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Published With The New York Tunes and The 


PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


— *•■ .r 7 ' m 


JO* tfmaa — S»Dh. UAL IftSJDrt 

Owea^ SO Dr. Nnhrtwh_ 27 S FI Ui Ml (h» 4 _S 08 S 

1(00 ITS Bob Mgm — 170 K. Yugodaia — MOD. 

ESTABUSHED 1887 


'“wSiiitt" » «?* *hVi Ia? 

^*“£^3?$ Mile 

4:aS“ ( '4 tl , Ex-Red Guards 
‘ Demand Return 

BVSS i^ToUfemOty 

SsSS? ws&it-- 

‘ OUlCh *4.A Ml fl i TaCTTTXU-l _ TJ l J r 


Chinese 

Protest 

'Exile’ 




BELTING — Hundreds o I mm . 
and women who resettled in the 
countryside daring the Cultural 
Revolution have broken a taboo on 
public protests by occ up yi n g the 
steps of Bering’s Camnanna Party 


JDs ^p, ... Acvoiuuonoavc oroxcn ataooo an 

leader rf P ublic protests by ocaipymg the 
t>. annoa^ .l^CSJ 5 ^ 01 Comnram«Party 

cess, VatmuTT headquarters and demanding per- 

^ Sbte!' V?J> miKio " “ “ vc “ »“ 

n r *a. ■ U| naa 1 j ) ). vr 1., 1-t . 


^wHt shippjm £ a ., ms ®4s - Nttriy 17 years after they setoff, 
w. Shanxi province prodaiming 

i« of thr* M^SifcfrTNr siqjpon for Mao, thefonner 
and the fc.ie pJ2l LW Guards returned in a mood of 

nufce Alj truculence and disillusion. Al- 
n though the policy of forcing young 
■t- u city dwellers to- settle among the. 

differ**?] ^auku- peasants was abandoned mom than 
J.-erem Lind of \wj?| 4 <fccade ago. hundreds of thou- 
Th-f?w' lclna ®^aiD^ sands people were never given 
» v-aiitomia itiifit-Jr • the residence permits required to 
f *s aawffe ! come home 
d ^. a f l‘- un ^ °f to ndj* i Resentment can be found wher- 
iVX~ j A D P BC *nfcsS : ever resettlement took place, bid. 

if® 1 .* tk lw!' concerns about retribution have 
r^l Allowing riots, generally stifled protests. Instead, 
J^^ratK National C®r liwse “parated from their famffies 
rwtemua ;n in inien^, and friends have generally ctmeen- 
' ictr.im ’• cieraiis' nW U^led toeir efforts on working the 
« isninaion. he saii ■% &«work of influential contacts, 
should celebrate and mj ^ Q0W ' Q guanxi, that Chinese tiy 
sense of honor and pauZ 1 ' * develop as a means of obtaining 
\ti men to riant in Y^ : T&rors from the btireancracy. 



Bonn Tells Congressmen 
Cemetery Visit Is Firm 


Fortner Red Guards sitting-in at Beijing's Communist Party headquarters Friday on the fifth day of their protest 

U.S. Deficits: Reagan Takes Another Look 


zrze- ggSj 

capii 


i ECWtSN 


j was r.o : ^ ^ , j'Hjose who have joined the pro- 

; ? ai nousm among test, which was continuing for the 
I 0 ?P°Nd ihe^aromofoo^ fifth day Friday, are thetosers in 
wnu: this couain this game of maneuver. 

• Sitting beneath large red-and- 
M .-Zi n W ^ ** white banners proclanning their 
J v ijnd of memoi^aa cause; a member of the yoim said 
- — they represemed about 20,000 peo- 

vtt RPAim!? P k SLil * “exiled" in Shaanxi, out of 

F “SSH? 400.000 sent there from the capital 

± ; in 1968. Most were in their teens or 

^ ’ ana «riy 20s at the time, and are now 

38 ; I was boro and brought up in 

'it in Bering," one maw said. “Il’s die 

OF ~ : Z: capital and the cultural owner of 

4 1 r&scs CYCUHcaac ^hia. I want to rgoin tny parents 

i* ! 2 :aT *a-cr« ^d rdfltiyes."-?::; 

•D • f ~ ^ AUhro ^, ;l ic ^ 9g2 gm ^ ^ - 

. v , acAiHos.ini^ guarantees, the : right to denial 
“ strate. public protests have been 

-* ’ ■ " ■ effectivdy banned since a wave of 

. erT ... BBa — protests that took place daring the 

■ * tfiee speech movement” in 1979. 

Z'Z ;jV r But P 0 ^ guarding the entrance 
r ' '' - ■? ■« to the party headquarters during 

t’- the sit-in have not taken any acticm. 

Js.-Zyj* ■ ' — — ~ — prjT — An official at the doorway refused 

! — u> comment, saying, “Tlus is our 

ECrt= £N internal affair." 

I-.* ISOlAftW* {Polioe on Friday sealed off a 

v you* driveway leading into the com- 

w smubtoS P^d to keep journalists from . 
srsszz^ '•* ■:•* Ks.- «« talking to protesters. United Press 
».-'"-r2s International reponed from Beij- 
i-w-n - : 'r- “IS- Eariier, police photographed 

V Chinese who spoke with rqxxters.} 

;iV : --- ’ST’^care* As is commonly the case when 
iff*' r-'-t'-i &£%.*Cbincsc look for redress of their 
-V -V M ' re- grievances from Beijing, the dem- 

• '' r c rinilW<#i ohstrators appeared to look first to 

Deng Xiaoping, China’s para- 

ITT ; S T c*P? mount leader, who was exiled to a 

3*5?^. r :' . ' Tt remote provincial town during the 
~' :z y : -■• < T:l — Cultural Revolution and forced to 
rt : ; •* iTXirpotjo^M work as a lathe operator. 

r ’’:. s “Save us, Comrade Xiaoping," 
f ": ; 5 •Bj.’Sgtf = read one of the banners. "Mr. Deng, 

' r. has condemned the forced re- ' 

- settlement, but has noted the prob- 
tens involved in getting all those 

t ' ^ concerned back into the over- 

*• - - 71 ,: crowded cities. 

■' :• _* — — — The protesters said abmit 500 

people traveled to the capiud by 

1; train from a region of Shaanxi that 

:Tr - lies about 200 miles (320 Itilome- 

rV>- - ‘ PARK t*“ 3 ters) west of Beijing The area is 
, one of the poorest in central China. 

— Many of those who spoke with re- 

. . .-*•> :, . sfej, porters complained of bang lied to 

.} -^V unskiDed jobs at low pay and living 

^ ^ 'Jlj? 17 among local people who regarded 

* s*;5 ^ ~ iT! them as inrerlopors. Sane had not 

1. J- -■ seen their Berjing relatives for 

years. 


By Peter T. Kilborn 

New Vet* Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President Ronald Rea- 
gan, in appealing for support for a compromise 
budget to end what he termed an “immoral, 
dead-end c oar s e of deficit spending." strode 
notes Wednesday more akin to those Walter F. 
Mnndale played last year than to those the 
public has become accustomed to hearing from 
Mr. Reagan. 

The president has turned more than a oratori- 
cal corner. The federal budget deficits, which 
keep growing despite earlier assurances that the 
Reagan economic policies would bring them 
down, now worry members of the administra- 
tion for the same reason they have worried 
Republicans as well as Democrats, conservative 
as wdl as liberal economists, and the Federal 
Reserve Board and foreign governments. 

Some economists agree that some public rela- 
tions is at work in the administration’s new 
em phasM: nn the hazards of deficit spending. 

,Jf there is a single mission of the Reagan 

OibenwiCrflfrO 


administration would raise taxes. But a smaller 
government requires harsh spending cuts to 
restrain or end politically popular federal pro- 
grams. so the administration appeals for fiscal 
frugality. 

“One has to distinguish between reality and 
political theater." said Robert G. Dederick, who 
saved in the Reagan administration as undcr- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

secretary of commerce for economic affairs and 
now is chief economist at Northern Trust Co, in 
Chicago. 

“Last night was political theater,” Mr. Deder- 
ick added, referring to the president's televised 
address Wednesday night “He was trying to 
whip up support for the program.” 

Nevertheless, the administration now ac- 
knowledges that the deficits are tied to ominous 
turns in the economy, especially the strength of 
the dollar, the huge foreign trade deficit, high 
interest’ rales, andhigh unemployment 
: 'The strong -dollar has robbed ‘farmers and 


many manufacturers of their ability to compete 
with foreigners, keeping the unemployment 
rate, which was 12 percent last month, at a level 
that once occurred oily in the depths of reces- 
sions. 

Meanwhile, demands in Congress for job- 
saving import restraints and other protectionist 
devices have reached a level unknown for a 
generation. Although protectionism might help 
individual industries, it would also lead to retal- 
iatory actions and undermine the economies of 
evay nation. 

“With the dollar and tbe trade deficit,” Mr. 
Dederick said of adminis tration officials. They 
finally recognize that the other rock up there, 
the budget deficit, is related. There’s a feeling 
now that this is an untenable situation that 
could end in an untenable way.” 

In railing attention to tbe hazards of the 
deficit, Mr. Reagan and his economic advisers 
have made a marked turn from their earlier 
positions. ' 

As secretary or tbe Treasury. Donald T; Re- 
( Q)n ti ra»fri oo Page 2^CoL 5j . . 


JZfljfCR 

BONN — The West German 
government said Friday it would 
not be moved by a new appeal from 
the United Slates that President 
Ronald Reagan’s visit May 5 to a 
military cemetery be canceled, and 
called on congressmen who sent it 
to respect West German wishes. 

At a news conference at which he 
voiced irritation over the contro- 
versy surrounding Mr. Reagan’s 
visit to the cemetery at Bitbuig, tbe 
government spokesman, Peter 
Boenisch. said Bonn had no inten- 
tion of dropping it from Mr. Rea- 
gan’s agenda. 

T have already said that the visit 
to Bitbuig will take place and that 
there will be no changes to the 
pants” on Mr. Reagan’s program, 
Mr. Boenisch said. 

[The Senate called Friday for 
President Reagan to cancel his visit 
to the cemetery where 49 members 
of Hitler’s elite Waffen SS are bur- 
ied, The Associated Press reported 
from Washington. 

[The Senate, by voice vote, 
adopted a resolution hailing the 
reconciliation between tbe united 
States and West Germany 40 years 
after the end of World 11 and call- 
ing on Mr. Reagan to cancel his 
visit to the Birburg cemetery. In- 
stead, the resolution said, Mr. Rea- 
gan should visit “a symbol of Ger- 
man democracy.” 

[The 78 co-sponsors included 
Robert J. Dole, the Republican of 
Kansas who is the Senate majority 
leader. He said tbe resolution is “ah 
expression of the Senate that we 
should pay homage to the memo- 
ries of toe millions of civilians and 
the American and Allied soldiers 
who suffered and died at the hands 
of the Nazis."] 

Mr. Boenisch asked the 257 Re- 
publican and Democrat congress- 
men who sent the letter to Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl to take note that 
delegates to the Bundestag, or par- 
liament, in Bonn had voted Thurs- 
day, by 398 to 24, against dropping 
Bitburg from Mr. Reagan’s itiner- 
ary. 

“Just as we will consider their 
letter seriously, they have to take 
our vote on Bitburg seriously,” Mr. 
Boenisch said. 

■ Reagan Strategy 

Earlier, Dowd Hoffman of TTu 


Washington Post reported from 
Washington: 

President Reagan will ay to 
partly ease the controversy over his 
plans to visit tbe cemetery by hon- 
oring, during his trip, Germans 
who fought the Nazis during World 
War 11, U^S. officials said. 

“They're going to squash Bitbuig 
into 18 seconds,” one aide said 
Thursday, describing efforts to di- 
rect attention away from tbe ceme- 
tery visit through speeches and ap- 
pearances by Mr. Reagan while he 
is in West Germany. 

In Congress on Thursday, the 
House minority whip, Trent Lott, a 


blocked consideration of a resolu- 
tion sponsored by Democrats call- 
ing on Mr. R eagan to reconsider 
the Bitburg trip. Bui Mr. Lou also 
said he feels “very strongly” that 
Mr. Reagan should find another 
site to visiL 

In New York, Edgar M. Bronf- 
man. president of the World Jewish 
Congress, announced that leaders 
of Jewish communities in 70 na- 
tions will ask the U.S. ambassadors 
in their countries to urge Mr. Rea- 
gan to drop the Bitburg visit. It also 
was announced that Jewish com- 
munities in Europe were planning a 
“massive demonstration" outside 


Republican from Mississippi, (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 

Dollar, Not Trade , Urged 
As Main Topic for Talks 


By Scuarr Auerbach 

Washington Peer Service 

WASHINGTON — Senate 
Democrats and a leading Republi- 
can lawmaker have urged President 
Ronald Reagan to make the strong 
dollar the prime topic at next 
week's economic s ummi t in Bonn 
and have warned him against press- 
ing for anew global round of trade 
talks. 

“You haven't done your home- 
work" on the trade talks, said Sena- 
tor Lloyd Bentsen, a Texas Demo- 
crat, who is head of a group of 
Senate Democrats that has released 
a report on trade. 

Senator John C. Danforth, a 
Missouri Republican, who is chair- 
man of the Senate Finance Com- 
mittee's trade panel said in a re- 
cent speech to the National Press 
Club that Congress was unlikely to 
give the president “the green light” 
for new trade talks “without a thor- 
ough study of what has gone wrong 
in international trade and what the 
administration intends to do about 
iL” 

The bipartisan opinion of influ- 
ential senators appeared to jibe 
with the view of the United States’s 
closest allies in Western Europe, 
who have been urging the Reagan 
administration to make exchange- 


rate imbalance, especially the 
strong dollar, a major agenda item 
at the economic summit and to go 
slow in pressing for the new trade 
round. 

A new global round of trade 
talks, however, is the Reagan ad- 
ministration’s major trade initia- 
tive. 

At the same lime, Mr. Reagan 
and his closest economic advisers 
have resisted demands to include 
discussions of currency imbalances 
at the Bonn summit, where leaders 
of the seven industrialized democ- 
racies will meet. They assert that 
the strong dollar is a ago of the 
United States's economic strength 
and the weakness of other econo- 
mies. 

The Senate Democrats, whose 
report was adopted Tuesday by a 
party caucus, urged coordinaled'in- 
tervenlion by the United States and 
other major players in world-cur- 
rency markets to reduce the value 
of the dollar. 

Mr. Danforth declined to go that 
far, urging attempts to reduce the 
budget deficit first. If that does not 
bring down toe dollar, however, he 
said other steps, including inter- 
vention, will be needed. 

Although aides said there was no 
. .(Continued on Page XCoL 8) 


Ethiopia Food Piling Up 
But People Still Starve 




By Blaine Harden 

WcahinguM Poa Service 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — In 
a half year's time, toe rich nations 
of toe world have outrun Ethiopia’s 
famine. 

The United Stares has led tbe 
way,. 

Triggered last autumn by tele- 
vised images of starvation, a crash 
mobilization of food aid is now 
dumping mountains of grain at 
Ethiopian ports. For the nearly 
right mini on people threatened by 
famine, there is now within this 
country a two-month cushion of 
food 

In outrunning the famine, how- 
ever, the donor nations and the 
United Slates in particular have 
moved into a phase of disaster re- 
lief that is far more loastically 
complicated and potitically con- 
fused than simply putting food be- 
fore starving people. 

On tbe logistical level, a trans- 
portation bottleneck has developed 
since the first of the year. Sixty 
percent of toe 332,000 tons of food 
delivered here since January has 
not been distributed according to a 


fewer than half toe trucks required 
to deliver tlx: more than 100,000 
tans of food that arrive each month 
at Ethiopian pots. 


On the political level, strings tied 
to aid provided by toe United 
States, which bankrolls one-third 
of the relief effort in Ethiopia, are 
preventing its use to help buy 
erodes. These restrictions also pre- 
vent relief agencies from using U.S. 
aid for any project deemed to “de- 
velop” Ethiopia, a country whose 
Marxist nrilitaiy government con- 
tinues to have unfriendly relations 
with the United States. 

In interviews this week, officials 
of five of the laigesi private relief 
organizations in Ethiopia — Cath- 
olic Relief Services, Lutheran 
World Federation, CARE, Oxfam 
and Save the Children — said that 
restrictions on the use of U.S. food 
and money are branning to under- 
mine efforts to help Ethiopia recov- 
er from tbe famine. 

Their frustration was echoed in 
interviews with Kurt Jansson, UN 
assistant secretary-general for 
emergency operations in Ethiopia, 
and with Maurice Strong, the se- 
nior UN official far famine relief in 
Africa. 

In particular, these officials con- 
demn restrictions that prevent re- 
lief agencies from using U.S. food 
as pay for Etoiopian famine victims 
who are rehabilitating toe central 
highlands, rebuilding their farms, 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


UPI May File 
For Protection 
From Lenders 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — United 
Press International, acknowledging 
that it lacks sufficient funds to cov- 
er its payroll, said Friday that its 
directors unanimously authorized 
toe news service to fife for protec- 
tion from creditors under U.S. 
bankruptcy statutes. ' 

A UP1 news story Friday said 
there was uo indication whether or 
when Luis G. Nogales, UPI chair- 
man and chief executive officer, 
might exercise his authority to file 
for reorganization under Chapter 
11 of toe federal bankruptcy law. 

The UPI story, quoting unidenti- 
fied sources, said mat Mr. Nogales 
“promptly took steps to try to ar- 
range coverage of current payroll 
checks, which a key lender had de- 
clined to honor in a move appar- 
ently aimed at forcing the company 
to submit to court supervision." 

UPI’s principal lender is Foothill 
Capital Corp. of Los Angeles. 

Tbe stay quoted Mr. Nogales as 
saying that he was planning to meet 
Friday onto officials of Foothill “to 
discuss resumption of credit” that 
had been halted Thursday. 

Louis Guinn, a Foothill spokes- 
man, was reached in Los Angeles. 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 




Gorbachev Says SDI 
Increases Risk of War 





■macfrlMMi tamatod 

WASHINGTON PROTEST — Police and demonstra- 
tors dashing during a protest against tbe U.S. visit of 
Chun Doo Hwan, tbe South Korean president. Mr. 
Chun talked with President Ronald Reagan on Friday. 


Reuters 

WARSAW —Mikhail S. Gorha- 
chev warned Friday that the Soviet 
Union would retaliate with a nucle- 
ar buildup if the United States per- 
sisted with plans to develop an out- 
er space missile defense system. 

The new Soviet Communist Par- 
ty leader spoke as he and the six 
other leaders of toe Warsaw Pact 
renewed toe East European mili- 
tary alliance for 20 years. Their 
agreement provided for a further 
10-year extension in toe year 2005. 

He said that the US. Strategic 
Defense Initiative was multiplying 
the risks of nuclear war. “If prepa- 
rations fa SDI continue, we will 
have no other choice than to under- 
take countermoves including, of 
course, the strengthening and up- 
grading of nuclear arms,” he said 

Mr. Gorbachev said the U.S. ini- 
tiative “destabilizes the entire sys- 
tem of international relations and 
leads to an eves greater sharpening 
of political and military confronta- 
tion.” 

His statement was released after 
a round of formal talks to renew 
toe treaty which treated the War- 
saw Pact as a counter to toe West's 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion. The original treaty was rati- 
fied in 1955, tbe year that West 
Germany joined NATO. 

The pact members are Bulgaria, 
Czechoslovakia, Poland, Romania, 



Saudi High Life Dries Up Along With Oil Income 


^ «< ^ j IhiNMr York Una 

carpet mentosoitsj&ye bear affected by the decline in Saudi Arabian ofl production 
^v^i^that has seas a $7Mjj drop in three years. Last year, 300 businesses went bankrupt 




By Elaine Sdolino 

Neve York Tunes Service 

RIYADH — It was toe disposable decade, an 
era of such high living that little-used things 
could be thrown away. Furniture was replacea 
every-rix months, cars were traded in as soon as 
new models arrived and designer silks from rue 
du Faubourg St. Honort were worn only once. 

Now, for toe first time, wealthy Saudi Arabi- 
ans are beginning to fed toe effects of a three- 
year recession that promises to cut deeper in the 
years to come. 

The source of toe problem is painfully obvi- 
ous. Oil production has plummeted from a high 
of 10 million barrels a day only four years ago to 
4 milli on Jast year. This year it will fall even 
lower, to 3315 million barrels a day. 

The kingdom is trying to cope with toe effects 
of a S70-biQion drop in income from three years 
ago by canceling contracts, delaying payments, 
postponing and scaling bade projects and slash- 
ing subsidies on everything from wheat to water. 

Behind toe doors of Saudi villas, it is nearly 
impossible to judge how much toe recession is 
hurting, in large part because outward appear- 
ances and hospitality are dear to Saudis. A 
favorite stay ts the legend of Hatim al-Taa, 
whose hospitality was so great that he lulled his 
horse rather than let unexpected guests go with- 
out dinner. 


But the recession is bringing social disloca- 
tion and financial adjustment. Even the wealthi- 
est Saudis are affected, at least psychologically. 

“I built an empire.” said one of toe country’s 
self-made billionaires. “But even I won’t give 
my visiting relatives a new car this year, as I 

f One of our problems is that 
we have had almost total 
satisfaction. 9 said a minister. 
*We have to create a Saudi 
who labors for what he gets. 9 

always have done. They can have a two-year-old 
BMW from my garage instead.” 

Some Saudis nave cut back on sumptuous 
dinners at home. “Before, when we invited 10 
people for dinner, we cooked For 20” toe bil- 
lionaire said. “Now we’ll cook for 13.” 

In Riyadh and Jeddah, toe two largest cities, 
40 percent of all commercial and residential 
buildings are empty, according to Western 
economists and diplomats. Landlords are com- 


plaining that they have to let office and residen- 
tial space at discounts up to 25 percent. 

Huge unoccupied apartment blocks, put up 
quickly by developers expecting a continued 
influx of foreign labor, stand as symbols of an 
investor’s dream gone wrong. 

The first belt- tightening measure for many 
Saudis has been to keep last year's car. Sales of 
U.S. cars have plummeted 50 percent in two 
years. At one Mercedes dealership in Riyadh, 
sales of 500 SEJLs are down 12 percent since last 
year. 

“Instead of buying eight-cylinder cars, people 
will buy six-cylinder models,” said KM. You- 
sef, sales manager for Olayan GCC, which sells 
Mercedes, Jaguars and Land Rovers. “But it's 
not easy fa anyone to accept that his income is 
reduced.” 

Sales and discounts at retail stores, unheard 
of in toe salad days, are so popular now that the 
government has stepped in to protect consumers 
from bogus bargains. Shopkeepers are required 
to list regular and sale prices with toe chamber 
of commerce and to limit sales to twice a year. 

One young woman found it difficult to sell 
tickets to her luncheon fashion show until she 
began giving discounts on toe S50 tickets. Even 
toe women’s philanthropic societies, made up 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


Hungary, East Germany and toe 
Soviet Union. 

Mr. Gorbachev, on his first trip 
abroad since he assumed toe Soviet 
party leadership in March, accused 
toe United States of wishing to 
“achieve toe possibility of an initial 
nuclear strike with impunity." 

On April 7, Mr. Gorbachev an- 
nounced a seven-month Soviet 
freeze on deploying medium-range 
SS-20 missiles m Europe and said 
he hoped the West would recipro- 
cate to extend toe moratorium. 

Washington rejected toe offer 
and said the Soviet Union already 
had a 10-1 advantage in nuclear 
warhead strength in Europe. Mr. 
Gorbachev said Friday: “Who said 
we wanted to stop at a freeze? On 
the contrary, we insist that it be 
followed by a radical reduction of 
nuclear weapons.” 

Mr. Gorbachev urged the West 
to reconsider its initial dismissal of 
toe Soviet arms freeze. “We haw 
the right to expect Washington and 
toe capitals of other NATO coun- 
tries to evaluate our initiative with 
greater seriousness and insight and 
that they will in turn show restraint 
in toe deployment of U-S. missiles 
in Western Europe,” he said. 

A communique issued after the 
signing repeated a long-standing 
Warsaw Pact offer to dissolve itself 
in return fa toe dismantling of 
NATO. 


INSIDE 

■ Christian villages near Sidon 

were looted and burned by 1 Pal- 
estinians. Page 2. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Cartier “mystery docks” 

bring prices that illustrate the 
impact of art books on toe art 
market. Paged 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Ford Motor Co. reported that 
its first-quarter profit declined 
12.7 percent in toe first quarter 
of 1984. Page 13. 


MostofUS. Is Changing 
ToDf^/li^SaiDingTiine 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Most 
Americans wfl] put their clocks 
ahead one hour this weekend as six 
months of daylight saving time be- 
gins. 

Standard time ends at 2 A.M. 
local time Sunday across toe coun- 
try except for Arizona, Hawaii and 
pans of Indiana, where the time 
change is ignored. 


:.?r 






INTERNATIONAL HF.BAI.n TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


2 Villages Near Sidon Burned 
After Christian Forces Leave 


....... a a mm* “ ••* 



> DARB AS-SIM, Lebanon — 
Hundreds of Palefanians looted 
and burned two Christian villages 
in southern Lebanon on Friday, 
But Moslem militias prevented 
looting in other villages abandoned 
by Christian forces, 
j,- In the villages of Dart) As-Sim 
and Miyeh Miyeh, southeast of S- 
don, hundreds of Palestinians from . 
refugee camm in the area caned 
away whatthey could cany from 
deserted homes. 

p The villages woe among several 
abandoned by most of their inhab- 
itants during the fierce sectarian 
fighting around Sidon and the 
Withdrawal this week of 400 Chris* 
fam militiamen of the Lebanese 
Forces from Sidon toward Jezrine 
fa the east, the "min Chris tian town 
of southern Lebanon. 

(“At least 75,000 people have 
fled the region and taken refuge in 
idle Jezrine area. The condition of 
the refugees is very poor,' 7 a former 
member of the National Assembly, 
Jean Aziz, said in a cable to Prcsr- 
■flent Amin Gemayd, United Press 
International reported. Mr. Aziz, a 
native of Jezzine, is an independent 
' Christian and an advocate of Leba- 
nese Army control over the region.] 

J Smoke hung over both villages as 
young men jubilantly fired weap- 
ons into the air and at blackened 
houses. 

But Sunni and Shiite Moslem 
militiaman prevented looting in 
other Christian viHraes. 

Shiite Amal mmtiamen took 
over the town of Maghdonsbc and 


villages to the southeast, while Sun- 
ni militiaisen kept order in the vil- 

eastand north^^ilon. ^ iam ^ 

In Dash As-Sim, adjacent to the 
Palestinian refugee camp of Ain el 
HiTweh, a young Palestinian hnried 
a portrait of President Gemayd, a 
Margate Christian of the Pnalan- 
gist Party, to the floor of a wrecked 
house and hacked at it with a 
hatchet. 

“This was a Phalangist Party 
house," he said. “Of course I'm 



Crowds of Palestinians entered 
die villages with cars, trucks, mo- 
torcycles and wheelbarrows. They 
{riled them high with household 
equipment, furniture, stoves and 
chickens fad took them back to 
their camps. 

Security sources said Moslem 
and Palestinian fighters, mean- 
while, were pursuing groups of 
Chrifaan militiamen eastward 
from Sidon’s hilly suburbs toward 
Christian areas. 

In the viQ^es of Qayaa, Hfla- 
liyeh and Alfa, formerly an the 
front fines, thousands of Moslems 
inspected homes they were forced 
out of by the Lebanese Faroes dar- 
ing monthlong battles 

around Sidon. 

The crowds fled in panic when 
eight heavy mortar shells hit Abra 
at 8 AM. 

The Lebanese Forces pulled 
back tins week in attempt to stop 
the Moslem-Qiristian fighting. Se- 
curity sources said they withdrew 
their last men from suburban vil- 


lages Thursday night after Mos- 
lems and Palestinians stormed 
Miyeh Miyeh and Darb As-Sim. 

In Beirut, Moslem political 
sources said Moslem forces were 
dete rmine d to drive the Christians 
from all territory between Sidon 
and Jezrine. 

The Christian Voice of Lebanon 
radio station in Beirut quoted An- 
toine ifflhad, commander of the Is- 
raeli-backed South Lebanon Army, 
as saying he would bombard Sidon 
if the battles continued. 

Sidon’s mam Sunni Moslem mi- 
litia issued a statement vowing to 
destroy the Lebanese Forces, but 
said innocent people should not be 
hart “The battle is still long,” the 
statement said. 

■ 4 Israefe Injured 

Four Israelis were wounded 
Thursday night near the soon- to- 
be-evacuatcd seaport of Tyre ac- 
cording to an army commumquk, 

United Press International report- 
ed Friday from Jerusalem. 

The statement said “four border 
police were wounded Mien light 
arms fire" was directed at an Israeli 
Defense Force outpost in the Tyre 
area. The incident took place the 
day after Israel completed the sec- 
ond stage of its three-part with- 
drawal from southern Lebanon. 

Tyre, with a population of 
55,000, mostly Shiite Modems, has 
been the site of fierce resistance to 

the withdrawing Israelis. An army h*, 

^oftte£rf^eof^w£ A woman stomped on the picture of the assassinated Chris- 
drawal, win take place in “the near tian president-elect, Bashir Gemayd, in the village of Miyeh 
future.” Miyeh while a Palestinian dressed as Santa Clans looked on. 


•V Vy 


Saudis Find High Life Goes Less Smoothly as Oil Income Fads 


(Continued from Page 1) 
.almost entirely of the wealthiest 
•Saudi women, demanded 10 per- 
cent discounts. 

While no one is advertising used 
private jets, the usually peripatetic 
, Saudis are taking fewer vacations. 
•One minor prince who runs a small 
'Construction company took nearly 
!a dozen overseas vacations last 
year; this year, he has yet to leave 
'the kingdom. 

The gover nmen t « ur ging 
Jo vacation within the country and 
Is offering package deals to the hiDs 
of Asir province and the Red Sea. 

Saadis are tipping less than they 


used to. One wealthy businessman 
illustrated the pomt when he 
picked urn the tab for three coffees, 
a total of 27 rials, about S7-50. He 
left 30 rials. “In the old days,” he 
said wistfully, “I would hove left 
50." 

Last year, 300 businesses went 

days when profits were as high as 
50percaiL Even wefl-run business- 
es nave been affected. 

“No doubt about it, our profit 
wiQ be lower than before,” raid 
Qmair Alomair, the general man- 
ager of Riyadh Furniture Enter- 


prises, one of the country’s largest 
manufacturers of office and insti- 
tutional furniture. “Some people 
are shocked. But where is it better? 
Can we go somewhere better to 
invest?” 

Saudi officials use the word nor- 
malization rather than recession. 
They see it as an opportunity to 
introduce a more rigorous work 
ethic to a people who came to be- 
lieve that they were destined for 
easy wealth. 

“One of our problems is that we 
have had almost total satisfaction 
in Saudi Arabia,” the minister of 
p lanning , Hisham Nazir, said in an 


interview. “We now have to create 
a productive Saudi who is healthy 
and well-educated, but who labors 
for what he gets.” 

Prince Muqrin bin Abdul Aziz, 
governor of Hail province, put it 
mare bluntly: “A Saudi wfll have to 
learn that be cannot throw away his 
car Mien the ashtray gets full” 
Young graduates who, a year 
ago, were demanding starting sala- 
ries of 535,000 a year plus generous 
Irving and housing allowances, now 
have to take jobs for 515,000. A 
recent graduate said he preferred to 
wait until his father, a real estate 
developer, could afford to buy him 



a Mercedes before he went looking 
far a job. 

In an interview in- a Jeddah- 
based newspaper, Mahsoun Jalal, 
founder of the National Industrial- 
ization Co., a private investment 
concern, complained of wasting 
vast sums oS money to train young 

Sandis. 

“The youth wants to do the least 
amount of work and get the maxi- 
mam return possible,” he <m'd 
“Unless our citizens bfaome patri- 
otic and more interested, we wffl 
not be able to maintain our devel- 
opment.” 

Government employees, land- 
lords, hospital workers and teach- 
ers, among others, are grumbling 
over recently announced cuts in 
pay and benefits that will reduce 
their take-home pay by as much as 
30 percent Resentment is building 
over the conspicuous overspending 
by some membera of the royal fam- 
ily. 

The strains of the recession have 
certainly not hit all soda! circles. 

At a recent women-only party in 
Riyadh, a dozen women, three of 
than princesses, put on silks and - 
beaded chiffons and Harry Win- 
ston gems to dine at an oversized 
table that groaned with perhaps 40 
assorted dishes, from whole baby 
lambs and stuff ed fish to platters of 
sweets and imported fruits. 

They talked about their booses 
abroad, their hostess’s coming va- 
cation to Singapore, their clothes, 
children and volunteer work. But 
not about budget-cutting. 


Food Mounts 
In Ethiopia 
But People 
Still Starve 

(Coo turned from Page 1) 

di g gin g irrigation ditches or build- 
ing roads. 

Alex Rondos, a spokesnan for 
Catholic Relief Services, the giant 
American operation that moves 
more US. food than any other 
agency, said that restrictions on the 
use of US. food are crimpin g its 
rfforts to keep peasants an their 
farms and out of relief camps. 

“There is a point in any relief 
effort, and we have readied h, 
when than is a' degree of stability 
amid the misery,” Mr. Rondos 
said. “You are conscience-bound 
to move da to rehabilitation. Amer- 
icans cannot go around Ethiopia 
simply salving their gnflt with 
handouts. There is more to refitf 
than just that 

*Tf we could do any type of work 
for food, we could prevent further 
and fikdy displacement of more 
people, that is the fundamoital 
point of being here, isn’t it? The 
whole object of our woik is to pre- 
vent these rather ghastly camps 
from growing.” 

The head of Britain’s Oxfam op- 
eration here, Hugh Goyder, said 
that unless restrictions an the use 
of U.S. aid woe modified it might 
end up doing more h»*rn thaw 
good. “So many people will have 
become dependent on handouts 
and the infrastructure of the coun- 
try will not have been improved," 
Mr. Goyder said. 

US. food aid to Ethiopia is 
bound to two flmenrimi-ntq to the 
U.S. Foreign Assistance Act The 
amendmwits prevent tiie UJS. gov- 
ernment from giving anything oth- 
er than “humanitarian” aid to 
countries that have not paid their 
debts to the United States. 

The first amendment prevents 
development aid to countries, such 
as Ethiopia, that have nationalized 
the property of U.S. citizens and 
have not talr m “appropriate steps” 
to pay for iL The law u named after 
the late Senator Bouzke B. Hkken- 
looper, a conservative Republican 
from Iowa, and was passed in 1962 
in response to nationalization of 
prope r t y in, Brazil. 

While the Ethiopian, government 
has begun compensating Ameri- 
cans for property seized after its 
1974 revolution, there still are 
about 530 milli on in outstanding 
debts. State Department lawyers 
have ruled recently that “appropri- 
ate steps” can be whatever Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan 

The second amendment, named 
after Edward W. Brooke, a fanner 
Republican senator from of Massa- 
chusetts. prevents development aid 
to countries that have not paid off 
loans to the- U.S. govemmem. i 
Whenjsthiopia turned away from . 
the United States, ia 1977 and -.co- 
ward the Soviet Union, it failed to 
repay U.S. loans for nrifitary hard- 
ware. 

As 415,817 tons of U^. aid pour 
into Ethiopia this year. AID offi- 
cials here — with regular guidance 
by cable from Washington — are 
forced by the Hkienlooper and 
Brooke amendments to make him -: 
dreds of judgments about the uses' 
of this food and money. Relief is 
allowed but development is forbid- 
den. 


WORLD BftffiFS 

— ■ — = — — - — * 

U.S. Expels Soviet Military Attache : 

WASHINGTON (UH) — The State Department ordered the expul- 
sion Friday of a Sonet nrifitary attach^ from the United States in ‘ 
retaliation far the shooting death of TJB.- Army major, Arthur D. 
NkJwlson Jr n by aSovietsentrym East Gennanyfflihwrch24. . . « 
The State Department said that tito assistant secrctary of state for 

1-1 1 T» n~* J’sffnnK 


OlegSokolov, and informed him that lieutenant Colonel Stanislav If 
Gromov was bong expelled and had seven days to leave fae cotmby. \ 

A U.S. official said Cokmd Gromov was selected for expulsion on the 
adviceof the Pentagon, which desmbed him as *Sray actiwrin coDccting 
military information for his country. The offiriai snggested there amid bfc 
further US. actions agsinst the Russians. ;V jjj 

Republicans Disrupt U.S. House 

WASHINGTON (WP) House RqwMkanS used pariiamentaiy 
maneuvers and delaying tactics to protest the outcome of a disputed 
election in Indiana's 8th Congressional District, and have threatened to 
repeat the tactics next week. _ 

. The maneuvers Thursday forced Democratic leaders toadjoum the 
session- The disruption was a signal that the House could be cat the veige 
of & serious breakdown that may threaten President Ronald Reagan's 
legislative program and Democratic priorities daring the rest' of the 99th ^ . 
Congress. . 

“it is as bad a scene as Fve seen up bereinmjr 16 jears, w said Trent 
Lott, of Mississippi, the assistant leader of the minority Republicans in 
the House. The united Republicans said there maneuvering was an 
example of how they could disrupt the Hbosei.l1iey thrcatmed to do fbk 
same next week if Democrats txy to seat the incumbent, Frank McCh*- 
key, who was declared a four-vote winner over the Republican, Richard 
Mcfotyr& Republkams are pressing fra a new election. - 

Nigeria Moslems, Police Ckb; 11 Die 

LAGOS (AFF) — At least 11 persons, throe of them pcdteemea, were 
lolled in dadies between thepoficc and Moslems ou Friday in Gombe in 
northeastern Nigeria, the News Agency of Nigeria reported here. 

Tea policemen were injured and 1! people .were afrestedJn the armed 
dashes that began at 5:00 Aid. and were ooatmmng early in 
afternoon, the agency sad. The fighting began after police tried to ari^u. 
a Modem fundamentalist leader, Yusufn Adamu, the agency said. 


ist Martatsine sect, whidi has been involved in the past in dishes wi 


Gombe was surrounded by the police, who were altawing tracklaads of 
families to escape the aty in Banaii stfa the agency said. At least ^ 4^000 
people, according to anofficial count, dudinriots in 1980 mtheiurthein 
of Kano, when the sect leader, Maiwa Martatsine, was killed. 

U.S. Abandons Austrian Ceremonies j 

VIENNA ( AP) Um tedS^e g has whh drawn from two 

of World War n and Austrian independence, the UB. Embassy said 
Friday. * . . \ 

An embassy spokesman said hewasnot authorized to comment tm^ vdiy 
the United States pulled out of the events in tire provinces of Styria and 
Lower Austria. UB. and Soviet mflitary attaches had planned to meet ai_ 
tire fanner demarcatiasL fines between their postwar occupation zoaesJ& 
The United-States refused to send representatives to marking 

the 1945 meeting of Soviet and UjSl troops on tire River Elbe on 
Thursday became of tire shooting of a UA Army major last month by a 
Soviet guard in East Geomany. ... 

But the spokesman said UB. Secretaiy ot State George P. Shultz still 
would meet as scheduled May 14 in V ienna with the Soviet fo reign 
minister, Andrei A. Gromyko. “That meeting is on, if s definitely on, "15 
said. , 

2 Arabs Charged in Geneva Bombings 

GENEVA (UPI} — A bomb exploded in the car of a Syrian di plomat 
in Geneva on Foday, r*im»ng only afifa* irguries, shortly after an 
exploskm at the Libyan Arab Airlines office; ' 

Swiss pafice later charged two Arabs with carrying cut the attacks. 
They said one of the Arabs made a confession and kd investigators to 
another bomb that was^ removed before it could explode. Bciice said thw 
did not know the exact identities of the two .arrested mere noi'lhcar 
motives. 


For the Record 


Ia^ Turkey, 18 persons were kBkd and 24 figured when a bus plunged 
over a cliff on Friday near tire town of Bdu, about 90 mdes (140 
k ilomete r s) northwest of Ankara, the state radio said. ,. (Roam) 
Prfece Bemhard, 73, of theNe&eriaads was in a satirfactcty condition 
in a hospital in Leiden Friday after an operation revealed benign 
inflammation of the pancreas, a spokesman said. ; • (Return) 

The publisher and the alter of Eteas, Greece’s largest newspaper, 
George Bobolts and Alexander FDmpopoulos, were sentmeed Dnirsday 
to five months imprisanmsit or a rare of 5500 an charges arising 

from the wiretapping of The New York Times offioe in Athens. . (AP) 

Seaetare of State Gouge P. SMtz will visit Egypt, Jordan and toad 
next month, the State Department said Friday. (AP) 




-V- .mg 


ARGE3V TINES ASSEMBLE — Motbers of children riders. The white masks are meant to represent prigging 
who disappeared during die junta's crackdown on left- persons. Leaders of 15 political parties, meanwhile, have 

ists in t he 197 0s demonstrating this week In Buenos signed a manifesto in defense of Argentina's democratic 
Aires to support the public trials of trine former military system and in opposition to a threatened military coup. 



19 8 5 

Charles Tanqueray & Company Limited/ English Gin Distillers, 
are very proud to have received 

i 

THE QUEEN’S AWARD FOR 
EXPORT ACHIEVEMENT 1 985 

We extend to our customers and employees our sincere 
appreciation for their contributions to this Achievement 

CHARLES TANQUERAY & COMPANY LIMITED 

260, GOSWELL ROAD, LONDON EC1V7EE 


Visit Firm, 
Bonn Says 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Bit burg cemetery if Mr. Reagan 
goes there. 

The World Jewish Congress also 
said demonstrations were bang 
planned in Lafayette Park, across 
from the White House, on May 5. 
Leaders of Conservative Judaism 
said they will observe a day of 
“mourning, prayer and fasting" if 
Mr. Reagan visits Bitburg. 

A news conference scheduled for 
Mr. Reagan this week was canceled 
because aides feared that questions 
about Bitbuxg would dominate iL 
Officials said Mr. Reagan's appear- 
ances were bong planned with an 
eye to countering the protests over 
Bitburg with remarks honoring 
lefaers of the resistance. Also, they 
said, Mr. Reagan may drop plans 
to lay a wreath during his visit to 
the cemetery. 

■ Anti-Nazi Law 

The West German parliament 
passed a law on Thursday making 
it an automatic offense to “slander 
the victims of National Socialism 
and other tyrannies,” Reuters re- 
ported from Bonn. 

Another draft, m existence for 
more than two years, specifically 
referred to the Holocaust and 
would have made it a crime “to 
deny or trivialize the acts of geno- 
cide” committed undo 1 Nazi rule. 
It was dropped last month because 
of insistence that account also be 
taken of Soviet atrocities against 
Germans expelled from prewar ter- 
ritories that are now pan of East- 
ern Europe. 


Reagan Takes 

ANetoLook 

AtDefidts 

(Continued from Page 1) 

gan, now the White House chief of 
staff, told the Senate last year that 
it could “throw away” the annual 
economic report of Martin S. Fdd- 
stein, then chairman ol the Council 
of Economic Advisers, because it 
maintained that high deficits con- 
tributed to the relatively high level 
of interest rates. 

And the president, campaigning 
for re-election, contended that a 4- 
percent annual economic growth 
through 1989 and a cut in the 
growth of government spending to 
5 percent a year from 6 percent 
would eliminate the deficits. 

In a radio address last August, he 
said: “The Democratic nominee 
has said he accepts deficit projec- 
tions of over 5200 billion a year as 
far as the eye can see. Now, I don’t 
accept them. And if we can keep 
our economy growing strongly, no 
one will have to.” 

A mouth earlier, when he accept- 
ed the Democratic presidential 
nomination, Mr. Mondale said of 
the deficits, “Here is the truth 
about the future: We are living on 
borrowed money and borrowed 
time. These deficits hike interest 
rates, clobber exports, stum invest- 
ment, kill jobs, undermine growth, 
cheat our kids, and shrink oar fu- 
ture.” 

If they are arited, Mr. Re^an and 
Other administration officials still 
say there is no direct link between 
interest rates and the deficits, but 
they do not volunteer it in speeches 
anymore. And faith in the econo- 
my’s contribution to deficit reduc- 
tion has abated. 

“I don’t care how he got reli- 
gion,” Alice M. Rivlin, director of 
economic studies at the Brookings 
Institution, who is former director 
of the Congressional Budspt Of- 
fice, said of the president, “unjust 
glad he’s got iL” 


UPI Board Authorizes Move Dollar Urged 
To Protect Against Lenders As Topic for 


(Continued from Page 1) 

He said: “We have so comment at 
this time on UPL” 

Meanwhile, UPI began notifying 
subscribers this week of a 95-per- 
cent rate increase effective April 
28. In a letter, a copy of winch was 
made available by a subscriber, Mr. 
Nogales said the increase will “pro- 
vide essential revenue.” 

Under Chapter 11 of the Federal 
Bankruptcy Act, a federal court is- 
sues an order freeing a company 
from the threat of creditors’ law- 
suits until it can develop a plan to 
put its finances in order. 

While reorganization proceeds 
under Chapter 1 1, management ac- 
tivities must be approved by the 
court, and the nltimate reorganiza- 
tion plan must be accepted by a 
majority of the creditors. 

The UPI board consists of Mr. 
Nogales: Maxwell McCrohon, the 
editor in chief; William Morrissey, 
president of the Wire Service 
Guild, and Douglas F. Rnhe, one 
of the two UPI co-owners. . 

The Guild, which represents 

said earlier Friday in Newest 
that “it is the union’s opinion that a 
Chaplet 11 filing at this time is 
necessary to protect many employ- 
ee lights ana to protect company 
assets.” 

In a statement issued by David 
Wickeodea, a company spokes- 
man, Mr. McCrohon said: “UFTs 


baric news, picture aud featme ro- 
poit will not be intenupted during 
this period of financial reorganiza- 
tion. All tile financial alternatives 
open to us mean that oar employ- 
ees will be paid and that die news 
service wiD continue to deliver its 
full report to all subscribers.” 

He added: “UPI is here and will 
be tomorrow. If s business as usual. 
There certainly will be no interrup- 
tion in service.” 

UPI, founded 78 years ago, has 
about 1,800 employees in 257 bu- 
reaus in 160 countries. UPI news 
reports have said that the agency is 
about $17 million in debt. On 
March 30, a committee of its crea- 
tors agreed to a 9(Way debt mora- 
torium to give management an op- 
portunity to farther trim operating 
expenses. 

The UPI story on Friday said 
that, according to unidentified 
comp an y sources, the agency “ap- 
parently readied « crftieal finncal 
crunch because the Foothill Capi- 
tal Cocp-. UFTs chief provider of 
cash, w as tfissatisfiea with die 
Guild's refusal to renegotiate a la- 
bor contract and make new wage 

concessions.” - 

On March 13, the Guild rejected 
as “entirely unacceptable” a UPI 
proposal for an 18-monlh wage 
freoe and other employee conces- 
sions. At that time, employees were 
being paid 85 percent of normal 
wages under a pay cut negotiated in 
August 1984. 


As Topic for < 
Bonn Summit 

tCourinued from Page 1) 
collaboration, there was a marked 
resemblance between the report of 
die Democrats aim Mr. 

Danfarth’s speech to die' National 
Press Gob. 

Besides their stands on the 
strong dollar arid the new trade 
round, both faulted the Reagan ad- 
min i s t rati on for not having acoor- 
dmated trade policy despite a re- 
cord 51233-bffirai trade deficit in 
1984 that may go evm higher tins 
year. 

Mr. Danfcith accused the ad- 
ministration of “inaction" on 
trade. Hesrid it has long been “the 
poor stqxhdkT of government, 
placed behind foreign poficy arid 
other economic concerns. 

Of Japan, Mr. Danforth said, 
“no other natron contributes so tit- 
tle to tiie open trading system in 
relation to its grins,” and he urged 
the a d minis tration to retaliate 
against Japanese barriers to U5. 
products. Hie said tins “measured 
responses would be more construc- 
tive than co ngre s si o n al riietosic [ 
thatnow serves as the onty ‘‘pracfr: 1 
cal (feancamve to Japaneseproteo- 
ti o n aan " 

Mr. Danforth called USL efforts 


Sudan Group Visits Ethiopia 


MORE NEWS IN LESS TIME 

THE WORLD IN 16 PAGES 

DAILY IN THE IHT 


The Associated /Vbj 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — A 
Sudanese delegation arrived here 
Friday to improve ties with Marx- 
ist-ruled Ethiopia in a second ma- 
jor foreign pohey overture follow- 
ing Sudan's ApIU 6 mili tary coup. 

Fadlalla Burma Nasir and Fans 
Abdallah, both brigadier generals 
and members of the ruling Militaiy 
Council that has replaced President 
Gaafar Nxmeiri, mid the refugee 
commissioner, Abed el Majid Aba- 
madi, were wefcomed by Ethiopia's 
foreign minister, Gosha Wolde. 

They brought a message from 
Sudan's leader. General Abdul 


Rahman Swareddahab, for his 
Ethiopian counterpart, Meugistu 
Hade Mariam, a Sn da iw se nffirial 
said. Its contents were, not dis- 
closed. 

Under Major General Nimeiri, 


with Libya in a 1982 defense pact, 
cbaiged that Sudan shmlariy aided 
rebels fi ghting m the Eritrea and 
Time regions of Ethiopia. 

Since the coup. Khartoum has 
sent a delega t i on to Tripoli to suo 
cessfuny negotiate the ie-«tabfish- 
' meat of diplomatic relations with 
Libya. 


dees em bar r assingl y ineffective,* 
“Itis embarrassing,” he said, “to 
watch the president at the United 
States plead with tiie prime nrims-. 
ter of Japan. It is embarrassing 
see one negotiating ddratkm 5 
another return from Tokyo with 
hopeful announcements and ool 
new sales. Itis ineffective ^ when our 
exports to Japan grow by 2 percent 
while our imparts grow by 38 pff- 
ceaL" ... 


Copter Crashes in NewYmk 

The Associated Pros . 

NEw YORK — A heScopter 
crashed into the- East River as il.s 
•took off from tiie 34th Street hdi- r - 
port Friday mfli.ejjg&t persons 
aboa rd, ari d at least seven of them 

^^Sd&p^migasanJaew 
were fefaed frwn the New York 
Heficopfa; craft. 


* / 





Page 3 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


AMEkKlAN TOPICS 1 Saadinists Two Harts Quicken the Political Pulse in California 

oinr „>**.***- ■ - 1 ' - - - ■ Call Aid Vote - - 


£r. Yusuf u A^^P^etSiL*- 


OT^occd in thccanrfaSynufc 
; only slight injuries, shaft * 
irhnes office. 

® Arab? with carrying on 
ie a cocfesara and led nm®* 
before it could emkxk Ma*. 

ties of the wo arrested an 


iBed 2 si ZA injured fctaafefc 
he tows of Bolu. about H jfei 
•a, the state radio sad. ik 
ttheriands ssusfactaroBf 
y after an opcraccn rodaii! 
i spotessar: said. ifc 
r of Exlmos. Greece's brgeSts 
• Ftiippopoulos. were samrifc 
:r a f^te of 5500 each on dag:: 
;ew York Times office is Adra. 

Shultz ftill visit Egypt Jdriasai' 


Dollar Vf 
As Topicja 
Bonn Siuffl 


iC*»tinwd 

sosibcwBOB, 

■L setiie Daf 1 ®? 

Press Ollb. 

Besides uwr 
»gn» 

=££££& 

Skfe-s* 1 *. 


4s Aaii. 




lha WtataCPQa Ro* 

MIRROR, MIRROR ^Cranes and scaffokfing being 
used for repairing tbe west side of die U.S. Capitol are 
seen in the reflecting pool on die MaD in Washington. 


Good Landing: One 
You Walk Away From 

The Discovery space shuttle 
flight this month was the rough- 
est yet for any shuttle aircraft: ' 
123 heat-shidd tiles broke, 'ap- 
parently during lift-off through ’ 
rain, and otter damage was 
cause&when sun glare required 
landing in a direction without & 
headwind, with a touchdown at 
231 mph (372 kpb), the fastest 


shuttle landing yet. 

This made the brakes lock. 


which in nun blew out two 
tires. A hole the size of a dinner 
plate was burned in the tip of a 
wing where a landing Dip ap- 
parently dislodged several pro- 
tective tiles. Robert Seek, tbe 
shuttle laimdi operations direc- 
tor, said, “We suffered more 
severe damage on thi< landing 
than on any other so far.” 


million to one. . . . Farming is 
the most dangerous m^or U.S. 
occupation, according to the 
National Safety Council, not 
because h has become more 
hazardous but because of im- 
provements in safety records 
for other risky jobs lute mining 
and-coosunctioo. . ..When the 
National Law Journal assent . 
Med a list of the 100 most pow- 
erful lawyers in the United 
States, New York and Wash- 
ington finished in a dead heat 
with 20 big-league attorneys 
each. ... The United States had 
832,602 millionaires in 1984, 
according to Georgia State Um- 
yersjiy, and at present rates of. 
increase will have a million of 
them by 1987. 


Easygoing Times 
At die White House 


Short Takes 


A rime manufacturer. Puma 
USA, says it has managed to 
combine two US. passions, jog- 
gmg and computers, in a shoe 
with a built-in electronic device, 
which weighs only an ounce (28 
grams). It can be plugged ipto a 
home computer when the nm is 
done and provide an instant 
read-out on how far you ran, 
how fast, how many calories 
you burned up and how faith- 
fully you kept to your jogging 
program. 


For the first time, the Federal 
Aviation Administration has 
set a maximum Wood alcohol 
standard for airline crews, in 
addition to the long-standing 
rule prohibiting drinking or 
drug use for right hours before 
a flight. When the new rule 
takes effect June 17, air person- 
nel are to be considered under 
the influence if the alcohol levd 
is .04 percent or higher. A typi- 
cal police limit for testing driv- 
ers is .10 percent 


Shorter Takes: William Sex- 
ton and his twin sister, Marga- 
ret Adams, jointly celebrated 
their 100th birthdays this 


month in Ashland, Kentucky. 
The Guinness Book of Records 


The Guinness Book of Records 
estimates the odds of twins both 
reaching die age of TOO at ,700 


In 1933, President-elect 
Frajfljl^ p v R^eveh.surwyfd 
an assassination attempt. May- 
or Anton Cermak of Chicago 
was fatally wounded when the 
bullets went wild. A recent let- 
ter to The Washington Post 
suggests that the White House 
did not adopt stringent security 
measures as a result. Represen- 
tative Michael D. Barnes, a 
Maryland Democrat, recounts 
that a year or so after die shoot- 
ing. his father-in-law, driving 
with a friend on Pennsylvania 
Avenue in an open roadster 
when h started to rain, looked 
for a spot to put the top up. 

They drove onto the white 
House grounds and under the 
portico, drawing the attention 
only of the boiler. “A bit em- 
barrassed,” Mr. Baines says, 
“they simply told the butler 
that they had stopped to *pay 
their respects to President ana 
Mrs. Roosevelt.’ Each then 
handed the butler bis business 
card,” and they drove off. 

About a week later, the con- 
gressman recounts, they “re- 
ceived formal invitations to an 
•evening musicals ” given by 
the president and the first lady 
at the White House. “They at- 
tended and, by all accounts, it 
was a very pleasant evening.” , 


— Compiled by 

ARTHUR mOEE 


CHURCH SERVICES 


2 Youths Charged 
With Extortion by 


eC«W 


O! ■ doy*. 12 noon. T«U 720.17.92. 


*“33^ 


buffs in Los Angeles and Monterey 
■ a. Sommwvie*. t«Ls 607 . 02. areas, police say. They said the two 


PARK SUBURBS 


Rub Bora-Rats ire. Tot.t W.JJ.2?. 


were turned over to their 


: „ .!>: . ABONit carlo after they were arrested Wednes- 

at their homes-^Authorilics In 

T.L 253151/233115. 


In Congress 
A Key Victory 


By Edward Cody 

Washington Past Serticr 

MANAGUA — ■ The Sandmm 
government believes it has won an 
important battle against the Rea- 
gan administration with the refusal 
by U.S. congressmen to authorize 
further aid to the Nicaraguan in- 


surgents. 

The Reverend Miguel d’Escoto 
Brockmann, the foreign minister, 
has called the vote in Congress “an 
important step, inasmuch as it iso- 
lates the president, because Con- 
gress has raid it will no longer be an 
accomplice to his policy of state 
terrorism.” 

Throughout President Ronald 
Reagan's crusade to get $14 milli on 
more for the insurgents, Sandinist 
leaders made their objective dear 
no more UJk military pressure 
against their revolution and re- 
sumption of direct talks to normal- 
ize 0 ^.-Nicaraguan relations. 

A proposal backed by Mr. Rea- 
gan to give $14 million for food, 
clothing, medicine and other non- 
military items to the guerrillas 
fi ghting the Nicaraguan govern- 
ment failed, 215-213, in tbe House 
of Representatives on Wednesday 
night. 

The vote was seen here as a dem- 
onstration that key Sandinist argu- 
ments were shared by the congress- 
men. Bui it was not considered as a 


By Jay Mathews 

tYashliigtto Pat Service 

SAN LEANDRO, California — 
Constituents have suspected him of 
bigamy. Callers have scorned him 
for statements he never made. Ho- 
tel clerks have greeted his arrival 
with confused looks. 

It is not all cheers and confetti 
bang Gary Hart, especially if you 
are not the Gary Han who last year 
became a household word when be 
sought the Democratic presidential 
nomination. 

Nevertheless, for a tall, hand- 
some California state senator who 
happens to bear the same first and 
last names as the tail , handsome 
UJS. senator from Colorado, tbe 
confusion has produced an unex- 
pected bonus. 

In the media-driven circus of late 
20th-century UJ3. politics, having a 
familiar name is half the batue. 
What otherwise would be no more 
than an odd and amusing coinci- 
dence has turned a legislator de- 
scribed by one supporter as “not 
flashy,” a man who never has nm in 
a statewide election, into a Demo- 
cratic contender for the California 
governorship. 


% W - * 

' §E '*•*«** 3* 

• 'x : • 



For a tall, handsome 
California state 
senator who happens 
to bear the same name 
as the tall, handsome 
U.S. senator from 
Colorado, confusion 
has produced an 
unexpected bonus in 
contending for the 
governorship. 


Gary Kersey Hart 


that kind of name identification,” 
said Mr. Hart’s chief of staff, Jerry 
Seedbmg. Gary Warren Hart’s na- 
tional publicity and smashing vic- 
tory in the 1984 California presi- 
dential primary made Gary Kersey 
Hart’s name unforgettable. And it 
pm him near the top of the list of 
candidates for the position held by 


a Republican governor. George 
Deukmejian. 

When it was revealed that the 
Colorado senator had been bom 
Gary Haxtpence and changed his 
name, supporters of the Santa Bar- 
bara senator began to refer to him 
as “the real Gary Han.” 

If Gary K. Han had no achieve- 
ments to back up this public rela- 
tions windfall. Republican tacti- 
cians would not be so concerned. 
But in right years as an assembly- 
man and two as a state senator, Mr. 
Han has steered politically potent 


solution to the guerrilla conflict, , 

Bush Lays Groundwork 

In assessing the congressional J 

Rescan himself has sod thar inde- For ’88 Presidential Bid 


S himself has said that jndft - 

tly of the vote in Congress 
d never abandon his broth- 
ers, as he tflrftg to rail th^ PTA 
mercenaries, that he would contin- 
ue violating all the laws and look- 
ing for a way to go on financing 
crime and destruction in Nicara- 

___ it 

gua. 

"Let us have no illusions.” Fa- 
ther d’Escoto said. “The war has 
not ended. The war continues. The 
CIA is still directing the mercenar- 
ies and seeking other ways of fund- 
ing.” 

[President Reagan ordered on 
Friday a review of political, eco- 
nomic and other steps that could be 
taken against the government of 
Nicaragua and in support of the 
guerrillas, The Associated Press re- 
ported from Washington ] 

Leaders of the mam guerrilla 
group, the Nicaraguan Democratic 
Force, have pledged from Hondu- 
ras and tbe United States (hat they 
wiD cany on their battle to over- 
throw the ax-year-old Sandinist 
government even without the $14 
. million denied by Congress. The 
pMg« recalled similar declara- 
tions last summer, when Congress 
first ait off rebel fundingafter ap- 
proving approximately $80 million 
in OA fmanrial and logistics aid 
over three years. 

The guerrilla war continued de- 
spite that cutoff. Insurgent com- 




By Gerald M. Boyd 

New York Tunes Service 


would run, he said, “but dearly it 
will be interpreted as a signal that I 


WASHINGTON — In the most am very interested and that would 
telling indication so far that be be the proper interpretation.” 


might make a 1988 presidential bid, Mr. Bush, 60. said that the cre- 


vice President George Bush has ation of the c ommi ttee would be a 
declared his intention to establish a “big step forward” from his pos- 


yt 


political action committee. 


ture in the presidential campaign 


In talcing (he step, Mr. Bush last summer, when he refused to 
joined several other Republicans discuss a possible bid in 1988. 


who are possible candidates for the Although some details have not 




nomination and have established been resolved, the committee is to 
similar committees. Mr. Bush's be formally established this week 


committee would provide tbe vice or next week when papers are filed 
president with an organization to with the Federal Election Commis- 


raise funds if he deri 


sion, according to Craig L. Fuller, 

.L. - ■ —rr 


In an interview Thursday, Mr. the vice president's chief of staff. 
Bush acknowledged that the com- Mr. Fuller said that an office with a 


George Bush 


mittee represented the dearest si g- smal l staff will open early next 
nal to date that he would be a month. 


candidate to succeed President Mr. Fuller said the decision to 
Ronald Reagan. However, Mr. move ahead with the committee 


Bush said (hat he was still undedd- was the result of u rging * b 
ed about seeking the office and cal supporters, who wan 


would wait until after the 1986 Bush to begin positioning hiintrif 
elections before making a decision, toward seeking the nomination in 


“It will be interpreted. 1 think 1988. 
with some degree ot propriety, as a “His friends wanted a political 

signal on 1988, but it shouldn’t be organization and we formed the 


interpreted as having made a deri- fund in answer to that demand,” ““ “ v “‘ 

sion,” Mr. Bush said. Mr. Fuller said. The committee is also expected 

. The decision to establish a com- Officially, tbe committee is to be to provide funds for Republicans 
mittee did not represent the “defin- a “multicandidate committee” and tunning for the House and Senate 
itive” statement on whether he is to operate in a manner similar to next year. 


Mr F^said^deririonto 

^ wth the committee Bush is to serve as honorary chair- 
ts tnc resulti of urgings by poltu- ^ j^ben A. Mosbacher, a 

1 supporters, who wanteS Mr Texas oil executive, is to be treasur- 

^ J? PS Uomi ? 8 cr. Mr. Mosbacher was finance 

ward seeking the notmnauon m chairman for Mr. Bush’s campaign 

Sli- f- A - . . . - in 1980 when he opposed Mr. Rea- 

Hb tods wanted a pohtual ganfortheRepuK^esidmt^ 
Bamzation and we formed the ^ naH r™ 


The committee is also expected 


maztders and Sandinist officials -a a • » Tpv w -w-w w« 

rolisn Actwist Denounces the rolice 

of attack and staying power in the _ _ . „ _ _ . _ _ „ 


northon and Michnik Urges International Monitoring of His Trial 

winter, mnrnhs after U5. funding O o 


winter, months after U5. funding 

^ “ T. Kaufi™ 

said the grnlanalinn for the cod tin- If* 77 _ r "" s f rnce 

sa PP txt [ M1 g an g Nj Ciraguan peu- ^ J 

p ales mdS^M aides” else- J? r mtcmational mom- 

rTl tonns of his commg tnaL He also 

urged that the treatment of pditi- 

J^SStSSS ? d s r r? ,beaddKito f^ n - 

ition continued to back the rebels a . ^ iciter^dS^AL^son on 
rough CIA money that was laun- 1“ thelctta, utied Atessonon 

... which he challenged and ridiculed 

Eventual Aid Expected Polish au thonties from prison - 


States and 
where. 


aides” rise- 


however, that the Reagan adminis- 
tration continued to bade the rebels 
through QA money that was laun- 
dered to get around the congressio- 
nal ban. 

■ Eventual Aid Expected 



or Ministry u nde r any circum- 
stances.” 

These, he wrote, included infer- , 
mation about when, where and 
with whom conspiratorial meetings 1 
were hdd. “To acknowledge the I 
authenticity of tbe tape, it would be 
necessary to conclude that Lis went 
crazy to confide such intimate ac- 
counts to agents of the security 
apparatus,” he wrote. 

Mr. Michnik was obviously 




aware that the tape, if aired by the 
Polish radio ana television, could 
disenchant some of Solidarity’s ad- 
mirers by suggesting collaboration 


- the rousb authorities Irom prison 

Democrats and Republicans in for more than two and a half years 
Congress say that some form of cm til he was freed in a general am- 
nonmili tary aid to N icaragu a n in^ nesty nine months ago. 

After six months of freedom, Mr. 


with the police, naive or otherwise, 
by one of the movement’s beros. 


surgents is likdy to be amroved if 
the issue is raised again later this 
year, as expected. The Washington 
Post repotted from Washington. 

Even though the House voted 
against further funding, Mr. Rea- 
gan’s spokesman, Larry Speakes, 
said the administration was seeking 
ways to force further votes on the 
xssucl 

Several moderate and conserva- 
tive Democrats who voted against 


Michnik was arrested again in Feb- 
ruary at a meeting convened by 
Lech. Walesa, the founder of tbe 
independent Solidarity trade 
union. 

Mr. Michnik and his fellow Soli- 
darity activists, Bogdan Us and 
Wladyslaw Frasyniuk, are awaiting 
trial on charges of inciting public 
unrest in connection with the meet- 


by one of the movement’s beros. 

“In reading the transcript of the 
tape, I finally understood that I 
had been accurately charged with 
extremism,” he said. “My extrem- 
ism is based on the conviction that 

. . . - one should never have any conver- 

Adflm MicnnOt gation with security forces in any 

place. I never spoke with them and 
leader who had then been out of I will not do so in the future, 


prison for scarcely a month, went though I know their bandit-like 
to talk with two secret police tricks and their contemptible. 


small, spying souls.” 


tTZm. W«£ LOS ANGELES — Two ieen- 
2^^noJr.92. age computer enthusiasts have 

^ - been arrested on charges of trying 

re **?. 


tive Democrats who voted ag ains t ing. At the meeting the men dis- “Us went to the room in order to » 

the proposal aid they woulfc aSed a strike aTa re^onse to ukeTi^in a dLSSStibSSTu tuiod mtolhe ^ersaoonby the 
supported it if thqr had known that government plans far price in- undeSamding between the na- P 110 ™^ 01 dialogiu:. Michnik 
tha aJlcmativc would be no aid at a-* , K, 


15-year-olds hid threatened to de- 
stroy thrir dectromc files or to 


harm other computer buffs who 

mejaon. EnotWi ipecaung, on aanomno- .. , 

ton. KbJ- ifcxV- 9 p* 5, wonhtp: 10o45- 56 WOUM OOt pay . 


The two high school sophomores 


r parents 
Wednes- 


thc alternative would be no aid at 
all. 

After the House lolled the pro- 
posal backed by Mr. Reagan, it also 
lolled a Democratic alternative that 
it had approved earlier. Tins would 
have prodded $14 million in aid to 
the rq^on without assisting the re- 
bels directly. 

Legislators said that the outcome 
was the result of parliamentary 
one-upsmansbip, not a reflection of 
the mood of the House. 


iSss- saroasK 

inpamg and seeking to party the jn his letter. He said the two agents ,:L~ ^ 

C ^ ^ i * “ ^^Mr. Michnik and his fellow SoB- 

that pc^ce^made surreptmooriy of tions. “with a candor surprising m *,_!«« «rr;« a Tc a 


Mr. Michnik and his fellow Sob- 


evidence against the three. dance. “ “.““X 

Mr. Mich^, disclosing the exis- «... . . , , Fnxn Ins cell, Mr. Mkhmk ^>- 

tence of the recordinzTsaid it was u of the qpuuou that the pealed to foreign lawyers, labor ac- 

made in Room 404ca he Hevdius tape contains faked and edited am- twists and scholars toapply for 
Hotel on Jan. 25 when Mr Lit a vexsation with the agents and it visas and seek permission to ob- 
former Solidarity tmdergroimd would be hard to deny him craipe- serve his triaL 

— - tence in this judgment ^Mr. Mich- I partroilarly and warmly mvne 

mk wrote. He added that the tape those among yon who take part in 
TT C i? nr np contains details “which ordinarily the peace movements and who ac- 

uiunjinii 1U1CC a member of Solidarity would not tivefy seek a dialogue between gov- 
__ nj.!i confide to employees of the Interi- emments and natrons,” he wrote. 


From his ceQ, Mr. Michnik ap- 
on that the pealed to foreign lawyers, labor ac- 
1 edited con- tivists and scholars to apply for 


ties were cons den 
which county, they 


bow, and in 
nldbepros- 


Secret Spy Satellite of U.S. Air Force 
Is Revealed to Be in an Unusual Orbit 


“1 particularly and warmly invite 
those among yon who take part in 
the peace movements and who ac- 
tively seek a dialogue between gov- 
ernments and natrons,” he wrote. 


Sim: 


“electronic bulletin 


UNTTAMAi'UOflVBtSAUST, worship and jjjg fyytae’. from a sergeant at 

Fort Ord and his teen-age son, who 


New York Times Server 
WASHINGTON— A secret air 
force satdlile that is widely be- 
lieved to be an mteDigence-gather- 


■o+fy. 


y STOCKHOLM 

/ IMMANUEL CHURCH necr dty -t 
.1 Friwirfv diffatien iWowiWp- Sondoy ! 

j-V' Tot.: (08) 316051, .151225. 

i*' . v 




To place an advertisement 
in das section 


<1" tJl« phoae contacts 

. M. Hfabeth HERWOOD 

: flilP.jjtf, 181 Ave. 

" r^j 92521 NewiUy CedO, Fimee 

• TeLs 7»7.12,6S. . \ 


subscribe to a similar bulletin 
board on the base, and from anoth- 
er teen-ager. 

The beys allegedly sent electron- 
ic messages through the computer 
bulletin boards, demanding, that 
money be sent to an address in San 
Jose. The police said the boys - 
threatened to “break bones," 
smash windows, damage comput- 
ers, order the detfvnyaf unwanted ' 
.pizzas and harass their targets in 
other ways if the money was not 


ing device was placed in a radically 
different orbit from many such re-. 


connaissance satellites. 

According to figures made pub- 
lic Thursday by the air force, the 
satellite was placed in a highly el- 
liptical. orbital a low angle above 
the equator. 


The majority of UJL reconnai- 
nce satellites have been launched 


sauce satellites have been launched 
into roughly circular orbits that 
pass across polar regions, so that 
they spend as much time as posa- 
ble' over' the Soviet Union. This 


over lower latitudes a-«wnfng that 
it stayed in its initial orbit. 

It was carried aloft on the space 
shuttle Discovery on Jan. 24. It 
had, after Iflimrilmo a marimnm 

altitude or 21,543iniles (34,670 ki- 
lometers). Its low point (hen was 
212 miles. This elliptical path was 
inclined 28.4 degrees to the equa- 
tor. 

At the time of the handling, foe 
Pentagon refused to comment on 
any aspect of foe mission, other 
than to verify that a booster rocket 
bad functioned without problem. 

Most of the information in the 
media reports was available from 
open sources such as : — ' 


GREYLANDS COLLEGE 
Bembridge, Isle of Wight, U.K. 


Ert. 1922 rcg. with ihe dept, ot education and science. Residential co- 
educational college leaching G.CJL 'O' level and 'A' levd in all subjects. 


BTEC genetal certificate ana national diploma. Diploma in photography, 
film and video. SA.T.. T.O.E.F.L. Examination centre for seven boards. 
Preparation (or university entrance in U-K- and U.SJL, very small classes, 
expat Wide ™iy of h ports including most team twmk, 

sailing, windsurfing, wa; adding, archery, fencing, track. S mated in 
beautiful grounds on its own beach in a friendly English village. 


The principal and his assistant will hold a seminar for interested parents 
and students at the Geneva Hilton Hold, at 7:30 pjn. on Thursday 2nd 


May. Prospectuses, photographs, a/v, video, questions on tbe college in 
particular and British education in general. 

The principal, Patrick McKieman, and his assistant, Sharon 
Richards, will also be at the Geneva Hilton from the evening 
of 1st May until 4th May to meet prospective parents and 
students and may be contacted there. 


:%a 


gram vetoed last year,” he said. 

“Tbe whole idea of six more 
years of waiting around” for Mr. 
Deukmejian “to retire during foe 
most productive years of my fife is 
not very appealing,” be said. „ 

Mr. Hart said that he and his 
wife. Carry, a pediatrician, and 
their three young daughters were 
ready for a statewide campaign and 
the mixups that are sure to result- 
some. inevitably, from Mr. Hart’s 
name. Staff members recall one 
constituent, thinking be was seeing 
the California senator on televi- 


sion, calling to ask “whyGary kept 
calling his wife Lee.” That is the 



Gary Warren Hart 


bills on education, environment 
and drunk driving through the leg- 
islature. 

By ho*ri»tig his constituents’ en- 
vironmental concerns and standing 
up to the powerful California 
Teachers Association, be has kept 
liberals and conservatives happy. 
His conservative district, which un- 
til recently included President 
Ronald Reagan’s ranch, has a scant 
47-10-41 percent Democratic regis- 
tration advantage. Although he is a 
liberal with dose ties to foe west 
Los Angeles organization of Henry 


A. Waxman and Howard L. Ber- 
man. Democratic representatives 
to foe U.S. House, Mr. Hart holds 
his own. 

He has two formidable potential 
opponents for the Democratic 
nomination, foe mayor of Los An- 
geles, Tom Bradley, and a slate 
senator, John Garamendl Both of 
them have run statewide cam- 
paigns. But, Mr. Hart said, the frus- 
trations of foe Deukmejian admin- 
istration justify foe risk, if he can 
find the money. 

“I bad my whole legislative pro- 


name of foe Colorado senator’s 
wife. 

Both Gary Hans were baptized 
politically in the anti-war move- 
ment and since have been friends 
and occasional allies. They first 
met when foe Colorado Han came 
through California as chairman of 
George McGovern's presidential 
campaign. 

In July 1972, with Gary W. Han 
in town trying to get voles for Mr. 
McGovern and Gary K. Hart run- 
ning for foe state assembly, the 
Santa Barbara News Press pub- 
lished side-by-side photos, of foe 
two. Both wore white shirts and 
wide striped ties, held telephones to 
their -left ears and balanced notes 


on their laps while their right 
hands, holding pens, rested on 


hands, holding pens, rested on 
stacks of maiL The only noticeable 
difference was Gary W. Han’s 
much longer hair, “and that might 
lose me votes,” foe newspaper 
quoted Gary K. Hart saying. 


Britain Prepares System 
Of Censorship for War 


By Karen DeYoung 

Washington Past Servtce 

LONDON — The Defense Min- 
istry has approved the outlines of a 
new system of media control de- 
signed to “protect military infor- 
mation” during times of conflict 
while avoiding foe kind of censor- 


ship charges that arose during the 
1982 F alklan d* War with Argenti- 


In a minis try white paper issued 
late Wednesday, foe government 
rejected as not “practicable today” 
foe recommenda tions of a minis- 
try-sponsored study group. The 


group urged that it establish a 
World War Il-tvpe press Censor- 


World War Il-type press censor- 
ship mechanism that would go into 
effect during a major conventional 
war. 

But in proposals that go far be- 
yond those adopted in the same 
area last year by tbe Pentagon, the 
ministry accepted a recommended 
bargain with the media — to apply 
to both limited and general war — 
under which war-front correspon- 
dents would agree in writing, in 
advance, not to report anything foe 
nutitary did not want than to. 


In exchange, the journalists 
would be made, in effect, part of 


the military unit or operation they 
were covering. They would be pro- 
vided with uniforms, transporta- 
tion with foe troops, informational 
briefings and assistance in trans- 
mitting their dispatches from foe 
front. 


At home, a government advisory 
group would counsel editors ana 
journalists on coverage. 

The assumption, a defense offi- 
cial said Thursday, is that “foe Brit- 
ish media would be fundamentally 
on foe side of foe government and 
the side of foe services. The media 
would reflea that approach and be 
prepared to be advised on what 
they should or shouldn’t say.” 

In the event that foe media de- 
ride not to heed the advice, foe 
official said, foe “guidance" system 
would be “underpinned by foe gov- 
ernment being able to call up statu- 
tory [remedies] if necessary.” . 

Those regulations, and foe way 
in which foe British government 
managed press coverage of the 
FaDdands crisis, have bren foe ob 1 
ject of some envy within foe Rea- 
gan administration, which had 
problems with the media over its 
restrictions of press access during 
its 1983 invasion of Grenada. 

But media outrage, congressi^ 
nal pressure and First Amendment 
tradition have made it difficult for 
the U.S. administration to effect 
any widespread institutional 
c hang e s in foe way the U.S. press 
does business or sees its mission. ; 

British tradition is quite differ- 
ent and press reaction to foe white 
paper’s proposals, which the gov- 
ernment said will be discussed with 
the media before bring carried out! 
was subdued. 


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t e n nis court, b e s ted swimming-pool. 

□ Comprehensive nadwnic program in small d n . Official certificates and 

diplomas. _ 

□ IntenaiTg Cady of French md English. Language lab orator y. 

□ Full Amman Hkh School Program, Grades 8-12. CEEB (SAT, PSAT, ACH). 
TOEFL Advanced Placement. College guidance. F.xrrflmit uui venity accep- 
tances. 

□ Secretarial and commercial courses in French or English- Word processing and 
co m puter science. 

□ Dreerrilkd activities: art, music, haflet. cookery, sports. Educational Trip*. Winter 
vacations in Cnns, Swim Alps. Summer course. 




I . AM I RK AN CO I 

sw h/i;rl\m) 


, v O Accredited by meMkXM Stales Asaocis- 

^ A,- ' • . '■) 4 Bon of Cottogsa and Schools 

P*tT • BA, as. AA. Degrees In: 
xJumJ J' r 7 mtemaltoiwl Business MraMstratfon. 

Hi I HTVp -arttsSfl&lg Economic*, knamatlora/ PoWtcmJ Studies. 

tTH W. HiH' iu aa> Modem European Languages, and 

IrSomBOOtwl Studies 

,i • ii acre campuswttfi hill resWwrtWtadmies 

• Summer Session begins May 17. 086- 

Contacl: American Co I lege of Switzerland, Admissions Office, 
CM-1BS4 Leysln H. Tel. (025) 34 22 26. Telex: 45a 227 AM CO 


Summer School end Language courses with a new 

flair. 

At the American School in Switzerland or in Greet Britain. 


INSTTrUT MONTANA ZUGERBERG 

International boys' boar d ing school with rigorew.IJA enflege 
pr epuud ory prOQrum for Anwconi Grades >12 (Separate j 
sections for French, German and hafiotvapeating student^. 

Thorough practice of modem language*. Highly qoafified Amencrai A — L* 
faculty. AffiEate member Notionol Associate*! of Independent r >^ *-r 
Schoob. College Boards. kfeafiy locoted at 3,000 feel above sea T, 
level, in central Swrtzeriond. 45 nanutes from Zirieh and Lucerne. AU ^ 

sports, excellent ski ftwWes. Travel Workshop (hiring spring 
vocation. Language Pro^orn in Jtdy and Augwt. 

Writes Dean of the American School, institut Montana 
6316 Zogerberg, Switzerland 



Franklin College 
vie T eee e r m ie to 
€000 Lugeso 
Switzerland 

Telephone. 091 -2285 85 


M 


FHANKUN COLLEGE SWITZERLAND JDi. 

Education for International Competence W^ICwa 

Accredited by Middle States Association ww 


Franklin College 
BBS United Nabons "Plaza 
New York. New York 10017 
Telephone. 212-02-7775 



COMMUNITY SCHOOLS 
OF ATHENS 

The OldestepfLOitiy Accredned 
America(i, School fo-AJhens 


Tradmd* arid<5artlfled EaciStjr 


Over 52 NattonaRias pwrenfly Enrqtied Pre-kbxtergarten 
through T2& Grade 


Acattentfc and University Testing Program 


Advanced Pteetehiwt McM* 1 Baecateureate Diploma 


K-12 Cbrapofer; Uteracy Program • 


a-Fdtaj^iangBage Course 


Broad Catturei Exposure In Greece md Abroad 






For Information & Brochure write to: 
Office of Admissions 
129 Aghtas Paraskavis 
152 34 Halandri, Athens, Greecs 
Tel : (01) 659-3200 Tbc 223355 ACS GR 



Goethe-lnstitut 


tosp&ucgerman? Goethe-ln 

.. .SPEAK TO US FIRST 

More than 3 million students in 33 yeon 
146 institutes in 66 countries 

•, g. COLOMBO. Tel. MM2 £ 

DAMASCUS, TeL 333797 
CASABLANCA. TeL 276032 

15 insfihites in fhe Federal Republic of Germony & 

For tiemOed W tamw H o m j.'y 

GOETHE-WSTITUT <*£/ / 

ZerriMhMfwtdlana / 

Lmtbochptotx 3 / 

D-8000 Munchen 2 S y / 

TeL (O] 89-5999-200 / /* / 

Trie* 522940 / ■ ' v' 




r/y. 

y- y / 
/ / / 

y// 


KUNStSCHUlE 

ASTERD4MM 

HAMBURG 



IntBnwtiond School 
ofEraplHC-Ossp 
Direction: GsnlFSBtae 
f wtiha ml s tnssal7 
D -2000 Handmni 1 

Germany ANast 


COMPUTECAMP 

INTERNATIONAL 

International Specialists in Technology Training 
Intensive 3 week session for boys 14 to 17 
First Session July 15-Aug. 2 Second Session Aug. 3-Aug. 24 

Combining personal computer skills, word processing 
and programming with outdoor sports and activities 

For information ComputeCamp International 
& Applications % Institut Montana 

contact: Zugerberg, Zug, Switzerland 

phone: 41-42-21-17-22 

Applications Due by May 1. 198) 




Institut Le Rosey 

1180 RoUe (on lake Geneva) 
Switzerland TeL: 021 75 15 37 
SUMMER CAMP in Switzexiaixf* 

For Boys and girk 9 • 16 yre. from 7th July to 10th August. 


Beautiful mediaeval chateau, parkland, lakeside facilities. 
French, English, Computer courses 
IS Sports to choose from. 

Leisure and excursion programs. 

Optional Computer Camp of Tour of France. 

FordeaiLt write to the aho/e address - or tel.: 021 75 15 37. 


JOHN CABOT 
INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE| 
Rome, Italy 


BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(BJA DEGREE) 

LIBERAL ARTS (AA DEGREE) 

AfflUATOftb Hkom College, Ohro USA Founded 1850 

ACCREDITATION: AH courses fully tr an sferable to Hiram College, an 
accredited college in U5 A 

MEMBER: American Assembly Collegiate Schools of Business, 

Association bier national Colleges and Universities, 
European Council of International Schools, Near East 
South Asia Council Overseas School. 

On campus computers. 

VIA MASSAUA 7, ROME. TEL: 8395519. 

Aathmrixmd ttf£an AUnatry Education, deawm My 22, 1976, No. 31-32. 


THE INTERNATIONAL 
SCHOOL OF MILAN 

For day students aged 3-18 

The school offers a British-based, English medium cvmcuhmi 
and extro-currkxrlar programme. It is a recognized G.CE and 
CE.EJL testing center, and offers its own transportation and 
lunch services. The current enrollment is 600 with 37 national- 
ities represented. Boarding facilities are not avaBable. 

For further details please apply tor The Headmaster, 

Via Bezzola 6, MBano 20153 - TeL: 45.24.749 



Porentc, our 1(0* 

advisory service 
tierps you to choose :h* 

RIGHT SCHOOL 

in the 

RIGHT PLACE 



• mar* Ion SO urlval* Khooti and «tW« 

• Macning: «ral rtoutvtt toe O ourtty and OraraCy 

• Sunxnar arc Wimef toons 

LAKE OF GENEVA REGION 

Carton at Vaod - SWITZERLAND 

• fa reuraBte amrarmano tor ltodyng 

■ tab ot a vaat network of Wt raa boo a l bias of comwncaton 

• baauttiA tanaacaoa - hea*fry cfcnato 

PfnvWTE SCHOOL AOVISOItY BUREAU 

W. Atra tfe U Gara - CH-1002 Lauaama 

TH 021/22 77 TV Te*er 24 390 

Under i he patronatt of tlw Association of nrtvau soioots 

IAVD6P1 and m* Tourtai Olica at Lake el Osn«*a Ravon (OTVJ. 


Indapondant Day School 

Grades Nursery-12 
. Large Campus and 
Extensive Sports focSities 

Advanced Placement and IB available. 
Accredited by NAIS, EOS, 

' Middle States As so ciation. 

For catalog pleas* contacts 
A me ric a n School of MSat — Admissions 
VHIaggio Mfaasole, 20090 Nover asco efi Opoets, 
Milan, ITALY. - TeL: (02) 524-1544. 


CENTER FOR UNIVERSITY STUDIES 

\.,.J AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF ROME 

yy LICENSED DEGREES 

AA. in Humanities, Social Sciences 
AA.S. in International Business 
B.B.A. in International Business 
<three years in Rome, one year London or U.S.) 

High school graduates: inquire Into our joint enrollment 
with American University (Washington D.C.) 

For tietailed information write: Via Marche 54 
00187 Rome, Italy - Phone 493.528 - Telex 612510 


INSTITUT MONTE ROSA 

• British and American university preparation 

• Intensive French courses 


• Excellent (acuities and staffing 

• Labs/Computer/I .anguages (including EFL) 

• Sports/ Cultural excursions 

Summer Courses in Montreux and Gstaad 

during June, July, August 

Write to: 

MONTE ROSA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 

CH-1820 Montreux. Switzerland 
TeL: 021-63 53 41 - Telex: 453 267 ROSA CH 



Notre Dame International School - Rome 

Americmn eoBep prepmuny «nd demeatary school forboyi. 


grades 5-E. 34ih swcewfnJ year, 99% of graduates accepted at 
major American colleges. Advanced Placement jmpant and 
prepamboa available to qnaSfied ofca u . Vnaty and inna- 
rn nrml athletic programs. Classroom field trip art and hinar* 
chw e i . Bendent gtridanee counselor. Accredited by Middfe 
Stain Aacodalioa 

34tb year or terriee vt intern a tio n al education. 

Dep*. EL 796 Va Aurelia. 00165 Home. Italy. 

Phone* of 1 .60.5 L 62L60.7L 



THE AMERICAN OVERSEAS SCHOOL OF ROklE IS A CO 
EDUCATIONAL NON-DEN0M1NAT1OKAL SCHOOL USING 
AMERICAN CURRICULUM AND TEACHING METHODS AND 
B ACCREDITED BY THE MIDDLE STATES ASSOCIA- 
TION OF COLL E GES AND SCHOOLS. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

U5. Coll eg e Preparatory Curriculum - 
Advanced Placement Comae* 

MIDDLE SCHOOL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Plug, in for Ages 11.13 ftngrui for Age* 5-10 


(Grades 64) 


(Credea K-5) 


ACTIVITIES INCLUDE- Ea«hsti Lecture Seno. 
Stalunpore FesnvaL Iruerwliolasllc Alhfelicft. Inlnmiural 
Sportv Dianu Varied Extracurricular rnpm Field Tnp, 
and Euvraicin% Spring Fair. 

FOR INFORMATION TELEPHONE 38SASA1 


311 VIA CASSlh 00189 ROME. ITALY 



SwitzeriSHd • Four weeks of intensive 
tuition in French, German, Italian or En- 
glish. For students aged 12 to 18. July or 

August. 

• Chdtsau dea Enfant* for children aged 6 
to 12. International summer camp with 
four weeks of tuition in French or English. 
July or August. 

Free color brochure mIMIt from: 
TASK. Vocation Language Courses, 

Ext. 17 S 

CH-6926 Montagnote-Lugsoo, v| 

Switzerland M 

1M. (091) B4 6471. Tlx. 7S3T7 M 


Great Britain • Swrask Summer 
School for 12-18 year olds. English Utara- 
turo. Theater in London, Shakes pears and 
British History. Reading and Study Sld»*. 
Computer Science, ana intensive English- 
es-a-Second Language. 

Many extracurricular activities in Switzer- 
land end England, including sports, music, 
theatre, art excursions. 

t TASIS England. Ext. 17, 
Coldharbour Lane. 

Thorpe. Surrey, 

England TW 20 8TE. 

TeL (09328] 05252, Tin. 929172 


HOTEL & TRAVEL AGENCY CAREERS 


HOSTA Hotel & Tourism School, Leyrin, FrendvSwHzeriand 
Founded 1959 

OSTR Courses: Instruction in English; 

2Vfr-yw ce mp lefe Dtplaiw pr o g ra n. 

— Hotel Adniinistratiwi ond advanced Monogement {nduefing training period) 


I DipIcfTVG Coun# in 

— HoW AcMnafraEoa (Reception endTST ft) (abo In German) 

— Advanced Ho tel M o no g e m ent 

9 -month Tourism Diploma Course-. 

— Official IATA/UFTAA Travel Agent’s Program: 

Full sports faculties, especially ski and tennis. 

Next courses start: August 25, 1985, Write tor fuff info r mat i on for 
HOSTA, CH 1 854 H LEY5IN. Tel: 025/34.18.14. Telex- 454.1 52 OTTO CH 


01)6464 71. Tbc. 79 317 TOCT fr TeL (093281 66252, Tbc 929172 

The American School in Switzerland 


THE AMERICAN 
SCHOOL 
OF aORENCE 
• 

Nursery through grade 12, 
college preparatory, 
international baccalaureate, 
American High School 
diploma, 

accredited 33 year. 

• 

Via del Carota, 16, 
50012 Bagno a Ripofi, 
Rrenze, Italy. 

TeL: 055/640.033. 


EARN AN AMERICAN 
MANAGEMENT DEGREE IN BRUSSELS 


MASTER OF SCIENCE 
IN MANAGEMENT 

The Advantage 

lramg^g CTpoiQQCC 

• StudeBshanoBaT coumricsandcalinies 


• Loam) e Biusck, “tit eap^offaropc 7 ' 

Practical Hotk-sndy jfpoadr 

• Evonngda^ mk^<2OTwkhiD-aicffaidom 

• Thra ttnns [x^iumng Jznnzy, Mzj 1 aid Scptoriw 


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

* FuB-time stodeas may firtpii in I? mmth^ 
pat-rime 7A nwmhs 

* Traaia mtrmiJrip fcr fufl-rime snxlaiK 
Kawledgc and dials ne immediatdy appfoWcTOtbejob. 


17A Awme de bTobcra «T0r,Be 69 1060 Brass^Bdeium 
Td(02)5U 1806 



Q3J ST GEORGE'S SCHOOL 

jJMr, SUMMER CAMP 

boys and girls aged 11-16 
1815 Qarcns/Moncrcux (Switzerland) 
Recognised for its high academic standards during the school 
facilities In JULY 8t AUGUST for intensive French and English 
couzscs with sports and excursions. Heated swimming pool, five 
tennis courts. Luge grounds overlooking Talw Geneva. 

TeL 021/64 34 11 Telex 453131 geot. 


Your kav to a career in Imomauonal Business and information Sysams: 

European University 

Antwerp- Brussels and Switzer land 
Member ot tha Amancan Assembly of Collegiate Schools ot Business. 

□ Undarpradoata progra ms (full-time) in Business. Marketing 
Management, finance. Economics. Information Systems. Accounting. 
Hie University's placement service channels graduates into internship*, 
managerial positions, or graduate management programs around the 
world. 

□ Graduate programs (part or (id-time): Master's of Business 
Administration, International Management or Information Systems. As 
above, the placement service Facilitates employment, but also, uniquely 
offers graduates the opportunity tar obtaining a second master's degree 
at a top US. university m as btde OS 6 months. 

Courses ere taugh t In English. French and Dutch: students choose the 
language ot instruction. 


T> 7T 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY BRUSSELS 

Hwmnlapflf BoutalhzitcayindlftyUa n t ni e k &iHd 


THEE-EX. SCHOOL ANTWERP AND BRUSSELS- 

Tte Independent international school that responds to tee comr^rriw^ 
needs, and ceras about each child's needs. Ouribitish SndA^Smff 

O KindeigarMn (from age 2 'A □ Primary School □ American s«on 
danr School □ British g.CE. curriculum ^ - 

Our highly effiewnt use of funds keeps your tuition h nn , ^ 

level: from BF 6SH00 to BF nuanMa 


THE E.E.C. SCHOOL 


Jacob Jordeenratran 75-79 - 201 8 Amwerp/Brtgium 
Rue Boyale 302 - 1030 BruaseWBaighim 

i JSSlV’fESS • nd 'VBWtration caU 
Mr. J. Wells. Headmaster at 03/237 J7 t ft 
03/218.81^2 

Registration daily all summer. 



r A 


The Admosunm Officer ' Cvnpus toceuons: 

EUROPEAN UNrvZJCHnr Jacob Jordrananer 7S-7B 

Acnar tteta 131-133 2018 Araworp / Balgun 

2000 Antaerp / Belpun 

Tel: 03/238.1 082 "uo 303 

03/21881.82 T030 Bnmrta / B^gaan 

Man SunreWd coma to ba amouncad 



WAVOX MOWN INSTITUT! OF LANGUAGES 

P.O. Box 138, 1000 Lausanne 9, Switzerland. 
Tel.: (021) 37 68 15. 


■ : m : w< j 4 ;T7TT7lTrrTrr 


httonsive comes for oduHf, 4 to 1 1 weeks. 

SmaB groups. Private trash-courses. 

Objective; Fluent oral and written communication. 


PARENTS! 

Are YOU looking for fhe right 
school for YOUR child? 

fa fare informa ti on, please contact: 

FEDERATION SUISSE 
DES ECOLES PRIVEES 

40 Rue d« VoBonde*, 

1207 Geneva. 
_Tefephcro; rmriSKriV, 


John f. Kennedy 

International School 

Soanen-Gstaod 

A uniM Msmaiiond school tar duL 

?*" P -1 ?- VT*- Soortd P»*Pwutfan 
for EngMn-longuoge aecondery 
iriioob. Small dauu, fom3y atmo- 
•pbere, superb alpine location. 
French, Aung, sports, excursions. 
Sutnawir camp July-August 
W riter W Btam Laved, Dirader 

OM792 Socmen, Swftz a riond. 

... TaLi (030)4 1372. 


ST. JOHN’S INTERNATIOIUL SCHOOL 


I International Ecumenical, coed, day and resident 

aritooi nurocry through 12th grade; American 
" ■ Academic Promm iocTodin^ Advanced Placement 

courees together with G.CE. 0 level and International Baccalaureate. 
French second language- extensive European student travel, strong 
athletic and exoraennicalar programs. Bn» service covering general 
Brussels area. 

FULLY ACCREDITED BY THE MIDDLE STATES ASSOCIATION 
OF COLLEGES AMD SECONDARY SCHOOLS 


fw ffm^wglmdBUea for B3gk m 

ST. JOHN'S INTERPCATIONAL SCHOOL 
preva Rlehdle 146 , 1410 Waterloo, Belgium. 


I TO LEARN FRENCH 

I C^an. a chateau mlhe Belgian AnJennt«t who™ _• 
in French. Small groups 

I We, each pnva.&e. 

I For corapiete documentation, send ihis 

I am ,n. e rsst«lin courses lor: □ Adults^ 

1 D Priva te □ Business 


COMPANY 

















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRa 27-28* 1985 


SPECIAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


Experimental dTEtode 
aikChaMta 



FMN^AISE 


UHPBWBAPWiTf CCHJRSES 
French boceofouraot level ncfulnd* 


• F re nch longuagi and CMfeatimi 
Course*. limited number of 
inscriptions. 

foreign Teacher* £ Stedeetfs. j Winter ond Spring Smea ri er * . 
Ooufiei far Tietfatn^cf French 1 % Summer Coemi July, August, 


Languoge and OvBSxotion. 
Sptdofaad tro Wn q courses In di 


• fctieitie S ess i o ns , Jonuary 


Apply to: COUB5 BE CIVILISATION FRANQAJSE, 
47 So« <W fcocim, Psri*-S c . T*L: 329-12-13. 



by mmeder or year mduded in dm “Section UmvenMaire and Magisttre." 


2nd port of the "rtptftme ivpineur - . 

Students enrcledin thine p wp ao i ory comet receive both em 
and dplome from the Serbonne 
and the French Chamber of Commer c e and Industry. 


0 DEGREES 

ies. Social Sciences 
national Business 
‘‘national Business 
one year London or 

iquire into our joint enroKua 
rersity (Washington D.C.) 

tion write: Via Marched 
lone 493.528 - Telex 612511 


HARTFORD 

BUSMESS SCHOOL 


ie. 


**★* 

THE AMERICAN MBA IN PARIS 

DIPLOMA: "Master's degree of Business Administration" 
(M.B.A.) delivered by University of Hartford 
(Connecticut} U.5.A. 

Full time intensive program given by the profes- 
sors of Hartford University; 

In Paris 2 from September 16, 1985 to May 
31, 1986. 

In UJUL: from June 2 to August 7, 1986. 
ADMISSION: University or "Grande Ecole" Degree. 

A complete documentation will be sent to you upon request. 


Sponsored by 


21 Rue Van Loo r 
75016 PARIS. 
Tel.: 288.97.79. 


ALLIANCE FRAN^AISE — 

totento fa nel echos! pushing f mmb la wg u ogo ami d vi h m fa n te n s 
(Prirarto school for higher education] 

101. Bbd RmpaS, 75270 Pori* Codex Ob FMNOE. 

TeL 54438JS. Tele* 204941 . CM* obm. AilFRAN PAIS 
Sdwd open dl yw round except Xw end Barter 
A. Study of the French language 

4 week lemon (wap AH txriOeramber). 12 lemon* per yoor.OrwMMn leer prior 
*> 6 ra ragtoroiem. bnontivs or inNmim courts*. 

1 - nw ian tey, Inform orfcite aid ud v u i iced lewh 


- Prapcnodon for the alemarttary ctrtifiaris of pnxhed Frireh. (and of jerond 
graja} 

- fVsparuson far tfn French Language Diploma (and of 3rd grotty, 

2-Nghor level 

Prepcrorion for highar dqJoroa of French madam nudes. 

2 Haws Satmmbar/ January and Fabruo^/Jvna 
I Summer tenon, July end August 
B* SpteCkJ Court Oi. (WiamiMlOn ovatoble Upon requl) 

• PnpcaeKon for Diploma in Kotor French Ada* 

. Profidoncy CsrffoXs for teaching French abroad. 

- Btaimn Franch pmporaiion for Cmtifirote end Hgh Diploma iaued by Iha Pan* 
Chamber of Coxmras and be Cartfiada iooad by ihe AKance firuncoiie. 

- Written Franch 

- Conversation doom 

- Correspondence axjrsec 

- tatogogkd counts for leaders of French. 

C. C omp l e w w r to Iqnguoge cou r see. 

- Longings laboitdary [la grade iavaQ 


• Unguoga M«fadhaqM P aid 3 favd4 hdipedml wvlc 
- Laboratory of phonstic corrwsion. 

free dbaimtea o t fa n owffabfr opon request. 



^ A WEBSTER UNIVERSITY 

W. 7 IN EUROPE 


Accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. 
Evening and Daytime Classes. 

MA Degrees in Management. Marketing. International Relations. 

Human Resources Development, Economics and 
Finance, Computer Data Management. Energy 
Economics, and Business Administration. 

BA Degrees in International Studies. Management, and Com- 
puter Studies. 


Next 8-week term starts May 27, 1985 


NETHERLANDS 


Boommarkt 1 
2311 EA Leiden 

Tel. (071) 144341 


SWITZERLAND 


15, ronte de CoIIex 
1293 Bellevue, Geneva 

Tel. (022) 742452 


AUSTRIA 


Scbubertring 14 
1010 Vienna 

Tel. (0222) 521136 


rRAiKIHS KHA 


Hate! Career? 


HOTEL OPERATIONS 
FRENCH LANGUAGE 

M oor Hofct Management 
Tnuntag Centre. 

CHATEAU FOLKTALES. 

STRASBOURG. France. 

The one year cant also Indndcs 
burod action u HotH Opcratiaas. 
Hotel A man ting. Typing. From 
desk travel and Tourism Services 
and prepares yon tor fasmediair 
employment m the bold Industry 
or further study in Hotel 
Management to degree 
level Tuition in English. 
HOmiNCtA I Orff. HMJr 


Schiller Internutionu) I niversilt 


' Mil . 


INSmur DE FRANCA 15 - D.27. 

.23 Am. Gftn.-Lederc, 0*230 VMofctmeha/Mor. TeL: [93) 01-83-44. 



The TASIS Schools 


ENGLISH 

IN LONDON 


B tgw un to Advanced 
Short and long conn 
A nxw » i w dowon arranged 

Sets 

School of English 

Recognized by 
The firms?) Covnc* 

64-65 long Aon 
Covenl Garden 
London WC2E 9JH 
Telephone! 01-240 2SS1 
Telex, 2*8312 Wmcom SeUcot 


6 to 9 Student* par Clots 
INDIVIDUAL TUITION 




7 v I . I J ; i 4 . . H , 


in CHAMPAGNE, near Pans 
with the ROTHMANS INSTITUTE 

An intensive French course for executives and students, 

English, German, Spanish, Italian, 

The method used is sponsored by the French Ministry of Industry and 
Research (A.N.VAH), 

Recreational activities (soiling, tennis, hone-riefing, etc.), 

1,500 executives and students have leaned a language in our Institute. 

ROTHMANS INSTITUTE 

8 Avenue de* Lombard*, 10000 TROYS (France) 
==T«1.: (25) 82.37.66 8 82.48.45 ======= 


SWITZERLAND 

The Oldest movement American 
baarduig school ei Europe. founded 
rr> 1955. American College Prep. 
General Studies and inn Section 
(ESLV Coed, boarding and day, 
grades 7-13 Activities, * sports. 
St Monu sw term, and extensive 
travel throughout Europe. 


ENGLAND 

35-acre country campus only 18 
miles horn central London and 
6 mrtea tram Heathrow airport 
Ftounded in 1976, oftenng American 
Cotage Prep currlculun am ESL 
Coed, grades K-12day , grades 7-12 
boarding. Complete sports, activi- 
ties, am travel program 


CYPRUS 

The newest TASIS campus, situated 
m the hill district of Nicosia. Cyprus, 
often dose proximity to Uie Middle 
EasL American Co Bege Preparatory 
am General Studies curricula 
Coed, grades 7-12 day: grades 
9-12 boarding. Diverse spans, ac- 
tivities, and travel 


Study 


TT» American 3cfw>rt fa Switzerl a nd. Ext. 31. CH-dPtfltont»Bnola. S w t traf te nd.T»l:LnB»no (0*1) 34 84 71 Tlx: 7*31 7 
TASS England. Ext. 42, Cefaharbour Lnnn.Tborpn, Surra,. EoglnadTW20 BTE.1M:ClMrtMy (0*3281 BS 252 Tlx: *2*1 72 
TASS Cyprun. Ext. S3. 11 Kaxaoa Sues. P. O- Box 232*. Mco«te.Cvpioa.Tal:»ce»te 10211 «3W4Tlx;4B0t 






American Fducalion in Europe with an International Dimension 


' \ k 1 lil T J ’ • i' . * i I ® 1 . ’ * I / 


H'KUOL Or BuML 14 1 CO 
AM i r. anas VI SlMOOl isro 
s tie VETHOMva 

111 UISCU STITES 14KCU 
MI MM'WLS 

,11 SCHOOL 
repnn:i>r« CurrUuKiin 
finurma:: C.->ur»a 

FUAtEMUO StMOOl 
H Pis^rxc: tor Kftl 4W 
•OraJw K 51 

, ...- L . • V- 

n..., . . l-SUa.-l' 


ow Tt'.EFWeni JK.aS« 


JA, WJ1»? W3M€. ITAIV 


■pr-' i ►, a i ra i j 1 1 v 


in calm and kfyi6c surroundings near Monte Carla 
iUL/v Cepd'M a hoollti retort, affars a wide range of herab and pmem. 

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Rbrory oc« avaloblo lo itvdenB aipervoad by o profeuor 

line* 1952 Btedwre with onroftneot Feet, done or wNh board and lodging- 

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06320 Cap if All (Franca). TU (93)78^1 M. Tbu CBHB) 461792. 
or 3 -wt nk counes in Ambdie (Vd-de-loireL with Famfy oeaxmaddion, ikxtng May 20. 
June 10. July I, 22. August 12, September 2, 21 Brodxira with enrobnenf form. 

CENTRE DE FORMATION ET D’ItUDES FRANCAISES PRATIQUES 
wmm 8 Moca Maori -Batyaoei, 7S008 Pari*. TiLi B2X04vl 1 — 


IF FRENCH IS ESSENTIAL TO YOU 

Enrol at i. F. G. LANGUE5 for a tailor-mode course. 

. .. Phone to make an appointment for a check up 
on your language needs. 

I. F. G. LANGUES 

37 OiKri de GreneOe, 75015 Pam. Tal.- 578.61.52 (Ext. 55T) 


3EE 


The American School 
In London 


^c'Ata- 

Jr 

+. 

94 * 


A non-profh edacatkmal tnist administered by a Board of Trustees. 

Accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. 

The American School in London is the oldest American school in the United Kingdom. Founded in 
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The School is located in Si. John's Wood. The purpose-built campus is divided into 3 units: Lower, 
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The ASL High School is college preparatory. Graduates gain admission to top ranking colleges and 
universities in North America. 

2-8 Loudoun Road London NWS 0NP England 
Telephone: 01-722 0101 Cables: Amschool London NWS 0NP 


Programmes in 
OXFORD 

Summer Vacation 1985 
and one-year courses. 
Prospectus: 

Brown & Brown Tutorial College 
26 Warn borough RtL, Oxford, 
UK. Telex S3 147 BBT0 ORG 


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A private, nonprofit coed school 
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□ English curriculum leading to 
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□ Boarding possibiTrfies with 
selected IwmCes. 


ANGLO-AMERICAN SCHOOL, 
MOUGINS, 

B P. 01, .06250 MOUGINS, FRANCE. 
Tei.': (93)90.15.47 o- (93, 75 52 7 = 


STUDY 
PROGRAMS 
IN PARIS 

UMVeRSITT UVELS 

GRAPUA1E A UNDERGRADUATE 


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15 OCTOBER to 20 MAY 


3 FEBRUARY to 20 MAY 


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JULY - SEPTEMBER 

HNEAK35-FASMGN 

LANGUAGE-ART 




Wrde or telephone: 


9, im dm l) nriMi.7 H01 tab. tanai 
TaLt »SJ9 j 09 or 33SJW.91 


ECOLE NICKERSON 

Longues Vivante* 

Since 1962 

French 

Cammm, Indian, EngtUk, Arabic, 
Spanish, Portuguese, Russian 
Inteanve, extensive courses 
Croups or privitc leaeona. | 

Adults J 

, ECOLE NICKERSON j 
L 3 Ave. du President Wilson / 
I 75116 PARIS / 
\ 5th floor a 

\ TeL: (1) 723.36.03 / 


COURSES 

FOR 

EXECUTIVES 

Full or part-time tuition, 
individual courses 
or small groups, 
in NICE or PARIS 

INTERLANGUES 

176, av. Ch. de Gaulle, 
92200 NEUILLY 
Tel.: 747.12.80 



CEVENOL 

Altitude 3,200 ft. 60 miles from Lyon 
Opon Summer and Water 


1 7.Vi: ■ 


IN A FRENCH SCHOOL 

Summer 1985: TWO sammer school t a n faw for oges 10-18 

[Students raoy eneoti for either or both sessions) 

JULY 10- AUGUST 1 mid AUGUST 4-24 

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• For French students (8th through Terminate): Review oouraes (French, 
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SCHOOL YEAR 1985/198& 3 Trimexten 

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• French curriculurn dth through Terminote. Foreign welcome. Sperid daues in 

French. U.S. high tchool cradit obtsnable. CaHegs Boards on request 
LEARN &Y IMMERSION: AO courses in French 
Dormitory life wWi French schoolmates ■ 

_ 43400 IE OUfUON-sw-UONON, TeL: (71) »J232 — 


an imastmant, o necessOy, a pleasure. 




9 place de la Modden^ 75006 Pork 
TeL 2&50.41.. and la Defame. 


Next 

SPECIAL 

EDUCATION 


vo iU appear on 

September 7 
and 

December 7 



Computer Studies, Humanities, 
Sciences, Engineering Program, Media 
and Music Studies. 

f After successful 1st year, continue ar 
Ithaca, New YorV, or transfer to other 
American Univaarics. 

For further information please cootaa: 
Dr. Christie King 


35 Hamng con 
London SW7 4JU 
TeL: (01) 370 1166/7 
Ithaca College it accredited by the 
Middle Stases Association of Colleges 
and School*. 



an International network 
London 

George Road, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT2 7 PE, England 
e Boarding and day school for girls 

• Age range 12 - 18 years. Grades 7-12 

• American College Preparatory Curriculum 
e International Baccalaureate Programme 

TeL +44 1 949 0571 

Paris 

72, Boulevard de la Saussaye, 92200 Neulffy, France 

• Day school for girts and boys aged 3 -14 years 

■ Montessori approach in pre-K groups 

e American style curriculum fnK- Grade 8 
e Strong emphasis on the teaching of French language 

TeL +33 1 624 1051 

Rome 

VtecH ViRaLauchli 180,00191 Rome, Italy 
e Day school for girt8(K- Grade 121 and boys (K- Grade 6) 

■ Boanfing for girts aged 14^ -18 yeais, Grades 9-12 
e American College Preparatory Curriculum 

e International Baccalaureate Programme 

Tei. 4-39 6 328 0671 

Each school has Its own prospect us. toe schedule and admission 
procedure. More Information maybe ob falnod by contacting the 
schools directlyorthrough the Provincial Center, SO Wilson Park Drive, 
Terrytown, NY 1059T, USA 


AUSTRIA 

LANGUAGE STUDY IN SALZBURG 
Salzburg International Language Center 

G*^m|H^mAa intern tlkwai Language liutituie 
* located in Europe's most beautiful 

city. Intensive German, English and 
Russian courses held at all leveb. 
Special aommer program* offered 


~ ARCHITECTURAL ASSO CIATION SCHOOL ^ 
OF ARCHITECTURE 
34-36 BEDFORD SQUARE. LONDON WCIB 3ES 
TeL: 01-636 0974 

Founded in 1847, the AA. aiinaied in Central London, is the larged and only 
independent school of architecture in the UK. 

In addition to the 5-year recognized conne leading to the AA Diploma and 
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Personal uuenrfews are preferred, but portfolio* may be assessed in 
absentia. Transcripts are alio required. 

Prospectus and application forms an available from the Admissions Regis- 
trar at the above address. 


= THE BILINGUAL SECTION OF L ERMITAGE - 

Give your chihkwn a BHJNGVAl education vrhSe fn France! 

* Day, and 5 or 7 day Boarding/ Co-ed/ Grades 7-1 Oj 

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* Computer Science/ Engflish-Arnerican-Frandi staff. 

Contact-. Mr. CL Hunter, 44, avenue Egl4, 7BAOO MABONS-LAFFtTTE 
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65 Qum <f Onay, Parti 7Hi — Founded in 1960 

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CMdraa ban 2H fa 7 years ohL 
Preparation fib* 1 Brandi ad Eitfkh *p*nM*«g 
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Summer school. In JtAr- EoT mbnuoNoo, oath 70S .66.5 S 


I 


1 m ■ Special aommer programs offered 

_ _ - r mi far all ■** groups. Course* sugmenud 

i ■ » AUI » ■ by extensive travel program. Full 
I ■■ y AAA TT' boarding facilltte* available on or 
y z, ™ B off campus. For Information write: 

SfWium International Language Centra Moontnfit 106 A 
A -5020 Salzburg, Austria, Europe Tel. 44 4 85 



ST MARY’S GATE 

BOIILVOIOITH 

( Founded 1886) 


InriojK-nJi-m Bujnliii^ and Da\ School for CirL. 
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Full derails from the Hriidmistress. 


AUSTRIA 


SEA PINES ABROAD 

} A-5324 Fcdstenou bei Salzburg 

AUSTRIA 

An American preparatory school situated high in the Alps. 
Grade* 9 thru 12. Coteducationol. Boarding. 

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TEFORCATALOC 


SALZBURG INTERNATIONAL 
PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

A coeducational American boarding school in Europe's most 
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Extensive travel sluing and cultural piagrams. 

For catalog write- SIPS. Moo&Clr. ICifra, A- 5020 Salzburg. AUSTRIA 
TeL (6621 44485 & 465 1 1 





TURN TO 




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P.O. Bax 1 66 TeL- 027 41 42 17 
02741 33 84 

CH 3963 Cranft-Montana 
SWITZERLAND 






































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Monograph Boosts Sale of Cartier 'Mystery docks 




International Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK — A sale of 
“Magnificent Jewels” at 
Christie's on Wednesday has pro- 
vided spectacular evidence of the 
impact that an books are having on 
the an market. 

Although diamonds accounted 
. for an overwhelming percentage in 

SOUREN MeLHOAN 

value of the $7 -million sale, it was 
not confined to jewelry. 

There were also precious objets 
• d'an of the art deco period, among 
the rarest of which were three 
“mystery clocks." produced by the 
Cartier company between the two 
world wars. The idea is that the 
mechanism of the clock should not 
be apparent despite the transparent 
casing. As Hans Nadelhoffer re- 
counts in “Cartier, Jewelers Ex- 
traordinary," published last year 
by Harry Abrams, the idea was Erst 
pursued’ by French clockmakers in 
the early 1 9tb century and refined a 
hundred years later by Maurice 


Couet, who presented the first of 
his models to Cartier as early as 
1913. 

Couet’s invention is based on an 
optical illusion. The hands of the 
dial, made of transparent material 
such as rock crystal seem to float 
in emptiness without any visible 
connection to the movement. They 
are actually “fixed onto a separate 
crystal disk with a toothed metal 
rim. which is driven by worm gears 
disguised in the frame of the case." 
Nadelhoffer wrote. 

Couet devised three series of 
models: a transparent stele encas- 
ing the dial; a kind of portico with 
the dial attached to pillars on either 
side; and an animal resting an a 
pedestal carrying the dock on its 
back. 

The side type was represented in 
Wednesdays sale by a remarkable 
piece drawing its ornamental de- 
vices from the neoclassical reper- 
toire. It dates from 1919. according 
to the chronological chart worked 
out by Nadelhoffer; he spent a year 
researching the archives of Cartier, 


broadcasting to cable companies 

y IN EUROPE &THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

[CHANNEL "Europe's Best View' 

PROGRAM. SATURDAY 27tfi APRIL UK TIMES 


12 00 ICE HOCKEY 

13 05 US SPORTS CAVALCADE 

14 00 (NT MOTOR SPORTS 
15.00 SKY TRAX 1 

15.45 SKY TRAX 2 
ili 30 SKY TRAX 3 


17.30 THRILLSEEKERS 
1B.0Q CHOPPER SQUAD 
IB. 50 ST ARSKY & HUTCH 
19 40 ALL STAR WRESTLING 
20.35 THE GOLDEN DISC 
22.00 SKY TRAX 


which had been gathering dust in 
the basement of the company's 
headquarters at Place Venddme in 
Paris. 

A rock-crystal case standing on a 
white agate base appears to be en- 
tirely transparent except for the 
white enamel frame in front and 
the white enamel chapter ring off 
the dial which are set in with gold 
motifs and Roman numerals. Rose- 
cut diamond borders run along the 
frame. In the center of the dial two 
hands made of rose-cut diamonds 
mounted on invisible metallic rods 
seem to float in space. 

Cartier was so eager to keep the 
manufacturing process a secret that 
the mystery docks were shown 
only to hand-picked clients. Three 
specimens were displayed in 1922 
in Biarritz, where the queen of 
Spain saw them. These were even- 
tually sold in New York and not a 
single piece was sent to the Exposi- 
tion des Arts D£coratifs in 1923 in 
Paris. So secretive was Cartier that, 
when selling in the United States, it 
disguised its name as “European 
Watch and Clock Co.." Nadd- 
hoffer's book reveals. 

On Wednesday, the stele mys- 
tery dock carrying such an inscrip- 
tion under the movement soared to 
$36,000. well above the previous 
highest price paid for that model 
48,000 Swiss francs, offered in Ge- 
neva in November 1979 (S29.2S0 at 
1979 exchange rates). 

The sale of the stele dock paved 
the way for a mystery dock with an 
octagonal dial resting on a stand, a 
variation on a 1920 Cartier model 
Framed by a chapter ring of black 
enamel and gold with applied rose- 


mystery. The estimate was $30,000 
to $40,000, but the piece zoomed to 
$80,000. 

But that was peanuts compared 
with the third mystery clock, an 
animal sculpture made in Paris in 
1924. An agate chimera perched on 
rose quartz rockery supports the 
hexagonal dial. It is one of only 12 
mystery docks with animal figures 
made by Cartier from 1922 to 1931, 
according to the data culled by Na- 
delhoffer from Cartier's files. 

Here Cartier surpassed itself. 
The overall effect is one of Holly- 
wood bad taste. The 19th-century 
chimera from China is of yellow- 
ish-green agate, topped by an or- 
nate turquoise enamel saddlecloth. 
Pearl pendants dangle on either 
side. The rockery is mauve and the 
pedestal is applied with mother of 


From a technical standpoint, how- 
ever, the dial is astonishing. Four 
plates of rock crystal are sand- 


wiched together, and the inner two 
plates are fixed to each hand and 
rotate by gears concealed in . the 
case. 

Its whereabouts were unknown 
until February this year. During an 
appraisal day organized by Chris- 
tie's in Mianti, Francois Carid. a 
Christie's vice president, received a 
call from a woman who said she 
owned an “old jewel clock” by “a 
European Watch and Clock Co." 
To Curid, with Naddhoffer’s book 
fresh in his mind, the name rang a 
bell He made an appointment at 
once, saw the piece with its mind- 
boggling ornamentation, noted the 
fine leather fitted case typical of 
Cartier in those years, telephoned 
his New York office to get more 
information from Nadelhoffer's 
book and took the dock in for his 
big April auction. He delighted the 
seller with an estimate of $40,000. 
On Wednesday the piece estab- 
lished a record for any Cartier 
clock —$240,000. 


§i?41 



Hot Springs Bathhouses 
Prove Source of Dispuim 



SKY CHANNEL TV ADVERTISING SELLS PRODUCTS FAST - 
FOR MORE INFORMATION. RATES, MARKETING A 
AUDIENCE DATA CONTACT THE SALES DEPARTMENT 
SKY CHANNEL. SATELLITE TELEVISION PLC 
TEL: LONDON (01) 636 4077 TELEX 266943 


cut diamond numerals, the rock- 
crystal dial has two hands suspend- 
ed inside. The hands, which 
together form a curving dragon 
made of s mall diamonds, add to the 


Watercolor to Stay in U.K. 

The Associated Press 

L ONDON — A public appeal for money has helped raise the 
/ $242,000 needed to keep an English wateirrolor from going to the 
United Stales, the British Museum announced Thursday. 

Stanley Moss, the New York City art dealer who bought “A 
Cornfield by Moonlight With the Evening Star” by Samuel Palmer, 
will get his money back and the pain ting will stay in London, the 
museum said. The museum, launched its appeal in February after the 
government's export reviewing committee said it would hold up an 
export license for the painting for five months. 

The 1 9th-century watercolor, which measures just over 7 inches by 
11 inches (18 by 30 centimeters), is in the museum's exhibit of English 
landscape watercolors, which has attracted 100,000 viators in 11 
weeks. There has been a collection box beside it 
Half the appeal cash came from the government’s National Heri- 
tage Memorial Fund and the rest from the public and the museum 
trustees. 


' “Mystery dock,* 1919. 

■ Without the wealth of informa- 
tion in the Cartier monograph, 
such a price would never have-been 
.paid for the clock Christie's most 
optimistic expectation was about 
5100,000, and, indeed, the piece 
might never have reached a New 
York sale room. Until the book 
came out, the name “European 
Watch and Cock Co.” meant noth- 
ing, even to experts. 

■ Shakespeare Folio 

The first published folio of 
Shakespeare's plays, dated 1623, 
was sold Wednesday at Sotheby’s 
for 5638,000 to John Fleming, a 
rare book dealer. United Press In- 
ternational reported from New 
York. 

The folio was one of 181 items 
from the library of the songwriter 
Paul Francis Webster, who died 
last year. He had bought the folio 
in 1965 from Fleming. 

The highest price ever paid fora 
Shakespeare first folio was 
S775.000 at an auction in Paris in 
1980. 


By Philip Shabecoff 

Jtor York Times Service 

H OT SPRINGS. Arkansas — 
The decaying bathhouses of 
this venerable resort, once glitter- 
ing attractions for those seeking, 
relief from-a3menis and gangsters 
seeking a refuge, may soon be re- 
born as an galleries, theaters, res- 
taurants and fitness centers. 

The ornate, labyrinthine bath- 
houses once drew hundreds of 
thousands of people a year to to try 
the supposedly therapeutic waters 
of their many hot springs. With the 
advent of miracle drugs, the popu- 
larity of Bathhouse Row dropped 
dramatically, putting all but two of 
the houses out of business. 

The houses, the centerpiece of 
the Hot Springs National Park, 
were built by private interests on 
parkland. They started closing 
down oik by one in 1962. As they 
were abandoned, ownership revert- 
ed to the National Park Service. 

Die service wants to lease them 
to entrepreneurs for renovation 
and commercial use. But a dispute 
has erupted over who will pay the 
millions of dollars to restore them. 

Clay Farrar Jr, a Hot Springs 
lawyer, beads a committee that is 
seeking to revitalize Bathhouse 
Row. He and his associates con- 
tend that the structures deteriorat- 
ed under the ownership and sole 
control of the park service and that 
the service should bear a large 
share of the cost 
What happens here will be care- 
fully watched as the first major 
effort of the park service, under a 
1980 law, to lease historic struc- 
tures to entrepreneurs. 

The bathhouses present an at- 
tractive facade against the green 


mountainside bdrind Ihern^BoLm- 
side are crumbling plaster, shat- 
tered glass, dangling wires, broken 
pipes, nis^ lockers, huge Mbs 
lying on their sides. • • 1 

Tnereare still vestiges oTgraa- 
deur in the bouses, pajticaiarly &~ 
sick- the Fordyce, the biggest 
them. It is graced with stamed-glf&s 
skylights, etched-glass doors, edi- 
ble benches and fo un t ai ns.- matiefe- 
any dressing cubicles, elaborate me 
floors anid a central atrium .domi- 
nated by ’a life-size scnj*ire% 
Hernando de Soto accepting an In- 
dian maiden’s offering of wats-T' 

Business interests in Hot Springs 
favor commercial use of the bmld- 
ings, contending that the image c/j 
decay created by the bathhouses iir 
a significant factor, in the steep 
ductron in the number of tourisms 
and in the city’s economic decSae. 

Park service officials say thertis 
not enough money in the Rcfflin 
administration budget, now orlat- 
er, to restore the okl bathhouses^ 

Park service officials say entre- 
preneurs who lease the buildings, 
for art galleries, fitness spas or res- 
taurants, will have to pay for the 
refurbishing. 

Hoi Springs's thermal waters, 
long believed by many to ha'F. 
strong therapeutic powers, have Jr 
traded visitors for centuries. Tradi- 
tion has it that the Sp anish explorer 
de Soto, in 1341. was the first Euro- 
pean to taste the waters. 

In 1832, Congress made Hot 
Springs a federal reservation to be 
used as a "pleasuring ground” for 
the people. Thus, in all but name, it 
became the first rational park 40 
years before Congress acted to pro- 
tect Yellowstone, which is general- 
ly regarded as the first. 


SPECIAL EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


U.SJ1. 



ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 

• Intensive Program • Superb living Facilities 

* Tennis * Sailing * Photography * Swimming * Computers * Drama * Arts * Dance 

Co-ed 6-18 3, 4 ,7 week sessions 

rrn I/O A tin 787 Pdm Crescent, Suite 1 85, Newmo tfc e i , Ontario L3Y5B7. 
tUUvAjVir Tel: (416) 444-6731. 



Sports incl. Riding. Riflery. Soccer, Skiing, Tennis. Golf 


Catalog: HENRY WICK III. YALE B.A. Dir. Box 1569 
Scottsdale. AZ 85252 » 602-946-7731 • Telex 669440 


‘BUSY STUDENTS ARE GOOD STUDENTS 


*1$ manhattanville college 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE 

•••in beautiful Westchester County 

north of New York City 

— courses offered at eight levels 
— TOEFL Sc University Prep 

— executive/technlcal/industrial programs 

— summer youth & teacher programs 
Six starting times & dormitory rooms available throughout the year- 

For information can or write: 

Marilyn J. Rymniafc - Director - 1S5C/EU 
Manhattanville Col l ege - HT 
Purchase, NY 10577. (914) 694-2200 
vvw^T d TOaaOlWSWlffURaAltroWVlvww^ 


Earn your 

Masters Degree in Europe. 


You can earn an M .A. while maintaining work and 
family responsibilities. Plan and implement a Masters 
study in a major area of concentration in conjunction 
with a Program professor. Complete your siudy at 
home in consultation with a local mentor. 

The Graduate 

Program Box 26. Vermont College of 

NORWICH UNIVERSITY 

Montpelier, VT 05602, USA. 


Study at the International Language Institute, 
university of South Rorida! 



1 47J-1 


A Residential School 
For Teenagers With Learning Problems 

Have you searched for c school where the staff cares about your diW 
academically, socially, emationafly, total/? The Kverview staff does. 
Now in fts second quarter century, Kverview yearly serves 100 boys 
and girii diagnosed as perceptually or teaming disabled. God orient- 
ed, personalized, complete academic progra m s u xu p leu tente d by 
individual language therapy, counseling, life and v oca ti o na l sldb and 
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lMTERNATIONALmRAlD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


Page 7 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Morandi Still Lifes at Marseille 
Suffused With Peculiar Silence 


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By Susan Ijimsdcn 

F LORENCE— Sixty-seven works of art on paper 
represent the Dutch component of COBRA, the 
renovatory artistic movement dot sprang from the 
ashes of northern Europe after World War n, in an 
exhibition at the Dutch Institute of Art History. 

At first glance, COBRA art looks like children's art 
and so it was, in part. Its Danish, Bdgjm and Dutch 
founders were det ermined to begin anew, free from the 
fo rmalism that drfiqp d and mnfrned the reigning 
Surrealistic art of Paris. 

There, in 1948 in the caffc erf the H6td Notre Dame, 
these self-proclaimed northern “barbarians’* launched 
their movement against formality. The Belgian artist 
and writer Christian Dotremeni labeled it COBRA 
after the first letters of Copenhagen, Brussels and 
Amsterdam, which produced its members. 

Children’s art, primitive art and that of (he mentally 
deranged was particularly cherished. Furthermore, 
COBRA mam minor! that art did not neces sari ly have 
to do with beauty. As ifto prove the point, the children 
of the artists helped decorate the walls of a house in 
Bregnerod, near Copenhagen, which was offered to 
Asset- Join, the leading Danhb artist of the group. 
Their performance was repeated in the oomxnnnal 
COBRA house in Brussels, flhmrinaied by the artistic 
personality of the Belgian Pierre Akchmsky. (Both 
houses have been destroyed.) 

Karel Appel is the most celebrated Dutch graduate 
of COBRA. A retrospective of his work can be seen as 
well, at the Palazzo Med&'Ricc&niL The 26 oils and 
54 drawings from Dutch museums and private collec- 
tions map the artist’s progress from neo-rnfantihsm to 
Abstract Expressionism and beyond. Indeed, anyone 


looking for the father of neo- Expressionism in Europe 
oould consider Appel as well a$ Willem de ~~ 

Yet, unlike the art of the neo-Expressionists. 
tends to be violent or macabre, Appel's is lively, 
humorous and cheerful. 

•‘Dog*’ (1955) and “Wild Bird" (1956) are quintes- 
sential COBRA subjects, stylized in form and fused in 
color. Even “Cat Fighting With a Pigeon,” executed in 
1981, is recognizable in its COBRA origins. 

"Cobra: II Contribute Olandese, Vi ale Torricelli 5; 
"Karel Appel. " Palazzo Medid-Riccardi, hath through 
May 12. 

a 


By Michael Gibson 

International Herald Tribune 

M ARSEILLE — Giorgio Mor- 
andi. a hulking, big-boned 
man, devoted his life to painting 
works of exquisite claustrophobia, 
the continuous, patient series of 
low-keyed still lifes that are today 
his mane. 

While many artists then achiev- 
ing fame were intent on shocking 
the world — a world delighted at 
such a prospect — Moran di's aes- 
thetic choice was much 
maidy disturbing, as if 
friend whose vitality everyone ad- 
mires declares one day that he in- 
tends to become a Cistercian monk. 

An exhibition at the Mus6e Can- 
tini here assembles 138 works by 
Morandi from 1910, when the 
painter was 20 years old, to 1964, 
the year of his death. It includes 
paintings, waiercolors, drawings 
and engravings. 

Two paintings stand at the be- 
ginning of the show to indicate 
Morandi's responses to Cubism 
and to “metaphyseal* 

The latter work includes a" 
er’s dummy similar to the Figures in 
the works of de Chirico. Morandi 
retained something of his passage 
through the metaphysical move- 
ment, but it was the strange silence 
it evoked, not the moo obvious 
trappings associated with the term. 

This silence was intentional in 
metaphysical painting. De Chirico, 
who disliked the Italian term natu- 
ra mono, coined natura silmeiosa, 


which is closer to the English “still 
life.” 

Morandi’s still lifes are suffused 
with a peculiar stillness. They are 
devoted to the silent existence of 
the ewers, books, boxes and vases 
that stood on the table of his stu- 
dio, their color and former gloss 
transfigured by dust. Such subject 
matter fills the artist's career. 

Artists like the American painter 
Jim Diae express appreciation lor 
the work of Morandi because, as 
Dine says. “I am not interested in 
descripuve painting — whai inter- 
ests me is a painting which deals 
with painting.” This sort of state- 
ment reflects a notion (“the subject 
of art is an”) that goes back to the 
end of the 19th century, to Whis- 
tler, Mallarme and Maurice Denis, 
though one may wonder to what 
extent the motivations of Morandi 
coincide with those of Dine or 
Whistler. 

Whistler, a brilliant and fashion- 
able artist living at the high pram of 
Europe's expansion and power, 
was responding with unanswerable 
irony to the Victorian demand for 
elevating subject matter. Morandi 
was in a quite different situation. 
He once remarked to a friend, on 
seeing the streets of his native Bolo- 
gna beflagged for the anniversary 
of the Italian victory in 1918: 
“They are commemorating the 
death of Europe.” He was not a 
recluse, but nor was he a social lion 
like Whistler. 

Morandi’s work is marked by a 


voluntary poverty. The objects he 
mints are mostly devoid of value. 
But his inanimate assemblies have 
a vestigial theatricality about them. 
While they can be perceived as pure 
painting, they can also suggest a 
transposition of family croups or 
friendly reunions. In this sense 
there is a certain community of 
spirit with the work of Giacometti, 
who was always whittling down his 
human figures, eliminating the su- 
perfluous flesh. 

Morandi also calls to mind a 
muted Chardin, a Chardin of an 
age that has come upon hard times. 
Morandi’s thoughtful reserve is 
also perceptible ua his landscapes, 
which are characterized by a curi- 
ous remoteness. A 1941 landscape 
is typical in this respect, with mon- 
umental buildings set on the 
ground like boxes on a table. One 
critic observed that Morandi's 
landscapes seemed to have been 
viewed through a telescope. 

Giorgio Morandi. Mu. tee C a mini, 
19 rue Grignan. Marseille, through 
June 13. 

a 

Other exhibitions here include 
one at the Music Borely devoted to 
Victor Hugo, his forebears, his de- 
scendants and the general intellec- 
tual and cultural climate in which 
he lived. Hugo's father was a gener- 
al under Napoleon who took part 
in the conquest of Naples and ar- 
rested the famous bandit Fra Dia- 
volo, immortalized in the opera by 
Daniel Auber. 



I 

■&' :< \ 

Giorgio Morandi: Voluntary poverty. 


Hugo had two brothers who were 
artistically inclined. He had five 
children, including Fran$ois-Vic- 
tor. who published the first com- 
plete Shakespeare in French, and 
among his great-grandchildren, 
Jean, who died last year, and Fran- 
cois, who died in 1981, were, re- 
spectively, a painter and a gold- 
smith. Jean's wife, Valentine, was 
also an artist and a friend of the 
rounder of Surrealism. Andre Bre- 
ton. 


"Vne FamiUe. ks Hugo, “ Musee 
Borely. Avenue Clot- Bey. Marseille, 
through Mav 26. 


The Maeght Foundation in Saint 
Paul de Vence is showing (through 
May 16) “Piet Mondrian! de la fig- 
uration a rabstraction.” a selection 
or 42 works by Mondrian that trace 
his transition from representation- 
al painting to abstraction. 


After AU the Fuss , Spaniards Flock to Restored r Las Meninas 9 


French 

“Napoleon Crossing the Great St Bernard” by 
Jacques- Louis David is the triumphant poster paint- 
ing of the show. It was one of the thousands of works 
of art commissioned or collected by Emperor Lotris- 
PhQippe to commemorate the “glory” of France after 
a bloody revolution and the Napoleonic wars. These 
portraits of generals, kings, queens, royal children and 
court ladies were hung in the new museum created in 
the old royal palace at Versailles. 

Shown at the National Portrait Gallery in Washing- 
ton two years ago, these 50 masterpieces include some 
of the finest of French paintings by Ingres. Antoure- 
Jean Gres, Philippe de Cbampargne, Charles Le Bran, 
Simon Vooet ana Jean-Marc Nattier. 

“ Capoiavori da Versailles," Palazzo Pint, through 
June 16. 


Susan Lumsden writes about the arts from Florence. 


By Stanley Mdslcr 

LotAirgda Timet Service 

M ADRID — This is one of the 
most political cities in Eu- 

S >e, but when Jean Daniel, the 
tor of the Paris news magazine 
Le Nouvd Obscrvateur, came here 
recently he found his political 
friends «titen«fng something other 
than politics. The talk of the town, 
Daniel wrote, was the 17th-cealmy 
Spanish painter Diego VdAzquez. 

For several months, S paniar ds 
have been slipping into the Prado 
Museum to rediscover one of 
Spain’s great masterpieces, “Las 
Manias” (The Maids of Honor), 
painted by Vdizquez in 1656. 

Amid great controversy, the 
painting was cleaned last summer, 
and Spaniards are finding new 
wonders in it 

“One of the most celebrated 


paintings of all Lime,” Daniel 
wrote, “was simply unknown." 

The excitement over the redis- 
covery of the painting has tended 
to make many Spaniards forget the 
anger and recrimination of last 
summer, when the Prado called in a 
foreigner to clean the canvas. Brit- 
ish-born John Brealey, 61, chief of 
conservation at the Metropolitan 
Museum of An in New York 

Vdizquez was the coart painter 
of King Philip IV. “Las Meninas," 
completed four years before his 
death, may be ms most famous 
work. The huge painting has an 
unusual perspective, for it depicts 
the Infanta Margarita, her maids of 
honor, two dwarfs and three other 
attendants in a room with Vdiz- 
quez while he paints the portrait of 
King Philip and Queen Mariana. 
Only a mirrored reflection of the 
, and queen can be seen. 
f or many years, it had been dif- 


ficult for visitors to the Prado to 
appreciate its full magnificence. 
V arnish put on the painting in its 
last cleaning, in 1871. had become 
dark and discolored. On top of this, 
the painting was exhibited in a 
small, dark room. After five weeks 
of work, Brealey received the Span- 
ish Medal of Fine Arts from King 
Juan Carlos I. The cl eanin g was 
followed by restoration of paint by 
the regular restoring staff of the 
Prado. The cleaning and restora- 
tion turned up touches of color that 


This kind of criticism has been dis- 
missed by Brealey as absurd be- 
cause of what be calk his reputa- 
tion as a conservative cleaner. 

The response from most Span- 
iards has been far more positive. 
For months, the special gallery ex- 
hibiting “Lis Manilas” and a se- 
ries of display cases describing the 
cleaning has been crowded. 

Writing in Madrid's influential 
newspaper El Pais, the columnist 


Carlos Seco Serrano said, “l have 
been able to make a reverent and' 
passionate visit to ‘Las Meninas,’ 
thanks to an impeccable restora- 
tion.” 

The Prado is itself being renovat- 
ed. It will soon reopen a series of 
galleries devoted exclusively to the 
works of Velazquez. The plan is to 
put “Las Meninas” on a will where 
it can be prominently seen even 
through the doors of a neighboring 
gallery. 


had been hidden, and brought out 
much of the original color. 

When the painting was put on 
exhibit in a special room in the 
basement of the Prado, in August, 
there were stiQ some grumbles. An- 
tonio Bisquert, a painter and re- 
storer, told the Madrid newspaper 
ABC that the painting had lost 
tones and unity because it was 
overdeaned ana made too bright. 


ANTIQUES 


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43, rue Royale - Daily from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Weekend: 1 0 a.m. to 8 p.m., evening on April 26, til! 1 0 p.m. 


'Americana’: A Fable 
Of the Desire to Create 


C APSULE reviews of movies 
recently released in the United 
States: 


with what he knows is inevitable. 
Sheila Benson of the Los Angeles 
Times- finds the film “something 


WaMS 
CAL EP« 



Carradine; wearing worn khaki 
with an Airborne patch o o his 
sleeve, wanders into a sleepy village 
indistinguishable from countless 

MOVIE MARQUEE 

\ others, except for a derelict carrou- 
■A-sd standing in a field alongside a 
road. He knows that he has found 
whet he has bees looking for, and 
sets about restoring it. 

In “Am e ri cana ." which he also 
directed, Carradine “so effectively 
communicates without words that 
he is a man who has survived a hell 
on earth that we understand he is 
satisfying an intense craving to cre- 
ate rather than to destroy, writes 
Kevin Thomas of the Los Angeles 
Times. “By the time this mesmeriz- 
ing poetic fable is over, it has more 
than earned so sweeping a title." 

□ 

“Die Hit** is the story of a gang 
member- turned- informer whose 
day of reckoning finally comes. We 
see Willie Parker (Terence Stamp) 
before and after bis testimony, and 
he undergoes a marked change — 
from flashy hood to a man at peace 
with the world, and at peace even 


carrying me clear 
stamp of an extremely interesting 
director,” Stephen Frears. 

□ 

Fitzroy Wynn (Christopher 
Hammer) is part ham actor, part 
theatrical genius, a man whose im- 
mense ego is being eaten away by 

^"w^Li^^S^e^mth), has 
wrivmammmigscziptforODew 
film with no part lor hk With the 
help of bis longtime agent, Jerry 
Sifter (Adolph Great), and the 
magic of a makeup man, he dis- 
guises biTmrif as a blond, youngish 
Italian and lands the role. Though 
the only writer whose name ap- 
pears in the film credits is Frank 
Cued, “Lift m Love" is, in fact, an 
updated adaptation of Ferenc Md- 
nar’s classic romantic farce, “The 
Guardsman.' 

Shot in Budapest and New York, 
the film was directed by the Hun- 
garian Kandy Makk. Smith “is 
splendid here as Fitz's possibly 
adulterous wife," writes Vincent 
Canby of The New York Times. 
“Hummer’s performance is possi- 
bly the best thing he's evo- done on 
the screen, and Green is a delight as 
the implacable voice of reason.” 




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Page 8 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


Hera!!* 




Pnbtiabed With IV New YoHt Times and Hie Washington Post 


The Nicaragua Unpolicy 


^ributtC. j± Chance to Narrow the Gap in Geneva 


First the House of Representatives rejected 
military aid for the Nicaraguan “contras” — 
that was good, a blow against a misguided 
intervention. The House then approved a 
Democratic alternative designed to aid refu- 
gees and facilitate peacemaking — not so 
good: It pul no muscle behind the call to 
negotiate. Then, having meanwhile rejected a 
Senate-approved plan (which was accepted by 
the administration) for nomnxlitaiy aid to the 
contras, the House threw out that same Demo- 
cratic alternative, 303-123. Democrats wished 
to derail any legislative vehicle the president 
might later try to commandeer; Republicans 
were mad at the Democrats. Thus did Con- 
gress kill the administration’s policy and offer 
no substitute: the new Nicaragua impolicy. 

What now? Under the congressional heav- 
ings a workable policy may be struggling to be 
bora. Let us hope so'. Congress opposes mili- 
tary intervention, proxy or direct. On this issue 
there is a real gap, yet President Reagan has no 
wise choice except to rule out intervention. But 
there is only marginal congressional favor for 
the San dman s’ internal order and there is 
much distrust of their pro-Cuban and pro- 
Soviet orientation. Congress rightly bodied at 
the use of force, when, means short of force had 
not been used against a regime with which the 
United States is not at war. Surely Congress is 
ready to support other means now. 

What needs to be done is to organize the 
nonmiliiary means and to establish reasonable 


ends to which to apply them. The instruments 
should include a further economic squeeze; its 
effect could be substantial, since the United 
States is Nicaragua's top trading partner. As 
the prospect of military intervention fades, it 
should become progressively easier to enlist 
other T.ntin Americans in economic sanctions 
and in political pressures designed to exact a 
price for the S andihis ts* failure to honor the 
pledges of pluralism and nonalignment they 
mad* to the hemisphere in return for help in 
ousting the Somoza dictatorship in 1979. 
These pressures could include condemnation 
and diplomatic isolation. 

They should be applied first to obtaining a 
cease-fire — 'a merciful mission, given that 
Congress has now cut off the contras from 
their basic source of military aid. In conditions 
of a cease-fire, the Contadora regional peace 
effort becomes at once more feasible. 

The second goal should be to induce the 
S and arists to open up a dialogue with the 
opposition, as tire Salvadoran government has 
done even while the ^vadoran insurgents are 
still fighting. Contadora has a direct relevance 
here too. American-Nicaraguan negotiations 
can be used to promote a dialogue of Nicara- 
guans and to advance the Contadora talks. 

The Reagan administration is stung by the 
defeat of its militaiy option in Congress. But a 
new American consensus is there waiting to be 
formed, if the administration will take a hand. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Reagan: 'Tiger’ on Deficits 


President Reagan's budget speech Thursday 
was a sharp and effective attack on the mis- 
management by that fellow in the White 
House, whom he never named. The question, 
Mr. Reagan declared, is whether the country 
can compel its government “to end the danger- 
ous addiction to deficit spending and finally 
live within its means.” Right! The United 
States, he said, cannot “stay on the immoral, 
dead-end course of deficit spending.” How 
true! If only Mr. Reagan bad been elected in 
1980, things would be different Mr. Reagan is 
a tiger on deficit spending and, if he were in 
charge, you can be sure there would be no huge 
deficit to strain and distort the economy. 

We pause here for a deep sigh and a return 
to reality. Since the late 1960s, Republican 
presidents have fallen repeatedly into the habit 
of speaking about deficits as though they were 
in the opposition. Tire reason is simple. The 
spending programs are popular, and deficits 
produce the kind of temporary boom that is 
very helpful in winning elections. But good 
conservatives cannot approve of them, and the 
recent Republican presidents have usually re- 
solved the dil emma by pretending that some- 
one else must be doing these dreadful things. 
The fastest increase in social benefits in Amer- 
ican history was not in the New Deal or the 


Great Society, but in the Nixon-Ford period of 
the early 197%. Nondefense spending this year 
will be higher, both in dollars and as a propor- 
tion of gross national product, than it was 
when Jimmy Carter left office in 1981. 

Speaking of spending cats, Mr. Reagan ear- 
nestly said: “One area we will not touch, 
however, is the safety net for needy Ameri- 
cans.” Realty? Mr. Reagan was advocating a 
cut of 2 percent a year, for the next three years, 
in the purchasing power of Social Security 
benefits. If that goes into effect, the Congres- 
sional Budget Office estimates, about 650,000 
people will fall below the poverty line. There 
scans to be a hole in the safety net. 

But Mr. Reagan is right when he says the 
deficits are a serious threat They result from 
the excessive 1 98 1 tax cut The deficits speeded 
up the economy, pulling it out of recession and 
producing a wave of prosperity for last year's 
election. But as they continue they will gener- 
ate either much higher interest rates or much 
higher inflation. Spending cuts alone cannot 
control the deficits. Higher taxes are needed. 

Mr. Reagan seems at last to sense serious 
trouble ahead. That is a good sign. But he is 
evidently not yet ready to deal with it in ways 
that are either fair or effective. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Still Counting in Indiana 


Controversy over Indiana’s 8th Congressio- 
nal District seat continues to grow, while the 
possibility fades of conclusively determining 
who actually was elected to it It is time for the 
House to declare the seat vacant so that Indi- 
ana’s governor can authorize a special election. 

The controversy began on the last election 
night when the incumbent Democrat, Frank 
McCloskey. finished 72 votes ahead of his 
Republican challenger, Richard McIntyre. Af- 
ter a recount put Mr. McIntyre ahead, Indi- 
ana's secretary of state certified him the win- 
ner. But the House, controlled by Democrats 
who were suspicious of the state recount, re- 
fused to seat Mr. McIntyre and ordered anoth- 
er recount under the direction of a special task 
force. That tally, completed last week, gave 
Mr. McCloskey the victory by four votes. 

A close vote — and this was one of the 
closest House races in tins century — does not 
by itself justify a special election. But the 


recounts have been hopelessly tainted by the 
appearance of partisanship. The House task 
force, for example, voted 2 to 1 on partisan 
lines to exclude dozens of absentee ballots for 
technical reasons. Yet it aUowedotoer absen- 
tee ballots with the same flaw to be counted. 

One need not agree that Democrats have 
“raped" the Constitution, as some Republi- 
cans put it, to appreciate that Mr. McQoskey’s 
“victory” now is no more convincing than Mr. 
McIntyre's was earlier. While there is no guar- 
antee a new election would not be just as dose, 
it should be possible to ensure against another 
bungled vote count. Ground rules to assure the 
integrity of both balloting and counting could 
be worked out in advance by local authorities 
and representatives of the House. The decision 
rests with the House Democrats, who, with a 
70-seat margin, can do as they wish. Wisdom 
and fairness argue for a special election. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Reagan: Lame but Not Immobile 

President Reagan is said to be a lame duck: 
But such' a bird can still fly high, far and fast, 
and he is not ready for a duck shoot He has 
great political strengths, for he owes nothing to 
1988’s electoral politics: His obligations are 
now to his own sense of place in histoiy. His 
commitments of principle — for example to 
preventing the evolution of the Managua re- 
gime into a model of Soviet-Cub an socialism 
— can be expressed with a clarity denied other 
politicians making electoral calculations. 


President Reagan has, moreover, a direct 
line to Americans: That, above all, was shown 
by last November’s results. Tins week’s votes 
are not irreversible nor (given the willingness 
of the House to arm the president with trade 
and diplomatic sanctions against Managua) 
irredeemable. Members of the House and 
some senators who face the polls next year 
stand vulnerable to a full, convincing expres- 
sion by the president to the people of foreign 
policy imperatives in Nicaragua and else- 
where. Congress has not wholly grasped that 
— The Times (London). 


FROM OUR APRIL 27 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: U.S. Vice President Hark Tariff 
ST. LOUIS — Mr. James S. Sherman, Vice 
President of the United States, addressing the 
Citizens' Industrial Association here, strongly 
supported the new tariff law. He declared that 
the protectionist policy would never be aban- 
doned; the new law was working better than its 
framers had believed it would. Mr. Sherman 
said: “It is a revenue-getting tariff, for it wfll 
probably wipe out the deficit in the first year." 
He pointed out that, on the other hand, the 
imports for the past eight months of the fiscal 
year exceeded by over $200 million those of 
the previous year and stated that nine- tenths 

of these imports could be made in America. He 
would not say that any American industries 
had been injured, but hie asked if it would not 
be well lo examine these increased imports. 


1935: France Inaugurates Tdeviaon 
PARIS. — Television was inaugurated in 
France [on April 26] when a distinguished 
assembly, including postal, radio and state 
officials, wireless experts, photographers and 
newspaper men gathered at the post office 
headquarters in the Rue de Grendle to see the 
first photographs flashed through space. 
“Marvelous r was the word on everyone’s Hps 
after the experiment, which all agreed was 
successful The first picture transmitted was 
that of Beatrice Bretty, a member of the Comfe- 
die-Frangaise troupe which recently visited 
Italy. Receiving sets, which can be attached to 
the ordinary radio with simple plug-ins, con- 
sist of a sort of rectangular screen about eigh- 
teen by twenty-four centimeters. They are 
ready for the market at about 10,000 francs. 


international herald tribune 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1953-1932 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

Scq mrF Execub* &£nr REN£ BONDY Dtf 

Deputy^ R^fgffoRGAN 

ROBERT K_ McCABE topury Editor STTEmAW W mNAWAY 

CARLGEWIRTZ aZSZet SS j££; 

, . . . „ 101 „ ROLFD.KRANEPUHL Director of Ad 

ssae MMUnanmua masts. 

Dinoeur de la pidtUcmbn: Walter At Thayer. 

U.S. subscription; S28f yearly. Second-class postage paid at Long Mand City NY. -11101. 
C I9&S, Imemattanal Herdd Tribune. AB ngfcu mened 


Dqnay PMbAet 
Associate Pubttshcr 
Associate PMbher 
Director of Operation 
Director (^Qradatton 



XT EW YORK — The complex 
IN arms control talks taking place 
in Geneva recessed this week with 
Utile to show for six weeks of deli- 
cate negotiation. Despite the diffi- 
culties, however, I believe that con- 
ditions for reaching a major 
agreement are far better now than 
in the 1970s. 

There can be little doubt that 
future historians will look to the 
early 1970s as a period of lost op- 
portunities in Soviet-American rela- 
tions. What was lost was nothing 
less than a chance to reverse the 
inexorable cycle of the arms race 
and achieve significant cuts in U.S. 
and Soviet nuclear arsenals. 

Why was this chance lost? I see 
three primary reasons- First, the 
United States entered into ddtente 
from a position of weakness:. It was 
engaged in the Vietnam War, which 
by that time Americans knew they 
could not win. In pursuing d&enle, 
Washington hoped to make Mos- 
cow help it wind down the war while 
preserving American honor and in- 
ternational standing. The United 
States was ready to recognize Sovi- 
et-American strategic parity and 
promised to treat the Soviet Union 
as an equal global power. 

Second, this American weakness 
abroad was magnified manyfold by 
the Watergate crisis. The isolation- 
ist “Vietnam syndrome” combined 
with an unprecedented decline of 
the power and credibility of the ex- 
ecutive to leave American foreign 
and security policies in a state of 
virtual paralysis. 

Third, whatever the Russians’ 
plans and expectations when they 
entered into detente in 1972. their 
reaction to America's weakness was 
dear. The Kremlin decided to con- 
tinue its strategic and theater mili- 
taiy b uOd-up almost unilaterally. It 
saw litde risk in its or its proxies' 
involvement in Ethiopia, Angola, 
South Yemen, the southern African 
“frontline” states and Afghanistan, 


By Seweryn Bialer 


Where does this leave us? In a 
sense; the passage of time has made 
a major arms control agreement 
even more difficult than before. The 
danger of the 1970s still remains — 
that arms negotiations and partial 
arms control agreements wfll not 
stop the exponential growth of the 
two superpowers' nuclear arsenals. 

And the asymmetries that make 
arms control accords intrinsically 
difficult — the asymmetry in the 
Soviet and American nuclear forces 
and in their geopolitical situations 

— have if any thing mC PTased b irring 

the last 10 years of-futfle negotia- 
tions and non-negotiations. 

Yet the Geneva negotiations have 
a much greats chance of success 
than the negotiations of the 1970s. 

Today, both sides dearly hope to 
achieve a comprehensive agreement 
that would inctade an aspects of die 
existing and planned strategic and 
theater systems and would result in 
radical aims reductions on both 


United States is much more power- 
ful than it was in the ignominious 
1970s. Amer ica has shown that it 
can increase its military expendi- 
tures and match any likely Soviet 
buildup. It has resumed initiatives 
in the international arena: It is 
again an activist power, but one 


revolution of electronics, working 
from a basically strong economic 
position. The leaders of both politi- 
cal parties now show the will to 
increase the ride, and costs of any 
Soviet adventurism. 

The Atlantic alliance has sur- 
vived the caudal political test that 
accompanied the deployment of 
American PasIring-2 and cruise 
missiles in Europe. The continuing 
dfeteate between Western Europe 
and Moscow does not compensate 
the Russians for their unsettled re- 
lations with Washington. China is 


able to consolidate Ms power much 
faster than Nikita S. Khrushchev 
and Leonid L Brezhnev were able to 
do. He may also have the power to 
impose his views on arms contra, 
even on those vested interests that 
oppose them. In this, he may benefit 
from the fact that the Soviet armed 
faces are being led by second-rank 
militaiy professionals. 

All of this argues foi a major 
opportunity to make an arms deal 
with the Kremlin. American lever- 
age over Soviet Union was never as 
great as it is today. But this oppor- 
tunity will be lost if America repeals 

the wwytfltfg that Moscow made in 
the 1970s: It most not kick the Rus- 
sians in »h” r time of trouble. 

One sure way to rain die opportu- 
nity would be to make President 
Reagan's “star wars” initiative a 
non- negotiable item. If, on the oth- 
er hand, it were negotiable, in the 
present situation — a correlation of 
forces favoring America — a mora- 
torium on its testing and develop- 
ment could be traded for radical. 



influence at U.S. expense. The 
Kremlin decided it conld kick 
America when America was down. 

The inevitable American reaction 
was not long in coming. From the 
last two years of the Carter adminis- 
tration, but particularly during die 
first Reagan term, America started 
to rearm. America became again a 
credible and activist force. 


sides. This is as it should be: The 
Geneva talks should not shy away 
from partial agreements of the kind 

sought in the 1970s, but they must 
be regarded as steps to a compre- 
hensive arms reduction accord. 

America is bang green a second 
chance to achieve the three key 
goals of arms control: to demy either 
power the capability to launch a 
“first strike," to buna stability into 
the Soviet-American strategic bal- 
ance and to establish a balance 
based on finite deterrence — an the 
minimum forces necessary to deter 
the other side. 

This second chance exists primar- 
ily because the correlation of forces 
is far more favorable to the non- 
communist countries now than it 
was in the 1970s. 

The balance of military power 
has not changed perceptibly, yet the 


taking decisive steps toward mod- 
ernization, posing a new strategic 
threat for Moscow. Japan has ae-. 
aided to add political power to its 
economic mi ght, even as it slowly 
increases nrihtaiy spending. 

The Soviet Union finds itself in a 
deep domestic crisis. This is funda- 
mentally an economic crisis, but it 
has political, social, ideological, cul- 
tural and psychological expressions 
as wdL In the international arena, 
the Soviet Union is retrenching: It 
is overextended and short of the 
resources necessary for an ambi- 
tious foreign polity. 

The new leader in the Kremlin, 
who knows that the strength of for- 
eign and security policies starts at 
hone, would prefer to concentrate 
on his country’s internal IDs. hi to- 
day’s emergency conditions, Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev will probably be 


Petrtdc. En Nin I Be) or ode). C&W svmflcote. 


balanced cuts in Soviet and Ameri- 
can offensive arsenals. 

Sensitivity to common security 
interests is required. The Russians 
have to be convinced by US. pro- 
posals in Geneva that they have 
more to gain from a radical arms 
agreement than from an unrestrict- 
ed spiral of the arms race; The U.S. 
side, in torn, must be convinced 
by theRnssiam. 

Let us not blow the second 
chance of a meaningful arms pact 
America’s renewed strength is wel- 
comed by everybody in the free 
world But America’s strength must 
be tempered by a knowledge of its 
Emits and concern for mankind. 

The writer is a professor of political 
science at Columbia University. He 
contributed this comment to The New 
York Tunes. 


Bitburg, 1985: The Damage Is Done, a Lesson Remains 


P ARIS — The damage has already 
been done by the incredible mis- 
handling of President Reagan’s trip 
to West Germany next week. Ger- 
man- American relations were fine 
and did not require any special, 
flashy gestures. But in the era of TV 
politics, men who should be primari- 
ly, concerned with statesmanship ap- 
parently cannot resist stagemanship. 

Now the trouble is rubbing off on 
all concerned, not only the president 
and his staff but cm Chancellor Hel- 
mut Kohl, who also looks bumbly 
and poorly informed. His spokesman 
has said it will hurt relations if Mr. 
Reagan does not gp to the Bitburg 
cemetery after so much talk. The 
German public cannot understand 
what the nus is about, and the Amer- 
icans cannot understand how the 
Germans could fail to understand. 

This is (he price of trying to ignore 
histoiy. The past can be overcome 
with .new friendsMps and alliances, 
but it cannot be swept away. 

Mr. Kohl made the first mistake 
with his disingenuous complaint at 
being leTt out of D-Day celebrations 
last year. But there was no reason to 
veil the fact that Germany was the 
enemy 40 years ago, and that it was 
defeated in the horrible war it 
launched with such enthusiasm. 

There were German victims of the 
Nazis, most but not all of them Jews. 
It is wrong, however, to encourage 
Germans now to suppose they were 
“liberated" in 1945 and that the evil 
that was done (tied with their defeat 
That reply should have been made 
dearly to Mr. Kohl. 

The letter from the floor leader of 
Ms party in the Bundestag to Senator 
Howard M. Metzenbaum, who origi- 
nated a petition signed by 53 U.S. 
senators asking Mr. Reagan not to go 
to the Bitburg cemetery, is symptom- 
atic of the bad thinking that comes 
from trying to refashion histoiy. 

The floor leader, Alfred Dregger, 
noted that he had fought the Rus- 
sians in World War D and Ms brother 
had died on the Eastern front. He 
said, “When you demand that your 
president leave off his noble gesture 
... I must take this as an insult to my 
brother and his fallen comrades.” 
Does Mr. Dregger think that be- 
cause the United States and Soviet 
Union are adversaries now, Ameri- 
cans approve of the German invasion 
of 1941 and the monstrous treatment 
of Russians, while only deploring 


Dresden Was Not Dachau 

Regarding the opinion column 
" When History Forbids a Fair Hear- 
ing ” (April 22) by V. W. Hughes: 

The basic flaw in Mr. Hughes's 
argument is the contention that 
World War II was no different than 
any other war. The Nazis were not 
just fighting a war. World War II was 
the extension outside of its national 
territory of the Nazi regime's policy 
of extertninatioiL 

Dresden, Hiroshima and Dachau 
are not the same, as Mr. Hughes 
believes. We were horrified by the 
bombing of cities like Dresden and 
Hiroshima, as by the conduct erf the 
German army in Belgium. But none 
of these acts was the implementation 
of a policy aimed at the annihilation 
of an entire population. 

DOMINIC LUSINCHL 
San Francisco. 

We all realize and understand the 
horror of war. But as Mr. Hughes 


By flora Lewis 


what Germans did in the West? 

Evidently Mr. Kohl got the idea of 
a cemetery visit from President Fran- 
cois Mitterrand of France, who does 
know history, and who arranged a 
deeply moving ceremony of French- 
Gentian reconciliation last fall at 
Verdtin. That was the bloodiest 
World War I battlefield, now a vast 
panorama of crosses. Both Germans 
and French are buried there; 

There is no American military 
cemetery in Germany, and this is not 
because Americans did not die on 
German soil. The insensitivity of 
both Mr. Kohl and Mr. Reagan to 
what this does mean is overwhelming. 

Mr. Reagan’s offhand remarks 
about Nazi victims and Ms refusal to 
pay a visit of homage to them at 
Dachau seriously compounded the 


witlessness. A quick stop at Bergen- 
Bdsen is not exactly a substitute. The 
site of that camp lias grassy mounds 
covering mass graves. 

Dachau is an extraordinary muse- 
um. It is terribly painful, but it is 
humbling and instructive. - ' ' 

A lesson is to be drawn from all 
these gaffes. It is the lesson of Efie 
WieseL a survivor of Auschwitz. Ex- 
plaining why he can never stop writ- 
ing about the Holocaust, Mr. Wiesd 
said. “The fear of forgetting remains 
the main obsession of all those who 
have passed through the universe of 
the damned." We fortunate ones who 
can never imagine what it is to have 
such memories must also fear forget- 
ting lest a time come when, we do not 
understand what evil means. 

And it is the lesson of Ryszard 


BergenrBelsen, 1945: Death and Liberation 


This was ex 


l firm a broadcast by Patrick Gordon - Walker, an Oxford historian and BBC commentator, 
the liberation of the concentration comp that President Reagan plans to visit 

I WENT lo Bdsen. The Wehrmacht was not were the sick, who were more or less cared for by their 

allowed near it. It was entirely guarded by SS men friends. Then there was the vast underworld had 

and women. The first night of Hberty, many hundreds lost all self-respect, crawling around in rags, living in 
of people died of joy. Next day some men. of the abominable squalor, defecating in the compound, 

[British] Yeomanry arrived. The people crowded often mad or half mad... 

around them, kissing their hands ana feet — and Over and over a g ain I was told the same story. The 

dying from weakness. parades at wMch people were picked cart arbitrarily 

Corpses in every state of decay were lying around, for the gas chambers and the crematorium, where 
piled up on top of each other in heaps. One woman many were burned alive; life and death was a 

came up to a soldier who was guarding the milk store question of pure chance. . . . 

and doling the milk out to children, and begged for ‘'My father and mother were burned. My sister was 

milk for her baby. The man took the baby and saw burned." TMs is what you hear all the time. ... A 

that it had been dead for days, blade in the face and story of Auschwitz was told to me by Helen —and 

shriveled np. The woman went on begging for milk. her last name she didn’t remember. She was a 

an the dead tips. The mother then Czechoslovak. When the women were given the 

h joy and earned the baby off in chance to go and work elsewhere in the work zones 

led and fell dead in a fewyards. like Hamburg, mothers with children were, in fact, 

pses were reckoned TheSS given the choice between their lives and their 

d pushed along and made to ride children’s. Childr en could not be taken along. Many 
1 corpses and then shovel them preferred to stay with their childr en and face certain 
3pen graves. The SS women were death. Some decided to leave their children But it got 
ury heavy loads. The inmates said around amongst the 6-year-old children that if they 
cruel and brutal t han the men, were left there they would at once be gassed. There 
in their 20s. There was no water, were terrible scenes between children and their 
w some boded stinking carrots, mothers. One child was so angry that though the 
ndred people. Men ana women mother changed her mind andstayed and died, the 

1 raw roots. child would not mlk to her. 

sin classes in the camp. The None of this is propaganda. This is the plain 

lanaged to keep themselves and simple truth. 

1 of these had typhus. Thai there The New York Tunes. 


So he poured some on the dead lips. The mother then 
started to croon with joy and earned the baity off in 
triumph. She stumbled and fell dead in a fewyards. 

About 35,000 corpses were reckoned The SS 

men were driven and pushed alone and made to ride 
on top of the loaded corpses and men shovel them 
into the great mass open graves. The SS women were 
made to cook and carry heavy loads. Hie inmates said 
that they were more creel and brutal than the men. 
They are all young, in their 20s. There was no water, 
nothing but roots and some boiled stinking carrots, 
enough for a few hundred people; Men ana women 
had fought for these raw roots. 

There are three main classes in the camp. The 
healthy, who have managed to keep themselves 
decent, but nearly all of these had typhus. Thai there 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


correctly notes, peacetime is not war- 
time. Nothing can be gained from the 
endless self-torture of accusation, 
condemnation, rehearsal of sorrow, 
tearing at old wounds, lacerating the 
spirit. The Christian ethic is one of 
forgiveness. Forgiveness does not 
mean condoning. Forgiveness is hard 
— that is why it is a virtue. 

HARRIET S. DANNENHAUER. 

Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. 

One cannot but shudder at the 
thinking of Mr. Hughes. Does he say 
that if. Heinrich Himmler were 
known to be alive somewhere, efforts 
to find him should be dropped? This 
would amount to saying that evO nei- 
ther exists nor demands atonement, 
that it does not, at least, demand a 
bringing to book followed by a metic- 
ulous public judgment 

Mercy? Yes, in the face of ex- 
pressed repentance. Catching a 
Himmler or an Echmann undenmg 
every few years — a hairless, harm- 
less oldster — serves a purpose at 
least as important as causing justice 


to be done and seen to be done: It genocide now, or at any lira 
educates the young, dramatizes for put ai risk the only valuable 
them what fellow men are capable of that may be learned from toes* 


educates the young, dramatizes for 
them what fellow men are capable of 
and what they, the young, must at aQ 
costs steer clear of. 

JOHN COLEMAN-HOLMES. 

Paris. 

How could anyone compare the 
willful murders in Dachau and other 
concentration camps with the bomb- 
ing of Dresden and Hiroshima? How- 


that may be learned from these atroc- 
ities: We must never forget. 

HOWARD MANN. 

London. 

The Cemetery Visit 

I visited the Bergen-Belsen concen- 
tration cam, on toe very day of its 
liberation by the British and saw the 


8 vy uic snusn ana saw the 

ever debatable, the latter were to help horrors contained within. Had anv 
shorten the war. Were the murders in one dared to tdQ me that ait American 
Dachau meant ro do toe same? president would, 40 years later lava 
LISELOTTE ROSENTHAL wreath in a German military ceme- 
Ascona. Switzerland tetyespedally one containing tombs 

Mr Hughes either ignores or belit- 5m man 
ties the fact that those who died in iSruimA? ca ? ed huD 

these camps did so because of whom Alas, alas . . . 

or M. ZLATOVSKL 

luigm, uil pjjuiijum w m of NATO. The German army of yes- 






Kapuscinski, a Polish journalist who 
writes about the fall of dictators in 
exotic lands in order to send a secret 
message of hope to Ms compatriots. 

Mr. Kapuscinski says of .the 
French historian Fernand Braudel: 
“He wrote that history is like a river. 
On the surface, it flows rapidly, and 
. disappears. But down.bdow there is a- 
deep stream wMch moves more slow- 
ly, doesn't change quickly, but is the 
mare important Decause it drives the 
whole river. What Pm interested in as 
a writer is finding this deep current." 

If the world’s leaders ignore this, 
especially the leaders of free coun- 
tries, tow can only be driven by 
events. Toe mess in preparing Mr. 
Reagan's trip will have saved a use- 
fill purpose after all if it brings this 
conclusion. It is what we do not know 
that can hurt us most 

The New York Tunes. 


An LB J Rule’ 
RR Should 
Have Used 

By Philip Geyelin 

W ASHINGTON — Lyndon . 

Johnson left behind no foreij / 
policy doctrine. But he had deep 
held convictions about the pern 
ability of the powers of the preside 
that might have been raised to t 
level of a doctrine if he had slat 
them publicly. They bear directly 
the condition of Ronald Reagan fi 
lowing his sound defeat in Congo 
on the issue of military support l 
the Nicaraguan “contras. 

The Johnson Doctrine begins wi 
the belief that a president cannot c 
a commanding figure on the wot 
stage if he is not perceived to be. : 
command of his own political pi* 
cesses. Mr. Johnson carried toe arg 
men! to the conclusion that just a 
defeat in Congress on an iss\ 
deemed vital to a president's inters^ 
could be crippling beyond repair. ■ 

It is true that, in the instant cas 
President Reagan abandoned his h 
sLstence on military aid and slxppe 

from sight when it became obvious h 
could not win. But that cannot aht 
the perception that he spent heavil 
from political capital — and Iosl « 
Regularly. Mr. Johnson warned hi 
advisers that he had only a limited 
supply of political capital It was ti 
be husbanded for propositions witfe-i • 
reasonable prospect of acceptor! 
or for emergencies. ■ 

' But does the Johnson Doctrine ap! 
ply to Ronald Reagan? Does Ms par- 
ticular political magic render him im< 
mune? Or is his fabled Teflos 
presidency already damaged? 

I would not bet either way. Bui 
there is enough recent evidence erf 
unfamiliar fallibility in the perfor- 
mance of toe second Reagan admin- 
istration to suggest a certain reles 
vance of toe Johnson Doctrine tc 
Ronald Reagan's case. Even before 
the mindless bungling of the prepara- vj 
tions for his European ^.tnepresii J 
dent had dipped deeply into ins polit- j 
ical bank account to win a narrow " n 
and perhaps hollow victory ou the 
MX missile. B; Ms inability to dij( 
himself quickly out of the disaster he 
had dug himself into with his Europe-j 
an itinerary, the pres dent squan- 
dered further political capital. 

So toe loss of toe key issue of 
military aid to the “contras” came at' 
a time when a lot of people were 
already beginning to wonder whether , 
toe second Reagan administration 
had somehow lost the first Reagan 
administration’s fine touch for those, 
tricks of the trade that serve the Rea- 
gan presidency best: imagery, sym- > 
bedim communication, the projec- 
tion of “leadership.” 

Mr. Johnson finally lost command 
by losing control of events, and ap- 
pearances, in about February 1968, 
with toe Tet offensive in Vietnam. 
But generally he did not risk his pre^ 
tige on behalf of controversial propo? 
ritions unrelated to his larger Great ' 
Society designs. Witness the way hi 
overruled sane of his most trusted 
foreign advisers on an issue that con- 
fronted him after Ms election in 19647 
It was not an earth-shaking deal: 
The question was whether toe United 
States would participate in a multi- 
lateral nuclear force. It was to. be an 
experimental mini-armada of surface 
ships, manned by mixed NATO 
crews aAd armed with Polaris missiles 
whose nuclear warheads would be 
under U.S. control. • 

But Mr. Johnson was not persuad-; 
ed that the Europeans wanted it 
nor that Congress wanted it. ' 

In a decisive meeting in December; 
1964 he killed toe idea after gjrang his 
assembled advisers a lecture on presi- 
dential and congressional Dolitics.Hfw 




was not carried away by any etecticw 
“mandate.” He doubted Cfongress 
was impressed; he knew how fickle 
public opinion could be. He spoke in 
shorthand. He was not going to do! 
“another 1919” (a reference to 
Woodrow Wilson's defeat on the 
league of Nations and its lasting 
impact on Wilson's control over Con- 
gress). Neither did he intend to do 
miother “1937” (a reference to 
fra nklin Roosevelt's “court packing” 
sjchMie whose rejection he believed 
tod Roosevelt permanent damage). 

"As usual, he had a story from Tex-.- 
ss to embellish his argument. It way 
of a cowboy who savetT all year to buy 
a bottle of whiskey and a string of 
firecrackers and consumed both on 
New Year’s Eve. yp 

“I worked like bell to get to be 
president,” Mr. Johnson said, “and I 
don t want to set it all off at once." ' 

. Now. LBJ never laid rlaim to cha- 
nsma . of toe kind that Mr. Reagan 
can rightly lay claim to. So we will 
nave to wait and see whether Mr. 
Kea S ai ) is the exception to a wtilr 
recognized rule. What can be said 
with certainty is that Mr. Reagan's 
recent handling of the money for the. 
contras was in clear violation of the 
Johnson Doctrine. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


tCTday, to which toe young men bid- 
ed at tins cemetery belonged, fought 
k«S° nv 5? Uonal waT in a generally 

ta5«if ab - e fas ki on - Exceptions cer- 
^Utiy exist — -net Mill « tL> n -m ali 


f f 


n™ 7”™ armed forces were 
-°°k of the Nazis’ racial es-_ : 
“'ttnwauou policy. The soldiers of 
r~ wnnan army, navy and aitfoitt. 
tought much as the AIHed soldiers ’ 
° ““Where and when sent The 

younc Gemian nf 


. - uy UK 

Nazi party — was ao more 
j~pousible for the. war than his Eni. 
Sjjsn or American countaparc A 

thZn' maccuratc condemnation 'm. 

ute German soldier in WorltT Wa# . 

^appropriate. Such sentiments 
rec ted at the -f tk. jesjme' - 


7~°* j propnate. Such sentiments at j 

J^^at the memories pftbeSS.are, 
fa;™!- 16 must bemadeiu. 

awjess to toe German natitffl 
who win caity.toe sMoxj^ 

* Holocaust with tbemfoseta. ,^ 

- *.T0pE^ 
Wiesbaden, We^Gennany* - . . 


. - : -/ - 7 — s-r~ : • 


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A SPECIAL REPORT 

S ATURDA Y-S UNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


Page 9 


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lh «* is enough?* a4tr *» 
anfain.l^r fadbflS^L^ 
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“»«wn :o *22 T** 

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,w ‘ &an *- account u> tT 
t!S S* rhi Ps boltoi 

^n«!fou I cUVou7 ( fi^ 

.f° ■•“.*«« Of ihe kT, 

nalitir* aid io the "coddx'c 

a iitoj wnsnataofpJ 
®‘ eau > btfamuiijiowoK 

tn* second Reagan abss- 
Rad semens l«i ticfial; 
adcup.!s:rauons fine toudiSj- 
:nck> oi the fade ihaum^ 

Jan prexidcac) bsi: imm r 
bolisru w\?-ruTiuniiafok c 1 
t-vn of "leadership “ 

Mr. johraon fuuSviu^ 
b> !as;r.g control oTa^jr 
seawBtta. i£ about Ftbnj! 
w* :be Tei offensive b fe 
Bui jererJly he did nsuHbp 
uje .. n behalf of tfcaaata*--, 
F.uorj UT.Tiiiied iDK'ispt 
Soc:o:> deigns. Ytinsfov 
o-.srrJiC some of teas a 
fonrgn advisers on aoiasita 
ircr.isJ bin afierhudaauJ 
I: r.oi an eanh-tofe: 

The .juries 
S:o:ef Aould panidpaebiE 
iaterul nuclear force. UaSBi 

ekO^'mer'aJ Enru-annskefE 

ships. 3u.'j:ed b\ anal W 
ere*: arc anr.ee MihWai® 
a hos* "uciear uartokK 
unde? r 5 coBifrf. 

2 j. Mr. Joicson^itfp 
cd f - :-! ihe Europeans rt® 
rvr ina! Cr npsj ranwf fl- 
ip j drj:#ivs fE"ns®‘® 

1SS4 he -ailed the stoafffF 
jk jerinmi advisers ifconss 
^r.iooniieswoilp^ 

L "” ”"'! ojrr.ed"j 9 'a.‘ (?'*?,_ 




'■■■■. - ! 


* **. ; 7i w ™^w 


iVoti? t/i€ 'Fourth Generation 9 Joins iVeii? Wave am? Old Guard 


By Leticia G. Jett 


the retailers started to buy — and sell these comphcai- As Akira Mori, associate publisher of Women’s 


tavyo r-r i . cm, x/™!.. ■ < , ed clothes at prices estimated to be 200 to 250 percent Wear Daily Japan (and son of Hanae Mori), said: 


tor nansai r amamoto it is Happiness, for Hanae Mon 
it is femininity and for Rei Kawakubo it is all an 
inexplicable abstraction. 


Everyone watched and waited. Sales waxed and 
then waned as the ever-changing mood of fashion 


inexplicable abstraction. 7““* “ 

That is what Japanese fashion design is about — but SSt2£*S^ 
not completdy. It is also a rich amalgam of tradition, S£fSSS 5S SK225 

CTOKS-Ollfnirfll infliirnn^ rrnflcmnnshin innnvmirvn .ve pointed OUt the gexuia] lnfluaice It has had On 


“Many of the most recently successful designers take 
their success for granted. The next couple of years wih 
be selective and only a few will last" 

Hanae Mori, the doyenne of Japanese fashion, is 


Women’s their clothes are often colorful and some of their work 
)ri). said: is absolutely crazy, but it’s exciting." 
piers take Some of the fourth-generation names to watch in- 
years wm dude Atsuro Tayama, whose A.T. label can be found 
in the United States and Australia, Kensho Abe, 
ashien. is Noriko Kazulci. Voshio Ishikawa, Akiko Sakaizumi, 


From rise left, fall 1985 de- 
signs from Hanae Mori, 
Kenzo, riie “Fourth Gener- 
ation” designers Noriko 
Kazni, Atsuro Tayama and 
Kensho Abe, and Issey 
Miyake’s special body 
sculpture bustier. 


cross-cultural influences, craftsmanship, innovation u ^ S t^T- - ^ ?: a suttenng international following, but also a remark- Kaimsalo. Others are Manko Aimi, who has a New 

and experimentation, and it is much more than a li -^c f25iuon JJSJ 1 - >c ^ gncrs m “ d “ c ably magnanimous woman who has throughout her York-based company that sells under the label Mar- 


credited with being not only an excellent designer with Takayuki Mori, Yoshiki Hishinuma and Katsuhiko 
a glittering international following, but also a remade- Kamisald Others are Mariko Aimi, who has a New 


ana experimentation, and it is much m 
passing fad in the fickle world of fashion. 


United States started loosening up, cutting more am- 


rim to 

enormous unstructured masses of textured fabrics in ms P irauon - 


black, bhicd-black and gray and white, captured the 
imagination and the headlines a few seasons ago. a 
shock wave was sent through the re gular **! ranks of 
international ready-to-wear. 

In numbers too large to.be overlooked and with a 
lode too surprising 10 be ignored, they hit the Paris 
runways ana, in the beginning at least, gave the bias* 
chroniclers of fa mode something to talk about. Then 


If Japanese fashion design were simply the New 
Wave group, perhaps it could be considered of limited 
interest, but that would discredit the brilliance of Issey 
Miyake, the sustained elegance of Hanae Mori, the 
fresh exuberance of Kansai Yamamoto and Kenzo 


career helped and promoted new talent. She is opti- 
mistic about the future of Japanese design. 

“We are now seeing the birth of the ‘fourth genera- 
tion' of designers," she said. “They are very different 
from the third generation, or New Wave group" (Mss 
Mori considers herself the first generation and 
Miyake, Kenzo, Yamamoto and Mitiuhiro Matsuda, 
among others, the second generation.) 


iko; Nobuo Ikeda, whose line is available at 250 stores 
around the world, including top U.S. retailers; Masaru 


the birth of the ‘fourth genera- A™* 00 “d Chisato Tsumori. 

: said. “They are very different As the debate over the lasti 


As the debate over the lasting importance of Japa- 
nese fashion continues, the prediction is that there are 
more surprises to come —from all the generations. 

Besides, as Rei Kawakubu, Comme des Garmons 
designer and high priestess of the New Wave, sagely 

nnn if •‘Th. 


industry. 


“These young men and and women of the fourth puts it: “The course of one’s life is peaks and valleys — 
generation are more relaxed; they don't take them- that is what we remember —and we must realize it is 
selves so seriously she said. They have great humor, not part of life to always be at the peak" 


From Revolution to Evolution, Influences of New Designs Roll On 





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1983 Comme des Gargons, 


• «4 




. . . and in 1985. 


Yohji Yamamoto in 1985, 


' . * 

1 4^1 


in 1984 


- % 




and in 1983. 


A View From the Runways of Paris 


A View From New York Retailers 




By Nina Hyde 


urj 

.n,l ’f 


“They would use stiff fabrics, some wools would even have the lanolin 
left in, rf he said. "But now, as they get to know the American market 


7, « s WASHINGTON - When the Japanese collections led off the week- : ^ SSL 

* > s long ready-to-wear showings in Paris on a Thursday last month, the ^ "*?*?** including fabrics so soft they drape. 

- aum e nce was dressed largely in black and gray oversized raincoats to Bilze nan confers with the Jap a nese companies during the year. “Th 


! 

. VI h/ uS. 


cope with the bleak weather. On the runway, the clothes of designers Rei 
Kawakubo for Comme des Garmons and Yohji Yamamoto were rather 
often in odor and wonderful prints. The 


; v-JIt** shut, iu identifiable shapes, 
models even wore lipstick. 


The Japanese designers had changed. But the rest of the fashion 
business had changed, too, greatly influenced by Japanese design as. 

“The Japanese invasion gave the whole fashion industry a welcome 
shot in the arm," said the respected Tobe Report, a weekly publication for 
retailers, recently. The Japanese iofluencegoes beyond their use of black 
and gray and inventiveness with fabric. “Their introduction of knotting 


Bilzenan confers with the Japanese companies during the year. “They 
want 10 know what they can oo to stay strong. They discuss color ana 
silhouette and fabric. They are the only ones who bother to ask.” 

He finds the Japanese smartest about price. “They’ve never raised their 
prices, where others, as they get the hype or press of being new and grand 
and desirable they get on their pedestal, and you can watch the prices go 
up as the designers think about their new apartments. 

“Their prices are mot out of band. You can still fed the value of the 
clothes and the individuality because of fabric or print design or color.- 
Customers recognize it and say: I know it, I want it. You never hear 
anyone say the Japanese clothes are not worth the price.” 

Gene Pressman, exam live vice president of Barney’s in New York 


By Anne-Marie Schiro 

NEW Y ORK — Japanese New Wave designers burst upon the fashion 
world two years ago in a blaze of glory that was hailed by press and 


„ and tying, their use of draping and twisting fabrics to define or ignore the criti^tb^toc^ 
body, their use of uneven hemlines, all have left a strong impression on discarding them the nexL ^ 

u-- 4 *1! v ? scene - . “Fashion is a people business that relies on talents,” he said. “And 

” : : v For fail, bodi Yamamoto and kawakubo pared down their voluminous whflc Japanese |QE was a phenomenon that car*: by storm, that 

- ..-n> „ E' £ n^*ghapes- Kawakubo did it by ai^lifying her cuts, Yamamoto seems to influenced the world market heavily and is now in a slight decline, it will 
: --r.- We gotiena bit tracer, ^wakubos shapawerefar lessabsmact and always be valid. One doesn’t lose tklent right away“ 

iW -: more identifiable than m the past, mdudmg splendidpckets and pleated pressman also uses the talents of Japanese fabric makers and manufac- 

,r jumpers and introducing and colors m man-made fibers. mrers for his private-la bcl business and buys accessories and clothes by 

Yohji Yamamoto's lean coats, high-rise skirts and pattern mixes young Japanese designers in Tokyo. 

: S- T^- f emerged as important looks from his collection, winch had the rffect of Ann BoD, divisional merchandise manager for Ndman Marcus, said: 

I..' ^ tefji ver X Dtckoisian from the oversea^ hats and swallow-tafl coats, “The Japanese; such as Issey Miyake andYohji Yamamoto and Matsuda, 

askew collars and assymetncal wraps that showed up tfaroughouL 0 rfer a strong alternative to the typicaUy ultra-feminine and rather 
■ Issey Vfiyake, who has shown in Paris for 10 years and prefess not lobe precise, fashion of Europe. They may be bestunderstood by an iniellectu- 

lumped with the other Japanese desgners, narrowed his silhouette as al minority . . . but for us it offers new shapes, new fabrics and new 

- . iP';: welL Miyake, who has his design studio in Japan, likes a challenge. When attitudes that we don’t otherwise see. The fact that they are Japanese is 

- 7 . L -*r> critics said Miyake never made tailored clothes, the designer offered secondary." 


Z \ ,r ir l^) i^. jumpers and introducing arid colors in man-made fibers. • 

Yohji Yamamoto's lean coats, high-rise skirts and pattern mixes 
i t . "Z T 11 ' v emerged as important lodes from his collection, which had the effect of 
; . tV> c :o^'- being very Dickensian from the overscale hats and swallow-tail coats, 
"JZZ j: askew collars and assymetrical wraps that showed up throughout. 

" — ' I "y ictiw Miwilcf.. whft has cbnom m Psm fra- tflwAK and ntefm not In he 


■ ;h"— ‘ 
rJf-' 


■ ** superb pointed hem suits for spring. And to show that he could make 

o' ‘J- .ulCP". .ii.1 «Ti* IvvVif fu mnturl hie rfnthM miirh rlrtW tn 


Cztudes mat wc don t oincrwisc see. The fact that they are Japanese is 
oondary." 

Rather than making obvious fashion swings with the usual season 


' "c'-'-irf# > Japanese, says that Japanese fashion, in maturing, has worked to adapt He believes no one can copy their Hi»dgn< or their fabrics. “Many lave 
- .' -j;; t - , ‘ U itself to the American market. tried, but it never turns out the same.” 




'■■■■' « ii* 


retailers as the greatest thing since Yves Saint Laurent. Some fashion 
people even started wearing the baggy blade clothing. Stores bought 
heavily, advertised heavily and wailed for the customers. 

But something happened between the racks io the stores and the racks 
in people's closets. 

The American public looked at the somber gray and black garments 
with tattered edges, designed-in moth boles, confusing shapes and inflat- 
ed prices, dubbal them “rags" and ran scared. 

The word went out: The new look had bombed. 

But is.it really true? Have the clothes disappeared from the stores and 
the streets of America? Yes and no. 

FirsL, the Japanese designers have influenced other designers on both 
sides of the Atlantic in one significant way: Clothes have become bigger 
and looser and more comfortable. The big shirts and oversize jackets that 
are the hot look this spring may not bear Japanese labels, but they can be 
traced directly bade to the oversize dothes showed by such designers as 
Yohji Yamamoto. 

Second, Japanese designers' dothes have been simplified and cleaned 
up (nomorr tatters) and some of them actually come in colors other than 
black. Many of than are not instantly identifiable as Japanese, as they 
were two years ago. 

Also, stores are no longer lumping the desgners together under the 
heading of “Japanese.” 

“I don’t think the Japanese influence is called Japanese anymore,” says 
Ellin Saltzman, fashion director of Saks Fifth Avenue. “We bad' a 
Japanese boutique in 1983, but now the merchandise is scattered through- 
out the store. It's not thought of as Japanese specifically because it now 
fits in with other merchandise. Though I do think the Japanese were 
responsible for the current interest in comfortable, oversize clothing.” 

Saks is still carrying four Japanese designers who have stood the test of 
time, she said. They are Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, Kansai Yama- 
moto and Matsuda. 

Those names, along with Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Gallons, are 
the ones that have emerged on top of the heap, Kenzo, who works in Paris 
and has been around so long he is considered French rather than 
Japanese, now has his own shop on Madison Avenue. So does Matsuda, 
who is opening a second shop on Park Avenue later this year. 


Bergdorf Goodman, which had not been on the Japanese bandwagon 
in 1983, opened a department for Issey Miyake last year. Henri Bend el 
still carries Comme des Garcons, which has developed a following of its 
own. And the Comme des Garmons shop in New York’s S0H0 is highly 
successful according to its owner, Dianne Benson. 

“1 felt a backlash against Japanese fashion last spring,” Benson said. 
“What was the vanguard of everything was suddenly the nadir of 
everything. I felt a reluctance from our clientele. But now Comme des 
Garmons is booming and my Miyake business is just like it used to be.” 

One of the reasons for the popularity of the Comme des Garmons spring 
collection, she said, is that it is easy to understand. “Every garment has 
two arms, a place to put your head and your feet.” All those extraneous 
panels and sleeves on the earlier Japanese dothes did put off quite a few 
potential customers, who could not figure out how to wear them. 

Benson has two other boutiques in New York called Dianne B., one on 
Madison Avenue, the other in S0H0. Her first store, the one on Madison 
Avenue, has been selling Issey Miyake and Kansai ail along. 

“1 recently did a study for my accountant,” Benson said, “and 
discovered that the Japanese portion of my business has been steadily 
between 35 and 45 percent for nine years." 

Selma Weiser of the -Charivari shops in New York said her sales of 
Japanese fashion doubled last year over 1983. 

She has been selling Issey Miyake since she found him in Paris in 1974, 
she said. “1 thought he was the world's greatest designer. I discovered 
Yohji three or four years ago and took an initial big position on him.” 

Her stores still cany both designers, and she now goes 10 Japan 
regularly to find lesser-known lines. 

When Bloomingdale's announced a Japanese promotion for last fall 
many observers felt that the timing was not exactly propitious. But 
according to Kalman Ruttenstem, store vice president and fashion 
director. The customer surprised us. and the Japanese clothing sold very 
well especially Yohji Comme des Garmons and Matsuda. 

“Once the Japanese fashions got over the period when they were ragged 
and tattered,” ne added, “the customer discovered that they were com- 
fortable and great to own. They realized that they didn’t have to wear the 
look from head to toe but could just buy individual pieces and wear them 
with their other clothes. Our sales have gone consistently up." 

Dianne Benson pretty much summed up the feeling of retailers today: 
“Now that nothing is being said about Japanese fashion, everything that 
is good and positive about it is restating itself.” 






Page 10 


INTERNATION AL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 

A SPECIAL REPORT ON JAPANESE FASHION 



■'■VijV-frfW vt 




Western Retailers 
Meet with Success 


By Terry Trucco 

TOKYO — In receni years, Jap- 
anese designers have opened bou- 
tiques everywhere from San Fran- 
cisco to Sydney and large Japanese 
retailers have also {gained a toehold 
abroad, notably in the United 
States. But big-name foreign firms 
are just as eagerly setting up shop 
in Japan. 

Some of these companies lease 
space in. lam department stores. 
The new Seibu store in Tokyo's 
Ginza district contains outposts of 
VanCleef and ArpeL, Hermes, Yvea 
Saint Laurent ana even Sotheby’s, 
all on one gilt-edged floor. 

More and more international 
names in retailing are making a 
bigger investment here and launch- 
ing their own free-standing stores. 
In the Ginza district alone, the styl- 
ish foreign line-up includes Loins 
Vidtton, Laura Ashley, DunhilL 
Gucci, Chanel and New York 
clothiers Paul Stuart And the 
ranks are growing rapidly in other 
parts of Tokyo and Japan, spurred 
by Japan's keen interest in upscale 
goods. 

Foreign retailers have discovered 
what the Japanese already know: 
The best way to establish an image 
and a presence in Japan is through 
a carefully decorated store that 
sells nothing but die company line. 
In a nation where packaging is im- 
portant a distinctive store is the 
most effective advertising avail- 
able. 

“It’s easier for customers to 
come to the shops we have in de- 
partment stores,* says Toshio Mo- 
toki. general manager of Brooks 
Brothers Japan. But Brooks Broth- 
ers’ wood-paneled Tokyo store, a 
scaled-down twin of its venerable 
New York headquarters is worth its 
tent alone for what it provides in 
image and prestige. 

Such dements have gained im- 
portance as Japanese shoppers 
grow more selective. A decade ago, 
a foreign name was often sufficient 
to make a sale, but Japan is now 
"saturated with foreign clothing 
brands,” as one retailer put it Jap- 
anese shoppers also tend to gravi- 
tate to whatever is new, then lose 
interest Foreign companies in par- 
ticular are vulnerable. 

Indeed, the most successful for- 
dgn retailers in Japan deal in high 
quality or the unusual and have an 
appealing image. Many also have 
learned to blend dements of East 
and WesL 

The new Laura Ashley store in 
Tokyo, which is co-owned by the 
British specialty concern and Ja- 
pan’s Jasco supermaket chain, is a 
good example. Designed by Mrs. 
Ashley’s eldest son, David, the 
shop interior looks like an English 
country house, with floral-print 
walls and imported antiques. En- 
glish words are much in evidence, 
too, used almost as decoration on 


cards, signs and the company logo. 

But mine Ashley’s print fabrics 
are everywhere, nearly all the 
clothes are sewn and sized in Ja- 
pan. “Japanese have very high sew- 
ing expectations, and we can't sup- 
ply Iks than what the market 
wants," said the shop manager, 
Mie Nakayama. Even the sheets 
are made in Japan. 

The line is also edited for local 
taste. Missing from the spring col- 
lection were a two-piece printed 
dress, deemed too sheer, ana a cod 
white cotton article too vast for 
most Japanese. Because brides here 
are usually unattended, Ashley's 
bridesmaid growns are sold as par- 
ty dresses. 

Several quirks in the Japanese 
market have further modified what 
foreign retailers sdl. Styles that ap- 
peal to broad age brackets in 
America and Europe sell to much 
narrower groups in Japan. “Laura 
Ashley says her clothes are for ages 
3 to 80, but in Japan they mil 
probably sell to women in their 20s 
and 30s.” Nakayama said. 

The trend is even stronger in 
menswear. Both Paul Smart and 
Brooks Brothers have much youn- 
ger customers in Japan than in the 
United States. But each is hopeful 
the market will expand as today’s 
25-year-olds mature. “Middle-aged 
Japanese men still don’t under- 
stand Western styles, but younger 
men are becoming more knowl- 
edgeable and concerned with what 
they wear,” said Brooks Brothers' 
Motoki. - - 

One reason Paul Stuart Japan 
makes most of its lines locally, li- 
censed from New York, is that its 
customers were too young to afford 
costly imports when the brand was 
introduced eight years ago, accord- 
ing to Shigekaisu Kawaraura, Paul 
Stuart Japan president and 51-pex- 
cent owner. Their clothes are still 
less costly than in New York, al- 
though pricier styles have been 
added, along with a sprinkling of 
imports. 

in women's wear, there is much 
difference between the New Yoric 
and Tokyo Paul Stuart stores. 
American customers tend to be ca- 
reer women who need tailored suits 
and dresses for the office. In Japan, 
sales are mainly to office ladies, or 
“O.L.S," as they are called, Le. 
young unmarried women who wear 
company uniforms by day and 
preppy styles after work. Once 
married, they will probably shop 
elsewhere. 

Despite such differences, it is 
easy to see the Japanese market’s 
attractions. Japan has a large popu- 
lation, a healthy economy and 
while the fascination with designer- 
name garments is fading, it is far 
from dead. A Japanese store also 
adds cachet for an international 
retailer. And in some cases, Japan 
is the only place a company can 
expand. 









Teen-agers Turn Trendy on the Weekends 


TOKYO — Every weekend, Jap- 
anese teen-agers discard their no- 
nonsense school uniforms and es- 
cape into a fantasy world of 
colorful costumes and copious con- 
sumerism. 

The playground for this momen- 
tary retreat from their strictly disci- 
plined academic lives is Harajuko, 
the neighborhood that offers some 
of the best trendy shopping in To- 
kyo. It is also the perfect backdrop 
for flaunting the latest purchases 
around the La. Ferret shopping 
complex and the boutiqae-fifled 
Hanae Mori Center and along sev- 
eral narrow shop-filled pedestrian 
walkways. 

Harajuko is one of fashion's hot 
spots, ranking with Kings Road in 
London and the Halles area in Par- 


is, where retailers, designers and 
man ufacturers from around the 
world come for fresh ideas and a 
little street-smart inspiration. 

The area is a microcosm of eclec- 
tic dressing where the extremes of 
body adornment can range from 
all-American preppy to wfldly ex- 
travagant punk getups comple- 
mented by appropriately stylized 
hairdos tinged with lime green, 
shocking pink or electric yellow 
pain t — all of which is washed out 
before school Monday morning. 

At the moment, the best looks 
are melanges of the old and new 
with a definite inclination toward 
the bright and whimsical. Gone are 
the dreary black and gray turnouts 
•cut on the big bold body-conceal- 
ing theme; instead, young gills are 


wearing 1960s miniskirts with 
sweet blouses, pastel tights and del- 
icate flat dippers, or full 1950s 
skirts with petticoats and sweater 
sets, flowered tennis shoes, and 
hair tied back in bright chiffon 
scarves. 

Boys and girls are crazy about 
American baseball jackets or pricey 
facsimiles from Kansai Yamamoto, 
and they are often teaming them 
with trousers from Bigi or long 
skins from Matsuda. 

Hooded sweatshirts and graphic 
knits are other favorites, as is. the 
omnipresent sloudry overcoat the 
boys wear over anything from jeans 
to impeccably coordinated 1950s 
zoot-suit ensembles either bought 
from one of the stalls at the week- 
end flea market or the retro re- 


editions of some of Japan's con- 
temporary designers. 

But the most interesting notion 
to come from the streets of Hara- 
juko is that, even in this highly 
competitive game of attracting at- 
tention, the crucial ingredient must 
always be the esprit. 

Thai is, above aO, fashion is sup- 
posed to be fun. And the best- 
dressed players have mastered an 
inventive technique of mixing bits 
anri pieces from East and West, 
such as combining an Issey Miyake 
plantation T-shirt with a Laura 
Ashley skirt, a Yohji Yamamoto 
swearer with a Brooks Brothers 
shirt or a pair of French jeans with 
a Co name des Gardens tunic. 

— LETITIA G. JETT 



FASHION NOTEBOOK 


Tokyo’s Most Popular Periodicals 


Those wbo make it their busi- 
ness to be au entrant include 
these slick periodicals on then- 
reading list: Focus and Friday 
(written in Japanese although 
the names are m English), both 
of which can best be described 
as devoted followers of that in- 
ternationally successful formu- 
la of newsy blood-and-guts sto- 
ries spiced with some good 
old-fashioned gossip and sex (a 
recent issue of Friday showed 


Princess Stephanie of Monaco 
romping topless on a beach). 

On the fashion side is Mode 
et Mode. The name may be 
French, but the text is Japanese, 
an information guide to every- 
thing off the runways of the 
world. For the English reader, 
and supposedly trendy Japa- 
nese, Tokyo and Weekender 
provide the typical city-maga- 
zine format of service pages 
plus entertainment. 






Matsuda and Bigi: Everybody h Talking About Them 


Hfrofco Tsnji 


The Bigi label, designed by 
32-year-old Hjroko Tsqji for 
young men and women be- 
tween the ages of 20 and 25, 
with the Just Bigi line for teen- 
agers, is consdered to be one of 
the most influential collections 
in Japan. 

“I think dothes are only 
dothes,” Hiroko said recently. 
“I design from a feeling of the 
moment, not with the idea that 
something is to last forever. I 
get my ideas from traveling 
around Europe, Morocco, all 
sorts of places, places where I 
am the outsider, where I can 
observe in a culturally detached 
way. For me, the most interest- 
ing influences are from the 
mentality of the '60s and ’70s, 
androgyny. Freedom is the 
most interesting thing for me, 
not accepting what you are told 
to do, told to wear by a design- 
er. 

“In Japan, it has been less 
than IQ years that everyone has 
been fashion conscious.’ We 
don't have a long history of 
wearing European clothes,” she 
said, “so it is all quite fascinat- 


ing for us and we want to have 
lots of them.” 

For the near future, there are 
no plans for major exportation 
to Europe or the United States, 
although there is an indepen- 
dently owned Bigi shop on Ro- 
deo Drive in Beverly Hills, Cali- 
fornia, which carries all the 
company's labels, including 
Mogaand Inabe. 


Mitsuhiro Matsuda. whose 
client list includes such names 


as Candice Bergen; Brooke 
Shields, Jack Nicholson and 
Mkk Jagger, is one of Japan’s 
most successful designers, with 
a three-year-old boutique at 854 
Madison Ave. in New York and 
representation in top European 
and U.S. stores. He says his 
original inspiration came from 
Coco Cband and Paul PoircL 
“Chanel was the greatest de- 
signer. perfectly timeless. She 
and Poiret freed women physi- 
cally and mentally, an extraor- 
dinary thing.” 


V. . 

. ' * V:.v 

' • \ 

P V 



Cosmetics Company Puis on a New Face to Join in Occidental Beauty Rituals 


Discover the essence of hospitality 
in the concept of the Imperial 
There’s always been just one. 
Chances are it’s just the one for you. 


IMPERIAL HOTEL 

TOKYO 

Contact Imperial Hotel Bureau de Umsoa-Paria, your nearest travel agent, 
or any Japan Air Lines office. Or tekx the .Imperial: 26816 IMPHO J. 


Shiseido. the worid's third 
largest cosmetics company (af- 
ter Avon and L’Oreal) with re- 
tail sales in excess of S2.7 bil- 
lion in more than 20 countries, - 
sees its greatest growth poten- 
tial in France and the United 
States. 

With a highly focused mar- 
keting strategy, Shiseido has 

managwt 10 readapt and rein- 
vent Oriental product and 
packaging ideas to complement . 
Occidental tastes and needs. As 
a result, best-selling products 
vary considerably from country 
to country. Yoshio Ohno, presi- 
dent of Shisddo, said. 


Japanese water is harder than 
that in the United States for 
example, thus products used 
with water must be reformulat- 
ed. Also. Shiseido recently in- 
troduced a light shower cologne 
on the Japanese market, which, 
according to Ohno, would nev- 
er sell in Western countries. 
“The fragrance is not strong 
enough,” ne said. Skin-lighten- 
ing creams are another popular 
product in Japan, but are not 
exported to the United States. 

On the subject of beauty ritu- 
als, Ohno noted that Japanese 
women completely change their 
line of cosmetics three times of 


year to coincide with the sea- 
sonal temperature changes. 


At POLA, the $900-million 
cosmetics company referred to 
as the “Avon of Japan” because 
of its door-ta-door selling, these 
are some of the results of stud- 
ies on the differences between 
Japanese and Anglo-Saxon 
women: 

Japanese women have skin 
that is more moist thicker, 
stronger, smoother and more 
delicate. Furthermore, they pre- 
fer thick applications of foun- 
dation with lips rouged in red- 


dish orange, and eyes darkly 
rimmed on die lower lid. 

Anglo-Saxon women, on the 
contrary, prefer light founda- 
tion. red with purple lipsticks 
and eyes rimmed in bright col- 
ors with a heavy coating of mas- 
cara on the lashes. 

But in all countries, research 
has shown that women want 
everything to work fast 

Last October. POLA’s IS (In- 
telligent Skmcarr) division en- 
tered the U.S. market with a 
futuristic computer /TV out- 
post at BloomingdakV Sales 
for the three months of 1984 
were $400,000. ' 


Jean Boucheron indulges in a Japanese cristom i 
by painting the eye of Colbert, for good luck. 

Paris to Tokyo: A Cultural Exchange ' 

Eighteen months after tbev pv^. . . : 

celebrated the tricentenniai of Art de Vivre willshow- 

Colbert, Louis XJV S JJ»ore than. 800 objects 

ble finance minister at the Iro ? the private collections of 
French Mint, the pJestijtious ^nouseSasHenn^Caron,- 
Comitf Colbert is going to Ja- {““araf, Chanel, Patou and., 
pan. TbeComitfcGcdbert unites boucheron in the art deco 

70 of the most daryimg naw* ' splendor of the Tokyo metro- 
of France’s luxury grandamor- Tciea Museum, a far- . 

ques in perfume, porcelain, iew- r* 1 imperial palace decorated 

ehy, stiver, leather, couture, “ 1930s by Herni Raping 

crystal and wine. 006 of, the designers of the!. 

From April 1 to May 12, an 0Cc ? P..Mnar Norm andie. .' ' 1 
exhibition focusing on “The G. J ETT a nd- 

JEAN RAFFERTY 






( 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 



A SPECIAL REPORT ON JAPANESE FASHION 







mm 




m 


f&M’ 


- By Nancy Bcrh Jackson 


_ PARIS- — Japanese. manneqiriu 
are a m odd a gent's dreamr prompt, 
hard-working, meticulously made- 
. op and professional at every uim. 

' That- is why Jean-Franqois 
Guulfe. manager of Glamour nod- 
ding agency in Pais, has no prob- 
lems pucmg these "perfect mod- 
\ ds,” as be calls them, on the 
* runways of top designers. 

Jean-Loiris Schemer, with an 
Oriental theme to his fall/wimer 
collection, was a major employer 

during the recent ready- io-wear 

Showings, where one-third of his 1 5 
“odds were Japanese. "It depends 
oq the collection. There are Asian 
tendencies this . year," said a 
spokesman for Schenec. . 

' J Herbert dc Givenchy has at least 
' one Japanese model in his shows 
and sometimes two or three, no 
jsatter what mood he wants to set 
-He likes their bodies — no hips, no 
bust, vety skinny — and % g gpp. 
dal affection for Japan and its an. 

- He used bis first Japanese mode ls 
In Paris in 1980 ano two years ago 
celebrated his 40th anniversary in 
fashion by staging a ret r os pe c ti ve 
in Tokyo in which 48 of the 52 
models were Japanese. 

: “Monsieur Givenchy Ekes very 
Jhin legs, not much hip, vety sveh, 
very fine,’* said his press spokes- 
, A*nan,.Max Michel Grand. "And ev- 
^erything about a Japanese modd is 
'perfect — the makeup /tfiwiti yong 
M a show. If Monaettr Givenchy 
-has them wear a dress with a bow, 
•Jthey make the bow tidy, perfect 
-American or European modH s are 
. - not always Eke this, unforamate- 
;ly.“ 

•- Japanese modds come to Paris 
as house modds for Japanese do- 
signers, through cooperation be-, 
-tween Paris aid Tokyo agencies, 
with their agent- bus bauds or just 
“pop in" an agency to ask about 



Although most designers and 
agents see no difference m how the 
modds move in the shows, Mary- 
vonne Numata saw a “very obvious 
difference" in a recent Issey 
Miyake show. 

"One Japanese modd between 
two Americans and there is no dif- 
ference, but put a group of Japa- 
nese together and they move slot 
differently, a lot smoother, more 
Eke No theater,” she said, aHrimg 
that perhaps that was the effect 
sought by the an director. 



I 



Off the runway in Paris, Japa- 
nese modds tend to Eve together, 
maintaining a Japanese life-style. 
Few speak either French or En- 
glish, the languages most often 
heard among nwvWt They have 
the reputation in the business for 
not omy being industrious, but 
fastidious. Ot the 2S apartments 
the Glamour agency immmiin for 
models, the Japanese are always 
given the cleanest. 

“They wouldn't stay in them oth- 
erwise,” Guillfe said. 

When the first Japanese modds 


began showing up in Europe about 
six years ago and the popularity of 
Japanese designers swelled, predic- 
tions were made the models would 


soon be everywhere, but they have 
remained a novelty. Some design- 
ers, such as Nina Ricci, would nev- 


er consider hiring them; the house 
prefers traditional blue-eyed 


“In France, we are very conser- 
vative about the look,” Mallta said. 

Glamour, which hanrifrs many 
“exotic” models, reports that 90 



• perieoce in Paris and Milan cn- 

* nances value back home. 

Ruth Malka, booking director of 
-Karen modeling agency, said the 
' market for Japanese models m Par- 
is started when designers were 
looking for “exotic types like 
blades, Japanese and bnmeoes" 
for their shows. Although some 
Japanese modds have moved into 
print, they are usually called upon 
only for a layout requiring a special 
Oriental look, she said. 

Some of the so-called Japanese 
models in Paris are of Japanese 
ancestry, but of another national- 
ity. One modd flown in for last 
month’s ready-to-wear collections 
was a Japanese- American. 

“They send me everyone who is 
Oriental.” said Maiyvotme No- 
meta of Issey Miyakes Europe of- 
fice: . _ . 




MisMko, one of Hubert de 

Japanese modds on French run- 
ways are as tall and willowy as their 
Occidental sisters in tie trade. 
Minimum height is almost S feet 10 
inches (about 1 78 centimeters). The 
suture often comes through an 
American father or grandfather. 
Although mixed blood nas encoun- 
tered prejudice in the closely knit 
Japanese society, in fashion the ex- 
otic mix is an asset In the world of 
international modeling, the blend 
of black or white American fea- 
tures with the Japanese gives a 
broader appeal. 

Hie trend among Japanese mod- 
els is what Malka calls “the girls in 
the street, ” with little makeup and 


Jaavtuca Kiri 

Givenchy’s favorite models. 

much natural appeal Issey Miyake 
discovered his latest favorite, with 
her pretty adolescent face and 
boy's body, operating an devator 
in a Tokyo department store. 

For Japanese modds, French 
haute couture is a vacation since 


they work only a few hours a day, a 
few days a week. In the Tokyo 
collections, they work from 8 AJM. 


to 8 PAL in the showroom as well 
as on the runway and are fined a 
day's pay if they do not turn up for 
work, says Guul£. 

Bat practice makes perfect. 
“When they arrive hoe, they know 
how to move,” he said. 


nese. (AH of the Japanese models 
are women.) 

Despite their professionalism 
and a gentle aging that allows them 
longer careers, few Japanese man- 
nequins have become regulars in 
Pans, although Muhiko, a favorite 
among several top designers, has 
worked several seasons for Gi- 
venchy. 

Japanese models “won't take 
over Paris," Numata says. Even 
Japanese designers only use a few 
of their countrywomen in Paris 
shows — and not because it is 
cheaper to hire locally. Japanese 
designers use blondes because they 
do not want to present themselves 
as “Japanese” designers, she be- 
lieves. 

"Miyake doesn't consider him- 
self a Japanese designer,” she said. 
“He designs for everyone and his 
inspiration is worldwide. Some- 
times a collection is toward Africa, 
sometimes India. He is not so inter- 
ested in saving let's have some Jap- 
anese or black modds. He is more 
interested in the character of the 
girls. His clothes are very strong 
and the girls have to come alive in 
them.” 






... ,, •: - - • 

... . • 

• ••• • - • •• •- ' v ‘ • 


IfCtBV 





! S'. * V ; 

- - : : • . 


•• •• 


Akiko Kamei 


mg^*An Exotic 'Nose’ in the Men’s Club of Fragrances 




’.IK ann* 


By Jean Rafferty 

PARIS — The exclusive band of 
talented perfumers who concoct 


among about 20 other scents, still Kama, dressed with a Pa risian where there is no tradition ot 
more changes were made. “I due in bright red sweater and gray strong, heavy perfumes, calls for a 
worked with Hermfes far months to shirt, accented by red earrings and different style. "Everything is 
improve it," Kama said. “The Jm a vividly color" 1 -* — ! — --- 



the fabled French fragrances have, was exactly what we were looking mid-40s but looks 10 years youn- colognes with a fresh floral note, 
h~n Tnacrt.hni. Vrt for" Jcan-Lonis Dumas-Hermis, ger. “It’s being Japanese, Yoga, usually a bouquet of white flow- 
president of Hermfes, said. "Per- and playing tennis two to three ere,” she points out 
haps our affinity is not so suipris- times a week,” she said “Japanese men prefer a very re- 


shawl, is in her much lighter, eawc de toilette or 




outstanding of the recent crop of baps our affinity is not so $ 
new French perfumes, the M Paxfum mg. Hermfes and Japan share the 
. tTHermfes,” lau n c h ed by the luxury same sense of harmony and ~ 
Faubourg Saint Honorfe store, is mi cm AJdko grid she fou 
elegant, feminine — and Japanese, echo of the Japanese sense of 
For Akiko Kama of the " fra- non at Hermes?* 
grance-development company Kama was working for i 
Rome Bertrand Dupont, the sue- • metre company in Japan wh 
cess of the “Parfum d’Hermfes” ■ dealings with perfume sal 
comes after 10 years of hard work, provided a fascinating giimp: 

, experimentation and what she calls the world of fragrance. Sheqi 
“incredible good luck.” job, went to Grasse and enro! 

She first conceived the formula, a school of perfumery; then i 
i a semi -Oriental, floral blend of on to work for Roure, fi 
f roses, jasmine, hyacinth, vetiver, Grasse and for the last three 
peach and one of her favorite ingro- in the company's labors tork 


traditionally been masculine. Yet for,” Jean-Loois. Dumas-Hennfes, ger. “It’s being Japanese, Yoga, 
the “nose” behind one of the most n resident of Hermfes. said “Per- and Dlavine tennis two to thrw 


□aps our aamny is not so sorpns- umes a weex, sue saia “Japanese men preier a very ic- 

ing. Hermfes and Japan share the . She never wears fragrance at freshing, very classic top note 
same sense of harmony and dyna- work, but Ekes it in the evening and based on tobacco, spices ana a tittle 
n ris m . Akiko said she found an on weekends as long as it is not leather with tittle or no animal es- 
twhoof the Jmmicse sense of tiadi- overwhelming. Her favorites: Her- sences," riie said, “while European 
non at Hermes.” mis’ Amazone, Fidji from Guy men like a much stronger, spicy 

Kama was working for a cos- Laroche, Guer Iain’s Chamade and blend with emphasis on animal 
metre company in Japan when her her own Parfum d’Herm&s “for its notes and a top note of lavender or 
dealings with perfume salesmen discretion.” rosemary." 

7S “0^8 synthesis of East When one is involved in the ddi- 
Sb S mra n and West^ehcr an extra edge, cate art of composing a perfume, 
a school J 01 111 P 0 *®® 1 chann > ^ “ inspiration can^ intervene at any 

^ to to woit “Akiko blends the two mSment, on the temtis court or at 

lO wont awe, HTSt ,n mltUTPS mtrt n fnrm nf hioMv mwi. tlu ... 


“I imagined a modern woman, 
but not only modem, one with a 
classic side to her as well” Kama 
said. “She is a woman with a cer- 
tain distinction and an activewom- 
an who works hard at whatever she 


Grasse and for the lastthm- vears t ^ tures ,‘ nl ? ? ^ onn highly posi- the theater, where she was recently 
KateS! nw ^°^=«a«ivitytliatis arehanted by the four-and^ha]7- 
SSS/ffia * ^ J 001 controlled by the same norms hour B^art production of Mishi- 

is her first ma Geoffrey ma’s five No plays. “1 pm them all 

jor bi> tSs^mie, ^ h£ oe- c°gmcrdal di- in my bag of souvenirs, and they 

o nmniiw nf frimmwi a rector, lends an Eastern spar- come out Tats - . Sometimes I get up 
kle to everything she does." mthemiddleof themgbtaJ^ite 

. * . _ . >■ • a _ n/Wni Vntl l/lMS Atl fnA ffMAl 


both, mens’ and womau’ colognes Her Japanese side comes most down my ldcas m *** ^° L 

for Italy, a perfume for a Scandma- into evidence when she is designing Kamei is currently working on 
vian country and scented creams, a fragrance for men. “There is an another formula for a “great per- 
shampoos and eau de toilette for emphasis on the physical spiritual fume.” “It has a very 
both men and women in Japan. A and moral side of a man,” said bright top note,” she ejqplain^ 
French fragrance for men, to be . Kamel “1 am composing a scent “and a blend of fruity, green and 


r~-:cr-- d^^veloping other fragrances at the firms her Hermfes 

T.ik ' 1 .tr _ j _ . l 


both men and women in Japan. A and moral side 
French fragrance for men, to be . Kamel “1 am cc 
launched next month in Paris, con- for someone who 


rras ho- Hermfes success. interior mixture of spiritual quali- 

This time she was inspired by the ties: I wouldn't like a man who was 


esse, an floral chords." 


. __ r rrapances at tne rirms her Hermfes success. interior mixture of spiritual qnali- Tike manv of today’s best-sefl- 

same time. *Tt needed to be dressed This time she was inspired by the ties. I wouldn't like a man who was ers, ft wiE be semi-Oriental and 

d, and I had to add image of a "wdl-balanced man. successful athletic, yet brutal He dassicin structure: “The fashion in 
IresmtL'jM.Amie successful at work, tail also very must be solid, yet romantic. I un- fragrance now is a return to the 
-Roure] helped me romantic. He is athletic, yet also derstand a mania a vay different dassic style of many mm-of-the- 


■J '- ’ rr . up, modernized, and I had to add image of a "well-balanced man , successful * 

f'"-' ^ 1 other ideas,” she said. “Jean. AntLe successful at work, but also very must be soli 

C,, i.-sf'-ii* [presi^ 1 of hdped me romantic. He is athletic, yet also derstand a i 
. enonnonsly." intelligent with a certain interior way.” 

«=r^f When Hena4s fi toe it from, degance." Creating 

. :V K 


century perfumes Eke Chypre and 

for Japan, I'Ongan from Cbty,” she saM. 


PARIS — When Paris-based 
Japanese shoe designer Tdtio Ku- 
ra agai plays cat and mouse, the 
results are delightfully wearable. 

In addition to shoes in the shape 
of the felines and their quarry, he is 
the designer of a host of amusing 
footwear ranging from shoes deco- 
rated with surrealistic op-dots to 
dassic red, white or black pumps 
with just a smudge of contrasting 
color on the toe. 

Kumagai’s designs, priced from 
700 francs to 1,500 francs (about 
S78 to SK57), may be whimsical but 
they are finding their way onto an 
increasing number of international 
feet — and not only the young. 

“My clients range in age and 
style from tire late Princess Grace 
of Monaco to the young Beaux- 
Ans student who waits for my 
sales,” he said. "I like that — de- 
signing for a wide category of peo- 
ple.” He thinks his slues are not 
really for the 18-year-olds. “One of 
my favorite diems is a lady in her 
60s with a way avant-garde esprit. 
She dresses in Comme des Garmons 
and bought npr mouse shoes.” 
Another client, the wife of the 
president of one of America’s larg- 
est companies who accompanies 
her husband often on business 
trips. Ekes Kumagai's shoes for an- 
other reason. “She told me they are 
wonderful as a conversation ice- 
breaker with people she doesn't 
know," be said 

Kumagai is virtually alone as a 
Japanese designer creating accesso- 
ries. “We don’t have a tradition of 
accessories in Japan,” he said His 
own eatrfee into shoe design came 
by chance after spending 10 years 
in Italy as a stylist for various fash- 
ion houses. “In 1975, Fiorncd gave 
me carte- blanche and I designed 
basketball shoes in silver or gold 
fm- evening.” he recalls. They were 
a smash nit, widely copied, and 
Kumagai was launched on a new 
career in shoes. 

“It is a fascinating and attractive 


Who Always Goes 


mfetier," be says, “but difficult to 
da Shoes are vety important in 
defining a designer s style or look." 
Kumagai first worked with his 
dose friend, Issey Miyake, but gave 
up doing runway shows when he 
realized that “no one looks at the 
shoes.” 

Each collection encompasses 
two very different directions. “That 
is what sets me apart from the oth- 
ers,” he says. “Half the collection is 
created in the sense of the current 
fashion coCcctions. For example, 
my fiat, masculine style shoes go 
with the present Loot The other 
half of the fine is pure creativity: 
shoes designed as objects to give 
total freedom of how they are to be 
worn to those who buy them. 

“Some clients buy shoes as ac- 
cessories to go with their clothes. 
Others choose a dress to go with 
their shoes. I wanted to overthrow 
the stereotype that shoes must al- 
ways come second, as an accessory 
to an outfit" 

For evening, he always shows 
high heels. “Stiletto heels have the 
same effect an women as a tie does 
on men. The}- affect how they place 
their feet how they walk. High 
heels give a woman’ a more femi- 
nine silhouette. Women now work 
like men. That's good, but from 
time to time they need to feel more 
feminine, to bring out and wear 
their jewelry. We don’t want that to 
disappear." 

Inspiration is drawn from 
sources as varied as an exhibitions, 
movies or even passages from a 
novel. The sur realist show at the 
Pompidou Museum in Paris pro- 
duced shoes decorated with a single 
eye, the imprint of a mouth and a 
series of trompe ToeO hand-painted 
faux marbles, simulated woods and 
newsprint. Others resemble the ac- 
tion painting of Jackson Pollock. 

A description of a girl wearing 
silver shoes in Marguerite Doras’ 
novel “L'Amant” ( s The Lover”). 


was translated into flat silver lace- 
up shoes, while that ultimate in 
cinematic spectaculars, “Cleopa- 
tra,” resulted is a pair of Roman 
high -laced open sandals. 

Sometimes the success of certain 
numbers surprises even Kumagai. 
“1 never thought the ‘eye' shoe 
would seR” he says, “but it did 
very welL" His imaginative collec- 
tions provide a new dimension for 
those women who love collecting 
shoes. “Many women, Eke Diana 
V reel and, for example, possess 
more than 200 pairs at shoes. They 
wear them, but they take very good 
c are of than.” 

The true collector’s stamp of ap- 
proval came one day when Kmna- 
gai noticed an elegant gentleman 
studying a window display of shoes 
based on a Kandinsky exhibition. 
“He came in and boiuht a pair 
without asking the size;” Kumagai 
recalls. “When I asked him why, he 
told me he collected Kandinsky, 
and he was going to display my 
shoe in front of one of his paint- 


Kumagai feds Japanese design- 
ers in Pans have given French fash- 
ion “a new spirit." 

“They have brought in some 
fresh air, some oxygen,” he says. 

“Because of the progress in 
transportation and information. 


very different civilizations and cul- 
tures meet and synthesize. Thai is 
the spirit of the future — the new 
life-style." 

He cites Issey Miyake as most 
epitomizing this Japanese ap- 
proach to fashion. “He has com- 
pletely assimilated the cultures of 
the East and West — from Africa 
to New York. He wasn’t content 
just to remain a couturier. With 
him, an became couture. He has 
opened a new path in design.” 

Kumagai himself dresses in the 
low-key blacks and grays so associ- 
ated with the Japanese, although he 
maintains he is looking forward, as 
an old man with white hair, to 
dressing in a “pale pink jacket with 
a light yellow tie.” His personal 
footgear is a pair or black Addidas. 
He smiles when taxed with this 
seeming anomaly. 

"In France, they say ‘pastry 
cooks never eat pastries/ In Japan, 
the saying goes ‘fabric dyers are 
always dressed in white.’ You 
would be surprised how manv styl- 
ists are badly dressed ” 

But in his case, he puts it down to 
the “creativity gap. When I am de- 
signing something, I really want to 
have it. Bui when it is finished. I 
want something else, and so move 
on to the next project" 

—JEAN RAFFERTY 


CONTRIBUTORS 

NINA HYDE is fashion editor of The Washington Post. 

NANCY BETH JACKSON is a Paris-based jour nalis t 

LETTflA CL JETT, a journalist who specializes in fashion, coordi- 
nated the articles for this report. She is a special correspondent in 
Paris for the Chicago Tribune. 

JEAN RAFFERTY is a Paris-based journalist who writes about 
interior design and lifestyles. 

SCHlKO is a New York-based staff writer for The 

New York Times. 

TERRY TRUCCO is a Tokyo-based journ alis t 



Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 



VOL 

Htafe 

i Law 

Lost 

Che. 

Unocal 

36650 

46% 

45ft 

45* 

— * 

William 

10788 

30* 

27ft 

27% 


GMat 

9855 

70% 

68ft 

68ft 

—2* 

Texaco 

9317 

39% 

38* 

39% 

— 14 

FardM 

9134 

43* 

42* 

42* 

— % 

Aetnu 

9025 

43% 

42* 

42* 

— * 

Travler 

8551 

44% 

43ft 

44 

— % 

Mobil 

8492 

31* 

30* 

30* 

— * 

East Air 

8482 

SM 

7* 

8* 

+ % 

CrwZel 

8455 

43 

40 

41 

—2% 

AlmxAJx 

8306 

29* 

Z7% 

27% 

— 1* 

AT&T 

Bill 

21% 

21 

21* 

— * 

Goodyr 

8023 

26* 

76 

Z6M 

— * 

Exxon 

7777 

sz% 

51% 

51% 

— * 

MldSUt 

7652 

13* 

13* 

13* 

— % 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open hw Law Law On. 

Indus 1236-22 129030 127054 127X18 — 940 

Trans 59245 59677 553-fll 53625— 664 

Util 15475 755-47 15398 15675— 0.10 

Comp 518.12 51958 51U3 SHOT— 185 


NYSE index 


Composite 

industrials 

Transp. 

Utilities 

Finance 


Provlou* Today 

HU Low Close JPJA. 
10615 10557 10615 10562 

121A5 121 JJ1 121-45 12073 

fTJS «-22 77 JH 9640 

5617 5606 56.17 5604 

11117 11264 11117 11141 


Dow Jones Bond Averages | 



Prev. 

Today 


Close 

Noon 

Bands 

73X2 

75.10 

utilities 

7240 

7X13 

Industrials 

7845 

7847 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unch an ged 

Total Issues 
New Htetis 
New Lows 


as 

853 

479 

1987 

98 

6 


903 

609 

474 

1986 

'Tl 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Apdl 25 
April 24 
April 23 
April 22 
April 19 


•Included m the sat as flow« 


Boy Sales 

171033 445-064 
171982 425.733 
229,200 446854 
2006S4 446526 
1867 6V 406094 


•ShYt 

m 

IX* 

6950 

7.922 


Fridays 


MSE 


Closing 


Vnl nti PM 

I4t578400 


108430490 

Prtw consolidated dose 

13MZ1408 


Tables Include ttie nation wide prices 
op to ttie closing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 

Dectaed 

Unchanged 

Total issues 
New HUo 
New Lows 


238 

291 

277 

239 

260 

242 

775 

772 

31 

27 

4 

TO 



Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

utilities 

Banks 

Transp. 


week 
Close 
28197 
29775 
347 AS 
33118 
27276 
26114 
251-46 


Now «•> *0* 

284J4 28111 27117 

_ gi44 2SL59 
— 25245 25458 


Standard & Poor’s index 


_ , Today 

High Low Close 3 P.M. 
Industrials 20187 20245 20347 30247 

Transp. lgJ5 151-47 1056 1034 

Utilities 82-40 82H2 8230 S230 

Finance 22X0 2U3 22XD 2115 

Compos He 75L4J 18212 18143 18338 


AMEX Saies 


4 PJVLvoluRte 
Prev. 4 PM- volume 
Prev. con*, volume 


6630000 

7320000 

7420000 


VoL HM LOW 


WOO* 

wo taft* 

RoonPn 

GHCdB 

instSr 

BAT 

BaroBr 

DOTO-P 

ovnlct 

vIContA 

TIE 

TexAfr 

IntHvd 

KavPn 

Astro tc 


7293 1816 
4054 n% 

3847 3 

2839 « 
1831 -1* 
1620 41J 

1320 27% 
1304 2% 

ii5 in* 
m 10 * 

934 5b 
928 12V* 
927 7ft 
9TI W 
851 lb 


17ft 

lift 

2ft 

14b 

ft 

* 

13ft 

9*6 

5ft 

lift 

7 

*% 

1 


17ft —ft 
lift — ft 

J* +Z 

1ft 

27ft + ft 

ift + % 

’S* i# 

12 + ft 

7ft —Mi 
*ft — ft 
1ft 


amex Stock index 


previous 

Low 

229.14 


Close 

230.19 


Today 
3 PAL 
229 A3 



12 Month 
mob Low Sloe* 


Sb. p— 

Dfv. YW. PE IlftHWiLjw Quol.arae 


23ft 16 
19ft 9ft 
18ft 9ft 
21ft 13ft 
43’A 24ft 
21ft 18ft 
n 19 
14ft 8ft 
66ft 44ft 
27 14ft 
54 36% 

25ft 17 
22 12ft 
10W 8ft 
17ft 15 
20 lift 
19ft 8ft 
41ft 25ft 
12b 6ft 
14ft B% 
431* 2716 
53b 52b 
35 15b 

4ft 2ft 
51 38ft 
21ft 13 
2 I 
32 26b 

7ft 6 
I02W 85V6 
14 11 

22Ui 9b 
17ft 10ft 
31b 22ft 
21ft 23ft 
36ft 27ft 
32 17 

26W 20b 
89ft 69 
28b 18b 
22ft 15b 
W% B1 
31ft 24ft 
21b 15b 
45b 28b 
65ft 53ft 


A8 25.3 


AAR 
AGS 
AMCA 
AMF 50 25 57 
AMR 9 

AMRpi 2.18 103 
ANRpf 212 HU 
APL 35 

ASA 100 38 
AVX 32 21 12 
AMLaB 140 20 15 
AccoWds .44 19 18 
AcmeC -40 1H 
AcmeE J2b L6 11 
A da Ex 211*127 
AdmMi 32 22 6 

AdvSys 531 50 15 
AMD 13 

Advert .12 M 
Asrflex ll 

AetnU ZM 41 42 
Art Lot XKJelOJ 
Annins TOO 36 14 
AJleen 21 

AIrPrd 100 15 11 
AlrbFrt OO 13 10 
AIMoas 23 

AkiP pfA 302 122 
AtaPdPf -37 no 
AlaPpf 1100 10-7 
Ataascs 104 7 A 8 
AlskAIr .14 2 9 

Albrtoa JB 13 19 
A Brians .76 15 13 
A Icon 1.20 45 12 
Alcostd 1.20 3A 11 
AlexAlx loo 3A 
Alexdr 19 

AllgCP 1061 16 30 
Aislnl 1-40 SO 
Atalnef 119 112- 
Alolptcn^s 123 
AIISPw 170 85 9 
AllenG Mb 3.1 14 
Alldcps 1 AO 4.0 9 
AldCopf 674 102 


113b 99 AldCppfUOO 106 
107ft 100b AldCpt 11390115 
27W 12 AttdPd 
59W 38 AlldStr 2.12 37 8 
12ft 5ft AlHsCh 
34ft 24 AlhC of 
27ft 20 ALLTL 104 69 9 
39ft 30b Alcoa 150 37 K 
25ft 15ft Amax 70 l.i 
42b 32ft Amaxpt 3M 17 
33ft 2Zb AmHaS 1.10 35 15 
144 98ft AHesPf 150 18 
2b 1ft AntAsr 
19ft 15ft ABakr 8 

70 53 ABrand 350 57 9 

27b 24ft ABrd pf 175 10 JO 
115 55b ASdcrt 180 18 M 

26b 19ft ABIdM 86 38 13 
27ft 20 ABusPr 84 24 15 
5 5b 40ft Am Con 270 58 11 
24ft 21ft ACanpf 180 117 
48 36 ACanpf 100 65 

110 103 ACari of 1375 128 

199* 16b ACopBd 120 115 
33ft 25ft AOvCv 251o 98 
11 6ft ACrtltC 1Z 

56b 43ft ACvan 180 38 13 
29b 18ft ADT 82 38 26 
21ft 15ft AEJPw 1260115 8 
44ft 25 Am Exp 173 28 15 
30 14ft A Fa mil 84b 12 13 
33ft 19ft AGnCp 180 11 10 
13ft 6 AGnl wt 
90 SBb AGnl pfB 5806 67 
71ft 44b AGn I Pf 125 48 
67 40b AGnpfD 284 61 

32ft 25ft A Herd 188 38 9 
13b 7ft A Holst 
62ft 46ft AHome 280 47 13 
38 26b AHOSP 1.12 37 10 

■6ft 62ft Amrtch 660 75 8 
79b 52 AlnGrp 84 8 19 

TSft 18ft AMI 72 38 12 
5b 3 AmMot 
65b Z7ft ANtRss 122 38 12 
43ft 25 APrasU 741 15 3 
13ft 5ft ASLFta 4 

18ft 12b ASL-FT pt 2.19 162 
16 10ft AStllP 80 68 14 
35ft 22ft AmSId 180 58 11 
56ft 26ft AmStor M 12 9 
66b 46ft AStrpfA 488 69 
56ft 51 AStTPfB 680 128 
22ft 14ft AT&T 120 58 18 
38ft 30ft AT&T pf 384 9* 
39ft 31ft AT&T Pf 374 97 
27b 13b AWotrs 180 37 9 
68b 36ft AWatpf 183 11 
28ft 19ft Am Hot! 240 9.9 8 
68ft 53b ATrPr 584 82 
lift 4ft ATrSc 
BO 58b ATrUn 584 7.1 
33 26 ft Amor an lao 48 7 

43 17ft AmesOs 20 5 21 

112ft 60 Amespf S32 48 
29ft 2lft Amefefc 80 12 13 


195 16ft 16ft 16ft + b 

24 13% TOft 13% + % 
21 10b 10ft 10b + ft 

1657 20ft 19ft 20 — ft 
4744 41ft 40ft 40b— ft 
14 21ft 21b 21b + ft 
223 20ft 23ft 20ft + ft 
48 8b 8ft Bft— W 
160 53 52ft 52 W— b 
166 15ft 15 15ft 
782 Sib SDft 50b— ft 
114 23ft 23 23b + b 

25 14ft 14ft 14ft 

19 9 9 

52 16ft 16ft 16ft— ft 
175 15ft 14b 14ft— I 
410 9ft 8b 9 —ft 

4229 29W 28ft 29 — ft 

31 0b Bb 8b 
43 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
9023 43ft 42ft 43ft + b 
55 55b 55ft 55ft— ft 
Ml 34 33ft 33ft— ft 

12 2b 2b 2b 
374 48ft 48ft 48ft 

77 18b 18 18ft + * 
103 1ft 1ft 1H 

6 32b 32 32b + ft 

54 7ft 7ft 7ft— V* 
50ZI02W 102ft 1MW 

55 W 14 14 

846 22 21ft 21ft — ft 

26 16b 16ft 16b + b 

350 31ft 31 31 +» 

1777 25ft 25 25 — ft 

41 33b 33ft 33b + ft 
8308 29b 27b 27b— lb 
87 22ft 21ft 22ft + b 
47 78b 71 78 +1 

69 2Sft 24% 25 
11 19ft 19ft 19ft— ft 
5 911b 91b 91b 

351 31ft 31ft 31b + ft 
171 19ft 19ft 19ft 

6716 46b 45ft 45ft— ft 
38 65ft 65b 65ft 

7 113b 112b 112b— ft 

50 104 103ft 104 + ft 

14 21b 21b 21b 
2610 57b 55ft 56ft + ft 

148 7 6b 6ft 

57 29ft 29ft 29ft , 
62 26ft 25ft 26ft + ft 
1985 32b 32W 32b— ft 
534 17b TTft 17ft 
7 34ft 34ft 34ft 
2924 52ft 31 31ft— ft 

2 136 134 134 +4 

233 2ft 2 2ft 

51 18ft 17ft 1BH + ft 
290 68ft 67ft 67ft 

18 27ft 27ft 27ft 
293 708ft ?07ft 108 —ft 
40 25ft 25ft 25ft 
4 26b 26ft 26ft + ft 
907 S3* S3* 53ft + % 

1 23ft 23ft 23ft 

53 46b 44M 46ft— ft 

4 109 100ft 109 +1 

10 19ft 19 19ft + ft 

13 27ft 27ft 27ft + ft 
20 ffb Sb Bb 

568 S3b 53b 53ft— ft 
516 24b 24b 24ft— ft 
2144 21b 21ft 21ft 
5381 44b 43b 43b— ft 
111 29ft 28b 28ft— ft 
3719 33ft 32 32b— 1 

286 13ft 12b 12b— ft 
544 89% 87ft 87ft— 2ft 

2 71ft 71ft 71ft— ft 
903 66b 64ft 6fft— 2 

4 30b 

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104 30* 29% 29ft— ft 
625 87ft 86ft B7ft -l-lft 
1195 79b 78ft 7Bb— 1 
968 94ft 23b 24 
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372 25W 25 25ft— M 

117 26ft 25ft 25ft— ft 
138 10b 10W 10ft 


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JD 

24 

16 

68 

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305 

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88 

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240 

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20b 13ft Anlxtr JB 20 16 
16b Bft Anthem 44 J 14 
15b 10ft Anttmv Mb 38 6 
14ft 9b Apache 28 13 12 
2W ft ApcfiPwt 
19ft 15ft APChP utfl.10 100 
61b 50 ApPWPt 7-40 111 
32ft 27b ApPwpf 4.18 128 
39ft 17b APlDta 1.121 U 19 
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21b 15ft ArehDn .14b J 14 
94ft 14ft Artz PS 272 11.1 7 
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102 79 ArIPpf 10J0 106 

23ft 13% ArVBs! M 2.1 I 
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A b ArinHt 
19b 6b Armco 
29ft 15ft Armcpf 2.10 11.7 
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36 29ft ATRlWpfSJS 1QJ9 
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26W 13b ArowE JO 14 7 
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23ft 14 Arvlns 40 4.1 7 
31ft 17ft Asoreo 
31ft Mb AshlOil 160 5.1 
43b 33ft ASMOpt 440 105 

40 31ft AshlOpf 346 94 

63 45W AWDG 260 49 10 

100 73 AldOpf ITS 44 

Kft l«ft Alhtane 160 it 9 
Z7ft 19ft AtCvEl 248 9.1 9 
54ft 40ft Alt Rich 3-00 i7 25 
356b 284 AtiRCPf LOO 4 
38 32W AtiRCPf 175 104 

127ft 97 At! Rent 240 22 
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33b 18b Ausat 40 14 20 
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5 4b Avalon n 
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3»ft 23 Avery 
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8 

40 1J 14 
240 94 10 


5 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
234 12ft 12b 12b— ft 
199 lb 1ft 1ft 
308 19ft 19b 19ft 
120x61 61 61 +1 

21 32b 32b 32b + ft 
205 34b 34ft 34ft + ft 
63 13b 13 13 

*57 21ft 20ft 20b— b 
1039 24b 94 24 W— ft 

16 29b 29ft 29ft— ft 
50X1 00W 100ft 100W— ft 
16 19b 19ft 19ft + ft 
8* 21b Kg Zlg-J* 

1127 8 7b 8 + ft 

117 ISb 17b 18 
205 18b 18b lib— ft 
716 34ft 33ft 34 + ft 

300Z 34b 34b 34b 
16 26b 26ft 26b + ft 
270 14ft 14b 14ft 
28 25b 25ft 25b 
86 19b 19ft 19b— ft 

136 24ft 24b 24ft + ft 

137 31ft 31b 31b— ft 
54 42b 42W 42b + b 

4 39ft 39ft 39ft 

838 62b 41% 41ft — ft 

Too iw ioa loo + b 

5 20b 20b 30b + b 

230 27b 27 27b + ft 

7361 53b 52 Vj 53 — b 
9 361b 36Tb 361b +4W 
200x36 36 36 

4 ISB 136ft 124ft— 1% 
12 13W 13ft 13b— V. 
281 22ft 22b 22b + b 
288 42b 42V. 42ft— ft 
45 4ft 4b 4b— ft 
,47 26b 26ft 26ft + b 
128 34 33b 33b + ft 

68 14b 14b 14b— ft 
1305 30b 29b 29b + b 
1255 21ft 20ft 21ft + ft 
40 20b 19b 19b— b 


20 10 
35W 18b 
23W IS 
24b 18ft 
2ft b 
9 2 

52b 29b 
23ft in* 
14b 7b 
43b 30b 
Mb 21 
10b Bb 
,5b 3b 
62 39ft 
48ft 29 

56 49 

43b 26b 
27b 15ft 
21 14ft 
52ft 40 
isb iib 
32W 23b 
68b 37b 
24b 19b 
42ft 35 
12ft 7ft 
30ft 19 
24ft 18 
52b 33ft 
33ft ms 
13ft 8b 
28b 17ft 
18ft lib 
25ft 17% 
n 20 b 
JSb 29b 
33b 24b 
62 46W 

50 30b 

9% 4b 
11 9b 
18ft 12ft 

fr g 

»b 22b 
27b 19% 
38 27b 

55 38ft 
29ft 20b 
40b 23 
3B 32 
21 17 

7b 3b 
23b 7ft 
6ft 3ft 
17b 10ft 
26ft 14b 
SSb 37b 
27W 1M 
36ft 21ft 
24ft 19ft 
1BW 13ft 
26ft 17b 
32ft 21 
40 14b 

53ft 37 
66ft 37 
44ft 32ft 

57 48 
29ft ISb 
72b 5Z 
24ft 16ft 

8ft 4b 
39b 2SW 


BMC XB 46 

Baimcs jo 16 

Bkrlntl S2 50 
BaJdor M 16 
viBoidu 
eidupf 

Bolicp 128 26 
BallvMt JO 12 
Bally PK 

BaltGE 320 76 
BncOne 1.10 36 
BncCtrn 62e 56 
BanTex 

Bandas 120 2.1 
BkBas 260 SO 
BkNEdp&68el02 
BkNY 204 46 

BnkVas 1J0 17 

BnkAm 162 76 
BkAm nf 5L19el12 
BkAm pf 208 
BfcARfy 260 76 
BanfcTr 270 LI 
BkTrnf 230 102 
BATrpf 422 102 
Bonner ,Q3e 3 
Bard 64 16 
BamGp 60 36 
Barnrt 128 26 
BeiyWr m 23 
BA9IX .12b 16 
Bauscfi 78 26 
BaxITr J7 26 
BayFIn 20 .9 

BovStG 260 8.1 

Bearlns 160 30 
BaatCo 160 56 
Beat Pf 328 57 
BectnD 120 26 
Beher 

Belter M 170 1*6 
BeldnH 60 27 
BrtHwl 36 16 
BetHwpf 67 23 
BrtMIt 6JSB 76 

BCes 128 

Belllnd 22 16 
BejiSpu 260 76 
BrtoAH 60 16 
Dentil 160 3-5 
BMfCp 260 46 
Benrtnf 460 tzo 
Benefp f US 114 
BsnotB 071 
Bergen 
Berkoy 

Best Pd M 16 
BettiSlI 60 26 
BetMl pf 560 126 
BethStpfuo ill 
Beverly 23 12 
BJgTTir 30 37 
Btacftn 

BJacftD 64 10 
BIckHP 162 33 
BlOfrJn fit 27 
BICkHR 260 4.9 
Boeing 160 22 
Bailee 160 47 
BobeCpfSOO 92 
BaHBer .10 6 
Barden 364 45 
BorgWa 62 46 
Bormns 

BosEd 324 12 


28 58 

IZ 24 
2 1567 
15 t 
125 
1 

12 41 

1390 

'2 A 

IJ 465 
124 

12 
S 

7 
9 


to* tow iaw— b 

31ft 31U 31ft + ft 
18ft 18ft 18ft + ft 
22ft 22b 22ft 
lft lb lb 
«V> *W *W 
52b 51b Sift— ft 
Wft HW lib + b 
10b 10ft 10ft 
42ft 42b 42W + ft 
30W 30 30ft + ft 
9ft 9ft 9ft 
3ft 3ft 3ft 


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r;i 

rzi 

57% 


203 

tj 


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140 

SS 

55 

55 + * 

161 

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42 

42* 


27 

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27* — 

ft 

2054 

21 

ca 

2D% — 

ft 

12? 

46 

46 

46 — ' 

1 

81 

16% 

16* 

16% 


288 

31% 

31ft 

31* 


434 

67* 

66* 

66% — 

% 

101 

24* 

34* 

24ft— 

* 

3 

41ft 

41ft 

41ft — 

ft 

33 

10* 

10% 

10ft— 

ft 

1B3 

| J 


30% + ft 

7 

Ea 


30%— 

ft 

643 

53 


52ft — 

* 

42 

21* 

jj( 

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ft 

223 

12 


12 + ft 

162 

r r t, 

31 

27ft — 

ft 

4067 

® i 


15* 

1 



22ft — 

h 

16 



3214 — 

ft 

75 

34 


33% — 

ft 

2388 

31* 


31* + ft 

11 

58 


57* 


300 

50 

49 

49ft — 

% 


12* 

* 

9 50 

10 157 

1 

9 988 
145 

13 *9 
8 1990 

25 153 

10 11 
10 2191 

300C 
15b 
22 120 

14 4 

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27 154 
2998 
99 
27 

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1* 387 

M 

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8 33 
1* 185 

13 99 
8 18*2 

17 398 
14 

20 79 

9 445 
9 >34 

*3 
■ 198 


-- -- 5b 

left 10 b in* + % 

15ft 15 15 —ft 

29b 29ft 29ft + ft 
29b 29b 29b 
88 87 87ft + V» 

30 29 29 —ft 

20ft 20b 20ft + b 
38 J7W 37b 
51 SOW 50b— b 
28 W 28b 28b + W 
41b 40ft 40b 4- W 
37W 36W J7W +lft 
21b 21W 21b 4- b 
5ft 5b 5b— ft 
23ft Z3ft 23ft 
*V» 5b 5b- W 
13ft 13ft 13ft— b 
17b 14b 14b— ft 
41ft 41 W 41b 4- ft 
2W> 20ft 20ft— b 
mil 33 5JW— w 
22ft 21ft 21ft— ft 
17ft 17ft 17ft 4- ft 
21W 31ft 21ft— b 

m* sob soft— « 

21W 20b 20ft— ft 
49ft 49ft 49ft— b 
«b 62ft 62ft— 1ft 
41ft 40b 40b— % 
Wfc 54ft 54ft 4- ft 
26b 21ft 24ft 
Mb 44ft 47ft— b 
21b ZIft 21ft— ft 
■ 7ft 7ft 4- U 
38ft 38b 38ft 


N.Y. Stocks Prices Move Lower 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices were lower at the 
dose of ihe New York Stock Exchange Friday 
in moderate trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which rose 
6 l 29 Thursday, was off 9.6 to 1,275.18 at the 
close. 

Declines led advances by a 4-3 margin. 

Volume amounted to about 86.6 million 
shares, down from 108.63 million Thursday. 

Despite its earlier advances, some analysts 
were skeptical about the market’s ability to 
sustain an upward drive. 

“The stock market is beginning to sense a 
renewed uncertainty” about Federal Reserve 
action and legislation on the federal deficit, said 
Eugene Peroni of Bateman Eichler, HUi Rich- 
ards in Los Angeles. 

The market has “mounted a pretty good 
foundation here for gains, bat it still lacks any 
particular fire power,” he said. 

There is an uncomfortable disparity, he not- 
ed, in the leadership, with most emphasis on 
special-situation stoats. 

Until the market sees more leadership — 
particularly in the high-technology sector — the 
market will continue to go up only cautiously 
and be more vulnerable to retreat, he said. 

Ihe market still looks promising, said Alfred 
Goldman, of A.G. Edwards & Sons, Sl. Louis. 

He said the intermittent rally begun earlier 
this week could eventually take the market to 
retest the 1300 level 

But the lack of quality leadership, and the 
emphasis on “crap-shooting merger mania — 
fact or fiction” is a problem, he said. 

Friday’s early lows were caused by normal 


profit-taking and seD programs, especially 
among the blue-chips, he saioL 

But fundamentally “there is no reason any- 
body should have any conviction about any- 
thing,” Mr. Goldman said, citing “a world of 
unknowns” about the economy. 

Because of those unkn owns and a lack of cash 
at many institutions, “nobody will be buying 
with wild abandon,” be said. 

In early trading, Unocal was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, off fc to 46. Travelers Coip. 
followed, off to 43ft. Aetna Life was third, up 
ft to 43ft. 

PepsiCo, was up ft to 53ft in active trading. 

■ Crown Zellerbach was off 2ft to 41ft after 
announcing plans to liquidate its timber hold- 
ings and split the company into three parts. The 
move was an effort to thwart Sir James Gold- 
smith’s takeover bid, after its $1.36 billion offer 
from Mead Corp. collapsed. 

General Motors was off 1ft to 69ft, Ford (ex- 
dividend) was off ft to 42ft and Chrysler off 1 to 
35ft. 

Among technologies, IBM was off ft to 128ft, 
Digital Equipment up ft to 103ft and Cray 
Research was off ft to 70%. 

Data General was up ft to 39ft. 

Storer Communications agreed to a leveraged 
buyout by a company to be formed by Kohlberg 
Kravis. The stock was off 2 to 77ft. 

Prices were lower in active trading of Ameri- 
can Stock Exchange issues. Wang Laboratories 
class B led the actives, unchanged at 17%. Dyn- 
alectron was second, up ft to 14%. Dome Petro- 
leum followed, unchanged at 2ft. 


To Our Readers 

Becau s e of the seven-hour time difference 
between New York and Paris tmtil April 27, 
some itwroi in the Market Summary above are 

from 3 P.M. New York time instead of the usual 

4 P.M. Also because of the time difference. 


s om e other items elsewhere in the Business 
Section are from the previous day’s trading. We 
regret the inconvenience, which is necessary to j 
meet distribution requirements. 


12Mfln» 

Hiatt Lew Stodc 


D»v. YM. PE 


20% 12 
3V* 
3% 1% 

?U VI 
16* 6% 
19% ** 
23 P*< 

2B% 21* 
2 SM 12V4 
78 60* 

52 4BV» 
60* 37% 
30ft 2 QVj 
32ft 20* 
29V. 31 Hi 

18 % ia 

34* 19 
29% 19* 
29ft 25ft 
28* 23ft 
15ft 9% 
9* 4% 
10 % 7 % 
28% IS 
>8 11 * 
16% 5% 

78* 58% 
14ft 5ft 
20ft lift 
32* 24ft 
20ft 15 
ft 

32ft 21% 
38* 18* 
29ft I7ft 
21 % 21 % 
3* m 
21% 9% 
20 75ft 
ZIft 1* 
28ft 15ft 
6ft 3 
17* 11% 
46 28ft 
14% 9ft 
Uft 5% 
22* 12% 
24ft T7ft 
31% 18ft 
20ft TO 
7% 1% 
9ft 2% 
41% 30 
16% 13% 
54ft 38 


64 22 


EOOCO 
East Air 
EALwtO 
EALwM 
ElAJrpf 
EAirpfB 
EAlrpfC 
EastGF 120 56 
EartUtl 2D6 116 
EsKoO 320a 43 
ejKMfwi 
Eaton 160 23 
EeJiUn 28 36 
Eckert LU4 36 
EtSisSC 160 4J> 
EDO 28 13 
Edward 20 23 
EPGdpt 235 ItUJ 
EFGPt 365 132 
EPGpr 
ErToro 
EMM 

EMM pt LOO 92 
eictsss 28 6 

Etalri 20 A3 
Etscinf 

EmrtEl 260 36 
Em Rod 64t 68 
Entry A 60 36 
Emttart 1600 46 
EmoOs L78 87 
EnExc 

ErtalCp 72 27 
EnttBu 26 12 
EmetxJt 160 56 
ErtsExn 
Ensree 
Ent»ra 

EotxSn L87e>L1 
Entaxln 120 69 
Eaufxs 1.14 60 
Eaubnk 

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Eat Res 132 38 
Eanritcn .12 6 

Ertwnitf JO 27 
64 22 

C 200 36 

Estrtnr 32 33 
EtttYl ■ 26 27 

vIEvanP 
vIEvanpf 
ExCelo 120 <3 
Excolsr 126H16 
Exxon 360 66 


775 

8471 

240 

248 

40 

102 

240 

w in 

7 63 

12 2716 
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12 115 
T1 1068 
11 122 

13 132 
20 341 

7 

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18 764 

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II 9 
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17 277 

11 4771 

ID 45 
7 23 

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13 157 

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1028 
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15 91 
94 

5 

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9 5 

IS 45 

12 24 

13 32 

9 29 

11 1634 

44 

45 
9 67 

27 

8 7775 


20 % 20 
8* 7ft 
3% 3ft 
1* 1 
15ft 15ft 
18% 17* 
23ft 22ft 
22ft 22 
19* lift 
67% 66% 
45ft 4 4ft 
52% 52ft 
25* 24% 
27 26ft 
35% 35 
15ft 15* 
31 29% 

23ft 23% 
29 28* 

28ft 28* 
15 14* 

F* 8ft 
10* 10*. 
25 24% 

15ft 14% 
7 6% 

72 71* 

14% 13% 
15ft 15ft 
28ft 28* 
2Qg 20% 

27% 26% 
34% 34% 
27ft 26ft 
21% 71ft 
2V. 2% 

10ft 10 
17 16% 

18% 10% 
28ft 28 
6* 6% 
16ft T6ft 
45ft 45 
13 13 

11M 70* 
20* 20 
23ft 23ft 
19% 19ft 
20ft 20* 
2 * 2 % 
2 * 2 % 
35ft 35% 

16ft 16% 
52% 51% 


20 

IW + % 
3ft + * 
lft + ft 
lift + % 

1791— * 
23ft + % 
22 — * 
IS*— % 
44% — ft 
44ft— ft 
52%— % 
25ft— % 
26ft— * 
35 

15ft + ft 
30ft— % 
23ft 

28ft— * 
28% — * 
IS +ft 
8ft— ft 
Iff*—* 
24ft— ft 

15% ft * 
6ft— ft 
71ft— % 
13ft— * 
T5%— % 
23* ft ft 
20* 

26ft— % 

£*ft% 

TTft 

ZW 

10ft— % 
16ft ft % 
T*ft 

28*— * 
4W + % 
16ft— ft 
45 — % 

13 

11* + * 
20ft— % 
ZIft— * 

19ft— * 
20% + % 
2ft— % 
2ft + % 
35ft— ft 
16* + * 
Sift— % 


c 


nMnm 

HUB Low Slot* 


Dhr.YM.PE WtaHWiLnw 


Gate 

OuaLClfO* 


1U 


1.17 113 
113 


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s 

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77 63 BosEpT 

W* 9 EknEpr ... 

12ft 10% BoiEpr 1.44 

25% 14ft Bowtrn Jl 

31% 25% BrtoSf 1M 

58* 43 BrbtM 188 

4ft 3* BrKLnd 
30 21% BrltPt 

18* 9% BrttTpp 
5* 2ft Brack 
22 15% Brckwy U2 &0 21 

39 28 BfcyUG 3.12 El 7 

32% 29 BkUGpf 395 122 

26* 13 BwnSil 80 18 9 

30 22* BrwnGp 1J6 52 IS 

45ft 26ft BrwnF 188 25 16 

40* 23* Brrawk 180 18 8 

40% 27% BrrtiW* M 15 15 

16 12 BucvEr M 32 53 

19% 13ft Bundy 80 48 « 

18% 15% BankrH 116 128 

21ft 14* Burlnct 12 

29ft 23 Burllnd 184 68 72 

58% 35 BriNth L40 2J 7 

7ft 8% BrlNOBf SS 78 


50z 

74 

74 

74 — 

* 

18 

10% 

TOft 

10% + 

* 

1 

12* 

17* 

12* 


301 

22% 

22* 

22ft — 

* 

80 

29* 

27* 

28* + 

* 

Z195 

S7% 

57% 

57* + 

* 

1 

4* 

4ft 

4* 



657 77ft 77 27 — * 

188 17* 17 17 — ft 

46 2* 7% 7* 

190 22 21% 22 +% 

200 38ft 38* 38% + % 
24 32% 32* 32*— ft 
19ft 20 ‘ 

36% 26% 

43* 43% 

33 33% 4- * 

32% 33 
W% 13ft 
15 TTft 17* 17* 

3 17% 17* 17% 

116 18% 18% 1M 

549 25* 23ft 25* -f % 
702 51% 51% 51% — * 

4 7% 7% 7ft— ft 


, 20 
91 26% 
159 44* 
1053 33ft 
93 33 
zn |4 




22* 

19 BrtNpf 

XW 

94 

4 

22* 

22* 

22* + * 

51% 

44ft BrtNPf 

X56el0L9 

4 

61 

41 

51 


IBM 

12% BumdV 

44 

52 15 

27 

14* 

14* 

14* 


44* 

48* Burroft 
12* Buttrln 

X60 

43 11 

1170 

41* 

40ft 

60* — 

* 

20% 

J2 

24413 

206 

18* 

'SS 

18% — 

* 

11% 

2ft Buttas 



68 

3ft 

M — 

* 

15 

6* Birin P? XI0 2X0 

79 

9* 

8* 

9* + * 


23ft 24% CBI In 180a IS 
122 60* CBS 3410 28 

8% 4* CCX 
12 8* CCX pf 185 125 

55* 27 CIGNA 160 4.9 
3TW 23% CIGpf 275 98 
40% 21% CNAFo 
10% 8ft CI4AI IJOatU 
44* 34* CPC lilt 380 54 
23* J4H CPNtl 740 M 
20ft 19ft CRIIMI 2.158108 
27% 18% CSX 1.16 48 
40* 23 CTS 180 29 
12% 7% C3 Inc 
33* 22% Cabot SX 38 
14* B* Coeiar 
20ft 17% Cal Fed 48 26 
47% 32* CalFdpf 4J5 104 
23% 13% CaltHl 85b 18 
IB 15* CRUco 40 
9% 3% CmoRg .161 

73* 54* Cam 5a 2J0 3J 

45% 28% CdPacg 140 

21ft 14* CanPEa 89 

223 141 CaoCIta 80 

50% 30% CopHW 1J4 38 

14ft 10 Carina® 48 

40* 24% Carlisle 182 Z» 

mu 15 CaroFf 40 18 

28 % IV* CarPw 240 9J 

Z3ft 19% CorPfrt 147 118 

48 35% CarTec 2.10 ST 

lift 7% Carrol JI7 T 

44% 30% CaraPIr 180 23 

32* 18* CartHw 182 48 

34ft 19% CarTWI 52 U 

16% 9% CoscHC 180 78 

T6ft 9% CartfOc 
75 1M CetiCBf 128 
49% 28% CatrpT JO 1J 

27* 16 COCO .76 38 

94% 62% Cetane* 440 4J 

40% 34 Crtanpf 450 114 

« 7% Cengyn JD4 4 

«ft 32% Cental 288 58 

26ft 17 Centex n 
2« 17 CenSaW 283 88 
»* 16% CenHud 284 118 
25 18% CenllLt 282 &9 

19ft 14* Oil I PS 1J4 S4 
25% 17% CnLaEI 2X8 &2 
» ZM CLaEloU.lt 1ZJB 

gSi^as^’s 'g 
’aa' 381 " 

iw 7* CntnrTI 80 78 
23ft iff* Cenvlll 240 128 
27% 15% Crf-taed JO IS 
24% 16ft CeuAIr 48 28 
mu 16ft rampln 48 18 
27% 19 Chmlpt 180 49 
54 43* rami pf 440 98 

W 8 CllamSo 40 48 
4% 1 vlCnrtC 

m u viratwt 
5% 1 % vlOirtpt 

SS* 35% ChQM 380 78 
46 34% Chose p» 585 1U 

58 48 CltOMPf 683el28 

57ft 51 raase Pfl240e238 
21% 14 Chelsea 82 38 
34* 24% raemed 182 58 
« 23% C funny 248 68 

Oft 33% Qt NY pf 1X3 43 
s«e 46 raNY p# 58SB1L1 
39ft 31* OMBBk 184 34 
38% 31ft ChesPn 2410 58 
39% »* gievrn 240 68 
30* TTft CNWrt 
209 127 raiMhv 

** 33ft ax Ml Pt 
26* 16% CMPnT .We 4 
) ,7ft OtfcFiri l J3T 4.1 
rt% 24% rarlsCr 48t 1.1 
12% 3 Qtristn 
13ft 9ft Chro ma 
if.. O Oirnipf 
Mft Wt Chryrtr 1X0 28 
67% 34% raubbe 280 U 

HSSap** 3 ® P 

19% lift Church » 44 24 
46 35ft anBUI 3.12 68 
Wft 8ft CUtOE 2.16 148 
31. 34 CbtGpf 4X0 m 

54% 3? ClnGpf 7A4 1*7 
69 50 CmGpf 982 138 

28* 30 ChtAMI 82 38 
36 21* ardK 84 28 

31 1«% CJratv XB 8 

34* 14* arcus 
47ft mu cmerp 284 49 
86 68% cmaspf 2190102 

«% 32% atVlIW 
68 52 Ctylnpf 200 38 

25% 21* Ctylnpf 227 118 
10* 6ft CtaUr Jl WL1 
32* 33% CtarKE 1.W 33 
16 6ft CIOVHm 
Oft 17 ChrCH 1X0 A1 
21% 13* ClewEI 282 120 
*0 46ft OvEl pf 740 113 
» 87 OvElpf 786 123 

lift ID Owpk 80 48 
17% 15% Ctvpkpf 283 138 
n if* avtfipf U4 iia 
36* 32ft ctorax 1J6 38 
2T* Mft ciubMn .10* 8 
EJ* 23* aueftF 1X0 38 
»% 15% atirtpf 1X0 54 
2* 13* ceadun 40 23 
31 , 2% Coastal 40a 8 

26% 30ft raiaM 12b SO 
49% 39 CataPpf 486 98 
23* 14% OMAIRB 84 38 
n 10 colFdes .16 3 

21* 2D* Col Pen 14 a 49 
63% 39% cottlnd 280 44 
35% -24* C0IGM 3.18 114 
H 48 CrtOcat 5560118 


12 1148 25% 25 25% + * 

II 1921 108% 105* 105*— 2% 
10 45 6* 4ft 6ft— % 

20X 10 TO 10 

54 715 54% 53* S3*— 1* 

101 30ft 30* 30% — * 

16 52 38* 36ft 38% — % 

15 10% TOft 10ft 

10 720 4T* 40% 40ft— % 

0 39 am 21% 21ft— 16 

243 20ft 20ft 20* + % 

8 1732 24* 23* 24 + % 

_ 140 34* 34* 34% — % 

>1 93 9% 8% 9% + % 

9 5SU 25* 25* 25* + % 
15 1113 13* 12* 12%—* 
7 192 19% 1«* 78ft— V4 

« 45* 45 45 — * 

16 19ft 19% 19ft 4- % 

78 ZIft 21 21ft— ft 

42 4ft 4 4 

11 137 67% 66ft 66ft— * 

170 43ft 43% <3*— % 

4 20H 20% 20ft— ft 

31 393 223 220% 221% + ft 

12 482 50% 50% 50% + ft 

. 18 lift 11* 11* 

10 24 35* 35* 35% 

10 201 21* 2T 21* + % 

7 839 27% 27% 27ft 

13 X Vft 9% »% + % 

8 38 42% 42 42% + % 

18 2660 28% 28 28ft— ft 

12 47 32* 32% 32* + * 

8 16 15% 15% 15* 

659 11* 10* 10*—* 

6 20* 2D* 20* + * 

„ 200 33 32* 32* 

11 3 23 23 23 

9 145 92% 9T% 92ft + % 

2 39% 39% 39% 

25 378 9* 9% 9* + % 

9 51 49% 40% 40ft + * 

ID 252 2 22% 22% 

7 688 14* Uft 34% + ft 

6 160 24 25% 25%— % 

9 64 25 24* 24ft— ft 

10 644 19 15* 19 + ft 

7 54 25* 25* 25ft— % 
_ U 34% 34M »ft + % 

5 363 10% 9ft 10% + ft 

IS 701 24 34 34 

6 33 18* 17% M — ft 

_ 113 1% 3* 3* 

8 34 10* 10% 10% 

8 2S5 19ft 18% 19% + ft 

11 TFT 23% 23% 27ft 

15 246 18* 17ft 18% + ft 
6915 23ft 22ft 22ft— * 

5 24% 24* 24% 

241 50* 49% 49ft + * 

12 484 8* 8% B%— * 

» ** “ + ft 

34 2ft 0% 2ft 

6 6140 54% 54 S4%— ft 

22 44* 44* 44*— ft 

10 54% 54% 54% 

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172 12ft lift 12* + ft 

107 10* 10% 18* 

. 26 50% 50 50 

•3 4445 36% 35% 35%— Hi 

15 897 67 66 66 —lft 

104 SB 57% 57*— % 

M 255 18* 18 18ft 

8 17 46* 46 46 

6 312 15% 15% 15* + ft 

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26 68 23 2Z% 22% — ft 

M 769 33% 33% 33% + * 

13 376 26% 25% 26 — % 
13 749 24% 23* 24% + ft 

7 2477 46% 45% 45ft— ft 

100 80% BOH 80% — ft 

9 1203 38% 31* 38* 

10 59% 59* 59% + ft 
188 34% 24* 24* 

6 63 7% 7 7ft 

18 689 29ft 39ft 39ft .+ ft 

13 13 12% 12ft 12%— ft 

■ 37 19ft Wft 19% 

6 598 21 20* 21 + ft 

60k 60 60 60 + % 

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14 330 14* 13% 14 • 

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88 wi 69* 68* 68* + * 

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17 1171 29* 29% »%— ft 
34 asm 26 25% 25* + ft 

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9 294 28% 28* 38% _ 

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17 11* CWEpf 2X0 120 

102% 80 CWEpf IIJB 718 
22% 18ft CwEpf 207 105 
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59* 46 CwEpf 704 120 
25% 17ft ComBS 202 90 
34* 20 * comeat uo u 
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27 19% CnnNG 240 9.1 

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46% 31 CnsNG 202 SO 
9* 4% CoraPw 

28% 13* Ot P PfB 480 14.1 
45% 23* CnPptD 745 170 
46% 25* CnPpfE 7J2 170 
25% 11% CnPPTV 440 170 
21ft 9* CnPprU UO T70 
22ft 10* CnPpiT 378 170 
23% 11* CnPprR 4X0 170 
23% 10% CnPprP 358 T7.1 
22% 10* CnPprM 385 174 
15% 7* CnPprM 2X0 160 
14% 7 CnPprt. 223 158 
24% 11 CnPprS 4X2 170 
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15 20 17* 17ft 17ft 

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7 1484 33ft 33* 33*— * 
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23* 23* 23* + * 
22* 23% 22% 

12 15% 14* 15% + * 

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37ft DotoOn 
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21% DmFd 
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27 DettaAr 
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11% OrtEd 
47% DetEpf 
46 DetEpf 
45ft Date Of 
20% DEprR 
19* DEpfO 
19 DEofP 
20 DE PfB 
21* DEPtO 
19% DEpfM 
24* DEptL 
34ft DBPfR 
13* DetEPT 
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9% DiOior 
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B * Dorsey 
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31 duPnfp# 
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64 Dukenf 
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28 Duke pf 
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415 94% 93% 94* + % 

203S »* 38* 38ft— ft 
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10x95 VS 95 —2ft 
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213 24* 34* 24ft— % 
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9 35 34* 34* 

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2367 19* 19% 19ft — * 

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253 79 78 78M— ft 

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413 36% 21 36% + % 

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63 12 lift lift 
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21 lift lift 18% 

87 49 48* 4B%— ft 

3614 56% 55* 55% — ft 

1 35% 25% 35% 

2 44% 44% 44%—% 

1311 33* 33 33* + * 

lOQz 79 77% 79 +1% 

120x 72* 71ft 71ft— % 
•1608 70ft 67ft 70ft +3* 

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460X77* 17* 17* 

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10k 18* 10* 18* + * 
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158 25ft 25% 25ft + ft 


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B3% 55 FMCpf 23S 79 

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71% 35* FBasf 170 IO 11 

27 18% FsfOlfC 132 SA TO 

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21 8% Fiatv 9 

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11% 7* FtMtat 74 17 8 
18ft 16 FtHafnn 13 

53 31ft FH5IB 188 55 7 
7ft 4% FrtPa 
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31ft 22ft FtUnRI 1X2 68 16 
25ft 14ft FtVaBk J4 3J 9 
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52* 45ft FWbCPf 425 12-0 
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48 42% FlIF Pf 456e 98 

28ft 14% Fleet En J6 14 9 

39% 2Z% Flemno 1X0 24 14 

33ft 23ft FtaelV O0 16 M 

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37ft 19% FTtatSf 20 4 18 

31* 14% FloafPf 14 

42* 2?ft Fla EC .160 A U 

27* 18ft Fla Pro 116 10 9 

18% 11% FIa5H 40 24 17 

7% 3* FlwGen 

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22% M% Rtwr 40 11 

57* 47* FootaC 27S 30 12 

51% 33% FardM 140 5J 3 \ 
12% 10* FtOoar 1J6 11.1 
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11* 6% fTOxSfF 40 77 11 

3S% 25ft Faxbra 1X4 17 97 

22% 21ft FMEPn 
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34% 21* Friafrn 40 14 15 
2M6 19 Fruetlfe 40 24 5 
32% 25 Frvhfpf 3X0 7.1 
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25ft 11* HmFSD 7 443 25% 25 W&— ft 

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30ft 22 Hotel In ZOO 9.1 14 38 28% 28% TSVs 4- % 

37% 71% HouotM M 24 U 

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37% 24ft Hooalnf 175 48 9t0X36ft35*36ft + % 
83% 54% Ho tot Pi 237 30 1 79% 79% 79% + % 

77ft 61 Hotnfpf 605 IX 19 »% 7S 75. — * 

2S% 18% Houlod 244 M3 4a237 2Sft23%25* + W 

54% 39% KocKO 20 42 25* 45* 45% 45% 

18% 8 HouOR U6e20J II 9% 9ft 9% + ft 

23* Uft HpwKp 40 23 
27ft 20% Hobbrt 228 84 12 
Uft 9ft Huffy 40 30 
2D* 12% HuohTl 48 11 
25 17* HU®USp 32 U 

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27% TSft HuntMf JO U 
41ft 23ft HirttEF OO 23 15 
25ft M* Hydra! 200 73 


6* 3* LILCo 
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20% 8 % LILPfX 

20% 9 LIUPfVY 

20ft 9Vs LILPN 
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19% lft LILpfT 
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14 

10 


EH3 

aw 

15 

892 


35 

35* 

9 

47 

JL 

27* 

27* 


I 


3 


-40 36% EGG 

17% 17 EQKn 

ww 


48 M 30 


08 

104 


IJ IS 

48 8 


TOO 38* 27% 37%—* 
5 .17% 17% 17% 

304 29* 29 29 —ft! 

73 27% 22% 32% + % 


24% 

37% 

34ft 

77* 

10% 

13* 

44% 

23* 

10 

62% 


19ft 

TOft 

lift 

47ft 

17% 

46* 

34* 

21 

•4 

r 

?* 

14% 

17ft 

27* 

60% 

85 

22 

40 

52% 

9 

13* 

78* 

12ft 

53» 

78% 

8% 

28* 

23ft 

36 

27% 

37% 

21* 

X 

II* 

21* 

25% 

66% 

30% 

27% 

12% 

11% 

s* 

17* 

9 

25% 

13% 


29* 

19 

32* 

44% 

49 

17% 

18* 

47* 

21% 

43* 

29% 
16% 
29% 
6* 
13ft 
12% 
X 
34% 
1% 
27% 
39% 
24* 
X 
7 5% 
30ft 
33ft 
75 
19 
19ft 


16% GAF .!5e O 11 
25* GATX IOO 38 14 
19% GCA 12 

48ft GEI CO IOO 13 Tl 

4 GEO 
5* GFCP 

35% GTE 308 70 I 
19ft GTEpf 248 10J 
4ft GdHou 

36* Cam) 1A0 25 70 
18* GCPStr 80 18 IB 
10 * Gearttf 40 3J M 
13% Go! cO 06 30 15 
9ft Gem IIC 
TO Gem 1 1 1 ODe TJ 
X* Gnecro 180b 34141 
J4H OAlBV UJelOX 
29* GnBertt 1X0 24 8 

19* SChmi 40 IO 11 
12% GftDats 14 

44* GrrDyn 108 14 9 
48* GenEI 200 38 12 
49* GflFds 280 19 11 
5* GGtftn Mo 93 
5* GfiHnte 13 

8 * G Hart » JO 12 2 
Bft GnHoue 34 25 
15% Gnlnot 35 18 
47ft GaMJIts 2J4 4J 32 
61 GMrt 3X0r 73 4 

33 GMEn ,»e J 

34 GMctpf 3J5 99 
44ft GMSf pf 5X0 10X 

3ft GNC .16 24 70 
7* GPU 4 

44* Gen Re 186 20 22 

5 GflRrtr 4 

39% GnStanl 1J0 43 11 
61ft GTR pf 8.16 11J 

4ft Geneca 11 

13% GftRod .10 4 26 
15 Gerato 1 X 0 
24% GenuPt L18 3J 14 
TO GoPoc xa 38 24 
33 GnPcpf 204 40 
22% GaPwpf 344 1X3 
25% GaPwpf 326 no 
17* GaPwpf 286 1 23 
T7 GaPwpf 282 12X 
Zl* GaPwpf 2JS 108 
Et GaPwpf 700 125 
20% GerbPs 1.16 38 11 
12 GerbS S .T 2 J 12 
fl% GlanfP 

5* GlbrFn 5 

16* GiffHIll 82 20 22 
42ft Gillette 240 40 U 
11% GieasC 
3ft GlabIM 04 60 
77* GtobMpfaSO 774 
S% GfdNoa 18 

1* GVdN wt 

11 GtcfWF JO J 7 
GdrkJi 186 SX 14 
73% Gdrdipf 705 9.1 

23 Goodyr 140 6.1 7 
13* GortnJ 82 24 17 
17 G«4d 48 II 59 
X% Groce 280 7.1 10 
47 Gratnar 13 * 23 12 

8 % GtAPrt 48 28 * 
13% GtAtPc 8 

27% GtLLta 1X0 30 13 
15% GNirn lOSelOO 7 
31 GtMNk 1ST 4.1 9 

16% GfWFtn 30 22 W 
11* GMP 1J2 103 8 
18% Grevn IOO 43 11 
2 * Oroller 9 

8 % GrewGS JO 2J 17 
6 * Grub El XB O 13 
23% Onimn 1 X 0 30 7 
34% Grumpt 200 108 
4* GTIfllM ,14 30 
20 GuIHrt 48 30 8 
23% GlfWat 80 24 13 
11% GvtfR* 22 U 

14% GwHR Pf 1XO 58 
id cirstuf 144 no 6 

24 GW3U PT.305 120 
27 GIB UPJ440 I3X 
as* GttSU pf 800 114 
12ft GAare 49* 64 19 
14 Gutton 40 38 13 


— n 

s*8 


705 34% B% 

39 30% 30% 

41? 25V. 24% 

ZT8 75VS 74ft 

43 S 4% 

21 7ft 7ft 
2S06 41 4Qft 

367 23% 22ft 

a2 5* 5* 

P6P 60% 5? 

ICO 36 26 

121 12% lift 

31 19 18ft 

76 10% 10% 

3417 Tift lift 

281 44% 43% 

79 16% 16ft 

1 42% 42% 

148 3Zft 22 

ZT2 14ft. 14% 

863 70* 69% 

3924 60% 59% 

384 65% 64ft 

52 6% 6% 

23 7* 7 

381 13% 13* 13% 

15 9ft 9% 9ft . 
457 17% 16% 16%—% 

6182 54% S3 53ft— 2% 

9855 70ft UOVi 4f%— 2* 

404 65ft 45* 65%—* 

5 37ft 37* 37ft + ft 


32% -2 
30% . 

24ft—* 
73 —ft 
5 + ft 

7ft— ft 
40ft— * 
23ft + ft 

3ft- ~ 

18ft 

10ft— ft 
lift + ft 
43*— ft 
36*— ft 
43% + * 
32ft— * 
14% + ft 
69ft— 1 
60*—% 
64ft— ft 
6% 

7 , + fc 


511 __ 

96 29% 2 9ft 
581 16* 16* 
13 11% II* 
265 II* 11 
123 23* 23% 
306 61ft 61% 
6 12ft 12% 
513 4 3ft 

03 171% TOft 
576 12% 12ft 
207 3% 3* 

93? 31% X 
400 I1W 31 
IQz 86 86 

8823 26% 26 
65 15* 15% 
412 21ft ZIft 
1491X40 39ft 
SS 60ft 60 
15? 16ft 16ft 
693 17% 17 
777 50% 48* 
10 18% 18 
225 37 36ft 
191 27ft 26ft 
<2 16ft 76ft 
534 28* a 

608 5* 5 
68 12ft 12ft 
833 11% 10* 
2380 26ft 25ft 
4 36% aft 
17 5ft 6ft 
317 2Zft 22ft 
2840 38 37ft 
836 17ft 16ft 
3 23 73 

T745 14% 14% 
24 aon x 
. r 33% 33ft 
IQt 76 76 

189 15 14ft 
34 15ft 15* 


60 29* 29 79 — ft 

3 21 31 a — * 

3 21 25% 21 + ft 

7 25* 25* 25*— ft 
62ft +lft 
29ft— ft 
16ft— * 
11*— * 
11 — * 
23* + ft 
61*— ft 
12ft 

TOft + ft 
17* + ft 
3ft 

a* — % 
n — * 
*6 + * 
26*—* 
Uft— * 
21*—* 
39ft 

60 — % 
16% — % 
TOft + ft 

so +a 
18 — % 
36ft— Hr 
36%—% 
16% 
zn 

5 —ft 
12ft + .ft 
n%— 1 % 

74 

26% + * 
5% + ft 
2Zft— W 
38 —ft 
17 

23 +14 

14% 

X —ft 
33% + ft 
» +ltt 
15 
15ft 


H 


27ft 19% 
43* 26* 
1% % 
11 SH 
36% 25* 
13% lift 
20 15% 

55ft 27% 
27% 13% 

Bff* 

30ft 17* 
12* 7% 

33ft 14ft 


HallPB 

Hototo 

Hottwd 

Hefwdpf 

HamPB 

HrtUS 

HanJi 

KandUn 

Hand! wf 

HcndH - 

Hanna 

HaTBrJ 

Harfnde 

Harm Ft 

HroR* 


1X0 18 
UO 51 11 
SO 49 TO 
St 51 
1J6 4 A 10 
1X70108 
1X40 98 
1.12 21 16 


M 

AO 

1X0 

46 


24 19 
Zl 77 
19 14 
14 19 
27 

XI 12 


52 26ft 36% 
121 31% 31ft 
1747 1% lft 

1R 11* 11 

481 31%. 30ft 

73 13% 13ft 

2 19ft 19% 
ZM 50* 50 

39 a - 23ft 

40 19% TOft 

271 . 19 — 

216 

46 

49 1 — . 

13 26* 



29* 

56% 

T3* 

19 


U 


35% 2ft 1C inde 1J0 4X 12 
T9* 16% ICMn 32» IJ 

11 % s* icn m 

X 2ft ICN of 270 94 
17* 14 INAlo 132 1U 10 16* 

25% 23 IPTtatB 154 25* 

20 * 14%lRTPr»U0 8J 7 M 19ft 
37% 20% ITT CP 1X0 34 II 3116 34* 

63* 40 ITTPfK 4X0 68 3 61ft 

61% 44ft ITT pfO 5X0 &4 5 59ft 

46% ZB ITTpfN 22S 5X 1 

65 42ft ITTpfl 4J0 7X 2 

Zl* 15* lUlnt U0 7 A 610 

tn 30% JdoftoP 330 79 » 

21ft 13ft IdeolB 
25% 17% lltpowr 264 MS 
TOft 14ft HPowpf 210 UJ 
19 14ft HPowpf XU 123 

19 15 HPowpf 221 114 

32ft 2514 HPowpf 178 TL8 
33ft 25ft HPowpf 4J30 12A 
ft* 21* ITWs J4 20 U 
40* 27% irepChm 2X9e 54 
9ft 5% iroolCp 
14% Bft INCO JD 14 
62 49 IntfTM Pf 7J6 128 

TOZft 9Tft lndWprtXOO T2.I 
17ft 14 IrxSM pf X15 12J 
18% 14ft IndIMpf 25S TLA 
28% 23ft IndIMpf U3 1X1 
25* 20ft IndIMpf 275 184 
28% TOft irxSGts 148 7.1 6 
15 5ft fnexco .14 2J _ 

5ft 1316 fnfmtc 29 

50 35ft inoerR 260 56 TO 
37ft 27% ln®RPf XX 74 _ 

15ft lift InorTec 44 44 21 

acsss-.ifta- 

j?* JiSSc 1 

If IntoRpf 343 117 
42 InfBRpf 648eU2 
25* IntoRpf 425 122 
7* IntRFn 
15ft ItcoSe XTOolU 
66% 55 Intarco 3X8 
140 U0 inter Pf 725 
14 9ft fntrfrt 40 
53% 41 lofruc 260 
16ft Bft totaled 
2fft 14% intAlu 
US* 99 IBM 
24ft 15* fnfCtrl JO 
29ft 2Zft InfFtav 1.12 
11* 5ft irttHorv 
7ft Z% IntHrwt 
50 23ft IntHpfC 
42 20* IrrtHpfA 

36% 17% IntHPlD 
ePk 32ft InfMM 260 
35ft 30* IrtMnpf 4X0 1U . 

29ft 23 InlMutt 1J6 42 11 
57* 46 IrttPopr 240 
17% 9* I office 


999 32% 32ft 32%—% 
SO TOft TOft 17ft— ft 
366 11 TOft TO* 

5 Mft 3M 2fft 

16%- IJ 


16* 16%—' 
B 25ft— 
19% 19% 

T 


% 

61ft 

59% + % 
44% 44% 44ft— ft 
64% 64% 64*— ft 
14* 14 UUa 
MS 41* 43V, 41ft— ft 
74 15ft Uft Uft 
6 3190 24% 24* 34*— ft 

TOQr IB 18 18 

lOte TO* 17* TO* 

5501 Uft Uft Wft + ft 
5901 32 31ft XZ +1 
7 -3 Sfc 3 7ft 32% 

302 32* 32ft 32% + ft 
1053 36* 34 36ft— ft 

104 8ft 8* 8ft— ft 
2245 73% U* 13* 

2A80C 42* 63 62* + ft 

100Z 99* 99* 99% 

l 52 US + S 
u 2S ??%■“ % 

188 J Tk 7 
9a 24ft 23ft 
46ft 

21*— ft 

s 

SSZ-% 


14 




12% + 


_ 


n% ft* 18 % 


42 36 Mocypf 445 Ml 

39% mSiO* 140 24 7 

Sft lift Manbln 30)23 K 
Zl* 13% ManbWt J2 17 U 
25% 11 McnrCe .16 2 22 

41ft 22ft Mfrttan MU 
55* 40 MfrHpl 5479114 
n* 5ft viMonvl 3 

28ft »ft wIMnvfpf 
33ft Zl MAPCO 140 34 * 
4% J Marnta 

M* 19*nS 5S& U0 47 I 
51* 40% MorMpf 528eM6 
34* IS* Marlons 23 39 
12% Vft MarfcC 22 3A 
W* 14ft Mark pf 140 
87* 60 Man-Jof 84 
67% 35* MrshM 
54* 30* MartM 
lift 8% MWYK 
33ft 22ft Maeco 
13* 7* MassMr 
20 Uft MaeM 
2ft 2 MaeevF 
27* 20% MojO> 

11% 9% Mart PC 
80ft 51% MattuE 
14* 6ft Mattel 
TO* 4* Motel wf 
32* 16% Matt! pf ISO XI 
15ft 9* Maxant 4 

49ft 31% MayD*. 148 U 10 
50 34* Mayty 240a SJ 10 

31* 25% McOrpf X» 74 
23ft 20ft McDrPf 240 114 
31% 23ft McDerf 1 JO ' 

12 6* McDrlwt 


137 19* TO TOft + ft 
1347 S3* 51* 51*— 1ft. 
479 20* 28% 20%+ % 
195 TOft 10* 10% + ft 
70 33* 33 13 — * 

450 38% 31% 38%—% 
119 U* W* 14% + ft 
2 12ft 12% 12ft + ft 
776 13% 13% U%- ft 
74 3 2% 3 + ft 

61 26% 26% 26* + ft 
67 TO* If If* + ft 

312 30 29% 29* 

28 11 1742 46ft 45ft 45ft 


14 TO 

12 21 

6 

34 8 
74 8 
14 If 
24 37 
16 


140 

134 

.12 

56 

40 

140 


400142 41 42 +2ft 

117 11% 11% 11* 

■4 35* 35 35ft 
49 2% 2% 3% 

56 Uft TOW 13% — ft 

109 19 1** 18% 

_ 125 33* 23ft 23ft- % 

5 1623 X 37ft 37ft— % 
713 SO* 49% -49% — ft 
865 6ft «* 4ft— * 
59 70 TOft TOft— ft 
669 33% 32* 33 — ft 
23 3ft 3ft 3ft 

99 % % % 

32 34* 34 34 — ft 

11 50 TO 50 — % 

381 33* 32ft 32*— % 
34 9ft 9% 9%— ft 

3 15 1$ 15 

223 85* 88* 85% + ft 
739 ft 66* 66ft + ft 
253 S3* 52* 52*— ft 
465 11* lift IT* 

946 29% 29* 29*—* 
64 12* Uft 12ft— ft 
104 19* TO 19 
204 2ft 2 2ft 

M 27* 26ft 27 
15 11% 11* 11*— ft 
270 IB Sm 59ft— 1ft 
SB* 13% Uft 13ft + ft 
34 1% 9% 9% + ft 

33 31 30% 31 +% 

ITS 13* T3% 13*— ft 
473 48* 47% 41 —1 

M 49* 49ft 49ft— ft 
U 3Stt 9 23ft + * 
U 23* 33ft ZM + ft 
45 18 1117 Z7% 27* 27% + % 
44 I 7% I +ft 


44 

4 16 
34 41 

$17 
1.9 IS 
U 15 
94 13 


248 M7 
132 114 
ar 4 12 


23 11 37 18 » * 

IJ 14 1195 43ft 62ft 62ft— % 


23 TO 

XI TOO 


54 1? 


79* 78ft 78* + ft 
36 64% 64% 64% 

414 46% 46ft 46*— ft 
13 35* 34ft 34ft— % 
an 43* 41ft 43ft— ft 
99 Uft 12% 12%— ft 
65 4ft 4 4ft + ft 
11 JM 38ft 28* 

318 38ft 37% 37%—* 


444 TO* 10* 10% . , 29* 

59 30* 49* 50ft + ft 

374 9% 8* 9ft + * 

Jl 44 . I 11 18* Uft 18*— * 

<40 34 12 6996 12** 127ft 127*- 1% 


54* 3Z% intNrth 248 44 9 
41* 27ft IntPbGP 148 26 14 
17* W IntBofcr 
20* 15ft intsfPw 140 94 8 
X 16* InPwpf 248 114 _ 
19* 14* Iowa El UO « I 
3D* ZIft tow [to 244 19 7 
20% 17 I awl II pf 241 114 . 
32* 75 lowaRj 3X8- 94 8 
36ft 36 > pal co 30* 0A 9 

13* 9* |PC9Q> 44 .XI IT 

38* 23ft IrvBkl 146 XI 7 
54 42* IrvBkpf 5.15* W4 


527 24* 21% 26% +1 

405 a* a a — % 

1597 8* 8* e+J* 

141 5% 5% 5% — U 

73 49 47* 49 +1* 

"t?33* 33* 33%-+ * 
15f 27* ZTft 27ft + ft 
259 39% 39% 39*— ft 
2 35 35 35 

... I 27% 27% 27% . 

49 M 2031 49% 4» 49%—* 

16 1710 13% 13* 13*—* 


14 10 
44 15 


64 11 


3351 52 41% 51% +1% 

341 41* « 41 

117 16* 15% 16.. + % 
a 20* 20ft 2M 
1202 19* 19* 19* 

401 19* 19ft 19ft—* 
76 30* 30ft 30* _ 

4081 TO* 19* 19*— % 
369 32* U 32* + % 
234 36% 36* 36ft— % , 
3X7 Jl* 11*— * I 

167^38* 37% 38* + * 
55 51* 51* 51* — % 


TOft 6* McOW __ 

63* 40 * Mconla 42 
84* 48* McDnD 144 
65 31% McGEd 240 

49* 36% Me GfH IM 24 >6 
39% 19* Mctnt® 

45* 32% McKen 240 
Uft 10 McLean 

rssaFm « 

2 » u* M* '2 u n vS 3% rn mi + » 

sfti&jKsr ^ 54 

2 7 2>% Mellon pf 240 104 6 26% 26% 26*+ * 

4M 31* MiMII 144 34 12 47243W«6«6 + * 

66* 43 M er est 130 23 TO 17 58* 58* 58* 

'SSSSiCS, 3 5 5 ifl’I’i+S 
Sh »8KI? "Si s, 

T% Sft Meeab J4a10f 7 
57ft 48ft Mffipfl X12 1A4 
3* 2ft MnxFd Jle &0 — „ 

28ft 17. MtlCnpf 246 1X3 11 ITOfc 

16ft 12* McfiER m 94 9 3 15* 

7% 4ft MlddbS 46 4 30 16 6* 

5Z* 31* Midcan 2J6 4J 9 796 51 
14% 9* MldSUt IJI 134 5 7U8 13% 

22% 14% MMRoe 1X0 J4 243 17 16% 

29* 22. MWE 2J8 94 11 81 

17ft 11* MlttnR At 3J 16 TO 

86 72 MMM 150 44 13 3047 . 

34* 23* MlnPL 276 XI ■ 172 34 

If* 6% Mlanlne 252 3 7 * 

21% 15 MoPSV 142b 64 7 52 21% 21% 




iS+* 

79%— * 


21 17% MoPSpf 244 TU 

22* 18* MoPS pr 281 114 
34ft 38* MoPSpf 4.12 1X1 
8 4 MIM 

31% 23* MobH 220 
3* ft vlMOWH 
9* 5% ModCPf 
a 16* Mohuec 40 
15 . 3 McMcDt 
21ft 14% Montxft JO 
51 40% Monent 230 

26ft 16% MonPW 2X0 
Uft 14% MonSt 1400M1 
9* 6* MONY 48 94 8 
53ft 34% MooroC 240 XV 12 

am IM MoroM 144 42 13 

50ft 28* Morons xa 44 a 

7TH Uft Moree? 'x 

21, . 12 MlgRfy IJ 60 84 11 

32* 73* Mortons 84 XI 8 



4 21 

5 22* 

4 34* 

88 5* _ 

72 10 8492 31* 30* 

72 % * 

11 91 68 

14 11 1408 29 
1115 J* 

4 J a as 17 .. . 

XI 10 6634 45% 44 % 45*— * 

9.1 11 5*4 22 21* 21% — * 

58 18 17ft 17* + * 

1J4 9ft 8% 9* 

24 9 51* 51*— ft 

17 21% 24ft 24ft— * 
1885 51 49* 49*—% 

591 41* 409b 41 
31 20% 30* 20* 

68 19% TOft TO* + * 
1105 31 30% 30% 


38 TO 
34 12 


44* 29* Metric e 84 20 11 6175 31* fi 31* + % 


31ft 70 JWT* M2 16 17 
34ft 23ft JRWer 46 22 8 
24* Uft Jamswv .12 S 18 
13% 10* JoonF 1846124 
43 26* JeffPIS 1J2 13 6 

29ft 24ft Jercpf 4X0 118 
16ft »2* JertPf Xtf 135 „ 

9% 5% Jewtcr 28 JOB 

JohnJn 148 24 U 3730 


46* 37ft JotmCn 
29% 21% Joroen 
26* 15* Jortens 
27ft 21* JoyMfB 


146a 47 I 
1X0 18 II 
40 14 14 
UO 52 14 


145 31* 30% 30% 

494 26* 25% * 

214 22% 21* 22 — % 
94 11* 11% 11%—* 
102 40 29* 39* 

Zb 29 79 79 +* 

27 MW 16* MM 

— 7 * v* m— * 

44* 43ft 43*— * 


26* 16* Munfrt 84b 13 13 

23* 15 Munsnp 70 

H. UO 24 TO 

23ft MuroO 1X0 13 12 

27% 16ft MuttyO 80 14 TO 

13% 11 MlriOm I84el08 
11% 2ft MyerLn 


143 23ft a 23*— * 
n 21* 21 Zl + ft 

270 47% 47* 47* 

2a 30% 30* 30% + * 
a 17* 17* TTft— * 
•1 13* IS* U* 

65 3 2* 2%—* 


NAFCO 140 
280 


117 39% 3V* 29% 

1 a* 26* 26ft 

118 23*- 23* 23* + * 
437 26ft 24* 24* + * 


21ft 16 ... 

63% 40 NOD 
24 12* NBI 

22ft 17ft NOI 
40 23* NCNB 

30% 20% NCR 
16% 10% NLInd 


TO* 

18ft 

41ft 

40% 

16* 

68 


TOft 

at . 


7% KDI 20 22 
9% KLMs • . • 
ZTft Kmart Uo 4.1 
72 KNEW 14 II 
12% KolsrAI .151 _ 

54 Kal S7pf «J3 8 2 
14% KaTOCe J0 IJ 
15* KalCpf 137 (8 
Pi Konob 80 44 
14* KCfyPL 2J6 104 
H* KCPLpf 230 112 
15ft KCPLPf 2J3 I1J 


10 in 

11 467 
9 3099. 
M 21 

4171 

1 

27 

1 


13 

50* 


50*—* 

54* 

36ft KCSou 

140 

24 

8 

289 

ca 

51 

6% 

6% 

6%— ft 


10* KCSopf 

140 

72 


2500C 13 

236 

12* 

12 

12 — * 

19% 

12* KcnGE 

136 1X4 

6 

620 

t,.l 

611 

71 

77 

77ft— % 


38% KonPLf 

196 

BA 


355 

Euj 

31 






107 




115* 

43% 

42% 

42%— % 


18 Kntyln 




151 

34* 

3001 70 

70 

70 +2 


10% KoufBr 

A0 

26 

5 

42 

15* 

in 

4% 

4% 

4% 


17% KoufPt 

140 

9 A 


2 

16 

36 

17 

16ft 

T6ft— ft 

SO* 

2VM KeftofiS 

1J6 

36 

14 

847 

f r i | T 

60 

202 

20% 

32% 


20ft + * 
31% — % 

34% 

1; 

f 

1J0 

34 

7 

a 

IOO 


622 

22% 


2Z%— * 

28ft 

19% Kerim t 

40 

36 

15 

■45 


10 


F ■ 


26% 

28% KyUHl 

144 

9.1 


278 

r' , ll | 


9 8% 

16%. 16* 
34* 34ft 
TOW 3PW 
13% 13* 
54* TOM 
15* 15% 
16 16 
SM 9* 9* 

5 306 22 21% 

1 1B% W% 
5 19ft TOft 
48* 
12% 


16 


16* 

26* 

34* 

27% 


23* 

104 

TO 

43* 

26% 

*67* 

23* 


TO KenCI 84 __ 

17% Ktrflpf 1J0 9J 
as* Ken-Mc 1.10 34 
18* KeyBk uo 48 
14 Kovrtnf 88 27- 
26ft KWde 120 34 
39* KJmbCe 232 42 
23% KnsMRd 76 Z3 
IT* Keaer 2J0 &? 
U% Kehnor 32 U 
17% Konere 49 44 
96* KopprpfMXO 1CX 
IS* Korean 
29ft Kroner 240 48 
II KuMme-Jo 23 
41* Kyocer J3e 4 
13 KVeer 40 48 


26 2226 
8 37 

18 126 
'9 195 
10 173 

15 406 

52 125 

16 170 
34 366 

l 

29 

12 2126 
14 86 

24 28 

6 43 


31% 

1 


TO ft?& 
32ft 31% 

26 % a* 
T7% 17* 
34 33* 

25% 35% 
18* 17% 

ssss 

44 43% 

27 26ft 
43* 43* 
18* 18* 


8% 

16% + * 

34ft 

39* 

13% 

54ft— 4ft 
15* 

16 

9* 

21% + U 
18% + % 
19ft 
4V +1 
13 ' +1 
19 
37* 

20 % — * 
34 — H 
15% 

16 

48*— * 
31%—* 

2Zft ■ 
26* . 

11 + * 
18% + * 
31% + * 

OAA® 

17ft + * 
33% 

53% + * 
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42* 

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TO* J3 LTVpf 125 0A 
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42* a* LOCttta. 48- 24 11 
51* 23* U -eft 



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(Coofinaed <® Page 14) 













Statistics Index 


HeralbS^Sribune, 


AMEX FkW -W*-l 


MW H BB- -• > 
IUHEX U«MAa«tf.M fM <W MM P.U 

wyw wm pyj cm mum p.u 
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DlyMaMs r.M MvmMi P.M 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 



U.S. Stocks 

Report, Page 12 


5ATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


** 


Page 13 


s».li 


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ECONOMIC SCENE 

Jobless Rate Troubles 
|West German Analysts 

By LEONARD SILK 

Nf*> For* Times Jowr 

RaNKFURT — W est German economists are troubled 
about the failure of the current recovery to generate 
more jobs. With strong demand for its exports, es pecial- 
ly from the United States, the German manufactu ring 
industry grew by 3tt perc e nt in 1984, nearly one* third faster than 
the German economy as a whole. 

But German economists think it tmlikdy that industries here 
-will again outperform the rest of the economy in 1985. The 
German expansion, in their view, is unlikely to exceed 2% percent 
— too slow a pace to reduce unemployment. 

The jobless rate in West Germany averaged 83 percent last 
year — about four times as high as in the earlier postwar period. 

There is nothing unique about the German jobless situation in 
the European comma. Economists at the Organization for Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and Development expect unemployment 
throughout Europe to average' 

this yeaf. The —————— 

They are worried - 
that confidence 
in their countries 
could be undermined 


II peri 
OECD 


ereeoi 

countries of Europe 
now have 20 million cut of 
work, compared with 10 mil- 
lion in 1979 and 5 million in 
s» »• ui ar« 1970. For all the OECD coun- 
*•& Ml! including the United 

13s wf " ,7 c 2* 2* 2ft rates, Canada. Japan. Atis- 

MO* i] 


wt 

iM 

te 

rK 

X 

tVr 


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ij 13 
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12 




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is 32 million, 
11 million in 1970. 


tralia and New Zealand, as 
well as the European countries, un 
compared with ISA million in 1979 

The European economisis are worried that if the recovery does 
not break the long trend to higher imemployzoent, con fid enc e in 
the kind of policy their conntnes have been following will erode. 

Two main issues concern them. The first is whether high real 
interest rates, the strong dollar and the unbalanced trade posi- 
tion, with the United States in deep deficit and Japan ana the 
Europeans in high surplus, can be sustained much longer. They 
ore anxious about the shock that a major change in the structure 
of Interest rates, capital flows and trade balances might yield to 
the world economy. 

German economists are asking how long the United States can 
go on borrowing in excess of its domestic savings to finance its 
. level of public and private consumption. 


3* 128 2.0 io 
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229 72 

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infintirm: 


HILE growth pr 
unemployment 


ts s e»n unlikely to bring down 
i, there is much uncertainty 
regen era ting 
economists, observing 


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on how to spur more i 
inflationary expectations. The 
the more rapid growth of jobs in the United States, are looking 
hopefully at supply-side solutions: ways of accelerating techno- 
logical change to create new jobs, to increase the rate of invest- 
ment. to create greater flexibility in labor markets and to reduce 
disincentives for productivity. 

Jean-Claude Paye, secretary-general of the OECD, said recent- 
ly that empirical evidence of past periods of intensive technologi- 
cal innovation shows that even though technology-induced gains 
in productivity may have led to the elimination rtf many jobs in 
certain sectors, these have been more than compensated by the 
growth of demand and by the emerge n ce of new opportunities for 
work elsewhere in the economy. 

However, he added, using a phrase invented by the late 
Professor Joseph Schumpeter of Harvard, 


iarvard, this “creative destruc- 
is perceived by 
: far two reasons. " 


KW 

i»u« 

SR=S 

#2 

urn* 

PSir 

»SCrt 


ition" of jobs at a time of 
r many as being'possUy 

“First,” he said, “there is little evidence that job creation will 
occur without time lags or in a painless and automatic manner. 
Second, considerable employment diversion win take place. In 
other words, there is every likelihood thar part of the employment 
created by the cur re n t wave of technological innovation will not 

(CoBtfamed on Page 15, GoL 2) 


AJC.H 
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Currency Rates 


] 


lata mtorbank rates on April 26, axdvdbg hes. 

Official fixings far Amsterdam. Brussels, froidcfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rales ot 
4 PM. 


Ford Posts 
Decline 
In Profit 

Taxes Blamed 

For 12.7% Drop 

Untied Press International 

DEARBORN, Michigan — 
Ford Motor Co.'s first-quarter 
profits declined by 12.7 percent to 
$783 J million from the $897.2 mil- 
lion reported in the first quarter of 
1984 because of heavy taxes, com- 
pany officials said Fnday. 

Net income per share declined 
14 J percent io $420 a share from 
$4.90 a year before, but worldwide 
sales increased 1J percent to $13.2 
billion from $13 billion ayear ago. 

Ford set aside about $527 mfl- 
Voq in' taxes for the quarter after it 
used up all investment tax credits 
and carryforwards, said Tony 
Fredo. a spokesman. On a pretax 
bans, the No. 2 automaker earned 
a record $1J bOljon, $18 «"HKnn 
more than a year ago. 

The jwtftniaker sa id the *wiinp 
was also related to the high costs of 
new product development and 
plant investments. 

Part of Ford's $2.9-biDion pro- 
gram to bring out its Ford Taurus 
and Mercury Sable midsize cars 
this fall and a $750-miflion pro- 
gram to develop its Aerostar mini- 
van were included in its $819.8 mil- 
lion in capita] expenditures, op 
almost 60 percent from SS12.7 mil- 
lion in the year-earlier quarter, Mr. 
Fredo said. 

Ford's share of the domestic car 
market rose almost Me percent to 

29.9 percent compared with a year 
ago. It said higher sales of its Tem- 
po and Topaz compact models ac- 
counted for most of the increase. 
Ford offered 8.8-percent sales in- 
centives on those models through 
April 22. 

Profits from Ford’s operations 
outride the United States d J 
almost 27 percent to $157 
from $214 millioa in the first 
ter of 1 984, mainly because of i 
er taxes. 

Together, the profits of the Big 
Three automakers — Ford, Gener- 
al Motors Carp, and Chrysler 
Corp. — were down 27 percent to 
$236 billion from $322 billion in 
the 1984 first quarter. 

GM attributed its 333-percent 
drop in net income to the high costs 
associated with new products and 
plants. It reported a $1.07-biHk» 
profit on record sales of $242 bil- 
lion for the first quarter, compared 
with a $ 1 .6-billion profit on sales of 

522.9 trillion a year ago. 

Chrysler Cop. said its taxpayer 

status — which began in last quar- 
ter of 1984 after a five-year brush 
with bankruptcy — caused a 28- 
percent decline in after-tax earn- 
ings to 5507.6 million, compared 


: quar- 
fhigh- 




s 

8 

D-M. 

r. F. 

ILL. 

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Amsterdam 

15485 

4275 

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— 

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Frankfurt 

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London (b) 

1817 



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1*17.10 

430*5 

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31289 

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3X13 253X8 

9515 

11.553 

32502 

— — 

4X75* 

2X972 

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3X515 3X04* 

Tokyo 

251*0 

30*20 

KM 

2838 

HXL* 

7TX2 

399X8* 

98X5 

Znricn 

14175 

MTU 

83J35* 

27X1 ■ 

02303* 

73X75* 

424* 

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■ *!»**• 5] S- *. Currtmar 
c 3*1 w r «, 04*24 AmtroOooS 

:: « J jiup ofi*s Aotnoa kMJBhq 

; >o X 00157 Bert km fin frwic 

^ 0.7324 CBMOH1 

0H833 Donbftknm 

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OJ074 Greek dradnna 

— 0.1244 HoagKMigS 


!S 

i3 'Si is 


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J H 

£i t3 _ 

S :iS4|fe 

.... 58 Ib^ s? r* 


Far 

UJX 

Dollar Values 

* Corrw*, P * r 

Eeohr. ^ USX 

_ . . OnTencr 

For 

USX 

1X092 

0X955 IrirtE 

1X0*5 

04*8 stamwet 

3232 

2220 

0 X 011 l«nxff stottet 

♦3270 

05T7 5. African r— 8 1X3*2 

81X5 

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0J027 

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048X0 

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£498 

aoag'le— . ombIb 

173X0 

1131 

aim onw-Bw* 

9X0 

01105 » wed. loose 

9X5 

4239 

08843 PbILMU 

15*32 

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39X7 

134X0 

0X057 Port ends 

174X0 

DXM3 TWMI 

27X05 

7JK5 

8277 SmbcS rtrs) 

3X105 

82731 UJULdfrWm 

3X725 


*J 8 

133 


.csiMibmUWSirfiiic 

Ml Commercial franc IOI rt#we»e»ouw (e) Amoirt3nB»0B(JlobWon*cfcUar (•) 

umts of wo (*l Unlteaf UM lv> Unirtol vum 

N.Q : ntrt ovotrO; HA.: nof nvoBotJrt. . _ 

*r S § V Sourees: SarKN/ * <*“ Benelux I Bna^H Conuner OkOm ttaUana (M ltan); Stmaum 


- -- i?1r nm/iwrc wr rwBo ir-wf«rf — 

. (diner, rival mmomk Ottm iti fu from /Hunts and AP. 


Sources: oanoue au aenmux fpruDwi/. . r# 

riaUonate da Paris {Ports!/ IMF ISDR)/ Banoua Aruba at tntamattonala dinvaatt u amant 




Eurocurrency Deposits 


April 26 


Dollar 

D-Mark 

swfts 

Franc 

xieritoe 

FrencB - 
Franc 

acu 

tbit 

Bth - Olw 

5ft 

- 5ft 

5ft 

- Sft 

12ft,. I2»w 

TOM - lOto 

9ft • 9ft 

m 

B f » - B9W 

Sft 

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5ft 

- 5ft 

12 ft- 12 ft 

TO A- 10 ft 

9Yi -9ft 

aft 

Hr. - 8% 

5 Ok 

- Sft 

Sft 

- Jft 

12 ft- 13ft 

TOM - 10ft 

9ft Sft 

n 

Sft - 9 

5k. 

- 8ft 

Sft 

-Sft 

12ft- 12 ft 

18ft- 10 ft 

9ft - 914 

0ft 

9ft - m 

8ft 

- 4 V, 

Sft 

•5ft 

12ft - 12 ft 

MV.- 11 ft 

9ft -9ft 

0ft 


quarter. Sales were a record 55.4 
billion, versus $4.9 billion in the 
first quarter of 1984. 

American Motors Corp., 
plagued by slow sales of its Alli- 
ance and Encore subcompacts, 
broke a string of five profitable 
quarters with a$29-miHion loss for 
the latest quarter, compared with a 
$5.1 smltion profit a year ago. Sales 
dropped 16.4percenttoS919.4mil- 
1km from last year’s $1.1 Union. 

Chrysler, as wdl as Ford, low- 
ered indnstty profits with fee re- 
wards. 

A heated sales incentive war at 
fee small car end of the market 
helped cut profits although car 
sales remained strong, especially 
for Ford and Chrysler. 

Large investments in plants and 
futures models also depleted prof- 
its . GKfs $344 million increase in 
investments from last year to S13 
billion went towards plant im- 
provement and new car programs 
for 1986-87. 

Part of Ford’s $819.8 million 
capital spending during the first 
quarter went towards its S2.9-bil- 
lion Taurus and Sable cars for 1986 
and a $750 million for its 1986 

Aerostar minivan. 

rc^d^feede^^^tode aliost of 
new models and investments in 
joint ventures with Japan and Ko- 
rea. 



Th* Nbw torti Tin 


United Landed Routes to Pacific 
By Methodically Pursuing Pan Am 

By Jonathan P. Hicks 

York Tuna Service 


r Service 

NEW YORK — United Airline’s proposed 
urchase of the Pacific routes of Pan American 

one 
lead- 


pu 

World Airways may look like a sudden coup, 
that would instantly establish United as a li 
ing international airline. 

But in fact, the agreement is just the latest 
example of fee steady, methodical management 
style that Richard J. Ferris, fee chairman and 
president of UAL Inc., has used to help make his 
airline the largest and most profitable in fee 
United States. 

At a news conference on Monday, Mr. Ferris 
said that he first approached C Edward Acker. 
Pan Am’s chief executive, three years ago to 
suggest the transaction. “He just smfled, ,v Mr. 
Ferris said. 

The issue arose again two years ago, Mr. Fenis 
said, but the Pan Am executive *just smiled." 
And when Mr. Ferris repeated the suggestion a 
year ago, he said, Mr. Acker »g«in “just smiled.” 

This year, however, the scenario changed. "I 
called him, and we got down io b usiness. ” Mr. 
Ferris said. 

Analysis say that kind of persistence is a 
hallmark of Mr. Ferris and United. 

“Fenis and United don’t move quickly,” said 
Michael W. Derchin, an airline analyst wife .First 
Boston Corp. They tend to take things slowly 
and do their homework. But when they do some- 
thing, it’s usually something big.” 

Indeed, United is a mighty carrier by virtually 
any measure. Its fleet of 319 jets is the largest of 
any U3. airline. It operates fee most domestic 
flights each day — 1,580 — and is the only airline 
that flies to at least one city in every U.S. state. 


United also is raping high profits. Last year, 
UAL Inc* the carrier’s parent company, report- 
ed net income of S258.9 million on revenue of 
$62 billion for its airline division. 

United dominates the most lucrative east-west 
airline traffic corridor in the United States 
through its passenger hub at Chicago's O’Hare 
airport, and nas other sizable hubs in Denver and 
Sian Francisco and smaller transfer centers in 
Seattle and Cleveland. 

The proposed addition of Pan Am’s Pacific 
routes promises to help keep United on top. 

Tt obviously adds a whole new dimension to 
the airline,” said Monte Lazarus, United’s senior 
vice president for external affairs. “It gives us a 
strong presence in fee Pacific. It’s a pretty sub- 
stantial addition to the company.” 

The deal also is viewed as another major 
achievement for Mr. Ferris, 48, who became the 
airline's president in 1974 and was widely viewed 
as a wunderkind in the industry. He previously 
beaded the Western International Holds, which 
later became the Westin Hotels subsidiary of 
UAL. 

“United did not do well in the early years of 
deregulation and he Look a bad rap for that,” said 
Mr. Derchin of First Boston. “But in recent years 
things have gone better, and he’s shown feat he’s 
bright, dynamic, and will stick to his course. This 
is probably his most dramatic move.” 

Analysts predicted that fee Pan Am routes 
would add another $60 millioa to $75 milli on in 
annual profits. 

“It’s a good move for them to go overseas,” 
said Robert J. Joedicke, an analyst at Shearson 
Lehman Brothers. “Where else could United 
(Continued on Page 15, GoL 2) 


Goldsmith Abandons Zellerbach Bid 


Rates OPOUCOoUp W //Utaxwx* EMHwia 

Sources: Morgan Guaranty {donor, DM, SF. Pound, ffii Uovtts Bank ( ECU U Routers 
(SDR). 


• By Stephen J. Simurda 

The Associated Press 

SAN FRANCISCO —Sir James 
Goldsmith abandoned his bid Fri- 
day for control of Down Zdkr- 
baefa Corp., dting the forest-prod- 
uct company’s new plans for 
restructuring and a competing bid 
for the company from Mead Corp. 

But Sir James said he would re- 
main a shareholder in the compa- 
ny. did not rule out another bid 
later and promised to continue to 
solicit shareholder support for a 
seat on the Crown Zellerbach 
board and for a drive to dismantle 
the company’s takeover defense. 

On Thursday, Crown Zellerbach 
had announced plans for a restruc- 
turing, disclosed that Mead’s board 
had rejected a friendly $50-a-share 
takeover offer from the manage- 
ment of Mead and said it had of- 
fered Sr James two seats on its 
board in exchange for an agree- 
ment to limit the stock he would 
buy in Crown for three years. 

Sir James, an international fi- 
nancier, owns about 9.4 percent of 
the stock in Crown Zellerbach and 
is its largest single shareholder. 

He began a tender offer April 10 
of $4230 a share for as many as 19 
million shares of Crown’s 272 mil- 
lion shares outstanding. 

“We hoped that Goldsmith 
would join us in our restructuring 


program." Crown's chairman, Wil- 
liam T. Creson, said Thursday. 

But Sir James said Friday that 
his CZC Acquisition Corp. was ter- 
minating its $42.50-a-share offer. 

“We are taking this action in 
view of fee actions taken by Crown 
Zeller bach’s management and 
board of directors, fee attitude of 
Crown ZeUerbach manifested to us 
in our telephone conversations yes- 
terday, the confusion created by 
fee proposed transaction between 
Crown ZeUerbach and the Mead 
Corp., and fee complex proposed 
restructuring plan of Crown 2eQer- 
bach," Sir James said. 

He said he would not remain a 
passive investor and that he re- 
served the right “to make another 
bid for Crown Zellerbach, to seek 
control of Grown Zefierbacb, and 
to take such other action as we 
consider consistent with our posi- 
tion as the largest shareholder.” 

In fee statement on its restruc- 
turing plan. Crown sad it would 
split itself into three units — tim- 
beriands, specialty packaging and 
paper — and that its shardiolders 
would get securities in each uniL 

Mr. Creson said that under fee 
plan approved by the board on 
Thursday, Crown will offer to buy 
back about 50 percent of its out- 
standing shares by offering to ex- 
change them for partial ownership 
in a limited partnership that would 


available to anyone who is willing 
to offer a value consistent with fee 
restructuring program.” 

Crown, like many forest-product 
companies, has become an attrac- 
tive target for takeover specialists 
because the value of feeir timber- 
land assets hag diminished and fi- 
nancial results have remained rela- 
tively flat. The stocks are therefore 
seen as undervalued. 

In 1984, Crown had net income 
of $86.9 million, or S2.61 a share, 
on sales of $3.1 billion. 


U.S. Delegate 
Cites Progress 
In Japan Talks 


take possession of virtually all of 
Crown’s vast timberiand, roughly 
1.6 million acres. 

The proposal also offers shares 
in a newly-formed corporation that 
will operate Crown’s specialty 
packaging business. 

Crown shares, units of the part- 
nership and shares in the packaging 
business will trade separately. 

Mr. Creson also said the compa- 
ny was still wflling to have another, 
more-friendly buyer enter the pic- 
ture. 

• “At the same time,” Mr. Creson 
said, “Our board has authorized 
management to continue to be 


By John Burt 

Washington Past, 

TOKYO — The United States 
has obtained “virtually everything 
we’ve asked for” in recent talks mi 
further opening the Japanese tele- 
communications market, the leader 

of the talks’ U.S. delegation said 
Friday. 

Li o nel H. OLmer, undersecretary 
of Commerce for international 
trade, said many areas of the S25- 
billion-a-year market have not 
been touched by fee talks and fur- 
ther long-term negotiations are 
needed. But in areas discussed so 
far. the United States has dime 
quite well, he said. 

Mr. Okner’s optimistic remarks 
came at a time when fee Reagan 
administration is anxious to defuse 
threats by Congress to limit Japa- 
nese imports into the United 
States. 

Other U.S. trade negotiators 
have taken a less-positive view of 
fee i«tk-s which since late last year 
have been fee cause of considerable 
tension between the United States 
and Japan. 

Mr. Olmer made his remarks af- 
ter the United States and Japan 
completed a four-hour session in 
Tokyo cm sales of foreign electron- 
ics in Japan. 

That field and telecommunica- 
tions are among four sectors that 
the two sides have agreed to discuss 
in an effort to reduce the U^ trade 
deficit with Japan, which was $37 
billion last year. 

After Friday's session, Japanese 
officials characterized the talks as 
fnntfuL Americans, however, said 
the Japanese offered few new sub- 
stantive suggestions. 

The telecommunications talks 
have so far centered on regulations 
for computer networks and “inter- 
connect” equipment such as 
switchboards, facsimile machin es 
and telephones. 

“The Japanese have done virtu- 
ally everything we have asked them 
to do in fee telecommunications 
short of giving us a blank 
for goods not yet received,” 
Mr. Olmer said. 

Mr. Olmer said pressure from 
President Ronald Reagan and 
Congress and fee cooperation of 
Japanese Prime Minister YasuMro 
Nakasone had helped bring about 
this progress. 

Skeptics within the U.S. govern- 
ment and business community ar- 
gue feat fee Japanese have left 
themselves considerable leeway to 
keep old practices alive in sub- 
stance if not in name. 

In an April 24 letter given to 
Moriya Kqyama, vice minister for 
posts and tdecommunications, Mr. 
Olmer listed three general areas for 
fee next phase of talks between the 
two governments: 

• Confirmation of details of 
changes that the two sides have 
worked out only in broad principle. 

• Discussion of changes in laws 
feat govern nse of the radio waves 
in Japan. The United States has 


said the current law often makes it 
difficult for U.S. firms to sell radio- 
based equipment such as mobile 
telephoned 

• Discussion of U.S. firms pro- 
viding international phone service. 
At present, fee Japanese company 
Kokusai Denshin Denwa is alone 
in that business. 

In fee electronics talks Friday, 
the two sides worked wife a nine- 
point list submitted by fee United 
Slates in an earlier session. It cov- 
ered highly technical disputes in 
such fields as customs clearance, 
patent registration and access to 
Japanese research. 

Japan presented a detailed pro- 
posal for mutual reductions of tar- 
iffs in some 40 electronics items, 
such as computers, components 
and magnetic tape. 

U.S. officials have promised to 
study it but believe a mutual cut 
would not necessarily reduce the 
U.S. trade deficit with Japan. 

One of the few points or specific 
new progress, according to U.S. arx 
counts, was a Japanese promise to 
grant foreign exchange licenses in 
one day for certain types of im- 
ports. 


Japanese 
Industrial 
Output Slows 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Japan’s industrial 
and mining production was up 52 
percent last month from a year ear- 
lier, the slowest pace in a year and a 
half, fee government reported Fri- 
day. 

The growth rate was down from 
5.8 percent in February and was 
the most sluggish since July 1983, 
when it registered 22 percent 

Economists said a recent down- 
trend in exports had started cutting 
into output. Except for the steel 
and pulp industries, output in all 
sectors went down in March, the 
government’s report said. 

Kazuo Kida, chief economist at 
Sumitomo Bank Ltd. said that in- 
dustrial production had been hi- 
ded by exports and fee dectronics 
sector last year but feat both areas 
had cooled off this year. 

He said however, that Japan’s 
economy continued to expand 
steadily. 

“Fundamentally, fee expansion- 
ary trend remains unchanged,” he 
said “Both in fee UJS. ana Japan, 
fee economy has shown a pause 
after considerable expansion." 

Japan’s exports have been de- 
dining in recent months due in part 
to an apparent slowdown in fee 
U.S. economic expansion. Exports . 
slipped 6.8 percent in March from 
a year earlier, following a 2.5-per- 
cem 12-month decline in January. 


Dollar Slips mNe w York, Europe 

United Press Tmenuakmal 

NEW YORK — The U.S. slipped against other currencies in both 
New York and Europe on Friday. Gold and dosed mixed. 

In London, the pound closed at $1217, up from Thursday’s 
$1 2043. In late New York trading, fee pound was quoted at $12155, 
up from $12085. 

Other New York dollar dosings, and comparable Thursday figures, 
included: Deutsche mark. 3.133, down from 3.148; Swiss francs, 
1613, down from 2624, and French francs, 9.55, down from 9.59. 

In Tokyo, the dollar finished at 25240 yen, up from 251.05. In New 
York, the dollar was trading at 252908 yen, up from 252.398. 

Other European doting rates, compared wife Thursday; 3.1527 
DM, up from 3.1203; 26175 Swiss francs, up from 25995; and 95615 
French francs, up from 9515. 

The Republic National Bank in New York dosed cash gold at 
$323.00 an ounce, down from $324.00. The New York Commodity 
Exchange settled fee April contract at $323.00, down from 5323.90 
Wednesday. 


,*r t * jIbS 


Asian Dollar Rates 


April 26 


U.K. Current Accounts Fall 


u 

• •* r' 
hi 

« 

f* t -c 


c * 

^ '£ L 0 
3 ? St 


1BML 
a iv -aiw 
Source: Router*. 


3 mas. 
a*, -a* 


3 mot. 
Iib-liv 


Sft -f 


It 




\ S Key Money Rates 

12 Stales 

Lt “ 


ossa pnv. Britain 


ljcjjc-s a,.- 

jssS? 



CM icc unt Rom 
Foderol Funds 
Prim* Ro*« 

Broker Loan Horn 
Comm. Pcomr. 3M7T days 
3- month Tmasurv BUIS 
fr-montn Treo«urv Blit* 
CO 1 * 30-59 dovs 
CO'S 40-89 dovs 

West Germany 

Lombard Rom 
Overnight Rote 
One Month Interbank 
3-month interbank 
6-montn interbank 


> 

8 3/16 
TOW 
9 
WO 
7X3 
t» 
7JU 
7Jf 


6M 

5JS 

4J0O 

wo 


8 

B)fc 

TOW 

Hfc-9 

MS 

739 

UM 

7J0 

7JS 


AM 

SJS 

S85 

MO 

W0 


Baik Base Rate 
Call Manor 
rt-dav TrtKoorv BHI 
3-month interbank 

Jinan 

Discount Rote 
Coll Money 
404av mmrtxFiic 


UVj 
13M 
13 1316 

134412 13/14 


12to 

13 


S S 
6VU S 1/18 


j Gold Prices: 



. i?*ji . 

Ffance 

S4 :2‘ , 5 i inlervenllon Rot* TOW TOW 

!??' f 5 Coll Money WW. 1W* 

one-month Inter*** ■ nM 
,2 Jfi ? i- 3 -menth Inlirbonk - 1» WU 10 UU 

is frmenth interbank . WW .TOW 

* Sources: Rwulert. Oxnmanbonk, Croat Lr- 
j* jp r annals, uoyds Bank, Bank at Tokyo. 


Hone Kano 
Ummbouro 
Pori* (125 kllol 
Zurich 


33350 

SBM 

32240 

th* 

32250 


FM. 

3&JK UIKh. 

— —an 

32251 4-030 

hik + im 
32350 * 150 

>*,» York - 32200 —050 

OffcfeJ (brine .tor London. Porii and bn* 

Ogunfc aoerdnoondctoBkie prim * far H— Ken 

M Zurich. Nm York Com« current contract 
M arias In U55 per own. 

Seance.' Reuters. 


Compiled by Ow Su$ From Dispatches 

LONDON — Britain’s current 
accounts slumped to a deficit of 
£900 million ($1.08 billion) in 
March, a record for a single month, 
officials said Friday. But they said 
that overall figur e s reflected an im- 
proved economic performance. 

Dep ar t men t of Trade and Indus- 
try statistics showed a risible cur- 
rent-account deficit of £456 mil- 
Eon, fee second- worst since the 
government began keeping records. 

But department officiate said the 
month’s export total of £6.815 bil- 
lion was fee second-highest ever, 
and feat over the past three months 
exports had risen one percent and 
had fallen one percent 
came after five con- 
secutive months of surpluses in fee 
current account a broad trade 
mmoirr that fnctpfl cg merchandise 
as well as n n n m w c faandisc items 
such as services; The last was a 
£131 -rnfflion surplus in February. 

Imports increased £550 mil- 
lion to £7.715 bOlioiLThe increase 


was attributed largely to stepped- 
up oil imports to replenish stocks 
which ran down during a year-long 
strike by coal miners. This was 
compounded by the dollar’s high 
value in February, the Energy De- 
partment said. 

The trade defirii in the first 
quarter of 1985 was £124 billion, 
down from £153 billion in the 
fourth quarter of 1984 but wdl 
above fee £57 million shortfall in 
the first quarter of last year. 

(AP, Reuters) 


Gold Options (prim* b S/BBJ. 


too 

Mar 

** 

Nor. 

330 

11X81250 


, — , 1 WT, 

3X 

4X8 7X0 

17X819X0 


3*) 

308 4XJ 

12X81*51 

71X82250 

3B 

L58 100 

9781175 

172W ISO 

Ml 

058 UD 

7X8 S3 

125813X0 

VO 

038 125 

5X8 450 

W75-I22S 

360 

— — 

258 3X0 

1SUQXD 


Oak! 32230 -3QB) 

Valero WUteWdd SJL 

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IV.I 









INTERNATIONAL 


Iridays 


N1BE 


Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to Hie closing on Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


32% 18 PHH 48 2.9 12 340 318k 30ft 30H— 1 , 

40 24% PPG 1.40 44 B 1053 25Yi 35V* 3S%— % 

24(4 15 PSA M IS 53 8 34 24 24 

19% ins PSAdpf 1.90 9.9 10 17% 19*4 19% — Vh 

13% 11% PttCAS 144 114 37 13% T3VC 13*4 

1814 13 PacGE U2 M 7 TO TWi HU l«b — % 

44% 30% Pact- to 032 70 12 228 43% 42% 43 

29 21% PcLum 1J» 48 IS 112 25% 25% 25% 

9% 5% PacRes 05r 5 29 349 9% 9% 9% + % 

19 13% PacRspf £00 108 75 19 18% 18% + % 

17% 11% PoeSeJ 40 17 17 14 15% 15 15 — % 

73% 54 PocTnte 572 88 B 1932 70% 49% 49% 

12% 9% PocTbi 40 32 ID 14 12% 11% 12% + % 
28% 21% Poetics 232 88 8 470 28% 28% 28%— % 
33% 27% Podf pf 407 114 5 32% 32% 32% + % 

43% 25 PatnWb M 14 52 293 37% 34% 34%— * 


34% 24% PolnWpf 225 74 75 31% 30% 30%—% 

39 24% Palm Be 180 11 14 38 38% 38% 38% 

28% 20% PanABk 70 24 8 I 27 27 Z7 

414 4 PatlAm 1445 5*4 5% 5% 

3% 1% PanAwl 73 2% 2% 2%— % 

21 13% Pandckn 80 1 J 20 49 15% 15% 15*4 + 14 

39% 31 PanhEC 280 44 10 1948 34% 35% 35% — % 

5% 3 PontPr 18 452 5% 5*4 514—14 



U.S. Futures April 26 


Season 

Season 


Htati 

Low 

Open Htati Low data Cba. 




Grains 


WHEAT (COT) 

5480 bu minimum- doflors ear bushel 
485 382% MOV 3-51 153 

190 12414 Jul 128% 388J4 

174% 384 SCO 388% £28% 

143% 383% Dec 384*4 389 

174% 140% MOT 143 143 

482 343 May 389 139 

Est. Safes Prev.Satas 198Z7 

Prev. Dor Open InL 3741 B up 225 
CORN (CBT) 

54100 bu mkilmom- dollars per bushel 
130 249% MOV 283% 285 

381 273 Jul 28114 281% 

281% 244% Sep 271 271% ' 

295 240% Dec 244% 284(4 ' 

110 14914 Mcr 27* 274 

381*4 274% May 273% 279 

284 177% Jul 180% 281 

Est.Sales Prev. Sales 26863 

Prev. Day Oeen Utf.1 22417 off 2870 

SOYBEANS (CBT} 

&080 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
787 5.70% May 587% 588 

779 580% Jul 685% 486% ■ 

786 582 Aus 688% (l 09% i 

671 581 Sep 688 688% I 

688 583% Nov 617 517 I 

479 594% Jon 687 627*6 I 

742 484% Mar 687% 487% i 

779 615 May 644 644 I 

658 638 Jol 

Est. Soles Prev. Sales 38890 

Prev. Day Open (nl. 44,725 up 396 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 lone- dal Ian per Ion 
20500 12800 May 12340 12480 ' 


79450 129.10 

18080 13280 

17980 13480 

18X50 13780 

18480 14270 

163J30 14550 

20450 15(180 

16250 15650 

16780 14200 

Est Sales 


Jul 12970 130.10 
Aon 131.30 13290 
Sep 13580 13580 
Oct 13880 13880 
Dec 14150 14400 
Jan 14550 14480 
Mar 15180 15180 
May 155J0 15580 
Jol 

Prev. Sates 18268 


Poprctf JO 48 14 361 18% 18 


18% 10*6 Pordvn 24 

21% 12% ParfcEs 11 

12% 5% ParVDrl .14 IS 

39% 25*4 PorkH 1.12 U 9 

19% 13 ParkPn 82 28 31 
2* 1% PatPtri 14 

17% 11% PayNP 80 45 12 

2114 13% PayCsh .16 J 18 

life 6*6 Peobdv JO 21 

1% % Persia 

56% 41 PenCen 11 


24 291 12% 12*6 12%— *6 
11 35 15% 15% 15% — % 

.14 28 1587 6% 6% 4%— % 

.12 U 9 870 29% 29% 2916 — % 
82 28 31 44 18% 18 18% 

14 43 2% 216 214— % 

80 48 12 170 13% 13% 13% 

.16 J 18 1 067 19% 1914 19% 4- % 
JO 3.1 174 7 6% 6% — % 

170 H h % 

11 240 54 53% 53%—% 



rft.iilir 





54% 41 PenCen 11 240 54 53% 53% — % 

55% 44% Penney 286 58 I 2247 47 46% 46% — % 

27% 2014 Pa PL 284 108 8 3488 24% 23% 24% — % 


37% 30 PoPLpf 480 128 
70 57% PaPLof 880 128 

27% 23*6 PaPLdPfl42 128 
24% 20 PaPLdor2J0 128 
47 54% Pa PL or 880 123 

27 22% PaPLtfPfO-25 127 

29% 25% PaPL dP<375 129 
8416 45% PaPLpf 974 107 
M 43 PaPLnrl180 117 
70 58% PaPL or Q70 138 


80z 37 36% 36% . 

4DZ 40% 48% 48% ■ 

38 27% 27 27%—% 

7 24% 24% 24% 

150* 45% 65% 65% 

26 26% 26% 26M— % 
24 29% 28% 29 — % 

100* 86% 86% 86% 

180z 94% 94% 94% 431V 
70i47% 67 67 —1% 


33% 

21% VF Carp 1.12 

36 

8 

103 

229b 

32% 

32% — % 

13% 

5% Valero 




2839 

11% 

10% 

1B*_ te 

23% 

14 Valor pf 

364 147 


31 

23% 

23% 

23% + % 

49k 

2% Vateyln 




12 

2H 

24b 

24b 

38% 

19 vanDrs 

52 

46 

< 

71 

21 

20% 

20%— % 

<% 

2 % varco 




30 

z% 

2% 

21b + % 

46% 

29% Varlon 

.26 

0 

11 

341 

31% 

30% 

31 — % 

13% 

9% Vote 

60 

30 

14 

113 

10H 

10% 

10%— % 

25% 

17% Veeco 

60 

£0 

13 

143 

20% 

20% 

20% 

6% 

3% Vends 




4X2 

6% 

5% 

6% + % 

10% 

8% VeatSe 

1700110 


8 

10% 

KRb 

10%— % 

45% 

25% Vtacpm 

62 

10 

19 

«5 

44% 

43% 

43% — 1% 

75% 

60% VaEPpf X04 115 


580*74% 

74% 

74% — % 

76 

<7% VaEPpf 860 117 



73% 

73% 

73% 

63% 

51% VaEPpf 70S 110 


200a 63% 

63 

<3 +T 

21% 

11% Vfthays 



IS 

7 

20% 

20% 

20% 

41% 

27% Vomod 



10 

2 

31% 

39H 

399k— % 

70 

59 VutaiM 

£80 

35 

it 

29 

74% 

74 

74—9* 


40% 31% Penwtt 220 68 11 189 34% 34% 34% + % 

25% 20 Penwpf 180 77 11 22% 22 2% 4 % 

51% 30% Pennzol 270 47 23 1102 51% 51% 51%— % 
17% 9% PoopEn 170 77 8 188 16% 16% 16% 4 % 

38 23% Pep Boy .40 1.1 16 60 37% 37% 37% 

55% 39*6 PepsiCo 188 32 36 7152 53% 52% 53% 4 % 

30% 17% Per* El 76 28 13 1959 23% 2 23% 4 % 

10% 7% Prmlan iTteiAQ 357 9 8% 8% 

22% 12% PervDr 78 T8 13 380 17% 17 17% — U 

39% 28 Petrie 180 38 15 40 38% 38% 38% 

30 24% PBTRs 172el3J 40 26% 26% 26% 4 % 

16% 14 PetRspf 177 98 56 16% 16% 16% 4 % 

7% 4 Ptrinv 180621.1 14 4% 4% 4% 

45% 29% Pfizer 188 38 14 3461 44% 44 44% — % 

25% 12% PtMlpD 513 20% 19% 20% 4 % 

48% 34 Pheln PT 500 107 41 48 47% 47% 

41% 20% Pilfers 74 18 24 337S 39% 38% 38% —1 
16% 9 PhlklEI 270 135 6 1930 15% 15% 15% 

29% 22 PhllEpt 3J0 137 Ml 28 28 28 

32% 25% PMIE Of 470 137 100c 32% 32% 32% 

35 25 Plti IE Pf 480 138 10x32*6 32*6 32%—% 


32% 25% PtlllE Pf 470 137 
35 25 PmiE pf 480 138 

35 25% PMIE of 488 137 

53% 40 PtlllE pf 7J» 135 
63 50*6 PtlllE pf 875 T47 

10% 9% PtlllE pf 181 138 
10% 6% PtlllE pf 173 138 
57 43 PhllEpf 775 147 

TO 6% PMIE pf ITS 132 
120% 97 PMlof 17.12 145 
108% 87 PMIE pf 1575 147 

41 51 *»3» ,U 


21% 15% PhllSub 172 6.1 13 

95% 62% PtlllMT 470 47 12 

25 10% Pnllpln 88 28 11 

56% 33% PtillPet 370 77 8 

28% 16% PM1VH 80 1J 9 

P 22% PledAs 78 3 8 

23% PleNG 272 77 V 

14% Pier 1 12 


50c 34% 34% 34% 4 % 
10151% 51% 51% 41% 
20Qz 61% 61% 61% 4 % 
224 10W 10% 10% 4 % 
132 10% 9W 9H— % 
1001 56 56 56 

45 10 9% 9% 4% 

40*118 117% 117% — 1% 
50*107 107 107 —1 

1560*68% 67 67 —1 

340x 56% 55% 55%—% 

46 21% 21% 21% 4 % 
1545 93% 9314 93W 

453 21 19% 20% —1% 

6631 40% 39% 40 — % 
304 22V, 22% 22% 

164 29% 29W 29W 4 % 
10 32 21W 31%—% 

58 20 19% 19%—% 


49% 34% Plbbrv 176 37 11 341 47% 47% 47W 

34 21% Pioneer 174 47 6 632 27% 27 27% — % 

26% 17 PkmrEI .17r 7 39 7 20 19% 19%— % 


19%— % 
38% — % 

s*=» 

7W— % 
10% 4 % 
17% 

29 — % 


43% 27% PltnyB 170 XI 11 825 39% 38% 3S%— % 

14% 9% Plttstn 417 12% 12 12 — % 

15% 8% PkBlRa 70 18 11 195 17% 12% 12*6— % 

13% 7% Ptantm .T4b XI 11 95 7% 7W 7W— % 

«w 8% Playboy 3 a 10% io% io% 4 % 

22% 15% PosoPd 80 38 35 636 17% 17W 17% 

32 24% PofdrM TJO 38 171 650 29% 29 29 — % 

22% 11% Pondrs 80 7 13 452 12% 12% 12% — % 

ffl 15 PopTof JO 4.1 6 19% 19% 19% — % 

mi 13% PorteC 80 28 57 48 15% 15% 15%— % 

T9 13 PortGE 172 98 7 309 19 18% 18% 

OTJ 17% PorGpf 280 1X0 7 22 21% 21%— % 

33% 28% PorGpf 480 1X0 30 33% 33% 33% 4 % 

33% 28*6 PorGpf 472 1X1 24 33 32% 33 4 % 

38% 25% PoNIcti 176 48 12 25 33% 33% 33% 4 % 

29% 19% Pehn El X16 77 9 381 29% 29% 29% 

39 31 PotEI Pf 4J4 105 570z 38% 38 38%—% 

25% 17% Preml S 76 18 16 14 22% 22% 22% — % 

8 % 25 Prlmrfc X00 57 7 32 37% 37% 37% + % 

% 11% PrlmeC 13 1647 16W MW 16% 

28% 13% PrlmM S 79 7 27 302 28% 27% 27% — % 

59% 47 ProctG 240 50 12 1590 52% 51% 52% — % 

15 7% Prd Rati 72 27 70 121 14% 14% 14% 

4716 37 Prefer 180 389 9 39% 38% 29 — % 


£% 31 Prefer 180 38 9 9 39% 38% 29 — % 

21% 16% PSvCol 100 97 I 577 21% 21% 21%— % 

20 16% PSCWpf XI0 108 5 19% 19% 19%— % 

9% 6% PSInd IDO 129 8 975 7% 7% 7%— % 

» 1916 PSInpf 150 148 30* 24 24 344% 

8% 6 PSInpf 104 144 2000* 7% 7 7%— % 

f 6% PSIr pf 1J8 148 450* 7% 7% 7% 4 % 

61% 49W PSInpf 984 167 1450*58 58 SB 

£ ^ 'f 4 30152 52 52 4 % 

55 43 PSInpf 878 168 100*51 51 51 + % 

65 50% PSInpf 980 167 2000*57 57 57 -8 

S7% 46% PSInpf 876 168 200* 53% 53% 53% — % 

6 3% PSvNH 1 1B3 4% 4% 4% 

U* « PS.NHjrf 1550* 10% 10 10 4 % 

« PNHpm 2 10% 10% 10% 4% 

17% 8% PNHpfC 7 15% 15% 15% 

15 7 PNHpfD 3 13% 13% 13% 

JSVb 2 PNHpfE 3 13% 13% 13%-% 

2 1114 111,1 

M 7% PNHpfG 52 12 12 12 

2% 1«% PSvNM X88 108 9 3255 27% 27*6 27% — % 


29% 20% PSvEG X72 94 
36% 28 PSEG Pf 448 11 J 
36 28% PSEG pf 4.18 11.9 

39 29% PSEG Pf 470 123 

42% 33% PSEGpf 545 11.9 
45% 35% PSEGpf 508 122 
105% 92 PSEGpfl182 10.9 
18% 15 PSEGpf X17 110 
63% 51% PSEGpf 752 114 
81% 65% PSEGpf 983 11 3 
4% 2% Public*. 

13% 6% Pueblo .16 18 

K 9% PuoetP 1.74 128 


559 28% 28% 28% 4 % 
1700* 34*6 34% 34% 41% 
1260Z 15% 33% 35% 4 % 
100* 35 35 35 

Mte«% 42% 42% 
200*43% 43*6 43% — % 
26 106% 104% 106% 41% 

7 18% 10% 18% 4 % 

5000x 63% 63% 63% 4 % 
1130*81 80 81 41% 

76 3% 3% 3% 

55 11% 11% 11% 

712 14% 14% 1416 — % 



Prev. Dov Open I nt 48744 up 926 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60000 IBs- dollars per 100 lbs. 

3440 2240 Mat 3380 3X45 

3X72 2X70 Jul 3X10 3X15 

31.95 22-50 AUO 3075 3175 

31.10 22 50 Sep 3X15 3080 

3037 2X90 Ofl 2925 29.55 

2975 2X90 Dec 2885 2B0B 

2947 2380 Jan 2870 2880 

2X60 2480 Mar 2740 2840 

2680 2480 May 

Est- Sales Prev. Soles 29454 

Prev. Dav Open int. 6X203 up 764 
OATS (CBT) 

SOOOBu mini mum- Cal Ion per bushel 
L91 186% May 186% 186% 

1.78% 180*6 Jul 181% 181% 

139 180% Sep 1-59 189 

172% 18? Dec 183 183 

187% 186% Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Saks 96 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 3867 off57 


386% 388 —42% 

374% 325% —02% 
373% 334%— 46% 
373% 334 — 45 

378% X38% — JM% 
175 X2S —44 


243% 244% +40% 
281 281% —40% 

2J0% 270% —41 

284% 284% —41% 
272% 273 —41% 

278% 279 —41 

2J0% ZSI —41 


5-95 £95% 

643% 644% ■ 
646% 646% 
645% 645% - 
6.13 6.13% 

624 624% 

645% 645% 
683 683 ■ 

689 - 


12300 —.10 

129 JO +.10 

13120 +.10 

13480 —80 

1 37 JO —.10 
14340 +.10 

14S40 

75080 +81 

155 JO +40 

16050 +J0 


3X90 2293 —85 

3185 3187 —80 

3075 3X30 —83 

3040 3045 —80 

29.1 D 29.15 — 4B 

2845 2X40 — 45 

3X15 2X15 —82 

2790 2790 — 20 

2786 —JO 


183 183% —43 

1.59% 1-597? —42 

187% 188% —40% 
182 182 —41 

184% —41 


Metals 


Jon S66U — -D 

Est. Sates 


Prev. Sole* 





Prev. Day Ooen Int. 3.M3 oH3S 





SILVER (COMEX) 






£000 trey az^GKits per froy ac. 






5573 


6250 

<250 

6355 




mn 

May 

6290 

6320 

6215 

6310 

+25 

14610 

5620 

Jut 

6380 

6410 

6300 

6390 

+22 


5730 


6480 

6500 

6390 

<4X5 

+23 

123X0 

5900 

Dec 

6640 

6640 

6SS0 

6634 

+24 


59S0 





6685 

4£6 

11930 

6070 

Mar 

6775 

<775 

6730 

<790 

+49 

10480 

6210 

May 

67£S 

6725 

6725 

6904 

+30 

9450 


Jul 

6950 

6950 

6 953 

7020 

+30 

900 

6410 

Sen 




7147 

+36 

7990 

6670 

Dec 

7360 

7260 

726 0 

7330 

+40 

7890 

7610 

Jan 




7404 

+42 



Prev- Sates 19604 




Prev. Day Ooen Int. 74721 ofTflB 






*rrm 







mi 


yaz. 



28X70 

—160 




28200 

8450 

28X50 

28200 

—140 

39300 

25000 



8X50 


m m 

—140 


trr.f 










off 15C 






I5BS 

zni 







industrials 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40400 lbs.- cents per Hl . 

6980 6X32 Jun 6X90 6X15 6245 6345 

6787 6X15 AUS 64.17 6682 6445 6427 

6580 6180 Oct 6X00 6X15 6247 6X42 

6785 6380 Dec 64.40 64X5 64.15 6425 

6785 6400 Peb 6480 6500 6490 6490 

6787 65JS Apr 6640 

Est. Sales 6899 Prev. Sales 10833 
Prev. Day open ML 56456 off 875 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44400 1 bs.- cents per lb. 

7X75 6470 May 65.15 6582 6545 020 

7X70 6680 AUO 6X27 6X87 6X00 6X02 

7X00 6740 Sep 6X35 6X40 6787 6787 

7X32 67.10 Oct 6X10 6X20 S7J5 6777 

7120 67.90 NOV 6047 6X87 6X17 6X7D 

79-60 69 JS Jan 6985 

Est. Salas 1J41 Prev. Sates 1861 
Prev. Day Open I nL 8893 upSS 
HOGS (CME) 

30400 lbs.- cents per to. 

55« 4X32 Jun 4687 6747 4655 4685 

5X77 4X85 Jul 4980 4980 4980 4982 

54X7 4780 Aoo 4985 5X17 49 JS 4985 

5175 4540 Oct 4740 47J0 4685 47.15 

5085 4X30 Dec 4X30 4X45 4X30 4X25 

5040 4625 Feb 4X85 4X97 4X70 4X95 

4785 4540 Apr 4582 4515 4582 4585 

4945 4740 Jun 4X20 4X30 4X15 4X37 

4X20 47J3 JUl 4X80 

Est. Safes 44X9 prev. Sales £154 
Prev. Day open Int. 23894 ott93 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

3X000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

8240 61.15 May 64JD 65.10 64.15 602 

8287 62.15 Jul 6XX 6655 4X75 4587 

8085 6X20 Aup 6470 6540 6480 6465 

7620 6115 Feb 7180 72.15 7185 7205 

7580 6440 Mar 7UQ 7U0 7L10 7180 

7560 7080 May 7285 

7640 7070 Jul 7295 

Est Sales 4854 Prev. Sales 6997 
Prev. Day Open Int 12435 off 494 



COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37800 lbs.- cents per tb. 

15240 12201 May 14585 14599 

14920 12140 Jul 14600 14675 

147J0 12740 Sep 14689 14680 

14640 12925 Dec 14588 14575 

144.75 12X50 Mar 14490 14580 

14275 137 40 MOV 145.70 145.10 

14X30 13X30 Jol 

14240 13275 Sep 

Est. Sales 1800 Prev. Sales 1997 
Prev. Day open int. 12840 up 710 
SUGA EWORLD 11 (NY CSCE) 

1 12400 lbs.- cents per lb. 

1080 3.16 May 122 227 

985 382 Jul 189 383 

975 389 Sep 389 £70 

945 373 Oct 182 385 

775 415 Jon 418 422 

9JO 463 Mcr 470 472 

7.15 4J5 May 491 493 

669 546 Jul 5.15 £16 

620 £32 Sep 

Est. Sales 1X075 Prev. Sales 11,110 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 8X180 off Blf 
COCOA (NY CSCE) 

10 metric tons- Sper ton 

2570 :rn May 2403 TOO 

2400 1998 Jul 715D 2160 

205 1*17 Sep 2090 2095 

2337 1945 Dec 2030 ZH4 

2190 1955 Mar 3835 2(05 

2130 1940 Mav 

2110 I960 Jut 


14490. 14572 
14575 14681 
14S7D 14680 
14540 14580 
14490 14580 
145-10 14480 
14306 
- J4X38 


3.19 225 

384 364 

366 386 

377 277 

470 415 

463 444 

485 485 

£08 546 

546 


2399 2407 

2131 2141 

2066 2068 
2028 

2029 2027 

203S 
2035 


US T. bills fuam 

S! million- Ptscf 100 pet - 
9225 87.14 Jun 9202 9207 9195 9203 

9177 8694 Sep 9185 9184 91 J? 9181 

9142 8577 Dec 9141 9148 9096 9146 

9X93 8660 Mcr 9060 9060 9060 9070 

9064 8741 Jun 9080 9080 9X40 9082 

9036 8840 Se> 9X13 9X13 9X13 9017 

9018 8945 Dec 8974 

8986 89-5B Mar 8974 

Est sales Prev. Sates 12.169 

Prev. Day Open InL 41841 up 177 
W YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

SlOQOOOprio- pts&32ndsof IDOpCt 
82-8 70-9 Jm 00-20 81-7 80-20 118 

SM3 - 75-11 S«P 79-21 806 79-21 80-5 

80-22 75-13 Dec 79-11 

80-8 75-14 Me 78-11 

79-26 7620 Jun 77-25 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates £714 

Prev. Dov Open InL 44524 up 284 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 pcz-sioxooopb & 32ndsaf 100 pet) 

77-15 57-20 Jun 7017 71-1 70-15 71 

76-2 57-10 Sco 67-26 70-1 69-16 70 

76-5 57-8 Dec 6X23 69-4 60-19 69-4 

72-30 57-2 Mar 67-27 68-11 67-27 60-11 

70-16 56-29 Jun 67-9 67-22 <7-6 67-21 

70-3 56-29 5ep 66-22 67-2 66-22 <7-2 

69-26 56-25 Dec 46-5 66-10 66-5 66-17 

69-12 56-27 Mar 65-22 66-2 65-22 66-2 

69- 3 63-12 Jan 65-16 65-21 65-16 65-20 

68-26 63-4 Sep 65-4 65-10 658 09 

68- 8 62- 34 Dec 6+36 6+30 6+26 6+29 

Est. Sales Prev. Saleil 72894 

Prey. Day Open latJ17J20 off 2828 
QWMA (CBT) 

si 00400 prl n- pfs X 32nds of 100 pet 

70- 10 57-17 Jun 69-21 70-2 69-21 <927 

69- 19 59-13 Sep <8-29 69-10 60-28 <98 

68-18 594 Dec 60-17 

<8-1 58-70 Mar <7-31 

<7-28 50-25 Jun <7-15 

SJ-3 <5 Sep <7-1 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 106 

Prev. Day Ooeo InL 4495 off 75 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- pis at TOQpcf 

9145 8X30 Jun 9136 9147 9135 9146 

9148 8540 Sep 9X60 9007 9X60 9QJ8 

9X56 8534 Dec 90J4 

9X18 <456 Mar 8942 

8942 86J3 Jun W47 

89-50 £46 Sep 8933 89.13 89.13 89.16 

8X99 0X34 Dec 8X08 

Est Sal ns Prev. Soles 433 

Prev. Day Open Int. 5432 off 132 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mRlftHMifsof 100 pet 

9131 8X49 Jun 9X97 9149 9X90 9140 

9X72 BL53 Sep 9X27 9039 9X16 9038 

9X20 8440 Dec 8932 8946 B9J2 8945 


00-20 01-6 
79-21 00-5 
79-10 
78-18 
77-29 


70-15 71 
<9-14 70 
<8-19 <9-4 
67-27 <6-11 
67-6 67-21 

66-22 <7-2 
6+5 66-17 

65-22 6+2 
65-16 65-20 
65-4 65-9 

6+26 6+29 


69-21 <927 
68-28 <95 
68-17 
67-31 
<7-15 
67-1 


9135 9146 
9X60 9038 
9024 
8942 
8947 
89.13 89.16 


Stock Indexes 


(Indexes compiled shortly before mar ke r da 

SP COMP. INDEX (CMC) 
points and cents 

189.10 156.10 Jun 18635 U445 18X20 18335 

19230 16X00 Sep W45 W7J5 186J0 18640 

19640 17530 Dec WOAO 19060 189-90 19840 

19535 19X10 Mar 19345 19345 W340 19340 

Est Sates Prev. Sates 55477 

Prev. Day Open Int. 57348 up 1404 
VALUE UKECKCBT) 
points and cents 

7T960 17340 Jun 19730 19840 79615 19630 

21330 18533 Sep 20240 20255 20X50 20145 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates L910 

Prev. Day Open InL 6632 up 517 . 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 
points and cents 

11X00 9040 Jon 107.15 107.25 10640 10645 

11130 9135 Sep 109.15 109.15 10650 10855 

11335 10130 Dec 111.15 11115 11145 11145 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 11JOS 

Prev. Day Open lid. 10407 up 974 




Close 

Moody's 94060 f 

Reuters - 1,90450 

DJ. Futures N.A. 

Com. Research Bureau. NA 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 

P - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters ; base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


E ulh ffl n .-12 A 171 is% w%— w 

30% 22% Purolat 128 £1 40 292 25% 25 25% — % 
10*A 5% Pvro 7 160 8% 8 B 


S? ^ Sy**?* 1-2J 34 13 1692 44% 43% 44% 

22% 15 OwJkSO 40 33 25 66 21% 21% 21% + % 

11% 6% Quonex 35 94 9 0% «%— ti 

34% 23 QuMtar 160 AS 9 125 32% 32% 32%— % 

25% 14 QkRBlI 34c 1.1 16 12 Zl% 21W 21W 


54 55 

16% 

48% 

49% 

ss 

J6% 

Z7Vi 

T 

17W 17W 
36% 36% 
43% 44% 
47% 48 
14% 14% 
1 % 1 % 
9% 9% 
6% <% 
35 35% 

31% 32 
12 % 12 % 
14% 14% 
34% 24% 
29% 30 
19% 19% 
12 % 12 % 
54W 54% 
64% 6<% 
21% 21% 
9% 9W 
75 
23% 
12 % 
33% 
33% 


47% 33% Xerox 100 64 18 1843 47% 46% 46% — % 

52% 45% Xemxpf £45 1X5 2 52 52 52 + Vi 

29 19 XTRA 64 LS 9 102 25% 25% 25% — % 


30 34 ZateCp 132 43 8 34 27% 27 27 

24% 13% Zapata 64 53 T7 477 14% MW 14% 

61% 30% Zovre 60b J 15 332 62 V. 60% 60% — W 

31% 18% ZealthE 8 1292 2Mi 19% JO — % 

21% 14% Zeros 17 30 18% 11% 18% + % 


Paris Commodities 

April 26 


NYSE Highs-LowB 


April 26 






Close 



High 

Law 

BM 

Ask 

Chtae 

SUGAR 





[ French franc* per metric tan 



AUQ 

1003 

1086 

1095 

1098 

— 13 

Oct 

1022 

1005 

1010 

1015 

— 14 

Dec 

1050 

1050 

1045 

1055 

— 19 

Mar 

1435 

1430 

1430 

1438 

— 13 

May 

1485 

1485 

1485 

1498 

— 12 

Aue N.T. N.T. 1545 

1 Est. vol.: 6*2 lets at 50 tori. 

1450 —7 

Prev. actual 

sates: 1033 lots. Open Interest: 15007 


COCOA 






1 French francs per TOO ko 



Mar 

£183 

£175 

£175 

£185 

+ 17 

Jly 

N.T. 

N.T. 

£190 


+ 10 

Sea 

£152 

£150 

£140 

£150 

—5 

Dec 

2063 

£074 

£070 

2061 

+5 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 


£085 

— 25 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 


£0X5 

— 25 

^St.VOl 

N.T. 

N-T. 

£055 


— 35 

5B lots of 10 tons. 

Prev. octuo* 

sales: 73 loft. Open Interest: so 



COFFEE 






French francs per 100 kg 



May 

£440 

2440 

2430 

2449 

— 20 

Jlv 

£505 

£5X5 

2460 

£520 

Lincti- 

Sea 

£562 

£550 

£535 

2460 

— 12 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Z6SS 

£580 

— 6 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2450 

2490 

UnctL 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

£550 

£575 

+ 2 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

£530 

2470 

+ 5 

EsL vaU 34 tats of 5 tons. Prev. actual sales: 

43 tats. Open Interest: 226 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 




Asian Commodities 

April 26 


HOMG-XONG GOLD FUTURES 
U£6 per ounce 

dose Previous 
HKrt Km Bkt Ask Bid Ask 
API — N.T. NX 32200 3H0O 332J» 32400 
May _ N.T. N.T. 322J» 3240Q 37200 32400 
Jun - N-T. N.T. 32400 32400 22400 32600 
AUS - m00 33000 3290G 33100 229.00 33100 
Oct _ 33400 33400 33X00 33500 333JB335A0 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. 33800 3*000 33000 34X00 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 3000 34500 34300 34500 
Volume: 21 fats of I Mo*. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U£J per ounce 


"Hrt J-ow' Seme seme 
Jw* - ■ 32500 32560 T?4*n 32560 

AUS N.T. N.T. 32960 ^60 

S«p N.T. N.T. 33160 33100 

volume; 112 lets of 100 ck. 


Dividends April 26 


Turkey Awards Contract 
For Bosphorus Bridge 

_ ANKARA — Turkey has awarded a consor- 
tium of Turkish, Japanese and Italian compa- 
nies a multimillion-doDar contract to build a 
second bridge over the Bosphorus, the Anato- 
lian news agency reported Friday. 

it said the consortium of Serai Turkes-Fevzi 
Akkaya Insaat AS of Turkey, Mitsubishi Heavy 
Industries, Nippon Kokan and Ishikawajima- 
-Harima Heavy Industries of Japan and Lra- 
preglio of Italy received the 5551 3 million con- 
tracL 

They were the lowest bidders. All bidders had 
to supply foreign credits to cover construction 
to be eligible. 

Apart from the bridge; the contract includes 
construction of around 300 kilometers (ISO 
miles) of highways on both sides of ihe Bos* 
phorousL 

Four other consortia had bid for the contract. 
They included Cleveland Bridge of Britain, 
which constructed the First bridge over the Bos- 
phorous. with Bechtel Corp. of United States 
and Enka Insaat of Turkey. 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
MoIoyNob cants per kilo 
Close 

BW »«»t 

May 19X75 19300 

Jun- 193JD 19400 

JlY 19650 197 JO 

Aup 19950 200 JC 

Sep- 20200 20300 

Volume: 18 tots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore amis per kilo 
Clout 

Bkt Ask 

RSS I Mav- 169.73 17X25 

RSSlJun- le£7S 17X25 
RSS 2Mav_ W70O 16860 
RSS 3 May. ItSJfl 16L50 
RSS 4 MOV- 1*160 16350 

RS5 5A6ov- 15650 15850 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

Malaysian rtnsvits per 25 tons 
Close 

BM Aik 

May 1,720 1,770 

Jun 15*0 1JS2 

Jhr- 1650 l-td5 

AuB 1.3&0 1^00 

5ep 1.320 1-570 

Oct 1310 1(360 

Nov 1000 1050 

Jan 1(290. U40 

Mar ia»0 1.340 

Volume: 0 kits of 25 tons. 

Sowbb.- Reuters. 


Provioas 
Bid A»fc 
192J5 19X25 

19350 19X75 

19640 19750 

199.5(1 20100 

20250 20350 


Previous 
BM Ask 
16950 17000 

17000 17050 

16750 16850 

16550 16650 

16150 16350 

U69I 15850 


Prey loos 
Bid ANc 
1620 1670 

1(490 1513 

1600 1640 

1030 1030 

1020 1070 

*010 1060 
1000 1050 

1090 1040 

1090 1040 


London Commodities 

April 26 


Close Previous 
Htatl Low BM ASK BM ASk 

SUGAR 

Sterttea Per metric ton 
May 9900 9500 9760 9900 9900 9960 
Aup 10660 10500 10500 10560 10700 10700 
ocf 11100 10900 10960 10900 11100 11160 
Dec 11700 11560 11560 11500 11600 11700 
Mor 12860 17700 177.20 12760 12960 12960 
Mar U260 13260 13260 13300 13400 13500 
Aug 13900 13900 13700 137-41 13*00 14X00 
Volume: 3081 late of 50 tans. 

COCOA 

Sterling per metric too 
*}?r 1.W7 }M5 10O 1088 1090 1091 

Jhr 1,922 1092 1092 1094 1.905 1007 

s«» 1090 1055 )0J7 1058 1070 1074 

2£ IS MSI 1121 wit i0i3 

Mar 103 1J99 1000 1001 1011 10T2 

N.T. N.T. 1005 1015 1015 1020 
Jhr N.T. N.T. 1025 1035 1000 1040 

Volume: 26« loft oflO Ions. 

COFFEE 

Sterling per metri c ton- 
Moy 2,174 £125 £125 £127 £149 £150 

Jhr 2020 £165 £165 £167 £186 £1B8 

X245 £208 2J10 £215 £225 XtS 
NOV £283 £240 2044 £247 2^ 1 JS6 

Jon 2096 £252 £252 2060 £261 £265 

Mar 2074 £250 2.235 £2*5 2040 fitr, 

May N.T. N.T. £210 £230 MM ZXM 

Volume: £765 lots of 5 tons. 

GASOIL 

UJ. deftars per metric tea 
API 231 JU 23)00 23X00 23)00 22958 23X25 
May ^00 ^25 22X50 22600 alaXOSO 
Jim 22200 22X50 22X75 22100 22X50 22X73 
Jlr 21975 21X25 21825 21875 2ULOO maf 
AUO 22150 2X175 22X00 22100 22X00 22X7! 
S*P 22400 22350 22300 22 325 22350 22375 
OO N.T. N.T. 22400 22600 22550 mflO 
NOV N.T. N.T. 22700 22650 T79JM 

Dee N.T. N.T. 23600 22700 22750 23000 
Volume: 1024 tats of 100 tons. 

ZZmi£$0? OnaL0ndan p * fn,ewn E *' 


DM Futures Options 

April 26 

W. Geraai Hark-SSSOO morfcs cMs per raork 


Cash Prices April 26 


Commodity and u«n 

Cofiee 4 Santos, th- 
Prlntciolti <4/30 38 V+ yd _ 

Steel billets (Pitt.), tan 

hw*2 Fdry.PtilkL.ien _ 

Copper elect, lb — - 

Tin (Strolls), fe 

Zinc, E. St. L. Basis. Lb 

Palladium, °t W — 
Silver N.Y.oz - 
Source; AP. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

April 25 



L*S. Tneasmy Bill Rates 
April 25 


Bid YMd Yield 
704 702 80S 801 

807 XB5 153 <63 

uneveor 829 X27 XM 806 

Sovra> : Solomon Brothers 


London Metals 

April 26 


srnKe Colo-Same 
mice Jun San Dec 

W 208 261 300 

J* 100 151 262 

32 X70 1J7 100 

33 033 I6Q 

34 0.15 0 64 100 

35 008 061 1129 

Estimated total voL6207 
£2? : vdL J. 94 Q open I 

Pets : Tltars. vnL 402* oph 1 
Source : CME. 


PeteSettls 
Jm Sep dk 

0.70 065 065 

Ml X72 100 

069 1.14 Ijg 

Ul 169 - 

2.1 J £36 _ 

in 3.10 3.11 


McDonuell Dou^as 


50% 35% SOW £00 42 13 88 47% 47U 47% + % 

13% a SL Inds 200 1.9 10 7 10% 10% 10H 

» If* SPSTec 00 19 13 84 Z744 27V? 2^?_ g. 

26 15 Sabine 04 5 S 23 17% 17% 

23 16 SabnRy £74 167 172 1+ T6ta inf + u 

18% 11% SlodBs 34 15 15 1W IM i» | SJ- % 



EC Drops Investigation 
Of Dumping Char ges 

The Assodtaed Pros 
BRUSSELS — The European 
pmmnuuty said Friday that ii had 
halted an inquiry into allegations 
that U.S. and Japanese Companies 

































































;* 


•Sja Mar ^ 

3 P | S ® i h "busi ness rou ndup 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 


it tFlSs 


in 


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ssssw^ 


i&Iaudiiis Domier Tries 
To Block Daimler Bid 


JOB 

I§1 


Sr? 


■gw 

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■»6W S£ - l0 «Ja 
80 bS? 

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^ ^ ^ S3 a*. 

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By Warren Gcdcr 

Imemmuxtel (Jerald Tribune ■ ■ 
MUNICH — Claudius Domier 
s&id Friday chat he would not con 

«*nl f.-k r\a.mW *» I ^1. 


meat, Daimler said thaiit had writ* 
ten to Jam and told him it was 
ready for further talks. 

Mr. Dormer’s option to buy up 



sent to Daimler-Benz AG’s plans to shares offered to onuaders was stip- 
acquire bis family's Doruicr *»• — *■:. *-•> — 

GmbH unless he was guaranteed a 
: minimum 25-percent stake in Dor- 
Thai share amounts to veto 
-er over company policy 
incorporation ehanget under West 

German law. __ 

Mr. Domier holds a I2.8-peroent West Germany's second- largest 
stake in the West German aviation aviation and aerospace group. 
^■53&*»n a ^ gtoup, which wmdd maeasc to 20 Daimler is imdcretaod to have 
“3* ?? rt ? nt .s Und ^. V* Da “£? fi 30, z & ced «>J»V just under 400 mil- 

-• 'ffimYiSS* J* 15 brwhcr - S 3 ™* would hofa an lion DM for the 

a/ujctihJ, 2 ^-percent stake under the Daimler bolding. 


«ga 

•M39CS 


Claude Domier. who founded the 
company. Claudius Dormer's in- 
tention to exercise that option pre- 
sents a potentially insurmountable 
obstacle to Daimler's stated desire 
to win full “majority control” of 


proposed 68-per- 


ST'P"®!' 

Jsai fe. *n w 

i * 

*£■***, ^ 



»cm E , iiM «55i 

“'jV, 1 ,®* 5- ■■iac.be. 

m ~ & ill ii5 S» 


plan. while other family sharehold- 
er would sell their shares. 

- * Daimler announced Tuesday 
that it bad reached a takeover 
agreement with five of the six Dor- 
mer family shareholders, excluding 
Claudius Domier, to acquire 68 
percent of the company. Ten days 
earlier, Mr. Domier the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune that he 


. Dormer’s ] TWA to Fly to Caribbean 

t share would be reject- * 


uiw 5? ’suo l|S "will d° everything [he] can top 
§3 §38*5* ventanjr big raiSmy from 


l PrrfL’^M JS2 J«3 S: over majority control of Domier, 
*c w ., ; «. liffli” and wmlldliy other family shares 

that must be tendered within the 
*.» family before being sold to outad- 

2*3 Sts £* « , «S. 

ft : ■ Mr. Domier, 70, said Friday that 
S* *5 'dc* west German automaker now 


-'Ur 


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Mr. Domier said Friday that 
Daimler already indicated during 
negotiations with family members 
Monday and Tuesday in Studgart 
that a 25- percent bolding for Clau- 
dius was not acceptable. A Daimler 
spokesman 
whether Mr. 
a 25-percent share would be reject 
ed. 

Mr. Domier also said he was 
skeptical that .the Daimler plan 
would meet with the required ap- 
proval by the trustees or the 27.8- 
percent stake in the estate of Amu 
Domier, the founder’s . deceased 

widow. 

He said that he had the support 


Phillips Posts 45.1% Drop in Profit; 
Tenneco Earnings Phwge 59 A% 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Phillips Petroleum Co n citing the cost of a 
restructuring it undertook to escape from two hostile takeover bids, 
said Friday that earnings tumbled 45. 1 percent in the first quarter of 
1985 from a year earlier. 

And Tenneco Inc., a diversified enemy company, said its profit 
plunged 59.4 percent, due largely to a 75-day shutdown of production 
at its JI Case Co. subsidiary, a move aimed at reducing excess dealer 
inventories of farm equipment. The conmany predicted that Case, 
which purchased International Harvester Co.'s farm equipment busi- 
ness late last year, would turn a profit by the end of 1985. 

Phillips said that its first-quarter profit fdl to $106 million, or 71 
cents a share, from SJ 93 million, or SI 26 a share, in the like period a 
year earlier. Revenue edged up 1.5 percent, however, to S4.0Z billion 
from $3.96 billion. 

Wi lliam C. Douce, Phillips* chairman said that earnings were 
reduced by S40 million for expenses related to a restructuring of the 
company that was developed to settle separate takeover attempts by 
T. Boone Pickens and Carl C. Icahn. 

Phillips borrowed $4.5 billion to buy back nearly half of its stock 
and agreed to sell 52 billion of its assets to reduce the new debt load. 

Tenneco said that profit fdl to $63 ariUion. or 34 cents a share, from 
$155 million, or SI a share. Revenue fell 4.1 percent to $3.72 billion 
from S3.88 billion. 


Lta Angela Times Service _ 

NEW YORK — Trans World fcred from one outstanding com- 
Airlines has announced that it petitive disadvantage; a highly sea- 
would begin serving destinations in soobI route structure and revenue 
the Caribbean beginning Nov. 15 match. We fly like mad all 

in an effort to keep its planes filled summer, then have to follow the 


MJS ** 



6,JC iu must decide whether it can come to of all but one family rnanSf to fli ghts ^would be summcr ^ busiest sea- 


year-round. 

C.E Meyer Jr., the carrier’s pres- 
ident and chief executive, said 


*i!f* «■ e! tenns with his conditions. Those ^ek a restructuring of company between i New York and San Juan, 

^ i .t _ . i- MimAMltm it. Plif-rtn Pirn TWA ale a unTI vniF 


c 01 L«y me , 

»oe .-.is. 




rife: 

Tit:- 


jfg 

i a 

•40 V 
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OJtlKVMs; 

-■eotlr^lMr i;. 


conditions would stipulate that his 
minimum 25-percem stake wouU 
not be affected by a future capital 
increase in Domier by Daimkr. 
n* S» ^ Daimler shares, which had risen 
' 5 ^ jS § sharply in the previous few da 


ji feD 6 Deutsche marks (51.92) Fri- 
S day to 6843 DM per share on the 
** Frankfurt Slock Exchatue, 

Following Mr. Dormer's state- 


ownership that would leave tire 
family with 60 percent and an out- 
side partner, or partnm, with 40 
percent. 

Mannesmann AG, which had ex- 
tensive talks with Domier members 
last week parallel with those of 
Daimler, has said that it would set- 
tle for a share of less than 50 per- 
cent. 


Puerto Rico. TWA also wfl] serve 
Sl Thomas and St. Croix in the 
U.S. Virgin Islands. Nassau and 
Freeport in the Bahamas, and Sl 
M arten, Antigua, Martinique and 
Guadeloupe. 


son. The airline had profits of $29.8 
million last year. It reported a loss 
of 574 J million in this year’s first 
quarter, traditionally one of its 
slowest periods. 

Mr. Meyer said that TWA in- 
tended to add one or two new Ca- 


“We think it's going to solve one ribbean destinations each year as 
of our long-standing problems for pan of a five-year plan to develop 


us,” Mr. Meyer said. “As everyone 
surely knows, along with our many 


lop 

the market, and might later buy 20 
new planes . 


i' 1 -'■li 2^5 Sj 

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■ADVERTISEMENT- 


»p. IhOEX'.CMEl 
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M g 13318 b 

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Commodity Infos 

Cia* 

?ao 

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NA 

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INTTERNATICHVAL FUNDS 

Quatonoos Supplied by Funds Listed 
16 April 1985 

ThBintotm wHuaquWBttooi Hwwi Pl o w OH M nulfdayttn PiwitmmdwWi Hie 
exception of miim hmd> ntox motes ore baton oa tune Mien. Tbe tonowtiw 
mcrofaiai lyrabolt IntgcatofreooooCY of iwot g M em topp n o o tor ttw IHT: 
<a>- 0 oU»; (v)-iMtkin (U-bMnantMv; (r) -roookirtir; tU -IrrowrtarJv. 

AL MAI. MAMACEMEWT 
<w) Al-Mol Trust, f 
BANK JULI US BAER A CO. U«L 


OBUFLEX LIMITED 
S 15X41 — (wiMutricurrofiev. 


— (a i Boertxmd- 
— [o ) Connor. 


Pol tor MotHurn Town. 
DoHor Lora To M 


— Id 1 E outdoor America. 
—Id ] EauSmer Eutom_ 
— Id I Eaulbaer Padtlc— 

— id) Grobar 

—Id 1 Stodktnr 


BANOUE IN DO SUEZ 
— (d I Asian Gmwtti Fund. 


tsiSiS — Jopanete Yon 

Pound StarHra. — 

— te Km — (wiDeanchoManc 

Sc 115™} — * w > dpk*i Pwm 

If S -‘- 1 

SFMWX0* ORANCC NASSAU CROUP 

PBBUn. Tho Hapuo OXI) 4000 
— <d] Sever B o P oomow lf 


.DMt&lO 
_FL 1U* 
_sf y.»a 


— (w) Pjve rbond— 

— (wi PTF— AmeriL 
— tw) Fi F— Europe 

— iwl F IF— Pot me. 

— Id 1 indoMNzMuttiboadCA. 


— (d ) indaMMZ Mutttbands B 
B R ITAN N ULPOB 2T). St HeRir. Jmv 


SHUT 

SF 5250 PAR ISBA5— CROUP 
S 18J7 — Id 1 Corlexa InietnoHanol 
SnjM — (w)OBLI-DM 
- *1170 — 1*1 OBLIGES 

IWJ4 — (w)OBU-DOL 

*14740 — <w> OBLI-YEN 


S 3440 
SI741 


— jel Brii-Daliar Income. 


tw) BrltS MonoaOrr. 


—Id ) Bril. inttSManoaPortr. 
—Id ) Bril. iMLrMotMXLPonf. 
— IWJ Brll.Uirivenal Growth. 
— I wi BrlLGMd Fund. . 

— tw) BrilJHanraXumncv— 
, — (d 1 Biir. Japan Mr Pert Fd. 


3 B4ok^ulden^ 

■l) PAROIL-FUND™ 

■tlPAfttNTERFimO 

r run ~* a ’ PAR U3 Timmy e 



r , — <wi BrltJertey CW Food HUD 

■L-lul Brit. World Ul*. Fund SLOM 

— td)Br I). World Techn. Fund— S0J» 


rcrec';"- 

■. !i -Z‘.-S 


:rs rcM 
rr 


29C. 31. 1931 
ncl 

its ILItti. 

: sec. it. in. 


Market Guide 


£. 


i- SS: iK’S * ~'VH 

ws 'ssitile Exam 
.r.ta'-tt* vun*w> Jtttt 
> C- ^ss 'rtersMDi s»M 
sew Zooa.St-ier.UPM 

■ic. Zerxr esaam 

■ X. T - EoagStt wO? 
sr» “srt Mers"iit WW* 
as«b» - *L S«rt al Tc* 

«wen -ert P.Tjres EkdWW 


i ?* h Prices if 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— (w) CnpUM Inti Fund 

—lw» CapUal Holla ! 


— Id | PAR 

tLWd* ROYALS. OF CANAOAFOSMCUERNSEY 

saws -Hwl RBC Canadian Fund Ud. 1 1U3 

SOJM w) RBC Far EatUPacMc Fd — U05T- 

c 1442* -rM KEiC Inrt Ccwrtol Fd. I30 j»* 

sossb -hw) rbc mn iname Fd s mlM 

min -Hd) RBCMaaCumoncvFd $23.10 

-Hwl RBC North Amer.Fd 194* 

S KAN □ I FOND 1NTLFUNO (4*-*- 73*270) 
— (w)inc: Bid at » Otter SU» 


m 


— (w)Aoc-: Bkf- 


lOHor- 


SVEN5KA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

CREDIT SUIS5E (ISSUE PRICES! 17 DavoMlVe SaJjnMfcn-31-377-S84D 

—Id ) Action* SubMt — __ SF JtfUO — (b > SHB Bond Fond_ *2179 

— id) Bond Volar Swf SF WOO — Cwl SHB In W Growth Fund I20J6 

—Id) Band valor D-mark 

—id) Bond Valor US-OOllaR— 

—Id) Bond voter Yen— Yen ^ 

—<d) Convert Valor Swt^ SF109. 


DA ? mnn SWISS BANK COUP. (ISSUE PRICES) 
» waJE — (d » Amorlemvolar— _ — SF sn 


— id jD-Marfc Bond Selection 



DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

—fid ) Concentra 

— Hd | inTI Re<denfond_ 


Dunn AHaroitro LJovd George. Bnamli 
— (ml DSH Commodity Pool- S31MJ3 ~ 
— imj Currency S Gold Pool — S 199.2* 
— tmi Winch. Lite Fut Pool— *5902 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

— <d) AmcaUSLSh. SF40M 

— Id ) Bond-lnvoct SFS7JS 

—id ) Foraa SvrlM Sn. SF 137-50 

— (d » Japan-1 nvetl — : SF 94A5B 

*30*43 *— — IdlSaflt SouthAlr.Sh.__ SF551JU 
—Id > Sima (stack prfot) 5F 7972)0 


DM 25.22 

DM 19 JO 



qm)™v^d r F^ r pSM; iSSS- ^qN.IHVES TMENT Pmnkt urt 

FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISEK _ —Id 1 Unltond* 

I, Laurence Paunty H1B< EC4. 0I-C23-4SM — (d) Unlrak 

-(«) p*c Attanuc ; — in* Other Funds 

, — <w) FAC European * WAS * 

AMwl FAC Oriental ... .... S2*40 (w> AcTtoonds Investments Fund. 

* FIDELITY POB <70. HamllMn Bermuda „ ~~ 


Z{l5}^McS^5& *wtt§ jjirt Afltdmmi.rnrttana.TO- 


**°»K rai Artone lljn.n 

— \ HS!E oKSlSJSipSrf <«e> Tmmr lore Fd, |A6IF) S 1M7 

“12 1 — <\S£ Iwl BNP interbond Fund S 10137 

zin 1 fHShJ pit tSt SZZ itfJ* tw) BondMtes-liM Pr — SF 13SM 

— iS ! EHSfK n25 ^SLr*"* 1 Sum (m) Canada Gtd-Morfooae Fd S9JB 

—Id) Fidelity Fr^jor_Fund_— AS21 i^S Auetralla Fond * 1QHS 

Iffi 


S*7.U 


') Arab Finance IJ 1 - 


DM4120 

DM22S0 

DM7745 


*21 JO 
S 1041 
S3L00 
S1 1740 
*04843 


11341 

, -td I Fidelity Paatlc Fund--. — * r»J7 
1_ — (d) ndelltySacL Growth Fa — SM47 

— (d ) Fidelity World Fund *3049 

FORBES PO 6087 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Aoenl 01-8*9-3013 
— (w) Gold Income . . ■ *740- 

— (w) Gold AppriKialkm IM3 


id I CJ4L Australia Fond . 
Id I CJJL Japan Fund. 


I 


S" he) tneCstabl Wiinoni Trust siji» 

« id) Europe ObUorttons SW4 

...a su * ™- 13 iw] First Eoele Fuad — — * UJTfUf 

UU-tTUM ini FHYv stars Ltd. SD9JM 

Cw) FMstxiry Group Oa s 1J7.9* 

. (w) Ffaced income Trans * 10JK 

S 13R81 Iw) Forttelr* ln» Pr SF 309 JO 

SlSt7 twl FareKfund — - — .__S741 


— <wl Dollar income. 

— (ml Stroteoi'c Trodi 

GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— (wi East investment . 

— (w) Scottish World Fund. 

— Iw) Slate St. American 

Canil GukLLM.LDn4iaenWn-m42X 
GLOBAL A55ET MANAGEMENT CORP. 
PB in. St Peter Port. Guernsey, 0O1-3OT5 
(ml FtiturCAM SA 


ml Cleveland Otttxjre Fd S3JMU4B 

w) Columbia Securities FL 11148 

COMET E * 89573 

. Convert. Pel inn A Certs 19.14 

;w» Convert. Fd. inn B Certs S3LM 

iwlO.GX. ■ - ... S79J* 

*042 Id) D. Witter WldWWelvtTst SUJ3 

S l.M (b | DrokJcar invest Fond N.V- * 1,11545 

(d i Dreytus Fund Inti * 37.14 

Iw) Drevfus interaxrHnenL. 131.94 


IWl 

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>13 




>- J ^ 

- . : •• ..n 

' ' l-se 


ImJGAM Arbttrooe Inc. 

(Hr) GAMerlca Inc 

(wi GAM Boston Inc 

Iw) GAM Ermltooe 

(wl GAM Franc-val, 


S 13747 (w) Formula Selection FO 
X 10047 (d 1 Fondltada . 


Id > GAM international Inc — — 
Iwl GAM North America Inc— - 
tw) GAM N. America Unit Trust, 
(w) GAM Pocinc Inc, . 


(w) GAM stcrL A Inti Utur Trust, 
(ml GAM systems Inc. 


. 11349 (d ) Gover run. Sec Fund* 

SF 97.18 a ) Frankf-Trust lnterz(<n_ 
S10SJ6 w) Haussmarm HhMS. N.V_m. 

*1044* w) Hestla Fun di — - — 

i 04.00 p h) Hart a m Fund 

*112*8 b 1 1 LA Inti Gold Bond 

nosa p o iimertundSA. 


|w) GAM Worldunde lnc_ 


(ml GAM TycheSACKtSSA — 
G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 

—iwl Berry Poc Fd. (JO. 

— Id } G.T. AppH*d.Scl«« 

L —«d 


S 1*749 Iwl Inter market Fund I . 


SF48J27 
. *23.1* 

- *0*48 
DM42J» 
. S 1114S 
. *10443 
S 1.12(44 

— *940 
*12.90 


*33045 

*14043 Id) talermlidno MuL FdL 0.*B"— *40141 
*11*43 (r) Inrt Securities Fund— — * 9 JI 

Idl InvmtuDWS DMU41 

(r) Invest AtlanHaues *743 

' <t > noNortune Inn Fund SA S 1147 

SJB2I (Wl Jaoan 5etectian Fund *10X09 

G.T. Asean rijc. GwttkFd — *1247- (wl Japan Pacific Fund .010293 


— (w) G.T. Asia Fund-—, 
—Id > G.T. Australia Fund. 
—Id I G.T. Europe Fund- 


JUT (ml Jeffer P ms. inlL U 
SJO.99 Jo ) KleMwarl Benson Inrt 
*944 (V*) Klemwort Bens. Jap. 


— (wi G.T. Eura Small Cos. Fund — *11-57 W ) Korea Growth Trust 

— (d ) G.T. Dollar Fund *W44 d 1 LMcom Fund 

— Id > G.T. Band Fund—- — — — 5 J9-!i w) LevaraoeCop 

—Id 1 G.T. GlotMl Tecnntav Fd — * 1343 a t Lloulbaar. 

—Id ) G.T. Honshu Poth finder. 324J1 W ) LuxJund 

—Id 1 G.T. investment Fun d -■ — *1J49 ml Moanatund N-V. 

—Id ) G.T. Japcet Smoll Co.Funa — M.17 d 1 MpdManam Set Fd, 

dSiS:T:SMi F F , SS= SttS IZI!X8 2== 

MILL W“U|L1^r^lQJ^INTL.SA. « } 

Jersey. wi Novotec investment Fund *924* 

Barwy. P43. to ^ a * n . F .. .. w| NAJ9LF SJ4A17 

rjd ! ^p'f^Sd) ~~ -*WS41 



— 10 ) mini. Bond Fund 

—(d) tnL Currwtcy UJ — 

zSiKTAtasaBteo; 


EBC TRUST COJJERSgYILip. 

t-3 Seale StJSL Heller. ■0534-3601 

t^Xded CURRENCY FUND 

aid) Inc.: F 1 * 1 W TO- Otter S9J77* 

5 2 cS.: bmTTjidjs O flW *10470 

INTERNATIONALINCOME FUND 

Id I snort Term a- (AM um) — *140g 

—td I Short Term A (Dlstrl. *14148 

^ —Id J Own Term 'B' lACCum) S L1134 

: JdlaSriTertn-B-lDlstr) 1M4W 

- — (wl Lona Term S2LS 

JARDINE FLEMING. K» 70 GPOHO KO 

- — lb J J.F Japan Tarsi—- Y«4 

— <b ) j.f south east Asm . - 

Zip ) j.f Japan Tertmohwv — ■ y 21.106 

— <b ) J.F Paclfle SecAlAcc) Silt 

— (b) J.F Australln *44* 


teicn inn war r.i.i . . .. ihmi 

SF3a j e (it ) Podllc Hortzon investment Fd!*8434 

| <w) PANCURRI Inc *1197 

s ... O — a SF1J97J0 

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- 


Another California S&L 
Reports Heavy Losses 


By Thomas C Hayes 

New York Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — BdQ Nation- 
al Corp., parent of a rapidly grow- 
ing California thrift institution that 
invested heavily in Silicon Valley 
real estate in the last three years, 
has reported a loss of about S60 
milli on in tire fourth quarter. 

According to Bell’s chairman, 
Miles A. Cobb, the loss for all of 
1984 was about 547 milli on. He 
said Thursday that it all but wiped 
out the net worth of the company’s 
principal subsidiary. Bell Savings 
ft Loan Association, which ac- 
counts for 90 percent of the par- 
ent’s revenues . 

Federal regulations require thrift 
associations to maintain a net 
wonh of 3 to 5 percent of liabilities, 
depending on the pace of deposit 
growth. 


’ Mr. Cobb estimated Bell Sav- 
ings’ net wonh at 52 million, but 
said that a final analysis could re- 
sult in a “deficit." Bell Savings, 
with headquarters in San Mateo, 
has 515 billion in assets. As recent- 
ly as 1982, it had only 5300 million. 

Bell National's shares, which are 
traded on the over-the-counter 
market, ended Thursday at 51.875 
per share, down S 1.125. 

Bell Savings has approximately 
5 1 .4 billion in deposits. About 5200 
million is in accounts with ‘more 
than 5100.000. tbe maximum eligi- 
ble for federal insura nce. 

Earlier this month, Beverly Hills 
Savings ft Loan Association said 
that a spate of bad real estate loans 
caused it to lose about 5100 million 
last year. Federal regulators ousted 
its management and (Erectors last 
week. 


United’s Route to Pacific 
Was Slow and Persistent 


(Continued from Page 13) 
expand when they’re serving 50 
states and there aren't any more 
states.” 

For all its might. United has not 
been without its problems in recent 
years. During the early years of 
airline deregulation, its earnings 
were battered by spiraling fuel bills 
and sagging ridership. Between 
1979 and 1982, United reported 
more than $500 minion in operat- 
ing losses. 

Even as profitability returned, 
other challenges arose, in the form 
of route and rare competition from 
itS^Lfch-rival American Airlines, 
tire resurrected Continental Air- 


W. Germans 
Are Troubled 


(Continued from Page 13) 
match, either in skill or in other 
characteristics, the labor force re- 
leased directly or indirectly by job 
destruction." 

The issue is what policy mea- 
sures tbe European countries can 
adopt to minimize tbe impact of 
“creative destruction" on jobs. 

In Mr. Paye's view, the role of 
policy in supporting the process of 
technological innovation and in 
iximizmg the gums for all should 
involve several dements: providing 
a stable environment for overall 
economic growth and, especially 
growth of investment; keeping in- 
ternational markets open for trade 
in technology and for the free flow 
of goods, services and knowledge; 
improving competition in domestic 
markets and promoting the adapta- 
tion of the Libor force, especially 
through education and training, to 
new conditions, and supporting a 
positive social donate for techno- 
i cal change. 

rhere is particular concern here 
for youth unemployment. Some 
fear that a mood of desperation 
that could lead to social and eco- 
nomic decay may develop unless 
bolder actions are taken to over- 
come the high andpersistem rate of 
unemployment. This is a problem 
that now extends from Britain to 
virtually all parts of Western Eu- 
rope. . 


lines, and from the hewer “up- 
start," People Express Airlines. 

The labor situation has also pre- 
sented difficulties. Two years ago, 
American announced an agree- 
ment under which its entry level 
personnel would be paid substan- 
tially less than the prevailing wage 
levels. United sought similar agree- 
ments from its unions, and has won 
tbe concessions from its machinists 
and flight attendants. But the pi- 
lots, after more than a year of nego- 
tiations, have still not accepted the 
plan and the two sides earlier this 
month entered a 30-day cooling-off 
period. 

United officials say that the car- 
rier cannot possibly remain com- 
petitive without the concessions. 

United is expected to release its 
first-quarter results on Tuesday 
and analysts expect its perfor- 
mance wifi be weaker than in the 
first quarter of 1984, mostly be- 
cause of tbe widespread use of the 
more deeply discounted air fares 
announced earlier this year. 

“The first quarter is typically a 
weak period in the industry,” Mr. 
Dcr chin said. “But I don’t think 
this quarter will be as good as the 
previous year." 


FDIC Sues 4 Former Officials 
Of Continental IQinois Corp. 


competitive strengths, we’ve suf- 
fered fre 


The Associated Press 

CHICAGO — The Federal De- 
posit Insurance Carp, has sued four 
framer officials of Continental Illi- 
nois Corp. to recover more than S3 
million in severance payments they 
received after resigning last year in 
the wake of Continental Bank’s 
near failure. 

The FDIC filed suit Friday in 
U.S. District Court to recover a 
portion of tbe severances of the 
former Continental chairman, 
Roger E. Anderson; Donald C. 
Miller, former corporate vice chair- 
man; John H. Perkins, former pres- 
ident of Continental Illinois Na- 
tional Bank ft Trust Co.; and 
George R. Baker, former executive 
vice president of the bank and tbe 
corporation. 

The suit charges that tire Conti- 
nental officials lost their eligibility 
for such severance payments when 
they resigned. 

The FDIC seeks recovery of S1.2 
million from Mr. Anderson, 
S951.000 from Mr. Perkins, 
$587,000 from Mr. Miller and 
$420,000 from Mr. Baker. 

Ia a joint statement, Mr. Ander- 


son, Mr. Perkins and Mr. Miller 
said they believe the severance pay- 
ments were appropriate. 

The severance payments bang 
challenged were made in a^rfiwrtn 
to accrued and vested pennons and 
other retirement benefits to which 
the four officers were entitled, the 
suit said. 

The suit said the three senior 
officers managed the affairs of the 
corporation “when the bank feO 
from its position as one of tire 
country's leading financial institu- 
tions to tire brink of failure mid 
insolvency." 

Mr. Anderson, who resigned in 
April 1984, was chairman of the 
corporation when tire bank bought 
more than $1 billion in energy 
loans from Perm Square Bank of 
Oklahoma Gty. Penn Square failed 
in July 1982 and Continental wrote 
off most of the loans. 

The Penn Square loans were 
among bad loans that totaled $2.7 
billion last June, when concern 
about Continental's stability trig- 
gered tire biggest bank run in histo- 
ry- 


COMPANY 


Qub Mfedfcnanee SA 
one-for-10 free share issue 
bdders and a one-for-Gve rights 
issue at 400 francs (about 542} per 
share. The proposal follows a two- 

-for-one share split approved by 

shareholders Friday. 

Gannett Co. facts a proxy fight 
from Carl R Lindner, who said be 
owns 5 percent of the newspaper 
chain, to prevent the adoption of 
measures to block an unwanted 
takeover. 

IBM Dentsddaod GmbH, the 
wholly owned West German sub- 
sidiary of International Business 
Machines Corp., said it increased 
group netprofit 6.7 percent last 
year to 726.4 million Deutsche 
marks (S234 J million). 

Lotus Development Corp. said it 
had signed a letter of intent to ac- 
quire Dataspeexi Inc_ a maker of 
portable, radio-operated stock 
market quotation devices, for a 
price of So3 million. 

Un-g-France, a unit of Lurgi 
GmbH of West Germany, heads a 
French consortium that has won a 
contract worth 13 billion francs 
(about 51 36 million) to set up a gas 
condensate processing plant in 
Russia. 

Midland Bank PLC, seeking ap- 
proval to gain 100-percent control 
of Crocker National Corp., told its 



write-offs and loan- 
loss provisions at the troubled U.S. 
bank. 

Nortiuup's new F-20 fighter jet 
has been highly praised by tbe IIS. 
Air Force, which said it is seriously 
considering purchasing tire plane in 
its fiscal-1987 budget. 

Occidental Petroleum Corp.’s 
long-delayed joint venture coal 
project in China is still under dis- 
cussion but U.S. expons under the 
pact will fall to about $200 million 
from a previously estimated 5300 
million, tire U.S. Export-Import 
Bank saud. 

Pepsico Inc. plans to market soft 
drinks in India under a joint ven- 
ture with India’s Duncan tea 
group, a Duncan spokesman said. 
Coca-Cola had given up the Indian 
market rather than abide by a gov- 
ernment order that would involve 
sharing the secret formula for its 
concentrate. 

Philip Morris Inc. said its stock- 
holders approved a proposal to re- 
organize the company into a hold- 
ing company. The plan, to take 
effect about July 1, calk for the 
formation of a new corporation, 
Philip Morris Cos. Inc. with Philip 
Morris Inc. becoming a whol- 
ly-owned subsidiary. 


bears and possums into hiberna- 
tion when winter comes.” 

TWA earns most of its revenues 
from trails- Adamic traffic, for 


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INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


CHIEF/PRINCIPAL TECHNICIAN 
(ACTE PROGRAMER) REQUIRED 
AT NATO HEADQUARTERS - NAPLES, ITALY 



from a reoognizad 
axjre« of two years 


and dgoal equp- 
norbe 


9iould be duly quafifiad of technician level with a 
technical school offering a full tone electronics tsd 
duration. Have preeffleaf repair experienc* of modern 
mart end be proficient m me use of various lest equipmesK Should ideally nor 
above 40 years of age and have an up to date knowledge of modem arcut design 
inducing tronsstore and modem digital printed draaf boards. Have a fundamental 
understanding of programing tedvsques as viefl oa Hie abity to interpret tedwied 
manuals, vwmg ana s c hematic ciesgrores. plus day to day administration and 
supervisor of technical doff. A former experience in ted programing computer 
based equipment, parricutor logic droit analysis is desirable. Must be flues-* in Enpfah 
language. Base salary Ita&an Lira 2J200000 plus authorized aSowcnteS and fringe 
privileges lax -free. Submit curriculum not later than 10 MAY 1985 tor 

CIVILIAN PERSONNEL BRANCH. PANDA DIVISION. 

HEADQUARTERS AFSOUTH RAGNOU, NAPLES, ITALY 


SALES VICE PRESIDENT 

In response to last conversations Chairman of Board 
will speak to previously selected candidates. 

Call between 7:00 p.m and 9:00 p.m. from May 6th 
to May 9th: 

Annette HALE, 

P.O. Box 164041, Miami, FLORIDA. 


„ Hie Dafiy Source for 
International Investore. 




McDonald's is a major U.S. corporation with an international branch network and 
outstanding growth and performance record. Worldwide sales are well in excess of 
U.S. $10 billion. Due to our rapid expansion we are looking for a 

European Finance Manager 

This person will be responsible for implementing a cash management system in Europe. 
He/ she will also assist in arranging financing for wholly-owned subsidiaries, advising 
joint venture partners licensees on their financing and assisting in the negotiation of loan 
agreements. 

The ideal candidate will have a broad financial background including cosh manage- 
ment, bank relationship management and local currency financing in various countries 
within Europe. Knowledge of accounting and strong quantitative financial skills are 
required. Language requirements are English, German and French. Spanish and Italian 
would be a plus. 

Please send resume with picture and salary requirements to: 

McDonald’s System of Europe, Inc, Attn. Mr. Ernest Mathia, 
European Controller, Kennedyallee 109, 6000 Frankfurt/ Main 70. 


rj" 


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166 7MJBIQQ.il 
lOta 94 9935 10035 
Hit 2*5 lDumouo 
Uta 2*5 100*210082 
fta IM0 100.1510821 
fta 48 100,1110038 
fta 2*7 10080100.10 
10W 278 9980 10080 
9% 198 1004510060 

UH. 94 uazisar 

1BK 274 1084510855 
fW 2*5 9835 9935 
1*7 iarniOOLQ 
58 100*310033 
264 lOOJOUd 
29-7 1803010030 


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SCOTdbnvlOT F1napr73 
Scanalnov km Fin flecn 
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Secufity Pacific 97 
Sncf IS 
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SF.E.91 

Sodefe Generate 90/95 
Societe Generate 90 
SodeM Generate Mar 94 
Sodefe Generate gov« 

Sactotc General 97 
Sncbfl 

SoaM(Klnedaa) 92/97 
Snato 05 

KkiedomOl Spain 93 
SPO/n 99 
Standard OiartefM Aug 99 fta 
Standard Chartered *4 «W 


fta 194 99.98 10808 
fta Urlfl 9925 10050 
fta 218 *930 9948 
lOta 2*4 100*010038 
Ota 21-5 99*5 9935 
lta 3*7 ms 10085 
fta 366 10002100.12 
9L 36 9935 100.15 
fta 198 9935 10025 
Uta 44 T082510L25 

10W 98 1008010180 

Uta 1*9 100*010030 
10W 74 1083210042 
10L 154 UDJ4H0.U 
10W 20-5 1002510035 
1080 274 IKLO103-5J 
fta 2*5 9987 9927 
Uta 304 100*710037 
95, 2*5 9935 10005 
194 1003*1004* 
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SkmdaRi Chartered *1 Uta 20-5 ioq 2 dimoo 
Standard CnarteradnnrtO Uta 114 10127)0132 
Standard cnortered p*rn iota 7-5 1003310033 


State BkOtlntSdS? 
Sumitomo Trait 92/94 
Sweden 90/05 
Sweden 09/94/99 
Sweden 91/82 
Sweden oerp 
Sweden 92/05 
Tdya Kobe 92/M 
Tofcuoln 92/94 
Trtol Asia Ltd 94^9 
Toronto Dominion 92 
TOVD Tran 92/99 
TvO 94/04 

Onion Bk Norway 99 
united 0/54d* Bk 59 
Willi Fargo 97 
WIDtoms + Giynifi 
Work) Bank 94 
Yokohama 91/94 
Z*ntrale*patka**»91 


_ 31-5 9930 loom 
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8ta 1*7 9925 9938 
fta 384 9935 9940 
lDta 2*5 100.141BD.19 
fta *7 1002010035 
Ota 204 9945 99*5 
I Ota 2*5 100.1*1003* 
10L 1*9 10050100*0 
fta 124 1003210042 
9W 144 10045)0055 
fta 146 loraiM® 
fta 94 9800 9835 
fta 214 9SJD 99J0 
9W 288 9935 10035 
fta 05 9930 99*0 
lDta 1*9 100*010078 
889 314 98*5 9985 
TW 2-10 1003010040 
fta 15-7 MOIST DOS) 


Non Dollar 


Imar/MaL 
Am 97 

Bk Montreal 94 
Bk Tokyo aOrtQ 
Bqlndomezfl 
Clllcore 89/91 
Cansondated goto 
CepmeM 
CredJl Fancier 99 
Credll National 91/95 
Denmark 93/91 
LLI.94 

Kingdom BetaUm 94 
UoydsN 
MlnlteblO 
Snd 90/n 
YortaiUre 91/94 


Coupon N«t Bid Mkd 
14W 144 10085108.11 
13W 278 1002310081 
14ta 214 9980 bU 
I4W 214 10085100.15 
Uta 154 9925 ff*5 
14W 58 98.91 9*.I8 
13W 218 tOQJNOO*) 
Uta 96 1002510035 
irk 1*6 1003310043 
Uta 22-5 11114610056 

raw 157 xxuBioon 

Uta 1*7 H03210032 
Uta 244 9937 10087 
Uta 74 99.97 10887 
Uta 24-7 uonoo*i 
Uta 278 10005100.15 


Source : Credit Su/iso-Fkvi Boston Ucu 
London 


Act byApril 30. 



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i?j si si * By David A. Vise pajm^UwinbcE^aresfanilarw u‘on w» dosed to reporters, but cause it required ihe sak of CBS 

*1 L Wtafaxfi&t fm Semie OuKT recently completed buyouts analysts later described the CBS assets to help meet interest pay- 

J A Jji. WASHINGTON — Ted - of media corapanks. presentation. The investment menu, it was not as tmlikd y to 

Hj $ 'Turner’s 53-biBion bid for CBS ® oth urvestnam bankers said bankers said they believe Morgan succeed as many Wall Street ana- 

Jj 5 ^ ^“lnc. is Goan dally viable' and could their financial analyses were valid Stanley’s presentation was not ob- lysis have suggested. He said the 

& gj ^(‘succeed unless the company takes ,n the event that Mr. Tumer jective — since the firm has been offer should be taken seriously. 


INTERNATIONAL HERAUD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY* APRIL 27-28, 1985 


r’s Bid for CBS as Viable I INTERNATIONAL C 




° 1# 


(Continued From Badk Page) 


a 


? tS 1 li • Tm,..t ,n.nr i, - ■ « i ouu uunuigv buiwiunmu, urn i>u. luiuu luuwm 

’i fr i-n 0 n ^fn 1 r?i!? I r a> **•**? Federal Co mm uni c ations Co minis- er than an objective 

1 WaE Street Gnns. both with son and the Justice Department, a cates. 

*jj 5* r ?^f^ t rt ot ^ e ^^ v * sm8COT- ‘ process that could take many The investment bi 

2 & & jT^horts on broadcasting mergers j 


kx involved in the 


Turner jective — since the fins has been offer should be taken seriously, 
jval to retained by CBS to prevent a take* Both the investment bankers and 

otraer is over — and included several ques- the investor agreed that if Mr. 
Securi- tiouable assumptions that made Turner is able to sweeten his bid by 
ion, the Mr. Turner's proposal appear riski- adding cash, CBS wQl be forced to 
otxmiis- er than an objective analysis indi- take meaningful steps to fight bis 
mem, a cates. takeover bid. They said CBS could 

many The investment bankers dispnt- fight Mr. Turner and keep its stock- 


AUTOS TAX FREE HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


9& HK* 

*5 UrtmtB 

Jto uiu2?£ » 

58 S &.--8 

giSSIH S'S» 

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wains, ed, for example, Morgan Stanley's holders happy t 

Morgan Stanley & Co., the CBS assumption that the bonds Mr. measures, onco! 


r.r.U. - ■ » «--- . “■ '-v-» ««. OJJuiuuut"U uut UK IAIUIU i»u. IUWIUQ, UDC Ul maul WIHUU UC IU 

**£"?• ““ s f^y^ K y- ~^ r t investment adviser, told Wall Turner has proposed to exchange repurchase some of its stock at a 

Street analysts recently that Mr. for CBS stock are so risky they pnee above the market price. This 

ii^ ,« Turner's bid would leave the com- could be worth nothing because would dimmish the difference bo- 

t P“7 30 burc}cncd ^bi that it they might not trade. They said tween the CBS stock market price 

wnfidentiiil ananas would not make a profit for at least that there is a mill ti-bil lion -dollar and the value of Mr. Turner’s bid. 


■ij . b l^e/Kirr .L JLn .r i^imT T_ _> .1™"^ ” « ****** mvwu UlW \-UiJ AUM UUU M#l U11M. 

would 001 ma ^ c a prof" 11 Tor at least that there is a multi-billion -dollar and the value of Mr. Turner’s bid, 
,! !£ ^ .P r °^ dcd wera BtM watQfiHL jo years and might be bankrupt by market of risky bonds that are ac- making his offer less attractive to 
The two investment bankers esti- J987. Morgan Stanley’s presents- lively traded by professional inves- CBS stockholders.. 


HtOM STOCK 
Morceda* 500 St, new, blade 

Mood** 500 stSa/ste. nor 

md non otm at 
Cadllac. Forran. faguor, Sanaa Row. 
land ROw, Poncfia, Mtrado aid 
c**w ioadng mate. 

Sant day ragmraeoo peaw. 

KZKOvrrs 

O undu dran* 36. CH-8027 Zurich 
Tal. 01/202 76 id Telex: B159I5L 


DAWAJI TRADE 

MTL DHJVSY 


2 q t 2S* ^witiwvouiiwui u 0 u^u»bu- 1 7oi. gurneys piaaiiz- u 

5 ^ ‘mated the value of Mr. Turner's bid tion was pan of an »ff?TT csg i w ~ u 

1 jit about SI50 a share. Thi^ said paignbyOStoresistMr.Tuniei's 
\ * ^:jhat while Mr. Tuniert bid docs takeover attempt and was designed h 
J ift t.J^iolve a hi^i degree of risk be- to influence Wall Street's analysis fi 
s] ^ r; cause it consists entirely of high- just as many analysts are trying to a 


lively traded by professional inves- CBS stockholders, 
tore. While the majority of Wall Street 

The opinion of these investment analysis have mid they think Mr. 
bankers that Mr. Tomer's bid is Tomer's bid is not financially via- 
finan dally viable was supported by ble, a Merrill Lynch analyst, W3- 


5* vsr n 

SW- " 

1 #“ ; 

3> ^ Vuicco « 


v. ^ 


cau» ii consis ts entirely of high- just as many analysis arc trying to a nationally prominent investor Liam Suter, disagrees. ‘Turner’s bid 
weld ‘■junk bonds," the fin anc i al figure orn what the complex bid is who also asked to remain anony- is real, and I put a minimum value 
'characteristics of the offer, includ- worth. mous. He said that while Mr. of 5150 a share on his bid." Mr. 

, ing the projections of how interest The Morgan Stanley presents- Turner's proposal was risky be- Suter said. 


United States 


Emery Air Freight 
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WorThn 

2 Wroth a 
3^ WrylHB 


- , 20 
11 4 \\ 

l2 d j} 

. 1 * ft » 


■‘SSr .1 • 

14 23 5 

32\ 1 


SB 

IT 

>2. W !| 
■4S« U 11 
33 


iaa no 

■S u 1 

■K .1 

as. a 


SheUer-Gtobe 
2nd OUar. MS IN* 

Ravanua 2417 2174 

Hal ll J ij** 

Par shore— >.» 0.9* 

id Half INS m* 

Ravanua *49.7 191 J 


Teradyne 

Id Ouar. MM HM 

Ravanua 994 854 

Not Inc 154 9.1 

Par Shorn— 047 0J9 

Texas Eastern 

Id Ouar. INS 1984 

Ravanua 1.00. 1480. 

Nat Inc 4*8 St: 1 

ParSnara— 083 M3 

7904 par short raautt i ext- 
iutraa tor 24a*l tpltt. 


.'IK&' f Month* 

'f n* V * Ravanua 

J , I {* Nat inc 

« l Lv ,perSh °|*- 


Nal inc. 544 

Par Shorn-*. 0.77 


5j2 Nat inc 


Par Shorn — U* 


a '[ IT: Ingersofl-Rand 

17 J. 1 ■ Id Own-. 19IS IN* 

S U J 'Ravanua *31.2 5725 

23 i3 ft, Not Inc 1*2 740 

S s' ’ft.PnrShora 04* 0J0 

U| : - MwphyCW 

,71 S^l IdQuor. 1915 19M 

11* {J jt, Ravanua 5113 5728 

la , > Nat inc 2027 2*29 

«£*• PM Shores as* on 

NL Industries 

» ^i- w INS 199* 

|£ 2J*i|Ravefiwa 3274 3112 

S 8 Hal Inc 441 0.91 

* £ fc'Per Shorn __ DM - 


ms lttow. INS IN* par stwa— 

740 Ravanua <*24 541.) 

OL30 Nat Inc 208 212 p— 

Par Short 1.15 1.17 ITOOM 


Pacific Re*, 

m osar. ne m* 

Ravanua 3900 S3SO 

Hal me *80 058 

Par sttara 027 — 

Par imw after orator ta 

dhWmA 

Pennzoil 

IdQuor. INS 19M 


3rd Ouar. 

NatmcTm! MOO 2208 

MJJ Par Shorn tL9A 02 

S fMOtcns. T9ts IfM 

_ Ravanua IMS. *4»- 

_ Not Inc - 5200 7072 

*° Par shorn 3.U *25 


Procter & Gamble 

re Ouar. INS IN* 


— Dear Shorn — 122 1J9 

IMS not Jactudat oatn at W <-,,04, 

mtuktn from totr of property. >q*«DO 

Rkhmdson-Vkks pJX^TL. ™ *25 

3rd Otw fits 19M Mat Inc 422 34.9 

■mSwT!!. 2*U Par Shorn— 178 049 

pw shoraZI 083 Si Stmdard Oil Ohio 
9 Month# ms HM ldQoar. 

Ravanua — _ »S9.7 9S9.9 Ravanua 

Nat Inc 5W Nat Inc 

Par Shorn 283 229 P*r Share _ 

SheBOd i 

ift Qua r. HM HM id Ouar. 

Ravanua *740. *958. Ravanua __ 

Nat Inc 7878 Nat Inc 

Par Shorn 0.94 UB parSharn-^. 


Quaker Oats 


79*. not htdodn gain of SSnS* - ~ 
5474X30 tram cttscoatinuet) JJJ* L"£r— 

•rattans. Pm Shore— 


*082 Ravanua __ 
492 Not Inc ■ ... 
125 Per Shorn-. 


™* Times Mirror 

04* lot a war. H95 »M 

0. 94 Ravanua 4958 4494 

1. Nat Inc 4*2 413 

Par Shorn 044 043 

iw Transco Energy 

1J2 ldQoar. ms TN4 

Ravanua 9734 1.14a 

Nai Inc 314 378 

IMi ParShari.*. 1J3 1J7 

i&i 

i^ Tytaf 

IdQuor. INS 1TM 

Ravanua 21 9 J 214.9 

Door Nat 115 389 

IN* ooar Share— 017 020 

*?’ IDS* nar metutos last at 




AMSTHIDAM 182197 

nUSTIU LADY ODMPAMON 

Otorm in g, aduomd. tfovo B ed. 


** PARIS 553 62 62 +* 

FOR A REAL VJ.P. YOUNG LADY 
Datinguishad, Bagont, MabSngoal 


VIP LADY GUIDE 
'ouna, a d u an a d . oJogont & fr a ng o ol 
(or davt. ova r inm & travoL 
PAMS 533 SO 26 


PAMS REAL VIP SOPHB1KA1H) 
Young lady compgnan, for your ala- 
nd damns. avonnfP & watfund*. 
Why don't you phone 277-01-691 A 


THE MAGNIFICENT 
STELLA 
SOLARIS 

7 AND 14 DAY CRUISES 

To tha Groak blanch, Turkey. 

Egypt A bratL 

SoSng Evaty Monday front Praia 
and 

THE YACHT-UKE 
STEUA 
OCEANIS 

3 AMD 4 DAY CRUISES * PARIS 527 01 93 * 

To tha Graak blonde & Turkey. SoSng YOUNG LADY TRUNQUAL VIP-PA 
ovary Monday & Friday from Brora 

Plane apply tojmwTrovel AfliRt or: 

5, Kor. SarvKB St., Atftore 10562 
ToIoie 215621. Phone 3228883. 




Why don't you phone 277-01-691 A 
lafioad bdngud guide, even fry your 
a & travail. 


TOKYO: 442 39 79 

European young lady companion. 


Pwd tafc 265 80 36 
Munich tat 395 613 
Genova let 327 110 
Zurich let 391 36 55 


PAMS 704 80 27 
VH» PA YOUNG LADY 
MuitSogual. 


YOU API VERY MOTIVATED to nay 
erne year in Amanaei family. Cortod 
our organization: Port* 55/87 98 


*77*000 from dlscoMitnuad 

imirnffiw 


(Ji. Tobacco 

ldQoar. HM 


»M ldQoar. INS HM „ ldQoar. HM IN* 

«"-J Ravanua 1M0. z*xl Ravanua — io»4 

5« Not Inc MU 811 “!*!«■ 1*57 

229 ParMtare«_ 14* 154 Par Share — 0.71 043 

Sun Vulcan Materials 

HJ* ldQoar. HM IfM HIQuor. HIS HM 

*»- Ravanua 3470. *211 Ravanua. — 2015 2015 

7972 Nallrtc— 127 St 1410 Nallnc. 884 118 

185 par Shore 1.12 123 Par Share — 043 UR 



-'i. 1 / 1 rWi'-J 


RG TEAM 


Over-the-Counter 

NASDAQ National Market Prices 


April 26 


I9M web Lata aPJkLQilM 

w 




Sol** la Net 

190s HW Leer 3PJM.Oroa 

74037 3SU> 3SM— IK 
3 * 4 4 + V* 

3l*1«*li H 1flfc + 4k 
797314 Rtk 12th 
21 30V6 29M 30 +14 

4423V, 27*4 22K 
17 4ta 4U 4V0 + lb 
2121H 2IU 2H4 + Yt 
114114 41 81U>- W 

4323« 23V, 23V,— M 
1320V, 20 20 

942 MN MM, MM 
to 49k 4N 4*k 
12370*4 10 UAi + «. 
12 514 48b 48k— N 
1479V, 19 19li + Vk 
151 5V, 5*k 5*k 

52 514 SVh 5Vk — 1* 
525 25 25 


CONDITION. 

tmcBxs 

MOST: 

$4,000 

BMW 

$4,000 

PORSCHE 

$4,000 

JAGUAR 

$4,500 

FERRARI 308 

$5,500 

TESTA ROSSA 

$6,000 

* * ONE OF THE LARGEST CENTERS 

- ALL WO«C COMPLETED AT OUR 
SHOP 


Offer* to* free con or low prices. AH 
mokes & types; now A used. FtnldoGv- 
ory. PO Bok 2050. 4800 CB, BBfflA / 
HoSond. Tal {0| 76651550. fbc 74281 



OGNEVA 

RCSKXNCE DC PRANCE 

4 Ava. de Fnmca. CH-1202 Ganew 
Tdb 00*1 22/31 1479 
BaauriM. fire doss. cir-conc&ionBd. 
maitmikii hjmdhad upm liuonti ora 
pudas. FUfy aqapped btdwn, 
doily maid service. 

WaaUy and monfWy rotas. 
Evcafent loccBOn. 


FO» SALE & WANTED 


UNITD. USA & WORLDWIDE Tali 
212-765-7793 / 765-7794 


SOdETE DIANE PAMS 260 87 43 
Man & women gwdes, security & rent- 
car sarMcas. 8 am ■ 12 pm. 


HHKDPORT TAX CARS 
Col far fret analog. 

Be* J20T1. BottardomAapoftHoflancL 
Tat 010423077. Tbu 2»nEPCA5l NL 


New/uncL tramedcte delivery- Fa AVI 
Tal Germany (0) 6234-4092, ffau 464966 




BOOKS 



{714} 898-2182 


DOT - EPA 

LICENSED CERTIFICATIONS 
We arrange shipping, customs boning 
and US 5 year repair worronkas far 


E or u pe un auto*. 
ATLANTIC IMI 


AUTOMOBILES 


ATLANTIC U4PORTH) MOTORS 
NEW JBSEY.USA 
ToL 20I-322-7BH; Tfe 226078 
Q u a l it y Coavanioa* Shea 1978. 




SINGAPORE INTI GUIDES. Cdk Snv 
73* 96 28. 


HONG KONG (K-3| 723 12 37 


HONG KONG 3-671267 young lady 


■KORMZH) UNIVERSITY 
Gives quMid parsonofitiei 
die opportunity to gat a PJ-LD - PJrLD 
H.C - nohdondograa through a sps- 
dd B O BO * Ptaosa writo to 
Boot 7140, LH.T, Friedridar. 15, 
6000 Frondurt/Mdii 


LONDON WBL BXJCATB) Young 
lody companon. Tat 622 6615 


YOUNG LADY COMPANION Lon- 
don/ Heathrow. Tot 386 7671. 


TOKYO LADY COMPANION, PA 

Personal Assistant 03-456-553? 


PARIS LADY INTERPRETER. Trawl 
companon. Pans 633 68 09. 


D.O.T. it EP JL 

5 VEaBS EXP80ENCE 

X RANK INC. 

kdrinapofa, Indiana 317-291-4108 




MERCB3ES freai EUROPE 

^ ^ I DOT/RA CONVERSIONS to US. 

SAPE1Y STANDABOS 1 Aaoatana guoronW VIA 

D.O.T. 4 EJ> JL Gorpsl iMOft^xtCartia, Bote- 


BOATS A 
RECREATIONAL 




LEGAL SERVICES 



VJU 8 IA. IMMI • ■ Wiliam W unuv. WRU* 

more. MD 21224. Teh 301-6334611, 
The 4995689 VIA US Autos avtdcWe 
in BoIquol Tot 32-50-715071. The 
82309. 


ALTOS TAX FREE 


NEW MERCEDES 




NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE. BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

for MMnUTFria&vwy 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


ICELANDER 

30 Yean Annhranary 

5paaal one, way forts 
void May 7di - June 7th 

•Now York f 1.7W 

aWadsatgfon F 1JR 

aCMcnga F 1,** 

aPdrog ■■ F 1,991 

•OrWo (Hotida) F 2J9t 

eLaa Aagowe FZ99I 

•Son f rend s e n F Z99I 

For Round trip, caA 

khandauTpams 

Tot p] 742 52 26 




HOLIDAYS A TRAVEL 


Cruise in Elegance 

to fhe GREEK ISLANDS 
EGYPT, KRAE & TURKEY 

CHOICE OF 7-4-3-2-1 DAY 
CRtltSES aul of A4 »m (Ptraaw) 


Pons. 72700 12: 


PENPALS 


MS AMD GUYS oB coremorti wav 
pan pab. DdAna Hantie s Vertag, 
Bax 1IO66Q/M, D-1000 Borfe, TI, 
West Garmcny. 


YOUNG iADY 

PA/fatterpratar & Tooriim Guide 

PARIS S62 0587 


WEST MHAN LADY Componion Tat 
London 381 9847. 


HAMBURG - YOUNG LADY compan- 
ion, muhiSnauaL Tefc 27 04 570. 


— FRENCH LADY VIP 

Assistant. Tat 723 0272 


SOPHQTICATH1 Young AAre Compan- 
ion London/ Heathrow 01 385 9*76 


747 59 58 TOURIST GUIDE Paris, 


COPB4HAG84. TOP CLASS compan- 
ion. Td- €1-22 20-19 4 pm - 11 


LONDON: EDUCATED LADY Com- 
ponxtn/ Guide. Td 889 1694. 


LOS ANG&B, Tour Guide Samca. 
213713-2762. 


YOUNG OCEANIC LADY in Lcndon 
01-245 9002 Airports/TrowL 


lil- l- vjiIATT'^I 



2131 8551736 


3ues 

d^s 

in the Trib. 


(Thursdays and 
Saturdays, too) 

Start your day 
with a smile with 

Art 

Buchwaki 


Xeboc 

233 4** 

41* 

•»lk 

Xleor 

27* l*k 

> 

■ — Ik 

XUax 

• 

2*24U\k 

tH4 

13U +16 


YVmPt 

UM 

3JB 

-asm 

33V. 

33V. 

VarkPd 

M 

14 

4141* 

IM 

14Vk + *k 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

satvKZ 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in Now York 
330 W. 56th St., N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CHDIT CARDS AND 



Zahntal 

ZanLJia 

Zantac 

Ztooler A*a *4 
ZlenUt 184 2A 
Zltat 
Ztvod 

Zandvn 84 U 
Zymaa 


141 48k 41k 4H 

M23IK, 50** 3Hk -k Hi 

W» ) 3 — «% 

21 11 lim II +1* 
4 341* 364* 5*1* 

40 38* 31* 38* + W 

90 5 48* S 

331DW UVh 1IM— ft 

142 2 m 2 n 2n 



Portimn Escort Agency 

67 CMtam S treat, 
London W1 

Tat 486 3724 er 486 1158 
AB ntafar nd3 creds oc capl ad 


LONDON 

BBT ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL 200 8585 


LONDON 


S3 231* 

33V* 

11 2*U. 

V 

7M «Vh 

n* 



313*4 

13** 

5 MU 

141* 

171 W 


DU 

12% 

11 SM 

7% 

1*210% 

101* 

43231* 

22% 

1431* 

431* 

41017 

14% 

121 371k 

34** 

4HK 

HH* 

50 * 

5% 

3M 

M 

22325 

24** 

17027 

20 

79 3 

2% 

2SW 

1*1* 

MM 
*4 3Vk 

w 

M3S 4%. 

4V* 



17 m* 

10% 

W1 L. 

43 3% 

% 

52220% 

2M 

*4 31* 

3Vk 

4* 4% 

4 

»MI 

4% 


Dutch Trade Surplus Up 

Reuters 

THE HAGUE — Visible trade 
in the Netherlands showed a provi- 
sional surplus of 1.4. billion guilders 
($397 million) in February, after 
surpluses of 900 million guilders in 


February of 1984, the 
Ministry said Friday. 


W.GenuuCo6tdliriiigl^ 

Reuters 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMER/CAN 


EVERYWHERE YOU ARE OR GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Cdl free from LLSj 1-800-237-0892 
Ce£ fete from Rondo: 1-300-282-089Z 
Lowell Eodarn waton ei you badd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 
IN NEW YORK 



LONDON CLASS 

ESCORT SERVICE 


L0M3ON, HEATHROW £ GATWKX 
Toil 01 890 0373 


ARISTOCATS 

Loaden Escort Sarvfea 
. 128 VWgnwa St™ London W.l. 
AB rnrior Oetfil Cords Aaxptad 
let 437 47 41 7 4742 
12 naan ■ midraght 


ZURICH 

Samroi&a'a Escort L Gtrida Sank* 
Me4a A Faaak. Tat 01/56 96 93 


* MADRID * 

TASTE ESCORT sanncE 
TEL 411 72 57-259 61 96 


ZURICH 


Tat 01/252 61 74 


ZURICH-GENEVA 


TELOI/363 08 64-022/34 41 86 


MILAN ESCORT 

SERVICE: 03/69762402 



sspsa mi 

'mill nil' I'l l iiil'3 


OHVA * BEAUTY* 


TEL 29 51 30 



BKORr SBVKE 385 3573. 


ZURICH 


THc 01/69 55 04 


JASMINE 


* AMSTERDAM 

S7f Eccart Sorvfeo. 227837 



ESCORTS & GUIDES 


GENEVA - BEST 


TEL- 022/86 15 95 


FRANKFURT SONIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. let 069-68 34 42. 


FRANKFURT/ MUNICH Mole Escort 
Semen. 069/386441 & 089/3518226. 


GRDA’S ESCORT SStVICE. FronHwl, 
TeL 069 - 88 55 99. 


AMSTHIDAM JEANET Boon Service 
Tat 1020) 326420 or 340110. 


DUSSELDORF4SOUCKME-Esser>aenn 
EngEih Escort Service 0211/ 38 31 41 


MUFBCH - BLONDY & TANJA Escort 
Service. Tel: 311 79 00 or 311 79 36 


NEW YORK: Reis's Escort Service. 
Tel: 312-581-1948. 


NONAME ESCORT SEEVK2 Irak- 
furr, Tefc 069/55 88 26. 


AMSTERDAM SYLVIA ESCORT Ser- 
vice HH 20-255191 


AMSTHIDAM FOUR ROSES Escort 
Service (0) 20-96*376 


TEL 212-737 3291. VENTURA 



LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Esestt Service. 

Tefc 736 5877. 


212-888-1666 


WIESBADEN , West Germany 
— The cost of living rose in West 
Germany a provisional 0.2 percent 
in April from March to stand 15 
percent higher than April of last 

year, the federal Statistics Office | STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort 5««a. I V®»IA- DESIREE ESCORT Service. 
saidFridav. I Tet 071! / 262 II 50. I fetSHMSS. 


MADRID INTL 


TEt 2456548. CSHXT CARDS 


GBhIEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tet 46 11 58 


CHELSEA ESCORT SaVJCE. 

51 Beaudoin Place, London SW3. 
T«t 01 584 6513/749 {4-12 pn^ 


BRUSSELS. CHANT AL ESCORT Ser- 
vice Tel: 02/520 23 6S. 


BRUSSHS. ANTWHtP NATASCHA 

Escort Servwe. Tet 02/731 76.41. 


FRANKRJRT - ANffS Escort Service. 
Tek 069/ 28-81-03. 


JMMSTS ESCORT 6 TRAVR Ser- 
vice Fronkfuri Tel: 069/555-S93 





LONDON ZARA ESCORT Service. 
Heathraw/GataridL Tat 834 7945. 


HDMMUir + SU«OUNWNGS| Mltra Slffj^ EKORT 5«we. 

Christina's Escort Service 069/364656] Tat 089/4486038 


LONDON TRUUE ESCORT Sence. 
Tet 01-373 8849. 



















































































































1 Sale sign 

7 Iroquoian 
people 

12 Chilean 
revolutionist: 
1785-1821 

19 Unfair critic 

20 Connective 
tissue 

22 Woofer's kin 

23 Brewer from 
Toledo 

24 Esposito under 
contract? 

26 Hereditary 
ruler 

28 Infrequently 

29 Kind of branch 

30 Papuan 
natives 

32 Della and Pee 
Wee 

34 Jazzes up the 
punch 

35 Slangy denials 

37 Fogs’ fellow 

travelers 

39 Little (the 

Ocean State) 

41 Endings for 
chemicals 

42 Unemployment 
act of 1973: 
Abbr. 

43 Redactor's 
word 

44 Fencing blade 

48 Say further 


DOWN 

1 Bank-account 
fig. 

2 off (sore) 

3 What 
Middlecoff 
hoped to do in 
the 1955 
Masters? 

4 Harmony; 
concord 

5 Cordage fiber 

6 Comb wool 

7 Suffix with go 

8 E. Indian 
herbs 

9 Turn upside 
down 

10 Posts held by 
Cato and 
Caesar 


ACROSS 

49 Bridge passes 

50 Marriage doc. 

53D.I.'s*‘stop” 

54 Transportation 
notable 

55 Skull: Comb, 
form 

57 Japanese 
P.M-: 1972-74 

59 Israeli city 

61 Christmas-tree 
concern 

62 Jackpot, e.g. 

63 Vertebral- 
column pans 

64 Ornamental 
clasps 

86 Abdul-Jabbar, 
to Laker fans? 

.70 Constable 

73 U.S. naval 
historian: 1840- 
1914 

74 E.T.etal. 

78 Little corn 
grower 

79 "Charley's 
Aunt" 
character 

80 Ridicule 

81 "When I 

my fiddle 

. . Yeats 

82 Champagne 
bucket 

84 Elbe tributary 

86 Oxford 
measure 


DOWN 

11 Meteorological 
device 

12 Boxer’s need: 
Abbr. 

13 Windmill sail 

14 Peddled a used 
car 

ISRanatape 

back 

16 Set of moral 
values 

17 Raid: Scot. 

18 Kingdom of 
Burgundy 

21 Vietnamese 
political 
family 

25 Sicilian code of 
silence 

27 Fleet Street 
name 


127 


137 I 138 


ACROSS Play] 

87 done W1 ^ ,be (2 |3 |4 |s |io |n 

88 Before, to — 

Keats ,B ^B” 

89 Refer to ftr 

90 Schmaltzof §JBf 

“Moon 26 

Mullins" Bi 

91" Death”: ^ 

Grieg ■■■_ _ 

93 devivre 35 36 

M -Fefi !" __^^BB— — 

96 Devilfish 

98 On the horizon 

99 Annoyed 48 “ “ H 

102 Fished with a g — j« 

net Wmt; 

105 Confine, as a g “ “ Hn - 

stream 

108 Mountain in h ^ 

Spain j 

109 Thin-skinned 70 71 |H 

111 Moon goddess I H 

113 Borg: 6/6/56? 7 » ^B™ ■ 

117 Slenderize ■ 

_ . . _ 82 S 3 lpr 85 

119 Sea cow 

120 Flimflammers ^ ^Bfe 

121 Nautilus con- 

struction site |^MHBB** 95 

122 Hebrew 

greetings 89 100 101 

123"... o f BB^ 

singing 108 

birds” 5 : S. 

Johnson iia 114 Mis | 

124 Makes resolure 1 1 _ 

119 ■ 


DOWN 

31 Perch 

33 Wood finish 

35 Civil-rights 
org. 

36 Comb, form 

■ after pachys 

38 Moslem 
salutation 

40 What QB 
Graham 
signed? 

42 What Young 


Play It by Ear by am page 


PEANUTS 


112 M 3 1 14 115 116 117 118 


[2i 


|31^H32 


l33^to34 


ImT I « 


144 145 146 147 


II i 


153 T |6C 




BLOND EE 





U “ / -v 

r/d&J 


i I KNOW ^ 
YOU'HEIN 
-i THERE // 1 


175 176 f 77 


11021 11031104' 


fibs! I106I1Q7I 










WHAT KIND OF A, 
PINNER \S> TH \SV. 
NOT ONE TWIN© I 
LIKE- 1 Ohn ^ 



OkCAY, 1 GOT MS 

attention... y 

NOW WHAT ? ) 




§• mF=t 



© Nob York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


Sox fans to 
heave? 

43 NaNa, 

rock group 

45 Magician's 
utterance 

46 Author Wiese] 

47 Wlgglers 


down 

49 Hand ax 

51 Figure in a 
bracket 

52 The high cost 
of leaving 

56 Rock rat 

57 Mao tung 

58 Singer Sullivan 

66 With humor 
65 Capital of 

Western 

Samoa 

67 Dutch scholar: 
14667-1536 

68 Of the 
underworld 

69 Wind dir. 


DOWN 

70 Relating to the 
ear 

71 Centers of 
activity 

72 Pumps' 
contents 

75 Part of 
Rockne’s 
needle found in 
the Bard’s 
cauldron? 

76 Water wheel 

77 Scornful look 

-89 Kind of cell 

83 Job 

interviewee, 

sometimes 


DOWN 

’85 Family of an 
Irish hero 

87 Mets, Jets and 
Nets 

92 Sault 

Marie 

93 Nameless 
one's name 

95 Tooth: Comb, 
form 

96 Mohammed, 
forme 

97 Stick 

. 99 Some U.S. 
missiles 

160 Indian prince 


DOWN 

101 Scandinavian 
money 

103 Markers 

104 Nape 

106 Icefloes 

107 Vigilant 
llONopes' 

antitheses 
112 Bionomics: 
Abbr. 

114 Pro 

115 Faroe Islands 
whirlwinds 

116 Summertime 
inN.Y.C. 

118 U.S.N.A. 
graduate 



BRIGHAM YOUNG: American Moses 

By Leonard J. Arrington. 522 pp. $24.95. 
Alfred A. Knopf, 201 East 40th Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 

T HE second president of the Moimon Church 
and one of the chief colonizers of the Western 
frontier, Brigham Young is one of those epic 19th- 
century figures who stand out in the landscape of 
American history like a carving on Mount Rush- 
more — seemingly larger than lue in the magnitude 
of their ambition, their achievement and their con- 
troversial beliefs. 

As the spiritual, political and economic leader of 
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for 
three decades. Young effectively consolidated the 
movement — he oversaw the organization of several 
hundred settlements — and lea its followers west- 
ward to realize, in the desolate, inhospitable reaches 
of Utah, a vision of his New Jerusalem. 

In doing so, he proved himself not only a charis- 
matic religious leader but a hard-headed eutrepre- 
neur, a savvy politician and an empire builder 
capable of such stunning arrogance that he could 
view the Gvil War, in ms biographer’s words, as 
“divine retribution upon a nation" that had allowed 
the Mormons to be persecuted and maligned. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


BOOKS 



Leonard J. Arrington writes that his biography 
attempts to “steer between the extremes of, on the 
one hand, telling the Mormon story with Young as 
merely a leading personality and, on the other, 
recounting the life of Young without placing it 
sufficiently in its proper historical setting." 

As Arrington, a professor at Brigham Young 
University, sees him. Young embodied “the su- 
preme American paradox, not because he contained 
elements foreign to American soil but because he 
united them — the business genius of a Rockefeller 
with the spiritual sensitivities of an Emerson, the 
lusty enjoyment of the pleasures of good living with 
the tenderness of a Florence Nightingale.” 

Unfortunately, while cr amm ed full of facts that 
attest to prodigious research, this biography neither 
penetrates Young’s public poses to reveal anything 
about his inner life nor dramatizes his role in the 
Mormon Church with any particular distinction. 
Rather than put the emergence of the Mormon 
movement in perspective with the rise of other 
spiritual movements in America during the 19th 
century, Arrington tends to dwell on internecine 
arguments within the church, leaving the lay reader 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 


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athCTmystifkdastothenatnreofcatamdortrmes 
and “revelations” or bored by detailed, repetitions 
accounts of various missions. 

No doubt Arrington has chosen to focus on such 
rfwaik in an attempt to be both comprehensive and 
objective, but his willful reluctance to interpret 
events or situate them within any larger context 
results in a baggy, plodding narrative that shirs over 
important issues. He does not really examine the 
relationship between the persecution the Mormons 
suffered — in the 1830s and /40s, they were driven 
out of Missouri and Illinois — or the so-called 
Mountain Meadows Massacre, in which church 
followers were involved in the killing of dozens of 
nonbelievers. He similarly fails to probe the blur- 
ring of political and religious lines during Young’s 
tenure as territorial governor of Utah. 

When it comes to the character of Young himself, 
Arrington is also overly cautious — and the results, 
again, are passages that read like a heavily footnot- 
ed scholarly report, set down in serviceable but 
undistinguished prose. Even the most mundane of 
the author’s statements have the feding of being 
hedged. For example: “Although Brigham could be 
kind to orphans, aspiring students, and helpless 
widows, he expected a full day’s work from his 
employees.” Or, “Although Brigham tried hard to 
be fair, he did not like to be taken advantage of.” 

able convict over the claims of the church and the 
needs of his family, Arrington skims over these 
matters, saying he “appears to have been a reason- 
ably fair and generous husband.” Even the emotion- 
al consequences that tire doctrine of plural marriage 
must have had on Young and his wives are dis- 
missed with phrases to the effect that “he rnnst have 
held long ana earnest conversations” with bis first 
wife, Maiy Ann, before going ahead with another 
marriage. 

If Arlington’s intent in treating Young so ginger- 
ly was to create a sympathetic yet balanrod portrait 
of a controversial figure, be has somehow gone 
astray. About all that he has managed to do in 
“Am eri can Moses” is make Young — and his ac- 
complishments — seem dull 

Michiko Kakutani is on the staff of The New York 
Times. . 


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to HIS WIFE/ ITT 


GOOD/ HE'S REALLY 
BEEN WORRIED 
ABOUT HER.' 


TOM WHAT 
HE'S SAID, DO 
YOU THINK 
THERE AUGHT 
BE SOMETHING 
PHYSICALLY i 
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WITHOUT EXAMINING HER, I 
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GARFIELD 


Wbrid Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse April 26 

dosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 



1 LOOK, MOM ! THEY jlist call 'em wild flowers. 

THem REALLY VERY TAME !* 


SB 





















*i i )i Vi~ 







To Our Readers " 

not 






















INTERNATIONAL 





TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 27-28, 1985 



SPORTS 




Gretzky Excels in Oiler Sweep; Islanders Beat Flyers 


The Associated Press 

WINNIPEG, Manitoba— With 
three goals sod four assists, Wayne 
Gretzky led the Edmonton Oilers 

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 

into the Campbell Conference fin- 
als with an 8-3 root of the Winni- 
peg Jets here Thursday night. 
Gretzky's performance, as the 03- 
exs swept the bcst-of-scveu Smythe 
Division final, tied his own Nation- 


al Hockey League playoff mark of 
seven points, set April 17, 1983 
against Calgary. 

Mean while , the New York Is- 
landers averted a Patrick Division 
sweep. Chicago took a 3-1 lead in 
die Norris Division and Montreal 
evened the Adams Division final bl 
2 - 2 . 

“I was on tonight," said Gretzky, 
the league's scoring leader to the 
last five seasons and its most valu- 
able player to six. "I bad a really 


Brewers Blast Tigers 
From 1st Place, II-7 



Compiled by Ow Staff Front Dispatches 

MILWAUKEE — With one 
swing, Ted Simmons knocked De- 
troit out of first place. Simmons hit 
a bases-loaded home run with two 
out in the ninth inning to lift the 
Brewers to an 1 1-7 victory over the 
Tigers here Thursday night. 

Detroit's pitching staff, a prima- 

BASEBAIL ROUNDUP 

ry factor in winning last year's 
World Series, couldn't hold a six- 
mo lead in the late inning * as the 
Tigers lost to the sixth time in their 
last eight games. They dropped 
into a second-place tie with the 
Brewers in the American League 
East, a half-game Balti- 

more. 

Detroit built a 7-1 lead behind 
the hitting of Alan T ramm ell, who 
homcred, tripled twice and drove in 
four runs, and Lou Whitaker, who 
had three hits. 

In the ninth, Paul Molitor ho- 


With a grounded Larry Bird groping for a loose ball, teammate Dennis Johnson and ninth. Paul Molitor ho 

Cleveland's World B. Free dosed In for apiece of die action. Boston won die game, 117-115. 

Celtics, Trail Blazers Close Out Series, 3-1 


M ply.- y, & yCcnrfibJ b,< Our Si JJ Fran Dupatda 

RICHFIELD. Ohio - Even 
KPOEf Y»th a had wing, this Bird flies 
--■==V M better than any other. 

; Larrv Bird who missed Game 3 
y. " because of bone chips and bursitis 

a ,<r' H in hb. elbow, scored 34 points, in- 
JT eluding a pair of free [mows with 

NBA PLAYOFFS ' 

23 seconds left Thursday night, en- 

abling the Boston Celtics to diim- 

" -«ate the Cleveland Cavaliers from 
_ the National Basketball Assoda- 

WfTHOUT EXAmM, in’ 11011 P ,a > ofb ^ 3 117 ' 115 vic ‘ 
CO^DWTSAy.JUkHr' 10 ^- , .... .. 

SOMETIMES PEOfUta **“? als ° P ulW » » 
&SADILY ACCEPT A W«* bouncis 36 80510,1 WOE the best-of- 
•LLWESS Than One Eas.t^ Conference scries, 

AN E-vcTiONAi. jteTvhe Critics JMyaiWft. lO.ih^EaStem 

■ — -r-- — ^—Xonfcrence semifinals against Dc- 

i g. 0 - ' Tnlrtroit, with Game 1 Sunday ai Bos- 
■ Ir^ K. Tnjljon. Garden. 

■ - v ■ /|i* In Thursday's other game Port- 

i | |land eliminated Dallas, three 

I j/l games to one. and will face the Los 

I Jjf Angdes Lakers in the opener of the 
\ ' ^ cslcrn Conference semifinals 
“’art, rw' I Saturday in Los Aogstes, 


In payoff series that were to 
resume Friday, Philadelphia was a 
Washington hading, 2-1; MBwan- 
kee at Chicago leading, 2-1; Den- 
ver it San Antonio leading. 2-1, 
and Houston at Utah trailing, 2-1. 

Tm not out to please every- 
body,” said all-star forward Bird, 
who had c riti c iz e d the basketball 
knowledge of Cleveland fens. “I 
just wanted to do what 1 said Td do 
— help die Celtics win. I did it. " 

“Bird came through from the 
time he came out on the court," 
said Boston's coach, K.C. Jones. T 
think the elbow was bothering him 
a little, but he’s a gutty person." 

The loss aided what had become 
a storybook season to die Cava- 
liers. Cleveland began the season 2- 
19, but ^tsdf put to 

make theplayoffs for die first time 
once 1978. 'Die Celtics’ three play- 
off victories were by a combined 
total of seven points. 

Til say this about Qevdand," 
said Jones. “They might have been 
our toughest obstacle. This might 
get people in Philadelphia and Los 
Angeles upset, but it’s the truth.” 


Trading by 111-107 with 3:10 
left, Boston lira the score with 2:34 
remaini ng on a basket by Ray Wil- 
liams and two free throws by Den- 
nis Johnson. After World B. Free, 
who kd Cleveland with 30 points, 
and Williams Lraded free throws. 
Bird was fouled by Ben Poquette 
on a drive and sank the free throws 
fora 1 15-113 Celtics lead. 

Phil Hubbard's jumper tied the 
score, but Bird was fouled again, 
tins lime by Free, and hit the cru- 
cial foul shots. Gev eland had three 
more chances to tie or win the 
game, following Bird's final points, 
but John Bagley missed a three- 
point attempt. Mark West failed on 
a dp-in attempt and Free’s desper- 
ation shot at the buzzer was 
, jjlocked by Johnson. , . 

TreB Blazers 115, Mavericks 113 

In Portland, Oregon, reserve 
center Audie Norris hit ajmnp shot 
with one second left to lift the Trail 
Blazers into the second round of 
die playoffs. Norris came in for 
Sam Bowie, who fouled out with 
9:23 to play, and finished with nine 


points. Mark Aguirre scored 39 for 
the Mavericks; high man for Port- 
land was Kilri Vandeweghe with 27. 

Forced into action when both 
Portland centers, Bowie and My- 
chal Thompson, were gone on 
fouls, Norm scored on a lay-up 
with 22 seconds to play to rive the 
Trail Blazers a 113-111 Lead. After 
Brad Davis sank two free throws to 
knot the score, Norris «nir a 10- 
foot baseline jump shot to win the 
game. 


“I never know how many min- 
utes Fm going to play,” Norris 
said, “so I try to make the most of 


“I would Eke to think Portland 
won this series, we didn't lose it," 
said the Mavericks' coach, Dick 
Motta. “We played about as well as 
we can play and they answered 
every challenge. ” 

“It was a magnificent series," 
said Portland Coach Jack Ramsay. 
“I give huge credit to Dick Motta 
and the Mavericks. They played 
great basketball.” f UP1 , AP) 


mered off reliever Bill Scherrer, 
Robin Yount and Brian Giles fol- 
lowed with singles and Ben OgHvie 
was hit by a pitch before Simmons 
hit Scherrer’5 first pitch for his first 
home run of the season. It was his 
eighth career grand *iam anrf his 
first in the American League. 

Tve had grand slams before,” 
said Simmons, "but tins was the 
biggest borne ran I ever hit Corn- 
ing bade like that, with the stage 
set you can’t get much more dra- 
matic than that” 

Orioles 7, Indians 1 
In Baltimore, Eddie Murray, 
Fred Lynn and Ride Dempsey ho- 
mered to highlight a six-run sixth 
that produced the Orioles' root 
Rookie Ken Dixon's three-hit per- 
formance included six strikeouts. 

Yankees 5, Red Sox 1 
In New York, Phfl Niekro scat- 
tered five hits and struck out nine 
over 7% innings, and Dave Win- 
field, Don Baylor and Ken Griffey 
hit consecutive third-inning dou- 
bles to spark the Yankees to their 
first victory over Boston in six 
g pmes this year. 

Twins 5, A’s 4 

In Minneapolis, Kirby Puckett 
singled off tne first pitch from re- 
liever Tom T el Unarm to score Tim 
Teufd from second with one out in 
the ninth, giving the Twins their 
fifth straight victory. 

Angels 3, Mariners 0 
in Seattle, Mike Witt pitched a 
two-hitter and needed only Bobby 
Grich’s second home run of the 
season to give California its tri- 
umph. 

Giants 7, Reds 3 
In the National League, in San 
Francisco, Chili Davis homered 
twice and drove in four runs to 
pace the Giants. The winners took 
a .198 team batting average into the 
game, but boosted it over the .200 
mark with 10 hits off Cincinnati 

' l&pos 4,'Csnfimib 2 
In Montreal, Andre Dawson 
drove in two runs with a home ran 
and a single to lead the Expos to 
their third straight victory. 

Brares 3, Astras 2 
Shortstop Dickie Them’s throw- 
ing error in the 10th allowed the tie- 
breaking run to score and Terry 


good feel for the game, and I 
seemed to be in the right spoi at the 
right time to get those loose pucks." 

There’re games when I get five 
points and I play bad. I'm judged 
cm goals ana assists, but in the 
playoffs it's a little bit tighter 
checking and it’s a bit tougher for 
me." 

U didn’t look tougher against 
Winnipeg. Gretzky scored two 
goals in the first period and set up 
three in the second as the Oilers 
mounted a S-I lead. Two of 
Gretzky's tallies came with the 03- 
ers short-handed. Jari Kurri added 
three goals, all on assists from 
Gretzky. 

Winnipeg Coach Barry Long 
praised his team, which skated the 
entire series without star center 
Dale Hawcrchuk. who was out with 
a broken rib. Of Edmonton he said: 
"It’s certainly no disgrace to lose to 
that team. Possibly next year, well 
overcome that That’s what we're 
working toward — to defeat the top 
dog in our division.” 

Isiaoders 6, Flyers 2 

In Umondale, New York, the Is- 
landers’ victory over Philadelphia 
was highlighted by Mike Bossy's 
82d career playoff goal tying him 
with Maurice Richard as die all- 
time leads. He has played in 1 19 
Stanley Cup games; Richard 
played in 133 for Montreal Bossy 
also has 152 playoff points, fifth on 
the all-time fist. 

"I was glad I was able to score;" 
said Bossy, who had been blanked 
by the Flyers in the first three 
games. "But more important was 
the way I played tonight I played a 
real good game overall aside from 
the goal. It was just Eke the icing on 
the cake.” 

The Islanders took a 2-0 first- 


period lead on goals by Pat LaFon- 
taine and Bryan Trot tier. They 
made it 4-0 when Denis Poivin ana 
Bossy scared in the second period 
and then coasted home behind 
rookie goalie Kelly Hradey. a sur- 
prise starter in place erf BQly Smith. 

“I didn’t fed any extra pres- 
sure,” said Hrudey, a rookie. "It's 
easier to go out there when you are 
relaxed.” 

Black; Hawks 7, North Stare 6 
In Bloomington, Minnesota, 
Chicago outlasted the North Stars 
behind the 4S-save performance of 
Murray Baonerman and Darryl 
Sutter's goal 1:57 into a second 
overtime period. 

The victors’ Denis Savard had 
two goals and two assists, and he 
tied the game with 7:28 left in regu- 
lation time. At that point. Iron 
Bcaupre was pulled m favor of 
GiEes Melodic, who had started 
the first six playoff games for the 

North Stars. 

The North Stars were led by 
Randy Velischek: with two goals 
and a goal and two assists from 
Craig Hamburgh. 

Bannerman rat his teammates 
shouldn’t have bad to work so long. 
"1 don't think it should have gone 
into overtime.” he said. "I let in a 
lot of cheap goals.” 

Suiter's game-winner was a up- 
in of a rebound of a shat by Tom 
Lysiak, who stole a pass from Min- 
nesota's Neal Broten. "It was roll- 
ing,” Sutter said/Tt was Eke you 
got five minutes to watch iL*T was 
saying, ‘Don't jump over my stick 
Don’t jump over my stick’ " 
Canadens 3, Nonfiques 1 
In Quebec Qty, Guy Carbon- 
neau’s shorthanded goal in the sec- 
ond period broke a 1-1 tie and 
Mario Tremblay scored on a power 
play in the third period to lift Mon- 


treal Lucies DeBlois had a first- 
period power-play goal for the win- 
ners, while defenseman Randy 
Moller scored the Nordiques' only 
goal 

Quebec played much of the game 
without Mime! Goulet, who suf- 
fered a hip injury at 2: 17 of the first 
period, when he was leveled by de- 
fenseman Ric Nattress. The lead- 
ing goal scorer in the playoffs with 
11, Goulet played only sparingly 
thereafter. 

Russians, 
Czechs Win 

United P r ess International 

PRAGUE — The Soviet Union 
battered Team Canada, 9-1. at the 
world hockey championships 
Thursday, but Czechoslovakia put 
the Canadians into the medal 
round by downing Sweden. 7-2. 

Czechoslovakia and Canada ad- 
vanced to the medal round along 
with the Soviet Union and the 
United States; Sweden. F inlan d, 
West Germany and East Germany 
go into the relegation playoffs. 


Canada withstood the Soviet on- 
slaught until Viktor Tyumenev 
passed the puck behind his back to 
an onrushing Nikolai Drozd etsky, 
who beat goalie Rick Wamsley 
with an angled shot to the far cor- 
ner at 13:56 of the first period. Two 
minutes later Andrei Khomutov 
picked up a rebound off the boards 
and stuffed the puck into the net, 
and the rout was on. 

The Czechs opened with a three- 
goal outburst in the first 10 minutes 
on tallies by Darius Rusnak. Milos- 
lav Horava and Jiri Lola and then 
coasted home comfortably. 


Greed, Bad Judgment 9 :The Door Slams on McLain 

Compiled b.- Oar Staff Frm Dapatdm “I don’t know bow you get to awaiting sentencing. He had been with mminal backgrounds. Levine. 
TAMPA. Florida — Denny where I was today from where I was convicted of the four charges cm who had asked I or probation with a 
IcLaia who once appeared head- 17 years ago,” McLain told the Mart* 16 and bad run been al- condition for (immunity services, 

court beforethe sentencing. lowed to make bail because the said be would file an appoL 

aded for 23 vears in a house of He got there, as he tried to ex- judge considered him a poor nsk He was put up on a pedestal, 

* ruction. plain, halting on occasion as his The site of his incarceration was said Levine. He was somewhat 

•bn Thursday afternoon. Judge voice cracked, because or “greed, not amoun(»L 

lizabeth A. Kovachcvicb of the avarice, a tot of bad judgment and Urokmg back on his career, Mw®ed to have sensational 

.S. District Court here sentenced trying to make the fast dollar ” McLam said that “17 years ago" , 

fcUin to federal prison to serve Seated on a wooden bench in the seemed “so long ago -it seems 

?: 36 if«^£Shrce eight-year sentences to run visitors’ gallery, McLain’s wife; like it never happened." same time asMcLara, warn t rar- 

concurrentlv for racketeering, ex- Sharon, and their two daughters. He had a 31-6 record in 1968, pns«i about his former teammate s 

tortion and' conspiracy. She added Christie. 19. and Dale, 18. sobbed and was the first piidierto wm 30 problems. 

_ T) 15-vear sentence for drug traf* as they listened. The McLains’ two games in a season since Dizzy Dean " wa ys 'p trouble ah ms 

i P pf |1 Blocking (possessing three kilograms bow did not attend. m 1934. McLainwon the Cy Young ^ 

t < .of cocaine with intent todStrib- McLain, who is 41 and weighs Award as the best pitcher m the 

• flute). about 260 pounds (117,9: kilo- American League and shared the ball team, he was suspended by the 

J J vaflOS jr Tile former Detroit Tiger star, gramsl stood before the judge; his award with Mike Cuellar the fd- Tigers and he was suspended by the 

the last maior-leaeue pitcher to win light gray blazer strained at the lowing year, when McLain won 24. Ica jgf- , , .. 

I ^0 games in a season, could have shoulders, his hands were dug into He was traded to Washington for . used to say he was either 

— mImss - - •« ■ the pockets of his gray slacks.and, — wmur to wind imm cm.™** *w* 

wearing glasses, he read his re- 
marks from a legal pad.. 

He had written his statement in 


- ;r L^iiuredii -A*ven years — ofhis sentence Iks . . (he Seminole CountyjaD, where he 
- ’- : v. ' — >v joaiy served. has spent the last five weeks while 

, . 



awaiting sentencing. He had been 
convicted of the four charges on 
March 16 and bad not been al- 
lowed to make bad because the 
judge considered him a poor risk 
The site of his incarceration was 
not announced. 

Looking back cm his career, 
McLain said that “17 years ago" 
seemed "so long ago — it seems 
like it never happened.” 

He had a 31-6 record in 1968, 
and was the first pitcher to win 30 
games in a season since Dizzy Dean 
m 1934. McLain won the Cy Young 
Award as the best pitcher in (he 
American League and shared the 
award with Mike Cuellar the fol- 
lowing year, when McLain won 24. 
He was traded to Washington for 
the 1971 season, and had brief stints 
at Oakland and Atlanta before his 
major-league career ended in 1972, 
It appeared that both he and his 
fastball had grown fat. 

He was indicted last year with 
seven others. McLain pleaded not 
guilty to the charges — he was 
found not guOty of a fifth charge of 
importing cocaine — and his attor- 
ney, Arnold Levine, has said that 
McLain was "a patsy" for others 


with criminal backgrounds. Levine, 
who had asked for probation with a 
condition for community services, 
said be would file an appeaL 
"He was put up on a pedestal,'' 
said Levine. “He was somewhat 

naive He was not a scholar. He 

happened to have a sensational 
arm. That’s aU it was.” 

Mickey LoEcb, a pitcher at the 
same time as McLain, wasn't sur- 
prised about his former teammate’s 
problems. 

“He was always in trouble all his 
liTe,’ 1 LoEch said in Lake Orion, 
Michigan. "When be was on the 
ball team, he was suspended by the 
Tigers and be was suspended by the 
league. 

“We used to say he was either 
going to wind up in concrete tiroes 
or in prison." 

Atlanta General Manager John 
Mullen — whose team has experi- 
enced drug problems •— said 
McLain’s sentence will help base- 
ball in its fight against drugs. "It 
sure can’t hurt,” he said. "It's a 
tremendous problem throughout 
sports and society in general May- 
be what happened to Denny might 
wake a few guys up." (NYT, AP) 


the inning as Atlanta held off the 
Astros. 

Dodgers 6, Padres 3 
In Los Angeles, Al Oliver singled 
in BUI RusscQ with the tie-breaking 
run in a three-run sixth to give the 
Dodgers a victory. Winner Rick 
Honeycutt scattered four hits in his 
eight innings of work. (UP I, AP) 




Hu Asocnfed fton 

SO THERE — Kathy Whitworth, left, and Mickey Wright became the first women to 
ever compete against men in a PGA-sanctioned event in Thursday’s first round of the 
Legends of Goff tournament In Austin, Texas. On the 6^584-yard, par-70 Onion Creek 
coarse, Whitworth, 45, and Wright, 50, shot a 5-under-par 65 in the best-ball seniors’ 
event. Only five men’s teams had lower scores. Said farmer Masters champion Bob Goal- 
by: ‘They were playing from the back tees? To be honest, I didn’t think they could do it’ 


Baseball 


Major League Leaders 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 



O 

AB 

R 

H 

Prt. 

Orsulak Pit 

11 

24 

4 

11 

450 

Murphy Ail 

15 

54 

U 

22 

Jt3 

Waiting Htn 

14 

42 

7 

16 

J81 

Martinez 5D 

10 

32 

1 

12 

J7S 

Puht Htn 

9 

30 

9 

11 

JK7 

Her r StL 

15 

52 

10 

19 

-365 

Nettles SO 

11 

22 

4 

8 

J44 

Almon PM 

10 

20 

3 

7 

-SS0 

Cruz Htn 

16 

45 

7 

22 

J38 

Cerene AH 

12 

42 

3 

14 

333 

Cotoman StL 

0 

33 

5 

11 

-333 

Corcoran Phi 

13 

34 

4 

12 

.233 


Slrfiumits: Sola Cincinnati. V. JXMLaoa 
Pittsburgh. 31; Gooden. Now York. 24; Vatan- 
zuala. Lot Ansalca 25; Krutov*, Son Francto- 
cn, 21; Ryan. Houston. 21. 

Sava; LaSdiHiLCftlOMM: RoarOon.Mon- 
troaL 4; Suttor. Atlanta 4; 5 are fled with 3. 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 


ThiAaBcMhai 


: ? r : 


At the top: Denny Mdjairi winning No. 29 in 1968. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Chiefs Crown Takes Bluegrass Stakes 

LEXINGTON, Kentucky (AP) — Chiefs Crownprepped to the May 
4 Kentucky Derby with a front-running victory in Thursday’s Blue Grass 
Stakes at Keendand. The 1984 2-year-old champion, unbeaten in three 
outings this year, covered the mile and one-eighth in 1 :47-3/5, a fifth of a 
second off the track record. 

Ridden by Don MacBeth, Chiefs Crown finished five and a half 
Lengths in front of Floating Reserve; Banner Bob was another bead back 
ana 1 1 lengths in front of last-place Under Orders. 

The track record of 1:41-2/5 was set by Round Table, under 126 
pounds, in the 1937 Blue Grass and equaled by Numbered Account (119 
pounds) in 1972, and Star Choice (112) last October. Chiefs Crown 
carried 121 pounds Thursday. The starters in the I'm- mile Kentucky 
Derby will carry 126. 

Stewart’s 66 Leads Houston Open by 1 

THE WOODLANDS, Texas (AP) — Payne Stewart shot a six-under 
par 66 that included seven birdies here^ Thursday to take a one-stroke lead 
after the first round of the Houston Open golf tournament. 

Tied for second were MDte Nicotette, Calvin Peete, David Frost and 
Keith Feigns. Ken Brown and Buddy Gardner had 68s. 

Holmes to Defend IBF Crown May 20 

NEW YORK (AP) — Larry Hoixnes, the undefeated International 
Boxing Federation hravyweight champion, will defend Ms oown here 
May 20 against Carl Williams, it was announced Thursday. 

Chasing Rocky Marciano’s all-time record of 49-0, Holmes is 47-0 

lifetime; with 34 knockouts. Williams has a 16-0 record. 


Rum: Murphy. Atlanta. 15; Marshall, Log 
A nwtM. 13; . EXtovls. Cincinnati. 11; Kam- 
mlnsk, Atlanta it; OSmlth. St. Louis. II. 

RBI: Murphv. Atlanta 22; CDavh. San 
FrancJscaU; Hsrr.SL Louis. 12; Harnandez. 
Now York, 11; JCJortc, st. Louis. 11. 

Wti: Cruz. Houston. 22; Murotiv, Atlanta 
22; Carvav. San Dleoa 21 ; Marshall, Los Ai*. 
aataa 20; Owyna San Dlaea IV; Herr, St. 
Louis. 19. 

DauMes: waitach. Montreal, 7 are flea 
with A 

metes: 10 or* lied wHb X 

Heme Runs: Murphy, Atlanta 7: Kennedy. 
San D!eoa4; Marshall. Las AneeieM; Straw- 
berry. New York, t: 9 an lied with X 

Stolen Baa: Cototnaa St Louts. I; Las- 
mtttkSL Louta.7; EUaytadncInnatW; CDo- 
vtaSan Francisco, 5; GtoddsaSan Francis- 
co. 5] M.wnsoa New York, 5. 

PITCHING 

Wan-Last: Mahler, AfL +0: Soto. On, 4-1; 
Andutor.SLU HawfcJnv SD and Smith, MIL S- 
0: Gutncksaa MIL Sutcliffe and Tnxrt,CM,3-l. 


Franca Cle 

G 

M 

AB 

49 

R 

12 

H 

22 

PcL 

A49 

Whitaker Det 

12 

m 

11 

20 

MB 

Horrah Tex 

14 

43 

12 

17 

■395 

Bodhte Oak 

IS 

42 

7 

14 

-381 

Breofcens Det 

u 

21 

3 

5 

-381 

Grich cm 

14 

45 

8 

17 

J78 

Bernzrd Cle 

12 

32 

6 

12 

-375 

Melltar Mil 

14 

57 

10 

21 

Jil 

Berra NY 

9 

30 

0 

11 

-347 

Giora Tor 

13 

25 

2 

9 

J40 


Runs: MDavli. Oakland, IB; Murphv. Oak- 
land. 14; Rice, Boston. 14; 5 are fled with TZ 
RBI: MXiavis. Oakland. 19; Armas. Boston. 
14; G-Thomas. Seattle. IS: Denmsev. Balti- 
more, 14; Puckett Minnesota, 14. 

Hits: Puckett, Minnesota. 25; Franco, 
Cleveland, 22; Collins, Oakland, 21; Molliar. 
Milwaukee. 21: TaMer. Cleveland. 2t 
DauMes: Leman, Detroit B; Orta, Kama 
Cftv. 4; Baylor, New York, S: Franco. Cleve- 
land. 5; MDcvts, Oakland, 5; Mattlnslv. New 
York. 5; Upshaw, Toronto, 5. 

Tri p l es : Trammel L Detroit, J; Wilson, Kan- 
sas cifv. 3: G. Walker. Chicago. s : Griffey. 
New York. 2; P^radiev. Seattle. 2; Pettis. 
California. 2; Puckett Minnesota. 2. 

Heme Rom: G.Thomas,5eattie,6; MDavts. 
Oakland. 4: Prestov. Seattle, «; Annas. Bos- 
ton. S: Brunanskv, Minnesota. 5. 

Stolen Bases: Cotllns. Oakland. 10; Pettis. 


Major Standings Transition 


Baltimore 

Detroit 

Milwaukee 

Boston 

Toronto 

New York 

Clevatand 

Oakland 

GaiHornla 

Kansas CHv 

Ch laws 

Minnesota 

Seattle 

Texas 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Beat DtvbJea 

W L Pet. GB 
9 4 MO — 

B & .571 K> 

i B 4 571 Vi 

S 7 533 1 

B 7 .533 1 

4 7 .462 2 

4 9 -400 3 

West Dtvrtlon 

9 7 -543 — 

9 7 .542 — 

IV 7 7 J00 1 

I 7 ill W 
7 9 .43* 2 

7 9 .431 2 

5 9 JS7 3 


BASSBALL 
Amwfcan lmb ih 

OAKLAND— Colled up Tom TeDtnam, 
pitcher, from Tacoma of the Pacific Coast 
League. Optioned Mike Galleaa Inflelder, to 
Modesto of tne California League. 

IMtonal League 

CHICAGO— Activated Gary Woods, out- 
fleMer. Optioned Brian Davett, outfielder, to 
Iowa or the American Association. 

LOS ANGELES— Activated Bob Bailor, m- 
fieider. Optioned Ski Bream/flnt baseman, to 
Altxxmeraue of the Pacific Coast League. 


European Soccer 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
• East Division 



W 

L 

PC*. 

GB 

Chicago 

10 

4 

-714 

— 

New York 

9 

5 

A43 

1 

Montreal 

9 

6 

-400 

IKi 

SL Louis 

7 

8 

JO 

3Vj 

Philadelphia 

4 

10 

.28* 

6 

Pittsburgh 

4 10 

West Dtvtslea 

.284 

6 

Los- Angeles 

M 

7 

JM 

— 

Ctacttmati 

9 

7 

543 

Vi 

San Dloea 

8 

7 

533 

1 

Houston 

■ 

8 

soo 

lie 

Attaifa 

7 

8 

JO 

2 

San Francisco 

5 

10 

333 

4 • 


WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
. Cologne 3, Wertier Bremen 3 
Bonisslo Mo nc hengledooch 1. Dortmund l 
Mormturim 1 Braunscnwelg a 
Karlsruhe Z Scholk* 2 
Ouessetdorf 1, Kaiserslautern 0 
Points . standings: Bcvem Munich 39; 
Werdnr Bremen 38: Borassta MOnchenglod- 
bacti34; Cofaane33; Hamburg 32: Mannheim 
31; Saver UerdlngacWFL Bochum 29; VFB 
Shirtgort 28r ElntroeW Frankfurt. Sdtalke 
27; Boyer Leverkusen 24; KaHerstaoternK; 
Dortmund 24; Fertuno Pucss e t d erf 22; Ar- 
rrrinlo Bielefeld 29; RorUruhe IB; Ebitroct 
Braunschweig 16. 


California. J; Griffin, Oakland, 5; Mosebv, 
Toronto, 4; 5 ore lied with X 
PITCHING 

Won-Last/Wlenlng Pet.: Alexander. Toron- 
to. 2-o. 1.000; BGibson, Milwaukee, 34. IjOOO; 
Boyd. Boston. 24. 1400; Darwin. Milwaukee. 
24, 1400; Hentandec, Detroit 24, 1400; Lel- 
orandl, Kansas atv. 24. 1400; Oleda, Boston. 
24. 1400; Slaton. California. 24, 1400; Zabn, 
California 24, 1400. 9 are tied with 1400 12 
decisions). 

Strikeouts: Morris, Detroit, 25: Nlekra New 
York. 2U Alexander, Toronto. 20; Baddlcker. 
Baltimore, 20; Butcher, Minnesota 20. 

Saves: JHoweiL Oakland. 4; RtoheW, New 
York, 5; Wadded. Cleveland 4; Hernandez, 
Detroit, 3; Nunez, Seattle, 3; Stanley, Boston, 
X 

Thursday’s Line Scores 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
SL LOUIS 010 IN HO— 2 7 2 

Montreal 104 2M Six— « B 1 

Cox, Lahti (71, Honan (8) and Lavnlllere; 
Gutllckson. Reardon (7) and Fitzgerald. W— 
Gumckflon, 3-1. L— Cox, 1-1. Sv— Reardon 141. 
HRs— St. Louis. Clark (3). Montreal, Dawson 
( 3 ). 

Cincinnati ON ON 300-4 3 2 

San Frandsee ISO 002 IJx— 7 10 1 

Pasture, Hume 17), Willis (0) and Van 
Geraer; Gott. AADavis (7) and Brenlv. w— 
MXtavis, 1-1. L— Hume o-i. h to-Ctodnnan, 
Esasky (2>. San Frartclsca CDavIs 2 12), 
Brenly (2). 

Atlanta 000 ON 010 3—3 9 1 

Houston NO IN OH 1—2 4 2 

Barker, 2LSmJlh 18), Sutter (10) and Bene- 
dict; Nlekra. D.Smlth (8). DIPIno (10) and 
Ashby. Bailey <11. W-S4mlfh. 2-1. L— 
D^mllh, 2-1. HR— Houston, Gamer (1). 

San Dleen IN BN MO-4 ( 2 

Los Angeles tie 003 2*x— « r 1 

Shew. DeLeon (6). Stoddard (8) and Kenne- 
dy; Honeycutt, Nledenfuer (91 and Sclosda. 
W Ho o ey cult. 1-1. 1 — Shaw. 2-1. HR— Los An- 
geles, Marshall (4). 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cleveland BN NO 401—1 3 l 

Baltimore DM 104 00s — 1 S B 

Raman. Jetfcoat (6) and 8arKto; Dixon and 
Dempsey, W — Dixon, l-a L — Roman, (hi 
HRs— Baltimore. CMurray (4), Lynn (11, 
Dempsey (4). 

Batten Ml OH 000— 1 4 2 

New York 012 NO 20x— 5 10 0 

Hurst. Clear (7) end Gedmon; Niekro. Rlgh- 
ettl (8) and Wvnegar. W— Nlekra, 3-1. L— 
Hurst, 1-1. 5v — RtoheMF (51. 

Detroit B02 022 108— 7 13 1 

Milwaukee ON ON SIS— II 13 1 

Wilcox. Hernandez (4), Scherrer (9) and 
LFarrish. wLCostllio (7); Haas. Gibson 16] 
and SOwneder. W— Gibson. 34. L — Scherrer, 
0-1. H Re— Detroit, Trammell (31, Milwaukee. 
Mentor (1), Simmons (1). 

Oakland OM 812 108-4 7 2 

Minnesota IN 031 001—5 7 8 

Krueger, Atherton (81. Conrov (9), Tell- 
mann (91 and Heath.' Butcher and Loudner. 
W— Butcher. M. L— Atherton, i-1. HRs— Oak- 
land. Murahy (3). Minnesota, Brunanskv <5). 
Cullfarnla BN 801 011-4 8 8 

Seattle IN 0M *08-4 3 3 

Wirt and Boone; Langston. Nunez (91 and 
KearrMv.w-witt.l-3. L— Langston. 2-Z HA— 
California, ©Men (2). 


Hockey 

NHL Playoffs 

THURSDAY’S RESULTS 
Montreal 1 1 1-4 

Quebec l 0 0— l 

DeBlois 12). Carbarmaau 13). Tremblay (2); 
Moller (2). Shots ee goal: Montreal (anGosse- 
lfn> 10-14-4—30; Quebec (on Penney 1 44-11— 
21 . 

Philadelphia 0 11—3 

N.Y. Islanders 2 2 2—4 

La Fontaine (j|. T rattier (4), Pofvin (j), 
Bessy (5). Jomson 111, Kerr 11); D. Smith (1). 
Kerr (S).SIiotson goal: Philadelphia (an Hru- 
dev) 10-7-9— 14; N.Y. Islanders [on Lindbergh. 
Froesel 74-12-27. 

Edmonton 2 3 3—8 

Winnipeg 1 2 8—3 

Gretzky 3 (4). Kurri 3 (6), Anderson 13), 
Messier (4); Cerlvie (1). Picard (2). Wilson 
(4). Stmts an geal: Edmonton (on Havword. 
Behrend) 10-10-11—31: Winnipeg (on Fuhr) 
1444—29. 

Chicago 3 12 0 1—7 

Minnesota 2 2 2 0 0 — t 

Larmer (3>,Soword 2 ISl.OIczyk (5). Lvskdc 
13). Gardner (11. Suttor (4); R. Wilson (1). 
Velischek 3 (3), Harlsburg (4), Roberts (1), 
McKeonev 15). Shuts an geal: Chicago (on 
Beaupre, Metoehe) 7-7444-35; Minnesota 
(on BenfMTfnon) 18-1 94-7-2— 54. 

'World Gbampionships 

W L T PM GF GA 
x-Sovlet Union 6 0 0 12 47 7 

f -Czechoslovakia 4 1 1 9 29 11 

x-Unlted States 4 11 » 21 24 

n-Conada 3 2 1 7 27 20 

y-Sweden 2 4 0 4 21 24 

y-FInland 1 3 2 4 IS 22 

y-E.Germany 0 4 2 2 11 42 

v-W.Gei many 0 5 1 1 11 31 

(k-advances to medal round) 
l /-relegation plavetts) 

THURSDAYS RESULTS 
Czecheslovakla 7, Sweden 2 
Soviet Union 9. Canada 1 

Friday's Games 

West Germany w East Germany 
United Slates vs. Finland 

Saturday's Gamas 
Soviet Union vs. Czechosiovokki 
Canada vs. Sweden 


Basketball 


NBA Playoffs 


THURSDAY’S RESULTS 
Boston 32 II 31 23—117 

Cleveland 33 33 23 24—115 

Bird 11-17 12-14 34, Johnson 7-18 10-10 24; 
Free u-27 84 30, Hubbard 10-15 2-2 23. Re- 
bounds: Boston 57 (Bird 14); Cleveland 47 
(Shelien 8). Assists: Boston 24 (Bird 71; 
Cleveland 24 (Bagiev 10). 

Dallas 24 31 28 28—113 

Portland 21 38 33 27—115 

VandeweMM 1 1-19 5-5 27, Drexler 7-12 4-5 18; 
Aguirre 15-73 *-!D 39, Parkins 5-13 11-T3 21. 
Rebounds: Dallas so (Perkins ID); Portland 
40 (Carr 10). Assists: Dallas 24 (Davis 8); 
Portland 30 (valentine 9). 








ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAY, APRIL 27-28* 198o 


OBSERVER 


people 


Lessons of Film History Spring in Japan Is Leam-to-Bow-Tune 



W ASHINGTON — President 
Reagan has had a great deal 
of difficulty in the past few weeks 
with the history of World War IL 
His first gaffe was to believe that 
German and American soldiers 
were buried in the same cemeteries 
in West Germany and could pre- 
sumably be hon- 
ored at the same 
time. His second 
one was to say 
that very few of 
today's Ger- 
mans remember 
the war and cer- 
tainly none of 
the adults now 
living participat- 
ed in any wav. 

Finally, he really BudiwaW 
flunked the course when he said the 
soldiers buried at Bitburg were just 
as much victims of the war as peo- 
ple who died in Lhe Holocaust 
What is one to make of the presi- 
dent's blunders? There may be 
clues in a book called “The Films 
of Ronald Reagan” by Tony 
Thomas (Citadel Press, 1980). 

□ 

Despite his being under contract 
to Warner Brothers. Reagan did 
not play in as many World War II 
movies as one might think. Yet his 
view of the war and the Nazis could 
easily have been formed by the 
ones he did appear in. 

In 1941 Ronald Reagan went 
into action for the first rime in a 
film tilled “International Squad- 
ron." He played a daredevil Ameri- 
can stunt pilot who femes a bomb- 
er to the RAF in England. Once 
there he witnesses the death of a 
child in an air raid and joins the 
RAF to get even with the Nazis. 
But Reagan doesn’t take his flying 
job seriously and while he’s mess- 
ing around with a French pilot's 
girlfriend be misses a mission. His 
best friend, another American, sub- 
stitutes for him and is killed. 

This sobers him up as far as 
World War II is concerned. He 
decides to atone for his tacky be- 
havior by knocking out the French 
pilot and taking his mission. After 
shooting down several German 
fighter planes in a smashing dog- 
fight, Reagan dies a fiery heroic 
death. The important thing is that , 
while there is a lot of talk about 
German bad guys, Reagan never 
gels to meet one personally. 

To my knowledge the only time 


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Ronald Reagan ever came face to 
face with the Nazis was in “Desper- 
ate Journey," made in 1942. He co- 
starred with Errol Flynn as part of 
the crew of a bomber' Reagan plays 
a brash, amusing, irreverent but 
very brave Yank. 

After the plane drops its bombs 
on Germany it is shot down and the 
crew is rounded up by a German 
major (Raymond Massey). Mem- 
bers of the German military in 
“Desperate Journey" are portrayed 
not so much as villains as they are 
as bumblers and idiots. In Rea- 
gan's big scene, he is being de- 
briefed by the major, who thinks 
the Yank' will tell Mm everything 
about the mission. Instead Ronnie 
knocks out Massey, then sits down 
and eats the major's breakfast. 

□ 

After this hilarious scene Reagan 
and the crew Find it a breeze to 
escape and make their way across 
Germany, blowing up half the 
country with sabotage. In a slam- 
bang finish they manage to steal a 
German bomber and take off for 
En glan d with Errol Flynn at the 
controls. 

That, as far as 1 know, was Ron- 
ald Reagan's only Hollywood ac- 
tion in the European theater during 
World War II. He did serve honor- 
ably in Burma in “The Hasty 
Heart,'’ and in the Korean theater 
in an MGM film called “Prisoner 
of War," which was so bad that it 
has said that this film hastened 
Reagan's decision to go into poli- 
tics. The future president’s finest 
hour was “Hellcats of the Navy,” in 
which Reagan was cast as a naval 
commander on a sub in the Pacific 
who wreaks havoc on the Japanese 
fleet. Not only did Reagan win the 
war, he also won the girl a nurse 
played by Nancy Davis, who is now 
the U. S. first lady. 

□ 

1 detail the films that Reagan 
played in for only one reason: It 
appears that the president's Holly- 
wood war record, while distin- 
guished, did not prepare him in any 
way for the 40th anniversary of the 
end of hostilities with Nazi Germa- 
ny. It also might explain why Rea- 
gan is so ignorant of World War II 
history. Even a bit part in “Die 
Battle of the Bulge" would have 
made Him realize that visitin g a 
military cemetery where SS soldiers 
are buried is not the right thing for 
a U. S. president to do. 


MOVING 


By Clyde Haberman 

New York Times Service 

T OKYO— This is the season when young 
Japan is taught bow to bow. 

The skill might not seem to require lessons, 
especially in a country where people bow at 
far more than just the drop of a hat. But there 
is a proper way to do everything in Japan, 
and that means rigorous spring training for 
the many thousands of young people who 
graduated from school in late March. 

’ For the past few weeks the bigger compa- 
nies have put their recruits through courses 
not only in the right way to bow but in the 
right way to smile, the right way to dress, the 
right way to walk Young women learn the 
right way to serve tea, and young men the 
right way to present their calling cards to a 
new acquaintance — a ritual of immeasur- 
able significance here. 

Everyone learned the right way to talk, a 
less-than-breezy task because polite Japanese 
involves varying levels of humbleness, de- 
pending on whether one is speaking to a 
social superior, equal or inferior. 

No one has had to work harder at all this 
than employees of department stores and 
banks who maintain steady contact with the 
public. Most such companies prepared man- 
uals and videotapes demonstrating proper 
techniques, such as the importance of keep- 
ing the back straight when bowing and of not 
bobbing one’s head like a fishing float. 

At the Takashimay a department store in 
central Tokyo one recent morning, the time 
had come for 32 ill-at-ease women, all just out 
of high school, to learn how to bow properly. 

The women were divided into groups of 
eight, and they took turns bowing and greet- 
ing, bowing and greeting, trying to remember 
that at Takashimaya one bent 30 degrees 
when welcoming customers and 15 degrees 
when encouraging them to look around. At 
other stores, 45-degree bows are de rigueur 
for departing customers. 

“You look so nervous," said their instruc- 
tor, Mitsuo Keucfai, a crisply dressed man 
recruited from the men's clothing depart- 
ment. “You have to smile when you say, 
'Good morning.' " 

So the young women greeted and bowed all 
over again, trying to get it right but not 
looking discemibly less nervous. They had far 
to go, concluded Kazuo Hosbino, who heads 
the store’s education division. 

Inevitably, many older Japanese think 
young people have poor maimers, bowing 
fitfully and speaking unspeakably. Some say 
younger Japanese are too tall for graceful 
bowing; others blame lax discipline at home 
these days. “What I see most clearly is 
stooped posture — their hands hang in front 
of them like gorillas," said Kjyonobu Ogasa- 
wara, the 72-year-old master of an etiquette 
school in Tokyo. 

Older people everywhere tend to think that 



Nancy ended the inter- 

national first ladies’ summit on 
drug abuse; urging students to he 
“dear-eyed and dear-rmnded” and 
felling parents that they are the 
most effective weapon in the fight 
against drugs. She addressed 1.500 
students and the wives of 15 for- 
eign lffa drr s in Atlanta, where the 
two-day conference dosed. Seven- 


I i r. t*. ... 



Sen Wiban/The New York Tim 


Two young women practice bowing in Tokyo park. 


youngsters are not what they ought to be, but 
even so, in how many other countries are 
manners so crucial that someone would in- 
vent a machine like the one that has been 
used by the Kinteteu department store in 
Osaka? It is a bowing machine. A person 
presses his or her chest against the breast- 
plate, and in that maimer the body adjusts to 
the desired angle. Usually, that is somewhere 
between 15 and 45 degrees. Deep-crouched, 
bo Lh-hands-touching- the-straw-mat bows are 
far less common. 

A few years ago the bowing machine de- 
lighted foreigners, who raw it as a splendid 
amalgam of Japan’s passion for precision and 
for gadgets. In reality, the machine is little 
used, but it does- make a point as to how 
somberly Japanese take tins ancient custom. 

There may not be as mud) obligatory bow- 
ing as before World War II, when people 
made obeisances in the general direction of 
the Imperial Palace, but there is still enough 
beading to keep everyone limber. 

The prime minister bows to members of 
the Diet, or parliament, before addressing 
them, and television announcers bow from 
behind their desks before reading the evening 
news. In offices, workers sometimes bow in- 
voluntarily when saying goodbye on the tele- 
phone. 

In Takashimaya. Mitsuko Hi taka, who 


sells maternity clothes, estimates that she 
bows seven to ten times for each customer. A 
magazine called Gendai examined bowing 
! patterns two years ago and found that in one 
unnamed Ginza department store the young 
women who ran the elevators bowed to shop- 
pers an average of 2^60 times a day. 

As important as bowing for young people 
is the instruction they have received mis 

S in polite language — learning which 
to use to snow they recognize then: 
kali on. This is a complicated business and a 
serious one, even in make-believe. The actor 
Toshiro Mifune, for example, refused to use 
language he thought unfit for the feudal lord 
Toranaga when he niariw the American ntmi- 
series “Shogun” a few years ago. 

Modem youngsters do not automatically 
know such subtleties, said Hoshino of the 
Takashimaya department store. But he was 
confident that with perseverance his new re- 
cruits would eventually know instinctively 
how to bow and talk, from the opening wel- 
come to the final “Sayonara." 

On second thought, even sayonara, perhaps 
the one Japanese word most foreigners know, 
is becoming vaguely unfamili ar to young Ja- 
pan. It is snfl used, to be sure. But more and 
more youngsters part company by not bow- 
ing to each other and then saying in perfect 
non-Japanese, “Bye-bye." 


day’s session in .Washington: from 
Argentina, Bolivia, Canada, Co- 
lombia, Ecuador, Ireland, Italy, Tar 
- insicfl, Japan, Malaysia, Mauritius, 
Mexico, Norway, Pakistan, Pana- 
ma, Portugal and West Germany. 
'□ 

Responding to the barring of the 
Canadian writer Farley Mowat ■ 
from the United States and contin- 
ue! delays in allowing entry of a 
Nicaraguan cabinet minister. Rep- 
resentative Barney Frank of Massa- 
chusetts says he will introduce leg- 
islation to repeal lemg-standing 
provisions of U.S. immigration 
law allowing foreigners to he de- 
nied entry solely because of their 
political beliefs and affiliations 
Frank, a Democrat and member of; ■ 
the House immi|rafioa subcom- 
mittee, said, “We have to stop act- 
ing as if admission to the United 
States is an enormous favor we’re 
doing for foreigners." Nicaragua’s 
minister of culture, Ernesto Car- 
denal, has rawt-HaH the start of a 
10-day U.S. speaking tour and 
stayed in Managua while State De- 
partment officials consider his visa 
application. Mowat said Canada’s 
Prime Muster Brian MAroey 
and External Affairs Minister Joe 
Qaric called him to offer assistance 
in seeking “an accommodation” 
from Washington. 


about nothing but cuts?" SB* 
asked." 


King Juan Gatos I, Queen Soft 
and Prime Minister Fefipc.Gomfc 
lez attended a funeral Mass id 
marie the reburiM of lhe remains g 
the king's grandmother amongtbe 
tnnihit nf Snanish rovakv. ' (mma 


Victoria Eagiria died m 1969 '* 
Lausanne, where she was -bused! 

< 1 J 1 T1 IK VfSv 


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Beverly SOb has denounced : 
U.S. federal income tax reform, 
saying its enactment would be “the 
greatest angle catastrophe of our 
times" for the arts. The tenner star 
soprano, who is now general direc- 
tor of the New York City Open, 
and the actor-producer John 
Houseman told 500 representatives 
of foundations, and corporations at - 
a meeting in Washington that orga- 
nizations far the artsshould give up 
on federal aid and focus on state 
and municipal governments and 
private philanthropy. “Cuts, cuts, ’ 
cuts — we are in such good [eco- 
nomic] diape, why are we talking 


buried in the crypt ctf'tittEsconal. 
outside Madrid, where the queen 
has now been reburied. She and 
Alfonso fived in exile after the king 
left Spain on the declaration at the 
Second. Republic in April 1931. 

• ; Q 

NBC is busily re-editing atefc 
sion show on missing people, "(fi* 
to air Monday* .because a NeW 
York youngster featured in thepn* 
gram was reunited this week with 
bis father. Pablo Tones, 15, had 
been missing since Aug. 13. He «a t 
found when workers caring for him 
saw his face on a local New York 
television show. His stay was onq 
of seven to be featured in NBC£ 
“Missing . . . Have You Sea? 
This Person?” 

□ : 

Rudolf Hess turned 91 Friday in 
Spandau prison in Berlin, where<& 
is serving a fife term far war czj&k; 

Geraldine Ferraro met private!* 
with Pope John Paul n, but tin 
fanner U.S. vice presidential candg 
date said they cud not talk about 
abortion — a key issue in last falTs 
camp ai g n — because although sffi 
advocated freedom of choice ori 
abaction in the campaign, herpr£ 
vate views are the same as tfi 
pope’s. In an unusual move, the 
Vatican neither announced the l(£ 
minute audience in advance nor 
confirmed that it took place. Feri* 
ro said she and the pope discussed 
h uman rights and arms control. V 

Residents of a village north 4t 
Dublin have dropped a threat & 
legal action against a rock concert 
by Brnoe Springsteen this summer 
after receiving pledges of security. 
The residents feared a repetition of 
the violence that occurred at the 
site during a Bob Dylan concert last 
year. *4 



REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
PARK PALACE 

Magnificent apartment, 116 sq. meters 
fxrfy furnished at Pork Palace, appo- 
site the casno and Hotel de Paris, in the 
Golden Triangle of Mom Carlo, new 
btfdng, 5th Boar with front and rear 
terraces, cellv & parking. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D’AZUR 

BETWHN MCE 8 ANTIBES 
lit das upce t m w* , 3 bedroom^ 200 
sq.ru. terrace, tennis, pool & private 
part. Avaiable summer 85. 

JOHN TAA08 SA 
to Coile sur Loup 
Tet (93} 32 83 40 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 




PORTO. ERCOtfe Seaside viRo with 
Manning pool owriabfe early June 
or Sept. Sleeps 12 lOaCre garden. 
Uwtino views, domestic help. Tel 


Mimna vwws. dome! 
London pll mom 




HAVE A NICE DAY] Betel Have a 
dee doyt BofceL 




MOVING 



PARIS Deebardei faitemationcd 
(01| 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT JJLJttK 

{069] 250066 

MUNICH i.*as. 

(089) 142244 

iondon Jrxs; 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSaS: Ziegler SA 

(02) 425 66 14 
CAIRO ABied Van lines Infi 

(20-2) 712901 

USA ABied Von Laws Inti Carp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


DEMEXFORT 

PAWS • LYON ■ MARSHUE 
LILLE e NICE 

tail moving by ipaoafat from motor 
ories m Ffora m ad arias n rhe world. 
Toll Free Fr om F iroce 16 105] 24 10 83 
FR& ESTIMATES 



In the charming mountain resort of 

LEYSIN: 

RESIDENCE LES FRENES 

Over toolsing a splendid Alpine proora- 
ma 30 min. from Monfrew and Lcke 
Geneva by car. 

- you con own qyaEfy residences 
with indoor swimming pool and 
fitaea foriStiss in an ideal 
emronmert for leisure and sports 
Js*>. golf. efc). 

• finanangat low SF. rates 
up >o 80% mortgages. 

Please co nt act: 

Bewdenee ^^Frenw^^ 54 leytai 

Tefc (0251 34 1 1 55 Th; Moko 26629 CH 


LAKE GENEVA 
MOUNTAIN RESORTS 

Lovely apartments with maleficent 
mews or Lake Geneva and mountains. 
Mcntreu*. VBars, Verbier, Las Diabier- 
e*s. Chateau cfOax near Gstoad. Ley- 
wt. Excellent Opport unffi tas Far 
Foreignei s 

.Wees from 5FI 23-000. 

Ltoerd mortogaes at 6ft* interest. 
GtcSTKAN SJV. 

Av Mon Repos 24, 

Established Since 1970 


ITS YOUR DECISION 

In the famous skiing and summer 
ryarta DAVOS and Madufain near 
ST. MORITZ at wdi os on the world 
ferrous LAKE 1DCBGW we offer beou- 
ftful continents in typied Swiss sfyled 
houses, best bastions. Top quafoy, 
Prioaw SFZIQflOQ to SF1 nriSon. Free 
for sale le i foreigners. Mortgcge* at low 

Swim interest rates. 

EMERALD-HOME LTD 
DarJ* OM872 Weesen 
Tet OI-S8-43177S- 
Tbu 876062 HOME CH 


GREECE 


HYDRA. AA.Y -AUGUST, 5 room 
2 to 4 pjn. Greek lime. 


Renthouse International 
020448751 (4 lines) 

Nederhwen 19-21, Amsterdam 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 

Deluxe rentals. Vaferorstr. 174 
Amsterdam. 028621234 or 6232^2. 


PETER BRUN MAKBAAROU 
Ml Homing Servfce-Renfcds 
ArwtenW Tel: 020-768022. 


.When in Rome: 

PALAZZO AL VBABtO 
Luxury apartment house with fomahed 
Hats, avodable for 1 weekend more 

Phone: 6794325, 6793450. 
Wrifet Via del Yetobro 16, 
00186 Rome. 


ROME 

RESIDENTIAL AREA 

lovely opartrnenE by day, by week or 
by month. Direct phone. Autonomous 
heating. Bar. Z e ttauront. Garage. 
24 hour service. 

RBDB4CE CORTINA D'AMPEZZO 

{39-6) 3387012 - 3387015 


PARIS AREA 


ABP ELYSEES CONCORDE 

rtgh das apartments, best mea 
Short term rentals 


9, rue (toyote, 75008 Paris 
Tel: (1) 265 11 99. Tlx: 640793 F 


74 CHAMPS-JBLY5EE5 8fh 

Studto, 3 or 3*oom apartment 
One month or more. 

LE OAJRDGE 359 67 97. 


• SWITZERLAND 


SWISS HOUDAY CHALET 
Situation hidfum, heart of Gforner- 
tond, 70 km from Zurich Ideal fomJy 
chalet, ,3 bedroo ms (7 heds), playroom, 
centroBy heated. S ur ro u nde d by faros- 
land and forest, views of vffleges and 
mounim. 

Superb in all seaso ns . 

SMSa per week 

For information rod photograph or 
booking, please write: L ScWaepfar, 
PostfarK 57048750 Gtarus. or Tet 
0567614223. Midday cr evanngs. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 



Man Your ClassiM All QuAddy arid Easily 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE - 

■y P h e n e ; CoS your load IHT representative wilh your text. You 
will be informed of the cost im medi utol y, and once prepayment is 
made ydlir ad wffl appecr within 48 haws.' . 

Coefc The bo*it rate hr JSL80 per Ene per. day + toed knees. There are 
25 fetters, rigns and spoOHm the fins the and 36 in lhe fallowing Shat. 
AAtiSrtwi space a 2 few. No abbeviafons- adapted . 

Credit 1 Crwds: American Express, '1>r»rV Or*. 'EuCocord, Master 
Card. Aoctss and Visa 


POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


HEADOfTKZ 


(Ifer doedfied only): 

747-4600. 

EUROPE 




-4 SHORT TERM in Latin Quarter. 
No agents. Tei- 329 38 81 


International Business Message Center 



BUSIN ESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 
PROMOTION 




BUSIN ESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


THIS WEEK 
MAY 6fo, 


Young woman, 30, Swiss, seeks free- 
trocmg opportunity in fine arts, cosmet- 
ic, fashion, fine jewelry, new products. 
Con oer as oronf domicSed in Switzer- 
land Has wide international cortacK. 
Free to travel Speaks Engfah, French, 
Germro, Itakon. Creek. 

- Commission bale 

arr ro Qe m eiJs possib le 
3 prospects wee rut r it. 

Please reply with full partiedm to: 
OTHB? PF 22-351 283 
Pubidlas. 0+1211 Geneva 3. 


ATHEN54NVE5TMB4T in Greece. 
Partnership for S. Mroke) business. 
Inqu i ries: Tbc 218597 ATEC GR. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


wn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMJTH3 INC 
USJL8 WORLDWIDE 

A complete social & bums service 


SALES - GERMANY 
Wb roe a major American carparaKon, 
> Our products ore cons u mer items. Due 
to npansioiv we roe feoldng for anoth- 
er person to cover our US. m&tary 
acaxmis.The postlian is based in south- 
ern Germany^ We offer a very com- 
petitive sakry, oast of lying aflcvvance. 
profit shan ^ ||Com^arty ^OT & other 

W« are faokina for someone with pravi- 
0 « wJes openenre & a busmesj^retot- 
edaoflegedqyee b desired but not es- 
santioL Due to the nature of this 
position, ropfaerts should bear « 
American passport & be presently rw 
sdng in Germany. 

Pfecee send your resume mdudmasab- 




Amsterdam 2636-15 
Athens: 361 -8397/360-2421 . 
■meek 343-1899. . 

CepenbaB*: (01) 329440. 
Frankfort: (069] 72d7-55. • 
te w—m s i 29^8-94. 

Gdsrer. 67-27-93/66-2S44. _ 
Urndaro pi) 8364802. 
Madrids 4S5-2891/45S3306. 
Mfcm. (02] 7531445. 
Norway: (03)845545. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Snroden: OB 7569229. 
TolAvhn 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

UNTTH) STATE 

Nmw Yorfc pi2) 7523890. 
West Coast: (415) 362-8339. 


EMPLOYMENT 




Buen os Akw 4] 40 31 
• (Dept. 312) 

O wn ymptfo 431 943/431 
Uma: 417852 
Pmsmstm '644372 
Sms Jtoem 22-1055 
■ Sitln pD i 69 61 555 
Sno Ftaata: 852 1893 

MUDUEAST 

Bahrain: 246303. 
fortW 25214. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
le h a n O n. 3400 44. 
(Ms*; 416535. - 

SwS Andua: 

Jaddcdu 667-1500. 
UA-Ei Dubai 224161. 

FAR EAST 

Bangkok; 390-0667. 
Hong Kong: S213671. 
.Mania: 817 0749. 
Soovfc 725 8773. 
«ugapore; 222-2725 l 
T aiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 

AUSTRALIA 

Sydnay: 929 56 39. - 
Mdboum* 690 8233. 


employment 


^ domestic 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


213-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St. N.Y.C 10019 
Service PeprsMntotives 
NetdqdWoridwida. 


Me rc e des and Porsche Cars 

CO-IMPORT / EXPORT 

World Wide Tax-Free Cars From Europe 
Frans Bitten 

200 Special Care in Slade - Immed i ate ttaHvary. 
Two Roar Showroom - Unique in Europe, 

500 SL 380 5L/C 450 51/C, 280 SL/C 500 SEC, 5005 




USA RESIDENTIAL 



BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 

a Executive Pay: The Top Ton 

• Japan: Attacks From RMi At 
Home And Friends Abroad Buffet 
NefaWMML 

• totwnadenal OvSooto Where A 
Savtot-Chmase Thaw Would 
Uove The U5. 

a Hands-On Empire-Boader, Gondd 
Ronsoa of Bmobi's Heron Even 
Checks The Light Bulbs. 

NOWON SALE 
AT ALL INTBlNATfONAL 
WWSSTANDS. 


3 ESTABLISHED Canodranham* oil 
W pw t are seeking senows mva- 
ton. lorry Rsutch, abonto n - (4031 



C One retmn'air ticket home, 
re tecoliro oBow ancs, m edBcol 
msurroce rod company cor. 
D. Two year o ans rod 
Conctdate should have convn rod of 
Engfah languoge and fuinJu ily with 
Arabic language a pha. PfeoM ired 
resume to: 

A merieo n Industrid Inti. 

7775 Cooper Road 
Gndnnoti. OH 45242 USA 
Telex: 21/4442 AMUNC 


INTERNATIONAL AUDITOR 

Openmg for Inti Aucftor for irt'L 
child spomorslnp agency. R e s pu n ub J. 
Mei indude sysmao & procedure* de- 
velopment, oudring, advisory anis- 
tonce to loeel rnenagemenf, 8 averum 
travel (60% or tims) to Latin Ameriai 8 
Africa. 

Crocidole should have bus ness de- 
wee, 3-5 yeors f**Sc accounting / au- 
diting expmterav fluent n French 4/w 
Sparash. Safcxy S2tK Send reunite to: 
Perioond M rong er 
P.O. Bee 804 
E- Greenwich, EJ. 02818 
Ecfid Opportun it y Employer M/F/H 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


MAXIMIZE YOUR US. 


Seotoned entrepreneur seda new did- 
Iwge & want* to mroageyour compa- 
ny t STowth m the ILS. 20 yerot scW 

Hjceess m butidng new bmineaet in 
European & US morkeb for 2 of the 
worfcTs fargwt food & beve ra g e com- 
pamej. If «u need o Strong, resote 
onasetk German ^edang executive, 
conkcti 

Woemer, 7 B e lmon t Avenue 
Rye, JW York 10580 
(914) 967-S077 


wperviM prowmg safes fan*. Mud 
be Free to travel edtawveiy with own- 
«. Wennevw 28/29 Apii at Hotel 
Mwrfea .Fors. Leave none / tat ro. 
for *k. Hess the hotel (758- 1230) 
who wm make oppo iivii p witk 


1.-: . 

wi-hrtL 




^^bmjcational 

POSITIONS AVAIfjimjg 


^^^SH^raACHBiHTrniT IM 

amkhca-haus 
STUTTGART 
*'★* ' 

• •UiSSrostip 

2 ?? !°,y ywaf age 
• Mrodrosy tool twgfea 
*ew>an as soon as posnbfe 

, , HOBBY t-MEGEK nfliwi 

Srimteemtrasse 13, 7000 




PagelT 
FOR MORE 
CLASSinEDS 








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uu 

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