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i'V 


The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hone Kong. Singapore, 
The Hague and Marseille 


INTERNATIONAL 




WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 22 


Published With The New York limes and The Washington Post 


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No. 31,782 


** 


PARIS, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


ESTABUSHED1887 


Kohl Calls 

5J.S. Visit 

'Noble’ 

Hails Reagan 
Offer to Visit 
(German Graves 

By James M. Markham 

/Vex- York Tima Service 

BONN — Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl described President Ronald 
Reagan on Thursday as “a friend Of 
our people" for agreeing to lay a 
wreath next month at a German 
military cemetery. The chancellor 
gave no hint thaL he intended to 
release the U.S. leader from bis 
commitment to visit the cemetery. 

. Mr. Kohl told the Bundestag: “I 
God it most regrettable that this 
grgat man, who is a friend of the 
G^vOans, has encountered consid- 
erable domestic diffirailtics because 
of this envisaged noble gesture. 

"Let me state this as a German 
and as the German chancellor." he 
continued, his voice cracking, “1 
am grateful to him for the attitude 
he has once a g ain demonstrated.” 

; Mr. Kohl spoke during a debate 
tfaar was meant to review the first 
two years of his coalition's four- 
year parliamentary mandate; but 
the debate was dominated by the 
controversy over the Reagan itmer- 

- The president has come under 
sharpening pressure in the United 
States to renounce the May 5 stop 
ax die cemetery in Bitbnrg because 
y.affen SS combat troops are 
among its dead. 

• “Of the 49 SS soldiers named 
there." the chancellor said, “32 
were younger than 25 when they 
died. Their short lives are much 
shorter than the space of time that 
has elapsed since their deaths. To- 
day we are discussing on both sides 
of the Atlantic the fate of SS sol- 
diers who died 40 years ago." 

Mr. Kohl added: “1 do not ven- 
ture to judge those who experi- 
enced all the horror and barbarity 
of the Third Reich at Auschwitz, 
Treblinka and Bergen-Belsen, who 
are unable to forget those occur- 
rences, what they suffered and 
what their next of Kin suffered, and 
who are unable to forgive." 
llhe opposition Social Demo- 
1 'tiftis' parliamentary leader, Hans- 
Jochen Vogel, said that, because of 
the Christian Democratic chancel- 
lor's ineptitude, “one embarrass- 
ment has been piled upon anoth- 
er." 

“You are responsible," Mr. Vo- 
gel said, “not the American presi- 
dent.” 

The Social Democrats put for- 
ward a resolution regretting that 
U.S--Wesi German relations and 
“regard tor Germans in the entire 
world” had been damaged by the 
government's preparation of the 
visit. The resolution, which did not 
call for canceling the Bitbuig stop, 
was defeated, 262-155. 

The leftist Greens party submit- 
ted its a resolution that said- the 
Bitburg agenda “had correctly and 
fflTunately produced a wave of in- 
ternational outrage, particularly in 
the Jewish, Israeli and American 
public." It demanded that the Bit- 
burg stop be eliminated. The reso- 
lution was defeated, 398-24. 

The figure of 49 SS graves was 
(Continued on Page 2. CoL 6) 

Pentagon Is 
Investigating 
45 Contractors 

£ By Wayne Biddle 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The Penta- 
gon’s inspector general says that 45 
of the 100 hugest military contrac- 
tors in the United States are under 
criminal investigation by the De- 
fense Department. 

. The official, Joseph H. Sherick, 
told members of the investigations 
panel of the House Energy and 
Commerce Committee on Wednes- 
day that “anybody who quotes me 
as saying things are good needs 
their bolts tightened." 

Mr. Sherick was appointed to 
head the Pentagon's oversight ac- 
tivities two years ago after Con- 
gress established the post 
] Mr. Sherick, discussing the issue 
of improper overhead expenses 
billed against government con- 
tracts. characterized the industry’s 
latitude as “we stole it fair and 
square." He recommended that 
Dfcvid S. Lewis, chairman or the 
Genera] Dynamics Corp., and Gor- 
don EL MacDonald, the company’s 
chief financial officer, be debarred 
from military work. 

* After the hearing, General Dy- 
namics issued a statement saying: 
“As far as we are concerned, there 
are no grounds whatever for sus- 
pension or debarment of either the 
company or of its senior execu- 
tives." 

.j'.The investigations subcommittee 
flis been examining the billing of 
overhead expenses, which are'titose 
not incurred directly in the delivery 
of a warship or aircraft to the De- 
fense Department by General Dy- 
( Continued on Page 2, Col. 3) 








Soviet and U.S. Veterans Remember linkup on Elbe 

The Soviet and US. forces linked up 40 years ago this week at Toigau on the Elbe river, above. 
Some of the veterans from both sides celebrated the anniversary on Thursday, including William 
Robertson of California, left with glasses, and Alexander SHvashko of the Soviet Union. Page 4. 


ouse Kills 



y - ■ ■ 

-Sandinists 


Reagan Says Campus Anger at Apartheid Grows in U.S. 
U.S. Stands at 


Crossroad on 


Budget Cuts 

By David Hoffman 
and Helen Dewar 

Washmpon Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, declaring that the 
United States cannot “stay on the 
immoral, dead-end course of defi- 
cit mending," has appealed to the 
public to support a budget plan by 
Senate Republicans that would cut 
next year s defidL by $52 billion. 

• . In the first nationally televised 
address from the Oval Office of his 
second term, Mr. Reagan said the 
economic gains of the last few years 
were at stake in the Senate budget 
votes this week. 

“All our progress, aD the good 
we’ve accomplished sd far, and all 
our dreams for the future could be 
-wrecked if we do not overcome our 
one giant obstacle,” he said. 

Mr. Reagan warned that he 
would veto any tax increase and 
said he could not compromise fur- 
ther on defense spending. He called 
instead for a large number of cuts 
in domestic programs, including 
the elimination of some activities, 
calling it unfair in many instances 
to ask some atoms to finance 
benefits for others. 

These budget cuts for the next 
fiscal year are in some cases more 
far-reaching than those the presi- 
dent won in 198 1 in his first months 
in office. 

He also defended a proposed 
limit on Social Security cost-of-hv- 
ing adjustments as a necessary 
sharing of the burden. 

“We stand at a crossroads," Mr. 
Reagan said. “The hour is late, the 
task is large, and the stakes are 
momentous." He quoted President 
John F. Kennedy s call of 1961: 
“Ask not what your country can do 
for you. ask what you can do for 
your counuy." 

The televised appeal came as the 
Senate was preparing to begin vot- 
ing Thursday on the compromise 
worked out between the White 
House and Senate Republicans af- 
ter Congress rejected Mr. Reagan’s 
first budget proposal 

White House officials said the 
first roll call of votes would be 
critical because il would determine 
whether the proposal would hold 
together or be picked apart by in- 
terest groups. Regardless of the 
outcome, legislation passed by the 
Republican-controlled Senate 

(Continued on Page Z, CoL 4) 


By Larry Rohter 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — On college campuses across 
the United States thousands of student protest- 
ers took over administration buildings, boycott- 
ed classes and held teach-ins, rallies and 
marches demanding (hat their schools end in- 
vestments in companies doing business in South 
Africa. 

At the University of California at Los Ange- 
les, 200 protesters occupied a campus building, 
following a demonstration Tuesday by more 
than 2,000 students, many bearing placards with 
slogans like “Apartheid Kills" and “Divest 
Now ” In Albany, New York, two dozen di ant- 
ing students staged a sit-in at the business office 
of the State University of New York's central 
administration building. 

The “National Anti-Apartheid Protest Day,” 
organized by a coalition of student groups, was 
the latest of numerous indications of a tentative 
and somewhat limited resurgence of student 
activism at American colleges and universities 
this spring. For the first time in many years, 
campuses are stirring to calls to take a stand on 
the political and social issues of the day. The 
coalition estimates that protests were organized 
on more than 7.0 campuses 


Thus far, most of the attention has been 
focused oo Columbia University, where on 
April 4 student protesters barricaded a campus 
building demanding the university get ria of 
$32.5 million in investments in companies doing 
business in South Africa. 

The Columbia protest is scheduled to end 
Thursday, without the students having achieved 

The White House wants to delay for two 
years any decision on sanctions against 
South Africa. Page 3. 

their stated goal. But on other campuses from 
California to Wisconsin to Massachusetts, ral- 
lies, marches and sit-ins on issues ranging from 
South African divestment to Central America 
and nuclear disarmament have broken out and 
are still in progress. 

Students protested Wednesday at Harvard, 
the University of Louisville in Kentucky, Ober- 
lin College in Ohio, San Jose State University in 
California and the University of Wisconsin, 
among other schools. 

Those activities contrast sharply with the 
popular image, developed in the mid-1970s, of 
university campuses .as passive bastions of con- 
servatism and of students as self-absorbed and 
exclusive! v carw-oriemed. Talks with students 


at universities scattered across the country indi- 
cated, however, that they find that image far too 
simplistic and somewhat out of date. 

“In my eight years, the c lima te on campus has 
certainly changed enormously," said Tom 
Keenan, a 25-year-old graduate student at Yale 
University. “You can feel the difference be- 
tween something like a forum to discuss things 
and the kind of movement that decides enough 
is enough and lakes an active turn. That seems 
to be what is happening this year." 

“The image of the passive campus was defi- 
nitely correct for most of my college years,” 
added Mr. Keenan, who has participated this 
year in demonstrations against recruitment by 
the Central Intelligence Agency and in support 
of striking Yale staff workers. “But it's definite- 
ly changing." 

“The image that we are all selfish and inter- 
ested only in getting a job that pays $30,000 a 
year is not true," said Anne Evens, 21. an 
engineering and physics major at Cornell Uni- 
versity who took part in March in a demonstra- 
tion against CIA activities in Central America. 

A recent study sponsored by the Higher Edu- 
cation Research Institute at the University of 
California at Los Angeles and the Amen can 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL I) 


By Steven V. Roberts 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives has dealt Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s Central 
American policy a stin ging setback 
by killing attempts to provide re- 
newed aid to guerillas fighting the 
Nicaraguan government. 

While the decision Wednesday 
night was a serious defeat for the 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz compares Central Ameri- 
ca and the Vietnam War. Page 3. 

president, leaders from both par- 
ties said it was too early to tell 
whether the issue was dead for the 
rest of this fiscal year. 

[The Nicaraguan government, in 
response to the House vote, an- 
nounced two conciliatory gestures 
Wednesday night, the Los Angeles 
Times reported from Managua. 
The Sandmist regime set a May 2 
departure date for 100 Cuban mili- 
tary advisers and promised to ar- 
range pardons for 107 prisoners 
charged with “counterrevolution- 
ary crimes-'’ 

[The government had announced 
plans far the Cubans’ departure 
Feb. 27 but had not set a due. The 
regime said that there are 800 Cu- 
ban advisers in Nicaragua, but . 
Washington put. the number at 
about 3,000. The prisoner release is 
a new development, but the an- 
nouncement gave no other details.] 

In Washington, before die final 
vote, (he House had adopted, by a 
vote of 219*206, an amendment 
drafted by moderate Democrats 
thaL provided S 14 million in aid to 
the region but did not assist the 
rebels directly. But when it came up 
for final action, liberals and conser- 
vatives joined forces to bury the 
bill, bya vote of 303-123. 

In the closest vote of the day. an 
amendment backed by the White 
House that would have provided 
$14 million in direct, nonmHitary 
aid to the rebels lost at the last 
second by a vote of 215-213.. 

Jim Wright of Texas, ihe major- 
ity leader, said the aid requests “be- 
came a victim of two extremes. A 


lot of liberal Democrats didn’t 
want anything and the Republicans 
acted in a fit -of pique." 

Tlie House decision came in the 
face of a vigorous campaign by Mr. 
Reagan to renew financing of the 
rebds, whom he has praised as 
“freedom fighters.” 

Bat that argument Med to per- 
suade members who are Increasing- 
ly alarmed that Mr. Reagan’s polt- 
ries in Central America could lead 
to deepening American involve- 
ment in the region and the use of 
combat troops. 

[Late Wednesday night, the- 
White House issued a statement 
that said President Reagan was 
“deeply disappointed" by the out- 
come in the House, AgenceFrance- 
Presse reported from Washington. 

[The -president said the move 
“damages national security and 
foreign policy goals," and added, 
“T intend to return to the Congress 
again and again to seek a policy 
that supports peace and democracy 
in Nicaragua.'’ ] 

The next legislative step is uncer- 
tain. The Senate adopted legisla- 
tion Tuesday night providing S14 
million in non- military aid to the 
rebels, but since the House ap- 
proved no Comparable fall a con- 
ference between the two chambers 
cannot be held. 

The aid at issue Wednesday was 
only for die fiscal year aiding Sept. 
30. Mr. Reagan has requested $28 
million for the next fiscal year, and 
the battle over that request could 
in the next few months. . 

.e presents tive Thomas P. 
Jr., Democrat of Massa- 
chusetts and the speata of the 
House, warned Wednesday that 
Senate Republicans could still try 
to resurrect aid for the rebels by 
attaching it to other ^legislation. 
Asked if the issue was over for this 
year, Mr; O’Neill said, “I wish it 
ware, but it isn’t" 

■ Rebel Gitidzes House Vote 

A Nicaraguan rebel leader as- 
sailed Thursday the House rejec- 
tion of aid as a “Cammnnist vic- 
tory,” The Associated Press 
reported from W ashing ton. ' 


Kepr 

O’Neal 


Gould Collection Paintings Sell for $32.6 Million 


By Souren Melildan 

International Herald Tribune 

NEW YORK — Fifty-six 
paintings and drawings from the 
collection of the late Florence 
Gould, most of them by Impres- 
sionists and early 20th-century 
masters, were sold" Wednesday 
night at Sotheby’s for $32.6 mil- 
lion. It was the highest total for 
one person's collection ever 
achieved at a single auction ses- 
sion. 

Much of the money from the 
sale will be donated to the Ameri- 
can Hospital in Paris in accor- 
dance with the wishes of Mrs. 
Gould. She was the widow of 
Frank Jay Gould, the heir to a 
U.S. railroad fortune, and the 
daughter of Maximilien Lacaze, a 
French publishing magnate in the 
United Slates. Mrs. Gould died 
in February 1983 at age 87. 

The sale, which included re- 
cord prices for works by four 
painters, illustrated the continu- 
ing strength of the market where 
major works of art are concerned. 
But there were no surprises. 

The two most important paint- 
ings sold within the expected 
price bracket Van Gogh’s “Pay- 
sage au Soldi Levant" painted at 
Saint-Rfimy in southern France 
in November 1889. went for $9.9 
million, including the 10 percent 
commission. 

The landscape was painted six 



Van 

York 


s “Paysage an SdeU Levant" went for S9.9 million at the auction in New 
paintings owned by the late Florence Gould. Sales totaled $32.6 milli on. 


months after Van Gogh's admis- 
sion to St Paul's Hospital at 
Saint-R&my as a mental patienL 


In a letter written to a friend, the 
painter Emile Bernard, the artist 
described the painting as “the sun 


rising oyer a field of young 
wheat.; lines fleeting away, far- 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Karami Agrees to Stay 
After Moslems Confer 


United, Press International 

BEIRUT — Prime Minister Ra- 
shid Karami of Lebanon has with- 
drawn bis resienation after a recon- 
ciliation conference of Lebanese 
Moslem leaders that was set up by 
Syria. 

The Syrian first vice president, 
Abdel Halim KJhaddam, said in 
Damascus after the two-conference 
ended Wednesday night that Leba- 
nese ministers had agreed to with- 
draw their resignations. 

Shortly after the agreement was 
reported, dashes with heavy ma- 
chine guns and rocket-propdled 
grenades broke out on Beirut’s 
Green Line, which divides the city's 
Christian and Moslem sectors. The 


In the Shadows of Summits, Former Leaders Find a Spotlight 



Internal i 


h Fitchett 

Herald Tribune 


Helmut Schmidt, left, the former West German chancellor, 
with Jacques Chaban-Delmas, former prime minister of 
France, at a session Thursday of the InterAction CoundL 


PARIS — That journalistic diche. a dub of elder 
statesmen, exists: 30 former leaders of their countries 
are holding a shadow summit in Paris to formulate 
some wisdom [or their successors at the economic 
summit, opening in Bonn on May 2. 

“We may be the world’s most exclusive club,” said 
Jacques Chaban-Delmas. a former French prime min- 
ister. “Even the French Academy takes applications 
for membership: we don’t" 

Called the InterAction Council, the group of former 
government leaders has an illustrious roster. 

Active members indude Takeo Fokuda of Jai 
Helmut Schmidt of West Germany, James (Mat 
of Britain, Malcolm Fraser of Australia, Giulio An- 
dreotti of Italy, Leopold Sedar Senghor of Senegal. 
Adolfo Suirez of Spain and Pierre Eliott Trudeau of 
Canada. The council also includes former leaders from 
Yugoslavia and other East European countries, from 
the Pacific basin and from North Africa. 

Most operated on the liberal side of the political 
spectrum, and corridor conversations are full of nos- 
talgia for the 1970s when they held high office and 
when d&ente, development and international cooper- 
ation seemed to flourish. 

Officially, the council denies its members share any 
ideological color or even a feeling that summitry is not 
what it used to be. The council's purpose, according to 
Mr. Chaban-Delmas, a founding member, is “to draw 
our successors' attention to major issues which they 
may neglect under the pressure of day-to-day busi- 
ness." 


Like other high-powered old-boy networks such as 
the Trilateral Commission, the Bilderbere conference 
or the forums sponsored by former U.ST presidents, 
the InterAction Council helps its members, who are 
unpaid, to maintain contacts and visibility thaL bdp 
qualify them as consultants and lecturers. 

Council members are aware they could be viewed as 
warfiorses who refuse to go to pasture. “Some people 
call us ‘has-beens,' but we think of oar successors as 
people training on the job to join oar did}," said a 
participant. 

Some expect to return to power the council's only 
woman, Maria de Lourdes Pmtnsilgo, is a leading 
contender to become Portugal’s next president. If she 
(kies, she will have to leave the dub — an alumna that 
the InterAction Council would try to sway with its 
views. 

At council meetings, timed to precede the annual 
economic summits, members tty to agree on a few key 
recommendations on issues they fear are being over- 
looked, then fan out to lobby world leaders. 

For example, this year the council is enqphasizmg 
the international debt crisis: While the debt is not a 
high priority for the Bonn economic summit, it re- 
mains a catastrophic and urgent problem for the 
poorest debtor countries. 

The council shuns lengthy reports — “They have a 
habit of gathering dust," Mr. Chaban-Delmas said — 
and stresses “action," that is, personal contact 

Last year, council members, in the weeks prior to 
the London economic summit, met most of the partid- 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 7) 


“All ministers who resigned 
withdrew their resignations and all 
agreed to participate in cabinet 
meetings," the rightist Christian 
Lebanese radio said. The resigna- 
tion of the prime minister had 
threatened to bringdown the entire 
government 

Mr. Karami and Salim al-Hoss, 
the minister of education and la- 
bor, offered their resignations last 
week to protest street battles in 
West Beirut. The fighting ended 
with the defeat of the Sunni militia 
by Shiite and Druze militias. 

Mr. Karami said later that he 
would lead a caretaker government 
until the future of the nine-member 
coalition cabinet had been re- 
solved. sub Mr. Karami and Mr. 
Hoss attended the Damascus meet- 

D ^leanwiiile. Richard W. Mur- 
phy, the U.S. assistant secretary of 
state for Near Eastern and South 
Asian affairs, arrived in Beirut on 
Thursday from Cyprus for talks 
with President Amin GemayeL 
In a statement after the talks, 
Mr. Murphy said, “We had nearly 
two hours of talks about my trip in 
the region, the situation in the area, 
developments in Lebanon and Leb- 
aneso-lLS. relations. We support 
all efforts made to restore peace 
and stability to his country, which 
is very dear to us." 

■ Moslems Reach Compromise 

Christopher Dickey of The Wash- 
ington Post reported earlier from 
Damascus: 

In anticipation of a major fight 
against Israeli-backed forces in 
southern Lebanon in the next few 
weeks, the Lebanese Moslem fac- 
tions agreed on a compromise to 
end their recent confrontations. 

According to participants in the 
Damascus meeting, the Syrians em- 
phasized the need for Lebanese 
unity as the final stage of I&aefs 
withdrawal from Lebanon ap- 
proaches. The intent is to resist 
Israeli attempts to establish a bor- 


der buffer patrolled primarily by 
Christian Lebanese that Israel has 
armed. 

The Syrian argument for unity, 
said Wait'd Jumblat, leader of the 
Lebanese Dmze Moslems, wa£ 
“Forget about West Beirut because 
we are expecting big events in the 
Bekaa ana Sidon." 

Mr. Jumblat said that if Israeli-, 
anned Christian militias attempted 
to assert control over the Bekaa 
Valley south of the strategic lock- 
out post at Mount Baruk as Isradi 
troops pull back, there would be 
“terrible bloodshed.” 

A Moslem commumqu6 
Wednesday night emphasized the 
need for a united Lebanese govern- 
ment, including Christians as well 
as Moslems, and called for an end 
to the sectarian divisions of Leba- 
nese politics. 

Syria has pressed for the forma- 
tion of a nansectarian, unified Leb- 
anese government. Syria has dem- 
onstrated a decisive influence on 
Lebanese politics in the past two 
years, ana it has about 40,000. 
croops stationed in Lebanon. 

But even for Syria, achieving a 
semblance of unity among the Leb- 
anese Moslems required the mak- 
ing of a' complex — and still unsta- . 
6ie — formula for patrolling the 
streets of West Beirut. 


INSIDE 

■ The United States will ask 
Europe and Japan to stimulate 
their economies to offset slower 
U.S. growth. - Pfcgel 

■ S aiwBms t leaden ' paid re- 
spects to a Nicaraguan arch- 


bi 
Paul 


chosen by Pope John 

car dinal. P 


to beat 


p*gel 


■ A speech by Mikhail Gorba- 

chev cast a chill on what ap- 
peared to be warming U.S.-SW- 
Viet relations.. Page4. 

■ Some changes may be forth- 

coming iu Vietnam’s w gmg lea- 
dership. . — - 


■ Reflections on the Vietnam 
War. a page of pieturesJ > age7. 

WEEKEND 

■San Wanamaker, the actor- 
director, is campaigning for the 
reconstruction of Shakespeare's 
Globe Theater. Page 9. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Chrysler Cotp. sald its first-:, 
quarter profit fell 28 
from a year ^earlier. 

■ UJ5.btsinessprodacririty de- 
clined 12 percent in the first 
quarter of 1985. Page 13. 









U.S. to Ask Summit Partners 
To Offset American Slowdown 


By Axel Krause 

Inremaiimial Herald Tribune 

PARIS — President Ronald 
Reagan will seek a pledge from 
West European and Japanese lead- 
ers at their summit meeting in 
Bonn next week to stimulate their 
economies to offset the slowdown 
in the growth of the U.S. economy. 
Treasury Secretary James A- Baker 
3d said Thursday. 

Mr. Baker said that Europe 
could ease or eliminate obstacles to 
growth in domestic financial and 
labor markets, while Japan should 
accelerate elimination of import 


barriers to stimulate demand and 
consumption in its econony. 

The administration "hopes that 
the slack in the United States will 
be picked up by Europe and Ja- 
pan." without creating new infla- 
tion. Mr. Baker said in an interview 
by satellite from Washington with 
reporters in the six countries, other 
than the United States, involved in 
the summit meeting. He ruled out 
urging new government spending 
programs, however, or what he de- 
scribed as "pumping up the econo- 
my by artificial means." 

The Treasury secretary said Mr. 


Student Anger , Protests 
Grow Over Apartheid 


Reagan would be pointing to bis 
efforts to reduce the U.S. federal 
budget deficit by spending cuts, 
and that they would represent 
Washington's contribution to pro- 
moting economic growth. 

Mr. Baker also said Mr. Reagan 
would seek a pledge from other 
summit participants to designate 
1986 for the start of new trade 
liberalization negotiations. 

Mr. Baker emphasized that the 
administration would be seeking to 
avoid confrontation with summit 
partners from West Germany. Brit- 
ain. France. Japan, Italy, Canada 
and the European Community 
Commission. The EC member 
countries, led by. France, have de- 
clined to agree to start trade talks 
next year, but they have agreed on 


preparatoiy meetings. 
There 


(Continued from Page 1} 
Council on Education indicates 
students support a wide variety of 
liberal positions. The study, pub- 
lished in January in the Chronicle 
of Higher Education, is based on 
interviews last year of 182.370 in- 
coming college freshmen at 345 
schools, who were asked their opin- 
ions on a variety of political, social 
and economic issues. 

The survey, conducted every 
year since 19 m, found that support 
Tor Increased military spending 
among this year's incoming fresh- 
men declined to 33 percent from 39 
percent in 1981 

A majority of the fr eshm en also 
supported a national health care 
plan and school busing by the larg- 
est margin since the survey began, 
and they also favored legalized 
abortion and higher taxes for the 
wealthy. But support for the legal- 
ization of marijuana and abolish- 




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meat of the death penalty declined 
to record lows. 

"There was very strong endorse- 
ment for a number of liberal posi- 
tions on what are viewed as litmus 
test issues," said Dr. Kenneth 
Green, who helped conduct the 
survey. “There was no support at 
all for the idea of a universal, 
monolithic trend toward conserva- 
tism among college students.” 

In fact. Dr. Green said, the num- 
ber of student respondents identi- 
fying themselves as “conserva- 
tives" has remained fairly constant 
since the survey began: about one 
student in five. And the number of 
students classifying themselves as 
"liberal" or “far left" has actually 
risen since 1 982, the only year when 
conservatives actually outnum- 
bered liberals. 

The current generation of college 
students differs from that of the 
late 1960s and early 1970s, Dr. 
Green said, in that now "there is 
less willingness of large numbers of 
students to act" on their beliefs. 
But. he added, signs of a resurgence 
of campus activism are consistent 
with the values students have ex- 
pressed in the survey in recent 
years. 

*Tm not surprised at what's hap- 
pening," he said. “Many students 
are always looking for issues in 
which to get involved." 

Student activists were unani- 
mous in agreeing that among their 
strongest recruiting points are the 
Reagan administration policies 
and even the personality of the 
president himself. Hie current oc- 
cupant of the White House, they 
said, offers a sharp contrast to what 
are seen as the benign presidencies 
of Gerald R. Ford and Jimmy Car- 
ter. 

According to a New York Times- 
CBS News PoO. full-time students 
who voted in 1984 chose Mr. Rea- 
gan at a rate 7 percentage points 
below that of the entire, electorate, 
with 52 percent of the students vot- 
ing for Mr. Reagan and 47 percent 


:re will be "no ganging up on 
anybody," Mr. Baker said. Accord- 
ing to U.S. officials, that meant 
that the administration has eased 
away from its earlier suggestion, 
expressed privately, that West Ger- 
many should accelerate tax cuts to- 
taling 20 billion Deutsche marks 
($6.4 billion) planned for 1986 and 
1 988. Chancellor Helmut Kohl's 
government has firmly rejected the 
suggestion. 



Paris Delays 
Nationhood 
Referendum 
For Non 


WORIJKBRIEFS * 



U.S. Denies Repo! 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The director of the United Stales 
Service on Thursday labeled as “absolutely tmurue re^tbatim** 
have been sent to Paraguay and Europe to search for a Nan wena^ 


J ^ln£ ^ 1C MoiTis confirmed that the Marshals Servic e, hfe beta 
brought mto the Justice Department's investigation mto the vjer^boos 
of Mr. Mengele, who would be.74 if still alive, and who has been befievtd 

to be hiding in. Paraguay. . , 

The role of U.S. marshals, be said, has been to gather add share 
information with other law enforcement agenaes, mch^d^tfapK j. 
West Germany and Israel, Interpol in Pans, and with the Snast-Wo. 
senthal Center on Holocaust Studies mtas Angeles. 

“What we’re doing is to assist others, Mr. Moms 
the basic police work necessary on a cold trail 


RauCarvlAvfed Press Srwnafcood 

President Ronald Reagan speaking from the White House. 


Reagan Says U.S. Stands 
At Crossroads on Budget 


“1 seriously doubt that the presi- 
KohL or 


dent will lecture Helmut Kohl or 
anybody else, on precisely what ac- 
tions they should take to stimulate 
their economies." another adminis- 
tration official said in Washington. 

The agenda for the May 2-4 
meeting mil be kept informal and 


(Continued from Page l) 
faces amendments by the Demo- 
cratic-control] e*l House. 

The president's address followed 
the central theme of his four years 
in office: a shift in federal priorities 
away from domestic spending and 
toward defense while cutting taxes. 


New Caledonia a special status of 
semi-independence in association 
with France by the end of this year 

after a scheduled referendum in the 

territory in September. French con- 
servative parlies supported a cam- 
paign against independence, accus- 
ing the Sodalists of encouraging a 
militant minority of separatists. 

Announcing the postponement. 
Prime Minister Laurent Fabius 
said that a referendum on self-de- 
termination would be held by the 
end of 1987, allowing time for “a 
wager cm the good sense" of all 
parties to succeed. 

A major military base will be 
. established in New Caledonia, he 

comes to Washington, it won’t said, underscoring France's deter- 
amount to a hill of beans if govern- urination to maintain its strategic 
ment won't curb its endless appe- role in the Pacific and to enforce 
tite to spend,” the president said, the provisions of protecting min or- 

The compromise package would ities in the eventual new constitu- 


h Firchcrt 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France on Thursday 
withdrew a proposal to hold a. ref- 
erendum in the fall on indepen- 
dence in its Pacific territory of New 
Caledonia, pushing back the 
planned vote until after French leg- 
islative elections next year. n • £T'| »i 

The socialist government had Yelena Bonner Seeks Review of Exile 

advanced a plan calculated to give ^ .. - . ~ c , 

- - - * MOSCOW (AP) — Yelena G. Bonner, the wife of Andrei D. Sakharov. 

the dissident Soviet physicist, has asked officials for a review of her case, 
sources say. She was sentenced to five years of internal exile Iasi summer 

for slandering the state. - : . . . _ ;■ 

Mrs. Bonner and Mr. Sakharov have been in forced exile in Grab, 2S) 
miles (400 kflometersyeast.oF Moscow. The dty is dosed to fonaga a*. 

The sources, who spoke to Western journalists Tuesdayon condmopt. 
anonvmii 
Supreme 

Presidium has the aul 




t 


-Jj‘5 


iT 




xirces, who spoke to western juumausu. * uesuaj uu ujmuukjp* > 
ity, said that Mrs. Bonner had sent a letter to the PresWBnm of the 
i Soviet asking that her term of internal exi le be iw iewfcd. The 
m has the authority to review and revise sentences. . 

Guerrilla Suspect Arrested in Italy 

ROME (Reuters) — ViLtorio Antonini, suspected of jdayirig ; au»or 
role in the 1981 kidnapping of U.S. Brigadier General James L. Doner, 


was arrested Thursday, police said. 

The police said that Mr. Antonxm. 29, also a suspected leader of the- 
Red Brigades guerrilla group, was arrested during a rad on a house 40 
kilometers (25 miles) from Rome. Police said seve ral Red Brigades 
documents were found in the house, including leaflets damtiog rcajona- 
bUity for the kidnapping of General Dozier, who later wasftkased 
unharmed in a raid by the authorities. ' 

Mr. Antonini has already been sentenced in absentia to 26; 

• . I- ft 1 - * f I 


end or phase out 20 government lion for New Caledonia The base prison for his alleged part in the kidnapping. He also faces 

nfYVtrtmr Snnlllffmn mink MAmiloa Ml r _ P _ _ . _____ i ■ . _1 1 * __ .1 T-fli: _ AnllnA . iffjj I I— n 


programs, including such popular 
ones as the railroad subsidy to Am- 


meeung win oe Kepi miormai ana It also followed past themes in lay- trak.. UvaM provide for major The government's decision about TT C MwITco HiPniW Anna 

flexible, U.S. and European offi- mg the blame for the record peace- cuts m 40 other programs, ranging New Calerin nia will be viewed by Oily if UdUlTIdJ UBC Ul Pl ll w at Aims 

dais said, with discussions among time deficits of his presidency on from export subsidies to college- French opposition parties asapo- 

domestic programs, many of which student aid. and largely freeze the htical retreat. But political com- 

grew out of the Great Society legis- r*st of the government's domestic memators had predicted the post- 

ponement, saying that the Socialist 


will provide facilities for troops, 
aircraft and nuclear submarines. 
The government's decision about 


charges, including the killing of two police officers. 


the leaders expected to cover politi- 
cal security, environmental and 
Third World issues, as well as eco- 
nomic problems. 

French officials said Wednesday 
that President Francois Mitterrand 
would present a plan to combat 
famine and drought in Africa. It 
calls for the financing of two satel- 
lite ground stations, improved 
transportation of relief food sup- 
plies and intensified research on 
grain production in arid zones 
south of the Sahara. 

The French plan, along with oth- 
er aid programs currently under 
way in Africa, will get “consider- 
able attention," the administration 
official added. 


grew out ot toe Great Society legis- 
lation of the 1960s and 70s. 

Mr. Reagan's speech alro came 
against the backdrop of slowing 
economic growth. 

The White House chief of staff, 
Donald T. Regan, said before the 
president's address: “Our economy 
is not that strong at tins time." 
Only a few months ago, before the 
election, Mr. Reagan was saying 
economic growth would largely re- 
duce the deficit; he did not make 
that claim Wednesday night. 

“The simple truth is, no matter 
how hard you work, no matter how 
strong this economy grows, no mat- 
ter how much more tax money 


has expressed 
of chemical weapons to 


Pentagon Is Investigating 
45 Government Contractors 


accounts. 

The plan would allow for 3 per- 
cent growth above inflation for de- 
fense spending. The deficit would 
be reduced from a projected S227 
billion to 5175 billion next fiscal 
year, and would decline to a 
jecied 595 billion by fiscal 198l 

Mr. Reagan made brief mention 
of the reduced Social Security cost- 
of-living adjustment in the Senate 
plan. The new formula would pro- 
vide raises of 2 percentage points 
less than inflation for each of the 
next three years, but with a mini- 
mum annual increase of 2 percent 
This is roughly half what current 
law would provide, under the ad- 
ministration's current economic 
projections. 


government hopes that the issue 
win fade before national parlia- 
mentary elections a year from now. 

Since a contested local election 
in New Caledonia in November, 
the issue has damaged the govern- 
ment politically in France. Vio- 
lence, in which 20 persons have 
died, has continued on the island 
between militant Melanesian seces- 
sionists and French settlers op- 
posed to independence. 

The government risked seeing its 
plan defeated if it proceeded with 
the referendum proposed for Sep- 
tember by its special delegate to 
New Caledonia, Edgard Pisani. 
Polls indicate that a referendum 
would produce an anti-indepen- 


WASHINGTON (NYT) — The State 
concern that Iran may have developed an : 
use in retaliation against Iraq. 

“We are aware that Iran has been seeking to develop a „ 
weapons capability ." said Bernard Kalb, the State Department spokes- 
man, “and" n may now be in a position to use such weapons.” 

In the last 13 months, the United States has twice accused Iraq of using 
mustard gas and nerve gas against Iranian forces. Wednesday was -the 
first time that Washington has said that Iran might also be preparing to 
use .Such weapons. The two countries have been at war for almost five 
years. 


10 ftfUed in Caste Warfare in India 


caste 


The Senate majority leader, dence majority of settlers and other policies, clashed with swords and stones Thursday and 

I wT 3 y . . tk. ___ _r ^ : n„i: in 


NEW DELHI (UP!) — Rival mobs angered, over government 

threw arid at each 


(Continued from Page I) 
namics and by the Pratt & Whitney 
engine division of United Technol- 





CELINE 


PUBLICATION JUDICIAIRE 


AUDIENCE SOLENNELLE DE LA COUR D’APPEL 
DE LYON DU 20 DECEMBRE 1984 


LA COUR 

Statuant en execution d'un Arret de la Chambre 
Commercial e de la Cour de Cassation du 12 octobre 1983. 


REQOIT la Socletd CEUNE en son appel, ses defenses 
et ses demandes. 


REFORMANT le Jugement defers, dit mal fondde faction en 
imitation frauduleuse de la Soddtd HERMES concer- 
nant la marque deposee Inttialement par la SoclitA 
CELINE sous le numero 195.486, enregistr&e sous le 
numero 924.108, deposee & nouveau le 24 septembre 
1984 sous le numdro 715.382 et enregistree sous le 
numdro 1.277.007. 


DEBOUTE la Societd HERMES de ses demandes aux 
mdmes fins concemant les marques deposees le 
24 septembre 1984 par la Soc&te CELINE sous les 
numeros 715875 a 715.379, enregfstrees sous les 
numeros 1.277.002 a 1.277.006. 


CONDAMNE la Societe HERMES a payer a la Socidte 
CELINE la somme de 100.000 Fa litre dedommages- 


interets. 


CONDAMNE la societe HERMES a payer a la Socidtd CELINE 
la somme de 1 5.000 F en application de I'article 700 du 
nouveau Code de Procedure CMIe. 


ORDONNE la publication du present ArrSt, par extraits ou 
resumes, dans cinq journeux ou periodiques aux frais 
de la Societd HERMES pour un montant de 55.000 F. 


The subcommittee series to show 
that the improper billing of over- 
head expenses, particularly enter- 
taiiiiiient and travel has been prac- 
ticed by many companies. 

Mr. Sherick said his office re- 
cently warned the navy not to use 
figures developed by the General 
Dynamics Electric Boat division on 
subcontractor prices, because an 
audit had “concluded that the com- 
pany consistently underestimated 
the amount of price reduction it 
could obtain from its vendors ” 

He also told the subcommittee 
that he had directed his staff “to 
conduct a full investigation of non- 
navy Defense Department officials 
who received gratuities from Gen- 
eral Dynamics." This was believed 
to be the first official acknowledg- 
ment that senior Pentagon civilians 
were under such scrutiny. 

House investigators released evi- 
dence last year that the company 
had given jewelry and other per- 
sonal gifts to Admiral Hyman G. 
Rick over, who led the navy's nucle- 
ar submarine program until his re- 
tirement in 1982. The company, 
whose Electric Boat shipyard is a 


curity division. Mr. Conahan re- 
viewed the conclusions of a 1984 
GAO study that found the Penta- 
gpn did not adequately prevent im- 
proper overhead chaises against its 
contracts. The GAO is the investi- 
gative arm of Congress. 

Even though Pentagon auditors 
might challenge significant por- 
tions of such billings, the study 
concluded, military contracting of- 
ficers often negotiate settlements 
allowing millions of dollars more 
than the auditors recommend. 

In a review of Pentagon auditing 
activities at 1 1 major companies for 
1978 through 1980. the GAO study 
found that Pentagon auditors ques- 
tioned the propriety of S37.4 mil- 
lion out of 5843. 4 million id 
charges. But negotiations between 
government representatives and 
the contractors resulted in $16.5 
million of these challenged costs 
being reinstated and included in 
overhead payments. 


major producer of submarines, has 
denied that 


that the gifts were illegal 
gratuities. 

Mr. Sherick did not name any of 
the companies under investigation 
by Pentagon agencies. In recent 
months. General Dynamics and 
Pratt & Whitney are known to have 
been subjects of grand jury investi- 
gations. The General Electric Co. 
was indicted in March on charges 
that its Space Systems division al- 
tered time cards in a way that de- 
frauded the government 

Also testifying before the sub- 
committee Wednesday was Frank 
C. Conahan, director of the Gener- 
al Accounting Office's national se- 


WORLDWIDE ENTERTAINMENT 



12, av. g*oigu V t«l.7Z3.3Z. 32 


PARIS -FRANCE 



ot tbs bor only Z40fri 
* JS s o mvkc charg? 


Paper Says Soviet 
To Ration Vodka 


Reuters 

PARIS — The Kremlin is 
preparing to ration vodka and 
take other radical steps to curb 
what it considers to be a nation- 
al drinking problem, the princi- 
pal Russian-language newspa- 
per for Soviet emigres said 
Thursday. 

Russkaya Mysl, a weekly 
based in Paris, said that the 
Soviet authorities planned to 
announce Lhe measures May 10 
but dial details had been given 
in advance to certain press offi- 
cials. 

Vodka will be available only 
under a system of ration cou- 
pons, the report said. The 
Kremlin also plans strict en- 
forcement of laws, now often 
ignored, that ban the distilla- 
tion of home-produced alcohoL 
the newspaper reported. 


Robert J. Dole of Kansas, applaud- 
ed the speech, which he had sought. 
“It was tough stuff,” he said, “just 
what we needed.” 

In the Democratic response to 
Mr. Reagan’s speech, the Senate 
minority leader, Robert C. Byrd of 
West Virginia, accused the presi- 
dent of breaking promises to the 
dderly, imposing the 
sacrifice unevenly, and 
mining the future of the country by 
shortchanging education and’ re- 
search. 

“To be blunt about it. the presi- 
dent has not offered a solid finan- 
cial plan for America's future," 
Senator Byrd said. 

He said that Mr. Reagan, in five 
years, "doubled the national debt, 
doubled the debt that it took 39 
presidents almost 200 years to ac- 
cumulate. He is the biggest spend- 
ing president of all time." 

Mr. Byrd said that “it is simply 
□ot fair, not rigbL that Social Secu- 
rity recipients are asked to sacri- 
fice, and middle-income families 
are asked to sacrifice, and fanners 
are asked to sacrifice” and “yet the 
largest, richest and most powerful 
corporations in America are per- 
mitted to get a free ride." 

Mr. Reagan had said that “the 
burden will not be great if all of us 
help cany die load," adding that 
“our veterans, disabled workers 
and retired citizens have earned 
their benefits. They deserve an ade- 
quate and dignified standard of liv- 
ing, and we win never renege on 
Lhat pledge." 

Senator Byrd said “there are 
those who would have you believe 
that the Democratic response to 
the deficit problem is to raise your 
taxes. Democrats will actually op- 
pose a personal income tax in- 
crease.” However, he did not rule 


non-Melanesian immigrants. 

Under the new timetable, the 
problem will have to be handled by 
a new French government after 
□ext year’s elections, which polls 
indicate will be won by conserva- 
tive parties. 

Mr. Fabius. who announced the 


other in the western state of Gujarat. Police said 10 people had died and 
at least 25 had been wounded. 

Those deaths raised to 68 the number of people killed in the last three 
months in Gujarat, the Press Trust of Ind& the domestic news agefccy, 
reported. The fighting had pitted upper-caste Hindus and lower castes, 
Hindus and Moslems, and rioters and police. 

Officials said the death toll was likely to go much higher because 24 . 
people were reported missing after dashes Monday between Hindus and 
Moslems in a labor camp near the state capital of Ahmedabad. That 


ises to the plan after a special cabinet meeting Moslems in a- labor camp i 
burden of Thursday, said that four regional fighting left 5,000 homeless. 

of under- councite'would be set up in New ' _ _ - „ 

Sudan Restores Relations With Libya 

KHARTOUM, Sudan (A^) — Sudan’s new mflitary govermwat^uis 
announced the ^nation's, first, major foreign policy shat by restating 
diplomatic relations with Libya -after a four-year break. • 

A statement issued in the capitate of Khartoum and Tripoli, Libya, said 

the decision emphasized “the need to confront all the challenges and 

source of revenue, will be in- dangers of imperialism and IBbntem aimed at the presbit^ and die f$nrc 
creased, Mr. Fabius called for tol- nation.” * : i 

For the Record . : 


Caledonia to handle some local ad- 
ministration. This move is appar- 
ently designed to provide political 
experience for the indigenous Mel- 
anesians. 

Promising that French aid, 
which already is the island's main 


erance on all sides in New Caledo- 


nia. 


Kohl Praises 
Reagan Visit 


out a minimum tax on corpora- 
tions, which some Democrats on 


(Continued from Page 1) 

two more than had ori ginall y been 
listed by Theo Hailet, the mayor of 
Bitburg. Mr. Hailet said a review 
bad uncovered two extra grave 
sites. The mayor said that only one 
officer was among the SS dead. 

Mr. Hailet did not identify the 
dead men’s Waffen SS units. But a 
spokesman for the Popular Associ- 
ation for the Care of German War 
Graves, which assembled the 
roughly 2,000 bodies at Bitbuig af- 
ter the war, said they were princi- 
pally from the 2nd SS Panzer Divi- 
sion and the 10th SS Panzer 
Division. 

Since the outcry that FoDowed 
the administration's announce- 


P*™* Minister Nafuadno Mmifia of Zambia was rembVel Tlnxrsday 
by President Kenneth Kaunda alio said he would be made an ambassa- 
~ r * *“ e D *y prime ministeris Kebby Musokotwane, who is still into 
30sand holds the education at^ culture portfolio^ i- (Sestets) 

The first port call to China by US. warships since 194$ has been 
downgraded from an. aircraft carrier battlegroup to Spniance dass 
destroyers, the Far Eastern Economic Review reported Thursday. (J¥T) 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, arrived Thursday in Wacaw 
to attend a Warsaw Pact summit conference. It is his first trip abro& 
since he assumed power. last month. (Reu & S 

The last ragor league baseball pitcher to win 30 games, Denny Met* 
41, was sentenced to 23 years m federal prison Thursday m Tampa, 
Florida, for racketeering, extortion, bookmaking and cocaine possess cn. 
Mr. McLain won 31 games, against 6 losses, for the Detroit Tigers in 
1968. (UPJ) 


Gould Collection Paintings . 
Auctioned for $32.6 MUUon 


mem April 11 that Mr. Reagan 
Capitol Hill have been discussing. ? ould u ^ BiU ? ur & U -S- officials 
Mr. Reagan used familiar arm- *1 bee ° 



The collection of the Itolion 
designer “Rocco Borocco” 
and the Knap label with its 
creations in silk, suede and 
leather. 

KNAP - 34, FAUBOURG 
SAINT-HONOR§ 


meals to counter demands for 
slower growth in the defense bud- 
gej- 

. ‘The Soviets are far more dan- 
gerous today than during the *50s 
and '60s, periods in which we de- 
voted far more to our defense" rela- 
tive to the size of the economy, be 
said. The 3 percent growth above 
inflation provided for in the Senate 
compromise “is the rock-bottom 
level we must maintain for effective 
deterrence to protect our security." 
be said. 

Mr. Reagan said the Senate plan 
would “require canceling some 
programs" and “some nonessential 
military bases may be closed or cut 
back. But mainly we will continue 
to identify and eliminate waste and 
crack down harder on excesses in 
contract costs.” 

The administration has dis- 
played growing sensitivity to 
charges of waste in Pentagon pro- 
curement and Mr. Reagan said 
Wednesday night that “padding of 
expense accounts, overcharging for 
weapons, profiteering at the ex- 
pense of the public — thee should 
be, and will be, prosecuted to the 
fullest extent of the law." 


background of the dead out of fear 
that some of the interred SS men 
might have been involved in the 
Malm6dy massacre on Dec. 17, 
1944, during the Battle of the 
Bulge. 

According to the U.S. Army's 
official history, at least 86 Ameri- 


can prisoners were gunned down 
by troops of the 1st SS Panzer Divi- 


sion south of the Belgian (own erf 
Malmfidy; 69 others were mur- 
dered at two other sites by the same 
unit during the Germans' doomed 
offensive into the Ardennes forest. 

The War Graves' association 
maintains that most of the bodies 
regrouped at Bitburg were from 
units that fought near the Luxem- 
bourg frontier and not farther 
north in Belgium. 

The official U.S. researchers are 
known to have consulted dccn- 
ments in West Berlin on Nazi war 
crimes. According to a source dose 
to their investigation, they have un- 
covered information on “two or 
three" SS men buried at Bitbufg 
who appeared to have bam in the 
1st Panzer Division, but they w«e 
said to have died before the Mal- 
rofidy massacre. . 


(Continued from Page 1) 

rows rising up high into the picture 
toward a wall and a . row. of lilac 
hills . . . The white sun is- surround- 
ed by a great yellow halo.” 

The buyer, who was identified by 
a spokesman for Sotheby's only as 
an American private collector, was 
bdieved to be A. Alfred Taubman, 
chairman and owner of Sotheby’s. 

The other museum-quality 
painting, a portrait in oils on board 
painted by Toulouse-Lautrec in 
1895, established a record for the 
artist when it was bought at $5.28 
million. The name of the buyer was 
not disclosed. 

Two other records were estab- 
lished. Early in the sale, a painting 
of a vase of flowers by Gustave 
Courbet, who preceded Impres- 
sionism, went for $1.21 million Ca- 
ndle Pissarro's “Rue de La Cita- 
dcue, Pontoise,” dated 1873 and 
the view of a street in a provincial 

M50oSo der SnOW ‘ W3S Mld for 
A remarkable price, although 
not a record, was paid for an out- 


standing early landscape by Jean- 
Baptiste Camille CoroL Entitled 


•aft” UJUUCU 

Rome: He et pont San Bartolo- 
meo.. it was painted on paper laid 
down on canvas during Corot’s 
First trip to Italy. It illustrates the 


exhibitions, was sold for $450,000 
against an estimate of 5600,000 to 
5800,000. A pastel by Degas. 
Trote Danseuses," interesting. for 
its composition of three gfrfest&ch 
mg at the top of a room with a-b& 
slanting ejroanse coming down to-" . 
ward the viewer, went for SL1 mil- 
lion against an estimated S1^5m3' 
lion to $1.75 million. 

This was a favorite picture of the 
late Georges Wild eastern, thedeal- 
er in whose office it hung until his 
death. Daniel Wfldensrein, a devot- 
ed mend of Mrs. GoukL who had 
always wanted the painting, sold it 
to her only after his father's drath. 

Another disappointment was a 
still life done by Manet in 1882. 
Jhe hammer went down ; al 

5300.000 against an estimate of 

5400.000 to S 500.000. ' * 

Only three lots, representing 2 

P^cent of the total, remained nn- 
sold. These failures were not due to 

any cooling of the market -bub re- 
flected the exaggerated estimates 
put on nearly aflTthe paintings fol- . 
lowing an extensive paanotiaiaL 
campaign. Including traveling* ex- 
hibitions and parties, theSothrijyJ 
spokesman said, the campaign cost 
51 million.' ' 

This resulted.in a highly attend* 
m sale — Douglas Dmcm, Stayros 



which he retained later in his Ro^ « ^y»en-Boraemisza ; ^ 
man period. Considered by many iT?? 8 thos ? ,n - ^ rooni “***¥ 
the masterpiece in that style, itwem ,n . enthusiasm cm" which' 
for $850,000. .^nwent auction house apparently [bad 

In contrast, there were a number — °P- Gwen the incRffcrefll 


of disappointments. Half the paint- 
ings sold under the lowest esti- 
mates. including Corot's "Vue du 

Pincio, Italic," which immediately 

followed the sale of his other paint- 
ing and sold for $200,000. 

A good portrait of Madame Juli- 
ette PascaL painted by Toulouse- 
Lautrec m 1887 and son in many 


quality of many pain tings.- - 1 th*- 
^erall result could be.CQjwdCTedt 
pniiunu even if overheads arel«iw 

ly to leave . Sotheby's .a mmimrf . 
profit. : / 

.TJ e g|in in prestige remains is 
ooudl The wild expectatioas.-gan* 
crated by tbe deluge of press re- 
lcas «, conferences and sud^wert 
not fulfilled. ' 

.''•■'A .1 - • 


Iraq Says It Attacked Targets in Gulf* 

BAGHDAD (Reuters) — Iraq said Thursday that its aircraft attacked 
and hit two large naval targets — an Iraqi term far tankas — near Iran's 
mam oil terminal at Kharg Island in the Gulf. 

Iraq also claimed to have attacked a naval target on Wednesday: There 
has been no confirmation of either attack. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


& 


U.S. Sanctions 
OnFretoria 


U.S.: Sanctions 
f On Pretoria 

aorcemLr: Deco ^ ^V--.' 

?P?l »n P-JS*****, \SS t. ' % David B. Ottaway 

^aies in Los a 111 ^ iS^f. HibAb^im Pou Sw«r 

^V' 1 WASHINGTON— nefteagan. 
**« trail- ** 3 ^ \ > admioistratiwi. seeking la conism 
■'i > ‘ ■ . pressure in Congress from both Re- 

3CFks R a • f> publicans ami Democrats Tor cco- 

; *^CVjp. 7 ■ nomic measures against Sooth Aff 

■ oonn CT , _ l j 1c _.. “Oft, rica. has submitted a bin that 
, officUi.T* h % . -would increase aid to that country's 
0 ^ ve years « " ‘majority black population But pur 

U5t ernaj g^tt^ ,off any decision on sanctions for. 

So« . been ^forced CWOy “ rS ' 

»terai^.. The ^vS^ba * ■' The bill marks the start ofama- 
lerhad^^^MuK^ ^ l° r batlk lxw{ * n admimstra- 
,‘ ion ** CoogTKS over U5. policy 
revH? ln -ernal *Jr *W ^toward South Africa and us system 
Cview revj^ *of racial segregation, or apartheid. 

Av», B ° 6t * At the same time, the ad m inisr 

L,L i ‘uTC§[flJ ■ - [ration sen! the chid" architect of 
3 Actonim *8 M this policy-, the assistant secretary 

US BrioTj ■ 1 s Pected tj .1 . of state for African affairs. Chester 
said. General A - Crocker, before the Senate For- 

tonini, "*9 ,1 ^1; eign Relations Committee on 

" • 4is 0 a ' Wednesday' to nreseni reasons whv 


SS£ 


sentenced 


aneu&Jkf* ' argued that sanctions were “prc- 
wh 0 . r cisdy the wrong signal to send” at a 
time when South African policies 


>f two w!Jlv ,!rr -J* Tbe administration measure 

^ w offioas. ^>ould give the president until 

_ t 7 m ‘ March 1987 to deterimne whether 

*7 L‘8C (Jhpniinj the South African government has ' 
-*Ttv c,». ' a *«CR4i, made “significant progress 1 ' to- 

retooedT? 1 * De P a nmeni w - ward abolishing the pass laws re* 
-a arsenal ofSw st^cting the movement of black* 
-tat i--. Stowing unrestricted union rights 

MrivSk 5 *?*? to devfU J for black. an end to the migrant 
~ . v-^b. the Siaie rwj 51 ? labor system and an improvement 

tue^Satif- UV! M housing - 

ainv If the determination were nega- 

| said LhmT^/ 0rce ?- ^edntlf- ■*»* president would have to 
suntries h £1"+ aJ toS ; . -recommend sanctions to Congress. 

' been 31 'Huff? , These indude bans on new com- 
_ met rial investment, bank loans, the " 
.J 1 rp ' importation of gold Krugerrands 

it-KcU I3rgPtaJ],(' or die sale of computers to the 

nq sad TTmrxiav fo, .w”? <‘ manaau - 

■ — an Iraqi icrra rnr t J,v ® c ^' The latest bill also would set up a 

Sand in the Gulf 5 15-million scholarship fund for 

lacked a nival La™ e , m a , . black* mandate that all US. com- 
?ither attack * panies operating in South Africa ' 

ensure equal treatment for Afri- 
.»« TT n _ p , _ cans, and direct the Etport- Import 
’*■“ tv artare m luA Bank and the Overseas Private In- 

iva! mobs mmnu « slnKn . t C 01 ?- » WpJ™ 1 ™ 
compame cwned by blacks. 

W ?ol*re sa>d Iflpcopfcferi ■ 16 Accused of Treason 

wen.itr-v-oftvnnUMu i. Sixteen members of the anti- 
apartheid United DemocraUc 
ne' u-me- - v u ^ nE ® R : . Front were foimally chamd with 
L*!fr. Hussite. _ treason Thursday, United Press lo- 

■, w \r^.rrr ± ^ . temational reported from Durban, 
ii w.iSas.eJ> to eo mudhdBb South Africa. The trial is due to 
i.er.as.tCi Mosdix tesafe . jjegjn May 20 in the Pjetennaritz- . 
ear ±e >ta:e capital of burg Supreme Court. 


u^tUl 


are “changing more than ever.'' 



U.S. South Is Furling 
Flag Long After Defeat 


Sandinist Visits Foe: 


op 


Obando, Named a Cardinal? Symbolizes Resistance to Ortega 


U»AmatUtdPimt 

Confederate flag still flies in many places in tbe South. 


By William E. Schmidt 

Nrw York Times Smite 

ATLANTA — For the. first 
time io years, the mammoth 
Confederate battle flag did not 
fly this spring in from of the 
Kappa Alpha rratemiiy house 
al Auburn University. 

Amid complaints that the 
banner is a symbol of racism 
and on affront to blacks, the 
president of the Alabama, 
school, James Martin, banned 
the display of the 20- by 40-foot 
(6.08- by 12-meter) flag during 
the fraternity's annual celebra- 
tion of Old South Week. 

One hundred and twenty 
years after Genera] Robert £. 
Lee surrendered to the North's 
General Ulysses S. Grant, the 
flag that once led Confederate 
armies into battle continues to 
be an object of emotion and 
sometimes anger in this region 
of the United Slates. 

Many Southerners defend it 
as a proud emblem of their an- 
tebellum heritage. Others insist 
it is a bloody slurt waved in the 
faces of blacks. 

Two months ago. The Atlan- 
ta Constitution newspaper, in 
an editorial that generated an- 
gry responses from many read- 
ers, argued that the Stars and 
Bars should be removed from 
(he field of the Georgia slate 


flag, where it bad been placed in 
1956 by defiant sta te lawmakers 
reacting, in part, to the rising 
tide of civil rights protests 
across the region. The newspa- 
per described the state flag as 
an “intentional insult” to black 
citizens. 

In Alabama, blacks sued nine 
years ago to have the Confeder- 
ate flag taken down from atop 
the flagpole outside the state 
capiiol in Montgomery, where 
it nad been ordered placed hy a 
segregationist governor, John 
M. Patterson 

At the University at Missis- 
sippi, two years ago, black and 
white students faced off in an 
angry confrontation over the 
Confederate flag, leading uni- 
versity officials to declare an 
end to its use as the school's 
official emblem. 

At Auburn, members of Kap- 
pa Alpha, a fraternity based 
largely in the South and found- 
ed in 1865 in reverence of Lee, 
were angered by Mr. Martin's 
decision. 

But forbidden from unfurling 
the big flag, they decked their 
houses with dozens or smaller 
Confederate flags, donned rent- 
ed Rcbd uniforms and span 
much of the week dashing 
around campus cutting loose 
the Rebel yell. 


Shultz Links Central America and Vietnam War 


icked Targets fot 

raqsjud Thursday thatiu^, 
- — an Iraq: term r™ 


The Associated Press Soviet influence, this lime near our 

WASHINGTON ’ — Secretary of very borders. Here is your parallel 
State George P. Shultz warned between Vietnam and Central 
Thursday that U.S. failure to con- America, 1 ' he said, 
iinue fighting Communism in Cen- “Can we afford to be naive again 

^ tral America could lead to the same about the consequences when we 


“Those who assure us that these 
dire consequences are not in pros- 
pect are some of those who assured 
us of the same in Indochina before 
1975.*’ he said. 

“How many times must we learn 


.America's retreat from global 


By Edward Cody 

H'jsAiffjwi Past Service 

MANAGUA — When news 
reached here Wednesday that 
Archbishop Miguel Obando y Bra- 
vo is to become a rawtinat one of 
the first 10 pay respects was the 
prelate's most powerful adversary. 
President Daniel Onega Saavedra. 

The courtesy caD at the bishopric 
by Mr. Ortega, who wore the olive 
uniform of the Sandinist revolution 
and drove his own black jeep, was a 
sign of Archbishop Obando’s key 
political role in this counuy even 
before Rome announced his ascen- 
sion to cardinal. Observers forecast 
that with the new mark of respect 
from Pope John Raul II, Archbish- 
op Obando’s viability is likely to 
increase in coming months as Mr. 
Onega deals with the Nicaraguan 
church hierarchy and its opposition I 
to his Sandinist government 

Archbishop Obando. who has 
headed the Managua diocese since 
1970, has become a formidable 1 
leader of the internal opposition, ; 
using his strong personal populari- 1 
ty and the deep Catholic faith of 1 
many Nicaraguans in his struggle 
against the revolution’s Marxist \ 
leanings. In the absence of an ides- _ 
tifiable opposition political hero, 
particularly with a censored press, 
the prelate is the most visible sym- 
bol of peaceful resistance for Nica- 
raguans living here who oppose the 
Sandinist revolution. 

In the same manner, tbe arch- 
bishop frequently displayed his dis- 
taste for the repression of the late 
President Anastasio Somoza, who 
was overthrown by the Sandinists 
in 1979. As a result, when Edfcn 
Gdraez Pas torn, as Commander 
Zero, took over the National Palace 
in 1978. it was Archbishop Obando 
that the Sandinist guerrillas called 


resulis as the U.S. pullout from pull back, about tbe special ruth- the same lesson?” he said. 


leadership “created a vacuum that on to mediate with the president. 1 
was exploited by our adversaries,*' Archbishop Obando, 59, was 
Mr. Shultz said.' “The Soviets took born in the cattle country of Chon- 
ad vantage of our inhibitions and tales province. Short and thick, he : 
projected their power to unprece- has the dark skin and directness of 


He declared that “the larger les- 


“the litany of apoJ- son of the post decade is that when ed, the hard way. that American ant villages as a younger priest, 
mists and condem- America lost faith in herself, world eneaeetneni. American siren 2th. often riding a mule, that Archbish- 


Vietnam. lessness of Communist rule?” He declared that “the larger les- 

His views were in sharp contrast Warning that “the litany of apoJ- son of the post decade is that when 
to earlier administration attempts ogy Tor Communists and condem- America lost faith in herself, world 
to avoid comparing the two situa- nation for America and our friends stability suffered and freedom lost 
tions. is beginning again.** Mr. Shultz ground.” And he pledged: “This 

Mr. Shultz make his remarks in a said: “Do the American people must never happen again.” 
speech commemorating tbe ~ 10th really accept the notion that we, Speaking al the State Depan- 


dented lengths." 

“Once again it was demonstrat- 


Nicaragua's peasant majority. 

It was in repeated visits to peas- 


ally accept the notion that we, Speaking at the State Depart- 
id our friends, are tbe represents- menu with hundreds of employees 
ies of evil?” listening, Mr. Shultz said the “cost 

Asked whether Mr. Shultz was of failure was high” in Vietnam. 
Ivocating an increased U.S. role “The price was paid, in the first 
Central America, a State Depart- instance, by the more than 30 mil- 
eni spokesman, Bernard Kalb, lion people we left behind to fall 


engagement, American strength, often riding a mule, that Archbish- 
and American leadership are indis- op Obando gained his popularity 
pensahle 10 peace. A strong Ameri- among the country’s poor, 
ca makes the world a safer place." But in his 15 years as the 


he number of people bUednit- 
Trus: 0: Inin, the domsnicBir 
itted upper-caste Hindus sd bee 
oters and police, 
ii was Usd) to go muditaisE. 
after rashes Moadn benafe 
ear the >:a:e capiul of 


Mr. Shultz make his remarks m a said: Do the American people must never happen again. ca makes the world a safer place.” But in his 15 yeans as the 

speech commemorating the 10th really accept the notion that we. Speaking at the State Depart- . . Mt . . 

anniversary of the fan of South and our friends, arc the represents- menL with hundreds of employees v - 

Vietnam on April 30, 1975. The lives of evil?” listening. Mr. Shultz said the “cost I 

speech came a day after President Asked whether Mr. Shultz was or failure was high" in Vietnam. . JjJ? «Si??5LS£2f!n! '' IM ^ ei ^ roim ® Explosion 

Ronald Reagan’s proposals for aid advocating an increased U.S. role “The price was paid, in the first rJu In Sihpria T« Rpmnfcri 

to the guemlhs in Nicaragua we inCei.tnJ Amtrica.aStattDmm- instance, by the tnblre that. 30 mil- ° f Of pnee bat was p aid o atl- In Siberia IS Recorded 
rejected in Congress. mem spokesman, Bernard Kalb, lion people we left behind to fall LmieJ Pms huenumomu 

In his speech, Mr. Shultz said: said: ”1 am not going to interpret under Communist rule. But Ameri- STOCKHOLM — The Soviet 

“Vietnam and Central America — the secretary’s speech. It has to ca. and the world, also paid a vYi „ flY n , «ii nn Union set off an underground nu- 

rS:" clear explosion Thursday at a mili- 


Underground Explosion 


on. Our goals in Central America 
arc tite uose we had in Vietnam: 
democracy, economic progress and 
security against aggression." 

“Broken promises. Communist 
dictatorship. Refugees. Widened 


Mr. Shultz said the rebels in Nic- 
ragua “deserve our support." 


“For a time, the United States 

retreated into introspection, self- 


aragua deserve our support. retreated into introspection, sen- 
*They are struggling to prevent doubt and hesitancy,” he said 
the consolidation and expansion of “Some Americans tended to think 
Communist power on our door- that American power was ihe 
step," he said. source of the world’s problems " our exertions will exact." 


iwm iu a ^ ^ ^ j Q S ibe- 

“We know that we must be pru- ria". Swedish seismologists 
dent in our commitments,” be said, reported. 

"We know that we must be honest )i registered 7 on the Richter 
with ourselves about the costs that scale. It was the second Soviet ex- 


Sandinisis first look power. During 
the final guerrilla offensive against 
Somoza. the archbishop had of- 
fered an ecclesiastical endorsement 
of the people's right -to rise up 
against the government- And in the 
early days of Sandinist rule, he 
posed no objection to clerics ac- 
cepting key roles in the government 
on Lhe ground that the country 
faced an exceptional situation after 
its debilitating civil war. 

However, he later concluded that 
the Sandinists were setting out to 
organize a Marxist government in- 
stead of the pluralistic democracy 
he had been pushing for, but the 
four priests holding office in Nica- 
ragua remain in their positions de- 
spite misgivings in the Nicaraguan 
Bishops Conference and pressure 
from the Vatican. 

^ Pope John Paul 11 used his visit 
... . . _ to Nicaragua in March 1983 to dra- 

Miguel Obando ) Bravo maiize papal support Tor the hierar- 
chy. The church structure, with the 
church's leader in the capital, the archbishop at its head, was being 
archbishop also has gained a repu- criticized by Sandinist offic ials ana 
ration for astuteness m his dealings sympathetic clerics in what they 
with authority. called the “people's church" as a 

He was regarded as one of the vessel or traditional bourgeois vaJ- 
revolution’s supporters when the ues and interests of the rich. 



with authority. 

He was regarded as one of the 
revolution's supporters when the 



Aldebert 

PARIS: 16, place Vendome 1, bd de la Madeleine 
70, fg Saint-Honore Palais dcs Congres, Porte Maillot 
CANNES: 19. La Croisette • so* 


plosion recorded this year. 


— Sudor. s new nuiiunpas . 
L m-.:or foreign policy 
?yj after 2 four-year break 
;p:li‘.vof Khinc-umaciiTqiib.. 
;e need :c confront all ikdfc 
armed a; the pres® ait 


Brown Boveri in the oil field 
put secondary recovery in a 
with the world’s 


new light 


Mundia of Zambia ws rtffirit - - • — 

aSgs^-first ultraviolet 

ina V.5 warshiri anK l 6 ^'- ' 

vt canxr: r^onp u Sg; A^AlAI 

verrm:. Rs'W* rdW< 

J* whunac' *. m ■ ■ ■ . n M ■ M _ h 

^"^■sterilization plant. 




:tion Paintty Water down, oil up 


Of $32 *6 ^ ^ Offshore oil production can be 
^ WJi <&*!'- boosted by injecting seawater 
*^1 into the oil-bearing rock, raising 
K d^'fnai^-'the pressure and so lifting the 

' 

S'.; But the water must be germ- 

free. Sulfate-reducing bacteria 
;7r; would otherwise turn the oil 

: . \ 'souri, causing severe corrosion 

bf the oil-handling equipment 
v and piping. 

^ Sterilizing the water with ultra- 
violet (UV) light is the method 
<}*. ■?* accepted today. 

■7V-- •" 

V 7 For the North Sea's Ekofisk oil- 

-. I . - - "fiAiH .PhillinQ Ppfmlpi im in Nnr- 


r v zation plant, together with all 

l- 7 : ”■ the plant and process engineer- 

^iv-'ing. The installation will treat 
77 • ’ ’ 2500 m 3 of seawater per hour. - 

-«■ - *::7. v. 

• 7 :;;“ • - " The Brown Boveri system meets 

7:<“ - r 7;7.:"7f^-..--the requirements of offshore 

I’C jVp; * - - 

■ 7 - ■ • -■ •' • 

1 


operations: it needs little space, 
it is light highly reliable, low on 
maintenance and has an ad- 
vanced control system. 

Designed by BBC engineers in 
Switzerland and Norway, the UV 
sterilizer consists of 8 radiation 
lines. Each line contains a 
radiation chamber with 14 high- 
intensity UV lamps and the 
associated piping and fittings. 

Tbe container package in- 
cludes all the electrical equip- 
ment and instrumentation, and 
the whole is controlled and 
monitored by a computerized 
process control system. 

The first of rts kind in the world, 
this assignment is another 
example of Brown Boveri’s 
capabilities in the field of water 
treatment Different and new, it is 
just the kihd of challenge that 
BBC engineers make light of. 






Wi CSlOTl 

' •■■'7 -■■■ ' -W ' ' i ■<■■■■■ " ;> : • 




..... . . 

; r i7 

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‘ .1 

1 


Competent - Dependable - Worldwide 


BBC 

BROWN BOVERI 


For further information please consult your local BBC agency or write to: S w i t ie rtamfc BBC Brown, Boveri & Company, Ltd.. RO. Box 58, CH-5401 Baden; Federal Republic of Germany: Brown, Boveri 
S Cle. Aktiengesetlschaft, Postfach 351, D-6SQO Mannheim 1: Austria: Oesterreichlsche Brown Boveri -Werke AG. Postfach 184. A-1101 Vienna; BrazB: BBC Brown Boveri S.A. Caixa postal 975, 
06000 Osasco fSP): Canada: BBC Brown Boveri Canada Inc., 2260 Place du Canada, Montreal, Que., H3B2N2; France: BBC Brown Boveri France S.A. 21, rue des Trois-Fontanot. Parc de la Defense, 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


Gorbachev Cools Ties to U.S. 

Sharp Sally Called Bid to Improve International Stance 


By Serge Selim em arm 

.Vt'H 1 Yurk Tilths Seme* 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev's unexpectedly sharp sally at 
the United Slates on Tuesday has 
thrown a new chill into what had 
seemed a warming of Soviet-Amer- 
ican relations. 

In the first six weeks of his rule 
as head of the Soviet Communist 
Party, the signs had seemed propi- 
tious. His early speeches had 
stressed the detente of old; anti- 
American statements in the press 
abated: a few more Jews were al- 
lowed to emigrate; and arms nego- 
tiators were meeting in Geneva. 


But in a speech to the Commu- 
nist Party Central Committee. Mr. 
Gorbachev accused the United 
States of not really looking for an 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

agreement in Geneva, and he hint- 
ed that the talks could founder. He 
was also critical of U.S. military 
and economic policies throughout 
the world. 

The assault coincided with a re- 
newal of recriminations over the 
shooting death of a U.S. Army ma- 
jor by a Soviet sentry in East Ger- 
many. 

Western diplomats offered sev- 


q/t !fc«. » ■ » ■ tm ■ 

Beverly Wilshire Hotel 

IN THE HEART OF LOS ANGELES 
Wilshire Boulevard* at Rodeo Drive 
Beverly Hills. Calif. 90212 
1213) 275-4282 Telex 698-220 

‘Mi— rr 

^JhtFJadwgTIotdaof ihtFWorld ig 

London (01) 583-3050 
Frankfun 1069) 29 04 71 
Hong Kong 1 5) 22 11 42 



London (01) 409-0814 
Frankfun (069) 28 75 24 
Hong Kong (3) 68 23 35 


era! explanations for Mr. Gorba- 
chev's stance. First, his assessment 
of the first round of the Geneva 
talks seemed to reflect Soviet frus- 
tration with the lack of progress 
and an attempt to put pressure on 
the United States in advance of the 
next round starting in May. 

The Russians have sought to 
block President Ronald Reagan’s 
plan for developing a space-based 
missile defense, while the Ameri- 
cans have tried to focus on reduc- 
tions in medium-range and strate- 
gic missiles and bombers. 

Second. Mr. Gorbachev's criti- 
cism of global U.S. behavior — his 
charge of stepped-up political, eco- 
nomic, ideological and military ac- 
tivities against Communist and 
Third World countries — appeared 
to be in preparation for the War- 
saw Pact summit meeting opening 
Friday in the Polish capital The 
meeting is expected to renew the 
pact for another 20 years, and dip- 
lomats believed that Mr. Gorba- 
chev had to dramatize the reason 
for its existence. 

Third. Mr. Gorbachev's tough 
talk may be related to the maneu- 
vering that Mr. Reagan has initiat- 
ed for a meeting with the Soviet 
leader. Since Mr. Gorbachev took 
office, Mr. Reagan has called for a 
meeting, even an informal one. 

Mr. Gorbachev, however, has re- 
mained publicly silent on such a 
meeting, and diplomats surmise 



U.S. Ascribes die Arms Talk Impasse 
To Soviet Fixation on Space Defense 

. . . W* also an^ 



By Bernard Gwcrtzman s P ac ? 

iVw York Tima Service pOSSil 

WASHINGTON — No progress Tfc 
was made in the first round of the Janus 
Geneva arms talks with the Soviet state, 
Union because of a basic disagree- . Sovie 


space defense will help reduce the proposal! i public. 

posaMity of nuclear SdhLlt deployment of new me- 

r ^ dium-range missiles in Europe for 

January when the U.S. secretary of ^ mcmr hs. and would deride on a 
state, George P. Shultz, and the if rhe United States- 


uraeva -HUB uum wiui me acnci uwigv *■ - .. — further freeze u the Uni Lea arnica 

Union because of a basic disagree- . Soviet Union's foreign minister. w ^ 0 jfc r> The U.S. reject- 
mem over how the talks should be Andrei A Gromyko, met in Gene- -j^ on ground that a 

conducted, U.S. officials say. vaand agreed on setting op the new won id preserve what the 


bdtVI 

Mikhail S. Gorbachev 

that he may see a political danger in 
Mr. Reagan's invitation. 

According to this line of thought, 
to accept would be to endorse tacit- 
ly Mr. Reagan's military buildup 
and his pursuit of the space-based 
defense system. To refuse could 
mark Mr. Gorbachev as intransi- 
gent In this context, the diplomats 
thought, Mr. Gorbachev had to as- 
sert his position. 

In the same speech. Mr. Gorba- 
chev included an overture to China, 
listing it with other "socialist na- 
tions” with which Moscow sought 
to strengthen ties. Some diplomats 
suspected that Mr. Gorbachev's 
courtship of China was part of an 
effort to bolster his international 
position. There has been specula- 
tion that he may seek a visit to 
Beijing before agreeing to meet 
with Mr. Reagan. 


conducted, U.S. officials say. va and agreed on setting up the new 
These officials took issue with three-pan 311115 negotiations. 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet “What happened basically is that 

leader, who in a speech Tuesday the Soviets wanted, as was clear in 
blamed the United States for the January, to make the unity cvf the 
impasse in the three-part negotia- talks more important than the three 
tions on strategic, medium-range parts.” a U.S. official said. “They 
and space weapons. are pulling more to unity and we to 

“We reject Mr. Gorbachev’s the trinity. They wanted a ban on 
Haim ih.it the U.S. negotiators are tiie Strategic Defense Initiative to 
not seeking agreements at the nu- dominate all three areas, and we 
clear and space arms talks,” a wanted progress to be made in the 
White House official said Wednes- otber areas ' reference to 

day. SDL’ 

The U.S. officials said the Soviet The Soviet delegation sought to 
side bad refused to bargain cm cuts unify the three-part negotiations, 
in strategic or medium-range nu- by having the strat eg ic, medium- 


clear weapons until the United range and space weapons sub- 
S tales first agreed to negotiate a groups meet together as often as 
ban on research and deployment of possible; administration officials 

I . _ TIC fnurirftrl CSnO- 


space defense weapons. 


The United States, they sakL of- rate talks. They compromisriby 

fered proposals for cuts in Ibe sm- havm fiST. S ' SS, ° nS 

tegjc and medium-range weapons 561531316 sessions, 

but declined to negotiate curbs on During the talks, the Soviet side 
research aimed at developing a proposed a moratorium on deploy- 
space-based defense system, which mg new strategic and raedi am- 
is known officially as the Strategic range weapons and on space-weap- 
Defense Initiative and popularly as oos research for as long as the 
“star wars.” The U.S. position is negotiations lasted. The United 
that a ban on research cannot be States refused, 
verified and that, over the long run, Mr. Gorbachev then made the 


vaand agreed on setting up thenew d vAal the 

three-pan arras negotiations. M a *' Sovict advantage. 

“What happened bascally is that mtcrview Wednesday, 

the Soviets wanted, as was clear m ^ w Adelmaru director of 
January, to make the unity of the Conno\ and Disanna- 

taiks more important than the three “* rj®* ... 
pans.” a Unofficial said. “They raenc u 

are pulling more to unity and we to “The big picture is that the Utut- 

the trinity. They wanted a ban on ed States came in with more flexi- 
the Strategic Defense Initiative to bility and a greater determination 
dominate all three areas, and we to move the process, and it seems 
wanted progress to be made in the that the Soviets came in with great- 
other areas, without reference to er rigidity and less determination 
SDL” to move the process." 

The Soviet delegation sought to Referring to Mr. Gorbachev's 
unify the three-part negotiations, speech, he said; 
by having the strategic, medium- . ... 

range and space weapons sub- “There « a new 
groups meet together as often as Kremlin, but no new were 
possible administration officials pr^enied. The new man canw up 
aid. U.S delegates favored sepa- with all the same positions as the 
rate talks. They compromised by old men had come up with over the 
having some plenary sessions and years past.” 
more separate sessions. A State Department official said 

During the talks the Soviet ride that despite the lack of progress, 
proposed 3 moratorium on deploy- there was no indication that the 
ing new strategic and raedi am- negotiations were doomed to fail- 
range weapons and on space-weap- ure. They are to resume May 30. He 
ons research for as l ong as the said Mr. Gorbachev was still at an 


range weapons and on space-weap- ure. They are to resume May 30. He 
ons research for as l ong as the said Mr. Gorbachev was still at an 
negotiations lasted. The United early stage in his rule and was just 
States refused. now putting together his team in 

Mr. Gorbachev then made the the Politburo. His first priority 


Kenneth W. Adehoan 

seems to be in domestic economic 
changes, the official said. 

“It is quite dear that in foreign 

S »licy you will get. for a wide, 
romyko with a smile." the official 
said. “That is not surprising. They £ 
don’t have overwhelming problems 
in foreign affairs. Gorbachev's for- 
mal statements so far bear that on 
in spades. There has been nothing 
strikingly new and positive but 
enough to leave the door open for 
some movement along die fine." 

Another official raid Moscow 
“had moved away” from agree- 
ments believed to have been made 
by Mr. Gromyko with Mr. Shultz 
in January. Tins official said Mr.. 
Gromyko had agreed that h was 
not possible to verify a ban an 
research, but in the Geneva talks, 
the Soviet side insisted on having 
such a ban. 



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U.S., Soviet Veterans 
Celebrate Elbe Linkup 


The Associated Press 

TORGAU, East Germany — 
About 20,000 people gathered here 
Thursday as American and Soviet 
veterans of World War II marked 
the 40th anniversary of their linkup 
on the Elbe River. 

A member of the East German 
Politburo laid a wreath at the foot 
of the Torgau memorial as bands 
played the national anthems of the 
United States, Soviet Union and 
East Germany. 

“The linkup of April 25, 1945, in 
Torgau, went down in history as a 
clear symbol of the victory of the 
anti-Hitler coalition over German 
fascism.” Erich Honccker, the East 
German Communist Party leader, 
said in a statement 

U.S. officials boycotted the re- 
union because of the death last 
month of a U.S. Army mraor, Ar- 
thur D. Nicholson Jr„ who was 
shot by a Soviet guard in East Ger- 
many. But 100 American veterans 
attended the ceremony. 

In a statement released by the- 
official East German press agency, 
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leader, called for “understanding 
and cooperation among nations.” 

"The Soviet people are con- 
vinced that constructive coopera- 
tion between the former allies, 
among all states working at safe- 
guarding peace, can and should be- 
come a powerful factor in tire im- 
provement of the international 
climate.” Mr. Gorbachev said. 
“Mutual understanding and coop- 
eration among nations, and not 
hostility and discord, should serve, 
as the reference point for man- 
kind.” 

Mr. Gorbachev made no men- 
tion of Major Nicholson’s death in 
his message. The Soviet Union has 
said that he was spying in a restrict- 


ed military area; U.S. officials have 
denied the charge 

In Moscow, a Foreign Ministry 
spokesman said when asked about 
the absence of an official U.S. dele- 
gation: “It is not a meeting of the 
army, but of the participants of the 
meeting 40 years ago.” ^ 

The ceremony marked the anni- 
versary of die linkup in Torgau 
between more than 50 members of 
the 69th Infantry Division of the 
American 5th Army Grips and; 
members of the Soviet 58th Guards 
Division who were advancing to- 
ward the west. 

Hitler committed suicide five 
days after the linkup- 

Mr. Honecker's message, re- 
leased by the official East German, 
press agency, ADN, used the re- 
union to warn against the dangers 
of nuclear war. 

“Today, because the danger of 
nudear catastrophe exists, it is 
more important than ever to pull 
together all the power of peace in a 
coalition of realism and reason.” ip 
Mr. Honecker said. 

Torgau, an industrial town with- - 
austere blocks of apartments and 
rutted streets, was spruced up for. 
the ceremony. 

Red flags fluttered at every street 
corner and state-sponsored peace 
slogans stretched across bunding 
facades. 

While the East German govern- 
ment viewed the anniversary as an 
occasion to celebrate the victory 
over Hitler, the UJ5. veterans saw it 
simply as an opportunity to reaf- 
firm friendship between different 
peoples. 

“As old as we are, yon just have 
to try to get the hate out of your 
hearts," said EJR. Sams, 61, a for- 
mer GI and a retired tobacco fann- 
er. ■ . * 


In the Shadows of Summits, 
Ex-Leaders Find a Spotlight 


(Continued from Page 1) 
pants. “I know we had an im p ar f 
on that meeting, even though I 
can't quantify it,” said Bradford 
Morse, secretary-general of the 
council. 

Mr. Morse, head of the United 
Nations Development- Program, 
was a principal organizer of the 
council, along with Mr. Fukuda. 

The council was founded in 1983 
amid dismay over the Failure of the 
Cancun summit in Mexico the pre- 
vious year to. impart new impetus 
to economic development. 

That summit was organized in 
response to a long report about the 
relationship between industrial na- 
tions and developing countries. . 

One of the authors of the report, 
Willy Brandt, the former West Ger- 
man chancellor, said of the Inter- 
Action Council's approach: “You 
are doing what we tailed to do." 

To minimize the personality 
clashes that often mar internation- 
al summitry, the council tries to 
choose politicians who can work in 
harmony. 

One member comes from each 
| country, and the UB. chair has 
j been offered to Gerald R. Fora, the 
former president. He has not re- 
sponded yet, conference organizers 


said, indicating he wants to be sure 
there is no conflict with his base 
ness activities. 

Council members, like prophets, 
are often heard least in their own 
countries. 

Mr. Schmidt, for example, has 
little clout with the conservative 
West German government, but be 
retains access to the U.S. secretary 
of state, George P. Shultz, wits 
whom he helped start the institu- 
tion of economic s um mi re: 

Britain's prime minister, Marga- 
ret Thatcher, has no time for the 
council's British member. Mr. Cal- 
laghan, but she readily sees Mr. 
Fraser. 

Finding a Soviet representative 
for the council has been awkward 
since the Soviet Union has few sur- 
viving former brads of government. 

But a Russian is expected to be 
nominated soon to the. policy 
board, to join a prominent U.5. 
politician. Robert S. Strauss; a 
Democrat, and a Republican about, 
to be namftri 

Conference organizers said the 
councD was supported by ihe gov- 
ernments of Norway, Sweden, Jar 
pan and Colombia and a private , 
donation from Prince Tuna lan-. 
Abdul-Aziz of Saudi Arabiai. , J . 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


Page 5 


Mincer Say ? Changing Realities Are Catching Up With the Aging Leaders of Vietnam 



By William Branigin 

Washmfstm Past Senricr 

HANOI — A lh«rv about how 
Vietnam is run goes like this: Ha- 
“ noT& long-en trenched leadership is 
like a mao hanging his head against 
a wait He does it relentlessly, day 



..IT .** *,v- > y *■- • >. / 


in and day out. knowing that one 
day the pain will cease. He knows 


the pain will cease, not because one 
day. he wiD stop banana his head, 
bat because eventually he 
molish (be wan. 


will de- 


li dip. 

that analogy to illustrate his point. 

VIETNAM 

10 Years Later 

Fourth of four articles 


Sfcms 1° be m 
11 K quae 

P? Uc V you *** 
GroitivkowiiiT ^ ft* 

sai.H ^ Hasmik?* 


? A ^tk n aSnjJ fe. 
don ’l have 

MSxl* 2?8 


H 


Compiled bpQir'Stafl From Dtspa&ta 
BANpMNG, Indptysa -r- The 
Chinese -foreign ministe&.Wu .Xne- 
qifln.$akTThuisdiiym*sp«htoa 
conference of Asian and African 
countries that Qrina .wonld not 
threaten its Asian neighbors or in- 
terfere in their internal attain. 

Speaking at theccnnhcmonniop 
of a 1955 meeting in Handling of 
Third World countries* Mr. Wu re- 
called a similar assurance given at 
the original conference by the late 
Chinese leader. Zhou En-LaL Mr. 

Wu said that the Chinese ‘’cherish 

-V^^d-loofcagp^ 
^ cme of constant confrontation. 


either countries.’ 


be said. 


a» AoBiern Khotar, Doodu 
and other supplia Cm- ^ a]Jed u ^ doclliM <,[ ^ 


SSU^S^' ^omPenh.cLm.m^ta™ 




also fought limited battles with. 
Vietnamese forces along their com- 
mon border. 

. Indonesia’s foreign minister, 

Mochtar K.i 


stde Z.S 



• j GrOmvkn www « s um syufluiniiamiawa, miu ins- 

Jaauan. JJpHrt! cr that President Suharto had* 
kKOmxfco j f rr«!? a ' & agreed to meet Mr. Wu. He said no 
001 Possible ilsu lime had been so. 

“ ^ ? 'i . Mr. Wu is the highest-ranking 

Chinese official to visit Indonesia 
^ since Jakarta severed diplomatic 
, variations with Beijing 18 yeais ago. 
v wo 


years after an abortive Com- 
T 7 rouoisi coup in which Indonesia 

Y accused China of coroptidty. 

Uj|^ At the closing session of me two- 
-m-g day meeting Thursday, the ddo- 

f • j gates representing more than 80 

K/U tf dnfnin countries unanimously endorsed a 
declaration that called for an iro- 
.j . T proved economic rdatkut^tb with 

the industrialized nations and criti- 
cized Israel and South Africa. 

The declaration condemned the 
South African government, urging 
the eradication of its policies of 
racial segregation. 

It also gave backing to the Pales* 
tine Liberation Organization. 

(AFP, Reuters) 
m Appeal to Sihanouk 
, China and the Association of 
die pdjf. ImanuTiw? Southeast Asian Nations have 
American 5ih ij? 1 * agreed to ask Prince Norodom S- 
hanouknouo step down as bead of 
the Cambodian coalition fighting 
to drive Vie tnames e troops from 


'ram 

ii 

sd Ruliun jres- 
- teed the charge ° 0i *- 
h Moscow. a ^ 
P^wewiun said u-fcj®!* 


complex. 

To the aging Vietnamese leaders, 

Mr. Pile said, dan truth can be a 
miliiary struggle, a political strug- 
gle. a diplomatic struggle or a com- 
bination thereof. To them, he said, 
time is an ally and victory is inev- 
itable. 

According to the diplomat, the 
Vietnamese mindset says: “We 
know well win. If it takes 100 or 
1,000 years, we’ll win." 

This outlook has carried the 
leaden of Vietnam through an al- 
most uninterrupted stale of war be- feeling among diplomats and 
ginning with World War IT. It has 



Visitors appear daily at Ho Chi Minh’s tomb in HanoL 


>Pv‘ _____ 

the absence 

KiSWS 

-jj 

^sceiSBWwsntt^, , 
^ the luhT'f- 


members i 


; of the Soviet 
*« sJ 

ware ihi west, ■ 

Hitler commiutd 
day> _tf:er ihe Imhip 
M’ Honeclers 
leased b> the of rioal Eastfe 
pre.'i iiSliCV ADN. imd e 
anion to w»m ajamukt 
y. cuciesr «jt. 

42.* "T*du>. becauieifefe. 

r.Uv.ej: ^aiastr.jphe es\ 
nv:e important Msst: 


ssi 

cr, 

Ii" 

\r- 


the country', Mr. Mochtar said. The 
Associated Press reported from 

Handling. 

Mr. Mochtar said Wednesday 
that be and Mr. Wu had acted that 
Prince Sihanouk's resignation 
would not be beneficial for the 
Cambodian people: He said that he 
had also discussed the Sihanouk 
matter with Foreign Minister Isma- 
il Ahmad Ritbanddeen of Malay- 
sia, 


served them well against the Japa- 
nese, the French and later the 
Americans. It also seems to frame 
their view of the current conflict 
with resistance guerrillas in Cam- 
bodia. 

Some observers wonder, howev- 
er, whether the usefulness of this 
philosophy is tunning out now that 
the principal enemy is China. The 
Americans were impatient in their 
war with Hanoi, bin the Chinese 
think in even longer terms than the 
Vietnamese. 

Moreover, the value of dau tranh 
is questionable in dealing with the 
economic difficulties that beset the 
country. A leadership mired in 
J920*5tyle Stalinism has shown it- 
self incapable of running a modern 
economy. In fact, it has become a 
cliche: Hanoi won the war, but 
failed to win the peace. 

For these reasons, and because 
the average age of Vietnamese Po- 
litburo members is 72. there is a 


scholars that some leadership 
changes may be in the offing. 

The 13-member Politburo is be- 
lieved to represent the longest-serv- 
ing leadership of any country in the 
world. It is headed by Le Doan, 77, 
secretary-general of the Vietnam- 
ese Communist Party. Even the 
party's 116-member Central Com- 
mittee is not much younger, with 
an average age ct about 69. 

Vietnam watchers are looking 
ahead to a party congress that is 
likely to be held next year for signs 
of changes in the leadership. But no 
one outside the inner circle of Viet- 
namese leaders seems to know 
whether any significant changes 
will occur, whom they might in- 
volve or what they would bring. 

There have been rumors that 
Prime Minister Pham Van Dong. 
78, the third-ranking man in the 
party hierarchy and who has held 
his post since 1950. may be prepar- 
ing to step down because or ill 
health and 'fatigue. But major 


changes in the senior leadership are 
generally considered unlik ely. bar- 
ring death or disability, although 
there may be some “rejuvenation" 
of the Central Commmee’s lower 
echelons with the introduction of 
some younger members. 

“1 don’t think the top five leaders 
can be moved," a European diplo- 
mat said. “They’re too important. I 
think they're going to die at their 
posts." 

Besides Mr. Duan and Mr. 
Dong, the others in the top five are 
Truong Chinb, 77, the party theore- 
tician who tanks No. 2 in the Polit- 
buro and serves as head or state; 
Pham Hung, who holds the power- 
ful post of interior minister and 
ranks fourth in the pony; and Le 
Due Tho, 74. the negotiator at the 
Paris peace talks. Mr. Tho ranks 
fifth and holds no government 
post, but he is believed to run Ihe 
day-to-day affairs of the country. 

It is the name of Mr. Tho that 
comes up roost often when Viet- 


Union Carbide Cites Refusal of Bhopal Offer 




- flew York Times Serrr cr 

DANBURY, Connecticut — 
— — , the current chairman of The- Union Carbide Corp. has ac- 
' 0 -~ : S:C ‘ ^ - P’ 5 * 9 *?® ASEAN, which is comprised of In- knowledged that India rejected the 

01 r 5 S H® 3 ’* -Vdonesin, Malaysia. Singapore* cojppany’s formal offer to pay vic- 

N.r. rl.v.jaer Thailand, the Phdiomnes and Bro- rime jS ihp fticicl^r at ife 


jfs- 




2 T\C 


T-.-rcju. js. ifldan&r 
-w>.crr b’.ixii of shs: 
ry.'.cc. tree's. -A2i ijaae 
:r; .-crimon;. 

R.-df.^fluiiefaiaw: 
jnJ ;i2if-swstt? 

ii--..* >i«:cnal icofc 

v h:.? ±: bil Gsro? 
itemed iiano®?: 
*V . -.0 :slibtatirc 
.'.cr Hit.cr tie Li i*®? 

jT. I'jjii'iunpr 
jj-.- ir- c r.i>hip 


Thailand, the Phdippmcs and Bro- rims the disaster at its jiestiade 
neL plant in Bhopal. Negotiations 

* Mr. Riihauddcen, on behalf of ainadat an out-of-court settlement 
ASEAN, had sent a me ssage to have been broken off, the company 


Prince Sihanouk asking him to 
change his mind about resigning, 
the minister said. 


5 th Recipient 
Of Artificial 
Heart; Dies 

"V 

- •, [he bate isa f The Associated Press' 

r f i: EK.S 5 J ' LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — 
:!i : O! -.a : Tcuieu’xtot _ j ac k C. Burchaxn, 62, who was the 
’fifth recipient of an experimental 
Jarvik-7 artificial heart, died 
Wednesday after 10 days because 
the pumpmg action of the device 


added. 

A report from India last week, 
quoting an unnamed government 
offidak said that Union Carbide 
had offered $200 million to be paid 
out over 30 years. 

At its annual meeting here 
Wednesday. Union Carbide said 


that it had made a “fair, forthcom- 
ing and comprehensive proposal" 
10 compensate the victims of the 
Dec. 3 chemical leak, which killed 
as many as 2,000 people and in- 
jured 200,000. but that India's gov- 
ernment hod rejected the cash offer 
as too low. 

Warren M. Anderson, chairman 
erf Union Carbide, declined to dis- 
cuss details of the negotiations or 
to say how much compensation 
Union Carbide had offered. He 
said, however, that it would cover 
payments to the survivors of those 


those who might suffer “blent" ill- 
nesses as well as payments for child 
care services, job training and ex- 
penses of the Indian government. 

“Stockholders should not take 
our strong interest in achieving a 
settlement as an admission of 
liability," Mr. Anderson said, 
corporation did nothing that either 
caused or contributed to the acci 
dent, and if it comes to litigation we 
will vigorously defend that posi 
lion." 

Mr. Anderson said that Union 
in the leak of methyl isocya- Carbide was “ready to resume neo- 
nate. those who were injured and gotiations at any time." 


a -1 Ji. the pumpmg action of the device 

fV^ 01 tobibiwi one of his doa- 

'indaSpo# 




ou. 


irilas 2 * 


;jr cs»- 

1 . ,L ‘ - 


j-ih 


Mr. Burcham, who was from Le 
Roy. Illinois, had bad. difficulty, 
doctors discovered later, because 
the Jarvik-7 implanted April 14 
was loo large for his cbesL ne had 
severe bleeding the day after the 
operation. 

1 One of Mr. Burcham’s doctors at 
Humana Hospital -Audubon, Allan 
M. Lansing, said that pressure in 
the chest "prevented the htarl from 
pumping and produced sudden 


: OrrsaE acute congestion in his lungs." 

;> p ^ RIrwvt nrvinin Mr 1 




... - 

a; i«S«J 

• " 9-.jsii»»r- 


-- i X 




- _ , ' iri' - . 




Blood backed up into Mr. Bur- 
chain's lungs, causing respiratory 
failure, and there was a large blood 
dot around the artificial heart. Dr. 
Lansing said 

But there was no indication of 
clots within the heart, and an su- 
ture lines were “intact and dean , 1 
lie said 

Dr. Lansing said that doctors 
would not know the exact cause of 
death until an autopsy. 

Mr. Burcham, the fifth and old- 
est recipient of the plastic and met- 
al device, had also suffered kidney 
^ problems and was put on a dialysis 
* , Vi machine twice this week to cleanse 
his blood. 

r.^- 7 „ Three men with Jarvik-7 hearts, 

y£K-- William J. Schroeder and Murray 
• Jv. p. Haydon in -Louisville and .an 

. unidentified man m Sweden, re- 
attached to machinery that 
drives the device with air.. Mr. 
§chroeder has lived the longest 
with the heart, 152 days as of 
Thursday. The first recipient, Dr. 
$ame>; Cork, died after 1 12 days. 
■ Other Deaths: 

• Sarah T. Hughes, 88 , a US. dis- 
trict judge. who swore in Lyndon B. 
Johnson as president after the as- 
sassination in 1963 of President 
John F. Kennedy, Tuesday in Dal- 
las. 

_i Kent South, 78. an actor whose 
Aage, film and television wort 
A spanned four decades, Tuesday Of 
Congestive heart failure in Los An- 
geles. Mr. Smith acted on Broad^ 
way in “Measure for Measure*" 
?Sweei Love Remembered,’’ "The 
$esi Man" and “Ah. Wilderness." 


•- . -’TP 1 ' ® - 

main 

1 prr»- 1,’ dnves 



'ELirt? 


rep* 5 ' 


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A wall for Hadrian. 

A railway for the world. 
A car for Nissan. 



The North of England has 
been providing its skills and 
experience to the world for 
centuries. Now it has 
secured a prize which will 
ensure its success with the 
new technologies of the 
future 


Next? 


Ntss;r' r.-:.i.rj:rtc a e-.'.- olarr 
..-i Nor:h c.r Enpiard 
wrier: wli r:e toe if.os* 

: -ac h r i ■ c a i y d d : n 
Euror.e t-t se:;n r^cocmses 

h-;i~<m resources- •"•>.•=? in tho 
North of cnciar-r: :o nr; the 

England is an .dee. 
n'i.-.r o! :'ici : c-r bumpe 


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North oi England Dcxclopmcnt C’ouncil 

Bank House. Cartici Sq ja r o Ncwcast'e'upon Tvnc- NEi 6XE 
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-v-ir* 


□am watchers roccuiatc about a 
successor to Mr. Duan. But a senior 
Central Committee member dis- 
counted this, hinting that he was 
too old and infirm. 

In any case, diplomats and Viet- 
namese officials said. Mr. Doan 
has recovered from an earlier ill- 
ness and seems much stronger this 
year than last. 

Asked about the prospect ofbav- 
ing to replace aged Vietnamese 
leaders, Hoang Tung, a member of 
the Communist Party secretariat, 
said: “We don’t consider it a prob- 
lem for us. If necessary, we can 
have a meeting immediately to de- 
cide on a new leader ” 

Vietnam watchers generally 
agree that major leadership 
changes must be made if there is to 
be any progress toward solving the 
country's most onerous problems: 
its growing isolation, its six-year 
war in Cambodia and its state of 
hostilities with China. 

Mr. Pike, a Vie tnam scholar ai 
ihe University of California at 
Berkeley, sakL “The leadership has 
become calcified, characterized by 
rigid thinking and inflexibility in 
dealing with problems.” 

The Indochinese Communist 
Party was founded by Ho Chi 
Minh in 1930 as the precursor or 
today's Vietnamese Communist 
Party. Ho proclaimed an indepen- 
dent government in Hanoi in 1945. 

"The rulers erf Vietnam today are 
very largely the same small group 
present at the creation in 1945," 
Mr. Pike noted. “There are 40-year 
political associations here, both po- 
litical friends and political foes, but 
even antipathy extending over four 
decades takes on the quality of a 
bond." 

Some of the closest bonds may 
have been formed in prison during 
the 1930s, when the French colo- 
nial rulers of Vietnam arrested a 
number of Communist revolution- 
aries and banished them to under- 
ground cells and harsh conditions 
in prison. Among those jailed there 
were Mr. Dong and Mr. Tho. 

Details are sketchy, however, on 
the backgrounds of many of the 
most prominent Vietnamese lead- 
ers. 

So secretive is the network that 
several of the highest-ranking lead- 
ers are known to the public only by 
their wartime aliases. Le Due Tho, 
for example, is a nom de guerre, 
and so is Truong Chinh, which 
means “long march" in Vietnamese 
and reflects a youthful infatuation 
with Mao's revolutionary feat. 

In their penchant for pseud- 
onyms. these leaders cake after Ho. 
who is generally believed to have 
been named Nguyen That Thanh 
when he was born in 1890. During 
his long career as an itinerant revo- 
lutionary, Ho used many pseud- 
onyms. the best known of which 
was Nguyen Ai Quoc. or Nguyen 
the Patriot, before be settled on Ho 



AT AP faMi 

Hanoi's aging leaders, from left: Le Due Tho, Le Duan and Pham Van Dong. 


Chi Minh, or He Who Enlightens. 

Since Ho’s death in 1969, his 
disciples have carried on in his 
name with a remarkably cohesive 
collective leadership, one of the few 
in the world that have worked as 
such. 

Now, however, Vietnam is ap- 
proaching what Mr. Pike called “a 
generational transfer of power." 
When that transfer comes, be 
wrote, “changes in policy seem cer- 
tain." 

Yet, some Western diplomats in 
Hanoi feel it may be too much to 
hope that the next generation of 
leaders will make any major depar- 
tures from the line of the old men 
who now run the country. 

The old leaders took a lot of very 
courageous derisions in their lives, 
a European ambassador said. He 
added: “I’m a little bit afraid of the 
younger generation, which has 
been brought op in this stifling sys- 
tem. They have not been encour- 
aged to use their brains to act indi- 
vidually." 

When all of Vietnam's many 
problems are considered — its pov- 
erty, its isolation, its warm Cambo- 
dia, its difficulty in unification, its 
fear of China — rt looks, on paper, 
like something has to give. 

But when one watches Vietnam- 
ese peasants toiling in the rice fields 
as they have for centuries, stooped 
over planting or plowing with wa- 
ter buffalo, oblivious to everything 
else, it is easy to think, as the oldest 
Vietnamese leaders probably do, 
that nothing has to give. 


Strike Halts Japan Airlines 

The AnotiuteJ Press 

TOKYO — Japan Air Lines ' s 
flight engineers and second officers 
went on strike Thursday, causing 
the cancellation or 14 domestic and 
two international flights, a JAL of- 
ficial said. The 70 union members 
are seeking wage increases and pro- 
les ling the assigning of flight crews 
to ground work, wiuch pays less. 


ib 


CC 7 


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Page 6 


FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


Tteralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


Pnbtisbcd With Tbe New Yorft Tunes and Tbe W««binp©n Post 


Saying No to Genocide 

Utah's Senator Orrin Hatch opposes ratifi- 
i the possibility 


Half a lifetime ago, the United Nations 
approved a treaty that declares the mas killing 
of ethnic, racial or religious groups an interna- 
tional crime. But that Genocide Convention 
has languis hed, unratified. in the U.S. Senate 
for 36 years, to the profound embarrassment 
of the nation that sponsored the Nuremberg 
trials. There never was any good excuse for 
hesitation. Every argument against tbe pact 
has long since been laid to rest. 

The embarrassment can be remedied if the 
Senate Foreign Relations Committee heeds 
tbe Reagan administration and moves to ratify 
— without the demeaning reservation pressed 
by Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina. 

The word genocide, meaning the annihila- 
tion of an entire people or group, was coined in 
1944 by Raphael Lemkin. an American schol- 
ar of Polish origin, to characterize the Nazis’ 
slaughter of six million Jews. It has come to 
denote any such mass murder, like the 1915 
trillin gs of* the Ottoman Empire's Armenians. 

The UN convention binds 92 signatories to 
punish genocide as a crime in peace or war, 
thus broadening the Nuremberg war crimes 
doctrine. It defines genocide as the attempt to 
eliminate all or part of a group for reasons of 
race or ethnicity, by murder, by seizing its 
children or sterilizing its adults. It requires 
trial of tbe guilty where the crime occurs or 
by an international penal tribunal. 

One flaw in the pact is that it fails dearly to 
proscribe mass killings for political reasons, as 
perhaps Pol Pot’s slaughter of two million 
Cambodians. A further defect is that tbe signa- 
tories have yet to agree upon the penal tribu- 
nal The Soviet-bloc nations expressly insist on 
denying jurisdiction to the World Court in The 
Hague; and Senator Helms, with the adminis- 
tration's regrettable tactical support, would 
adopt this Soviet reservation. 


cation altogether. He conjures 
that the treaty would empower the United 
Nations to cause the anest of an Israeli in New 
York on charges of plotting genocide against 
Palestinians. This insults Congress, which 
must pass the enabling legislation that gives 
any ratified treaty legal teeth. It can be couni- 
ed on to guard against Mr. Hatch's nightmare. 

Phantom scenarios have haunted this treaty 
ever since President Harry Truman proposed 
ratification. It was once solemnly argued that 
declaring genocide a federal crime would vio- 
late the American states’ rights to deal with 
murder. The American Bar Association waited 
until 1976 to reverse its opposition on the 
ground thar creating international human 
rights compromised constitutional doctrines. 
But it has joined the imposing roll of organiza- 
tions favoring approvaL 

Incredibly, much of the American opposi- 
tion has been carried forward from old battles 
over domestic civil rights. The World Court 
came to be seen as a Super-Supreme Court, the 
meddlesome bogey threatening to tell Ameri- 
can states how to treat their own citizens. 

The value of the Genocide Convention is 
that it legitimizes international scrutiny of 
genoddal policies, granting the victims at least 
a moral defense. The more appropriate objec- 
tion to the pact is that without practical en- 
forcement procedures, signing it is a risk-free 
gesture. Thus the Soviet Union has piously 
censored the United States for decades for 
failing to ratify. But the inability of nations to 
enforce civilized standards is not an argument 
against proclaiming the elementary righ t erf all 
peoples to live and procreate. To reject this 
convention is to desecrate the memory of the 
martyrs who inspired iL 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Rules Are Rules, but . . . 


About two or three years ago the US. Of flee 
of Management and Budget clamped down on 
advocacy activities by nonprofit organizations 
receiving federal grants — organizations such 
as the Legal Defense Fund, Family and Child 
Services and so on. The office' s proposed rules 
were very tough — so tough that they inevita- 
bly aroused suspicion that the Reagan admin - 
istration'spursuit of them derived more from a 
desire to satisfy conservative demands to "de- 
fund the left” than from a concern for 
squeaky-clean management 

Nonetheless, we believed then — and still do 
believe — that tighter rules were justified, if 
perhaps not quite so light as the budgeL office 
wanted. Federal rules ought to prohibit lobby- 
ing with federal money just as, for good and 
obvious reason, they prohibit use of federal 
money for advertising, party-giving or favors 
for federal officials. 

True, maintaining separate services — sepa- 
rate copying machines? — would be much 
tougher for some child advocacy or legal ser- 
vices group than it would be for a major 
defense contractor, but fair is fair, as they say. 
and what’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the 
gander — as long as the sauce is dished out 
evenly. “The rales do apply to defense contrac- 
tors?” we recall asking our budget office 
source at the time. “Oh, of course,” he assured 
us. “In fact. Cap Weinberger is insisting on 
even tougher rules for the Pentagon." 

From time to time something would happen 
that would make us feel a bit uneasy: charges 
by the General Accounting Office and others. 


for example, that Lockheed Corp. and the 
Pentagon bad waged a massive joint lobbying 
campaign in 1982 to persuade the House of 
Representatives to approve another S10 billion 
purchase of C-5B cargo planes. Lockheed ap- 
parently had a computerized data base that 
kept a day-to-day tally on Pentagon and Lock- 
heed lobbying assignments. "You’re sure,” we 
would ask our budget office friend, “that no 
Pentagon money is being used for lobbying?” 
“Cap is very tough on that,” he assured us. 

Now we read that over the past few years a 
major defense contractor, Pratt & Whitney, 
has been treating Air Force officers .to deep- 
sea fishing charters and golf, entertaining Pen- 
tagon officials at lavish parties and making 
donations to art exhibits at the request of a 
general And that when such charges were first 
questioned by an auditor in 1981, the Penta- 
gon responded by investigating the auditor! 

. Meanwhile, General Dynamics was running 
up $244 million in improper overhead charges 
— about enough to keep the entire Legal 
Services operation or the job-help program for 
welfare mothers operating for a year. And we 
did not even mention the small change: the 
country dub dues, the kennel fees, the lobster 
feasts, the seminars for defense executives' 
wives, and so on. Although we still believe that 
fair is fair and that rules ought to be evenly 
applied, in the face of such gross abuse the 
question of hew the old folks’ league uses its 
Xerox machine somehow fades in importance. 
We have been had. All of us. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Nancy Reagan’s Good Work 


Washington is rough on the spouses of its 
wielders of power, and most of all on the wife 
of the president of the United States. Whoever 
she is, she operates by borrowing the earned 
authority of her husband, and she is constantly 
reminded that she is something of an interlop- 
er. She has no official duties, but she is ac- 
countable unofficially to a vast flight of eagle- 
eyed observers. It is bard to do much right 

Nancy Reagan, however, has done some- 
thing extremely right She has thrown herself 
into the fight against drag abuse with vigor 
and intelligence. If she bad simply been shop- 
ping for a worthy cause, she might have picked 
a homier, more heartwarming or more photo- 
genic one. Instead, she picked a relatively 
ungainly and untended one where her particu- 
lar contribution could be of special value: to 
display a commitment and to use the inevita- 
ble interest in ber to draw others to the cause. 

The conference that Mrs. Reagan ran this 
week was a good illustration of her work. She 
brought together the wyes of the leaders of 17 
foreign countries to publicize the global nature 


of drug abuse — and of caring about drug 
abuse. This latter dement emerged strongly 
from the conference. The women attending 
seemed quite aware of tbe limitations of what 
they in their particular role can do. There was 
evident, however, an awareness of the human 
dimension of tbe drug problems in their re- 
spective countries, and of the requirement for 
a stronger community of concern rooted in 
family values and f amily ways. 

Does it make a difference in the end? How 
can it not make a difference for the idea to 
spread that drug abuse compels the alarm and 
the informed attention of responsible women 
like these? Their governments, while all friend- 
ly to the United States, are not all equally 
cooperative in the often very political matter 
of drug cooperation. Such difficulties are not 
to be swept under the nig. but the personal 
warmth and tbe shared purpose evident at the 
conference are important assets. For using the 
resources of her position to increase them . 
Mrs. Reagan deserves gratitude. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR APRIL 26 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Frost Nips American Orchards 
NEW YORK — Jack Frost seems to have 
done indescribable injury in the orchards in 
the Middle West [on April 23-24], thanks to 
the fact that spring is three weeks in advance 
because of the phenomenally mOd March. For 
forty-eight hours Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, 
Nebraska, Wisconsin, Kansas, Texas, Illinois, 
Ohio, Minnesota and Kentucky have enjoyed 
either blizzards or freezing temperatures, and 
damage of $40,000,000 has been sustained. 
The Mississippi and Ohio valleys resembled 
the scenes of the historic 1860s. The sky was lit 
up with innumerable camp fires. Wood, coal 
and straw piles were set round in hundreds of 
orchards, while blankets and quilts were 
wrapped over pear, apple, plum and cherry 
trees ready to burst into bloom. 


1935: Nazis Stifle TVon-Aryan’ Press 
BERLIN — Karl Amann, president of the 
Reich Press Chamber and Nazi press dictator, 
has dealt a deathblow to all church and non- 
Nazi newspapers in Germany. By a decree 
[issued April 25], Jews and other “non-Ary- 
ans" and all denominational bodies are ex- 
cluded from influence in the newspaper pub- 
lishing field. The decree excludes from the 
publishing Geld any person who cannot prove 
his own and his wife's pure Aryan descent 
back to 1800, regardless whether the person is 
a publisher, a partner in a publishing firm , or a 
member of the board of directors. Church 
newspapers suffer the most deadly blow. Pub- 
lishers must cease business if their newspapers 
appeal to persons limited according to profes- 
sional or denominational considerations. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chairma n 1953-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM & PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M.FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 

carl gewirtz 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pvbtuher 

Exrcutbr Editor RENtBONDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN 

Dtpm Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Auodau Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISON5 


ROLF] 


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Director of Opera&xa 

... — Director of Qradadan 

KRANEPUHL Director of Adnataing Sales 


International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Owties-deGauIle. 92200 Neaflfr-sur-Stine. 
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0 1985, International Herald Tribune. AB rights reserved 



The Bitburg Affair: Study in Disproportion 


B OSTON — Why is President 
Reagan going to lay a wreath at 
the German cemetery in Bitbuig? 
The question is not going to go 
away. It will never go away, because 
the reasons given are so trivial com- 
pared to the damage that would be 
done. The whole miserable business 
is a study in disproportion. 

Tbe starting point was politics. 
Two like-minded politicians, Hel- 
mut Kohl and Ronald Reagan, saw 
a dance to do something Tor their 
c ause. In their petty concerns they 
could not see that they were touch- 
ing on enormous moral and histori- 
cal interests. And then, burned, they 
have been too proud and inflexible 
to change: so far. at least 
The political origin of the affair is 
plain from a fact of timing. The 
annual Western economic summit 
meeting is usually held in early 
June. This year's was moved up a 
month to the beginning of May. 


By Anthony Lewis 


That kind of change, involving 
heads of government takes a good 
deal of arranging. It was arranged, 
by all signs, as a political favor 
to Chancellor Kohl 

The West German state of North 
Rhioo-Weslphalia holds an election 
on May 12 It is a crucial election 
for Mr. KohL His opponents, the 
Social Democrats, now control the 
state's legislature. Its p remi er. Jo- 
hannes Ran, is national deputy 
chair man of the Soda! Democratic 
Party and a potential leader, in 
short the election gives Mr. Kohl a 
chance to defeat a possible future 
competitor for the chancellorship. 

Hence the cariy Western summit 
conference. The heme was that a 
presidential visit to the Federal Re- 
public one week before polling 
would rub some Reagan glmiinr off 
on Mr. Kohl and the dhrisiign 


Democrats. And Mr. Reagan was 
ready to cooperate. 

There is particular symbolism in 
the choice of Bitburg as a place to 
visit The president is grateful to 
Mr. Kohl for being the European 
it man in favor of deploying 
-2 and cruise missiles. And 
Bitbuig happens to be the site of 
rate of the largest concentrations of 
U.S. nuclear weapons anywhere. 

If nothing dse were involved, Mr. 
Reagan's favor to a political friend 
abroad would raise few eyebrows. 
But much else was involved. The 
president of the United States was 
visiting the ground of the Nazis 40 
years after their defeat. That fact 
without more, touched the sensitiv- 
ities of history and of mflhons of 
people. And then there was more: 
The Bitburg cemetery turned out 
to include the graves of 47 SS men. 



For a president to honor such a 
place was profoundly offensive to 
the survivors of Nazi tenor, those 
who were tortured and hounded by 
the SS. And doi only to the survi- 
vors: to anyone with, a memory, 
anyone with the barest understand- 
ing of what the Nazis meant. 

That was when the disproportion 
became so grotesque. Confronted 
with the awesome reality of the Ho- 
locaust and its meaning for this gen- 
eration. Mr. Reagan and Mr.- Kohl 
reacted as politicians: little ones. 

Tbe president said he had to go 
through with the visit to demon- 
strate reconciliation with Germany. 
He said twice that German soldiers 
who died for the Nazi cause were as 
much “victims” as the Jews and 
others beaten and gassed and 
burned to death in concentration 
camps. When his aides worried 
about political damage and tried to 
get the Germans to switch from the 
Bitburg site. Chancellor Kohl dug 
in his heels and said no. 

This adventure in insensitivity 
will damage German- American un- 
derstanding and inter nal German 
political maturity. For not all West 
Germans feel that the Bitburg visit 
musr go ahead at all costs. 

A leading West German political 
editor, Chnstoph Bertram of Die 
Zedt, has warned that Mr. Kohl and 
Mr. Reagan “have increased misun- 
derstanding.’' Writing in The Wash- 
ington Post he said the two men 
bad acted as if this were tbe 40th 
anniversary of just another war. 

“World War II was not just an- 
other European war,” Mr. Bertram 
said. “It was the darkest hour of 
European civilization. Its end 
brought to an end the world's most 
atrocious regime.” 

It is the failure to understand this 
reality that makes the symbolism of 
the visit to Bitbuig unacceptable. 

Some critics of Mr. Reagan are 
taking pleasure in his mistake. I 
think it is just as disproportionate to 
make a political point of iL It is too 
serious, too devastating. I still can- 
not believe he will go to Bitbmg. 

The New York Tones. 


Viel 


lam’s 


Why Brazilian Democracy Will Survive After Neves 


N EW YORK — The death of the 
president-elect of Brazil, Tan- 
credo Neves, is a great loss for his 
country and the world. But it should 
not dash the encoura ging prospects 
for Brazil's transition to democracy. 

The consummate political drills 
that “Tun credo” brought to the tran- 
sition are lost No other official can 
hope to enjoy the fervent trust he 
inspired. The new President, Jos£ 
Sarney, is suspect among both the 
outgoing military and the incoming 
democratic forces. But the rebirth of 
Brazilian democracy does not depend 
solely on leadership. 

For one thing, most of the coun- 
try's other political leaders remain 
committed to democracy. For all 
their initial doubts about Mr. Sar- 
ney’s legitimacy and capacity to gov- 
era, the people who wonted with such 
exemplary skill to make Tan credo 
Neves the first civilian president in 
more than 20 years will now rally 
behind Mr. Sarney simply because be 


By Alfred Stepan 


in the military on the need to restruc- 
ture its institutions. 

This alleviated an identity crisis, 
giving the military a sense of mission 
that has nothing to do with direct 
rule. Certainly, tne military wiD con- 
tinue to play a significant economic 
role in Brazil the sixth-largest arms 
exporting country in the world. In 
short, unless President Sarney and 
the political parties prove totally un- 
able to control domestic political 
conflict, h is very unlikely that the 
military will fed called upon to top- 
ple the new government with a coup.; 

Finally, -Brazil's' much rieglectedf 
poorer classes favor a strengthened 
civil society. There will of course be 
great demands to service the coun- 
try’s staggering domestic “social 
debt” of poverty, sickness and unem- 
ployment But even the Brazilian left 
is firmly committed to democratic 


procedures — not just as a temporary 
tactic, but as an enduring value. 

Lacking Tancredo Neves's credi- 
bility, Mr. Sarney will undoubtedly 
find it hard to impose austerity mea- 
sures. He will also have to go further 
than Mr. Neves would have in pursu- 
ing visible social reforms — and will 
be hampered all the while by his 
country's external debt tbe largest in 
tbe world. Yet even here he has some 
leeway. Unlike Argentina or Chile. 
Brazil recently developed a major in- 
dustrial plant This new capacity is 
waiting for a revival of internal and 
external demand: already, in 1984/ 
Brazil hada record year of exports. 

The world debt crisis is not over 
however. Ask anybody in Brazil — 
especially tbe poor and their leaders 
— about the effect of spending some 
5 percent of its gross national prod- 
uct merely to service the external 


debt: Tancredo Neves once called it 
“taxation without representation." 
Tbe debt crisis was containable last 
year, thanks largely to declining in- 
terest rates, declining oil prices and 
booming exports to the United 
States; but no one knows how long 
these favorable conditions will last 
it is a time of sadness but not 
despair in Brazil The country has 
room to develop democracy and tem- 
porarily. at kart, a tiny bit of room to 
develop its economy. History will 
deal harshly with the United States if 
it fails to help Brazil's democracy to 
evolve successfully — even as it pur- 
sues its own mifilaiy obsession in 
Central. America: • 


The writer, a professor of political 
science and dean of the School of Inter- 
national and Public Affairs at Colum- 
bia University, is finishing two books 
dealing with Brazil He contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 


represents constitutional and demo- 
cratic continuity. Mr. Neves’s elec- 
toral calendar — direct elections in 
the state capitals in November 1985, 
elections for a Congress to serve as a 
Constituent Assembly in November 
1986 and the possibility of direct 
presidential elections in November 
1988 — is likely to gain increasing 
support It is the least confrontation- 
al and most constitutional path. It 
would also give the left time to orga- 
nize under democratic conditions. 

Second, the military is unlikely to 
cause trouble. The officers have their 
own complex reasons to respect the 
transition nnder Mr. Sarney. They 
know that Nuxemberg-style trials of 
military abuses are much less likely in 
Brazil than in Chile and Argentina, 
where deaths and disappearances 
caused by the military may nave been 
as much as 100 times more common 
(counted on a per capita basis). The 
desire to return to civilian rule was 
also strengthened by tbe Aigentine- 
British war for the Malvinas, or Falk- 
land Islands, which forced a debate 


How Europe Can Help Central America 


W ASHINGTON — In the ongo- 
ing confusion and frustration 
in Washington over aid to Nicaragua, 
it may be useful to take another and 
maybe a different look at the report 
of President Reagan’s Commission 
on Central America, issued on Jan. 
1 1, 1984. and quickly forgotten. 

It was in some ways a remarkable 
document. First it pul tbe military, 
economic and social aspects of the 
problem in historical perspective. 

Second, even during the emotional 
pressures of the 1984 presidential 
campaign, it was approved unani- 
mously by leaders of both political 
parties, by business and labor. 

Nobody argued ranch with its 
analysis of the Central American 
problem, but its proposals were nib- 
bled to death by opponents who ob- 
jected to one part or the other rather 
than grappling with tbe whole report. 


By James Reslon 


Mr. Reagan supported the report 
in principle, which is his way. Some 
argued that there could be no military 
peace without economic reform fi- 
nanced by a kind of Marshall Plan 
for Central America. 

Others insisted that there could be 
no practical economic solution with- 
out peace, or at least a reduction in 
the military violence. 

So tbe plan was shelved, but 

tbe dile mma re mains. 

Enter now in Washington the for- 
mer chancellor of West Germany, 
Helmut Schmidt, with another idea. 

If I heard him right, he said that 
maybe the Kissinger report should be 
reconsidered. It recognized the mili- 
tary threat from Cuba and the Soviet 
Union, and the urgent need to deal 


Miami: Drugs , Drive, a Dash of Beirut 


By George F. Will 

M IAMI — “Look.” says the mayor, turning and 
gesturing toward the window and beyond at this 
city’ s erupting skyline. “If it’s so bad, how come the big 
players in real estate are here?” And he rattles off a list 
of those players. 

Well, maybe the real-estate boom derives partly 
from die fact that there is a lot of bad money looking 
for things to buy. And one reason many banks and 
corporations have offices here is the same reason a few 
things are bad here: Latin America is just over the 
horizon. So are the drug traffickers. 

“Look.” says Mayor Maurice Ferre, 49, using a knife 

draw 9 lin# ,in a i: jf. 


to die South Pole. Every major airport in South Ameri- 
ca is to the east of Miami. If you want to fly from Lima 
to Los Angeles, the quickest way is through Miami.” 
And among the things coming through Miami is a 
flood of “controlled substances,” which barely are. 
Controlled, that is. The drug traffic continues in spite 
of Crockett and Tubbs, the characters — and how! — 
rai the American television show “Miami Vice.” 
yiewmg that program is like being locked inside a 
rock video with two boys who, having overdosed on 
chocolate doughnuts, are hyperactive and should be 
srat to their rooms. Crockett and Tubbs are police 
officers. Sure they are. When not roaring around in a 
5pe«lboat. they are roaring around in a Ferrari, and in 
S500 ItBijan linen jackets and peach-colored T-shirts, 
."“IT shooi-’em-up portraying Miami as crime- 
ndden bother the mayor? No, be ays equably, people 
are uying to explain Miami's vitality in terms of the 
wrong chemicals. It started with Dow, not drugs. 

• £5??-. 15 hc ^ Dow Chemical Co. 

decided it could not efficiently ran its Latin American 
operauons out of Michigan and did an elaborate study 
that highhghted Miami’s advantages. That study ciicu- 
lated widely, and soon tile city's commercial base 
achieved a critical m a ss , with European and American 
banks and corporations creating “symbiotic energy” 


center for commerce, pleasure and cosmopolii 
The big^difference. the mayor says, is “trie Ai 


Tbe mayor is in his sixth two-year term, and, tike the 
city, is revved up. 

Energy, Miami hasr too much, some people think It 
bad ample energy even before Castro flooded it in 1980 
with refugees lacking proper character references. But 
the mayor insists that Miami is a Latin American city 
only the way Boston is Irish. 

Miami has been called “tbe Hong Kong of Latin 
America,” bat the mayor prefers to compare it to 
Beirut — before the civil war. He says Miami is to 
Latin America what Beirut was to the Arab world: a 

taoism. 
American 

flag” — the FBI, the Constitution, the law. But some 
Miamians think the difference is not big enough. 

Of the drug money sloshing around, the mayor says: 
“Is it a great part of Miami? Of course.” Look, be says, 
Miami is the cocaine capital of tbe world only because 
the United Slates is the main cocaine market. 

If all international cocaine merchants formed a 
single American company, that company would rank 
with Ford Motor Co. near tbe top of Fortune maga- 
zine's list of largest corporations. Recently some co- 
caine was found here in tbe cargo on a Colombian 747 
airliner. Tbe. street value of the cocaine was 5600 
Bullion — five times the value of the 747. . 

Drug runners have the best boats, planes and elec- 
tronic equipment. Miami, says the mayor, cannot help 
but be awash with drag money. Dealers can load the 
cash into jets and deliver it to numbered accounts in 
Bahamian or other “offshore” banks and then have it 
transferred, electronically, back lo Miami. 

. Look, the mayor says cheerfully, geography is desti- 
ny and Florida always has attracted adventurous spir- 
its because it is “the end of the line.” So it is. and so it 
has been home for aviation pioneers, Lmd speculators 
and other high-spirited folks including, iL is safe to say, 
America's only mayor who compares hi «; city to Beirut.. 
Washington Post Writers Group. ■ ■ 



with the region's economic and social 
problems, but this, he thought, could 
not be resolved by military means or 
even by a new Marshall Ran. 

The Marshall Ran idea was too 
narrow, and it smacked of U.S. domi- 
nation. Tbe hope lay. he said, in wid- 
ening the economic restoration of the 
area, using the other Central Ameri- 
can nations — the Contadora group 
— to lead the way lo a regional solu- 
tion, and bring other nations into a 
deal for peace and economic recon- 
struction of Central America. 

Mr. Schmidt thought that the Cen- 
tral American problem was dividing 
the Western allies and that they 
would be wiling to contribute to an 
economic aid program for peace, if 
the Reagan administration thought 
this might break the deadlock 
I talked to Henry Kissinger about 
this, and he agreed that help from the 
European allies could be useful. He 
had talked to Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl of West Germany about the 
possibility erf European aid, and Mr. 
Kohl had been helpful 
But Mr. Kissinger was cautious. 
He was not sure that the president 
wanted to look at the Central Ameri- 
can report again, or get the Europe- 
ans involved in an economic solution. 
He thought Mr. Schmidt had a good 
idea, but n was up to the president, he 
thought, to pursue or i gno re it, . 

Stfll as Mr. Schmidt suggested, the 
Kissinger report is the best analysis 
of the problem we have; and it should 
be read again. It made these points: 
“The use of Nicaragua as a base for 
Soviet and Cuban efforts to penetrate 
the rest erf the Central American isth- 
mus, with El. Salvador the target of 
first opportunity, gives the conflict 
there a major strategic dimension. 

This is a challenge to which the Unit- 
ed States musL respond” 

And “beyond, this, we are chal- - 
lenged to respond to the urgent hu- 
man needs of the people of Central 
America. . . . Our task now, as a na- 
tion, is to transform the crisis in Cen- 
tral America into an opportunity.” 
Everybody agrees with this, and 
wants the support of both political 
patties and the Contadora nations to 
help resolve the conflict hot so far 
nobody except Mr. Schmidt has come 
up with a way to do iL 
Use the Marshall Han idea, though 
Central America today is not like 
postwar Europe. Give ii a new name, 

be proposes, use the Contadora na- 
tions, but also can on Europe and • 
Japan to bring the Old World to the 
aid of the New, for a change . ; 

It is not a very promising idea, but 
it is the only new one heard around 
here for a long time. 

The New York Times. 






For American 

’ 9 

By Henry * 
Steele Commager l 

A MHERST. Massachusetts — Ittf 
30 years now since, heady with 
victory over Germany and Japan, the 
United States blended into the Viet* 
nam War. It is 20 years since Rresfe 
dent Lyndon Johnson ( partly by Id# : 
canery) induced the Congress lo pas| tr; 
the fateful Tonkin Gulf i*’ ' ‘ 
giving him a free band to ioaugi 
a full-scale war in Vietnam. Tt 
years since the collapse afv« 
and the victory of the Viefc' 
forced the desperate . 
drawai from Southeast Asia... 

What does this tragic dm 
our history have to teach us? 

Firat, the folly of supposing** 
providence — or history — I 
how. appointed the United 
be at once the conscience andtfSj 
policeman of the world, and ati&g 
rized it to bustle about the glob! 

its concepts, policies aiifl 



rations on other peoples and na= 
tions. The Founding Fathers, to be 
sure, thought that “the American was 
a new Adam in a new paradise,” but 
they were content to let tbe rest of the 
world profit by their example. 

Second, and with particular refer- 
ence to Vietnam, it teaches the folly 
of deluding ourselves that we were 
not only an American and a Europe* 
an power, bat an Asian power as i 
and that we had both the right 
the ability to impose our solutions to 
Id problems on the peoples of 
it vast continent, a people even 
then in the throes of the greatest 
social revolution in history. 

Third, the foQy of assuming that if 
Vietnam should somehow embrace 
communism, the whole of Southeast 
Asia would inevitably follow — the 
famous “domino theory,” and with it 
the assumption that if that should 
happen, it would pose a mortal threat 
to the United States. (China has now 
been communist for 35 years, without 
posing any threat) . 

And why did we delude ourselves 
that if communism should somehow 
win out, we had either the right or the ^ 
power to reverse that tide? Should we* 5 * 
not rather recall that the Europe of 
the Holy Alliance took precisely that 
view of the threat from the new U.S. 
democracy to the new nations of Lat- 
in America and to Europe, but had 
the good sense not to intervene? 

Fourth, the danger — f amiliar 
enough in histoty — of becoming the 
mirror of our adversaries, particular- 
ly when those adversaries do not 
share our respect for the traditional 
concepts of “the laws of war.” That 
is, to an alarming degree, what hap- 
pened in the Vietnam War. It proved 
to be a war brought on by deception 
and fought with a ruthlessness un- 
precedented in our history. * 

We used napalm to destroy people 
and Agent Orange to destroy natures 
We launched Operation Fhoemxjjv 
which jailed thousands of prisoners 
and killed about 18,000 of them. W# 
inflicted honors like the My LaJ 
massacre on noncombatants. We 
dropped seven million tons of bomlgj 
on a country the size of Montana. £ 

Finally, the outcome of the wa? 
should reconcile us to ^defeat," for ji 
illustrates a valuable lesson of histo; 
ry: that there are some wars so pentis 
cious in their consequences that 
feat is better than victory. : • .£. 

We need not turn to the old wodg 
to demonstrate tins, to the experience 
of Germany in two world wars, ” 
example. We have our own ea 
ence. Who, now, even in the de. 

South, would reverse the verdict *t 
Appomattox and rejoice in an indi 
pendent Confederate Stales of ; 
tea, retaining slaveiy? 

There is. I think, little doubt 
future historians will conclude 
the Vietnam War was one we shc_ 
never have fought, or that, having 
fought it it is one that we did well to 
lose. It wasted our resources, hiimajj 
and material; it undermined our trao 
dition of the supremacy of the civil to 
the military authority and our moral 
tradition of honor and magnanimity* 

It is because we have not yet adr 
justed ourselves to that conclusion 
that we are once more in danger erf 
plunging into a conflict — this time 
in Central America — in which we 
wfl] be politically and morally isolate 
ed from the rest of the world and 
which, whatever the outcome, wflj 
cost us more in self-respect and in 
the respect of other nations thug we 
can afford to pay. - i w 

The writer, a professor of American 
history at Amherst College, is the mij 
ihor of numerous books, including 
The Empire of Reason. " Be contrifc 
uxed this comment to Newsday. t 


LETTER : 

What Ogarkov Said * 

Regarding the opinion column “Les * . 
from Grenada Should Apply tb 
Nicaragua ** (April 18}: .* 

Michael Ledeen has the same cav^ 
her attitude to the truth as his hero 
Ronald Reagan has showh ih' his 
frantic effort to extract millions from 
for Nicaraguan rebels; - v- 

,Mr. Ledeen has no hesitation ia 
misquoting the ttms of Grenada govf ■ 
efument documents stolen by thl Jl 
United States during the invasion, r 

Russia's Marshal Nikolai i 


s Marshal Nikolai Ogarto 
o* says, told the Grenadians: “Aie* 
years ago all we had in your part & 
the worfd was Cuba; now we have 
ypil Nicaragua and a war going cut ia 
H Salvador ” Proof of the Gre 4 
Conspiracy, he proclaims. 

-Yet the documents have Marshs* 
y&fkpv saying innocnously: “Ovef 
. W there-' was cmlf 
America, today theri 
are Nicaragua. Grenada and a sen? 
ousbattie going on in B Salvador^ . 

Tins and other such disKHtibnsJS 
1 22l CDd ° m ^ Ledeen’s colj v 

sadly reflect the f' 1 ~ " '* 

the author's case. 

GREG CHAMBERLAIN^ 

‘ Pfifis: * 














INTERNATIONAL 


FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 




The Best in Company 
Entertaining 


S PORT knows no frontiers. Company 
executives in every continent realise that 
business can often be won on the fairways 
of golf courses, or by entertaining clients 
and customers at those sporting events everyone 
wants to see. 

For many years Keith Prowse, who have a 
worldwide reputation for supplying theatre, opera 
and ballet tickets, have led the field in providing 
luxury sporting packages for business hospitality 
to tens of thousands of businessmen. 


A CITY FOR 
BROWSING ... AND 
BUYING 


place ai the top of the de luxe Each year the company offers 


league. 

The luxury 


begins 


all the facilities top executives 
the need to be the perfect hosts. 


moment you step into the whether the venue is Epsom 
lobby where all is classical ele- for the Derby, Wimbledon 


gance, but with an obvious for the most prestigious of all 
insistence upon modernity. Tennis tournaments, the 


Close by is the tasteful calm of British Open golf champion- 
the Chinoiserie restaurant and ship, the classic Ryder Cup 


L ONDON is one of the world centres for browsing among antiques 
and buying exquisite handmade pottery, china and glassware. 
Strangely, this desire to collect, whether as furnishings, 
investments, or as an expression of personal taste, is quite recent. It 
was hardly known before the torn of the century. 


by Moss Murray 


lounge where light refresh- golf match between the 
ments are served throughout United States and Europe, or 


the day. 
Here, with 
strumming b 


the Marlboro British Grand 
harpist Prix of motor racing, 
back- For each of these gala 


ground, they serve each after- occasions Keith Prowse 
noon that traditional British Supersports produces tailor 


institution — afternoon tea. made packages that combine 
After tea it is often time for luxury with good value so that 


The coming of age of a wide- 
spread interest in an and an- 
tiques can be traced to the 
publication of several special- 
ist magazines such as The 
Connoisseur (1901), The Bur- 
lington Magazine (1903), 
Antiques (1922) and Apollo 
(1925). At the same rime 
London stores like Maples 
and Gillows opened sections 
solely devoted to 17th and 
18th century furniture and 
artifacts. 

Throughout the 1920s the 
American journal Antiques in- 
cluded a regular feature ‘Liv- 
ing with Antiques’ which re- 
flected the transatlantic im- 
portance of the new awaken- 
ing and awareness ... and 
also, perhaps, its novelty. 
Jerome K Jerome foresaw the 
development of this enthus- 
iasm for collecting even earl- 
ier. Writing in 1889 he spec- 
ulated on the likely value of 
the ordinary items of his own 
age to future generations. He 
suggested that the ‘sampler’ 
which the eldest daughter 
produced at school would be 
regarded as ‘a tapestry of the 
Victorian era’ and become al- 
most priceless. 

In Three Men in a Boat he 
wrote: “The bine and white 
mugs of the present day road- 
side inn will be hunted up, all 
cracked and chipped, and 
sold for their weight in gold.” 
A humorous prediction, yes, 
but it has all come true. 
Anthony Marks, whose 
Marks Antiques at 49 Curzon 
Street is possibly the finest 
place in London to buy 
antique silver, explained: 
“Everyone today has learned 
to admire the arts of the past, 
valuing them not only for the 
skill and care that went into 
their design and making, but 
also for the light they throw 
on lives and rimes that were 
different to oar own.” 

Marks Antiques is a place for 
browsing as well as buying. 
There are trained members of 
staff to help, but you are 
never forced to buy. And 
don’t worry about the prices. 
They are among the most 
reasonable in London. If you 


decide to buy, your purchase 
can be shipped and freighted 
to any part of the world in the 
certain knowledge that it will 
arrive undamag ed. 

It is not only in Curzon Street 
that you find antique shops. 
They exist in every part of 
London, sometimes along the 
finest thoroughfares like 
Bond Street, and often tucked 
away down almost hidden 
alleys such as St Christopher's 
Place, a few yards from 
Oxford Street and close to 
Selfridges. 

Another street where you can 
spend an entire morning or 
afternoon window gazing or 
browsing among antiques is 
Church Street which connects 
High Street Kensington with 
Bayswazer Road. 

Back in the heart of die West 
End is a landmark always 
worth a visit. This is Thomas 
Goode at 19 South Audley 
Street, close to the Dor- 
chester, Qaridges and Conn- 
aught hotels. Here .all is relax- _g 
ed elegance. The displays of 
fine china and glassware en- 
able everyone to conjure up a 
picture of how the items will 
look in their own homes. 

Sandra Weston, one of the ex- 
ecutives, told me: “Ameri- 
cans, in particular, find they 
can buy from us at often 30 
per cent below the equivalent 
price in New York.” 


wearers and admirers alike. 
There is a saying in the world 
of discretion that everyone 
who is anyone buys their 
jewellery at Van Cleef & 
Arpels. They know that 
secrecy and confidence will be 
maintained. However, it can 
now be disclosed that among 
many past celebrities who 
have been clients of the 
company included Gloria 
Swanson, Madeleine Carroll, 
Marlene Dietrich, Lily Pom, 
King Farouk, the Duchess of 


the British busines sman to scores of British, Australian 
think about adjourning to his and American companies now 


club, this is a characteristic, have annual bookings which 
of the English in particular, they carry forward from year 


that constantly intrigues to year, 
visitors... their passion for . 

clubs. They love to spend Wimbledon 

their leisure among people One American businessman 


with similar tastes and 
incomes as their own. 

This trait probably has much 


and who has a permanent booking 
for himself and guests at 
uch Wimbledon told me at the 


to do with the class society grounds of the All En gland 
that dominated the country Club last yean “We have 


for centuries, separating into many British diems. This js 
almost watertight compare- 


the perfect place, and the 
perfect way, to thank them 
for being loyal customers. But 
we insist this is not a man only 
occasion. Although we may 
Talk business, the tennis 
makgs it an unforgettable day 
out for our wives as well.” 
This year at two o’clock on 
Monday June 24 when John 
McEnroe walks onto the 
famo us Centre Court to open 
the men’s singles champion- 
ship in the defence of the title 
he won last year, Keith 
Prowse, which has the exclus- 
ive rights to sell Wimbledon 
tickets overseas, will also be 
there offering hospitality that 
I know from personal exper- 
ience will be memorable. 

On opening day is costs £97 to 
make it a champagne Wim- 
bledon. A specially reserved 
marquee will be home for a 
day which begins from 11 
o’clock when chilled Momm 
Cordon Rouge champagne 
will be ready for serving. A 
five course lunch follows 
before play commences. Later 
in the afternoon there is a 


ments the aristocracy from 
the middle classes, and those 






A superb Victorian S piece tea and coffee set 
Maria Callas, engaged in ‘trade’ from work- 


The Goldsmith's Art 


There are glamorous gifts to 
behold, too, in the New Bond 
Street salon of one of the most 
famous jewellers in the world, 
Van Ckef & Arpels. Here in 
subdued, but truly elegant, 
surroundings you can inspect 
the wonders of the gold- 
smith’s art, the artistic fancies 
of master craftsmen working 
with sublime pieces of 
jewellery, including clasps 
and brooches made up of' 
precious stones and 
diamonds, or in decorative 
motifs to suit personal tastes. 
And, increasingly, there are 
collections of individually 
designed watches for men and 
w o men that fascinate and 
command the attention of 


Windsor, Maria Callas, 
Elizabeth Taylor, as well as 
the Maharajahs of Baroda, 
Jaipur and Indore. 

Today it is businessmen and 
their wives from both sides of 
the Atlantic, as well as the 
Middle East, who daily enter 
the tasteful and comfortable 
showroom at 153 New Bond 
Street, where only the best is 
good enough. 

For those for whom the best is 
a way of life, flying from one 
country to another means 
knowing where yon can be 
certain of receiving chat level 
of service and convenience 
which the experienced 
traveller insists upon. The 
standards, and ambience, of 
the hotel of your choice can 
often be the most important 
factor in deciding whether 
yon have a visit to 
remember... or forget. 


ian chicken with rice to Corg- 
imychiaid, a Welsh prawn 
salad) it is, for me, as near as 
you can get in London to a 
true patran/chef establish- 
ment that one so naturally 
associates with the best of 
French dining. 

The welcome that Patrick 
Gwymi-Jones gives his cust- 
omers puis them in the right 
mood for a leisurely lunch, or 
stimulating dinner, during 
which good companionship 
and bright conversation com- 
pliments the food. 

I -would travel far to eat at 
Ormond’s, one of London’s 
many newer restaurants 
owned by a young generation 


mg men and women. The of restaurateurs,- women as 
world of ‘Upstairs, Down- well as men. Let us begin- 


stairs’ continued until the last 
war. It still survives in a few 
isolated corners. 

For the traveller in London 
the best dubs are those where 
you can drink and dine in 


with the ladies. 

Admittedly, lovely Leila Raz- 
adad is not British, bat to talk 
to her you would never know. 
Educated in this country, 
there is not a trace of an 


comfort and luxury. One of Iranian accent as she wri- 
the most pleasant lies along comes you with a delightful 


the waterfront of London’s 
own river, the Thames. This 
is the Elephant on the River, 


mix of politeness and charm. 
Her four year rid ‘baby*, is 
tucked away in a mews 


with uninterrupted views of between Jermyn Street and St 


A Flagship 
Hotel 


Entertainment 


THE DERBY 

5ih June- 

j 5^.^ ■ 


■ 5 *-**«*tf < ,* 



In London there are many 
luxurious hotels from which 
to choose, but during the past 
three years the Hyatt Carlton 
Tower in Cadogan Place, 
close ro Hatreds, Knights- 
bridge and Sloanc Street, and 
now Hyatt’s flagship in 
Europe, has won for itself a 


river traffic. 

Although a club, -non-mem- 
bers are welcome at the 
Elephant. There is a mini- 
mum charge of £12.50 for 
your meal, or you can become 
a full member for only £45, or 
£50 for a husband and wife. It 
is open every evening except 
Monday. Try the Sunday 
Brunch when youngsters are 
especially welcome. 

You can come back to the 
river for your next taste of 
lively London eating. Pom- 
egranates lies directly across 
the road from the Elephant on 
the River. And don’t be put 
off because it is situated in a 
basement. 

Although completely cosmo- 
politan in its menu (I counted 
no fewer than 15 different 
national dishes from Malays- 


James’s Square. Everyone is 
surprised to learn that it was 
once the famous Jermyn 
Street Turkish Bath where, 
until die end of the last war, 
successive generations of rid 
and young Londoners spent 
the night sleeping off the 
evening’s excesses. 

Today all is different. The 
atmosphere at Ormond’s is in- 
viting and the food excellent. 
Leila has used her knowledge 


but tasteful, screens. 

It is the same, only different, 
one hundred yards away at 
Greens, until recently known 
as Green’s Champagne Bar. 
After three years of over- 
crowded success, Simon 
Parker Bowies has extended 
the premises so that the att- 
ractive bar, with its discreet 
alcoves for private business 
discussions or whispered con- 
versations between young and 
old lovers, now leads to an in- 
viting restaurant where both 
the mood and the food is dis- 
tinctly English. 

Try the traditional sausages 
and mashed potatoes on Mon- 
days or boiled beef on 
Thursday. Each lunchtime 
sees a different -speciality on 
the menu. It may be steak and 
kidney pie or kedgeree. Al- 
ways, you can be certain that 
whatever you order you will 
enjoy it in surroundings that, 
while dean and modern, have 
a touch of the traditional, too. 
In London you not only meet 
the world and his wife, you 
can also find restaurants that 
serve authentic foods from 
every part of the globe. It is a 
city where everyone feels at 
home. 


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“SUPER STYLE" No one else does entertaining at the 
Classic Sporting events better than we do. So,.if you would 
like to see any of these occasions, in style, read on. 
“SUPER LUNCH” In the prestigious setting of our exclusive 
Marquee Restaurants 4-course meals or buffets with wine. 
-SUPER CHAMPAGNE” You are welcomed by a 
Champagne Reception. Enjoy only the finest Mumra 
Cordon Rouge Champagne. 

“SUPER SEAT Very best seats in prime positions. 
“SUPER VIEW” Special enclosures, grandstand 
locations, exclusive facilities. 

-SUPER VALUE” It costs less than you think. 
L— n TheDerby starts at just S59 + vat, the 
ApTj 114th Open £99 + vat. The British Grand . 
j\jF Prix&169 + vat and Henley £79+ vat. 



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Telephone: 01- Wi» 1788 



Dining Out 


Ring (H -935 9991 


for bookings or brochure with hill deoils. We promlieyou. 
Your day wlU be ■ auper nieces*. 


••-v -v- 

' 


Him sy(e rnaResffie occasion 


„ T *l® 

Elephant 
on the 
River 



DINNER & DANCE 


VAN CLEEF & ARPELS 

— WORLD FAMOUS JEWELLERS — 


Open Tvmdey *o Sunday 
Indini-e. Ckwad Monday. 

129 Gfwveoar Rood, London S.W.l, 
Tel.: 834 1« 21. 


DeH/tfful restaujtnf lucked away 
in SI. James's. NouveRe cuisine plus 
dher favourites. Private member- 
ship ckX> downstairs. 

6. Ckmond Yard SW1. off Duke of 
York SI. Owed Saturday lunch and 
Sundays. Tot- 930 2642. 


Gbeen’s - 

CHAHFAGNE IA1 

Champagne, oysters and cold 
seafood In hec»t at St. James's - 
now we have a new section s&v~ 

Yglradffioncrf hafEngBshdhhet ' 
36 Duke St Tel: 930 4566 


strawberry tea. To make sure 
none of ihe action is missed 
colour television cameras 
prowl the courts picking up 
the play on screens in the 
marquee. It should be an ace 
of a day. 

The Derby 

A few weeks earlier the most 
famous horse race in rhe 
world cakes place on the 
Downs at Epsom on .the 
outskirts of London — the 
Derby. Here the company’s 
specially built restaurant is 
available for entertaining on 
all four days of the meeting 
with reserved seats in the 
grandstand 1 . Guests can also 
be entertained in privaze 
boxes or, in complete 
contrast, executives and their 
spouses can enjoy the 
informality of a picnic lu n c h 
in an uncrowded corner 
overlooking the course. 

British Grand Prix 

Two events will hit the 
headlines at the same time in 
July when Silverstone is the 

for the British Grand 
Prix of motor racing with 
Keith Prowse Supersports 
offering business clients 
turbo-charged excitement 
from the prime viewing spot 
overlooking Abbey Curve. 
The hospitality package 
begins with coffee and 
croissants from 9 a.m. with 
champagne later in the 
morning followed by lunch, 
tea and closed circuit 
television. 


within driving distance of 
London, the Royal St 
George’s at Sandwich, Kent 
Severiano Ballesteros will be 
defending last year’s title and 
hoping to win the £65,000 Bop 
prize. Also there will be 
scores of businessmen offer- 
ing their clients hospitality 
from a marquee al on g s i d e the 
course. - • 

The Ryder Cup 



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The Open 

The other event is the 114th 
Open Championship being 
held this year at one of the 
most testing golf courses 


But perhaps the greatest golf 
occasion of the year will be 
the 1985 Bell’s Scotch Ryder 
Cup match' between reams 
representing the United 
States and Europe at the 
Belfry from September 13/15/ 
Will the leading players from 
Europe, led by Tony Jacklin, , 
be able to improve upon their ] 
historic performance last time 
in Florida which took them 
within a whisker of winning? 
The task will be tough. The 
occasion memorable.;' 
Already' the bookings are 
flowing into the offices of 
Keith Prowse Supersports at 
1 Melcombe Street, London, 
W1 (01 631 4920). Companies 
can have their own private 
chalets in which to entertain 
40 guests throughout the 
three days, or smaller parties 
can be offered hospitality in 
the clubhouse where there are 
several exclusive suites. 
Alternatively, executives can 
use the Keith Prowse chalet in 
the tented village alongside 
the first fairway. 

What about Ascot? “Please 
don’t write about it,” pleaded 
a Supersport’s executive. “All 
the tickets went long ago.” 
How long before they are 
saying the same about Epsom, . 
Wimbledon and Royal St 
George’s? MJVi. 





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April 26,1985 


WEEKEND 


Page 9 


The Tempest Over Shakespeare’s f Wooden O’ 


by Susan Simpson 


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I ONDON — Sam Wanamaker has nev- 
er learned to tales no for an answer. 
The American actor-director has 
spent 16 years cmnpaignmg for the 
reconstruction of Shakespeare's Globe The- 
axer by the Thames. So far, the only thing 
that has-been buift is an architect’s modd — 
but Wanamaker will not give up; 

"J’ra not a Shakespearean actor really, or a 
Shakespearean director," says Wanamaker, 
who is 65 years oM and has lived in Britain 
for more than 30 years. “The idea just, 
seemed so logical and right.” 

Driven by the dream of creating a “monu- 
ment to the world’s greatest playwright,” 
Wanamaker is viewed as a fanatic in some 
quarters, and his family and friends have 
called him obsessive. 

“They tell me that if I’d spent this kind of 
time and energy on my career, fd either tie a 

rnnlrirnini r maln * of & huge Star.” W fnanm- 
ker says. A successful actor on Broadway in 
the 1940s.be continues to work on both sides 
of the Atlantic. 


Over (be years, he has won same influen- 
tial support for the project. Prince Philip is 
the patron, the American oil magnate Ar- 
nrand Hammer is one of its principal finan- 
cial backers, and Lord Olivier is the honor- 
ary president of what has been named the 
International Shakespeare Globe Centre. 
For Wanamaker, it has been “a tremendous 
challenge.” 

. But be has also struggled against reluctant 
bureaucrats and hostile local residents. He 
found the British theater establishment, with 
some exceptions, indifferent. He speaks now 
of “the stages of despair" he has experi- 
enced. 

His devotion to Shakespeare began at the 
1933 Chicago World's Fair, where he saw his 
first Shakespeare play in a mode Globe. 
Later, as a drama student, he spent a sum- 
mer acting at another Globe reproduction in 
Cleveland. Shakespeare was served there like 
hamburgers at a fast-food joint. “The plays 
were cut to under an hour," Wanamaker 
recalls with a broad smile. "We played the™ 
from noon until nine — a different play 
every hour on the hour." 

It was a heavy' dose of Shakespeare for a 


young actor and it left him with a deep 
interest in the playwright and the Globe. In 
1949, when he arrived in London to make a 
film, Wanamaker couldn't wait to explore 
the rite of die lfith-eentuiy playhouse m 
Southwark, on the south bank of the 
Thames. What he found shocked him. 
“There was a plaque,” be says. “That’s alL li 
was disgraceful." 

Twenty years elapsed before Wanamaker 
took up the Globe project in earnest. During 
that time, he had become 3 British resident 
and often took visitors on sightseeing tours 
of London, invariably including the site of 
the Globe. One day he arrived to discover 
(hat several warehouses had been pulled 
down, opening up a view of the river with the 
dome of St. Paul s Cathedral swelling above 
iL “1 started leaping up and down and say- 
ing, ‘How is the chance.' “ 

Others had tried before him. In the 18th 
azut 19 th centuries. King George IV, Sir 
Walter Scott and the actor David Garrick 
were involved in unsuccessful attempts. Fif- 
ty years ago another plan, sponsored by the 
former U. S. president Herbert Hoover, was 


cut short by World War II. Wanamaker 
knew it would not be easy. 

From the tvginmng, he was determined to 
create a faithful reproduction of the first 
Globe close to its original site. The play- 
house burned down in 1613 during a perfor- 
mance of Henry VIH — a gun fired as a stage 
effect set fire to the thatch roof. Rebuilt the 
following year with a tile roof, it was tom 
down in 1644 after the Puritans dosed the 
theaters. The theater's records no longer ex- 
ist, but Wanamaker brought together schol- 
ars from around the world, who 
with a design. 


no came up 



his space 
or 

ing Offer 
m 


Architect's sketch of the Globe Theater project. 


NmoCam D«pgn 


i HE plans call for a covered, circular 
building — what Shakespeare called a 
“wooden O" — lined with benches. 
The central section, the pit. would be left 
open to the sky. “Groundlings,’’ or standing 
spectators, gathered there around the stage 
in Elizabethan times. The amenities of a 
modern theater — lighting, heating or ampli- 
fying equipment — have been ruled out. 
Now as then, it is intended only for summer, 
daytime use. Such is the dedication to au- 
thenticity that exit signs would be removed 
after each performance. 

The Globe is envisaged as the star attrac- 
tion of an $18- million entertainment and 
educational complex. Plans have been drawn 
up for a smaller indoor theater, a museum 
and an Elizabethan restaurant-pub, which 
would be grouped on a plaza. Wanamaker 
has $6 milljon in pledges for the first stage of 
construction, raised in part through two 
charitable trusts, the Shakespeare Globe 
Trust in Britain and the Shakespeare Globe 
Centre (North America). He is convinced 
that the center would prove irresistible to 
tourists. 

“Eighty-five percent of the people who 
visit this country come through London first 
and then go out to other interesting places,” 
he says. “You mean to say that those people 


who are interested in Shakespeare, who go 
up to Stratford-upon-Avon are not going to 
come here first?" 

The project site today looks like a waste- 
land, strewn with broken glass, scrap timber 
and other debris. Planning consent for the 
project was granted in 1980. A contractual 
agreement to secure the site was signed by 
Wanamaker. Lbe borough council of South- 
wark and a property development company 
in 1982. But construction has never stoned. 

The story has taken on a complexity wor- 
thy of a Shakespearean plot. The characters 
include local residents who have argued that 
the site would be better used for housing, a 
leftist borough council elected after the 
agreement was signed, and the property de- 
velopers who initially planned to build an 
office to accompany the theater project. 

Enter the lawyers. Wanamaker, acting for 
the Shakespeare Globe Trust, has served 
writs on the borough council and the proper- 
ty developers alleging that obligations haw 
not been fulfilled. The property developers 
in turn are suing the council. Preliminary 
defenses have ben filed, and while the legal 
arguments are examined, discussion of the 
case is restricted. 

Wanamaker has encountered delays be- 
fore. 

“During the (British) coal strike of 1974, 
we were on the point of getting the project 
ready to be built when the whole country 
collapsed economically” he says. “The idea 
of going ahead with something as fanciful as 
this was utterly knocked on the head.” 

A dedicated group of supporters has stood 
by him, but what rankles and perplexes 
W anamaker is what he sees as the apathy of 
the British theater establishment. 

“You would have though t that they would 
have jumped on this bandwagon and 
marched down Piccadilly and come to the 
town hall of Southwark demanding this the- 
ater,” he says with some bitterness. 

A few came “on board,” according to 



Sam Wanamaker. 


Swan Swpicn 


Wanamaker. but many remained in the 
wings. “I went to the obvious people,” he 
recalls, among them Sir John Gielgud, Sir 
Ralph Richardson and Sir Alec Guinness. 
“Alec Guinness outright opposed it and still 


does. He dunks one should put one's energy 
into existing theaters and not look back. In 
my view, he's quite wrong and very short- 
sighted. . . . The others gave it tacit sup- 
port, but reluctantly.” 

Wanamaker suspects that his being an 
American has caused resentment among 
Britons. But his unshakable belief in the 
project and a clear-eyed view of his own 
reasons for acting, drive him on. 

“I'm not interested in creating a self-ag- 
grandizing home base for myself, for my 
artistic foibles and interests.” he says weari- 
ly. “To me, it's enough of an ego-fulfilling 
thing to believe that 1 have brought this to 
the point of reality. I don’t have to do any- 
thing else.” ■ 

Susan Simpson, a Canadian journalist 
based in London, is a correspondent for the 
Canadian Broadcasting Corp. 


Mehdi Charefs ’Street Poetry’ 


by Amy Hoflowell 


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P ARIS — Across the freeway that 
belts this dty like a modem ram- 
part, the suburbs rise up in concrete 
and glass sterility, second-genera- 
tion shantytowns whose residents are invari- 
ably poor, often immigrants, and never here 
by choice. The best most can hope for is •' 
survival. Some, legally or not, do better; but 
few do as well as Mehdi Charef. 

An Algerian immigrant who came to Paris 
in 1962, Charcf has just made his 1983 novel, 
“Be Thfe au Harem cPArchi AfifaedTimd i, 
film that was considered as a possible candi- 
date for the Cannes film festivaL The drama 
of his success Is heightened by the fact that 
for more than 10 years Charcf earned his 
living working in a tool-and-die factory and 
wrote in his free time. 

“Le Thfe au Harem d’Archi Ahmed" re- 
counts the not-so-prctty lives of a gragp of 
working-class kids m the bleak nottherasyb- , 
urbs of Paris. Some are imupgyrotSiaonae arc 
not, but they aD lead the same empty 
fence: no money, no work, no place to go. 

Fictionalizing this world for the novel was 
what Charcf (alls a “violent release," but 
making the film version was even, more ento; 
tionaL . . V. 1 • ; ' |- 

“Facial expressions are so much more 
moving, more real,” Charcf said recently in a ' 
Paris caffe. “Expressing something with a 
look, with a gesture, I find much more beau- 
tiful than using words.” 

Searching for just the right word in 
French, he said finally that bis work could be 
defined as “street poetry,” somet hi nga k in to- 
Bruce Springsteen, the rock musi cia n . “I love 
Springsteen . he sad.. . • 

Charefs speech has a hard edge ' 10 it, 
smacking of slang and street rhythms. He 
makes no effort to hide his roots- St3L he 
does not see himself as an “Arab writer” or 
an “Arab filmmaker,” but simply as an an- 
thor, with more than one story to tdL 
He was bom in Algeria, in 1952. Tea years 
later he moved with his mother to France, 
where his father, whom hebarelyknew, had 
already been working as a laborer for several 


years. His first impression of his new coun- 
try, he recalls, was the bitter November cold 
as he stood on the platform at the Gare 
d’AustcrJjtz. He remembers crying that day. 
“No one told me it was going to be that 
cold,” he said. 

But Charcf grew used to the cold, learned 
French, all but forgot Arabic and still found 
himself trapped like so many other young 
people in his concrete housing project. 

Books and movies, which he consumed 
avidly, were his secret orit. He became en- 
amored with the cinema, he remembers, 
upon seeing Martin Ritt’s “Hombrc," star- 
ring Paul Newman^ (“I, like movies that 
‘smell’ like beer.”) At 1 3 he discovered Hen- 
ry Miller in the school library and derided he 
wanted to be a writer. 

“You don’t tdl people you want to be a 
writer or a pianist or something like that,” 
Charef said- “You say you want to be a 
soccer player or a boxer, because that's the 
way out for kids like you.” He admits that a 
career in professional soccer would not have 
beta tjeyond consideration, had the oppor- 


I 


tunity presented itself. 

He MLschool Tuid took a f; 
writing in the evenings and on weekends. 
Nothing became of the film scenarios be 
repeatedly sent off to producers until he 
received a response to “Le Thfe au Harem 
d’Archi Ahmed.” The producer was im- 
pressed, bat advised Charef to make the 
script into a novel instead. 

The book, which he dedicated to bis moth- 
er, Mebarka, “even though she can’t read,” 
was published in March 1983. It was praised 
by critics, but did not sell enough to permit 
Charef to leave his job. There followed an 
unmemorable television appearance on 
“Apostrophes,” the popular literary talk 
show (topic: “Ari&ijierature in the French 
Language”), where he did little more than 
briefly' answer the moderator’s questions. 

A favorable review in the weekly Nouvel 
Observateor led to Charefs break into dne- 
. ma. The article piqued the interest of Mi- 
chtie Ray-Gavras, the wife of Costa-Gams, 
andishe eventually bought the film rights to 
the book. Her husbandalsb liked the idea, 
and after meeting with Charef, they decided 



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Mehdi-Charef. 


that no one was better suited to make the 
movie than the author. Ccsta-Gavras and his 
wife would act as technical adviser and pro- 
ducer. but Charef would write and direct the 
film. 

“When they told me, I aged all at once,” 
Charef says. “As long as you are dreaming, 
you are like a child, but the day you do it, 
you are an adult.” He left the factory in June 
1983 and began work on the film. 

On the set, he says he was unpleasant, at 
limes odious, pushing the actors — most of 
(hem also young unknowns — to precision. 
He did not agonize over the film; he knew 
..what he wanted and it was only a matter of. 
getting it done. Shooting took 10 weeks late 
last year, on location in Gennevilliexs, the 
suburb where Charef grew up, Paris and 
Deauville, on the Normandy coast It opens 
in Paris next week. 

T is a simple film, a simple story, shock- 
ing in its realism, soothing in its human- 
ity. 

The focal point is the relationship between 
Pat, a Frenchman from abroken family, and 
actory job, Madfjid, an Algerian immigrant with a histo- 
l weekends! ry not unEke QiareTs. They are companions 
on the ragged side of life, equal partners in 
their camaraderie of silent desperation. 

They speak vary, little to one another; 
communication is as sparse as the barren 
housing development in which they live. Pat 
and Madjid look each other in the eye only 
once. They do not express even the simplest 
of sentiments; it never occurs to them that 
they should, or that such feelings exist 
•They don't know the words, they have a 
very small vocabulary. It’s something that 
just isn't done in their world,” explains 
Charef. Tt would be like undressing, and 
they are painfully modest I could have add- 
ed pages of dialogue, but it wouldn't be real 
What is there is what exists. Nothing more." 

Reality has. touched even the film’s title, 
which was changed to “Le Thfe au Harem 
d’ArchimMe.” The theorem of Archimedes 
figures only briefly in the story, when a 
teacher asks a pupil if he knows the name of 
the theorem written on the blackboard. Yes, 
the child responds, it is “le thfe an harem 
d’Archi Ahmed" (a malapropism meaning 
roughly “the tea harem of Archi Ahmed”), 
much to the uproarious delight of his class- 
mates. 

Although the movie has yet to be released, 
it has already won recognition. Although the 
film was finally not chosen for Cannes, 

' Charef was awarded the Prix Jean Vigo last 
month for French cinema’s best “first work” 
of the year. 

“The Prix Jean Vigo was the greatest hon- 
or." Charef said. “Especially when you con- 
sider, that directors nke Jean-Lac Godard, 
Alain Resnais and Claude Chabrol are 
among the past winners.” 

Suddenly, Charef has found himself in the 
spotlight of the French press, although he 
keeps wondering why. A recent guest ap- 
pearance on the “Journal de VLogt Hieures," 
French television’s most popular evening 
news program, was “crazy,” he says, because 
neither he nor the anchorman, knew why he 
was there. 

Tt was like being thrown into a lion’s 
den,” he says. 

He suspects, and it is not unlikely, that the 
attention is related to the current furor over 
racism that has swept France. This surprises 
Charef. Indeed, he is proud (hat there is no 
racist or anti-radsi rhetoric in the book or 
the movie. 

While he is grateful to Costa-Gayras, also 
an immigrant, for having believed in him — 
sometimes when no one else did — Charef 
does not dwell on his part in the production. 
He speaks of the Greek-born director casual- 
ly, as he would a friend. 

His circle of friends has not changed with 
celebrity and he sees his family (nine broth- 
ers and sisters) regularly. They are happy for 
him, he says, but they just go on living their 
lives, as he does, except zhat.he does not go 
to the factory anymore. And his mother, 
what does she think of her son the author? 
Mehdi Charef smiles reflectively. 

“I’m not sure that she really understands,” 
he says, then pauses and adds: “Yes, 1 guess 
she understands. And I guess she’s probably 
proud.” ■ 


Amy ***»■« 


The Young Reign of Danjuro XII 


by John Burgess 


T OKYO — The Kabuki actor known 
as Ebizo X had been preparing 
since childhood. He gave up ciga- 
rettes and alcohol. He spent days 
cloistered in a studio pacing through scenes 
from particular plays, fortifying his voice 
and exercising sometimes with a teacher in 
attendance. 

Od April I, he took a new name, Danjuro 
XII, and joined a succession of larger-than- 
life actors bearing thaL name who have 
reigned on the flamboyant Kabuki stage 
since shortly after its inception in the cities 
of feudal Japan. 

There has been no Danjuro since 1965. 
Theater devotees awaited the April 1 event 
like a royal ascension. For three centuries the 
Danjuro name has been passed down in his 
family, the Horikoshi family, sometimes by 
blood line, sometimes by adoption of a 
promising understudy. 

Many theater people were talking about 
the stage being artistically whole again, 
though a few dissenters questioned whether 
this man, now 38, really has the mettle for 
the name. 

But the more practical-minded are looking 
at the publicity that the event generated 
around Japan. They hope it will help draw 
people hack to Kabuki, an ancient institu- 
tion that has taken a hammering In the 20th 


century and is enjoyed about as much as the 
average American enjoys Shakespeare. 

The ascension was the focus of three 
months of special performances and celebra- 
tions in Kabuki theaters. Danjuro and a 
troupe from the Sbochiku Kabuki company 
will tour the United States this summer to do 
it all over again. 

The Japanese prize Kabuki as a national 
treasure and spend the equivalent of about 
$10 milli on a year in taxes subsidizing it. But 
its decline in popularity is often cued as 
that values 


another sign 1 
great are slipping. 


that made Japan 


Schoolchildren are dutifully bused to Ja- 
pan’s national theater: and other Kabuki 
stages in Tokyo, but few return on their own. 
On Sunday evenings fewer than 1 percent of 
the TV sets in the Tokyo region are tuned to 
Kabuki broadcast by public stations. A 
baseball game can draw 30 percent or more. 

“For entertainment, I prefer something 
more lively," said Akesni fida, an employee 
at a Tokyo law firm. “We have so much to 
choose from these days." She had heard 
about the Danjuro succession (the advertise- 
ments are everywhere), “but it means noth- 
ing to me.” 

The irony is that in the beginning Kabuki 
was something everybody could enjoy, if 
they had the money. Its emergence as a 
distinct art form around the year 1600 is 

Continued on page 10 



Danjuro XII. 


MacMillan Moves in at the ABT 


by Anna Kisselgoff 


N EW YORK — Writing in 1956, 
Ninette de Valois, founder of 
Britain's Royal Ballet, recalled 
her impressions 10 years earlier of 
a young student just out of the company’s 
school — “a thin tall boy of great talent, by 
name Kenneth MacMuIan.” How varied 
that talent would be was evident by 1965 
when MacMillan, no longer dancing but 
devoted to choreography, presented his own 
version of Prokofiev’s “Romeo and Juliet” 
Forty-three curtain calls greeted its premiere 
by the Royal Ballet in London; after the 
three-act ballet opened in New York the 
same year with Rudolf Nureyev and Margot 
Fonteyn it remained a solid hit with Ameri- 
can audiences during the British company’s 
frequent visits over the next decade. 

Who would ever have predicted that a 
virtual signature piece of the Royal Ballet 
would one day become a major production 
in an American Ballet Theater season? Yet 
“Romeo and Juliet” Ballet Theater’s engage- 
ment this week at the Metropolitan Opera — 
with seven different casts to be on view over 
the next eight weeks — and the British cho- 
reographer and former director of the Royal 
Ballet hims elf is cm hand in a role that wonld 
have been even less likely 20 years ago. Last 
fall, Mikhail Baryshnikov, ABTs artistic di- 
rector, appointed MacMillan artistic asso- 
ciate of the company at the same time that he 
named John Taras associate director. 

MacMillan's potential impact on the 
American company as its de facto resident 
choreographer is, then, a crucial one. A can- 
did interview with him prior to the opening 
produced some surprises. 

For instance, he does not take at all to the 
idea that he is at Ballet Theater to create 
dance-dramas as a balance to the many plot- 
less ballets introduced under Baryshnikov’s 
regime since 1980. Nor, he emphasizes, is he 
a choreographer obsessed with sexuality in 
ballet, as he feels his critics perceive him. 
“Different Drummer," his recent ballet ver- 
sion of “Wazzeck” for the Royal, has caused 
some balletomanes to use words like “revolt- 
ing." 

In some new autobiographical insights, he 
counters certain accepted interpretations of 
his ballets. “Triad,” which Ballet Theater 
presented last year, was not about a homo- 
erotic relationship into which a girl intrudes, 
he asserts, but was inspired by a youthful 
rivalry between himself and his brother. Fi- 
nally, while MacMillan cannot envision a 



Kenneth MacMillan. 


situation without ties to the Royal Ballet 
(where he is principal choreographer), he 
does not regard himself as an occasional 
visitor to Ballet Theater. 

T haven’t been brought in to do just 
dramatic ballets, ” the 55-year-old Scottish- 
born choreographer declares. “) will do dra- 
matic ballets and I will do so-called abstract 
ballets as well ” 

All this might come as a surprise to those 
who felt that MacMillan was meant to focus 
on dance-drama, a genre that had made ABT 
famous in the 1 940s and '50s. It is a side that 
many see lacking in the company today. 
Significantly, Ballet Theater’s season will 
also feature the 1967 psychological MacMil- 
lan ballet “Anastasia,” with Cynthia Greg- 
ory and Martine van Hamel alternating m 
die title role of Anna Anderson, who claimed 
to be the daughter of Czar Nicholas II. 

Nooethelss, the choreographer ventures, 
“I think I’m about to change. And this is 
because of the impetus of the company. It is 
not that the dancers are not good dramati- 
cally. They're excellent. But I detect a sort of 
energy that 1 haven't found in Europe. There 
is a concentration on dance technique and 
the technique is astounding. It's brought 
back to me the origin a] impetus I had about 
dance, as a dancer and in my early works — 
when I could fed the movement in my 
body” 

MacMillan said he had had three foot 
operations, which shortened a dancing ca- 
reer that began in. 1946 with the Sadler's 


Wells Theater Ballet, the junior company of 
the Sadler’s Wells Ballet (now the Royal). 
ABTs dancers “make me want to dance 
again," he says. Tve never known such a 
hard-working company. They’re phenome- 
nal in class and rehearsal, and when they go 
straight on to the performance they’re as 
good at 8 P.M. as they were in the morning.” 

T HE stronger technique available in 
Ballet Theater has opened up new 
choreographic possibilities to Mac- 
Millan, though pure-oance ballets are not 
new to him. But the typical MacMillan work 
has concerned itself with a youthful protago- 
nist struck down early in life by a trauma. 
More directly, MacMillan feels many of his 
baDets have been concerned with “the per- 
son destroyed by the social milieu." 

“Gloria." which seemed inspired by a 
poem by Vera Brittain about the British 
generation cut down by World War I, was 
actually linked to his father, MacMillan re- 
veals. “My father was massed in World War I 
and went back to a England that was sup- 
posed to be better and braver. He was unem- 
ployed. For the rest of his life he had only 
itinerant jobs." Asked if such ballets were 
based on political feelings, MacMillan 
seemed startled, replying that he had not 
thought of himself in this connection. More- 
over, in seeing his father now as a victim of 
society, he realized for the first time what the 
real scar in his own youth had been. 

“My mother died when I was 11. My 
father died when I was 15. The interesting 
thing is I thought that my mother’s death 
was the trauma in my life. Now I think it was 
my father.” 

This vision of a life destroyed by society is 
reflected again in “Fin du Jour,” a deceptive- 
ly glamorous ballet in which the beautiful 
people of the 1960s cavort on the Riviera 
until the day comes to an end — that is, war 
doses the era. “I wanted in that ballet to 
present a very serious theme in what seemed 
3 frivolous setting,” he says. “That’s when I 
was growing up. And when the war started, 
yes, 1 thought it was the fin du jour. I didn't 
know from one day to the next whether I was 
going to be dead dr alive. The people in. (hat 
ballet are the sort who are not aware of what 
Germany was doing at that time.” 

In 1982, MacMillan choreographed “Val- 
ley of the Shadows'* based on ‘The Garden 
erf the Finzi-Continis," a story of an Italian 
Jewish family whose children live in an en- 

Continued on page 11 





Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


TRAVEL 


l. 

• a ■ .‘r 


t ! K 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 




VIENNA. Konzenhaus{ttl:72.12.11). 
RECITAL — April 29: Oleg Maisen- 

•N^aUcverein (i§: 65.81.90f 
RECITALS — April 28 and 29: J3rg 
Demos piano ( Bach). 

April 27: Gidoo Kramer violin. Mar- 
tha Argerichupiano (Beethoven. Schu- 
mann). 

•Stantsoperftel: 53240). 

OPERA — April 28 and May 2: “Mac- 
beih" (Verdi). 

April 30: “The Masiersmgers of Nu- 
remberg” (Wagner). 

May I: “La Boh&me” (Puccini). 
•Volksoperftd: 53240). 

BALLET — April 29 and May 2: "Gi- 
selle” (Alonso, Adam). 

MUSICAL — April 27: “My Fan 
Lady” (Lemer, Loewel 
OPERA — April 30: “II Barbiere di 
SivigUa”(Rosnnj). 

May 1 : “La Bobfcme" (Puccini). 

ENGLAND 

LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). ^ , , 

Barbican Hall — - April 27: London 
Symphony Orchestra. Edmon Co- 
lomer conductor, Brigitte Engerer pi- 
ano (Tchaikovsky). . . 

April 28: City of London Smfonia, 
Christopher Warren-Green conduc- 
tor/ violin. Crisp i an Steele- Perkins 
trumpet (Bach. Vivaldi). 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Company — April 25-May 1: 
“Richard in." 

•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734.90.52). 

EXHIBITION — April 19-July 14; 
“Edward Lear. 1812-1888." 

•Royal Opera (tel: 240.10.66). 
BALLET — April 30: “The Sleeping 
Beauty" (Petipa, Tchaikovsky). 
OPERA — April 27: “Andrea Chi- 
llier” (Giordano). 

•Tate Gallery (tel: 821.13.13). 

EXHIBITION — To June 2: “The Po- 
litical Pain ling* of Merlyn Evans 
(1910-1973V 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (tel: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITION — To June 9: “The 
People and Places of Constantmople: 
watercolours by Amadeo, Count Pre- 
33053(1816-1882). 

•Wigmore Hall (tel: 935.21 .41). 

CONCERTS — April 27: Brodsky 
String Quartet (Beethoven, Mendels- 
sohn). 

April 28: Chamber Orchestra of Eu- 
rope, Alexander Schneider conductor 
(Mozart, Schubert). 

RECITAL — April 28: Maggie Cole 
harpsichord, Nigel North lute (Bach). 


FRANCE 

PARIS, Centre Georges Pompidou 
(tel: 277.12.33). 

EXHIBITION —To May 10: “Image 
and Science.” 

•Espace Cardin (tel: 266.17.30). 
EXHIBITION — To May 12: “Sho- 
gun.” 

•Galerie Claude- Bernard (tel: 326. 
97.07). 

EXHIBITION —To May 25 : “Draw- 
ings by Alberto Giacometti." 
•Galerie ICarl-Flinker (tel: 325. 
18.73). 

EXHIBITION — To May 31: “Paul 
Klee: The Last Ten Years. 

• Maison de Victor Hugo (tel: 
272.16.65). 

EXHIBITION — To June 29: “Le 
Vpyage do Rhin. Paintings and Draw- 
ings." 

•M&ridien Hotel (tel: 758.12.30). 
JAZZ — April 27: Cab Calloway and 
His Orchestra. 

•Mus6e d'Art Moderne (tel: 
723.6 1.27). 

EXHIBITION —To July 8: “Photos 
by Marc Riboud." 

•Mus£e de F Assistance Publique (tel; 
633.01.43). 

EXHIBITION — To July 31: “Salva- 
dor Dali." 

•Museedela Marine (tel: 553.31.70). 
EXHIBITION — To May 15: “50 
Years Ago, ‘Normandie’." 

•Muste de Montmartre (tel: 
606.61.11). 

EXHIBITION — Through June: 
“Montmartre, Its Origins, Its Famous 
Residents.” 

•Museedu Louvre (tel: 260.39-26). 
EXHIBITION —To May 6: “French 
Engravers from iheXVUI Century." 
•Museedu Petit Palais(tel: 742:03.47). 
EXHIBITION —To June 30: “James 
Tissot: 1836-1902." 

•Musee National des Arts Afri cams et 
Oceanian; (tel: 343 14.54). 
EXHIBITION — To July 1: “Imagi- 
nary Museum of Oceanic Arts.” 

•Salle Pleyd (563.07.96). 

CONCERTS — April 27: Orchestra 
National de France, Colin Davis con- 
ductor (Berlioz). 

April 28: Berlin Philharmonic Orches- 
tra, Herbert Von Karajan conductor 
(Mozart, Strauss). 

•Theatre des Cinq Diamants 
(285.47.27). 

CONCERT — To May 5: Florence 
Caxnarroque. 

•Thiatre Musical de Paris (tel: 
261.19.83). 

BALLET — Maurice B(g art 20th Cen- 
tury Ballet — April 27 and 28: “Le 
Concours." 

SAINT- PAULrde-VENCE. Fonda- 
tion Maeght (tel: 32.8L63). 
EXHIBITION — To May 16: “Piet 
Mondrian.” 


GERMANY 

BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

BALLET — April 29: “Coppilia" 
(Delibes). 

April 30: “La Sylphide" (Lovensk- 
joid). 

OPERA — April 27: “La Fand ulla del 
West" (Puccini). 

April 28: “FTdelio" (Beethoven). 
•Ptrilharraoniefiel: 54880). 
CONCERTS — April 27: Berlin Ra- 
dio Symphony Orchestra, Ernst M3r- 
zend orfer conductor (Mozart, Pou- 
lenc). 

April 28: Berlin Studio Choir. Eddy 
Rhein conductor (Brahms). 
FRANKFURT, Aile Oper Frankfurt 


(tel: 134.04.00). 

CONCERTS— May J: Sl Louis Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Leonard Sladdn 
conductor, Joshua Bell violin (Bern- 
stein, Sibelius). 

May 2 and 3: Radio Symphony Or- 
chestra, Mosbe Atzmon conductor. 
Reinhold Friedrich trumpet (Hinde- 
mith, Tchaikovsky). 

RECITAL — May 1: Brigitte Fass- 
baender mezzo-soprano, Irwin Gage 
piano (Mahler, Schumann). 

HAMBURG. Staatsoper (tel: 
35.15.55). 

MUSICAL— May 1 : “My Fair Lady" 
(Lemer, Loewe). 

OPERA — April 27: “Don Carlos" 
(Verdi). 

April 28: “Oudlo" (Verdi). 

April 30: “The Barber of Seville" (Ros- 
sini). 

May 2: “The Flying Dutchman" 
(Wagner). 

May 3: “Carmen" (BizeL). 

MUNICH, GSrtnerplalz State The- 
ater (tel : 20 1 .67.67). 

OPERA —April 29: “LeNozze di Fi- 
garo" (Mozart). 

•National Theater (tel: 22.13.16). 
BALLET — April 27 and 29: "La Fflle 
mal I gardfee" (Hfcrold). 

OPERA — April 28: “TannhSuser” 
(Wagner). 


WEEKEND 


HOTELS 



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HOTELS 


GERMANY 


**** LUXimr HOTELS 


ANUSES - 06604 

HOTEL DU CAP-EDEN ROC 

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Td. (93) 69.91 iX) - Tdw 47W87 

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Td. (93) 66.91.91 - TrifN 470708 
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Td. (93) 68.91 SO - Tdw 470039 

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PONOPAUJY OF MONACO 
MONIE CARLO 
HOTH. PE RAMS 
Td. (93) SOaOJO-Tdm 469925 
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W. (93) 309001 -Wu 479413 
MONTE-CARLO BEACH HOTB. 
Td.(93)78J1.40-Td«4794H 

NICE-06000 
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Td. (93| 883931 -Tdw 460040 

ST.JEAN0WRRAI- 06230 

iavoudvr 

Td. (93) 01. 13.13-Tdi ^0317 

SAJNT-PAUL-D&VENCE - 06570 

lEMASD'AirnGNY 
Td. (93) 3X8434 -Mu 470601 

SAINT-TROPEZ - 83990 

IE BYBLOS - La Otadal* 

Td. (94) 97X1004 -Tdw; 470236 

VBKE-06140 

DOMAMESTwMARIM 

TaL (93) 5&0UB -Mk 470282 


o 


GMND HOTEL 
SOWiETiBICHL 

Ganrasch-ParterAirchen 1 
Germany 

The only Grand Hotel 
in Uppw-Bavaria 
Totally renovated in 1984 

T«L: (0)8821-7020 
Cable: 05-9632 

Rev UteB International + Steigcibwger 
Set. Service 


SPAIN 



GRAN HOTEL SARR1A 

BARCELONA 
314 roams 
Business facSties 
first dass 

Ada. Sana, 50. 08029 Barcelona 
TeL (93) 239 11 09 
Tetec 51033 y 51638 GHS8 E 
Cable: CRANHOm 


WORLD RENOWNED MEDICAL CLINIC 

Glion-sur-Monfreux, Lake Geneva, Switzerland 

located at 2,000 feet altitude in a moderate and protected climate, the 
clinic has the -finest ac c o mm odations available for your c om fort. In a 
beautiful end calm setting overlooking the Lake of Geneva and the Mont- 
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Centers are provided for ^cardiology, physiotherapy, el e ctrotherapy, 
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Write to IWr. H. Tuor - Director 
CUNtC VALMONT, TS23 OP o n or Montro u* , Switzerland 
Telephones 021 /63 48 51 (lO Ones) - Te text 453 1 57 valmt-ch 



HOTEL CHAMARTIN 
MADRID 
378 rooms. 
Buri nc ssfacMes. 
first dass. 

EsCaddn Charrjatfn. 28016 Madrid 
Tek(91) 73371 11 -733 9011 
TeJac 492D1 HCHME 
Cable: ENTURSA 


HOLIDAYS 



[ 

SHOPPING 

I 


Nina Meert 

EXCLUSIVE COLLECTION 
SUMMER 1985 

Linen and Silk - Lingerie and Clothing 

Nina MEERT, 4, rue de Varenne, 75007 PARIS 
Tel.: (I) 222.13.79 


SOME CHILDREN WILL MAKE 
MORE FRIENDS THAN OTHERS 
THIS SUMMER. 


Choose tram 30 Activity noMsy centres 
and from just £62 you won! find a better 
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and full introduce them to sailing, 
riding, canoeing, archery. Mal bikes and 
much, much more. 

Write or phone <ora brochure and dea Its 
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year*. Free video available showing the 
P.G.L Magic in actionl 

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ACCOMMODATION 




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CoraiJetDOTtary airport coDrctioo * Travri 6 Them bootura 
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GREECE 


ATHENS, Ailhousa Tehnis Psydricou 
Gallery fteL' 671 .7166). 
EXHIBITION —To May 19: “Tonia 
NikoLaidouu" 

•Argo Gallery (tel: 362^16.621. 
EXmBmON — To May 14: “Boats: 
Anastasia YianissL" 

•Center for Folk Art and Tradition 
(tel: 324.39.87). 

EXHIBITION —To May: “Folk Art 
andTtadi don of Thrace. 


Civilizations. Turkey/ 
•Japan Folk Craft 
467.4527); ' 


Museum (td: 1 


EXHIBITION —To June 23: “Crafts 
of North Eastern Districts." i 

■National Museum of Modem Art 


(td: 21425.61). 
EXHIBITION — 
Munafcata." 


To May 6: “Shiko 


Callaloo, the Caribbean Stew 


f 

■ {%, !;ii 

p' 


DUBLIN. Alliance Francaise (td: 
7621.97)7 

EXHIBITION — To April 30: “Fer- 
nand Vivien." 

•Civic Museum (tel: 77.16.42). 
EXHIBITION — Through April: 
“Wood Quay." 

• David Hendrik's Gallery (tel: 
75.60.62). 

EXHIBITION — To May 4: “Roy 
Johnston." 

•National Concert Hall (tel: 
71.18.88). 

RECITAL— April 27: John O’Conor 
piano (Beethoven). 

•Oliver Dowling Galleiy (tel: 
76.65.73). 

EXHIBITION — To April 30: “Gil- 
bert Swimberge." 

•Oriel Gallery (td: 76J4.I0). 
EXHIBITION — Through April: 
“The Dubliners. Watercolours by Mi- 
chad Healy." 

•Peacock Theatre (tel: 74.45.05). 
THEATER — Through April: “Glen- 
gerry Glen Ross" (David Mamet! 
•Projects Art Centre (td: 713327). 
EXHIBITION — To May 3: “Lys 
Hansen.” 

THEATER —To May 9: “Victory" 
(Howard Barker). 

•Taylor Gallery (td: 77.6039). 
EXHIBITION — Through April: 
“Louis leBrocquv." 

•The Gallery of Photography (tel: 
71.46-54). 

EXHIBITION —To April 30: “Views 
from Ulster," “Roseanne Lynch." 

ITALY 


BOLOGNA, Galleria d’Arte Mo- 
dema (tel: 5028.59). 

EXHIBITION —To May 20: “Tnllio 
PericoU," “Roberto Barm." 

•Teatro Comnnale (td: 222939). 
April 29: Ensemble Ga rbarin o, Giu- 
seppe Garbarino conductor (Stravin- 
sky). 

GENOA, Teatro Margherita (tel: 
58.9329). 

OPERA — April 28: “Andrea Chi- 
llier’' (Giordano). 

MILAN. Padiglione d’Arte Conte m- 
poraneaftd: 78.46.88). 
EXHIBITIONS— To AprD 28: “Afra 
and Tobia Scarpa: architects and de- 
signers," “The Imaginary and the 
Real: Paolo De Pbh, Candida Fior, 
ToniZuccherL" 

TURIN, Royal Palace (tel: 83938.02). 
EXHIBITION— To May 22: “Court- 

S 'Life in Rqasthan Seen Through In- 
ian Miniature Paintings from the 
XVII to XIX Centuries." 

•Teatro Regio (tel: 5430.00). 

OPERA — April 27 and 28: “The Bar- 
tered Bride" (Smetana). 

VENICE, Ca* Vendr amin Calergi (td 
70.99.09). 

EXHIBmON — To May 19: “Figu- 
rative Japanese Art: 1873-1964." 

JAPAN 


TOKYO, Azabu Museum (tel: 
582.14.10). 

To April 28: “Masterpieces of Ukiyo- 
E Painting:'' 

•Idemitsu Art Gallery (td:21 33 1 28). 
EXHIBITION— To June2: “Land of 


•Rjccar Art Museum (td: 571 3234). 
EXHIBITION— ToApril29:“Scemc 
Spots in Edo -Ando Hiroshige.” 
■Seibu Museum (td: 981.01.11). 
EXHIBITION — To May 12: “Leo- 
nardo da Vinci Nature Studies." 
•Tobacco and Salt Museum (td: 
47620.41). 

EXHIBITION — To May 6: “Japan a 
Hundred Years Ago.” 

•Yamatane Museum (td: 669. 4036). 
EXHIBITION — To May IQ: “Con- 
temporary Japanese Painting." 

SPAIN 


BARCELONA Centro deEstudios de 
Arte ContempQriureo(td: 329. 19.08). 
EXHIBITION —' To May 19: “Antho- 
ny Caro.” 

MADRID, Colcgio Mayor Elias Ah uj a 
(lel: 734.05.90). 

MUSICAL — April 27: “The Mika- 
do" (Gilbert and Sullivan). 

•Palacios de VeUzquez y de Cristal 
(td: 274.77.75). 

EXHIBITION —To April 30: "Span- 
ish Sculpture 1900-1938." 

•Sala de Exposkiones de la Caixaftd: 
419.04.40). 

EXHIBITION —To April 30: “Rich- 
ard Hamilton." 

•TeatrodelaZamiela(td: 429. 1236). 
OPERA — April 28: •'Armide*' 
(Gluck). 

•Teatro Real (teL 24838.75). 
CONCERTS — Orquestay Cores Na- 
donalesdeEsiana — April 27 and 28: 
Crisidbal Hallf ter conductor (Dvorak. 
Ravel). 

April 30: Victor Martin conductor, Pe- 
dro 1 turn-aide saxophone (Britten 
Glazunov). 


swrrcnujun 


BERN, Mus6e des Beaux-Aris 
(tel: 22.09.44). 

EXHIBITION — To May 19: “Ca- 
tmUe Claodd and Auguste Rodrn." 

GENEVA Petit Palais (tel: 46. 1433L 
EXHIBITION— To June 15: “Marcd 
Lepnn and Monmartre." 

ZURICH, Opernhaus(td: 25 1.69-20). 
BALLET— May 3: “BaDeltabendir 
(Bruce, van Manen). 

OPERA — April 27 and May 2: 
“Manon" (Massenet). 

April 28: "Viva la Mamma" (Donizet- 
ri). 


by Richard Lyons 

C HARLOTTE AMALIE, Virgin Is- 
lands — April is carnival month on 
the island of Sl Thomas, and 
Arona Petersen, one of the ac- 
knowledged doyennes of Caribbean cook- 
ing, is m using over the making of callaloo. A 
dish served on special occasions, calialoo is a 
stew made of meat, fish and vegetables, with 
assorted herbs and spices. The name of the 
stew comes from an often-induded ingredi- 
ent: callaloo, the leaves of the taro plant. The 
heart-shaped leaves can be as much as three 
feet long and their faintly bitter taste is 
reminiscent of spinach. 

She first made callaloo stew 65 years ago, 
when, like most 12-year-old girls at the tune, 
she started helping her moths - with the 
household cooking. Over the years, she has 
innum erable batches of the pungent 
fare. While traveling throughout the region, 
die has also researched the origins of differ- 
ent kinds of callaloo. 

“During holdiay times there is a pot of 
callaloo on the stove of every serious kitchen 
in the West Indies," Petersen said, “although 
the basic ingredients vary all over the Carib- 
bean, from Island to islan d." Because of its 
range, she likes to label such cuisine West 
Indian ratter than Creole, originally the 
term referring to a person of European par- 
entage bom in the West Indies, Central 
America or the Gulf states. 

Much of the variation in West Indian 
cooking can be attributed to the colomzation 
and trading history of the area. “In Marti- 
nique, callaloo is African and to some extent 
Indian, with a layer of French," she said. 
“Here, the overlay may be Scandinavian, 
while on the other islands it may be British 
or Spanish." In the British Virgin Islands, 
she said, mixed greens are often used, while 
on neighboring SL Croix, the favored ingre- 
dients include taro root, which has a someh- 
wat nutty taste, and the herb called bari-bari. 

Petersen discussed her own callaloo prep- 
aration in the living room of her home over- 
looking the harbor as she and a visitor drank 
guava- berry tea and ate a rich, dark molasses 
fruitcake. 

A Sl Thomas native, she said she so en- 
joyed cooking as a young girl that, as an 
adult, she turned if into a profession, work- 
ing as a chef in Puerto Rico, the Dominican 
Republic, Costa Rica and the suburbs of 
New York City. In the process, her restless 
creativity encompassed cooking, painting, 
sculpture and folk dancing. Mrs. Petersen 
recently coached dance at a girls’ school 
here. 

“Tve had a hard life but a good life," said 
Petersen, whose youthful appearance — hair 
barely touched with gray, and an assured 
step — belies her 77 years. 

Nowadays, her living-room walls are lined 
with examples of her primitive-style ofl 
p ainting s , most of them vividly colored land- 
scapes. Her borne also features the works of 
Ken Petersen, her son, who creates arresting 
sculptures from the roots of trees. 

For years, her small blue and white house, 
ringed by purple, orange, red and white 
bougainvillea, served as a due restaurant for 
people familiar with some of the best of West 
Indian cooking. Formally named Hillside 

Danjuro XII 

sometimes regarded as a backlash to the 
rigid conventions of Noh, Japan's other ma- 
jor type of traditional theater. 

Kabuki’s brilliantly colored costumes, re- 
volving painted sets and action-packed plots 
I (swordplay and vengeance figure prominent- 
ly) filled large wooden theaters (bar went up 
in Edo, as feudal Tokyo was known, and 
other dries. 

A raucous nightlife revolved around the 
theaters, which m the begumingwere some- 
times fronts for prostitution. Brawls over 
actresses led authorities to ban women from 
the stage in 1629, and all-male casts remain 
I the rule today. 

Gradually. Kabuki came of age. A vast 
repertoire of dramas was written. Elaborate 
make-up — of which some techniques are 
kept secret by..ffce actors — manners of 
walking, gesturing and speaking evolved that 
took long study-jo master. 

Around 1675,: an actor with the stage 
name Ichikawa Danjuro appeared. His biog- 
raphies describeJhim as a man of letters, a 
playwright a devout Buddhist and a brilliant 
actor, speci alizing in aragoio, or vigorous 
action parts. He died in 1704, murdered on a 
stage in Edo by another actor. 

His son took the name and thus began the 
line. Other family lines were also established 
and endure today, but the Danjuro name is 
considered the most prestigious. 

The new Danjuro was born Natsuo Hori- 
koshi- As the first son of the man who 
became Danjuro XL he knew he could ex- 
pect the name himself and was trained from 
childhood. 

But his falter died in 1965, only three 
years after his own ascension, leaving his 
son’s education to others in the family. By 
some accounts, many in the Kabuki world, 
looking at flagging box office sales, pushed 
for promoting the son qniddy. Kit older 
actors who oversaw his training held back 
approval until the young man was more 
seasoned. 

Today’s Kabuki actors are not ascetics 
living in the past. The new Danjuro went to 
college. He wears smart three-piece suits, 
owns a telescope, and until recently smoked 
in his dressing room. He has appeared on 
television samurai dramas (Kabuki actors 
are sought out for these parts because they 
add period color) and talk shows. 


ay 1 : “Der Mdsteramger vbn NOm- 1 Since P Ians for ^ succession were made 


berg" (Wagner). 
•Tonhalle (tel: 2 


•Tonhalle (td: 22122.83). 
CONCERTS — April 27 and 28: Ton- 
faallc Orchestra, Willi Gohl conductor 
(Mussorgsky). 

May 1: Academy of St. Martm-in-lhe- 
Fieldsj Icma Brown conductor, Wil- 
liam Bennett flute (Bach, Mozart). 
RECITAL— April 28: Claudio Arrau 
puuio (Beethoven, Liszt). 


NEW YORK, Guggenheim Museum 
01:36035.00). 

EXHIBITONS — To Mav 12: 
“Eduardo ChOlida." 

To June 16: “Gilbert Sc George." 
•Metropolitan Museum of Art (td: 

EXHIBITIONS — To SepL 1: "Man 
and the Horse.” 

To Sept. 5: “Revivals and Explora- 
tions in European decorative arts." 





Arona Petersen in her office. 


Way but more popularly known as “the 
house with the green roof," the restaurant 
became popular for dishes such as johnny 
cake; funeni, a local mixture of okra ana 
commeal that looks and tastes like mashed 
potatoes; meat paths and homemade ice 
cream. In 1971, she was honored by the 
Smithsonian Institution in Washington for 
her culinary contributions to American folk- 
lore. 

She dosed the restaurant several years 
ago, conceding that age was slowing her 
down a bit, bat she continued to operate a 
catering service. 

Now even the catering has ceased, but 
Petersen's advocacy of good Caribbean 
cooking remains strong. Her sporadic food 
column in The Virgin Islands Daily News 
and her book, “Herbs and Proverbs of the 
Virgin Islands” (St Thomas Graphics, 
1974), have helped establish her as an au- 
thority on the subject 

S HE said she receives mail from all over 
the islands and the United States 
mainland asking for help in determin- 
ing just the right ingredients for Caribbean 
dimes such as salt fish salad, taro soup or 
turtle stew. One favorite, herring gundy, un- 
derscores the influences of the different eth- 
nic groups of the area — it is a Caribbean 
variation on a .Swedish dish, a blend of 
herring, potatoes, onions, beets, carrots and 
eggs. 


Sieve Enfetem. New YoA Tmo 


Callaloo is another such crossover. “It 
started out as African survival food." she 
said. “ Everyone who chipped ingredients 
into the communal pot could share in the 
dish that resulted." 

Mrs. Petersen said callaloo was considered 
a “good-luck dish." often served on New 
Year's Day to bring peace and prosperity to 
the household and “to bring lovers closer 
together.” 

For her own callaloo. Petersen uses saltedr 
pig’s tail and pig's mouth or pig's snou^ 
soaked overnight and then put into a three- 
gallon pot to boiL A ham bone is loosed m, 
along with three pounds of okra, two huge 
onions, three cloves of garlic, an eggplant, 
two pounds of fresh conch, hot peppers', 
some crabineaL shrimp and whelk, the herb 
papalolo and spinach, which is often hard to 
obtain, or callaloo. 

“When you get through, you have got 
enough for a crowd — that's how it should 
be,” she said^ 

She refuses to be drawn into the endless 
arguments over who serves the best food on 
SL Thomas, but she has no doubts about the 
best maker of callaloo. “A lot of people ask 
me for advice about making it, and I'm glad 
to help because most people say I make the 
best callaloo on the island," she said Raising 
her eyes from her teacup, she added, “And L. 
agree with them.” 

© 1985 The New York Times 


Continued from page 9 



Danjuro in the Kabuki play “Shibaraku . : 


DOONESBURY 


OKAY. KIDS, THISIS B&K& 
JUSTBSRXBlie&RtOUS 


public two years ago, he has been especially 
hot property. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Na- 
kasone turned up at a party for him at a 
Tokyo hotel recently. U.S. Ambassador 
Mike Mansfield also has been photographed 
with him 

To his followers, people like Hatsue 
Kawamora, daughter of a wo man who was 
housekeeper to a famous actor 50 years ago, 
April 1 was a dream come true. “I've spent 
more time with Kabuki than with my fam- 
ily," Kawamura said recently, in anticipa- 
tion of the evenL 

K AWAMURA was one of several 
hundred people who showed up re- 
cently at a charity fund-raiser where 
the man was signing autographs — his last as 
Ebizo — with a calligrapher's brush and. 
with the amicable self-assurance of royalty 
fielding questions on his arL ' 

One questioner wanted to know what heis 


T-SHtitrcmEsr.s&msA ter- 


iooking at when he strikes a violeaL“wid^ 
eyed stare at emotional peaks, a -Kabuki 
trademark. Nothing, he said. “I imagfnr the 
sun mid the moon, that one eye is tne sias. 
round \vitii the pupQ in ihe center, that the 
other is squinting, like the crescent mooa. fl 

Kabuki audiences these days tend to be 
gray-haired and sprinkled with foreign tour- 
ists. But the old flavor is recalled by fans in 
me cheap seats who bellow ecstatic words of 
admiration at strategic moments. ^ 

Danjuro himself says he feels an obhga* 
uon to convey the art to the next generation 
but cim only do so much to. popularize jL 
“Tne duty of the actor is not to cnUgbtcV' 
but to perform on the stage," he said. 

„ r ~;° “ m *6 prime or life, bat already js 
preparing a successor, his 7-year-okf son. 


® 1985 The Washington Past 



NOKJ t BUm r 
PONT urns 
YOUKSHOm 
UttnLAFIBt. 

■ THESPR/W- 

t£Ka mou. 


GRUNT! 












FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


"Using the Company Plane: 
Business or Ego Trip? 


by Roger Coffis 


^-'.rs 



P 





*=■ Wi, 


moo 

id 


•“‘Other SlKh 


EOPLE tend 10 have extreme views 
about corporate planes: They are 
seen either as costly toys for the 
chairman's ego trips or as indispens- 
able as computers in the race to improve 
~ productivity and competitive edge. 

Somewhere in between is the dialectical 
reality. Whether or not they are cost-effec- 
tive depends on what you want to achieve 
and how much value you put on manage- 
ment time. Modem corporate aircraft are 
fast, safe and comfortable. They offer busi- 
ness opportunities that are not possible with 
scheduled airlines. For example, bow else 
can you go to five African cities in as many 
: Jfla; ys except by corporate jet? But with 
.planes costing up to 56 million and charter 
costs ranging from $150 an hour for a Piper 
Aztec to more than 51000 an hour for a 
Learjet, it's important to pick the right plane 
for the right job. Of course, this depends on 
how far you want to go and bow many 
people you want to take along. With a foil 
load, cost per passenger often can be less 
than with commercial flights. 

But direct cost savings are only one con- 
sideration. For most companies, conve- 
nience and time-saving count much more. 
Commercial airlines serve only about 170 
out of the 2, (XX) airports in Western Europe 
that can accomodate private planes, al- 
^ough not always jets. So you can get much 
closer to your actual -destination and avoid 
major airport hubs in a private plane. For 
example, if you want to go to Eindhoven in 
the Netherlands, you can land there instead 
of flying to Schiphol and rubbing shoulders 
with its hordes of travelers. Corporate planes 
can often use military airfields like Melun, 
south of Paris (ideal if you are going to 


turboprop and fly full load, it can be cost 
effective. But I’m afraid that some of the 
time it isn’t. We used to have five of our own 
aircraft. They are very expensive toys." 

"Buying an aircraft is a complicated deri- 
sion. Very often it’s more of an act of faith,” 
says a London-based official of a major oil 
company that operates two corporate jets. 
“We depreciate the planes over 10 years to 
20 percent of the £5-imHion (about S6.35 
million) purchase price. Direct operating 
costs wont out at £550 an hour assuming 800 
flying hours a year." On this basis, a round 
trip from London to Brussels (total Dying 
time about an hour and 40 minutes) would 
cost £850. excluding landing fees of about 
£250. This compares with a return business- 
class ticket of £160. So six executives would 
need to travel in order to make the trip cost 
effective in purely cash terms. 

To charter a comparable jet for the same 
trip would cost £1,900 for a day return, 
including landing fees. A turboprop, like the 
Cessna Conquest, would take 40 minutes 


Expensive toys 
are sometimes 
efficient tools 


cverv. -ie h "el f,,r ^iciciu ii you guujg 10 

e coTv^-mli . c kppsi to Fontainebleau), or Northoli on the outskirts 


the coirm-w to riMJUlu,cracau /. or i>urmou on uic outsorts 

trj’L res' 'Vf* " * H ‘ l <£' of London. One of the new twin-engined 

. ’’ helicopters, like the Dauphin 2, can ferry you 

r .~-7. , from Battersea heliport in central London to 
rw , Chen MnJ- a heliport on the edge of Paris, cutting the 
nn = pracrar^jZ' time of a door-to-door trip to as low as an 


1 

• ••*- j . 


to hrinj Q • ^ lour “d * 5 minutes. What's more, you can 
' ' ‘ 1 hold a private conference with half a dozen 
?r her v*.vr. p . people cn route in leather-cushioned com- 
tail fort and rerun) home when you want to, free 

tfd ^ ‘-of schedules. 

- oeu pur iao : AlLhough corporate or business aircraft 

include anything from a pistm-engined 
Navajo to a customized Boeing 747, 
usually applied to a turboprop or 


» ib-.- icl Kduiffi uu iu ; 

*H.i the commuter-type pi 
•’ c ? 1 .. ifc . :niv ’ n - Bflfer 31, which can carry u 


.in. vT 
Vhcn 


jet sealing up to 10 people. Beyond tins are 
j>lanes,U 
n cany up to 18 


es, like the Jetstream 
passengers. The 

term “air taxi" is sometimes limited to i 



'.f rciL' 


be drwsgfofc. 


up to zoo miles an hour. Tms compares 
300 mph for the topical turboprop and more 
r.er t* -r :,p A . >cr v. ^ ' titan 50Q mpb for Leaflets, the sports cars of 

-j. business aviation. 

piiv-V Vr Reliable figures are not available, but It 

- , i’.-.- J Aum- has been estimated that the world's fleet of 

‘vTJ!’' C“ corporate aircraft is about 14,000;- at least 

%; 11.000 of these are in the United States 
L .(where, it is said, there are twice as many 
.n e> * -■“ ” '•2'-up. '-in aa - v .private jets as commercial airliners), perhaps 
c v. r.n it . .‘Tv. f&qoo in Western Europe, and afewhundred 

. • r-, :.v • i; operating in the Middle East, Asia and the 
‘ Far East, where the market is underdevel- 

oped, mainly because of political and bu- 
reaucratic restrictions. 

In Europe, most charter operators believe 
the market is set for growth. One indication 
of this is in Britain, where according to Larry 
Flowerdew, chief executive of the Air Trans- 
. ; V port Operators Association, the total nura- 
..... ber of hours flown increased from 92,000 in 
1978 to 137,660 in 1984. Holders of air 
operator licenses increased from 162 to 213 
over the same period. These .figures indude 
helicopters as well as fixed-wing aircraft. 
Flowerdew’s association claims to represent 
85 percent of U. K_ operators (65 companies 
owning a total of 350 aircraft). 

Flowerdew also observes a drift from 
company-owned planes to chartering, a view 
shared by Frank MacFarlane, chitt execu- 
~£ve of the European Business Aviation As- 
-wdation in Brussels. According to MacFar- 
lane, companies like Barclays Bank and 
.... Unilever have moved to chartering exdu- 
br sively. Others, like IBM, Philips and Shell 
v„. still operate their own aircraft. But whether 
for reasons of security or to avoid the gratu- 
\ itous scrutiny of unions and stockholders, 
£ few companies arc willing to talk about how 
: •„ and why they use business planes. 

£ “Please, please, don’t quote roe,” says the 
! travel manager of a state-owned corporation 
^M y , in Britain, “but if you pick a prop or a 




longer and cost £1.300. Most economical of 
all would be a seven-seat Piper Nava, 
which would take two and a half hours but 
cost only £700. So chartering can be as cosi- 
effective as a company-owned plane. 

It depends on corporate dispersion. For 
example, if a company’s main pattern of 
travel is between London and New York, a 
corporate plane doesn’t make a great deal of 
sense. But if it has locations in Nuremberg, 
Valencia and Lyon (which is the case for one 
toy company), a corporate turboprop would 
be a good investment if annual flying time 
exceeds about 600 hours. But few companies 
have a fleet that can meet all their needs. 
Many both own planes and charter them. 
Some even rent their planes out to other 
companies. 

The longer the trip the more economical a 
faster plane becomes. This is because the 
higher hourly cost is offset by a shorter 
journey time. It’s a matter or horses for 
courses. A small plane like the Navajo is a 
good choice for up to about 400 miles, from 
400 to 800 miles a turboprop makes sense, 
while for longer trips a Jet is ihe best value. 

According to Dominique Chewier, chief 
dispatcher of Executive Jet Aviation in Ge- 
neva, a Learjet 35 becomes cheaper than 3 
Kingair turboprop on flights that last more 
than 90 minutes. He contends that a Gene- 
va-London round trip for seven persons in a 
Learjet works out at the same cost per head 
as business-class tickets. 

Most operators charge on the basis of 
actual hours flown from the time the plane 
leaves home until its return, plus overnight 
expenses for the crew. McAlpine Aviation, 
the largest U. K. operator.charaes an extra 
£1.000 for every complete 24 Sours that a 
plane is laid over, but there is no pro rata 
charge for shorter stops. 

In Western Europe alone there are an 
estimated 700 charter Finns operating up to 
350 different types of fixed-wing aircraft and 
helicopters. It can pe a problem finding the 
plane you need at a suitable time and place. 

The Aircbarter Centre, a firm of air bro- 
kets based at Gatwick Airport in London, 
has come up with what it says is a unique 
solution: a computerized data bank that 
stores details of more than 3.500 charter 
operators throughout the world. It came on 
line two weeks ago and according 10 the 
managing director, Tony Mack, contains 
constantly updated information on aircraft 
availability, seating capacity, flight times 
and charges. “We can provide the right air- 
craft at the most competitive price wherever 
you want to go," Mack says. 

A new generation of corporate planes is 
lifting off the drawing boards. For example, 
turboprop aircraft with rear-facing “pusher" 
engines, like the A vtek 400, are claimed to be 
30 percent more fuel efficient and can fly at 
sublet speeds with a range of 2,000 miles. 

The day may not be far off when the 
business traveler will routinely avoid the 
hassles of major airports and commercial 
schedules. ■ 


MacMillan 


Continued from page 9 


closed world as the Nazis prepare their 
jdoom. 

Most of the MacMillan ballets created 
jitfe-v' since the late 1970s are unknown to the 
■c-vii Pf % American public partly because the Royal 
Ballet comes here less frequently and be- 


fees to his Mahler ballet, 
Earth,” and his ballet to thd Fi 


of the 
“Requi- 


■ v yi* 


iii: •. 1 3- cause his “sordid” experiments are not con- 
sidered good box office by American pro- 
; it- ducers. 

rf Once considered to be on the laconic side 

* by interviewers, MacMillan now proves 

r '. r .“ r :J : \ quite willing to talk about his works. “My 
Brother, My Sisters" (1978), for instance, 
S'-saP. was inspired by a book about the Brontes — 
"I,; ;ff-' Bramweli and his sisters, Anne, Charlotte 
and Emily, and their father. As children, the 





IpT- '-f ^ MacMillan says. So my ballet became a 
“• . ' ballet about a brother and all the sisters, 

:• - V," V " - 1 about their fantasies. I didn't want the pub- 
• ' - ; : lie to know It was the BrontSs.” 

-■ ^ . Nevertheless, MacMillan did transpose 

: "" ‘ ^me of his information to the stage. 4 ‘When 

* the Brontfi children did anything wrong, the 
father would put a cloth on the child’s head 
and face so that they would be uninhibited 
'and talk about what they’d done. That’s very 
Freudian. 1 used a mask in the ballet.” 
Speaking of sex, which some people say 
-MacMillan does too often in his ballets, the 
' . choreographer declares, “I don’t go out of 
: way to show the sexual side.” In his 

ballets about Isadora Duncan and the Haps- 
rj^burg Crown Prince Rudolf, for instance, 
s ¥ “this side is important to their lives, and tins 
% « also 1985." Certainly such ballets show 
% nothing 
r* . films, but, : 

-(ballet critics who go to plays 
^They’re encased in their Uttie ballet world. 

“I regret that a lot of critics think of me in 
I Verms of sexuality on the stage. . I have a 
yd - sacred’- side as well" Here, MacMillan re- 



1 1 


: v- 





In the last few years, MacMillan has di- 
rected stage plays — Strindberg’s "Dance of 
Death” with Edward Fox, “The Chairs” and 
“The Lesson" by Ionesco, and Tenessee Wil- 
liams’s “Kingdom of the Earth." 

Directing plays took his bias toward dra- 
ma in ballet to its logical conclusion and 
perhaps accounts for nis interest in doing 
something new. He has certainly used non- 
classical movement recently and he admits 
to being influenced by Martha Graham’s 
idiom, now that he has seen more Graham 
works. 

Yet he affirms, *Tm a classicist at heart," 
and stresses the following point with respect 
to his place in Ballet Theater. “Historically, I 
come from a great classical school. I think 
when Misha Baryshnikov became director 
here, tiie seeds were sown to create more of a 
classical company than it had been before — 
and 1 think he has succeeded.” 

One situation, is now shared by nearly all 
major ballet companies: “Every company is 
in a state of transition. And most are now 
mn by male ex-dancers." The fact that no 
women directors are at the hdm strikes Mac- 
Millan as Strangs’ than it would an Ameri- 
can. British balls bad two founding mothers 
— Ninette de Valois and Marie Rambert — 
and produced major company directors such 
as Beryl Grey, Afada Markova, Celia Franca 
and Mona Inglesby. “In my days with Dame 
Ninette, we all used to look to her as a 
mother. Every company leader takes on the 
mother or father role.” Yet this is hardly the 
way today’s dancers and audiences regard 
the new young directors. Most are intent on 
change and “all present directors are having 
great difficulties," MacMillan says. 

“The audiences expect every company io 
be as it was. Nobody likes manges. Itrs a 
very important point. ■ 

O ; fl&5 Th* New York TSmg ' 


ESTEHNATIONAL HF.ftAIJ> TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


TRAVEL 



Page 11 


North America’s Annual Road Show 



by Andrew H. Malcolm 


I T usually begins in the morning, anywhere from 45 to 60 
minutes bier than planned. Again and again, each family 
member shuttles between house and car. carrying suit- 
cases, satchels, piles of books, 'toys and maps. It is a scene 
to be repeated millions of times in the coming weeks as spring 
revives the land. For just as regularly and predictably as birds 
return north after winter’s chill, year after year, generation after 
generation, Americans take to the road. 

They go in search of newness, adventure and togetherness. 

I But car trips, tike some new toys, can wear out very quickly, 
what with fatigue, flat tires, exhausted radiators and seething 
sibling rivalries. Yet hope persists — or memories are short. 
And so Americans set out 10 wander the byways of North 
; America, with ritual stops every few hours at such roadside 
attractions as Dairy Creme, Dairy Delite, Dairy Freeze or 
Frosty’s. 

They enjoy a quintessential fact of American life: that the car 
is the liberator of the spirit. Going somewhere, anywhere, in 
some son of vehicle has been an integral part of American lore 
from the days of the prairie schooner. This urge hasn’t changed 
now just because the vehicle is a car, the fuel is gasoline instead 
of oats and the dashboard tabes back, with a Japanese accent It 
is the automobile, though smelly and costly at times, that 
regularly frees the multitude from the confines of the diy, the 
home and the genera] routine of life. 

In a complex, harried life, the car is one of the few things that 
gives the average American a feeling of being in complete 
control. Driving, he can shut out the outer world simply by 
rolling up the window. The automobile traveler is a king on a 
vinyl bucket-seat throne, changing direction with the mm of a 
wheel, changing the climate with a flick of the button, changing 
the music with the switch of a dial. 

More important, perhaps, vacationing Americans on an auto- 
mobile trip can experience again, for a few days or a few weeks, 
a sense of serendipity increasingly rare in our computerized 
world. It is not bad.’ on an ordered globe of precision and 
straight lines, sometimes to drift at whim, turning down this 
road or (hat for no particular reason, stopping here or there 
according to no schedule, just wandering. 

The car trip can draw the family together, as it was in the days 
before television. But the trip itself has changed in recent 
decades. As recently us 30 years ago, there were few Interstates 
and fewer toll roads. Although the glove compartment might 
have contained a roadside restaurant guide by Duncan Hines 
that seemed to list virtually every place in the country (including 
specialties and prices), many mothers still made picnic meals for 
traveling. In those days a car radio was not called an audio 
system, and one speaker seemed sufficient. 

M UCH, however, remains the same. There are the 
sounds: the wonderful whine of rubber tires against 
the pavement, the friendly honks of immense truckers 
in immense trucks responding to waving youngsters and, of 
course, the wind rushing by, bringing the scents of farms, fir 
forests and fresh thunderstorms somewhere nearby. The radio 
announcers discoursing authoritatively on the sale of grains and 

animnt parts. 

And there are the back-seal squabbles as brothers and sisters 
contend far space, comic books or pillows. An armistice can 
sometimes be negotiated by mediators in the front seat who 
threaten denial of motel swimming pool rights that evening. Or 
diversionary tactics can be attempted: “Look at that,” an adult 
can say, peering intensely through the windshield. Even blast, 
video-age kids can't rein in their curiosity enough not to look. 
And if it is something as ordinary’ as a 50-nullion-year-old. 
snow-capped mountain range, or a canyon continually carved 
by nature since way back, even before the Beatles were bom, 
well, it will earn a yawning, “Oh, yeah, 1 saw that on television." 
(If, on the other hand, (he scene is something truly spectacular, 
something like, say, an empty football stadium whose global 
significance was confirmed by being televised last New Year's 
Day, then the view will likely evoke, “Awesome!" — s high 
accolade this month.) 


There are familiar sights: Stockinged feet sticking out of a 
station wagon’s rear window. A long line of passenger cars 
dutifully cruising along, for now, at 54 miles an hour behind a 
state trooper's cor. A 46-foot-tolI neon cowboy, beckoning to 
passers-by, the urgent signs that order vacationers to “See 
Frontier Fort," “See Elvis* Car,” “See the Presidents in Wax," 
“See 15-Ton Log" and the more sedate “Food-Fnel-Lodging, E- 
Z Off-On." 

There develops, too, on these longer drives a sense of the 
freeway fraternity. That car with the rusty Indiana license 
plates, the one that was in the motel parking lot last night and at 
the restaurant at breakfast this morning, is passing again and is 
given a wave of friendly recognition. Something special has 
brought strangers together for one moment on the same stretch 
of highway. 

That something is a flight from the routine, a hum for 
something, new or a rediscovery of something old. h is a time 
free of chores and appointments and telephones. It is a chance 
to be absorbed in a landscape large enough to hold miles of 
mirages, beneath skies bigger than cities. And it is an opportuni- 
ty to lake note of such things, and then to share them with 
others. 


T HERE are other important discoveries to be made: 
Meeting people from other parts or the counliy, and 
savoring their cultural and linguistic differences. Visiting 
an array of East Coast historical shrines in segments connected 
by the same roads the Revolutionary Army may have used. Or, 
if you're a youngster, hanging your hand out a speeding car’s 
window’, and discovering, for yourself, the principle of aerody- 
namic lift 

I can recall driving through Nova Scotia one rainy day, and 
gaining a new appreciation for the elasticity of a young mind 
when, from the hack seat, my preschool son. Christopher, 
rattled off the alphabet — backward. That same afternoon, the 
sun re-emerged over the twisting, coastal Cabot TmL unveiling 
a wave-punctuated panorama of greens, blues, reds and browns. 
I’m not sure which scene I remember most — the Nova Scotia 
seaside, where the taD cliffs meet the shifting, moody surface of 
the North Atlantic, or Christopher’s mindscape. But the auto 
vacation made both possible. 


I can remember, too, discovering one day, from the back seat 
of a 1948 Plymouth, that my father had a previously unnoted 
passion for cherry Life Savers. Whenever a red Life Saver would 
come up in those rolls of candies, dispensed from my mother's 
purse, my father would ruthlessly snatch it. A very small thing, 
to be sure, but something that began to make that big godlike 
father more of a human being, thank goodness. 

There were other lessons learned, too. in the touring family 
car. Long vacation evenings spent in rural Michigan quietly 
cruising dirt roads “hunting" wildlife, especially the deeT 
bounding in and out of the lines of trees. The point those nights 
seemed to me to be racking up the largest number of confirmed 
sightings. “Oh. there’s another one over there! That’s 42 for 
me." Bui I know now there was a larger lesson being ta ug ht, as l 
began to realize that 1 was just one of many kinds of creatures 
sharing this landscape. 

T was alone in a car the first time I encountered, by accident, 
the road through Beartooth Pass, on the Wyoming-Montana 
border, quite possibly North America's most spectacular drive. 
I have returned many times since, with my famil y, to that 
northeast entrance of Yellowstone Park. And each time we rise 
through the layers of cooler air along switchback after switch- 
back to the 10.940-foot summit's alpine meadows (where snow 
still stands in August), I see new things, there and in myself. 

Oh, yes, there is often a drowsy ennui that seeps into the 
vehicle during droning drives on well-known roads on the way 
home. But more often there are some delicious moments of 
discoveiy, such as the time near Guernsey, Wyo^ when the car’s 
headlights flashed across a little sign for the Oregon TraiL 

It had never occurred to me that anything of the famous 
pioneer route survived The official slate road map carried no 
mention of anything special at Guernsey. But we followed the 
sign, driving a mile south of town across the North Platte River 
to a cliff with century-old grafiiti. On a nearby knoll, by the 
beam of our flashlight, we came upon the tracks of past 
American travelers. There, in a narrow passage between two 
boulders, thousands of slow-moving, metal-nmmed wooden 
wheels bad worn deep ruts in the stone. The tracks remain for all 
to see how fragile were the wheels, how small were the wagons, 
how big was their idea. 

The experience was, well, awesome. ■ 

© 1985 The New York Tima 


Following are four favorite routes in differ- 
ent parts of the continent described by corre- 
spondents of The New York Times. 


Vermont 

The soul of New England may plausibly 
be said to lie in the southeast corner of 
Vermont, amid the winding roads that snake 
through fores 15 of pine and birch, never far 
from a burbling stream. 

Sail past the big, bustling interstate high- 
ways and enter Vermont instead by a quieter 
path, climbing up Route 1 12 from western 
Massachusetts. The route runs along an ele- 
vated ridge, through apple orchards and 
clumps of maple trees, across narrow 
bridges, past farms where outcroppings of 
rock jut from the diy fields, 

When the road enters Jacksonville, pause 
to visit the general store, then head off on 
Route 100, through the scenic Deerfield Val- 
ley, to a little town known as Wilmington. 
One of the attractions here is the Coombs 
Sugar House, where you can watch maple 
sap boiled down to pure maple syrup in big 
metal tanks. 

Then, as part of a big loop around Lake 
Whitingham and the Harrunan Reservoir, 
take Route 9 west out of Wilmington to 
Searsburg. 

Follow Route 8 as it veers south from 
Searsburg: a winding road creeping through 
dense forest, which opens occasionally upon 
a breathtaking panorama of south Vermont, 
Follow the signs for Readsboro and Whi- 
tingham, past Sadawga Pond Roadside 
streams rush by, creating little waterfalls, the 
only sound audible among the trees, the 
white clapboard houses and the weather- 


beaten red bams. The road descends steeply 
and suddenly bask to Jacksonville. 

From there, retrace the path north along 
Route 100, but this time turn right at Wil- 
mington and head east on Route 9, past the 
Hogback Mountain ski area, until a sign 
points the way to South Newfane. A well- 
traveled but unpaved dirt road runs north, 
under a canopy of trees, to a covered bridge, 
which leads to South Newfane. Newfane 
itself, the well-tended model of a New En- 
gland town, is just a short drive away. 

Robert Pear 


South Carolina 

Along the Atlantic coast, between the cit- 
ies of Savannah and Charleston, ties South 
Carolina's Low Counliy. It is a flat land- 
scape of black water and marsh grass, one of 
the last major unpolluted marine estuaries 
on the East Coast. 

Seen from the narrow two-lane highways 
that meander beneath canopies of moss- 
draped oak, it is a serene and graceful place; 
a long, low horizon broken only by the flight 
of herons. Here are small towns and poor 
houses and roadside stands selling fresh 
crab. Along the coastal islands that divide 
the marsh from the sea, there are black 
communities that date from the time of the 
Civil War. when freed slaves came to make 
their living here by fanning and hunting and 
oystering. 

The area is now changing. Vast real estate 
developments have begun to eat into the old 
coastal plantations, but there still is much to 
be savored. 


Stan at Hilton Head Island, 30 miles 
northeast of Savannah. There, in Harbour 
Town, near the island’s southern extreme, 
leave the car and take the three-hour boat 
trip and tour of nearby Daufuslde Island, 
where automobiles are not permitted and the 
residents still speak with a trace of the Gul- 
iah accent of their forebears. 

Back in the car, head north, past the 
crowded resort hotels and condominiums of 
Hilton Head and on to the mainland, follow- 
ing VS. 278 through the tidal marshes for 22 
miles to state road 170, and then bear north- 
easi, across Port Royal Sound, past the en- 
trance to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot at 
Parris Island, and on to Beaufort. This small 
port city, pronounced Bew-fort and founded 
in the early ISth century, is one of the little 
known jewels of the Southeast coast. 

Drive slowly along Bay Street, past the 
antebellum homes, and visit the John Mark 
Verdier House, where the Marquis de La- 
fayette was entertained in 1825. 

W3UamE.Sdurddt 


Michigan 

1-94 between Detroit and Chicago is 275 
miles of monotonous, heavily traveled high- 
way, but travelers can break that monotony 
with two detours into the past. 

Starting westward from Detroit, a visitor 
could spend at least part of a day at Green- 
field Village, in nearby Dearborn. The 254- 
acre complex is Henry Ford’s attempt to re- 
create some of the events and places that 
were pivotal in the transformation of the 
United States into an industrial power; the 



In Monument Valley, on the Arizona-Utah border : 


Wright Brothers bicycle shop, for example, 
and one of Thomas Edison’s laboratories. 
The village is open from daily except holi- 
days, from 9 to 5; admission is $8, $4 for 
children. 

Marshall Michigan, is about halfway be- 
tween the two big does, and is a good place 
to break the journey. If the rows of ginger- 
bread-bedecked Victorian houses that line 
the streets seem rather grand for this little 
community of 7,000. it is because the early 
settlers thought that Marshall would become 
the state capital and built accordingly. Polit- 
ical power went elsewhere, but the gracious 
Style r emains . 

For overnight accommodations, the Na- 
tional House Inn is conveniently situated 
just off the town square. It was built in 1835 
to be an overnight stop on the stagecoach 
route between Detroit, then a small fur trad- 
ing post, and Chicago. It was restored in 
1976. and is the oldest operating inn in the 
state and possibly the region, with 16 rooms 
and suites priced at S44 to S73 a night, 
■including breakfast. 

Thirsty travelers have been known to stop 
off at the Copper Bar on Michigan Avenue, 
Marshall’s mam street. Light and dark beers 
are served by the pint in Mason jars, and 
peanuts come straight from an antique cof- 
fee roaster. Just toss the shells on the floor. 

JohnHolusha 


Mexico 


Visitors to Mexico who spend their time 
only in the bus ding, smog-laden capital or at 
one of the many beach resorts can come 
away thinking of the country as a cross 
between Los Angeles and Miami. A quick 
drive south from the capital, at least as far as 
Cuernavaca, can help correct that mistake. 

Leave Mexico City by the Cuernavaca toll 
road, heading south’to climb along the sides 
of (me of the many mountains that surround 
the capital. About 15 minutes along the way, 
look back for an overview of Mexico City’s 
ever-growing sprawl; farther on, you will see 
the two majestic volcanoes, Ixtoohuatl and 
Popocatepetl 

Those lucky enough to pass this way dur- 
ing harvest season can see hay being scythed, 
slacked and baled in ways left behind "in the 
United States long ago. Miradores — over- 
looks — oFfer vistas of the unspoiled valleys. 
Here are the vendors of delicious quesadil- 
las, filled tortillas fried in hot oil, known to 
be consumed even by those of us in the 
business of idling tourists what not to eat. 

Just after the huge switchback known as 
La Pera, you can turn off for a side trip to 
Tepoztlan, a charming, lazy market town 
with a 16th-century Dominican monastery 
and church off its main plaza. The physically 
fit can make the two-hour climb to the the 
Cerro of Tepozteco. some 2,000 feet above 
the town, to see the pyramid there and gain 
an extraordinary view of the entire region. 

Cuernavaca itself, 14 miles from Tepozt- 
lan , is becoming a miniature Mexico City. 
But many Mexico City residents make the 
trip just to while away the afternoon sipping 
drinks surrounded by Zuniga sculptures, 
peacocks and pretty people on the lawn of 
Las Mananitas, at Ricardo Linares 107. The 
former palace of Cortds, now a museum just 
off the mam plaza, is worth a visit, particu- 
larly for its heroic Diego Rivera murals. ■ 

Richard J.Meislm 





Page 12 


tntrhnaTIONA^ HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 



Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bands 

UflllNas 

industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 127183 1285.ro 1272-53 12S4.7B + 129 

Trans 585X7 595.99 582X0 592B9 + 6X4 

Ulll 155.11 15583 154.06 15485— 0X1 

Como 514J6 52088 512.16 51783 + 282 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 
New Highs 
New Laws 


m 711 

M>9 764 

475 4« 

1986 1993 

140 137 

10 13 


NYSE Index 



High 

LOW 

Composite 

105X0 

105X0 

Industrials 

120X8 

120X1 

Transs. 

9&29 

95X5 

Utilities 

56X7 

56X3 

Finance 

111.74 

111X9 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Buy Sales *5bTt 

April 24 171912 425J33 7.997 

Aprils 229200 446,854 7J04 

April 22 200x54 44106 6.950 

Aprlll 9 184269 401094 7.922 

April 18 200X16 451283 14X92 

'Included In the sales figures 


Thursday s 

MSI 

Closing 


VOL or 4 PM 108X30800 

Prev.4PXA.vol 99X00X00 

Prev consolidated dose 119X60X50 


Tables include l fie nationwide prices 
up to Hie closing on Wail Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 



dan 

Prev. 

Advanced 

30 

253 

Declined 

341 

268 

Unchanged 

241 

257 

Total issues 

772 

778 

New Hlgtts 

76 

26 

New Lows 

10 

6 


Standard & Poor's Index 



Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

utilities 

Banks 

Tramp. 


Noon Ago Ago 

283-22 293X3 74190 

— 329 - 02 

= SgSSiS 

_ 2S2J0 215X* 




4 PM. volume 

Prev. 4 PJM. volume 
Prev. com. volume 


ameX Most Actives 


High Law last On 


BAT 
InstSv 
WongB 
GlfCd O 

T,E „ 

BergBr 

Ovniet 

DotoPd 

Matrix s 

□on»P 

NPrae 

Husky & 

Teiespn 

Unlmrn 

ToMPl 9 


41V 4h 
2 1^ 
17% 16ft 
14ft 14ft 
5ft 5ft 
27ft 36ft 
14ft 13ft 
12ft tZtt 
24 U. 22ft 
2*. 2ft 
18ft 18% 
8ft Bft 
4ft 3ft 
10ft 10ft 
12ft 12ft 


4ft — ft 
1ft 

17ft + ft 
U% + ft 
5ft 

26ft +1 
13ft —1ft 
12ft + ft 
22ft —1ft 
2ft 

1B% —1ft 
8ft + ft 
4 4- ft 

I9ft + ft 
12ft + ft 


amex Stock Index 


Prevents ] 

High low Ctaso 

>59-50 228.96 B9.19 


12 Mot 
W an 

ith 

an s»c*. 

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won 

Lew 

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7 

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13'« 







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24 

5911122 

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aw 

20ft— W 





9 

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14*S AVX 

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1X0 

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50% 

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1.9 

18 

16 

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23 + V* 

22 

12 1 : AemeC 

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2X 


83 

15 

14ft 



Shares Gain in Active Trading 


10'-; 8ft AcmeE X2b 3X 11 
17ft 15 AdaEs 211e)26 
20 lift AdmMl -32 2.1 6 

19ft 8ft AdvSvs 531 5J 15 

41ft 25’* AMO 13 

12ft *’» Advesl .12 IX 

14ft 8ft Aerflflx II 


Llle)2X 49 16ft 16ft 16% + ft 

£ 11 1 33 15ft 15ft 15ft + VS 

XJt SJ 15 489 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

13 2711 29ft 28ft 29ft + ft 

.12 IX 118 9ft 8ft 8ft— ft 

II 51 12ft 12ft 12ft 


42ft 27ft AelnLI 244 62 41 7910 43 42W 42ft 

3*4 52ft AetLpf 5JDO10J 2205 55ft 55ft 55ft 

35 15ft Attains 120 IS 14 242 14 ft 33ft 34ft 


4ft J< 3 A i Iren 


51 33ft AlrPrd 120 25 11 424 49 

24ft 1J AirbFrt 40 14 !0 348 18 

2 1 AINVoas 23 22 V 


2ft 2ft 2ft 


3 1 AIMoa s 23 

Vi 21 Ala Pol 2.94c 10.0 
32 26ft AlaPolA 192 123 
7ft 6 AtoPdol X7 11X 
71ft 61’-: AklPof 9.00 123 
109ft 85ft AlaPpf 11X0 !07 
68': 57 AlaPpf 8.16 12.1 
68 56 AioP Of 828 115 

13ft 11 AlooSCS 1X4 7 X 8 
aft 9V. AlakAir .14 x 9 
?7ft I Oft Albrtes .39 23 19 
lift 29ft Aibtsna .76 2X 13 
31ft 23ft Alcon 1-2) &2> II 
36ft 27ft AlcoStd 1J0 16 11 

32 17 AlexAlx 1X0 3X 

26ft 20** Afexdr If 

67 V 6? AllgCp 2X6r 17 30 

lift 23 AloCppI 186 109 
23ft 18ft Alglnt 1X0 5X 
22'* lift AlOln pf 119 11.1 

31 ft 94ft AligPw 170 15 « 
91V* 15ft AlienG XOb 3.1 14 
45 28ft AlldCps 1X0 3.9 9 
64ft 53ft AldCppf 6JA 10-3 
112ft 99 AWCpefll-OO IftS 
107ft 100ft AldC of 1239811.9 
23ft 12 AlldPd 

59ft 33 AlfdSIr 112 3X 1 

12ft s’* Aiihcn 
14% 24 AHsC Of 

ZTft 20 ALLTL 1X4 6.9 9 

25ft 20ft AlpMPr XOa 35 13 

39ft 30ft Alcoa 1JD 17 16 

25t< 15'-: Amaji JO 1.1 

42 ft 32ft Amm of 3X0 87 
33": 22ft AmHeS 1.10 35 16 

2ft 1ft AmAur 
19VH IS'. a ABokT 8 

70 53 ABrond 190 SJ 9 

70ft 53 A Bed pf 2X7 19 

115 55ft ABdCSt 1X0 15 16 

36'* 19' : ABIdM X6 3X 13 

27ft 20 ABusPr X4 25 15 

S5ft 40ft AmCon 7M 55 11 

24** 21ft ACon pf 2X0 11.7 
49 36 AConof 3X0 6X 

110 193 ACan at 1175 117 

19ft I t>ft ACapBd 120 11X 
33ft 25ft ACapCv 2510 9X 
11 6ft ACentC 12 

56'* 43ft ACvan 1.90 15 13 
29% 18ft AOT .92 18 27 
21ft IS'/a AElPw 126O105 8 

44ft 25 AmExp 1.28 19 15 

30 14ft AFamil 44b 22 13 

32ft 19ft AGnCp 1X0 10 10 
12ft 6 AGnlwt 
57 Sift AGnlpfA628ellX 
V i 58ft AGnl pfB5.90e 6X 
691: 44ft AGn |pf 325 45 
64ft 40ft AGn DfD 164 4X 
13ft 7ft AHolSt 
62": 46ft A Home 190 4J 13 

38 26ft A Hasp 1.12 17 10 

86ft 62ft Amrtdi 6X0 75 8 

79 52 AlnGra M X 20 

131W 112ft Al Gp pf 5X5 4X 
2flft 18ft AMI .72 10 12 
5*. 3V* AmMot 
65ft 27% ANIRss 122 14 12 

43’ * 25 APrasid 74t 2x 4 

13ft Sft ASLFIa 4 

18' : 12'* ASLFI Pf 119 1X1 

16 10ft AShlP XO 65 13 

354* 22ft AmSId 1X0 55 11 

56ft 26ft AmStor X4 12 9 

66ft 46'. AStr pfA 4X8 6.9 

56ft 51 ASIrofB 6X0 11X 

22ft 14ft AT&T 120 5A 16 

38ft 30ft AT&T 01 164 9A 

39". 31ft AT&T pi 3.74 97 

27ft 13ft AWalrs 1X0 17 9 

12ft 10 AWd5of 125 102 

28ft 19ft AmHoll 2X0 9.9 I 

68ft 53ft ATrPr 5X4 82 

lift 4ft ATrSc 

79'. * 58ft ATrUn 5X4 7.1 

33 26ft Ameren 140 U 7 

43 17ft AmesO s JO 5 21 

1121* 60 Ames Pi 522 A9 

29ft 2m Ametek XO 32 13 

28Vi 18ft Amfac 

16 8ft Amfesc 4 

63ft 50'* Amoco 130 5.1 9 

38ft 26ft AMPS .72 2J 17 


11 424 49 48ft 487* - 

10 348 18 17ft 17ft- 

23 22 1ft 1ft lft- 

5 27 27 27 ■ 

16 32 31ft 31ft- 
57 7ft 7ft 7ft 

50; 73 73 73 

100:1021* 102ft lKft 
l60z 67ft 67ft 67ft ■ 
130- 66ft 66ft 66ft - 

8 87 14 13ft M - 

9 693 21% 21ft 21% ■ 

19 21 16ft 16% 16ft- 

13 45 31ft 31ft 30ft- 

12 3024 25ft 24ft 25ft ■ 

11 92 33ft 33ft 33ft ■ 

6812 30 28 29 - 

18 2 S 72'u 21 ft 217* - 

30 51 77 76ft 77 ■ 

2 26ft 28ft 26ft 

194 25ft 25 25 - 

1 in* 19% 19% 

9 255 31ft 31ft 31ft 

14 51 19ft 19ft 19ft - 
9 7045 45% 44% 45ft 

220 65ft 64ft 65% - 
38 l!3ft 113ft 113ft - 
525 103ft 103% 1037* - 
8 22 21 % 21 % - 
1 806 56ft 55ft 56 - 
174 6ft 6% 6ft - 

128 29% 29ft 29ft 

9 72 27 26ft 26ft- 

13 6 23 23 23 ■ 

16 1991 32% 32ft 32ft - 

1329 17% 17ft 17ft ■ 

3 34ft 34 34ft- 

1611828 31% 29% 31% - 

95 2ft 2 2ft - 

8 If® 18 17ft IB 

9 340 67ft 67 67% ■ 

6 68 68 68 

16 2276 108ft 107% 108ft - 


13 70 25% 25ft 25ft 

15 ISO 36% 26 26 - 

11 1B4 53ft 53ft 53ft 

9 23ft 23% 23ft 
2D 46ft 46ft 46ft 
2 108 108 108 • 
35 19ft 187* 19 - 
26 28 27% 27% - 

12 22 8% 8ft 8% 

13 1014 53ft 53ft 53ft 

27 326 24ft 24% 24ft 

fi 3498 21% 21ft 21ft- 
15 7870 44ft 43% 44% 
13 117 29 28% 29 

10 3467 33% 32% 33% 
607 13% 12ft 13% 

SS KSS*: 

104 71ft 70 71ft 

!* 4 5ft “9ft X. 

61% 61% - 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — - Prices were higher at the 
close of the New York Stock Exchange Thurs- 
day in active trading. 

The Dow Jones indus trial average, which fell 
0.22 Wednesday, was up 6.19 to 1284.67. Ad- 
vances led declines by a 3-2 margin. Volume 
amounted to about 107.1 million shares, com- 
pared with 99.6 million in the same period 
Wednesday. 

The market's performance Thursday was 
"relatively good.” said George Pirrone, of Drey- 
fus Corp. 

"We're upward bound.” he said, looking for 
the market to approach the 1,300 level in the 
□ext week or so. 

Trading in the prior session was not a total 
washout, he noted since the Dow was able to 
come back from its lows to close with only a 
small loss. 

“The market still looks very good. We’ve 
been in this mild ’up* trend for most of about 
two weeks.” said Rjcky Harrington, of Inter- 
state Securities, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

“I think eventually well test 1,300,** he said, 
noting that there “was nothing really on the 
downside." 

The one thing that could really set this thing 
on fire would be lower interest rates," he said. 

"With rates coming down like this, stock 
prices are going higher in the long run." said 
Kevin Keeney, of Southwest Securities. Dallas. 

He noted strengths in international oils, sav- 
ings & loans and some defensive issues. 

Unocal was near the top of the actives, and 
lower, amid its takeover struggle with Mesa 
Petroleum's T. Boone Pickens Jr. 

Petroleum issues were generally higher, after 


To Our Readers 

lfowiK* of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris until April 27, 
sane items in the Market Summary above are 
from 3 P.M. New York time instead of the usual 
4 P.M. Also because of the time difference. 


several brokerage houses upgraded their opin- 
ion. Atlantic Richfield, Exxon and Texaco were 
among the gainers. Coca-Cola was lower in 
active trading. 

Gannett, which jumped Wednesday on the 
rumor that CBS may acquire it, was up a bit. 
CBS was fractionally higher. Times Mirror 
Corp. was lower after reporting first-quarter net 
of 64 cents a share compared to 63 cents a share 
in the year-ago quarter. 

G.D. Searle Buys Shares 

The Associated Press 

SKOKIE, Illinois — G-D. Searle & Co. said 
Thursday that it has bought for S388.1 million 
15 million shares of common stock from trusts 
established by the Searle family. 

The purchase, for S51.75 a share based on 
Wednesday’s closing on the New York Stock 
Exchange.'romes four weeks after the board of 
directors abandoned plans to sell off the com- 
pany either in whole or in parts. 

Searle said it would pay for the stock with 
$250 million in 60-day notes and the balance in 
five-year subordinated notes. 

After selling the stock, various Searle family 
trusts will hold 21.39 percent of the corpora- 
tion's 41. 8 million outstanding shares, down 
from 33J35 percent prior to the transaction. 

The shares were sold from trusts established j 
by the Searle family, but none was from trusts j 
held directly by the Searle family, a spokesman 1 
said. The corporation also received a four-year I 
right of first refusal for the remaining shares j 
held in Searle family trusts. I 


13 9ft 
13 2471 62% 

10 2684 30% 

8 942 86% 

20 1514 79% 

14 133ft 1 

12 1311 24 23% 24 

1640 3ft 3 3 

'l 677 31ft 
4 92 5ft 5% 5V* 

123 13% 13% 13% 

13 151 12% 12 12% 

11 633 29 28ft 29 

9 1154 52% 52ft 52% 

12* 63ft 63 63ft 

16 7657* 21ft 21% 21% 
38 


8 183* 20% 20ft 20% 

9 68ft 68ft 68ft 

7 iiTirf 

21 1210 J?% JffftJjVi- 


24 12ft Amoco JO 2X 
21% 12% Amreos 
28 ft 19 AmSItl 1X0 5.1 
40% 25% Amstcd 1X0 19 
4% 1% Anocmo 

24ft 15% Antog 5 
30% 19>* Anchor 1X8 6X 
42% 24ft AnClav 1J2 15 
22': 16% Angelic -56 17 
82 58' « Anheus 2X0 2X 

58% 45% Anhau pf 160 6.1 
20V. 13ft Ani«tr SB 11 
16% 8% Anthem .84 j 
1«% 9% Apache J8 2J 
2ft ft AoehP wl 
17% if* AechP urfLiO 10X 
67 55ft ApPwpf 8.12 122 
61'* 50 ApPwpf 7XO 113 
32ft 27''* APPwpi 4.18 119 
39ft 17% ApiDIa 1.121 13 
211* 8 ApolMg 

21% 15% ArchOn .14b J 
24ft lift ArizPS 172 11X 
3D 23 ArIP pf 158 11.9 
102 79 ArIPpI 10.70 10X 

23% 13% ArkBsl XO 11 
241*. 16 Arkla 1X8 5X 
■ft ArlnRI 
19% *% Armco 

29ft 15ft Armcpf 110 11.7 
24ft 15ft ArmsRb .48 16 
38 22% Arrnwin 1J0 3X 

34' J 19 AroCp 1X0 4X 
26ft 13'.. ArowE 20 IX 
26% 16 Artra 22 .9 

73% 14 Arvlns X0 4.1 
Sift 34% Arvln of 2X0 4 J 
31% 17% Asarco 
31% 20% AshlOll 1x0 5X 

40 31ft AahlOpI 196 9.9 

A? 451, ASdDG 2X0 A! 
98 73 AsdDpf 4.75 4X 

25ft 18% Attilane 1X0 7X 
77ft I6Ti AfCvEI 2X8 9.1 
52ft 40% All Rich 3X0 5X 

347% 7B4 Art Pc Pi 3XO B 
38 32ft AIIRCPI 175 10.4 
125 97 AURcPl 2XD 2J 

20 lift AflosCp 
33% 18% Airaol X0 IX 
46'. 30 AutaDt X3 IX 
5 4% Avalon n 

37ft 15% AVEMC X0 23 
39% 23 A«erv X0 IX 
15% 10 Avion n 

41 27 Avne! 50 1.7 
25% 19'.* Avon 2X0 9J 
30% 18 Avdin 


18% Balrncs XO IX 
IS Bkrlnn .92 5.1 
18% Baldor 36 IX 
% vIBaUU 
2 BldU pi 
29% BollCP 1X8 2X 
111, BallvMI JO 1J 
73s BallvPk 

30% BallGE 120 7X 
36ft BallplB 4X0 10X 
71 BncOrve 1.10 17 
B% BncCrrn J2e 5X 
3ft BanTe* 

39ft Bandog 1 JO 11 
29 BkEkw, 2X0 5X 
43 BkBoSPfS.lSe 9X 
49 BkNE dafiXBelOX 
JAft BkNY 204 4X 
15% Bnkvas 1X0 17 
14V: BnkAm 1X2 73 
40 BKAmPl 5.19*1 IX 
66 BkAm pi BJSellX 
lift BVAm pf 2X8 
23% BkARty 240 7 X 
37% BanhTi* 270 4X 
19'* BkTrpf 2XO 1&1 
9ft Banner .03e J 
19 Bord X4 IX 
IS SwnGp X0 3X 
13ft Barnat 136 2X 
19ft BorvWr X0 2X 
8% BAS1X ,12b IX 
17V: BaiKCh 78 23 
11% BaxtTr 37 2X 
17% So v Fin JO .9 
20% BavSrG 2X0 BX 
39% Bearing 1X0 2.9 
74ft BialCa 1X0 5X 
46>* Beal pi 138 5.9 
10% BectnD 1J0 2X 
4% Belter 

9% Befcer Pf 1.70 16 J 
13ft BeldnH XO 7.6 
23 BelHwl X6 1.9 
22 BelHv.Pt *7 23 

66'': BbIIAII 6X0 73 
22% BCE S 128 
19% Behind J2 IX 
77ft BellSau 7X0 74 
38% BelaAH 80 lx 
20% Bemli 100 3X 
!1 BenfCp 100 5X 
30". Beiwl Pi 430 111 
17 Banel pf 2X0 11.9 
3ft BengtB X71 
7ft BergEn 
3ft Beritoy 
10% Best Pd 2A IX 
14ft BcthStl .40 23 
37ft BelflSiplSXO 12X 
16% BetnSi cl 2X0 12X 
21ft Beverly 32 .9 

19*6 Bio Thr XO 16 
13’ i fliodin 
m Bloc kO X4 10 
21 BlckHP 192 63 
lift Bfan-jn J4 2X 
37 BIcIcHR 140 4X 
37 Boeing 1x0 23 
32ft BumC 190 4X 
46 BOIWC Pt5 DO 93 
15% BollBar ID X 
52 Barden 104 4J 


9 4896 64% 

17 1603 32 

16 147 12% ..™ .... 

8 44 17ft 17 17% ■ 

B 6 27% 27% 27% - 

14 1309 41% 40% 41 ■ 

306 3% 3% 

18 597 20% 19% 20ft - 

337 23ft 22% 22% 

19 34 37ft 36% 3716 ■ 

12 34 21 20% 21 

11 1378 83% 82ft 83% 

2i3 59% 58% 59ft ■ 

16 207 14 13% 13% - 

15 77 14% 14% 14% 

12 376 13% 12% 12% - 

261 1 % 1 % 116 

433 19% 19V* 19% 

110*67 66 % 66 % - 

30i«0 60 60 - 

1 32% 32% 32% ■ 

IS 73 34 32% 34. - 

IBS 13% 13 13 

14 1982 21% 21 21 

7 1234 24% 24% 24% - 

63 30 2914 30 ■ 

2170:181% 101 101 ■ 

7 74 19% 19% 17% - 

17 5035 2216 21% 2114- 

VO ft Vi ■ 

1138 8 714 7% 

60 IB 17% 18 ■ 

7 523 19% 18% 18% - 

9 1820 33% 33 33% 

7 22 36% 26 26ft 

7 IS 14% 14% 14% 

45 25% 25 25% 

7 1237 19% 19 % 1 f% 

4 46ft 46ft 46ft 

265 24% 24% 24% - 

502 31% 31% 31% 

, 43 39% 39% 39% 

10 1122 63 61% 62% 

„ 22 100 99 99% 

9 10 20ft 20ft 20% - 

J ,2 S 27% 27% 271* 
25 38224 54% 51% 53% • 

2 356% 356% 356% 

402 37 36 36 - 

21 127ft 124 127% ■ 

11 13% 13ft 13% 

19 389 22% 22% 22% 

18 403 43 42% 42% 

7 4% 4% 4% 

13 43 26% 25% 26% 

14 153 33% 33% 33% ■ 

B ID 14% 14% 14% - 

13 2207 30% 29ft 29% - 

10 4381 21% 20% 21 - 

10 43 20ft 20 20ft 


12 Month 
High Low fact 


24% 16% 
8 % 4ft 
39ft 25% 
77 63 

10% 9 

12% 10% 
25% 14% 
31% 25% 
58ft 43 
4% 3ft 
30 31% 

18ft 9ft 
5ft 2% 
22 15% 

39 28 

32% 29 
26% 13 
30 22 ft 
45ft 26ft 
40% 23% 
40% 27% 
16 12 
18% 15% 
21% 14ft 
29% 23 
58% 35 
7% Aft 
22% 19 
51% 44% 
18% 12 % 
65% 48% 
20% 12% 
11% 2% 
15 6 ft 


5ft dole 

Dtv. Yld. PE 10 % Kbh Law QuoLOiVe 


124 SJ 1 
8X8 11X 
1.17 114 
1X6 11 J 
.72 32 t 
1X1 57 I 
1X8 13 16 
28 

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JO IX 9 
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1X0 10 7 

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2.16 12 J 

1X4 64 71 
1X0 17 7 
-58 73 
112 9.7 
SJ6eia9 
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2X0 4J 11 
X2 2X617 


3496 21% 
12 7% 

281 39 
50z 76% 
22 10 % 
5 12% 
1144 22% 
213 28ft 
2690 57% 

1 4% 
7432 27ft 

631 17ft 
765 2% 
613 22 
76 38ft 
70 32% 
27 20 
349 27 
104 44% 
1470 34% 
1728 33ft 
406 14 
22 18% 
44 18% 
81 25% 
2387 51% 

2 7% 
2 23 

205 51% 
48 14% 
662 61% 
565 18ft 
107 3ft 
99 9 


21 % 21 % — 
■7% 7% + 
38% 38% + 
76% 76% + 
10% 10ft 
12 % 12 % + 
22ft 22ft + 
27% 27% - 
57% 57% + 
4ft 4% 

26ft 27 + % 

17% 17% — ft 
2 % 2 % 

21 % 21 % 

38 38% 

32% 32% 

19% 19% 

26% 26ft 
44 44 — % 

37% 33% —lft 
33 33 - % 

13% 13% — % 
17% 17% — % 
18% 18% + V* 
25ft 25% + % 
51ft 51% 

7% 7% + % 
22 22 
SI 51 — % 
14% 14% 

41 61 — ft 

17% 18ft + % 
3% 3% + % 
8 % 8 % + % 


28 7? II 

12 48 31ft 

17 2661 1S% 

15 19 22% 

>15 7% 
1 6% 

13 M 52ft 

. 704x 15% 

11 40 11 

8 931 42% 
_ lOQz 42% 

10 113 29% 

8 TO 9% 
115 3ft 

12 104 57% 

5 216 47% 

$ 

7 349 42ft 

9 43 27% 

11 6469 21% 

41 47 
111 73% 
90 16% 
11 09 31% 

7 191 67 

5 24% 
17 7 10% 

13 246 30% 

9 20 209* 

I 554 52% 

15 .88 21% 

II 184 12ft 

16 406 27% 

65 6539 15% 
41 9? 22% 

9 52 32% 

H I 34ft 

6 3318 31% 

5 57ft 

14 910 49% 

67 5ft 

9 10ft 
9 165 15% 

10 401 29% 

23 29% 

9 734 B7ft 

.. 'S 

11 10 20ft 

8 2521 37% 

21 419 si 

10 19 28ft 

10 1365 40% 

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22 289 $% 

14 12 23% 

32 157 £% 

27 765 13% 
608 17ft 

13 41% 

1* 251 34 
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12 1116 21% 

9 ft 31 

16 88 21ft 

13 210 49ft 
.8 4212 6Jft 

17 149 4tft 
12 34'4 

28 113 26% 
9 1423 69 


10% + ft 
31ft + % 
18 
22% 

1% 

6ft 

52ft +lft 
15ft + ft 
10ft— ft 
42ft 
42ft 

294* + ft 
9% — ft 
3% 

57% + V* 
47ft— ft 
57ft + % 
54% + % 
42ft + V* 
27% + ft 
20% + ft 
47 + % 

73% — ft 
16 % 

31ft 

67 + ft 

34% 

10% 

30Vj +- ft 
20% 

52% +lft 
21% — ft 
11 %— % 
27% 

15ft— ft 
22ft + ft 
32ft— ft 
34ft — ft 
31 — ft 

57ft — % 
47% + ft 
5ft— ft 
lOW 

15% + ft 

2% 

29 V* + ft 
87ft + % 
29% + % 
20% 

37% 

. 40U, +1% 

35ft + ft 

5% 

23% 

6 

13% + % 
17ft 

41ft- ft 
20ft ft 
33% — >4 
22 

17ft— ft 

31ft 

30%— ft 
21ft- 'A 
49% — ft 
63ft + % 
40% — V* 
54ft 

26ft— % 
68ft— % 


33% 24ft CBI In IXOo 5X 

1122 68% CB5 3X0 2X 

8ft 414 CCX 
53% 27 CIGNA 2x0 4 J 

31 23ft CIGPl 175 W 

7% 4% CLC 

iflft 21% CNA Fn 
10% 8% CNAI IJOallX 
44ft 34ft CPC Ini 2.M S3 

23ft 14% CP Nil 1X0 65 

20% 19ft CHIIMI 2.15*10X 

27% 18ft CSX 1.16 4.9 

40ft 23 CTS 1X0 29 

12ft 7ft C3 Inc 
33% 22ft Cabal .92 3X 
U'A Bft Caesar 
201* lift Cal Fed XS 2X 
47ft 32% CalFd pf 4JS 1QX 
23% 13ft CalDm 25b U 
18% lift Camrnl .12 X 
B 15ft CRLKo .40 
9% 3% CmpRg .161 
14W 10% CpRpfg 2X0 
73ft 54ft ComSP 250 3J 
45% 2Bft CdPocg 1X0 
I 21% 14ft CanPEg X0 
223 141 CapCits 20 
I 49ft 30ft CapHld 1X4 XI 
14% IB Caring a M 
40ft 24ft Carlisle 1X2 19 
I 26% 15 CcroFI M IX 
1 28% 19 ft CarPw 2X0 93 
23T* 19% CorPpI 3X7 1IX 
40 35% CarTec xio sx 

lift 7ft Carrol X7 J 
44ft 30% CarsPIr ljo 19 

3214 18% CartHw 1J2 4J 

34ft 19ft CarlWI X2 IX 
16ft 9% COSCNG 1J0 7X 
16% 9ft CtHtICk 
49ft 2Bft CatroT X0 IX 
27% 16 Coca .76 3J 
94ft 62% Cel ansa 4.40 AB 

15 7ft Cenovn M a 
41% 32% Ceniei 2J8 59 
26% 17 Centex n 

24ft 17 CenSoW 2X2 8J 
26% 16ft CenHud 2X4 11X 
» 18ft ConllU 222 8.9 
19ft 14% CnllPS 1.64 &7 
25% 17% CnLoEl 2X8 H.1 
lift 7ft CbMPw 1.40 14JJ 
24ft 14 CnSoyo X4 35 
10% CV1PS 1 JO 10X 
12ft 3ft CenirDt 
10ft 7% CrrtrvT! X0 7X 
23ft 1B% Canvlll 2X0 117 
27ft 15% Crl-rwd .7D 10 
24ft 16ft CcssAIr X0 2J 
24% 16% Chmflln X0 1.7 
27% 19 Chml pf 1J0 AS 
54 43% Oiml pf 4X0 93 

0 B Chom5o X0 4X 
4ft 1 vIChrIC 
1% Vi vlOllwt 
5ft fft viChripf 
55% 35% Chose 3X0 ?J3 
46 36% Chose Pf 5J5 11.7 

SB 48 Chose pt 6X3*12X 
57ft 51 Chose pfT2.40eZ12 
21% 14 Chelsea 72 3X 
34% 24% Chemed 1X2 5J 
43 23ft ChmNY 2X8 6J 
42ft 23% ChNY pf 1X7 47 
56ft 46 ChNY pl 5.9Sel 1.1 
39ft 31% ChasoK 1J4 3X 

38% 31ft ChesPn 2X0 5.9 

39% 29% Chevm 2X0 6X 
30% 17% CNW&I 
200 127 OilMlw 

80% 53ft ChIMl Pf 
26% 16% ChlPnT .ID* X 
14% 7% ChkFull J2t 4X 

49ft 24% ChrisCr xm l.i 
12 ft 5 Christa 
13% 9% Chroma 

38ft 20ft Chryslr 1X0 2.7 

67 34% Chubb 5 2J0 3J 

58% 50% Chubb pf 4JS 73 

19ft lift Church s X4 2X 

*6 35ft ClnBell X12 AX 

15% Bft CinOE 2.16 1U 

31 24 ClnGpl 4X0 13X 

681* 50 ClnGpf 9X0 135 

68 40 ClnGPf 9J8 137 

69 50 ClnGpf 9X2 139 

28% 20 ClnMU J2 3.1 

36 21% ClrclK 74 2J 

31 16% arCIfv .06 J 

24% 14% arcus 

47V* 27% OHsp 2X6 AS 

M 68ft CITlap of &i9eiai 
99% 7SVi CIlCPPfA 9.74.10 J 
44ft 32% Clrylnv 

68 52 Clylnpf 2X0 J4 

25ft 21% Civ In pf 2X7 UA 

10% 6% Clablr 72 10.1 

32% 23% ClortE U0 3X 

16 Aft CtayMm 

22% 17 CIvCH 1X0 5.1 

21% 13% ClevEI 2X2 111 

40 47 CIvElpl 7X6 13X 

16% 10. Clevpft X0 4X 

17ft 15ft Clvpkpf 123 112 

20 14% ClVBfcpf 1X4 11.1 

35ft 22V: C tor ox Utj 3X 

21% 14% ClubMn ,10e S 
32% 23% CliwltP 1X0 13 

20% 15V* Chwl Pl 1X0 SX 

21% 12% Ceeehm X0 19 

50ft 23ft Coastal 

54 24% CSfl Pf 

55 24ft Call Pf 1X3 13 

72'A S3ft CACOCJ 2.96 4X 

19% 9ft CoIaca 

34 25% Colemn 170 4X 

26ft 20ft ColoPol 178b 5X. 

23% 14ft Col Aik * M 3X 

23 10 ColPdss .16 .7 

31ft 20ft C0lp*n 1.40 A* 

63% 39ft Coding 2X0 4J 


12 417 26 25V* 25%— ft 

19 1312 1D9U 108 108% + % 

13 5A 6% 6ft 6%— ft 

56 3956 5SV. 54 55 +1% 

196 31% 30% 30% 

34 5ft 5ft 5ft- % 

1A 1032 30% 37Va 38ft -Klft 

15 10% 10% 10% 

11 1365 42ft 41% 41ft— ft 

9 62 21ft 21 'A 21ft 

174 20ft 20ft 20% + ft 

8 1925 24 23% 23ft 

111 35% 35 35 — % 

31 113 9ft 9 9 — ft 

a 1086 25% 24ft 25% +■ % 
16 127* 13% 13 13% — % 

7 118 19% 18% 18ft— ft 
ID 45% 45 45% + % 

59 19V* 19% 19% + % 

44 14% 14 14% + % 

299 21ft 21% Zl% + % 
-13 4% 4 4 — V* 

4 lift 11% lift 

11 154 68% 67ft 67ft— ft 

799 43ft 43% 431* + ft 

123 31 20% 21 + % 

2T 514 221 ft 219% 221 — ft 

12 1141 50% 49% 50ft +1% 

258 lift 11% 11% 

10 128 36 35% 35ft + % 

10 99 21% 21 21% + ft 

7 711 28 27% 77ft— ft 

5 23% 33% 23% — % 

9 131 36ft 36ft 36% — % 

13 154 9ft 9% 9ft- % 

8 2 42 42 42 

10 1BQ 2flV: 28% 28% 

12 125 32 31% 32 Aft 

I 70 15ft 15ft 15ft— % 

283 11% lift lift— % 
1530 33 32% 32ft— % 

11 2 23 23 23 

9 215 92ft 91 92ft +11* 

25 2202 9% 9 9% — ’6 

V 621 40ft 40% 40% — ft 

10 24 22ft 22ft 22ft— % 

7 1906 24ft 24ft 24ft + V* 

6 86 25% 25% 25% 

9 254 25 24ft 25 + % 

10 1103 19ft 18ft 18% — % 

7 43 2Sft 25% 25% — V* 

5 179 10% 9ft 10 

11 537 24% 24 24 

6 24 11% 18% lift — ft 

227 3% 3% 3ft 

B 94 10ft 10% 10% + ft 

B 411 19% 18% 19 — ft 

11 152 23% 23% 23% 

IS 191 18 17ft 18 + % 

6004 23% 22 23% +1ft 

4 24V: 34 24ft + Vi 
61 49% 49 49% + % 

12 1116 8ft Oft 8% + ft 

108 2ft 2% 2ft 

lA — 

14 2ft 2% 2% 

6 1701 54% 53% 54ft + V* 
114 45 44ft 44% — % 
33 55 54% 54%— ft 

_ 235 54% 53ft 53ft— % 
1 7 ISM 18ft lift — ft 

13 74 28% 2B% 28% — ft 

6 1143 40ft 40% dfl'J— ft 

6 40 40 40 

1 53ft 53ft 53V: + ft 
10 91 36% 36ft 364* + % 

10 2014 34% 33% 34% — % 

8 3943 37% 36% 37ft + ft 

47 55 IBft lift lift 

61 27 139ft 131ft 139 + M 

12 75 74% 75 + % 

7 ? 23% 27ft 22% — ft 

92 89 8ft 8% 8ft — ft 

82 46 45ft 45% —IV* 
28 11% 11% 11% + ft 
154 10% 10ft 10ft 
3 J620 371* 36ft 36% — ft 

15 1162 67% 66% 67% +1 

662 58ft 58 58% + ft 

16 655 18ft 17% IBft + % 

8 4 46 46 46 

A 1697 13ft 15 15% 

50z 30% 30% 30% + % 
1101 67. *7 67 + % 

400: 66% 66 *6% + % 

300r 68ft 68 68ft + ft 

26 487 23 22% 22%—% 

14 128 33% 33 33ft 

14 493 26% 26ft 26ft— ft 

14 78 24 23% 24 

1 3771 46% 46ft 4A%— % 

32 BO% 80% 80% — '/* 

60 9SVa 9Sft 95ft + ft 

9 1241 38ft 38 38% + % 

9 59V* 58% 59ft + ft 
446 24% 24% 24% — ft 
i 49 7ft 7 7ft 
18 386 29 28% 29 

13 24 13% 12ft 12% 

8 13 19% 19% 19V* + ft 

6 316 21ft S3% 20ft— ft 

570* 59ft 5S 58 —lft 

18 13% 12ft 13ft 

I 16ft 16ft 16ft 

H lift lift 16% + % 

12 444 36'i 15ft 36 + ft 

18 14 20% 20V* 20% - ft 

12 239 30ft 29% 29%—% 

.22 19V: 18V* 18ft— I 

14 505 14 13 14 + 9* 

11 2244 51 4*ft 50% + % 

6 ffl i 55 55 +4 

37 SS 55 55 +1 

B7154M 69% 67% M —1 

1026 14% ]4ft I4%— ft 

18 103 30 29% 29ft 

H 7287 25 1 * 25V* 25% 

7 282 21 70% 21 + % 

’S J® f % 31ft 21% + % 

’ 28% 38ft 28ft 

9 4W 58 56% SB +lft 


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FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


TECHNOLOGY 


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? Do-It-YoureeIf’ Chip Sales 
Seen Quadrupling by ’89 

By ANDREW POLLACK 

Mev York Tunes Service 

S ANT A CLARA. California — David S. Saudifer, a devel- 
opment engineer far Geosource Inc. in Houston, makes 
microelectronic chips for use in his company’s seismic 
equipment. But unlike most people who make semicon- 
ductors, Mr. Sandifer does not wear a white “bunny suit” and 
work in a sterilized factory with huge furnaces and chemical 
tanks. 

Mr. Sandifer makes the chips himself, on his desk. After 
feeding the design for a chip into a computer, he puts a blank chip 
in a little programming unit, waits a few seconds and the chip is 
programmed to his design. “We make our own custom chips,' he 
said. Such “do-it-yourself* 
chips have represented a tiny rrw » . » 

niche of the semiconductor *ne industry IS 

business for y«rs. But now, toward 

technological improvements 

promise to make these chips, chips that can be 

known as field-programmable r 

or user-programmable logic, produced quickly. 

more popular. Dataqucsu a : 

market-research concern, esti- 
mates that sales of such customer-definable logic circuits will 
nearly quadruple by 1989, to $910 million, from $251 million in 
1984. 

More than that, however, these systems, dubbed desk-top 
silicon foundries, represent in a very rudimentary way 3 direction 
in which the whole semiconductor industry is moving — toward 
customized chips that can be turned out speedily. 

C URRENTLY, if a company needs a chip that is not 
available off the shelf, it must go to a semiconductor 
company to have it made. The process can take weeks or 
even months. With a customer-programmable chip, the wait is 
reduced to minutes. Panatech Semiconductor has just introduced 
such chips. The customer chips are also especially useful during 
the early stage of a product development, when a company might 
need only a few prototypes. 

The first customer-programmable chips were memory chips, 
which merely store information. They were known as program- 
mable read-only memories, or Proms, and Eproms, which are 
erasable Proms. By the late 1970s, customer-programmable logic 
devices began appearing, starting with the programmable array 
logic device, or Pal, introduced by Monolithic Memories. 

These chips, now offered by most of the major semiconductor 
companies, contain pre- wired circuits. The user customizes the 
chip by blowing fuses on certain circuits, leaving only the circuits 
needed to perform the desired function. While these chips have 
done moderately well, they use a bipolar technology that uses a 
lot of energy. And once a fuse is blown, it cannot be mended. 

Now companies are starting to develop programmable circuits 
using a process known as complementary metal oxide semicon- 
ductor. or Cmos. While not as fast as bipolar chips, Cmos chips 
use far less energy. Moreover, the chips can be erased by ultravio- 
let light and reprogrammed. 

Leading the way with these new chips is Altera Corp^ which 
introduced its first chips last year. Panatech Semiconductor 
introduced a similar product last month. Others expected in the 
market this year include Monolithic Memories and Cypress 
Semiconductor. 

Altera sells a $2^00 kit in a box the size of a shoe box. It 
consists of software, a card that fits into International Business 
Machines Corp.’s PC, a cable and a programming unit the size of 
(Continued on Page 15, CbL 5) 


Currency Bates 


Amsterdam 
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London (bj 
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djm. e*. 
113.1* * 37JB7S- 
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3277 ' 

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Otdr. BJ. 

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Tokyo 

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TIM 

40040* 

76.72 

— 

Z- 

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„ £:• 

Zurich 

ZS995 

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813*5* 

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01302* 

7122- 

4.1338* 


10333* 


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1 ecu 

071*8 

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252*1 

44JS17 

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£ 

i. m 




Dollar Values 





i* 


t 

Eovlv. 

Currwer 

Pfr 

UJLS 

« 

Eniv. 

CWr * ,KY Z siv. COrr “ Cy 

Per 

USS 



(L4*6 Australians 

14*8 

1 JMS irkfcE 

fttts bas mwwi 

2222 


VS 


asm Austrian KMDbia 
anise BeWafl Ha. front 

0.7321 Canadian % 

DJBM Daaixfi krona 
0.1S37 Flootafi markka 
00074 OrMfc drDdnno 
0.1234 Hana Knags 


OD0J1 Itmtll iMH 73370 

Mon KiMalH Anar 03022 

04015 Motor, rlnaga 24*05 

0.110* Marw. krone 73)45 

00542 PAH, mu 1145 IS 

00057 PgrLHOMto '7AM 

0277 SouArlm 14105 


OS775 S. African rand 1.7324 
00012 S.Ko>wanwgn MSS) 
DOOM Soo n o ntato 17X00 
B. 1 W 1 s*Md.krsas *08 
00251 Taiwan 1 3US 
00345 TMbaW VMS 
02723 ILAJLdfrbaai 14727 


ciiarllna: 12127 Iridic 

(at Cam im refol frane IB) Amounts iwatfed lo buvoea pound U> Amaunh needed to buy one doHar <•» 
Units of 100 (X) UMR 01 MOO (VI URftS M tSlOOO 
HS3.: not aualrd; NJL: no) aveifobto. 

Sources: Borme du Benetue (Brussels}: Banco CornmercMe ttaflana (Milan): Banauc 
Nariortale de Ports (Ports): IMP (SDR); Baoaue Ante et Internationale mnyesHssemenf 
( dinar, rival, dirttam), other data (ram Reuters and flP. 


Interest Rates 


lifci 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


April 25 


Swfu Frtock 

Dollar D-Mark Franc SltrflOO Frsne ECU SDR 
IM. 0'i ■ 8to .51*. 5V, -5k 12 V.- 12V. 10H - lOVz *fc-*?k On. 

2M. flVi - 8Vj n. -5% sv. - Sto 129» - 12*5 Uh-WM. 9Vj - 94k BH, 

3M. &•'} - ffto 5 W. - 5 tv SfL-SK 12%. . 12 *v 10 k, - 10 !L TVS ■ M« S1A 

6M. 0t. -8 tv 5 tv - 6 W S*v-5a> 104% • 1034 97v - Ttk 8 f. 

IV. T7» -TTv *'/• - iNt 5*. -5*. 7J - IT* 70V.- M V. *** -TV. BW 

Rates applicable to latertsan * deposits a! St million uMimmi (or eouhralenll. 

Sources: Monon Guaranty (dollar. DHL SP. Pound. FF): Lloyds Bonk (ECU): Reuters 
(SDR 1 . 


Asian Dollar Rates 


April 25 


I IM. 

8'fc -84% 

Source: Reuters. 


Key Money Rates 

United Stales c 

Discount Role 

Federal Foods 
Prime Role 
Broker Loan Role 
Comm. Paner. 30-179 day* 
3-manm Treasury Bin* 
t-monfti Treasury Bills 
CD'S 30-5* ami 
: COS 6049 davS 

West Germany 

Lomtwrd Role 
OvernWd Role 
One Montn Inlertwnk 

3- month inter bonX 

6- month Inter honk 


3mv 
SM -07. 


Bonk Bose Roto 
Call Money 
i 91 day Treasury BUI 
3-tnonni interbank . 

Japan 

Discount Rota 
Coll Money 
60 -dov interbank 


lJVj 12Vtr 

13 13 

1211 13/1* 
12 13.1*12 11/16 


5 5 

« 1/16 5 15/1* 
6W *5/1* 


Gold Prices 


France 

intervention RAM 
Coll Money 
One-monln Inierbook 
3-monin inierbonk 
e-monin interbank 


IO'a ion 
lov* mi* 

» 5/M 10 7/1* 
10 5/14 10 7/1* 
WM TO'A 


AJM. P JW. Ckbl 

Haag Kong 322.75 32105. 0.10 

LmtemaoWD 33335 - +025 

Paris f>2J kltol 322.5% 322J1 + £82 

Zurich 31125 33105 + IJ0 

London 32X40 32350 + UQ 

Mew Vork — 32X90 + 1.10 

□flicloi llakra* for London. Pori 1 nod LUaai- 
bogra. odeauig and cfostog orlcas for Hono Konp 
and ZurKh. Nw York Csnai Current conlroa. 
All price* *n U55 per ounce. 

Source: Reuters. 


'■* J sources: Reuters. Commeriboa*. Credit Lv- All Prices » U55 per ounce. 

• ~ onnais. Lloyds Bank. Bank et Tokyo. Source: Reuters 

' ■ C ?V C,^ " r 

:i : Ipl Markets Closed . 

: , j Financial markets were dosed Thursday in Australia, New Zealand, 

Egypt. Israel Bombay and Milan for holidays. 


IlcralbS^gribunc, 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


J5j> 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 12 

Page 13 


IQ Profit 
Rose 8.9% 
In Quarter 

Akzo Reports 
28% Increase 


By Bob Hagcrty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Imperial Chemi- 
cal Industries PLC disappointed 
the stock market Thursday by re- 
porting an 8.9-pcrccnt increase in 
pretax profit for the first quarter. 
The dower-tban-expccted growth 
reflected dull performances from 
fertilizers and general chemicals. 

Separately, Akzo NV, the Dutch 
man-made fiber and chemical com- 
pany. reported a 28-percent rise in 
first-quarter net profit. 

1CI said that pretax profit rose to 
£267 million ($326 million) from 
£245 million a year earlier. Net 
profit totaled £155 million, or 24.8 
pence per share, up 6.2 percent 
from £146 million, or 23.9 pence a 
share. 

Sales grew 15 percent to £172 
billion from £137 billion. 

On the London Slock Exchange, 
ICI shares tumbled 25 pence to 
close at 740 pence, even though 
analysts had been reducing their 
earnings forecasts In recent days. 

“It's a disappointment to have 
one's worst fears confirmed." said 
Mark QuQliam, an analyst at James 
Cape! & Co. 

Bat IQ said the performance 
was good in light of slower eco- 
nomic growth in most of its mar- 
kets. “We’re on budget." said Alan 
Clements, ICTs finance director. 

Mr. Clements said that the com- 
pany had strong performances 
from crop-protection chemicals, 
pharmaceuticals, fibers, petro- 
chemicals and plastics. Severe win- 
ter weather depressed sales of fer- 
tilizers and some heavier chemicals. 
The relatively small dyestuffs busi- 
ness remained unprofitable. 

Profit in Id's oil business 
slipped to £22 million from £31 
million a year earlier. That decline 
reflects higher petroleum-revenue 
taxes and declining output from 
the Ninian field in the North Sea. 

The latest figures included one 
month of trading from the Beatrice 
Chemical units, acquired late last 

(Continued on Page 19, CoL I) 



Poland Nurtures Private Firms 

Raises, Bonuses 
Test Socialist 
Work Ethic 

By Michael T. Kaufman 

Nr*r York Times Service 

WARSAW — In the gritty in- 
dustrial section of Warsaw, at 
the end of the tram line and next 
to the large state-owned fac- 
tories, lies a modem medical 
equipment plant. Its private 
owners are (derated and even 
coddled by the authorities in the 
hope that they and others like 
them succeed in transforming 
the work ethic of socialist Po- 
land. 

The company, Plastomed, 
which has 350 workers produc- 
ing calibrated pipettes and elec- 
tronic laboratory equipment, is 
one of the 650 privately owned 
companies financed from abroad 
that have sprouted here in the 
last three years with the blessings 
from economic planners. 

Although these private com- The n«» y«i r«« 

panics, aliinvolvedm light man- Workers at the Plastomed factory In Warsaw, one of 
manuring of items suen as cos- 650 privately owned companies operating in Poland, 
me tics and clothing, together 

account for scarcely 1 percent of would be untaxed for three down or standing e 
the value of Poland’s national years. sand zlotys you car 

production, they are being in- R^ano» of the original link* to one such adage. A 

crcasingly viewed as the cutting Poles abroad, the concerns were “The state pretend: 
edge of an effort to revitalize a called Pokmia companies. The and we pretend to v 
limping economy and invigorate name is still used, even ihnng h . Absenteeism runs 
a slug gi sh culture of industrial in its search for capital and mod- nity leaves extend t« 
labor. emiring technologies, the gov- and recent visits to s 

Despite occasional ideological eminent has expanded the pro- bile, beer and glider 
attacks on the whole idea of pri- gram to include those without veiled a highly cm 
vale, profit-oriented b usiness es Polish ties. toward work and 

from hardline and doctrinaire Obviously a major objective of large number of 

Communist Party factions, the the plan was to attract capital to seats, 
government of General Wqjriecfa a Poland hit hard by restricted Throughout the I 
Jaruzelski is nurturing at least credits from the West. The plan the dominant econc 
some of these companies and is was geared to attract export -ori- for mechanisms to i 
studying an expansion of the enleo projects and the foreign ductility. In Hungai 
concept that would draw larger owners are permitted to tepatri- pie, workers in su 
■imwinK of private capital for ate 50 percent of their gross bard now are permitted 
laree-scalejomt ventures beyond currency profits. gether and ted to pr 

li ght industry. But beyond the pure and still- Tied numbers of iien 

As originally conceived and limited economic elements, the lar hours of work, 
outlined during the upheavals of Polonia companies are being effectively as private 
the Solidarity period, the govern- studied as models for changing but doing their regi 
meat program Hmited invest- the behavior of a work force that state-owned machini 
mem and ownership to foreign- has dose to the lowest productiv- lar shifts, 
ers of Polish descent. At the time ity record in Europe. Not surprisingly, 

the idea was explained here as “There is no doubt that what shown that the Hun] 
just another attempt to establish Poland needs is a new work ethic ets are more produt 
links with the Polish Diaspora, to replace attitudes that have de- most part, when 
those estimated 40 million peo- veloped in the last 40 years," an means money than » 
pie of Polish origin who live be- aide to General Jaruzelski said in using the same mad 
yond the country’s borders. Un- a recent interview. their regular shifts, 

der the original plan such people Those attitudes are enshrined Another recent H 

could invest as tittle as S2J100 to in jokes and sayings often heard novation intended 
open a business whose profits among workers. “Whether lying (Continued on Pagt 


Chrysler Profit 
Dropped 28% 
In First Quarter 


would be untaxed for three 
years. 

Because of the original links to 
Poles abroad, the concerns were 
called Polonia companies. The 
name is still used, even though, 
in its search for capital and mod- 
ernizing technologies, the gov- 
ernment has expanded the pro- 
gram to include those without 
Polish ties. 

Obviously a major objective of 
the plan was to attract capital to 
a Poland hit hard by restricted 
credits from the West. Tbe plan 
was geared to attract export-ori- 
ented projects and the foreign 
owners are permitted to repatri- 
ate 50 percent of their gross bard 
currency profits. 

But beyond the pure and still- 
limited economic dements, the 
Polonia companies are being 
studied as models for changing 
the behavior of a work force that 
has dose to the lowest productiv- 
ity record in Europe. 

“There is no doubt that what 
Poland needs is a new work ethic 
to replace attitudes that have de- 
veloped in the last 40 years," an 
aide to General Jaruzelski said in 
a recent interview. 

Those altitudes are enshrined 
in jokes and sayings often heard 
among workers. “Whether lying 


down or standing erect, a thou- 
sand zlotys you can expect," is 
one such adage. Another says, 
“The state pretends to pay us, 
and we pretend to work." 

Absenteeism runs high, mater- 
nity leaves extend to three years 
and recent visits to state automo- 
bile, beer and glider factories re- 
vealed a highly casual attitude 
toward work and a seemingly 
large number of unoccupied 
seats. 

Throughout the Eastern bloc, 
the dominant economic quest is 
for mechanisms to increase pro- 
ductivity. In Hungary, for exam-’ 
pie, workers in state factories 
now are permitted to band to- 
gether and ted to produce speci- 
fied numbers of items after regu- 
lar hours of work, functioning 
effectively as private contractors 
but doing their regular jobs on 
state-owned machines after regu- 
lar shifts. 

Not surprisingly, studies hare 
shown that the Hungarian work- 
ers are more productive, for the 
most part, when their time 
means money than when they are 
using the same machines during 
their regular shifts. 

Another recent Hungarian in- 
novation intended to improve 
(Continued on Page 15. CoL I) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

HIGHLAND PARK. Michigan 
— Chrysler Corp. said Thursday 
that its’ first-quarter profit fell 28 
percent from the like period of 
1984. 

The automaker said it earned 
S507.6 million, of S4.I8 per share, 
in the first quarter compared with 
$705.8 million, or $5.64 per share, 
in the opening quarter of 1984. 

Its pretax earnings for the quar- 
ter were $725.1 million, a 2.6-per- 
cent increase ever last year's $706 J! 
million. But net earnings declined 
because of a $217.5 milli on tax bilL 

Chrysler became a corporate tax- 
payer again in the fourth quarter of 
1 984. Before that, the company was 
able to use tax credits earned dur- 
ing its close brush with bankruptcy. 

The company said that its world- 
wide sales in the first quarter rose 
102 percent to a record S5.4 billion 
from S4.9 billion in the first quarter 
of 1984. The previous sales record 
of $5.3 billion was set in the fourth 
quarter of 19S4. 

The company said that it sold 
547,047 units in the first quarter, an 
increase of 5.9 percent from the 
516,672 units sold in the first three 
months of last year. 

General Motors Corp. an- 
nounced earlier this week that first- 
quarter profit dropped by about 
one-third to S1.07 billion on sales 
of $24.2 billion. American Motors 
Corp. last week announced a $29- 
million loss for the quarter. 

Ford Motor Co. said that its 
earnings statement would be re- 
leased late Friday. Analysts said 
that they' could be lower due to a 
larger rax bit. 

In the first quarter. Chrysler and 
Ford, which were offering’ sales in- 
centives to customers and dealers 
and special financing, gained mar- 
ket share at GM’s expense. 

In 1984, Chrysler earned a re- 
cord 5138 billion on sales of $19.6 
billion, more then triple the 5700.9 
million profit made in 1983onsales 
of $13.3 billion. 

For the fourth quarter of 1984, 
Chrysler reported a record profit of 
$609.7 million, or $4.91 a share, on 
sales of $5.3 billion, compared with 
net income of SI 18.3 million, or 91 


cents a share, on sales of S3.8 bil- 
lion in the last quarter of I9S3. 

Chrysler recently announced a 
joint-venture project with Mitsubi- 
shi Motors Corp. of Japan to pro- 
duce small cars at a plant some- 
where in the Middle Western 
United States. 

And Chrysler’s chairman, Lee A. 
lacocca last week announced a 50- 
50 joint venture with Samsung Co. 
of South Korea for automotive 
pans and ccmponen is for Chrysler. 
Mr. lacocca said that the venture 
would “study the possibility of car 
assembly in Korea. (AP. UPJ) 


Dollar Gains 
Sharply During 
New York Trade 

Compiled In • Our Staff From Ddpuuha 

NEW YORK — The doDar 
gained in New York after clos- 
ing mixed in European trading. 

Dealers in New York said the 
driving force behind the dollar 
remains a conviction that it has 
weathered the bad news about 
the U.S. economy in the first 
quarter and can look forward to 
stronger growth this quarter. 

In New York, the British 
pound ended at SI J0S5, down 
from SI .229 on Wednesday; at 
3.1480 Deutsche marks, up 
from 3.105 DM; at 9.5900 
French francs, up from 9.465 
francs; at 252.45 yen, up from 
250.85 yen; and at" 2.6240 Swiss 
francs, up from 1585 Swiss 
francs. 

The U.S. currency gained 
substantially against the pound 
in London,’ but was still well 
below records set in January. 
The pound closed at $1.2043. 
down from 51223. 

The dollar ended in Frank- 
fun at 3.1203 DM, down from 
3.1275 DM on Wednesday: at 
9.515 French francs in Paris, 
down from 9J6 francs; and un- 
changed at 15995 Swiss francs 
in Zurich. (AP. Reuiers) 


Late interbank rates on April 25, exduding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt. Milan, Paris. New York rates at 
4 PJA. 


U. S. Productivity Falls 
1 .2% in First Quarter 


The .istoaaied Press 

WASHINGTON — U.S. busi- 
ness productivity declined 12 per- 
cent in the first quarter of 1985. the 
Labor Department reported Thurs- 
day. 

Analysts said the fall reflected a 
slowdown in economic growth and 
heightened concern about infla- 
tion. 

The decline in productivity was 
the fust since the third quarter of 
1984. 

Unit labor costs jumped 7.3 per- 
cent m the period, the department 
said. 

The report is “clearly a disap- 
pointment in terms of its potential 
inflation impact." said Allen Sinai, 
an analyst at Shearson Lehman 
Brothers Inc. “But it is not surpris- 
ing in view of tbe slowdown in the 
U5. economy during the first quar- 
ter and the continuing hiring in the 
nonmanufacturing sectors," he 
added. 

Commerce Department figures 
released last week showed the econ- 
omy grew at a slow 1 J-percent an- 
nual rate in the first quarter. 

But a brighter picture was given 
by Labor Department figures re- 
leased earlier this month showing 


that businesses continued to hire at 
a rapid rate in the first quarter, 
with more than 400,000 new jobs 
created last month alone. 

Thursday’s report showed a 1.6- 
percent rise in output during the 
quarter. But hours worked were up 
2.9 percent and hourly compensa- 
tion rose 6 percent, the Iargttl in- 
crease in a year. 

Thejump in unit labor costs was 
the biggest since a 7.6-percent rise 
in tbe second quarter of 1982. 

About 0.4 percentage points of 
the rise in hourly compensation re- 
sulted from increases in Social Se- 
curity contributions, which wQ] not 
continue to rise in the remainder of 
1985. 

Unit labor costs reflect changes 
in productivity and hourly com- 
pensation. 

“I would not expect results in 
subsequent quarters to be this dis- 
mal," Mr. Sinai said. But be cau- 
tioned that weakness generally in 
productivity is a sign that the cur- 
rent business expansion is aging. 

Productivity measures produc- 
tion efficiency in terms of the vol- 
ume of goods and services tbe econ- 
omy puts out in an hour of paid 
working time. 


m m 




. " . )’;' 


i 



.s-i m 






The coan with exceptional goals 
needs an exceptional bank. 


Japan Gives U.S. Proposal 
On Pharmaceutical Imports 


What makes TDB exceptional? 
Above all, our personal service. 


Bv John Burgess 

Washington Pair Service 

TOKYO — Japanese officials 
gave a U.S. trade delegation on 
Thursday a plan to change rules on 
the import and sale of foreign drugs 
and medical equipment and said 
the changes would meet many US. 
objectives in the field. 

“We are pleased with their atti- . 
tude," said David Mulford, assis- 
tant secretary of the treasury for 
international affairs and head of 
the American delegation. But, he 
said, “you shouldn't overplay tbe 
positive dement" 

One U.S. official said that in 
many cases, the proposed steps 
were vague. Their significance 
would not become clear, he said, 
until final rules were published and 
enforced. 

The proposals were contained in 
a working paper that contained for- 
mal responses to eight U.S. ques- 
tions in the medical field, one of the 
four import sectors that the two 
governments are discussing. 

The package represents a 
“steady improvement 1 ’ in the dis- 
cussions, said Kumeo Shirota, a 
division director in the Ministry of 
Health and Welfare. Asked if it 
meant that Japan was “surrender- 
ing," Mr. Shirota responded that 


the United States “had some valid 
points.’’ 

Japan currently imports at least 
$750 million a year in U.S. pharma- 
ceuticals and medical equipment 
The total annual market in Japan 
for pharmaceuticals is believed to 
be in the neighborhood of $15 bil- 
lion. 

U.S. companies have contended 
that Japanese government require- 
ments that drugs and equipment be 
tested extensively in Japan before 
bang sold and other import regula- 
tions are unnecessary and consti- 
tute an unfair trade barrier. 

Japan has defended the rules as 
necessary to protect public health. 

Some of the major features of the 
Japanese packages include: 

• Import procedures will be sim- 
plified. 

• Foreign clinical test data will 
be accepted for medical equipment 
and diagnostic agents used outside 
the body. 

• A foreign company which has 
licensed a Japanese company to 
produce a product will be able to 
obtain that license without reappli- 
cation if it wishes to begin its own 
production in Japan. However, this 
will be allowed only if the Japanese 
company agrees lo it. 


P ersonal service is more than 
just a tradition at TDB - it’s 
one of the basic reasons for our 
success over the years. And it 
makes an important difference 
to our clients, in a number of 
ways. 

In fast decisions, for exam- 
ple. At TDB you don’t have to 
waste time going through 
endless “channels.” The execu- 
tive you talk to makes sure that 
your requirements are brought 
directly to the people who 
decide. We make it a point to 
avoid red tape and bottlenecks. 
We assign an experienced 


bank officer to your account and 
he is personally responsible for 
seeing that things get done on 
your behalf’ whatever the ser- 
vice. So you can be sure your 
instructions are carried out 
promptly, intelligently and to 
the letter. 

Whether your business 
requires trade and export financ- 
ing, foreign exchange, precious 
metals or any of our full range 
of banking services, you’ll find 
that TDB has something a bit 
special to offer. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust with 


your business, get in touch with 
its. Now that we have joined 
American Express International 
Banking Corporation, with its 
89 offices in 39 countries, we are 
even better pbced to serve your 
individual banking needs. 

TDB funks in GtiJi t J. LwJoi/. 
Paris. Luxembourg. Cbhisto. MtmU 
C.irh. Nassau. Zurich. 

TDB is j nhmbtr of 1 hi Anurictw 
Express Company, irbidi has antts of 
US$ 62. S oil !ivu auJ share huh ft rs' 
tifi/if) o/US$ 4.4 (illioii. 



Trade Development Bank 


Shown :u k’ti. chc lx-.xi office 
of Trade lX-. clopmunt B.mk. Geneva. 


An American Express Company 








** 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26,1985 



Thursday^ 



Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Dtv. YM- PE 


CJost 

Quot. Ol*9F 


(Continued from Page 12) 







21 

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nr 

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103 

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31 

111 


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119a 


4J8032J 


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14% 



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7U 


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32 

367 

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80: 30% 

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339. 

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15=* + 





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431 

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17 



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K3 



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154 13.1 

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1547 

46 

45% 


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28 

NSPwpf 3X0 11.1 


180= 329* 

32% 


V; 


31% 



410= 37 

35V= 






8560= 37% 

37 






200= 60 

60 




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JO 


875 

35% 

35'* 

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4% 


T fl 

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IJO 2J 

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47% + 

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284 

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54% 

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224* 

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10% 

111% 

10=6- 


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n 

60 

34% 

33% 

34'.* 


30 b 



1X0 frX 

16 

501 




l'8 




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TA3 

55 

54’* 

55 +1 

51% 

20% 


.22* 3 

12 

562 

26% 


1 J 


8 71 

26 


M 1.1 

10 

937 

36% 

LM 



fori 



-Mi 


62 

4% 

WPS 


rri 

50% 

NYNEX 

6J0 75 

8 

769 

84=* 

84V 




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36 2Jft 

35V 23% 
17 9% 

111 BOV 
23=b 20ft 

20% 17V. 
2 2ft 18% 
51% 48% 
113 105% 

lOSft lfllUi 
34% 22 
31% 24% 
I* 7 * 7*6 

34 2SV» 
35% 24% 
56 42 

61 IS 45 
26% 18ft 
29% 21 
15 10%. 

66ft 51 
63 47% 

87 76 

8 9V 77 
17'* 11% 
74V Ifft 
B% 7 
36%. 2 a'4 
26% 546 
1716 14 
33% 26% 
25% 1716 
13% 6 % 
26 17% 

13% 8% 
10ft 6 % 
31% 24 
31% 18% 
.33% 17% 
19 13 

37 25% 

46ft 31 U 
77 75 

• 16% 10% 


Ooklnd 

OokiteP 152 4J 13 
OcetPet 250 8J 10 
OccIPwt 
OcclP Pf 4,00 42 
OcclP pf 250 115 
CiecIPpf 212 UJ 
OcdP of 230 115 
OcclP ot 6J5 123 
OCClPpflSJO 14.T 
Ocd Pi 1462 135 
ODECO UXI 38 17 
Oeden 180 5.9 IS 
OtiioEd 188 128 6 
Oh Ed pt AM 135 
Oh Ed Of 456 114 
Oh Ed of 756 1X9 
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OhEdpf 3 JO 13J 
Oh Ed pr 192 lli 
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OhEd ot 9.12 138 
OhEdpf BXJ U7 
OtlEpt 10.48 120 
OhEpf 10.76 126 
OhMotr 40 li 13 
OkfaGE 20C BA t 
OkloGpf JO 10.2 
Olln IJO 4.9 9 
Omncra 

Oneida JO 54 10 
ONEOK 256 BJ 9 
OranRk 2JK 8JJ 9 
Orange J3t 5.0 13 
OrlonC .76 38 50 
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Orion of JO 6x 
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Owen I II 1.68b 3.7 9 
Own II of 4 JO 58 
Oxford M 3.7 11 


179 2% 

17 35ft 
6256 30Vi 
7 12'i 
1 94% 

4 21% 

1 19 
12 20ft 

835 50% 
22 170'-. 

5 106 
151 26% 
100 30% 

1231 14% 
10= 23 
501 34 
380= £1% 
450: 60 
34 26% 

22 29% 

2 142. 
130= 66 
280z 63 

25001 mi 
10; 85 1 6 
384 11% 
163 22% 
26QZ 8 
110 31 
105 7% 

23 14% 
1408 30% 

174 25% 
67 70% 
1185 25% 
441 1DV 
1 7% 

40 29% 
56 6 23% 
KM 28' : 
418 77 
461 31% 
2033 4J-, 
7 75% 
32 11% 


1% lit 
35 35 

28% 30 
11*6 12 ". 
Q4V| 94% 
21% 21% 
19 19 

20% 20% 
50% 50% 
110% 110% 
105% 105% 
26% 26% 
30% 30% 
14% 14% 

33 33 

34 34 
53% 53% 

60 aa 

25% 26 
29 29 

14% 14% 
66 66 
6296 63 
87% 87% 
85 Vi 85% 
11% 11% 
2216 ZB* 
7% 7% 

30% 30% 
7% 7% 

14% 14% 
30% 30% 
25 2546 

103k 10% 
24** 25 
10% 10% 
7% 766 
29 29 

23% 21% 
27% 28ft 
16% 16% 
31% 31% 
44% 44*a 
75% 75% 
11 % 11 % 


— ft 
+lft 
+ 96 
+ 1 % 

— h 

+ % 

— % 
— ft 
+ % 
_ Vi 


— I* 
+1 
+ Vi 

— ft 

_ % 
+ % 


+ % 
+ V* 

— ft 

— '•» 
+ "4 
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3 




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55*s 441* Pennev 236 58 8 
27% 20 Vi PoPL 25a 103 8 
36% 30% PoPLpf AM 128 
70 57% PoPLpf 8X0 12t 

27% 23% PoPLdPfXtt 124 
24*« 70 PoPL dort.90 120 
67 56% PdPLPT SJ0 128 

77 32% PoPL dar3J5 123 

29% 25% PoPL d«3-75 129 
86% 65% PoPLpt 9J4 127 
96 81% PaPLprllXO 11.7 

65 54% PaPLpr BOO 127 

40". 31% Permit 220 64 11 
£5% 20 Penn of 1 JO 73 
51% 30*. Penned 220 43 23 
87 72 Peru PfB 840 9J 

17% 9% PeopEn 130 7J 7 
38 23'. PeoBov 40 1.1 16 

55% 39% PepsiCo 1J8 33 23 
30% 17*6 PerkET J6 2J 13 
10% 7% Prmian 134el4j) 

22% 15% PeryDr 38 IJ 13 
39% 28 Petrie 140 26 15 
30 24H PetRs 3J2e!4X 


5’% 596 1 5% + % 
1SU 18% 18%—% 
13% 12% 12% — V 
15% 15% 13% + % 
66. 696 69* + % 
30- 29% 2996 — 96 

1896 * 18ft 18% — % 
296 2% 296 
13% 13Vi l£* 

1996 19*9 1996— % 
7V6 6*6 7 

9* 9b 96 + & 
376 54% 53% 54 + 96 

1187 47 46* 46% + % 

1624 25 24% 24% — % 

MQ=34Vj 34% 34% 

50= 68% 68% tfft 
9 2 7*. 27% 27% — J* 
4 24% 24% 24V t — % 
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69 2696 2696 26% — % 
32 29% 29%— % 

60z 86% 86% 86% + % 
130= 94% 94 94% + % 

110= 631s 63 63 —I 

91 3496 3496 34%— 96 
23 22 21% 22 + % 

inf 51* J 0% 51% + » 
120= 83 S3 83 +1 

169 16% 16% 1696 — 96 
-16 37% 37% 3796 + % 
4555 52% 51% 5296— 96 
3576 2294 229* 22% 

Z26 9 8% 8% + % 

63 1796 17Vs XT. 1 !— » 
960 38*6 3896 38%— 9* 
26* 26% 36% + % 
16% 16% 1696 


16% 14 PetRSPf 1J7 9J 56 .... ._ . ... . 

79i 4 Ptrlnv 1.00621.1 27 4% 496 494— % 

45Va 2996 Ptlrer 148 23 14 9136 44% 43% 4J% — % 

25% 12** PhelpD 1462 20% 199c. 20% + % 

489. 34 PIMlPPT 5J» 105 108 47% 47 47% 

41% 209. PhibrS it 14 75 6040 40 38% 3W* + * 



96 

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134 

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119 

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211 1096 10W. 10% 


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62% PhiUUr 
10% Phllpin 
33% Phi I Pet 
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22% PledAs 
23% PieNG 
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21% Pioneer 1J4 
17 PipnrEl .I7r 
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99* Pitfstn 
1% PlonRs 
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19% piesev 
15V* PoooPd 
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11% Pondrs 
15 Popfal 
13% Ported 
13 PartGE 
«0 PoGof .. 

38% PorGof AM 121 
2BV. PorGpf 432 121 
259. Pol IICJ1 1J6 4J 12 
19% PotmEI 216 7J 9 
31 PolEIPf 404 10J 
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25 Primrk 2X0 
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13'j PrlmMS 09 
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31 Prater WO 
16% PSvCd 200 
16% P5Col Pf 210 1017 
»r« psind 1X0 127 


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JO 24 35 
1.00 24 171 
JO 2 7 
JO 4.1 
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1J2 9J 7 
11J0 112 


58 7 
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4.9 13 
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494, psinpf 
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3 JO 15.1 
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1.08 14J 
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852 165 
888 146 


79 21% 21% 2196 

2880 93% 91% 934* +1«6 

672 2156 20% 21V.— 16 

5263 40% 4016 4096 

341 22% 22% 22% + % 

246 29% 29% 29% — *4 
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75 19% 1W* 1946 + 9* 

586x47% 47% 4796 + V, 

579 279* 27 2796 + 96 

10 20% 20% 30% — 96 

926 3996 38% 39% — % 

523 12*4 11% 12% + % 

125 12% 12 • 12% + % 

48 79. 7% 79* + Vs 

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106 17% 17% 17% 

1109 29V4 28% 29% 

242 13% 12% 129* 

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50 15% 15% 15% — '4 

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20=102% 102% 102% 

18 33% 33% 33% + % 

27 32% 32% 32% + % 

114 33% 33 33% + 96 

500 29% 29V* 29% + V6 

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13 2294 22% 2296- % 

245 1794 37% 37% + % 

1744 16% 14% 1446 + % 

123 28% 27% 28 — % 

2707 53% 52% 52% + W 

222 14% 13% 14% + % 

9 39% 39U. 3991 — V, 

537 21% 21% 21 % — % 

12 19% 19% 19% — % 

371 7% 79* 7% 

702 2314 231* 23'* — U 
1360= 7% 7Vi 7Vi — Vt 
120= 7% 7% 7% — % 

1600= 58 57% 58 +9* 

2550= 52 51% 51% 

900= 50% 50% 50% — % 


29% RCApt 


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9% 3% RongrO 
66 47% Ray cm J4 

17V6 9% Ravmk 

48% 34% Roythn 
13% 7% Read Ell 


6 

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10 '* 

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7 3% ReoAir 

2 1% ReoAwt 

12% 4% RoGvns 

*4% 31% ReoNY 

26% 20% RNYpfCX12 12X 
34% 21% RepBk 1J4 58 
22% 14% RshCot 
37% 22% Revco 
14% 9% vIRevgr 
40% 32% Revlon 
24** 17% Rexnm 
19% 11% Rexnrd 

87% 52% Reyn In 

4996 46% Rev In pf 4.10 


*9 6 18% 18% 18% 

674 39i 3% 3% + 16 

24 238 60 Vi 60 60 — % 

1 11% 11% 1146— %. 
16 1445 4696 45% 46% + %- 

38 1178 10% 1046 1Q%— V6. 

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33% 17% RtttAld JO 
7% 4% RvrOk n 
36% 27% Robshw 1.12 
47% 35V. Rabtwi 1J0 
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21% 13 RochG 
38% 27% RoChTl 
39% 23% Rockwl 
71% 48% RohmH 
55% 28% Huhrln 
22% 10% RolCm n JO# 1 J 


22 12% Rovlnfs 

50 33% Rubrmd 

26 13'* RussBr 

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28% 17% RvanH 
28% 19 Ryders 
269* 12% Rvland 
15% 8% firmer* 


23 1% 1% 196 
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8 2801 46% 45% 46%— 1* 

33 24V6 25% 26% + % 

7 47 31% 31% 31% 

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37 12% 11% 12% — % 

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8 2445 84% 8396 B3%— % 

1 4894 4894 4894 

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4 73% 73% 73% +1% 

10 248 339% 32 32%— % 

38 1996 1B46 191* + 96 

17 1147 29 22% 28% — % 

11 51 496 4% 496 + % 

7 134 31% 309* 31 + % 

19 86 39 38% 39 

117 2096 20 20% + % 

6 345 2196 21% 2196 

M 80 3896 38% 38% + % 

10 1952 369k 359* 3496 + 96 

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9 163 3094 50% 58% — % 

31 59 2296 22% 22% + % 


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18 222 149* 14% 149* + % 

■64 U 16 13 46% 46 46% 

16 170 2396 23% 23% 

71 42 I 33 18% 18% 18% — % 

1X0 4.1 14 01 2496 24 24%— % 

Jl 15 I 653 2396 23% 2394 

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4 63 14 [39* 1396— % 


220 102 
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16 ScbnRy 274 16J 
1196 SfgdBS 24 1J 


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34% 22% SallleM ... _ 

5396 50% SalIMpf 4X3S 7J 

26% 1796 SDieGs 216 8X 

10% 6% SJuanB .90010.1 
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432 104% 10396 10396- 
1892 27% 27% 27% 1 

3 17% 17% 17% 

JO* 34 33% 33%- 

13 129* 12% 


51 

134 





THIRD NOTICE 

COAL MINE FOR POWER GENERATION 

IN PAKISTAN 

THE WATER AND POWER 
DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 
(WAPDA) 

A SEMI-AUTONOMOUS AGENCY OF 
THE GOVERNMENT OF PAKISTAN 

PLANS TO 

INSTALL AND COMMISSION AS SOON AS POSSIBLE THE FIRST OF A SERIES OF 300 MW CAPACITY 
INDIGENOUS COAL-FIRED POWER GENERATION STATIONS. DISCUSSIONS ARE BEING HELD 
WITH USAID, WORLD BANK, ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK AND OTHER FINANCIAL AGENCIES 
REGARDING THE FINANCING OF THE PROJECT. COMPLETE FEASIBILITY STUDIES FOR THE POWER 
PLANT AND COAL MINE(S) ARE NOW UNDERWAY WITH USAID ASSISTANCE. 

The quantify of coal required for the first unit will be about 1 1.4 million tons pier year and is to be supplied from the Lakhra Coal Field 
situated about 5 km. to 50 km. from the three proposed power plant sites. 

The Lakhra Cod Reid is spread over an area of about 400 sq.km, located to the North-West of Hyderabad and about 220 km. North-East 
of Karachi. There are private as well as public lease holdings in the field. The area presently being investigated is leased to a public sector 
organization working in cooperation with WAPDA. 

Expjerienced expatriate and Pakistani private companies are invited to participate in the investment, development and management of the 
mines. 

Options opien for consideration have been revised and extended to include the following: 

1 . Majority participation on an equity basis in the formation of a new company to develop and manage surface and underground mines in 
the Lakhra Raid to supply coal to the power plant, with full private sector management and operation of this new coal mining company. 

2. Long-term supply contract of part or all of the cool required for the first and/or subsequent power plants) from private an/or public 
concession areas in Lakhra. The supply of the coal could be direct, through one or more long-term sub-co n tractor s , or both. 

Ether one or a combination of the above options plus overall responsibility for the integrated management of the design, construct) or 
supervision and the coordinated start-up oF the mines and power pjlarrt. 

4. Variants of one or more of the above listed options that are consistent with the equity and management objectives indicated above. 

5. Those private sector parties who are interested in installing power plants of their own, based on Lakhra Coal, for sale of energy to 
WAPDA may give their indications with their desired plans. 

All qualified parties, both Pakistani and expatriate, who are interested in one or more of the above listed options and who have not already 
done so are invited to write to or telex the undersigned no later than. May 15, 1985 to obtain a copy of the Information Package and to 
enter into discussions. The Information Package will contain the original request for Expressions of Interest, amendments to it, and status 
reports on USAID funded feasibility studies now underway. Contacts from principals are preferred. 

The deadline for the find submission of prequaliftcation information from firms interested in either or all of the options is June 30, 1985. 

Firms will be prequah'fied for one or more of the options by August 15, 1985. Prequatifisd firms will be invited to take observer status at 
their expense in on-going project Feasibility studies, and will receive'regular progress reports and final reports on these studies. 

FOLLOWING DISCUSSIONS WITH PROSPECTIVE AID DONORS AND APPOINTMENTS OF A FINANCIAL ADVISOR TO THE PROJECT, 
IT IS PLANNED TO ISSUE A FORMAL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS IN LATE 1985 OR EARLY 1986 TO FIRMS THAT HAVE BEEN 
PREQUALIFIED FOR ONE OR MORE OF THE OPTIONS SELECTED FOR FINAL CONSIDERATION. 

MR. KHAWAJA DAOOD 

GENERAL MANAGER (THERMAL GENERATION) 

WATER AND POWER DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY (WAPDA) 

ROOM 197, WAPDA HOUSE, 

LAHORE, PAKISTAN, 

Phone: 213676. 

Telex: 44869 WAPDA PK. 


25 17 SoLnGss TJH 73 7 

41% 2846 SNETI 2J7 6X 10 

36% 31% SoNEof 282 1U 

249* 21% SORYM ZM ICLS 

31 23 SoUnCo 172 6J 

36 23 Soutine 1X0 33 

17 11V* So Ror 

8% 61* Sowrtrk 
2* 149* SwAlrl 

22% 119* SwtFar 

169* 1046 SwtCas 

769* 55 SB* EMI 

28% 194* SwEnr 

23% 17 5t*1P5 

1746 11% srortan 

2796 1 8% SceclP 

5496 334* Sperry 

30% Springs 


J u 
27 


43% 

581* 

24% 

211 * 

2096 

50% 

1896 

17 

3096 

35% 

10 % 

3% 

20% 

11 % 

33% 

22 

36 

12 

4596 

39% 

53% 

214* 

12*6 

77 

2146 

181* 

SV6 

331* 

3446 

141* 

57% 

122 

49% 

141* 

34% 

48% 

174* 

21% 

351* 

151* 

591* 

381* 


31% SouarD 
37% Squibb 
179* Sloley 
16% StBPrrt 
11 StMoIr 
39% Swoon 
6% SIPoeCs 
11% Stcndex 
19% 5 ton Wit 
23% Slorrett 
B9i StoMSe 
296 Steceo 
141* Sterdii 
996 StriBcp 
239* siHiDo 
151* Stevnj 

27 srwwm ... 

8% StkVCpf 1X0 85 
32Va StoneW 1M U f 
25 StoneC JO 22 10 
331* 5top5Hp ].io 24 10 
15V6 StorE t 1X4 8J 15 
2 viStorT 
32V6 Storer 

17% StrTftUn 

14% StridRt 


124 7JB 
6X0 77 8 
S2 17 II 
1X8 77 9 

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24 

172 3J 10 
IJ2 47 9 
1X4 5X 10 
1X0 28 16 
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-54 27 11 
72 27 10 
280 57 8 
9 

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1X0 3.0 11 
1700117 
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76 4X 10 
76 6X 10 
170 37 13 


U0 7X 10 
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JO 


3% SuovSh 
219* SunBKs 
241* SunCh 
64* 5unEI 
43% Sun Co 
904* SunCM 
3496 Sundstr ' 
7% SunADn 
24% SuprVI 
194* SupMM 
14 Swonk 
16%' Svbran 
28% Srbmpf 

ii% symaCp 

389* svntex 
254* Sysco 


X0 57 20 

170 3X.11 
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230 4J 11 
225 22 
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25 

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79 

172 13 14 
-36 1.1 15 


- -10 22 % 

13 27% 
167 44 

1616 2996 

14 7 
2505 25% 
3526 209. 

25 24% 
114 4096 
23 36 

1 244* 

86 27% 
1371 31'* 

127 14% 
346 Ta 
1027 22 
253 1ZV. 
130 15% 
967 78 

17 27% 
489 24 

ID 14% 
73 19 
3421 51% 
151 32V* 
765 37% 
1948 58% 
713 70 

87 20% 
316 11% 

4362 48% 
108 1796 
86 'IS 
112 38 % 

2 33% 
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12 396 

5 18% 
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875 31% 
73 17% 

18 28 
100= 114* 
23 44 

534 37% 
219 459* 
137x21 
2029 3% 

9705 79% 
132 20'* 
33 151* 
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22 34=6 
84 7 

1175 51% 
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653 19 
9 329* 
570 7436 
9S4 57% 
2114 34 


221*- 2296 
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78% 29% +1% 
6% 0% 

34?6 25 — % 
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2496 24% + '- 
4016 AOY* — % 
36 36 

249k 24% 

27 27% + % 

31 31 

14% 144k— V* 
716 7!6— % 
219* 22 
1116 12V* + % 
1596 15% + % 
761* 77% +1% 
27% 27%— % 
2396 23% + % 
1496 14% 

18% 18% 

50% 5JP6— % 
31% 32’A + Vb 
3696 37 —% 

579u 58 — ’* 

19% JP%— % 
20% 20%— 9k 
11 % 11 % 

47% 48(6 +196 
17 17V.— 96 

149* 149k— % 
28% 28 V* — % 
33% 33% — % 
10% 10%—"'* 
31* 3'* , 

18% 18% — % 
11 11 % 

304* 3094— 1* 
17 171* + Vi 

274* 28 + 1* 

114* lift* 

43% 43%— % 
2796 27*6 + V* 
44% 4596— '* 
2096 21 + 46 

2=6 3 — % 
77'* 779* +2% 
19=6 20 
15% 15% 

5% 596 + 14 
31% 32 — % 
34% 34% + 11 
6% 6%— '* 
501*- 51% +196 
104% 104% +11* 
4396 43%— % 
8% ■ 816— 1* 
33 339* + 96 

401* 48% 

151* 15% 
1896.189* 

3296 . 324*+ I* 
139* M -6 
57V1 57=6+ ’A 
33 3396-1% 


49% 32 UAL JSe U 7 
34 <* 24% UAL Pf 2J0 8X 
1596 7=6 UCCEL 19 

234* 16% UGI ZX4 8X 10 
24% 19% UGI Pt 2J5 11 J 
11% 3 UNCRes 

14 10 URS JOB 35 17 

339k 1796 USFGs 2J0 AT 450 
3596 22% USG 5 1X8 U 6 

1996 13% UnfPrst JO IJ 11 

10244 75 UnINV 3X5e 3X 10 

411* 3fF6 UComp 1X4 4X 10 

58% 324* UnCorb 140 8J 9 

7V6 496 UnlonC 
1896 12 UnEIsc 172 #J 6 

37 28% UnEl O) 430 127 

319* 24% UnEIPfM4X0 111 
2596 18% UnElBf 2X0 127 

18 13% UnElpf 2.13 11X 

25 19% UnEl pf 272 109 

6196 45 UnElBf 7X4 127 

62% 49 UEIPfH 8X0 12X 

50% 341* UnPoe 1X0 37 12 

111** 02 UnPcef 775 67 

20*6 94* unlrevl .18 IX 12 

70 53% Unryl Bf 8X0 11.9 

696 31* Unitor 154 

1046 10% UnBriW 17 

16 996 UBrdpf 

40 2096 UCMTV .14 J 59 

3296 22% UnEnre 2X8 BJ 23 

179e 9 Ulllum Z00 12J 3 

2896 19 U 1 1 III Bf 3X7 T47 

2814 20% Ulllupf 4.00 743 

14% 10 UIIIUBf 1.90 117 


4818 42=6 41% 
104 30 29% 

304 14% 13% 
772 24% 23% 
IDT 24 24 

96 99* 996 
22 1196 11% 
3170 J6 33% 
1432 3296 31% 
52 14% 1396 
66 99 98% 

335 35% 35% 
630 1896 38 
257 6 5% 

1827 18% 10 
300= 35% 35 
26 30=6 30%. 
121 24% 241* 
25 18 179* 

3 25% 25 
500= 6096-60% 

60= 63 621* 

2603 49=6 4396 
22 109% 107=* 
4280 19% 18% 
110= 67 67 

57 4% 496 

121 139* 1396 
5 1396 13% 
371 37% 371* 
755 27% 29 , 
93 161* 16% 
*4 27% 27 

4 23 279k 

34 13% 13% 


<29* +1% 
30 +96 
T4% + 96 
23=6 + V* 

24 
99* 

11%— % 
M +2% 
3296 + % 
14% 

98%- % 
3596— J* 
381* + % 
5=6 + 96 
18% - 
35% — % 

2496 — 96 
IS-. + 96 

25 

60% + % 
62% + % 
49 -+ 96 
108 

18% + % 
*7 

496+ % 
13=6 

13% + '* 
37% + I* 
TS'i. + 96 
16% 

27 • 
28—96 
13%+ % 


1 




T 




1 











35% TDK 

J7e X 

19 

69 

43=6 

43V 

43V— % 

% 

24 TECO 

236 

7X 

8 

1303x 31% 

30V 

31% 

% 13V6 

786 TGIF 



18 

57 

11% 

lift 

11% 

46 16% 

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1JS 

7,6 

9 

14 

16% 

16ft 

14=6— % 

- % 25V 

17 TRE 

1X0 

42 

15 

202 

23% 

23 

23ft— % 

% 81% 

SB% TRW 

3X0 

41 

10 

306 

72% 

7246 

72V— % 

E 10% 

3% TacBoal 




346 

3% 

3V 

3V 

V 70V 

52% TaftBnf 

1.12 

L7 

14 

>55 67% 

66 

67 -flft 

% 17V 

11% Talley 

X5e 2 

13 

121 

17% 

16% 

17 

V 20V 

14% Tolley pf 1X0 

5.1 


11 

19V 

19% 19V + % 1 

Vb 74 

46% Tambro 

320 

4J 

14 

621 

73% 

72ft 

73 

36% 

Zlft Tandy 



15 

1187 

31% 

30% .30% 

15% 

12% Tndyot 



14 

2 

14% 

14=6 

M% 

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51% Tekimx 

1X0 

13 

8 

184 

58% 

57% 

57=6 — Vb 

% 5V 

2% Tdcom 



7 

36 

3% 

3% 3% 

V6 302=6 151% Tektvn 



9 

130 244%24Z%'243% — 1* 

% 24 

13% Telrale 

J2 

IJ 

3? 

33 

77 

2TV 

21V — % 

% 48% 

20V Telex 



14 

917 

44% 

43 

44% +1% 

% 39% 

25% Tenipln 

.64 

1.9 

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300 

34% 

33V 

34 

% 44V 

32% Tetmao 

232 

6X 

11 

3177 

44% 

43=6 

44ft + V 

% 35V. 

211* Tcrdvn 



12 

4741 

23V 

77% 

22=6— V 

1* 20=6 

9% Tesoro 

AO 

32 

48 

457 

17% 

11% 

12 + ft 

36=6 

20% Tesorpt 2.16 

-92 


163 

7 A 

23% 

23% 

% 41% 

31% Texaco 

3.00 

7J 

39 

9771 

M 

38% 

39% + % 

% 41% 

31% TxABc 

15? 

48 

8 

- 84 

37- 

31% 

32 + ft 

Vk 47% 

32% TexCm 

1J6 

4J 

7 

797 

35 

34V 

35 

% 35% 

26% TxEsfs 

220 

63 

8 

598 

33 

37% 

32% 

S 57V 

52 TxETpf iJSelU 


491 

56ft 

56 

56ft 

4k 35V. 

25 Texlnd 

Mb 73 

15 

ITT 

30ft 

30 

30 — ft 

- % 149% 

90V. Texlrert 

2X0 

21 

9. 

1482. 9SV 

93% 

95=6 +3 

V* m 

1 Texlrtf 




184 

7ft 

3% 

3ft + % 

ft 27% 

16ft TexOGs 

18 

1.0 

11 

3500 

17% 

17% 

17% + V 

y> 

2BV TxPac 

JO 

12 

Tfl 

79 

37ft 

31V 

32 + % 

% 29% 

20V Tex UNI 

2.52 

8J 

7 

7009 

28V 

28% 28%— Vb 

% « 

2 Texfi In 




181 

4 

3% 

3% — ft 

ft 46V 

26V* Textron 

1X0 

.18 

15 

1444 

47(6 

46% 

47 + V 

ft 51 

28V Textrpf 

3.08 

4X 


13 

51% 

50V 

51% + % 

ft 41 

23V Textrpf 

IJO 

3J 


2 

41% 

41% 41% + V 

10% 

5% Thock 



47 

11 

9% 

m 

9% + % 

Hi 2» 

14% ThermE 



74 

13 

23V 

23% 

23V— ft 

V 431* 

28ft ThmBt % 1X4 

15 

15 

268 

35% 

34V 

35 — ft 

18=6 

12% Thom In 

X8b4j 

9 

7 

16% 

16 

16% + % 

% 26% 

13ft TtimMet 

40 

78 

8 

34 

U% 

14ft 

14ft — .ft 

ft 22=6 

12V Thrifty 

611 

29 

13 

114 

20% 

20ft 

20=6 

28% 

17% TldMtr 

«|} 

43 


141 

18% 

18 

18ft— ft 

ft 10% 

4% Heerin 




1516 

9% 

8% 

9 +56 

v 10% 

8 TlBripf 




640 

9ft 

8ft 

9 + % 


33V Time 

1X0 

1.9 

16 

788 

54 

53% 

54 — % 

% 102 

60% Tirnl PfB 1-57 

IX 


1 

95V 

95V 

95V— V 

% 23’* 

12 TTmplx 



15 

425 

UP* 

16V 

16% 

SI 

341* TlmcM 

1X6 

25 

14 

1741 

48V 

46V 

47% —1 

ft 59% 

47% Timken 

1X00 Xa 

16 

145 

50% 

50 

50 — % 

39% 

28V TodSho 

731 

42 

6 

77 

30% 

30% 

iSS-H 

ft 21 

14V Tokhtni 

JB 

24 

11 

170 

20ft 

19% 

ft 18=6 

13% TalEdls 

2J2 138 

5 

671 

18% 

77ft 

18% 

18ft 

V* 27% 

24% TolEdpf 172 13X 


7 

27 

27 + V6 

27% 

22 TolEdpf 3.75 13X 


101 

77% 

27% 

27% + % 

-ft 25V 

20 TafEdPf 3X7 13J 


31 

75% 

2SVl 

25V + ft 

ft 18 

13 1 * TolEdpf 236 13.2 






% 17V. 

13% TolEdpf 221 

13X 


11 

17 • 

16V 

17 + ft 

35V 

13% Tonkas 



16 

475 

38 

36% 

37V +2 

ft 43ft 

19ft ToolRol 

JB& U 

13 

21 

43% 

43 

43% + ft 

48 

19% Trchms 

1X0 

71 

13 

706 

47% 

46V 

47 + % 

V 17% 

9% ToroCo 

JO 

22 

9 

451 

14% 

14 

14=6 + % 

36 4% 

i Tosco 




177 

1% 

IV 

1=6 

% 3% 

BV Towte 




17 

9% 

9ft 

9ft— ft 

ft 351* 

24V Toy RU 1 



28 

1588 

35% 

34% 

35V + V 

ft 35=6 

19% Trocar 

J4 

1.1 

lb 

440 

32 ft 

31% ,32%— % 
» J3%- % 

ft 14 
=6 >S 

iI5?«Spf 

225 15.1 

5310244 ip 

=6 25% 

16% TWA PfB2JS 

92 


498 

ss 

74% 

3S27 5 

1 30V 

20!6 Transm 

1X4 

52 

13 4165 

29=6 

ft 20 

16% T ranine 

222 11J 


79 

1V% 

19% 

T»% + % 

ft 12% 

Wft TARIIy 

1X0 

82 

14 

JO 

12ft 

12% 

12ft 

ft 57ft 

37% Tratuco 

2.161 

iS 

11 

816 


55% 

55% + ft 

66% 

45ft Tmsepf 3X7 

204 

45 j 

64ft 

65 + ft 



2jd lai.n • 

HW- 

22 j 

21% 


I 92V 
| 24ft 

77 TrGPpf 8X4 9J; 
20 TrGPpf iso >05 


“TSl 

92 

23V 

93 -KH* 
23V— % 

| 13% 

6% TmsOh 



13 

266 

12% 

12%' 

12% + % 

| 3fift 

20 Trnnwy 

1X0 

53 

10 

32 

33% 

33% 

33%.,. 
33% + V 

| 37% 

24% Tmwtd 

xfl 

IX 

11 

2686 33% 

33 

| 20% 

9% TwW wtA 



19 

n ft urn 

1 17V 

14V Twld nf 

w 

XX 


9 

| 45% 35% Trovler 

1 52% 50% Trav Pf 

4X 

10 

6m 

44=6 

43% 

44% +1% 

4.16 

73 


437 

44ft 

ar* 

1 II 1 

19V Tricon 

3L53C1A1 


226 

25 

1 11 1 

30ft Trier pf 2J0 

92 


1 

2/V 

27V 

27V 

1 IK.1 

12% Trlalnd 

JO 

IX 

30 

287 

26ft 

24 

25ft —1 

31ft 

20V TrlaPc 

1X0 

3X 

8 

25 

2/V 

27% 

27V— % 

44% 

24% Trltane 

X4 

1.9 

16 

1049 

44ft 

42% 

43%— V 

6% 

4 Trlcnlr 

J8e 73 

12 

2 

6ft 

6Vk 

6ft + Hi 

8% 

5% Trieo 

^ £ 

16 

50 

6% 

6% 

6V + V 

21=6 

12% Trlntv 


61 

14% 

14 

>4% 

211* 

lift TrifEnp 
0% TrltEpf 
29V TuesEP 

-lot 

X 

41 

VZJ 

24 

22% 

22=6— ft 

13% 

I.IU 

8.1 


69x 13V 

13% 

13% + ft 

40 ft 

3X0 

7J 

10 

126 

40 • 

39V 

40 + % 

19 

16 TwlnDs 

XO 

42 

III 

16 

i6r» 

16V 

16V 

41 

27% Tvco Lb 

xa 

U 

9 

333 

45ft 

34% 

3516 + % 

17V 

11% Tyler* 

J0 

27 

8 

633 

15ft 

14% 

15 + % 

1 








1 


POSSIBLE DREAM 


One of th e paradoxes otourerajs the s of “telrorists"! contrasted 

with lettersfrom investors who ivronder w ^^®^| y l “31obe negath/e. white North 

n^^^'-Greafdangers^aione produce greaPvictories, and without the possibility of 
failure, achievement would be savorless 

teetered on the brim of disaster. 

We belong in this high compi 

2500 ^fhe'^^?wert 5 ^the conviction that anyone can attain arosierme uiiuugi ■ 
toSw entemrise and sensible thrift, that life’s prospectsane essentiallygood.that 

“penrttess LSition" Is bankable. Mankind «!!' ^soTfhemtriSt 3 ^ 
poet hailed as a “better, fresher, busier sph ere . To ingest the fmrts ■ of the rn^ket. an 
irwestor must resist the “Crowd", the manic-depressive behavior of th e Shreet . 

In evisceratinq “Crowd" psychology, we were branded as mavencte. hawng 
recommended BOEING below S17. FORD at S18, G.M. under S40, and SEARS at S16, 

^cSfSl'wes to decipher the maneuvers of the "Power 

they use in orchestrating stock prices. “Elitists pre-conditioned to buy jnto 
weakness, to sellTnto strength. Our forthcoming tetter focuses upon securities that 
may be acquired at premium prices, emulating an energy equity that C.G.H. 
recommended at S31. an equity that was “absorbed" by a predator at S80. 

For your complimentary copy, please telephone or wnte to: 


CAPITAL 

GAINS 


C.VXX Capital Venture Consultants 
Amsterdam B.V. 

Kalverstraat112 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) 27 51 81 Telex: 18536 


“I 


Name: 


Address: 


u= 


Phone: 


1HT26/4 


fj 


Fast performance does not guarantee future results 


12M0RBI 
US* Low Stock 


Dlv. YM. PE 


SM 

lltoHIsb Low . 


GootCKto 


22% 14% 
41% 35 
41 2* 

16% 996 

2% 2% 
38% 22 
8% 5% 
42% 29% 
329* 23 
30<* 22 
147% 11596 
299* 22% 
39% 31 '4 
76% 559* 
45 29% 

39V* 28=6 
24% 1796 
35 26% 

21 131* 

3376 22 
22% 149* 
27=* 18% 
23% IS 1 * 
53 30 

84% 45 
43 23% 

10 S% 
25% 2096 
26 2196 

219* 1796 
189* 15% 


Unltlnd 36 13 
Unjflnn 22 X 
UJerSfc 1X6 38 
UUMM 
UPkMfi - 
UsoIrG .12 A 
us Horn . . 

USLeos JO 2.1 
USSboe J6 Z7 
USStaef 1X0 3X 
USSflBrl275 1DX 
USStlpf 125 8.1 
U5ToO 1X2 45 
USWest 5X2 75 
UnTchs ijo 3J 
UTchpf 255 7.1 
UnITel 1X2 SX 
UniTlpf IJO 4J 
UWRl 
Unitrde 
Univor 


128 *7 
20 X 


....... X8 19 

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New Issue 


These Bonds having been sold, this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 

CHRYSLER 

FINANCIAL CORPORATION 

Troy, Michigan, U.S. A. 

DM 200 000 000 

7Vi Vo Bearer Bonds of 1985/1990 
Issue Price: 100 % 


A 


April 1965 



European Banking Company 
Limited 


Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 

Morgan Guaranty Ltd 


Orion Royal Bank 
Limited 


Swiss Bank Corporation International 
Limited 


Banque Paribas 
Capital Markets 

Creditanstalt-Bankverein 


Dresdner Bank 
Aktiengesellschaft 

Merrill Lynch 
. Capital Markets- 





Bayerische Landesbank 
Girozentrale 

Daiwa Europe 
Limited 

Genossenschaftliche 

Zentralbank AG — Vienna 

Salomon Brothers International 
Limited 

S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 


-saa-'- 

n«"'Kb. 

, nf Kre <?'etbank 
International Group 

Societe Cen* ra | e 















**: 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


Page 15 


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BUSINESS ftOUNDtfP 


Pickens to Offer to Sell 
Shares Back to Unocal 


_ The Asitnju-J Proa 

NEW YORK — T. Boone Pick- 
ens said Thursday that his invest- 
mem group pbnsto offer to sell its 
2.1.7 million shares of Unocal Cora. 
Mock back to the company if the 
group Tails in a court attempt to 
block Unocal's lucrative slock buy- 
hack offer. 

But Mr. Pickens insisted that be 
was not dropping his bid to acquire 
lire large California oil company. 
He said his group wanted to protect 
its investment. 

Mr. Pickens said that if Unocal 
succeeded in buying back 27.8 per- 
cent of its stock with securities val- 
ued at $72 a share, he would revue 
terms of his own S54-a*5lunr cash 
offer for 36.8 percent of the compa- 
ny's slock. 

’ “We are firmly committed to our 
objective of acquiring Unocal." 
Mr. Pickens said. "We will pursue 
that objective whether or cot the 
Unocal offer is enjoined and 
whether or not Undo! actually 



Orient Holdings Ltd. 
Says Profit Up 37% 

RtW «w 

HONG KONG — Orient 
Overseas Holdings Ltd. said 
Thursday that 1984 profit rose 
37 percent to 167JS million 
Hong Kong dollars ($21.56 mil- 
lion) from 122.S million dollars 
in the previous year. 

The company said it had ex-, 
iraord inary losses of 687 mil- 
lion dollars from provisions for 
losses on ship disposals, dimi- 
nution in vahie of vessels and 
deferred taxes resulting from 
changes in the British taxation 
system. 


purchases shales pursuant to its 
exchange offer.” 

Mr. Pickens is the chairman of 
Mesa Petroleum Co. of Amarillo, 
Texas, and leads Mesa Fanners IL 
an investment group that owns 13.6 
percent of Unocal's stack. Its cur- 
rent offer for another 64 million 
shares would raise its stoke to just 
over SO percent. 

Unocal said Tuesday that it 
would buy bade SO million shares 
of its stock with securities valued at 
$72 a share and that Mr. Pickens 
and his partners would be excluded 
from the offer'. 

The Pickens group had accumu- 
lated its current holdings of 23.7 
million shares of Unocal stock for 
$1.1 billion, or an average of $46.4 1 
a share. 

Unocal closed Wednesday at 
S47J575 per share on the New York 
Stock Exchange, down SI .875. It 
was trading early Thursday at $47 
per share. 

The Pickens group filed a lawsuit 
Wednesday seeking to block Uno- 
cal's offer on the grounds that the 
company engaged in "fradulent, 
deceptive and manipulative prac- 
tices" in violation of federal securi- 
ties law. 

It asks the court to enjoin Uno- 
cal from refusing to accept any 
shares tendered by the Pickens 
group and from completing the re- 
purchase until the exclusion is lift- 
ed- 

Mr. Pickens said Thursday that 
if the offer was not enjoined by 
April 30, the group intended “to 
tender our 23.7 minimi Unocal 
shares to Unocal’s amended ex- 
change offer in order to protect our 
investment in UnocaL" 

"The provision to exclude Mesa 
Partners II is still in force,*' said a 
Unocal spokesman. Barry Lane. 


Occidental 
Posts Rise 
In Profit 


$3 78-Million Bailout 
Is Arranged for DAL 


Reuters 

MAINZ, West Germany — The 
five West German shareholder 
bonks of Deutsche Anlagcn -Leas- 
ing GmbH, the troubled leasing 
concern, have agreed to cover 
losses of 1.18 billion Deutsche 
marks ($3782 million) on the com- 
pany's 1983 accounts, DAL man- 
' „ ‘Bgement board chairman. Ham 

lire result was in line with earlier Widens, said Thursday. 


The Animated Press 

NEW YORK — Occidental Pe- 
troleum Cofp. of (he United States 
said Thursday that its earnings rose 
8.S percent in the first quarter of 
the year from a year earlier, but 
only because of a large tax credit 


reports of weaker first-quarter 
earnings by several other large oil 
companies. 

Occidental said profit rose to 
S11S.7 million, or 45 cents a share, 
from $106.6 million, or 36 cents a 
share, a year earlier. But $32.9 mil- 
lion of the profit represented tax 
credits. Without this, profit would 
have declined by 223 percent. 

Occidental, which is based in 
Los Angeles, said lower oil prices 
reduced its operating results from 
oil and natural gas production. But 
it reported an after-ux gain of 
$66.5 million from the sale of pe- 
troleum interests in tire North Sea 
and California. 

"Our results in Colombia are 
confirming initial expectations," 
said Dr. Armand Hammer, the 
chairman. 

Also reporting results Thursday 
was Standard Oil Co. (Ohio), which 
said its profit fell 10 percent. 

Cleveland-based Sohio said first- 
quarter earnings fell to $343 mil- 
lion, or $1.46 a share, from S3S1 
million, or $1.54 a share, a year 
earlier. Sales rose 103 percent to 
$32 billion from $2.9 billion. 

Lower petroleum prices and a 
continued squeeze on profit mar- 
gins, along with a 34-percent in- 
crease in exploration, expenses were 
the primary factors contributing to 
the decline, according to Alton W. 
Whit chouse, Sohio’s chairman. 


He told a news conference a 
thorough reviaon of DAL’s books 
has taken into account all possible 
risks on its leasing business and the 
company is on a sound footing for 
future business. 

The banks had already covered 
losses of 224 million DM for 
DAL's 1982 accounts. DAL ran 
into heavy losses at the beginning 
of the 1980s, with the shareholder 
banks bringing in Mr. Widens dur- 


ing 1983 to rescue the company and 
make a thorough revision of its 
hooks. 

The main shareholder bank is 
Wesideutscbe Landesbank Giro- 
zemrale with a 30-pervcm stake. 
Other banks are Landesbank 
Rheinland Pfalz with 26.6 percent, 
Hessische Landesbank Girozen- 
irale and Bayerisehe Landesbank 
Girozemralc, each with 16.7 per- 
cent, and Dresdner Bank AG with 
10 percent. 

The bailout is also larger than 
the 900 million DM put up by a 
consortium of German banks in 
late 1983 to rescue the private 
banker Schroeder, Munchmcyer, 
Hengst und Co. 

The combined losses of 1.4 bil- 
lion DM for 1982 and 1983 at DAL 
are less than the bankers' forecast 
of 1.9 billion DM. 


Storer Accepts 
Buyout Offer 

limed Press J’lUcraolnnat 

MIAMI — Storer Communi- 
cations Inc. accepted Thursday 
a new offer or a leveraged 
buyout from a New York in- 
vestment company, an action 
designed to Uiwan a takeover 
threat by dissident shareholders 
who would liquidate the mon- 
ey-losing company. 

Kohlbetg, Kravis, Roberts & 
Co. made an improved offer of 
a three-part plan that offers 
shareholders $100 a share, jflus 
some equity in the new compa- 
ny, Storer said. It would give 
shareholders $75 a share in cash 
and $25 in preferred stock, plus 
warrants. 

A dissident stockholder 
group headed by Coniston 
Panners of New York hopes to 
oust Storer's management and 
liquidate the company. 


IBM Unit Is Lead Tenant 
Of Hongkong Land Project 


By Dinah Lee 

Iniermiltimal Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — IBM World 
Trade Corp. (HK) has rented about 
10 percent of Exchange Square, the 
Hong Kong city center complex 
developed by Hongkong Land Co. 

The signing Thursday of the 
lease with the unit of International 
Business Machines Corp. of the 
United States brings the total occu- 

> . . i. ^ _ uuuAiviieui uibnuiiu^iiM 


nurse the ailing property company 
back to health. 

“You cannot believe how good it 
feds to sign a lease like that," said 
Mr. Davies. 

Other tenants include Citicorp of 
the United States, Schraders Asia 
Ltd., and Credit Agricole, the 
French cooperative bank. 

Hongkong Land claims the Ex- 
change Square project has pro- 
duced one of the world's most tech- 


Hongkong Land's managing direc- 
tor, David Davies, said. 

IBM will be the lead tenant in 
the building — which has cost 
Hongkong Land 83 billion Hong 
Kong dollars ($1.10 billion) to 
complete. 

Mr. Davies inherited the project, 
which is also to house the Stock 
Exchange, when he was chosen to 


The project has set the pace for 
the local property market In Hong 
Kong, property accounts for more 
than a third of the weighting on the 
local Hang Seng index. 

Mr. Davies said Hongkong Land 
has leased as much top-grade prop- 
erty from January through April 
this year as the annual average for 
the entire market in the last four 
years. 


COMPANY NOTES 


Aflfed Corp. said its eugineered- 
plcsucs group received an exclusive 
license to use the technology of 
Unitika Ltd., Osaka. Japan, to pro- 
duce and market biaxially oriented 
nylon film in the United States, 
Canada and Mexico. 

British Aerospace has signed a 
memorandum of understanding 
with China Aviation Supplies 
Corp. for the purchase of 10 BAc- 
146 Series 100 airliners seating 86 
passengers. 

Chesapeake Corp. reached a 
5214-million agreement with Philip 
Morris Inc. to acquire two paper 
manufacturers, Wisconsin Tissue 
Mills Inc. and Plai Dwell Paper Co. 

China Airlines, Taiwan's sta- 
te-owned carrier, and Hong Kong- 
-based Cathay Pacific Airways 
have signed a new five-year accord 


Poland Nurtures a Few Private Firms 



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-:.sS: «• 


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- 

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(Continued from Page 13) 
worker morale is a provision that 
now permits managers in certain 
state factories to be elected by 
workers. 

In Poland, it is the Folonia com- 
panies that are serving as a stimu- 
lus if only by proriding something 
of a control group against which 
productivity can be measured. 

“Just like the black market 
serves to tell us what the real value 
of things are, so the Polonia firms 
help establish the real value of 
work in a setting where wages, ex- 
penditures and production norms 
are all centrally planned." said a 
Polish economist- 
some political opponents of the 


manager, was the linkage of salary 
levels to productivity. 

“It is true that our average entry- 
level worker gets about 50 percent 
more than his counterpart in a state 
enterprise, but I would say that he 
has to work more than 50 percent 
harder,” said the manager. “We 
have a number of people who come 
and leave very soon, making it dear 
they prefer to do less and receive 
less, and we have even more we 
dismiss because they cannot work 
up to standard." 

“Our biggest problem." he went 
on, “is Ending managers attuned to 
making quick, independent deci- 
sions. Hone people are trained to 

think vertically, rather than hori- 

idea have pointed totbe operations zontafly. They learn early that you 
of some investors, who brought in ' " ’ 

almost no money and then shut 
down operations after taking ad- 
vantage of the tax holiday only to 
start another undercapitalized en- 
terprise. 


saying no than saying yes.” 
Despite such problems. 


Plas- 


tomed’s owners in Frankfurt have 
already recouped their $150,000 
cash investment. 

“Their idea was to exploit Polish 
know-how and engueenng talent." 
Mr. Czernecki said during a tour off 
the plant. “So far most of our pro- 
duction has been for the Eastern 
bloc. This part has been easy be- 
cause we essentially have a monop- 
oly and can sell everything we pro- 
duce and have the backing of the 
government, which needs our pro- 
duction. 

“Meanwhile we distribute most 
of our ruble and zloty earnings to 
our workers in the form of bonuses 
and incentives and we are now us- 
ing the staff to develop a line of 
fairiy sophisticated equipment for 
export to the West" be said. “The 
real test of our efforts will come 
when we face real competition." 


Usinor Posts 
Loss in 1984 

Reuters 

PARIS — Usinor, France's 
largest state-owned steel group, 
reported on Thursday a toss of 
7.59 billion francs ($790 mil- 
lion) in 1984, more than half of 
the loss in a major restructuring 
plan. 

The company reported a loss 
of 5.34 biluon francs in 1983. 
Usinor had 4.1 billion francs in 
exceptional charges for the re- 
structuring in 1984 compared 
with only 636 million francs in 
1983. 

Net loss excluding exception- 
al items in 1984 fell to 3.7 bil- 
lion francs from 4.7 billion in 
1983, while group volume rose 
19 percent to 38.7 billion francs 
in the same period. 


"t b3 




«:.-»* - 


«, = .•. tfl.'S 


»■ 



-t --** & 


_j/ri 


e experiment is not fully con- 
clusive, although there is a general 
belief among many workers that 
wages in the Polonia companies are 
considerably higher, that work con 
ditions can be better and opportu- 
nities for advancement can be 
greater. 

Managers of state enterprises 
now often explain dedining pro- 
duction by saying that their em- 
ployees are bong drawn away to 
the'Polonia Grms. 

“That is nonsense,” said Andxzei 
Czernedti, the manager of Plas- 
Siomed, noting that the Polonia 
companies probably employed no 
more than 100,000 people. But he 
said that behavioral changes appar- 
ently were being forged by some of 
the Polonia companies. 

“You can see the difference in 
our bathrooms," Mr. Czernecki 
said. "All over Poland, in the Mate 
factories, the bathrooms are filthy, 
few people haw pride in their work 
place, while here, because real work 
has real value, the bathrooms are 
kept clean." 

The biggest difference in the 
work, said the Austrian-trained 


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XEROX CORPORATION 

(CDR's) 


TV wick-rsigrut] announus that as from 
2nd May 1985 at Kas-Asaociaiie N.V„ 

SuinMiajl 17—. Amsterdam, div_cp.no. 
4-i of iV CDR’a Xerox Corpora- 
lion, each repr. 1 share. Will be 
luiabft- uuii Dlls. 2.18 net (div. per 
ri-rnnl-dulr 03. 01. 1985: eras S -,75 
ii.sh.1 after deduction of 15% L5A-UX 
U S -.l 12$ - Dfls. -.38 per CDR. 
Dit.trix belonging to non-residents of 
Tin- Nether Ian* will be paid after de* 
dui liiifr ‘A an additional 15% USA-lax 
(= § ..1125 = Dfls. -38) with Dfls, 

1.80 net. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
- COMPANY N.V. 

Am-tepfiim. 16th \pril 1985. 


advertisement 




Lid 


:e»"- 

. er ein^" 1 

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ictban^uP 




Gri" 


iWiV- 


r.t-nf 


t?ral e 


? GRAND METROPOUTMt P.Lfi. 

(CDR’h) 

. The miili-rMpiifl jnrnniini> that as from 
- 2nd May 1985 at Ki-A-*oeurii- N.V.. 
hjmi-lw.it 172. \ms-tenfara. div.cjt.no. 
'29 ■•{ i h<- CDR's Grand Melropoli- 
. hr P.LL, each rejpr. 50 shares, 
hill lie |«ialilr »ilh Dfl». 12,04 In- 
iiiul ilitiiliiu! fur the year ending 30lh- 
S-iireinf"-r fWDj 5.5|i JUT share. 

.Tj\ . n-ilil E 1.1785 » IJIU 5.16 |*t 
CUR. .. . 

\i.ii.n~.idini-. nf llie I uitid Kinjzdnm 
■ , ,i» miU rLuni this lax i-ndil i»fii-n the 
n-li-i.ini la'- ir« - Jti rani-, this bt-ilin. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.Y. 

Xin-li-riLuii. IHih I0H5. 


Summary Rnancial Statement 
as of December 31, 1984 


Assets 


(In million of Lux. Francs) 
Balance sheet 


o 


Liabilities 


Liquid Assets 

- Cash, Balances on Postal Cheque 
Account and with 


Liabilities to Banks at sight 
(inch those maturing 
within one month) 


211.573 


Central Banks 

6.740 

Liabilities to Banks 


- Balances with Banks at sight 


for agreed periods of more than 


(IncL those maturing 


one month 

147.642 

wfthln one month) 

108.897 

Current Accounts and Deposits 


Balances with Banks for agreed 


- Current Accounts 


periods of more than 


(inef. deposits maturing within . 


ond month 

124.769 

one month) - 

35.930 

Bills cfiscounted 

14.746 

- Deposits (agreed periods of 


Other Advances . ; - 

127.368 

more than one month) 

30.947 

Secqrlties 

69.315 

Miscellaneous 

7.111 

Misceflaneous 

7.605 

Subordinated Loan 

3.180 

RxedAssets 

4.088 

Capital and Reserves 

' 12.075 


Provisions for Contingencies 
pnd Depredation 
Balance-brought forward 


463.528 


15.069 
1 

463528 


Profit and Loss Account 


Expenditure 



Revenue 

Interest and Commissions 

22.634 

interest and Commissions 

23.176 

General Expenses 

560 

Other Income : 

4.723 

Provisions for Contingencies 

5.068 

Release of Provisions for 


Depreciation 

10 

Contingencies and Depreciation 

432 

Other Expenses 

59 

28£31 


28.331 


The itemized Balance Sheet and Profit and Loss Account wfl be published in the “Memorial - 
Recueil Special des Social £s et Associations du Grand- Du chd de Luxembourg". For your copy 
of the Annual Report in English, German 'and French please contact: 

Compagnfe Luxembourgeoise de la Dresdner Bank AG - Dresdner Bank International - 26, rue 
du March6-aux-Herbes, P.O. Box 355, L-2013 Luxembourg, Telephone 47601. Telex 2558 
DRINT LU (all departments), Telephone 42816, Telex 2302 DRIFX LU (Euromoney/Forelgn 
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over the route between Hong Kong 
and Taipei. 

Daewoo Motor Co.'s workers 
ended a nine-day strike at the 
South Korean company's vehicle 
assembly plant after they agreed to 
a 16- percent wage increase. More 
than 2.000 workers had struck. 

De Beers Consolidated Mines 
Ltd. predicted increases in sales of 
rough diamonds if the world econ- 
omy continues to grow. The annual 
report said buyers were interested 
in a wider range of stones and busi- 
ness increased in the larger sizes in 
this year's London sales. 

Eastman Kodak Co. said it and 
1CN Pharmaceuticals Inc. have 
formed a *joim research institute" 
to investigate new biomedical com- 
pounds aimed at stopping the 
spread of viral infections and slow- 
ing the aging process. 


Fleet Holdings PLCs proposed 
transfer of newspapers to United 
Newspapers PLC has been referred 
to the British Monopolies Commis- 
sion. The newspapers, including 
the Daily Express and the Sunday 
Express, comprise the former Bea- 
ver brook newspaper empire. 

Fujitsu Ltd. has signed a basic 
agreement with Comp an i a Na- 
tional Telefonica de Espana to set 
up a joint computer company in 
Spain, a Fujitsu spokesman said. 
The new company is to produce 
and sdl medium-size computers 
and will be 60-percent owned by 
Fujitsu. 

Hughes Tool Go. is uncertain 
about its chances of operating at a 
profit in the second quarter. The 
company said in its annual report 
that it might incur losses in the first 
half this year. 


Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. 
has won orders for a thermal power 
plant valued at about 10 billion yen 
(about $40 million) from China 
National Technical Import Corp. 
and a geothermal power plant or- 
der for about 13 billion yen from 
the U3. Chevron Resources Co. 

Pan Ocean Shipping Co. will ab- 
sorb Daeyang Shipping Co., an af- 
filiate of the Daewoo Group, ac- 
cording to Pan Ocean officials who 
declined to give the purchase price. 
Pan Ocean win expand its fleet by 
12 ships as a result of the transac- 
tion. 

Toyo Soda Manufacturing Co. of 
Japan said it has set up a joint 
venture in the Netherlands with 
DSM NV to cany out market re- 
search on and produce aspartame, 
a low-calorie sweetener used in soft 
drinks. 


'DIY* Chip Sales Seen Rising 


(Continued from Page 13) 

a desk-top calendar. An engineer 
can design ihe chip on the personal 
computer, using so-called comput- 
er-aided engineering programs 
available from other vendors. 
Then, the Altera software changes 
that design into instructions for en- 
coding the chip. A blank Chip is put 
into the programmer and emerges 
programmed 15 seconds later. 

The customer-definable chips 
are still small and relatively unso- 
phisticated, containing the equiva- 
lent of a few hundred logic ele- 
ments. In contrast, a powerful 
microprocessor has thousands of 
logic elements, (f more sophisticat- 


ed customized chips are needed, so- 
called semi-custom drips, using 
gate arrays, can be used. These 
chips are partly premamifactured 
and then customized in the final 
manufacturing steps in the fs 
The wait for arch drips can still 
several weeks. 

Lasemath Inc, a start-up com- 
pany in San Jose, California, is try- 
ing to apply a variation of the fuse- 
blowing idea to more complex 
chips. The company’s system, stQl 
under development, would use 
thousands of Brief pulses from a 
high-powered laser to cut away all 
but the desired circuits. The aim is 
to give customers a drip in 24 
hours. 


STOCK 

uss 

USS 

DeVoe- Holbein 
International bv 

Ste 


City-Clock 

International jiv 

2% 

3V4 

1 Quotes as ot April 25, 1965 I 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and wtthout 
obligation. 


First Commerce Secnritiesbv 
Herrngrachr 485 
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The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)5 1 20 26090 1 
Telex: 14507 firconl 


H 


HACHETTE 

Jeon-Luc LagardAre, Chairman of 
the Board of Hochette SA, parent 
company of the largest French 
communication group, announced 
ihe following results for the fiscal 
year ended December 31. 1984. 

?. The parent company's after tax 
profirs excluding extraordinary 
gains increased from FJr. 1 15 
million (1983} to F.Fr. 127 million 
(19841. 

In addition, after tax extraordi- 
nary gains amounted to F.Fr. 53 
minion vs. 135 million for the 
preceding year. Consequently, 
total after fax profits amounted 
to F-Fr. 180 million in 1984 vs. 
F.Fr. 250 million in 1983. The 
high figure of 1983 is explained 
by the fact that capital gains 
were exceptionally important 
due to the sole of certain subsid- 
iaries during 1983. 

2. After lax consolidated earnings 
for the Group (not yet audited] 
excluding extraordinary gains 
will amount to approximately 
F.Fr. 202 mi Cion vs. F.Fr. 187 
million a year ago. After tax 
extraordinary gains for the year 
will be in the range oF F_Fr. 62 
m3bon vs. F.Fr. 142 million for 
the preceding year. As a result, 
total 1984 earnings for the 
Group will amount to FJr. 264 
miHian w F.Fr.329 million in 
1983. 

3. The dividend of Hochette SA.. 
to be approved by the next 
Shareholders Meeting should 
amount to F.Fr. 18 JO per share 
vs. FJr. 1650 for the preceding 
year. 


Announcement by a South African organization 

A MODEL IN MINING 

Mr. R.A. Plumbridge, Chairman of Gold Fields of South Africa Limited, 
talks to David Cane. Editor of the “Sunday Times Business Times' \ 



Mr. R.A. Plumbridge 
Chairman 

Gold Fields of South Africa Limited 


G 


old Fields of South Africa, 
a front ranker among 
mining houses in South 
Africa, is descended from a 
company launched by Cecil John Rhodes 
nearly one hundred years ago, of which it 
became independent in 1971. 

Its associate companies include three of 
the richest gold mines in the world. 
Within ihe group as a whole, earnings 
amount to some US$1.3 billion annual- 
ly. In 1984 Gold Fields accounted for 
139 tons of gold — more than 12® of the 
free world’s new production — as well as 
significant quantities of coal and base 
metals. On the Johannesburg Stock Ex- 
change (JSE). Gold Fields and its ad- 
ministered companies were collectively 
valued at USS4.3S billion. 

Under Gold Helds administration are the 
celebrated Driefontein and Kloof opera- 
tions, both of which have prospects of 
contimied high yields at relatively low 
cost over a long life. Driefontein Con- 
solidated ’s two divisions last year pro- 
duced 73 tons of gold; at US$2.67 billion, 
Driecon's market capitalisation makes it 
the second largest company on the JSE. 
Ollier important gold mines in the Gold 
Fields group are Deelkraal, Doora- 


fontem, Ubanon and Vemerspost. Main 
investment companies in the group are 
New Wits, Selected Mining and Vbgd- 
struisbult; limited strategic investments 
outside mining include stakes in Com- 
mercial Union, the group’s short term 
insure^ and in Standard Bank Invest- 
ment Corporation. 

Shareholders in Gold Fields of South 
Africa have realised an average all-in 
return of their investments of 30% per 
annum in the past five years. Consoli- 
dated Gold Fields of London has the 
largest single holding of' 48% in the South 
African company which, however, enjoys 
autonomy in management and is entirely 
responsible for its own funding. 

Gold Fields of South Africa is distinct 
from other mining housesin South Africa 
in having largely resisted the urge to 
diversify out of mining into other indus- 
try and finance. No less than 91% of 
group income is from mining- 82% from 
gold and 9% from other metals and coal. 
Its position is a matter of deliberate pol- 
icy, says Chairman Robin Plumbridge. 
“We have analysed the South African 
muring industry and taken the view that 
it will remain competitive in world com- 
modity markets as a supplier of quality 
products on a basis of reliability, thanks 
to the country’s excellent infrastruc- 
tures. Gold Fields means to continue 
playing a major role in that success story 
by wholehearted commitment to a busi- 
ness in which we are acknowledged 
experts, both technically and manageri- 
aliy.” 

Mr. Plombridge is cautiously bullish on 
gold. In the belief that it still has impor- 
tant financial and industrial use, he 
argues that large US budget and balance 
of trade deficits, together with currency 
fluctuations and the world’s unresolved 
debt problems, will underpin gold’s 
hedging role; meanwhile, at lower dollar 
prices, industrial demand has tended ro 
provide a floor price for the metal. 

Gold Fields, whose corporate antece- 
dents were instrumental in discovering 
the fabulously rich gold reefs ol the Wesr 
WItwatersrand in tbeearly 1930’s, retains 
a large proportion of profits for explora- 


tion. Besides investigating gold pros- 
pects south of the existing Kloof mine, it 
is exploring the feasibility of mining 
platinum in the northern Transvaal as 
well as several promising coal deposits. 

Recent acquisitions bear out the group’s 
policy of ch'versifymg its mining inter- 
ests. The 90% interest in Clydesdale 
Collieries broadens a coal base so far 
represented only by Apex Mines; an 
increased stake in O'okiep Copper 
brought with it the management contract 
previously beld by Newmont Mining. 
Gold Fields has a 55.4% share in the 
Black Mountain lead/zinc/copper mine 
and has the right of first refusal on Phelps 
Dodge’s sale of its 44.6% share. 

“We will mine anything that is 
economic,” declares Me Plumbridge, 
who is unpersuaded by the avanr garde 
thesis that the world has entered an age of 
low growth in demand for commodities: 
“There may be shrinking per capita con- 
sumption of metals in the industrialised 
world, but the size of the industrialised 
world is increasing ” 

Gold Fields is an equal opportunity 
employer as far as South African legisla- 
tion permits it to be. Through the 
Chamber of Mines the group has thrown 
its corporate weight behind efforts to 
abolish the last vestiges of job reserva- 
tion. Its own remuneration practice is 
based on the principle of equal pay for 
equal work done, rather than on 
minimum wages which, in Me Plum- 
bridge’s view, would tend to aggravate 
u nem ployment in a' sub-continent 
characterised as h is by grinding poverty. 
“Starting wages must be marker-related. 
The priority is to get a person employed; 
once he is on the ladder he can start to 
climb by improving his own productivity 
through our training schemes.” 

Rapid' advances in technology and all- 
round productivity notwithstanding, 
South Africa’s mines remain labour- 
intensive. Of 700,000 jobs provided by 
the industry as a whole to workers from 
six countries. Gold Fields accounts for 
some 82,000; of the total yearly wage bill 
ofUS$I.8 billion, theGold Fields group's 
share is some US$232 million. 


GOT D FTF.T ,DS 

OF SOUTH AFRICA LIMITED 












INTERNATIONAL 


Floating Rate Notes 


lumr/Mot. CMmHn) bm Askd 


Dollar 


April 25 




Jrv . 
















U.S. Futures April 25 



Season Sanson 
High Low 


Don High Low One Chg. 


Grains 


£83 2X3% — .81 
281% 281 VS — mVi 
171 Vi 271% — mVh 
liitt 2MVi —JR 
2J4'4 274V. — J1Q% 
179 ISO 
2 *W 283 +X0% 


Non Dollar 


WHEAT [CBT1 ■ 

+000 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
4JJS 132% Mav 351 Vi 3X3% 149 3XM6 — -02 

190 124 V. Jul 333% 135 238 338V. —JOS 

376% 126 See 13» 134V. 338% 121*. —MV: 

3X3% +33% Doc 142% 144 Vi 33BV, 139 — s33% 

374% 3X0% MaT 144% 144% 3X1% 143% — X4V. 

4.02 143 Mav 139 -44 

Esi. Sales Prev. Sales 1830 

Prev. Day Open ini. 37.193 off 1T0 
CORN (CUT) 

5X00 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 

130 149% May 284% 285 283 281% —81 

131 273 Jul 282% 283% 281% 281% —81% 

121% 244% See 271% 272% 271% 271% —81% 

295 240% Dec 24716 247% 244% 244% —81 

110 249% Mar 274% 2J74 274% 274% —80% 

121% 274% May 280 281 279 280 

284 277% Jul 281% 283 280% 282 +80% 

Est. Sales Prev.5t.i*! 27873 

Prev. Day Open M1.12S387 off L333 
SOYBEANS ICBT) 

5800 bu minimum, dot lor* per bushel 
7.97 570% Mar +00 484 597% 598% —81% 

789 580% Jul mm 6.12% 484% 506% — J00% 

756 583 AW 510% 515 509% 6X9% —80% 

571 581 Se« 514 515 689 509 —81% 

540 583% NOV 63fi &22% 517 517% —83% 

579 5X4% Jan 532 533% 528 528% —84% 

782 504% Mar 542 543 539 539% —84 V. 

7.79 515 Mar 549% 550 547 547% —84% 

556 538 Jtri 553% -84% 

Est. Sales P rev. Sales 34.715 

Prey. DavOpen Int. 64,329 up 1.127 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 Ions- dollars per ton 

20588 12480 May 12480 12480 12380 12110 —130 

19550 13080 Jul 13080 13(L20 129.19 129 JO — 'U0 

18080 13100 Ado 13120 13120 13280 132.10 —130 

17950 13580 Sep 13550 13520 13480 13490 — L10 

1BO90 13880 Oct 13980 13980 137.50 13780 —130 

18480 14480 Dec 14480 14480 M27U 14290 —180 

16380 14500 Jan 14680 146J0 14550 14530 —180 

20550 151J0 Mar 15180 15180 15080 150.10 — L40 

16250 15550 May 15530 —180 


7.97 

SJDVi 

MOV +00 

6X4 

+97% 

739 

+80*. 

Jul 

+08% 

+12% 

+06% 

7J6 

583 

Aug 

+10% 

+15 

+09% 

+71 

5X1 

Sea 

+14 

+15 

+09 

+48 

5X3% 

Nav 

+20 

A*Ht 

+17 

6J9 

5X4% 


+32 

+33% 

+28 

7X2 

4X6% 

Mar 

4X2 

6X3 

+39 

7.79 

+15 

May 6X9% 

+50 

6X7 

+58 

+38 

Jul 







147X0 

16200 

Jut 




15970 

—1X0 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 1*510 




Prev. Day Open Int. 47X20 up 273 




SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 
60jxnibs-doiknperl00 

bs. 





33X8 

2280 

May 

3360 

3*00 

3350 

33J8 

+J5 

3225 

2270 

Jul 

32J5 

3272 

3215 

3227 

+X5 

31.17 

2250 


31X0 

31X5 

31X0 

31X3 

+X5 

3035 

22J0 

seo 

30X5 

31 JO 

30X5 

30X5 

+X2 

20X5 

2290 

Oct 

29X0 

3037 

29X0 

2073 

+J6 

2SJD 

2250 

Dec 

28X5 

29X5 

28X0 

2875 

+J0 

7ff.K 

2360 

Jan 

Mm 

29X7 

28X0 

28X7 

+J7 

2775 

24X0 

Mar 

28.10 

28X0 

28X5 

28.10 

+X0 

26X0 

24X0 

May 




27X5 

+X5 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sales 27.113 





Prev. DavOaen Int, 59X39 up 1831 
OATS (CBT) 

5800 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
1J1 186% Mav 187 187% 

178% 181% Jul 182 182% 

179 ISM 500 189% 180 

182% 183% Dec 183% 184% 

187% 186% Mar 

Est. Sates Prev. Soles 460 

Prev. Day Open Int 3724 up 147 


184% 186% —86% 
180% 181% —801*2 
188% 188% — JJ1 

183 183 —81 

185% —an 


All of these securities having been sold, this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


U.S.$3 5,000,000 

Mitel Corporation 


14%% First Mortgage Notes Due April 15, 1993 

(Interest payable April 15 and October 15) 


Drexel Burnham Lambert 


INCORPORATED 


April. 1985 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40800 lbs.-cants per lb. 

4980 4272 Jim 6272 6377 

4787 6115 Aug 64.12 6480 

6590 6180 Oct 6120 6137 

6785 4140 Dec 64 JO 6*75 

67X5 6480 Feb 6530 6530 

6787 6525 Apr 

Est, Sole* 10754 Prev. SolM 12J84 
Prev. Dav Open Int 56731 OH624 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

45000 n»s^ certs per lb. 

7275 64JD May 6540 6580 

7170 6568 Aug 6870 4875 

71M 6780 S»p 68X5 6880 

7232 67.10 Oct 68.10 6875 

7120 <7.90 Mav 6985 4987 

7980 6925 Jan 7080 7085 

Est sale* L572 Prev. Sales 1837 
Prev. Day Open Int. 8X08 UP86 
HOGS (CME) 

30800 ibc^ cents per lb. 

5540 4685 Jun 4680 4590 

5577 48.95 Jul 49.15 4985 

5477 4780 Aim 4985 4987 

5175 4SM Oct 4680 4590 

5085 4670 Dec 47.7J 4832 

5080 4525 Feb 4880 4885 

4775 <500 Apr 

4985 &7M Jun 4885 4525 

47J5 47J5 Jul 

Est. sales 5810 Prev. Sales 737 9 
Prev. Day open Ini. 23887 off 40 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38800 lbs.- cents per lb. 

8280 61.15 May 6175 64J8 

8247 6215 Jul 6+10 667 S 

8085 6020 Aug 6480 6*90 

76,3a 6115 Feb 7187 71 JO 

75X0 6483 Mar 70.10 7040 

7580 7040 MOV 7180 . 7180 

7680 7030 Jul 7275 7275 

Est So las 6345 Prev. Sates 7819 
. Prev. Day Open Int. 12829 off 24 


6280 6272 

6480 64.10 

6292 6297 
6430 6437 
6490 6487 

44 an 


6580 6582 
6830 6332 

6830 6837 
6885 600 

6885 6897 
6985 6985 


4633 4680 
4980 4940 
4935 4985 
4645 4680 
47J5 48.12 
4850 4880 
4583 
4885 48.15 


6160 6447 
6585 6585 
6177 6480 
7080 7187 
70.10 7070 
7180 7280 
72JS 7275 


COFFEE C(NYCSCB) 

37800 lbs.-cants per lb. 

15280 12281 Mgy 14680 14635 

14930 12180 Jul 14780 14735 

14780 12780 Sea 14680 146.95 

145 JO 12935 DeC 14580 14680 

14480 12880 Mar 14380 14475 

142J5 13180 May 

14080 13580 Jut 

14280 13275 Sep 

Est. Sales 4,100 Prev. Sales 4.912 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 11J30 off 129 
SUGARWORLD 11 (NYCSCE1 
1 12000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

1080 no May 333 334 

9.95 342 Jul 389 382 

9J5 389 Sep 177 382 

7.05 373 OCt 380 384 

7J5 4.15 Jan 4.15 435 

933 4X3 Mar 480 483 

7.15 485 Allay 4.97 582 

689 586 Jul 5.17 504 

630 532 Sep 

Est. Sales 11364 Prev. Sales 13842 
Prev. Day Open Int. 61999 uo239 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tons- S per tan 

2570 1996 Mav 3415 2429 

WOO 1998 Jul 2148 2155 

3415 1967 Sep 2095 2102 

2337 1945 Dec 2047 2050 

2190 1955 Mar 2043 204} 

2130 1960 Mav 


14580 145.90 
14585 14631 
14535 14633 
14475 14521 
14380 14475 
143X8 
14250 
14180 


325 330 

383 385 

373 17J 

386 387 

4.15 424 

474 474 

494 495 

5.15 5.15 
525 


2402 2413 
2131 2136 
2077 a®) 
2025 2026 
2037 2022 


Metals 


COPPER (COME XI 
25800 lbs.- cents per lb. 

6585 6125 Apr 

9280 S&3B May 6265 6380 

6475 6185 Jun , __ 

00.25 5780 Jul 6180 6680 

f+25 £8 » a %% 

8000 5980 ftter 65.10 6+£» 

74X0 S-J8 ST S| g 

7080 4230 Sep 6620 6620 

7030 6400 Dec 

7020 6530 Jan 

Est Sales 13800 Prev. Spies 1+fiB 
Prev. Dav Open InL B+976 off 882 
ALUMINUM (COM EX] 

40800 Itk&.-cents oer lb. 

4980 4870 apt 

SZSO *7X0 Mav 4880 4885 

4925 49.10 Jun „ „ 

59X0 4680 Jul 4930 4980 

7430 4925 See 58.10 50.15 

3083 50X5 Dec 

7680 5175 Jan 

7380 5185 Mar 

6675 5175 /May 

63X5 5585 Jul 

5210 5180 Sop 

Dec 
Jan 

Est. Sales 400 Prev. Sales 265 

Prev, Day Open Int 3.181 uo42 
SILVER (COMEX) 

5800 trov azv cents per troy az. 

6758 5578 Aar 

15138 5538 Mav 6198 6298 

14618 5628 Jol 6268 63+5 

11838 5738 Sep 6358 6488 

1238X 5908 Dec 6508 4618 

12158 5958 Jan 

11938 6078 Mar 6708 6788 

18488 *218 May 6798 4348 

««UJ 4358 Jul 6928 6920 

9408 6*18 SOP OT1 -5 7318 

mss 6678 Dec 7228 7248 

7898 7638 Jan 

Est Sales 19800 Prev. Sales 20X27 
Prev. Day Oaen till. 75839 off 893 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 trov at- dollars per trov at 
44780 23680 Apr 28130 28180 

28780 25180 Jun 

44980 24180 Jul 28180 28580 

39380 25080 Oct 28780 28980 

37380 24080 Jan 29380 29480 

32980 Z7V83 APT 29980 30180 

EU. Sales 1,191 Prev. Sales 2326 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 12449 wttt 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 
too trov o*. dollars per az 
15980 10680 Jun 10975 11080 

14175 10675 Sep 10075 10975 

14180 105.50 Dec 10685 10875 

12780 10680 MOT 

Est. Sales 318 Prev. Seles 633 
Prev. Day Open Int 7879 up 129 
GOLD (COMEX) 

100 trov at- dollars oer trov az. 

51480 2B26Q Aar 32280 32480 : 

22780 29280 May 

51080 28780 Jun 32480 32670 : 

48580 29180 Aug 32970 33080 I 

49180 29780 Oct 33430 335.40 I 

48980 30180 Dec 33880 34080 : 

48580 30600 Feb 34380 34380 \ 

49680 31470 Apr . 

43578 32080 Jun 

428X0 33180 Aug 

39570 33580 Oct 3*780 36780 

39389 34280 DOC 

Esi: Solos 21800 Prev. Sales 25759 
Prev.DayOcenlnt.124870 ua 47 


FInancia 


i us T. BILLS (I MM) 

SI minion- pts Of 100 PCt. 

922S 87.14 Jun 9287 9207 

9177 B&M Sep 9185 9185 

9172 B577 Dec 9189 9189 

9093 B680 Mar 9088 9070 

9084 8781 Jun 90X1 90X1 

9036 B&M SOP 90.12 90.12 

90.18 8985 Dec 8987 8987 

8*88 8988 Mar 8986 8986 

Est. Soles 11X63 Prev. Sales 8732 . 
Prev. Day Open InL 41,364 up 8 
» YR. TREASURY (CRT) 

S100800 prln-pts & 32ndsoM00pct 
82-8 78-9 Jun 81-1 81-3 

81-13 75-18 Sec 82-2 80-2 

80-22 75-13 Dec 79-2 79-2 

80-8 75-14 Mar 

79-26 7+30 Jun 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 9X79 

Prev. Day Oaen Int. 44740 up 613 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
t8ocl-S1OO0O&-ots+IZndsof lOOpct) 
77-15 57-20 Jun 70-28 70-31 

7+2 57-10 Sec 69-26 69-30 

7+5 578 Dec 68-31 49-2 

7230 57-2 Mar 668 48-7 

70-16 5+29 Jun 67-16 67-18 

70-3 5+29 Sep 6+26 4+31 

69-26 5+25 Dec 46-4 4+13 

69-12 5+27 Mar 65-26 65-29 

*9-2 43-12 Jim 45-13 45-16 

*8-2* 61-4 Sep 45-3 654 

4+8 43-24 Dec • — " 

Est Sales Prev. Salesl 25X21 

Prev. Day Oaen lnt720348 up 20 
GNMA (CBT] 

sioaoooprln- pts & 32nds of meet 
70-10 57-17 Jun 6+28 6+30 

69-19 59-13 Sep 69-2 498 

6+18 594 Dec 4+15 4+15 

4+1 5+20 Mar 

67-28 5+25 Jun 

67-3 65 Sea 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 96 

Prev. Day Open Int. 4.170 ofl 41 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

Si million- Pts of IXpct 
91X5 8570 Jun 91X2 91X6 

9UM 85-00 Sep 9083 90X3 

9056 8574 Dec 9073 9076 

90.18 8+56 Mar 

89X2 86X3 Jun 

89JD K7.B+ Sep 89.18 89.18 

B&39 804 Dec 

Esi. Sara 414 Prev. Sales 228 
Prev. Day Open Int. 5.964 aft XU 


6350 
6250 43X0 
*470 
4350 6455 
64.10 4505 

6450 65X5 
*5X0 
6550 65X5 

65X0 *6.05 

6550 *470 
4+05 *+55 
*750 
67.15 


4855 
4BXS 48X5 
49.05 
4975 49X5 
5010 5020 
51X0 

51 x 0 

53X0 

S3X0 

5470 

55X0 

5*70 

56X0 


6287 
6105 62+5 

*2+0 637 J) 

635X 6467 

6500 661J0 
66+3 
66+0 67+4 

6797 *87 X 
6920 698.9 
701.5 711-1 
7220 729.7 

7367 


28170 28170 
28279 
28170 28470 
TIM ni l 238.90 
29300 29*70 
29970 30170 


109.15 109X0 
10775 10875 
107X0 107X0 
107.10 


322X0 32370 
32+80 
32+00 32470 
32870 33050 
33X00 33500 
33730 33930 
34150 34570 
350X0 
356X0 
nnn 
36770 .368X0 
37570 




B 

trfmmr- 

msmm. 





91X4 9204 
91X2 91 JO 
91X1 7176 
9*1X8 9070 

9078 90X2 
90.12 90.17 
89X7 B7.94 
89X4 8974 


80-24 80-28 
79-24 79-26 
78-31 78-31 
7+7 
77-18 


7+19 7+26 
69-17 69-26 

^ 23 6+30 
60-5 

67-11 67-16 
6+23 6+29 
66-6 6+12 
65-26 65-29 
6+13 45-16 
45-2 45-4 

“ "64-25 


69-23 69-26 
69-1 694 

6+15 6+15 
67-29 
67-13 
67 


91X2 71X2 
90X5 9075 

90.18 9024 
89X2 
89 JO 

89.18 8920 
88.93 


mmmo 003905 Dec 704035 001047 704031 DMOT 
004140 iKMQ90 Mar J304075 

Est Sales M* ?««.»•« 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 10X06 off 1-256 

5W1SS FRANC (IMM) ____ 

S per lrantr-1 point eaua Is 50.0001 

xwo -Hg -3E2 -gy 

easSi« 2+ra PiKW MflC 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 27.139 off 433 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130X00 baH.-SaerlJ»Obd.lt. . 

225X0 121.10 Mav 133.00 13920 132J0 138.90 ++M 

230JO 12970 Jul 14170 14+50 14050. U+30 +3X0 

19750 13550 5» 14558 151J0 14+DO 150X0 +110 

18+10 137X0 NOV 1*100 15200 147.10 15150 +250 

187X0 1**A0 Jan 15*00 15950 154TO 15950 +3X0 

195X0 150X0 Mar 1J950 16*00 15950 76*00 +100 

173X0 153 JO May 163X0 163X0 163X0 16750 +X10 

Est. Sales 3.156 Prev. Sales M74 
Prev. Day Open Int. 9X06 off ISO 

COTTON 2(NYCE) S 

6SJS S6J0 64JS tSAI -* 
79X5 63X5 Jul 6*95 6524 6470 6475 -X 7 

7750 6*62 Oct 64X5 6*85 6*51 6*55 —25 

7100 6*61 Dec 65X5 65.10 6*50 6*55 _XB 

7+75 6S.C0 Alter 6+18 6+18 65X5 65X5 -33 

7BUOO *6X1 Mav 6+70 6775 *5X5 6+53 —.15 

70X5 6+50 Jul 6)20 *720 67X0 £7X2 +X2 

65X0 65X0 Oct A5X0 

Est. sales 5500 Prev. Sales 5535 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 13X38 off 88 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42X00 oal- cents per gal 

82X0 6*00 Mav 76X0 76.90 7525 76X4 -58 

78.40 *350 Jun 7220 72.44 71X5 7235 —71 

7S.2tt 6535 Jul /BJf® 7070 69JW 7059 — J8 

7550 6825 Aug 70X0 7120 7055 71X6 -5* 

7+45 7D.25 Sep 71X0 7210 71X0 7150 —35 

77.10 7250 Oct 7230 72JS 7130 7295 — JB 

7455 73X0 Nov 73X0 

7825 72X0 Dec 75X0 

7+00 7+78 Jan 7+00 

Feb 7+60 

May +10 

Est Soles Prev. Sales +956 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 17568 off 631 
CRUDE OIL (NYME] 
i iB» bbL- dollars per bbl. 

2955 2*20 Jun 27X0 2750 27X8 2750 —Al 

2954 2*10 Jul 2720 272B 2+95 7735 —.10 

2957 2425 Aug 26.92 27.15 2+77 27.13 +X2 

2950 2*08 5eo 2+72 2+92 ■ 2+65 2650 ' . -/ 

2950 24X5 OCt 2+70 2+85 2+70 26X5 +X6 

2950 24X0 Nov 2+75 2+82 26X5 3+82 —XI 

2950 23,90 Dec 2+70 26X5 2+70 26X5 

ESI. Sales Prev. Soles 11312 

Prev. Dav Open int 43X44 op 1X57 , 

I Stock Indexes 

(Indexes compiled shortly before market ciece) - 
SP - COMP. INDEX (CME) 
paints and cents 

189.10 15+10 Jun 18110 18*70 182.90 184X0 +1X0 

19270 160X0 5ep 18+20 187.90 18+15 18750 +1X0 

196X0 17+70 Dec 190X0 190X0 190X0 190X0 +35 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 49X83 

Prev. DavOpen Int. 5+344 up 787 
VALUE UNE(KCBT) 
mints and amts 

219X0 173X0 Jun 19+80 198X0 19+70 19850 +1X0 

21230 18+75 Sep 201X5 202X5 201X5 20275 +X5 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 1239 

Prev. Day Open Int 5.919 up 105 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
painis and cents 

110X0 90X0 Jun 10+35 10735 HN30 10730 +55 

11150 9135 Sep 10830 109JO 10830 10930 +.75 

11335 10150 Dec 11030 111X5 11030 111X5 +50 

113X5 111.10 Mar 11230 11230 11210 11230 —35 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 10358 

Prev. Day Open Int. 9X33 up 200 

I Commodity indexes ; 2 

. Close Prev too? 

Moartv-* 938.10 f 

Reuters 1^89^0 

D J. Futures — NJL 

Com. Research Bureau. . NJL 

Moody’S : base 100 : Dec.3L 1931. 

P - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Prevtow 
Ml 
,10 


IXmTSgrTTlfff 


NYCSCE: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFH: 


Chlawo Board of Trade * 

Chicago Mercantile Exchange < 

taimatlsnal Monetary Market 
Of Chicago Mercantile Exchange 

York cocoa Sugar, Coffee Exctungb 
New York Cotton Exchange 4 

Commodity Exchange. New York , 

How York Mercantile Exdwnge j 

Kansas atv Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 1 


DM Futures Options 
April 25 

IK. Gena MeM&nO rartecUs nr exit 


RECORD PROFITS FOR 
THIRD SUCCESSIVE 
YEAR- 1984 UP 57%. 
PATTERN SET FOR 
FUTURE GROWTH 


Pre-Tax Profit 47 5 

£ million 


strew 

Calb-Setfle 


Pnts+etfle 

Price Jan 

Sen 

Dec 

Jun 

Sep 

Dec 

30 7.V7 

7M 

M0 

0.14 

ox* 

MS 

31 172 

171 

245 

034 

074 

?J® 

32 BOT 

1X2 

1X0 

073 

L19 

130 

33 0X5 

097 

1X0 

131 

174 


34 117 

066 

1X0 

214 

238 

_ 

35 0X9 

0X6 

B75 

3X5 

215 

3X5 

Estimated total vaL 10X05 




calls: WtaL VOL +919 seen tat *0JM 
■Puts : wed. voL +079 open lot 30X97 


Source: CME. 






SAP 100 Index Options 
April 24 


# Total dividend increased to 
8.75p per share - up 25% 

# One for three scrip issue 

# Strong cash position 

#£34 million spent on ten 
acquisitions 

§ Sale of pigments business 


Sales 

£ million 


1980 1981 1982 1983 19841 


Earnings Per Share 

pence 


1980 1981 1982 1983 19841 


1980 1981 1982 1983 19841 


r p>ilnraiWN9iExMBniM*di«ag«itfilvGrDif > irJj k iMBVBlBAh^wwkrprM'qihrhin(ainrio 

uniiMaicfivn^ialndvCW'iMAm 


“Laporte is a successful international specialist 
chemical company. I expect continued progress 
in 1 985". . . R. M. Ringwald, CBE, Chairman. 


SPECIALIST CHEMICALS AND RELATED SERVICES-WORLDWIDE 
Laporte Industries (Holdings) PLC, Hanover House, 14 Hanover Square, 
London Wl ROBE. 


LAPORTE 


AMERICAN 

FINANCIAL 

MANAGEMENT 

CORP. 

proposes 

Your Uf c 

rssi 

your best 
investment 

High return 
Maximum security . 
Top rated north american 
insurance companies 

Pleas* con caci 

our European' 
representative's office 

F.M. FINANCIAL 
MANAGEMENT SA. 
7, rue de la Fontaine 
1211 GENEVAS - 


Paris Commodities 
April 25 


SUGAR ^ ^ Art CII-« 

French fronts p«r metric tan 
Aua 1307 1385 1305 1310 +35 

Oef 1327 1310 1325 1327 +45 

D«C N.T. N.T. 1360 1377 + 37 

Mar 1X45 1X25 1X45 1X« +36 

Mav 1500 1300 J3G0 1305 +42 

. V&JfcK-MW 1*558 +21 

Bit ypL: 1X82 icris of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
soles; 1.188 tats, open Interest: 1+195 
COCOA 

French francs per 1M kg 
MOV 2170 2160 2161 2165 +3 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2175 — —5 

Sec 2152 21*2 2147 2152 + 9 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2066 2075 +4 

Mar N-T. N.T. 2090 — +5 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2X90 — +5 

JIV N.T. N.T. 2090 — +10 

Esi. vd.: 71 Ms of 10 tans. Prev. actual 
sales: 57 lots. Open Interest: 775 
COFFEE 

French francs per 180 kg 
May 2470 2470 — 247B + 13 

JIV 2520 2320 - 1540 +10 

Son 2575 2360 2556 2365 +11 

JtT- N.T. — 2X00 + 13 

Jan N.T. N.T. — 2X10 +10 

Mar N.T. N.T. — IMG + * 

May N.T. N.T. — 2970 +10 

Est.vdL: 31 lots at 5 tans. Prev. actual sales: 
70 loll, open Interest: 225 
Saureo: Baurso Jo Com me rce. 


London Commodities 
April 25 


HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES 
U33 per ounce 

Close Previous 
High tow BM Art BM Art 

Apt — N.T. N.T. 322X0 324X0 322X0 32*00 
May . N.T. N.T. 322X0 324X0 332X0 32*00 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 324X0 32*JM 32*00 326JM 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 32MI0 331X0 328X0 330X0 
Oct _ N.T. N.T. 333X0 33+00 33200 334X0 
Dec _ 339X0 339.00 338X0 340X0 337X0 339.00 

Feb - “a™ “*”*000 MM0 a* 100 ““0 

Volume: 23 tots of 100 ai. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UXJ per ounce 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santas, lb 
Print daft) 64/30 38 %. vd . 
Steel billets (PIHJ.ton — 
l ran 2 Fdry. Phiia_ tan _ 
Steel scran No 1 hw pm. 

Lead Spat, lb 

Cooper elect, lb 

Tin (Strolls), lb 

Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb 

Palladium, 02 

Sliver N-Y-ai - 

Source: AP. 


dost 

sugar”’*' ^ Art 

Starting per metric tan 
May 100X0 9U0 99X0 99X0 
Aug 10930 107X0 107X0 107X0 
OCt 113XO 111.40 111 JO 11 1X0 
Dec 118X0 117X0 11+80 117X0 
Mar 131X0 129X0 129X0 129X0 
MOV 13*80 134X0 134X0 135X0 
Aug N.T. N-T. 139X0 140X0 
Volume: 2742 lots of 50 tans. 
COCOA 

Starling per metric ton 
May 1X05 1X72 1X90 1X91 
Jhr 1.910 1X87 1JPOS 1.907 
Mp 1X80 1A5B 1X7U 1X7* 
Dec 1X23 1X02 1X11 1X13 
Mar 1X18 1X00 1X11 1X12 
May 1X34 1X34 1X15 1X30 
Jlv N-T. N.T. 1X00 1X40 
Volume: 3X83 lots oflO tans. 
COFFEE 

Sterling per metric tan 
MCV 2.160 2140 2149 2150 
Jhr 2300 2180 2184 2188 
Sep 2240 2223 2X25 222* 
Nov 2370 22S0 •r/w? 2255 
Jen 2383 2359 2261 2265 
Mar 2365 2365 2340 :1360 
May N.T. N.T. 2J2S 2238 

volume: 2534 lots of 5 tons. 
GASOIL 

U-5.doUars per metric ton 
*P* 331J5 229J5 229X0 23025 \ 


Prevtam 
BM Aik 


10020 10040 
109 JO 109X0 
11X20 113X0 
11480 12000 
131X0 131X0 
13+20 136X0 
140X0 142X0 


}%* JXJ5 

1X80 1X81 
1X53 1X54 
1X94 1J98 
1XW 1X« 
1X94 1X05 
1X95 1X10 


™x 5 220 JS 22050 22075 222J5 2ZL00 
ffl 50 21+00 21+00 21+25 220X0 »im 



VS. Treasary Rales 
April 24 


Offer Bid Yield YMd 
S-menfti 7X5 7J3 axn +03 

Aenonlh 7X8 9X4 443 +44 

One year +20 in u US 

Bn Him 


J 


HW LOW 

Jun 32+40 m?8 

Aug N-T. N.T. 

Sen N.T. N.T. 

volume: 139 krts of 100 az. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 

Malaysian cents per kilo 
Ctose 

Bid .Ask 

May 19275 19X25 

JW 19150 193X5 

JIV 19+50 197 JO 

Aug 199 J0 301.00 

Sep - 202J0 2D3J3 

Volume: 22 tats. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER ' 
Singapore cents per Wto 
Close 

Bid Art 
RfSiMay. 169 JO m/so 
RSSl Jyn_ 17BJM 170 JO 
RS5 2May. 1*7 JO 14+50 
RSS 3 Moy_ 1*5 JO 14+M 
RSS 4 MOV. 141 JO 16X5® 
RS5 5 May. 15+50 15+50 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malavtien rtnggus per 25 tans 

Close 

^ BM Ask 

May 1.620 1X7U 

Jun 1X98 1,513 

Jlv 1X00 1X40 

AUB 1X30 1-EO 

Sep 1X20 1X70 

Oct 1X10 1X40 

NOW . 1X00 1X50 

Jan 1X90 1X40 

Mar 1X90 1X40 . 

Volume: B lots at 25 tans. 
Source: Heuten. 


Settle settle 
323X0 325JD 
329 JO 329.90 
33180 33210 


. Previous 
BM Art 
193X0 19*00 

10*25 19+00 

197 JO 197X5 
199 JO 201 JO 
203X0 20*00 


Previous 
BM Art 
170 JO 171X3 
171X0 171 JO 

1*450 1*9 JO 

14+50 167 JO 

16258 164J0 

157 JO 159 JO 


Dividends April 2SJ 


Company Per Amt Pay ^ee 

INCREASED » 

Q rayfjs , a .is 5-is iw 

Grainger Inc Q 34 frl 56 

McNeil Corn 0 S +7 5-17 

STOCK 

Grainger Inc _ 100% 4-1 'H 

STOCK SPLIT 

Computer Tort Group — D-Eor-2 t 

USUAL • j 

ALLTEL Coro Q X4 7-3 


Grainger Inc 


Previoos 
Bid Art 
1J40 1J80 

1X40 1X85 

1X60 ixoa 
1X20 1X70 

J-3W 1J40 
1X00 1X50 

1X00 1X50 

1^0 1X40 

1J90 1X40 


London Metals 

April 25 


.... f rwloos 

ALUMINUM BM Art BM Art 

Sternwp per metric ton 

iassasasaa 
sssg^nSia ?s ,staBd “ rt) 

JSSLrri }«|-S2 1 x 00 xa 

tarwgrd 1 X 2200 1 X 21 X 0 1 . 19*00 1,19540 

LEAD 

Starting per metric ton . 

M1X0 300X0 311X0 
wvmrd - MH 305X0 308X0 310X0 
NICKEL 

sterling per metric ton 

ESLant 

SILVER 

Penes per h-ov ounce 

SPOT 513X0 51*00 50050 gii<n 

tartvgrd 528X0 529X0 ST6S0 S17X0 

TIN (Standard) 

Starling per metric fan 

2*1*555 ?-310XO 9X15X0 
mrworrf 9X10X0 9X20X0 9X30X0 B AwTyj 


r ■futuAU uaum > 

I 4X30X0 4JHX0 


ZINC 

Starling pgr 
Spot 
tarwgrd 
Source: xf». 


metric tan 

72SX0 737X0 711X0 717 
721X0 722X0 712^ 713X0 


Aitwr Business Prd 
Atwsr Elec Power 
Anheuser-Busch 
Bearings Inc 
Blocks Decker 
Stack Hills Pwr 
Buell Industries 
Canadian Ctan Elec 
Caslle 1AM] 8, Co 
Ceca Indus 
Chattem Inc 
Computer Task Ge 
Cons Capital 
Copperwdd 
Dennison Mta 
Ecstem Co 
FfFedS+LA rh 
Fr Howard Paper 
Pst Nrthrn S4L 
®»Amer Fst Svg Bfe 
Hercules Inc 
Hexcel carp 
Hwghtan Mlffln 
Inland Steel 
Lukens Inc 
Marine Carp 
Morket Rads 
M°5fand (CHOI 
McGraw-Hill 
MCMCorp 
Mexico Fd 

JteM Mmtkal Ent 
NCNB Carp 
Wmv Hampshire 5vg 

sssEr- 

Pam and le East 
Philips Ind 
Ponderou 
Postal) nsiont 

ssrassr 1 - 

fWMH Care 
Schwab Serf* 

Seated Power 
Syc M erchandise 
gwn InOustrtas 
Sjjejl Canada Ltd 

Smllhkllne Beck 

faesKssr 

7%S!2 n PMro,mm 

T^d Shipyards 

Union Carbide 

KSS'S.E*® 3 ™ 

UtdAIrcrMtPrd 

We(s Markets 


8 X4 7-3 Safe" 

.1* 6-14 5-3r-’ 

DJ4% 6-10 5-10 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL. REAL ESTATE 



OUR LAKELAND PARADISE 
AWAITS YOU 

Your own vacation land on the fabulous Lake of the Ozarks In Central 
Missouri Right tn the heartland of Amenta. Away tom ones, noise, 
pollution and the rat-race of the workaday world. 

Forbes Inc. publishers of Forbes Magazine, through its subsidiary. 
Sangrede Ctisto Ranches inc. is offering the opportunity of a Weome far 
you to acquire one or more acres of our choke Missouri lakeland. 

There's no better time than right now to find out if Forbes Lake of ihe 
Ozarks is the place for you AH our honesties, indudaig lake front and lake 
view, will be a minimum sire of one acre — ranging to over three acres. 
Cash prices start at $6,000. One or mote acres of this incredibly beautiful 
lakeland can be yours far the modest payment of $60 per month, with 
easy credit tetms available 

For complete Inloonaflon. mdudmg pictures, maps and fill details 
on our liberal money-back and exchange privileges, please write to- 
Forbes Europe Inc. Dept H.PO Box 86. London SWI1 3UT England 
Obtaet the Property Repon requeea Ov Feoerai taw and read 4 oetoe 
signing anyttung No Federal agency nas judged m* menu or value it any 
o< rtus property EouaJ Crectd one Housing Oonooun-iy 



WEST COAST WATERFRONT PROPERTY 

VICTORIA, ELC. SATURDAY JUNE 22, 1985 

600 ACRES - 9500 FT. OCEAN FRONTAGE 

14,000 sq. ft Swfss-style Lodge plus other buildings to be 
sold by auction in 5 parcels from 5.6 to 291 acres. 

Located IB miles west of Victoria, this magnificent ocean- 
front property known as the Grouse Nest Resort is well 
suited for development, retreat, training center, or exclusive 
private residence. 

Main Lodge & 99 Acres - Minimum Bid Price $750,000 Cdn. 

Approximately 500 Acres In 4 parcels, over 5,000 ft water- 
frontage - By absolute unreserved auction to highest 
bidders. 

"An unparalleled West Coast opportunity for this 
multi-miHion dollar property 11 

Crosby, Galbraith & Associates Ltd. Licensed Realtor 
814 - 1155 Melville Si. Vancouver. B.C.. Canada V6E 4C4 
Telephone: (604) 669-5822 [24 hours) 

OBTAIN OUR FULL COLOR BROCHURE WITH COMPLETE DETUL8. 


\!Z71IjDS©DQ 

Let your SUS Dollar buy more In Canada 

170 Apartment Complex 

■ Very well maintained complex 

• Price S3 .310,000. CON or S2.412.000. US. 

• Excellent tow, long term financing until 2007 

■ True 12% return on investment 

Downtown Toronto 

First class commercial property In the heart of Toronto with 
good future for appreciation. Price S4.75 M CON. or S3. 46 M US. 

For further information and brochures plaasa contact: 
WINZEN REAL ESTATE LIMITED W1NZEN CORPORATION: 
Attn. Marketing Manager A Leading Development, 

67 Yonge Street, Suite 700 Sales, Property Managamem 

Toronto, Ontario. Canada USE 1 J8 and Marketing 

TeU (416) 6634071 - Telex 06524301 Organization! 



■' Hawk offers distinguished services for the owners and. guests of our 
luxurious homes nestled in ihe Green Mountains of Vermont. Blissfully 
secluded, yet only minutes from Killington, New England’s premiere ski resort 
Cathedral ceilings, juidsiorw fireplaces and sky-lit rooms characterize these 
splendid retreats. And every effort is made to spoil you.fiom a urine- 
arid-cheese welcome basket to an old-fashioned hayride through the peaceful 
countryside. Understandably, we are a Mobil Four-Star. AAA Four-Dianumd 
resort Exquisite Hawk homes from S150.000-S450.000. For ownership 
information call us collect m the US. at 802-672-3811 or unite Hawk Vermont 
Mountain Resort, 5th Floor. 87 JerrmjnSL, London SWl Y6JD. 

L ^ TWX 710-227-0657. 


Mount 

V 


HAWK d tk& u&wnQjfa (hjCu/Uf. 



GatwickRoad Crawley 


A property so flexible, 
wel even let you design it younself 

16500-66,000sqft adjacent to Miction IO-M23 l 




I— ! Wtt \ : Y&&- 

:-4 




■!«!‘--.tS-V|| ■ 


W^:-V ' ' Cv:. ' 


Chestertons 


Chartered Surveyor* 

01-490 0404 

M arm* 5MM1. Lanfae W1V 1Yfa 


VERMONT MOUNTAIN RESORTS 


NTAIN RESORTS P.O. Box 64-H433, Plymouth, Vermont 05056 

Masterplan and design ofHAWKhcmes and communities by 
Robert Carl Williams, Architect and Associates. 

Mxd where prohfcUed by law. 



BOYD & BOYD 

ESTATE AGENTS 

40 BEAUCHAMP PLACE, LONDON S.WJ. 

MOUNTAINS DES MAURES, VAR, SOUTH OF FRANCE. 

-Att i a u t fre hnngW la beradfid re ttin g huflf in 1965 for preteat ownera 
eel In well lauasoped gmmeb of niproxumadr 5,000 wj-nri-. filtered 
»w Tinmm g pool, double yrey. telcphopc, centrfJ. beating. Acco rom od a- 
tfoo: 3 dooUe bedroom*, 1 ensuite jbezhroom, Z ehowvr roam, large 
recc p tiow zoom with b ce med ceding, atone fireplace and doom to piv^ 
tonce. Veil equipped kitchen. 

40 latmeten from Toulon, 19 kilometer* from Le Lxvendou and sandy 
beediea an within 30 nrimur s drive as wdl aa 18-hole golf coune. 
Pries, faOj fundaheds X 100,000. 

Fca further rfirTirff** 

BOYD A BOYD, London 584-8893. 


~i|WHRfr~ 


Greenwich, Ct., USA 

“BLOSSOM MANOR HOUST 

1979 Rnanch Provindd on 4.4 hifitop 
acres. 5000 sq.ft v feafuring marble Ent 
Hall, depdown firing roam, 4 fpfe, 
master bedroom with his & her baths. 5 
oddtional bedrooms & baths. Mast 
furnishings included PLUS a 1959 Sihw 
daud Rob Royce_5l ,695,000. 
Susan Kane & Anthony T. Winn, 
Managers - 203/869-9263 


Jessie G. Ferris, Director 

2537 Post Rood, Foimid, Ck.06430 
203-255-6841 






LIFE ATOP NEW YORK CITY 

A real i spoon unity Mapmfu'cfa ixtiiA rrunium spai.r 1 3,-*00 sq ti lata pnee under 
the market, kicuted t«i the ptime .'Cixihfawa omcr of Trump Tixver faith exciting 
panoramk' \mnif Central Park and Manhattan fnrni River ui Rh-cr Adclkknal space 
cm kmvr fkh<r( tjUQJ-iq 6 i can he nnued m suit y» 'ur neett. as a simplex or 
duplex Plea.se i.‘jilfir fill! Jeuiti«ai prk esand space pi «stfiiliries. i fa\'ne Shannon a( 
f2l2l»«V *m!H Tc-lex J.rxr DfXF 

Dottglas Elliman 

MadiMYi Avenue. New Yuk. NewVnk I0Q2J 


JAVEA 

COST BLANCA - SPAIN 
DbSghiM, niv4y built Sponoh Town 
Houn n unqu* end dumng pe- 
Jukui salting on ths b«od> end 
only 5 minW M weft ton Jovra Pen, 
shop) and restowaas. 

Idad as haSday hand and kx nM- 
ol mcoa*. 

HgMy ceaagtfdiua pros for 1 bed- 
room un4> hem CISAOO. 
Lxnifad avaiobby. 

Presto? Homes Ltd 

7 Easton Ptacr - Laming too Sp* 

0926 B32220/83232I 




— SWITZERLAND 

Farftauflor vend sur LES HAUTS DE FtCHY 

superb# villa neuve de 9 p i ec es n epofties sur deux ffagres, grand sous- 
sol, 4 sodas d'eauj legumier, garage pour deux voifuret sur pareelle de 
3 TOO m*. 

La plus bdb vu* sur I* Liman et las Ahes. - 
Prtx : S.Fr. 1 700 000,- 

Pour tous ranseigneinents : T4L i (022) 47-45 - 45 (M. 5aifo) 


U.S-A- 

SUNBELT 

Invost and mako immedkita profit 
from your property asset. 

Your town-house (villa) part of a high quality complex, 
with leisure facilities (swimming pool, tennis courts). 

Outstanding return and above average capital' g ains 
Full administrative and rental services cd your tfisp os aL 
. For gaerles of delaihod brochures, please contact: 

JAWEft S.A, P.O.B. 420, CH-121 1 GB4EVA 3 



ITALY 

Tuscany 

Beautiful ancient farm- 
house, totally restaured and 
fumiabed, nonuions baih- 
roome with annexe and 
22,000 sq.m. land. Excep- 
tional view, location near 
Pisa. 

BREFICO (PARIS) 

533.68.91 


Global Vision 

As the largest full service 
real estate firm in Texas 
and the southwestern U.S., 
we provide expertise in 
properly acquisitions and 
management. 


Please note specific interest 
in request to 


HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS' 

David Dqposky. CEO 
Corporate Headquarters: 
2001 Bryan Tower 
Dallas, Texas 75201 
214/748-9171 Tefex 732459 
The Drhmg Face In Texas Real Estate. 
Rortnars m Service twin Grubo & Eats 



The fastest growth area in the USA 
Offering parcels within the Internation- 
al Corporate Park. Orlando's major 
business center near Orlando Ini'L Air- 
port with direct access lo major ex- 
pressways. Great potential far high 
ptoTrt bom resale. Project being devel- 
oped by centra! Rarida's largest indus- 
Itial - commercial developers with an- 
nual leases of one mtffion sqit. Win sell 
sues or joint venture projects. Limited 
investment tracts offering investor a 
return of 25% per year guaranteed. 
Project is surrounded by $15 biffion of 
development. 

Ideal for investors seeking safe invest- 
ment with warranty, deed to parcels 
and tide insurance. Brokers participa- 
tion tmnted. 

Aneian P ewlopmeet Rea ll y WL, Ik. 

9100 S. DodeJond Blvd., Ufa 
Miami, Florida 33156 


Miami, Florida 33100 

Tel.-. pQ5) 662-7588 
or (305) 661-5900 
Teteu 264099 GEC-UR 


Montiwnc-Geneva Lake 


= ik'/Tnl 


For sale luxurious apartments, 
from T to 5 rooms, overlooking the 
prettiest part of Geneva Lake. 
Prices: 5 Jt. 123,000 rod. equip- 
ment and furniture. 

60% mortgage available at 
616% interest. 

Phase contort the owner: 

RfcOiE DE LA RIVIERA SJL 

32 avenue du Casino 
1820 Mantraox-Switxarland 
TeL: 021/635251 

Telex: 25873 orH di 




OWN A SUPERB, LUXURY FLAT 
IN REGENCY BATH, ENGLAND. 

JF<?- . 1 HOUR. FROM HEATHROW 

IbvKWlli Oh»i.) Rwulireni Vinmun numimi 
jKl Xh skrlfuliv tonwird into US lied luxury finis provides 
/ShI ib-uh rnaic in urucinu* living. I^md-apnl RardnH, 

m. •••|amiramif ill llw Knmiin (iy of Bull 

rmwnnl bir il% urchllmural hrauly «nd hi«« 
C kj« rilnil iwhI S r «i!nnnmunioiiicj«i» Now h ihr 

1 II Hn I.v-m ktwinhlr litni- u» buy frir funhrr iaiurnuiKm 
a 1 H irkphunr Brivnl 

O WIMPEY HOMES 


Unique Opportunity 
Wonderful property 
of the lake in 
Zoitikon 

near Zurich. 

In fhese drc u r re tances to be 
sold to frte highest bidder. 
2500 sq. m, oonsintdion al- 
lowance for one-family house. 
Chtffra 022 Zy, 

Orafl FBqH Werbe AG, 

Hdbatosfr. 30, CH-8022 Zurich. 


= MAGNIFICENT = 
BEACHFRONT BSTA1S 

Santa Barbara, California. 

A IXOPtCAL PARADISE -LoeMd on one of 
Mortscra i firesr oaMnfront lams. There a 
a loobig of Hcwai viuh eommandng vslas 
et to mo and afanefc offduxe from praoi- 
coly every mum. High calngs. marble 
Iveptace. a chef i large latcfwn and many 
other rooms. In addAon, there a a very 
large separate new guen house. The 
{pound! ore onbeSevoWe. orchid trees, 
flower*, a tennis court al on ihe largest 
■KBonfraet parcel on prestigiout Ferreld 
Pomt. Brodese. *4,500,000. 

ALEXANDER VELTO 

RKALBSTATE 
1101 Coast Village Road. 

Santo Barboro.^jriifomfat 93106. 


PARIS, FRANCE 

Enchanting family house 35 mins 
n o rt h of Paris, in village on edge of 
beautiful hunting forest, dose to 
racecourse & golf. 

7 beds, 3 baths. 3 recepts, large 
kitchen, utility mu. & cloakroom, sur- 
rounded by 2,000 sepn. walled gar- 
den, heated swimming pool & pool- 
house, 2 garages & outbuildings. 

HUSEHOLD F.Fr. 3^00,000 
(approx.) $31 5,000- £25^000 

Contort Mis. McLaren, Plerrefle u rs, 
Vtoet^ St. Fhtnin, 60500 ChantOy. I 
Tel.: Chantilly 457 0689. 


Locaird on a hill, in a verv 
lovely area of the Peripord, 
magnificent view. 

LARGE BtlLDING 

(ancient farm) 

vomjilrtrlv m>uuml and rnunjliri 
with Uivdy n -pi oi til iloiw liru-ks. 
7 n win nv.i'nb. larpc- Liic-hcn. 2 baih- 
momH. t4viv.iv. 3 v.i'.. ivniral hnil- 
iiy^ larjy krfl In !»■ fitliri. farp- 
niradou- and uoorfc. 
Numerous oullnakticpx 
Jtadflrd prices F.Fr. ldKW.OOO. 

Mr. BORELLL 
fliilMB de CanlegreL 

CARVES, 24.170 BELVES. = 


South of France 
Var 

Between Tourtour and Aups 
Magnificent estate, 

XYith century counfryhouse, 

8 rooms phis outbuflefings, 

30 hectares 10 of which cultivated, 
quite exceptional environment. 

Price: Z000.00(M)0 FF. 

Tel.! (94) 70 14 71 or 

(93)44 5010. 


BTERNATVOm 
REAL ESTATE 


appears every 

FRIDAY' 


To place an advertisement 
contact our office in your country 
(listed in Classified Section) or: 


Max Ferre ro, 

181 Ave. QaricfrdfrGanlk, 
92521 NauDv Cedes, France. 
TeL 747.12.65. Tekc 613595. 




































i i -*r nfc tffi . ^ 


f 

• 4«* J ** 


REGULAR QUARTERLY 
DIVIDEND 


57.5C 


per common share 

Payable: June 15, 1985 

Record: May 24. 1985 

Declared: April 24, 1985 
Continuous dividend payments 
since 1939. 

Cyril J. Smith 
Vice President & Secretary 
P.O. Box 1642 
Houston, Texas 77251-1642 


PANHANDLE EAEZTERN 
CORPORATION 


diversified in energy— natural gas transmission 
oil and gas exptomion and production 
contract drilling, coal mining 


COLUMBIA SECURITIES N.V. 


Amsterdam 


Shareholders are invited to attend the Annual 
General Meeting to be held on Wednesday, 15th May, 19S5 at 
10.30 hours at the head office of the Algemene Bank 
Nederland N.V.. VSjzelstraat 32, Amsterdam. 


AGENDA 


1. Opening 

2. Report of the Management for the financial year 1984 and 
report of the Supervisory Board. 

3. Adoption of the Annual Accounts for the financial year 
1984. 

4. Determination of the appropriation of profit 

5. Composition and renumeration of the Supervisory Board. 
- proposal to appoint a new member of the Supervisory 
Board, thus fixing the membership of the Supervisory 
Board at four members. 

The Supervisory Board has put forward nominations wtth 
regard to the proposed appointment and has deposited 
these for inspection. Mr. Roger Desalnt is placed first in 
these nominations. 

6. Any other business. 


The respective documents are available at the office of the 
Company, Noorderstraat 6. Amsterdam. 


Holders of bearer shares wishing to attend the General 
Meeting must deposit their shares ultimately on Friday 10th 
May with the Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. orwith Banque 
de Neufllze, Schlumberger, Mallet Paris. A deposit certificate 
will be issued to such shareholders, which, upon surrender, 
will entitle them to attend the meeting and cak their vote. 


Holders of shares registered with the Company in its share- 
holders' register must inform the Managing Director in 
writing at least four days prior to the meeting that they wish to 
attend the meeting in person or by proxy. 


Amsterdam, 26th April, 1985 


The Supervisory Board 


Moet-Hennessy 


The Board of Director* of Mofl-Hennem. the bolding company, met on 
April 19, 1985. and approved the financial statements for the fiscal year to 
December 31, 1984. Nci after tax income amounted to Fr. 106,428.000. 
The Board will propose to the Annual General Meeting of Stockholders, 
convened for Jane 13, 1985. to declare a dividend of Fr. 23 per share. 
Including prepaid tax (a lax credit of Fr. 11.50), tire total dividend will 
come to Fr. 3430, against Fr. 30 in 1983. 

An interim dividend of Fr. 9 having been declared on February 4, 1965. an 
additional dividend of Fr. 14, plus prepaid tax (Fr. 7 tax credit) will be paid 
out at the beginning of July. 


CONSOLIDATION POLICY CHANGES 


Concurrently to introducing the new accounting rules applicable to French 
companies, MoEt-Hermessy decided to adopt for its consolidated accounts in 
1984. the rules generally applied in the United States and by most of the 
world’s leading corporations. This dednon, winch is justified by the 
Croup's expanding operations abroad, by its increasingly diversified stock 
ownership, and by the need to gain access to the world capital markets, has 
entailed certain changes in the presentation of the finandal statements. 

To allow year-to-year comparisons, consolidated financial data for 1983 
presented in this year's consolidated financial statements have been restated 
according ro the new methods. 

The changes mainly concern the definition of the scope of consolidation, the 
recording of foreign currency translation differences, and the calculation of 
depredation and deferred tax liability. 


MOET-HENNESSY group consolidated data 


(in Fr. million) 

1984 1985 % 

Sales.. 

6,841 

5^29 

+28 

Pre-tax income 

1,103 

807 

+37 

Net income 




(Group Share) 

547 

414 

+32 


the 28% rise In sales revenues flows from a very substantial volume 
increase, reflecting considerable growth in real terms. Increased average 
sale prices have amplified this growth, the inddence of currency parities 
plating a beneficial role. 

Pro and post-tax income growth reflects a considerable improvement in ibe 
Croup’s overall profitability. 


Champagne and vines 


This sector’s 1984 sales totaled Fr. 3.072^)00.000. compared with 
Fr. 2325.000.000 m 1963. up 22%. Pre-tax income was up 33% to 
Fr. 551.000.000. 


Champagne shipments increased by 18%. 


Cognac and spirits 

The Cognac sector's sales totaled Fr. 2J 45,000.000 in 1984. up 46% on the 
1983 figure of Fr. 1,460.000.000. Pre-tax income was up 73% to 
Fr. 496,000.000. 

Shipments were up 9% in volume terms. 


Perfumes and beanty products 

Sales rose owe more in 1984. totaling Fr. 1319.000,000. against 
Fr. 1.252.000.000 in 1983, represeating an increase o I 21%. Pre-tax 
income for 1984 was up 19% to Fr. 210.000,000. 

Purfums Christian Dior reported a 22% increase in sales and a 35% increase 
in {irv-tax income, with Fr. 230,000,000 in 1964. 

With a 19% increase in sales. Laboraimres Roc reported a loss of 
Fr, 20.000.000. 


Other lines of business 


Armstrong'-, *al« remained steady in dollar terms, but it reported an 
up-rating loss of Fr. 60,000.000 before taxes, in addition to non-recurrem 
provisions mialing Fr. 18.000.000 related to the completion company’s 
riiirpannsiiiun. 

TV imput-i iJ ihcse Imms on net inromc is significantly lessened by the 
rulif. ul fiscal inlep ration in the Inilcd Slates. 


Outlook 


1985 fu» begun well from a rtimmrrrial viewpoint. Al the end of Marrh, 
ivHwiliriiilitl Group wlii* wre up 24% un the firs! quarter of 1984. 
I low it it. the v i-ar'ji juTformarur as a whole is highly dependent on the slate 
of liic i-i-inuimh-s in our major market* in the second half of 1985. 


April 22, 1985. 


ENTERNAXIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


ADVERTISEMENT 


Over-the-Counter 


April 25 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


HMD Lm 3 P.M. art* 


Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 


total ta Not 

ms HMti low SPJK.aeK 


Ub Htafe Low 3PACKW 


25 April 1985 


(Continued from Page 17) 


The net asset wine quotation* spawn below o ra HWP ljtU bribe Rmd» tetadwlin Hie 
except fan of some funds wfwse wMx 

■nominal symbols Indicate frequency of qwtoltons supntlqO fo r the IHT. 

MJ- dolly; (w) - weekly; ib)- bi-monthly; trl- regularly; (0 «lrr*g*darty. 


I M 43 100 

i.ra u> us 

too 39 103 

30 13 68 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w) Ai-Mal Trvsi, SLA 


BANK JULIU5 BAER & CO. Lid. 


—id J Baerbond 
—Id i Conbar— 


d t Conbar.. SFiimro _>j w j 

diEoulboer America J11M.D0 _j w) 

d I Eauibcer Europe SF 118480 — | W j 


— <d I Eauibcer Eunw 
— (d ) Eaulbaer PocKI 
— (d ) G rotor . 

— (d ) Siockbor. 


OBLIFLEX LIMITED 
_ S 13141 — Iwl MuttfCU 
. — (wl Dollar I 

L _ — rwl Dollor Long V 

SF 71130 — [w) Japanese Yen 
wl Pound Slenino 
— ,wt Deutsche Mark 
SF JIMaO __| W j Dutch Florin 
JI2H2 -Iw) Swiss Franc. 


SF 91130 
SF 1181 JXJ 


SF 102100 

SF 164280- ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

PB 8B78. The Hague (070) 4*9670 

BANOUE INDOSUEZ . _ — to I Sever BeHotfro w H- 13480 

—id I Aslan Grwwlti Fund S1UJ7 

_f*l ruuMfyind SF B2JSQ PA RI5BA5— GROUP 

«ibt 7 -td > Cnrtsm l u tw iio tlw ml 187.42 

F 1 1L04 1«l OBLI-DM DM 1,1713* 

: s I5J0 -<wl OBUGESTfON SF92J0 

-Id! mtoSXllbondsA 189-56 JwlOBU-DOLLAR . &HB21 

-» I Indosuez Mulllbonds B S 14744 -^w MUWEM-- 

BRITANNIAi>OBZn.St.Hellflr,Jer»v _<a) PAR OIL-FUND 1104.95 

— (wl BriLDollor Income 1 0X48 — Id I PARINTER FUND 8 10442 

—iwl BrltA Morv»9.CurT ___ SB.97 — (d ) PAR US Treasury Band 1103X9 

-IdJ^ISuiKfSSp^IircLIT? ROYAL 0. OF CAN AOAPOB244JJUERN5EY 

=SHb8SaKB — sss 

r n tja -f id I RBC MoiLCumncy Fd. 

S 1J164 -Hw) RBC North Amer. FcL_ 

£BL77B SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (464234Z7D) 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL . — JwNnt: Bid. *X0B Offer SSM 

—Iwl Capital Inn Fund S 34.19 —Iwl Act: Bid 55.11 Offer SS48 

—Iw| Copilot Italia SA \XZ34 5 vENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 1 7 SVSSSf il* S^London-m -377-EWJ 

—Id ) Actions Suisses— — 5F 367.75 — lb ) 5HB Bond Fund 521.79 

^dl SF 10435 -I w) SMB Inti Growth Fund S 20 Si 

Dl sltVM SWISS BANK CORP. (ISSUE PRICES) 

— Id) Band Valor US-DOLLAR— — SlilW . Amerlea-Valor 5F57A00 

— (dl Bm»i vnlnr v«« Yen 1054100 ! D-Mark. Bond Selection DM115J9 


S 15J0 —Iwl OBLIGESTIOK 

i SB9JA —iwl OBLI-DOLLAfi 


S87J2 

DM 1,17134 

- SF 9230 
. S 1,129.11 
Y106J3540 

FL 104038 
_ 5104.95 
_ *104X2 

— 510109 


— lw> BrH.Goid Fund 

— (w) BnUMunoo-CuiTeney 
—Id ) Bril. Japan Dir Perl. Fd 
— <w) Brit Jersey Gin Fund. 
— Id > Brtt. World Leb. Fund 
—Id ) Brit, world Teehn. Fund 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

—Iwl Capital inti Fund 

—Iw| Copilot liana SA 


— (d) Bond Valor Yen Yen JP543.00 id ) D-Mark Bond Selection 

— Id) Convert Vu«or Swf— — SF 10830 i<j ) Dollar Bond Selection 

-Idl.Qmvert Valor US-OOLLAR.^ 5 HI J2 ® tori sSmSIw 

! 3!S£Sftsn= 

=JSlSK2’« 1 SffiSSr»wi 

={d! g^ v ^!I^l_ D sF S — ss i assess »*?- raw 


—Id I CanoMC... ■ 

—Id ) CS Foods— Bonds 

—Id I CS Fonda — InTI— — 
— Id ) CS Money Morket Fund 


S 12434 
FL1I9S9 


SF 831 jn 
_t 10133 


— IdtUSHK 

—Id ) Eurooo— Valor 
—Id > PocHIc —valor 


SF 138^7 
YllLOOIUn 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
— Hid ) Concentre ■ ■ 

— Hd > I nr I Rentwifand — 


Dunn A Harsttt 4 Llovd George, Brussels 
— tm) DlH Commodity Pool-- S 304J3 

—Un) Currency & Gold Pool S 19934 

— Un) Winch. Life Fut. Pool— S598J2 
— Iml Trans World Fut. Foot- S 89838 


FSC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 


I, Laurence Paunlv Hilt EC4. 01-423-4480 . . 

—iwi FACAttaitic sura Othpr Funds 

—Iwl FAC European 5 1079 filler TUIHIS 

— (wl F8iC Oriental 524.11 (w) Actlbonds Investments Fund. SZU0 

^PMU-Pf POBrnH^man Mihh {ml VSffl 

■imS fw) Aaulla Intemattarwl Fund 

S 6472 Ir) Arab Finance IJ=. 


—Iwl FAC European 
—Iwl FAC Oriental — 


u inn — 1° « awowniir new 

5p iSnrm —Id i Universal Bond Select. 
sf ts? no — Id i Uidversol Fund— 

SF 14A00 1 Ycn Bond Seledlon 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

nu,, — —<dl AmcaU.S.Sh. SF4A00 

HfSS / Sond-tnvesf SF 035 

-Id) FanwSwteSh. SF 13630 

— Id ) Jaoon-lrtvwt SF 934.00 

—id) Saflt South Afr.Sh. SF 54430 

— Id ) Sima (stock price) SF 197 JO 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

_(d ) Unirmta DM 4330 

S — (d ) uniform* DM22.90 

I344B0 —Id ) Unlrak DM77J6 

- Other Funds 


— (ml American Values Common 
— (ml Amer Values CuncFref 
—Id ) FMellly Amer. Assets— 
—Id > FIdelllv Australia Fund 
—Id ) FIdelllv Discovery Fund 

—Id ) Fidelity Dir. Svgs.Tr 

—Id ) Fidelity Far East Fund 

—Id ) FKJeflfv Inti Fund- 
—la > Fidelity orient Fund 
—Id ) Fidelity Frontier Fund 
—Id I Fidelity Pacific Fund- 
—Id ) FKMHy Spcl Grawffi Fd— 
—Id ) Fidelity World Fund 


b ) Arlan* 

,w) True! cor rnn Fd. (AEIF) 
(w) BNP Interbond Fund 

eitAB Bondselex- Issue PT. 

tm) COnoda Gtd-Morigoge F 
(d > Capital Preserv. Fd. Inf 

(wl Cl lode 1 Fund 

s 129 ju Id ICJ.R. Australia Fund 
. «439 (dl.C3.R.Japan,F»nd-- - 


S 1J91.11 
siarr 
110X91 
SF 13X40 
5 9JJ3 
51137 
5132 


eSSSi SESrfpZ? 1 ra im) Cleveland OfMiorw Fd. 

—Id) Fidelity World Fund 1 3(189 (w) Columbia Securities FL 11138 

FORBES POB887 GRAND CAYMAN lb 1 COMETE. S8»73 

London Aaenf 01-439-3013 Iwr) Convert. Fd. Infl A Certs— 5 9.12 

—Iwl Gold Income 5772* lw] Convert. Fd. Inti B Certs 53427 

— Iw) Gold Appreciation 5 438 (w) D.G.C. S 79.36 

— Iw) DoltoJncome 5 833 Id I D. Witter Wld Wide IvtTst 51079 

—Iml Straleglc Trading 81.14 b I DreWigr InvestFund N.V- 5 1,11345 


Id I Dreyfus Fond loti — - 
GEFINQR FU NDS. . _ _ | w) Dreyfus I ntercontlnent^ 

— Iw) E(TO InvMfmyrt FiaxL— 5346.10 t w ) The Establishment Trui 
— lw) Scottish World Fund....,.— 1 11473 Id i Europe Obfioalkns 

-Iw) State St. American 5 154.13 5® f RMJEiwle^nd 

Captl J}ukU.ld.LonAaent Jll -491 4230 lb ) Fifty Store LJd!r 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. "> 

PB U9,si Peter Port. Guernsey, 0481 -28715 ! w > Fixed Income Ti_ 


S 37 JH 
5 3134 

S1j09 

— 5831 

SIA32028 

fES 


Iml FuturGAM SA 

(m)GAM Arbitrage Inc 

(w) GAMerlca Inc 

(wl GAM Boston Inc.—..— 

(wl GAM Brmitage 

(wl GAM Franc-val 

(d I GAM Internalional Inc— 
(w) GAM North America Inc. 


5 12931 (wj Fonselexlssue Pr, 
j >22.47 (w) Forexhind— _ 
i 13737 iw) Formula Selection 
1 IB5J7 (d I Fond Italia 


d ) Govemm-Sec. Fund* 
d ) FrankF Trust mterzins 


a Haussmann Hhfss. N.V 
HestloF 


(wl GAM N. America Unit Trust. 10430 a w> Horlmn Furwi 

(w) GAM Podflc inc 511X48 5 Borel 

(wl GAM Sterf.AInN Unit Trusl. 13050 0 W f !"*"SS4*f - 


(ml GAM Systems Inc. 

(w) GAM Worldwide Inc 

(ml GAM Tv Che S A. Class A— 
GX MANAGEMENT (UK) Lid. 


110739 (w) Inier m orltet Fund 
514032* > Intermlnlng Mut. ' 

Sn»32 «r 1 lnfl Securities Fi 
(d) Investa DWS_ 


utF d. Cl.-B-_ 

Fu«dl 


— Iw) Berry Poe. Fd. LkL . - 
—Id I G.T. Applied Science . 


Id I G.T. Aseon H.K. GwttLFd — 51172 


(r) Invest AtlanHa 

ff5 irl italfortvnc Inn Fund S 
S 1530 j W ) japan Selection Fund. 


Iwl G.T. Asia Fund 

Id i G.T. Australia Fund. 

Id ) G.T. Euruoe Fund 

(wl G.T. Euro. Small Col 
Id ) G.T. Doltar_Fund 


w) Japan Pacific Fund SI 

m) Jeffer Phis. InM. Ltd — — SI 
4 ) KMnwart Benson infl Fd— 

— (d)G.T, Europe Fund— , sv ja iw) Kleinwort Bens. Jap. 

Korea Growth Trust 

- . _ — . — . Lelcnm Fund . — 

-Id) G.T. Bond Fund 51024 (wl Leverage Cm Hold 

— id I G.T, Global Technlgy Fd — $ 1X42 (d)Uqulbaer. 

—Id ) G.T. Honshu Pathfinder 524.14 *1 L uxt 

—Id) G.T. Investment Fund 51737 }m) 

— (d ) G.T, Japan Small Co Fund— 540.17 

—Id ) G.T. Tachnaloar Fund— 52430 

—Id I G.T. South China Fund 51X69 (w) NAAT 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT.. INTL.SA. 

CSKfiA & T| Ttf 4»l 7 »«5i £> investment Fund — 

=8 SPHSattk=== .1 


Id ) G.T. Investment Fund— - „ 
Id ) G.T. Japan Small CaFund— . 


iili* 


Japan Small Ca3« 
Tednalagy Fund. 
South China Fund. 


HILLSAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTL.SA. 


— Id ) ITF FdJTetfmoiogv) 

— Id ) O-Stas Fd IN. AMERICA). 


EBC TRUST CO.IJERSEY) LTD. 
1-3 Seale St«St. Heiier.-0S34-34331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 


S Iwl PANCURRI ln& S 15.97 

Ti iii Ir ) Parfon Sw. R Est Genova SF U9730 

* '*j (r I Permal Value Fund N.V 

* Ih) Pleiades 


a PSCO Fund N.V. 

PSCO Inti. N.V„ 
<d I Putnam Inn Fu 
(bl Pri— Teen 


f (d) Inc.: Bid 5935* Offer 59340* w. r , «*,. 

VldlCap.: Bid S10J2 Otter 510339 (wl Quantum Fund N.V. 


^ _ _ , _ . 5337637 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND (d ) Renta Fund LF 237X00 

— Id) Short Term 'A 1 lAceuml 513464 id 1 Renllnvest LF 135530 

— (d I Short Term 'A' |Distr)__ 513144 id I Reserve Insured Deposits- S1D75L93 


id I Renta Fund 


— (d) Short Term’s 1 i Accum I— 1 1.1284 (*rl Samurai Portfolio SF 10435 

— 1*5 J Short Term 'B’(Distr) *03550 (d) SCI/Tech. SA LuxembourB — 5939 

—Iw) Long Term — 52135 (w) Seven Arrows Fund N.V_ SUMOOO 

UDniiic n euiur nna n nmu. r, (w) State St. Bank Equity KdOSNV 5936 
il^^T&.5P fl70 ® POH ®v B 4wu (W> strateuv investment Fund— *20.15 

ZrS I JlifaTK Iffll d] Syntax Lid. 1 (Class A)' 5 735 

Zihi t voftS (w) Techno Growth Fund 5F8433 

z}h \ J l , B pS5SSr T 2??la?Jr“ Y ?«ll Iw) Tokyo Poe. How. ISOO) *97.94 

ih l J i'c xfSSfi£^ (A ^ > IW) Tokyo Poe Hold. N.V. *13*4? 

—ID 1 J.F Australia 5436 iwITnnmrlllrCiwI 


10 1 J.y- Aimraiia 1426 j w ) Treropaclflc Fund 18X11 

LLOYDS BANK I NTU POB 436. Geneva 11 > Turoi^re Fund - * 1003J 

—ftwl LtoYds InTI Dollar 510730 tw Tw^dr. Browne n.v£lassA 52,11134 

— Ilwl i bwdc InM Fumna . . SF 11040 (w) T weedv.Browno n.vX7assB 5 130X23 
5F 17530 <m) Twoedy.Brewne (U.KJ N.V, * 

SF 31130 Id ) UN ICO Fand__ 

510135 (d I UNI Bond Fund 
SF 13070 (bj UNI Capital Fund 


|w) Lloyds Inti Europe 
— rlw) Lloyds Inn Growth 
— Hwl Llovds I nr I Income 
— t-(w! Lloyds Inti N. America 
— Hwl Uovds I nr l Pacific— 


— Hw) uovds Inti. Smaller Cos.. 51338 i 


NIMARBEN 

—Id ) Class A 

— Iwl Class B-U3.— 
— Iw) Class C- Japan. 


im) Winchester Dtverslfledee 

(d ) World Fund SJ1 

^ (w! Worldwide Securities S/S 3Vs_ 5433* 
175J0 (w) Worldwide Special S/S 2W. 5139470 


DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Fronts; FI Dutch Florin; LF — 

Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs; a — asked; + — Offer Prlcesib — bid 
dtange P/V 510 to 51 per unit; FLA. — Net Available; N.C — NotCom muni coted ;o — 
New; S — suspended; SJS — Stock Spill; * — Ex-Dividend; ** — Ex-Rts; — — ' 
Gross Performance Index March; • — Redemal-Prlce- Ex-Coupon; •• — Formerly 
worldwide Fund Ltd; 0 — Offer Price lncl. 3% prelim, charge; ++ — dally stock 
price as an Amsterdam Stack Exchange 


TENDER NOTICE 


The SOCLGT£ CENTRAFRICAINE DE DfiVELOPPEMENT 
ACRICOLE (SOCADA), BANGUI, BJ>. 997, Central African 
Republic, hereby gives notice of invitation to tender the supply of 
the following, in indivisible lots; 

Lot No. 1. 1,520 1 fertilizer NKSB (22-8-24-1); 

Lot No. 2. 760 1 urea (46 units of nitrogen) 

used for NKSB manuring. 

Lot No. 3. 2,320 1 urea (46 units fo nitrogen) 
used for NS manuring; 

Lot No. 4. 1,160 t sulphate of ammonia 
used for NS manuring; 

Lot No. 5. 72us Jot may replace lots 2, 3 and 4 should consist of: 
4,240 1 complex NS fertilizer, ti trating 40 units 
of nitrogen and 5 units of sulphur; 

Lot No. 6. 200,000 1 ULV acaricide insecticide; 

Lot No. 7. 630,000 1 ULV aphicide insecticide; 

Lit No. 8. 4,000 treatment appliances; 

Lot No. 9. 500,000 electric batteries. 


DELIVERY DESTINATION: 

1,2.3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 should be delivered to: CAF, rendu Pointe 
Noire or Douala. 

Lota 8 and 9 should be delivered to: CAF, Bangui. 


DELIVERY DEADLINE 

The fertilizers (lots 1-5 inclusive): before October 3L 1985. 
Lots 6 and 7: January 31, 1986. 

Lots 8 and 9: before March 31, 1986. 


PARTICIPATION 

to all suppliers from I.B.R.D. member countries, 
1 and Taiwan. 


TENDERS • 

Offers, written in French, should be addressed to: SOCADA. 
Bangui, BP. 997, Central African Republic, or delivered to die 
above offices, in the case of: 

lots 1 ■ 5: by June 17, 1965, deadline 12.00 p m 
lots 6 - 9: fay September 23, 1965, deadline 1200 p m 


TENDER NOTICE FILE 

The tender notice file may be obtained from SOCADA, BANGUI, 
B - P- 9 97, Central African Republic, telex 5212 RC, or from the 
CFDT. 13 Rue de Monceau. 75008 Paris, on payment of CFA 
Fr. 20,000,’ by cheque made- out to SOCADA or to CFDT. 


31 U 72 
•15c 3 443 


3714 37»h + V* 
42U 4234 + M 
2934 2934— <6 
5*4 * — 1% 
19 2IW + Yt 
49V* SOVi +3 
11W TIM + V, 
6ta 7 
124k 12*4 


3ft 

3ft 



17% 

17% 


% 

15% 

15% 

+ 

w 

35 

35 



11% 

11% 

-Ml 

llh 

12ft 

T2ft 



3% 

3% 

— 

ft 

14% 

17 



14% 

14% 



ft 

30ft 

30 K> 

— 

ft 

27% 

22% 

— 


4% 

4% 



19% 

K% 



ft 

1% 

1% 



9% 

10% 

+ 

ft 

5ft 

5ft 

— 

ft 

27ft 

27ft 

— 

ft 

13% 

13% 

— 

% 

15W 

15% 



28% 

29 


ft 


9ft 


ft 

28% 

28ft 

+ 

ft 

m 

8% 

— 

ft 

14% 

14% 

+ 

ft 


1444 1 4k. 

2544 2544 + 14 
10 KCA — 14 
in 161b + vt 
74 14 

47 47 —hi 

7 7 

3414 34%— A 
29% 30% 

5Vj 51b 
12 12Vi + » 

^ +Ui 
2H 2ta 
20Vj Mill 
43V» 43%— ta 
1834 )»,— 14 
4414 4414 
5Vt 5ft— 14 
Uft 14ft 
16ft 1Mb 
2414 2714— 14 
32 14 32H— jit 
5 5 + ft 

4%— ft 
44 48 +2 

22 22ft + W 
38% 39 
16 16 
914 *fa 
2314 23ft + 14 
28 2844— ft 

16 14ft— ft gJ2JMa 

23ft 24 +1 

15ft 14ft + ft 


PahitM 
Pah*» 

Patti! I 
Paul Hr 
PaulPt 
PayN 
Pavdw 

» JSS, 

MM rat 7 540 9 

2.00° 19 J0S1-4 

PenaEn 220 74 II 29’’* 

5K5 1 - 

pSSSia 42 28 137 18ft 

PoapRt 
Pwcoat 
P*n»A 
PersCot 

pSJmS 1.12 18 37 wv 

Petr inn 


S4 ft fft SrtMN 

3 5 5 5 SVSlGfl 

184 8 ri4 8 _ svstml 

231 19ft 18ft 19ft + » - 

54 10ft 9ft 10 — | 

8 23ft ZJft 23ft , „ I — 

3 )2ft 12ft 1214 + ft 
118ft 18ft 18ft _ TBC 


Semin tw-. 

iota Htah Low 

17 5ft 5ft mw- 14 
39 10ft 7W4 + ft 

28 7 Aft 6ft — ft 
1 4 54 1914 W 79ft — «T' 


73ft 13ft— ft TCACb 


49422ft 32ft Oft „ JLS 
540 9 & 8ft + ft TSI 

4 44 44 44 TSR 5 

705114 57 51 — « TocVIvs 

31 30ft 30 30 — « Tanoem 

5726 Kft W*— ft Tendon 

681214 12 12 Tchnal 

553 Bft 8ft ,|ft —ft Tchlncs 
137 78ft 18„ Iff-* + 1“ Telco 
72 » J* ft , , , TTcmA 

8 7ft 7ft ,2? + S TrIP las 
18918? ‘S + ft Teierft 

8 Bta Bft 8ft ,, Telecrd 


21812ft a ]g + ft 

382014 20 20 — ft 

15 5 5 

)) 7 7 — v,. 

70Uii3 MW »» 

12 6ft 4ft 6ft 

257818% Ifft Mft + to 

tajtj 5h 5ft 5ft 
1 14 I*. 76 + ft 


„ 93 7ft 6ft + ft 

22215ft 15ft + 44. 

) B9329'4 Mft 29ft +lft 

12a 10ft 93i 9ft— ft 
5ri15 M Kft + ft 
■w 14 53218 17ft 18 + 14 ) 

JZ 31823 22ft C + ft 

127 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
ia I** 74ft J£A — w 
nr, 8419ft 19ft 19ft 

80 5ft 5ft 5ft + ft 

45 2>> 2ft 2ft + ft 

15 7ft 7ft 7ft 
39 6ft 6ft 4ft + V-* 

I 42 7ft Tm 7ft— ft r 

’ 29 2 1ft 2 

3 1 1 1 — ft 

ese 14 alA% 14ft left 

,25 " 2411ft lift lift 

13415ft 16ft 16ft -7 
72 1014 9ft 10 — ft 


Phrnict 
Phrmcia Me A 
Phrmkt 
Phrm wl 
P5F5 

PfillGI — — 
PhnxAm 
PhotoCs „ .1 
Ptirsln *“ 
PlcSav 
Plccafe ^0 29 
PtonFdl A5t XI 
PlonHi 92 29 
PlontrC 94 X3 
PIzCBc .10e IB 
Plenum 96 3J0 
PoFaUc 


3ft— It Te iepict 
3729ft 29 m 29ft + ft TelvW 
34 2ft 2ft ?ft — ™ T-Iiih, 

ot ioft io io% + - JSISsS 


GK Sv i 98 19 
GTS 
Galileo 
Gatoob 

GarnoB .10 7.1 
Graldltg 
Garcia 
Genetch 
GnAut 

GenCer .lDe 9 
GnShcrt JSr 5JD 
GenetE 
GeneiL 
Genets 

Geneve .10 2 

Genex 
Genova ,10e 19 7. 
Go Bob jD5e 19 
GaFBk 

GerMdS 98 19 
Gibson 98 22 
GItaG 8 
GhjoTr 

GlIbrtA 1J0 49 
GienFd 

Gocffrvo SI XI 
GklCorr A3e 5 A 
GoMEe M 19 
GdTaoo 
Gotaas 
Gatt 

Gould P Ji 49 
Graco 94 42 
G rodeo 
Gran Ire 
Grophl 
GrohMd 
GrehSc 

GtUcFd JBe A 
GWFSB 98e 23 
GtSoFd 

Gtwash JOe 79 
GreenT 

G rev Ad 390 19 
Grouiofi 
Gtech 
GuarFn 
Guests 
Gullfrd 

GHAbW 90 22 
GHBdc 

Gull 95 0 9 


1815 
111 Bft 
2013 
9413 
IQ 9ft 
48 4ft 
■1 2ft 
249 51\*j 
102 514 
13 
215 
220 2ft 

20 ** 
541ft 

3 22 

12 72ft 
491170% 
415ft 
5Q26ft 
91411ft 
72 74% 
241214 
7279ft 

4 ft 


16ft— ft 
8ft + ft 
13 + ft 
72ft— ft 
9ft— ft 
6ft— 14 
214 + ft 
51ft + ft 
514— ft 

a —i 
is — V4 
2ft + ft 
7ft 

6ft— ft 
41ft + ft 
4ft 

5ft— ft 
5 — ft 

15ft + ft 
6ft + ft 
12ft + ft 
20ft + ft 
15ft + 14 
24 ft— Hi 
lift 

1 6ft— ft 
lift 


"St+E 

15ft 

12ft— ft 
14ft + ft 
10ft— ft 
8ft 
8ft 

12ft— U 

3 - ft 
5 — ft 
12ft + ft 
aft 

Tift + ft 
4ft— ft 
18 - ft 
IBS 48 
12ft 

12ft + Vi 
4ft 
13 

15ft + 14 
914 + ft 
14ft 

lift — ’4 


JBe A 40812ft 
980 2J 2020 ft 


HBO 90 19 

HCC .04* 4 

HCW .10 IJ 

HEI Tx 

HEIMn 

HMOAm 

Habers 

Hodco 

Hudson 

HaleSv n 

Halifax: JMe J 

Hal ml 

HamOII .10 9 

Honvi t Ji U 

HaroG 94 l.T 

HrttNt 190 59 
HrtlSIm 390 X7 
Harvln 


90 19 UBj aw 19ft aft + «. 


3 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
6* 5ft 6 + ft 

1514ft 1414 14ft + ft 


23 414 4 
20? 13ft 13 
149V91* 19 


4ft— Vk 
13ft + ft 
19ft + 14 


161 4ft 4ft 4ft— Ml 


HOWkB 

Himcss 

HNhln 

Hlthdyn 

HechgA 

HechaB 

Home 

HetenT 

Helix 

(HenndF 


87 3ft 
a »h 
J 3 5ft 
960 2ft 
9 18515ft 
19 H040ft 

59 7530ft 

3, ^ 

29 1320 

25 51 9ft 

1512ft 
52 4ft 
266 3ft 
9 10324 
9 3927ft 

16 8V» 


Her It Bn 190 39 
HerllFd 


Herlev 7 

HlberCs 790b 49 112 
Hlckom 2 


JV« 

ft 

5ft— ft 

2ft 

15ft 

40ft +114 
3114 

30ft— Ml 
85ft +2ft 
43ft— ft 
9 — ft 

n 

9ft + ft 
1214 + 14 
414 

3ft + ft 
2 M- ft 

a + ft 
3414— ft 
44ft 

16ft— ft 
5ft— ft 

2 ^ + " 
51s— ft 
26ft — is, 
31 +1 

lift 


9* 2J 46lmi 19ft OT4 + ft 
190 49 4227ft aft 27ft— ft 

.21 5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 


55722ft Bft ZZVi— ft 
1327 24 1 - 27 + ft 


85 10ft lOft 10V, 


HunlgB 198b X4 23244 4311 43ft— ft 


2879 9ft 8ft 9 
39 714 7 714 + ft 

15 5H. 514 51m + 14 

72725ft 25ft 25Vi — ft 
92 19 10027 24 a +1 

30 7ft 7 7 — ft 

58412ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
290 9.1 9724ft 24 24ft— ft 

478 Bft 8 8ft + ft 
1352 21 72 + ft 

98 SJ 16121- 13 + 14 

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If! m * ' ill 111 ^^onBank 

it- » !S!t; ToB “yGrenfeU : 

l^i B& « « m 1 2 , ^mianal Herald Tnbuns - 

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B£ B5 , * ssar IBSa*- p« <w> ^ of . 


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72 54 ft -JS International Herald Tnbune 


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, LONDON — C anadian Inmeri- 
al Ba^c of Commerce announced 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 

BUSINESS PEOPLE 



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giiv, ‘ i . (CMttawdTrem Page 13) 


JoiL ? i . (Conrinuedfram Page 13) jcui-cirnci itfJj guilders. or Xlto 
$&» *& i war from Beatrice Cos. for $750 guilders a share. Sates increased 12 
TSinillion. percent to 4.69 billion guilders 


li^e^nilliwL percent to 4.69 billion guilders 

3 \ C* 3 Slightly more than half oFiCTs from 4.17 billion mldeirs; 

Jjre? vo? Vise in pretax profit from a year The sales growth was <hre.motnly 

E arlier was due to the pound’s de- }° selling prices and chanas 

1* &iine against other currencies, in exchange rates. Also said. Sales 
}P\ 3*3>irich increased thepoaodvahicof volume rose just 1 percent. 

£'& & .yjverseas earnings.. Interest costs Tell, but the com- 

u ^ t! v ln light of. the results, analysts pony's tax burden rose to 36 per- 
£ *Z jj ;>A-ere reducing their forecasts for ccntfrom 24 percent a year before, 
g ^ <i ijtefuD year. John Doree of Scrim- Trading profit from chemical 
i ] fj i‘jeour. fcemp-Gee & Co. predicted . products surged 55 percent to ISO 
k ' «^ ,ax profit of £1.10 bUUon. up million guilders, partly because the 
1984’s £1.03 billioa. Capers severe win ter boosted shipments of 
% <Mr. QuiUiam forecast £1.13 billion, highway salt. 

W* , “We're looking at a father flat Profit from fibers fell 13 percent 
*h I ■{ Minings trend for a year or two," to 88 million guilders, reflecting 
u” said. weakness in the American Enka 

a gj h ? Akzo reported net profit of 256.1 tmh, hit by a surge of dieap im- 
,?■ ^ -Trillion guilders (372.3 million 1, or ports. Enka Europe showed im- 
g \ S^x5 guilders a share, up from the proved sates and profit. 


Swedish Match Names Chairman 

J-'a-Y.-. America for the parent, Amoco 

Chemicals Corp„ This is a subsid- 


million guilders, partly because (he 
severe winter boosted shipments of 


highway salt. 

Profit from fibers fell 13 percent 
ip 88 million guilders, reflecting 
weakness in the American Enka 
tmh, hit by a surge of cheap im- 
ports. Enka Europe showed im- 
proved sates and profit. 


^ ^"V-rr 
s 1 i I 


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Company Earnings 

RavwHHt and profit*. Hi mill lone, or* to local curnmdn 
untess otherwise Indicated 


' Britain 

*e». l’ Biu* Grde Ind. 


! ui-.rv ? is® 


H j ' 

lEF" ’C-& 

: bnilr.;. 
j u.i^ K 

'i .uSiSS. 150 

- • a 


V«w im in 

J ^'\R«v*TO» B70J 906 

Mtl_ 1132 W 

5j^ Nv snores. c«3i 04: 

a & St > House of Fraser 
Ss }•:! Yew i«m in 


mi Year HH IMS 

M4J RMflU* 4525 T 3430 T 

yw iw i at 

r : trOUoa. 


,-o *•-. . v- i«M ina 

543 3 J Revenue wo n mom 

^b, ' : “relax Nol_ 46.16 3676 

Jlfc ?-k. p *r Share— am am 

ICI 

=ss 

5, : *rt10« N8t_ 267 0 2*50 

iff ll Shore — 0.2*4 BJJt 

i®. j. ^ • 


Japan 

AsahiGkass 


Year 

devrnwe— 
pt t Share. 


I1W IMS 

. 722290. 4*1,150. 
. 2 92» zs&m. 
742S 3239 


Matsu. Bee. bid. 


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"ill 

, . Jgn:ae ijK H a» .*■- 

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Wimpey (George} 


• •kc fi 1 .Heveoue 1420 Man 

Miff." £ .Pfrto* Ner„ 302 *50 

» 7 ; Share — 0.121 0.1 j* 

S-j},' Canada 

4* \ m “ v 2 

'4w . Can. Dvlpmnt Cp. 

,2'i &: n«iQ«w. im m* 


IHQaar. 

Revenue— 

JO} profit 

lets Per snare— 


ms I9W 
UST 1119 r 
41800. 51.930. 
3SJ7 3940 


Netherlands 

Akio 


Duke Power 
ictauor. ms i9S> 

RMIW 75U 471 J 

Hd IOC 13*24 12X19 

Per snoie 1.U To* 

E-Systems 

IB Qnor. im 194* 

Revawe— 72X3 1910 

Net Inc US 15.74 

Per Share 0X8 OS 

IWneflncluOnoaMOitZl 
million (ram proMftv. 

Gen. instrument 
«t* oaar. im me 

Revanae 224.1 230.0 

NB 1 we. (0)3*9 749 

Per Shore— — 023 

a: tan. 

General Motors 

id Qoor. im im 

Revenue 2*200. 22.900. 

Nat IOC IJXKI. 1X10. 

Per Shore 344 XII 

Guarantee fin. 


By Brenda Haecrry 

Iniemaaonal HeraU Tribune 

LONDON — Swedish Match, 
the . Stockholm-based industrial 
group and the world’s largest mak- 
er qf matches, appointed Curt Ni- 
colin chairman on Thursday. For- 
merly deputy chairman, Mr. 
Nicoltn succeeds Lars- Erik Thun- 
holm, a former chairman of Skan- 
dinaviska EnskUda Banken, who is 
retiring. 

Mr. Nicolin, 64. who is also 
chairman of Asea AB, the Swedish 
electrical and electronic engineer- 
ing group, was seen as Mr. Thun- 
holm's most likely successor. He 
was the candidate favored by tbe 
Wallenberg family. The family, 
through its investment companies, 
Investor and Providcntia. raised its 
holding last fall to around 21 per- 
cent of Swedish Match’s equity and 
more than 41 percent of the voting 
rights. Mr. Nicolin, a director of 
Investor and Providentia, is suc- 
ceeded as deputy chairman of 
Swedish Match by Sven Wallgrcn. 

Named to Swedish Match's 
board were Gdsta Bystedt, presi- 
dent and chief executive officer of 
Electrolux AB; Claes Dahl bade, 
president of AB Investor, and Hans 
Larsson Larsson, president and 
chief executive of Swedish Match. 
Not 5 landing for re-election were 
Mr. Tbunholm, Franz Gal liter, 
Lord Kindersley, PederPeder Wal- 
lenberg and Gunnar Dahlsten, Mr. 
Dahlsten resigned as president and 
chief executive of Swedish Match 
late last year. The board's member- 
ship has been reduced to eight from 
10 . 


'r-~ 

> • 
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Curt Nicolin 

Deutsche Shell AG of Hamburg 
has appointed Cornelius Herk- 
stroter presideni, effective May IS. 
He succeeds Ha ns -Georg Pohl. 
who is moving to the Hague as 
coordinator for Europe for the 
Shell group. Mr. Merkstroier for- 
merly was based in Paris as vice 
president in charge of finance and 
administration for Shell Fran^aise 
SA. 

Amoco Chemicals Europe has 
named James A. Maish managing 
director, succeeding George E 
Light, who is retiring- Mr. Maish 
moves to Geneva from Chicago, 
where he served as vice presideni of 
marketing for Central and South 


iary of Amoco Cop, formerly 
known as Standard 03. Co. (Indi- 
ana). 

Nadooal Westminster Bank PLC 
of London said Christopher To- 
gendhat, who retired in January 
after four years as a vice president 
of the European Commission, ha* 
been appointed a nonexecutive di- 
rector or the bank, effective May I. 
His major responsibilities at the 
commission were for the budget, 
financial institutions and taxation, 
as well as financial control. 

Burgan Bank SAK of Kuwait has 
appointed Robert de la Mare depu- 
ty executive manager in charge of 
marketing and syndications, effec- 
tive May 1. He currently is with 
Bank of Tokyo International Ltd. 
in London. 

Fiat Anti) (France) has named 
Enrico Fossa ti director of market- 
ing, succeeding Luigi Trivdlato, 
who has left the company. Mr. Fos- 
sa ti previously was director for the 
Bari region in southern Italy for the 
parent. Fiat Auto SpA. tbe Italian 
automaker. 

Tandem Computers L t d . , the 
British arm of the California-based 
computer maker. Tandem Com- 
puters Inc„ has appointed Sir 
Campbell Fraser a nonexecutive 
director. He formerly was president 
of the Confederation of British In- 
dustry and currently serves as a 
member of its council. He was 
chairman of Dunlop Holdings PLC 
until the end of 1983. 

SRI International, the Califor- 
nia-based management consulting 


firm, has appointed Elmar Windtit- 
orst to the new post of regional 
director for West Germany, Aus- 
tria and Switzerland, based in 
Frankfurt. He formerly was a 
•member of the board of Standard 
Elektrik Lorenz AG. ITT Cbtp.'s 
West German arm, and AEG Tde- 
f unken AG. 

Adam & Gcl, a private Edin- 
burgh-based bank framed in 1983, 
has named Mark Hedderwtek to 
the new post of investment manag- 
er. He joins tbe bank from the 
Lloyd’s underwriting agency, 
Langlons. 

Hondi nitre International, a 
French executive-search firm, has 
appointed Hans Ulrich Graf presi- 
dent of its operations in Switzer- 
land, where u recently set up its 
first offices in Geneva and Horgen, 
near Zurich. Mr. Graf, who will be 
based in Geneva, previously held 
senior posts within Massey- Fergu- 
son’s European operations. 

CSR Ltd. said Sir Gordon Jack- 
son resigned as deputy chairman 
and a director. He had been associ- 
ated with the Australian natural 
resources group for 44 years. 

Philips NV, tbe Dutch electron- 
ics company, has appointed Simon 


(Gold Options DHcnlal/u). 


Knoester as director of finance and 
adminis tration for its British Oper- 
ations. He succeeds Constant . 
Busch, who, as previously reported, 
has been named director of corpo- 
rate finance for the parent, based in ' 
the head office in Eindhoven. 

Chloride Group PLC and Si ng er 
Products Inc. of New York plan to 
form a joint venture to provide the - 
Chinese battery industry with mod- 
em plant and technology. Named 
chairman of the new company. 
Chloride Singer (China) LuL, was 
David Hanonson. a director of 
Chloride Group, and Dominick 
Puccio of Singer Products will serve 
as general manager. 


Barclays Bank PLC said Ken 
BigraH Ms'beeh appointed deputy 
divisional general manager of Bar- 
dayeard. He formerly was an assis- 
tant general manager, responsible 
for finance and planning. 

Cigna Corp^ a Philadephia- 
based insurance and financial ser- 
vices group, said Bruce K. Howson 
was named president of Cigna 
Worldwide Ipc_ which is a unit of 
its Cigna property and casualty 
group. Mr. Howson. most recently 
responsible for Cigna Worldwide's 
European property and casualty in- 
surance operations, succeeds D. 
William Schrempf, who left the 
company. 


MM 

330 

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T73.MJS 

340 

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13001450 

330 

13 ITS 

9254075 

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370 

380 

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Valean WUteWeM SA. 

1. Qua! <!■ Mm-Bmc 
1211 Cram USoiocrM 
Tet 3102 SI - Tdn 21 305 


SILVER SPUR 
SILVER SPIRIT 

Paris delivery tax free 
F.F. 786000 & 682000 



FRANCO BRITANNIC 

25 rue P.-V. Couturier, 92300 Levallois 
Tel. : (01) 757.50.80/Telex 620420 

JAGUAR - ROVER - RANGE ROVER 


Ui i If-. Ill WTO 

i* ?1 .Ravenua. 
1 9«i *-Prafffi 




IMS 1TM 
4M0. «J» 

254.1 W9S 


^tt-PerShor. 


RarSDara—. 4J0 


Id Oaar. IMS 19M 

1W Raima 7S A 4*2 

078 Mat Inc. - 0.97 0.9b 

ms. Par Stare 8.14 0.14 

Homwtolti Mining 

1U Ooar. IMS 1914 

Revenue 714 su 

imi inc. 131 ItJ 

I Par Shore 007 023 


‘ R 


Cbw. Bathurst Norway 


.£♦ A 


IMi Si IMOvar. 

ll 7, V I Revenue 

i| c. V -Prolii 

n, 


3 "J Si lUOuar. IMS 7944 

'30 4| S^^'Revaiwe 42JJ S09.0 

JS 5 a?;^:OoarNei — 5ta rut 

Jpef 5nor«_ 148 1 2A 

Siii Gulf Canada 

17. S J Sii, itrOaar. IMS 1944 

'g*. Jv'Revenu# — • . IJ70. UK 

JtSr J : Pfttl I IM TIB 

“Jt: > -Per Snore _ 043 0J2 

, , i ’ Rio Algam 

-ft iCJ III Oaar. IMS 1914 

iq y . Revenue — 322.9 2*sa 

s; r .Prom 23.15 14 02 

•x>S o is .^-PWShana 052 024 

7~ i T - . Sears Canada 

— .mewar. 1945 1944 

„ Revenue 74*J 795S 

i Net Lais *15 002 

*io * a, France 

'i J*riRr. ' rTU,M * 

'U t; ? r - Banqu« Paribas 

„ .. "TfSii Yeor 19*4 1M3 

4 V •■I pr0,lto wa.1 175A 

• Puchirroy 

c Year 1M4 1943 

<: j; Prom S44H(at4dio 

. 'Ut. I 


Doratar 


Norsk Hydro 
Itrovar. I9IS HH 

Roveaua 9A2S. fi.753. 

PnMIl MU 4094 

United States 


III Oaar. ITO 
R|v«nM_ AKL3 

Nei Inc. tnW.91 

Per S4oro_- — 



INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS — 

Tandem Application Software Specialists 


CAR DESIGN SPECIALIST 


Owyiter WQo £" 

1*7 OW. MM IMI 

Ravenua WOO. 4JWL Nei Inc. 

Narine. 5R7A 7058 Per Store „ 

Par Snare m. 4.1* S M 

fMf not inc tuOts crad/f ot j 

tZJi t>tr short from lox-ltat , ^ 

amvtorm mtd lit Oaar. 

Revenue _ 

Cofaaf o - P rfroolhre SrswC 


Moca Pot. 


Colgat o-P ohnoBve Prih«w — 
mot-r. ms iim Norle 

Revenue IJ38. 12«. . ”° fTC 

Net Inc. 443 SSJ lOQuar. 

Par Share 037 DM Revenue 

M»i net inc&taM ffotn ot Net inc. _ — 


WK 1M4 
10129 10*63 

49M 6J9 

L73 HD 


IMS 19*4 
15*00. ISJtOO. 
3304 3S04 

178 193 


Norfolk Sthom 

IM Qoor. MS 19*4 

■venue 843.2 44*7 

8 IOC. 99J 1033 

ir Share— _ 139 134 


1914 SI 7 4 million from sale ol Ptr share — I- 59 

W Nfhoast Util. 

Com. Fratghtways mooar. ms 

inOear. 19C 1M4 

K Revenue — 4423 MiJ 

net inc. 1335 my -Per Share— 0.914 

IMS Per Share— 833 0*5 WmiiHUrfM 


Diamond Sham. 


MOMr. 

Revenue 

Net inc. 


1945 1944 Net IIK. _ 

9S47 1.141 Per Share 

59-07 5931 ttasnnt, 


lit Ooar. ntS 19*4 

Revenue 590.9 5833 

wet inc. 9*3* 8943 

Per Shore 0.916 1*99 

Washington Post 

IM Ouor. 1985 1*84 

Revenue 243L4 2195 

Net IIK. 2*0 9.1 

Per Share 1.7* 034 

IMS not Include* oolnof *77 


Per Share— - 034 033 million /root sole ol units. 


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Announcing 
hand delivery 
in Germany ! 

Hie Intenxaliona] Herald 
Tribune is pleased to announce that 
readers in the following city centers 
can now have their paper delivered 
the morning of publication and still 
pay less than the newsstand price! 


Hannover 

Diisseldorf 


Frankfurt 

Ludwigshafen 

Mannheim 

Heidelberg 


Numberg 


For details contact our 
representative in Germany: Foreign 
Press Services, Gleisstrasse 5, 

6832 Hcdcenheim-Taihaus, 

Td: (06205) 20131. Tdex: 465826 


Leading Italian automotive Coachbuilder located in Torino, Italy is 
Reeking a matured denigner with several years automotive design 
experience to work in a cooperative team environment. Ponition 
offers international design opportunity. Initial position will introduce 
successful candidate to advanced automotive design function and 
could lead to manager appoin lenient in short timeframe. Candidates 
mast have extensive design knowledge and be familiar with advanced 
concept vehicule and potential production design. Knowledge of 
Italian is preferred. 

Occasional international travelling is required. 

Position will offer salary and fringe benefits commensurate with 
qualifications, experience and position responsibilities. 

Send inquiries in Italian or English, in confidence to: 

F. FUCCINI 

PERSONNEL AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER 
GHIA S.p.A. 

Via Padre A. da Montefeltro, S 
• 1013-1- Torino Italia. 


Iiitestare fattura 

GHIA S.p.A. 

Vis Psdre A. As ftfonirfellro, 5 
1013 1 TORINO 
C-F. 00 S2 1 4600 1 4 



TANDEM COMP tTERS sole and exclusive distributor in KUWAIT and the 
GULF COUNTRIES has two immediate openings. 

Senior Systems Analyst/ Appl. Designer 

to work nn*APPLIC4TION-SOFTWARE-DEVELOPME]VT- PROJECTS. The position 
requires the following qualifications: 

— A minimum of 8-10 years experience in Computer Applications Design + Development; 
minimum 3 yearn of Tandem Application-Design and Development; sufficient project leadership 
experience; application background preferably in Banking or Finance. 

Programer Analyst 

to w ork on APPUCATION-SOFTWARE-DEV'ELOPMENT-PROJECTS. The position 
requires the following qualifications; 

— A minimum of 6 yean experience in Applications Development; minimum of 4 yean heavy 
progranungi-xjfiericacc in COBOL; minimum of 3 yean PATHWAY programing experience and 
Tandem utilities knowledge: good experience in writing program* specifications and leading 
prugraming-teamfc. 

Both puoiiiufu require also heavy experience in: T1SSII, TXP. ENCOMPASS, GENERAL DATA 
COMMUNICATIONS. Knowledge of FORTRAN and TAL will be faelpfuL 
We offer a good salary, furnished accommodation (incL family), medium sue company car, payed 
annual 1 month leave and airfare (ind. family). 

Please send resume and salary requirements in confidence to: 

EDV-Penfonalberaxung TOLZ 
Frankfurter Straase 31, D-6367 Karben 2, 

West Germany or call: (0) 6046/7236, Jnergen Krueper 





Export 

creation de filiales 


80 fifiales dans le monde - 90 % du CA b f export - des produks 
com me le MinHab Photo, leader aux USA et mftme au Japoa 
Depuis de nombreuses annfees, Kis est dtte par tous les grands 
obaervateurs pour son dfivetoppement mondial et sou exemple 
de r&ussJte tant en France quA retranger. 

Dans le cadre de cette expansion, nous lancons un nouveau programme de citation deflates dans 
16 PAYS <f Europe et cfAfirique. 

Pour chacune, nous recherchons son 

Futur directeur 

ll aura une autonomie compete pour cr&er et dinger la filiate. 

Pour fake face a ses respextsabifitfes, le candidal aura une experience conduante dans le domaine 
commercial, gestion, management et impfcrativement un proffl d'entreprenera. D sera self 
dynamique 

Cette offre sfodresse aux CauUdats Etxangers maBtrisant paifaitunentlebanc^s 
ou aux frangais bHriflngue ayant une experience export; de preference acqtise ft raranger. 

La rfemunftration tits attractive sera composie tfun fixe et tf un intfiressement important au CA 
Ecrire b Monsieur D. Gabs, sous reference 1069. KIS. BP 204 X. 38043 Grenoble Cedex. - 



McDonald’s is a major U.S. corporation with an international branch network and 
outstanding growth and performance record. Worldwide sales are well in excess of 
U.S. $10 billion. Due to our rapid expansion we are looking for a 

European Finance Manager 

This person will be responsible for implementing a cash management system in Europe. 
He/ she will also assist in arranging financing for wholly-owned subsidiaries, advising 
joint venture partners licensees on their financing and assisting in the negotiation of loan 
agreements. 

The idea! candidate will have a broad financial background including cash manage- 
ment, bank relationship management and local currency financing in various countries 
wilhin Europe. Knowledge of accounting and strong quantitative financial skills are' 
required. Language requirements are English, German and French. Spanish and Italian 
would be a plus. 

Please send resume with picture and salary requirements to: 

McDonald's System of Europe, Inc., Attn. Mr. Ernest Mafhia, 
European Controller, Kennedyallee 109, 6000 Frankfurt/ Main 70. 


The United Nations Children’s Fund 

WHh Haadquorten in New York end offices throughout the world, 
working with developing country governments to provide disadvan- 
taged children and their mothers with the basic services they need to 
survive and deve lo p seeks 

A 

Now York, USA fRmij VN507) 

RESPONSIBILITIES: 

to conduct reviews of assigned organizational and functional activities 
and to evahiale the adequacy and effectiveness of management and 
hnancid controls, to carry out outfits of EDP functions and to assist hi the 
review and evaluation of new EDP systems and the implementation. The 
report outfit findings and make recommendations for corrective actions. 
Improving operations and effecting economy. 

QUALnCADONS: 

certified public accountant or equivalent and/or Masters degree in 
accounting or business administration. Knowledge of computerixed audit- 
ing, Minimum 8 -years of relevant experience in auditing. Fluency in 
English; working knowledge of French or Spanish. 

LOCATION: 

the selected candidate wifi initially be posted in New York for ot least 2 
years. Subject to satisfactory performance position could lead to a e ar n er 
oppeintmenl and outposting to either of these locations: New Delhi, 
Bangkok, Bogota, Nairobi, Abidjan or Ammon. 

Sakvy commensurate with qualifications and experience. Exceilenl bene- 
fits podcoge. . . 

5end d ei ofled resume no later thon May 25. 1985 to: 

Michael K, Corbett, 

. Chief Recruitment and Placement 

UNICEF 

ABB UN Plaza. New York, NY 10017, USA 


FINANCIAL EXECUTIVES 


Fast-paced diversified financial services organization with varied 
worldwide interests has several openings for financial control- 
lers/ executives. 

Experience in broad range of corporate finance, cosh manage- 
ment, audit raid computerization of systems, coupled with proven 
ability to work in an unstructured environment are mandatory. 
Probable Brussels base with extensive travel. Immediate start. 
Superior financial package for the right people. 

Apply with Ml C V. and salary history to: 

Box 034875, 1.H.T., 

63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England. 



MANAGERS 

International financial services organisation requires several 
managers for London and overseas branches. 

Proven track record in developing and directing new branch 
operations/ money management and people management skills 
requisite. 

Ability to travel /relocate; immediate start; superb financial 
package. 

Apply with full CV. uk 

Box 034876, International Herald Tribune, 

63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH. England. 


Petite entreprise trds performante et mondiale merit connue 
dans sa branche par ses dfeveloppements depuis vingt arts, 
recherche pour adapter ses structures d la demande du 
march6 international: 

UN INGENIEUR, 

28 a 35 ans, grand** «cdes, ayant : 

• Lfonvargura <fun honuna cfaffuii-M ; 

• PorfaB * im*n* bffiwgu* frangai*/ angfah ; 

■ L* Mm du contact huRKdn ; 

■ Un* mpfciwa n g fa i— ring ou travmnc n*wf» ou butoau Jttodo*. 
informs* par 

- Un* act i v irt prananta tounfo* vors rUwk dm projets, la rfaJao- 
tion dm offrm, la negotiation, I* wwvi dm affairm avc la grand* 
indusM*; 

- D* rMfoc posdbffifos cfocarrfont. 

Envoyar candidahire, 4Vrricuhim vtta* et phpto sou* ref. : 
Bex D101, Horald Tribune, 92521 Nsudly Gxbx, France. 


SALES VICE PRESIDENT 

In response to last conversations. Chairman of Board 
will speak to previously selected candidates. 

Call between 7:00p.m. and 9:00 p.m. from May 6th 
to May 9th: 

Annette HALE. 

P.O. Box 164-041, Miami, FLORIDA. 





















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HUNGARY 

A CONFERENCE ON 

TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 


Five succinct reasons 
why theWakforf =Astaria 
is Newark's 
finest luxury hotel 




nn.ivwn'HPmi'imnl 
(■■>/ wi . in . i <anr.i <■ DA r.iail 

■ ■■I IBI ••; ill i:lk'i Lba ■■■■ 


Lvu\i 1 1 1 i//oovi\\mui r/4r/ 

TKJOCOvVU/WSCQaO^X'P.MIf/'.., _ 


Comfort 


The kind of comfort that comes from 
investing $ 1 1 0 million in our hotel over three 
years, including our Park Avenue lobby, all 
public and private function rooms, our restau- 
rants, and our new, luxury guest rooms 

Entertainment 

The choice of entertainment you get 
from three of New York's finest restaurants, 
offering haute cuisine, hearty steaks and fresh 
seafood, or gourmet Japanese fare, plus live 
grand piano music nightly. Sir Harry's unique 
safari lounge, the Terrace Lounge, the popular 
Oscar's restaurant, and more. 


security to visiting heads of state, as well as 
helping each of our daily guests who need the 
impossible done immediately. 


SPONSORED BY 

THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

Budapest, June 1 3-1 4, 1 985 

The International Herald Tribune conference on " Trade and Investment Opportunities in Hungary'' 
will be of keen interest to any executive concerned about future economic relations between East and West. 

The conference provides an extraordinary opportunity for business leaders to examine 
how the Hungarian government is approaching questions of domestic and intemationd economic relations 
and offers Western executives on unusual occasion for direct contact with business leaders from Eastern Eur 
Senior executives wishing to register for the conference should complete and return the coupon below *** 
JJfrE 13 IBJC 1 A 


Elegance. 


JUNE 13 
Keynote Address: 

Mr. J6zsef Mo rjai. Deputy Prime Master 

The Economic Outlook 


JUNE 14 

The Banking System 

Fekete, fir# Deputy President, National Bonk of 


Innovation. 


The kind of innovation regarding our 
guests’ unique needs that makes us the only 
hotel in the world which hosts a nation's 
embassy, and enables us to offer privacy and 


The unparalleled elegance of a priceless 
collection of Art Deco treasures which adorns 
our hotel And the Waldorf Towers, which has 
been the celebrated residence of a former 
president of the United States, one of our 
country's favorite songwriters, a great national 
hero and those most prominent in society. 

Value. 

The value that comes from staying in 
New York's finest hotel, but not New York's 
most expensive hotel. You can spend more, but 
you can't get more. 

When business or pleasure brings you to 
New York, stay at New York's finest luxury 
hoteL 


Professor Jozsef Bognar, Director, Institute of World Economics Western Banking and Hungary 

fka Wf ffWrrvwr drrviami/ Cr&o^rcr Ilj_ » . I rr J.r • i r — r. • 


of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences 

Foreign Trade 

Mr. btvan Torflk. Secretary of State for Foreign Trade 

The Rve Yecr Pksi 

Dr. Janos Hods, Secretary of State.. National Planning Board 

Afternoon Address 

Dr. Armand Hammer, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, 
Occidental Petroleum Corporation 
Investment incentives end Tax Free Zones 
Dr. Peter Medgyessy, Deputy Minister of Finance 

Beeler 

Mr. Sdndor Demcsok, General Manager, Hungarian Foreign 
Trading Bank 


M^Gcfcrid E&ter Vkb President and General Manoaer 
Bark of America N.T, Vienna manager. 

Industrial Outiook 
Afternoon Address 
Joint Venturas 

Mr. Laszlo Borb&y, Director General Deoartm** r 

Moderator: Mr. T6mas Bede u. 

Commerce ' ■ ^ lender*. Hungarian Chamber of 




^ ?r vBiivTl 


Without the Waldorf, it isn’t New fok 

Park Avenue at 50th Street, New York City 1 0022 - (2 1 2) 355-3000 Telex: 666747 

A Hilton Hotd 


'£5r.!: >1*2*1 

rfSl 





i 

































































LONDON ZARA ESCORT Sena. 
HMfhtWCkrtwdc. Tet 834 7S>45. 


LONDON C WS£ ESCORT S etna. 
Tab 370 7151. 



















































































































































, Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 



P 121314 


19 10 17 18 19 


17 1 T MB 


PEANUTS 

TOCW WE celebrate 
THE ZOO*** ANNIVERSARY 
OF THE BIRTH OF 
JOHN JAMES AUDUBON 


HE UA5 FAMOUS FOR 
HIS PAINTINGS OF. 
NORTH AMERICAN BIROS 


flhU 

,/W? 


NO, I DOUBT THAT HE 
EVER KNBjJ YOUR MOM 


I Ui 





BLONDIE 

OH DEAR, MEPE 
COMES IRMA 
Tv-E GOSSiP <U 


ACROSS 

1 Audit makers 
5 Energetic 

16 More 
acidulous 

12 Resident of 
Balaklava 

14 Singer 
Mandrel! 

/ 15 He gave 

Louisiana its 
name 

16 Local pol. 

17 Area near a 

% dugout 

v 19 B1 is one: 
Abbr. 

20 TV’s “Family 

22 demenihe 

23 German tran- 
scendentalist 

24 Dark 

26 Elec, unit 

27 Lookout 

28 Palma de 

30 Unruffled 

31 Prisoners of 
war 

33 Constructs 

38 Latin, 

Paris 

40 Proscription 

, 41 laude 

42 Matchmaker 
in “Fiddler 

■a- it 

" 43 Come 

(find) 


44 Church 

l andholding 

46 Sports org. 

47 Racket 

48 Some cats- 

50 Against: Abbr 

51 A printing 

53 Flower 
clusters 

55 Content 

56 Nurses’ hot 
cloths 

57 Resting places 

58 Name of two 
caliphs 


DOWN 

1 Statesman 
Hull: 1871-1955 

2 Locale for 
“Cheers" 

3 Omani, e.g. 

4 Ice pinnacle 

5 Strengthen 

6 Hazard 

7“ Yankee 

Doodle 

Dandy” 

8 Fabric edge 

9 Soviet 
president: 
1923-46 

10 Salt marsh 

11 The daily grind 

12 Hold tightly 

13 irk 

14 Georgian port 


18 Engravers’ 
sketches 

21 Calif.’s 

Valley 

23 Soprano 
Flagstad 

25 John Todd's 
radio role 

27 Robin's cousin 

29 Some linemen: 
Abbr. 

30 SaJton, for one 

32 Old Testament 
book 

33 Schumann's 

Sym- 

phoniques” 

34 Rappahannock 
tributary 

35 Hard rubber 
substance 

37 One entering 

38 Resting places 
for troops 

39 Scythes 

41 ** Brown,” 

Sharp best 
seller 

44 Screws up 

45 Poet’s Muse 

48 Smaze’s cousin 

49 Dross 

52 Polynesian 
plants 

54 D.C. ecology 
group 



SHE KNOWS ALL THE 
S t S^^ r VANotov^S 
EVB7VONE A EPH-UNS < 


JUST SEEING 
MAKES MV 
SKIN CRAWL. 


VOU'D BETTER U YES, LJ 
PUT MOPE IN \ WE'LL 
THE PARK ING ] BE HERE 
-r METER , v'S AWHILE 


— BEETLE BAILEY 


SIR, POI'TYOU J IT GOES 
THINK YOU PRINK l WITH THE 


TOO MUCH? 


AFTER ALL, I AM 
RUNN1N& THE WORST 





ANDY CAPP 

£ IMS DirtY Mno> Nnipiptn IU 
CM by Hun A nw «c« tiwnm. 


HOW'S THE 
^ wet 

„ RUBE? ) 


oh, dontask! I've ’ 
BEEN EATING LIKE 
A HORSE THE LAST , 
> COUPLE OF MS. < 
[ HOW ABOUT M0U? J 


WELL, XlMBElhG 



© Nnc York Times, edited fry Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 




W77 


' Well, at least he's a limited edition.' 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
lour ordinary words. 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
9 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 

rr - — — — 

I tt should be eecura two I 


THALC 


MIGRY 



WIZARD of ID 


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REX MORGAN 

1 v S’JjfS i'll be home a 

YOU SOUND TIRED, fji WEEK FBOMTOCKV, 
CLAUDIA.' WH£N WILL DARLING' I MISS 

YOU GET HOME 1 ? 1 INSIST Sb YOU ( v 

ON MAKING AN APPOINTMENT /Iff 
FOR YOU WITH DR. MORGAN rUB Fill I 
ISS FOR A CHECKUP' 






GARFIELD 

SURPRISE. GARFIELP/ 1 MAP£ 
VOU SOME WEENIE GELATIN / 


GOBBLE 

SLURP 

SMACK 

GULP 


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WELL, WHAT POlA MV MOUTH 
VOU THINK? A LIKEP IT BUT 

STOMACH 

\| > »S STILL 


BOOKS 


MEN AND ANGELS 

By Mary Gordon. 241 pp. S16.95. 

Random House, 201 East 50th Street. New 
York, N. Y. 10021 
Reviewed by Richard Eder 

W HETHER art's deep purpose is to imi- 
tate life is one thing; but it is not to 
imitate the current received discourse about 
life, except by way of illustration or parody. 
There are genuine and engaging emotions m 
Mary Gordon’s “Men and Angels,” and the 
problem of a woman's balance between mater- 
nity and autonomy is real and fairly put But 
the emotions and the problem lack hosts with 
voices that are precisely their owzl Gordon's 
relationships are better done than her charac- 
ters. 

Anne, the protagonist, is a pretty, intelligent 
woman in her 30s with a passion for art, a 
Harvard Ph. D. in art history, and no opportu- 
nity to use them. She is a devoted motter and 
wife in a college town where her husband. 
Michael, is a professor. Her creative abilities 
have no place in their life; people “invent her 
awry,” seeing in her mainly a graceful and 
charming domestic creature. 

Then an old friend and mentor asks- her to 


and contemporary of the rauves. To take the 
assignment, Anne cancels plans to accompany 
Michael on a year’s work in France. To take 
care of the children, she hires an odd, religious- 
ly obsessed young woman as her housekeeper. 

“Men and Angels” takes Anne through sev- 
eral sorts of adventure and ordeaL First, there 
is her exploration of the character and work of 
the painter, a flinty genius who broke with her 
family, lived in Pans for herself and ha art, 
neglected ha illegitimate son and died in an 
unfathomable mixture of pride and regret. 
Anne is transported both by ner subject and by 


Helped and befriended by the painter’s 
daughter, Jane — a formidably autonomous 
figure in ha own right — Anne puzzles ova a 
character and destiny. At ha own center, she 
muses, there is “not something hard and bril- 
liant but something soft and fiat." Yet for all 
her bedazzlemeni, she can’t come to t erms with 
ha subject’s maternal callousness. 

A second strand in the book is Anne’s attrac- 
tion to an electrician who comes to rewire ha 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


□□□QH □□□QE3 □□□ 
□ODQD □□saa □□□ 
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EGdBnco Qoiaaaaa 
□□aaa aaaaaa 
BE0E nnaoHaa 
□□□□ □□□□□aaa 

□lias ssaann aaaa 
□□□□□ana aaas 
□nnaaiiH □□□□ 
□□□□HD HC3QHCI 
00QHQEH 

EJD0CH3GH1E10 HHDHH 

□ed hdhhd anana 

□BE HBHDB HaEHDH 


house. Adrift in her cord usions, slwmcscomi- 
cally to seduce him. and fails. 

Fraallv. there is the gradual and terrifying 
encroachment of Laura, the housekeeper. Soft. 
mann ered, ungainly and infinitely helpful, she 
was savagely rebuffed by ter mother as a child 
and has turned to a religious dementia that she 
tries to conceal. Anne, occupied with. ter other 
crises fails to notice the madness until she 
must 'storm to the defense of ha endangered 

children. . 

She has not been able to protect them oom- 


would grow up like the children of the poor”— 
unsheltered by illusions, she means. She goes 
on to weave the uncertain balance between 
maternal duty and maternal limitations, and. 
conversely, between the need for autonomy 
and the limits of autonomy. 

The moral is inconclusive but thoughtfully 
done, it is the story that suffers; partly, pa- 
baps. out of Gordon's need to balance ter 
thematic points. 

There is some graceful end acute writh?^ 
Ha description of a museum reading-room 
with its row of busy heads and empty air 
overhead is delightful The complexities of 


beneath ha concern, that, if he will have a bard 
time being loved. he may come to be honored 
and even feared. 

The seduction scene with the electrician ap- 
proaches farce. When Anne sways towards 
him , he suggests kindly that patting one's head 
between one's knees is good for dizziness. 
Quite marvelously, she does so. before rearing 
up and blurting out ha passion. 

But ttere is a great deal of woodenness^d 
doubtful rhetoric in the characters. Laura's 
interior monologues are a travesty of demen- 
tia; she all but cackles. This puts quite a 
burden on the stoiy. It is not suspense, exactly. 
If you see somebody dropping a rattlesnake 
between the sheets in the first act ymt assume 
that it’s only a matter of time before someone 
goes to bed. Gordon does not simply telegraph 
ter message; she tends to send it by parcel 
post 

Anne is sympathetic, on the whole, but ha 
monologues can fall into a deadly windiness. 
As, for example: “How had she become the 
woman rite was? At age 38, neva to have 
performed a daring action. She was tired of it. 
tired of the weakness that had marked ter Efe.” 

Language apart, Anne’s emotions are so 
much the center of the book that they absorb 
its energies. The otter characters tend to hr - 
dim or cursory, though ttere is a kind oil 
unassembled splendor about Jane, the paint- 
er’s kind and ruthless daughter. Anne's chil- 
dren lack much specificity; so do ha woman 
friends. The electrician's mixture of old-fash- 
ioned scruples and childlike need makes us 
want to see him more dearly, but we neva do. 
And the otter men are shadows, brought in 
only for (heir effect upon Anne. 

At times, for all its seriousness, “Men and 
Angels” is like a story about somebody playing 
solitaire. There is one player. The other charac- 
ters are cards. The women are face cards. Jane 
is the queen of hearts, lavish but flat Laura is 
the queen of spades. The men are plain threes, 
fours and fives, except for the dectridan. who 
might be the jade of diamonds. 

Richard Eder is on the staff of the Los Angeles 
Times. • 


I® £RM CW/fS V-ZA 


By Alan Tniscort 

O N the diagramed deaL 
South landed-in three no- 
trump as shown and could 
place the high cards accurately 
when West led a diamond to 
his partner's queen. 

The vulnerable overcall 
made it very probable that 
West held all the missing 
kings, and the first trick had 
marked him with the diamond 
jack. In that event. West would 
be in trouble when the dubs 
were run, and would be set up ■ 
for an end play. 

South could not afford to 
duck for fear of a heart shift. 
He therefore took the diamond 


BRIDGE 


ace, cashed five club winners 
and led to the spade ace. He 
then exiled confidently with- 
the 'diamond ten, but was dis- 


comfited when West produced 
the spade king and four dia- 
mond winners. • 


The defense had discarded 
perfectly. The West player had 
thrown the heart five, the 
spade six and the diamond sev- 
en in that order. His partner 
had given up two spades and 
two hearts. There was nothing 
to indicate to South that the 
play of the heart ace would 
have succeeded in dropping 
the king, and all he could do 
was to congratulate the de- 


fenders and record the deal for 
posterity. 


NORTH 

♦ Q 1042 
*>93 
*95 

45A 19843 

•H 1 ill wEv. 

* K J74«3 U,Hm OQ8 

*»« *5 

SOUTH (D) 

♦ A 
AQ 74 

« A 19 3 

_ * K Q J 7 3 

*Me* were vtdnanHa. Tim 


bMdtog: 

Soot 

Vfit 

Nora 

1 * 

1 a 

1 ♦ 

3 ? 

Pm 

3* 

3 N.T. 

Pm 

PXM 




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js- r 


Wtatt led tbfi Btz. 


CHYSIP 


YAHNTS 


Answer here: A 


WHAT A SAFE N 
DEPOSIT BOX 
MIGHT BE CALLED*. 


Now arrange the circled letters lo 
turn the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: DECAY TARDY SLOUCH PURPLE 
Answer What an easy talker generally is— 

A HARO STOPPER 


WEATHER 



EUROPE 

HIGH 

LOW 



c 

F 

C 

F 

% 

Ahrarva 

18 

64 

8 

46 

m ‘ 

Amsterdam 

8 

46 

3 

37 


AlftWI 

23 

73 

13 

55 

<- 

BortdBM 

16 

61 

10 

SO 


Btlgredo 

12 

54 

I 

34 


Berlin 

6 

43 

3 

36 

- 

Brunei 1 

9 

48 

2 

36 


Bucharest 

16 

61 

to 

50 


Budapest 

13 

55 

2 

36 


Coponhaaon 

5 

41 

1 

34 


Costa Del SOI 

18 

64 

9 

48 

*■ 

DoMln 

11 

52 

6 

43 

«. 

Edinburgh 

S 

41 

2 

36 


Florence 

20 

68 

5 

41 

. 

Frankfurt 

11 

52 

-1 

30 


Geneva 

11 

52 

1 

34 


Helsinki 

3 

37 

2 

36 


Istanbul 

19 

66 

10 

50 

" 

Las Palmas 

22 

72 

15 

59 


Lisbon 

15 

99 

9 

48 


London 

It 

53 

5 

41 


Madrid 

14 

57 

7 

45 


Milan 

15 

59 

9 

48 


Moscow 

18 

64 

10 

50 

- 

Munich 

12 

54 

-4 

25 

-6 

Nice 

19 

46 

13 

55 


Oslo 

8 

46 

-5 

23 


Parts 

16 

61 

4 

39 


Prague 

9 

48 

1 

34 


Revklavlk 

6 

43 

1 

34 


Pome 

20 

68 

9 

48 


Stockholm 

5 

4} 

■2 

28 

- 1 - 

Strasbourg 

14 

57 

-3 

38 


Venice 

14 

57 

4 

39 


Vienna 

13 

55 

2 

36 


wonm* 

6 

43 

0 

32 


Zurich 

15 

55 

-1 

30 


BaaekM 

Balling 

Hoag Kona 
Mcnlla 
How MW 
Seoul 
Shoos rim 


HIGH LOW 
C F C P 

30 84 20 » o 

20 M 15 59 C 

V SI 23 73 cl 

32 90 20 79 cl 

37 99 22 72 (r 

23 73 16 61 o 

W 75 15 SP r 


Singapore — — — — 

Taipei 21 BS 18 64 

Tokyo 21 70 16 61 

AFRICA 

Algton 19 66 12 54 cl 

Cairo 27 81 16 61 cl 

Capo Town 19 46 10 50 o 

Casa Mateo 21 70 10 50 d 

Harwe 34 7s 17 63 fr 

Logoi — — — — na 

Nairobi 23 73 IS 59 cl 

Tonlt 22 72 IS 59 cl 


LATIN AMERICA 

BaeoaiMrei 24 75 15 
Uma 21 70 14 

MMlCDdty 26 70 13 
Rio do Janriro 28 82 22 
Soo Paolo — — — 

WORTH AMERICA 


MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 14 57 2 36 fr 

Botanf 23 73 17 63 tr 

Da mates* 2S 77 11 52 lr 

Jerusalem 17 63 11 52 o 

TCI Aviv 23 73 14 57 a 


, OCEANIA 


Anc&onm 

Atlanta 

Boston 

-Maooa 

Mover 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Houston 

LOl AA B llM 

Miami 

Mluxaponi 

Montreal 

Nassau 

Now York 


7 45 -1 

28 82 13 

18 64 8 

21 70 6 

U 57 0 

21 70 Tt 

29 84 21 

28 82 14 
25 77 13 

29 04 JO 

II <4 3 

19 66 2 

23 77 19 
18 6i 9 


Auckland 17 63 It 52 ’ o 

Sydney 16 64 12 S4 ah 

cl -eloudv;, to-toeov; fr-folr,- Mioll, 
cloudy; r-roln; ah-snowers; lwsnow, 


Son Francises 19 66 9 

5 soltlo 12 54 4 

Toronto 21 to 12 

Washington 24 79 13 

n»«Qt available; o-overcost; 
St-stormy. 


» PC 

54 PC 

55 PC 

PC-Portly 



WbHd Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse April 25 

Casing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Ctoso Prey. 
Unilever c 1145/641121/33 
United Biscuits 182 182 

Vickers 267 299 

Woolwo rifts 814 807 

F.T_» Index : nSM 
Prevhns : 96250 


ABN 

ACP Holding 
Aegon 
aiczo 
A hold 
AMSV 

ATJom Rubber 
Amro Bonk 
BVG 

Buotirmonn T 
Coland Klda 
EI»vler-NDU 
Fakker 
Gtsi Brocades 
Hoineken 
Hoogovens 
KLM 
Naorden 
Nal N editor 
Nedllord 
OCO Vendor G 
Pakhood 
PniKps 
Raboco 
RoctamCD 

Rotlneo 
Rorento 
Hovel Dutch 
Unllevar 
Von Ommeren 
VMF Stark 
VNU 

ANP.CBS Go acral lodes : 2 ob_ 5 
Previous : 208.18 

) Btwbb cI b ""j 

Arbod 
Bekaert 
Cocfcerlil 
Ceoeoa 
EBES 

GB-inno-BM 
GBL 
Govaorl 
Hoboken 
intercom 
Krodtetnank 
Petrofine 
Sac Generate 
SoHna 
Sdvoy 
Traction Elec 
UCB 
Unerg 

viellle Monlagne 

Current stock Index : 2227 J2 
Previous : wnm 

j Fraahfmri i 


Close f>re«. 

USK 1 291 JO 291 JKJ 

IWKA 315 m 

Koll + Sail 30 KO 

Karstadt 226 zu 

Kaufhol 21 a 222 

KloecknerH-D 253 254 pi 

Klaeckner Works 71 JO 7150 

Krupp Stahl 106 105 

Undo 425L50 W 


Sosal 

West Holding 


Close Frov 
610 610 
6900 6700 


Stocfcl ode* : I10B79 
Previous : 10S&60 


Luntwrao 

MAN 

Mannesmann 

MuenctiRueek 

Ntedarf 

PKI 

Porsche 

PreutKw 

PWA 

RWE 

Rhehunetall 

Scherino 

SEL 

Siemens 

Tftvssen 

vena 


189 192 

145 14550 
162 162-50 
1340 1320 
500J0 57150 
.506 593 

12M 1233 
. 272 272,50 
12560 126 

1M158J0 
320 322 

451 4S2J0 
363 360 

543 544.50 
W.vo 1 D 2 J 0 
in 184.70 


AACoro 
Aliled-uyons 
Anglo Am Goto 
Ass Brit Food, 
ASS Dairies 
Barclays 


Vfrtkswooenwert 2S&50 207 
Wollo 569 569 

Commerzbank Index : 123560 
Previous : I232J0 


Bk Easl Asia 
Cheung Kong 
China Light 
Groen Island 
Hong Song Bank 
Henderson 
HR Electric 
HK Realty A 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shanghai 
HK Teieahone 
HK Whorl 
Hutch Whampoa 
Hvsan 
inti City 
J online Math 

J online sec 

Kowloon Malor 
Miramar Hotel 
New World 

SfiFiisr"* 

Slelux 

Swrire Pacific A 
Tpi Cheung 
Wall Kitatn 
Wneelock a 
Wing on Co 
Winwr 
worts inn 


23J0 23 

. 16 1630 
14.70 I4J0 
7 JO 7.90 
45J0 46 

1.96 1.97 

755 7.95 

16.10 965 

37 34 

- SJO £80 
8 BJO 
74 73-50 
660 635 

23 2360 
OJB 0jS8 
087 086 

12.10 1280 

1360 U 
1080 9.90 

32 30JS 
SM 6.90 
2.15 2825 
1080 1060 
180 18d 

24.10 24.10 
187 1J0 

187 183 

785 785 

2215 185 
4.725 485 

2.175 2.175 


AEG-Teletunken 

Aiitonx Vers 

Altana 

Bosf 

Baver 

Baver.Hvao. 

Bayer.V9r.Bgnk 

BBC 

BHF-Bank 

BMW 

Commontaonk 

Cantloummi 

Datmier-Bacu 

Dogussa 

Deutsche Babcock 

DovischeBank 

Dresdner Bonk 

GHH 

Hor tenor 

Hocwier 

Hocchsl 

HOOSCft 

Horton 


11150 112 

HS6 1155 
365 36980 
70530 705.90 
21170 21380 
35050 353 

„ 340 341 

214 JO 213J0 
_ 278 278 

369.80 370J0 
16980 171 

136 134.10 
690J0 681 

351 35080 
145 16120 
„ 469 4474!1 
208.70 218.90 
15380 1S7 

M0 335 

_ 472 475 

2T4J0 31480 
’OTTO 10780 ■ 
170 170 


I Hang Sons index : 151087 
Previous : IS17J0 


AECI 

Anglo Americsn 

Anglo Am GaW 

Barlows 

Btwoor 

Butters 

Do Beers 

Orfefonteln 

Elands 

GF5A 

Harmony 

Hiveto Stool 

Klaot 

Ned bank 

Pres Sievn 

RuMior 

SA Brews 

StHefone 


015 BOO 
2710 2660 
17975 17550 
1150 1135 
1500 1475 
8900 0700 
102 S 1010 
5450 5300 
1775 1700 
3600 3400 
3100 MOO 
400 390 

0300 BOM 

itbo mo 

6350 6000 
1750 1700 
755 . 750 
3775 372S 


BAT. 

Beechom 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Circle 
BOCGroup 
Boots 

Bowetor Indus 

Brit Homo 51 
r I r !l Telecom 
Brit Aerospace 
Brltoll ” poc * 
BTR 
Burmah 
C^Je Wireless 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cans 
Commercial U 
Cwiscotd 
Court oulds 
Dalgety 
De Beers* 
Distillers 
Driefonleln 
Pisans 
g^StCtod 

GeiAcddent 

Ghmo s 

Grand Met 

&RE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawtusr 

ICI 

Imps 

Jaguar 

Land Securities 
Legal General 
Uovtls Bonk 
Lonrtio 
Lucas 

Marks and Sa 
Meiai Bex 
Midland Bonk 
Nat West Bank 
PndO 
Pliklnoton 
Plessey 
Prudential 
Ratal Elect 
Pond tgn lefti 
Rank 
Reed mil 
Reuters 

Raval Dutch 1 . 
RT 2 

SaatBii 

Salnsburv 

Sean Holdings 

Shell 

STC 

Chartered 
Sun Alliance 
Tote and Lvte 
Tesco 
Them emi 
T, l, Group 
TWrtOlgwHSe' 

THF 

Ultramar 


T13V3 S13W 

- - 173 1» 

d WWixd no 

I 234 236 

150 130 

344 349 

S «9 

338 340 

358 360 

731 231 

79 39 

4J0 

273 2oS 

173 173 

345 248 

545 526 

282 284 

140 13V95 

I 413 408 

206 208 

££ 676 

222 220 

525 520 

157 156 

JB5 185 

220 222 

544 547 

IS 

478 43B 

S2S ^ 

,.,77 8 27 8 

*27J, S375k 

311 

828^6 Stow 

192 188 

565 571 

230 229 

12U. 12 13/64 
290 283 

6M 68* 
242 741 

212 211 

435 429 

739 769 

185 ig 

2 S 250 

2?8 297 

663 671 

fS S47 

177 176 

% 764 

139 140 

390 393 

J53 358 

276 278 

!?? m 

636 641 

„ 19B 196 

Snips snots. 1 

360 35H 1 

546 546 ' 

.« iy; 399 

47 0/3246 17/22 { 
634 627 

665 ITS 
M0 332 

ervi a ? 1 

725 716 

210 2fl6 [ 

449 469 

463 446 ; 

440 433 i 

246 246 ! 

i 421 417 | 

230 " 228 v 

333 OS i 

-138 137 • 

225 228 T 


Air Ltou Me 
AJlfhom All. 

Av Dossouft 

Boncolre 

BIC 

Bang rain 
Bouygues 
BSN-GD 
Carretaur 
Char Bears 
Club Med 
Dartv 
Dumez 
Elf-AauHalnfr 
Europe 1 
Gen Eaux 
Hochefte 
Lata rt»c Cop 

Legrand 

Lesleur 

roreal 

Martell 

Matra 

Merlin 

Michel hi 
Meat Henm *»y 
Moulinex 
Occkhmlale 
Pemad Rlc. 
Peiratos (Ise) 
Peugeot 
Prlntomos 
Rodldtechn 
Rrdoute 
Rousael Uetof 
Sonofl 

SMsRossIgnol 

Sour .Perrier 
Tele m e con 
Thomson C5F 

Agofl index : 2BU2 
Previous ; 38832 
CAC Index : SUM 
Previous : 2U60 


Altai 

Asahl Chem 

Asahl Glass 

Bank of Tokyo 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

Casio 

CHoh 

' Dal Nippon Print 
Dai wo House 
Dalwa Securities 
Fcmuc 
Full Bank 
Full Pholo 
Fulttsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

Japan Air Linos 
Kalftna 
Kama! Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kevocem 
Kiri n Br ewery 
Komatsu 
Kubota 

Matsu Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Coni 
Mitsui and CD 
Mltsukoshr 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nik ko Sec 
Nippon Koeoku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon SIOOl 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura See 
Olympus 
Pioneer 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Shlrnaru 

Shine tsu Chemical 
Sony 


442 453 

MO 845 
880 849 

77B 778 

515 517 

1300 1270 
1700 1640 

,353 353 

1010 1000 
550 534 

778 780 

8980 ra 
1300 1450 
1730 1710 
1200 1180 
815 812 

645 M0 
1370 1340 
5900 5700 
290 289 

1400 1410 

143 143 

5330 5350 
602 SOT 
440 438 

336 333 

1530 I4M , 
710 702 

1490 1480 
455 454 

397 394 

260 262 
525 525 

332 333 

513 486 

1070 W0 
1110 tfiSO 
877. B65 
705 710 

1500 1450 
865 875 

146 147 

ZB 234 
630 632 

1030 1030 
1330 1130 
2520 2560 
947 933 

1000 1000 
700 686 

1010 1020 
4300 4270 


Clow Prev. 
Sumitomo Bank ' 1650 1620 

Sumitomo Chem 228 224 

SumltamoMwIne 590 585 

Sumitomo Metal 145 1*5 

Taieei Carp 225 215 

Talsha Marina 437 4TB 

TofcedaChem 850 B55 

TDK 557® 5550 

Ten Ih 435 431 

Takvo Elec n ewer 77W 1700 

Tokyo Marine B19 80S 

Toppan Printing 848 845 

Tarw fnd 452 451 

Toshiba 388 392 

Toyota 1350 1280 

Yamal chi Sec 730 740 


Cmat&m stach via AP 


NKkei/DJ. Index : 1333187 
Previous : 122I7J7 
New Index : HI1J4 
Previous : 95127 


Adta 2730 2730 

Bar* L»U 3560 3S70 

Brown Bavert 16HJ 1610 

ClbaGelBV 2940 2585 

Credit Suisse 2425 2430 

EHCtn owalt 2860 2870 

Ge«V Fkreiwr 745 m 

Inter discount 1980 1985 

Jacob 5uchard 6250 6325 

Jotmoll 1950 1960 

Landis Gvr 1680 1675 

Nestle 6510 6500 

Oortlkon-B U25 1425 

Roche Baby era B650 

Sandnz 7825 7150 

MthMler 4000 4005 

E5 775 

SBC 389 385 

Swissair 1048 1060 

Swiss Reinsurance 10700 10900 , 

Swiss Volksbank 1460 1460 

UrUan Baik 3710 3690 

Winterthur 4700 4700 

Zurich Ins 24179 23900 

SBC Index : 443LN 
Previous : 439 JO 

KfiJ net auatedi NA: net 
avallaMo; *d: ex-dlvldena. 


Cold Storage 
DBS 

FmerNeavo 
Haw Par 
inchcape 
Alai Banking 
OC8C 
OUB 

Overseas Union 
ShansrHa 
Si me Darby 
SPore Lana 
Spare Press 
S Steamship 
St Trading 
uni tod Overseas 
UOB 


240 N.T. 

6 685 

722 2 .ll 
2 M 2 M 
580 580 

8.95 9 

160 340 

2J0 2M 
ZI7 2.16 
1 J2 1.94 , 
IS 2 U5 
&3S 625 

1A4 IM 
444 448 

1J6 1.97 

4J8 4M. 


Straits Times Ind. Index : 799J3 
Previous. :796J6 • 


^MhhahB 


AGA 1 

Alto Laval 

Asoa 

Astra 

All as Copco. .. 

BoHden 

EiecfroUw 

Rrtceeon 

Cndie 

Han dotab ankon 

Pharmacia 

Saab^conia 

Sandvlk . 

Skatska 

SKF 

Swedish Matcti 
Votvg 

Atfaersvaerldenl 
Prrvkws ; 39*38 


420 410 

197 196 

353 340 

400 400 

117 123 

218 218 
322 324 

. 291 291 

365 365 

164 164 

201 203 

NA. - 
410 410 

9050 91 

216 215 

234 ZE 

235 254 


BA Expands Concorde Fleet 

Reuters 

LONDON — British Airways added on Thurs- 
day a seventh Concorde to its fleet to meet demand 
for flights on the supersonic plane. 

A spokesman said the extra Concorde had been 
/‘mothballed” three years ago as a potential source - 
for spares. British Airways, which the government 
■plans to sell to the private sector, is giving its 
Concordes new internal fittings and p ainting the 
BA coat of arms on the taiL 

The British-French Concorde, developed at a' 
cost of S25 billion, wentimo service nine years ago 
only to be overtaken by rising oil prices and reces- 
sion. However, it has rebounded with flights on the 
profitable London-U-S. routes and through its ex- ( 
pan ding charter business. . • 


/Hi 


' 250Abtl Prco - 

SCOOAcfclondt 

7325 Aon Ico E 
4000 Agra Ind A 
11095 Alt Energy 
975 Alto Nat 
521 Algo mo St 
BOOAndraWAf 
10266 Argon 
1741 BP Canada 
40002 Bank BC 
103769 Bank N S 
91S0 Barrtck 0 
15782 Bonanza R 

2800 Bra lame 
5870 Bra ma lea 
10O Brenda M 
11002 BCFP 
106620 BC Ros. 

4W9 BC Phono 
200 Brunowk 
4awBuddCon 
33932 CAE 
4MCCLA 
47WJ CObffa S I 
5480 Cad-Fry 
1800 C Nor West 
13600 CPackrs 
888* con Trust 
4MCTang . 
99572 Cl BK Cam 
. SOD Cdn Nat Rax 
117457 CTIrg Af - 
1703 Cara 
2300Cokxiosa 
940 Colon 175 P 
150CHUM 
4«CDWbBI 
7300 CTL Bank 
1300 Convent™ 
92294 Qneka R 

-TOO Conran A 

10098 Crownx 
IMS45czar R*» 
20345 DaonOav 
__ 251 Doan A 
104288 PtflHan A 0 

74094 Denison B f 

13DOOcvb1cor 
7B0 DKfcran A f. 
2SO Dlckran B • 
6*40 Daman A 
257S5 Datosco A 
40680DuPantA 
MSlDvtaxA- 
2763 Elcthom X 
11973 Eauily Svr 
1600 C Falcon C 
7036 Fknbntae 

250 0 Far dv Rn 
4300 Fed Ind A 
22900 FCrty Fin • 
SOOFruotUMf 
32So Gondii A 
^ 75*3 Gooc Comp- . 
180 584 Gaacrwde 

4»o Gibraltar 
31010 Getdconif 


l75.Gaodv«or 
100 Grandma 
2960 GL Forwf 
2235 or Pacific 
,630 Gray tmd 
3200 H Croup A ~ 
ssoHrdinaAf ■ 
4Sn Hawker 
J200 Hama 
259W H Bay Co 
2R01ma8co 
UDOIndat 
550 Inland Gas 
7317a inti Thom 
3500 Urtpr Plpo 
41550-Jamiadr . 

260 Kerr Add 
11930 Labott 
17205 LOC Marls. 

1300 LOnt Cam 
naooLacana 
. rsu-Loe • . 
26463 Ublaw Co 
600 MDSXA . 

. 7MICC ‘ 
6030 MCRM H X - 


High Low Clow ctrge 


S5ZP 5ZU 5216 + u. 
Sldta 14 u 
sm. 17J» 17H. 
mu 74s n, 

OIJA 2 US 21 W 

5143 6 1436 14*. + u 

gnu 22 UsZZ 

. S24 233a 233u i* 

35 + 3k 
Bta 5W 5*4 + 1% 
*13 1234 1236 

135 132 135 —3 

440- 460 -hM 

475 470 475 

^ Sto lo^ta 

S'* s w-* 

*26 2588 26 — v, 

*55 5W 5W ^ 

SSS LS? IS*- 14 

2*236 2336 iWi- u 

201 -J + 12 

*3716 36% 36-T8— 4u 
*1416 14 to |TljZ S 

r frit 

^ ’S , ls +,i 

*1036 1836 iw2 + v- 

S IS 2S 

go -10 410 4® 

HSS 'p* 13^—1^ 

*g w VZ"* 

■ JS S tEl'Z 

aw 215 " 

*3% T is 

517^ 1736 !7^~ ** 

S: m* u . 
wis 13?;+^ 

f&Vl 23 23Vj+ to 

H7to 2 n. 27V. ” 

mvt 12 12 

305 294 300 + 4 . 

SW ■ 10 + to 1 

f f f~! 

is pis"" 

145-145 14? + . 

»19«i 19 ■ » * ? 

Sa WJ« 15?t h 

out i7k a ^ 

11436 1436 iSlgZ 3 
*173% 1736 iSik ** 
Bh Bto |S 
S36Ui 36 Iav 

ffiSB iM igi+S • 

sins ins 

■«a s sa+g - 1 

8*» 5n? 

215 215 2is” •« 
SaW ; 2336 Mli +% I, 


McGrow H 
'SfiJMeriondE 
TamMolson At 
- 2100 Nabisco L 

. 9 H«NoroiKta 

! ,0^? Narcen 
• 

■™}OsADwoAf 

2300 P amour 

! P 

“SE=Mbina 

IMPtoe Pokit 
.JSSPocoGOa 
1 '£525 Placer 

Provloo 

“SSSuo sturgo 
200 Ram Pet 
WOORayrockf 
,5® Redpath 

2»5 d \ renhsA 

6£00 ResSorv f 
S 8 ™ pr » A 

'aogoooriA 
4®J Roman 
1M Ralturkxi 

fsigffir 

tStaiES, 

JSrUjxrfhm 

94JS5KMCOA 

7018* Su Intro 

Tor Dm Bk 

Traders A f 
SWOTmsMi 

SSKES,-- 

IIP 


T 3E 300 index: 


High LraChHOm 

»36 Ztv» 223k + 36 
•CT 415 415 — 5 

*15% 1536 153b 
*2486 24to 24VS+ to 
*1736 1736 ITto 

S IW 'f * 1 
S4W A. 

sat 2336 2336 
54 51 54 

*914 Bto 714+Ito 
24V6 24364- to 
*7?l 736 796— V6 

*32 31 to 32 + to 

SIBto 1816 lBto-t-16 
S7to 7V6 716 

CT36 ail, 28*+ 16 
124 122 124 +3 

*2634 2£6 263b- to 
*1936 1936 19* + 16 
425 420 425 —35 

Mto 636 6to 

*^ 1OT6 IFkt^ 

i» ^ isa 155 

,*E6 M6 9VS + 16 
Slim 1086 1 0*6+ 16 
*41 41 .41 

JW6 5to 686+ Mr 

SKV6 2436 25V6+116 
*796 JJi Tto— 36 
H9 to 28*6 2914 + 36 
S7to 71L 736 

S93k 936 936— 36 

*5596 S5to 5514 + 16 
Kfflto 2BU. 3Sto 
290 280 290 

245 245 3*5 —5 

24 - 22 24 

*2314 23 2314+ 36 

*13 . 128k 12<b— 36 
513*6 1314 13*6 
*36*6 36*4 36*6+ 36 
S55 5486 5686— to 

*1936 19V6 19*6+ to 
*2036 2036 2Mh- to 
*22to 2136 22*4 + 86 
*10 934 996- 16 

405 390 390 

*25to 2586 2586— to 
*34%. 2436 243+ „ 
43S 430 435 +10 

*27 27 27 — 16 

54 50 54 +5 

*71& 636 7to+ to 

R146 1136 1136 
*1114 ITto 1136 
100 100 100 — 5 . 

*586 53k 586 

*1136 11*4 1186+ to 
*13 13 13—86 

*1516 15 15to 

*58to 58Vi 58V6+3L 
no 7* 75 + *z 

*llto life llto + Mi 
SAto 6 6 


CImc Prevkws 
ZU6M UBLX 


^Cli kMM t S27M 

BP®* P 

'S 

^ 63 ^ p 

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S ° tea:2 ««45 Ohara, 


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2*86.2916+ to 
1414 1414 — to 
lOto IBto 
U -IS 

Uto 1846+ 14, 
32W 3Jto+ 34) 
SW1 20«i+ C 
29V6+ 36 
2£b 2034+ to 
7786 37to— 34 


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iV. ■_ * 7 *^ 

■ s >4 

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T»*Ti 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 


SPORTS 






seiaggf *ea ^ nip 

dv ^" 01 ken ,kt ^ ^ tfc u ly Our From Dwpatehcs With two OUU 

sh^r?' hav e w! ,0 PW " ■ NEW YORK —The minors are Wee prodoad the 
* rnsHr*^ it S*,* flying *S*n. For the second time totunxRqn Gmdr] 

^2?52!?-- seas ?“’ a «»? E 6 ! 01 : 


:’s Tenure Appears Shaky 
d Sox Nip Yankees A gain 


Af ji~ . 


With two ouu in the seventh. 
Wee produced the game^winner by 
hitriugRoxi Ckodiys 1-0 pitch d irp 
into the right-field bleachers. It was 
Rice's 26th career homer against 


up liLv iu “ray; , mance in a series against Boston Rices Zotu career homer against 

to l ? ed . by U] usion ' imperiled ihejohofNew York New Yoik and his J 7th at Yankee 


to » . D > «lu5in«T wa ttn5W -y w* unperuea tnejoaoi new xonc 
; m ^ ve Uie ^V^Vankee Manager Yogi Berra. 
SS. dut >' and The YaSStost Sifae Rod Sox. 

«selv, b au . ee ^ta^]^^ i> -7^ here Wednesday night and 


Stadium. 

Blue Jays 10, Royds 2 


in the seventh, Nolan Ryan’s bid for his sixth ca- 
aame-winner by rcer no-mttcr. Ryan's bid was bro- 
ira 1-0 pitch deep ken up with one out in the seventh, 
bleachers. It was when Dave Parker singled. Walker 
r homer against then hit his first home run of the 
; 37th at Yankee year and Nick Esasky later scored 
on an error to give the Reds a 3-1 
lead. Houston tied the game in the 


,lT' oeiu-een ^ma] - /-c, nere weonesoay mgm ana j n Toronto 
of am 0 “ e *** TV - continued their sloppy play afidd drove in five runs 
made, two cruoal errors, andatripktosp* 
ts the “VUisiv» l. brinemc their total far the current >n.i v 


‘ - me Stan hi- Dunging utar iotai id 

,s - Of gS Mil& ** honwsmnd to 14. ' 

!?ntic noinii " n * ■ ■ The team's itrinci 


i*«uc pomu. 11 4 1 


They made two crucial errors, and a triple to spark the Blue Jays' 
bringing thor total fd the current k >-2 romp over Kansas City- Wm- 
home stand to 14. ncr Lxifc Leal (1-1) faced the mini - 


In Toronto. Jeff Burroughs «“*■$ Cru ?' s ™o-ron sin* 

ove in five runs with a home Si * u j *5“ 11 ■ 


The team's principal owner, n^n 24 batters through eight in- 
Georgc Stembrenner, had ex- nines, but gave up homers to Greg 
pressed displeasure wtan only a and Omx toncepdon in the 
few players bad showed up at an nmih 


5 fSRJS? " Fraak 

10-2 romp over Kansas City. Wm- D *™° 
ncr Luis Leal (1-1) faced the mini- Dodgers 4, Giants 2 

mum 24 batters through eight in- In San Francisco, Dave Ander- 
nings, but gave up homers to Greg son and AJ Oliver drove in second- 


rtead * deUy — = 

bSL'S* BASEBALL ROUNDUP 


• aw*wa: d 


optional off-day workout on Mon- 
day'; he was unhappy that Berra 


rungs, out gave tm homers to Greg 
Pryor and Chrix Concepcion in the inning runs to start Los Angeles on 
ninth. its 4-2 defeat of the Giants. 

Twins 10, Mariners 0 Cubs 5, Pirates 2 

In Bloomington, Minnesota, In Pittsburgh, Leon Durham hit 
Mike Smithson pitched a four-hit- a two-run tamer and Davey Lopes 
icr and Kent Hrodc hit a thrcc-run had three hits and drove in two 
home run to hiehliRhi Minnesota’s runs as Chicago defeated the Pi- 


‘"he sedueii 


had not made the session manda- home run to highlight Minnesota's runs as Chicago 
tory. “We made four errors Tues- 104) shellacking of Seattle. Smith- rates, 5-2, Pittsbu 
day night. Boston scored two un- son (2-2) struck cut four and in eight games. 


fs seventh loss 
ito Lezcano's 


andw “ :0L ' I >- ihedof® 


1 to: E v One highly placed source said 
bt^- Berra could be gone if the Yankees 


In Qevdand, George Vukovich's 


** * i«a dii> ^ *»t ‘o ^ Red Sox in Thurcday’s ^Ui-inmng auric drove 

Jbifiil f n-ion. , n series finale. “I haven’t made am “ ^ tarter to pve the Indians a 


w. e . ■ ■ ‘usn.nr^™’ , . J in Ananetm, Gamorma. Mute 

50rr!cb ^ v games dus year. Davis^glSm his 19Snm of the 

ih ? in th®? 2 e : What. 1 lJunk is best te the team a season to^ap a throe-rim first and 
1 . S Rutter of SS*! ■ • - Dwayne Murphy homered in the 

f ^ u, '‘don d. w Z>r-' S** Bcrra: “We’re just giving to a 6-4 ver- 

-He »-nds 100 “*** "™ *«% “ diet overSifornia. 

\ ‘ ^ ^ j. 1 , can you make? They're better than f. rrL ^ mM . ^ ? 

Aane i> svmpaihei.- , ■ they’ve shown.” Bmm L ™ Sox 2 

•noio^jev L-^n f'.ii 0[1 ^ % Berra has already survived one 1° Chicago. Charhe Moore had 
to t V*» *^i- ■ Boston massacre this year. The three RBIs, _ i nc lu di ng one that 

'-tcir. i ' A !'" k 4sV. 1 Yankees were swept in the season- broke a 2-2 tie in the smh, to lead 

— «. . I..C ACuuneu Ik,, 


The team went 97 innings without a 
homer. 

Padres 3, Braves 1 
In San Diego, LaMarr Hoyt and 
Rich Gossage combined an a five- 
hitter and Carmelo Martinez hit a 
two-run home run to lead the Pa- 
dres past Atlanta. 3-1. (AP, UP1 J 



Sampson Hampered by Fouls, 
I Rockets Bow to Jazz, 112-104 


Cenpi kdbrO i* Staff From Dtspmeha Utah hit 78 percent of its foul shots (39 of 50). while 

SALT LAKE CITY — One of tta few men in the the Rockets hit 16 of 28 for 57 percent. 

National Basketball Association capable of stopping _ „ 

Ralph Sampson is the gny with the whistle. Biai«ts 118, 76ers 100 

with the 7-foot-4 (ID-meter) Sampson on the In Landover, Maryland, Cliff Robinson scored 21 
bench with foul trouble here Wednesday night, rookie points and ignited a third-quarter surge to keep Wash- 
Akeem Olajuwon — the other half of Houston's twin ington alive with a 118-100 rom of Philadelphia. The 
towers — was left to battle Mark Eaton and the Utah Bullets trail the besi-of-five series, 2-1, with Game 4 
Jazz. He couldn’t do it alone. scheduled here Friday night. 

Adrian Dantley scored 29 points to lead Utah to a Robinson outscored the entire opposition with 14 


112-104 triumph over the Rockets and a 2-1 edge in points in the third period, when Washington battered 
1 ■ ■ ■ 1 ■ the 76ers. 30-13, and vaulted to a 22-pom t lead. 


NBA PLAYOFFS 


ItwNiwYriTi 




Yogi Berra, helping load up for spring training. 


their best-of-five first-round playoff series. The Jazz “«L £ 

can advance, to meet the winner of the San Antonio- 
Denver series, with a triumph here Friday night. W0 monLas 0 
In other opening-round games Wednesday, Wash- 
ington clobbered Philadelphia, Detroit edged New ^ Fgct ^ 
lersey and Chicago m^cd MHwaulcec. On Thmsday, 20-foot base 
Boston was to play at Cleveland and Dallas was on the 
road against Portland. The Celtics and Trail Blazers f the 

hold 2-1 leads in their series. six re«ular-si 

“The game was in my hands and I didn't produce,” ^ Extern C 
Sampson said. “I missed two foul shots, a turn-around Qeveland wi 
jump shot, atri then I got my sixth fouL It was my w j 1 jj c 

fault. points apiece 

Utah took the lead for good with 3:38 left, when ^ ^ 

Thurl Bailey scored on a dunk and was fouled. His free 
throw gave the Jazz a 101-98 lead. CMcagt 

Sampson, who played the final 7:30 with five fouls, coining in the 
kept the Rockets within one point late in the game, , w ^° • 

matching baskets by Bailey and Dantley. P 11 ^. ^d d 

With 1:13 left and Utah leading, 103-102, Sampson m Oucago. 
missed a free throw'; Dantley answered with a basket Milwaukee 
to give the Jazz a 3-point lead with 52 seconds to go. A sp 0 * at ova ^ 
series of free throws provided the final ma rg in. with seven se 


Philadelphia missed 14 of 19 shots from the field in the 
quarter and committed 8 turnovers. Bullet center Jeff 
Ruland, who was out with injuries for most of the last 
two mouths of the regular season, scored 25 points. 

Pistons 116, Nets 115 

In East Rutherford, New Jersey, Isiah Thomas hit a 
20-foot baseline jumper with two seconds to play, 
giving Detroit a 116-115 victory and a three-game 
sweep of the Nets. The Pistons, who dropped five-of- 
six regular-season games to New Jersey, advance to 
the Easton Conference semifinals against the Boston- 
Geveland winner. Terry Tyler paced Detroit with 23 
points, while Buck Williams and Albert King had 28 
points apiece for the Nets. 

BaBs 109, Bocks 107 

In Chicago, Michael Jordan scored 35 points — 16 
coming in the fourth quarter — to breathe life into the 
Bulls, who squeaked by Milwaukee, 109-107. The 
Bucks lead the series, 2-1, with Game 4 set for Friday 
in Chicago. 

Milwaukee, 0-4 on the Bulls' court this year, lost a 
shot at overtime when Chicago stole an inbound pass 
with seven seconds left to play. (UPI. LAT) 


Dwayne Murphy homered in the 
third, lifting Oakland to a 6-4 ver- 
dict over California. 

Brewers 3. White Sox 2 


Lar.at o* ^ ai bounding in Qevdand- This time. Orioles 2, Rangers I 

** Sie !=r.^r -f ^ ^ la Arlington. Texas, Mike 

cner- ; .. r K oZ ' ^n^ertadprormsed“awar,’’ Young hit his second home nm in 
a; cr - J 111 ^ two sbraushes thus far M ^ Mike Bod- 

i^embied 'risiSirf ^ ve produced only Yankee casual- dicker (2-l)reartered six hits over 
'* kind jr.i :u\V.s ■' oe t. , , . . _ . the eight innings he^ worked to pace 

« !ajk w -h t . .The top of Wednesday's ; ftrat m- Baltimore to a 2-1 dedaon ow 

end, ning was 8 ‘Jefeaavc ***** *- Texas. 

r'.ii ’ * Dwight Evans walked and Inn Rice M . . „ . , 

; n : , >, “ l ; hild]ii£ m'.' -followed with a single that center Canfcmls 5, lVfets 1 

“X 5C \k''T ah:,rec >«ih.ini5» Crider Ridcej' Henderson booted. In the N^kmal League, in. St. 
t riudoBp putting runners at second and Louix, Joaquin Andnjar pitched a 

tiics: ef : c^i upon Amt third. Mike Easier lifted a fiy to left - five-hitter for his third straight vio- 

.’. ti.rir:. )or ill it, senousB^ field — which Ken Griffey tory as the Cardinals downed New 
l . j.e i atoiuam*,' dropped. Tony Armas then hit a 2- York, 5-1. Met pitcher Dwight 
l.uL-re Tr.itv- lionipbjerTniit " 1 pitch off the left-firid fool pole- Gooden, last year's rookie of the 
r*. u.rr -arc? Thr’A.^naiaitla- for a 4-0 lead. year, had a 23-inning scoreless 

c-j.ur iavtsh bn V After Mike Pagliaralo pulled streak broken m.route to his first 

s que ;r: c: ? rjo??. The m New York to within 4-2 with a two- loss in three decisions, 

ur - 4r.ti : . •- e\„cpt for ran home ran in the second, Boston Fvpno 7 f PUffies 6 • 




Berra has already survived one 1° Chicago, Charlie Moore had „ _ _ __ „ , 

Boston massacred^ year. The three RBIs, including one that ^ DtifHBcha . 

Yankees were swept in the season- broke a 2-2 twin the smh, to lead LIVERPOOL — Juventus and 
opening scries ar Fenway Park, but Milwaukee to a 3-2 victory over the Liverpool, two of Europe's soccer 
possibly saved Berra's job by re- White Sox. powers, hcadri for ashowdown by 

bounding in Gevdand. This time. Orioles 2, Rangers 1 reaching the final of the Caanmi- 

with the fed So x coann^ jo wwa. u Mike ^C U pw,d.v,cio n «Wedn^y 

Young hit 1m second home run in 


Liverpool, Juventus Headed for Champions 9 Cup Showdown 


gregate by winning, 1-0, in Athens meet Rapid Vienna. Playing at was ordered because of crowd trou- the Champions' Cup. scored a 3-0 left tverton tr 

against Panathinaikos. home, the runaway English League We, played to a 1-1 road draw with home-field victory over Interna- him. 

Juventus, beaten in the 1973 and leader downed Bayern Munich, Dynamo Moscow and advanced on zionale of Milan to overcome the But Graeme Sha 
1983 finals, lest on the road, 2-0, to which leads the West German a 4-2 aggregate. Italians* 2-0 first-leg advantage and 29th goal of the sea: 

Bordeaux, but advanced on a 3-2 League. 3-1. after the two sides bad Evert on's victory set up an op- reach the final of the UEFA Cup. ^tes mto the secor 


and left Everton trading at half- 


ms* Cup with victories Wednesday aggregate, having previously beat- played a scoreless draw in the first- portunity for the d 


night. 

Liverpool, the defending cham- 
pion and a four-time winner, 
readied its fifth final on a 5-0 ag- 


en the French League leader in Tu- leg in Munich. 

Rapid Viem 

Everton reached the final of the ‘'beaten" by C 
Cup Winners’ Cup, where it will round but sup 


to claim both the 


st tro an op- 
of Liverpool 


where it will meet Videoton. 


But Graeme Sharp netted his 
29th goal of the season three min- 
utes uto the second half, Andy 
Gray put Everton in front in the 


Rapid Vienna, which had been Cup Winners' Cups in the same 
“beaten" by Celtic in the second season. 


i’ and Hun garian team lost its second-leg 72d minute and four minutes from 
same «*niTinal against Zeljeznicar in Sa- the end of the match Trevor Steven 


semifinal against Zeljeznicar in Sa- the end of the match Trevor Steven 
rajevo, 2-1, but advanced on a 4-3 iced matters. 


round but survived after a replay Real Madrid, five-time winner of aggregate. 


In a stunning comeback from a 
first-leg deficit, Real Madrid 


. -■ .. 7t*«. t W)/VI nMuiuuBjiiunjir 

n * n 8 was a defensive disaster. 
“'Jj ' s Dwight Evans walked and Ttm Rice 

■ ' , J,fcl -- 1 - childhb 'followed with a single that center 

"T S5 ' ;,rec l«iij 1 ini.i Odder Ridtey Henderson booted, 
l”' 5,7 r ‘ ir ‘ dudtiB p putting runners at second and 
^iw: efjeji upon Amt' ‘ ' thhd.MikeEaslerliftedanytoleft' 
, ior -•* iL’ senous^y Held — which Ken Griffey 
a :'or. anoiasoiata dropped.Tony Armas then Mi a 2- 
uui-re I r^rv-iiowplajerTntcfc ' 1 pitch off die left-fidd fool pole- 
:* .^rr -a:d> Thr-A0fnaian:fe c . for a 4^1 lead. 

hsaas.iavBhfc B fc i After Mike Pagliaralo pulled 
s c : : pjo??. The m et . New York to within 4-2 with a two- 
ur - ar.J ; , ex.cpt for run home ran in the second, Boston 

i-j ^ : i- s . . v>. • >: diaaiOMt t<x * a ^ tod in the third. Evans 


. In Montreal. Tim Raines scored 
r^5‘‘!. R !£ su ^ e i, T ? , l™ 6 twice and drove in two runs with a 


r... r v.i sufjfas later. Bill Buckner doubled home 
: Evans and Marty Barren brooght 


triple and a double to lead the Ex- 


GE 


iMnmfromOroeVngaaedioe 
third, when the Yato! raltei for ^ from ^ md 

toro^mdaMhe-Koadmon fc SchntidL It was Schroidrt 

426th iifetifne, tying him with Billy 

; h“o J%£J&SS&S& 

- i n i: t im e UsL 


'rr.^ and raisin 

■-■ • r. •tsr'ii 




m 

9(5*1 

:» 

:« 

basic 

VZS7 

; 

* E»e 

Sh ! 

r £5 

lip '■ 

?. : • 


a » 6 

1 


sx a: 


it 

“ a fl'l 


:£ 


Bit;: 


walked. Don Baylor greeted reliev- 
er Steve Crawford (2-1) with an 
RBI single and Winfield scored 


Reds 8, Astros 3 
In Houston, Dave Concepcion 



when Griffey bounced into afidd- and Duane Walker homered as If Everton fans were stunned when Bayern Munich’s Dieter Hoeness tallied the game’s first 
er’s choice. Gndnoati, an 8-3 victor, overcame goal, above, Hoeness was equally shodted by Graeme Sharp’s equalizer. Everton won, 3-1. 


Baseball 

Wednesdays Major League Line Scores 


Football 


United Stales Football League Leaders 


5-2 0£a Detroit 


AMERICAN LRA9UE 


IN M HM T 1 1 MHhMl 


1» m BU-4 IS 1 

m no mw u i 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Ttwn OftMM 


8M SH in— T H • Dtnnv. Xotfwv <61, Carman (I) and vtroll; 


PM I*-. Easiartv <a) and Btntwv w^Eailartv. 10. m. HRa-PMtadtWila, Vlratt 3 (3). Maddox Boftlmoro 
U L— Loan, 0-1. HR— DotroH. Mrndan IT). Cl), 5ctnnMt (II. Jodawnvll 

.Wttesi' s<wm * «N ON NS— o 4 1 aacfmafl ON SN MS-1 T • Birrolnaho 

! MWnoioto Wintt-H U B Mratoa . . . BN SW BN-3 6 J Mamphlo 

AMoro, G«kMf <6), Vando Bora (B> and Vot- &tfa. V o*mr and vonCordf , BHflrdaUo 

t»: StnilhionondSolas. w— Sndttuan.3-2. L— It) I Rvan. DIPfaio IS), Dowtov tth Cathaui* 






m* Moon. 2-2, HR — Minnesota Hrtwk HI. ffl ana A>hbv. W — Sa to . 4-1. l— D inna. 0-1 
g;?. Kamos atr BN BN BBS— 2 4 1 HJto— OMlnflOILWOilMr (D.Concapdan tt). 

a Toronto m BN «*-» U S LM AlNNria BN B11 ISO— I 7 3 

o>4 satwrtioom Gura (3). Jones (i> and Sund- son Frtndxa Ni m bn t ■ X 

OM. Wafftan (71: LeoL MasMtman (?) tsv) Reuse, Brennan (5). Hmwtt (6) and Sdas- 
fl- - W" 11 *- w—1 - ec1 ' 1 ' 1 - L— SoMcMbmv 1-2. dajLaekev.Bhw (SI, DavliUL Garretts (7) 
B.« HR»— KanacBCllv.PrYor fl).Conc*nMon<lj. pndTnndneiW-arofiiian.l-O.L-IJB^ 

S ■ Tonxita Burmiain HI. S e H a wn (». HR— Los Angel n , Laiv 

“ i ..oaWand 3B3 BN BB0— 4 12 B droaox (3|. 

tf. ; CalHdoiia ON 284 2BB— 4 S I chlcaea nt BIB BIB— 5 11 1 

Hi - Cedi roll, McCatty (4), Conroy IBL Howell m hj— > mag m m T n ■ 

% [ *-? 0n ^- H f°?i- W y W ?! , ! ICl ?‘- «»' WWtor 16). smm. C7) and DOV1.: 

c. Macwe <W and Boone. W— McCtftV, 1-0. L— iu»dM.auanta>ut.M>tfHanrn.H«iiaMf(ei 



Yards 

Rush 

Pass 

Tompo Bay 

3468 

1054 

2396 

New Jersey 

3110 

1879 

1301 

Baltimore 

3069 

1200 

1869 

Jacksonville 

2956 

1154 

1B02 

Birmingham 

2930 

1311 

1612 

Mem Phil 

2840 

1354 

I486 

Orlcndo 

2176 

1969 

1107 


Team Defense 


Birmingham 

2430 

975 

1455 

Boftlmoro 

2513 

903 

1601 

Tom pa Bov 

2786 

UK7 

1719 

Memphis 

2419 

i m 

1624 

Mew Jersey 

3029 

1079 

1950 

.Jacksonville 

3208 

1259 

1949 

Orlando 

3376 

1630 

1746 


ColUer. ORL 
GoHtom, ORL 


Wdkrr. NJ 
Rezler, JACK 
Crlbba. BIRM 
Andtnofi, TB 
Bledsoe. ORL 
BlTOnl, BALT 
CorHien, NJ 
Lewie. MEMP 
Horvln, BALT 



San Anionla 

26 17 

1129 

1488 


Oakland 

7769 

942 

1827 


Arizona 

2773 

1163 

1610 

826 

2 4 Portland 

2921 

1293 

1628 

483 

3 5 Los Angeles 

3103 

1053 

2050 


Houston 

3359 

1225 

2134 


Rumen Hoomoo 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD O* 

114 IC06 U N 10 A 

IF 703 W H 4 KMhr, HOU 
151 611 A1 IB 6 HfOerf, OAK 
13V 603 Oilll Williams, ARIZ 
ns 529 19 20 2 Yam. LA 

BJ £03 S3 82 4 EwCns. DEN 

103 465 « 55 3 NeutWUeL SA 

S3 445 LI <3 3 Robinson. PORT 

106 417 IV 47 3 Woodward, PORT 


QHomroacbi 
ATT COM YDS TD I NT 


S ir H a wn tSt. HR— Lot Anael BB , Lah- 


Otlcoeo 112 BIB BIS— d 11 1 

PttWharob BNTTBBBS— 712 • 

Trout, Brufater 16). Smnti (7) and Davli: 
Rtwdtn, Guanta CO, Rabtnsan (7). Holtand (BJ 


Lewie, MEMP 
fitaudL BIRM 
Rwelna. BALT 


O’) BMMw*teX.20.Sw— ^ Howell (a. HR— Oakland. ondOnii.'W*— Trout. M.L—Rtwden, 0*3. Sv— 


O , MlHVttY <21. 

.Boitwv m MB IN-9 V • 

New York 836 9W BBS-4 • 3 

t Ntoper, Crawford <3),Oleda (81. Stanley (V) 
-and Sullhan; Guidry end HYneger. W— 
CrawfonL2-t. L — Gaidrv.VZSv— Stanley <3)1 


5mttti (O.HRs — Odeouo, Durttom tM.PIfT*- 
buroh, LMcano 11). . 

Atlanta BN bib' BIS-1 M 

San DISSO BNlN Bhi-d S I 

. Peru, renter (7) and Benedict; Havt.Gos- 


FUrtle. NJ 
Lvidw, JACK 


atwrterbacfti . 

ATT COM YDS TD INT 
172 B2 I486 IS 4 
218 122 US1 14 10 
247 ISA 1855 t 7 
290 162 2230 13 11 
I BO B3 1414 10 10 
197 1» 1353 V 14 


,1-; -'r *v'. ; 


• ; £ # ! HRs— Boston. Armas (51. Rice (4). New York * oa *. < ? > 


.PooHanjIo <11. 
BoWmore 


!fi Texas 


B2B BN BN— 2 .7 • 
BN NI BOS— 1 4 1 


BoddUdcer, T -Martinez (?) and Nolan. 
Dempsey (7); Rozema. Mae on (ei.Senmidi 
''■« <B) and SlausM. w— Boddkker. 2-1. L— Ro- 
5“ zerna. 1-3. Sv— TJtertlnu (2>. HR— Battl- 
ii; more, Youno. 

<£■. Milwaukee BB2 NI 0B0— I IS 3 

1 1 aucoao 2M MO 00S-2 7 I 

; : vuckovlcti. Soaroee (B) and Moore; Bum. 

■j ■ sniuner <71. Fotloo (81 and Plxk. W— Vucko- 
C'; Vicn.l-0.L- BUTOJ.3-1-5U— Seoraoe (ll.HR— 

ji :• Chicooa. Baines (3). 

fc' NATIONAL LEAGUE 

0 ; New York SN ON NI— 1 J B 

f ^ ; St, LOUlS 000 IM 23X — 5 s s 

£. - Gooden. McOoweU IS) end Hurdle; Andwlar 
V ’ ' and LovaUlere. W— Andukw, ML L— Gooden. 

*.2-1. 

S'; 

1 ■ Major League Standings 

('■ AMERICAN LEAGUE 

‘.. ’ East DWMoa 

> ’ W L Pet GB 

S’ Detroit B S 515 — 

'f • BaliWnore B * 571 W 

,-L. Boston ■ * 4 571 >4 


rot, 0-1 Sv-Goopm (3). HRs— Son Dleoa, 
Martina (3), Nettles (1L 


| Hockey 

Worid Championships 

W L T Pts GF GA 


Basketball 


NBA Playoffs 


Fltzkee, BALT 
Alexlk JACK . 
Smith. BIRM 
Brodsky, TB 
Crowtord, MEMP 
Kemn JACK 
Moser. MEMP 
Truvllllon, TB 
KiOL JACK 


Cater. ORL 
SWIder, JACK 
Miller. MEMP 
Londeta BALT 
Andrusystiyn, TB 
Pam-fdae. nj 
P arsons. BIRM 


Heustoe 23 24 33 22-JW McFoaden, BIRM 

Wan 34 27 29 33-112 Jockson. ORL 

Dantley 7-13 15-20 2B, Bailey 7-16 B-B 22: Lane. BALT 

Olaiuwon 10-20 65 24, Lloyd 10-19 3-4 23. Re- Williams, MEMP 
bounds: Houston 65 i Olaiuwon 161; Utah 51 Daniel. NJ 
(Bollev.WUklns III. Assists: Houston IB (Lu- Vaualwa TB 
cos 7}; Utah 25 (Green 10). Kid 

Milwaukee - 31 X 26 26— TD7 

CMceoe 2B 2V 24 27-169 Parrish. ORL 

Jordan 12-261 1-16 35. Waolrldae 10-1* M 28; Harris, BALT 
Cummlnoi 15-20 7-4 37. Moncrlef (UU 11-1328. Paaues. NJ 
Rebounds: Milwaukee 42 (Cummlnas BJ; Otl- Kuna. JACK 
capo 51 l Green B). Assists; Milwaukee 23 Carrum, BIRM 
tPruMv.MonerhrlSliCTikcaimint Jordan 71. Futren. TB 
Detroit 22 34 26 33—114 williams. TB 

New Jersey 31 30 28 34—111 williams, MEMP 

Tyler 6-14 11-12 23, Lalmbeer 5-13 6-7 16, Butts. JACK 

Thomas 6-134^16; Wllllams9-13 10-1228. Kina 

13-223^23. Richardson 9-14 1-5 21. Retwood*: WESTER 

Detroit 44 (Trlpukfl-Tvier 11); New Jersey 44 T« 

(WHUams 121. Assists: oeiraii 21 (Thomas 
ill; New Jersey 33 I Richardson ID). Houston 

PMtadeMla 35 31 13 33— IN Denver 

washlnetni 23 32 30 n — III Oakland 

Williams 11-20 5-5 28. Ruland IMS W 25; Portland 
Malone 7-16 3-4 17. Ervino 6-14 M 11 Re- Arizona 
bounds: Philadelphia 56 (Barkley III; Wash- Los Ansetes 
Ington 50 (Robinson Ruland. Ballard 71. As- San Antonio 
»Hti: PhUodclDhki 14 (Toney SI; Washlnaton To 

24 (Ruland, P_tahnson 51. Denver 


Soviet Union 

5 

0 

a 

to 

38 

6 

United Stoles 

4 

1 

i 

9 

21 

26 

Canada 

3 

1 

l 


26 

11 

Czechoslovakia 

3 

1 

i 

7 

22 

9 

Sweden 

I 

3 

0 

4 

19 

17 

Finland 

1 

3 

2 . 

4 

IS 

22 

E. Germany 

0 

4 

2 

2 

11 

42 

W. Germany 

0 

5 

1 

1 

IT 

31 


: - “ 

■; A" Ofr S- ' Milwaukee 

7 

6 

.538 

■ 1 


•*?*— -jr i-. Toronto 

■ 

7 

■533 

1 


VL-:-. . 1 Mew York 

' - Cleveland 

5 

7 

■417 

TVS 

■ • — 

6 

B 

ATt 

2VS 

• ■ • • •-' - ■ 

jii' Oakland 

west Division 
9 4 

AM 



■ ■■; f* California 

8 


333 

1 


J> Kansas Cihf 

7 

7 

300 

1V» 


Seattle 

7 

B 

40 

2 

. . “ 

icniwaa 

fe 

7 

40 

2 



6 

9 

ADO 

3 

* : .* 

• T e»o* 1 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
J/ - East Dlviiloe 

3V» 



w 

L 

PCt. 

GB 


.- , Cnlcaoo 

10 

4 

.714 

— 

* 


9 

5 

343 

I 


H'-Manireol 


6 

371 



L.. Si. Louis 

7 

7 

300 

3 


;‘T- ' ■. ' £ ■Philadelphia 

4 

10 

386 

6 

.. 

■ I ■’•■s ii,: Pinsaurpn 

" . *iV 

4 10 

West Division 

at 

6 

> * r 

'.‘I 7 'tc 1 . ^. CJnclnnall 

9 

4 

360 

— 

■4 

---C if .. J-i'san Diego 

4 

6 

371 

fe 


Las Aneeles 

9 

7 

363 

fe 

-- - 

■<i r ttouston 

■ 

7 

333 

1 


Atlanta 

4 

a 

329 

2b 


.. j.- 1 -" riSgn FroncHeo 

4 

10 

Mi 

4fe 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
United Stales 5. East Germonv 5 
Finland X wm Germany 3 

Thursday's Gomes 
Sweden vs. Czedmslovakle 
Canada vs. Soviet Union 

Friday's Games 

West Germany vs. East Germany 
United states vs. Finland 

Saturday* Games 
Soviet Union vs. Czechoslovakia 
Canada vs. Sweden 


Transition 


3 CLEVELAND— Activated Andre Thornton, 

■357 SV* desianared hitter. Oattoned Ramon Romero, 
Pilcher, to Molae at ttie Inlernatlenal League. 
DETROIT— Named Gordie MocKaaxJe (n- 
GB lerlm monewer ol Bs Ctass AAA Nashville 
- 714 — farm dutt Named Mark DeJatm Interim 
.* manaaer of ns Cbrns AA Birmingham afflU- 

J ate. 

■5W 3 NEW YORK— Ptoced Soott Bradley, catch- 

384 * er, on the ij-doy disabled list. 

BASKETBALL 

Jto _ National Basketball Jissedattee 

571 b SEATTLE— Anoouneed that Letmv Nil- 

563 Vt kens will not return as head Coach next seo- 
533 1 Km.hu! will r*t»toce LesHobeoaerasaenerol 

529 2to manooer. Named Habeoaerdlroaor of Ploy- 

296 4W eraeroonnel. 


PLAYOFF SCHEDULE 
■ASTERN CONFERENCE 
( Boston leads series, 3-1) 

April 25: Boston at Cleveland 
x- April 28: Cleveland ai Boston 

(Milwaukee loads sartos- 3-11 
April 26: Milwaukee at CWaooo 
x- April 28: CMcooo at Milwaukee 
(Philadelphia leads cedes, 2-1) 
April 26: PhltadelpMa ol Wash Loci on 
x-Aprll 28: Wash button at PhllodetahhJ 


Receivers 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 

,T 46 561 125 37 0 

45 571 117 51 2 

34 620 17J 56 7 

32 473 145 43 2 

EMP 31 523 16.9 35 6 ^®m^OAK 

31 437 135 34 3 OAK 

P 29 65B 225 SB 4 f™** 7^., 

S 29 452 I5L6 64 5 

W * 1,MM 0 SJKLreVr 

Punters 

NO YDS AVG TB I2D LG 

48 2055 425 4 14 64 Vwdhv HOU 
i » 1197 425 5 6 57 Herfh. DBS 

P » 963 415 4 7 53 Jah(1M n, HOU 

.T 33 1346 415 10 5 60 Lewis. DEN 

1 TB 27 1106 415 1 8 59 Coder. OAK 

I 32 1248 395 3 B 61 Banks. OAK 

M 36 1SS 385 3 . 1 50 white. DEN 

Pont Returners Me Nell. HOU 

NO YD5 AVG FC LG TD Hudson, LA 
IRM 14 166 11.9 B 37 0 
14 Wl 115 J 71 0 
25 254 105 3 30 0 Tolley. OAK 
:MP 17 140 85 0 47 0 Gossett, PORI 
13 71 55 3 15 0 OeBdiUn. ARK 
9 34 35 5 ID B Partridge. LA 

Kickoff Returners Walters. HOU 

NO YDS AVG LG TD Soeelman. Oe 


Banks. OAK 
White. DEN 
MC Nell. HOU 
Hudson, LA 


394 22« 313B 36 12 

256 BJ 2033 IB 12 

257 141 1759 10 9 

137 66 951 3 6 

275 134 1837 9 13 

169 87 1114 8 11 

MB 74 974 8 15 

111 47 634 2 5 
12B 58 776 2 10 

Rasher* 

ATT YDS AVG LG TD 
IN 744 75 33 7 
91 5*7 65 57 1 
93 496 U 44 6 
64 4T2 tA 25 3 
U 316 35 17 2 
76 297 35 24 1 
nVt 35 17 4 
60 272 45 It 1 
St 236 4,1 17 0 
Receiver* 

NO YD5 AVG LG TD 
58 717 125 74 6 
47 551 11.7 46 5 
J5 STS 125 52 4 
41 590 144 30 3 
34 684 20.1 50 7 
34 587 17J 43 4 
32 413 13.9 49 3 
30 616 205 61 4 
29 477 147 46 8 



Liverpool, which will meet Ju- crashed Intern Milan to gain the 
vermis at Heysel Stadium in Bras- ^V 13 ^ -« , , , 

sels, Belgium, on May 29, breezed Striker Carlos Santmana led the 
into the Champions’ Cup final in a «>u£ with two first-half goals and 


pa fl ri dtiTrec ma tch that hardly cafic- midfielder Michel Gonzalez 
fied the 60,000 spectators in Ath- clinched the triumph with a tally in 


The game’s only goal was scored 
by Irish international Marie Law- 
renson in the 60th minute. 

Steve Nicol passed the ball to 
John Wark, who, with Lawrenson. 
set up a twcMm-one against Pan- 
aihmaitos goalie Thomas T-afiw. 
Lawrenson scored easily from di- 
rectly in front 


the 57th minute. 

Interim coach Luis Molowny 
said the victory was “doubly 
sweet,” following Real's humiliat- 
ing 2-0 first-leg defeat in Milan, 
which resulted in the firing of Coa- 
ch Amando Anaaro and shattered 
morale. 

“All the credit goes to the boys, 
because they gave their all,” said 


Juventus, facing a strong Bor- Molowny, who stepped in last week 
deaux offensive effort that featured to take over the that finished 
unanswered goals by Dieter Muller an erratic fifth in the Spanish 


and Patrick Battiston, barely made 
the final for the third time: 


League. 

A goal three minutes from the 


Juventus’s tactic of conceding end of the game by defender Csn- 
midfield and blocking the goal area hay pm Videoton in the final 


nearly backfired when Muller, the 
West German striker, took an in- 
side pass from Bernard Lacombe. 
spun and sent a low shot into the 
comer past goalkeeper Luciano 
Bodini m the 25 ih minute. Bor- 
deaux was unable to penetrate 
again until the sweeper Battiston 
hit a hard 30-meter shot in the 79tb 
minute that caroomcd in off the 
right goalpost. 

Bordeaux nearly evened the ag- 
gregate in the 88th minute when 
midfielder Jean Tigana pounced on 


against Real Madrid. Videoton 
won the semifinal first leg 3-1 in 
Hungary two weeks ago, but when 
trailing by 2-0 on Wednesday, the 
away-goals rule weighed againk it 
Csuhay’s 87th-minuie strike, how- 
ever, earned it an aggregate victory 
and its first appearance in a Euro- 
pean final. 

Zeljeznicar’ s goals came from 
Bahtic in the fifth minute and 
Curie in the 72d minute of a game 
rife with missed scoring chances. 

Right wing Bahtic put the home 


a loose ball in the goal area, but was club in the lead after a melee in the 
thwarted by Bodini’s brilliant save, penalty area. He picked up the ball 


Bordeaux fullback Thierry Tus- 
seau had a final chance in injury 
time, but headed a comer kick over 
the bar. 

Everton recovered from the 
shock of conceding its first goal in 
the competition to reach the Cup 
Winners’ Cup final for the first 
time. 

With Everton pressing forward, 
Bayern suddenly reversed the flow. 
Ludwig Kogl raced dear of a 
square defense: Dieter Hoeness, 
who earlier had missed with a head- 
er, scored after goalkeeper Neville 
Southall parried Kogl's shot. The 
goal stunned the 49,500 home fans 


rmerry Tus- and sent it into the net from dose 
ice in injury range with goalie Peter Disztl al- 
uer kick over ready on the ground beaten. Zeljez- 
nicar had full control in the mid- 
1 from the field, but its forwards produced 
; first goal in few real threats to the Hungarian 
ach the Cup goal in the early stages, 
for the first In the 72d minute, Zeljeznicar 
made it 2-0 when Curie netted from 
ing forward, dose range after Disztl dropped the 
sed the flow. ball. 

dear of a In the dosing minutes. Videoton 
er Hoeness, launched an all-out effort to score, 
with a head- and in the 87th minute Csuhay 
eper Neville rook the ball in the penalty box and 
's shot. The sent it past diving goalkeeper 
10 home fans Skrba. (UPI, AP) 


54 105 3 30 0 Today. OAK 
40 85 0 47 0 GoWftt, PORT 
71 55 3 15 0 OaBniUn. ARIZ 
34 35 5 10 D Panr Ida*. LA 
ion Waltara. HOU 


puototo in the third 

NO YDS AVG TB 120 LG span of lfiSS 


U.S. Gains Hockey Medal-Round Berth 

Compiled by Ow Staff Fnm Dispadta First-period goals by the Los cans a 2-0 lead before HaraJd BOIke 
PRAGUE — East Germany Angeles Kings' Bob Miller at 9:18 narrowed the margin to 2-1 at 
came, from behind with four goals and Joel Otto of the Calgary 17:18. 


ros AVG LG TD SoMlmen. oew 
2B 710 2S4 95 2 Mlko-Mover. SA 
9 199 211 41 D Hartley, SA 
14 284 205 38 0 Pt 

13 264 2U 38 0 NI 

11 222 2012 26 0 Martin, DEN 
18 199 19.9 28 D Gunn. LA 
13 243 147 M 0 Me Nall, HOU 
17 314 IBS 49 0 Halt PORT 
17 313 185 33 0 Harris. ARIZ 
— — — Banner, sa 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Taam Olfeasa 


Today. OAK 3fl 1653 435 3 16 76 

GaiSftt, PORT 33 1371 415 4 6 56 

OaBAlUn. ARIZ 33 1351 405 2 13 72 

Panridaa. LA 44 1785 405 1 11 S3 

Waltara. HOU 35 13U 392 4 6 56 

Soaaimon. oe« 27 1D14 375 0 2 SB 

Mike- Moyer. SA IB 667 37.1 3 4 55 

Hartley. SA 22 777 355 0 2 54 

Punt Retanwn 
NO YDS AVG FC LG TO 
Martin, DEN 11 145 135 4 31 0 

Gunn. LA ID 118 115 4 45 1 

McNeil. HOU 20 211 105 2 79 1 

Halt PORT 12 I0B 95 4 32 0 

Harris, ARIZ 27 240 19 2 23 0 

Banner, SA 9 73 U 2 27 0 

BonU. OAK 12 70 55 0 13 0 

Kickoff Returners 


iod — three in a Flames at 15:16 gave the Amen- 
n four minutes — 


and hdd the favored United States 
to a 5-5 tie in the world hockey 
championships here Wednesday, 
but the tie enabled the U.S. squad 
to clinch a berth in the playoff 
round. 

With a 4-1-1 record and nine 
points, the United States is one 
point behind die first-place Soviet 
Union and two ahead of Canada 
and Czechoslovakia, which are tied 
for third. The top four teams in the 
standings will play in the final 


Yards 

Rush 

Pass 


NO YDS 

AVG LG TD 

3543 

467 

3076 

Verdin. HOU 

19 

509 263 95 

2 

3378 

1251 

2127 

Harris. ARIZ 

18 

437 243 76 

a 

3077 

1115 

1962 

Faulkner, oak 

15 

364 243 57 

0 

2702 

1211 

1484 

Ricks. TORT 

15 

325 21 J 41 

0 

2677 

T022 

1675 

Banner. SA 

12 

2S4 2L2 31 

0 

2310 

962 

13M 

Jaeksan. TORT 

13 

369 2BJ7 44 

0 

19B9 

811 

117B 

Turner. DEN 

21 

424 202 30 

0 

im Defense 


Beddle. LA 

18 

351 193 29 

0 

2612 

97S 

1637 

Alexander. LA 

9 

143 153 26 

0 


European Soccer 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
(Donvar toads mk-Im. 2-1) 
April 26; Denver at San Anion lo 
x- Anri i 21: San Anionla at Denver 
(Utah Mads series, 2-1) 
April 26; Houston at Utah • 
x -Anrii 28: Dish at Houston 

(Por t land loads series , 2-1) 
April 25: Dallas at Portland 
x -April 77: Portland a) Dallas 
Ot-lf atansanrl 


CHAMPIONS' CUP 
{SemlflnaL Second Las) 
Ponaihlnalkoi 0. LJ vafpaol 1 : Liverpool ad- 
vances. S-ft an ooereoaML 
Bordeaux 2. juvanius 0: Juventus ad- 
vance*. 3-2. on awreoaia. 

CUP WINNERS' CUP 

(Semifinal Second Lea) 


Dynamo Moscow 1, Roald Vienna 1 ; RaoM Wool Bromwfcji Albion l, Sundoriand & 


Vienna advances, 4-2, on aaparoate. 


Everton X Pn vem Munich I; Everton od- Unlfod 66; Tottenham 64; Sheffield wodmts- 


wmcn. 3-1, an a nflreo a w. 


UEFA CUP 

(Semfftoal Second Lta> 


advances, 3-1 on asareoote. 


SC2£ S 437 2L3 76 o Americans are assured of a 

out knar, oak is 364 24j 57 a spot m the playoff senes even if 

jdui port is 225 21 j 4i o they lose their remaining firsl- 

SSSSl TORT ia jut 202 44 o »“»d “A 11 * ASAtot Finland on 

urner. DEN 21 424 2U 30 0 Friday. 

eddie. la is 35i 195 29 o The only other certain finalist is 

lexwv ‘ w '' LA 9 U3 isj 26 o fa gQyjgj Union, which has two 

preliminary games remaining. 

c ~ In the day’s other match, West 

soccer Germany and Finland tied, 3-3 — 

— -■■■ giving the West Germans their first 

zeuetnicar saraievo x vumiwv u vueo- point of die tourname&L The result 
ion wina. 4- x cn caareoato. moved the Fwns into a tie For fifth 

ENGLISH FIRST DWIS.ON ^ Sweden ' ^ f0nr 

Alton villa 1, Wofford 1 pOUltS. 

Nattinahaiii Forest l Luton Town 1 The F inns , who previously had 

**!T , * on 0 downed the Swedes 5-0, have a 1-3- 

Norwtoi otv X Stoke City 2 . , 

Mf Bromwich Albion 1, Sunderland 0 * reCOFCL 

Points- Standi rm: Everton 75; Manchester The Ame ricana went into the fi- 

tXiSSS, 6?! ! JrS=S Ml period with a 4-1 leatL But the 
am Foreat 60; Anenom: a>eisM 56; Aston cast uermans rallied against sec- 
Nio 58; west Bromwich 48; oueone Pork ond-string goalie Christopher Ter- 

^•S«!£tSiS Si toTST Vanbies- 

:; Sunderland 39; Coventry 37; 5k* tt 17. bTOUCk. and 3 Sluggish defense. 


Points Staadtoos; Everton 75; Manchester 


day 62; Southampton 61; UverpooL Nottinp- 
hom Forest 60; Araenal59; CheWo56: Aston 
Villa 58; West Bromwich 48 ; Queens Park 
Ronaora 47; Watford, LolcMtor, Norwich. 


{Semifinal, Second Lta) Ranaora 4?; Watford, LeKestor, Norwicn, „,vfei„w fr*. 

Ftoal Madrid X Inter Milan 8; Real Madrid IPJwkh 4i; Luton. VVesf Ham _Y7® 



41; Sunderland 39; Coventry 37; Stake V. 


Referee Lind: Hors de corneal. 


17:18. 

The United Slates went ahead, 4- 
l, in the second period on goals by 
Paul Fenton of me Hartford Whal- 
ers at 3:37 and Tom Fergus of the 
Boston Brums at 15:33. 

Friedhelm Bdgdsack cut the def- 
icit to 4-2 at 8:21 of the final peri- 
od, only to have Fergus score his 
second goal of the day, at 11:49. 
But the East Germans then turned 
it on. Rati Hamschke connecting at 
12:55 and Frank Proske at 13:38, 
and Thomas Graul tying the score 
46 seconds later. 

Of his team's third-period per- 
formance, U.S. Coach Dave Peter- 
son said, "The only problem we 
had were the East Germans. At the 
time of the letdown, they were very 
quick to capitalize." 

“They were all a little tired.” said 
Art Berghmd. manager of the U.S. 
team. 

“When we scored the fifth goal, 
we quit skating. This tournament 
has been such a success for us that 
the fellows were maybe a bit too 
relaxed. They stopped playing of- 
fensive hockey.” 

The final four minutes of the 
second period were played without 
a referee. Swedish referee Kjell 
Lind, cut above the eye by the 
raised stick Of East German de- 
fenseman Roland Peters, left the 
game at 1 6:09. The remaider of the 
period was handled by the two 
linesmen; in the final penod, Czech 
referee Vladimir Subn took the ice 
as a substitute. (AP, UPI) 








Page 24 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1985 



OBSERVER 


Putting Passion in die PC 


By Russeii Baker 

N EW YORK — Many tycoons 
of the computer industry have 
written begging me to tell them 
how to recover from the sales 
slump threatening disaster for the 
personal-computer business. 

First, let us speak of decorator 
colors. It is obvious that nobody ir- 
the computer industry ever heard 
of decorator colors. They have 
made ail their home computers 
day-colored. 

Shoppers who wandered into the 
home-computer store found them- 
selves confronted by masses of 
drab, clay-colored machinery and 
were naturally crushed. 

□ 

They had seen those dreary gray 
plastic-encased machines in the of- 
fices of hospital-bill compilers, in 
television shows set in police sta- 
tions, in collection centers where 
officially authorized tyrants brow- 
beat the helpless on behalf of gov- 
ernments and vast monopolistic 
utilities. 

Evcd people determined to buy 
must have been put off. Think of 
the milli ons who wanted to say. 
‘'Don't you have something in ma- 
genta or lime?" 

- Henry Ford treated his custom- 
ers with the same arrogance during 
all those years when they were told 
they could have a car in any color 
they wanted, so long as the color 
they wanted was black. Car buyers 
put up with that for years. They 
had to if they wanted cars, ana 
wow! did they ever want cars! 

Whereas almost nobody really 
wants a home computer, because, 
after all, when you get right down 
to it, can you drive a home comput- 
er to the seashore, or screech 
around town in it on Saturday 
night tossing empty beer cans at 
pedestrians, or spend all day Sun- 
day washing and waxing it? 

So the marketing problem is to 
persuade people to want home 
computers whether they want them 
or not 

□ 

It is the same problem the phone 
company faced in selling people on 
second, third and fourth tele- 
phones, the same problem the gar- 
ment industry faced in persuading 
people to pay double for jeans that 
said “Chemm de Fer or “Basra. 
Luigi'' on the hip pocket. 

The phone company did the trick 
with decorator colors, and the gar- 


ment industry did it by making 
denim seem sexy. Once people 
could buy a phone to match the 
paint in every room in the bouse, it 
was easy to double and triple tele- 
phone sales. 

Which brings us to sex. If sex can 
seD jeans it ought to be able to sell 
anything, because, well what are 
jeans, in the final analysis, but 
overalls? They were invented to be 
worn while tramping around the 
barnyard, and then the U. S. Navy 
cut off the tops and made sailors 
wear them while shoveling coaL 
Talk about dreaiy clothing! 

No problem for the garment in- 
dustry. ft sewed them skintight on 
nympheis, stitched a name culled 
from the European Common Mar- 
ket phone directory onto the hips 
and made the upwardly mobile mil- 
lions shell out big cash for duds 
bom for forking the manure pile. 

The home-computer industry 
apparently doesn’t know about sex 
yet, for there was never a sugges- 
tion in any of its advertising that a 
home computer could take years 
off your physical appearance, 
pounds off your hips and inches off 
your waist: that it could make you 
smell irresistible and make your 
hair shine brighter, or — well nev- 
er mind. 


Instead, what did it talk about? 
Recipes. And balancing your 
checkbook. They were constantly 
telling you how swell life would be 
when you could balance your 
checkbook on a borne computer. 

Imagine: “We've got this weird 
machine, and how can we get peo- 
ple to buy?" somebody asks. And 
somebody replies: “Fve got it! 
We'U make them think about kitch- 
en work and balancing their check- 
books." 

No wonder the market went 
bust If you want to pari a person 
from a lot of money for something 
he doesn’t need, you'd better lull 
him with a dream first 

What you don’t do is remind him 
of his checkbook balance. That will 
only remind him that be probably 
can't afford a computer, and that 
anyhow, if he’s too dumb to bal- 
ance his checkbook on paper, he'll 
never learn to’do it electronically. 

Sex is the solution, gentlemen. 
Paint those things Passion Orange 
and get them into the boudoir. 

New York Tima Service 


Short-Story Writer Paley 
Works like Poet: 'Real Slow’ 


By David Remnick 

H’as fiingfon Post Semce 

N EW YORK — Grace Paley 
hardly exists west of the 
Hudson or east of Fifth Avenue. 
Her shon stories are a kind of 
New York chamber musk in 
which the instruments are the 
voices of the city — more specifi- 
cally Greenwich Village, more 
specifically llth Street between 
Sixth and Seventh. 

She works slowly, noting the 
flattened consonants and the po- 
litical yams heard on the benches 
of Washington Square Park, the 
eternal kvetching in the coffee 
shops of Bank Street, the play- 
ground yelps on West Fourth, the 


good smelf of bread 
to’s and the pizza 
Ray’s. 

Paley is attuned to all of it. 
Sometimes she does her best ob- 
serving while handing out protest 
literature on the comer of llth 
and Sixth. Once in a very great 
while, the voices and smells, the 
emotional strength and overheard 
conversation will flower into 
lines. Her new book or stories, 
“Later the Same Day." took more 
■than a decade to grow. 

“I’m always making little notes, 
false starts, beginnings," Paley 
said, curling up in an old rope 
chair. "I wrote poetry for years 
before I ever wrote a story. I still 
work like a poet. Real slow." 

She has the friendly aspect of a 
TV grandmother. With all her 
notes and effluvia scattered 
around her, she says, T can’t even 
keep a journaL Tm always losing 
the book. 1 have no discipline.” 
Certainly not the steely discipline 
of a Joyce Carol Oates or an An- 
thony Burgess, the sort of literary 
industry that produces bulging 
books in and for all seasons. 

“I can’t work like that and nev- 
er have," Paley said. “There have 
been long periods of my life when 
I was bringing up my two kids 
and playing with them at the play- 
ground or working on political 
things and the stories had to wait 
fve let all that happen. No re- 
grets. The stories come when they 
come.” 

At 62, Grace Paley has pub- 
lished three collections of stories, 
a total of 45 tales. Nearly all are 



Nancy Keye for Tha t 


Grace Paley: Prose “was the real breakthrough.'" 


remarkable for their clarity, their 
sense of place, their sympathies. 
As Philip Roth has said, Paley's 
stories display ‘an understanding 
of loneliness, lust, selfishness, and 
fatigue that is splendidly comic 
and unladylike." 

She seems to be of a type, a 
New York type, ready for lam- 
pooning. The dry is filled with 
would-be writers who wear their 
concerns like sandwich boards, 
who struggle for a quiet eccentric- 
ity in a city where difference is a 
merely a given. But Paley is the 
genuine article, unpretentious, 
funny and wise. In the words of 
ber neighbor and colleague, Don- 
ald fiarthdme, she is a “wonder- 
ful writer and troublemaker." • 

Paley's second-floor living 
room is vintage Village: Book- 
shelves c ramme d with Isaac Ba- 
bel, Anton Chekhov and Karl 
Marx, records piled into a canon 
that once held jars of mayonnaise, 
a rag rug, artifacts of politics, 
woolly pillows strewn on the 
floor, three empty light sockets in 
the ceding. 

Paley’s parents. Isaac Good- 
side and Manya Ridnyik, left 
Russia in about 1905 and settled 
in New York, first on the Lower 


East Side, then in the Bronx. 
When they were young in Russia 
they had been Social Democrats, 
opposed to the czar. Goodside 
barf been wrilerf to Siberia and 
Ridnyik to Germany. In New 
York, Goodside helped teach 
himself English by reading Dick- 
ens. He became a doom. His wife 
lock care of the bouse. Paley of- 
ten does sweeping and washing 
when her stories won’t come un- 
stuck. 

“When I was little I loved to 
listen to my parent’s stories, all 
the talk that went on.” she said. “I 
loved to listen and soon I loved to 
talk and tdL" 

She studied at Hunter College 
and New York University but did 
not take a degree. When she was 
19 she married a movie camera- 
man, Jess Paley. They had two 
children, Nora and Dan, now 35 
and 33. She studied writing with 
W. H. Auden at the New School 
for Social Research in the 1940s. 

“I really went to school on po- 
etry. I learned whatever I know 
about language and craft from 
writing poems. I worked at it for 
yean and years but I was never a 
great poet. I didn’t know what to 
do about it, except keep at it 


“When 1 was in my early 30s 
and 3 wasn't doing any work I wras 
worried because whai I was most 
interested in were the lives of 
women around me and our vari- 
ous relationships. I just couldn’t 
write about that in poems, and so 
I started trying a little prose. That 
was the real breakthrough." 

Her first siory. “Goodbye and 
Good Lack" is the work of a natu- 
ral It is about a young woman in 
love with a great actor of the Yid- 
dish theater. 

Only two of the stories in her 
first collection, “The Little Dis- 
turbances of Man." had appeared 
before the book came out in 1959. 
“And the magazine that took 
them," Paley noted, “was Accent 
a little journal in Urbana. Illinois. 
The way the book got published 
was that I had the nerve to show 
them to Ken McCormick, an edi- 
tor at Doubleday who is the fa- 
ther of one of my children's 
friends. He saw three of them and 
said, ‘Write seven more and you’ll 
have a book.’ " 

Short-stray collections rarely 
sell many copies. For years. Pa- 
icy’s publishers goaded her to 
write a novel She tried. All it did 
was delay ber second collection of 
stories, “Enormous Granges at 
the Last Minute," which came out 
in 1974. 

Life — political and personal 
— interrupted the writing for long 
stretches of time. She has been an 
activist for years, working against 
nuclear power, the war in Viet- 
nam and U.S. involvement in 
Central America, and for various 
feminist causes. She frequently 
reads her work at political forums 
in the city and beyond. Yet poli- 
tics has not bludgeoned ber an 
Her stories are often political but 
free of the sort of agit-prop fury 
that turns words to wood. 

When “Enormous Changes at 
the Last Minute” was finally pub- 
lished, it attracted what the indus- 
try Hkes to call a “cult" audience, 
which means small and devoted. 
The cult is growing, however. Ear- 
lier this month a film written by 
John Sayles and based on three 
stories in the collection opened at 
the Film Forum in New York, 
and Paley win join the likes of 
Stanley Elkin and Tom Morrison 
in Paris May 4 for a discussion of 
contemporary American litera- 
ture at the M usee d'Art Modemc 
de la ViOe de Paris; Paley is also 
giving a lecture at the museum on 
Thursday. 


The short story is enjoying a 
renaissance in American litera- 
ture, and Paley's publishers hop- 
ing “Later the Same Day will 
attract a wide audience. The boot 
won terrific reviews in Tune and 
Newsweek magazines and m The 
New York Times. 

It is not. however, any more — 
or less — commercial than Paley* 
previous work At their best the 
stories are still direct, swift and 
vibrant The characters have aged 
along with Paley. At times she 
picks up Irish voices in the air, 
sometimes black or Chinese. 
Sometimes the voice sounds much 
like her own, as at the start of 
“listening": 

“J had Just come' up from the 
church basement with an armful f 
leaflets. Once, maybe only twenty- 
fire, thim- years ago, young wo/na? 
and men bowled in that basement, 
played Ping-Pong there, drank hot 
chocolate, and wondered how in 
God's separating world they could 
ever get to know each other.” 

Paley makes her living t eachi n g 
at Sarah Lawrence College and 
City College. She is divorced from 
Jess Paley; she and her second 
husband the architect and writer 
Robert Nichols, divide their time 
between the apartment in New 
York and a cabin in Thetford. 
Vermont. They are apart for 
months at a time, Paley in the city 
and Nichols in the country. 

“I can't stay away from the 
block too long," she said. 

One frequent character in Pa- 
ley's stories is Faith, an alter ego 
who first appeared in “The Used- 
Boy Raisers" in the first book, 
resurfaced in “Faith in the After- 
noon." “Faith in a Tree" and 
“The Long Distance Runner” 
and now is heard from in 
“Dreamer in a Dead L a n guage" 
and “The Expensive Moment,” 
two of the strongest stories in 
“Later the Same Day.” 

Faith, like Paley. is “at that 
lively time of life, which is so full 
of standing up and lying down," a 
feisty period in which all experi- 
ence and thinking has come to an 
extraordinary maturity. 

“Faith is the one who does the 
most work for me," Paley said. “I 
don't think I'll ever kill her off. 
But I can't ever sav what’s ahead 
for my stories. I don't have any 
plots or plans. 

“Pm glad to have written what 
Fve written and I’m at a point in 
life where I feel a little smarter 
and more experienced and ready 
to write the best I can.” 



S' 


Hughes Aide Sue&m thr * 

Of Stolen Memos in Boe 

Robert A. Mahea, a former -aide 
to Howard Hughes, has fited saft. . 
against the author and pubfioAq-hf 
“Citizen Hughes." oomep*^**-: 
the best-seller about the 
billionaire contained stoics ratted 
al. The book, published m Feh**.. 
ary. is based largely on memo;: 
tween Hughes and Mafr 
1966-1970. The suit , was 
against Michael Drosjmi. ifee 
er; Holt. Rinehart & Winston, 
publisher; CBS Inc^ wfckfc 
ihe publishing company; PI 
Inc., which published excerpts afeS? 
Summa Coro., once owned 
Hughes which lost the memos: 
burglary. Maheu is seeking 
lect profits from the Book aflffjah 
million in damages. ..*£&•- 
• □ • • ^ . 

day. *Cfint Eastwood 
meeting with Michael L Ranch , ' 
sistant secretary of -defense Ja 
public affairs, to get backing for a 
film on an Army sergeant s carcer 
in recent wars. Eastwood got Pen- 
tagon help for the 1982 film “Fire- 
fox,’' but Burch said no dedaans 
were made. 

□ 


The Aga Khan, leader of .ihe 
world’s Ismaili Moslem communi- 
ty, announced that bissisfer, Pi®, 
cess Yasnnn Aga Khan^wfiwed- 
Basil Embiricos, 36. ttmeanbe^ota- 
Greek shipping family.; this; 
raer. Princess Yasmin istiieda _ 
ter of the actress RitaHaywrth 
and the late Prince AlyKtaa. ~ 


Tom Hayden has an idea for a 
different kind of Vietnam memori- 
al: one to Vietnam ’War protesters. 

The California state legislator; hus- 
band of the actress Jane Fonda, . 
was a founder of the radical Sta- - 1* 1 * 
dents for a Democratic Society and 
a defendant in the Chicago Seven 
trial following riots at the 1968 
Democratic National Convention. 
Referring in an interview -to. the 
Vietnam veterans’ memorial in 
Washington, he -said; “While we 
should celebrate and respect the/ 
sense of honor and patriotism that ^ 
led men to fight in Vietnam, that 
was no less a sense of honor or 
patriotism among those of ns who 
opposed the war ool of our senseof 
what this country was all about 1 
think the antiwar movement de- 
serves some kind of credit and 
some kind of memorialhsdum." 


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ANNOUNCEMENTS 


DIVORCE IN 24 HOURS 

Mutual or core*5ted actions, low cost 
Han or Domnicon Republic. For infor- 
mation. sand S175 far 2Xpoge booklet 
/bonding to Dr. F. Gorsrnfes, ODA, 
1KJ5 KTS» N.W_ Washington D.C 
20006, USA let 202^52-8331 


“U3UAE" PRIVATE DETECTIVE 
FRANCE and OVHSEAS. Coll 24 
hours 49-88 67 84. Tb: 790586 attn 
LOU. 36 veors of experience, cantocb 
vfrtdwxfc. Write: Bes ideria La 
CWerie. 86000 POfTTBS. FRANCE. 

HAVE A NICE DAYI BokaL have o 
nice day! Bohri- 


SUM MV. TIMES - _ 
Write Keyser, POfi 2. B1 


Very Last Chance for 6 (Vlonths 


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*#*#□ Please send further Information. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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contact our load datribgtor or-. 

MecnaEond Herdd Titan* 
1005 TalSangCaatmardalBuading 
24-34 H»meay Rood 
HONG KONG 
TeU HK 5-286726 


ALCOHOLICS 
Paib 

0320. 


ANONYMOUS kt 
6345965. Rem 


REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 


BUYING A PROFS7Y M THE UK? 
We con fmd you onytfiug from q 
studio to a ecstfe. Let our eiperti 
the chore out et tooling. Cornficte 
property Rndtog swyiee provided, 
prerfeniona 


oko 


I odviee on 


nuance, 

letting & management Town & 
Around ltd 108 Belaze lane, Ltnion 
NW3. TeU 01-435 9366 (7 days). Hit 
295441 BUSY.BG. 


1ST A PROFESSIONAL find the home 
wKeh meets your personal jpedfico- 
lion. Homehunten Service. London 
235 3603 or S3? 6040 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOR MORE KAL ESTATE 
OmWUNJTKS SEE 
PAGE 17 


BAHAMAS 


CAME BEACH THE 8AHAMAS- 
New 3 bed ro om, 3 Vt both Aegean 
style home. Ootonfront pool 8 patio. 
saJeifite TV, maid service, car. Ided 
for _cr 2^3 _ couples. 


S250Q/morth. Summer 6.., . .. . 
endudma unEties. Inquiries: Caprice 
Vffloi, P.O. Box N524. NosMuTBoho. 
mot. After 5 pm EST: 809-3277661. 


CANADA 


CANADA. FOR (4VE5TMENT5 in ho. 

noiaoiQ, LmuMJiuaj. provessonci 
red estate services in Canada. Write 
Scu 20)6, Herdd Tribune, 92521 
Neuily Codex, France. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


CANADA 


NOVA SCOTIA BLAND 
84 oaes. Adamic & Bay exposures. 

S8AOOO (uilWhta Bax 925 - 
Oortvsifc, New Jersey 07834 USA 


VANCOUVER B£GANT EXECUTIVE 
suite overlooking part- 2 bed, 2 txxh, 
aD marble floor, exduave 
G* Honolulu 808737-2873. 


CORSICA 


SANT ANTOMNO, Wands most 
beautiful mountan top vifage. 1 0th 
century Moortfs stronghold & look- 
out, entire viBage d e wi fiod historic 
lorxtoiorV. 20 nsns. from Gton ewport, 
10 mins to beadies- Braptiond 4- 
floor house, oridnd 10m century 
stone structure. 6 bed-oorm, 3 bdhs, 

cn. uajiu oams, pujnaJTg, etccmc- 
itr. windows, shutters tofcAy new 
1964. Terrace SO scun, Atiered gw- 
den ■ 500 s^nv, 180 view overiook- 
ingmouirtxns & sea FISOODOQ- 
TifcB'WE, 46 rue Bodwtoucn 
75009 Pons. Teh dl 874 22 95. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

CAWC5 


park 6 swunmoig 
room, 2 bedrooms. . 
sunny terrace - foan. 

view over sea& daxk to I. 

Wry re asonable priae. FZ25D.0QO 
Reel 836 

JOHN TAYLOR SA. 

55 la Crctoene 
06400 Carnes 

Tel (93) 38 00 66 The: 470921 F 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MEGEVE: winter-summer: apartment 
near center, 3 rooms, 63 sq.m. Swig 
space + 12 sqm loggia, comfort- 

»al. tafSAF60MH). 


FBBGORD. 13 to CENTURY CASTLE. 
7 rooms. 4 baths, central hoofing, 4 
huge fireplaces, period furniture 8. 
'y.Tgeragcs, 2 ha Jeffte hd> 
pra. (£$054505 


FORCAlOWBb 

venae. Morey 
v3og* home, with 
forge bedroom, 2 


centra! 1 

tfio with shower. , 


■BUS, I 

F550j»Q. 


Tel: 322 97 06 fois 


fonwuVBa 
o errter « smal high 
sunirtuous 4 i cum*, 
v, ccnturyaid Icstaric 


sunny, art 
fi replo ce . 


Cowries (93] 38 62 62. 


park, near beach, 
meter boot. Porte, 
071 52 13 after 7 pm. 


International Business Message Center 


ATIBWON BXECUTIVB 

in toe h&wmaBo mU Horauiri- 
bono, wWe more toon a 
of or mSHon readers wotid- 
widt, most of whom two in 
b vtinom aid indotty. vriB 
mad it Are# tatax us (Park 
6I3S9SJ baton Warn* on- 

aaing Ibaf w* can flefex you 
back, a*/ your manage wig 
opp mar wftMn 43 hours. Tho 
fata k US. $9.80 or had 
mquMaid porUno. You mutt 
btaudm eo malo t m and vmrifi- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


Name. 


giwomashniM *t 


Address 


P 


g. City/Country . 

^MORROW* 


ZIP. 


(Please print clearly) _ 

MAIL TODAY • WIN TOMORROW • MAIL TODS 1 


ORLANDO, FLORIDA 
INVBTMENT 

• This trea has been targeted os ora 
wthe chromic yowth centers in the 
USA. After the Mcittand in ter ch ange 
m M opened, citrus lands near the 
aarwhjdi was once sold for 
USS2#)0 an oau, suddenly 
rocketed to $300,600 l 

• Euro^ntencan has options 
negoroted 3, years ago on land 

SSS-Tte!* 

• Addnionat parrnarjs) required 

» complete purchase and take tide 

• Short hoidng period before very 
profitable re-sale proieced 

at 100% pit*. 

• fowesrrowit range USS15.O00 to 
$1 rriOon. 

B1KVAMBUCAN 
INVESTMENT CORPORATION 
„ 100 N. Rseoyne Bvd 
Suta 1209, Mwrni. ft 33132 

T 


MONEY TRffS ? 

TBI Invest in one of America’s most 
•xritmg technotookal brwddtm^hs in 
a Wtoo ddv mdstry. We Iim plant- 
ed man nut tries in 1984 than any 
other developer in e>w Stole. 

High annua era mugs UMUieil far 
"wiy yean and. «» gaarat- 
taa to lep ur dmee hi ve e faw enl at 
eight tones earnings. 

BROKERS' ENGUHES DMIB. 
Matenoi ovaSaWe in Engish, french. 
German. Bar 1993. Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neu8y Cedes, from 


PANAMA UBSBA. CORPORATIONS 
from USS40Q crraitoble tww. Tel 
J06241 2024a Tatar: 6S3S ISLAND 

brWaUK). 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MOST CONTAINER LEASING 
COMPANIES ADVHtllSE 

77 % - 20 % 
FIXED INCOME 
PER ANNUM 

WE DON'T HAVE TO BECAUSE 
WE BBJEVE WE CAN OFFBl 

MORE! 

We ere a major conttener leasmg com. 
parry (founded 1973) with an eJceBent 
rec o rd of return & service for our cS> 
wits. We are eunertty managing over 
17,000 confdnen for over 1000 aients. 

we havecwhT 
$36 MflJJON 

UNDBl MANAGEMENT 
AND AN ANNUAL. TUENOVH 
IN EXCESS OF 

$15 AUUJON 

If >ajB* considering or investment in 
wnamers we suggest you contact us 
before mating jw deesfon. 

WE PAY OUR OlB<!5 

QUAMBtlY 

A GROSS DOUAR MCOME 

SHIRLSTAR 

INTBLNATIONAL SALES 
KBZSttGRACHT 534 
1017 EK AMSTBDAM 
TEL (020) 272822 - 

A UK C ompay with piwdwry 
cainyuisw m France, Germany, 
Hofand, Norway & Sweden. 


FOR SALE W ^ fTALY, Good 


business i 

GcwIL . 

ere 8 crofts. GoodwR 


5hg Tsui Kcwrtaon. Hong Xoog. 

I ESTASUStS Camdanbased o4 
compaiwi are seeting serious 

otofonsoMf* 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOP1E 

UMiMirS) INC 
LLSJL 4 WOR1DWDE 

A complete toad & business service 


212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. S6th St, N.Y.C 10019 
Service Rapresenfcmves 
NeededWoridwide. 


BUSBCSS i PLANS. MARKETING pro- 
gromv c fi noncement pockopes pro- 
poiftd faf Gompaniei or convnuntws 
seeking ogb exponsion. diversifica- 
ban or deveiepment. Lender /irwestor 
requireme n t fully met in each pack- 
age. Send fuS cwtoik of needs, we 
s oxl you rxyobBgjsion ttacati. For 
urgent wwttSTjS 7T3WZ0200 
or tlx 7741^ ftBCS HOU. Presktirt, 
Inremationto Management Services, 
1717 E. Loop Sv Ste. 120. Hooston, 
Teas 77029. US A. 


INVEST 2 WBC5 in Bette r Heath. 
Enter t Carcfoc fek Prrreroon 8. 
HecAh Recond honing Program now. 
Begtetf maimn, psaeefa Surrey 
countryside. NgHy quakfied mecka 
wpecvtsion. Vert nan M e toed Cen- 
tre, Enton near 
GLK5AL 45 mm. 

1042)8792233. 


Goddrebig, Sumy 
rsn. London, fag 


HSNCH BAI1B04A. well traveled. 
27, bfaguol, avrefoUe for rood bus*- 
n«s & private short term ossgments. 
London based 3 pm - JO an. Tel: 01 
225 0368 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT. 
Report - 12 countries adnsd 
Dtudn WMA, 45 Lyndhuret TCE, 
Suite SOS. CvtTd, Hong Kong. 


TAX SERVICES 


US INCOME TAX returns and oudts 
by protenonafc. Paris 563 91 21 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


□ENTER OF MONACO 

! Commercial 
meters, vnth 


750 or 300 sq. 

■ far 


FOR SALE 

tss 

MT/day 

P.O.Bw 


11C 


lmprim4 i 


l 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


PRWQFAUTY OF MONACO 
MONTE CARLO 


am kind of busnen 

AO&40E BMTHlMajlA 

Tek (99) 50 66 84. Us 469477. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 

Your best buy. 

Rne d amends m ory price rouge 
at lowest wholesale prices 
toreo from Antwerp 
center of foe damand world. 
Fufl y uon te e . 

For free price Est write 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

Vienne 18th Cent. Chateau 

On 150 ha, river & pond, 30-hone sto- 
_ bfod stud farm wah 2.900 meter trad. 
2 pcsable odrthord ISBJmj. rmst 
„ perfect oondtion. Price F7^0O,0O0 l 
2 ABD 553 93 73 Pons 

* 

d- CAMCS. 4 vfflas, 3 bedrooms, 3 biriv 
rooms each. «i reskfortiol estate with 
superb pmrORsc view over Cannes 
/ Merftarracrei - Prices from 
R2AOQ0OO to FZ850.000. Starting Es- 
tates ROUM, 18lue Notre Dame. 
06408 Cannes Cede*. Tel: (^ 39 39 
- 00.11x461023. 




] CAP D’ANITOLMayfficert art deco 
i via, wonderful sea view, mountdns, 
* 3 acre pmfo 5 bedrooms, 5 baths. 

Fsrooroo. Vines (93) 61 fu 24 

m MAH IES PMS. Amidst the pines, 10 
I ft* plots of fend. 1500 sqjn. eodi. 
1 Price from FdOOroO a> taxes mdud- 
| ed Apence Ganrirr, tat {93)6349 15. 

1 VAR. 30 KM HYBH5. Beautiful end 
calm 5SOOO sqjn. fat Very comfort- 
able 170 sqm. house, pool Price. 
n_600.000.TeL (94) 28 375D 

GERMANY 

1ST CLASS PROPR1Y, mJWtorify 
Jonmg, fifly serviced, 216 acre in 
center of Bad Hamer doe to Bom 
and within minutes of Rhine river. 
Price idea: DM5J mifcoa Owner 
would oho consider dtaroative pro- 

BStss^aifissss 

Kurt Kroegel, Anuid4taoe-Str 1 d D- 
2000 HorSwrg 20. W. Germany. Yd ; 
f01 040 - 48 7? 75. 1 

ROBIOIB IBSURE PARK. 14 h eO- 
ares ;wrth pfonreng perrras»on & etist- 
ng mfrodnirture loaned near major 
popsAmon oentar. Contact K Cocwn, 
Sodmtt House. GcwidwousrfTRood, 
Baetxngton. Kent, England 

GREAT BRITAIN 


Estotfehed 1928 
Wtoiistwii 62, B-2018 Antwerp 
Begun ■ 1 Tefc02 3)234 07 51 
The 7177? syt b. At the ttomend Oub. 
Heart or Antwerp Diamond industry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO 
MONTE CARLO 

Very sunny offices, modern buftJShg, 



.i50 66 84 
46M77. 


Baunem Service in Luxembourg 
Acewewng/ company formotiom + 
trernogement/seeretanol/ phone,' to- 
Iw/mol Contact fiiwr. 12-14 Bd. 


B*0 BU5MSS OITB 

W Keaengrodtf, 1015 CH Amsterdam 
Teh 31 .2026 57 49 Telex 16183 
World-Wd* Sw*a Cmtoi 


HMOPE'S SatCON V ALLEY, 2 buss, 
nets cottars - ©ne city cerfer other on 
bm*. Heathrow 20 mins. 
cRicH » services. 
Tri. 0628 34281 or tofee 846366. 


FAU5 ADDRESS. 

Since 1957 15f . provides _ 

rooms. 5 rue cf Artois, 

75008. Teh S9 47 04. The 642504. 


YOUR Offla IN PAR& 7H£X. 
ANSWB3NG SBVWX soffrtry, 


Umque mod^property 1100sq.ft& 
OP n V t - Probably the most presfc- 
900 $, seduded & tofrtxJfoe peds> 
torre m Mayfcxr. Award wmrena ar- 
ehrted designed & finished to Highest 
■tarnation^ stwidords. Studio recep- 
hon / dnig area, superb btchen. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


GMaousomcE 
BUUXNG FOR 
yom COMPANY M 

WEST M) OF 
LONDON 
FRKHOLD 

22,000 sqJt. or can be enlarged 
Own Cor P«rt 

A- historic bargoin. This eJegont !9fo 
Century buSklng, once foe nonr* of 
Carrind Marmmg. is in Conservation 
Aroocfose to Victoria Station 8 Aiport 
connections. 

R lends itself to economicd refuTOish- 
mort 8 rnodemizooext to provide a 
prestigious European Headquarters. 

Pteose contact: 

HUB PARKS MAY 8 ROWDEN 

77 Graivanas Street 
London W1A 28T. 
Telephone 01-629 7666. 

Telex 267683. 


RECSmY DECORATED REMOLD 

hoise in qiset street control Chelsea. 2 
reception rooms, 4 bedrooms, 2 bath- 
rooms, newly fitted kitchen, doafc- 
rmwn, anal garden, integral garage. 
Price to mdude al feted crepeti, air- 
faa, teak & one pelmets, certain 
light fitting & Modes, ofi pfombed in 
new tittfien equipment. AM bathmom 

Long Acre. Londrei, WC26 9JH. 


SUPBtB CENTRAL LONDON apart- 
moot for sole n ihe most prostigoui 
squre in Lonrian. Suitable for a mix 
of rasidefiTid t 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


-6 . 


GREECE 


ARGIROUTOUS- Superb ban vfe, 
270 sqju, buikfcttj plot 470 soa 
ting, (jroixid floor oatht 


Sf' . 

11528 Athens, 


parting. Ground floor I 
foa. Mdxdatopottar 
them, 1 * 721^4 




RAROS CYCLADIC HOUSE Astwfiafo- 
9250 sqjru. stews 8, super views, " 
mimtai beodk US?IW, 0 C 
0603 743856 UK. 


SIQA1HOS. large beautiful vitewifol • 
acre of wooofond by the beach 
USS275J00. London 73439S3 . . 


ISRAEL 


JRUSA1EM, Beth Hawxs. for sole. 2 
individual pfots. Plot 1: 9 ,300 xpn. 
Plat 2; 15 m» sqjrt Construction per- 
fflit on hand. Contact Mr T 5THMAH 
Frankfort, West Germany, teh 0 
69/434066. 


ITALY 



“MOON I SOUTH KB4SMGTON. 
Bride 4th fioar penthouse duptix in 
w* tree lined street, 2 bedrooms, 2 . 
^hroo rrg 2 r^hqns. foOy fitted 
tihfoen / breakfast room, roof ter- 
rac& Bevator, 44 year iera. 

I SMSP«^ Lcodon 

581 5351 or 228 0992 




IflWWB SQUARE SW1. 2 bed- 


decorated ^bedroom house, 2 


GREECE 


ISOLA PIANA 

YOUR PRIVATE BLAND PARADISE 
IN THE MHMTBRANEAN 5EA 
5 MILES TO SARDMA 

The 220/XM sqjn. bland, with arfy 180 
apartments hos its own port, restauroBt; 
supermarket minKmng pool, taws 
courts, beaches, 2 ships - and no ass. It 
own ed by the buyers of the 
apu 'menti. 

Best connections by air from Mian ted 
Rome to CdgStFi/Sartfinio. 

We wiJ be pleased to send you ... 
information about this drmzn stand. 

EMKALD-HOME Ud. 

YOUR PARTN9 M EUROK 
Dorfjp. Ch 8872 Weesen 
TeL CH-58-431778 
Us 0+876062 HOME Cft 

trUX PORTO BICOIE stone fcuit 
fomiy house - 210 sqm. wifo krae 
lenace in lovely wdey awrioofanq 
fort; 8, aa. 2sspai\rte opa rtmenn < 
oaths, sleeps 7. 4,800 tom. gordml 
lond.Tefc|g64/fimi7^ 

VB8CE. Spacious condamrreum oo ad- 
arfoi Gtudecoa: 4 rooms. 2 brfh, 
tildwn. big attic 35,000. Rdan- 
speaking owner: 041-7 03432. 

MONACO 


monte carlo 
PARK PALACE 

ifieent apartment. 116 sq. n W«I ; j? * 

fornfahed at Parle Prince, oppO-° 
cemno and HoW de Paris, ta |fs . 

wrote*, oeflar & porting. 

fr^Wormctfiotti Please aaft 
H. Schlechter, at Bwkfoerg, 

Wen Germany Teh [028431 18221 


£■; 


SZi 




h-, 4 

Ihi"' 


V.. . 

;V 

<5-; 


■ tj! 


<-. 


^ l. km from town, beaches. Sea 

hSt^ESJS^ L o35 r<wn 




HOLIDAYS and 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ICELANDAIR 

30 Yem Annivenay 

fojeaol one way fares 
vow May 7th - June 7fo 


•far TorfcM 
uWasbfngtoc . 
KlfowM 
*Delro6_] 

*Orlarvdoj 




•San Fri es a ' l co. 

.For Round trip colt 

ksandairparb 

T* (!) 742 52 26 


l 1,790 
£1790 
F 1,990 
F 1,990 
F 2J90 
F 2,990 
f 4,990 


5fc fafafflfct t f ^ 2xS ^ U06 
~~ HARDTD. 


NEW YORK 
FI 990 one WAY 


*5S8SBKtBfcttr.. 


PEvangile. 75018 Paris. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


_»*r. PA 19002 Tat 275 1 


WOUDAY i TRAVft ADS 

PIMIURNTO 

PAGE 10W . 

_ IN THE MOfBO SECTION 
U^A 1-80055)^584. 


riorth 


waasaa 

agg-dK5F^g 

ffi'Ssasftifr 1 



p y K :°*— 

fre^a-Tel; 577 
gweat 

“Tw, etc. foatautort / 


TefcOl 703 4175.