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INTERNATIONAL 




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S«tea^$i l/.S. Congress Nears Vote on Re 


Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


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jen /kd in failure after two days of 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The US. 
Congress neared a vote Tuesday in 
a foreign policy confrontation over 
President Ronald Reagan’s pro- 
posal to release SI 4 mSfion in aid 
to Nicaraguan gnerrillas fi ghting 
the leftist Sandinist government 



on the aid issue between 


the Earlier, efforts to reach a com- 

TjfcJkjJ*. of - ;- Mr. Reagan and Senate Democrats 



S*. w .S!S 1 "55lff 

Fedew.cn r " J[lw »l tE* 


Jack Lang. Fi a 






talks. 

Debate opened Tuesday in both 
bouses of Congress on an issue that 
has bitterly divided members of 
both political parties. Hie Reagan 
administration views the vote as a 
key test of its Central America po- 
lity. 

As votes approached in the 
House of Representatives and the 
Senate, Vice President George 
Bush and Secretary of State George 
P. Shultz met with Senate Republi- 
cans. who emerged almost com- 
pletely unified behind Mr. Rea- 


F ranch coofciiu “ d proposal for the rebels, or 


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tne goAernmeni. Senate 


U.K. Asks 
Soviet for 
Goodwill 


Urges an End 
To Expulsions 
Of Diploma ts 


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The Bri;.vh 
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Senator Richard J. Lugar, chair- 
man of the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee, predicted that 
Mr. Reagan would win in the Ro- 
publican-controOed Senate. 

Democrats in the House were 
confident they had the votes to de- 
feat both Mr. Reagan's initial plan 
and a more moderate 
alternative. 

Mr. Lunar said that Republi- 


Robert J. Dole, the Senate majority leader, right, and Senator Robert C Byrd, the 
minority leader, discussed the failure of negotiations Monday on Nicaraguan rebel aid. 


"•woumfr 


No matter what the outcome; 
Mr. Lugar added, “The president is 
going to continue to support the 
contras.” 

Also being considered in the 
House is a proposal by moderate 
Republicans, sponsored by the mi- 
nority leader, Robert H. Michel of 


cans, who hold a six-vote edge in Hlroois, that would provide $14 
. the Senate, “are ready to stand up mfflion in “nonlethal" aid to the 

<•^4 n 


and be counted." 


• “What we are saying is the presi- 
dent should be in charge of foreign 
policy the senator said. 


rebels through the U.S. Agency for 
International Development 

Mr. Reagan's p lan is channel 
money through the Central Intelli- 


gence Agency, allowing it to dis- 
burse $14 million to the rebels for 
all types of military supplies except 
weapons and ammunition. 

A Democratic proposal in the 
House would give $10 million to 
Nicaraguan refugees through the 
Red Cross or United Nations and 
set aside $4 minion for implement- 
ing a possible peace settlement. 

On Monday, White House aides 
rejected proposed Democratic 
compromises, charging that they 
denied a negotiating role for the 
rebels, and who have been fighting 


yineg 1981 to overthrow the San- 
dinists. 


Return 

LONDON — Britain said Tues- 
day that it wanted a thaw in Bri- 
tish-Soviet relations to continue de- 
spite a dispute with Moscow over 
spying, and it urged the Kremlin to 
halt retaliatory expulsions. 

But the Soviet Embassy in Lon- 
don accused Britain of unfriendly 
acts. The dispute has led to the 
expulsion as spies of live Soviet and 
three British officials. 

Britain, announced the expulsion 
of a Soviet diplomat and die Lon- 
don charter manager for Aeroflot, 
the Soviet national airline, last 
week. At the same time it ordered 
three more diplomats to leave with- 



Gorbachev Says 
U.S. Violates 
Accord on Talks 


By Serge Schmemann 

York 


Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. 


■ Indian Pact Announced 

Leaders of the Nicaraguan gov- 
ernment and a rebel faction of its 
Miskito Indian population have 
agreed to “avoid offensive armed 
action” against each other. 

The agreement, announced at 
the Mexican Foreign Ministry, fol- 
lows six months of negotiations to 
end the four-year-old conflict be- stw® in die Ft 
tween the Indians and the Sandin- British radio, 

ISIS. 


in a month. In the hope of averting 
it did not make 


Soviet Denies 
Vow Against 
Using Force in 
East Germany 


New iork Times Service 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev. the Soviet leader, charged 
Tuesday that the opening round of 
arms talks in Geneva showed that 
the United States was not seeking 
an agreement. 

In his hardest-hitting attack on 
Washington since talcin g charge in 
the Kremlin six weeks ago, Mr. 
Gorbachev accused die United 
States of violating the accord set- 


head of ihe KGB security appara- 
teofl 


tus and a long-lime associate of Mr. 
Andropov — who died in February 
1984 — was promoted from candi- 
date to full membership in the Po- 
litburo. 


little progress was made in first 
round of Geneva talks. Page 2. 


Soviet re taliati on, 
die move public. 

When three members of the Brit- 
ish Embassy staff, indadiM the 
naval attach^, were expelled Mon- 
day night from Moscow, Britain 
revealed the full extent of its own 
action. 


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South Africa 
* T ~ ^ Holds 3 Top 
Opponents 
Of Apartheid 


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U.S. Authorities Arrest 5 Neo-Nazis 

Arms Are Seised at Camp of Survimlist Sect in Ozarks 

By Wayne King 

New York Tunes Service 


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CLASSIFIES 


The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — The po- 
lice said Tuesday that they de- 
tained without charg es three lead- 
ing opponents erf the government, a 
day after President Eater W. Botha 
accused activists in South Africa of 


MOUNTAIN HOME, Arkansas 
— Four members of the neo-Nazi 
group called the Order have surren- 
dered to the federal authorities, 
along with the founder of a remote 
Ozark retreat that the government 
believes was a paramilitary training 
ramp and munition* factory. 

The four, including two under 
indictment on federal r h j n -g p* m 
Seattle, were arrested Monday as 


V seeking revolution to. end: walked oot -of the- 224. acre 


minority rule. 


mty 

A police spokesman in Preuma 


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said the three were leaden of the 
United Democratic Front; a multi- 
racial organization working to end 
apartheid. South Africa's system of 
racial segregation. 

The three were identified as Pat- 
rick Lekota, the front's national 
publicity secretary; Popo Molefe, 
the group’s general secretary; and 
Moses Chikane, one of its officials 
in northern Transvaal Province. 

Sixteen other leaders of the 
nization were imprisoned 
this year and are awaiting trial 

A source in the United Demo- 
cratic Front said that Mr. Lekota 
was detained as he left an airliner 
that arrived in Port Elizabeth in the 
« eastern part of Cape Province, the 
&cene of continuing racial violence. 

It was not known where the oth- 
ers were detai n ed. 

Mr. Botha asserted Monday that 
the front was seeking revolution to 
end white-minority rule. The group 
has said it does not want violence 
but that it opposes all forms of 
racial segregation. 


(90-hectare) compound. For 10 
years the encampment has been the 
home of an anti-Semitic sorvivalist 
sect called the Covenant, the Sword 
and the Arm of the Lord. 

The founder and spiritual leader 
of that group, Jim Ellison, 48, was 
arrested on a separate charge of 
conspiracy to manufacture, possess 
and distribute machine guns and 
silencers over a three-year period. 


Federal officials regard the ar- 
embers of 


rest of the four members of the 
Order and the discovery of the 
weapons facilities as a break- 
through in. their investigation of 
neo-Nazi extremist group*. Some 
of these groups seek to destroy the 
UJS. government, which they claim 
is controlled by Jews. 

. Hie group known as the Order, 
which had drafted and signed a 
“declaration of war” against what 
it termed the “ZOG,” or Zionist 
Occupation Government, was orig- 
inally thought to be a small band. 

But investigators have gradually 
uncovered links between the Order 
and such groups as the Ku KJux 
Klan, the American Nazis, the Pos- 


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Coke: The Real Thing 
Now a Different Thing 


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Compiled by Ow Sufi From Dispaicha 

NEW YORK —After neariy 
a century as the world's best- 
selling soft drink, Coca-Cola is 
changing its secret recipe in an 
attempt to keep its share of the 
market from fizzing away. 

The Coca-Cola Co. an- 
nounced Tuesday that it had 
sweetened its secret formula in 
a move that analysts said was a 
response to Coke's loss of 
ground in the highly competi- 
tive cola market. . 

While declining to say what 
other changes had been made in 
the drinkTRobenaC Goizneta, 
chairman of Coca-Cola, de- 
scribed the new formula as 
“smoother, rounder and 
bolder." 

Pepsi-Cola. Coca-Cola's 
main rival, contends that 
Coke's switch in formula means 
the drink known as “The Real 
Thing” is in trouble. 

“After 8? years of gang at it 
eyeball to eyeball the other guy 
just blinked,” PepsiCo, the pro- 
ducer of Pepsi, said in an adver- 
tisement. In a press release, the 
company said, “The announce- 
ment by Coke is dearly an ad- 
mission that it’s not the real 
thing." 

Coke is still the most popular 
soft drink in the world but has 
lost ground to Pepsi since 1980, 
when Coke held 24.3 percent of 
ihe S28 billion soft-dxink mar- 
ket in the United Stales. At ihe 
end of 1984. its market share - 
had dropped to 21.7 percent. 


compared with Pepsi's 18.8 per- 
cent, according to the trade 
publication Beverage Industry. 
Pepsi leads in sales at super- 
markets and other take-home 
outlets, however. 

The new Coke is to start ap- 
pearing on store shelves by May 

Coke’s new formula — like 
the old recipe — will be locked 
in a vault at the Trust Co. of 
Georgia Bank in Atlanta, where 
the soft drink firm has its head- 


quarters. 

The 


developed 
John Stytli 


Coca-Cola was 
ty 8, 1886, by Dr. 
"tyih Pemberton. The rec- 
ipe for the concoction involved 
melting sugar with water in a 
brass kettle over an open fire 
and adding certain ingredients. 
Two of than were coca leaf, the 
source of cocaine, and kola nut, 
hence Coca-Cola. 

Company officials said the 
recipe was passed down by 
word of mouth to only several 
employees. 

In 1902. a Virginia doctor 
claimed one of his patients was 


driven to suicide Coca-Cola. 


Other complaints followed. 

In 1909, a government in- 
spector, J-L. Lynch took sam- 
ples of the ingredients, all ex- ^ 
cept something called 7X. the 
secret component 

Government officials sus- 
pected that cocaine was pan of 
the secret formula. In 1918, the 
government and Coca-Cola 
agreed on a change in the for- 
mula. (UPI.AP) 


se Comitatus and the Covenant, the 
Sword and the Aim of the Lord. 

The Order has variously been 
known as the White American Bas- 
tion and Bruder Schweigen, or Si- 
lent Brotherhood. 

Fifty-five of Mr. Ellison’s fol- 
lowers, including women and chil- 
dren, some bom at the camp in its 
10 years of existence, also left with- 
out incident after the five men sur- 
rendered. 

The two members of the Order 
arreted Monday.^ere flamed ib.an 
indictment issued April 12 in Seat- 
tle. The indictment charged the 
group with offenses including ar- 
son, murder and attempted mur- 
der, counterfeiting and armed rob- 
beries totaling more than $4 
million. 

The two were identified as Ran- 
dall Paul Evans of Los Angeles, 29, 
and Thomas Bentley, 57. 

The other two Order members 
who gave themselves up Monday 
woe identified as Jefferson Wayne 
Butler. 42, and James Wellington, 
41. The charges to be made against 
them were not disclosed. 

Ray McEIhaney of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation termed the 
operation at the Covenant com- 
pound “extremely successful” 

“Items were seized in the search 
of this compound,” be said, “that 
directly licuc the Covenant, the 
Sword and the Aim of the Lord 
with members of the group known 
as the .Order.” He said the Order 
already was known to be a splinter 
group of Aryan Nations, a neo- 
Nazi organization based in Hayden 
Lake, Idaho. 

Several members of the Order 
were said by the FBI to have under- 
gone paramilitary training at the 
Covenant camp. 


Federal Bureau of Alcohol Tobao- 
co and Firearms said that searches 
had uncovered computer and radio 
equipmenl a machine gun, addi- 
tional pistols and rifles, and 1 5,000 
rounds of ammuni tion. 


Both the Order and adherents of 
the Covenant group subscribe to a 
belief that civilization will soon be 
thrown into chaos in a racial Arma- 
geddon. and that traditional cur- 
rency will be useless and survivors 
will have to depend on the bartfr of 
valuables. - - ’ 


Malcolm Rifkind, a minister of 
gn Office, said on 
e would certainly 
hope that the matter will now be 
seen as concluded and we can get 
back to the substantive questions 
of political dialogue and other ex- 
changes of that land." 

Mr. Rifkind and Foreign Secre- 
tary Sir Geoffrey Howe, who was in 
Bam, both restated Britain’s desire 
to improve East- West relations but 
said national security took priority. 

The Soviet Embassy said that 
none of the expelled Russians were 
spies. It described the British gov- 
ernment's actions as bein£ incom- 
patible with its declared mtentiou 
of improving relations. 

“The whole responsibility for all 
possible consequences of this un- 
friendly action rests completely 
with the British side ” the embassy 
said in a statement read from the 
chancery steps. 


By Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Post Service 

Washington — The soviet 

Union has challenged the accuracy 
of an official U.S. statement last 
week that the Russians had pledged 
not to use force against American 
military fiaiaon personnel in Fact 
Germany. 

The statement, distributed late 
Monday by the Soviet Embassy 
here, reigmted the dispute about 
the shooting death last month of a 
VS. A nay major. 

Earlier, a high-level U-S.-Soviet 
military meeting and a U.S. report 
on that meeting seemed to suggest 
its resolution. 

[The White House spokesman. 
Lory Spcak.es, said the expression 
of regret by the Russians was “not 
enough" and that the United States 
believes they should apologize »pd 
agree to pay compensation. The 
Associated Fress reported. 

[Secretary of Defense Caspar W. 
Weinberger, interviewed on CBS 
television, said, “They’re just lying, 
that’s all Their general who is 
their authorized agent, made that 
pledge to our general"] 

The State Dqjartment respond- 
ed almost immediately to the Sovi- 
et statement by summoning a so- 


ring up the talks, which linked dis- 
cussion of medium-range and stra- 
tegic missiles with space-based 
weapons. 

The first round of negotiations, 
winch began March 12, the day 
after Mr. Gorbachev took charge in 
the Kremlin, ended Tuesday. 

“The completed first stage of the 
Geneva talks already gives ground 
to say that Washington does not 
seek agreement with the Soviet 
Union,” Mr. Gorbachev said. 

Later, referring to the Soviet 
walkout in Novonber 1983 from 
earlier arms talks, he warned: “We 
would not like to have a recurrence 
of the sad experience of the previ- 
ous talks.” 

Mr. Gorbachev made the points 
in a major speech to a plenary 
meeting of the Central Committee 
of the Communist Party, at which 
he also demonstrated the extent to 
which he has assumed control in 
the Kremlin by brin g in g three po- 
litical allies into the Politburo. 

Tass, the Soviet press agency, re- 
ported that two party secretaries 
closely identified with Mr. Gorba- 
chev and his political mentor, Yuri 
V. Andropov, had been elevated 
directly to full membership in the 
Soviet Union’s most powerful 
body, bypassing the usual period of 


candidate membership. 

They were Yegor K. Ligachev, 


64, charged with party cadres, and 
w, 55, an expert in 


Nikolai L Ryzhkov, 
heavy industry who is believed to 
be involved in plans fa economic 
reform. 

„ . _ fCoptisucdPh P?g? ?, Cq1jm 71__ Viktor M. Chebrikov, 61, the 


Vietnam Economy Remains in Shambles 


By William Branigin 

Washington Past Service 

BIEN HOA, Vietnam —- The 
old furnace at the large steel mill 
here belches smoke, sparks and 
flame as grimy workers pour mol- 
ten metal into long, orange streams 
and visitors step over large chunks 
of hot iron lying on the dirt floor. 

The scene is out of the 19th cen- 
tury, a Vietnamese version of the 
Industrial Revolution. In this case, 
however, the metal comes from 
U.S. tank treads and artillery 
pieces. 

At the Bien Hoa steel complex, 
the feed stock comes from acres of 
junked U.S. trucks, tanks, armored 


VIETNAM 
10 Years Later 


Second of four articles 


camp. 

Since Friday, the federal authori- 
ties have surrounded the Covenant 
compound with a force of up to 200 
state and federal officers. 

No resistance was offered by (cl- 


ears, jet engines, shell casings, en- 
gine blocks, helmets and assorted 
other war materiel collected from 
southern Vietnam. 

The steel complex represents a 
rare economic benefit from the 



Tl» Wtshngton Pea 

Produce, piled high on a motorized tricycle, being carried to market in Ho CM Minh City. 


Vietnam War. According to 'We are very poor,’ said the Vietnamese foreign minister, f but we have 
iiuicuauuiw; ** uu „« u Nguyen Thuong Chi, the director r a 

lowers of Mr. "luisonT* iSpite of ^biggest °( *vo> phots in the no instability as in other countries which are richer than mine. 9 

warnings that auempu to lake him “Sfc'fe'w 1 

by force would result m bloodshed fnrriwmmwm of the pre-1975 managers have 

been replaced. Most of the 


State and federal negotiators held 
intensive discusnonswith Mr. Elli- 
son and others off and on fa three 
days at the encampment. 

Since surrounding the encamp- 
ment on Friday, the law officers 
bad gradually tightened the cordon 
and had uncovered numerous 
weapons and explosives in the 
camp, i 

Preliminary searches of rough- 
hewn huts and outbuildings in out- 
er parts of the compound seized by 
the state and federal force turned 
up pistols, shotguns, rifles, explo- 
sives and materials fa making ex- 
plosives. 

On Monday, Jack KiHorin of the 


Sam Ervin, 88, Dies; 
Had Key Watergate Role 

The Associated Press 

WINSTON-SALEM, North 
Carolina — Sam J. Ervin Jr., 88, 
who represented North Carolina in 
the U;S. Senate for 20 years and 
played a kty role in the Watergate 
hearings, died Tuesday at a hospi- 
tal here of respiratory failure. 

Mr. Ervin, r a native of Mogan- 
ton, was besi remembered for his 
role as chairman of the special Sen- 
ate subcommittee that investigated 
the Watergate affair. An expert cm 
the Constitution, he served as a 
co n g r e ssm an before being appoint- 
ed to the U.S. Senate in 1954. 


for five more years. 

But there are few other bright 
spots in Vietnam's basically subsis- 
tence economy. 

Not only is the country still 
struggling to recover from a decade 
of war with the United Suites (hat 
ended 10 years ago this month. It 
also is grappling with the postwar 
problems of inexperienced and in- 
efficient management, continued 
isolation from the West because of 
the Vietnamese occupation of 
Cambodia and apparent confusion 
about how lo deal with the free- 
wheeling southern half of the coun- 
try that nas been reluctantly reuni- 
fied with the north. 

“Using standard economic crite- 
ria, the country is in a bloody 
mess," said a We 
in Hanoi 

The steel complex helps to illus- 
trate several pants about the Viet- 
namese economy 10 years after the 
Communists took over South Viet- 
nam and imposed a policy of “so- 
cialist transformation" to wipe out 
the vestiges of capitalism. 

The main plant in the complex 
was formerly owned by Ly long 
Than, a Chinese- Vietnamese ty- 
coon described here as an adopted 
brother of Nguyen Van Tbieu, the 
former South Vietnamese presi- 
dent. It was the first factory to be 
nationalized by the Communists, 
Mr. Chi said. 

Previously, he said, the plant was 
run by 15 Taiwanese managers. 
Now, according to an engineer, all 


new 

ones are’ from northern Vietnam. 

Like Mr. Chi the directors of the 
other plants in the complex are 
southerners who went north with 
the Communists when the country 
was divided in 1954 and received 
special training to prepare them fa 
eventual assignments in the south. 

The grip of northerners or north- 
ern-trained cadres on key positions 
in the south has become a sore 
point with some native southern- 
ers, including members of the 
Communist Viet Cong who fought 
the U.S.-backed government of 
South Vianara. 

Another sore point is the erosion 
in the standard of living of many 
r estern ambassador southerners, including those who 
are now employees of the state. 

In a move seen as reflecting this 
erosion. Vice Prime Minister Tran 
Phuong said in Hanoi on Saturday 
that Vietnam’s currency, Lbe dong, 
was being devalued from its official 
rate of 11.7 to the dollar to a new 
rate of 100 to the dollar, represent- 
ing a loss in value of 850 peroenL- 
The devaluation still leaves the of- 
ficial rate far out of line with the 
black-market exchange rate of 
about 350 dong to the dollar. 

In one example of comparative 
living standards, Doan Gial a 45- 
year-qld furnace worker in the steel 
mill here since it started operating 
in 1969. raid that before the 1975 
fall of Saigon he earned a salary 
equivalent to about $46 a month. 


Now, he said, he averages 1,000 
dong a month, $10 at the new offi- 
cial rate, but only 52.85 at the more 
applicable black’- market, rate. He is 
the only provider fa a family of 
five. 

“Normally it’s enough to live 
on," he said. “But if someone has to 
go to the hospital I can’t afford the 
medicine.” 

The situation has engendered a 
“passive resistance” in tne south — 


hy as in other countries which are 
richer than mine." 

Asked if the spreading of poverty 
is not a strange policy for any gov- 
ernment, Mr. Thacb replied," “No, 
we would tike to become richer, but 
we will have equal distribution of 
wealth, not as in the United States 
and other countries where the gap 


between rich and poor is so big. " 
Viet- 


Yet, the fact remains that 
nam now ranks as one of the 20 


particularly in the former capital of poorest countries in the world, a 
Saigon, now Ho Chi Minh City — nation with a per-capita income 
to the north's “socialist transfer- officially figured at about S160 a 


mation” policy. 

Among recalcitrant southerners, 
the polity is seen as a northern 
effort to raise its living standard at 
the expense of the richer south by 
spreading the north’s poverty na- 
tionwide. 

Indeed, that is roughly what has 
happened in the 10 years since the 
war ended on April 30, 1975. Like 
the baskets (tf a dbn gonh. the ubiq- 
uitous carrying pole, the north and 
the south have been finding a bal- 
ance, probably at a level similar to 
that prevailing before the war. 

“Here the poverty is well distrib- 
uted,” said Nguyen Co Thach, the 
Vietnamese foreign minister, as he 
labored to compare Vietnam favor- 
ably to its economically dynamic 
neighbors in Southeast Asia. 

“So once the poverty is well dis- 
tributed,” he said, “there is no so- 
cial injustice. If there is nu social 
injustice, there is stability. We are 
very poor, but we have no instabil- 


year. 

It is a country unable to feed 
itself, where the per-capita avail- 
ability of rice, as calculated by the 
International Monetary Fund, 
stands below that of India and 
Bangladesh and does not meet 
minimum nutritional needs. 

It is a country where a tube of 
toothpaste costs more than three 
months’ basic salary of an average, 
government worker in Hanoi and a 
dozen, eggs sell for neariy two 
weeks’ wages. 

From Hanoi to Ho Chi Minh 
City, a standard complaint is that, 
in economic terms at least, people 
lived better during the war than 
they do now. Constantly rising 
prices in the free market, which 
even government workers must rely 
cm to supplement their meager ra- 
tions, seem to be the biggest griev- 
ance. 

Asked when the best years were, 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


Mr. Gorbachev also named Vik- 
tor P. Novikov, 55. the former agri- 
culture minister of the Russian fed- 
eration. to take over his own former 
portfolio as party secretary for ag- 
riculture. 

In another move, seen as an ef- 
fort to reassure the military that it 
was not b eing neglected, the minis- 
ter of defense. Marshal Sergei L. 
Sokolov, 73, was made a candidate 
member of the Politburo. 

The appointments raised the 
membership in the Politburo to 13 
and stamped it distinctively as Mr. 
Gorbachevs. 

The new members, in addition to 
their political links to the new lead- 
er, marked a distinct shift to youn- 
ger men in the top ranks of Soviet 
power and away from the S talinis t 
generation that held swav until the 
death of Konstantin U. Chernenko 
last month. 

In his speech, Mr. Gorbachev 
spoke against “any stagnation in 
the movement of cadres,” and 
called fa the promotion of “wom- 

(Continued on Page 2, Col. 8) 


Israel Agrees 
To Free 1,000 
Palestinians 
JnPOWSwap 


United Press International 

ATHENS — Israel has agreed to 
release about 1,000 Palestinians 
held in Israel in exchange Tor three 
Israelis captured in Lebanon, Bru- 
no Kreisky, the former chancellor 
of Austria, and senior Western dip- 
lomats said Tuesday. 

Mr. Kreisky said'that final tech- 
nical details for the prisoner ex- 
change were being negotiated by 
the International Committee of the 
Red Cross in Geneva. He said he 
expected the exchange to take place 
in the near future. 

The three Israelis are Hezi Shah 
Yosef Gropp and Nissim Salem. 
They were captured in Lebanon in 
1982 by the Syrian-backed Popular 
Front fa the Liberation of Pales- 
tine-General Command. 

Their expected release is the cul- 
mination of two and a half years of 
negotiations. 

The negotiations earlier led to a 
prisoner exchange between Syria 
and Israel and the exchange in No- 
vember 1983 of six Israelis cap- 
tured by the Palestine Liberation 
Organization for about 4,500 Pales- 
tinians and Lebanese held by the 
Israelis. 

Most of the negotiations were 
conducted by Mr. Kreisky and se- 
nior Austrian officials who had 
talks with Abu Hazem Shehabi, a 
member of the executive committee 


of the Popular Front for the Liber- 
ation of Palestine, as well as 


Shmuel Tamir, a senior aide to the 
Israeli defense minister, Yitzhak 
Rabin. 

The final breakthrough came af- 
ter Mr. Kreisky suggested in De- 
cember that one Israeli be ex- 
changed for every 330 Palestinians. 

Earlier, the Popular Front Tor the 
Liberation of Palestine refused to 
acknowledge the capture of Mr. 
Shai or to discuss apossible prison- 
er exchange until Israel had clari- 
fied the fate of several Palestinian 
fighters missing in action, Mr. 
Kreisky and the diplomats said. 

Mr. "Kreisky and the diplomats 
declined to discuss how the ex- 
change will take place. 

In 1983, Israel released an esti- 
mated 3.500 prisoners in Lebanon 
and another 1,000 were flown to 
Algeria. 

Mr. Kreisky and the diplomats 
declined to disclose whether 121 
Arab prisoners, originally sched- 
uled to be among those released for 
ihe six Israelis held by the PLO, 
were now bang included in the new 
exchange. Hie 121 prisoners were 
held back by Israel at the time of 
the 1983 exdiange with no official 
explanation. 


INSIDE 


■ Seven Weston European na- 
tions agreed to cooperate in 
high-tech defense fields. Page 2. 


■ U-S. protests increase over 
President Reagan’s planned vis- 
it to Bitburg. Page 3. 


■ The Sholtz-W efnberger feud 

has caused stalemates in U.S. 
policymaking. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


■ The inflation rate in the Unit- 
ed States jumped by 0.5 percent 
last month. Page 11. 












Page 2 


7 West European Nations Agree to Technology Ties 


WORLDS 


By Henry Tanner May. is expected to be debated for des but standing also for European 

international Herald Tribune many months. Research Coordination Agency- 

, BONN — Foreign and defense The Western European Union to. Dumas and W«t Goman 
ministers of the seven-nation West- includes Britain, France, West Ger- officials were at pains to underline 
L European Union agreed Tues- many, Italy, the Netherlands, Bel- that the need ^^d^co- 

dav to seek closer cooperation in a gium and Luxembourg. The orga- ?P er ^9“ w rSLh 
wide range of high-technology nization, which was revived last long beforcae^ U.S^spi attnscsinto 
fields, in keeping with a ream: October after many years of inac- P lan was lauiKhed and that Eureka 
FrencA initiate* tivity, is the only ifiolly Western was not ui tended 

. But the ministers failed to come Europ^n body dealing with ques- a ^telitute for the Amencan uu- 

iip with a joint response to Presi- uo ° 5 ° f defense. Mr defined the research 

dent Ronald Reagan’s invitation 10 Following up on a deasontaJren . u & ^ program with 
Western allies take pan m research in Rome, the ministers agreed to ^ dvfli ^ implications,” while 
for the U.S. Strategic Defense Ini- give the union new structures in the ^ Eureka vast long-range 
dative, the space-based missile de- fonn of three agencies dealing with dvfli program with military pro- 
fense plan popularly known as arms control, security and coopera- iecticns _- 

“star wars.” tion in armaments. J -n,. m Fimw. is first 


includes Britain, Franc^West Ger- crffioah were at pains tounderime 
many, Italy, the Netherlands, Bel- that the need for technology co- 


^’airi^b^T^ToS- operation **&£-»* 
□ization, which was revived last long before the U.S.roaoerwearcb 
October after many years of inac- plan was launched and that Eureka 


man defense minister, Manfred 
W6mer, warmly welcomed the 
French idea on the grounds that 
technological cooperation has be- 
come an increasingly important el- 
ement of European unification. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl an- 
nounced last week that he will send 


Ort.->Vv»r after manv vears of inac- P ian was launcnea ana uiai ju^ iwl - “ 

oSTS? WeSm was not intended either as a rival or a team of «pem w Washing tot to 
uvity, is tne only ^uy w«torn . . f . Americail examine the conditions m which 


European body dealing with ques- ® substitute for the American ini- 

tiods of defend " M^Dums defined the research 

Following up on a denaontaken , a “military program with 
in Rome, me mmisters agreed to S ^vLn uSTtioS” while 

m.rd rVid. nmnn nra/ ctnar-tiirpc in thA ,1 “ u ’ 


West Germany would take part in 
research for the U.S. space-based 


liative. the space-based missile de- 
fense plan popularly known as 
“star wars.” 

A statement at the end of the 


jections. 

The challenge to Europe is Erst 


Roland Dumas, the French min- c f ajj technological; the mflitaiy countries. 


defense plan. 

Mr. Kohl had added that West 
Germany would participate only if 
a “fair partnership" were guaran- 
teed and be railed for further con- 
sultations with other European 


to consult bilaterally with the Unit- 
ed States to find out what then- 
scientific and industrial contribu- 
tions should be and that consulta- 
tion in Europe should foDow. 

Some of his colleagues seemed to 
think that the consultations should 
begin in Europe. 

The two-day WEU conference 
underlined the quandary in which 
European governments End them- 
selves as they ponder the U.S. invi- 
tation to join the space-defense re- 
search. Although the U.S. defense 
secretary, Caspar W. Weinberger, 



dropped his original 60-day dead- 
line for a reply from allies on 


iwo-day meeting said only that the ister for external relations, said that challenge mil come later " Mr. Du- 
ministers had agreed to continue be had won “overwhelming" sup- mac said in a statement, 
consultations in an effort to reach a port for the idea of a “European 


“coordinated" answer to the U.S. technological community” he pro- 
invitation. posed a week ago in a letter to the 

in response to questions, Hans- { ordgo ministers of the European 
Dietrich Genscher, the West Ger- Community as weD as Spam and 


“If our countries were to find 
themselves weakened tedmologi- 


Britain is understood to be the 
only one of the seven governments 
present to be decidedly cod to the 
French idea. One of the reasons 


whether they would participate, 
several diplomats confessed that 
they felt pressured by Washington. 



U.S. Says SS-20 Sites Stffl Being Built 

WAWTNRmN fNYT) — Reagan administration officials say the 
mediu m-range missiles in Europe, desprtea 

new deployment of such missiles announced by Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 

^Th^^Sid Monday that the seven sites, ochof ' which is capable 
of ho^gSree of the tee-warhead SS-20*. had been undra construc- 
tion before Mr. Gorbachev made his mnoupcMt 
“We expect that they will deploy in all of the sites that wercbegun pnor 
to April 7and probably hold off putting up new ates .imtfl _ Aemoraton- 
um n ms out.” a higih-ranlring State Department official said. He said an 
eighth site was being built in Soviet Asia. 


Prince Norodom Sihanouk 


One diplomat listed these factors 


sdiplom 

debate: 


man foreign minis ter, made it plain Portugal. 

that the merits of the research plan The French project is meant to 


cally," he added, “their capacity to cited was that Britain does not like 
contribute effectively to their own the idea of yet another European 
defense would be reduced and their agency. 


defense would be reduced and ter 
political weight would be dimin- 
ished at the same rime.” 


The British defense minister, Mi- 
chael Hesdtine, indicated Tuesday 


itself were not an issue but rather enhance cooperation in such higb- 
that the ministers had dealt only technology fields as lasers, micro- 


Mr. Dumas said that his govern- that his view of European “consul- 
ment would follow up the initiative ration" about the space research 


with the possible ways of harend- processors, optics and information with some of the smaller European plan differed from that of some of 
rising European reactions to it. technologies. The project’s name is countries. his colleagues. He said that Euro- 

The two days of talks were seen Eureka, boreowed from Archime- Mr. Genscher and the West Ger- pean governments would first have 

as the start of long and difficult 

exchanges about the research plan m 1 • riTI H 

Little Progress Made in Geneva lalks 

which was expected to be a major ” 

industrial nations attended by Mr. Neither Side Showed Much Willingness to Compromise 

Reagan^here at the beginning^ ^ William Drozdiak deadlock when talks resume m late Priority. U.S. negotiators have 

— — ' waMtgun Patt Service May. spmt much of th £ * SK .wwks 

Thf» hnmp BONN— The United States and The two sides appear to have outlining the Reagaa admmistra- 

liie Home ^ g. t Union concluded six clung tenaciously to past positions bon s “philosophy^ of seeking deep 

OfBurberrysPanS, weefctf negotiations on nuclear bothmpubKcandinmv^du^ 

irvrvn and soace arm in Geneva on Tues- the opening round of negotiations, emphasrirng the future role or non 

Since 1909 a ™ 5L littfenmm-H tn show, but whicheSnnass offensive strate- nuclear defensive measures that 


countries. 


his colleagues. He said that Euro- 


Mr. Genscher and the West Ger- pean governments would first have 


Little Progress Made in Geneva Talks 


Europe could not afford to miss 
the technological breakthrough 
that the research plan might bring; 
some European industries were 
anxious to participate and in some 
cases might accept individual con- 
tracts; gifted specialists might be 
hired away, ana technology trans- 
fers from the United States to Eu- 
rope mi gh t remain difficult. 


Sihanouk 
Seeks to Quit 
Coalition 


Honecker Starts 2-Day Visit to Italy 

ROME (Rentas) — Erich Honecker, the East Gennan leader, began 
talks Tuesday with Italian political leaders at the start of a two-day visl 
M r Honeckefs stay, which will include an audience with Pope John 
Paul n is the first by an East German head of state andgoverament to 
the capital of a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and 
the European Community. Bettino Craxi, Italy's Socialist pnme minister, 

visited East Berlin in July 1984. , , n ji , ■ 

In September, Mr. Honecker indefinitely postponed a planned visi t to ■ 
West Germany on short notice, u nde r what Western diplomats called 
heavy Soviet pressure. 


US. Envoy Calls 
Talks Ty^ftadt 9 


since 1909 

(Near the Madeleine) 


defensive measures that 



i day mth little progress to show, but which encompass offenave strate- 
e«d«.ly determined to pr«i 0c weapon*, mrermedi^nmge 


ahead in seeking a break in the 


7/ 

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w.Twmrc'mTT^c'To far even to discuss the merits of the 

NEWS ANALYSIS “strategic concept" as presented by 

Max M. Kampdman, the head of 
missiles and outer space missile de- the U.S. delegation. 


fense systems. 


The United States also has pre- 


Moscow’s opening gambits have $enred its objections to alleged So- 
consisted of moratorium offers to viet violations of the Anti-Ballistic 
halt deployment of nuclear urns as Missile Treaty, particularly the 
well as research and testing of phased-array radar system at Kras- 

mama rvw»»j i mp CyMrinf nan/vti. _« • . < !. TL* 


The Associated Press 
.GENEVA — The first round 
of US.-Soviet arms talks, de- 
scribed by the chief U^. dele- 
gate as ‘‘difficult," recessed 
Tuesday after 54 hours of meet- 
ings on nuclear and space weap- 
ons in six weeks. 

“The American delegation 
expected these negotiations to 
be difficult, and they have 
been,” Max M. Kampdman 
said at a press briefing after the 
end of the round's final meet- 
ing. The talks resume May 30. 


Reuters 

BEUING — Prince Norodom 
Sihanouk of Cambodia has sought 
to resign as president of the Cam- 
bodian coalition government-in- 
exile that opposes the Vietnamese- 
backed regime in Phnom Penh, 
foreign diplomats said Tuesday. 

The diplomats said that Prince 
Sihanouk wrote to Khieu Sam- 
phan , the Communist prime minis- 
ter or the coalition, tendering his 
resignation for health reasons. 
Telephone calls to the prince’s resi- 
dence in Pyongyang, North Korea, 
went unanswered Tuesday. 

According to the diplomats, Si- 
hanouk, who has previously threat- 
ened to resign in protest against his 
two coalition partners, is not in 
poor health, although he has 


rhi-tstian Militia Fulls Back in Sidon 

SIDON, Lebanon (Reuters) — Christian militiamen pulled out of 

- ... i_ ' hatfltna nntlV tnvrm nnfl MiTSlCTn 


l^co&ncac xuuuj “t , 1 -- " ~~ r, , 

nese Forces withdrew from Sidon’s eastern suburbs to Majddyoun, a 
Christian village a few miles inland. • __ 

They ware waiting for troops to take over the front hues before an 
expected evacuation by sea to Beirut, the sources said. Military sources in 

(ho ortnu nrmilH nnt mnvr in nnril it COUld confirm that 


expeciea cvuuuiuuu uj sox iav — — — j — 

Sidon said the army would not move in until it could confirm that 
militiamen had left the area. 


Indonesia and China Agree to Talk 


seemed tired recently and could be 
suffering from high blood pressure. 

The coalition, recognized by the 
United Nations, affiliates Siha- 
nouk’s followers with those of the 
non-Communist Khmer People’s 
National Liberation Front and the 
Communist Khmer Rouge. 

As a former leader of Cambodia, 
the prince is useful to the guerrillas 
for his political respectability. He 
offsets the presence of the Khmer 
Rouge and makes it easier for 
Southeast Asian countries to bade 
the coalition. 

His offer of resignation may re- 
flect his unease about the limited 
aid given to his forces by the stron- 
ger Khmer Rouge during recent 
Vietnamese offensives against 
guerrilla bases on the Thai border, 
the diplomats said. 

Beneath a veneer of unity against 
Vietnam, which invaded Cambodia 
in 1978 and installed a pro-Hanoi 
government in Phnom Penh, the 


space-based systems. Soviet 
a tors have not shown any 1 


noyarsk in central Siberia. The 
Americans contend that it could 


ness to bargain or make conces- serve as an early warning or battle 
sions, apparently waiting for the management system. 


United States to take the initiative. 
The United States has spumed 


The Russians deny that the radar 
is destined for military purposes 


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After a recess. U.S. and Soviet 
negotiators are to begin a second 
round of talks on May 30. But 
substantive progress is not antici- 
pated soon, even if a summit meet- 
ing is held this year. 

While the mood at the negotia- 
tions became “more businesslike” 
toward the end, the Soviet negotia- 
tors have not shown signs of ex- 
chat 


Gorbachev, however, has stirred 
speculation drat the new Soviet 
leads may be prepared to move 
more rapidly toward reaching an 
arms deal with the United States to 
free more resources to bolster the 
Soviet economy. 

So far, Mr. Gorbachev has not 
made b is mark in foreign or securi- 
ty affairs, repeating positions, even 
phrases, that are considered to be 
crafted in dassic Gromyko style. 

But some senior Western offi- 
cials predict that Mr. Gorbachev 
will extend his authority quickly in 
chose areas because Mr. Gromyko 
no longer possesses the overwhelm- 
ing power he wielded during the 
incapadtation of ailing Soviet rul- 
ers in recent years. 


BANDUNG, Indonesia (Reuters) — Indonesia and China agreed 
Tuesday to formal talks for the first time since Jakarta froze diplomatic 
relations between the two countries in 1967. 

The Indonesian foreign minister, Mochtar Kusumaatmadja, said that 
the Chinese foreign nnmsier, Wu Xneqian, had asked for a meeting. The 
taiifg were being arranged but a time had yet to be fixed, Mr. Mochtar 
said. 

Mr. Wu, attending ceremonies to mark the 30th anniversary of the 
Bandung African-Asian conference, is the first Chinese minister to visit 
Indonesia since relations were suspended after an abortive Communist- 
backed coup attempt. 


EC Ministers Fail on Cereal Accord - 

BRUSSELS (Reuters) — Moves to contain the European Communi- 


ty’s cereals surpluses by severely cutting prices appeared doomed on 
Tuesday after farm ministers failed again to reach agreement at the 1 

annual price fmng . 

The 10-nation community’s Executive CommisskHi, eager to cut the 
cost of maintaining surpluses, had proposed cutting cereals prices by 3.6 
percent after last year’s bumper harvest. 

But West Germany has refused to accept any cats and blocked progress 
at the price review. “The situation is very serious," a community spokes- 
man mid. “We are at a complete impasse.” 


For the Record 




Israefi troops killed two guerrillas near Jabal Barouk in southern 
Lebanon, the army said in a communique The army said that Rnssan- 
made Kalashnikov rifles, protective vests and rucksacks containing food 
had been found on the bodies. (VPI) 

The trial of 14 alleged terrorists in Israel wQl go ahead after a decision 
Tuesday that their confessions bad not been coerced. An Israeli court 


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

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Applications are invited for the provision of 

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT 
AND ACCOUNTING SERVICES 


There has been no discussion 
among the negotiators, even at in- 
formal lunches or receptions, of 
striking a “grand bargain” that 
could bring radical reductions in 
nuclear weapons in exchange for 
restraints on space arms. 

The unyielding positions and 
tactics adopted by the Soviet dele- 
gation so far bear the signature of 
Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gro- 
myko, whose negotiating methods 
are based on sticking to one view 
until the other ride feds compelled 
to give ground fust to reach an 
ultimate agreement. 

As long as Mr. Gromyko master- 
minds the Soviet strategy, progress 
toward an agreement is expected to 
be agonizingly slow. 

The ascendancy of Mikhail S. 


evident in the Geneva negotiations 
until the next Soviet Communist 
Party congress is held, probably 
early next year. By that time, it is 
believed that be will have moved 
his personal allies into key posi- 
tions and supervised the creation of 
the Soviet Union's next five-year 
military and economic programs. 

For that reason, a possible meet- 
ing this fall between Mr. Gorba- 
chev and President Ronald Reagan 
is not expected, by itself, to break 
the impasse in the Geneva talks. 




ed statements by Khieu Samp turn, 
who was president of Cambodia 


But after the party congress, it is 
believed that Mr. Gorbachev may 


introduce more flexibility into the 
Soviet negotiating posture. Such a 
development, however, also would 
depend on the status of Mr. Gro- 
myko. 


who was president of Cambodia 
when the Vietnamese drove*‘the 
Khmer Rouge from power, that the 
Vietnamese lolled three of the 
prince's children, his grandchildren 
and other relatives. 

“Those people were murdered by 
the Khmer Rouge," the prince told 
The New York Times. 

On Monday, Sihanouk's office 
publicized a letter to the Indone- 
sian foreign minister, Mochtar Ku- 
sumaatmadja, in which the prince 
declined to attend the 30th anniver- 
sary meeting of the Asia- Africa. 
Conference in Bandung. Represen- 
tatives of 80 nations are gathering 
in the Jlvan town for the commem- 
oration of the conference held there 
in 1955. 


for the above association of computer users 
from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. 


The association which was founded In 1961 has its current headquarters in 
Nijmegen, The Netherlands, but needs to complete a new agreement for at least five 
years from January 1st. 1987. 

SEAS represents more than 3S0 large computer installations and organizes two 
annual conferences. All communications are conducted in En glish. 

It is expected that the new agreement will enable a future SEAS Headquarters to 
extend fully its range of automatic facilities and up-to-date management techniques. 
A full prospectus of the duties and responsibilities will be forwarded to suitable 
applicants on received brief details indicating the ability to provide headquarters 
services of the kind envisaged. 




mosque, Islam's holiest rite in Jerusalem. (Reuters).^ 

Two Iranian sokEers flown to Europe for treatment of injuries that ' 
appeared to be the result of poison gas have died, Iranian embassies 
reported Tuesday. The soldiers died in Linz and Brussels. (Reuters) 
Turkish deputies in the Council of Emupe’s Parliamentary Assembly 
will be allowed to keep their seats. The assembly voted Tuesday to allow 
them to remain despite reports of continuing violations of human rights 
by the Turkish authorities. (At) 

The Kenyan government demanded Tuesday that Nairobi University 
students sign a pledge not to boycott classes or damage university 
property and undertake not to convene or attend any meeting on canrous 
or talk to the media without clearance, campus sources said. The 
university reopened Monday two months after campus unrest (Reuters) 
The ch^ of staff of the French anned forces, General JeannouLacaze, 
left Paris cm Tuesday on a visit to New Caledonia to examine Fiance's 
military strength on the island. (Reuters) 

President Ronald Reagan on Tuesday proclaimed tins week as National 
Organ Donation Week, urging “all Americans to join me in supporting 
this humanitarian actum." (At) 

President Fernando EEdatede Terry said Monday night in Tima that 
the second round of voting to dect his successor wfll be held in May. A 
slow count continued of voting in the April 14 elections. (API 

: —4 


Moscow Denies It Pledged 
No Force in East Germany 


(Continued from Page I) cts that they will not p ermit nse of 
nior embassy official to xqfact the ^ orce ^ weapons against the mon- 
Soviet interpretation as “unaccept- °* 001 ^tnMaiy liaison mission 
able" and contrary to fact. ' m future." 


The State Department also said 

4l n ■ _ _ a. w . r— 


arose from differences between , « — -- 7 — - — 

military and civilian authorities in ra ™y to higher authority." 

Moscow. Repeating tins report on Mon- 

Similar differences about the State Department officials ( 
handling of the case have emerged s ^. there was “no doubt" that the -ts 
in Washington. The Defense De- Soviet general promised not to use 
partment has been more demand- force in the future against U.S. hat- 
ing t h an the State Department and personnel, and that, General 


ON BUSINESS IN EGYPT- 


COME TO SHERATON. 


ing t h an the State Department and 5® personnel, antT that. General 
some White House officials in in- told General Otis that in- 

sisting on a Sowet apology for the struct rons were being issued to rcit- 

sbootTng of Major Arthur D. Nich- erate this point to Soviet personnel 


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Come ten minutes from the airport, to 
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^or Arthur D. Nich- 
olson Jr. by a Soviet sentry, as wdl 
as compensation fen- his family. 

The Pentagon announced Mon- 
day, before the Soviet statement 


m his command. 


The Pentagon announced Mon- O • * *1 

day, before the Soviet statement uOVlftt ASSHIIS 
was issued, that a planned trip to 

the Soviet Union scheduled for last TT O rrt IT 

Spunky by 15 officers from the IJ«0 # Oil 1 HIKS 
National War - 1 - mXUw£7 


_ j — J UV1U U1W 

National War College was canceled 

late last week. It attributed the can- fCnntimiM! tw«, n 

cdlarion to “the lack of SovieTre- l^ntiniied from Page 1) 

spoosiveness in meeting our de- 05 young promising workers to 
mands for an apology and Potions of responsibility." ' 

conrnensatinn — - - • 


compensation.” The 

The killing on March 24 of Ma- pressed 
jot Nicholson, a U.S. military Iiai- boldnes 

son officer in East Germany, creat- ^ragein 
ed tension and ill will in Nation. 
American-Soviet relations. Alon 

President Ronald Reagan, tak- Gorbac 


The personnel changes iffl- 
pr««xi Western diplomats by ter 
boldness, especially at so early a 
sta 8,e in Mr. Gorbachev’s adminisr 


with the toughness of Mt 
ev*s address on both do* 




. — r — mi- aaaress on botn tur 

mg a low-key approach, said the mestic and foreign issues, thedeva- 

^ tion of his own men into the leader- 

teldB; Ma * a A S. ship confirmed him as a man 


!**■ ’*V 
0 


: . d^crouned. to take charge and to 

A March 30 meeting of Secretary recharge the country’s economic 
of State George P. Shultz and the and political life. 

Soviet ambassador, Anatoli F. Do- The Cental Commitlet meetog 
byrmn opeoed the waj- for hmh- was dS 

S^r OB ® Sm “ adK 

^WGeoetal.GieattiL b 

Otis, the commander of U A Army Mr ,ut 

Europe, and his Soviet coonteroarL th^ Gwbacb ? v M 

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ooSeSlkata^^SSL^ .“S?' d f" 4 °E“£! 


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The hospitality people of ITT 


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Student Protests: 


'Short Takes 


A Far Gry from *68 

About .150 students, stting-m 
oo the steps of' Hamilton Ha D ax 
Columbia University smct April 
4 to protest the mstiraiicfl’s in- 
vestments in South .Africa, called 
off their demons [ration minutes 


before a fudge issued an order 
that would have ended it. They 
said they would use “hew tac- 
tics,'' yet to be announced. 

This first sk-in at Columbia 


that anyone could recall since 
1969 differed from the one that 


®"**y postpone V 

in * hai W4^ : 


'BsBactjj.D.. 

toistian miiui, 
t baling anm^ 1 
month. ■ 

: fighters of th eCh . . * 


year when students, protesting 
military research and a gymnasi- 
um that would have displaced a' 
black neighborhood, seized Eve 
buildings. Police were sum- 
moned. Dozens of injuries and 
hundreds of arrests followed. 
Since then, calling the police on 
campus has become, in the words 
of one dean, “anathema." 

Today’s demonstrators, less 
pugnacious than their predeces- 
sors of the 1960s, drew attention 
to their cause, as have students 
on other campuses. But there 
was little noise and no trouble. 
And in 1968, although only a few 
hundred students occupied 
buildings, thousands of others 
milled about the campus is sup- 
port. 

“In 1968 you had a spade 
thrown in a tmdetbox," Done 
Ravitch, a historian of educa- 
tion, told The New York Times. 
This time, she said, there was a 
spark but no tindabox. 


- American Legion membership' 
has thinned to 2^36,062, com- 
' pared to 3.3 million the year after 
World War II. Only veterans 
who were on active duty during 
either of the two world wars or 
the Korean or Vietnam conflicts 
; may join. To swell its ranks, the 

charier to include* ^c^u^an 
missile crisis, Grenada and Bei- 
rut. 

The consuner movement got 
its biggest impetus 20 years ago 
when Ralph Nader’s “Unsafe at 
Any Speed” was published. 
Since then, the movement has 
not only expanded but matured. 
Gone are the pickets and boy- 
cotts of earlier years. The New 
York Times reports; now con- 


The Power Breakfast: 
AU Work, No Food 



Ralph Nader 


Spreading all too rapidly 
trough the New York business 


through the New York business 
community, according to some 
red-eyed executives, is the break- 
fast-time business meeting, 
which goes by the trendy name 
of “power breakfast." The idea is 
to squeeze in an hour or two of 


sumer experts negotiate with 
government and industry. Stuart 
M. S taller, a member of the gov- 
ernment’s Consumer Product 


business planning before office 
hours, The New York Times rc- 


ativ; Commission, cam 
■opossd caning ceittgpjj: 

rapi ejects and bkefadiRr 


a sear Jiba! Baron! h sg 
niqur. Th; said thaiSee 

,’es^ and rucksack ou^ 


Israel wt!! go ahead 2 fer 
3« been coerced. Aa lnj c 
ere charged is anmasntt 
?i \o blo'A up the DoneofifcJt 
lisa " t , 

rope for treautiem s'sesfe 
i go? "r.a*.e died. lrais«E ; 
in Laz ar.d Brussek tf® 


hours, The New York Times re- 
ports. 

“New York is a strange town.” 
explained Sid Davidoff, a law- 
yer. “It’s the latest symptom of a 
crazy competitiveness,” said 
Jonathan Gerard, a financial an- 
alyst. “It's great,” said Judith 
Price, who publishes Avenue 
magazine. “The purpose of the 
meal.is not to eat. One does not 
order food. A power breakfast is 
a meeting.” 

Power-breakfasting at Le Res- 
taurant on Park Avenue, Mrs. 
Price recoiled in horror at the 
sight of a tray coming out of the 
kitchen. “Oh my God T she ex- 
claimed. “Pancakes! He must be 
from out of town.” 


era meat’s Consumer Product 
Safety Commission, said, “There 
will always be more to be done, 
but the problems that remain are 
much more esoteric, much more 
complicated.” Mr. Nader mused, 
“In the early years it was dramat- 
ic.” Bat he insisted that even to- 
day, “There should be an adver- 
sarial relationship” between 
consumers and businessmen. 


The New York office of the 
International Herald Tribune 
has received a letter on White 


House stationery, signed by 
Ronald Reagan, but with the no- 


tation “Paid for by the National 
Republican Congressional Com- 
mittee” and requesting contribu- 
tions to the GOP Victory Fund. 
The letter is addressed to “Mr. 
Herald Tribune” and the saluta- 
tion says. “Dear Mr. Tribune.” 


ARTHUR HIGBEE 


f Europe's Par j jirenay 
he assembly yv.rc Tiesfeti* 
niinuini rioiaiioEioftanw 


Mafia Controls 4 Unions 


usds y that Nairobi Ite 
classes rr auaaiSK. 
■ attend an;* mimsas: 
:e. canrras sources al- 


By Robert L Jackson 

Las Angela Tima Service 

CHICAGO — A presiden 


CHICAGO — A presidential 
commission that is studying the Ln- 


ifter :i.T.pu>unrei (fc 
arees. GesiralJeaMiD; 

Caiedorjj totucuffc 
lit 

rs.-aaji»:o2«S^F 


r> sad a#® 1 * 

jys vu.vcs.or -:i! 


i It Pledged 
st German? 


fluence of organized crime in the 
United States has charged that die 
Mafia controls the Teamsters and 
. three other national unions. 

The three other unions represent 
construction-site laborers, hotel 
.and restaurant employees and 
dockworkers on the Atlantic and 
Gulf coasts. 

The charges of mob control were 
- Vnade Monday as the 19-member 
* President's Commission on Orga- 
nized Crime began three days of 


the Internatiotud Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, the Laborers Interna- 
tional Upion, the Hotel Employees 


Sc. Restaurant Employees Interna- 
tional Union and theJnternatkraal 
Longshoremen’s Association. 

"I’m not saying that every local 


of these large unions is controlled 
or even influenced by organized 
crime," add Mr. McBnde, who was 
inspector-general of the Depart- 
ment ofXabor in the Carter admin- 
istration. “In fact, some local union 
leaders have, shown great courage 
in defying the racketeers.” 

But Mr. McBride said that of 930 
indictments handed down against 
labor unions in the last four years, 
.45 percent involved the four large 
unions he had mentioned, as did 
one- third of all labor-related con- 
victions for racketeering, embezde- 


Reagan Assails 
Moves to Freeze 


Military Spending 


United Press International 
■ WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan said Tuesday that 
his latest budget compromise puts 
military spending at “rock bottom” 
and accused Democratic lawmak- 


ers of making the Pentagon budget 
v “a whipping boy for the fafluicof 


theft of funds 
plans. 

The charge 
sters represen 


ainst the Tearo- 
the most sweep- 


Soviet-*®’} 

r.S.®» Ts ! 


.Cor-n® 


V fV ,-apsm 1 




: Congress” to cut domestic pro- 
grams. 

Mr. Reagan told the National 
Association of Realtors that Dem- 
ocratic calls for spending freezes, 
either across the board or just on 
the military, are “a retreat in the 
face of special interest pressure.” 
Mr. Reagan has agreed to limit 
military increases to 3 percent fa* 
the next three years. 

In a preview of a broadcast ad- 
dress scheduled Wednesday night, 
Mr. Reagan said his budge Land tax 
proposals, which have not yet been 
detailed, can “build a new era of 
good feeling” in the United States. 

Replying to moves by some 
Democrats in Congress either to 
freeze the 1985 budget across the 
board or freeze Pentagon spending, 
Mr. R eagan said, “While that may 
seem appealing it doesn't get the 
job done. It’s the wrong mediane 
1 at the wrong time.” 

“A freeze,” he said, “is a decision 
not to make a decision, a retreat in 
the face of special interest pres- 
sure.” 

■ The two speeches and lobbying 


mg accusation in years by a federal 
agency against the 1.9 million- 


agency against the 1.9 mfllion- 
roember truckers union. The union 
has sought in recent years to im- 
prove its image, and it was the only 
major labor organization to back 
President Ronald Reagan in 1980 
and 1984. 

Commission officials indicated 
that de tails of Teamsters union cor- 
ruption will emerge later. 

- Mr. Presser’s attorney, John R. 
CKmaco of Cleveland, told the 
commissioo by letter that Mr. 
Presser would refuse to answer 
questions, riling his constitutional 
protection against self-incrimina- 
tion. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


Page 3 


ILS. Protasis Press Leaks Pentagon Test of Pool Coverage 

r» a O J O 

trfOW UV6F By Eleanor Randolph The plan’s first test — to cover a scheduled degrees centigrade). They were not informed c 


Reagan Visit 

To Cemetery 


By Eleanor Randolph 
and Michael Wdsskopf 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon's fust ex- 


The plan’s first test — to cover a scheduled 
military exercise in Honduras — drew criticism 
from Pentagon officials and media spokesmen, 
and both sides spotted flaws. 


degrees centigrade). They were not informed of 
the destination or that the pool was a test. 
Pentagon officials said that they had read to 


PiageT 


By Kathy Sawyer 

Washington Post Service 

PHILADELPHIA — “For Ron- 
ald Reagan, I want to say only one 
thing,” said Emil Far bat, S3, in 
halting English. “When I wake up 
in the night, 1 still see the blood 
running down my son’s face, where 
the SS shot him before my eyes.” 


i iniended^i permit * A ft nugoo Mkhri 1. Burch, 

dia coverage of secret U.S. military operations *** Defense Dq>artment would review the 
resulted in leaks Sunday and an mS&Monday “ d "H# 1 anolher ICSI 10 ovcr ' 

in The Washington Post after a radio network come < “f‘ lcu « u cs> 


Pentagon officials said that they had read 10 
the executives a prepared advisory, including 
the warning that “secrecy, until the operation 

begins, is paramount.” 


“Any leaks could jeopardize the operation,” 

the warning said. “You may not discuss with 


spread word of the exercise. 


The Mulual Radio netwo* .old other radio Sff’teS* H 
netw °rhs UK Penagou tad«dv«ed . 


“ ,woru f n “ £ a operations. We’re got to look at it. The press has 

prearranged pool of newspapw radio and iele- j OQ ^ dL ^ we g 0l t0 ^ bow we 

25 rep0n P*' ***** Mutual hadbeqa ^ do u Sic future/ 


the SS shot hnn before my eyes. 

The annual gathering of Holo- 
caust survivors is an emotional 
kaleidoscope,” as one called it on 
Monday. For Mr. Faiben and 
many others here it is complicated 
this year by their anguish over the 
president’s planned trip to the mili- 
tary cemetery in Bitbnrg, West 
Germany, where 47 Waffen SS sol- 
diers are buried. 


asked to send a correspondent to Andrews Air 
Force Base by 4 A.M. Sunday to cover an 
unspecified operation. 


. .. , . . . anyone that the pool has been activated.” 

“We hoped it would prove the case that we ^ } arrived in Honduras 

uld coofide in the press to cmrer tbe exerose, nooa Sunday, according to the Pema- 

r. Burch said. “There was a breakdown in g,^ 

lerations. We’re got to look atit. The press has w OT d of the test anually several 

1 to look at it, and we have|ot to see how we ^ in 3dv3IHX _ ^ McFarland said that NBC 
n do 11 better m the future. learned from “Pentagon sources” Wednesday or 

After journalists were barred in Grenada, Thursday that the pool exercise was imminent, 
osi major news organizations protested, A Pentagon spokesman. Colonel Robert 


most major news organizations protested. 


Mutual told the others despite a Defense 
Department directive to keep the plans secreL 
When a Post correspondent in Nicaragua 
learned that a radio colleague had been told by 
his home office that the pool had been activated. 


Defense prompting the Pentagon to set up a panel to O'Brien, said that, as far as the Defense Depan- 


siudy how military operations might be covered, mem was concerned, the secrecy agreement was 
Under the plan, a pool of reporters would be broken Sunday at 1:20 A.M. when a network 
included wno would keep the mission secret bureau chief called hint. 


learnea mat a racuo coueague naa been torn oy uniii it began. Jack Smith. Washington bureau chief of CBS 

Charte J. Lmis. Washmt.on bmau chief N « Klpowtedged SWdajr te he had made 
the correspondent told his editors. The Penta- f . ‘ p™. S.w“i, , a call at about that time because be had heard of 

gon subsequatdy confirmed that a pool test had the mission from a source and, as the chief of the 

been initiated Saturday night. photographer to theppol. said. “When there are for ^ networks, he had been 


Bart TesslerMutuai's news director said that ^“^dwork 
1 informing the other networks he had acred .Ttvr“ „ 


p^to^^^tothepwl^i“Wimi^reare ihemission from ia source and, as the cUefafthe 
rin«v«. M ihRW.rn* in fhe nrfttenr rw,i cvwem alt P°°l operation for the networks, he had been 


flaws, as there are in the present pool system, all P™. 
pani« should work to correct tW problems. 


?tL 

at I was aware 



Signs printed hastily appeared 
round the Survivors Village at the 


around the Survivors Village at the 
Civic Center on Monday. They 
urged: “Call the White House. Tefi 
President Reagan, *Bitbuig is not 
his place.* No honor to SS. Make 
one phone call. Tefl a friend.” 

The annual reunions of survivors 
in the United States began in 
Washington in 1983. An estimated 
14,000 attended the first. 


in informing the other networks he Had acred C- ~ fl3r lfs nrfm , m L. . “I told the Pentagon officer that I was aware 

under guidelines chat radio executives had given 0 ? dStaran of lhc P°° l CBS Ncws ** leanjed a 

1 He Penlflann Imi fall He said Defense Denart- 00,1 01 rcnw S° Q P 001 sjstan. nnol had been activated and T warned 


the Pentagon last faJL He said Defease Depart- 
ment officials had never responded to the guide- 
lines, which call for notifying other radio com- 


Robert D. McFarland, 
Washington bureau chief < 


Pentagon pool 
yire proidem and ^ tn OW ^ , 
id of NBC News, said, c-ii-whv Wi 


panics so they could arrange for transmission “I’m not sure this is going to go down as a 
facilities from the pod member. failure. I think this will go down as a test that 


Pentagon pool had been activated and I wanted 
to blow why was CBS not notified,” Mr, Smith 
said. “Why was not the pool chief notified?” 
He said network officials bad been led to 


Gant's watch 
in 18 carat gold, 
water -rBshtant, 
with extra-tlat 
quartz movement. 

Instant time-zone change. 


failure. I think this will go down as a test that believe that each network would be allowed a 
had some problems.” correspondent on a larger pool such as this one. 


jn offi- 
didnot I 


'PiageO 1 

ZMmtt-CaAo SSL 


But the gathering's sponsors dis- 
tanced themselves from such orga- 


mflitaiy operations such as the Grenada inva- chosen to cover the Honduras exercise. They broadcast news of the exercise until it had 
sion in October 1983, when the press was ex- were told to be prepared for rain and tempera- appeared Monday in The Post, which is not a 
eluded for more than two days. Hires of 70 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit (21 to 32 pool member. 


3, avenue des Beaux- Arts 
MONTE-CARLO / 


nized protests aimed at the presi- 
dent They said that they bad sent a LfCUlULIil l 
telegram on Monday thanking him 

for his recent help in evacuating |*A»n TnrliQTio^c 
Ethiopian Jews to Israel Wifi llllllalld 9 

They said that they did not want 1 0 

Lhsputed beat 


Democrat 


obscure Urn gathering’ s yuiyu* m ^ An ^ a Times Sfrvice 

to to for the Untied Steles. WASHINGTON - In a vote 
Benjamin Meed, president of the characterized by bouts of shouting 
merican Gathering and Federa- anti table pounding between two 


jurposc or 
[States. 


American Gathering and Federa- 



Street March 
Marks Trial 
In Argentina 


We've captured the flair 
of Rodeo Drive. 


lion of Jewish Holocaust Survivors, congressmen, a Democratic-con- 
said: “I am not a man of threat. I trolled House task force accented 


said: “I am not a man of threat. I trolled House radr force accepted 
personallynm not going to lead this an official recount Monday that 


organization to threaten anybody.” 
He added, “We will never be a 
political organization.” 


awarded a Tour-vote victory to 
Representative Frank X. McClos- 
key. a Democrat, in Indiana’s long- 


Mean while, Noah Dear, a New disputed congressional race. 

York City councflman, said Mon- The task force, on a 2-1 vote. 


day that he would be at Bitbrng rejected its sole Republican mem- 
during Mr. Reagan’s visit, wearing ber's call for a special election in 
the striped clothing that had been Indiana’s 8th District and sent the 
issued to his father-in-law at the bitterly contested four-month dis- 


Retncrt 

BUENOS AIRES — A criminal 
trial of nine former military leaders 
accused of waging Argentina’s 
“dirty war” against leftists has 
opened with none of the defen- 
dants in court and 50,000 demon- 
strators taking to the streets. 

The nine, including three former 
presidents, are accused of organiz- 
ing the abduction, torture and : 
death of thousands of guerrillas , 


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360 N. Rodeo Dr.. Bevcriv Hills. CA 90210. Telex No. 691 3 66 


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and opponents after removing | 
President Isabel Per6n in March 


concentration camp at Dachau, pute to the House Administration 
near Munich. Committee. A committee vote is 

H^led - f - -CJESir&l 


Frank X. McQoskey 


whatever I ran to embark hon. R both of 

Mr. Meed said: ‘The young are California, clashed over the adop- 
more radical not in the political uon of a report by the General 


more radical, not m inc pouncai ug n of a report by the General 
sense, but in that they feel the pain Accounting Office that Mr. Mc- 
of their parents. If we would have cioskey had defeated Richard D. 


of their parents. If we would have cioskey had defeated Richard D. 
to react, we would react against McIntyre, a Republican, by 


Germany, not America." 

In Washington, the assistant mi- 


116,645 votes 10 116,641. 

At one point Mr. Thomas, after 


nority leader in the House of Rep- Iosing numerous procedural votes 
resen ta lives, Trent Lon, a Repubu- IO ^ panetta and a fellow Demo- 
can of Mississippi, said that he and cm. William Clay of Missouri, 
other House Republicans believe Panena, “Do we have to 


hearings into labor corruption and 
labor racketeering. 

One commissioner, Thomas F. 
McBride; said in presenting find- 
ings of his staff that “the big four” 


unions controlled by the Mafia are 
the International Brotherhood of 


that Mt. Reagan should not go to 
Bitburg. 

“Why should he?” Mr. Lou 
asked. “It does have negative con- 
notations.” 

He added, “Surely there must be 
some place more appropriate.’’ 

Mr. Reagan has added the site of 
the Bergen-Belsen concentration 
camp to his itinerary. 

Several House Democrats also 
denounced the Bitburg visit. 

Representative John B. Breaux, a 
Democrat of Louisiana, said: Tin 
sony, Mr. President, but you’ve re- 
ceived bad advice and are wrong to 
have accepted iL Nazi soldiers 
should not, now or ever, receive a 
wreath from die president of the 
United States.” 

Charles Z. Wick, director of the 
U.S. Information Agency, said that 
the “unfortunate” controversy over 
Mr. Reagan’s trip is overshadowing 
the fact that it was “intended as a 
symbol of reconciliation between 
two very important allies.” 


lake a 2-to-l vote on whether 1 can 
ask a question?” 

“No matter how you break this, 
your candidate didn't win,” an 
irate Mr. Panetta said a few min- 


utes later, drowning out Mr. Thom- 
as’s objections at the height of the 
three-way shouting match. “You’re 
not going to be satisfied until 


you’ve played out this whole angle. 
You wouldn't have done this if 



President Isabel Per&n in March 
1976. 

As the trial opened Monday, 
thousands of people marched 10 
Congress to demand the prosecu- 
tion of all military officers suspect- 
ed of human rights violations. The 
prosecution, the protesters assert, 
is only way to block future military 
coups. 

In the first court session, Jose 
Maria Orgeira, a defense lawyer. ; 
told the six-man federal appeals 
court that he questioned the consti- I 
rationality of the trial, “which I 
really consider to be political.” 

The defendants, including for- 
mer presidents Jorge Videla, Ro- 


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to invest in U.S. 
Treasury bills. 


berto Viola and Leopoldo Gained, 
were not present. They have denied 


You wouldn't have done this if 
you r candidate had won, that’s for 
damn sure.” 


Richard D. McIntyre 


Until last week’s House-ordered ‘fay that the task force had arbi- 
recount, Mr. McIntyre twee had trarilv decided which of those bal- 


were not present. They have denied 
the charges against them. 

All but one of the former leaders 
are in prison. Five were jailed on 
charges relating 10 the crackdown 
on the left and three on charges 
relating to Aigentina’s invasion of 
the British-held Falkland Islands in 
1982. 

The court has said that the men 
need not attend hearings unless 
specifically ordered 10 do so. 

The defense says that the trial is 
unconstitutional and that officers 
should be tried by military courts. 

More than 2^00 witnesses are 


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been declared the winner of the lots to count He called for a special 
contest: by 34 votes immediately election to be held unless all such 
after last November’s election ana ballots were counted, 
by 418 votes after a recount or- Iaw requires ^t voters 

dered by Indiana s secretary of have absentee ballots notarized or 


state, a republican. witnessed before they can be tal- points around the court building in 

The task force and the General lied. According to Mr. Thomas, the central Buenos Aires as the trial 
Accounting Office have sought to task force counted unnotarized bal- opened. 

sort out what was seen as an in con- lots that were forwarded to pre- 

sistent procedure for validating dis- cinct officials but not similar bal- 
puted absentee ballots. lots that were held at county clerks' 


months. 

Hundreds of policemen on 
horseback and in armored cars set 
up a security cordon and check- 
points around the court building in 


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SUUCMrnONS A*£ owur UC8VED ON WI SMB or THt MOVfCTVS. MOT FO* OSTWICTOM M THE 
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puted absentee ballots. 


But Mr. Thomas asserted Mon- offices. 


mem, conspiracy, tax evasion and 
ibeft of funds from union benefit 


In Hong Kong 

we are in the Central Business District. 


. . . ein Spitzengerat besonderer 
Art, das alle Wunsche erfiillt, 
die man heute an eine Kamera 
stellen kdnnte . . .” 


And yet just minutes from Kowloon. 
You should be, too. 


Germany’s ‘Foto-Magazin’ leaves 
us with nothing else to say 



amatxuh photographer - ca 

FOCUS NL 

TOTO'i 

WWtUMMZM BRS 
PHOTO C1ME BXNKT ■ Oi 


Turn FOrOGRAP! ■ I 


HOTEL FURAMA 
INTER* CONTINENTAL 


DIAMONDS 


efforts are aimed at rallying sup- 
port for the budget for the J2- 
month period starting Oct. 1. The 
budget seeks to cut $52 billion from 
the federal deficit- . 



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.Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Published WRb TTie New Yorfc Time* and The Washington Port 


Brazil: Uncertainty Ahead 


Sribun C* Tech: Europe Is Uptight 


By Flora Lewis 


Brazilians have suffered an unkind blow in 
' the death of their recently elected but uninau- 
"gu rated president. Tancredo Neves. Mr. Ne- 
ves. who endured a month-long medical or- 
deal. had appointed only some of the top 
members of the government that he intended 
to run before he fell ill. 

in the month since, the man elected vice 
president with him. Jose Saraey. has taken 
some further steps to get the democratic sys- 
tem and the new government in place. But Mr. 
Saraey. necessarily, moved slowly, waiting for 
public pressure to build for him to take ac- 
tions. and proceeding with immense caution. 
_ There were reasons for this. The vice presi- 
'dent (who became, while Mr. Neves was 01, the 
acting president) did not wish to appear over- 
eager or in any way ambitious to assume Mr. 
Neves's place. Another reason was that Mr. 
Saraey, who came over from the military gov- 
ernment’s party to ran with Mr. Neves against 
a man that military government favored, does 
not begin to enjoy the popularity or support 
that Tancredo Neves did Mr. Saraey w01 now 
have a huge political chore to accompany his 
formidable task of governing. 

Although there seems to be no prospect of 
an effort to revoke or overturn Brazil's new 
democracy, there will be much controversy as 
to how soon direct elections for a successor 
government should be held; there probably 
will be an effort to have them held very soon. 
And there are politicians in Mr. Neves's Bra- 
zilian Democratic Movement Party who are 


stronger and more popular than Mr. Saraey. 

None of this will make it any easier for Mr. 
Saraey to preside, and the new president has 
much to do. Brazil, like other countries in the 
region, is obliged to fight a ferocious inflation 
rate with steps that are alienating workers and 
threatening a part of the population that is 
inordinately poor. Its export earnings, spectac- 
ularly high last year, may be sharply reduced 
this year. Brazil has sent one failed letter of 
intent after another to the international Mon- 
etary Fund and is now in another round of 
negotiations with the Fund The emergency 
measures that have enabled the country to 
carry its debts will not be adequate indefinitely 
— particularly if and when the North Ameri- 
can economy, with its gigantic demand for 
Latin exports, begins to slow down. 

Governing Brazil is going to require im- 
mense skill and steadiness. It is going to re- 
quire a high degree of trust between the people 
at the top and the people at the bottom. It is 
not an opportune moment for a long hiatus or 
a debilitating quarrel over who is in charge and 
who possesses the title to legitimate authority. 
The country’s financial position requires deci- 
sions that cannot be postponed. 

The sudden death of the man who won the 
election, in the moment of his triumph, puts 
enormous tests ahead of Brazil and its new 
democracy. But the nation and its political 
leadership have shown, over the past year, that 
they are capable of great things. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Test for the Republicans 


The Republican Party faces an important 
LesL It must put together a plan for dealing 
with the very large budget deficits that threat- 
en the economic future of the United States. 
The plan must be more than a public relations 
exercise, an excuse for shifting blame to politi- 
cal rivals or predecessors. It needs to be under- 
standable by and acceptable to most of the 
public. And it must be fair to and careful of 
those people least likely to be able to protect 
themselves. That is a huge order. But it is not 
loo much to ask of a party that wants to be — 
and is well on its way to being — the country’s 
do minan t political force for years to come. 

The Republican Party has beat in control of 
the White House for 12 of the last 16 years, but 
it has only controlled the Senate dining the 
four years of the Reagan presidency. Only in 
1981, its first year in office, did the Reagan 
administration exert major influence on eco- 
nomic policy. That was when the president 
pushed through Congress the combination of 
big tax cuts, major military spending increases 
and smaller domestic budget cuts that pro- 
duced the enormous budget deficits that the 
country has experienced ever since. 

Enacting the 1981 economic program rc- 

3 uned strong presidential leadership, but it 
id not really call for much political courage. 
The sacrifices it required in the form of social 
program cuts were focused on lower-income 
people wiLh little political power, while the 
benefits it offered — lower taxes and defense 
jobs — were broadly popular. 

Since that time the administration has ob- 
structed as much as it has led efforts to cope 


Other Opinion 


Brazil Feels the Pain 

The passing of Brazil’s President-elect Tan- 
credo Neves is especially poignant because his 
countrymen had put so much hope in his 
recent selection as their first Chilian president 
in 20 years. His death ended a month-long vigil 
that left an entire nation emotionally drained. 

Now Brazil's political leaders must begin 
the process of carrying on without Mr. Neves. 

Vice President-elect Jose Saraey is entitled 
to serve out Mr. Neves's full term. Many 
Neves supporters are appalled at the prospect 
of a six-year Saraey presidency. But it is 
doubtful that the Br azilian military will allow 
a new round of voting. 

Thus it becomes the responsibility of Bra- 
zil’s political leadership to work out a new 
arrangement that will keep the government 
functioning under Jo$& Saraey. but also allow 
for ihe eventual election of a new president 
supported by a majority of the people. 

This will not be an easy process, but if 
Brazil's politicians can pull it off, it will be the 
greatest tribute that they can pay to the memo- 
ry of Tancredo Neves. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 

To Maintain Deterrence 

Up to now, NATO, for excellent reasons, 
has adhered to the principle that the individual 
nations of the alliance should act independent- 


ly in the matter of nuclear weapons and that 
the non-nuclear countries, especially West 
Germany, should have no respomubiliiy for 
American, British or French nuclear strategy. 
The alliance would be overtaxed if it had to 
make a decision on the Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative. But Washington does not intend to 
make its final decisions until hard and fast 
results are available, and it is consequently 
determined to push ahead with research. It 
would therefore be wrong for the Europeans to 
attach too much importance to the question of 
whether or not to participate in the research 
programs. There will still be plenty of time to 
thrash out the strategic implications. The main 
thing for now is to maintain deterrence and 
avoid undermining the alliance. 

— Neue Zurcher Zeitung (Zurich). 

Can Syria Help Lebanon? 

Syria has the capability to impose its mili- 
tary will [on Lebanon]. President Reagan is 
unlikely to send in the marines after the fuss 
last year, and the Israelis have just agreed to a 
June I puDouL If the Syrians do move on 
Beirut Mideast peace will be set back. But a 
Syrian-imposed cease-fire might give the Leb- 
anese another chance to build a nation. And 
the Israelis may find a tacit truce with Syria’s 
army, an enemy they know, preferable to ter- 
ror attacks by Shiite and Palestinian irregulars. 

— The Bangkok Post. 


FROM OUR APRIL 24 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Famine Sparks Riots in China 
PEKING — Thousands of persons in Hunan 
are on the verge of starvation owing to crop 
failures. Several weeks ago the Governor, to 
prevent high prices, prohibited the exportation 
of rice. British and Japanese merchants pro- 
tested to the respective Legations in Peking. 
An effort was made to induce the Diplomatic 
Corps to protest. This was frustrated by the 
refusal of die American and German Lega- 
tions to join in. Then the British and Japanese 
protested to the Wai-Wu-Pu, which, in view of 
treaties, was compelled to instruct the Gover- 
nor that he must postpone the inhibition. A 
jump in food prices followed. The suspension 
or the inhibition drove the poor to desperation. 
They wrecked Government buildings, Consul- 
ates, missions and other foreign buildings. 


1935: Soviet Deep in a Blue Funk’ 
PARIS — The Soviet government is deep in 
what used to be termed a blue funk. The signs 
of increasing distress are numerous. All the 
repressive measures begun after tbe assassina- 
tion of Sergei Mironovich Kirov, Leningrad’s 
party boss, and continuing down to the recent 
deportation to Siberian exQe of thousands of 
citizens of Leningrad bear witness to an inner 
decay of the system which much loud talk 
cannot conceal. With a serious food shortage 
in the grain-producing regions, due in part to 
the dislocation of agriculture by collectiviza- 
tion, with exports dwindling, in spite of dump- 
ing on the foreign market anything which may 
be turned into cash, bread stolen from its 
peasants or art treasures from its museums, the 
Soviet government faces a desperate situation. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chatman 1953-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


Executive EdUor RENE BOND Y Dam Publisher 

WALTER, WELLS Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate Publisher 

DepxyEdtor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

??SFrreShw ABE Depmy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dirtatr tf Operatim 

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International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chades-de-Ganlk. 92200 Ncnffiy-sur-Stine. 

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® 1985, International Herald Tribune. AH rights reserved. idSH 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Executive Editor RENE BOND Y 


Deputy Et&tar 
Associate Editor 


P ARIS — Advanced technology has become a 
major European issue, a hope and a fear, a 
promise and a threat to the future of allied rela- 
tions. The problems are not really new. but they 
have come together on many different levels to 
make a sharp new impact on the public discourse. 

They will certainly arise at tbe Western summit 
in Bonn next month, not so much as an issue to be 
resolved but as a shadow overlaying all other talks 
on money, trade and East- West troubles. 

Two developments and a recent revelation in 
France reflect the extent to which the prospects of 
high technology affect policy. 

The most dramatic event was an hour-and-a- 
half television show last week called 'Taring 
War." The narrator was the widely admired singer 
and actor Yves Montand, staunchly implanted 
well on the left for most of his life but converted a 
couple of years ago to become a preacher against 
tbe menace of communism. 

The theme was that France is no longer as safe 
as it thinks under its nudear mini-umbrella, that 
having to face a choice between war and abject 
surrender is possible, and that it had better look to 
its defenses. The stark presentations provoked lit- 
tle rebuttaL No one denies that technological 
change affects security. 

Earlier in the week, President Franco is Mitter- 
rand proposed a European initiative to look into 
’‘star wars’* technology, primarily to be sure that 
Europe's economies are not deprived of possible 
civilian commercial benefits, but also to strengthen 
bargaining power with the United States. The 
Europeans are disturbed at the way Washington is 
approaching them country by country, even com- 
pany by company, without government agreement 
There is concern that each could be locked into, a 
worse deal than they could negotiate as a bloc. 

The previous French notion of a fully indepen- 
dent European effort on space defense got no- 


where. But it left.ideas that could be useful about a 
possible surveillance system. 

The revelation came” with publication of a Soviet 
document that explained for the first time why 47 
Soviet officials were suddenly expelled from 
France two years ago. The paper, said to be only 
one of many that French intelligence obtained in 
an extraordinary coup of counterespionage. 


A 




paign for militar y advantage. 

It was as a result of the coup that France set 
aside its skepticism about American demands for 
stringent new constraints on selling technology 
to the East bloc. 

The document showed that 61 percent of the 
technological advances the Russians filched 
around the world came from the United States. 
Paris shared its find with Washington, which re- 
flects the good relations Mr. Mitterrand has had 
with President Reagan even when there were Com- 
munists in tbe government. 

The reason for making the disclosure now is not 
dear. Officials him that since it takes about two 
years to relaunch a shattered spy network, going 
public with the past incident was meant as a 
warning to Moscow to restrain itself. 

But one cause of European uneasiness at U.S. 
invitations to join in star wars research is that the 
Pentagon may so tie up the results that European 
trade will be blocked m a variety of technologies. 
The irony of the contradiction with Mr. Reagan's 
offer to “share" findings with the Russians is not 
lost, but that offer was never taken seriously. 

in any case, the suggestion of an independent 
“eye in the sky” is gaining support. It recalls 
President Eisenhower's offer to the Russians of an 
“open skies” program of joint surveillance, actual- 
ly achieved now, but in rivalry, and menaced by 
development of satellite-killers on both sides. 




\K-«3r is* 



Drawtno by Stave MetWelaon/Th# woahlrwton Po*»- 

A third net. depending on neither superpower, 
could provide an enormous reassurance to the 
world in time of crisis, helping stability with an 
added guard against misinformation and miscalcu- 
lation. Sadly, the United Nations, which ought to 
perform this peace-supporting role, just is not up 
to objective, effective action. Several middle pow- 
ers, not only NATO allies but Switzerland, Israel, 
Australia and Japan, do have the capacity to create 
and operate the service if they collaborate. 

Europe especially is shuddering at increasingly 
frequent predictions that it wifl sink into Third 
World impotence and poverty if it does not plunge 
into technology. That is the new rallying cry for a 
Community whose politics have foundered on arti- 
chokes and spilt milk. It is the new challenge for an 
Atlantic partnership that cannot decide whether 
the key issue is competition or cooperation. 

The New York Times. 


with the unwanted, but not unexpected, conse- 
quences of its 1981 policies. Defirit-reducing 
legislation — the tax reforms of 1982 and 1984, 
the Social Security reform package, additional 
domestic budget cuts and some slowing of the 
militar y buildup — has been fashioned by 
leaders in the Senate and, occasionally, the 
House, passed with bipartisan cooperation 
and grudgingly accepted by the White House. 

That strategy of hanging back while Con- 
gress acted has provided convenient political 
cover for President Reagan, enabling him to 
take credit for progress while distancing him- 
self from the unpleasant side effects. But it has 
produced only minor accomplishments: by 
and large just enough savings to offset mount- 
ing interest costs of the mammoth debt, bot 
not enough to shrink the annual deficit. 

Congress needs to do more than simply run 
bard to stay in place. The rebound from the 
deep recession of 1982 seems to have petered 
out The economy is straining to accommodate 
both record-breaking budget deficits and, 
partly as a consequence, enormous trade defi- 
cits. The budget compromise reached between 
the White House and Republican leaders in 
Congress would make a convincing start to- 
ward narrowing future deficits. But it is not a 
fair and workable plan. Too much is asked of 
the did and needy, too little is asked of well-off 
taxpayers and the military. 

Devising an acceptable, but still ambitious 
plan mil require standing up to some tough 
lobbies and dealing in good faith with political 
opponents. Can the Republican Party do it? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A Role for European Diplomacy in the Mideast? 


B russels — what role should 
Europe play in the Middle 
East? In the past the Europeans 
have been reproached for muddying 
the waters. But a joint declaration 
by the EC governments might assist 
the diplomatic feelers bring tenta- 
tively put out in the Middle East 
and would boost the renewed U.S. 
effort to mediate. 

In several European capitals, and 
increasingly'in Washington, there is 
a school of thought (hat a more 
active European Community role in 
the Middle East peace process 
could be helpful During the last 
nine months of American inaction 
in the Middle East, Europe has been 
fearful that a vacuum was being 
created that would eventually suffo- 
cate the moderate forces. West Ger- 
many is particularly interested in 
establishing a son of diplomatic 
stand-by system, so that if U.S. ef- 
forts falter the Europeans will be 
able to step in and keep tbe Middle 
East dialogue alive. 

In some years Washington wel- 
comes foreign policy initiatives 
from its European allies in areas 
where tbe United States exerts the 
principal influence; in other years it 
resents them. The Reagan adminis- 
tration's present mood seems to be 
that the Europeans could help at 
least to create the right climate 


By Giles Merritt 


for initiatives in the 'Middle East. 

That mood should be seen in the 
context of (he long-standing differ- 
ences over the huddle East that 
have separated the United States 
and the Europeans. There is a post- 
war history of misunderstandings 
and mutual suspicions that predates 
the United States’s failure to back 
Britain and France during the Suez 
crisis in 1956- 

For years, American policymak- 
ers doubted the motives of the Brit- 
ish and the French in the Middle 
East because of their past colonial 
connections. More recently the U.S. 
suspicion has been that the Europe- 
ans’ real concern is to safeguard 
their oil supplies. Above all, the 
United States has not forgotten or 
forgiven the ECs surprise Venice 
declaration of June 1980, when 
without warning to the Carter ad- 
ministration, EC countries en- 
dorsed the Palestinian people's 
right to self-determination as part 
of any peace settiemeoL 

Since then, American policy has 
moved closer to the EC position. 
And that, together with the realiza- 
tion that the Lebanon crisis and the 
Iran- Iraq ,war are adding a danger- 
ous dimension to the Middle East, 
has helped convince opinion on 


both sides of tbe Atlantic that a new 
EC intervention might be usefuL 

It had been intended, in fact, that 
the EC would issue a new statement 
on the Middle East at the end of last 
month, when the 10 heads of gov- 
ernment met in Brussels for regular 
talks. Italy, which currently holds 
tbe revolving six-month presidency 
of the EC Council of Ministers, has 
been particularly anxious to pro- 
mote a Community initiative on tbe 
Middle East. Its own geopolitical 
position and history make Italy the 
keenest of the EC countries to be- 
come involved in Middle Eastern 
politics. But in the end, the summit 
was dominated by debate on the 
entry of Spain and Portugal into the 
EC m 1986.. 

Yet a common stance on the 
Arab- Israeli conflict might have 
evaded the European governments 
even if they had actively sought one. 
That is the key reason they are not 
more involved in the peace process. 

Taking the EC member states for- 
ward on the issue is a ticklish busi- 
ness. The pro-Israeli sentiments of 
the Dutch, for example, have to be 
reconciled with the pro-Arab senti- 
ments of the Greeks; meanwhile. 
France, Britain. West Gennaxty and 
Italy each have their own finely nu- 


anced policies on the matter. 

Yet the I talians believed they had 
adequately prepared the ground 
and hoped they might, in a modest 


— when last they had the EC p resi- 
dency — with the Venice declara- 
tion. In a four-month flurry of dip- 
lomatic activity, the Italians had 
consulted all the major players. 

Beginning with a December 
meeting in Tunis between Prime 
Minister Bettino Crari and Yasser 
Arafat, the Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization chair man, Mr. Craxi and 
disable foreign minis ter, Giulio An- 
dreotii, talked to tbe Jordanians, 
the Syrians, and the leaders of 
Egypt and lsraeL 
The text submitted to the EC 
leaders welcomed the recent rap- 
prochement between Jordan and 
the PLO, as well as the Mubarak 
initiative; its tone was such that it 
might have been drafted by Secre- 
tary of State George Shultz’s aides. 

The summit rather brusquely re- 
jected the proposed declaration, 
saying there was no time to agree on 
its' wording and that tbe Italian 
presidency should therefore release 
it in its own name. It seemed the 
son of offhandedness that could 
. make greater EC involvement in the 
■ Middle East a mixed blessing. 

International Herald Tribune 


I Would Pay 
More Tax, f gBSp 
And Gladly W"' 






By Richard J. Dennis 

C HICAGO — When Senator Bill 
Bradley and Representative 
Richard A. Gephardt introduced a 
tax-reform bilk I was so interested in 
their approach to a fairer, simpler, 
more efficient tax system that I asked 
my accountants how my tax pay- 
ments might vary if it became law.’ 

I was fairly sure of the validity of 
the Bradley-Gephardi flat-tax ap- 
proach, but I figured it could not hurt 
to see if I was one of those unlucky 
three of every 10 Americans who 
would pay a little more under this 
proposal. Political philosophy is fine, 
but there is no law against pursuing 
one's own genuine self-interest. 

As a commodities broker, I make 
heavy use of long-term capital- gams 
deductions, which Bradley-Gepfiardr 
would eliminate- I enjoy deducting 
my business expenses at my highest 
tax rate instead of the lowest, as 
would be the case under Bradley- 
GephardL The accountants say my 
average tax rate would rise about 3 
percentage points under Bradley- 
Gephardt. Nonetheless, I have decid- 
ed I am all for iL In fact, I am so 
enthusiastic that 1 am lobbying for it 
as a member of tbe council of advis- 
ers of the Fair Tax Foundation, es- 
tablished by Mr. Bradley and Mr. 
Gephardt Am I acting contrary to 
self-interest? Not necessarily. 

Today, investors and entrepre- 
neurs must give too much attention 
to a complex, arbitrary tax code. This 
diverts effort from productive to use- 
less financial activities. 

Without the bias of our tax laws, 
pooriy conceived oil-well projects, 
for example, are ridiculous invest- 
ments. I receive dozens of proposals 
that brokers would be embarrassed to 



l 


JS*.. „ -a ” 






present if it were not for the tax 
benefits. With tax reform, the bro- 
kers' self-interest would require them 
to present productive long-term ac- 
tivities for investment 
Today’s (ax code encourages an 
investor to pursue certain strategies. 
For example, to get tax benefits, he 
must decide to liquidate unprofitable 
stock positions before they become 
long-term. This typifies the short- 
term thinking permeating American 
corporations even though they must 
compete in the world economy with 
Japan, which stays with an invest- 
ment over the long haul 
Ordinarily honest citizens feel 
tempted to cheat on their taxes be- 
cause they enjoy no loopholes and 
can see that others have specially de- 
signed ones. They suspect that the tax 
law will become more lopsided as 
well-focused lobbies make their 
mark. Even those who want to pay 
their fair share are stymied by a tax 
code that reads like “Alice in Won- 


derland ” and whose interpretation is 
endlessly debated in the courts. 

Complex, arbitrary, individualized 
tax rules reduce respect for all laws. 
In a system that depends on volun- 
tary compliance, as America’s largely 
does, 1 would be willing to pay a little 
more to get a fair, simple system that 
would treat all taxpayers equally. 
This would encourage tax compli- 
ance. I never expect to like paying 
taxes, but I do not like bang a root by 
paying more than other people in 
similar circumstances. 

There are other important lax is- 
sues: having appropriately progres- 
sive rates of taxation: distributing the 
tax burden fairly among different in- 
come groups; reducing the deficit. 
But they are all separate issues and 
linking them would kill them alL The 
Bradley-Gephardi plan to maintain 
the current (ax distribution and raise 
the same amount of revenue is logi- 
cally consistent and strategically nec- 
essary. (If we are not to have BradJey- 


Gephardt, then the Treasury's tax 
reform plan also provides fundamen- 
tal, necessary changes.) 

What, them, is a person’s genuine 
self-interest in taxation? Getting a 
lower rate than everyone else? That is 
not possible for all of us, is it? Why 
not a fair, simple system that treats 
everyone equally, that promotes bet- 
ter economic performance for each to 
share in, that encourages investors 
and entrepreneurs to focus on pro- 
duction. not tax savings. I would give 
up my tax loopholes to get iL Td 
rather keep 72 percent of my income 
in a good economy than 75 percent erf 
it in today’s economy, which is crip- 
pled by our tax system. That’s both 
good political philosophy and genu- 
ine self-interest. 

The writer, founder and chairman of 
the Roosevelt Center, a public-policy 
research organization, is managing 
partner cf CAD Commodities. He con- 
tributed this to The New York Tunes. 


No Option 
But to Love * 
The Bomb 

By Philip Geyelin 

A nnapolis, Maryland — 
“We’ve come to love the bomb, 
so to say.” 

Standing alone, those words could 


get a European puuuuou v* uiuiuuuu 
m a heap of trouble. But they fit 
sensibly enough in the context of ^ 
what the British ambassador in 
Washington, Sir Oliver Wright, was 
seekine to explain in a recent speech 
here entitled “The NATO Alliance: 

A European View." The occasion was 
the 25 ih annual Naval Academy For- 
eign Affairs Conference and the am- 
bassador was making a point of more 
than passing interest as President 
Reagan gears up for his European 
tour in early May. 

He was »«ikmg aboil the differ- h 
ence between Europeans' view of the 
world in general (and of the Sonet 
Union in particular) and that of most 
Americans. Having experienced con- 
ventional war in a way that Ameri- 
cans have not, he argued, most, if by 
no means all Europeans have a cer- 
tain grim confidence in the deter- 
rence of conventional war by the 
threat of nudear retaliation. 

Left by geography with no alterna- 
tive, Sir Oliver argues. Europeans 
have also adopted over the years a 
less apocalyptic way of thinking and 
ra IHng about the threat to their 
neighborhood than the Reagan ad-^r 
mini strati on conveys when it speaks 
of the comparatively minuscule Sovi- 
et presence in Cuba and Nkaragua. 

The contrast was made more vivid 
by the character of the conference, 
which brought invitees from 140 uni- 
versities. They were a diverse, intelli- 
gent lot, engaging in intense and well- 
informed round-table debate. 

But, Sir Oliver aside, the rest of 
what was served up was hardly what 
you would call a balanced diet for 
hungry young minds. Vice Admiral 
John M. Poindexter, deputy assistant 
to President Reagan for national se- 
curity affairs, opened things up with 
the White House line. 

“World War III has already be- 
gun," he warned, “in tbe form of # 
state-supported terrorism.” He urged 
the students to think deeply about 
how to fulfill our “moral obligation 
to support freedom fighters." 

The keynote address was delivered 
by the newly Republican Jeane Kirk- 
patrick, the former ambassador to 
the United Nations. For an hour, she 
belabored the Nicaraguan case. But 
she paled by comparison with Presi- 
dent John R. SOber erf Boston Uni- 
versity, whose Democratic Party af- 
filiation was supposed to have given 
bipartisan coloration to the Kissinger 
commission on Central America. 

Rattling the dominoes until you 
had to wonder whether we would all 
live out the night, he cited a weak and 
unreliable Mexico as the final domi- 
no, and tossed out an estimate of A ' 
between $50 billion and S 100 billion 'r 
as the cost of defending America’s 
southern border (at the expense of 
NATO and the rest of the world) if 
the United States faded to support 
the Nicaraguan “contras.” . 

At the end, you had to wonder 
which was the superpower, the de- 
fender of Western security, cool, con- 
fident, and in command, and which 
was the once^great empire, now living 
with its continental NATO compan- 
ions under the guns of tbe Warsaw 
Pact — the United States or Britain? 

Sir Oliver tried to straighten it out: 

“You are our friendly neighborhood 
superpower. Thank God for Ameri- 
ca, say I." 

But the ambassador gently ques- 
tioned whether most Americans un- 
derstood Western Europe any better 
than they understood the Soviet. 
Union. Acknowledging the potential'. £ 
power of European peace move- 
ments,. he noted that the Enropean 
allies were nonetheless deploying in- 
termediate-range nuclear missfles on 
schedule. Tackling the “burden-shar- 
ing" issue head on, he argued that 
Europe provided 90 percent of the 
ground forces, 90 percent of the ar- 
mored divisions, 8Q percent of the 


■J.tl 






morea amaons, bo percent of the 
combat aircraft and 80 percent of the 
tanks defending the central front 
He secs this as “the front line of the 
free world,” and the world’s “most 
dangerous” area because it contains 
the “greatest concentration Of lethal 


-.b *V 

*0 * 


r 


i'V: 


The Egyptian Role 

Regarding the opinion column 
“ Mideast : Pitfalls of U.S. Activism ** 
(April 15) by Fouad Ajami: 

Mr. Ajami's views on Egypt’s ef- 
forts toward peace in the Middle East 
are incorrect and misleading. Egypt, 
with or without the Camp fiavidac- 
cords, is the same country that sup- 
ported and is Supporting the rights of 
the Palestinian people. Egypt has 
never used this support to achieve 
what Damascus and others want to 
achieve without caring about the 
plight erf the Palestinians in the occu- 
pied territories. 

Yes, Egypt is facing tremendous 
economic problems and Egyptians 
know very, well that these problems 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


are the result of Egypt's support and 
belief in its destiny as an Arab coun- 
try. But these economic problems wll 
never sup Egypt from giving contin- 
uous support to other Arab states, 
and to the Palestinians. 

IBRAHIM EZZAT. 

Cairo. 

Armed hut Unprepared 

“Sci-Fi History” was certainly an 
apt heading for Rosemarie Gautia's 
assertion in a letter to the editor 
(March 19) that “we in Germany 
have been taught - • • that Russia was 
not armed when Hitler broke his trea- 
ty with it and invaded." There is no 
question that, owing to one dictator's 
miscalculation of another. Statin’s 


U.S.S.R. was unprepared for the Ger- 
man invasion. Bui unarmed? The 
peoples of Estonia, Latvia, Lithua- 
nia, eastern Poland and southeastern 
Finland did not Ml under Soviet rule 
in 1939-40 because the Red Army 
threw flowers at them. 

LEENEserr. 

Bern, 

What Israel Wants 

Regarding “ * Right ’ Is the Wrong 
Way’- (Letters. Aprils): 

John Whitbeck is quite right ia 
questioning the necessity of batting 
the Arabs recognize “Israel’s right to 
exist,” but not for tbe reason he gives. 
Tbe word “right” does indeed have 
“unavoidable moral connotations,” 


but only someone choosing to ignore 
history as wdl as morality can equate 
the Jewish set tiers of the land oflsra- 
d with “European settlers of North 
America, South Africa and Austral- 
asia ... [dispossessing] the indige- 
nous population." It is questionable 
whether present-day Palestinian Ar- 
abs, many of whom are third- or 
fourth-generation immigrants from 
neighboring Arab countries, can be 
considered “indigenous” (Jerusalem, 
even 140 years ago, had a Jewish 
mq'ority). Be this as it may, it is not 
the right to exist that Israel wants the 
Arabs to recognize but rather the 
unassailable right erf every nation 
to li ve in peace. 

ZALMAN SHOVAL. 

TeJ Aviv. . 


cessive milit ary strength, aggressive 
gotiqy.and dark, woridwideaesigns. 
it is our business to match its 
strength and frustrate its objectives.” 
But he found it possible to take some 
comfort in Soviet weaknesses: eco- 
nomic. ideological, systemic. 

_ If the Russians are und enia bly 
“imperialistic and aggressive," they 
also come across to these who have 
lived alongside them for centuries as 
cautious, defensive, possessed of a 
. swge mentality based on repeated 
invasions.” Sir Oliver tnged Ameri- 
cans to take some of these contradic- 
tions into account. 

You do not have to' buy all of this 
to understand the European percep- 
trqn of the Soviet mind- set. In a cer- 
tain sense, the Europeans have tbe 
best seats in the house. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


Peace Through Violence 

No matter how the politicians play 
with numbers and distort the slaugh- 
-j 11 Vietnam, I still question how 
killing your enemies and sacrificing, 
your children can bring peace. ~ 
PAUL FINLAYSON.- . 
Soultz-sous-ForSts, France; 

intended for publication 
should be addressed'lLetters to die 
editor” and must contain the writ- 
e f s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Lmers should be brief and - 
subject to editing We cannot . 
. ro&onsible for the return of . 

wsoacited manusc rip ts. 











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** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


Page 5 


Manila Signals Concern 
Over Rise in Insurgency 
And Vows to Combat It 


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By Robert K_ McCabe 

. International 1/araU Tribune 

MANILA — The Philippine de- 
fense minister, Juan Ponce Emile, 
has promised victory in the govern- 
ment's struggle against a steadily 
growing Communist insurgency 
but warned that the fight might last 
“two years, three years, half a de- 
cade" and of bloodshed to come. 

"You cannot fight an insurgency 
with words," he said. “You have to 
use guns and bullets. I hope the 
destruction will be minimal, but 
there will be shedding of blood. We 
cannot avoid that." 

Mr. Emile's statement is a sign 
that the Philippine government has 
come to acknowledge the serious- 
ness of the situation. *'! think they 
realize they cannot get away with 
just talk any more" a political ana- 
lyst .said. 

Mr. Enrile spoke in an interview 
last week against a background of 
continuing bad news for the gov- 
ernment of President Ferdinand £. 
Marcos. Particularly disturbing to 
Manila was the possibility that the 
S83.5 million second installment of 
a loan by the International Mone- 
tary Fund might not come through 
quickly. 

Bull be public is also discontent- 
,-ed with worsening unemployment, 
a failing gruss domestic product 
and a S 15- billion balance -of-pay- 
nienis deficit, which is increasing 

.As the economic situation wors- 
ens. the insurgency continues to 
spread. The Communist New Peo- 
ple's Army is steadily strengthen- 
ing its grasp on Mindanao, the fer- 
tile southern island where it has 
been strong for years, and is ex- 
panding in areas farther north. 

A particularly restive area is the 
sugar-producing island of Negros, 
which has been hit hard by the fall 
of world sugar prices. The guerril- . 
las are growing more aggressive as 
well in Leyte and Samar. In Panay 
and Bicoi, and in the mountains of 
northern Luzon, the rebels are ex- 
ceptionally strong. 

Stung by the increasing criticism 
from U.S. officials as well as from 
Filipinos, the government has be- 
gun an effort to seize the military 


initiative from the rebels. This 
month, government units have 
gone on the offensive, and army 
spokesmen report successes. 

But through March and much of 
ApriL guerrilla attacks were at their 
highest levels and so were govern- 
ment losses. Perhaps the most stun- 
ning among recent setbacks came 
late last month in Negros, where 
rebels raided a government armory 
and left with 400 weapons, mostly 
M-16 rifles. Defense officials ac- 
knowledged that this was the worst 
single arms loss of the Communist 
insurgency. 

In recent days. Senator John F. 
Kerry, a Massachusetts Democrat, 
and Represen lative Stephen J. So- 
larz. a New York Democrat, have 
told Mr. Marcos here of U.S. con- 
cern about the situation, including 
the potential threat to two U.S. 
military bases in the Philippines: 
Gark Air Base and Subic Bay Na- 
val Station. Mr. Marcos assured 
both visitors that all steps neces- 
sary to control the insurgency were 
being taken. 

But Mr. Enrile put his response 
differently. “We respect your opin- 
ions," he said with a smile, “but tell 
us when you last won 3 counterin- 
surgency.’" 

Perhaps in pan because of 
Washington's concent, the Philip- 
pine military is looking again at its 
counterinsurgency strategy. Lieu- 
tenant Genera] Fidel V. Ramos, 
acting armed forces chief of stair, 
convened a group of about 50 se- 
nior officers lost week for two days 
of what was described as a "full 
assessment” of recent counterin- 
surgency experience. 

Mr. Enrile stressed the political 
aspects of the effort. “An insurgen- 
cy problem is not merely a military 
problem," he said. “For us, we per- 
ceive it to be basically a political 
problem, rooted in social and eco- 
nomic causes." He said it was nec- 
essary to tai^et the political organi- 
zation of the Communists, not only 
the military forces. Some Western 
sources put the number of political 
supporters at perhaps 100,000. 
scattered over most of the major 
islands of the Philippines. 



Juan Ponce Enrile 

On paper, there should be not a 
contest. The Philippine armed 
forces, including army, marines 
and constabulary, total about 
200,000 men. In addition, there is a 
militia of about 50,000 militia, but 
these arc considered to be of dubi- 
ous quality. Against this force, the 
guerrilla forces are small. Their 
strength, according to the Defense 
Ministry, is estimated at 8,500 to 
9.500 men. The army says the New 
People's Army has 10,000 to 12.000 
guerrillas. Still higher is a U.S. fig- 
ure of 15,000 cited in Washington 
recently. 

Despite the ratio of government 
to rebel Lroops. the guerrillas nuke 
steady progress, At a recent press 
conference in Mindanao, the rebels 
said they planned to use their expe- 
rience gained in the southern capi- 
tal of Davao, where the New Peo- 
pled Army virtually controls some 
urban areas, to spread the insur- 
gency to Manila starting early next 
year. 

Asked about this, Mr. Enrile said 
sarcastically: "I hope so. I do not 
discount that possibility. But as 
they say. the proof of the pudding 
is in the eating. Let's see." 

■ Wanting on UJS. Bases 

Mr. Marcos is prepared to expel 
U.S. military personnel if Washing- 
ton fails to recognize Manila's sov- 
ereignty over the two U.S. military 
bases by 1991, the Bulletin Today 
newspaper quoted the Philippine 
labor minister. Bios F. Ople, us say- 
ing Monday. The report was dis- 
patched by Agence rrance-Presse. 


U.S. Reports 
Iran and Iraq 
Are Massing 
More Troops 

By James Gcrscenzang 

Ijl*i Jhi ; eto Times Sen u t 

WASHINGTON — Iran and 
Iraq have begun to mass even 
greater concentrations of troops 
along the southern reaches of ibeir 
border, according to Reagan ad- 
ministration officials. 

Tlicse officials, spe akin g on the 
condition that they not be identi- 
fied. said they expected the Irani- 
ans to drive toward the Iraqi city of 
Basra, separated by marshes from 
the northern end or the Gulf. So 
far. the Iranians have been unable 
10 overcome Iraqi troops in the 
marshes. 

Such a campaign would send the 
Iranians against some of the best- 
prepared Iraqi troops, the officials 
said. But. if successful it would be 
considered a military breakthrough 
for Tehran. I 

Administration officials said the 
Iranians had deployed as many as 
100.000 troops in the current build- 
up. along with hundreds of tanks 
and artillery pieces. Among the 
Lroops deploys were members of 
the Revolutionary Guard, who 
have spearheaded the fighting. 

“But no one could predict when 
any battle would begin,” one offi- 
cial said. 

In addition, according to one of- 
ficial, the United States is receiving 
indications of “growing domestic 
unrest, due to the economy and the 
war" in Iran. Such unrest is "being 
watched very carefully," he said. 

The reports, based cm intelli- 
gence information, indicated con- 
tinued difficulties for Iran os pres- 
sure built in the war zone. But 
Western reporters have rarely been 
able to reach the front, and inde- 
pendent assessments, as well as de- 
tailed government reports, have 
been infrequent. 

The officials stressed that al- 
though intelligence reports indicat- 
ed that the buildup had been under 
way for several weeks, (here was no 
indication as to when the battle 
would begin. 


2 Key Arabs UrgeBigger U.S . Peace Role 


By David B. Or r a way 

and John M. Goshko 

ti jsfim^lon Pust Sen- tie 
WASHINGTON — Two promi- 
nent Arabs have called for a greater 
U.S. effort to revive the Middle 
East peace process amid reports 
that Richard W. Murphy, the assis- 
tant secretary of state for Near 
Eastern and South Asian affairs, 
was having trouble in his mission to 
the region to find new ways of 
involving Jordan and the Palestin- 
ians in expanded taikv 
ln a speech to an .Arab League 
conference here on Monday, 
Crown Prince Hasson of Jordan 
said that there bad been "apparent 
movement" by the Reagan admin- 
istration in its recent declaration of 
willingness to meet a Jordanian- 
Palestinian delegation. He warned, 
however, that this “piecemeal ap- 
proach" to renewed talks was 
doomed to failure. 

“The momentum needs to be in- 
creased and the entire process 
strengthened,” he said. The crown 
prince is the brother of King Hus- 
sein. 

An earlier appeal was made by 
the Arab League secretary-general 
Chedli KJibi. He called on the 
United States to take advantage of 
“new positive elements" in the 
Arab stand toward peace talks and 
to use its “influence and persuasion 
to bring about a permanent peace- 
ful settlement, and soon.” 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz, meanwhile, said Sunday 


that it was Arabs who ought to play 
a more active role, primarily by 
hacking Hussein in direct talks 

with Israel. 

“Now is the time for the Arabs to 
let King Hussein come forward." 
Mr. Shultz said at the annua] meet- 
ing in Washington of the American 
Israel Public Affairs Committee. 
“There is no alternative to direct 
negotiations." 

The indirect exchange between 
Mr. Shultz and the two .Arab lead- 
ers occurred as U.S. officials and 
diplomatic sources acknowledged 
that Mr. Murphy had made no pro- 
gress in his discussions about the 
possibility of direct negotiations 


between Israel and a Jordanian del- 
egation that would include Pales- 
tinians who are not members of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization. 

The U.S. officials cautioned that 
it was too early to declare Mr. Mur- 
phy's mission a failure, but they 
acknowledged that he had nothing 
specific from cither side. 

They carefully declined to say 
whether Mr. Shultz, who is to visit 
Israel on May 10 for a Holocaust 
memorial ceremony, also would go 
to Amman and Cairo, as has been 
widely expected. 

Arab diplomatic sources said 
that Hussein still was urging the 
United States to accent known 


PLO members in the proposed Jor- 
danian-Palestinian delegation as a 
way of strengthening his hand with 
the rest of the .Arab world and 
ensuring the success of negotia- 
tions. 

The United States Is sticking to a 
longstanding commitment to Israel 
not to negotiate with the PLO until 
it recognizes the right of Israel to 
exist as a siate. 

Israeli sources said that Prime 
Minister Shimon Peres's govern- 
ment, preoccupied with withdraw- 
ing troops from Lebanon and curb- 
ing inflation. is not eager to become 
involved in a potentially divisive 
peace initiative now. 


Remains of 62 Found 
In Mass Grave in Algeria 

Return 

PARIS — A mass grave, con- 
taining the remains of 62 persons 
and dating from the 1954-62 war of 
independence against France, has 
been discovered near Mila in east- 
ern Algeria, the Algerian news 
agency APS reported. 

First examinations of the re- 
mains indicated that many of the 
dead were children, women and old 
people who had been tortured. APS 
said Monday. The Algerian au- 
thorities said that several mass 
graves have been unearthed near 
former French Army interrogation 
center;. 


Lingering Effects of War Leave Vietnam 9 s Economy in Shambles 


(Continued from Page 1 ) 

a government employee in Hanoi 
answered, “In the 1960s and early 
1970s." Mainly because of -abun- 
dant foreign aid, she said, "it was 
better during the war." 

Like other government employ- 
ees, her 300-dong monthly salary is 
supplemented by rations worth an-' 
other 1.000 dong a montit. But to 
make ends meet, she must moon- 


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light as a private tutor, earning up 
to 1,200 dong. 

“Everybody has a sideline." she 
said. 

While living standards may be 
lower than during the war, they 
have been improving, especially in 
the countryside. 

In 1981 the government imple- 
mented a policy calledf the -"con- 
tract system.” Under that system, 
fanners can sell surplus produce on 
the free market at higher prices 
than the quotas they must sell to 
the state. 

Now. many Vietnamese say. 
peasants in the countryside gener- 
ally live better than dty-dwellers. 

SuIL that situation seems precar- 
ious at best 

Rice production has been rising 
in recent years, but the increases 
have been outstripped by a popula- 
tion growth estimated at 2.4 per- 
cent a year. 

In addition, natural calamities 
have set back minimal self-suffi- 
ciency achieved in 1983, leaving the 
country with a shortfall of nearly 
one million teas of food grain in 
1984 and forcing the authorities lo 
seek emergency food aid from the 
United Nations this year. 

According to Trail Phuong, the 
deputy prime minister in charge of 
economic affairs, the World Food 
Program agreed to supply 10.000 
tons — out of a request for 15,000 
tons — and that aid is on the way. 

. Nevertheless, Mr. Phuong said. 


Vietnam this year may have to im- 
port 200,000 to 300.000 tons of rice, 
although the United Nations has 
estimated needs at about 500.000 
ions. 

The situation represents a seri- 
ous setback for Vietnam, which has 
hailed self-sufficiency in rice pro- 
duction as one of its great achieve- 
ments since the end of the war. 

Other difficulties facing the 
country, according to Western dip- 
lomats and economists, include in- 
flation running from 50 percent to 
90 percent, foreign exchange re- 
serves of only $16 million, a foreign 
debt of more than $6 billion, a 
balance- of -pay men Is deficit of 

$175 million and a cutoff in IMF 
lending because of an inability to 
make debt payments. 

_ “In terms of international trade 
arid balance of payments, it's a 
country that is dose to bankrupt- 
cy," said an official of an interna- 
tional relief agency. "If 1 were a 
bank. I would not extend any cred- 
it. It's a country that is not cre- 
ditworthy under the present cir- 
cumstances." 

“For the time being I must say 
that we are not good in economic 
management," Mr. Phuong said. 

But, he added: "A lack of spirit 
in economic management is under- 
standable" because Vietnam waged 
war for 30 years against the French 
and Americans and had only the 
last 10 years lo concentrate on eco- 
nomic development. 


While black-marketeers contin- 
ue to do business openly, the state 
has cracked down in recent months 
on private restaurants and caffe, 
taxing many of them out of exis- 
tence and forcing others to enter 
"joint ventures” with the govern- 
ment. Last year Ho Chi Minh 
City's long-surviving book market 
was closed, its private kiosks dis- 
mantled by the police. 

The Hanoi leadership is placing 
great hope for future growth in 
several major projects, notably a 
1,920-megawatt hydroelectric 
plant at Hoa Binh in the north that 
the authorities say will be bigger 
than Egypt's Aswan High Dam 
plant and crude-oil production off 
the coast of southern Vietnam. 

The hydroelectric plant is to start 
operating partially in 1987 and be 
completed in 199 1 ; the oil project is 
scheduled to reach full production 
at an as yet unspecified level in 
1990, Mr. Phuong said. Both pro- 
jects involve Soviet aid. 

“We hope that in the next five 
years things will change," he said, 
"and we will not be one of the 


poorest countries in the world any- 
more." 

Tomorrow: The union of northern 
and southern Vietnam is often 
marked by manual mistrust ana, in 
the south, considerable misgivings. 


“Canon are to be congratulated, 
first and foremost for taking 
what must be one of the most 
complicated systems around 
and reducing its control to a 
simplicity that literally has to be 
seen to be believed.” 


‘35mm Photography’expressed their amazement 
when faced with 
the brilliant T70. 



AIDS Kills Swedish Quid 


Reuters 


STOCKHOLM — A nine-year- 
-old hemophiliac boy died in a hos 
pical during the weekend after con> 
trading AIDS from blood plasma, 
doctors said Tuesday. 



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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


in Germany! 

The International Herald 
' ’ Tribune is pleassd to announce that 
• readers in the following city centers 
can now have *£heir paper delivered 
the morning off publication and still 
pay less than the newsstand price! 

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U.S. Urges Basic Trade Reforms 

Wants a Japanese Import Policy, Not Short-Term Relief 


By Joseph Fiucbert 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — In tackling the 
U.S.-Japanese trade crisis, the Rea- 
gan administration says it is look- 
ing beyond quick relief for troubled 
American industries and is pressing 
Japan for fundamental reforms 
that would permit more imports 
from Western Europe and the Pa- 
cific Basin as welL 

Congressional pressure for im- 
port curbs to protecL U.S. manu- 
facturers. the officials indicated, is 
being used by the Reagan adminis- 
tration to seek long-term changes 
in Japan's commercial practices to 
save the global trade system. 

This presentation of Reagan ad- 
ministration policy, apparently 
foreshadowing the U.S. position at 
next month's economic summit of 
seven industrialized nations, 
emerged in a private meeting of 
officials, parliamentarians and in- 


dustrialists from the United States, 
Japan, Western Europe and Cana- 
da in Brussels on April 13 and 14. 

The meeting, known as the Qua- 
drangular Forum and hosted this 
year by the Center for European 
Policy "Studies and the Paul-Henri 
Spank Foundation, was marked by 
unusually forthright discussion be- 
cause participants could not be 
quoted without permission. 

At the meeting. William E. 
Brock, who is to become secretary 
of labor next month after serving 
for six years as the top U.S. trade 
negotiator, stressed the Reagan ad- 
ministration's readiness to pass up 
short-term Japanese concessions 
and hold out for fundamental re- 
form in Japan. 

When a Japanese participant 
said his government probably 
would offer to reduce exports to the 
United States, Mr. Brock com- 
mented: “I was sorry to hear my 


Free-Trade Agreement 
Is Signed by U.S., Israel 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Poet Service 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States and Israel have signed an 
agreement that will eliminate all 
trade barriers between them within 
10 years, a move that President 
Ronald Reagan hailed as adding “a 
new dimension to the special rela- 
tionship between our countries." 

After they signed the agreement 
here Monday, William E. Brock, 
the U.S. trade representative, and 
Ariel Sharon, the Israeli minister of 
industry and commerce, toasted 
each other with kosher champagne 
from California and IsraeL 

“Our two countries are bound to 
benefit from this agreement,” Mr. 
Sbaron said. He called it “an addi- 
tional milestone in U.S.-Israeli re- 
lations" and said it wOl “foster 
greater unity and friendship be- 
tween our two nations.’’ 

Mr. Brock predicted that two- 
way trade between the United 
States and Israel, now S3 5 billion, 
will quadruple in three years as a 
result of the agreement. 

The accord had been approved 
by Israel's Knesset, or parliament 
Congress has 60 days to approve 
the agreement once it is submitted 
by the president probably later 
this week. 

The signing ceremony was held 
during the annual meeting of the 
American Israel Public Affairs 
Committee, which has been lobby- 
ing to make sure the agreement 
wins congressional approval 


William E. Brock 

The free-trade pact was one of a 
number of military and economic 
concessions made by President 
Reagan during his November 1983 
meeting with Yitzhak Shamir, Isra- 
el's prime minister at that time, in 
an effort to help the Israeli econo- 
my and strengthen strategic lies be- 
tween the two nations. 

Under the agreement, areas of 
the two countries' economies that 
are considered especially sensitive 
to imports will escape the immedi- 
ate effects of duty-free status, but 
within 10 years they will have been 
phased in." 


Japanese friend offer voluni 
port restraints. That's not what I 
want to hear. What I want to hear is 
a Japanese commitment to import, 
to import a lot more, and to do it 
for your own sake.” 

Viscount Etienne Davignon 
commented: “What American offi- 
cials are saying is this: We are will- 
ing to renounce our short-term ad- 
vantages, the quick Bx which scores 
us points with our public opinion, 
we are serious enough to bold ont 
for a serious solution to save the 
system” of world trade. 

’ Until this year, .Mr. Davignon 
represented the European Commu- 
nity in trade negotiations with the 
United States and Japan. He and 
other European officials frequently 
have vented their frustration at see- 
ing Japan provide trade relief to the 
United States while continuing to 
flood Europe with exports. . 

For example. Japan's latest 
round, of market-opening measures 
was characterized as “a suit cut for 
Unde Sam” by Willy De Clercq, 
EC commissioner for trade issues. 

But Mr. Brock said he did not 
expect the Japanese “necessarily to 
buy U.S. products while the dollar 
is so strong. 

“But don't tell me,” he added, 
“you can't buy more from Taiwan. 
Or Singapore. Or Europe. Or any- 
body.” 

All the American participants, 
while agreeing with the Japanese 
that U.S. foreign trade had been 
hurt by federal budget deficits and 
a strong dollar, constantly returned 
to their contention that Japanese 
trading practices undermined the 
world trading system. 

“We can't have free world trade 
with the world's No. 2 economic 
power importing almost only oQ 
and other raw materials and ex- 
porting manufactured goods." said 
Rimmer de Vries, head of the inter- 
national economics department of 
the Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. 

“You have responsibilities, too,” 
he added 

After decades in which, exports 
have led Japan's economic jrowth. 
Western participants said, Tokyo’s 
attitudes on trade need to be shak- 
en to their cultural roots. The Japa- 
nese. they said, need to see trade as 
a cooperative venture, not just 
bloodless warfare. 


GETTING THE WORD — Japanese business executives, from rigbt, Takashi 
president of Nissan Motor; Akio Morita, chairman of Sony Corp.; ana _ 


president 

Sekimoto, inv«uww i ~ » * . » 

international trade and industry, Keijiro Murata* urged them to buy more foreign goods. 


Sekimoto, president of Nippon Electronics Co„ listened Monday as the minister 

- . , i » • i . 


But another U.S. participant 
added that “if we don’t get a basic 
turnaround in Japan, the world will 
move to an era of totally managed 
trade, starting in the United 
States.” 

The objective of the Reagan ad- 
ministration, according a U.S. offi- 
cial. is to obtain a commitment 
from Japan to double its import of 
manufactured goods over a three- 
year period. 

Expanded imports are the main 
way in which Japan could help oth- 
er world regions accelerate their 
economic growth as the U.S. recov- 
ery slows. But other way's were sug- 
gested in which Japan could wield 
its economic strength to maintain 
international equilibrium. 

For example, Mr. Brock suggest- 
ed. Japan should dr amaticall y raise 
its aid spending to help revive trade 
in developing countries burdened 
by debt, particularly in Latin 
America. “If you can’t spend 6 per- 
cent of your gross national product 
on defense” as the United States 
does, he said, “then you should be 


willing to spend, say, 5 percent on 
helping keep the economic system 
functioning.” 

An aide added: “And we don't 
mean aid tied to the purchase of 
your own exports.” Currently, Ja- 
pan spends less than one-third of 
one percent of its gross national 
product on foreign aid a bit less 
than the average among industrial- 
ized countries. 

But the core of the problem, 
most participants said is Japanese 
reluctance to import. Even if Ja- 
pan's political leaders are urging 
change. U.S. officials said the civil 
servants in Japanese ministries re- 
sist. 

“1 think the Japanese govern- 
ment bureaucracy has conned the 
politicians into letting them kero 
control,” said a former U.S. trade 
official. Unless the Japanese gov- 
ernment sweeps away many admin- 
istrative regulations, he said bu- 
reaucrats mil continue using them 
to protect Japanese markets. 

The wrangling over disguised 
Japanese protectionism was often 


good-natured. Japanese burea-.j 
era is. one Japanese participant ex-;, 
plained are reluctant to allow 
Western cosmetics into Japanese ' 
markets because Japanese skirv 
needs special protection. • * 

A veteran U.S. negotiator retort- 
ed: “O.K., but what about nail po- 
lish?" 

A Canadian cattle rancher won- 
dered why Japanese tourists in 
Canada gorge on beef without suf- 
fering any apparent ill effects, yet 
stick to a largely meatless diet in 
Japan. 

Apparently missing the Canadi- 
an’s irony, a Japanese spokesman 
explained that Japanese have small 
appetites for meat because they 
have exceptionally long intestines, 
the result of milienia during which ' 
the Japanese diet has been based - 
largely on rice and vegetables. 

Undeterred a VS. official said: 
“My intestine may be small but 1 
eat and enjoy sushi and sukiyaki. - 
and I’m convinced that Japanese' 
can learn to like beef in Japan as ■ 
well as abroad.” 


15 More Reported Dead in Indian Caste Violence 


Reusers 

NEW DELHI —At least 15 per- 
sons were killed and 80 wounded 
Tuesday in street battles involving 
the police and rival groups in Ah- 
med a bad. capital of the west Indi- 
an state of Gujarat, the Press Trust 
of India reported 
It was the worst day of violence 
in. ihe recent flare-up of a bitter 
campaign to end government poli- 
cies that reserve jobs and college 


places for minority groups. During 
clashes involving tile police and 
supporters and opponents of the 
policies, people were stabbed shot, 
stoned and burned to death. 

The violence, in which 35 per- 
sons have died in the past week, is 
the gravest iaw-and-order problem 
faced by Prime Minister Rajiv 
Gandhi since ; his election four 
monthsago. 

Troops took over most areas of 


BBC to Pay Dietitian £1.2 Million 
In England's Costliest libel Award 


The A aoeiated Press 

LONDON — The British 
Broadcasting Corp. agreed on 
Tuesday to pay a dietitian more 
than £12 million (Si. 53 million) in 
court costs and libd damages, the 
highest amount ever incurred in an 
English libd case. 

Dr. Sidney Gee, a weight-loss 
specialist, brought action against 
the BBC, alleging that its entertain- 
menL and investigative TV series, 
“That’s Life,” portrayed him in a 


1983 program as “a profiteering, 
unscrupulous quack.” The BBC de- 
nied the charge. 

Dr. Gee’s lawyer. Michael Be- 
ioff. told the court that the BBC 
bad accepted that the program bad 
included incorrect information. 
Mr. Beloff said that the BBC also 
regretted that its reporters entered 
Dr. Gee’s London office and inter- 
viewed him in front of his staff and 
patients. 


Ahmedabad on Monday night 
when the police went on a rampage 
after a colleague, was backed to 
death. Some policemen attacked 
journalists and the offices of news- 
papers that have criticized their 
handling of the unrest. 

The violence continued despite 
the deployment of troops, the im- 
position of an indefinite curfew 
and the arrest of thousands of riot- 
ers. 

The Press Trust of India said 
that sporadic clashes broke out late 
Monday night while troop rein- 
forcements were taking up posi- 
tions. From sunrise, the violence 
grew in intensity and spread 
through the city as rioters ignored 
the curfew, the news agency said. 

The agency said that seven per- 
sons died from bums, three from 
stab wounds, two from stortings 
and three from bullet wounds. 

Ramesh Menon, an Ahmedabad 
journalist, said that the streets were 
littered with dozens of burned-out 
cars and bicycles as hundreds of 


small shops and houses smoldered, 
from arson attacks. 

Mr. Menon said that the clashes 
mainly involved groups of several - 
hundred people fighting pitched 
battles with stones and rags soaked 
in gasoline. He said the worst vio- 
lence Tuesday was in outlying sub- 
urbs and slum areas, strongholds of 
poorer residents who benefit from . 
the policies being challenged. 

Tne Gujarat violence first flared 
in February, three months after the 
announcement that government 
job and university quotas for un- 
touchables and other underprivi- 
leged castes would increase from 31 
percent to 49 percent 

Students, mainly from upper- 
caste Hindu families, as sen that 
ihe quotas deprive them of jobs and 
college places on merit 

Rioters attacked pedestrians- 
who were not involved in the con-; 
troversy and most shops and of-' 
ftces were shut Mr. Mraon said. 
“It has become a free-for-all” he 
said. 


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^ ' - V . : 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 

mm i 

Page 7 

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ARTS /LEISURE 




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Paul Bley: “Repetition is anathema to me.’ 


Paul Bley: Carving Out 
His 'Places* and 'Areas’ 


- 1_ 


By Michael Zwerin 

International Herald Tribune 

P i ARIS — After interviewing the 
composer and bandleader Carla 
Bley, a journalist asked her to rec- 
ommend a music composition 
teacher. Bley answered, lauj * * 


Arr*. rtoe 


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“Why don’t you many Paul 
-v Paid Bley, who wrote songs with 
his now-former wife and has also 
been married to and worked with 
the singer and songwriter Annette 
Peacock, is not easy to find. He 
splits his time between a farm in 
New York state, a Greenwich Vil- 
lage studio, several bouses in Flori- 
da and four month-long tours of 
Europe a year. He works in the 
United States only when be gets his 
price, which has not been very of- 
ten recently. 

He also spends attended periods 
in hiding: “With all those video 
channels plugged into your house 
— old movies, concerts, a jazz 
chann el — everything on the lube, 
it's pretty hard to leave it,” He 
added, laughing, “Especially if 
you’re living in the mountains and 
■it’s snowing." - 

Musically, playing mostly solo 
acoustic piano, he has been disap- 
pearing mto abstract, intellectual, 
totally improvised explorations of 
what he rails “areas" or ^places.” 
Do not expect tunes or licks. An 
“area” can be an ostraato, a tempo. 
“I can play a good ‘place’ for a yrar 
or twor Bley said. 

Bley was bom in Montreal in 
1932, studied at the Juilliard 
School of Music, played with 
Charles Mingus, Ornate Coleman, 
Don Cherry and Jimmy Giuffre, 
was a key member of the coopera- 
tive Jazz Composers Guild and, in 
the mid 1960s, accompanied Sonny 
Rollins — a formative experience. 

“At that time Sonny was legend- 
ary for playing long tunes. If there 
>«as a three-hour set h would be one 
three-hour tune. Sonny would play 
for an hour and IS minutes. How 
do you play after somebody has 
been soloing for an hour and IS 
minutes? You can’t just play four 
choruses. You’re going to have to 
go on for at least half an hour. That 
raised a lot of questions of form m 
my mind, because repetition is 
anathema to me.” 

He formed a recording company 
in the 1970s, Improvising Artists 
Inc (IAJ), which released 20 al- 
bums. (He has recorded almost 100 
albums for various labels, induct- 
ing the classic “Footloose,” with 
songs by Carla and himself, to 
Savoy.) LAI also shot more than 
* 100 hours of Hve concert videos. 
Bley said he was “sitting on" the 
unreleased videos because “right 


now they’re too easy to pirate. I'm 
waiting for the video disk to be 
developed, because that way they 
can be sold cheap enough so that 
people wiB not want to copy them, 
and theyH lose fidelity copying 
them. Right now, you put out a 
video, it's like giving everybody a 
free master." 

The company is inactive because 
he “got tired erf 1 dealing with OPC," 
other people's careers. “I’m not 
sure an artist should work on other 
people’s careen. But it is an educa- 
tion to find out what goes on on the 
other side of the desk. I think a to 
of musicians are unnecessarily par- 
anoic about record labels. They of- 
ten think they are getting cheated 
when they are not They don’t un- 
derstand the numbers.” 

Bley knows how to make himself 
scarce. He almost disappears be- 
fore your eyes. His normal speak- 
ing voice is a barely audible whis- 
per. His answers are elusive, 
opaque; you must continually ask 
to explanations. 

Ibis acoustic piano connoisseur 
was an early experimenter With 
synthesizers. Last month be played 
a Yamaha DX-7 in quartet with 
Steve Swallow, John Scofield and 
Barry Ahschul at New York’s Lush 
Life chib. It was a challenge he 
approached as he approaches art 
and life in general — with intellec- 
tual preparation. 

“If you work in a genre you have 
to study the history of that genre. 
Solo piano has its history, electric 
groups have their history. I always 
try to find out what’s been done, or 
rather where there’s something left 
undone, so to speak, and try to fill 
the spaces." 

But the accent is mentally, not 
musically, intellectual. He never 
practices: “The question is what to 
play. Practicing doesn't lead to 
that. Thinking about it leads to iL 
If you haven't yet thought of what 
to play, how can von practice it? If 
you practice scales and arpeggios 
and Mozart you'll come on stage 
and play that. There's no prepara- 
tion to real-time performance ex- 
cept real-time performance. 

“The future is predestined by all 
die moves you’ve made so far. Mu- 
sically, at least, I don’t think about 
the future at alL It’s got to be a 
surprise. The other day ! heard a 
tape of a conceit I’d done two days 
earlier, and you know, I didn’t rec- 
ognize the pianist That was won- 
derful.” 

Paul BUy: Angers, France, May 
4; Geneva, May 8; Unna, West Ger- 
many ( near Dortmund). May 10; Es- 
sen, May 14; Amsterdam. May 16. 


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HAMMER! 


'The Party’ Revival Savagely Funny but Weaker in Casting 


By Sheridan Motley 

Inumaneeal Heratd Tribune 

L ONDON — To mark the I 
/ ture of Laurence Olivier from 
the National Theatre 11 years ago, 
one might have expected a Lear or 
at any rate a Prospero breaking his 
staff and bidding a long farewell to 
all his greatness; instead, in a typi- 
cally and splendidly quixotic ges- 
ture to new drama, ulivier chose to 
make his last stage appearance as 

THE BRITISH STAGE 

the hard-line Trotskyire Glaswe- 
gian John Tagg who in Trevor Grif- 
fiths’ “The Party” has one of the 
longest speeches in 20th-century 
theater. 

That speech and that farewell 
tended to overshadow the rest of 
John Dexter's production, though 
it was infinitely more strongly cast 
in the lower registers (with Denis 
Quill ey and Frank Finlay, among 
others) than is the first revival of 
the play, now in the Royal Shake- 
speare Company repertoire at the 
Barbican PiL 

“The Party” is sei in London 
during the Paris uprising of 1968, 
and its title does double service: 
The party in question is both social 
and political, and the bulk of the 
evening is- taken up with a debate 
between a group of socialist tren- 
dies about the present slate and 
future hopes of Marxism in a capi- 
talist world. 

When first seen, the play was set 
five years in the past but its charac- 
ters had an immediate topicality; 
they all seemed to add up to a 
savagely intelligent comment on 
mid-1970s impotence. But the pass- 
ing of another decade has done 


some very nasty things to that per- 
ception. 

Griffiths’ characters now seas 
as distant from us as players in 
some Restoration comedy: stylized 
relics from a pre-Thatcher world, 
they have dated even faster than 
the Paris uprising that brings them 
together, and It would probably re- 

S iire a new Chekhov to set them in 
e correct melancholy of their lost 
ideals. 

Griffith had begun to realize this 
when he wrote toe piece: It is an 
often savagely and cynically funny 
look at people who talk about revo- 
lution in the way that other people 
keep goldfish. Lines like “How’s 
your Cuba book?” and the notion 
of a television-drama producer try- 
ing to. do a deal with Jean-Luc 
Godard for the filming of the Paris 
barricades even while they are still 
being erected have acquired an ad- 
ditional savagery, and as a study of 
the social impossibility of English 
Marxism this is still the best party 
in town. My only regrets are that, 
in rewriting, Griffiths has stripped 
away some of the more intriguing 
sexual characteristics of the host, 
and that in its new casting tire RSC 
has not matched the strength of the 
original, though Ian McDiannid 
has a brave if unsuccessful stab at 
the Tagg whom Olivier brought so 
unforgettably to life and near- 
death, 

□ 

In another transfer from last sea- 
son at Stratford, the Roger Rees 
“Hamlet” is on the main Barbican 
stage. It remains an unashamedly 
romantic and straightforward, u 
sprawling, production (three hours 
into even the best of Shakespeare, a 
law of diminishing returns starts to 


operate, and at that point in this 
Ron Daniels staging we are still 
almost an hour away from the end). 

Rees has grown hugely in confi- 
dence and hollow-eyed anxiety 
since the Warwickshire opening 
last summer. Accustomed as we 
have become to directors’ Hamlets, 
it is good to see a production solid- 
ly built around actors. In the new 
casting of John Stride as Gaudius 
and Christopher Benjamin as Polo- 
nius the company has been consid- 
erably strengthened, while Virginia 
McKenna remains the most heart- 
rendingly beautiful Gertrude or re- 
cent times. 

□ 

Michael Frayn's new translation 
of “Three Sisters” at the Royal 
Exchange in Manchester also runs 
more than three and a half hours, 
and Caspar Wrede’s production is 
inclined toward the end to be not so 
much slow as stopped altogether. 
This nonetheless remains an eve- 
ning of considerable delight, first 
because Frayn as a comic dramatist 
and a Russian speaker is unusually 
qualified to bring us Chekhov, 
whether reconstructed (as in his 
“Wild Honey” at the National) or, 
as here, in utter fidelity. 

Moreover, Wrede lias gone for 
some intriguing Scandinavian cast- 
ing, so that we get Espen Skjobog, 
Norway's answer to Ralph Rich- 
ardson, playing the doctor and 
Sven-Beriii Taube, a leader of the 
Danish national theater, as Ver- 
shinin. Niamh Cusack, youngest 
member of that remarkable Irish 
acting family, makes an English 
stage debut of haunting beauty and 
power that bodes nothing but good 
for the Desdemona she is to play 
soon at Stratford. 


Amid all this, the other two sis- 
ters — Emma Piper as Olga and 
Janet McTeer as Masha — are a 
little overshadowed, especially 
since Nicholas Blane as the fat and 
feeble Prozorov brother and Cheryl 
Prime as his ghastly wife acquire a 
center-stage strength that is also 
unusual. 

This is therefore a play about one 
sister and a great many starry sup- 
porting characters, but none the 
worse For that. Di Seymour's si 
lative setting manages huge 
quet tables, sunlit summer gardens 
and a blazing inferno some streets 
away with equal brilliance, and 
the echo of Cusack's “If only we 


could know" will be bard to forget. 
□ 

At Greenwich, a rare revival of 
Arthur Schnitzler’s “Intermezzo” 
confirms Sheila Gish as one of the 
greatest actresses of her generation 
(a truth long known by theater- 
goers in Greenwich and Hammer- 
smith) but lands us once again on 
that bloody Viennese carousel 
where the same two characters kern 
coming around to the front with 
monotonous regularity. 

Schnitzler's twin obsessions with 
theatricality and dosed-dreuit sex- 
uality are here wrapped around a 
marital struggle between a conduc- 


tor and a soprano who may or may 
not be about to perform together or 
apart in bed or on the concert plat- 
form. Schnitzler's apparent convic- 
tion that we can be made to care 
about what happens to them, when 
nothing else in his play happens at 
alL strikes me as both arrogant and 
turgid, but an intelligent transla- 
tion by Robert David MacDonald 
and a loving production by Chris- 
topher Fettes manage to make one 
forget at moments to that most of 
its duration “Intermezzo” is like 
bring trapped in a comer at a cock- 
tail party by both the Macbeths 

S t after they have decided not to 
Duncan after alL 


Rage Marks New Play About AIDS 


By Frank Rich 

Vm York Times Service 

N EW YORK — The blood coursing through “The 
Normal Heart," the new play by Larry Kramer at 
the Public Theater, is boiling hot. In this fiercely 
polemical drama about the private and public fallout 
of the AIDS epidemic, the playwright starts angry, 
gets furious, then skyrockets mto sheer rage. 

Although Kramer's theatrical talents are not always 
as highly developed as his conscience, there can be 
little doubt that “The Normal Heart” is the most 
outspoken play around — or that it speaks up about a 
subject that justifies its sense of urgency. 

What gets Kramer mad is his conviction that neither 
the heterosexual nor homosexual community has fully 
met the crisis posed by acqnired immune deficiency 
syndrome. He accuses the governmental, medical ana 
media establishments of foot-dragging in combating 
the disease, especially in the early days of the epidem- 
ic, and he is even tougher on homosexual leaders who, 
in his view, were too cowardly or too mesmerized by 
the ideology of sexual liberation to get the story out. 
Some of the accusations are questionable, and we oten 


hear only one side of inflammatory debates. But on 
occasion the stage seethes with the conflict of impas- 
sioned, literally Tife-and-death argument. 

When the hero, Ned Weeks (Brad Davis), implores 
his peers to curtail sexual activity rather than risk 
contracting AIDS, an equally righteous activist vehe- 
mently counters that this would negate years of fight- 
ing for the freedom to practice homosexual love, 
while the logic may be with Ned, Kramer allows the 
antagonist, woundmgly played by Robert Dorfman, 
to give full ideological and emotional vent to an 
opposing point of view. 

Much to his credit, Kramer makes no attempt to 
sanit™ AIDS; the scenes featuring the disease’s suf- 
fering victims are harrowing The playwright is equally 
forceful when he- passionately champions a proud 
homosexual identity “that isn’t just sexual" 

Davis has the unenviable assignment of playing a 
shrill public scold, and one admires the actor’s refusal 
to sentimentalize him. But he seems vacant in his 
reposeful romantic scenes with D. W. Moffett, whose 
characterization of a reporter is the most complex and 
moving of the evening 


The Sun also sets. 


I f all you want on your holiday is 
sunshine, you're too easily satisfied. 

You’re also fortunate, because the 
world is full of places, some race and 
some quite nasty, that can give you 
what you seek. 

But what will you do when you’ve 
had enough sun? 

And what wOf you do when it sets? 

A holiday should be a pleasure at any hour 
you favour, under the sun or the stats, in your 
choice of landscape, whether you’re active or 
sedentary, culture-minded or hedonistic. 

If you agree with us, and want your holiday to 
satisfy aO of your senses and seusibffitks, read on 
about Spain. 

The mountains or the shore? 

Spain has plenty of both. 

Our mountains, among the highest in Europe, 
offer some of the world’s best and least crowded 
siding. There’s great climbing, too, and every other 
mountain sport in season. 

As for the shore, take your choice of beaches 
from nearly 6,000 Km. of coastline. 

Have a great Spanish holiday at sky level or at 
sea level. 

It’s up (or down) to you. 

What if you sunburn easily? 

Spend part of each day indoors. 

In shops, for instance, selling choice leather, 
lace, porcelains, antiques and art. 

Or come indoors to see things money 
can’t buy. In the great museums of 




regional wines keep them perfect company. 

By the time you've savored the last of your 
Spanish brandy, you will have had a late night. And 
the fun is only starting. 

Enjoy our longest, latest nights. 

At Spanish fiestas, the party seldom stops until 
sunrise. 

And at many, not until two or three sunrises 
have passed. 

No matter when you come to Spain, you wiD 
find a fiesta somewhere. There are literally 
hundreds throughout the year. Some are simple 
Saints' days in little village squares. But these are 
often wonderful for their intimacy, the welcome 
given to strangers and their sense of natural, 
unplanned gaiety. 

Others are spectacles, elaborately staged and 
wardrobed. See processionals, mock battles, floral 
decoration competitions, wine harvests or solemnly 
impressive holy days. Or watch the breaking of wQd 
horses or the showing of exquisitely trained horses. 
Or see the running of the bulls at the St. Fermin 
fiesta in Pamplona, made famous by Hemingway. 


Speaking of rooms... 

Spain offers every kind of accommodation, 
from simple country inns to world-class deluxe 
hotels. 

Some of our most modem hotels are in 
some of our most ancient buildings. Many castles 
and other historic landmarks have been 
converted with ingenuity and elegance, 
featuring art and furnishings of their periods. 
Interestingly, even our newest and most 
fashionable resort hotels use traditional Spanish 
architectural themes and decor, so you never 
have that modem sense of deja vu found in the 
usual “international” resort. 

We have heard that one young woman, 
asked where she went on {■ 
her holiday, replied 



Spain are displayed troves of priceless treasures. 

Or stroll in the shade of castles and palaces, 
mosques and alcazars. 

Spam has thousands of ways to tempt you in, 
out of the sun. 

What happens after sunset? 

You understand a people when you understand 
how they eat. 

Not just the cuisine, but where, how, when and 
with whom it is enjoyed. 

We start, with “tapas”, snacks in amazing 
variety, eaten at stand-up bars at eight or nine 
in the evening. That’s the time to meet us and 
make new friends, in the hours before dinner starts 
at ten or eleven at night. 

Then you can maintain the informal note 
or go to dress-up places serving haute cuisine 
as splendid as any in Europe. As for us, we love 
seafood simply prepared, and even hundreds of 
miles inland you’D find it fresh daily; Our regional 
dishes are so varied that you might think they come 
from many countries and cultures. And our 



Every fiesta is a party, and you’re invited to 
them all. 

What’s to do at night between fiestas? 

If night dubs, casinos, ballet, opera, jazz, folk 
music, discos, rock music and flamenco dancers 
don’t interest you, there really isn’t very much. 

Perhaps people-watching at an outdoor cafe 
while sipping a rare sherry might catch your 
imagination. Or you could just go to your room 
and read a book. 


This long ad Is far too short. 

If you’re interested in visiting Spain, there’s 
much more you’ll want to know. 

Such as details on your personal interests. 
Where you can golf or charter a boat or hunt for 
game, for example. Or how to follow the route 
of Don Quixote. Or where the Paradores, our 
national tourist inns, are located. 

We have booklets and brochures on practically 
everything. 

Visit your nearest Spanish National Tourist 
Office or mail the coupon below to tell us what 
you’re interested in. 

Whatever it is, you’ll find it in Spain, where 
there’s everything under the sun. 

r _ — — — — — — — — — — 

Secretarial General de Turismo i 

Mara de Moina, 50 

28006 Madrid. Spain. I 

Please tell me where I can find everything | 

under the sun. ■ 

Name ■ 

Address I 

aiy , 

Country 

lam interested in: 

:r ' ! 

Spain. Everything under the sun. 8 

i mm mm mm m m ^m m h ■ h mm m m mm J 








INSIGHTS 


Shultz- W einberger Feud: A Source of Key U.S. Policy Stalemates 

^Aniino to Michael K. Deavi 


By Philip Tanbman 


Wi 


AVh* York Tuna Service 

ASHINGTON — Thunder roUed 
'across the flight deck of the French 
aircraft carrier Gemenceau in the east- 
ern Mediterranean. One by one. 14 Super Eten- 
dard jet fighters roared skyward and banked 
toward Lebanon. Their mission: to retaliate for 
the suicide truck-bombings of the French and 
American military headquarters in Beirut that 
had killed 59 French paratroopers and 241 
American servicemen. 

Until that day — Nov. 17, 1983 — the raid 
had been conceived and planned as a joint 
French-American effort to attack targets near 
the Lebanese town of Baalbek, a stronghold of 
pro-Iranian Shiite Moslem militiamen believed 
by the Central Intelligence Agency to have been 
involved in the bombings. 

President Ronald Reagan had authorized 
U.S. Navy fighter planes attached to the 6th 
Fleet to join the air strike, a decision that has 
remained oue of the better-kept secrets of the 
Reagan a dminis tration. 

But the French carried out the strike alone. 
The American planes never took off. The exact 
reasons remain classified, but this much is cer- 
tain: A mission championed by Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz, viewed warily by Secre- 
tary of Defense Caspar W, Weinberger and 
approved by the president was aborted because 
the final go-ahead order was not issued in time 
by the Defense Department 

According to Michael L Burch, a Pentagon 
spokesman, Mr. Weinberger was not personally 
responsible for that decision. Some White 
House officials say otherwise, insisting that the 
defense secretary tacitly agreed to have the 
mission scrubbed. But at the very least the 
incident serves as a dramatic example of the 
battles that have raged over foreign policy dur- 
ing the last two years, in no small part because 
Mr. Shultz and Mr. Weinberger have disagreed, 
often openly, on a variety of major issues. 

A White House official tells, for example, of a 
White House meeting in 1983 when Mr. Shultz, 
frustrated by Mr. Weinberger’s reluctance to 
apply more military pressure against Syria, said, 
“If you're not willing to use force, maybe we 
should cut your budget-” Mr. Weinberger, ac- 
cording to one of his aides, seemed intentionally 
to taunt Mr. Shultz about the failure of the 1983 
agreement between Israel and Lebanon that the 
secretary of state had personally negotiated. 

T HE sources of the conflict between the 
two men are partly institutional: The 
State Department's mission is to seek 
diplomatic accommodation, sometimes through 
the selective application of American military 
force abroad. The Defense Department, directly 
responsible for defending the nation’s security 
against hostile powers, is often more conserva- 
tive about improving relations with the Soviet 
Union and less willing to commit American 
forces to combat 

The differences between Mr. Shultz and Mr. 
Weinberger reflect very different backgrounds 
and temperaments and a longstanding profes- 
sional rivalry. “There is a personal edge to the 
disputes between George and Cap that is much 
sharper than previous feuds.” says a veteran 
national security official “These guys have been 
rivals for 15 years." 



Deaver. White House 


Mr. Shultz’s access to the president. 

During the last year. Mr. Shultz has been able 
to develop those all-important a l lian ces within 
the administration, ana the recent change in 
command in the White House staff was a lucky 
break for him. Mr. Shultz and Donald T. Regan, 
the new chief of staff, are old friends. On most 


issues. Mr. Shultz has found another ally in Mr 
mkrt n/ww/ting to some of bos aides, 
.Weinberger's intrana- 


well, iaduding dtat be and James A. Baker 3d, 

Washington and Managua lT? J^ itnowl- the former chief of staff, were able to increase 

divergence, as many government aides ^' Kn “ w ‘ . . ,»,* nrMidml 

edge.nas been an often inconsistent and confus- 
ing foreign policy stance in that area. 

T HE differences and tensions between 
Mr Shultz and Mr. Weinberger came to 
a boil in 1983 over the question of what 
the United Stales should do in Lebanon. 

Mr. Shultz was committed to the withdrawal 
of all foreign forces from Lebanon. According 
to aides, he felt that tbe United States had to see 
through its obligations or suffer a senous set- 
back to its policies in the Middle East and its 
prestige worldwide. ed on two basic levels. They have fought about 

Soon he and Mr. Weinberger were tangling. |jut determine the overall direction 

As the situation in Lebanon deteriorated, par- 
ticularly after the Oct. 23. 1983. truck bombing 
of the U.S; and French military headquarters, 

Mr. Shultz advocated military retaliation. Mr. 

Weinberger opposed any escalation of force, 
arguing that it could lead to a war with Syria. 

In late 1983, the president’s top national 
security aides —meeting as the National Securi- 
ty planning Group, an informal committee of 
the National Security Council — held a series of 


McFarlane who. accordi 
is often frustrated by Mr. 
gence. 

The Shultz-Weinberger struggle has proceed- 


sessions in the White House. The question was 
whether the use of force by the United States 
should be escalated beyond the shelling by tbe 


Stf. 


large i 

of the nation's foreign policy and they have 
fought over specific steps to implement policies. 

Today, according to observers, Mr. Reagan's 
foreign policy goals reflect Mr. Shultz’s views in 
several areas. A senior White House official for ■ 
example, says, “George has prevailed recently inf* 
the sense that the president has endorsed his 
general agenda of resuming the Geneva negotia- 
tions and looking for ways to posh forward the 
peace process in the Middle East.” 

- On the other hand, the White House seems to 
have adopted the tougher line on Nicaragua 
espoused by Mr. Weinberger, and neither man 
has put his stamp on the arms control issue. 

Moreover, even on some issues where the 
Shultz view seems to be in the ascendancy, the 


Defense Secretary, Caspar W. Weinberger, left, and Secretary of State George P. Shultz. 


The competition dates back to 1970, when 
Mr. Shultz was director of the Office of Man- 
agement and Budget in the Nixon administra- 
tion and Mr. Weinberger was his top deputy. 
Later, both men worked for Bechtel, a giant 
construction company in San Francisco, with 
Mr. Weinberger again in a lesser position. 

At times, Mr. Weinberger has clearly chafed 
at the disparity. Joseph Lai tin, who worked in 
the budget office in tbe early 1970s, recalls, 
“Cap became so frustrated with his lack of dear 
authority that he finally insisted that George 
sign a memorandum de si g nating him as the 
acting director when Geozge was out of town." 

Now, in its latest incarnation, the Shultz- 
Weinbeiger relationship provides a vivid exam- 
ple — perhaps the clearest in recent history — of 
the interaction of personal factors with govern- 
ment policymaking. 

The Shuitz-Weinbmger disputes, coupled 
with a lack of clear direction from the White 
House, have produced, and continue to pro- 
duce. stalemates over key foreign policy and 
defense issues. 

For example, Mr. Weinberger and Mr. Shultz 
and their aides fought endlessly during Mr. 
Reagan's first term over what position on arms 
control to take to the bargaining table in Gene- 
va. When the arms talks resumed last month. 
American negotiators were given unusually 
broad instructions by Mr. Reagan, in pan be- 


cause Mr. Shultz and Mr. Weinberger remained 
divided over what sort of deal to offer, the 
Russians. 

Similar disputes led to a stdl-unresdved im- 
passe over how to deal with the Sandinists in 
Nicaragua, with Mr. Shultz favoring diplomatic 
initiatives and Mr. Weinberger advocating an 
increase in US. pressure on the regime. 


HE relationship between Mr. Shultz and 
Mr. Weinberger is complex and subtle. 


T 

Mr. Shultz, 64, is by nature and training 
a professor, mediator and private man. He pre- 
fers conciliation to confrontation. Often impas- 
sive — a colleague describes him as “sphinxlike” 
— he is a man of enormous self-assurance. 

Mr. Weinberger, 67, is a litigator, a politician, 
altogether more of a public personality. He 
seems to thrive on confrontation and, like his 
idol Winston Churchill, can be totally unyield- 
ing in defense of principles be considers impor- 
tant, such as sustained growth in the defense 
budget Unlike Mr. Shultz, Mr. Weinberger 
does not radiate a sense of being at peace with 
himself and his position. 

Some ideological differences have seeped into 
the Shultz-Weinberger relationship as Mr. 
Weinberger has adopted the hard-line, amir 
Soriet pc^ lion of many in the Reagan adminis- 
tration. In this, he also has been heavily influ- 
enced by the anti-Soviet views of his key aides. 
Mr. Shultz, while hardly a pushover on Soviet 


battleship New Jersey and other vessels posi- 
tioned off the Lebanese coast Mr. Weinberger, 
according to participants, refused to budge, a 

stance that was particularly irritating, to Mr. president has faded to endorse specific steps to 
Shultz, trained as he was in the arts of mediation Implement those policies in deference to Mr. 
and conciliation. Weinberger’s opposition. For example, the 

Mr. Shultz and Robert G McFarlane. the American negotiators were sent to Geneva wirh- 
p resident’s national security adviser, eventually ' out instructions as to precisely what rednetiocfc 
succeeded in persuading Mr. Reagan to approve in arms in the Soviet nuclear arsenal would ESr 
the air strike with the French. Mr. Shultz, ae- acceptable to Washington as part of an arms 
cording to his aides, was frustrated and discour- control agreement. 

aged when American participation in the raid jvir. McFarlane is generally credited with en- 
was aborted- ' gin wring a reduction in some of the outward 

issues, favors a more flexible approach designed The question of how to respond to terrorism signs of tmmcnL An example of Mr. McFar- 

tiSwe superpower tensions! 9 in Lebanon was raised again last month when lane’s peacekeeping xmsston, according to a sc- 

liwnhituinfil wtnrc mflVf 1 cnm#. mn Flirt v»r- the Reagan administration, at Mr. Shultz’s urg- nior administration official, was ms decision to 

mg, warned that. Washington would retaliate involve Mr. Reagan at an eariy stage of the 
against Iran if it executed American hostages discussions leading up to Mr. Shultz’s January 
kidnapped by Lebanese extremis is influenced meeting with the Soviet foreign minister, Andrei 
by the Khomeini regime in Iran. A. Gromyko. 

The public bickering between Mr. Shultz and Mr. McFartane’s goal the official says, was to 
Mr. Weinberger;' in the view of many foreign, make sure that everyone m toe a^mmstranon 
policy analysts, has done little to enhance Amer- would understand that toe president really 
ican prestige or influence abroad. The White 
House clearly has the power to put an end to the 
Shultz-Weinberger disputes, but Mr. Reagan's 
leadership style does not generally include 
knocking heads to settle differences. He prefers 
to set the overall objectives and tone of toe 
adminis tration and leave the details to. others. 


Institutional factors make some conflict be- 
tween the secretaries of stale and defense and 
their aides inevitable. But the differences be- 
tween Mr. Shultz and Mr. Weinberger have not 
always fallen within reasonable limits. 

Their first major clash was over an embargo 
on overseas sales of certain lrinds of oil and gas 
equipment, a move intended to slow down con- 
struction. of a natural-gas pipeline from toe 
Soviet Union to Europe. Mr. Weinberger fought 
to maintain toe embargo; Mr. Shultz opposed it 
as harmful to Washington’s relations with its 
European allies, and eventually H was dropped 

As a means of forcing toe Sandinists to stop 
sending military supplies to the guerrillas in El 
Salvador, Mr. Weinberger favored increasing 
pressure on Managua — increasing American 
support for toe Nicaraguan rebels and conduct- 
ing large-scale U.S. military maneuvers in near- 
by Honduras. 

Mr. Shultz, while not opposed to military 
pressure, advocated a diplomatic approach as 


M R. Weinberger initially had a major 
advantage over Mr. Shultz in such an 
atmosphere, since h is relationship with 
Mr. Reagan was of much longer standing.. Mr. 
Weinberger had far greater access to the presi- 
dent. But top people on the White House staff 
have worked hard to redress tbe balance. Ac- 


understand that 

wanted arms talks to resume. And, in fact, 
harmony was achieved. But as a senior official 
points out, toe agenda of those talks dealt pri- 
marily with procedural matters, not the substan - A 
tive arms control issues that must be worked our 
before any final agreements can be reached. 

_ Few authorities believe that recent confusions 
in US. foreign policy can be resolved until tbe 
Shultz-Weinberger war is ended. But in spite of 
toe efforts by Mr. McFarlane and others in the 
admhxtstration, toe prospects for such a resolu- 
tion are slim. 

' “Everyone over here wants them to work 
together instead of arguing.” says a White 
• House aide, “but we know it won’t be easy ” 


* 

The Heritage 



Footprints on the sands of time — women carrying food to their menfolk. 

On Pakistan International, you’ll find that 
devotion to duty is a carry over from 
our folklore. 


Too Many Secrets 
Lead to Leaks, 

U.S. Officials Tind 

r. • .v y-- - . . • 

By Richard Hail or an 

New York Times Service 

■ X%TT ashington ~ The following 
%*/ paragraph, taken from a memorandum 
ft setting out objectives for toe US. 
Navy's 1986 budget, was classified “Secret.’’ In 
its entirety, it reads: 

“The navy must continue to attract and retain 
sufficient numbers of high quality, drilled and 
motivated people. Compensation and quality of 
life improvements must be competitive m the 
job market Ways must be found to reduce 
requirements for administrative Junctions, re- 
dues personnel turbulence and permanent 
change of station moves.” 

In context, the paragraph was one of four 
under the beading of ^General Programming 
Objectives.” One instructed planners to ensure 
that the uaty was ready to fight “today, across 
the decade and beyond the turn of the century." 
Another said that deployments around toe 
world would continue. A third, also in its entire- 
ty, ordered, “Take maximum advantage of our 
technological superiority ” The four paragraphs 
were in a document given to a reporter by 
someone who hoped to influence policy. Ah 
were marked “Secret," 

Why those paragraphs were classified secret is 
not exactly clear, for the secret classification, 
according to Executive Order 1235b, “shall be 
applied to information, the unauthorized disclo- 
sure of which reasonably could be expected to 
cause serious damage to the national security." 

Could the disclosure of an effort by the navy 
to enlist ami keep good sailors be reasonably 
expected to cause “serious damage” to the na- 
tional security of the United Suites? ...... 

Or is toisa classic case of the extent to which 
some government officials abuse, misuse and 
overuse the authority to keep information se- 
cret, thereby rendering the system almost mean- 
ingless ai tunes? 

Whatever the answers, the Reagan adminis- 
tration, which has vigorously sought to reduce 
tbe flow of government information into the 
public domain, seems lately to have concluded 
that the classification system itself is part erf the 
problem because so many people, in and out of 
government, hare lost respect for iL 

The new attorney general Edwin Meese 3d. 
said recently: “We have far too much classified 
information in tbe federal government. A lot of 



>/. 'S' 1 \\ ■ .» . 

mmt 


■;.;VK 



Pakistan International 

Gittat people tojfy with -J 


FLYING TO: ABU DHABI, AMMAN. AMSTERDAM. ATHENS. BAGHDAD. BAHRAIN, BANGKOK. BEUING, BOMBAY. 

CAIRO. COLOMBO. COPENHAGEN. DAMASCUS, DELHI, DHAHRAN, DHAKA, DOHA. DUBAI. FRANKFURT, 

ISTANBUL. JEDDAH. KATHMANDU, KUALA LUMPUR. KUWAFT, LONDON, MANILA. MUSCAT. NAIROBI. NEW YORK. 
PARIS. RIYADH. ROME. SINGAPORE, TEHRAN. TOKYO. TRIPOLI and 24 destinations within Pakistan. 

lAL(PAK)-85 




NtwYorfcTWaa 


Information is classified for a variety of rea- 
sons, only a few of which relate unquestionably j 
to national security. 4l 



things which shouldn't be classified are, and 
therefore there is a kind of ho-hum attitude 
toward toe protection of national security infor- 

ina /! on - . . . . , a small portion is so marked to prevent 

He urged that toe system be tightened up “so technology from f alling into the hands of adver- 

toat only material that really has to be kept 1n ««*«—- ---- 

secret in the interests of national defwi«a» or 
national security is classified.” He asked toe 
news media to cooperate in malting sure that 
information was not “improperly disclosed." 

There is considerable evidence that the sys- 
tem has major problems. In the vaults of the 
Defense Department alone are 12 million docu- 
ments classified "Top Secret," the highest of the 
routine classifications for information that sup- 
posedly would cause “exceptionally grave dam- 
age” to national security if it got oul 


Categories of Classified U.S. Data 

w. 


New York Tima Service 


ASHINGTON — Although no law 
ithorizing government officials to 
classify information has been adopted 


by Congress, an executive order signed by Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan cm April 2, 1982, permits 
the following categories: 

• Top Secret — Information that could cause 
“exceptionally grave damage to the national 
isecurity” if released. 

. • Secret -^Information that could cause “se- 
rious, damage to the national security” if re- 
leased. 

Confidential — Information that could 


cause “damage to the- national security" if re- 
leased. 

Id addition, there .are classifications more 
sensitive than “Top Secret” with code nmwc 
such as “Umbra" that are themselves secret, as 
are the various categories of information they 
cover. Some documents are marked for limited 
distribution or for “eyes only," meaning the 


ta fy of state in tbe Kennedy and -Johnson ad- 
m i n istrations, once estimated that 5 percent of 
the information fell into those categories. 

Much data is classified to obtain advantage in 
political infighting in a city where, as the dicW 
bolds, information is power. Some documents 
are stamped “Confidential” to cover up short- 
comings, especially in the testing of weapons. 

Large amounts of information are .classified 
out of habit. In Korea, a reporter asked an 
mfantiy company was at -lall stnmgflLJIhat 
information was classified, an officer sa&Buta 
chart tacked to the wall behind tbeS^er- 
geant s desk gave complete 
Oceam an officer aboard the aircraft; Verier 
asked when saa&s;wild 


addressee alone. 

Information d 
clem- matters has 
Information mvd 
methods. An old Wi 


..with cryptology or nu- 
tional categories as does 
ntclligence sources and 

. lgton saw holds that the 

most sens tive classification is “Bum Before 
Reading.”'; 


Hcralb^^^Sribunc 

• ‘‘b 1 * 11 * i.ati - j 


Many disclosures of information w 
«^offiaals seeking to influence 

budget debate, the outcome of an « 

Secretary of Defense Caspar W. 
a s P? ec k tiiai the Soviet m 
^ ces- made .with 
technology near a submarine baselfi 
mg to support ins case for cutting at® 

dfivka* toen, thc tfecdverj^ 

device had been secret 




















Standard Oil Company (Indiana) 
is changing its name to 

Amoco Corporation. 

(Our New York Stock Exchange symbol is AN.) 


Amoco Espana Exploration: Company 
Amoco Europe and West Africa, Inc. 
Amoco Fabrics — Europe • 

Amoco Netherlands Petroleum Company 
Amoco Norway Oil Company 
Amoco (U.K.) Exploration Company 
Amoco (U.K.) Limited 

Now, our entire corporate family is proud 
to carry the Amoco name. 


Amoco Corporation 


You already know our operating 
companies and our European 
subsidiaries: 

Amoco Production Company 
Amoco Oil Company 
Amoco Chemicals Corporation 
Amoco Chemicals Belgium N.V. 
Amoco Chemicals (Europe) S.A. 
Amoco Denmark Exploration Company 





For more information, write: Amoco Corporation, 200 East Randolph Drive, Mail Code 3705, Chicago, Illinois 60601 









amox pj7 

AMEX M lWW tfW EHo* nda osta p.Io 
kyse oricn . _•• P.12 Crio m ori fti . P.11 

HYie H M Wtam f.n* Mmcfrata Ml 
Canodtoa Jtoeta P.M Wortet summary p.n 
Cunoocy wtt* P.tt Orttoa P.U 

. CmnodUH P.M OTC stock P.M 

^•yowawMs '.-PJa OBwriuartgsft P.M 


Hcralb3sL tribune, 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 12 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


** 


Page 11 


S 


tWTHtNATtONAL MANAGER 

China Lures Foreign Firms 
But Slow Growth Is Seen 

By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — China may not yet be the land of golden 
opportunities, but it is trying. Following a series of 
overtures to Western businesses last year, the market in 
China for managerial talent has grown. Nevertheless, it 
seems that such growth will be slow at first. 

As more ventures between China and foreign companies have 
been formed, demand byU-S. and European concents for quali- 
fied managerial staff to work in China has also risen. Beijing 
official figures show that since 1979, China has approved 930 
joint business ventures with foreign concerns. Tms figure in- 
cludes all bilateral contracts and licensing agreements. And the 
pace increased last year.' with - 


Foreign companies 
complain of 
indirect taxation 
in Hiina. 


741 projects set up. 

The Chinese government 
approved 83 joint-equity ven- 
tures between 1979 and 1982 
and an additional I0S such 
arrangements in 1983. In a 
joint-equity venture, both the 

Chinese and foreign concern 

invest in the project. 

There are no figures available for the total number of expatri- 
ates working in C hina. But many companies operating in China 
t , try to keep their managerial staffs lean. This is partly due to 
Beijing's policy and partly because of the costs involved. 

The Chinese government wants Western managerial expertise 
.but is also anxious to provide jobs for aspiring Chinese managers. 
On the other Hand, Western companies want to retain some 
managerial control over their projects but also aim to keep their 
costs down. Housing and office space for expatriate staff is 
expensive. F ramatnme SA, the French-nuclear power company 
negotiating to build a plant in China, estimates that keeping a 
team there costs the company $800,000 a month. 

O THER factors are also keeping foreign investment in 
China from rising rapidly. Many Western companies still 
view the Chinese market as uncertain. “In the heady days 
of 1978 and 1979 (when the Chinese first opened the country to 
foreign investment) companies took on a lot of staff to work 
specifically in China," explains Susan Ware, editor of the Lon- 
don-based Sino-British Trade Review. “Then there was a shake- 
out in 1980 to 1981.” 

Learning from their mistakes, foreign companies prefer to keep 
» staffing in China flexible. They work on the theory that they can 
always increase expatriate employees if business grows beyond 
expectations. 

“We have to be pretty flexible with our staff size," says Dick 
Hughes, vice president of marketing for Fluor China Inc. “In 
other countries where we had joint ventures, we always had an 
idea of the work down the road." Fluor Chin a, a subsidiary of 
Fluor Engineers Inc., the U.S. engineering company, plans to 
only have three expatriate managers for the joint-venture it 
expects to set up in China. The agreement is expected to be signed 
with the Chinese government on May 1. 

“Compared to our investment there, our managerial staff is 
small,** says a spokesman for Gould Inc^ the U.S. electronics 
company, of China. The company has only one expatriate man- 
ager in C hina. Fast year, Gould signed a 10-year licensing 
agreement with the state*owned National Machinery & Equip- 
ment Import & Export Corp. in Tanjin to assemble computerized 
electronic systems. 

Under some licensing and joint-venture agreements, the Chi- 
nese government has required the joint venture to match each 
expatriate manager with a Chinese manager; paid a salary equiva- 
lent to the expatriate manager’s salary. The Chinese manager is 
then paid the lower, official Chinese wage and the government 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


\ 

1 


Currency Rates 


] 


Into interbank rales pn April 23, exdwfing fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brunei*, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates erf 
4 P.M. 



S 

C 

DM. 

w. rti_ 

OMr. 

88. S8. Yon 

Amsterdam 

LOSS 

046 

1WJ2- 

37.10- 01773- 

— 

5414 - 0484-138409 

Bnmels(al 

61.24 

77.7425 

20.1445 

64021 1155? 

17JJ16 

- 24J64 2442 * 

Fran Marl 

3J345 

1854 

— 

3176- 1545* 

B8J35- 

4.962- 12085- 1J22- 

London (b> 

US23 

— 

3J44 

11-72 Z4S4J0 

48488 

77345 3.1905 312JO 

Milan 

1.941 JO 

Z444J0 

43077 

20982 

54485 

31487 77X77 7J13 

NawYamtO 

__ 

1.2485 

3J94 

M2 1.97000 

05065 

6348 357 25020 

Parts 

92475 

1L772 

3JS2 

4773 X 

24955 

15.14 - 349 3725- 

Tokyo 

24M5 

32044 

1022 

2726 1381 • 

7352 

41253- mm — 

Zurich 

15175 

\ian 

8285“ 

37.155" 01297- 

7343* 

4.1275- 18119 • 

S.I ECU 

07388 

05801 

1233 

68236 lASUt 

353ft 

431102 1847 183403 

f 1 SDR 

0598477 

078541 

103049 

93SB24 183093 

3431 

61.159 25092 348471 




Dollar Values 



c 


For 

t 

Por 

t ' Per 

_ . Contact 

Ettuiv. 

1155 

Eqoiv. 

Q ^ 0CT OSS BOW. C * fT ~ CV ' U 54 


(U2U AMtmBoaS 
<UM7 Austrian tdtfOloa 
00162 Batatas Nil. franc 
07372 Canadian i 
‘olfrU DoaHS krone ' 

0.1 SW FimtJm morUto 
0 0076 oraekdrodniia 
0.12ft Mono Kona S 


iJWd 

2U9 

*uo 

1.2545 

ions 

1242 
11188 
7 JJS 


I-M25 Msec 
08811 bracBsMnl 
3J2B KrwnMl Moor 
(LtQ54 Matar.rtaMtt 
0.1U Msrw.kroM 
00541 PNLMSO 


0277 Saadi i 


assn 

HMD 

0301 

TAB 

us 

1137? 

u&n 

141 


04545 StaMMTOS 220 
09 s. African ranO U221 
00012 S. Korean woa KUO 
00057 Siwu po Mta 1*00 

ana smcotom tsars 
00251 TfcNaaS 29 JO 
0047 TMtaM 272SS 
02721 OAOtMan 34728 


E Sterivna: 13222 Irish C 

(ai Commercial franc tW AmaunlsiiMOHi to Ornrao* pound <el Amoonti ooedod to fcnramdaitor ri 
units of too mi units of ijoo (y) infaonaooo 
MU. 1 , not quoted; MA.: not availobtaw 

Sources: Banova Oo Benelux (BnmaR)f Banco Commercial r ItaHana (Milan); Banova 
Naibnote Ha Par Is (Porta): IMF (SOI V: Banana Arana at intnmaHoaale tTInvasMasomant 
(dinar, rival. tUrnam). Olttar data from Raatars and AP. 



Eurocurrency Deposits 


April 23 



Dollar 

PMarlc 

Franc 

StarOna Franc 

ECU 

SDR 

1M. 


- Bh. 

5ft - 5ft 

5 -Sft 

12ft- 12ft 10h- ion 

9ft - 9ft 

8 

2M. 

8ft 

- 8ft 

Sft -5ft 

Sft -Sft 

12ft - 12ft Wft - 10ft 

9 ft -*ft 

8ft 

3JVL 

8ft 

- 8Vj 

5S. - 19. 

Sft - 5ft 

Oft- 12ft 10ft- 10ft 

9ft - 9ft 

8ft 

6M. 

84L 

- Sft 

59. - 5ft 

Sft - 5 IV 

11 ft- 12 ft 10ft- 10ft 

9ft -Oft 

8 ft 

IV. 

9‘A 

- 9ft 

6 - 6ft 

5ft - 5ft 

lift - lift 10ft- 11 

9ft - 9ft 

•ft 


Bairn applicable At Interbank deposits a! SI mutton minimum (or equivalent). 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dotted. OM. SF. Pound. FF): Lloyds Bank (ECU); Roman 
(SDR). 


Asian Dollar Rates 


April 23 


1 mo. 

8V. 

Source: R avion. 


2RMS. 
8*1. -8 ft 


3 root. 
M-M 


(ML 

M-n 


IV. -9ft 




Key Money Rates 

United States 


dose Prey. Britain 


Discount Rote 
Federal Funds 
Prime Bate 
Broker Loan Rate 
Comm, paper, 30-179 dOVS 
uriwrth Treasury Bills 
6- month Treasury Bills 
CO's 30-59 davs 
CD's tM9 davs 

West Germany 

Lombard Rate 
Overnight Rata 
One Month interbank 
3-montn Interbank 
e-month interbank 

~*<r France 

' imervenilon Rale 
Call Money 
One-month Interbank 
3- month interbank 
S- month Interbank 


8 

10Vi 
834-9 
005 
7 44 
7JB 
7JD 
780 


6J0 

SJO 

SUBS 

5JS 

AOS 


8 

7TA 
10ft 
Bft-t 
BOS 
744 
706 
7 JO 
70S 


600 

SM 

SJO 

5.95 

AOS 


Bank Base Rate 
Call Money 
twwr Treasury Bill 
3-month Interbank 

Japan 

Discount Rote 
Colt Money 
6 0 dov Interbank 


Close Prw. 

12ft 12ft 
- HA tPA 
—11 13/16 
— 12ft 


S . 5 

S 13/16 59b 

A 5/14 6 5/16 


Gold Prices 


] 


10ft 10ft 
10ft. 10ft 
10 7/16 10 7/16 
» 7/M 18 7/16 
10ft 10 5/16 


Sources: Routers, ConmenbanhCnatLy 
annals. L lauds Bank. Bank a/ Tokyo. 


AM. pm. Ckbe 
HonaKoao 326.95 325JS —200 

Linemnouro 32SJ0 - —.MB 

Paris 1125 kllol 32634 22555 — 2A5 

Zurich 32705 3Z625 — 225 

Leaden 32600 32665 —1.10 

N«w York — 3 23J0 — AO 

Official finings tor London, Paris one Luxsm- 
bourn, atoning and closing orfeas tar Hano Kona 
and Zorich, New Vork Comes corrant contract. 
AH Prices In U54 eer ounce. 

Source: Routers. 


Inflation 
In U.S. 

Up 0.5% 

Durables Orders 
Down by 2.3% 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Surging 
gasoline prices drove consumer 
costs up 0.3 percent in March, the 
government reported Tuesday. But 
analysts said me big increase was a 
one-month phenomenon and no 
cause for fears that inflation is re- 
heating. 

More worrisome to economists 
was yet another drop in orders for 
durable goods, a further indication 
that manufacturing industries are 
suffering from foreign competition. 

Overall, factory orders for dura- 
ble manufactured goods dropped 
13 percent in March, the third de- 
cline in the last four months, de- 
spite a 24-percent increase in de- 
fense equipment orders, according 
to Commerce Department figures 
released Tuesday. 

The weakness m U.S. manufac- 
turing has been cited as one of the 
main reasons that overall economic 
growth was so weak during the first 
three months of the year, as report- 
ed last week. 

In another report, the Labor De- 
partment reported Tuesday that 
real average weekly earnings in- 
creased 03 percent from February 
to March, adjusted seasonally, and 
the Treasury saM the todget deficit 
jumped by $28.5 billion in March. 

The earnings increase stemmed 
from a 0.5-percent rise in average 
hourly earnings and a 03- percent 
increase in average weekly hoars. 
The March deficit figure brings the 
total for the fiscal year that began 
last OcL l to $128.1 billion. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speak es, said, “Inflation still 
appears to be well under control" 
But he added that “prompt deci- 
sive action by Congress in reducing 
federal spending is essential if we 
are to mamram the expansion of 
the U3. economy." 

Although the increase in the La- 
bor Department’s Consumer Price 
Index was the most pronounced 
since January, 1984, analysts noted 
it was doe primarily to a 33-per- 
cent jump m gasoline and other 
motor fuels coming on the heels of 
a 2.6-percent dedme in February. 

Inflation for the first three 
months of the year — after in- 
creases of 03 percent in January 
and 03 percent in February — is 
Tunning at an annual rate of 4.1 
percent. It was 4 percent in all of 
.1984 and many economists do not 
think it will be any higher by the 
end of 1985. 

“There’s really nothing to be 
concerned with,” Rob Wesoott of 
Wharton Econometrics said of the 
consumer price report. “I see this as 
temporary, a one-month aberra- . 
tion." 

John M. Albertme, president of 
the American Business Conference 
said: “Once gasoline prices level 
off this spring the CPI will resume 
its stodgy pace." 

The Commerce Department's 
durable goods report, hdwever, was 
disturbing because of the pattern it 
affirmed and the intensity of the 
decline in orders for nondefense 
goods. 


The f Battle Royal’ Over ZeUerbach 

Goldsmith Sets Sights on U.S. Forest-Products Firm 


By Victor F. Zonana 

Los Angela Tima Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — An ex- 
ecutive of Crown ZeUerbach, tbe 
forest-products giant that is the 
latest target of the Anglo-French 
indust rialis t. Sir James Gold- 
smith, is still haunted by a ■o gHi 
be saw on a recent business trip 
to New York. 

“I was walking down the street 
and I saw the old headquarters of 
Diamond International Corp.," 
tbe forest-products and packag- 
ing concern that Sir James ac- 
quired in 1982 and later dismem- 
bered “It looked like a very 
lonely place." 

For this executive, the sight of 
Diamond iptemiuionar ? desert- 
ed offices drove home what he 
feels is a simple truth: that 
Crown ZeUerbach, a 115-year- 
old fixture of the West Coast 
business community, is en gayrf 
in a fight for its corporate life. 
Occupants of the company’s 
landmark headquarters building 
here are bunkering down for a 
long siege. 

Early this month. Sir James, 
who holds an 8.6-percent stake 
in the company, threatened in a 
letter to ZeUerbach to begin a 
proxy fififat if its directors do not 
dismantle an elaborate anti-take- 
over defense that they installed 
last July. 

The threat was coupled with 
an offer by General Oriental In- 
vestment Ltd, Sir James' prima- 
ry holding company, to acquire 
ZeUerbach. which owns or con- 
trols about 2 million acres 



Wilfiam T. Creson 

(800.000 hectares) of prime U3. 
timberiand, for at least $1.13 bil- 
lion, or $41,625 a share. Sir 
James has not yet disclosed any 
plans for ZeUerbach, bat compa- 
ny officials fear Zellerbach's fate 
would be similar to Diamond’s. 

In a sharply worded state- 
ment, tbe company defiantly 
vowed that it would not be “hur- 
ried, bullied or intimidated.” 
Earlier, William T. Creson, Zd- 
lerbach’s chairman and chief ex- 
ecutive officer, insisted that the 
company would not buy back Sir 
James’ shares aL a premium, a 
practice known in the business of 
mergers and acquisitions as pay- 
ing “gre enmail * 

A group headed by Sir James 
last year gained a SSO-million 
premium when it sold its 9-per- 
cem stake in SL Regis Corp. 
back to the company; SL Regis 


was later acquired by Champion 
International Other forest-prod- 
ucts companies also have been 
taken over by investors seeking 
undervalued asset*. 

In its attempt to avoid a simi- 
lar fate, ZeUerbach has hired 
some of the biggest names in the 
mergers-and- acquisitions field 
— including Man in Lipton, a 
laywer, Salomon Brothers Inc., a 
New York-based investment 
banking firm, and Gershon 
KeksL a public relations man — 
to orchestrate its defense: 

Tbe showdown between Sir 
James and ZeUerbach is shaping 
up as a “battle royal” said 
George B. Adler, first vice presi- 
dent and a forest-products ana- 
lyst for Smith Barney, Harris 
Uphara & Co. Mr. Adler thinks 
that Sir James’ bid has put Zel- 
ler bach up for grabs and that the 
company will eventually be sold 
for more than $50 a share. 

“There are already buyers 
lined up for various parts of 
Crown ZeUerbach,” be said. 

Sir James, a flamboyant finan- 
cier whose career began at the 
age of 20 when he paid $200 for 
the rights to peddle a British 
rheumatism cream in his native 
France, can be a tenacious oppo- 
nent It took him more than two 
years to wear down Diamond 
international. His global finan- 
cial empire includes the French 
weekly news mag azine, L ’Ex- 
press, oil reserves m Guatemala 
and a 40-percent interest in the 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Renault Raises 
’84 Loss Estimate 
To $1.38 Billion 


Daimler in Pad to Buy Dornier Stake 


By Warren Geder 

International Herald Tribune 

STUTTGART — Five share- 
holders of the family-owned Dor- 
nier GmbH, West Germany's sec- 
ond-largest aviation group, agreed 
Tuesday to sell a 6S-percent stake 
in the company to Daimler-Benz 
AG. 

The purchase of the 68-percent 
holding would have an indicated 
value of 391 million Deutsche 
marks ($128.7 million). Before the 
takeover can occur, however, it 
must be approved by Claudius 
Dornier, die only one of the six 
family owners who has not yet con- 
sented. At present, the family owns 
all the company’s shares hut^under 
terms of the founder's will any 
family member wishing to sell his 
or her stake must first give each of 
the other five members the right of 
first refusal 

The takeover must also be ap- 
proved by the Federal Cartel Office 
in Berlin and by the trustees of the 
27.8-peroem stake of Anna Dor- 
nier, tbe deceased widow of the 
company founder. 

Interested parties have until May 
15 to object formally to the plan. 

Lothar Spath, president of the 
West German state of Baden- 
Wflrttemberg where Daimler and 
Dornier are based, said the pro- 
posed new ownership of Dornier 
would give Daimler a controlling 
holding, and the state of Baden- 
Wflrttemberg would have a 4-per- 
cent stake. Under the plan, Claudi- 
us Dornier, the eldest of the six 
family members, would maintain 
bis 20-percent bolding, and Silvius 


Dornier, his stepbrother, would re- 
tain an 8-percent stake. 

Dornier, based in Friedrichsha- 
fen on Lake Constance, had 1984 
sales of about 1.6 billion DM and a 
work force of 9.000 engaged in avi- 
ation, aerospace, traffic systems 
and medical technology. 

As of 10 P.M. Monday, it ap- 
peared that Daimler would have to 
settle for a 48-percent stake, but 
Justus Dornier then agreed to sell 
his entire 20-percent stake to 
Daimler, giving the West German 
automaker its desired majority 
control and bringing tbe negotia- 
tions to a close at 3:30 Tuesday 
morning. 


Mr. SpSih said the state govern- 
ment had agreed to pay 23 million 
DM for its 4-percent stake. 

Edzard Reuter, one of two 
Daimler board members taking 
part in tbe talks, said the price 
Daimler agreed to pay for its 68- 
percent stake was in proportion to 
that paid by Baden-Wuntemberg 
— which would come to 391 mil- 
lion DM. Daimler is to finance the 
purchase from its own funds. 

In trading Tuesday on the 
Frankfurt Stock Exchange, the 
price of Daimler shares jumped 8 
DM on news of the takeover, to 
close at 666 DM. 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Renault, France's 
state-owned automaker, said on 
Tuesday that its estimated loss for 
1984 had widened to about 12J 
billion francs ($138 billion), 33 
billion francs more than forecast by 
the government and tbe largest ever 
by a French company. 

The higher figure, presented to 
the board by the chairman, 
Georges Besse, was nearly a tenfold 
increase over the 1983 loss and 
largely reflected special provisions 
to cover planned layoffs and imme- 
diate financing requirements. 
These total about 43 billion francs 
and were decided upon by Mr. 
Besse shortly after bring named 
chairman on Jan. 22. 

In January, government and in- 
dustry sources estimated the 1984 
loss at 9 billion francs. 

Mr. Besse succeeded Bernard 
Hanon, who was fired by the gov- 
ernment primarily because of Re- 
nault’s mounting losses. The com- 
pany had a loss of 1.57 billion 
francs in 1983 and a loss of 138 
billion francs in 1982. 

Mr. Besse also said that Re- 
nault's consolidated sales rose to an 
estimated 117.6 billion francs in 
1984 from 1103 billion francs in 
1983. Final figures on sales and 
earnings will be announced at the 
annual board meeting on May 21. 

The Renault chief did not dis- 
close reorganization plans. These 
are currently being discussed with 
top managers and may be an- 
nounced within several weeks, ac- 
cording to industry, banking and 
government sources. 

According to the sources, the 
company’s goal is to substantially 
reduce Renault’s losses and various 
steps are bring considered, such as 
dosing inefficient plants and in- 
stalling advanced technology. 

Under a decision approved by 
the previous management, the 
company’s work force will be re- 
duced to 89,000 by the end of this 
year from 103.000 at the end of 
1983. 

However, tbe number of workers 


GM Net Off 
33%inFir$t; 
Sales Up 5% 

United Pros International 

DETROIT — General Mo- 
tors Corp_ citing the high cost 
of future product prog rams . 
Tuesday reported a 333-per- 
cent decline in first-quarter 
profits to 51.07 billion on re- 
cord sales of S2430 billion. 

The leading U3. automaker 
said the latest net figure com- 
pared with the record high net 
of $1.61 billion for the first 
quarter of 1984. 

Sales in the latest quarter 
were 5.6 percent higher than the 
$219 billion a year ago. 

Net per share on GM's com- 
mon stock amounted to $336, a 
36-percem decline from $5.11 
per share in the initial 1984 
quarter. 

Earnings on GM’s Gass E 
common stock, based on the 
earnings of Electronic Data 
Systems, tbe Dallas computer 
concern acquired by GM in Oc- 
tober, 1984 for $235 billion, 
amounted to $136 a share. The 
dividend base per share for the 

(Continued on Page 13, Col. 1) 

origin could be increased, possibly 
by 10.000 in I9S6. 

The plan will require 20 billion 
francs in new financing over sever- 
al years, some industry and bank- 
ing sources es tima te 
However, industry analysts, 
bankers and government officials 
said that additional efforts may be 
required if Renault is to eventually 
become profitable. Some analysis 
estimate that Renault may require 
45 billion francs in new financing 
between 1985 and 1991. 

Government officials also specu- 
late that Mr. Besse may be forced 
to sell off ailing divisions, particu- 
larly in industry vehicles, and farm 


laid off through early retirement equipment sectors, and possibly its 
and the transfer of African immi- 46-percent 


grant workers to their countries of 


holding in American 
Motors Corp- 


Dollar Up Sharply in the U.S. 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — The dollar ral- 
lied sharply in the United States 
and Europe Tuesday, surging cm a 
wave of speculation-led buying de- 
spite new signs that tbe UJS. econo- 
my is slowing, dealers said. 

Paradoxically, tbe dollar’s main 
moves were sparked by news of a 
large and unexpected drop in U3. 
March durable-goods orders. 

“We bad exposed it to foil very 
heavily on that figure, bat it -re- 
fused to go below 3.01 Deutsche 
marks,” one dealer said. “This 
sparked stop-loss buying orders 
which quickly snowballed. ” 

But dealers cautioned that the 
frenzied buying that sent the dollar 
to -about 3.0880 DM in early after- 
noon trading in New York did not 
represent a mange in its fundamen- 
tal outlook. 

“When one or two people start to 
cover short positions, everyone 
jumps in,” said James McGrcerty, 
chief dealer - at Discount Coro, of 
New York. ■ 

- In New York, the pound ended 
at $13485, down from $13680 on 
Monday. The dollar closed at 


3.0940 DM, up from 3.038 DM; at 
9.4200 French francs, up from 937 
.francs; at 23700 Swiss francs, up 
from 2312 francs; and at 25030 
yen, up from 24935 yen. 

Earner in London, tbe pound feD 
to $13523 from $13780 Monday. 
In Frankfurt, foe dollar rose to 
3.0345 Deutsche marks from 
23815 on. Monday. 

Other late dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with late rates Monday, 
included: 23175 Swiss francs, up 
from 14795; 93675 French francs, 
up from 9.1 120; 3.4355 Dutch guil- 
ders, up from 33780; 1,941.00 Ital- 
ian lira, up from 1,908.00. 


To Our Readers 

The international Herald 
Tribune is expanding and im- 
proving its international stock 
market- listings. The listings are 
on Page 18 today. Comex alu- 
minum figures are now also be- 
ing included in the U3. futures 
coverage. U.S. futures appear 
today on Page 14. 


r= CHARTER ==ii 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHAUENGF* 

123 Ft 12 persons go anywhere. 

We are die besr in Greek Islands. 

MedHen an ean Cruises Lid. 

3 Staduu SL, Athens. 
TeU3236494.TfctJ 222288. 


iffiTAPMAN 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTREND U 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded tfw blowing 
after aO charges: 

M 1980: +165% 

K IWls +137% 
1983; +32% 

M 1983: — 24% 

M 1984:— 34% 

mof 

APRIL 18,. 1985 
‘ EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
US. $91,828.93 

CaS or write Rqyai Frazier at 
TAPMAN, Trend! Analysis and 
Fordoto Management. Ino, 
WfeB Street Ptsza, New Mxk. 
New %ric 10005212-289-1041 
"felex BMI 667173 UVY 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


U.S. $1,000,000,000 

Phillips Petroleum Company 


APRIL 1985 



Revolving Credit Facility 


The Bank of Tokyo Trust Company 
Commerzbank AktiengeseUschaft 
Deutsche Bank AG 

New York Branch 

The Fuji Bank Limited 

Chicago Branch 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company 
The Mitsubishi Bank Limited 
The Sumitomo Bank, Limited 


Lead-managed by 


Chemical Bank 


Credit Lyonnais Credit Suisse 

First Interstate Bank of California 
The Industrial Bank of Japan, Limited 
Midland Bank pic 
Standard Chartered Bank 
Westpac Banking Corporation 


Christiania Bank og Kreditkasse 
National Bank of Canada 

CUc*gO Brandi 


Managed by 

Creditanstalt-Bankverein 


Bank of Ireland 

ClC-Union £urop6enne International et Cie. 


Kleinwort, Benson 

I Imlfrf 

The Tokai Bank, 

Limited 


The Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan, 

I ifltMl 


The First National Bank of Chicago 
Sociltl G£n£rale de Banque 

Co-managed by 

Banque Paribas Bergen Bank 

Den norske Creditbank Kansallis-Osake-Pankki 

State Bank of New South Wales 
Union Bank of Norway Ltd. 

Provided by 

Bank of Ireland The Bank of Tokyo Trust Company Banque Paribas 

Bergen Bank Berliner Handels- nnd Frankfurter Bank 

Christiania Bank og Kreditkasse ClC-Union Enrop^enne International et Cie. Commerzbank International S. A. 

Creditanstalt- Bank verein Credit Commercial de France Credit Lyonnais Credit Suisse Den norske Creditbank 

Den tsebe Bank AG DieErste osterrrichischeSpar-Casse - Bank First Interstate Bank of California 

New York Braort - First Austrian Bank - 

The First National Bank of Chicago The Fuji Bank Limited The Industrial Bank of Japan, Kansallis-Osake-Pankki 

Cfaingo Branch Limited 

Kleinwort, Benson Kredietbank International Group Tbe Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan, 

Limited Limited 

Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company Midland Bank pic Hie Mitsubishi Bank National Bank of Canada 

limited Chicago Brandi 

6stcrreichische Lfinderbank Soci£t£ G6n£rale de Banqne Standard Chartered Bank State Bank of New South Walts 

Aklfeagesdtadiaft 

Hie Sumitomo Bank, SvenskaHanddsbanken Group The Tokai Bank, 

Limited limited 

Union Bank of Norway Ltd. Westdentsche Landesbarik Westpac Banking Corporation 


BCI 

Limited 

Chemical Bank 


Co-ordinated by 


Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 


Morgan Stanley Internationa] 


Agent Bank 

Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 




UNTER1VATIOIVALJHERAUD -TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY^ APRIL 24, 1985 


■i 


NYSE Most Actives 


Unocal ' 

JohnJn 

SoufhCo 

BnkAm 

Exxon 

BaxJTr 

LTV 

■CmwE . 
TWA 
GMot 1 
NtSofnl 
AT&T 
IBM : 
DatoGa 
AH Rich 


VOL Hhrtl .Low. 

' 54892 JOM 4846 

10430 43% 41% 
13475 30*k . 20% 
1236T 20V» 19% 
T2Z2J 52»3 514k 
12032 15% 15% 

10711 10% 9% 

1073S 3QVk am 
10087 13% 12Vk 
10421 71% tm 
9905 11 10% 

9873 21 Vi ZlVk 
9592 129 Hi 1Z7W 
9383 40 38 

8728 48% 47% . 


49% +1% 
43% +2% 

20% + % 
20% + % 

f 

9 % — % 
30 

13% + % 
71% + % 

10 % +% 
2i% -*■ % 

129 +1% 

39% —2% 


DoW Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

75.13 

75.13 

amities 

7110 

72.17 

tnduslrlats 

78.08- 

78.10 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own man Low Lot. chs. 

■Indus 115535 128231 1201.15 127831 + 12.15 

Tram 581.71 58860 57772 58030 + 388 

Ufll 154.95 15549 1504 15583 + .053 

Cams 510.71 J17.26 50889 515.37 + <22 


NYSE Diaries 


AcrvanccKf 
Declined 
Unchang ed 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
Nsw Lows 


934 039 

578 850 

510 503 

2028 1998 

107 S3 

10 14 


NYSE Index 


ill 


Previous Today 

High Low Close 3P8IL. 
Composite 104.93 10481 10480 10483 

Industrials 120® 1W® 120® 120.12 

Transc, 95.97 95J7 9551 9580 

Utilities 55JB 55.72 5578 5582 

Finance 109.95 109.52 109.95 11081 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y 


April 22 

April 19 

April IB 

April 17 

April 10 


-included In the soles figures 


Buy Sales ■Sh’rt 
200854 440820 6.450 

180769 400894 7.922 

200810 458783 14892 

207250 450031 9.137 

— NA — 


Tuesdays 


KMSH 


Closing 


VoLaMPJA 

108,920080 

Ptbv.4 PJM. VOL 

79,930 flOC 

Prev consol Id ated dose 

90220360 


Tables Include tbe nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street and 
da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tatat Issues 
New High* 
New Lows 


250 227 

281 314 

228 249 

7*5 790 

78 21 

12 T4 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Hign ^Tnw” aose IpK 

V'SSS£. in,s K M 92 Sffi 

SES5 SLw » &fl jg 

Composite 16173 18025 1S07D 18070 


NASDAQ index 


Gomooslte 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

u mules 

Banns 

Tronic. 


Year 

Noon Ago Age 
281.77 281.07 243.93 
39552 29034 27702 
_ 339.98 200.90 

— 336.47 25002 

— 207jw msj 

— 7o2£7 

— 249.92 21573 


AMEX Sales 


4 pjw. volume 
Prev. 4 P 74. volume 
Prw. cans volume 


lUKOOM 

77803300 

7280000 


amex Most Actives 


HMt LOW Last On, 


BAT 

wanaB 

TIE 

Comma 
GttCdO 
picrD a 
DomeP 
H astir s 

Da to Pd 
Astro! c 
Echos B 

Vertjtm 

Hellont 

Russett 

MtchlE 


4% 4% 

10% H 

0% 5 

10% W% 
14% 14% 

« ’St 
AS 33 

1% 1% 

12 % 12 % 
7 % 7 % 

0% 6 

15 14% 

14% 14% 


A 40 
16% + %- 
• * — 
10 % — %, 
14% * 

19% — %’ 
3% + %■ 
30% +% 
11% + %, 
1VS 

12% — % 
7 % — %. 
0 % — % 
14% + % 
14% — %' 


AMEX Stock index 


S’ T-if 


75 510 
9 

03 - 

"37 
100 37 
J2 11 12 
1.40 77 15 
i 64 10 17 
60 77 
22b 3J U . 

70 

71 6 
5A 16 

13 
13 

12 
39 

14 
21 

74 11 
3J 10 
23 

IU 

122 - 
107 
123 
175 
73 
7 

J8 73 
■70 74 
120 AS 
120 70 
1JW 74 


Prices Rise Sharply on NYSE 


16% 

8% DycoPI 

M 

49 

10 

45 

12% 

12 

12% + 

25% 

17% DvnAm 

20 

X 

12 

29 

25 

25 

25 — 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 


Separately, tbe Labor Department- said con- 


NEW YORK — Stock prices moved ahead sumer prices rose Q .5 percent in March. 
Tuesday on the heels of a late rally by the Despite its gains, the market continued to be 
market s blue chips. Trading volume picked up a -mixed bag," said Thomas Ryan, of Kidder 
from its recent sluggish pace. Peabody. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose “The market is still in a very unsettled peri- 

II 14 tn I 178 71 il< Ivct a'liu einn> Wart'll IQ r w l. ‘i a ... .a 


12.15 to 1,278.71. its best gain since March 19, odT he said. “A trend is not going to emerge in 
when it climbed 21.42. Tuesday’s increase also the short-run." 


lifted the average to its highest level since it 
stood at 1,28037 on March 6. 

Advances led declines by a 3-to-2 margin on 


Analysts said the new data just added to 
investor confusion about the economic outlook. 
‘‘We’ve been going through- a tug-of-war for 


the New York Stock Exchange and the compos- the last month and a half.” said John Brooks.of 


ite index rose 0.63 to 105.43. 


Sh earson-Robinson- Hump hrey , Atlanta, with 


4*i 


£ 




37 17% 

97 60 

29% 21% 
28% 18% 

a 8% 
% 20% 
24 12% 

21% 12% 
28% 

40 
4% 

24% 

SB* 

s* 

a* 

58% 

20% 

10 % 

15% 

14% 

2% % 
19% 15% 
32% 27% 
30 26 

39% 17% 
21% B 
21% 15% 
24% 14% 
29% 23 
102 79 

23% 13% 

1“ 

1% 

* 

% 

% 


Big Board volume swelled to 108.92 million investors trying to decide whether the economy 
shares from 79.93 million in tbe previous ses- headed for recession or whether it is entering 
si on. a slower growth phase. 

At the American Stock Exc h a n ge, the market “if you were really going into a recession, we 
value index fell 0-21 to 229.31. would not be in this' range, we'd be trading 

Prices generally had been mixed until the under 1,2QQ right now,” he added. 
final hour, when the Dow Jones industrials The market has been hovering in a very tight 
began moving up sharply. Most of the overall trading range,' said Harry Villec, of Sulro & Co„ 
market then followed suit. Palo Alto, California. "And the catalyst for 

The late upturn came despite developments breaking us out of that range is going to be 
that might have been considered bearish for lower interest rates," he said 
stocks. General Motors was off fractionally after 

The Commerce Department said Tuesday reporting net earnings of $3.26 a share, down 
that March factory orders for durable goods fell sharply from $5.11 a share in the year-ago 
2J3 percent, the third decline in four months and quarter. Ford and Chrysler were slightly lower, 
another indicator that the UR. economic ex- Johnson & Johnson was higher in active trad- 
pansion is weakening. Many investors are wor- jug after announcing first-quarter net of 94 
ried that the slowing economy will erode corpo- cents a share, com pa red to 78 cents a share in 
rate earnings. the year-ago quarter 

fctaiS Data General was off diaiply after reporting 

ss ssss: s? ^ ~ 

VA percent late Monday. ^ (AP> , -UP I) 


To Our Readers ■ _ . 

Because of tbe seven-hour time difference some other items elsewhere in the Business 
between New York and Paris until April 27, Section are from the previous day’s trading. We 
StMhMrfStU r^rcl the in^venisnce,widdi isnecessaiy lo 
4 P.M. Also because of the time difference, n«** distribution requirements. 








10% 9 1 
12% 10% 
25% 14% : 
31% 25% 
58% 43 
4% 3% 
39 21% ' 

18% 9% 
5% 2% 
21% 15% 
39 28 

32% 29 
20% 13 
30 22% 1 

45% 26% : 
40% 23% 
40% 27% ! 
16 12 
tf% 13% 
17% 15% 
21% 14% 
29% 23 
58% 35 . 
7% 4% 
51% 44% 
18% 12% 
65% 48% 
20% 12% I 
11% 2% I 

.15 6% ! 


1.17 116 
1,46 115 
72 72 B 
140 SJ 0 
1-88 13 17 
28 

1430 6.1 B 


1-32 6,1 21 
3.12 72 B 
r 3.95 122 
JB IJ> 9 
176 57 15 
1.08 24 17 
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48 14 IS 
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40 44 0 

116111 ,2 
144 64 19 
140 27 7 
t SB 77 
iStellU 
44 5J 14 
240 47 11 
72 27600 


IB 10% 
23 12% 
959 22% 
47 28% 
3808 58 
2 4% 

203 27% 
888 17% 
12 2% 
180 21% 
51 38% 
11 32% 
30, 19% 
121 26% 
796 44% 
781 35% 
55 34 
443 14 
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29 17% 
115 10% 
577x25% 
1062 51% 
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210 51% 
157 14% 
2021 60% 
96 18 
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104 8 


127 

25 7 27 

36 9 308 
44 7 58 

14 7 62 

7 29 

4.1 7 271 

580 

5.1 459 

97 276 

47 10 022 
47 
76 
97 
67 
107 
24 


67% 44% 
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13%. 9% 
14% f% 
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39% 33% 
16% 9% 
24% 10% 
19% 14% 
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11 8 % 
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-37% 29% 
45% 28 
39 29% 

19% 10% 
27 16% 

£% aS 

37 25% 

17% 

5Vi 

19% 

Z!% 

57 
36% 

71% 

19% 

3% 

30% 







SS 

17 

SS 


45 

9 

JJt 


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U 

X4 

11 

22 

26 

20 

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19 

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r Li 



' SOCIETE GENERALE 
$ US 50.000.000,- 
FLOATING RATE 
NOTES DUE 1991 

For three months, April 18, 1985 ; 
to July 17, 1985, the rate of ? 
interest has been fixed at 
9 % P.A. - 

The interest due on July 18, 1985 
against coupon nr 24 will be 
$ US 22,75 and has been 
computed on the actual number of 
days elapsed (91) divided by 360. 

THE PRINCIPAL 
PAYING AGENT 
SOCIETE GENERALE 
ALSACIENNE 
DE BANQIIE 
15, Avenue Emile Reuter 
Luxembourg 


4 , 






31 20 . 

341* 23% . 

24% 13% . 
13% 10% . 
43 26% 

48% 54% . 
5*% 46% . 
16% 12% . 
9% 5% , 

42% 28 . 
44% 37% , 
29% 21% . 
26% 15% . 
27% 21% , 


14 123 
8 B0Q 
M IBS 
138 
4 615 
201 
HU 
81 

20 KM 
16 16430 
8 47 

18 15 

14 478 
14 233 


30% 30% 
Z7% 26% 
21 % 20 % 
11 % n% 

38% 38 
47 67 

59 59 

MU » 

9% 9% 

43% 41% 
40% 40 
77 27 

24 23% 

24% 24% 


30% 

20 % — % 
31% + M 
11%— % 
38% + % 
67 

59 4-1 

16% + % 
9% 

43% +2% 
40 — % 
27 
24 
24% 


■ h 












19% 

52% + % 
20% — Vi 
11%— » 
39% 

14% + % 
12% 

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3% 

204k +2% 
18% — Vi 
29% + % 
44% + % 
12% + % 
33% 

14%—% 
18% + % 
23% + % 
3B% + % 
S3* + % 
51% + % 
7% 

am 

33% 

34fc + % 

34*—% 
33% +2% 
9% 

85% + % 
634k + % 
52% — % 
10%— % 
29 * 

12 % 


A & 
AAA 

44% 44% 44M 
33 33 32% 

21 % 21% 21% 
17% 17% 
84k 


15 

41? tflS 

m 

5 « 39% 
367 59% 
1172 24 

»? 2 m 

44 42 

,555 i** 
1S S ^ 
» i* 

377 13 
33 27% 
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4 3% 


1946 + * 

am-# 

?S + g 

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an *— n 

41% 

12H 

30% + % 

19 

5 %^ 


j yfia 













































































*V 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


v# L 

Bi 

m 

pi 

’to ’Si 
2? 

*02 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


BUSINESSPEOPLE 



.J 

C 

ree months 


; °TES 


199] 


uly 17. 


ir 

»>- 

li 


Apri, ;8..^ 


35% Last Year 

■ : Untied Prm Imermaontd 

TOKYO — Spurred by bdslc. 
car sales overseas, Honda Mo 
tor Co. reported Tuesday a re* 
cord consolidated net lor the 
year ended February. 

4' The company said nei rose 35 
percan. to 12S.51 billion yen 
(S527.4 izdUionX from 95 _5SbU- 
bon yen a year outer. Sales 
increased 16 percent to a re- 
cord 2.752 trillion yen from 
2.374 trillion yen. with exports 
accounting for 73.5 percent of 
the rise. 

Auto exports rose 20.5 per- 
cent from a year earlier to 

865.000 units though domestic 
sales declined 42. percent to 

387.000 units, the Japanese 
company said. 


Hoechst Posts 48% Increase in Net 


By Warren Getler 

Imtntanonol Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Hoechst AG 
of West Germany reported Tues- 
day a 48.5-perccm increase in 1984 
net income to 1 J5 billion Deutsche 
marks (5453 miflioa) from 900 mil- 
lion DM a year earlier. . 

World group revenue, benefiting 
from buoyant overseas demand 
and a strong dollar, totaled 41.46 


company’s shares closed 80 pfen- 
nigs down, at 214 DM. 


pretax result outpaced the 
50-percem rise to 2.52 bfllion DM 
m pretax profit reported earlier by 
BASF AG, the second of the “big 
three" West German chemical 
companies. 

Chi Tuesday, BASF reported a 
73-percent jump in world etoud net 


to 895.4 milKou DM in I9s* from 
517.2 million DM a year earlier. 


Rolf Stunmet, Hoechst’s chair- 
man who shortly will be replaced 
by fellow board member Wolfgang 
Hilger effective Jane 4, said that 
West German chemical industry 
sales were up 4 percent in the first 
qnancr this year and should remain 
strong, albeit falling short of the 
ll-pcrccnt increase in revenue 
posted last year. 

Mr. Sammet is approaching re- 


i » < f — — — wuucr. tirement age and has been nomi- 

37 Whinhi Sm a ^ .company, as expected, also Mted to take a seat on Hoechst's 
, -I 4 - y . ’ ,a *■«* 11 w “ lifting its dividend to 9 advisory board. 

,is pretax world DM from 7 DM. Its share trice 
ended 10 pfennigs higher at 205.7 
DM on the Frankfort exchange. 

Bayer AG, rounding out the big 
three, is expected 10 annnnnm- a 
parallel dividend rise to 9 DM from 
7 DM. Earlier this month, the 
group reported a 34.3-perccm rise 
m group pretax profit to a record 


■9*5. a* 


Hoechst said us pn 
group profit surged 90 percent in 
1984 to 2J55 billion DM from 1.96 
billion the year before. 

The chemical group said it would 
raise its dividend on 1984 results to 
9 DM from 7 DM. The increase 
had largely been discounted on the 
Frankfurt Stock Exchange and 
consequently failed to boost 
HoechsL's share price Tuesday. The 


2.9 billion DM .in 1984, up from 
2.16 billion DM the year before. 


[ere « ha S been ~ raie 


f China Lures 
"s 'Foreigners 


v ' P.A. 
^residue on j ulv 




<^..1 . . has 

on ;ne --mi 

^c E A a 

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rt ': enu * E mik iw 
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(Continued from Page 11) 

pockets the difference. Forrign 
companies complain this is indirect 
;• taxation. The Chinese argue that 
'* foreign companies undervalue Chi- 
L nese managerial t«l«ii 
,-: v American Motors Gup. is at 
’’^resent involved in a dispute on 
4 ■’This point with Beijing officials. 
Beijing Jeep Coip., its Chinese 
joint-venture, has nine expatriates 
, v > on its managerial staff and nine 
v. Chinese managers. The Chinese 
v joint-venture partner has asked 
AMC to pay Chinese managers the 
il^-same salaries as expatriate manag- 
— ers. 

As the dispute cooiirrues. AMC 
-—has deposited the equivalent erf 
- nme U.S. manflflwial calarwK in a 
reserve account. “We wifi decide 
% Twhai to do with the money later," 
" _says a spokesman for the U.S. anto- 
* Tnaker. AMC has invested 58 mil- 
• -lion in cash in China, plus technol- 
ogy valued at 58 million. 

Written into most licensing 
agreements are provisions to train 
Chinese managers and to eventual- 
ly replace expatriate staff with Chi- 
nese staff. 


Kabi Vitnrni AB Stops 
Output of Growth Drug 


By Juris Kaza 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Kabi Yitrom 
AB, one of the world’s largest mak- 
ers of human-growth hormone for 
treating dwarfism, said Tuesday 
that it was halting production of 
the substance because a death has 
been traced to a similar hormone 
made by a U.S. producer. 

The nail came on the eve of a 
nrtceiw#* announcement of a coop- 
eration agreement, or possibly a 
meiger, between the state-owned 
company and Fermenia AB, a fast- 
growing maker of products for the 
antibiotics industry. 

Lars Eric Boettiger, Kabi's vice 
president for medical affairs, said 
the company was suspending sides 
of crescormone, produced from pi- 
tuitary glands taken from cadavers, 
after it was determined that a 
young man in the United States 
died of a rare nerve disease. The 
victim was treated for dwarfism as 
a child with growth hormone pro- 
duced under the auspices of the 
National institutes for Health. 

Dr. Boet tiger, a physician and 
professor of medicine, said Kabi 


could lose at least 100 million kro- 
nor (511.4 million) in sales as a 
result of the suspension of sales of 
the hormone. Last year, sales of 
growth hormone accounted for 
about 300 million kronor of total 
sales of 1.5 billion kronor. He said 


Bethlehem Steel 
Pasted Wider Loss 
In First Quarter 

The Associated Press 

BETHLEHEM, Pennsylvania — 
Bethlehem Steel Coro., the third- 
largest steel producer in the United 
States, said Tuesday that its first- 
quarter loss climbed to 562.1 mil- 
lion from $54.6 milli on a year ago. 

The company said the price of 
steel has am tinned to fall smee the 
last quarter of 1 984 and its losses in 
steel operations rose from 536 mil- 
lion during last year's first quarter 
to 540 milli on for the same period 
this year. Steel shipments increased 
by 17 percent over the previous 
first quarter. 

The operating loss was softened 
by .$6 million because more vain- 


Unocal Alters 
Defense Against 
Bidby Pickens 

TheAaoaaud Pretx 

NEW YORK — Unocal- 
Corp. said Tuesday it would 
boy back 50 million shares of its 
stock for S3.6 billion, whether 
or not the group beaded by T. 
Boone Pickens Jr, the chairman 
of Mesa Petroleum Co., pro- 
ceeds with its hostile bid 

The announcement made 
changes in an earlier defensive 
measure, in which the 13th- 
largest U.S, oil company had 
said it would buy bade 872 mil- 
lion shares of its stock, or 49.9 
percent of its shares, only if Mr. 
Pickens succeeded in his at- 
tempt to purchase the other 
50.1 percent. 

The California oil concern is 
offering securities valued at S72 
a share for its stock. Mr. Pick- 
ens is offering 554 a share in 
cash in his current bid for 64 
million additional shares. 

Mr. Pickens’s group, Mesa 
Partners H. criticized the initial 
Unocal offer as too conditional 
and claimed it was designed to 
confuse shareholders prior to 
Unocal's annual meeting next 
Monday. 


Yernier-Palliez Is Named 
To Post in Podain of France 



By Brenda Hagerty 

Intemaaanal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Tenneco Inc. has 
appointed Bernard Vermer-Pafiiez 
as president of the supervisory 
council of Podain SA, the unprofit- 
able French maker of hydraulic ex- 
cavators. 

In addition, Mr. Vernier- Pallicz 
was named to the European adviso- 
ry council of Tenneco, which, 
through hs JX Case Co. subsidiary, 
owns 44 percent of Podain. Ten- 
neco is based in Houston and has 
interests that include oil, natural 
gas pipelines, shipbuilding and 
construction and farm equipment 

Mr. Vernier- Pal liez began his in- 
dustrial career with Renaul t and 
became president of tbc French 
automaker in 1975. From 1982 to 
1984, he served as France's ambas- 
sador to the United States. 

As bead of Podaitfs supervisory 
board, he succeeds Piene Bataifie, 
who heads a group of shareholders 
that is is the process of acquiring a 
hydraulic parts division of Podain. 

Crfcfit da Nord has nBirvH Pierre 
Barberis director-general He will 
succeed Girard de Saint Blau qua t, 
who is to assume new duties at the 
Paris-based bank in October. Mr. 
Barberis currently is a director- 
general adjoint. 


Rolls-Royce LtfL, the British 
state-owned maker of arcraft en- 
gines, has appointed Harold Mour- 

gue a non-executive director, effec- 
tive May 1. Mr. Mourgue is vice 
chairman of Thom EMI PLC and 
chairman of its specialist semicon- 
ductor subsidiary, Inmos Interna- 
tional PLC. 

Dow Bulling Cup. of Zurich 
has appointed Henry Angst a direc- 
tor. He is chief executive officer of 
Dow Scandia Holdings Ltd. in 
London. 

Gutf & Western Industries Inc of 
New York has named Alan R_ 
Fields vice president of its enter- 
tainment and communications 
group. He has been a director of 


PhBips Qicdrtnan 
To Step Down 

• Reuien 

EINDHOVEN, The Nether- 
lands. — Europe’s largest elec- 
tronics company. Philips NV of 

the Netherlands, said Tuesday 
that its president and chairman, 
Wisse Deleter, will step down 
next April. 

Philips said Mr. Dekkex, 60, 
would be succeeded as chief ex- 
ecutive officer by Cor Van der 
KJugt, now vice-president and 
vice-chairman of the manage- 
ment board. Mr. Dekko - will 
become chairman of the super- 
visory board. 


Paramount Pictures (UX) Ltd, a 
unit of Paramount Pictures Cor 
which is a member company of i 
Gulf & Western group. 


that tests to determine whether Ka- able material was being sold from 
bfs hormone, also extracted form inventory, the company said - It 

cadavers, was safe could take as added that the corporate loss was 

long as two years. reduced by $1 1 million by adjust- 

Analysts said it wasn't clear how mg employee-benefit costs to ra- 
the suspension could affect Kabi's fleet previous overfunding, 
negotiations with Fermenta. The 
withdrawal of the hormone made D , v 0 . T 

form pituitary glands could speed People iuqnese Posts Loss 

the testing and marketing of Kabi’s The Associated Press 

synthetic-growth hormone, soma- NEWARK. New Jersey — Peo- 
tononm, which is produced by re- pie Express Airlines, citing the ex- 


combinant DNA techniques. 

Dr. Boet tin ger said the fatal 
nerve disease was transmitted from 


peases of trying to establish an ex- 
panded route structure, Tuesday 
reported a first-quarter loss of 


was 5195 million, up 80 percent. 


the cadaver and was not caused by 518.8 million in contrast to profit 
any biochemical property of the of $18,000 a year earlier. Revenue 
hormone. 

Fermenta shares were un- 
changed at 324 kronor Tuesday. 

The company’s board meets 
Wednesday to cons der a coopera- 
tion or a possible merger with 
Kabi. 


LUXrilND 

SodM Anonym* 


Luxembourg, % boufovord Royal 
H.C. lonkon* B - T3S7 


Mewieuei lea Actionnairea unt pri&i (funster i 
L’ASSEMBLEE GENERATE ORDINAIRE 
qui k tiendn I* 10 mai 1985 - 15 heum m ri£ge social. 
ORDRE DU JOUR 

1. Rapports du Conseil d’admmiatntion et du Comsunairc ux complies; 

2. Approbation da Ulan et eompte de pertea et profit* aa 31 d&cembre 
1964; affectation dee rfe aa ha te; 

3. Qnitus IUX Ailm!iii«mtwiw q[ iq CoQUBUHUe * ,nr OOdtplMi 

4. Nominations stamtaiies; 

5. Questions divetaes. 

Le Cornell d* Administration. 


We are pleased to announce the formation of 

Cerepfi 

tJa (taw ^■fTrn'^*- 

This company will service European institutions 
in their brokerage activities on the U.S. various 
securities markets and will dear transactions with 
Alex. Brown & Sons Inc., Members of the New York 
Stock Exchange and other leading Exchanges. 

Cerepfi in which the Bessemer Group (U.S.A.) is 
an investor will also conduct a financial engineering and 
corporate finance business. 

The initial board of Cerepfi will consist of : 
Claude H. Collier, Chairman, Arthur de La Grandidre 
Vice-Chairman, who are the founders of Cerepfi. 

John R. Whitmore, President of the Bessemer Group, 
will represent his group on the Board. The other Board 
Members are Dominique Chatilfon (France) and 
John R. Read (United Kingdom). 


Tel. 


20 Place VendOme 
PARIS 75001 
261.53.00. Telex : 216387. 




w ova 
. [*<» 

- rtO 

ii 44 9 
3-S’* ’X It II 
S5=iJ 3 
s* *30 -iS 

1-* !14 
O: Z.-34 &£ 
!*V4 SJt O 

1 4 •.! 

it n- Mft !J 
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■ i 1 ■» Ilj 10 

>«na -SUH 


W? : Goldsmith Sets Sights on Grown Zellerbach 


Ipl 


(Continued from Page 11) 
Aspinall gambling casinos in Brit- 


ain. 


sPI* 

J* •J't a;. 

i: wtiaS 


M 




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S>/S-R*M 13 SC.ttE. 

ISn -i «!®.t t. 
JU'. »• i S ?i S 

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3_:a *ir II 16:1KB. 

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144 * * * 

3 fi 6' 

IT Kh 

Ml IN 

63 5T3 
ST . 
u y* - e Z 

3 IS » <* 


His biggest holdings m the Unh- 
ed States are Grand Union, an East 
Coast supermarket chain, and 
■: .about 1.7 million acres of umber- 
, land that remained after he took 
.—Diamond International apart and 
\ sold off its various divisions. 

Zellerbach, his latest larget is a 
; i>nce-sluggidr company that has 
undergone radical surgery of hs 
own since Mr. Creson moved up to 
. ihe top position more than three 
.years ago. 

Under Mr. Creson. Zdkrbach 
ias reduced its work force to 
19,000 from 28.000, sold its money- 
Josing Canadian operations and 


T GM Profit 
Tails 33 % 

(Continued from Page 11) 


pumped 5800 million into desper- 
ately needed null modernization. 

Mr. Creson also pruned ZeQer- 
bach’s product line to dimmaie 
such low- margin commodities as 
newsprint, pulp and kraft paper, 
which is used to make brown paper 
bags. 

Nevertheless, the company’s 
earnings have remained lackluster. 
Zellerbach posted net income of 
586.9 ' million," or 52.61 a share,' in 
1984, down slightly from a year 
earlier, as improved earnings from 
paper, container, specialty packag- 
ing and distribution operations 
were offset by depressed conditions 
in the timber ana wood industiy. 

Analysts say Mr. Creson inherit- 
ed a company that had been severe- 
ly weakened by years of misman- 
agement His predecessor, C.R. 


Dahl, who retired in 1981 at the age 
of 60, skimped on capital improve- 
ments and left Zellerbach saddled 
with some of the most antiquated 
mills in the industiy, critics say 
One of Mr. Creson 's first acts 
was to get the board to slash the 
dividend on common stock in order 
to divert cash toward capital 
spending. The dividend was cut 57 
percent to a 51-a-share annual rate 
from die previous 5250. Though it 
served its purpose, the move made 
Zellerbach shareholders restive and 
added to the company’s vulnerabil- 
ity to a hostile takeover. • 

“My surmise is that the likes of 
Sir James recognized that most of 
the major surgery has taken place 
and that the company's earnings 
potential is in place,” said one 
source dose to Mr. Creson. 


Class E stock totaled 63 cents a 
;T: is i 3 ishaie, GM said, 
w j? i For the final quarter of 1984, 
- !i iiC . GM earned 5877 amUon, or $2.71 a 
share, on sales of 520.9 billion. 

'• Roger B. Smith, GM chairman, 
and F. James McDonald, presi- 
dent, attributed the automaker's 
decline from year-ago levels to the 
“front loading’’ of design and engi- 
neering for future model programs. 
.. l* - -sj .. They stressed that stronger sales 
-is ft -and volumes are evidence that 
*■ .. £ 'GM^ basic earning power remains 

y ; J S|i '■ strong. 

■ t; i 1 Worldwide sales of vehicles to 
?? <- dealers increased 2.8 percent 


. . r y> 


4 SJiSS 

44 

.^41 

•sags 

: 3- f i 
- - ri. pi : 


■gffiCS 

w % yie 


^ - 
451 


*. if 


*1 %1 - 
> f-: 


S is g* . to 2J8 million cars and trucks, 
compared with 2.31 million a; year 
? : ago. Domestic sales of cars and 
i J ^^i-^Strucks increised 5 percent to 1.67 
S ^million from 159 million units in 
"the year-ago period. 

Thc two top officials said that 
domestic sales are still on target at 
J5 million units for 1985, and pre- 
dicted another outstanding year for 
the automaker. 


S'?' 


j ses? 


BANQUE VERNES ET COMMERCIAIE DE PARIS 

On April 11th, 1985, lb* Board of Director* m«T undw The Onwroarohip 
of Mr. Gilbert Locfargues to dan the accounts for the 1984 financial 
year. 

Total assets amounted to 14,843,000,000 franc* compared with 

1 2.254.000. 000 bancs on December 31 , 1983, an Increase of 21 %. 
Net banking income adviced more than 15 % to 430,000,000 francs as 
a result of improved interest earnings and increased bank service 
commissions. 

With overheads barely 8 % higher, the fir ass operating result before 
depredation and amortization and exceptional income, prov i sions and 
costs was up mare them 50 X compared with 1983. 

Despite this encouraging p er formance, the bank's net result turned into 
a loss of 369,800,000 francs due to provisions of 459,100,000 francs, 
75 X af which were for recti estate operations. 

This stemmed from the increased vulnerability of a number of property 
developers, which was already noticeable last year, and that of a 
number of real estate op erati on s initiated by group companies several 
years ago. 

Routine provisions aside, there was also the effect of the adrStioncd 
reorganization of the Hong Kong subsidiary and the appreciation of the 
doflor. 

The Board of Directors convened a General Meeting to approve an 
increase of 370,000,000 francs in equity capital through the incorpora- 
tion of current account fodhies extended by Ihe Governmen t and the 
Suez group. 

During this meeting, it was also announced that the bank's balance sheet 
had been strengthened by a participating and convertible shareholder's 
loan issue of 120,000,000 francs, under Ihe terms of an agreemen t 
between the Government and the Suez: group. 

Thus, The increase of the shareholders funds and equivalent funds from 

261.000. 000 francs to 381 ,000,0 00 francs wiR enable the bank to 
continue its expansion in sa tisfactory comftions. . 


* j: 43 * 
1 Ji] :« 




£- 

sjSjS; 


_I -■ •■■J 


is 


if! Cl 

**’ -« * 

£ Hi 

■1 


■ :v i* 


.• 

s rj \ - 

saftr- 

$W~ 



r: !■- ■ r i 


-giM- 


2 • 'iji&f 

.. « &&'. 

rf •: t: '*• . 

;• .i fe. <• i?. - • " 


We are pleased to announce that the following 
have joined our International Division 


JEAN-CLAUDE GONNEAU 

Senior Vice President and Sales Manager, Pans 

GILBERT BAERISWYL 

Vice President, Geneva 

BEAT ZOSSO 

Vice President. Geneva 


Donaldson, Lufldn ft lenzette 


April 24. 1985 


COMMERZBANK JlZ 


»Once the mind 
is set on something 
any challenge 
can be met« 


Healthy profitability maintained in 1984 


Fee-eaniing business expanded 
Balance sheet structure further improved 

CommerTtrank again achieved outstanding results in 
1984. Its continued good performance strongly reflects 
significant further improvements in its balance sheet struc- 
ture. Above all, the Bank considerably stepped up its cus- 
tomer business both at- home and abroad, in particular 
scoring success through the reinforcement of its domestic 
retail position. 

Consolidated total assets rose from DM 113.2 billion to 
DM 1227 billion. All sectors operated profitably, the 
Group nearly attaining the record earnings level posted 
in 1983. This enabled Commerzbank to repeat the 12% 
dividend to its 140,000 shareholders, while again making 
substantial loan loss provisions and markedly strength- 
ening .its reserves. The Group's equity base was thus raised 
from DM 292 billion to DM 3.14 billion. 

Fee-generating activities are assuming an ever more 
important part in the Bank's earnings performance, both 
nationally and internationally. Foreign commeraal busi- 
ness, especially export-related transactions, turned in sound 
gains. Commerzbank also broadened its engagement in 
investment banking, lead-managing 26 foreign DM bond 
issues and co-managing 53 atbers.Trust business, induding 


portfolio management and broker/dealer services, regis- 
tered sturdy growth. Own-account activities once more 
contributed notably to the year's results, as did the oper- 
ations of the Bank's foreign branches and subsidiaries. 

Backed by solid financial and human resources, 
Commerzbank is active around the dock, around the 
world. Its international presence, which now indudes some 
70 outlets in over 30 countries, is to be extended this year 
through a wholly-owned subsidiary in Zuridi and a fourth 
US office in Los Angeles. 


Commerzbank Group Highlights 



1984 

1983 


■nDMbflon 

in DM bSion 

Total assets 

1227 

113.2 

Borrowed funds 



up to 4 years 

787 

71.8 

4 years and over 

38.5 

36.4 

Total lending 

903 

84.6 

Capital and reserves 

3.1 

29 


For further information, please contact: . 

Commerzbank AG, Public Relations Dept., P.O. Box 2534 
D-6000 Frankfurt/Main, West Germany, 

Telephone: (69) 1362-1, Telex*. 411 246 


Branches and Subsidiaries: Amsterdam. Antwerp, Atlanta, Barcelona, Brussels, Chicago, Hong Kong, London, Luxembourg, Madrid, New York, 
Osaka, Paris, Rotterdam, Stnoapore.Tokvo. Re presentative Offices: Bahrain, Beijing, Buenos Aires, Cairo, Caracas,Copenhagerv, Jakarta, Johannes- 
burg, Mexico City, Moscow, Rfe de Jarieiro, Sdo Paulo, Sydney, Tehran/ Tokyo, Toronto. 













U.S. Futures Apia 23 


OP *i Hist) LOW Close Chs. 



Metals 


liesdaj? 

MSE 

dosing 

Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on wall Street 
and do not reftectlate trades ebewtere. 


ssrss’SSg'i^Sr-s 
afB'&vS ILsshts 


0 D 4 ISD J 0 O 3 S 7 D Sep JXM 053 504071 504011 504025 — M 


CATTLE (CME) 

4 tuxuii».- cants par lb. __ 

6950 S2J7 Jim 6220 *322 

67*7 * 3.15 Aug * 4*0 6450 

A 5 ®a fiijffl Oct 4320 6 X 35 

SjK 6140 DK 6445 4455 

67*5 SCOO Fib 65.15 * 5.15 

6757 5525 APT MDO *U» 

EsL Sales 4413 Pr»v-Sol« W» 
Prow. Dav Opon Int. SUM off*B 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

4*000 lb*- cants per lb. 

7 X 75 *450 MOV 6555 6579 

TAW 6440 AMO 6050 «57 

7100 67.00 Sen 6450 6850 

7 X 32 OJt Od 4110 6 S .17 

7120 J 7 J 0 NOW am 69M 

79 Aa 69 X 5 Jon *990 7 »D 0 

Eat. Sales 1572 Ptpv.SoIss 1212 
Prev. Day Open int. M 42 u>*s 
HOGS (CME) 

mix® late o*ni* par ib. „„ 

55.40 47.07 Jim 4720 OA 5 

55.77 4495 Jul 4950 4952 

507 4750 Aug 4952 50.15 

51 X 5 4100 Oct 44 M MX 

M l flC 4430 DSC 4420 4835 

SOO 40 Fib 4878 4490 

47 X 5 4500 APT «32 *522 

4905 4700 Juft 47 J 0 4412 

Jul *775 < 7.75 

EsL Solas Prev.Salaa 7039 

Prow. Day Open Int. 23433 off 223 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

3 U 00 lbs.- cants par lb. _ 

8200 * 1.15 Mov *500 6555 

8 X 47 6 X 15 Jul **05 * 721 } 

8005 *020 Auo ME *575 

7420 6115 rib 7158 OM 

7540 *400 Altar 7 L 27 7 T 27 

7550 ? turn May 

Eddies 5 * 7 ? Pw.Sclaa 74*6 

Prav. Day Open Int 12453 UP 15 


w w *247 
6160 | MM 
6245 6300 

64.12 6445 
*405 *400 
6540 6*05 


6670 6522 

*775 *855 

*740 67.95 
6740 6745 

6840 6075 

6948 7000 


4075 4722 

4925 4977 
4940 49.90 

4645 4647 
4725 48.10 

4845 4845 
45.12 4 L 50 
47 JO 4742 
4775 4700 


6445 *507 

6575 < 7.12 
6450 6540 
7147 7220 
7005 7140 
7225 
7247 



Financial 


US T. BILLS (I MM) 

SI million- pt» of! bo pet __ 

922 S 87-14 Jurl 9201 9117 9149 

9177 86.94 See 9100 9107 9101 

91 X 2 8577 DBC 9123 9123 91.15 

9 B,Rj &rn Mar 9007 9007 9078 

90*4 8701 Jim 

was ssjffl sop 

90.16 B 9 JJ 5 Dee 

8948 B 9 J 8 AAar 

Eat. Solas 11*15 Prow. Salas UIB 
Prow. Dayopan Int 41,152 UP 452 
U TIL TREASURY (CUT) 


(Indexes compiled shortly before market do 
SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

iwtrAaita canto ^70 10400 18 L 60 18345 

19270 MOlOO Sap 18505 187.10 I 8 M 0 TI 6 J 0 

19640 17570 Dec 188 X 0 18920 18800 19005 

EsL Salas Prev. Soles 42 , 17 * 

Prav. Day Open int. 51466 up 600 
VALUE LINE OCCBT) 

^ 40 ™ , lSj 0 Jun 19505 190.15 1«75 19705 
212 X 0 18575 Sep 20055 20300 20055 20 X 80 

Est.Saias Rrew, Sales 2099 

Pnrr. Day Open Int. 553 * uplBl 
NYSE CO MP.. I NDEX (NYPB) 

points mui cents 

IKLOO 9008 Jun 10540 10*00 10540 10670 

11140 91 XS 5 ep 107 J 0 10840 10740 10075 

11375 10120 Dec 111 X 0 1 IL 00 10940 11040 

11345 111.10 Mar 11145 11145 11145 1114 S 

EsL Sales Prov.Sule* Wi 29 l 

Prev. Doy Open Int 9401 up 339 


Commodity Indexes 


Close I 

Moody's 94340 f 

Reuters 1,873.90 l; 

DJ. Futures. — NA 

Cam. Research Bureau- NA. 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 




N+ 


W: 


■fn 


Previous 
947.90 f 
147050 
12323 
24250 


i i 


Dividends April 23 



Paris Commodities 

April 23 



i£i£Si! 


1 1, -i j 


Asian Commodities 

April 23 


commodity end Unit 

Coffee 4 Santos, m 

p dm cloth 64/30 38 fe. yd _ 
Steal billets (Pitt.). Ion — 
Iron 2 Fdnr. PtiHa- Ion — 
Steel scrap No I hw Pill. . 

Lead Spot, lb 

Cooper elect., lb . ..... ■ 

Tin (Strain), lb 

Zinc. e. 5t. U Basis, lb 

Palladium, o: 

Silver N.Y- oz . 

Source: AP. 


Est.vol.; 36 1 ats a 1 5 tons. prev. actual sales: 
34 lots. Open Interest: 196 
Source: Bourse do Commerce. 


AUCTION 

MARINE SALE 
26 BOATS & BARGES 

MAY 16th - 10 A.M. 
HOUMA, LOUISIANA. 

(5) Alum. Crew Boats: 1982 
to 1978, 38’ to 125' Long. 
(14) Push Boats: 1981 to 
1967, 400-HP to 1,700-HP, 
50' to 80’ Long. (3) Utility 
Vessels: 1981, 460-HP, 65’ 
Offshore Vessels. 

Supply Vessels: (1 ) 1 968 
l^OOHP 153' Supply Ves- 
sel. Barges: (1) 1980, 130' 
w./mud tonics; (1) 1980, 
264' tank barge; (1) 1980, 
110' material A water barge. 
FINANCING: available to 
qualified buyers thru WCC 
call: [504) 833-1 961. 

WRITE OR CALL FOR 


r , ; if • •; / 2 ; i v j .- 1 • ; « : ; j ; 


(405) 842-0920. 

La Ucense #623-8485. 


EBCO 

AUCTIONEERS, INC 
P.O. Bax 14008 
Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma 73113. 


London Metals 
April 23 


Close Prewtom 

Bid Ask BM Ask 

ALUMINUM 
sterling per metric too 
scat 88740 888 X 0 B 69 D 0 8704)0 

forward 9084)0 90850 B 904 W 89140 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 

1 , 1854)0 1,18740 
forward 1 , 1714)0 1.171 JO 1.15550 1.15640 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Sterling par metric tan 

spat 1.17040 1.17240 1 . 1*040 1,16240 

forward 1 , 1*940 1 . 1704)0 1.15740 1.16040 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 

spot 30940 31040 30440 30540 

forward 30040 309.50 304.50 30540 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric tan 

spot 4*6050 4*8050 432340 433340 

forward 437040 438040 42*040 42*540 


spat 50140 5024)0 50040 50140 

forward 51650 51740 51540 51640 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling par metric ton 
soot 922040 924040 923540 924540 

forward 923040 9,24000 923540 923640 

ZINC 

Stalling per metric ton 

Boat 70 X 00 70400 *9840 7004)0 

(onward 701.00 70240 6904 » 69100 

Oww AP 


DM Futures Options 
April 23 

W.GemnMotfc-QSODiinii&ctnbiiB'Bni 


Strike 

Cam-Settle 


Pub-Settle 

Price Jon 

see 

uee 

Jun 

See 

Dec 

30 2 JB 

286 

33 * 

0.11 

ft 3 fl 

051 

31 1 X 3 

118 

XU 

OX* 

0*0 

082 

32 097 

1 X 9 

X 10 

058 

0.95 

LI? 

13 050 

1.11 

1*7 

1.11 

1 ** 


025 

DJS 

1 X 3 

18 ) 

288 

— 

35 X 12 

0 X 4 

185 

2*9 

2*3 

— 

Estimated fatal vaLlSLBT* 




Calls: Mon. ml epao inL 37 J 77 

Pets : Mon. veL 35*3 open lot. 26 X 95 


Source: CME. 







15754735 I 3 W 2 S 75 

1US-132SH 
875-1025 
650-040 


UA TVeasray Bill Rates 
April 22 


Prey 

Offer Bid Yield YWd 
J-momti 749 7x7 7.94 14* 

feHmontn 78 JIT IB W 

One rear *.12 l» W W 

Source: Satomoc Brothers 


London Commodities 

April 23 


Close Previous 
High Law Bid Axil Bid AM 

SUGAR 

Starting par metric ten 

MOV 100.00 9820 9840 98 X 8 10040 10 X 40 
Aug 107 J 0 10520 10540 10640 10720 10740 
Oct 11140 10940 1 I »®1 13040 11140 11130 
Dec 116.40 11648 11*40 11720 11740 11740 
Mar 129.40 12 B 2 D 12840 12 B 40 12940 113040 
Mov 13448 13340 13340 13440 13540 13540 
ADO N.T. N.T. 13840 14080 13920 14140 
Volume: 1412 lots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Starting per metric ton 
May 1295 1258 1260 1241 1299 1,902 
Jly 1.900 1441 1478 1 479 1 499 1.901 
Sep 1455 1431 1451 1452 1461 1463 
Dee 1,797 1781 1793 1795 1401 1 J 1 M 
Mer TJ 95 1,701 ITW 1 J 91 1401 1403 
Mav 1799 1795 1792 1799 1404 1408 
Jly 1400 1400 1400 1404 1795 1415 
Volume: 5478 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metric ton 
May 2499 2465 2483 2485 2444 2450 
Jly XI 44 2,108 2234 2,135 2490 2492 
Sep 2,185 X 1 M X 175 XI 78 XIX. X 128 
Nov X 212 X 1 B 0 X 197 22 DQ X 156 1159 
JM 2416 XI 85 2209 XZ 10 X 162 X 166 
Mor 2200 XI 80 X 195 X 200 2 X 40 X 145 
May 2 , 1*0 XU 0 2,170 2.190 XI 25 X 13 S 
Volume: 3432 lots of 5 Ions. 

GASOIL 

U 4 . dollars par metric Ian 
API 23140 23140 23140 23140 23075 23125 
Mor 230.75 22825 22840 22875 229.75 23040 
Jun M ytiff -m-K 22340 22540 wftf 
Jly 22440 22 X 00 22173 22 X 00 271.75 22340 
Aug 22540 22540 2 ZU 0 22475 22440 22600 
Sen 22740 22*40 23640 22*40 2 Z 740 .2775 
Od N.T. N.T. 22640 23040 22840 23 X 00 
Nov N.T. N.T. 22740 23000 22840 23 X 00 
Dec N.T. N.T. 22825 22940 23040 23025 
Volume: 731 Inti of 100 tons. 

Sources: Routers and London Petroleum Ex- 
ettanae loasolU. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

April 22 


Stlfkt CgtH-LOH PgtvLoJl 

Prtct Mot Jaa Jtv in Nn Jh Jit flo* 

MOMVj 17 — — - b 344- 

MS IP* — IA. - 1/1* J/M 7/16 I* 

no 7 n n - sa*m m m 

T 75 3 V» 5 ik 7 t lit 25 / 117*1 n 

mi :vj w. in 4% si* a i 

in it i m n t t* - - 

no i/i* ft 

NS 1/1* _ 

Total con vowne 101278 
TcMI coll seen tat.nun 
Total nut wlame Kin 
Total pel open M.4B4B 
mat*: 

High 1764) Low 17138 Ooa 17607—11,15 
Source: CBOE. 





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NYSE Highg-Lows 


April 23 




































































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0-50 km/h very quickly. 


We hope you’ll never see a long queue 
at an Avis rental desk. Not that we don’t like 
being popular. We do. 

Which is why we’ve introduced ways 
of getting you into your car faster than 
anyone else. 


Our Avis Express Card for instance. 
All those tedious questions you’re usually 
asked are encoded on a magnetic strip. 

When we run it through one of our 
computer terminals your rental agreement 
is printed automatically. 


But it’s not just our speed that’s made 
us the largest rental company throughout 
Europe, Africa and the Middle East. (Around 
the world we’re represented in 126 countries 
and more than J 100 airports.) 

We may have the only direct world- 


wide computer link in car 
rental. 

But we also owe a lot 
to those three old-fashi oned 
words. 

We try harder. 



Avis features 
Opel cars. 




















































, .--Li' 


INTFHNATIONAL HFHALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL M» 1985 


Pan Am- Untied Pact on Pacific Routes EC Jobless Total 
Jolts Airline Industry , Raises Questions Declined in March 

^ J n -kpih^r the routes were Pan Am's The Associated Pres! 


Over-the-Counter 


April 23 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


n T3 ■ -wri W/irkin question of whether the routes were Pan An* 

By RjLhMd " . itkin J, ^ ^ whether they belonged to the Amen- 

.VfH’ York Times Senii*' nt-nnle 

NEW YORK — The airline industry has of ihe aviation industry see 


The Associated Press 

BRUSSELS — Unemployment in the Euro- 
nean Conun uni tv fell in March to 1 1-8 percent 

. . t r V c_* i -> in F^hniarv 


LiCtlUViivu wj , . n A -irt if flu* I ITHICQ JUllCT lti» iw* w p- _ - 

the historic Pacific operauons of 1 an Amencan u . prestige and influence, that have ported Tuesday. unem . 

World Airways to Umted Airlines. _ ^nSd from the onmipresence of the Pan Am The number of people regjstered as imem 

If titerTwis one point on which experts capitals. Others, ployed fell 317 000 to 13-3 ^on ast month, 

agreed after Monday’s announce menu it was ^ v lhat “showing the Rag” on planes the lowest total since last D»»mber. 

that a minimum of 12 to 18 months will be J rline identified with a government The total is not seasoi^ a^usted and ex 

needed before the change can take effect. of a ^aimne dudes Greece, where jobless entena are not 

The outcome depends on decisions of tiie h a narT0WCT po im of view, the key ques- comparable with those of the other EC member 
federal eoverament. And those decisions are heine asked is what impelled Pan Am to nations. 

bound to be critically affected by tiie posiuoas Pacific. The Far East is almost The March report saidthe : 

of Japan and other Pacific Ocean governments looked upon as the world’s most unemploymentwere m West ^rman^ with a 

taSi U.S. airlines directiy or pc-tenually m- the greatest poten- dremof 137000; France wg J ^dme of 

volved in trams- Pacific competition. - . , pfn-ratino new waves of mternational 65,000. and Britain, down 56,000. Italy, witn an 

Bevond the issue of government approvals, nal for generating new wa « inCTeaS e of 3,000 jobless, was the only country 

- — = J *». nhterv. air trail it. . • to show an increase. 

Ireland continued to have the highest unem- 


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DCH'ilU ; _ * * , 

the biggest question posed by industry observ- 
ers waTwhat the effect woufd be on the long- 
term future of Pan Am. Underlying that unvrer- 


tial for generating new waves ot miernauonai 
air traffic. . . . 

Pan American’s chairman. C. Edward Acker, 
•oid at a news conference that his company 


It was Pan Am, under the sometimes erratic 
but visionary leadership of Juan Tnppe. that 
pioneered trans-ocean airline operations, in 
fact. Mr. Trippe began his long-range, over- 
water jumps across the Pacific, not the Atlantic. 

The results of that move, made in the mid- 
|9M>s with giant flying boats, was the secunng 
of facilities at such places as Guam and wake 
Island that were to prove of tremendous value 

in Woild War II. . , 

Consummation of the agreement with United 
would mean that no single U.S. airline would 
carry the U.S. flag io all major areas around the 
world. Some industry specialists even raised the 


feed its trans-Pacific operations. 


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WHAT ARE THE EXPERTS SAYING? 
READ 

WALi STREET WATCH 

BY EDWARD RORHBACH 
IN EACH THURSDAY'S IHT 


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Floating Rate Notes April 23 


Dollar 


issuer/Mat. 1 

Allied Irish 15 
allied Irish H 
Allied Irish 87 
Allied Irish Pera 1 
Arab Blu Caro 11*61 
AHanlic Fin Ini l«l 
BcaCanm.ltoLM 
Ban Naz Lovaro!! 

Banco 01 Roma 91 

BcaOISantoSpl.il 
Banco Pinto 85 
Bank 01 Amer ico*l 
Bi OtGrewoil/% 

Bk OiGreecn*! 

Bk Ot IretonOBV 
Bk 01 Ireland *2 
Bi Montreal *0 
Bk 01 Montreal** 

Bk Of Man) real*! 

Bk 01 N*« York 1 *6 
Bk Ot Nu*a Scotia 88/*5 
Bk Of Nova Scotia 9* 
BkO! Tokyo 73 
Bk 01 Tokyo 89 
Bk Of Takvo 87 
Bk Of Tokyo toDB8/*1 
Bk 01 Tokyo dedlHril 
Bk America *6 
Bankers Trust W 
Banken Trust 14 
Bonkers Trust*# _ 
BaArotW El Invts 87/91 
BBL95 
BBL** 

BBL *3 

Baindasuaiti 

BalmtosuecW 

BUE8* 

BFCE 87 
BFCEodtM 
BFCE lanffl 
BFCE »« 

BtiP 95 
BNP 87 
BNP 85/88 
BNP 84/9# 

BNP ** 

BNP 8* 

BNP 18/91 
BNP 96 
BNP 05 

Bo Pori Das Pert) 

Ba Worms l»/*4 
Baida vs Os60 s« 
BorelovsOseosn 
BardaysOseot oern 
Bordovs OseosM 
Khn Bets pen) 
KhwBelBWW 
Kirs BdoH 

Kino Self *4/04 
KinoBeig9f.D4 
Cetera 
Cera 05 
CNCA90/15 
CNT °0 
C/4T6I 
CIM05 

CIDC IWfclVJ *» 


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10ft 264 I CD 051 00.15 
911/674 9725 9*95 
9ft 29-5 9928 W.10 
lOW »5 *925 10BJS 
9ft 9-5 9960 WJO 
9*. IB-7 *923*828 
9ft IM 98 45 9860 
9k. 31-5 100.1010025 
9 2S-7 WJO 100775 

9ft 204 ™.&7mJ7 
B% 29-4 1004210052 
107* 30-4 1006310073 
9A 15-7 *9 JV 9959 
107* 2(M 1X551 0075 
Sft 11-7 10045100.75 
Sft 24-10 10025100.40 
Bft 2*-4 100.1210022 

Bn. 29-7 ira.imoo 

9V5 66 100J5ISU5 

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101. 13-9 1004510055 
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Dili 25-3 99JS bid 
8% 30-4 100.1210022 
7ft 136 1005210072 
9ft 56 7952 1X02 
1000 9-5 100.101X3) 
10ft 4-9 IBUOIfllX 
9ft 22-7 100031X13 
900 17-5 99.70 9900 
1000 116 1MJ21WO 
7ft #-B «».14]X-S 
9ft 30-7 1X9710107 
9ft 174 1007510005 
16ft 1-5 WO 381X48 
10V* 4-9 1004110051 
Sft 124 1002010030 
Oft 13-5 10027100J7 
91i KM 9997 10007 
9ft 31-5 1CM.1210027 
8ft 18^ 1X101X25 
7U 9-7 1X101X20 
Oft 11-101003210042 

9% 124 imuaioojo 

9V. 154 9934 *9.76 
9ft 74 1005710057 
99* 24-11 1X1810023 
10ft 8-5 IXXIOUH 
7ft 264 99.75 9735 
(ft 254 98.75 98.90 


Issuer/ Mot. 

Cl be 9i 

Carteret S+L« 
Chase Manhattan 93 
Chase 0* 

Chemical Bk 74 

Chemical (Wkfv) *6 
Christ Ionia BV VI 
Christiania ®4 


coupon Next Bid Ashd 
9ft 18-7 1X1510025 
Oft 38-5 9995 10005 
Bft 31-7 *9.96 100-06 
9ft 56 *770 IXJH! 
Sft 27-12 1X5410064 
8ft 2*4 9SUU91S5 
7 V. 136 WO. 1210042 
10% 6-9 1DSU551X70 


ennsnama n i-** ^ . abtc wun 

Citicorp IWklvl aug.1776 8ft 274 XK W.*0 

CIHconiSeot96 9ft 1*6 7774 993# 

cm Oct % 96 r. 3W *?« W6 

Citicorp 94 «■* !J6 10124101^ 

Citicorp oero J 1 * L-7 WiB WiSU 

Citicorp *7 0ft X* WO* *7y» 

Cominerabank8* f'f JIJ *996 1X0# 

ConvnenDankNwO* 10V* 

Comm Urb Mont realiwi «J* ]X 151X30 


sss a a* 

CCFtebW *ft B4 10025100J5 

CCF97° ’■ 32-S w - 75 

CEPME 87/9! 10ft 126 100741X34 

repue or IQ b-b lOO-lolwU® 

C^BDuNord®^ 9ft 276 WOM 

iSSIKlrfr *4 -J 99T100S 

m-vonW/*# *ft 11-10 1X5210062 

Ortl^LWMhBi 10'i 23? 1X2010050 

CrS»LM5S5!»W *^ 9-10 100A71M.77 

rr«jiU.vmvwls8*/« 9ft 9-7 1X47JXJ 

I Credit Lyorna.s91/9S 9*. 2*-S 100^01 MKi 

Credit Lrorwaks dec9* 9». 276 JX1B1HL2I 

Credil Lvawiais lan*2/96 9 18-7 10020100X 


Credit National X 
Credil Nailonal X94 
Credit National X 
CretfltonslallW 
Ded Kara toll 96 
Dal i chi KanpvoT# 
DamkeOHe9« __ 

Den Norske mv91 
DefiNarsfcedecTO 
Denmark tonffl/W 
Denmark nctXX 
Denmark M 
Denmark oerp 
Die ErslOest 92/94 
Dreed ner Bank *3 
Dresdner BankB* 
Dresdner Bank *2 
Eldorado Nuclear 89 
EDF99 
EDF75 
EDF77 
ENEL 00 
EAB73 

EABTO 

EEC 88*90 
Ektertorlnll*# 
Ferroy)e9S 
Ferrovle99 
Finnish Paper *5 
First Boston Inc *l/*4 
First Boni. Systems 96 
First Chicago 97 
First Chicago 94 
Firs CltyTe*os95 
First Interstate 95 
Full 94/96 
CenBnonce W.W 
Genflnance *2/94 
GZB8* 

GZB*2 


9 18-7 1X1010020 

wft n-9 ioa64iaa7< 
955 20-8 9*50 10040 
7. 11-7 1X2610036 

9V. 274 1002610034 
10ft 136 1X1410024 
9ft *6 1X251X15 
9ft 13-5 *955 10050 

196 *9*5 10050 
9ft 9-7 100371X47 
94k 1S-W 100471X57 
7ft 194 100551X65 
9ft 84 1X1210022 

8>j 29-7 97X 9*58 

u srwa 

10 274 10037WQ47 

a lit 

8L ^ Hw 

<ft 214 KXL031X13 
7ft 254 W54 9936 
lOK. 304 1X451X55 
*9J5 9*55 
9ft 286 *940 9960 
9ft 136 9935 9920 
9'* 7-5 99-M lOODO 
9ft 21-5 1X1210022 
7 22-7 9240 9430 

Ft. 66 9952 9932 
Bft 15-7 1XJ6IX16 
Oft 286 100281 0038 
Sft 22-7 lMXUKUO 
7ft 135 1X1710027 
Sft 116 1XJ31X93 


Imer/Mot. 

GZBnerp 
GZB96 
Giro 71 
Grind kjv&*2 

Grind lOVS *4 
Great Western Fin »4 

Greal Western 95 
Hill Samuel 96 
Hilt Samuel perp 

KlSPOtta Amerlcono 95 

Hydro Quebec 94 

Hydro Quebec 05 

Lc industries 91 

indcneslaB8/?3 

IBJ15 

1BJ nov88 

Ireland *6/97 

ireianaT? 

Rep. Ireland W 

Italy (ResubUclX 
C. itch 87 
Italy 89/94 
j.P. Morgan 97 
KOPteW! 

KOP mov92 
KemiraOyX 
Kleluwort Benson 91 
Ktomuiart Benson 96 
Korea DevBkX 
Korea Eichaoge B 
Lincoln*? 

Uoyds 93 
Lloyds n 
LtovdsM 
LTCB lulW 
LTCB85 
LTCBIunW 
LTCB 86 
LTCB 92 
Malaysia 94/09 
MatovstalS 
Malaysia aor89/y2 
Malaysia dec<9/*2 
Malaysia 88/93 
Mon Han O/Seas 94 
Mon Han (WLIv) 96 
Marine MUHand*4 
Marine Midland 09 

Marine Midland 96 

Mellon Bk 96 ' 

Midland 93 
Midland 8* 

Midland 92 
Midland 91 
Midland 99 
Mitsui Fin 9t 
Margin Grenfell *4 
Mortgage Den 96/93 

SSJSBffi? 


Had Wes tmlnlH 

Nat Bk Detroit 9# 

Mat Cam Sdl Arabia W 
Nan westmln si 
Nan westmlnra 
Nall WestmlnW 
Natl Westmki 92 
NaiiWestminpgrp 
Nesle Ov 94 _ 

New Zeo Iona 87 
New Zealand Steel92 
Nlnoen Credit BkX 
Nippon Credit Bk 85 
N inaon Credit Bk 16 
Nordic IntFVn 91 
OKB86 
OLB94 
OLB9S/97 
Ottshare Mining 91 
Oilstwre Mining U 
Pirelli 91/94 
PkbtPlkcn 99/91 


Coupon Next Bid Askd | 
18ft 146 98ft 19ft 
Fft 29-5 10055Ilffli5 
Vft 276 1D035101JH 
10ft 389 100521X42 
8ft 14 1X1410B24 
iff* 237 99.00 99-10 
fft 66 77.12597625 
1 8ft 274 1X1510030 
7ft 286 9460 9AJM 
TVi 24-18 99X ¥> M 
9ft 22-7 1X081X18 
9*30 lauo 
7ft 15-7 99J5 1»:H 
9ft 9-10 1X1510030 
10 86 KHUnotd 
10ft 20-5 1004410054 
10 16-9 1X371X47 

10ft 384 1X131X23 
m 10-7 1X041X14 
10ft 276 99.75 10025 
10ft 4-9 18D4310153 

H'4 239 IX.15T0045 
915/1 96 <*.7l 9*36 
206 1X661X76 
Bft 14 10U510025 

IIT.i 9-5 KHJK11D1.10 

10ft 254 1X431X73 
7ft 286 1X151X35 
10ft 274 1X3850W3 
10 56 99® 1XX 

9ft 7.10 9*751X25 
7ft. 136 99.95 1X05 
KFft 384 10035100® 
7ft. 36 IXJ91X79 
Sft 18-10 99.99 1X09 
9k* 22-7 99.90 10040 
10ft 14-5 lOOOMjid 
10 116 1X481X58 

7ft 17-6 1X2510035 
9ft 316 1X5510065 
7ft. 106 9936 99.96 
9ft 156 7921 97J1 
9ft *-18 1X351X50 
10 56 180371X22 

10ft 284 1X361X48 
7ft 31-5 99.97 10037 
7 294 *835 9*38 

9ft 9-7 1X271WJ7 

7ft 186 100351X15 
7ft 196 1X301X10 
9ft 316 1002210032 
9 29-7 100361X16 

9ft 246 1X7*10089 
9ft 76 MlJaiDlAI 
U 386 1X9610136 

10ft 6* lOMtlXM 
10ft *4 1X6*10079 

». 11-7 nm 9*35 

10% 11-9 10130101.10 
9ft 196 1X301X45 
9ft 18-10 99.96 1X36 
7Vi 286 *936 9*36 
U 9ft 216 99.77 *937 
9ft 18-7 100451X55 
9ft 276 lOOJWbid 

S 16-10 1003010060 
2S-M 1013510135 
10ft 136 .1X381X90 
10 274 1004310833 

9ft 9-10 100421X52 
1 9ft 246 108.2410036 
7ft 12-8 1002110031 
*% 286 993S bid 
9ft IM 10(1/321X12 
10ft ?>5 9975 10025 
lNk 20-5 1X231X33 
l»ft 285 IXTOlOOffi 
9ft 1M0 100201000 
9ft 46 100221002 

9ft Z3-7 1003S1W.1J 
10ft 274 *930 lXlB 
F*, 196 1X351X71 


issuer /MoL 

Queensland 96 
Rente 9 1 

Ren Bk Dallas 97 
Raval Bk Scotland 86/94 
Salloma*l/*3 _ 

Sonwa inl.FlnX 
Sanwo *4/2004 
Sonwa ini. Fto 92 
Scmdlnavtan Fin apr93 
Scandinavian Fin dec93 
Scotland Inl Fin 92 
Security Pacific *7 
SNCF88 
SEAT 90/93 
S.F£. S9 
S.F.E.71 

Sodete General Him 
Sodete Generate M 


Caapan Next Bid Askd 

10ft 96 1X271X37 

10ft 27-9 1005510045 
9ft 20-5 *125 9845 
4 ?ft 187 1004370053 
9ft 56 1X431X73 

fT, 26-* loaoobu 

Bft 29-7 1X2510035 
7ft 194 1SM2183 12 
1 7ft 1310 *975 10OSD 
3 9ft 216 *9J5 9945 
lflft 24-9 100731X83 
Bft 216 9943 97J1 
Bft 3W 9*37 10007 
9ft 246 1X051X15 
W 36 99-90 1X10 
9ft 196 9975 10075 
I Oft 46 10025101.25 

10ft 9-5 100021X12 


Sodete Generoien iuv* y-a 

SodeteGenerahMar94 m 189 Oa^X-78 

, Sodete General enov94 WL, 7-5 

%cMeGciwal97 lO 1 ^ 18-9 10tL4OID0_50 

MKBel lffft 206 1X261X36 


Spain I Kingdom] 92/97 

KJnadam Ol Sooin 9J 
i SnainW 
Stand Chari X 
Stand Chart 94 
Stood Chart 91 
Stand Chari mart) 
Stand Chart nenl 
Slate Bk Of India 87 
Sumitomo Trust 92/94 
Sweden 90/05 
Sweden 89/94/99 
Sweden 93/03 
Sweden pern 
Sweden 92/05 
Tidye Kobe 92/04 
Te6uain 92/94 
Total Asia Lid wn 
Taranto Dominion *2 
Two Trust *2/9* 

TVO 94/04 
Sooin X 

Union Bk Norway 99 
united O/Seas Bk 89 
Wens Fargo 97 
Williams + Glyns*l 
World Bonk 94 
Yokohama 91/94 
Zentralesparkosse 91 


ffl'/i 189 1X40101150 
Iflft 206 1X261X36 
10X 274 1005010040 
10ft 304 100481X78 
9ft 3-5 1009510X0 
9ft 194 1X401X58 
7'i. 8-7 100291X29 

10ft 28-5 1X2530035 
1 Oft 116 10I3Q101.43 
10ft 76 100251X35 
9ft 31-5 9*5010040 
7ft 124 1X201X30 
8ft 10-7 9928 9923 
9% 28-5 97 37 9942 
10ft 20-5 1X181X23 
7ft 9-7 1002310028 

Bft 206 9945 9955 
10ft -m 1003410031 
10ft 187 1005510645 
9ft 176 100401X50 
7ft 144 100471X57 
7ft 146 1X341004* 
7ft 9-5 9S BQ 7875 
9ft 22-5 9945 9975 
7ft 214 9840 XX 
9% 286 *975 10035 
9ft 135 *946 9*56 
10ft 18-9 1X49100-99 
84* 31-5 9545 9945 
9ft 2-10 100461X56 
9ft 157 1X401X55 


Non Dollar 


Amrwst 

Amgen 

AmsfcB 72 33 

Amosk 120a 19 

Am pod s 40 2.1 

Anadlta .10 1J 

An logic 

Anahri 

Anaran 

AndrGr 

Andavr 

Andrew 

Andros 

Apogee -12 14 

ApdoC 

APPleC 

AptBIas 

AptdCm 

ApfdMt 

AplUSIr 

Archive 

2^ -40b 24 

Artel 

AShton 

AsdBcp 76b 19 
AtdHsJ .12 9 

AstroM 

Aslroo .10 J 

Astrosy 

Atcor 44 24 

AHGsLt 252 8.1 

A tint Be .90 10 

AtlnFd 

At I Fin 

At I Res 

AtSeArs 

AudVId 

Austral 

AlwdOc 

AutTrT 

AufaSy 

Autmtx 

Auxton 

Avacre 

AvrrtGr 

Avnlek 

Avatar 

AvlatGP 

AktcM JO 42 


isets ” 

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20 7ft 7% 7ft" - ™ LfeCoi 

3628ft 28 28ft . .. MMyA 


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8 78* 7% 7%— % Flrster 
2137 8% 8% B% + % Flagler 

jjlr 1 IB 12ft 12ft 12ft— % Flai»y 

M 13 46926% 26ft 2Sft— % FletaTI 
112 6% 6ft 6% + % Fief ill 
227512% 12% 12ft „ FIN FI ■ 
29 Ira 1% l%+& FlowS S 


l£l 8% 7ft 7ft— ft Flurocb 74 13 

96 3ft 3 3%— % F=onar , 

277 9ft 9 9% + % FLIon B JI7 4 

291 26 25% 26 FLIon A 419 3 

2 6ft Sft 6ft For Am 76 XI 

3110ft 10ft 10ft + % FarestO 14)0 44 

224 7% 7 7% + % FortnF 

3 8% 8% 8% + % FortnS _ , 

IB 7ft 7 5* + J* Forum J6 3 

29 7ft 7% 5ft + % Faster .10 13 

336 4ft 4% 4%— % Foxmvr 

36 7ft 7% 7ft + % FmkRs 

342 8% 7% 7ft— ft FnmFdl 

147 4ft 4 4 — % Fremnt 48 17 

SO 9% 9ft 9ft - - - 


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417 4 24517 16ft 17 + % MastGP -66 53 

09 A ^4 15 14ft l-Fft MalnetJ UO 3.2 

56 XI 26 31ft 3tw 31% +1% MaIRt 
IJB 44 2922ft 22% 22%—% Malrlte -M« 

5420 19% 19%— ft MatSd 

TOO 1ft 1ft 1ft + % fttanim/ 30 34 
416 3 1213 10% ?% ’0 + ft ManfHs 

30 13 64 Sft Sft 5%- % MfrsN IM X5 

4728 2% g% — -ft Marcus 4»e 14 

10529% 27% 2*% +2 MargUK __ 


470 8% 6% 8% + V> MamC S IX 43 


48 17 10626% X 


JB J. 256214b 21 21 — % 

69 Bft fft WJ + % 

42 5% Sft 5%— ft 

29 3 Zft 3 

SSttft 11% im=Ji 

a? a 

1^ XI 8418% 18% 18ft + ft 
3JB0 123 18524 23% 23ft— % 

T41 93 6217 16% 17 

14BaUL3 4216% 16% 16% 

100 123 207B% Oft 23ft + % 

13 7wi 7n /ti 


9% Fudrek 559 8ft B% aw 

21 - J* FulHBS 32 27 171 14ft 14ft 14ft 


559 Sft Bft BW + % Manjst 
171 14ft 14ft 14ft MarsSf 


32 6% 6% si? — ft cormwt 149 £l 84 18% 18% 18ft + ft 

1820% WHU gom 1 3M 123 18524 23% 23% - % 

7129 28ft 29 + ft ’ 9S an «% 17 

IZ k L ^ 

S 1 ** ^ ’?ft= » S 13 K S1% T 4 1% + ft 

21?,, sa S _ % ^ ^ M J » » J* + £ 


69 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
3318 17ft IB 
4031% 30ft 31 — % 


4228 27ft 28 + % 

41 5% 5 5% + ft 

1 3ft 3ft 3ft + % 
1225 25 25_. — % 


4031% 30ft 31 — W ia25 25 25 — % 

4930% cS«Bc 5 234b 57 121 34ft 34% 34ft + ft 

12013ft 12 12ft— % j-, n — % 


9ft ff '$-* S 

492 13% U 4 13% OlWtC 

lOT19ft 19 1*ft— ft Confln* 

t iu llh 4Ut CtlflST 

1317ft 17% 17%—% ConvFd 
41 B 7% 8 Convgt 

1610% TOV. 10% — % ConvTTje 
140 7% 7 7% CoorBto 

15 5 5 S — ft tooraB 

37 Sft 5% 5ft— ft CnpyTel 
1»12% lift 12 + % 9 or ^ m 

17323ft 23% 23ft + ft Cord 01 
47111ft 18% 18ft + ft OoreSt 
12617 16ft 16ft , Corvus 
9 4ft 4% 4ft + ft Cosmo 


Corvus 

Cosmo _ 
Courer s JO XI 


Iwuer/Mat. 

Aic*7 

Bk Montreal*! 

Bk TakvoN/90 
Bain0owez9l 
Citicorp W<«l 
Cansondaiedgald 
CEPME M 
Credil Fonder W 
Credit National 91/95 
Denmark 93/98 

1.1.1. 94 

Kingdom Belgium 94 
Lloyds 96 
Mini feblO 
SNCF W/93 
Yorkshire *1/94 


Coupon Next Bid Askd 
14% 1+5 MO.101M1M 
13ft 274 1X3010XU 
14ft 21-5 *9X bjd 
14ft 31-5 100071X17 
13-.. 155 **35 *9.45 
14% 56 9890 99.10 - 
13% 21-6 1UU010050 
1 0ft 94 103301X40 

Uft 184 103.11X53 
14% 2M lffiUSIXJB 
12ft 157 1X051X15 
13% 187 1X2210032 
14% 24-5 1X021X72 
13ft 7-5 lXXlXtfl 
12% 244 MKOBIffiWS 
13ft 27-4 100.1310823 


L20 46 40450% 48% 48%— 7 
4 1% 1% 1% 

3 7 7 7 


11 7 

4% 

6% 

- W 

m 2* 

2ft 

2ft 

310* 

10% 

10ft 


30 8% 

8 

8 

+ % 

24 35 

35 

35 

159 

59 

59 

+1 


Source ; Credit Suisse- First Boston UtL 
London 


viv mw iiwgv 

you're flying 1 


when 





27 8 7ft 7ft— % CulInFr 
nso J 17524ft 24% 24ft + % Cullum 

iju 4j iso jo so +% Corn 

1326% 25% 25% + % Cvear* 
30 49 <61 8% 1» IW + ji CyprSv 

124 40 4430% 30% 30% + % 

imieifc iov. io%—% i 
no 93 108 8% B 8% 

1X0 42 328% 28% 28% +1 

US* 43 17068ft 67ft 68 — % 

Mb 24 5828% 28 28% + % 

3012ft 12ft 12ft + % 

1/00 95 410% 10% 10% 

wrsibS 
2i5?s r 

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11111% TOft U — % 

JOa 24 23233V. 33 33%—% 

MU 14751ft 51ft 51ft- % 

.12 IJ 26 6ft 6% 6ft— % 

J5b 22 1015ft 15ft 15ft + % 

138 4% 3ft 4% + % 

,10b 1.1 55 9ft 9 9 — % 

7 8ft 8ft 8ft 
69 20% 20% 20W> + ft 
314ft 14ft 14ft— % 

J2 73 9814ft 14ft 14ft— % 

B15 782. 815 +25 

66 % fc % 

120 X5 510 34% 34 34% + % 

M 23 8622ft 21ft 22 —ft 

616ft 16% 16ft + % 

15 1ft 1ft 1ft + % 

5415% IS 15% + % 

229 6% Sft 6 
28724% 23% 24% 

381 6 5% 6 + ft 

69 6% Sft 6% 

9715% 15 15% + « 

2® Sft 3% 3ft „ 

50 7% 7 7ft— ft 

27 8U 8% |ft + % 
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JOe 19 5 7% «k 6ft- % 

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132 SJ 60 26ft 26% 26ft— % 


412% 12 12 — % 

10414 13ft 14 + % 

177 5ft 5ft 5ft— % 
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1878 8% 7ft 7ft— ft 

m 16% 16 16 — % 

26 4 3ft 4 

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28021% 19% 20% + % 
63 6% 6% 6% 

265 9% ? 9 — % | 

2J08 X* 1155 53ft 53 S3ft— % 1 

535 2ft 2% 2ft + % 

94 5% 5% 5% 

JO XI »23% 22W 23% + % 
13 <% «ft 6% 

32 14 2023% 23 23% 

102 lit 1 1 , 

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a 15 "SKS la** 1 

1022 % 21 ft 22 % 

JOe U 611 11 11 


P ■ HBO JO 1J 

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121 7% 6ft Wb 
1 6ft 6^ «ft . „ 


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39 6ft 
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33355% 
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299 5 
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38715% 
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149520% 
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1826ft 

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JS 44 11816% 

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TWA r s new Ambass^orOaSs^K are a new experience. 

No other business dass has seats like Flying to and from America will never theAMcRyTWi^747Amb^d^ 

these They're new The widest business be the same again, \toti ican really relax on ^ ^ ™ 

dass seaisThevVe exclusive to TWAs 747 the flight-Wofk in comfort. Sleep serenely our 747 fleet wdl have them by 31st March. 

Ambassador Class. Of course these seals areonfy six But you can always enjoy 6-across seating 

To sit in them is to float Perfectly relaxed. across.There’s plenty of leg room and OT^/^rb^tonte™ftVbur 

They curve to support every part of your plenty of space ail round TWAMajnAgentwtll tell you X" f 

body There's even aspedaifegand foot rest Tiythenewoqpfflenceoffloatirigacrc^ all about it / 


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Leading the way to the USA. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


Over-the-Gounter 

- • NASDAQ Notional Market Pries* 


April 23 


*08 

44 

M 

Tto 

21 U. 

OVt 

tt 

me 

34 

51 

» 

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17» 

34 
144 



INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFlE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PAKI$ AREA FURNISHED 



(Continued From Back Page) 1 



EMPLOYMENT 




AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE ACBir 

764 03 17 


74 CHAMPS-ELY5GES 8tfi 

Snide, 2 or 3-rooni upullU B f. 
One month or more. 

IE CLAJUOCE 339 «7 97. 



SHORT RENTAL M MRS; Shrfos 
and 2 room, beounfiAy decorated. 

75D0B PAa^ftfifl35999 50^“' 


. Kn LAW FIRM 

Pm Bth {Ave. P r onhfai RoaKvek) 

, mb for Hofaia poukon 

| SECRETARY 

I FLUB*! FRENCH - ENGLISH 

'ssiura.'tssacas 

photo & salory dewed ta 
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mm« for American firm in Pam 

BILINGUAL SECRETARIES 

Shorthand & knowledge of french 
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AUTHW. Peri*. Top pay for high level 
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SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


AUTO SHIPPING 


More tea WbrfwMb Cor S 
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leva - fuf dnna w maion 
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D-2900 bnm 1, W. Germany 
Tek 0*21/14264, Ik 246584 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


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INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
23 April TWO 

TfciMtatHl value quotations (hewn below ore seppllcd by the PindiUMwin the 
except ion of come funds whose quotes are based oo (ssm prices. The foUowtng- 
mars Inal symbols Indicate frequency of wuuaflon supplied tor the IHT: 

Id] -da fly; (w) > weekly; (b) -W- monthly; (r) - renularfv; 01 - Irreoufarty. 

AL NIAL MANAGEMENT OBLIFUEX LIMITED 

(w) Al-Mal Trust, aa ■■ 1 15X41 — I wl Multicurrency S 1027 

nxuir mi me iidb . m I u — M Dollar Medium Term 1 WU2 

“ANX JULIUS BAER & CO. LW. _lwilMlivlmTimi t in XI 




sow sm 

TWtt to. 

T* ȣ 

an* 26V* 
44* 4H4 


— Id 1 BaorbcuHJ - SF 69720 

— (d)Conbor SF 1151.00 

—Id I EauJboer America S IT09JD0 

—Id ) Eqotbaer Europe SF 1187.00 

—Id > Eqiriboer Pacific— SF 167000 

— IdIGrobor SF995JW 

—Id I Sloddwr SF IM8.00* 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ 

— Id > Aslan Growth Fund SIO 

— (wl Dfoertond — 5PM 

— Iwl FIF— America— SI6 

-iwl FiF — Europe Sll 

-t w > FIF— Pocffir , .. 115 

— tdl indosuezMufflbonds A__ S6V 

—Id I Indosuez MuRlbarxK B - S 147 

BRITAHNIA.POB 271. U. Heller. Jersey 

—iwl BrtLDoUar Income SOJ 

— (wl Brits ManoB.Curr ** 

— Ml Brit. Inti* ManoB-Borlt *14 

— Id J Brit. lntUManouJ>orrt_ (1.14 
— (w) Brlt.unlwnol Growths— . itu 
— <w) BrlLGoM Fund— — SOJ 
— (wl BrllJManaB.CurTencv— _ % 14.1 
— Id J Brit Japan Dir Pert. Fd— SO.! 

—Iwl BrllJersey Gill Fund — (02 

— Id 1 Brit World Lels. Fund — SIO 
—(d) Brit, world Tscftm Fund— SOJ 
CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

-4wl Capital inn Fund S3*. 

— (wl Capital Italia SA SIX 


OBLIFUEX LIMITED 

— iwl Multicurrency S 1027 

—iwl Dollar Medium Term J NL33 

. —Iwl Dollar Lang Term S 1043 

—Iwl Japanese Yen S 1042 

—Iwl Pound Sterling — .(1031 

—Iwl Deutsche Mark DM10,11 

— iwl Dutch Florin fl hum 

I —(wl Swiss Franc— SF t.tl 

ORANGE NASSAU GROUP _ 

PB 8557*. TIM Hague (070) 4AM30 

i — Id 1 Bever Beteno WM l J 33.90 

PARISH AS— GROUP 

1 —Id 1 Cortna international *8140 

i —Iwl OBLI-OM DM 1.17736 

—Iwl 0BUGE5T10N 5F9XS0 

— (w| OBLI-DOLLAR S 1.12537 

3 wi nsLi.vsM ■ YiDsjnjn 

■mm umnFii FL 1057.90 

d)PAROIL-FUND — S 105.10 

— Id) PARI NTER FUND SID4J9 

-(d) PAR US Treasury Bond— S102.VB 

ROYAL B. OF CANADAPOB 24LGUERN5EY 
-Hw) RBC Canadian Fuad Lid— *11.2* 
-Mwi RBC Far Eau&Podfle Fd — SIILiO- 
-Hwl RBC Inn Capital Fd.— — S2035* 

■+iwi RBC inti income Fd slam 

-Ha I RBC ManCurrencv Fd— *2X25 

■41*1 RBC North Amar.Fd_ *»■» 

SKAND1FOND INTL FUND 144*234270) 

— (wllnt: BIO *504" Offer *543* 

— (w)Acc.: Bi n — — t SM Offe r . ■ . *5 4 5 

SVeNSKA INTERNATIONALLY}}. 

17 Devonshire Sg..l nnrtntv0V377-8040 

— (b)SHBBond Fund— — *21.7* 

— iwj SHB Inll Growth Fund *2056 


Company Earnings 

Revenue ond profits, In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated 


: Canada 

Attica Int'l 

1 st Quar. 1 «B me 

avemie 35X9 35X1 

: roots 171 1» 

.er Shore — OJB 

.' Results In UJS. doUors. 

France 

Renault 

- Year me m3 

levenue 117400 110J7Q 

^ - W Loss 11550. 1380 


i Schneider 

Year 1914 1963 

. rrt1 w.. — 124(a)1406 

"c a: loss. 

Japan 
Honda Motor 

YM r ItM 19SS 

. • evenue 175 T IXTT 

>0111 - 120510 95-580- 

. er Share— 13071 1DI.I6 

trillion. 

_ , “United States 

Z : Allegheny Int'l 

% ■ 1 st Ouar. ms m« 

- rvcfUM 507.2 697-fl 

3ar Net — 014 6.92 

r : net excludes loss et th4 

■ lllfon from dixanNnueOi OP- 
oWons. Per share fw/fs 
' far pre fer r e d dlvk/enOs. 

Am er. Motors 

-1st Guar. 1WS IW 

.. rvenue 919A 

-H LOSS — 29-° 


Borg-Wamer 

1st Quar. 1965 1VM 

Revenue 939 J 9478 

Net lot 4A5 502 

Per Share— . 030 035 

Bristol-Myers 
1st Quar. ms 19M 
Revenue — 1880. UHL 

Net IOC 12*8* 109-95 

Per snore— . 091 081 


2nd Qaar. 1985 1914 

Revenue 5473 467.9 

Net me. 1787 2523 

Per snam— . 035 036 

1*1 Half lftf 19M 

Revenue IMS. S678 

Net Inc. 42 A) 42.76 

Per Shore — 132 133 


1 st a oar. 1915 1964 

Oper Net 242 lin 

Mar Share— 1.1* 620 

Nets exclude realized tn- 
veitmmt perns of UOOJttO vs 
XiP minion. 

Cinannali Mil. 

1st Qaar. 1»S5 1984 

Revenue 1613 1517 

Net IK — — 1S2 1.77 

Per Share 0.15 006 


Armco 

let Qaar. l» 

ivemie 9193 9678 

.SflSS — W>35.1 1403 

. ter Share— — ^ 

o: loss. Netsexc^tdeooinol 
\U million vs toss 0 f 
lllfon. ms, net also ex- 
-udes provisions ter 
i lias million and oaln at STS 
million. . 

Ashland Oil 

•2nd Quar. 196* 196* 

•■.venue — Lfca 28 oa 

A Inc. — 142 so 

.irStwre— H22 — 

' 1st Half 1965 1*5? 

■ .ryera/e Xj-m AlOG 

■ of inr Aui) SdmX 

\S hurt, — 

■ te-r share oiler onelerijd 

■Mends. 6-month nef* 
me oalna of sr.4 million vs 
,48 million. 

Atlantic RidtfieM 

1st Onar. Wg 

•iveflue — - %g 0 . 6390. 

it Inc. MM 39U 

r Shore — ’37 133 

1904 net Includes loss Of SIT 
niton. 

Banc On® 

.-1st Quar. ms m* 

■I Inc. »■£ Sfl 

••r Shore 026 0.09 


•••1st Quar. W ™ 

t Inc. 2933 258 

"r Share — OJt a«9 

Becton Diddnson 

" 2nd Qtw- «•§ jgj 

. m ^ 

. d Snare — 185 

- ,w Hotf m* '»• 

;-nr= ^ 

J snore-. »■» 

. BothMiem Steal 

•-JMTL i3S iS 

63.1 5*6 


Cons. Edison 

Hi Quar. 1965 ItH 

Revenue 1341. 1352. 

Net Inc 13686 14437 

Per Share — l.W 1.11 

CUtet* Paabody 

Ut Hear. ms 196* 

Revenue 2368 - 2272 

Net me XS 735 

Per Share — OJS 088 

TftS net Inetudes charge of 
SZS minion. 

Data General 

Sad Ouar. «*5 1984 

Revenue — 3202 27X9 

Netinc 9.1 142 

Per Share— 034 035 

1st Half 1965 1984 

Revenue 65X9 5142 

Net Inc 3X1 242 

Per Share 121 0.95 

Disney Prod. 

and Over. 1965 1M4 

Revenue 4513 *073 

Net me 353 313 

Per Shore 184 082 

111 Holt Ift* 1984 

Revenue 6788 7093 

Nci Inc — — 672 1164 

Per Shore 159 321 

1904 e-month net Includes 
oaln of S74 . 1 million from 
change tn accounting. 

Fst Hawaiian 

1st Qaar. 1985 196* 

Net ItlC — — i 682 ■ 539 

Per shore — 0.90 080 

fforida Fed. SAL 

3rd Qaar. IMS 1984 

N*r me — la IK). I 5^3 

Per Snore— — 038 

f Months 1985 1904 

Net Inc (017.99 1X03 

Per Snare— — 129 

a: toss. 

Goodyear Tire 

1 st Quar. ' 1915 1984 

Revenue. — . 2386 2338. 

Me) Inc 867 1118 

Per Share 681 186 

Nets Include goto of SS.7 
million from sole of unit vs 
rax credit of stjm mttitoa and 
gain a fJUSmlBkm from sole 

ofalant 


Holiday Inns 

in Quar. TOS m* 

Revenue 42X3 4«X5 

Netinc 337 2SM 

Per Shore 186 039 

Nets toefudo gain of SZU 
mMton vs toss ot sr.r million 
from property ft uws p c Wan s . 

Johnson Johnson 

istquor. Mi 1 «M 

Revenue 139(L 180. 

Net Inc 1713 1498 

Per Shore — 0.94 IL7S 

Kansas Pwr Light 

la Quar. 19M IH4 

Revenue 5277 

-Netinc 3131 3177 

Per Share— 121 129 

Martin Marietta 

1*1 Quar. MB 1W4 
Revenue — Loop, imo 

Net Inc 2775 2484 

Per 3har»_ 026 034 

iMsnet Includes gain of OB 
million from disconilnuodoe- 
erottons. 

Menfl Lynch 

tat Qaar. 1915 1961 

Revenue 1990. 1JNL 

Net Inc *53 1X4 

Per Share — 056 021 

Mukon 

2nd Quar, ,19B WM 

Revenue L36&- U«- 

NM Inc 6039 4983 

Per Snare— 280 134 

W Hall WM MW 

Revenue 1S«L 2« L 

Net Inc 11189 ®35 

Per Snare—. 330 100 

Midland Ross 

1st Quar. IIS5 1964 

. lfJ8 ’fy 

Net Inc — 57* 3.n 

Per Share— . 034 025 

1904 net Includes loss Of SI J 
mfIBan from discontinued op- 
erations. 

Hew York Tones 

1st Quar. ms 19*4 

Revenue 3277 2973 

Net Inc 322* 2451 

Per Snare 081 032 

ifSSnei includes oaln of SIS 
mutton from sole of property. 

Old Stone Corp. 

1st Qaar. 19B WM 
OPtr Net — *« 4» 

Oner Share— 079 032 

Nets exclude tax credits of 
SSBWOOOVSS944MO. 

PainB W ebber 
2nd Quar. 1965 1H* 

Revenue 43X9 3833 

Net Inc 834 587 

Per Share— 032 020 

1 st Naif m* m* 

Revenue 89U 7*63 

Net Inc 1*5 162? 

Per Snare 078 086 

Phibre-Salofnan - 
in Quar. 1965 W64 

Revenue 61*5. 6M9. 

Net Inc 1*18 1208 

Per Share — 6.91 0,79 


Polaroid 


in Quar. 1965 . 19M 
Rt&IW-— , 261-2 “H 
Nai inc — — (allXS 64 
Per snare— — 021 

a: toss. Nottoctudosprov*- 
sienofOO million. 

PSA 

1st Quar. 1965 . 1984 

HtlSS- 17M •»! * 
Her Loss — AM 





LOW COST FUGHTS 


ICELANDA1R 

30 Yots Anniversary 

Spend one way fare* 
void May 7A ■ Juft 7ifa 


■Ttovr York F 1,790 

•Wodilngfon F 1,790 

•Oikaao F 1,990 

•Detroit F 1,990 

•Ortanda (Honda).. F 1390 

•Lee Angela* F 2.990 

•Sim TroncUeo F 2,990 

Far Round trip. caDb 
KBJUOAB PARS 
TeL (1) 742 52 26 



EMISSION 




MOOmCAIKM OF MEW MOCMEL 


MBICBDES 
BMW 
PORSCHE 
JAGUAR 
FBUtARl 308 
TESTA ROSSA 


$4,000 

Hooo 

$4,000 

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FREE CARS 

■ CaS or write fer free cataloa. 
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Send USJ5 for analog 


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YOUNG LADY 

PA/Inrnpranr S Tounsm Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 


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Hecse apply Travel Agent on 

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PAHS 704 80 27 
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PARS LADY GUOS 224 01 3Z 
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YOUNG LADY PARIS 533 80 26, 
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SOOETE DIANE PARIS 260 87 43 
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FR/'i- KfURT. Young tody companion. 
English, Frendi, Germcm spoken. Free 
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PARIS NOTE IMS PHONE AT ONCE 
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London. Td. UK 01-381 6851 


SMGAFORE INTI GUIDES. OA-. Sin- 
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HONG KONG (K-3) 723 12 37 
sophsticrted companion. 


PARIS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 
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Pant ret 365 80 36 
Munich tek 395 613 
Geneva tek 327 110 
Zurich iek 391 36 55 


Crime in Begance 


to the GREEK ISLANDS *ows iact conggon lo-Tdon- 
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CH«a OF 7-4-3-2-1 DAY LONDON: B3UCATH3 LADY Cbm- 
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wkk Tek London 870 5680 



5ervice ii for leacing world wtde indut- 
triafirt. You ccn tee Europe and the 
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Reply with photo (essentid) to Box 
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Shipping Wfrom U8-A. 


PAWS RECBTIVI TRAVRAgwicy ne- MATMA: Antwwp (3) 234 36 68 
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seacta£ te- 5p *Kkd CrxtcBion* at the Leotfing 


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We Veep a large dock of 
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Tek 02/648 55 13 
Tekx 65658 
42 rue Lent, 

1050 Brussels. 




TOKYO 645 2741. Touring & shop, 
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HONG KONG 3-697006. Chanrwig 
fande/nude campomon 


PAWS BILINGUAL ASSISTANT to 
harness executives. 500 58 17 


PAWS LADY MIBPSETBL Travel 
compvion. Paris 633 68 09. 


PARIS YOUNG SOPHISTICATED YIP 
lody, triknaud PA. S00 89 72. 


HAMBURG -YOUNG LADY rnmparv 
ion. muWmgual Td: 27 04 570. 


HONG KONG - 3-620000 .Young- 


FOR SALE & WANTED | London - young cawbsean 

Lody 01724 1859 Airports / Travel 


ESCORTS & 


INTERNATIONAL 
ESCORT 
USA A WORLDWIDE 

Hood office in New York 
330 W. 56th St, MY.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES 



REGENCY 




LONDON 

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Tel: 736 5877. 


Perlman Escort Agency 

67 CMHem Street, 
London Wl 

Tel: 416 3724 or 486 1158 
AB major credit cards accepted 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SERVICE 
1H: 200 8585 


NEW YORK OFFICE 

Teh 212-838-8027 
8 212-753-1864 


* USA A 1RANSWORLD 

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Cod free from LL5 j 1-800-237-0892 
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Lowefl Eastern wekxxnee you bodd 


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LA VENTURA 


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LONDON CLASS 

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LONDON, HEATHROW 8 GATWKK 
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ARiSTOCATS 

London Escort Service 

128 Wigmore St- London W.l. 
Al maior Credo Cards Accessed 
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12 noon - midnight 


ZURICH 

SamanRw's Escort 6 Guide Service 
Mtde 8 Female. Teh 01/56 96 92 


* MADRID ★ 

TASTE ESCORT SBMCE 
TEL- 41 1 72 57-259 61 96 


ZURICH 

CAROUNE ESCORT SERVICE 
Teh 01/252 61 74 


ZURICH-GENEVA 

__GWKWS ESCORT SBWIOL 
TBzOl/363 0864 -022/344! 86 


ZURICH 

ALEXIS ESCORT SBLVICE 
THj 01/69 55 04 


★ KITTY ★ 

MADRID SERVICE 250 34 96 


ROME CLUB EUROPE BGOfiT 

8 Guide SmSlifoS^S589 
1146 (from 4 pa lo 10 pm) 


OS5EA ESCORT SERVICE. 

51 Beauchamp Pta™, London SW1 
Tet 01 584 6513/2*49 (4-12 pm) 


GENEVA ESCORT 

S8TV1CE. Teh 46 11 58 



MAYFAIR CLUB 

GLIDE SBLVKZ from 5pm 
ROTTBIOAM (OljO-254155 
THE HAGUE (0) 70-60 79 96 


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TH.- 022/86 15 95 


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THj 2456548. CREDIT CARDS 


LONDON ESCORT AGENCY. 

Tek 935 5339. 


BARBARA 



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VKNNA-S RET ESCORT tennee. Tek 
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MADRID SELECTIONS ESCORT Ser- 
vice Tel: 401 1507. Credit Cord*. 


MUNICH WELCOME Escort Service. 
Tek 91 81 32 


BRUSSHS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 

Etaort Service. Tel: 02/731 7641. 


HAM40VEK - Coriima Escort Sennee. 
Tek 0511/80 61 59. 


LOfOON ZARA ESCORT Semioe. 
Heathrcw/Gatwick. Tek 834 7945. 


AMSTERDAM FOUR ROSES Escort 
Serwce p) 20-964376 


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LONDON TRUDE ESCORT Service. 
Tek 01-373 8849. 


LONDON GBflE ESCORT Service. 
Tek 3707151. 

































































































































Page 18 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 




ACROSS 


1 Cupid 
5 Circa 

10 Porridge 
container 

14 Pasternak girl. 

15 Left-band page 

16 Entertaining 
Martha 

17 “Evangeline" 
poet 

19 Cypriot 
measures 

20 Spanish gold 

21 Bohemian 

22 Stowe heroine 63 Small child 

24 See 


4 / 24 /as 

12 Penultimate 
letter 

13 Cayes. 

Haiti 

18*'. . . lands 

forlorn" : 
Keats 

23 Man, to Cato 


26 Lloyd, Jeff and 63 Former 


DOWN 


Beau 

30 TV's "You 

There": 1953-57 

31 W.Va. city 
settled in 1793 

32 Unite 

35 Trollope’s 
Phineas 

36 Dies 

37 Moslem prince 

38 Artist James 
Mon _ 

39 Archibald 
theN.B.A. 

40 Publius 
Ovidius — 

41 Lake islets 

42 Stella or Felix 19 Liberal 

43 A Hollywood 11 Acorn 
First Family producer 


45 Single 

46 Spraying 
devices 

47 Bartender's 
need 

51 Vital statistic 

52 majesty 

53 Ratite bird 

54 Pongee shade 25 Kind of 

57 Diamond railroad 

positions 26 Forehead hair 

60 Braided 27 Himalayan 

fastener antelope 

61 Ten-dollarcoin M Growing out 

62 Feed the kitty fȣui de 

— 31 Decrees 

32 Southern 
constellation 

33 Violin designer 


64 Race 


Tunisian 

rulers 


ltgomery 

hibaldof 


1 Permit 

2 New Zealand 
denizen 

3 “Like it !’ 

4 Low or 
worthless 
playing card 

5 Reluctant 

6 Girdles 

7 Paris airport 

8 G.I. haven 

9 Excessive 


34 Stair pan 

35 Zips around 
38 Dukes of 

Parma and 
Piacenza 
42 Inca’s milieu 

44 Summer mo. 

45 Expelled 

47 European 
blackbird 

48 Siena 

49 Void 

50 Tricks 

52 Theater part 

54 Newt 

55 Shout 

56 Seoul is his cap. 

58 Luck . 

59 Diner’s bill 


Cl New York Tunes, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



‘SmimsUmVmMMS 
IAH8 SOUND SPOOKY.' 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
ig by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble tfiese four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


CIKHT 



m 

□ 

□ 


WREEF 



zc 

□ 

□ 


STEBiC 


TTT 


_ 


STOLCY i 


HE 

□ 

□ 



-.irr^o 


HOW A f . 
HANFICAPPEP 
GOLFER PLAYS. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, 83 sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 




Yesterdays 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: CLOVE LAUGH WAITER BLAZER 


Answer A spendthrift wife might love her husband 

^- ORTH 


for this— ALL HE'S 1 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 



C 

F 

C 

F 


Aloarve 

15 

59 

7 

45 


Amsterdam 

9 

*8 

4 

3V 


Athens 

19 

M 

10 

SO 

cl 

Barcetaiw 

17 

63 

9 

40 

r 

Belgrade 

22 

72 

7 

45 

d 

Berlin 

B 

46 

3 

37 

r 

Brussels 

t 

43 

3 

37 

r 

BudlcnMI 

18 

64 

1 

M 

ir 

Bn-danest 

21 

70 

7 

45 

fr 

CopanhaBra 

4 

39 

4 

39 


Casta Del Sol 

IB 

64 

9 

48 

d 

Dublin 

B 

46 

6 

43 


Edinburgh 

B 

46 

4 

39 

tr 

Florence 

22 

72 

8 

46 


Frankfurt 

14 

57 

9 

48 


Geneva 

17 

63 

8 

44 

Ir 

Helsinki 

4 

39 

-1 

30 


Istanbul 

10 

50 

9 

48 


Los Palmas 

22 

72 

13 

ss 

cl 

Lisboa 

10 

50 

9 

48 


London 

10 

so 

6 

43 


Madrid 

13 

55 

5 

41 


Milan 

78 

68 


4] 


Moscow 

IS 

64 

9 

48 


WluniCB 

14 

57 

| 

34 


Nice 

IB 

64 

12 

54 

d 

Oslo 

8 

46 

0 

32 

tr 

Parts 

13 

55 

8 

46 


Prague 

14 

57 

6 

43 

cl 

Revkiavlk 

6 

43 

6 

43 


Rome 

17 

63 

1? 

34 


SlocUtolm 

4 





Strasbourg 

14 

57 

9 

48 


Venice 

17 

63 

7 

45 


Vienna 

22 

72 

7 

43 

fr 

Warsaw 

IB 

64 

n 

46 


Zorich 

14 

57 

ID 

SO 

0 

MIDDLE EAST 




Ankara 

13 

55 

5 

41 


Beirut 

21 

70 

15 

59 


DumciKfSJ 

— 

— 



no 

JGnwaiem 

IS 

59 

7 

45 

d 

Tel Aviv 

ia 

64 

11 

52 

d 

OCEANIA 






Auckland 

18 

64 

9 

48 

fr 

Sydnay 

IS 

64 

14 

57 

d 


— — — — no 


— — — — no 


A5IA 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 

Ban® took 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Baltina 

23 

73 

B 

46 

Hong Kone 

27 

81 

21 

70 

Manila 

32 

90 

23 

73 

New Delhi 

39 

102 

25 

77 

SaoaS 

12 

54 

7 

45 

ShaneSial 

28 

IB 

15 

59 

Slsmaoore 

— 


— 

— 

Talpcl 

31 

88 

18 

64 

Tonya 

22 

72 

13 

55 

AFRICA 





Algiers 

23 

73 

6 

43 

Cairo 

25 

77 

13 

56 

Cape Town 

20 

68 

13 

54 

Casabtamsa 

20 

68 

10 

50 

Hare rt® 

24 

75 

12 

54 

Logos 

32 

90 

26 

79 

Nairobi 

20 

68 

15 

iV 

Tunis 

18 

64 

13 

55 

LATIN AMERICA 


Buenos Aires 

2D 

68 

15 

59 

Lima 

23 

73 

16 

61 


28 

82 

11 

52 

Rio de Janeiro 

27 

81 

21 

70 


Soo Paulo 


— — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 


AIKMRKW 

Atlanta 


Chicago 

Draw 

Detroit 

Honolulu 


d-clouav; lo-towr, fr-folr; Mali, 
.sh- showers; sw-snow; et-stormy. 


LMAAfWlM 
Miami 
Mlnnetunrfls 
Montreal 
HOMOU 
New York 
Sob Francisco 
Seattle 
Toronto 
Wadilnotea 
oovercost; pooartly aoudv 


7 

45 

-3 

27 

tr 

2# 

84 

IS 

59 

DC 

17 

63 

9 

48 

fr 

26 

79 

19 

46 

st 

15 

59 

1 

34 

PC 

29 

B4 

14 

57 

a 

29 

84 

20 

88 

fr 

30 

86 

20 

68 

PC 

25 

77 

12 

54 

fr 

29 

B4 

22 

72 

PC 

17 

63 

12 

54 

st 

19 

44 

4. 

43 

r 

28 

82 

» 

68 

tr 

25 

77 

14 

57 

PC 

19 

M 

11 

52 

fr 

12 

54 

5 

41 

r 

30 

« 

14 

57 

DC 

32 

90 

13 

55 

fr 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST - CHANNEL: Roush. FRANKFURT: Cloudy. 
Temp. W— 1 157 — M|. LONDON: Cloudy, Temp. 13—3 (5S— I7J- MADRID; 
Rainy. Temp. 11 — 3 152—371. NEW YORK: Partly cloudy. Temp. 24 — 13 
ITS — 55). PARIS: Cloudv. Temp, »-£ {55-431. ROME: Cloudy. Toma. 
>* — 12 144 — Ml.TEL AVIV: Clotiav. Temp. *9 — 10 (M — 501. ZURICH: Cieudv. 
Toma. 13-4 <«- 39). BANGKOK: Fossv. Temp, 3S-2* (9S-79). HONG 
KONG: Fair. Temp. 27 — 23 |B1 — 731. MANILA: Stormy. Temo. 31 — 25 
<88 — 771. SEOUL: Foray. Tern P.14— 7(57 — 451. sinGapors; stormy, Temo. 
29 — 25 IB4 — 771. TOKYO! Showers. Temo.21 — 15 (TO — 591. 


[" THE HERO OF THE 
BOOK STARTH7 OUT 
IN THE STOCKROOM 


'* LATER, he hap a 
SHIP IN THE COMPANY 




A DICTIONARY OF SLANG AND 
UNCONVENTIONAL ENGLISH 
Eighth Edition 

By Eric Partridge. Edited by Paul Beale. 
1,400pp. $75. 

Macmillan, 866 Third Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

W,i 

veatiouu mwian . _ . , 

the nearest thing to a standard work in its nad. 
It was a heroic achievement, and Partridge 
went on adding to it over the yeara. By the ume 
the seventh edition came out in 1 969. his addi- 
tions had spilled over into a supplementary 
volume; and he was still collecting material a 
few weeks before his death 10 years later. 

Not long before he died he designated a 
successor — Paul Beale, a former British intel- 
ligence officer who became involved with the 
dictionary in 1974 when he began submitting 
military slang. Beale has produced a single- 
volume edition that is a landmark in the histo- 
ry of the work. Along with some corrections 
and judicious pr unin g, he has done his best to 
bring it up to date; more important, for the 
first time revisions and additions have been 
integrated into the original text 

The new entries reflect a good deal of the 
social history of recent years. Moonies, Sloane 
Rangers and punk rockers have come over the 
horizon, to say nothing of wimps and Wets 
(soft-line Tory opponents of Margaret Thatch- 
er, the focus of the dictionary remains predom- 
inantly British.) 

Since the first edition, and still more since 
the seventh edition, most lexicographical ta- 
boos have broken down. By Partridge's esti- 
mate, what he called ‘‘vulgarisms" occupied 
only about 0.5 percent of the original work, 
though they were what people tended to look 
np first. “Vulgar** topics are another matter, 
the dictionary conveys as few books do the 
preoccupations and attitudes that loomed 


having been essentially a 
It con t a » ns many mistakes and has many 

dating is haphaza rd, and far too 

reliant on primed ^.SSLSf 

material is heavily influenced by Partridge s 
Australasian origins and his experiences as^ 
soldier in World War l. 

Although Beale gives signs of being aware of 
these shortcomings, he belongs to the same 
tradition. The gaps remain. and 
speak, added some gaps of his cwraiders 
tJSllook in vain for many familiar terms- ... 

But this remains an endlessly rewarding 
book. Open it anywhere and you are lftdyto 
come across a strange catch phrase, a deg», 
tion vou could never have guessed at, a bfcj 
metaphor, a well-honed insult, an mmgomg 
allusion — backed up, in most cases, byquota- 
tions from an astonishing range of sources. 



John Gross is on the staff of The New Yak 
Times. 


BEST SELLERS 


7* 


The New Ycffc Times . . 

This fist ii basal ob room Cron toon than 1D0Q boofataef 
lhr t2gbour the United Siaie*. Weeks on list are aotwraMifly 
ccBuecadve. 

FICTION 

71b I* — 

We* 

l FAMILY ALBUM. ^ DaMle Sled — 

o IF tomorrow Comes, by sd«y 

Shew on 


W Mft eeLta 


l 


INSIDE. OUTSIDE bv Herman Wonlc - 
THINNER, bv Rich ard B achman — — — . 
THE LONLEY SILVER RAIN, by Iota 
D MacDonald .... — 

PROOF, by Dick Francis ' 

THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, by 


Tom Clancy ; — — 

GLITZ, by Elmore Leonard „ 
SEE YOU LATER ALLIGATt 


SEE YOU LATER ALLIGATOR, by Wil- 
liam F. Buckley Jr. 


HOTELDU LAC. by Amu. Brookner — 
MINDBEND, by Robin 


i Cook 


ii QUEEN IE by Michael Korda 

13 THE FINISHING SCHOOL by Gail 


!0j 

\l4 

9 


Godwin 


CHAPTERHOUSE: DUNE, by Frank 
Herbert 


12 ro 


much larger in everyday life than they do in 
forms I literature or official pronouncements. 
But if it brings you dose to the commonplace. 


THE TALISMAN, by Stephen King and 
Peter Straub 


— 1 


— ' 23 


NONFICTION 


and to the lowest common denominator, it also 
r emin ds yon of how many subdivisions and 
subcultures a society is liable to have. 

As a reference book, the dictionary is indis- 
pensable Edmund Wilson, once said, “It ought 
to be acquired by every reader who wants his 
library to have a sound lexicographical foun- 
dation.” But since Partridge's death, critics 
have begun to point out some of the dictio- 
nary’s weaknesses, most of which stem from its 


lACOCCA: An Autobiography, by Lee la- 
cocca with William Novak 


BREAKING WITH MOSCOW, by Ar- 
kady N. Shevchenko 

LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Bracafi- 
lia 


SMART WOMEN, FOOLISH CHOICES, 
by Council Cowan and Mefryn Kinder — 
THE COURAGE TO CHANGE, by Den- 
nis Wboley 


1 25 

r-.« 

3 ‘34 
6 3 


CTTiZEN'iflJGHES. bv Michael Dranstn 
THE BRIDGE ACROSS 


Richard Bach 


1 FOREVER, by 


5 *.’10 

4 n 


Solution to Previous 


□□□BO □□□ 
□□□□ 


□EDiiaa 



“SURELY YOU'RE JOKING. MR. 
FEYNMANN." by Richard P. Feynmann 
ALIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Shd Silvrr- 


7. .33 

(0 ft 


MOSES THE KITTEN, by lames Henioi 
THE SOONG DYNASTY, by Sterling 


9126 

H '28 


OF THE MORNING STAR, by 

Evan S. Connell 


THE LIVING PLANET, by David At ten- 


14 TlffiSLOOD OF ABRAHAM, by Jimmy 
Carter 


1 

S‘t9 
12 6 


— 1 
14 .'4 


15 DISTANT NEIGHBORS, by Alan Riding 
ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 20 


NOTHING DOWN. I 

WHAT THEY DONT. 

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 
Mark it McCormack 


N.by Roben.G. Allen 
3NTTEACH YOU AT 


□EHQBsaniaaaaaQQ 

a 

□ 


ClOlTlE 


ENES 


■ rTc oMi 


WEIGHT WATCHERS QUICK START 
PROGRAM COOKBOOK, by Jean Ni- 
detch 


3 31 


ONTA 


treys 


THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jeff 
Smith 


4/24/85 


THE ONE MINUTE SALES PERSON, 
by Spencer Johnson and Lany Wilson __ 


2 14 
5*3 


‘tf’ 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscoct 


O N the diagramed deal. 
South was surprised to 
hear North bid clubs after the 
opponents had bid the major 
suits. 


At favorable vulnerability, a 
save was obviously in prospect, 
so South carefully bid dia- 
monds, a lead-directing move, 
en route to supporting clubs. 
Since East dearly had heart 
support. West took a shot at a 
slam. 


Now North had to be care- 
ful in his turn, and made an 
intelligent bid of six no-trump. 
This showed a desire to save in 


a minor suit and left the choice, 
to South. South naturally 
chose dubs, and East-West 
could not gamble in seven 
hearts because, thanks to the 
four-diamond bid. North knew 

what foleed. ■ 

South appeared to have four 
losm, but South avoided one 
of them when West failed to 
find either the double-dummy 
lead of a diamond or the diffi- 
cult shift to a diamond. After, 
the lead of the spade acc and a 
spade continuation, he could 
not be prevented from strip- 
ping all the major-suit cards 
from the North-South hands. 
Then he played the ace and 
another diamond and end- 


played East, who could not af- 
ford to unblock. 


west 

♦ A3 

o K J 11854 

o Q 10 S 5 

♦ a 


NORTH 

♦ 764 

o — 

♦ J632 

♦ A Q J 9 72 


EAST (D) - 
♦ KQIU52 
? AQS73 
«■ KS 
Jk — ' ' 

SOUTH 

♦ as 
o«a 

C A74 

♦ K 10 B 5 4 3 


The tariffing: 

EM Sopfh 

Heat 

1 ♦ P*8S 

29 

4* ' 4 0 

• 9 

PM8 ?♦ 

• DbL 

ft" Pm 

Wok tod the spade ace. 


Mina 

ISS- 


Wbrid Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse April 23 

Closing prices in local currencies otherwise indicated. 


Amsterdam 


Clew 

Prev. 

ABN 

428 

433 

*CF Holding 

204 


logon 

I7B 


HKZO 

115 

■Elf j 

Miold 


I'.fl 

AMEV 


230 




ftraira Bank 

7A6Q 

76J0 

BVG 

20550 

206 




Caland Hldg 

34 J) 

3430 

Efsevier-NDU 

116J0 


Fokkar 

110 

10950 

Gist Brocades 

18450 

IBS 

■UHneken 

150.50 

1S4J0 

-loogavens 

59 JO 

60 

£LM 

58 

59 JO 

Vaordan 

5030 

50JO 

val Nedder 

6650 

67.10 




yen VarKlar G 

31750 


Pa khoad 

68 


Philips 

57 JO 

57 JO 

Rabeoo 

7150 

71 A0 

Rodamoo 

137 JO 

137 

Pollnco 



Rorenla 

44.40 

44 JO 

ttoval Dutch 



Jnllevor 

344 

345 

4anOnifneran 

30 

3050 

I7MF Stark 

15550 

155 

VNU 

21450 

213 


Ciese Prev. 

Hochtief 

475 474 


3X4 21450 

Hoeach 

10850 107 JO 

Horten 

170 171 

Hussal 

291 50 29450 

IWKA 

31150 30050 


252 249 

Karstodt 

22450 226 

Kaufhof 


Kloeckner H-O 

259 259 

Kloeduirr Wrtrko 

72 7080 


H» 106 

Undo 

428 429 

Lufthansa 

19450 196 


149 )49 

monnewionn 

163-50 164 JO 


m.i.M: .1 

NhaJort 

572 575.10 

PKI 

600 601 

Porsche 

1195 1190 






159 JO 159 

RheJruTjytoll 

325 326 

SCItorl ng 

454 459 

SEL 

359 357 

Siemens 

544J0 547 

Thvsseo 

• 'E'*i '■ 



Volkswagen mark 

20SJ0 2Q550 


567 57000 

Cemmerzbaek index : 123850 
Previous : iae.18 


1] Hoig Koo>t 


If PllIRWlg 

-j 

Arbed 

1810 

Wtu 

’Bekaert 

5410 

ir. 

Cocker! II 

237 

til 

Gobeoa 



EBES 

3110 



i i'l l 

[TLt 



tu ; 




Hoboken 

A-V' 


intercom 


Hf 


-Y.Vl 

8190 

Petroflna 


» 


VB 

m L-V ' 

S«»ffoa 




4170 

if' 



■ '■*4*1 

UCB 

1_-> 7 >1 


Unerg 

IfT'l 

Erfjp 

Vfellle Mqntogne 



Current Stack Index : 2233.79 
Previous : 2224J3 

|$ IPraakfiart 

Zi\ 


AeG-Teletunken 

AUlonz Vers 

Altana 

B«f 

Bayer 

BaywvHvpa. 
Bayer, 1 VerJSank 
BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Cammerabank 

Conilaumml 

Daimler-Benz 

own# 

Dauliche Bafecack 
Deutsche Bank 
Dresdner Bank 
GHH 
Haraener 


1TZ80 113 

1141 1130 
365 365 JO 
2057020540 
214 214JD 




345. .. 
31450 214 

281 2BI 
373J0 375JO 
172J0 177 

135.10 137 JO 
6*4 65850 
350 351 

163 14150 
4722047150 
21140 mM 
150 159-90 
330 323 


Bk East Asia 


Cheuna Kang 
China Light 
Green island 


Hang Sane Bank 
Henderson 
HK Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shanghai 
HK Taloahane 
HK Wharf 
Huich Whampoa 
Hvm 
inn ary 
Jardlna Math 
Jardlne Sec 
Kowloon Mater 
Miramar Hotel 
now World 

iKMsr” 

Stela* 

Swire Pacific A 
To! Cheuna 
won Kwono 
Wtieetock A 
Wing On Co 
Wlnsar 
worm inn 


22M 
16 
15 
B 
45 
1.96 
7.95 
9A0 
3350 
iM 
BJS5 
NA 
6 JO 
2350 
0J9 
0J3 
1250 
13J0 
10.10 
30 
4. VO 
230 
1040 
1J2 
24 
US 

143 

725 

156 

4JO 

2125 


2250 

15.70 

1450 

I 

4425 

153 

7J0 

9.10 

3X75 

550 

8 

7250 

6.10 

2280 

058 
051 
1230 
13 
10 
30 
A70 
225 
1030 
1J1 
24 
147 
143 
7 JO 
1J5 
445 
2075 


HoogS* eg index : 151143 
Previous : lino 


\ Jdbmi 


m2 


AECI 

Anglo American 

Anglo Am Gold 

Bar lows 

Blyvoar 

Buffels 

De Been 

Drlefontetn 

Elands 

GF5A 

Hormanv 

Hlveld Steel 


800 815 

2675 2710 
17400 17*75 
H4S 1150 
1460 1500 
8700 8900 
1010 1025- 
5375 5450- 
1750 1775 
3450 

3025 3100 
390 400 


Ctoee Pro* 


KlOOt 
NeiflTenk 
Pres Stevn 
Rusplal 
SA Brews 
51 Helena 


West Holding 


B15D 0300 
1160 1100 
6225 6350 
1725 1750 
755 755 

3775 3775 
6TO- 610 
5750 6900 


Com pailte Slack lodcx : 10rs.ll 
Previous : 1)8270 


aa Core 
Allled-Lyons 
Anglo Am Gold S92Kxd 974stf 
Ass Brit Foods 236 


S13*< S14U 
177 170 


ASS Dairle 
Bare lays 


BAT. 

P eecti o m 

BICC 

8L 

Blue Circle 
BOC Group 
Boats 

Bowarer Indus 
BP 

Bril Homo St 
Brit Telecom 
Brit Aerespoce 

Briiaii 
BTR 
Burmah 
Cable wireless 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cons 
C o mmercial u 
Cons Gold 
Court tnrids 
Patoely 
De Beers* 

Distillers 
Drlefanlaln 
Flsons 
Free St God 
GEC 

Gen Accident 
GKN 
Glaxo E 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Gutnnoss 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICi 

Imps 

Jaouar 

LondSecurllles 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lanrno 
Lucas 

Mares and so 
Melal Sex 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bonk 
PandO 
Pllklnstan 
P lesser 

Prudential 
Roeal Elect 
Randfontotn 
Rank 
Reed inti 
Reuters 


150 

357 

534 

330 

353 

233 


152 
357 
539 
326 
356 
243 
39 
485 
277 
175 
252 

533 548 

288 293 

139V, 137V, 


476 

270 

173 

250 


403 

208 

662 

220 

515 

150 

185 

224 

552 

135 

470 

530 

278 


S38SS S28VV 

.311 311 


S29U 

IBB 

573 

229 


S29*6 

188 

575 

232 


llVkll 61/64 


685 

242 

855 

208 

427 

74« 

185 

287 

303 

670 

549 

177 

265 

144 

393 

354 

602 

348 

280 

196 

641 

198 


304 

666 

547 

177 

269 

145 


359 

604 

351 

290 

196 

636 

an 


S114V9 S116M 
361 363 

550 552 

388 388 


ROYOlDutCtU 46 47/64 469b 


RTZ 
SonTEhl 
Sainsburv 
Sears Hold togs 
Shell 
STC 

Sid Chartered 


614 


637 
880 
332 336 

88VS 89 

WS 723 

208 206 

472 472 



Close 

tor»v. 

Sun Alliance 

471 

471 

Tale and Lyle 

430 

441 





422 

434 


228 

230 

Trafalgar Hj? 

334 

338 

THF 


U9 


233 

-240 

1 Unilever C 1135/6411 19732, 


182 

187 


2S2 

. 256 

Wool worths 


F.T.30 index : 95950 


| Previous : 97150 



|| TIBI™ |j 


16720 ITUS ] 


3080 

3146 


7420 

7635 

Credltal 

2110 

2130 


9450 

9487 


11850 

11910 

Flat 

2961 

2999 



56 


43410 44150 


7350 

7520 


64750 85000 


1570 

1551 

ftafmobnrarf 

69700 ABS03 


B3500 84050 

Montedison 

1515 

1522 

Ollverti 

6180 

6230 




RAS 

64300 64900 

Rlnascente 

65850 66750 

SIP 

1W0 

1941 

SME 

1199 

1197 

3nla 

2750 

2793 

Stsnda 

Stet 

12500 

2505 




j previous : l» 



11 11 

Air Llqulde 

609 

611 

AlsthoRi ah. 

302 

307 

Av Dassault 




639 





Bangraln 

I860 

1892 

'SSSSS* 

690 

2425 

490 

SfS 

Cerncfour 

2115 


476 


Chib Mad 

1052 

106* 



1250 




EIFAauitaine 

235.10 


Eureael 

885 


Gen Eaux 

628 



1840 



491 


Lee rand 

2080 

2130 

Lesleur 

735 

735 

I'Oraai 

2301 

2431 

Marlell 





I960 

Merita 


Midietln 

920 

930 

Meet tJ?nne®->- 

1821 

1115 

Moulinex 

106 101501 

OccMentale - 

680 

881 




Petrol sr. Use) 

261 

26OJ0 

Peugeot 

34750 

355 

printemp* 

231 

2=0 

Radlaledm 

292 

278 

Redoute 

1325 

1335 

ReuaselUdaf 

1750 

1730 

Sonofl 

651 

661 

Ski* Roeslgnpf 

1820 

1850 


483 

W 

Telemecan 

248o 

Thomson CSF 

sss 

567 

Agefl index : 2KXS 


Prevtas* : 287JS 



CAC Index 7 21X10 


| Previous : 21538 



II Singapore 11 

Cota Storage 

2.55 

n.qJ 

DBS 

6 


FraserNeove 

5 

4.96 1 

HowPor 

122 

118 


Inch caae 
Mai Bank bis 
OCBC 
OUB 

Overseas Union 
Shantm-la 
Sbne Darby 
S*pore Land 
S'pore Press 
SStcamshlo 
St Trading 
Untied Overseas 
UOB 


245 245 
5A5 5J0 

8.90 BJO 

158 154 

239 273 

2.17 Z1B 

1.91 1^5 

7SJ 287 
430 675 

N.T. 108 


Close Prev. 


2 174 

440 436 


Straits Times lad. ladex : 795A4 
Pravtovs : 78779 


AGA 

Alta Laval 

Asca 

Astra 

Anas Copco 

BoUdan 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esselto 

Handel sbanken 

Pharmacia 

Soob-Sconla 

Sandvlk 

Ska mica 

5KF 

SwedWiMatch 

Volvo 


400 395 

196 196 

356 351 

395 400 

122 122 
718 218 

322 322 

284 278 

350 NA. 
162 162 
201 200 
NX). — 
NA 410 
NA 90J0 
215 216 

220 m 

250 251 


AftaersvaerMea Index : 39720 
Previous : 39408 


Sydney 


ACI 
ANI 
ANZ 
BHP 
Bora I 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Coles 

.Comolca 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixi 

Hooker 

Maoolkm 

MIM. 

Mvor 

Oakbrtdao 

Poke 

Poseidon 

RGC 

Santas 

Sloloti _ 

Southland 

vwwdsldo 

War mold 


200 205 

272 


273 

465 

568 

316 

230 

377 

378 


245 243 

638 


663 

295 

218 

304 

155 

270 

315 

177 

98 


293 

215 

303 

155 

270 


460 458 

576 570 


630 420 

175 175 


25 25 

180 160 


All Ordinaries Index 
Previous :B4U0 

Source.' Reuters. 


355 158 

;BS9Jfi 


Tefcy 


Altai 

Asanl Chem 


Asaht^lnss 


Bank of Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

Costa 

citoh 

□ant Ip aon Print 


Dahva Hnm 
Ddwa Securities 


PrauC 
Pull Bank 
Full Photo 


451 450 

809 800 
843 862 

773 770 

517 513 

1250 1230 
1740 189) 
353 356 

994 995 

538 542 

795 797 

■830 1800 
1450 1400 

1710 1710 


Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
-Honda 

Japan Air Unas . 
Kallma 
Konsof Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kayocera 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Matsu Elec inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
-Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Corn 
MHsu and at 
Mi tsu Kashi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

K GK insulators 
toko Sec 
Nlooon Kouaku 
NtooanOii 
Nippon Stoel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 

Pioneer 

Rksh 
Shorn 
SMraazu 


1140 1120 
802 798 

*75 490 

1290 1240 
5700 5950 
292 291 

1410 1430 

145 145 

5300 NA 
59B 400 

439 437 

338 m 
1440 1470 
709 710 

1470 1470 
436 448 


393 

240 

527 

335 

500 


393 

259 

532 

340 

512 


1000 WIB 
1040 107ft 
873 879 

717 716 

1380 1400 
875 887 

147 147 

233 232 

*30 *35 

1040 1040 

n 20 mo 

2570 2590 
086 185 

1000 999 

685 687 


Sttototsu Chemical 1000 1020 


Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumllomo Metal 
TajM Corn 
Tolsha Marine 
Takoda Chem 
TDK 

Tenth _ 

Tekvo Elec. Power 1710 1730 

Tokyo Marine 807 807 

Topoan Printing 855 BSS 

Tansy ind 451 452 

Toohfba ■ v 385 3*9 

Toyota 1240 1250 

Yamolcnl Sec 745 779 


4240 4250 J 
1440 1470* 
218 218 
595 400 

146 148 

213 215 

413 417 

836 ,851 
5490 5490 
434 


MUM/DJ. Index : 12124.14 
Previous : 72I79J2 
new index: 951 J8 
Prev ices : 952J7 


2725 2740 4850 FCA Inti 

3530 34B 7725 C FalcnnC 

15tf IM 1186 Flcnbrdae 

^ JW 2870 ISO Fardy Ret 

Credit Suisse W0 WM 2720 Fed Ind A 

E led rewatt m 2880 1400 F City Fin 

750 740 1900 Fraser 

I960 2SS5 6G«hllsA 

A8 ^ 2700 GoocCoihe 

197D 1960 1DI972 Geoerude 
1640 lot 2450 Gibraltar 
6460 6460 34681 Goideorpi 
1433 14« 1300 Graft G 
8650 8650 27SGrandUC 

55 522 IWOOCL Forest 

3950 4000. JOOGt Pacific 

366 372 BOGreytMd 

379 375 isoo H Grow A 

g*»jto<ac . IMP liffl saooHrdlng At 

Stria Reinsurance 10900 ))W0 SSOHa*kor 

SwHd volksbank 1470 USA 921 Hares D 

Union Bank . 36« 37a iroHBayCa 

WnlwTftur 4720 4800 45900 imasco 

Zurich Ins 23600 24200) 4700 Indal 

300 [nails 


Adia 
Bank Lou 
Broom Bovorl 
aba Golov 
“/rail Sutssa 
lectrowatt 
Georg Richer 
interabcoimr 
Jacob Suchard 
Jolmoll 
LanatsGvr 
Nestte 
OerllkooB 
Roche Baby 
Sandaz 
Schindler 
suiter 
SBC 


SBC index : <37 JB 
Previops : 68838 


N-Qj nor quoted; mjl: not 
avaltaMe; *fl: eiudivMind. 



April 22 


Canadian, stocks da AP 


310 Ann Free 
15200 AcfckiRds 
7150 Aratao E 
20200 Agra Ind a 
24070 Alt Energy 
500 Alta Nat 
807 Ahwma St ■ 
iSBOArgcen 
1356 Atco I f 
1150BP Canada 
9258 Bank BC 
98957 Bank NS 
15394 Borrk* o 
15000 Baton A I 
5354 Banatua R 
142*0 Braiome 
5954 BramaUm 
100 Brenda M 
3027 BCFP 
29*53 BC R«S 
3*15 BC Phone 
2200 Brunswk 
1800 Budd Can ’ 
15439 CAE 
100CCLA 
zomcaisibBt 
36756 Cad Frv 
SOOCNorWest 
20*27 Con Trust 
200C Tuna 
149158 Cl Bk com 
1000 can Not Rw 
95215 CTIreAl 
400 Cob 
T 700Celanes8 
700 Cefam 175p ■ 
52MCT3lstbA 
2000CDtatbBf 
13555 CTL Bank 
100 Canvanlrs 
3000Casaka R 
350CanronA 
29*40 Crownx 
39900 Czar -Res - 
33035 Daon Dev 
JB3 Dtssn A 
4000 Denison A p 

61369 Denison B t 

3900 Develcan 
10240 Oldcnsn A f 
I2JS3 Dlcknsn B 
2746 Daman A 
„ 1D952 Dofasra A 
50 Du Pont A 
15490 DVtoxA 
1050 EidtiomX 
12900 Saul hr Svr 


Htah LgwCImahje 


5400 Inland Gas 
2100 Inti Thom 
43180 Intar Pipe 
H2lvaeoB 
4300 Jannock. 
62l4KamKotta 
lOOKetatv H- 
793 Kerr Add . 
3997 cobalt 
34778 Loc Mnrts 
933LOntCem 
1*76Lorana 
M0 LL Loo 

idULottawCo 


55314 ST& 531* — 
816 16 16 

515 173k IB + Vfc 

. 5786 7*1 7W— W 

*211* 208S 21 — *k 
514V* 141b 14V9 — U 
*23*1 2316 . 23’4*— Vk 
SI916 19V* 1914 
SSU B*k B%+ V* 
53414 34 34 — Vk 

S5U. 5*k 516+ Vk 

S12*k 12*k 12*6— tk 
134 129 131 —3 

51*36 16*6 16*4 
425 415 415 —10 

485 480 480 —5 

SI 716 17 17W 

SIEk lWk l(Hk+ Vk 
SWk 916 916 

247 245 24* + 1 

522*4 22U. 2216 
51716 Iflk 17VB+ Ift 
S2214 2116 22to+to 
si7*k n 17 + to 
538 28 28 

SS» 598+ 14 

814% Uto 14to— to 
524 24 24 

S37to 3 *4k 36to— to 
514*6 1416 14to 
S30to 30to 3016— to 

28 a 28 .+ 1 

S8to ■ Bto 8*4 + to 
51116 TT14 1114 
5716 7to 7to 
51744 17to 17*4+ Vk 
ISV 5ft 

S5to 5*4 5*4+ 14 

SlOto 9*u 10to + hi 
SSto 5to 5*4+ to 
335 338 335 —5 

512*4 13*4 12*4— to 
51814 18 1816+ to 

192 189 192 + 3 

440 425 435 —5 

390 390 390 —35. 

5127k 12to 12to+ 16 
512 llto 117k + to 
56*4 64k 6*4 

S6*k 6to 6*4 . 
S6to 6to 614 
225 210 2TO —10 

S25to 25to 25to— 14 

516 16 16 

54216 43 42 

57 694 694 

48*6 Bto Bto— 1ft 

any. 20 20 —to 

51816 17*6 18 

104 into into— to 
280 280 280 —10 
S21Ml 21 2144+ *4 

£1316 13 13 to — *4 

STT. TOto 17 
27 27 27 

112V, 1316 12*6— to 
300 2» 393 

*1016 10 10 —M 

58 744 8 

534 32*4 34 +2 

46 46 46 —to 

S87to 57to 87to+ to 
S30to 30to 30to— 16 
S25to 2514 2Sto— *6 
S7 7 7 

145 WS 143—1 
Sim im I9to— **r 
ilOto lOto IDto 

SISto 1571 157k- 1ft 
828 . Z7V| 27& + 3ft 
513*6 13*4 13*4+. lift 
*15*6 15*6. 1S*|+to 
517VS- 1716 1716— 16 

St £* - ,nh+M, 


Mgft Lew dees Che* 


400MDSHA 
13200 MICC 
2650 Melon HK 
1800 McGrow H 
135514 Mer land E 
H625MotsoflAf 
1300 Nabisco L 
72214 Noranda 
14520 Norcsn 
139537 Nva AHA I 
32855 NowscaW 
16503 NilWst sp A 

86960aicwood 
4000 Oshawb A f 
Z7D0 Pamaur 
10600 PanCan P 
400 Pembina 
2150 Phonlx Oil 
1278 Pine Point 
17460 Placer 
2300 Proviso 
36450 Que Stura o 
1725 Ray reck f 


51716 17to T7to 
235 230 230 +'5 

S24to 24*6 34*6+ *6 
522*6 22*6 22*6 - 
425 415 415 -U 

516 isn 7596 — 
*24*fc 24*4 2flfc+-to 
SITto 1716 17*6— to 
-5159k 15*6 15*6 - . 
S6to 6 6V6 - 

S25to 25 2S —to 
53 50 50—2 

SB a 8. + to 


524to 2416 WU— to 
SBto 7to 7*6-r to 




36 


-B|*6 21*6 21*6+ 16 


siito lito lia— .. 

128 129 125 - 3 

«4to 34 Vs 34to 

SS ^ 2316— 1% 
53616 35*6 35to+ *6 
1216 12to— to 
13 1316+ ft, 

' *39 29 39 — «» 

51816 18 IB 


12157 

8200 Res Serv I 
47KI Revn Pro A 
$00 Rogers A 
ISO Roman 
SO Rothman 
3879SceBtre 
1400 Scotts » 
10600 Sears Can 


451 P9 Shell Con 


53311 Sherri 
wasiema 
1540Sauthm 
1400 st Brodcst 
100605telco A 

ITOOSulPtra 

50 Steep R 
5425 Sydney o 
aoooTafcorn 
6i7D0Tara 
1390 Teck Cor A 
21750 Teck B f 
2845 Tax Can 
3670 Thom N A 
28288 Tor Dm Bk 
1336 Toretor B I 
184 Traders A f 
12450 TntSMt 
100 0 Tim tty Res 

BKEBKW* 

67330 Trfmac 
81885 Turbot 
munlcarp Af 
2100 Un Carbtd 
11444 (J EntprEse 
liOOUKeno 
MO Van Per 
B70Q Verm Af 

ZSSS 

■ US SSS 1 " 

3574 WootfWd A 
talWSYkBeor 
Tefal sates 9JS9.841 


S32to 31*6 31*4 . 
5181ft 1BV6 ItHi + *6 
S7V3 716 716-i. 1* 

5281ft 28*6 28*6 
52696 26*6 26*6 , „ 
S19to 1914 im+to 
495 m 480 +■ S; 
JBIft to W/ 
511 10*4 10*i-#^ 

521 Vj 21 21 — *6 

293 291 293 — J 

165 160 .160 — } 

-89*6 916 916 - 
510 10 10—14 

MOM. 401ft 401ft— to 
86*6 6*k 5*4 

523*6 231ft 23*6+ > 
. 87*6 7*6 7*i. *• 

528*6 28*6 28*6+ to 
8716 7 714 i 

1916 9to 91ft — 34 
55514 55 5516— to 

512*4 1214 12to 
520*4 20*6 20V, 

310 305 305 —5 

250 250 2S0 

23 23 23 — 1 

96 94 94 —4 

522Va 2216 221ft— *6 
51314 131% 1314 
813*6 131ft 13*6 r 
536*4 36V, 366ft - 

155V, 54*4 54*6—1 


819* 6 1916 1914— *4 


XU®* 201ft 20*b> 
521*6 . 21*4 21*4 
SlOVft 9*6 1016+ to 
395 395 395 —15 

125*6 2S*6 25*6' 
Stm 241ft 34to-r-T4 
430 - 415 425 +5 

42 57 59 —1 

J 7 . 7 7 +14 

511*6 11*4 11*4 
51114 llto llto— to 
81116 llto 1114+ 1ft 
320 320 320 —5 

559k 5*4 5*6+ Vi, 

515*6 IS 15 — 

578 7B 7B + 14 

511*6 llto llto— *6 
** SH t . 
shares 


13E 380 Index: 


Owe Prmaus 
l«ft» Z63&50 


.4pra22\ 


SO^BcmkMqnt 

*4QQ Roitanrin 

IsaSr 


High Low Close Otoe 
527*6 26% 2416— H, 
Wk Wk 

Se^ l°to-+Uk 

515 14*4 jj + fJ 

«■» iBtoiitolto 

52716 27to 2714 ii"' 

Sig? 1W4WH** 

19*6 

2Bto 28*4— to 
*38 27*4 28 + % 


Indu8trfal» Index: 


Ctose 

NA 





' s- 






? ,.S' . 

‘-•'■ft' ■- ... 




.. • * 



















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


fseaiiaUv 

SB*' 


SPORTS 



Globetrotter 
S#^ On A Strai^it Road 

“ r «D^^ i ' r aSaiK •' ,mernmiaealH 

** « an^h? ■ LONDON-" 

058 a sifa««? e ^ a visiting titL Sux 


World^ 

^fiealeeivw 

,n » & 

ided 


--dSpjar 


- fa acked Sh ,ns riw! * 0 ? 

m an an«_?; nvxi -I* 0 as/-. 




titrate Tribune 

Leave it!" yelled 
w a visiting Can. Sure enough, Sian- 
■ ley. who bad been assigned to 
gpard the net simply ty ran V* he 
stood head and shoulders above the 


^** J 5 r an ae ^VC - ^“e times that afternoon the 

iross is o riu " 01 haD entered the gawky teenager’s 

m ‘ n *siQff gf ^ goaLWho on earth could have sus- 

^ peered that here were the begm- 
'■ rungs of a love affair destinedto 


George VI by the arm at cop finals. 
For. genuine services to sports, 
Rous received the king’s knight- 
hood after the 1948 London Olym- 
pics. 

By then he was long since done 
with stooping to pick balls out of 
his net (a twice-broken wrist had 
obliged him to stop playing in his 
college days) and with traveling as 
a referee. He bad already ex- 
changed schoolleadung for the sec- 


®ESt^eJTp^n Rob H ughes Sp?62]iS F i (f 5 

- . .. . - ... . — »sb Central Council for Physical 


ihasr- 


TfcNe. 


SKSK; 






outlast tbree-quartes of a century? 
Who could have imagined that 


isb Central Coundl for Physical 
Recreation. 

. ■ "on-,: •• " — And he was just warming up. In 

^ *ftnley would do more m his way 1961, at 66. he really took off as 

nourish and shape soccer than president of FIFA, soccer’s inter- 
national authority. His rule was 
that of a colonialist, gathering Asia 
and Africa into FIFA’s fold, as 


Hctka 


even Pel*? 

That great Brazilian will surely 

iLv albuv r, t be among millions, literally mil- , _ 

pwoRRow' covSSfc Skh s bons, wishing they could pay trib- indeed he had used his diplomacy 
qj-- ute at Sir Stanley Rous’s 90th birth- to bring postwar Gcrmau v into Fn- 

*nsr. v «?£■ *>> Htnn^.r- party i 11 London on Thursday. 

LONLSV • Given half the chance, the birth- 

“ ^tijyL day boy will cut through the pomp 
and ceremony (which be adores) 

■ with self-deprecating humeff about 

his days as a pioneering referee. 

And he will ask but one thing — 
that the game should somehow re- 


cu, fc V - -^ocW 

hfgte , “ M1 *s 




to bring postwar Germany into Eu- 
ropean soccer. 

Rous has dined a global Ef crime 
on refereeing tales. Only last week 
he was spinning the one about a 
player who accused him of blind- 
ness. What did you say? Oh, dead 
as well, are you? And the one about 
the spectator shooting abuse. 
“Who,” Rous demanded, “is refer- 
eeing — you or 1?" The reply: 
“Neither of us.” 

Somewhow be retained a streak 


Mend. > - ■ discover its sense of fun. 

^nhocfi ^ld age does not blur his vision. 

^.MSriixu schoo l ByTVednesday he will have seen 

pterhouse W - - “““thing like 110 matches this 

cr. ■ L! ^. b,~ f - season, the latest being a European of the gullibility he displayed as a 

s£H S man - *> S*pw — .. scmiFuiaL 14-year-dld goalie. When the refe r- 

_ European club competitions, ee’s whistle was first pressed into 

nosfktion ^ now ^rimilljon dollar affairs, his hand, he recalls asking the Nor- 
X‘C»- vi \xsm v, . grew from seeds planted exactly 30 wich team captain (who had put it 
years ago by this Fn gKdunnn io- there) when he should blow it 



Rangers Beat Orioles for Fourth in a Row 


Unued Pros imenuMnai Minnesota past Seattle, 9-5. The 

. . ARLINGTON, Texas — Gary Mariners* Gorman Thomas hit his 
Ward drove in two runs and Larrv sixth homer of the year. 

P— .Vfc ..J IW U. U. ■_ 

Angels 6, A’s 1 


Sir Stanley end the World Cup 


UmdPrwikMnKMMt 




was not surprising that Norwich 
won everything." 

"You can’t laugh in this game 
h-, cipal (known as the diagonal sys- anymore," Rous sighs. "Everything 

x'dai^ 5lCRo5s FotsSS icm, because the referee operates is so grim, so deadly earnest, so 
rel> \ f lL re • between diagonally placed lines- argumentative. It's the money. I 
vv - - . v . ^ men) formulated by Rous. suppose. Winning is eveMhing. All 

^The satellites that beam impor- this talk of bribery. . . . Oh dear, so 
rent matches to billions at a time distressing," 


^ASHbES* 


ShJSXe 


es T*i= kJTTEN.t>i came outside Sir Stanley's infiu- 
so*j\\. DVNAsri t, :6t ence. So did the jet travel that has 


r>»e 

;*°c..SS' w,SBiS ffiEi 

iwxsopicniiiaj 

•bLOC-r.-OF^^HAM^ 


T.-WTNEiiiHKiRih 


> AlmRiijj 


recently taken him to speaking en- 
gagements in Toronto, Zurich, 
Moscow, Paris, Amsterdam, Glas- 
gow and, as guest of honor. Singa- 
pore during the Asian Cup. 

Some schedule for a 90-year-old. 
Some globetrotting for a truc-Wne 


the post of honorary president, he 
declined Havdange's suggestion of 
naming the World Cup the Rous 
World Cup. 

Similarly Rous killed at the 
source an English suggestion that 
FIFA ought to charge a fee for the 
use of its laws, warning that since 
the copyright was in his own name, 
such a course "would have lined no 
pocket but my own.” 

The way soccer and sport in gen- 
eral have developed, perhaps (hat 
does suggest Sir Stanley's values 
are bygone. The greed of his sport 
today is such that, despite the su- 
perfluity of tournaments that re- 
duce even European Cup finals to 


A man m his dotage, out of step 
with modem times? "Maybe Tm 
old-fashioned,’' concedes Rous, 

"But I always followed the philoso- 
phy of my first boss. Sir Charles 
Clegg, then chairman of the FA, 
flrnt a *wnn caiHlOt get lost QQ B 
straight road." 

, v a- .w. - — Not lost, but perhaps taken from 

' My "- Tl -' vsd uisceu«b amateur bom the son of a village behind. Retirement crept up on 

J — * - ' ■ * him before he was ready. He was, 

a mere 79 when he was 
as FIFA’s president in 

— — ... 0 — — He had sough 1 one more four- _ . 

1 .,-|. B .- T rn quaint old British ability to keep year term, ana believed until too Banhara Langer and his Amencan 
a- . ~ ;_ I hS one’s head while all around are late the Brazilian Jo5o Havdange’s slopped at a fast-food 

i ONE ~z iALEspEsss loang theirs. word that he would never stand res ^ auran ^ a hundred yards 

.•-rj.: jsijmJi. • '^If Rous ncvo" lost the t ranip nTiiy against Sir Stanley. But stand Ha- from the Augusta National Golf 
it came frqoi a boyhood among vriange did, and the Africans, dwb. The Langers stood in line. 


penalty shootouts, yet another non- 
sensical trophy appears. 

On August 21, France and Uru- 
guay will play one another as 
champions of their continents. It 
will be hyped as yet another pseu- 
do- World Cup and, now that mon- 
ey alone is the sporting god, it has 
the blessing of those who rule. 

1 only hope it is not during Stan- 
ley Rous's lifetime that the real 
World Cup — the one he fdt 
should not bear his name or any 
other — becomes the Coca-Cola 
Cup, the Camel Cup or the Cin- 
zano Cup. Even Sir Stanley might 
not convince us of a funny side to 
that. 


Parrish and Pete O'Brien hit home 
runs to support the two-hit pitch- 
ing of Charlie Hough here Monday 
night, lifting the Texas Rangers to 
their fourth straight triumph, a 6-! 
decision over Baltimore. 

In his first complete game of the 
season, knuddeballer Hough (1-0) 
struck out eight and retired his last 

BASEBALL ROUNDUP 

19 consecutive batters. He gave up 
a double to Jim Dwyer in the first 
inning and an infield single to Cal 
Ripken in the third (when he also 
walked his only barter of the game). 

Texas took a 3-1 lead in the first 
off Scott McGregor (M), who suf- 
fered his first loss in seven lifetime 
decisions to the Rangers. Ward's 
run-scoring triple, a sacrifice fly by 
Buddy Bell and Parrish’s boner 
put the Rangers ahead to stay. In 
the second, they made it 5-1 and 
chased McGregor on Toby Har- 
rah’s RBI double and a run-scoring 
angle by Ward. O’Brien's second 
home run of the year, off Sammy 
Stewart in the eighth, produced the 
final margin. 

Baltimore, which has lost six of 
its last right games, scored in the 
first when Dwyer doubled, went to 
third on a passed bail by catcher 
Don Slaught and scored on a wild 
pitch by Hough. 

"Hough was changing speeds 
very wen," said Dwyer. “Their 
catcher can hardly catch that 
knuckleball, so how am 1 supposed 
to hit it? If we looked lure we 
couldn't hit it, your eyes weren’t 
deceiving you.” 

Royals 2, Bhe Jays 0 

In Toronto, Charlie Lribrandt 
(2-0) pitched a five-hitter and Steve 
Balboni and Darryl Motley ho- 
mered to lead Kansas City past the 
Blue Jays, 2-0. Loser Dave Slieb ( 1- 
2) also went the distance. 

Twins 9, Mariners 5 

In Minneapolis. Kirby Puckeu 
hit his first major-league borne run, 
good for three runs, and Gary 
Gaetti hit a two-run shot to power 


In .Anaheim. California. Juan 
Beniquez and Doug DeCinces hit 
home runs, and Jim Slaton (2-0) 
scattered three hits over eight in- 
nings to lead California's 6-1 rout 
of Oakland. 

Imfians 6, Tigers 4 
In Cleveland, rookie third base- 
man Chris Piitaro's fourth- inning 
error led to three unearned runs 
and helped the Indians to a 6-4 
verdict over Detroit. Cleveland has 
won five of iis last seven games. 

Brewers 4, White Sox 2 
In Chicago, Bill Schraederis two- 
run homer with one out in the 
eighth broke a 2-2 tie and lifted 
Milwaukee past the White Sox, 4-2. 


Winner Danny Darwin (2-0) 
pitched seven innings. 

Astros 4, Reds 1 

In the National League, in Hous- 
ton. Mike Scott scattered five hits 
over Sis innings and Kerin Bass hit 
Houston's first home run in the 
Astrodome this year as the Astros 
downed Cincinnati, 4-1. Houston's 
third straight victory ended the 
Reds' winning streak at seven 
games. 

Padres 5, Braves 3 
In San Diego, seventh-inning 
RBI singles by Tony Gwynn and 
Steve Garvey broke a 3-3 tie, and 
Andy Hawkins and Rich Gossage 
retired the final 24 baiters to pace 
the Padres past Atlanta, 5-3. 

Dodgers 3, Giants 2 
In San Francisco, Pedro Guerre- 
ro's two-out, two-run homer in the 
ninth tied the score and Dave An- 


derson's bases-empty home run in 
the 10th gave the Dodgers a 3-2 
decision over San Francisco. Dave 
LaPoint (0-3) had a 1-hit 2-0 shut- 
out when he yielded Guerrero’s 
game-tying shoi. 

Mets 7, Cardinals 6 
In St. Louis, home runs by Dar- 
ryl Strawberry and George Foster 
helped Calvin Schiraldi to his first 
major-league victory as New York 
nipped the Cardinals. 7-6. 

PhiBies 9, Expos I 
In Montreal. Von Hayes drove in 
four runs and Gary Maddox three 
as Philadelphia bombed the Expos. 
9-1. 

Pirates 5, Cubs 3 
In Pittsburgh. Steve Kemp hit a 
two-run single and three pitchers 
combined on a seven-hitter as the 
Pirates downed Chicago. 5-3. and 
ended a five-game losing streak. 



The Allocated Preu 

Chris Pittaro slid in safely frith a seventh-inning triple, but an error by the Detroit rookie in 
the fourth paved the way for three Cleveland runs, and the Indians went on to a 6-4 victory. 


VANTAGE POINT/ Thomas Boswell 



At the Top of His Game 9 Langer Bidding for a Place at the Top 


:c-ht m yiv. "RsoucsnSj on his first school outing has been. 
H-R,=iV ->A3C*Ok. h tv (he quality sus taining him — that 
. njJjri&i.v. .*Tt 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The day af- 
ter he won the Masters last week. 


: SL 


Too bad Langer snatched his That’s only fair. Langer is al- That's how Langer, the son of a 
green coat almost before anyone ready the golfer without honor in bricklayer, did it. 
knew he was in town. Seldom has his own land. With only one public They would know how tough a 
so appealing a player won such a golf course. West Germany barely four-foot putt can be when the gro- 
large prize so quietly. knows he exists. In the voting for eery money — and your chances of 

Langer never made the leader his nation’s top sportsman in 1984, ever bring a somebody — ride on it. 
board until Saturday evening, was he wasn’t nominated — despite be- They know where the yips are bom. 


E 


_ he wasn’t nominated — despite be- 

yftii came irom a Doynooa among yaange mo, anu me Ain cans, -»*»*«'. »» »» «*~i obscured by greater names until ing Europe's No. 1 golfer. So it was fitting that Langer was 

farmers and fishermen, his Suffolk whom Rons ‘thought he had helped ordered the chain's 2,157,345768th Sunday's back nine and didn’t * Langer’s stoiy is one Ben Hogan, sitting ih Everyman’s Burger Joint, 
rustic lilt was smoothed into the most, gave their crucial votes not to burger, took a scat, ate and eventu- reach the top alone until he was Sam Snead and other rough-edged When he first made an interaation- 

- - - - -ll.71-.fi VI- — — — — ———— .— J t- - — . fkn L n l> TJ-nu,- £0 /• 1_ 1_ i i —T T-.L — J 


careful enunciation you hear from 
■ another grocer’s child, Prime Mro- 


iira:K 

tore to unbiai 

l-Wcii 

mi 1 

SC' Sti 

o:i< i 

U- ’.hr 

:• 7s:i 1 

■ kr.r* 

♦aqjk: 


U15T «■ 


* A " lit - 


;KJ!ejS4 riji 

'T.~ 


■—4 r- 

*« *-f 

Utofc* *»• 

5K7H 


Oil l 

- 

1 cli'i* 

re: 

After 

: n T| 

JTJ - 

Eas; oUb« = ' 


The august, sometimes autbori- 


ihe old schoolteacher bat 4o the 
Latin American lawyer. 

Rous had done the missionary 
work; Havdange proffered prom- 
ises of large-scale soccer-develop- 
ment courses on a Coca-Cola trol- 
ley. And although Rous accepted 


ally left No on recognized him. 

No one, that is, except a PGA 
tour official, Rik Carlson — who 
watched in amazement as nothing 
happened. "I knew Langer wasn’t 
well known in America. But this 
was in Augusta. The next day." 


playing the 7 1st hole. He was 68-68 men of fierce ambition who learned al splash, finishing second in the 
over the final two days. the game as caddies in the 1920s 1981 British Open, he did it in 

Now, by underlining bis Masters and 30s would appreciate. cracked old golf shoes that most 

triumph with a sudden-death vie- They would know what it feds U.S. tour pros would be embar- 
toiy Sunday at the Heritage Qas- Qke to carry a bag at age 8, to carry rassed to let their caddies wear, 
sic, Langer has given us a second double before your teens and to Langer’s made it big and fast the 
chance to get to know him. leave school and turn pro at 14. last few years in Europe, but when 


SCOREBOARD 


Baseball 


Hockey 


Golf 


NHL Playoffs 


v—ii- 


:« *■■■■ 
.jiS: ;•-« 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
pcfrnlf MS H> US-4 > I 

*? CMrataiid sos 3sa Mx—4 » 4 

*: * fcrris. L eon (71. Bofr (SI: Schulz*. Jett- 

' . cos' <B), Waddell IB) and WQlara. W— 
*■ SdhulM. 1-S. L— Morris, 2-1 Sw— Waddell (41. 
Kansas a tv m in m*-3 I 0 

,-iieSBfcO Toronl* DM DM NS— 4 I 0 

Lalbfiond* and Sandberg; SHeb aid BJWar- 
nnez. W— LelbrantH, 2-0. L — SI lab. 1-2. HRs— 
Kansas CIlv. Boltwnl (4). Mnflev (2). 

^ Barn wane IM ON B8S— 1 3 0 

Texas ms bm six — s j 0 

McGregor, SNHI (21. SSIstrarl (I) and 
v Demosey; Hougti ana Stouahf.W— Hough. 1 -4L 
CJ* 7 L— McGregor. 1-1. HRs— Texas, Parrish 131. 
a 'I O’Brien (3J. 

^Milwaukee 0M 110 020-4 f a 

j 7 - G CKiCago SI0 BIO MM 7 \ 

Sin s Darwin. Fingers (» and sairoader; Dot- 
jjj i 4an,Aaasle(7lanbdFlsk.W— OarwbL.M.Li— 
r* J Agosto.0-l.Sv— Fingers (3). HR— Milwaukee. 
2 sehroeder Ul. 

Cl- ^‘Seattle OOB SU 031 — S ie I 

2- '.Mkmesata IN 4M Six— • U B 

r M.Y owns. Best M. Stanton (71. Vande Berg 
f*. d (?» and Valle: Schram. UDovli (B), Lysander 
0'2(ai and Laudner. w— Sdirom. 1-2. L— 
Si 5. FLYowng. 1-1 Sv— Lvsander (It. HR*— Seat - 
L i'”* Thomas (4). Minnesota, Poekett il). 
jf: tOWettl (31. 

V> -'Oakland BIO 000 DM— 1 3 0 

Q'c caiHamta ooinuttlx-411 e 

5 A 1 Sutton, McCaitv (71. Kaiser (B) and Heath: 
P- .'sialon,DJMaore(9)and Boone. W— Slotoa2-a 
SS. fL— Sutton.2-i.HRs— Oakland. Heotn (31. Coll- 
*£ Atornla. BeMauez (21. DeCIncu (». 

v NATIONAL LEAGUE 

V- «i»nlladeJptila 1B0 m ISM 15 i 

Montreal Ml 001 00M » 0 

LJ Rowiev. Hudson (el. Carman (71. Andersen 
gn. ■ |7). ZocJiry I9J and Vlrall; Heskelh. Gro- 
|S* ibenthln (41. Schatzeder (7). Roberge (B), 
S?~; burke (91 and FltzgerokL W— Rowlev,34L L— 
b i Heskefh, l-l. HRs— ManlreaL Dawson (23. 
■■ - Philadelphia. Wilson (2). 

■< ..Chicago BOO IN B2B-3 7 B 

^Pltti burgh Bil 013 Tlx— 5 8 1 


71* tafia?' 

£x*r Soak 

: » pta 

t* * '• 

?jjs ■ * 

?S!3 r*® 


tXV-e, 

::x v : - 


ice 

y .; ji-.-? A. 
Wir.-.'-l'P- 
i'.n -jn*.' . 

iV * 


; ~ j: -! 


Ruitwen. 0-1. 5v— Candelaria (3). HR— Pitts- 
burgh. Durham (l). 

OncInnaM BN *10 MB— 1 5 1 

Heashxi ON 012 91K-4 7 T 

Tibbs. Price (It. and BUantefto; ALSatt, 
Smith (93 ana AihbV. W— ALSartt 1-0. L— 
TiBbs, 0-3. sv— Smith (2). HR— Houston, Bass 
in. 

NOW Yard 321 IN MM 1 1 

SL Louis 6B3 0M 2M— A IB 2 

Scftirokfl, McDowell (7), Orosco (B) and 
Carter; Tudor, Davlev (4), Horton (4), Lahti 
(Bi and Laval Here. Nieto <91. w— Schiraldi, V 
D. L— Tudor, 0-2. Sv— Orosco (2). HRs— New 
York. Strawbsrry (41. Foster (3). 

Atlanta 3M BM MM 4 B 

Son Diego 2H DM Mx— 5 7 0 

Bedrosion. Smith («). Camp (7). Garber (11, 
ondCerene: Hawttlas.GoseaM(ll,andlCen- 
nedv. W— Hawkins, WL L — Smith. VI. Sv— 
Gossage (2). HR*— Atlanta. AAurgttv (7). San 
Diego. Kennedy [4j. 

Los Ang el es MMMl-1 5 1 

Son Francisco 002 BM BM M 5 B 

wwav CasHUo U). C-Dtai ID. NMentuar 
(f) and Yeager; LaPoint. Garretts (103 and 
Brotily. W— Nledenhier, 1-0. L— LaPobit, DO. 
HR*— Los Angelas. Guerrero (21. Anderson 
( 1 ). 




r -V iTtfi St' 1 . 

\Ksigr. 


' X ? 5 .. 

"■atii -. ->■ 


Transition 


BASEBALL 


! --ai *r-‘ 


,f - . J — j» 

»:s! s*_ 

"u -"^2" 


i 


■ \ • — t*' 
; : a- ‘^jr 







* ■- 

7"* ■ t ‘a j'i ' 

, «* 


Si Rumven, Frozier (4). Fontenot (7) and 
LLoke; McWUllams. D. Robinson (81. Cnnde- 
k: Ear la (?) and Pena. W— McWnUams. 1-1. L— 

|i* n. 

^Major League Standings 

, AMERICAN LEAGUE 

C r Bod Division 

‘j ■ w L Pet. GB 

7 4 MS — 

A 5 JU5 -1 
7 4 .538 1 

4 4 JOt lb 

4 4 J00 IMr 

J S 300 lb 

5 7 417 21* 

West Division 

B 5 .415 — ‘ 

7 4 -538 1 

7 4 538 1 

4 4 500 IIS 

5 6 ASS 2 

5 7 517 214 

4 9 JOB 4 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 

East Division 

W L Pet. GS 
9.3 JS0 — 

8 4 547 1 

6 4 500 3 

5 7 517 4 

4 B J33 5 

4 8 333 5 

west Division 

8 5 515 — 

7 5 583 . Vs 

8 4 571 Vt 

7 4 538 1 

5 7 517 2Vi 

3 9 J30 4Vj 


-Ibetrolt 

(’■- .'Milwaukee 
fi:'? Soronlo 
■y', { I >lllmore 
f 1- aloetan 
:4ew York 
Cleveland 
(’■i ■ 

y laiUornlo 
^ laklond 
cattle 

F* :onsos Cltv 
tr 3iicooo 
"exas 
vunnesota 


CHICAGO— Acttvatod Richard Dotson, 
pitcher, from the disabled list. Placed Al 
Jane*, pitcher, an the 15-dav supplomentat 
also bird list. 

CLEVELAND— Fined Julia Franco, short- 
stop. tar falitoa to thaw up tor Saturday's 
game aoolnst New York. 

DETROIT— Pibised Dovp Bar oman. first 
basemaa an the upabmenlal 15-dav dis- 
abled list. Purchased the contract of Alelan- 
dra Sanchex. autfieider. from Narttvllle of tne 
American Aeaoctollon- 

NEW YORK— Activated Rickey Homer- 
ton, outfielder. Optioned Vic Mata autflelder, 
to Columbus of the International League. 

TORONTO— Activated Ron Shepherd, out- 
fielder; fatten me 15-daY disabled itat and ou- 
frighted Mitch Webster. ouHMder. to Svra- 
cuee of the International League. 


DIVISION FINALS 
Adorns (series Ned, Ml 
April 23: Montreal at Quebec 
April 25: Montreal at Quebec 
April 27.- Quebec at Montreal 
x-Aprll X: Montreal al Quebec 
x-Mav 2: Quebec at Montreal 

Patrick (PirihMMptUo leads, 2-e) 
April 23: Philadelphia at N.Y, Islanders 
April 25: Philadelphia at N.Y. lelonders 
x -April 21; islanders at Phi lode tofila 
x-Aprll 30: Ptillodetphlo at Iskmdors 
x-May 2: itmnders at Philadelphia 
Harris (series lied. M) 

April 23: Chicago at Minnesota 
April 25: Chicago al Minnesota 
April 28: Minnesota at Chicago 
x-Aprll 30: Chicago at Minnesota 
x-May 2: Minnesota al Chicago 

Smvltw (Edmonton leads. 2-4) 

April 23: Edmonton ai Wtanloeo 
April 25: Edmonton at Winnipeg 
x -April 27: Winnipeg al Edmonton 
x -April 30: Edmonton at Winnipeg 
May 2: Winnipeg ai Edmonton 
Wf necessary) 
CONFERENCE FINALS 
(Beil -of -Seven) 

Wales 

Montreot-Quebec winner vs. N.Y. I stondefs- 
Phliadelphla winner. 

Campbell 

Minnesota-Chlcago winner vs. Wtontaeo- 
Edmanton winner 

World Championships 

Finland 4, East Germany 4 
Czechoslovakia 4, . Canada 4 


Basketball 


NBA Playoffs 


New Tork 
irf*j3iieogo 
C’ Monireof 

L‘5 JtadeiBhlo 
S- .'iTwburgh 
(■* - . 

j" ' tncinnofl . 
jflion Diego 
g'tSos Angeles 

a loustan 

ft .ftonta 

on Francisco 


LEAGUE— Purchased thecom rod at Done 
DeMutn, umpire, from the PodHc Coast 
League. 

ATLANTA— Col led up PouJZuvei kLlnflokt- 
er, Irom R W imond of the. International 
Laogue. 

HOUSTON— Pfoced Terry PuW. outfielder, 
on the 15-dav disabled list. Recoiled Ty 
Gol nev muffle Ider.lrom Tuscan of the PocHIc 
1 seguft 

LOS ANGELES P lac e d Jov Johntfoae. 
eurfMder.on ttw 21 -dovd*iooied list effective 
Tbesdav. Activated RJ. Reynolds. outfielder, 
from the disabled UsL 

NEW YORK— Activotod Ray Knight, third 
baseman. Optioned Terry BJ ocfcer, outfielder, 
and Bill Loiham. pitcher, to nawatar of the 
IntonvsHonal League. Recalled Colvin ScWr- 
oKH. Dttcher, tram Tidewater. 

ST. LOUIS— Activated Jeff Lahti pitcher. 
Waived Art Howe, Intleider.for the purpose of 
giving him his unconditional release. 

FOOTBALL 

Canadian FoeHMfl League 

WINNIPEG— Stoned Jimmy Williams, rtne- 

backer, to a two* ear contract 
HOCKEY 

Notion al Mocker League 

N.r. ISLANDERS— Recoiled Alan Kerr 
and Mark Hamwav. rtgtrt wJngs. and Date 
Henry, left wfng, tram SprlwfleW of the 
American Hockey League. 


FIRST ROUND 
EASTERN CONFERENCE 
(Boston leads, 2-8) 

April 23: Boston at Cleveland 
x-Aprll 25: Boston at Cleveland 
xrAprll 28: Cleveland ol Boston 

(MitwewKM toads. Ml 
April 24: Milwaukee at Chicago 
x-Aprll 24: Milwaukee ai Chicago 
x-Aprll 2fl: Chicago ol Milwaukee 

(PhitodeWria leads, M) 

April 24: Philadelphia at Washington 
x-Aarfl 24: Philadelphia at Washington 
x-Aprll 28: Wash in g to n at Pnilooelpnio 

(Detroit leads. 2-8) 

April 24: Dslreil at New Jersey 
x -Aurll as: Detroit at New Jersey 
x-Aorii 29: now Jersey at Detroit 


Statistical leaders on the Profe ssio nal Coff- 
ers Assoc tot Ion Tew through toe Sea Pines 
Heritage Classic: 

EARNINGS 

1. Curtis Strange SMMeS. % Calvin PMto 
VB*ma. X Bernhard Longer 5250547. 4 , Craig 
Slodier $218544. 5. Mark O'Meara $214545. L 
Lorwv wodfclns 52155SB. 7. Fuuy Zaefler 
5143511. S. Tom Watson $138532. 9, Fred Cou- 
ples $131545. la Mlk* 5mltfl $131,109. 
SCORING 

1. Don Poolev, 7005. 2, Craig Stodhtr, 7007. 3, 
Larwiv wadktm, 7041. 4, Larry Mize, 1055. L 
Tam Watson and Curtis Strange. 1959. 7, Cal- 
vin Paete,704]. B, Don Paul, 7054.9, Ed FiorL 
7059. ia Corev Pavln, TOTS. 

AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
l.Gree Norman, 277.LX Fred Couples.277j). 
lAndv Bean, 276.1.4, BIN Gtosson. 21X1. & Jim 
Deni, 2125. AMocOTJnodv.2725. 7. Dan Pont, 
2725. 9. Tom Watson. 2715. V. Greg Twiggs. 
27IL7. 10, Tom Purfzer, 2105. 

DRIVING PERCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
*■ Calvin Peete. 511. X Hale Irwin. 505. X 
David Edwards. 59X4, Tam Kite, .773. 5. Tim 
NarTls, J7L t, Wayne Levi, J4B.7, Mike Retd, 
J#7.X Lorrv Nelson. .758. 9, Bruce Uetzh a J5A 

IX Jack Renner, .754. 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
1. Jack Nick tom, 747. X Bruce Llotxke. 728. 

X Dan Pahl, 725. 4. At Gelberger. 722.5. Corev 
Pavln, 71X L Doug Teweii, ^14. 7. Calvin 
Poole. .711 X Mac O'Grady and John Mahaf- 
toy, 709. 10. Tze-Chung Chen. 707. 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
1. Kikuo AraL 2776. X Chi Chi Rodriguez, 
2838. X Save Ballesteros. 2852. 4. Morris Ko- 
to i sky, 2854. 5. Loren Robert*. 2857. 6. Firm 
z eeiier, 285X 7. Frank Conner. 2X59. X Dan 
Poole v. 285X 9, Bobby Ctamoett. 2951. 10, Dan 
Foreman. 2854. 

PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1. Craig Slodier. 739. X Lannv WodkJns and 
Tom Watson. 73Z 4, Curtis Sirange, 72X & Hat 
Sultan, 721. X Tze-Ctiima Chen. 719. 7, Don 
Peolev and Fred CouMes, 714. 9, Gil Morgan. 
71X 10, Three tied with 710. 

EAGLES 

L Larry Rlnker. 9. X Curtis Strange. X X 
Craig Slodier, Corev Pavln. Howard T witty, 
Fred Couples ond Buddy Gardner, 7. X Four 
lied with x 

BIRDIES 

l. Fred Couples, 199. X Curt is Strange, 112. X 
Craig Slodier. 177.4. Larry Rlnker. 149. X Hoi 
Sutton. 16X6, Scott Slmoeon, 145. 7, Bernhard 
Longer. 144.X Loren Robert sand Larry Mlza. 
163. ia Joey Slndatar. 161. 



Unssd ftm H enwand 


Bernhard Langer 1 feel Eke Fra going to sink every chip shot’ 


the money comes as hard as it did 
for him. you grab it while you can. 

Funny thing: The bigger his 
bank account, the smoother his 
putting stroke. 

The reason Langer is blossoming 
now, at 27, is simple. He finally has 
the cushion of financial security — 
ihe margin of error that separates 
failure from disaster —that almost 
every NCAA hotshot on tour en- 
joys from his first day. 

Back when Langer was scuffling, 
he had one of the worst cases of 
early- age rips on record. Once, in 
1976. he rolled a 35-foot downhill 
putt off the other side of the green. 
Soon, he was double-hittmg putts 
like an old man. 

His affliction was so obvious 
that an English neurologist. Wolf- 
gang Scbady, cited Langer in a pa- 
per called Neurological Syndromes 
in Sportsmen. He speculated on a 
"dysfunction of th'e basal gan- 
glia. ... " 

Golfers might diagnose the prob- 
lem as an emptiness in the hip 
pocket. The more you want to be 
great, the more talent you know 
yon have and the more fragile the 
economic shoestring by which your 
whole future hangs, the more the 
pressure is focused in your putter. 

“In those years, the yips were 
always with me. It was a night- 
mare,” Langer once told Dudley 
Doust of The Sunday Times of 
London. 

"I carried two putters at times,” 
be recalled after his Masters vic- 
tory, an admission that he would 
spot his foes a dub just so he could 
nave the option of forsaking one 
putter in mid-round. "I usually 
putt cross-handed inside 20 feet, 
even now. But which way I putt 
depends on many factors, includ- 
ing how I happen to feel at the 
moment.” 

In other words, to this day, 
Langer tries to keep his own svnap- 
ses confused by changing styles. 

“The best part of my game the 
Iasi few weeks has been my short 
putting. I haven’t missed anything 


inside five feet. It’s a great feeling,” 
Langer said Sunday after three- 
putting once at the Masters and not 
at all at the Heritage. “I’ve only 
done it" — avoided three putts — 
“twice in rav life, and to do il over 
here...." 

Langer never played in the Unit- 
ed States until last year and, with 
Seve Ballesteros and Greg Nor- 
man, he’s proved that the best of 
the world tour can also play with 
America’s best in the '80s. In right 
starts in 1984. Langer won $82,465. 
So far in ’85, he’s won $256,667 in 
12 tournaments. 

That’s $339,132 in 20 starts. 
Maybe the Masters and Heritage 
aren’t that much different from the 
Irish, French, German, Spanish 
and Dutch opens, all of wmch be 
won last year. 

So far, the jury remains out on 
Longer, as it does on Ballesteros 
and Norman. Like many non-U.S. 
players, Langer tends to be streaky. 
Just as Norman seemed unbeatable 
in the summer of ’84, Langer has 
the magic now. 

Langer is no obsessive student, 
no mechanic ol the swing like Tom 
Watson or Jack Nickiaus. Rather, 
he is a gifted, gritty fellow who, 
when he’s hoL and confident can 
hook an 8-iron out of a jungle and 
then chip in for a birdie — as he did 
at the 12th bole Sunday. He’s such 
a dangerous character* these days 
that he says. “I feel like I’m going 
to sink every chip shoL" 

It is extremely unlikely that he 
will dominate the U.S. tour any 
more ihan Ballesteros and Norman 
have, or than Gary Player did in his 
heyday. Like those last remaining 
self-taught up-from-under Ameri- ' 
cans — Lee Trevino and Calvin 
Peete — they don’t have textbook 
swings learned as children on coun- 
try club tees. 

Instead, these slashing, gambling 
golf immigrants will continue to 
enliven their sport with a hungry- 
heart style that would make Bruce 
Springsteen proud. Not to mention 
Sam and Ben. 


The 76ers’ Old Guard Can’t Be Counted Out Yet 


Football 


USFL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

W L T Pet. PF FA 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 

Birmingham 

7 

2 

a 

778 

225 

153 

(Lm AhooIm leads. 25) 

New Jersey 

4 

3 

0 

547 

227 

204 

April 23: Los Anooles at Ptowilx 

Tamoa Bov 

6 

3 

0 

557 

234 

200 

x-Aprll 25: Las Angela al Phoenix 

Baltimore 


4 

l 

500 

152 

124 

x-Aurll '27: Phoenix at Lm' A ngela 

Jacksonville 

4 

5 

0 

544 

221 

235 

■ 

Mem dill 

4 

5 

0 

544 

171 

199 

[Sarto* lied. 1-11 

Orlando 

2 

7 

a 

722 

154 

242 

April 23: Denver at San Antonio 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


April 2t: Denver at San- Antonis 

Denver 

6 

3 

B 

547 

229 

144 

x^Aom 29: San Antonin at Denver 

Houston 

6 

3 

0 

547 

279 

199 

— ‘ 

Oakland 

5 

. 3 

T 

511 

219 

200 

(terta itod. Ml 

Arizona 

4 

5 

0 

544 

179 

119 

April 24: Houston ai uton 

San Antonio 

3 

6 

o • 

733 

131 

1B8 

April 24: Houston at Utah 

Portland 

3 

6 

0 

733 

135 

202 

x-AarR 28: Utah Of Houston 

Los Angela 

2 

7 

0 

722 

149 

232 


ISwto* tied, M| 
April 23: Dallas at Pomona 
April 25: Dallas of Portland 
x -April 27: Portland at Danes 
t»if MceuanrJ 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Baltimore 2X Portland 17 
Birmingham 30. Tampa Bov 3 
Houston 3X Arizona 17 

MONDAY'S RE5ULT 
Oakland 27, San Antonio 20 


By John Fein stein 

New York Times Service 

PHILADELPHIA — They are 
past their prime now, old men in a 
business that scorns age. Julius Er- 
ring is 35, with tinges of gray pop- 
ping up in his hair. Bobby Jones is 
32 and has to elbow his way into his 
locker because of the crowds sur- 
rounding youngsters Charles Bark- 
ley and Andrew Toney. 

But the old men of the Philadel- 
phia 76ers aren't through yet. They 
have their one National Basketball 
Association championship ring — 
from 1983 — bm each would Tove 
another before going off to rock by 
ihe fireplace. 

That was never more evident 
than Sunday afternoon, as the 
76ers backed the Washington Bul- 
lets to the brink of playoff elimina- 
tion with a 113-94 victory. Most of 
the raves went to Toney and Bark- 
ley, but it was Erring and Jones 
who nailed things down. 

“Sometimes it's tough to keep 
playing hard on defense because 


the other guys aren’t always doing 
it," said Jones, who's done it for a 
tiring 13 years, two fewer than Er- 
ring. “But when you turn the ball 
around like we did it gives everyone 
a lift and makes all five guys want 
to play hard on defense .” 

Sunday, it was defense that kept 
the Bullets at bay. All game long, 
Erring and Jones popped oat to 
attack perimeter passes; they were 
helped by Moses Malone's stellar 
job inside against Jeff Ruland. 

As a result Philadelphia could 
play its open-court game, and the 
Bullets can't afford a wide-open 
game. That’s what Sunday’s second 


from 18 feet. Then, after Ruland 
missed a foul shot Erring pulled 
down one of those one-handed re- 
bounds that still leaves ’em gasp- 
ing. 

The finishing touches: On Wash- 
ington's next three possessions. Er- 
ring created a turnover with a de- 
flection and Jones caused two 
turnovers, once stripping Ruland, 
once forcing him into a bad pass. 

Erring finished 9-of-16 from the 
floor with 23 points. Jones was 7- 
of-11 for 16 points; be had 8 re- 
bounds. 

“I’ve read articles about Erring 


Right now, this team’s got a lot of 
enthusiasm.” He smiled boyishly. 
“That's a feeling I still really like 
haring." 


at s wnai Sundays second and Jones, that they’re aging,'' Jeff 
half was. and Washington’s shoot- Malone said. “I think they’re still 


ing — 16 for 50 as opposed to 23 of 
39 in the first half — reflected the 
pace forced by Philadelphia. 

It was still a game, 89-80 Phila- 
delphia, with eight minutes to pixy 
when Washington's Cliff Robinson 
tossed a brick from the left corner. 
Jones rebounded and fed Barkley, 
who found Erring for a lay-up. Af- 
ter a Jeff Malone basket. Erring hit 


both doing pretty well for them- 
selves. They’re sull playing greaL" 

Does Erving think about the fact 
that the clock is running on his 
career? “Never." he said. “I ran 
still play and that’s a blessing." 

And Jones? “If we hadn’t won a 
championship I might think about 
it more,” he said. “But we got rid of 
that extra pressure two years ago. 



Bobby Jones 


-.seL*' 


iff*-* 


r* 1 







■•v- 


Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Nazis: A Show-Biz View 


:on 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — In the enter- 
tainment business, villains go 
through three stages. They begin as 
representations of authentic evil. 
Their task is to be loathed and 
feared, then destroyed to make au- 
diences happy. Because audiences, 
being human, cannot be unreserv- 
edly happy to see another humai. 
destroyed, the villain must be made 
utterly inhuman. 

An example is the Jack Falance 
character in “Shane.” Rootless, he 
comes from Nowhere on behalf of 
Death and amuses hims elf by casu- 
ally killing helpless people. We are 
delighted when Shane fills him with 
bullets. 

Pure v illainy , however, can satis- 
fy an audience only in small doses. 
So a mutation occurs. It is designed 
to hirIt* 1 . the villain interesting to 
the audience by exhibiting certain 
characteristics that say that, for all 
his nastiness, he is still a human 
being. In its higher form this crea- 
ture is one of Shakespeare's inven- 
tions, such as the king in “Ha mle t," 
who may be a murderer but he still 


tries to pray; or Lady Macbeth, too 
humanly prone to guilt to make a 
good killer. 


While the audience approves the 
destruction of such people, it, 
doesn't cheer about it In movies a 
villain in this phase may even be so 
sentimentalized that the audience 
dislikes seeing him punished. 

□ 

Decadence sets in at Stage 
Three. Here the villain is bur- 
lesqued and the evil he once repre- 
sented is made a subject of ridicule. 
The Jack Palance character, for ex- 
ample, may be played by a per- 
former famous for his a m usi n g 
drunk act —Dean Martin, perhaps 
— and, of course, he bungles alibis 
killing s by getting drunk and fall- 
ing off his horse. 

Now something interesting has 
happened. We have lost all contact 
with the moral questions that were 
raised when the villain was pure 
evil. And we have moved away 
from difficult questions of human 
weakness that troubled us with 
Cagney and Lady Macbeth. Now 
we have turned grave issues raised 
by villainy into idle show business. 

The v illain has arrived at a stage 
in which the juices of real life have 
been squeezed out of him. Now he 
exists only as an institutionalized 
show-business convention divorced 


from any connection with reality as 
the audience knows it. 

The three stages of villainy make 
me think of the Nazis, who have 
passed through the same stages 
during the nearly 50 years during 
which they have served American 
emertaimhenL . 

In Lhe late 1930s and during the 
war years, the entertainment 
world’s Nazi was a representation 
of the real thing — a system that 
created monsters costumed head to 
toe in black who amused them- 
selves by killing helpless people. 

□ 

The earliest movies of this genre 
were so directly involved with the 
reality of Nazi Germany that the 
studios, always timid about dealing 
with the real world, were nervous 
about issuing them. 

Very late in the war came the 
first movie hints that not every 
Nazi was pure beast, that there 
might be one or two with a bit of 
humanity. We were in Stage Two 
here, the’ phase later to be spoofed 
by the burlesque Nazi saying. “Zo, 
you are surprised dot a Nazi can 
like BeethovenT 

With Stage Three, the show-biz - 
Nazi became an Incompetently hi- 
larious bungler, as Illustrated in (he 
popular long-running television sit- 
com “Hogan’s Heroes." Here was 
the Nazi as side-splitting top ba- 
nana. the amoral equivalent of the 
gunslinger as lovable boozer and 
Dracula as the hysterical gay. 

Now the Nazi began to exist only 
as an institutionalized show-busi- 
ness convention disconnected from 
any reality the audience had ever 
experienced. For one thing, more 
and more of the audience hadn’t 
been bom until the real non-enter- 
tainment Nazis had been put be- 
hind us; for another, more and 
more people who knew that the 
non-entertainment Nazis had been 
neither hilariously incompetent nor 
a mi icing had been so marinated in 
show-biz Nazism that Entertain- 
ment N ariland had begun to seem 
like the real thing. 

□ 

This seems to have happened to 
President Reagan. Perhaps it was 
natural for a man of the entertain- 
ment world. Perhaps he did us a 
service, for we need to be reminded 
that evil can sometimes be abso- 
lutely authentic. 

New York Times Service 


Only R ecently Have Recording Artists 
Discovered Their Power to Raise 
Large Sums for Charily 


By Robert Palmer 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Concerts in- 
tended to raise money for 
humanitarian projects or foT is- 
sue-oriented groups such as the 
anti-nuclear movement have 
been around for years. So has the 
“telethon” concept of radio aid 
television programming, which 
has raised funds to combat a 
number of diseases. But only re- 
cently have recording artists be- 
gun to discover their power to 
raise large sums of money for 
charity by assembling a galaxy of 
stars to make hit records, with the 
artists donating time and services 
and the record company turning 
over the profits. 

Scores of recording stars in the 
rock. Latin, reggae, gospel, 
heavy-metal rock and African 
pop idioms are banding together 
to make singles and albums, with 
the profits earmarked to aid the 
starving and homeless in Ethio- 
pia and elsewhere. 

The trend was inspired by a 
gathering of British pop stars, re- 
cording as Band Aid, whose sin- 
gle “Do They Know It’s Christ- 
mas?” was a hit in Britain during 
the Christmas holidays and 
raised more than £8 million (now 
about $10 million) for African 
f amin e victims. But the major im- 
petus has been the No. 1 single 
and Top 5 album “We Are the 
World,” recorded by more than 
40 American stars calling them- 
selves USA for Africa. 

Four milli on albums, 3 million 
singles, 400,000 posters and 
140,000 copies of a “We Are the 
World" book have been sold in 
the last month. Sales of the album 
— which includes previously un- 
released songs by Prince, Bruce 
Springsteen, Tina Turner and 
others whose disks regularly sell 
in the million s — have generated 
$20 milli on in aid. 

It all began last fall with Bob 
Geldof , lead singer for the Irish 
group Boomtown Rats. He co- 
wrote “Do They Know It’s 
Christmas?” and assembled the 
British stars fas well as members 


of the American group Kool and 
the Gang). 

From a strictly musical stand- 
point, these recordings have been 
a mixed blessing. “Do They 
Know It’s Christmas?" has a sen- 
timental lyric and trendy ar- 
rangement. 

The USA for Africa single, 
“We Are the World," is a more 
solid piece of music. It starts 
somewhat blandly, but gathers 
momentum and emotional punch 
about half-way through, especial- 
ly when Ray Charles begins kick- 
ing the rhythm along. 

“When Ray comes in, it's like 
bearing the soul of America,” 
said Liond Richie, who wrote the 
song with Michael Jackson. “But 
our idea was to make the song an 
anthem that anybody could 
sing." From this point of view, 
the song is remarkably successful 

The album “We Are the 
World" is a hodgepodge; too 
many of the songs sound like re- 
jects from the stars' most recent 
album sessions, though several 
were newly written and specially 
recorded. The nadir is “Tears Are 
Not Enough,” sung by Joni 
Mitchell, NeD Young and other 
Canadian artists. 

Julio Iglesias, Celia Cruz, Josfe 
Feliciano and a number of other 
Turin stars, calling themselves 
Hermanos (Brothers), recorded 
April 9; a angle of a specially 
composed song, “Can tare, Can- 
taras,” will be released May IS by 
Hermanos Records. An album 
bring put together for a mid-June 
release is expected to include 
Menudo, Placido Domingo, Irene 
Cara and other leading Latin nnir 
sicians. 

Although the original intention 
was to donate most of the money 
to Africa, now Hermanos plans 
to contribute 90 percent to aid the 
hungry and homeless in Latin 
America. 

Sixty-five gospel artists, in- 
cluding Al Green, Amy Grant 
and Shirley Caesar, joined the 
drive for African famine relief 
April 3 after ceremonies for the 
Gospel Music Association's 
Dove Awards in Nashville. As 



Die Amdated Prea 

Bob Geldof 

CAUSE — Christian Artists 
United to Save the Earth — they 
recorded “Do Something Now,” 
a song specially written by Steve 
Camp and Phil Madeira. 

Sparrow, a leading gospel la- 
bel is preparing to release the 
song as a 12-inch single and has 
agreed to donate all income from 
the record, including artist royal- 
ties,, to Compassion Internation- 
al. a relief organization, for Afri- 
can nations hardest hit by 
famine. 

In Britain, reggae and pop stars 
including members of UB40 and 
General Public recorded a new. 
version of the Pioneers’ now- 
timely reggae song “Starvation.” 
In Paris, l eading African pop 
stars such as Manu Dibanga 
King Sunny Ade and Touii 
Kunda recorded “Tam-Tampour 
I'Ethiopie.” A single with “Star- 
vation" on one side and “Tam 
Tam pour FEthiopie” on the oth- 
er has been released in Britain, 
where it has had. brisk sales. It is 
in some U. S. stores as an import. 
Proceeds are to be distributed by 
the British relief agency Oxfam. 

This single features the most 
absorbing and powerful music 
that has come out of the benefit- 
record trend thus far. Most of the 
artists are largely unknown cut- 
ride their countries, and their per- 
formances sound urgently genu- 
ine. 

Ronnie James Dio, lead vocal- 


most popular heavy-metal bands, 
including Quiet Riot, Judas 
Priest, the Scorpions and Iron 
Maiden, as well as the heavy- 
metal satirists Spinal Tap, have 
agreed to contribute perfor- 
mances. The group is pl ann ing to 
call itself Hear ’n‘ Aid- 

Several benefit concerts are be- 
ing planned. The wives of 39 Afri- 
can delegates to lhe United Na- 
tions have organized United 
African Mothers for the Crisis 
purl will present Roberta Flack, 
Melba Moore, Manhattan Trans- 
fer, the National Dance Compa- 
ny of Africa and other artists in a 
S250-a- ticket benefit concert Fri- 
day in the General Assembly Hall 
for the Secretary General's Emer- 
gency Fond for Africa. Peter 
Martins choreographed “We Are 
the World" for a New York City 
Ballet production. 

Martin Rogol executive direc- 
tor of the USA for Africa Foun- 
dation, said the organization and 
artists involved hoped to contrib- 
ute to long-term solutions fOT 
some African problems. 

“We studied the roots of the 
situation,” he said. “We found 
rhar the famine is part of a larger 


PEOPLE 


rippett’s 'Priam’ Praised/; 

_ , four days after Governor Martha 

Sff Michael ^ Layne Coffins of Kentucky and sw- 
oduction of his opera tving ,.vun*n were named Re- 


production of his opera "IGng Pn- 
hnT win a long ovauon Monday 
night at the Royal Opera, Covent 
Garden. “I c was splendid and exat- 
ing.” he said. Tippett, whose 80th 
birthday '■’ear is bang celebrated in 
several ’ countries, and the Royal 

Opera travel to Greece in July to 
present “King Priam^n the open- 
air Herod Atticus Theater. The 
Royal Opera performance, pro- 
duced bv the actor and director 
Sam Wanamaker to the design oi 
the late Sean Kenny, plays out the 
tale from the Iliad of Homer on a 
huge disc in the center of an almost 
empty stage. The Royal Opera will 
dve "two performances each of 
“King Priam" and Verdi s Mac- 
beth” in Athens. 

□ 

The Argentine writer Ernesto 
Sabato, who beaded an inquiry into 


en other women were named na- 
tional outstanding mothers of the 
year by another group, the Nation 

Mother's Day Committee. Ci- 
mino. asked why she thought she 
was selected, said. "I think for rai* 
ing 10 children, all accompIiriKd.- 
The ten, ranging in age from 22 to 
39, include four doctors, two attor- 
neys. a nurse, and three with mas- 
ter’ degrees in education. 

□ 

The former wife of the newspa- 
per heir Peter Pulitzer says she is 
not ashamed of appearing nude in 
Playboy magazine. More titan two 
years after the trial in which she 
lost a large divorce settlement and 
custody of her twin sons, Roxanne 
Pulitzer, 34, said she hoped the 
exposure would help launch a show 
business career. Playboy show h; 


I *. 

! + T i 


SabatO, wno neaueu l J business cairo . yvy auuws 
the disappearance of thousands of oh j U cover in a swimsuit and - 
people under Argentina’s former ^ wearing a smile, 
military dictatorship, received >. 


ning a successful solo career, has 
been working with members of 
his heavy-metal band on instru- 
mental backing for an all-star ses- 
sion. Members of some of the 


and corruption, and ambitious 
industrialization programs that 
have left farm and grazing land to 
be swallowed up by the advanc- 
ing desert.” 

Rogol said 35 percent of the 
funds would go for imme diate 
relief, with em phasis on medicine 
and food “The second 35 per- 
cent,” he said, “will go for agri- 
cultural aid, to help the African 
nations hit hardest by the famine 
become self-sufficient in terms of 
growing their own food. Another 
20 percent will go for long-term 
economic development in those 
countries, and the final 10 per- 
cent is for aid to the hungry and 
homeless in our own country.” 

■ Shipping Effort Begun 

The stars who sang as Band 
Aid have sponsored a shipping 
service to take relief supplies to 
famine victims in Ethiopia and 
Sudan, Reuters reported Monday 
from London. 

The service will carry relief 
supplies bought with proceeds 
from the record as wdl as sup- 
plies from international relief 
agencies, a spokesman for the 
group said. 

A ship christened the Band Aid 
1 vrill sail Friday for Port Sudan 
and Assab mi the Red Sea, the 
spokesman said. 


Spain's Miguel de Cervantes liter- 
ary prize Tuesday from King Juan 
Cbrtos I. The award is worth 10 
million pesetas (about S60.0Q0). 

□ 

Princess Anne of Britain made 


Pope John Paid O has stepped 
into the controversy 1 over Jean-Lnc 
Godard's film on the Virgin Mai} - , 

— — — thnl “ Yrtiic ColiiA 


saying Tuesday that “Je Vous Salue 
Marie” (Hail Mary) distorted and 


princess Anne ui duuuu v . ■ 

her fiai-track racing debut Tuesday reviled the spiritual significance of 
at Epsom Downs, riding Against the mother of Jesus. The film p«- 
ihe Grain to fourth place in a spe- trays Mary as the teen-age daugh- 
cial invitation race. The winner was ter of a gas station manager and 
No- U-Turn, ridden bv Bain Mel- Joseph as a taxi dnver who devours 
tor ' science-fiction paperbacks. The 

n ' pope said in an unusually srrgjjs 

u , public statement that he deplored 

U. S. News & World Report s ^ which is showing at one 
owner, Mortimer B. Zuckennan. j^ me cinema. A telegram sent in 
has named himself editor in chief in ^ narae by the Vatican secretary 
addition to chairman of the weekly 0 f state. Cardinal Agostino Casar- 
news magazine. Zuckennan said he ^ w Cang^d Ugo Poletti of 
had always made it known that he ^ome said the film deeply wound- 
would be involved with the onion- ^ believers* religious sentiments 
al strategy of magazme Zuck- and for sacred things, 

erman said that Shelby Coffer 3d, 
the magazine’s editor, was doing a □ 

if JE A. Bardett GUunatti, president of 

“thrilled with the changes Coffey yale University, has announced 
had brought about m his first three thal ^ ^ r^ign in June 1986 . 
weeks on the job. Officials of the university in New 

□ Haven. Connecticut, have beeun a 


-®ks on the job. Officials of the university in N» - 

□ Haven, Connecticut, have begun a 

The American Motherhood nationwide search for his succes- 


Committee Inc.’s new mother of 
the year is the old-fashioned sort. 
Louse Monaco Chnino of Omaha, 
Nebraska, said of today's moral 
standards: “I think they need 


sor. The search committee H 
chaired by Cyrus R. Vance, seafe 
tary of state under Preadent Jfann^ 
Carter. Giamatti, 47, said he 
planned to take a year off after 


MaUUaiUdi JL mint Ulbj Utbu piauuwu iu uuvw u 

strengthening. We need more of the leaving, and bad nothing concrete 
old-fashioned virtues. Less crime, in mind after that. He said he had 
las exposed sex, less drugs. These intended to submit his resignation 
are the problems youngpeople face a year ago but delayed it to deal 
today." The choice of Ciminocame with a labor dispute. 


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75 Tons Per Day (2250 Meter] 
Modern Liquid 
Eueflent Condition 

LOW PRICES 
FINANCING AVAILABLE 

Nicolai Jaffa Coro.. 9171 WUiWe 
Beverly Hfe, CA 90210 Tbc 67-4638. 


CARLSBERG 

One of Gskforria's most successful Red 
Estate companies has a selection of 
land parcels auaBode lor ir u rnotional 
investors. The properties, boated 
throughout lhe slate range to price 
frommOOO » MOOK, ST avoAoble 
with terms. For information about the 
company, *eir track record and the 
propertiM, contact; 

CAHL5BERG LAND COW. 

PO Box 413 
London NW3 4PP 

Tel: 936 9119. Tehw 268048 aH3CH3 


FROM £110 

Comprehend*! Ad mto toiatian. 
Noranee sennets. Powers of Attorney. 
Regatered offices. Telex, telephone, 
mail fbrwardtog. 

Idand Resources 
Btdocurrie House. 
Summerh i ll, 

Isle of Man. 

Teh (0624} 28020-20240^28933 
Telex 628352 Wand & 


OPPORTUfflTY FOR FINANCIAL 
A REAL STATE ADVISORS 
Located m Europe A Asia Become one 
of our exdusire commissioned dairibu- 
tow for our commercial S- agncullurd 
properties loosed in CaEfornia USA. 
Guaranteed return on investments for 
your cSent. Wile or phone: 

Mr. Prudent 

The Chartered Group Ltd. 

Pari Office Box 430 
Wofout Creek. CA USA 94697 
Teh 415-947-1047 


roue own company bn 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH -■ ZUG - LUZERN 
Prom SF500 per aniwu - up. 
Canfideio, Bacrentr. 36^CH6300 Zug 
Teh 0041 42 21 32 88, Uu 86 49 l£ 

A Present for Your Son 


M U.S. - FOR MULTINATIONALS 
CPA FIRM 

tall & U lax planning, accounting, 
financial 8> busmes* servos - red es- 
we. inrestnwnts, o perating companire. 

HAROLD GOUHTBN A CO. 

225 W. 34 St, New York, NY 10122, 
Tel: 2115944771. 


SETTWG UP BU5MESS 
M GERMANY 

We offer indhmfod organaalion. od- 
nxnisrrofion, personnel, legal aid tax 
cmangeaMftfs for your intended bust- 
ness foundation. 

Write to BeUer Consulting, Frankfurt 
Branch, Hfotergrose 5, 67/7 Bas Cam- 
berg, West Germany. Teh (0) 6434- 
806* Telex: 4S2162T JAU D 


Business Sovkx 
Assistance 

PAMS ffiag? f 0 y*,5,o 

PER AT HOME 
DONG BUSINESS W PASS 


PRIVATE DETECTIVE SCANDINAVIA 

& Finland, odl Norway: 24 hours 02- 
42 72 14. Tbt 18949 Agent. Mcnager 
G. ReUev, former pofce/army offi- 
cer. caatads waridiwde. Post la Jerrv 


.if hyi i p* 


(SHE 




PANAMA COMPAWB wnhnornnw 
dredore and confiiaflfid Swiss /Pat- 
ama bonk account formed m 48 hour 

or ready-made. Offshore banks 
formed for $7000. Currencies or funds 
moved into Eurocurrency time deposit 
accounts with fox free interest red 


Montx, 10 P»k Place, St. James's, 
London SW1A 1LT. Teh 01-408 2007. 


OFFSHORE 
LIMITED COMPANIES 
BANK5 


Worldwide 
From £75 

Mating . Telephone - Teh* 
Seg toon d 

UX, tsta of Man, Jersey, Guemery, Gi- 
brdtor, Panama, Liberia, Luxembourg, 
Antilles* Ready mode ormeckA Free 
e xplanatory booklet, 

Asian Company Ftarmahom 
Dept Tl, 8 victoria St 
Doughs, We of Man. 

Tab (5624 26591 - 
Telex 627691 SPIVA G 


OFFSHORE SERVICES 

UX non resxfcnl companies vrth 
nominee directors, bearer shores and 
confidential brek accounts. FuB badwrp 
& support services. Parana & Liberian 
companies, first rate confidential 
professorial serviam. 
JJ.CR- 17 Widegote. St, London 
E17HP7 tbI: 01 277W4. TW.89391 1 G 





FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


TEXAS OIL COMPANY - Seebmu- 
fors for nfield drilling ventures to 
Teivte. High return. Write Ken Renter, 
6113 Gemn Lara, Ft. Worth, Texas 
76114 USA. Tel: 2f4J38046£ 


Gnrp^ Bok 1530. Tampa 


YOUR KJSMSS CONTACT 
MGBCVA 

WbD introduced m Buttoesi & hrklt trid 
drdes, with dl office faofcej. 
JMB. CP. 10, 1218 Grand Soamnw 
Geraw. Tel (022)98 31 21 


Inti Business 
AssotiafMn & Publisher 

wrih tare iWifcusliiM and world cov- 

rerage seeks S3 to S5m outside ftoroig 
fo mWtWepiisBi progronL 
Secur e, mestment. 

•htotfo-. Herdd Tribune, 

W52I Neuflty (^dS. From, 



P»NCB*AUTY OF MONACO 
MONTE CARLO 

Stare. 165 spin, on 2 levafr, 4 windows, 
wry cammeraai cEstrid. PossTjBfy for 
aw lend of business 
A^KIINTHtMHJlA 
Tel: (93) 50 66 B4. Ihr 469477. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


WORLD-WIDE 
BUSINESS CBSTRB 

hnnlsbed Executive Offices 

fTaau aaa- 

Repraeen taflw i A Other FocSfiei 

AhWratDAM Euro Buaneu Carter 
CH Amsterdam 

.1 jfdggagftg. Telex: 161B3 
A?HBffi Ewattire Serricw, Athens 

Ty.g js Telex: 216343 

Norunan Bombay 400 021. 
Teb2^l949. Telex: OH 6897. 
■BJ5S0LS: 4 Rw de fo Presxe 
Tot 217 83 60 

Telex: 25327 

DUMI: P.a Box 1515. DNATA 

TONDON. HO The Strand. 

London WC2R OAA. 

^6^0x1 24973 
MADRID: C/Orcnn hf 
Modnd 2802) Tel 270 56 00 or 
270 .66 04. Telex: 4*643 
MILAN: Via Boccaccio Z 

MfeTel B6 7389/BO 59 279 
Telex: 330343 

YORK 575 Modern Avenue 
New York, W 10022. Tel: BIS 605- 

£2?- Victor Hugo 

75116 Parts. Te k 502 18 00 
Telex.- 620893F, 

TeteA 613458 

StNGAPORt in Norih Bridge Rd. 
Tele* 8126567812981. 


- Funited offices at 
. Gstrifona. 141 

• The bast businesi address 
-Tbr -Mcri -Ftwhnfc 

- hnand bbtgud secretary 

- Cotporate representation senices 

(BUNGTON 

Tefc *.‘"•0150 - Tl* 486T4 


LOS ANGaES • ■ , 
Fumitfied offices in Beverly Kfc- Cj 
venient, prestigiots oddrmx »*. ** 
seaetorid & few* services. 

F x e art Svte Beetneex Serwcie 

9777 WOshire Bhet.-Ste. 6®. BrngV 
HRs, CA 90212. Tel: B13 WM"-, 
Tele* 472-0457..