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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneous!; 
in Paris, London, Zuric^. 
Vi Hoik Kong, Singapore!. J* 
The Hague and 


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Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 




WEA1VO DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 18 


Published With The New York T3iaerHnd The Washington Post 


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Ratings Up Since Last Year 


Reagan 
May Visit 
Remagen 

U.S. President 
Repeats He Will 
; , Go to Bitburg 

By William Drozdiak 

Washington Post Service 

BONN — The U.S. and West 
German governments are consider- 
ing adding a ceremony at the Re- 
magen bridge to honor the efforts 
ofU.S. soldiers in the closing days 
of World War II in an attempt to 
defuse the controversy over Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan’s planned vis- 
it to a military cemetery. 

Peter Boenisch, the West Ger- 
man government spokesman, said 
Monday that the Reagan stop at 
>s»e Remagen bridge was proposed 
by Jewish groups in the United 
States and was being studied by 
both governments. 

[President Reagan said Monday 
that he would visit Bitburg, despite 
the controversy that arose because 
‘ 49 Waffen SS graves are in the 
■ cemetery, The Associated Press re- 
1 ported from Washington.] 
j Mr. Boenisch repeated Bonn's 
intention to go through with the 
! Bitburg ceremony. 

“We are going to complete what 
$: we said we would do in the first 
£ place,” Mr. Boenisch said. 

| Mr. Reagan is to arrive Wednes- 
7' dav in Bonn at the start of a Euro- 

To Reform 
Currencies 


Europeans Fonder of Reagan 


By John Vinocur 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — President Ronald 
Reagan's standing and popularity 
among West Europeans — apart 
from the aura of blunder and insen- 
sitivity surrounding the Bitburg 
cemetery visit — seem, on the evi- 
dence of perils and interviews, to 
have strengthened moderately over 
thepast year. 

For large segments of public 
opinion in Western Europe, the re- 
opening oF nuclear arms negotia- 
tions in Geneva, and Mr. Reagan's 
repeated expressions of interest in 
meeting with Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, the Soviet leader, are positive 
developments that have enhanced 
Lhe president’s reputation. The 
strong performance of the Ameri- 
can economy in comparison with 
those in Europe has also increased 
admiration for Mr. Reagan. 

But skepticism and contempt 
about Mr. Reagan remain intact 
among many government officials, 
political scientists and editorial 
writers. 

Europeans have also been told in 
recent weeks by correspondents of 
their newspapers in the United 
States that Mr. Reagan seems to be 
encountering more serious policy 
difficulties at home, and that Jus 
skills at communication may be 
flagging. 

“The charm is vanishing," Jac- 
ques JuIIiard said in a dispatch to 


the weekly Le Nouvd Observateur percent replied that he was and 46 
last week, referring to the pres- percent that he was noL This cam- 
dent's difficulties with the budget, pared with a pod in February 1983, 

before deployment of new cruise 
nuclear missiles in Britain, when 
only 22 percent said they felt that 
he was a good president and 65 
percent that he was noL 
After his re-election last Novem- 
ber, a pod indicated that a minority 
of Britons found this a positive 
event for both the United States 
and for British-American relations. 
In 1980 the same polling organiza- 
tion reported that most Britons 
found Mr. Reagan's election a neg- 
ative development on both counts. 

While attitudes vary among the 
populations of lending allies — ac- 
cording to aNew York Times/ CBS 
News Poll last autumn, in Britain 
and West Germany support for 
Walter F. Mondale was about 
equal to that for Mr. Reagan, while 
the French preferred Mr. Reagan 
by a wide maigin — the president 
seems to have done little in the past 
year that is regarded by the public 
as compromising European securi- 
ty or countering its interests. 

In past years, the central aspect 
of European criticism of Mr. Rea- 
gan, on the basis of issues, related 
mainly to what was seen as a con- 
frontational altitude toward the 
Soviet Union. Now that issue has 
receded, and criticism often relates 
to policy that is tangential to the 
(Continued oa Page 2, CoL 5) 


Nicaragua, the slowdown in the 
economy and the uproar over bis 
planned visit to the German mili- 
tary cemetery. 

In general however, approval 
for Mr. Reagan appears to have 

Approval for Mr. 
Reagan appears to 
have grown 
moderately in 
important sectors of 
public opinion in 
Europe. 


grown moderately in important 
sectors of public opinion in Eu- 
rope. 

In Britain, for example, where 
press criticism of Mr. Reagan has 
been intense since he was elected in 
1980, a poll taken by Gallup Inter- 
national in February showed him 
attaining his highest level of popu- 
larity in five years. 

Asked whether Mr. Reagan was 
proving to be a good president, 41 


Senior Israeli Army officers peered at a map of southern Lebanon Monday in a tent on the 
outskirts of Tyre as Israeli troops were polled oot of the region. They are from right: the 
chief of staff, Lieutenant General Mosbe Levy; the commander of the northern front. 
Major General Ori Orr, and the bead of military manpower, Major General Amos Yaron. 


Summit Clash Japanese Military Budget Reportedly Will Exceed 1% of GNP 
Seen on Push 


a pean visit that includes the seveo- 

- nation economic summit 
conference Thursday, Friday and 

- Saturday. 

[ The Reagan visit to Bitburg has 
j provoked outrage from Jewish 
groups and war veterans in the 
( United States. Mr. Kohl insists that 

( the ceremony is meant to symbolize 
U.S.-German reconciliation, 
t In response to the protests, Mr. 
c Reagan added a trip to the Bergen- 
i Belsen concentration camp to pay 
tribute to Nazi victims. 

: The capture of the Remagen 

i bridge, the last span across the 
' Rhine left intact by retreating Nazi 
soldiers, hastened the demise of 
i ,Hi tier’s regime two months later. 

‘ i it enabled the Americans to push 
25,000 combat troops across the 
river to establish the first Allied 
bridgehead in the German heart- 
land. 

Mr. Boenisch declined to give 
details on the possible alterations 
£ in the program. 

He described coverage of the 
planned Bitburg visit by U.S. news 
organizations as scandalous be- 
cause some reports had depicted 
the town as a haven for Nazi sytn- 
j pathizeis. 

( ■ Nixon Backs Visit 
' Former President Richard M. 

< Nixon urged Mr. Reagan last week 

l not to back down from plans to 
I visit Bitburg, The Washington Pest 

i 1 reported, quoting adminis tration 
i ''sources. 

1 Mr. Nixon, whose views were so- 
j li died by senior White House offir 

. dais, was reported to have said the 
' planned cemetery visit had caused 
“substantial domestic political 
damage” but that a reversal would 
• undermine Mr. Reagan’s standing 
with the Western European allies 
and his ability to negotiate with the 
. Soviet Union and in the Middle 
East. 

White House sources also said 
- that former Secretary of State Hen- 
ry A Kissmger had urged Mr. Rea- 
gan to make the visit, tiring the 
'f importance of relations with West 
Germany. 




By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France’s determina- 
tion to press President Ronald 
Reagan for a reform of the interna- 
tional monetary system could lead 
to a dash at the economic summit 
conference in Bonn this week, se- 
nior West European and U.S. dip- 
lomatic officials said Monday. 

In an interview published during 
the weekend by Liberation, a Paris 
daily newspaper, Mr. Reagan ruled 
out any immediate move on mane-' 
tary reform. He renewed his insis- 
tence that one of the summit's most 
important agenda items will be 
agreeing cm the time the UJS. ad- 
ministration is seeking for opening 
trade liberalization negotiations — 
early 1986. He added that other 
governments supported him. 

But President Fraajois Mitter- 
rand of France, in a television in- 
terview on Sunday, said that “it is 
not possible for us to accept negoti- 
ations on trade matters if, at the 
same time, there is a refusal to start 
talks on subjects as important as 
currencies." He thus renewed an 
earlier threat to block the setting of 
a date for the trade talks unless 
progress was made on monetary 
reform. 

Mr. Mitterrand and his aides 
have also told recent visitors that it 
would not be posable for France to 
agree on a date for trade talks until 
the agenda had been decided. 

The negotiations would be held 
under the auspices of the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 
the Geneva-based agency, and 
would involve about 90 GATT 
members, including developing 
countries. 

A senior European diplomat in 
Paris said: *Tt may be pre-summit 
posturing by President Mitterrand, 
but based on what he and his advis- 
ers at the Elysee Palace are saying, 
it looks as if a dash with President 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) " 


By John Burgess 

Waskingum Past Service 

TOKYO — Japan is drafting a 
$100- billion, five-year military 
spending plan that would expand 
sea-lane and air-defense capabili- 
ties and probably mean the formal 
end of a policy of holding military 
spending to below one percent of 
gross national product, according 
to press reports here. 

The plan, being circulated within 
the Japanese Defense Agency, is 
expected to be adopted officially as 
a government target this summer. 
The Diet, or national legislature, 
then would have to approve money 
for it year by year. 


The plan would continue Japan's 
steady expansion of military 
spending in recent years but bring 
no radical changes in speed or di- 
rection. 

It is pan of a long-term effori to 
take over some of toe regional de- 
fense burden now shouldered by 
toe United States, which maintains 
about 50,000 troops in Japan. 

Here are toe main points of toe 
plan, according to toe Asahi Shim- 
bun newspaper. 

• U.S.-designed P-3C Orion 
anti-submarine patrol planes, now 
numbering about 50, would rise to 
100. Combat ships would increase 
from 49 to 63. Submarines would 


rise by five to reach a level of 15 or 
16. 

In toe early 1980s, Japan agreed 
lo work toward building a capabili- 
ty to defend its sea lanes up to 
1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) from 
its shores. Thus, much of the new 
equipment is directed at that goal 

• The Japanese Air Force, by toe 
end of toe plan, will have 190 F-15 
fighters, 65 more than it has now. 
The planes are manufactured in Ja- 
pan under license from McDonnell 
Douglas. The old Nike surface-to- 
air missiles would be replaced with 
toe new Patriot missile system. 

• Japan would buy four more 
Grumman E-2Cs, a small propel- 


ler-driven radar plane, bringing its 
total to 12. 

• Army divisions on toe north- 
era island of Hokkaido, which is 
contiguous to toe Soviet Union and 
toe traditional focus of ground de- 
fense, would be reorganized. The 
army would get 40 new anti-tank 

helicopters. 

The plan would come into effect 
with toe fiscal year that begins 
April 1, 1986. The current fiscal 
year's budget already has Japan 
butting up against toe one percent 
of GNP ceiling an military spend- 
ing that was adopted by toe Japa- 


ter Yasuhiro Nakasone wants to 
scrap the criling. 

It is widely expected to be bro- 
ken formally this summer for toe 
first time since it went into effect 
and toe Diet probably will approve 
a pay raise for all government em- 
ployees. Larger paychecks for the 
180,000 people m uniform auto- 
matically would take spending 
above one percent of GNP. 


nese cabinet in 1976. 

The government of Prime Minis- 


dicting an average GNP growth of 
four percent a year for toe five 
years covered by the plan. The mili- 
tary plan would then exceed one 
percent unless economic growth 
were considerably higher. 


INSIDE 


■ The number of Soviet advis- 

ers in Syria has been sharply 
reduced since October, Western 
sources say. Page 2. 

■ The UJSL pilots union is mov- 

ing to organize air controllers as 
an affiliate group. Page 5. 

■ Dinka and Ga are on a list 

that the US. government con- 
siders critical — for language 
students. Page 5. 

■ Dachau's Eberatian was re- 
membered with .mixed feelings 
over how to interpret the col- 
lapse of Nazi Germany.Page <L 

■ Israel’s leader is reported to 

have promised to support re- 
strictions on the country's mon- 
etary policies. Page 6. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ New York designers featured 

a broad-shouldered but very 
feminine look alternating with 
hints of the 1960s. Page 8. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Atlantic Richfield announces 

another major restructuring to 
bolster earnings. Page 9. 

■ Growth in the world banking 
market has slowed markedly, a 
survey shows. 



The New York Yankees 
dismissed Manager Yogi 
Berra and named Billy 
Martin to replace him. 
Martin takes over as 
Yankee manager for the 
fourth time. Page 19. 

To Our Readers 
In observance of toe French 
holiday, there will be no edi- 
tions of the Internationa] Her- 
ald Tribune dated May 1. 


Party, at Deng’s Insistence, Selects 
1,000 as Core of Future Leadership 


By John F. Bums 

New York Tima Service 

BEIJING — In an effort to en- 
trench the policies he has intro- 
duced, Deng Xiaoping, China’s 
preeminent leader, has had the 
Communist Party apparatus select 
1,000 middle-aged officials as the 
core of China's future leadership. 

A front-page article Sunday in 
toe People's Daily, toe main party 
organ, said the officials had been 
designated over toe past year. It 
said they had been chosen from 
“different parts of China" an the 
basis of recommendations by cur- 
rent leaders and by “a vast number 
of ordinary people." 

The article said toe men and 
women had been earmarked for 
“provincial and ministerial posts.” 
In addition, it said, “tens of thou- 
sands of others” have been selected 
for eventual promotion to top posts 
in toe prefectures and counties that 
are toe lower rungs of toe Chinese 
administrative system. 

The announcement indicated 
that Mr. Deng has positioned the 
people that he would like to see 
take over the running of toe gov- 
ernment. Since he is also insisting 


that executive talent should be de- 
cisive in promotions to the top level 
of toe party, he has in effect chosen 
the pool of men and women from 
whom he expects the country’s next 
generation of rulers to emerge. 

In part, Mr. Deng’s purpose has 
bem to phareoto toe generation of 
elderly offidals who now hold deci- 
sive power — he is himself 80 years 
old — and to replace them with 
more vigorous, better-educated 
people in their 40s and 50s. 

This in turn is pan of a broader 
effort to break toe cycle of upheav- 
al that has seen toe country oscil- 
late for 35 years between periods of 
pragmatic rule; such as Mr. Deng is 
offering now, and the more ideo- 
logical brand of leadership associ- 
ated with Mao Zedong. 

Mr. Deng's calculation appears 
to be that younger officials, gener- 
ally with higher education, are 
more likely to stick with his empha- 
sis on prosperity and to shun toe 
mixture of egalitarianism and anti- 
intdlectualism that characterized 
Mao’s rule. 

Besides, be has said repeatedly 
that the young leaders he is bring- 


ing along are simply more capable 
than toe generation that has ruled 
the country since 1949. ' 

Beyond this, toe move is part of a 
continuing effort by Mr. Deng to 
institoticnalizfi the political process 
to replace the personal and arbi- 
trary rale that has prevailed much 
of the time since toe C ommunis ts 
took power in 1949. The effort has 
taken many forms, but the underly- 
ing purpose is the same: to pre- 
clude a power struggle after his 
death in which ideological hard- 
liners could again seize power. 

The People’s Daily described 
this selection of future leaders as “a 
strategic task vital for the future of 
the party and the slate." Song Ren- 
qioug, a dose ally of Mr. Drag on 
the ruling Politburo, was quoted as 
saying toe party should move 
ahead with the process “with a 
sense of urgency.” 

The newspaper did not say when 
the pool of future leaders would 
move in to top posts, but there have 
been other indications recently that 
Mr. Deng is in a hurry to get as 
many as possible inplace this year, 
or by toe end of 1986 at the latest. 


Israelis 
Pull Out 
Of Tyre 

Residents Cheer 
As Tanks Depart 
Lebanese Port 


The Associated Press 

TYRE, Lebanon — Israeli 
troops completed their withdrawal 
from the Lebanese portdty of Tyre . 
and surrounding areas on Monday. 

Tyre was' toe last major Lebanese 
city held by toe Israelis since their 
invasion in the spring of 1982, and 
its citizens celebrated as toe Israelis 
pulled out. 

As toe lasL two convoys of about 
45 ranks, armored personnel cam- • 
era and trucks headed south, Leba- 
nese poured into the streets of 
Tyre, the country’s southernmost 
port 

Thousands of men, women and 
children tinnrwti and sang in the 
streets. They surged out of their 
homes when officials of toe Inter- 
national Committee of the Red 
Cross confirmed that the last Israe- 
li soldier had gone. 

“Life under toe Israelis turned 
Tyre into a big jail” said one man. 

“It was a big prison. But now, 
thank God, it’s over, it’s over." 

Just before 11 A.M-, the last Is- 
raeli convoy left toe city. It headed 
for Jesr el-Hamra, lOtmles (16 ki- 
lometers) south, where some Israe- 
lis remained on toe northern edge 
of what was expected to be a buffer 
zone north Of toe border against 
guerrilla attacks. 

- The Israelis have announced 
their intention of completing their 
withdrawal from Lebanon by June. 

Tyre residents were not the pnly 
people celebrating Monday’s with- 
drawal At toe Israeli border cross- 
of Rash Hnnflrr ft, those Israeli 
: reluming all toe way home 
threw colored smoke grenades, 
waved bottles of champagne and 
stuck pink carnations in toe barrels 
of their machine guns when they 
crossed the frontier. 

“No, Lebanon, no," a group of 
soldiers chanted 

Amid the rejoicing in Tyre, how- 
ever, there was a menacing under- 
current as guerrillas of Amal, the . 
main. Shiite. Moslem movement,. . .. 
prepared to hmir dcwv®" &T 

had collaborated with the Israelis. . 

“They will be punished, sooner 
or later, in front of ail the people,” 
one man said “They betrayed us. 
They betrayed Lebanon.” 

Officials estimated that about 50 
residents of Tyre had worked with 
toe Israelis. But 30 were believed to 
have fled south with them. 

Scores of suspected collabora- 
tors were killed in Sidon, 20 miles 
north of .Tyre, after toe Israeli^ 
puDed out in Februaiy. 

An 1 8-year-old woman said: 
“We’ve lived in a slate of fear while 
the Israelis were here. We couldn't 
walk in the street without being 
afraid” 

Other residents said they had 
wailed in their homes through Sun- 
day a& toe Israeli withdrawal accel- 
erated From daybreak Monday, 
they Waited for this moment, peep- 
ing from behind their curtains until 
the Israelis vanished from toe 
streets. 

They heard several explosions on 
the mriskirts as the Israelis appar- 
ently blew up bunkos while with- 
drawing. 

As Tyre residents cheered from 
balconies and rooftops, toe first 
outsiders to reach toe city from 
across the abandoned Israeli front. - 
line along toe Litani River to toe 
north were carloads of guerrillas. 

The guerrillas, who have ha- - - 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


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IV 


Vietnam Vets: They Fit In Now 

But Those Who Saw Heavy Combat Lag Behind Others 


By Barry Sussraan 
and Kenneth E. John 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Ten years after the fall of 
Saigon on April 29, 1975, Vietnam War veterans, in 
general, live not much differently than other Ameri- 
cans, according to a Washington Post-ABC survey. 

When they entered military service in toe 1 960s and 
early 1970s. three-quarters of them bad no education 
past high school; a fifth were dropouts. But more than 
half went back to school Today, the survey indicates 
that a Vietnam veteran is more likely to have gone to 
college than a man of his age who was not in the 
service. 

With education have come job prospects and in- 
comes similar to those of other men toe same* age, 
according to toe survey. The unemployment rate for 
the Vietnam veterans surveyed is about 7 percent, also 
srimiar to that of afi working-age Americans. Three of 
four Vietnam veterans surveyed said their annual 
household incomes exceeded $20,000; almost half 
took in $30,000 or more each year. 

Most also are now married and have childre n and 
homes of their own. Eight of 10 Vietnam veterans 
surveyed are married. Ninety percent have children, 
and 43 percent have three children or more. 

Strikingly, 78 percent of the Vie tnam veterans sur- 
veyed already are homeowners, the great majority 
paying mortgages on traditional, single-family houses. 
More than Other Americans, they trad to hvc in small 
towns and rural areas. 

Despite the grief and anger many of them experi- 
enced during toe war, followed by bittoness when 
they first returned home, Vietnam veterans appear 
statistically to have settled down to lives not nnKte 
those of toe veterans of World War 11. 


Asked whether they personally benefited or were set 
back in the long run by having gone to Vietnam, 56 
peaoaitof toe veuraiu said they benefited; 29 percent 
said they were set back. There are qualifications to 
those answers. 

“Since 1 survived, 1 fed I benefited,” said a former 
army corporal “I learned a lot about toe psychology 
of people under stress." 

He added: “But it took toe two best years, from age 
19 to 21, out of my life.” 

Said another: “As far os growing up, manning, 1 
benefited. But that’s toe extent of it.” 

One particular group of Vietnam veterans, however, 
has adjusted less well Although they are a minority of 
all who served, they are the ones Americans think of 
most when remembering the wan those who survived 
heavy combat They tend to be slightly less well off 
than other Vietnam veterans, somewhat more bitter, 
and suffering from more bad memories and personal 
problems. 

These conclusions are drawn from 81 1 veterans who 
served in Vietnam and Southeast Asia, selected at 
random and interviewed by telephone last month. An 
additional 438 Vietnam war-era veterans who served 
elsewhere win also interviewed, but the findings in 
this article are based almost entirely on the responses 
of those who were in Southeast Asia. 

Those surveyed are sharply divided about whether 
toe United States should have sent troops to Vietnam. 
Bui they generally said they were proud of having 
served there 

Unlike the responses of most Americans inter- 
viewed in other national surveys, a majority of toe 
Vietnam veterans said they thought that they had a 
clear idea of what toe war was about and that toe 

(Continued ou Page 2, CoL 4) 


Veterans are sharply divided about whether the United States should have sent 
troops to Vietnam. But they said they were proud of having served there. 



Sudan May 
CeaseFood 
Shipments 

By Jonathan G Randal 

Waikingion Past Service 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan 
is considering halting food ship- 
ments to rebet-held areas of Ethio- 
pia’s Eritrea and Tigre provinces in 
an effort to end Ethiopian aid to 
Sudan’s own insurgents, in toe 
south, according to Sudanese offi- 
dals. 

Speaking Sunday before the ire-; 
turn of a high-level Sudanese dele- 
gation from a gpod-wih visit to Ad- 
dis Ababa, the officials 
admowiedgpd that slopping trans- 
portation of food aid across Sudan 
to rebel-held areas could tarnish 
toe new transitional government's 
international image. 

But toe ruling transitional mili- 
tary council and the interim civil- 
ian cabinet are convinced that Su- 
dan's national interest lies iu 
on John Gar- 
ang, toe Ethiopian-based leader of 
toe Sudan People's Liberation'. 
Army .the offidals said. 

Analysts said that the potential 
for reaching an agreement between 
Ethiopia "and Sudan by mutually 
ending support fra their insurrec- 
tions long has existed. But they ' 
added that toe rebels and tora 


Th7S*=dKSr (CoBtim>edooPnge2,CoL3) 










Page 2 


Number of Russian Advisers 
In Syria Is Reported Reduced 



By Christopher Dickey 

Washington Post Service 

DAMASCUS — More than a 
third of the Soviet military advisers 
in Syria have been withdrawn in 
the last six months, including an air 
defense unit that was the only po- 
tential Soviet combat force in the 
region. Western sources say. 

Senior Syrian military and civil- 
ian officials would not comment on 
the motives few the withdrawal or 
on any specific aspect of their 
armed forces. 

But the decline in the number of 
Soviet advisers from a high of 6,000 
to 4,000 or less is viewed among 
diplomats here as an indication of 
the careful control that Syrian 
President Hafez al-Assad main- 
tains over his country’s relations 
with Moscow. 

“The Soviets have basically only 
one major foothold in Syria and 
tha t is the arms relationship.*' a 
diplomat said. 

Another Western envoy suggest- 
ed that with the exception of its 
military hardware, “Syria has noth- 
ing in common with Soviets.” 

Sources said the main body of 
the Soviet air defense unit, includ- 
ing troops manning the SAM-5 sur- 


face-to-air missile batteries, pulled 
out in October, and smaller groups 
of advisers have been leaving regu- 
larly ever since. Although some So- 
viet “fire control” over the SAM 
systems may be maintained, they 
said, the Syrians are believed to run 
them mostly on their own now. 

According to one usually well- 
informed source, the number of So- 
viet advisers may be as low as 2,000 
to 3.000. 

Western diplomats in Damascus 
said that Mr. Assad's government 
often pursued its own course with 
scant attention to Moscow's wish- 
es. 

The most fi 
pie was Syria’s 


cited exam- 
d in 1976 to 


commit troops to Lebanon despite 
t opposition. Andrei A Gn 
myko. the Soviet foreign minister, 


Soviet 


n> 


flew here to press the point but the 
Syrians crossed the border anyway, 
not bothering to inform Mr. Gro- 
myko until the action was an ac- 
complished fact, diplomats said. 

Soviet arms supplies to Syria 
dropped dramatically after that 
and did not pick up again until 
1978, Western diplomats said. Af- 
ter 1982, when Israel invaded Leb- 
anon, the scale of Soviet arms sup- 
plies rose dramatically. 


Israelis Leave Port of Tyre 
As Lebanese Residents Cheer 


(Continued from Page I) 
rassed the Israelis with ambushes 
and suicide car bombs for months, 
were welcomed as heroes as they 
drove in. Soviet- made assault rifles 
and rocket-propelled grenade 
launchers poked out or their car 
windows. 

Near Sidon. meanwhile, about 
4,000 more Lebanese Christian ref- 
ugees fled sectarian violence on 


Monday, according to the spokes- 
man for the United Nations Inter- 
im Force in Lebanon, Timor Gok- 
sel. 

The force sent a truck loaded 
with food to four other villages in 
southern Lebanon, Mr. Goksel said 
in a telephone interview from UNI- 
FIL headquarters in southern Leb- 
anon. 

About 1,500 Christian refugees 
arrived Sunday in the southern 
Lebanese village of Qlaia after flee- 


Direct engagements with Israel's 
U.S.-backed forces cost the Syrians 
98 aircraft, including helicopters, 
MiG-21 s and MiG-23s, according 
to Western sources. Since then, Mr. 
Assad has sought Soviet help to 
replace what was destroyed and to 
stan building a force that could 
claim a “strategic balance” with 
Israel. 

With Syria's traditional military 
ally a gains t Israel now out of the 
picture — Egypt having signed .a 
peace treaty — the Syrians con- 
cluded that “they can count on no 
one, so they must count on them- 
selves.” a diplomat said. 

Foreign Minister Farouk al- 
Sharaa has said Syria's goal is “to 
be strong enough to defend our- 
selves against any future Israeli ag- 
gression” and to be able to negoti- 
ate eventually without “the Israelis 
being able to dictate their condi- 
tions to us.” 

To pursue such a policy in the 
face of Washington's firm commit- 
ment to Israel, Syrian officials said, 
they turned to Moscow. 

Syria has met its goal of rebuild- 
ing its armed forces, according to 
Western sources. It reportedly has 
more than 500 combat aircraft, in- 
cluding a few sophisticated MiG- 
255, about 3,500 tanks and more 
than 2.000 artillery pieces. The Syr- 
ian armed forces total about 
400,000 men, of whom 40,000 are 
in the air force and 60,000 in air 
defense units. 

Syria claims to be approaching 
Israel in the size of its armed forces 
and in its number of weapons, but 
the aim of “strategic balance” is 
still far away because of Israel's 
vast technological advantages, 
sources said. 

It strikes some Western observ- 
ers as odd that the Soviet military 
presence is being reduced now. 
wheat tensions are rising in Leba- 
non and the factional fighting be- 
tween Syrian-backed forces and Is- 



AMttvUnttd Press h tt w nanond 


NEW YORK ROBBERY — Four armed men overpowered guards, emptied a truck 
containing $8 mil lion, then abandoned it under fbe Brooklyn 


Federal Bureau of Investigation said. The record for a U.S. cash robbery is Sll million. 


Bridge on Monday , the 
hnwboyis 


WO^E^RIEFS 





6 More Blacks Killed in South Africa 


JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Six more blacks have died in violence as 
two gold mining companies planned talks with a black union over the 
largest dismissal of black miners in memory, government officials said 
Monday. 

Police reported fresh rioting in at least 15 townships Sunday night and 
eariv Monday. A total of 17,400 miners were dismissed over the weekend, 
14.400 by Anglo-American Corp. at its Vaal Reefs mine and the rest at 
the Hanebeestfomein mine owned by the Anglovaal company, according 

to figures released Monday. . . , . _ 

In Cape Town, meanwhile; the minister of law and older, Louis Le 
Grange, reported that 217 people have been killed in rioting 7 
September to March 22 and that more than 10,000 people were arrested 
A spokesman for the South African Institute of Race Relations said, 
however, that newspapers have reported at least 312 deaths over the past 
nine months. 


Police Warn of Bonn Terror Threat 


WIESBADEN, West Germany (AP) — The authorities warned Mon- 
day that leftist terrorists might be p lanning “spectacular attacks” during 
this week's economic summit conference in Bonn. 

Heinrich Boge, the president of the Federal Criminal Office in WiesJv ■ 
den. appealed to the public to support police efforts to thwart terrors - 
“Terrorists and their sympathizers are planning other spectacular alu«acs 
to demonstrate their opposition to the political and economic system of 
the Western world,” Mr. Boge said. 

The warning occurred after leftists claimed responsibility for three 
overnight bomb attacks in Cologne and DOsseldorf that caused extensive 
damage to businesses. There were no injuries. The Revolutionary Cells 
said in a letter to a leftist newspaper that the group planted the bombs ic 
protest the summit meeting of leaders of the seven industrial nations. 


Draft Resister Begins Prison Term 


Vietnam Veterans Back in the Fold 


yv a _.» o LCDanese vmage oi aner liee- 

Direct Action days lng villages near Sidon, which had 
J been overrun by Palestinian and 


raeti-supported units is increasing. 
But others no 


It Bombed IMF 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — The extreme leftist or- 
ganization Direct Action, in a letter 
received Monday by Agehce 
France-Presse, claimed responsi- 
bility for the weekend bombing 
outside the Paris offices of the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund and 
the World Bank. 

The bomb shattered dozens of 
windows and seriously damaged 
the front of the six^story IMF 
building when it exploded at 3:28 
A M. Saturday. There were no inju- 
ries. Police said the bomb was 


plant 
IMF offices. 

Hie French news agency said the 
letter bore a red star, the symbol of 
Direct Action, and that the group 
authenticated its claim by giving 
the make and license plate number 
of the car under which the bomb 
was placed. . 


Moslem militiamen. 

At least 42 people were reported 
killed and 30 wounded in the fight- 
ing in southern Lebanon. There 
were allegations on both sides that 
civilians were being massacred or 
abducted. 

A spokesman for the Israeli- 
backed South Lebanese Army mili- 
tia said Sunday that he expected 
thousands more Christian refugees 
to flee to the border strip where 
Israel intends to establish its securi- 
ty zone. 

But he said the area was Hi- 
equipped to provide food, housing 
and jobs for the refugees. 

■ Aid to Christians Hedged 

Israeli government leaders said 
Sunday that Israel would assist 
Christian victims in Lebahon but 
would not intervene in the fighting. 
The New York Tunes reported 
from Tel Aviv. 

Moshe Arens, the former defense 
minister, said in a television inter- 


note tint the Syrians, 
aware of their military shortcom- 
ings, are careful to avoid direct 
confrontation with the Israelis at 
this point and probably would not 
expect much from the Soviet Union 
if one developed. 


Many Syrians and Western dip- 


lomats say that Syria is aoser 
turally to the West, particularly to 
Western Europe, than to the Soviet 
bloc. From the end of World War I 

until re gaining independence in 
1946. Syria was administered by 
France under a League of Nations 
mandate. 


(Continued from Page 1} 
United States could have won, if 
not for the politicians. 

“The war could have been won in 
a month's time,” said a former ri- 
fleman. Sergeant First Class Alfred 
Simmons. 39. who is still in the 
army and now stationed in Virgin- 
ia- ^We let a Third World country 
defeat us and mak e fools out of us. 
The government should have let the 
military be in charge." 

Hie Post-ABC News survey and 
similar studies underscore the dif- 
ferences between veterans of heavy 
combat and the others. About 30 
percent of those interviewed in the 
Post-ABC News survey said they 
had been in heavy combat. 

Of the veterans in the survey who 
did not see heavy combat, 29 per- 
cent saw their first marriages break 
up. Of those who said they were in 
heavy combat, 41 percent married 
and divorced. In both groups, most 
remarried and are married today. 

Veterans were asked about eight 
types of problems they may have 
had on release from the service, 
including health, money and job 


Sudan Considers Stopping 
Food Shipments to Ethiopia 


(Continued from Page 1) 
causes have acquired a life of their 
own that could prove difficult to 
snuff out by political accords 
alone. 

Sources dose to the Tigre and 


WHAT WOULD LIFE BE LIKE 
WITHOUT IT? 

WEEKEND 

EACH FRIDAY IN THE IHT 


been proposed by the U.S. govern- 
ment two months ago before the 
Reagan administration, too, appar- 
ently lost interest in the idea. 

The new Sudanese authorities, 
who have renewed diplomatic ties 
with Libya and sought to improve 


problems, loneliness, drinking, use 
of marijuana or other drugs, diffi- 
culty in getting along with family 
and friends, and emotional strain. 

Half of those who said they were 
in heavy combat reported suffering 
from at least three of the afflictions 
listed. Fifty-three percent reported 
undergoing emotional strain, 44 
percent said they had a drinking 
problem wbeu they came home. 42 
percent cited bouts of loneliness, 40 
percent said they did not have 
enough money to live on, 33 per- 
cent had difficulties with family 
and friends. Use of marijuana or 
other drugs was mentioned by 16 
percent. 

Among veterans who did not see 
heavy combat, fewer than three in 
10 said they suffered from three or 
more of those problems after com- 
ing home. 

Three of every four veterans of 
heavy combat said they agreed with 
the statement that “I often find 
myself still thinking of the death 
and dying” during the war. Among 
the other Vietnam veterans inter- 
viewed, 48 percent said this state- 
ment applied to them. 

One widespread belief about the 
Vietnam War is that black Ameri- 
cans were called on in greater pro- 
portions than whites to serve. The 
U.S. government has insisted that 
this was not the case. 

But the survey suggests that 
blacks did more than their share of 
the fighting. Almost half the 
blacks. 30 of the 67 interviewed, fell 
into the heavy combat category, 


:rv lu i 

veterans interviewed said they 
in heavy combat. 

Possibly for that reason, more 
black veterans than white veterans 
said they encountered problems on 
their return to civilian life. 

About half of all Vietnam veter- 
ans interviewed fed that one result 
of the war has been to prevent the 
United States from becoming in- 


SAN DIEGO (AP) — Benjamin H. Sasway was ordered on Monday by 
a federal judge to begin saving a prison term of two and a half year for 
his 1982 conviction of failing to register with the Selective Service. - 
Mr. Sasway, 24, was the second man since the Vietnam War tu .. 
convicted for failure to register. Before p assing the sentence, Jiid£f 
Gordon Thompson told him, “I think you ought to know as a District 
Court judge, it's my duty to uphold the law, and it is your duty to obey the 
law.” Judge Thompson told Mr. Sasway that he not only had broken the 
were law, but that he had encouraged others to do so. 


Mr. Sasway's August 1 982 conviction and sentence were upheld Feb. 2, 
1 984. by the 9th U.5. Circuit Court of Appeals. The U.S. Supreme Court 


refused to hear the case on April 1. He served 40 days in the federal prison 
in San Diego after his conviction. 


Vietnam Calls Again for U.S. Ties 


BANGKOK (AP) — Le Duan, general secretary of the Vietnamese 

10 th 


_ f Communist Party, called a g ain Monday, in a speech marking the 
vqlvedjn subsequent major con- anniversary of (lie Communist victory m Vietnam, for normalized reia- 


flicts. But three in 10 think that 
Central America will be the next 
Vietnam. 

■ Stories Trigger Problems 

An increasing number of Viet- 
nam veterans are seeking treatment 
for psychological problems trig- 
gered by the Hood of news stories 
marking the 10th anniversary of 
the fall of Saigon, United Press 
International reported Monday 
from Washington. 

The newspaper and television re- 
ports are causing nightmares, flash- 
backs, anxiety and depression for 
many veterans, according to Ray- 
mond Scurfield, assistant director 
of the Veterans Administration's 
Readjustment Counseling Service. 

“We have a number of centers 
saying they are being flooded with 


tions with the United States. 

Speaking at a party meeting in Hanoi, Mr. Duan also suggested that 
Vietnam and its two Indochinese allies, Laos and Cambodia, re t 
“ closely bound” to the Soviet bloc. 


Agency and monitored in Bangkok, Mr. Duan said: “We extend to the 
progressive American people our friendly greetings. Our country is 
disposed to normalize relations with the United States in the interest of 
the two countries, and of peace and stability in Southeast Aria.” 
Washington has insisted that Vie tnam withdraw its troops from 
Cambodia as a precondition to nor malizing relations. 


For the Record 


The foreign ministers of Cuba and Vietnam held talks Monday in Hanoi 
aimed at promoting bilateral relations and cooperation on regional and 
international issues, the Vietnam news agency reported. (AP) 

President Chan Doo Hwan of South Korea returned home Monday 
after a four-day visit to the United States. (Reuters) 

Mozambican rebels have blown up a bridge near the South Africa-Mo- 
people," said Mr. Scurfield, whose zambique border, severing rail links with South Africa and cutting off 
office oversees 157 counseling din- vital coal supplies for Maputo’s only power station, the Mozambk 

news agency reported Monday. (Rem ' 


ics for Vietnam veterans. 

“We are not surprised at alL” he 
said. “It’s the whole issue of bring- 
ing to one’s attention a traumatic 
event they would like to forget. It’s 
hard to avoid when it’s right in your 
face every day.” 


Corrections 


Because of editing errors, an article on the British trade deficit in 
weekend editions contained erroneous figures. The merchandise trade 
deficit for March was actually £900 million ($ 1 .09 billion). The deficit on 
the current account was £456 milli on 


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themselves our allies. 

“No Israeli can be m different,” 
be added. 

But he said that in deciding to 
withdraw from the Awali River 
line, the government had been 
aware that there would be anarchy 
in the evacuated territory and that 
it would extend southward. 

He added that consistency was 
needed 

Mr. Arens, who is now a minis ter 
without portfolio, said that the 
withdrawal must be completed and 
that military action will be consid- 
ered only if there is a threat to the 
inhabitants of northern Israel. 


said stopping the food shipments 
from Sudan would result in more of 
their people starving and would in- 
crease the flow of refugees heading 
toward Sudan. 

Linder Major General Gaafar 
Nimeiri, deposed as president earli- 
er this month, Sudan welcomed ref- 
ugees from Ethiopia and other 
neighboring countries but also 
backed the cross-border feeding 
operations in order to reduce the 
flood of refugees. 

Last week it was learned that the 
ruling military council in effect had 
decided not to increase the cross- 
border feeding operations as had 


UPI Files Under Bankruptcy Code 


NEW YORK (NYT) — United Press International, the second-1 
news agency in the United States, has announced that it has fill 
application to be protected from creditors under Chapter 11 of the 
Federal Bankruptcy Code in order to gain “breathing space” while trying 
to reorganize its finances. 

The agency said papers to that effect were submitted Sunday to the 
U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Columbia. Their purpose was 
to prevent the creditors of the 7 8 -year-old news agency from seeking to 
collect on liabilities up to S45 million, UPI said. 

The agency said that amount was more than double its estimated assets 
of S20 million. According to its lawyers, the agency planned to ask the 
court Monday for permission to cover last week's pavcbecks for nearly 
2.000 employees. 


Ethiopia. 

Mr. Garang is dealing with them 
despite his repeated denials on his 
Ethiopian-based clandestine radio. 

Sudanese officials said indirect 
contacts existed with Mr. Garang 
even before General Nimeiri was 
overthrown on April 6. Now, they 
said, direct contacts are under way 
in Addis Ababa, Khartoum ana 
other capitals. They called them 
“very encouraging.'' 

If and when “Full, direct dia- 
logue” leads to negotiations, the 
officials added, those talks would 
be held in public and should lake 
no more than six weeks to com- 
plete. 

The officials sought to dispel in- 
creasing Western concern that im- 
proved relations with Libya and 
Ethiopia might be bought at the 
expense of loosraing ties with 
Egypt and the United States, which 
had very close links with General 
Nimeiri. 

“We made dear to the Libyans," 
the officials said, in commenting on 
the resumption or lies last week, 
that “normalizing relations does 
not adversely affect our relations 
either with the United States or 


(Continued from Page 1) 

national interests of the allies or to 
Mr. Reagan’s personality. 

Professor Hugh Brogan, a lectur- 
er on American history at the Uni- 
versity of Essex, offered a dear 


example of this. Speaking of Mr. 

aid: “He's regarded as 


Reagan, he said: 
a rather bad president, although 
reactions to him as a human being 
vary. Some think of him as an ami- 
able booby. 1 think his policies are 
exceedingly ill-advised, and his 
policies m Central America are 
very worrying indeed” 

But there were other, more favor- 
able, appraisals. Hans-Adolf Ja- 
cobsen, a professor of political sd- 
ence at Bonn University in West 
Germany, said that “since the new' 
term has begun there seems to be 
less cause for criticism from those 
who were more than- skeptical 
about Reagan at the beginning be- 
cause of his militant rhetoric and 


visibly great inexperience in the 
foreign policy field.” 

“On balance,” he said, "if you 
exdude those furthest to the left, he 
is being treated with more reserve. 
A trend to a more positive evalua- 
tion is noticeable, and his new tone 
and growing understanding” on 
East-West issues “has been regis- 
tered Skepticism remains that he 
seeks hard rather than soft solu- 
tions in the international area.” 


Summit Clash 
Seen on Push 
For Reform 







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hope all our friends will IT C Rarlm Kppna 
understand and appreciate our ex- ilitlilU IVtxps 

tremely delicate situation,” they 


added. 

■ Nimeiri to Be Tried 
General Nimeiri, in exile in 

Egypt, will be placed on trial, a 
member of Sudan's ruling council 
was reported as saying Monday, 
The Associated Press reported 
from B ahrain 

Brigadier Osman Abdullah Mo- 
hammed, appointed defense minis, 
ter after the coup, was quoted by 
the Abu Dhabi newspaper al-Itti- 
had as saying: “The trial of the 
deposed president is a popular de- 
mand and this demand will be met 
shortly.” 

He did not clarify whether Gen- 
eral Nimeiri would be tried in ab- 
sentia or whether bis extradition 
from Egypt would be demanded. 

■ Airlift Officials Face Trial 
General Abdul Rahman S wared - 

dahab, the Sudanese leader, said 
Monday that 


License Despite 
Racist Broadcasts 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Communications Commission has 
ruled that the broadcast of pro- 
grams advocating racial hatred and 
disregard for the government is not 
a ground for denying the renewal of 
a radio broadcast license. 


A West German poll, taken for a 
state television network, reported 
that opinion about Mr. Reagan was 
more favorable now than at the 
time of his last visit to Bonn in 
1982. A ranking of the main allied 
leaders by the polling group placed 
Mr. Reagan in third position be- 
hind President Francois Mitter- 
rand and Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 
but ahead of Prime Minister Mar- 
garet Thatcher. 

Thierry de MontbriaL director of 
the French Institute for Interna- 
tional Relations, said: "For the 
general public, the Reagan image is 
good, it's that of the resurrection of 
America. As far as the experts go, 
their attitude is rather different. 
They don’t understand how such 
an intellectually limited man can 
function as president The idea of 
the man who doesn't work much 
and doesn't know his dossiers pre- 
vails.” 


(Continued from Page l) 
Reagan is shaping up, since it is 
difficult to imagine the White 
House giving more on monetary 
reform than they have already.” 

A U.S. official said, “Mr. Mitter- 
rand and the European Communi- 
ty countries owe Mr. Reagan one 
— not the other way around.” 
Other European and U.S. diplo- 
matic officials said that senior 
West German officials, acting on 
behalf of Chancellor Helmut Kohl, 
who will be the host at the summit 
have been quietly urging France to 
moderate.iis position. 

Some of Mr. Mitterrand's advis- 
es also have reportedly cautioned 
him about pressing Mr. Reagan, 
citing the fact that France has tittle 
apparent support for major mone- 



Frangois Mitterrand 


lary reform among the key partici- 
pants — West Germany, Britain 


But in fact what European poti- 
?ublic about 


„ — bis government 
would try officials who took part in P etul S applicant 
the airlift of several thousand Ethi- footing. 


Jn rejecting petitions opposed to 
(he application of the radio station 
KTTL-FM in Dodge City, Kansas, 
the commission held 5-0 on Friday 
that such broadcasts fall within 
First Amendment guarantees of 
freedom of speech. 

But the commission, noting that 
a competing application for thefre- 
quency had been filed, ordered a 
comparative hearing, which puts 
the current licensee and the com- 
largdy on an 


lidans actually say in put 
Mr. Reagan enhances Mr. Rea- 
gan’s reputation. Mr. Mitterrand 
has called Mr. Reagan a patriot, a 
man he genuinely likes and with 
whom he feds comfortable, 


Mitterrand Plans 
To Stay Full Term 


opian Jews to Israel, United Press 
Internationa] reported from Am- 
man. 


“We have actually begun investi- 
gating the matter and will reveal to 


our people the results, and if the 
allegations are proven, we will put 
those concerned on trial,” General 
Swareddahab said in an interview 
with the Jordan Tunes newspaper. 

In the operation, carried out 
mainly in late 1984, several thou- 


Several commissioners con- 
demned the content of the broad- 
casts, after a commission official 
told them that in late 1983 and 
early 1984, the station aired more 
than 200 hours of sermons by two 
radio ministers, William P. Gale 
and James P. Wicksirom, in which 
they made “crude, derogatory and 
defamatory'' statements about 
blacks and Jews. They also at- 
tacked the 


Reuters 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand has moved to cut short 
speculation about his political fu- 
ture by saying that he will not re- 
sign if the conservative opposition 
next year's parliamentary 


and Japan. 

Mr. Mitterrand's main supporter 
will be his former finance minister, 
Jacques Delors, now president oi 
the European Commission, who is 
to attend the summit. The leaders 
of Italy and Canada will also be 
present. 

France may wind up being iso- 
lated if Mr. Mitterrand presses 
President Reagan oq monetary re- 
form, but Mr. Mitterrand can cer- 
tainly block the 1986 date,” said a 
U.S. official. He added, “You never 
know- what compromises might be 
worked out once the summit partic- 
ipants start talking” 

Last week, however, support for 
the French view surfaced in the 
United States when a group of 
Democratic senators and one Re- 
publican urged Mr. Reagan to 
strong dollar the primary 
topic of the summit. At the same 
“me, they warned the president 
jtgainsi pressing for new trade 


tory reform be organized in Paris . 
next year under the auspices of the* 
International Monetary Fund. 

Mr. Mitterrand has told viators 
recently that he also would like w 
see closer links established among . 
tile U.S. dollar, the Japanese yen 
and the European Currency Unit 
Hie goal, which he has expressed at 
previous summit meetings, is great* 
cr stability of world currencies lot 
industrialized and, particularly, (k 
veloping countries. 

A European Commission source, 
who declined to be Identified, said, 
What has been agreed to by the 
United States so far is not enough 
and some kind of new meeting uo* 
dcr the IMF is needed, either this 
autumn or next year " 

Replying to questions from Eu- 
ropean reporters in Washington 
last Thursday, including the Liofr* 
ation correspondent, Mr. Reagan 
said that a study on currency inter* '4 
vention, ordered at the 1983 sum-" 
nut in Williamsburg, is expected to 
be published in June. 

Mr. Reagan said that based on 
the reform measures that the study 


suggests, the U.S. government 

— determine if a conference is jitf d; 

During the television, interview. rS wfa at ** agenda wSl be. 


wins 

elections. - ---o *v»v*iaiuu. interview /•>-«. _ r ■ — — - 

Mr. Mitterrand, a Socialist ■ said he was disapl he sai * be did not want 

speaking in a television interview ^ *5?®*”** unwilling- -• lrt , 

on Sunday, said for the first time “ 1 ° COm ? ut h u»self furthers responding to - J 

that he would complete his seven- ^ UI be said that ? uestl 5 MI ' said he was not backing 


1988, 


several tnou- tacked the government, lawyers, 
S 1 ?! if!? ^ i“d»» and bureaucrats and en- 

brougnt out of Ethiopia to Israel cou raged disregard of the law, the 
through Sudan. commission official said. 


-year term, which ends in 
whatever happened. 

The increasing likelihood that 
led 


away from earlier statements abo*4. 


Reagan appeared more re- 

served in his approach than his own raform Treasury Seer St 

Wlute House advisers. H: tar y James A. Baker 3d, The P 1 ^ f. 

France and the European Com- be was not opposed to 


in the National Assembly elections edly said that monetan; 
has led to intense dehaie -iJLij “ moneta f 3 ' 


repeat- 

reform 


wh efl , w SfJS" "ummu withfe 

btlwes " “ ^ preidml a " d a Aides io Mr. Mitimad have 

suggested that a meeting on mone- 


According to a French text of the speech carried by the Vietnam News I? 

Mr. D 








rightist parliament. 


“asidering organizing a conf®'- 
ence on monetary reform later thfe. 
Kj 85 Mr. Baker had suggested," 
out he clearly indicated thathe 
not expect that the conference 
would be at the center of thesuh*>-_ i 
mi i discussions on ecoaomidisso®: 


..sate 




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Herald 


UNTERNATIONAL 



eribunc. 


PubUbed With The New York Tow* and The WariungHw Pont 


The Trials of Argentina 


Something remarkable is going on in Argen- 
tina. A democratic government is prosecuting 
the dictatorship it replaced for crimes commit- 
ted against the human rights of their people. 

In the early decades of this century Argenti- 
na was a prosperous, liberal democracy. But 
for most of the last 55 yean it has lived in the 
thrall of demagoguery, lawlessness and eco- 
nomic decline. President Raid Alfonsin seeks 
to put that past behind, not by denying or 
prettifying it but through a lawful process of 
acknowledgment and accountability. 

The trial, which may last as long as six 
months, will determine the guilt or innocence 
of nine generals and admirals who led military 
juntas from 1976 to 1982. But they do not 
stand in Lhe dock alone. The legal process 
recognizes that their reign of disappearances 
and torture was. in fact, welcomed by substan- 
tial portions of the population. The defense 
has summoned a host of civilian political lead- 
ers to try to prove that the juntas conducted a 
necessary war against subversion, a war law- 


fully declared by the previously elected gov- 
ernment of Isabel Peron. 

The prosecution will argue that terrorism 
can never be lawful, that murder, kidnapping 
and torture have no redeeming political pur- 
pose. The principle is similar to that invoked 
by Britain against the “political" troops of the 
Irish Republican Army, and by Italy against 
the Red Brigades. In a lawful society, any such 
crimes must be a matter of personal responsi- 
bility. There can be no ideological immunity. 

The defendants in Buenos Aires, however, 
are not members of some radical fringe but 
pillars of the military establishment And the 
trials come at a time when debt and inflation 
again threaten social order, and on the eve of a 
sharply contested midterm election. 

All this marks Mr. Alfonsin as uncommonly 
courageous. The same qualities that made him 
the upset victor in the race for president 18 
months ago will now be needed to sustain his 
government through the tensions ahead. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Keeping Out the Sugar . . . 


You may have heard that Japan excluded 
imports of American baseball bats on the 
pretext that Louisville Sluggers might violate 
Japanese “safety standards." But how about 
the customs officials who halted imports of 
frozen pizzas fearing someone would extract 
the tiny amount of sugar they contain and sell 
it cheap? Believe it or not, that horror story, 
reported by The Wall Street Journal is real, 
with a twist. The customs officials were not 
Japanese but American, and the pizzas were 
made in Israel How this happened says a lot 
about the Reagan administration's trade po- 
licy, none of it very nice. 

American sugar growers cannot ever com- 
pete with growers in poor tropical countries, 
even less so at the moment. In a more rational 
world American consumers would save about 

SI billion annuall y by purc hasin g all their 

sugar from the Caribbean; American sugar 
growers would switch to another crop. But that 
prospect has never pleased the Louisiana sugar 
lobby, or its friends in Washington. Import 
quotas and tariffs maintain the domestic price 
of raw sugar at 21 cents a pound (46 cents a 
kilogram), seven times the world price. 

That is a difference in price large enough to 
sail a freighter through. Access to cheap world 


sugar gives foreign manufacturers of sugary 
processed foods a big cost edge. So domestic 
sugar growers, fearful of losing business as 
foreign- processed foods increase their share of 
the American market, pressed the Reagan ad- 
ministration for even more protection. 

In January, the president responded with 
emergency quotas on imports of three customs 
categories, including a miscellaneous group 
called “edible preparations," As predicted, the 
executive order has reduced imports of can- 
dies, jams, glazes and packaged desserts. That 
will eventually be felt in higher prices for 
consumers and higher profits for domestic 
sugar growers. What is causing a special fuss is 
that the “edible preparations" category is so 
miscellaneous it indudes even kosher pizzas. 

Eventually, the Customs Service will no 
doubt figure out how to distinguish between 
chocolate-covered ants and powdered soup 
mix. But the bigger questions raised by the 
sugar fiasco will linger. If it makes sense to 
limit imports of steel why not refrigerators 
or ball point pens made of steel? If American 
interest groups can obtain such outrageous 
favors from Washington, how can we expect 
belter from Tokyo? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


. . . And the Farley Mowats 


They have done it again. Early last week, 
U.S. government officials, citing the 1952 
McCarran Act, refused to allow a visitor into 
the United States on political grounds. Usual- 
ly these decisions are made by the State De- 
partment, which has the power to deny visas to 
persons whose presence in the country is 
deemed “prgudicial to the public interest" or 
dangerous to the “welfare, safety or security of 
the United States." This time, because Canadi- 
ans do not need visas, it was the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service that stopped the 
wildlife writer Farley Mowat at the Toronto 
airport. By Friday, the prohibition was effec- 
tively lifted for Mr. Mowat, but the statute and 
policies implementing it remain unchanged. 

The McCarran Act was a piece of xenopho- 
bic legislation enacted in the early 1 950s whose 
guiding emotion was fear — fear that the 
wrong people would get into the United States 
and overwhelm or subvert it The act's provi- 
sions are regularly invoked to keep people out 
of the country who might say something the 
government is afraid to have Americans hear. 
The act gave broad powers to the bureaucracy 
to exclude would-be visitors. The statute re- 
flects a profound misunderstanding of Ameri- 
can free-speedi traditions and sadly underesti- 
mates the critical judgment of a free people. 

Farley Mowat is a Canadian who writes 
about the wilderness. His book “Never Cry 


WolT is a classic study of these predators and 
was made into a popular movie. His latest 
work is about wildlife on the seacoasts of the 
United States and Canada. He may have made 
comments about American military power and 
may have joined a committee in support of 
Fidel Castro’s Cuban government many years 
ago. So whal? Surely he does not belong on 
any list, bode or computer File of persons who 
pose a danger to the United States. 

How are these lists compiled? The State and 
Justice departments will not say, but once you 
are listed, you are there to slay, and you need a 
waiver from the attorney general every time 
you want to enter the country. The fact that 
Mr. Mowat was offered a waiver (which he 
refused) does not solve the general problem. 
Others are on those lists, some because of 
affiliations or activities decades ago. 

The law is preposterous and outmoded. A 
country as strong, stable and free as the United 
States can hear Mr. Mowat, Nicaraguan cabi- 
net members (Cultural Affairs Minister Er- 
nesto Cardenal has just been offered a waiver), 
Chinese parly leaders, the Reverend Ian Pais- 
ley and even Mikhail Gorbachev without fall- 
ing under their spell. Representative Barney 
Frank, a Massachusetts Democrat, is planning 
to introduce legislation to change this law, and 
his effort deserves support. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Less Leverage on Nicaragua 

No money for the “contras" means less 
American influence. Within the contra move- 
menu this could mean that the former support- 
ers of President (Anastasia] Somoza will be 
strengthened at the expense ol the democrats. 
And the Americans’ leverage on the Nicara- 
guan government — the worry that if it tight- 
ened the screw, American backing for the 
contras would increase — has been removed. 

In Lhe longer run, American de tachme nt 
might even spread the war in Central America. 
If the contras' challenge grows, the United 


Slates will have no power to guide them to- 
ward a negotiated settlement. If the contras 
wither, the Sandinists will be freer to resume 
their help to rebels in H Salvador, Honduras 
and Costa Rica. That would increase the dan- 
ger of a regional war, which could take on the 
character of a struggle to decide whether the 
territory between Mexico and Venezuela was 
to be Marxist or democratic. Since the United 
States would not find it easy to stay out of such 
a war. the vote [on April 23] may have made 
the loss of American lives on Central Ameri- 
can soil more, not less, likely. 

— The Economist (London). 


FROM OUR APRIL 30 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: U.S. Marines Leave Nicaragua 
NEW YORK — Relief is expressed that con- 
ditions in Nicaragua do not require further 
American intervention. The New York Sun 
says: “This country is to be congratulated on 
an escape from an intervention in Nicaraguan 
affairs that for several weeks seemed almost 
inevitable. The United States has, however, a 
duty to perform in that region, a duty that 
embraces not only Nicaragua, but its neigh- 
bors as weH Whatever it can wisely and prop- 
erly do for the restoration of peace and for the 
resumption of commerce should be done." The 
Boston Herald adds; "The American marines 
are being withdrawn from Nicaragua. Dr. Jose 
Madriz is President, General Estrada is defeat- 
ed, the revolution is practically at an end. 
There is no longer any reason for the presence 
of American marines in that quarter." 


1935: U-S. Solves Mexico Silver Crisis 
WASHINGTON — Mexico's monetary prob- 
lems have not only been solved, but the out- 
look for the country is even bet to 1 than before, 
Roberto Lopez, Assistant Secretary of the 
Mexican Treasury, declared [on April 29J fol- 
lowing a conference with Secretary of the 
Treasury Henry Morgen thau Jr., which was 
the result of the Administration’s recent in- 
crease in the price of silver. The Mexican 
official, whose country is one of the great stiver 
producing countries and which has been 
forced to call in all silver coins as the result of 
the American policy, emerged from the meet- 
ing in an optimistic frame of mind. By calling 
in all silver coins and issuing token' money, 
Mexico’s wealth is materially increased, as 
silver may be disposed of as a commodity to 
the United States at higher prices. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chmrttum [958-19&2 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M.FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEEW. HUEBNER, PvbhAcr 

Executive Editor RENE BOND Y Dam Pubbsfa 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Assadate Piddah 

Deputy Editor RIC HARD H. MORGAN Associate Publish 

Deputy Mior STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director of Opera/** 

Associate Editor FRANOJIS DESMAISONS Dinaor of Qmdaik 

ROLF D. KRANEFUHL Director of AdienamgSal 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Oiarlcs-dc-Ganlk. 92200 NemUysur-Srine, 

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® r&SL International Herald Tribune. AO rights reserved 



TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


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The Storm in France 
Over Voting Refor 


y 1 


By Flora Lewis 


P 


But the moment of truth is 


, AR1S — The French Assembly, stamp ^ 
where Socialists have an absolute nearing. And President Francois Mit- 
majority thanks to the old election terrand’s attempt to avert it is the 
law of one representative per district, reason for the eta 



proportional representation 
of the administrative departments. 


reason for the electoral reform. 

He am! his Socialist Party have lost 
support- They do not have a hope of - 
holding their majority, or even d - 
rebudding a majority with their erst-/ 


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of the administrative departments. repuuamg a uwjumj uitu am 
This will bring a profound change . while Co mmunis t Party coalition 
in the French political scene, not easi- partners, now on a historic course of 


'War Guilt 9 : How Much Is Enough? 


B OSTON — I was 5 years old in 
1969 when my mother took me 
and my sister to Germany. We were 


By June Tierney 


Americans, and our only connection 
to tie place was my grandfather, an 
Arizonan who worked for Radio Free 
Europe in Munich. We ended up 
staying 11 years. I went to German 
schools, made many friends and 
learned something about how young 
Germans think Of war and guilt. 

For their sake, I am dad President 
Reagan is going to the Bitbuig ceme- 


tery. It is an important gesture to my 


young German classmates. I feel 
owe it to them to cell the world how 
their heads would bow in shame at 
the mention of Hitler, and to describe 
the courage with which they accept 
the responsibility for crimes they did 
not commit. 

Their sense of remorse surpasses 
anything I have seen displayed by my 
American peers when they are re- 
minded of our nation’s sins: the Indi- 
ans massacred in the name of mani- 
fest destiny; the blacks enslaved to 
pick cotton; the Japanese-Americaas 
interned in World war n. 

We Americans appear to have for- 
gotten that we are allied with a new 
generation of Germans — Germans 
who have undergone 40 years of pen- 
ance and are now in need of a signal 
that their nation's crimes, while they 
will never be forgotten, will not be 
held against them. 

The name Hitler meant nothing to 
me when I arrived in West Germany. 
But once I had heard about him and 
the war he started and the millions he 
killed, I wanted to know more. By the 
time 1 entered second grade in a Ger- 
man school, I had learned that my 
playmates were not the people to ask 
about him. Hitler's name was more 
offensive to them than any dirty 
word. They would shrug at my ques- 
tions and kick a hole in the ground 
until I changed the subject 

After World War II, West Ger- 
mans accepted the blame. They de- 
cided that the best way to come to 
terms with their past was to pass on 
to the next generation a legacy of 
guilt. The concentration camps have 
been preserved because they are con- 
sidered the supreme, irrefutable 
proof of German war guilt — Krie- 
gesschuld. Each year, German educa- 
tors send as many children as they 
can on field trips to the death camps. 
Participation is mandatory. 

Sometimes our teachers would 
start discussions in class about World 
War II. The talks always ended with a 
reminder that Germany alone was to 
blame for the war. My classmates 
would bow their beads and stare at 


their desks, while I would lode 
around, unable to identify with their 
guilt, but aware that an oppressive 
mood bad settled over the classroom. 

Are the West Germans making a 
mistake in imposing the Krieges- 
scbuld on each new generation? Some 
say it is necessary for a country to be 
acutely aware of its past. But others 
say it is a mistake — and perhaps 
politically dangerous — to make each 
generation responsible for the crimes 
of its predecessors. 

Win young Germans go on feeling 
lty? Or will they, at some point, 
I it more than they can handle and 
seek a release in nationalism? 

Last summer I returned to Munich 
and had a conversation that left me 
wondering whether perhaps Krie- 
gesschuld is pushing young Germans 
into a “whiplash” of nationalism. 
The conversation was held over tea 
with my ninth-grade biology teacher. 


She listened to me complain about 
Ronald Reagan’s flag-waving cam- 
paign. “It kills me to see how Ameri- 
cans are so tickled with his flag pro- 

T inda,” I said. 

wasn’t looking at her when she 
answered. Touching my arm lightly, 
she said, “I wish that you would in- 
fect our kids with some of that 
‘flagomania.’ " 

Exasperated. I blurted out, “Bui 
isn't this what you wanted — a new 
Germany of citizens who are so 
ashamed of their past that they vow 
to kill themselves before they let it 
happen again? 1 ' 

She pressed my arm urgently. She 
bowed her head and whispered. “Oh 
yes. They’ve turned out the way we 
wanted them to. The problem is, 
we've been too successful The guht 
— it's more than they can bear. And 
you know, it’s not really theirs.” 


ly foreseeable. It has been called 
Fi/th-bis, because it will still be the 
Fifth Republic established by 
Charles de Gaulle but it wall not be at 
all the same. Governments will have 
to be built on coalitions. The multi- 
plicity of parties and their maneu- 
vers. which sank the Fourth Repub- 
lic, will be crucial again. 

Nothing the Socialist government 
has done so far is likely to have such 
an enduring effect. French foreign 
policy, including relations with allies, 
is not at issue now. But chances are 
that clear tines will grow blurred in 
domestic political rivalries. 

The trouble stems from a flaw in 
the French Constitution, which gave 
the country a hybrid of the tradiuon- 


dedine. Mr. Mitterrand’s term lasts 
until 1988, however. So the big ques- 
tion is bow he can manage to govern 
after the 1986 elections. Nothing in 
the constitution would oblige him to 
resign, and even old-time GauQists 
who cannot stand him dislike the idea 


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Under the new system* 
governments are likely 
to grow weaker. 





al parliamentary system and the U.S. 
system of a directly elected president 


of forcing a president out. It would 
undermine the Gaullist concept of 
personal authority at the helm. 

resentation, the methekfof dectionm 


Ip;. 


The writer, a student at Boston Uni- 
versity. contributed this comment to 
The Washington Pose 


who is also chief executive. 

The French president has vast 
powers, greater than the American 
president because he can dissolve the 
Assembly at will forcing deputies to 
face new elections. He names the 
prime minister. But if his choice and 
bis policies cannot command a legis- 
lative majority, it is a deadlock. There 
is no rule for a veto, or a way to 
override one, no clear definition of 
the relation between legislative and 
executive power. 

The critical test has never come 
since the start of the Fifth Republic 
in 1958. The president has always 
managed to command the parlia- 
ment. usually forcing it to be a rubber 


the Fourth Republic, was always in 
list pla ‘ 


the Socialist platform. But now Mr. 
Mitterrand sees it as an immediate 
necessity, since it is likely to prever ~ 
switch to an overwhelming ma/or&fr. 
for the opposition. ThcEfrfec Pa Jaw 
hopes that the reform will produce 


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the opening for a compromise left- 
trist coali ' 


40 Years’ Worth of Accomplishments 


w something else to remember on 
the 40th anniversary of the end of the 
last world war: not only the dead but 
the living, not only the disasters of 
the past but the achievements of 
these last 40 years. 

The ancient enmity between Ger- 
many and France has been com- 
posed. Nationalism is still a domi- 
nant force, but Western Europe is not 
thinking about the cemeteries of the 
past: ft is struggling ever so slowly 
toward economic and occasionally 


By James Res ton 


Washington took more commitments 
to fight for the freedom and indepen- 
dence of more nations than the Brit- 


ish or French ever did in their long 
imperial histories. This was done 
with the approval of both political 
parties under both Democratic and 
Republican presidents. 

The United States could not refuse 
to recognize that the Russians lost 


political unity. 

The record of America in dealing 


more than 20 million people in the 
last world war and therefore were 


with the tragedy of the two world 
wars of this century is mixed. A case 
could be made that if the United 
Slates 7 had committed itself in ad- 
vance -to fight for the defense of 
Western civilization, and armed itself 
to do so, it might have avoided both 
the First and the Second World 
Wars: but this it did not do. and the 
American people did not want it to. 

Since then, the United States has 
learned two lessons: First, it could 
not stand aside but had to make clear 
in advance that any threat to the 
major free nations of "the world would 
be resisted by the militaiy power of 
the United States; and second, that it 
had to have the military power to 
make that warning credible. 

After the Second World War, 


entitled to defend their borders. At 
Yalta, President Roosevelt agreed to 
their protection, provided they al- 
lowed the Poles and others in Eastern 
Europe a free choice over their own 
affairs: but in the end, this is precise- 
ly what Moscow rejected. 

In fairness to Washington, the 
United States invited the Soviet 
Union to help in rebuilding Europe 
under the Marshall Plan. This offer 
the Russians rejected 

Also, Washington proposed the in- 
ternational control even the aboli- 
tion of atomic weapons, under the 
Baruch Plan, the Ubenthal Plan and 
the Acheson Plan, but again Moscow 
refused, believing this was a trick. 

There was then, as there is now, a 
crisis of confidence between the nu- 
clear powers; and the two have dif- 


fered on the control of nuclear arms 
on Earth and now in space. 

Despite his recent blunders, Presi- 
dent Reagan is in a strong position. 
Never have the victors in war been 
more generous to the vanquished 
than the United States was to the 
Germans and the Japanese, now its 
allies and competitors. 

If, 40 years ago, those of us who 
went through the Blitz in London had 
wondered about the tangles of world 
politics today, my guess is that we 
would have thought they would be 
tenible but manageable, and would 
have been reasonably optimistic. 

After all when the Europeans were 


centrist coalition. 

Details of the new system avoid the 
worst defects of proportional repre- 
sentation, which lends to fragment 
the political spectrum and make gov- 
ernment unstable. Major parties will 
benefit. Smaller ones, now including 
the Communists, are likely to do even 
less well than under the existing sys- 
tem with its provision for second- 
round runoffs, which encourages 
trades with allies. 

But the question of presidential- 
parliamentary relations is made 
trickier than ever. The French have 
come to call it “cohabitation." 

Former Prime Minister Raymond v' 


i .. 

1 **- 




Barre, who does not have a party of 
with Mr. 


his own to offer for a deal with 
Mitterrand, denounces “cohabita- 
tion" and any idea of a coalition with 
the Socialists. 

Another former prime minister, 
Mayor Jacques Chirac of Paris, who 
beads the neo-Gaullists, says parlia- 
mentary winners should move into 
the house of power and govern, leav- 
ing the president to accommodate his 
antagonistic lodgers. Former Presi- 
dent Valery Giscard d'Estaing waf- 
fles, though he has made a deal to 
combine his support with Mr. Chir- 


i . 

I 


.W.I 


Among ths ::■« 
a little gem # 


in charge of world politics they stunt- 
ed into two world wars in 20 years, 
giants in Moscow 



bled 

yet the stumbling _ 
and Washington have avoided anoth- 
er world war for two generations. 

In short, the sacrifices of lhe dead 
in these two world wars have not, 
when you look at Europe, been a total 
waste. It is not the Europe of lhe 
dreams of Jean Monnet, or the world 
of Woodrow Wilson with his dreams 


of the League of Nations to end all 
wars, or of Pa 


Paul Valery, with his hope 
of not only a League of Nations but a 
League of Minds. But the dream goes 
on. and after 40 years it seems more 
reasonable even now than it was at 
the end of the last world war. 

The New York Times 


_ for 

position in the 1988 presidential ejec- 
tions. Personal rivalries and ambi- w 
lions dominate the play, behind * 
high-sounding rhetoric about the fatfc •* 
of the Republic and whether or not 
Socialist policies should be quickly 
dumped But there is a real tu 
point comjrng for France that 
transform its institutions. 

Governments are likely to grow 
weaker. Some Frenchmen welcome 
relief from the right-left polarization 
that the current system produced. 
There is little chance of reinforcing 
the center, however, and more risk of 
steamy paralysis. From afar, France 
seems to be trudging on calmly. The 
storms are gathering. 

The New York Times. 


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Lite 




Central Issues for Losers 
In Life’s Uneven Lottery 


By George F. Will 


W ASHINGTON — In 1972, 
Jonathan Will, with a nice 
sense of family tradition, was bom 
on May 4, his father’s birthday. So 
in a few days he will attain the 
status of teen-ager, wiih all the 
prerogatives pertaining thereto. A 
wit has written that adolescence 
was first considered a phase, then a 
profession and now is a national- 
ity. Jon’s acquisition of citizenship 
in that nation comes on the heels of 
a ruckus about people like him. 

He has Down’s syndrome, a ge- 
netic defect involving varying de- 
grees of mental retardation and, 
sometimes, physical defects. When 
be was born we ware bombarded 
with advice, some good, some bad. 

It is said we are all born brave, 
trusting and greedy, and re main 
greedy. 1 am pleased that Jon has 
been like that — like the rest of us, 
because it was depressing to be 
told, repeatedly, that children with 
Down's syndrome "are such happy 
children. That implied subhuman 
simplicity, mindless cheerfulness. 

Jon, like the rest of us, is not 
always nice or happy. Indeed, he 
has the special unhappiness of hav- 
ing more complicated feelings than 
he has the capacity to express. He 
certainly has enough problems 
without being badgered by bureau- 
crats telling him to quit avoiding 
the central issues of his life. 

Recently two officials of the 
U-S. Department of Education re- 
signed after stirring a storm with 


interesting metaphysial and polit- 
ical thoughts. One official was a 


woman who said in 19S3 that a 
“key reason" for declining aca- 
demic achievements was that the 
government had been catering to 
groups such as the handicapped 
“at the expense of those who have 
the highest potential to contribute 
positively to society.” I wrote then 
that this was a frivolous analysis 
and a dangerous subordination of 
Individual rights to calculations 
of social utility. 

She wrote a response, now circu- 
lating, in which she said: “They 
[the handicapped] falsely assume 
that the lottery of life has penalized 


them at random. This is not so. 
Nothing comes to an individual 
that he Has not, at same point in his 
development, summoned. Each of 
us is responsible for his life situa- 
tion." And, “There is no injustice 
in the universe. As unfair as it may 
seem, a person's external circum- 
stances do fit his level of inner 
spiritual development. . . . Those of 
the handicapped constituency who 
seek to have others bear their bur- 
dens and eliminate their challenges 
are seeking to avoid the central 
issues of their lives.” 

Jon avoids making his bed, but is 
hot to confront central issues of his 
life, such as why the Baltimore Ori- 
oles start slowly. His father is try- 
ing to fathom how Joo “sum- 
moned” chromosomal problems. 

The woman has resigned, as has 
another Education Department of- 
ficial who favors repeal of, among 
other things. PL 94-14Z That law 
guarantees handicapped children a 
Free, appropriate public education. 
To millions of handicapped per- 
sons and their parents, it is as im- 
portant, substantively mid symbol- 
ically. as the Voting Rights Act is 
to blacks. The official who advo- 
cated repeal was betraying a presi- 
dent who supports it. 

The two resignations detonated 
the Wall Street Journal’s editorial- 
ists. The Journal said the two offi- 
cials were victims of “the usual 
crazed antibodies” in Washington, 
engaged in a “feeding frenzy” to 
destroy Ronald Reagan ana red- 
blooded conservatism. 

The strain of manning the ram- 
parts of rittht-wing purity may be 
getting to the Journal 

Mr. Reagan opposes weakening 
PL 94-141 He has enough prob- 
lems without being saddled with 
supporters who define conserva- 
tism in terms of dismantling such 
protections and who associate con- 
servatism with crackpot metaphys- 
ics about the perfect justice of the 
universe. If the Journal can believe 
that America does or should want 
such conservatism, then the Jour- 
nal can believe anything. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


The 'Paranoid Style’ in U.S. Politics 


N EW YORK — A few days be- 
fore the vote in Congress on 


By Aryeh Neier 


uX 


President Reagan's plan to aid the 
Nicaraguan rebels, I i 


, . testified al a 

congressional hearing on their hu- 
man rights practices. It was an ugly 
occasion, perhaps the ugliest of the 
scons of such hearings I have wit- 
nessed. It seemed to me to say some- 
thing about the political climate to- 


day and, more troubling, about the 
ature of American public life. 

Most members of Congress pre- 


nature of American pub 

. of c w ... . 

sent seemed intent above all on dis- 
crediting the witnesses. At one low 
point, two Congressmen tried to im- 
pugn the testimony of a distinguished 
lawyer by Unking his wife’s step- 
brother to the Sandinists. What the 
witness had to say was disregarded. 

The hearing struck me as emblem- 
atic of much of the debate on the 
rebels, or “contras." No doubt, the 
president’s overheated rhetoric about 
the Sandinists was a factor in poison- 
ing the political atmosphere. Yet it 
does not seem fair to place all the 
blame on him. The debate also seems 
to reflect what the historian Richard 
Hofstadter described more than two 
decades ago as “the paranoid style in 
American politics." 


As Mr. Hofstadter pointed out, the 
practitioners of the paranoid style 
perceive the enemy as “totally evil 
and totally unappeasable.” In this 
vein, the Sandinists have been por- 
trayed as trying to subvert neighbor- 
ing countries, preparing to wage war 
against the United Slates, practicing 
genocide against their Indian minor- 
ity and transforming their own coun- 
try into a “totalitarian dungeon." 
They are also charged with being 
anti-Semitic and anti-pope, driving 
hordes of “feet people^over the bor- 
ders of the United Stales and even 
trafficking in drugs. 

Not that all these things are entire- 
ly invented. “What distinguishes the 
paranoid style," according to Mr. 
Hofstadter, “is not the absence of 
verifiable facts (though it is true that 
in his extravagant passion for facts 
the paranoid occasionally manufac- 
tures them), but rather the curious 
leap in imagination that is always 
made at some critical point . . . from 
the undeniable to the unbelievable.” 

Mr. Hofstadter noted that a recur- 
ring aspect of the paranoid style is the 


significance that is attached to _ 
renegade from the enemy cause. Cei 1 
tainly, Nicaraguan renegades have 
recently become celebrated figures in 
the United States, even though ah we 
generally know about them is that, al 
some point, they exhibited bad judg- 
ment, either when they were allied 
with the Sandinists or when they 
broke with them. Also, Mr. Hof- 
stadter wrote, paranoid movements 
have “a magnetic attraction for demi- 
inrelfeetuais" of a pedantic bent 
whose view of events “is far more 
coherent than the real world, since it 
leaves no room for mistakes, failures 
or ambiguities." The participants in 
the debate about the Sandinists in- 
clude more than one person who 
would fit that description. 

The paranoid, Mr. Hofstadt* - 
wrote, “constantly lives al a turning 
point: 1 1 is now or never in organizing 
resistance to conspiracy." That sense 
of urgency is difficult to match, 






which may be why the paranoid style 
so often prevails in U.S. politics. 


The writer is vice chairman of Amer- 
icas Watch, a human rights organisa- 
tion. He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


Hie Jewish Cemeteries 

Last summer when 1 visited a town 
in West Germany — Niederzissen, 
near Remagen, in the region of Ko- 
blenz — from which my great-grand- 
father come to America, my German 
relatives showed me the Jewish ceme- 
tery there. Vandalized and desecrated 
during the Nazi period, it was partial- 
ly restored after the war and a plaque 
was erected to commemorate the Ho- 
locaust victims. 

However, with great distress my 
relatives told me that someone 
apparently with the complicity of the 
local government — was about to 
build a house illegally on half the 
cemetery's property, blocking the 
view of the gravestones and destroy- 
ing the great natural beauty and sa- 
cred character of the rite. 

Jewish friends have told me of the 
lamentable condition of many Jewish 
cemeteries they have visited in Ger- 
many, sometimes those where their 
ancestors were buried.* Perhaps a part 
of President Reagan’s visit to West 
Germany could he a pledge for great- 
er respect for these graves ~ at least 
to prevent illegal expropriation and 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Turner, Not Trudeau 


further deterioration and obliteration 
through neglect. 

The memory of these dead who 
contributed so much to the economic, 
cultural religious and humanitarian 
life of prewar Germany, but yet suf- 
fered so much there, deserves the 
continued attention of both Germans 
and Americans. 

FREDERICK E. BRENK. 

Rome. 

Poor but Equal 

Regarding the analysis “ Vietnam 
Economy Remains in Shambles " 
(April 24) by William Branigin: 


Regarding "Democrats Must Make 
Economic Sense ” (April 8): 

Canada did not defeat Pierre H- 
ro Tru deau in the federal election 
of September 1984. Mr. Trudeau had . 
by then retired as prime minister to * 
graze among the greener pastures u' “ 
the private sector. Canada did defeat 
John Turner, giving Brian Mulroney 
a go at undoing a decade and a half of 
liberal mismanagement. 

JOSEF A. SINKO. 

Belgrade. 




the says 


Here poverty is well distributed,” A I . 

s Vietnam’s foreign ministerTin A Hate 


what must surely rank as one of the 
most asioundingly fatuous public ut- 
terances of all time. “So once the 
poverty is well distributed, there is no 
social injustice." Indeed. 

Churchill, as usual put it 


Jar** "Princess Mi 

Ttyritny* Faiher Sened in the ss " 


when he said; “The vice oT^piiS N f*’ ^ 

is its unequal distribution of pleasure, ludicrS^nS" u of !* al ? ? 

* * Ess 

JACK JOL1S. ^ ,n his rise [o power. ^ 

susan palmer. - 


The search Tor Nazis who evaded S 
punishment hopefully will help brim. - . 
justice, but to hound the Nazis’ chil- 


— — M W| oukiuusi 

equal distribution of misery.’ 


Antwerp- Bd 




••• 


lWu*S. Pilots Association 
*ts Moving to Organize 
Air Traffic Controllers 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1983 


Pag* 


Uvi* 

k. 


0 


it, i L-' " f Or t If, 3* 

hs i; s By Richard Witkin 

:r, . “.“'-'r. 'p,^ ,Vm' York Timet Service 

:Q' a %r- NEW YORK — Leaders or the 
:?.zr. a !JV r Line Pilots Association, which 

; :•■ t,- ■' ! 2 . ■;{ used to honor picket lines when 

?■_ r ~ r n .^a 'jjfir traffic controllers struck aiegal- 
: M- four years ago. are now moving 

’■ ■ r , ^ > organize controllers into an affil- 

' ^ f iled union. 

'IF 


approve,” said Henry A. Duffy, the 
union president 

The drive, if successful raises the 
prospect that a potent labor organi- 
zation would confront the Federal 
Aviation Administration, which 
operates the nationwide air traffic 
control system. 

In 1981 , the strike by the Profes- 
sional Air Traffic Controllers Or- 




U.S. Educators Predict a Critical Teacher Shortage 




>r the pilots’ union next month. 
ivr fa “We would not be going this far 

n ■ we were not convinced that we 

-an organize the controllers and 
T r , not believe the council would 

“y : 


■ niff 




Its 


Youths Attack? 
Rob Marchers 
In New York 

~ Nw York Times Scnce 

• :.,T- V' ; N EW YORK — A fund-rais- 

.«.? ing"waIkathon”for the March 
■ r: . . .. ' r T of Dimes ended in turmoil Sun- 
:: ---.' .day as groups of youths at- 
:'•••• lacked marchers in and around 

• - • il; - .r " " * Central Park and snatched neck 

: - ’ chains, purses and other prop- 

: erl . v - 

'• Seven people were injured 

- and 17 youths were arrested 

.7 during the march, police said. 

iV They said 52 cases of robbery 
and ihert were reported, 41 of 

• . them in the park as 26,000 

. : :: y marchers ended an 18- mile (29- 
- •: kilometer) hike that raised hun- 

- 4.". ; ‘ dreds of thousands of dollars 

- for the charity. 

; The violence recalled the an- 

"rV archy that followed a concert 
- 1 . 'i by the singer Diana Ross in 
^ T: ‘j- Central Park on July 23, 1983, 

• • : c ?, when 80 people were arrested 

V f ’. and 1 7 1 people filed complaints 
v' of beatings, robberies ant 
" attacks. 


Donald D. Engen 

interview. “You can’t turn things 
around in six months" or eighteen 
months. I t’s a long-haul problem." 

The aviation agency has put into 
effect many new measures it said 
could mean less congestion and an 
easier workload for controllers (his 
summer, despite a predicted 10- 
percent increase in traffic. 

The American Federation of 
Government Employees, which has 
250.000 U.S. workers on its roils, 
has filed petitions with sufficient 
controller signatures requesting 
bargaining elections in two of the 
aviation agency's nine regions. 

They are the Northeast region, 
centered in Boston, and the Eastern 
region, in New York. Bui the pilots’ 
leaders, representing 34,000 pilots 
aciiities °f 48 airlines, said they believed the 

The latest survey to be made had 

public was conducted in June at the S .1 

FAA’s behest by three outside ex- ' , Complicalmg th e thr eatened 

pens. It found working conditions ^ F S tabAla- 


strikes by government employees. 

The organizing effort threatens 
to touch off a bitter battle with the 
American Federation of Govern- 
ment Employees, which has been 
working for months to form a new 
union to replace the one that was 
stripped of jts bargaining rights for 
calling the strike. 

It could also have an effect on 
the shape of the 510-billion pro- 
gram to improve the air traffic con- 
trol system over the next 15 years. 

Industry officials have expected 
the controllers would sooner or lat- 
er vote to unio nize . Union officials 
said ihe lime now appears to be 
ripe for successful organizing 
drives because of evidence of un- 
happy labor relations in many con- 
trol facilitic 


By Keith B. Rich burg 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON —The United 
States faces a critical shortage of 
elementary and high school teach- 
ers over the next 10 years, educa- 
tors predict, with an estimated one 
million new teachers needed by 
1990. 

Hie problem could reach crisis 
proportions, education analysts 
and teachers' union officials say. 
They said fewer college graduates 
are becoming teachers, elementary 
school enrollments are expected to 
increase, much of the existing 
teaching force is nearing retirement 
age and younger teachers are de- 
fecting to more lucractive fields. 

Some school districts have al- 
ready begun hiring classroom in- 
structors without traditional leach- 
ing qualifications. The Los Angeles 
Unified School District, For exam- 
ple, hired 167 “teacher-trainees" — 
college graduates with no teacher 
training — to meet their need for 
instructors last fall. 

Education experts blame the im- 
pending crisis on demographic fac- 
tors and changes in the labor mar- 
ket over the last two decades. 
Children born in the 1970s during a 
small baby boom are entering 
school while teachers of the post- 
World War II generation, many of 
whom went to college on the GI 
Bill of Rights, are in their fifties 
and nearing retirement 

Increased job opportunities for 


women and blacks have deprived 
the teaching field of its most de- 
pendable pool of recruits. 

The teaching field is also plagued 
by large-scale defections by youn- 
ger instructors, according to stud- 


ies by the Rand Corp. and. the 
American Enterprise Institute. 

By most estimates, up to half of 
new teachers leave their jobs within 
five to seven years, usually express- 
ing dissatisfaction. Even more dis- 


couraging to educators is the exo- 
dus of the most qualified teachers, 
those with the best test scores and 
school performance. 

The pending crisis, coupled with 
a push for reform, has forced many 


Bmshmg Up Your Ga orDinka 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — In the name of national 
security, economic well-being and the advance- 
ment of scientific inquiry, the United Slates may 
be in the market for bright young men and women 
with a passion for learning D inka. 

And Ga and Pashto. 

These languages are among the 169 included on 
a proposed list of languages that the U.S. govern- 
ment considers “critical" The list was compiled by 
the Education Department after receiving sugges- 
tions from the State, Defense and Health and 
Human Services departments, as well as the Na- 
tional Science Foundation. 

It is an outgrowth of legislation passed last year 
that provides about $145 million to help students 
who want to study a “critical language" 

The proposed list includes some stalwarts, such 
as French. Spanish, German and Italian, as well as 
Russian. Arabic, Hindi Japanese and Chinese. 

Other languages reflect national security con- 
cerns. Afrikaans, for example, is the language of 
white South Africans of Dutch descent, while 
Pashto is spoken near the Afghan-Pakistani bor- 
der. 

Then there are Ewe- Fort, a member of the large 
family of Sudanese languages; Yoruba, spoken by 
about 3 J million people in southwestern Nigeria; 


Dinka. spoken in Sudan and the Upper Nile re- 
gion: and Tamil Telugu and Mahvalam, which 
together are spoken by about 80 million people in 
southern India and Sri Lanka. 

According to the Education Department, lan- 
guages were included on the list after considering 
“the national security interest in diplomatic and 
military situations, or strategic geographic loca- 
tions; ihe economic security interest of the United 
States in our economic ties with other nations; and 
scientific Inquiry and research which have signifi- 
cant worldwide or regional importance." 

The Education Department spends $32 million 
a year to help fund 93 national resource and area 
study centers, most of them on college campuses,' 
where students have been studying about 150 of 
the languages on the list 

The proposed list is expected to be whittled 
down in the next two months to a working list of a 
dozen or so very critical foreign tongues, officials 
said. 

That these languages are obscure to most Ameri- 
cans is evidence of what linguists call their “lan- 
guage illiteracy.” 

The general inability of Americans to speak 
anything but English with fluency, they say, only 
serves to limit their involvement and exchanges 
with other countries and lifestyles. 


states to pursue often contradictory 
policies, known in the education 
field as “screens and magnets." 

“Screens” are policies aimed at 
“screening out" poor teachers. 
These include teacher-competency 
tests; stiffer professional require- 
ments, such as prescribing certain 
college courses, and efforts to raise 
entrance and exit requirements at 
schools of education, last year, 30 
states had some form of teacher- 
competency tests and a dozen more 
were considering them. 

“Magnets" are policies to attract 
people to teaching. They include 
pay raises, forgivable loans and 
scholarships for students who want 
to study teaching and proposals to 
use untrained college graduates to 
meet teacher shortages. Michael 
Kirst, a former president of the 
California State Board of Educa- 
tion and a Stanford University pro- 
fessor, said: “State policies are 
gradually changing from screens to 
magnets. Stales are throwing out 
all sorts of magnets to see which 
ones work." 

Educators said the “great un- 
known" is the “reserve army ,’’ the 
thousands of people with teacher 
training who have left the profes- 
sion. many of them women who left 
after marriage. 

“Will they come back?" Profes- 
sor Kiret asked. “If so. under what 
conditions? There are just a lot of 
people out there who. on paper, are 
qualified to teach." 


perts. It found working condi dons 
to be generally “as bad, or perhaps 
a bit worse," inan those that existed 
before the strike. The survey also 
raised a disturbing safety issue by 
concluding that the new controller 
force, like the old one, felt over- 
worked and believed that air traffic 
at times was “exceeding the capaci- 
ty of the human-technical system." 

The bead of the aviation agency. 
Donald D. Engen, stresses that the 
survey is 10 months old and insists 
that “progress is being made each 
passing week" both in traffic han- 
dling and in improving working 
conditions. 

“I don't want to say everything is 
sweetness and light," be said in an 


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lions Authority will uphold the de- 
cision of a regional director that the 
controllers may vote to form bar- 
gaining units region by region rath- 
er than having to form a single 
national bargaining unit 

The other issue is bow the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor and the 
Congress of Industrial Organiza- 
tions interprets article 20 of Its con- 
stitution, under which the govern- 
ment employees’ organization 
claims to be the only AFL-CIO 
union with the right to organize the 
controllers. The pilots' union is also 
a member of the AFL-CIO. 

The potential alliance of pilots 
and controllers was looked on by 
some proponents as a perfect mar- 
riage. The initial reaction among 
government officials, however, was 
that it would raise the specter of job 
actions that could threaten to bring 
commercial air. service to a stand- 
still. 

Pilots argue that they would nev- 
er countenance an illegal strike of 
federal employees like the control- 
lers, which was why they did not 
honor the pickeL lines. 



IRS Computer Problems Worsen, Reports Say 


By Anne Swardson 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — Computer 
and operational problems are more 
serious than previously believed at 
the Philadelphia Service Center of 
the Internal Revenue Service, ac- 
cording to two new government re- 
ports. 

More than 150,000 taxpayers 
may have received erroneous dun- 


Philadelphia also is the filing 
center for overseas taxpayers, who 
are allowed an automatic extension 
to June 17 for filing their returns. 
The IRS said that foreign residents 
who took advantage of the exten- 
sion were unlikely to encounter de- 
lays in receiving refunds. 

The computer network that pro- 
vides access to taxpayer accounts at 

the Philadelphia center was work- 

: nin'g notices because of the com- ing only 26 percent of its scheduled 
puter system’s failure to record hours in 1984 and 18.6 percent of 


Fernando Mor&n 

Spain to Seek 
Cuts in U.S. 
Servicemen 


Ortega Gets 
Soviet Vow 
Of Support 

The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — President Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra of Nicaragua, re- 
portedly seeking $200 million in 
emergency aid to bolster his coun- 
try's flagging economy, met Mon- 
day with the Soviet leader, Mikhail 
S. Gorbachev, and received a 
promise of Soviet assistance. 

A Soviet account of the meeting 
said that Mr. Gorbachev promised 
Kremlin support in resolving Nica- 
ragua’s “urgent problems of eco- 
nomic development,” but did not 
mention any new grants or loans to 
Mr. Ortega’s leftist government. 

Mr. Ortega is on a tour of nine 
Communist countries. He was said 
by officials in his country to be 
seeking $200 million from Moscow 
to counter U.S. economic sanctions 
imposed since January 1981 and to 
finance the purchase of food and 
other essentia] items. 

According to Tass, Foreign Min- 
ister Andrei A. Gromyko and Gei- 
dar Aliyev, first deputy prime min- 
ister, attended the meeting. 

CIA Said to Supply Missiles 

Nicaragua’s defense minister has 
alleged that the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency is supplying anti- 
Sandinist rebels with surface-to-air 


missiles. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Managua. 

Humberto Ortega Saavedra, 
speaking Sunday at a display of 
captured rebel weapons, said: “The 
presence of these arms represents a 
true danger for all of Central 
America and could unleash an un- 
controllable terrorism which could 
make dvO aviation its first target.” 
No anti-aircraft missiles were dis- 
played Sunday. 

He warned that the shoulder- 
launched. Soviet-designed SA-7 
missiles could be obtained by “ir- 
regular forces that fight in other 
countries, such as El Salvador." 

Last week, a Nicaraguan rebel 
leader, Indaledo Rodriguez, said 
that his group, the Nicaraguan 
Democratic Force, has enough SA- 
7 missiles in its arsenal to counter 
the Soviet MI-24 helicopter gun- 
ships that the Sandinists are be- 
lieved to have received last Novem- 
ber. 


By Edward Schumacher 

New York Times Service 

MADRID — Foreign Minister 
Fernando Moran has said that Ma- 1 
drid would demand a cut in the 
more than 12,000 U.S. servicemen 
stationed in Spun. 

He told the Spanish news agency 
EFE on Sunday that Spain would 
ask the United States to begin talks 
on the reduction before a Spanish 
referendum planned early next 
year on wbelher to withdraw from 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation. 

The governing Socialist Party 
adopted a policy platform at its 
national convention in October 
calling for a reduction. Mr. Mor- 
an’s remarks were the first by an 
official to set a timetable. 

They were made a wedc before 
President Ronald Reagan is to visit 
Spain. Leftists, nationalis ts and 
pacifists opposed to the American 
servicemen have planned street 
protests during Mr. Reagan’s 
three-day stay. 

Mr. Moran said the government 
of Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez 
bad not decided bow many U.S. 
servicemen should pull out. But, he 
said, “We are going to ask the Unit- 
ed Slates to renegotiate the accords 
in which we set the level of Ameri- 
can presence.” 

The current accord was negotiat- 
ed in 1982 and ratified by the So- 
cialists with some minor clarifica- 
tions in 1 983. It expires in 1988 but 
allows either side to reopen negoti- 
ations. 

Of the three UJS. air bases and 
one naval base in Spain, the Span- 
iards are mostly concerned with the 
air bases in Torrejbn, near Madrid, 
and in Saragossa because they are 
dose to big dues. 

A U.S. Embassy spokesman de- 
fended the military presence. “We 
think the bases make a big contri- 
bution to security, including 
Spain’s," he said. 

The spokesman said the treaty 1 , 
which has been regularly renegoti- 
ated since the 1950s, had worked 
well. He was confident that “any 
problems can be solved on the basis 
of that framework.” 


many returns the first time they 
were put through the system. 

Some taxpayers who filed early 
in the tax season are experiencing 
unusually long delays in getting re- 
funds, and taxpayers who waited 
longer to file are Ukely to get their 
refunds first. 

Delays for refunds are r unnin g 
12 to 16 weeks long at the Philadel- 
phia center, which processes re- 
turns for the mid-Atlantic region, 
an IRS spokesman said. That 
means a taxpayer who filed Feb. 1 
may not receive a refund until May 
20 . 

The IRS will not begin paying 
interest on late refunds until June 
I . however. The number of delayed 
returns was unknown. 


its scheduled hours in March, the 
reports said. 

The reports, by the General Ac- 
counting Office and the IRS’s in- 
ternal audit division, focused on 
problems nationwide and especial- 
ly at Philadelphia. That center is 
running behind most others and 
appears to have had more trouble 
adapting to the service's new com- 
puter. 

The Philadelphia center fre- 
quently has dunned taxpayers for 
money they do not owe and report- 
edly has lost or shredded returns. 

The internal report said some 
taxpayers still have not been offi- 
cially notified of the IRS’s failure 
Iasi fall to record withholding- tax 
payments for 26,756 corporations 


in the mid-Atlantic region. Thou- 
sands of delinquent notices were 
sent and levies were placed on five 
bank accounts because of the error. 

The GAO report disclosed that 
the error was repeated many times 
at the Philadelphia center, affecting 
as many as 150,000 additional tax- 
payers who may have received erro- 
neous notices, levies and liens. 

The Philadelphia center had a 
backlog of more 'than 100,000 
pieces of unanswered correspon- 
dence from taxpayers at the end of 
March. With 89 percent of letters 
more than 45 days old, that backlog 
was the greatest in the nation. 

The two reports were made avail- 
able to the The Post by the over- 


sight subcommittee of the House 
Ways and Means Committee. 

Critics such as Representative 
J J. Pickle. Democrat of Texas and 
a subcommittee chairman, say they 
are worried that proposed cuts in 
the IRS budget will increase collec- 
tion problems evert after the new 
computer is r unnin g better. 

The Reagan administration has 
requested 86,489 IRS staff posi- 
tions for fiscal 1986. fewer than the 
IRS had in fiscal 1980. That num- 
ber of positions is almost 9,000 
fewer than the service sought be- 
fore its request was cut during the 
administration’s budget-drafting 
process, according to congressional 
sources. 


U.S. Navy Crews Fail Nuclear Tests 


New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The navy 
crews of three nuclear-powered 
warships recently failed annual 
tests of their ability to operate nu- 
clear reactors safely, according to 
Defense Department officials. 

The officials said the crews of the 
aircraft carrier Carl Vinson, -the 


newest carrier in the fleet, and the 
guided-missile cruisers California 
and South Carolina failed the tests. 
They said they believed the failures 
were the first' since the U.S. Navy 
began using nuclear-powered 
ships. Other officials confirmed the 
failures but said the crews had 
passed on the second try. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


Israeli Leader Is Said 


To Back Restrictions 
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By Norman Kempsrer 

Las Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — Prime Min- 
ister Shimon Peres of Israel has 
promised in a letter to Secretary of 
Slate George P. Shultz to support 
restrictions on Israel’s inflationary 
monetary policies and to adopt 
other austerity measures, according 
to an Israeli diplomat 
In the letter, Mr. Peres reported- 
ly outlined the measures that his 
coalition government was prepared 
to lake. Mr. Shultz has demanded 
economic reforms as a condition 
for granting as much as SI .5 billion 
in additional U.S. aid to Israel 
Mr. Shultz is expected to discuss 
the proposed package May 10, 
when he is to visit Israel at the start 
of a Middle East trip. He will also 
visit Jordan and Egypt 
The Israeli diplomat said Sunday 
that Mr. Peres sent the letter about 
a week ago. The State Department 
has not officially acknowledged iL 
The new package was based on 
10 ‘’benchmarks” laid down by 
Herbert Stein, a former White 
House economic adviser who is Mr. 
Shultz’s top aide on the Israeli 
economy. Mr. Stein visited Israel 
last month. 

“Peres said that some of the 
benc hmar ks are reasonable and we 
are proceeding with them," the dip- 
lomat said. “Others are more diffi- 
j cult and will take time." 

Israel’s government budget ex- 


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Thousands Observe Dachau Anniversary 


ceeds the country’s gross national 
product, pr total output of goods 
and services, a situation that makes 

it mathema tically impossible for 
the government to finance its pro- 
grams by taxation alone. 

In recent years, the government 
has handled its budget deficit by 
borrowing Israeli currency from 
the Bank of Israel which, in turn, 
ob tains the money by printing huge 
quantities of shekel notes. 

Unlike the Federal Reserve 
Board, which controls the U-S. 
money supply, the Bank of Israel is 
not independent of government 
control so the bank is unable to 
play a restraining role. 

The diplomat said the top item 
on Mr. Stein’s list was to make the 
B ank of Israel an independent 
body. The diplomat said Mr. Peres 
promised to support such a step 
although the prune minister point- 
ed out that it required legislation 
passed by the Knesset, or parlia- 
ment, which may take time. 

The diplomat said that Mr. Peres 
also accepted Mr. Stein’s call for 
curbs to prevent government agen- 
cies from overspending their bud- 
gets. Under existing regulations, 
departments regularly spend more 
than their budgets call for, render- 
ing budget cuts essentially mean- 
ingless. 

However, the diplomat said, Mr. 
Peres balked at Mr. Stein’s plan to 
prevent banks from offering ac- 
counts that are automatically ad- 
justed to compensate for declines 
in the value of the shekeL Mr. Stein 
complained that these accounts 
help to fuel inflation which late last 
year neared die 1.000 percent a 
year rate. 

Such bank accounts are so popu- 
lar in Israel that the government 
would almost certainly fall if it 
started to tamper with them. 

The U.S. adminis tration has al- 
ready recommended S3 billion in 
military and economic aid to Israel 
during the fiscal year beginning 

Ocl r. 

But the Israeli government is 
seeking an additional $800 millio n 
in supplemental assistance for the 
current fiscal year. Israel, the larg- 
est single recipient of U.S. aid, al- 
ready has received $2.6 billion this 
fiscal year. 

■ Veto Plan Adopted 

The national unity government 
has adopted a plan to enable either 
the Likud bloc or the Labor align- 
ment to veto political decisions lia- 
ble to break up their coalition. The 
New York Times reported. 

The 25-member cabinet, com- 
prising representatives of nine par- 
ties, voted Sunday in Jerusalem to 
create an inner cabinet of 10 in 


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Coiwo fteo 

Shimon Peres 

which the two major parties would 
have equal representation. 

A communique said the inner 
cabinet would decide matters of 
foreign policy, defense and land 
settlement as well as other issues 
that can be referred to the group. It 
added that decisions by the 10 
would have the same validity as 
those of the full cabinet. 


By John Tagliabue 

fie*’ York Times Senior 

DACHAU. West Germany — 
Thousands of people, many of 
them former inmates, have marked 
the 40 ih anniversary of the libera- 
tion of the Dachau concentration 
camp. 

But the ceremonies Sunday at 
the camp site outside this rural Ba- 
varian town and in Munich, 10 
miles (16 kilometers) to the south, 
reflected the rancor here over how 
to interpret the collapse of Nazi 
Germany and the end of World 
War II. 

At Dachau, about 5.000 people 
attended religious services and laid 
wreaths at a monument bearing the 
motto “Never Again” mi the site of 
the camp where about 32JXX) peo- 
ple are thought to have lost their 
lives. 

At a separate event in Munich, 
Franz Josef Strauss, tbe premier of 
Bavaria, remembered the victims of 
Nazism and the war, and said the 
collapse of Nazi Germany sealed 


the decline of European influence 
in world politics. 

Mr. Strauss said that while Nazi 
Germany's collapse had brought 
“an end to "»« deaths, nighttime 
bombing raids and summary exe- 
cutions." it had also meant the 
“end of Europe's leading role in 
world affairs.” 

Mr. Strauss refused to attend tiie 
Dachau commemoration, sending 
a Farm Ministry official instead. 

Political groups on the left, in- 
cluding the opposition Serial Dem- 
ocratic Party, encouraged the view 
that Germany was liberated in 
1 945 and that the evil that had been 
done died with Nazism’s defeat. 

By contrast, conservative leaders 
like Mr. Strauss stressed Germa> 
ay's defeat, the expulsion of mil- 
lions of Germans from former Ger- 
man territories in Eastern Europe 
and the country’s division into two 
states in opposing military blocs. 

President Ronald Reagan, who 
will be in West Germany this week, 
will visit a military cemetery at Bit- 


burg that includes graves of sol- 
diers of the Waffco SS, the Nazi 
elite guard. The Bitburg visit has 
been widely criticized. 

Mr. Strauss has often accused 
tbe Dachau camp committee, a 
group of former inmates and others 
who oversee the camp memorial, of 
being under Communist influence. 

Unlike huge gatherings earlier 
this year at other camp sites, such 
as Bergeo-Belsen in northern Ger- 
many and Buchenwald, near Wei- 
mar, in East Germany, the crowd at 
Dachau was thin — about 5,000, by 
police estimates. 

To the sound of muffled trum- 
pets, former inmates from several 
countries, including France, Bel- 
gium, Poland and Italy, laid 
wreaths at a gray stone wall near 
the camp entrance. 

Tbe gathering was addressed by 
the leader of Munich’s tiny Jewish 
community, Simon Snopkowski. 
who lamented signs of neo-Nazism 
in West Germany. 


“It cannot go unmentiooed," he 
said, “that in our slate an SSmeej. 
mg will soon take place under the 
banner of Adolf Hitler." 

He was referring to reunions of 
SS veterans that are planned not 
month at a Bavarian resort 
Speaking in from of die Jewish 
memorial, Simone Veil of France, a 
former president of the European 
Parliament and a survivor of 
Auschwitz, wanted against a “baa- 
alization” of the Nazi concent^ 
lion camp. 

. “When Auschwitz is lumped to- " 
geiber with other events as an inci- 
dence of war, then it is no longer 
Auschwitz,” Mrs. Veil said. 
“Auschwitz is not Hiroshima." 

Speaking to reporters later, Mrs. 
Veil said she was “very surprised 
when President Reagan spoke 
about victims of the camps on the 
same footing as the SS." adding, “I 
think that is impossible to accept" . 

“I think President Reagan did 
not know what happened in Eu- 
rope." she said. “After all. Califor- 
nia is a long way from Europe." 



U.S. Space Shuttle Lifts Off for a Week of Research Projects 


The Associated Press 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida 
— The space shuttle Challenger, 
carrying seven astronauts, two 
squirrel monkeys and 24 rats, blast- 
ed off Monday for a week of con- 
tinuous research in the European- 
built Spacelab. 

The launch was the second here 
in just 17 days, cutting in half the 
record of 34 days for the shortest 
period between shuttle flights. The 
Challenger’s sister ship. Discovery, 
was launched April 12 for a week- 
long mission. 

■ A Flight for Science 

Thomas O'Toole of pie Washing- 
ton Post reported earlier from Wash- 
ington: 

The seven-man crew of the shut- 
tle called the mission a flight by 
scientists for science. 


“This mission marks the first 
tune that scientists who designed 
their own experiments will be exe- 
cuting those experiments in space." 
said Don L. Lind, a physicist. “I 
think that’s a miles (one.” 

The other scientists in the crew 
are Dr. Norman E Thagard and 
Dr. William E. Thornton, both 
physicians; Lodewijk van den Berg, 
a chemist, and Taylor G. Wang, a 
physicist 

Tbe mission commander will be 
Colonel Robert F. Overmyer. and 
the pilot will be Colonel Frederick 
D. Gregory, both of the air force. 

This is the oldest crew to fly in 
space. Mr. Lind is 54, Mr. van den 
Berg is 53 and Dr. Thornton is 55. 
Colonel Overmyer is 49, Colonel 
Gregory and Mr. Wang are 44 and 
Dr. Thagard is 41. 


Reagan’s Son Visits Moscow to See 
Red Square Parade, Bolshoi 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Ronald P. Reagan, son of the US. president, has 
arrived here with hi s wile and two friends for a weddong private visit 
that he said would include the May Day parade in Red Square. 

Mr. Reagan. 27, said when he arrived Sunday that he was working 
as a freelance journalist and that he hoped to write about his visit 
when be returned to California. The president’s son was staying at the 
residence of the U.S. ambassador, Arthur A. Hartman. With him were 
his wife, Doria, and two friends. 

Mr. Reagan, a former ballet dancer, said his itinerary included the 
Bolshoi Theater and the Kremlin and that he might choose to travel 
outside Moscow. 


Challenger’s crew will split into 
two teams and work in 12-hour 
shifts around the dock on the 15 
experiments aboard tbe Spacelab, 
built by the 10- nation European 
Space Agency. 

Tbe weightlessness of space is so 
crucial to these experiments that 
the crew has been told to limit their 
in-flight exercise so their move- 
ments do not rock the boat in orbit. 

“The autopilot will fly Challeng- 
er die entire time we’re in orbit 
because it’s impossible for a man to 
fly it as tightly as we warn it,” 
Colonel Overmyer said. 

One of these sensitive experi- 
ments is an attempt to grow pure 
crystals of tryglycine sulfate, which 
if successful could have applica- 
tions in (he Reagan administra- 
tion's proposed space-based de- 
fense plan. 

The substance is a detector of 
infrared radiation so sensitive that 
scientists have predicted that it 
could detea the engine exhaust of a 
missile from space seconds after it 
leaves a silo on the ground. 

Tbe two sqnirrel monkeys, the 
first primates to have flown in 
space with humans, are aboard to 
see how they tolerate living in orbit 
in specially built cages. If they do 
not get nervous or frightened in 
space, later flights will cany squir- 
rel monkeys with surgical implants 
to lest for physical effects of space 
flight. 

Four of the rats aboard have sur- 
gical implants in their hearts to 
record changes in heart beat and 
blood flow’ in weightlessness. All 24 
are to be dissected and their inter- 



UMFwlOrtdimMato) 

A worker attending to one of the two squirrel monkeys that 
were launched aboard the space shuttle on Monday. 


nal organs examined within hours 
after Challenger returns to Earth. 

Other experiments will be obser- 
vations of the Aurora AustraMis. 
the “southern lights” near the 
South Pole at this time of year. The 
Spacelab abb carries a French- 


built wide-Field camera that will be " 
making its second survey of stars * 
whose strong emissions of ultravio- 
let light can be seen only in space. 

Spacelab's mission is scheduled ( 
to end next Monday at Edwards 
Air Force Base in California. 











INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 






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In 1985 Pan Am's service W%Ww* IPIP^ 
will be even bigger. We're adding more nonstop 
flights to cities we now serve, plus new service to 
even more cities throughout Europe. 

So now you've an even bigger choice when you 
fly Pan Am. 

In fact everything about Pan Am is bigger. 
And, for travellers, that means better. 

Bigger on the inside. 

We're in the process of enlarging our 747's. 


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Not much we could do on the outside, but inside 
we've given you a lot more space. More space for 
business with wider six across seating in^^^ 
Clipper® Class. More space for luggage 
with the cavernous overhead luggage 
bins we're installing this year. 

Little things that make us bigger. ^W Hjjy 

We've also added lightweight 'S|JRL 

electronic headphones and a brand 

So now everyone has the best 

enjoyable; it's the software 
Like carnations and silver 
service in First Class. And your 

choice of main course served to 


you separately 

in dipper Class 
^ And friendly 

M | cabin crew that take a real interest in you. 

Big around the U.S. 

™ Whether you're flying to the U.S. or on to the 
Far East or Australasia, 

Pan Am try to make your 
journey easier. Same 
terminal connections in 
most major airports 
around the World. (We're 
big enough to arrange that.) 

At New York, our 
Worldport® is the only 

terminal 

at JFK to have international and 
internal U.S. flights under one 
roof. So you can step off your flight 
from Europe straight onto your 
flight to a U. S . city. 

Big in the Apple. 

If you're travelling First or 
Clipper Qass to New York the 
Pan Am experience doesn't end at 
JFK. A free helicopter service 
awaits to whisk you to Manhattan or Newark. 

In the evening a free limousine is available to 
chauffeur you to your hotel in Mar^sCtan. 

No other airline offers 
better service than this. ^0% 


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j At Pan Am we don't || just give you a 

comfortable flight, we believe in making 
i your journey easier and more enjoyable. 

That's why, all in all. Pan Am is a bigger 
! experience. Next time you fly to the States, 
f think big, think Pan Am. 

Call your Travel Agent or the nearest 
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Pan Am.\fau Can't Beat The Experience: 









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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBinVE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


Parallel Trends in New York: 
The Slim ’40s and Baggy ’60s 


Inicnuuional Herald Tribune 

N EW YORK — As the first 
week of the New York collec- 
tions came to a dose, two silhou- 
ettes were emerging strongly. One 
is ultrafeminine, broad-shouldered 
and nipped at the waist over slim 
hips; the second is big and baggy 

Hebe Dorsey 

and amusingly layered, with over- 
tones of London street fashions 
and the camp, psychedelic 1960s. 

The first one. bourgeois, pretty 
and safe, appeals to more conserva- 
tive women: proper, predictable 
and affluent- Tne second is irrever- 
ent, young, geared to women with a 
more independent approach to 
fashion. Geoffrey Beene and Caro- 
lina Herrera belong to the first 
group; Marc Jacobs, Danny Noble 
and Anne Pinkerton to the second. 
The independent spirit Norma Ka- 
maii is in a class by herself. Anne 
Klein, designed by Louis delTOlio, 
exemplifies what many consider 
the best of American sportswear. 

Both Beene and Herrera got 
standing ovations from their fans. 
Their collections had an impecca- 
bly well-groomed finish to them, 
demonstrating that Americans can 
deliver luxurious, exquistely made 
clothes, and never mind the ex- 
pense. Both put the accent on eve- 
ning wear, which came off well in 
the crv5tal-chandeliered ballrooms 



The collection of the Italian 
designer “Rocco Borocco" 
and the Knap label with its 
creations in silk, suede and 
leather. 

KNAP - 34, FAUBOURG 

saint-honor! 


of tbe'Pierre and Plaza hotels. Both 
showed feminine silhouettes, cut 
very dose to the body, and Beene's 
skinny look included belted coats 
over belted dresses. Herrera's was a 
little gentler, and just skimmed the 
body rather than hugging it 

Beene is a serious designer who 
has become something or an insti- 
tution. Using a lot of jersey, he 
showed a simple, pared-down look 
livened up with colored tops, in- 
cluding short blousonsand tailored 
jackets. His body-conscious 
clothes, with skirts cupping the der- 
riere and cut well above the knees, 
were quite ladylike because of the 
dark-colored, opaque legs. Even 
the mermaid evening dresses, cut 
within an inch of your life, were 
long-sleeved and pretty much cov- 
ered up. 

Beene's was a precise look, with 
neatly tailored suits, gloves and 
scarves tightly wrapped around the 
bead. Americans can show just a 
sweater and a skirt with great flair, 
and Beene’s version was a lesson in 
simplicity. Many uncluttered, un- 
complicated outfits were also a 
pleasant relief from some overde- 
signed European clothes. American 
women love accessories and wiD 
pay a lot of money for original bdts 
and bangles, and collections such 
as this one gave them a great deal to 
play around with. 

Beene also showed three-quarter 
coats over short skins in interesting 
color combinations, such as dove 
gray and mauve, or orange and 
brown. 

His collection covered just 
about every occasion. There was 
plenty of glitter, including se- 
quinea evening sweaters, elabo- 
rately beaded cardigans and gold 
lame blouses with black satin 
skirts. He also revived full-length 
evening coals, with a pretty one of 
striped silk lined with floral-print 
silk. 

Herrera is a Venezuelan socialite 
who has climbed to the top in four 
years. Now definitely in the big 
leagues, she knows her audience 
welL Her main asset is that she 
makes women look good while re- 
taining a strong signature. She used 
to be stiff and structured, but she 
has now loosened up. 

She showed wide, square shoul- 
ders and clean, flattering lines with 
strong geometric proportions. Suits 
and dresses often came In two col- 
ors, black being combined with a 
stronger hue. Herrera had direct 
and aggressive color combinations, 
but her blacks and whites had a 
distinct Spanish glamour. 

Her long coats were always 
shown over short dresses or pant- 


ARTS /LEISURE 


suits. The cognac-and-loden her- 
ringbone wool pantsuits under sa- 
ble coats were the ultimate in a 
“throwaway" elegance. Black vel- 
vet insets fr aming the waist or hug- 
ging the rib cage had a flattering, 
s limming effect 

Herrera showed a lot of opulent 
black velvet, often combined with 
white or black satin. Her evening 
wear was spectacular, with strong 
sleeves, many outlined with differ- 
ent colors, and often with draped 
back dfecolletages. 

One of America's leading talents, 
Nonna Kamali is the designer who 
introduced the sleeping-bag coat, 
sweatshirt cover-ups and dramatic, 
daring swimsuits. She recently 
signed a contract with Warner Cos- 
metics (which already has such 
names as Ralph Lauren, Gloria 
Vanderbilt ana Paloma Picasso) 
for a line of fragrances and cosmet- 
ics. 

Believing that “to be serious all 
the time is not important in fash- 
ion," she is also well known for her 
wit, her experimentation with fab- 
rics and the generally upbeat feel- 
ing of her clothes. 

This season, she introduced two 
major looks: One, which bordered 
on fantasy land, was tum-of-tbe- 
ceniuiy, languid Vicioriana, while 
the other revived the hard, chic 
silhouette of the ’40s. Panne velvet 
and amusing fake furs — zebra, 
ocelot, Persian lamb — lent her 
clothes a distinctly sensual look. 

She shaped fake furs into volu- 
minous, rounded and wrap-around 
coats, with big shawl collars and 
completed with muffs, gloves, 
feather-trimmed hats and tight, 
laced-up booties. “Feminine, femi- 
nine, fe minin e." an assistant of Ka- 
mali kept saying. 

The same animal prints reap- 
peared on dresses, with long sldrts, 
snug waistlines and the strong Joan 
Crawford shoulders that Kamali 
has always loved. Long skirts, light 
around the hips and flared around 
the ankles, were worn with tightly 
belted fake-zebra jackets, with 
shawl collars and flared pepiums. 

The revival of the '40s resulted in 
scalpel-crisp suits, also decorated 
with fake-fur accessories. Several 
were made of black-and-white 
bounds tooth, but the most striking 
was in red with fake-zebra collar 
and cuffs. 

The evening included rich bro- 
cade coats reminiscent of Ballets 
Russes costumes and an updated 
version of cancan girls, done with a 
fun combination of zebra strapless 
top and swirling black velvet skirt, 
flounced around the hips. 

The Anne Klein collection,. 






Chari* Garti 

Herrera's geometric shapes (left); KamalTs for trimmings. 

which used to be designed by both Anne Pinkerton, came through 
Donna Karan and Louis deU'Olio, with amusing clothes that seemed 
is now all delTOlio since Karan thrown together almost by acri- 
wenl on to form her own company, dent They included vests (a big 
The result is still the strong sports- item this season} worn every possi- 
wear this house is famousfor, with ble way, including over long frock 
the accent this season on jodhpurs coats; the schoolgirl look in cordu- 
and riding boots, topped by bright- roy jumpers and matching coats; 
ly colored suede coats. and lots of overscale jackets with 

Saying he wanted to make Amer- tight leggings. The floral brocades 
icana chic, deU'Olio did a salute to that originated in London were 
the Marlboro Man and the Navajo very much around, as were faded 
Indian- Accents such as Stetson chintzes straight out of English 
hats, inlaid lizard details, lots of country houses and Dickensian 
stitching and Western, heeled dandies complete with top hats. 

boots completed the look. Coats, 

an important segment of this col- nOOlVFKRf TRY 

lection, included unlined ones out- 

lined in leather and long roomy 
rerf^coats-ITie la^rfgeof 

collection came from such fabrics a Gfucmit f vrttr/ihi re- 

as cashmere, angora and alpaca. . 

The younger generation, mchid- £ 'fQuK£$SWMSJVSTTm 
ing Marc Jacobs, Danny Noble and o POLITICAL SIGNALS. 


Japanese Divorce Rate Falls * 

The Associated Press \ 

TOKYO — Japan’s divorce rate L 

fell last year for the first time in 20 = j 

years, to 1.51 couples per 1,000 ?! 

population compared with 1.52 in I- 

1 983, Kyodo News Services report- 
ed Sunday, quoting a preliminary 
government report JN 



Blending the Past and the Present 
In the Popular Music of Black Africa 


By Michael Zwerin 

huemaiional Herald Tribune 


confuse Ivory Coast with Anglophonic countries such 
as Nigeria and Ghana. 

"Modem popular music only arrived in this country 


Exotique” is a film about a film crew snooting a 
documentary on sacred masks. In it a village chief 
blesses a mad- by trilling a chicken over it after which 
the director shouts “Cut!" and asks for another take. 

“No," the chief says. “We cannot do that twice. It is 
not our custom." 

The director explains that only one chicken will 
appear to be sacrificed in the finished film. The chief 
replies: "But we will have too much meat tomorrow.” 
Paul Wassaba, who wrote the music for “Cbmddie 
Exotique.” tells of this scene to illustrate the conflict 
between traditional and modem musical in Ivory 
Coast and in black Africa in general "Composers like 
myself are trying to get two takes out of each chicken." 
he said, laughing. 

“The minute we use an electric guitar,” Jimmy 
Hyacin the said, "we ‘African’ composers are no longer 
making African music.” Hyacinthe produces albums 
for Ivorian singers and has played guitar with the 
American bluesman Johnny Copelandl 
“ African rhythms are very complex and if we oy to 
present the real undistilled ihing in Europe it would 
not be understood,” he said "So what I am trying to 
do is combine these rhythms with European melodic 
and harmonic and technological elements.” 

The international success of such African pop 
groups as Toure Kunda, Akin dengue and Sonny Adfc 


Anne Pinkerton, came through 
with amusin g clothes that seemed 
thrown together almost by acci- 
dent. They included vests (a big 
item this season} worn every possi- 
ble way, including over long frock 
coats; the schoolgirl look in cordu- 
roy jumpers and matching coats; 
and lots of overscale jackets with 
tight leggings. The floral brocades 
that originated in London were 
very much around, as were faded 
chintzes straight out of English 
country houses and Dickensian 
dandies complete with top hats. 

DOONESBURY 


rests on a marriage of the music of the village and the ing to the old music. African popular music is expoit- 
dty — and of Africa and Europe. Both Wassaba and ed, goes to Europe and the States, is filtered through 
Hyacinthe have lived in Paris, and both still record the media and market trends over there, and tho. , 
there often. There is only one serious studio in Abi- returns here in altered form. So Africa has become just r 
djan. and it has only one eight-track mixer. one more market for its own music." 

Although more modem studios have been built in Dagri reflected the realities of the marketplace 
Togo. Zaire, Nigeria and Ghana, Hyacinthe said: when he said: "I only listen to traditional African 
“There are more amateurs than professional musi- music for professional reasons. 1 do not listen to it on 
dans in Africa. They often arrive late or unprepared my own record player. It is not the music I am 
for the session. This causes producers problems. And comfortable with. I listen to European classical music, 


the latest technology is European. So we are obliged lo jazz, the Chad Mitchell Trio. This music responds 
make African music in Paris.” more closely to my own sensibilities." 

Wassaba said: There is not enough work here for a “Everything depends on the presentation." Hya- 
significant number of musicians to make a living at it cimhe said. “African music is having an impact on the 
full time. Most of them have other jobs too. Whoever world because it is adapting to world music. When you 
owns the equipment gets the job. This usually means I order a steak, if it isn’t presented well you won't eat it. 
have to take an existing group like the TV house It is not enough lor the steak to be of good quality. It 


have to take an existing group like tne iv nouse 
orchestra or Alpha Bloody’s band. They have their 
own sound. So there won't be the original sound I’m 
looking for." 

He pointed out that one should be cartful not to 


v OKAY, BOIL from u 

F0R.M5.MlKe. EXACTLY 'NEVER 

WHAT MESSAGE AMI NOW FOREST' 

S&BZNGTOTHEJEiUS? \ 

w / \ 


must be inviting on the plate. That is the case with 
African music. We are looking for common denomi- 
nators to make our tradition palatable for the mass 
market.” 


AND MY 
MESSAGE 
TO 7m 
GERMANS? 

a / 


, OKAY.SO 

rrsAuma 

AND FORGET- DIFFERENT, 
\ RJGHT? 

\ m / 


SO- ■' 

£■,. v 


interested in business than an, but since the economic ; 
crisis hit. the Ivory Coast is the only black African /. 
country that is still reasonably prosperous and so we 
have become a more interesting market for many 
artists. Films are being made here now, and the music 
is becoming more creative.” 

A coordinated regional musicology research project 
has been operating since 1981 under the auspices of 
the Ivorian Institute Nauonale des Arts, directed by 
the ethnomusicologist Pierre Augier. 

“Nine Francopbonic African countries cooperate, 
according to their human and material possibilities," 
Augier said. "We have produced a series of teaching , * 
cassettes, which deals with the history of world music, 
including Oriental music, jazz, European classical mu- 
sic — and African tradition, of course — so teachers 
can now expose their students to the music of the 
world. The Ivory Coast is so far the only one of the 
participating countries to be using this program.” 

While a major aim of the project is to preserve and 
document African traditional music, this tradition is 
nevertheless becoming increasingly "museumized” as 
young villagers leave in search of work in the cities. 

Paul Dagri, an Ivorian graduate student working 
with Augier, said, "The man in the street listens to 
reggae and funk. Regrettably, the young are not listen- 





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IKeralG^Sribune. 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 12 


i '-:h 


TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


9 




fLil, 


FUTURES AND OPTIONS 






‘’-Hf • 


^ The Markets Need Not Be 

L-, 

Merely a Game o! Chance 

By H J. MAIDENBERG 

Mb* York Times Service 

N EW YORK — Traders in stock-index futures and 
options were again taken on a wild roller coaster last 
week, as the market in terms of the Dow Jones industri- 
_ al average closed unchanged Monday, then soared 

i : c 12.15 points, dipped 0.22, jumped 629 and cm Friday plunged 

!:~=s i 9.80 points, to finish at 1,275.18. 

/ «f j{ Outwardly, it would seem that the index markets are a toss-of- 

: • X ter ;-.pL.f ^ die-coin affair, simple wagers on whether the stock market would 
• C’ r * se w ^ But many index- market experts believe that these 

markets need not be mere games of chance, if traders follow 
established fundamental and technical guidelines. 

“If index traders bad studied the relationship between the 

Standard & Poor’s 500 and the 

broader 1,700-issue Value 
Line, they could have avoided 
being whipsawed by the mar- 
ket in recent weeks,” said 
Donald M. Seikin, senior fu- 


* "" V*: ‘3: x**' 

ju. 


- - vlt -«t lure ^ research analyst at Pru- 
deniial-Bache Securities Inc. 

-!r v--„ ■* Bin- 


to?-'. ' 


Even the Mae 
chips stocks have 
shown some 
signs of fading. 


The S&P, against which the 

performance of insthudonal 

.. and other professional portfolio managers are judged, consists 

• ■' ? _ ;Il ' " i; ’q 4 .L^Sargely of blue chip stocks. The Value Line reflects more of the 
’ 7 - - -r ,, |L ^activity of the “retail” or average individual investor. Why? 


• ''Mi. 

i "■'■bty . 

r. - 






T 







HE Value Line covers many issues that are not blue chip, 
including many slocks traded in the over-the-counter mar- 
ket, and it has been attracting large numbers of small 
investors recently, Mr. Seikin explained. 

What has beat evident since the Dow average closed at a 
record 1,29936 on March 1, and the Value Line hit its high of 
201.18 on Feb. 13, is that the retail element has moved to the 
sidelines, Mr. Seikin said. 

“Without the retail traders, what we have is institutions, in 
effect, tossing about Large blocks of stocks, which helps explain 
the frequent one-day up or down price spikes,” Mr. Seikin said. 
‘There can be no sustainable market advance until the retail 
investors participate. 

Even the blue drips have shown signs of fading since then, as 
reflected by the decline in the S&P 100 index. Options on this 
index are the most actively traded of all index contracts. 

But the relationship between the Value Line and the S&P 500 is 
considered a more valid market indicator, Mr. Seikin said. Since 
the stock market peaked on March 1, the Value Line index 
declined from 19935 to 19421 as of last Friday's close, from its 
record level of 201.18, which, he said, underscored the decline in 
retail activity. 

The Dow has been falling since it hit its peak on March 1. 
Although the S&P 500 rose to 182.18 last Friday, from 181.21 
March 1, Mr. Seikin said it did not truly reflect the undertone of 
the market. No futures or options are traded on the Dow Jones 
average. Thus, Mr. Seikin said, options traders depend more on 
the spread between the Value Line and the S&P 500. 

“The market will not become healthy until the Value Line’s 
’premium’ over the S&P 500 widens," Mr. Seikin said. . 

But investors in index and other options have to consider more 
than their underlying “cash” markets, said Vilas Gadkari of 
Salomon Brothers Inc., another expert on the subject. He said 
several factors must be considered. 

Whether an option is overpriced depends basically on such 
factors as wheli^ one is buying ,a put or a call; the strike price at 
which the' 'transaction is made; the underlying Msh market at the 
time; the relationship of domestic and foreign, interest rates (in 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 2) 


Currency Bates 


lute interbank rales on April 29, excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Mian, Paris. New York rates at 
2 P.M. 



S S DM. F.F. HJ_ 

JJZ7 4J32 HIM* .3 7.09 • 0.1774 

63Ji 77.1075 20.JJ5 6M> 3.154 

3.1148 3*28 32J85* 1568* 

15305 ' 1834 TTJHM 1*4250 

189100 144350 63826 209.12 

(LOSS 10885 9-42 1.98150 

95045 11683 USDS 4782 X 

Cloud 

14215 12114 B1B3S- 2769- 11314 • 74.17- 4.1713- 

07184 15029 2236 48228 162766 25303 410279 

0.9S76SA 0-80395 107435 95871 B 164662 14833 61.9557 


Qldr. BLP. 

— — 5623 * 

177983 

8860 - 4868* 
43240 76.99 

56*53 31717 

1697 6277 

25973 15.145* 


5JF. Y«l 
134765* 13*50 * 
2199* 2457 • 
119.19*18355- 
12158 310575 
75950 7584 

2509 25215 
163337685- 

— 1.0371 * 
1-8771 U1.103 
25812 NA 



Per 

Dollar Values 

S Par 

f 

Per 

_ , Cwtwicv 

EqnW. 

U5lS 

eon*. COTr * ncv 

U1S 

M. CBrtW 

uaj - 

Q6SM Australians 

1.516 

0.9995 Irish t 

18095 

04494 Humans 

2224 

00*52 AaMria «driHHw 

32.12 

00011 JnaBilMkCl 

fSV 0 

05155 OAMcaaiuM 18399 

00158 Bntefan fin. franc 

6325 

130W KlMMffl iflnar 

03074 

DOCK? S. Korean wan 86788 

0J307 Canadian! 

1J4B5 

04027 Malar. rlM*n 

2883 

00057 SpteLMMla 

175.10 

60889 ocafadtkraoa 

.112425 

01112 Herw. krone 

089 

O1108 Strnd. kraaa 

90025 

0.153 Finals!) markka 

UU 

00542 PM. Mm 

1045 

08251 Totems 

3981 

00073 Greek drachma 

13680 

00057 Part, escudo 

17400 

00362 That haM 

27805 

0.1305 HOM KaM$ 

728 

0277 Sontfi rival 

1*105 

02723 UA8.tftrHen 

3873 


i Start bra! 12244 Irish c 

(a) Commercial Irgnc ID) Amounts needed to buy one pound (c) Amounts neodod to Duy one dollar (*) 
Until of IDO |xl Units of 1 580 Cyl Units of 1M00 
KA: not quoted; NA: not avunable. 

Sources: flanaur du Benelux (Brussels); Banco Commercials Itatlana (Mtton)t Chemical 
Bank (Now York); Bonoue National* do Paris (Paris); IMF tSDR); Bandua Arabe et 
Internationale d'lnvestlssement (dinar, rtyaL dirham), other data from Reuters ondAP. 




Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


April 29 


French 



Donor 

D-Mark 

Franc 

Sterling 

Franc 

ecu 

5UR 

1NL 

8V, 

- m 

5% 

- 5W- 

5 - 5V, 

12V. ■ life 

10 K, ■ 10 f* 

9% 

-m . 

1% 

m 

OH 

■ BVa 

5V, 

- 5» 

SVt - SUM. 

12** - 124* 

im - 104b 

9% 

- 9% 

8% 

3M. 

BVh 

- ID 

5% 

• Sit. 

5* - 516 

12*i- 12** 

109*- 10% 

9 Vi 

- v% 

BU. 


8* 

-9 

6* 

- »h 

5V. -SIS 

124*- 12 1* 

10**- 10% 

9% 

- 9% 

8V> 

1Y. 

»?t. 

. 99L 

6W. 

- th 

5V. . Ste 

12 - 121* 

10%. uv* 

Mi 

- 9% 

8% 


Kates atnnicobi* to interbank deposited SI m/Mon minimum loremfvotenll 

Sources: Moraan Guaranty (ootlor, DM. SF. Pound. FFU Lloyds Bank (ECU): Reuters 

tSORi. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


April 29 


1 mo. 

BU -BRk 
Source: Reuters. 


2 moL 

ote.-iw 


1 men. 
8M -8% 


tmn. 
8*. -8m 


m 


Key Money Rates 

United States 

DlKDUnt Role 
Federal Funds 
Prime Rote 
Broker Loon Rato 
Comm. Paper. 30-179 dors 
lendAtn Treosurv Bills 
64!Hnto Treasury Bills 
con 30-59 days 
CD's 6069 days 

West Germany 

Lombard Rate 
Ovemtsbl Rote 
One Month Interbank 
3-montli InterOonfc 
6-manfti Interbank 

France 

Intervontiofl Rat* 

Colt Money 

One^nonth Interim* 
frnoaa Mterflonk 
6HTrtdNi Interbonk 


5 


Britain 

anw 

CIO* 

Pr*». 

Bank Baso Rate 
Call Money - • 

121* 

1396 

8 

fl 

71-day Treosurv Bill 

12 1/U 


79* 

3-montti interbank 

1294 

wte * 

' 9 

in* 

9 

Japan 


8.15 

&I2 

Discount Rote 

S 

784 

7.77 

Coll Money 

. .cud 


UP U» 
7 JO . 7 JO 

755 755 


650 .650 

5.90 650 

555 S£5 

450 650 

6.10 4.10 


10b lOVi 
1014 1014 

10 5/16 1014 

ioh n sni 
■hr* tow 


6Woy irrismank 


1ZW 

u 

12 

lVk 


- 6te 


Gold Prices 


] 


Sources: Reuters. Commerzbank. Credit Ly- 
annals, Lloyds Badk,.atmk of Tokyo. 


AM. PM. ebb* 

Hons KonO 32275 32125 + 030 

Lu-embours 3XL25 — + Q5S 

Ports 1125 Ulol 331.98 323J* —0.17 

Zurich iw« _ UU 

London 32350 32250 —150 

RewVork . - . 225.10 +210 

. OfWdol tlxinss for London. Ports ond Unem- 
bouro, aoertns tmd ckalns wlces (or Hons Koag 
and Zurlcn, New Ygrt Corran current contract. 
All vices In U55 per ounce. 

Source- Reuters. 


Markets Gosed 

Because of the. May Day. holiday, financial markets in Brussels, 
Frankfurt Milan, -Paris, Singapore. Stockholm and Zurich will be dosed 
Wednesday. AH banks and^ ^fmandal markets were closed Monday in 
Japan for the Emperor’s Birthday. 


Money for the Raiders: ^ The Junk Bond Financiers 

Commitments made by targe investors and other? to htQh-yfefd issues, called junk bonds, intended to finance takeovers 




fluldkala 

MBVNf * 

IksI* 

TotN nmW.ftr 

Number Watt fain- 

or daLFMtete 

investor* Iron 






•' -■ . 



Takeover Target 

Mra at ' 
As* Rand 

.flftuttlOB 

(SmSmanaj 

Charles 

Knapp 

Tbrouph: 
SunUst 
ftnancW. 
' TraWBBf 
HotfnQS 

Masterfan 

HttcEs 

Through: 

Bcftertoy 

MHtritt 

Stephen 

Wynn 

Through: 

Golden 

Nuog« 

NtilM* 

Pan* 

s? . 

Ill0.y:i“v7 

Gene 

PhllUpa 

Brough: 

Souhmuk 

Corporation 

Through: * 

tWonse 

wop 

Fred 

Cair 

Through: Es- 
ecuteeLite 
muranee 
Company, 

Safa 

Secoribes" 

Total, 
SgM 
large ■ 

Invest ore 

PNfflps 
Petroteum (C) 

31(500 

47 . 3268 

5100 

$2® ‘ 

540 

■ 520 

$25 

$80 


S558 

American Natural 
Resources (P) 

.* 300. 

■34 » 


.80 - 

SO 

, 36 / 

25 

so - J 

$50 

290 . 

WaltDfeney 
Productions (C) 

MO 

22 -15 

200 



io 




. 225 

National 

Can IP) 

N9 

36 ' ; 9 

25 

/ -ip 

f 



7 


33 

83. 

Condec 
Corporation (A) 

30 

4 . : V;. .. 






17 

33 

50 

QRAND 

TOTAL 

33,123. 

wei 

$325 

995 *: 

$90 

366 . 

357 

312T 

3116 

31*206 


Noted (Q Margar orated. IP) Uwdv pwKflng, (A) Acoulmd by Fartoy MuM* 

.‘*Mteat tep^»> > n tewte^» t vBteB , ttbtea , ACb || M8teibteiian g w | 6W>4.«*l rt tteapteiteioM8ponto»i»atinacoBiBi*tnwi*»taottwrbaafci. 
•'AalndwtenitentbrolMf.cliteBfpoBtviaBitte i ovowntlnBMr.CteTtnitw AmwlCPntteftx«tROTOurc<»«naN«iwnwCwico«*xiihii«n i* . 


Hw Now York Tuxs 


Junk Bonds: A Corporate Raider’s Sword 


By Fred R. Bleakley 

New York Times Serving 

NEW YORK — The financial press has 
been bulging with the latest examples of a 
world seemingly gone mad with corporate 
takeover fever. 

However varied the prey and their pursu- 
ers, there is one common denominator in 
these efforts: All are likely to rely on an 



[ped fuel 

frenzy that has gripped the United States in 
recent months. 

Among the big names in the junk-bond 
business are T. Boone Pickens and Carl 
Icahn, along with two newcomers, Ted 
Turner, the media financier who is moving on 
CBS Inc., and Stephen Wynn, whose Golden 
Nugget Inc. is bidding for Hilton Hotels 
Corp. 

In the arsenal of today’s takeover bucca- 
neers, the junk bond is the latest — and 
perhaps most deadly — weapon. The junk 
bond has helped bring about so much take- 
over activity that Congress is now scrutiniz- 
ing it and corporate executives across the 
United States are charging that it threatens 
the very fabric of American business. 


“Junk bonds are the Holy Grail for hostile 
takeovers, at least for now” said Roger 
Miller, co-director of mergers and acquisi- 
tions at Salomon Brothers, a firm that often 
defends companies from raiders. 

Junk-bond financing involves putting to- 
gether a package of securities whose high 
rates of interest and dividends will be paid 
mostly by the target company once it is ac- 
quired. All a raider must ao to lunge at even 
the mightiest corporation is to get a small 
circle of private investors to make a commit- 
ment to buy such securities. 

With that f inancing lineup, or even the 
threat of it, in band, the raider can then 
mount a takeover bid, especially when a tar- 
get company’s management is unresponsive 
to a friendly overture. 

And, unlike the old days, he can stalk his 
prey without first winning bis banker’s sup- 
port 

The reach of the junk bond today is vast 
and growing drawing a widening circle of 
investors, raiders, and investment bankers. 
With junk-bond financing, takeover entre- 
preneurs of even modest size can rattle a 
mighty saber Mien attacking a giant prey. 

Small corporations can go big-game hunt- 
ing And many major corporations, newly 


vulnerable, must now scramble to lift their 
stock prices out of striking range. It is a 
development that is causing increasing alarm. 

“Junk bond financing of takeovers is a 
further exacerbation of increased leverage in 
the economy,” said Martin Lip ton of Wach- 
tel, Upton, Rosen & Kate, a law firm used 
frequently by giant corporations under at- 
tack. 

He said -that increasing speculation and 
dependence on debt is “creating a system 
which historically goes back to the tulip bub- 
ble in the 17th century, the Smith Sea bubble 
in the 18th century, the money panics in the 
19tb century and in 1929, which have resulted 
in crashes, panics, and great devastation ” 
Moreover, the small group of junk-bond 
investors, which includes such aggressive fi- 
nanciers as the Bdzberg family, Charles W. 
Knapp and Saul P. Steinberg, has come under 
heavy criticism. It is said to be an opportunis- 
tic cadre more eager to collect commitment 
fees and share in a raider's legal blackmail of 
a company, known as greenmail, than to put 
away the securities as a Jong-term investment 
And critics say that despite the raiders’, 
claims that they are the champions of share- 

(Continued on Page 17, CoL 1) 


Arco Announces 
Major Cuts to 
Boost Earning s 


The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Atlantic 
Richfield Co. said Monday it is 
getting out of the gasoline market- 
ing business east of the Mississippi 
River, abandoning its copper and 
molybdenum businesses and mak- 
ing other retrenchments that will 
lead to a one-time write-off against 
earnings of $1.3 biHioQ this year. 

To sweeten the sting from the 
second such cutback in Jess than a 
year, the sixlh-largest U.S. oil com- 
pany said it was raising its dividend 
and buying back more than 20 per- 
cent of its stock for $4 billion. 

Arco, based in Los Angeles, said 
directors approved the reorganiza- 
tion on Sunday, citing “diminished 
expectations” for future oQ prices. 

The company did not say how 
many of its 39,400 employees 
would lose their jobs, but an- 
nounced there would be a special 
severance and pension plan. 

Tile program will produce $500 
million a year in savings from oper- 
ating cuts but will raise interest 
expenses by $250 milli on. ]t will 
therefore increase earnings $250 
million by 1986, Arco said. 

Investors appeared to cheer the 
developments, with Arco stock 
shooting up $5.50 to $58 JO a share 
in early trading on the New York 
Stock Ex chang e. 

One person not surprised by Ar- 
co’s cuts was Tracy L. Stanton, 
president of the 60,000-member 
Service Station Dealers of America 
and owner of a Shell station in 
Bexley, Ohio. 

“That's been going on probably 
for the last 10 years,” Mr. Stanton 
said. “First it was Texaco, then 
Exxon. The majors are restructur- 
ing the market, trying to push more 
volume through fewer stations.” 


Under the restructuring, Arco 
said it will “sell or otherwise dis- 
pose" of: 

• its refinery in Philadelphia and 
about 2,000 Arco-brand gas sta- 
tions, convenience stores and relat- 
ed marketing outlets in 10 Eastern 
states, the District of Columbia 
and the Chicago metropolitan area. 

• All of its remaining noncoal 
mineral operations. 

• Certain unspecified invest- 
ments that “no longer relate to its 
business strategies.” 

Arco also said it was cutting 
spending on oil and natural gas 
exploration and writing down the 
value of certain' exploration prop- 
erties. 

“The petroleum industry faces a 
difficult environment," said Robert 
O. Anderson, Arco’s chairman. 
“We believe that those who are 
willing to confront it realistically 
will find substantial opportunities. 
This program puts us where we 
need to be in both operating and 
capital structure.” 

Arco said it would raise its quar- 
terly dividend by 33 3 percent, to 
$] a share from 75 cents, payable 
June 15 to shareholders of record 
on May 17. 

It said that be ginning May 2, it 
would spend $4 billion to buy back 
an estimated 50 milli on to 67 mil- 
lion shares of its stock, or between 
21 percent and 28 percent of its 
outstanding shares. 

The dual announcement of ma- 
jor cutbacks and a stock-repur- 
chase program followed the strate- 
gy Arco tired last summer, when it 
said it would take a 5785 million 
writedown against earnings for the 
planned sale of mineral and chemi- 
cal holdings. 


World Banking Market 
Slows Down Markedly 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The International 
banking market, which early this 
year looked as if it had recovered 
from the shock following the mid- 
1982 outbreak of the Latin Ameri- 
can debt crisis, appears to have 
entered a new phase of markedly 
slower growth. 

The Bank For International Set- 
tlements, the Basel-based central 
bankers' central bank that tracks 
the market, said in its quarterly 
report issued Monday mi the final 
three-month period for 1984 that 
net international bank credit (ex- 
cluding double counting resulting 
from the redepositing of funds be- 
tween banks) expanded only $25 
billion. 

This appears to confirm the 
slowdown witnessed in the third 
quarter, when the net credit figure 
rose only $10 billion. 

That figure — a paltry sum com- 
pared with past market perfor- 
mance, even in the immediate wake 
of the debt crisis — was seen as 
possibly being exceptional, the re- 
sult of extreme caution forced on 
the market as Continental Illinois 


Dollar Off 
Slightly 

In Europe Trade 

United Press International 

LONDON — The dollar 
opened the week lower against 
most European currencies 
Monday. Gold was steady. 

The dollar opened a fraction 
lower against all major curren- 
I ties except the Swiss franc. In 
' Zurich, the U.S. currency 
opened slightly higher at 2^215 
Swiss francs, up from 2.6175 on 
Friday. In Frankfurt, the dollar 
was .at 3.1148 Deutsche marks, 
down from 3.1527 on Friday. In 
Paris it dosed at 9 .5045 French 
francs, down from 9.615. 

The pound rose to $1.2305, 
compared with $1217. London 
analysts said activity on the cur- 
acy markets remained at a 
crawl, with most dealers wait- 
ing for Tuesday’s release of sev- 
eral U.S. economic reports. 
Gold opened unchanged in Zu- 
rich at S322J0 and it was up 
$125 in London at $32175. 


National Bank & Trust Co. stum-: 
bled toward collapse. 

The BIS now reports that “tak j 
ing into account seasonal influ-' 
ences {which normally bloai 
fourth-quarter activity}, it appears 
that ... the underlying growth of 
international bank credit slowed 
down once more in the second half 
of 1984." 

The six-month total of $35 bil- 
lion is the smallest since the first- 
half of 1983, when net credits 
reached a low of $25 billion. With 
confidence in the credit market re- 
stored following debtor-country 
agreements with the International 
Monetary Fund and rescheduling 
packages with the banks, the net 
credit figure expanded $60 billion 
in the second-half of 1983 and $135 
billion in the first-half of 1984. 

Evidence that the difficulties of 
Continental Illinois ceased to be a 
worry in the fourth quarter is 
shown by the sharp rebound in the 
interbank market, where banks 
tend to one another. After register- 
ing a rare decline of $7.4 billion in 
the third quarter, interbank busi- 
ness expanded $43.4 billion in the 
final period. 

Deposits from nonbank entities, 
which had dropped $5.7 billion in 
the third quarter, rose $7 billion. 






!. 5 % 


C6sar Virata 


Philippines 
Reports Pact 
With Banks 


Reuters - 

MANILA — The Philippines 
and its creditor banks have readied 
a final agreement on a 510-biUioo 
rescue package, a spokesman for 
Prime Minister Cesar Virata said 
Monday. 

The spokesman said the problem 
of the National Co mme rcial Bank 
of Saudi Arabia’s refusal to take 


Reuters 

BONN — West German gross 
national product will grow by 
about Z5 percent in real terms this 
year, in line with expansion of 2.6 
percent in 1984, the country’s five 
leading independent economic re- 
search institutes said Monday. 

In a joint report, Lbe institutes 
also predicted that the trade sur- 
plus win widen to a record 75 bil- 
lion Deutsche marks ($23.80 bil- 
lion) from 54 billion DM last year. 

They predicted that the current 
account surplus would rise by be- 
tween 30 billion and 35 billion DM 
from 17.7 billion DM in 1984. The 
current account is the broadest 
measure of trade, encompassing 
merchandise and nonmcrchandise 
items. 

Inflation, the report said, will 
average about 2J5 percent, after 2.4 
percent last year. Unemployment is 
expected to rise slightly to average 
228 million compared with Iasi 
year's 227 million. 

The forecast for GNP, which 
measures the total value of goods 
and services, including income 
from foreign investments, is broad- 
ly in line with official gove rnme nt 
expectations of 2_5-percent growth 
or more. 

However, several ministers have 


Bom Widens 
Trade Surplus 

Reiners 

WIESBADEN, West Germa- 
ny — West Germany’s current 
account surplus widened to a 
provisional 17 billion Deutsche 
marks ($857.1 million) in 
March from an upward-revised 
23 billion DM in February, the 
Federal Statistics Office' said 
Monday. 

TTie merchandise trade sur- 

S lus increased to a provisional 
.4 billion DM from an unre- 
vised 4.7 bQIion DM in Febru- 
ary. 

In the first quarter the cur-, 
rent account surplus rose to 42 
billion DM from 22 billion 
DM in the corresponding peri- 
od in 1984, and the trade sur- 
plus increased to 13.6 billion 
DM from 11.4 billion DM. 


recently said they saw this year's 
expansion nearer 3 percent. 

The institutes said growth will 
probably continue next year as well 
but gave no forecast. Karl Heinrich 
Oppenlander, president of the Mu- 


nich-based 1FO institute, one of 
the five that produced the report, 
said last week that 1986 expansion 
should be slightly faster than this 
year's. 

The Teport noted economic ac- 
tivity was limited by harsh weather 
in the early months of the year but 
said the recovery should continue 
for the rest of 1985. 

Exports will again be the main 
prop of the West German econo- 
my, rising 9 percent this year, but 
domestic demand will be Nery re- 
served," the report predicted. 
Equipment investment will rise but 
will be concentrated in manufac- 
turing industry and not in sectors 
where medium-term chances for 
creating newjobs are best, the insti- 
tutes said. 

Imports will increase by between 
a real 5 and 6 percent this year, the 
report forecast 

The study maintained that the 
dollar mil average just under 3 DM 
in the rest of the year, but will rise 
against most other currencies in the 
European Monetary System. 

In an appendix, the report said 
more must be done to strengthen 
growth and remove obstacles to 
higher employment. 


part in the package had been re- 

_ solved, but that no date had been 

The bulk ofdwT Toimh-quarter for ^ agreement 


net lending, or $17 billion, was to 
entities in the industrialized coun- 
tries, especially in the United 
States. Loans to non-bank U.S. 
borrowers rose $5.7 billion while 
non-bank borrowers in other major 
industrialized countries declined. 

That decline, the BIS states, is 
“probably largely as a consequence 
of substitution of security issues for 
bank loans.” 

The $7-biUion len 
to entities outside the 
area was “essentially a 
phenomenon” and “quite modest” 
compared to fourth-quarter pat- 
ients of previous years, the BIS 
said. It noted that the $163 billion 
(Continued on Page 17, CoL 1) 


increase 


Mr. Virata traveled to New Yoifc 
last week to persuade the bank to 
lake part He returned over the 
weekend. 

Several creditor banks had 
threatened to withdraw their sup- 
port for the package after the Na- 
tional Commercial Bank said il did 
not want to join other hanks in 
syndicating new loans. The hank; 
which wanted a separate agree- 
ment, had an exposure of about 
$150 million. 

The new package includes $925 
million in new loans, $3 billion in 
trade credits and restructuring of 
$5.8 billion in debts. The Pbilip- 
pines owes its bank creditors about 
$25 billion. 


ARGENTINE 

REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL U.5. $ BONOS 

AND 

BONOS NOMWAHVOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

JEhguineJi to: 

CH-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Roe de la Palx. 
Telex: 25869. 

TeL.- 021/20 1741. 


Notice To Commodity Investors : 

PROFESSIONAL 

MONEY 

MANAGEMENT 

Rudolf Wolff has developed considerable 
expertise in money management, and is 
able to offer proven programs for qualified 
investors who do not have the time or 
expertise to manage their own investments 

Minimum initial Inve s tment $100^000. 

Fkidctl Wolff, estobtetod In 1886, « 6 iwamber of me Noranda group ol 
companies, a mining and resource group with a net worth of SZWIlfon. 


Rudotf WoiH Futures inc.HreBHHteai 

295 Madison Avenue, New ttxk, NY 10017 USA 
Phone (212) 5734440 Telex ITT 423840 | 

Attn; William Rafter | 



_ Please send 
1 a detailed 
( Rudolf Wolff 
* Information Kit 


Name .. 
Address 


Ptww 


Teta 


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'■ I 4 "- 




• ; PARIS;8,'rtie Royale ““35; avenue Vlaor-Hugo - A£roport de Roissy -Duty-Free*- 
CANNES'. 6 , to- Croisdie GENfcVE: 68. rue du Rhone CRAhS-SUR-STERRE: -Les Trols V£t£ran£» 











■la. 







Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 



SAABS HAVE 

AIWAYS DEFIED COMPARISON 

INTRODUCING THE 
DEFIANT S 



jm 



m 







Page 11 



EVTERNATONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


Saabs have never invited compari- 
son with other cars. They’ve never been 
like other cars. 

They’ve never looked like other 
cars. They don’t drive like other cars. 
They don’t perform like other cars. 
When aerodynamics meant nothing to 
other car- 
makers, it 
meant every- 
thing to 
Saab. 

When 
other car- 
makers 
pushed then- 
cars, Saab 
pulled. 

When other carmakers gave up power 
for fuel efficiency, Saab found a way to 
give up neither. 

From the beginning, people 


position that it is possible for one car to 
do everything well. 

It is exceptionally fast, with a 
16-valve, intercooled, turbocharged engine. 
It is practical as well as comfortable. It’s the 
largest Saab ever made. Your passengers 
will find driving in a 9000 Turbo 16 as 



Saabs range from the economical Saab 90 and the versatile Saab 900 series to the 
luxurious new Saab 9000 Turbo 16 . 

enjoyable as you find driving one. 

It rides like a luxury car, yet 
handles like a sports car. And like all 
Saabs before it, it is unquestionably safe. 

How to defy 
compromise. 
There is only 
one way to fully 
understand what 
Saab has created 
in the new 9000 
Turbo 16. 

You have to 
take some time and 
study it. That’s the 
only way anyone 
has ever under- 
stood what Saabs are. 

Write us soon and well send what 
you need to understand the Saab 9000 
Turbo 16. 



The interior of the Saab 9000 Turbo 16 is large and luxurious. 

bought Saabs because Saabs defied the 
limitations other carmakers designed 
into their products. 

And now there is a Saab that is 
more unlike other cars than any other 
Saab before it. 

The new Saab 9000 Turbo 16. 


The least compromised car ever built 

Carmakers build cars with built-in 
compromises. They build exciting cars 
that aren’t practical. Practical cars that 
are dull. Fast cars that lack efficiency. 
Goodhandling cars that are uncomfort- 
able. 

The new Saab 9000 Turbo 16 defies 
these compromises. 

It is dedicated to the simple pro- 


Then, 
compare it 
against what- 
ever other car 
you’re thinking 
about buying. 

If you’ve 
studied properly, 
you should find 
there’s no 
comparison. 



One reason Saabs aren't 
like other cars is that the 
manufacturer isn’t like 
other car manufacturers. 

The Saab-Scania group 
also produces aircraft, 
satellites , buses, trucks , 
industrial equipment and 
electronics. 



9000 TURBO 16 


For additional information,write to 

Saab-Scania AB, Saab Car Division, Advertising Department, S-611 81 Nykoping, Sweden. 





NYSE Most Actives 


1 31* 

+ % 

1 58% 

+5% 

i 45% 

— % 

> 28% 

— % 

l 14% 

+1* 

67 

— 1* 

■ 39* 

— * 

41% 

— 1. 

1 20% 

— * 

44* 

— 1 

u 

— % 

1 49 

+ % 

1 64% 

+ % 

1 25 

— * 

1 126% 

— * 


Daw Jones Bond Averages 


Bonos 

UtliiNn 

industrials 


Dow Jones Averages 


Own HI oh W Ifflt op. 

Indus 127256 1277JM 1B730 tt£3 — 
Tran 2431 57SI9 57139— 7M 

tM wS TOJ7 15382 TWJ- ua 

Comp ST2.77 51151 SD6ST 50830 — 578 


NYSE Diaries 


Advaraad 
DKIInsd 
Unctramnd 
Total I90UM 
Nn HUB 
Now Lews 


438 439 

HIM SS3 

40 474 

1999 1947 

H 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


NYSE index 


Previous today 
High Low Close 3 PM 
composite 10433 T0SJ3 10552 10452 

Industrials 19131 12044 12044 12033 

Transp. *85 M80 9441 M87 

Ullimes 54.17 5434 5*35 55J3 

Finance 11333 11140 11280 11159 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Bay Sales UtiTt 

April 34 173.494 414.159 1031 

April 25 178.038 445364 8545 

April 24 178.982 425,733 7.997 

April 23 329300 44*854 7504 

April 22 2B0854 44*524 *950 

’Included hi the sales ftaures 


Mondays 


VoL at 3 PM 71840800 

Prev.3PJM.vot 7W3MOO 

Ptbv consolidated dose 104381370 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to ttie dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
unctanaod 
Total issues 
New HWn 
New Laws 


Ctoee Piw. 

917 238 

328 274 

219 241 

744 775 

17 31 

4 4 


Standard & Poor's index 


Previous Today 

HU Law Close 3 P.M. 
Industrials 204.17 20220 20255 201.40 

Tramp. 153 9? 151.94 15128 149.95 

Utilities 8284 8113 8256 B1JH 

Finance 2280 21.78 2159 7183 

Composite 18340 18111 IB1IB 18151 


NASDAQIndex 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Tro«sP. 


Week Year 

Close Noon 

201.14 28353 

297.14 295.91 

34880 - 
338.92 - 
274.13 - 
24852 — 

251.67 — 


AMEX Sales 


3 PJM. volume 
prev, 3 PAL volume 
Prev. com- volume 


AMEX Most Actives 


WWTSB 

BAT . 

Amdahl 

DomeP 

Busttn 

CltCd a 

Tie 

Astrute 
SFNpfA 
vlCcntA 
EdroBo 
vIAnal V 

Data Pd 
Pott-* 
Dynlct 


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17% IT* 
4 VS 4Vk 
13* 13 

2 * 2 * 
12 % 12 * 
Uft Ws 
59k 5% 

its I 

7* .7% 
TOW 10. 
12% 12* 
2 * 2 
12 % 11 % 
3% 3% 

14% 13% 


AMEX Stock index 


Previous 

High Low Close 

00.74 22952 229.18 



Rate Worries Said to Hurt NYSE 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange were heading lower late Mon- 
day, and some analysis attributed the decline to 
investors' worry about interest rates. 

Auto stocks weakened and oil issues provided 
most of the action. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was off 
10.60 to 1.264.57 an hour before the dose. 

Although prices in tables on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
P.M : 


Declines led advances by a 2-1 ratio. Volume 
amounted to about 71.1 million, compared with 
74.9 million in the like period Friday. 

Prices were lower in moderate trading of 
American Stock Exchange issues. 

The market continued to retreat because 
"there simply wasn't enough conviction to get 
this thing going," said Charles Comer, of Op- 
penheixner & Co. 

“A lot of investors are stepping aside for a 
while," he said. 

Mr. Comer said the market may continue to 
be sloppy until investors have a better handle on 
interest rates. 

Leadership from such companies as Eastman 
Kodak. IBM, General Electric and General 
Motors was poor, he said. ‘They're not putting 
on a very good show here," Mr. Comer said. 

"For the moment, there's not a lot to entice 
investors into the market. And for those who 


want to get out, there’s plenty ot excuses " he 
said. 

The market's losses Monday were not unto- 
ward, based on Friday’s weak performance, 
said Joseph Broder, of Stuart, Coleman. 

"The April market made fools of us," he said, 
with many analysts expecting the market to 
break 1.300. 

“1 believe we'll get going toward mid-May," 
he said. 

The overall outlook is favorable, and sooner 
or later, investors will translate positive eco- 
nomic factors into higher prices, Mr. Broder 
said- 

OU issues were higher, dominating the activi- 
ty on the hopes they may introduce restructur- 
ing packages benefit ting shareholders. 

Atlantic Richfield was near the top of the 
active list, and sharply higher after announcing 
such a restructuring plan. 

Other gainers in petroleums were Mobil, Ex- 
xon, Amoco. Texaco and Chevron. 

Unocal was also up a fraction in active trad- 
ing. 

Auto issues softened, with General Motors, 
Ford and Chrysler all lower. 

Technology stocks were losing, with IBM. 
Digital Equipment and Cray Research aD low- 
er. 

Sperry Corp. was up a bit after reporting 
fourth-quarter net of SI. 89 a share, compared 
with net from continuing operations of SI. 53 in 
the vear-earlier quarter. 

Xerox was slightly lower. It reported first- 
quarter net of $1.06 a share, down from SI—O a 
share in the year-earlier quarter. 



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.Uta 18 103 

484 45 10 TO 

11 1864 

650 

80 10 11 76 

84 15 8 153 

485 48 3ta 

J* 15 IS 1051 

2- 00 11.9 7 1220 

7.48 129 5fc 
787 128 tax 

,86 15 17 200 
1JH 38 25 768 
152 7.9 9 153 

80 1.9 7 1061 

30 

52 28 17 1221 
180 48 13 93 

180 35 13 47 

188 108 7 1086 
9-32 134) 4501 

786 125 6001 

7J6 128 100X 

255 118 6 

334 117 60 

113 116 29 

3.12 128 ■ 

259 113 13 

380 124 34 

382 125 50 

44)0 134) TO 

4.12 119 13 

288 128 5 

80 35 11 84 

84 44 163 

22S 48 S 

136 9.1 11 5096 
400 108 34 

180 28 9 460 

12 3644 

180 18 51 332 

160 44 6 154 

4 60 

.12 MI 

232 19 9 2074 
86 38 4 23 

1.16 11 18 299 
180 48 12 236 

82 13 13 676 

180 6.1 11 2945 
38 IS 21 158 

80 48 63 

88 U 16 1171 
2410 103 47 

80 U 12 967 

3- 00 IU 12 2564 

380 95 2 

480 108 16 

288 78 8 563 

830 118 338X 

U> 118 2SOOz 
780 11.1 332 0 X 

289 103 2 

385 115 9 

I -DO 1D8 
888 11.1 
280 38 21 387 
10* 119 7 373 






12 * 

44% GnDvn 
48% G*nEI 
47% QnFtb 
5% GGIhn 
5% GnHme 
0% GHosf 9 
8* 

IS* 

47% 

61 
33 
34* 

44% 

3* 

7* 

46% 

5 

39% 

9% 


ufA 110 123 

ol 2.00 13^ 

Pf zes 118 
Pf 287 125 
2-10 T25 
LSI 128 

m 113 

80 48 10 


31* 20 . 

34* 23* 
34% 13* . 
13% 10%. 
43 26% . 

68% 54% . 
16* 19% . 
9% 5* . 

44% 99 . 

46% 37* . 
29* 21* . 
26% 15% . 
27* 21% . 


17 167 31* 

8 405 SA'A. 

10 148 32* 

199 11% 
6 429 40 
lOOz 67* 
132 16% 
20 43 9* 

15 3478 44* 

9 122 39* 

18 t 26% 

14 93 24 

14 1205 24% 


30% 31* 4- % 
25% 25%- * 
22% E% + M 
11 * 11 % 

39 89 —* 

67* 67* + * 
16* 16* — * 
9% 9* + * 

43% 43% + * 
39* 39% — % 
26% 26%— * 
23* 23%— * 
24% 24* + * 




m 




29 
49* 

27 
43* 43 
58% 58* 
03% 102 1 

61% 

30* 

2 * 

17* 

6* 

3% 

30 

57% 

58 

2% 

15% 

6% 

58* 

13% 


w* 

7% 

18* 

9% 

41* 

27* 

40* 

28 

16% 

12% 

22% 

14% 

20% 

15% 

16 

8* 

24 

14* 

IB% 

14% 

20 

15* 

54* 

36* 

19% 

12* 

37% 

28* 

22* 

10 

Z1 

17% 

43 

18 

115 

49 

20 

10% 

15* 

12* 

88 

68 

50% 

29* 

34%. 

3% 


28* 

19% 

26* 

20% 

16% 

TO 

34* 

26% 

27% 

16* 

5 

2* 




187IC 

10.9 


165 

184 

98 


37 

1.12 

22 

IS 

159 




33 

86 

38 

19 

10 

80 

21 

27 

9 

180 

1.9 

14 

IBS 

86 

18 

30 

MS 


26 

15B 

80 

LI 

12 

46 

88 

38 

n 

4(1 



o 

236 

188 

43 

11 

47 

188 

40 

9 

115 

180 

118 

11 

n 

184 

78 

ID 


30t 

18 

7 

167 

80 

13 

15 

296 

52 

30 

17 

34 

53 

a 


m 


m 




17% 11% OtiMafr 






































































l?n _ 

s«s>? m * 


S & ?! 


ffia A 


«3 J* 9> 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 



T2Mnnm 
HMlLow Stock 


SR CRH 

Dlv.YM.PE WBsHtah Low Quct. Ores 



Seoaon 

Season 




Com 

da. 

Htob 

Law 

Omi 

High 

LOW 

2110 

mo 

Jul 



2041 

+13 

Est Sates 


PMv.sates 1573 




Prev.OavOPW lot. 34,159 OH343 




1 ORANGE JUICE C NYC E I 
USOOIbb-CMKlPorRk 





lUJU 

15100 

May 157 jo 

15785 

I56J0 

15770 

—JO 

18455 

1^ 

Jut 15&78 

15670 

15170 

15580 

—JO 

uuo 

Sap 15560 

15566 

15480 

15480 

—JO 

Kino 

1525D 

NOV 19280 

13260 

15160 

1SUO 

—70 

18000 

15275 

Jen mn 

inn 

15KM 

15280 

—30 

177 SO 

153(10 

mot 



mn 

—20 

16Z5D 

16080 

May 



SO* SB 

—70 

157 JO 

157 JO 

Jul 



15X80 

— 70 

18050 

mjs 

Son 



15780 

—70 

Bs). Sates 

400 Prev. Sates 

399 




Prev. DoyOpwi lirt. 6JS7 up54 





Metals 


COPPER.(CQMEX) 






SSnoibercsnteperlb. 






9X50 

5470 

MOV 

6X90 

MSI 

<270 

<075 

+85 

6475 

6185 

Jun 




<365 

+75 

■875 

5780 

Jul 

<355 

6470 

6X55 

<375 

+60 

BLIO 

5780 

Sop 

6460 

6480 

*485 

6450 

-MO 

8475 

an 

Dm 

6580 

6570 

6470 

6470 

+JD 

8470 

5960 

Jan 




44 f*l 

+65 

8080 

5980 

Mar 

8560 

6560 

65J0 

6570 

+60 

7480 

61.10 

May 

6565 

6565 

6575 

6665 

+65 

7460 

61J0 

Jul 

6&7D 

6565 

6570 

6565 

+65 

7080 

030 

Sea 

*570 

*585 

WB 

6570 

+65 

7080 

6480 

Dm 

6650 

4*50 

6650 

6675 

+65 

7070 

6980 

Jan 




6&5D 

+65 

Eft. Sates 1X500 

Prev. Sates 1X308 




Prev. Day Oam Ink 87751 off 191 




ALUMINUM ICOMEX) 






40800 ibAr rents pbt m. 






8280 

<760 

May 

4150 

48LSS 

4U6 

4X35 

—OS 

49JH 

49.10 

Jun 




4U0 

—85 

5960 

48JB 

Jul 

4960 

4965 

4978 

497S 


7478 

<975 

Sap 

50.10 

50.10 

60.10 

enne 

+85 

7H60 

5065 

Dec 

51 J8 

51 JO 

51 JO 

5175 

+JH 

76JS0 

JUS 

Jan 




5165 

+85 

7X60 

Slid 

Mar 




5265 

+85 

6673 

5195 

MOV 




5375 

+85 

6965 

5585 

Jul 




S48S 

+85 

SX10 

5180 

Sap 




5485 

+85 



Dec 




5685 

+85 



Jan 




5665 

+85 

Est. Sam 

525 Prev. Sales 

312 




Prev. DavOpm InL 3,121 off 22 




SILVER (COMEX) 






5800 tray ot-csal 

3 par troy oz. 





15138 

55U 

May 


6318 

«S8 

414 1 

+5J 

14618 

5628 

Jul 

<398 

<4*8 

6315 

6448 

+47 

11B38 

5738 

Sap 

6478 

6568 

6640 

653J 

+48 

12308 

5908 

Dk 

4x->n 

<718 

6548 

ten* 

+58 

171 SIS 

3PS8 

Jan 

6698 

6698 

6*98 

<737 

+5B 

11938 

mo 

MOT 

6788 

6B6J 

6775 

6846 

+5.1 

10488 


May 

6818 

6968 

6808 

6956 

+57 

M58 

6358 

Jul 

7048 

7048 

1048 

7076 

+56 

94SJ3 

6418 

Sap 

7308 

7308 

7208 

THU 

+56 

T998 

6678 

Dec 




7396 

+5.9 

708 

708 

Jan 




7468 

+57 

E*«. Sate* 25800 Prav.5atos 17872 




Prey. Dav Oaen Int 74600 off 321 




PLATINUM THYME) 






50 Irov er-doitere par tray ol 





25380 

25080 

May 




am 


^7J0 

25180 

Jun 




28660 

4570 

449 JO 

34180 

Jut 

28350 

2*960 

28X00 

20060 

4570 

39380 

25080 

Oct 

28880 

29480 

21880 

29260 

+6J0 

37X50 

26080 

Jan 

29450 

29980 

294.10 

29960 

+650 



Apt 

30180 

30450 

30180 

306.10 

+450 

Est. Sates 


Prev. Sates MHO 




Prev. Dav Oeen Int. 1X004 oH2l5 




PALLADIUM (NYME) 






100 Irev as- dollars nor az 






159 JO 

I0A50 

Jun 

11170 

71X90 

11179 

11X60 

+225 

14185 

10675 

Sop 

11150 

11380 

11150 

11285 

+275 

14IJD 

105JD 

Doc 

11180 

11380 

11180 

11160 

+275 

127 JO 

10650 

Mar 

11180 

111JD 

11180 

111.10 

+225 

Est Salas 


Prev. Sates 

213 




Prev. D oyOpm I nL 6854 up 71 





GOLD (COMEX) 







loo trav az.- dollars per troy ox 





32780 

29280 

May 32SJQ 

WtVI 

325J0 

225.10 

+2.10 

51080 

28780 

Jun 

T>t «n 

32750 

32450 

32770 

+200 

48580 

29180 

Aug 

33080 

■WM 

22860 

33150 

+280 

49380 

2*780 

oct 

33370 

33650 

33379 

33680 

+280 

4B9J0 

30150 

Doc 

34080 

34150 

33450 

341.10 

+X20 

48X50 

30680 

Fab 

34580 

34750 

34580 

34660 

+230 

43570 

32050 

Jun 




358.10 

+250 

42860 

33180 

Aug 

36450 

36450 

1*450 

36470 

+260 

39570 

33580 

Od 




37060 

+270 

39380 

34280 

Dm 




37770 

+280 

Eft. Sates 21800 Prev. Sate* 28820 




Prev. Dav OPMlat.127641 up 476 






Industrials 


Financial 


US T, BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- pfs of IM pet. 

9225 87,14 Jun 91.98 91 JOB 9190 9193 

91.77 BAM SOP 9198 *163 9JJ7 9U9 

91.32 HSJ7 Doc *0.98 9078 9071 90.92 

9073 8680 Mar mss 9056 9055 9055 

BOM S7-B1 Jim 9035 KUS m3* 9035 

mss moo s«p 9am 9am iui mat 

WM 8905 DK 8*75 

89 86 mat Mar 89.53 

Esf.Sotes Prev. Sates 9742 

Prev. Day Doan InL 40769 off 772 
M YR. TREASURY ICRT) 

SIOOMO Prtn* Pts 8.32ndt Of 100 oct 
83-8 TO* Jun 80-22 80-29 80-20 30-22 

81-13 75-11 So* 79-21 79-26 79-19 79-28 

80-29 75-13 D*C 7B-25 

808 75-14 Mar 78-4 78-4 79 79 

79-26 74-30 Jun 77-11 

Est-Sates Prev. Sate* 5848 

Prev. Dav Open InL «UH off 210 
US TREASURY BONDS (am 
(I PCf-SlDtUXfrpts 8.33ms of 100 PC» 

77-15 57-Z) Jun 70-15 70-21 70-10 70-12 

7(5-2 57-10 Sop 60-15 69-22 89-11 89-12 

76-5 57-8 Doc 6840 68-25 60-15 69-16 

7380 57-3 Mar 6746 <7-31 <743 <7-23 

70-16 56-29 Jun <7-4 <7-1® <74 674 

703 56-29 SW <640 66-28 66-15 M-1S 

6946 5645 Doc 66 663 65-50 6500 

<9-12 5627 Mar 65-19 <5-19 <5-15 65-15 

<9-2 63-12 Jun 65-1 

68-26 664 So® 6441 

688 62-24 Doc 64-11 

Est. Salas Pfov-Soloo 97JS5 

Pntv.Oav Onon Intjl 5,168 off 2552 
ONMA(CBT) 

SKXUMB prtn-nts 8.32nd* of] 00 ed 
70-10 57-17 Jun 69-20 49-27 69-19 <943 

89-19 59-13 SOP 89 69-4 69 89-1 

68-18 59-4 DOC 40-13 

68-1 5840 MOT <747 

6748 50-25 Jun <7-4 <7-14 <74 <7-11 

67-3 65 SOP 6649 

EASnlH Prev. Sates 79 

Prev. Day Open Int. 4060 off 15 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- Pt* of 100 pet 

91 AS 8SJ30 Jun 9126 9U6 9127 9129 

91-08 8500 Sop 9063 9064 9057 9057 

9056 8534 Doc 9009 90 j09 9028 9000 

9018 86-56 Mar 8956 8956 8956 «56 

■9 JO 8683 Jun 89.18 8920 89.18 8821 

8950 E7J6 SOP 8009 8029 8829 8829 

8829 8834 Doc 8841 

Est. Solos Prov.SOlM 337 

Prov.DovOpon int. 5494 up 62 
EURODOLLARS IIMM) 

SI mlUkm-ptsQf 100 pet 

9131 8249 Jun 9027 9098 9091 9092 

9072 8453 Sop 9025 9025 9013 90.14 

9020 8420 Doc B9J1 8921 8950 2951 


Stock Indexes 



Commodity Indexes 


close 

Moody's NJV.f 

Reuters ■■-■■■■ 159SJI 

DJ. Futures. — - — NA 

Com. Research Bureau. NA 

Moody’s : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 
940.60 f 
1.904 JO 
12173 
241.00 






The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Sales of single-family 
homes in the United States climbed 9 percent in 
March to the highest level in a little more than a 
year, the government said Monday. 

“This is welcome news for an industry that 
was particularly hard Ml by the last recession 
and there are no signs to indicate dial the 
current boom wil] begin to slow anytime soon," 
said the While House spokesman, Larry 
Speak es. 

The report from the Commerce Department 
and the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development said March sales totaled 698,000, 
on a seasonally adjusted annual rate, compared 
with 638,000 in February. 

The March figure, representing the second 
straight monthly increase after a slight dedme 
in January, is the highest since February 1984, 
when the 'annual rate of sate reached 700,000 
homes. 

The housing industry experienced a sharp 
slowdown last spring as interest rates began 
climbing. But they peaked in July and have been 
faffing steadily since, leading to brisk sales in 
both new and existing homes. 

The average sales price of new homes sold in 
March was $100,200, down from SIOIJOO the 
month before. The nadianprice was $83,000 in 
March, compared with $83,100 in February. 
The median price means hall the homes sold for 
more and half for less. 

Regionally, the sharpest jump was the 21- 
percent gain in the West Home rales went up 9 
percent m the South and 7 percent in the Mid- 
west, but declined 8 percent in the Northeast. 


47% 33% Xerox 320 65 18 3106 46% 45% 4546—1 

53% 45% Xerox M 555 105 14 53 52 S3 

29 19 XTRA 54 35 9 157 25% 34% 24%— Vfc 


M W 5H9S® u I 19 27 26% 26% — % 

24% 13% Zopola 54 59 2S 777 14% 14% 1416— % 

OVf J2 Jnvj u 600 2 15 725 42 60% 41% + % 

22: 2% M*e « 713 20 % 19 % 19 %— % 

21*9 14% Zeros 16 111 18 17% 17%—% 


Close Previous 
High Low HU Ask Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

Storting per metric too 
MOV 10150 9750 9720 9950 9750 9950 
Aug 10650 10550 10550 10550 10120 10550 
Oct 11050 10950 109.*B 11050 10950 10950 
Doc 11550 11550 11520 11550 11550 11520 
Mw- 12820 13650 12750 12720 12720 12750 
May N.T. N.T. 13120 13250 13260 13350 
AW 13750 13750 13550 13850 13750 13750 
Volume: 1297 lots of SO tons. 

COCOA 

Starttna oor metric too 
May 1273 .1864 1264 126S 1287 1288 
Jly 1290 1278 1JM0 LOT 1592 1594 
Sep 1259 1250 1252 1253 1257 1258 
Doc 1-BS3 1.795 1.799 1200 1201 1202 
Mar 1200 1J95 1298 1200 1200 1201 
May NX N.T. 1200 1210 1205 1215 
Jly N.T. N.T. 1205 1225 1225 1235 
Volume; 2295 lots of 10 Ions. 

COFFEE 

Starting pot metric ton 
May 2,120 2598 2.116 2.118 XI2S 1127 
Jlv 2.168 2.141 ZT<6 1147 1165 2.147 
SOP 1212 2.170 2207 2210 2,210 2015 
NOV 2239 1214 2227 1230 2244 2247 
Jan -m ; 2547 UU 

Mar 2324 2518 ZZ® 2235 2235 22*5 
May N.T. N.T. 2210 2735 22W 2530 
Volume: 2 556 tats of 5 mu. 

GASOIL 

U J. donoiT per metric ion 
API 23050 23750 22650 22775 23050 23150 
Mar 22575 224.75 22550 22525 225-50 22650 
Jan 22075 21950 21975 22050 22175 22150 
Jly 21050 21750 21775 21825 21825 21875 
Aw 220-50 21975 219.50 22000 22050 27150 
Sep wim mm mm vm * -mnn rnv: 
OCt NX N.T. 22250 22550 22450 22650 
Nov NX NX 22450 23950 22550 22750 
DOC N.T. N.T. 22650 23050 22650 22750 
Volume: 1.174 lets of 100 tons. 

Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
change taasotu. 


London Metals 

April 29 


Paris Commodities 

April 29 


Clow 

HM Low Bid Ask 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric ton 
Aug 1790 1775 1584 1790 

Oct 1J1B I JOO 1,388 1510 

Dec N.T. NX USS U60 

Mar L428 1525 1528 1535 

May 15B0 1580 1575 15B0 

AW lJ+Q 1535 1538 1540 

Est. VOL: 340 tots Of SO tons. Prev. 
Hies: 879 lots. Open interest: 15534 
COCOA 

French francs per 108 kg 
MOV 2,170 1160 2.165 2,174 

Jlv NX NX 2.185 — 

SOP 2150 2.137 2.144 3,145 

DOC 2573 2565 25S3 2575 

Mar N.T. N.T. — ZD?» 

MOV NX NX — 2580 

Jly N.T. NX 2570 - 

Est. vol.: 134 lets of ID tons. Prev. i 
sales: 116 lots. Open Interest: 774 
COFFEE 

French francs per 700 leg 
MOV N.T. N.T. — 2520 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2582 2590 

5ep N.T. NX 2525 2545 

Nov NX NX 2535 2545 

Jan nx n.t. i&a isea 


Dividends April 29 || Cash Prices April 29 


Company Per Ami Pav Rec 

INCREASED 

Armstrong Wld Hid Q 52 % 6-1 5-10 

All Richfield Q 5150 6-13 5-17 

Consol FrelgWwavs Q 77 to 5-28 5-10 

UnlvarCarp Q 70 6-18 5-17 


REDUCED 

Q 

STOCK 


.15 6-10 5-15 


Countrywide Credit - 3% 6-7 5-17 

Grt Worm Fd S&L . in hi H 


Commodity and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santos, lb ■ 

Print doth 64/30 38 to. vd _ 
Steel billeti IPltt.l. Ian — 
iron 2 Fdrv. Pfilla, Ion- 
Steel scran No 1 nw Plti. . 

Lead Spot, lb 

Capper elect, lb 

Tin (Straits), lb 

Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb — 

Palladium, az ■ 

Sliver N.Y.oz 

Source: AP. 


NYSE Highs-Lowfl 


AlllodCp 

Amoco 

AflRfi2Npf 

BkJvnUGpfA 

Coast! CppfA 

Dean Foods 

EsinAIrpfC 

GrnMIPwr 

HonwsMFInn 

lOwaEILfP 

Me tETfOpf 
NevPaSOuf 


NIW HIGHS U 

AUledCPPf AmCon 1395 p 
Aowtod ABMOpf 

Mica BanwtBk 

CnHudGOf Pf CnLaEleepf 
CoaitICppfB Dor 1)0 on 
DOTE 340PK7 DukaP BIG 
FtNalnwdn HaEaCst 
GHSU 440pr GlfSU880pf 
IndMTOBpf inform Gen 

lawaResrcs irvngBki 
MoPubSve ncnbcb 


April 29 


AmuOepts 

AffRlchfid 

BenefISM 

CaastolCp 

DOVtPLptF 

DukePpfA 

GrTLcMuHnt 

HahNodGnpf 

intent Pw 

Kentcky Ut 

NeMacDBrd 


OcciPpfJ 

PMEU5O0f 

5oulndGEs 

UnEJML 

UfPL2f0pf 


APLCp 

CnmptKn* 

Genescalnc 


NEeePw of 80 

QhEdB64pf PocTIn 

PSEGSOSpf RnWnPur 
SMOflOh Tonkas 

UnEIZIM U SWeal 

VeneaCe WtaPubSv 

NEW LOWS Q 

Am SLFlo AvaknCnn 
DotoGenl Dlribolds 

Norim Rdmwi 


AMEX Higta-Lows 


Penmoll 

RepNY 

TWA 

Upjohn Co 


CafnpTvan 

FWIHmeLnPf 

StratMla 


April 29 



HEW NMUU 17 


Foods 

PurkOwm 
SDNHWpf 
Valley Rsc i 

CartCpA 
EdMBay 
PsrnnRC 
HMpwMI In 

vlContAJr 
FstFSLnn 
PresRealB 
SCE 221 pf 

vKoatAlrpf 
PGE T280pfY 
PSvCal425p 
TrlenoCp 


NEW LOWS 6 


Akmco 

Manhlnd 

1 

Bvshlndn 

Mavte&tor 

InstrSyst 

JumoJackn 


Sterling per metric tan 
spot 91050 9KL5CS 92258 

forward 92550 92450 93150 

COPPER CATHODES (HM Grate) 
SterllDo per metric fan 
vat 175200 175450 176150 

forward 171 150 171150 172150 

COPPER CATHODE5 RHandanl) 
Starflno per roetric ton 
■Pat 1,19830 170050 171550 

forward 1,19450 1,19850 171550 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric ton 
Spat 31100 31450 31450 

forward 31750 31850 30850 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric ton 
gaol 479550 4J5D550 456050 ■ 

forward L475JM 478050 451050 . 

SILVER 

Pence per Innr ounce 
spot mm 51050 51250 

forward 52S5D 52450 52850 

TIN (Standard) 

Sterling per metric tan 
SPOt 973050 974050 972050 ! 

forward 9JDS50 9JW50 951150 < 

ZINC 

Stem no per metric ton 
SPOt 786J0 71050 71950 

forward 71750 71850 71350 

Source; AP. 


DM Futures Options 

April 29 

KGennEt^mfllOrnil&CBhMfinirii 


strike CaNe&tHi . PoWWIh 

Price Jno lee Dtc im S» Dec 

31 170 tS 253 tS MS 877 

32 142 170 222 846 091 1,14 

33 051 LIB T.70 094 U6 

34 023 080 177 154 196 

35 am 055 094 150 167 ITS 

36 OM 024 068 — IM - 

Estimated toW«L 6,185 
Cam: FrL VBL IM) open lot. « 3K 
Puts : FrL voU.9S5opw let 32927 
Source; CME. 


Jlv N.T. N.T. 2A82 2^90 

5cp N.T. N.T. 2525 2545 

NOV N.T. N.T, 2535 2545 

Jan NX N.T. 25« ZS80 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2530 2545 

Mav N.T. NX 2J20 2J5S 

Est. vaL: 4 tats of 5 tans. Prev. actual : 
11 tots. Open Interest: 217 
Source; Bourse do Commerce. 


Asian Commodities 

April 29 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
use per ounce 

Close Previous 
High Law Bid Aik Bid Aik 
API _ NX N.T. 32250 321B0 32250 32459 
May _ N.T. NX 32250 WS 32250 324J» 
Jim _ 32550 32550 32450 32650 32450 32650 
AUO _ NX. N.T. 32B50 33050 229JX) 33U» 
OCt N.T. N.T. 33350 335J10 333.SJ XSM 
Dec _ N.T. N.T. 33850 34050 33850 34000 
Feb _ 34456 34450 34350 34S50 34350 34550 
Volume: 22 tots of 1B0 Oz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U75 per ounce 


High Low Settle Settle 

Jun 32550 32470 325J0 32540 

Aug N.T. N.T. J2958 32950 

Sep- „ . NX N.T. 33150 37150 

Volume: 130 lots of 100 os. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents per Ule 

Close Previous 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

May 19225 19275 19275 193J0 

Jun 19375 19350 193150 1WJ10 

Jlv — 196-69 19750 19650 19750 

Aug 19950 20050 19950 20050 

Sen . 20150 20230 20200 20350 

Volume: 9 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per Idle 

awe Previous 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

RSS 1 May- I TOTS 17075 169.75 17075 

RSSUun— 17050 17050 169JJ 17025 

RSS 2 May- 16850 14950 16750 16850 

RSS 3 May- 16650 16750 16750 16850 

RSS 4 May. I«350 16450 16158 16150 

RSS 5 May. 15750 15950 15650 15850 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malavstan ringgiH per 25 torn 

Cjo» . _ Previous 

IM AM BM AM 

MOV 1550 1700 1720 1,770 

Jun 1560 1596 1540 1552 

Jly L490 15® IASS 1,465 

Aug 1580 1^0 1J60 1500 

Sep 1^ 1595 1520 1570 

Oct 1530 1510 1510 1560 

Nov 1520 1570 1500 1550 

Jon 1500 1550 1590 1540 

Mar 1500 1530 1590 1540 

volume: 0 lots of 25 tons. 

Source: Reuters. 


U.S. Treasury Bill Rates 

April 26 


Offer BM YietO Yield 
3-moniti 758 7J6 &04 80T 

6-montti U3 (O U) IS 

One y«rr 875 L23 BJ3 1.96 

Source: Salomon Brothers 


Allied Carp Q M 6-10 5-10 

Amer Indem. Fnd Q 78 5-15 5-10- 
Baker Inlematkmol O 73 5-24 5-6 

Brown A Shame Mfg Q JH 6-7 5-17 

Champion Spark Pig Q .10 6-14 5-24 

Consol Tamoka Ld 5 75 6-14 6-1 

Countrywide Credit _ A3 5-31 5-17 

Duke Power Q J2 4-17 5-17 

Ferro Cora Q JO 6-lts 5-15 

GAFCorp Q JB 5-20 5-9 

Cull Canada Q .13 7-1 5-31 

Heclc* Inc Q H7 M 

IBM Coro Q 81.10 6-10 5-9 

Indiana Gas Q .47 60 5-15 

Inglls Ltd Q M 6-14 5-15 

lowa-lll GosJ, El Q .68 to 6-1 5-6 

Jefferson Smurflt O .JB s-w S-\o 

kenametal Inc O TO S-24 5-10 

MEM CO Q 79 8-12 6-28 

Mobil Cora a 55 6-10 5-6 

Monsanto Co Q J7to 6-12 5-10 

N Enal Business Svc Q .13 5-24 5-10 

Noranadalnc Q.12to 6-13 5-14 

Rot hams PoU Mull Q 6-T7 63 

Soso Cora Q .13 6-7 5-04 

Saroenf-Welcft Sci Q J5 5-24 5-6 

Scrlpps-Howard Bd. Q 70 6-10 5-24 

snelier-Clobe Q to 67 5-7 

Stewort-Worner Q .47 6-1 5-10 

Tennecolnc Q 73 6-11 5-10 

Texaco Inc O 75 6-10 5-7 

UJ5. Leasing Inti Q 70 6-3 5-17 

Macke nhut Q .15 Ml 5-M 

Moloham Lumber Q JM 4-7 vi? 

Zero Cora Q JU 6-10 5-20 

4- Annual; M-Mantniv: Q-Quarterly; S-Sem>- 
OamiaL 


S&P 100 Index Options 

April 26 



VW to Open Tunisia Hant 

The Associated Press 

WOLFSBURG, West Germany 
— Volkswagenwcrk AG an- 
nounced plans Monday to eqren a 
50-million-Deutsche-mark (Slfr- 
milliaQ) assembly plant in Tunisia 
with an annual production capacity 
of 5,000 cars and pickup trucks. 


STOCK USS USS 

DeVoe-Holbein 

IrUenwtional bv 5% 6 Vi 

City-Clock 

buenutiojnal nv 2% 3% 

Quotes as of: April 29, 1985 


lnvescors seeking above average 
upital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
noie and ihe weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
Telephone: (0)5120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firco n! 


Bra* canvust psmlui 

Pda May Jm Jlv AwMnJDaJty tea 
turn— mi — - - % — 

165 is iw - uu 1/11 to u % 

170 7Vj S 11 1216 N to 13/16 1 1/11 

175 W sti rt S I K a M 

UO 1W16M 4 5 St ft W (Vl 

IK 3d6 1 KAMI 1 rc 
198 1/16 % % - 12 12%-- 

18 l/lll/ll- - - — - — 

Total □>« volume 

Total Cflflapm InL 5SUB4 
IiMM Wum IP6S 
- Total out open M. 344JB4 

HlghnLH Low 17495 Oosel76J4— 183 

Source: CBOE. 


Rolls Wins Cathay-Pacific Job 
LONDON — Rolls-Royce, ihe 
British aircrafi -engine maker, won 
a S3 1 -million contract Monday to 
upgrade engines on nine jets owned 
by Cathay Pacific Airways of Hong 
Kong. 


Notv offering 
CBOT 

BOND 

FUTURES 

FUTURES 

OPTIONS 

Also Fururcs and 
Futures Options on 
COMEX-GOLD & SILVER 
IMM -CURRENCIES 

Low Ceranusm fours 


C T E?* ROUND TURN 
DA^" AND 

liy OVERNIGHT 

* Applits uabftgirada 

txatAy JSO aniroas per 

calendar roomth. FmS 2i0 

ton mteti 125 round turn. 


Coil tmt of our pro/esstonctls: 

212-221-7138 




CORPORATION 

652 Filih Avenue. NY. NY 10018 
An AfGliauof 

BvpitUie Ratoul Baik at Saw 'brk 

An SII7Biflioa Commercial Bank 










































































uZiAHRKilHHdtl^HUwM bwu»u, 


i * 



w 

Page 14- 


CVTERIVATIONAL ] 


*w^j .’«a m <?-tM .'.i.rf-1-.w ^ - -»? 


TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 



Nit 

'JM.Ch*M 

v* 

33% — % 

14 +"16 

15 

24*— U 
i2%— ui 
2% 

31%-* 
15% +1% 
49*— % 
771+ 

34* + Ui 
13*- ft 
41ft— % 
1016 — 14 
21* 

71b 

3V. — W 
21 

0*- * 
9% 

1V%— 1% 
716— 14 
9 

12 — 14 
27% 

414 

12*— Vb 
116— 14 
74b— lb 
SU + Vb 
9%— lb 
2514— Hi 

7 +14 
1014 

71b— U 
74b— ft 
744 

714— ft 

4ft 

7ft 

8 — Vb 
9* 

2314 + ft 
B — 14 
4 — ft 
314 + 14 
9ft— ft 
lift 

«-* 
7ft + ft 
2514— ft 
lift 
23ft 
1714 

1514 — ft 
23ft 

714— ft 
41 +14 

26ft + ft 
4ft— ft 
3ft 

25 — ft 

35 

12ft— ft 
1 3ft— lb 
514 
30 

6ft + ft 
7ft + 14 
7ft— ft 
171b + ft 
3ft— ft 
15ft + lb 
3014—14 
7 

8ft + ft 
S3Vb 

2ft— Ui 
51b— ft 
— + ft 

tmK 

14 +14 

13ft 
9ft + 14 
20ft— ft 
14ft— 14 
— Ui 


wt»m 
life Hfgb 

34 U 


Dvfood 34 M 
DfroTl „ 
notuOl ‘ 
DkCnl 34 M 
PomB 140 3J 
DrcfiH 30 12 
DnRjOITI 40 IS 
DeyIDB JB 4.1 
Dranfz 40e IJ 

Dmtir .lie 14 

DrasB 

DrewNt 

Draxir 


DikkAI X 2.1 
DunkDs 34 12 
Durttti 

Duriime 148 32 

□or Iron M S 2 

DurFII .18 U 
DyuR* 

Dynacn t 
DvntcftC 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
29 April 1985 

The net asset value qnotatloassbawn below ora supplied by the Funds listed wftfa the 
exception of ione funds wboso quotes art based an Issue prices. The (Mowing 
marginal symbols Indicate frequency of auatatloas summed for the l MT: 

Ml- dally; (w) -weekly; (b)-bMnonflily; (rl-raoulnrir; (0- irregularly. 

AL MAL MANAGEMENT OBLIFLEX LIMITED 

(wlAl-Mal Trust. SA S 15341 — fwl Muttlcurmncv „S1D4D 

_« U1 , - — fw) Dollar Medium Term S1IUS 


im — twj Dollar Medium TenTI * iu_u 

— W ) Conbor ... . SF 1 1ST -00 Pntmft <ltiirllfin' " f TflTJ 

-td 1 Equlbaer America S 1 I2SJJ0 US— . nSSS+I?2!lI*' mi ISm 

— <d I Equlbaer Europe SF 118940 H," c i nno 

—Id > Equlbaer PadHC SF 112550 IJ* « om 

-fd 1 Drobcr SF 1B3450 Fraie SF M0 

—Id I Stock bar SF 1439.00* ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

RAMOUB iMnncnpy P B 15571. the Hoouv WTO WOT 

^iSi M raf?und *3350 

— Itrj 0/vertwnd 5FB250 PARISflAS-GROUP 

—fwl FI F— America $1837 — fd ) Cortexc lotornaltond— — > S B8J5 

— tw) F IF— Europe shim — iwi nm i jim__ DM1.17836 

—fwl FI F— Pacific *1575 — ") OBLIGE 5T (ON SF 9240 

— fd I indosuei Muttlbonds A — *8756 — lw) OBLW30LLAR *1,129.11 

— fd) Indosuez Multi bands B $ 14744 — fwlOBLI-YEN r 1D6J2550 

— — [wl OBLl-GULDEN FL1060J8 

H * WWV m -fd I PAR01L-FUND S 10521 

VfS “i d 1 PARINTER FUND S104J3 

=fd ! SIM — <d » PAR US Treasury Bond * 18247 

— fdl Brit IntUMantmPorH 1 1.179* ROYAL B. OF CANAD&POB246GUERN5EY 


B ritann ULPOB 271. SI. HeKer, Jersey Ziw paroilIfund 

— fdl Brit Inns Manatuiortf— _ OT450 ^ 0,KA " U> lreoEW1 ' t 
— fd 1 BrIL Intl-C MgriOB-PorH 1 1.179* ROYAL B. OF CANAO 



SKANDIFOND INTL FUND (444-2162781 

— fwllnc: Bid 5SJ8 Offer ■ ■ *546 

— (w)accj Bid JS.11 Offer *548 

SVENS KA INTERNATIONALLTD. 
l7Dmm*hlre ScuLon<tofv4>M77-a040 

— fb J SMB Bond Fund S 2139 

—fwl SHB mil Growth Fund S 2056 


—fwl BrlLUntversai Growth— *0960 ~Hw> RBC Canadian Fund Ud_ 

—fwl Brit.&oM Fund. *0476 +lw) RBC Far EastSPadflc Fa 

—fwl BrllManaaXurrencv— ^ E M_25" -+(w) RBC Inti Capital Fd. 

— fd | Brit. Japan Dir Part. Fa *0.771 -K«l RBC M*1 Income Fd. 

— fwl BrlfJorsev Gilt Fund— *0224 +ld ) RBC Man-Corrency Fd. 

—fd I Brit. World Lets. Fund. — S UMS -Kwl RBC North Amor. Fd__ 

-fd ) Bril. World Tsehn. Fund S B.7B0 SKAMD , F0MD tNTL FUND (4^.2162781 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL —fwllnc.: Bid, *548 Offer *546 

—fwl Capital I nil Fund — — .. ■ *36.19 — (w)accj Bid js.ll offer *548 

— (wl copltai Italia SA % 12J* JVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) 17 OuvaroMre Sq-Londan-01-377-8040 

— fd I Actions Sulsses SF 37140 — fb ) SMB Band Fund S 2139 

—fdl Bond Valor Swf 5F 10445 —fwl SHB mil Growth Fund 32056 

=m! KooW_.“* 1 VU& ^ ss ^, K c 5gS^ llssUEP R sf E J1k 

-fd) Bond Valor Yen YenlOSSJUIoHg n£ 

— fd) Convert Valbr 5 wf SF 7017D ~J9 D ««K? 

r52\9^ Volor ^dollar.^ * mo. K^SiSSr-FLl^ 

HiS SF 75S — 1,1 Intervalor SF 8950 

_liunc.wi._inn ceidoui — fd Japan Portfolio — _ — _ SF 83725 

H<d ) cl itoSribtar Ui Fund__ >105648 “55 SS 111 ? 000,1 Sanction e 10147 

— Idles Money Market Fund DM ,103240 — {J F 9 ™ i sFamso 

w-lA I CitPiww. Unlnr Up Ul7^ Unlvjfllll FlHVl 5F 119.28 

Hid I PodBc^vSSr ' SF im 40 -W Von Bond Selection V 949140 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM U ?i < ?15££ES l ;5 W,TZERLAN 9,- 

— Hd ) Oancentra DM 25.16 

— Hd > infl Rentcnfond DM 1946 ~}° { cViSm 

_ _ — Id ) ronaa Swn Sh SF 13830 

Dunn & Haroftt 6 Lloyd Georoe, Brussels — id ) Jaoan-invesf SF 94850 

— fm) DIM Commodity Pool_ * 30443 *•* —fa ) Sofll South Air. Stl. SF S5530 

— {ml Currency & GoW Pool — S 19936 ••• — (d ) Sima (stock Price) ___ SF 19740 

— (ml winch. Life Put, Pool — SS9832 ■“ iiMinw ILWCCTUCI.T 
— fmj Trans World Fut. PoaL. S BftUH - »%}??, »{S^ TMEIIT PrBn>cft n ? uut ^ 

F6C MGMT. LTD. 1NV. ADVISERS —Id ) UnltondS DM2250 

1. Laurence PountyHIILECfL 01^234680 —Id i Unlrak _ DM7740 

—fwl PSiC Atlantic S 11.95 nrtifir Cinwli 

— fwi f&c Euraoacn * iiias vToier runtis 


=ISj ^VtaSd P Rrt P Cl_ I Bff4> ^WMBSa rnmm n ™ 4330 

F6C MGMT. LTD. 1NV. ADVISERS —Id ) UnltondS DM2250 

1. Laurence Pounty Hill, EC4L 01-4234480 —Id ) Unlrak — DM 7740 

— lw) F8.C Atlantic S 11.95 (Mur Riimlc 

-fwl F&C Europew S 1048 U ® er rUIlflS 

—fwl F&C Oriental * mjo tw) Actlbontls Investments Fund. S 2130 

FIDELITY POB 670, Hamilton Bermuda I™*, Jr” *_"■£' 

—fm) American value* Common- S86J0 i!?, 1 i ribw^c T i; 

— fltilAiiier Value* Cum.Pref S 10134 J?} Fmld— 

— fd ) FWoUfv Amer. askIs sum 

-tdl Fidelity Australia Fund *8.26 {S, ~ 5 

— fd Fidelity Discovery Fund *1033 n^{5L!Sl Fl 

— fd I Fldolrtv Dir. Svos.Tr S 12246 W g NP .j r ? » fl ?> n < | Fjmd 1 

-fd ) Fidelity Far East Fund *1945 **>■ § ond * etl, J‘ : , .My ?*- — — SF 

— id PMeiliv Infl. Fund *5653 JT,* 

— 10 1 Fidefiry Orient Fund * 26.14 0 } ^JJ. 1 £^f rv - ln * 1 

— td 1 Fidelity Frontier Fund 1 1348 *{ iriCj „* 1-R 

— fd ) Fidelity Pacific Fund J 12958 5 Hd V2« 

-fd ) Fidelity 5ocL Growth Fd. *1445 l 1 , ?„£££ 

--Id ) Rdelltv World Fund *304* 

FORBES POBJ81 GRAND CAYMAN b 1 rnMFT F.H SB89JO 


—Id I Rdelltv Dir. Svos.Tr 

— fd ) Fidelity Far East Fund— 

—fa) Fldetltv Int'l. Fund 

— fd I Fidefiry Orient Fund 

— Id I Fidelity Frontier Fund — 

— Jd ) Fidelity Pacific Fund 

— fd > Fidelity Sod- Growth Fd. 
-Id) Rdelltv World Fund — _ 


London Aoent 01-837-3013 fwl Convert. Fd. mri A Certs s 9.12 

— fwl Gold Income — — S 740* f w) Convert. Fd. Inti B Certs S 2638 

— lw) Gold AopredotkHl — — . * 443 (w) D.G.C — * 7936 

—fw) Dollar Income *842 fd I D. Witter WM wide Ivt Tst__ S1033 

— Im| Strategic Trading Sl.14 lb ) Drakkar Invest.Fund N.V_ *1.11545 

GEFINOR FUNDS. Iwl Orovto *3iw 

-lw) East investment Fund S 34159 " Vim 

Cuull r!j?| 5 tli jQ5u?in * 15aJB I W) Rret Eoole Bi»u1 — 51422275 

Cat»I.GuHU.rdJ4IVAoenf41-47l4230 (b) Fifty Stars Ltd. ssnhi 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. (*»> Rratmrv Group Ltd 5 11746 

PB 119, SI Peler Port. Guernsey, 0481-28715 lw Fixed Income Trans *1053 


- *1044 
_ *9.95 
5240548 
FL 1)148 

. *88930 
_ S 9.17 

- *2630 

- * 7936 


GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— lw) East Investment Fund 

— I*) Scottidi World Fund 

— lw) state St. American 

GaBtl,GuMJ.hLLoaAPfnf41-49l4230 


■ uro (»! Dfeytus lirteramtlnent S 31 

w) The Esi^Hshment Trust SI 

C « > |«2«S OMtaatkms 60 

* 1 lw) Rrjt EcsHe Fund *14225 


(ml Future AM SA 

fm)GAM ArMfraae Inc 
(w) GAMerlca Inc, 
lw) GAM Boston Inc 
lw) GAM Emllwe 
lw) GAM Franc -vat 
Id J Gam Interrattanal I .... 
(wl Gam North America Inc. 


*11746 fw> FoBselex Issue Pr SF 212.98 

S 12248 fw> Forexfund * 732 

*137.98 J*’ Fwfjjuia Seieetton Fd. 5 F 6837 

I10&75 fdl Fondttalta - . *2115 

*1340 (d I Govemm. Secv Fund* S81SB 

SF 96.9) Id i FranW-Tru*! mtoalns DM4253 

S 10453 Iwj Hansmann Hlda*. N.V *11146 

S 10407 lw) H ostia Funds_. * 1M71 


lw) GAM N. America Unit Trust. 10400 » fwi Horton Fund_ *1.12454. 

AMPoetflc Tnc *11345 5 J LA Inti Bond *948 

AM Steri.&mtl Unit Trust. 13250 e jd ) Interfund SA._. — — *1149 

S 10645 Iwj n ermarkot Fund 1 32065 

*13443 a I IntermlnbiD Mut. Fd. 340271 

*11544 ir I mnsecurtWe* Fund SVJi 

fd ) Invesla DWS DM 4531 

.... jr ) IrrvestAltantlaues S7J3 

n. -uin^ii Triau . jr I Ita I fortune I nil Fund SA *1147 

G.T. Applied Science . *1531 v») Jopon Selection Fund ____ *10344 

G.T.toeont^GwthjRi-- *1246; wi jSS! 

G.T. Asia Fund ml Jettar Ptaa. InIL Ltd— s 18489 Jffi 

5 «or? ! d J KWnwort Benson Inn Fd S3202* 

I") KlelnvwrtBens.Jap.Fd *7054 

e(i« J?! . K8 . rBC ' e™wih Tn ' s> *948 

fd 1 Leleam Fund *130551 

5JS?? lw) Leyeraue COP Hold *17413 


IW) GAM Pacific Tnc *11335 5 I LAIntl GoW Bond. 

Cw) GAM Sferl. & inti Unit Trust. 13200 a d ) n erfund SA 

fm) GAM Systems Inc. *10645 lw| Inlermarhal Fund _ 

(w) GAM Worldwide lnc._ ... 

(ml Gam Tvctw S-A. class a 

US 1 InvHda DWS 

G.T. MANAGEMENT EUK) LM. 

—fwl Berry Pnc. Fd. Lid. 

— fd ) G.T. Applied Science . 

— Id G.T. Aseon H.K. GwttuFd *1246' 

— W> G.T. Aeta Fund 
—id S G.T. Australia Fund 
— fd ) G.T. Europe Fund 
— fw) G.T. Euro. Small Cos. Fund 
—Id ) G.T. Dollar Fund 
— Id ) G.T. Band F 
—Id > G.T. Global Teehnlpy Fd 
—Id 1 G.T. Honshu Pathfinder 
— Id t G.T. Investment 

■ ' ' G.T. Japan smell CaFund 

G.T. T ... 

Id I G.T. South China Fund...... s 13.78 < W ) maat 


) Lliliioer HH. '.HH 

*7426 (wiLuxtumL_ 

(m) Moonqfund n.V— 
(d ) Medtotanum sol. Fd 
mi Mmofi 

* 13.78 <w) MAAT 


HI LI. SAM U EL INVEST. MGMT. I NTI_S A. ! d > NjliFp Growth Pockoae Fd *?.13434 


Jersey, PD. Box 63. Tel 0536 76029 
Borne, PD. Bax. 2622. Tit 4131 224DS1 

— (tfl Crossbow (Far Ecrsf) S 

— fdlCSF I Balanced I , 

-fdllnlnl. Bond Fund 
— (d ) Int. Currency Ui 

— fd } itf Fd 1 Techno loovl 

-fd ) 0*560* Fd IN. AMERICA) 
EHC TRUST cafJERSEYI LTD. 

1-3 Seale SLSI. Heller ;0S34-36331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

Sfdimc: bio VJ7 m oner 

Sid I Cap.: Bid SI0J5 Offer ... 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

— (d I snort Term 'A' (Accutn) : 

! Shari Term 'A* (Dlstrl _ 

Short Term *B* lAcaim) 

, Shari Term *B* (Dlstrl 
lw) Lana Term 


Iwl Nippon Fond *2943* 

1 l"} tWrefS llw »»fn'*M Fund S 9156 

SF I UK fw* N A M p J 146.17 

fm) NSP F.I,T« 5)5531 

} d ! K?!2f.^l l 5r ll0n Investment Fdf98424 

„ lw) PANCURRI Int S 1547 

*1146 J r j Sjt Geneva SF 147700 

S r 1 Prrmal Value Fund N.V *144544 

(b) p letadeo — S1IBQ46 

lw) PSCO Fund N.V., S 121.77 

lw) PSCO Infl. N.V S 

fd I Putnam Irtfl e.Mri SJ&Jl 

19471' (b I Prt— Tech _ * 87946 

.S1OS70 fw) Quantum Fund N.V *343948 

1 fd I Ranfa Fund l f 247200 

S146M (d ) Rentlnvast— L LFUBMB 


S 14674 (d ) Rentlnvast— __ LF1JB548 
JH1SS (d | Reserve ;lra«T»d Deooslti- *107709 

* 1.1234 lw! Samurai Portfolio SF 10JJ5 

S0JB73 Id J SCI/Tech. SA Luxembaura *943 

$2155 lw) 5^ r Amnv3 Fund N.V — SIAUlOO 
JATOINE FLEMING. POB 70 GPO HD Kfl i" NV 

— fb) J.F Japan Trust Y4704 Id » — *J83! 

— fb ) j.f South East Asia * JJJ7 f”! rSSSJ; ““ — 


J J-C Japan i ecnnaiagv r ujjm T£mPw- £.M T,..— 

— fb ) J.F Pacific SecO (Acc) S 119 , ! i®5*S L* Hold. tsec)_ 

HIbl 1C JfJS fw) Tokyo Poe. How. N.V. „ 

J.r **- lv I w) Tmraoodflc Fund 

LLOYDS BANK INTL. POB 43S.G«nevan jd} IuTOuoIiw Fund 

fwl Uevds inn Dollar. * W7.oi fw) Tweedv.Bnwvn* n vix 

Cw) uavds inti Europt 

— +JWJ IMrtb Inn Growth 

— +fw) Llovds Infl Income. 

— Hwi Llovds Int'l N. America 

— t-lw) Lloyd* Infl PocWlc 


*107 JO w Tweody.Brovme n.v.ClossA *211144 
5F 11040 ( w) Tweedy.Brmme iLv.CkusB J1JB&23 

SF 17540 W TWwdftBTOwte IUJU N.V. I 

SF311JW unaoo 

*10145 id ) UNICO Fund .— DM 7430 

-+l w) Lloyd* Inn Focfflc SF 130JO « J UNI BnndPimw J 99544 

— +fwi Llovds int’l. Smaller Cos.. *1341 (b j uni Cociiai Fund — siotvas 

uimaqdcu to I umruit- Dm 11040 

N trt»SSS. N « Iwj Vandertjl ItAsset* __Z_H S 1 1 Ji 

— 95SL pV i ic — t2Hv !c!!S n Fp“f» r E d »<K“iua^. s 10.15 

JiHSS V* — — — 5Z?S im) winchHW p ver* fi*d**_ *2223* 

-fw I CI0M C - Japan S 7634 w j World Fund £ n S 1^4 

w SecuritlesSTS *4345 

fw) worldwide Special S/5 2ft. $140432 

DM — Deutscha Mork; BF — Beiglum Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Franc*: a — asked; + — Offer Prices: b — bid 

ChonBo F/vno toil par unit; NA— Not Available; NX NsttommunlcatMia— 

New; & — suspended; 5/S — Stock Spilt; ■ — Ex-Oividend; — Ex-Rls; *** — 
Gross Performance index March; •— Redemol-Prlce- Ex-Coupon; 00— Formerly 
worldwide Fund Ltd; 9 — Offer Price bid. 3% prelim, charoe: ++ — dally stock 
prise as on Amsterdam Slock Exchange 


INVEST1SSEMENTS ATLANTIQUES 

SoriM Anonym* 

Registered Office: Luxembourg, 14, Rue Aldringen. 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL 


GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 


Tbe Annual General Meeting of Shareholders al INVEST1 SS EMEiYTS 
ATLANTIQUES will be held 31 its regiiitered office at Luxembourg. 14. rue 
Aldringen, on Ma^ 17th. 1985 al 14.00 o'clock for the purpose of 
considering and voting upon the following matteis: 

1. To hear and accept the reports of: 

a. the directors 

b. the statutory auditor. 

2. To approve the balance sheet and the profit and loe» account 
for Ute year ended December 31st, 1984. 

3. Allocation of profit. 

4. To discharge the directors and the auditor with respect to 
their performance of duties during the year ended December 

5. To elect the directors to serve until tbe next annual general 
meeting of shareholders. 

6. To elect the auditor to serve until tbe next annua] general 
meeting of shareholders. 

7. Miscellaneous. 

The shareholder* are advised that no quorum for ihe statutory general 
meeting is required and that decisions vriU be laker) al tbe majority of the 
shares present or represented at the meeting, with tbe restriction that no 
shareholder neither by himself nor by proxy can vole for a number of shares 
in excess of one fifth of the shares issued or two fifth of the shares present or 
represented at the meeting. 

In order to take pari at the statutory meeting of May 17th, 1985 ihe 
owners or bearer shares will have to deposit their shares five clear davs 
before the meeting at tbe registered office of the Fund, 14, rue Aldringen, 
Luxembourg, or with the following banks: 

— BAISQUE G£n£RALE DU LUXEMBOURG S.A. 

14, rue Aldringen, LUXEMBOURG. 

— CAZENOVE& Co. 

1% Tokeahonse Yard, LONDON EC2. 

The Board ol Directors 



TENDER NOTICE 

IBRD 005/ SOCADA 


The Sociele Gemrafricainc de Developpeznem Agricole (SOCADA). B.P. 
997. BANGUI Central .African Republic, herebv gives nolice of invitation 
to lender for the supply of agricultural equipment, in indivisible lots, as 


lajt No. 1: 2 rolarv grinders 

Lot No. 2: 2 disc harrows 

Lot No. 3: 2 tine harrows 

Lot No. 4: 2 cultivator 

Lot No. 5: 6 ground-nut decorticaiore 

Lot No. (r. 4 com shelters 

Lot No. 7: 2) treatment appliances 

Lot No. 8: 2 winnowing machines 

DELIVERY DESTINATION 

The combined lots should be delivered to the SOCADA tlores 
situated at Avenue David- DACKO, BANGUI. 

DELIVERY DEADLINE 

At the latest, within six months of reception of the purchase 
order letter. 


FMNat 

FDP 

FMI 

FabWM 

FalrUi 

FalrFln 

FamHIe 

FrmHm 

FarmF 

FrmHo 

FannBr 

FrmG 

Farr Co 

FdScrw 

FeOGrp 

Feraflu 

Rbron 

FldKT 

FltthT* 

Ftaole 

Fllmtec 

Flltrik 

Flnalco 

FnciSac 

Flngmx 

Flnloan 

FAIoBb 

FstAms 

FtATn 

FtBnOti 

FComr 

FtCorm 

FDataR 

FEstCs 

FExec 

FFwst 

FFdMc 

FFUCal 

FFChar 

FFFtM 

FFdIVa 

FFMSL 

FFMOIl 

FtFnd 

FtFnCp 

FFnMat 

FtFIBk 

FHaws 

Ftmcp 

FHndl 

FlnstCp 

FJarNt 

FKvNt 3 

FMdB 

FtMllfB 

FNtans 

FNtSup 

FNHB 

FtOklB 

FRBOa 

FttvFla 

FSvWta 

FtSacC 

IstSnce 

FtSttui 

FTenNi 

iFTOnCs 

FtVaiyj 

FtVtFn 

FtWFn 

Flreter 

Ftoater 

Ftaknv 

Flexstl 

FlaFdl 

FlaGulf 

FINFIS 

FlawSe 

Riirocb 

FOnar 

FLIanB 

FUon A 

Far Am 

FornstO 

FartnF 

Forms 

Fonirn 

Foster 

Foxmvr 

FmkEi 

FrnkRx 

Free Fdl 

Franuit 

Fudrck 

FulHB* 


GKSvs 38 14 

GTS 

Gal Kao 

Gatoob 

GamaB .10 1.1 
GandHo 
Garcia 
Genetch 

GnBInd 36 2J 
GnMaa JBt 4 
GnPhVS 

GnStnl 3» SO 

GanetE 

GeaetL 

Genets 

Game 

Genova .10e 14 
GoFBk 

GerMdi 38 13 
GttnGe 34 13 
GleaTr 

GllbrtA 130 64 
GtaiFd 

Godfryi 42 33 
GMCorr Aft *4 
GaMS S 34 13 
GOT oca 
Gotocn 
Gott 

GaataP 76 43 
Greco A4 19 
GTOdCO 
Grantra 
Graph! 

GrahMO 

GrphSe 

GravGo 

QtUcFd MSB A 
GWF5B Aft 24 
GtSoFd 

GtWash 3ft 84 

GraanT 

GraVAd 340 14 

GriTTcn 

Grotnan 

GwttiFd 

Gtech 

Guests 

GBAdW 30 2 A 

atmaQ 

Gull JHe A 


HBO 30 14 

HCC MB A 

HCW .10 13 

nei TX 
HMD Am 
Hodiflo Jd 1.1 

Haber* 


Nat 

Law IPJVLCbte 
Wft )0ft + VA 
Wk 18ft + ft 
Sft Sft 
2Jft 23ft „ 
32ft 32ft + ft 
16ft Mft 
15ft !6U> + ft 
21ft 2T» + ft 
12ft 13 
16 16ft- ft 

IS 15ft + ft 
15ft 15ft 
14ft 15ft + ft 
30ft 20ft + ft 
19 19ft + ft 
38ft 38ft 
10ft 10ft + ft 
14ft 15ft + ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
23ft 23ft 


1ft— ft 
9ft— ft 
13ft + ft 
3ft 
Aft 

m + ft 

ft 

3ft 

6ft 

10ft + ft 
29ft— ft 
15ft 

Bft— ft 

10ft 

15 + ft 
10ft— ft 
10ft 

17 — ft 

16 + ft 
16 —1 

5ft— ft 


23ft + 86 
14ft + ft 
13ft— ft 
21ft + ft 
1186 

Bft + ft 
33ft 

9^+ft 

7ft— ft 
7ft— ft 
»-* 
6ft 

Uft— ft 
ZJft + ft 
16ft + 8k 
18ft— 1ft 
10ft— ft 
9 

ft ft 

T2ft 12ft— ft 

18 18 

28V* 28ft— ft 
13ft 13ft +1 
16ft 16ft — ft 
12ft 13 — ft 
15ft 15ft- ft 
5ft 9ft + ft 
Bft 8ft + ft 
318k 31ft— ft 
12ft 1286— ft 
3ft 4 

Mft I486 + ft 
10ft 18ft— ft 


2<ft— 1 - 
7 

5ft + ft 
13ft 

6ft + ft 

tf+to 

25ft— ft 
28 — ft 
4 

37 +2 

99ft— 86 
lift — ft 
im— ft 
28 — ft 
6ft + ft 
16ft— ft 
S5ft + ft 
47ft + ft 
32ft 

15ft + ft 
19ft 

4U + Ik 
6ft + ft 
8ft— ft 
lift— ft 
26 
32ft 

35ft + ft 
61 —1 
24ft— ft 
37ft— ft 

8=: 

14ft 

15ft— ft 
21ft- ft 
17ft- ft 

]%-' 

8ft 

12ft + ft 
37 +2 


19ft— ft 
22ft 

31ft— ft 
2786 

40 + ft 

loft— ft 

10ft + ft 
10ft + ft 
33 

27ft +1 
7 — ft 
24 24ft 
T3ft 13ft— ft 
TO 18 
378k 37ft 
41ft 42ft— ft 
29ft 30ft + ft 
27 27 

5ft 5ft 
98ft 50ft 
rift lift— 46 
6ft 6ft— ft 
1286 12ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
15ft 15ft— ft 
35 3* 

1186 12 + ft 
12 12ft 
38k 3ft 
Mft 16ft 
1486 14ft— ft 
30ft 30ft— ft 
32ft 23 
19ft 1986 + ft 
186 1ft 
984 986— 86 
5ft 9ft 
2684 2684— 16 
19ft 15ft— ft 
28ft 29 +1 

886 Bft— ft 
281k 28M— ft 
7ft 8 — 8k 
Mft 14ft 


5 3ft 
174 5ft 
2 5ft 
70 Bft 
20623ft 
ID 2 
96410ft 
8E& 
272 5ft 

1 2ft 

53 7ft 

40 4ft 
506 2Vk 

2 6 

! 737 

425ft 
311ft 
M Oft 
12837ft 
929ft 
2 8ft 

57 3 
11 5 
1320 
5 386 
11022ft 
11927ft 
7 4ft 
774 5ft 
9 7 
13011 
55 4ft 
32722 
82 6ft 
1322 2786 
336 78k 
51 7ft 
8410ft 
2 9ft 
250168k 
83x7 
184658ft 
705 8ft 
2114ft 
S7M 

1 M 

248 9ft 
IS 4 
51 W 
32214 

2 Bft 
28119ft 
37IT786 

41 Bft 
29 7 

149 1 
1929ft 
3862516 
221 6ft 
50 3ft 
29 1486 
5 4ft 
57 5ft 
1407 HRS 
4541ft 
3lUft 
860 8 
96 4ft 
43616 


3ft 3ft— ft 
5ft 5ft + ft 
5ft 5ft + ft 
8ft Bft- ft 
2286. 23ft + ft 
2 2 

9ft ID - ft 

32 32 -ft 

5 5ft + ft 
2ft 2ft + ft 
7ft 7ft- ft 1 

4ft 48k 
7 2 

A 6 i 

36 37 + ft 
25ft 25ft 
lift lift + ft 
8ft 9ft +lft 

37 37ft— ft 
29ft 29ft 

Bft Bft 
2ft 2ft 
5 5 + ft 

27ft 28 
3ft 386 + ft 
21ft 71ft— ft 
2686 27ft + ft 
4 4Vk + ft 
58fc 98k 
486 7 + ft 
10ft 108k — ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
21ft 21ft— 16 
Aft Aft 
268b 2486—1 
6ft 6ft— ft 
7 2 

10 10 
9ft 9ft— ft 
16 16ft — 8k 
Aft Aft 
96ft 56ft— lft 
Bft Bft + ft 
168k Mft — ft 
9ft 994— ft 
14 14 + ft 

9ft 986 
3ft 4 

Mft 14 + ft 

1386 1384 — ft 
8ft Bft- ft 
19 19 

17ft 178k + ft 
Bft Bft- ft 

\ \ + * 
25 25ft 
3484 2484— ft 
6ft 6ft— ft 
3ft 3ft— ft 
14ft 14ft 
4ft 4ft + ft 
5ft 5ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
4116 41ft 
10ft 10ft— ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
48k 48k— ft 

36 36 


iBtf s g EliiiT! 
HB a nspl 

NHmc* 37m u zfzfv* 2£6 38ft + ft 

NtLumh £3* » 

2 914 914 9ft + * 
510ft 10ft 10ft 
5 38k 38k 3ft- ft 
3615ft 15ft ISft „ 
308 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 
32 4ft Aft 4ft 
5 4ft Aft Aft + ft 

NetaiT 30 18 JA 7ft Jft m-* 
72 Bft 884 8ft 

NlwK5s "S§“g“^=!! 

15 S 5 
AS 98k Fto 94k + ft 
NHnwB JO 39 2123ft 73 23ft— ft 

M 1.12b AA 

JiifS r IT- a 

M J Ms’rft ’tSk 7ft- ft : 

'1% IM 

mm 

ISsn A6 33 24020ft 20% 20ft 

S A4 1.1 904086 40ft 40ft 


NtPrwH 

NTochd 

NtWflLf 

NtnwdP 

NatrBty 

WfrSunx 


Ntwk5> 

Mautras 

NevNBc 

NBninS 

NHnwB JO 15 
KJNOtS 1.12b AA 
NYAlri 

NwCtry 1.10 63 


SecTm 



86 au 

3% 

3%-% 

SEEQ 



172 3* 

3% 

3ft— ft 

SeQMl 

40 

34 

922% 22* 22% 

Serai cn 



28 8 

7* 

7ft — ft 

Sensor 

JOS 

3 

1272 7ft 

7% 

7ft 

snmiat 



144 1* 

T* 

lft 

SwcWer 

48 

A 

909 W 

129k 

13 +«v 

Syrnost 

1.12 

11 

23926 

35% 

36 — W 

Servlcu 

t 


219* 

19* 

19*— U 


Non* B .12e 3 
Norwan 

HoAHot JJir .1 
NAtnn 

NCarGs 1JM 7A 
NaFrkB UXto 3L0 


3 428k 4284 42ft 
31 686 Aft Aft 
10 9% 9ft 9ft 

4 684 684 686 

335 29 25 

233ft 33ft 33ft 

6 384 386 386— ft 

33110ft 9ft 986 
77 6 5* 5ft— ft 

6318ft 18 16ft + ft 

naoft soft soft— ft 

4034ft 34ft 34ft— ft 
2223ft 23ft 23ft— ft 
86 48b 4ft 4ft— ft 


-01 


10919% 

1816 

IBM— 1 

SpecCfl 

JM 

.9 

17 6* 


45 3 

Zft 

3 + % 





93 

14 

13647ft 

47* 

47* 





1613* 

13% 

13% 




223 9% 



54 3ft 

5% 

5Vb— % 


40 

35 

15 6 

.12 

4 

215 

M* 

14*—* 

Stand vi 

UO 

35 

626 


NoAIr 

I NwNG 1A4 7J9 

NwtFn* A8 32 

NwNL 8 JO 2J 

NwstPS 210 9.1 

Novmtx 
Novor 
MovoCp 
NODteU 
NucMet 
NuctPh 

NucJSpt .12 J 

Nimrax e'ks* # re i»4— 

Numeric J8 33 3527ft 2ft 27ft 

NutriF 25 7ft 7ft 78k 

Nu Mod 511384 1386 1386 

153 lft Dk 1ft— ft 
73 34k 38k 3ft 

51 2ft 2ft 2ft 

79 2ft 28k 2ft 

101484 1484 1486— ft 
OHsLOD 99 2ft 2V, 284 + ft 

Osluri S 1J8 33 8284014 39ft 3«- ft 

OhloBC 2J2 SJ 647ft 47ft 47ft 

OtiloCa 220 5.1 451 Sft 53 55 —ft 


.16 1.1 2551514 lift 

6 6ft 6ft 
1418 17ft 
t 51 6ft Aft 

6439ft 39ft 
AO L7 132384 2314 
8 17ft 17ft 
619ft 18ft 
140 Al 139ft 39ft 
A4 \3 1025ft 25ft 

40a 32 4T 17ft 17ft 
139 7ft 7M 
J2 J 76319ft lHft 
107 ft ft 
3 5ft 5ft 
t 63 5ft 516 

I 32 5ft 5ft 

92 9ft 8ft 
193316 32ft 
A0 20 26920 19ft 


15ft— ft 
Aft + ft 
17ft— ft 
Aft— ft 
39ft— ft 
23ft 

17ft — ft 

Mft 

39ft 

25ft + 8k 
17ft— ft 
78k 

586 

58k— ft 
5ft— ft 
Bft 

33 + ft 

198k— ft 


CHIDri* 1921ft 21 

OMKnrs 1J0 32 IBB 2884 28 

OkfNBx 200 as 

Old Rep -88 22 

OtaStne 208 72 

OldSptC 380 120 

OrteBcp J8e 14 
OiLIne 


1921ft 21 21 — ft 

1882884 28 28ft 
1592 51 52 

304086 40ft 40ft— ft 
329 2884 2886— ft 

2218k 218k 218k 
3418ft 1986 IB86— ft 
94 7 684 7 

10 2»k 2ft 28k— ft 
9915ft T4H Mft- ft 
25043 42ft 42ft— 8k 
2614ft 14 U — ft 
33718 17ft 17ft— ft 
293 7 Aft Aft 
62 10ft ID M 
643 AU 5ft 584 + V6 
11 18 171k 17ft 

1117 Mft 16ft— ft 
1017ft 1284 12ft 
383186 31ft 318k— ft 
3012ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
570 19ft 19ft 19ft — ft 
126 2th lft 2 
198 57 5686 97 + 8fc 

9 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 



17ft 178k- 
lift 11ft- 
5 8 

7ft 7Vk 
27ft 27ft 
178k 178k- 
ISft 15ft 
Bft Bft - 
28k 284 

,s ft 14 &: 
37ft 37ft 
38Vk 388k ‘ 
9484 5484- 
48% Gk- 
4084 408k - 
Aft Aft ■ 
586 6 ■ 

128k 12ft ■ 
886 Bft- 
21 21Vk- 

29ft 29ft . 
5ft A - 
9ft 9ft • 
15ft Mft 
7ft 7ft- 
6ft 686- 
19 15 

178k 17ft- 
7 7 - 


OreoMt 320» 62 10ft 10 „ 

OrfOCP *43 AU 5ft 584 + ft 

OrlonR 

Oetimn 30 U 

Oimne* 

OttrTP 276 80 

OvrExp 

Owen** AS 21 57019ft 19ft 19ft— ft 

Oxo co 

PNC 232 4.1 198 SI 5684 S7 + 8k 

PabstB 9 90k 9ft 9ft— Ik 

Paccar 120a 29 41742 41ft 4186 
PocFsf 315119k 1186 lift 

PcGaR 1O0 42 16224 2»8 24 — ft 

PacTel 20 6M 31 13ft 1284 13ft 

,J i ift 9ft W 

pKx .13 10 793 78k 7ft 7ft + ft 


POWlI 
PorPhs 
PorTch 
P orison 
PartcOn 

ParicOh 40 4.1 


268 191k 19ft 19ft- 8k 
81716 15ft 15ft 
2316ft 15ft 16 + ft 

9 086 1214 1284— ft 
136 36 36 

201486 141k 1486— ft 
93712ft 12ft 1284 + ft 


193 5% 

5 

5 — % 

5V 4* 

4ft 

4M 

154 B 

7ft 

7ft— % 

394 19ft 

T9 

19% — % 

15411* 

HHk 

11* + % 


418ft Mft IBM 
423ft 23ft 231k 
5412ft 12 12ft— ft 

73 M Mft 1686-186 
178 1386 13 13ft— 8k 

723 23 23 + ft 

91 BVk 886 886 

2945ft 44 44ft— 86 

3251 51 51 +1 

1230ft 30ft 30ft 


LDBmk 

LJN 

LSI Lob 

LTX 

La Petes 

LaZBv 

LocklSI 

LodFm 

Laldlw 

LdlTB* 

LamRs 

Lancasr 

Lances 

LdLnSL 

LIMBF 

LdmkS 

LoneCq 

Lonofr 


25 8 786 

»I3 12to 
10321386 1286 
1821686 1586 
14215ft 15 
3841ft 41ft 
4320ft 20 
125 17ft 17ft 
71386 1386 
823 98k 9ft 
91310ft 98k 
3515ft 1486 
2226ft 26 
18510ft 10ft 
137 Mft 168k 
86 14ft 131k 
32747% 47 
4 7 7 

1925 35 

JS230 28 

726 58k 5ft 
2151186 10ft 

3 Bft B84 
73T 28k 28k 

75 2ft 2 
24719 18ft 
124416 44ft 
2-89 5ft 5 
2414ft Mft 
105946ft Mft 
328527 2686 

213286 31ft 
21 5ft 5 
10 5 5 

749 47 

223 23 

62439ft 38 

4 9ft 9ft 
40238k 23ft 

8462886 27ft 
15 Mft MU 
22386 23ft 
543178k 17ft 


,5». + V6 

12ft 

Tz\ 

Hu 

Jif 

* 

13ft— ft 
47 
7 

35 + ft 
28ft— 1ft 
58k 

1H6 —18k 

S 

1 Bft — ft 
44ft 

5 —ft 
Mft 

1686 + ft 

27 

3286 

Sft + ft 
S —ft 
47 —2 
23 + ft 

38, —1 
9ft — ft 
2386 + ft 
27ft— lft 
Mft — ft 
2386 

17ft— ft 


Pea Gld 061 J 91 8ft 886 

Perm Vo 140a 34 2945ft 44 

Penbcp 200 19 2251 51 

PecoEn 200 7J 1230ft 30ft 

Pantars 48 27 2042616 25ft 
21912ft 12 
Poop EX 2244 9ft 9ft 

PeapB * J2 25 6 Mft 17ft 

PeopRt — ■' “ 

Percept 
PerpA 


SJft +1 

25ft— ft 

’ift + ft 


2244 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 
PeapB* 22 25 AMU 17ft 1786 u 
216 ft ft ft + Hi 
4 6ft Aft 6ft— ft 
72DT7U M Mft + ft 
A Bft Bft 8ft 

202 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 

1.12 30 6A»84 29U 29ft + ft 

152 2ft 2ft 2ft 

Pta-mct 37310 9 9 —1 

Plrmcta JMe A 24 Mft 1686 16ft 

kt 56 Bft Bft Bft— Vi 

1 7 7 7 — ft 

JHa J 2725 9ft 9 9ft— ft 
J0e 3.1 232 MU 16ft Mft 

£ £-ft 
JB 4J 21 A A 6 

-133126 

40 33 .16120ft 
PtonFdl 45e 34 49 1386 

Plane* JO 14 201886 


Ptareln 

PtonFdl 45e 34 ' 49 
Plane* JO U »- 
PtonHI .92 25 14913286 
PlanSts .12 14 1015 8ft 
PtantrC .96 13 A 
-10e 14 13 

.96 30 7 


32ft— ft 
Bft + ft 
.96 13 A 29ft 29 29ft 

.10e 14 13 5ft 5 5ft 

.96 34 73186 3186 3186— ft 

2411ft 1086 lift + ft 
2BS2484 36U 26ft— ft 
JSr 2J 11210ft 10ft 10ft— ft 

12 22U 21ft 22ft 

220 2U 1ft 2ft 

IB Mft 16 Mft 
28 886 B8i> B84 
.12 2 16426ft 258k 25ft 

42 17 93184 36ft 30ft i 

316 6 58k £ + 8k 

3926 25 25 - ft I 

JO 33 26 1SU I486 UU 1 

240 4ft 3ft 3ft i 
1 M 48k 4ft 4U — ft 
16617ft II lift 

3B7S7U 56ft 5686 

.16 24 M 6U Aft Aft 

5612ft 12 12U— U 

179 4U 4 4U + M ; 

13 m 58k 5ft 

40 34 81186 1186 1186— ft . 

.16 J 21647ft 46ft 46ft 

94 5ft 58k 58k— ft 

JO 8.9 511381 Mft 13ft— 8k 

42 25 6325 24ft 24ft— ft . 

2B 2 186 2 + U I 

„ „ 21 I4*k 14ft 148k + U 

48 19 2298M 98 98 — U | 


Hadeon 

HalaSvn 


PARTICIPATION 


Biddii^ is o: 
tries, from S 


to all suppliers from I.B.FLD. member coun- 
rZERUND or TAfWAiV 


TENDERS 


Offers, written in French, should be addressed to: 

SOCADA, B.P. 997, BANGUI, Central African Republic, or 
delivered to the above offices by 30th May 1985. 1&00 hours 
deadline. 


TENDER NOTICE FILE 


Tender notice files may be obtained from SOCADA. B.P. 997, 
BA NGUI Central African Republic, Telex 5212 RC, and from 
the CFDT-P.ARIS 13 roc Monceau, 75008, France, on payment 
of CFA F 20,000 per dossier. 


Hlttiln 

HlfMvn 

HechgA 

HedtuB 

HelenT 

Helix 

HenrtF 

HerttBn 

HerilFd 

HlberC* 

Hickom 

Hpmt 

HolmD 

HmBen 

HfflFFI 

HmFAz 

HffMCfl 

HmoSL 

Honlnd 

HookDr 

Hoover 

HrxnAIr 

Heralnd 

HwBffJ 

HunpTo 

HonuB 

HntsRs 

HuntnB 

Horen 

Hv twite 

HvdeAt 

Hyoonx 


15 15 

m* 8% 

13 13ft 
12 12V.— U 

9ft 9ft— U 

ns 

51 51—86 

Mft 13ft 
lift lift + ft 
986 10 - U 

15 15 

2ft 2ft + ft 
286 3 + V6 

Aft Aft— ft 
Aft 48k— ft 
Sft 5ft 
15U 15ft 
686 Aft + ft 
20 20ft— ft 

16 16 + U 

26ft 24ft— U 
11 lift— Ik 
Mft Mft 
1186 1186— ft 

"*+tl 

15ft 15ft— ft 
1286 1386— ft I 
MU MU 
11 1IU + ft 

a s 

Bft Sft + ft 
12ft 1286— U 
Sft 3ft 
4ft 5 + ft 

8 8 — ft 

12ft Mft— ft 
2086 2086— 86 
10 Mft— ft 
6U 4U 
TTVk 17ft— 86 

185 IBS —5 

486 48k— ft 

1784 1286— ft 

5 5 — 8k 

12ft 12ft- ft 
12ft 1286 
8U Bft— 8k 
Mft Mft 
1H6 1186 


1986 19ft— ft 
986 ID 

» t +* 
1386 14U 
13 13 — ft 

not mm— u 
19ft 2016 + 84 
416 4ft— ft 
3 3 - ft 

k an 

15* 16 + ft 

3986 3984 
30 38ft + ft 
BS 85 — I 
43 43 - 86 

Sft Sft— ft 
16 16 — 8k 

20 20 
Oft 9ft 
M 12 - ft 
4ft 4ft + ft 
3ft 3ft 
25ft 26 
27ft 2786 
Sft 5ft— ft 
32 32 

34 34 —ft 

4*84 47 + ft 

Mft 17 +86 

21 21 + ft 

9ft 9ft- ft 

5 Sft 
26ft 2686 

lift Sft- ft 

20ft 38ft— ft 

8 8 + ft 

24 36ft + ft 
20ft 30ft 
36ft 368k + ft 
27ft 37ft + ft 
Sft 6 — ft 
3ft 3ft— ft 
27ft 228k 
Sft 5ft— ft 
36ft 36ft 
Wft 10U— u 
43ft 4386 + ft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
30 20 — ft 

Sft Sft— ft 

•ft Aft + ft 
7ft 786— ft 


MCI 

MP5I1 

MTS 8 

MTV 

MacbTe 

MacfcTr 

ModGE 

MaomP 

MagtMc 

MOOGp 

MalRt 

Malrtto 

Mona 

Monttw 

ManfHs 

MltsN 

Marpux 

MarnC* 

Manat 

Mar*9t 

Martha 

Marsdll : 

MrtdN* 

Mascmp 

Mxcaln 

Manfor 

MtahBx 

MatncS 

Maxcra 

Maxwei 

MayPl 

movSoa 

MavnOI 

MavxJ 

McCrm 

McFad 

Me Fart 

McGriti 

Meditrs 

Aiiadex 

MedCre 

AMddSt 

Iktodsrw 

MedlGI 

MedPii 

ManOt* 

Mentor 

MontTG 

MercBc 1 

MtrcBk 

MerBCa 

MerBPa 

MarNY 

MrcttCa 

MorehN ' 

MrdBc : 

MrdBpf : 

Mori B s 

M ortmc 

MervG* 

MaryLd 

MHbAV 

Metrbn 
MefAirt 
MelrFn 
Metrml 
Mtonm 
Micro 
MicrMk 
Mlcrdy 
MhxTc 
Mtcrne 
Mlerpro 
. MlcrSm 
MldABc 
MMNtl 1 
McfPcA 
I MdStFd 
' MMBkB l 
MdwAIr 
MdwPn ' 
vIMIIITc 
MIIIHr 
Miiiiem 
Mllltar 
Mtniscr 
Wnefnk 
Mtaxtar 
Mhchor 
MGok 
M0OICA 
MotrlCB 

MOCON 
Madina ■ 
AWMelr 
Motox 
AtonCa 1 


3733 9 
113 5 

59Uft IB 18—16, 
8925 Mft 2486— ft 
3 7ft 7ft 7ft 
1532124k 118k 118k— 86 
9224ft 24 24ft 
95 Bft Hk Bft— ft 
62 21U 19% 3WU— 86 
19 12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
179 Bft 8ft Sft 
77 17 1684 168k 

30212* 1284 12ft 

5922ft Ztft 22U 
3612284 21 21 —114 

24957 56% 57 + ft 

25 7ft 7ft 78k + ft 
3S30U 2786 30ft 
3311ft 11 lift + ft 
155 12 lift 12 
2317ft 16ft 16ft— ft 
763 42ft 63ft — ft 
999 2786 2786 27ft— 8k 
837 6 Sft 5ft— ft 
51143 42ft 42ft— ft 
672 4U 3ft 386— ft 
321386 13V. 13ft— ft 

3 37 27 27 — ft 

413029U 29ft 28Vb — ft 

7 1216 1186 12 — ft 
437 5 484 5 + ft 

31786 1786 1786— 16 
254 4ft 4 4 

10 9 886 886— U 

4133386 33ft 3386 + ft 

1111 11 11 

312ft 12* 12ft— ft 
84 9ft 9ft 98k— ft 
281386 1286 1386 
HI W I 9U + U 
IW 7ft Aft Aft— ft 
341416 lift 14 
J523I* ZJft 2386 + ft 

11 5 5 5 

25234% 238k 24V, + ft 
29 Sft 584 586 

3921786 1686 16ft— lft 
38923ft 23U 23ft— ft 
393716 37 37ft 
16448% 48 48% — ft 

1 Aft Aft AM 

4 4086 4086 4086 

1 78 78 78 

1 M% 16% Mft— ft 
249ft 49ft 49% 

43546 45ft 45ft 
3 32 3186 32 

1515ft 15ft 15ft 
514ft 14ft 1486 
1614ft 14 14 — ft 

Sllft 118k 1186- ft 
1.?.. 3 — ta 


PredLo 
PnraLta 
Pr*tnCz> JO 33 
Prewav 
Priam 
PrlcCm * 

PrlcCos 
PrlnvO 
Prtranx 
Prodigy 
Praflnv 
Profits 
ProgCP .M J 
Progrp 

PnwtTr 720 8.9 
ProtCp 9 43 25 
Pratcol 
Pravln 
PrvLM 248 39 
RntaSk 
PotaoC 
PUSNC 140 84 
PgSdBc 1.12 34 
PuiOSF 40 22 


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1.12 34 3531ft 21 21U I 

40 22 436* 2686 Mft— U I 

. . 1553 7* 7% 7ft — ft I 

40 14 11B2286 20* 22ft + H 

31011ft lift 118k — ft j 

20 6 58k 5* + ft 

J8 3J 1011% lift lift— ft 

16 1* 1* 1*. 

1015 14ft IS + 8k 

45221 20% 21 + ft 

12 5ft 5% Sft— ft 
96 3ft Sft 3% + ft 
15 784 78k 786 + * 
15810 984 986 

1455118k lift lift + ft 
96 9% 9ft 9ft 
26 2 4 572386 2386 23* + ft 

26 34 5317 Mft 16ft- ft 

471 986 9*6 9%— ft 

91 13% 12ft 12ft — ft 

4 7ft 7 714 — ft 

„ 124 5* Sft 5* — ft 


Quixote 
Quatm 
RAX 

SklP ■“ J 4 $72386 23* 23* + ft 

RPM* 46 34 5317 Mft 14ft~ V. 

RodSvi 471 m vu. OV. — u. 

RadtnT 
Radian 

ROOWI ... 

totar* 1J» 34 535278k 27% 27*— ft 


Ramtek 

RavnuJ I .70 19 
RovEn 24 14 
Readng 
Recoin 


7V 4* 4* 4*— ft 
2024% 2386 24ft + ft 
21 17ft 1 7ft 17ft— ft 
1319 18* 18* 

1 Aft 6% 6%— ft 


rfedknL 44 11 1173084 30ft 30%—% 

Reeve* 4280 iom iou 10ft— * 

, » 971286 1186 12ft— ft 

ROCTEI 4 II 109 ft ft 6*— ft 
Regto* 09 3 104 12ft 12 lz% 

4 M4 «k 6ft A* + ft 
43e 4 56 5 48x 5 

U7 4U 6 Aft 

Renal 14 4 4 

RraSOrtr 818* 18ft is* + ft 

RoAulp 44 44 B8 9ft 9% 9ft + ft 
5^'"’ 211 16ft Id 16ft + ft 

RmExc 2 2ft 2ft 2% 

S M .£. 5v 16 14U 1384 14 

RoulrH 31p J 5 39* 28* 78* ft 

Revw-A 144 12.1 3912 IM4 II*- ft 

&2SL . jy- 784- U 


RayRev IJ4 3J 213J986 39 39 - 84 

Rbades 34 2.1 3811* lift 11* a. 2 

M lift - S 

RkJiEI 243A84 7£84 2AV. u. 

RlmsN 240 44 1558% 50% 50ft— I 

^! fzvs 2* 28k— ft 


.10r 

.9 

711% 

11% 

11% + * 



3614ft 

14* 

14*- * 

40b 4.1 

4ZM* 

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131 1914 

iv% 

19% 



50624 

22% 

22ft— 1* 



230 4ft 

4ft 

4ft- * 



73 7ft 

6* 






A%— ft 



345811 

I0U 

10*— % 



165 A* 

5ft 

5ft—* 


184 2H 2* 28k— ft 
33 58k 5% Sft— ft 
1 19* 1986 1986— ft 
SB 28 20 —1 

207 3* 386 3* 

120* 2086 2086 
AID 3216 32 22U + ft 

2774 58k 4* 5* + ft 

« 

57335* 35 UU— * 

3 3% 3% 3% 

19039 38„ 38 -86 

1009 38k 3% 3* + ft 
408 714 7 7ft— ft 

11924ft 2386 23*— * 
AM 16 16 

41 13 13* 131k— ft 
• 886 8% Bft— ft 
76 fft 886 B«— U 
276 6ft 6 6* + * 

352DU 1936 If*— ft 
27 7* 7% 786- U 
1B33U 33ft 33U 
1134586 45ft 45ft— * 
41 3 286 286— U 

1319ft 19ft 19ft 
1» 9 8% 9 

98712* 13* 12*— ft 
1430* 30* 30*—* 
TOW 2586 25* 
1026ft 2AM Mft +1 
7)2% 12% 12% + ft 
1522U 22 22M + ft 

3031986 19* 19%—* 
IM 5* 5% Sft— ft 
2612% 12ft 12ft— ft 
40 1486 1486 I486 

4 Sft 21% 22% + * 
1722ft S S 

17MS6* SSU 56ft—* 
214722* 21* 21ft— * 
73 5* 5* 5* + ft 
4314* )4U 14ft 
>2 12% 13 12 — ft 

»«% 24 24 

- - - 9 w 

. 4% 4ft— ft 

1514 13* M + u 

*03 42% 421k 42ft— % 


<5 SflMiSr* 

rSSSJT , MM% 13ft 14 

KODMn 1 34 6% frJ* 

RobNug 46 A “4 13* J3U 13* + % 

sss? Jirru*** 

roiwh .in ii 1 1? {: 

RMUnd 109 8* Jft m— 14. 

Ro»St 5a >5 ’iwiS US 81ft— % 
rSSb 3Z \i iff g* J? 

ROSOICtl 40 3J) 5819* 1986 m& ™ 

gome , lx* IS 11142% 42 48% I 
RewaFr -1& 13 11010 9* 986— ft I 

ROVBGO A 7* 7 7J4 j « , 

RavlAlr TS? gS SS" 2 

11 4ft 4ft 4ft ^ Vk 

PvnraL A 14ft 16U 16ft 

HEE,* „ ,, A1A% lift Mft 

13 M S 8ft B 8 - 8k 

S^YJnd 1313ft 12* 13 —ft 

1» IS*- ft 

— 5“ 

48 JJ 5419% W* 19*— * 
StoWj 1 JSe A 2831* 31ft Sift— u 

^ S 140 44 

Ira** *8* USE*** 

SlPauj J40 4A 796 W6 67ft 67* + ft 

IBr t u 3* 3* + ft 

*** 3 g 7 7ft— ft 

Settles 3lo hi iiL ju 

SSSE. 


SvBkPS 44 24 
ScanOs 
SeonTr 
Scherer J2 12 
Schotas 

SdilmA M 22 
SclDvn 

SclCnw 30 42 
Scl Inc 9 
ScIMie 


SdSvSv 

Senex 

Sen pm 40 12 
SooGal 
Seaeati 

SeoUns 
SeawFd 48 44 
SCNtBId 1.10 63 
SecNII UO IS 
3ecAFn .10b £ 
SocBcp 1.12 44 


m s* isszS 

.SIS? 14ft— ft 

io ir* it* 17* + % 

£% a ml 

St ft ft=s 
Si ml 

IgM IS 15*- ft 
M3J » 3A%-3 

191 9 n 9 j. u 
959 48k 4ft *ft + * 

1115% lS5 1S%~ ^ 

sSr^r+i^' 

SRRKEig 


SvcFrct 161 Aft Aft SU + % 

SeyOdfc M 1.1 24 M* MU Mft- % 

ShrMed 48 U 35130 29* 29*-% 

Swmt* 148 « A3 34* 34% 3416-%, 
ShettJV* .M 4 9219% 18* 19 +% 

Sheld l* . 77 IM 13% 13%—% 

Stanevi .13 2 309*86 30 K* + * 

IS 1 .10.2.1 

ISwfS fllMA 

silknx «lgk 1916 156- % 

SI line 38 7* 7ft 7* 

Sfmjur 30311% 11 11% + 16 

Shnpln 48 £1 2115* 15ft IS* 

ItoMn 9715% 15 1516 + ft 

SteCo B 416 4U 4ft— ft 

Stater 15420* 20 20U + ft 

Skipper 46 A 9910% TOft Igk- 16 
Sky Exp 5 31k 3% 3% .. 

StoonTc 3A 8 7* 784 + % i 

SmtttlL 304 3ft 3 3ft— % T. 

SmlttiF 19 Bft 8 816 

Society 144 4J 4343ft 42* 42* 

lo^Sv 13914% 13* 13*_ % 

•Mtech 1 7% 71k 7% 

SoftwA 4014% 13* 13*— ft 

sSSo 40 14 126% 26% 26% 

SonocP iJ6b 32 3846ft 45ft 46 + ft 

ionrRI .ISO 4 2817* 17% 17* + % 

iSKn IJD ?J ,5423ft 23ft 33ft- % 
SgteHp 143 5* 5% 58k 

SftKJFn 42 14 SSiWi 38ft 2M4 

Soutrst UB 34 2125* 25* 23* 

Swfat .10 14 144 7 6* A* 

Sovran 148 34 5642% 42% 42*— ft 

SpcMJc 7 lft 1% lft— ft 

SponA 46 7* 7* 7* + ft 

Speedy 3313% 13ft 13% 

Mrtto 331 17* 15* 17* + * , 

sSecOI 06 .9 17 6m 6% 6%—* / 

SpertTD 36 2* 2% 2* + % v . 

Sw 2014% M* 14* + % > 

StarS r a 223 9% B* 9 — ft 

Slam Id JO 34 15 6 5* 5ft— ft 

Stand™* 140 34 626 25% 25% — ft 

StdMJc 644 15ft 14* 15 — U 

StdReg 1J0 32 2854ft 54 54 

Standun IB 6* 6% 6%— ft 

ItantaT 111*11*11*—* 

Stanhas I JO 5J 23 23 23 23 + ft 

sioSfB 1JM 1 9 8355* 54* 54*- 16 

StoteG .15b 24 138 5% 5% 5* 

Stetoer 42 6ft 6 6 + % 

JSrarL 3) «* Aft Aft 

StowStv 4313* 13* 13*— ft 

srwlnf 33 34 4 032 21ft 21U- U 

StawSn .15 M IN W 3 3 

SntM 101 6ft Aft Aft— U 

StckYle .16 T.l 4614ft 13* 14%- ft 

StockSy 1410 9% Id +% 

Sirotas 9421414 M Mft 

StrwCS 1.14 11 1156 55ft Mft- % 

Stryker 528* 2814 28ft— % 

Stab* 517* 17* 17* 

StuartH 25 LI 4 4% 4% 4% . 

Subaru r 40 1 J 627I37V5 T3S% 737 + % 
SobAIrl JB 1.1 2 4% 4% 4% 

SubrB 142 34 44950ft 49* 50ft ; 

Sudbry 302 9* 9ft 9* + 84 

SuffSB .12a 4 6415% 15 15 — ft 

Sumlta 1.16 73 115* IS* 15* + ft 

Summa Z3 3ft 3ft 3U — ft 

SumtBi 96 40 330 30 20 — ft 

SumBA PBJD 43 246* 46* 46* 

SumtHI 498 4 25612ft 11* 11*— Aft 
SunCst 479 1ft 1% 1*— ft 

Sonolr J4 44 7 6 6 6 . . 


W.j 

S 1 '-" 


Sun5L t 

SunstFd 

Snatafe 

Sunwst 140 14 
■GupRte .16 2 

SupSky 

SuperEl lJ0tl04 
5uprtex 


Srstonf 44 
TBC 

TCA Cb .12 
TSC Inc 
TS1 “ 
TSR! 
TacVtvS 
Tandem 
Tandon 
TctiEaC 
TeCom 
Tdl Inc s 42 
Telco 
TIcmA 


Telortt 
Tetocrd J2 
Teiupict 
Telvld 
Tetabs 
Tebcon 
Tomco 
TmPfE 
Terntax 

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Teiwanl 33 

Tarm_. 
Tesdata 
Texan 
Textne 
BMfPf 
Ttirmds 
Tlwtfd 

ThdN » 1J8 


24 45 7 6 A A 

19% 9% 9% + ft 
t 1081 5* 4* 5ft— ft 
17 4 3* 3*— % 

9 Mft 14% Mft +1% 

Ij40 14 1141 41 41 

.16 4 105 18* 17* U — M 

10 9ft 9ft 9U 

JOT 104 S3 11% lift 11%— U 
851 3% 3% 3* 

25 9% 8* fl%— % 

112 * * 

23 3* 3% 3* + % 
261 12* 12ft 12* + % 
411 4 3% 3% + ft 

123514* 13% 14 + * 

181 4 3* 3*— ft 

J8 U 43016% 16 16ft 

34323 22* 22*— 16 

358 5* 5 5% 

32 10 9* 10 — U 

7 7 A* 6* 

44 2 S2T916 19 19 

221 12% 12 12ft 

.12 4 8420 19* 20 + ft 

17 8* Bft Bft — 16 
48 1.1 13 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 

3514 13% 13% — % 

48 6% 4% «% 
217719ft 18% 18* + % 
1514 5* Sft 5*— % 
120 20 20 —lft 

50 9 9 9 — U 

43 A 4 7 7 7 

12A 15% 14* 15 — * 
t 210431 2BT S 3® — * 
798 9% 9ft 9* + % 
2A31A 15ft 15% + % 
J2 14 184 17ft 16* 16* — % 

9923ft 23 23 

296 3 2* 2*— % 

21215% 15 1516 + 16 

41e 11519% 18* 18*— ft 

65 5* 5% S%- % 
10 2ft 2% 2% — % 
1 7% 7% 7%—% 
40 3% 3 3% + % 

33 4A 52B* 20* 20*—% 
13 4* 4* 4ft 
t 22 7* 7ft 7* + 16 
319 Mk 2 2ft + ft 
50 1% 1% 1% + Vt 


Tran La 1J4 63 
Trrador JJ2r 4 


U5L1CS 40 34 
uilrBcp IJ8 4J 


UnFedl 
UnNafl 244 44 
nPIntr 

wflTrBc 240 34 
USHT* 


JSe 14 5016* 16* 16* 

10611% 10% SB*— ft 
Thrmd! 11814% 13% mk— % 

■tlfettd 22 9* 9* 9*— ft I 

TbdN > 148 3.1 14240* 40 40* + ft 

23327 25* 26% + * 

511 11 11 1 

34 9% 9 9 — % f 

21116* 14% 14* + %„• 

54 8ft 8% «%—%:-, 

mbrtd t J 5* 5* 5*+% 0' 

TlmeE s 32413 12* 12* f - 

TmeFUl Ml Iff* 18% l®ft + ft 1 

Tiprory 123 * * * 

Tata* 3613* 13* 13* 

ToledTr I JO 44 5940% 3915 39* + U 

TopavA 3 4* 4% 4% + ft 

TrokAu 215* 15* 15*— ft 

Tranlnd t « 3* 3* 3* 

Tran La 144 64 920 30 20 

Tmadcr 42r J 50 7% 7 7* + * 

26 2* Zft 2* + ft 

159 7% 7ft 7% + % 

JJS J% 3* J* — % 

.10 14 M 8* 8ft 8U— % 

_ A0 13 1224% zm 2** 

TBkGg 1J» 29 59534* 34* 34* + * 

9 4% Aft 6ft— ft 

_ 56 * * 8k- K 

Tyson F M A 83320ft 18* 2016 +1U 
USL1CS 40 34 252116 30* 28*— % 

UTL 523ft 23ft 23ft— ft 

UilrBcp 148 4J 2129% 29% 2«k + % 

JMe 3 472 B* 8% ff%— ft 

60814 12* 13 —I 

113 13 13 — » 

186 IB 9* 9*-% 

1712% 12% 12% 

20 7* 7* 7*—* 

21210* 10ft 10% 

UnNafl 104 4 A T 44 44 44 +1 

Intr 1522% 22% 22% 

rBC 240 34 1064 63U 63*—* 

84035ft 34* 35 

1 8* 8* 8*— % 

■12e 34 7 4 4 4 

•10a 4 78319* 19* 19* 
lJffl 93 27 13 13* 13 +%*.. 

US Try 1J0 4J 1466 30ft 29* 30 
UStatas 40 .9 18923% 22* 22* • 

UTrtct 132 Aft 5* S*— * 

Unjefev - 3621* 7F* 21* 1 

UnTote 510* TO* 10* , 

SftWBn 36 42 1318 17% 17%— % 

UVaBs 1+4 «JJ 15 41ft 41 41 —ft 

UnvDev .I5e A 89 23* 23% 21% .. 

42 20% 20 20 — % 

31114% Mft 1416— ft 

14 *3 ’jS 18 1 f t _ w 

UPenP 240 1B.4 8I9U 19ft 19ft- ft 
UroaCr 51 5% 5 5 — % 

Uscote 41a 4.1 156 5% 5 5% 

Utah Be 148 44 20725* 25 25ft + * 

VLI 443 7* 7* 7ft 

19011% Wft 11 — ft 
VMX 1552 5* 5* 5%— % 

ValklLa T30T3 12* 13 + % i 

X° 'WI 1816* MU 16% ' 

VoWBc 1JB 44 327 25 27 

H?io SL 22315* 15% 15* + % r 

VINBcs 150a 32 2 45 45 45 !• 

1J0 13 23037* 37% 37ft— ft 

4L 11 151 W* 19% 19%- % S^B 

Vallek 49a 14 13 A* Aft Aft— % V| 

M l- 4 43335 2S 

VftiShfc 12 Sft Bft 8ft— U 

1530 9* 9* •: 

XSIlCrs 23 7% 7 7 + ft 

M 44 ,3Vj 13%-* “i . , 

« % * *— y» /a-- 1 

JJ2S322L i3ia* w* 1 sft „ 

__ 206 4% 4ft flk— % 

VtRH^ IJOo 19 S 30% 30ft 30% + % 

JO U 3 15 15 IS 

120 U % ft >i 

_ 6 3 3* 2*— %T .* 

J*8 4 149 24* 24% 24%—* 

yjedeFr J2e 19 M lift IKS 1 lft + % C' • 

169111k 10* 10*—% 

3418% 17% 17%— 1 kX 

116 1% 1* In— n 

121 11% 11 11 . 

7 4 3ft Jft— % \?| 

279 17* 17 17ft— ft fc\ 

. 131 29* 19* 29*—* 

48 9 60 9ft 9U 9ft— % tAJ 

_ 8 6% 6% 6* 

Waferf - 2 S ^3 3*4 20 * 20 20 ft— % 

VWI.75S. M J 731ft 30 31ft + * 

WaJ** , 254 Sft 7* 7*- ft \1 

5 SS « ’-ZL. S-5 39 2Dft 20* 20ft + * « 

W«L* 40b 2A 1135 30% 38% SOU— U 
„ . 163 13% 12% 13%“ % 

WdSrtw .12 J 43 2J 2214 22ft- * 

-UK 2 5* 5* Sft— * , 

5^ KJ1lPo ■« 33 IB 12ft 12 12ft 'f ■ 

44 30 216% 15% 15% • 

v&« # -5 A 280 in whi 10 *— % V; 

Hs S’gST'ilSt* 

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1931»fc 12ft 12ft V 

WMlcte Mi|ftnui2U-% \ 

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VLSI 

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VaiLn 40 u 

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Wlllml 
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wjltww 'm li 38% 39 -7ft 

55..IE" *s 512% 12ft 12 % — ft 
, aw 11% 12 +% 

a»ui u 

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s™ J?W i 5 =r 4 agj^- tt 

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356 4* 4% 4%— % 

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lar. 

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Zlyud 171 3* . Sft 3* . 

4,1 315 ^ S— * 


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Ly.lf. 






■mM 






BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


CBM Sees Solid Gro 


3j~ 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


Page 15. 


^ ; The Associated Press 

ATLANTA — International 
business Machines Corp. expects 
j ^ ^i'oiid growth in 1985 despite a diffi- 
3 \ jvult tint half and weakness in cer- 
U < pain segments of the computer 
ebusiness, John F. Akers, IBM's new 
|$ief executive, said Monday. ' 
“Despite what appears to some 
jjsj; |is a pause in our industry, we ex- 
^ wet our shipments to be strong in 
&Sj;985. particularly in the second 
’h j 1 Wiaif of the year,” Mr. Akers told 
^ sjibout 2.000 IBM’s shareholders. 

r (. As earlier reported, the comput- 
H&sijjr giant's profit fell in the first 
£ I 5 1 ! juarter by 18 percent, its first such 
ss'£{ ledine since the fourth quarter of 

Vs j981 - 

Over the 12 quarters ended Dec. 

IBM had shown average year* 
sjj’* ^‘o-year earnings growth of 23 per- 
;S»*5 tent, capped by an exceptionally 
5 {; v.trong 19S4. 

*ti5j k ■ The first-quarter results, howev- 
$*j §ar, “are not up to your expecla- 
•jj £ j'" ions, nor ours." Mr. .Akers told the 
!.£* Stockholders. 

’“£■ IBM blamed the decline on the 
J*f.&:.irong dollar, which narrowed 
--U' jv^erseas earnings, and the Feb. 12 
introduction of its new generation 
i£v<;rf large-scale computers, the 3090 
»i!g Series. 

said many customers 
;£Y ( raused to evaluate the 3090, nick- 
flamed “Sierra,” which prompted a 
; i ‘ »• lemporary pullback in orders. 

£ >r ; Now, “worldwide new order ac- 
’MJdvity is encouraging, and Tin con- 
^•f’jMdent that we wifi enjoy solid 
j! t' f growth in revenue and eamings for 
•Jlv he year as a whole,” Mr. Akers 
said. 

S-£.' However, Mr. Akers reiterated 


his earlier prediction that “it’s go- 
ing to be difficult to show, any 
growth during the first half of 1985, 
and I don't see anything on the 
horizon that suggests we ought to 
change that forecast / 1 

He said the dollar remains a neg- 
ative force in thncuizent quarter in 
terms or trying to secure sizable 
year-to-year eamings improve- 
ment. 

Mr. Akers declined to forecast 
the dollar's specific impact for the 
rest of the year, but said, T would 
like to see it erode modestly, and 1 
think the consensus forecast sug- 
gests that's going to happen." 

In addition, the slowing of the 
U.S. economy is apparently 
prompting many companies to re- 
evaluate their capita! spending 
plans. This is being felt largely in 
industrywide sales of mid-sized 
computers. 

Minicomputer makers such as 
Data General Corp., Digital 
Equipment 'Corp. and Wang Lab- 
oratories Inc. all have died the 
sluggish economy for weaker U.S. 
sales. ■ 

“Some of our (minicomputer) : 
competitors are experiencing a. 
slowdown," Mr. Akers said, but 
added, “I don't think we're seeing 
anywhere near the degree (of soft- 
ness) they have.” ■ • 

Vet he cautioned that “if the 
economy turns south” later this 
year, “it's going to affect every- 
body's business, including ours ahd 
including the mid-range (sector).” 

Still. IBM currently is expecting 
a si gnificant pickup in the li£t half 
of the year, ■ ~ • 


Xerox Eamings 
Declined 10% 

In First Quarter 

The Associated Press 

STAMFORD, Connecticut 
— Xerox Corp. reported a 10- 
percent decline in first-quarter 
profit on Monday. It said the 
setback resulted from the 
strength of the dollar and a 
drop in earnings from its insur- 
ance subsidiary. 

In the three months ended 
March 31. Xerox net income 
was SI 14 million, or 51.06 a 
share, compared with $126 mil- 
lion, or $ 1-20 a share, a year 
earlier. Revenue increased 
slightly to $ 2.02 bilHon, from 
5101 billion. 

Xerox said first-quarter in- 
come from reprographics and 
information systems operations 
declined 7 percent to $91 mil- 
lion, from $98 million a year 
ago, largely because of the im- 
pact or the strong dollar 
abroad. 

First-quarter income from 
the company’s financial ser- 
vices organization, including 
the Crum & Forster insurance 
unit, Xerox Credit Corp. and 
Van Kampen Merritt, dropped 
20 percent to $34 million in the 
first quarter, from $43 million a 
year ago. 

The company said its insur- 
ance results had been hun by 
price competition and a 512- 
million surety loss from a con- 
struction company’s inability to 
complete a large construction 
project. 


Judge Rejects Zellerbach Bid 
To Bar Goldsm ith Purchases 


Compiled bv Our Stuff From Pispucha 

SAN FRANCISCO - A Neva- 
da judge has cleared the way for Sir 
James Goldsmith to acquire more 
stock in Crown Zellerbach Corp., 
his lawyer says, although Sir James 
backed off last week from his un- 
friendly takeover attempt. 


Leraer, said in a telephone inter- 
view Sunday that Judge Bruce 
Thompson of U.S. District Court 
in Reno denied Crown Zcllerbach’s 
application for a restraining order 
to prevent Sir James from buying 
more stock. 

The ruling was handed down on 
Friday. Earlier that day, Sir James 
withdrew a tender offer from his 
CZC Acquisition Corp. for the pa- 
per and forest-products group, 
which is based in San Francisco. 
He cited a Crown Zellerbach reor- 
ganization and confusion over a 
competing offer of S5Q per share 
from Mead Corp. The Mead board 
rejected the offer after the Crown 
Zellerbach board bad approved it. 

However, Reuters on Monday 
quoted a source close to Sir James 
as saying in New York that Sir 
James could still accumulate 
Crown Zellerbach stock in negoti- 
ated transactions or in the open 
market 

Sir James, who controls 9.4 per- 
cent of Crown Zellerbach’s com- 
mon slock, had sought 78.4 percent 
of the stock at $4250 a share. He 
withdrew the offer a day after 
Crown Zellerbach announced its 
reorganization, an apparent at- 
tempt to stop Sir James from tak- 
ing control 


The Crown Zellerbach chair- 
man, William T. Creson, said in a 
telephone interview from the com- 
pany headquarters in San Francis- 
co that he expects the restructuring 
to be completed by early July. 

Mr. Creson said the plan would 
be filed for Securities and Ex- 


Thc board would continue to re- 
view outside bids, be said, adding 
that the board believes the compa- 
ny to be worth about $60 per share. 
Crown ZeUerbacb dosed Friday at 
$41, down $2,625. on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 

“This is not something we just 
dreamed up last week in a knee-jerk 
response to the Goldsmith tender 

(AP, Reuters) 

2 Insurance Firms 
In UJL Hold Talks 

Intemaianal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — C. E Heath PLC 
and Hogg Robinson Group PLC 
said Monday that they were hold- 
ing talks that could lead to a merger 
of the two insurance brokers. 

Based on current share prices, 
the combined company would have 
a stock market value of about £280 
million ($344 millioa). It would be 
Britain's third-largesl insurance 
brokerage, behind Sedgwick Group 
PLC and Willis Faber PLC 

Heath had pretax profit of £13.7 
million in the six months ended last 
Sept. 30. For the same period, 
Hogg reported pretax profit of £45 

milli on 


^EGON 


AEGON nv registered offices at The Hague. The Netherlands 


Shareholders are invited to attend the 
Annual General Meeting of Shareholders to 
be held in the room ‘Residentiezaaf of the 
Promenade Hotel. 1 VanStolkweg. 

The Hague. The Netherlands, on 
Wednesday. 22nd May 1985 at 2.30 p.m. 

Agenda 

1 . Opening of the Meeting. 

2. Minutes of the Meeting of 25lh May 1984. 

3. Report of the Executive Board on the 1984 
financial year. 

4. Reading and approval of the annual 
accounts for the 1984 financial year agreed 
by the Supervisory Board. 

5. Information on the results for the first three 
months 1985. 

6. Retirement and appointment of members 
of the Supervisory Board. The statutory 
details concerning the members of the 
Supervisory Board to be reappointed are 
open for inspection at the Company's offices 
in The Hague. Amsterdam and London. 

7. Vacancies on the Supervisory Board in 
1986. 

8. Appointment of Auditors. 

9. Alteration of the Articles of Association. 

10. a. Appointment of the Company's 

Administrative Organ empowered to 
issue shares and to depart from the 
preferential right of shareholders. 


b. Authorization of the Company to 
acquire shares in its own capital or 
BDRs for a consideration. 

1 1 . Information from the Executive Board. 

12. Matters arising 

13 Any other business and termination of the 
proceedings. 

Holders of ordinary shares to bearer of the 
Company are admitted to the meeting on 
production of a certificate proving that their 
shares have been filed at the office of a 
member of the "Verenigmg voor de 
EffectenhandeC in The Netherlands, in the 
United Kingdom at the "Amsterdam- 
Rotterdam Bank N.V." or the “Algemene Bank 
Nederland NV." in London and in 
Switzerland at the'Schweizenscher 
Bankvereinr “Schweizerische Kreditanstalf or 
"Schweizerische Bankgesellschaft" in Zurich 
Basle and Geneva. The filing must have taken 
place on 15th May 1 985 at the latest 
Copies of the agenda with explanation 
and the documents to be considered at this 
meeting are available to shareholders free of 
charge at the Company's offices in 
The Hague, Amsterdam and London and in 
Switzerland at the "Schweizerischer 
Bankverein" in Zurich. 

The Hague. 30th April 1985. 

1 Churchiilptein The Executive Board 


AEGON Insurance Group * International growth from Dutch roots 


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£il60 millioa in cash, 
j*, British Airways PLC said the 
■ unitrust suit that it and 11 other 
1 j defendants have filed against Laker 
Airways PLC was continuing but 
. i; bat there would be no comment on 
■ U published report that a settlement 
:£was imminent. 

] ij‘ Bristow Rotorcraft Ltd, a new' 
= -rompany, said it would offer one 
Bristow ordinary share for each 
; f; Westland PLC ordinary share in an 
• i’rffer that values Westland at 
! ^£88.93 million ($106.7 million). 

; £ Chrysler Corp. said a campaign 
If 1 against rising employee medical 
’“‘costs, which encouraged workers to 
1 £ use outpatient facilities and to get 
second opinions before they en- 
1 tiered hospitals, bad saved the com- 
; ‘-jDany $58 million in 1984. 

!5; Hilton Hotels Corp. said it has 
; rigreed to sell its hotd and casino 

. vnmnW in Atlantic f’ltv Mm in. 


House in the central business dis- 
trict of Hong Kong for 210 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($27 million).- 

Triangle Industries Inc. said it 
had received about 9.2 milli on 
shares, or about 90 percent, of Na- 
tional Can Corp. in response to its 
$42-per-sbare lender offer and that 
the offer had been extended until 
May 1. 

Wafa Kwong Shipping & Invest- 


ing a 1984 profit of 125 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($16 million), 
dawn from 151 million the previ- 
ous year, said it sees no significant 
recovery in the world shipping 
market for at least two years be- 
cause of a surplus of ships. 

Xebec Corp. of San Jose, Califor- 
nia, said it reached an agreement 
with International Business Ma- 
chines Corp. extending its contract 
to supply disk controllers to IBM's 
■Entry Systems Division in ..Boca 


e provides 


m 





















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 


Mondays 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing an Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

f iff The Associated Press 


n„ Vld, PE 

MwnLuw Stg« * 5 SVk J 

« 31 fS 1% ■« 

13 .15 » 33%. 


6% SuSwef* i3 IS 1” jV a3»h_'V 


7% 7% 

12 % 12 % 
S% g» 
10 ,**• 
ISVS IB 
7% 7 
4 

21 - »> 

im i* 

5414 56% 
4% <V» 

18% 16rt 
2 % M 
80ft 180ft 
2% 2ft 
28% Mft 
io 

8 ‘4 7ft 

m Si 

5% 5% 

7ft 7 
12ft lift 
Aft 4ft 
20ft 20ft 
3ft 3ft 
2ft 2ft 
4ft 4ft 
3ft 3 
30ft 30ft 
70ft 70ft 
8 8 



238 13ft 
255 ft 
9 13ft 
104 10ft 
20 1814 
8 2QU. 
59 1ft 
13 1ft 
40 14ft 
40 8ft 
12 13ft 
15 7ft 
2 17ft 
49 14 


19ft lift CDI S 
15ft 9 CMB 
9ft 5 CAM CP 
41* 1ft CMX Cp 
19 lift CRS 
19ft 9ft CoesNJ 
13ft 10 CoIRE 
25 ISft Calmtn 
6ft 3ft Colton n 


9 1 19ft 17ft 19ft— ft 

20b Ul4t 3 15ft 15ft 15ft 4- ft 
22 Bft 8ft 8ft 
9 2ft 2ft 2ft— ft 
34 20 17 3 17ft 17ft 17ft 

18 10 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

13 M I 82 13ft 13 13ft 
40 2828 161 22ft 22ft 23ft + ft 

21 5» Sfr 5Jh 


12ft 8ft FPA 
22ft 18ft Fablnd M \ 
1T% 4ft Fldaln 
11 9ft FtCann 130a 1 
31W 18ft FtFSLn 40b 
13ft 11 FWymB 80 i 
18ft lift FlschP 4Bt ! 
18 7ft FHcGE 
lift 8ft FTanEfi 


1 7£ 12 ft 

n it 

160 5ft 

3 18ft 

17 lift 
11 12ft 
40 12ft 

f & 

18 9ft 


12ft Uft 

19 19 

5ft 5ft 
10ft 10ft 
31 31ft 
12ft lZft 
lift 12ft- 
8ft Bft 


43% 

25M FlaRck 

JO 

IJ 

10 

IS 

41 

40% 


30% 

22% Fluke 

1J8 1 55 

10 

99 

29% 

25% 

75% 

UVb 

8% Foodrm 



10 

16 

9% 

9% 


10 

7% FoatoM 




37 




9ft 

4M FttllllG 



20 

58 

S% 

8M 


22% 

15 ForsfCB 

■09 

A 

83 

2 

20% 

20% 

20% — Vb 


37ft aft 
3ft 1ft 
15ft 10 
16ft 7ft 
17ft 10ft 
9ft 5ft 

17ft a 

2ft 1ft 
4ft 2ft 
4ft 3ft 
5ft 3ft 
6ft 3 

5ft 3ft 

3ft 2 
15ft 9ft 
15ft 8ft 
27ft 21 


KnGapf 4J0 in 
KusokC 7 

KuyCp 2D 14 22 
Kearfin 40 30 14 
Kntchm 581 17 
KayCo 20 17 
KerPh J0 12 15 
KmrCawt 
Klddawt 

Kltam 15 

Ktnork 71 

Kirby 

KRMIb 13 

KImtV JOr .9 
Knooo 16 

Knon 14 

KOOWC 132 88 154 


100Z 34ft 
BS 2ft 
2 14ft 
151 13ft 
136 18ft 

18 7ft 

490 9 

10 1ft 

19 3ft 
15 4ft 
14 4ft 
54 3ft 

1 5 
37 2ft 

2 13ft 

3 12ft 

127 28ft 


34ft 34U— 1ft 
2ft 2ft + ft 
14ft 14ft 
13 13ft + ft 
15ft 15ft +1 
7ft 7ft -f U 
8ft 9 4- ft 

1ft 1ft— ft 
3ft 3ft -• 
4% 4% 

4ft 4ft 
3ft 3ft + ft. 
5 5 

2ft 2ft— ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 
12ft 12ft— ft 
28ft aft + u 


13ft 10ft 
HHk 8 ft 
wft a 
34ft a 
32ft 28ft 
27ft 21ft 
21ft 17ft 

a 15% 

21ft 17 
22ft 17ft 
9ft 7ft 

aw> isft 
18ft 13ft 
18ft 13ft 
19ft 14ft 
17ft 13ft 
19ft 15 
9ft 7ft 
21% 14ft 
43ft 34 
AS 35ft 
lft ft 
39ft 29ft 
•ft 5ft 
9ft 3ft 
23ft 19ft 
14ft 7ft 
5ft 2ft 
Bft 5ft 
11 81b 


PGEpfA 
PGEpfE 
PGEpfG 
PGEpfF 
PGEpfZ . 
PGEpfY . 
PGEpfW: 
PGEnfV : 
PGEpfT : 
PGEpfS : 
PGEofH 1 
PGEpfR : 
PGEpfP : 
PGEpfM 
PGEptL. : 
PGEpfK ! 
pGEptj : 
PGEpfl 
PGTm 
PocLtpf . 
Podtpf i 
POMB 
Paircp 
Pwrtost 
ParaPk 
PartrOi 
ParTdi 
Pay For 
PUMG 
PmrTu 


M 14 19 
23 

40a 25 10 
34 
& 

■12o 14 18 
40b 44 16 


9 12ft 

11 Hfft 

4 10ft 

10 33ft 
19 31ft 
a 28ft 
27 2116 
50 19ft 

12 20ft 
41 22 

5 9ft 
4i a 
41 17ft 

9 16ft 

2 18ft 
4 17ft 
4 19ft 

R) 9ft 

6 72 
ISOz 42 
lOBz 43ft 

25 Vi 
165 33ft 
16 7ft 
U 9ft 
■ 24ft 
40 10ft 
'10 4 

3 7ft 

11 9 


21 21ft + ft 
17ft 17ft— ft 
10% TO% , - 

I4ft 14ft + ft 
19ft- 19ft 4- ft 
18ft lift— ft | 
« . • 

7 7. — ft 

6ft 6ft— ft 
Bft 6ft 
35ft 36ft 4- ft 
9ft 9ft ’ 

8ft 8ft— ft 


12ft 12ft + ft 
10ft 10ft 4- ft 
10ft 10ft - 
33ft 33ft + ft 
31ft 31ft + ft 
28ft 26ft— ft 
21 21ft— ft 

19ft lift 
20ft 20ft— A 
21ft 23ft 
7ft 9ft 
19ft 17ft ' 
17ft 17ft + ft 
16ft 18ft — ft 
life lift -I- ft 
17ft 17ft + ft 
19ft 19ft 4- ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
21 « 21 ft— ft 
42 42 +1 

43^ 43ft — 1 

33ft 33ft -K ft 
7ft 7ft +• ft 
9ft 9ft + ft 
23ft' 24- + ft 
10ft 10% + ft 

7ft fti - : 

9 9 — ft 


7ft 7 SFNpfA 
12ft 7 Sana 
10ft 5- Strtem 
3ft ft SCarta 

7ft 5D00Pf 180*11.1 
67% SDoopf 984 128 
41 49 SDsapf .7 a 128 

21ft 17% SOoo Of 247 117 

38ft 31 ft SDoopt 446 128 
23ft 18ft SOoopf 248 115 
ft . 23ft Sondstn 80 38 
5ft 31b Sonmrk _43f 98 
10ft 7ft taundpf 180 11.7 
Sft 3ft Scaptrn 
22ft 15ft Schalb 56 IB 
*ft 4ft SdAW 
35 15ft SdLsg 

62 34 SbdCfr 

ISft 10ft SocCop .MB 1.1 
Sft 2ft SebPro 
ft 

•ft 3ft Sdas 
Sft 3ft SolteAs- 
2Wk Swntcti 
5ft Servotr 42t 45 

18ft 10 Salons .12 3 

14ft Bft SrioerS 180e 88 

7ft ft Storon 

18 9ft Sboowl 

14ft 12ft StarHSn 
13 10% siarSen xn 22 

15ft 10ft Staoi 40 17 

7ft Sft 3 ffCO 20 34 

5 8 SdutfAS 20 15 

18ft 10ft SmthA '* *' 

16ft 9ft SmttiB — 

15ft 12ft Srtvdar 280 138 
■“ 5ft Son (run 

ft SOTWC 

7ft SC Ed pf 182 IIJ 

10% 7ft 3CEd Pt .186 118 

10ft 7ft SCEdpf 188 in 

lift ft* SCEdpf 1.19 115 

47ft 33ft SC Ed pi 48i 87 

13ft 10ft SCEdof 145 118 

21% 16ft SCEdpf 230 113 

20ft U SCEdpf 221 107 

14ft 6ft sodom 

10 6ft Sprtcpf 188 15.1 

20ft 9ft Spctros 89 5 

7% 3ft SpcdOP • 

.5 - 8ft Spencer 34 25 ‘ 

lift Bft Spndtti n 

3 T% Spndt wt 

23ft 13ft Sid Prd 88 37 

77ft 58ft SMSnr- 

11ft r Stonwd 

20ft lift StarrtH 

lift Aft Skrtex 

21 T4ft Stapan 

Sft 4ft StrtCoo 

Sft lft Start El 

3 . 7ft SMExI 

fft 9ft StortSfT .13o 14 : 

3ft iftstrutw 
Bft Sft SlimlfE 
15 lift SUflrtEPflJO 13L3 

17ft ifft ISkJr ° 4* 23' 1 
28ft 18W SuorPd 44b 17 1 
2ft ft SupCra 
M - 4ft SwHnd . 30a 15 1 
15ft lift SuprSr 38 24 1 


887 7ft 

10 lft 

• 19 6 

1 1ft 

2 9 
10QZ 82 
lOQz 60 

6 21l« 
27 27ft 
20 23% 

16 aft 

16 4ft 
43 10ft 

IM 5 
9 19ft 
X 4H 
294 16ft 
1. 82 
81 14ft 
6 Sft 
a ift 
10 6% 
4 5 

6 Sft 

103 91b 
27 18ft 

330 12 £ 
70 18ft 
117 13ft 

11 11% 
1 10 % 

55 Sft 

3 13% 
31 17ft 
10 16ft 

104 ISft 
27 7ft 
170 ft 

4x 9% 
7X10% 

12 ftk 
Ox 10% 
50a 48ft 

lx 13 

17 20ft 

a zm 

A 8ft 

3 4ft 

34 19ft 

13 ift 
70 9ft 
31 9ft 

4 2ft 

ia 21ft 

9 74ft 

14 8ft 
123 18% 

2 9ft 


7ft 7ft— % 
8ft Bft— ft 
Sft 5ft— ft 
1ft Ift— ft 
Bft 9 + ft 

82 82 +1 
60 60 
21ft 21ft— ft 
37 37 —ft 

23 23% + ft 

a au. + ft 

4ft 4ft 
10% 10%—% 
4ft 8 + ft 

19ft 19ft— ft 
4ft 4ft 
15ft 16 — ft 
62 82 
14% 14ft— ft 
3 3 — ft 

Ift lft + ft 
Aft Aft— ft 
5 5 

3ft 3ft 
9ft 91b + ft 
I Aft 16ft 

«£+* 
1Aft 16% 4- ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 

12 12ft + ft 
10% 10ft + ft 
5ft Sft— % 

13% 13% 

17 17 — U 

lift lift + ft 
15 15 

6ft ift— ft 
ft ft + ft 
9 9 — ft 

9ft fft 
9ft fft— % . 
10ft I Bft — ft 
48ft 46ft— ft 

13 13 — ft 
20ft 20ft— % 
20% 20ft + ft 


19ft * 
ift + ft 
9%— ft 
9ft + % 
21b + ft 
21ft— % 
74 —ft 
Btt 

18 — % 
9% — ft 
lift 

5 —ft 

ib+is 

S5-* 

1 f%— ft 
5ft 


10ft fft 
IBM 10% 
27ft 16ft 
12ft 4ft 
5ft 2ft 
23ft 14ft 
7ft 3ft 
15ft 9M 
10% 4ft 
9% 5Vj 
A 2ft 
84ft 32M 
fft Aft 
12ft 8 
19ft 13Vb 


VST n 80e 38 
VallyR* 140 75 14 
Volsprs 44 1.9 13 
Vartrtm 

ft&C 40b 2.1 =1 

Venitt 80 il >0 

vxrtBch 

Vicon li 

VUitoe 

V& J0UII 

« 3 SJI?? 


Aft WTC 
17ft WOJbar 
10ft Wales 
15ft WancvB 
1A WaroC 
ft WmCwi 
Sft WshHs 
70ft WshPst 
17ft WRIT 
Alb WatocB 
2ft Wttrfrd 
13ft Wthfdpf 
IM Wobcnr 
3M Wedcc 
lift Weettcn 

7 WeWTb 
ift WaMtrn 
4ft Wail co 
2% WalGrd 

lift wesco 
ft Wexocp 
7% WstBrC 
8% Wstbro 
Sft WDIoHI 
7% wtHJthn 
14ft WIRET 
16 WltnSL 
fft WhEnts 
2% WldiltO 
71b WlllcxG 
19ft Wlntln 
35% WlsPpf 

8 wvtbtrm 
11 WkWaor 

2ft WwdaE 
12ft WWdepf 
17M Worttm 
13 Wrattis 
3M WrotHa 


13ft 5ft YankCo 


21 

40 n 13 
M 25 10 
.18 .9 12 

.11 4 13 


.9A 8 16 

140 64 IA 
.16 15 6 


13 

02e .1 18 
821 


12 

20 13 

17 
17 

152 8.1 15 
AM \3 13 
79 


224O102 
450 105 
.40 4.1 10 
52 3.9 7 

180 121 
50 2A 7 
-02 

jQSe 2S 


B 7% 
211 241b 
93 15% 
7430 17ft 

4 18% 
A8 IVo 

11 8 

12 115 
24 24ft 

2 10ft 
103 Sft 

A 17M 

20 1ft 

21 4ft 
20 14% 

3 7ft 
72 IT 

5 7ft 
20 3ft 

6 26% 
20 1 % 

12 9 
40 11M 
400 lift 

5 17ft 
15 18% 
99 29% 
42 30ft 

13 2ft 

6 10ft 

14 22 
90Z41U 
10 fft 
10 13ft 
AS 4M 

5 15 
5 19M 
50 201b 
316 7% 


7% + M 
12 ft— ft 
5ft— M 
10 

IBM + ft 
7ft + M 
3ft 
2ft 

19 — % 
5Atu + % 
ift— 1b 
16M— % 
2ft 

180ft— lft 
2M— % 
28% — ft 
9ft 

5ft 

7 — ft 

lift— ft 
Aft— ft 
aft + u 
3ft — ft 
Zft 
4ft 
3ft 

30M + ft 
70ft— IM 

12% + ft 
1ft 
25ft 

lWb — % 
17% — ft 
IS**— % 
fft S 
9% + “ 
Sft— M 
6ft— % 
3% 

lift— ft 
27ft— ft 

3 — % 


13ft 13ft- M 
10ft 10% _ 

IBM IBM — M 
MM 20% — % 
1ft IM + M 
1ft 1ft 
14 14 — % 

AM 8% + ft 
U% 13% 

7ft 7ft 
17ft 17ft . 

13 13 —1 


10 

18ft + % 

23 + % 

7ft— M 
4ft— M 
19 — % 
4M— % 
fft 

9 — M 

7ft 

3% 

64%— ft 
9 + lb 

lift— M 
19 


7M 7% 
23% 24 ■ 
15ft 15% 
17M 17ft- 
18% 18% 

1 lft 
8 8 
115 115 
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IMF Predicts 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


Page 17 


mope is Said 

Slotcdmunfor m t 

EeommiJ To Learn Lesson’ 




.r ■ ; 


•■*1 

]?- 
• -'i 


i /• 


By Hobart Rowcn to 

Wasktym Pan Sm-kr BRUSSELS — Greater political 

2 y. WASHINGTON — After the and economic realism tjas pro- 
world economy's best showing last duced a significant improvement in 

* ^ . year since 1976 — a 5 percent rate the investment dimate in many 
£ \ \ of growth — a slowdown to no Western European countries, ac* 
- ■ better than a s dll-acceptable 3 per- cording to participants in an inter- 

: ,! flj \ • cent rate is likely this year and next, national investment conference 

* £ . the International Monetary Fund here. 

4 2 said Monday. Several partidpanls said govern- 

J i f . It also gave an Optimistic ap- merits had “teiracd a lesson" in the 

praisal of Third World problems, post decade about the negative ef- 
ciiing a narrowing in the combined fects of automatic wage increases, 
current account trade deficits of heavy state spending arid excessive 
developing conn tries from 5313 bil- interference in pnvate business, 
lion as recently as 1981 to only $38 The lessons were expected to have a 
billion last year. The current ac- long-lasting effect on government 
count is a broad figure that mea- policies as Europe attempts to stem 
sures trade in merchandise and its relative (to the United Stales 
nonmerchandise items, such as ser- and Japan) economic decline^ the 
vices. participants said. 

Nonetheless, the IMF warned “My feeling is that people have 
that if the larger countries follow come to understand that the poli- 
“worse policies’' than they now ti cs we pursued in the 1960s and 
the agency's modestly 


U: 


it; 




promise, the agency s 
hopeful scenario could deteriorate 
into “a significant recession”. 

Thus, a worst-case scenario 
could drop the global annual 
growth rate to 2 percent in 1985-86 
while on anticipate! 5 percent an- 
nual slide in the exchange rate of 
the dollar could accelerate into a 
depreciation of dose to 20 percent 
in 1987. In such circumstances, 
"■''•there would be a sharp decline in 
, U.S. economic activity, accompa- 
: ; nied by higher interest rates. 

The consequences of this gloomi- 
‘ er perspective would be felt seri-r 
:« ously in the Third World, where 
economic growth could be cut from 
a projected 4 percent rate in 1985 to 
no more than 1.5 percent. 

The IMF report calls on the 
United Slates and other nations 
with large deficits to cut them 
sharply. 


1970 would lead to a disaster," said 
Andreis van Agt, who was Dutch 
prime minister from 1977 to 1982. 
He said he did not expea even the 
opposition Labor Party, if it won 
control of the government in 1986, 
to sweep away the present policy of 
wage restraint, reductions m social- 
welfare benefits and reduced state 
spending. 

The Dutch awareness of the need 
for economic reform is “so dee- 
p-rooted I cannot not see a return 
to the stupidities of a decade ago," 
he said. 

Krister Lewenhaupt, a manager 
with Wyatt Co. AB m Stockholm, 
said almost all the political parties 
in Sweden “understand the need to 
keep profits for companies at a 
high level, and to keep down gov- 
ernment spending.” 

Their remarks came last week at 
a conference on investment and in- 


centives sponsored by the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune and Plant 
Location- International NY, a con- 
sulting firm, ft included represen- 
tatives from 16 Western European 
rations and executives from Amer- 
ican and European businesses. 

Wilfred Martens, the Belgian 
prime minister, pointed to his par- 
liament’s approval in January of 
measures making it easier for com- 
panies to hire and fire workers, as 
well as a partial move away from 
indexing wages to inflation, as key 
pans of Belgium's “strategy for re- 
covery." 

While the changes in state poli- 
cies were most strongly noted by 
speakers from northern European 
countries with center-right govern- 
ments, representatives From Social- 
ist countries said they had seen 
cherished beliefs abandoned or 
modified by their governments. 
They also cited more moderate 
union attitudes, because of recent 
economic difficulties. 

Paul Home, a vice president of 
Smith Barney, Harris Upham & 
Co. in its Pans office, said that the 
Socialist government of President 
Francois Mitterrand of France had 
shown flexibility in its decisions to 
impose an austerity program and to 
make the country more open to 
foreign investment. 

During the past two years, Mr. 
Home said, the French Ministry of 
Industry has become more recep- 
tive to American takeovers of 
French companies, provided that 
they do not result in the domina- 
tion of key economic sectors. 

In Portugal, according to Jose 
Viana Baptista. head of the Foreign 
Investment Institute in Lisbon, the 
heady atmosphere of upheaval that 
followed a 1974 revolution is gone 



Offshore Tax-Shelter Records Seized 


He* York Times Senice gplis, a Los Gatos. California, at* 

SAN FRANCISCO —In Febru- toraey. 
ary, federal authorities, armed with On Aoril 1 1, Mr. Margolis was 
a subpoena, gained custody of two charged ‘with 10 counts of fraud, 
tons of documents that were being perjury and obstruction of justice 
stored behind the .Ample Hamper, for his involvement in what the 
a grocery store in Tortola, one of government chorees was the ere- 
British Virgin Islands. ation on paper of S3 35 million in 


by his office, and obstructed justice 
by failing to comply with a subpoe- 
na for records of offshore compa- 
nies. 

On Thursday, Mr. Margolis 
pleaded not guilty to all the 
charges. 


. . Also named in the indictment 

In dome so the Justice TWm- loans to four partnerships de- was Everd Van Walsum, a business 

signed to fabnate S4j million in associate of Mr Moolis, 
interest-tax deductions for Mr. 

Margolis’s clients. 

The indictment charges that Mr. 

Margolis advised and assisted in 
the preparation of the tax returns 
of the partnerships, known as 
MCDM Partnership One, Two. 


ment seized the offshore business 
records of a tax-shelter promoter 
for the first time. 

While agents of the Justice De- 
partment and the Internal Revenue 
Service continue to inspect the doc- 
uments, the Justice Depanmem 


Andries van Agt 

for good. “The workers have be- 
come much more conscious of the 
economic implications before they 
strike,” he said. 

The average wage in Portugal, 
$1.63 an hour, is the lowest in 
Western Europe. Mr. Viana Bap- 
tism said, giving the country an 
advantage in attracting foreign 
companies. The wage structure will 
change after Portugal joins the Eu- 
ropean Community in 1986, how- 
ever, and should be seen only as a 
“transient asset," he said. 

The Spanish government expects 
parliament to approve in Septem- 
ber a major relaxation of the proce- 
dures that foreign companies must 
follow to invest m Spain, according 
to Leon Beneibas, an assistant di- 
rector of the Ministry of Econom- 
ics. 

West German representatives 
stressed their government is plac- 
ing increasing emphasis on protec- 
tion of the environment, but that 
state grams and low-interest loans 
are available to help companies 
with the costs of meeting environ- 
mental standards. Government 
subsidies are also available for 
companies making environmental 
products such as air filters. 


has announced that it expects the Three and Four, for the 1978 tax 
records to have an impact on 5,000 year, with the knowledge that inter- 
Tax Court and District Court cases est deductions claimed on the re- 
involving more than SI00 million . turns were false, 
in taxes. 


Based on evidence Tetrad in the 
documents, a grand jury in San 
Francisco has indicted Harry M ar- 


il also charges that Mr. Margolis 
made false statements under oath 
in depositions taken in civil tax 
suits involving partnerships created 


Maigolis. 

This is not the first time that the 
government has decided to tangle 
with Mr. Margolis over the issue of 
offshore tax havens. In 1975 he was 
indicted on charges of preparing 
false tax returns and conspiracy to 
defraud the United States of $1.4 
million of income taxes. 

In that case, the government said 
Mr. Margolis and another attorney 
had created fictitious tax deduc- 
tions for wealthy clients through 
the use of sham companies in the 
Bahamas and the Netherlands An- 
tilles. 


Court to Rule 
On f Non-Banks’ 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court Monday agreed to 
decide whether the Federal Re- 
serve Board may regulate limit- 
ed-service banks. 

The court said it would re- 
view a decision blocking the 
board from limiting growth of 
the new institutions, called 
“non-bank banks." A derision 
is not expected until next year. 

The new institutions, which 
provide several banking ser- 
vices but do not offer conven- 
tional checking accounts or 
commercial loans, are increas- 
ing in number as brokerage 
companies such as Merrill 
Lynch & Co. and corporations 
such a$ J.C. Penney Co. enter 
the field. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


EXECUTIVE SUITES MAYFAIR, hwu- 
ry fumahed apartment], newly deco- 
rated. fifty serviced, secretarial/ fete* 
focitMs. M50/£S> b per week. 3 
months la 2 years. Mountarzon Man- 
agement Ltd. London 01 491 2626 
ietex: 299185. 


; Junk Bonds: A New Weapon for Corporate Raiders 


-id*’ 


(Continued from Page 9) 
holders, hostile takeovers financed 
by junk bonds are often structured 
so that many original investors in a 
target company can be worse off 
than before. 

The issues are called junk be- 
cause in most cases, most, if not all, 
of the debt may not qualify for a 
blue-chip rating because of the 
heavy debt load that the acquired 
company will carry. Only securities 
rated Baa and higher by Moody’s 
Investors Service, for instance, are 
considered “investment grade,” 
meaning that they are presumably 
safe for even the most conservative 
investors. 

But the name junk bonds, whicb 
Wall Street firms prefer to call 
“high-yield securities,” belies their 
power. Mr. Steinberg used them in 
his thrust at Walt Disney Produc- 
tions last June, so alarming the 
company that it paid a premium to 
buy out his shares. 

In February, Mr. Icahn used 
them, too, forcing Phillips Petro- 
leum Go. to yield to a recapitaliza- 
tion plan, which brought him a hef- 
ty profit. Two large friendly 
takeovers now’ pending, Triangle 


Bank Growth 
Seen Slowing 

(Continued from Page 9) 

' lending figure for all of last year 
represented a 40-percent drop from 
1983. 

By contrast, deposits from what 
the BIS calls the outside area con- 
tinued to exceed borrowings as 
they have since the start of 1984. In 
the" fourth-quarter, deposits 
amounted to $10.3 billion with de- 
veloping countries outside the Or- 
ganization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries supplying the milk, or 
$6.7 billion. 

For all of last year, outside area 
deposits totaled $34 billion. Non- 
OPEC developing countries pro- 
vided $21.7 billion of the total, “by 
far the largest yearly expansion yet 
recorded” in deposits from these 
countries, the BIS staled, adding 
that Latin America provided a re- 
cord $1 1.4 billion. 

“This meant that in contrast to 
the usual geographical pattern 
there was a large transfer of re- 
sources from these countries via the 
international banking sector to the 
rest of Lhe world," the report said. 

While the United States took less 
money ($1.4 billion) out of the mar- 
ket than it did in the third quarter 
($9.5 billion), the report noted that 
“the international banking sector 
continued to make a substantial 
contribution to the financing of the 
U.S. current-account deficit in the 
fourth quarter of last year." 

OPEC, mainly the Middle East- 
ern members of the cartel, woe 
also net takers of funds — amount- 
ing to S1.3 billion. 

The BIS figures also show that 
new lending to Latin America grew 
by only S3 3 billion Iasi year, de- 
spite the nearly $10 billion of cred- 
its granted by banks under IMF- 
sponsored packages. This 
presumably was due to the repay- 
ment of short-term trade credits 
and private-sector debts not cov- 
ered by the rescheduling agree- 
ments and reduced lending to 
countries that have not resched- 
uled. 

Banks' exposure to Venezuela 
showed a drop of $1.9 billion and 
to Argentina, of $1.32 billion. 

In Asia, China was lhe largest 
borrower — taking $1 billion in 
new credits and reducing its depos- 
its by 51.4 billion. 

However, the country remains 
the largest net creditor of any so- 
called outside area country with 
deposits at the reporting banks to- 
taling SI 43 billion. 


Industries' purchase of National 
Can Corp. and Coastal Corp.’s ac- 
quisition of American Natural Re- 
sources Co., were initiated on a 
hostile basis through the power of 
junk-bond financing. 

And investment bankers from 
Dr ex cl, Burnham, Lambert Inc, 
have been lining up junk-bond 
commitments worth $2.4 billion so 
that a T. Boone Pickens Jr. invest- 
ment group can pay cash to share- 
holders for a controlling interest in 
Unocal Corp., the 12th-largcst UJS. 
oil company. Last week, Mr. Pick- 
ens offered to let Unocal tty to buy 


for instance, will rely on Drexd to 
help raise the money for its planned 
Sl-btilion buyout of Northwest In- 
dustries Inc. 

But junk bonds became an in- 
strument of takeover warfare dur- 
ing Mr. Pickens's move against 
Gulf Oil Corp. in early 1984. In 
effect junk bonds gave Mr. Pickens 
the muscle to be taken seriously by 
Gulf management, which then 
scurried into the arms of Chevron 
Corp. for the largest acquisition in 
history. 

Since then, Drexel has been the 
financial engineer for six more 


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PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT OR SALE 

Stt fif 563 25 60 


81 AVEFOCH 

Luxurious Shi (Sat 
Phone, color TV, kndien, short term 
lease. No owner fee*. F4.500/ month 
574 857. 


back the 13.6 percent of the stock junk-bond takeover attempts. It is 
his group now controls, but reaf- involved in several other takeover 
finned hu determination to acquire attempts, including the move 


the 36.9 percent of the stock that 
would give him control of Unocal 

In the latest big takeover at- 
tempt, on April 18, Mr. Turner 
offered 53 billion for CBS Inc. His 
bid was funded entirely by junk 
bonds. 

Although the offer has been giv- 
en little chance of success, some 
Wall Street experts say it is finan- 
cially viable and should force CBS 
to take steps to increase the price of 
its stock. 

Hostile takeovers financed by 
junk bonds are the brainchild of 
Drexel Burnham. By giving seem- 
ingly puny raiders a muscular look, 
“Drexel has become more potent 
than the commercial banks,” said 
Irwin L. Jacobs, a Minneapolis cor- 
porate raider. He said he would 


against Hilton Hotels Corp. by 
Golden Nugget Inc,, a Drexd clir 
eat; Lorimar Productions’ $1.02- 
bDJion offer for Multimedia Inc.; 
and Mr. Icahn’s bid for control of 
Uniroyal Inc Drexd is expected to 
call on its junk-bond investors for 
hdp in at least some of these deals. 

“If managements would sit down 
and talk, there would be no need to 
take this route” said G. Chris An- 
derson, a managing director of 
Drexd. “The trouble is that en- 
trenched executives stonewall you. 
And unless you are a company like 
Chevron they refuse to take you 
seriously.” 

Corporate chieftains, of course, 
do not quite see it that way. They 
say that the long-term interests of 


son pointed out. And unfriendly 
ones among the giants do not occur 
often because “it’s a very clubby 
thing: They don't pick on each oth- 
er." he says. 

But for smaller companies, the 
junk bond has become a big part of 
a takeover strategy, friendly or oth- 
erwise Triangle Industries, for in- 
stance, had net income of a little 
more than 53 million last year on 
sales of $291 million. YeL early this 
month, the $1.9- million National 
Can Co. agreed to yield to a sweet- 
ened offer from Triangle’s boss. 

Nelson Pdtz. 

Triangle mil finance nearly all of 
the 5430-million cash offer to Na- 
tional Can shareholders by calling 
upon the money committed by 36 
junk-bond investors. If the share- _ 

holders turn down the offer or if Ishorttbum stay. Advoucne* of a 

v '~‘‘ 1 — u - J ** 1 1 hotel without inconveniencK, foal at 

home in mea dries, one bedroom 
end mare m Pant S08EUM: 544 39 
40,- 90 rued* IWuersHL font 7th. 


National Can had thrown a road- 
block in its way before it turned 
agreeable, then the timing on the 
commitments would have expired 
and the would-be investors would 
not have put up any money. 

So far. Triangle’s has been the 
only successful takeover that has 
relied on junk bonds to finance 
virtually the whole package, al- 
though Mr. Turner is trying to fol- 
low suit in his bid for CBS. In 
takeovers, the term junk bond is 
used loosely to encompass debt ob- 
ligations as well as preferred stock, 
both of which are offered to raise 
necessary financing. 

Sometimes banks agree to come 


shareholders would best be served 
“have no hesitation” about lapping by following through on a well- in for most, or all, of the remaining 
the firm’s junk-bond sources if he tb ought-out corporate game plan, outstanding shares after junk-bond 

and not by yielding to takeover 
overtures for a quick stock gain. 

In any event, Mr. Anderson said, 
when a client puts together a take- 
over bid, he often has no choice but 
to line up junk-bond financing and 
take a bid directly to shareholders 
via a public tender offer for their 
shares, rather than gp through hos- 
tile management- “All we are doing 
is giving the right to someone who 


decided to pursue a bigger target 
than his war chest would allow. 

“The pendulum is shifting and 
Drexel is now giving the opportuni- 
ty to a new group of people," Mr. 
Jacobs said. 

Although business has begun to 
stiffen its resistance to the raiders, 
the use of junk bonds to wage a 
hostile takeover may well be just 
beginning. 

Wall Street executives and a 
growing number of concerned con- 
gressmen say that many more raid- 
ers will be tempted to gp on the 
prowl. And the big money at stake 
for putting the agreements together 
is likely to make investment bank- 
ers willing, to hdp finance aggres- 
sive takeovers from small compa- 
nies, even If they must incur the 
wrath of their major corporate di- 
ems by doing so. 

Drexd Burnham has been tap- 
ping its investor base for a number 
of friendly leveraged buyouts of 
corporations or their subsidiaries 
since late 1983. Farley Industries, 

How to Study 
Market Signs 

(Continued from Page 9> 
the case of currency and certain 
financial options); the maturity of 
the contract; and the expected vol- 
atility of the market The options 
market’s shorthand term for these 
seven key variables is the contract's 
“implied volatility.” 

Tnese variables are important 
factors because an investor who 
buys an option is buying the right, 
wiihout any obligation, to buy 
(call) or sell (put) the underlying 
goods at a fixed price within a set 
period of time. Tne cost is known 
as the premium. 

Mr. Gadkari noted that most of 
these factors have been computed 
mathematically by using various 
versions of the Btack-SchoLes for- 
mula, which has long been the stan- 
dard form of judging the values and 
pricing of stock options. 

“While the implied volatility for- 
mulas are still far from perfect, 
they provide lhe investor with bet- 
ter odds than the so-called coin- 
toss method, and the investor, and 
his broker should take the time to 
understand them,” said Mr. Gad- 
kari. 


financing has helped a raider gain 
voluig control or a company. The 
successful raider might then offer 
the remaining shareholders a mix 
of debt and preferred stock securi- 
ties. Mr. Icahn did that in his move 
on Phillips and Mr. Pickens plans 
to do it if his offer for control of 
Unocal is successful. 


is aggressive to put some money 
where his mouth is,” he argued. 

Junk-bond financing commit- 
ments give a raider credibility in 
the early stages of a takeover at- 
tempt, when bank financing nor- 
mally is not available — particular- 
ly when a small company pursues 
larger prey. 

Big companies have no trouble 
finding bank financing for acquisi- 
tions, especially whtti they are 
friendly from the start, Mr. Ander- 


Hong Kong to Replace 
Commodities Exchange 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — The Hong 
Kong Futures Exchange Lid. will 
be inaugurated on May 7, replacing 
the Hong Kong Commodity Ex- 
change Ltd-, the commodity ex- 
change said Monday. 

The new exchange will ultimate- 
ly diversify beyond into financial 
instruments. 


LONDON. For it* bar forrijhed flats 
and houKi. Consult the Speoafon: 
PNloi, Kay and Lcwii. TeL London 
* Fill 1. Tetex 27846 RESIDE G. 


3521 


ITALY 


MOAN RJRMSHED 4-room, good k> 
cation, staling July 1 (prosHe 1 ■ 4 
month rented). Cal 02/4963)28. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

8 Am a* mesrine 
73008 Fori* 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

RHONE 532 78 99 


AN ATTRACTIVE BREAK from Hotels 
with Ffatotol. for you f short for long) 
Bays in Para. Futfy equpped studios 
to 5-room apartments, inducing btdi- 
en and hotel services if desired from 
stays of one week upwards. Informa- 
tion / central booking: FLATOTEL. 14 
rue du ThLfirre, 750T5 
62 20. Tl* Will F. 


Poos. Tet 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED' 


(Continued From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


LATIN QUARTER, 2 rooms, both kitch- 
en, hear, phone. Teh 354 65 69 


ST. GERMAIN: 3 room, character. 
F5JOO net. Tet 720 9* 9S 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


5TH near NOTRE DAME 

Superb apartment duple*. 3 large 
rooms, character, beesns, aU comfort. 
Top floor, elevator, (un, anet. 
Fllftfo net. 329 60 60 


FAST EXECUTIVE HOMERNDiNG- 
Fads & suburbs. Bents/ soles 551 09 45 


SPAIN 


WAR BARCRONA. Whole forge top 
floor apartment, Ena sea view terrace. 
SI .QOO/iwrth. tefc (771 69 05 09. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


CAEN [FRENCH UNIVERSITY] 1- 
room flat July/Aua for same in Lon- 
don. Write Detennle. 87 rue DHer- 
ouvffle, 14000 Coen. France. 


WANTED GfSECE vika to rent dose ra 
sea. to deep 6 adults and 6 children, 
for 3 weeks end of July to md August. 
Cod Rome 678 33 1-1 office hours. 


PARS - SEBCS TO RENT studfo. or 
room fumahed June - August while 
attending school. Coll; [*21 64 16 15 


EMPLOYMENT 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 

Strio, 2 or 3-room apartment. 
One monlh or more. 

LE CUUHDGE 359 67 97. 


ETOILE - ENA 
2 rooms, high doss, par Jang. 
F7600 + charge!. 
NEVEU 743 9696 


SHORT RENTAL IN PARIS.- Sh*£o» 
and 2 rooms, beautifuty decorated. 
Contact: Sofirime 6 owe. Deicosse. 
75008 PARIS Tgni 359 99 SO. 


14TH AU5IA: 2 newly redone quar- 
ters, private garden, quiet. 1 couple, 1 
sjnofe - $1,400/month. 1 couple - 
JTOO/month. Teh 542 49 84 


HE ST UJUIS: Luxurious Funwhod 
opartment, triple reception, 3 bed- 
rooms, upper floor, sunny & open 
new. rromont: 500 66 00 


POTHOUSE AVE MONTAIGNE, 
near Champs Efysees. 130 sqm. + 
large terrace, view an Seine, high 
doss furniture. 723 43 2. 


NHJ1L1YST. JAMES. Superb 4 rooms, 
luminous furniture, garden, parking. 
For 6 months. 225J6454. 


1ST LOUVRE, beautiful artist loft, 1D0 
sq.m. June/ July/ Aug. Office or ready 
to tve in. F7J00/mcnlh. 260 01 60. 


8TH MONCEAU. Bewit wrf fur- 
nished living + 1 bedroom, kitchen, 
both. F6JOO. Tel: 720 37 99. 


IMh AU1RJIL. Began) large double 
living, 2 bedrooms, well furnished, tug 
bdeony, sun, quid, FI 1,000; 7203799 


6TH ST GOMAJN DES PRES. Cham- 
ing 2 rooms, kitchen bath, folly 
equipped. F4200. Tet 730 37 99, 


SHORT IBM in Latin Quvter. 
No ogenls.Teli 329 38 83. 


CHAMPS B.YSES. I . 
Short/long term. 562 ! 


i dass studio, 
132. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


IF YOU CAN SBL 
YOU ARE OUR MAN (WOMAN} 

Earn good money whilst meeting inter- 
esting people. Wad: m your home area 
or whatever country you Eke. 
D.Ti. Sueddfoe 2, 

D-6642 Mettkxh 3. 

Phone Germany (ffl ffl68/517. 

TU 4452« DES D. 


AMERICAN BROKERAGE firm re- 
quires for its Pans office bilingual 
young woman preferably French with 
experience in brokerage business & 
finance including uttiemerf or trades 
' £ fbm&or with Eurobonds- Must be 
avadabie enmedately, very good, 
conditions. CV & chceo Ben 2110, 
HeraLd Tribune, 92521 Ne ‘ ' 
France 


Newly Codex, 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


PUBLIC RHAUONS OFHCBL. Inti ex- 
perience, French woman 24, seels 
diaSenfyrig position m multinational 
or bcnc. SoM background in market- 
ing, fluent Engfish&ltdS an. Write Box 
2097, HerokTMburte, 92521 Neu3ly 
Cede*. France 


YOUNG GOMAN fashion . model, 
NgWy educated. Looks for on interest- 
ing position. London 245-0000. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE - AU PAIRS. 
dildrwTi nanny, mum's helpers & all 
brooches of IP dass hte-in domestic 
help worldwide. Call Sioane Bureau. 
London 730 B122/5142J24 hours! LL 
C.EMPAGY. Thu 995067051 OAT'S G, 


BURST VALET O® / Housekeeper 
couple 18 yean experience in lop 
households, very reliable, prafosmn- 
al couple, free now. Fry Staff Consul- 
torts, 7H^ St^ UdersriOt, Hotel UK. 


Tet 0252 


UK licenced. 


MATURE WELL EDUCATED tfgh in. 
lenity couple wish Id oortlake resi- 
dence from September. South France; 
Switzerland. Tel [UK] 0634 
after 730 pm or weekends. 


ALWAY5 AVAILABLE LONDON only 
bobyminders & 1st daw duly nods. 
Sioane Bureau, London 730 8122 / 
5142. Licenced employment agency 


CHAIffiUR very good reforenca. 
Gajda, 17 rue Dam, Paris 8th. 


AUTO RENTALS 


AUSTRIA A EAST BJROPE US$15.00 
per day. Autohansa. Franzenbruedt 
enstr, ft A- 1020 Heim Tet 747694. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAR SHIPPING 
SPECIALISTS 

Pass m soo 03 cm 

CAMVES/MCE W} 39 43 44 

FRANKFURT l&V 071 80 51 

BONN / COLOGNE [02281 212921 
SIUTTGARI JOWBll 88081 

MUNICH (W 10 45 

BREMERHAVB'I (0471 1 43063 

NEW YORK {212695 7061 

HOUSTON 713) 931 7605 

10S ANGELES 213 568 9288 

MONTREAL 514 B66 6681 

AGENTS WORLD WOE 
Leave it to ut to bring it to you 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TAKE THE PROFIT 

On your now European aula purchase 

MYCAR 

moke their buflf buying prices available 
for yeur mfiwdua purchase 
Pos-Jess I upon 
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» we da the work 
Worldwide sNpmenb to your 
specification. 

Send for a quotation la 
MYCAR 
of Ucbndge 

(15 tanutes from Lordon Airport) 

5 Windsor Street, Uxbridge. 
Mddfasx, England UB8 TAB. 
WrUKjjfe 8077073772160 
Tlx: UK 8813271 GECOMS G 

MYCAR 


COOPER ST JAMES 

OFFICIAL AGENT 
OF BMW (GB) LTD 

While you eve in Europe, we can offer- 
considerable savings on brand new 
BMW ears to most specifications. Fu5 
factory warranty. 

We can teso supply right or left herd 
drum tax free BMws at tourist pnoes. 
We ofeo supply factory butit buBet- 
proof BMWi and the Alpma BMW 
rirnge tax free. 

• G* London (Oil 629 6699. 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

for UIMBNAJI delivery 
BEST SERVICE 

For shipping, irwunotca, bond 
convanion in ILSJL 

RUTE INC 

Toununtr. 52. 6000 Frankfort. 

W Gemv, tel 62-232351 , tU 411559 
Information only by phono or telex. 


10 YEARS 

Wo Dftfraw Cars to the World 

TRANSCO 

Keeping a constant stock of more than 
300 brand new ears, 

>«na tor we rnuincoiorcnxoiog. 
Transco SA, 95 Noordefaan, 
2030 Antwerp, Belgium 
Tel 323/512 62 40. Tbc 35207 TRANS B 


GOMAN CARS 
FROM GERMANY 

Experienced car trader For Mercedes, 
Porsche Of BMW. hnmeefato delivery. 
Full service imparf/export U.5. DOT & 


EPA for tourist and dealer. OCM, Toer- 
stegenstr. 8, 4 Duessddorf. W. Germa- 
mcTel: (p) 211-434644 telex 8587374. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

HJROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 

Ctel or write far free catalog. 

V Box 12011 

Rotterdaei Airport, Hofland 
TeljM UW23&77 
Telex 25Q71 EPCAR NL 

MEKOraeS 1985. LARGE stock. 
TRA5CO. GB. BJLD. CH. Ctel John in 
London teL 44-1-208 0007, lb: 
8956022 TEAS G 

TRANSMUNN 8BGIUM. 21 G«Jei- 
sebaan, B-2241 Zoente, Antwerp, Tel: 
03-384.1044 Tlx 32302 Transm 8. In 
stock Mercedes. BMW, ASO. 

EXCAUBUR. Sm ear ad in Friday 
Rftion. 

BOATS & 
RECREATIONAL 
VEHICLES 

WINNEBAGO BRAVE 60.000 mbs, 
1972, air-condmoned. F60ft0Q. TeLpj 
412 37 38 France. 

LEGAL SERVICES 


LOW COST FUGHTS 

NY ONE WAY (ISO. Everyday N.Y. - 
West Coast SI 45. Paris ZS 92 9a 

HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

THE NEW WAY TO 
CRUISE THE 
GREEK ISLES 

Luxury 7-day cruses aboard 
yacht-like Ocean Islander 

•Weekly departures from Venice 
or Athens (Piraeus] Saturdays 
through Oct. 19. 

•Comrig on Mykonos, Gale 
Santorini, Kusadasi Ephesus), 

Corfo, DubrovrA, Kornati 
blonds, Zodai. 

For knmednte reservations contact: 

OCEAN CRUISE LINES 

Venice: Sat Marco 1497 
TeL J41) 709822 
Alhens: 97 Syngrou Ave. 

(0) 9020921 

CHARTER A YACHT IN GRBCL Di- 
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American management. Excellent 
oewv govt bonded. Valef Yachts, 
Akti ihemistoUeous 22C, Pxaeus, 
Greece. TeL 4529S71, 45ZM86. Tbu 
21-2000. USA offices: Fir Rood. Am- 
• bier, PA 19002. TeL 215 641 1624. 

HBIAS YACHTING. Yodit Owners. 
Academia 28, Athens 10671, Greece. 

EDUCATION 


SERVICES 

***** 

YOUNG EUEGANT 1ADY PA 

Representative services far YlFs 

ZURICH 830.58.88. 

TOKYO: 442 39 79 

Eunpean young tody companion. 

SMGAPORE INTI GUIDES. CteL Sto- 
gopore 734 96 2& 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/lteerpretei & Tourism Guide 

PARIS 562 OS 87 


AMSTERDAM 182 197 

TRUSTFUL LADY COMPANION 

Channmg, educated, travel. 

PARK REAL VIP SOPMSTICATS) 

Young lady companion, for your ele- 
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Why don't you phone 277 dll -69? A 
refined bftigute guide, even far your 
shopping & travw. 

*★ PARIS 553 62 62 ** 

FOR A REAL V.LP. YOUNG LADY 
Distinguished. Elegant, MuMmgute. 

VIP LADY GUIDE ^ 

Young, educated, elegant & trilingual 
far days, evanngs & traveL 
PAHS 533 80 26 

YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 
PA. PARIS 525 81 01 

* PARIS 527 01 93 * 

YOUNG LADY TRILINGUAL V1P-PA 

PARIS LADY GUIDES 224 01 32. 
Young, etegort, edueteed, infl for 
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Pam & Airports. 

INTERNATIONAL BEAUTIFUL People 
UMTD. USA & WORLDWIDE TtiL 
212-765-7793 / 76W794 

SOOETE DIATC PARIS 260 87 43 
Men & women guides, security & rent- 
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PARS NOTE THB PHONE AT ONCE 

757 62 48. Trustful V.LP. lady, trawl 
oomprnon. 

LONDON. BEGANT mtetiteducteed 
French lady companion. Wefl Haw 
ef*d & versteie. fob 821 0364 

FRANKFURT. Young lady companion 
English, French, German spoken. Free 
to trawl. 069/44 77 75. 

LONDON. Yourg German/ Fretxh affi- 
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London. TeL UK 01-381 6852. 

HONG KONG (K-3) 722 12 27 
Young saphsticUad companion. 

HUNCH RIVIERA. Interpreter Travel 
companion |93| 61 7B 63 

PARIS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 
VIP PA & biinaute interpreter. 

HONG KONG 3-671267 young lady 
(Orientte/Ewopean) companion. 

FRANKFURT YOUNG LADY oonwjn- 
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LONDON WEIL EDUCATED Young 
lady companion. Tel: 622 6615 

YOUNG LADY COMPANION Lon- 
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TOKYO LADY COMPANION. PA 
Perianal Assistant 03-456-5539 

PARS YOUNG SOPHISTICATED VIP 
lady, trifrgual PA. 500 89 72. 

WEST IMH AN LADY Comparaon Tefc 
London 381 9847. 

SOPfflSTICAIH) Ynmg Mim Compan- 
xxi Lorxfon/ Heathrow 01 385906 

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airports. 7 anUnridmqht. Wl traveL 

LOMXM B1UCATED LADY Com- 
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YOUNG OCEANIC LADY in London 
01-245 9002 Auports/TrawL 

BSUSSaS. YOUNG LADY V.I.P. 
Compcncn Tel: 347 35 49 

HONG KONG - 3-620000 Young 
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HONG KONG K-689920. Charming 
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PAHS BflJNGUAL ASSISTANT la 
business executives. 500 58 17 


ATHENS. Lady companion and person- 
al assistant. Tel: 8086194. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in mil lkm& are fn local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


Canada 

Asamera 

lstoecr. 1983 1984 

Revenue HS.7 75.7 

Profits Itn (a)OJQ 

Per Share ft® — 

a: loss. Results In UJt Oof- 
tots : 

Can. Packers 


Ford Motor Can. 


Oorox 

MOaor, 
Revenue _ 

Net Inc. 

Per Share 

f htontta 

Revenue 

Net Inc. - 

Per Snare— 


1W5 

267.5 

2A29 

0.90 

ms 

725L4 

39.16 

2.19 


1914 

2329 

9771 

083 

1984 

6801 

57.10 

2.17 


Spony 

4thQwr. ms 

Revenue 1J30& 

Net Inc. 1055 

Per Share — 1J9 

Year 1985 

Revenue—, am. 

Net Inc. 2867 

Per Share 5.15 


1984 
1ASO. 
865 
1-63 
1984 
Asia 
21 AS 
4.17 


HI floor. 

IMS 

19M 

Revenue— 

im 

VO. 

Profits 

Mft 

127ft 

Per Share 

1134 

1526 

Noranda 


HI floor. 

IMS 

1984 

Revenue—. 

874ft 

B74J 

Proftf 

la) 9ft 

31ft 

Per share™ 


M? 

•.‘ten 




im fit unth net Includes 
gain of SZ7 million from sale 
af brand. 

Computervision 
litQaar. 19IS 1984 

Revenue VOS 121ft 

Net Inc la) IBS 10ft 

PIT Share— — 037 

a: loss. 


Tandem Comput. 
2ftdQmr. 1985 1984 

Revenue — . 146ft Ills 

Net ine. 6ft4 1.97 

Per Shore — 0.16 005 

ltf Hoff 1915 1984 

Revenue 306.1 237-6 

Net Inc. 209 TU 

Per Shore— 050 039 


Texas Util. 


lit floor. 

Net Inc. 

Per Shore 

a; loss. 


Utfluar. 
Revenue . 


ms 

907.2 


1984 

836ft 


Rn. Cp of America 

INS 1984 

H B TU 

Tyson Foods 


Hong Kong 

Wah Kwong Ship, 
rear lft4 im 

Profits 125ft 151ft 

United States 

Briggs & Stratton 

3rd floor. 1985 1984 

Revenue 207J 286ft 

Net Inc. 1275 26ft6 

Per Share 088 IftO 

t Months 1985 1984 

Revenue SBM 478ft 

Net Inc 2448 2X44 

Per Shore _ 173 152 

Champ. S par k PL 

lit floor. 1985 WW 

Revenue 22ift 21x1 

Net inc. __ 9ft 9ft 
P«i*5tW»_ US US 


utQuar. 
Revenue — 
Net int _ 
Per Share. 


Gulf State Utd. 

T98S 


5X5 

M2 


1984 

3725 

54ft 

MS 


Inti Flavors Frag. 

tSTOuar. 1915 1984 

Revenue _ 121 J 123ft 

Net Ine, 17ftl 1872 

Per Share 048 051 

Louis. Land Expl. 

lit floor. 1985 1984 

Revenue 2997 304ft 

Otter Nd 26.1 27ft 

Doer Share— 1 ftl Oft? 

1 1 &* net excludes Joss of SZP 
million from dtaawflnuerf op- 
SfoNOH A 

Marsh McLennan 


2nd floor. 
Revenue — 
Net ine. — 
Per Share — 
lit Hoff 

Revenue 

Net I rtc. 

Per Share 


1985 

2897 

BftO 

1.12 

19S 

537ft 

16ft 

270 


1984 

IBM 

til 

056 

1914 

3527 

06 

085 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SBMCE 

USA ft WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CRBMT CARDS AND 
CHECKS ACCEPTS} 

P riv ate Mmfoteiipi Available 

TM> aw ted winning lendet box 
been le ebired at the top 1 meet 
•xduilwi Emort Servn» by 
USA A Memafiond newt maria 
Indodaig radio and TV. 


* USA ft TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SBtVKE 
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LaweB Eastern udoomes you bock! 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 
IN NEW YORK 
TEL 212-737 3291. 


Vcuian Ass. 


2nd Avar. 

Revenue 

Oner Net 

Oper Shores 
IN Naif 
Revenue _ 

□per Net 

doer Share_ 


1N5 

2464 

123 

056 

1985 

4747 

24ft 

1.19 


1984 

226ft 

15ft 

071 

19M 

rtlB 

28ft 

130 


MQuar. 
Revenue — 

Net Inc. 

Per Share— 
a: loss. 


1985 1994 

mil 281ft 
44ft 10128ft 
IftO - 


Xerox 

ldQunr. ms 1914 

Revenue — 2020. 2ftlO 

NefWC JWft 1240 

Per Share—. ]fte 170 
_ Nets Induae gain of S12 mil- 
daa from sole oi lease and 
loss el f12mHllon w has otU 
million from dlscon tinned op- 
erations. 


LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

Eicori Service. 

Td: 736 5877. 


MADRID INTI 

ESCORT SBMCE 
TEL 1456S48. CRBNT CARDS 


ZURICH 

Sn an edh u 'e Eemrt A Guide Service 
Male A Femcde. Tel: 01/56 96 92 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


LONDON 

Poriman Escort Agency 

67 CMtara Street. 
London W1 

Teh 486 3724 or 486 1158 
Al eiafor cnrfit cards ac ce pted 


LONDON 

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TEL 200 8585 


LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

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10 KB451NGTON CHURCH ST, W8 
TEL: 937 9136 OR 9379133 
M major cradH card* accepted. 


LONDON CLASS 

ESCORT SERVICE 

LONDON, HEATHROW t GATWKX 
Tet 01 890 0373 


AR15TOCAT5 

London Exert Service 

128 Wigmora 5t, London W.I. 
Al major Credt Cords Accepted 
Tel: 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - nvdnigW 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK ESCORT SBMCE 
212-888-1666 


ZURICH-GENEVA 

GINGER'S ESCORT SERVICE. 
10:01/3630864-022/3441 86 


ZURICH 

ALEXIS ESCORT SBtVKE 
TEL; 01/69 55 04 


★ MADRID * 

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TEL 411 72 57-259 61 96 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MAYFAIR CLUB 

GUIDE SBMCE from Sum 
ROTTERDAM JO) 10-254155 
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THE HAGUE (C 


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ZURICH 

CAROIME E5CORT SERVICE, 
Tefe 01/252 61 74 


JASMINE 

AMSTODAM ESCORT SStVICE. 
TEL: 020-366655 


COPENHAGEN 

BEST ESCORT SBMCE 
Teh 01-29 52 13 


* AMSTERDAM* 

SHF Escort Service. 227837 


* KITTY * 

Madrid Escort Sendee 250 34 96 


ROME OUB EUROPE BCORT 

& Guide SenrioaTet 06/589 2604- 589 
1146 prom 4 pm to 10 pm) 


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51 Beauchamp Place, London SW3. 
Td: 01 584 6513/2*49 {4-12 pm} 


GB4EVA •BEAUTY* 
ESCORT SBMCE 
TEL 29 51 30 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


GENEVA TOP ESCORT SBMCE 
For Weekend + Travel, Ptoaw 
Reserve. Teh 022/32 34 IS 


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ESCORT SBMCE 
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GB4EVA WELCOME 
MuUSngtfaL Escort Service 
Tet 22/35 93 6S 


AMSTERDAM BARBARA 

BCORT SERVICE. 020-954344 


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Cretfit cards accepted 0211 /3T43 a? 


AMSTERDAM NICOLE 

ESCORT saVKX 020-999244 

GENEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 11 58 

MILAN ESCORT 

SBBVlCEi 02/69762402 

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gbh, French. German spoken. TeL 
fOT) 43 57 63. . 

GENEVA - HBLB4E ESCORT SBtVKE 
Tel: 36 29 32 

FRANKFURT AREA - ANGEUCXff'S 
fcitngute Escort + travel service. Tefc 
069762 8805. 

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Cologne - Bsen 021 1-395066 Pomelo 
Escort Aoency. All credit cards. 

DUSSHDORF - COLOGNE - BONN 

Exclusive Escort + Travel Service. 
Tefc 021 1-099863. 

AMSTERDAM, Brusds, Antwerp. The 
Hague. Rotterdam. Catege Escort 
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LONDON BCORT AGENCY. 
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6574. 

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NEW YORK Renee i Gabriele Escort 
Service. 213-2230670. 

VBMA ETOUE ESCORT SBtVICL 
Tefc 56 78 55. 

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FRANKRJRT AREA - Female + Mtee 
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don 01 381 6278 

FRANKFURT + SURROUNDINGS 

Christina's Escort Service. 059/364656 

G&CVA CHAJQB* GUIDE Service. 
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VBtNA - DBKE BCORT Service. 
Tefc 53-3D3S5. 

FRANRFUKT/MUNCH Male Escort 
Service. 069/386441 £ 089/3518324 

LONDON JAPANESE ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tefc 01 821 0627. 


DOMNA, AMSTERDAM ESCORT 
Glide Service. Tet (020) 76342 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


CObOCPtOusseldorf-Bonii-Aochen. 

1 a daw escort service. 0221/54 33 04 


DUS5BJDORMXXOGftfHEtsenftom 
English Escort Service 0211/ 38 31 41 


HEATHROW LONDON ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 994 6681 


NEW YORK: ROfEFt Escort Servo. 
TeL 212-5B1-1948. 


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Service P) 2&-9&G76 


BRUSSEU. CHANTAL BCORT Ser- 

vice; Teh 02/520 23 65. 


FRANKFURT -ANNE'S Escort Service. 
TeL 069 / 28-81-03. 


MEAN VIP INTERNATIONAL Escort 
service. 02 65 90 719. 


RAMKTORT "TOP TEN" Escort Ser- 
vice. 069/59-60-52 


LOMXJN ZARA ESCORT Service. 
Heathrow/Gatwicfc. TeL 834 7945. 


MUNICH SUPREME ESCORT Seneca. 
TeL 089/4486038 


STUTTGART PRIVATE Escort Service. 
TeL 0711 / 262 11 50. 


FRANKEST - PETRA Escort & Travel 
Service. TeL 069 / 68 24 05 


FRANKFURT JB4NY ESCORT + trav- 
el service. Tel: 069/55-72-10 


FRANKFURT SONJA ESCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 06W8 34 42 


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and Travel Service. TeL 069/44 77 75 


OnDA'5 ESCORT 5BMCE. Frnkfort, 
TeL 069 - 88 55 99. 


HAMBURG ESCORT + GUIDE Ser- 
vwl Tel: 54 17 42 


MADRID SELECTIONS ESCORT Ser- 
vice TeL 401 1507. Crerfit Cards. 


MUNICH - PRIVATE ESCORT 

Guide Service. TeL 91 2314 


VENNA'SHRST BCORT service. TeL 
02244-4191 or 722-432, till midnight 

rope Etoort f 


JBWFBTS BCCHT A TRAVEL Ser- 
vice Wfort TeL 069/555-973 


LONDON RAYSWATH BCORT Ser- 
vice. TeL 01 2290776. 


LONDON GAB8&LLA BCORT Ser- 
vkb. TeL 01-229 6541. 


LONDON ZOE WEST Escort Agency 
TeL 01-579 7556. 


MADRID IMPACT BCORT & Guide 
Service. 261 41 42 

STOCKHOLM BCORT AND GUM 
Service. TeL 68 34 68. 


HOUANDJB BCORT SBMO. 020- 
222785,030-944530. 02997-3685. 


l»OON TWttE BCORT Service. 
TeL 01-373 8849. 


LONDON GENE BCORT Servica 
TeL 370 7151/* 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


PEANUTS 

AM I WRONG, OR HAVE 
VOU GAINEP WEIGHT? 


yOU LOOK A LITTLE 
HEAVIER THAN USUAL 


tt‘s just ‘winter) 
l FAT.?. J 


IT'S ALWAYS GONE 
BY THE MIPPLE 
. OF AUGUST! > 


JlllillllWIII 
HIH ill I 

HHH1I1 BilllHiB 

■till Bill ill 
Bllllilllliilll 
ill ilH illll 

ailiilll illlll 

■ Hll Bill 
BBllliilllliBB 



BLONPIE 

YOU GET THE RAISE IF 
VOU TELL. ME WHICH r 

* SHELL THE J 

PEA IS v"f 
& r tjT7 UNOGD J 





ACROSS 49 Wholebean- 

5*ffidown 
iliUiv lightly 

aining unit 57 J^f da 
Roraanov ™jSL 

dicing foil’s “i*E™ for 

SfiXi 60 Lucy's pal 

\rnveaerci gl Polynesian 

me Mauve 

aoade- 62 Comedian 

ithor ^ 

ause style 63 Farm-machm- 

at the eiy pioneer 

ound floor 64 Boil slowly 

p for auction PQWN 
aits of 1 Philippine 

inductance island 

/birth 2 Lead off 

ory line 3 Requirement 

alien socially 4 Hebrew 

rojan War prophet 

»ic 5 Packing 

ieds ’s river - « mIainer 

rk passenger ® Eastern 

iccessor to nursemaids 

■yeve Lie 7 Hamiet - for 

ifore, a £?w 

etically 8 Highly 

amusing 

unwe, [ 9 Raises the 

lutzpah value of 

Joises Off io Where the 

°P , . Light Brigade 

a Islands charged 

[X * uct UTemper- 

rvicebr. ale 

lick fog 12 Cupid 

® New York Time s, edited by Eugene 


1 Speech pan: 
Abbr. 

5 Military 
training unit 

19 A Roraanov 

14 Fencing foil's 
kin 

15 Forcefully 

16 "Arrivederci 

17 “The Mauve 
Decade" 
author 

18 House style 

19 Get the 

. ground floor 

20 Up for auction 

23 Units of 
conductance 

24 By birth 

25 Story line 

28 Fallen socially 

33 Trojan War 
epic 

34 Leeds's river 

35 Ark passenger 

36 Successor to 
Trygve Lie 

40 Before, 
poetically 

41 Is unwell 

42 Chutzpah 

•43"Noises Off" 

prop 

46 Sea Islands 
product 

47 Service br. 

48 Thick fog 


13 Had charge of 

21 Valerie Harper 
role 

22 Allen or 
Brooks 

25 Staff officers 

26 Frau 
Schumann 

27 "The Lady or 
the — — 
Stockton 

28 Watch faces 

29 Acts humanly 

30 Lacking funds 

31 Artillery 
salute 

32 W. German 
seaport 

34 Rene’s date 

37 Affected 

38 Russian whip 

39 Modern 
airfields 

44 Unloaded 

45 Doctrine 

46 Pamper 

48 Show contempt 

49 Food fish 

56 Surrounded by 

51 Scold 

52 Longing 

53 Undiluted 

54 Stare open- 
mouthed 

55 Chopped 
cabbage 

56 "High 

M. Anderson 
play 

Maleska. 


BEETLE BAILEY 

WHY VO THEY ALWAYS 
BREAK A BOTTLE OF 
CHAMPAGNE ON A 
NEW SHI P® y 



NOPE ! VOU CAN TRY 
“7 AGAIN NEXT WEEK 


, ( I HAM5NVSBEN 

! ^ THAT PEA IN 

i 1 TEN VEARS ! 




i 


it's for success I, I for the 

*nn A/vioiiir^ I? I gmpz 


ANP GOOP LUCK 


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FOR THE 
CHAMPAGNE 
MAKERS 


ter 

.towrep 


ANDY CAPP 


Di*1 UrNawtAnttlClStnaul* 


jmyvouback-v 


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BEEN LOOKING 

, ALLOVER — r- 


( hOW JUST VOU TAKE 


WIZARD of IP 

[7— -,T- I,', 


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DENNIS THE MENACE 




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.An • Vd dl* /iM 1 1 , 


REX MORGAN 

L- 1 XT WOULD SEEM THAT J 

T WE'VE MADE A REAL FRIEND IN 4. 

1 CLAUDIA i SHE'S STAYING IN TOWN AN ) A 

; EXTRA DAY AMD WOULD LIKE TO SPEND THE/ £ 

^ ^ EVENING WITH U S.TESS/ mmmrnU ? 


DON'T *5 END THE LlMO AFTER )f ILL DO 
HER/ WHY DONT YOU PICK HER A THAT/ 
—7 LIP IN THE JAG*? j ^- T r' 




*H0W COME THATIHING KNOWS SO MUCH ABOUT ME 
WHEN tT WASNt EVEtf MADE WHEN 1 WAS BORN V 


THAT SCRAMBLE] WORD GAME 
$ by Henri Amok] and Bob Lee 


GARFIELD 

MV COUSIN JOPV IS COMING 
TO VISIT ANP SHE'S BRINGING 
^ HER CHILPREN , - 


S p.13ktfar 


SO POT EVERYTHIN© 
VOO VALUE 
. OUT Of REACH > 


Unscramble tries© tour JumWes, 
one letter to each square, to tonn 
tour ordinary words. 


DYLOM 




BOOKS 


HOME TRUTHS 
Sixteen Stories 

By Mavis Gallant. 530 pp. SI 7.95. 

Random House, 201 £ 50th Street, New 
York, N. Y. 10022. 

By Michiko Kakutani 

T HOUGH the title of this new collection of 
Mavis Gallant stories is “Home Truths, 
the idea of home, of a place of belonging, 
remains elusive for ail the author's characters. 
They are all spiritual orphans — parentless 
children, refugees, expatiates or “J 
placed individuals who have shucked off their 
pasts in search of some vague idea of "free- 
dom" or “liberation" or “escape. 

Torn between their yearning to be safe and 
their need to be free, they hover, precariously, 
on the periphery of the known: They leave 
home; they pretend they don’t b a y® P a ^ 1 f s ' 


with strangers found in hotels ana ipnagu 
beaches — only to find that they ve traded 
their fear of entrapment for rootlessness and 
another kind of fear. Eager Tor some kind of 
definition, they clutch at symbols of tradition 
(a school uniform, a church service) and rules 
oF etiquette (the use of a slang expression, the 
choice of sandwiches at tea) that might give 
them a due as to who they're supposed to be. 

The 16 stories have been arranged in three 
categories: portraits of Canadia ns at home 
(who long to leave behind its suffocating pro- 
vincialism): portraits of Canadiaas abroad 
(who think they can fmd a new identity among 
foreigners who speak and think differently 
from themselves); and a series of interlinked 
tales about Linnet Muir, a young aspiring poet 
who suffers from a sense of emotional es- 
trangement 

Lumet works for a time as a reporter, and 
Solution to Previous Puzzle 


DQC3QS □ EI0 HQ1QQQ 

□com scan] caanao 
aocjGJancinQ naana 

DC EE □□□ E3QE3D3 
DD □□□□□□ BE3E) 

□□□□□EE3 □□□ 

□naaa asaanaQa 
QQEHDE3QS □□□□□□□ 
EcscQQaa Qaasa 
ces aaaaana 

□an aHQiaaaQa 
OEQEE2 E1QD DEDQQ 
BEQaa aaaaaacaaa 
noaDa □□□ aaQaa 
□□□□□ aaa [DaaHa 


K cm be W.K 

pl^Aefto'anollia'a^or 

sociological fact SaH as Peter and Shall the 
ewatriates in ‘'The Ice Wagon Going Down 
ffitrar unhappily discover, there are pa- 
proceXg as though life woe ^oth, 
ing but a succession of romantic gestures, a 
Series of extended holidays: they realize, one 
fo£5ay, that they can no longer go on hvrngm 
thTfutuk that m a sense, ihey have become 
the people they were only pretending to be 

Asfor Gallant she, too. purveys a somewhat 
detached, ironic attitude in her wntrng. She 
writes from a high altitude — cooL but not 

..hill y that enables her to dispassionately 

chronicle the tiny details of her characters’ 
dav-to-day existence, and at the same time 
trace the larger curves and arcs of emotion that 
wiD constitute their fate. Though her portraits 
are not without sympathy, she can be tough on 
her characters, noting down all then- embar- 
rassing foibles, the nasty twists and turns of 
iheir minds; as a result, her supporting casts 
are filled with Dickensian creations — the 
noisy emotionally extravagant .American 
woman in “Thank 'You for the Lovely Tea." 
the charming but morally languid cad m “In 
the TunneL" the stylish, fragrant wife of a 
famous artist in “Bona venture. 

With one or two exceptions, these people do 
not devolve into blurry caricatures — such is 
Gallant's density of imagination, her ability to 
improvise on old themes. Rather, her charac- 
ters continually manage to surprise ns — snd- 


denly and summarily changing their minds; 
giving voice to outrageously hurtful things |jf, 
(“she told each of her five daughters as they 


grew up that they were conceived in horror, 
that she could have left them in their hospital 
cots and not looked back") or totally miscon- 
struing something obvious about a family 
member or a friend- Taken together. Gallant s 
finely hammered stories leave the reader with a 
sad, lingering image of the separateness of 
individual*: — the terrible “foreigimess" of 
other peoples' lives, and our inability to ever 
really know them. 

Michiko Kakuumi is on the staff of The New 
York Times. 


Rare Hebrew Manuscripts Exhibited 

United Press International 

JERUSALEM — Fifty rare Hebrew manu- 
scripts from the Palatine Library in Parma, 
Italy, are on display at Hebrew University. The 
exhibits are from the 1.500-item collection 
started by Giovanni B. de Rossi. 


By Robert Bvme 

T HE British international 
master Mark Hebden has 
for several years been taking up 
the thankless gage for old gam- 
bits. However, in the Common- 
wealth Championship in Lon- 
don. his espousal of the King’s 
Gambit was warmly appreciat- 
ed by the Indian international 
master Praveen Thipsay who 
crushed White’s hopes for at- 
tack in the eighth round. 

The basic idea of the King’s 
Gambit is that 2 . . . PxP 
abandons the center to White. 
The positional motif involved 
in 5 P-KR4 is to force 
5 . . . PN5, cutting off the 
black KBP. 

In a game between Albin 
Plannic and Svetozar Gligoric 
in Ljubljana-POrtoroz in 1977, 
7 . . . N-QB3; 8 KN-K2, P- 
B6: 9 N-B4, P-B7ch!?; 10 KxP, 
P-N6ch!?: 1 1 KxP, NB3 yielded 
Black a promising countergam- 
biL Even though Gligoric won 
that game in brilliant fashion, 
Thipsay diverged with 
7., . . N-KB3, which relin- 
quished protection or the black 
Kfi and thus let Hebden recov- 
er the gambit pawn after 8 KN- 
K2, P-Q4: 9 P-K5, N-R4; 10 P- 
KN3. N-QB3; 11 NxBP. 
Hebden was not concerned 


CHESS 


about 11 . . . NxNP? because 
12 N/4xP!, BxB; 13 QxB, 
NxR; 14 N-B6ch. K-K2; 15 
N/3-Q5ch, K-K3; 16 Q-B4- 
would have given White an' 
overwhelming attack. 

After 18 . . . Q-K3, the po- 
sition was roughly even, but 
what strategy should White 
have adopted for the middle 
game? He might have tried the 
positional 19 B-K2, to be fol- 
lowed by 20 R-R 1, 21 R-R4, 22 
N-Ql and 23 N-K3, with pres- 
sure against black's artificially 
isolated KNP. 

Hebden’s alternative was to 
probe for a mating attack with 
19 N-R4. He was soon quite 
willing to sacrifice a pawn for it 
with 22 N-B3, QxRPto gain a 
speedy repositioning of his 
knight wtii 23 N-N5. 

Yet it was difficult to make 
any impression on the solid 
black formation, and after the 
black KRP began advancing 
with 26 . . . P-R4 and 

27 . . . P-R5, the pressure was 
heavily on White to produce 
something quickly. 

It would not have done to try 

28 B-B8, since 28 . . . KxB!;, 

29 Q-R6ch, K-Nl; 30 RxN. 
QxR; 31 QxRPch. K-Bl would 
have left White a rook down for 
nothing. 



Hebden made a last desper- 
ate attempt to cloud the issue 
with 33 NxRP, but after 
33 . . . NxR4!; 34 N-N5, P- 
N8/Q, he was staring at defeaL 
ThipsaYs 38 . . . Q-N8ch 
forcast 39 K-B3, Q-K6mate, so 
Hebden gave up. 

t 

KINGS GAMBIT 


i mw pbp u a/wo 0-83 

3 N-KKJ P-M II FUR QlRP 

4 JMM P-KN1 B PWO WO 

5 MUM P-ftS » WH N-BJ 

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I F-KS N-84 a MH MX 

u MINI puj B3 a iw 

II N«n> NzN n 4HU 

n bin Bzs a i-Qj Nil 

n p*» iwu a mi wn 

14 Ml It-KNl a UU HUM 

U «HP B-B4 M IMO PWt 

I* M4 =» PlN Oxft* 

17 B-NI HO * KrNZ 

U MB Q4J 37 PIP 

U PMU P-N3 » B-NS $jOcb 

a IMMeb Ml O Bolyai 


HECARB 


Answer just as 


YUirld Stock Markets 

Via Agenee France- Presse April 29 

Qosinfi prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


{Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: PANIC DOUGH UNSOLD GRASSY 
Answer What form of speech Is doub(e-talk7— 
VERY "SINGULAR" 


Pres stavn 
Rusoiot 
SA Brwi 
SI Helena 
50501 

Wert Haldlns 


WEATHER 


HIGH 

C 

F 

19 

66 

9 

48 

24 

73 

17 

43 

9 

48 

7 

45 

8 

46 

15 

59 

10 

SO 

8 

46 

21 

70 

17 

54 

7 

48 

17 

63 

7 

45 

9 

48 

8 

66 

21 

m 

20 

66 

20 

60 

9 

48 

20 

68 


36 

61 

52 

fr 

el 

ti- 

36 

cs 

32 

sh 

37 

a 

a 

r 

39 

Cl 

32 

rti 

54 

d 

48 

d 

37 

0 

36 

fr 

36 

sh 

30 

a 

28 

a 

57 

el 

59 

a 

55 

Ir 

37 

a 

37 

fr 

32 

ti- 

39 

ts 

32 

o 

46 

fr 

34 

It 

39 

a 

30 

d 

39 

r 

45 

fr 

36 

a 

34 

a 

34 

fr 

37 

cl 

34 

sh 

34 

a 


HIGH 

c 

F 

w 

86 

24 

73 

24 

73 

36 

97 

41 

U6 

19 

66 

25 


m 


F 

73 

fr 

52 

Cl 

68 

0 

75 

d 

n 

fr 

50 

o 

57 

a 


Alflten 33 73 10 

50 fr 

Cam 33 K 24 

75 fr 

QrntTOWB W M 11 

52 d 

CosatManca 19 64 13 

a ci 

Harare 19 m 14 

57 fr 



Clew Pee* 

Thom EMI 417 419 

T.l. Group Z3S 234 

Trafaloar Hse 3*Bt 337 

THF 139 137 

Ultramar 225 228 

Unilever t 11 4S/6411 45/64 
United BlSCUitS 1B1 182 

VlcJcen 964 266 

Wool worth 830 >14 

F.T. 20 Index : MUO 
Previovt : V7BS9 


Overseas Union 
Shangri-la 
SI me Darby 
5 ‘core Land 
S'pore Press 
5 Steamship 
St Trading 


Close Prtv 
2JB 2.78 
N.T. 2.17 
1.91 1.92 

1M 172 
&S3 AJO 
1JJS 1JM 
4J2 444 


6100 6100 
1700 1765 
755 755 

3800 3825 
610 612. 
6550 6700 


Composite Slock Index : NJL 
Previous : 109650 



AEG-TetefuntoM 
Alllara vers 
Milana 
BASF 
Bavor 

Bov Hypo Bank 

Bavverelnsbank 

BBC 

BHF-BanJt 

BMW 

Commenbank 
Cant Gumml 
Delmter-Etenx 
Deoussa 

Deutirtw Babcock 

□oirtwhe Bank 

Dresdner Bank 

GHH 

Harpener 

Hoditlef 

Hoechst 


111 11150 
1J77 1170 
369 364 

206 2QS50 
21550 215J0 
347 34750 
340 34050 

Sfi ^2 

779 2S1 

363^40 36650 
>70 170 

134J0 136 

679 68450 
. 352 35150 
16320 165 

474 47220 
21230 21050 

154 154 

32032958 

475 475 
215 21520 


Bk East Asia 
CtMuneKong 
China Gas 
China Light 
Green Island 
Hang Sene Bank 
Henderson 
HK Electric 
hk Realty A 
hk Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shew Bank 
HK Telephone 
HK Wharf 
I Huich Whampoa 
Hvsan 
innatv 

Jardlne 
Janflne Sec 
Kowloon Motor 
MJromar Hotel 
New Wdrld 
Orient Overseas 
SHK Praps 
sieiux 

Swire Pacific A 
TalCheum 
wah Kwoctfl 
WheerockA 

Win? On Co 
Wlnsor 
World Inf l 

Ham Sene Index : 
Previous : 150659 


2420 2420 
1190 7550 
8,95 9 

1450 1450 

7.75 7X5 
4550 4525 

1.94 1.95 

755 750 

1220 1050 
3650 36.75 
550 555 
720 8 

77 76 

AM 6 35 
2220 3280 
057 058 

084 0J8 

1120 12 
1210 1350 

saw 1020 

33 31 

6.75 680 
210 2175 

1050 1080 
180 180 
2340 2290 
156 154 

150 153 
725 725 
250 2375 
4.70 4.70 
210 2125 


Banco Comm 

Centro le 

Claatiotels 

Cred Hal 

Eridanla 

Farmltalla 

Flat 

Flrakler 

Generali 

I FI 

Holes menu 

Italpas 

Italmablllart 

Mediobanca 

AAonledlson 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rinascente 

SIP 

SME 

Snla 

Standa 

Stet 


16810 16700 
3100 3010 
7420 7380 
2100 7091 
9490 9410 
12125 11990 
2965 3965 
59 58 

44400 43850 
7460 7365 
85000 B4M 
1595 1582 
71 BD0 72490 
B4400 84330 
1505 1558 
6298 6300 
2235 3230 
65300 64700 
67OJ0 66850 
1940 1930 
1228 1227 
2000 2770 
13980 12640 
2565 2531 


United Overseen 1.93 1 84 


Straits Times Irtd Index : 79583 
Previous : 79655 


Stockholm 


_ Wormoid 330 355 

AGA 420 420 

Alfa Laval 1*6 197 au OntlnaiiM index .-868J8 

Asea 356 359 Previous ; 17450 

Astra 408 405 Source: Reuters. 

Atlas Copco 118 118 

Bouden 215 718 

Electrolux 319 321 

erica son 290 294 

Esaelte NA — 

Handelsbanken 162 163 

Pharmacia 1W N8}. 

SmJfc-Soanlo N.Q. — 

Sandvllc 400 N.Q. 

Skansko 92 91 

SKF 223 919 

Swedish Match 217 215 

Vatvo 254 254 


AffoersvaerUm index : 39980 
Previous ! 39980 


mib Currant Index : 1222 
Previous : 1210 


Sydney 



209 209 
270 773 
474 472 
602 $98 





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Nat Bkr*. *M >5 15 

,£S HavTrMri. SS? 289k » - » 
rJTMsteinhra a 2>H»TWk+>k 

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— 

Yanks Fire Berra 

'• 7.’ . * r *S | (i .f c!«f ^ 5 ^ Compiled by Our Stiff From Dispatches HOW, I'm juSl grains go home ai 


£la 


- in- /ei 
-£aa«;,. 44 *> 




CHICAGO — George Siefa- 
broiner, who said two months ago 
that Yogi Berra would be the New 


now. I'm just gonna go home and 


Berra said he fdt no relief that 
the turmoil of the last three weeks, 


n * •y, /r . i ^ , 1 -liH I -s. ua».uau ji ti.mu, ouu uiuugm uuvn diiuui 

• / ;- j. t : •• fl!i p, W : Billy Martin for his fourth term in his head. *Td still like to stay here; 

t;;T: J 7V :; 1 ; 0 ru ~%2' pinstripes. he said. “But like 1 said, he’s th 

: ft The appointment of Martin, who boss.” 

i.T* ^ V was removed as Yankee raanagerat Berra, who managed the Yan 

~7 :r7 iy X: the end of the 1983 season and kees in 1964 but was fired afte 

V;^ '* oi fte* named a special scout, marks the losing the World Series to St. Louis 

; ---tr 777 ir «fl I 2 ih managerial change since was named manager for the secont 


Berra, who managed the Yan- 
kees in 1964 but was fired after 
losing the World Series to St. Louis, 






12 th managerial change since was named manager for the second 
Steinbrenner led a group that time on Dec. 16, 1983. He replaced 
bought the Yankees from CBS in Martin —who was in his third stint 
1973. managing the team — and was giv- 

Informing Berra of his dismissal £° a two-year contract. 


7: 7 :U -W- tell lo Clyde King, the team’s gen- 

;iH 5;7 eral manager, who spoke with 
Steinbrenner hy phone during Sun- 


That marked the sixth time Mar- 
tin had been fired as a major-league 
manager. He had also resigned 


day’s game here with the White from the Yankees under pressure in 
Sox. According to King, Stdnbren- 1 978, but midway through 1 979 he 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 

SPORTS 

Flyers KO Islanders 
In Fifth Game, 1-0 

Umted Preu international them play better, i didn't have any 

PHILADELPHIA — No matter rebounds and no screens at all.” 
who represents the Campbell Con- Sinisalo’s goal came at 6:43 of 
ference in the Stanley Cup fi nals , the second period on a high back- 
one thing is certain: For the first hander after teammate Peter Zezel 
time in six years, that i«? m won't had collided with Islander goalie 
face the New York Islanders. Kelly Hrudey and knocked him to 

The Philadelphia Fivers defeated the ice. 

New York. 1-0. here Sunday night The P Ia .V began when Zezel 



New York. 1-0. here Sunday night T &e play began when ^ezei 

_ dropped a pass to Crossman near 

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS 

to win the besi-of-seven Patrick Di- Zezel arrived at Hnidey simulta- 
vision title series, 4-1, and advance neously; while Hrudey lay on the 
to the Wales Conference finals ic ^ Sinisalo picked up the loose 
against the winner of the Quebec- puck and scooped it in. 

Montreal Cup quarterfinal. Que- The Islanders pulled Hrudey, 
bee leads that series, 3-2. with who stopped 38 shots, with 44 sec- 


Game 6 set for Tuesday night. onds left in the game but could not 
In Sunday’s only other National mounl a threat. 



r; '• -!i.\ ner had decided to dismiss Berra took over for the man - who had 

. J ■ .. 1 .-r 1 ^ 7 even before the contest ended in a replaced him. Bob Lemon. Martin 

' 5 ■ 7, 4-3 Yankee defeat the team’s third was fired again at the end or that 

’. I ' • “ Straight loss. New York, 6-10, is season, following a celebrated fight 

■_ ' -r-. ._7y-* v ’* t 5 ;s- tied with Cleveland for last place in with a marshmallow salesman in 
V ■ .~u 7-T.‘r cl '- , -> 77: the American League East. Minneapolis. 

“ Steinbrenner also telephoned In addition to his stints with the 

Berra an hour later in the club- Yankees, Martin managed the 


- r: --“^7 




:rra an hour later in the club- Tanxees, Martin managed tbe 
house at Co mis key Park. Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers, 

A statement issued after the Oakland As and Detroit Tigers, 
me quoted Sieinbrcnner as say- Martm die first man to 

g. “The action was taken by the "***& M Araencan League team 
inkecs and we felt it was in the four separate um«, Danny Mur- 
« interests or the dub." The 

itement said Steinbrenner told , 957 f *’ 111 l 96 . 7 ’ du ™l 197 KI' 
ing that “he would rather fire 25 a ^ hCT . a ^ r0 ? ,|? 73 10 1976 - 
avers than fire Yogi, but we all had 1 

mu.- I ho* k- £L«a*- that Berra would be fired as the 



Hockey League playoff game, Min- 
nesota stayed alive by beating Chi- 
cago: 

The Islanders won four consecu- 
tive NHL championships before 
losing Lhe cup final in five games to 


“The first two games here put us 
in a hole," said the Islander coach, 
Al Arbour. “Again we played weU 
tonight, but it wasn't well enough." 
North Stars 5, Blade Hawks 4 
in Chicago, Dennis Maruk 



^ game quoted Steinbrenner as say- Marun «e iiist man ic 

• 1 - *g. “The action was taken by the “ American League lean 

::v: - Yankees and we felt it was in the four separate ams. Danny Mur 


,7V **;.■ best interests of the dub." The 
. r statement said Steinbrenner told 
, *1 . •' King that “he would rather fire 25 
7:7 :t f# players than fire Yogi, but we all 
7 ;'X- know Lhat would be impossible.” 


RbumUR 

Yogi Berra m Qiicago Sunday. sj 0 ns." Minnesota. The series winner will 

_ C4 . With the Philadelphia defense t^e on Edmonton, which eliminat- 
comract wdl be honored, Stem- deari QUl lhe m ^ [rom of ^ ed Winnipeg m four games. 

brenner said at the ume. j pelie Lindbergh had a notably Maruk's third goal of the play- 

“Ijust can’t understand all these e^y n jgjit. He stopped 25 shots, ofFs came cm a pass from Dirk 
teams changing managers the way and ukka Sinisalo’s second-period Graham, who dug die puck out 
they do. The lack of stability is &( sl00t j 0Pi -They just played from behind the Chicago net. 
alarming, he said. unbelievable,” said Lindbergh of It was the second consecutive 

Berra, a 15-rime All-Star catcher defensemen Mark Howe, Brad overtimegameoftheseries,Chica- 
for the Yankees, was elected to the. McCrimmon, Brad Marsh and go having won, 7-6, in double over- 
Hall of Fame in 1971 (AP. NYTj Doug Crossman. *Tve never seen rime Thursday. 


Edmonton last year. “Any rime you scored 1 : 14 into overtime to corn- 
shut the Islanders out. you're doing plete Minnesota's rally from a 4-0 
something right," said the Flyer deficit The Black Hawks, up four 
coach, Mike Keenan. “I'm proud of goals halfway through the game, 
this hockey club. When you play a still lead the besl-of-seven series, 3- 
heavyweight like that you have to 1 The sixth game was to be played 
get a knockout There are no deri- Tuesday night in Bloomington, 


RsmarvUmed Pres* knernorcncJ 

Tod Bergen high-s ticked Islander John Tonelli into the Flyer bench in Sunday's first period. 

Nuggets, Jazz 3-2 Series Victors 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcha semifinals of the Western Confer- 

DENVER — The Denver Nug- ence against Ulah in a best-of-sev- 
gets, noted for their unrestrained en senes that was to start here 


Celtics 133, Pistons 99 
In Boston, Robert Parish scored 


Berra, who remained behind Yankees fdi far bdiind the eventu- 

closed doors for nearly a half hour 5!. World Pf 1 ™ 1 

after receiving the news, smiled Tigers. But last Oct .i, Stonbren- 
when reporters finally entered the ner announced Bora would return, 
small office. “I'm in a very good The Yankees wU nol be making 
mood.“ Berra said. “This is suU a chan S« for 1985. Yogi Berra s 


7 small office. *Tm in a very good 
" '*t mood,” Berra said. “This is still a 
very good ballclub, and they're gei- 
' — ^ ring a good manager in Billy Mar- 
i,j tin. I don't think my players laid 

down on me." 

_ ^ Berra refused to criticize Stein- 
— brenner. “He's the boss," Berra 

"7 said. "He can do what he wants. 


offense, won one with defense. Be- 
hind 33 points from Alex English 

NBA PLAYOFFS 


en senes that was to start here 27 points, Kevin McHafe 26 and 
Tuesday nighL Utah concluded the Larry Bird 21 to power the Celtics 
other first-round series Sunday by past Detroit. Boston had a 59-33 
downing Houston in Game 5; else- edge in rebounds, with Parish pulr 
where, Boston and Philadelphia ing down 16. Piston center Bill 
opened the Eastern Conference Laimbeer was held to just one point 


and a smothering defense, tbe Nug- semifinals with convincing vie- and three rebounds. 


gets blew out San Antonio, 126-99, 
to advance to the second round of 


So aggressive was Denver's de- 


It was the second consecutive the National Basketball Assoria- fense that the Spurs managed only 
mime game of the series, Chica- lion playoffs. 17 field goals and 33 percent shoot- 


The Celtics, halting Detroit's 
winning streak at eight games, ran- 
up their largest playoff victory 
margin since a 121-81 shellacking 


rime Thursday. 


“The Yankees will nol be making for the Yankees, was elected, to the. McCrimmon, Brad Marsh and go having won, 7-6, in double over- The Nuggets, who won the best- through the firk three periods of Philadelphia in 1982. 
any changes for 1985. Yogi Berra's Hall of Fame in 1971 (AP. NYT) Doug Crossman. “I've never seen rime Thursday. of-five series 3-1 advance to the -phe Nuggets led, 42-39, with 6:59 76ers 127 Bucks 

It S e garter but ^ mumuI'c. Mos 

Valenzuela Sets Mark but Loses, 1-0, ou Gwynn’s Home Run Like a 65-45 halftime lead * 22^^ ^Tadeflphia^ 


Compiled bv Our Staff From Dispatcher 

LOS ANGELES — Tony 


passed the record of 40?4 season- uled starter Steve Carlton was side- 
starring innings without allowing lined by a sore shoulder, pitched six 




That's what this game is — manag- Gwynn's nimh-inning home run an earned run. set by Hooks Wiltzc shutout innings and the Phillies 

ers are hired to be fired. I know it’s halted Fernando Valenzuela’s ma- of the 1912 New York Giants. took advantage of two errors to 

an old saying, but that's what it is." j or- league record for most consecu- But with one out in the ninth, down Chicago. 

Berra had been dismissed twice rive innings without an earned run Gwvnn sent Valenzuela's first pitch . . 

before, once by tbe New York into the right-center field stands. Meis 5, Pittsburgh 4 

Mets, whom he manned for nearly BASEBALL ROUNDUP “The guy's shder was running In N" Yak, Moolrie Wilson 

four years in the 1970s, and by the Mtl he had great control.- Gwvnn *»«l from third on an error by 

Yankees. at the start of the season and gave «»,*« urii in Hii't i.t first baseman Jason Thompson 


Danyl Strawberry 's single before 
Clint Hurdle hit a ground ball 


White Sox 4, Yankees 3 
In Chicago, reliever Joe Cowley's 


to play in the second quarter but 
then held the Spurs to one field 
goal while ou [scoring them, 23-6, to 
take a 65-45 halftime lead. 

The winners’ Calvin Natt added 
20 points and Mike Evans 16. San 
Antonio had 19 points from Arris 


In Milwaukee. Moses Malone 
scored 27 points and Clint Rich- 
ardson came off the bench to add 
22 as Philadelphia ended the 
Bucks' 16-game home-court win- 
ning streak. The game was decided 
in the third quarter when Philadel- 


through Thompson’s legs to end three ninth-inning walks — the last Gihnore but only 12 from George p hia went on an 1 1-6 run and took 
the 5-hour, 21-minule game. the bases loaded — save the Gervin and 16 from Mike Mitchell, a 81-59 lead. /fM .4 Pi- 


Gwynn sent Valenzuela's first pitch c r .„ . , , 

into the right-center field stands. Mete 5 ’ PlttsbuT E h 4 

“The guy's shder was running ln Nf* York, Moolrie Wilson 
and he had great control.- Gwynn scored from third on an error by 


ur, .M -minute game. 
Giants 2, Reds 1 


with the bases loaded 
White Sox their victi 


gave the 
in Yogi 


“We dodged the bullet twice this 


(UPI, APh 


at the start of the season and gave l0 Relieve he’s 2-3 ^ sl baseman Jason Thompson 


Asked if he would accept anoth- San Diego a 1-0 victory over the ^ slu ff he's got” 
er position with the dub, Berra Dodgers here Sunday. B 

said: “I don’t know. He hasn't Valenzuela, who allowed just PMles 3, Cubs 


ienzuela, who allowed just 


asked me yet My contract says 1 two hits, struck out Craig Lefferts 


Phillies 3, Cubs 2 
ln Philadelphia, Kevin Gross, 


don't have to do anything. Right to end the eighth inning; that sur- pressed into service when sched- 


with none out in the 18th to beat 
Pittsburgh for the Mets. Gary Car- 
ter drew a four-pitch leadoff walk 
from Lee Ttmnell; Wilson ran for 
Carter and advanced lo third on 


In San Francisco, David Green, last S 3 ™ 6 “ New YOTt ' s *“ “ ^ “ inning 

r manager. while turning the ball over.’ said 

Hi tuns .Uoli lashed q nin-scorins ® 

singlein the II th to give the Giants Orioles 8 , Indians 7 San AmonioCoach Cotton Fitz- 

their squeaker over Cincinnati. In Baltimore, Eddie Murray’s ^ y came out 

Expos 5, Canfinals 3 Clr^"" “W' j“*l playsd gral (Hsmt,” 

In Montreal Tim Raines' sec- winnino Firm A: 


f . run eighth that downed Geveland. 

fa Montreal Tim Raines' sec- Winning reliever Don Aase al- ■}* winning coach, Doug Moe. 

ond-mning sacrifice fiy brought in i owe d only one hit over the final Thal “ ^ ultimate defense. 


the go-ahead run, and the Expos three innin g* 
went on to down the Cardinals for 


OARP 

Baseball 

Sunday’s Major League line Scores 


Basketball 

NBA Playoffs 


AMERICAN LEA SUE 
'New York 1M MW 2M— 3 | | 

Chicago tit Mfl 211-4 6 B 


Toronto bob mm-* t a 

Tuns BOB OBI 200-3 IB 1 

Alexander and Martinez; Meson, Harris (6> 


their sixth Straight victory U1 a 
game delayed by rain at tbe start 
for 2 hours and 43 minutes. 

~ ” Astros 2, Braves 1 

1 ransition In Houston, pinch hitter Enos 

■ BASEBALL - Cabell’s two-out ninth-inning dou- 

Amerlcoe League ble scored Alan Ashby from first 

California— R ecoiled Rofoei Lunoand base to lift the Astros past Atlanta. 

Stewart album, Pilchers Irani Edmonton of 


Angels 2, Mariners 1 


Jazz 104, Rockets 97 

fa Houston, Thuri Bailey scored 
15 fourth-quarter points and Lhe 


fa Seattle, Tommy John and 13 tourm-quarter points ana tne 
three relievers combined to give Jazz stayed alive by outscMing the 
California a four-game series sweep Rackets, 3?-J, in the final penod- 


of Seattle. 

Royals 5, Red Sox 2 


Despite Ralph Sampson and 
Akeem Olajowon, Houston’s “twin 
towers," Utah dominated the late 


In Boston, Frank White’s two going — and did so without 7-foot- 
bases-empty home runs led Kansas 4 (223-meter) center Mark Eaton, 


Cowiev and Wyiwgar; DaHan, Burns 18) ondStougtrt.w— Alexander, W.L— Alhaon.2- 
and FIs*. W— Burns, 3.1. L— Cowlor. w. 2. HRs— Toronto, Martinez (1). G. Bell IS), 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS Stewart cilbum, Pilchers from Edmonton of 

Detroit M» H 24— W PacHIc Coasl League. Sent Bob Klpoer, Twins 10, A's I 

Boston 3S 29 37 32— in pitcher, to Midland of lhe Texas League. . , , . , . ... 

Parish 12-17 3-4 27, McHalc 10-17 e-6 28: Placed Luis Sanchez, pitcher, an the 15-day lQ taC American League, tn MUl- 

■nwmos 0.22 44 23. v. jorwson io-i« m 20 . disowed list. neapolis, Mickev Hatcher went 4- 

Refaoonds: Detroit <4 (Roundflcld. Benson. Milwaukee— P laced Rick Manning, oul- f hie mncwnitivp hit 

Cure ton SI. Boston 49 (Ports* 181. Assists: fielder, on toe l^onv disabled list. Acth-ored . C 

Detroit 23 (Thomas 8), Boston 32 (D Johnson, Dton Jamefc outfielder. Streak tO nine at-tiatS DfitOTe t lying 

wiiuoms 7). Minnesota— A nnounced mot Bruce out in the seventh, as Minnesota 

PhUodeJphto 87 29 21 33-127 Haynes, vice preshtanl. has been reosstarwd , j !i u/ec tho Tarinc' 

Mltomakea » 27 22 31-tdS « a consuttomanU uncial assignment scout. rpUlOU UBLjand. 11 WHS me twins 

Malone 10-177-727, Richardson 11-120422: N.V. YANKEES— Fired Yogi Berra, man- eighth consecutive VlCIOiy and the 

Cummings 0-15 1-1 17, Moncrlof 7-11 2-2 id. oger.ondnomed Billv Month to replace him. fourth defeat fa E TOW for the A’S. 

Rebounds: Phltodilphlo 50 (Bartley 8). MU- National League Wotplvw whr» Tuont S fnr S nn Cat 

woukee51 1 Prassev 10). Assists: PNIndciPhlo LOS ANGELES— Ptoced Bob Welch, pitch- natener, WnO went »0r-j OU >3t- 


Thotnos 9-22 44 23. V. Johnson 1MB M 20. dlscWed list. 


HRs— Chicago. FisK to), Gamble II). 
Kansas City 110 Bn 000—6 II I 

Boston B01 MO 100-2 12 • 

Leibiandt, Beckwith (0) and Sandberg; 


Ueshow 2 (4). Texas. C. Johnson (4), Word (1 ). 
Cleveland 080 JOO M0-7 13 0 

Bo I II more 100 301 Dx— 8 9 ) 

Blviewen, von onien (8), Waddell (8). Jeff- 


Rebounds: Detroit 44 (Roundflcld, Benson. 
Cure ton 5), Boston 89 ( Parish 18). Assists: 


Milwaukee— P laced Rick Manning. aul- 
n eider, on the 15-anv disabled list. Activated 


Boyd, Olecto (91 and Sullivan. W— Lefbrandt. coat (8), Thompson (B) and Willard; Davis, 


34. L-Bovd, 2-1. Sy-Becfcwffh (I). HRs— 
Kansas Cltv, While 2 (2). Boston. Boggs (1). 
Detroll 101 DM 030— S B 1 

Milwaukee BOO B00 000—0 4 0 

Terrell and Parrish; Hlouera Ladd (8) and 
Schroeder. W— Terrell, 3-0. L— Hlguora, Gl. 
hps— D etroir, Trammell 14), Parrish at. 
Oakland 000 ON 010— 1 7 0 

Minnesota 100 015 2Bx— 10 14 0 

WorreaMcCallv (8), Tellmonn fe). Conroy 
(0) and Tefiieton; Smithson and Salas, w— 
Smithson. J-2. L— Warren, 1-2 


Stewart 12). Snell (SLAase (7) and Dempsey. 

more. Gross (21, Sheets (3). Lynn (2). Cummings 0-15 1-1 17, ,Mona1et 7-11 2-2 IA ooer. and ntun eO Billy ^M artin to replace Him, fourth defeat fa a TOW fOT the A’S. tO home 0105 SUIlk Texas. Pilcher Without OUT kfiy player, OU the IT>ad 

SS" 1 ” mo mb Boo-1 to i ^^(P^S'iwlASto^VoSihto LOS ANGELEs^k^d^b welch, pitch. Hatcher, who went 5-for-5 on Sat- Doyle Alexander stayed unbeaten and pulled off the sweet upset," 

John, Corbett (41. Lugo (7), Moore IS) and WlCh«dii9).M»woukoe27(Pressay, Hodges er. on the 21-dav disabled list, and Dave An- urday, SCOred twice and Capped the despite giving Up homCTS tO Cliff said Utah Coach Frank LaydfiU, 
orron. Boone <e) ,- aoroias, Beattie (4i, von- derson.jniiekMr. on me_)s-day disabled u«. Twins' five-run sixth with a two- Johnson fa the sixth and Garv “We had to win two 2 ames in here 


City past the Red Sox. 

Tigers S, Brewers 0 
In Milwaukee, eighth-innfa; 
homers by Alan Trammell am 


who exited shortly before halftime 
with a hyperextended knee. 

“I thought we’d won when we 
went up 10 points and the big guy 


Detroit 23 (Thomas 8). Boston 32 (DJohnsoa Dion James, outfielder. 
Williams 7). MINNESOTA— Announ 

PhUadelpblo 87 29 21 33—127 Haynes, vice preshtanl. h 

Milwaukee 24 27 23 31— fas as a consultant and week 

Malone 10-177-727. Richardson 11-120422; *- v - YANKEES— Flrec 


UY I Lilili 1 I .AII l lilk.il UUU _ _ " M ■ • 1 ^.1 e 1 P» 

Lance Fairish nailed down De- ^d 01? ^ ^ 


iroit’s victory over the Brewers. 
Blue Jays 6, Rangers 3 
In Arlington, Texas, four Toron- 


tshed with 32 points and 14 re- and Fergus entered the final round 
bounds. “I still don’t believe we deadlocked fa first at 8-under 208. 


Floyd Takes 
U.S. Golfbyl 

United Press International 

THE WOODLANDS, Texas — 
Ray Floyd broke a three-way tie by 
shooting a final-round 69 Sunday 
to win the Houston Open golf tour- 
nament by one stroke over David 
Frost and rookie Bob Lohr. Floyd, 
who had not played fa the event 
since 1976, finished with an 11- 
under-par 277 and picked up 
$90,000 for his first tournament 
victory since 1981 

At 278, Lohr (on a closing 67) 
and Frost (69) were a stroke ahead 
of Payne Stewart (71). Keith Fer- 
gus (71). Bob Murphy (67) and 
Russ Cochran (70). Floyd, Stewart 
and Fergus entered the final round 


lost the game." 

“We came back from the dead 


Major League Standings 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


Nl Ml. Parrish 121. Narron. Boon* t«) ; Borotos. Beattie (4), Van- 

000 0* 010— 1 7 0 dsBero (7), Best 17) and Scott, w— John. 1-1. 
too 015 MX— II 14 0 L— Baralas. 0-2. Sv— Moor* (31. HR— Soattto, 
Tel Imam (6). Conroy Bradley (41. 

!nr S01 ”' national league 

Chicago DM goo 200-2 8 2 

C., j, PMmtatohta 1W 200 Mu— J » 1 

e Standings sutdltte, Brusitor (!) and Davis; K-Gross. 

Andersen (7) and Virgil. W— KJSrnss.7-2.L— 

1 LEAGUE Sutcliffe. 3-2. Sw— Andersen (2). 


uton 20 19 20 37—104 

Nagstoo 24 U 32 21— 97 

Danttey 8-17 13-13 25, Bailey 7-20 84 20; 


MONTREAL— Signed Ned YcHt.catcitar.to 
i minor-league contract. 

MEW YORK— Placed Bruce Beranyl. Pilch- 


run single. 


Johnson fa the sixth and Gary “We had to win two games fa here 
Ward fa tbe seventh. [UPI, AP) and that made it even sweeter." 


Bernhard Laager, hoping to be- 
come the first man to win three 
tournaments fa a row since Gary 
Player did so fa 1978, finished at 
287. In the previous two weeks 
Longer had won the Masters and 
the Sea Pines Heritage Classic. 


Olalimtm IM9 0-15 32. Sampson 10-14 3423. w. on Hm 15 day disabled list. Signed Joe 
Rebouads; UMi 53 (Eaton 10), Houston 58 Sombita pitcher. 


(Otoluwan 14). Asslsii: Ulah 21 (Green 8). 
Houston to (Lucas 0). 

San Antonio 34 71 24 30— 99 


PHILADELPHIA— Sent Steve Hen. notch- 
er. to Port lend of lhe Pacific Coast League. 
PITTSBURGH— Stoned Larry McWII- 


Dei roll 

East Di vision 
W L 
11 6 

Pci. 

.447 

GB 

San Diego 008 810 101—1 2 ■ 

Los Angcln 008 DOB 800-0 9 1 

Thurmond. DeLeon (71, Lefferts 17). Gas- 

Baltimore 

11 

7 

411 

to 

sage (9) and Bochv; Valenzuela and Sctoeda. 

Toronto 

II 

7 

411 

to 

W— Lefferts- 14LL— Valenzuela 2-1 Sv— Gas- 

Boil on 

9 

9 

JOO 

2to 

sage (51. HR— San Dlcga Gwvnn (11. 

Milwaukee 

8 

9 

xn 

3 

PBTctorrgtl 010 083 008 008 080 800-4 11 3 

Cleveland 

7 

11 

J89 

4to 

New York 408 800 MO 800 080 881-S 6 1 

New York 

4 

10 

J75 

4fe 

BieleckL Holland (5). Scurry (8). Robinson 

Colltornla 

West Division 
12 7 

432 



(81. Candelaria IS), Guanto (101, Tunnell (14) 
and Pena; McDowell, Sctilrakfl (6), SambHn 

Chicago 

9 

7 

J83 

ito 

<71, Slsfc (8). Orosco (9), Gorman (11) ond 

Kansas Cltv 

9 

1 

529 

2 

Carter. W— Gorman, 2-1. L— Tonne) 1, 0-2. 

Minnesota 

10 

9 

524 

2 

HR»— Pittsburgh, Hendrick HI. Pena (1). 

Oakland 

9 

10 

X74 

3 

New York, Strawberry (8). 

Seattle 

7 

12 

■388 

S 

Cincinnati 080 010 800 80—1 8 1 

Ten. os 

S 

12 

.294 

6 

San Francisco 808 Oil 808 81—3 7 2 


Denver 31 34 32 29—124 Homs, pitcher, too five-vear contract. Traded 

English 12-21 Ml 33. Natt 7-14 6-7 20; Gil- su,ve Hera, calcher. to Philadelphia In «■ 
more S-ll 9-10 H. Mitchell 8-14 4-4 18. Re- change lor Mike Dias, catcher; sent Diaz to 
bounds: San Anlanio5J(lavaron),GllmorelL HowaH of the Pacific Coost League. 


Europe Becomes World Cup Battleground 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
East Dtvtsiaa 




W 1 

l 

PCt. 

GB 


Montreal 

12 

8 

487 

— 


Chicago 

11 

6 

447 

to 

- ’ 

New Vark 

11 

6 

447 

to 


SI. LOUIS 

7 

10 

412 

4to 


Philadelphia 

6 

11 

-353 

Ste 


Pittsburgh 

5 12 

West Division 

594 

tto 


San Diego 

10 

B 

558 

— 

- 

Los Angeles 

11 

V 

550 

— 


Cincinnati 

10 

9 

526 

to 


Houston 

10 

9 

528 

to 


Atlanta 

8 

10 

444 

2 


San Francisco 

7 

11 

-369 

3 


Denver 50 I Non 101. Assists: San Antonio 15 
(Moore 4). Denver 31 (Lever 10). 


Pittsburgh 010 003 HO 000 000 000-4 U 3 EASTERN CONFERENCE 

New York 400 OH 000 000 000 Ml— 5 8 1 First Round 

BieleckL Holland (5). Scurry (8), Robinson Boston def. Cleveland. 3-1 
(8). Candelaria 1 8), Guanto (10>, Tunnell (14) Phi tadHuhla def. Wasblngton. 3-1 
and Pena; McDowell, Schlrolca (8), SambHn Milwaukee def. Chicago. 3-1 
(71, Sisk (0), Orosco 19), Garmon ill) and Dclrolt def. New Jersey. 34 
Carter. W-Gomwn, M. L-Tnnnell, 0-2. Semifinals (best-oFseven) 

HRt— PltlUurah, Hendrick il), Pena (1). April 29 Boston 133, Detroit 99 

ttaw itort, Strawberry (4) Aefll » - D^t a™ 

taMkmLai ua asi us Stll ! 2 May 2 - Boston al Detroit 

Sai FrandscD 0M 0*1 B0i 81— 3 7 3 say 5 — Boston at Detroit 

Sola Power (9), Hume (Tl) amt BUordelto. KWWav 8 _ 

VanGorder («)i Krukow.GarralK (91. Minton ^ 1Q J^Son «l DUrall 

(IlJondTrevlnaW_MlntoaM.L-Hume.il. 12 - iZ ol Boston 

SL LOUIS 110 BOB BUI— 3 I 2 

Montreal 215 om I lx 5 10 1 A0r,< a ~ Phitodelpwo 127, Milwaukee 105 

Kepshlre, Horton (7). Allen (7i.Davlev (71, * prH 30 ~ Phllodelohla ol Milwaukee 
Lahti (0) and Porter; Racers. Schofzeitar (4J. Mov 3 ~ Mlhwwkee al Philadelphia 


Reardon (01 and Fitzgerald. W— Rogers. 2-2. MDV 3 — Milwaukee at Philadelphia 


Football 

USFL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
T Pet. PF PA 


Birmingham 

7 

3 

0 

JOO 

242 

180 

Tampa Bav 

7 

3 

0 

.700 

284 

214 

New Jersey 

6 

3 

0 

467 

227 

208 

Jacksonville 

S 

5 

0 

500 

248 

2S2 

Memphis 

5 

5 

0 

500 

204 

205 

. Baltimore 

4 

5 

1 

450 

178 

158 

• Qrtcndo 

2 

7 

0 

XO. 

154 

343 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Houston 

7 

3 

0 

.700 

316 

227 

- Oakland 

4 

3 

1 

450 

244 

211 

Denver 

6 

4 

a 

400 

248 

199 

Arlrana 

4 

6 

0 

400 

189 

205 

San Anion »0 

3 

7 

a 

300 

140 

224 

Los Angeles 

3 

7 

0 

JOO 

145 

244 

Portland 

3 

7 

0 

JM 

147 

219 


SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
Tamoo Bov » Baltimore 14 
Jacksonville 57. Birmingham 17 
Houston 38, San Antonia 29 


L— KenshJre, M Sv— Reardon (5). 

Atlanta DOB 1B0 08*— 1 5 1 

Houston oat BOO OBI— 1 7 0 

Perez. ZLSmlth (7), Forster II] ondCerone; 
Ryan, D-Smlth (81 and Bailey, Ashby 18). W— 
DJmltti, 3-1. l— F orster. 0-1, HR— Houston. 
CJtovnolds 12). 


Hockey 

NHL Playoffs 

SUNDAY’S RESULTS 
N.Y. tstanders 0 0 o— o 

Philadelphia 0 1 0—1 

Slnlsato (3). Shots an goal: New York (on 
Undbergh) 11-84-25; Ptiltodetohlo (on Hro- 
dev) 10-174—38. 

Minassota 0 2 2 1—5 

Chicago 2 2 8 0-4 

MeKean&v2(7).Belkws (2j.CkCarnlll (3), 
Maruk (4); Savard (4).Suttor (SLSecord (5), 
Lamer (41. Shots on goat: Mlnnesdto (on 
Bannermanj 12-15^1—37; Chicago (an Me- 
toctw. Beauore) 13-9-134-35. 

DIVISION FINALS 
Adams (Quebec leads series, 3-2] 
April 30: Montreal al Quebec 
-May 2: Quebec at Montreal 

Patrick (Philadelptiie writs, 4-1) 

Morris (Chicago leads series, 3-2) 
April 30: Chicago ai Minnesota 
x-Moy 2: Minnesota at Chicago 

Smyrna (Edmonton wbH. series 44) 
(x-l* necessoy) 


x-Moy 0 — Philadelphia at Milwaukee 
x-Mav 10 — Milwaukee at PMlodetohla 
x-May 12 — Phtlodelohia at Milwaukee 
WESTERN CONFERENCE 
First Roasd 

Los Angeles Lakers def. Phoenix, 3-T 
Denver def. 5an Antonio, 3-2 
Utah def. Houzloti, 3-2 
Portland del Dellas. 3-1 

SemlfiMls (best4t-seven) 

April 27 — LOS Angeles 125. Portland Iff! 
April 30 — Portland at Los Angeles 
Mav 3 — Las Angeles al Portland 
Mov 5 — Los Angeles at Portland 
x-Mav 7 — Portkmd at Los Angeles 
x-May 9 — Los Angeles ot Portland 
x-May 1) — Portland al Los Ansefcs 

April 30 — Utah at Denver 
Mav 2 — Utah ot Denver 
Mov 4 — Denver ot Utah 
May 5 — Denver at Utah 
x-May y — uiah at Denver 

x-May 9 — Denver at Utah 
x-Mov 11 — Utah ot Denver 
fx-H necessary) 


orange iot nuxe uhd, caicner; sent uiai id . . . „ , , _ ,, 

Ho won al the Pacific Coost League. lmerrumona! Herald Tribune 

FOOTaAl - L LONDON — It was all very well for the poet 

BRmsT^coL^rS Jim Alfred Edward Housman to si>eculate lhat May 
Bouwera, tight and. to a two-year con had. wuj be fine next year. Modem soccer stars have 
F^otwi Lmue their work cut out negotiating this one. 

^ Lflmar An roads to Lhe 1986 World Cup lead to 

miami— Announced the retirement of jim- Mexico, and all are bottlenecked. Only 24 can 

my Cefolo. wide receiver. 

United States Football League -n 

ARIZONA— Signed Mike Robinson, defen- K HR H T 

sfve end. to o two-vear contract. JJt U LfOILiJ 

HOCKEY 

Nattouoi Hockey League play the finals, and three-quarters of the 121 

Stotan^^T^^g^K^ starters are stffl on the quaftymg route. 

(or a slide -swine Ing Incident In a game wttti MCXiCO, 3S hOSL and Italy, as champion, have 

lhe Chicago Black Hawks on Anrll II automatic passage. Hungary and Uruguay are 
GRAND canySS^L Peter Duoh *> far die only qualifiers. And the tattle in 
soccer coocn. Europe now heals up through 10 games m seven 

southeast lou isi ana— N amed Frank groups over three days, 
w, Schneider women's basketball coach. “ . _ ■ j xi 

southern coNFERENCE-tiamed OTOiqi I — DeJ^um vs. Potant: Inese are the 
Gurney Chombers oresktanf ond Charles heavyweights Of a gTOUp SO fraught With UnCCT- 
Clork vice oresldent. t>_i J 


(or a si lefc -swinging Incident In a game wttti 
file Chicago Black Hawks on April 11 


World Cup Soccer 

European Qualifying 


Golf 


W. Germany 

Portugal 

Sweden 

Czechoslovakia 

Mafia 


England 
No. Ireland 
Finland 
Romania 
Turkey 


GP PTS 
4 5 

2 3 

4 3 

4 3 


GP PTS 

4 5 

5 6 


GP PTS 

3 8 

4 4 

4 4 


oumament Tennis | \^orld Championships 


MEN 

{la Atlanta) 

Sing to* Final 

John McEnroe (1 ). U A.det Paul Amaetm, 
VS. 7-8. 7-4, 8-1 

Doubles Final 

Annacone and Christo Van Rensburg# South 
Africa, del. Steve Denton, US. and Tomas 
Smta, Czeehasiovaklo, 4-4, 44. 

WOMEN 
(in San Diego) 

Stogies Final 

Annabel Craft, Britain, def. Wendy Turn- 
bull, Australia. 44. 7-4 (7-5). 

Double* Final 

Turnbull and Candy Reynolds. IL&, def. Roz 
Foirbonk, South Africa, aid Susan Leo, Aus- 
tralia. 6-4, 84, 


MEDAL ROUND 

W L T Pts GF GA 
soviet union 0 0 o 0 0 1 

Canada B 0 0 0 0 1 

Czechoslovakia 0 0 0 0 0 1 

United Stofes 0 0 0 8 0 1 

CONSOLATION ROUND 
Finland 1 0 0 2 4: 

Sweden 1 0 0 2 5 1 

E .Germany 0 t 0 0 2 1 

W.Germanv 0 1 0 0 2 1 

SUNDAYS RESULTS 
Con sciatica Round 
Finland 4 , East Germany 2 
Sweden 5, West Germany 2 

Monday 'i Somes 

Medal Round 
Canada vs. United Stales 
Soviet Union vs. QnchoOovakla 


Too finishers and eartongs In to# Houston 
Open, wklcb ended Sunday oa tbe Dar-72,7JK2. 
yard Taantament Players Course at The 
tMndkndi, Texas: 

Raymond Floyd, 590000 69.7049^9—277 

David Frost. JW.000 47-71-7149-278 

Bob Lohr, 884,000 7348-7047—278 

Rub Cochran, 819487 724349-70-279 

Keith Fergus, 819487 47-7249-71—279 

Bab Murphv. 519,687 7148-7347—279 

Payne Stewart. 819487 68-72-70-71—279 

Phil Blackman, 815X00 49-7248-71-280 

Calvin Peele, S15LA00 87-72-71-70- JBO 

Donnie Hammnd. 8U000 70-70-71-70-281 

Jdm Matwffev. SI 1000 7040-70.71-281 

Mark Breaks. 89214 70.71-7349—282 

Ken Green. SMM 70.72.7149—282 

Morris HalBlskf. SMM 71-734949-282 

Hale Irwin, 89414 70-7249-71-282 


Group 1 — Belgium vs. Poland: These are the 
heavyweights of a group so fraught with uncer- 
tainty that even Albania could win it Poland 
awaits, as ever, word from Italy that Zbigniew 
Boniefc and Wladyslaw Zmuda,’its most experi- 
enced campaigners, are fit, eager and free of lire 
fever or pasta overkill. 

In soccer, if little else, Belgium's problems 
dwarf those of Poland. Bel gian trainer Guy' 
Thys first has to find enough innocent players 
— no easy task now lhat tax investigators are 
following up the bribery scandals and “black 
money” paid to 1982 World Cup stars. Doctors 
aren't helping either. Last week Lbey whipped 
out the appendix of gpalie Jean-Marie Pfaff, 
completing the decimation of one of Europe’s 
most reliable defenses. 

Still there is one man — a youth, actually — 
whose burgeoning creative powers scare the hell 
out of Poland. Enzo Scifo, 19 years and six 
weeks old. stands accused of nothing more than 
that his dark looks and svelte skills are more 
Italian than Belgian (al though he was bran fa 
Brussels, his parents are Sicilian). 

When he was 15, an Anderlecht talent scout 
spotted him — “no bigger than a blade of grass, 



Northern Ireland, extremely unlucky to lose 
to England, simply must win fa Belfast over the 
hapless Turks or fade out of all contention. 

Group 4 — Bulgaria vs. France; Luxembourg 
vs. Yugoslavia: French cavalier blades, dulled fa 
a 0-0 draw fa Yugoslavia last month, will again 
be hard-pressed m Sofia. Tbe Bui gars are ex-, 
peris fa suffocating creativity and sometimes; 
adept at sneaking a goal. 

But France has nourished defensive redoub- ‘ 
(ability of its own —just four goals conceded fa . 
12 straight victories last year and so far none fa ' 
World Cup qualifying. It may depend on how 
much Michel Platini is holding back for Juven- 
tus's European Cup final later this month. 

Luxembourg is the group's whipping boy, and 
Yugoslavia, barren at home, performs best on 
the break. It mil have to, considering the score 
fa Zenicar was another pathetic 1-0. 

Groiqi 5 — The Netherlands vs. Austria: By 
tradition, another dour encounter. The Dutch 
have lost tbe genius of Johan Cruyff and the 
know-how of the 1974 and 1978 teams. But they 
have the promise of Ruud Gullit fa midfield and 
Wim Kieft and Marco van Basten on attack. 
Austria, dreadful against Hungary despite Her- 
bert Probaska ana Walter Schachner, seems 
equipped at best to spoil the Dutchmen's effort, 
to be runner-up to the Hungarians. (In groups 
of only four teams, the runner-up has a playoff 
chance of entering the finals by a tack door.) 

Group 6 — Tbe Soviet Union vs. Switzerland; 
Ireland vs. Norway: Denmark, without a match 
this week, lurks as group favorite. Yet the Swiss 
still are unbeaten, thanks to technique, spirit 
and the Houdini act of Andre Egli, who tallied a; 
lasi-mfaute equalizer when Lhe Russians led for 

tbe second lime at Bern two weeks agp. 

Enzo Scifo: ‘A remarkable natural talent’ The Soviet Union, as ever, has the players to- 

do well but they never seem to muster the same 
attitude their compatriot hockey players and 
ticket; they labored to an gymnasts sometimes seem born with, 
ss draw in Malta. The Irish Republic, too, rarely performs as if 

ania vs. England: Northern the whole is the sum of its gifted parts. Liam 


second 


Franca 

69-704949-277 Yugoslavia 
47-71-7149-278 Bulgaria 
7348-7047—278 E. Germany 
724849-70-279 Luxembourg 
47-7249-71-279 


Don Poo toy. 39,214 

Clarence Rose. 59,214 
Hal Sumn. 89.214 
Garv Koai.S6A60 
Warn* Levi. S4J180 
Nlek Pries, S4JM0 
B«bbV Wodklns, SUMO 
Richard ZefcoL 34460 
Dave Barr, S4A50- 

Frgd Coooles. 34JS0 

Warns Gratfv-I4jffi> 


7148-7347—279 
68-72-70-71—279 
49-7248-71-280 Hungary 
87-73-7I-7Q— 380 The Nwtwrtands 
7X3-711-71-70—281 Auslrla 
7040-70-71-281 Cvrew 
70.71.7249—2*2 

70- 72-71 49-282 ' 

71- 734949 — 287 

70- 7249.71-282 SwUMrland 

71- 71-7347-282 Denmark 

619-71.71-71—282 Norway 
7249-71-70—282 Ireland 
7148-70-74—283 Soviet Union 
7147-74-71—283 

72- 70-7348-283 I 

49-70-70-74—283 

71-72*71 49— 283 Scotland 
73.7049-72—284 Wotos 
7549-71 49-2S4 Spain 
71-7370-7) — 284 Iceland 


3 o When he was 15, an Anderlecht talent scout unspeakable scoreless draw in Malta. The Irish Republic, too, rarely performs as if 

spotted him — “no bigger than a blade of grass, Groap3 — Romania vs. England; Northern the whole is the sum of its gifted parts. Liam 

gp PTS but a remarkable natural lalem." At 17 be was . Ireland vs. Turkey: Romania Coach Mircea Brady scans a midfield general without aii 

4 7 performing fa Europe: at 18, because Italy had Lucescu insists, “We are competing for second army. Surely, despite phlegmatic resistance, he' 

* | not responded to his dream of playing for his place. England has shown awesome form, has will mastermind Norway’s downfall? 

j 2 father's country, Anderlecht and Tliys persuad- found the right blend, and has players the envy Group 7 — Wafas vs. Spain: Volatile is the 

* o ed the boy lhat he was all-Belgian. He signed a of tbe world.” * operative word. Ian Rush is fit after a knee 

binding contract, which included a clause that True, three straight triumphs are encouraging injury; his fiery partner, Mark Hughes, has had 
gp pts heforgo claims under his father's nationality, and Hverton’s emerging Trevor Steven has baP an astonishing first season for Manchester Unit- 


The Italian connection broken, Scifo played meed England’s right flank. But as another East ed — and they run into Antonio Maceda and a 

!- at r -I f r- .1. ■ T* r V J : W!1 ! J .8 n 9 A i • ito . ( 


in. Sen or 


GP PTS 
3 5 

3 4 

4 3 

3 3 

3 2 


OP PTS 
4 4 

4 4 

3 4 

3 2 


overawed, but ne s better now and win be better in the spring. England s empna 
still fa Mexico if his country can get him there, physical running and its overbui 
Group 2 — Czechoslovakia vs. West Genna- and cup structures take their tolL 


dened league cally backward, although Hughes said. 


ot physi- 
id, after 


ny: Thanks more to the finishing i 
Rudi VoIIer than the presence of 3 


instincts of Romania is hurting: Marcel Coras, a midfieid 


Kari- H ein ? strength, suffered a broken collarbone, and 


their meeting fa Seville, “I found Mm no dirtier ' 
than the average defender." 

Finally, spare a thought for Lebanon, whose 


Four games, four victories suggests the old as- direct counterattacking mask instead of its bra- peppered the Lebanese net with 22 goals, but for 
surance, if not the vintage quality. tal intimidatory side, I think Romania can that devastated nation to train a <«im of able:- 

The Czechs wifi struggle to claim the group’s shade a home victory. bodied men is itself a triumph. 







INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Lesson in Suit Prevention 


W ASHINGTON —The phone 
has been ringing off the hook 
since President Reagan decided to 
go to the Bitbiirg cemetery. Some 
people are not happy about it. 

Sylvia Grossman called the other 
day. “I read in 
the paper the 


m 


m 


reason the presi- 
dent is going to 
the cemetery is 
because he 
doesn't want to 
offend the West 
Germans." 

“Thai's cor- 
rect," I told her. 

“Tell me , 

something: Bucnwaid 

What would happen if he did of- 
fend the Germans?' 

“I'm not sure I understand what 
you're driving at." 

“Let's say the president cancels 
his visit to the graveyard where the 
SS soldiers are buried, and the Ger- 
mans become offended. What can 
they do to us? Do you think they'll 
stop sending Meiredes-Benzes to 
the United States?" 

□ 

“1 don't believe they would go 
that far, though an embargo of 
German automobiles is always a 
possibility. Our main fear is they 
could get into quite a suit about iL" 

Sylvia said, “They should have 
thought about that when they start- 
ed World War IL OX. let’s take 
the worst-case scenario. They get 
into a sniL We have countries all 
over the world who are in a snit 
because of something we've done. 

Boston Pojis Party 
Opens 100th Year 

United Press International 

B OSTON — The Boston Pops, 
which has become one of the 
world’s most popular orchestras for 
light classical and popular music, 
opens its 100th season this week. 

The Pops celebrates Tuesday 
with a party and a concert by John 
Williams, the orchestra's 19th con- 
ductor . It will feature guest perfor- 
mances and the debut of a long-lost 
P-D.Q. Bach piece. 

The Pops was launched in 1885. 
four years after the founding of the 
parent Boston Symphony. Its suc- 
cess is attributed* in part to Arthur 
Fiedler, the conductor for 50 years, 
who died in 1979. 


One more snit is not going to hurt 
us. Besides, if the president has to 
choose between a German tantrum 
and die feelings of American ex- 
GIs and victims of the Holocaust, 
then let him live with the snit." 

“It's not just a German snit we 
have to worry about," I told her. 
“We also have to concern ourselves 
with Chancellor Kohl’s political fu- 
ture. If the president doesn't go to 
the cemetery. Kohl's Christian 
Democrats will have a problem 
winning a May 12 election to North 
Rhine- Westphalia.” 

a 

“Are you trying to tell me a local 
German election is the reason Rea- 
gan insists on going to Bitbnrg 
against the advice of everyone from 
the American Legion to the survi- 
vors of the Naas’ death camps?' 

“It's not just the Westphalia 
election. The president owes Kohl a 
lot." 

“Why does he owe Kohl?" 

“Because the chancellor took our 
Pershing missiles." 

“How can the president owe 
Kohl for accepting our missiles? 
They are in Germany to protect 
him’ as much as they are to protect 
us," Sylvia said. 

“It's not just the missiles." I said 
patiently. “Kohl has also spoken 
out strongly for Star Wars. The 
president thinks he’s a real neat 

guy." 

Sylvia said, “I don’t know Kohl, 
but if he’s such a real neat guy why 
doesn't be let Reagan off the hook 
by finding him someplace else to go 
besides a cemetery where Nazis are 
buried?' 

“As 1 understand it, the SS sol- 
diers buried at Bitburg were not 
real Nazis, but just lads drafted 
into the service.” 

“Who said that?" 

“Chancellor KohL You must re- 
member, he has a lot more to lose 
than Mr. Reagan if the president 
doesn’t visit Bitbuig.” 

□ 

Sylvia said, “I wouldn't be too 
sure of that-" 

I tried to be as diplomatic as 
possible. “I don’t think it's your 
duty or mine to tell the president of 
the United States what cemeteries 
he should visit and what ones he 
should skip. After all he has very 
qualified staff in the White House 
who do nothing but tell him what’s 
good for him and what isn't." 

“Oh yeah? So where were they 
when Reagan needed them?” 


The Roar of the River, the Climate of Challenge 


By Edward A. Gargan 

Sck York Times Senke 

NORTH CREEK, New York 
— The river races here. Swollen 
with melted snows and spring 
rains, it rushes in a wild, white 
froth through still forests. 

Perched on the stem of a gray 
rubber raft. Ernie LaPrairie 
screamed, “Power, Power!” to 
eight paddle wielders. Instantly, 
eight yellow blades clawed the 
river, and the raft hurtled into the 
Cedar Ledges, a jumble of boul- 
ders lathered by waters pouring 
from the confluence of the Indian 
and Hudson rivers. 

A burst of cotton-colored foam 
about seven feet (two meters) high 
slammed over the raft’s bow, del- 
uging the paddlers in icy water, 
the roar of river punctuated only 
by the whooping of frenetic 
rafters. 

Spring comes grudgingly to the 
Adirondacks. but the white-water 
rafting season is blossoming now. 
near where the Hudson River be- 
gins. Until June 2, hundreds and 
sometimes thousands of people 
will shoot down rivers each day, 
careering over rocky ledges in in- 
flated rubber boats. 

In the past century and until 
the timber companies pulled out 
in 1951, the only things that man- 
aged to run these rivers safely 
were logs felled by those compa- 
nies. 

“The river’s got to get you 
hi gh? said Pat C unningham, a 
former professional skier who 
now runs rafting trips throughout 
the Adirondacks. “You have to 
get a kick out of nature." 

For $75, Cunningham provides 
each rafter with a dark-blue neo- 
prene wet suit and a ride in a 
battered gray school bus to the 
river to join seven other similarly 
clad sonls and a guide, who then 
head down the white waters to- 
gether. Cunningham has been do- 
ing this since 1979. and since then 
22 other rafting companies have 
started up. 

LaPrairie. a rugged, bearded 
fellow, is one of the guides, a man 
apparently immune to pedestrian 
fears. 

“This is classed as one of the 
top 10 waters in America.” he told 
a busload of novices in tones in- 
tended to instill either cockiness 
in one’s prowess or dread over 
one's future. ‘The degree of diffi- 
culty, high -stan ding waves, the 







Nn York Tunai 


White-water rafters, with Pat C unningham steering from the stem, paddle into a rapids on die Hudson River. 


scenic country — all make this 
one of the places to raft." 

After lumbering up a long hill, 
the bus veered onto a rough dirt 
road that wormed its way be- 
tween stands of pine and past a 
thunder of water tumbling down 
the Odder Slide, a fall of water 
that seemed to take on the dimen- 
sions of Niagara Falls. 

“We’re not going to run that" 
C unningham said, trying to allay 
sudden looks of alarm among the 
two dozen people aboard. 

“We’ve got a river here," he 
said, obviously delighted at the 
water that rampaged before him. 
Not satisfied with the natural tu- 
mult of water. Cunningham's 
company and each of the other 
rafting companies in North Creek 
pay the town of Indian Lake 
SI ,000 each spring to open the 
Abanakee Dam on the Indian 
River between 9 and 1 1 AM. to 
raise the river two feet above nor- 
mal. 

At a place called Indian Head, 
the rafters ginsoly lugged the 
three 1 20-pound (54-kilo) rafts to 


the river bank, where LaPrairie 
delivered the last instructions. 

“Keep your lifejacket buckled 
at all times," he said. “If you fall 
in — and someone usually always 
falls in — roll on your back and 
get your feet pointed down- 
stream. If you gel separated from 
the raft, work your way to shore, 
and someone will come bade and 
get you. 

“And remember,” he said, 
“bold onto your paddle. It’s the 
most important thing you have." 

With that, the rafts, loaded 
with paddlers and a thermos jug 
of hot chocolate, drifted into the 
middle of the Indian River and 
toward the Cooley Steps, the first 
of more than a dozen rapids that 
tug the river down 700 feet over 
the 16-mile (26-kilometer) course. 

“That makes a very high aver- 
age drop and tremendous quality 
water," Cunningham said. 

At each of the rapids, the 
guides began hollering, urging 
their paddlers on. “Power. Pow- 
er!" LaPrairie shouted. 

Behind his raft C unningham 


exhorted his paddlers. “Forward, . 
Forward!" And like pinballs from 
the chute, the rafts sprang into the 
churning river, with at times only 
the beads of the rafters poking 
above the plumes of water. 

“You have to paddle faster 
than the river to keep control." 
Cunningham said. “Otherwise 
you stall out and really get into 
trouble.” Here, the river was mov- 
ing at nearly nine miles an hour. 

Quickly, before the rafters had 
caught their breath, another rap- 
ids and then another were upon 
them. The Cedar Ledges gave way 
to the roar of the Blue Ridge Rap- 
ids and the rumble of the Blue 
Ledge Narrows. At Blue Ledge, 
700 feet of granite rose toward the 
sun from the river’s south bank. 

The rafts drifted around a cor- 
ner and the Hudson vanished. 
This was the Kettle Mountain 
Rapids, a short but intense drop 
in the river, the most difficult of 
the rapids to maneuver. 

“Whenever you can’t see the 
river." Cunningham said, "you 
know it's good." The rafts bucked 


and heaved, the hardness of the 
boulders pummeling the rafters' 
feet as the rubber boats pushed 
through a river that seemed to 
boil around them. 

Beyond Kettle Mountain, near 
the rapids called Gunsight Out, a 
red-tailed hawk lazily worked the 
currents of air, one of the first to 
arrive in the northward spring mi- 
gration. 

More than four hours later, 
with the Harris Rift and the Grey- 
hound Bus rapids behind them, 
the three rafts swung abruptly 
into Point of Rock, where the 
school bus was waiting, its engine 
and heater running. 

Shivering, some with teeth 
chattering, the rafters hauled the 
rubber boats from the river and 
strapped them to the roof of the 
bus. 

The run was over. 

“This is the best time." said 
Cunningham, sipping at a Styro- 
foam cup of steaming onion soup. 
“April and May, when you have 
the runoff from the snow and 
spring rains, that’s the best time." 


PEOPLE 


CaU Him e Granddad’ > : 

A New Role forRingo 

It’s-later-than-you-ihini depart- 
ment: Ringo Stair, 44, is going to 
be a grandfather, the fust former 
Beatle to be one. Ringo's son, Zak, 
19. who is married to a 25-year-old 

1 oetqftf nopnt mil _ 


DC a uauj u\jj uuu i worn lu pg 

called Granddad,'’ Ringo told the 
Standard newspaper in London. 

O 

Michael Radford's “ 1 984." based N ' 
on George Orwell's novel has won 
the top award at the Istanbul film 
festival, the Golden Tulip. 

□ 

The daughter of the jailed South 
African black nationalist leader 
Nelson Mandela has accepted a hu- ' 
man rights prize from Bordeaux 
lawyers on behalf of her lawyer - 
father. Zanlm Mandela received the f 
Ludovic-Trarieux Prize, estab- 
lished last year, from European Af- 
fairs Minister Catherine Lalmmere, 

. . . British actors have called on 
Derek Bond, the president of their 
union. Equity', to resign because he 
performed in South Africa for six 
weeks last year. A meeting of 600 
delegates of the 33.000-aiember 
union voted overwhelmingly in f a . 
vor of his resignation. Bond said he 
did not intend to resign and added 
that he had made dear his opposi- 
tion to South Mrica's racial segre- 
gation laws while he was there. 

□ 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales met Pope John Paul II in a 
private audience Monday, but a 
Vatican source said Buckingham 
Palace had decided they should not 
attend a private papal Mass. 


The U.S. Immigration and Natu- 
ralization Service has offered the 
Canadian author Farley Mowat a 
“parole" to come to the United 
Slates to promote his new book, 
but Mowat rejected the offer, call- 
ing it “totally unacceptable." “1 
want total clearance or nothing." 
Mowat said. A prominent writer on 
wildlife and conservation. Mowat 
was refused permission, for unstat- 
ed reasons, to board a Los Angeles 
bound flight at Toronto Iasi week. 
A similar dispute, over a visa fora 
Nicaraguan cabinet minister. Er- 
nesto Cardeoal was resolved when 
the INS granted him a waiver to 
begin a truncated tour of poetry 
readings and talks. 


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PARIS Dvsbardas In te rnational 
(01] 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

(069} 250066 

I.M.S. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON .nffESS 

(01) 953 3636 

CAIRO Allied Van Unas Ml 
(20-2) 712901 

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MOVING 


MOVING to & from Israel by Id ckns 
experts offering foil door-to-door ser- 
vice, peeking, insurance and docu- 
mentation. Ambassador Forwarders 
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650039 Tx 341177 oofo .1 ext ASD 


CONTINBC Codbusters to 300 ones 
worldwide • Air/Seo. GnD Chcrfie 
281 1881 Pons (near Opera) Cors too 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ISOLA PI ANA 

YOUR PRIVATE ISLAND PARADISE 
IN TM MHHTHOtANEAN SEA 
5 MILS TO SARDMA 

The 220.000 sqjn. efand. with only 180 
iqjartmenfc has its own port, restaurant, 
supermarket, swimming pool, terms 
courts, beaches, 2 ships - and no cm. It 
is owned by the buyers of the 
opertmenb. 

Best connections by or from VSan aid 
Rome to CagStxi/Sardinia 
We wfl be p eased to send you mare 
information about His dream Blond. 


Vienne 18th Cent. Chateau ™**2™*^ 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


TUSCANY 

RESIDENCE MONASTHY 
SANQSMONDO 

Ranxmlie, tadimasfy perfect apart- 
ments in a 23,000 sqm peek ground in 
the heart of Tiaasty. Turns, pod. core- 
taker Prices Le. $45,000 & 5106,000. 

HMERA1D HOME LTD. 

YOUR PARTNH IN BJROPE 

Dorftfcr. 

CH-8872 Women SG 
Switzerland 
Tel: CM 58431778. 

Tl* 876062 HOME CH. 


On ISO ha, river & p on d 30-hone sta- 
bled stud form with 2^00 meter track, 
pensile additional 150 ha, most 
perfect condition. Price F7.500.C00. 
ABO 553 93 73 Pans 


IMPORTED 


Canadian Club. 

Lighter than Scotch, smoother 
than Bourbon. 

The smooth and distinctive taste of 
Canadian Club fe appreciated all over 
the world. Enjoy Canadian Club, neat, 
on the rocks or mixed to your taste. 


tyb/iadau < ^//C a 


Since 1558 


YOUR PARTNER IN EUROPE 
Dorfstr. Oi B872 Weesen 
Tefc 0+58431778 
Thu 0+876062 HOME 04. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


INVESTORS 

Center of MONTE CARLO 
CLOSE TO C ASINO 

Muynificaat 3 room apartment 
175 iqm. with ce&F and parking 
space, presently occupied. Very 
ifaerestmg investment opportunity. 
For further details please contact: 

AGED! 

36 bu Bd Prinresse Owrtatte 
Monte Carlo, MC 98000 Monaco 
Tel: (93) 50 66 00 Telex- 479417 MC 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


Embassy Service 

8 Ava. da Mamina 
7500B Paris 

Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

PHONE 562-1 640 


RYSEES-BERRI 

Modern buidng 

6th floor: double Svmg, 2 bedrams, 2 
baths, terrace, refer . 

• 2nd Boor; double living. 1 bedroom. 


1 bath, cellar. 
COT-tf-m 


-INTBlNA'nONAL 
3W 82 7I 


International Business Message Center 


BRITTANY SEASIDE, F350.00Q. fuBy 
equipped end fumched 39 sqjti. 
11«fSud» + balcony. (6) 43* 2694. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


SE3EI 



equtvaietrt per fine, You must 
Mode to rnpi o f m twt d voriS- 
abia bSTmg address. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


THIS WEEK 
MAY 6th, 


BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 

• Cxaarthru pay. The Tap Tan 

• Japan: Attacks From Rhds At 
Honw And Friends Abroad Buffet 
Nretafona. 

• M o ra o Boad Outlook: Where A 
SovW-Otinam Ihnr Would 
leave Tha U.S. 

• tfcreds-On Enu»4«MaR Gerald 
Ramon of Britan's Horan Evan 
Chock* Ho light Bulb*. 

NOW ON SALE 
AT ALL INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


ORLANDO, FLORIDA 
INVESTMENT 

1 This area has been targeted as one 
of the dynamic growth centers m the 
USA. After the Mdtimd interchange 
■n 1-4 opened, alna lands near the 
ewt which was once soW for 
US$2 ,000 an acre, suddenly 
racketed to $300,000. 

1 Euro-Amencan has options 
negotiated 3 years ago on land 
jtrateaicafly located near Daney 
World / Orlando. 

> Additional partners) required 
to complete per those end take tide 

< 5hort holding period before very 
profitable resale protected 
at 100% phis. 

1 investment range USS 15000 to 
$1 mfflon. 

BJRO-AMSaCAN 



OFFSHORE A UK 
LTD COMPANIES 

incorporator) and manogwitert ift UK. 
We of Mai, Turks. AngujHa, Channel 


SS OUR AD ON 
PAGE 15 

TRANS CONTAINS 
MARKETING AG 


OFFSHORE COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Makng - Tefephore - Tele* 

Full secretarial secretarial 
Me of Man, Jersey, Guernesy. 
Gibraltar, Pmcma. libero, 
Uwemaovra Antilles, UK. 
Ready made or special 
Free explanatory booWet, 

Boat regrttratiers 

London representative 

Alton Company Forip ah ant 
Dept Tl. 8 V£tar>o $t„ Douglas, 


We of Mai, Turks, AngwRa, Channel 
Wands. Parcma. Liberia and most other 
offshore areas. 

• Ccnfiderfejl advice 

• kmnediafe cvala bitty 

• Nominee services 

• Bearer slimes 

• Bool regstrationf 

• Accounting & tt fa w ir o ftcn 
■ Maj, fafapta na 4 tofa x_ __ 

Free explawtofy boofdat frees. 
SBECT CORPORATE 
sennas ltd 

Head Office 

Ml Ple n u m ! , Douglas, Ue of Men 
Tab Douglas (0624) 23718 
Telex 628554 SLECT G 
London Represartnm 
2-5 OU Bond^, London W1 
Tel 01493 «44. Tl* 38247 SC5LDN G 


Isle of Mon. Tel: 0624 26#] 
Telex 627691 SPTVA G 


MONEY TREES? 

YES forest in one of America's meal 
averting tocnnGk>9CQ} breoknveunhs in 
a Ukon dofiar meustiy. We have pfent- 
ad mare ms trees m 1984 (Son any 
ruw State. 

•ui rings trend lor 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE TAX SHELTRS 

From 475 

UK, Isle of Marx Turks, Channel Islands. 
Pana me. Liberia & most offdiare areas. 
Compl ete to p pon^fpo fues. 

Very stnctfy confidential. 

Free consuttonon: 

Roger Griffin LLB, F.CA. 
Brochure: Corporate Management bd. 
Western House, Victoria Street. 
Douglas. Isle of Man. 
Tri : J0624) 23303/4. 

Tele* 637389 CORMAN C. 


C.CJA. LTD 

Comparnes fanned U.K. & worfdwnde 
nd acting Isle of Man, Turks 6 Cocos, 
Anguitfa, Panama ana Libera. 

For further information, please contact 
us an -5 Upper Church 5r_ Douokn, We 
c# Man, vn Great Britain, tel: Douglas 
P624) 23733, Ihu 627900 CCMIOMG. 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 

Attorney & Redtor ob t o n visas & per- 
manerk rodenre. Helps to set up USA 
businesses & locates cammeraai, indus- 
tries & residential red estate. For free 
bredu* write: Dowd Kirson, 1201 
Dove St., Ste 600, Newport Beah, CA 
92660 ISA. (714) 752. 0W6. 


FRENCH WEST INDIES 

PUMICE STOIC (Pierre Ponce) 
far s de. Otxr ry operator seeks intfus- 
tnd interested ei Hns rough materiel. 
For information cdl/write V, TRAPET, 
27 rue de Suede, La RodteBe, France. 
Tek (46) 34 83 W. 0ffi« Itouri 


UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY for a food 
equipment company to erter the US. 
(trough investment m a yowm US. 

nenufaourer. wnle 
P.O. Bar 1542. Normal. OK 73070 
USA or oaP (4051 3603871. 


PANAMA UBB8A. CORPORATIONS 
from LBS4M available now. Tel 
£624) 20240. Telex: 628352 ISLAM) 
b.fuaUKL 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTI 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNLIMITED INC 
U-5.A, 4 WORLDWIDE 

A complete wool & business service 
pr wring a mwe collection of 
t a l e nted, versatile & muMmgiial 
ndwiduok far aS occasions. 
212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.Y.C 10019 
S&vKe Representatives 
NeededWoridwide. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


FBB4CH BALLERINA, writ travefad. 
27, bilingual, available for soda) busi- 
ness & private short term assign merits. 
London based. 3 p.m. - 10 p bl Tefc 01 
225 0368 

INVEST 2 WEEKS in Better Heefth. 
&itaf | Cm doc fisk Prevention & 
Heath CeoonditKmng Program now. 
Began* mansion, peaceful Surrey 
countryside, highly quashed meefcai 
supervision. Vat Enron Medical Cen- 
tre. Enton near Godabnmg, Surrey 
45 min. London. Ring 
IM2) 6792233. 



H OW T O GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 
"eparr - 12 countries anefyzed. 

Jetab. WMA, K LyrKflwu ' Ta 

Swte 936. Central, Honq Kang. 


DIAMONDS 



OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR BEST SWISS 
BUSINESS BASE 
IN ZURICH 

FULLY INTEGRATED 
BUSINESS SERVICE 
. aOSTOFtNANOALCENTa 

Fwiydyd Offices / Confanenre Roams 
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.. Com pany Formatio n 

INTERNATIONAL CFBCi 

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fp” 

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REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS * SUBURBS 


DOURDIN-DORESSAY 

Realtor in 1st Class Property 
Tele.: 613807F 

(I) 624 93 33 


81 AVENUE FOCH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SUNNY SOtmfiWI SWITZERLAND 

LAKE LUGANO 

Lakeside apartments m a large 
beautiful perk (1 7,000 sq.m J with s*m- 
mng pool, private manna and Ipnvale 
beach. 1st qur#ty. Apartments 80 n*m. 
up to 190 sqjn. + terraces 24 - 47 
sq-rn Prires: Sf 453, 000 - 50.123,400 
Of: The Residenza fcvafogo in the South 
area of the Lake offers apretmeith 
from 57 sqjn. to 1Xsqjn..averiookng 
the Idee and the mountains. Price* 
SF210.450 - SF 485.450. Free for sale to 
foreigners. Mortgages at low Swiss 


oto bath, about /6 sqjn., sun. 74- 
video seainty. OME 538 65 65. 



5111123255 


UNIQUE OPPOSTUWTY to acquire 
on u H fl fitah o ndf f known he* dressing 
safari in Convent Garden. London & 
hard reisers staff employment agen- 
cy Sunabfa In* major muestors wnh. 
-mg to buBd a group suuanan Cvea 
EH.000 Inquntes wT 01 821 «56 


OFF5HORE SERVICES 

UX non resident c omp an ies with 
nominee directors: besrer shores and 
amftdirtid bank accounts. Fiil boefc-up 
4 support services. Panama & Lbenan 
companies. Firs rale confidential 
professiond services. 
I&UL. 17 Wriegate St., lo-ricn 
EI7HP Tel. 01 377 1474. Tl« 873911 G 


UES HALLES (2nd) 

Lovely 2 rooms. 60 sqjn. + 11 sqjn. 
mezranne, newly re done . Beams, 
calm, character. F900,000. 

Visa today from 1 1 .00 o.m. ■ 3 j 00 pm, 
62 rue Monhmtre. Pons 2nd. 


SUMPTUOUS MANSION in a very 
residential area 7 miles West of Pans 
& 25 mms from Champs Byseas, 1 380 
sqjn. isolated in on exceptonoSv 
beautiful private park 9740 sqjn. trim 
possfofte of fiether exteraon. OT- 
TUifSCOi 5660 rue de Pons. 92100 
Boulogne (France) Tel: 604 64 28 


AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AGENT 

764 03 17 


EMERALD - HOME LTD. 

YOUR PARTNBt IN BJROPE 
Via G. Cattori 3, CH-6900 Lwgaao 
Tel: CH-91-5429T3 - 
The 73612 HOME CH 


In the chnrmng mountain resort of 

IEYSIN: 

RESIDENCE LB FRENES 

Overlooking a spfarrid Alpine p myo- 
ma. 30 tmv horn Montreux and Lake 
Geneva by car. 

■ you can awn qudity re&denres 

with Moot swimming pool and 
fitness foakhes in an ideal 
environment far letsure and sports 
goH. eta). 

■ nn ai tongat tow SF. rates 

up » 80% mortgoges. 

PloaM contact; 

Residence la* Frame, 1854 loysin 
SWITZERLAND 

Tel: (025) 34 11 55 The Moke 26629 CH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND, rweicrara con bw 
STUDIO APARTMENT /CHALET, lAKc 
GENEVA MONTREUX or in these 
world famous resorts : CEAN5-M0N- 
TANA. ICS DiABLERETS. vgjfflES. VK 
LARS. JURA, etc from £FT 10,a» Mort- 
gages 60% at 656% interest. REVAC 
SA 52 MonthriHam. 0+1202 Geneva 
TeJ. 022/361540- Tele*. 22C30 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


MANHATTAN. NYC 

THE ULTIMATE IN 
CONDOMINIUM LIVING 

TRUMP TOWB - on fifth Avenue 
MANHATTAN PLACE - 1st Av 8. 38 5t 
New, elegant, prestigious unn Feature 
datmcAve, secure aid private 2, 4, 5, 
bedrooms. (1500 to 3000 sq. ft ) Ava+ 
able cfirectiy from owners. 

Contact: Mr. M Parnass 

Em-Eu Management Carp 
116-35 Queens Blvd. 

Forest HA, NT M 375 USA 
Tel: 718W-4848 


REAL ESTATE 
TIMESHARING 


WE ARE INTERESTED <n hmohmrg 
sofas promoters m Switzerland for 
sales of times hanng in Cyprus, taytf 
A Greece. PVcoe gw full detab d 
set-up 6 experience in timeshan - 
sates at: 5unshare Invesmteno l 
P.O. Bov 5067. Neon, Cfpnj. TJj; 
4023 SHUNSHAff CY. Tel- 357 71- 
5301V53440 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


TOR 5UMMER FEAR CHASES, 
kwefy country house, 3 Iwfow™- 
help available, phone. FiOCO'iwA 
Call Pans: 870 27 28 



International Secretarial Positions 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SUBSIDIARY of international grout 
Paris 17th. seeks pon-nnw [oftn 



fAS.I 

Temporary agency xeks for 
"■e*^»ral companies in Peris 
engfoh mother tongue 

BILINGUAL 

SECRETARIES 

Word proresung experience an asset 
Apply: 156 rue Monbnmte, Paris 2 
or coll 233 17 54 


PRODBTETT 

SECRETARIES 

WORD-FROCBSOK 
. _ VKiOTEXT 


PHARMA CHJTfCAi. 

Company, seeks executive secretary 
June to Decmbar. English mother 

tongue. Errish sh or thand, goad writ- 

ten reel spoken Frendt. Teh i70 72 40 I BIUNGUAL 30. speedwritmg, sefj* 
Mrs. Gabel. | permanent popw Pans 2®3 22 0’ 


EngUi mother tongue 
&**«» honing offirred 
Tel: 26SI662 / 335.1 4 JO 


Engfah. B elyai, DurJ, „ German 


idt 

. *5116 Pans, France. Tel: 


Multinational bank near Opera requires 

I AN EXPERIENCE® 
MANAGEMENT SECRETARY 

perfectly bilingual. Knowledge of French/English ebort- 
band and word processor equipment. 

High potential to advance to executive secretary position 
shortly. ' v 

Attractive salary and usual bank benefits. 

Send hand-mitten letter. 

Photograph. UK 

M£dia System, ref. 4148 

2 Rue de la T. 


'XA? L-R * ■ riTTg; 17TTT T