110 

fun 

110 


150 

Bolmea 

a 



19 

300 


Mta 


15 

BkrInH 

97 



553 

17% 

tn 

17 — % 











7% 

0 

vIBoIdU 




378 

7 

10 

10 













BoUCp 

la 




450 

a 

480 + 0 



BoIhrM 

00 

ij 


532 

15% 

15 

15% 



BoltaPk 




14 

11% 

11 

11 



B0II6E 

300 



4U 

a 

Fig 

43%— 0 



BoltplB 

tso 102 


80X 43% 


43% +1 



BneOne 

1.10 



•4 

99% 

7* 

290 + % 

50 






79 


3% 


63 


Bondn 

ia 


17 

190 

0% 

0 

UVk + % 

a% 

79 

BkBos 

la 

55 

6 

739 

au 

47% 

470— *k 

s 

ta 

BkBa pf 1130 9.9 


44 

S0 

510 

510 


56 0 BkNEdPfii0p105 

0% 0% BkNY 204 47 
36% 13% BnkVos 150 35 


30% 

S3% 

W 

16% 

»% 

68% 

20i 

12 % 

29% 

34% 

50% 

33% 

13% 

096 

10 % 

35% 

3196 


1 54 54 54 +1 
302 0 41% 419b + % 
H 20b 26% 25% + % 


l4(4 BnhAm 158 77 11 5552 19% 19% 1996 + % 


0 BkAmD4 5.19oll> 


56 

11 % 

23% 

37% 

19% 

7% 


n% 

0 

50 

10 % 

11 

ISM 

Wa 

a 

0% 

8% 

87% 

37% 

a 

0% 

37% 

7% 

a% 

5% 

17% 

26% 

57% 

27% 

35% 

34% 

18% 

25% 

32% 

0 

53% 

55% 

44% 

57 

29% 

72% 

34% 

8% 


IB 

0% 

19% 

896 

17% 

1196 

17% 

19% 

29% 

0% 

0% 

3096 

4% 

9% 

12% 

22 

& 

M% 


BkAmpI 0.38P1M 
BkAm0 258 
BkARty 20 75 II 
BonkTr 270 4.1 
BfcTTpf Z5D 103 
Banner 53e 5 17 
M 15 13 


BorvWr 0 27 12 10 20% 


2 45% 48% 4SH— % 

S3 73% 73% 72%— <b 

SS 1516 16 ls% + % 

61 31 3096 3096— % 

7 1097 0% 506 M 

2 24% 34% 34% + % 

3 10 % 10 % 10 % + % 

84 39% 29 2916— % 

46 31% 3114 31% 

539 0% 0% 49% + 96 


57 11% 


BASIX .12b 15 .. .... 

BwectI 78 25 16 IM 27% 
BoxtTr 57 23 U 3151 15% 
BovFln M 7 41 
BoyStG 20 84 9 
Barlno 10 27 11 
BootCo 10 57 
Beolpl 30 55 
BoInD 10 25 15 
Belcer 

Baker 0 10 1S5 
BeldnH 0 £5 9 


39 221b 
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10 30b 
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10 S% 
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BMHwl 0 17 10 383 29 


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BenfCn 200 S4 


BelHwpf 57 35 
BcllAtl 50 87 
3zn BCEa 30 
mt Bellind 52 15 
27(41 BeUSes 20 75 
35% BetaAH 0 15 
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Berkey 
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Beverly X 15 
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BlekHR 80 45 
Bod no 10 12 
BoiseC 1.0 44 
BolseCPfS0 97 
BoHBer .10 A 
Borden 354 45 
BoreWo .98 45 
Bormni 


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a 153 5% 
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31% 

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11% 

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56% — (6 
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S%— (6 
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29 — % 
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BS% + % 
a + lb 
20% + % 
37% + % 
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a — % 
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49%— % 
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37%— 1% 
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n% + % 
8 — % 


NYSE Prices Gain Slightly 


Congiiled bi- Our Staff From U^eha 

NEW YORK — Stocks turn^ in a riiixed 
showing Friday on the New Yorit Stock Ex- 
change as tradm cautiously evaluated the eco- 
nomic outlook. 

Hie Dow Jones average of 30 industrial 
stocks rose 1.43 to 1.266.56, fioisbing the week 
with a net gain of 0.8$. 

Advances and declines were about even, with 
volume totaling SI. 11 nullion shares, against 
(00.64 million in the previous session. 

On Thursday the maiitet |ot off to a strong 
start, but then retreated to finish with its first 
loss in more than a week. Analysts said the 
downturn appeared to signal increaang concern 
that the ecoQomv was losing momentum. 

The U.S. government's report that the ^oss 
national prcuuct grew at an unexpectedly low 
1.3 percent inflation-acyusted annual rate in the 
first quarter seat interest rates tumbling, and 
thus drew a brief favorable response from stock 
traders. GNP measures the lot^ value of goods 
and services, ioefuding income from foreign 
investments. 

Traders' enthusiasm soon gave way, however, 
to worries that the pace of growth in business 
activity and corporate pronts would remain 
subpar in the months ah^d. 

Brokers also noted that investors were pro- 
ceeding cautiously Friday with some options 
and futures on stock indexes reaching their 
expiration date. 

In recent oxmths. complex maneuvers by 
professional traders involving the options and 
futures and the big-name blue chip stocks have 
touched off sharp swings in the stocks’ prices as 
the options and futures approached expiration. 


In earlier trading, Texas Instruments 
dropped 47 b to 92% after taking a I21i-point 
tumble Thursday, when the company reported 
first-quarter earnings of 37 cents a ^are, dmm 
from $3.32 in the comparable period a year 
earlier. 

CBS rose 2V* to lOSU. steadying after a 3Vi- 
polnt decline Thursday, as tradm continued to 
assess the coiqilex offer made by Ted Tomer, 
.chief executive of Turner Broadcasting, for cmi- 
crol of Che company through an exchange of 
stock and debt securities. 


Xerox Said to Discuss . 
Sale of Publishing Unh 


H'ashington Pat Service 
WASHINGTON — Xerox Corp„ the U.S. 


iK^Liaiing to seU its R. R. Bowker Co. publish- 
ing subsidiary, according to sources dose to the 
talks. 


Intemaiitmal Thomson Organization Ltd., a 
Toronto-based multinational conglomerate 
with interests in publishing, travel and oQ, is 
considered to be the most Ukely purchaser. 

R. R. Bowker Ca is best-known for publish- 
ing major reference books and magazines, in- 
ctudiog Books In Print, the listing of aD avail- 
able i^k titles, and Publishers Weekly, the 
trade journal of the book publishing industry. 
Among iis other reference books and magaanes 
are Library Journal, Literary' Market Place and 
American Men & Women of Sdeoce. 


To Our Readers 

Because of the seveD-hour time difference 
between New Yack and Paris nntil April 27, 
wym e in the Market Summary above are 
from 3 PJ^ New Yoik time instead of the usual 
4 Pid. Also because of the time differ ence, 


some other items dsewfaere in the Business 
Section are from the previous day’s tradmg. We 
nigret the inconvemeoce, which is necessary to 
meet distribution requirements. 


CMonlh 
HtgliLoit Stodc 


DK’. YM. PE 


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210 

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40% 2196 CNA Fn 
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23% 14% CP NN 10 
20% 19% CRI n 
27% 18% CSX 
40% 22% CTS 
12% 7%C3IK 
33% 22% CObot 
14% 8% Coowr 
20% 11% ColPod 


10a 55 12 10 0% 25% 2S%— % 
30 3J IS 11833 10 10596 107V, +1% 
18 0 5% 5% 5% 

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14% 10 Coring B 0 
40% »% Cantata 10 
2596 14 CoraFI 0 
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23% 19%CarPpf 277 117 
0 35% CorTee aiO SJ 9 

11% 7% Corral 0 J 13 
30% CorvPir 10 27 0 
0% 1096 CenHw 10 47 10 
S% 19% corfWI 0 17 12 
15(0 9% CokNG 10 77 7 

IM 9% Cosnck 
^ 15(6 ClIiCBf 125 
49% 2H« CotroT 0 17 
m 16 Oko J6 37 11 
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40% 34 CalMipf 40 117 
15 7(0 Ctnpvn M 7 

41% 32% Coital 20 67 
26% 17 Conlax n 
24 17 COfiSoW 20 87 

^ 16% CmHud 8S4 1U 
34% 18% ConllLt 20 M 
0 36 CniLtpf 40 11.1 

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17> CnLoEl 2.16 


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0 77 8 
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18% Ccnvni 
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SM m% CoHAir 
34% 16% Ownsln 
27% 19 OimlOf 10 5.1 
a 0(6 Oiml pf 40 97 
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46 36% OlM pi 50 117 

M 48 Olownt 6730117 
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31% 14 Chebw 0 35 0 
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0 23% OimNY 20 6.1 6 

42% 23% CUNY Pf 10 *J 
S8% 0 giNY Pi 5730117 
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sm a% owapk 10 14 16 


a 11% 11% 11% + % 

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11 1096 1096 I0%— % 
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400 21% 2096 21 — 1% 
1527 37% 37% 27% 

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15 48% 0(6 43%— % 
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a 38% 38% 32% — % 
62 15(0 15(0 1S%— % 
3157 11% 1095 II — % 
18 a 1996 a 
1555 a 32% 38%— % 
7 22% 22% 82% 

20 91 89% 91 — % 

9 3996 a% 39% + % 
9 I9h 8% S%— % 
151 48% 39% 39%— % 
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359 35% 24% 25% + % 
321 10 996 9% + % 

73 »% a at 
31 10% 18% 11% + % 
171 4 3% 3%— % 

M 10% 10% 10% 

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35 a% a% 33% 

615 mo 15 W% 96 
3501 21% 28% 21% 

1 806 23% 23% 
m 48% At 41% + % 

IM 8% ■% 8% + % 

90 3% 2% 2%— % 

50 3% 8% »6 

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0 0 0 0 96 

10 M% 5396 Sa%— % 
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115 9896 27% 87%— 1 
•46 40% 40% 40% 

1 39% 39% 39% — % 
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3796 8596 306— 96 


a% 3^ OMlPn 20 57 10 1965 33% 39% 33% + % 


4323 35% a% as + % 
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31% iSS cSlvIw " 0 

l%'s%gijsrs» " 

m 16% OilPnT .lOo 7 7 la M 2M B% + % 

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am girtacr 01 17 «45%^44%+% 

L. g»rt»ta 10 11 % 11 % 11 %— % 

13% 9% enrema 72 ia% 10% loio 

35% 90% Oinrslr 10 27 3 450 Sr 36% 37 + % 

43% 34%awabo la 37 14 2M 0 InS so%—% 

sA 8096 cbubbpf47S El ia n% m 

19% 11% Churehs At 97 16 10» mS » % 

“ ■■ “ ■ 45% 44% 45%— % 


tt 35% CInBoll M9 A9 „ _ _ 

15% 8% CIOGE Z16 143 6 257 15% 15% 15%— % 
31 U CblGpr 470 137 400X3M a 30 + % 

0% SO CHlCpf MO 147 45% 55% U% 44% + |6 

a 39 CInG pr 70 135 90OZ M S 54 ^ ** 

0 0 CInGPl 90 147 100X44% 44% S% + % 

M so CInGpl 90 147 50X0 0 0 ^ 

a% a Gdiwui 72 XI a im 33% 32% s% + % 

a 21% areiK J427 14 032I&S a% 

31 14% CiratT 0 7 M 113 35% 96% 96%— % 

34% 14% eiroffi 14 n 2* mm 

47% 87% cittern 276 57 7 1943 45% 45% 4M— % 

M 0% OltCPPf 5790103 306 SS 70% tuS— u 

a% 32% CHyinv 9 1370 a% S a%— % 

40 0 etvinpf 20 04 3 S9% 0 0 — % 

S% 21% CfTinpt Z57 117 »1 2496 2496 24% 

IM 4% GNMr J2 iai 6 102 7% 7 M + % 

3296 93% CtaniE 1.10 37 M H 29V6 a ^ + % 

16 6%aayHm 14 a u iz%% — % 

^ 17 ctvcir 170 S.1 8 a 19% 19% 19% + % 

21% 1396 CiovEi 373 UO 5 853 31 30% 81 + % 

a 46% civEI Pi 70 123 174QZ M 0 0 +1 

0 47 ClwElPf 70 IZ7 50X 59% 59% S9%— % 

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^ 9^^ 273 137 I 16% 15% 15% 

a 14% avphor 10 117 s 15% i5% 15% 

3M 22% Oonx 175 3,9 11 mi 35% 34% a 

»% 14% Ciub56n .1M 4 II 232 20% 20% 20% + % 
atb a ciuoNP 10 XI n 2a 31% 31% 3i%— % 

20% IS Cluetpf 10 5:1 8 1996 19% 1996—% 

21% 18(6 COO^ 0 Z8 8 1U 1496 14% l«6— % 

50 23t6 Cooxtal 00 7 10 lom .4796 0% 46% + % 

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7M m CoaO ZM AI 15 37» 71V, 59% 71% +1% 

19% m COIOM 1510 15% 15% 15% 

34 25% Coleinn 10 Al 18 92 a 20% 79 + (6 

^ ?55S SAVUP i-Xbu a 4 tdbx2s% 25% 2S% + % 
0 18 7 357 20% a 8D%— % 

23 10 CotPdSa .16 7 15 107 B% 2196 a96— 96 


UMtnth 
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Die. YM. PE 


Sta. 

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31% 

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39% Colilnd 20 44 
35% ColGca 111 117 
48% ColGxpf 50 105 
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8 Oxndta 0 

15% ComiiM 
894 Comoro 
23% CmwE 
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13% CwE pt 20 117 
a CwEpf 110 117 
18% CwE pf 277105 
20% CwEpf 257 114 
17% ComES 232 97 
3096 Comaot 10 34 
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13% COMIr 0b 17 
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10% Conroe 0 27 
23% ConoEd 20 77 
a CenEpf 40 117 
a CenEpf 50 114 
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13% CnP 0B 40 177 
a% CnPpfD 70 177 
25% CnP PIE 70 174 
a CnPpf6 70 174 
11% CnPorV40 174 
9% CnPprU 340 177 
10% CnP PIT 30 17J 
25% OiPpfH 70 174 
11% CnPprR 40 177 
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10% OiPprN 30 I7J 
7% CnPprM20 167 
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44% CoxCm St S 
4% Crais 

a Crone 1406 47 

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3490 CrwnOc 
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13% CifllnoU 
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27% Cyctops 2)0 87 




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20% 80% 
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31% DonoCp 10 44 
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0 OotE pt 90 129 
47% DotE Pf 70 125 
t6 DotE Pi 70 134 
45% Dote pf 70 125 
19% OEpfP 273 117 
30% OE prR 234 125 
1996 DE pIQ 213 125 
19 OEpIP 213 123 
a DEpfB 275 117 
21(6 OEpfO 30 125 
19% DBpfM 30 125 
94% DS prL 40 1U 
M% 06 pfK AI3 134 
13% OtIE pr 30 124 
17% Doxtor 0 37 

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34% DtaShpf 40 107 
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111 14% 
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51% OtlABrd 20 3JD 
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14 OvBpM 2W 123 
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125 218 127 

IS! 231 128 

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9 3492 38% 
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15 1387 3096 
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10 430 55% 

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9% 9%— (4 
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1546 15% 

57 5/ Vi 

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1196 1196 
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12 12 


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190 


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52% 406 GMotpf 50 25 
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12% 0% GlonlP 

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27 1596 affHIII 

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572 3196 31% 31% + % 

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1 35% 3096 3196—% 
293 2596 34% 2596— % 
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140 40% 40% 40%— % 
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10 10% KM W% + % 
99 11% 1190 11% 

40 45% 0 tt — % 
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407 33% 3291 3396— % 
a U 1396 13% + V» 
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30 27 13 400 69% 50% S8*k— % 
20 45 11 40 53% 52% 43 +% 

00 95 10 5% 5% 5% 

10 a 7% 7% 7% + % 

0 23 3 597 13% 13% 13(k + % 
0 24 0 18 10 9% 9%— % 

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10 45 11 IMS 43% 48% 43% + % 

13 195 5% 5% 5% + (6 

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10 1U 80% 80% 80% + % 

10 21 a 30% 20% 30% + % 

1.10 35 U 543 33% 38% 3296 + % 

35 a 15M 23% a% 33% + % 


55 


36% a% a%— % 

20 37 25% 35% + % 

31 3796 3796 87%— (6 

13 0% 79 »W + % 

18 21% 81 31% + % 

» 81 3096 81 4- % 

427 85% 85% 85% + 96 

201 0 0 0+1 
10 89% 206 89(6— V6 

552 18% 17% »%- V6 

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0 XS a 995 3596 35% 3596 
20 45 n UM 51 60V6 60% + % 

15 1» 13% 13%—% 

... 54 U 551 4% 416 4(6— (6 

25% 1796 GtabMpiam T75 10 2096 0% 20% + % 

13% 0% GMNUO II U41 U 12% 12%— % 

4*6 196 GMNvrf Sa 396 3% 3%— % 

31% 11 GMWF 0 5 7 1390 39*6 29% 2*% + % 

a% 24% Gdrldl 10 SE 14 sn 31% XM 3196 + 96 

39(6 a Coedyr 10 *0 7 1901 37 25% 25%— % 

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44% 35% Groa 20 55 II 01 40% 40% 40% 

0 47 OroUlBr 10 20 13 ” “ — — 

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a 

T0 22 12 
10 e121 7 
10 AI 9 
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10 iOA ^ 

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18% 13% GtAtPe 
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31% 15% GNIm 
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29% 1«% OfWPIn 

1996 996 OWHw 

1615 11% GMP 

89% 18*6 Grevb 

44*6 37% GroybPf40 1i . 

5% 3% GraNor 12 

1396 8% GrwfGs 0 13 17 

12% 596 OrubEI 0 J’ 15 

0 B%Crumn 1.0 -35 7 
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1% 4% Gnmtal .15 29 
27% 70 OulHTd M 29 8 
39% 2S% etfWM 
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a 15% GuNR Pt 10 
15% 10 emnii 10 
a 74 GtfSU or 30 jao 
3296 0 Glf5Upr4A0 121 


79 51 5096-5096— % 

221 15% 15% 15% + % 
30 15% 15% I5%— % 
tat to ttVi to +1 
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T« 37*6 37 37 — % 

451 35% 35% 35% 

US 17% 17V6 1716 
10 14% 15% 15%— % 


AS ID 190 25% 25% 85% + % 
IM . . 20l 44% 0V6 44% + % 


30 5% 4*6 5% 
a U 1296 -13 +% 

2a 12% 11*6 n*6— % 

240 306 2596 3S)6 + % 

a 25(6 a% 35% + % 

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Hcralo^aifeenbmic. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.^. Stocks 
Report Page 8 


SATURDAY^UNDAY, APRIL 20 * 21, 1985 


<¥* 


Page 9 


Panamanian Leader Urges 
Use of Economic Measures 


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BjUEQNARDSaK 

. X*w yieri TiniM &!nur 

ANaMA city — President NicoUs Ardito Barielia of 
Panama is an eocnoosst who took his bachelor's and 
master’s degrees in agricokural economics at North Car" 
i^ina State universi^ and his doctorate in ecoaomics at 
the University of Chicago. 

He has spent most of the last two decades in various economic 
posts. At the time he was elected president last year, «ith the 
backing o( the Nanonal Guard he was at the World Bank as vice 
president for Latin America and the Caribbean. 

Despite his close ties with the militazy, Mr. Barietta favors 
peuceful economic devdopmenc. rather than ix^iary force, as the 
way to prevent the ffm4 of 
communism and further the 
trend lOM’ard danoOacy in 
Latin America. 

In an interview, Mr. Barkl> 
ta expressed orucieiy over the 
strains that Latin nations, in- 
cluding his, were undergoing 
as the}' sirug^ to cope Min 
external debt, inilaikn} and 
unemploymeni. 

“Adjasuneni ptrficies have a limit beyond which it is very hard 
to go." he said, **11 is inqwrtut for the ir^Rinri^tiaiinp of 
political and sodal stability in Latin American countries that 
they go from an adjustment ria reeesaon to an adjnsimeni via 
recovery and growth." 

To achieve such a.dypaasc efaangp. he says three things are 
necessaiy: intemal pdlides to increase and tSversify expons and 
to moke coonomies more efficient; additional external finance 
"to boTien the blow,” and, "most important, the international 
recovery, along with a decree of openness in the United States, 
Japan and Europe for Laun Amencah oqxnts." 

Mr. Barleiia said that at the fflotneni, there is a "wave" 
democratic gok'enuuenis in the r^on, bol it would be **a great 
irony if we lose the opporumity to streogiben them." That, he 
warned, could happen as a resuh d rising unemploynient. urban 
misery and poverty, and a shortage of jobs and services for young 
people. 

U nless these problems are dealt with vigorously, he said, 
these countries woold estate worse problems for them- 
selves. "If Nicaragua ts considered a p^lem in some 
quaners," he said, "im^jne what would happen if Brazil became 
a problem." 

Mr. Barietta is a strong supporter of the efforts of the Conta- 
- dora group — Ctriombia, Mexico, Venezuda and Panama »< to 
achieve an agreement for multilateral negpti8ii<»s to settle local 
disputes, such as those in Nican^ua and El Salvador. 

Mr. Barletia said he fdi that greater efforts would be needed 
by the United States and other Western countries to establish 
-order in the interaational moaetaiy ^'stem if Latin America's 
troubles were to be sdved. 

Specifically, he said a "soft landing" for the dollar — a gradual 
downward reat^nstineat in hs exchange vahre could help to 

reduce interest rates spur econo^^ growth. 

Like President Baiicta, many bankers and businessmen inter- 
viewed in Panama said ib^ believe the answer (o any commumsi 
threat in the region is not force, but basically eccmomic develop- 
ment and measures to improve socia] stabili^*. 

Panama, which uses the United States doQar as its own 
national currency, and has no' ceaitral bank, has virtually no 
infUtioa — the tut year’s rate was between 2 and 3 percent Bnt 
Panama suffers from a huge external d^t, economic st^natioa 
and high unemploymeat. 

Mr. Barietta is trying to find a way out this country’s 
economic bind, but many in the banking and business communi- 
ty believe he cannot ito so unless he shews greater political 
independence and sl^ in overcoming the dictates of the militaiy. 



tale in l af fa or ik roles on April 79, exebding fees. 

Offiod fi»ngs for Amterdom. Bnaseh, FronUurt. Mton. Paris. New York rotes at 
A P.AA. 


II 

14 r. 


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Dollar Values 





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BJSI4 PMLhs* 

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09735 OAJ.*kM 36735 



isnrtl*t:l23U imnt 

to) CommtrctaXcanc (MOinwpil in i ca igttawBBepoendteiftincwitineoatflf koyontdoHorf) 
uiuii or 100 is I unfri oi i Ao (vj Units of MAO 
N.O.: not auotH; KA.: iwtevaUBtSc. 

Sauteesi asow* du 54vwAn fgntutai.' Boom eammtretaie itallana tAUIonf.- Banw 
HoH^>oi& M Para iParM: IMF tsoitf; Bcn*» Ant* *t inttnatianal* tnnn$llaatm*nf 
{dinar, rtroi. dirtam}. on>*r data tram ttaattnandAF. 


Interest Rates 


£nrocurr«nGy Deposits 


Ayrfl19 


Dollar 

1M. S9W • Sk. 

2M. atk - Oh 

3M. a He • at). 

6M. ait. • B4t. 

IV. »h • 9*. 


Swiis 

p Merti Prone 
54b • sik 69b ■ Sib 
590 . 5M 6<H. - Stb 
Sib ■ S9b 4*lh -Stb 
5%: .59b 519 • SVb 
6 -61b SV* - 518 


StMUo* Fmc ' ecu SDR 
429b. )39b Nib* 104b 91b - 91b S«b 

T3tb.)39b 1M - tOM 99l - 919 SU 

13Ki.12fh M4b<109b99b .9V9 S4b 
1195 ■ tno 109b • 1095 9 ft. .ftb SM 

lltb.IMb 1B9b. 1} 99k - 99b aib 


mm oppimei* to infrrsoM mpositt or S7 iBf ilTon mAtbmn Mr muMM;. 

SourcH.' Maroon Oiaraafr iaattor. DM, SF, Faun* FFu uavdi Book <eevu Btatan 
<SDRi. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Apsfl 19 


imo. 

Sib -OVb 
Souret: Renters. 


iitm. 

Sift -Sla 


Jnaf. 
89k -8VS 


towo 
Sib 'lib 


9M >991 


Money Rates 

United States 


Omo Piw- 


Otscount Rota 
FtetfOl PuMt 
Prime Rato 
6 rokor Loon RetO 
Conun. Popor. 30-179 dovs 
3.iMntli Timhov Sills 
64MMti Treasury Will 
CD's 3049 0091 
CO'S MM9 doyi 

West Gfflnanv 

Lombsra Rota 
OwernlWit' Rotv 
Ont Monlli mttrboiiK 
>menth UitirbM>k 
SHtMom interbank 

Fimtcs 

Intorvenilen Rote 
CoU'Mmv 
pAksnonlh lotMtonk 
S^nwMIi Inlarbt^ 
oimmcfi 4nMrb0tk 


s 

795 

lOM 

9.9W 

ooo 

767 

7JS 

7SS 

7.90 


660 

S.60 

5iQ 

5.9S 

iilS 


8 

79a 

HFk 

^91b 

OD5 

763 

7J9 

765 

760 


660 

SJO 

S» 

6M 

5.10 


Bp**»»t 

Bonk 8au Rota 
CoU Mon*y 
9 l>4lav Yroofurr Ml 
34 Tianta inierbonh 

Japan 

OKCBiint RVM 
Cotl Monev 
OMav Interbank 


etM* Prav. 

1M 1395 
I39v 1395 

1195 13 

11 13/16 13 sns 


5 5 

S ions 6 1/16 
6S/16 SS/16 




1DV3 10*4 
1095 low 
1014 IDVk 
UM lOVi 
IP 5/M loans 


taureod! Rdutan, CommarMank, CridU Lv- 
onnaJs. Uavas Bonk, Bank ot TWrya 


iLM. P.M, eiraa 
33125 93665 +360 

32760 - +Ui 

329.16 333.05 * 230 

3373S 33760 — 2SD 

337.79 32760 — US 

- '32a50 +060 

OMIcwTxMs tor Loeaei). Perts«rt Umm. 
BBvip. optnim oaO ctoiink srloos tor HOM KHW 
and ZufiOi tto*» vorft Conm earronf csilfabet 
AH prieti i" "*■ • 

Saidtt: Rfutors 


HON Kono . 
(.uumkeMO 
Poris ini kMl 
Zurich 
London 
Naw Vorh 


Chrysler 
Agrees On 
Seoul Tie 

Samsung Project 
To Make Parts 


CnnpdeJ hf (tar Si^ Fntm Dnpatthn 

SI^UL — Chiysler Corp. and 
Samsung Co. of South Korea have 
agreed to form a joint company to 
manidactuie and procure amomo- 
tive parts in South Korea for 
Chrysler, Lee A. lacoixa, Utt chair- 
man of the U.S. automaker, .caid 
here Friday. 

Mr. lacocca said the venture ini- 
lialty woidd be Itmited to parts 
muufaduring but may be ex- 
panded in the future to isclu^ 
manofacnire of ears for Chiysler. 

"We h(M the j(^t-venlute com- 
pany could dex'elop into a bigger 
ihin^” be said. "We would like an 
assembly line of cars at some dme 
in the future." 

The new undertaking is sulgect 
to govemmeiii approve It follows 
a study started b}’ the two compa- 
nies in June. 1984. 

The Chrysler chief, who arrived 
in Seoul on Thursday to discuss the 
venture, sud Chrysler and Sam- 
sung e^ will own SO percent of 
the new concern, tentatively named 
Samsung Development Co. Mr. la- 
CDCC3 did not disclose its capital- 
ization but called it "substantial.” 

He added that the new company 
will work with other South Korean 
ooncems to procure automotive 
eoRiponorts for Chiysler vdiicles 
assembled in North America. 

"We will start modestly,” Mr. 
lacocca said. An office staffed by 
personnel from the two companies 
wiU be opened immediaidy. 

Samsung operates a wide range 
of indusuw plante and services, 
including bi^-technolo^’ elec- 
tronics, smpyards and ma^neiy. 

'This is a significant step for 
Quysler," Mr. lacocca said. "Ii 
mil make Korea a major parts and 
con^wnents base for Chiysler, and 
keep us compeiidve in the world 
automotive maikeiplace. Slaying 
oompetitive worldwide is the only 
way to protect ihejobs of our work- 
en in the United States.” 

"No oiw is inore concerned that 1 
am about the trade unbalance and - 
iu impact on American jobs.” 
lacocca said. "But as a buaness- 
man, I must be pragmatic.” 

lacocca came to South KO' 
rea after a riat to Japan, where it 
was announced that Mitsul^bi 
Motors Corp. had with 

Chrysler on a plan to bwd Mitsu- 
Inshi cars in the United States. 

"Under America's currem trade 
pdides, ihoe seem to be two alter- 
natives involving automobiles," 
Mr. lacocca said. 

"The first is simply to import 
more fmeign cars and trucks whicb 
are conpleiely assembled outride 
the United States. In that case, ail 
of the labor and most of the proHts 
go U) the forrign producer. This 
heightens the trade tension because 
no American jobs are created, and 
many are lost." he said. 

But Mr. lacccca maintained that 
in the arranKments that Chrysler 
has made in Jiq>an and South Ko- 
rea, "there is a sharing in the eco- 
nomic and employment benefits of 
our trade. Both American and Ko* 
rean jobs wll be created, for exam- 
ple, beo^ of our new partnership 
hm," he said of the Seoul link. 

(Reuters, AP) 


BritishBanks 
Cut Base Rales 
By Half -Point 

Raiim 

LONDON — Four British 
banks said Fri^' that they 
were cutting their base lending 
rates to 12K per ce nt, effective 
imme^ately. The li^luctjoiis 
later were endorsed by the Bank 
of England. 

National Westminster Bank 
PLC, Citibank NA. Lloyds 
Bank PLC and Williams & 
Glyn's Bank PLC had bett 
quoting a 13-percent rate. The 
base rate is ine rate on which 
banks determine interest 
charged to borrowers and paid 
to deposiiois. 

National Wesiraioster, 
Lloyds and William & Glyn's 
also cut the interest they pay on 
seven-day deposits to 9^, 

!l was the second round of 
cuts in amoQih. Base rues were 
increased three limes in Jami- 


'We remain hopeful that the 
strengthened sterling exchange 
rates will enable this downward 
trend to continue," said P.W. 
Wilkinson. National Westmin- 
ster's diler executive. 


Getting Merrill Lynch Going Again 

Its Latest Leader Has Ideas — But Will Hey Work? 


By Leslie Wayne 

Veh' 7<v6 Iimki S^ue 

NEW YORK — There no 
other firm in tlie world quite like 
. Merrill Lynch & Cii. 

It is the uanl of the biukcroge 
indu-stry, from New York to 
London to Tokiu. Ib the United 
States. MerriH’s brokerage of- 
ficei have been kniiwn for de- 
cades in nearly c\erv hamlet in 
the I.imi — ' ahriut 40 percent of 
all Americans live wiiliin 20 
miles (.^2 kilometers) of a Merrill 
branch. 

More receiitly. the tixm has 
elbowed Its way into the upper 
echeliias of lovesltnent banking, 
becuming a major force in the 
world or high-stakes cevporate 
finance. 

Bm the giant is faltering Its 
1984 financiai results were dis- 
mal. Merrill earned S9S million, 
compared with S230 million the 
year before — on revenues in the 
same S6-billion range- Its pretax 
profit marj^n was a slim 1.2 per- 
cent, und ii.s 4.8-percem return 
on ei|uliy was for beiov. the in- 
dastry nonn. 

And Mcrnll's executive office 
has been in disamiy: Three dif- 
ferent chief executives have 
reigned in the last four years. 

Those inside and outside the 
autqiany contend Merrill has 
grown lOis far and too fast, and 
that costs have ballooned dan- 
gerously out of control And 
more fundamcnialiy. they ques- 
tion whether the new* man at the 
top hu.s the vision and ilie inner 
fortitude needed ki make (he 
hard dexisions to get the giant 
moving again. 

The new man, nearly 10 
nmnths in the job, is William A. 
&hreyer. 57. u gregarious and 
e^liient former branch manager 
who claims to haie the situation 
in hand, particularly the compa- 



ThvN^TMk rnn 

William A. Sefarey chief executive of Merrill Lynch, 
sitting next to a statue of a bull, riie company's syinbol. 


ny's rising costs. Mr. Schreyer 
points to a cut of 2,300 people 
from Merrill’s pavToll a( 4ZS00. 
He has reorganized the company 
into smaller units, whicb can be 
more tightly monitored. 

Critics are not impressed. 
"They haven't really contained 
cosis." said Joel Rosenthal, an 
analyst for the finn Jesup & La- 
imint. "They have cut out smne. 
but oihers are moving up." 

But Mr, Schreyer is uimimted 
by such rental. He is con- 
vinced the doric days of 1984 
were a fluke of history that is 
over, and insists that his efforts 
will raise 19SS profits and pori- 
uon Nterrill for the day when it, 
and a few other giants, will rule 
global rinancial services. 

'*! uHildn’t be more poriuve or 
enthused," said Mr. Schreyer, 
who returned to Merrill last Jan- 
uary' after a two-month leave for 
coronary bypass surgery, "We^re 
going to let the results speak for 
themselves, and I will ^ great 
satisfaction out of showing 
them." 

Yet a larger question looms at 


Merrill. Vtth some S2 billion in 
capital, the company towers over 
all brotoage rivals' and has the 
sheer financial might to be a 
dominam player in the decades 
ahead. The issue for MerriU, 
however, is one of excellence. 
Win the company remain in the 
leagues riinply because of its 
size — a bu^' but mediocre 
player? Or wiU it realize iLs pn- 
lemial and lead the mdusuy in 
creativity and profits? 

The challen^ is enormous, for 
Merrill a^ires lo succeed where 
others have not dared to go be- 
fore: It wants to be the top in 
both retail br<Aerasc and invesi- 
ment Hanifing Many wonder 
whether Merrill, or any company 
for that matter, can pull off that 
feat Menill’s core busness, re- 
tail brokerage, is beii^ buffeted 
by cuuhrmi compeiiuoa. and its 
prize asset, a nnely-tuned net- 
work of 10,000 retail brokers, is 
seen as a «>sUy anachronism in 
an dectronic era. 

"There is no question that 
Merrill is a m^or player," said 
(Cootumed on 13, CoL 3) 


Analysts Skeptical About Turner Bid 


By Sally Bedell Smith 

Nn' y»ir* OmnSmiHe 

NEW YORK — The view on 
Wall Street is that Ted Turner has 
.only a slim chance of succeeding in 
his offer lo buy CBS Inc. 

Richard MacDonald, an analyst 
for First Boston Corp., on invnt- 
ment house, called the (Kroposal "a 
Inilliam idea, a fabulous blueprint 
for someone who wants to take 
over CBS.” But he added, "h will 
never happen." 

CBS. the dominam televiaon 
network in ratings and also a power 
in radio, magazines and records, is 
certain to fijght for its indepen- 
dence. Thur^y, chough, it de- 
clined comment until it could study 
the proposal, which it characterized 
a.s "coimlcx.” 

Mr. Turner, acting without fi- 
nancial partners, offered to bt^ 67 
percent of the broadcasting gjani, 
but he would not pay any cash. 
Instead, he would give CBS stock- 
holders a package of slock in his 
much smaller company. Turner 
Broadcasting Sy'stem Inc., as well 
as bonds and other notes paying 
high interest. Later he would offer 
to buy the rest of CBS on the same 
terms. 

Mr. Turner estimated the value 
of his olTer at SI7S a share, al- 
though analysts said it was more 
reulisticidlv worth from S150 to 


SlbO a share. At a value of S150 a 
share, a 67 percent bokting would 
cost Mr. Turner about S3 biUion. 

The price of CBS stock gyrated 
Thursday, as it has in the wedts 
since Mr. Tunnel's interest became 
known. It ended the day at 
S106.l2S,downS3.625. 

Most Wall Street analysts ex- 
pressed doubts about Mr. Turocr’s 
offer. But several of a dozen ana- 
lysts, after bong briefed by Mr. 
Turner Diursday morning, smd 
they were inmresWd. 

."You can t dismiss the oian." 
said Edward J. Atorino, an analyst 
with the investment firm of Smith 
Barney, Harris Upbam & Co. *Tie 
is determined, and he has presented 
a creative package to investors 
who, if they put grm before other 
things, could go along with it" 

Mr. Mac Donald oS First Boston 
said Mr. Turner could face difficul- 
ty gainin g the confidence of CBS 
shareholders. "It is because of his 
personality," Mr. MacDonald said. 
"He is a wonderful businessman, 
but he is a maverick.” 

In effect, Mr. Turner’s proposal 
is "the first leveraged buyout di- 
recily to shareholders," said Darnel 
J. Good, executive vice prerident 
and head of mergers and acquia- 
tions at EF*. Hutton &. Co„ which 
is working for Turner. In a 
leveraged buyout, a group of inves- 


Canadians See Hibeniia Project Proceeding 


By RussclJ Blinch 

RniiiTS 

TORONTO — A consortium led 
by Mobil Corp. of the United 
Stales is expecira to go with 
a project to develop the controver- 
sial Hibernia oUndd off the coast 
of Newfoundland, i^astry and 
government officials say. 

liu! mullibillion-ddlar prqect 
was delayed for years biMaiise of a 
di^te between Newfoundland’s 
provincial government and the fed- 
eral government in Ottawa over the 
owneTfthip of mmeral rights. 

But in March, the Supreme 
Court (d* Canada uphdd federal 
domain over the oilfield, rejecting 
Newfoundland’s claim that it 
6wned all mineral ri^is by rirtue 
of its former status as an indepen- 
dent nation. 

Diis effectively cleared the wa^ 
for oil conqianies to start what u 
considered to be a $10-billion pro- 
jeci. 

Still to he resolved, however, are 
taxes payable by the compaAies in- 
volved, which include Mobil Oil of 
Canada Ltd; Chevron Cuada Re- 
sources Ltd.; Petro-Canada, the 
national oil concern, and Columbia 
Ga.s Development of Canada. 

Industry observers say the Pro- 
gressive Consen'utive ^ly gov- 


emmeni, whicb came to power last 
fall, wants to get the prqect mov- 
ing. Hibernia is bdieim to be the 
most significant find in North 
America since Alaska's Prudhoe 
Bay discovery in the 19^. 

Newfoundland’s ener^' minis- 
ter, William Marshall said he ex- 
pects operatiems to start early next 
year. He cited a new condliatory 
approach by Ottawa to both the 
province and the industry. 

Talks on tax matters are now 
gtung <» betvreen the consortium, 
and the federal and provincial gov- 
ernments. 

"We have to see the final costs. 
Until we know that, a final decision 
won’t be made," G.GX. Hen- 


derson, piesdem ot Chevron Can- 
ada Resources. 

Stephen Proby'o, a senior policy 
adv'isar to the /edeiiti eziem minis- 
ter, Pat Carney, said he beuei'es the 
dedsioD to gp ahead will be made 
soon but that the timing is hard to 
piedicL 

If development wmk begins next 
year initial production is expected 
to start in early 1990, more than a 
decade since Hibernia was discov- 
ered in 1979. 


ENH NUIONALE PER L'BIERGIA ELEITRICA (LN.LL) 

TVi per ceal. 1971/1986 loan of 
European Corrency Unitn 60 , 000 , 000 . 

Notice is hereby given to bondbuldcni erf the above loan that the 
Deutsche Mark (European Currency Unit 1 = DM 3.66} has been 
nlectcd as paj'mcnl curreuev for drawn debentures ami due 
coupon. Drawn dehenlures and coupon N* 14 will be payable on ur 
afkr May 1, 1985 by paying :^nts mentioned on 11 k debeulura. 

Fiseal Agent 

KREDIETBANK 

S.A. lHiaeinbiiur|jeofec. 



On the French Riviera 


THE ONLY FRENCH 
CASINO WITH A Fl^Ll. 
COMPLEMENT OF 
FEMALE DEALERS 



Loews 

LaNaEode 

five minute drive 
freon downtown Cannes, 
on the beach 


FOR INFORMAHON: 
please CAUi 
(93) 69.90.00 


311 RESERVE 

INSURED OEPOSrrS TRUST 


SteiNDEP 

An Aeeount far the Cautious bivHtor 
to Preted and Increase Gipitoi 


U.S. Detlar Denominated 
InsuTMl by U.S. Govt. Entities 
tfitportont Tex Advonteqes 
Cenipetitive 
Money Mniet YMdi 
hfa fttoiliet Risk 
Immedote Liqi^ly 
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CHEMICAL BANK New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 

Registrar 

RESfNDEP 

Cose Rostole 93 

121 1 Gene v a 25, Switzerland 

Please send pre^edus end 
oeceunt appkeetien lOi 


Name. 


Addres. 


Nbr iMKfaUi Mdhn I5t USA 


IMF Makes Plea 
For Stability in 
Exchange Bates 


tors buys a company in a transac- 
tion financed m^y bv borrowing 
agmnst the assets of i6e company 
being taken over. Ev«anuUy the 
debt is paid off ^ money derived 
from tiie company's operaiing in- 
come as weU as from the sale of 
some assets. 

Mr. Turner made clear in docu- 
mems filed Thursday that be want- 
ed CBS’s television operations but 
would sell ofi its record, toy and 
publiriung divirions, whidi n^re- 
sent a laige part erf the coiporauon. 
He also ^ be would selThs radio 
stations and WCAU in Philadel- 
phia. one of its five televiaon sta- 
tions, iher^' complying with regu- 
latory requirements. 

Mr. Turner disclosed Thursday 
that Turner Broadcasting of which 
he owns 80 percent, has acquired 
140,000 shai« <rf CBS stock for 
S14.9 million. That is less than one- 
half of 1 percent <rf the shares oul- 
standii^ 

Mr. Turner’s trffer is contingem 
on his bring able to acquire at least 
67 percent — or 20 tmllion — of 
CBS's 29.7 million outstanding 
shares, aj^roval by the Federal 
Communications P-ommiKsiftn and 
the repeal (rf a CBS bylaw passed 
by the company’s board of direc- 
tors last week that removed from 
shareholders the ri^i to call a spe- 
cial shai^trfdeis' meeting. 


Compilni Our Staff Frca: Pupjirkcs 

WASHINGTON — The laia- 
national Monetary Fund's policy- 
making interim commiiiee calM 
Friday for countries to seek greater 
ex«.4uDge-rale stability. 

The plea came in a coirununique 
issued at the end of I.MF and 
World Bank semiannual talks. 

The panel also said the trend 
toward proiectiouism in trade must 
be quickly rev'ersed. This followed 
a call eartier in the conference by a 
World Bank committee for a new 
round of inieroaiiona) trade talks. 

Fiscal defiots in sev-eral nations, 
the committee said, continue to 
cause concern. But the communi- 
que praised the U.S. govemmem's 
initiative to cut its bmdget deficit 

A more critical \iew of U.S. eco- 
nomic jctioo. howeic', M-as voiced 
by Nigel Lawson, Bntish chancel- 
lor of the exchequer. He said as the 
talks between the two interoational 
agencies ended that the Reagan ad- 
nunisiration should seek a bigger 
cut in the dendi. which was. he 
charged, being financed by "suck- 
ing in the savings of the rest of the 
world.’’ 

The U.S. administration's bid for 
neuriy SJOO billion in spending culs 
over the next three years should 
probably be matched by increased 
taxes, itie chancciior said. 

Mr. Lawson said the U.S. deficit, 
estimated at a recrnid S213 billion 
this year, will probably be a prob- 
lem for a several years and win 
k^ interest rates high, de^ite 
White House plans to trim it to 
atkuit SlOO billion in 19S8. 

Mr. Lawson appeared receptive 
to U.S. suggestions that European 
nations should improve their econ- 
omies by removing "structural ri- 
^diiies,'^ such as excessive regula- 
tion. 

Malcolm Baldrige, the U3. sec- 
retary of commerce, rmmety de- 
scrib^ Europe as a backwater of 


constraints on new technology, 
controls ihat stifie enuepreneur- 
ship and resistance to senice in- 
dustries. 

Linking the trade and exchange- 
rate preoccupations of the talks be- 
tween the two ag^cies, the French 
finance minister. Pierre Bcu^ovoy 
said trade negotiations connc'i ig- 
nore the extreme iosubiliiy of in- 
ternational exchange rates and high 
interest rates. 

Earlier during the talLs, the 
World Bank urged industrial and 
developing countries alike to join .'i 
new round of talks to lower barriers 
to uttrld trade. 

The Reagan administration 
would like to see such a round take 
place in 1986. and is pushing for 
aeatioD of a preparatory commit- 
tee this summer to start planning it. 

The U.S. president is expected to 
urge such a timetable at the eco- 
nomic summit of industrial nations 
io Bonn May 2-i. 

The bank also announced that its 
e.\ecutive board has decided to go 
ahead with discussions with mem- 
ber countries aimed at creating a 
new international agmey to insure 
private iavestmem in developing 
countries against political risk m an 
effort to innease capital flows to 
them. 

It also urged increased aid to 
sub-Sahara .Africa and multiyear 
rescheduling of debts of countries 
there to allow them to focus more 
of their energies on reducing their 
acute poverty and achieving eco- 
nomic growth in the years ahead. 

In another development, the 
United States a^n opposed ex- 
pansion of the World Bank's re- 
sources. Many countries e.xpressed 
disappointment at what has so far 
been a successful Reagan adminis- 
tration effort to block a capiial in- 
crease for the hanL 

(Reuters. AP. VPI, NYTl 


DoUarStabSises in iV.Y. Trading 

IhiuJ Press /menusttoHdt 

NEW YORK — The dollar advanced Friday in New York and 
dealers said it appeared to stabilize as the market looked for direciion 
on the economy and interest rates. 

But ihe dollar remained below 3 Deutsche marks and dealers said it 
will need a strong impetus lo make an assault on tiiai key level in the 
days ahead. 

"We’ve had the big adjustment down for the dollar, now we need a 
period of digestiem," said ilonald Liesching, economist at Chase 
Manhattan Bank, "ilte doUar can't continue dropping at such dra- 
matic rates but. with the economy apparenilv weakening, and the Fed 
easing the trend for now is clearlv down." ' 

"The selling pressure seems to'have abated for the time being,” a 
dealer for anothd' bank said. "We look for a period of consolidation." 

The British pound eased to S1.29S0 on Friday from $1.2973 on 
Thursday. Other late dollar rates Friday in New Yorit. compared with 
Thursday, included: 2.9780 Deutsche marks. 2.9875; 9.0950 French 
francs, 9'0550; 2.47S0 Swiss francs, 2.4600; 1,906 Italian lira. 1,903, 
and 247.38 Japanese yen. 247.10. 


“PRI/TECH” 

PRIVATE AMRICAN TECHNOLOGY S.A. 

SociM Anenyme (Tlnvestissement 
Rogistored Office: Lincembeurg - 20 Bd. Emmonud-Servots 
R.C Lnxemboiirg B 20.566 

.Notirr is betiebv giren that the 

.4!«WAL GENERAL MEEICVG 

of [be fthaieholdeis of pn/tech will be bdd at the leguterrd office at 2.30 

p.m. OR .April 29. 1985 with the following 

AGENDA 

1. .Appmii'al of the repons of the board of diiecton and of the statutory 
aiKUior. 

2. .ApprovalofthebalancesheetaiidpRrfitaBdlossaccouniforlbefbcal 
year ended December 31, 1984. 

3. Allocation of the net result. 

4. Dischaige to the statutoiy* auditor for the proper performance of its 
duiiei during the fiscal year ended December 31, 1984, 

5. Re>electiou ^ the statuuicy auefitor and election of two new ditectors. 

6. MiftcelLuiiwis. 

Resolutions of the ahareholden ivill be passed at a simple majoriiy n{ 
ihow present and xtnuig. Each share b entitled to one vote provided 
no petsim a» shareholder and/or proxyholder nur role for more than 
20^ at the shares issued nor for more' ilun 40?e of the shares present 
at lb.- meetii^. 

and that an 

EXTRAOBDIBrARY GENERAL MEETING 

Of the companv will be held immediaiely tbereafler with the following 

agenda: * 

1. Ameodmeat of the ioftl par. of article 3 and of article 30 of the articles 
nf ixKorpuranon by sutiraRifing a reference to the Liw of 25ih Aisusi 
!9ffi on collective investment undertakings to thit of the 31st July, 
1989 on bolding ounpanies, 

2. Arnendroent of the fourth sentence of the second par. of article 21 of 
the articles of ioeorpoiatioB, which shall read as follows: the mlemp- 
lion pnee. which shall be deieimined at least once a mcmtii shall be 
the net asset v^ue per share c^cuhled in conformity with article 23 
hereafter at the valiution date on which the redeniption request is 
received, provided the company receives such a request before Roon, 
Luxembotiig time, or at the ncii valuation date, if receipt lakes place 
after such tiroe ai a valuation date. 

3. Insertion of ihefoUowii^at the end of the first par of article 21 of the 
articles of incorporaiion: 

'The redemption price shaU nomuUy be paid H-ithin 10 days 
following the laluation date on which it has bm determined". 

•L Insertion in article 5, at the third paiagtspb, of the artirtea irf 
ew sentence to read as follotor. 

"The issue or sales price shall be paid by the subscriber within seven 
I ^e of deteiminaiioa’'. 


incueporatiun of a new : 
"The issue or sales 
days foUowii^ the < 


5. AddiiionoIaseccHidsentenceiiiaR.24of thearticlesafinorapontion 
to read as follows: 

*Tlwre shall be at least one net asset valuation every month, in 
accordance with art. 23 hereabove". 

6. To r^rlue the word "comineirial" by the word "abnormal" in 3 tl 23 
of oiueles of incorporation in par. 1 of the nilea of determiiution of 
the nd asset value. 

Retulutioos of the shaiFboldera la be pasted at tbeextraordiizary general 
meeting require a quorum of 50?o of tne shares outsunduig to tie presoil 
or repmented and will be passed at a majority of 41 of tbe^ present and 
voliiqi;. 

At the extraordinary general meeiii^ each share is enrilfed to One vote. 
A sfureholder inav act at any ineetii^ b> proxy. 

Id Older to paiticipalc in the above meetings the owners of bearer shares 
shall have to deposit ihrir abares five bi^i^ da}‘s before the nie|rtiiu at 
tiu* legistred ofuoe of pri/tech or with a bank acceptable to pri/tei'iL 
Ob bnhnU of the coispnBy, 

BANQUE PRIV£E Sdi. Lwxewbotirg Brandi 
jjp BL E.- Servafe > Lnseinboiirg 












Inda)% 




dosing 


Tables include the notienwide prices 
UP to the closing on Walt Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


23 M im 
20 StS 
38 ?k 30 Ui 

30 U siie 
saw <sva 
Site aoM 
SM 
BW 3 
S 3 H S 8 H 



U.S. Futures j^traw 


Grains 


WHEAT CCBT) . . 

MOObumlnlmiiffl-tfelkinwbifsM 
4S 3 AM MOV SJDWi 3 J* UOK 1 S 6 -K gS 

3 M 3 d 4 VS Jul S 30 in 3 J 3 

1 »W 3 dS Sep 130 U 2 M t- gW* 

3A3W 3Jm Dec 141 W &0 3L«ns fm -MRM 

3 ^lS amo Mo- 14 M X 474 fa 146 

tm 144 _ww v_ ■ 345 -jxn 

EsLSoles Prev.Soles 9 < 3 H 

Prev. Dov Open Inrt. 37413 off WB 


Metals 


SOYBEANS (CBT) 

AOOObo mMinunvdellaniwbwM 
7,97 S 4 IM MOV SJfie SWW 


7.99 MO 

746 M2 

6J1 Ml 

648 M3 

649 SM 


MOW Jul 642 AK 
M 2 Aug SAM AASte 
Ml S 9 SAIW 643 
M 3 VS Nev 647 4 ASM 
S 44 W Jon A 1 S A 18 W 


7 J 9 A 15 
649 648 
Est.S 0 les 


60SW MV sn sn 


May 63 S 646 V> 

Jul 643 643 

Prev.SelM 20481 


Prev. Dov Open tnt 64482 us 994 
SOYBEAN MEALCCBT 3 

lOOtons-dellanperta 

30 SL 00 12640 MOV 12740 12 B 40 

19640 13240 Jul 13340 1 M» . 

18040 13 S 40 AU 8 UM W .10 

17940 138.10 Sep 13940 13940 

18350 14350 OCt M 350 14240 

» 44 e 14380 Dee 1 £A 1£40 

16340 14840 Jon 15000 15000 

20650 15340 Mar 1 SS 40 15540 

faS 15940 Moy 15940 15940 

ICTJM l^f» Jill 

^Mles Prev.Soin IA 649 

prev. Day Open Int. 46476 ona 45 
SOYBEAN OILCCB-n ^ 

60000lbs-dellar9Per100ll& 

3348 2240 May 3142 3145 

3225 2370 Jul 30 L 5 D 3040 

31.17 99 ea Aue 2940 2540 

3030 2250 Sep 2355 2395 

9.15 2240 Oct 2310 2310 

2830 2240 Dee 2735 2740 

2745 2250 Jon 2650 2740 

2730 3640 War 2640 2640 

sue 9 i 4 d May 

Ewlsutee Prev.Seles 12441 

Prev.DoyOpwilnL 573 S 4 upil 

OATSCCBTl 

540DbumbtlnHim*denaniwbwM 

141 U 6 W ftey 158 lilWi 

138 VS 143 Jul 14316 144 

140 Sep 14 M 14 Z 

142 M 144 Dee 144 W I 44 M 

14786 14686 Mor 

E 5 tSolet__ P'WJS'W ««W 3 

Prev.DoyOpenlnl 3120 ofl 27 D 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMEI _ 

43800 Ibo^ cents per lb. 

6940 59 JD APT 6040 6315 
6940 6277 Jun 6345 6315 

5747 6315 Aug 6430 6445 

6540 6140 Get 6347 6 I 4 D 

6745 6240 Dec 6445 6440 

6745 6440 Fib 6035 6 Sn 

6747 0535 Apr 6635 6630 

EsLSoles 13534 Prev.Soles UIM 
Prav.DoyOpsnlnt. 56456 offMS 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

46 A 0 aib 3 -egat 9 psrlb. 

762 D 6445 Apr 6 & 7 S 63 M 

7175 6440 May 6545 6672 

7330 6640 AUB 6347 6542 

7340 6740 StP 6130 6 in 

7232 67.10 Del 68 J 0 6332 

7250 67.90 Nev 6375 6545 

7940 6935 Jon 6940 694 $ 

Bst.SaM 6 1303 Prev.SoM 1371 
Prev.DavOpgnlnL 3505 offU 3 
HOOSCCME) _ 

33000 ftSfesnls per lb. ^ ^ 

5445 4250 APT 4345 4340 

5550 47 JS Jun 4315 4540 

S &77 445 Jul 5365 5040 

5437 4740 Aug 5035 S 3 S 5 

S 14 S 4 Sj 00 Oct 473 D 4740 

5385 4630 Dee « 3 S 4850 

5040 4635 Peb 4842 4940 

4735 4540 APT MAS 4645 

49 AS 4740 Jwi 4835 435 

EsLSnles 5567 Pfw.Soles 4320 
Prev. Day Open Int. 2 X 964 upi 21 
PORK OBLUESfCME) 

31400 IbA-cents per ti. - __ 

• 1240 67.15 May tSTO *5M 

8247 42.15 Jut 6140 6735 

•365 6030 AOS 6 SL 5 D 1545 

7630 63.15 Feb 7 U 0 7 U 0 

7540 6440 MOT 

7 S 50 7040 MOV 

7600 7040 Jul 

Est.Salae 3031 Prev.Soles 4313 
Prev. Day Open Int 12417 oeU 7 


COFFEE eOlYCSCfl) 

37400 Ib 6 - cents per lb. 

15240 12201 Way I 4 QJ 0 14215 14330 

14930 12140 Jul 14040 1 « 3 S 14000 

1474 D 12740 SeP 13940 UUS 13950 

1444 S 12935 Dec 13930 14140 13950 

14340 13390 MOT 13940 14290 13940 

142 .n 13140 May 14 QJ 0 14050 14040 

14050 13540 Jul 14040 14300 14340 

1374 Q 13235 Sep 

E 9 t. 5 oles Pr»y.Sales 2409 
Prev.ppyOpenlnl. 13369 Off 327 
SUOARWORLD 11 CNYCSCEI 
112.000 tbsr cents per lb. 

1090 343 May 342 256 141 

945 367 Jul XJO 274 341 

9 J 5 347 Sep 350 353 284 

945 441 <£t 4.10 610 8.99 

7JS 440 Jon 640 440 640 

• 943 441 Mar 445 445 606 

7.15 312 May 316 316 547 

649 545 Jul 330 548 330 

640 617 StP 

EsLSoles 8401 Prev.S^ 7418 
Prev, Day Open Int. 84401 «HV 7 
COCOA orrcscR) 

10 inetrielens*$pgrtDn 

2570 1998 May 3410 aSOB 2 « 7 D 

2400 1990 JW 2265 230 2229 

3415 1917 Sep 3159 2205 2154 

2337 1945 Dee 3145 3156 2130 

2190 1955 Mar 3150 2152 2143 


Paris Commo^ties 

April 19 


Freneb trena per metrle ton 
Aug 1 ^ 1 ^ 1470 1472 +14 

Oct 1496 1490 1496 1497 +6 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1440 14 S +11 

Mor 1430 1625 1426 M 32 +4 

MOV N.T. N.T. I 4 n 1480 +4 

Aug N.T. N.T. 1431 1452 - — S 

Est. v^; inbjols et 50 tom Prev, actual 
gales: 603 tolAOpsn Interssi: 16449 


- 547 W +jn 8 S 
6 JHU +41 
645 +JXM 
642 — 41 W 

647 W >^ 40 U 
617 W -M 
649 — 401 b 

636 W- 4 M 2 

642W^im 


12740 —40 

13170 —40 

13640 —40 

13940 — M 

14240 — un 
14740 —40 

14940 —JB 
15660 +.10 

15940 +140 
16140 +140 


3145 -46 

3040 

2945 —45 

2 UD 
2745 
37.12 

3142 -J 1 
3670 —40 

2 f 40 —40 


14 M +4086 
144 + 40 W 

lU +4M 
16486 +4086 
14786 


6040 6047 
6360 6360 
6660 6612 
6342 6365 
6440 6660 
6500 iS» 
tun 6640 


6545 65 n 
ixix S6L05 
6 I 4 S 
6625 6565 
6845 682 
6865 68 M 
6940 6940 


6».ai 6242 

5040 5047 
SOLOS 58.12 
4745 4745 
4825 4835 
4142 4875 
4 S 4 S 4540 
M .10 4815 


6690 6547 
6645 6662 
6690 6542 
7140 7142 
71 JU 
7245 
TIN 












irr.mgng 













PinonclQl 


us T. BILLS (IMMI 
51 mllllon-plsof meet. __ 

9245 17.14 Jun 92.18 9244 

91 J 7 8694 Sep 9147 9147 

9143 1547 Dee 9143 QN 

90193 1640 6 Mr 9047 9043 

9044 5741 Jun 9040 9040 

9 Dl 36 M 40 Sep 9045 9045 

9815 8945 Dee 9813 9815 

8948 8948 Mar 

EsLSotes Ptev.Salei 16458 

Prev.DoyOpgalnt 4 tM 78 olfISS 
TO YR. TREASURY fCBT> 

5100000 prtiKpt 9833 nds of MO act 
■24 709 Jim 0146 B -4 

IMS 7 S- 1 I Sep 0026 gl -4 

•022 75 >I 3 Dec 00 004 

•04 75 -M MOT 79-7 794 

79-36 7+30 Jun TB-H 78-19 

ErtLSales Prev. soiee 10866 

Prev. Doyopen Int. 40451 efl 3 l 2 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 Pd«Q 0400 ptB A 32 ndsof HOp^ 
77-15 57-90 Jun 72-3 72-15 

7+2 57-10 Sep 71-1 7 V 13 

7+5 574 - Dec 784 70-14 

7230 57-3 Mor 49-7 69-19 

- 70-16 5+29 Jun 68-15 68-98 

703 S +29 Sip 67-29 6+7 

69-36 S+ 2 S Dec 5 F* 

69 - 12 5+97 ' Mar 

6+2 63-12 Jun 6+7 6+19 

6+26 634 Sep 66 664 

604 6224 Dec 65-16 6546 

EsLSoles Prsv.Sales 19 SJS 7 

Prev. Day Optniat 4 l 84 M up I 486 
ONMACCBT) 

5100000 prln-pts 83 Indsonoopct_ 

70 - 10 SM 7 Jun 704 70-10 

69-19 5+13 Sep 69-12 69-13 

68-13 594 Dee 

6+1 5+20 Mor 

5748 5025 Jim ' ' 

574 65 Sep 

EstSales Prev.Soles 737 

Prsv.DoyOpWlnL 4475 up 2 n 
CERT. DEPOSIT <IMM) 
smuiltoo-ptseflWpet 
9145 1540 Jun 9 IA 9141 

9141 1540 SSP 9897 9141 

9046 0544 Due 9049 9049 

9815 1856 Mor 0946 09 N 

5942 1643 Jun 

09 N 1746 See 

5899 08 M Dee 

EstSolM Prew.Salee 346 

Prgv.DoyOpeninL ARSeftBlO 



(Indems compiled stigrtly bofa 
BP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
polnisamfosnis 

. lOltM mw Jim IflN W40 

19340 16049 Sep 109L30 MMO 

19840 17SL70 Dec M04D 18895 

1900 19810 Mar 19340 19340 

BN. Sole* ■ Prev.Saiee SMU 

Prev.boyOpenlnL 51452 oftlNt 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
pobitsond cents _ -l 

21940 17M0 Jun 1*6-60 19rN 

212N 1^ tee anS NM 

EstSaIss . Prev.Solm .am 
Prev.DoyOpeBinL S436eff166 
NYSE CO MP., IN DEX (RYPyt 

ppiffrisondcwnv 

tI«M 9M0 Jun W3S MMO 

111N 9145 Sep I07.B WN 

1U7S WUO Dec M87S M9L7S 

11345 lILM Mgr 11140 11140 

Bst.Sglei Piw.Saige 11431 

Prev.OgyOgeninL Ml5 aft77 


I markgfclaoe) 


11140 11220 +45 

1005 IBS 4 S 4 sM 
10860 nlN + 4 tf 
mJO 192 M 


1905 1 W 40 

20140 20140 -«60 


1 OU 0 MSN +.15 
10745 10745 — tIS 

M 9 JD M 9 J 3 —40 
11 IN 111 N — iBL 


Commodlnr Indexes 


Closo 

MOOdVll I - 951.»f 

RWf***** - .liMBJO 

DJ. Futures.— NA. 

Corn. Resoorch Bureau. . NA. 
MoodyV 1 base 100-: Dec -31, 1931. 
p -preliminary; f ■final 
Reuters : base 100 : Si^ IB 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31< 1974. 


Previous 

9 S 1 i»f 

1 ,BB 6 J 0 - 

122 . 98 » 

. 242J0 


Asian Commodities 

April 19 




49 W 31 W UAL JSg 14 6 2779 43 Vb 414 b 419 k- 
36 M 24 W UALPl 2 N 82 131 30 29 W 

15 W 7 *k UeCBL 19 139 MU M 

2 m levk UGI 246 94 10 141 22 W 214 % 3 Z«W 

S 4 M 19 Vk UGI M 245 115 1000 s 23 W 33 W 834 

1 IW 3 UNCRes 58 98 i 9«8 9 W 

14 10 URS 40 b 34 17 39 11 H IIW 11 ^ 

33 W 1718 USPGS 220 64420 2135 338 < 321 b 331 

35 «b 22 V 9 USGS 140 U 6 6 B 33 32 32 > 


Raiten 

FRANKFURT — West Goman economic 
growth may already have peaked and forecasts 
of 3-pen^t expansion of the gross narinnai 
moduct in 19S5 are wishful thmldns, Hans 
Fahnin^ chainnan of the Assodation m Public 
Sector Banks, said Friday. 

The fondesbank. West Germany’s central 
bank, said in its 1984 annual rraort released 
Thursday that the foun^tion for eawn inj^- 
growth in Germany was secure. 

GNP forecasts generally range from 2.5 to 3 
percent from government minisieis, and some 
economic institutes have been citing 3 percent 
or more, GNP measures the value of a 
nadon's goods and services, including income 
from forngn iovesnnents. 

Mr. Fahning told a news conference that 
several components of domestic demand are 
weak and growth is heavily dependent on ex- 
ports that could ea^y be hit by a doUv fall. 

Mr. Fahning, ^io is chief eiiecutive ^ the 
Hamburgjsche Lande^Tank Giiczentrale, said 
he beiiev^ thai- the Bundesbank had set an 

Monet ary expansiiin 

ifi - . been^ 


COCOA 

Freoch macs pgr IN kg 
May 2415 24 N 2409 2410 —1 

Jly N.T. N.T. aam — UnDl. 

SOP U7B 2357 X 1 S 5 Z 161 —3 

Dee N.T. N.T. 2475 2 N 0 +2 

Mor N.T. N.T. — 2.105 Undi. 

May NT. N.T. — 2,120 - S 

JfV N.T. N.T. — zm —5 

M. voL: tf tarn of 10 Ions. Prev. oduol 
Mill: 216 lots. Open imgrest: 7*4 

COFFEE 

Frepeh frana pv IN kg 
May 3465 34 N 2 N 6 24 N —2 

Jly 24 M 34 N 2 N 0 2490 —5 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2410 24 N + M 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2430 2470 UndL 

Jon N.T. N.T. 2435 2475 Ufidl. 

Mor N.T. N.T. 2410 — +10 

MOV N.T. N.T. 3M — +7 

Eet. veL: 3 lelsofS lDn+ Prev.oduelHlM: 
49 tote. Open bitarest: 213 
Secirea.* Sewraeak/CemnMrea 


London Metaln 

April 19 


Cloee Prev l oei 

ALUMINUM “ ** 

sterung per metric foe 
«eet 072M 87340 S64N 065N 

forworO WIN 8NOO 88040 HUM 

m^ER CA-rmOES (Hipb Grade) 
SleiiiRu per roefrlc ion 
apot l.)6aiB 1,17000 1.172N 1,17440 

lorword l.uun I.INjQO 1.IS7N 1.15740 

COPPER CATHODES (StBadOrd) 

Sterling per metric ten 

•pet 1.I4JJM 1.146JM 1.1S9N 1,16340 

(envard 1,16340 l.lSjQO l!U8H 145940 

LEAD 

Sterl in g per metric top 

•Pel 2KMB 29640 nwmi auen 

forward 298N M40 mS *StS 

NICKEL 

Sferthtp per metric ton 
spot 444040 646540 642040 646UI0 

forward +17SLM +W40 ^IIMM - wnM 

SILVER 

Penc e per trey eupce 

Si^ £840 £940 69040 5D8H 

forward SI3N 51340 514N S18N 

TIN (Stoodard) 

Sterling per metric ten 

ZINC 

.stenipg per metric ten 

OMN 7TO-Og 68740 69040 

terword 68840 OfdJIO H140 ft? Iff 

SounnAP. 


London Commodhios 

,^prill9 


CtoH . Prwlow 
HM Low EM Ask EM Ask 

SUGAR 

sterdne per metric ton . - 
SSoy 10540 I04N 10340 T044D 10540 10SN 
Aug 118N 11IU0 11020 1I0N 111N lILM 
Oct 11SL60 1I4N 1UM I14N 11530 1UN 
Dec 121N 12IN 1^ 12140 I2U0 1224Q 
Mor 13640 13260 iSS 13260 13X60 inJO 
May 13940 139N 1W60 137N 138M 13940 
Aeg N.T. N.T. 141M UXH I63N 145N 
Volume: 2440 lots Of n tom. . 

COCOA 

MerllngperiiielrfeleE ' 

May 1425 T.9M I4M tJSS I'ST 

Jly 1417' 14N 1497 IJtl ' 1496 1,197 

sm 1467 tSS »« 1461 1447 IM 

Dec 1406 14U 1416 1N7 1^4 im 

Mor T4N 1N9 li» IJ84 INIr1^ 

660y 14N 14N 1^ 1,795 IQ 1400 

Jly N.T. N.T. 1485 1410 . IJTC 14H 

Vekime: 2422lat6en0tan+ ' 

COFFEE 

Sterling ger metric ten 

6Ny 2403 1.9N 1,986 1^ INJ 

Jly 2450 2N6 2.W 2<SS 

Sep 2495 2470 2472 2473 2470 2473 

Nev 3JU 2413 240 2ND 2497 2498 

Jop X1N 2JN %f07"XU6 2,1N 1107 
Mm- ZTM 2490 2410 84M 24N 2494 

MOV 2490 24BS 24M 2490 2460 2470 


Cash Prices April 19 


Cemmodlty and Unit. 
Cofte 4 Sontoti Bl.— — — , 
Prifltciolh 6^n Vb, yd . 

steel bllMs (PitU, ton 

Iren 2 Fdrv. Ptillo. ton 
Steel scrap Ne 1 liw pitt, . 
LeodSpoLIb——..,— 
Copper elect, lb 

Tin (Sirahsl, ib — - 

Snc. B. St. U Eoels. lb — _ 
Poliaffliim.az • 

saver N.Y.ec — 
Sbarea.'AP. 


Dividends April 19 


24M 24M 2470 


Volume: 2761 Mis of 5 tons. 


GASOIL 
U4. dollar! i 


’ metric ten 

>40 33040 2293522875 


DM Futures Cations 
April 19 

W. Gwooi Mwb-I&OOO nois. coA pw mb 


CelMcMe 
Job See Dec 

31 Z7S 3.11 340 

a 1,«0 . 2£ — 

K 142 LB — 

S OB. TN ON 

X 036 ON — 

» on 064 — 

EsIMM Wei vebUDI 
CBlE!T1MveL7.»MH 
Put! : Ilwrs. veL X 999 aOH I 

Source.’ CME. 


Pm+SelflB 
Jwi Sep DM 
049 833 042 

823 056 — 

049 885 — 

898 U< — 
1 i 1 144 — 

— ' 2N — 




S&P 100 Index Opti ons 
April 18 



Senatoi^ Delaj 
Conrail Sale Vote 

The Assocutud Press 

WASHINGTON -- llie pro- 
posed sale of ConraQ to Nonxcdk 
Southern Corp. ran into unexpect- 
ed trouble when a Senate commit- 
tee posqxxied action after mem- 
bers complained that -several 
antitrust measures had sot -been 
fiiQy examined. 

llie Senate Commerce Commh- 
lee put.ofT on Thimsday a vote on 
the proposal until April 30.- At the 
appeared to be 


same time, 


k*j.i;W.»f:T;rT;rer] 


ComimitBe for a resobitioa seekmg 
to bold aU Senate action imdl the 
Justice Depanmenx examines a 
track divestuureitian anned.at pro- 


Me CellKat PdMjP 
1^ M May J«M Jh AN Mar Jbm Jlr 

— — ma _ M bL I* 

I4f 11 in« in* 8 te 

l?i tu L L 1? W 1 w. 

•S' i!i. ’ s/l6 It! 3H Ph 

III 1/16 1b 3bk Ab Ab Ok 5« » 

IS KU ?» « ® - 

W I IJS Lnr ^ - 

T WPccfl wnem uue 
T9WeWieeabd.|4btff 
. nW9N vaNnw li&TIS 
TEMMaptalatinj* 

UwITSM OoiinSM-1.16 
Seem; C30B,' 


the natioD’s lanest-imln^ 


Hoesdi Weike lifts Sales 

Reutm ' 

DORTMUND, ' West Germany 
— Hoesch Weike AG, the .West 
German stedmaking concern, said 
Friday that sales rose 7.6 percent is( 
to 7.25 bilH(>o Deutsdw 
nwks (S2J9 billion). Despite a sig- 
mficamiy higher, operating profit 
bowever, the company said it wift 
.omit a dividend for last year. Nb 
profit figures wme gvea. ■ 


GfaanaDevrinegitg Cariei^^ 

united Press Iiamtolonal ' 
ACCRA, Ghana — flliang' has 
devalued its cuiren^ by 6pcicS 
and announced moves to'miaeasp 
imports and credit as part of a plait 
u boost.tte ec^ononw, *nie Baifk rf 

®iana saM Ihoisday that Ihe'et: 
raasge rate would drop from 50, to 





























































INTERIVATIONAL HERALD TRIBtJN£» SATURDAY-^LISDAY, APRIL 20-21, 1985 


BUSniK ROUNDUP 


MA 9|Ib \ 

P ^ p ' 

E« ^ B»S 5-n 53 • 

gja 52 «»« &4i til V 
tfM juSi aaj« SA !>a • 

25 2^8 Sl • 


Borden Posts 2 . 6 % Increase in Profit 

• u™ i ^pany, has inwf' wilh itb easUng U.S. i>pcruiiuns, its 



sat., twi feults.froa its ttumaa> 
iion^ t^aitons Here d^nused 


UM upersung utcone mini it» in* Borden the worlJ's JnrgeM mium- 
tdrtuuixutldiviitftni fell 25 percent, facturer df decnraiive wollctncr- 
Eugene Sulli\‘aa, ehairroun uf ings. 

Bonten. &ud two ihinis of the de* It also soid it signed a letter uf 


by the strea^ of the doKar. Boiden. &ud two thirds of the de* It also said it signed a letter uf 
Bwdm also aonounoed U had UUw abroad was due. to foreign* tAtenttojtMn with the ^qihar first 


<Jg4 

•TMt 52 ^ 
*SSl Sffr 


jasD S» 

1^ 5u 


S£ :1SS§ -]«gl 

^ ^ % JKS 

^ jS S a 

ffSis, 

iS 

5r — 


^ ' purchased waUonering businesses exdiange losses, combined with the 
^ in Britain ai^ Canada. effects of the strong dollar. The 

It maintains these acquisitions company had exchange 1 om«s that 
aill make Borden the indnsiry me more thou S3 million above 
^ leader in decosative waUewerings. the year-i^ level 
^ In additioo, Borden said that it MeanAflik, Borden said it was 
% > had agreed to micr a jmnt vesture buying the Cron's and Sunworthy 
^10 build a pawdered*milk plant in vailoovenng operations of 

China. rhiematicoal PLC, which have 


Hamings fur the first three combined annua] s^ of ^ mil- 
m^ihs of this year rose to S34.g 1km. Tenns wta'c not diiL-|n^ 
minion, or St.33 a share, from Crown is the largest producer of 
S33.9 million, or SI.22 a share, a walieovenogs in Britain ami Sun- 
Near earlier. But sales fcU 1 ,7 per- wvrtby is a major producer in Can- 


cem to S1.QB billion from SI.IO 
billion. 


ada. 

Borden said that when combined 


Light Industry Bureau to build a 
powdered milk plant in China. 

The plant, with a capacity to 
prucess 200 urns of milk dully, is 
scheduled to begm operations by 
October, 1987. 

Continental CiiLh fumdoD Fore 

The .4im iiiini Frin i 

HOUSTON --Comineniai .Air- 
lines said Friday it will bi^n its 
new H<ius(on-lo-Lundun service 
with a special S199. one-way coach 
fares, nearly half the cost of the 
tegular fate. 


OuJput and Sales 
Riseatjaguar 

L'mud f/eu latcrtuhi^ul 

' LONDON — Jaguar PLC, 
the private autonukcr broken 
off from BL PLC last year, has 
rqioncd u 1.1-pervent increase 
in Sales and a 15-percflil lise in 
production for the hrst i)uarier 
of IW5. 

Jaguar said Thursday that it 
sold K.883 curs in tlie i|Uaiter 
and produced lO.()Q6.TheauU>- 
maker sud it plans to spend 
£400 million (S5((i mitlum) by 
(be end i>f the decide to in- 
crease pnKluclioo to ^.UOO. 

.Also Thursday, a £2-minian 
headquariers Utr J^uar Hol- 
land was initiated. The Uni^ 

Si-dUi is Jaguar's biggest mar- 
ket, but the company is trying 
to increase sales m furope.* 


Dee Concedes Defeat in 10 -Month Did for Booker 


Company Earnings 

Revenue ond preMs, in milUem. ort in iKoi eurrmcies 
imteu elh«r wis^ tiKticatvO 


Holders Respond Negatively 
To llnocaVs Defensive Move 


United States 


HcvtfefdNoPt &m^ 9 Dtu 9 0V rrco Ulcatcicry* 

1 « Oiwr. HM »M 111 OiNT. mS HM AW York Tinyti Smuf 

K -iv- _ IXm ItA RMvnva 415^ 441.1 vicTip 

iriRorv^ . afi . an Ndi irK. 1I.9T 90 If NE% YORK — Major iilSDUi- 

HaaMsanBrww. « jionul shareholders uf Unocal 

iMOMf. HU m« ^“P. have reacted negatively u> 

rta*-- ^ SSSSt'** ^ the mi company's defensive raa- 

>r«iivt_ . es ttor T«idy neuver to avoid a takeover by T. 

Horadt* ^ wwo iif. • ifij ifw Boone Pickens. 

MOW \m ,W4 5«T2t*.IZ *5i* *Si Several of them said Thursday 


AfF.Bkiheres 

SftOuar. ms HM - AM 

Per snort.... a4i i].£7 KcdMion Bl 


^ ^ SP* QU 

'M ^ 


Ahmonson {H.F.| 

IS Oear. IMS TM* 
Mft Inc ...... 3UI ISU 

Per snort — IJC esi 


p f WeMiiM- 
JuUbc 

W fferanort. 


HM UlOiNr. 
11JI lle«»nvo_ 
077 MH Inc __ 

Per Stare..... 


e^HiUiom- Mr ttultt re- 
*M«W 


By Fred R. Blcuklc)' 

A'isv f«rl TfHk-i .Vrrvirii 


Air Pdts A Omai. 


%S ..staOMT. itiT^ 

rSS S 22 H'-SO MiS .,.,Venue HJA I&33 


HMOriM 


.nKrr-« *5 WHOM ms TIM 

‘..gyCP . SpYenue m.0 lUS 

OMBoerib, Nerine. «ie8 km 

S3* iWev Mas M» P” Stare 132 2JS 

SS oSj ^ 22 «« S •' 

uS 2?* ^ ^ as * 1»Ousr. IMS 1M4 

2m '1^'' ^ H* hS *1 Ae-ieRue _ IJOO. laoo 

67.M 5:2 E-ttS*. Met IOC *; 9ft 

**« o2 •' PerMtwe— CDS 1* 

Ub He ** inenoff gam of StiJ 

upenint. isae oHn^ “• * iT-uhOA. 

OILCNYMB) 

^"*3Sv HM Arvinhid. 

RS Jw ^ 22 ’la Hi lOQuor. ms IMS 

aSL35 Jul 7 ^ Hjl Si ■■ Revenue..-, lAD I7MI 

35 ^ 72H 2* Per Stare— OM 

MM IS?' ^ Asereo 

tBo Jm ^ TUI^: i«Q«er. ms ms 

f2£ Hi Revenue M0.7 3fU 

_ pJSsolM 7.,M 0 2 ««*•«*— "0* »>« 

Open Inf. Ifl^U ue73t n ■ 

iLorriwE) B*n Allantie 

MhmHrbol. a iiiQiiv. IMS tfM 

“ ss 5:8 gjS: »«.* 

UM Nov VJ» 5jS nm S$- lUQuor. IMS HM 

Sin Dee 27.13 2 TM s Revenue — l«U liae 

2«JS Jon »a rj ’ Netinc — . an u? 


WOuer IMS ISM 

n. Rtvenw — Me «»» 

Netinc JIS3 47ae 

ZB P«r Stare »es am 

M e 1WU "*i lo e i m es etan# a 

113 ttJnHUJon 

Tt tainoMTeol Wks 
la _^woot. ' rm ' HH 

•JS MevomH MT7' 137.3 

M« me. -|3M RM 

PerStarO— * AS3 


WOOii ef. 

»!ei?2t*JZ: 21 .* isi acverai w incm saiu inurMuy 
per snore— D3S <uo lhai ihev wwild prohablv lender when >ou sc« to 

tJ^SSTL iJBS ibdr Shiva w the tovestor group nw«un«rjai^niy u 
gSSSirr:: '?S led by Mr. Picfceftf rather ihaS r 
JUS D»n uKimt* writ*- pledge tfaem to Unocal in an offer Aetna Life & 

-Hn-rriuoiiiu-a Thai may never be nciXaled. 


Tandy 

IffS 


percent <if Unocurs shares if Kir. 
Pickens gains control of the compa- 
ny. Tile purpose of such a move is 
to raise Unocal's debt, making it | 
unaiiraeuve to buy the t'timpany. 

Bui the possibility (hat Uno^ | 

.sbarehoiders may never get ihCi 
chance to cosh in on the Unocal 
offer makes Mr. Pickens' bid more 
attractive. ‘'When you start to re- 
move uncertainty it nukes life easi- 
er. " said Peter Canoni, a senior 


onnf «r tiU mitUan. 


inousr, ms 1M4 . Kmohl-Riddw 

AevcRuu ■■ 1 JOfl. IJM ■vrin^M 

?2!3£r;~ ^ ?'i R*is;sr- »iK siiS 


Taxos Inst. 

•r. IMS 

I lax 

— *.(0 
■»_ ar 


Casualty Co.. w*hich oevos about ' 
1.3 millitin Untx^ shares, ; 

In active trading Thursday. Uih^ 


Arvin hid. 
in Quor. ms 
Revenut— , HID 

Net Inc 4 SO 

PerShwv— OSS 

Asoko 
mover. ms 
Revenue U0.7 

Met ten— n04 


SSStTC *S§ iM, M;. Pickens, throu^ an mv«^ In active trading Thursday. Unu- 

5??S* " ’f?o ^io« ^ t** *^?^*”*^ cal's stock, for the first lime since 

iar5S®*^S?nfM «>? « II. h« offered CO purchi^M^ the company's offer on Tuesday. 

sr:5^ ns Tu--aN.-- ^«leda..ifMf.ftckefisiender»iff^ 

SSUz- ;:ii share If suixi^s^rul. the bid would for S54 a nliare might stand a | 

SS»'SS;Jt£SSSSU* ^ vs 1 P';« »hc^ 50- 1 percent of Uno- chance. .After trading down as I 

. ^ZTZr outstanding much .is Sl.25. it rebounded to^ 

tu Tima Jihead 115 cents for the day. i 

MnSTl- IMS wi moDv. ms im 4 In response, the California oil at S4U.7.5. Before Mr. Rckens ^ 

rf LcM — «s U4 gytiy — . ? VA MS coflCcm offaed Tuesday to ex- gan buying (.tnucal shares, they i 

• Mopco »«w«— 0 JO 047 change S72 worth of debt for 49.9 were trading at abimt S35 a share. I 


Lom Star Ind. 


tuOiwr. ms 

PwMNM.— >4S0 
Hvf Cau_ *Si 

■ Mopco 
lUWMir. ms 

Rtvmo* ATI 

owTHM 3*as 

Oht Star*.. «M 


Boll Allanrie 


> isl Qiwr. 

SRMdw« 


OwSlwre.. «M 010 
tiftn *MCty 40 . cnarg* ai um mr — 

stirxe» M Si gt aJh^ 

wgj eisrwiffnimr MMra 


Transomerieo 

Iwr. HU 11 


§s SSf =’■” 

auo p«b 
a«.»2 Mor 
acn Aor 
Oita May 
U70 Jun 
asj% «M 

. Pr«v, Soles 1S.IM 
OpMtnt. 4Va74 oH4M 


IslQtier. 
Aevefiue — 
Mel inc — , 
p«r Shore— 


Per Star* .. IU3 S.M 

AM mkMM snm at tttd 

vf MCtJCa tut not 
MayA»%mf “* 

laouw. 1m iMi 

tSXIS^IZ ‘Si VA TnwisWoridAlri. 

Per Snore— oil ea* iftOuer. tm ms 

tm meMf iaetuM fLW Revenue— H4J1 44ia? 

namaa»sameatacmttrg6 tScIlom. — eeiH arj3 


AM C Plans Budget Cutbacks 


Tkt AUi.iiUtil Pn-yi 

DFTKOn* — American Motors 
r<xp.. preparing to announce j fi- 
naiK'laf k&s for tlie first quarter. 


been fat, but we (hitd, we can be 
leaner." 

AMC has 6.100 white-collar 
workers and 17,000 blue-c^br 


Bordon 


„„ has ioid it plans to slash internal workers. It reported a 1964 prt^il 

«ere«w«9c«fi»#«j.* budgets hy 25 percent, a move that of S15i milUon. 


lUQuar, 
Revenue — , 

Mef iftb 

Per Shore.-. 


M ofca nfil n Bkihrs 

iS? ihomt. im tiM 

n* ***r lec- — «J> - 1 *S 

Perwme l.« IJ1 


Natlfllcshrt 

laoeer. 1M5 \ 


laoeer. 1M5 IH4 

Nei inc — «as A34 

Per Shore— SM 0e3 

. MeM Tnetvoe f f^nkn ter 


Burlington Ind. NofT Bksi 

■ MOMr. ms m« », VK 

^♦ork lH«< hvee ^ Revenue — 7«.l gU3 SS-K^.r"" 

iinieXM Neiine. — . 5.1S 3147 Per Shore— SM 

PerSnere— 0.11 7.U , »9H k>etyae prmtt 

TxescsfnPlIedahentvbeiiinmeBi i«Mo» ins tiM JSS,®' 

.mDEX(CMB) fteyenue— UljD 

Mer Inc -M.. *.74 43.14 IkAM 

iscie Jun ir.*o II2JS in* BIS . P«sta»«— oar lu 
uon Sep Ilia iiua IMS 1U ; ms e-men/n ner inciudM moMr. ms 
17SJ0 Dec 1SU9 mss IMS lu 9ainat»e^p*f_abai».aM Reverw.— . jssi; 
m.10 Mor i*2a ITUS imiiu^ P*fs mc/«MV Uel Lon— 11304 


luauar. 
Pevciiuc — 
NetiiK. — . 
Pv Stare - 


The U.S. automaker planned to 
release ib first-ouarrer finaactaf re- 
sults after the cloic of business on 


litOuer. 
Mel NIC — 


taMprsjPMMiMVsaj pSrMre 


/TMltan. 

1^ 

.eieOMr. ms 


could cost .some white-collar wurk- , , . . 

UH 14 W. Ctahid. Iheir jobs. automaker plant^ to 

AMC said Thursday that it «<ase'bfiRt-ouarterfinaflciarre- 
— ’jifl would institute the coSI-cuiiing after l^hc close of husuiess on 

rz ii? la^ plan in May. While no whiie-coHaJ Friday. Company spokesmen 
I Bki Colorado layoffs were scheduled, they could wwild not diw osc the contents, 
or. • ms ifM occur, spokesman Jeny Sloan said. ss’urccs said it would .show a 

7Z. IS* 044 “Controllable costs," such as 


litd Bks Colorado 


yg? jgr travel budgets, would be cut, Mr. 


Prov.Sata Stm 
Opsnint. sitfl ptnm 
INI (XCRTl 
cam 

mas Jun 1*S.t« |«7JQ IKS W3 


HITS Sap anas 3DI.H an.B p*** short— . 

frav.Saiai JJ*J « , 

Oomint. S4U OHI44 Combt 

NIP. IHOBX (HYPI) ^JlfOuor. 


OUOT f«f ntfs aha utelod* Mat Lon 
paMd/J/omM 

- Calif. MU .ttSITm 

IslOvar. .ins im w" 

Nat ine SS7 4J» Ovi 

P«r Short— OJO 044 a-. 


Ovomita Tramp. 
M Q*«r. IStS 1VS4 


tOflO Jun IQISS 1BS.N »U W < Net ln& — 
VI JB Sap lOtjs 10AI W4I IM . Y9t Short— 
WUO Dpc 19T.7S HtJI IMA Wl 4 _ 

nt 1 « Mer 11 U 0 HIM mJIIIi|4 Co 

Prpv.SeiM njn ISOuar 

Otaninl. UaseH./ Ntlinc^— . 

P.rr snort— 


CombticKon Eng. nSmc^ 

lilOuof. ms 1914 P«Star* 

Ptvtnwt — . 71U 44SJ B • 

Net inc — 7J lU Poe 

Per Short— 003 0J9 i«a— 


■rMaw — . mu 9U NCI inc 
NMinc c^ «J MSM 


JOHH at SlJ ntiiien m sii 
Mtiflta ms olia Meiudts 
MNcrMWa/flURaa 

UtddorsoyBks 

MOW. I«U ISM 
MM IflC — _ MM . 7.17 

tarShort^ Ml l.«7 

U.S. Bancorp 
MOwor. ms 1944 


would not disclose the contents, 
but rourccs said it would .show a 

U1S.S. 

.AMC is 46-perceni owned by the 


Sloan said. “We don't think we've French car manufacturer, Renault 


COlWPAfiY NOTES 


LS. Bancorp Bdl Group Ud. has reportedly change agreement covering mk^ 
cut tU 5.05-pisrceni stoke in Broken processors. Thomson stud. 

4- SS foi Hill Prv, Co. to som^jCTe be- MiisubHM Becrric Con 

U.S. Homo 2 4-hillion-^ (. 

N'. 1« m «nt through, the sale of .April op- i:,^, ..-.,*.-1 fnitn ift# H 


Pacific Gas Eloc 


Comoriea 

1 - frs 


tm Rrwenuv— . 


n«vanui_ yn NituM!!" ^ ^ Uons. according ( 0 share analysb. 

- . aattvtaremarti. rionua-bascd pubushuig firm, »atd 

waJ~^ .» U.S. W«t j' » acquiring ivvo uniis of Homt 

*«» <»« lowrance Co. for S130 million, 
w^rt— M Q* l*ttto^JI!Z 'itM 3 ^ Comalco LriL's chairman, John 

rioJuuwT A i pr^wjorv— . tos 3.iq Ralph, told the firm's anuual mcet- 

itrowr. ms 19 M Univonoi Foods ing that the world alumimum mar- 

52?T;2^'*~ ^ OMQwr. i»ts ifu ket faces low growth in demand 

K^nurt.j MM o& 5!r?y — and highly competitive pricing in 

Bovlon ^ the ,shon to medium term, suggest- 

MOuta. IMS 19S4 3iS 3^ lOg cKccss Capacity in bauuic olu- 

08WVV# ^V.T 4iM.O N4t IA& . |,T1 L79 Riin9 9nH nnnt^n/ aliiminiiiTii 

N*i IK -- N- HI %ks p^Hipr 9 ^ num ana pvmdvy aiuminiura. 

ptrsfiM— sal ^ Oeutsdie LoftliaiBa AG has won 

' R«ynold>hid. .« W.S Orrman^^ 

HI Quor. tm 19M Rpumut— . . s*&s S4U al for vo 2S-paceni stake lo Avis 

^ ^ pSrlSwr^ ijo ^ Inc.’s German sub^diaiy^ Avis Au- 

ptr Start— I4S . la: USAIr tovmnieuing GmbH. 

Rydor Systems mu mu General insininents Corn, said it 


CoinmoditY indws 


/res—— 

sNTch Bureou.. NA 

J : Dose 100 : Dec. 31. 1^31. 
minerv: f ■ tinei 
i : boss >00 • Smp. i 8. ir3| 
les ; DBSe >00 : 


Comm erce Union 
b M Owr. I9ts ma 

Net Inc. _ 130 4*9 

I' pcrsnorv— 0*3' 0J4 

% Dominion Roe. 


U.S. Wost " acquiring two units of Home said it plun.s to re.scructure its i^- 


IslOMr., 

Rcvpnvc 

TMttaC. — 
prrsmrv— 


Univofsoi Foods 


Insurance Co. for S130 million. 

Comalco LriL's chairman. John 
Ralph, told the firm's anuual meet- 
ing that the world aluminium mar- 


Iff OwA>-. 

ms 

IfM 

Acvenw 

TWO 

6440 

Nfi me. — 

84 4B 

W.46 

Per snore .... 

UC 

0.44 


East. Gas A hiol 


Cash Price? 


isrQuor, 

I48S 

i486 

Revenue 

3865 

3M0 

Nei me. — . 

174 

370 

t^r snore,— 

0.78 

103 

Ernhort 


Irt Duar. 

ms 

1406 

■L^enwe _ 

4300 

U10 

' net Inc. 

14.) 

2)2 

, Per snore— _ 

001 

007 


^ Cofli>tae»> S ' ^ Rydor Systems 

ts Come4Sani&'.:-;7^ ij FoderoMAogul MOwar. ms HM 
A prwiciein ~ ns ^ ouor ms I9M Rv»*Nie — . ufJ 573.4 

Si OewJnSS^* St ^f3 OMINgf 3tt« lt.4 

*ron:=tfr> f^.io- rw -- V.i7 OPWShorv^ 047 041 

^ swe* ««» ' Ppr Shore— OSS 102 f«emaw gewn p» 

eO Ltco &RS'- ' ^ ’ *3271090 tfam tneMtittavaa 

35 Copser BISS’- 1“ — g& x p_* M«Hanw Kn optrottons. 

Tm iSirflitsi.16 — ::: — ^ uir . rw nanonw. nn. 

■£ ZlhS. E. S’ U 804*- '® — iSiB ■ l« Ouar. HIS 1IM SOteWCiy OtOrOS 

u pa^'un.e: — (fiJMi-tinc. I07S 10J8 IsIQuar. IftS IfM 

*5 M •• - a: — Per Start— 070 049 Revanu* — 4JS0. 4400. 

•*“ ejlrca- 4P lestncimeluaataaniofU.? Nat lot asj 3iqi 

million Inm salt at ftoek. P^Start— 043 M7 


MiiaibhU Electric Corp. said it 
had wiin a 4-hillion-^ tSt6-mil- 
lionl ctKuract ftom the China Na- 
tional Technical Import Corp. 

Suciele Meialluigiqiie le NIcIm{ 


Mi owr. i»ts IfM ket faces low growth in demand 
5!.*?y — ”12 and highly competitive pricing in 

p*r Star*— OSl 0J7 ihe chiVT in TneHiiim larm viiatMt. 


aliens in New Caledonia imo a 
separate wholly-owned subsdlaiy* 
to help it deal with differing fi^ 
and 1^1 requiremems in New Cal- 
edonia and France. 


I Gold ^3pbOQS(s^^^Va^ 


" RoyrioMsInd. 

HI Quor. ms . .19M Raocniia,.. 

RavaMv 3J9S ZaSS N«t >>ic 

Mvlliw ..... tout Hail parSoarp. 

P*r Start— I4S . la: 


Upjohn 

ms 

— S4SS 

— 514 

— MS 


Fsf NoHonw. Hn. 


1440 parsoara— MS SIS Hiv. 3 uernun . 

' USAir t0^euing( 

1 st Oaor T 9 S 0 TfM General insQ 

iJft 52T?2?*-— Sy willhalveiisquarterlydividendbe- 

^i?4 ^starv— ‘on cause of a loss in the fiscaJ year 

Utah Power Light ended Feb. 28. 

«« tsroMr. iw TfM Hooeywea 


Rm 

to, 0 t« 

ta. 

m 

150 B 1 A 20 — — 

• •AM 

xn 

4251 Q;S 710032 ,'$ 


Ml 

42 $. 160517 .'$ 

363586 » 

3 W 

375 422 13001400 

SOOMIdO 

360 

l $0 3 flD 425107 $ 

UfiOVJO 

to 

075 200 650 800 

U 7 SI 43 S 

300 


1 Q 25 I 175 

Gold torn - 3:700 



s; I Di' 

jt 

"K 

iQO cotntanv 
95 


Di'videads 


Fst NoTl State Bk 

nauer. ms ifM 


Start— 043 OJ 

Soniti FoSfhom 


Per **>"'* 

IMCB64SED 

3**^^ 
a B :. 


ifiQuor. 
Net >nc- 

Per Stare^ 


IfM MQvor. 

1143 RtvaitM 

143 Mtl ine- 

Siwa— 


ms IfM 

IJUL l44a 
4la 1070 
034 054 


tsroMr. ira IfM Honeywell Inc's shareholders 
gSry — *i2 UiS approved antitakeover provi- 
ptrstara.. «i7 osf sioos uoder which Sale or merger of 
VF Corp. company to any party holding 

iHouar. TIM IfM 10 percent or more of Hon^ell's 
StMot*“ ^41 stock would require a majority vole 
pw-sfiort— 0J4 an of shares not owned by the suitor. 

. Wolb Fargo M Corp.Ai chairman, Samuel 


p H >nevs”‘« ./ 


;gg Gomsott 

. V'. s' lUOMr, ifSS 

8 'q y Revmut 4SU 


p •! Nc> ine. 41-D 

Par snort 053 




'» JMTtr Wir .W*S 

I I iJnYs 


117 0007. I9« I9H 

40’ loe. 910 UJ 

fi" >erSriaro 04(7 

Gon. Signal 

. i»i Quor. ms ifS4 

•vMun MT.I 4345 

. ' al ine. n* 7:5 

3 i tr Sfiart—. ftfO Uft 

j{ ^ • Harris Bkcorp 

iHOMr. IMS im 

If ’ ; pint 1i» ly 

a fj H Start.... 1.9S l.,3 


Sdiormg-Plough 
10 Otar. nSS ' IfM 
Rtvanuv — 4S39 OMS 

NetIrK S4.I . SU 

Par Stare— 1.D7 IBS 

Sn^-On-Tools 


iMOtar. TIB 
Ntl inc — 44.VS 
Par Start— i.fS 


.1% Zdl, said at the annual meeting 

4M3 1 


'Woyoriioeuser 
T««tw. IMS 11M 


147 that he has no plans to take the 
^ company private. 

Kauef Seel Corp. and the Inter- 


Irt Dear. 

1405 

1404 

R6verti>e — ... 

144.4 

1310 

Net me. 

162 

14.1 

Per Star* 

070 

060 


li i«S4ncr<neiwa*sfai(iarsx.' rut lee. 


Sloiley Works 

1ST Mwr. TtB ' ' IfM 
RMIHM4— 27«57. 3*^ 


' K?iwvt*“ 'iw national Brotherhood of Boilw- 

n-Tools Par Start— o4« oS makers union soid ih^ havc filed 

i«M 13 M Wtnn-Dixte Storos complainu with the llS. Intcma- 
j|^ HI wB DRW- HM IfM tiunal Trade Commission accusing 

CM. r-j* cj s8§i 2 wi Korea of selling offshore oil plai- 

omoraCaPf. Bd. pwstara— ^ m forms in the Uiuted States at beIo«’ 
i3S iSK iSg s3£ fair value. 

SSSSyr: 12 'SS WSSrn: 'iiS IS Coim a subsidiary of 

. . V It ,. . . . United Technologies Corp., and 
J!?^fM Thoinson-CSF. a subsidiary of 

fvB3 IrVR IPB QtfQFe ■TgS 1 fm4 mm m . « «ata * M . 

7657. 344W . RevMMe— . 3SI4 3124 France s stale-owncd Tbomsoii SA 

w M M JSi group, have signed a pr^uci-ex- 


ks ' YoUow Freight 

' IfM Vfl Owr. TtlS IfM 

344W . RevMMe — . 3Sfc« 3124 
U43 Met Wc. — ^ 943 T.H 

Sif P«-SMce_. S44 044 


WUteWeU &A. 

1. Qta> 4a Mew-aoM 
1211 Cfticn 1. *' ■ *** 

Tel 319X51 -T<ln2f3«S 


AD>THTISEMENT 

GANADUN PACinC EH^RISES 
UWTQ 

(CDIb) I 

IV undvraifswd snnouncei ikii the .An- j 
null Repon JQSSoTCsiuulian PactCc i 
Eaierpiisa Lid. will br jv^toble in 
AiirMi'fdam al: 

PivRKNi, Htrldrine di Pienoo N.V., 
.Uf^'inmn Bank Nedcrbinl M.V.. 
Aiiwlcidani.RoUvnlani Bonk N.V.. 

Bank Mw« & Hom MV. 

KoN-AMoeiati)- N.V. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY PLY. • 

AuHlPTxlsin, April 9lh, 1965. 


- 

OWEOK '”6 
P<A iTie 

Pw'wn-* 

Ik A-Aimw"'- »*• 

, AoPi'^' ■ 


0 S *!•.• 

“ Ns 

1 

Vli’- 

HI? 


EWEBJVATIONAL POSITIONS 






i.-rn4.n 


direction 

internationaie 


Friday 01^ 

nTi'ji- flj 


TheCEGOS Group seeks 

A consultant on strategy 
with an American background 




mkitmum 9g»:2S 

— French-Baking. 

— Diversified experience in sirat^y and marketing, especially In service activities. 

— University degree of the MBA type. 

— The required business BkiUs. 

TTie position eftered : . 

— High-level Internationa} consulting, both In France and in the USA, wRh the support of the CEGMARK subsidiary In the 
and of the Management Strategy DhiisJon In France. 

— Prospecting for American and French clients. 

_ Several years of successful development will lead to a management poMlon in New Yorit or in Paris. 

Bend your application, rdsume and hand-written letter to : Jean Brilman, DIrecteur International du Groupe CEGOS 
Tour Chenonceaux - 204, Rond Point du Pont de Sevres • 92516 BOULOGNE (FRAN^), 




By Bob Hdgtacj’ 

riiimM:h»tLU i/rr_-.‘j fniune 

LONDON — Dee Corp.. a rap- 
idly growing British food retailer. 
cDtK-edcfd d^eai Friday m its 10- 
month-old bid to buy Booker 
M^Mnell PLC for about 
million (S46S mtllion) of Dee 
shaffti. 

DeeS offer lapsed after eliciting 


acceptances reprteemiBg just 16.7 
percent uf the foc^I company's 
^areb in addition to the 15.^ p«- 
cent alread> owned by Dee. The 
offer wa& <muidiiiana] on Dec 
laining more than 50 penem rtf the 
shares. 

Booker’s r^isunce to the bid 
benefited from improving results 
and signs of more aggressn e man- 


.Am’ERTlSEMENT. 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

OuotafiOAS Supolled by Funds Listed 
19 April 19S5 

Tta nttoiMi voiwoMtotiantiiBvNibeiaw art iMTfUefl By lilt PsadsIisM with tlH 
taeeMlM of utn* ftudi wBn* ooem an BesM u luet vices. Tne mmwIm 
mureMMl wnbelt ttatcote f rto ta nef af ouertottent w oNIM tor fta IHT; 

(et -eoUri (w) wcomr; (b) Bi-mMlSty; (O-reguianr; (f)«lm«iilarTr. 

ALMALMANAbEMENT 08UIFLCX LIWITEO 

IwiAl'Nlol Trust. 34 kis^ Mullictmenev —,.41077 

rn IM ^wlDolla* M«ewfnT«cm— SlUZ 

«*7W O***®' «•»« Term—— _4W43 

— S{?2!125^ — — IW» JtaOOMsVta^— — 5W« 

I CdflWif.% ■ M » Sr IIAItflO PaoaM as.w<hm a HL^I 

r!3?£sasg *^ ^VSilS -««>»S-:aFrtae SR f.fl 

— ldlf.lMM4 SF IUI40- O0AN6C HA4UU0R0UP 

_«,t , e — PO 4M7t Tin HOS.M {3tB( 4tfstD 

rl5lS?i.’t2I?crr7 -Ifl i BMf taWfOUtaO** 4300 


— miClF FvM 

—14 I CroikbOM Fwu 

— lailTFFunOMv 

— tWOBLKJM OW1.U7JS 

-141 A Mta.&rnw tll Fwtd twis ,.,*tI«UGEiTia(t__— . SFf24D 

j*** — 4«»O0l.l-OOLLAft— SU3S.7T 

Zr.'e -l•^Q■fc|.y£M V 1DOO»i» 

i 1 — *»j0 — ii»tOBl.|.auiJ.e«l.. FUI0ST.f0 

— >wl f IF— Paci>,r , . 41447 ...m i mbai, .c ,.uq 4UA5S 

-fdlltaMuaZMuniMtaSA 4MJI .)3;5?5rJTBoerK»<i'’ ■ ‘ ■ <ln7u 

-<4>l>vMuMMu>t«on4t0 4U7JD ,|Sl PAR Js Tf«^.y teM: slnSi 

B»4I «DVAL B.OF C4N*CAPSB;itGUERNSEV 

~ ? n^fP S Vf** -ri»*aaCC«M4«lFui«Lia. 41146 

lJ7l «i«i5 -itaR»cf»'es*i*tat4ieFo— swjo- 

"1J.52I Hr?]SSS2?ftSlJi •♦iwiRBCiBrteapiiDiFa 430JS* 

milX AMMWO Pent Citu* .^>,-1 aMr i«ssi Kn 1 ffin 

taISS i««UacJStaO?reS»fe:L_— sSS 

—tal BnIGew Futa SOtK arc km ajiw Fa 494f 

— idlBrir.JOMnDtrPert. F4 10463 SiCANDIFONDINTl FUND |4aJ.2]63TBI 

— (wIBittOMtavGiltPuv COS — 4«>llnc. Bid .SSM-OHer—ttU- 

— Id I Brit. iMrld UIS FuM 41440 — (MlAcc.: Bd 4440 Otter— .4445 

-<djarlMW««T»eta FdW 4D716 scenskA INTERN*T:OMM. I.TD. 

CAPITAL tMTERNAnCMAL 17 DCwWMtire Sd.Ldnden^l.JTTaM 

— IMlCOADdl »VT PuM 432,41 — 4bl SHBBandFund— _^__4315f 

— 4Mtt — <m 1 &HBlMlC;«wtB PtFW — .47fi.30 


SF 104T 

. 413 77 PARISBAS-GROUF 

->(4 1 Corttta icrtfRioiiera! . 
..... — (wOBLIOM 


Stow 

_ 4Ff34D 
. 41.134.77 
y1D6J04i» 
fi. I0ST.40 
_ 4U42S 
_ 410U6 
_ 4103.46 


— idiBrir.JooanDtrPerf P4 10463 SiCAnDIFONDINTl FUND imJ-SJaSTBI 

— (wIBittaMtaVGiltPuV (Cl-B — 4«>llnc. Bid .S446-OH6r—44A3- 

— Id I Brit. iMrld UIS FuM 41440 — (MlAcc.: Bd 4440 Otter— .4445 

-<djarlMW««T»eltn FdW 4D716 scenskA INTERNAT:OMAL I.TD. 

CAPITAL tMTERNAnCMAL 17 DCwWMtire Sd.LAndon^MTTOM 

— IMlCOAitdl »VT PuM 432,41 — 4bl SHBBdtaFlind— _^__4315f 

— 4Mtt — <m 1 &HBlMlC;«wtB FtFd —.47036 

CSEOIT 4UtS4E (I44UE PFiCE&t SW>S& BANK CORF. IlSSUE FRICESI ^ 

— tdl A£tlens4ulSSf^ — SF 36A24 — (d i Amorica-Vdlor SF4S7JI0 

-lOi Bond valor 4«d SF 10«< — >d > a SHor i> Beta Si H CWn DMIIS.4< 

—Idt Bom valor GptarL _ OM lOT.lo —Id > Dollar BotidSdioctieA— S133A6 

— u» B om V diar U&-D0LLAR SIITJD —4dt Florin BoMSoieci«n_ Fli>4a4 

— >01 Bom VMr von >tnlQ4l4M — td i Intewoior— — 4FM8 

— ldiCon>6TTVelvSw« SF <4740 — id > Jooon PorHoi«_— SF 101.74 

— uli CM«or( Volar u4-00:.lar 4 tllAT — <d I Stertino BoM Selection c 10053 

— >dlC0M6M SF 41300 —to > SwiM PortlBn B om 4e1. SF 10443 

— idicSFoim— Bendt SFT17S — Id) SmiMvaierNewSeriot. SF344iO 

—Id I CS »«» > - SF lOUO —Id t um>orMl BoM Solea — SF 1224 

— Id iCSMondv Mor«ot Fund 4144340 — id i Uniwrioi Fwtd SF >tSJ4 

— Id I CS Nwer Mornet FuM D.VltC3',40 — (d > Yen BoMSeUOion Y 1300400 

-idiEuropo-vaiar SF 1S140 -*9 ? »> ■£«■» 

-sOUNchc-Vota sp,^-{d)^lnw«I_ 

oiriNwEsruENTFFM — Id I j&een.invo<i— — SFOttM 

— via ) Conuntrd DMSS.IS — id I SdItt South Air. SR — 4F4(40O 

— «Sd t IM*I RentHthird DMM74 — Id > Simo (uacunrice) SF304JD 


— (d ) unirentd 

— (d I i»-i»«~— 

—Id I Unvok — — 

Other Fnisds 


I3MA«0 
DM 3350 
DM 7605 


=IS)ES!fcMi5?irz=r sfSmo |f2« 

-sOUNchC-Vota sp,^-{d)^lnw«I_ 

oiriNwEsruENTFFM — Id I j&een.invo<i— — SPSttM 

— via ) Conuntra DMSS.IS — <d I SdItt South Air. Sr — 4F4(40O 

— «Sd t IM*I RtnKRtord DMM74 — ld> Simo(uoc«Br,ce) SF304JD 

DunnO HoroiltALioyd GooroF. Bruuelt UNION INVESTMENT Frenkluri 

— iin)OOMCDn»noditr Pmi. 43M03— — Idiunirtnia DMA40 

— imlCurraiW* 0 Gold P06l — 4 I44J6— —>n ■ iii>,i»— » DM3340 

—■fniWinai.LlttFut.PQDi.. 4 44022 -** —id i UnVon—— DM7605 

— imi TfonoAoridFui Fo6>. sMOAi— Other Fimd^ 

FACMGMT LTD INV. ADVISERS i art nnn-i. ir t C_.m 

i.LoufM£6P6utii« Hiii.EC« et-62M6B <*! ^fi***** In.ettmtnft PuM. S3IJ4 
-twl FAC AlUnhc SItJi VSSb 

-ISiFtcoJvSRSr g/l^taVi^^ motiotalFuM- '41*t?g 

-••t FAL OfNntoi 13AII I,. J A,ao Fjftftrtce I.F 45007 

FiDELiTV POBsTOLHoiRilltaBermudo tbi Anon*.— 41041.11 

— (Rl ArMtUOn voiunCDARton. 456J0 iwt Truitar UdTFd. lAEtP)— SIAIQ 

—iffllAiner values CumPrel—. 414106 i«v) Bmp intirboM Fund 410134 

— id I Fidriitv Amct. Assets 466 71 (iwl BertOMten-iiSue Pr.,— SF 13330 


— idt Fideiitv Austrono Fund 4AI4 iml Comoo CM .M ortaope Fd 4403 

— tst Fiaelilv Disco-erv Fund— 114J0 (d ) Cooitot Pretefv Pd IMI— 41106 

-Id) PkMlitv DU 4-ovTr - I I37A2 (wi Citadel FuM——_ 4t02 

— (0 > Fiaehiv For Eott Fu>ia— 4 le.Tt (0 > CJ.R. Awstrolio FtMd — 4 40t 

— IS I Fidelilv inn Fidid 4 47.10 to < C.J.B. Jooon FuM—_ . 4400 

—la I Pioeiiiv Orient Fund 176.13 tnt) Clevelano OtHtare Ffl 4X002,4 

-tdiFtaelitvFreolicrFune 41303 (wt^tanbiDSecwriltOA.^ Fu 110,41 

— idi Fideiir* Pocilic Puna— n<m«6 ^ntenMovg 4ISA13 

—id I Fidelity SocL CrtMtii FA— . 4I4J3 lari Cmcrt. Fa. inn a CorlA_— 44.10 
-tdlFMelilrWOrlOFiM 4 3104 (•) CtawOTt. PA int : B Cert4^_ 43A33 

« > ^^tierwaWMelutVet^ *1WJ3 
. tb I proiikor lny«*LFono N.W_ Sl.llSAS 
— im) Gold <ncO>t< e s,.47* iS i 5 m>Iu* BuMd inl'l 43 lA6 


. 4AI4 iml COMOd CM .Mortaope Fe 
114J0 (d ) Cooitot Pretefv PA IMI- 
SI37A2 (Wi Citadel FuM—— 
4 14.Tt (0 > CJ.R. Awttrollo FtMd — . 
447.10 {OlC.J.R.JeoonFuM— 

S 76.13 tnt) Clevolana OHtnore Fd 

41303 (wtteiiimbiDSecwrilteA— 
413000 (BlCOMETE^_— _ 
. 4I4J3 lari Cmcrt. Fd. inn a CotIa 
4 310? |<a^ Ctawort. PA int : B Certs 


tb i DratAor invMLFuna N.V. Sl.llSAS 
— — • VvS Id i PMrhn FurM mil. , ■ S3A0« 


-ta» £mi iRantment FuM 43203 (b ) Flttv Start LM — . 

—<«r> Scoitlsn World Fund EllSJa <«>> C!***^^* ^RVoLid 

— iwi SWe St Ameneon 4ISS0I tar) Fl»oa inepnio Trm 


ly. ' 5“^ ivr) The EirtWishioeiirTrosl. 

-liniSiroleoicrraauM Si.u ® ) Europe Obl>ootions—_ 

CEFJNOR FUNDS. w> gB« Eoole Fifd— . 

-ta» £mI iRantment FuM 4 3203 B > &*Rf | 

—<«r> Scoitlsn World Fund MI3M «i) Finsburv Grouo Ltd — 

— iwi SWe St Ameneon 4ISS0I ** £j*.FFJ» “«ta Tru— 

CdMiJ3uiALiALoiLA»em0i>i4UUD wi FtasmajetuePr— 

« FormuMSelActionFA. 
PB ttf. St Peter Port. Cuerittey.0ai-2I71S a) FonditoMo— — . 

iiR)FulurCAwSA 4]^ 8 < OMOrm. Stc 

imiCAM Arbtiroae inc * JJii 8 > FronU^fusHMe«lt». 

tiktCAM^ico ine — — 4i3AU w) Hewssmom NMoi. N.V. 

Ml GAM Boston Inc — 410154 

iarl CAM BriMloee — 41303 

y.Jtif ibMLAimiGoWBondL— 

iOiCAM ifdeinoiiortai me— 4 ,0104 (8ilaierfuM2A_— 
lari GAM NecthAffletits Inc— 4<St.lS lati inteimariiet FiMiB— 
iw) GAM N;Wi4riC0 Ui>U Trus). *8*^ * t8 > IMermlnlno AIM. FA O 
(w) GAM Pou)>c me 41I2JM trIint'isiariiiotruW — 
tai^MSta^milWWlTrST Uljp ISnnykSbwn-!^^ 
rwtOAMS'rUfBis trrfc 4ID705 irt inveei AtMnttouio— 


_ 431.46 

— 4104 

— J?*8 

4IASBAI7 
. 457400 
. 411701 
_ 4IO0B 

SF6405 
_ 4 3302 


l8<O«vorim.SocFun0»— *55M 
! <B * FranM-Trvsl inierxlm^ DMel.44 


i ISS Hewssmom nMoi. N.V, 

tw) HoftlO FuMS — 

,S*5-f3 tarl Hcrleen FurM 

* *>-* Cow BendL— 

<8 ) InitrfwM 2A - 

(w) intsimariiel FiMid— 


trlim'ilieiriiMFwnd— . 

rrp't&AMSYS W^ nfc 41^ y 1 itapi^tklntMuMiMZ-l^ 

twi CAM midwita me— 413^ rrilWIMfl^ Inn Fund SA, 
imiCAMrveheSACiossA— 111607 (w) Moon Ballon Fuas — 

©.T.MANAC6MENTIUKIUA imi jiSS 

-laitB«ryP«.PA1.IA — 4400 1?? i !*tP ?*!* k j^lbn^PTF 

-HdlO.T.AppiieaSoence sISai f9.> ? l!g?gL* Igy? *"*i,? 

-IdiOT.AseonNiTCothFD— 41306- ?y 

-lw> RT, A»w Funp 4106* jy 

-M ) at Ausrroiio Fund 410.61 *9.1 l-*‘gg-f <g?--=r=r 

-Id )GT. Europe Fund »**5 J?i 

-fw) G T. ButA Smoll Cos FuM 41103 fS.{ LSlfcSy 

—Id > G.T. Doner Puno,, 41466 ' ■ 

-ICIO.T BondFiAtd 41004 W*.! 

-ld)GT.Olo0olTeO*iWtF0 S13i» ^ I W9^gg" v»" 8eU Fd 

-id ) C.T Monfhu Pomiinder 4 7171 5®.f CTyT* 

— id ) O.T. inaoslmetR Fund— 417.70 }? aft^I siAuZ 'Scrr; 


n.N.V— . 4IU.I3 
— — — 410600 
— ^ 4t.»(04 

M - 4400 

4I32S 

M _ - 432O0S 

-PdiaT- 534704 
“M -- 4401 


;wi Korea OrpwtR trva , 


— mr w. •> Burc wTNwi UDL rune— ><i^ aei er 

—Id > G.T. Doner Puno,, 41466 ,*.n-g 

-Id ) O.T Bond Fi0)d S lOJf }5*.> r. - ■ v!l 2 

-ld)OT.Olo0OITeO*lWtF0 S13M SI 

-Id ) C.T Monfhu Pomimder 5 2171 5®.f M*>ye ■■■ . n T yMW 

— id ) O.T. inaPStmeiR Fiine— 417.78 »** j — --*.iyK 

— idiOT.JoponSmoJtCoFiMd- S«0I* fd i N lhSo C rowPi PecfcPBP Pd >4.I3W 

— Id ) 0.7. Teehciciopy FuM 437.10 {■>) W)p^ Fwm .. ,. m , , 

-Id » c T, swin Ch.no F«mi 4 fwo {*> }J23J5 inuesiment Fund — ,*,2;^ 


EBC TRUST CO.iJERSEVr LTD. 
l0SooieSr.JI. Heiwr.-QSM 36331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND 


.«..MSPCIT S 12121 

(wl PANCURRI IIM— _ SI147 
(t iPorfenStr.R ESiGcnem SF 1J470O 
S4.TB2 (r) PprmaJ Value Fund N.v.__ 4I04S04 


MdHne.; Bid— „S4.4f oiler — S4.TB2 (r ) PprmaJ Value Fund N.V.__ 4I04S04 
PldlCop.; Bid 4ID4IOHer 410406 ibtPljHpdet , ,' ... 414007 


INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND l>rl PSCO Fund N.V . 4 13)27 

— id > Snort Term ’A'(Aeeum),— . 4)0664 >— ■ oor-rt i— - - »■ 4 

— idiSnonTerm A'iDitfr)-,.,. 41.013$ id ) PuImiw I nrt FtFid _ 4SEf7 

— idlStartTcrm'B (Aceuwi— 41.1376 (b)Pri— Tech 406307 

—Id ) Short Term'd itNstn,.— 400610 iw) Ouenlum Fund N.V,— _ 4X65406 
—Iwl Lone Term 42107 id ) Renlo Puna .. LFZM.W 

f5K‘?l ">&«»*** iS i Se5S>M!iSI5dD5o^^ 

{«» Somurol PorTfoWo— 5F 107.»5 
j J-F id ) sciTTiOL SA UMemtaure— S4.f4 

*">> S*^*7fOwsFvodW.V_ S10QQ0P 
"12 •^'r — — SJ3J Iw) Stele 51. Bonk Eou)ty)M*4NV Sf.lO 

— <b) J.F AustTBii B SA,e Iw) Slroteey inveoiitient Fund— . S20.1S 

LLOYDS BANK INTUPOB430,Geitewo II W j Sytite LM.'<Ctd» _S.70O 

4)0660 IW) TectaoGrpwni FuM_— SFH03 
SF1M60 Iw) Tokyo Pec HoM. lSeo)_— 310103 
SF 17700 Iw) Tokyo PocHeW-N.V..^— S13B.44 
31000$ tw) TmispoCHIc Fund $1*07 

5F31I0O id ) Turquoise Fung 310000 

SF 13140 Iwi Tyreedy.BrowneAv.ClofM 3111153 
S 1143 Iwl Twiidy.Brownen.v.Cla il B 3100403 
(>n)TwMOy,BrewnelUJUN.V.— 3 
NIMARBEN ISIUNICOFuM..— — DM7700 

— idlClqisA, — ,3 Wa 7 10 I UNI Bend Fund— 344454 

— (w)CIqwB-U. 5 . $440$ lb » UNI COMMI FuflO.^— 3 IO72i04 

— <w ) aoss C • Jtaon 37500 (w) Vanotrbm Asseis^^— 31IJ0 

iml Wlnctasier F.iwncioi LM— ^ins 
tm) yyinOiesTer Divfr3)tlt0ta_ 33223' 
(d ) world Fund SA—,— $1003 
(w)WDrwwldeStewruitsS7S3Vi_ 34117 
IwiWorMwMeSeecMiS/SZ’Y. 31050.17 

DM — Deuucne Mark; BF — Belelum Frencs: FL - • DWKli Florin; I.F — 
Lukembewre Francs; SF — Swiss Frones; a — CBiced: + — Offer Prieesib — bid 
tfwnee Prv siO le 31 per unit ; N A. — Net Available; N.c. — MotCommunlcoted.’e — 
New; s — suspended: 5/S — riecK Spill; ' — Ek-Oivldend; ** — Es-Rts: '** — 
Cress Pertermonee Index Mor'ai: ■ — Redempt-Price-Ei-Ceupen; ee— Porrnerly 
Worldwide Fund Ltd; ^ — Offer Price tael. 34> prelim. cTiaree; ++ — doily slack 
price 04 on AmPerdem Stock ExOwnBe 




— il-S IwlSieteSI.BonkBoulty 
— <b) J.F Austroii o 44,6 Iw) Sireteey invesiitaM F 

LLOYDS BANK INTUPOB430,Geitevo II W j Sytite LM.'<pd» A_>'. 
— 4KW) Liotds inn Ooirar. «in*m iw» TeowoGrowni Fom. 

—TIwi LlOvOS inl'l Europe 
— +lwT Liovds mri Grpwtn 
— ^iw) LiDvds int'l N. Anierlca 
— +lwl LJovds mil ineorrie. 

— +iw) uoyds IM’I PacJfie- 

iw. LMrd. IML SmoIRr Cos TwtaoV.drawM iUJL 

NIMARBEN 10 1 UNICO FuM..— 

— iOlCIOlsA. ,4 Wa 7 lOlUNIBondFund—. 

— (w)CIQ»lB-U.5 . $4405 lb ) UNI COMIOI FuflO. 

— <w ) CJoss C • Jtaon 37500 iw) Vanoerwii Assets 


A Conference on 
Trade and Investment 
Opportunities 
Budapest, -*une i3-i4, i9S5. 

The International Herald Tribune 
conference on "Trade and Investment 
Opportunitres in Hungary" will be of 
keen interest to any executive concerned 
about future economic relations between 
East and West. 

Speakers at this landmark confer- 
ence will indude Hungarian government 
ministers, business leaders, bakers and 
economists. 

For further information, ^ease 
contact the International Herald Tribune 
conference office, 181, avenue Charles 
de Gaulle, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, firance. 
Tebpbone: 747 1265. Telex: 613 595 F. 


agemrat. For 19S4. the compaov 
reponed pretax profii of £Ji6.S mif- 
Uon, up 47 pcTcimi from a year 
earlier. .Aii pan of an effon lo fend 
off Dee, &K)ker forecixi ihai pre- 
lax profit Ibis year would rise 22 
perveni, lo about £4S million. 

Booker's interests include chick- 
en and turkey brenJing, other agri- 
cultural operations, production of 
xitamins and health foods, food 
distribution and supermarkets. The 
company also has major siurehoid- 
ings in companies that own c^- 
ri^is on books by .^aiha Christie 
and Ian Fienaing.' 

Dee, Britain's fourih-iargcst 


fixxJ retailer, first annoonced its 
bid last June, but the bitile was 
delayed for se\en moathk during a 
reiieu' by the Moni^polies and 
Mergers Commission. The panel 
ruled in January that :.he offer 
could go ahead. 

Last autumn. Dee acquired ELM 
Industries PLC's international 
Stores unit for £1SQ million. 

Booker's '-iciory came j day af- 
ter a British icuiic ctinipany, toiv 
lal Group PLC, defeated a £I2S- 
million takemcraitempi by Enirad 
Corp., an .Australian le'nilc con- 
cern. 


ADVERT|$EME.Vr 


SCHLUMBERGER Umited 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETtNU OF STOOlUOLDERS 
NihLt I- Ivifbv pivn ihji tbr .Aioiiul Gisurjl uf SiiKklk'.l L-n. ■■! ScilLl'ilBERl'-Ot 

UMITKl) (bi‘hliuil<'*iwr N.X.) ihi* Ciiiu|uai, t>iU Iw IvlJ jt F-TLiSLifj-jr Guult'\x’ii IR, 
U'lilcimlad, CunQbi, Ncihi'rumia ,01 Tiw^Oiv, Mjv 7, I'Xvi, jt a<i(l.-Vl.-.-k l-i ih.' 

aflrnwa (l.jirjSiD tiiiiri Ira tin* fulloi-v^.' jiur}*aMN: 

1. Til selci I lb (Smoiv 

a. Tm R'(iuR .in lily Liiu.-sy uf tasjiiiii aunR^lhv irjr riska Lkr.'ii'Ja.T r.l, ^. j^«nivr ihi 
Cuajtuti'sCiVRubdaifil EiLiDiv:fhn‘I^JTDyLnntjyr31, i4t:ia;i>liL-i!^f:aotiibl'ni:^a]isi;Kid 
u( hk-unie for ilv \nr nidyd U'rrmliyi 31, lUtU, jod hi thr -Jn unlidn ji' iIimJs^uL 
ht dir ftovilof Diiu.'kA A rriLvktl in dk-CauipJiHs IQm .Lii:iuj 2 Ry^iri in ruv^h'iMiir: 
;i. Tu laiJk aiDeodmcni* lo dk' 0}4i.iii Pbri: 

1. T)j}fRneil»-4ppiiiniiiiiTUu(l*re.vVjii'rhot^^ini2q>*nernipt:Uh‘4,-i6uiLuM>ijudiill!i' 

otTouiH uf die <oni[uni fur i>^i 

&. Tu kiAiidcr Jod mt Mt a stwAiviSiier )(p<{Ktai iVn.'iitcd iii lb* V'Rixt ^irm.-sL 
kiTmn todJ oL-o lakm npoo swb ulb-r nuOi;!S J6 nut i.unir a-r>ivri> twinK ita' iiin lirc. 
t'p 10 April 2bih, 19B3 tho bdliirb iii iVrtifiraini ivpnsimijiic ^.'ocirun iLuis S.iiluinlK-p.'n 
Ijiniin] nuv pir xoiiiif; utaru.'riGU, lu ibc litpLbiUn undiT iLpoui uf diei.' n-niriui,-* i-iUi ib- 
■AkViwgnnl ur Iw MirKuL'r i5 a ili'pciui Jilii.y nf 'Jk.‘lr kuuL 
If no «.4ine iiMiiicliuoa arr piiru ‘ly undyiviMinf mII iuIi' lo; lU- 0 >m.‘ Rur.i.'r- 
i^upinoItlirikiUL'i'iiithLi '^Riulfp.wral Uyiinr u{5lucLhiiUrM.juIij'. t!v .\wiili 1 tUyn 
an* aiaiUlilr uilii Uir imik.T.'.iiifd. 

XjikbrJaiU, April UMl IVtLs. 

^fwi6tr.ul ITIL Tel iiAVj liyj l. Eil aou. 

PA&IBAS .\0!HINiSTR.4T!EK.AVrD0R B.V. 

(Fonnrrin .AdnuBiutmirkanifior van dr Banque dr Paru rt d«6 Pavn-Baa B.V.) 


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Tables inctude the nationwide prices 
up to the closine on wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

I 'in iTie Assochued Press 




I9U OowlOT IJOr 3J » 
1S*k OrnOAu .40 U 12 
8M Granl f 

I GrBntwt 

10 . GrTech 16 

26V4 GtAml 10 

27„ GrtLkC .44 1* 

Hh Or«nm s IS 

GraUttr _ 16 

aie GrdOi M O 10 

1010 GItCdg JS . ,, 

2240 GIfair .40 1J 17 


4 WA 
70 SOW 
33 9K 
2 9 

10 13 
6 34U 
23 30H 
98 S3Va 
134 114fe 
25 11« 
343 14U 
51 30th 


24*4 

30 —W 
Mk 
3 

134k— 
34W + to 
jno— 1* 
3310 + W 

H4i + 10 

+ vk 
UVi— w 
30H + to 


7S . 

I3*h MIdind 

A 

IA 

* 

3 

uvt 

74% 

24(0 + to 


SHk-MInPot 

SJO tu 


25x43(5 

43(5 

43%— 1 

25% 

14(0 fMcME 

J< 

U 

M 

.59 

Uto 

144k 

14% + % 

SXa 

33% MiteCp. 1A 




.toVi, 

5M5 

Sto— % 

10% 

f% MenMs 







9% + Vk 

17% 

10% MOOOB ■ 




15% 

15(5 

I5(a— to 

17% 

10% MOOOA 

Job IJ 


49 

IMO 

IMk 

15(0 

4(* 

a% MIURtwt 



5S 

3*6 

S4k 

34h— % 

1945 

12*kMlgO» 

IA 

■J 

5 

77 

IS 

17% 

17% 

Tto 

24h WtMed 



1* 

1 

4*6 

05 


8 

15% MavStr 



• 

4 

15 

M*b 

IMk— (5 

646 

4% MevteL 




14 

no 

flto 

5(0 

5% 

2% Murptn 




10 

3% 

3% 

3(6 + U 


3*0 MmeAr 




N 

7*6 

7(0 

.740 







to 


1* 

13(5 

7% Mverin' 

A 

23 

11 

5 

R% 

12% 

13(5— % 



34U> IMS OEA 
22*0 14tk OokMd 
U 4 OdotAn 
15t0 49t OdatBo 
90H Ulk Oflafnd 
IMA 10 Oldons 


13 

JOP A 13 

30 

5t 

AO XI tS 
M U IS 


5 21W 211* 21t*— W 
51 IMh 10 IflA — I* 
3S 71* 7*0 7H— H 
.0 IIM 11W 11W— U 
7. in* m* tn* 

135 2DW 1«(P 3DW -M 


25Ui ICH XS J 11 
Mfe IRTCpn 35 

m impGp .11« AS 9 

100 Impifid 

3SMImpOHo1AO 
5W infrtht ^ 

15M ifialren A Id *4 
i<o instSv 9 

3W InaSvpf 351 XI 
590 IntCtyo AO __ 
1115 Inlmk .13 14 32 
310 IntBtoil 
10 intakwi 

700 irttKvd 15 

3t0 IlMPtW 475 

9 irriThm 500 

9 inThrpt 
1 IntDtO 

I7M ionics 12 

10H ireoara s 


457 94U 09U. 0310 +3U 

n 'ijs ’se-tw 

35 I^O 190 190— to 

152 40 3M0 40 —to 

IS w» MO no + VO 

9 23 22W S *Vk 

144 2 1^ 3 

5 3W 345 2«i + th 

79 9 090 9 

70 12H 131* 121* —VO 
58 3tli 3V0 31* + 10 

3 111 



3(0 OOUan 




19 

5 

M5 

M5— (5 






4 

7% 

7% 

7% + (0 

S' 

5% OrtolKA 

.IS 

22 

1* 

7 

5% 

54* 

*4* 

3(0 





70 

1% 





Mt 

4J 

1(1 

M 

10(5 

9% 


n 

74* OzBriiH 

A 

23 

6 

11 

9 

M5 

0%— % 


.12 IJ 8 

n 

IMk 

13% 


50 

3to 

31* 


3 

1 

1 

14 

8 

Tto 

7% 

475 

10 

4% 

4% 

500 

1300 

10 

9to 


257 

9% 

9% 


18 

145 

1*k 

12 

71 

8 

8(0 

S 

109 

8 

34 


1740 12 Joriyn 50b 3A 9 15 1M 1M 


«0 5l« JoeoOs 

sv» 340 JclAfii 5 

240 40 JefAtW 

8V0 440 Jptron A9t *3 15 

5V9 290 JetnPd 


20 540 540 510— to 
45 2ba 210 310— t* 
31 *0 % 40 

S 74* 7*A 744 

44 3% 340 345 


1110 7\* JohnARi JO U 14 57 lOta 10. 10.— 1* 


1140 3t0 Johfifnd 
TV* 4 JffipJK n 


73 740 790 745 

10 410 440 54« 



wr 


37U 3r* 
390 1V0 
1540 945 

9V0 540 

1710 -S 
131* 5 

3V0 1V1 
910 TVj 
490 T* 
544 340 
51* 3 
S4l 310 
340 9 

15% 910 
1510 090 
2740 21 


KflGspf 450 123 
KOMkC 0 

KMrtln AO XI 13 
KwCo JD X7 
KnPh JO 2J IS 
KevCo 9 

KflvCaort 
KcyCaun 
KIddawt 

Kkiort 21 

Kirbr 

KtlMig 13 

Klccrvs Mr 5 
KnooP 17 

fCnoll 14 

KeetrC X33 U1S5 


50x 354* 
121 310 

40 12*0 

3 710 

410 91* 

9 5*0 

35 14* 

3 840 

30 4 

15 440 

27 319 

5 5 
40 21* 

42 1440 

4 1290 
345 3*40 


2510 35(0—4* 

] a T10 

12Va 1240 T 10 
710 no + 1* 
910 910— to 

540 54a 

14* 14*. %a 

840 M 

2th 390—10 
440 440 

240 2%— 10 
490 5 
21* 31* 

1440 14W 
1240 12t0— 10 
UU. 9510 


7% 

1(0 LSB 

2 

Ito 

1% 

1%— % 



7S 

2% 

3*k 




7 1 

S 



8% 

23to Lakes g .IA 

34 

as% 

3440 

3M— % 


1410 1110 UndBnn 54 23 9 
1790 11 Ldmko J2 XI 11 
15*4 910 Looar 45 

510 41* LozK» 

3740 34U LAOrPP 

940 210 LCePti IS 

3190 1340 Lchieha 11 

510 340 lAlSurT 10 

171* 710 LMPPh JO 1J 6 


51 14*0 1410 14Vs 

505 1S*h 15 1540— 4o 

30 11% nio iiio 

3 310 510 svs— 10 

15 24% 3A. 3490 -0 40 

47 5% 51* 5V0— to 

39 31% 3010 3010—140 

9 5 540 5 9- V* 

39 1710 1710 1740 ^ 10 

85 3% 310 SO- 10 

23 3V0 3% 21* 

436 24% 211* 33%— 1 

5 144* 14Xi 144* + VO 

3 124* 1240 12% + 1* 

IS 11% 114) 1140 

1 14 14 14 9- VO 

S3 33% 311* 3910 


, VO 3no 
.g 34I* 
. 4* V 
5% 





7 

4% 4% 

3% 2% 
110 11 % 
940 9% 
8% 84* 

i6% 15% 

14% 14% 
3% 1340 
i9VO 13% 
11 % 11 % 

5 


5U 2 
2440 010 

% % 
154* 11% 
11% 61* 
21 U1* 

21 15% 

3 % 1 % 

340 1% 

14% 10% 
22% 10% 
8% 5% 
1MO 14% 
14V0 7% 

10% 5% 
1» 9% 


USR ind 

Uitmto 

Ufilcerp 

Unicppf 

Unimrn 

UAIrPd 

UnCooFS 

UPeedA 

UFoedB 

UtMnd 

USAGivt 

Unll*IV 

Unini n 

UnvCin 

UnlvRo 

UnvPet 


2% 345 

1340 13,. 

14 1340 

10 % 10 % 
10% 18% 
31% 21% 
2 190 

110 1 % 
15V0 14% 
17% 17% 
6% 5% 
10% 1040 
13% 13% 
8<A 790 

1240 13% 


240 

"£-!i 

14 +% 

1040 

lf%— % 
3140— % 
2 

140— % 
151* <0 4* 
17% 

6 %— % 
1840— U> 
13U— I* 
7%— 10 
13% 





10% 9% 

18% 10% 
97% 15V0 
12% 440 

5 2% 

33% 14% 
7% 3% 
15% 940 

'91* 5% 

5% 210 
11 % 11 % 
63% 50% 
8% 6% 
1240 8 
19% ir% 


VSTn JOB 
VollyRo lAO 
valspra A4 
Verbtm 

vwll 

VIAinC .400 
VIRsh 

V«ni» JO 
Vicpn 

vmtee 

vircp JWr 
Vplnw „ 
VIsuolG JO 

VOPtea M 

VtlICCP JO 


18 18 
22 % 33 
7% 7% 
3% 3% 
19% 

4% 31> 
10% 9% 
7% 7% 
3% 3% 
14% 14% 
52% 52 
. 040 8% 

11% 11% 
18% 18% 


18 — 

22 — 
7% +*% 
3% 

19% T IB 

4% 

9%—'% 

7% 

3% .f 10 

14% 

53% 'OH 
8 %— % 
Tl% ' 
18% 


11% 

5% TBv 

Jit 5J 

21 

8 

0% 

0% 

8% + Vi 

12*0 

7% TEC 

JA 

J 

8 

. 1 

1340 

IXto 

12W + % 

19% 

S% TIE 



IS 

550 

MO 

5% 

5%— % 

Uto 

5% Til 



43 

a 

10 

940 

10 

1846 

U TebPrfl 

A 

1.1 

13 

4 

IB 

It 

10 

15U 

9% Tasty 

40 

2J 

n 

8 

IS 

14(6 14(5—45 

5% 

3% Team 




2. 

Sto 

Sto 

Sto— % 

4*6 

1% TWiAm 




A 

2*0 

2*0 

240 

33% 

13% TdiSym 



15 

8 

19% 

19(0 

19% 

5040 

33% TBcnoP 



14 

•2 

SMO 

A% 

St% 

B 

SV TeebTp 



7 

A 

4(0 

440 

44k— V6 

8% 

7% Tectitrl 

A 

1J 

ID 

45 

17% 

1540 

17% + % 

185 

77% TelonR 

JA 

JIM 

2SBdA. 

IK 

IK 

5 

2 Telaan 




U 

3% 

2% 

2to + % 



Sales neures ore unoMdoL yearly Mgheond Iowa reUec 
tt>epraylpiia52w atlrs piuoifteeurT aj iiwae fc .butnelthelBiB«l 
tradbie dov. Where s aplK or tiodc divkSend emeuntlno to 25 
pereem or mere has been PoM. Ihe vaor^ htoh^ow ronoe end 
dividend ve shewn tor Itie new stodc only. UnIcot otharwlae 
noted, roiee of dtoMendanre annual dlsburaements based on 
thelotaei dadoraflen. 
e— dividend elao extralsiyt 
b — onniBif rate at dividend plus stock dividend/i 
e— llauWoNns dtvidcnd./i 
dd— caliadi/l 
d -new yearly IPW./I 

a— dividend oeclarod or paid In precodlns 12 monlhiL/l 

0 — dividend In Canadian toids. auMed to 16% nen-resMence 

tax 

1 — dividend de cloi e d ofter spIKmjp or stock dividend. 

I— dividend paid this year, omitted, deterred, er MocHon 
taken at toiest dividend maeilne. ' 

k— dividend dactorad or paid this year, an accumulative 
towe with alvidenda In arrearx 

n— newlaue in Ihe past S2 weeks. The hion>lowraawbaBinB 
with the start a( Iredlne. 

+ % nd— Mxtdoydeiivenr. 

P/S — price-Mmines ratio. 

r— dividand declared or peu In preceding 12 menltis. piue 
itodi dividend. 

s— stock vlir. Dividend beams with doieof spin; 

SIS— soles. 

t — dividend ooia in etodc In eracadinp 13 i min t ux asrimafed 
cedi value i eK»dlvldend of arHislrinuHen delx- . 

D— nenryaarlyhlgli. 

V— trntine halted. 

vl — to bonOruetcy er receiverstilp er belna reonKRiIxod un> 
tfer The Bankruptcy Act. er eecurltieo oasurned by such corn- 
pomes. 

wd — when distributed, 
wi— tdwnissuea 
ww— with warrmns. 

X — exHlIvWend er ex<le()tx 
xdls — euflstrlbuttoa 
xw— without warrants, 
y — ex^ivMend and aoies In full, 
vtd— rlHd. 
s— aoteeln ML 


14% Mk yonkCo 

9 

48 

7 

4% 

5%— to 

Sto 4 Yordny 

A IJ 13 

3 

5(6 

5% 

5% 



AMEX High»>Lo ws 


NEW HIOH8 n 


AdomRueet BeiorPtionn CltedetHId. 

GrtAmrlnd Grelnor HeollhCare 

MoalndSen NYTImes Oleleni 

SCEITBpr- SCE895pr TanMrCP 

WherheaEnts 

NEW LOWS 13 

Angles DoioPred Enetarpf 

JetAmarwr MSlDotoCo *%vieSter 

PetLewSap PlenacrSy SalemCoip 

SelentLsB 


cnvGasPla 
UbtyFedPhil 
Guebcoras'* 
UMMedIc *■ 


GOMHIteSt 
PelLewHsp 
Science A%t 


m: 


m 


Over-the-Counter 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


ASM Pd 
ADCTI 
ABLs 
APG 
ASK 
AT&E 
ATE 
AotRT 
Acodin 
AcapRs 
Aceliin 
AeuRov 
AcnieG 
Actmed 
AdOCLb 
Adage 
Adlsnw 
Advar 
AdvGan 
AdvTei 
Aequtrn 
AerSys 
AKBCP 
ARBeh 
AaevRt 
AIrMd 
AIrWIsc 
AlskBe 
AlokMt 
AllhNt 
AlakPe 
Aht«B 
Airin 
Aleerex 
Alegwt 
AiiegBv 
AionOrs 
AiMBn 
AiidCap 
Aiinof 
AllvGor 
AlPMIC 
Aitmer 
Altos 
AJIron 
Amcost 
Amrfra 
AWAIrl 
AmAdv 
ABkCt S 
ABnkr 
AmCorr 
ACenti 
AExpl 
AFdSL 
AmPrst 
APiete 
APurn 
AGraei 
AminLf 
AindP 
AInvLf 
AMoenI 
AMS 
AAUSv 

AAUal 

ANilns 

APhvG 

AQuoar 

ASecCs 

ASeior 

ASure 

AWetCp 

Amtllr 

Amrwst 

Amoen 

AntskB 

Ampods 

Anodlte 

Aniogic 

Anolvl 

Anoren 

AndrGr 

Andovr 

Andrew 

Andraa 

Apogee 

AoelaC 

AppieC 

ApIBleo 

APidCm 

ApIdMI 

AoldSir 

ArabSn 

Archive 

AreeSv 

Arise 

Artel 

Ashton 

ASdBCP 

AsdHsi 

AsrraW 

Astrcm 

Astren 

Aalrasv 

Atcor 

Athey 

AhcoFn 

AliCsLt 


Selesta Net 

10% Hteh Lew SPALClfoe 


5% T 4* 
13%— % 
2S%— % 
2I%— 10 
15—1* 
10 %— % 

4 

30%— % 
9% + % 
5% + % 
MO 
20 % 

16% 

35 — VO 

5 — 10 
8(0 — •* 

2M*— 15 

0 

4V0— % 
5%— U 
410 + % 
3% 

IS 

14 

30 + % 

12% + % 
14% 

540 

1540 

13% + % 
25% 

37—10 

21% 

7% + % 
30% 

20% 
38V0— 1 
2540— % 
21% 4- % 
2% 

13 

7% 

7%— % 
11 4- % 

11% 

15 4-1* 

4 — % 
7% 

1010 

174* 

1110 4- % 
11% 4- % 
740— % 

440 

14% 4- % 
7 

444*— 1* 
I2%— % 
35%— % 
lOSh— 10 
201* + 4* 
5% 4- 10 
940— % 
171* + 10 

3340— 10 

. % 

35% — % 

?*— Ki 

7 4- % 

6Ai 4- 4v 
30*h— % 

SI* 

21 + % 
1i%— V« 
540 

I 12%— % 
10% 

. 1Z%— % 
11 + Vr 

7 + to 

S 

4to 

•Vh — 10 
23%— % 

I 22M— % 

I 31%— 1 
154h 

35%— % 
9*0 + 1* 
5to 

5% + % 
. 20 — % 
204* + % 
710 + U 

9% 

25 - % 

I 13%— % 

8to + % 

5 — % 
. 1140— % 

7to— % 
17%— % 
. 204* * 4* 
Oto + % 

31 - % 


AtIntBc 

AtInFd 

AtIFIn 

AtIRM 

AtSeAro 

Audvid 

Ausiran 

AtwdOc 

AutTrT 

AuteSy 

Autnahe 

Awrten 

Avecrt 

Avniok 

Avatar 

AvIatGp 

AztcM 

Azieh 


BoyBke : 
Boyiy 
BIPuoes 
BellNI 
BellW 
Benhen 
Bonhnwl 
Berklev 
BarkGs : 
BerkHa 
BeolCp 
BeteLb 
Blbbi 
BtoB ' 
BieBIle 
BtaBear 
Biiimpo 
Bindiv 
BloRes 
Bloaen 
Blomet 
Biaare 
BioteR 
Btrainc 
BlatiGr 
BMcInd 
Biosiue 
BIISSAT 
BaoiBn 
, BobEvn 
I BoltTc 
BoonEI 
Beomin 
BoolliPs 
BeetBe 
BsInDlB 
BstnPC 
Bredvw 
BraeCo 
BrnchC 
Brence 
BrdoPd 
BrwnRb 
Brwrom 
Bruno 0 
BuHlen 
evIMTr 
Brnnm 
BurnaS 
BurrBr 
BMA 
BuSinM 
BuiirJ 
Bwilrmt 


.\pril 19 


I 29% 29% 

■ 13% 12% • 
lOto 1040 

■ 35% 35% 

I 13% 13% 

I 19% 19%- 
1 4% 4% 

IS 18 
710 8 
1 10% 1040 
I 540 7% 

445 5 

5% 5 

• S% 2S%- 
I 111* 18% 

1540 1540. 
t 4% 4to- 
1 2% 240 ' 

I 4940 50% • 

i 1% 1%- 

94* 340 

I 10% 10% 

> 0% l%- 

3440 35 • 

740 I - 
23% 24 
t 50% SD% 

■ 2845 2545 ' 
I 17% 1740- 

30% 30%- 
I 10% 10%- 

I 8 8% 

I 28% 28% 
t 38 3B ' 
58% 5I%- 
I 2745 98% 

I 12% 12% 

t 10 10 - 

13 13 - 

■ 32% 32% - 
I i% 840 

I 1 1% ' 

I 15 15% 

I 3% 3% ' 

040 840- 

■ llto 1145 ' 

I 33 33% 

■ 5D4e 50% ' 

5% 7 

54* 7 ' 

I 4 4 - 

I 14* 9 ' 

I 30% 20%- 

■ 14% 14%> 
I 1440 W44- 

33 33 ' 

750 770 

I % % 

I 34 34% 

i 324* 2Z%- 
' 15% 15% • 

> IH 1%- 
I IS IS 

> S9fe 5% 

I 34 94% 

I 5% 5% 

I 5% 5% 

■ 15% 15% 

340 4 • 

i 7% 745 

I 0% 8%- 

S% 5% ' 
k 740 745 ' 

. \ X- 

•34 34 - 

t 30% 3D%- 
745 8 ' 

I 7% 7% ' 

■ 345 3% 

• 4945 1945 ' 
I 30% 30% 

545 7 - 
1645 17 ' 

I 33% 33% 

■ 1445 1445 

> 32% 3245 
I S 5% 

I i'-. 4% 

I 15 15% ' 

■ 3 3V0- 

. 14% 1S% ' 
I 14* IK • 
I 2A0 344h- 
i 18% 1l%- 
I 84* 8% ' 
I 18% 18% 

I SI 51 ' 

k 745 745 

17 17 ' 

85% 37 

I 8 1 • 

I 7% 7%- 

I 30 28 

I 27% 27%- 
i 43% 43%- 
19 19 - 

r 10% 10% 
15% 15 
I 5% »*• 

745 B - 
10 10 

> 245 2% 

I 4 4% • 

IMk I9%- 


OiHand 

Chemer 

Otranr 

OirOws 

Chyme 

CtanAi 

QnMlc 

Ontas 

Cipher 

Qpiiee 

Oreen 

.Otfou 

etcsca 

ClzFMe 

CizGtP 

CIZUtA 

CtzUtB 

aivPed 

OvNCp 

ClivBep 

CMrSts 

OorkJ 

CloalcC 

ClaarO 

ClevIRf 

Othtme 
ceestp 
Catlint 
CstSav 
CoboLb 
Cdcaetl 
Ceour 


1 19% 
40 
03 2% 
334 

209 0% 

177 S% 

23 3% 
47312% 

34 740 
20522% 

a 10% 

331 2H 
510% 
14111% 
17511% 
S3 745 

a 4% 
112 2% 
51811% 
4318% 

aa 

184 a 
42915% 
a45% 
529% 
1«S4% 
1713% 
751140 
235% 
S3540 

24 145 
1011 % 
37 5% 
J4 3% 
17511% 

7 5% 
5 8% 

58 5% 
96515% 
11715% 
318 18% 

aS3% 
7917% 
85 a 
377 a% 

59 5% 
3 5% 

ai7% 
1313 
53510% 
3481% 
a27% 
41845 
»I27% 
385 9% 
3951510 
2Sa 6% 
»W% 
291 15% 
1333% 
n71M5 
3 7% 
10 840 

aa% 

■a 93% 

a38% 

417% 



ColABn 

CBeppA 

CoInGa 

CelLIAc 

CeirTle 

ColeNt 

CeluPd 


Camars 
Cemerc 
earnest s 
Cerndtu 
Comdlal 
Cemerc : 
CemClr 
CmeeU 
CmBCel 
CmeIBn : 
CmISnr 
CwlthB 
ewithP 
CmwTI 
CemAm 
Comind 
ComSva 
CemShr 
CmaCde 
OmPUe 
Cemeoq 
CoipaT 
CmpCr 
Cmperc 
Compch 
CmpSvs 
Cempus 
CCTC 


»18% 
mis • 

581545 

4134% : 
3131540 
325119% 
41 8% 
140 9 
15914%- 
15415 
34497% : 
9719% 
148 2% 
4135% : 
4)78% : 
9834 
5113 
1740 
4911 
731% : 
30 1 
asfto : 
21 3% 
7922 
5010% 
a 9% 

ns% : 

15 745 
813 840 
• 13% 
•5037% : 
174512% ' 


19% 19% — % 
% 40— H 

2% 2% 

34 

8% 8% + % 
5 5 

3% 340— % 
11% 12% + 40 

745 740 + % 

21% a% 

940 995— % 
3% 24* + K 
18% 18% 

11% 11%— 40 
10% 11V* 

7% 745 + % 

^ % 

11 11 %— % 
18% 18%— % 
a 

3845 a + U 
14% 15% + 40 
45 45% + Vg 

29to 29% 

3140 33H— % 

13 13 

114k 11H— % 
3540 38%— 0% 
W% 35% + % 
145 145 

11% 114b— % 
5% 5% 

3% 3%— % 
11% 1140 
5 5% + to 

9% 5% + to 
5to 5% 

144* 15% +n* 
1540 1540— to 
15 1S% + % 

a a — % 
17 17% 

I I 

2900 2940— % 
5% 5% 

5% 5% — M 

15% 17% + to 
11% 11%— to 
IOto'10%— to 
11% 81% 

27% 27%— to 
18% 18%— to 

a% a — to 

9% 9to 
1470 15 

8% + % 
«3VS 9310 + % 
15to— to 
3M 32% 

19% 19to— % 
7% 7%— % 

5to 5to 

Mto + to 
9140 21%— % 
38to 3M0 
1745 1740 
35% 3S%— 1 

avo a% 

18to 10% 

2710 27to-+ % 
M 34—40 
15% llto— % 
34% 34% — % 

5 • — to 

15to 15to— to 
.» — Vk 
144* 15 +1to 
1540 1540 + % 

7 7 — % 

14% 14% — % . 

14 15% +1to 

34% U + % 
IS% 15% — % 
9% 940 

1945 1940 

4% 4% — % 

14% 14%— % 
21% 31% — 40 
4% 5 

10% 15% 

14 14 —1 

15% 1546 + % 
3* 34% + % 

15% 1545— % 
1846 104*— % 
1% 8% + 40 
84* 845 + % 

14 14 

Wto 1445 
351* 3640— % 
13% 13% 

2% 945 

304* 3M0 + % 
77% 78% 

33*0 33to— 4t 
1245 13 + to 

394* 40 — % 
10 % 10% +'% 
304* 8045— % 

746 • 

39% a% + 10 
so* 300— V, 
2lto'21%— v» 
10<A 10V0 
9to 9to— V-. 
22 % avb + to 
745 74* 

fVh 8Vk 
13% 12%— % 
27% 37Vh— % 


CmpAs 
CptAut 
Cmpor JO j 
CpIEnl 
CmptH 
Cmpidn 

CmpLR .13 1J 
CmatM 
CmpNet 
CmpPda 
CmpRs 
CmSyn 
CmToh JS J 
Cmpwtn 
Cptctt 
Cmirve 
C anwty 
ContsIK 
Onpehp 
Camteh 
Conoti 

Cenltrs IJO 40 
CennWI 1AI 03 
CnCae 3J0 12J 
CnCopI 1A1 9J 
CCoaR USaiQJ 
CCopS 3J0 1U 
CenPbr 

OiPoes ia 3J 
CeniPd JO 1A 
OiTem AOe 1J 
GenstIB 1J2 iS 
Ceiwil 

OenWIs 1A0 X5 
OltIBO XMb 5J 
aiNits 

aiHiic 

CenNns .12 A 
aLoar 

Cenvnt J5e 4J 
Cen^ 

Convrae 

CoprBlo 

Caere B ad u 
C opytel 
Ceroem 
Cordh 

CorcSI 3J0 X9 
Cqrvue 

Comvs JO u 
CourDls 

COUSP S J2 14 
Cavnai 

CrhBrl .14 1J 
CrodTr J5 A1 
Cramer 
CraiEd 
Cranue 
CresTr jo X3 
CnAuta 
CWnBk 

Cruma 44 1A 
CulInPr .94 47 
Culium J5 XS 
Oita Jl ij 
Cycere 

cyprSv jpe IJ 
DBA 

DCNY 435e 7J 
ODI 
DEP 
DUtoe 
DNAPI 
DOC 
Detilbra 
DalrMt t 
OelsySv 
DaleaP 
OmnBie 

OariGp .13 .1 

Oolorde 
DialO 
DiSwIch 
DotSCP 
Dteelh 
Datum 
Gauehn l.9i sj 
Deviwe 

DMSh joe 1.1 
OedsD 
Oeoem 
DakJM 33 3J 
OelGim a 14 
DeltaDt 

DeltNC 1J4 9.1 
Dellak 
Deitawe 
Denelcr 
Denmika 

Dro Gty 930 SJ 

OtooPr 
Diocrve JO 25 
Dtaeone 
gibral 
igceon 
,DlcnK4 
iDletoe 
Oiaicm 
OiaiiSw 

DInnrai 40 44 
Dlenex 
DIstLee 
•."vnod 
G* -01 

O'rc. : ._ 

DamB UO 3J 
OrenH jn U 
DglLeffl 40 24 
OeytOB M 40 
Oronlx joe ij 
Droshr .15e IJ 
DresbS 


15025% 25'A 25% 

430 7 540 540—% 

411 11 II +% 

an* 7% 7<A — % 

a 8% 710 8% + to 

479 7 *4* Oto— % 

55 740 7% MO + IO 
ia 440 44* «% 

a 7% 7% Tto— % 
181 840 840 840— to 
1 410 4to 4to 
M 9% 9% 9% 

lisaik 31 a%— % 

153 COO Oto Oto— to 
« 5% Sto 540 — 4e 
a 3to 3 3% + to 

117 9to 945 940 
1711% 11% 1140 + to 
31 SM Sto 540 + to 
31 1% ito l%— to 
ia 0 790 74«— to 

5320* »% 254« * % 
1518% 1740 1741 
»3S4h 33% 23%—% 
*317% 1540 17 
4117 15% 15%—% 

iaa% a 32Vr + % 

S 7% 74* 740—% 
39340% 394* 40% * 4* 
13 5% 4% «)* 
sa a a 

11274* 27% 27«0 + 40 
a 540 5% 5%— to 

oa a a 
oa% a% »% + % 

ZMT4% ISVO Uto + 40 
149 54* S% 5%— % 
as? 30% 31 + to 

a 5% 4 5%— « 

a 74* Tto 7% 
iin 0% 04* 04«— % 

15715% 15 15 — to 

a 4 3to 340— to 
4891510 15% 15% + to 
11930% 19% a +1 
390 4% 5% 5% + % 

77 9% 9% 9% 

55ia% Sto S3to— 1 
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Page 13 


W-i m$iJ 2 BWioa in Latest Merrill Lynch Faces an Uncertain Future as Its Latest Leader Settles In 


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dcpp^ 

TbeF«ds^M-l (dlto«MuiaBdlya£iiBUd$573.6bi]Uoaindie 
wedc aided Aprtf 8, Tram S574A iRffion IK invMus wed:. 

For (be blest 13 «eeics, MtI vended £68.9bilUon, a lOJfereeot 
setMu^ a^usied aiR^ fate of SVftKkdiiK bw 
wcAs. 'Toe slow erowdi raised eapcctatioas oo WaO Street (hat 
iincteantGS would WK rise' sbB]dy. 

. Bat Elliott natt do u crt ftwmrt al Dooaldsoe Lufkin A Jeordte 
floe.. fOKcast that tbe eeatraf bank wiS laa dose tahi on mon^ 
Sio"^ *‘Y<w have to bdknv thu looK (Fed) casing has ben wi b 
pteee^** given re ecm dedhtes n shon-ton mteresi rases, he said. Yet 
(he “market still sold off s touch at the dose becaose the money 
supply was sot down » nudi as (he Jsaita iraoted,^ Mr. FUit ttid of 
Thuesday’s iradi^ 


(Comfiwed from Page 9) 

Jama P. Hubuiy, an analyst with 
Werthda A Co, The real issue is 
*\riietha” they can bring (hdr busi- 
nesses in focus. Ibe typical com- 
nem you hear is, Tf only Merrill 
could pul it iMether, Lbey-*d be voy 
competitive.* 

Ihore IS a lot of Merrill lo put 
together. It has a nuil nelw^ 
second to none: 476 ofnees tlMi 
have pulled in soneSlSO billion in 
assets from 4 imllioo individual 
custonaers. Merriirs investmem 
banking busuiess has grovm smart- 
ly, and the co^any has rapidly 
become the natioo's second-largest 
realtor, with some 12,000 indmeu- 
deni ^enia sdiing houses for ii. 


And «Q ibc iatcmatioual from, 
Merrill is moving a^ressively to 
win beachheads in overseas fiban- 
dal markets, which, like the Ajoeri* 
can one are der^uIatiDg. 

Most of the company’s explosive 
growth eame unda the lenure of 
(he dordneerisg Donald T. Regan, 
who left tot Washington to be sec- 
retary of the Treasury in 1981 and 
is now Presideni Ronald Reagan's 
chief of staff. From 1973 to 1981, 
Mr. moved MerriU bke a 
supertanker throu^ t^ deregulat- 
ing world of nnandal services as he 
amassed new products and bus- 
nesses. 

But all this came too fast and 
went too far, and when the markets 
Uimbled in 1982, Mr. Regan's hdr. 


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BOATS A 
RECREATION.AL 



Roger E. Birk, bad Il« scramble (o 
reverse gears. 

Mr, Birk, a good No 2 to Mr. 
Regan, was unable as No. 1 to put 
Memii back on course. During his 
tenure, its earnings hit lows not 
seen in years, and iu image was 
badly umished by its entangle- 
ments in the Baldwui-Uailed Cotp. 
colbpse and the Washington Puo- 
tk Power Supply System default. 
After a mere thr^and-a-half yean 
as chief e.\enitive; he handed the 
baton to Mr. Schreyicr. Mr. Birit 
will also step down as chairman in 
July. 

S^e obsenen wrader if Ma- 
rill is spreading itself too thin in 
trying to be ^u«U> successful in 
the retail brokerage and in- 
vestment-banking businesses. 

“Merrill got overextended trying 
16 be all ibmgs to all people,” 
Perrin Lon^ an analyst with Up- 
per Analytical Seeuriries. 

“They are trying to maintain 
tbeir position as the largest retail 
firm and join the ranks of piesii- 
gtous investment hanK like First 
Boston and Goldman, Swdis. They 
have to make up their minds. No 
Ofic has done both and been suc- 
ceasTul. Somewhere they will have 
to decide and concemrate on only 
one or two things." 

Yei othas maintain (hat Merrill 
can move in iwo directions. But. to 
be successful, it will have to make 
some hard chokes with a discipline 
it has not dispbyed before. 

Some find it ironic that Mr. 
Sch^er Is now the apostle of cost- 
culling, since it was be who had 


Mam^Hcawy 
To Reorganise 

New York 7)mn Semce 

NEW YORK - Manufac- 
turers Hanover Coip. has ao- 
nounced a reoiganizBtioo plan 
that it said was derigoed to Mi- 
ster lagging earnn^ and to 
sfaffi the oq)haas from growth 
in size and gross eamiogs. 

Under the plan •wfwiwrwt 
Thuxsday, the highly central- 
ized bank bokling company will 
be broken into five units, otth a 
separate profit center 
by its own executive vice pre^ 
deot. Pm of the new stzat^ is 
to break down the disuncuons- 
between the bank and the bold- 
ing company. 

Manufacnirers Hanover has 
generally been viewed by ana- 
lysts as a hank with soane- 
t^t lackluster earnii^ But 
banking analysts respond fa- 
vorably to the rewganizatoD 
plans. 


in much of the free 
spending that got Menill into trou- 
ble. Over the years, Merrill execu- 
tives threw money at problems with 
httk attention to the bottom line. If 
the head of nding wanted more 
resources, he got thm If the head 
of retail want& more resources, be 
got them. Everyone was denud- 
ing more and no one said no — 


until the markets caught up with 
Merrill and profits felL 

Todqr Mr. Schr^er ^pioacbes 
eon-cuiting with brnn-again zeal 
. “This can't be eonsinied as a one- 
time quid; fix,** he said. “We ^ve 
to kcM pouniEng this thing fcff- 
ward.*^ 

Mr. Sefareyer boasts that in the 
second half of 1984 alone, his ef- 
fora have saved Merrill some SI 10 

tnilUnn , 

But if Maril! is cutting costs on 
some fronts, it is also pili^ up new 
ones. Merrill is comomted to 
spending oxhc than S90 minion 
over the next several years in a joint 
venture with IBM to devdop a new 
cooipuieiized i^oimaiion and or- 
der execution sy*stem for brokers. It 
is agiending some S16S m^'m for a 
new broker-training facility in 
Piineeton. New Jersey, and 
minion foradaia-pxoeessingfacili- 
ly in Somerset, New Je^-. It is 
planning to move from its present 
Wall Street headquarters into two 
towers now under construction in 
Battery Park City m Manhattan. 
This ^ cost Merrill about S12S 
million in lease payments. 

Mr. Sdireyer defends these ex- 
penditures as investments in Mer- 
rill’s future, and says the camtal 
projects may save the firm SISO 
millioQ to $300 minion in the long 
run. 

One of the sources of costs at 

MerriU is the re^ distribution ttet- 
work that accounts for about half 
of MenilTs bilUon in annual 
revenues from securities opera- 
tions. 


Last year was a particularly bad 
one for MerrilTs retail operation. 
Ou a strictly operatkmal basis, ii 
lost mo^. The business was car^ 
ried oa interest earned from about 
S4 billion in loans on margin ac- 
counts, and the use of about SI 
billion in free credit halaiw< that 
Merrill customers had left in tb^ 
accounts. Merrill did not make 
money on its traditional comnis- 
sion or fee business. 

A persoiulized brokerage net- 
wofk IS a higiMost way d doing 
business. e^Mrially con^rmed with 
such alieraative d^very Q'siems as 
direct mail, persooai conqmiers 
and automated teOeis. There is the 
overhead of running the branches 
—the office leases, the salaries and 
the electronic suppon netw-orL 
Then, the broker takes about 40 
cents of every dollar 'in comnusrion 
and fee revenue that Merrili col- 
lects. 

“You have to ask bow appropri- 
ate b a broker as a dbiribuuon 
system for financial services,” said 
Rodney Sebwanz. an anolvsi ax 
P^e Webber Inc. “Other forms of 
distribution could rendtf antiquat- 
ed a traditional broker delivrry sys- 
leoL” 

Muriel Sieben. head of Muriel 
Siebert & Co., a discount broker- 
age, said, “The removal of the indi- 
vidual investor from the market has 
got to have bad effects on MerrilL" 
Individuab ate now estimated to 
account for only 10 percent of all 
trading on the' New York Stock 
Exchange, down from 33 percent in 
the late 1970s. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(ContinDed From Bade Page) 


SERVICES 


LOWCOSTFUOnS iFORSALEAWAhTIED 


SERVICES 


YEAt RETUm flOM AMSiamAJlL 
do^ bf Kfwdubd bMwa in US d» 
bn, ndudMpMl CDwriM: Mortraal- 
•'TemiB- Sn OtKaaot 48). LV 
fNoeot S)^, HewBan Stt, 
Vonctuiw: S30t boc 60. tana 6)0. 
Meteu TimI, DmA jO. Ttb 30- 
27404!. AMwdon Tabc 14635 NL 


HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


THE MAGNIRCBff 
STBU 
SOURIS 

7 AND 14 DAY OUJISB 

T» Nw &Mk UondL TuAey. 
Egypt a Woil 

SttbiQ EMcy Monday fton Trawt 

THE YJ^-UKE 
SIHU 
OCEANIS 

3 AND 4 DAY QUISB 

To *• CrMh a Turtoy. SUr« 

MOfy Mondoy & Frdoy from Nobs 

rboM sndy Agam or: 

2. Kor. imwm. Si, Ailm IQS62 
TiIik: 215621. Ph«o 323883. 

rbraa^'^B0 36 
MM«dvh6 K6I3 
Gonm tal 37 no 
Zimdi M; 39! 36 55 



EDUCATI<»4 


lOANKHiffr YOUNG lAOV eonpoi- 
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UMXM WBL BXlCATa Yeuin 
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I MBS YOUNG SOnuSnCAtED ViP 
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TOKYO lADY COM9AMOK PA 
Pwunoi Aasort QSU^SSSY 


HONG KONG - 3-620000 Yeung 
tadv tAsan/Weaeml Cempgwon 








WiM I HAMBUBG - YOUNG lADY eenpot- 
Td; 531 3666 Fdw. | «n, nwUnaueL Tib 27 04 570. 


UNDON.Yaw«Q«Tnan/fMidk. LONDON DUCATS Com. 
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La^TiL UK 01.381^ 






TOKYO 645 224t. Toumg & diap. 
■Biatatoifi, Me. 


YOUNG OCEAMC lADY in londM 
01.245 9002 A«pam/Tte»^ 


FORSAU 

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ironiCA btf 79, pwfie cendden, 
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SERVICES 


YOUNG lADY 

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MB 562 059/ 


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YOUNG EUGANT UDY 
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nusnu. lADY COMPAMON 

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FANS 704 80 27 
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TOKYO: 442 39 79 

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ACROSS 

1N.R.A. man 

4Precederofcut 
or fire 

9 Israeli dance 

13 Leading 

18 Middle 
Easterner 

29 Virile 

21 Primordial 
substance 

22 Mother-of- 
pearl 

23 Kem musical. 
with"Tbe” 

26 Air or motor 
follower 

27 French school 

28 Henry was one 

29 Restrain 
legally 

31 Hit song from 
“The Firefly" 

34 European 
blacUiirds 

38 Rialto sign 


39Apq>raise 

40 Word>for>word 

41 Sphere 

44 Former Syr.- 
Egypt. union 
47 Art stand 
49 Pearl Mosque 
site 


DOWN 

1 Confronted 

2 Northern 
constellation 

3 Boca .Fla. 

4 Direct with 
autb. 

5 Some NASA 
takeoffs 

6 Pigment for 
J(»epb Turner 

7 Clip 

8 Not so 
adamant 

9 Water 
compounds 

10 Worn 

11 Book by D. S. 
Freeman 

12 Innovative 
Broadway 
producer: 1871- 
1937 

13 Down^— 
(destitute) 

14 Common 
arctic sea 
mammal 


ACROSS 

50Lute«haped 

marine 

creature 

55 Drudge 

56 Meat cut 

57 Find out 

58 Water pots of 
India 

60 Small sum 
62 Mskepicots 

63 Krupp steel 
dty 

64 Author St. 
Jobnsetal. 

66 Believes in 
68 Pt^ular piano 
piece 
73 Sadat's 
pr^ecessor 

76 " with 

flagons . . 

Song of 
Solomon 

77 Dog's role in 
“Peter Pan" 

81 Veterans' org. 

82 Triangle ratio 
85 Fencing feint 
86Eminexu 

87 Biblical nation 
89 Composer of 
"TheBobe- 
mluGiri" 

92 Movie western 
94 Grayish yellow 

DOWN 

15 "The Name of 
the Rose" 
author 

16 Prepare for 
battle 

17 Frances or 
Ruby 

19 Obstructs 

24 At no time, to 
. Keats 

25 College in 
Westchester 
CO..N.Y. 

30 Formal or 
fashionable 
attire 

32 “Hold 

horses!" 

33 Fir or pine 
board 

35'Cereal fungi 

36 Prop for Will 
Rogers 

37 Distorts 

40 A brother of 
Simeon 


ACROSS 

95 Rattled 

96 "Whoopee! " 

97 Be suitable 

98 Lie back 
lOO Altars for 

Augustus 
103 "Old 

MacDonald" 
refrain letters 

106 "Streetcar" 
character 

107 Birds with loud 
calls 

114 Humpback 
salmon 

116 Mine engineer 

117 Aquiline abode 

118 Husband of la 
reine 

121 A.k.a. 

"Christmas 
Don't Be 
Late":195S 

124 Angler's 
pitAlem 

125 Trifle 

126 Biting 

127 Autocrat 

128 Japanese 
emperor's title 

129 Playwright 
O’Casey 

130 “Beau " 

131 Compass dir. 

DOWN 

41 Makeqresat 

42 Feds remorse 

43 InclinatiCBi 

45 Musical key 

46 Janeiro 

48 U.S. missile 
■51 Laborious 

travels 

92 Oakley and 
Rooney 

53 British carbine 

54 Rings of light 
$9 Tot's hero 
61 Spiny, blue- 

flowered plant 
65 Short for 
mfecti<»- 
causing 
bacter^ 

67 Take forcibly 
69 The Supreme 
Court, e.g. 
TOPhotog’s 
solntiOD 
71 Grinding 
material 


Musical Menagerie btedwardmarciese 


13 

14 

IS 

16 

22 




26 





PEAIVUTS 
(l CAN^BajEVEir 


THEH' CANCELS? MV 
fAVORTTE PROGRAM/ 


135 136 137 



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50 HARP. 


45 

46 


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^ THE CH I aB 


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rnT 178 17S 


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riooi 1101 1102 


1103110411051 



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Hit 111211131 


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1118 1119 |120 : 


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O Neu! York Tbnts, tdiied by fiigeiie Mnleiim- 


DOWN 

91 Pre-Roman in 
Italy 

93 Water pitdier 

99 Philipfiine 
seaport with a 
repditive 
name 

161 Oriental baby 
lender 

162 Forest. 

fonner 
English royal 
park 

104 Author 
Dinesen 


GOLDKORN TALES 

By Leslie ^stein. 244 pp. $16.95. 

Dtaton, 2 Park Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 

L EIS GOLDKORN is back! You will remanber 
j him, perhaps, from Leslie ^stein’s wemdexful 
stoiy, “The Siemway Quintet,’' published nearly a 
decade a^. L Goldkom, a poson of some culture 
and sensitivity. A 20ih-oeatuiy man, survivor of the 


Holocaust, contemponai^ of S. Freud and L Witt- 
e^tein; a lover of music, himsdf a flutist of seme 
disiinciion, and a player of the Bedhsum piano at 


the Scrinway RestauranL A non-believer, a drinker 
of scluu^ips. 

You would like to ask. maybe, what is the mean- 
ing of his tale? What moral ^tein means for the 
reader to draw from Ins very fuimy. very upsetting 
adveatiues? 1$ his histoiy not the bsiory of rids 
ceaturv? Of modern times? Nodoe bow HIk Saul 
Bellow’s hero, A. Sammler, Goldkom is haunted by 
memories of the terrible events in Europe duiioe the 
war. How he. too, has seen, in the dty of New loik. 
in the United States, the prondsed land, becooe a 
violent snkhole of hooligans. wise-gu)(s, and rude 
driamers of all that is brautiful and civilized. Are 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


DOWN 

72 Big turf winner 

73 Designators 

74 Wading bird 

75 Rare 

. 78 Coral strip 
79 Hindu dr^ 
SOCoupd' 

83 Nucha. 

84 Sextet in 
"Little Nellie 
Kelly" 

88 Voice 
amplifier 

96 "Ode to 

Collins 


BOOKS 


we not meant by Easton, authcM' of "King of the 
Jews" and “Regma," to find some l^d df parable 
here? 

As his earb'er fiction has demonstrated. Eastern is 
an exuberant writer, whose amh iripfn to addnass the 
large matters of histoiy, and our moral and inteDeo- 
tual efamces, is matchH a commodions talent — 

an ease in story-teUing and a screwball feding for 
comedy thai counterpoints the high seriousness of 
his suqects and invests them, at once, h uman , 
ity and a sense of emergency. 

In anempting to write two seqiKis to his master- 
ful “Stanway (hunietT — whidi is also included in 
this volume — the author has, of course, set hinwJf 
a daunting task. That origina] ston —in which two 
thugs hold the patrons and staft of t^ Steinway 
Restaurant host^C> and cCcct a nuraculous, if 
somewhat ambiguous, escape — n<H only intro- . 
duced Leib Goldkom. a mify enchanting character, 
but also seemed, in its juxt^orition of Old Wmid 
culture and contetqpoiazy violence, an oigaiuc and 


DOWN 

105 "Lend less 
than thou 
Shak. 

107 Califoniia- 
Nevada lake 

108 Mamer's 
adopted child 

169 "Ala 

Recherche du 

Perdu"; 

Proust 

116 Breakout 

111 Rebelled 

112Fochand 

Simone 


DOWN 

113 River mNE 
Spain 

115 “Seems, 
madam! Nay, 
Bamlet 

118 Utah Beach 
craft 

lU Chemical suf- 
fix 

128 Operated 

122 Age, in Asti 

123 American 
humorist: 
ISSd-96. 




ANDYCAPP 



BCIJSE ME. Bur X IVtlNKTHE 
FELLER TM WITH IS BR3KE , 
-DO SOU THINK 
( OFFENDER IF X BOUSHTJL 

^ - HIMADRINK?rSi^ 





j^AN 
OFWHftT 
> BEUKE1HE 

sexnorwE 




wholly complete worit of art So perfectly bonded 
was its alloy of the magical and to r«sL the collo- 
quial and the marvelous, that the reader fdt there 


S<4iitioa to Last Week’s Puzzle 


naoao aQaaQa □□□□ □□□□□ 
aaoDG □□□□□□ noaci □□□□□ 
□ciDaDDDaaQQC] QEiaacioaDaD 
anno ddugei anciaa 

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ana noa aQisi!i tiaaaaDci 
□□□□□□□Qaaa qqo 
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□□BO □□□□□ □□□□□ □□□□□□ 

□OQ □□□□□ciaaaoa aasaoci 
□□□□□a 000 ooBaoD 

I □□□□□□ □□□□□[□□□□□□ □□□ 

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!□□□ □□□□□□ 

I □□□□□□□ □BOO □□□ □□□ 
□□□□ □□□□□ Qtioao 
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□□□□□□□□□□ □□aaooooaDno 
□□□OD □□□□ aaaaaa □□□□□ 


were do loose ends left to be tied, no farther pomts 
tobemade. 

Do Leib Goldkom’s further adventures Eve up to 
hisdebnt? Wen. no and yes. The second story in this 
volume, "Muac of the Spheres," is an anemic ai- 
tenqit to show how the passing of time has affected 
both Goldkom and the Steinway RestauranL h^ 
fedings like love and hope can be retom long after 
they appea^ to have died. Both the restaurant and 
our h^ h seems, have failes. on hatd times — 
Goldkom has been redu^ to playing musical 
glasses (m the street oorimr for a livmg, the Siemway 
has become a son of Off Off Broadway theater — 
and both undergo, in the course of the stoty, certain 
tzansformatkms. 

No doubt in casting Goldkom as Roderigo in a 
Steinway production of “Othdlo,** Epstein wants to 
draw some paiaD^ between art and reality, but his 
dforts promice only a tired edio of his ooi^ “R^- 
na," in wiuch riM heroine mures up the role she plm 
inlife and the role she plays in Chekhov's “Sca^id." 
In "The Ma^ Rute,^ however, Goldk^ — and 
his creator — come full aide. This story not only 
works m^jcal dnages on the themes Of Mozart's 
opera, but on ^tein’s previous two stories as well 
and the result is an energy densely patterned tale 
about revenge and forgiveness and the stunning 
tricks that life can play on its victims. 

After many yeais, GoUSoom again finds himsdf 
working at the Steinway RestauranL thongh in the 


VIZABP of ID 

f 

I 

\ .yM&a^oFiT! j 


\-~s 


REX MORGAN 


IM AFRAID YOUVE SOMiB 

MISTAKE ON THAT NOTICE YOU'VK 
$ENT US / /MRS. BISHOP IS ALMMYS o 
VERY PUHCTUAL IH /MAKING HER 5 
CAR WMM6HTS/ YES; fU HOLD ON / S 











reduced capadw of stoe-shme boy; he finds the 
Rudafl & Rose flme that had been stolen from him 
back in 1963; and bealso encounters again — or so 
he dunks — the man responsible for sending his 
faimly off to the toath camps many yean ago. 

Epstein has orcbestrated this story — and in 
petrospect. the reader sees, all three "Goldtom 
Tole:^ — as a mnsicdamtpostiozL rewriting mo- 
tifs, images, and emotional notes in a sen^ d 
variations that cause the reader to constantly reas- 
sess what has gone before. And by its end, as Leib 
Goldkom reonbcaces music as a symbol of nature 
and kumony, the reader, too, is moved to ^ebrate 
the ledeim&ve powen of the imagiaation — and to 
applaud ^ntein's artistry and ambidoa. 

Midiiko Kakaaro is oa tlx su;^ of The New York 
Times. 



TWERK MO MIYAKE. MR. 
BISHOP.' WEVK RECEIVED 
NO PWMEWTS IN THREE 
A^ONTHS f } r-d 


GARFIELD 



^OH SURErVOa'RE PROBABLV 
tTHINKIN& VIMS’ PDWNPEEP 
S TM A MI9TER NICE 


WELUSET ONE FIN 
OtITOFTHAT CAGE 
ANr VOD'RE HI6TORV 



/1?iu 


)l9SS UnMd FMtur* SyndeitaUiie. 


W>rid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse April 19 

Ooemfl prkti in laoal ommeia anUa othowise indieatei, 


'6cY,TlWWAS^to®4e.' 1)lI!16<irYEr,*lCIVl?* 


WEATHER 


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HK Hotels 
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Previews : isno* 


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1750 1770 
3475 3350 
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CMIPMII* stock IMtaX : 11MJ9 
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BIC , 

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Retfleltehn 2 

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Aeefi Index ; 30U1 
Pievtewi jlteje 
CaC Index ; 7MJ0 
Prnvlees : Ti*4e 


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307 30MO 
1405 1«* 

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Zurich Im 24800 33000 

sac index : 440.18 
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NA.: net neeted: njl: net 
eveltaMt; xri: ex-dlvhiencL 


Hilton May Sell Hotel . 

ffew York Times Senlee 

NEW YORK — iSItOD Hotels Corpn whose 

X " ation to operate a casino in its undpeoed 
tic Gty hotd was rgected seven we^ ago, 

has ’ ^ 

proper^ to Donald Trump, a Nw ^'oik zeal estate 
entrepreneur. 

A source dow to the negotiations said that the 
price being discussed for the New Jersey picp^, 
^e Atlantic Ci^ Hilton, was beew^ tn^uin 
'and $325 tnilhoiL Hus source said .the' deal wouU 
be completed tv early next wedc. Ihe 634-ioom 

structure cost MiItoQ $308 million' to bi^ . 


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* ■ -s-v'. 

INTERIHA'nONAJL HERAJUD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY^UNDAY, APRIL 20-51, 198S 



Page 1^ 


SPORTS 






North Stars Come Back to Defeat Hawl^ in Opener 


TTtt AstiKiOtrJ frtsi 

CHICAGO -- The MinneiiiU 
North Stan, after spoitifle the Chi* 
api Black Hawks a 3K1 lead, 
atonned haiik Thursday night to 
win, in dw opening eame of ibe 
NHL\ divisiotui phyoifs. 

The North Stars won the Natioa* 
d Hoekey League's Noms Divi' 
Sion last year hut were a dismal 
fourth this season uiih a 25-43-12 
record. A skw nf injuries and 
ferem performances hy the healthy 
players were the main cause of Uie 
team*s fall. 

But the North Stars are tindicat' 
iag theabdves for their horrid reg< 
uuir season. In the opening rouM 
of the Stanley Ci^ payoffs, 
defeated Norris champion 

St. Louis, and (heir \ictoty Tburs* 
day gives them a 1-0 lead in the 
hest-^’Ses-en divisional fmaL 

Haewhere in quarterfinal open- 
ers Thursday, (^ebec surprised 
Montreal, 2-1, in overume m the 
Adams Disison; defending Stan- 
ley Cup champion Edmonton got 
two third-period goals to defat 
Winnipeg, 4-2, in the Smvthe le- 


sion. and nuladdphia blanked the 
New York Ishtu^ 3-0. in the 
Patrick Division. 

The Oiki% and Jets will play 
again Saturday. Tbe ocher three se- 
ries resume on Sunday. 

North Stan Catch blen Sonmor 
said, “I think the Hawks took ti for 


NHL PLAYOFFS 

granted that when we were dafwn 3- 
0. it would be a cakewalk. But after 
we got those two qukk goals [in the 
first fteriodl, we knew the shM was 
OR the other foot We not only 
outfought them and outskated 
them, but we beat them to the 
pncL** 

Rookie Ed OlezyL defenseman 
Doug Wilson and Tom Lysiak beat 
goaltcnder GUIes Mdoche in the 
opening 5:42 of p!a> and the root 
appearu to be m. Bui Dennis 
Maruk and Willi Pleti rgslied in the 
nnt lt45 to close the Hawks* le^ 
to 3-2. 

Then Brian Bellows laid out Chi- 
cago’s Keith Brown with a crushing 
cheek which freed Tony McKegney 


on a breakaway. McK^ey beat 
goalie Murray Banneman to tie 
the contest at 7:40 ot the second 
session. 

“It was gratifying to see Brian 
work so hard.” Plen said. ‘’After 
the Si. Louis scries, I kind of took 
Brian and Steve Payne under mv 
wtng and told them when ifae>’ pla'y 
the Hawks to be a little more pnysi- 
cai and muck it up a Uitk. 

“The check that Bellows put into 
Brown ignited our icam.*' 

Nonfiqoes 2, Canadleiis 1 

fn Montreal, the Nordioues' 
Marie Kumpd put in a shot from 
ibe right-wing boards at 12:23 of 
overtime (hat Caiudiens* goaltend- 
a Sieve Penney couldn't get his 
glove on. The Nordiques. who fin- 
ished three points bddnd flm- 
placc Montre^ in the .Adams, were 
I-6-I against the Ca.nadiens during 
the season. 

“I was trying to siay wide on the 
p>lay. Michel Goulet got me the 
puck and I got rid of it quickly," 
said KumpeC a I9B4 L'.S. Olympi- 
an. “I knew the defenseman was 


coming up on me. so 1 just shot, 
ICK&ed up and it was in.” 

Brent Ashton had ^bec*s oth- 
er goal, while Lucien DeBlois 
scorra for Montreal. 

"i think both teams were kind of 
flat. There wasn't the imensiiy 
there usually is," said Montreal for- 
ward Mats Naslund. 

OBcr 4, Jets2 

In Edroomon, .Alberta, Paul Cof- 
fey’s shot bounced into the net off 
the skate of Winnipeg's Date Ba- 
bych six minutes into the third pe- 
riod, then Wsyne Gretzky added 
an empty-net goal for the Stanley 
Cup champions. 

The Oilers have won sewn con- 
secutive playoff gamftc against 
WiDnipeg, wUch was missing in- 
jured stars Dale Haavrehuk and 
goalie Brian Haywajrd. 

Gretzky scored his first playoff 
goal and had twx) assists for Ed- 
Diomoo, which also got goals from 
Mark Napier and Jari Kuni. The 
Jets kept pace through two periods 
with goals frmn Bengt Lundhoim 
while they were sbormaoded, and 
Paul MacLeoa 


Only 16,236 fans attended, near- 
ly UOO short of a sellout and one 
of the smallest crowds in Edmon- 
ton’s NHL playoff bisioiy. 

Flyeis 3, Lslanden 0 

In Philadelphia, the Islanders 
appeared listless after ihdr come- 
back in the opniing series, beating 
WashingUMi in five games after 
drying the first two. 

Rick Tocchet contributed a goo! 
and an assist and Brian Propp set 
up two goals for the Flyers, (werall 
points leaders during the season. 

Tun Kerr and Ron Sutter also 
scored for the Fivers and goalie 
Pelle Lindber^ blocked 22 shots 
for his fust playoff shutout and 
second over the Islanders this 
month. 

~!t probably was one of the best 
games for our defense," said Lind- 
bergh. “It is nice to have the shut- 
out, but winning was most impor- 
tant." 

.Added Flyers Coach Mike 
Keenan of the shutoutr'Those kind 
of things always help a person’s 
confldencc. But if you keep tbe 
Islanders off the board, the defense 
bod to play wdl to help him.” 


Celtics Edge Cavaliers, Lakers Overwhelm Suns 


'^1 



A' 

RM#n4Mid Ami MarmlOTrf 

Doable check: The North Stars’ Brian Befiovrs, left, tad the Bbdc Hawks* Doug WOsoo. 

V,S, Upsets Su)edm in World Hockey; 
Soda, Csediodomkia Wm2d Games 


, Carfikd br Osr Sj^ ftam flt'yuldto 

' PRAGUE — Corey Millen 
scored the winner early in ihielotf 
period Thnrsday as tbe U.S. team 
upset Sweden, 4-3, in dse World loe 
Hodiey cbaoipioaships. 



[THERE’S 

’ BISHOP.' weVe lEcar 
NO PAYATEMTS IN THE 
MONTHS.' 




ffk&e 

Vanfaiesbiouck was just ontAand- 
ing,** said U.S. com Dave Peiav 
son. 

In the fmal minoie, VaoMes- 
brouck. of the New York Rai^srs, 
made two ^lectacular saves. 

In other games Thozsday the 
powerful Sovirt Unkm mdrayhed a 
deadly powa play in downing Hn- 
bnd, S-1, soaring fow goak whfle 
enje^g a manpawer advantage, 
rand Cz^oslovaJoa dtfeated East 
'Germany, 6-r 

The Soviet Union. Oediodova- 
ioa and Canada share (hst place 
with 2-0 records. The top four of 
the eigfai teams after round-rot^ 
pby advance m the medal round. 

Clark Donaielti, Danid Dorioo, 
Mark J<rimson and Millen scored 
for (be United States in its upset of 
Sweden. Kent Nilsson scored twice 
for Sweden and Lar-Gminar Pe> 
lersson added a goal 

Another goal by Peicrsson was 
disallowed the Soviet referee be- 

cause a teammate standing in 
tbe crease. AciuaDy, he had bM 
pushed there 1^ a U.S. defense- 
man. 



of Nationil Hoekey League pros, is 
eiq>ecung some pick-ups as w^: 



JoteViniii esM PBiK* 


The Americans tkentnaux! phy 
for the better part of the mafoi, a 
surprise aRer thty were thrashed 
11-1 by the Soviet team on 
Wednes^. 

KeinforceiDeau for the U.S. 
teams are omected to insve soon, 
indudingNatShedwoftheCalgar 

; 7 Flames and bfikcCfCoBBcg TO 
dm Fergus from the Boston 1^ 
ins. Offlaab were imsore vdietha 
they would arrive 1^ Saturday, 
wfam the United Slata wiQ pay 
Canada. 

Team Canada, made up enrirdy 


' Angdea Kings. 

Based on thdr showing so far, a 
9-1 dnibbiiQ of East Germany on 
Wednesday and their 5-0 victory 
over West Germany Thursday, die 
should pw the U.S. 
team more problems than the 
Swedes. 

TonyTaod of the Vancouver Ca- 
nada, wfao scored two goals for 
Canada in Thursday's game 
against West Gentiany. said. "For 
gnys Eke me, Sun ^yL John An- 
derson and Ride Vaive, this is our 
playoffs, oor Stanley Cup-** 
.,4’antl and Anderson aod..Vaive 
of the Toronto Maple Leafs have 
been among the best Team Canada 
sn^Mxs. Tand and Vaive, who also 
scc^ Tborsday, each have three 
gjuls afterTeam Canada's first two 
games. 

Sriijd, a Vancouver teammate of 
Ihnti, has not scored a goal but his 
work along the boards, and that of 
Don Mal(»ey of the New York 
Bangers and Dave Taylor of the 
Los Angdes Kings, to name just 
two otb^ has vital 

In other games Saturday, Swe- 
den will pl^ Hnland, West Ger- 
many wul play Ckedioslovakia, 
and the Soviet Union will play East 
Germany. (AP, UPI) 


CtuffiM h* Out Staff Frcn 

BOSTON — Kevin McHale and 
Lorry Bird scoted 13 points be- 
tween them in the lost four and a 
half minutes Thursday n^t to 
bring the Boston Celtics from be- 
hioiTror a 126-123 victory over tbe 
Ceveland Cavaliers in ' the first 
ganK of National Basketball Asso- 
dation playoffs. 

It was the 20th eonseoitiye de- 
feat at Boston Garden fir the Cav- 
aliers, hut, behind Roy Hinson and 
Jotin Diigjcy. they played the de- 
fending NBA champion Critics <m 
even terms im^t of tire ni^L The 
Cavaliers hod nine more field goats 
than the Celtics and, with 4:38 left 
in theumc, led, 118-113. 

In other first-raand openers, tiie 
Los Angeles Lakers demolished 
nioenlx, 142-1 14: the Denver Ni^ 
gets rilled iq> San .Antonio, 141- 
in, and Detroit clobbered bfew 
Jersey, 125-105. 

In a tight game, needed 
two overtiroeN to get pmt PorUond, 
139-131. 

Chicago wa.s at Milwaukee and 
Utah at Houston Friday ni^t ftR- 
niher serie, openers. 

In Boston, a charge coll on Phil 
Hubbard In the last period and the 
scoring of McHale changed things 
around in a hurry for tbe Cavalien. 
McHale scored nine points and 
Bird four in the stretch drive. Edgar 
Jones and World 6. Free ml^ed 
ihrecrpoim tries in the dosing sec- 
onds dial would have tied the game 
for the Cavaliers. 

Althou^ he said the elbow inju- 
ry that kept him out of two games 
late in the season still bun. Bird 
scored 40 points, rinking 14 of 25 
shots and 1 1 of 12 free throws. The 
Critics won the game at the Eire, 
sinking 35 out of 39 attempts. 

The Cavaliers shot almost 56 
percent from the field, but ody 62 
percent from the line in loring for 
the 16th time in a row to the Crit- 
ics. But this was tbe closest the 
Cavaliers have conre to beating 
Boston. It was a confidence build- 
er. 


"ni iril yon aoc thing,” Free 
said, “we con play with them. We 
^n't win the game, but we played 
a hard game." 

Hinson scored 24 points and 
Bagley hod 22 points and 1 1 assists. 
It wjs not one of Free's better 
gomes. Bothered by a groin injury, 

ISBAMAYOFFS 

he was only 8 for 21 from the firid. 
The Cavaliers need a big game 
from him to win. 

They know how' to make the big 
plays, we're just leaming how to 
do It." Cavalier Coach Gttrge Karl 
said. The Cavaliers, after losing 19 
of their first 21 ames this season, 
hat e shown steady improvemeoL 

la the lost sevim weeks of the 
regular season, the Cavaliers had 
the third-best record in the East 
(23-15). Boston was 26-10. 

The second game in the best-of- 
five series will be Saturday at Bos- 

IlMl. 

Mavericks 139, TraB Bbzera 131 

In Dallas, a ouraairiceat clutch 
performance by Rolando Block- 
man kept the Mavericks from being 
the first home team to lose in tbe 
pbyoffs. With Portland leading, 
112-110, Blackman made a driving 
scoop shot with just four seconds 
left in rOTilaiion to send the game 
injo the first .overtime. 

'HieTrail Blazers again led in the 
first overtime. 121-119, but Black- 
mon drove the baseline with six 
seconds left lo tie 1 l With time 
running out. Mychal Thompson 
was bringi^ the ball up for a 
game-winniogdunk, but Bladunan 
knocked tbe ball out of his bands to 
fOTce a second overtime. 

In the second overtime, Kiki 
Vandeweghe of Portland sco^ the 
first two baskets, but Blackman 
scored tire next three to trigger a 
1S-2 burst that carried the Maver- 
idcs to victory. 

Blackman rinisbed with 43 
points. 

“Fm vmn^g wet," Maverick 



tha AocogiMl Pren 


Critics giiani Dennis Johnson, right gets off a pass desinte 

raUers^ World B. Fkee. . 


tbe best efforts of tbe Cavs 


Coach Dick Moiia said. "As tbe 
game progressed we fell Rolando 
could ni by Clyde Drexler so we 
started running plays for him. He 
did the job and it wu a great game 
to watch." 

The second game b Saturday in 
Dallas. 

Lakers 142, Sms 114 

In Inglewood. California, the 
Los An^es Lakers, a champion- 
ship finalist in each of the last three 


years, had an easy time in blasting 
ibe Phoenix Sons. 142-1 14. 

The Lakers set a playoff record 
with 45 first-quarter points in 
building a 21-pimt lead. Philadri- 
phia set the previous first-quaiter 
record of 43 points in 1967. 

"We didn't know what thm* 
might do agrinsi us," Lakers Coach 
Pat Riley said, "but they came out 
and challen^ us. I thought we 
were very sharp and focused. We 
played as well as we could, I think. 


for a stretch of about 10 minutes in 
the first half." 

Phoenix tied the Lakers 20-20 
after six and a half minutes, but 
Los .Angeles went on a 25-2 spun 
and it was only a question of mar- 
^ the rest of 'the way. 

Mike McGee led the Lakers with 
22 points and guard Earvin John- 
son added 18 points and handed 
out 19 assists. Chorltt Pittman was 
the Suns' leading scorer with 22 
points, and Mike Sanders and 
Maurice Lucas eodi added 20 
points. 

The second game of the series is 
Saturday in Inglewood. 

Ni^gets 141, Spurs 111 

In Denver, the Nuggets wasted 
little time showing the ^urs that 
ib^' are in for a roi^ time. Denver 
started with tbe first six points and 
extended the lead to 68-5 1 by half- 
time. Tbe Spurs oev*er threatened. 

In the first half, George Cenin 
was held sco^ess as the Spurs 
made only 14 field goab , Alex En- 
glish scored 33 points for the Nug- 
geLs, 15 of them in the third quar- 
ter. 

The teams will meet again Satur- 
day in Denver. 

PfsioDS 125. Nets 105 

In Detroit, it took Don Round- 
field only 97 seconds to let Buck 
WUliams and tbe Nets know the 
Pistoos planned to take the ball to 
the hoop. He made a tiun-around 
jumper in close and a driving lay- 
up. 

With Isiah Thomas »tting 21 
pouts and ! I assists, the Pbtocs 
never looked bacL Bv halftime 
they led 6445. Bill Lounbeer had 
13 rebounds and Roundfield 10 as 
the Pistons compiled a 52-39 re- 
bounding edge. 

"Tb^ said they were going to 
come to me early," said Round- 
field, who had 8 points and 5 re- 
bounds in the opening quarter. 
"My teammates have been kidding 
me, ‘Hw do something with it.’ 1 
had to do it." 

Came 2 of the series u Sunday in 
DetrcHt. (LAT, AP) 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 


Baseball 


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Tennis 


i THIRD ROUM 

s,+ i.i taj Chris EwortUort.Ui.dol. 

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WTA CHAMPIONSHIP 
(At Amelia Itlow PItriao) 

THIRD ROUND 

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Transition 


T56308 









BASEBALL 
TMUoMl L e og et 

MOMTREAL— RoenMcd Dick GraeontiMii. 
Bllchor, from IncMMOdiif «( Hie Amort eon 
^SSMlolian. Optioned Oor Johnson, ovHtoW- 
■■•IfTr, to inddinooDUs. 

HIP P;' FOOTBALL 

^ TMtaMt FOMboU LtOO ll t 

^ CHICAGO— Announead Nio retkemont ol 

S’ iplTerry Scfirtiidt, »<"tfbae|t 
rr,. eOU.B« 

l&S’ CENTRAL MISSOURI STATE— Nomod 
w' WDoidrWM noM vnuiDon cinsa ' 

WASHINGTON— AnrvwiKOd Hw rosleno- 
3^ R5^.^T leu Javea Sofco. uwnofi^ t»kel&o)1 coocti. 




Thursday’s line Scores 

AMMRKAN LEAOlfE 
CMCOM 9M3MiSF.4H ff 

. How York 911 9M Hm— I 9 a 

Bonnloior and FkA; Raimoiwil. BordI (7), 
RiBMill 19} ond wvnooor. W »e* dl )4. Lr- 
BOMUHor. 0-2. Sw . B lonoHl (3). ' 

TOMI ' tit M Ml— a 7 3 

Toronto maNHM 1 I 

TonoiM, sapoJdf tt) m SMvom: Stioh, 
Lo«ono(7) Ackfr{7).CaudHim and Marti- 
noi. Whip («). W— MM. VL L— TadMO, 94. 
S«— CnwHI II). HR^ ToxH. OWrIon (1). 
Toranto. 7lefMiV (1). 

BoMmara 9N 3» 9 13 3 

Oeoiiond m 139 m— 11 V 1 

' OevIhSiion t»,T.Mac1tn07 in,Aaao IS) 
ond Donmov; BIrlovon, Eoportv (4), von 
Oman Ul. WoddoH <*) end oendo. W— Von 
onun. M. LF-Snelb M. HRi- Mthnorw 
Ownpuv 3 K). Onuotana. Conor (1), TcMor 
ll». 

coHiomio an an no-t n t 

Minoneto mmiw-au i 

John, Sonchet Ot, CorMIt U>, Moero U} 
and Norrsn. OeorH (71; SchratihViMrdlo (91/ 
XlawNler (7). Oovip (M oM Loudotr. Solos 
(7). W— CortwH, ML L— Sennm, M. Sw— 
DMooro, HRs-<elHomiA oocmett m. 
Mtnnosntw Bush (1), 

BoshHi MS IN tM W M-f 9 t 

KoMot Clit* Ilk lit tM Mo M*4 n 1 

(14 limlnos} 

• DoYd, Mania* (I). OlodO (13) ond Sullhm. 
Codmofi (S); DMClb QuIsiiiborrT (S): Bodfc- 
wUh(Wl.MJ«ios(1»Bndl wi diorwWeMidn 
(ML W— Olodo. l-W L— MJooob B,% 
•osleiL RICO a). 

NATIONAL LEAOUE 

MoOMOt 113 419 919-3 IS I. 

SLL90IS 9t19IMI»r1 9 > 

Rooort and FRtfOfBld) KasoWro. DavM 


World Championships 

RoaoNs and scbodulo far ino World Hodtor 
OoMptoMhlM: 

Apm II 

Conaon 9. Wo»i Otnnaiiv 9 
Seirloi Union x Flnlond l 
UnHod stole* A Sweden 3 
CmehoaleveUa A Eoir Cermonv I 
Aomao 

Sweden va Finland, 
weet Comianv wa CiochuiovaLio 
Eoir C tm ianv va Sowist Union 
Conodo VA United Stotes 
April 91 

East Cermonv va Sweatn 
, Conodo VA PMond 
Weal Gormonv va Sovlel Union 
United Stale* va Ciochaslavakla 
April 31 

EaW Gormonv va Flnlond 
Canada va CvcfieitovakM 
Sovlat unloa va S*md*n 
uoltaa stoti» VA Wait Gormnny 
April 34 

unttoo Stott* to, Eaot Germany 
Pbilond VA Wo«) Cermonv 
April as 

SvMon VA CnehoMavolclo 
Conodo VA Sovfoi union 
April H 

WHt Gormonv va Bool Germanv 
united Mom va Flolond 
APrItaa 

SovHi Union va C4t«ho»lavalilo 
Canada va 9noa*n 


NHL Playoffs 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 

1 I 9 I— a 
Montrtal l l 9 •— l 

AHdon<4),Kumtol m; DoBlols (ll.Shtla 
M pool: Qu^oc (on PennevI S114>3— 31. 
MHttrool (on GoHolin) 7-440-19. 

RV. iMondors 0 9 w-9 

PMtodoMilo 0 3 1—3 

Toechtl m« KfiY w. Ron Svtiw (». IMs 
on tool: NoniVorl((MiLindborgli}74-7— 13; 
PMoiMohle (on Hrudovl 1S-144-3S. 
MlnnOHM 2 4 a— 1 

Chieooa 3 9 3— s 

Moruk (1), Pletl (3). MCKooniv 3 (3|. Bro- 
HP <31, BMIowi 0), Coolli (1), Poyno (I); 
Olayli (4), D.wilMn (SI, Lvskiic (ILCColio- 
banli),B.WIIion (3).Shonoao90i;MlnneM' 
to (on Bonnornion) IIMS-U— 3B: Chlcooa (on 
MiHodw) U-l«-1l^. 

T 1 9-3 
1 1 3-4 

Rurrl HI, NopltrWS), CoKoy H). CroTzhv 
tl); Umdholni'n), MocLaon (3), SbaiSM 
•ooi:Wlnnleoe(enPulirl^l14-S3j Eonion' 
fan (on Batirbpdt B14<13>rt4. 


Oriole Errors 
Give Indians 
TheViOory 

tv Our Staff Fnrn Dispaidvs 

CLEVELAND — The Oeve- 
Uod Indians, who gave airay a 
gaim to Ibe Baltimore Oriote with 
their gloves on Wednesday, had tbe 
favor relumed on Tburs<uy. 

A pmr of c iTcrs by the usually 
reliable sborts^ Cal Ripken en- 
abled the Indians to score three 

BASEBAIL ROUNDUP 

runs in the sixth inning and go on 
10 defeat the Oriries, 11-5. 

Ripken booted Pat Tabler's 
grounder Ui open die inniK and 
Tablet went lo third on G eorge 
Vukovich’s angle. Joe Carter then 
doubled to left to score Tabler with 
(he tie-breaking ran and Vukovirii 
also scored on the play when Rip- 
ken dropped the iriay for his sec- 
ond eiTor. Brett Butler singled 
home the final ran of the inning. 

Yankees 3., White Sox 2 
In New York, Ken Crirfey mode 
a spectacular defenare play and 
tingled home the tie-breaking run 
in the sevrath (o give the Yankees a 
3-2 victory over Oticau. GrilTey 
ran down a hard liner oy Carlton 
Fitic and turned it into a double 
play in the sixth. Rriiever Ri^ 
Bora (1-Ok who piwbed one in- 
nii^ was the winner, l^ve Ri^- 
etti mi the lasi five outs for his 
third save. 

Kue Jays 4, Rangers Z 
In Toronto, Uoyd Moseby belt- 
ed a two-run bonier and Damaso 
Garcia had three doubles and 
scored a pair of runs, hdping the 
Blue Jays defeat Tex:^, 4-2, It was 
the Rangers’ ses'raih Iiks is iheir 
first eight ^es. Dave Stieb 
worited innings and oUowed 
(wo runs on six hits and five walks 
in evening his record at 1>1. Bill 
Caudin got the last three outs tor 
hU first save. 

Aiqris 9, Tw 8 
In Minnellis, Doug DeGnees 
hit a threc-nm home nm and Rod 
Carew and Brian Downiin cadi 
drove in two nms U) power Califor- 



Tiilane Administrators 
Ban Men’s Basketball 


Th* AMoowrt 


icago Dodgers' Fenuudo Vrienzuria winds up during a 5-0 

Carltm shutout — his second tins season — of tne Padres. 


nix past (he Twins, 9-8. Doug Cor- 
bett (1-0) pitched two hmings in 
Tclief to ^ the victory, and Donnie 
Moore went inninp for his sec- 
ond save. Pinch hitter Randy Bosh 
hit a iwo-ruD homer for Minnesota. 

Red Sox 4, Royals 3 
In Kansas City, Missouri, Jim 
Rice’s long home run off Mike 
Jones in the 14th inning powered 
Boston over tbe Royals, 4-3. Rice's 
blast gave the victoiy to Bob Ojeda 
(14)) who emered tm game in the 
12th. Jones (l> 1 ), the fourth Kansas 
Cty pitcher, started the 13th. 

Dodgers 5^ Padres 0 
In tbe National League, in San 
Diego, Fernando Valenzuela 
pitcM his second shutout of the 
season, giving up two hits and 
striking out eidt as Los Aisles 
defeated tbe Padres. 5-0. Mike 


Marshall and Candy Maldonado 
each drove in a pair of runs to lead 
tbe Dodgers. It was Valenzuela's 
20tb career shuiout and his third 
two-hitter. 

Eiqws 7. CanBnals 1 
In St. Louis, Mike Fitzgerald's 
two-ran double keyed a four-run 
upriting in the fourth, helpiog 
Monir^ roll past the Cardinals, 7- 
1. Steve Rogers, battling bock from 
an injury-plagued 1984 season, 
walked four and struck oot four on 
his way to a five-hiner. 

Reds 4, Giants 5 
In Cincinnati, Cesar Cedeno's 
bases-loaded tin^e in the bottom 
bf the lOlh drove in two runs to 
ave the Reds a 4-3 victory over San 
Francisco. Tbe Giants twice failed 
to bold one-nm leads, in the ninth 
andlOih. (UPI^AP) 


The Auoaaed Press 

NEW ORLEANS — Tulane 
University's Board of Administra- 
tors voted unanimously Thursday 
to end the sdiool’s basketball pro- 
gram after 72 years because of 
charges involving fixed games, 
drugs and illegal payments to play- 
ers. 

Players and other students are 
alleged to haro been involved in a 
point-sharing gambling scheme to 
rig two games Iasi Febraaiy. 

'Tm saddened and disapixnnted 
by the events that haw taken place 
and the necessity for taking this 
action," said Tulane's president. 
Eamon Kelly, who had recom- 
mended the abolition of the men’s 
baticeiball program. 

Boatner Riley, the board’s chair- 
man, said the administrators felt 
that “under the circumstances, Dr. 
Kelly took exactly the appropriate 
action" with his recommendation, 
which earlier this week was over- 
whelmingly approved by the 
school’s senate.. 

Tulane teams have played al- 
most 1.400 games tince the school 
started intercollegiate basketball in 
1912. 

Riley would not discuss the pos- 
tibility that (be program might be 
revivM at some later date. 

However. W. Kennon McWil- 
liams, chainnan of the ictercolie- 
giate athletics commiitee, said he 
hoped it could be resumed. 

"1 told them that after tbe stud- 
ies and all, we are going to double 
our efforts and we are going to end 
up with a program that suits the 
aroemie program at Tulane. We 
ore going to re-earu our credibility 
and we’ll be back to them." 

Two members of Iasi season’s 
team are under Indictment for 
point shaving. Another player 
pleaded guilty in the conspiracy, 
and twx) are t^iifying against their 
fornier leammat^ 

The sebooFs athletic director. 
Hidman Walk (be basketball coa- 
ch, Ned Fowler, and two assisiani 
baskeiball coaches have resigned. 

Spems llliLctrated magazine re- 
ported in this week's issue that a 


Tulane basketball star and oiher 
players received about 5700 during 
a three-month period from Green 
Wave alumni. 

Quoting sources, which were not 
identified. Sports Dlusimted identi- 
fied John w illiams as One of the 
players who received the money, an 
act tiut would constitute a riola- 
tion of National Cellmate .Athletic 
Associatiem rules. Williams, the 
only player identified hy the maga- 
zine is of five Tulro players 
accused of iovoivement in the 
point-sharing scheme. 

Williams, who has pleaded not 
guilty to sports brib^’ charges, 
told the magazine: “1 guess you 
learn from your tnisiaKes. All 1 
want is to be happy." 

SI said that williams declined 
comment on his alleged acceptance 
of S >0.000 from a booster to attend 
Tulane and as much os SlOO at 
times from Coach Fowler. 


Bobby Wadkins 
Leads in [LS. Golf 
After First Round 

The Asioaiaai Press 

HILTON HEAD ISLAND. 
South Carolina — Bobby Wadkins, 
who has played his career in tbe 
shadow m older brother Lanny. 
reeled c^f three consecutive birdies 
on his way to a 6-under-par 65 and 
a one-shot first-round lead Thurs- 
day in the Hnes Heritage Clastic 

“That word *potential,' it’s been 
the killer of a lot of players. I'm 
tired of hearing iL” said Bobby 
Wadkins, who has yet to take an 
American title in his I I-year PG.A 
career. His brother has won 14 
times, including twice this year. 

Paul Azinger was second after 
the first round with a 66. One back 
at 67 were Hale Irwin, Jim Thotpe. 
Bobby Qompett. Mike Bright and 
Larry Nelson. 

BCTiihard Langer, who won the 
Masters last Sunday in .Augusta, 
Georpa, led a large group at 68. 


r 







Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL BOBRALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAYrSUNDAY, APRIL 20-21, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


people 



Tnnnn 'Spiritual Godmother’ of Wilderness Purchase Assa^* 

Bv Barbara Gamarckian • W. %1K ^.u_^«f.h^NaiioaalGaUery s^P 





W ASHINGTON — TTie last 
Japanese soldier from Worid 
War II was holed up in a cave on 
Okinawa. A team of Americans 
and Japuese with loudspeakers 
were ii^g to persuade him to 
come out 

^Corporal Nakajinko, it's all 
right to surrender. The Vf-aris over.** 
“How do 1 Imow if you are lying 
to me?” said a 
plaintive- voice 
from the cave. 

. *T can assure 
you, Naka- 
jinko,” a Japa- 
nese official 
yelled over the 
speaker. “All 
hostilities have 
ceased.” 

There was „ 

about three min- Bucnwald 

utes of silence and then the voice 
sai^ “Who won?” 

The official yelled back, “The 
Americans. The Japanese laid 
down their arms 40 years ago.” 
“This could be a trick. Prove to 
me that the United States won.” 
“The Americans now have a 
trade deTicit with Japan of S37 bil- 
Uoa.” the ofncer shouted. 

□ 

“How can the Americans have a 
$37-biIlion trade deCcit if Japan 
lost?” 

“Because the Japanese rethought 
thdr strategy in 1945 and it made 
more sense to invade the United 
States Mth automobiles than with 
soldiers. The Americans are buying 
everytl^g Japan produces, but the 
Japanese are not buying much of 
wGat the United States makes. It's 
all here in Fortune magazine if you 
want to read about iL” 

“Leave it at the mouth of the 
cave." the voice said. 

Half an hour later the rescue 
team was getting impatient. 

Suit on Connterieit T-Shirts 

UniieJ press Intenuaonal 

LOS ANGELES — Seven Cali- 
fornia manufacturers and retailers 
seOing fake US.A for Africa T- 
shirts and other mcFchandise relat- 
ed to the pop album to aid African 
famine victims were sued Hiursday 
in federal court here. Jay Cooper. 
USA for Africa attorney, said the 
suit was the start of an effort that 
could save millioDS of doU^ for 
famin e victims. 


“Nakajinko, are you now per- 
suaded mi Japan lost the war?” 

“I am puzzled,” the voice from 
the cave said. “If we lost, how can 
we export 25 perceui more cars to 
the United States than we did last 
year?” 

“Because we had a voluntary 
quota, and once it was lifted we 
decided this was the best time to 
flo(^ the U. S. markeL" 

The voice from the cave said, 
“Didn't the prime mimster realize 
this would anger the Americans?” 
“He’s tiymg to make up for it 
now. by asking all the Japanese to 
buy American goods.” 

Nakajinko ywed, “Pm not com- 
ing out if I have to buy American 
goods. I still remember Pearl Har- 
bor.” 

“As a Japanese veteran you will 
be exempt from buying American 
goods. We want you to come out of 
tbe cave so we can declare Wodd 
War II officially over.” 

“American goods aren't made as 
well as Japanese products,” he 
yelled. “Eveiy time i stole some- 
thing from the U. S. Army quarter- 
master depot. I had to take it 
baciL” 

“Nakajinko. This is no time to 
discuss the merits of U. S. and Ja^ 
anese manufactured goods. We 
have a trade mission in Washington 
trying to iron out things right 
now." 

“Does that mean there is going 
to be another war?” 

“Of course there isn’t going to be 
another war. Gnmtries don’t go to 
war over trade (Merences.” 
“Iliat's what the Japanese cabi- 
net said on Dec. 6, 1941,” Naka- 
jinko cried. 

□ 

The American liaison officer 
shouted through his buUhom, 
“Look, if you don’t come out in the 
next 30 sunutes we're going to have 
to shoot you." 

“Why? Because my country 
won’t Older any telecommunica- 
tions equipment from you?” 

“It nothing to do with tele- 
communications equipment,” tbe 
American ydled. “It has to do with 
your people's refusal to buy Alka 
Seltzer.” 

' “I think ni stay here until the 
Americans and J^anese resolve 
their differences.” 

“Why, Nak^inko? Whyr 
“Because If th^r don't, HI just 
have to End myself anotto cave.” 


By Barbara Gamareldan 

New York Times Service 

W ASHINGTON — When Margaret E 
Murie packed her trousseau 60 yean 
ago for her wedding on the Yukon River, it 
consisted ^ a fur parica, fur boots, flannel 
fKyafflas. kiuckers, wool shirts and hDdng 
boots. 

It was the beginaiog, she says, of a ^eat 
adventure. For more than 30 yean she shared 
her husband's life as a wildlife biolo^ Rni 
on the trail in Alaska and tha in the wilder- 
ness of Wyoming. 

Maidy. as she is known, met Olaus .J. 
Murie when she was a girl in Fwbanks, 
Alaska. As his collaborator and companion 
she rais^ three chil&en in tbe wilderness, at 
times with little more than a baciqpack, a 
campHre and a tenL "We cooked ovct the 
coals of the Ore and washed clothes in the 
creek a^ stood the cfaildFen in creek and 
scrubbed them up,” she recall^ With a 
chuckle, she added: “Bui think of the things I 
didn't have to do. 1 didn’t have to talk on the 
telephone or go to a bridge party or wax 
floors." 

Murie, who was in Washington recently for 
the 50th annivetsaiy celebration of the 
demess Sode^, has a member of the 
sodeiy's governing coundl rince 1976. Her 
husband, who died in 1963. was its president 
for 17 years. 

Murie, 82, lives in Jackson. Hole, Wyo- 
ming, in a log house in the middle of Grand 
Teton Natio^ Pailc. Ste slds cross-country 
every day, cooks on a wood stove and feeds 
martens at her kitchen door. 

She is still on the lecture drcoit, and she 
speaks vigorously about the continuing ne- 
cessity to protect the wSdemess. “If manis to 
survive happily, he must have some wilder- 
ness. Wilderness has some right to exist, and 
right now we have oitiy2 percent of our land 
protected.” 

The WOdemess Sodeiy’s president, W- 
liam A. Tumage, said : “In many ways Mardy 
is kind of tbe qniitual godmother of tbie 
environmental movemeat Pec^le admireand 
revere her as kind of a guru, and the only 
other woman vriio can match Maidys stature 
in the history of tte American conservation 
movement is Radid Carson.” 

The first woman to eraduate from the Uni- 
versity of Alaska, in 1924 (“I was it — I was 
tbe senior class — and we bad a big com- 
mencement with a band, and the governor 
came”), she has lectmed, writien and lobbied 
on h rfiaif of wddemess preservation. 9ie was 
in the White House Rose Garden when Presi- 
dent Lyndon B. Johnson si^ed the 1964 
'V^erness Act. and conservationists say she 
was instnimental in the passa^ of the 1980 
Alaska Lands Act, which set a^e millions of 
wilderness acres. 

She has written three books: “Wapiti Wil- 
deraess,” with her husband; "Two in the Fm* 
North” and “Island Between.” “Two in the 



Gw9i ToiM/Thi Nn» Yoric Um 

Conserratioiiist Marie: Encouraged by yom^ people. 


Far North” was reissued in 1978 by Alaska 
Nor^est Publishing Co., and went into a 
fourth piinti^ in 1983. 

Olaus Mnrie’s work with tbe U. S. Bicdogh 
cal Survey studying caribou in Alaska tow 
him into die ^demess for months. His wife 
frequently travded witii him- “Olaus had 
supreme confidence that I could do any- 
thing.” She traveled by dog team and snow^ 
shoe, trying, she said, to keep im with a man 
who “p^le used to say must w half caxi- 
bou.” She told tales of the Yukon and Lobo 
take and the mining camps where she would 
wear her one “dressy” flannel shirt to dances 
and “dance all ni^t, because I was only one 
of five wmnen with 70 men." She Uud of 
taldng her lO-monih-old son. Martin, on a 
four-month eiqiedition up the Old Crow Riv- 
er. "I wonder about it now,” ^ said. “We 
had some adventures, but the baby never 
suffered at alL He leanied how to ciavri on 


the gravel bars, but the gravd hurt his knees, 
so he crawled around like a little bear, on hb 
hands and feet” 

In the 1930$ her husband was sent by the. 
Biological Survey, a foreruhner of. the Fish 
and Wildlife S^ce, to J&^isoa Hole to 
study dk. Tbe Murie fao^ lived in Jackson 
during the winter, when the elk would mi- 
grate to a national on tiie edge of town. Eadi 
spring the family foDowed tbe herd to the 
failla, uvingin tents and cookiwover caiq>- 
fires, vdule she worked wiAnBr husbmul, 
catalo^jng his botanical and anail mammal- 
collections. 

Students from the Teton Sdenw. School, 
an enviiDomental education instinitioii, fre- 
quently drr^ by her Jackson Hole hmne for 
tea, cowes and conversation. *^e one thing 
that really dicourages me." she sdd, "ate the 
young pet^le — th^ have such areal interest 
in preserving tbe environment.”” 


Tbe head of the Naiiond G JUery 
of Scotland said Friday r 

Paul Getty Museum of California 
essentiaUy broke a pWge not to 
bid for ^ Adoration of the 

Mast" painted in about 1500 
ilintalian Andrea Mante^ 
Geitv museum made the 
for the work Thursday at 
tie’s: a record £8.1 miflion (about 
SIOJ mfllioa), including a premi- 
um of £600,000. Tlje British g^'- 
emment has not decided wheihCT 
to place an export emba^ w me 
54.by-7 1 -centimeter (21-by^/- 
inch> painting to give a British buy- 
er the chance to match the Getty 
bid. “The Getty in the p^ has said 
it would not go for a Briush-oumed 
picture if a museum or gallery here 
wanted it,” said Umolhy CTfford 
h>a^^ of tbe Scottish museum. “I 
told J<An WalA, director of tbe 
Getty, on Wednesday that the Na- 
tional Gallerv of Scotland wanted 
.the Mant^’a.” Clifford said be 
would start an app<^ for money to 
ke ep the pninring in BritaiiL Tbe 
Marquess of NmlisiiiptxNi sold the 
picture to secure the mture of two 
large Tudor niaosioos he owns. 


Gormnm' Martha Lipme OdBns 
of KeDtudQr is among eight women 
named motiiers of the year by the 
noiqiroGt National Mother's Day 
rAmminiia. a gTOup dedicated to 
rairing Americans’ consdousness 
of Motb^s Day (this year, it's May 
12). The others; Dr. Anna Fite, 
space shuttle astronaut, mother .of 
one ^1; Loiasa Kenn^, with four 
stms, wife of the ranking American 
official held hostage in Iron for 444 
days: Susan Lucd, mother of two 
and star of the daytime soap c^ieia 
"All My Children”; Sarah Palfrey, 
mother of two and a former world- 
class tennis player; Madge Sindair, 
mother of two and an actress on 
tdeviaon's Trapper John M. D.”; 
FVederka Tt» S(^ mother of two 
and a mezzo-si^rano at the Metro- 
politan Opera; and Qan Hate, 
who runs a Harlem home for chil- 
. dren of drug-addicted mothers, 
who number “so many I can't 
count them.” The groiqrs “Poster 
Mbdier of the Ynr” is another 
Jtotucltian, PhylEs George BfO^ 
co-anchdr oi the CBS Morning 
News,afomiersportscaster,a 1982 
motba of the yeai and a former 
hfiss America. . . . Women's Ac- 
tion for Nudear Disannament will 
award, the annual Caldicott Lead- 


ship .Award to two actresses^^A 
Field and Uiy Tomfin, at its Mp^ 
er's I^y Ball The. Bcteh-b^ 
group was founded by-Dii - 

M. Calida^ better known asekn 

fleure in the anti-nudear 
for Social Req>bimbS^; 

o 

A new bic^phy says Fi^j^ 
D. Roosevdt as a yoi^ 
a serious romance mth.a Boam],.^ 
socialite who turned down bis 
riage proposal as wdl as a tew'd' 
his overly anKutnis passes. Geof. 
frey C Ward, author of ‘^Befoeite 
Trumpet: Young Franklin’ 1l6os^ 
vdt.” says Alice StAter rgected & 
20 -year-old Roosevelt's cdter b^ 
he wanted six children anH 
her do^r had said that bning 
children would be risl^ for ber.T 
did not wish to be a cow,” S Aiw 
who was 17 at the time.bf thepio^ 
posal told a fiieod years, later. 
hier is also quoted as saying: *10 a ' 
day and age when wdl-brot^t^p 
young men were eroected to keep 
their hands off the persons of 
young ladies. Franklin had lo be 
slapped hari” The bocAssd Roo- 
sevelt began courting his eventual . 
wife, his distant cousm OeaDor, 
just weeks after he Ian' saw Sritier; 
the couple had five children.. 

Ed& Murphy taunted homosex- 
uals and othm protesting Ids ap- 
pearance at Brandeis Unmssity^ 
Waltham, Massadinsetts! The pr^ 
testers called on him to donate 1^ 
S60.000 fee for a comedy shbw at 
the universi^ to the Boston AIDS 
Action Committee. He relayed the 
request to his audience of 2,000. 
and said “Ha!” adding, "Besides, 
it’s only $50,000.” Mmidiy said of 
his rqrerUHne of hmntnexual and 
A1E>S jokes. “I'in not anti-aiq^ 
thing. I'm just pro-humor." 

D - 

Prince Charles Britain and Us 
wife, Diana, arrived in Satdi^oi 
Friday to b^in a I7-d^ official 
tour of Italy. They were gre^ by 
the president of the Italian. Soale, 
Francesco Cossiga, when thdr,* 
plane from London landed Theu^ 
program includes an audience wth 
Pope Jte Pan! JDI, an opera at La 
Sc^a in Milan and a tour of tin 
Grand Canal in Venice. ... . 
Prince Charles’s aunt, Pria^ 
Margar^ is in Hungary forafive' 
day private visit, the first , 
member of the British royal-fa^ 
since W(»1d War IL 


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DOMESTIC 

posmems AVAILABLE 


FFTStUnOtom. Td; (33- 


GRBRIN X US (deeas. m coneilion- 
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551 80 Iff 


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nth photo 
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Av Mon Repos 24, 

01.1005 Lounnw, Suriturlmui 
Td: (211 23 35 12 Tba 251 85 MOS 
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HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
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Tha document eiqilans iUly whd one 
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sdely and ligaly. K hdudes new & 

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“ *^*™**» “■ 
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TRANSCO 

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rata h tU.S9.30 or loe^ 
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OPPORTUNITIES 


MONEY TREES? 


OPPORTUNmES 


OOUJMBIA GOIF and Uli^ vdacles 
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es. fwm 'mim toi Box 2136. , liiT., 
Fiiedridnir. 15, 6000 Frmildurt/Mdn 


SERVICES 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPOtT. 
Report . 13 oeiintries endyaed. 
Detoilii WMA, 45 Lyndnrt 
Suhn 505. Cenliol, Hoi« Koi« 


DIAMONDS 



r mewh. DiM pnene. Auonomous YE5I Invert n om of Americn'i irnrt 
healing Bor. RKtaurent. Ooroge. mMng ledwK 


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RBE»ICE COETMA tTAMPESO ed mare nuMrees m 1984 lidTm 
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ofBn / teleic. riaose coroaoi Tehi 

1 OFFICE SUIVICES 

BUSINESS SERVICES 





PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


MAY OM.Y, 8ASTH1R I fae^eom 
rooftop flot, terraoi, ftih cnhpecL 
ihyli^ F45D0. Owner 


INTI 

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UNUMnSMC 
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213^65-7794 
330 W.56lh SI, N.Y.C 10019 
• Service BesraenMnes 
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COMPUTER PORTRAITS 

T-SHmrFOTOS 

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Trt 06WCTM Th <I2?13 k 6« 


brqirmipar (^rint, YSrus^ PEvai^lf, 7^^;Faiis, 


WANTED 

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: B^.Mercid»PBndi6 
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AlLANnClMPORnD MOTORS 
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DAWAJI TRADE 
INTLOaiVERY 

We heap a bjie sipefc of 

mod car wanB 
Teh 02/648 §13 
Tdabr.666S8 
.43rue U«l - 
... 1050 Bnoadk